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Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

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November 1988 




Canada $4.95 U.S. $3.95 











Election Eve 



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GANTELET II - CoCo 3 Disk iprtlv- 



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HIGH 
SCORE 



"W^m PLAYER 1 

H,9Q0 

ENERGY 



S BULLETS 

L t|| GRENADES 
56 

PLAYER Z 

ENERGY 

BULLETS 
50 

GRENADES 
20 



RUSH 1 N ASSAULT - CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 



BBa 



We accept: 




cheque or money order 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT., CANADA L9T 2X8 



24 hr. order line: 
(416) 878-8358 
personal service 9-5 
E.S.T. 



Please add $2 for shipping and handling (add 
$5 each for The Rat and all Light Phaser 
Packages). Ontario residents add 8% sales 
tax. Looking for new software. 



Jill 1<9IHf[t| 



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(IKItlJWill 

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t .Tilrr. "I'm 1 h ill, y^f jv^'i^gf^ 

~ frf5lTT»K!!iliii!ilM 



mull Kw 

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jiVJiiL'TvjnntVillFfiltl^ i i 



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128 k CoCo 3 joystick and disk drive required. 



SCORE: 1[ 
LEVEL: 5 
KNlEHTSs 2 




128 k CoCo 3 and disk drive required. 




||"4l|il: .'^B — - 



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r- / 




# 




uires 128 k CoCo 3 one disk drive. 



I 





From Com, 



after 



after 






Tandy 1000 SL $689 
Tandy 1000 TL $969 





BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 HX 1 Drive 256K 439,00* 
Tandy 1 000 TX 1 Drive 640K 799.00 * 

Tandy 3000 NL 1 Drive 512K 1279.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg.Ram 1959.00 

Tandy 5000 MC 2 Meg. Ram 3799.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 169.00 

Radio Shack DMP-132 120 CPS 245.00* 

Radio Shack DMP-440 300 CPS 549.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel349.00 
Tandy LP-1000 Laser Printer 1899.00 

Star Micronics NX-1000 144 CPS 199.00 
Star Micronics NX-1000 Rainbow 269.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 144 CPS 199.00 

Panasonic P-1 091 i 194 CPS 249.00 

Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 369.00 

Okidata320 300 CPS 369.00 

Okidata 390 270 CPS 24 Wire Hd 515.00 

NEC Pinwriter P-2200 170 CPS 399.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Practical Peripheral 2400 Baud 229.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 

COCO Max III by Colorware 79.95 

Max 10 by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTerm by PXE Computing 29.95 39.95 

TW-80 by Spectru m (CoCo3) 39.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Telewriter 128 79.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 

Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 

CoCo 3 51 2K Super Ram Disk 1 9.95 
Home Publisher by Tandy (CoCo3) 35.95 

Sub Battle Sim. by Epyx (CoCo3) 26.95 

Thexder by Sierra (CoCo3) 22.45 

Kings Quest III by Sierra (CoCo3) 31.45 

FIEghtSim.il bySubLogic(CoCo3) 31.45 

OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71 .95 

OS-9 Development System 89.95 

Multi-View by Tandy 44.95 

VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 

VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 



14.95 
119.00 
59.95 
26.95 
329.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit (28 pin) 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit (2 or 8 chip) 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 
PBH Converter with 64K Buffer 
Serial to Parallel Converter 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 
Magna vox 8515 RGB Monitor 
Magnavox Green or Amber Monitor99.00 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 19.95 
PBJ 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 1 59.00 
Tandy OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 24.95 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 149.00 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 
Worlds Of Flight 
Mustang P-51 Flight Simul, 
Flight 16 Flight Slmul. 



25.95 
34.95 34.95 
34.95 34.95 
34.95 34.95 



Prices are subject to change without notice. 
Please call for shipping charges. Prices in our re- 
tail store may be higher. Send for complete 
catalog 

*Sale prices through 11/30/88 




»mh,'i£>imI 





P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (508) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 




Tabl e of Cont e nts ' 




L-Featufe& 



16 ^ 

A CoBBS Update 

Kevin Sloan 

Modifying the CoBBS system 
to work with a CoCo3 

28 

The Computer 
Connection 

Don Hutchison 
Connecting a CoCo to other 
computers 

102 




36 

So You Want 
to Be a SysOp 

Dave Jenkins 

You see the glamour, let me 

tell you about the work 

41 

RAINBOW'S Holiday 
Shopping Guide 

Staff 

Making a list? Check out 
these CoCo gift suggestions 

45 

Playing 

the Stock Market 

Mark Webb 

Wall Street comes to your 
CoCo screen with this game 
of luck and skill 



November 1988 
Vol. Villi No. 4 

Get the Point ^ 

William P. Nee 
Part V: Machine Language 
Made BASIC 

88 

CoBBS Xmodem ^ 
Routines 

Robert John Grubb 
Upload and download 
Xmodem protocol using the 
CoBBS system 

102 

Washington, *0 
Adams, Jefferson - . . 

Ralph D. Miller 
A program to help memorize 
and list the names of the U.S. 
presidents in order 

110 

A Remote Update ^ 

Paul Alger 

Modify an old favorite to use 
on the CoCo 3 



36 



58 

Election '88 

Leonard Hyre 
Keep track of presidential 
election results and make 
your own predictions 




4 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Nov i c e s Nich o ^ 
74 

Free Zone 

Ric Pucella 

75 

I/O in the Fast Lane 

Joel Hegberg 

75 

Showing Off Random 
Graphics 

Men Goff 

76 

It's a Bug-Eat-Bug World 

Stephen Elms 

77 

Odd One Out 

Ken Ostrer 



/i^The cassette tape/disk sym- 
bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on Page 12, 



Departm e nts 



Advertisers Index 
Back Issue Info _ 
BBS Listings. 



.192 
_123 
.106 
. 26 
_138 



CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 

Hints — 83, 92 

Letters to Rainbow 6 

_114 

_190 

_139 



One-Liner Info 
Racksellers 



Received & Certified _ 

Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 82 



Subscription Info 



.116 




nun 19 



140 

BASICally Speaking 

Bill Bernico 

BASIC problems solved here 

84 

BASIC Training 

Joseph Kolar 
What's the angle? 

142 

CoCo Consultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

33 

Delphi Bureau 

Don Hutchison 

New faces, new places, a 

discussion on computer 

viruses and Don's database 

report 

144 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

40 

Education Notes 

Steve Blyn 

You can't get there from here 



8 

PRINT#-2 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's Notes 

157 

Turn of the Screw 

Tony DiStefano 

A simple — expandable 

LED project 

146 * 

Wishing Well ^ 

Fred Scerbo 
Growing up with CoCo 



1 Rainbowt o ch 



172 

Accessible Applications 

Richard A. White 
Boot mysteries revealed 

160 _ 

Barden's Buffer ^# 

William Barden, Jr. 
Sorting it all out 



176 

KISSable OS-9 

Dale L. Puckett 
Installation, automation and 
more 



' Product Rgvigws 



BASIC Utility Diskette/ r. EM of California 
Castle of Tharoggad/Tandy Corporation _ 



DELPHI: The Official Guide/Simon & Schuster. 
EZGen/Burke & Burke 



Hard Disk Organizer/floberf A. Hengstebeck — 
Keyboard Commander/E.Z. Friendly Software — 
OS-9 Level II BBS/Alpha Software Technologies 

Spellbound/TAior Software 

V-Term/G/mmesoff . 



.129 
.130 
133 
.137 
.136 
.135 



Video Draw Poker/ Prometheus Software 
Vocal Freedom/Dr. Preble's Programs — 



.130 
-136 
-134 
.134 
.126 



the RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 
phone (502) 228-4492. THE RAINBOW, RAINBOWfest and THE RAINBOW and 
RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N, 705- 
050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE 
RAINBOW. P.O. Box 385, Prospect. KY 40059. Authorized as Second Class 
postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 
• Entire contents copyright © by FALSOFT, Inc., 1988. the RAINBOW is intended 
for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and 
reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of information herein is for the 
single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. AH 
programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without warranty of any kind 
whatsoever. • Tandy, Color BASIC, Extended Color BASIC and Program Pak are 
registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to the rainbow 
are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S, $38. Surface mail 
to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with 
next available issue. • Limited back Issues are available. Please see notice for 
issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full 
refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/1 2ths the subscription amount 
after two issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



The Rainbow 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Faik 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Sue Fomby 

Reviews Editor Lauren Willoughby 

Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 

Copy Editor Beth Haendiges 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, 
Ed fliers. 

Technical Assistant David Horrar 

Editorial Assistants Wendy Faik Barsky, 
Sue H. Evans 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., Bill Bernico, 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Sharon Adams, 
Teri Kays, Denise Webb 

Typesetters Linda Stone Gower, 
Renee Hutchins 

Falsoft, Inc. 

» i i ■ . : I i i i i : - ■■ ' m' , * ' i : i i> M 'ft i y . : . i * m m 

President Lawrence C, Falk 
General Manager Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst. to the Publisher 

Sarah Levin 
Editorial Director John Crawley 
Asst. Editorial Director Judi Hutchinson 
Senior Editor ?. Kevin Nickols 
Director ot Production Jim Cleveland 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quash nock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Manager 

Beverly Bearden 
Customer Service Representative 

Carolyn Fenwick 
Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 
Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 
Dispatch Tony Olive 
Business Assistants Dawn Cecil, 

Laurie Falk 
Chief of Building Security 
and Maintenance 

Jessie Brooks 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Otfice Information, 
see Page 192 



Cover photograph copyright © 1988 
by Carl Maupin 

Art direction by Heidi Maxedon 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 5 



BACK TALK 

Editor: 

I was a bit dismayed by Richard 
Esposito*s answer to Elbert Jenkins in 
the September '88 "Doctor ASCII" 
column [Page 138], He infers that Mr. 
Jenkins problem with writing to the 
VIP Library disk has to do with copy 
protection. This is not the case at all! 
Mr. Jenkins finds zero grans available 
on the disk because the "leftover" room 
on the disk has been disabled by placing 
a value in the GAT pointing to this area. 
Primarily, this is done to prevent writ- 
ing to the master disk and possibly 
crashing it. Mr. Jenkins could (on a 
backup) use his VIP DiskZap to find a 
full granule that is open and place $FF 
in the GAT at the byte pointing to that 
granule. Then he could save his pro- 
gram to the disk. 

D.S. Ricketts 
Boring, OR 

REVIEWING REVIEWS 

Editor: 

I am very fond of VIP Writer III and 
thought that I should add a couple of 
comments to Ms. Willoughby's nice 
review of it. The customizer program is 
apparently much more extensive than 
indicated in the review. It not only 
configures VIP Writer III with the 
screen width, line width, screen and 
printer margins, baud rate, parallel or 
serial printer driver, etc., it also has 
three programmable function keys so 
that they are available as soon as you 
boot up the program. Ms. Willoughby 
mentions the use of the CLEAR key as 
a "control key," just like the old Writer. 
The CTRL key serves the same purpose 
now, so you have a control key on both 
sides! Ms. Willoughby didn't like the 
partial saving of the text if the cursor 
wasn't at the top of the file — I consider 
that little feature a vital asset because 
many times I need to save only a portion 
of the buffer. And, as stated in the 
review, VIP Writer ///does tell you that 
you have done only a partial save — in 
text and with a loud bong. Finally, 
when overstriking a line of text and 
going past the end of that line, all you 
have to do is press BREAK to take out 
the newly inserted line and simply delete 
anything necessary. 

D.S. Ricketts 
Boring, OR 

6 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I run a 24-track studio and own three 
CoCos for music production and would 
like to know if anyone out there has a 
patch or modification for Radio 
Shack's Audio Spectrum Analyzer for 
the CoCo 3. 

Michael Bridges 
Germantown Recording Studio 

1209 Ave. N. 
Nashville, TN 37208 

HINTS & TIPS 

Editor: 

I recently ruined my Multi-Pak Inter- 
face by trying to upgrade it myself, so 
I wound up buying a new one. In Marty 
Goodman's "CoCo Consultations," 
July '88 [Page 146], Marty said that 
Tandy was not selling CoCo 3- 
compatible Multi-Paks. I wrote Tandy 
and was told that the discontinued 
Multi-Paks were the ones with the 
satellite board installed. So, if you are 
thinking about buying a new Multi-Pak 
for the CoCo 3, first look in the port 
that plugs into the CoCo. If you see a 
small satellite board, the Multi-Pak is 
upgraded. If not, you will need to 
upgrade. 

I have also heard that the new Multi- 
Paks have a small side effect. When you 
turn off your CoCo, sometimes the 
drive motor comes on. This is due to 
noise being introduced into the Multi- 
Pak through the CoCo. If this happens, 
press reset, or turn both the CoCo and 
the Multi-Pak off and on again. 

John Cleaveland 
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia 

A Memory Aid 

Editor: 

Since my purchase of ADOS and 
Sub-Battle Simulator, I have had to 
memorize several commands for each of 
my command keys. Instead of memoriz- 
ing the commands for each program, I 
have made several placards, which 
frame my keyboard. On these placards 
— one for each program — I have 
written the functions of the various keys 
either next to the key or in the margin. 
Poster board, manila folder, etc. could 
be used to make the placards, and you 
can make as many as you need. 

Also, as a member of the printing 
industry, I was quite impressed with 



your May and June covers. I think that 
they are the best covers you've printed 
to date. I think the coated paper cover 
for the July issue and the decision to seal 
the magazine in plastic were great ideas. 
Sealing the magazine in plastic not only 
protects the product, but it also looks 
sophisticated. 

Craig Bat hurst 
Greenville, SC 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

I live in New Zealand and have been 
operating a Color Computer for about 
four years. I own a CoCo 3. As a 
teacher, I find my computer an invalu- 
able aid to preparing work for my 
pupils. Unfortunately, the CoCo is no 
longer sold in this country, and all 
necessary computer purchases must be 
ordered from various places in the 
United States. I write to thank you for 
your impressive publication and to offer 
some advice to others in my situation. 

THE RAINBOW is a must for anyone in 
an isolated situation. The ads and the 
reviews really help users to choose the 
best software for their needs. I have had 
to purchase a lot of software since I 
upgraded to my CoCo 3, and every issue 
of RAINBOW tempts me to purchase 
more. While I have been more than 
happy with most of my purchases, there 
are occasional problems. The general 
rule seems to be that the more you pay 
for software, the better it is. 

Another tip I must pass on to others 
in my situation concerns mail order 
suppliers. There is nothing more nerve- 
wracking than to order an expensive or 
delicate item by phone and then to wait 
as the weeks tick by, peering hopefully 
into the mailbox every day. I have 
ordered from many suppliers and would 
like to recommend those who have 
provided excellent and reliable service. 

Computer Plus heads my list. It 
provides friendly and reliable service of 
the first order. Microcom Software can 
also be relied upon, and Micro World 
is another firm that provided regular 
first rate service. 

Thank you, RAINBOW, for providing 
a contact with the rest of the CoCo 
Community. 

Phil Burt 

North Canterbury, New Zealand 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S ^ 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42, 51, 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 
They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



PEN PALS 



• I am a 17-year-old grade 12 student at 
St. Jerome's High School in Kitchener 
and would like to have pen pals from 
anywhere, but preferably close so we 
can meet sometimes. I have a 64K CoCo 
2, one disk drive, a tape recorder and 
a DMP-130A printer. I like writing 
special-purpose programs and would 
like to help anyone with problems. 

Anton Peter Milardovic 
8 Smetana Dr. 
Kitchener, ON, Canada N2B 3B8 



• I am a 16-year-old male and would 
like to hear from anyone in the United 
States. I prefer someone around my age, 
but I will answer anyone. I have a 64K 
CoCo 2, CoCo 3, disk drive, cassette 
recorder, Multi-Pak, DMP-130, RS 
Speech & Sound Pak and Orchestra 90. 
I an interested in music, graphics, 
machine language, Adventures and 
games. 

Orman Beckles 
45 Meridian St. 
Maiden, MA 02148 



• I am a 20-year-old man looking for 
pen pals who have a CoCo 2 or 3. My 
system includes a CoCo 3, 501 disk 
drive, cassette recorder and DMP-105 
printer. My other interests are sports, 
baseball-card collecting and photog- 
raphy. I will answer all replies. 

Charles Braude 
69-10 Yellowstone Blvd. 
Forest Hills, NY 11375 

• I am 14 years old. I have a CoCo 3 
and my hobbies are freestyle skate- 
boarding and swimming. I love to listen 
to music and watch movies. I would like 
for a girl my age or older to answer my 
letter, but if anyone else writes, Til 
answer as many as possible. 

Timothy W. Smith 
Rt. 1 Box 147 
Leland, NC 28451 

• I am 1 3 years old and would like some 
pen pals from all over the world. I own 
upgraded CoCos 1 and 2, a DMP-105, 
FD 502 and a Multi-Pak Interface. I 
love Adventure games and science. I 
will answer all letters — no age limits. 

Juli Williams 
Star Rt. 24-2 A 
Graford, TX 76045 



• I am 16 years old and looking for pen 
pals aged 14 to 21. I am interested in 
everything about my computer. I have 
a 64K CoCo 2, one FD 500 drive and 
a DMP-1 10. I welcome letters from all 
over the world. 

Bednarek Luc 
Hanebergstr. 62 
3960 Beverlo 
Belgium 

• I am 16 years old and interested in a 
pen pal. All letters will be appreciated. 

Christie Goedert 
Rt. 3 Box 265 
Stockton, MO 65785 



THE rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O.Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
pr to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type RFlI to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBO\V> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 

November 1 988 THE RAINBOW 7 



Computer Uses — 
You Decide 




y all-time favorite computer story is about the friend who 
came over many years ago, to look at my new Color 
Computer 



It was hooked up to a television set (that being the monitor) in our 
spare bedroom — somewhat affectionately known as the "blue room" 
since the walls were painted blue and there was a blue carpet on the 
floor — and sat in regal splendor on a roll-top desk I had bought 
several years before. 

"What does it do?" he asked. 

Since this was a4K Color Computer (the largest amount of memory 
at the time) with basic built in, and since I had just taught myself 
some very basic basic, I did some simple things like changing the color 
of the screen, making the computer count to 100 very quickly and 
the like. 

Even then, I am afraid, I was into toys. My friend had been through 
several crazes, suffered through explanations of why this or that was 
the greatest thing since sliced bread, and watched and waited as I grew 
tired of them. I am sure he viewed the computer as "Lonnie's latest 
toy" and viewed my enthusiasm with skepticism. 

After a half-hour demonstration, he asked me one simple question: 
"But how do you ask it questions and get answers?" 

"You don't," I replied. "It only gives you back what you have put 
into it." 

"Well, what good is it?" he asked. "I want answers to questions." 

Today my friend has two computers in his house. One is a Color 
Computer; the other is a Tandy 1000. 

I am relating this story because this is our November issue and you 
can do a friend of yours a favor by telling him or her about your 

computer. (continued on Page 14) 




Word 

Power 3.2 



More Versatile • More Powerful With 
Spooler • Calculator • Split-Screen • 2-Column Printing 



Unparalleled Power packed in this 100% ML Word Processor 
written from scratch for the CoCo 3! No other word processor 
offers such a wide array of features that are easy to learn & use. 



DISPLAY & SPEED 

-l 



T.T»Try»V. T .V. f .' 



► **>»"■*•#'•"♦*>•■ 




Word Power 3.2 runs at double-clock speed 
and uses the true 80-column display with 
lowercase instead of the graphics screen. The 
result is lightning fast screen reformatting and 
added speed! All prompts are displayed in 
plain English in neat colored windows . The current column num- 
ber, line number, page number, percentage of free memory is dis- 
played at all times. Even the page break is displayed so you know 
where one page ends and the other begins. The Setup program 
allows you to change fore/background colors as well as (in) visible 
carriage returns. Word Power 3.2 can be used with RGB/Com- 
posite/Monochrome monitors as well as TV. 

MAXIMUM MEMORY ggm^m^BPM^^MM 




Word Power 3.2 gives you over 72 K on 128K and over 
450K on 512K CoCo 3 for Text Storage - more 
memory than any other CoCo word-processor. 
Period. 



EFFORTLESS EDITING 

Word Power 3.2 has one of the most powerful and user-friendly 
full-screen editor with word-wrap. All you do is type. Word 
Power takes care of the text arrangement. The unique Auto-Save 
feature saves text to disk at regular intervals for peace of mind. 

Insert/Overstrike Mode (Cursor Style Changes to indicate mode);OOPS Recall 
during dele te;Type-a head Buffer for fast type rs; Key-Re peat (adjustable); Key- 
Click; 4-way cursor and scrolling; Cursor to beginning/end of text, beginning/end 
of line, top/bottom of screen, next/previous word; Page up/down; Delete charac- 
ter, previous/next word, to beginning/end of line, complete line, text before/after 
cursor; Locate/Replace with Wild-Card Search with auto/manual replace; Block 
Mark, Unmark, Copy, Move & Delete; Line Positioning (Center/Right Jus- 
tified); Set/Reset 120 programmable tab stops; Word-Count; Define Top/Bot- 
tom/Left/Right margins & page length. You can also highlight text 
(underline-with on-screen underlining, bold, italics, superscripts, etc.). Word 
Power even has a HELP screen which an be accessed any time during edit. 



SPLIT-SCREEN EDITING 

Splits the screen in half so you can view one portion of your text 
while you edit another. You'll love it! 



.... w 



MAIL-MERGE 

Ever try mailing out the same letter to 50 different 
people? Could be quite a chore. Not with Word 
Power 3.2! Using this feature, you can type a letter, 
follow it with a list of addresses and have Word Power 
print out personalized letters. It's that easy! 





r4 




. D 








CALCULATOR 

Pop-up a 4-function calculator while you edit! Great for tables! 

SAVING/LOADING TEXT 

Word Power 3.2 creates ASCII format files which are compatible 
with almost all terminal/spell-checking & other word-processing 
programs. Allows you to Display Free Space, Load, Save, Ap- 
pend & Kill files. The ARE YOU SURE? prompt prevents ac- 
cidental overwriting & deletion. You can select files by simply 
cursoring through the disk directory. Supports double-sided 
drives & step-rates. 



•>X*ftvXw>X 



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PRINTING 

Word Power 3.2 drives almost any printer (DMP, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc). Allows options such as baud rates, 
line spacing, page/print pause, partial print, page number- 
ing/placement, linefeeds, multi-line headers/footers, right jus- 
tification & number of copies. The values of these parameters & 
margins can be changed anytime in the text by embedding Printer 
Option Codes. The WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET fea- 
ture allows you to preview the text on the screen as it will appear 
in print. You can view margins, page breaks, justification & more. 



PRINT SPOOLER 

Why buy a hardware Print Spooler? Word Power 3.2 has a built- 
in Spooler which allows you to simult aneously edit one document 
& print another. 



TWO-COLUMN PRINTING iMIIililMlliliilll 



This unique feature allows you to print all or portion of your text 
in two columns! Create professional documents without hours 
of aligning text. 







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Word Power 3.2 comes with spelling checker/dic- 
tionary which finds & corrects mistakes in your 
text. You can add words to /delete words from 
dictionary. 



PUNCTUATION CHECKER m^K^m^m 

This checker will proofread your text for punctuation errors such 
as capitalization, double-words, spaces after periods/commas, 
and more. Its the perfect addition to any word processor. 



DOCUMENTATION H^lfiMlltlllSl^H 



Word Power 3.2 comes with a well-written instruction manual & 
reference card which makes writing with Word 
Power a piece of cake! Word Power 3.2 comes on an 
UNPROTECTED disk and is compatible with 
RSDOS. Only $79.95 

(Word Power 3.1 owners can get Word Power 3.2 Upgrade FREE by sending 




proof of purchase & $5.00 to cover S&H costs & i nstructio ns) 

JhJF MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618. Ph: (716) 383-8830 \l£f$\ 
All orders $50 & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. Wc accept Visa, MasterCard, Amcx, Check or 



MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% S&H(minimum $5). New York Slate resi- 
dents please add sales tax. Looking for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 



A Great Holiday Gift Idea! 



RAINBOW Binders 



JHF <X*OR COMHJm MONJHY mauazne 





Distinctive, Durable RAINBOW Binders 

the rainbow is a vital resource to be referred to 
again and again. Keep your copies of the rainbow safe 
in our quality, distinctive binders that provide com- 
plete protection. 

These attractive red vinyl binders showcase your 
collection and ensure your rainbows are in mint 
condition for future use. Each binder is richly em- 
bossed with the magazine's name in gold on the front 
and spine. They make a handsome addition to any 
room. 

Put an End to Clutter 

Organize your workspace with these tasteful bind- 
ers. Spend more time with your CoCo and eliminate 
those frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two binders, which holds a full 12 issues of 
the rainbow, is only $13.50 (plus $2.50 shipping and 
handling). 

Special Discounts on Past Issues 

To help you complete your collection of the rain- 
bow, we're offering a special discount on past issues 
of the magazine. 

When you place an order for six or more back issues 
of the rainbow at the same time you order binders, 
you are entitled to $1 off the regular back issue price. 
To order, please see the "Back Issue Information" 
page in this issue. 

Know Where to Look 

You may purchase the "Official And Compleat Index 
To THE RAINBOW" for $1 when you purchase a set 
of binders. This comprehensive index of rainbow's 
first three years (July 1981 through July 1984) is 
usually priced at $2.50. 



YES. Please send me 



set(s) of rainbow binders 




Take advantage of these special offers with your binder purchase: 

Save $1 off the single issue cover price for back issues. Minimum order of 6 magazines. Please 
enclose a back issue order form from a recent issue indicating magazines wanted. 

Purchase the "Official and Compleat Index to THE RAINBOW" for $1 . (Regular price $2.50.) 



(These offers good only with the purchase of a rainbow binder set) 

Name 

Address _ 

City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of 

Charge to: □ VISA 

Account Number 

Signature 



is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

□ MasterCard □ American Express 

Expiration Date 



Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Binders are $13.50 per two-binder set plus $2.50 shipping and handling, If your order is to be sent via U.S. mail to 
a post office box or foreign country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, p[ease. 
In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



COCO NEWSROOM 




An excellent Desktop Publishing 
program for the CoCo 3. Design your 
own newspaper with Banner Head- 
lines/6 Articles using sophisticated 
Graphics,Fonts & Fill patterns. Comes 
with 22 fonts & 50 pictures! Over 140K 
of code. Compatible with Epson, 
Gemini & Compatibles, DMP 
105/106/110/120/130/200/400/420/500/ 
2110, CGP-220, Laser LP1000 & IBM 
Compatibles, "... a smash for CoCo 3 ..." 
-March 88 Rainbow Review. Comes on 3 
non copy-protected disks. Only $49.95 




Create distinctive bright yellow 
diamond shaped car signs. Includes 2 
resuable clear plastic sign holders with 
suction cups, and 50 sheets of bright yel- 
low fanfold paper. Printer Require- 
ments are the same as for the CoCo 
Graphics Designer. Only $29.95 



COLOR 

SCHEMATIC 

DESIGNED 



By Prakash Mishra 

An excellent Circuit Schematic 
Design Software Package for CoCo 
3. Features; 

* Runs in 640x192 at 1.8 Mhz 

* Pull Down Menus 

* Keyboard/Mouse/Joystck Support 

* RGB/ Composite/Monochrome 
Monitor Support 

* 72 Modifiable Symbols 

* Multiple Hi-Res Fonts 

* Multiple UNDO Command 

* Symbol Rotate/Line/Box Draw 

* Supports 3 Layers of Circuits 

* Powerful Screen Print Command 
for DMP/Gemini/Epson Printers 

* Complete Documentation 



Only $39.95 



K00H $ 
WIT /■ 






i( 1 






COCO 

GRAPHICS DESIGNER 

Create beautiful Greeting Cards, Signs & 
Banners for holidays, parties and other oc- 
casions. Comes with a library of pre-drawn 
pictures. Includes utilities to create your 
own character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires CoCo 1,2,3 or TDP-10G 
with a min. of 32K, one Disk Drive and a 
Printer. Compatible with Disk Basic 
1.0/1.1/2.0/2.1, ADOS(3) and JDOS. Sup- 
ports the following printers: DMP 
100/105/106/ 110/130/ 430; CGP220, 
EPSON RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX-10/1000 & OKIDATA. Latest Ver- 
sion! DISK Only $29.95 
PICTURE DISK #1,#2,#3,#4: Each pic- 
ture disk contains over 100 pictures !! Disk 
$14.95 each. ALL 4 Picture Disks: $54.95 
FONT DISK #1,#2AB: Each disk con- 
tains 10 extra fonts!! Disk $19.95 each. Buy 
any 3 Font Disks and get the 4th FREE!! 
COLORED PAPER PACK (with matching 
envelopes): $24.95 




GAMES 

(Disk only) e 
(CoCo 1,2 & 3 except where mentioned) 

WILD WEST (CoCo 3 Only): $24.95 
VEGAS SLOTS(CoCo 3 only): $29.95 
VEGAS GAME PACK: $24.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 

P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
PYRAMIX(Cubix for CoCo 3): $24.95 
KUNG FU DUDE: $24.95 CHAMPION: $19.95 

WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY: $19.95 
IN QUEST OF STAR LORD(Animated Graphics Adven- 
ture for CoCo 3): $34.95 

TREASURY PACK#1: Lunar Rover Patrol, Cubix, 
Declathon, Qix, keys of Wizard, Module Man, Pengon, 
Space Wreck & Roller Controller.Only $29.95 
TREASURY PACK #2: Lancer, Ms. Gobbler, Froggie, 
Madness & Minotaur, Ice Castles, Galagon, Devious and 
Syzygy. Only $29.95 

SPACE PAC: Color Zap, Invaders, Planet Invasion, Space 
Race, Space War, Galax Attax, Anaroid Attack, Whir- 
lybird, Space Sentry & Storm Arrows.Only $29.95 
WIZARD'S CASTLE: A hi-res graphics adventure game 
filled with traps, tricks, treasures. Only $19.95 





XENOCOPY-PC 

An amazingly versatile program that allows you to Format/Duplicate / 
Read/ Write disks from over 300 different computers. For example you 
could transfer programs between CoCo, IBM, PC-DOS, TRS-80 Model 
3, TRS-80 Model 4, TRS-80 Model 100, Xerox 820, Zenith, Kaypro II, 
Novell , NEC DOS and much much morel! Send for FREE List. Requires 
an IBM Compatible with 2 drives. Disk $79.95. 

512K BACKUP LIGHTNING 

The ultimate CoCo 3 disk copying utility!! Reads your master diskette 
once and then makes as many copies as you want. It automatically for- 
mats an unformatted disk while copying! Supports 35, 40 or 80 track drives 
with various step rates. A must for any disk user!! Only $19.95 

PRINTER LIGHTNING 

Never wait foryour printer again!! This Print Spooler allows you to print 
to your printer and simultaneously continue with your programming. No 
need to wait for those long printouts! Disk Only $19.95 

BASIC FREEDOM 

A Full Screen Editor for Basic Programs! ! A Must for anyone who writes 
Basic Programs. Only $24.95 

VOCAL FREEDOM 

Turn your computer into a digital voice / sound recorder. Produces 
natural voices/ sound effects. Req. inexpensive RS Amplifier (#277- 
1008) & any microphone. Only $34.95 

HACKER'S PAC 

Allows you to incorporate voices created by Vocal Freedom into your own 
Basic and ML programs. Only $14.95 




lh Jr MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618. Ph: (716) 383-8830 \ V/SA ] ^S>] IB 
All orders $50 & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Amcx, Check or 
MO. Sony, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% S&H(minimum $5). New York State resi- 
dents please add sales tax. Looking for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 



PHI i" , 



OUCfVfA 



Still pounding away at that keyboard? 

^^^^^^^^^^^ 




SAVE upto19%~ 

when you buy a joint sub- 
scription to the magazine and 
either rainbow on tape or 
rainbow ON DISK! A one-year 
subscription to the rainbow 
and rainbow on tape is only 
$91 in the U.S., $108 in Can- 
ada, $153 foreign surface rate 
and $188 foreign airmail. A 
one-year subscription to the 
rainbow and rainbow on 
disk is only $115 in the U.S., 
$138 in Canada, $183 foreign 
surface rate and $218 foreign 
airmail.* 

Every month, these convenient 
services bring you as many as 24 
ready-to-run programs. Using the 
current issue of the rainbow as 
documentation, all you have to do is 
load and run them. A one-year com- 
bination subscription to the rain- 



bow and rainbow on tape or rain- 
bow on disk give you more than 230 
new programs! The typing time you 
save can be spent enjoying your 
CoCo! 



RAINBOW ON TAPE 
For No-Fuss Fun 

Back issues of rainbow on tape 
are available beginning with the 
April 1982 issue. A single copy of 
rainbow on tape is $10 within the 
United States; U.S. $12 in all other 
countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow on tape is $80 
within the U.S.; U.S. $90 in Canada; 
and U.S. $105 for all other coun- 
tries.* 



RAINBOW ON DISK 
Offers OS-9 Programs 

In addition to all the programs 
offered on tape, part of one side of 
rainbow on disk is formatted for the 
OS-9 operating system. That means 
you can now get all the OS-9 pro- 
grams from the magazine — pro- 
grams that cannot be put on tape. 
Back issues of rainbow on disk are 
available beginning with October 
1986. Subscriptions to rainbow on 
disk are $99 a year in the U.S. Cana- 
dian rate is U.S. $115. All other 
countries, U.S. $130. Single copy 
rate is $12 in the U.S.; U.S. $14 in 
Canada; and U.S. $16 in all other 
countries.* 



To order by phone {credit card orders only), call (800) 847 
0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228- 
4492. 

Look for our envelope located between pages 66 and 67 for 
ordering individual subscriptions to the rainbow, rainbow on 

TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. 



YES! Sign me up for a joint 1-year subscription (12 issues) to: 



□ THE RAINBOW and RAINBOW ON TAPE 

□ THE RAINBOW and RAINBOW ON DISK 

□ NEW □ RENEWAL (attach labels) 



Payment Enclosed □ ('payment must accompany order) 

Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ Am. Express 
Account Number 

City State ZIP Signature Exp 

*U.S. currency only, please. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks 
for delivery of first copies. Joint subscriptions to the rainbow and rainbow on tape or rainbow on disk begin with the current issue. 

Please note: While group purchases of RAINBOW ON tape and RAINBOW ON DISK are permitted (and multiple subscriptions are even discounted, if purchased in one 
order from a club), no license to make copies is conveyed or implied. Yes, your group may even purchase a subscription to our disk/tape services, but such purchase 
in no way authorizes that any copies be made of that original disk/tape. Specifically, this means that the original disk/tape itself may indeed be kept in a club library 
for use by members. However, a group purchase does not entitle club members, individually or as a group, to copy that disk/tape. 
Unauthorized copying of any copyright product is strictly illegal. The copyright (right to make copies) is in no way conveyed in the purchase transaction. 



Name _ 
Address 



COCO 3 UTILITIES GALORE 

(CoCo 2 Versions Included where specified) 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 





* Disk-to-Disk Copy * Tape-to-Disk Copy 

* Tape-to-Disk Auto Relocate 

* Disk-to-Tape Copy * Tape-to-Tape Copy 
Copies Basic/ML/Data Files. CoCo 1,2 or 3. 
Req. min. 64K Disk System. Disk Only $24.95 



COCO CHECKER 




Something possibly wrong with your CoCo? 
CoCo Checker is the answer. Will test your 
ROMs, RAMs, Disk Drives & Controller, 
Printer, Keyboard, Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, 
PIAs, VDG, Internal Clock Speed, Multi-Pak 
Interface and more! Only $24.95 



DISK UTILITY 2.1A 



A multi-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY 
disk handling. Utilize a directory window to 
selectively sort, move, rename & kill file entries. 
Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy & back- 
up. Single key execution of Basic/ML programs. 
This will become your MOST USED program !! 
CoCo 1,2 or 3. Req. Min. 64K. Disk Only $24.95 




MAILLIST PRO 



The ultimate mailing list program. Allows you 
to add, edit, view, delete, change, sort (by zip- 
code or name) and print labels. Its indispen- 
sable!! Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! 
Allows elongated, normal and condensed for- 
mat for text. Double Strike, Border Creation, 
and multiple label printing. Its a MUST for any 
user with a disk drive. Supports DMP 
105/106/110/120/ 130/430, GEMINI, STAR, 
EPSON and compatibles, (CoCo 2 version in- 
cluded). Only $19.95 




COCO UTIUI 5°cg 



(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to 
IBM compatible computer and vie a -versa. Re- 
quires 2-Drive IBM Compatible. Disk $39.95 



RGB PATCH 



Displays most games in color on RGB monitors. 
CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



COMPUTERIZED 
CHECKBOOK 2T 



Mm K.i. 



Why bother with balancing your checkbook? 
Let the CoCo do it for you. Allows you to add, 
view, search, edit, change, delete and printout 
(in a table/individual entry format) checkbook 
entries. Updates balance after each entry. Al- 
lows files for checking, savings, and other ac- 
counts. Disk$19.95« (CoCo2 version included) 




BOWLING SCORE 
KEEPER 



An excellent utility to keep track of your bowl- 
ing scores. Allows you to save scores under in- 
dividuals or teams. You can edit change, delete, 
and compare scores. A must for anyone who 
wants to keep track of his or her bowling perfor- 
mance. Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER^Jg 

Organize your videotapes with this prog»am. 
Allows you to index tapes by title, rating, type, 
play time and comments. Also allows you to sort 
titles alphabetically & view/print selected tapes. 
If you own a VCR, this program is a MUST!! 
Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



COCO 3 SCREEN DUMP 



32, 40, 80 column text dump, PMODF 4 
Graphics Dump. Single Keystroke Operation al- 
lows you to take snapshots of your screens even 
when programs are running! Works on DMP's, 
Epson, Gemini and compatibles. CoCo 1, 2 and 
3. Disk $24.95 



HOME BILL MANAGER as 




Let the CoCo keep track of your bills. Allows 
you to enter bills under various categories and 
reminds you when they are due. Disk $19.95 



CALENDAR MAKER 



t » • * » » 
• « •» • 

« » n * »,« ■ 



Generate monthly calendars on your printer for 
any year in the 20th century. Disk Only $19.95 
(CoCo 2 version included) 



ADOS 3 

Advanced disk operating system for CoCo 3. 
Comes on disk and is EPROMable!! Disk 
$34.95. ADOS (for CoCo 1,2): $27.95 



OS 9 



OS9 LEVEL II 
OPERATING SYSTEM 

Supports 512K RAM dual speed, rnulti- tasking, 
multiple windows, and more!! Comes with disk 
and complete documentation. Only $89.95 



MULTI-VUE 

User friendly graphics interface with multiple 
"window" applications for Level H. Only $54.95 



WIZ 

OS9 Level II Terminal Package with 300-19200 
baud rate and windowing capability. Requires 
512K and RS-232 Pack. Only $79.95 



DYNASTAR 

Best OS9 Editor/Word Processor Text Format- 
ter. Has Keyboard Macros, supports terminals 
& windows simultaneously, configurable, auto- 
indent for C/Pascal programming, mail-merge. 
New Manual makes it easier than ever. Only 

$149.95. DynaSpell $49.95. Both 
Dynastar and Dynaspell: Only $174.95 



DYNACALC OS-9 

Excellent spreadsheet for OS-9 users. Only 
$99.95 




OS9 LEVEL II BBS ^ 

BBS program that supports multiple users and 
sysop definable menus. Includes the following: 
Tsmon, Login, Chat, Message Retrieval, Mail 
Retrieval, Uloadx, Dloadx, and much more! 
Req. 512K. Only $29.95 



PC-Xfer UTILITIES 

Programs to format and transfer files to/from 
MS DOS diskettes on CoCo Under OS9 Level 
1 and 2. Requires SDISK or SDISK 3. Only 
$44.95 

SDISK 3 

Standard disk drive module replacement allows 
full use of 40/80 track double-sided drives. Req. 
OS9 Level II. Only $29.95. SDISK: $29.95 



OSS LEVEL II RAMDISK 

Lightning Fast Ramdisk with Auto-Formatting. 
A must for any OS9 Level II user. Req 512K. 
Only $29.95 



OSS BOOKS: 

Inside OS9 Level II: $39.95 
Rainbow Guide to OS9 II: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide to OS9 II Disk: $19.95 



OS9 Reference Card: FREE with any 
OS9 Purchase!!! 



JftJF MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. Ph: (71 6) 383-8830 [^fi 
All orders $50 & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. Wc accept Visa, MasterCard, Amcx, Check or 
MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&II (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% S&H(minimum $5). New York State resi- 
dents please add sales tax. lxx>king for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 



Obviously, I did not "get tired" of my 
computer. The reason is a very simple 
one — and it really relates to the com- 
plaint my friend had when he first saw 
my first computer. Our computers, all 
of them, are really nothing more than 
empty boxes waiting to be filled with 
whatever we are interested in. 

That is the secret, of course. 

No matter what your interest, you 
can "fill up" your Tandy computer with 
information about it. Art and words, 
data (read that information of any kind) 
and communications — whatever it is, 
you have the empty box right there, and 
you can fill it to the brim with your own 
interests. 

I have heard literally hundreds of 
stories over the years from people who 
bought a computer for one single reason 
or another — to balance a checkbook, 
to play games, to write letters — and 
found that simply and easily, just by 
adding another program, they could 
make it do all of those things and so 
much more. 

I think my favorite recreational use of 
the computer is using my desktop pub- 
lishing program to create little "news- 




"Our computers 
are really nothing 
more than empty 
boxes waiting to 

be filled with 
whatever we are 
interested in. " 



papers" celebrating one event or 
another in the lives of my family and 
friends. 

When the friend I mentioned at the 
start of this column turned 45, I did a 
special "newspaper" for him — all 
about him. When my daughter was 
married a few months back, there was 
another. Other events have been "cele- 
brated" in the same way. 

For me, these are creative and fun. 
But the nicest thing of all is that doing 
just them would never justify the ex- 
pense of a computer. So, at home, I also 
play some games, keep track of ex- 
penses, have files of all my books and 
do a myriad of other things. Yes, interest 
in this or that will flag, but, remember, 
the computer is just an empty box 
waiting for me to fill it up. 

I know most of you know this. But 
I am sure you have friends who do not. 
Do them each a favor. Tell them to buy 
computers as presents to themselves 
next month. 

And, yes, tell them to get that Color 
Computer from Tandy. Because, as time 
has proven, there really is no better 
value. 



— Lonnie Falk 



METRIC INDUSTRIES, INC. 





^Or JSSSL 





Model 101 

Serial to Parallel Printer Interface 

* Works with any COCO 

* Compatible with "Centronics" Parallel Input Printers 

* Just turn the knob to select any one of 6 baud rates 300-9600 

* Comes complete with cables to connect to your printer 
and computer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 104 Deluxe Interface 
with "Modem Switch" 

* Same Features as 101 Plus 

* Built in Serial Port for your Modem or other serial device 

* Switch between Serial Output and Parallel Output 

* Comes with cables to connect to your computer and printer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 105 Serial Switch 

* Connects to your COCO to give you 2 switch selectable 
Serial Ports 

* Comes with a 3 foot cable to connect to your computer 

* Now you can connect your Printer (or printer interface) 
and your Modem (or other serial device) to your COCO 
and flip the switch to use either device 

* Does not require power 



Cassette Label Printing Program 



New Version 2.1 prints 7 lines of information 
on Cassette labels 

Comes on Tape with instructions to transfer to disk 
Menu driven, very easy to use 
Save and Load Labels from Tape and Disk 
Uses the features of your printer to print standard, 
expanded, and condensed characters 
Automatically Centers Each Line of Text 
Allows editing of label before printing 
Program comes with 24 labels to get you started 
16K ECB required 



Some of the Printers 
That Can - 

Supply power for the 101 and 
1 04 are Radio Shack, Star, 
Okidata, Brother, Juki, and 
Smith Corona. 

Some of the Printers 
That Cannot - 

Supply power for the interfaces 
are Epson, Seikosha, 
Panasonic, Silver Reed and 
NEC. If your printer cannot 
supply power to the interface 
you can order your interface 
with the "P" option or you can 
supply your own AC adapter. 
We recommend the Radio 
Shack 273-1 431 AC adapter 
with a 274-328 connector 
adapter. 

Write or call for more 
information or for technical 
assistance. 



Price List 

Model 101 

Model 1 01 P 
Model 104 
Model 104P 
Model 105 



35.95 
41.95 
44.95 
51.95 
14.95 



Cassette Label Program 6.95 
Pin Feed Cassette Labels: 
White 3.00/100 
Colors (specify) 3.60/C 
Red-Blue-Yellow-Tan 



4 Pin Din Serial 
COCO Cables: 

Male/Male 6 foot 
Male/Female 6 foot 
Female/Female 6 foot 
Other Lengths Available. 

All Items covered by a 
1 year warranty 



4.49 
4.49 
4.49 



Info 



Free Shipping in the 

U.S.A. (except AK and HI) 
on all orders over $50 
On orders under $50 
please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling 
On orders outside the 
U.S.A. please write or call 
for shipping charges 



You Can Pay By: 

★ VISA or MasterCard 

★ C.O.D.- add $2.25 

★ Or send check or money 
order payable in U.S. funds 



Metric Industries Inc. 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

(513) 677-0796 



1 4 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



Books That Can Launch A 1000 Programs!! 



Pokes, Peeks and Execs are your guides into the jungle of computer programming. These commands give you the power of 
Machine Language without leaving the security of BASIC. Each book is a collection of "inside" information, with explanations 
and examples to help you immediately put it to use. Everyone from the novice to the professional will find these handy books a 
wealth of information. 500 POKES 

PEEKS.'N EXECS 



300 POKES, 
PEEKS, N EXECS 
for COCO III 



*40/80 column Screen Text Dump 

* Save Text/Graphics Screen to Disk 
'Command/Functions Disables 
•Enhancements for CoC63 BASIC 

* 128K/512K RAM Test Program 
*HPRINT Character Modifier 




SUPPLEMENT TO 500 
POKES,PEEKS, 'N EXECS 



Only $19.95 



'Autostart your BASIC programs 
•Disable Color BASIC/ECB/Disk BASIC 
commands 

•Disable Break Key/ Clear Key/ Reset Button 
•Generate a Repeat-key 
•Transfer ROMPAKs to tape 
•Set 23 different GRAPHIC modes 
•Merge two BASIC programs 
•And much much more!!! 

For CoCo 1,2 and 3. Only $16.95 
ALL 3 BOOKS for $39.95 



200 additional Pokes,Peeks and Execs (500 Pokes 

Peeks 'N Execs is a prerequisite) 

•ROMPAK transfer to disk 

•PAINT with 65000 styles 

•Use of 40 track single/double sided drives 

•High-speed Cassette Operation 

•Telewriter, EDTASM + CoCo Max enhancements 

* Graphics Dump (for DMP printers) /Text Screen 

Dump 



For CoCo 1,2 or 3. Only $9.95 



UNRAVELLED SERIES 




COCO LIBRARY 



An invaluable aid for Basic and Machine Language programmers, these 
books provide a complete disassembly and annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and Disk ROMs. These listings give complete, uninterupted 
memory maps of the four ROMs. Gain complete control over all versions of 
the color computer. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: COLOR 
BASIC and EXTENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: DISK BASIC ROM 1.1 and 
1.0 Disassembly : $19.95 

BOTH ECB AND DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $49.95 
SUPER EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: SUPER EX- 
TENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly for CoCo 3. $24.95 
COMPLETE UNRAVELLED SERIES (all 3 books): $59.95 




CoCo 3 Service Manual: $39.95 
CoCo 2 Service Manual: $29.95 
Inside OS9 Level II: $39.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 Level II: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 II (disk): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (Level 1): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (2 Disk): $29.95 
CoCo 3 Secrets Revealed: $19.95 
Basic Programming Tricks: $12.95 
Assembly Language Programming(tepco): $18 

Addendum For CoCo3 (tepco^ $12 
Color Computer Disk Manual (with ref card): $29.95 




OTHER SOFTWARE ... 

COCO MAX III (with hi-res interface): $79.95 
COCO MAX II: Disk $77.95 Tape $67.95 
MAXFONTS #1,.#2,#3 } #4: Disk $19.95 Each 
CGP-220 Driver Kit For CoCo Max III: $19.95 
MAXPATCH: Run COCO MAX II on COCO 3. $24.95 

TELEWRITER 64 (COCO 1&2) :Disk $57.95 Tape $47.95 
TW-80: COC03 features for TW-64 Disk $39,95 
TELEFORM: Mailmerge/form letters for TW-64 Disk $19.95 

AUTOTERM:Universal modem software Disk $39.95 Cas 
$29.95 




PRO-COLOR FILE *ENHANCED*: Multi-feature Database 
$59.95 

PRO-COLOR FORM & DIR: Forms/directories for PCF. 
$24.95 SIDEWISE: Print ASCII files sideways $24.95 

EDT/ASM 64D: Editor-assembler (specify 1,2,3) $59.95 
SOURCE: CoCo Disassembler $34.95 SOURCE III: $49.95 
CBASIC: Best Basic compiler $149.95 CBASIC III: $149.95 




WINDOW MASTER 

The hottest program for your CoCo 3!! Imagine using Win- 
dows, Pull-Down Menus, Buttons, Icons, Edit Field, and 
Mouse Functions in your Basic Programs. No need to use OS9. 
It uses the 640x255 (or 320x255) hires graphics mode for the 
highest resolution. Up to 31 windows can appear on the screen 
at one time. Need extra character sets? Window Master sup- 
ports 5 fonts in 54 sizes! How about an enhanced Editor for 
Basic? It gives you a superb Basic Editor which leaves the 
standard EDIT command in the cold. And don't forget that 
many existing Basic/ML programs will operate under Window 
Master with little or no changes. In fact, it does NOT take up 
any memory from Basic. Requires 1 Disk Drive, RS Hi-res In- 
terface & Joystick or Mouse. Specify 128K/512K. $69. 95 Win- 
dow Master & Hi-Res Interface. Only $79.95 

F1 

FUNCTION KEYS oBt, 

Use F1,F2, ALT, CTRL Keys on your CoCo 3!!! If you 
program in Basic, this program is a must! Only $14.95 




(Looking Fo 
I which you < 
^royalties!!! 



[Looking For New Software . If you have a Basic or ML program 
would like to market, contact us! We pay excellent 



JfiJf MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618. Ph: (716) 383-8830 jJ^J C2*> [H 
All orders $50 & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. Wc accept Visa, MasterCard, Amcx, Check or 
MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% S&I I(minimum $5). New York Slate resi 
dents please add sales tax. Looking for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 



Modifying the CoBBS system to work 
with the Co Co 3 



A CoBBS Update 



By Kevin Sloan 

Since 1985 many Color Bulletin 
Board Systems have been in use. 
When Tandy introduced the 
Color Computer 3 in mid-1986, many 
of the people who had been running 
CoBBS on their CoCo 2s upgraded to 
the more powerful CoCo 3, only to find 
out that their bulletin boards wouldn't 
work. 

The incompatibility lies in the new 
interrupt structure. Since memory in 
the CoCo 3 can be "moved" with the 
memory management unit, an addi- 
tional interrupt service was added to 
keep the machine from performing an 
interrupt to an area of memory that had 
been moved. For instance, when you do 
an HSCREEN2, memory at $60000 to 
S67FFF is moved into the CPU (central 
processing unit) address space of $2000 
to $9FFF. If the IRQ (the interrupt that 
keeps the time on the timer function and 
in the software clock of Coterm) is 
serviced while the Hi-Res screen mem- 
ory is in this location, basic crashes. 
Therefore, the initial interrupts were 
changed to point to $FEEE instead of 
$100. 

The software clock in Coterm is the 
specific culprit. It pulls the IRQ address 
from $FFF8 and $FFF9 and tries to put 
its "detour" into $FEF8 and $FEF9 
(where $FFF8 and $FFF9 point). The 
result is a foregone conclusion — the 
computer will crash and lock up. 

The fix is very simple, and all changes 
that follow are to the original CoBBS 
system series appearing in THE RAIN- 
BOW from November 1985 to February 
1986. To fix the software clock, just put 



Kevin Sloan, a computer operator and 
programmer by profession, has been 
using (he CoCo for five years and is a 
very active member of his local user 
group. 



these three pokes in STRRTUP right after 
Coterm is loaded from disk: 

71 POKE &HF78, &H8E 

72 POKE &HF79, &H01 

73 POKE &HF7A, &H0C 

The software clock in Coterm can now 
be used with the CoCo 3 as it would be 
normally with the CoCo 1 or 2. 

But that's not all you must do to get 
CoBBS working. You need to remove 
the useless Error Trapper, since the 
CoCo 3 has that built in. To ensure that 
it is not poked into memory, delete the 
GOTO 250 in Line 210 in STRRTUP: 

210 FOR fi=&H10D5 TO &H10D7:POKE 
R,&H12:NEXT R 

Next, all of the RUNTs need to be 
changed to ON ERR GOTO. Here is a list 
of the line numbers in USER/SYS and 
CDBBS/SYS where they can be located: 

U5ER/5YS lines: 

10, 20, 61, 64, 66, 68, 70, 80, 110, 180, 
210, 305, 365, 371, 410, 415, 420, 430, 
510, 905, 980, 7025, 7030, 8005, 9005 
and 9610. 

C0BB5/5Y5 lines: 

9, 1 1, 70, 405, 555, 604, 655, 1005, 1 190, 
1205, 1215, 1226, 1228, 1235, 1245, 1255 
(two changes), 1275, 1290, 1310, 1340, 
1342, 1345, 1375, 7025, 7030, 7040, 
7041,7060, 96 15 and 9810 

An easier way to do this is to save 
USER/SYS and COBBS/SYS as ASCII 
files. Then load them up in a word 
processor and do a universal change of 
RUNT and RUN T to ON ERR GOTO (Disk 
Color Scripsit doesn't work very well 
because of its buffer size). 

The error-trap processing needs to be 
upgraded to work with the CoCo 3's 
new commands as well. Make the fol- 



lowing changes: In USER/SYS, delete 
lines 915, 920, 925, 930 and 935. Then 
retype Line 935 to read: 

935ER$="**Error: Type"+STR$ 
(ERN0)+" in Line"+STR$ ( ERLIN ) 
+":l)ser" 

In COBBS/5 Y5 delete lines 1 1 80, 1 1 8 1 , 
1182, 1183 and 1185. Retype Line 1185 
to read: 

11B5ER$=CHR$(13)+"*ERR0R"+ 
STR$(ERN0)+" IN LN"+STR$ 
(ERLIN)+"*":GOSUB870: 
PRINTERS :G05UB9G15:TR$= 
STRINGS (32, "+ " ) +CHR$ ( 13 ) 
+ER$+CHR$(13): GO5UB9600 

To take advantage of your CoCo 3's 
Hi-Res text screens. Make the following 
changes to USER/SYS: 

Add Line 6: 6 WIDTH32: PRLETTE 
13,0: Palette 12,63 
Change the CL50 to CL5 in Line 34: 

34 II=TIMER:IFII>15999AND 
PEEK(4G94)O0THEN CLSrIFII 
>60000THEN TIMER=20000 

Insert WIDTH40 : PRLETTEB , G3 : 
CL53 in Line 40: 

40 W I DTH40 : PRLETTEB , 63 : CLS3 : 
EXEC&H10Dfl:POKE4657,0 

Insert WIDTH40:PRLETTE8,63: 
CLS3 in Line 66: 

66W I DTH40 : PRLETTE8 , 63 : CLS3 : 
GOSUB9000: IFK1=0THEN67EL5EGET 
111 , 1 : RE=CVN ( HIS ) : GETttl , 2 : RS 
=CVN(H1$) :CL05E 

Now your CoBBS system should 
work on your CoCo 3. I will be happy 
to help you with this upgrade. My 
bulletin board runs from 10 p.m. CST 
to 1 p.m. CST of the next day Monday 
through Friday, or 111 put the system up 
at any other time upon request. Just call 
at 300 bps, 7 bits, one stop bit, 601-693- 
8092. 

Editor's Note: The modified COBBS/ 
SYS and USER/SYS files are included on 
this month's rainbow on tape and 

DISK. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this upgrade may also be addressed to 
the author at 3228 11th Place, Meri- 
dian, MS 39305. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) /R\ 



1 6 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



DISK DRIVES 

New Double-Sided Double-Density 360K 40-Track 1/2 ht drives for CoCo 2 & 3. These are the same quality drives that are used in 
IBM® compatible computers. Buy from someone else and all you get is a disk drive. Buy from us and not only do you get a quality 
drive but $50 of Free Disk Utility Software (Super Tape/Disk Transfer & Disk Utility 2.1A) and our DISKMAX utility which al- 
lows you to access BOTH sides of our drives. It's like buying TWO drives for the price of ONE! ! 90-day warranty on ail drives! 

Drive 0 (With Disto Super Controller!, Case, Power Supply & Cable):$229.95 Drive 1: $149.95 
TWO 1/2 ht Drives in one case with Cable, Case & Disto Controller:$339.95 Bare Drive: $89 
J & M Controller (with RSDOS): $79.95 1 Drive Cable:$19.95 2 Drive Cable: $24.95 4 Drive Cable: $39,95 M 

DISTO Super Controller: $99.95 DISTO Super Controller II: $129.95 5fc 

Add Ons: Mini Eprom Prog.: $54.95 RT Clock/Parallel Interface: $39.95 Hard Disk Interface: $49.95 Multi-Board Adapter $59.95 



HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Complete w/Hard Drive, WD Controller, 
B&B Interface, Cables, Case, Power Supp- 
ly, Software (OS9/Basic) & Instruction 
Manual. Assembled/ tested/ formatted. 
Just Plugn'RunH Multipak Req. 
Seagate 20 Meg System: $509 Best Hard 
Seagate 30 Meg System: $539 Drive Deal 



HARD DRIVE INTERFACES 

CoCo XT: Use 2 5-120 Meg Drives with 
CoCo. $69.95. w/Real Time Clock: $99.95 
Hyper IO: Allows Hard Drive use with 
RSDOS. Only $29.95 

CoCo XT ROM: Boots OS9 from 
Hard/Floppy Drives. Only $19.95 

(Multipak Required for Interface) 





RS232 SUPER PACK 

Here it is! True RS232 port for 
your CoCo. Compatible with 
Tandy ® Deluxe RS232 Pack! 
Includes DB25 Cable. Req. 
Multipak. From DISTO so you 
know its quality! Going fasti 
Only $54.95 (CoCo 1,2 or 3) 




COMMUNICATIONS 
EXTRA VAGANZA 

1) AVATEX 1200e MODEM: Fully Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 w/ speaker, Auto- 
Dial/Answer/Redial (Reg $109.95) 

2) MODEM CABLE: 4 pin to DB25. (Reg 

$19.95) 

3) AUTOTERM TERMINAL SOFT- 
WARE (Reg $39.95) 

4) FREE COMPUSERVE OFFER and 
Access Time 

5) UPS 2nd DAY AIR Shipping 

ONLY $149.95 
(With AVATEX 1200hc 
instead of Avatex 1200e: $174.95) 
with AVATEX 2400: $249.95 





MAGNAVOX 8CM515 
RGB MONITOR 

Razor-sharp picture 
quality for your CoCo! Has 
14" screen, Analog/TTL I 
RGB, Composite inputs \ ij 
for CoCo 2/3, Speaker, ^ 
tilt-stand & 2 year warranty! With a push 
of a button you can go from RGB to com- 
posite mode. This means that ALL your 
CoCo programs that appear in B&W in 
RGB mode will appear in color!! Only 
$265 (add$12S&H US/$40 in Canada). 
Magnavox Cable for CoCo 3, Com- 
posite/Audio Cable with purchase of 
monitor: $19.95 



X 



EPROM 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER 

(for CoCo): Programs 2516-27512 & 

more! Includes software and complete 

documentation. Latest Version. Lowest 

Price anywhere! $137.95 

EPROM ERASER: Fast erase of 24/28 pin 

EPROMs. Only $49.95 

BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER and 

ERASER: $179.95 

EPROMS: 2764-$8 27128-$9 each 
Call for other EPROMs 
ROMPAK (w/Blank PC Board 27xx 
Series): $12.95 

BLANK CARTRIDGE (Disk Controller 
Size): Only $10.95 




KEYBOARDS , ETC. 

KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: 
Move your keyboard m r. K 
away from the com- C I'.. 
puter & type with ease. 
Use your existing 
keyboard with this 
cable or leave your present keyboard in- 
tact and use a second keyboard. Only 
$39.95. 

Cable with CoCo 2 Keyboard: $49.95 
Cable with CoCo 3 Keyboard: $69.95 
CoCo 3 Keyboard (with free FUNCTION 
KEYS software value $14.95) :$39.95 

CoCo 2 Keyboard: $19.95 

NX-1000 Rainbow Printer 

Fully Epson Compatible 7 Color Printer. 

Only $259 



CABLES 

MAGNAVOX 8505/8515/8CM643 Analog 
RGB Cable: $24.95 

SERIAL-TO-PARALLEL INTERFACE: Use 

your parallel printer at high speed (300-9600 baud) with 
CoCo. Comes will all cables. No software compatibility 
problems. Only $44.95 

15" MULTI PAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER 
CABLE: $29.95 

VIDEO DRIVER: Use a monochrome/color monitor 
with your CoCo. Comes with audio/video cables. Specify 
CoCo t or 2. Excellent picture quality/resolution! $34.95 
RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 Devices to the serial port. 
Only $18.95 

Y CABLE: Use your disk system with Speech Pak,CoCo 
Max, DS69, etc. $27.95 
RGB Analog Extender Cable:$19.95 
SONY Monitor Cable: $29.95 

VIDEO CLEAR:Reduce TV interference^ 19.95 
MODEM CABLE:4 pin to DB25.0nly $19.95 
3-POSITION SWITCHER: $37.95 
HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 



CHIPS, ETC 

Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
3): $29.95 ECB ROM 1.1:$29.95 
68B09E or 6809E Chip: $14.95 
MultiPak PAL Chip for CoCo 3: 
$19.95 

PAL Switcher: Now you can switch be- 
tween the CoCo 2 and 3 modes when 
using the Multi-Pak. You need the 
OLDER & NEW PAL chip for the 26- 
3024 Multipak. Only $39.95. With 
NEW PAL Chip: $49.95. 
5 1/4" Disks: $0.45 each! 

ME3M ^ 

™* UPGRADES 

512K Upgrades for CoCo 3: $CALL 
64K Upgrade for CoCo Fs, CoCo IPs 
with Cat #26-3026/27, 26-3134, 26- 
3136: $29.95 

64K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/B CoCo 
II: $39.95 

(Free 64K Utility Software incL with 64KUpgr.) 




JhJF MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618. Ph: (716) 383-8830 
AJI orders $50 & above (except drives, printers & monitors) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. We 
accept Visa, MasterCard, Amex, Check or MO. Sony, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% 
S&H(minimum $5). New York State residents please add sales tax. Looking for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 



IT 



ir»i s: 




^ REAL DESKTOP 






TM 



J 



ii 



AND 



File Edit options colors Font Size style 




p# Jiiilr mi® 



CoCo Max III is absolutely the best drawing package 
available for the CoCo 3, and it does more than just let 
you draw. CoCo Max III includes animation, text, color 
mixing and more features than you would think 
possible. It combines incredible speed with dazzling 
graphics and it is a joy to use even its most powerful 
features. 

Pictures, graphs, flyers, cards, signs, school projects, 
labels, buttons and anything else you might dream of 
creating is now possible with CoCo Max III. Is it any 
wonder that the majority of CoCo Gallery pictures in the 
last five months were created with CoCo Max? 

Thousands of CoCo users have found that you don't 
have to be an artist to have fun with CoCo Max. You'll 
wonder why you waited so long to get the incredible 
CoCo Max III. 



CoCo Max III is the best because it includes: 

- a huge picture area (two full hhres 320x192 screens) - a large 
editing window - Zoom mode for detail work - 28 drawing tools 
which you just point and click on - shrink and stretch - rotation at 
any angle (1.5 degree steps) - 51 2K memory support (all features 
work with 128K too) - an Undo feature to correct mistakes - you 
can even Undo an "Undo" - Animation - special effects - color 
sequencing (8 colors, variable speed) - thirteen fonts (more 
available) - each font has eight different sizes - five style options 
(bold, italic, 3D. etc.) for thousands of font/size/style combination 
possibilities. - the CoCo Show "slide show" program - color 
editing of patterns - automatic pattern alignment - prints in single 
and double size - smart lasso (move text over a background...) 

- advanced tools: arc, ray, cube, etc. - select 16 of the 64 colors (all 
64 colors are displayed at once for selection!) - picture converter 
(CoCo Max II. MGE. BASIC) - extensive prompting - "glyphic" 
clipbook of rubber stamps - double click shortcuts - color mixing 
(additive/subtractive/none) - money back guarantee - sophisticated 
data compression saves disk space - pull down menus (no 
commands to remember) - forty paintbrush shapes - two color 
lettering - spray can - scrapbooks of pictures - error free 

- Y-cable or multipack not required - high speed hi-res interface 
included (plugs into joystick port) - disk is not copy protected 

- amazing "flowbrush" - RGB and composite monitor support 

- replace color - printing on black and white printers in five shades 
of gray - full color printing with optional drivers for the NX-1000 
Rainbow and CGP220 - entirely rewritten for the CoCo 3 



can 



do 



th 



this 



to * hat r a ni^ tlon ' ttlTs^ ^ 



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CoCo Max III: $79.95 

Max-10 owners: deduct $10 

System Requirements: 

CoCo 3 disk system and a Joystick 
or Mouse 

Printer drivers included: 

IBM/Epson and compatibles. GEMINI. 
DMP1 05/1 06/1 30.OK11 82/1 92. CGP220 
(B&W),DMP110, DMP200 

Color printer drivers (prints 125 
different colors) Star NX-1 000, CGP- 
220, or Okimate 20 each $1 9.95 



For all CoCo Max Versions 

Max Edit Font Editor: A font is a set of 
characters of a particular style. With Max Edit you can 
create new fonts or modify the existing ones.$1 9.95 

Max Font disks (send for list) each $1 9.95 

Max Font Set (95 fonts on 4 disks) $49.95 

DS69/69B Digitizers: allows you to capture the 
image from a VCR or video camera and bring it into 
your computer CoCo Max will let you load digitized 
pictures and modify them. 

DS-69 (2 images per second. Requires 

muttipak) $99.95 

DS-69B (8 images/second) $1 49.95 



CoCo 1 & 2 Owners 

Stili Available: 

(See previous ads or 
write for information) 

CoCo Max II (works on 

all disk CoCos) $69.95 

CoCo Max Tape 

(CoCo 1 & 2 only) $59.95 

Y-Cable $24.95 

CoCo Max II Picture 

Disk Set 

set of 3 disks: $29.95 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max or Max-10 for a full month, 
tf you are not delighted with either of them, 
we will refund every penny. 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc. 




j TO ORDER ^S* 

- (203) 656-1806 MON-FRI 9 to 5 EST^ 

Visa or Mastercard accepted. C.O.D. orders $3 extra 
Otecfc or M.O. to Cokxware. 242-W West Ave. Darien CT 
Add S3 per older for si^pptng {$5 to Canada. 10% to overseas) 
CT resents rid 7.5% sales tax 



seas) 1 



PUBLISHING 



[COLORWARE 




THE DAZZLING WORD PROCESSOR 

You probably already have a word processor, and you 
probably wish it had these features: 

► Fully menu driven (CoCo Max style) with point and 
click marking of text. You don't need the arrow keys! 
True WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) 
including variable size fonts, styles (bold, italics, etc.) 
and graphics. 

Can print multiple columns on a page. 

► Not limited by printer capabilities: fonts up to 24 
points (1/3 M ) high, superscripts, small print, etc. 

► Fully integrated spelling checker (incredibly fast), no 
need to exit program to check spelling. 

► Graphics can be imported from just about anything 
(CoCo Max; MGE; BASIC; even Macintosh pictures 
from a BBS) and resized to fit your document. 

► Full screen preview including graphics. 

Max-10 has all these unique features, plus all the 
features you are used to in your current word 
processor. Even with all this, you don't give up anything. 
Max-10 is easier to use, more intuitive, faster and more 
powerful than anything else. It's not just a word 
processor, it's a desktop publisher. 



■■•4 

inc. 



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Max-10: $79.95 

CoCo Max III owners: deduct $10 
Max-10 requires a CoCo 3. at least 1 disk, & joystick or mouse 
Printer driver* Included: IBM/Epson and compatibles; DMP 
105. DMP106. DMP130; CGP220 (B&W); Gemini/Star 



TM 



File Edit Search* Layout Font 



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Bold 



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CP 
CB 



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WTSIfIG adl (wiz-ee-wig) 1. What 
You See Is What You Get (acronym) 

a uuke cfeiice if httiit fonts ao<J 



Some of the many features of Max-10: 

- Blinding speed - printing in multiple columns - online dictionary 

- speil checking - graphics can be mixed with text - full justification 
of proportionally sized characters - bold, italic, underline 
superscript and subscript type styles - superb file support, just point 
and click - "Undo" lets you correct mistakes - easy to use. no 
commands to remember - any graphics program can be used 

- pictures can be shrunk or stretched to fit - right and left alignment 

- centering - variable line spacing - page numbering - current 
page number displayed on the screen - variable tab stops - left and 
right margins - tabs and margins can vary in the same document 

- cut and paste text and graphics anywhere in the file - page break 
shows on the screen - puit down menus are quick and simple to use 

- lightning fast access to any point in the document with the scroll 
box - twenty fonts (styles and sizes), more available - any number 
of character sizes and styles can be mixed on the same line - up to 
more than 120 characters per line, depending on font size, style and 
letters - headers and footers, even with graphics - file compatibility 
with other word processors - right, left, bottom and top margins 

- word wrap - set starting page - type ahead - key repeat - key 
click - scroll up and down - ASCII file output for compatibility 

- disk directory - kill files- block cut, copy and move - global 
search and replace - paragraph indent - clipboard - merge 

- show file (on disk) - free memory display - page count 

- paragraph count - word count - graphics can be resized and 
moved - multiple fonts - error recovery - true lowercase -512K 
memory support (all features work with 128K too) - complete point 
and click cursor control - moving, clearing and changing blocks of 
text is ridiculously easy, just point and click at each end of the text 
block - onscreen ruler - preview file before loading - search and 
replace - disk is not copy protected - more than 35 pages of text 

CoCo Max III and Max-10 
Perfect Together 

You do not need CoCo Max III to insert and print 
graphics in Max-10. Max-10 works with any graphics 
creation program, and you can also use graphics 
downloaded from bulletin boards. 

Similarly, you do not need Max-10 to create graphics 
with text in CoCo Max III. There are tremendous 
lettering capabilities in CoCo Max III, with its many 
fonts, styles, and sizes. 

Together Max-10 and CoCo Max III are an unbeatable 
combination. This desktop publishing system is better 
than anything you've ever seen on a CoCo. We are so 
confident that you will use, and enjoy using *he two 
software packages, that we offer an unconditional 
money back guarantee. Stop wasting your time and 
effort using inferior or obsolete products. Move up to 
the new generation of CoCo software now. 



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A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 





The Amazing A-BUS 




An A- BUS system with two Motherboards 
A- BUS adapter In fcftf^ro u nd 

Trie A-BUS l¥9tam works w*th the of Iglnsl CoCo, 

theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 

About the A- BUS system: 

• All the A^BUS cards are very easy to use with .any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC, use IN P and OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application, Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-8US cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-123) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 

Relay Card re-i4o: $1 2d 

Includes eight industrial relays, (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched, 8 LEO's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE In 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable, 

Reed Relay Card re-156: $99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card ad~i42:$i29 

Bght analog Inputs. 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 100V by adding a 
resistor, 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc, Very easy to use. 

12 Bit A/D Converter AN-146: $139 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%. Input range is ~4Vto 
+4v\ Resolution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 130ms. Ideal for thermocouple, 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-1 56 card) 

Digital Input Card in-i4u$59 

Trie eight inputs are optically isolated, so It's safe and easy to connect any 
"tin/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-148:$65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTt device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed Input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255 A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cl-144:$89 

Powerful cfock/cafendar with: battery backup for Time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time anddate); built in alarm relay, ted and buzzer; timing to 1/1 00 
second; Easy to use decimal format Lithium battery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph-i45.$79 

Each tone Is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INPor POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pfm 52: $1 5 

3% by 4 ft In. With power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I.C.s 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
yoiir Computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 




Smart Stepper Controller sc-i49:$299 

World's finest stepper controller. On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously. Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 10.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory. For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half, full, wave), 
scale factor. units,l)olding power, etc. Many inputs: 8 limit $ "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (350mA) for small steppers (M0-1 03). Send for SC*1 49 flyer, 
Remote Contrbl Keypad Option ROI 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-1 22: $1 9 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board. 

Stepper Motor Driver ST-143: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with. them, Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V, bidirectional, 4 phase, 350mA per phase). 
Special Package: I motors (M0-1 03) + ST-143: PA-181: $99 

Stepper Motors MO-103: 815or4for$39 

Pancake type, 2Va u dia, Va" shaft. 7.5°/step. 4 phase bidirectional, 300 
step/sec, 12V, 36 ohm, bipolar, 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701-P2. 

Cu rrent Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter.4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC. XT. AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot 
Tandy 1 000, 1 000 EX & SX, 1200, 3000. Uses oneshort slot. 
Apple It, l|+, He. Uses ew slot. 
TRS-80 Model 102, 200 Plugs Into 40 pin "system bus". 
Model 1 00. Uses40 pin socket (Socket isduollcateo" on adapter). 

TRS-80 Mod3,4,4D.Fits50pjnbus(Wi|hharddisk.useY-cab)e). AR-132...$49 

TRS-80 Model 4 P. Includes extra cable. (SOpin bus is recessed). AR-1 37. .$62 

TRS-80 Model L Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or E/I. AR-1 31 ,..$39 

Color Computers (Tandy).Fits ROM slot. Muitioak. or Y-cable AR-1 38. .$49 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft, 50 cond.) CA-163: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i20:$99 

Each Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
ijv^m second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 

r J\ 161 : $1 2). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included, 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 



RE-140 




IN-141 



AR-133.S69 
AR-133...$69 
AR-134...$49 
AR-136,..$69 
AR«135...$69 




J 



AD-142 



Add $3.00 par order for shipping. 
Visa, MC. checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT A NY resident* add sales tax. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada.' shipping is S5 
Overseas add 10% 




a S'qma Indvsin&s Company 



ALPHA lh/^ojl^. 

242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 




Technical info: (203)656-1806 

%2**?$ 800 221 -091 6 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE CELEBRATES 6 YEARS 



IQCIIE 41 llll V 10119 
IdoUC #1, JULT Ivoc 


IQCIIP #7 IAN IQfll 
IOOUC ff / , JAN. ISOO 


IQQIIC #11 II II V 10IW 
IdoUC ff lu, JULT IbOO 


ICCIIC #10 IAN 10IIA 


COVER 1 


NEW YEARS COVER 


THIRTEENTH COVER 


BANNER 


RACE TRACK 


LIST ENHANCER 


FLASH CARD 


PROBE 


HANGMAN 


SUPER PRECISION DIV. 


ICE BLOCK 


DISK DIR. PROTECTOR 


MUSIC ALBUM 


BOMB DIFFUSE 


COSMIC FORTRESS 


OPTICAL CONFUSION 


LIFE EXPECTANCY 


SPACE STATION 


MAIL LIST 


WORD PROCESSOR 


WORD TESTS 


ML TUTDRIAL PT. 2 


DOLLARS & CENTS 


WORD SEARCH 


KILLER MANSION 


SHOOT OUT 


ML TUTORIAL PT.8 


ASTRONAUT RESCUE 


BARTENDER 


FIND UTILITY 


SDSK COPY 


STAR TRAP 


CALENDAR 


CYBORG INS. 


MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 


PIE CHART 


ROBOT WAR 


CYBORG FACES 


CRAWLER 


FORCE FIELD 


looUt #Z, AUG. isoZ 


icciic wn ten hooo 

looUc wo, rep,, i9o3 


ICCIIC U4A ftllP -moo 

looUc ff14, AUb. 1983 


ISSUE #20, FEB, 1984 


UFO COVER PT. 1 


COVER 8 


MYSTERY COVER 


INTRODUCTION 


BIORYTHM 


DEFEND 


ROW BOAT 


HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 


BOMBARDMENT 


3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 


COMPUTER TUTL PT 1 


ESCAPE ADVENTURE 


BLACK JACK 


COCO CONCENTRATION 


INDEX DATA BASE 


SEEKERS 


CDST OF LIVING 


AUTO LINE NUMBERING 


DISK ZAPPER 


MASTER BRAIN 


FRENZY 


ML TUTORIAL PT.3A 


COCO-MONITOR 


LIST CONTROLLER 


BUSINESS LETTER 


ML TUTORIAL PT.36 


COCO-ARTIST 


DISKETTE CERTIFIER 


QUICK THINK 


NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 


RDBOT COMMAND 


ROM COPY 


QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 


DUAL BARRfER 


TEST SCREEN PRINT 


BASIC RAM 


QUEST FOR LENORE 


BRICKS 


HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 


SNAFUS 


IQQIIP HI CEPT 1QR9 
IdoUC rfo, aCrl. l\3oc 


ICCIIC H(i MARPU 1QQQ 

looUc TPS, mftnUn lHod 


ICCIIC CCDT 100Q 

looUt fflo, ocrl. laoo 


ICCIIC UO-i MAD 4QQA 

looUc ffel, MAn. 1904 


UFO COVER PT.2 


TIME MACHINE COVER 


MYSTERY COVER PT.2 


BASIC CONVERSIONS 


BASKETBALL 


TRIG DEMO 


GOLD VALUES 


FINANCIAL ADVISE 


CHUCKLUCK 


PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 


TREK INSTRUCTIONS 


CASTLE STORM 


SLOT MACHINE 


PROGRAM PACKER 


TREK 


DOS HEAD CLEANE' 


ALPHABETIZE R 


BUDGET 


HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 


COCO TERMINAL 


NFL PREDICTIONS 


ELECTRONIC DATE BOOK 


ASTRO DODGE 


SNAKE CRAWLER 


FLAG CAPTURE 


ML TUTORIAL PT.4 


OR. COCO 


WAR CASTLE 


ROBOT BOMBER 


TAPE DIRECTORY 


PEG JUMP 


SKY FIRE 




BLOCK-STIR 


MORSE CODE 


EASY BASIC 




COCO ADDING MACHINE 


PURGE UTILITY 


DOTS 3-D 


IQCJ|C M.A flPT 1QB9 


ICCIIC iiin APDII 1QQQ 
looUc it IU, MrnlL lyflo 


ICCIIC J*1ft APT 

looUt fflo, Ubl. 19BJ 


ICCIIC unn ADDII HOQA 

loouc ffiZ, ArnIL 1984 


UFO RESCUE 


TENTH COVER 


MYSTERY COVER 


HEALTH HINTS 


TANK BATTLE 


PYRAMID OF DANGER 


BOPOTRON 


GLIBLIBS 


DRIVEWAY 


TYPING TUTOR 


DIRECTORY RECALL 


CLOTHER SLITHER 


SOUNOS 


ML TUTORIAL PT.5 


VECTOR GRAPHICS INST, 


BIBLE 1 & 2 


BALLOON DROP 


TINYCALC 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


BIBLE 3 & 4 


MIND BOGGLE 


STOCK MARKET COMP 


SKYDIVER 


CATCH ALL 


COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 


YAH-HOO 


SWERVE AND DODGE 


INVADER 


CALORIE COUNTER 


MISSILE ATTACK 


NIMBO BATTLE 


ALIEN RAID 


JACK-O-LANTERN 


SCREEN PRINT 


TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 


MOON ROVER 




BRIKPONG 


LIFE GENERATIONS 


10 ERROR IGNORER 


|CO||C #R NflU 1QA9 
IDOUC WQ, NUV* ISO* 


ICC lie if 11 MAV 10111 


ICCIIC #17 Mfllf 1004 
loouc ffl/, NUV. liJod 


icciic unn iiiv Ana a 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 


CATALOG COVER 


ELEVENTH COVER 


THANKSGIVING COVER 


MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 


BOWLING 


ARCHERY 


3-D TIC-TACTOE 


STDCKS OR BOMBS 


PROGRAM INVENTORY 


FROG JUMP 


INDY 500 


WALL AROUND 


PROMISSORY-LOANS 


ML TUTORIAL PT.6 


COLLEGE ADVENTURE 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT.1 


CHECKBOOK BALANCER 


MLT DICTIONARY 


MEMORY GAME 


NUCLEAR WAR INST. 


TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 


BASIC SPEED UP TOT. 


DUNGEON MASTER 


THERMONUCLEAR WAR 


CONVOY 


METRIC CONVERTOR 


WEATHER FORECASTER 


CIRCUIT BREAKER 


BAG-IT 


GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 


GRID FACTOR INST. 


MOUSE RACES 


SPECTRA SOUND 


GRAPHICS PROGRAM 


GRID FACTOR 


SUPER SQUEEZE 


CONVEYOR BELT 


CATERPILLAR CAVE 


DRAW 


DATA FALL 


ISSUE #6, DEC. 1082 


ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 


ISSUE #18, DEC. 1983 


ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 


CHRISTMAS COVER 


TWELFTH COVER 


CHRISTMAS COVER 


DIR PACK & SORT 


RAINDROPS 


SHOOTING GALLERY 


CLIMBER 


BRICK OUT 


STOCK MARKET 


BOMB STOPPER 


GALACTIC CONQUEST 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 2 


ADVANCE PONG 


VALLEY BOMBER 


WARLORDS 


USA SLIDE PUZZLE 


DESTROY 


STAR FIGHTER 


STATES REVIEW 


51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 


SOUNO ANALYZER 


WHEEL OF FORTUNE 


MATH TUTOR 


51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 


CREATIVITY TEST 


ML TUTORIAL PT.7 


MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 


CITY INVADERS 


VOICE DATA 


MERGE UTILITY 


PRINTER UTILITY INST. 


PRINTER SPOOLER 


ML TUTORIAL PT.t 


RAM TEST 


PRINTER UTILITY 


STEPS 


LOONY LANDER 


LANDER 


MUTANT WAFFLES 


SNAKE 



ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT,3 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEY MAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDITOR INST 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLt BUSTER 
ROCOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUG. 1984 
PEEK POKE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG TYPER TUTDR 
O-TEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
COCO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

ISSUE #27, SEPT. 1984 
COCO TO COM 64 
GALACTIC SMUGGLER 
INDY RACE 
ACCOUNT MANAGER 
CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 
STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 
SPACE OUEL 
BUGS 

TRAP-BALL 
BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCT. 1984 

HANGING TREE 

CHECKERS 

FOOTBAtt 

MORE PEEKS & POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RAT ATTACK 

ISSUE #29, NOV. 1984 
DISK ROLL OUT 
ROBOT ON 
MULTIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
QUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 

ISSUE #30, DEC. 1984 

MATH HELP 

ZECTOR ADVENTURE 

WORLD CONQUEST 

DRAG RACE 

MINE FIELD 

T-NOTES TUTORIAL 

T & D PROGRAM INDEXER 

SYSTEM STATUS 

ERROR TRAP 

DROLL ATTACK 



ISSUE #31, JAN. 1985 
TREASURES OF BARSOOM 
BATTLEGROUND 
STRUCT. COMPILED LANG. 
MINIATURE GOLF 
STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEB. 1985 

DR. SIGMUND 
ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 
LOTTERY ANALYST 
BASIC COMPILER 
MUSIC CREATOR 
MEANIE PATROL 
TRI-COLOR CARDS 
SHAPE RECOGNITION 
DISK BACKUP 
SPACE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MAR. 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 

PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
Ml DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 

DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEED KEy 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

HOVER TANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSIC GENERATOR 
FYR-DRACA 
ORIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 
SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 
SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
KNOCK OUT 
HAUNTED HOUSE 

ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 

SELECT A GAME 2 
VIDEO COMPUTER 
SPEECH SVUTHtStS 
SPEECH RECOGNITION 
SPACE LAB 
AUTO COMMAND 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 
KNIGHT & THE LABYRINTH 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 



VISA 




SUPER SAVINGS 
Single Issue $8.00 

2-5 Issues $6.00 ea. 

6-10 ISSUES $5.00 ea. 

11 or more Issues . $4.50 ea. 

All 72 Issues $199.00 

Purchase 20 or more issues and 
receive a free 6 month 
subscription. 



Every Issue Contains 
10 or More Programs 
Many Machine Language 
Programs 

Available for COCO I, II and 
All Programs Include 
Documentation 



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No Charge 

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ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 
CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE 5-7 

SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 
RLE TRANSFER 
FOUR IN A ROW 
MARSHY 

TAPE CONTROLLER 



AUTO TALK 
SGR8PAK 

ISSUE #38, AUG. 1985 

GOLF PAR3 
WIZARD ADVENTURE 
KITE DESIGN 
ROBOTS 
GOMOKU 

AMULET OF POWER 
LINE COPY UTILITY 
DISK PLUMBER 
SUPER RAM CHECKER 
GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPT. 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
CAR MANAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHINE 
ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 
SUPER VADERS 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

ISSUE #40, OCT. 1985 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
COCO WAR 
DISK LABELER 
SHIP WAR 
ELECTRIC COST 
MULTIKEY BUFFER 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
SAND ROVER 

ISSUE #41, NOV. 1985 

GRUMPS 

DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 
SOLAR CONQUEST 
GAS COST 

RIME WORLD MISSION 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 
GRAPHIC TEST 
GRAPHIC LOOPY 
BOLD PRINT 



ISSUE #42, DEC. 1985 

HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAHTZEE 
DISK UTILITY 
MACH II 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
SLOT MACHINE GIVE AWAY 
TEXT BUFFER 
TUNNEL RUN 



ISSUE #43, JAN. 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER COST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 

KEYPAD ENTRY/ : 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEB. 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 

ISSUE #45, MAR. 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT. 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COCO KEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
LIBERTY SHIP 
SINGLE STEP RUN 

ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DISK LOCK 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 
BOMB RUN 
TANKS 
TAR PITS 
BASEBALL 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 
ROULETTE 
GLOBAL 



ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST ■ 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFF, 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
TV SCHEDULE 
BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTl COPY 
AUTO MATE 
SCROLL PROJECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 



ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 
DISK DISASSEMBLER 
BAKCHEK 
PACHINKO 
STOCK CHARTING 
HAUNTED STAIRCASE 
CANYON BOMBERS 
DRAGONS 1 & 2 
GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 
AUTO BORDER 

ISSUE #50, AUG. 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPT. 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET 51 
VAN GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 

ISSUE #52, OCT. 1986 
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 
INVASION 

THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOT RACE 
FLIPPY THE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS 
SUPER ERR0R2 

ISSUE #53, NOV. 1986 
CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CARVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DEC. 1986 

JOB LOG 
PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TYPE 
PANZER TANKS 
MRS PAC 
BIG NUM 



ISSUE #55, JAN. 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
DIR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEB. 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRUSH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EOITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 

ISSUE #57, MAR. 1987 
THE BAKERY 

ENCHANGED VALLEY ADV. 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR 1 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTl CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
; WEIRDO 

ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 

HOME PLANT SELECTION 

CHECK WRITER 

HELIRESCUE 

KABOOM 

NEW PONG 

CROQUET 

FUNCTION KEYS 

ZOOM 

ELECTRONICS 2 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
LABELS 

CATCH A CAKE 
COGO MATCH 
ROBOTS 

street racers 
Howling 3 
electronics 3 

GRAFIX 
KRON 



ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 
EZ ORDER 

SUBMISSION WRITER 
KEYS ADVENTURE 
WALLPAPER 
CHOPPER COMMAND 
UNDERSTANDING OPPOSITES 
BIT CODE PLOTTING 
ELECTRONICS 4 
KING PEDE 
RAIDER 

ISSUE #62, AUG. 1987 

PENSION MANAGEMENT 
HERB GROWING 
CATOLOGER UTILITY 
RAIDERS 
ALPHABETIZING 
U.F.O. 

ELECTRONICS 5 
RAMBO ADVENTURE 
BLOCKS 

MULTl SCREEN CAVES 

ISSUE #63, SEPT. 1987 
GENEOLOGIST HELPER 
SMART COPY 
MAINTENANCE REPORTING 
C0C03-C0C0 2 HELPER 
DIRECTORY PICTURE 
SUB ATTACK 
SAVE THE MAIOEN 
CAVIATOR 
ELECTRONICS 6 
MONKEY SHINE 

ISSUE #64, OCT, 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE IN THE GRASS 
CYCLE JUMP 
GEOMETRY TUTOR 
WIZARD 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS 7 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 

ISSUE #65, NOV. 1987 

TAXMAN 

DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 
CHILDSTONE ADVENTURE 
SIR EGGBERT 
CROWN QUEST 
GYM KHANA 
COCO 3 DRAWER 
FOOTBALL 
ELECTRONICS 8 
CHOP 

ISSUE #66, DEC. 1987 

ONE ROOM ADVENTURE 
0S9 TUTORIAL 
RIVER CAPTAIN 
SOUND EFFECTS 
BETTING POOL 
ADVANCE 
MATH TABLES 
ELECTRONICS 9 
LOWER TO UPPER 
NOIDS 



ISSUE #67, JAN. 1988 
AUDIO LIBRARY 
SAVE THE EARTH 
WEIGHTS ANO MEASURES 
LOW RES PICTURES 
WORO COUNTER 
BACARAT 
BATTLE SHIP 
ELECTRONICS 10 
TAPE CONVENIENCE 
PENQUIN 

ISSUE #68, FEB. 1988 

COINFILE 
WORD CDUNTER 
SQUIRREL ADVENTURE 
AREA CODES 
DRAW POKER 
TURTLE RACES 
ELECTRONICS 11 
MULTl SCREEN 
CANON PRINT 
COCO TENNIS 

ISSUE #69, MAR. 1988 

POLICE CADET 
STAMP COLLECTION 
BARRACKS ADVENTURE 
CITY/TIME 
HI-LO/CRAPS 
OLYMPICS 
HI-RES CHESS 
ELECTRONICS 12 
DOUBLE EDITOR 
DOUBLE BREAKOUT 

ISSUE #70, APRIL 1988 

BLOTTO DICE 
SUPER COM 
GENESIS ADVENTURE 
PLANETS 
PHK/WAR 
SIGN LANGUAGE 
ARX SHOOTOUT 
ELECTRONICS 13 
MAGIC KEY 
SNAP PRINT 

ISSUE #71, MAY 1988 

SUPER LOTTO 
ROBOT ADVENTURE 
MAZE 

YAHTZEE 3 
PHASER 

SHAPES & PLATES 
STAR WARS 
ELECTRONICS 14 
PRINTER CONTROL 
MAZE 2 

ISSUE #72, JUNE 1988 
FLYING OBJECTS 
THREE STODGES 
HOSTAGE 
PROGRAM TRIO 
GLADIATOR 
US & CAN QUIZ 
JEOPARDY 
ELECTRONICS 15 
COCO 3 PRINT 
CTTY COMMUNICATOR 




MAIL TO: 



T & D Subscription Software 

2490 Miles Standish Drive 
Holland, Michigan 49424 
(616) 399-9648 




Name 



CIRCLE ISSUES DESIRED 



Address 
City _ 



State 



ZIP 



Credit Card # 
Expires 



1 


9 


17 


25 


33 


41 


49 


57 


65 


2 


10 


18 


26 


34 


42 


50 


58 


66 


3 


11 


19 


27 


35 


43 


51 


59 


67 


4 


12 


20 


28 


36 


44 


52 


60 


68 


5 


13 


21 


29 


37 


45 


53 


61 


69 


6 


14 


22 


30 


38 


46 


54 


62 


70 


7 


15 


23 


31 


39 


47 


55 


63 


71 


8 


16 


24 


32 


40 


48 


56 


64 


72 



TOTAL AMOUNT $ 



PLEASE CIRCLE 

TAPE or DISK 



The excitement continues! 




Fourteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our fourth Adventure competition. Reiy on your wits 
to escape a hostile military installation, try to stop the Nazi plan to invade Great Britain, or manage to reinstate 
our defense system before the enemy launches a massive missile attack — and that's onfy the beginning! 



The Park of Mystery — You overhear a gang of robbers 
discussing where they've hidden their loot. Can you find 
it — and battle greed and confusion at the same time? 

Superspy — You awaken from a horrifying nightmare 
of chases, inexplicable scenery changes and sickening 
f reefalls into space. Or was it a dream? You be the judge 
— and determine your own fate! 

Term Paper — A real nightmare: Someone's stolen your 
freshman midterm paper and hidden its pages all over 
CoCo State's campus. Are you smart enough to find 
them before you miss the due date and flunk the 
course? 



House Adventure — Try to find your way out of a 
mysterious abandoned house that keeps sprouting new 
rooms just as you think you've found an exit. 

Life: An Everyday Adventure — Just getting up in the 
morning in time to do last-minute chores before 
catching a plane to a family reunion proves you don't 
have to leave home to find adventure. 

The Earth's Foundations — A mysterious maze inside 
a deep crevice near your village is having a devastating 
effect on the entire area. You've been chosen to 
investigate, and promised great riches — if you survive! 



Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these winning authors: Mike Anderson* Tio 
Babich, David Bartmess, Stephen Berry, Eugene Carver, Charles Farris, Jeff Hillison, Jeff Johnson, Richard 
Kottke, Ken Lie, Andre Needham, Fred Provoncha, Paul Ruby Jr. and Eric Santanen. 




The Fourth Rainbow Book of 
Adventures is only $10.95! 

Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 



The tQpo and disks are adjuncts and compiernante to the book; the book ts. necessary 
for introductory material and loading ' insfouti.bni 




j □ My check in the amount of 
K enclosed* 



Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard 

□ American Express 

Acct. No. . 

Exp. Date 

Signature 



■ Mail to: The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures, The 
Faisoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

*Add $2.00 per book for shipping and handling in the U.S. Outside the 
U.S. add $4 per book (U.S. currency only). Kentucky residents add 5% 
Si sales tax. In order to hold down costs, we do not bit). Please allow 6-8 
weeks for delivery. 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (8Q0) 847-0309, 8 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 



VIP Writer III 2.0 

4 9 5 K Total Text Space • EASY 4 Color MEN US 



"In the beginning there was VIP Writer and users saw that it was good, But it's not the best anymore. There's a 
new word processor to claim the crown.. .VIP Writer III -Setting the Standard" -RAINBOW Sept, 1988 



COMPARISON CHART 




VIP Writer III 


Telewriter 128 


Word Power 3 


Screen Display 


32/40/64/80 


40/80 


80 


Spelling Checker 


VIP Speller 


NONE 


FREE WARE 


Dictionary Size 


50,000 Words 


NONE 


20,000 Words 


Print Spooler 


YES 


NONE 


YES 


Total Space 128K 


106,000 


48,000 


72,000 


Total Space 51 2K 


495,104 


48,000 


450,000 



SCREEN DISPLAY OPTIONS 

VIP Writer III offers more screen width options -all with 24 lines and actual lower case 
letters using the CoCo 3's hardware display. It runs at double clock speed and has 4-color 
menus making VIP Writer III FAST and EASY to use I You can choose foreground, 
background, hilite and cursor colors from up to 64 hues. Color can be turned ON or OFF 
for the best possible display using a monochrome monitor or TV set. VIP Writer III has a 
context sensitive help facility to display command usage in easy to read colored windows. 

CUSTOMIZER & PRINTER INSTALLER 

VIP Writer III comes with a configuration / printer installation program which lets you 
customize VIP Writer III to suit your own liking. You can set screen width and colors as well 
as margins and more. You can also install your own printer and set interface type (serial, 
parallel or J&M}, baud rate, line feeds, etc. Once done, you never have to enter these 
parameters again I VIP Writer III will load rT go with your custom configuration every time! 

TEXT FILE STORAGE 

VIP Writer III creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all other VIP Programs 
as well as other programs which use ASCII files. You can use VIP Writer III to even type 
BASIC programs! There is a 48K text buffer (438K in a 51 2K CoCo 3) and disk file 
linking allowing virtually unlimited text space. VIP Writer III works with up to four disk 
drives and lets you display directories and free space as well as rename or kill disk files. In 
addition VIP Writer III is 100% compatible with the RGB Computer Systems Hard Disk. 

EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer III has a full featured screen editor which can be used to edit text with lines up 
to 240 characters long with or without automatic word wrap around. You can select 
type-over mode or insert mode. There is even an OOPS command to recall a cleared text 
buffer. Other editing features include: Type-ahead • typamatic key repeat and key beep 
for flawless text entry • end of line bell • full four way cursor control with scrolling • top 



of textfile • bottom of textfile • page up • page down • top of screen • bottom of screen • 
beginning of line • end of line • left one word • right one word • DELETE character, to 
beginning or end of line, word to the left or right, or entire line ♦ INSERT character or line 
• LOCATE and/or CHANGE or DELETE single or multiple occurrence using wildcards • 
BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to TEN simultaneous block manipulations » TAB key 
and proarammable tab stops • word count • line restore • three PROGRAMMABLE 
FUNCTIONS to perform tasks such as auto column creation and multiple copy printing. 

TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you to format your text in 
any way you wish. You can change the top, bottom, left or riant margin and page length. 
You can set. your text flush left, center or flush right. You can turn right hand 
ustification on or off. You can have headers, footers, page numbers and TWO auxiliary 
ines which can appear on odd, even or all pages. You can also select the line on which they 
appear! You can even change the line spacing! Parameters can be altered ANYWHERE ! 

PREVIEW PRINT WINDOW 

VIP Writer III features an exclusive format window which allows you to preview your 
document BEFORE PRINTING IT! You are able to move up, down, left and right to see 
centered and justified text, margins, page breaks, broken paragraphs, orphan lines etc. 

PRINTING 

VIP Writer III prints TWICE as fast as any other CoCo word processor! It supports most 
serial or parallel printers using J&M JFD-CP or Rainbow interface and gives you the 
ability to select baud rates from 110 to 19,200. You can imbed printer control codes 
anywhere in your text file EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT! VIP Writer III also has 
TWENTY programmable printer macros which allow you to easily control all of your 
printers capabilities such as bold, underline, italics and superscript using simple key 
strokes. Other features include: multiple copy printing • single sheet pause • line feeds. 

PRINT SPOOLING 

Save up to $150 on a print spooler because VIP Writer 111 has a built in print spooler with 
a 57,000 character buffer which allows you to print one document WHILE you are editing 
another. You don't have to wait until your printer is done before starting another job! 

SPELLING CHECKER 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller AT NO ADDITIONAL COST! VIP Speller checks text 
for misspelled words and has a 50,000 word dictionary that can be added to or edited. 

DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer 111 comes with a well written 125 page manual which is Laser 
printed, not dot-matrix like the competition. It includes a tutorial, glossary 
of terms and examples for the beginner as well as a complete index! 

VIP Writer HI includes VIP Speller. DISK $79.95 



Writer III or Library /W owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer III 
2.0 for $10 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $13 total. 



VIP Writer owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer III 2.0 for 
$49.95 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $52.95 total. 



VIP Database III 

VIP Database III features selectable screen displays of 40, 64 or 80 
characters by 24 lines with choice of 64 foreground, background, hilite 
and cursor colors for EASY DATA ENTRY. It uses the CoCo 3's 
hardware screen and double clock speed to be the FASTEST database 
available! VIP Database III will handle as many records as will fit on your 
disks and is structured in a simple and easy to understand menu system 
with full prompting for easy operation. Your data is stored in records 
of your own design. All files are fully indexed for speed and efficiency. 
IN-MEMORY SORT of records is LIGHTNING FAST and provides for 
easy listing of names, figures, addresses, etc., in ascending or 
descending alphabetical or numeric order. Records can be searched for 
specific entries using multiple search criteria. The built-in mail-merge 
lets you sort and print mailing lists, print form letters, address 
envelopes - the list is endless. The built-in MATH PACKAGE even 
performs arithmetic operations and updates other fields. VIP 
Database III also has a print spooler and report generator with 
unlimited print format capabilities including embeddable control codes 
for use with ALL printers. DISK $69.95 

VIP Database owners: Upgrade to the VIP Database III for 
$39.95 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $42.95 total. 



VIP Library 

/W riter Database Enhanced 

The VIP Library /WDE combines all six popular VIP application 
programs - VIP Database III, VIP Writer III, VIP Speller, VIP Calc, VIP 
Terminal and VIP Disk-ZAP - into one program on one disk! The 
program is called VIP Desktop. From the desktop you have instant 
access to word processing with a spelling checker always in attendance, 
data management with mail merge, spreadsheet financial analysis, 
telecommunications and disk maintenance. * DISK $169.95 

For VIP Library shipping please add $4 USA. $5 Canada. $10 Foreign. 

VIP Library owners: Upgrade to the VIP Library /WDE for 
$89.90* + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $92.90 total, i 

* Future VIP Library upgrades available at reduced cost. 
All products run under RSDOS and are not copy protected. 

SE) IEnteiripimsies 

®(503) 663-2865 ^POB 1233 Gresham, OR 97030 

Non VIP Library orders add $3 for shipping and handling in USA. Canada $4. Foreign $6. COD orders 
add an additional $2.25. Checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. All other orders are shipped the same day- 
Telewriter 128 is a trademark of Coanitec. Word Power 3 is a rademart of Miaocom Software. 



CoCo 
Gallery 



1st Prize 
CoCo 3 

Richard Perreault 
Tiger 

Richard, a student in Boucherville, Que- 
bec, used CoCo Max III to develop this view 
of this fierce, flesh-eating native of Asia. 
Richard enjoys skiing, fishing and comput- 
ing. 






is* Vj * 



v V I 




L 7 



] 3rd Prize 




Robert Williams 
C-O-ARMS 

CoCo 3 basic was used to create this 
scene. Robert has been using a CoCo 
for four years, enjoys role-playing 
games and lives in Lucasville, Ohio. 





1st Prize 
CoCo 1 and 2 

Mark Winship 
Spacecraft 

Deskmate and the CoCo 2 were used to illus- 
trate Mark's idea of a traveling spacecraft. He 
lives in Houlton, Maine. 




26 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



/ 



■ + 

i ■ 4, | ■ .4 
r,'\ .«. - " ■ -„ 

i. Tt jrr~ • «. 



X J * J f 




SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! You are invited to nominate original work 
for inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." Share your 
creations with the CoCo Community! Be sure to send a cover letter 
with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you 
created your picture (what programs you used, etc.) and how to 
display it. Also, please include a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game 
screens, digitized images from TV programs or material that's already 
been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears 
in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

We will award two first prizes of $25, one for the CoCo 3 and one 
for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize of $15 and one third prize of 
$10. Honorable Mentions may also be given 

Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo Gallery, 
THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Remember, this 
is a contest and your entry will not be returned. 

— Angela Kapfhammer, Curator 



2nd Prize 

James Farmer 
Starship 

This animated scene was developed 
with CoCo Max III. James lives in North 
Charleston, South Carolina. 





Honorable 
Mention 

Wally Mayes 
Eagle 

Wally, a machinist in Hamilton, Ohio, used CoCo Max III to develop 
this depiction of the national emblem. 




November 1988 THE RAINBOW 27 



* Featur e 

Connecting a CoCo to other computers 




The Computer 
Connection 




By Don Hutchison 



When I travel, I like to use my 
portable Tandy 102 both to 
stay in touch with Delphi, 
and to generate short messages and text 
files for articles, Delphi Mail, Help 
notes, etc. I enjoy the convenience of 
using the 102 almost anywhere. Some- 
times, I sit on my sofa and use the 102 
while watching TV or talking on the 
phone. I am sure that there are many 
others who like the 102 for the same 
reasons. 

In the past, however, 1 felt restricted 
by my portable's inability to format. I 
wanted to transfer the text to my CoCo 
3 to use its word processor for cleanup, 
formatting and final printing. I also 
wanted to transfer PCM ON DISK pro- 
grams from my PC compatible to my 
Tandy 102. 1 began looking for a way 
to transfer programs from my PC com- 
patible to my 102. Once I solved that 
problem, 1 began looking for ways to 
connect the PC compatible to my 
CoCo. 

There are many reasons to use a 
second computer to download pro- 
grams. You may choose to use your PC 
compatible because it has a hard drive 
or because your IBM terminal program 
provides support for batched uploads 
and downloads. (This option allows the 
transfer of multiple files with little or no 
operator intervention, and if you are 
paying for access to an information 
service, the time savings can be signif- 
icant.) Programs that are downloaded 



onto your PC compatible can be trans- 
ferred to your CoCo at your leisure by 
using the techniques described in this 
article. 

Although you won't be able to 
transfer MS-DOS programs to your 
CoCo and expect them to operate 
correctly, the CoCo and the PC com- 
patible are now connected in a manner 
that allows them to communicate. If 
you prefer to download programs from 
Delphi onto a hard drive, there is now 
a convenient way to transfer the files to 
your CoCo. 

Background 

Generally, computers are not socia- 
ble things. Indeed, they prefer to be left 
alone. A computer chooses one owner 
and will do what that owner asks of it, 
but it usually prefers not to commun- 
icate with other computers. Fortu- 
nately, computers can be made to talk 
with each other rather easily. 

Let's begin by looking at the basics of 
computer interface. I'm a big fan of the 
KISS principle (Keep It Simple and 
Straightforward) so I looked for the 
minimum equipment needed to get two 
computers to talk to each other. Simple 
communications like the ones we'll be 
discussing are based on the use of just 
three signal lines: a line on which to talk, 
one on which to listen and a common 
line for the sake of electrical complete- 
ness. 

There are two complementary config- 



urations for the standard RS-232 inter- 
face: DTE (Data Terminal Equipment) 
and DCE (Data Communications 
Equipment). As the name implies, Data 
Terminal Equipment consists of those 
devices operating as terminals, and 
Data Communications Equipment is 
comprised of those devices designed to 
communicate with the outside world. 
The two devices are actually designed to 
be directly connected to each other. 

A modem is a typical example of 
DCE gear, and portable computers, 
such as the Tandy 102, are examples of 
DTE gear. When a computer is imitat- 
ing, or emulating, a terminal, it is 
configured to operate as DTE. 

Although this sounds complicated, 
all we are defining is how a computer 
listens for information and talks to 
other devices. For example, DTE hard- 
ware uses Pin 2 to send data, and DCE 
equipment uses that pin to receive data. 
So, when the two devices are connected, 
one talks while the other listens. In fact, 
both units can be talking and listening 
at the same time. Humans should be so 
lucky. 

To get your CoCo to communicate 

Don Hutchison is an electrical engineer 
living in Atlanta, Ga. He works as a 
senior project engineer and is involved 
in the design of industrial control 
systems. On Delphi, Don is the Data- 
base Manager of the RAINBOW SIG. His 
Delphi username is DONHUTCHISON. 



28 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



TELEWRITER: UNDISPUTED #1 



If you've read the other word processor ads, 
you've probably had your fill of cold lists of 
features, and claims of ultimate speed, power, 
and ease of use. So let's try to get past the 
overblown claims and empty buzz words— with 2 
simple facts: 

Fact 1: Telewriter is undisputedly the #1 most 
popular word processor on the Tandy Color 
Computers. 

Fact 2: Telewriter's exemplary ease of use and 
power have been acclaimed in numerous maga- 
zine reviews and in thousands of letters and calls 
from end users. 



THE OTHERS DON'T UNDERSTAND 



So why has Telewriter gained such a large and 
loyal following, while other Color Computer 
word processors have come and gone? Ironically, 
our competitors' ads tell you exactly why. 

For them, word processing is nothing more than 
features and numbers. The longer the list of 
features, and the bigger the numbers, the better 
the word processor. Or so they think. 

They just don't understand that power and ease of 
use are not gained by tacking on random features 
or throwing in freebie utilities or forcing you to 
use a cumbersome mouse. 

Real Power, true Ease of Use, and genuine Speed 
can only be attained through thoughtful, logical, 
intelligent design, attention to detail, and a com- 
mitment to the act and the art of writing. That's 
the Telewriter tradition, and that's the reason for 
Telewriter's phenomenal success. 



TELEWRITER-128: INTELLIGENT 
DESIGN PERFECTED 



And now, Telewriter-128, the latest Telewriter, 
uses the added hardware power of the Color 
Computer 3 to bring this intelligent design to its 
logical perfection. 

Telewriter-128 adds unsurpassed speed and 
important new features to the already impressive 
arsenal of Telewriter-64. Not just speed for 
speed's sake, or features for the sake of 
advertising— but speed where it counts and fea- 
tures that make you a more efficient, more effec- 
tive writer. 

Rainbow magazine put it this way: "Tele- 
writer-128 will set the word processing standard 
for the Color Computer 3 because it is so simple 
and user friendly. . . . The 81-page tutorial/user's 
manual is nicely done. It is written in easy to 
understand language but the program itself is so 
easy. . . . Most people will be able to use the 
software right out of the package." 



TELEWRITER-128 OR DESKTOP 
PUBLISHING 



Desktop publishing is nice for adding pictures 
and fancy fonts to newsletters or business 
presentations— but its graphics orientation sacri- 
fices some important capabilities when it comes to 
working with words. 

If your main concern is expressing ideas through 
words (notes, letters, reports, papers, novels, 
etc.), the dedicated word processing power of 
Telewriter-128 still provides the most efficient tool 
for the job. Each tool has its place— desktop 
publishing for striking visuals, Telewriter-128, for 
effective writing. 



TELEWRITER-l 28 OR TELEWRITER-64 



You can no longer afford to be without the ease, 
power, and efficiency, that Telewriter brings to 
everything you write. 



Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 costs 
$79.95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

For the Color Computer 1&2, Telewriter-64 costs 
$59.95 on disk, $49.95 on cassette. 

To order by MasterCard or Visa, 

call (619) 755-1258 anytime, or send check to: 

COGNITEC 

704 Nob Avenue 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

(Add $2 S&H. Californians add 6% tax. To upgrade 
from TW-64 to TW-128 send original TW-64 disk and 
$41.95.) 

Telewriter is also available through your nearby 
Radio Shack Computer Center and participating 
Radio Shack stores and dealers— or order direct 
from Express Order by dialing 1-800-321-3133. 

Ask for: Telewriter-128 (disk) ... cat #90-0909 
Telewriter-64 (disk) .... cat #90-0254 
Telewriter-64 (cass) .... cat #90-0253 



FEATURES THAT MATTER: Telewriter's out- 
standing design and its complete set of features, put 
it in a class by itself, for smooth, efficient writing 
and letter perfect printed documents. Telewriter-128 
includes: 

Unbeatable SCREEN PERFORMANCE: lightning 
fast paging and scrolling, on-screen text that never 
lags behind your typing, and a response that is 
always instantaneous, no matter how much text is in 
the buffer, or where you are in the document. 

26 User definable MACRO KEYS type your often 
used phrases and titles with a single keypress— saving 
you time and freeing your concentration for writing. 
User settable DUAL SPEED CURSOR moves you 
anywhere on the line, on the page, or in the docu- 
ment, fast or slow— you decide, with the touch of a 
finger. Fast PRINT PREVIEW MODE shows you 
text as it will print: headers, footers, margins, page 
breaks, page numbers, justification— saves time and 
paper and guarantees perfect looking documents 
everytime. 

Instant, ON-LINE HELP summarizes all Tele- 
writer-128 commands and special symbols. The On- 
line OPTIONS MENU lets you instantly customize 
the writing environment at any time to suit your 
precise needs (Screen /characler color, Monochrome 
on/off, Key repeat/delay rate, 2 Cursor repeat/delay 
rates, Case-sensitivity of search, Auto file backup 
on/off, and more). A SINGLE FUNCTION KEY 
takes you instantly to any menu, so you never have 
to stop and think. 

The 24, 25 or 28 LINE SCREEN DISPLAY option 
lets you see 16% more on-screen text (28), or wider 
line spacing (25). The auto-loading OPTIONS FILE 
stores all your Macros, Print Format settings, and 
Options Menu settings, so they are always there 
everytime you run Telewriter-128. 3 pop-up STATUS 
WINDOWS tell you cursor position, word count, 



free space, etc. 

The QUICK SAVE feature lets you instantly save 
your current document with just 2 keystrokes and 
without leaving the editor. CURSOR THROUGH 
DIRECTORY to Load, Append, Rename and Kill 
files— so you'll never type a filename after the first 
time. HANGING INDENTS help you organize ideas 
on the page more effectively. Also: Footers, Multiple 
Print, Print to Disk, Key Click, Key Repeat, 40/80 
Column Option, Overstrike, Word Delete, Nested 
Macros, Definable Foreign and Math Symbols and 
more. . . . 

And, of course, Telewriter-128 incorporates all the 
Features of TELEWRITER-64, like: Works with 
absolutely any printer that works with your Color 
Computer (1, 2, or 3). Uses simple Embedded Con- 
trol Codes so all intelligent features of your printer 
are easily accessed, including: Underlining, 
Boldface, variable Fonts, Sub-script, Super-script, 
Italics etc. 

Format commands allow dynamically changing 
Margins, Headers, Spacing, Centering, etc., any- 
where in the document. Format menu sets Margins, 
Spacing, Page numbering, Baud rate, Lines per 
page, Justification. Chain Printing means the size of 
your printed document is unlimited. Also Single 
page and Partial Print. 

Fast full-screen editor with wordwrap, text align- 
ment, block copy/move/deiete, global search and 
replace, wild card search, fast 4-way auto-repeat 
cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward paging, 
settable tabs, word and line counter, full error pro- 
tection. Insert or delete anywhere on screen. Simple, 
easy to remember, "mnemonic" Editor Commands. 
Load, Save, Append, Partial Save files to disk or 
cassette. Kill, rename and list disk files. ASCII file 
compatibility. 



with another computer, you only need 
to run a cable between the two comput- 
ers, using the necessary adapters. In 
addition, these computers will run the 
terminal program of your choice. 

Communicating with Another CoCo 

It is probably easiest to get CoCos to 
communicate with each other because, 
like their owners, CoCos are pretty 
gregarious. They like to get together 
and communicate, especially online on 
Delphi and at RAINBOWfests. They 
even exchange pictures. 

It's a simple matter to connect two 
CoCos by using a cable to connect the 
two serial ports. Just crisscross the 
send-data and receive-data lines. In 
other words, connect the send-data line 
from one CoCo to the receive-data line 
on the other, and vice versa. When one 
CoCo talks on a signal line, the other 
CoCo listens. 

To construct the necessary cable, use 
two four-pin DIN plugs (Part No. 274- 
007) and a suitable length of cable. The 
cable itself is not usually crucial in 
short-to-intermediate lengths, such as 
six to 15 feet. Electrically, the cable 
would follow as shown below: 



CoCo 1 CoCo 2 
Receive Data 2 4 
Signal Ground 3 3 
Transmit Data 4 2 



The Carrier Detect (CD) function. 
Pin 1, is not needed for most CoCo 
terminal programs. Although the pop- 
ular terminal programs GETerm, Mi- 
key term and Rickeyterm do not require 
a carrier detect signal to operate, some 
terminal programs do require the car- 
rier detect line to be active. Because this 
function is normally provided by the 
modem, you must take steps to provide 
the carrier detect signal if you choose to 
use such a terminal program. Usually, 
the CD signal can be activated with a 
signal (such as DTR) that is obtained 
elsewhere. 

After the computers are physically 
connected, simply load and run your 
favorite terminal program on each 
computer. This will allow you to 
transfer files back and forth. Pretty 
simple, huh? 

I generally use the CoCo's standard 
four-pin DIN serial port for this type of 
communication because it is conven- 
ient. The serial port (on any model of 



CoCo) is adequate for the short files I 
transfer, and it usually operates reliably 
at speeds up through 1200 bits per 
second. The CoCo 3 is capable of 
operating at 2400 bits per second 
through the serial port; however, I've 
been able to use only 300-baud com- 
munications under OS-9 because of the 
increased system overhead. 

Remember that several terminal pro- 
grams will automatically sense the 
presence of an RS-232 pack, so remove 
it from your system before running the 
terminal program. GETerm, Mikey- 
term and Rickeyterm all auto sense the 
RS-232 pack. 

Remote Connection under OS-9 

OS-9 offers a unique method for 
connection through the serial port. This 
operating system allows you to use a 
separate terminal (such as a Tandy 102) 
to access OS-9. When you are con- 
nected to OS-9 in this fashion, you can 
type on either the main CoCo keyboard 
or the remote keyboard. OS-9 will 
honor requests from either source. 
Although some things can't be done 
from the remote keyboard (like showing 
windows on a Tandy 102), it's still fun 
to use. 

To link to OS-9, execute the XMode 
utility to configure the serial port for use 
with an external terminal. To configure 
the port for 300-bps, 8-bit, 1 stop bit, 
no parity, just enter the following: 

xmode 'tl type~0 baud=l 

Next, invoke TsMon (the Timesharing 
monitor) with the following line: 

tsmon /tl & 

This tells OS-9 to start up TsMon as a 
concurrent process. At this point, press 
ENTER from the remote terminal or 
keyboard to initiate the OS-9 login 
sequence. If you successfully log in to 
the system, you'll be greeted in the 
following manner: 

WELCOME TO COLOR COMPUTER 

05-9 

059: 

When asked for a username, press 
ENTER again. OS-9 will initiate the 
appropriate steps to enable access to the 
system. 

I've found this a quick and conven- 
ient way to extract text files from an 
OS-9 disk onto another computer. 



Simply display the file(s) by entering the 
LIST command from the remote termi- 
nal or keyboard, and capture the text as 
it's displayed. 

A better way to transfer files to and 
from an OS-9 disk is to use an OS-9 
terminal program like XTerm. This 
method works better because the system 
overhead is too great to allow the 
operating system to service the serial 
port as often as required when using 
TsMon with /tl. The CoCo's serial port 
is not very useful under OS-9 at speeds 
above 300 bits per second. 

This method is useful for those want- 
ing to extract OS-9 text files from their 
CoCos and use them with portable 
computers. It's also convenient for 
those who prefer a Disk BASIC word 
processor like Telewriter. The text files 
can be edited using the method of your 
choice. However, don't forget that it 
isn't possible to transfer OS-9 binary 
files to a portable (or vice versa) and 
expect them to function correctly. 

Using RS-232 Packs 

Because the CoCo uses nonstandard 
connectors for its serial port, we'll need 
to look at ways we can communicate 
with devices that use standard connec- 
tors and interface requirements. I refer 
to the CoCo's serial port because this 
port is not a true RS-232 port. The RS- 
232 standard defines both signal levels 
and the control signals that should be 
present. Fortunately, the serial port is 
compatible enough to let us commun- 
icate with a wide variety of RS-232 
devices. 

It is easy to initiate communication 
between two CoCos if both are using 
RS-232 packs. Rather than using the 
cable described above, you'll use a 
standard RS-232 cable with male DB- 
25 connectors on each end. Your local 
Radio Shack sells the cable (Part No. 
26-1408). Although it is called an RS- 
232-C cable for Model III/ 12, we will 
be able to use it with our CoCos. 

We will also need a small device called 
a null-modem adapter. That's a rather 
intimidating term for a simple adapter 
that is used when no modem is available 
(hence the name null modem). The 
advantage of this device is that you can 
use the cable with your modem when 
communicating with Delphi, then un- 
plug the cable and use it with a null- 
modem adapter to interface with 
another computer. Radio Shack sells a 
suitable null-modem adapter (Part No. 
26-1496) for under $10. 



30 THE RAINBOW November 1988 







§> Ail of our OS -9 products £ 
jj^work with: J 
|j OS-9 version 1 J 
fij OS-9 version 2 f 
fj OS-9 Level 2 £ 



XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program 

• Menu oriented • Definable macro keys 

• Upload/download Ascii • Works with standard serial port, RS232 
or XMODEM protocol Pak, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers 

• Execute OS-9 commands • Works with standard screen, Xscreen 
from within XTERM WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board 

$49.95 with source $89.95 



XDIR & XCAL 



Hierarchial directory OS-9 calculator 

• Full sorting • Decimal, Ilex, Binary 

• Complete pattern matching - + r ,*,/,AN D,OR,XOR,NOT 

$24.95 with source $49.95 



XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 
$34.95 with source $54.95 



HARDWARE 



512k memory upgrade 

Ram Software 
Ram Disk 
Print Spooler 
Quick Backup 



$124.95 



All three for only 
$19.95 



•Software by ColarVenture 







: m 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

• Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

• Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, overstrike, 
underline, super/sub-scripts 

• 10 header/Footers 

• Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

• Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source $49.95 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 

XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 with source $199.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 
$39.95 with source $79.95 



.... ..... j ...... 



•WW 




SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUTING 

This sales-based accounting package is de- 
signed for the non-accountant oriented busi- 
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the accounting oriented user to set up a double 
entry journal with an almost unlimited chart 
of accounts. Includes Sales Entry, transaction 
driven Accounts Receivable and Accounts Pay- 
able, Journal Entry, Payroll Disbursement, 
and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income State- 
ment, Customer and Vender status Reports, 
Accounts Receivable and Payable Aging Re- 
ports, Check Register, Sales Reports, Account 
Status Lists, and a Journal Posting List. 

$79.95 

INVENTORY CONTROUSALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory 
control, with user defined product codes, and 
produce a detailed analysis of the business 1 
sales and the sales force. One may enter/update 
inventory data, enter sales, run five sales anal- 
ysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter/update salesman records, 
and update the SBAP inventory. 

$59.95 





PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and 
payroll data for up to 200 hourly and salar- 
ied employees with 8 deductions each. Cal- 
culates payroll and tax amounts, prints 
checks and maintains year-to-date totals 
which can be automatically transferred to 
the SB A package. Computes each pay peri- 
od's totals for straight time, overtime and 
bonus pay and determines taxes to be with- 
held. Aditional outputs include mailing list, 
listing of employees, year-to-date federal 
and/or state tax listing, and a listing of cur- 
rent misc. deductions. Suited for use in all 
states except Oklahoma and Delaware 

$59.95 



PERSONAL BOOKKEEPING 2000 
Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense catego- 
ries. Menu driven and user friendly. 

$39.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history 
reports for each customer, perpares in- 
voices and monthly statements, mailing la- 
bels, aging lists, and an alphabetized cus- 
tomer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance 
charges for revolving accounts. This pack- 
age functions as a standalone A/R system or 
integrates with the Small Business Accting 
package. 

$59.95 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor 
and A/P invoice files. The system prints 
checks, voids checks, cancels checks, de- 
letes cancelled checks, and deletes paid A/P 
invoices. The user can run a Vendor List, 
Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged report, 
and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P sys- 
tem or can be integrated with the Small 
Business Accounting Package. 

$59.95 






MuterCud 



Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales lax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $3.50), personal checks. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 
OS~9 is a trademark of Aficraware ' .' . 






A null-modem adapter is just a small 
box with a DB-25 connector on each 
end and some internal wiring to facil- 
itate communication between two de- 
vices. The adapter connects the neces- 
sary control signals of each computer to 
simulate a connection with a modem or 
other DCE device. Additionally, the 
adapter crisscrosses the send-data and 
receive-data lines so each computer can 
send and receive data on the approp- 
riate lines. Without this adapter, things 
would be a bit more complicated. 

To use this adapter, plug one end of 
the RS-232 cable into one of the RS-232 
packs, plug the other end into the null- 
modem adapter, and insert the adapter 
into the second RS-232 pack. Crank up 
your favorite terminal program on each 
computer, and the two computers are 
directly connected and ready to com- 
municate. 

Different Computers 

Most computers use a standard DB- 
25 connector to interface with the 
outside world. This is what I use when 
I want my Tandy 102 to talk to my 
Color Computer. To connect another 
computer to the CoCo's serial port, 
we'll need to construct a suitable cable. 
Specifically, we'll need a CoCo four-pin 
DIN plug on one end of the cable and 
a standard male DB-25 connector on 
the other end. 

It is sometimes possible to find a 
usable cable at your local Radio Shack, 
but it is no longer a standard catalog 
item. If you choose to construct your 
own cable, here is the necessary equip- 
ment: 



Function 

Carrier Detect 
Receive Data 
Signal Ground 
Transmit Data 



CoCo 
DIN 

Plug 

1 

2 
3 
4 



DB-25 

Connector 

3 
7 
2 



The Tandy 102, like many other 
computers, uses a maximum of seven 
pins in its RS-232-C interface port. The 
additional functions of Request to Send 
(RTS), Clear to Send (CTS) and Data 
Terminal Ready (DTR) are seldom 
required for the simple communications 
interfaces we're using. When we use a 
true RS-232 port, however, these sig- 
nals must be properly connected. This 



is the function of the null-modem adap- 
ter. 

You'll find some variation between 
the different computers regarding re- 
quired control signals, so it's always 
best to consult the owners manual for 
each machine. If the other computer 
simply refuses to begin communication 
with the CoCo, experiment by connect- 
ing the DB-25 connector's Pin 20 to Pin 
8. This sometimes forces the other 
computer to acknowledge a carrier 
detect signal, which in turn allows it to 
function correctly. Your owners manual 
should explain this. 

As we did earlier, connect the two 
computers with the cable and null- 
modem adapter. Plug the DB-25 con- 
nector into the null-modem adapter, 
and plug the adapter into the other 
computer. Insert the four-pin plug into 
the CoCo's serial port and start up the 
appropriate terminal software for each 
computer. 

If you choose to use your RS-232 
pack to talk with the other computer, 
simply use the RS-232 cable and null- 
modem adapter as you would when 
using two RS-232 packs. 

MS-DOS Machines 

Interfacing to the PC-compatible 
machines involves a little trick, but the 
technique is still nothing exotic. Be- 
cause the PC compatibles use a male 
DB-25 connector rather than a female 
connector for the RS-232 port on the 
rear of the computer, you must pur- 
chase a "gender-changer" adapter, 
which is available from Radio Shack for 
$7.95 (Part No. 26-1495). Use this with 
the null-modem adapter and either of 
the cables described (depending upon 
your particular hardware). 

The shareware program, ProComm, 
is probably the most popular terminal 
program for the MS-DOS engines, yet 
it requires a little trickery to get it to 
work without a modem. We need to 
convince the terminal program that the 
carrier detect is active (as it would be if 
we were using a modem). 

The easiest way to do this is to install 
a jumper from Pin 8 to Pin 20 inside the 
cable connector attached to the PC 
compatible. This jumper connects the 
DTR line from the PC compatible 
(normal when using ProComm) to the 
carrier detect (CD) input. At this point, 
ProComm is ready to communicate 
with the other computer. This type of 
trickery may be required when using 



other PC terminal programs as well. 
Check the documentation to be sure. 

General Notes 

Of course, hardware hackers will 
notice that a null-modem adapter could 
be incorporated into the design of the 
cable, and that a gender-changer isn't 
required for use with MS-DOS ma- 
chines if you choose to replace one 
connector with another. However, the 
intent here is to use standard adapters 
and make the techniques available to 
most users. 

If you plan on interfacing with a lot 
of other computers, I recommend that 
you purchase an RS-232 Mini-Tester 
from Radio Shack. This small unit, 
priced at $14.95, is a great time-saver. 
It gives a quick visual indication of the 
state of each line in the RS-232 interface 
using red and green LEDs. 

It's usually wise to use terminal 
settings of 8-bit, 1 stop bit and no parity 
on each computer, because some termi- 
nal programs will not automatically 
adjust to these settings before beginning 
a file transfer. (These settings are re- 
quired when using the popular file 
transfer protocol, Xmodem.) You must 
also use the same baud-rate setting 
between the two computers, or com- 
munications will be totally garbled and 
impossible. 

Half-duplex operation is usually 
preferred, especially if two computer 
operators will be typing back and forth 
to each other. In half-duplex mode, the 
terminal software will echo each key- 
stroke to its operator. On the other 
hand, if the computer is operating in 
full-duplex mode, the operators will 
type blind because they will have no way 
of seeing the characters they are typing. 

If the two computer operators intend 
to type to each other, it's also wise to 
adjust the terminal settings to insert- 
linefeeds mode. If this isn't done, the 
lines may overwrite each other on the 
screen. The documentation for the 
particular terminal program will ex- 
plain how to do this. 

Finally, use protocol transfers when- 
ever possible. Even when transferring 
ASCII text files, it's best to use an error- 
checking protocol such as Xmodem to 
provide maximum protection from 
errors. 

Now you can connect your CoCo to 
your PC compatible. Enjoy the benefits 
of both machines with a wider selection 
of files. /^\ 



32 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Delph i Bur e au 



Effective this issue, I will be as- 
suming responsibility for "Del- 
phi Bureau" from Cray Augs- 
burg (CRAY). Cray has been writing the 
column since April, 1986, and now 
retires with our thanks. Don't worry. 
Cray will remain as the technical liaison 
between Delphi and THE RAINBOW. If 
you have a topic that you would like 
covered in this column, please contact 
me through Delphi's Mail system under 
the username donhutchison. 

Person To Person 

Delphi's newest SIG, Person To Per- 
son, is now open. This newest SIG is 
intended as a place for people to meet. 
It is accessible from the Entertainment 
menu, and can be found by typing GO 
ENT PER from almost anywhere in the 
Delphi system. SigOp Shannon Yoffe 
(SHANNONY) cordially invites everyone 
to stop by. Just sit anywhere. 

One of the features of Person To 
Person will be the photo library. We're 
encouraging our members to post pic- 
tures of themselves in the database for 
others to view. Naturally, not everyone 
can digitize his or her own picture, so 
we have arranged for that to be handled 
for you. James Farmer (MODEMMAS- 
TER) will be more than happy to digitize 
your photo and post it in the SIG's 
database. James just needs a good 
photograph (the bigger the better), and 
he'll take it from there. Send your photo 
to James Farmer, 5311 Barwick Road, 
N. Charleston, SC 29418. If you want 
your photo returned, please include an 
SASE suitable for photos. Remember 
to add at least one sheet of cardboard 
or some other stiff material so your 
photo won't get crushed or bent in the 
mail. 

James also invites calls from those 
who want more information about 
digitizing. You may contact him at (803) 
552-2837. Please remember that this is 
in the Eastern time zone, and avoid 
calling during odd hours. 

The Portable Place 

After a bit of restructuring, the Port- 
able Place is now open under the spon- 

Don Hutchison is an electrical engineer 
and lives in Atlanta, Georgia. He works 
as a senior project engineer involved in 
the design of industrial control systems. 
On Delphi, Don is the Database Man- 
ager of the RAINBOW Co Co SIG. His 
Delphi username is DONHUTCHISON. 



New faces, new places 
and a discussion on 
computer viruses 



these files each month in a special topic 
of the database, where they will be 
available for instant access via down- 
loading. These programs will each carry 
a $3 surcharge. 



Haven't I 
Seen You 
Before? 

By Don Hutchison 

Rainbow CoCo SIG Database Manager 

sorship of PCM. The Portable Place 
is dedicated to laptop computers such 
as the Tandy Model 100/102, 200 and 
600, and the NEC portables. SIG 
staffers include Marty Goodman 
(MARTYGOODMAN) as house doctor, 
Jim Reed (J1MREED) as key grip 
and me as chief engineer. We cordi- 
ally invite you to stop by. 

In cooperation with PCM, THE rain- 
bow's sister publication, we will have 
available the programs for portables 
from PCM ON DISK. We plan to post 



View Master 

David Mills (DAVIDMILLS) has 
posted an outstanding graphics-viewing 
utility on the CoCo SIG. David's pro- 
gram, View Master, allows a CoCo 3 
user to view most popular types of 
pictures using a single program. No 
more scrambling around when you 
want to view a particular picture — just 
run View Master. Look for it in the 
CoCo 3 Graphics topic of the CoCo 
SIG's database, and in the General topic 
of the database inside People To People. 

Viruses 

Lately, there has been a lot of pub- 
licity about the computer hazards 
known as viruses, time bombs, Trojan 
horses, etc. Do viruses really exist? 

Yes, definitely. Some, of course, are 
tamer than others. We've all heard 
stories about a bank programmer who 
installed a short program into the 
bank's system which transferred 
fractional-cent values into his own 
account. When discovered, he had more 
than $30,000 in his account, which had 
accrued simply from the interest calcu- 
lations on passbook savings accounts. 



Database Report 



The General Information topic of 
the database includes Chris Burke 
(COCOXT), who uploaded a product 
announcement for Burke & Burke's 
new RSB (which lets you run Disk 
BASIC programs under OS-9 Level II), 
and Brian Wright (POLTERGEIST), 
who uploaded a text file that describes 
some bugs in the Microware C com- 
piler. 

In the Applications topic of the 
database, Paul Jerkatis (MITHELEN) 
posted a StarTrek program in BASIC09. 
Robert Grubb (GRUBBY) uploaded a 
BASIC09 program for determining loan 
payoffs, and Steve Clark (STEVE- 
CLARK) posted an electronic mail 
system — including the source code. 

In the Utilities topic, Brian Wright 
provided us with a disk editor for OS- 
9 Level II, which was written by Pete 



Lyall. Jeff Blower (SEBJMB) posted 
Set Color, a utility that enables the 
user to change foreground, back- 
ground and border colors by pressing 
a single key. Mike Stute (GRIDBUG) 
posted a clever utility called Insulter, 
which randomly displays insults to the 
user, and Brian White (BRIANWHITE) 
sent us a program that will duplicate 
a file or directory at another location 
on the same device. It uses an OS-9 
feature not implemented by other 
commands. 

Brian Wright also uploaded a text 
file by Pete Lyall in the Patches topic 
of the database. This file describes 
how to modify the RS-232 pack to 
enhance telecommunications or use 
with an external terminal. Brian 
posted another file from Pete Lyall 
that will patch RCIRPAK's variable 



November 1 988 THE RAINBOW 33 



However, authors of viruses for per- 
sonal computer systems are probably 
out to destroy your data. 

Just what are these things, and what 
can we do about them? 

A computer virus is usually a small 
program that is hidden in some manner. 
(It may even be a part of a larger, 
innocent-looking Trojan horse pro- 
gram. An earlier name for computer 



space to allow more efficient I/O at 
speeds above 1200 bps. Merle Kem- 
merly (TOOK3) posted a patch, for 
flCIflPflK under Level II, that increases 
the input buffer to 140 bytes to help 
those operating at the faster baud 
rates. Dave Philipsen (DPHILIPSEN) 
posted a file to fix the seven-bit Xmo- 
dem bug in version 1.0 of the terminal 
program, SuperComm. For the Mi- 
croscopic Mission game Robert 
Grubb posted a patch file that allows 
the game to run from the current 
execution directory. (This also allows 
it to run from a hard disk.) Larry 
Oheron (LOHERON) sent us a file de- 
scribing how to set up DeskMate 3 to 
run from a single disk. 

The Telcom topic gives us Merle 
Kemmerly, who uploaded Version 3.2 
of the popular terminal program Tel- 
star, Jim Hollier (PGJIM), who posted 
Version 3. 1 of Jterm\ and Dave Phi- 
lipsen, who uploaded SuperComm. 

In the Graphics & Music topic, 
Mike Knudsen (ragtimer) uploaded 
his arrangement of a familiar tune. 
Dennis Weldy (OS9ER) uploaded a 
revised version of QuadDump, a printer 
driver for the Quad Jet color printer. 
Steve Clark posted a tongue-in-cheek 
drawing of the Color Computer and 
its Multi-Pak Interface. 

The Programmers Den topic in- 
cludes Brian Wright, who uploaded a 
file that describes the inner workings 
of the Citadel BBS package and the 
source code for that package. Mike 
Stute uploaded Part 2 of the C stand- 
ard library. 

In the Tutorials & Education topic, 
Mike Stute sent us an article on dy- 
namic allocation and doubly linked 
lists. Brian Wright uploaded a tutorial 
on OS-9 concepts, while Andrew 
Ellinor (CROPPER) sent us his text file 
containing an introduction to OS-9. 
Kevin Darling (kdarling) posted a 
text file concerning the Multi-Pak 
Interface and the Deluxe RS-232 Pak. 

CoCo SIG 
In the CoCo 3 Graphics topic, Mark 



viruses was worms.) A virus has the 
ability to duplicate itself and to travel 
to another computer through the 
transfer of disks or by electronic means. 
It may have the ability to hide within 
your computer for days, months or even 
years before activating itself. Maintain- 
ing good backup procedures doesn't 
prevent viral spread, because a timed 
release virus can also be in the backup 



Garbarini (F19) posted a picture of a 
sunset. I uploaded the CoCo Gallery 
Live pictures from the Chicago RAIN- 
BOWfest. Donald Ricketts (STEVEPDX) 
uploaded approximately 60 digitized 
images that he had converted from 
DS-69B format into CoCo Max 3 
files. Donald's pictures are always 
quite popular. David Mills posted a 
very popular viewing utility that will 
allow its user to view all major types 
of picture files. David also uploaded 
another adult picture from Brad 
Bansner, John Barrett (JBARRETT) 
posted several pictures of his favorite 
rally cars, and Richard Trasborg 
(TRAS) uploaded over one megabyte 
of clip art for use with Max-10. These 
files, drawn by Mike Trammell, have 
been very popular. 

The Source for 6809 Assemblers 
topic of the database gives us Mike 
Ward (mikeward) uploading the 
source code that details how to per- 
form disk I/O from assembly lan- 
guage. This file will be extremely 
popular with all aspiring assembly 
language programmers. 

In the Utilities & Applications 
topic, Stephen Macri (DRACMAN) 
uploaded his Alicia Calendars pro- 
grams. Robert Pierce (RPIERCE) 
posted a revised version of his popular 
disk editor and a 51-by-24 Hi-Res 
screen driver for the CoCo 1 and 2. 
Tom Wyrick (WYRICK) uploaded a 
program to assist in converting CoCo 
BASIC programs into IBM-compatible 
ones. Mike Sweet (DODGECOLT) sent 
us his favorite disk editor, and Jim 
Shoop (BAZAR) uploaded a patch for 
MAX-10 to eliminate the need to use 
the "clicker. M While Brian White 
posted a high-speed disk backup util- 
ity, Pierre Salvail (PSALVAIL) sent us 
a useful smooth-scrolling utility for 
the CoCo 3. Seth Short (SETHSHORT) 
provided a universal picture conver- 
sion utility. Fred McDonald (FRED- 
MCD) sent us a program for printing 
large banners on your printer and a 
search program for cross-referencing 
BASIC programs. Richard Trasborg 



disk or tape. Therefore, the virus is 
capable of destroying your data time 
after time. 

Although Trojan horses are usually 
programs designed to transmit a virus 
into computer systems, they may be 
destructive programs on their own. Just 
as the ancient Greeks captured Troy by 
hiding hundreds of soldiers inside an 
innocent-looking wooden horse, such a 



uploaded a VCR tape-cataloging pro- 
gram written by his wife. Finally, Billy 
Passauer (indianabill) uploaded 
Version 1.5 of the File Copy Express, 
a utility that allows wildcards during 
the copy operation. 

In the Hardware Hacking topic, 
Marty Goodman sent us a file describ- 
ing a bug in the RS-232 Pak and how 
to fix it. Bob Smith (HIBARBAREE) 
sent us a file describing how to use a 
Diablo printer with the CoCo, and 
Robert Pierce sent us a CoCo Max 3 
picture containing a CoCo 3 memory 
map. 

The Games topic includes Colin 
McKay (COLINKCKAY), who uploaded 
his Racko and Sea Battle games, and 
Tom Wyrick, who posted a dart game 
and a Wild Party game. 

In the Classic Graphics topic of the 
database, Tom Wyrick uploaded his 
graphics editor, and I was busy post- 
ing the CoCo Gallery pictures for 
September '88, as well as those pub- 
lished from October '85 to May '86. 

The Music & Sound topic gives us 
Mike Carey (SPOOLFRAME), who up- 
loaded fifteen more of his very popular 
Lyra files, and Mike Stute, who posted 
two more of his personal favorites. 

In the Product Reviews & An- 
nouncements topic, Chris Burke up- 
loaded a product announcement for 
the new Burke & Burke RSB. Donald 
Ricketts posted his review of the CoCo 
3 version of VIP Database. 

In the Data Communications topic, 
Tom Wyrick uploaded a data com- 
munications course composed of sev- 
eral BASIC programs, and a driver 
package for would-be BBS SysOps. 
Robert Combs (ROBCOMBS) uploaded 
two versions of Phone Clone, one for 
each model of CoCo 3. Rob also sent 
us MultiLink, a program to link the 
serial port with an RS-232 pack and 
enter a CB mode. Donald Ricketts 
uploaded a patch for Ultimaterm to 
adjust the program for 40-track disks. 



34 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



program can wreak havoc within your 
system. 

Another hazard, the time bomb, is a 
program that blows up a computer 
system after a certain interval of time 
following its installation. A pro- 
grammer who was fired from a com- 
pany might leave such a bomb in the 
system as a form of revenge. These 
bombs may do relatively simple things 
(like displaying a clever message on the 
programmer's birthday), or they may 
maliciously destroy thousands of im- 
portant records. Some time bombs will 
activate themselves at repeatable inter- 
vals (like every two or four days after 
a disk has been infected). The results are 
varied, but they may include any of the 
following: printer/display problems, 
system crashes, or the malfunction of 
peripherals. 

Viruses have been reported for all 
major brands of computers. Currently, 
those with IBM compatibles are the 
most vulnerable, but the potential 
threat is very real. One factor on our 
side is that viruses must be specific to 
the particular machine. (For example, 
an IBM virus cannot install itself into 
a CoCo environment.) 



In practice, a user is not totally safe 
unless he never uses his computer. The 
possibility of a computer viral infection 
cannot be completely eliminated. 

While there are all sorts of infectious 
agents that can invade your computer, 
the CoCo is more resistant to such 
attacks than many other machines. 
Because the CoCo uses a ROM-based 
operating system and the system exists 
as unalterable firmware, permanent 
change is virtually impossible. This 
provides a great deal of security for 
most CoCo users. 

The CoCo 3 is a slightly different case 
since the operating system is transferred 
to RAM at start-up. This makes it 
vulnerable to modification by a virus 
program. It would be rather easy, for 
example, to patch the CoCo 3's operat- 
ing system and destroy the allocation 
tables and/ or directory of a disk after 
a certain time or after a certain number 
of disk accesses. Fortunately, the CoCo 
3's operating system is "refreshed" at 
each cold start, so a virus couldn't live 
permanently in this system as it could 
on other systems. 

Those of you using OS-9, however, 
are susceptible to viral infection. Be- 



cause OS-9 is a disk-based operating 
system, it is as vulnerable as MS-DOS 
or any other disk-based operating sys- 
tem. At present, there are no authenti- 
cated reports of a CoCo OS-9 virus. 
Much of this can be attributed to the 
CoCo OS-9 user, who is usually more 
interested in the operating system itself 
rather than in childishly damaging 
someone else's system. 

Although real viruses have been 
created for MS-DOS machines, these 
are somewhat rare. Generally, when 
someone thinks a problem is due to a 
virus, it is actually due to software 
misuse, damaged software or a hard- 
ware failure of some sort. 

Since viruses can be created to merge 
with and contaminate the operating 
system in any of a number of ways, there 
does not seem to be any practical means 
of "protecting" our users against possi- 
ble viruses. All we can do is carefully 
examine any report of problems that 
might be associated with a program 
someone has downloaded from the 
database. Please notify the SIG staff if 
you suspect a program may be other 
than what it appears. We'll all be glad 
to help out. 

See you online on Delphi! /R\ 



The CoCo XT and CoCo XT-RTC Hard Disk Interfaces 



The CoCo XT interface uses advanced "NO HALT* hard disk controllers, which do not haft your CoCo and do not disable or use interrupts during hard 
disk access. You get full type-ahead, and the system clock does not lose time during hard disk access. Fully compatible with most RS-232 expansion 
ports! 

Great for Multi-User Systems 

The CoCo XT hard disk interface lets you connect up to 2 low cost, PC compatible 5-120 Megabyte capacity hard drives to your CoCo. You buy the 
drive, Western Digital WD1002-WX1 or WD1002-27X (RLL) controller, and a case from the PC dealer of your choice. Just plug them into the CoCo XT, 
plug the CoCo XT into your Multi-PAK, and you have a 20 Meg OS9 hard disk system tor under $4501 

We've sold hundreds of these affordable, high-performance hard disk interfaces to a very hot Color Computer market in a single year! This year, 
1988, is 'The Year of the Hard Disk" at Burke & Burke. 

CoCo XT (with anodized housing, 60 page user manual, hard disk back-up utility and new, Version 2.3 drivers for use with both HYPER-I/O and OS9) 
$69.95. 

CoCo XT-RTC (same features as the CoCo XT, and includes a real-time clock / calendar with battery backup) - $99.95 

THE PROFESSIONAL TOUCH: XT-ROM - Automatically boots and reboots OS9 from hard disk. Installs in your hard disk controller's BIOS ROM 
socket - $19.95. 

HYPER-I/O: BASIC runs hard drives, big floppies, and more! 



You or someone that you know may have the 35 Track Blues, ft strikes hundreds of CoCo users every year. One day you wake up, and say to yourself, 
'These 35 track floppy disks are just too small." There's only one cure. More storage. Get it. With HYPER-I/O, from Burke & Burke. 



Now compatible with DISTO and LR Hard Disks 



HYPER-I/O modifies the RS-DOS Disk BASIC in your CoCo 1, 2, or 3 to provide a "Dynamic Disk Interface". Use your existing BASIC and RS-DOS 
software with hard disk interfaces (CoCo XT, DISTO, LR), RAM Disks, and any mix of floppy drives from 160K to 720K each. Fully RESET protected, 
user configurable, expandable, OS9 compatible, EPROM-able HYPER-I/O is becoming the system of choice for the CoCo 1, CoCo 2, and CoCo 3. 
HYPER-I/O Version 2.6 now available only $29.95. HYPER-UI (RAM Disk and Print Spooler for CoCo 3 HYPER-I/O) --$19.95 



^IL d & ™ ers,on 2 1 Use VvildcardsM Check out these OS9 Utilities 

with most OS9 commands, or rearrange your _ , ' , „ • 
directory tree. Features recursive directory 700/9 '° te ' you spend te9S Ume f, * Mina oss ' 
searches. A hard disk must! $19.95 



and more time using ft. 



EZGen Version 1.04 Powerful OS9 
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ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 7% SALES TAX. 
COD's add $2.20. Shipping (within the USA) $2.00 per 
CoCo XT; $1.50 per disk or ROM. Please allow 2 weeks 
for delivery (overnight delivery also available for in-stock 

items). Telephone orders accepted (312)397-2698. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL J 

wmmmsr 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 35 



1 Feature 



You see the glamour, let me tell you about the work . . . 



So You Want to Be a SysOp 



By Dave Jenkins 




Many bulletin board users consider 
becoming a System Operator 
(SysOp), and some will start BBSs. 
Often, however, these new SysOps grow 
discouraged by the unanticipated problems 
and time demands of a properly running 
BBS. This article is intended to help the 
prospective SysOp make an intelligent 
decision. 

As a potential SysOp, you must have the 
right personality and experience before 
going online. You need the patience to 
answer questions from users. Perhaps 
you've answered that same question a 
hundred Limes before, but the person asking 
doesn't know tftst. You also need to know 
how to program, and how to use such things 
as a disk /.upper. A little electronics knowl 
edge can also be helpful. 

You should have plenty of spare time 
being a good SysOp takes a lot of time. I 
spend about an hour a day working the 
system, and an additional two or three hours 
updating files on Sunday mornings. Because 
most people don't have a large enough 
system to adequately run a BBS, you may 
need to update your equipment, so you'll 
need some money. You'll also need a second 
telephone line, which (depending on 
where you five} can be expensive. 

Before you decide to put a BBS on- 
line, you should ask yourself if you 
really want to do this. Don't an- 
swer too quickly. Remember 



J 



Dave Jenkins is an engineer at 
WNIN-TV I FM in Evans- 
ville, Ind. He has been a 
System Operator for four 
years and is BBS section 
leader on Compu Serve 's 
Co Co Forum. 




— ^ 




36 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



that your computer will be tied up while 
the BBS is online. When you want to use 
the computer, someone will probably be 
online. If you are into gaming, or use 
your computer for many other things, 
you will probably regret starting a BBS. 

You must also remember that most 
areas have several BBSs. If you want to 
be a success, you must find a need and 
fill it. Don't duplicate the other BBSs in 
your area. Find out what is needed in 
the community and do that. For in- 
stance, in my area no BBS supported 
graphics in a format that several com- 
puters could use. I started putting RLE 
(run length encoded) graphics online. 
These can be viewed by almost all the 
popular home computers. This has been 
very popular, and other BBSs in town 
have started posting RLE graphics as 
well. You might also want to offer 
online games, role playing games, spe- 
cialized message bases or downloads. 

Choosing Hardware and Software 

You need to decide what hardware 
and software to use. If you have a spare 
computer system sitting around gather- 
ing dust, it would be a prime candidate 
to run your BBS. I don't suggest putting 
new hardware online until you are 



certain that it works properly. An online 
BBS is a poor place to discover manu- 
facturing defects. 

If your software supports it, I recom- 
mend going with a 300/ 1200-baud 
modem. The 1200-baud modems cost 
less than 300-baud modems did just a 
few years ago. About one-third of the 
users on my system are 1200 baud, and 
more are moving in that direction. (In 
fact, if your hardware and budget can 
support it, I would go with 2400-baud 
service.) You should support at least 
300- and 1200-baud modems. Get a 
fully Hayes-compatible modem. The 
Hayes command set has become a de 
facto standard among modems, and it 
cannot hurt to follow the standard. You 
may be able to get by without it, but it 
may hinder a future upgrade. It is 
cheaper to buy it now than to buy a 
second modem later. 

You can find BBS software in two 
ways: shop for commercial BBS soft- 
ware or download free BBS software 
from Delphi or other networks. In 
either situation, talk to SysOps who use 
the software for an accurate judgment 
of the software's quality. Software sold 
commercially is not necessarily bug- 
free. Call running BBSs to get a feel for 



the software from a user's standpoint. 
No matter how you find the software to 
run your BBS, it should support Xmo- 
dem up- and downloading. Your system 
will be severely restricted without it. 

A good BBS should have at least four 
drives. Although I have run systems 
with two drives, and you can start at 
that point, you should expand to as 
many drives as possible. No BBS in 
existence has too much storage space. 
The more you have, the more you can 
offer your users. Plan to continue 
upgrading your system. 

A 64K CoCo makes an excellent BBS 
computer, particularly when it is outfit- 
ted with the RS-232 pack. A 512K 
CoCo 3, which allows two RAM disks 
online, is also an excellent choice. My 
system is a 512K CoCo 3 with a Multi- 
Pak Interface, an RS-232 pack, four 
floppy drives and an Avatex 1200 
modem. My future upgrades will in- 
clude moving to either double-sided or 
quad-density disk drives and the OS-9 
operating system. The upgrading never 
ends. 

You might want to buy a used system 
from someone for your BBS. If you can 
find the right package deal, you can get 
a system going for a reasonable price 



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November 1988 THE RAINBOW 37 



and keep your CoCo as your main 
computer. Don't rule out systems from 
other manufacturers. You might find a 
great bargain and learn something in 
the process. 

Getting a Telephone Line 

Many new SysOps try to begin run- 
ning their BBS on their residence tele- 
phone line. I do not recommend this 
practice. Some users will ignore or 
forget your hours of operation and call 
when the BBS is down. And, while your 
BBS is online, no one can call you. 

Telephone company rules vary widely 
from area to area. Some companies try 
to charge BBSs business rates instead of 
residential rates. Try to get measured 
service for your BBS line. Measured 
service limits the number of free outgo- 
ing calls and adds a surcharge for each 
call made beyond that number. Since 
most, if not all, calls will be incoming, 
this should not be a problem. Please 
remember that some telephone com- 
panies will not allow a measured service 
line in your home if you also have a 
standard line. 

You can save money on installation 
if you can do your own interior wiring. 
Telephone wiring is not difficult. There 
are several books available that explain 
how it is done. Our telephone company 
charges $36 an hour for installation, so 
it pays to learn how to do your own 
wiring. 

Before going online, you must also 
decide whether or not your BBS is free 
to the user. Charging for access creates 
other considerations. Every subscrip- 
tion BBS SysOp I have talked to has 
problems with users sharing one pass- 
word. I know of no solution to this 
problem except charging for connect 
time. You will also have to take care of 
bookkeeping and keep track of sub- 
scription expiration dates. If you charge 
for access, the telephone company may 
also consider your BBS a business and 
charge you business phone rates. 

Require that callers use their full 
names online. While handles can be fun, 
they can create a lot of problems. Most 
BBSs in my area that allowed handles 
didn't stay online very long because of 
troublemakers who hid behind the 
handle. Requiring full names reduces 
problems. 

Ready to Go Online 

Let's assume that you have the hard- 
ware and software ready and the tele- 
phone line is installed. You're ready to 
go online. What problems can you 
anticipate? 



First, you can expect hardware prob- 
lems. Running a BBS puts a heavy 
strain on your equipment. Expect to 
have your disk drives aligned and 
cleaned at least once a year. The drives 
are the weakest point in your system 
because they are the only mechanical 
part. The rest of your system is elec- 
tronic and should be fairly reliable, 
unless there is a lightning strike, over- 
heating, or some other severe condition. 

Get surge protectors for the power 
and telephone lines coming into your 
system. These devices may cost you $50 
to $75, but the insurance is worth the 
investment. If it saves you from just one 
lightning strike, a surge protector will 
have paid for itself. 

Your computer should not share an 
electric circuit with a heavy-duty ap- 
pliance (i.e., your refrigerator, washer 
or dryer). These devices draw a large 
amount of current when starting, which 
reduces voltage and could cause a crash. 
You might also look into ventilating 
fans for the computer, especially during 
the summer in a room without air 
conditioning. Never cover the ventila- 
tion areas while the computer is on. 

Unless you absolutely need it on, turn 
your monitor or TV off while the BBS 
is in operation. The screen images can 
burn into the CRT. This damage is 
permanent, expensive to repair and 
completely avoidable. One SysOp I 
know bought a used black and white TV 
to use as a monitor. It made an adequate 
picture, cost little and was a good choice 
for the purpose. He left it on all the time, 
but since it cost so little, he didn't care 
about raster burn. 

A little electronics knowledge can 
help keep you online. For instance, if 
parts have visible damage (charring or 
swelling), knowing how to pull the 
cover off the equipment, recognize a 
damaged part and replace it can save 
you money and keep you online. 

Develop a good relationship with the 
service manager at the nearest Radio 
Shack Computer Center. If your prob- 
lem is relatively simple to fix and you 
bring the unit in for repair, the service 
manager may expedite the repairs for 
you. Be subtle when you make such a 
request. Instead of applying pressure, 
tell the manager that your BBS is down 
and that you need your equipment back 
as soon as possible. If you have a good 
relationship with the service center (and 
the shop is not overloaded) your repairs 
may be moved ahead. Remember, 
though, we all feel that our repairs are 
top priority, and sometimes we may 
have to accept the wait. 



Preventive maintenance is also im- 
portant. Every week, you should clean 
your edge connectors and your drive 
heads to prevent corrosion. Radio 
Shack chose not to use gold edge con- 
nectors. You'll need to turn off every- 
thing, take the disk controller apart and 
clean all the edge connectors by rubbing 
them gently with a pencil eraser. Do the 
same on the back of your drives. Clean 
your drive heads with a wet head- 
cleaning system. (The dry cleaners are 
abrasive and their use will shorten head 
life considerably.) 

Protecting Yourself From Trouble 

You have certain legal obligations as 
a SysOp. You are responsible for the 
messages posted on your BBS. Two 
SysOps in my area were convicted for 
allowing telephone access codes to be 
posted. Not only did they face jail 
sentences, they also had to pay thou- 
sands of dollars in legal bills and had to 
pay the telephone company involved 
$3,000 in restitution. Unless you like the 
idea of going to jail for your hobby, 
avoid posting credit card numbers and 
telephone access codes. 

If you decide to post downloads, only 
post software and material that you 
know are either public domain or free- 
ware. You may not post any of the 
following: software from magazines like 
THE rainbow, commercial software 
and copyright software not authorized 
to be posted by the author. Many people 
believe that if they download something 
from another BBS, they may post it on 
their own system. That is not true. It is 
entirely possible that a SysOp could be 
held responsible for lost sales if software 
is illegally posted. The risks involved are 
not worth the effort. Do not post any- 
thing uploaded to your BBS until you 
are sure you have the right to do so. 

When uploading, watch for a Trojan 
horse. This is software disguised as one 
thing that is designed to do another — 
usually erase your disks. I have not run 
into this problem in the CoCo BBSs, 
but there are some nasty programs 
floating around the MS-DOS world. 
Test the upload thoroughly before 
posting it. Don't post anything that you 
have not personally run, unless you are 
confident of the source. 

If you wish to post a file from one of 
the commercial online services (like 
Delphi) check with the service in ques- 
tion regarding its policies. If it finds that 
you are violating its rules, your mem- 
bership can be revoked. 

Try to establish friendly relations 
with other local SysOps. In our area, we 



38 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



have formed a Council of SysOps. The 
purpose is to share information on 
problem users. In extreme instances, a 
user could be booted off every member 
system in town. We have no actual 
meetings. One of the boards has a 
message base restricted to SysOps, and 
we share information there. Don't war 
with other SysOps, if it can be avoided. 
Cooperation can help everyone. 

I don't have a hard and fast rule about 
verifying users. My area doesn't have 
many problem users, (and the Council 
of SysOps keeps everyone informed 
about troublemakers) so I don't voice- 
verify unless something raises my sus- 
picions. All users must leave their full 
names and addresses to gain access. Of 
course, someone could leave a phony 
name and address, and unless you verify 
you won't know. 

You should make daily backups of 
your online disks. Sooner or later you 
will have a disk crash. I had a power line 
surge that wiped out all my online disks. 
Fortunately, I had backups from the 
previous night, so I went to those and 
left a message about "stepping into the 
BBS zone, moving back in time to 
yesterday." It is bad enough to have to 
use your backups, but it is embarrassing 



if your backups are a few days — or 
even weeks — old. Before going to bed, 
back up your disks. It is not a matter 
of // you will have a crash, but when. 
You will have a disk crash sooner or 
later. 

Disks wear out. You can save a few 
pennies by buying bulk disks, but I have 
found that many of these wear out 
quickly. Computers are such popular 
items that discount stores often sell 
brand-name disks for as low as $6 per 
box of 10. Try to determine an average 
time that a disk will last on your system. 
Then, as a normal part of operations, 
replace your online disks before that 
time. For instance, if disks last eight 
weeks, replace them every six weeks. 
Keep the replaced disk for other things, 
but not for online use. 

You may also run into a system 
crasher. Security is a function of soft- 
ware, but some BBS programs have 
back doors that allow someone to avoid 
the usual security. These back doors 
should be eliminated entirely. I am using 
the CoBBS system, which turns off the 
modem if basic is entered. I have also 
disabled all disk commands that are not 
used (such as DSKINI, DOS, DSKDS, 
SAVE, COPY, BACKUP and DIR). Even if 



users could get through to BASIC, they 
still could not read any files or even see 
a directory. Keep in mind, however, that 
no system is completely secure. Your 
best insurance against destruction is still 
frequent backups. 

A Few Final Tips 

If you are still interested in running 
a BBS, I have a few suggestions that 
should make the responsibility a little 
easier. First, don't underestimate the 
intelligence of your users. They deserve 
your respect. Second, if you're going to 
take the BBS down to do something else 
on your computer, take the BBS phone 
off the hook and restrict your use to an 
hour or so. Incoming callers will get a 
busy signal (which indicates that the 
BBS is in use) instead of a ring with no 
answer (which indicates that the BBS is 
down). Third, keep in touch with the 
other BBSs in your area. Call them 
frequently, and read their message bases 
to find out what is on people's minds. 
Finally, have fun. □ 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this article may be directed to the author 
at 1418 E, Illinois St., Evansville, IN 
47711. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) /R\ 




"EZWRTIER" does professional-quality letters 
quickly and easily. ''EZWRITER" will automa- 
tically set the margins & characters per line, 
indent paragraphs, put your heading/greeting/ 
closing in the right places, and even center the 
letter on the page! Just type your message and 
\gatch your EWP or DMP print a perfect letter! ! ! 
Handles 1-4 page letters, mailing lists, and 
labels- It will make it possible for you to 
send any number of copies with a salutation for 
each recipient!! Perfect for personal corre- 
spondence, for letters to club members, or for 
direct mail advertising. '"EZWRTIER" is by far 
our #1 Best Seller, and it's no wander; it's the 
absolutely simplest letter writing system avail- 
able for the CoCo! Still only $19.95 plus $1.50 
S/H for either disk or cassette. GREAT on the 
CoCo 3 but will run on any CoCo with 32k EGB. 

MM E.Z. FRIENDLY SOFTWARE 

118 COflLlES AVE. • POUGHKEEPSIE, NY 12601 • (914) 485-8150 
(Add $1.50 s/h to all orders. NY residents add state sales tax.) 



"I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now. it's time to 
give BASIC a shot in the arm, with ADOS-3. Wouldn't It be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your 
choice, with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the occlaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned Into an EPROM that plugs 
into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S 15-20; we provide information concerning how you can 
have this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35. 40. or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC programs, auto-edlt of error line, and 
many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk . , . $34.95 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 . . . S27.95 (See 6/87 f^NBOW review) 
Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid for the expert, 
CoCo 1, 2, or 3 compatible. 

Disk . , . $23.95 Assembler source listing . . . Add S3.00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

Magnavox 8CM5 1 5/8CM505/8CM643 , 



S 19.95 SonyKV1311CR 



S29.95 



SPECTROSYSJEMS 




11111 N. Kendall Drive. 
Suite A 108 
Miami, Florida 33176 
(305) 274 -3899 Day or Eve. 



^ N o-^jayjylP"irepjal checks • Please add $2 : 0^_shipping^grry. no credit cards or COO's. h 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 39 



Education Mo tes 



16K ECB 




Many people do not realize that 
truly good readers train 
themselves to adjust their 
reading speed to suH each reading 
situation. Flexibility in approaching 
different kinds of reading materials 
requires training and practice. Like the 
driver of a manual-transmission" auto- 
mobile, a reader must learn to shift 
speeds at appropriate times: 

A good reader learns to read faster 
when skimming and slower When read- 
ing for details. When skimming mate- 
rial, good readers do not read every 
word. They concentrate on reading for 
the thought or the main idea rather than 
on the indiviual words. Good readers 
also know that they must slow down 
their reading speed when details and 
concentration on the material are de- 
manded. Words must be studied for 
their meaning; passages may have to be 
reread. 

This month's article presents a read- 
ing exercise suitable for middle school 
to adult education students. Its concept 
and appeal are important at all stages 
of life, and the exercise affords practice 
in careful, detailed reading of a short 
passage. 

The short story presented below 
requires slow, careful reading. In this 
age of fast food and instant anything, 
students often want immediate results 
from everything they do. It would be 
difficult to skim the passage below and 
come up with a suitable map of the story 
details. The story is constructed to force 
students to slow down and read the 
story carefully. , , / 

The following are the directions for 
this exercise and the passage to be read 
by the user: 

Read the following short story care- 
fully. Try to visualize the route of the 
car. Then draw a rough map of the route 
showing the landmarks, that were men- 
tioned. •* i 

Last weekend, we were driving north 
through a small, unfamiliar town. It was 
lunch time and we were, getting hungry. 
We knew that in this town, there was a 
wonderful pizza restaurant; on Main, 
Street. We asked a young lady how to 

■ 1 

Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs fo aid- the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York: 



Reading for detail 

You Can't 
Get There 
From Here 

By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



get there, and she gave us the following 
directions: 

"You are now going in the wrong 
direction. You will be able to make a U- 
turn two blocks up this street. Then go 
south on this street until you pass a 
library on your left. Three blocks later, 
you will see a gas station on your right. 
Make a left turn at the next intersection. 
Go on for about twelve blocks until you 
reach the first traffic light. The road 
forks at the light. Take the right fork. 
Keep going until you reach the next 
crossroads. You will see a school on 
your left. Turn right at the crossroads, 



before you reach the school. You will 
then be on Main Street. The restaurant 
will be on your left a few blocks down 
the street." 

Our program presents a low- 
resolution map of the story and illus- 
trates the route that the car should take. 
On the left of the screen is a guide for 
counting the number of streets or blocks 
indicated. 

Run the program after the student 
has read the story and produced a map. 
The computer screen is compared to the 
student's representation. The student 
should use this comparison to learn why 
any mistakes were made. Students may 
want to reread the passage after com- 
paring their maps to the computer 
representation. 

Have your students repeat the pro- 
gram after several days. You can then 
compare the results of the newly created 
map with the original. While slow, 
careful reading is not easily accom- 
plished in our fast-paced society, results 
should improve with each succeeding 
session. 

Use this program to produce other 
practice passages for your children or 
students. Alter some of the directions 
and make the necessary changes in the 
program for the new map. Better still, 
try to create a new town map with its 
own directions. We hope that you and 
your students enjoy and benefit from 
this program. See you next month. □ 



The listing: MfiPPER \p rem m visualizing what you read 

ii 

20 rem"steve blyn , computer islan 

d, staten island,ny, 1988" 

30 cls0:print@15,"n"; 

40 for t= 1024 to 1530 step 32 :p 

oke t, 209: next t 

50 print@73,"carm; 

60 print© 168 , "library" ; 

70 print@258 / "gas"; 

80 print@240 , "light" ; 

90 print© 37 5 , "school" ; 

100 print@497 , "pizza" 7 

110 print@398 , "main" ; : print@4 30 , 

"ST" f 

120 FOR T=1096 TO 1032 STEP-32:P 
OKE T / 241:PLAY"L30;C":NEXT T 
130 POKE 1031,241 

140 FOR T=1030 TO 1286 STEP 32 :P 
OKE T,241:PLAY"C":NEXT T 
150 FOR T=1287 TO 1298:P0KE T,24 
l:PLAY"C":NEXT T 

160 FOR T=1298 TO 1400 STEP 33 :P 

OKE T, 241: PLAY"C": NEXT T 

170 FOR T=1247 TO 1520 STEP 30 :P 

OKE T,241:PLAY"C":NEXT T 

180 EN$=INKEY$ : IF EN$=CHR$(13) T 

HEN CLS: END: ELSE 180 A 

. 



40 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Making a list? Checking it twice? Before you send 
it off to the North Pole you should check out our 
holiday shopping guide. If 'you've been very, very 
good, you might want to treat yourself (or a deserv- 
ing fellow CoCoist) to some of the goodies — 
ranging from $7.95 to $699.95 — featured here. 

* 
I 

(See Page 118 for ordering information.) 




CoCo 1 and 2 



[1] Have a blast from the past with Speed Racer. Racer 
X, eat your heart out! From MichTron, on cassette and 
disk, $34.95. (Also works on the CoCo 3.) 

[2] Can King William never rest? Join him in a trilogy of 
Adventures from RTB Software for the CoCo 1 and 2 
only — Labyrinth ($24.95), Quest for the Ring ($34.95) 
and Adventure in Lumeria ($36.95). Here he is at the 
beach, attempting to cross the sea to save his lady fair. 

[3] Go lunar and drive for yourself an out-of-this-world set 
of wheels with Moon Runner. It's arcade action in orbit. 
(Psst! % also included is a version especially for the 
CoCo 3.) From Nick Bradbury, disk system only, $15. 

[4] Deliver the ultimate parting shot with Car Sign 
Designer. The package comes with two reusable sign 
holders. From Zebra Systems for 64K CoCo 1, 2 and 
3 disk systems, $29.95. 

[5] Are you fumble-fingered? Is your wimpy wpm getting 
you down? Here's the cure — TypeMate, a typing tutor 
on a ROM pack from Tandy (also works on the CoCo 
3). Available in Radio Shack stores nationwide for 
$24.95. 

[6] Get a handle on CoCo 1, 2 and 3 data storage with 
Burke & Burke's Hyper-I/O ($29.95), a program that 
allows the use of 3V2-inch floppy drives and hard drives 
under Disk basic and OS-9. 




1 




YOU SEE: ttOTHHW lfPORTWT. 
DIRECTIONS: MOflTM EAST 

Wat not/? I 





rl u^u^h* t i ok _« J Jupy»^ 




November 1988 THE RAINBOW 41 




8 



10 




11 




CoCo 3 



12 




13 




[7] Trigger happy? Our Business Assistant, Dawn Cecil, 
is. Here she is taking potshots at the screen with the 
Iron Forest phaser. If you feel you're up to zapping a 
few monsters in the mission to protect a sacred white 
dove, this game is for you. (The graphics and sound 
effects are great!) From Diecom Products for disk 
systems only: $29.95 U.S., $37.95 CDN; with phaser 
and interface, $74,95 U.S., $93.95 CDN. 

[8] Thexder is the Number 1 arcade hit from the Land of 
Sushi and the Rising Sun. If you're into Transformers, 
you should like this game. From Sierra On-Line,' 
available in Radio Shack stores everywhere, $24.95. 

[9] Integrate text and graphics and dabble in new dimen- 
sions of desktop publishing with Max-10. It's menu- 
driven and requires a disk drive and a Hi-Res joystick 
or mouse. From Colorware, $79.95 plus $3 S/H. 

[10] Feel like questing? Then go seek ye the Phoenix 
Crossbow in Sundog Systems' In Quest of the Star 
Lord ($34.95 plus $2.50 S/H). Requires disk drive. 

[11] Based on the ancient game of mah-jongg, Shanghai 
is a brain-teaser for those who don't give up easily. It's 
on a ROM pack from Activision for $34.95: Available 
in Radio Shack stores nationwide. 

[12] Ever get the feeling you're lost in a maze and being 
chased by ugly monsters? Perhaps you've been 
playing A Mazing World of Malcolm Mortar in your 
sleep. On a ROM pack from Tandy for $29.95: Available 
in Radio Shack stores nationwide. 

[13] Dive into a mouse- and menu-driven programming 
environment for Enhanced Color Disk basic with 
Window Master. It requires 51 2K and adds more thah 
50 commands and functions to CoCo 3's basic. From 
Cer-Comp, $69.95 plus $3 S/H. 

[14] If you're in the market for 80-column, menu-driven 
CoCo 3 word processors, you might check out Word 
Power 3.2, which features a print spooler, spelling 
checker and split-screen editing. From Microcom 
Software, $79.95. 



42 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 






17 





Hardware 



[15] You might want to hold off on that new floppy drive you're 
planning to buy — Arizona Small Computer Peripherals is 
selling full-height hard drive kits that come with drive, SASI 
controller, power supply and cables. You supply the case and 
interface. Available in 5-Meg ($120), 8-Meg ($140) and 10- 
Meg ($160) models. As a bonus, some public domain 
software is included. The drive shown here is in a case and 
has a controller attached. 

[16] Here's a trio of goodies for any serious computer buff. CRC/ 
Disto's Super Controller II ($130) offers souped-up I/O and 
extra care for OS-9 operations. The EPROM programmer 
($54.95) can attach to the Super Controller and '*burn in" 
favorite utilities. The RS-232 SuperPack ($49.95 — requires 
Multi-Pak) offers CoCoists an RS-232 serial port. 

[17] If it's a self-centering joystick you want, here it is, the 
ComMander Deluxe Joystick — with its four firebuttons for 
lefties and righties both. The joystick was designed for other 
computer systems but has been modified by CRC/Disto for 
the CoCo's joystick ports. From CRC/Disto, $29.95. 

[18] You oughtto be in pictures. And if you have a CoCo 3, a video 
camera, disk drive and a Multi-Pak — you can be. The DS- 
69B Digisector pack shown here with our Customer Service 
Manager, Beverly Bearden, is sold by The Micro Works and 
costs $149.95. 

[19] Oh say, how cheaply can you see with this 12-inch, 80- 
column-capable green-screen monochrome monitor? Only 
$67.50 plus $7 S/H. Sold by Howard Medical Computers. 

[20] If you have data that's too important to lose, spring for Solid 
Drive, a static RAM disk that write-protects itself on power 
loss. It includes OS-9 and Disk basic device drivers and 
requires a Multi-Pak. From Vidicom Corp., available in 512K 
($395) or 1-Meg ($695) version. 

[21] How about it, CoCo 1 and 2 users? Here's the ultimate 
upgrade — Tandy's 128K Color Computer 3 ($129.95) and 
a CM-8 RGB monitor ($299.95) to take advantage of its native 
64 colors and 80 columns, and an FD 502 single disk drive 
($199.95). See what memory and Hi-Res graphics can do. 





4 



4 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 43 



23 





Accessories 




27 



[22] Here's an assortment of accessories to make the 
computing life a little easier. The DM-8 printer stand 
from Datum Manufacturing ($14.95) allows anxiety- 
free printer relations; tractor-feed paper can be stored 
snag-free underneath. The Curtis Copy Clip ($6.95), 
a reversible copy holder from Curtis/PCA, keeps your 
eyes monitor-level; it attaches to the monitor with 
velcro and folds back out of the way when not in use. 

[23] Don't let one bump in the night cost you $$$$ — get 
an MPI-CoCo Locking Plate from Gimmesoft ($7.95) 
and keep your CoCo 3/Multi-Pak connections solid. 
Comes in two styles. 

[24] The ultimate off-line utility — DELPHI: The Official 
Guide — will get you acquainted with every aspect of 
the Delphi online information service in its 488 pages. 
From Simon & Schuster, $21.95. 

[25] The MS-500 monitor stand from Datum Manufacturing 
($1 7.95) saves desktop space and adds a touch of class 
to your CoCo setup. 

[26] Set your own style with Foto-Wear!'s iron-on transfer 
paper. Print a graphic using a color printer — or color 
a black-and-white printout with crayons — and iron it 
onto a cotton garment. This T-shirt shows the possi- 
bilities. Four-transfer pack, $9.95; 10-transfer pack, 
$19.95. 

[27] A gift subscription to the rainbow and rainbow on 
tape or disk is a gift that keeps giving the whole year 
round, rainbow's OS-9 books, the binders, the Adven- 
ture books and other entries in the rainbow Library 
make nice gifts, also. See pages 10, 12, 24, 50, 51 and 
112 for more information on ordering these items. 



RAINBOW November 1988 



Wall Street comes to your Co Co 
screen with this game of luck and skill 
in buying and selling stocks 



Playing the Stock Market 

$ 



By Mark Webb 




lock Ticker is a Simulation game 
lof buying and selling stocks, 
Icollecting dividends and becom- 
ing wealthy. There are two versions of 
the program. Listing 1, 5T0CK53, will 
work on any CoCo 3 with 128K, an 
RGB monitor and one joystick. Listing 
2, ST0CKS2, will run on the CoCos 1 and 
2 and requires at least 16K ECB of 
memory. 

ST0CKS3, the CoCo 3 version, is 
menu-driven and uses the right joystick 
to execute commands. 5TDCK52, the 
CoCo 1 and 2 version, uses the follow- 
ing keys for game play: 



H 

C 

A 
S 

Q 

B 



Help Screen 

Original buy for playing 

against the CoCo (HAL) 

Autoroll 

Sell stocks 

Quit Autoroll 

Buy stocks 



Space bar Roll (single) 

Also, in the CoCo 1 and 2 version: 
Pressing the up-arrow key allows the 
next player to buy stocks without rol- 
ling and affecting the stock values. This 
allows each player to buy stocks at the 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



Mark Webb is a computerist by both 
vocation and avocation. He runs the 
chemical-plant computer at a Canadian 
pulp mill and, after hours, programs his 
CoCo 1 and 3. 



same price and can only be used at the 
beginning of the game. If you are play- 
ing against the CoCo (called "HAL" 
and only available in the CoCo 1 and 
2 version), press C when it is CoCo's 
turn to do the initial buying. 

The available stocks are as follows: 



GO = Gold 
SI - Silver 
Of* OilK 
80= Boiids 

IN ~ Industrial 
GR ~ fj ra m 

CoCo 3 version only; 

f O ~ : Forestry 




Both versions of Stock Ticker are 
designed for up to four players. The 
object of the game is to buy and sell 
stocks so that you accumulate more 
wealth by the end of the game than any 
other player. Each player begins the 
Simulation with $10,000 and may pur- 
chase stock at the start of the game at 
par value (e.g., $2,000 will buy 2,000 
shares of any stock at the start of the 
game.) It is not necessary to spend all 
of your money at once, though after the 
first player rolls, the prices may change. 
However, you can buy and sell any time 
it is your turn. An Autobuy feature is 
included which can be used to buy 
stocks for you automatically when you 



have enough money. By using Autobuy, 
you can select any ^ of the stocks you 
want it to buy for you. You can even 
select all the stocks, sit back and watch 
your money roll inl Stocks can be 
"turned on" or "off as many times as 
you want wher^ it is your turn. The Roll 
option VU1\ roll Just once for you and 
then stop. Autoroll will keep rolling 
until the joystick' button is pressed on 
the CoCo 3 version or Q is pressed on 
the CoCo 1 and 2. 

..The "computer sounds a notice when 
a stock has declared a dividend and is 
at or abov^.par;\value of 100. At this 
point players are paid a dividend 
amount depending upon how many 
shares of that stock they own. If a stock 
rises above 200, all players holding 
shares in it are granted a two-for-one 
split, and the stock is restored to a par 
of 100. If a stock crashes, or falls below 
zero, then players unfortunate enough 
to be holding that stock lose all their 
shares of it. 

The game ends when the number of 
rounds winds down to zero. When that 
occurs, the computer calculates each 
player's gross worth at game's end and 
displays it on the screen. A 500-round 
game can be played in 45 minutes to an 
hour. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
these programs may be addressed to the 
author at it P.Q. Box 793, Gold River, 
B.C., Canada V0P J GO. Please enclose 
an SASE when, requesting a reply.) □ 



November t988 THE RAINBOW 



45 




47 197 1580 

205 186 2075 

250 180 3030 

314 98 4080 

350 219 5015 

376 126 621 F 

520 228 7«,0 

680 24 7:i90 

900 166 8510 

1128 238 END 

1380 203 



159 
160 
.94 
218 
..9 
235 
228 
.54 
.74 
242 



Listing 1: ST0CKS3 





1 stockticker 88 


(C) 


i 


1 by mark webb 


2 






3 


1 COMPLETED MARCH 


1988 


4 
5 


'BOX 793 




6 


'GOLD RIVER B.C. 




7 


1 CANADA 




8 


'V0P-1G0 




9 







10 POKE65497,0 
15 CLEAR500 
20 CLS0 

30 DIM X, Y, J0, Y1,P,N$(4) ,SV(8) ,0 
V(8) ,14(4) ,S$(8) ,SL$(8) ,S(4,8) ,P1 
(15) f P2(15) ,T$(9) ,A$,B$,C$,D$,E$ 
(3) ,U,AB(4,8) ,Z 
3 5 U=l 

40 F0RX=1 TO 8:SV(X)=100:OV(X)=0 
: NEXTX 

41 T$ (6) ="BR1BU1F1R4NE1L2U8R2NF1 
L4G1BD7BR6" 

42 T$(7)="BR1NR4U4NR3U4R4BD8BR2" 

43 T$ (8)= !, U8R2F1D2G1L2R1F2D2BR2" 

44 T$ (9)="BR1R2E1U2H4U2E1R2F1D2G 
4D2F1BR6" 

45 T$ (1) = !, BR1NH1R3E1U2H1L3H1U2E1 
R3F1BD7 11 

46 T$ (2)="BR3E1NF1U7L2NG1R4F1BD7 



fi 



47 T$ (3)= M BR2NR3U1H1U4E1U1R3D1F1 
D4G1D1" 

48 T$(4)="BR4R2NE1L2H1U6E1R2F1BD 
7BR2" 

49 T$ (5)="U8D4R1F2ND2H2E2U2BD8BR 
1" 

50 FORX=l TO 4 :M(X) =10000: NEXTX 
52 E$(1)="UP":E$ (2)="DN" :E$ (3)=" 
DV" 

55 DATA 0,7,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,11,33, 
20,47,55,52,0 

56 FORX=0 TO 15 : READP2 (X) : NEXTX 

57 POKE&HE6C6,18:POKE&HE6C7,18 
60 DATA 0,48,63,38,9,40,54,17,7, 
24,46,5,1,2,56,59 

70 FORX=0 TO 15 : READP1 (X) : NEXTX 
80 FORX=0 TO 15:PALETTEX,P1(X) :N 



EXTX 

90 DATA GO,SI,OI,BO,IN,GR,FO,SP 

100 FORX=l TO 8 : READ S$(X):NEXTX 

101 DATA GOLD, SILVER, OIL, BONDS, I 
NDUSTRIAL, GRAIN, FORESTRY, SPACE 

102 FORX=l T08:READSL$ (X) : NEXTX 
110 GOTO5000 

200 '80 column screen setup 

201 HSCREEN0:WIDTH80 

202 CLS1 

203 POKE&HE047,0 

205 FORX=0 TO 15 : PALETTEX, P2 (X) : 
NEXTX 

206 ATTR5,0: LOCATE 2 3,0: PRINT"* * 
* * STOCKTICKER 88 * * * * M ;:AT 

TR1,0 

207 FORX=0 TO 3 : LOCATE1+X*20 , 2 : P 
RINT N$ (X+l) ; :NEXTX 

208 FORX=0 TO 3 

209 FORY=l TO 8 

210 LOCATE 1+X* 20, 2+Y: PRINT S$ (Y) 
.11 « pit ; 

211 NEXTY , X 

212 FORX=0 TO 7 

213 ATTR3,0:LOCATE2+X*10,12:PRIN 
T S$ (X+l) ;" = " ;SV(X+1) ; 

214 NEXTX 

215 ATTR2 ,0 

216 FORY=0 TO 3 

217 FORX=0 TO 3 

218 LOCATE2+X*20, 14+Y 

219 PRINT S$(Y+1);» ";S$(Y+5); 

220 NEXTX, Y 

221 ATTR4 , 0 

222 LOCATE3,19:PRINT f, BUY"; 

223 LOCATE18,19:PRINT"SELL" ; 

224 LOCATE3 4,19:PRINT"ROLL" ; 

225 LOCATE50 , 19 : PRINT 11 AUTOROLL" ; 
22 6 LOCATE 6 8 , 19 : PRINT" AUTOBUY" ; 
227 ATTR1 , 0 

22 8 RETURN 

250 '80 column screen update 

251 HSCREEN0:FORX=0 TO 15 : PALETT 
EX,P2 (X) : NEXTX 

252 ATTR1,0,U:FORX=0 TO P-l:LOCA 
TE1+X*20 , 2 : PRINTN$ (X+l) ; : NEXTX 
254 ATTR3 / 0,B:LOCATE1+(U-1)*20,2 
:PRINTN$(U) ; 

256 ATTR4,0:FORX=1 TO P:LOCATE7+ 
(X-l) *20,2:PRINTUSING"$$#######" 

;M(X) ;: NEXTX 

258 FORX=0 TO 3 
2 60 FORY=l TO 8 

2 62 LOCATE5+X*20, Y+2: PRINTS (X+l, 
Y) ; 

2 64 NEXTY, X 

266 LOCATE3 2,21:PRINTNR;"ROLLS L 
EFT"; 

268 FORX=0 TO 7 

270 LOCATE5+X*10,12:PRINTSV(X+1) 



46 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



272 NEXTX 
298 RETURN 

300 'joystick input here 

310 J0=JOYSTK(0) : J0=INT ( J0/12 ) 

311 F0RX=1 TO 88:NEXTX:IFJ0=0 TH 
EN J0=1 

312 ATTR3,0:ONJ0 GOSUB320 , 322 , 32 
4,326,328 

313 FORX=0 TO 88:NEXTX 

314 ATTR4,0:ONJ0 GOSUB320, 322 , 32 
4,326,328 

316 IF BUTTON (0) =1 THEN SOUND RN 

D(255) ,1:GOTO330 ELSE310 

320 LOCATE3, 19: PRINT "BUY"; :RETUR 

N 

322 LOCATE18, 19: PRINT" SELL"; :RET 
URN 

324 LOCATE3 4,19:PRINT"ROLL"; :RET 
URN 

32 6 LOCATE50, 19 : PRINT "AUTOROLL" ; 
: RETURN 

328 LOCATE 6 8 , 19 : PRINT "AUTO BUY" ; : 
RETURN 

330 ON J0 GOT0335, 370, 400, 430,45 
P 

3 34 'buy main 

335 GOSUB340:GOTO354 

340 'buy & sell subroutine 

341 ATTR3,0:A$=STRING$(40, " ") 

342 LOCATE 3 2 ,21: PRINT 11 HOW MANY S 
HARES? " ; : PLAY"T12 8V3 1L6401CECECO 
4EFG05GGFG" 

343 J0=JOYSTK(0) :NS=(J0+1) *500 

344 LOCATE49, 21: PRINT" "; 

345 LOCATE49,21:PRINTNS; :F0RX=1T 
0111: NEXTX 

346 IF BUTTON(0)=1 THEN348 

347 GOT0343 

348 PLAY "03 CGCGCGEFDGEFDGEGGGGEF 
FFFFEDDD01GDFEGCCC" : LOCATE 3 2 , 22 : 
PRINT"OF WHICH STOCK?"; 

349 J0<TOYSTK(0) :ST=INT( (J0+4)/8 
) :IFST<1 THEN ST=1 

350 L0CATE49, 22: PRINT" 

it • 

t 

351 LOCATE49, 22: PRINT SL$(ST); 

352 IF BUTTON (0) =1 THEN RETURN 

353 GOT0349 

354 IF NS*SV(ST)/100>M(U) THEN35 
5 ELSE360 

355 LOCATE20,21:PRINTA$:LOCATE20 
,22:PRINTA$; 

356 LOCATE 3 2, 21: PRINT "NOT ENOUGH 
MONEY ! " ; 

357 SOUND180, 2:F0RX=1 TO 667:NEX 
TX 

358 LOCATE 3 2, 21: PRINT" 

ii . 

359 GOT0362 

360 LOCATE20,21:PRINTA$; :L0CATE2 
P,22:PRINTA$; :M(U)=M(U) -NS*SV(ST 



361 S(U,ST)=S(U,ST)+NS 

362 GOSUB250:GOTO300 

3 63 *************************** 

370 'sell main 

372 GOSUB3 40 

374 IF NS>S(U,ST) THEN376 ELSE38 
6 

37 6 LOCATE 20, 21: PRINTA$; : L0CATE2 
0,22:PRINTA$; 

3 78 LOCATE32,21:PRINT"NICE TRY E 

H ! " ; 

380 F0RX=1 T022 :PLAY"T255L12803F 

FGGFFGGF": NEXTX 

382 LOCATE 3 2, 21: PRINT" 



ii . 



384 GOT0395 

386 M(U)=M(U)+NS*SV(ST)/100 

390 S(U,ST)=S(U,ST)-NS 

392 LOCATE 20 , 21 : PRINTA$ ; : LOCATE 2 

0,22:PRINTA$; 

395 GOSUB250:GOTO300 

397 *************************** 

400 'roll once 

410 GOSUB8000-.GOSUB3000 

411 U=U+1:IFU>P THEN U=l 

412 GOSUB250 
420 GOTO300 

425 1 ************************ 

430 'autoroll 

431 AR=88 

432 GOSUB8000:GOSUB3000 

433 U=U+1:IFU>P THEN U=l 

434 IF BUTTON (0)<>1 THEN432 

43 6 AR=0:FORX=0 TO 15 : PALETTEX , 0 

: NEXTX : G0SUB2 50 : GOTO300 

440 i************************ 

450 'autobuy main 

455 GOSUB8500 
460 GOTO 300 

500 'how many players routine 

520 HCOLOR10,10 

530 HPRINT(11,5) , "HOW MANY PLAYE 
RS?» 

540 FORX=0 TO 3 

550 HCOLOR8,8:HLINE(56+X*56,84) - 

(56+(X*56)+32,64) ,PSET,BF 

560 HC0L0R14,14:HLINE(57+X*56,8 3 

)-(55+(X*56)+32,65) , PSET 

570 HLINE(60+X*56,68)-(52+(X*56) 

+32,80) ,PSET,BF 

575 HLINE(57+X*56, 65) - (55+ (X*56) 
+32,83) ,PSET 

580 HCOLOR0,0:HLINE(60+X*56,68)- 
(52+(X*56)+32,80) ,PSET,B 
590 NEXTX 

610 HDRAWBM68 , 77 ; S4 ; C0 ;R6L3U6R3 
L6" 

6 20 HDRAW" BM12 4 ,77; R6L4U6L2R5NR2 
D6R2 " 

630 HDRAW"BM179,77 ;NR8R2NU5R2NU5 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 47 



R2U6R2L8" 

640 HDRAWBM235, 77 ;NR12R2U6L2NR1 
2R4D4F2R2E2U3" 

650 J0=JOYSTK(0) : J0=INT (J0/16) 
660 HCOLOR4,0 

670 HLINE(55+J0*56, 85) -(89+J0*56 
,63) ,PSET,B 

680 IF BUTTON (0)=1 THEN BP=77 EL 
SEBP=0 

690 HLINE(55+J0*56,85) -(89+J0*56 
,63) , PRESET, B 

700 IF BP=77 THEN 710 ELSE 650 
710 PLAY"T255L12801FFGFFGDFFD" 
720 P=J0+1 
730 RETURN 

749 1 BACKGROUND FOR # PLAYERS 

750 HCOLOR8,0 
755 HCLS0 

760 FORX=0 TO 319 STEP6 
770 HLINE(X,0)-(X,191) ,PSET 
780 NEXTX 

790 FORY=0 TO 191 STEP 4 
800 HLINE(0,Y)-(319,Y) ,PSET 
810 NEXTY 
820 FORX=0 TO 8 

830 HLINE(X,X)-(319-X,191-X) ,PSE 
T,B 

840 NEXTX 

850 HDRAW" BM0 , 0 ; C0 ; F8 ; BM3 19 , 0 ; G8 

; BM0 , 1 9 1 ; E8 ; BM319 , 19 1 ; H8 ; " 

8 60 FORX=ll TO 309 STEP32 

870 HSET(X,4,15) :HSET (X, 5 , 15) :HS 

ET(X+1,4,14) :HSET(X+1,5,14) 

872 HSET(X,187,14) :HSET (X, 188 , 14 

) :HSET(X+1,187,15) :HSET (X+l, 188 , 

15) 

880 NEXTX 

890 FORY=ll TO 180 STEP24 

900 HSET(4,Y,15) :HSET(4, Y+l, 15) : 

HSET(5,Y,14) :HSET(5,Y+1,14) 

910 HSET(315,Y,15) :HSET (315 , Y+l , 

15) :HSET(316,Y,14) :HSET(316,Y+1, 

14) 

920 NEXTY 
990 RETURN 

999 'graph update subroutine 

1000 FORX=l TO 8 

1010 IF SV(X)=OV(X) THEN1120 
1020 IF SV(X)>OV(X) THEN 1030 EL 
SE1080 

1030 FORY=OV(X) TO SV(X) 

1040 HCOLORX:Yl=INT(Y/2) 

1050 HLINE(2+X*32,168-Yl)-(30+X* 

32,168-Y1) ,PSET 

1060 NEXTY 

1070 GOTO1120 

1080 FORY=OV(X) TO SV(X) STEP-1 
1090 HCOLOR0,0:Yl=INT(Y/2) 
1100 HLINE(2+X*32,168-Yl)-(30+X* 
32,168-Y1) , PRESET 
1110 NEXTY 



1120 NEXTX 

1125 FORY=l TO 8 :OV(Y) =SV(Y) :NEX 

TY 

1126 HCOLOR3,0:HLINE (112,0) -(144 
,8) , PRESET, BF: HPRINT (14,0) ,NR-1 

1127 HCOLOR9,0:HLINE(28,168)-(29 
2,168) ,PSET 

1128 HCOLOR10,0:HLINE(40,184)-(2 
88,191) , PRESET, BF 

1129 FORX=l TO 8 :HPRINT(4*X, 23) , 
SV(X) : NEXTX 

1130 NR=NR-1 

1131 IF NR=0 THEN 6000 

1132 IF AR=88 THEN1140 

1135 FORX=0 TO15:PALETTEX,0:NEXT 
X 

1140 RETURN 

1199 'graph set up subroutine 

1200 HCLS 
1210 HCOLOR9,0 

1220 HLINE(28,68)-(28,168) ,PSET 

1230 HLINE-(292,168) ,PSET 

1240 HLINE-(292,68) ,PSET 

1250 HLINE(28,118)-(292,118) ,PSE 

T 

12 60 FORX=168 TO 68 STEP-5 
1270 HLINE(26,X) -(30,X) ,PSET 
1280 HLINE(290,X)-(294,X) ,PSET 

12 90 NEXTX 

1300 FORX=l TO 8 

1310 HCOLORX,0 

1320 HPRINT(1+4*X,22) ,S$(X) 

1330 NEXTX 

1340 HCOLOR8,0 

1350 D$="NR2 4U24NE12R2 4E12NL24G1 
2D24E12U24" 

1360 HDRAW"BM84,48 ;XD$ ; BM148 , 48 ; 
XD$;BM212,48;XD$;" 

13 70 FORX=0 TO 2 

1380 HPAINT(86+X*64,46) ,2,8 
1390 HPAINT(110+X*64 ,44) ,8,8 
1400 HPAINT(88+X*64,22) ,14,8 
1410 NEXTX 

1415 HCOLOR3,0:HPRINT(18,0) ," RO 
LLS LEFT" 

1416 HCOLOR3,0:HPRINT(0,8) ,"200" 
: HPRINT (0 , 11 ) , " 150 " : HPRINT (0,14) 
, " 100 " : HPRINT ( 0 , 17 ) , "0 50 " : HPRINT 
(0,20) ,"000" 

1417 HPRINT(37, 8) , "200" :HPRINT (3 
7,11) , "150" :HPRINT(37, 14) ,"100": 
HPRINT (37, 17), "050": HPRINT (37,20 

) ,"000" 
1420 RETURN 

1500 'number of rounds routine 
1510 HCLS 8 

1520 FORX=0 TO 158 STEP 8 
1530 Y=X:IFY>191 THEN Y=191 
1540 HCOLOR4,0 

1550 HLINE (X,Y)-(319-X, 191-Y) , PR 
ESET, B 



48 THE RAINBOW November 1988 




1555 HLINE(X+4,Y+4)-(315-X,187-X 
) ,PSET,B 
156)3 NEXTX 

157J3 HC0L0R6 .'HPRINT (12 , 9) , "NUMBE 

R OF ROUNDS?" 

1575 HCOLOR10,0 

1580 J0=JOYSTK(0) : J0=J0*25 

1585 IF J0>999 THEN J0=999 

1590 HLINE (150, 96) -(174,102) , PRE 

SET, BF 

1600 HPRINT (18, 12 ) ,J0 

1605 IF BUTTON (0) =1 THEN NR=J0:G 

OTO1620 

1610 GOTO 1580 
1620 NR=NR+1 
1630 RETURN 

2000 'title page routine 

2020 HCLS0 

2030 F0RX=1T0333:HSET(RND(319) ,R 
ND(191) ,8) :HSET(RND(319) ,RND(191 
) ,14) :HSET(RND(319) ,RND(191) ,4) : 
NEXTX 

2050 AS=T$(1)+T$(2)+T$(3)+T$(4)+ 
T$(5) 

2060 B$=T$(2)+T$(6)+T$(4)+T$(5)+ 
T$(7)+T$(8) 

2062 HCOLOR8: HLINE (0,0) -(319, 191 
) ,PSET,B 

2063 FORX=l TO 12 

2065 C$="BM"+STR$ (20+X) +" , "+STR$ 
(78-X)+",*" 

2066 IF X=4 THEN HCOLOR4 : HLINE ( 2 
,2)-(317,189) ,PSET,B 

2067 IF X=8 THEN HCOLOR14 : HLINE ( 
4,4)-(315,187) ,PSET,B 

2068 IF X=ll THEN HCOLOR3 : HLINE ( 
6,6) -(313,185) ,PSET,B 

2070 HDRAW"XC$;S16;XA$;XB$;" 
2075 C$="BM"+STR$ ( 130+X) +" , "+STR 
$(164-X)+";" 

2080 HDRAW"XC$;S24;XT$(9) ;XT$(9) 

2085 NEXTX 

2086 HCOLOR10: HPRINT (15 ,22) , "BY 
MARK WEBB" 

2095 PALETTE10,RND(16)+31:FORX=1 
TO20: NEXTX 

2096 IF BUTTON (0)=1 THEN2099 

2097 IF INKEY$<>""THEN2099 

2098 GOTO2095 

2099 PALETTE10,44 

2100 RETURN 

3000 'roll dice, show em div 

3001 'and update graph. 

3003 FORX=0 TO 15 : PALETTEX, PI (X) 
: NEXTX 

3005 HSCREEN2 

3007 X=RND( -TIMER) 

3010 D(1)=RND(8) :D(2)=RND(3) :D(3 

)=RND(5) 

3015 IF RND(5)=5 THEN IF D(2)=2 



THEN D(2)=INT(3/RND(3) ) 
3020 D(3)=D(3)*5 

3025 HCOLOR2 : FORX=0 TO 2:HLINE(8 
8+X*64 ,31) - (104+X*64 , 41) , PSET, BF 
: NEXTX 

3030 HCOLOR0:HPRINT(11,4) ,S$(D(1 
) ) :HPRINT(19,4) ,E$ (D(2) ) :HPRINT( 
26,4) ,D(3) 

3040 IF D(2)=l THEN SV(D(1))=SV( 
D(l))+D(3) 

3050 IF SV(D(1) )>=200 THEN SV(D( 
1) ) =200 : GOSUB1000 : GOSUB4000 : GOTO 
3140 

3060 IF D(2)=2 THEN SV(D(1))=SV( 
D(l))-D(3) 

3070 IF SV(D(1))<=0 THEN SV(D(1) 
) =0 : GOSUB1000 : GOSUB4500 : GOT03 140 
3075 GOSUB1000 

3080 IF D(2)=3 THEN3090 ELSE3140 

3090 IF SV(D(1))<100 THEN 3140 

3100 FORX=l TO P 

3110 Y=S(X,D(1) )/100*D(3) 

3120 M(X)=M(X)+Y 

3130 NEXTX 

3135 FORX=l TO 5 : PLAY"T255L25504 
CDEFGAB05CEGB" : NEXTX 
3140 RETURN 

4000 'split routine 

4010 SV(D(1) )=100 

4020 A$="*** "+SL$ (D(l) )+" HAS S 
PLIT! ***" 

4030 X=INT( (40-LEN(A$) )/2) 
4040 HCOLORD(l) :HPRINT(X,7) ,A$ 
4050 FORX=l TO 100 : PALETTED ( 1) ,R 
ND(63) : NEXTX 

4060 PALETTED (1) ,P1(D(1) ) 

4070 FORX=l TO P: S (X, D (1) ) =S (X, D 

(1) )*2:NEXTX 

4080 GOSUB1000 

4090 HLINE(30,55)-(279,64) ,PRESE 
T, BF 

4100 RETURN 

4500 'break routine 

4510 SV(D(1))=100 

4520 A$="### "+SL$(D(1) )+" HAS B 
USTED ###" 

4530 X=INT( (40-LEN(A$) )/2) 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 49 



c 



The Complete 




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Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to 
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Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adven- 
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card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
EST. For other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone 
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4540 HCOLORD(l) :HPRINT (X, 7) ,A$ 
4550 FORX=l TO P:S(X,D(1) ) =0 : NEX 
TX 

4560 FORX=l TO 1000: NEXTX 

4570 HLINE(30,55)-(279,64) ,PRESE 

T,BF 

4580 A$="ALL "+SL$ (D(l) )+" HAS B 

EEN CONFISCATED" 

4590 X=INT( (40-LEN(A$) )/2) 

4600 HPRINT(X,7) ,A$ 

4610 SOUND30,2 :GOSUB1000 

4620 FORX=24 TO 159 

4630 HLINE (X,55)-(X,64), PRESET :H 

LINE(319-X,55) -(319-X,64) , PRESET 

4640 NEXTX 

4650 RETURN 

5000 'main startup section 

5010 'game start gosubs 

5015 HSCREEN2 

5020 GOSUB2000 

5030 GOSUB750:GOSUB500 

5040 GOSUB1500 

5050 GOSUB7000 

5060 GOSUB1200:GOSUB1000 

5070 GOSUB200 

5080 GOSUB250 

5090 GOTO 300 

5100 END 

6000 'end routine 

6010 HSCREEN0 

6020 WIDTH32 

6030 RGB 

6040 CLS0 

6050 FORX=l TO 30 

6060 PRINT@X,CHR$(128+RND(126) ) ; 

6061 PRINT@X+480,CHR$(128+RND(12 

6) J ; 

6062 NEXTX 

6065 FORY=l TO 14 : PRINT@Y*32 , CHR 
$(128+RND(126) ) ; : PRINT@Y*32+31 , C 
HR$ ( 12 8+RND (12 6));: NEXTY 
6070 POKE&HFFBC,45:POKE&HFFBD,0 
6080 PRINT§33," * * * * STOCKTIC 
KER 88 * * *"; 

6090 PRINTS 10 6, "FINAL TOTALS"; 
6092 PRINT® 13 8 , "============» 

6100 FORX=l TO P 
6110 FORY=l TO 8 

6120 M(X)=M(X)+SV(Y)*S(X,Y)/100 

6130 NEXTY, X 

6200 FORX=l TO P 

6210 PRINT@135+X*64,N$(X) ; 

6215 PRINT@145+X*64,M(X) ; 

6220 NEXTX 

6230 PRINT® 4 2 7, "GAME OVER" ; 
6240 POKE&HFFBC,50:POKE&HFFBD,0 
6500 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN6500 
6510 GOTO 9999 

7000 'name input routine 
7010 FORX=200 TO 10 STEP-10 
7020 SOUNDX,! 



7030 NEXTX 
7035 HCLS12 

7050 HCOLOR0: HLINE (0,100) -(319,1 
06) ,PSET 
7060 Y=80 

7070 FORX=0 TO 319 
7080 Z=RND(3)-2:Y=Y+Z 
7090 IF Y>98 THEN Y=98 
7100 IF Y<50 THEN Y=50 
7110 HSET(X,Y,0) 
7120 NEXTX 

7130 HPAINT(2,40) ,11,0 
7140 HPAINT (0,191) ,13,0 
7160 HCOLOR14,0 

7170 HLINE(87, 56) -(216,120) ,PSET 
, BF 

7175 HCOLOR15 

7180 HLINE (91, 60) -(212,116) ,PSET 
, BF 

7190 HCOLOR14 

7200 HLINE(87, 56) -(71,40) ,PSET 
7210 HLINE- (200, 40 ) ,PSET: HLINE- ( 
216,56) ,PSET 

7220 HLINE(71,40)-(71,104) ,PSET: 
HLINE- (87 , 120) , PSET 
7230 HPAINT ( 73 ,100) ,8, 14: HPAINT ( 
87,48) ,14,14 

7240 HLINE(112,120)-(128,184) ,PS 
ET, BF 

7250 HLINE(176,120)-(192,184) , PS 
ET, BF 

7260 HLINE(176,184)-(160,168) ,PS 
ET 

7270 HLINE- (160, 120) , PSET 

7280 HLINE(112,184)-(96,168) , PSE 

T 

7290 HLINE- (9 6, 120) , PSET 
7300 HPAINT (104, 160) ,8,14 
7310 HPAINT(168, 168) ,8,14 

7315 HCOLOR8:HLINE(87,120)-(216, 
120) ,PSET 

7316 HLINE(87,56)-(216,56) ,PSET 
7320 HCOLOR0,0 

7330 HPRINT (12, 8) , "PLAYERS NAMES 

OH 

• 

7340 FORX =1 TO P 
7350 Y=0 

7360 HPRINT ( 12, 9+X) , "#"+RIGHT$ (S 
TR$ (X) ,1) 

7370 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN7370 
7380 IFI$=CHR$ (13) THEN7430 
7390 IF I$=CHR$(8) THEN HCOLOR15 
: SOUND50 , 1 : HLINE ( 104 , 72+X*8 ) - ( 20 
0 , 80+X*8 ) , PSET, BF : N$ (X) =" " : HCOLO 
R0:GOTO7350 

7400 N$(X)=N$(X)+I$:IFLEN(N$(X) ) 
=8 THEN7430 

7410 HPRINT (16+Y, 9+X) ,I$:Y=Y+1 
7420 GOTO7370 
7430 NEXTX 
7440 RETURN 



52 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



8000 ' autobuy subroutine 

8^5 FL=0 

8010 F0RX=1 TO 8 

8020 IF AB(U,X)=99 THEN FL=11:C= 
J3 

8030 NEXTX 

8040 IF FLO 11 THEN 8090 
8050 X=RND(8) :C=C+1 

8055 IF C>=30 THEN 8090 

8056 IF AB(U,X)<>99 THEN8050 
8060 IF M(U)>=SV(X) *5 THEN S(U,X 
)=S(U,X)+500:M(U)=M(U)-SV(X) *5 
8070 IF M(U)>=1000 THEN8050 
8090 FL=0: RETURN 

8500 'autobuy on/off routine 

8510 J0=JOYSTK(0) : J0=INT( (J0+1)/ 
8) 

8515 IF J0=0 THEN J0=1 
8520 Y=13 

8530 X=2+( (U-l) *20) 

8540 IF J0>4 THEN X=X+4 

8550 IF J0>4 THEN Y=Y+J0-4 ELSE 

Y=Y+J0 

8560 LOCATEX,Y 



8570 ATTR6,0 : PRINTS $ (J0) ; 

8580 F0RZ=1 TO 222:NEXTZ 

8585 LOCATEX, Y 

8590 ATTR2 ,0: PRINTS $ (J0) ; 

8 600 F0RZ=1 TO 222:NEXTZ 

8610 IF BUTTON (0)=1 THEN IF AB(U 

,J0)=99 THEN AB(U, J0) =0 : G0T08 630 

ELSE AB(U, J0)=99:GOTO8630 
8620 GOTO8510 

8630 PLAY"T25503DDGGDD01CCC03DEF 
D" 

8632 F0RZ=1 TO 8 

8633 Y=13 :X=2+( (U-l) *20) 
8 634 IF Z>4 THEN X=X+4 

8635 IF Z>4 THEN Y=Y+Z-4 ELSE Y= 
Y+Z 

8640 IF AB(U,Z)=99 THEN ATTR6,0: 
LOCATEX, Y: PRINTS$ (Z) ; ELSE ATTR2 
, 0 : LOCATEX , Y : PRINTS $ ( Z ) ; 
8645 NEXTZ 
8650 RETURN 

9999 HSCREEN0 : WIDTH32 :RGB: POKE&H 
FFBC , 4 5 : POKE &HFFBD , 0 : POKE 65 4 9 6,0 
: END 




200 211 

330 118 

530 16 

760 47 

950 61 

1160 89 

1400 16 



1620 123 

1840 123 

2010 176 

2180 5 

2355 188 

2620 166 

2840 12 

END 160 



Listing 2: ST0CKS2 

10 CLS0 

20 CLEAR2500 

30 DIM BA$(14) ,G(6,4) ,G$(8) ,T(14 
) ,L(6) ,L$(6) ,Z(6) 
40 ' 

50 »***STOCK TICKER*86********** 
60 i***BY MARK WEBB ************ 
70 «***FOR COCO 1&2************* 
80 »***REVISED AUG. 88********** 
90 »***BOX 793 GOLD RIVER B.C.** 
100 » **CANADA***VOP 1G0*****~*** 
110 ' 

120 POKE142,0 
130 X=RND ( -TIMER) 

140 PL$(1)="V31O5T100L1GABBGABBG 
ABBGABBGABBGABBGABBGABBGABBGABB" 
150 PL$ (2) ="V31T6401L4CCFFCCFFCC 
FFCCFFBCCFFCCFFCCFFCCFFCCFFCCFFC 
CFFCCFFCCFF" 



160 PL$ (3 ) = If V31T3204BAGFEDC03BAG 

FEDC02BAGFEDC01BAGFEDC" 

170 PL$ (4)="V31T3 202CDEFGAB03CDE 

FGAB04CDEFGAB05CDEFGAB" 

180 PL$ (5) ="V31L16T25504CEGBDFAC 

EGBDFACEGBDFACEGBDFA" 

190 PL$(6)="V31T2804L4V15CV13CV1 

1 C V9 CV7 C V5 C V 3 C V 1 C V 3 C V5 C V7 C V9 CV 1 1 

CV13CV15C" 

200 G$(1)=STRING$(31,249) :G$(2)= 
STRING$(31 / 246) 

210 G$(3)=STRING$(32 / 143) :G$(4)= 

STRING$(31 / 143) 

220 U=1:AD=0 

230 FORX=lT06:READ Dl$ : S$ (X) =D1$ 
: NEXTX 

240 DATA GOLD, SILVER, OIL, BONDS, I 
NDUST, GRAIN 

250 FORX=1TO6:L(X)=100:NEXTX 
2 60 F0RX=1T04 
270 F0RX1=1T032 

280 READD1:G$(4+X)=G$(4+X)+CHR$( 
Dl) 

290 NEXTX1,X 

300 DATA 128,128,167,175,175,175 
, 175 , 170 , 128 , 128 , 128 , 128 , 128 , 167 
,175, 175,175,175, 170, 128,128,128 
, 128 , 128 , 167 , 175 , 175 , 175 , 175, 170 
,128,128 

310 DATA 128,167,175,175,175,175 
,175,170,12 8, 12 8, 128, 128,167,175 
,175,175,175, 17 5, 170, 128, 128,128 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 53 



, 12 8 , 167, 175. 17 5. 175. 175, 175, 17 0 

m a^Bf n«t ■ ^bb> ^pt m m p^a W W *p^p — m * W m — f f 


680 F0RX=5 TO 2 6 


,128,128 


690 PRINT@32+X,CHR$(159) ; 


320 DATA 128,143.143,143,143,143 

BPBl ^BBF ^BB^ PM PB BPV BP BP PPPP PPP* V PPPP BP ^BP 7 AT PPPP ^P — f ^^^^ — T ■ ^^^^ 


700 PRINT@448+X,CHR$ (159) ; 


. 175, 17 0, 128 , 128 , 12 8 , 12 8 , 143 , 143 

m v ™y oPPV P W PPPP PPP* At ^BBP ^BBl AT P^^^ ^^^^ V ^^^^ * ^^^^ » ^^^^ 


710 NEXTX 


, 143 . 143 . 143 , 175, 17 0 , 128 , 12 8 , 12 8 

m «bp> * PBP 1 • ^Bte * ppp 7 V Pppp * ^bf » PPPP » M PPPP ^PP» M ppp" » V 


720 F0RX=3 TO 12 I 


, 12 8 , 143 , 143 , 143 , 14 3 , 143 , 175 , 170 


7 30 PRINT@32*X+3 , CHR$ (159) ; : PRIN | 


,128,128 


T@X*32+28,CHR$(159) ; l 


330 DATA 128,143, 143,143, 143,143 


740 NEXTX 


.174 .128 .12 8. 128, 128,128,143 . 143 

m ^bpb ¥ • m PPPP ppw ^Pf P ^ppp bppi ^Pr _f ^^P> ^bjt _V PPP1 PPB1 ^bf ■ m ^ppp pi Bar P bppf a ^bf 


750 PRINT© 10 3 , "HOW MANY ROUNDS"; 


,143,143,143,174,128, 12 8,128,128 


760 PRINT@199, " (200-400) IS AVG. 


, 128 , 143 , 143 , 143 , 143 , 143 , 174 , 128 

WWW* § w w w 


it • 


,128,128 


770 PRINT@301,"? "; 


340 'title page layout 


780 R$="":R=0 


350 CLS3 


790 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN790 


360 S0UNDRND(2 55) ,1 


800 IFI$=CHR$(8) THEN PRINT@302, 


370 F0RX=1T014 : PRINT@3 2*X, CHR$ (2 


STRING$(4,14 3) ; :GOTO780 
810 IFI$==CHR$ (13) THEN830 


49) ; :PRINT@32*X+31,CHR$(249) ; :NE 


XTX 


820 R$=R$+I$:PRINT@302,R$; :G0T07 


380 PRINT@0,STRING$(32, 249) ; :PRI 


90 


NT@480,STRING$(31,249) ; 


830 PRINT@395, "OK? (Y/N) ";: SOUND 


i 390 POKE1055,249 


22,1 


400 POKE 1535,249 


84p I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN84^ 


410 PRINT@70, "***ST0CK TICKER*86 


850 IFI$<> M Y" THEN I$=CHR$ (8 ) : GO 

/ * 1 1 \ / 


**» ; 

r 


TO800 


420 PRINT@138 , "BY M.WEBB" ; 


860 R=VAL(R$) : IFR<=0 THEN 670 


430 PRINT@297-32 , "JAN/06 , 198 4" ; 


870 PLAY PL$(6) 


440 PRINT@265-32, " COPYRIGHT "; 


880 1 


450 PRINT@326 , "COCO 1-2 VERSION" 


890 CLS 


■ 


900 TP$=STRING$ f 6 , 128 ) +"stock"+C 

<pW «W "p^ kpr Jb> ^ % «ppp ^ 1 *^P* V / «pW pp* 1 ^p* J W W V*f *pp* •> 1 

HR$(128)+"ticker"+STRING$ (14, 12 8 


460 PRINT© 3 87 , "UPDATED MARCH 86 


& AUG 88"; 


) 


470 IF INKEY$=""THEN470ELSE480 


910 PRINT TP$ 


480 1 # of players set up 


920 POKE1043,56:POKE1044,54 

^P» BPl PJ ^^^^W PPPP *P^ * _V » ^BB ^PP' PP> ^Bf PI PI ■ ^B' Bk 

930 PRINT@33,N$(1) ; :PRINT§49,N$ ( 


490 CLS3:PLAY"V31" 


500 SOUNDRND(88) ,3 


2) ; :PRINT@257 ,N$ (3) ; :PRINT@273,N 


510 PRINT@70, "HOW MANY PLAYERS (1 


$(4) ; 


-4) " ; :INPUTP 


940 PRINT@39, "$"; :PRINT@55, "$"; : 

^™ ~ ^bpp v • m ^bp ^ ^ ^bt ^bi ^ pppp Pp » BPS ^P^ ^P^ P m BJ 


520 IF P=4 THEN 560 


PRINT@2 63 ,"$";: PRINT@279 , "$" ; 

^BP 4B» V ^BB» V ■ PBP k_ P J ^ BP* P» ^ PMBf « ' ■ ■ Bp F ^Br P ^P^ » 


530 PRINT§162, "DO YOU WISH HAL T 


950 IF M(1)<1 THEN M(1)=0 


0 PLAY ALSO"; 


960 IF M(2)<1 THEN M(2)=0 


540 I$=INKEY$:IFI$="" THEN 540 


970 IF M(3)<1 THEN M(3)=0 


550 IF I$="Y" OR I$="N" THEN 560 


980 IF M(4)<1 THEN M(4)=0 


ELSE540 


990 F0RX=1 TO P 


560 PRINT@162,STRING$ (30,175) ; 


1000 M(X)=INT(100*M(X) )/100 


570 IF I$="N" THEN JJ=70:HF=88 


101$ NEXTX 


580 F0RX=1T05:S0UNDRND(255) ,l:NE 


1020 PRINT@40,M(1) ; :PRINT@56,M(2 

^^^^ ~ v - M P. M W » ^BP PPI ^fc BPPP ^Bj B PBP> ^PP' ^B^ P ^B, tfB> % BBBI 


XTX 


) ; :PRINT@2 64 ,M(3) ; :PRINT@280,Mf 4 

/ / W ^» p^ » * ^p* W ^p' * / V # * * * ppp \ai pppJ ^PT Am* W «V «V V ♦ 


590 IFP>4 THEN 480 


) ; 


600 F0RX==1T0P 


1030 F0RX=1T06 

PP> ^PP' ^PP^ ^PP^ PPP ^PP' PPi ^PP P» PPPI ^BK ^■P' ^PF^ 


610 PRINT@134+(X-1)*64, "PLAYER # 


1040 PRINT@32*X+33 # LEFTS (S$(X) ,2 

^p»^^ ™ * » ppp ^p^ PPPJ • p "PP^ P^pT * b»pbIbbbpJ «p> ^p^ VabF ppp* V «1 P> # » PPBf 


" ;X;"NAME" ; :INPUTN$ (X) 


) ; :PRINT@32*X+49,LEFT$ (S$ (X) ,2) ; 

M ¥ ^™ •* * pppp ™ "J pp* *p*^ pppJ p» pp * •»P T V "ppp"" ppp p^ % p^p»' p*p* L Wp) f M J f 


620 NEXTX 


1050 NEXTX 


630 IF P=4 THEN 650 


1060 FORX=8T013 


640 IF I$="Y" THEN P=P+1 : N$ (P) =" 


1070 PRINT@32*X+33,LEFT$(S$(X-7) 


HAL" 


,2) ; :PRINT@32*X+49,LEFT$ (S$ (X-7) 


650 FORX=1TOP:M(X)=10000:NEXTX 


2) ; 


660 PLAYPL$(5) 


1080 NEXT X 


67J3 CLS7 


1090 FORX=32T0192STEP32 



54 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



THEN FL=j3 
THEN FL=1 



Ilj3j3 PRINT@4+X+32,G(X/32,1) ; : PRI 
NT@2j3+X+32,G(X/3 2,2) ; :PRINT@22 8+ 
X+32,G(X/3 2,3) ; : PRINT@244+X+32 , G 
(X/32,4) i 

111) 3 NEXT X 

112) 3 F0RX=)3 TO 5 

113) 3 PRINT@48j3+X*5,L(X+l) ; 

114) 3 NEXT X 

115) 3 'draw a square beside playe 
r 

116) 3 IFU=1THENPRINT§32,CHR$(159) 

117) 3 IFU=2THENPRINT@4 8,CHR$ (159) 

118) 3 IFU=3THENPRINT@256,CHR$ (159 

); 

119) 3 IFU=4THENPRINT@272,CHR$(159 

); 

12) 3)3 'main loop 

121) 3 BS$=INKEY$ 

122) 3 IF BS$= M Q" 

123) 3 IF BS $ = "A" 

124) 3 IF FL=a THEN 13 5)3 

125) 3 IF BS$= ,, H f, THEN GOT0264)3 

126) 3 IF BS$= ,,A " THEN U=U+1:IF U> 
P THEN U=l 

127) 3 IFBS$= ,,AH THEN 88)3 

128) 3 IFBS$= f, B n THEN191)3 

129) 3 IF JJ=7)3 THEN 131)3 

13) 3)3 IF U=P THEN IF BS$="C" THEN 
JJ=7)3:GOT0286)3 

131) 3 IFBS$= ,, S"THEN191)3 

132) 3 IFBS$=CHR$ (32) THEN135)3 

133) 3 BS$= f,!l 

134) 3 GOT0121)3 

135) 3 f dice roll and adjustments 

136) 3 IF HF=88 THEN 138)3 

137) 3 IF RND(3)=2 THEN IF U=P THE 
N GOSUB279)3 

138) 3 RC=RC+1:IFRC>=R THEN 24)3)3 

139) 3 U=U+1:IF U>P THEN U=l 

14) 3)3 f roll three dice 

141) 3 PLAYPL$(2) 

142) 3 D(1)=RND(6) :D(2)=RND(3) :D(3 
)=RND(3) 

143) 3 IF D(2)=2 THEN IF RND(1)3)>7 
THEN D(2)=RND(2) *2+-l 

144) 3 IFD(3)=1THEN D(3)=5 

145) 3 IFD(3)=2THEN D(3)=1J3 

146) 3 IFD(3)=3THEN D(3)=2)3 

147) 3 'ADJUST UP & DOWN 

148) 3 GOSUB162)3 

149) 3 IF D(2)=l THEN L(D(1))=L(D( 
1) )+D(3) :PLAYPL$(4) 

15) 3)3 IF L(D(1) )>=2)3)3 THEN GOSUB1 
73)3 

151)3 IF D(2)=2 THEN L(D(1))=L(D( 
1) )-D(3) :PLAYPL$ (3) 



152) 3 IF L(D(1))<=)3 THEN GOSUB182 
f 

153) 3 'dividend routine 

154) 3 IF D(2)=3 THEN 155)3 ELSE 16 
1)3 

155) 3 IFL(D(1) )<1J3)3THEN F0RX=1T05 
)3)3:NEXTX:GOTO 1610 

156) 3 PLAY PL$(1) 

157) 3 FORX=lTOP 

158) 3 DV=G(D(1) ,X)/lj80*D(3) 

159) 3 M(X)=M(X)+DV 
16)3)3 NEXT X 

161) 3 GOTO 88)3 

162) 3 CLS)3 

163) 3 PRINT@71,"# ROLLS LEFT "+ST 
R$(R-RC) ; 

164) 3 PRINT@16J3,G$ (5) ? :PRINT@192, 

G$(6) ; 

165) 3 PRINT§224,G$(7) ; :PRINT@256, 

G$(7) ; 

166) 3 PRINT@288,G$(8) ; 

167) 3 PRINT@257,LEFT$(S$(D(1) ) ,5) 

168) 3 IF D(2)=l THENPRINTQ2 69, "UP 
it • 

169) 3 IF D(2)=2 THENPRINT@2 68 , "DO 



INC. 



(THE SOFTWARE HOUSE HAS A MEM NAME) 



D I SKS 




/twm 

10/44.95 

IPPY DISKS 10/17.95 

FACTORY PUNCHED-USE BOTH SIDES. * 73/ 100 

CERTIFIED ERROR FREE. N/SLEEVES, LABELS, M.P. 

PRINTER RIBBONS 



APPLE IMA0E WRITER 
APPLE IM.WR.I! 4 COLOR 
APPLE LQ - H/8 
COMMODORE MPS Bit 
COMMODORE MPS 803 
COMMODORE 1926 
DIABLO HVTVPE II - H/8 
EPSON MXB8/86E 
EPSON SPECTRUM LX8B/98 
BEMINI 18/S/BG, SLACK 
DEM COLORS R-B-G-BR-PUR 
NEC P2/P6 FILM 
NEC P3/P7 FILM 
OK I DATA 88/82/98/92 - SEE 
OKI.MICROLINE 182/192 
R.9. DHP138, BLACK 

COLORS RED-BLU-8REEN 
STAR ML/NX/18, BLACK 
STAR RADIX 18, BLACK 
OTHER RIBBONS AVAILABLE. 



• 4.99 
•12.99 

• 4.99 
4. 99 
4. 99 
7.98 
4. 99 
4. 99 
4.98 
2.88 
3. 88 
6. 99 
8. 99 

SEHINI 

• 7.98 

• 6.99 

• 7,99 

• 7.99 

• 7.88 
CALL OR 



6/427. 00 



R.B. DHPtlB 

BLUE STREAK 

6/427.88 

D0Z./422.88 
9/412.88 



3/422. 88 



WRITE. 



ALL ITEMS 100X GUARANTEED 

Add $2.50 S/H in U.S.A. - Canada Add $3.50 + $1.00/LB 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 
Send Check/Money Order Payable to: 



DATAMATCH , INC. 

9020 Hemingway, Bedford, Ml 48239 
(313) 937-1313 

Send Card Number & E* p. Date Mirt. Charge Q/d&f E 20-00 




November 1988 THE RAINBOW 55 



WN"; 

1700 IF D(2)=3 THENPRINT@2 69 , "DI 

V"; 

1710 PRINT§279,D(3) ? 
1720 RETURN 

1730 'splitting routine 

1740 PRINT§396, "IT SPLIT!!"; 
175p F0RX=1T03 : PLAYPL$ ( 1 ) : NEXTX 
1760 PRINT @ 3 9 6 , 11 1 T SPLIT!!"; 
1770 L(D(1)}=100 
1780 FORX=lTOP 
1790 G(D(1) ,X)=G(D(1) ,X)*2 
18j25j3 NEXTX 
1810 RETURN 

18 20 'breaking routine 
183)3 L(D(1))=100 

1840 PRINT@396,"IT BROKE . . . "; 
1850 PRINT@384+32, "IT FELL THROU 
GH THE FLOOR EH!" ; 
I860 FOR X=1T0P 
1870 G(D(1) ,X)=0 
1880 NEXTX 

1890 FORX=lTO 8 : SOUND122 , 1 : SOUND 
20,1: NEXTX 
1900 RETURN 

1910 'buy & sell routine 
1920 'display stocks first 

1930 SOUND200,1 
1940 CLS0 

1950 PRINT@8,STRING$(17,236) ; : PR 

INT@232,STRING$ (17,227) ; 

1960 FdRX=0TO7:PRINT@X*32+7,CHR$ 

(229) ; :PRINT@X*32+25,CHR$ (234) ; : 

NEXTX 

1970 PRINT§266,CHR$(239) ;: PRINT© 
277,CHR$ (239) ; : PRINT@297 , CHR$ (22 
7) ; :PRINT@298,CHR$(236) ; :PRINT@2 
99,CHR$ (227) ; : PRINT@308 , CHR$ ( 227 
) ;:PRINT@309,CHR$(236) ;:PRINT@31 
0,CHR$ (227) ; 

1980 PRINT@320,STRING$ (32,239) ; 
1990 FOR X= 352T0448 STEP32:PRIN 
T@X,G$(3) ; :NEXTX:PRINT@480,G$(4) 
; :POKE1535 / 143 

2000 PRINT (§40, "GOLD IS AT";L(1 

); 

2010 PRINT@72, "SILVER IS AT";L(2 

); 

2020 PRINT@104, "OIL IS AT";L( 

3) ; 

2030 PRINT@136, "BONDS ARE AT";L( 

4) ; 

2040 PRINT@168, "INDUST IS AT";L( 

5) ; 

2050 PRINTS 200, "GRAIN IS AT";L( 

6) '; 

2060 PRINT@301,LEFT$(N$(U) ,6) ; 
2070 PRINT@354,USING"$$######### 

";M(U) ; 

2080 IFBS$="B"THENPRINT@333 , "BUY 
ING" ; 



56 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



2090 IFBS$="S"THENPRINT@333, "SEL 
LING" ; 

2100 PRINT@484, "PRESS * ENTER* TO 
RETURN" ; 

2110 PRINT @ 3 90 , "HOW MANY SHARES" 

; : INPUTS : SOUNDRND ( 2 3 3 ) , 2 

2120 IFS=0THEN880 

2130 IFS<500 THEN 2110 

2140 PRINT@423,"OF WHICH STOCK " 

; : INPUTU$ : SOUND23 3 , 2 

2150 F0RX=1T06:IFLEFT$(U$,2)=LEF 

T$(S$(X) ,2)THEN2160ELSE NEXTX:I$ 

="N" :GOTO2200 

2160 V=S/100*L(X) 

2170 PRINT© 4 54, "VALUE IS";V;"OK( 
Y/N) 11 ; :PLAY"T25505CGDGECCGDGECC" 
2180 PRINT@485, "PRESS **Q** TO R 
ETURN " ; 

2190 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN2190 

2200 IF I$="N" THEN PRINT@462,S 

TRING$ (8,143) ; : PRINT@405 , STRING$ 

(8 , 143 ) ; : PRINTQ438 , STRING$ (8 , 143 

) ; :GOTO2110 

2210 IF I$="Q"THEN880 

2220 IF BS$="B" THEN GOSUB2250:G 

OTO 2240 

2230 IF BS$="S" THEN GOSUB2340 
2240 GOTO880 

2250 'value calculator to buy 
2260 IF V<=M(U) THEN 2310 
2270 PRINT© 3 90 , "SORRY BUT YOU DO 
NT " ; 

2280 PRINT@4 23, "HAVE ENOUGH MONE 

Y " ; 

2290 PRINT@454,STRING$(21,143) ; 
2300 SOUND30, 20: RETURN 
2310 G(X,U)=G(X,U)+S 
2320 M(U)=M(U)-V 
23 30 RETURN 

2340 'value calculator to sell 

2350 IFG(X,U)>=S THEN2360 ELSE P 
RINT§390,STRING$ (24,143) ; :PRINT@ 
423 , STRING$ (24 , 143 ); : PRINT@454 , S 
TRING$(24,143) ; : PRINT@423 , "NICE 
TRY BUDDY"; 

23 55 FORXW=l TO 33 3 : NEXTXW: GOT08 
80 

2360 G(X,U)=G(X,U) -S 
2370 M(U)=M(U)+V 
23 80 RETURN 

2390 'end routine here eh 

2400 CLS6:PRINT@167,"TIMES UP FO 

LKS ! ! " ; 

2410 PRINT@227,"ALL STOCKS WILL 

NOW BE SOLD!"; 

2420 SOUND220,20 

2430 SOUND200,20 

2440 SOUND220,20 

2450 SOUND200,20 

2460 FORX=lTOP 

2470 F0RY=1T06 



2480 V=G(Y,X)/10J3*L(Y) 


2720 PRINT§262, "B = BUY STOCKS"; 


2490 


MfX) =M(X) +V 


2730 PRINT@198,"S = SELL STOCKS" 


2500 


NEXTY 


• 

1 


2510 


NEXTX 


2740 PRINT§483," PRESS ANY KEY T 


2520 


F0RX=1T06:PLAYPL$(X) :NEXTX 


0 RETURN"; 


2530 


CLS8 


2750 EXEC44539 


2540 


F0RX=3T0 P*3 STEP 3 


2760 GOTO 880 


2550 


PRINT@X*32,N$(X/3) ; : PRINT@X 


2780 'hal routine 


*32+7,USING"$$#########»;M(X/3) ; 


2790 IF M(U)<1000 THEN 2855 


2560 


NEXTX 


2800 CLSRND(8) :PRINT@166, "I'M GO 


2570 


PN=l:HS=Mf 1^ 


NNA BUY"; 


2580 


FORX=2 TO P 


2810 Y=0 


2590 


IF MfX}>HS THEN HS=MfX1:PN= 


2820 X=RND(6) 


x 




2830 Y=Y+1:IFY=12 THEN2855 


2600 


NEXTX 

1* JJA X A 


2840 IF M(U)>=500/100*L(X) THEN 


2610 


FORX=l TO 133 3* NEXTX 

i viva -l. x w x> «j «j «j • it x 


G(X,U)=G(X,U)+500:M(U)=M(U) -500/ 

% W W » w W WW \ 9 ^ W w W W 


2620 


PRINT@490,N$(PN)+» WINS EH! 


100*L(X) 


rr • 

t 




2850 GOTO 2820 


2630 


GOTO2 630 


2855 RETURN 


2640 


'help menu here 


2860 'auto buy for hals 


2650 


CLS 


2870 1 original buying 


2660 


PRINT@10, "STOCK TICKER"; 


2880 FOR X=l TO 10 


2670 


PRINT@42, " » ; 


2890 RS=RND(6) 


2680 


PRINT@102 ; "H = HELP"; 


2900 G(RS,U)=G(RS,U)+1000 


2690 


PRINT@134,'»C = ORIGINAL BUY 


2910 M(U)«M(U) -1000 


FOR 


HAL" 


2920 NEXTX 


2700 


PRINT@166,"A = AUTO ROLL"; 


2930 U=l 


2710 


PRINT@230,"Q = QUIT AUTO RO 


2940 GOTO 880 


LL" ; 




m 



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SEAL 



★ 
★ 
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Available on COC0 1, 2, and 3 

Includes Documentation 

Over 4,500 Satisfied 
Customers 

Back Issues Available From 
July '82 (Over 720 Programs) 



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T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, 2490 MILES STANDISH DR., HOLLAND, Ml 49424 (616)399-9648 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 57 




iuesd^y, November 8, : 1988 
Election Day ^ is here- 
shearing presidehtial debates, 
reading the newspaper and listening to 
yqixr heart, you made your decision^ 
You voted for your favorite presidential 
candidate; - 

Now you wait. You made your choice, 
but did the rest of America agree with 
you? Most of us will sit through thfe 
%venirig, listening to the election results. 
Many will let their children stay up a 
little late because this night (like all 
election nights) is an important $art of 
our country 's heritage. We -may tell put 
children abbut the voting process, of We 
may explain our presidential chbice. 
Election riight is both solemn and 
' ^ but it is also a waiting game. 

posti^l^ listen as the newspeople 
S ; make prejiiiti^^ or try, once again, to 
(; explain the efecll^ college! We wait, 
of you woulcR|ike to tfa some^ 



™° ' thing o^;electi6^ night, and y^f chit 
drenv ; may ; 'haye-di$^^ 
■ !But what can ' 

you do? ■ 

Leonard Hyre's jetton <S#. Tins pro- 
gram tets; you plot the progress of the 
election, results as they come 4n. You. 
don't have to wait for your favorite 
newscasters to giye the results, explain 




tipns. With this pro|ram> yott d&n writer 
the infofmation, f ^^y^'^^^f;g^ 

, ^^j^lii^p^J election is a Vita! 
part of but; political ^ifeiri. Whether tijr 

our votes eoixnt in the decisioii-making 

eleclioti^s ^ovetage a 
interesting, Enjoy el^«?tiQii rtig^ iaMd 
t^p^ Election ■ C 



■ 'ft"" <V. , 



November 1988 TH^ RAfNBOW v .5,9' 



Soon we will elect a man to lead 
our nation for the next four years 
— the president of the United 
States. Like most Americans, my pol- 
itical sense is heightened during the time 
preceding our presidential election. I 
am, as we all are, involved in an impor- 
tant decision. 

In July, I presented Convention as an 
aid in understanding and enjoying each 
party's nomination process. Election '88 
is a companion to the previous pro- 
gram. Election '88 will help you and 
your family enjoy and understand the 
election process by letting you tabulate 
election results, review election history 
and predict the election's outcome. 




Let's begin with a brief explanation 
of our electoral system. Our president 
and vice president are not elected by 
popular vote. Instead, they are elected 
by electoral vote. When we vote for a 
president, we are actually voting for a 
particular party's right to send its 
electors to the electoral college. Each 
state and the District of Columbia sends 
as many electors as it has senators and 
representatives. There are 538 electoral 
votes available. To win the presidency 
or the vice presidency, a candidate 
needs at least 270 votes. If neither 
candidate receives enough electoral 
votes, the Senate and the House of 
Representatives will elect the president. 



Leonard Eyre is the author of Federal 
Hill Software's Handicapper series and 
a number of articles for RAINBOW. He 
also published several articles in RAIN- 
BOW*s sister publication, PCM, and is 
the author o/Sanyopoly, a new Sanyo 
game from Michigan Software. 

60 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Election '88's main objective is to 
keep track of the electoral votes as 
election-day results become available. 
Entering the votes by state is the first 
option on the program menu. If you 
choose to enter state votes, Option 1, 
you are asked for the two-letter postal 
abbreviation of the appropriate state. 
The program then presents that state's 
number of electoral votes. The program 
then asks you to identify who has 
received the electoral votes by pressing 
the initial letter of the following choices: 
Democrat, Republican or Undecided. 
After you have entered this informa- 
tion, the program will ask you for the 
next state. When you have entered all 
current information, type XX to exit 
Option 1. Your responses are then 
added to previous information and the 
results are tabulated. 

Option 2 presents an onscreen cur- 
rent status report, which shows the total 
votes accrued by both parties and 
indicates how each state has voted. 
Option 3 gives you the same informa- 
tion on a one-page printout. These 
options will help you keep track of the 
electoral votes and predict the outcome 
of the election — just like the pros. 

Option 4 adds a touch of magic to the 
program. A map of the United States is 
created. As you identify the winning 
party in each state, the state is painted 
the appropriate color. Use this option to 
illustrate the evening's progress, or use 
the map to reinforce your children's (or 
your) knowledge of United States geog- 
raphy. There might even be a lesson or 
two about party distribution or a can- 
didate's campaign practices in this map. 
You decide. 

Option 5 is a History Submenu, 
which (as the heading suggests) sends 
the program to a submenu that presents 
four options: 

1. Democratic Tickets (1920 — ) 

2. Republican Tickets (1920 — ) 

3. U.S. Presidents (1920 to 1984) 

4. Electoral College Facts 

Selecting any one of these options 
sends you (or your child) to an informa- 
tion screen, which elaborates on the 
chosen subject. (This way, we won't just 
tally the electoral votes, we'll know how 
they work. 

Menu Option 6 allows the user to 
save the data entries in progress and 
load them again at a later time. This will 
be most useful when using the last menu 
option to play "Political Predictions." 
Political Predictions is an option that 
lets you make a game out of the selec- 



tion process. For this, gather the family 
around on or before Election Eve and 
let them guess which candidate will 
carry each state. After the final tabula- 
tions are in, Election '88 will determine 
just how well the predictions match 
those of the electorate at large. 

Election '88^ program structure is 
straightforward and simple. You should 
have little trouble following the pro- 
gram logic. The first few lines dimen- 
sion the necessary data space and dis- 
play the title screen. Next, program data 
is listed and read into memory. Be 
careful typing these data statements. 
They must be accurate. Next, the main 
menu information is listed. (See REM 
statements in the program.) The rou- 
tines for each function follow. The 
routine that deals with state results 
(Option 1) provides the information 
needed for the other options. 

For the map routine, I used DATA 
statements to provide the LINE state- 
ments with needed information. (This 
shortened the length of the code needed 
and the typing required to enter it.) 
After the program creates the map for 
the first time, it gets the entire U.S. map 
as a graphic array. Therefore, when the 
program recalls the map, it puts the map 
on screen and skips the data section of 
the program. This solves all the pro- 
gramming problems and presents the 
map almost instantly. Users do not have 
to wait for the DRAW statement to per- 
form its laborious task each time the 
map is called. 




Typing in and running Election '88 
should present no serious problems if 
you enter the correct data, including all 
commas. If you have any problems with 
the program, look at the appropriate 
DATA statements. 

Enjoy Election '88. Let's hope "our" 
candidate wins! 



(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at P.O. Box 403, Cambridge 
MD 21613. Please include an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



HINDOO MfTCM 




. ; 'i j |iii nj i j i| j l .. i .i . . i u iii 
•Si.". ,,v.* v. -'i' w. ■! 



a)ORR(OR 



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All programs CoCo 1,2,3 compatible, unless otherwise stated 



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21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 





TRILOGY 



The epic adventure is back! The largest adven- 
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240 12 

340 65 

420 31 

500 64 

700 251 

840 248 

1020 4 

1184 206 



1330 163 

1422 6 

1600 0 

1770 165 

1910 132 

2050 86 

2230 139 

2340 190 



2480 94 

2600 89 

2690 205 

2790 109 

2940 53 

4010 23 

4504 7 

END 197 



The listing: ELECTION 

20 ■* ELECTION 88 * 

30 1 * (C) 7/88 L HYRE * 

40 f * CAMBRIDGE MD * 

5p r* ************************* 

60 ■ 

100 DIM M(600) :REM MAP ARRAY 
110 DIM LS$(51) ,S$(51) ,S(51) ,EV( 
51) ,DP$(17) ,DV$(17) ,RP$(17) ,RV$( 
17) ,OV(51) ,DW(51) ,SV(51) ,WN(17) , 
PP(51) 
120 ■ 

13j3 ****** TITLE SCREEN ***** 
140 1 

150 CLS5:PRINT STRING$ (64 , 175) ; 

160 FOR X=2T014 STEP 2:PRINT@X*3 

2, STRING$ (32 , 159) ; :NEXT 

170 FOR X=170 TO 298 STEP 32:PRI 

NT@X,STRING$(12," 11 ) ;CHR$(128) ;: 

NEXT:PRINT@182,CHR$(207) ; 

180 PRXNT@331,STRING$(12,128) ; 

190 PRINT@203,"*ELECTION*"; : PRIN 

T@237,"* 88 *";: PRINTS 2 68, "COVER 

AGE" ; : PRINT@2 99 , "BY RAINBOW"; 

200 1 

210 « ***** PROGRAM DATA ***** 
220 1 

230 DATA ALABAMA, AL, 1, 9 , ALASKA, A 

K, 2 , 3 , ARIZONA , AZ , 3 , 7 

24)3 DATA ARKANSAS , AR, 4 , 6 , CALIFOR 

NIA, CA, 5 , 47 , COLORADO, CO ,6,8, CONN 

ECTICUT,CN,7,8 

250 DATA DELAWARE , DE , 8 , 3 , DIST OF 
COLUMBIA , DC , 9 , 3 , FLORIDA , FL , 10 , 2 
1, GEORGIA, GA, 11, 12 
260 DATA HAWAII , HI , 12 , 4 , IDAHO, ID 
, 13 , 4 , ILLINOIS , IL, 14 , 24 
270 DATA INDIANA, IN, 15 , 12 , IOWA, I 

0. 16.8, KANSAS , KS , 17 , 7 , KENTUCKY , K 
Y, 18 , 9 , LOUISIANA, LA, 19 , 10 

280 DATA MAINE, ME, 20, 4, MARYLAND, 
MD , 2 1 , 10 , MASSACHUSETTS , MA , 2 2 , 13 , 
MICHIGAN, MI, 23, 20 

290 DATA MINNESOTA, MN, 2 4, 10, MISS 
ISSIPPI, MS, 25 ,7, MISSOURI, MO, 26,1 

1, MONTANA,MT,27,4 

300 DATA NEBRASKA, NE, 2 8, 5, NEVADA 
,NV,29,4,NEW HAMPSHIRE , NH, 30 , 4 , N 



EW JERSEY,NJ,31,16 

310 DATA NEW MEXICO , NM, 32 , 5 , NEW 

YORK, NY, 3 3, 3 6, NORTH CAROLINA, NC, 

34, 13, NORTH DAKOTA, ND,35,3 

320 DATA OHIO, OH, 3 6, 2 3, OKLAHOMA, 

OK , 3 7 , 8 , OREGON , OR , 3 8 , 7 

330 DATA PENNSYLVANIA,PA,39,25,R 

HODE ISLAND, RI, 40,4 

340 DATA SOUTH CAROLINA, SC, 41, 8 , 

SOUTH DAKOTA, SD, 42, 3, TENNESSEE, T 

N, 43, 11, TEXAS, TX, 44, 29 

350 DATA UTAH,UT, 45, 5, VERMONT, VT 

, 46 , 3 , VIRGINIA, VA, 47 , 12 

3 60 DATA WASHINGTON, WA, 4 8, 10, WES 

T VIRGINIA, WV, 4 9, 6, WISCONSIN, WI, 

50,11,WYOMING,WY,51,3 

370 DATA JAMES M. COX, FRANKLIN D 

. ROOSEVELT, JOHN W. DAVIS, CHARLE 

S W. BRYAN, ALFRED E. SMITH, JOSEP 

H T. ROBINSON, FRANKLIN D. ROOSEV 

ELT , JOHN N. GARNER , FRANKLIN D. R 

OOSEVELT, JOHN N. GARNER, FRANKLI 

N D. ROOSEVELT, HENRY A. WALLACE 

3 80 DATA FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, 

HARRY S. TRUMAN, HARRY S. TRUMAN 

, ALBEN W. BARKLEY, ADLAI E. STE 

VENSON, JOHN J. SPARKMAN, ADLAI 

E. STEVENSON, ESTES KEFAUVER, JO 

HN F. KENNEDY, LYNDON B. JOHNSON 

, LYNDON B. JOHNSON, HUBERT H. H 

UMPHREY 

390 DATA HUBERT H. HUMPHREY, EDM 
UND S. MUSKIE, GEORGE S. MCGOVER 
N, R. SARGENT SHRIVER JR. , JIMMY 
CARTER, WALTER F. MONDALE, J I MM 
Y CARTER, WALTER F. MONDALE 
400 DATA WALTER F. MONDALE, GERA 
LDINE FERRARO 

410 DATA WARREN G. HARDING, CALV 
IN COOLIDGE, CALVIN COOLIDGE, CH 
ARLES D. DAWES, HERBERT HOOVER, 
CHARLES CURTIS, HERBERT HOOVER, 
CHARLES CURTIS, ALFRED M. LANDON 
, FRANK KNOX 

420 DATA WENDELL L . WILKIE , CHARLE 
S MCNARY , THOMAS E.DEWEY, JOHN W.B 
RICKER, THOMAS E.DEWEY, EARL WARRE 
N, DWIGHT D.EISENHOWER, RICHARD M. 
NIXON, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, RI CHAR 
D M.NIXON, RICHARD M. NIXON, HENRY 
CABOT LODGE 

430 DATA BARRY M. GO LDWATER, WILLI 
AM E.MILLER, RICHARD M. NIXON, SPIR 
O T.AGNEW, RICHARD M.NIXON, SPIRO 
T . AGNEW , GERALD R. FORD, ROBERT J.D 
OLE, RONALD REAGAN , GEORGE BUSH,RO 
NALD REAGAN, GEORGE BUSH 
440 DATA 152,100,212,78,76,92,13 
2,88 

450 DATA 44,80,92,72,200,52,192, 
70 



62 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



460 DATA 212,98,172,116,164,100, 
212,88 

470 DATA 64,44,144,60,156,60,128 
,56 

480 DATA 108,76,160,76,136,108,2 
12,32 

490 DATA 184,70,204,48,160,48,12 
8,36 

500 DATA 144,100,132,72,80,32,10 
8,60 

510 DATA 60,72,204,44,196,64,92, 
92 

520 DATA 188,48,176,84,108,28,16 
4,60 

530 DATA 120,88,48,44,184,64,209 
,53 

540 DATA 176,98,108,44,160,84,11 
6,108 

550 DATA 76,72,200,40,180,76,48, 
28 

560 DATA 172,72,140,40,88,52 

570 DATA 2,2,2,1,1,1,1,1,2,2,1,1 

,2,2,1,2,2 

580 1 

590 i ****** READ IN DATA ****** 
600 1 

610 FOR X=l TO 51: READ LS$(X),S$ 
(X) ,S(X) ,EV(X) :NEXT 
620 FOR X=1T017:READDP$(X) ,DV$(X 
):NEXT:FOR X=1T017 : READRP$ (X) , RV 
$(X) :NEXT 

630 FOR X=l TO 51: READ OV(X) :REA 
D DW(X) :NEXT X 

640 FOR X=l TO 17 :READ WN(X):NEX 
T X 
650 1 

660 ' **EXIT TITLE AFTER READ** 
670 1 

680 PRINT@464, "<PRESS ANY KEY>" ; 
690 AK$=INKEY$:IF AK$= M,, THEN 690 
700 1 

710 ****** MAIN MENU HERE ***** 
720 1 

730 CLS: PRINT STRING$ (32 , 175) ; : P 
RINT@3 3 , "ELECTION COVERAGE BY RA 
INBOW" ; : PRINT@64 , STRING $ (32 , 159 

); 

740 PRINT: PRINT" MENU SELE 

CTIONS " : PRINT : PRINT" 1>ENT 

ER VOTING RESULTS": PRINT" 2>VI 
EW CURRENT VOTE STATUS" : PRINT" 

3>PRINT CURRENT VOTE STATUS" 
750 PRINT" 4>U.S.MAP WITH VOTE 
STATUS" : PRINT" 5>HISTORY SUBM 
ENU" 

755 PRINT" 6>SAVE OR LOAD DATA 
FILE" : PRINT" 7 > PLAY" ; CHR$ ( 34 ) 
/"POLITICAL PREDICTION" ;CHR$ (34) 
760 PRINT: PRINT" PRESS # OF S 
ELECTION "; 

770 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=""THEN 770 



You can make all your 
Holiday Greeting Cards 

this season with the 
CoCo Graphics Designer 




The Coco Graphics Designer produces 
beautiful Greeting Cards, Banners, and 
Signs for holidays, birthdays and other oc- 
casions. 

The program features picture, border, and character 
font editors, so that you can modify or expand the 
already built in libraries. Plus a special "grabber" 
utility is included to capture areas of high resolution 
screens for your picture library. 

Coco Graphics Designer $29.95 

Optional Extra Font and Picture Disks: 
Font Disk A 10 Fonts $14.95 

Western, Stencil, Banner, Shadow, Variety, 

Type, Stripes, Digital, Bold3, Object. 
Font Disk B 10 Fonts $14.95 

Arcade, Circle, Alien, Cube, Baroque, Deco, 

Block, Gray, Computer, Script. 
Picture Disk #2 4 sets of 30 pictures ea. $14.95 

Sports, America, Party, Office. 
Picture Disk #3 4 sets of 30 pictures ea. $14.95 

Animals, Nature, Religion, Travel 
Picture Disk #4 120 Holiday Pictures: $14.95 

Christmas, Chanukah, Thanksgiving, New 

Year's, Easter, Halloween, etc. 

See our full page ad (page 53) in the October issue 

of Rainbow for sample picture and font printouts, 
or send for our free complete brochure. 
Requirements: a Coco I, II or III with at least 32K, one 
disk drive, BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 or JDOS. 
Printers supported include; Epson RX/FX, Gemini 10X, 
SG10, NX10, DMP 100/105/110/130/430 CGP220, 
many Okidata (check with Zebra), Seikosha GP100/250, 
Gorilla Banana, Legend 808. Ordering Instructions: All 
orders add $3.00 Shipping & Handling. UPS COD add 
$3.00. VISA/MC Accepted. NY residents add sales tax. 

Zebra Systems, Inc. 
78-06 Jamaica Ave, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 

Orders shipped same or next day! 



November 1 988 THE RAINBOW 63 



780 IF VAL(AK$)>7 THEN 770 
790 IF AK$="1" THEN GOSUB 880 
800 IF AK$="2" THEN GOSUB 1120 
810 IF AK$="3" THEN GOSUB 1330 
820 IF AK$="4" THEN GOSUB 1520 
830 IF AK$="5" THEN GOSUB 1620 
832 IF AK$="6" THEN GOSUB 4000 
834 IF AK$="7" THEN GOSUB 4500 
840 GOTO 730 
850 ' 

860 '**** STATE RESULTS **** 
870 ' 

880 CLS: PRINT STRING$ (32 , 159) :PR 
INT@35, "VOTING RESULT ENTRY SCRE 
EN" J PRINT STRING $ (32 , 175) ; 
890 PRINT@448,STRING$ (32,128) ;:P 
RINT@484,"<ENTER XX FOR MAIN MEN 
U>" ; 

900 PRINT© 12 8 , "ENTER STATE ABBRE 

VIATION" 7 : INPUT ST$ 

910 IF ST$="XX"THEN RETURN 

920 FOR TEST=1 TO 51: IF ST$=S$ (T 

EST) THEN 950 

930 NEXT TEST 

940 PRINT© 12 8 , "NO SUCH ABBRE VI AT 
ION! TRY AGAIN I ": SOUND 1,1: FOR X 
=1 TO 800: NEXT: GOSUB 3070: GOTO 8 
80 

950 PRINT: PRINT "THE STATE OF ";L 

S$(TEST) :PRINT"WITH (";EV(TEST) ; 

") VOTES HAS VOTED:" 

960 PRI NT " < D > EMO CRAT <R>EPUBLI 

CAN" 

970 PRINT"<U>NDECIDED" : PRINT : PRI 

NT "ENTER D, R, OR U " 

980 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=" "THEN 980 

990 SV(TEST)=0:IF AK$="U" THEN 1 

070 

1000 IF AK$="D" THEN SV(TEST)=1 

1010 IF AK$=»"R" THEN SV(TEST)=2 

1020 DV=0 : RV=0 

1030 FOR X=l TO 51 

1040 IF SV(X)=1 THEN DV=DV+EV(X) 

1050 IF SV(X)=2 THEN RV=RV+EV(X) 

1060 NEXT X 

1070 GOSUB 3070:GOTO 880 
1080 RETURN 
1090 « 

1100 '** SCREEN STATUS REPORT ** 
1110 • 

1120 CLS : PRINT "UPDATE OF CURRENT 
STATUS " : PRINT STRING$ ( 3 2 , 175 ) ; " 
NEEDED TO WIN: 270 VOTES" 
1130 PRINT@96 , "DEMOCRATIC CURREN 
T TOTAL =";: PRINT USING"###" ;DVD 
V 

1140 PRINT@128 , "REPUBLICAN CURRE 
NT TOTAL =";:PRINT USING"###" ;RV 
1150 PRINT STRING$(32,159) ; :PRIN 
T"STATE/DC VOTES RESULTS" 

1160 ZZ=1:XC=0:XV=0 



1170 FOR X=224 TO 384 STEP 32: PR 
INT@X,LS$(ZZ) 

1180 PRINT @X+16, ;: PRINT USING"* 
#";EV(ZZ) 

1182 XT$=" " 

1183 IF SV(ZZ)=1 AND PP(ZZ)=1 TH 
EN XT$="*":XC=XC+1 

1184 IF SV(ZZ)=2 AND PP(ZZ)=2 TH 
EN XT$="*":XC=XC+1 

1190 IF SV(ZZ)=1 THEN PRINT@X+19 
, "DEMOCRATIC" ;XT$: ELSE IF SV(ZZ) 
=2 THEN PRINT@X+19, "REPUBLICAN" ; 
XT$:ELSE PRINT@X+19," 

1191 IF SV(ZZ)<>0 THEN XV=XV+1 
1200 ZZ=ZZ+1 

1210 IF ZZ/6=INT(ZZ/6) THEN 1220 

ELSE GOTO 1250 

1220 PRINT :PRINT"<PRESS ANY KEY> 
ii 

1230 AK$=INKEY$:IF AK$=" "THEN 12 
30 

1240 FOR Y=224 TO 416 STEP 32: PR 
INT@Y,STRING$ (32, " ") :NEXT Y:GOT 
0 1170 

1250 IF ZZ=51 THEN 1265 
1260 NEXT X 

1265 IF XV>0 THEN PRINT: PRINT "YO 
UR PREDICTIONS :":PRINT"YOU HAVE 
" ;XC; "OUT OF" ;XV; "CORRECT" : PRINT 
"FOR A";INT((XC/XV)*100) ;" % ACC 
URACY RATE." 

1270 PRINT@448,STRING$(32,128) ; : 
PRINT@488,"< PRESS ANY KEY >»; 
1280 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=""THEN 12 
80 

1290 RETURN 
1300 • 

1310 '** PRINTOUT STATUS ** 
1320 • 

1330 CLS: PRINT STRING$ (32 , 159) :P 
RINT@38 , "PRINTOUT CURRENT STATUS 
" : PRINT STRING $ ( 32 , 175 ) ; 
1340 PRINT: PRINT "MAKE SURE PRINT 
ER IS READY!" 

1350 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS <P> TO PR 
INT": PRINT 

1360 PRINT "ANY OTHER KEY TO RETU 
RN TO MENU" 

1370 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=" "THEN 13 
70 

1380 IF AK$="P"THEN 1390 ELSE GO 
SUB 3070: RETURN 

1390 PRINT#-2,STRING$(80,"-") :PR 
INT#-2 , "ELECTION NIGHT 88 - COVE 
RAGE BY RAINBOW *=CORR 
ECT PREDICTION" 
1400 PRINT#-2,STRING$(80, "-") 
1405 XC=0:XV=0 

1410 FOR X=l TO 51:PRINT#-2,LS$( 
X) ; :PRINT #-2,TAB(24) ;S$(X) ; :PRI 




64 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



MicroWorld 11 
PO Box 5330 
Clinton, NJ 08891 



Since 1982 



) ^^& COMPUTER CENTER 

I MicroMorld ] 




e^iln Pa: (215) 863-8911 
In NJ: (201) 735-6138 



MicroWorld 
PO Box 69 
Wind Gap, Pa. 



Since 1982 



18091 



Free Shipping* 



100% TANDY Products* 




CoCo 

CoCo III, 128K 
CM~8 

Magnavox-8CM515 w/cbl 
FD-502 Drive 0. CoCo 
DHP- 106 
DMP-132 

SEIKOSHA SP1000 lOOcps 
Same as DMP-130 

SEIKOSHA SP1200 120cps 
Same as DMP-130A/132 

Star Hi cronies NX15 

Star Hi cronies HXIOOO 

CCr-81 

Joysticks (Pair) 
Color Mouse 
Deluxe Color House 
Joystick - DELUXE 
Serial Cables 
Hi -Res Joystick Interf. 

CoCo Upgrades 

CoCo III, 512K UPGRADE 
Multi-pak upgrade OLD 

Multi-pak upgrade NEW 

COMPUTERS 
TANDY 1000 HX Computer 
TANDY 1000 TX Computer 
TANDY 1400 LT 
TANDY 3000 
TANDY 3000 HL 
TANDY 4000 

MONITORS 

VH-4 Monochrome Honitor 
CH-5 RGB Color Honitor 
CM-11 RGB Color Honitor 
EGM-1 color Monitor 
CM-8 

Magnavox - 8 CM 515 



$145.00 
$248.00 
$317.00 
$225.00 
$165.00 
$275.00 

$159.00 

$199.00 

$399.00 
$199.00 

$43.00 
$13.00 
$33.00 
$38.00 
$24.00 
$3.25 
$8.00 

v$1 45.00 
$12.00 

$12.00 

$535.00 
$860.00 
$1295.00 
$1475.00 
$1090.00 
$1890.00 

$95.00 
$220.00 
$310.00 

$525.00 
$248.00 
$298.00 



HARD CARDS 




TANDY 20 Heg Hd Card 


$439.00 


30 Meg ZUCKER 


$499.00 


HARD DISKS 




(Kits include cable k controller) 


Seagate 20 Mg Kit 


$299.00 


Seagate 30 Mg Kit 


$349.00 


Seagate 40 Mg Kit(nocontroller)$399.00 


FLOPPY DRIVES- 




TEAC Internal: 




TEAC 5 1/4 Disk-360kb 


$99.00 


TEAC 3 1/2 Disk-720kb 


$119.00 


FLOPPY DRiVEggg 








External: 




5 1/4 Ext. Drive-HX/EX 


$180.00 


3 1/2 Ext. Drive-HX/EX 


$199.00 


Internal: 




5 1/4 Disk-360kb 


$125.00 


3 1/2 Disk-720kb 


$125.00 


3 1/2 to 5 1/4 Adapter 


$24.00 


5 1/4 1.2M FDD Kit 


$215.00 


5 1/4 360K FDD Kit 


$140.00 


PRINTERS 

DMP-106 (Speclal);:5?t :/ 


$165.00 


DMP-132 


$275.00 


DHP 440 


$545.00 


DWP-520 


$719.00 


DHP 2120 


$1279.00 


LP 1000 Laser 


$1899.00 


SEIKOSHA SP1000 (DMP-130) 


$159.00 


SEIKOSHA SP1200 (DHP-132) 


$199.00 


Star Mi cronies NX15 


$399.00 


Star Hi cronies NX1000 


$199.00 





BOARDS 




Smart Watch 


$30.00 


Plus Upgrade Adapter Bd 


$12.50 


Memory Plus Expansion BD 


$110.00 


EGA Adapter 


$185.00 


MODEMS 

ill vl/ JJJ'l^/ 






41 X J J . V/U 


Plus 300 Baud Pc Modem 


$75.00 


Plus 1200 Baud PC Modem 


$150.00 


' -'^H;-'. MISC ' 




oeriai rnJLiit; 




joysncK — utLUAt 


t?a nn 


Mniri+nr Platform 

llUII 1 LUI r loll ui ill 


$24.00 


Rihhnn^ - nMP-1^0. 

txlMUUIlis — Ullr — 1JU 


$8 00 

. •pKJ . \J\J 


KlDDOnS - Urir-lUD/iUO 




Flips - R/5 


>1J,.UU 


Disk Clean Kits 


$5.00 


/•» _ . ,_v« nMD i nc /c 
COVer - UMr-lUo/O 


t3 nn 


Cover - CoCo I I/I 1 1 


$3.00 


Cover - DMP-130 


$3.00 


Bulk Erasers 


$12.00 


Flip n 1 Files w/lock 




(3-1/2 or 5-1/4) 6 


" > . ' • 


Library Case-Black 


$1.50 


Library Case-Tan 


$2.00 


Paper- Mini 20# 


$4.00 


Paper #15 


$14.00 


Paper #20 


$10.00 


DISKS 




Tandy SS 6 1/4 Disks 


1 $9.00 


Tandy DS 5 1/4 Disks 


$10.00 


Tandy DS 3 1/2 Disks 


$28.00 


Winners DS/DD W/Lib case 


$7.50 


Winners SS/DD W/Lib case 


$7.00 


Software 




OS-9 Level II S 


$63.95 


Multi-View 


$39.95 


Deskmate 3 


$79.95 


Other Titles 


20% iff 



* 100% TANDY Warranty on TANDY products - Manufacturer's Warranty applies on all other items. 

* FREE UPS shipping on orders over $50 (In the Continental US) - under $50 add $5 for shipping. 




above prices are CASH prices - add 3% for credit cards. No COD's will be taken. Prices 
may be slightly higher in our retail stores. 
* All returns must have prior authorization and are subject to a re-stocking fee. 



HOWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 

1690 N. Elston • Chicago, IL 60622 • orders (800) 443-1444 • inquiries and order status (312) 278-1440 



★ 5 STAR FINAL 



NOVEMBER '88 



RAINY 



HMC CUTS 515 to *266 



» 



Hundreds of $ off Monitors sighted as Major Factor. HMC is reported to 
have made a special purchase on Magnavox monitors. These items, listed, 
are being offered at remarkable savings. 

MAGNAVOX 7622 12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 350 lines resolu- 
tion at 20 MHz on a dark glass anti-glare CRT with built-in audio and 1 year 
warranty. ($7 shipping) $ 88 7652 green screen also available $88 

MAGNAVOX 8 CM 515 has analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB for 
Tandy 1000* or IBM PC's, and composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. Built-in 
speaker. 14" screen with 640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 2 years parts 
and labor warranty, reg. list $499 was $298 $266 + $14 Shipping 

CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable only $ 19.95 with Magnavox Monitor 
order. $29.95 w/o monitor. 






7622 8CM515 123A 

123A 12" This 12" green screen high resolution monitor offers 80 column 
capability, Zenith quality and a 90 -day warranty valid at any of Zenith's 1200 
locations. Retail $199. Our price $ 6750 ($7 shipping) REPACK 

VA-1 for monochrome and color monitors delivers video interface for CoCo's 
1 & 2 $ 29.45 ($2 shipping) 

DRIVE 0 +. Howards Drive 0 
gives you a DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 
cable and a HDS DC-5 Disk Control- 
ler for only $ 178.45. Double sided 
double density 360K. ($5 shipping) 
No charge for Disto DC-3 upgrade 




HMC's Guarantee— 
A Promise you can take to the Bank. 



Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compat- 
ibility. If you're not happy with it for 
*.".'.•♦.* * • . • • 

. >■'.•» 1 » * • • .* a 



any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states. APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 



Price Break on DISTO 
Disk Controllers 

Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. DISTO $ 75 DC-3[a| 
($2 shipping on all DISTO products) 

ADD-ON BOARDS 

DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer 
includes all software to program 
2764 or 27128 chips [B] $ 55 
DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port[C] s 40 




RS-232 $49.95 

($2 ship) 

Replaces R.S. RS-232 board. Plugs in 
drive port or multi pack. 2 MHz 
operation works with OS-9. 

MEB $30 

($2 ship) 

Plugs into multi pak to expand 
DISTO DC-3 bus. Use clock in DC- 
3 and eprom programmer in MEB. 



a 



hotline 
number 

DONT MISS OUT, 
D0NT MISS OUT, ORDER T6DAY! 

800 / 443-1444 

WE ACCEPT VISA . MASTERCARD : 
. AMERICAN EXPRESS . C.O.D. OR.-' 
CHECKS . SCHOOL P.O. 
NEW — DISCOVER CARD 




NT#-2,TAB(40) ; "Votes =" ; 
1411 XT$=" " 

1420 PRINT #-2, USING "##";EV(X); 

1421 IF SV(X)=1 AND PP(X)=1 THEN 
XT$="*" :XC=XC+1 

1422 IF SV(X)=2 AND PP(X)=2 THEN 
XT$="*":XC=XC+1 

1423 IF SV(X)<>0 THEN XV=XV+1 
1430 IF SV(X)=1 THEN PRINT#-2,TA 
B(58) ; "DEMOCRATIC" ;XT$ 

1440 IF SV(X)=2 THEN PRINT#-2,TA 

B(58) ; "REPUBLICAN" ;XT$ 

1450 IF SV(X)=0 THEN PRINT#-2,TA 

B(58) ;" " 

1460 NEXT X 

1470 PRINT#-2,STRING$(80,"-") :PR 
INT#-2, "DEMOCRATS HAVE ";DV;" VO 
TES."; : PRINT #-2, TAB (40) ;"REPUBLI 
CANS HAVE ";RV;" VOTES." 
1475 IF XV>0 THEN PRINT#-2 , "YOUR 
PREDICTIONS: ";XC;" OUT OF ";XV; 
» FOR A ";INT( (XC/XV) *100) ;"% CO 
RRECT SELECTON RATE" 
1480 RETURN 
1490 ' 

1500 ' **** MAP FUNCTIONS **** 
1510 1 

1520 GOSUB 2330 
1530 FOR X=l TO 51 



1540 IF SV(X)=1 THEN PAINT (OV(X) 
,DW(X)),jS,3 

1550 IF SV(X)=2 THEN PAINT (OV(X) 

,DW(X)),2,3 

1560 NEXT X 

1570 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=" "THEN 15 
70 

1580 RETURN 
1590 1 

1600 •**** HISTORY SUBMENU **** 
1610 • 

1620 CLS:PRINT STRING$ (32 , 159 ) ; " 
* HISTORICAL INFORMATION MENU * 
";STRING$(32,207) 

1630 PRINTS 12 9 , "1> DEMOCRATIC TI 
CKETS (1920-)" 

1640 PRINTS 161, "2> REPUBLICAN TI 
CKETS (1920-)" 

1650 PRINT@193,"3> U.S. PRESIDENT 
S (1920-1984) ":PRINT@225,"4> ELE 
CTORAL COLLEGE FACTS" 
1660 PRINTS 2 8 9, "ENTER 1,2,3 OR 4 

TO SELECT-" 
1670 PRINTS 3 21, "ANY OTHER KEY FO 
R MAIN MENU" 
1680 FY=1920 

1690 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=" "THEN 16 
90 

1700 IF VAL(AK$)>4 THEN SOUND 1, 



_! - , can , t find it? we'll uirite it! 



IJafit: 



zzz a timeless classic for Hours 
of family fun. (Coco 1,2, 3). ..$12.95 

get your disk problems 
under control. COPY, KILL, RENAME 
multiple files with one keystroke! 
Backup & restore directories. Print 
a hard codu of a directory to aid 
in restoring a damaged directory. 
(Coco 3 onim...»24.95 

BUftX£D fcUXX Pilot your chopper 
into position, uncouer the BUKH & 
return to base, but match out for 

hidden missiles and enemy bombs* 

tCPCQ 1,2 or 51,..S't9.95 

FONTOIEJV cr eate custom fonts & 
customize palette colors for use 
in AMY BASIC program & some M/L 
programs, ccoco 5 oniyi 

Quantum Leap 1-4 players leap 

into a new dimension of funl 
6 dice makes all the difference. 
. .. (Coco 3 only) $19.95 

Picture Puzzles Jigsaw puzzle fun 
for all ages. Kids lone 'em. 
CC0C0 3 only). »19.95 

48ASIC-M/L HYBRID. 
OTHERS ARE 100* MACHINE LANGUAGE. 
UISA. M"X. C.O.D., CHECKS ACCEPTED. 
ALL ORDERS ADD $3.00 P&H. 
CALIFORNIA RES. ADD 6* TAX. 
P.O. BOH 118, LOMPOC, CA 93438 
ORDER 24 HRS. C805) 735-3889 



NIGHT OF THE 
LIVING DEAD 



AN INTERACTIVE 
NIGHTMARE 




ADUEnTURE nDUEL SDFTUJflRE 

^kftiZ* ^ p -0- BOX 8176 « SPARTANBURG, SC 29305 /{^\ 

24 hr. order HOTLINE 




(803) 578-7421 

C.O.D. ADD 55 




RAINBOW 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 67 



1 5 GOTO 1690 

1710 IF AK$="1" THEN 1790 
1720 IF AK$="2" THEN 1950 
1730 IF AK$="3'! THEN 2110 
1740 IF AK$="4" THEN 2250 
1750 RETURN 
1760 1 

1770 '** DEMOCRATIC NOMINEES ** 
1780 1 

1790 CLS : PRINT STRING$ (32 , 159) ; 11 
DEMOCRATIC PARTY NOMINEES-" : PRIN 
T STRING$ (32,207) : PRINT" YEAR... 
. CANDIDATES" : SS=160 
1800 FOR X=l TO 17:PRINT@SS,FY;" 

";DP$(X) :PRINT@SS+41,DV$(X) 
1810 SS=SS+9 6:FY=FY+4 
1820 IF X/3<>INT(X/3) THEN 1840 
ELSE PRINT0480, "<PRESS ANY KEY>" 
; :AK$=INKEY$:IF AK$=""THEN 1820 
1830 FOR WP=160 TO 384 STEP 32 :P 
RINT@WP,STRING$(32," ") :NEXT WP: 
SS=160 
1840 NEXT X 

1850 PRINT0480, "<P=PRINT-ANY OTH 
ER=MAIN MENU>"; 

1860 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$= S " "THEN 18 
60 ELSE IF AK$="P"THEN 1870 ELSE 
RETURN 

1870 PRINT#-2,STRING$(80,"-") :PR 
INT#-2, "DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES FO 
R PRESIDENT/ VICE PRESIDENT (1920 
-1984)": PRINT # - 2 , S TRI NG $(80,"-") 
1880 FY=1920:FORX=1TO17 
1890 IF WN(X)=1 THEN WN$="*" ELS 
E WN$="" 

1900 PRINT#-2,FY;TAB(10) ;"PRESID 
ENT:";DP$(X) ;WN$;TAB(50) ;"VP:";D 
V$ (X) : PRINT#-2 , " " : FY=FY+4 : NEXT X 
1910 PRINT#-2,STRING$(80,"-") : PR 

INT#-2,"* = Winner In Election": 

RETURN 

1920 1 

1930 ■** REPUBLICAN NOMINEES ** 
1940 ' 

1950 CLS:PRINT STRING$ ( 32 , 159 ) ; " 
REPUBLICAN PARTY NOMINEES-" : PRIN 
T STRING$ (32,207) :PRINT" YEAR... 
. CANDIDATES " : SS=160 
1960 FOR X=l TO 17 : PRINT@SS , FY; " 

";RP$(X) :PRINT@SS+41,RV$(X) 
1970 SS=SS+96:FY=FY+4 
1980 IF X/3<>INT(X/3) THEN 2000 
ELSE PRINT@4 80, "<PRESS ANY KEY>" 
; :AK$<CNKEY$:IF AK$=""THEN 1980 
1990 FOR WP=160 TO 384 STEP 32 :P 
RINT@WP,STRING$ (32, " ") :NEXT WP: 
SS=160 
2000 NEXT X 

2010 PRINT@4 80,"<P=PRINT-ANY OTH 
ER=MAIN MENU>"; 

2020 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=" "THEN 20 



20 ELSE IF AK$="P"THEN 2030 ELSE 
RETURN 

2030 PRINT#-2,STRING$(80,"-") :PR 
INT #-2, "REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES FO 
R PRESIDENT/ VICE PRESIDENT (1920 
-1984) ":PRINT#-2,STRING$(80, "-") 
2040 FY=1920:FORX=1TO17 
2050 IF WN(X)=2 THEN WN$="*" ELS 
E WN$="" 

2060 PRINT#-2,FY;TAB(10) ;"PRESID 
ENT:";RP$(X) ;WN$;TAB(50) ;"VP:";R 
V$(X) :PRINT#-2,"":FY=FY+4:NEXT X 
2070 PRINT#-2,STRING$(80,"-") : PR 
INT#-2,"* = Winner In Election": 

RETURN 
2080 1 

2090 ■**** PRESIDENTS **** 
2100 1 

2110 CLS:PRINT STRING$ (32,207) ;" 

PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES 

";STRING$(3 2,159) 

2120 FOR X=l TO 17 

2130 IF X=9 THEN 2140 ELSE 2160 

2140 PRINT :PRINT"<PRESS ANY KEY> 
it 

2150 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=" "THEN 21 
50 ELSE: FOR WP=128 TO 448 STEP 3 
2:PRINT@WP,STRING$(32, " ") ;:NEXT 

WP:PRINT@128," " ; 
2160 IF WN(X)=1 THEN PRINT FY;" 
" ; DP$ (X) 

2170 IF WN(X)=2 THEN PRINT FY;" 

";RP$(X) 
2180 FY=FY+4 
2190 NEXT X 

2200 PRINT@448,"<PRESS ANY KEY>" 

2210 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=" "THEN 22 
10 ELSE RETURN 
2220 1 

2230 •** ELECTORAL COLLEGE ** 
2240 1 

2250 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(32,159) :PR 
INT@38 , "ELECTORAL COLLEGE" : PRINT 
STRING$ (32,207) ; 

22 60 PRINT" THE PRESIDENT AND 
VP ARE": PRINT "ELECTED BY THE E 
LECTORAL" : PRINT" COLLEGE . EACH ST 
ATE AND DC HAVE AS MANY ELECTORS 
AS SENATORS": PRINT "AND REPRESEN 
TATIVES . WE ACTUALLY" : PRINT" VOTE 
FOR ELECTORS . " 

2270 PRINT" THERE ARE 538 VOTE 
S. TO WIN, A CANDIDATE NEEDS 270 
VOTES. IF":PRINT"NO CANDIDATE G 
ETS THE NEEDED" :PRINT"MAJORITY, 
THE HOUSE AND SENATE" : PRINT"ELEC 
T THE PRESIDENT." 

2280 PRINT@484,"<PRESS ANY KEY>" 
• 

2290 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=" "THEN 2 2 



68 THE RAINBOW November 1988 





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The B\99 est 
The Best 
The indispensable 



D 

The 

THE COLOR COi 



PU7ER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With ail this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 



Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and 
run. No work. No wait. 

Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
250 new programs: games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications. And, with RAINBOW 
ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at a price that's 
"small potatoes." And now you even have a choice 
about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
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Use our 800 number! 



For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

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We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 a year in the United States. Canadian 

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In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 

Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
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YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

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RAINBOW ON TAPE or RAINBOW ON DISK! 

Just call (800) 847-0309 anytime from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. Credit card orders on/y. 
Subscriptions to rainbow on tape are $80 a year in the United States, $90 (U.S. 
funds) in Canada and $105 (U.S.) in all other countries. 

rainbow on disk is $99 a year in the United States, $115 (U.S.) in Canada and $130 
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Individual issues of rainbow on tape are $10 in the U.S., $12 (U.S.) in Canada and 
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add 5% sales tax. 

rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are not stand-atone products; you need the 
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the rainbow magazine is a separate purchase. 



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Proven Technology 

New CoCo 3 Utilities 

Great for 512K Systems! From Color Venture and OWL-WARE 




PRINTER LIGHTNING 

A great print spooler which gives you 
44K print buffer from a 128K CoCo and 
up to 438K (200 pages!) from a 512K 
CoCo. With this spooler you can run a 
program while you are printing a file. 
The spooler does not slow down the 
computer to any noticeable extent while 
you are running a second program and 
no lost characters arise. Baud rates 
selectable. Printer Lightning can reside 
in memory along with RAMDISKl 

|l | mm* iii * ■ mam m m m same l t me as U» Printer Lightningl of your most used programs! 

' NEW' NEW* Only $1 9.95 each. 3 for $39.95. 
SPECIAL With our 51 2K Upgrade (Next page) only $2. each Or 3 for $5! 



Using 512K CoCo 3 you have access to 
2 additional disk drives in RAM. All 
disk commands are supported, and the 
data are Reset button protected. You 
can now have up to 5 disk drive capa- 
cities on line at once and can assign the 
ram disks to any drive number. By 
making the ramdisk Drive 0, all pro- 
grams which require a lot of drive 
access will run much faster. You can 
have the RAMDISK in memory at the 
same time as the Printer Lightningl 



BACKUP LIGHTNING 

This program is the fastest way to make 
backup copies of your files using a 512K 
CoCo. You can backup 35, 40, or 80 
track disks single or double sided. Both 
RS and OS-9 disks may be backed up. 
The original disk is saved to memory 
and a copy can be made on an 
unformatted disk every 45 seconds! The 
lightning read, write, format, and verify 
routines that were developed make this 
program much quicker that RSDOS or 
OS-9 for backups. This will become one 



Announcing; 



The finest graphics/drawing program for the COCO 3! 



Da Vinci 




16 colors on screen at one time 

Modify each color from 64 available colors 

Use composite or RGB monitor 

Draw with custom paintbrushes 

Full resolution 320 X 192 

Picture converter for conversion of 

COCO 2 pictures to COCO 3 
Multiple text fonts 
Accepts input from joystick, X-pad, 

mouse, or touch-pad 
Boxes, circles, line, paint generation 
Screen dump for Tandy mono and color ink-jet 

printers, (NX- 10 and others pending) 
Sensible price 

No additional hardware required because of 

course/fine joystick movement modes 
Zoom mode for individual pixel editing 
Great on screen menu which is removable at 
the touch of a key to allow full screen edit 



Super I/O Board for OS-9 

Each Board Provides 2 Serial Ports and Centronics Parallel Port 

First Board has Real Time Clock and Beeper..* With Second Board up to 5 Users 

2 Serial Porte 



The serial ports are usable up to 19,200 Baud, and 
the parallel port is a true Centronics standard. 
Plug into your multi-pak. On CoCo 3> multi-puk 
must be upgraded. You will have a multi-user 
system with additional computers or terminals 
plugged into the serial ports. An OWL hard drive 
and 512K upgrade are strongly recommended for 
multi-user systems. 

Intro Price... 

BOARD 2. ..$145. 



(up to 19,200 BAUD) 



$169. 



Into 
MULTI PACK 







CENTRONICS 
PARALLEL 
PORT 



m 

P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 
• ORDER LINES (only) — 
(800) 245-6228 
{21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 



Pro ven 

On the Razor's Edge of 



Basic and OS-9 Hard 
Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or 

Business Users 




Every hard drive which has been 
produced by OWL- WARE during the 
last 3 years is complete. A system con- 
sists of software, hard drive, controller, 
heavy-duty power supply, and LR Tech 
Interface. There are no hidden costs for 
assembly or testing. When a drive sys- 
tem is ordered, we fully assemble, test, 
and bum-in the system for 3 full days. 
This ensures dependability and op- 
timum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo 
hard drive systems and parts for more 
than 3 years. This is the longest history 
in the CoCo market of any system. 
Some other advertisers are stating that 
they have one of the most reliable sys- 
tems for the CoCo with all of 4 months 
history in the CoCo hard drive market*. 
We have reached our position in the 
hard drive market by providing our cus- 
tomers with a quality product that they 
(and we) can be proud to own and use. 



Because of many requests for a lower 
price system in kit form, we are now 
selling a kit of all parts at a significant 
discount compared to our regular 
prices. We recommend this kit (or any 
kits offered by any other supplier) only 
to those who have experience in 
electronic assembly and OS-9. 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 

and t 




OWL Hard Drive BASIC 3 

There have been several ads in this 
magazine about BASIC for Color 
Computer hard drive systems. These 
ads sometimes only tell a part of the 
story. Our BASIC system price in- 
cludes assembly, testing, and 3-day 
burn-in period. We do not require a 
Multi-pak to operate. 

Our hard drive systems are fast, reli- 
able, and reasonable in price. This has 
been proven by hundreds of users over 
the past 3 years. We do not have to turn 
off error checking for speed. We 
achieve high speed BASIC from a uni- 
que indexing method. 

The table below will summarize some 
of the key points about our BASIC hard 
drive system and two other systems. We 
believe that we have the best BASIC in- 
lerface for CoCo hard drives available. 

BASIC Hard Drive Systems* 

Feature OWL B&B RGB 

Drive Portion Entire Entire{?) Entire 
Available 

User Sets YES Yes No 
BASIC/OS-9 

Partitions 

Add to Exist- YES Yes(?) No 
ing OS-9 
Drive Without 

Reformat 

Drives 0-3 YES No Yes 
Hard/Floppy , 

Built in Park YES No Yes 

Speed* FAST Fast Fast 

*A11 feature details are believed to be 
true at time of writing and are subject 
to change. We believe that our BASIC 
hard drives are the fastest due to our in- 
dexing method, but all three systems 
are fast. On ours all BASIC commands 
work including DSKINI, DSKIS, and 
DSKO$. 

Prices: Wigi^Wgthout Hard 

$35./$79. 







k (Ifiof «Cte$ Hard Drive, ^ LR Tech Interlace, 





















Technology 




-800-245-6228 



the Color Computer Frontier 




Bonus! 

Special 

Bundled 

Software 

with any 

Disk Drive 

Purchase! 




Floppy Drive Systems 

The Highest Quality for Service Now and for Years to 

Come 

Use our WHISPER DRIVE for the finest, quietist drive 
Drive 0 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $219. 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, 

cable, case, power supply, and manual 

Drive 1 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $129. 

New 3.5", 720K Drives for OS-9 with case & 

Power Supply $179. 

Drive 1 Systems have drive, case, power supply. (You may 
require optional cable and/or DOS chip to use) 

Special for 0/1 Combos (Drives 0,1,2,3) $315. 



HALF- HEIGHT DRIVE 



1MB 





All drives are new and fully assembled. 
We ship only FULLY TESTED and 
CERTIFIED at these low prices. We 
use Fuji, YE Data, and other fine 
brands. No drives are used or surplus 
unless otherwise stated to you when 
you order. We appear to be the one of 
the few advertisers in Rainbow who 
can truly make this claim. We have 5 
years experience in the CoCo disk 
drive market! We are able to provide 
support when you have a problem. 



Drives 1 Year Warranty 




OWL WARE Software Bundle 



Disk Tutorial/Utilities/Games 
DISK TUTOR Ver 1.1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language 
program. This tutor takes you through 
your lessons and corrects your mistakes 
for a quick, painless disk drive introduc- 
tion. (This professionally written tutor 
is easily worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster 
disk access and allows the use of 
double-sided drives. Corrects a floating 
point number error on early CoCo sys- 
tems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs be- 
tween disks. A wild card option selects 
groups of programs to copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad 
sectors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is more than $125 
worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with 
cheap, non-professional "Public 
Domain" software which is being of- 
fered by others. All of this software is 
copyrighted and professional in quality. 
The tutor is unique with us and has 
helped thousands of new users learn 
their disk drive. 

only $27.95 
(or even better) 
only $6.95 with 
any Disk Drive Purchase!! 

Our prices, include &. discount for cash 
But dr> not include snipping. 

OWL-WARE has a liberal warranty policy. During the warran- 
ty period, all defective items will be repaired or replaced at our 
option at no cost to the buyer except for shipping costs. Call 
our tech number for return. Return of non-defective or un- 
authorized returns are subject to a service charge. 



90 ELSE RETURN 
2300 « 

2310 '****** U.S. MAP ****** 
2320 ' 

2330 PMODE3,l:PCLS5:SCREENl,l:CO 
L0R3,1 

2340 LXNE.(l v £) -(255,191) ,PSET,B 
2350 LINE(10,10)-(245,181) ,PSET, 
B 

2360 DRAW"BM110,160;D15F2R8E2U15 
ii 

2370 LINE(106,156)-(150,179) ,PSE 
T, B 

2380 DRAW"BM134,160;BR10BD2H2L8G 

2D4F2R8F2D4G2L8H2" 

2390 LINE(36,20) -(36,22) ,PSET 

2400 IF MP=2 THEN PUT (30 , 20) - (22 

0,135) ,M:GOTO 2890 

2410 DATA6, 34, 22, 36, 34, 36,41, 33, 

47,32,64,35,75 

2420 GOSUB 2960 : DRAW" R2D2L2" 

2430 DATA7, 41, 89, 45, 90, 54,101,54 

, 103 , 64 , 103 ,77 , 107 , 87 , 107 

2440 GOSUB2960:DRAW"U1R5" 

2450 DATA42,97,112,97,115,103,11 

7 , 104 , 115 , 109 , 116 , 116 , 125 , 124 , 12 

8 , 124 , 122 , 126 , 118 , 129 , 122 , 130 , 11 

5,139, 115 , 141 , 117 , 148 , 117 

2460 DATA 145,113,156,112,160,11 

4 , 163 , 112 , 167 , 118 , 167 , 121 , 171 , 12 

7 , 171 , 129 , 173 , 131 , 178 , 129 , 178 , 12 

1, 177 , 116 , 172 , 107 , 175 , 102 , 178 , 10 

1,179,98,191,85,189,75,193,77,19 

4,75,194,72,197,72,200,65,198,64 

,199,61,197,59,207,56,212,53 

2470 GOSUB 2960 : DRAW"U2R2D1" :LIN 

E- (215, 51) ,PSET:DRAW"U2L2U1L2U6" 

2480 DATA12,220,40,221,35,218,34 

,218,26,215,27,210,25,207,35,204 

,36,192,36,181,43,178,43,174,47 

2490 GOSUB 2960:DRAW"R2D2L2" 

2500 DATA2, 163, 54, 168, 43, 2, 169, 3 

4,159,32,4,147,22,142,25,126,20, 

36,20,36,34,39,35 

2510 GOSUB 2960:DRAW"U3R2D2R2U2" 
:GOSUB2960:DRAW"U7L4U2":GOSUB296 
0 : GOSUB3 030: DRAWU2 " 
2520 DATA2, 48,36, 57, 36,57, 20, 57, 
44,3,55,46,58,47,58,53 
2530 GOSUB2960:GOSUB3030:GOSUB29 
60 

2540 DATA2,32,54,75,54,49,54,49, 

72,4,65,87,67,90,64,93,64,103 

2550 GOSUB3000:GOSUB2960 

2560 DATA68,54,68,84,2,67,37,69, 

44,6,75,42,97,42,76,60,105,60,84 

,60,84,107,68,81,127,81,105,60,1 

05,81,102,81,102,104 

2570 GOSUB3030 : DRAWL3D3" : DRAW"B 



M62 , 20 ;D8R2D8" : GOSUB2960 : DRAWR7 

U2D18R21U40" :GOSUB3000 

2580 DATA2, 92, 104, 92, 106, 102, 84, 

112 , 84 , 4 , 112 , 93 , 119 , 96 , 131 , 96 , 13 

3,115,119,20,119,26 

2590 GOSUB2960:GOSUB3030:GOSUB29 

60 

2 600 DRAW" BM127 ,81; D2R2D14 " : GOSU 
B3030 

2610 DATA3, 121, 29, 118, 37, 97, 37,1 

18,37,121,40,5,121,54,118,53,117 

,54,115,53,97,53,121,53,123,56,4 

,122,62,125,66,127,69,127,81 

2620 GOSUB2960:GOSUB3030:GOSUB29 

60 : GOSUB3 030: GOSUB2 960 

2630 DATA2, 105, 66, 125, 66, 143, 25, 

136,32,3,134,40,137,51,148,51,2, 

121,48,135,48,138,51,141,57,2,13 

7,65,124,65,149,51,150,53 

2 640 GOSUB3000:DRAW"D2L2":GOSUB2 

960:DRAW M D1R2":GOSUB3000:GOSUB29 

60:GOSUB3030 

2650 DATA5, 151, 56, 151, 70, 149, 73, 
145,75,143,78,137,65,145,81,142, 
84,137,97,137,97,139,100,4,138,1 
03 , 140 , 108 , 144 , 108 , 145 , 113 , 2 , 139 
,90,168,90,149,90,148,112,158,90 
2660 GOSUB2960:GOSUB3030:DRAW"D3 
L3U2L14 " : GOSUB3030 : DRAW"D1L6" : GO 
SUB3030 : GOSUB29 60 : GOSUB3000 : DRAW 
"R4U4R8 " : GOSUB2 990: DRAW" DM15 9 , 10 
9;R9U1R4" 

2670 PAINT (128, 56) ,2,1 

2680 DATA173,104,168,93,169,89,1 

80,90,183,93,158,90,160,87,2,163 

,87,168,82,149,73,150,74,4,153,7 

2 , 154 , 72 , 160 , 69 , 160 , 54 , 160 ,67,16 

1,69,10,162,68,165,70,170,78,173 

,78,174,74,177,73,178,72,181,71, 

187,72,189,77 

2690 GOSUB3 030: DRAW" D1L2 " : GOSUB2 
99.0 : DRAW"R5D1R6" : GOSUB3 030 
2700 DRAW"BM144,83 ;R4U1R41" 
2710 GOSUB3030:GOSUB2960:GOSUB30 
30 

2720 GOSUB2960:GOSUB3030:GOSUB29 
60 

2730 DATA2, 163, 81, 168, 78, 136, 31, 
140,30,6,144,34,146,34,148,40,15 
1,38,149,44,148,51,142,31,150,27 
,7,149,30,152,31, 156,29,159,33,1 
55,34,150,35,149,39,159,33,155,3 
7,3,153,43,153,47,150,53,157,35, 
161,37 

2740 GOSUB3000:GOSUB29 60:GOSUB30 
30 

2750 GOSUB2960:GOSUB3030:GOSUB29 

60:GOSUB3030 

2760 DRAW"D7R2U3" 



72 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



277)3 DATA2, 165,42,166,47,15)3,54, 

169,54,4,176,5)3,176,47,183,44,18 

4,42,172,52,172, 68,3, 191, 68,194, 

69,194,72,172,64,169,67,164,7)3,1 

93,58,192,58,191, 63,2,193,64,191 

,68,197,51,209,51,21)3,54 

2780 GOSUB296)3 : GOSUB3)33)3 : GOSUB29 

60:GOSUB3030:GOSUB2960 

279)3 DRAW"BM189, 68;D3R6" 

2800 GOSUB3030:GOSUB2990 

2810 DRAW"BM175,68;D4R5" 

2820 DRAW"BM175,51;D4R13" 

2830 GOSUB2990:DRAW"R4U9R2U12" 

2840 GOSUB3030:GOSUB2960:GOSUB30 

30 : GOSUB2990 : GOSUB3000 : GOSUB2990 

2850 DATA2, 205, 51, 205, 57, 199, 46, 

207,47,210,44,204,3 6,205,39,2,20 

3,43,203,47,209,32,208,35,2,209, 

43,210,43,202,60,209,58,3,210, 60 

,206,61,202,60 

2860 GOSUB 3030:GOSUB2960:GOSUB3 
030IGOSUB2960 

2870 DRAW"BM189, 69 ;C5D2R3 11 : DRAW" 
BM190,69;C3D3R2" 

2880 IF MP<>2 THEN GET ( 30 , 20) - (2 
20,135) ,M:MP=2 

2890 DRAW"BM210,80;U6R6D6L6BR12U 

6R4D6U3L4BR9BD3U6BR4G3F3 11 

2900 DRAW"BM210,90;U6R6D6L6BR12U 

6D3R5U3D6BR6U6" 

2910 DRAW"BM210,100;U6R6D6L6BR12 
U6R3F1D4G1L3BR9U6R3F1BD4G1L3" 
2920 RETURN 
2930 1 

2940 *** READ MAP ONCE ONLY ** 
2950 1 
2960 RE AD A 

2970 FORX=l TO A : READ B,C 

2980 LINE-(B,C) ,PSET:NEXTX:RETUR 

N 

2990 READA, B: LINE- (A, B) ,PSET:RET 
URN 

3000 RE AD A 

3010 FOR X=l TO A:READB,C,D,E 
3020 LINE(B,C)-(D,E) ,PSET:NEXTX: 
RETURN 

3030 READA, B, C, D: LINE (A, B) - (C, D) 
,PSET: RETURN 
3040 1 

3050 •** SCREEN CLEANUP ** 
3060 1 

3070 FOR WIPE=128 TO 416 STEP 32 
: PRINT@WIPE , STRING $ (32," » ) ; : NEX 
T: RETURN 

4000 CLS: PRINT STRING$ ( 32 , 175) : P 
RINT 11 LOAD OR SAVE DATA FILES..," 
: PRINT STRING$(3 2,159) 
4002 PRINT"CHOOSE 1>CASSETTE 2>D 
ISK ": INPUT CD$ 



4004 PRINT" DATA FILES WILL INCLU 
DE VOTES & PREDICTIONS." 
4006 PRINT: PRINT"CHOOSE 1> SAVE 
OR 2> LOAD": INPUT SL$ 

4008 IF SL$="1" THEN 4012 

4009 IF SL$="2" THEN 4020 

4010 SOUND l,l:PRINT"CHOOSE 1 OR 
2l":FOR DL=1 TO 460 :NEXT:GOTO 4 

000 

4012 IF CD$="2"THEN 4016 

4013 OPEN "0",#-l, "ELECT. DAT" 

4014 FOR X=l TO 51: WRITE #-l,SV( 
X) , PP (X) :NEXT X:CLOSE #-1 

4015 RETURN 

4016 OPEN "0",1, "ELECT. DAT" 

4017 FOR X=l TO 51: WRITE #1,SV(X 
),PP(X):NEXT X:CLOSE 1 

4018 RETURN 

4020 IF CD$="2" THEN 4026 

4021 OPEN ,, I",#-1,"ELECT.DAT" 

4022 FOR X=l TO 51:INPUT #-l,SV( 
X) ,PP(X) :NEXT X:CLOSE #-1 

4023 RETURN 

4026 OPEN "I", 1, "ELECT. DAT" 

4027 FOR X=l TO 51:INPUT #1,SV(X 
),PP(X):NEXT X:CLOSE 1 

4028 RETURN 

4500 CLS.-PRINT STRING$ ( 32 , 175 ) : P 

RINT" POLITICAL PREDICTION " : 

PRINT STRING$(32,159) ; 
4502 PRINT" YOUR CHANCE TO OUT-EX 
PERT THE EXPERTS. ENTER YOUR P 
RE DICTION AS TO HOW EACH STATE 
WILL VOTE."; 

4504 PRINT" ELECTION 88 WILL COM 
PARE YOUR PREDICTIONS WITH THE 
ACTUAL VOTEAS IT IS ENTERED. ":P 
RINT 

4506 PRINT"<PRESS ANY KEY TO CON 
TINUE>" 

4508 AK$=INKEY$ : IF AK$=" "THEN 45 
08 ELSE GOSUB 3070 

4509 FOR X=l TO 51 

4510 PRINT© 12 8 , "ENTER YOUR PREDI 
CTION FOR": PRINT "THE STATE OF " 
;LS$(X) : PRINT 

4512 PRINT" <D>EMOCRAT OR <R>EPUB 
LICAN" 

4514 PRINT"<X> FOR MENU " ; : INP 
UT CH$ 

4515 IF CH$="X"THEN 4530 

4516 IF CH$="D" THEN PP(X)=l:GOT 
0 4520 

4517 IF CH$="R" THEN PP(X)=2:GOT 
0 4520 

4518 PP(X)=0 

4520 GOSUB 3070: NEXT X 
4530 RETURN 

/55\ 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 73 





We're Looking for a Few Good Shorties 

Help! The Niche needs more submissions! If you have written 
a good shortie, please send it in. We're looking for graphics, 
utilities, educational programs and games (especially games!). 
How short is a shortie? Well, if you printed out your listing in 32 
columns, as we do, it should fit on one half of an 8 1 /2-by-1 1 inch 
page (be under 12 inches). (Entering PRiNTtt-2,CHR$(27) 
chr$(81)CHR$(32) will allow most Epson-compatible printers to 
LLIST a program in 32 columns if you want to check this.) 




Free Zone 

By Ric Pucella 

Scroll Protect is a utility employing a machine language 
subroutine to protect an area of the screen from scrolling; 
the area can be affected only by the PRINT @ command. Scroll 
Protect can be incorporated into another utility or a game, 
as long as the "parent" program works in the text screen. 

When run, the program puts the CoCo in the 64K all-RAM 
mode (ROM instructions are copied into RAM, where they 
can be modified). It asks you for the top and bottom line of 
the "new" screen. These two values (from 0 to 15) will be the 
new borders of the screen, and anything above or below them 
lies in the protected zone, unaffected by the scroll. To restore 
the screen to its original size, press the reset button or run 
the program again. 

The listing: NOSCROLL 

10 '*** SCROLL PROTECT 

20 '*** BY RIC PUCELLA 

25 CLEAR &HFF,&H7F00 

30 DATA 26,80,142,128,0,166,132, 

183,255,223, 167,128,140,22 4,0,39 

,5,183 ,255,222, 32 , 239,28, 175,57 

40 FOR A=3072 TO 309 6: READB : POKE 

A , B : NEXTA : EXECS 07 2 

50 FORX=&H7F00 TO &H7F1D: READB$ : 

B=VAL ( " &H"+B$ ) : POKE X , B : NEXTX 

60 DATA BD,B3,E4, 83,01, FF, 10, 22, 

35,40,C3,05,FF,34,10,9E,88,BF,7F 

,FE,35,10,DD,88,86, 63 , B7 , 7F , FD, 3 

9 

IP FORX=&H7FA0 TO &H7FB8 : READB$ : 
B=VAL("&H"+B$) :POKE X,B:NEXTX 
80 DATA B6 , 7F , FD, 81 , 63 , 27 ,05 , 86 , 
0D, 7E , B9 , Bl , BE, 7F, FE , 9F, 88 , 7F, 7F 
,FD,86,0D,7E,B9,B1 



90 CLS: PRINT "LINES FROM 0 TO 15" 

100 PRINT@128 , "TOP LINE : " ; : LINE I 

NPUT TP$ 

110 TP=VAL(TP$) 

120 IFTP<0 OR TP>15 THEN 100 

130 PRINT? 12 8, "BOTTOM LINE:";: LI 

NE INPUT BT$ 

140 BT=VAL(BT$) 

150 IF BT<0 OR BT>15 OR BT<=TP+1 

THEN 130 
160 TP=(TP*32+1024) 

T1=INT (TP/256) :T2=TP- (Tl*256 



170 
) 

180 
190 

) 

200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
320 
340 
350 

) 

360 
370 
420 
430 
431 
432 
433 
440 



BT=(BT*32+1024) 
Bl=INT(BT/256) : B2=BT- (Bl*256 

CLS0 

POKE &HA3 4 7,B1 
POKE &HA348,B2+31 
POKE &HA3 4C,T1 
POKE &HA34D,T2 
POKE &HA92B,T1 
POKE &HA92C,T2 
POKE &HA932,B1 
POKE &HA933,B2+31 
PR=BT-TP 
PR=PR+TP 

P1=INT (PR/256) :P2=PR-(P1*256 

POKE &HA354,P1 
POKE &HA355,P2 
POKE &HB903,&H7F 
POKE &HB904,&H00 
POKE &HB958,&H7E 
POKE &HB959,&H7F 
POKE &HB95A,&HA0 
CLS 



74 



THE RAINBOW November 1988 



I/O in the Fast Lane 

By Joel Hegberg 




Thumbing through the June '88 issue of RAINBOW, I came 
across Scott Honaker's article "Exercise Your Drives" (Page 
1 10). It showed how to really speed up the CoCo's disk drives, 
but it didn't show how to use that speed for everyday 
operations. After a careful reading of the article, I loaded 
EDTASM+, started nosing my way through Disk BASIC and 
found the places that use the disk drives. I made a machine 
language program and, after days of trial and error, created 
FastDisk. 

The program first does a ROM-RAM conversion on the 
CoCo 1 and 2. Then it stores the ML program into memory 
and runs it. The program actually changes the drive step rate 
from a slow 30 milliseconds to a fast six milliseconds. It also 
reduces the wait period CoCo takes before reading the disk. 
Every time 1 use my CoCo 2, I run this program first. 

1 tested my efforts by timing how long it took to load 
EDTASM+ before and after Fast Disk', it took 12 seconds 
before and only eight seconds after. FastDisk also makes the 
drive quieter and stops the rattling that worries so many new 
users. 

Just type in, save and run the program. FastDisk requires 
no other programs to help it along, and it should be 
compatible with most of your BASIC programs. If you press 
the reset button, however, the system will revert to Disk 
BASIC. To prevent this, either make a reset patch or simply 
type POKE 65503,0 at the OK prompt, to be back in 
FastDisk. * 



The listi 

J3 
1 

2 

3 

4 

5 



ng: FASTDISK 
FAST-DISK 

BY JOEL MATHEW HEGBERG 
93 6 NORTH TWELFTH STREET 
DE KALB, ILLINOIS 60115 



CoCo 3 



Showing Off Random Graphics 

By Allen Golf 



Loader and Ellipse are two complementary programs that 
let CoCo 3 users create a series of random graphics and store 
them for later recall. Ellipse allows the user some control over 
the final appearance of a graphic, and then saves that graphic 
(in binary format) to disk — it can save as many graphics 
as the disk will hold (about 20, as each "picture" takes up 
three granules of disk space). 

When run, Ellipse prompts the user for the number of 
designs to save to disk and then calls on random horizontal 
and vertical values to draw a design of interlocking ellipses 
across and down the screen. Pressing the up arrow key begins 
the process anew, overlaying the first design with a different 
one. The pattern can become as complex as the user wishes. 
Pressing the right arrow key saves the graphic in its current 
stage of development. Pressing the space bar clears the screen. 
The program will continue generating ellipses until it has 
saved to disk the specified number of graphics. 

When you have finished with graphics creation, load 
Loader, insert the "save" disk into the drive, and run. The 
program will ask you for the number of graphics to display 
and then proceed to display them in an automatic "slide- 
show." Although the pictures were drawn in PMDDE 4, the 
program gives you the option of viewing them in PMDDE 3. 



6 CLEAR5000:PCLEAR8 :CLS:IFPEEK(3 
3021) =50THEN7 : ELSE10 

7 GOSUB12 

8 CLS: PRINT" FAST-DISK IS INSTALL 
ED. " 

9 END 

10 RESTORE : FORT=4000TO4022 : READA 
: POKET , A : NEXTT : EXEC4000 : GOT07 

11 DATA 26,80,16,142,128,0,127,2 
55, 222, 166, 164, 12 7, 2 55, 223, 167,1 
60,16, 140,255,0,3 7,2 40,57,-4 

12 READA: IFAO-4THEN12 :ELSEP=573 
44 

13 READA: IFA=-1THEN14 :ELSEPOKEP, 
A:P=P+l:GOT013 

14 EXEC573 44: RETURN 

15 DATA 126,224,6,126,224,33,142 
,2 24,3,166,12 8,183,215 

16 DATA 101,236,132,253,215,102, 
127,215,192 ,13 4,205,183 

17 DATA 215,224,134,20,183,216,2 
2,57,127,9,133,150,234 

18 DATA 129,2,38,5,134,41,183,9, 
134,126,215,104,0,-1 



******************* 



LOADER PROGRAM 



Listing 1: LORDER 

10 CLS 
20 PRINT" 
*** " 

30 PRINT" 
* » 

40 PRINT" * PRESS 3 FOR MODE 

3 * » 

50 PRINT" * PRESS 4 FOR MODE 

4 * » 

60 PRINT" ******************* 
** * 

70 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$=""THEN 70 ELS 
E IF Z$="3" THEN P=3 ELSE IF Z$= 
"4" THEN P=4 ELSE IF Z$<>"3" OR 
Z$<>"4 M THEN 70 

80 INPUT" ENTER NO. GRAPHICS TO 
LOAD" ;N 

90 IF N=0 THEN 80 
100 FOR A=l TO N 

110 PMODE P,1:PCLS 1: SCREEN 1,1 

120 LOADM (STR$ (A) ) 

130 FOR T=l TO 1000: NEXT T 

140 NEXT A 

150 PCLS 1 

160 RUN 

170 END 

180 GOTO 180 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 75 



Listing 2: ELLIPSE 
10 CLS 

20 PRINT" ********************** 
******** 

30 PRINT" * ELIPSE TO SAVE GRAP 
HICS *" 

40 PRINT" * PRESS ANY KEY TO CON 
TINUE *" 

50 PRINT" ********************** 
******** 

60 INPUT" ENTER NO •GRAPHICS TO 
SAVE";N 

70 IF N=0 THEN 60 

80 FOR A=l TO N 

90 WIDTH 32: PALETTE CMP 

100 PMODE 4,1 

110 PCLS 1 

120 SCREEN 1,1 

130 R==25 



140 C=6 

150 I=.25*RND(10) 
160 FOR Y=l TO 191 STEP 27.142 
170 FOR X=0 TO 255 STEP 17.00 
180 CIRCLE(X,Y) ,R,C,I,0, .5 
190 CIRCLE(X,Y) ,R,C,I, .5,0 
200 NEXT X,Y 

210 R=R+1:IF R>50 THEN R=2 5 

220 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$=""THEN 220 E 

LSE IF Z$=" A "THEN 240 ELSE IF Z$ 

=CHR$(9)THEN 250 ELSE IF Z$<>" " 

AND Z$<>" A "AND Z$OCHR$(9)THEN 2 

20 ELSE 230 

230 PCLS: GOTO 150 

2 40 PMODE 4,.1:C=8 :GOTO 150 

250 SAVEM(STR$(A) ) ,3584,9727,358 

4 

2 60 NEXT A 
270 GOTO 270 
280 END 




If s a Bug-Eaf-Bug World 

By Stephen Elms 



CoCo 3 



In Centipede you become a big insect with a voracious 
appetite for little insects. As the little mites pop up on the 
screen you use your arrow keys to race over and gulp them 
up. The only problem is that each bug you eat makes you 
grow (Mother Centipede always told you that eating your 
insects would make you grow big and strong). As your body 
grows longer and longer, it becomes more and more difficult 
to negotiate the little rectangle in life youVe been allotted. 
Beware of running into your tail or bumping into a wall, for 
to do so is to court peril! Remember this one commandment 
and you will live to eat many bugs. 

The listing: CENTPEDE 
5 CLEAR 

7 BUG$="S3 ;U3L2H2F2D3L2R2D3G2E2R 

2U3R5L3D3F2H2U6E2" 

30 HSCREEN 2 



3 5 HCOLOR 10 
40 HPRINT(16, 10) 
50 HPRINT(19, 12) 
60 HPRINT(14,14) 
70 FOR X=I TO 2500: NEXT 
80 DIM EL(800,1) 
90 HSCREEN 2 
100 HCIRCLE(5,5) ,3,3 
105 HPAINT(5,5) ,3,3 

109 ON ERR GOTO 120 

110 HBUFF 1,100 
115 HBUFF 2,100 

120 HGET(0,0)-(10,10) ,1 



, "CENTIPEDE" 
, "BY" 
"STEPHEN ELMS" 



125 HGET(10,10)-(20,20) ,2 
130 HSCREEN 2 

140 HCOLOR7:HLINE(10,10)-(310,18 

0) ,PSET,B:HPAINT(5,2) ,7,7 

150 X=l 30 : Y=90 : L=l : N=l : C=l : MO=l 

160 EL(N,0)=X:EL(N,i)=Y 

170 N=N+l:IF N=801 THEN N=l 

180 P=HPOINT (X, Y) 

190 IF P<>0 AND PO10 THEN 490 

200 IF P=10 THEN XC=1 : LL=LL+5 : C= 

C+10:SOUND45,1 

210 GOSUB 380 

220 HPUT(X-5,Y-5)-(X+5,Y+5) ,1,PS 
ET 

230 IF C=0 THEN HPUT (EL(L,0)-5, 
EL(L,1) -5) -(EL(L,0)+5,EL(L,l)+5) 
, 2 , PSET 

240 IF C=0 THEN L=L+1 
250 IF L=801 THEN L=l 
2 60 IF C>0 THEN C=C-1 
270 K$=INKEY$ 

2 80 IF K$="" THEN 330 

290 IF K$=CHR$(94) THEN MO=l 
300 IF K$=CHR$(9) THEN MO=2 
310 IF K$=CHR$(10) THEN MO=3 
320 IF K$=CHR$(8) THEN MO=4 

3 30 IF MO=l THEN Y=Y-10 
3 40 IF MO=2 THEN X=X+10 
3 50 IF MO=3 THEN Y=Y+10 
3 60 IF MO =4 THEN X=X-10 
370 GOTO 160 

3 80 IF XC>1 THEN XC=XC-l:GOTO 4 8 
% 

390 IF XC=1 THEN HDRAW"BM"+X$+" , 
"+Y$+" ;C0;"+BUG$ 



76 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



4)3)3 XC=)3 

41) 3 RR=RND(1)3) 

42) 3 IF RR<>6 THEN 48)3 

43) 3 XX=(RND(25) *l)3)+3)3 

44) 3 YY=(RND(15) *10)+2)3 

45) 3 IF HPOINT(XX,YY)OJ3 THEN 43)3 

46) 3 X$=STR$ (XX) : Y$=STR$ (YY) :HDRA 
W"BM"+X$+" , "+Y$+" ; C1J3 ; "+BUG$ 

47) 3 XC=5)3 



, "SCORE 
, LL 



ii 



48) 3 RETURN 

49) 3 HCOLOR 1)3 
5)3)3 HPRINT(16,1J8) 
5j35 HPRINT(17,12) 

51) 3 HPRINT(14,14) ,"PLAY AGAIN" 

52) 3 FOR DLAY=1 TO 2)3)3)3: NEXT 

53) 3 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 53)3 

54) 3 IF K$="Y" THEN CLS:RUN 

55) 3 IF K$="N" THEN END ELSE 53)3 



Odd One Out 

By Ken Ostrer 




If your children are unsure of, or just a little fuzzy on, which 
numbers are even and which are odd, Even-Odd may be of 
help. When you run the program, a small tutorial is 
presented, and then the student is drilled on the subject. 

A line of numbers is displayed, and the student must press 
E or O depending on whether the number is even or odd. 
A bar at the bottom of the screen represents how much time 
is left for each set. If time runs out before the responses are 
complete, the drill will end. Speed and accuracy are of the 
utmost importance. 

Six sets of numbers are presented per screen "page." To 
make things more interesting, the child must get at least 75 
percent of the responses correct in order to advance to the 
next page. The child will probably get more out of this 
program if the parent and child solve the problems together. 

The listing: EVENDDD 

1) 3 CLEAR5J3J3:CLS: PRINT "EVEN ODD T 
UTORIAL" : PRINT : PRINT " NUMBERS THA 
T END IN )3, 2, 4, 6 OR 8 ARE ev 
en NUMBERS •" 

2) 3 PRINT: PRINT "NUMBERS THAT END 
IN 1, 3, 5, 7 OR 9 ARE odd NUMB 
ERS . " 

3) 3 PRINT: PRINT "HERE ARE SOME EXA 
MPLES OF EVEN AND ODD NUMBERS:" 
: PRINT "EVEN: 2, 4, 1)3, 102 # 2)36, 

3)34, 12)8)8/ 5498, 12984, 5)3)3)3)3, 
183484" 

4) 3 PRINT"ODD: 1, 7, 19, 31, 99, 
187, 3)33 ,1)397, 2555, 9999, 2)31)37 
, 8)33345" : FORX=1344T015)33 : IFPEEK 
(X)>9)3THENPOKEX,PEEK(X) -64ELSEPO 
KEX,PEEK(X) -64 

5) 3 NEXT: PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY FOR 
DRILL SECTION" ;:K$=INKEY$ 

6) 3 IFINKEY$=""THEN6)3 

7) 3 CLS: PRINT "EVEN ODD DRILLER" : Z 
=9 6 : T=)3 : C=)3 : N=)3 : TT=)3 : X=RND ( -TIME 

R) 

8(3 PRINT9449, "YOUR SCORE IS:"SC: 
PRINTS481, "% RIGHT THIS PAGE:")3; 
9)3 PRINT@19, "P: "PA+1 :N=N+1 : PRINT 



@Z+1,CHR$ (96+N) ; :FORX=lTORND(5)+ 
5:A$=A$+CHR$ (RND(9)+48) :NEXTX:PR 
INT@Z-27 , A$ : PRINT@Z+5, STRINGS (LE 
N(A$) ,141) ; :PRINT@417,STRING$(3)3 
,128) ; 

1) 3)3 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$o"0"ANDK$o"E 
"THENT=T+.1:PRINT@448-T, " "; : IFP 
EEK ( 14 4 1 ) =9 6THENPLAY "T1)301FGGGGF 
FEAGGGG" : PRINT (§3 2 , "TIME ' S UP ! " ; : 
FORM=)3 TO 7 5 )3 : NE XTM : GOT 0 1 9 J3 E LS E 1)3 )3 

11) 3 TT=TT+l:PRINT@Z+37+E,K$; 

12) 3 P=VAL(MID$(A$,E+1,1) ) 

13) 3 IFP/2=INT(P/2)THENIFK$="E"TH 
ENSC=SC+P*1)3 : C=C+1 : PLAY "T7 505 AEE 
EA":GOT015)3 

14) 3 IFP/20INT (P/2 ) THENIFK$="0"T 
HENSC=SC+P*1)3 : C=C+1 : PLAY"T7505AE 
EEA" 

15) 3 PRINT@448,STRING$(63,32) ; : PR 
INT@449, "YOUR SCORE IS: "SC: PRINT 
@481,"% RIGHT THIS PAGE : "C/TT* 1)3 

16) 3 E-E+1:IFE<LEN(A$)THEN1)8J8 

17) 3 T=)3 : E=)3 : A$=" " : Z==Z+128 : IFN=6T 
HENIFC/TT>=. 75THENPLAY"T505FBBCC 
DCA" : PRINTQ3 2 , "NEXT PAGE ...";: FO 
RM=)3T015)3)3 : NEXTM : PA=PA+1 : GOT07)3E 
LSEPRINTS32 , "SORRY, YOU DIDN'T G 
ET 75% RIGHT, ";:FORM=)3T015)3)3:NEX 
TM: GOT019)3ELSEIFN/3=INT (N/3 ) THEN 
Z=112 

18) 3 GOT09)3 

19) 3 PRINT@32,"DO YOU WISH TO TRY 
AGAIN? " ; : K$=INKEY$ 

2) 3)3 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$="Y"THENRUN7)3E 
LSEIFK$<>"N f, THEN2j3j3ELSECLS : END 

Submissions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from 
everyone* We like to run a variety of short programs that can 
be typed in at one sitting and are useful, educational and fun. 
Keep in mind, although the short programs are limited in 
scope, many novice programmers find it enjoyable and quite 
educational to improve the software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, 
but we cannot key in program listings. All programs should 
be supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how 
the program works. If your submission is accepted for 
publication, the payment rate will be established and agreed 
upon prior to publication. 



November 1 988 THE RAINBOW 77 



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The fifth in a series of tutorials for the beginner 
to intermediate machine language programmer 



Machine Language Made BASIC 

Part V: Get the Point 



By William P. Nee 



This month's programs change the 
color of various screen locations. 
Now, color information is stored 
in several locations in the Color Com- 
puter. Locations used in this article are 
as follows: 



Location 

$B2 
$B3 
$B4 
$B5 
$C2 



foreground color 
background color 
current color 
$B4x(#$55) 
PSET = 1; PRESET 



= 0 



Start-up 

(3) 
(0) 
(0) 
(0) 



As shown in Figure 1, colors depend on 
the PtIDDE and color set used. 

The computer colors zero to three 
correspond to the BASIC colors one to 
four and five to eight. Three is the 



or load the desired color number into 
Register B and JSR $9536. (The latter 
will not change the background color in 
$B3.) 

Location $C2 can be used as a toggle 
for PSET (if it is set to one) or to PRESET 
(if it is set to zero). However, the PSET 
routine we will use starts after the ROM 
routine has checked Location $C2, so 
we should use either the subroutine at 
$959A, which multiplies the color 
number by #$55 and stores this total at 
Location $B5, or PMODE 4/2/0, which 
will store a random 0 or -1 (RND(2)- 
2) in $B5 and then PSET or PRESET the 
point. (Remember, -1 is the same 
number as #$FF.) PMODE 3/1 will use a 
random (0 - 3)x(#$55) to PSET three 
colors or PRESET the background color. 



Figure 1: 






Setl 




Number 


Set 0 


$B5 


PMODE 3/1 


0 


green 


buff 


#$00 




1 


yellow 


cyan 


#$55 




2 


blue 


magenta 


#$AA 




3 


red 


orange 


#$FF 


PMODE 4/2/0 


0 


black 


black 


#$00 




3 


green 


buff 


#$FF 



highest number used for color because 
4x(#$55) would be greater than 255 and 
would not fit into Location $B5. With 
machine language, we can control and 
change the contents of the color loca- 
tions throughout the program. 

At start-up, the computer will store 
0 in $B3 (for the background color) and 
3 in $B2 (for the foreground color). 
Using the PCL5 routine at $9542 will 
clear the screen to the background 
color. If you want a different back- 
ground color, either load the desired 
color number into $B3 and JSR 9542, 



You may also use the PPOINT routine 
at S933C to check the color of a bit at 
any horizontal location (by storing that 
bit in Location $BE) and any vertical 
location (by storing it in SCO). The 
result of the PPOINT routine is stored in 
FP1. JSR $B3ED will return the color 
number to Register B. In PMODE 3/1 the 
result will be colors one to four (if you 
are using color set to 0), or colors five 
to eight (if you are using color set to 1). 
In PMODE 4/2/0, the result will be zero 
or one with color set to 0, and zero or 
five with color set to 1. Your program 



may have different branches if Register 
B was equal/ not equal to one of these 
colors. If a point has been PRESET, the 
PPOINT routine will make it the back- 
ground color. (Note: You always lose 
registers A, B, and X, so be sure to save 
them first.) 

The PSET routine is at Address $9374, 
and, as with most machine language 
programs, requires some additional set- 
up. The routine uses the following 
locations: 

$B9 bytes per line 

$BD/ BE horizontal coordinate — XI 

SBF/C0 vertical coordinate — Yl 

The coordinate locations are two bytes 
so that you could, for example, either 
STX $BD or STfl $BE. XI cannot be 
greater than 255; Yl cannot be greater 
than 191; and neither can be less than 
zero. 

A scaling routine at $93 ID is also 
required. Since we will pick up the PSET 
routine after ROM has scaled the coor- 
dinates, we must add this to our pro- 
gram prior to the PSET. Scaling adjusts 
XI and Yl to compensate for the dif- 
ferent bytes per line (in $B9) assigned to 
the individual PMODES. Without this 
scaling routine, most graphic com- 
mands (PSET, LINE, CIRCLE, etc.) 
would be accurate only in PMODE 4. (The 
PPOINT routine we've already discussed 
includes the scaling subroutine.) 



Bill Nee bucked the "snowbird" trend 
by retiring to Wisconsin from a banking 
career in Florida. He spends the long, 
cold winters writing programs for his 
Co Co. 



80 



THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Listing 1: POINTERS 

1$ PMODE 4 f l:PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 
20 FOR N=0 TO 32 . 
30 FOR NN=31 TO N STEP -1 
40 B=RND (2) 

50 FOR H=j3 TO 192 STEP 64 
60 FOR V=0, TO 128 STEP 64 
70 ON B GOSUB 100,150 
80 NEXT V,H,NN,N 
90 GOTO 20 

100 PSET (H+NN, V+NN-N) : PSET (H+NN- 
N,V+NN) 

110 PSET (H+ 6 2 -NN, V+NN-N) :PSET(H+ 
62-NN+N,V+NN) 



120 PSET (H+62-NN,V+62-NN+N) : PSET 

(H+62-NN+N,V+62-NN) 

130 PSET (H+NN, V+62-NN+N) : PSET (H+ 

NN-N,V+62-NN) 

140 RETURN 

150 PRESET (H+NN, V+NN-N) : PRESET (H 
+NN-N,V+NN) 

160 PRESET (H+ 62 -NN, V+NN-N) : PRESE 
T ( H+ 6 2 -NN+N , V+NN ) 

170 PRESET (H+62-NN,V+62-NN+N) : PR 

ESET ( H+ 6 2 -NN+N , V+ 6 2 -NN ) 

180 PRESET ( H+NN, V+ 6 2 -NN+N) : PRESE 

T ( H+NN-N ,.V+ 6 2 -NN ) 

190 RETURN 



The PSET routine in ROM uses reg- 
isters A and B, so be sure to save any 
information in them first. Before run- 
ning the program, set Location $FF/ 
100 to #$2000. Since the program starts 
with PMODE, type "GPMDDE" or "G3000" 
to execute it. Pressing any key will break 
the program, but you must hold the key 
down for several seconds because the 
program does a lot before getting to the 
break location. In the 4 A' mode you can 
read the program and symbols from 
$2200 to S2B65. 

Run the BASIC program first to get a 
feel for the design and program speed 



(or lack of it). Next, run the machine 
language program. (Note: The machine 
language program does not run on the 
CoCo 3.) If you run the machine lan- 
guage program from BASIC, clear 
enough memory with the command, 
CLERR 200, &H3000-1. Even though 



the machine language program is eight 
times longer, it runs much more quickly. 

( Questions or comments concerning 
this tutorial may be addressed to the 
author at Route 2, Box 216C, Mason, 
WI 54856-9302. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



Listing 2: PDINTBIN 



9374 
00BE 
00C0 



00050 * $FF/100=#$2000 
00100 ORG $3000 

00110 PSET EQU $9374 
00120 XI EQU $BE 

00130 Yl EQU $C0 



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July 11, 1088 1 4:37:30 

Shell 

OSS: imodi A«S lypesO 

OS0: tnlx /w5 

OSB: rab «»»»/w6 8 

8007 





jOPR . 1988 BURKE 8 BURKE 
DISK nil ENDED COLOR BASIC 2.1 
COPR. 1982, 1086 BY TANOY 
UNDER LICENSE FROM MICROSOFT 
AND MICROWARE SYSTEMS CORP. 

OK 

LOAD -DEMO" 

OK 

LIST 

10 PMODE 4:SCREEN 1,1 

20 X=RND(286)>t:Y=RND(192)-1 

30 A = RND(256-X)*1:B=RND{102-Y)-1 

40 LINE (X.YHX+A.Y+BKPSET.BF 



There Is nothing wrong with your Color Computer. 
Do not attempt to adjust it 

Burke & Burke's new R.S.B. program gives you a complete, OS9- 
compatible version of Disk Extended Color BASIC. We've added new 
software tor OS9-style graphics, sound, printer, and disk I/O. The BASIC 
you know and love is now running under Level 2 OS9 windowsl 

R.S.B. loads and saves files using OSO's file formal, so we've also 
included utilities to transfer BASIC programs and data files between OS9 
and BASIC disks. Of course, you can't use R.S.B. to run machine 
language programs, and some BASIC commands work slightly differently 
under R.S.B. 

Your BASIC programs can take full advantage of great OS9 features like 
hard disks, no-halt floppies, multi-tasking, and 2 MHz operation. 

R.S.B. requires a CoCo 3 with at least 128K RAM, a floppy controller with 
either Tandy Disk Extended Color BASIC or DISTO CoCo 3 CDOS ROM, 
and Level 2 OS9. 



R.S.B. $39.95 



ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 7% SALES TAX. COD'S add $2.20. Shipping (within the 
USA) $1.50. Please allow 2 weeks for deliv y. Overnight delivery Available for in-stock items. 
We accept MasterCard and VISA. Telephone orders accepted (312) 397-2898. 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 81 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the raInbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are usefuJ/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: -Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 







BF1F 


00140 RND 


EQU 


$BF1F 




3000 


C6 


P*. 


00150 PMODE 


LDB 


#4 




3002 


BD 


9628 


00160 


JSR 


$9628 




3005 


C6 


01 


00170 


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#1 


PAGE 1 


3007 


BD 


9653 


00180 


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$9653 




300A 


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9542 


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$9542 


PCLS 


300D 


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GRAPHICS SCREEN 


300F 


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95AA 


00210 


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3012 


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00220 


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#1 


COLOR SET 1 


3014 


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9682 


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$9682 




3017 


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30BF 


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82 



THE RAINBOW November 1988 



30D3 5A 




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3£D4 Fl 


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30D7 102C FF42 


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3JJDF 81 


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30E5 AD 


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rsAoooi 

L y^-jfrr 1 


ANY INPUT? 

ixx 1 X X. Ail X w X 1 


30E9 1)2127 FF2A 


00990 


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START 

X XXXV X 




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SET FOR TEXT SCREEN 

w Xj X X VvXV X Lvva> X UU1.\LLL1 


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PM0DE 





Cursor Controls 

Memory location 63372 con- 
trols the blink rate of the cursor 
on the CoCo 3's 40- and 80- 
column text screens. Simply poke 
this location with any value from 
0 to 255 to change the rate. The 
default value is 11. Lower values 
increase the blink rate while larger 
values make the cursor blink 
slower. If you want to stop the Hi- 
Res cursor from blinking alto- 
gether, enter PDKE633B1,0. To 
restart the blinking, enter POKE 
63381 ,1, 

Ken Ostrer 
Vancouver, Washington 

Hint . . , 

HPRINT Shortened 

When entering BASIC pro- 
grams, I like to use the shorthand 
version of the PRINT command 
(typing a question mark instead of 
typing out PRINT). Unfortu- 
nately, if you try entering H? on 
tte CoCo 3 (instead of HPRINT), 
you will get a syntax error upon 
running the program. To solve 
this problem, enter the entire 
listing using H?. Then save the 
listing in ASCII format and re- 
load it. All H? commands will be 
changed to HPRINT. 

Carl England 
Calhoun, Georgia 

Hint . . . 

BASICally a Setup 

In order to make using my 
CoCo a little easier, I saved a 
program on my utilities disk that 
sets the printer baud rate, drive 
selection and other parameters* 
To make things even simpler, I 
named the program *.BAS. Now 
when I want to start working, I 
just enter RUN''* and let the com- 
puter set itself up, milch in the way 
an AUTOEXEC file works on MS- 
DOS systems. 

Harold Grumann 
Atlanta, Georgia 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 83 



L-B ASIC Tra i n i ng 



16K ECB 



Using the motion option of the 
CoCo's DRAW command, we 
have created some simple line 
drawings. Let us now soften the tradi- 
tionally sharp edges of CoCo graphics 
by adding gentle curves to our creation. 

For this demonstration, we will make 
a simple footprint — specifically the 
print of a man's right shoe. We will start 
with a rough sketch on graph paper. 
After we get a shape that pleases us, we 
will use our modified Graph Paper 
program to put the sketch on the CoCo 
screen. 

Begin by choosing the dimensions of 
the shoe print. (For this demonstration, 
I chose 8-by-20 units.) Next, take a sheet 
of graph paper and outline an oblong 
that is eight boxes wide and 20 boxes 
long. Use a mark at the top of the 
oblong to divide the figure into two 
equal parts. Mark the oblong at two- 
block intervals along the left vertical 
line. For our purposes, the upper left- 
hand corner of this figure will be our 
point of origin (0,0). The tip of the shoe 
should be two units wide and centered. 

As you sketch, you are also plotting 
your program line. First, move three 
units to the right and then make a two- 
unit pencil mark to the right (BR3R2). 
Move in a 135-degree angle for one unit 
(F). Our sketch widens gradually and 
should touch the right border of our 
oblong at the coordinates (8,9). If you 
draw aline to continue in this direction, 
you would have a sharp angle two units 
to the right and three units down, which 
translates to M+2,B or M+2,+B. 

Next, make your sketch curve toward 
the center by using a line that moves six 
units down and two units to the left 
(M-2 , 6). Now we need to add a heel to 
this figure. To be in proportion with the 
rest of the shoe, the heel should be four 
units long. Because we have five units 
to fill, start by moving down one unit. 
Now we will create the front of the heel. 
In order to be centered, the heel's line 
should be four units long (NL4). Next, 
move down three units (D3), and round 
the butt of the heel by by moving one 
unit at a 225-degree angle (G) and two 
units to the left. 

(Are you sketching as we go? You 
should have one half of a shoe on your 
graph paper.) 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer, 



Smooth out those rough 
spots with a little help 
from CoCo 



What's the 
Angle? 

By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



To make the other side of the heel, 
move one unit at a 315-degree angle and 
four units up (HU4). We must now show 
an indentation for the instep. To do this, 
move in an angle that is four units up 
and one unit to the right (M+l , -4). Now 
widen the shoe until it touches the left 
boundary of your oblong by drawing a 
line that is four units up and three units 
to the left (M-3,-4). 

As we return to tlie tip of the shoe, 
we must draw a line that moves in a 45- 
degree angle (E) and reaches the top 
boundary of our oblong at the coordi- 
nates (2,1). This will leave a gap that we 
can connect with a line six units Up and 
two units to the right (M+2,-6). 

This outline should look like a right 
shoe. Go over the outline in red ink, 
moving from point to point. Now, let's 
see what this looks like on the CoCo 
screen. 

Load our Graph Paper program 
(September 1988, Page 80), and add the 
following line: 

300 GOTO 300 

We will need all 19 rows created on the 
screen and will need to modify the 
utility in the following manner: 

Line 30: change 1G0 to 190 in both 

C$ and D$ strings. 
Line 50: concatenate +fl$+B$+R$. 
Line 60: change 160 to 190 at all 

four occurrences. 
Line 70: change C4 to C2, and 
change 160 to 190 in 
both occurrences. 



Never hesitate to tailor an existing 
program to fit a new situation. In this 
tutorial, we need three more rows, and 
we want to change the border color to 
make our outline stand out. In a later, 
tutorial, we will create a full 256-by-192 
screen. 

You may want to make the following 
changes to our graph-paper utility: Add 
the contents of Line 90 to the end of 
Line 80, and separate with a colon. Put 
Line 90 in limbo with a REM. Now run 
the utility. If the program runs properly, 
delete Line 90. 

(While we're modifying our utility, let 
me offer the solution to the last col- 
umn's problem: Change all the Is to 2s 
in lines 150 to 157.) 

Back to the drawing board. We have 
a problem. We can only create 19 boxes 
in a vertical direction, but our shoe is 
20 boxes long. How can we create our 
drawing on the screen? We could 
shorten the shoe length one unit. Where 
can we remove one unit on each side of 
the shoe? I suggest that we begin at 
Location (6,15) and remove one unit 
down. Run a zigzag pencil line over the 
red line one unit above the heel. On the 
other side of the shoe, make a zigzag line 
over its mate. These zigzag lines indicate 
that you must omit the marked seg- 
ments when you are creating the pro- 
gram line. Now the shoe is 8-by-19 
units. 

Enter Line 95, which will remove all 
the unnecessary portions of the graph 
paper from the screen* This way, you 
can concentrate on converting your 
sketch into a shoe on the screen. 

Using our shoe print we will begin 
creating the outline on the CoCo screen 
by typing the following line: 

100 DRfiW "C3S40BM0,0BR3R2F" 

Then press ENTER and type RUN. 

Next, press BREAK and type 
EDIT100. Press ENTER and X to move 
to the end of the line. Use the left arrow 
to move one space and remove the 
closing quote marks in Line 100. Type 
in M+2,BM-2,6", press ENTER and run. 
If your screen does not duplicate your 
sketch, look for an error in either the 
direction or the number of units. Now 
press BREAK. 

Look at the sketch. We have reached 
the unit that we plan to omit. Edit Line 
100, removing the closing quote as we 
did before. Now we need to move four 
units to the left and return to the move's 



84 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



starting point (NL4). Next, we need to 
finish the heel D3GL2HU3). To do this, 
add the following to Line 100: 

NL4D3GL2HU3" 

Now press ENTER and run the program. 

Complete the shoe by editing Line 
100, removing the closing quotes and 
concluding the DRRW statement. Make 
sure that your statement omits the unit 
corresponding to the one we removed in 
our drawing. When you have finished, 
type RUN. 

If your footprint is faulty, don't 
panic. Just refer to your sketch and 
correct your program line accordingly. 

Look over your creation. Would you 
like to see it in a usable size (like Size 
8)? If so, just type in the following lines: 

98 GOTO 400 

400 PMODE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 
410 GOTO 100 

Edit Line 100 to change S40 to 58. To 
do this, type EDIT100, and press 
enter. Use the space bar to move under 
the 4, press D (to delete 4) and C8 (to 
change the 0 to an 8). Now press ENTER 
to get out of the editing mode, and run 
the program. 

Both sides of the sole come to a sharp 
point. We want gentler curves than this. 
Let's make a few modifications to our 
sketch. (After all, have you ever seen a 
drawing or a program you couldn't 
improve?) 

First, let's return our shoe print to the 
graph-paper screen by masking Line 98 
with REM and editing Line 100 by typing 
EDIT100 and pressing ENTER, moving 
the cursor under 8 and typing C4I0 to 
change 8 to 4 and insert 0. Now press 
ENTER and run the program. 

(You may wish to study the points 



that are earmarked for modification.) 

Begin at (6,0) and sketch a line that 
moves down six units and right two 
units, then moves down two more units. 
This changes M+2,8 to M+2,6D2. With 
a black pen, mark over the newly 
created pencil line. 



"We will make a 
simple footprint 
starting with a 
rough sketch on 
graph paper y then 
using our modified 
Graph Paper pro- 
gram to put the 
sketch on the CoCo 
screen. " 



At Point (3,11), we will make a line 
that moves for three units in a 315- 
degree angle, and moves up one unit. 
Pencil it in. That changes M-3,-4 to 
H3U. Ink over the pencil line in black. 

At this time, we have to modify Line 
100 to incorporate these changes. If you 
look at your sketch, you will see that we 
need to modify the red portions of the 
sketch to the coordinates indicated by 
the black lines on the sketch. Note that 
the first change begins after F in Line 
100. 

Type EDIT100 and press ENTER. Use 
the space bar to move the cursor under 
8. Type CGID2 to change 8 to 6 and add 



D2 to the line. Now press enter and run 
the program. 

You must go slowly when editing long 
DRRW statements because it is so easy to 
make a mistake. Therefore, we will 
make one set of changes, run the pro- 
gram to see if the outline is changing in 
the desired manner, and then move to 
the next change. 

The next modification begins after 
the sequence, M+1,-4. Edit Line 100 by 
typing EDIT100 and pressing ENTER. 
Next, type 50, use the space bar to move 
the cursor under the M of M-3,-4, and 
then type GDIH3U to delete the six- 
character move, M-3,-4, replacing it 
with H3U. Then press ENTER and run the 
program. 

This should accentuate the instep a 
bit more. To see what we have, mask 
Line 98 and edit Line 100 to change 540 
to 58. After you have done this, run the 
program. Now our shoe print looks like 
a shoe print. 

How would our shoe look with the 
sole and heel painted? We want to paint 
the sole in scale eight (5B) — the size we 
plan to use in our next tutorial. There- 
fore, we must use the PM0DE4 , 1 screen, 
(256,192), and determine our paint 
points by using PSET. 

To locate a point for the sole, key in 
110 PSET ( 10 , 10 , 1 ) and run. Now let's 
locate a point for the heel. Try typing 
in 120 PSET (34,8,1) and running the 
program. It doesn't work. Try reversing 
the coordinates and running it again. 
This time it works. 

Convert Line 110 to a PRINT state- 
ment by typing the following: 

EDIT110 

HPflINT(10,10) ,1,1 

Run it and then let's check the heel 
coordinates. Mask Line 1 10, and then 



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P.O. Box 143 

Imperial Beach, CA 92032 
(619) 690-3648 (evenings 6-10 PT) 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 85 



edit Line 120 by typing in and running 
the following: 

EDIT120 

HPAINT(8,34),1,1 

Finally, unmask Line 1 10 to see what 
the painted shoe print looks like. 

We have created a shoe print that 
offers three options for the next tutor- 
ial. For practice, get back to the Big 
Foot screen. Mask lines 98,1 10 and 120, 
and change SB to S40 in Line 100. Find 
the correct PRINT line coordinates and 
paint the heel and sole in color CI. We 
will use Line 101 for this PRINT state- 
ment. Key in Line 101 without the REM 
marker and run the listing. What if you 
wanted to use color C2? Try it and see 
why I chickened out. Your choices are 
unlimited. 

(When you are finished practicing, 
put the REM marker back in Line 101.) 

Now all we need to do is make the left 
shoe print. For practice, you could 
create the left shoe in the same way that 
we designed the right one. 

There is a better way. Flip over your 
graph paper drawing of the right shoe. 
You should be able to see the red and 
black outlines through the paper. (If 
not, go over the lines again — this time 
pressing a little harder. 

You may want to trace the two out- 
lines onto the back of the paper in order 
to see the line more clearly. Be careful 
as you move from point to point. The 
top of the sole should be outlined in 
black. Connect the lower red portion 
and heel separator. And finally, use red 



ink to run a zigzag line over the units 
above the heel that we will omit. 

The black outline should indicate the 
final modifications. In pencil, sketch a 
line at the top of the shoe that moves 
left three units. Sketch a similar line up 
from the leftmost point on the shoe. 
Your point of origin is where these two 
pencil points meet, and this is where you 
will begin your second drawing, 

(Save a copy or two of your work at 
this point.) 

There are other ways to proceed with 
this second print, so mark the point of 
origin as (0,0) and open up more work- 
ing space on the graph paper screen by 
changing 82 to 172 in Line 95. Next, 
add the following line: 

96 COLOR 1 : LINE ( 82 , 0 ) - 
(B9,130),PSET,BF 

We will use Line 105 to create the left 
shoe print. So begin the line by typing 
the following: 

DRAW"C3S40BM90,0 

Go ahead, Rembrandt, create. Copy 
from your new sketch. Don't peek at the 
listing. Work it out. 

When you have completed your mas- 
terpiece, there is one slight problem. 
The shoes are reversed. How would you 
swap them? It's easy. Just swap the 
horizontal locating points in lines 100 
and 105. 

Now let's check out our shoes in 
PM0DE4,1 by unmasking Line 98 and 
changing S40 to SB in lines 100 and 105. 
Now run the listing. 



We must move the right shoe print by 
changing the location of the vertical 
coordinate to 20 in Line 100. 

Paint the prints any way you like, but 
compare the two prints when you have 
painted the soles, when you have 
painted the heels, and when you have 
painted both. (Next, you may want to 
try sketching a pair of women's shoes, 
6-by-15 units, using the same procedure 
we have already used.) You may even 
want to make a copy of your work. 

Now, allow me to give you a few 
suggestions for creating clearer work in 
less time. First, sketches and drawings 
stand out best when done on 
SCREEN!, 0 of PM0DE4 , 1/They are as 
sharply defined as possible on CoCo's 
high-resolution, two-color screen. Sec- 
ond, when possible, make the entire 
design one long, continuous line; try to 
put locating coordinates only in the 
program's first DRPW statement. This 
allows much faster execution than when 
the CoCo is forced to jump from one set 
of coordinates to another. It also saves 
on the time it would take to plot those 
new coordinates. It is easy to pick up a 
location from a long DRRW statement 
and know exactly where it is in the 
sequence of movements. Finally, if you 
must make long jumps to new areas, use 
the B DRRW option. It works well when 
plotting a picture on graph paper. 

That's it for this month. Enjoy your 
new creative abilities — who knows 
what is next? With CoCo, the DRAW 
statement and your imagination, the 
possibilities are endless. □ 



The listing: 



0 'BIGFOOT 
5 CLEAR500 

10 PMODE3,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 

20 A$="D10R240":B$="D10L240" 

30 C$= M R10D190":D$="R10U190" 

40 E$=A$+B$+A$+B$:F$=C$+D$+C$+D$ 

50 DRAW"C2BM0,0D10R240D10L240D10 

R240D10L240"+E$+E$+E$+A$+B$+A$ 

60 DRAW"BM0,0R10D190R10U190R10D1 

90R10U190"+F$+F$+F$+F$+F$ 

70 DRAW H C2BM0 ,0R240D190L240U190" 

8 0 1 DRAW" C4BM0 , 4 0R2 40D4 j3L2 40D40R 

240D40L240" 

90 'DRAW !I BM40,0D160R40U160R40D16 
0R40U160R40D160" 

95 COLOR1 : LINE (82 ,0) - (240 , 190) ,P 
SET, BF 



96 'COLOR1: LINE (82,0) -(89,190) ,P 

SET, BF 

98 'GOTO400 

100 DRAW"C3S40BM0,0BR3R2FM+2 / 6D2 

M-2 , 6NL4D3GL2HU3M+1, -4H3UM+2 , -6E 
it 

101 , PAINT(36 / 36) , 1 , 3 : PAINT ( 3 6 , 1 
82) ,1,3 

105 1 DRAW n C3S40BM90 ,0BR3R2FM+2 , 6 
DG3M+1 , 4NL4D3GL2HU3M-2 , -6U2M+2 , - 
6E" 

110 'PAINT (10, 10) ,1,1 
120 'PAINT (8, 34) ,1,1 
300 GOTO300 

400 PMODE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 
410 GOTO100 



86 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Computer Island 




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FIRST GAMES 

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Firs! Games contains 6 menu driven 
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These programs give students prac- 
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DRAWING CONCLUSIONS 

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These programs contain short stories, 
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LOCATING STORY DETAILS 

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these programs contain short stories. 
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RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
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TRS-80 Color Computer 



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I Featur e 



Use these routines to let your CoBBS system 
upload and download Xmodem protocol 



CoCo3 64K Disk Mod 



the 
.RAINBOW 




_/.* -.\ 





CoBBS 

Xmodem 
Routines 



By Robert John Grubb 



The Color BBS System (CoBBS) by 
Richard Duncan (November 1985, 
Page 135) is one of the best BBS 
systems for the Disk BASIC CoCo. 
However, as the system is written, it has 
no reliable way of sending and receiving 
machine language, or packed BASIC 
programs. To remedy this, I have writ- 



Robert Grubb enjoys using his CoCo's 
for MIDIing his synthesizers, running a 
BBS, and playing games with his two 
sons. He enjoys programming in BASIC 
and machine language. Currently, he is 
working on an OS-9 Level II BBS 
system. 



ten two machine language routines that 
allow CoBBS to upload and download 
using the Xmodem protocol. With these 
routines, the system can send or receive 
100 blocks of data before loading more 
information or saving the information 
to disk. At 1200 baud, the system can 
send or receive one block per second. 

Both routines will run on either a 
CoCo 2 or 3. 1 have added REMs to mark 
the lines that are specific to each com- 
puter. The programs are written for the 
CoCo 3 using ON ERR GOTO. When 
running the programs on a CoCo 2, 
change those commands to RUN T. 

To allow CoBBS to run these new 
routines, a few lines in the main CoBBS 
program must be changed. Delete lines 



1200 to 1290 and 20440 to 20950, and 
add the following lines: 

1200 POKE&H7E00,B:POKE&H7E01, 
TD : POKE&H7E02 , Zl< : POKE&H7E03 , 
ZD:FORX=&H0 TO &H3:A$=MID$ 
( D$ , X+l ) , 1 ) : fl=R5C ( R$ ) : POKE ( &H7 
E04+X),A:NEXTX 

1205 TR$=TR$+"D0WN" :G05UB 
9615:PRINT"Loading Download 
Protocols. " : P R I N T " Please 
wait . . .":LORD"XMSEND/SYS'\R 

1321 CLS:PRINT"1 - ASCII" 
:PRINT"2 - Xmodem" : PRINT"3 
- Press <CR> to exit" 

1322 GOSUB6G0:ON ERRGOTO1300 
:X=VAL(CH$) : IFX=0THENRETURN 
ELSE IF X>0 OR X<3THEN PRINT 
TAB(3)CH$ELSE1322 

1323 IF X = 2 THENPOKE&H7E00, 
TD:L0AD"XMRECV/SYS",R 

Make sure you make these changes to 
COBBS. SYS from a freshly powered-up 
computer after a PCLEAR1 statement, or 
you will lose some of the programming 
when you save it to disk. 

Receiving Uploads 

XMRECV. SYS lets you receive uploads 
to CoBBS. When users first enter into 
this routine, they are prompted to press 
ENTER to continue. Line 40 contains a 
password that you, as SysOp, should 
choose. Any user who enters the correct 
password at this time can get a directory 
listing on all your drives. The user can 
then upload any file to any disk; and if 
that user uploads a file already on the 
disk, the file is overwritten. 

If the correct password is entered, the 
screen will prompt File to U^L:. The 
user should then enter an eight- 
character filename. Next, the prompt 
EXT: will ask for a three-character 



88 



THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



extension. Finally, the routine asks for 
the drive number (zero to three). The 
routine now tells the user to start 
sending. The host computer's screen 
clears, and shows the number of blocks 
received until the upload is finished. 

To get a directory listing and granule 
count, the user types DIR (upper or 
lower case) for the filename and ENTER 
for the extension. The user then enters 
the desired drive number. At the end of 
the listing, the system identifies the 
number of free grans left on that disk. 

If the user does not enter the correct 
password, the system identifies the 
number of free grans and asks for a 
filename only. The system takes this 
name, adds the extension /XUP to that 
filename and puts the file on the drive 
specified in the data line of the CoBBS 
menu. 

When the upload is complete, the 
system asks the user if another file will 
be uploaded. If so, then the system 
reruns the program. XMRECV. SYS is a 
program that asks the user to type (J to 
upload [See "CoBBS: A Look at the 
Commands," December '85, Page 153]. 
XMRECV . SYS has the same data types as 
the ASCII version of Co BBS with one 



exception: While entering the correct 
password gives users full access to all 
disks, without this password users may 
upload only filenames with the exten- 
sion /XUP. 

All uploaded programs are saved as 
ASCII files on the disk. As SysOp, you 
can change the filenames to names that 
can be downloaded without problem. If 
you want to run the programs on your 
CoCo, convert them to the proper type 
(i.e., -BIN, or -BflS) before you can run 



them. In the listings you will find a 
public domain file, FCONV.BRS, that 
will convert files for you. The file 
includes instructions. 

XMRECV . ASM is the source code to the 
machine language routine used by 
XMRECV.SYS. I assembled it on the 
Radio Shack Disk EDTASM+ as- 
sembler. Type it in and assemble it to the 
CoBBS system disk as XMRECV.BIN. 

Those of you who do not have an 
assembler can type in the BASIC pro- 



Listing 1: XMRECV. RSM 



00005 TITLE XMRECV/BIN (C) 1986 JOHN GRUBB 

00010 * * * **** * * *** * a *** 

00020 * XMRECV/BIN FOR THE CoBBS XMRECV/SYS * 

00030 * XMODEM TRANSFERS. COPYRIGHT 1986 (C)* 

00040 * JOHN GRUBB * 

00050 * RT 4 BOX 309 * 

00060 * GALLIPOLIS, OHIO * 

00070 * 45631 * 

00080 * PHONE (614)-446-7430 * 

00090 " t eidckiciririekick A k A"A A - A J HHnlHrtlrtHIr^^ 

00100 * YOU MAY USE THIS PROGRAM WITHOUT * 

00110 * CHARGE AS LONG AS ALL CREDITS * 

00120 * REMAIN INTACT. ★ 

00130 A - A -A- A * A - /c k- k + * - * r+' k**t A A A - A - A - A A - AA - A A A A A A *c*rtrk-*~frtrk 

00140 * YOU MUST USE THIS PROGRAM WITH THE * 

00150 * BASIC PROGRAM "XMRECV/SYS" AS THE * 

00160 * PROGRAMS EXPECT DATA FROM EACH * 

00170 * OTHER. THESE PROGRAMS ARE EASILY * 

00180 * MODIFIED FOR YOUR PERSONAL USE,.. * 

00190 A - A ' A ' A ' A , A ' A iH t *A*ATHlr A '* A " A " A , A " A , A , A A A ' A A - A A"A - A - A ' A A A A A A A A A 

7E00 00200 ORG $7E00 

00210 VHWnA****V 1.01*-*** AAA AAA** 




—Dual Program Specials— 

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November 1988 THE RAINBOW 



89 



gram, XMRECPK. BAS. This file will poke 
the values into upper RAM and save it 
to your disk. I have included checksums 
so that any mistakes may be identified 
by the line number. 

Sending Files 

XMSEND.SY5 lets you send programs 
via Xmodem. This file uses the same 
kinds of menus as the ASCII version. 
In this manner, the system remains 
virtually the same as it was originally set 
up by Richard Duncan. Therefore, you 
do not have to relearn how to set up 
downloads for your system. 

On your CoBBS menu, press D to 
download. The data specification is 
0COCO. The buffer number is 0, which 
means that the user's buffer is not 
opened and closed automatically. If the 
buffer number is 1 instead, the buffer 
opens, the directory is listed and the 
buffer is then closed. COCO is a four- 
character filename, in front of which the 
system adds DOWN, and at the end of 
which it adds /MNU. Therefore, the 
system searches all drives to locate a 
menu called DDWNCQCO'NNU. ' 

The buffer numbers 3 and 4 change 
the data to BDPxxx, where B identifies 
the download type; D identifies the 
drive from which to download; and P 
allows no downloads of files with the 
extensions /5Y5, /BIN or /BAK. When 
the buffer number is 3, the user can 
download only from the drive specified. 
When it is 4, the user has full access to 
all drives. The buffer numbers 3 and 4 
allow the user to type DIR to get a 
directory on any drive. 

When the variable B is either 3 or 4, 
the computer screen will prompt File 
to D/L:. At this time, the user should 
enter the eight-character filename and 
extension to be downloaded. The sys- 
tem then asks for a drive number. If the 
file exists on that drive, the user is 
prompted for download type (i.e., 
ASCII/buffer control, ASCII/no 
buffer control, or Xmodem). If Xmo- 
dem is selected, the system does a block 
count and asks if the user wants to 
continue. (The system offers several 
places to abort in case users change their 
minds.) The system then goes to Receive 
mode and begins sending the program. 
If Variable B is either 0 or 1, the system 
displays the menu and then asks for the 
number to download. Once the system 
makes sure the file exists, it performs in 
the same manner as when 3 or 4 is the 
buffer code. 

The ASCII transfers are the same as 
in the original CoBBS system. 

Because the system takes the number 

90 THE RAINBOW November 1988 









00220 BUFFER 


RMB 


128 


7E80 






00230 COUNT 


RMB 




7E81 






00240 BLKIN 


RMB 




7E82 






9925$ RECOM 


RMB 




7E83 






00260 CHKSU 


RMB 




7E84 


86 


99 


00270 INIT 


IDA 


#§0 


7E86 


5F 




00280 


CLRB 




7E87 


6F 


8C F6 


/inn rt 

00290 


CLR 


COUNT, PCR 


7E8A 30 


8D FF72 


00300 


LEAX 


BUFFER, PCR 


7E8E 


A7 


80 


00310 L00P1 


STA 


,X+ *CLEAR OUT THE BUFFER 


7E9J? 


5C 




00320 


INCB 




7E91 


CI 


80 


00330 


CMPB 


#128 *END OF BUFFER? 


7E93 


26 


F9 


00340 


BNE 


L00P1 *N0PE? GO FINISH 










7E95 


86 


15 • 


00360 REC 


LDA 


../-«-» _ 1 _ ft mm » t M *\ W\ mw J** mw m.m J <W V T a • p 

#21 *SEND ORIGINAL NAK 


7E97 


17 


006B 


00370 


LBSR 


SEND *GO SEND IT 


7E9A 


66 


99 


00380 


LDA 


#0 




A7 


8D 00 A8 


00390 


STA 


TIMER, PCR *RESET TIMER 


7EA0 


CE 


9999 


00400 TRIP 


LDU 


#0 SET TIMER TO 0 


7EA3 


17 


99™ 


00410 


LBSR 


RECEV 


7EA6 


81 


91 


00420 


cMpa 


#1 *IS IT START OF BLOCK? 


7EAB 


27 


19 


00430 


BEQ 


BLOCK *YES? GO GET REST 


7EAA 


B7 


7FFE 


00440 


STA 


S7FFE *SAVE IT 


7EAD 


81 


18 


00450 


CMPA 


#24 *AB0RT?7 


7EAF 


27 


53 


00460 


BEQ 


EXIT *THEN QUIT 


7EB1 


81 


04 


00470 


CMPA 


#4 *END OF FILE? 


7EB3 


27 


4F 


00480 


BEQ 


EXIT *THEN QUIT 


7EB5 


6C 


8D 008F 


00490 


INC 


TIMER, PCR *IN CREASE TIMER 


7EB9 


A6 


8D 008B 


00500 


LDA 


TIMER, PCR 


7EBD 


81 


FF 


00510 


CMPA 


#SFF *IS IT 255? 


7EBF 


26 


DF 


00520 


BNE 


TRIP *N0? GO ADD MORE TO TIMER 


7EC1 


20 


D2 


00530 


BRA 


REC 








00540 ieHck-k-k* 


***"*"ft*GET 


BLOCK****** *****# m i<*i** m tti*it&iriirtt1cit-ftir 


7EC3 


17 


004A 


00550 Block 


LBSR 


RECEV1 


7EC6 


A7 


8C B8 


00560 


STA 


BLKIN, PCR *BLOCK # 


7EC9 


17 


0044 


00570 


LBSR 


RECEV1 


7ECC 


A7 


8C B3 


00580 


STA 


RECOM , PCR COMPLEMENT 


7ECF 


3? 


8D FF2D 


00590 


LEAX 


BUFFER, PCR *BUFF ADDRESS 


7ED3 


17 


003A 


00600 L00P2 


LBSR 


RECEV1 *GET CHARACTER 


7ED6 


A7 


80 


00610 


STA 


,X+ *PUT IN BUFFER 


7 EDS 


6C 


8C A5 


00620 


INC 


COUNT, PCR *KEEP TRACK 


7EDB 


A6 


8C A2 


00630 


LDA 


COUNT, PCR .*TILL END 


7EDE 


81 


80 


00640 


CMPA 


#128 *0F BUFFER 


7EE0 26 


Fl 


00650 


BNE 


LOOP 2 *GET NEXT CHARACTER 


7EE2 


17 


002B 


00660 CKSUH 


LBSR 


RECEV1 *G0 GET CHECK 


7EE5 


A7 


8C 9B 


00670 


STA 


CHKSU, PCR *SUM 



00680 *+ * ++1r)c ki * COMPUT CHECK S UM' *** * ** * A - A - A A~A^V^Io^r^!^A^ -Mr 



7EE8 30 


8D FF14 


00690 


LEAX 


BUFFER, PCR *POINT BUFFER 


7 EEC 5F 




00700 


CLRB 




★SET UP COUNTER 


7EED A6 


80 


00710 


LDA 


,x+ 


*GET CHARACTER 


7EEF 5C 




00720 LOOP 3 


INCB 




*ADD TO COUNT UNTIL 


7EF0 CI 


80 


007 30 


CMPB 


#126 


★END OF 


7EF2 27 


04 


00740 


BEQ 


RESEND 


★BUFFER THEN QUIT 


7EF4 AB 


80 


00750 


ADDA 


,x+ 


*ADD TO CHECKSUM 


7EF6 20 


F7 


00760 


BRA 


LOOP 3 


★GET NEXT 


7EF8 Al 


8C 88 


00770 RESEND 


CMPA 


CHKSU, PCR 


7EFB 27 


91 


00780 


BEQ 


EXIT 


*ON MATCH LEAVE 


7EFD 86 


15 


00790 


LDA 


#21 


★SEND NAK NEXT 


7EFF B7 


7E96 


00800 


STA 


REC+1 


★PUT IN PGM 


7F02 20 


80 


00810 


BRA 


INIT 


★RESEND BLOCK 


7F04 39 




00620 EXIT 


RTS 






7F05 F6 


FF69 


00830 SEND 


LDB 


$FF69 


★CHECK STATUS OF PAK 


7F08 C4 


19 


00840 


ANDB 


#$10 


★IS PACK READY TO SEND? 


7F0A 27 


F9 


00850 


BEQ 


SEND 


★NOPE , TRY AGAIN 


7F0C B7 


FF68 


00860 


STA 


$FF68 


★YES, SEND IT, 


7F0F 39 




00670 


RTS 






7F10 B6 


FF69 


00880 RECEV1 


LDA 


$FF69 


*CHECK STATUS OF PAK 


7F13 64 


20 


00690 


AN DA 


#$20 


★CARRIER?? 


7F15 26 


28 


00900 


BNE 


NOC 


★NOPE? GO TELL BASIC AND EXIT 


7F17 B6 


FF69 


00910 


LDA 


$FF69 


*SEE IF PACK HAS A CHR? 


7F1A 84 


08 


00920 


ANDA 


#$8 




7F1C 27 


F2 


00930 


BEQ 


RECEV1 


★NOPE, TRY AGAIN 


7F1E B6 


FF68 


00940 


LDA 


$FF68 


★YES, GET IT 


7F21 39 




00950 


RTS 






7F22 B6 


FF69 


00960 RECEV 


LDA 


$FF69 


★CHECK STATUS OF PAK 


7F25 84 


08 


00970 


ANDA 


#$06 




7F27 27 


04 


00980 


BEQ 


CARIER 


★NOPE? GO CHECK CARRIER 


7F29 B6 


FF68 


00990 


LDA 


$FF68 


★LOAD IT 


7F2C 39 




01000 


RTS 






7F2D B6 


FF69 


01010 CARIER 


LDA 


$FF69 


★CHECK STATUS OF PAK 


7F30 84 


20 


01020 


ANDA 


#$20 


★CHECK CARRIER 


7F32 26 


0B 


01030 


BNE 


NOC 


★NOPE? GO TELL BASIC AND EXIT 


7F34 86 


00 


01040 


LDA 


#0 




7F36 33 


41 


01050 JUNK 


LEAU 


+1.U 




7F38 1183 


0050 


01060 


CMPU 


#$50 


★END OF BUFFER? 


7F3C 26 


E4 


01070 


BNE 


RECEV 


★NO? GET SOME MORE 


7F3E 39 




01080 


RTS 






7F3F 86 


18 


01090 NOC 


LDA 


#24 


* LOAD REGISTER THEN 


7F41 B7 


7FFE 


01100 


STA 


$7FFE 


★SEND IT TO BASIC PROGRAM 


7F44 20 


BE 


01110 


BRA 


EXIT 




7F46 32 


7E 


01120 


LEAS 


-2,S 




7F48 




01130 TIMER 


RMB 


1 






9999 


01140 


END 







00000 TOTAL ERRORS 



Figure 1 



Transitor 
2N2222 or 
Equivalent 



4.7k fl 



Left 

Joystick 
Port 

Pin #5 



To Modem 
Port Pin #12 




Pin #2 



Pln#3 



Joystick modification for 1200 baud modem detection. 
Modem must support Pin 1 2 high speed Indication. 



Listing 2: XMSEND. ASM 



7W 

7E00 10EF 8D ?UB 
7EJ35 BD B3ED 



7EJJ8 IF 

7EJJA E6 

7EJ3C AE 

7EJ3E CI 



n 

A4 
22 
8? 



7E10 lj?26 
7E14 5F 

7E15 6F 8D 0103 



7E19 86 
7E1B 8D 
7E1D A6 
7E21 8D 
7E23 88 
7E25 8D 
7E27 5F 
7E28 CE 
7E2B EF 

7E2F A6 
7E31 8D 
7E33 34 
7E35 34 
7E37 4F 
7E38 34 
7E3A EC 
7E3E E3 
7E4? ED 
7E44 35 
7E46 5C 
7E47 CI 
7E49 27 
7E4B 20 

7E4D A6 
7E51 8D 
7E53 8D 
7E55 81 
7E57 26 
7E59 6F 



01 

5C 

8D 00FA 
56 
FF 
52 



8D 00EA 

80 
46 
04 
02 

02 

8D 00DB 
El 

6D 00D5 
04 

80 
02 
E2 

8D 00C9 

26 

69 

06 

09 

8D 00BF 



00005 
00010 
00020 
00030 
00040 
00050 
00060 
00070 

00080 
00090 
00100 
001L0 
00120 

00130 
00131 
00132 
00133 
00134 
00135 
00136 
00140 
00150 
00160 
00170 
00160 
00190 
00200 
00210 
00220 
00230 
00240 
00250 
00260 
00270 
00280 
00290 
00300 
00310 
00320 
00330 
00340 
00350 
00360 
W370 
00380 
00390 

00400 
00410 
00420 

00*30 
00440 

00450 

00460 

00470 

00480 

00490 

00500 

00510 

00520 

00530 

00540 

00550 

00560 



TITLE XMS END/BIN (C) 1986 John Grubb 

***** *k***~k A m A"kk*~A-k~A m k kk'kkick -k^i<^k~k*kk*j^k-lrk 

* XMS END/BIN FOR THE CoBBS XMSEND/SYS * 

* XMODEM TRANSFERS. COPYRIGHT 1986 (C)* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
★ 



JOHN GRUBB 
RT 4, BOX 309 
GALLIPOLIS, OHIO 
45631 

PHONE: (614) -446-7430 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



k-k^kk~k*-kkk**k^rkkk k k*krk~k*)r*-k** ~k *-k*-A-k -A-A-* k * 

* YOU MAY USE THIS PROGRAM WITHOUT * 

* CHARGE AS LONG AS ALL CREDITS * 

* REMAIN INTACT. * 
*******^k********************^ A "* * * 

* YOU MUST USE THIS PROGRAM VITH THE * 

* BASIC PROGRAM "XMSEND/SYS" AS THE * 

* PROGRAMS EXPECT DATA. FROM EACH * 

* OTHER. THESE PROGRAMS ARE EASILY * 

* MODIFIED FOR YOUR PERSONAL USE.., * 
*1ckie** *k * **i rk * ** * *<k'k ** * ** * ***** iek k * kkkirk 

ORG $7E00 
•k-irA-k-A-k-k GET INFO FROM BASIC A A* 



STS STACK, PCR 

JSR SB3ED 

TFR D t Y 

LDB ,Y 

LDX 2,Y 

CMPB #$80 

LBNE ERR1 
CLRB 

CLR TRIES , PCR 



★STORE STACK POINTERS 

*GET PARAMETERS FROM BASIC 

♦MOVE TO Y 

★LENGTH OF STRING 

★GET STRING LOCATION 

★128 BYTES? 

*N0? THEN GO REPORT 

★CLEAR RETRIES 



*********** SETUP FOR BLOCK HEADER DATA ******* 



SETUP LDA #S1 

BSR SETSND 

LDA BLOCK, PCR 

BSR SETSND 

EORA #SFF 

BSR SETSND 
CLRB 

LDU #$0 

STU CHKSU , PCR 



★<SOH> 
★SEND IT 

★GET BLOCK NUMBER 
★SEND IT 

★COMPLIMENT OF BLOCK NUMBER 
★SEND IT 

★LOAD U TO 
★CLEAR CHEKSUM 



******* SEND THE BLOCK *********** ** *** 



SNDBLK 



LDA 

BSR 

PSHS 

PSHS 

CLRA 

PSHS 

LDD 

ADDD 

STD 

PULS 

INCB 

CMPB 

BEQ 

BRA 



SETSND 

B 

A 



CHKSU, PCR 
,S++ 

CHKSU,PCR 
B 

#$80 

ENDBLK 

SNDBLK 



★LOAD STRING BYTE 
★SEND IT 



★GET CHECKSUM 
★ADD BYTE TO IT 
★NOV SAVE IT 



★IS IT 128 BYTES? 
★THEN GO SEND CHECKSUM 
★GO SEND REST OF BLOCK 



******* SEND THE CHECKSUM *************** 



ENDBLK 



LDA 

BSR 

BSR 

CMPA 

BNE 

CLR 



SUM, PCR 

SETSND 

SETREC 

#$6 

RESND 

TRIES, PCR 



★GET LAST 8 BYTES OF CHECKSUM 

★AND SEND IT 

★GO WAIT FOR ANSWER 

★IS IT <ACK>? 

★NO? SEND LAST BLOCK AGAIN 
★CLEAR TRIES. AND GO FOR NEXT BLO 



entered by the user and adds COCO to the 
front and /DOW to the end of that 
number, you will need to make a text 
file called DOWNCOCO/MNU that lists a 
number, program name and a descrip- 
tion of that program. If a user enters 1 
for download, the system looks on all 
drives for a file named COCOl/DOk If 
the system locates that filename, it asks 
for the type of download (ASCII or 
XModem). From that point, the system 
prompts the user throughout the proce- 
dure. 

XMSEND - RSM is the source code to the 
program XMSEND.BIN, which is used by 
XMSEND. SYS. Assemble it to your sys- 
tem disk as XMSEND.BIN. As with the 
other source code program, if you don't 
have an assembler, type in the program 
XMSNDPK.BfiS. It will poke the routine 
in high RAM and then save it to disk. 

1200-Baud Modification 

In this article, I have included a 
schematic (Figure 1) describing the use 
of a transistor in determining the baud 
rate of a modem with a High Speed 
Indication Line (Pin 12 on the modem). 
This information is read by CoBBS 
through the left joystick port, and the 
entire circuit will fit inside the joystick 
plug. Cut Line 12 in the DB25 cable, 
which connects the modem to the RS- 
232 pack, and send it to the circuit. 
Next, change Line 40 in the USER. SYS 
program to read as follows: 

40 CLS:EXEC&H10DA:POKE4G57,0 
:GOSUB10035 

Add the following lines: 

10035 IF JOYSTK ( 0 )<30 THEN 
POKE G5387,56:PRINT"C0NNECTED 
RT 1200 8RUD":F0R X=l TO 900: 
NEXTX: RETURN 

1003G PDKEG5387,54:PRINT" 
CONNECTED AT 300 

BAUD":FORX=1TO900: NEXTX:RETURN 
10037 GOTO10035 

You may have to play with the value 
returned by JOYSTK ( 0 ) to find the best 
value for your modem. 

Enjoy these programs. If there are 
any problems, I can be reached on 
Delphi (username GRUBBY), or call my 
BBS at (614) 446-7430. I am online 
Friday through Sunday, from 6 p.m to 
11:30 p.m., at 300/1200 baud 8-bit, I 
stop bit, no parity. 

(Questions or comments about the 
programs may also be directed to the 
author at Route 4, Box 309, Gallipolis, 
OH 45631. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 91 



Hint . . . 

What's in Memory? 

Until you type the DOS com- 
mand, the computer's memory \\ 
mostly concerned with Color 
Computer BASIC. Once the DOS 
command calls the OS-9 operat- 
ing system into action, the 
computer memory locations take 
in all sorts of procedures. When 
you use the mdir (module direc- v 
tory) command, a screen display 
of all modules now in memory 
appears. 

Some of the modules listed on 
your screen are identical to those 
you will find in the CMDS (com- 
mands) directory of your OS-9 
system disk. For instance, such 
often-used commands as del (de- 
lete), list and load are in mem- 
ory and also available on the disk 
in the CMDS directory. But an 
infrequently used command like 
backup is found only on the disk. 

Other modules listed to the 
screen when you use the mdir 
command are not on your disk. 
Most such modules are not usu- 
ally commands, and thus not ex- 
ecutable. Most of them relate to 
OS-9 system functions. 

You can load commands into 
memory using the load com- 
mand. For instance, if you type 
load backup, then the backup 
command enters memory as a 
module along with the other 50 or 
more modules. It stays there until 
you type unlink backup. 

When you use the backup com- 
mand without first loading it into 
memory, it is automatically 
loaded into memory, does its 
backup work, arid then is auto- 
matically unlinked to remove 
itself from memory. If these things 
are done automatically, then why 
ever load backup into memory? 

When you buy an OS-9-driven 
commercial program (say, a 
game), the backup command is 
not likely to be on the disk. You 
could then load backup into 
memory from your system disk, 
replace it with your new game 
disk, and then call for a backup, 
running it from memory. You 
should unlink backup once the 
job is finished. 

Del Turner, Kamloops, BC 



7E5D 4F 




P0570 


CLRA 






7E5E 5F 




JJ0580 


CLRB 






7E5F 16 


00A0 


130590 


LBRA 


EXIT 


*G0 RETURN TO BASIC 






00600 ******* 


NOT ACK, RESET BLOCK AND SEND IT 


7E62 30 


88 80 


00610 RESND 


LEAX 


-$80, X 


★RESET START OF BLOCK 


7E65 6C 


8D 00B3 


00620 


INC 


TRIES, PCR 


★ADD 1 TO TRIES 


7E69 34 


02 


00630 


PSHS 


A 




7E6B A6 


8D 00 AD 


00640 


IDA 


TRIES , PCR 




7E6F 81 


06 


00650 


CMPA 


#36 


★IS IT 6 RETRIES? 


7E71 102C 009F 


00660 


LBGE 


ERR4 


★IF SO, GO 


7E75 35 


02 


00670 


PULS 


A 




7E77 20 


A0 


00680 


BRA 


SETUP 




* 




00690 »»»■*■*■* SET UP 


TO SEND DATA 


************ 


7E79 34 


02 


00700 SETSND 


PSHS 


A 


*PUT ON STACK 


7E7B 34 


40 


00710 


PSHS 


U 




7E7D CE 


0000 


00720 


LDU 


#$0 




7E80 EF 


8D 009 A 


00730 


STU 


COUNT, PCR 


♦CLEAR COUNTER 


7E84 6F 


8D 0095 


00740 


CLR 


TIMER, PCR 


♦CLEAR TIMER 


7E88 35 


40 


00750 


PULS 


U 




7E6A B6 


FF69 


00760 SEND 


IDA 


$FF69 




7E8D 84 


10 


00770 


AN DA 


#$10 


*IS PAK READY7 


7E8F 27 


06 


00780 


BEQ 


CONT1 


*N0PE 


7E91 35 


02 


00790 


PULS 


A 


★PULL FROM STACK 


7E93 B7 


FF68 


00800 


STA 


$FF68 


★AND SEND IT 


7E96 39 




00810 


RTS 










00820 ******* 


TIME 


OUT ROUTINE FOR SENDING BLOCK 


7E97 34 


10 


00830 C0NT1 


PSHS 


X 




7E99 AE 


8D 0061 


00840 


LDX 


COUNT , PCR 


★LOAD COUNTER 


7E9D 30 


01 


00850 


LEAX 


l.X 


★ADD 1 TO IT 


7E9F AF 


8D 007B 


00860 


STX 


COUNT , PCR 


★SAVE IT 


7EA3 27 


04 


00870 


BEQ 


TIMERl 


★IF OVER 255 THEN ADD TO TIMER 


7EA5 35 


10 


00880 


PULS 


X 




7EA7 20 


El 


00690 


BRA 


SEND 




7EA9 34 


04 


00900 TIMERl 


PSHS 


B 




7EAB E6 


8D 006E 


00910 


LDB 


TIMER, PCR 


★LOAD TIMER 


7EAF 5C 




00920 


INCB 




★ADD 1 TO IT 


7EB0 CI 


03 


00930 


CMPB 


#$3 


★3 TIME 0UTS7 


7EB2 27 


56 


00940 


BEQ 


ERR2 


★GO REPORT IT 


7EB4 E7 


6D 0065 


00950 


STB 


TIMER, PCR 


★SAVE IT 


7EB8 35 


04 


00960 


PULS 


B 




7EBA 35 


10 


00970 


PULS 


X 




7EBC 20 


CC 


00980 


BRA 


SEND 








00990 ******* 


SET UP TO RECV A BYTE ***** 


7EBE 34 


40 


01000 SETREC 


PSHS 


U 




7.EC0 CE 


0000 


01010 ' 


LDU 


#$0 




7EC3 EF 


8D 0057 


01020 


STU 


COUNT , PCR 


★CLEAR COUNTER 


7EC7 6F 


8D 0052 


01030 


CLR 


TIMER, PCR 


★CLEAR TIMER 


7ECB 35 


40 


01040 


PULS 


U 




7ECD B6 


FF69 


01050 RECV 


IDA 


$FF69 




7ED0 84 


08 


01060 


AN DA 


#$8 


★ANYTHING IN PAK? 


7ED2 27 


04 


01070 


BEQ 


CONT2 


★NO, ADD TO TIMER 


7ED4 B6 


FF68 


01080 


IDA 


$FF68 


★LOAD IT 


7ED7 39 




01090 


RTS 










01100 ★★*★★★* 


TIME 


OUT ROUTINE FOR RECEIVEING ACK 


7ED8 34 


10 


01110 CONT2 


PSHS 


X 




7 EDA AE 


8D 0040 


01120 


LDX 


COUNT , PCR 


★LOAD COUNTER 


7EDE 30 


01 


01130 


LEAX 


l.X 


★ADD 1 TO IT 


7EE0 AF 


8D 003 A 


01140 


STX 


COUNT , PCR 


★SAVE IT 


7EE4 27 


04 


01150 


BEQ 


TIMER2 


★OVER 255, THEN ADD TO TIMER 


7EE6 35 


10 


01160 


PULS 


X 




7EE8 20 


E3 


01170 


BRA 


RECV 




7EEA 34 


04 


01180 TIMER2 


PSHS 


B 




7EEC E6 


SD 002D 


01190 


LDB 


TIMER, PCR 


★LOAD TIMER 


7EF0 5C 




01200 


INCB 




★ADD 1 TO IT 


7EF1 CI 


15 


01210 


CMPB 


#$15 


★IS IT OVER $15? 


7EF3 2C 


1A 


01220 


BGE 


ERR3 


★GO REPORT IT 


7EF5 E7 


8D 0024 


01230 


STB 


TIMER, PCR 


★ELSE SAVE IT 


7EF9 35 


04 


01240 


PULS 


B 




7EFB 35 


10 


01250 


PULS 


X 




7EFD 20 


CE 


01260 


BRA 


RECV 








01270 ******* 


SET UP FOR ERROR REPORTS 


7EFF 4F 




01280 ERR1 


CLRA 






7F00 C6 


01 


01290 


LDB 


#$1 


★STRING ERROR 






01300 **** NEXT STATEMENT SENDS 


DATA BACK TO BASIC'S VARPTR 


7F02 10EE 8D 0019 


01310 EXIT 


IDS 


STACK, PCR 


★RESTORE POINTERS 


7F07 7E 


B4F4 


01320 


JMP 


$B4F4 


★PUT PARAM BACK TO BASIC 


7F0A CC 


0002 


01330 ERR2 


LDD 


#$2 


★COMMUNICATIONS FAILURE 


7F0D 20 


F3 


01340 


BRA 


EXIT 




7F0F CC 


0003 


01350 ERR3 


LDD 


#$3 


★XMODEM TIME OUT 


7F12 20 


EE 


01360 


BRA 


EXIT 




7F14 CC 


0004 


01370 ERR4 


LDD 


#$4 


★6 RETRIES ATTEMPTED 


7F17 20 


E9 


01380 


BRA 


EXIT 








01390 ******* 


PROGRAM VARIABLES 


***** , *^*'A I ****** 


7F19 




01400 CHKSU 


RMB 


1 




7F1A 




01410 SUM 


RMB 


1 




7F1B 




01420 BLOCK 


RMB 


1 


★POKED IN BY BASIC PROGRAM 


7F1C 




01430 TRIES 


RMB 


1 




7F1D 




01440 TIMER 


RMB 


1 




7F1E 




01450 COUNT 


RMB 


2 




7F20 




01460 STACK 


RMB 


2 




0000 


01470 


END 







00000 TOTAL ERRORS 



92 THE RAINBOW November 1988 




105 . . 


72 


210 


192 


450 ... 


89 


END 


...217 



Listing 3: XMRECV.SYS 

0 'XMRECV.SYS V2.1 

1 1 COPYRIGHT 198 6 BY JOHN GRUBB 

2 'PROGRAM TO ALLOW UPLOADS TO T 
HE 

3 'COBBS BBS SYSTEM 

4 'MUST USE XMRECV/BIN WITH THIS 
PROGRAM 

10 ON ERR GOTO 4 40 

15 FS=PEEK(&H7E00) 

20 CLEAR 15000, &H7BFE:EC=0: PRINT 

CHR$ (12) : 'CHANGE CLEAR TO CLEAR 

1500,&H7000 FOR COCO II VERSION 

25 DIM RC$(100) 

30 PRINT f, CoBBS Xmodem Uploader V 
2.1": PRINT "By John Grubb" : PRINT" 
Copyright 198 6": PRINT : PRINT : PRIN 
T"Please press RETURN to continu 
e. . ."; :PRINTCHR$(7) 

40 PW$=" PAS SWORD" 

50 LINEINPUTP$:IF P$OPW$ THEN G 
OTO 140 

60 FT$="":EX$="":D$="" 

70 LINEINPUT"File to U/L: ";FT$: 

IFLEN(FT$) >8THENPRINTCHR$ (7) :GOT 

070 

80 LINEINPUT" EXT: ";EX$: 

IFLEN (EX$ ) >3THENPRINTCHR$ ( 7 ) : GOT 
080 

90 LINEINPUT" DRIVE #: ";D$:D 
=VAL(D$):IF D<0 OR D>3 THENPRINT 
CHR$(7) :GOTO90 

100 IF LEFT$(FT$,3)="DIR" OR LEF 
T$ (FT$ , 3 ) ="dir" THEN110ELSEIFFT$ 
=""THEN440 

105 F$=FT$+"/"+EX$+": "+D$:GOT021 

110 IF D=l THEN DIR1:GOTO130ELSE 

IFD=2 THEN DIR2 : GOTO130 

120 IF D=0 THEN DIR0ELSEDIR3 

130 PRINT" Free Grans: " ; : PRINTFR 

EE (D) :GOTO60 

140 ON ERR GOTO600: PRINT" Checkin 
g free disk space. Please wait. . 



I! 



150 X=FREE(FS) : IF X<5 THENPRINT" 
Sorry, Disk is FULL! . . . ":PRINTCH 
R$(7) :GOTO440 

160 PRINT X;" Grans Free" 

170 ON ERR GOTO 600 

180 PRINT "Filename (8 Chars or 1 

ess). Do not use " ;CHR$ (34) ; "/" ; 

CHR$(34) ;")": PRINT "Enter nothing 

to ABORT" 
190 LINEINPUT" FILENAME >>";F$:IF 



F$="" THEN PRINT" Aborted" :GOT04 
40 

195 IF INSTR(F$,"/")>0 THEN 600 
ELSE IFINSTR(F$,".")>0 THEN 600 
200 F$=F$+"/XUP: "+RIGHT$ (STR$ (FS 
),l):ON ERR GOTO210:QPEN"I" , #1,F 

$: CLOSE: PRINT "I have that ":G 

OTO140 

210 ON ERR GOTO 440:A$=" ":POKEV 
ARPTR ( A$ ) , &H8 0 : POKEVARPTR ( A$ ) +2 , 
&H7E : POKEVARPTR ( A$ ) +3 , 0 
220 POKE&H7FFE,0:POKE&H7E9 6,21 
230 CLS 

240 OPEN"0" , #1 / F$:BL=0:ON ERR GO 
TO 420 

250 PT=PEEK ( &HFF2 2 ) AND1 : IFPT=1TH 
EN260ELSEPRINT#-2, "Uploaded ";F$ 
2 60 LOADM" XMRECV/BIN" : POKE&H7E9 6 
,21 

270 PRINT"Begin file transmissio 
n.":PRINT"On MIKEY TERM press <D 
OWNARROW> <3>." 

280 CLS2:FORX=1TO8000:NEXTX:GOSU 
B875 

290 RD=0 :T=0 

300 GOSUB 540 

310 FORX=1TO2000:NEXTX 

320 EXEC&H7E84 

330 A=PEEK ( &H7FFE) 

340 IF A=24 OR A=13 THEN 380 

350 IF A=4 THEN 490 

360 GOSUB 450 

370 POKE &H7E96, 6: GOTO 320 

380 GOSUB 570 

390 IF BL=0 THEN 410 

400 FOR X=l TO BL:PRINT#1,RC$(X) 

;:NEXT X 

410 CLOSE* 1: CLEAR 200 , &H7FFE : GOS 
UB885 

420 FOR X=l TO 5 : PRINTCHR$ ( 7 ) ; : N 
EXT X 

430 GOSUB700:LINEINPUT"Upload an 
other (Y/N) " ;Q$ : IF LEFT$ (Q$ , 1) =" 
Y" OR LEFT$(Q$,l)="y" THENGOTO 3 

P 

440 CLEAR 200 , &H7FFF : PRINT" Loadi 
ng Main System. . . Please wait. . . 
" : CLOSE : UNLOAD : RUN" COBBS . STM" 
450 A$=" ": POKEVARPTR ( A$ ) , &H80 : P 
OKEVARPTR ( A$ ) +2 , &H7E : POKEVARPTR ( 
A$)+3,0 

4 60 BL=BL+l:RC$(BL)=A$:POKE 1024 
,BL AND 255 

461 LOCATE10 , 10 : PRINT"Blocks Rec 
eived ";BL;:'USE THIS FOR COCO I 
II 

462 REM PRINT @3 3 , "BLOCKS RECEIV 
ED ";BL;:'USE THIS FOR COCO II 
470 IF BL<100 THEN RETURN 

480 FOR X=*l TO 100 : PRINT#1,RC$ (X 
) ; : NEXT X : BL=0 : RETURN 
490 1 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 93 



500 T=0 

510 E=PEEK( &HFF69) :F=E AND 16 
520 IF F THEN POKE&HFF68 , 6 : GOTO 
380 

530 T«T+1:IF T<1000 THEN 510 ELS 
E PRINT 11 PAK NOT READY ! 11 : GOSUB570 
:GOTO440 

540 POKE&HFF6A , PEEK ( &HFF6A) AND 
&H9F 

550 POKE&HFF6B, PEEK(&HFF6B) AND 
&H9F 

560 RETURN 

570 POKE&HFF6A, PEEK(&HFF6A) OR & 
H60 



Listing 4: XMRECPK.BR5 



0 1 XMRECPK. BAS V2 . 1 

1 'COPYRIGHT 198 6 BY JOHN GRUBB 

2 'THIS ROUTINE POKES THE 

3 1 MACHINE CODE FOR THE 

4 'XMRECV/BIN ROUTINE 

10 DATA 134, 0, 95, 111, 140, 2 

46, 48, 141, 255, 114, 167, 128, 
92, 193, 128, 38, 249, 134, 21, 
23, 0, 107, 134, 0, 167, 2865 

20 DATA 141, 0, 168, 206, 0, 0, 
23, 0, 124, 129, 1, 39, 25, 183 

, 127, 254, 129, 24, 39, 83, 129 

, 4, 39, 79, 108, 2054 

30 DATA 141, 0, 143, 166, 141, 

0, 139, 129, 255, 38, 223, 32, 2 
10, 23, 0, 74, 167, 140, 184, 23 
, 0, 68, 167, 140, 179, 2782 

40 DATA 48, 141, 255, 45, 23, 0 
, 58, 167, 128, 108, 140, 165, 1 
66, 140, 162, 129, 128, 38, 241, 

23, 0, 43, 167, 140, 155, 2810 
50 DATA 48, 141, 255, 20, 95, 1 
66, 128, 92, 193, 128, 39, 4, 17 

1, 128, 32, 247, 161, 140, 136, 
39, 7, 134, 21, 183, 126, 2834 
60 DATA 150, 32, 128, 57, 246, 
255, 105, 196, 16, 39, 249, 183, 

255, 104, 57, 182, 255, 105, 13 

2, 32, 38, 40, 182, 255, 105, 33 
98 

70 DATA 132, 8, 39, 242, 182, 2 
55, 104, 57, 182, 255, 105, 132, 
8, 39, 4, 182, 255, 104, 57, 18 
2, 255, 105, 132, 32, 38, 3086 



580 POKE&HFF6B, PEEK( &HFF6B) OR & 
H20 

590 RETURN 

600 EC=EC+1:IF EC=5 THEN440ELSE1 
80 

700 IFPEEK(4658)=0THEN710ELSE CD 
=PEEK(65385) :CD=CD AND 32:IF CD< 
>0 OR PEEK(4657)<>0 THEN440ELSE7 
10 

710 RETURN 

875 POKE&H0168,PEEK(4681) :POKE&H 
0169,PEEK(4682) : RETURN 
885 POKE&H0168,&H10:POKE&H0169,& 
HE 6: RETURN 



80 DATA 11, 134, 0, 51, 65, 17, 

131, 0, 255, 38, 228, 57, 134, 
24, 183, 127, 254, 32, 190, 50, 
126, 0, 2107 

140 CLS : PRINT@200, "NOW POKING CO 
DE" 

150 CLEAR20,&H7BFE:ST=&H7E84:C=0 

160 FOR Y=l TO 7 

170 FOR X=l TO 25 

180 GOSUB 400 

190 NEXT X 

200 GOSUB 500 

210 NEXT Y 

220 Y=8:FOR X=l TO 22 
230 GOSUB 400 
240 NEXT X 
250 GOSUB 500 
2 60 CLS 

270 PRINT" INSERT DISK TO RECEIVE 
FILE IN" 

2 80 INPUT "DRIVE 0 AND PRESS ENTE 
R";A$ 

290 SAVEM"XMRECV/BIN",&H7E84,&H7 
F48,&H7E00 

300 PRINT "FILE HAS NOW BEEN SAVE 
D" 

310 END 
320 STOP 

400 READ N:POKE ST,N 
410 C=C+N:ST=ST+1 
420 PRINT @0,N 
430 RETURN 
500 READ N 

510 IF NOC THEN PRINT "ERROR IN 

LINE #"; (Y*10) :STOP 
520 C=0 : RETURN 




30 128 

112 165 

610 236 

1005 233 

1217 119 



1250 250 

1320 102 

1380 108 

1460 67 



1530 166 

9210 123 

9620 148 

END 131 



Listing 5: XMSEND-SYS 

0 'XMSEND.SYS V2 . 1 

1 'COPYRIGHT 1986 BY JOHN GRUBB 



2 'PROGRAM TO ALLOW XMODEM DOWNL 
OADS 

3 'FROM THE COBBS BBS SYSTEM. 

4 'MUST USE XMSEND/BIN WITH THIS 
PROGRAM. 

5 ON ERR GOTO 30 

10 CLEAR15000,&H7DFF 

11 DIM BC$(21) ,L$(80) ,TY$(21) ,TX 
$(21) ,D$(21) ,B$(100) ,KY$(21) :NU$ 
=CHR$ (0) : DR$ (0) ="0» :DR$ (1) ="1" :D 



94 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



R$(2)="2":DR$(3)="3" 

12 DEFUSR0=&H0ED0 : DEFUSR1=&H0ED3 

: DEFUSR2=&H0E81 : DEFUSR3=&H7E00 : 0 

N ERR GOTO30:GOSUB9500:GOSUB25:G 
OTO900 

25 1 

2 6 IFPEEK(4658)=0THEN28 ELSE CD= 
PEEK ( 65385 ) :CD=CD AND 32:IF CD < 
>0 OR PEEK(4657)<>0 THEN 27 ELSE 
28 

27 CLOSE : POKE65387 , 54 : POKE65386 , 
107 : FORT=1TO100 : NEXTT : TR$=TR$+"L 
OC" : GOSUB9615 : CLEAR200 , &H7FFF : LO 
AD"USER.STM",R 

28 II$=INKEY$:IFII$="»THEN29ELSE 
CH$=II$:K=INSTR(" A _ ]",II$) : IFK= 
0THEN29ELSE ON K GOSUB 800,31,71 
30,9800 

29 RETURN 

30 PRINT :PRINT ,f Unable to ACCESS. 
Returning to Main System. :GOT 

010000 

31 RETURN 

100 1 

101 DC=VAL(HEX$(PEEK(&H0EFD) ) ) :H 
R=VAL(HEX$(PEEK(&H0EFE) ) ) :MN=VAL 
(HEX$ (PEEK(&H0EFF) ) ) :SS=VAL(HEX$ 
(PEEK(&H0F00) ) ) : HR$=RIGHT$ (STR$ ( 
HR) , 2 ) : IFHR<10THEN MID$ (HR$ ,1,1) 

104 MN$=RIGHT$ (STR$ (MN) ,2) : IFMN< 
10THEN MID$(MN$,1,1)="0" 

105 TI$=HR$+":"+MN$:IF SS<540RMN 
>58THEN108 

106 M>T=MN+1:IFMN>59 THENMN=0:HR= 
HR+1:IF HR>23 THENHR=0 

107 X=USR1(HR*256+MN) 

108 X=PEEK(4611) : IFXODC THEN111 

109 DA$KRIGHT$(STR$(PEEK(4608)) , 
2)+"/"+RIGHT$(STR$(PEEK(4609) ) ,2 
) +"/"+RIGHT$ (STR$ (PEEK(4610) ) ,2) 

110 GOT0118 

111 MM=PEEK(4608) : DA=PEEK (4 609) : 
YY=PEEK(4610) : DA=DA+1 : IFDA>3 1THE 
NDA=1:MM=MM+1:IF MM>12 THEN MM=1 
:YY=YY+1 

112 POKE4608,MM:POKE4609,DA:POKE 
4 6 10 , YY : P0KE4 6 11 , DC : GOTO10 9 

118 AX=PEEK(4615) *60+PEEK (4 616) : 
PT=HR* 60 +MN : IFF 3 = 1THEN 1 2 4 E LS EUO= 
PEEK(4619) :IFPT-AX<(U0*5)-5 OR U 
0=255 THEN121 

119 T0KPEEK(4619) *5 : T1=T0- (PT-AX 
) : IFTK1THEN T1=0:GOTO120 ELSE P 
RINT ,f You only have" ;T1; "Minutes 
left! M :GOT0121 

120 PRINT"No time left ! " : TR$=TR$ 
+"TIMED OUT "+II$:G0SUB9 615: GOTO 
9820 



121 1 

124 RETURN 
150 1 

152 F=ASC(F$) :E=128:F$="" 
154 FOR Q=l TO 8 
156 J=INT(F/E) 

158 IF J=0 THEN F$=F$+"0"ELSEF$= 
F$+"l" 

160 F=F-(E*J) :E=E/2 
162 NEXT Q 
166 RETURN 
600 1 

603 TIMER=0 

604 GOSUB25:ON ERR GOTO 1170 

605 EXEC&H10DA:CH$=CHR$(PEEK(448 
1)) :IC$=INKEY$:IFIC$<>""THEN CH$ 
=IC$:G0T0615 

609 IF TIMER> 4 0 00THEN PRINT : PRIN 
T:PRINT f, You timed out 1 ! " :TR$=TR$ 
+ " KTO 11 : GOSUB9 6 15 : GOT09 820 

610 IFCH$=CHR$(0)THEN604 
615 RETURN 

655 GOSUB2 5:ON ERR GOTO 1170: LIN 

EINPUTCH$ : GOSUB2 5 : RETURN 

675 GOSUB655 : Gl$=» " : IFCH$=" "THEN 

RETURN 

680 FOR G=l TO LEN (CH$) 

685 G1=ASC(MID$(CH$,G,1) ) :IFG1>9 

6ANDGK123THEN Gl=Gl-32 

690 G1$=G1$+CHR$(G1) :NEXTG:CH$=G 

1$: RETURN 

800 RETURN 

850 1 

855 POKE&H016B / 197:POKE&H016C / PE 
EK(4684) : RETURN 

875 POKE&H0168 / PEEK(4681) :P0KE&H 
0169, PEEK (4 68 2) : RETURN 
885 POKE&H0168, &H10 : POKE&H0169 , & 
HE 6 : RETURN 

900 B=PEEK(&H7E00) : TD=PEEK ( &H7E0 
1) :ZK=PEEK(&H7E02) : ZD=PEEK(&H7E0 

3) 

905 D$="":A$="":FORX=&H0 TO &H3 : 
D=PEEK(&H7E04+X) :A$=CHR$(D) : D$=D 
$+A$:NEXT X 
1000 1 

1005 GOSUB25:ON ERR GOTO 1175 
1010 f 
1015 1 

1020 GOTO1200 
1170 1 

1175 PRINT"System Error!, Wait.. 
."; :PRINTCHR$(7) ; 

1180 ER=PEEK ( &HFD) : EL=PEEK ( &HFE) 
*&H100+PEEK ( &HFF) 

1181 IF ER=>54 THEN EA=&HC242+ER 
:GOT01185 

1182 IF ER=>50 THEN EA=&H88D9+ER 
:G0T01185 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 95 



1183 E A= & HAB AF+ER 

1185 ER$=CHR$ (13)+"***ERR0R TYPE 
" +CHR$ ( PEEK ( EA) ) +CHR$ ( PEEK ( EA+1 
))+" IN LINE"+STR$(EL)+"***":PRI 
NTER$:GOTO1200 

1200 ON ERR GOTO 1229 : GOSUB885 : P 
RINTCHR$ ( 7 ) : IFTD>2THENPRINT : PRIN 
T"File to D/L: ";:GOT01215 
1206 IF D9=0 THEN D9=l : CH$="M" : G 
0T01225 

1210 PRINT :GOSUB100: PRINT" [M]enu 
,<CR> to Exit or": PRINT" # to Dow 
nload: " ; :FT$="" :F$="» 

1215 GOSUB675:ONERR GOT01229:IFC 
H$=" "THEN D9=0:GOTO10000ELSEFT$= 
CH$ : IFTDOTHENIFLEN ( CH$ ) >4THEN12 
00ELSE1220 

1216 IFLEFT$ ( CH$ , 3 ) <> " DIR"THENF$ 
=CH$:GOT01226ELSE D=VAL(RIGHT$ (C 
H$,1)):IF TD<4 THEN D=ZD 

1217 IFD=1THEN DIR1 : G0T01219ELSE 
IFD=2THENDIR2 : G0T01219 

1218 IF D=0THEN DIR0 ELSE DIR3 

1219 PRINT "Free: " ;FREE (D) :G0T01 
200 

1220 GOSUB25:IFCH$O"M"THEN1230 

1225 FT$="DOWN"+D$+"/MNU: ":D=-1: 
GOSUB1245:GOTO1210 

1226 IFTD=3THEN D=ZD ELSEPRINT"D 
RIVE: "; :GOSUB600:ON ERR GOTO120 
0 : D=VAL(CH$) : IFD>3THEN1226ELSEPR 
INTD 

1227 IFZK>0 THEN X$=RIGHT$ (F$ , 4) 
:IFX$="/SYS"ORX$="/BIN"THEN1200 

1228 F$=F$+" : "+DR$ (D) : ONERR GOTO 
1290:GOTO1230 

1229 GOT01175 

1230 CLS:PRINT"1 - ASCII, No Buf 
fer":PRINT"2 - ASCII, With Buffe 
r":PRINT"3 - Xmodem D/L":PRINT"P 
ress <CR> to exit" 

1235 GOSUB600: ONERR GOTO1200:X=V 
AL(CH$) : B=X-1 : IFX=0THENRETURNELS 
EI FX>0 ORX< 4 THENPRI NTT AB ( 3 ) CH$ELS 
E1235 

1237 IFTD>3THEN1255 

1240 FT$=D$+FT$+"/DOW: " :D=-1 

1245 ON ERR GOT01245 

1250 IFTD=3THEN1290ELSED=D+1: IFD 

>3THEN1290ELSE F$=FT$+DR$ (D) 

1255 CLOSE -.UNLOAD: ONERR GOTO1250 

:OPEN"I", #1,F$: ONERR GOTO1290:PR 

INTCHR$ (12) :CLS:IFCH$="M"THEN127 

0 

1257 IFX=3THEN 1300 

1260 IF B=0 THENPRINT " Open Buffe 

r ":PRINTCHR$(7) :FOR O =1 TO 

1500:NEXTO 
1265 IF B=l THENPRINTCHR$ (18) ; 
1270 IFEOF(l)THEN1275ELSEGOSUB25 
: LINE INPUT #1 , A$ : PRINTA$ : EXEC 4 3 14 
: CH=PEEK (4481):IFCH=83 ORCH= 1 1 5 OR 



INKEY$="S"THEN1275ELSE1270 

1275 ONERRGOTO1200:IFCH$="M" THE 

N 1280ELSEIF B=l THENPRINTCHR$ (2 

0) ELSEFORO=1TO1500:NEXTO 

1280 CLOSE :TR$=TR$+CHR$ (13) +"DOW 

: "+F$+CHR$ (13) :GOSUB9 610 :GOT012 

00 

1290 ON ERR GOTO1200 : PRINTCHR$ (7 

) ; :PRINT"Unable to access. ": PRIN 
T:GOTO1200 

1300 LOADM"XMSEND/BIN" : ON ERR GO 
TO 1625 

1310 CLS:PRINTCHR$(12) :PRINT"CoB 
BS Xmodem Downloader V2.1": PRINT 
"By John Grubb":PRINT"Copyright 
1986" 

1315 PRINT: PRINT" 1. Continue wit 
h Download" 

1320 PRINT"2. Return to CoBBS" 
1325 PRINT "Comand»"; 
1330 GOSUB600 

1335 IF CH$<"1"ORCH$>"2"THEN1330 
ELSEPRINTCH$ 

1340 IF CH$="2" THEN CLOSE:UNLOA 

D:GOTO10000 

1345 ON ERR GOTO 1200 

13 50 CLOSE : OPEN"D" , #1 , F$ , 128 : FIE 

LD#1,12 8 AS R$:PF=0:RD=0:BL=0:BC 

=0 

1355 PRINT"Loading program for b 
lock count. . " 

13 60 GOSUB1540: PRINT TB; "Blocks 
to send." 

13 65 PRINT: PRINT" Continue with d 
ownload? (Y/N)"; 

1370 ON ERR GOTO 1175: GOSUB600: 
IFCH$=""THEN1370ELSEIFCH$="Y"OR 
CH$="y"THEN PRINT "YES ! " : GOT01375 

ELSE PRINT"NO" : CLOSE : GOTO1200 
1375 ONERRGOT01625:PRINTCHR$ (12) 

:PRINT"Ready to transmit .": PRINT 
"On MIKEY TERM press" : PRINT" <D0 
WN ARROWX 4 >.": PRINT "Begin XMODEM 
TRANSMISSION" : GOSUB25 : GOSUB1605 
:GOSUB1415:IF RD THEN GOSUB1440: 
PRINT "<NAK> not recivedl ":GOT013 

10 ELSE1385 
1380 GOSUB1540 

1385 GOSUB875:CLS2 : FOR BV=1T0BL 

1386 LOCATE10 , 10 : PRINT"Blocks le 
ft to send"; (TB-BC) ;: 'FOR COCO I 

11 USE THIS 

1387 REM PRINTS 3 3 , "BLOCKS LEFT T 
0 SEND"; (TB-BC) ;: 'FOR COCO II US 
E THIS 

1388 GOSUB 1445 

1390 POKE 1024 / BC:LPOKE&H60000 / B 

C:NEXTBV: 'FOR COCO II, DELETE TH 

E LPOKE STATEMENT. 

1395 BL=0:IFLB=0 THEN1380 

1400 GOSUB1485 

1405 GOSUB1440 



96 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



14 10 CLOSE: UNLOAD :G0SUB8 85 :FORX= 
1T05 : PRINTCHR$ (7) ;:NEXT X:GOT012 

1415 GOSUB25:X=0:RD=0 

1420 E=PEEK(65385) :F=E AND 8 

1425 IF F=0 THEN 143 5 

1430 IF PEEK (65384)021 THEN1435 

ELS ERE TURN 
1435 X=X+l:IF X<1000 THEN 1420 
1440 P0KE&HFF6B, PEEK(&HFF6B) OR&H 
20 ZP0KE&HFF6A, PEEK (&HFF6A) OR &H 
60 : RD=1 : RETURN 

1445 G0SUB2 5:BC=BC+1:P0KE&H7F1B, 
BC 

1450 A=USR3(VARPTR(B$(BV))) 
1455 IF A=l THEN TR$=TR$+ 11 XMODEM 
STRING ERROR" :GOSUB9615:GOSUB16 
20:GOTO1410 

14 60 IF A=2 THEN TR$=TR$+"COMMUN 
ICATIONS FAILURE! - MODEM OR RS2 
32 PAK":GOSUB9615:GOSUB1620:GOTO 
1410 

1465 IF A=3 THEN TR $ =TR $ + " XMO DEM 
TIME OUT* 11 : GOSUB9615 : GOSUB1620 : 
GOTO1410 

1470 IF A=4 THEN TR$=TR$+"DOWNLO 
AD - 6 RETRIES ATTEMPTED" : G0SUB9 
615 : GOSUB1620 : G0T014 10 
1475 IF AO0 THEN TR$=TR$+" FATAL 
ERROR" :GOSUB9615 : GOSUB1620 : GOTO 
1200 

1480 RETURN 

1485 D=4:GOSUB1495:T=0 

1490 GOSUB1525:T=T+l:IF D=6 THEN 

GOTO1440ELSEIFT<200 THEN 1490ELS 

E1440 

1495 T=0 

1500 E=PEEK(65385) 
1505 E=E AND 16 

1510 IF E THEN POKE 65384, D:RETU 
RN ELSET=T+1 

1515 IF T<1000 THEN 1500 
1520 GOTO 1440 

1525 E=PEEK(65385) :F=E AND 8 

1530 IF F THEN D=PEEK(65384) : EL 

SE D=0 

1535 RETURN 

1540 TB=LOF(1)+1:LB=0 

1545 PF=PF+1 

1550 IF PF>L0F(1) THEN 1575 

1555 BL=BL+ 1 : GET # 1 , PF 

1560 B$(BL)=R$ 

1565 IF BL=100 THEN RETURN 

1570 G0T01545 

1575 MF=(PF-1) *128:LB=1 

1580 CLOSE : OPEN" D", #1 , F$ , 1: FIELD 

#1,1 AS R$ 

1585 BL=BL+1:B$(BL)="" 

1590 MF=MF+1:IF MF<=L0F(1) THEN 

GET# 1 ,MF: B$ ( BL) =B$ ( BL) +R$ : G0T015 

90 

1595 IF LEN (B$ (BL) ) <128 THENB$ (B 



L)=B$(BL)+" ":GOT01595 
1600 CLOSE: RETURN 

1605 P0KE&HFF6B , PEEK ( &HFF6B) AND 
&H9F: POKE &HFF6A, PEEK (&HFF6A) AN 
D &H9F 
1610 RETURN 

1620 GOSUB1440: PRINT "XMO DEM ERRO 
R": RETURN 

1625 GOSUB1440:GOTO1200 
7130 RETURN 
9200 1 

9205 F$="USERL. SYS : "+DR$ (PEEK (46 
72)) 

9210 OPEN"D",#l,F$,96 
9215 FIELD#1,50 AS UN$,8 AS UP$, 
1 AS UR$,1 AS UA$,1 AS Ul$,l AS 
U2$,l AS UU$,1 AS UE$,5 AS U5$,5 
AS UM$,5 AS UD$,1 AS U3$,l AS U 
4$,1 AS U0$,1 AS UL$,4 AS US$,9 
AS SP$ 

9220 K1=L0F(1) : RETURN 
9500 1 

9510 GOSUB9200:GET#1,1 
9520 K=INSTR(UN$,CHR$ (0) ) :NA$=LE 
FT$(UN$,K-1) :PR=ASC(UA$) :F$=U1$: 
GOSUB150 : P1$=F$ : F$=U2 $ : GOSUB150 : 
P2$=F$:UL=ASC(UL$) :IF UL<1 OR UL 
>4 THENUL=1 

9550 BC=ASC(UE$) :LM=CVN(UM$) :POK 
E4 6 19 , ASC (U0$ ) : POKE 4 62 8 , UL : POKE 4 
618 , BC : P0KE4 620 , PR: P0KE4 621 , ASC ( 
Ul$) :POKE4622,ASC(U2$) :CL0SE:RET 
URN 

9 610 IFLEN(TR$) <64THENRETURN 

9615 FR=PEEK(4669) :ONERR GOTO 96 
7 0 : IFFR=0THEN9 6 3 5ELSEIFFR=1THEN9 
640ELSEIFFR=3THEN9660ELSECLOSE:F 
$="TRACER.SYS: "+DR$ (PEEK(4675) ) : 
0PEN"D",#1,F$,128 

9616 FR=FREE (PEEK (4 67 5) ) :IFFR<3T 
HENCLOSE: RETURN 

9620 FIELD#l f 128 AS X$:K1=L0F(1) 

:K1=K1+1:LSET X$=TR$+CHR$ (0) : PUT 
#1,K1 

963 5 CLOSE :TR$="": RETURN 

9640 OPEN"0" , -1 , "TRACER/SYS" : PRI 

NT#-l,TR$:GOT09 63 5 

9 660 PT=PEEK(&HFF2 2)AND1:IFPT=1T 
HEN9635ELSEPRINT#-2,TR$:GOT0963 5 
9670 POKE4 669,0:GOTO1000 
9820 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "Thanks for 
calling" :PRINT"The Gallipolis Co 
BBS ..." 

9825 PRINT : CLEAR200 , &H7FFF 

9830 POKE4615,HR:POKE4616,MN:POK 

E4617,SS 

9840 PRINT"Please hang up now.": 

POKE 65386,106: LOAD " US ER . S TM " , R 
10000 CLEAR200,&H7FFF:PRINTCHR$( 
12 ) : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT" Load 
ing Main System... Please Wait": 

LOAD"COBBS . STM" , R 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 97 



Listing 6: XMSNDPK.BflS 



0 ' XMSNDPK. BAS V2 . 1 

1 'COPYRIGHT 1986 BY JOHN GRUBB 

2 'THIS ROUTINE POKES THE 

3 'MACHINE CODE FOR THE 

4 ' XMSEND/BIN ROUTINE. 

10 DATA 16, 239, 141, 1, 27, 18 
9, 179, 237, 31, 2, 230, 164, 17 
4, 34, 193, 128, 16, 38, 0, 235, 

95, 111, 141, 1, 3, 2625 
20 DATA 134, 1, 141, 92, 166, 1 
41, 0, 250, 141, 86, 136, 255, 1 
41, 82, 95, 206, 0, 0, 239; 141, 

0, 234, 166, 128, 141, 3116 
30 DATA 70, 52, 4, 52, 2, 79, 5 

2, 2, '236, 141, 0, 219, 227, 225 
, 237, 141, 0, 213, 53, 4, 92, 1 
93, 128, 39, 2, 2463 

40 DATA 32, 226, 166, 141, 0, 2 
01, 141, 38, 141, 105, 129, 6, 3 
8, 9, 111, 141, 0, 191, 79, 95, 
22, 0, 160, 48, 136, 2356 
50 DATA 128, 108, 141, 0, 179, 
52, 2, 166, 141, 0, 173, 129, 6, 

16, 44, 0, 159, 53, 2, 32, 160, 

52, 2, 52, 64, 1861 
60 DATA 206, 0, 0, 239, 141, 0, 

154, 111', 141, 0, 149, 53, 64, 
182, 255, 105, 132, 16, 39, 6, 5 

3, 2, 183, 255, 104, 2590 

70 DATA 57, 52, 16, 174, 141, 0 

, 129, 48, 1, 175, 141, 0, 123, 

39, 4, 53, 16, 32, 225, 52, 4, 2 

30, 141, 0, 110, 1963 

80 DATA 92, 193, 3, 39, 86, 231 

, 141, 0, 101, 53, 4, 53, 16, 32 

, 204, 52, 64, 206, 0, 0, 239, 1 

41, 0, 87, 111, 2148 

90 DATA 141, 0, 82, 53, 64, 182 

, 255, 105, 132, 8, 39>"4, 182, 

255, 104, 57, 52, 16, 174, 141, 



0, 64, 48, 1, 175, 2334 
100 DATA 141, 0, 58, 39, 4, 53, 
16, 32, 227, 52, 4, 230, 141, 0 
,45, 92, 193, 21, 44, 26, 231, 
141, 0, 36, 53, 1879 
110 DATA 4, 53, 16, 32, 206, 79 
, 198, 1, 16, 238, 141, 0, 25, 1 
26, 180, 244, 204, 0, 2, 32, 243 
, 204, 0, 3, 32, 2279 
120 DATA 238, 204, 0, 4, 32, 23 

3, 0, 0, 0, 0/ 0, 0, 0, 0, 711 
130 CLS: PRINT @200,"NOW POKING C 
ODE"- 

140 CLEAR2 0 , &H7DFF : ST=&H7E00 : C=0 

150 FOR Y=l TO 11 

160 FOR X=l TO 25 

170 GOSUB 400 

180 NEXT X 

190 GOSUB 500 

200 NEXT Y 

210 Y=12:FOR X=l TO 14 
220 GOSUB 400 ' ' 
230 NEXT X 
240 GOSUB 500 
250 CLS 

260 PRINT" INSERT DISK TO RECEIVE 
'FILE IN" 

270 INPUT"DRIVE 0 AND PRESS ENTE 

R" ;A$ 

280 ' SAVEM "XMSEND/BIN" , &H7E00 , &H 
7F20, &H7E00 

290' PRINT"FILE HAS NOW BEEN SAVE 
D" 

300 END 
310 STOP 

400 READ N:POKE ST,N 
410 C=C+N:ST=ST+1 
420 PRINT @0,N 
430 RETURN 
500 READ N 

510 IF NOC THEN PRINT "ERROR IN 

LINE #" ; (Y*10) :STOP 
520 C=0 : RETURN 



Listing 7:FCDNV.BRS 
10 CLEAR 1000 

20 CLS: PRINT "CHANGE DISK FILETYP 
E" 

30 PRINT" INSTRUCTIONS? (Y/N) ";: 
LINE INPUT Z$:IF Z$="Y ri THEN GOSU 
B 460 ' 

40 LINE INPUT "FILENAME :";F1$ 
50 LINEINPUT" EXT':";F2$ 
60 LINEINPUT" DRV V" ;DRV$:X^ 



VAL(DRV$) 

70 IF Fl$="" AND F2$="" AND DRV$ 
-iiii THEN 450 

80 IF Fl$="" THEN DIR X:GOTO40 

90 FORZ=3 TO 11 

100 DSKI$X,17,Z,A$,B$ 

110 A$=A$+LEFT$(B$,127) 

120 FORK=0 TO 7 

130 PT=K*32 

140 NA$=MID$ (A$,PT+1, 13) 

i50 IF LEFT$(NA$,1)=CHR$(0) THEN 



98 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



2W 

16j8 IF LEFT$(NA$,1)=CHR$(&HFF) T 
HEN PRINT" FILE NOT FOUND 1 " : GOT04 

P 

lip EXT$=MID$(NA$,9,3) 

180 X$=RIGHT$(NA$,2) :B1=ASC(LEFT 

$ (X$ , 1) ) : B2=ASC (RIGHT$ (X$ , 1) ) 

190 IF F1$=LEFT$(NA$,LEN(F1$) ) A 

ND F2$=EXT$ THEN GOTO2 20 

200 NEXTK 

210 NEXTZ 

220 CLS : PRINT CHR$ ( 12 ) : PRINT : PRIN 

TLEFT$(NA$,11) 

230 PRINT"THIS IS A "; 

240 IF Bl=l AND B2=255 THEN PRIN 

T" ASCII DATA FILE" 

250 IF B1=0 AND B2=0 THEN PRINT" 

BINARY BASIC FILE" 

2 60 IF B1=0 AND B2=255 THEN PRIN 

T"ASCII BASIC FILE" 

270 IF Bl=2 AND B2=0 THEN PRINT" 

MACHINE LANG. FILE" 

280 PRINT: PRINT "CONVERT THIS TO. 



290 PRINT" 1. ASCII DATA" 

300 PRINT"2. BINARY BASIC" 

310 PRINT"3. ASCII BASIC" 

320 PRINT" 4. MACHINE LANG." 

330 PRINT: LINEINPUT">" ; Z$ 

340 IF Z$<"1" OR Z$>"4" THEN 280 

350 IF Z$="l" THEN X$=CHR$ (1) +CH 

R$ (&HFF) 

360 IF Z$="2" THEN X$=CHR$ (0) +CH 

370 IF Z$="3" THEN X$=CHR$ (0) +CH 
R$ (&HFF) 

380 IF Z$="4" THEN X$=CHR$ (2 ) +CH 

R$<0) 

390 LINEINPUT"SURE? (Y/N)";Z$:IF 

Z$<>"Y" THEN 450" 
400 N1$=LEFT$(NA$, 11)+X$ 
410 MID$(A$,PT+1,13)=N1$ 
420 C$=LEFT$(A$,128) :D$=RIGHT$(A 
$ / 127)+CHR$(0) 
430 DSKO$X,17,Z,C$,D$ 
440 GOTO 40 

450 PRINT 11 1. EXIT TO DOS":PRINT" 
2. RESTART" :LINEINPUT">";Z$: IF Z 
$="1" THEN END ELSE GOTO10 
460 PRINT: PRINT "THIS PROGRAM MIL 
L ALLOW YOU TO" 

470 PRINT" CHANGE THE DIRECTORY T 
YPE OF" 

480 PRINT "XMODEM FILES THAT HAVE 

BEEN UP-" 
490 PRINT " LO ADE D TO COBBS ! WHEN 
THIS PRO-" 

500 PRINT "GRAM ASKS FOR THE FILE 
NAME GIVE" 



510 PRINT "ONLY THE FILENAME! YOU 
WILL BE" 

520 PRINT "PROMPTED FOR THE EXTEN 
SION AND" 

530 PRINT "DRIVE #. TO EXIT THIS 
PROGRAM" 

540 PRINT"JUST PRESS <ENTER> AT 
THE FILE-" 

550 PRINT "NAME, EXT, AND DRV PRO 
MPTS " 

560 PRINT: PRINT 

570 LINEINPUT"PRESS <ENTER> . . . " ; 
ZZ$ 

580 CLS 

590 PRINT"TO TAKE A DIR ON A DRI 
VE, PRESS" 

600 PRINT "THE ENTER KEY IN RESPO 
NSE TO " 

610 PRINT "THE FILENAME AND THE E 
XT" 

620 PRINT "PROMPTS. THEN PRESS TH 
E # OF" 

630 PRINT "THE DRIVE ON WHICH YOU 

WISH TO" 
640 PRINT"SEE A DIRECTORY." 
650 PRINT: PRINT 
660 RETURN 



HAWKSof t HAWKSoft 



HAWKSoft HAWKSo-f t HAWKSo-f t 




DDMINATIDN 419.00 

MULT I -PLAYER STRATEGY GAME! 
Try to take over the planet of YCNAN. Battle 
other players armies to take control of their 
provinces and de-fend yours- Play on a Hi— res map 
of the planet. Take the "RISK M and be a 
planet-lord today! ! ! Requires Coco 3 1 disk and 
joystick or mouse. See Rainbow Review JULY 88 




MYDQS 515.00 SSj' 

CUSTOMIZABLE! EPROMABLE ! ! 

The commands Tandy left out! 
MYDQS is an enhancement to Disk Extended Basic 2.1 
on the CoCo 3. One command loadm and execute -for 
M/L programs. Lowercase command entry and display 
on ALL screens. Screen echo and SAY command for 
RS Speech Pak. Point and click mouse directory. 

NEW FEATURES ! ! ! ! ! 
Supports double— sided and 40 track drives. Set 
any palettes you want on power— up (RGB or CMP). 
Power-up in any screen width and colors (or 
monochrome) you wish! More options than you can 
shake a joystick at!!! See Rainbow Review JUNE 87 



HAWKSoft KEYBOARD CABLE . «25. 00 

UNCHAIN YOUR KEYBOARD \ 
Five foot extender cable for Coco II and 3. Move 
your keyboard where you want it! Installation 
instructions and tips included! Custom lengths 
avai 1 i ab 1 e. 




HAWKSoft P.O. Box 7112 
Elgin, II. 60121-7112 
312-742-3084 



S&H always included. II. orders add 77. sales tax 
Checks Money-orders or COD No credit cards. 



November 1 988 THE RAINBOW 99 



«<GJMMESOFT»> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 



1 




MAXSOUND 

A High Quality Digital Audio Sampler and Sequencer 

Turn your CoCo HI into a REAL digital audio sampler with HIGH quality audio reproduction. Easily 
add exotic effects, ECHO, stuttering, speed shifting, sequencing, and reverse audio to BASIC or ML 
programs or GRAPHICS! Now includes Data Compression. Imagine recording any Voice, Music, or 
Sound effect and being able to use these DIGITAL recordings in your own programs! 3 disk sides 
includes: INTERFACT /BIN - ML driver for sound effects. G&M/BAS - Adds sound effects to 
Graphics. SHOWTIME and DEMO disks. SCOPE/BAS • Turns CRT into a Digital Oscilloscope to 
look at MAXSOUND waveforms. Version 3.0 upgrade $6.95 + Shipping & Handling 

"Afaxsound... bringing a new era to the CoCo Community" 
-Cray Augsburg, June '88 Rainbow Review 



CALL TO HEAR "OVER THE PHONE* DEMO (128k or 512k CoCo m only) ......... $59.95 



Maxsound Soundtracks & Graphics 



These exciting disks are samples of what can be created with MAXSOUND and CoCo Max III! 
Some work on 128k, some work without the MAXSOUND program and some are 512k 4 disk sides 
of unbelievable sounds and graphics! Just some of the titles are: Airwolf, Star Trek, Knight Rider, 
Warrior King Demo, Probe, and more are in the making! Prices range from just $5.95 to $9.95 

Call or write for a complete catalog of titles available! 



V-Term Terminal Emulator 




[ZCTirHAIXUl 



Communicate with VAX, UNIX, Mainframe, and BBS Systems! 

FEATURES: 

VT 100, VT-52, Vidtex (includes RLE graphics display), and standard CRT emulations. 
•Developed and tested on a UNIX system using the EMACS and VI full-screen editors. 
-All 128 ASCII characters accessible from the keyboard. 

•Uses a high-resolution graphics screen to implement a highly readable 80-column screen. 

-Menus can be operated concurrently with other terminal functions. (Disk Basic!) 

-Full 28 line by 80 column screen, with 3 bottom lines protected for menus. 

-Serial port up to 2400 baud, RS-232 Pak up to 9600 baud, DCModem Pak at 300 baud. 

-XModem, XModem-CRC, Y-Modem, and ASCII file transfers directly to disk or memory. 

•Prints disk or buffer files with settable margins, baud rate and word wrap. 

-Full 128k or 512k support with a RAMDISK like buffer. Monochrome monitor support. 

•Capture buffer, Snapshot, Conference mode, 35/40/80 Tracks, and over 56 pages of docs! 



Version 02.( 



upgrade .. — $6.95 + S&H Disk (128k or 512k CoCo m only) ...... $39.95 



Toll Free 



1-80O441-GIME 



Order line 



] 



Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
information: Delphi's CoCo Sig 



GIMMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301-256-7558 or 301-256-2953 



Add $3.00 for shipping and handling 
Add $2.50 for COD (USA only) 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VISA/ MC / Check/Money Order/COD 



VISA 



«< GIWJESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 




GRAPHICS-25 (512k CoCo in only) Great with MAXSOUND and/or CoCo Max mi 

Utilize the FULL 512k memory range of your CoCo III from BASIC for graphics! Create up to 25 ONBOARD HIRES 
SCREENS1 Six new BASIC commands allow instant display switching while secretly drawing other screens. Save and load 
screens to and from disk. Copy one screen to another. Fast Graphics action, Smooth animation, and 100% Machine Language 
code. Requires DECB 1.0, DECB 1.1, or FKEYS III. Complete with documentation. Disk $24.95 



MAX-10 (CoCo III only) The dazzling Word Processor and document creator for the CoCo III! 
MAX-10 is the perfect partner for CoCo MAX III! Mix graphics and text to get great looking newsletters, 
flyers, ect... Includes S pelling checker ! Requires Joystick. (CoCo Max III owners deduct $10) SALE .. 



$74.95 



CoCo Max III (CoCo III only) See April '88 review. Built in Animation! / Amazing Color Sequencing!!! 
Comes with Hi-Res Interface, M1N1LOAD/BAS, Demo Disk, CoCo Show Pgm. Requires Joystick or mouse. SALE .... $74.95 

MULTI-LABEL H 1 (CoCo III only) See July '87 review. An easy to use, versatile label creating program 
including many new CoCo III features. Print multiple fonts on each label! This one's a MUST for the CoCo III!! Disk .... $16.95 

FKEYS D X (CoCo I/n/UI) See April '87 review. A user friendly, programmable function key utility that creates up to 20 
function keys. EDITOR, DOS mods, Single or Double sided, 35/40 tracks, DISABLE, and it's EPROMable!. Disk .. $19.95 

SDCDRIVE (CoCo I/II/m) This machine language utility modifies DECB 1.0, 1.1, FKEYS III, or ADOS to allow the 
use of 3 double-sided drives (or 2 D/S drives and J&R's RAM DISKS) as 6 S/S drives. Disk $16.95 

AUTO DIME (CoCo III only) See Jan. '88 review. This hardware device protects your monitor, or TV from IMAGE 
BURN after a few minutes of inactivity from your keyboard. Illustrated and easy to install. Hardware $29.95 

MFI-CoCo Locking Hate (CoCo III only) See Sept '88 review. Protects your CoCo III and Multi 

Pak Interface from destroying each other! Please specify MPI number 26-3024 or 26-3124 when ordering! SALE $7.95 




(CoCo IB only) Become Rastann, Warrior King, on the quest to regain his rightful 

crown hidden deep within a sinister land. Battle monsters, gain magic & weapons, and travel thru harsh wilderness & 
dark castle dungeons in this medieval realm. From the creator of Kung-Fu Dude comes this awesome arcade game for the 
CoCo HI! Uses the most detailed 320 x 200 16 color graphics & high speed ML code to vault you into a world of fantasy! Dare 
ye challange the many perils ahead to become Warrior King? Requires 128k CoCo III, Disk drive, and Joystick .... $29.95 



HALL OF THE KING TRILOGY (CoCo I/1I/U1) See June '86 & Nov '87 reviews. The epic 

adventure is back! The largest adventure campaign ever seen for the CoCo is again available. A total of 6 DISK SIDES of 
intense graphics adventure will have you playing for weeks! Each section is a 2 disk stand alone adventure, but all 3 together 
form an epic saga! Quest for the legendary Earthstone in the ancient dwelling of the dwarves while you enjoy the classic 
graphics that made this trilogy famous! Each adventure can be purchased separately for only $29.95, the lowest price ever , or 
you can SAVE and purchase the entire set for only $74.95. Requires 64k, Disk drive, (and composite monitor for the CoCo HI). 
Please specify HALL of the King I, II, or III $29.95 each or the entire 6 DISK Trilogy for only $74.95 



In Quest of the Star Lord (CoCo 111 only) See Aug '88 review. This is THE graphics 

adventure for the CoCo III! Unparalleled 320 x 200 animated graphics will leave you gasping for more! You quest for the 
Phoenix Crossbow in this post-holocaust world of science and fantasy. Full 4 Disk sides of mind-numbing adventure! 
Requires 128k CoCo HI and Disk drive. Hun' SHEET $3.95 (+ $1.00 S&H by itself) Disk ........ $34.95 



KUNG-FU DUDE (CoCo 1/11/ 111) See Feb. '88 review. An exciting arcade game. The BEST karate game ever for 
the CoCo! Destroy opponents and evade obstacles as you grow ever closer to your ultimate objective! Spectacular graphics, 
sound effects, and animation! Requires 64k, Disk drive, and Joystick. Now displays color on CM8. Disk $24.95 

PYRAMIX (CoCo in only) See Dec. '87 review. Brilliant colors, sharp graphics, and hot action in this 100% ML arcade 
game. You'll enjoy hopping Kubix around the pyramid, avoiding Kaderf, Smack, Smuck, & the Death Square! Disk .. $19.95 



JimsZ LAD&D Character's Companion (CoCo I/1I/IH) This great timesaving 

utility helps create compatible AD&D characters. Includes dice rolling routine, pick ability, race & class. Buy from 
the Players Handbook, magic items & spell materials. Save, load, and print character info. 3 Disk sides .... $24.95 



White Fire of Eternity (CoCo 1/11/ III) See Dec '86 review. Enter the era of monsters & magic. Search for the 
legendary power of White Fire throughout the Forbidden Wood & Dark Caverns in this 64k animated adventure! Disk.. $19.95 

ChampiOIl (CoCo I/II/III) See May '87 review. Become a superhero in this action adventure! Disk.. $19.95 
Dragon Blade (CoCo I/Il/m) See Nov '86 review. Slay evil dragon in this 64k animated adventure! Disk.. $19.95 



A program to help memorize the list 
of U.S. Presidents 



Washington 



Adams 



5 



9 



1 



By Ralph D. Miller 





102 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



n — m>m 



& 




as 

mm 



; ; ;<.,,:' ^ :^3/;^.;.;r^->M ■ i-M-^- 




if oitiir 



ri 




r 



' y\-f£st~ 
■' -.'••.••v:?*^ 1 



n 





.-■ "jr.- 



" 'IS? 



»(,'■* "A 





I* " 

*: -' .OH 



ii 



,*1 -.1 M . 



overrider 




179 900 243 

119 930 252 

131 END 103 



The Listing: PRESDENT 



5 CLS 

10 REM THIS PROGRAM (C) 1985 BY 
RALPH D. MILLER, POB 13322, TALL 
AHASSEE, FL 32317 (904) 386-3618 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

22 PRINT 

24 PRINT" presdent" 
26 PRINT 

28 PRINT" ********************** 
********* 

29 PRINT" ***** MEMORIZATION HEL 
PER ****•• 

30 PRINT" ************ FOR ***** 
********" 

31 PRINT" ****** U.S. PRESIDENTS 
*******" 

32 PRINT" ********************** 
********" 

33 PRINT" * (C)1985 BY RALPH D. 
MILLER *" 

34 PRINT" ******* (904) 386-3618 
*******•• 

35 PRINT" ********************** 
********" 

36 PRINT" **** ALL RIGHTS RESER 
VED ****" 

37 PRINT" ********************** 
********" 

40 FOR T=l TO 5000: NEXT T 
100 DIM A$(40) ,B$(40) ,C$(40) 
105 CLS:V=0 

110 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT " eASY 



(LAST NAME ONLY) hARD 

(ENTIRE NAME) rETUR 

N (TO DISK MENU) qUIT 

(RETURN TO BASIC) pRINT 



(HARDCOPY LIST)" 
120 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$="" THEN 120 
130 IF Z$o"E" AND Z$<>"H" AND Z 
$<>"R" AND Z$<>"Q" AND Z$<>"P" T 
HEN 105 

140 IF Z$="E" THEN E$="LAST" 

150 IF Z$="H" THEN E$=" ENTIRE" 

160 IF Z$="R" THEN RUN "DIRECTRY 
it 

170 IF Z$="Q" THEN POKE&H71,0 :EX 
EC&HA027 

172 IF Z$="P" THEN GOTO 710 
175 RESTORE 
180 CLS 

190 PRINT " BEGINNING WITH THE FIR 
ST, INPUT EACH PRESIDENT'S "E$" 



104 THE RAINBOW 



NAME , " 

200 LINEINPUT"IN CHRONOLOGICAL O 
RDER OF THEIR PRESIDENCY: ";F$ 
210 IF F$="" THEN GOTO 105 
220 X=1:W=0 
230 GOSUB 630 
270 X=X+1 

280 LINE INPUT "NEXT: ";F$ 
285 IF F$="" THEN GOTO 800 
300 GOTO 230 

630 READ A$(X) ,B$(X) ,C$(X) 

635 IF C$ (X) ="REAGAN" THEN GOTO 

900 

637 IF Z$»"E" THEN 672 

640 IF B$(X)="N" THEN B$(X)="":D 

$=A$(X)+" "+C$(X):GOTO 690 

650 IF B$(X)<>"N" THEN D$=A$(X)+ 

" "+B$(X)+" "+C$(X) 

660 IF LEN(B$(X))>1 THEN 690 

670 D$=A$(X)+" "+B$(X) +"."+" "+C 

$(X) 

672 IF Z$="E" THEN D$=C$ (X) 

690 IF F$<>D$ THEN PRINT "SORRY. 

YOU SHOULD HAVE ENTERED: "D$:W= 
W+l:GOTO 695 
695 RETURN 

710 V=PEEK(65314) :IF V=4 OR V=6 
THEN 740 

720 CLS: PRINT© 200, "printer off 1 

ine":V$=INKEY$:IF V$="" THEN 720 
730 V=PEEK(65314) : IF V=4 OR V=6 
THEN 740 
735 GOTO 105 

740 POKE149,0:POKE150,17 

742 CLS:PRINT@200, "now printing 
list" 

750 RESTORE 

755 FOR Y=l TO 40 

760 READ A$(Y) ,B$(Y) ,C$(Y) 

765 IF B$(Y)="N" THEN B$(Y)="":D 

$=A$(Y)+" "+C$(Y):GOTO 790 

770 IF B$(Y)o"N" THEN D$=A$(Y) + 

" "+B$(Y)+" "+C$(Y) 

772 IF LEN(B$(Y))>1 THEN 790 

774 D$=A$(Y)+" "+B$(Y) +"."+" »+C 

$00 

790 PRINT#-2,D$ 
792 NEXT Y 

794 PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) 

795 GOTO 105 

800 PRINT: PRINT "YOU HAVE GOTTEN 



November 1988 



THROUGH 11 X-l 

8 10 PRINT 11 PRES IDENTS . 11 

820 PRINT "YOU GAVE "W" WRONG ANSWE 

R(S) 

830 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" str 
ike any key" 

840 M$=INKEY$:IF M$="" THEN 840 
845 GOTO 105 
900 CLS 

905 PRINT: PRINT "YOU HAVE GOTTEN 
THROUGH ALL FORTY PRESIDENTS 

. " : PRINT 

910 PRINT "YOU GAVE "W" WRONG ANSWE 
R(S) .":PRINT 

915 IF W=0 THEN L$=" INCREDIBLY S 
TUPENDOUS, MOVE OVER, E 

INSTEIN! 11 : GOTO 950 
920 IF W<6 THEN L$=" OUTSTANDING! 

YOU WILL VER 
Y SOON HAVE THEM AL 

L MASTERED . " : GOTO 950 
925 IF W<11 THEN L$="VERY GOOD! 

IT'S ALL DO 
WNHILL FROM HERE." 

:GOTO 950 

930 IF W<21 THEN L$="YOU'RE HALF 
WAY THERE !":GOTO 950 
935 IF W<31 THEN L$=" YOU'VE MAST 
ER A QUARTER OF THEM! PRACT 



ICE MAKES PERFECT!" 

950 PRINT L$: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" 

strike any key" 
960 M$=INKEY$:IF M$="" THEN 9 60 
970 GOTO 105 

1000 DATA GEORGE , N , WASHINGTON , JO 
HN , N , ADAMS , THOMAS , N , JEFFERSON , JA 
MES , N , MADISON , JAMES , N , MONROE , JOH 
N , QUINCY , ADAMS , ANDREW , N , JACKSON , 
MARTIN , VAN , BUREN , WILLIAM , HENRY , H 
ARRISON , JOHN , N , TYLER 

1001 DATA JAMES , N , POLK, ZACHARY , N 
, TAYLOR , MILLARD , N , FILLMORE , FRANK 
LIN , N , PIERCE , JAMES , N , BUCHANAN , AB 
RAHAM , N , LINCOLN , ANDREW , N , JOHNSON 
, ULYSSES , S , GRANT , RUTHERFORD , B , HA 
YES , JAMES , N , GARFIELD 

1002 DATA CHESTER, N, ARTHUR, GROVE 
R , N , CLEVELAND , BENJAMIN , N , HARRI SO 
N , GROVER , N , CLEVELAND , WILLIAM , N , M 
CKINLEY , THEODORE , N , ROOSEVELT , WIL 
LIAM , H , TAFT , WOODROW , N , WILSON , WAR 
REN , G , HARDING , CALVIN , N , COOLIDGE 

1003 DATA HERBERT, N, HOOVER, FRANK 
LIN , D , ROOSEVELT , HARRY , S , TRUMAN , D 
WIGHT , D , EISENHOWER , JOHN , F , KENNED 
Y , LYNDON , B , JOHNSON , RI CHARD , M , NIX 
ON , GERALD , N , FORD , JAMES , E , CARTER , 
RONALD , N , REAGAN /R\ 



"The Year Of The Hard Drive" 
Hackers Holiday Special 

Hard Drive Kits 

(Drive, SASI controller, Power Supply 4 Cables) 

5Hej $120 

8Hejf $148 

18M<?s $168 

x&isto Hard Drive Interface, . ,$58.88 

28Heg System. Complete. Ready to pluy in and 

run.,,.. $358. 88 

ARIZONA SHALL COMPUTER PERIPHERALS 

938 U. 23rd St. Suite 26 
Tenpe, Pa, 85282 
Phone (682H29-8828 

*Hhen purchased with kit. 
All drives formatted in CoCo 0S9 format. 0s9 SASI drivers included. 

Burke $ Burke HyperlO supported, 

Add $6.00 S«H on all drive orders. 



JUBILEX 

A fast paced game that requires both skill and 
quick thinking. Pilot your ship over the planet 
J ub ilex. Avoid shots from the ground while you 
destroy their aircraft. Complex weapon system. 
Requires joystick, CoCo III, and disk drive. $25 

GAT BACKUP 

A 128k CoCo III backup utility that gives you the 
options to backup only the granules used, a section, 
or the entire disk* Makes multiple copies. Copies 
35 tracks in two passes. Formats and gives 
directories. Requires CoCo III and disk drive. $15 

OIASM 

A disassembler that loads a file and allows you to 
disassemble it as if it were in memory, no matter 
where the program is really located. Works with 
auto-executing programs. Many other features. 
Supports printer. CoCo I, II, or IIL Disk only. $20 

All programs are in machine language. Add $5 per 
program if you want the source file included. We 
pay shipping and sales tax. Write for more 
information, or send check or money order to: 

GSW Software 
8345 Glenwood 
Overland Park, KS 66212 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 105 



1 Bu l l e tin Board Syst e ms 



The BBSs in North America 



For our Telecommunications issue, we at the rainbow have compiled a list of bulletin board systems running 
in the United States and Canada. Our list was compiled with the help of all SysOps who answered our request 
for information. We hope this list will make BBS users aware of the BBS systems in their area. 

Our list arranges known BBSs by state and includes the BBS phone number, BBS name and the parameters. 
The systems are up 24 hours a day, seven days a week, unless otherwise noted by a superscript after the BBS 
name. Use this list to sample various BBSs, and enjoy the chance try a new system. 

If you are running a BBS and would like to have it listed in a future issue of the the rainbow, send us a letter, 
including the information listed here to: The Rainbow BBS List, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 



State/ City 

Alabama 

Mobile 


BBS Name 

The Color Computer 
Board of Mobile 


Access Number 
(205) 341-4610 


Parameters 

(Baud Rate-Parity- 
Word Bits-Slop Bits) 

300-E-7-1 


SysOp 

Edward Jones 


Arizona 

Glendale 
Phoenix 


The Exchange 1 
CoCo BBS-157 


(602) 848-9902 
(602) 246-2131 


300/1200-E-8-1 
300/1200-N-8-1 


Charles Pippin 
Curtiss Schuler 


California 

Santa Ana 


Color Galaxy 


(714) 545-5156 


300/1200-O-7-1 


Tom Guzman 


Connecticut 

Groton 


CoConut Manor 


(203)449-1792 


300/1200/2400-N-8-I 


Ken Parsley 


Florida 

Miami 
Miami 

North Miami 
St. Petersburg 


Dade CoCo South 
The Matrix BBS 
Dade CoCo North 
The CCUG BBS 


(305) 266-1099 
(305) 895-2312 
(305) 893-2894 
(813) 867-2284 


300 to 1200-E-7-1 
300-N-8-1 
300-E-7-1 
300/1200-E-7-1 


Robert Jones 
Criss Malcom 
Alan Potter 
Tim Jay 


Iowa 

Boone 


The Tomb 


(515) 432-7853 


300/ 1200/ 2400-N-8-1 


Steve Kratz 


Illinois 

Chicago 

Indiana 

Evansville 
Shelbyville 

Kentucky 
Bulan 


The Mindmaster's 
Domain 

Disk Bank 
Duke's Shelbyville 
Colorama 

Hackers BBS 2 


(312) 463-8932 

(812) 422-4821 
(317) 392-2769 

(606) 439-1853 


300/1200-N-8-1 

300/1200-E-7-1 
300/1200-E-7-1 

300 to 1200-N-8-1 


David Lucas 

Dave Jenkins 
Duke Norris 

Kenny Napier 


Maine 

Sanford 


TreeTops BBS 


(207) 490-2870 


300/ 1200/ 2400-N-8-1 


Michael Lescord 


106 THE RAINBOW 


November 1988 









State/ City 

Michigan 

Bay City 
Bay City 
Manton 
Mississippi 
Meridian 

Missouri 

Kansas City 



BBS Name 



Access Number 



Warped Board 
Plastered Board 
The Manton Modem 



(517) 686-7598 
(517) 892-7885 
(616) 824-6026 



The Compute Rama BBS 3 (601) 693-8092 



The Frisky CoCo 



(816) 436-2904 



Parameters 

(Baud Rate-Parity- 
Word Bits-Stop Bits) 

300/1200/2400-N-8-1 
300/1200/2400-N-8-1 
300-E-7-1 

300-N-7-1 



SysOp 



Dave Witucki 
Mark Danak 
Carl Johnson 

Kevin Sloan 



300/ 1200/2400-N-8-1 Jerry Oliver 



Nebraska 

Wayne 



Hardsector BBS' 



(402) 375-1513 



300-E-7-1 



Nathan Tompkins 



New Hampshire 

Manchester 

New Jersey 

Hawthorne 
Mercerville 
New Milford 

North Carolina 

Concord 

Fayetteville 

Gastonia 

Newport 

Ohio 

Bellaire 

Gallipolis 

Sharonville 



CoComaster's BBS 

DYM 399/ ORA 18 
TAO BBS 
The Rainbow Con- 
nection Info System 

The Data- Link 
CoCo' nuts BBS 
The BBS of Belmont 

Abbey College 
The Dungeon 

Harlock's Hideaway 
The Rainbow's End 6 
Omega 



! 

i 

8 
t 



(603)644-4867 

(201)427-8418 
(609) 587-2672 
(201)967-1061 



(704) 788-7867 
(919) 425-8242 
(704) 825-6201 

(919) 726-9737 

(614) 676-2505 
(614) 446-7430 
(513) 671-2049 



: 
: 

I 



CODIS ENTERPRISES 

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BACH LOVERS? UNITE! — 6 dleke f each containing ovar 60 
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CODI0 COCO COMEDIAN — Thla all-nae WAGAIJNE special liee 
In the huaorous aids of life elth our Illustrious CoCo 
m -~ free current eerld event* to prearaao that mack 
i ' theef free readsr anscdotes to tontue-ln-ehesk product 
• reviawaf free "Nervoue Nov lea" to "Technical Tickles* 
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to atlas this SMporl- 
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monthly laausa. ••••24.00 



Sand check 
Enterpr laes. 
free to wrlti 



monay order aade payable 
Taw»» Raaldents add TX aalaa 

Ith any quastlona. 



to« Codls 
tan. Feel 



300-baud 

300/1200/2400-N-8-1 
300/1 200/ 2400-E-8-1 
300/1200-N-8-1 



300/1200-N-8-1 
300/1200-E-7-1 
300 to 2400-E-8-2 



George Proulx 

David Fischer 
Bob Watson 
Steve Rottinger 



Jim Brock 
Tom Taylor 
Ron Millar 



300/ 1200/2400-N-8-1 Chuck Katsekes 



300/1 200/ 2400-N-8-1 
300/1200-N-8-1 
300/ 1200/ 2400-N-8-1 



Dave Roth 
John Grubb 
Thomas Altum 



COLOR RIBBONS & PAPER 



COLOR RIBBONS 

RED • BLUE • GREEN • BROWN • PURPLE • YELLOW 



Ribbons Price Each: 


Black 


Color 


Heat 
Transfer 


Radio Shack - DMP 100 


6.00 


9.00 




- DMP 110 


4.15 


4.75 


5.75 


- DMP 120 


6.75 


8.50 




- DMP 130 


5.25 


6.50 


7.95 


- DMP 200 


6.75 


8.50 




- DMP 230/520 


4.00 


5.25 




- DMP 2100 


5.75 






- DMP 410/510 


5.00 


7.00 




- DMP 430 


12.00 






Apple Imagewriter l/ll 


3.75 


4.50 


6.50 


Citizen 120 D 


5.00 


6.00 


7.95 


Epson MX80/LX800 


3.75 


4.25 


6.75 


Okidata 182/192 


6.50 


7.50 




Panasonic K-XP 1090 


6.75 


7.75 




Seikosha SP 800/1000 


5.25 


6.50 


7.95 


Star NX10/NL10 


5.00 


6.00 


7.95 


Star NX 1000 


Call 


For F 


'rice 



COLOR PAPER 

BRIGHT PACK— 200 Sheets/50 each color: Red, 
Blue, Green, Yellow. 9 1/2 x 11 - $10.90/pk. 

PASTEL PACK-200 Sheets/50 each color: Pink, 
Yellow, Blue, Ivory. 9 1/2 x 11 - $10.90/pk. 



T-SHIRT RIBBONS (Heat Transfer) - Call For Price. 



COLOR DISKETTES 

5 1/4" DS/DD Rainbow Pack. 10/pack - $12.50 



For ribbons & paper not listed above, cal) for price & avail. Price & spec, subject to 
change w/o notice. Min. order $25.00. Min. S & H $3.50. Add $2.25 C.O.O. add'l. 
IL res. add 6.25% tax. MC & Visa accepted. 

RENCO COMPUTER SUPPLIES 

P.O. Box 475, Manteno, IL 60950 U.S.A. 
1-800-522-6922 • (IL) 1-800-356-9981 • 815-468-8081 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 107 



State/ City 



BBS Name 



Access Number 



Pennsylvania 

Easton 

NoTristown 

Reading 

Rhode Island 

Providence 

Tennessee 

Memphis 

Utah 

Salt Lake 

West Valley City 

Virginia 

Henry 

Washington 

Kennewick 

Kent 
Spokane 



Wisconsin 
Gays Mills 

Marshall 

Canada: 

Alberta 

Letchbridge 



Nova Scotia 

New Waterford 

Ontario 

Angus 

Scarborough 



Quebec 

La Tuque 



ASCII-=80=-BBS 
Graphics Pub BBS 7 
The Glass Menagerie 



Tempo BBS 

MCCUG BBS 

Data Warehouse of 
Salt Lake 
The CoCoshop BBS 

Colorama 86 V4.0 8 

The Time Machine 

The CoCo 

Connection 
Data Warehouse 

of Spokane 

CoCo BBS 

Madison Area 
Tandy Users BBS 



Public BBS System 
of Letchbridge 



Chip to Chip BBS 9 

ECCC BBS 
Remote Data 
Systems-09 (RDS-09) 

Babillard du Club 



(215) 252-1608 
(215) 277-6951 
(215) 376-1819 



(401)456-9394 



(901)458-9584 



(801) 969-6051 
(801) 250-1941 



(703) 365-2018 



Parameters 

(Baud Rate-Parity- 
Word Bits-Stop Bits) 

300-E-7-1 

300/1 200 /2400-N-8-1 
300/1200/2400-N-8-1 



300 to 2400-N-8-1 



300/1200-E-7-1 



SysOp 



Nevin Keller 
Bob Montowski 
H. Allen Cravener 



Arthur Mendoca 



B.J. Seaton 



1200-N-8-1 



300/1200-N-8-1 



1200-N-8-1 



Dennis & Terry Gray 



Ricky Sutphin 



Paul Alger 



(509) 586-2559 or 1200-E-7-1 
586-2160 

(206) 854-3744 300/ 1200/2400-N-8-1 Corrie Bender 



(509) 325-6787 



300/1200-E-7-1 



Dennis Mott 



(608) 735-4509 

(608) 274-6922 or 
655-3806 



300/1200/2400-E-7-1 
300/1200/2400-N-8-1 



Robert & Daven 
Howard 



(403) 329-6438 



300/ 1200/2400-N-8-1 Dieter Rossman 



(902) 539-7743 



(705) 424-7570 
(416) 283-7521 



300/1200-baud 



Allan Jones 



300/ 1200/ 2400-N-8-1 Eldon Doucete 
300/ 1200/ 2400-N-8-1 Doug Wright 



(819) 523-4329 



300-N-7-1 



Renald Martin 



Notes: 

l The Exchange is up from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. Monday through Friday, and 24 hours Saturday and Sunday. 

2 Hackers BBS is up from 9:30 p.m. to 10 a.m., 7 days. 

3 The Computer Rama BBS is up from 10 p.m. to 1 p.m., 7 days. 

4 Hardsector BBS is up from 10:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., 7 days. 

5 Additional parameter information unavailable for CoCo master's BBS. 

'The Rainbow's End is up from 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m., Friday, Saturday and Sunday. 

7 Graphics Pub BBS is up from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m., 7 days. 

8 Colorama 86 V4.0 is up from 1 1:30 p.m. to 1 1:30 a.m., 7 days. 

Additional parameter information unavailable for Chip to Chip BBS. 

108 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



The Professional 
Color Computer 



Enhancements 
for Productivity 
from HJL Products 




,,.|lC 







For peak performance with any computer, 
you have to get information into and out 
of the system as easily as possible. 

This Is the purpose of the HJL family of 
professional enhancements for ALL 
MODELS of the Color Computer, 
Including CoCo 3. 



The Self-contained 
ProCase-57 Keyboard • $79.95 

It's the popular HJL Keyboard perfectly 
fitted into Its own sleek, low-profile 
case. Put your CoCo on a shelf or hang 
It on the side of your desk. ProCase-57 
comes with 5-foot cable; installs In 
just a few minutes with no soldering. 

The HJL-57 

Keyboard Kit - $59.95/69.95 

Overwhelming favorite of serious CoCo 
users worldwide, the HJL-57 keyboard 
provides the smooth consistent feel and 
reliability you need for maximum speed 
with minimum input errors. Installs in 
your color computer without soldering. 
Just $59.95 for Original or F-version, 
Kits for CoCo 2 and CoCo 3 are $69.95. 

The NumberJack Keypad • $59.95 

A self-contained numeric keypad for 
serious number-crunching. Besides the 



numbers, It has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, including autoshifted 
ADD and MULTIPLY. Includes cable and 
connectors for solderless Installation. 

The Monitor Adapter • $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors. Easily Installed 
without clips, Jumpers or soldering 
(except some CoCo 2s with soldered-in 
video chips). Here's crisp, flicker-free 
monitor output with ail the reliability 
you've come to expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor -$99.95 

Our high-resolution amber monitor gives 
you the display preferred by most 
computer pros. Once you've used it, 
you'll never go back to the TV set. 
12-Inch CRT has etched non-glare face- 
plate. (Requires adapter sold above) 

Quick Basic Plus - $19.96 

High-performance programming aid works 
with any CoCo that has 4 function keys. 
26 one-touch BASIC statements, 10 user- 
defined macros at a time (save as many 
sets of macros as you like), auto line- 
numbering, Instant screen dump to 
printer, and global search, make this 
software ideal for any BASIC programmer. 
Specify disk or cassette. 



The Softswitch - $89.95 

Connect any two parallel printers to one 
computer; select printers manually or 
insert a simple printer code in the text 
to be printed for fully-automatio, all 
solid-state switching. Complete with 
three cables and operating instructions. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive HJL 
15-day unconditional guarantee (except 
software). 

Picks Pair and Save 15% 

Take 15% off the price of any two or 
more products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 



Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1-600*462-4891 
International calls; 716-236-8368 



Ordering Information: specify model (Original, F-version, or CoCo 2 Model Number), Payment by C.O.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Viea. Credit card customers include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2.00 for 
shipping, 3.50 to Canada; except monitors (call for shipping charges before ordering monitors). New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax. Dealer Inquiries Invited 



WW 



PRODUCTS 



Djv, of Touchstone Technology Inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 




Modify an old favorite to use on the CoCo 3 




Remote Update 



By Paul Alger 












Wa 




I've been running my own BBS for 
a few years and have always used 
THE RAINBOW'S Remote (No- 
vember '85, Page 106) and Remot232 
(November '86, Page 70) as my terminal 
drivers. When I purchased my new 
CoCo 3, however, 1 found that the 
Remote programs were not compatible 
with 40- and 80-column screens. To 
alleviate this problem, I modified 
Remot232 to allow the use of 40- and 
80-column screens and to provide 
scroll- and CLS-protected areas on ail 
screens. For those of you who would 
like to use the Remote programs in a 40- 
or 80-column format, allow me to 
present Remote 3. 

Remote 3 will work on any CoCo that 
has at least 32K of memory. The pro- 
gram includes all of the Remote pro- 
Paw/ Alger, SysOp for the Time Ma- 
chine BBS, holds a bachelor's degree in 
audio engineering. Paul currently 
works as a professional musician. 



110 



THE RAINBOW 



November 1988 



Table 1 



Location 

7D00 



7D01 



7D02 



7D04 



7D05 



7D06 

7D07 
&7D08 



Remote 3 Pokes 

Description 
If 7D00 contains I, the 
BREAK key is disabled from 
the remote user. If it con- 
tains 0, the remote user can 
use the BREAK key to break 
into BASIC. 

If 7D01 contains I, the in- 
coming character is dis- 
played in the right-hand 
corner of the scroll- 
protected area. If it contains 
0, the feature is turned off. 
If 7D02 contains 1, linefeeds 
are sent with a carriage re- 
turn. If it contains 0, no line 
feeds are sent; 
If 7D03 contains 0, normal 
characters are sent to the 
remote terminal. Any other 
value echoes the character 
with that ASCII code to the 
remote terminal. POKE- 
&H?D03,65 will echo all 
A's to the remote terminal 
no matter what you see on 
your terminal screen. (Use 
this feature for password 
entry.) 

If 7D04 contains 0, input 
from the remote terminal is 
not affected. A 1, however, 
converts the input from the 
remote terminal to ail up- 
percase, and a 2 converts the 
input from the remote termi- 
nal to all lowercase. 
This location works the 
same as 7D04 except that 
instead of the input, the 
output from the remote ter- 
minal is converted. 
Cursor value (32-column 
screen only). 

Used for scroll-protection in 
Remote. Poking here has no 
effect on Remote 3. 



Location 

7F00 to 
7F14 



7F1D 



7F1E 



7F20 



7F21 



7F22 



7F23 



7FD5 



Clock Pokes 

Description 

These locations contain a 
20-byte CLS- and scroll- 
protected area. Poke the 
string to be protected into 
this area. 

Each time the clock reaches 
24:00 (midnight), this loca- 
tion increments by 1. Peek 
this location to roll over the 
date. 

Location 7F1E contains a 
count-down timer. When a 
user logs on, poke the 
number of minutes you 
allow the user to remain 
online. Periodically peek 
this location. Time is up 
when the value is 0. 
If 7F20 contains 1, the clock 
display is turned off. A 0 
indicates that the display is 
on. 

If 7F21 contains 0, the string 
display is turned off. A 1 
indicates that the string is 
displayed. 

If 7F22 contains 0, the 
"chat" flag is turned off. A 
1 indicates that the flag is on. 
The "chat" flag flashes in the 
right-hand corner of the 
scroll-protected area. 
This is the clock speed. The 
default value is 50, Poking 
any other value in this loca- 
tion changes the speed of the 
clock. The higher the 
number, the slower the 
clock. 

This location will invert the 
clock display on the 32-col- 
umn screen only. If the loca- 
tion contains 48, the clock 
will appear green on a black 
background. If it is 112, the 
clock will appear black on a 
green background. Any 
other value will produce 
garbage in the clock display. 



Listing 1: 



00110 
00120 
00130 
00140 
00150 
00160 
00170 
00180 
00190 
00200 
00210 
00220 
00230 



* REMOTE 3 FOR 232 PAC * 

* A TERMINAL DRIVER FOR * 

* THE COCO 3 & RS232 PAC* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



FROM THE ORIGINAL 
REMOTE PROGRAM BY 
DAN DOWNARD RAINBOW 

11/83 
MODIFIED BY 
SCOTT TAYLOR RAINBOW 
11/85 

MODIFIED FOR RS 232 BY* 

* MARK CROSBY RAINBOW * 

* 11/86 * 



* 



grams' original bells and whistles except 
scroll-protection. To remedy this loss, I 
have included a software clock that 
allows 20 characters of scroll- and CL5- 
protection. 

Included with this article are four 
listings. The first is the assembly listing 
for the Remote 3. This version of the 
program is for use with the RS-232 
pack, and the pack must be installed 
before the program will work properly. 
(I do have a serial-port version of 
Remote 3 and would be glad to send it 
to anyone who wants it. To receive that 
listing, please send me an SASE, a 
blank disk and the necessary postage. 
The address appears at the end of the 
article.) 

Listing 2 is a software clock, which 
uses interrupts to allow the clock to be 
updated during disk access. The clock 
program provides CLS- and scroll- 
protection as well as a few other features 
I wanted for my BBS operation. 

Listing 3 is a BASIC loader that creates 
Remote 3 and the software clock in 
memory. It then saves these two pro- 
grams as one workable ML file on tape 
or disk. 

Finally, I've included a short demon- 
stration program, Listing 4. This dem- 
onstration offers a few examples of the 
program's various uses, including those 
for the new features. This demo pro- 
gram can only be used on a CoCo 3 and 
online at 300 baud. 

All program features are listed with 
their corresponding memory locations 
in Table 1. The descriptions presented 
for each location include both the 
program feature and the values used to 
achieve these results. 

Remote 3 does have one small annoy- 
ance. The cursor does not self-destruct 
when the backspace key is pressed. If 
that bothers you, type the following: 

PDKE&H?D06,96 

The bug (and the cursor) will disappear. 

If you would like to sample a BBS 
that uses this terminal driver, give my 
BBS — the Time Machine — a try. Call 
(509) 586-2559 or (509) 586-2160. The 
BBS runs at 7-bit, 1 stop bit, even 
parity, 300/ 1200 baud, 24 hours a day. 
The BBS features a multi-player D & D 
game, a multi-player World War game 
and an updated version of my Galactic 
Conflict game. Give me a call sometime. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
these programs may be directed to the 
author at 1303 West 26th, Kennewick, 
WA 99337. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 



w m • • » 

**»*•*«*•**»«• 
• • ■ • ■ *•«*•« •••« 

# • • ■•*»•!••*»• 



* ♦ • - 

■ • • 

* ■ « 



* 



• *•«••*«»*•»**: 



• a * • 

• * • 
■ ■ ■ • 

• ■ • 

• • * * 



■ 9 * l 

m m 9 m »••**««« 

• •*»»*••*•« 
• •••••»■•»*< 

-«**•»#• 

• •*♦«**•■*«*•• 

• •»«•**•»■»*••• 
»»•••.•*•*«*•» 

• •»*• »•»#**»»#• 

• *••••»*«•* * » • 
*•••••••«••*••' 

• ««*#*•*»•••«* 

• •«»•••«••••*•* 

• •»«#*•••••■•• 

• •«••***•«*•••■ 
*••*••»•»«♦••• 

«»••••••♦••«•• 

• **■•«*•€«•*•« 

• ••« » • • • 

• •••••*«••**«•» 

• « •••••«*•• 




• « • • • < 

• « « 4 1 

■ • • • • » • - P » * « • * 

• **««r#PP»*«*« 

• ••*•«•••«••«•■ 

• • »*•**•••••••« 

• »»***»#••«+«• 



HOW DO YOO GIVE A RAINBOW? 



I 
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I 
I 
I 
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I 
I 
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Name 



Address 
City 



j From: 

an- J Name 



Address 
City 



It's simple — Give a rainbow gift certificate . . . 

Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
source for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be 
nounced in a handsome card 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
safe at home. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate 
and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by No- 
vember 25 and we'll begin your 
friends' subscriptions with the 
January issue of rainbow. 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 



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□ My payment is enclosed. 
| Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
I Acct. # Exp. date 

I Signature 



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Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

Subscriptions to THE rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sates tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 









00240 


* MODIFIED FOR COCO 3 BY* 








00250 


* PAUL 


ALGER 


* 








00252 


* 


6/88 


* 








00254 










00260 




ORG 


$7D00 








00270 


^EQUATES FOR ROM AND RAM 






016A 


00280 


IHOOK 


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0167 


00290 


OHOOK 


EQU 


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A000 


00300 


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DEV 


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0070 


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01 


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CURSOR 


FCB 


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7DJ2T9 




00 


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COUNTR 


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$00 


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TABLE 


RMB 


$28 








00430 


^INITIALIZE RAM 


HOOKS 


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BE 


0168 


00440 


START 


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3? 


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BF 


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1+IHOOK 








00550 


* MOVE 


TABLE OF 


ROM ADDRESS 








00560 


*SET INKEY$ TO ROM BASED ROI 


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8E 


AA29 


00570 


MOVTBL 


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31 


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39 




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RET 


RTS 










00680 


*CHECK 


KEYBOARD 


AND 








00690 


*RS232 


FOR INKEY $ 255 








00700 


★TIMES 


IF NOTHING IN $87 


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96 


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26 


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[POLCAT] 


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26 


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00770 




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05 


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7A 


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DEC 


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26 


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INKEY 2 








00810 


★CHARACTER IN A 


REGISTER 








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★BRANCH IF BREAK (A=$03) 








00830 


★CONVERT TO STRING 


7D8B 


81 


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#$03 




TANDY COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000-HX256K 5 1/4"D. 
Tandy 1000-SL 384K 5 1/4" D. 
Tandy 1000-TL640K 3 1/2"D. 
Tandy 3000-NL 51 2K 3 1/2"D. 
Tandy 4000-LX 2 Meg 3 1/2"D. 
Tandy 4000 1 Meg 3 1/2" D. 
Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 1 Drive 
Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 40 Meg 
Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 84 Meg 
Tandy 1400LT 768K 2 Drives 
Tandy 102 24K 
Tandy Color 3 128K 

MONITORS & BOARDS 

VM-4 Monochrome Green 
VM-5 Monochrome Green 
CM-5 Color RGB 
CM-1 1 Color RGB 
EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 
VGM-100 Monochrome Analog 
VGM-200 Color Analog 
VGM-300 Color Analog 
Video 7 Vega Deluxe Card 
Video 7 Vega Vga Card 
Tandy EGA Card 
Paradise Basic EGA Card 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 
5 1/4" External Drive 1000EX 
3 1/2" External Drive 1000EX 
Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 
5 1/4' External for Tandy 1400 
Zucker 30 Meg Hardcard 
Seagate 20 Mea Hard Drive 
Tandy 1000/SX7TX Controller 

ZUCKER BOARDS 



535.00 
675.00 
955.00 
1275.00 
2999.00 
1890.00 
3825.00 
4955.00 
5395.00 
1335.00 
430.00 
155.00 



95.00 
115.00 
220.00 
335.00 
510.00 
169.00 
425.00 
535.00 
230.00 
295.00 
185.00 
160.00 



225.00 
180.00 
200.00 
450.00 
215.00 
395.00 
255.00 
69.00 



45.00 



Zucker Serial Board 

Zucker OK Memory Board 1000 45.00 

Zucker MFB OK for 1000 106.00 

Zucker 1200 Baud Modem Card 75.00 



PRINTERS 

DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 
DMP-132 Dot-Matrix 
DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 
Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 
Epson FX-850 Dot-Matrix 
Epson FX- 1050 Dot-Matrix 
Epson LQ-500 Dot-Matrix 
Epson LQ-850 Dot-Matrix 



165.00 
285.00 
345.00 
205.00 
375.00 
540.00 
375.00 
579.00 



Please write for complete price list. 
We carry more items than listed here. 



All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Adver- 
tised prices are cash prices. C O D. accepted add 2% (minimum charge 
$10,00). M.C., Visa add 2%. All non defective items require return 
merchandise authorization Call lor RMA Number before returning 
Delivery is subject to product availability. Add i Vz% tor shipping and 
handling, $5.00 minimum charge. 

TM - Registered Trademark of Tandy, Epson, and IBM 
Monday thru Friday 9am - 5pm EST. 

□ □□□□ 
□□□□□ 

□□□□□ 

□ □□□□ 

124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 





November 1988 THE RAINBOW 113 




About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . 



the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
near programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
one or two line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




/ uou 


1 0(97 

X Y> £. i 


T078 


00850 

VIC O j* 


LBEQ 


$AE09 


7HQ1 

/ 1171 


7F 


A 56R 


0086 0 


JMP 


$A56B 








00870 *0UTPUT 


CHARACTER IF DEV-0 








00880 * INSERT 


LINE FEEDS IF NEEDED , 








00890 *USE NEW PRINT 


ROUTINE 




TA 


(76 


00900 OUT 

r r r r 


PSHS 


A, B 


7HQ6 


GST) 


6F 


00910 


TST 


<DEV 1 




z o 


97 

z / 


00920 


BNE 


0RET1 




81 

O X 


08 


00930 


CMPA 


#$08 


/ Lf 7 \J 


27 


1A 


00940 


BEQ 


RM0UT2 ! 


7HQF 


81 
o x 


jO Lf 


00950 


CMPA 


#$0D 


7T1A0 


96 

Z Q 


0F 


00960 


BNE 


REMOUT I 








00970 *CHECK 


IF LINE 


FEEDS ARE 








00980 *T0 BE 


SENT TO 


REMO TERM 


7HA9 


F6 


7T}09 


00990 


LDB 


LFFLG 




97 
z / 


1 1 

J- X 


01000 


BEQ 


RM0UT2 


7flA7 


86 


0A 


01010 


LDA 


#$0A 


7T>AQ 

/ L)i\ J 


D U 


7F33 


01020 


JSR 


RSOUT 


1 L)A\J 


86 
o o 




01030 


LDA 


#$0D 


7HAF 


90 
zy 


08 

)vQ 


01040 


BRA 


RM0UT2 








01050 *ECH0 CHARACTER IN PRTFLG 








01060 *IF IT 


IS NOT 


- TO 0 


7DB0 F6 


7D03 


01070 REMOUT 


LDB 


PRTFLG 


7DB3 


27 


Of* 


01080 


BEQ 


RM0UT2 1 


7DB5 


B6 


7nGH 
i Uy/ J 


01090 


LDA 


PRTFLG 








01100 *CHECK OUTPUT 


FOR UPPER- C 








01110 *0R LOWER- C AND SEND IT 


7DB8 


F6 


7D05 


01120 RM0UT2 


LDB 


OCASE 


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BD 


7F0A 


01130 


JSR 


CKCASE 


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BD 


7F11 


01140 


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RSOUT 


7DCL 


35 


06 


01150 0RET1 


PULS 


A, B 


7DC3 


7E 


7H71 


01160 0RET2 


JMP 


RET 








02000 *INPUT 


FROM KEYBOARD OR 








02010 *RS-232 


IF DEV=0 1 








02020 *USE RSIN FOR REMOTE INPUT 


7DC6 


B6 


7D06 


02030 IN 


LDA 


CURSOR 


7DC9 


A7 


QF 0088 


02040 


STA 


[$88] 


7DCD 0F 


70 


02050 


CLR 


<FLAG 


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6F 


02060 


TST 


<DEV 


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26 




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32 


69 
o z 


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2.S 


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34 


X J 


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AD 


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[POLCAT] 


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27 


09 


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20 


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02120 


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NOCHNG J 


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27 


F1 


02140 


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INI ; 


7DE4 


20 


42 


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FF69 

f £ U 7 


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02170 


ANDB 


#$08 ! 


7DEB 


27 


1 ft 


02180 


BEQ 


ZERO A 








02190 *RS-232 


. INPUT 


FROM CART 


7DED 


C4 


07 
W* 


02200 RSAN 


ANDB 


#$07 


7DEF 


26 


1 A 
X*+ 


02210 


BNE 


ZEROA 


7DF1 


B6 


FF68 
r r do 


02220 


LDA 


$FF68 








02230 *ST0RE 


CHAR IN 


UPPER RIGHT 








02240 *C0RNER OF 32 


COL. SCREEN 


7DF4 


F6 


7D01 


02250 


LDB 


CORNER 


7DF7 


27 


01 
J* J 


02260 


BEQ 


CHKBRK 


7DF9 


B7 


0A1 F 


02270 


STA 


$41F 








02280 *CHECK FOR BREAK DISABLE 








02290 *AND FOR BREAK SIGNAL 








02300 *FR0M REMOTE TERMINAL 



114 



THE RAINBOW November 1 988 




The COCO hardware store 





er 

Controller 




$99.95 



Fantastic 
Super Controller 

Radio Shack/Tandy controller compatible. 

Works on all COCOs - 1 , 2 or 3 with or without Multi-Pak Interface. 

• One 24/28 pin socket for 8K ROM, 2764, or 27128 EPROM. 

• Internal MINI-EXPANSION-BUS connector for one 0IST0 Super Add-On. 

• Low Power draw; within COCO'S requirements. 

• Gold Plated edge connectors. 

• Under OS-9: 

• Buffered Read/Write sector achieved without halting the CPU. 

• Continual use of keyboard even while reading or writing to disk. 

• System s clock no longer looses time during Read & Write. 

• NmI is blocked and transferred to IRQ in software for low CPU overhead. 

• Completely Interrupt driven for fast & smooth Mufti-Tasking operations. 

• Drivers written by KEVIN DARLING 



A Superb Controller. Along with the included C-DOS, plug-in 
three more software selectable DOSes or 2764 or 27128 EPROMs 
burned to your liking. 

The Internal Mini-Expansion-Bus lets you add some 
incredible features to the controller. Disto Super Add-Ons 
were designed to fit neatly inside the controller case. 




$130. 



ADD-ONS 





• Real Time Clock & Printer Interface 

Have the Real Time, Date and Year displayed 
on your screen at a simple command. 




I 





$59.95 




: :':;-y« : :Iv*:' : 



wlulti-Board Adapter 



This Muti-Board is an adapter that plugs in any Disto Super Controller, 
Ramdisk or MEB Adapter. 

It includes a new and improved Printer Port (Centronics compatible), a faster 
Real Time Clock (works at 2MHzJ and a true RS-232 Serial Port (external 
12 volt AC adapter required). DB25 cable included. 

It fits neatly inside the metal case and is still within Tandy's power 
limits. II also works with or without a Multi-Pak. 



Mini EPROM Programmer 

A LOW COST EPROM Programmer that attaches 
directly to any Disto Super Controller or MEB 
adapter to program those often used utilities. 






$49.95 



■232 SuperPack 

A Stand-Alone (Multi-Pak required) adapter 
that gives the user a true RS-232 Serial Port. 
Completely compatible with OS9's ACIA software. 
Compatible with software that requires 
the Tandy Deluxe RS-232 Pack. t% w% g% 

DB-25 cable included. bnl 

COMPUTERS 




Hard Disk Interface 

A Hard Disk Interface fully compatible with 
SASI controller. Fits inside the Super 
Controller, Ramdisk or MEB Adapter. 
OS-9 drivers included. Also available 
with RS-232 Serial Port. 

Super RAM 3 ZeroK Board 

Now is the time to upgrade your COCO 3 to 
51 2K of memory. Just add the memory chips 
and install in your COCO 3. 

MEB Adapter 

A Stand-Alone Mini-Expansion-Bus in which 
you can plug any other Disto Adapter directly 
in a Multi-Pak without the need for a Super 
Controller or Ramdisk. - 

Board 



Super 



1-514-383-5293 



10802 Lajeunesse, Montreal, 
Quebec, Canada H3L 2E8 

We accept phone orders • Call for Canadian Prices 
Include S&H of $4 or $8 if order exceeds $75 

Sorry: No personal cheques 



Coming this fall to a dealer near you ; 



Real Time Clock, Printer Port, 
RS-232 & Hard Disk Interface 
all in one neat package 



Master Card and Visa Accepted 



See You At Princeton RAINBOWfest! 




About 
Your 
Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster. 

For Canadian and other non- 
U.S. subscribers, there may be 
a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 




7DFC 


F6 


7D00 


02310 


CHKBRK 


LDB 


BREAK 


7DFF 


27 


06 

r 


02320 

r r 




BEQ 


NOTBRK 


7E01 


81 


03 


02330 




CMPA 


#$03 

Try j* mf 


7E03 


26 


02 

r *■ 


02340 




BNE 


NOTBRK 


7E05 


4F 




02350 ZEROA 


CLRA 




7E06 


39 




02360 




RTS 




7E07 


F6 

J. w 


7D04 


02370 NOTBRK 


LDB 


ICASE 








02380 *CHECK IF CHAR SHOULD BE 








02390 *UPPER OR LOWERCASE AND 








02400 *CHANGE 


IT ACCORDINGLY 


7E0A 


CI 


01 


02410 


CKCASE 


CMPB 


#$01 


7E0C 

1 V \J 


26 


0B 


02420 




BNE 


CMPB2 


7E0E 


81 


61 


02430 




CMPA 


#$61 


7E10 

t i-t X v 


25 


15 


02440 




BLO 


RET 2 


7E12 

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81 


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00000 TOTAL ERRORS 












Listing 2: 






00100 










00110 


* CLOCK FOR 


REMOTE 3 * 








00120 


* BY PAUL 


ALGER * 








00125 


*WITH SPECIAL 


THANKS TO * 








00130 


* WAYNE LAFFARDY * 








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^SUBROUTINE FOR C0C03 








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^CONVERTS 32 


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116 



THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Christmas Sale! 

Tandy® Color 
Computer 3™ 

70 on 
gift for the 




whole family. 




A powerful computer for personal productivity, 
education and family fun— now just $ 129 95 . 



Have a colorful Christmas with the 
advanced Color Computer 3. This 
powerful computer is perfect for all 
kinds of applications: word process- 
ing, education, entertainment, pro- 
gramming, graphics and more. It's a 
gift for the whole family. 

Start computing Christmas day* Just 
attach the Color Computer 3 to your 
color TV, and you're ready to begin 
programming in BASIC. Or plug in a 



Program Pak™ for instant fun and 
games, personal finance and many 
other applications. The Color Com- 
puter 3 is compatible with software 
and accessories designed for our popu- 
lar Color Computer 2. 

Add a monitor for advanced graph- 
ics* For razor- sharp color graphics, 
add our CM -8 high-resolution moni- 
tor. With the CM -8, you can achieve 
up to 160 x 192 or 320 x 192 resolution 



Tandy Computers: Because there is no better gift value,™ 



graphics using 16 colors, or 640 X 192 
with 4 colors. 

Save on a disk drive, lb make the 
Color Computer 3 even more power- 
ful, add a disk drive, now on sale for 
just $199.95. You can store over 
156,000 characters of programs and 
data on 5 l k" diskettes. 

Come in today! The Color Computer 
3 offers uncompromising performance 
at an incredible sale price. 

Radio /hack 



Sale ends 12/24/88. Reg. $199.95. FD-502 Color Disk /CO reg. $299.95. Prices apply at Radio Shack 
Computer Centers and participating stores and dealers. Monitor platform sold separately. 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



TM 



Products listed in the Holi- 
day Shopper's Guide (Page 
41) are available from the 
following companies: 



Arizona Small Computer 
Periphera/s 

930 W. 23rd St., Suite 26 
Tempe, AZ 85282 
(602) 829-8028 

Burke & Burke 
P.O. Box 1283 
Palatine, IL 60078 
(312) 397-2898 

CRC/Disto 
10802 Lajeunesse 
Montreal, Quebec 
Canada H3L 2E8 
(514) 383-5293 

Cer-Comp 
5566 Ricochet Ave. 
Las Vegas, NV89110 
(702) 452-0632 

Colorware 
242-W West Ave. 
Darien, CT 06820 
(203) 656-1806 

Curtis/PCA 

1891 Goodyear Ave., Suite 622 
Ventura, CA 93303 
(805) 650-8020 

Datum Manufacturing 
12028 Venice Blvd. 
Los Angeles, CA 90066 
(213)313-0141 

Diecom Products, Inc. 
6715 Fifth Line 
Milton, Ontario 
Canada L9T 2X8 
(416) 878-8358 

Foto-Wear!, Inc. 
77 Milltown Road 
East Brunswick, NJ 08816 
(201) 257-6549 

Gimmesoft 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
(301 ) 256-7558 



(continued on Page 120) 



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118 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



COMPUTER AIDED INSTRUCTION 

Educational Programs for Students Grade K-12 and Adult Self Studies 

NEW PROGRAMS FOR YOUR TANDY 1000 

AND TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 

Compatible with Apple - Atari - Commodore - TRS 80 I, III, 4 - IBM PC Jr. 
16 New Programs now available in Basic Spanish 

-A 




'til 

id in 



CALL TOLL FREE 
FOR MORE INFORMATION 



Which has 






You it ay be able to 
reduce your taxes by 



- incoue 
averag ing 

- incoae 
splitting 

- tax ihalta 





One-ey 1 lable adjectives thai 
end in lj usually just arid I LJ 



Uhich >»as one syl lable'-* 
Q icy 



Interactive Tutorial Programs for Home or Classroom Use 

Over 1000 programs for your selection with 32 now available on disk for the Color 

Computer and 500 now available for the Tandy 1000. 



"We're Your Educational 
Software Source" 

Subject No. of Programs 

Reading Development 256 (4 on disk) 
Reading Comprehension 48 (4 on disk) 

Mathematics 128 

Algebra 16 (16 on disk) 

History 32 (4 on disk) 

Spelling 16 

Government 16 

Physics 16 (4 on disk) 

16 Programs in each 
of the following: 

Children's Tales - Carpentry - Electronics 
Health Services - Office Skills - Statistics 
First Aid/Safety - Economics - Business 
Accounting • Psychology - MUCH MORE! 

Send for our free catalog of over 1000 Dorsett educa- 
tional programs for Atari, TRS 80, Apple, IBM PC Jr., 
Commodore, Tandy 1000, etc. 



Apple II, TRS 80 I, III, & 4, and 
Commodore 64 computers require 
respective conversion kits (plug-in board 
and stereo cassette player), $99.00. Atari 
400/600/800/1200 computers require the 
Atari cassette recorder and the Dorsett 
4001 Educational Master Cartridge, 
$9.95. For the IBM PC Jr. a cassette 
adapter cable and a good cassette 
recorder are required. The Tandy 1000 
requires the Dorsett M1001 speaker/PC 
board kit, $69.00, and a standard 
cassette recorder. A Radio Shack 
CCR-81 or CCR-82 is recommended. 

CASSETTES: $59.50 for an album con- 
taining a 16-program course (8 cassettes 
with 2 programs each); $9.95 for a 
2-program cassette. 

DISKS: $14.95 for a one-program disk; 
$28.95 for two disks; $48.95 for four 
disks. All disks come in a vinyl album. 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome 



Dorsett Educational Software features: 

• Interactive Learning 

• User Friendly 

» Multiple Choice and Typed 

• Program Advance with Correct Response 

• Full-time audio narration (Cassette 
Programs Only) 

• Self-Paced Study 

• High Resolution Graphics 

• Easy Reading Text 

For more information, or to order call: 

TOLL FREE 1-800-654-3871 
IN OKLAHOMA CALL (405)288-2301 



IMosterCcHd 

■ V - 



VISA* 



r~) DORSETT 

mmm^r Educational Systems, Inc. 

Box 1226, Norman, OK 73070 



(continued from Page 118) 

Howard Medical Computers 
1690 N. Elston 
Chicago, I L 60622 
(800)443-1444 

MichTron 
576 S. Telegraph 
Pontiac, Ml 48053 
(313)334-5700 

The Micro Works 
P.O. Box 1110 
Del Mar, CA 92014 
(61 9) 942-2400 

Microcom Software 
2900 Monroe Ave. 
Rochester, NY 14618 
(716) 383-8830 

Nick Bradbury 
10500 Sandpiper Lane 
Knoxville, TN 37922 
(615) 966-0172 

RTB Software 
P.O. Box 777 W. 
Acton, MA 01720 
(508)263-0563 

Simon & Schuster 
1 Gulf+Western Plaza 
New York, NY 10023 
(212) 373-8142 

Sundog Systems 
21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 

Vidicom Corp. 
20 E. Main St., Suite 710 
Mesa, AZ 85201 
(602) 827-0107 

Zebra Systems, Inc. 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



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120 THE RAINBOW November 1988 




ECTOR 

VID EO 
uiulTIZER 
FOR THE 

COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 

s upe« 0 tioH i« 




USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works 1 DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3-3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS 1 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



>TM 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. DS-88 version available for IBM PC. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



COCO 3 SCREEN 



THE 




Purveyors of Fine Video Dig tszcrs Since 1977. 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



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00000 TOTAL ERRORS 




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4025 159 

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END 99 



Listing 3: BflSLOflD 

1 'BASIC LOADER FOR REMOTE 3 

5 CLEAR1000,&H7CFF 

10 CLS(0) :PRINT@171, "POKING M/L" 
• 

20 Z5=&H7D00:LN=3999:FORZ=1TO41: 
READA$ , B$ : Z4=VAL ( 11 &H"+B$ ) : LN=LN+ 
1 

30 Z3=0 : PRINT@228 , "READING DATA 
LINE"LN; :F0RZ1=1T0 LEN(A$) STEP2 
40 Z2=VAL("&H"+MID$ (A$,Z1,2) ) :Z3 
=Z3+Z2 : P0KEZ5 , Z2 : Z5=Z5+1 
50 NEXTZ1:IFZ3<>Z4 THENPRINT @ 4 1 6 
, 11 DATA ERROR IN LINE"LN; : END 
60 NEXTZ 

70 Z5=&H7EB4 :LN=4999:F0RZ=1T042: 
RE AD A $ , B$ : Z 4=VAL ( " &H"+B$ ) : LN=LN+ 
1 

80 Z3=0:PRINT@228, "READING DATA 
LINE"LN; :F0RZ1=1T0 LEN(A$) STEP2 
90 Z2=VAL("&H"+MID$ (A$,Z1,2) ) :Z3 
=Z3+Z2 : P0KEZ5 , Z2 : Z5=Z5+1 
100 NEXTZ1:IFZ3<>Z4 THENPRINT@ 4 1 
6, "DATA ERROR IN LINE "LN: END 
110 NEXTZ 
120 CLS(0) 

130 S AVEM " REMOTE 3 • BIN" , &H7D00 , &H 
7FFF,&H7D32 

140 POKE65386,107:POKE65387,54 1 
CONFIGURE RS23 2 PAC FOR 7-E-l @ 
300 BAUD 

150 CLS:EXEC£H7D32:PRINT"REMOTE 



3 IS NOW INSTALLED AND 
AT 300 BAUD ! " : END 

4000 DATA 0101010000009F04 

4001 DATA 0000 FFFFFFFFFFFF 

4002 DATA FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF 

4003 DATA FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF 

4004 DATA FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF 

4005 DATA FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF 

4006 DATA FFFFBE0168AF8D00 

4007 DATA 8BBE016BAF8D00F1 

4008 DATA 867EB70167B7016A 

4009 DATA 308D0048BF016830 

4010 DATA 8D0073BF016B8EAA 

4011 DATA 29318CAE10BF0128 

4012 DATA EC81EDA18CAA5126 

4013 DATA F7308D0005313CAF 

4014 DATA A4399687261586FF 

4015 DATA B77D09AD9FA00026 

4016 DATA 0ABD7DE62 6057A7D 

4017 DATA 0926F08103102730 

4018 DATA 787EA56B34060D6F 

4019 DATA 26278108271A810D 

4020 DATA 260EF67D02271186 

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4022 DATA F67D032703B67D03 

4023 DATA F67D05BD7E0ABD7E 

4024 DATA 3335067E7D71B67D 

4025 DATA 06A79F008 80F700D 

4026 DATA 6F2 65D32 623415AD 

4027 DATA 9FA0002702204FBD 

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4029 DATA 69C4082718C4072 6 

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4031 DATA 03B7041FF67D0027 

4032 DATA 06810326024F39F6 

4033 DATA 7D04C1012 60B8161 

4034 DATA 2515817A22118020 

4035 DATA 39C102260A814125 

4036 DATA 06815A22028B2039 



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....50 



1J3 CLEAR2Pj3 / &H7CFF 

20 DEFUSRj3=&H7F25 1 CLOCK PROGRAM 

START 

25 CLS: PRINT 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Back Issue 
Availability 



BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 



s 



Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
pages of material, it's all just for CoCo users 
— a great way to expand your library! 

A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents for 
each additional issue for postage and han- 
dling if sent by United Parcel Service. There 
is a $5 charge for the first issue, plus a $1 
charge for each additional issue on orders 
sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not deliver to a 
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MOST ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 are 
available on white paper in a reprint form. All 
others are in regular magazine form. VISA, 
MasterCard and American Express ac- 
cepted. Kentucky residents please add 5 
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costs, we do not bill, and no C.O.D. orders 
are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To check availability and order, review and 
fill out the form on the next page and mail 
it with your payment to: 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 123 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 



Please send me the following back issues: 



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VOLUME 5 






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RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1981 through June 
1984, is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Year Indexes including RAINBOW ON TAPE are printed 
in the July 1985, 1986 and 1987 issues, respectively. The Seventh Year Index is 
printed in the July 1988 issue. 

TOTAL 

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p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



2 6 PRINT" IS REMOTE 3 INSTALLED?" 
: LINEINPUTA$ : IFLEFT$ ( A$ , 1) ="Y"TH 
EN40 

30 LINEINPUT" ENTER FILENAME OF R 

EMOTE 3 PROGRAM. ";FI$:L0AD 

M FI$:FORZ=1TO1000:NEXT:EXEC 

40 POKE6538 6,107:POKE65387,54 'SE 

T RS232 PAC AT 7-E-l, 300 BAUD 

60 A=USR0(0) 'START CLOCK 

70 PRINT !, ENTER CURRENT TIME AS 2 

4 HOUR MILITARY TIME .": PRINT "E 

NTER HOUR " ; : LINEINPUTH$ : H=VAL (H 

$) :PRINT"ENTER MINUTES " ;:LINEIN 

PUTM$:M=VAL(M$) 

80 '*** CHECK FOR PROPER INPUT * 
** 

90 IFH<0 OR H>23 OR M<0 OR M>59 
THEN 70 

100 IF H>9 THENH1=VAL(LEFT$ (H$,l 
) ) ELSEH1=0 

110 H2=VAL(RIGHT$(H$ / 1) ) 

120 IF M>9 THEN M1=VAL (LEFT$ (M$ , 

1)) ELSE M1=0 

130 M2=VAL(RIGHT$(M$ / 1) ) 

140 i*** POKE CURRENT TIME TO CL 

OCK *** 

150 P0KE&H7F15,H1:P0KE&H7F16,H2: 
P0KE&H7F18 / M1:P0KE&H7F19 / M2 : POKE 
&H7F1F / H:POKE&H7F1B / 0:POKE&H7F1C 

160 INPUT"C0C0 3" ;C$:IFLEFT$(C$, 

1) ="Y n THENGOSUB1000 

200 MOTORON:POKE653 87, 54 :IFC$="Y 

"THENCLS (2 ) ELSE CLS(0) 

210 K=PEEK(65385) AND 32:IFK=0TH 

EN230 

220 IF PEEK(&H152)<>255 THENPOKE 
B+253 , 1 :M0T0R0FF : POKE65387 , 63 :X= 
19200:GOTO240 ELSE 210 
230 X=300 

240 '**** SOMEONE IS LOGGING ON 

ickick 

245 POKE&H7F20,0:POKE&H7F21 f I'TU 
RN ON NAME AND CLOCK DISPLAY 
250 PRINT "CONNECTED AT"X:F0RZ=1T 
0800: NEXT 

260 IFC$="Y"THEN WIDTH80 

300 PRINTCHR$(12) : CLS : PRINT "Remo 

te 3 demo.": PRINT: PRINT "Who am I 

talking to? " ; : LI NE INPUTN A $ 
302 POKE&H7F1E / 10 , SET 10 MINUTE 
TIME LIMIT 

305 '*** POKE NAME INTO CLOCK FO 
R CLS AND SCROLL PROTECT *** 
310 IF LEN(NA$)>21 THEN NA$=LEFT 
$(NA$,21) ELSE NA$=NA$+STRXNG$ (2 
1-LEN (NA$) ,32) 

320 F0RZ=1T0 LEN(NA$) : Z1=ASC(MID 
$(NA$,Z,1) ) :IFZ1>96 THEN Zl=Zl-9 



1 24 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



6 ELSE IFZ1>31 AND ZK64 THENZ1= 
Zl+64 

330 L=&H7EFF+Z:P0KE L,Z1:NEXT 

340 f *** MAIN MENU *** 

35J3 PRINT: PRINT "MAIN MENU" : PRINT 

: PRINT" [1] Toggle Chat flag":PRI 

NT" [2] Toggle Clock display" :PRI 

NT" [3] Toggle String display": PR 

INT" [4] Toggle Inverse" : PRINT" [5 

] Change Clock speed" 

351 PRINT" [6] Log off":PRINT 

360 GOTO 2 00 JS 1 CHECK TIME LEFT 

4j30 PRINT: PRINT "Enter choice» " 

; : LINEINPUTZ $ : Z=VAL ( Z $ ) 

41J3 IFZ$="?"THEN35J3 

42j3 IFZ=1 AND PEEK(&H7F22) =0 THE 

N P0KE&H7F22,l:PRINT"Chat flag o 

n!":GOTO350 ELSE IFZ=1 THEN POKE 

&H7F22,0-.PRINT"Chat flag offi":G 

OTO350 

43J3 IFZ=2 AND PEEK(&H7F20) =0 THE 
NPOKE&H7F20 , 1 : GOSUB2100 : PRINT : PR 
INT"CLOCK DISPLAY OFF" : GOSUB22j30 
:GOSUB2150:GOTO350 ELSE IF Z=2 A 
ND PEEK(&H7F20)=lTHENPQKE&H7F2j3, 
j3 : GOSUB2 100 : PRINT : PRINT" CLOCK DI 
SPLAY ON":GOSUB2200:GOSUB215J3:GO 
TO350 

44J3 IFZ=3 AND PEEK(&H7F21) =1THEN 
P0KE&H7F2 1,0: G0SUB2 100 : PRINT : PRI 
NT" STRING DISPLAY OFF" : GOSUB2200 
:GOSUB2150:GOTO350 ELSE IFZ=3THE 
NPOKE&H7F2 1,1: GOSUB2 100 : PRINT : PR 
INT"STRING DISPLAY ON" : GOSUB2200 
: GOSUB2150 : GOTO350 
450 IFZ=4THENGOSUB2100:GOSUB3000 
: GOSUB2150 : GOTO350 
460 IFZ=5THENP=PEEK(&H7F23) :PRIN 
T"Current clock speed" P : PRINT"Th 
e larger the number, the slower 
the clock. 11 :PRINT"Enter new cloc 
k speed " ; : LINEINPUTA$ : P^VAL ( A$ ) 
:POKE&H7F23,P:PRINT"Clock now at 
"P:GOTO350 

470 IFZ=6THENPRINT"BYE ! ! " :MOTORO 
FF : FORZ=1TO2000 : NEXT : GOSUB3 100 : G 
OTO200 

500 PRINT"HUH??":GOTO350 
1000 •*** SET UP 40 AND 80 COL S 
CREENS IF COCO 3 *** 
1010 POKE&HE03D,PEEK(&HE03D) OR 
&H20:POKE&HE046,PEEK(&HE04 6) OR 
&H20 : POKE&HF8F4 , &H19 1 THESE POKES 
SET UP SCROLL AND CLS PROTECTED 
AREA ON 40 AND 80 COL SCREENS 
1020 WIDTH80: PALETTE 8 , 48 : PALETTE 

4,0: PALETTE1 ,0 : CLS2 1 SET BLACK BA 
CKGROUND WITH BUFF LETTERS 
1(330 LOCATE0 ,24: ATTR0 , 2 : PRINT: AT 
TR0 , 1 ! CLEAR SCROLL PROTECTED ARE 



A ON 80 COLUMN SCREEN 
1040 POKE&H415, 96 'PUT A SPACE BE 
TWEEN STRING AND CLOCK ON 3 2 COL 
SCREEN 

1050 WIDTH32: CLS (2) -.RETURN 
2000 1 *** CHECK TIME LEFT *** 
2010 T=PEEK ( &H7F1E) : IFT=0 THENPR 
INT"Time limit is up!":GOTO200 
2015 PRINTPEEK(&H7F1D) "day(s) ha 
ve elapsed." 

2020 PRINTT "minutes left":GOTO40 
P 

2100 1 *** SEE IF COCO 3 *** 
2110 IFC$="Y"THENWIDTH3 2: RETURN 
ELSE RETURN 

2150 IFC$="Y"THENWIDTH80: RETURN 
ELSE RETURN 

2200 LINE INPUT "HIT ENTER TO CONT 
INUE";A$: RETURN 

3000 PRINT :PRINT"Q TO QUIT OR AN 

Y KEY TO TOGGLE" 

3010 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN3010 

3020 I F Z $ = " Q " THENRE TURN 

3030 IF PEEK(&H7FD5)=48THENPOKE& 

H7FD5,112 ELSE P0KE&H7FD5 , 48 

3040 GOTO3010 

3100 IFC$="Y"THENWIDTH32 : CLS (2) 
3110 POKE&H7F2 0,1: PRINT : RETURN « 




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Budget 

Checkbook Balancer 
Cost of Living 
Tinycalc Spreadsheet 
Electronic Datebook 
Account Manager 
Stock Market 
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Coco Terminal 
Bartender 

#4 Busines s Helper 

Workmate 
Word Processor 
Spreadsheet 
Calendar 

Accounts Receivable 
Accounts Payable 
Income Property 
Mail List 

Small Business Helper 
Stock Charting 
Job Log 
Asset Manager 

#7 Machine Lang. Tut. 

Basic Compiler 

ML Tutonal Pt. 1 

ML Tutorial Pt. 2 

ML Tutorial Pt. 3A. 3B 

ML Tutorial Pt. 4 

ML Tutorial Pt. 5 

ML Tutorial Pt. 6 

ML Tutorial Pt. 7 

ML Tutorial Pt. 8 

MLT Dictionary 

Coco Technical Look 

Coco Technical Look Pts. 1-3 



#2 Education 

Flash Card 
Spanish Lessons 
Typing Tutor 
Creativity Test 
Arith. Football 
Cost of Living 
Math Tutors 1. 2 
Trigonometry Tutor 
Typing Game 
Word Tests 
Talking Alphabet 
Clown Dunk Math 

#5 Games III 



#3 Adventures II 



4^ 

/ \ 



\ 



Sandy Rover \ ^ / / 
Gray Lady 'A*L^ ' 

Flippy The Seal *V£'hi* 
Abie Builders / ■ W 

y / \ 



Panzer 
Mrs. Pac 
Fire Runner 
Cosmic Rays 
Dig 

Battle Tank 
Kron 

King Pede 

#8 Gamble Issue 

Horse Racing 

Rack Track 

Black Jack 
Slot Machine 
Lottery Analyst 
Coco Keeno 
Lucky Money 
Betting Pool 
Baccarat 
Draw Poker 
Turtle Races 
Hi-Lo Craps 



Dungeon Master 
Hired. Tired. Fired 
Iceworld 

Jungle - 
Keys 

Amulet of Power 
The Trip 
Cookies 
Barracks 
Genesis Proiect 
Rambo 

Zigma Experiment 

#6 ElectronicsTutorial 

Electronics 1+2 \ \ / 
Electronics 3 + 4 \ I / 
'Electronics 5+6 ./IfiCV, - 
Electronics 7 + 8 / / W 
\ Electronics 9 + t0 / i N 
Electronics 11 + 12 ' 
Electronics 13 | 
Electronics 14 
Electronics 15 
Electronics 16 
Electronics 17 
Electronics 18 . 

#9 Coco 3 Only \ 

Paint Coco 3 
y Convert Coco 3 



\ 1 / 

~ZJ*4*tlUj Demon's Castle 
^ \ Function Keys 

/ I \ Bowling 3 
' / \ Coco 3 | Coco 2 
Wizard 

Coco 3 Drawer 
H-Res Chess 
FYR-Draca 3 
Whammy 3 
Coco 3 Screen Print 



// 



\ 




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T&D Subscription Software • 2490 Mites Standish Dr. • Holland, Ml 49424 • (616)399-9648 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 125 









, 
















rdware 



CqCo I, 2 & 3 



Vocal Freedom 
CoCo Claims the First Amendment! 



Imagine coming home one day and 
calling out, "Hello, is anyone home?" as 
usual. Suddenly, your best friend's 
voice answers, "Hi, I am speaking to 
you from inside your Color Computer! 
I decided to do a little experimenting, 
and I must have done something wrong, 
because here I am inside!" 

Then you hear your dog barking and 
your friend telling him to be quiet. 
You're beginning to be more than a little 
curious, because it really does sound 
like your friend's and your dog's voice 
coming from a machine. You go into the 
next room and see your beloved Color 
Computer on. Just as you clear the door 

1 26 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



it says, "I know this is a little hard to 
believe, but it's really my voice talking 
to you, and I'm getting kind of hungry, 
so I want to come out. You better not 
shut the computer off, or I might dis- 
appear forever!" 

Well, the barely controlled giggling 
from the closet indicates that your 
friend is not really in the computer, and 
Fido's wagging tail reassures you that 
he's OK, too. But you have to know — 
what is this amazing new device that 
makes your CoCo sound exactly like 
your best friend? You don't have long 
to wait, for soon the numbers on the 
display stop moving, the screen flashes 



red and a stranger's voice says, " Vocal 
Freedom is ready!" 

Imagine being able to write a pro- 
gram in BASIC and include sound effects 
like the whine of a jet fighter plane or 
the plunk of a piano. Or even a person 
talking and laughing or singing. Imag- 
ine the capability for a myriad of sound 
effects and human voices loaded into 
memory from file after file and played 
back at different speeds or in different 
orders, or all at once. And this is no 
cheap imitation — this is the real thing; 
whatever it is that the computer has 
heard, it will reproduce. 

OK, you say, what is this amazing 
device, this Vocal Freedoml It's a 
software/ hardware package from Dr. 
Preble's Programs that turns the Color 
Computer into a digital voice recorder 
(DVR), DVR is the same recording 
principle used in compact disc players. 

Vocal Freedom runs on the CoCo 1, 
2 or 3 with at least one disk drive. In 



addition to the DVR program, you can 
also buy a companion program called 
Vocal Freedom Hacker's Pac y which 
consists of a "programmers toolkit" for 
special effects used in conjunction with 
two demonstration programs (one for a 
64K CoCo and the other for a 512K 
CoCo 3). 

In addition to the disk and documen- 
tation, you also receive a special cable 
that connects between the right joystick 
port and an amplifier. Amplifier, you 
ask? Yes, a small mini speaker/ amplifier 
is required to run Vocal Freedom, along 
with any simple dynamic or electret 
microphone (like you'd find in a porta- 
ble tape recorder). The amplifier and 
microphone are not included in the 
package, so you'll need to buy them 
separately. Both are available from 
Radio Shack. The amplifier (Cat. No. 
277-1008), which costs $11.95, is a 
battery-operated audio amplifier with a 
built-in speaker. 

The microphone can be any one of 
many different kinds. Radio Shack also 
sells these, starting at $18. As long as it 
will plug into the miniature phone jack 
on the speaker/ amplifier, it will work, 
I recommend the Radio Shack 200-ohm 
dynamic microphone* It is inexpensive, 
but effective. If you are going to be 
getting serious with this product, natu- 
rally you are going to want a better 
amplifier and microphone. And if you 
have a CoCo 3 or a monitor driver on 
an older CoCo, you will be able to 
redirect the sound output to high- 
quality speakers instead of the TV or 
monitor speaker. 









■ 





CI Pi 



- SAVE #ZCQ*V1H& fff 01 

- USE COCO 1 z Htwmi 

- U$£ EH TEN DEB 

- SELECT HI F I DEL E V 

- SELECT STAHDft&B F I El EI I 

- SET RECORDING SOOHtf ' 

- SOOMD ACTIVATED 

- 01 : i DIRECTORY 

i - exit this pftomm 



Vocal Freedom gives you many dif- 
ferent options, which are presented in 
the form of a main menu. The program 
always returns to the main menu after 
it has completed a task for you. There 
are several allowances for using the 
CoCo 1 and 2 within the framework of 




1HI 



Vocal Freedom and Hacker's Pac are 
more than just run-of-the-mill programs 
for the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. They comprise 
a sophisticated software package that 
includes a digital voice recording pro- 
gram and a set of machine language 
programs to utilize the power behind the 
system. What is digital voice recording? 

Imagine if you will that the computer 
sees your voice as electrical charges after 
it is input from an amplified microphone. 
These charges are sampled or read by the 
computer either 4,000 times per second 
in slow mode or more than 8,000 times 
per second on a high-speed CoCo 3. 
That's an awful lot of reading to re- 
member! This process has a name 
analog-to~digital conversion. 

In this process, an actual number 
value, such as the number of millivolts in 
a frequency, is converted into a number 
that the computer understands, a number 
composed of ones and zeros — a binary 
number. When data is presented in bi- 
nary format, the computer can make 



sense of what it Is seeing and hearing. 

In qr<lbr to reproduce what it has seen 
and heard in a human-understandable 
format, the computer must take all the 
numbers it has recorded and convert 
them back into the actual frequencies 
they represent, then send them to a 
speaker like the one in your monitor or 
TV set. 

Dr. Preble suggests in his manual that 
you think of DVR as a series of snapshots 
the computer takes and arranges almost 
like a connect-the-dots picture. The more 
dots there ate, the closer together, the 
more realistic the "vocal picture" will 
look when the computer recreates exactly 
what it has recorded. 

This is the same principle at work with 
compact disc players. CD players sample 
a sound 40,000 times a second, though, 
which is 10 times faster than the average 
CoCo can, and which is why some CD 
players sound so realistic. They can play 
back a very accurate reproduction of the 
frequencies they have heard. □ 



this menu structure. One is an option 
that lets you use the CoCo 1 and 2 
memory map. There is also an option 
that allows the use of the CoCo 3 
extended memory map. Basically, the 
more memory you have, the more re- 
cording time you have. 

Another option lets you use the high- 
speed or high-fidelity mode. This is not 
just a feature for CoCo 3 users, though, 
as one might expect; many of the older 
CoCos are capable of the high-speed 
mode. I tested an older CoCo 2, and it 
ran in high speed just fine. This feature 
makes the 6809 CPU chip run at twice 
normal speed. It is called "high-fidelity" 
because it allows the computer to sam- 
ple input at a rate of 8,000 times a 
second instead of 4,000. This is an 
important feature, because it makes for 
a significant difference in quality on 
playback. 

High-fidelity is a must for quality 
sound reproduction. While Dr. Preble 
notes in the manual that 4,000 ADC 
(analog-to-digital conversions) per 
second is adequate to recognize speech, 
anyone with the high-fidelity capability 
in the CoCo would very likely not want 
to use the low-speed mode. Remember 
that each sample uses a byte of memory, 
so memory will get eaten up twice as fast 
in high-speed mode. This still allows for 



several contiguous minutes of speech in 
memory at a time. 

Another important thing to re- 
member, however, is that if you fill up 
512K of memory with sound and want 
to save it, you have to have 5 1 2K of disk 
space to put it on! Either that or you 
must create small files using the CoCo 
1 and 2 memory map option. For pro- 
grammers who might want to include 
speech or sound in their programs, the 
64K files would be a must. 

Besides the regular playback mode, 
there are two other important features 
of Vocal Freedom you should know 
about. First is the voice-activated play- 
back option. If you select this mode, 
CoCo will instantly play back anything 
stored in memory when it hears a noise 
in the room. (Note the opening lines of 
this review as an example of this excit- 
ing feature.) 

The second important feature is the 
option that lets you set the sound 
recording level. This option allows users 
to set the level of their amplifiers for 
optimum sound recording accuracy. 
This is accomplished by the computer 
requesting that you speak into the 
microphone repeatedly and then adjust 
the volume control. 

After six adjustments or more the 
computer will inform you that the 



November 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 27 



The Amazing Dr. Preble and his Programs 



Like so many other companies in the 
Color Computer Community, Dr. Pre- 
ble's Programs has some fascinating and 
humble roots indeed. The CoCo Com- 
munity has been supported largely by 
America's "cottage industry," which is 
best characterized by hobbyists with 
entrepreneurial designs inventing some- 
thing on the dining room table in hot 
pursuit of what no one else has done 
before. 

Before they know it, there is interest in 
their breakthrough. Then they create a 
little company, buy a little advertising in 
a trade journal, and pretty soon a star 
is born. Apple's famous Steve Jobs is a 
prime example of this. So is Dr. Preble's 
Programs, and here is that story .... 

In 1969, there were very few computers 
around, and most of them filled up large 
rooms and were owned and operated by 
the military. Laurence Preble, then an 
aspiring hobbyist, built for himself a 
microcomputer from a kit sold by 
Southwest Tech. 

The kit was a 6809-based computer 
with about 4K of memory, although it 
was soon upgraded to 24K. Its next 
upgrade was to 56K, and that is what it 
has right now — Dr. Preble is still using 
that computer, having it perform patient 
functions in his professional chiropractic 
office. It stores information on 8-inch 
Qume drives, also from a bygone era, and 
has a speech synthesizer attached to it. 



Dr. Preble's Programs actually began 
in 1978 when he wrote a program in 6809 
machine code and advertised it in the 
then fledgling Computer Shopper mag- 
azine. The program was called Fast Sort. 
Shortly thereafter, Dr. Preble became 
interested in speech synthesis and built 
his own hardware kit, programming 
speech phonemes (the actual elements of 
sound that go together to create speech) 
into the 6809 computer by hand. Two 
great and wonderful things occurred 
next. First, a company called Votrax 
developed a speech synthesis chip called 
the SC02, and second, Tandy invented 
the Color Computer. 

Dr. Preble was a hardware hacker 
through-and-through and could not 
resist the temptation of this $600-plus 
machine with its wonderful graphics and 
exciting sound capabilities. He imme- 
diately purchased one and began to work 
diligently with it. His next hurdle was in 
1983 when he wanted to obtain a disk 
drive; it, too, was in the $600-plus price 
range. 

Instead, he determined to utilize the 
upper memory bank in his CoCo to work 
as a fast disk drive by storing programs 
there in a slightly compressed format. To 
that end, Dr. Preble wrote a program to 
utilize the unused areas of the CoCo's 
memory. The program was called VDOS, 
and it helped to boost Dr. Preble's Pro- 
grams into the ranks of the dedicated 



contributors to a rapidly growing CoCo 
Community. 

A veteran RAINBOWfest exhibitor, 
Dr. Preble continued developing pro- 
grams for the Color Computer from his 
well-spring of a truly unique back- 
ground. One of Dr. Pteble's CoCos is 
now utilizing Vocal Freedom's speech 
recognition capability and the program 
Ears from Speech Systems (along with a 
variety of other devices) to run his 
burglar alarm — and also to open doors, 
turn on lights and run the intercom 
system in his house! 

As a chiropractor, Dr. Preble studied 
biofeedback. After completing some 
work with electrobiometers and galvanic 
skin response sensing, he took an eclectic 
approach toward curing patients who 
were suffering from back pain. He then 
wrote Mental Freedom, a fascinating 
video game program that reacts to a 
person's level of stress by using the 
computer to measure galvanic skin re- 
sponse. 

In addition to his private practice as a 
chiropractor, Dr. Preble is a private pilot 
and uses his Tandy Model 100 computer 
for flight planning. He also has the 
distinct pleasure of having taught our 
beloved editor and publisher, Lonnie 
Falk, how to fly. 

Dr. Preble said he is very committed to 
serving the CoCo Community in the 
months and years to come. He remains 
fascinated by the impressive and flexible 
Color Computer and is looking forward 
to developing ever newer and more 
innovative software for it. □ 



sound recording level is correctly set. 
This is important because if the record- 
ing level is set low, the computer will not 
hear you or will fade in and out and miss 
words. Conversely, if the volume is set 
too loud on the amplifier, you can 
overdrive the recording level and pro- 
duce very distorted and garbled results. 
Careful attention to this feature is a 
necessity! 

The documentation that accompa- 
nies Vocal Freedom is complete and 
easy to follow. It explains what the 
computer is doing to turn itself into a 
digital voice recorder in terms virtually 
anyone can understand. In fact, this 
sophisticated program could hardly be 
any easier to operate. The connections 
to the amplifier and microphone are 
very straightforward, and the main 
menu allows for simple operation. Very 
shortly after you turn it on for the first 
time, you will be using it like an expert. 

Hacker's Pac 

Hacker's Pac is a software package 
you can purchase as a separate add-on 

128 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



option to Vocal Freedom. It is written 
in machine language utilizing BASIC 
subroutines. The subroutines them- 
selves are stored on the disk as separate 
files to make it easy to merge them into 
your own programs; they are designed 
to allow the user to load, save, change 
speed and memory location, and play 
DVR files created by Vocal Freedom. 

Hacker's Pac is an excellent tool for 
extrapolating the uses of Vocal Free- 
dom and pushing the product to its 
utmost capabilities. With this program 
and its built-in subroutines, recording 
after recording can be loaded from disk 
files and stored in memory or switched 
in and out of memory locations. 

One of the best features of Hackers 
Pac is that it is position code independ- 
ent, which means that it can be placed 
anywhere in the computer's memory (as 
long as it does not interfere with some- 
thing else already in memory). This is 
useful when you want to tuck the mod- 
ule out of the way and utilize every last 
bit of available RAM. 

Although a little intimidating at first 



for the novice programmer, Hackers 
Pac comes with two demonstration 
programs by way of an online tutorial. 
It is extremely easy to use, allowing you 
to merge Hacker's Pac subroutines into 
programs you write. These demonstra- 
tion programs really help you learn 
quickly how to incorporate DVR files 
into your own programs for spectacular 
voice and sound effects. If you write 
programs for commercial applications 
that utilize Hacker's Pac, you must 
contact Dr. Preble's Programs for a 
commercial software license agreement. 

The documentation that accompa- 
nies Hacker's Pac is complete and 
accurate, although a little rigorous for 
the uninitiated programmer. I recom- 
mend the "grabbing the bull by the 
horns" approach in this case; once you 
begin to use (and enjoy!) Hacker's Pac, 
you will see how versatile and easy to 
use it is. 

If you are going to purchase or have 
already bought Vocal Freedom, 
Hacker's Pac is a must if you plan to go 
beyond simple recording and playback 



into the sophisticated areas of memory 
bank switching, speed setting, multiple 
file loads and saves, etc. As a "pro- 
grammers toolkit," this software is 
worth every penny and will stretch 
Vocal Freedom to the maximum. 

Hear Ye, Hear Ye! 

With Vocal Freedom you get an 
amazingly powerful package with few 
trouble spots. None of the problems I 
encountered were either substantial or 
show-stoppers — with one exception: 
The documentation does not specify 
filename format when the machine 
prompts you for loading or saving files. 

The version I used worked when the 
filename was typed without quotes and 
without its .DVR extension, in most 
cases. However, unless I answered with 
a correct filename at this load or save 
prompt, the program would crash and 
have to be restarted. Also, there is no 
warning when you run out of disk space 
— you just get tossed back to the main 
screen with the fate of your file in limbo. 
Here also the documentation assumes 
that nothing will go wrong. If some- 
thing does go wrong that you cannot 
handle on your own, you can call Dr. 
Preble's Programs for assistance. There 
is a 24-hour hotline. 

Vocal Freedom and Hacker's Pac, 
while being a little expensive when you 
add in the cost of the amplifier and 
microphone, are well worth the invest- 
ment. This is a real, working digital 
voice recording system that could have 
numerous applications from interactive 
education to entertainment to working 
with blind people who want to learn 
about computers. Its potential for 
special effects makes this an excellent 
value and an important volume in the 
CoCo software library. 

Vocal Freedom is a full-featured and 
sophisticated program made even more 
powerful by its companion, Hacker's 
Pac. In spite of a few minor problems, 
the programs are really quite versatile 
and well-programmed. I can recom- 
mend this package to anyone without 
hesitation. If the idea of digital voice 
and sound recording intrigues you, 
Vocal Freedom could be the program 
you've been waiting for! 



(Dr. Preble's Programs, 6540 Outer Loop, 
Louisville, KY 40228, 502-969-1818; Vocal 
Freedom, $34.95; Hacker's Pac, $14.95; add 
$2.50 S/H) 

— Jeffrey S. Parker 



I Softwar e 



BASIC Utility 

Diskette — 

Utilities 

for the BASIC 

Programmer 

The BASIC Utility Diskette from 
T.E.M. of California is a collection of 
five programs to assist the software 
developer in writing and debugging 
BASIC programs. The disk also includes 
a compiled version of two of the pro- 
grams to increase the processing speed 
for large files. The utilities require a 
CoCo 1, 2 or 3 with at least 64K, one 
disk drive and a printer. 

The five utilities consist of the follow- 
ing programs: COMPARE .BAS, CROSS- 
REF.BA5, DUMPCRT. BAS, DUMPDIR- 
-BA5 and DUMPFILE.BA5. Patches are 
provided for each of the programs, so 
you may customize them for your par- 
ticular hardware. This allows you to 
bypass the initial questions about which 
CoCo you are using and how many 
drives you may have. 

The first utility, COMPARE .BfiS, 
comes with a compiled version, which 
is loaded by a BASIC program called 
COMP.BAS. Both perform a line-by-line 
comparison of two BASIC programs, 
which may be saved in either ASCII or 
binary format as long as both files are 
in the same format. The lines that differ 
will be output to the printer (you can 
elect to have the entire line printed or 
just the line numbers). 

The compiled version requires that 
you leave the disk in the drive, because 
it loads program code as required. 
Single-drive users are required to copy 
the utility programs onto the same disk 
as the programs being compared. This 
utility makes it very simple to locate 
minor changes between program ver- 
sions. The manual includes instructions 
for handling versions with line number- 
ing offset by the RENUM command. 

The CRD5SREF . BA5 utility can be 
used only on BASIC programs saved in 
binary format. This utility provides a 
numerical listing of all jump instruc- 
tions (i.e., GOTO, GOSUB, etc.) in a 
program. It requires the use of tempo- 
rary storage space on your disk; there- 
fore, there must be space available and 



no write-protect tab. The space is re- 
leased upon normal completion of the 
program. Halting the program during 
execution wili not release the disk space 
used: You must run the program again 
and allow it to complete normally to 
release the space. The output produced 
is a listing of line numbers called and 
from where they are called. 

The DUMPCRT . BA5 utility includes 
three versions. One is for standard 32- 
by-16 text displays, one is for 40-by-24, 
and the other is for 8G-by-24, Of course, 
the last two are only for the CoCo 3. 
According to the instructions, the pri- 
mary use of this program would be to 
print the screen display of the TRON 
(trace on) command. DUMPCRT may be 
executed directly from the keyboard or 
embedded within the program being 
traced using the TRQFF (trace off) and 
RUN commands. Small sections of code 
may be traced and debugged in this 
manner. You must select the proper 
locations to embed the DUMPCRT com- 
mand so your trace will not scroll off the 
screen before being printed. 

The DUMPDIR .BAS program is mainly 
to assist in keeping track of the pro- 
grams on your disks. It produces a 
printed listing of the files on a disk that 
may be trimmed to fit into a disk jacket 
for reference. The information includes 
a disk name and date, filename, exten- 
sion, type, indication of binary or 
ASCII format, number of granules, 
number of sectors, and amount of free 
space remaining — a very handy pro- 
gram, indeed. 

The last utility is DUMPFILE. BA5. 
This utility may be used with programs 
written in BASIC and saved in either 
ASCII or binary format, as well as with 
machine language programs. A printed 
copy of the disk file is produced in either 
decimal or hexadecimal form. The 
number of sectors in the file is deter- 
mined, and you may dump any range of 
sectors. The listing contains 20 bytes per 
line and 256 bytes per sector. 

Two ol the demo programs provided 
on the disk are also useful utilities. One 
produces a sorted directory listing on 
the screen, and the other converts either 
a decimal or a hexadecimal number to 
binary. 

All of the programs worked flaw- 
lessly and were accompanied by a 32- 
page manual. I tested several different 
BASIC programs and one machine lan- 
guage program as well as the demos 
provided. The CROSSREF program even 
found a syntax error (an extra quote 
mark) in something I had typed. Pro- 
grammers who do much work in BASIC 

November 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 29 



would do well to include the BASIC 
Utility Diskette in their utility library. 

(T.E.M. of California, Box 4311, Fullerton, 
CA 92634, 714-871-8210; $19.95 plus $2 
S/H) 

— Larry Birkenfeld 



I Softwar e 



CoCo3 



Castle of Tharoggad — 
To Slay an Evil Wizard 

The good wizard who ruled the king- 
dom of Tharoggad has been abducted 
and imprisoned by his evil brother. You, 
the superhero of the land, must go into 
the castle and rescue him. But beware: 
There are traps to avoid and giant 
spiders, snakes, ghosts and bats that 
you must do battle with, using weapons 
found along the way. 

Castle of Tharoggad is a maze Ad- 
venture game supplied on a ROM pack 
for the CoCo 3. The game has seven 
levels, and you start out on the ground 
floor carrying nothing but a backpack 
that contains a torch. You will need a 
joystick or mouse and either a TV or 
RGB monitor. The package includes an 
1 1-page booklet that provides adequate 
instruction on game play. 

Castle of Tharoggad is icon- and 
menu-driven. The lower half of the 
game screen consists of the icons, which 
represent your options. In the center of 
the collection of icons is a beating heart 
— yours. The speed with which the 
heart beats is determined by how much 
you exert yourself moving around and 
battling creatures. The slower the heart 
beats, the healthier you are and the 
more likely you will defeat the crea- 
tures. On the other hand, the faster it 
beats the more likely you will lose the 
battle. 

Just above the heart is a compass you 
point and click to move around the 
maze. There is also a game save icon — 
this feature is a must! The game save 
consists of four codes of nine letters and 
numbers. Other icons include left and 
right hands, a backpack in which to 
store inventory, "grab" and "drop" 
icons, an "incant" icon, and "trap door" 
icons to reach the levels above and 
below. 

To pick up an object, you point to 
either the left or right hand and then to 



"grab." To pull something out of the 
backpack, you point to the backpack 
and then to a hand. To attack one of the 
verminous creatures that never leave 
you alone, you double-click on either 
the left or right hand icon. Castle 
inhabitants will also pick up objects — 
sometimes objects that youll need later 
in the game. However, when you kill a 
creature it drops whatever it's carrying. 

The graphics occupy the upper half of 
the screen — the maze with the crea- 
tures, weapons and traps. Youll see all 
this, that is, after you figure out how to 
make your torch work. The graphics, 
though animated, are not what you 
would expect from a CoCo 3 game. In 
fact, I have seen better graphics on 
CoCo 2 games. It's hard to feel heroic 
when you're slaying a blue spider that 
wears a silly grin on its face. 

Also, the joystick response some- 
times becomes very sluggish during 
battle, which can be frustrating. To be 
honest, the whole game is a little slow. 

Until you collect a certain number of 
objects, which involves killing a number 
of creatures, you cannot find the door- 
way to the next level. At times the 
creatures would attack in twos or 
threes, regardless of whether I stayed 
still or moved around. Other times I 
could find no creatures, weapons or 
door to the next level for long periods 
of time. 



oftware 



51 2K & OS-9 Level II 



I feel that if Castle of Tharoggad had 
better graphics and more action it 
would be more appealing. But if you're 
a video Adventurer who is persistent 
and does not mind if a game is a tad 
slow, Castle of Tharoggad could be a 
game for you. 



(Tandy Corporation, Fort Worth, TX; 
$29.95: Available in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide) 

— Steve Griffith 



OS-9 Level II BBS - 
Put Your Own 
Board Online 

One of the most entertaining aspects 
of the computer hobby is telecom- 
munications. Many of us use our CoCos 
to communicate with Delphi and Com- 
puServe as well as with friends both 
near and far. As you sit at the keyboard 
browsing through the myriad of data- 
bases on these systems, you might think 
it would be neat to operate such a 
system yourself, admittedly on a much- 
reduced scale. 

There are programs in the Disk BASIC 
world that let you start and operate a 
BBS. CoBBS (THE RAINBOW, No- 
vember 1985, Page 135) is one of them. 
Now those of us in the OS-9 realm have 
the same opportunities with the intro- 
duction of OS-9 Level II BBS. 

OS-9 Level II BBS is not a single, 
large bulletin board program — in the 
spirit of OS-9, it is a set of utilities and 
commands used to create and run the 
board. In addition to the software, you 
will need an auto-answer modem and 
512K of memory. 

Rather than discuss all the compo- 
nents, I think the following will best 
illustrate the package: 



Command 

tsmon 
login 
moni tor 
menu 

BBS-build 
BBS -chat 
finswer 

BBS. create 

BBS . post 

BBS-delete 
BBS. pack 



BBS -read 
BBS. forward 



Function 

autobaud terminal 
monitor 
user log-in 
manager 
carrier-detect 
monitor 
menu manager 
simple file creator 
chat with SysOp 
answers request to 
talk with SysOp 
creates message 
base 

posts a message to 
the board 
deletes a message 
packs messages 
after deletion 
(conserves disk 
space) 

reads messages 
reads forward 
beginning with a 
specified message 
number 



1 30 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



BBS . new reads all new 

messages since last 
access 

BBS. scan lists headers of all 

messages in the 
message base 
BBS . sea rch keyword search of 

message 
BBS .mail .post posts mail 
BBS. mail .check checks to see if 

previously sent 
mail has been 
received 
BBS. mai 1 . read reads mail 
BBS . mai 1 . re add deletes mail 
BBS. upload provides capability 

to upload files to 
the BBS using 
either standard 
Xmodem, CRC 
Xmodem and 
Ymodem 

BBS.dounload provides the same 

transfer options to 
download files 

BBS. con f enters conference 

with another user 

BBS. con f .uho informs user who 

is on the system 



As you can see, all the basics of a 
bulletin board are present, including the 
standard functions for operating the 
usual message databases as well as three 
protocols for uploading and download- 
ing files and programs. Not mentioned 
in this list are SysOp utilities and 
utilities for maintaining the download 
section of the board. The program 
provides a command that allows the 
SysOp to validate uploads and add a 
one-line description, a list of keywords 
and a paragraph description. This 
information is available to users wish- 
ing to download a file. 

The OS-9 Level II BBS package also 
comes with the utilities TSMon, Login, 
Monitor and a menu program. TSMon 
is the time-share monitor, which is 
similar to TSMon provided by Tandy in 
its Development Package. This is an 
autobaud version in that it adjusts to the 
standard baud rates between 300 and 
2400. Once TSMon opens communica- 
tion, it runs Login and Monitor. Mon- 
itor simply monitors the carrier detect 
signal from the modem. When this 
signal is lost, Moni tor kills all processes 
started by the user so that a new user 



can log in. Login provides just what 
you would expect — it requests the 
user's ID and password and then vali- 
dates the user and runs the menu pro- 
gram. This is the standard and usual 
way of running the board; however, the 
SysOp can choose to give a particular 
user access to the shell. 



"Installing the 
bulletin board is quite 
easy since an 
installation shell 
script comes with the 
package. " 

The menu program is quite useful in 
its own right, providing a way to add 
new options to the BBS. Two files are 
read by the menu command. The first 
file is the menu itself. The second file is 
the command file, which is a list of 
single-letter options and the command 



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enemy forces. Game includes 3-D glasses and works on any Color T. V., 
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Reg $29.95 Introductory Special $24.95 EXTRA GLASSES $2.95 

Color Computer 3 only 

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Aterrible mine disaster has just occurred and it will be uptoyou and your talents 
to enter the mine, jump the pits, avoid the spikes, fight off the bats and other 
creepy crawlers and get air to the needy victims. Mine rescue features over 2 
megabytes of arcade-style graphics, real time music and multiple mine levels. 
Hours of fun I 

Reg $29.95 Introductory Special $24.95 

Color Computer 3 only 

★ ★ ★ NEW ★ ★ ★ 

SAMPLE DISK 

Tired of getting burned on games you haven't seen? Try our sample disk. We'll 
ship the above three games on a demo disk for y ou to see for yourself how good 
they are. If you decide to purchase the full versions, we will deduct the sample 
disk price from your order (3-D Glasses Not Included). 
Demo Disk $4.95 

SUPER SPECIAL GET ALL THREE GAMES FOR $60.00! 

ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS - Game Point Software is looking for talented 
writers. Top royalties guaranteed. 

GAME POINT SOFTWARE 
Send Check or Money Order to: P.O. BOX 6906, BURBANK, OA 91510-6907 
Add $3.00 S/H (818) 566-3571 



Sv 
K'.' 

I 

el 



m 



I I 






THIS 18 ONE OF 
OUR CUSTOMERS. 



AND THIS IS NOT. 



URITE US AND ASK THAT 
YOUR MfttlE BE PLACED ON 
OUR FREE NAILING LIST. 
NO OBLIGATION. 



TOTHIAN SOFTWARE, INC. 

BOX 6G3 
RIHERSBURG, PA. 1B248 



(SINCE 1985> 



.w.y.y.w.w. 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 131 



to be executed for that option. The 
following should illustrate how Menu 
operates. 



Menu File 

L List files 
U Upload file 
D Download file 
M Main menu 



Command File 

LDirdownloads 

U Uloadx 

D DIaadx 

M Chd /dd/BBS 



All OS-9 commands and special 
characters are valid on the command 
lines of the file. The neat thing about the 
Menu command is that a change direc- 
tory command will cause Menu to read 
the menu and command files in the new 
directory. This is accomplished by using 
the same filenames for these files in each 
directory, e.g., bbs-menu and 



bbs . cmds. These files are text files and 
can be created by your favorite editor. 

Installing the bulletin board is quite 
easy since an installation shell script 
comes with the package; this consists of 
two disks that contain the various 
programs and a complete BBS ready to 
run. In other words, all of the menu and 
command files have been set up. In- 
stall creates all the necessary directo- 
ries and copies the menus and files. This 
is very useful for those with hard disks 
or floppy drives other than the standard 
single-sided 35-track drive, which the 
software comes on. 

A very nice feature of OS-9 Level II 
BBS is an option in the TSMan com- 
mand that allows you to run the BBS 
in a window for debugging. It's really 
neat to have the board running in 




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Window 1, DynaStar in Window 2 and 
utilities in Window 3 as you begin the 
process of customizing the board. In 
this way you can make changes and see 
the immediate result by flipping to the 
BBS window. 

Although the primary purpose of the 
OS-9 Level II BBS is to run a bulletin 
board system, there are several other 
uses for the software. As I noted above, 
the board will run in a window — it 
could be set up as a family message 
center. 

If you transfer public domain pro- 
grams with others, you can eliminate 
the need for two people to have to set 
up terminal programs. Rather, set up 
the BBS — at least one person is free 
to go on and do other things with the 
CoCo. As you would expect for a 
multitasking system, you can perform 
other tasks while the BBS is running — 
even on a floppy system. OS-9 Level II 
BBS was tested on a floppy disk-based 
system and performed just fine. Ob- 
viously, a hard disk will greatly improve 
system performance. 

The Menu program, which actually 
controls the BBS, is a very useful pro- 
gram in other ways. It can be used 
(especially on a hard disk) to better 
manage the use of the computer, i.e., 
make OS-9 more user-friendly by set- 
ting up menus and command files in 
each directory and letting Menu control 
the movement about the system. 

Although I don't have the time to run 
and maintain a BBS, OS-9 Level II BBS 
is an excellent package for those who 
do. It is nicely done, especially with the 
operational BBS included. The ability 
to customize the BBS to your own liking 
is an added feature. And the additional 
use of some of the utilities beyond the 
BBS make this package especially at- 
tractive. 

One precaution independent of the 
software is to make sure that the cable 
between computer and modem carries 
the DTR and carrier-detect lines. These 
lines are necessary and are sometimes 
not connected in some cables (I learned 
about this the hard way!). 



(Alpha Software Technologies, 2810 Buf- 
fon St., Chalmette, LA 70043, 504-279- 
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— Donald Dollberg 



132 



THE RAINBOW November 1988 



1 Book 1 

DELPHI: The 
Official Guide — 
Off-Line Help for 
Online Operations 

Like the intrepid native guides that 
lead expeditions up the Amazon, DEL- 
PHI: The Official Guide will lead you 
through the vast jungle of information 
offered on the Delphi computer infor- 
mation network. If you, like me, find 
the service easy to use, but the quantity 
of information offered bewildering, 
then this book is for you. 

Even though Delphi has a very com- 
plete online help library, the ultimate 
help utility is this book. Written with 
the new user in mind, The Guide will be 
of benefit to most Delphi subscribers — 
especially when trying something for 
the first time. 

"The reader M guided 
through virtually every 
menu the service off % 
and is provided detailed 
explanations of what each \ 
Woke from every menu 
will yield" 

The book begins with a section called 
"Getting Started." In simple language, 
using a minimum of jargon, the section 
gives you instructions on how to set up 
your terminal software to communicate 
with Delphi, how to sign up on Delphi, 
and how to tell either Tymnet, Telenet 
or Datapac that you want to be con- 
nected to Delphi. From there you go 
into a discussion of important com- 
mands and how to answer questions in 
a way that the service understands. 

The next few chapters are filled with 
descriptions of services and options 
available. Did you know that Delphi 
has a mortgage calculator online? 
That's just one of the services you can 
find out about in the book. I doubt most 
users would ever discover all the neat 
things on Delphi by themselves. With 
The Guide, it's all laid out in black-and- 
white for you to study off-line. 

The reader is guided through virtu- 
ally every menu the service offers and 
is provided detailed explanations of 
what each choice from every menu will 
yield. This alone justifies the price of the 



book. I have spent a great deal of time 
online searching through the various 
menus, looking for a particular service 
I'd seen somewhere but was unable to 
find again. Now I just look it up in The 
Guide's index, and there I am — with- 
out having to press CTRL-Z even once. 

The chapter covering online Work- 
space proved to be the most helpful to 
me. Workspace is a versatile feature 
with a very cryptic way of operating (at 
least to me). After reading The Guide 
I still find the Workspace to be cryptic, 
but now I can get around in it and do 
some tricks I had not even suspected 
were possible. The Guide gives concise 
instructions and clear examples on how 
to do most anything you can think of 
with the files in your Workspace. 

The Guide contains more than 480 



pages with almost 100 pages of referenc- 
es, indexes and appendices. There is 
also a three-page, front-and-back pull- 
out that lists all the commands and 
menu options. 

DELPHI: The Official Guide seems 
to be as complete a reference as you will 
ever need. If you use Delphi often, The 
Guide will eventually pay for itself — 
you'll save on the connect fee usually 
spent reading through help screens. You 
can look up any information you need 
— off-line. Besides, reading DELPHI: 
The Official Guide will give you some- 
thing to do while waiting for the evening 
hours when you can afford to get online. 

(Simon & Schuster, 1 Gulf+ Western Plaza, 
New York, NY 10023, 212-373-8142; $21.95) 

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' Softwar e CoCo1 - 2a3 » 

Video Draw Poker — 
Five-Card Simulation 



According to its author, Video Draw 
Poker was developed to simulate the 
video poker machines found in casinos. 
(Depending on where you live, they may 
also be found in local clubs and bars.) 

Usually for a minimum of a quarter, 
the machine deals you five cards. After 
the deal you may replace some or all of 
the cards. If your new poker hand then 
meets the requirements for one of the 
payoffs, you are either paid off or 
credited with additional plays. 

Unlike real slot machines, winning 
and losing is not totally a random event 
— your choice of which cards you keep 
and which you discard does affect your 
likelihood of winning. (Unfortunately, 
however, even if you make the best 
possible move, the odds, like the odds 
on slot machines, are still stacked 
against you.) 

Video Draw Poker works on two 
levels — you can play the game for 
nothing and, perhaps more impor- 
tantly, you can test various playing 
strategies. 

The simulation comes on tape or disk 
and requires a minimum of 32K. I tested 
the disk version. From a simple menu, 
your choices are playing, testing or 
quitting. If you choose to play, you will 
be asked how much money you want to 
start with. Once you are staked, you can 
bet from $1 to $5 on a hand as long as 
you have money. 

Once you have made your bet, five 
cards are dealt. (The graphics are rela- 
tively simple — the purpose of this 
simple program is not to dazzle your 
friends.) You then choose your discards 
and the computer replaces them. If your 
hand meets a payoff level, your win- 
nings are added to your stake. Play 
continues until you either run out of 
money, quit or decide to test a playing 
strategy. 

I found the strategy-testing part of 
this simulation to be its most interesting 
and valuable feature. The program 
allows you to set up a hand — you 
decide which five cards you initially 
receive, which you will discard, what 
your initial stake is and how much each 
hand is worth. 

When the simulation is set up, the 
computer will then randomly play this 



same hand as many times as you want 
it to — all the while keeping a running 
total of your stake. For example, sup- 
pose that you are dealt a four, five, 
seven, eight (each of different suits) and 
an ace of diamonds. Do you throw away 
the ace and hope to draw a six (com- 
pleting your "inside straight") or do you 
discard everything but the ace, figuring 
that drawing four cards will give you 
more possible ways of winning? 



*S oft war e 



CoCo3 



"What should I do if three 
of the cards, including the 
ace, are diamonds? If four of 
them are diamonds? With 
this simulation, I can find 
the best strategy." 



Figuring the odds of drawing the 
straight are fairly easy — there are four 
sixes in the remaining 47 cards. There- 
fore, I have four chances in 47 of 
drawing a straight that will give me back 
$4 for my dollar wagered. (Note that a 
six is the only card that will win for me.) 

The second possibility is not as easy 
to figure. With four cards, I could 
match my ace, pair other cards, get a 
straight, flush, full house, or even a 
royal flush. The possibilities are meas- 
urable but not nearly as easy to figure. 

Which is the better play? I could 
consult my old statistics textbook or I 
could allow the computer to play each 
hand perhaps 5,000 times. The answer 
would most likely be the same. The 
beauty of this simulati on is that it allows 
us to check various strategies. What 
should I do if three of the cards, includ- 
ing the ace, are diamonds? If four of 
them are diamonds? With this simula- 
tion, I can find the best strategy. 

In his easy-to-understand documen- 
tation, the author lists four uses for his 
program: fun, testing strategies, prac- 
tice, and deciding "if you want to do real 
gambling on this type of machine." 
Interestingly, the conclusion for the 
final use comes after you've done the 
other three. The program is fun, and it 
allows you to practice all kinds of 
strategies. But it still wins even when 
you use the best of strategies. If you are 
interested in video poker, you should 
check into this program. 

(Prometheus Software, P.O. Box 15859, 
Long Beach, CA 90815; $17) 

— John Matviko 



V-Term — 
CoCo 3 Terminal 
Emulation 

Whether you are going online for the 
first time or just looking for a terminal 
program that is a little more versatile 
than the one you are presently using, I 
don't think your search will be over 
until you have purchased a copy of V- 
Term. This is probably one of the most 
versatile and full-featured terminal 
emulators 1 have seen for the CoCo 3. 

One of the first things I noticed upon 
opening the package was the well- 
written and professional-looking man- 
ual, which contains 56 pages of infor- 
mation that will have you online in no 
time. It even includes a section called 
"An Introduction to Data Communica- 
tions," which should help even the 
novice to understand exactly how mo- 
dems and terminal programs work 
together to allow communication with 
other systems. 

I feel I should mention the quality of 
the manual because, in my opinion, 
even the best program is worthless if it 
is not supported by the proper docu- 
mentation. Believe me, V-Term's man- 
ual leaves few questions unanswered. 

Another thing I am happy to report 
is that V-Term is supplied on an unpro- 
tected disk, so you can make a backup. 

When I loaded V-Term, it auto- 
executed and I was greeted with the 
start-up screen. It was a 28-line screen 
of which the bottom three lines were 
reserved for the onscreen menu. Using 
the ALT and arrow keys I was able to 
select from the menu options, which 
usually presented me with a submenu. 

The first choice I made was to select 
the option Parameter from the main 
menu. From here I was able to change 
the RS-232 rate, the transfer protocol I 
wanted for uploading/downloading 
files, printer settings, and even screen 
color. I was able to save these and other 
options to disk — every time I boot V- 
Term it's configured exactly the way I 
like it. Still not impressed? 

Another option from the Parameter 
menu is Terminal, which allows you to 
choose from the four types of terminals 
V-Term can emulate: VT-100, VT-52, 
Vidtex and CRT. If you subscribe to 
CompuServe, something you may find 
of special interest is that V- Term's 



134 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



BAS I C a lly Sp ea king 



If you are working on a BASIC 
program that has you stumped, write in 
to Bill for a fix. He can help solve your 
programming problems. 

Merging Subroutines 

Dear Bill: 

I've been computing for only about 
seven months, and this month I finally 
upgraded to a disk system. I've written 
several programs that use the same 
subroutine. Up until now when I 
wanted to start a new program, I deleted 
all the lines from the previous program 
except those of the subroutine I want to 
re-use. What do I do, short of re- 
entering those lines, if I've already 
started a program and decide I'd like my 
old subroutine added? Any help you can 
offer will be greatly appreciated. 

Todd Barkley 
Orange, CT 

That particular question was one I 
asked a few years ago myself. I've since 
gotten some extended use out of the 
procedure I'm about to explain. It's 
called MERGE, and it is really quite 
handy. 

There are only a few things you have 
to remember when using the MERGE 
command. First, the program or por- 
tion of a program you'd like to add to 
the main program must first be saved in 
ASCII format. To do this, simply iso- 
late your routine, deleting all line 
numbers you won't be using. What's left 
we'll call SUBX (SUBroutine X). We'll 
call the main program MAIN; it will be 
numbered starting with Line 10 and 
continuing through Line 300. 

Personally, I like to renumber my 
subroutines before I save and merge 
them, but you don't have to. However, 
just humor me for now and do it this 
way. Later on, when you become famil- 
iar with the procedure, you can take all 
sorts of liberties. 

All right, so now you have SUBX and 
nothing else in memory. Type RENUM 
1000,10,10 and press ENTER. To see 
the results, type LIST. You'll notice that 
5UBX now starts at Line 1000 and 
continues listing in increments of 10. 
You can renumber starting with any 
number you like, as long as it's higher 



Bill Bemico, rainbow's newest colum- 
nist, is the: author of more than 300 
Color Computer programs. He founded 
Bill Bernico Software in 1987 and 
enjoys writing and recording his own 
music. 

1 40 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



BASICally 




By Bill Bernico 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



than the last line number of the program 
to which you want to merge it — at least 
for this example. Now that you have 
your renumbered SUBX in memory, save 
it in ASCII by typing SAVE "SUBX", A 
and pressing ENTER. Now if you type 
DIR and press ENTER, you'll see that 
your subroutine is saved on disk. Make 
sure that this ASCII-saved subroutine 
and the main program are both on the 
same disk. 

Once both of these files are on the 
disk, type L0AD"MAIN" and press 
ENTER. At this point MAIN is now in 
memory and SUBX is only on the disk. 
Once you've loaded MAIN, type MERGE 
"SUBX"' and press enter once again. 
You'll hear the disk drive churning. 
When it stops and the OK prompt 
appears, your two files will be merged 
into one. To make sure, type L I ST, press 
ENTER and you'll see the program scroll 
by. You can halt the scrolling any 
time by pressing SHIFT and @ 
simultaneously. 

You'll notice, as MAIN scrolls by, that 
when it gets to Line 300, the next line 
is 1000. This is where SUBX picks up. 
Now you're free to continue adding 
more lines to the main program between 
lines 300 and 1000. When you need to 
access your subroutine, add a line that 
says G0SUB 1000. 

Now the two merged files are in 
memory, but you'll have to re-save them 
to disk again. Call the product of the 
merger MERGPRDG, for example, type 
5AVE"MERGPRDG" and press ENTER. 



That's about all there is to it. It'll save 
you a lot of extra typing and time. 

DATA Dilemma 

Dear Bill: 

How does one understand and write 
DATA statements as part of a BASIC, 
pseudo machine language, program? I 
can understand the basic concept of a 
line like 

READ A : FDR I=&Hxxxx to &Hxxxx 
:P0KE I, A: NEXT I 

but from there on, my comprehension 
fails me. What are the numbers in the 
DATA statements? What do they stand 
for, and most of all, how do we (the 
programmers) know where to get them 
and how to put them in the proper 
order? 

I would really appreciate being en- 
lightened because some programs are 
written entirely in DATA statements. 
Thanks for your help. 

Bernice Shoobs 
Clifton, NJ 

It's funny that you'd ask me this 
question, Bernice. I wondered about it 
myself for a long time and finally asked 
someone more familiar with the proce- 
dure than myself about it. 

1 learned that the program is first 
written in assembly language using an 
editor/ assembler. When the process is 
complete, you have a binary file. Since, 
on a scale of one to 100, my knowledge 
of ML programming is about .00001, I 
can't help you with the procedure of 
assembling the code. 

However, from what I understand, 
once you have that binary file, you can 
convert it to BASIC by using a short 
program that changes the binary code 
to DATA statements. Kevin Davidson's 
utility, MacData, [RAINBOW, "The 
Demystification of ML On Disk," 
December '83, Page 181] would ac- 
complish this task. I've tried the pro- 
gram and have converted several binary 
files to BASIC programs. These pro- 
grams go a little slowly, but they work 
fine. 

From Text to Graphics 

Dear Bill: 

I'd like to convert some of my favorite 
BASIC text programs to the graphics 
screen. Without doing a lot of guessing, 
is there a way to figure out where to 
draw so that the text will appear in 
about the same position on the graphics 




The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 



The Answer, a program that allows you to commu- 
nicate with your "inner self" via subliminal messages. For 
theCoCo3. Alpha- Biotechnologies, Inc., P.O. Box 2203, 
Richmond, IN 47375, (317) 962-6644; $29.95. 

Armchair Admiral, a Battleship-type game for up 
to eight players that places you at the helm of four ships 
- a sloop, caravel, brigantine and galleon. "Your orders 
are to stay afloat while trying to sink your enemy, who 
is in command of identical ships,*' For the CoCo 3. 
Eversoft, P.O. Box 3354, Arlington, WA 98223, (206) 
653-5263; $14.95 plus $2 S/H. 

Bash!, a one- or iwo-player machine language 
arcade game, similar to Breakout, that has players ping- 
ponging and blasting away "bricks" (the scenario 
involves construction). There are 20 screens of debris that 
must be cleared away. If you catch the special falling 
bricks, you will be rewarded with points. For the CoCo 
3 and disk drive. Program written by SRB Software but 
available exclusively through Game Point Software. 
Game Point Software, P.O. Box 6907, Bur bank, CA 
915 10, (818)566-3571; $24.95 plus $3 S/H introductory 
offer, regularly $29.95 plus $3 S/H (demo disk, $4.95). 

0 

Deluxe Icon Editor, an AIF icon editor running Under 
OS-9 Level 11 in the Multi-Vue environment on 512K 
CoCo 3s. Documentation is included on the disk. A 
mouse and a high resolution interface are recommended, 
but not required. Requires 512K CoCo 3, OS-9 Level 11 
and Mufti- Vue. Puritas Springs Software, Ameritrust 
Building, 17 140 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, OH 4411 1, (216) 
251-8085; $10.95. 

Horse Sertse, a horse race handicapping program that 
breaks the race down into three sections — call, second 
call and wire. The speed of the horse is computed in feet/ 
second for each of these sections. For the CoCo L, 2 and 
3. Western Hills Software, 6133 Glenway Ave., Cincin- 
nati, OH 45211, (513)662-3233; $24.95. 

The KJV on Disk: Mark, the Bible's book of Mark on 
disk in ASCII files for importation into a CoCo 1, 2 or 
3 word processor. BDS Software, P.O. Box 485, 
Glenview, IL60025, (312) 998-1656; $3. 




MacPlay, a program that allows you to play 
Macintosh digitized sound files, which can be down- 
loaded from CompuServe or Delphi. For the CoCo 3. 
CoCoTech, Inc., 208 Cathy Ann Drive, Reading, PA 
19606, (215) 779-7768; $19.95. 




Mine Rescue, an action M L game for one or two 
players. Your mission is to rescue trapped miners whose 
air is rapidly running out. You can pick up extra points 
on the way by gathering gold and gems while avoiding 
falling icicles and the banshee. Carrying tanks of fresh 
air, you will climb rocks and ladders and leap pitfalls. 



The game was written by SRB Software but is available 
solely through Game Point. Requires CoCo 3, disk drive, 
joystick and color/ RGB monitor. Game Point Software, 
P.O. Box 6907, Burbank, CA 91510, (818) 566-3571; 
$24.95 plus $3 S/H introductory offer, regularly $29.95 
plus $3 S/H (demo disk, $4.95). 

R.S.B., an adaptation of Disk Extended Color BASIC 
for OS-9 Level II. The command syntax is identical, and 
BASIC programs may be run in several windows 
simultaneously. Commands are accepted in both upper- 
and lowercase, and all I/O uses OS-9 system calls. For 
the CoCo 3 and OS-9 Level II; compatible with Multi- 
Vue. Burke & Burke, P.O. Box 1283, Palatine. I L 60078, 
(312) 397-2898; $39.95. 

Scenery Disk #7, a scenery disk for Flight Simulator II 
that covers the eastern seaboard from Washington D.C. 
down to Miami. It includes themajor airports, radio-nav. 
aids, cities, highways, rivers and lakes. A map is 
provided. For the CoCo 3, requires Flight Simulator II. 
sub LOGIC Corporation, Champaign, IL; available 
through subLOGICs order line: (800) 637-4983; $24.95. 



♦ 



Security Projects for the TRS-80 Color Computer, 

a book of hardware projects including a "vacation light," 
a temperature alarm, a sound-activated alarm and an 
intrusion alarm. Browns Enterprises, 1 19 Skyline Drive, 
RH, Granbury, TX 76048, (817)573-0037; $7.50. 

Tax Estimator, a tax program, placed in the public 
domain, that helps users estimate their federal income tax 
liability in preparation of forms 1040, 2106 and 2441. It 
may be obtained for a $5 shipping and handling fee. For 
the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. TrvO-Bvte, 1008 Alton Circle, 
Florence, SC 29501, (803)662-9500; $5. 

TypeMate, a menu-driven typing tutor that draws the 



CoCo keyboard onscreen; whenever a key is pressed, the 
screen's keyboard echoes it. The program instructs 
beginners in correct finger placement, charts a course of 
study, and provides typing exercises and the capability 
for users to create their own lessons. Requires a CoCo 

1 with 32K, a CoCo 2 with 64K or a CoCo 3. Supports 
cassette recorders and a printer. Tandy Corporation, 
1700 One, Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX; Available in 
Radio Shack stores nationwide. 

Warp Fighter 3-D, a one-player, joystick- 
controlled 3-D space fighter Simulation in which you 
must shoot down the Akaira enemy from 25 sectors of 
space. To move quickly from one sector to another, your 
ship is equipped with the Federation's new warp drive. 
3-D glasses are supplied (for $2.95). For the CoCo 3 and 
disk drive. Program written by SRB but available 
exclusively through Game Point Software. Game Point 
Software, P.O. Box6907, Burbank, CA 91510, (818)566- 
3571; $24.95 plus $3 S/H introductory offer, regularly 
$29.95 plus $3 S/H (demo disk—without 3-D 
glasses— $4.95). 

Western European Tour Scenery Disk, a scenery disk for 
Flight Simulator //that covers southern West Germany, 
northern France and southern United Kingdom. It 
includes the major airports, cities, highways, rivers and 
lakes, and includes a map. For the CoCo 3 and Flight 
Simulator II. sub LOGIC Corporation, Champaign, IL' 
available through subLOGICs order line; (800) 637- 
4983; $24.95. 

ZoomDump, an update to the PMDDE 3 or 4 graphics 
screen dump for the DMP-105 and DMP-106. New 
features include horizontal paper positioning and the 
ability to print any rectangular section of the screen, 
along with upright or sideways images. For the CoCo 1, 

2 and 3. Codis Enterprises, 230I-C Central Drive, Suite 
684, Bedford, TX 76021, (817) 283-8571; $14. 

'■^^> First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Lauren Willoughby 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 139 



have edited at least one module. When 
you create a bootable disk for the first 
time using 059Gen or Conf ig, you are 
combining a number of modules into a 
program called D59Boot. While Con- 
f ig is perfectly capable of creating 
0S9Boot, it is time-consuming at best. 

EZGen comes into play when you 
want to alter, add to or delete from an 
existing program that consists of a set 
of modules. Using only the programs 
available with OS-9, these tasks are 
quite tedious. For example, when I 
bring my system to school with me I use 
a single drive instead of the two drives 
I use at home. I have been putting off 
deleting the dl device descriptor mod- 
ule in the 059Boot program for my 
school disk because it would take too 
long to generate a new DS9Boot using 
Conf ig. 

As a working test of EZGen, I re- 
moved dl from 059Bopt in about 10 
minutes, which included reading the 
manual. Patching the existing device 
descriptor for a 12-millisecond step rate 
was also a quick and painless job. 
Finally, I added the two RAM disk 
modules to D59Boot. All of this was 
done with EZGen alone. 

EZGen has several other capabilities 
that some people may find handy. It 
allows you to rename a module, patch 
a module using either Burke & Burke's 
Patch format or the Disk BASIC binary 
format, save a module to disk, extend 
a module and add a module header. 

The last two abilities are quite inter- 
esting and powerful for the hard-core 
types like me who like to do things in 
unusual ways. For example, using a file 
transfer program I can move a machine 
language program from the Disk BASIC 
environment into OS-9. Then, using 
EZGen, I can add a module header so 
that the program can be loaded by OS- 
9. Once it's loaded, I can use one of the 
powerful OS-9 disassemblers on the 
program. Being able to extend a module 
easily can allow you to add a small 
subroutine to an existing module with- 
out having to disassemble the whole 
thing first. I did that once and it was 
very tricky. With EZGen it could be a 
snap. 

There are a few things I wish EZGen 
could do, or at least could do better. 
First is an ability to locate modules and 
data blocks within programs. You must 
know the names of the modules youll 
be working on in order to tell EZGen 
which module name to find. This prob- 
lem isn't insurmountable; you can get 
module names with I dent before you 
start (or by forking a shell from within 



EZGen), but it would be easier it there 
were some way to call a list of module 
names from within EZGen. 

Another wish is related to a problem 
I had with user mistakes. Any user 
mistake causes EZGen to quit and 
return to OS-9 unless the command is 
preceded by a hyphen, I have a nasty 
habit of pressing enter a couple of 
times when I'm working in this type of 
program just to be sure it's awake and 
operating. Every time I do this, EZGen 
quits and I have to start it again. This 
isn't a flaw or a bug, just a way of doing 
things that takes time to get used to. 

Another problem I had was with disk 
space. Because EZGen has to create at 
least one copy of the module you are 
editing, you need sufficient disk space 
to use it. I suggest that any program 
with EZGen's power should be used on 
a backup. And because of the disk space 
problem, I recommend placing the 
backup on a nearly empty disk — 
especially if the module you are working 
on is large. 

I also have some problems with the 
manual. The style is that of standard 
UNIX "man" entries. This is OK for 
experienced users who know exactly 
what they want to do, but it can be 
intimidating to new or occasional users 
who aren't familiar with the terse style. 
The manual could also use more exam- 
ples and a better explanation of what 
EZGen can be used for. With some 
experimentation, most OS-9 pro- 
grammers who have a use for EZGen 
will be able to figure it out, so I guess 
the manual isn't a big handicap. I just 



Corrections 



think that it could be expanded some. 

Included with EZGen are two other 
programs that work as a team or indi- 
vidually for very specific tasks. Tag- 
Track corrupts the OS-9 file system in 
a controlled way that fets you determine 
which files reside at least in part on a 
particular track. Using TagTrack you 
can locate, edit or delete the OS-9 
kernel, or you can find the files that 
need to be deleted to clear a particular 
track for some reason (creating a disk 
readable by OS-9 as well as Disk BASIC, 
for example). 

Zap can undo the corruption caused 
by TagTrack. It does this by releasing 
the directory entry and file descriptor 
sector for a file without releasing the 
sectors in use. It can be used to make 
a sector or group of sectors unusable by 
OS-9. These things can be done using 
a patch program or disk editor, but they 
are very tedious that way. Burke & 
Burke has given us a way to perform 
several difficult tasks quickly and easily. 

If you've ever done any of the jobs 
that EZGen can do, you already know 
how much you need this package. If you 
don't see a reason why anyone would 
want to do what I described, then 
maybe you should wait until you need 
it. Just remember to get EZGen before 
you start — it'll save you an awful lot 
of work. 

(Burke & Burke, P.O. Box 1283, Palatine, 
IL 60078, 312-397-2898; $19.95 plus $1.50 
S/H) 

— Donald McGarry 




"Received and Certified" (October 1988, Page 130): 

The Hard Bodies program was incorrectly listed as the 
first review product from Baron Products for review 
in THE RAINBOW. An earlier Baron Products program, 
Track Events, was reviewed in the February 1986 issue 
(Page 200). 

"Quick Fixes" (October 1988, Page 58): An IC pin is 
incorrectly labelled in the schematic shown in Figure 
2 (Page 62) of the article. On the right-hand side of 
the figure, the designation IC4 Pin 3 should be 
changed to IC4 Pin 5. 

For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DATA 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIC> 
prompt. 



1 38 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



Your OS-9 programs can then be called 
up with a single keystroke. It can also 
change the data and execution directo- 
ries of any OS-9 operating system. 

With my 5 12K CoCo 3, 1 was capable 
of building the required "menu options" 
file quickly and easily. Building the 
required batch files that are to be 
executed in accordance with my selec- 
tion was a piece of cake. Now the menus 
presented reflect the types of OS-9 files 
my hard drive contains. I press one key 
from the menu calling up BASIC09, and 
within seconds it pops up on my 80- 
column screen. Impressive. 

I wondered how fast it would be to 
get a file buried within my hard drive. 
So I exited BAS1C09, and Hard Disk 
Organizer automatically returned to my 
screen. It sorted through a huge pathlist 
that I normally type in by hand, and all 
I did was press one key. It operated 
quickly and flawlessly. 

The program is compiled in C lan- 
guage for speed and portability. It fully 
supports OS-9 windows and remote 
terminal users. Many different terminal 
configurations are supported, including 
ANSI, ATS and Z19. 

The disk is not copy-protected, so 
you are capable of making a backup 



copy for safekeeping. The documenta- 
tion is well-written and takes you step- 
by-step through a lot of examples, so 
you can get your system up quickly and 
to your liking. 

The documentation states that the 
software can be used successfully on a 
CoCo 2 in addition to a CoCo 3, with 
Level I and II OS-9 systems. No mem- 
ory requirements are mentioned in the 
documentation. I found that the soft- 
ware operated flawlessly on my 512K 
CoCo 3 but would not operate on a 
128K CoCo 3 because of insufficient 
memory. 

I ran into the same memory problem 
when trying the CoCo 2 version on my 
64K CoCo 2. It would not operate 
completely due to the procedure of 
"forking." (To fork a process means to 
create a process as a branch of another 
process — a subroutine.) It could not 
fork large application programs on the 
lower-memory machines, due to the 
available free memory. But, to be fair, 
the author does mention that he is 
developing a procedure to "chain" to 
the application program instead of fork. 

Considering all that this software 
does, I feel it is reasonably priced and 
well worth the money for 512K users. 



You do not need to be an OS-9 expert, 
and in fact I feel this software will 
benefit those who are beginners, espe- 
cially because new OS-9 users often 
have a hard time getting used to typing 
long pathlists. 

(Robert A. Hengstebeck, 408 Grandview 
Ave., Feasterville, PA 19047, 215-322-5455; 
$24.95) 

— Brian R. Smith 

I Softwar e C ° C ° 12&3 I 
EZGen — 

OS-9 Module Editor 

EZGen from Burke & Burke is the 
kind of product that most OS-9 users 
will probably not need to use often — 
but when you need it, you really need 
it. As its name implies, EZGen is a 
module editor for the OS-9 Level I or 

II operating environments. 

My initial reaction to the product was 
one of minor confusion. After all, why 
would anyone want to edit a module? 
It turns out that almost all OS-9 users 



TURBO RAM 
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Includes RAM Board Utilities 



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for grey or white 
MULTI-PACK (26-3024) 



$19.95 






*ROM not included (RS DOS 
'1 SFtAM-416,95. 



100% Compatible with existing H/W & S/W 
No MULTf^PACK required (low power draw) 
8K Cache memory (expandable to 32K) 
Track Reads(programs load up to 2x faster) 
Two Switched Sockets (supports 8K ROM, 



Easy Installation (no cutting, soldering, jumpers or 



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under OS-9 with: 

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and multi-tasking enabled 
clock and type-ahead 



30 DAY MONEY-BACK 
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Prices subject to change without notice 



Send check or money-order to: 

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Or Call (714) 681 -3007 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 137 



PYRAMIX Arcade Game $19.95 



BACKUP LIGHTNING (disk dunlicatoh $14.95 



S&H: $3.50 U.S. and Canada (Si 5,foreign) 

COD: $2.25 U.S. only 

2ND Day Air: S1 .50 (contiguous U.S. only) 

Tax: inside California add 6% 

VISA or MC accepted _ 



will destroy you and your ship. You get 
three misses before the game is over. 

Frequently you will see the message 
"Press the Space Bar" displayed in the 
window. This is a warning that an alien 
vessel is about to materialize in front of 
your ship, and you must deploy your 
defense shields for protection. This is 

where I had trouble with the program. 

As your ability to destroy the attack- 
ing meteors improves, you will move to 
the next level of difficulty. One such 
level concentrates on the "second" row 
of keyboard keys, or the one just above 
the home row. The different levels are 
intended to drill the user by requiring 
all of the keyboard keys to be depressed 
in various random character sequences. 
As levels are increased and progress is 
made, the user becomes a keyboard 
commander and earns a certificate 
available from the author. 

Like most skills, typing requires a lot 
of practice. Keyboard Commander can 
provide some of the necessary practice 
in a manner that children will enjoy. The 
program provides the beginning typist 
with a clever, challenging way to learn 
the location of the various keys on the 
CoCo keyboard. Programs that use a 
"game" approach have proven to be 
effective learning tools. Keyboard 
Commander is such a program. 

Keyboard Commander is supplied on 
a non-protected disk. The program 
utilizes artifact PM0DE4 colors, and it 
looks best on a color composite monitor 
or a TV set. (If you use an RGB monitor 
with your CoCo 3, you will not be able 
to see the beautiful colors this program 
has to offer.) 

(E.Z. Friendly Software, 118 Corlies Ave., 
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601, 914-485-8150; 
$24.95 plus $1.50 S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



* Softwar e 



CoCo1,2&3 



Spellbound — 
Wizards, Warriors 
and Dungeons 

Down in the lowest dungeon waits 
the Arch wizard! Can your hardy band 
of Adventurers overcome monsters, 
avoid hazards and gain enough strength 
to defeat him? Can you guess his name 
and banish him forever? It will take 
many hours to find out in this Dun- 
geons & Dragons-type text Adventure. 



Visit the Adventurer's Guild to create 
your team, collect them at the Unicorn 
Tavern, then go on over to Elmo's 
Trading Post for equipment. Choose 
well, for in the vast dungeons below 
there are many monsters intent on 
destroying your team. Your characters 
may be human, dwarf, gnome or elf and 
function as paladin, fighter, thief, priest 
or wizard. CoCoists with a printer will 
be able to make a hard copy of both the 
roster and individual inventories. The 
latter come in very handy as the game 
progresses. 1 made an accordion-fold 
booklet that 1 consulted at every en- 
counter and updated while in "camp." 




" The dungeons abound 
with secret passages, treas- 
ures, tricks, hazar ds and 
monsters. The deeper you 
go, the greater the hazards 
and the better the re- 
wards. " 




The game is easy to play — just press 
a key. In the dungeons, the screen is 
divided into two parts. To the right is 
a list of the characters and a move 
menu. To the left is a view of the 
dungeon, in perspective, as you see it 
looking forward two squares. Mapping 
is a bit tricky at first. Careful study will 
soon make it clear. If you really get lost, 
you can have your wizard use the "map" 
spell. You won't see a diagram, just 
coordinates of your location relative to 
the Bronze Door (entrance). I found 
this was adequate. 

Camp is available any time there is no 
attack in progress. It is a place to view 
inventory, make changes, use spells 
(heal) or sleep (save). Each level of 
advancement adds a new spell; some 
protect or heal the Adventurers and 
others aid in defeating monsters. For 
proper updating of the disk, the Adven- 
turers should retire to the Green 
Dragon Inn; however, camp may be 
more convenient at times. 

The dungeons abound with secret 
passages, treasures, tricks, hazards and 
monsters. The deeper you go, the 
greater the hazards and the better the 
rewards. (Dungeon 6 is a zinger! Tele- 
porting from Dungeon 5 to 7 would 
have real appeal.) 

There are other places aboveground 
that are of interest: The Temple of 
Ymiro offers healing and advancement, 
and the library may hold some clues. 



The documentation is very good. The 
author offers full technical support (but 
no clues!). Send a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope (SASE) for a reply 
to your questions. I used both CoCo 1 
and CoCo 2 with no problems. The 
manual is very useful. The choices and 
spells are fully explained, so a novice 
can play the game as well as the more 
advanced. 

This is a game more for Dungeons & 
Dragons fans than Adventure addicts. 
The action and the objects are average, 
but the dungeons (mazes) are excellent. 
Spellbound is written in BASIC, which 
makes for a brief delay when leaving 
camp. There is nothing wrong; in a 
short time, the screen clears and the 
game continues. 

The biggest drawback is the lack of 
sound — no beeps to warn of attack or 
danger. The author is planning to 
remedy this. Some messages disappear 
too fast; however, the important ones 
wait for a key press. 

There is enough room on the disk for 
12 characters, which can be used six at 
a time. The extra characters should be 
developed for future use. Several back- 
ups are recommended for emergencies. 
It will take many hours, maybe months, 
to be ready for a confrontation with the 
Archwizard. I am neither a novice nor 
an expert (though I am good at map- 
ping), and I enjoyed playing the game. 
Spellbound requires 32K, one disk drive 
and a CoCo 1, 2 or 3. 

(Thor Software, Suite 162, 9431 Westport 
Road, Louisville, KY 40241, 502-588-5969; 
$16.95: First product review for this com* 
pany appearing in the rainbow.) 

— Audrey De Lisle 



I Softwar e 



CoCo 3, OS-9 



Hard Disk 
Organizer — 
Type Around 
Long Pathlists 

Don't let its name fool you — the 
Hard Disk Organizer will organize your 
OS-9 floppies, too. 

In a hard drive system, the CMD5 
directory will invariably become un- 
manageable due to the number of exec- 
utable programs found there. Hard 
Disk Organizer allows a user to develop 
menu-driven pathlists so that any appli- 
cation program can easily be accessed. 



136 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Vidtex emulation not only supports 
wide character display, but also me- 
dium and high resolution RLE graph- 



ics. 



V~T«tn» T*rmLiu| 



tow €t m.m m *** 




1 1LI 



itte w ■ Mb' 



' tl ii c^prtr4* %1P 



I was able to decide exactly how I 
wanted my screen to appear, including 
border color, background and fore- 
ground color of both the main screen 
and the menu display by cycling 
through the 64 possible colors available 
for each. If you spend a lot of time in 
front of your monitor as I do, I think 
you will find this very useful in finding 
a combination that is easy on the eyes. 

Going from one BBS to another and 
searching for some of the excellent 
public domain programs that are out 
there is one of my favorite pastimes. If 
you've ever downloaded a file from a 
BBS Pm sure you know how annoying 
it can be having to stop, save the file to 
disk and then clear the buffer before you 
can either download or upload another 
file. V-Term can save you some time. V- 
Term uses a RAM disk type buffer that 
allows you to have several different files 
in the buffer at the same time. 

You are limited only by the amount 
of buffer memory available, which in a 
512K CoCo leaves about 456K availa- 
ble for buffer storage. A 128K CoCo 
would have a 72K buffer. This buffer 
could save you a lot of time and money 
if you do much in the way of long- 
distance file transfers. V-Term also 



gives you the option of saving your files 
to disk instead of memory. While I am 
on the subject of file transfers, I think 
I should point out that V-Term gives 
you the options of using either line- 
oriented ASCII, Xmodem, Xmodem 
CRC or Ymodem transfer protocols. 

K- Term will work with just about any 
hardware configuration. This includes 
the back-panel serial port (up to 2400 
baud), the DCModem pack, and even 
deluxe RS-232 packs that have been 
altered to be addressed at $FF6C to 
SFF6F. Not to mention 35-, 40- or even 
80-track drives (providing the DOS you 
are using supports 40 or 80 tracks — but 
not JDOS). This should be a welcome 
feature to those of you using the pop- 
ular ADOS-3. 

I must admit the program lacks one 
feature — the ability to write to the 
buffer. I did not consider this to be a 
major problem, though, because it is 
possible to write to the buffer using the 
VT-100 mode and V-Term's "snapshot" 
feature, which copies the current screen 
to the buffer. The author told me that 
he plans to include this option in future 
versions of V-Term. I was also told that 
anyone currently using Version 1.0 can 
upgrade to Version 2.0 for just $7 plus 
$3 postage and handling. 

Overall, I found this program to be 
everything I could hope for in a terminal 
program and well worth the price. I 
would also like to add that the distrib- 
utor was extremely courteous and help- 
ful with the few questions I had and 
even went out of the way in helping me 
get in touch with the author, who was 
on vacation at the time. In my opinion, 
this kind of service is priceless. 

(Gimmesoft, P.O. Box 421, Perry Hall, MD 
21128, 301-256-7558; $39.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Bryan Gridley 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



' Software — 

Keyboard 
Commander — 
Learn To Type While 
Saving the Galaxy 

Keyboard Commander is a typing 
tutor written for the 64K CoCo 1 or 2 
(and CoCo 3) that teaches typing basics 
in a most unusual way: The student 
becomes a commander of a spaceship, 
and the keyboard keys are the controls. 
Interesting sound effects give the pro- 
gram an arcade flavor. 

After the program loads and exe- 
cutes, you will see the inside of your 
spacecraft, the window and the controls 
(which just happen to be in the form of 
the CoCo keyboard). Transparent 
hands are shown in the "home position" 
and can be seen moving about the 
keyboard during flight. 




™ 'BOARP 

Commander 





The object of Keyboard Commander 
is to shoot down the "letter meteors 1 ' 
that randomly rush toward your ship. 
You destroy these meteors by pressing 
the letter on your keyboard control that 
represents the letter attacking your ship. 
If you fail to press the correct key, or 
if you take too long, the letter meteor 



NO MORE EXCUSES. 

Introducing 

Start OS-9™ 

An Enjoyable, Hands-On Guide to OS-9 Level 2 On the Color Computer 3 By Paul K. Ward 



Ten step-by-step Tutorials teach how to: 

• Open and customize windows 

• Patch your system for its highest efficiency 

• Create custom boot disks 

• Manage memory and disk storage 



"Start OS-9" ($32.99 + s/h) is a product of Kenneth Leigh Enterprises 
write SMS-KLE, 2540 Potomac Hunt Lane, Suite 2A, Richmond, VA 



Special Articles On: 

• Basic09, by Dale Puckett 

• CoCo Hardware, by Marty Goodman 

• Telecommunicating, by Bill Brady 

• Hard disks and Ram disks, by Kevin Darling 

• Music and OS-9, by the author 

. To reserve your copy of the book with accompanying software disk, 
2121^ 

OS-9 is a trademark of Motorola and Microware Systems Corporation. 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 135 



screen as it did on the text screen? That 
is, if the original program had PRINTS 
294, "TEST", how would Iknow where 
to position the DRRW equivalent? 

Allen Owens 
Monticello, SC 

Good question, Allen. IVe done a lot 
of what you are proposing, so I think 
I can help clarify it for you. At first, I 
did a lot of guessing. Then I stopped to 
think about it. To illustrate what I 
learned, let's use a PMODE 4 screen. 

Keep in mind that on the PMODE 4 
screen, you have 256 pixels across by 
192 pixels down on which to position 
text. If you divide the 256 pixels by 32 
(the number of characters across on the 
text screen), you get eight. This is the 
width of each character. Now divide 192 
pixels by 16 (the number of characters 
down on the text screen). The charac- 
ters are 12 pixels high. 

There are three steps in placing text 
on the graphics screen. First, you must 
define each character and put it into 
R$(32) to fl$(90). This will give you 
most characters, excluding lowercase. 
Second, you must define the DRAW area, 
and finally, you must GDSUB to the DRAW 
subroutine. 



Suppose you want to put the message 
"Basically Speaking" on the text screen. 
Simply type the following: 

PRINT @ 294 , "BASICALLY SPEAKING" 

You now have the message displayed on 
the standard 32-column screen. 

On the Hi-Res graphics screen, you 
would type the following: 

A$="BA5ICRLLY SPEAKING: "DRAW 
"BM4B , 10B : GOSUBjcxxjc 

(where the line number at which 

your DRAW subroutine is located). 

Why coordinates 48,108, you ask? 
Simple. PRINT @ Location Number 294 
on the text screen is six spaces over and 
nine spaces down. Multiply 6 by 8 (the 
width of your graphics character) and 
you get 48. Multiply 9 by 12 (the height 
of each character) and you get 108. 

If your message doesn't look cen- 
tered, edit the message line to read 
PRINT 6 295 instead of 294, and the 
message will be centered. On the gra- 
phics screen, however, you change the 
first DRAW coordinate from 48 to 56, 
since you have to move eight more 
pixels to the right to equal one space on 



the text screen. Now your DRAW coor- 
dinates are 56,108. 

The message is now centered across. 
To move closer to the center up and 
down, type PRINT @ 231 instead of 295. 
On the graphics screen, you will need to 
move up two spaces (24 pixels). To 
match the position on the text screen, 
your new DRAW coordinates should be 
56,84. 

Thinking Logically is as essential as 
knowing how to program the computer. 
Everything the computer does relates to 
numbers in one way or another. I found 
out some of what I know purely by 
accident. The rest fell into place as I 
made changes and discovered that most 
of the changes in coordinates were 
divisible by 8. (Hmmmmm.) 



Questions about specific basic program- 
ming problems can be addressed to BASIC- 
ally Speaking, THE rainbow, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. We are unable to answer 
letters individually* 




ARK ROYAL GAMES is drastically 
cutting prices and reducing our in- 
ventory on most of our CoCo prod- 
ucts. Prices have been slashed on 
even our new programs. Send a 
ARK W SASE for complete price listing or 
ROYAL l& $1,0 ° for ^'GO (refunded with 

GAMES ft first order). 
vj/m icojm Better hurry When jtem | S de _ 

liyV pleted it will not be restocked. 

EXAMPLES 

ACES (64K Disk) WWI Flight/Combat simulator $15 

DOUGHBOY (64K Disk) WWI Real Time Combat $14 

COMPANY COMMANDER (32K) Tactical War Game ... $15 

ALL MODULES FOR COMPANY COMMANDER $10 

COMPANY COMMANDER SCENARIO CREATOR (32K) . . $12 

OKINAWA (64K Disk) WWI Marine Invasion $12 

LUFTFLOTTE (32K) Battle of Britain $14 

FIRE ONE! (CoCo 3 Disk) Sub Warfare in WWII $15 

PRO FOOTBALL (CoCo 3) 1 or 2 players $12 

BATAAN (64K Disk] Two games in one $10 

TUNIS (32K) Battle in North Africa $ 8 

GUADALCANAL (32K) America Strikes Back $ 7 

BOMBER COMMAND (32K) $ 6 

And more! Almost all prices have been cut. Call or write for 
price list. 

ARK ROYAL GAMES 
Post Office Box 14806 • Jacksonville, FL 32238 

(904) 221-5712 

Include 50 cents per program shipping and handling. 
Florida residents add 6% sales tax. 



NEW, LOW PRICES! 
SAVE 40% TO 33% 



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November 1988 THE RAINBOW 141 



CoCo Consultation 



Speaking of DRAM Prices . . . 

In this time of high DRAM prices 
(which has forced most RAINBOW ad- 
vertisers to either charge up to $200 for 
an upgrade or supply no chips with 
512K boards), I am pleased to report 
that I recently bought Tandy's 512K 
CoCo 3 upgrade for under $140. 

Marlin Lee Simmons 

( LIN LEE) 

Bridgewater, VA 

The DRAM-chip price situation is 
unfortunate. Dealers and end users 
alike have been hurt by the part's price 
increase. I believe Tandy was able to 
order a large quantity of these chips at 
a "locked-in" price. However, soon 
(perhaps before readers see this printed) 
Tandy will be forced to raise its prices, 
too. The increases in the prices charged 
by RAINBOW advertisers for 512K CoCo 
3 memory upgrades reflects the extreme 
increase in cost for the chips. Note, too, 
that the price of these chips varies from 
week to week (sometimes from day to 
day), so it is often impossible for dealers 
to post a price in the magazine, which 
is distributed a month or more after 
their ads are submitted. 

Increased Volume 

When I hook a speaker to the audio 
output on my CoCo 3, the volume is 
very low. How can I use an amplifier 
with it? 

, Matt Hazard 
Columbia Station, OH 

Feed the signal coming out of the 
audio output jack on the CoCo 3 into 
the auxiliary input on any high fidelity 
amplifier. Use that to drive a speaker. 
You could also hook the audio output 
of the CoCo 3 to the audio input of a 
Radio Shack speaker-amplifier (Cat. 
No. 277-1008) using Radio Shack cable 
42-2444. 

Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 



o 




CONSULTATIONS 

By Marty Goodman 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Memory Upgrades and a 3 ! /i-iitcli 

Drive 1 

I'm considering increasing my CoCo 
3's memory to 512K and getting one of 
the new word processors specifically 
designed for the CoCo 3. However, the 
buffer of some of those programs ex- 
ceeds the storage capacity of my 5 l h- 
inch drives. Will a 3 l /2-inch drive work 
as Drive 1? How would I hook one up? 
I have a standard Radio Shack con- 
troller and a FD 502 as Drive 0. 

Paul R. Broshear 

(GROUCHY) 

Saddle Ridge Trail, TX 

Your major concern is how to best use 
one of the current generation CoCo 3 
word processors, and 512K is not 
needed for such CoCo 3 word proces- 
sors as Telewriter 80, Word Power 3.1, 
Telewriter 128, or VIP Writer III. The 
jump from 1 28K to 512K really does not 
add much in terms of actual function. 
At the current DRAM prices of $12 a 
chip, the 512K upgrade is hideously 
expensive. 

512K is essential if you want to run 
programs under OS-9 Level II. But for 
most Disk BASIC word processor pro- 
grams, 128K should be all you ever 
really need. As you noted, Disk basic 
is not set up to save files bigger than 
153K of data (the capacity of a single- 



sided disk) even with double-sided 
drives. You can go to 3V2-inch drives. 
They are electrically identical to 554- 
inch drives, and using ADOS (from 
Spectrosystems), you can store up to a 
350 K file on each side of the disk. Some 
of the hard drive systems for the CoCo 
(like Burke & Burke's or RGB System's) 
can also handle large files under Disk 
BASIC. (Of course, they cost a few 
hundred dollars.) I do recommend that 
you get ADOS, if only to access your 
FD 502 on both sides (as if it were two 
drives). This will not increase the size of 
the biggest file you can store, but it will 
allow you to store twice as much on a 
disk. 

Artifact Colors on the CM-8 

Is it possible to build a TV tuner that 
hooks up to the CM-8 monitor or to add 
a composite video input to the CM-8 
monitor with some adapter or hardware 
project? I bought a CM-8 and am 
unable to see the red and blue artifact 
colors in the many games that use the 
PMODE 4 screen. 

Perry M. Dueck 
Rosenort, Manitoba 

You cannot modify the CM-8 for RF 
or composite video input. While it is 
technically possible to do what you ask, 
there are no commercial devices on the 
market to do that and cost less than a 
brand new Magnavox monitor. Making 
such a device from scratch would in- 
volve considerable design effort, and no 
one who could make such a device 
would bother to make one for the CM- 
8. Those who have not yet bought an 
RGB monitor should note that the CM- 
8's lack of composite video input makes 
it incapable of displaying proper PMODE 
4 artifact colors. The Magnavox mon- 
itor (sold by many RAINBOW advertisers) 
has composite video inputs (as well as 
other inputs) and has a sharper, higher 
resolution screen than the CM-8. 

I suggest that those who have a CM- 
8 buy RGB Patch from Microcom. This 
program will allow the CoCo 3 to 
display some degree of "artifact color" 
on a CM-8 when used with most Disk 
BASIC games and other graphics pro- 
grams. Sadly, RGB Patch will not help 
with programs running under OS-9 
(including the newer Tandy OS-9 games 
like Rocky 's Boots and Robot Odys- 
sey). 

Also, see Steven Ostrom's "Artifact 



142 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



Colors on CoCo 3's RGB,"(February 
'88, Page 1 14). 

Specifying CoCos 

/ have a Co Co 2 (Model 26-31 27 B). 
What sort of a Co Co is that? Also, 
where can I get the 256K/512K Super 
RAM cartridge? 

Michael D. 
Zanesville, OH 

The Model 26-3127B is the last 64K 
Extended BASIC Color Computer 2 that 
Tandy made before discontinuing pro- 
d uction of the CoCo 2. Its circuit board 
was set up so that it could accept 64K 
of memory in any of three different 
ways: eight 64K-by-l-byte chips on the 
main board, eight 64K-by-l-byte chips 
on a plug-in satellite board, or two 64 K- 
by-4-byte chips in two 20-pin sockets on 
the main board. This model also fea- 
tured the Tl VDG chip that, with 
special software, supported lower-case 
characters in the 32-column video 
mode. 

The 256K/512K Super RAM is sold 
by CRC in Canada. It is a RAM-disk 
card that plugs into the Multi-Pak 
Interface. It works quite well under OS- 
9 but has limited compatibility with 
Disk BASIC programs. 

Monitoring Questions 
Super VHS, 80-Columns and 3V2-Inch 
80-Track Drives 

/ have three questions. First, will the 
Magnavox 8CM515 monitor support 
the new super VHS video format? 
Second, my television cuts off the last 
two or three characters on the left-hand 
side of the screen when I put my CoCo 
3 in 80-column mode. What can I do 
about this? Finally, how can I use 3^2- 
inch 80-track drives under Disk BASIC? 

Bill Sanders 
Chula Vista, CA 

First, the Magnavox 8CM515 does 
not offer the sort of chromanance/ lu- 
minance video input used with the super 
VHS format video signals. However, if 
that format catches on, adapters that 
will convert a chromanance/ luminance 
signal to a RGB signal should become 
available commercially. Such adapters, 
if and when they are available, will 
allow any RGB analog-capable monitor 
to be used with the super VHS format. 

Second, your problem with missing 
characters is caused by the overscan 
setting for the horizontal-width control. 
This is common to most broadcast TV 



sets. The CoCo 3's 40- or 80-column 
mode was not really designed for use 
with broadcast televisions. In fact, 
programmers who write 40-column 
based software for CoCo 3s with tele- 
vision monitors know about this prob- 
lem and don't use the extreme left 
columns. In theory you could open up 
your TV and adjust the horizontal 
width internally (usually there is a 
ferrite slug in a coil somewhere that 
controls this), but when watching TV 
shows you'd probably see a black 
border at the left. 

Finally, Disk BASIC is poorly suited 
to use with 80-track drives, and I recom- 
mend that you do not try it. If you insist 
on trying, check with Burke & Burke 
about its Hyper I/O, or with Spectro- 
systems about ADOS. Those compan- 
ies make patches that (to a certain 
extent) will allow you to use 80-track 
drives with Disk BASIC. 

Upgrading the Modemphone 

Is there any way to upgrade a Tandy 
Modemphone to run at 1200 or 2400 
baud? 

Keith H March 

( KEITH MA R CH ) 

Continental OH 

I'm afraid that 1200- and 2400-baud 
modems are different both from each 
other and from 300-baud modems 
(more expensive to make, too). There is 
no reasonable way to convert one to 
another. You must buy a new modem if 
you want higher baud-rate capability 
than your current modem supports. 

Major Circuitry Differences 

A circuit for the CoCo 1's color 
monitor driver appeared in Hot CoCo, 
August '83. I was unable to get this 
circuit to work on a CoCo 2. Can you 
help me? 

Fulton Smith, Jr. 
Southfield, MI 

Even though the circuits may appear 
similar at first glance, the color video 
circuitry of the CoCo 2 is quite different 
from that of the CoCo 1. Unlike the 
CoCo 1, the CoCo 2 uses the RF mod- 
ulator portion of the 1372 chip. There- 
fore, there is virtually no color video 
signal available where there is on the 
CoCo 1 circuits. Color monitor driver 
circuits for the CoCo 2 are considerably 
more complicated than those for the 
CoCo 1, and because there were several 
available commercially when the CoCo 



2 was in production, I never bothered 
to develop one myself. Now that the 
CoCo 2 is no longer in production, 
many of those monitor drivers may not 
be available. Try Computerware, and 
check the ads in RAINBOW for other 
possible sources. 

ADOS to the Rescue (Again) 

How can I permanently program Fi 
and F2 to complete various functions or 
commands? How can I do the same with 
other keys? 

Claud Gervais 
Herouxville, Quebec 

Although frequent readers of this 
column may be tired of seeing me plug 
the system, ADOS (sold by Spectrosys- 
tems) is the answer to your question. 
Once configured and burned into the 
EPROM that will replace your Disk 
BASIC ROM, ADOS allows you to have 
single key strokes produce customized 
results permanently, (i.e., creating 
various BASIC programming word or 
multiple-word commands). 

Asking the Impossible 

Can I use a CoCo 3 and a DCM 6 
modem to send Spectaculator work- 
sheets from Ymodem to my company's 
FAX machines? 

Augusto Vajsest 
Lima, Peru 

I'm afraid that is not possible for two 
reasons. First, spreadsheets consist of 
character, or ASCII, data. FAX data 
consists of graphic, or photographic, 
data. Second, the way in which 300- 
baud computer modems encode data 
differs completely from the way in 
which the modems in FAX machines 
encode their data. 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, THE rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type R5K (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 143 



Doctor ASCII 



T/S Spell and TW-64 Compatibility 

/ recently purchased Tandy *s OS-9 
based spelling checker, T/S Spell. 
Files saved to disk under my favorite 
word processor, TW-64, will not read 
into T/ S Spell. I assume that the differ- 
ence in directory locations between 
Disk BASIC and OS-9 is at least part of 
the problem. Both are super programs. 
Is there a way to make them compat- 
ible? I have a CoCo 3 with 128 K, two 
Radio Shack disk drives, a CM-8, a 
DMP-200 printer, and a CCR-81 re- 
corder, 

Edward Scott 
Canaan, CT 

13 The directory structures for OS-9 
**}C and Disk BASIC differ completely. 
To check the spelling of a TW-64 doc- 
ument with T/S Spell, save the docu- 
ment in ASCII format and then use a 
file transfer program (like TRSCopy) to 
move it over to an OS-9 diskette. 

ROM Pack Problems 



El/ have just received my new 128 K 
Co Co 3. 1 have a Radio Shack Multi- 
&l Pak Interface (MPI), cat. #26-3024. 
When I use a power strip to power up 
the computer and MPI together, every- 
thing works except my EDTASM+ pak. 
I have no problem switching between 
other packs, but when I switch to 
EDTASM+ the screen Jills with gar- 
bage. Will a new PAL chip in the MPI 
solve this problem? Is there a patch to 
upgrade OS-9 1.01 to Level II? Is the fan 
in the FD 501 disk drive necessary, or 
can I remove it? Where can I get an 
extension cable for my keyboard? 

Bill Irwin 
Toledo, OH 



13 First, count yourself lucky that 
/£ only one of your ROM packs 
is not compatible with the CoCo 3. The 
PAL chip upgrade is unrelated to this 
problem. You could use Roger Schrag's 
patches to move your EDTASM+ code 

Richard Esposito is the principal engi- 
neer for BDM Corporation. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division, 




CoCo 3 ROM Packs to disk? I am 
interested in recording Thexder and 
Shanghai. 

David Morrison 
Brewer, ME 



By Richard E. Esposito 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 



to disk, (see "Patching EDTASM to 
Run on Disk," December '82, Page 29; 
"Patching The Patch: EDTASM to 
Disk Revealed," April '83, Page 194; or 
"Superpatch for EDTASM," Sep- 
tember '83, Page 66). Second, OS-9 
Level I and Level II are completely 
different prodcts. There is no patch or 
upgrade available; however, you can 
use the assembler and some of the 
utilities from Level I with Level II. 
Third, the fan in the 501 is there to 
dissipate the heat generated from the 
power supply. Removing the fan could 
shorten the disk drive's life. Finally, 
Marty Goodman has contracted with 
several rainbow advertisers to sell his 
keyboard extender cable. 

Needs a Patch 

^ / typed in the listing for PAKXFER 
from the December '87 issue 
f'Pak to Disk Transfer, " Page 152], 
I also looked over the patches for 
problem ROM packs listed in your 
March '88 column [Page 16], Do you 
have a patch for recording the new 



See the August '88 u CoCo 
Consultations" [Page 162]. 

Information, Please 



M Where I can find extensive informa- 
tion on the following: CoCo's sound 
I/O, data transmission through the 
RS-232, the ROM port, CoCo 3's new 
machine language instructions and 
addressing the disk drive directly (not 
through ROM subroutines)? 

Dave Brain 
Troutdale, OR 



Order the CoCo 3 Service Manual 
(Part #MS-2603334, $15.60) from 
Tandy National Parts, and read Scott 
Honaker's "Exercise Your Drives" 
[RAINBOW, June '88, Page 1 10]. 

Try the Clone 

I bought a copy o/Xterm because the 
ad said that it works with the CoCo's 
serial port. This may be true, but I 
have OS-9 Level II, which will not work 
with the CoCo 2. Xterm and Wiz both 
call for the RS-232 Pak. According to 
my local Radio Shack, the RS-232 Pak 
is no longer available. I would really like 
to use my OS-9 with a terminal pro- 
gram, but they all call for the RS-232 
Pak. Is there a substitute? 

Michael E. Phelps 
Belleville IL 

Y\j Disto is currently marketing an 
/C RS-232 SuperPack clone of the 
original Tandy Pak (without the virtu- 
ally useless ROM-based communica- 
tions software) for $49.95. 

Device Descriptor Problems 

I / have a 512K CoCo 3 with a Multi- 
_ Pak Interface, a hard disk inter- 
B face, 15-Meg hard drive, and OS-9 
Level II. I can 't get OS-9 to talk to the 
hard drive. If I boot with Level I Ver- 
sion 2.00 and attempt to format /h0 / 
get Error #24 7 (seek error ). When I copy 
the device descriptor and device driver 
to a Level II disk and try to format, I 
get Error #237 (memory full). I don't 
really want to reformat the drive, but I 



144 



THE RAINBOW 



November 1988 



can't access any of the data already 
stored there. The hard drive worked fine 
with OS-9 Level I (both versions). My 
problems, started after I had the Multi- 
Pak upgraded to work with Level II. 
Now that the Multi-Pak has been mod- 
ified, lean 't even use it with Level I! My 
floppy controller works fine in Slot #4 
of the Multi-Pak, so I don't think the 
problem is in the Multi-Pak itself. 
Should the software be modified? I have 
spoken to five different people at Radio 
Shack stores, and no one knows what 
to do about this problem. 

Charles Steinfeldt 

I? You need to change offset $0E 
/L of each of your hard disk device 
descriptors from $FF to $7F (probably 
/h0 and /dd). The hard drive driver and 
descriptor for OS-9 Level II are in- 
cluded in the Development System 
from Radio Shack. 

A Simple Sparklie Solution 

Is there a simple way to address the 
sparklie problem that does not entail 
replacing the soldered-in micropro- 
cessor or the $50 GIME chip? 

Juan Diaz 
San Juan, PR 

I?, I solved the sparklie probiem 
(small bouncing dots on the screen 
during 2-Mhz operation) on my CoCo 
3 by following Roger Krupski's advice. 
I replaced R9 and RIO (47-ohm resis- 
ters) with 100-ohm resistors and CIO 
and CI 1 (39-pF capacitors) with 47-pF 
capacitors. I carefully clipped the old 
resistors and capacitors, and I soldered 
the new ones onto the remaining leads 
— unsoldering was not required. For 
more information on the sparklie prob- 
lem, see Marty Goodman's "Quick 
Fixes," October '88, Page 58. 



Reprint Request 

I tried to get a reprint of your article, 
"Disk Utilities, from CW Commun- 
ications, but I did not receive a reply. 
Could you suggest any other way to get 
a reprint of this article? 

Floyd Craig 
Toronto, OH 



Try calling its business office at 
1-800-441-4403. 

Upgrade Prescription 









JL/UUUlc'aJtieU 


Offset 


35 track value 


40 track value 


80 track value 


$16 


$01 


$01 


$03 


$18 


$23 


$28 


$50 


$19 


$01 


$02 


$02 






Figure 1 





models but does not provide the direc- 
tions needed to upgrade earlier models. 
Can you help? 

Lonnie Morosic 
McCook, NE 

13 See B. H. Alsop's "D-Board 64K 
A % Upgrade," RAINBOW, March '83 
[Page 100], This article offers a unique 
approach using modified sockets, which 
avoids the need to cut traces. 

Hard Disk Guide 



/ want to upgrade an early Co Co 1 
D- Board to 64K. I have Color Com- 
puter Secrets Revealed by Disk 'N 
Data, which shows the upgrade of later 



I have been considering getting a 
hard disk for my Co Co 2, but there 
are several things that I need to know 
before I invest $600 to $700. Does a 
hard disk work on the Co Co like it does 
on an MS-DOS computer? Is there an 
established hierarchy of directories like 
in MS-DOS or OS-9? There are several 
systems advertised in RAINBOW, but the 
ads don't give enough information 
about the product to help me choose a 
system. 

Erasmo A. Martinez 
Water town NY 



D I have been using a Seagate ST- 
A 225 20-Meg hard disk with a West- 
ern Digital controller and a Burke & 
Burke CoCo XT-RTC interface for over 
a year. It cost me around $450. OS-9 has 
the same hierarchical directory struc- 
ture as MS-DOS, tut it had it first. OS- 
9 was designed for — and runs well on 
— a hard drive. Disk BASIC, on the 
other hand, was designed for 35-track, 
single-sided floppy operation. There- 
fore, its hard disk operation techniques 
vary from using the hard drive as several 
floppies to modifying Disk BASIC to 
handle the whole drive. While OS-9's 
operation with a hard drive works with 
all of your software, Disk BASIC'S op- 
eration will reveal some incompatibili- 
ties. 

A Patch Explained 

In your June '87 column [Page 90] 
you answered a question about 3 l hr 
inch drives and offered a short pro- 
gram patch to be used with Modpatch. 
Near the end of the answer you stated, 
You can add the missing descriptors to 



the modules directly and build the 
system directly with con fig. " You were 
talking about /dd and 'd8 for 80-track 
drives. How do you do this? I have two 
40-track double-sided disk drives, one 
80-track, 3 l h-inch disk drive and 
DMode from Computerware (only for 
40 tracks as far as I know). I want to 
get the Save command for Level II. 
Would you give me the patch program 
and the steps I need to follow. Also, is 
DMode geared for 80 tracks or do I 
have to buy SDisk3? 

EG. Douglas 
Stillwater OK 

13^ If you have Kevin Darling's 

/C DMode, you can patch the de- 
scriptors directly on disk in your Con- 
fig Modules directory. If you patch 
with Modpatch and then use Save, 
you'll need to know the address offsets 
in the descriptors (Figure 1). 

You may also want to modify offset $14, 
which controls the step rate ($00 for 30 
ms, $01 for 20 ms, $02 for 12 ms and 
$03 for 6 ms). Do not forget to verify. 
SDisk3 is not needed if you only want 
to support other size drives or vary the 
step rate under OS-9 Level II. The Level 
I drivers for OS-9 were hard-coded for 
single-sided operation. Consequently, 
SDisk, or an equivalent, was required 
for two-sided operation. However, with 
Level II, all you need for different size 
drives is to modify the device descrip- 
tors. 



For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, 
at the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
ASK for "Ask the Experts" to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete 
instructions. 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 145 



I Wishing Wfe fi 



32K ECB 



The last three columns have pre- 
sented a series of four early- 
childhood education programs: 
Oppo sites (parts I and II) and Match 
Game of Opposites (parts I and II). 
From the mail I have received on the 
first installment, / believe that these 
programs will help fill a vacuum in the 
CoCo Community's software library. 

This month, let's look at the final 
installment in this series. Picture This 
allows children to use all the skills 
developed in the first four programs and 
take them one step further. While some 
of the graphics will be the same as those 
in the last four programs, the DfiTR 
statements are not interchangeable. The 
alphanumeric part of each graphics 
string has been deleted. Instead, graph- 
ics text characters will be represented by 
an array of graphics alphanumeric 
strings. 

Our Purpose 

Why do we need this fifth program? 
In both the Opposites and Match Game 
of Opposites series, we dealt strictly 
with abstract concepts. We related a 
picture to a word and to its opposite. 

In Picture This, the user must take 
this know/edge and correctly insert the 
correct word in each sentence. Each 
concept's graphic representation is still 
given, but this time each concept is 
shown individually. For each concept, a 
sentence with a missing word (blank) 
represented by the graphic is presented 
with a series of possible answers. The 
question would appear in the following 
format: 

THI5 LITTLE 5NRIL IS 
VERY . . . 
R) THICK 

B) SLOW 

C) DRY 

D) FR5T 

In this example, the screen would 
include our snail graphic. (So that's 
where our old friend the snail from 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



Building on the skills 
developed in earlier 
games 

Growing 
Up With 
CoCo 



By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Snail Invaders [February '82, Page 17] 
and Snail's Revenge [July '83, Page 138] 
turned up. I have promised long-time 
readers his return for some time.) 

As with quiz programs presented in 
previous issues, the user needs only to 
press the letter representing the correct 
response. The program corrects and 
scores the responses. 

Typing in the Program 

This program listing is much longer 
than listings for the last four programs. 
Since you cannot use the DRTR state- 
ments from previous months, type in 
the program very carefully. There are no 
bugs in the program. Any bugs that 
show up will be your own. To be safe, 
get RAINBOW ON TAPE or DISK for a bug- 
free copy. 

Every data line that includes a state- 
ment also has an asterisk (*). This will 
be recognized as an underline in the 
program. I thought that indicating a 
blank in this manner would be more 
attractive than using a string of periods. 
Therefore, type each data line exactly as 
you see it. 

Using the Program 

When you run the program, the 
familiar title screen will appear. You will 
be asked to select a level from one to 
eight by pressing the appropriate 
number. There are a total of eighty 



graphics and statements, so each level 
will present 10 questions. Each set of 10 
will be assorted randomly, but you can 
control the set shown by selecting the 
level. 

As with our other quiz programs, you 
only need to select the letter corre- 
sponding to the correct choice. If the 
answer is correct, the screen will dis- 
play, "Very Good." An incorrect re- 
sponse will cause the screen to print 
"Sorry!" In both cases, an arrow will 
flash next to the correct response. 

If you press ENTER, you will move to 
the next screen. You may also press @ 
to go to the scorecard. At that point, 
you will be asked if you want to try 
again. You may then press C to continue 
where you left off, Y (yes) to start a new 
quiz or N (no) to quit. 

That's all there is to it. Young users 
may need an adult to read the sentences. 
This promotes the whole educational 
process with your children and gives 
you and the kids some fun time to- 
gether. (Learning can be fun for every- 
one, right?) 

Conclusion 

This month's listing is very long. 
Since we covered the educational theo- 
ries in the last three columns, there is no 
need to repeat them here. I hope you 
find this program as useful as the ones 
from the last three months. They make 
a nice set, and ihey also help teach some 
important skills. 

Once again I must thank those of you 
who have donated your old silver 
CoCos to our special needs classes. It 
seems that just when I think I have seen 
the last donation, another kind soul 
sends us another large box. As always, 
the machines are put to good use in one 
of our special needs classes. See you 
next month. □ 



If you have an idea for the "Wishing 
Well, " submit it to Fred c/o THE 
RAINBOW. Remember, keep your 
ideas specific, and don *t forget this is 
basic. All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 



146 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



1 


1 






208 635 143 1170 ..,..175 



705 . 
790 . 
865 . 
940 . 
990 . 
1045 
1115 



141 
170 
145 

.65 
...0 
230 
232 



1230 
1280 
1335 
1380 
1440 
1495 
END 



253 
84 
.35 
119 
115 
196 
155 



The listing: PICTURES 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 



PCLEAR1 



REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 



************************* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



PICTURE THIS 

BY FRED B.SCERBO 

60 HARDING AVE . 

NORTH ADAMS , MA 01247 

COPYRIGHT (C) 1988 
************************* 

9 CLEAR Ij3j3j3 

IfS CLSp:PRINTSTRING$ (64,252) ; 

15 F0RI=1T022 4 rREADA: PRINTCHR$ (A 

+128) ; : NEXT :PRINTSTRING$ (64,243) 



2j3 DATA61, 60, 61,52, 62,53, 60, 58,6 
2,61,60,58,58, 16,58, 62,60,58,62, 



60,21,28,30,29,21,24,29,2,0, 3J3, 21 
,28,29 

25 DATA53, ,53, ,58,53, ,58,58,53,4 

8,58,58, ,58,58, ,58,58, ,21, ,2 6,21 

,21,16,21,16,26,21,16,21 

30 DATA53, ,53, ,58,53, ,48, ,53,48, 

,58, ,58,58, ,58,58, , , ,26, ,21, ,21, 

16,26,21, ,16 

35 DATA53,60,60,4 8,58,53, , , ,53,4 

8,, 58,, 58, 62 >62, 56,62, 60,,, 26,, 2 

1,28,29,16,26,20,28,29 

40 DATA53, ,, ,58,53, ,53,48, ,58, 

,58,58,57, ,58, ,, ,26, ,21, ,21,16,2 

6, ,,21 

45 DATA53, , , , 58 , 53 , , 58 , , 53 , 48 , , 5 
8, ,58,58,53, ,58, ,, ,26, ,21, ,21,16 
,26,16, 18,21 

50 DATA60,56, , 52 , 60 , 52 , 60 , 56 , , 60 
,56, ,60,60,5 6,56,48,56,60,60, ,20 
,23, ,28,24,28,20,2 8,16,28,28 
55 PRINT@3 89, 11 BY FRED B.SCERB 

0 "; 

60 PRINT@421," COPYRIGHT (C) 19 
88 11 ; 

65 DIM P$(80,2) ,A$(2) ,B$(10) ,C$( 

10) ,A(10) ,N(10) ,B(4) ,C(4) ,D(4) ,E 

(4) ,F(4) ,AO(10) 

70 DIM L$(30) ,H$(80,4) ,AB(4) 

75 F0RI=1T03:READ C (I) ,D(I) ,E (I) 



1 



TANDY COMPUTER 
DISCOUNTS 



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26-3334 CoCo 3 

26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 



165.00 
259.95 



PRINTERS 



26-2802 DMP 106 
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25-1053 TANDY 1000 HX 
25-1401 TANDY 1000 SL 
25-1601 TANDY 1000 TL 
25-4072 TANDY 3000 NL 
25-1 023 CM-5 color monitor 
25-1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 



1 79.95 
599.00 
299.95 



599.00 
$ CALL 
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1,500.00 
249.95 
110.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 




VIP Disk-ZAP 

RAVED ABOUT IN THE 
APRIL 1983 "RAINBOW" 

Now you can retrieve lost data on any disk. 
VIP Disk-Zap is the ultimate repair utility for 
repair of most disk errors. VIP Disk-Zap 
verifies diskettes, reads and writes any 
sector and lets you retrieve all types of 
bashed text files, BASIC and ML 
programs. VIP Disk-Zap includes a 50 
page tutorial manual DISK $24.95 



VIP Terminal 

RATED BEST IN JANUARY 
1984 "RAINBOW" 

For your important communications needs 
you've got to go beyond software that only 
lets you chat. You need a smart terminal 
so that you can send and receive 
programs and messages and print them! 
The VIP Terminal features 32, 51 , 64 or 85 
characters by 21 or 24 lines on the screen 
and has a 43K byte buffer to store 
information. DISK $29.95 




< 

so 



Turn the page for more VIP software! 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 147 



, F ( I ) : NEXT : F0RI=1T03 0 : READL$ (I) : 
NEXT : F0RI=1T02 : READA$ ( I) : NEXT : FO 
RI=1TO80:READP$ (I, 1) ,P$ (I, 2) :FOR 
LL=1T04 : READ H$ (I , LL) : NEXTLL : NEX 
TI 

80 COLOR1,0 
85 GOTO180 
90 KK=20 

95 Z=LEN(A$) :IFZ<2 3THENL$=A$:GOS 
UB115 : RETURN 

100 FORI=22T01STEP-l:IFMID$ (A$,I 
,1)0" "THEN110 

105 L$=LEFT$(A$,I-1) :A$=RIGHT$(A 
$,LEN(A$)-I) :GOSUB115:KK=KK+16:G 
OT095 

110 NEXTI:GOT095 

115 DRAW"C0BM0 , "+STR$ (KK) 

120 Q=LEN(L$) : F0RI=1T0Q: K$=MID$ ( 

L$,I,1) ;K=ASC(K$)-64 

125 IFK=-3 2THENK=27ELSEIFK=-18TH 

ENK=28ELSEIFK=-1THENK=29ELSEIFK= 

~22THENK=30 

130 DRAW L$(K) 

135 NEXT 

140 RETURN 

145 DATA130,6,246,80,6,86,120,16 
2,130,86,246,162 

150 DATA U8R8D4NL8D4BR4,R2U8L2R8 

D4NL8D4NL8BR4 , NR8U8R8D2BD4D2BR4 , 

R2U8L2R8D8NL8BR4 ,NR8U4NR8U4R8BD8 

BR4,U4NR8U4R8BD8BR4 . 

155 DATA NR8U8R8BD4NL4D4BR4,U8D4 

R8U4D8BR4 , BR2R2U8L2R4L2D8R2BR6 , B 

R2NU4R8U8L4R8BR4BD8 

160 DATA U8D4R4NE4F4BR4,NU8R8NU2 

BR4 ,U8F4E4D8BR4 ,U8F8NU8BR4 ,U8R8D 

8NL8BR4,U8R8D4NL8BD4BR4,U8R8D8NL 

8NH4NF2BR8 ,U8R8D4L8R4F4BR4 

165 DATA R8U4L8U4R8BD8BR4,BU8R8L 

4D8BR8,NU8R8NU8BR4,BU8D4F4E4U4BD 

8BR4 

170 DATA NU8R6NU8R6NU8BR4,E4NH4N 
E4F4BR4 , BU8F4NE4D4BR8 , BU8R8G8R8B 
R4 , BR8 , BR2NU2BR8 , BR2BU8U2R8D2G4B 
D4L2BR8,R40BR4 

175 DATA"BM2 , 124C0" , "BM130 , 124C0 
it 

180 PMODE0,1:PCLS1:SCREEN0,0:LIN 
E (0, 114) - (130, 192) , PRESET , B : LINE 
(6,120) -(124, 184) , PRESET, B: PAINT 
(2,154) ,0,0 
185 FORI=1TO10 

190 AO(I)=RND(10) :IFN(AO(I) )=1TH 
EN 190 

195 N(AO(I) )=1:NEXTI 

200 PRINT@453," SELECT LEVEL (1 

-8) "; 

205 X$=INKEY$ : XX=RND (-TIMER) :IFV 
AL(X$)=0THEN205ELSEIFVAL(X$)>8TH 
EN205 

210 SCREENl,l:LL=VAL(X$)*10-10:F 



ORII=1TO10:DRAW A$ ( 1 ) : DRAWP$ (AO ( 
II)+LL,1) 

215 A$=P$ (AO (II) +LL, 2 ) +" . " : GOSUB 
90 

220 FORYY=1TO4:N(YY)=0:NEXTYY:FO 
RYY=1T04 

225 AB(YY)=RND(4) :IFN(AB(YY) )=1T 
HEN225 

230 N (AB ( YY) ) =1 : IF AB(YY)=1 THEN 

FF=YY 
23 5 NEXTYY:V=0 

240 F0RYY=1T04:KK=KK+16:A$=" 

"+CHR$ ( 64+YY) + " . "+H$ (AO (II) +LL, 

AB (YY) ) :GOSUB95:NEXTYY 

245 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN245 

250 IFX$= n @ M THEN1510 

255 V=ASC(X$) :IFV<65THEN245ELSEI 

FV>68THEN245 

2 60 V=V-64:IFAB(V)=1THEN270 

2 65 NW=NW+1:DD=KK:A$=" S 
ORRY" : KK=14 6 : DRAW" S8 " : GOSUB95 : KK 
=DD:DRAW"S4" :GOT0275 

270 NC=NC+1:DD=KK:A$=" V 
ERY H : KK=14 6 : DRAW'S 8 11 : GOSUB95 : KK= 
KK+2 6 : A$= " GOOD " : DRAW » S 8 

" : G0SUB9 5 : KK=DD ; DRAW" S 4 " 
275 V=1:IFKK=100THENKK=32ELSEIFK 
K= 8 4 THENKK= 1 6 

280 KK=KK+(16*FF) :KK$=STR$(KK) :D 
RAW"BM4,"+KK$ 

285 DRAW 1 C0R1 6NH4NG4 " : F0RYY=1T09 
0 : NEXTYY 

290 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=CHR$(13)THEN3 

00ELSEIFX$="@"THEN1510 

295 DRAW f ClNH4NG4L16 ,f :F0RYY=1T09 

0:NEXT:GOTO285 

300 COLOR1,0:LINE(0,0)-(256,110) 

, PSET , BF : LINE (8,l22)-(122,182),P 

SET,BF: LINE (132, 122) -(256,182) ,P 

SET , BF : NEXTII 

305 FF=1:GOTO1510 , 

310 DATA"BR60BD4F20L10D24L20U24L 

10E20" 

315 DATA THIS ARROW IS POINTING 

3 20 DATA UP, DOWN, LEFT, RIGHT 

3 25 DATA"BR60BD4L10D24L10F20E20L 
10U24L10" 

330 DATA THIS ARROW IS POINTING 
* 

335 DATA DOWN, UP, LEFT, RIGHT 
3 40 DATA" BR16BD2 0R8 0M-4 , + 20L3 6M- 
4 , -18NL3 6BR12BU4E4UH4UE4BR10G4DF 
4DG4BR10E4UH4UE4 11 

345 DATA THIS PICTURE SHOWS SOME 
THING * 

3 50 DATA HOT , COLD > DRY , WET 

355 DATA"BR60BD20L4ND6L6ND2L4ND4 

L2M+16 , +32M+16 , -32L16R4ND8R6ND4R 

6L2U4H2U2H2L2H2L12G2L2G2D2G2D4" 

3 60 DATA THIS PICTURE SHOWS SOME 



148 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



THING * 

365 DATA COLD , HOT , DRY , WET 

37J3 DATA"BR5jJBD56R4U3j3R4Ulj3R2Ul£ 

E2U4RD4F2D10R2Dlj3R4D3j3R4L22BR8BU 

2U24BR4D24" 

375 DATA THIS BUILDING IS SOMETH 
ING * 

380 DATA BIG, LITTLE, THIN, WIDE 
385 DATA"BR68BD52H4L4U2NR4D2L4NU 
ND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4 •» 
390 DATA THIS INSECT IS SOMETHIN 
G * 

395 DATA LITTLE, BIG, WIDE, THIN 

400 DATA"BR24BD3 6E12G6F20R20E20F 

6H12BL14H2G4L4H4G2BU10BL4NU4L2U6 

E4R2BR2 6L2G4D6L2U4" 

405 DATA A SMILE MEANS YOU ARE * 

410 DATA HAPPY, SAD, SLEEPY, HUNGRY 

415 DATA"BR34BD50H12F6E12R36F12G 

6E12BU16BL28H2G4L4H4G2BU10BL4NU4 

L2U6E4R2BR26L2G4D6L2U4 " 

420 DATA A FROWN MEANS YOU ARE * 

425 DATA SAD, HAPPY, SLEEPY , HUNGRY 

430 DATA"BR20BD22D20M+30,+10NU20 

R50U20NL50M-30 , -10ND8L50M+30 , +10 

M-30,-10E20R50G20L10NE20L10NE20L 

10NE20L10NE20" 

435 DATA THE BOX BELOW IS * 

440 DATA OPEN, CLOSED, HEAVY, LIGHT 



445 DATA"BR12BD16D20M+30, +10NU20 
R60U20NL60M-30 , -10L60M+30 , +10R12 
M-30,-10R12M+30,+10R12M-30,-10Rl 
2M+30,+10" 

450 DATA THE BOX BELOW IS * 

455 DATA CLOSED, OPEN, HEAVY, LIGHT 

4 60 DATA"BR90BD52U2E8U32H4L4G2D1 

0F2R4E4BL12U12H4L4G4D12F4R4E4BL1 

2U12H4L4G4D12F4R4E4BL12U12H4L4G4 

D12F4R4E4BL12D2G4L4M-10 , -6M-10 , - 

2L2G4D4M+8 , +4D2M+20 , +12F10M+6 , +2 

F2BE10H10M-8 , -3BD36" 

465 DATA THIS SHOWS YOUR * HAND 

470 DATA LEFT, RIGHT, FAT, THIN 

475 DATA I! BR28BD52U2H8U32E4R4F2D1 

0G2L4H4BR12U12E4R4F4D12G4L4H4BR1 

2U12E4R4F4D12G4L4H4BR12U12E4R4F4 

D12G4L4H4BR12D2F4R4M+10, -6M+10,- 

2R2F4D4M-8 , +4D2M-20 , +12G14G2BH10 

E10M+8,-3" 

480 DATA THIS SHOWS YOUR * HAND 
485 DATA RIGHT, LEFT, FAT, THIN 
490 DATA"BR30BD6D3 4R4E2U10R12F4R 
12E4R12F4D12R10U20H8L18H4L4U8R12 
U4L28D4R12D8L4G4L12U8H2L4BM+60,+ 
40F4D4G2L4H2U4E4" 

495 DATA THE FAUCET SHOWN BELOW 
IS * 

500 DATA WET, DRY, HOT, COLD 



THE POWER STONES 

OFARD 



THE QUEST FOR 
THE SPIRIT STONE 





You're tired, you're hungry, not to mention you're badly injured. No 
one in town seems to want to talk to you. Your magic sword has stopped 
glowing, the room is dark, you're out of spells, you can't get your wand 
to work, you won't swear to it but you may be lost, you have no idea what 
that last puzzle meant, and you hear something large moving just beyond 
the only door. The old sage warned you there would be days like this! 

"QUEST FOR THE SPIRIT STONE" is an Adventure that will keep 
you playing for hours. It features single keystroke commands, 16 color 
graphics, 100% Hi- Res graphics screens, full game save, extensive playing 
area, level advancement, and the disk is not copy-protected. You choose 
your character's name, race, sex, and ability scores. The use of arrow keys 
simplify movement. This one is easy to play but a challenge to complete! 

"Fun and challenging . . . should find its way into many CoCo 3 software 
collections. " 8/88 RAINBO W review 

ONLY $18.00 AND WE PAY SHIPPING! 

COLOR COMPUTER 3 AND ONE DISK DRIVE REQUIRED 
North Carolina residents add 5% sales tax 



Send check or money order to: 
or call: 

(919) 582-5121 



THREE C 5 
R RQJECTS 

P.O. Box 1323, 
Hamlet, NC 28345 




< 

o 

► 
r 



VIP Calc 

"MORE USEABLE FEATURES" 

FEBRUARY 1985 "RAINBOW" 

Now every CoCo owner has access to a calculating and planning 
tool better than VisiCalc™, containing all its features and 
commands and then some. VIP Calc displays 32, 51, 64 or 85 
characters by 21 or 24 lines right on the screen. VIP Calc aJiows up 
to a 33K worksheet with up to 512 columns by 1024 rowsl In 
addition, VIP calc has multiple windows which allow you to 
compare and contrast results of changes. Other features include 
16 DIGIT PRECISION • trig, functions ■ averaging • algebraic 
functions • column and row ascending or descending SORTS • 
locate formulas or titles in cells • block move and replicate • global 
or local column width • limitless programmable functions • works 
with any printer, Embed printer control codes for customized 
printing. Combine spreadsheet tables with VIP Writer documents to 
create ledgers, projections, statistical and financial budgets and 
reports. Requires 64K. DISK $59.95 



VIP Speller 

INCLUDES 50,000 WORD DICTIONARY 

VIP Speller works with ANY ASCII file 
created by most popular word processors. 
It automatically checks text files for words 
to be corrected, marked for special 
attention or even added to the 50,000 
word Dictionary. You can even view the 
word in context. Words can be added to or 
deleted from the dictionary or you can 
create your own dictionary! DISK $34.95 




en 

r 

r 

50 



Turn the page for more VIP software! 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 149 



505 DATA" BR30BD6D3 4R4E2U10R12F4R 

12E4R12F4D12R10U20H8L18H4L4U8R12 

U4L28D4R12D8L4G4L12U8H2L4" 

510 DATA THE FAUCET SHOWN BELOW 

IS * 

515 DATA DRY , WET , HOT , COLD 

520 DATA"BR10BD40R102L8E10M-8,+4 

L6U4H2L2G4R4D4F4L20E10M-8 , +4L6U4 

H2L2G4R4D4F4L20E10M-8,+4L6U4H2L2 

G4R4D4F4L20E20M-16,+8L12U8H4L4G8 

R8BE4NLBG4D8F8BU28BR4F6NU16NE6" 

52 5 DATA THE ARROW POINTS TO THE 

* IN LINE 

530 DATA FIRST, LAST, MIDDLE, SECON 
D 

535 DATA"BR10BD40R102L8E10M-8,+4 
L6U4H2L2G4R4D4F4L20E10M-8,+4L6U4 
H2L2G4R4D4F4L20E10M-8 , +4L6U4H2L2 
G4R4D4F4L20E20M-16,+8L12U8H4L4G8 
R8BE4NLBG4D8F8BU24BR74F6NU16NE6 11 
540 DATA THE ARROW POINTS TO THE 

* IN LINE 

545 DATA LAST, FIRST, MIDDLE, SECON 
D 

550 DATA !, BR56BD2 6S2M+3 6,+10F16L2 

H4L4G4H4L4G4H4L4G4H4L4G6D2 2G2L2N 

H2R2E2U22H6L4G4H4L4G4H4L4G4H4L4G 

4E16M+3 6,-10S4BU10R10E4NH4R6E4U2 

H4L10G4L12NG4H6L8G4D6F4R6F4R4E2R 

2R6R4 BR16NE 6NR2 0NF6 » 

555 DATA THE CLOUD IS * THE UMBR 

ELLA 

560 DATA OVER, UNDER, AROUND, INSID 
E 

565 DATA"BR56BD2S2M+3 6,+10F16L2H 
4L4G4H4L4G4H4L4G4H4L4G6D18G2L2NH 
2R2E2U18H6L4G4H4L4G4H4L4G4H4L4G4 
E16M+3 6 , -10S4BD3 6NE6NH6NG6NF6BR1 
6NE6NF6R22" 

570 DATA THE MARK IS * THE UMBRE 
IiLA 

575 DATA UNDER, OVER, AROUND, INSID 
E 

580 DATA"BR16BD20E2NR80R16E8R6NG 

4R6NG4R6NG4R6NG4R6NG4R6NG4NG4R6N 

G4R6NG4R6NG4R6NG4F8D2G8NH4L6NH4L 

6NH4L6NH4L6NH4L6NH4L6NH4L6NH4L6N 

H4L6NH4L6H8 LI 6NR8 0 » 

585 DATA THIS FEATHER IS SOMETHI 

NG * 

590 DATA LIGHT, HEAVY, FAST, SLOW 

595 DATA"BR26BD46R68M-14,-30L10U 

6H4L12G4D6L10M-14,+30BR18BU8U12B 

R6NR6D12R6NU12BR6U12R6D12NL6BR4N 

U6BR4NU6U4R4D4L4BU22BL14L4U4R4D4 
if 

600 DATA THIS WEIGHT IS SOMETHIN 
G * 

605 DATA HEAVY, LIGHT, FAST, SLOW 
610 DATA"BR60BD48R8E4U10R4U6L4U6 
H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU6NE4NH4B 



U8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BU16R6E2H2L 
20G2F2R12BD20BL20H16D16F16R3 6E16 
U16G16 11 

615 DATA AN ANGEL IS SOMEONE WHO 
IS * 

620 DATA GOOD, BAD, RICH, POOR 

625 DATA"BR60BD4 8R8E4U10R4U6L4U6 

H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU10NG4NF4 

BU4NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BU12E6D8L2 

0U8F6BL20D6G4L6NU10ND20L6H4U6BR7 

8NG4NF4D20G10" 

630 DATA A DEVIL IS SOMEONE WHO 
IS * 

63 5 DATA BAD, GOOD, RICH, POOR 

640 DATA"BR20BD16D30NR56U30R6U16 
R10F4G4L10D8R10D6R10D6R10D6R10D6 
R10D6R2 6BU42BL30L20NE4NF4" 

64 5 DATA THIS LITTLE FLAG IS * U 
P 

650 DATA HIGH, LOW, WINDY, SUNNY 
655 DATA 11 BR20BD16D3 0NR5 6U3 0R1 6D6 
R10D6R10D6R10D6R10D6R2 6L16U16R10 
F4G4L10D8BU2 6BR6NU16NH4NE4 " 
660 DATA THIS LITTLE FLAG IS MUC 
H * 

665 DATA LOWER, HIGHER, WINDY , SUNN 
Y 

670 DATA"BR32BD2 6NR50D2NR50D2R50 
D6L2D4R14U4L2U12H2U4H2U2H4L6D2F2 
D2F2D8" 

675 DATA A HAMMER IS SOMETHING * 
680 DATA HARD, SOFT, LIGHT, DARK 
685 DATA"BR3 6BD18H8U8R8F8E4R20F4 
E8R8D8G8D10G4D2G8L2G4L8H4L2H8U2H 
4U10BR10BD4R4NU2ND2NR4NE2NH2BR12 
R4NU2ND2NR4NE2NH2BG8BD4NE4NH4D6N 
F4NG4U6BR6NR20BL12NL20BR6D4BF4NF 
10BH4BG4G10" 

690 DATA A CAT IS SOMETHING * 
69 5 DATA SOFT, HARD, HEAVY, DARK 
700 DATA 11 BR30BD2 D10NR30D4NR30L2D 
4L2D4L2D4L2D12NR88D6R8NU6R8NU6R8 
NU6R8NU6R8NU6R8NU6R8NU6R8NU6R8NU 
6R8NU6R8U6U4H4M-10 , -4L4ND10M-3 0 , 
-10NU16NE6D4M+3 0 , +10BL58ND8NH8 " 
705 DATA THIS FOOT HAS A SHOE * 
710 DATA ON, OFF, LEFT, RIGHT 
715 DATA " BR2 6BD2D14L2D4L2D4L2D4L 
2D12F6R20E2R30F2R14E2F2R10E2U6H2 
L10H2L8M-30 , -10H4U18BL18BD20G4D4 
F4" 

720 DATA THIS FOOT HAS A SHOE * 

72 5 DATA OFF, ON, LEFT, RIGHT 

7 30 DATA" BR2 0BD6ND2 0R8 0G10NL50M+ 
10,+30G4L62H4M+10,-30H4L8D14L6" 

73 5 DATA THE PITCHER SHOWN IN * 
740 DATA FULL, EMPTY, HOT, COLD 

74 5 DATA" BR20BD6ND20R8 0G10M+10 , + 
30G4L62H4M+10,-30H4L8D14L6» 

750 DATA THE PITCHER SHOWN IN * 
755 DATA EMPTY , FULL, HOT , COLD 



150 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



76j3 DATA M BR5j3BD14ND2j3R12DlpNL12N 
Dlj3BR8R6NU6ND6R6BRlj3U18L6j3D3 6R6j3 
U18" 

765 DATA THIS GRADE IS THE * 

77) 3 DATA BEST, WORST, LONGEST, SHOR 
TEST 

775 DATA M BR5j3BD14ND2j3R12BDlj3NL12 
BR8R12BRlj3U18L6j3D3 6R6j3U18BD30" 

78) 3 DATA THIS GRADE IS THE * 

785 DATA WORST, BEST , LONGEST, SHOR 
TEST 

79) 3 DATA M BR3j3BD4ND6R6 j 0D6NL6j3D4L6 
j3NU4G4D28F4R6j3E4U28H4BL20BD32H4L 
4U2NR4D2L4NUND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4 



ii 



795 DATA THIS SHOWS A BUG * THE 
JAR 

80)3 DATA INSIDE, OUTSIDE, OVER, UND 
ER 

805 DATA"BR12BD4ND6R60D6NL60D4L6 
0NU4G4D28F4R60E4U2 8H4BR36BD32H4L 
4U2NR4D2L4NUND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4 



ii 



810 DATA THIS SHOWS A BUG * THE 
JAR 

815 DATA OUTSIDE, INSIDE, OVER, UND 
ER 

820 DATA"BR16BD30NR30U2NR30U2R18 

BR4R2BR4R2BL30U2R90G12M-48,+4U10 
ii 

825 DATA THIS CARVING KNIFE IS * 
830 DATA SHARP, DULL, SOFT, HARD 
835 DATA"BR16BD3 0NR40H2U4E2R40ND 
8R48F2D2G2L2G2L2G2L3 6H2" 
840 DATA THIS BUTTER KNIFE IS * 
845 DATA DULL, SHARP, SOFT, HARD 
850 DATA !I BR22BD6R30D6F4R8E4U6R30 
D16L8NU16L8D26L22NU30L22U2 6L8NU1 
6L8U16" 

855 DATA THIS NEW SHIRT IS * 

8 60 DATA CLEAN, DIRTY, WET, HEAVY 

865 DATA M BR22BD6R30D6F4R8E4U6R30 

D16L8NU16L8D26L8NU12L4NU20L2NU8L 

4NU6L4NU30L8NU12L4NU20L2NU8L4NU6 

L2NU18L2U26L8NU16L8U16" 

870 DATA THIS OLD SHIRT IS VERY 
* 

875 DATA DIRTY , CLEAN, WET, HEAVY 
880 DATA" BR20BD30NR8 4 " 
885 DATA THE SURFACE OF THIS LIN 
E IS * 

890 DATA SMOOTH , ROUGH , WET , DRY 
895 DATA"BR14BD30BRE4R4F4R4E4R4F 
4R4E4R4F4R4E4R4F4R4E4R4F4R4E4R4F 
4" 

900 DATA THE SURFACE OF THIS LIN 
E IS * 

905 DATA SMOOTH , ROUGH , WET , DRY 
910 DATA"BR2 4BD10R20F10L20NH10R6 

0M+20,+8BL20NL60BR20M-20,+8L60Gl 
0R20E10L20U16BL8NL16BD4NL16BD4NL 



16BD4NL16BD4NL16" 

915 DATA THIS BIG ROCKET IS VERY 
* 

920 DATA FAST, SLOW, THICK, DRY 

92 5 DATA"BR42BD44NR30H10U10E10R2 
0F8D10G4L16H6U4E4R8F4D2G2L4H2BD8 
R16E6R6NE6F4D4NL4G4L6BU8BR4R" 
930 DATA THIS LITTLE SNAIL IS VE 
RY * 

93 5 DATA SLOW, FAST , THICK, DRY 
940 DATA" BR3 2 BD4R60D4 6L60U4 6BF2R 
10NF4R18ND6R18NG4R10D5NG4D16NL6D 
16NH4D5L10NH4L18NU6L18NE4L10U5NE 
4U16NR6U16NF4U5BD23BR28F8U2H8NU2 
M-18,-4 M 

94 5 DATA THE TIME SHOWN IS * THE 
HOUR 

950 DATA BEFORE, AFTER, AROUND, UND 
ER 

955 DATA"BR3 2BD4R60D4 6L60U46BF2R 
10NF4R18ND6R18NG4R10D5NG4D16NL6D 
16NH4D5L10NH4L18NU6L18NE4L10U5NE 
4U16NR6U16NF4U5BD2 3BR28F8U2H8NU2 
M+18,-4" 

960 DATA THE TIME SHOWN IS * THE 
HOUR 

965 DATA AFTER , BEFORE , AROUND, UND 
ER 




VIP Writer 

RATED "BEST" IN SEPT '88 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Writer has all the features of VIP Writer 
III described elsewhere in this magazine 
except the screen widths are 32, 51, 64 & 
85. Screen colors are black, green and 
white, double clock speed is not supported, 
Spooler is unavailable. Hard disk is not 
supported. Even so, VIP Writer is the 
BEST word processor for the CoCo 1 & 2! 
VIP Writer includes VIP Speller AT NO 
ADDITIONAL COST. DISK $69.95 



VIP Database 

"ONE OF THE BEST" JULY 
1984 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Database has all the features of VIP 
Database 111 described elsewhere in this 
magazine except the screen widths are 51, 
64 & 85. Screen colors are black, green 
and white, double clock speed is not 
supported, Spooler is unavailable. Even so, 
VIP Database is the most complete 
database for the CoCo 1 & 2! DISK $49.95 




O 

> 

> 
M 



Turn the page for more VIP software! 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 151 



970 DATA"BF30E8R2E2NH6R2E2R4E2NH 
6R6E2R6NH6R4F2R6F2R4NH8F2R2F2R2F 
8H2L2G2L2G2L4G2L6G2L2j3H2L6H2L4H2 
L2H2NL2F2R2F2R4F2R6H4U2H2U4E2BR3 
0F2D4G2D2G4BU4BL10U8F2D4L4U6D8H2 
U4" 

975 DATA THIS EYE LOOKS LIKE IT 
IS * 

980 DATA AWAKE, ASLEEP, LISTENING, 
TALKING 

985 DATA"BF24BR4F2R2F2NG6R2F2R6F 

2NG6F2R8NG6R8E2R6NG8E2R4E2R2E2R2 

NG10E2BU20BL70R10G10R10BR6RBR6RB 

R6NR10E10NL10BD10BR6RBR6RBR6NR10 

E10NL10BD10BR6RBR6R" 

990 DATA THIS EYE LOOKS LIKE IT 

IS * 

995 DATA ASLEEP , AWAKE , LISTENING, 
TALKING 

1000 DATA n BD6BF3 8R8E4U10R4U6L4U6 
H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU6NE4NH4B 
U8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BR40BD20R8E 
4U10R4U6L4U6H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4 
R8BU6NE4NH4BU8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R 
2" 

1005 DATA THIS PERSON IS * A FRI 
END 

1010 DATA WITH, WITHOUT, HAPPY, SAD 

1015 DATA"BR60BD44R8E4U10R4U6L4U 

6H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU6NE4NH4 

BU8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2" 

1J32J3 DATA THIS PERSON IS * A FRI 

END 

1025 DATA WITH, WITHOUT, HAPPY, SAD 
1030 DATA lf BR60BD50R8E4U10R4U6L4U 
6H4L16G4D6L4D6R4Dlj3F4R8BU6NE4NH4 
BU8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BU12NL12R4 
U2NL16U2NL30R14L2D8NF2NG2" 
1035 DATA THIS IS SOMEONE WHO IS 
VERY * 

1040 DATA WISE, FOOLISH, STRONG, WE 
AK 

1045 DATA"BR60BD50R8E4U10R4U6L4U 
6H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU10NG4NF 
4BU4NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BU10R6M-1 
0,-20M-10,+20" 

1050 DATA THIS IS SOMEONE WHO IS 
VERY * 

1055 DATA FOOLISH, WISE, STRONG, WE 
AK 

1060 DATA" BRBD2 6BR2 4R7 6M-3 0 , -10L 
4G4L4H4L4M-30 , +10D2M+30 , +6R4E2R8 
F2R4M+30,-6" 

1065 DATA THIS IS PART OF A * FA 
CE 

1070 DATA PRETTY, UGLY, FAT, THIN 

1075 DATA" BD22BR2 0NE4NG4R7 6NH4NF 

4G12L52H12F6R10NU6ND6R10NU6ND6R2 

NU6R2NU6R2NU6R2NU6ND6R10NU6ND6R2 

ND6R2ND6R2ND6R2ND6NU6R10NU6ND6R6 
ii 

1080 DATA THIS IS PART OF AN * F 



ACE 

1085 DATA UGLY, PRETTY, FAT, THIN 
1090 DATA " BR 1 6 BD 2 0 R8 0M- 4 , + 20 L3 6M 
-4,-18NL3 6E4R3 6H2L32R12U4R8D4BD4 
2" 

1095 DATA THIS IS A PAN WHICH IS 

1100 DATA COVERED, UNCOVERED, HOT, 
COLD 

1105 DATA"BR16BD20R80M-4,+20L3 6M 
-4,-18NL36BU8BE4R36H2L32R12U4R8D 
4" 

1110 DATA THIS IS A PAN WHICH IS 

1115 DATA UNCOVERED, COVERED, HOT, 
COLD 

1120 DATA"BD2BR56F12D4G2L4D2F2D2 
M-16,+4M+12 ,+3F2D2G4D4G2L14G2D4B 
E20BR12NR26BD4M+20 , +6BU20M-20 , +6 
BH18L4F2" 

1125 DATA THIS SHOWS SOMEONE * 
1130 DATA TALKING, LISTENING, SEEI 
NG, FEELING 

1135 DATA"BD18BR94U4H4L4NU8L8G4D 
2G2D12F2DF8R4ND6R6E4BH6L4H2U4BL2 
8BD20E2R2E2U4E2U20H2U4H2L2H2BL12 
BD34E2R2E2U4E2U10H2U4H2L2H2BL12B 
D28E2R2E2U4E2U4H2U4H2L2H2BL12BD4 
NF6D14L6F2L2" 

1140 DATA THIS SHOWS SOMEONE * 
1145 DATA LISTENING, TALKING, SEEI 
NG, FEELING 

1150 DATA" BR30BD8NE4NU8NH4BL8D10 
NR60D20NR60D10R60BR6F4H2G2E4BR6U 
20NL60U20L60" 

1155 DATA THE MARK IS AT THE * 
1160 DATA START, FINISH, SIDE, MIDD 
LE 

1165 DATA" BR20BD8D10NR60D20NR60D 

10R60BR6F4H2G2E4BR6U20NL60U20NL6 

0D40BR6NE4NR8NF4" 

1170 DATA THE MARK IS AT THE * 

1175 DATA FINISH, START, SIDE, MIDD 

LE 

1180 DATA f, BR44BD4R6F4R2E4R2F4R2E 
4R6G8L20NH8D4R20NU4F12D14G6L30H6 
U14E12BF6BD4NR8L4D6R12D6L12R6ND4 
NU16" 

1185 DATA THIS MEANS SOMEONE IS 
* 

1190 DATA RICH, POOR, TALL, SHORT 

1195 DATA" BR58BD6R6F2R2F2R2F4R2F 

4D4F2D6G2D4G4L2G4L2G2L2G2L12H2L2 

H2L2H4L2H4U4H2U6E2U4E4R2E4R2E2R2 

E2R4BD12BL2NG4D16L4R8BR8BU4U4R2L 

6U4R6L2U4" 

1200 DATA SOMEONE WITH JUST THIS 
IS * 

1205 DATA POOR, RICH, TALL, SHORT 
12 10 DATA" BR 3 6BD2 0R50D3 0L50U3 0BF 
6ND16BR4ND16BR4ND16BR4ND16BR4ND1 
6BR4ND16BR4D16BD4NL2 4BR8BU4R4U2L 



152 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



4U2R4BU6L4U2R4U2L4BR32BU18M-14,+ 

6BL12NE8BLlj3NE8BLlj3NU8BLlj3NH8BLl 

2NH8BL12M-14 / -6" 

1215 DATA THIS RADIO IS VERY * 

122J3 DATA NOISY , QUIET , BRIGHT, DAR 

K 

1225 DATA"BD2BR3 6F12D4G2L4D2F2D2 
G4NLlj3F2D2G4D4G2L14G2D4BR2 8U24E4 
R2F4Dl^E2R2F2E2R2F2E2R2F2DlpG4BU 
2pBL8R6U4L6U4R6BR6D8U4R8U4D8BR6U 
8D4R8U4D8BR4R2BR4R2BU2j3BL8j3L6" 
1230 DATA THIS MEANS TO BE * 
1235 DATA QUIET, NOISY , BRIGHT, DAR 
K 

1240 DATA"BR40BD2R44F4D2M-8,+20G 
8L4D4F4NL2j3D6L2j3U6E4U4L4H8M-8 , -2 
j3U2E4BD4BR2G2M+6,+16R2U18NL4BR28 
D18R2M+6,-16H2L4BL22BD4NG2D16NL2 
R2BR2 BU6R4U4L4U4R4BR4R2ND8R2" 
1245 DATA THIS IS A SIGN OF * 
1250 DATA WINNING, LOSING, SLEEPIN 
G, READING 

1255 DATA" BR34BD16R6U4L6U4R6BR4N 
R6D8R6BR4U8R6D8NL6BR4U8R6D4L6R2F 
4BR4NR6U4NR6U4R6BD2j3BL5j3D10R10Ul 
j3NL10BR6BD4R6BRlj3BD6R4NR4U10NG4B 
R10D10R10U10Llj3BF18L74U44R74D44 n 
1260 DATA THIS IS A SIGN OF * 
1265 DATA LOSING , WINNING, SLEEPIN 
G , READING 



1270 DATA !I BR62BD3 6R8E4U10R4U6L4U 
6H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU10NG4NF 
4BU4NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BD10BF8M- 
12,+18M-12,-18BU24BR38D30R4U30L4 
U6R12D2R8F6D4L4H4L6U2L10BL50BD8L 
22D2NR2 2R2D4F6G6D4L2NR22D2R22U2L 
2U4H6E6U4" 

1275 DATA THIS IS SOMEONE WHO IS 

1280 DATA OLD , YOUNG , TALL , SHORT 
12 85 DATA M BR60BD44R8E4U8R4U6L4U6 
H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D8F4R8BU6NE4NH4BU 
8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BU8U2H2L4 BR2 
6BD6R10D20L10U20E2R6L2U2L2BL58BD 
4L2G2D4F2R2D10G2D2F2E2U2H2U10R2E 
2U4H2L2 " 

1290 DATA THIS IS SOMEONE WHO IS 

12 95 DATA YOUNG, OLD, TALL, SHORT 

1300 DATA" BR18 BD4R60D4 6L60U4 6BF2 

R10NF4R18ND4R18NG4R10D5NG4D16NL6 

D16NH4D5L10NH4L18NU6L18NE4L10U5N 

E4U16NR6U16NF4U5BD2 3BR2 8F8U2H8NU 

2U12BR40ND8R12D4NL12D4BD8ND8G6H6 

D8" 

1305 DATA THIS TIME IS VERY * 
1310 DATA EARLY , LATE , LONG , SHORT 
1315 DATA"BR18BD4R60D4 6L60U46BF2 
R10NF4R18ND4R18NG4R10D5NG4D16NL6 
D16NH4D5L10NH4L18NU6L18NE4L10U5N 



MJK & MJK3 



DOS 



WHY BUY ADOS 
WHEN YOU CAN HAVE 



RAINBOW 

ctnnncATtON 



THIS 



Hev: MJC-DOS for CUCO 1. 2. and 3 $39.95 
Moxt poverfull operating system for the CoCo evert 
AIIots up to 3 D5-80 track drives or standard drives. The 
DS-80 drives are software configurable to standard Radio 
Shack* format in order to maintain compatibility. AUqts 
global file name specif icatioo vith vildcards. All the files -will 
be displayed alphabetically, including the date that the file 
rat saved. Use one command to II LL or COPT a number of 
files that meet the global filename specification (can be a 
full disk!) in one run or one at a time upon user prompt 
(T-key). Use the po-verfull CHAIN command to use programs of 
any length. Use the built in FULL SCREEN EDITOR to allov 
fast and easy program modification. Tou can even use the IRON 
command that vril! put you (after an error) in the modified 
line editor or get the automatic error trap routine ▼ ith 
fully spelled out error names. Hit one key to repeat the last 
command. You -vill also get error trap. repeat key, AUTO. 
DATE. CAT (t»o columns of directory with only the filenames 
& extensions). VAIT. RDHM. BAUD. FIND. OLD. DATE), (string in 
basic program). LCOPT (groups of basic lines). REPL (to 
replace a string). TYPE (list a text file on screen/printer). 
SPLIT or JOIN basic lines. SAT for real spoken text, ▼ ore" peek 
it poke and many more.... MJE-DOS is primarily intended for 
double-tided 80-track drives (720C each) 

»ALL0V5 TOD TO READ/ VBITE/FDRMAT 3V*0 DISCS ON A 80T DRIVE* 

««tm» EPttOMABLE »'«** FREE TIPDATES FOR 1 YEAR *»•» 

MJT512 D0S<C0CO3-512E) $49.95 

BUILT IN RAM DIS1 AND RAM TEST COMMANDS 
Monitor-Disassembler (COCO t. 2A.3) $39.95 
Source-Code Genera tor/LabelCener otor (C0C01,2*.3) $49.95 
JB REMOTE rs-232 pack driver for bbs etc. (C0C01.2.43) $19.95 
REVIET (C0C03) oev key scan-.-gi^es you true ALT & CTRL $15.00 
BE vr;EY232(C0C03)--JB REMOTE and NEVHEY in one package $25. 00 
RTC -real time hardware clock for the coco 1.2.*3 $35.00 

CALL OR VRITI (COD ORDERS OK) 

COCO CONNECTION OF VHXLA. PA. 
5003 B ST. 
PIC XL.*-. P.*. 19120 
PHONE 1 215-457-1809 VOXCZ -AND DAlA 
COnPUSZnWZ TD« 723l7.437(L£.*l>i: PHONE*) 




The VIP Integrated Library combines all six popufar VIP 
programs - VIP Writer*, Speller, Calc, Database*, Terminal 
and Disk-Zap - into one program on one disk. The program 
is called VIP Desktop. From the desktop you have instant 
access to word processing with a spelling checker always *n 
attendance, data management with mail-merge, spread- 
sheet financial analysis, telecommunications and disk 
maintenance. Just move the hand to the volume on the 
bookshelf and the application is there. 64K req'd $149. 95| 
*CoCo 3 owners: See our FULL PAGE AD! 



SD Enterprises 

(503) 663-2865 P. 0. BOX 1233. Gresham, OR. 97030 
Please add $3 for shipping. COD orders add an additional $2.25. Personal 
checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. All other orders shipped the same day. 



November 1988 



THE RAINBOW 



153 



T 



*** *** *** *** COLOR COMPUTER 111 SOFTWARE *** *** *** *** 



CBAS1C III EDITOR/COMPILER 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer HI BASIC COMPILER!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient machine language programs and you don't 
want to spend the next few years trying to, learn how to write them in Assembly 
language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!!! 

CBASIC HI is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full advantage 
of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K RAM, without 
having to spend years trying to learn assembly language programming. CBASIC 
III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you are 
already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Res Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). We even 
added advanced commands not available in Basic to give you a level of control 
only avialable to very advanced Machine Language Programmers. Plus we made it 
exceptionally easy to use, not like some other compilers. CBASIC III is the 
friendliest and easiest compiler available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced Basic 
or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs without having to 
worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory allocations and so on, because 
CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. For Advanced users, CBASIC III 
will let you control every aspect of your program, even generating machine code 
directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC III features well over ISO Compiled Basic Commands and Functions 
that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, Tape, Printer and 
Screen I/O. It supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play 
and String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/Put, H/PTay ancf HfDRAW, all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC 111 also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate prograritmable 
printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
PRINT, INPUT, INKEY, GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands. 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the Color 
Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and install 2 Ultra 
Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation, Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 512K of memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8K blocks 
and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor which allows 
you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a full featured editor 
designed specifically for writing Basic programs. It has block move and copy, 
program renumbering, automatic line number generation, screen editing, printer 
control and much more. 

The documentation provided with CBASIC III is an 8 1/2 by 11 Spiral Bound 
book which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. We went to 
great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and understand, but 
complete and comprehensive enough for even the most sophisticated user. 

CBASIC III is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and 
well worth the investment. You can buy a less expensive compiler for your 
CoCo-3, and then find out how difficult it is to use, or how limited its features are. 
Then you'll wish you had bought CBASIC III in the first place. Dollar for dollar, 
CBASIC III gives you more than any other compiler available. If you can find a 
better CoCo-3 Basic Compiler then buy it t ! 1 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

DATAPACK III PLUS V1.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 

AUTOPILOT & AUTO-LOG PROCESSORS 
X-MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT-100 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

• No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port. 
" 8 Display Formats, 32/40/64/80 columns at 192 or 225 Res. 

" 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display & Disk. 

• ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 

■ Directly record receive data to a disk file (Data Logging). 

• VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

• VT- 100/52 cursor keys, position, insert /delete^ PF & Alt. keys. 

• Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates. 

■ Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

• 9 Variable length, Programmable^Macro Key buffers. 
' Programmable Printer rates from liO to 9600 baud. 

• Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 

• Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

• Freeze Display & Review information On Line with no data loss. 

• Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

■ Built in 2 Drive Ramdisk for 512K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R.S. Modem- Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128K & Disk, $59.95 

EDT/ASM III 

128/512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler. It is 
designed to take advantage of the new features available in the CoCo-3 with either 
128K or 512K of memory. It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 
lines in 192 or 225 Resolution, so you use the best display mode whether you are 
using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your display. Plus you can 
select any foreground or background colors or even monochrome display modes. 
It will even support 512K by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fast Ramdisk for 
lightning fast assembly of program source code larger than memory, There is also 
a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug your assembled programs. 
EDT/ASM 111 has the most powerful, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/Assembler package for the Color Computer. 

• Supports Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

• Full Screen line editing with immediate line update. 

• Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands, 

" Load & Save standard ASCII forma ttedtJile formats. 

• Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM III features include: 

" Supports the full 6809 instruction set & cross assembles 6800 code. 

• Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

• Supports Disk Library file (include) up to 9 levels deep. 

• Supports standard Motorola assembler directives. 

• Allows multiple values for FCB & FDB directives (unlike R.S. EDT/ASM) 

• Allows assembly from the Editor Buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 128K & Disk $59.95 



TEXTPRO IV 

"The ADVANCED COCO-3 Word Processing System" 

• 9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 

• On Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 

• Up to 8 Proportional Character Sets Supported with Justification. 

• Up to 80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function key sets. 

• Fully Buffered keyboard accepts data even duiring disk access. 

• Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system configuration. 

• 8 Pre-Defined Printer function commands & 10 Programmable ones. 

• Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

• Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 

• Completely Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush lefi & right. 
' Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

• Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 

• Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 5 12K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most advanced word processing system available for the 
COCO-3, designed for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is 
not like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
short documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional spacing, 
then most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simpler word processors. 
But, if you want a powerful wOrd processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is what your looking for. It works 
in a totally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
formatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
There are no time comsuming, and often frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
control at all times. You can see what the formatted document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, 
Italic, Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters right on the 
screen. 

tEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts, 
take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKI DATA 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!! ! All the character sets used on this AD are 
proportional spaced characters, all centering, justification, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89.95 

HI-RES (II Screen Commander 

The DISPLAY you wanted but didn't get on your CoCo-3 

• 54 Different Character Sizes available from 14 to 212 cpl. 

• Bold, Italic, Underline, Subscript, Superscript and Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad width characters. 

• Scroll Protect form 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

• Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN 3 mode. 

• PRINT @ is available in all character sizes & styles. 

• Programmable Automatic Key repeat for fast editing. 

• Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

• Selectable Character & Background color. 

• Uses only 4K of Extended (2nd 64K) or Basic RAM. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES HI will improve the standard display capabilities of the Color 
Computer 3, even the 40 and 80 column displays have several features missing. 
For example, you can't use PRINT @ or have different character sizes on the same 
screen, even when mixing text and graphics with the HPRJNT command. Hi-RES 
III can give you the kind of display you always dreamed about having on your 
CoCo-3, with a ; wide variety of display options that you can easily use with your 
Basic or ML programs. 

HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color Basic and its operation 
is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the normal screen display with an 
extremely versatile display package. With the full control code keyboard, you can 
control many of HI-RES III extended functions with just a couple of simple 
keystrokes. 

Requires 128K Tape or Disk $34,95 

512K RAMDISK & MEMORY TESTER 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 ULTRA 
High Speed Ram Disks in you CoCo-3. It does not need or require the OS-9 
operating system. It works with R.S. DOS Vl.O or VI. 1 and it is completely 
compatible with Enhanced Color Disk Basic! Plus it allows your CoCo-3 to run at 
double speed all the time even for floppy disk access!!! It will not disappear when 
you press reset like some other ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
ML program to test the 512K ram. It performs several bit tests as well as an 
address test so you know that your 512K of memory is working perfectly. 

Requires S12K & Disk $19.95 

"The SOURCE III" 

DISASSEMBLER & SOURCE CODE GENERATOR 

The SOURCE III will allow you to easily Disassemble Color Computer 
machine language programs Directly from Disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
compatible Source code. 

• Automatic label generation and allows specifying FCB, FDB and FCC areas. 

• Disassemble programs Directly from disk, unlike Other disassemblers. 

• Automatically locates Begin, End and Execution address. 

• Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

• Generates Assembler source files directly to disk or printer, 

• Built in Hex/Ascii dump/display to locate FCB, FCC & FDB areas. 

• 8 Selectable Display formats 32/40/64/80 columns in 192 or 225 Res. 

• Selectable Foreground & Background colors & Printer Baud rates. 

• Built in Disk Directory an Kill file commands. 

" Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

• Written in Ultra Fast iMachine Language. 

Requires 12SK & Disk $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 

purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 



' Umdow 



Mast-en" 






Prograi Ke 



lelete Key 
Display Keys 

Save Keys 
Load Keys 



'ojrai Keys Used 

0PEH:?CHR$ 

BUTTON 
OPEN 255,7 



ait f?= UTunnu nnsr n s;? 




Window Master 
Finder VI. 9 

Mr it ten by Bill Very on a 
Copyright <cl IS8& by C&r-Camp Ltd 



Screen Display Fonts 



Window Master supports up to 54 different character sizes on 
the screen with 5 different character styles. You can have Bold, 
Italic, Underlined, Super-Script, Sub-script or Plain character 
styles or any combination of them in any character size. You 
can also change the text color and background at any time to get 
really colorful displays. 

Fully Basic Compatible 

Window Master is fully compatible with Enhanced Color 
Disk basic with over 50 Commands & functions added to fully 
support the Point & Click Window System. Window Master 
does not take any memory away from Basic, so you still have all 
the Basic Program memory available. 

Hi-Resolution Displays 

Window Master uses the full potential of the Color 
Computer 3 display by using the 225 vertical resolution display 
modes instead of the 192 or 200 resolution modes like most 
other programs. It uses either the 320/16 color mode or the 
640/4 c6lor display to give you the best display resolution 
possible, and can be switched to either mode at any time. 

Mixed Text & Graphics 

Window Master fully supports both Text & Graphics displays 
and even has a Graphics Pen that can be used with HLINE, 
HCIRCLE, HSET and more. You can change the Pen width & 
depth and turn it on or off with simple commands. We also 
added Enhanced Graphics Attributes that allow graphics 
statements to use And, Or, Xor and Copy modes to display 
graphic information. With the Graphics enhancements added 
by Window Master, you could write a "COCOMAX" type 
program in Basic! In fact we provide a small graphics demo 
program written in Basic. 



Event Processing 



Window Master adds a powerful new programming feature to 
Basic that enables you to do "Real Time" Programming in Basic. 
It's called Event Trapping, and it allows a program to detect and 
respond to certain "events" as they occur. You can trap Dialog 
activity, Time passage, Menu Selections, Keyboard activity and 
Mouse Activity with simple On Gosub statements, and when the 
specified event occurs, program control is automatically routed 
to the event handling routine, just like a Basic Gosub. After 
servicing the event, the sub-routine executes a Return statement 
and the program resumes execution at the statement where the 
event occured. 

Enhanced Editing Features 

Window Master adds an enhanced editor to Basic that allows 
you to see what you edit. It allows you to insert & delete by 
character or word, move left or right a word or character at a 
time, move to begin or end of line, toggle automatic insert 
on/off or just type over to replace characters. The editor can 
also recall the last line entered or edited with a single key stroke. 
You can even change the line number in line to copy it to a new 
location in the program. 



Master Features 



Multiple Windows 



Window Master supports multiple window displays with up to 
a maximum of 31 windows on the screen. Overlapping windows 
are supported, and any window can be made active or brought to 
the top of the screen. Windows can be picked up and moved 
anywhere on the screen with the mouse. There are 6 different 
Window styles to choose from and the window text, border and 
background color is selectable. 



Pull Down Menus 



Menus are completely programmable with up to 16 menus 
available. They can be added or deleted at any time in a 
program. Menu items can be enabled, disabled, checked or 
cleared easily under program control. Menu selection is 
automatically handled by Window Master & all you have to do 
is read a function variable to find out which menu was selected. 

Buttons, Icons & Edit Fields 

Each Window can have up to 128 buttons, Icons or Edit fields 
active, if you can fit that many. Buttons, Icons and Edit field 
selection is handled automatically by Window Master when the 
mouse is clicked on one. All you have to do is read a Dialog 
function to find out which Button, Icon, or Edit field was 
selected, its very simple. 

Mouse & Keyboard Functions 

Window Master automatically handles the Mouse pointer 
movement, display and button clicks. It will tell you the current 
screen coordinate, the local window coordinate, window number 
the mouse is in, the number of times the button was pressed, 
which window number it was clicked in and more. The 
Keyboard is completely buffered, and supports up to 80 
programmable Function keys that can contain any kind of 
information or command sequences you can imagine. You can 
load and save function key sets at any time. So. you can have 
special sets of function keys for different tasks. The "Ctrl" key is 
supported so that you have a full control code keyboard 
available. 

Window Master Applications 

Window Master pushs the Color Computer 3 far beyond its 
norma! capabilities, into the world of a "User Friendly" 
operating enviornment. We are already planning several new 
programs for use with Window Master. So you don't have to 
worry about having to write all your own programs. And don't 
forget that many existing Basic and M.L. programs will run 
under Window Master with little or no changes. The 
Possibilities for Application programs are endless: Spread 
Sheets, Word Processing, Communications, Education, Games, 
Graphic Design, DeskTop Publishing and on and on. 

Hardware Requirements 

Window Master requires 512K of memory, at least 1 Disk 
Drive, a Hi-Res Joystick Interface and a Mouse or Joystick. 

Technical Assistance 

If you run into difficulty trying to use some of Window 
Master's features, we will be happy to assist you in any way 
possible. You can write to us at the address below or call us 
between 10am and 2pm Pacific Standard Time for a more timely 
response. Sorry, no collect calls will be accepted. 

Ordering Information 

To order WINDOW MASTER by mail, send check or money 

order for $69.95, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the 
address below. To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD 

call us at (702)-452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP Ltd. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702)-452-0632 



E4U16NR6U16NF4U5BD23BR28H8U2F8NU 
2U12BR40ND8R12D4NL12BD4BD8ND8G6H 
6D8" 

1320 DATA THIS TIME IS VERY * 
1325 DATA LATE , EARLY , LONG , SHORT 
133)3 DATA"BR12BD40R100L14BU2E2NR 
6U2H2L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF 
2L10U4R4U2E6R20F4R10D8NR2BL54L4N 
G2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L14NG202H2L2G2D2N 
F2L10U20R28D6R6D6R8ND8BE22D8NE4N 
H4 

1335 DATA YOUR CAR IS * THE TRUC 
K 

1340 DATA IN FRONT OF , BEHIND, BES 
IDE, UNDER 

1345 DATA" BR12BD40R98L8BU4NG2U2H 
2L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L10 
U20R28D6R6D6R8D8L4BL56BD2E2NR6U2 
H2L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L1 
0U4R4U2E6R20F4R10D8NR2BH22NU8NH4 
NE4" 

13 50 DATA YOUR CAR IS * THE TRUC 
K 

13 55 DATA BEHIND, IN FRONT OF, BES 
IDE, UNDER 

1360 DATA"BR12BD40R100L64BU2E2NR 
6U2H2L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF 
2L10U4R4U2E6R20F4R10D8R2BD4R8U24 
NG4U4NR44L8E12NR40BG16BL12NL14NH 
4NG4" 

1365 DATA THE CAR WILL * THE GAR 
AGE 

1370 DATA ENTER, EXIT, SURROUND, HI 
T 

1375 DATA"BR12BD40R100L14BU2E2NR 
6U2H2L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF 
2L10U4R4U2E6R20F4R10D8NR2BD4L52U 
24NF4U4NL44R8H12NL40BF16BR12R14N 
H4NG4" 

138)3 DATA WATCH THE CAR * THE GA 
RAGE 

13 85 DATA EXIT , ENTER , SURROUND , HI 
T 

139j3 DATA"BR30BD24ND10F10M+28 , -8 

R10F10G4NL10G6L10M-28 , -8G10U10U2 

BR3 6NH4NG4BR10BU4R2BR12R2BU6R2BU 

6R2BU6R2BU10BR4NF4G4L8H4G4L8H4G4 

L8H4G4L8H4G4L8H4G4" 

1395 DATA THIS FISH IS * 

1400 DATA ALIVE, DEAD, TASTY, AWFUL 

1405 DATA"BR30BD24ND20F10NG10R6N 

U4ND4R6NU6ND6R6NU8ND8R6NU8ND8R6N 

U8ND8R6ND8U8R4F8G4NL4G4L4BU22BL1 

0E2U2H2U2E2U2H2U2BL12D2F2D2G2D2F 

2D2G2" 

141j3 DATA THIS FISH IS * 

1415 DATA DEAD, ALIVE, TASTY, AWFUL 

1420 DATA" BR34BD3 4NU8R6NU8R6NU8B 

R6U8R8D4NL8D4BR6NU8R8BR6U8D4R4NE 

4F4BJR6ND4U12L68D16NR68U18R68U2L6 



8U2R68U2L68U2R68U2L68U2R68U2NL68 
L28NU6L10NU6BD32ND6BR10ND6" 
1425 DATA THIS SIGN TELLS YOU TO 

1430 DATA GO, STOP, LISTEN, TALK 
1435 DATA"BR34BD34NU8R6NU8R6NU8B 
R6U8R8D4NL8D4BR6NU8R8BR6U8D4R4NE 
4F4BR6ND4U12L68D16NR68U32R68ND3 2 
L28NU6L10NU6BD3 2ND6BR10ND6BU20BL 
34R2NU8R8U8NL10BR6ND8R8D8NL8BR6U 
8F8U8BR6R2ND2BR4R4ND8R4 11 
1440 DATA THIS SIGN TELLS YOU TO 

1445 DATA STOP, GO , LISTEN, TALK 

1450 DATA"BR22BD16NR68M+4,+10F16 

G6R40H6E16M+4 , -10BD10BR6R10F4D6G 

10M-10 , +3L10E6R10E6U2H2L4U4BU10B 

L30G6D4NF4G8" 

1455 DATA THIS CUP IS * 

14 60 DATA BROKEN, FIXED, HEAVY, LIG 

HT 

1465 DATA"BR22BD16NR68M+4, +10^16 

G6R40H6E16M+4 , -10R10F4D6G10M-10 , 

+3L10E6R10E6U2H2L4 » 

1470 DATA THIS CUP IS * 

1475 DATA FIXED, BROKEN, HEAVY, LIG 

HT 

1480 DATA"BR30BD42R50E4U6M-6,-16 
E2U4H4L12G2D6F2R4NE2D10H2L2H2L4H 
2L6G2L4G2L2G2L4BU10R12U2L12U2R12 
NR16U2NR16L12U2R12U2L12BR60R12D2 
L12D2NL16R12D2L12NL16D2R12D2L12" 
1485 DATA THIS SHOWS A * ARM 
1490 DATA STRONG, WEAK, HEAVY, LIGH 
T 

1495 DATA"BR30BD42R12D2R10D2R6U2 

R10U2R12E4U6M-6 , -16E2U4H4L12G2D6 

F2R4NE2D12L34BU16NR2 6NU4ND2U2R26 

BR2 2R2 2NU2ND4 D2 L2 2 11 

1500 DATA THIS SHOWS A * ARM 

1505 DATA WEAK, STRONG, HEAVY, LIGH 

T 

1510 CLS : PRINTS 101 , 11 YOU TRIED"NC 
+NW"TIMES &":PRINT@ 165, "ANSWERED 
"NC" CORRECTLY" 

1515 PRINT@2 2 9,"WHILE DOING"NW"W 
RONG • " 

1520 NQ=NC+NW:IF NQ=0THEN NQ=1 

1525 MS=INT(NC/NQ*100) 

1530 PRINT@293, "YOUR SCORE IS"MS 

"%." 

* 1535 PRINT@ 3 57, "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N 

/C) ?"; 

1540 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 

1545 IFX$= s "N"THENCLS : END 

1550 IFX$="C"THEN1560 

1555 GOTO1540 

1560 IF FF=1 THEN RUN 

1565 IFV=1THENSCREEN1,1:GOTO290 

1570 IFV=0THENSCREEN1,1:GOTO245 



1 56 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



1 Turn of th e Scr e w 



Ever notice that my articles run in 
patterns? Usually, I start with a 
simple project for the beginner, 
move on to a harder, longer project and 
then finish with an electronic lesson. 
Well, it's time, once again, for a be- 
ginner's project. It is always hard to 
design a simple project that actually 
does something. As an electronics stu- 
dent in college, I did a lot of labs. They 
were simple, but they were boring. (Set 
the power supply to 10 volts. Put two 
resistors in series. Measure the voltage 
across the two resistors. Compare the 
values to that of the calculated voltage 
values.) Those labs were enough to put 
you to sleep in the middle of a lab. 

For this column, I had to design a 
project that is simple but not boring. I 
checked to see what beginners wanted 
as a starter project. Most said they 
wanted something that worked in front 
of them — something that buzzed, 
beeped, moved or lit up. In the past, I 
have had projects using an LED to 
indicate that power is on, the disk drive 
is on, etc. LEDs are always a good 
project, and this beginner's project 
makes the computer control up to eight 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Ouest, Quebec. 
Tony's username on Delphi is DISTO. 



Finally, a beginner 's 
project that does 
something 

A Simple, 
Expandable 
LED Project 

By Tony DiStefano 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



LEDs. (Note: Even though this project 
is for beginners, some electronics 
knowledge is required. Read the article 
and judge for yourself if you understand 
enough of it to try it.) 

I will continue this project for a few 
months and make it grow into a mini- 
ature control center. This project will 
show the beginner how to turn on 
LEDs, small motors, relays, sensor 
devices, etc. If you come up with a few 
ideas, let me know. You can write to me 



in care of THE RAINBOW or reach me on 
Delphi. 

As with any project, you need tools. 
How far you want to go with this project 
will determine how many tools and 
parts you will need. To begin the proj- 
ect, you will need the following parts: 

Part # Description 

Ul 74LS273 

CI .luf 10 volts 

Rl to R8 470 ohm Va watt 

Dl to D8 LED Gust about any 
kind) 

Misc.: 20-pin socket and wire. 

You may already have some of these 
materials, and most are available at 
your local Radio Shack. You may need 
to get some parts through a mail order 
service. Many companies that have the 
parts advertise in RAINBOW. 

The first thing you need is a project 
board. Radio Shack has dropped this 
item. I suggest you check rainbow's 
advertisements to find a board. I get my 
boards through CRC, but the board is 
available through other companies. At 
this time, the only tools you will need 
are a soldering iron and some solder. 

It should take less than two hours to 
assemble this project. We will do it 
together, step by step. Don't start until 
you have all the parts. It's no fun to let 
a project sit, incomplete, because some 
of the parts are missing. 

Before we begin, it is important to 



DO 



D2 



.□3 



D4 



□5 



□ 7 



<scs3 



<+5V h 

<Tgnd~) 



vcc 

J 



33 



GNDl 



34 



U1 



1 1 0 


3 


-1 1 


4 


- 1 2 


7 


■13 


8 


-1 4 


1 3 


V\ 5 


1 4 


- I 6 


1 7 


- 1 7 


1 e 


i3G 


11 > 




i -k 






iQ5 





□ 1 

□ 2 
D3 
D4 
D5 

□ 6 

□ 7 
□B 



CLR 



□ 1 

Q2 

03 I — 
Q4 
□S 
□6 
Q7 

□a 



J. 2 
1 5 



1 6 
1 9 



74LS273 



VCC 

1 

. 1 uF 1 



O Volta 



R1 

-AAA 



D1 



470 
R2 

AAA- 



47Q 
R5 

AAA 

470 
R6 



AAA 



470 
R7 

AAA 



470 
RB 



AAA 
470 



OHM 



470 
R3 

AAA 

470 
R4 

AAA 



OHM 



OHM 



OHM 



OHM 



OHM 



OHM 



OHM 



LED 
□ 2 

LED 
D3 

LED 
D4 

LED 
D5 



LED 
D6 

LED 
D7 

LED 
D8 

LED 



Figure 1 



November 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 57 



Pin #1 



CoCo 
Connector 



DE 



U1 



4 

C1 



R1 



R8 



D D D D Q D D 0 

oooooooo 

t t 

D1 D8 



Figure 2 



understand how a schematic diagram 
works. Look at Figure 1, and examine 
Ul. The pin numbers are not drawn in 
any order. They are arranged so the 
diagram is easy to understand. All the 
inputs are one side, and all the outputs 
are on the other. 

On the actual board, the pins are 
arranged in order. Begin with Pin 1, 
which is identified by a notch or dimple. 



The next pin in a counter-clockwise 
direction is Pin 2. The other pins are in 
the same counter-clockwise order. The 
boxes on the left of Figure I are the pin 
descriptions for the CoCo's pin connec- 
tor. The numbers above the wires are 
the pin numbers. Pin +5V leads to a box 
labeled VCC. That means every point in 
the diagram hooked up to VCC is really 
hooked up to that pin. This also applies 



to Box GND. All points marked GND 
are connected. 

While it is not obvious on this small 
diagram, the way the diagram is pre- 
sented makes the schematic easier to 
read. Instead of wires everywhere, 
labels are used. (Please note: Though 
not marked on the diagram, Ul has a 
VCC at Pin 20 and a GND at Pin 10. 

Now, let us begin the project. 

First, put all the parts on a clean 
table. If you are using a CRC project 
board, make sure you have the right side 
up. A small #1 is printed next to Pin 1. 
This is the top. Pin 2 is directly below 
Pin 1. Pin 3 is next to Pin 1, Pin 4 is 
below Pin 3 and next to Pin 2, etc. All 
parts will mount on the top. 

Mount the 20-pin socket in the top of 
the protoboard. For proper placement, 
follow the plan in Figure 2. Make sure 
that Pin 1 is the pin closest to the edge 
connectors. Solder all the pins of the 
socket, and mount the resistors and 
LEDs. Make sure that the short lead of 
the LED is positioned away from the 
resistors. They are polarized, and the 
short lead is the negative side. Bend the 
leads so that no part falls out. Insert the 
capacitor next to the socket, and bend 
the leads of this part as well. 



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printer, 32K. 

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158 



THE RAINBOW November 1988 



The rest is just wiring. You know the 
pin numbers and positions. One at a 
time, solder a wire between the points 
in the schematic. Every time you place 
a wire, mark it off on the diagram. This 
serves two purposes: that you don't miss 
any points and that you don't try to do 
any point twice. 

Let's do the first few together. Follow- 
ing the schematic, solder one end of the 
wire to Pin 10 on the connector. Cut the 
wire so that it just reaches Pin 3 of U 1 , 
and solder that end of the wire to Pin 
3 of Ul. Mark off this wire on the 
schematic. Next, solder an end of the 
wire to Pin 1 1 of the connector. Cut the 
wire so that it just reaches Pin 4 of Ul, 
and solder that end to Pin 4. Mark off 
that wire on the schematic. Now finish 
off the rest of the wires one at a time. 
When you are finished, recheck all your 
work. Remember to check the VCC and 
GND of Ul. Insert the 74LS273 into the 
socket, and make sure that Pin #1 is in 
the right place. 

That's all there is to the hardware part 
of it. Plug it in, turn on your computer 
and check for the normal power-up 
message. If you do not, turn off the 
computer and check your work again. 

Now that you have built it, let's see 



how it works. Look at Figure 1. The 
main part in this project is Ul, an eight- 
bit D-type flip-flop. All the D's are 
inputs and all the Q's are outputs. When 
the CLK input is strobed, the binary 
level on D is transferred to Q. Thus, if 
all D's were at Level 1 when the CLK 
was strobed, all the Q's (outputs) are 
now at Level 1 . The D's are now at Level 
0. The CLK that I am using is the 
CoCo's SCS pin. It is mapped at $FF40 
to SFF5F. Since I am not using any 
address lines, mirroring will occur 
throughout this area. Next month, 
when we expand, I'll use the address 
lines to add more to this project. 

Since they are all connected to iden- 
tical circuits when any Q has 0 volts, no 
current can flow because the other end 
of the circuit also has 0 volts (GND). 
The LED is off. When any Q is high, 
roughly three to five volts, current flows 
through the resistor and the LED. 

Since each LED is represented by one 
bit on the CoCo's bus, DO on the CoCo 
controls LED 1, Dl controls LED 2, 
etc. Since it is memory-mapped on the 
CoCo's bus, a simple BASIC poke com- 
mand will turn on the LEDs. Thus, if 
you type PDKE &HFF4G), 255, all the 
LEDs should go on. (Wow! It works.) 



If it doesn't work, check all your 
wiring. Did you put all the LEDs in the 
right direction? Try reversing one and 
see. 

If it is working, continue by typing 
POKE &HFF40 , 1. Only one LED should 
be on. Now try typing 2 instead of 1, 
then 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and finally 128. 
Each LED should light up, one at a 
time. Now try 72 (8 + 64). Adding two 
LED values together will cause both 
LEDs to come on. Use a FDR/NEXT loop 
to write a program that makes a chaser. 

Those of you with Multi-Pak Inter- 
faces must remember that the SCS pin 
is switched. In order to poke the values 
at $FF40 in the right slot, you must 
change the slot access. You can do this 
by going into the all-RAM mode and 
turning the switch in front of the Multi- 
Pak to the project's slot. You can also 
make sure that your disk controller is 
in Slot 4, then put your project in Slot 
1 and type POKE &HFF7F , &H30. This 
will change the SCS access to Slot 1 and 
leave the CTS, or DOS, access in Slot 
4. Remember to return to &H33 before 
trying to access the disk. 

In my next column, I'll expand this 
project to include more goodies that 
beep, boop and buzz. /R\ 




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November 1988 THE RAINBOW 159 



RAINBOWTECH 




16K ECB 




Sorting It All Out 



By William Barden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



You wouldn't think sorting would be such a big deal 
on computers, would you? Alphabetizing a mailing 
list, arranging shapes in order of size, building an 
ordered word list — it just doesn't seem like a profound task. 
And yet, I'm sitting here with Knuth's Sorting and Searching, 
a 700-page book with fine print that discusses the various 
sorting methods. Although Knuth is a renowned computer 
expert, he doesn't write for the popular audience. (In fact, 
I haven't seen many descriptions of sorts that even an 
experienced programmer would understand.) 

This column will attempt to describe four typical sorts so 
that average rainbow readers (and the author) can under- 
stand them. Fortunately, we can use CoCo graphics to our 
advantage in this situation. The programs I'm about to 
describe not only sort data, but they display the data on the 
CoCo screen as it is sorted. I was amazed to see just how 
easily the sorts can be visualized if you can, well, visualize 
them. 

A Row of 126 Sticks 

Suppose that you have a row of 126 sticks of various sizes; 
some of the sticks may be the same size. How do you sort 
them? One way is to bundle them up, stand them on a flat 
surface, and pick the longest stick. This stick is then set aside, 
and the process is repeated for the next stick, and the next, 
etc. The process continues for all 126 sticks — 126 selections 
are made. 

A computer sort can proceed the same way. However, the 
computer can't see all 126 sticks and pick out the longest. 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 



It must scan through all 126 sticks, and compare each new 
stick with one previously set aside as the longest. It's as if 
a friend were holding the sticks behind his back and handing 
them to you one at a time. You'd compare the new stick with 
the longest stick you had found so far, and save the new stick 
if it was longer 

A Selection Sort 

The Selection Sort is similar to the case of the friend 
holding sticks behind his back. At the end of one pass through 
the sticks, the Selection Sort selects the longest stick. Let's 
see how it works. 

Suppose that you have the 10 sticks shown in Figure 1 and 
want to place them in order, smallest to largest, left to right. 
First, assume that we have a pad and pencil on which we've 
noted the "largest stick" and its position — one through 10. 
We'll begin with an imaginary stick smaller than any in the 
pile and place it in Position -1. We will also note on the pad 
the last position of the row — Position 10. Moving from left 
to right, we will look at each new stick. If it's larger than the 
largest stick we've recorded, we make a note of its position. 
As we continue moving to the right, we compare each stick 
to the largest stick we have found. If a new stick is larger, 
it becomes the largest stick, and its position is noted on the 
pad. At the end of one pass, we have the position of the largest 
stick. We now exchange that stick with the stick in the last 
position. Position 10 now holds the largest stick. 

Next, we use Position 9 as the last position and start the 
process again examining the sticks in positions one 
through nine. At the end of this scan we have the position 
of the next largest stick, and we exchange this stick with the 
one in Position 9. Then we begin the process again, using 
Position 8 as the last position. Next we use Position 7, etc. 
Each time we complete the process, we add the next largest 
stick to the last position. It takes 10 passes to order the sticks 
from largest to smallest, left to right. 



160 



THE RAINBOW 



November 1988 



B IC 



D 



Original 



B IC 



After Pass 1 



H 



H 



G 



B IC D E H 
After Pass 5 



B ic 



D 



H 



After Pass 6 



G 



G 



B IC D E F I 
After Pass 2 



H 



G 



D IC 
* 



B 



H 



After Pass 7 



B IC D E F H 
After Pass 3 



A IC 



B 



H 



After Pass 8 



B IC D E H 



After Pass 4 



G 



IC IA 



B 



H 



After Pass 9 



* - Next Position 



Figure 1: Selection Sort 



November 1 988 THE RAINBOW 161 



J I flfll If f f 



II 

Figure 2: 



I 



I 

Unsorted Sticks 




A Screen Full of Sticks 

We've simulated a pile of sticks on the CoCo screen, as 
shown in Figure 2. The basic LINE command has been used 
to generate 126 randomly-sized sticks across a 256-by-192 
resolution screen. The sticks are placed in alternating 
columns so that you can differentiate between individual 
sticks and so that a border can be maintained around the 
screen. (We could have used any number, but 126 was 
convenient.) 

The lengths of the sticks are stored in Array NO, a 126-entry 
numeric array. The values in NO correspond to the length of 
each stick. 

Selection Sort Mechanics 

The Selection Sort program is shown in Listing 1. The first 
portion generates the sticks on the screen; the middle portion 
is the actual sort; and the last portion displays the swapped 
sticks. 

In the program, Variable J is the position of the last stick. 
It begins as Position 126 and ends as Position 1. Imagine this 
position changing as smaller and smaller sticks move from 
the rightmost to the leftmost position. As the pass progresses, 
Variable LS, will hold the value of the largest stick. The initial 
value of LS is -1. Because every stick is larger than this, it's 
guaranteed that there will be a new largest stick at the end 



of the first pass. Variable SI records the current position of 
the largest stick. Its initial value is also -1, an illegal value, 
but this will be changed to a legitimate value by the end of 
the first pass. 

The main loop in the sort is Line 220. The stick lengths 
from NO (1 ) through NO ( J ) are compared to the largest stick 
in LS. Any stick larger than the value in LS replaces the LS 
value. Its position is then stored in Variable SI. At the end 
of the pass, S I holds the position of the largest stick — NO ( I ) . 
This stick is then swapped with NO ( J ) . The process continues 
as the value of J decreases by one with each pass. 

(After each pass, the two line display subroutines clear the 
two stick lines involved and then rewrite the exchanged lines.) 

Keep your eye on the largest stick while running this 
program. It will be swapped with the stick in the last position. 
You'll see progressively smaller sticks being placed from left 
to right as the sort is done. The result of this sort is shown 
in Figure 3. The Selection Sort program takes about V/i 
minutes on a CoCo 2. 

Bubbling Away 

The Bubble Sort is another popular sort. It's similar to the 
Selection Sort. At the end of one pass through the sticks, the 
Bubble Sort selects the longest stick. However, it may also 
exchange other sticks, partially ordering them. Let's see how 
it works. 

Imagine that we have the same 10 sticks shown in Figure 
1 and that we still want to order the sticks from smallest to 
largest. Moving from left to right, we look at a pair of sticks. 
We first compare sticks 1 and 2. If Stick 1 is larger than Stick 
2, the sticks are swapped. Next we compare sticks 2 and 3. 
If Stick 2 is larger than Stick 3, the sticks are swapped. 
Moving down the line, we will make nine comparisons — the 
last one is a comparison of sticks 9 and 10, 

At the end of the pass through the 10 sticks, what do we 
have? Since we swapped sticks each time the first stick in the 
pair was larger than the second, we find that the largest stick 
has "bubbled" down the line to the last position, Stick 10. 
The remaining sticks may be sorted, but probably aren't, 
although some sticks have been moved toward their correct 
position. We can now repeat the procedure for the remaining 
nine sticks. At the end of this pass, the next largest stick 
occupies Position 9. Eight more passes will guarantee that 
all sticks have been sorted. Of course, when no swaps are 
made during a pass, then the sticks have been sorted, even 
if 10 passes have not been made. The first pass is shown in 
Figure 4. 

The Bubble Sort program is shown in Listing 2. Like the 
Selection Sort program, the screen is first filled with 126 
sticks. The middle portion is the actual Bubble Sort. The last 
portion displays the swapped sticks and is similar to the line 
display subroutines in Listing 1 . 

If you run this program you'll see the swapping taking place 
as a dark line that moves across the screen. Each time the 
dark line appears, two adjacent sticks are being swapped. As 
the sort progresses, longer sticks build up on the screen right, 
one stick being added for each pass through the sticks. As 
the screen becomes sorted, youll see fewer and fewer swaps 
being made. 

The sort portion of the program uses two variables. 
Variable J always points to the last entry in the list. J starts 
at 126, the last screen line, but decreases by one for each pass. 
Variable I is the current location of the stick as a pass is made 
from Stick 1 to Stick J. Swaps are made by swapping stick 



162 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



bIc 



H 



A IC 



B 



H 



A 



Al C 



B 



A 



H 



A IC 



B 



A 



A 



A IC 



D 



B 



G H 



A IC 



B 



H 



A IC 



B 



A 



G 



A IC 



B 



H 



Largest 
Stick 



/~\ - Swap 
* - First Stick of Pair 



Ia Ic 



B 



G H 



Figure 4: One Pass of a Bubble Sort 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 163 



Increment m 4 
No Swaps 
For Positions 
1-4 



Increment « 2 
Second Position 
No More Swaps 











| ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 














i 



1 



Increment - 2 
First Position 
Swap 



Increment = 1 
Swap 



L-J_LJ_1_L-1_J 



Increment « 2 
First Position 
No More 
Swaps 



n 



Increment « 1 
Swap 



t_J_JL_J__L_L_LJ 




Increment - 2 
Second Position 
Swap 



Increment = 1 
Sorted 



t t t t t t t t 



Figure 5: Shell Sort of Eight Sticks 



1 64 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



ND( I ) and NQ( I + 1). A swap flag, held in SN, is set to 1 
if a swap occurred. The sort ends when SW = 0 after a pass 
(no swap occurred) or J reaches 1. 

Although the logic for the Bubble Sort is easy, it has one 
big disadvantage — it's slow for unsorted data. The sort in 
Listing 2 takes about 3 minutes to sort a screen of 126 sticks 
(values) when random stick lengths are used and screen 
graphics are not updated. When screen graphics are updated, 
the sort takes about 16 minutes. On the other hand, the sort 
is almost instantaneous when the data is sorted and very fast 
when only a few values are out of order. By comparison, the 
Selection Sort would slog through all 126 passes! 

The Shell Game 

Why is the Bubble Sort so slow? Although you can think 
about it abstractly, it's obvious from the screen — it takes 
many passes to move a stick that's out of order across a whole 
screen, and there are many sticks to be moved. It would be 
nice to bypass the tedious swapping and just throw the sticks 
in about the right location based upon length. You could then 
do a more detailed sort after the sticks were approximately 
arranged in order. This is the idea behind the Shell Sort 
program, shown in Listing 3. 

The first part of the Shell Sort program generates the same 
type of random data as in the two preceding sorts — 1 26 sticks 
with values in array NO ( ) . The line display subroutines are 
at the end, as in the previous program. The actual shell sort 
is in the middle of the program. 

The Shell Sort is more complicated than the Bubble Sort 
but is about five times faster — the program taking about 
three minutes instead of 16. This sort is much faster than the 



Selection Sort when the screen data is not updated (Selection 
Sort only re-draws 126 pairs of lines, but Bubble Sort and 
Shell Sort re-draw the lines constantly). A sort utility would 
not waste time displaying the sort data as we are doing. 

The operation of the Shell Sort is obvious from the screen. 
The program uses an increment that spans the width of sticks. 
The increment begins at half of 126 — 63. Using this 
increment, sticks 1 and 64 are compared, and swapped if they 
are out of order. Next, sticks 2 and 65 are compared and 
swapped if out of order. This process continues until sticks 
63 and 126 are compared. The pass is like the Bubble Sort 
— but with gaps. At the end of the first pass, many sticks 
have been moved approximately to the proper position. If 
any swaps occurred, the same increment — 63 — is used 
again. The increment of 63 is maintained until no swaps 
occur. 

Next, the increment is divided approximately in half, to 
31 (fractional values are not meaningful here, so a BASIC INT 
function is used to find the next lower integer value for the 
increment). Now the width of sticks are scanned again — a 
Bubble Sort of four items (i.e., Stick 1 is compared to Stick 
32, Stick 32 to 63, Stick 63 to 94 and Stick 94 to 125). At 
the end of this pass, the smallest stick has been moved to 
Position 125. The increment of 31 is maintained until no 
swaps occur. 

Now increments of 15, 7, 3 and 1 are used to further sort 
the data. The increment of 1 is really a Bubble Sort, but at 
this point most of the sticks have been positioned near their 
proper positions and the sort is much faster. The sort is over 
when the increment has been reduced to 0. 



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November 1988 THE RAINBOW 165 



Original 



Swap 




First Swap 



* L 




Left, Right 
Pointers Cross 



Now Have 
2 Parts, 
Each to be 
Sorted 



J V 



J 



Part 1 



Part 2 



* m Comparison Stick 
R,L - Right, Left Pointers 



Figure 6: Sample Quick Sort Pass 



The process is shown for an eight-stick row in Figure 5. 

In the program, Variable IN is the increment, ST is the 
starting location, EN is the ending location and I is the current 
location within the range. 

A Quicker Sort 

The quickest sort of all for random data (when screen 
graphics are not considered) is the Quick Sort. It's more 
complicated than the Shell Sort, but it sorts screen data in 
about 45 seconds when graphics are not used and 90 seconds 
when graphics are used. 



"/ Ve seen the A cropolis by 
moonlight and Los Angeles 
through the haze, but III have to 
say that the Quick Sort display is 
really beautiful to watch — not so 
much in an aesthetic sense, but 
beautiful in a logical sense. " 



The Quick Sort works like this: Start with a row of 10 sticks 
again. Now choose the first stick in the row and note its 
length. The row is now divided into two parts — left and right. 
Sticks in the left part are of lesser or equal length to the 
comparison stick and sticks in the right part are of greater 
length. The sticks are ordered by moving down the row in 
both directions at the same time. The sort keeps moving from 
the right until the first stick shorter than the comparison stick 
is found, and keeps moving from the left until the first stick 
longer than the comparison stick is found. Those two sticks 
are swapped, and the sort continues until the comparison has 
reached the middle of the sort. The comparison stick is then 
swapped with the last entry of the left portion. A sample pass 
is shown in Figure 6. 

Any stick in the left part is definitely smaller than any stick 
in the right part. However, within each part, the sticks 
probably aren't ordered. Now each part is considered 
separately. The whole process repeats again for the left part. 
The first stick is used as a comparison stick and the left part 
is further subdivided into two parts — the left part holding 
all sticks smaller than the comparison stick, and the right part 
holding all sticks larger than the comparison stick. The same 
process is repeated for the right part. 

This division into parts continues until each part holds two 
units. In a 126-stick set, for example, there will be about 63 
parts. The beauty of the sort is that sticks are moved over 
great distances and put into rough order without a lot of 
overhead. 

The main problem with a Quick Sort is that a record must 
be kept of each part — the position number of the start and 
the position number of the end. This record keeping calls for 
a list or array of items. After each sort of a part, the list is 
used to find unsorted parts, which will then go through the 
process and generate new parts. A sample of a Quick Sort 
of a 10-item list — including a record keeping tist — is shown 
in Figure 7. 

The Quick Sort program is shown in Listing 4. The 



166 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



RECORD KEEPING ARRAY 

(shows unsorted) 
1 2 3 4 5 



(empty) 1,10 



1,4 



5,10 



1,4 



5,8 



9,10 



1,4 



5,7 



1 ,4 (empty) 



Original 



1 23456789 10 



Time 



ii 



First Partition 

A: Left-1, Right-4 

B: Lett-5, Right- 10 



J V 



/ 



B 



\ 



Partition of A 
C: Left-1 , Right-3 




Partlon of B 

E: Left-5, Right-8 

F: Left-9, Rlght-10 




Partition of E 
G: Left«5, 
Rlght-7 




J D H i_j 



Figure 7: Quick Sort of a 10-Stick Row 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 167 



generate data code is identical, and the line display subrou- 
tines are similar, to the other sorts. The actual sort code uses 
a housekeeping array, L5. The first value of the array — 
LS(G) — is a pointer to the next available location in the 
array (see Figure 8). Two values at a time are put into the 
array — the left- and right-most stick positions. There may 
be many different sets of these, defining both large and small 
parts. As parts are sorted, two new parts are created, and the 
end points of each of these are put into the L5 array. End 
points are taken out two at a time to start a sort process. The 
sort loops back looking for new parts to sort. When LS ( 0 ) =0, 
all parts have been sorted. 

Variables ST and EN are the starting and ending positions 
for a part. Variables LP and RP are the pointers to this part 
and move in from the left and right. 

Another Computer Nerd 

I've seen the Acropolis by moonlight and Los Angeles 
through the haze, but I'll have to say that the Quick Sort 
display is really beautiful to watch — not so much in an 
aesthetic sense, but beautiful in a logical sense. You can easily 
visualize the sorting process dividing the sticks into parts, 
sorting those parts, getting new parts from the record keeping 
list and sorting them, and finally working on very small 
increments. I hope there are enough CoCoists out there to 
share my enthusiasm. Let me know if you enjoy it. 

See you next month with more CoCo topics. □ 



LS(O) 


4 


0) 


1 


(2) 


23 


(3) 


24 


(4) 


52 


(5) 









LS(O) Points to Last 
Used Location 



LS(O) +1 Points to 
Next Available 
Location 



(98) 
(99) 
(100) 



Figure 8: Quick Sort Housekeeping Array 



Listing 1: 5ELECTQN 




230 GOSUB 290 
240 TM = NO ( J ) : 


NO( J ) = NO( 




100 ■ GENERATE RANDOM DATA 




SI ) : NO( SI ) = 


TM 




110 PMODE 4 




250 GOSUB 320 






12 0 SCREEN 1,0 




260 NEXT J 






130 DIM NO( 126 ) 




270 GOTO 270 






140 PCLS 0 




280 1 LINE DISPLAY 


SUBROUTINES 




150 FOR I = 1 TO 126 




290 LINE ( J * 2, 


190 ) - ( J * 




160 NO( I ) = INT( RND ( 190 ) 


) 


2,0), PRESET 




170 LINE (1*2, 190 ) - ( I 


* 


300 LINE ( ( SI ) 


* 2, 190 ) - 


( 


2, 190 - NO( I ) ) , PSET 




( SI ) * 2, 0 ), 


PRESET 




180 NEXT 




310 RETURN 






190 1 SELECTION SORT 




320 LINE ( J * 2, 


190 ) - ( J * 




200 FOR J = 126 TO 1 STEP -1 




2, 190 - NO( J ) 


) , PSET 




210 LS = -1: SI = -1 




330 LINE ( ( SI ) 


* 2, 190 ) - 


( 


220 FOR I = 1 TO J: IF NO( I ) 


> 


( SI ) * 2, 190 


- NO( SI ) ) , 


P 


LS THEN LS = NO ( I ) : SI = I: 


NE 


SET 






XT I ELSE NEXT I 




3 40 RETURN 







Listing 2: BUBBLE 

100 ' GENERATE RANDOM DATA 
110 PMODE 4 
120 SCREEN 1,0 
130 DIM NO( 126 ) 
140 PCLS 0 

150 FOR I = 1 TO 12 6 
160 NO ( I ) = INT( RND ( 190 ) 
170 LINE (1*2, 190 ) 
2, 190 - NO( I ) ) , PSET 
180 NEXT 

190 1 IMPROVED BUBBLE SORT 



- ( I 



200 SW = 0 

210 FOR J=12 5 TO 1 STEP -1 

220 FOR I = 1 TO J: IF NO ( I ) > 

NO( I + 1 ) THEN GOSUB 2 60: TM 
- NO(I) : NO(I)=NO(I+l 
) :NO(I+l)=TM:SW=l: GOSUB 2 90: NE 
XT ELSE NEXT 

230 IF ( SW <> 0 ) AND ( J <> 1 
) THEN SW = 0: NEXT J 
240 GOTO 240 

250 1 LINE DISPLAY SUBROUTINES 
260 LINE (1*2, 190 ) - ( I * 



168 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



2 , p ) , PRESET 




2, 19p - N0( 


I ) ) , PSET 


27^t LINE ( ( I + 1 ) * 


2, 190 ) 


300 LINE ( ( 


I + 1 ) * 2, 190 ) 


-( ( I + 1 ) * 2, 0 ) , 


PRESET 


~ ( ( I + 1 ) 


* 2, 190 - NO ( I + 


280 RETURN 




1 ) ) , PSET 


290 LINE (1*2, 190 ) 


- ( I * 


310 RETURN 





Listinc 3: SHELL 


3 00 IF EN > 12 6 T"P"FM HOTO ?G(A 




-l-X'X' OijlNilKAill JKAJNjJUjyi UA1A 


310 IF NO ( "RM ^ MO ( T ^ TWITM 


b 


±±p jzvl\JUxu He 


OSUB 3 9 0: TM = MO ( T \ • mo f t ^ 






NO f FN ^ ■ MO ^ T?M ^ ""PM* ctaT — 




1 ? 0 HTM NO f 1 9fi ^ 
i-oyj UJ.VL n\j \ j. z o J 


1: GOSUB 42 0 




1 A 01 PPT c; (A 


32 0 I as "PM 






^ 1 0 TM = 7TM X TM 




160 "MO f T ^ — T'M r P / "DTtfn / lQfll \ \ 
lOjfl 1NVJ ^ X ) — XJNJ.^ rCINJJ \ ISjyj ) ) 


34 0 GOTO ^C^05 




1 H (A T TTJT? / T * O 1 Q fl( \ / T 4« 

±/p XiXJNrj ( X x £f iyp ; — ( X * 






o mo f t ^ ^ dcpt 


3 60 GOTO 24 0 




±O)0 IN Hi A X 


370 GOTO *^7 0i 




19J3 » SHELL SORT 


380 1 LINE DISPLAY SUBROUTINES 




2j3j3 IN = 126 


390 LINE ( 1*2, 190 ) - ( I * 


2 


210 IN = INT( IN / 2 ) 


, 0 ) , PRESET 




22J3 IF IN = 0 THEN GOTO 37j3 


400 LINE ( ( EN ) * 2, 190 ) - ( 




23J3 ST = 1 


( EN ) * 2 , 0 ) , PRESET 




24j3 IF ST > IN THEN GOTO 210 


410 RETURN 




25J3 SW = 1 


420 LINE (1*2, 190 ) - ( I * 




2 6J3 IF SW = 0 THEN GOTO 3 50 


2 , NO ( I ) ) ,PSET 




270 SW = 0 


430 LINE ( ( EN ) * 2, 190 ) - 


( 


280 I - ST 


( EN ) * 2 , NO ( EN ) ) , PSET 


290 EN = ST + IN 


440 RETURN 





lyO 1*1%/ 1 I \* • * 4 » ,1 Wit Ml 4*4(1 ■««■■ % t - 1 » I 





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November 1988 THE RAINBOW 169 



Listing 4: QUIKSORT 

100 ' GENERATE RANDOM DATA 
11,0 PMODE 4 
12 0 SCREEN 1,0 

130 DIM NO( 126 ), LS( 100 ) 
14 0 PCLS 0 

15j3 FOR I = 1 TO 126 

160 NO ( I ) = INT( RND ( 190 ) ) 

170 LINE (1*2, 190 ) - ( I * 

2, 190 -NO( I ) ) , PSET 

180 NEXT 

190 ' QUICKSORT 

200 LS( 0 ) =0 

210 LS( LS( 0 ) + 1 ) =1 

220 LS( LS( 0 ) + 2 ) = 126 

230 LS( 0 ) = LS( 0 ) + 2 

240 IF LS( 0 ) =0 THEN GOTO 450 

250 EN ■ LS( LS( 0 ) ) 

260 ST ■ LS( LS( 0 ) - 1 ) 

270 LS( 0 ) = LS( 0 ) -2 

280 LP = ST + 1 

290 RP = EN 

300 DN = 0 

310 IF DN = 1 THEN GOTO 240 
320 IF NO( ST ) >= NO( LP ) AND 
LP < RP THEN LP = LP + 1: GOTO 3 
20 

330 IF NO( ST ) <= NO( RP ) AND 
LP < RP THEN RP = RP - 1: GOTO 3 

30 

340 IF LP <> RP THEN GOTO 420 
350 DN = 1 

360 IF EN - ST = 1 THEN IF NO( S 
T ) > NO( EN ) THEN I = ST: J = 
EN: GOSUB 470: TM = NO ( ST 

) : NO ( ST ) = NO ( EN ) : NO ( EN ) 



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= TM: GOSUB 500: GOTO 310 
370 IF EN = RP AND NO ( ST ) > NO 
( EN ) THEN I - ST: J = EN: GOSU 
B 470: TM = NO( ST ) :NO( 

ST ) - NO( EN ):NO( EN ) = TM: L 
S( LS( 0 ) +1 )=ST:LS( LS ( 0 ) + 

2 ) = EN: LS( 0 ) = LS( 0 ) 
+ 2: GOSUB 50)3: GOTO 310 
380 I = ST: J = LP - 1: GOSUB 47 
0 : TM = NO ( ST ) : NO ( ST ) - NO ( 

LP - 1 ) : NO ( LP - 1 ) 

= TM: GOSUB 500 
390 IF LP - ST > 2 THEN LS ( LS ( 
0 ) + 1 )=ST:LS(LS(0)+2 

) = LP - 1: LS( 0 ) = LS 

( 0 ) + 2 

400 IF EN - RP > 0 THEN LS ( LS ( 
0 ) + 1 ) = LP: LS( LS( 0 ) + 2 
) = EN: LS( 0 )= LS( 0 ) + 2 
410 GOTO 310 

420 I = LP: J = RP: GOSUB 470: T 
M = NO ( LP ) : NO ( LP ) = NO ( RP 
): NO( RP )=TM: GOSUB 500 

430 GOTO 310 
440 GOTO 240 
450 GOTO 450 

4 60 1 LINE DISPLAY SUBROUTINES 
470 LINE ( 1*2, 190 ) -(1*2 
, 0 ) , PRESET 

480 LINE ( ( J ) * 2, 190 ) - ( ( 

J ) * 2 , 0 ) , PRESET 
490 RETURN 

500 LINE (1*2, 190 ) - ( I * 
2, 190 - NO ( I ) ) ,PSET 
510 LINE ( ( J ) * 2, 190 ) - ( 
( J ) * 2, 190 - NO( J ) ), PSET 
520 RETURN 



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RAINBOWTECH 




OS-9 



4 

Boot Mysteries 

Revealed 



By Richard A. White 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



have talked about the OS-9 players 
— the program modules that man- 
age the computer's operation and 
the specific data files (generally called 
descriptors) that provide the operating 
system with the information it needs to 
work. I have also mentioned that OS- 
9 can be configured to match your exact 
system hardware. System configuration 
is determined by the modules loaded at 
OS-9's start-up. These modules are 
included in the Kernel, located on Track 
One of the Kernel's functions is to 
initialize the system and then load 
□S9Boot. Since the CoCo 3 is different 
from the CoCo 1 and 2, one would 
expect the Kernels for the machines to 
be different. This is partly true. The OS- 
9 Disk Operating System (Radio Shack, 
Cat. No. 26-3030) is Level I, Version 1 
for CoCo 1 and 2s and will not work on 
CoCo 3s without modification. A Level 
I, Version 2 upgrade (special order, Cat. 
No. 700-2331, $24.95) works on the 
CoCo 3, but it cannot take advantage 
of more than 64K of memory or support 
CoCo 3 graphics. Level 11, on the other 
hand, uses up to 512K of RAM in a 
CoCo 3 and uses all its graphics fea- 
tures. Level 11 will only work in a CoCo 
3, and it is rather limited in a 128K 



Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in BASIC pro- 
gramming. With Don Dollberg, he is 
the co-author of the TIMS database 
management program. 



machine. However, it really shines in a 
512K machine. 

As you might expect, the Level H 
Kernel is quite different from the Level 
I versions. There are changes to other 
operating system modules as well. The 
modules to handle the keyboard and 
screen are new. The disk drive manager, 
CC3Disl<, is also new and now handles 
any double density drive (single- or 
double-sided, 35-, 40- or 80-track) you 
want to connect to your system. Con- 
sistent with OS-9's design philosophy, 
which keeps modules transportable 
between versions whenever possible, 
most of the other modules are the same 
as in Level L 

So the first configuration choice you 
must make is between Level I and Level 
II. (It's not much of a choice. Level I on 
a CoCo 3 is a waste of capability.) This 
is also the only choice that you can buy 
from Radio Shack. You must use OS- 
9's utilities to install all other options 
yourself. OS-9 Level I and Level II both 
come on single-sided, 35-track disks. 
Most users can put the System Disk into 
Drive 0, type DD5 and let the computer 
boot into OS-9. A few users with older 
drive controllers will have trouble. 

Disk Extended Basic Version 1.0 does 
not support the DOS command. A short 
program is provided in the documenta- 
tion of Radio Shack's OS-9 package 
that creates a machine language loader. 
A more costiy problem occurs with old, 
long black controllers sold from 1982 to 
1984. Most of these cannot reliably 
handle the 1.8 MHz CoCo 3 clock 
speed. This problem is particularly 



nasty because the controller will almost 
work reliably. But almost isn't good 
enough, and the only safe solution is to 
replace the controller. 

Next, let us consider what happens 
during the boot. Generally, this infor- 
mation is not discussed, or it is placed 
under "technical information'* where 
few will bother to read it. It is technical 
information, but making a new boot is 
a technical operation — particularly 
under Level II. The more knowledge 
you have about the operation, the less 
confusion you will encounter. I have 
wandered through my share of OS-9 
fog, and I speak with authority. Don't 
let this scare you. I survived and so will 
you. After all, if you learned to walk and 
talk, you can learn to make a boot file. 

The DOS command under Disk BASIC 
causes the code on Track 34 to be 
loaded and executed. (Since track num- 
bering begins with zero, Track 34 is the 
35th track.) Under Level I, this code 
consists of two modules: D59 and 
□59pl. The Level II code includes three 
modules: REL, Boot and Ds9pl. In both 
cases, these modules initialize the ma- 
chine, complete the boot operation, link 
to all the other system modules as they 
are loaded, and provide basic system 
services (i.e., memory management and 
multitasking). 

Merging Files 

Completing the booting process in- 
cludes loading the 059Boot file. This 
file merges all the system modules to be 
used. Merging files is a particularly 
useful tool under OS-9 — especially 



172 



THE RAINBOW November 1988 



under Level II. Understanding the 
operation can be quite useful, so make 
the effort to learn the process. 

A normal OS-9 file starts at the 
beginning of a sector (256 bytes) of a 
disk. The file's end will use part of 
another sector, the remainder of which 
is wasted. When a number of files are 
merged into a single new file, each 
merging file follows immediately after 
the preceding file. No space is lost. A 
directory will list the new file, but not 
the names of the files it contains. Be- 
cause these merged files still maintain 
their individual identities, the I dent 
utility will show the header information 
for each file contained in the new one. 
With your system disk in /d0, type 
ident /d0/DS9boot, and you will see 
what I mean. 

When you load a file into memory, 
OS-9 starts that file at the beginning of 
a 256-byte page under Level I or at the 
start of an 8K block under Level II. 
Therefore, if you load three IK files 
individually under Level II, you will use 
24K of memory. Memory is too dear for 
this kind of waste. 

A merged file starts loading into 
memory like any other file — at the 
beginning of a page or block. However, 
the files it contains are loaded imme- 
diately following each other in memory. 
Page and block boundaries are disre- 
garded. Considerable memory is saved 
— especially with device descriptors, 
which typically use only 50 to 80 bytes. 
Since many OS-9 utilities are small, 
merging five, 10 or even 15 files into a 
single file allows those files to be placed 
in one 8K block. Even those of us with 
5 12K CoCo 3s enjoy this memory saver. 

So 0S9Boot is simply one file into 
which all the system modules you will 
use are merged. The code that loads 
0S9Boot is rather simple, too. Conse- 
quently, make sure that OSgBoot is not 
divided into a number of places on your 



disk (OS-9 will split up a file if need be 
to make best use of disk space). When 
you make a new boot disk, use a freshly 
formatted disk to avoid this problem. 

Shell 

Under Level I, everything OS-9 needs 
should be included in D59Boot. Once 
□59Boot has been loaded, run the 
Startup file. Startup is a text file that 
contains commands you could have 
typed in at the OS9 prompt. Files of this 
nature are sometimes called procedure 
files or shell scripts. 

Shell is a program that allows the 
computer to interpret any command 
entered into it. The logical people who 
wrote OS-9's interpreter named it Shell, 
OS-9's Shell normally takes its input 
from the keyboard, but it can take it 
from a text file as well. Think of all the 
commands that you can type at the OS9 
prompt as a language. A text file of 
those commands would be like a pro- 
gram. In fact, Level II has a rich selec- 
tion of graphics commands that can be 
entered at the OS9 prompt using Dis- 
play. You could write a large text file 
of Display commands and generate a 
full-color picture, complete with text, 
using no "language" other than OS-9. 
The Startup file can get quite long, 
particularly under Level II. 

Under Level I, Shell is normally 
included in DS9Boot. This option uses 
the least memory. A different strategy 
applies under Level II. Shell is more a 
utility than a system module, and it does 
not need to be in the DS9Boot. No 
matter how much memory is in the 
computer, a 6809 microprocessor can 
deal with only 64K at a time. The CoCo 
3 and OS-9 manage memory by switch- 
ing 8K blocks in and out of the micro- 
processor's 64K "work space." If Shell 
is loaded separately from OSSBoot, it 
does not have to be in the "work space" 
at the same time as the boot modules. 



In this manner, the boot can contain 
other modules that need to be there. 
Thus, under Level II, Shell is loaded 
separately with a command included in 
the Startup file and does not need to 
be in the CMDS directory of your boot 
disk, if a full path to it is provided in 
the Startup file. 

While Shell is less than 2K bytes, the 
Shell file supplied on the Level II 
system disk is really a merged file that 
includes several other frequently-used 
utilities, which almost fill an 8K block. 

Another point at which Level II 
differs from Level I is the video and 
keyboard area. To take full advantage 
of CoCo 3 graphics and text options, 
additional code was needed. This code 
was divided among several modules. 
One such module, GrfDrv, is loaded 
separately and is not included in 
0S9Boot. GrfDrv is loaded imme- 
diately after OSSBoot, before the 
Startup file. Consequently, it must be 
in the CMDS directory of your boot disk. 

At this point, we know some of the 
things that must be on a boot disk. The 
Kernel must be on the 35th track on the 
front of the disk. On a single-sided disk, 
this is Track 34. On a double-sided disk, 
OS-9 counts the first track on the front 
as Track 0, the first track on the back 
as Track 1, etc., toward the center of the 
disk. In this case, Track 34 is not on the 
35th top-side track. However, Disk 
BASIC does not know about double- 
sided disks. When you boot from a 
double-sided disk, it looks at the 35th 
top-side track for the Kernel. Boot- 
making utilities provided with Level I 
assume you are using single-sided disks 
and do not properly deal with double- 
sided disks even if you have replaced 
your standard disk I/O driver with one 
that uses double-sided disks. On the 
other hand, Level II utilities handle 
double-sided disks properly. In this 
case, the utilities provided with Level II 



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are different from those of the same 
name in Level I. 

The 0S9Boot file must be a contin- 
uous file in the root directory. A 5 1 a r t - 
Up file must also be in the root directory. 
There must be a CMDS directory on a 
Level II boot disk. GrfDrv and the 
Shell file must also be available for 
loading when the Startup file runs. 

The simplest way to make a new boot 
disk is to back up the one you already 
have. Naturally, you will have followed 
the directions in the documentation and 
backed up the operating system disk 
that comes with your OS-9. Right? 
Whenever you make a new boot disk, 
back it up as well. 

Next you can use the program, 
Cobbler. Cobbler uses the system mod- 
ules as they exist in memory at the time 
to make a new boot disk. Start with a 
freshly formatted disk. Cobbler will 
then copy the Kernel modules to the 
35th top-side track and put all other 
modules loaded from 0S9Boot into a 
new 0S9Boot. The primary purpose of 
this program is to save changes made to 
descriptors with Xmode. 

Most users will need to change /tl, 
/t2 and /p from their defaults to match 
their current setups, /tl and /t2 de- 
scribe how the RS-232 ports work. One 
default setting is 300 baud. Most of us 
now use 1200 baud for telecommunica- 
tions, and some use 2400 baud. If you 
want to run at a baud-rate higher than 
300, include an Xmode command in 
your Startup file to change /tl or 
/t2 each time you boot. Similarly, few 
of us still run our printers at the 600- 
baud default. This can be changed by 
using Xmode on the /p descriptor. 
However, these changes only last 
through the current session and are lost 
as soon as you turn off your computer. 
When you use Cobbler to make a new 
boot disk, the descriptors in 059Boot 
will include the modifications made 
using Xmode, so you can eliminate the 
Xmode steps from your Startup file. 

Using Dsave 

The boot disk you make with Cobbler 
contains only the Kernel and 059Boot. 
You must also add the remaining direc- 
tories and files on your starting boot 
disk. To do this, use Dsave, which will 
copy or back up all files in one or more 
directories — including a whole disk. 
Dsave will not copy DS9Boot unless 
that option is specifically selected. 

In addition, Dsave does not directly 
copy files; it makes a procedure file that 
you later run to do the job. There are 
a number of advantages to this proce- 



dure. You can edit the procedure file 
and eliminate copy commands for files 
you don't want to copy or add copy 
commands for files you want to copy 
from a disk in a different drive. Addi- 
tionally, the copy or backup does not 
depend on the source and target disks 
being the same. Use this procedure file 
to make the 35-track system disk from 
your OS-9 package a double-sided 40- 
track boot disk, or to move the contents 
of a boot disk — excluding the Kernel, 
Ds9Boo t and Grf drv — to a hard drive. 
To boot, most hard drive users load the 
Kernel, 0S9Boot and GrfDrv from a 
floppy in /dl. After the initial loading, 
OS-9 discovers an /h0 device descriptor 
and automatically continues the boot 
procedure from the hard drive. 

When using Dsave, change your data 
directory to the one you want to copy. 
(The term one or more directories can 
mean a whole disk, since Directory /d0 
is the root directory of the disk in Drive 
0, and all files and subdirectories on that 
disk are under the root directory.) 

Next, determine which Dsave op- 
tions you want to use. The only one we 
need to consider now is the V option. 
The format for this option is -s integer, 
where integer is the amount of memory, 
in kilobytes, you want to allocate to the 
copy process. The entry, -s20, will 
allocate 20K bytes, which will handle 
nearly all files on a boot disk. Now you 
may want to decide to which drive (and, 
possibly, to which directory on that 
drive) you want to copy. Finally, you 
need to name the procedure file Dsave 
will make and choose the drive and 
directory on which it will be stored. 

Now, let's see how Dsave works. 
First, use Cobbler to put the Kernel and 
0S9Boot on a freshly formatted disk. 
Put the Level II system distribution disk 
in Drive 2. (Generally, you will find it 
more convenient to have your source 
disk in Drive 0.) Putting the disk in 
Drive 2 will better demonstrate the 
flexibility of Dsave. Next, type the 
following: 

DS9:chx /d2/cmds 
D59:chd /d2 

DS9:dsave -s20 /d2 /d0 >/d2/ 
makecopy 

Because the process requires the use 
of several program modules, the first 
line is used to change the current CMDS 
directory to /d2. The next line puts you 
in the root directory of /d2, from which 
you want to copy. The final line enters 
the Dsave command. Option -s20 tells 
Dsave to have Copy allocate 20K bytes 



of buffer for each copy operation. The 
descriptor, /d2, reminds Dsave that 
you want override the built-in /d0 
default and copy from Drive 2. The 
descriptor, /d0, tells Dsave to copy to 
drive 0 and to include a chd /d0 line in 
the procedure file. Finally, >/d2/ 
make-copy directs the resulting proce- 
dure into a file named makecopy on 
/d2. The following is a shortened ver- 
sion of the resulting procedure file: 

t 

chd /d0 

tmode .1 -pause 
load copy 
Makdir CMDS 
Chd CMDS 

Copy 820K /d2/CMDS/attr attr 
Copy 820K /d2/CMDS/backup 
backup 



Copy H20K /d2/CMDS/unlink 
unl ink 

Copy H20K /d2/CMDS/xmode 
xmode 
Chd . . 
Makdir SYS 
Chd SYS 

Copy tt20l< /d2/SYS/errmsg 
errmsg 



Copy 820K /d2/SYS/stdptrs 
stdptrs 
Chd . . 

Copy B20K /d2/startup start- 
up 



Copy B20K /d2/makecopy make- 
copy 

unl ink copy 
tmode .1 pause 

In this file, t is a shell command that 
tells Shell to display each line in the 
procedure file on the screen so we can 
keep up to date on what is happening. 
Tmode . 1 -pause tells Shell not to stop 
the display and the procedure after a 
certain number of lines are printed to 
the screen. The Shell default stops 
printing so you have time to see what 
was displayed and press ENTER to con- 
tinue. The .1 refers to the standard 
output to your screen. (Note at the 
bottom of the listing, Tmode .1 pause 
returns the pause feature.) 

Next is a Load Copy command. Since 
Copy is used so often, it saves time to 



1 74 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



load it once and unlink it at the end of 
the procedure. If Copy is already 
loaded, the Load command increases its 
link count by one, and Unlink de- 
creases the link count by one. Copy 
stays in memory. Next, Makdir CMD5 
creates a CMDS directory. Dsave's de- 
fault assumes that none of the needed 
directories on the target disk exist and 
that it will have to include commands 
to make these directories. This is exactly 
what we need here. The procedure file 
has used four OS-9 utilities: Tmode, 
Load and Makdi r, which must either be 
in memory or in your current CMDS 
directory, and Copy. (Since the line 
Load Copy is used, OS-9 will try to load 
it from your CMDS directory whether it 
is in memory or not, so you must have 
Copy in your CMDS.) At the end of the 
procedure file, Unl ink is used so it must 
be in memory or in the CMDS directory 
as well. 

Having made a CMDS directory, chd 
CMDS makes that the current data direc- 
tory and copying begins. Each Copy 
command includes 820K, which tells the 
program to use a 20K-byte buffer. We 
used the option -s20 to instruct Dsave 
to include this. Since /d0/CMDS is the 
current data directory, Dsave includes 



a full path (i.e., /d2/CMD5/attr) to the 
file to be copied; but since the file is 
being copied into the current data 
directory, Dsave needs only to provide 
the target file's name. 

Most of the rest of the procedure file, 
except for Chd . is repetitious. The 
is shorthand for "previous direc- 
tory above the current one." When I 
started Dsave, my current data direc- 
tory was /d2. Since the disk in /d2 is 
the one I want to copy and I saved the 
procedure file, makecopy, onto that 
disk, I need only to put my target disk 
into /d0, type makecopy to start the 
procedure file, and get a drink or do 
something else while the process takes 
a few (long) minutes to run. 

If you think this is easy, there is a 
better shortcut for those who don't want 
to edit the procedure file. Don't make 
a procedure file at all, just redirect the 
output for Dsave directly into Shell for 
immediate execution. Using our pre- 
vious example, put the source disk in 
/d2 and the target disk in /d0, and type 
the following: 

□S9:chx /d2/cmds 
□S9:chd /d2 

OS9:dsave-s20/d2 /d0 ! shell 



Everything is the same in this second 
example except that >/d2/makecopy is 
replaced by ! shell. The *!' is the set 
of pipe commands that routes the stand- 
ard output of the foregoing process into 
the standard input of the following 
process. Look at page 6-41 in your Level 
II manual and circle the short para- 
graph that covers this, since you will 
certainly want to find it quickly in the 
future. When you type Dir, you get a 
listing on the screen of the names of the 
modules and directories in your current 
data directory. However, if you type 
Dire, you will get that listing in much 
greater detail, including the date and 
time the file was saved, attributes of the 
file, the starting sector on the disk and 
the byte-count of the file. Well, the byte- 
count of this file has gotten large 
enough that I had better quit for this 
month. 

My next column will cover the 
DS9Gen and Conf ig processes for mak- 
ing a boot disk. We will also discuss the 
infamous, unsolvable, Level II boot 
order problem that has totally con- 
founded all the experts since Level II for 
the CoCo 3 first came out. I will leave 
you pondering this enigma until next 
month. /5S\ 




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RAINBOW 

CtRTIFICtriOW 
MAI 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 175 



RAINBOWTECH 




OS-9 



Installation, Automation 

and More 



November is a good time to start 
some serious programming. I 
hope that this month's interview 
will help you get more enjoyment out of 
those long sessions with your CoCo. 

CCEnv 

Allow me to introduce a man who got 
tired of the complicated and redundant 
process required to compile C programs 
— and did something about it. Chris 
Fox has been programming since 1978 
when someone gave him a Casio calcu- 
lator that spoke BASIC. He started 
working with C four years later. 

Fox bought a CoCo 2 with 16K of 
memory because he wanted to work 
with graphics and color. (It was also one 
of the only computers on the market he 
could afford.) He learned a lot with his 
CoCo 2, but he wanted to learn more. 
When OS-9 came out in 1983, he had 
to have it. When the Microware C 
compiler came out, he had to have that, 
too. The compiler was Fox's first expe- 
rience with C language, and it took him 
a long time to learn the language and 
use the compiler. He explained: "I didn't 
have a second disk drive and didn't 
know I needed it. I really got things 
moving when I caught on and started 

Dale L. Puckett, a freelance writer and 
programmer, serves as director-at-large 
of the OS-9 Users Group and is a 
member of the Computer Press Associ- 
ation. His username on Delphi is 
DALE?: on packet-radio, KOHYD @ 
N4QQ; on GEnie, D.PUCKETT2; and 
on CIS, 71446,736, 



By Dale L. Puckett 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

using a RAM disk to compile my C 
programs. The RAM disk worked so 
well for me that I made it an automatic 
feature in CCEnv" 

Fox wrote CCEnv because he was 
tired of the long directory names and 
command line options used to run the 
OS-9 text editor. CCEnv eliminated 
these length requirements. 

Yet, CCEnv works with almost all 
OS-9 languages. You can run your 
Pascal compiler with it — or use it to 
assemble programs written for ASM or 
RMR. The CCEnv manual pages will 
even clip into your Multi- Vue manual. 

An intelligent project manager is 
built into the program. "It's a graphics 
Make," Fox said. "It checks the date. If 
a text file has been updated, it's recom- 
piled. If you have enabled the project 
option, CCEnv links to any relocatable 
object code you have written during the 
programming project. It automatically 
uses the startup code inCStart.r and 
the standard library, so you can split 
your programming projects into seg- 
ments." 

Fox's company, Foxware, sells a 
graphics library that works with 
C.Link in the original C compiler 
package and a C math library. Fox also 
offers a BASIC09 math library, and a 
BASIC09 mouse and menu library that 
help you create mouse-driven applica- 
tions with pull-down menus. The latter 
contains many routines similar to the 
Gfx3 package published in last month's 
column. 

The Foxware graphics library in- 
cludes a function that returns a pointer 



to the device name string. This makes 
it easier to use redirection from within 
your own program. While you can issue 
a fork call without the devname func- 
tion, you can't redirect any output. To 
do that, you must know the name of the 
device receiving the output, not just the 
path number. Devname enables dy- 
namic redirection — you can find an 
available window and redirect output to 
it immediately. The graphics library also 
includes a function that calls the device 
/w and returns the path number for you. 

Essentially, CCEnv is a graphics 
driver for OS-9 compilers and as- 
semblers, which lets you issue com- 
mands with a mouse-and-menu and 
eliminates long command lines. It also 
remembers compiler options and keeps 
track of your directories. 

Chris Fox guarantees that there will 
be at least one less manual open on your 
lap when you use CCEnv to program. 
Fox used the Microware C compiler for 
more than a year before he tried Turbo 
C(one of the most convenient MS-DOS 
C compilers). He was struck by the ease 
of program development and deter- 
mined to develop something similar for 
the CoCo 3. 

Although Fox bought an IBM- 
compatible computer and intended to 
move on to the more sophisticated PC, 
it never happened. Fox explained, 
"After investing a few months to learn 
DOS, I realized that OS-9 is a superb 
operating system. I preferred the CoCo 
3." Fox now uses his Tandy 1000 TX 
almost solely as a terminal for his CoCo 
3 when he runs OS-9 Level 2. 



176 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



After working on CCEnv for a few 
months, Fox began to use the half- 
finished program to complete itself. 
"The results were so pleasing that I 
decided to generalize CCEnv so it could 
run all OS-9 compilers and assemblers," 
he said. Fox also realized that this 
program, which had been developed for 
his own convenience, would be useful 
for other programmers as well. 

Equipment 

To run CCEnv, you'll need OS-9 
Level II and the Windlnt system mod- 
ule that comes with Multi-Vue. The 
program runs under Multi-Vue but can 
be ruri independently if Windlnt is in 
your 0S9Boot file. You will also need a 
mouse and 5 1 2K of memory. Compiling 
a program on the CoCo 3 without a 
RAM disk is a slow process. Therefore, 
CCEnv automatically writes all tempo- 
rary files to the drive, 'r0, if it is 
available. If that driver is not available, 
the program will prompt you for a drive 
name or directory. CCEnv will re- 
member this location in its environment 
file, so you won't need to type it again 
until you want to change directories. 

You must also supply your own OS- 
9 compiler, assembler and text editor. 
CCEnv is pre-configured for the Micro- 
ware C compiler but works well with 
Pascal, RSM, RMfi and C.R5M. The 
CCEnv edit menu offers four text edi- 
tors: Edit, Scred, TSEdit from Tandy 
and Xed from MicroTech Consultants. 
If you don't own one of these, a fifth 
menu entry lets you specify your own 
editor. 

To run CCEnv, copy two files to your 
OS-9 system disk. CCEnv goes in your 
CMDS directory. Env.ccenv goes in 
/DD/5Y5. Make sure that any programs 
CCEnv will use are also in your CMDS 
directory. For example, the editor you 
plan to call from the menu and all the 



files in the Microware C compiler 
(except ccl) must be in CMDS. Addition- 
ally, you'll need the utilities you use 
during a programming session: Attr, 
Dump, Debug, Verify and Tmode. 

If you would rather not clutter your 
CMDS directory, create a special direc- 
tory for CCEnv, load it with your 
compiler files, editor and utilities, and 
change your current execution direc- 
tory to the special CCEnv directory. 
You can do this before you run the 
program or from within the program 
itself; however, include the StdPtrs 
and StdFonts files in your 'dd/SYS 
directory. 

If you look in your modules directory 
after loading CCEnv, you'll see two new 
modules — CCEnv and ShellCmd. Run 
CCEnv by typing: 

CCEnv pathlist options. - . 

When CCEnv sees a hyphen, it knows 
that it has found an option. Otherwise, 
it treats a name on your command line 
as a pathlist to the file you want to 
compile or assemble. CCEnv uses the 
data directory holding the file you are 
compiling as its current data directory. 
Here's a typical CCEnv command line. 

CCEnv filename -v 

Type this line when you want to run 
a single session to compile an existing 
C or assembly program. To configure 
CCEnv to run OS-9 Development Kit 
assembler, type: 

CCEnv -a -1 -x=startup.a 
- z=stdl ib -asm -v=env.assm 

When you type this line, CCEnv uses 
RMfi to assemble your file and RLINK to 
link your object code. The program 
substitutes the assembly startup code 



for CStart.r and the standard library 
for CL i b . 1 , and it saves the options you 
typed in an environment file, — 
Env-Assm. The next time you want to 
work with your assembler, just type: 

CCEnv -v=env.assm 

You can save as many environment 
files as you like. In fact, you can keep 
one for each program you develop. 
{CCEnv will automatically keep track 
of the libraries and other relocatable 
modules needed for each project.) Store 
these environment files in your /dd/ 
SYS directory. 

Menus 

You'll find six menus on CCEnv's 
main menu bar — Close (a square box), 
File, Edit, Run, Compile and Option. If 
you are working with a binary file — a 
file with an . r or no extension — you'll 
notice that a Module menu replaces the 
Edit menu. From this menu, you can 
Debug or Attr your object code file. 

Pop-up menus ask you for informa- 
tion when it's needed. For example, if 
you name a file with an unrecognized 
extension, you'll be asked to identify its 
type. Generally, a pop-up menu will ask 
Yes or No questions. If CCEnv needs a 
longer answer, it will request the answer 
in a dialog-box. Essentially, this is the 
only time you'll use your keyboard 
while running CCEnv. The rest of the 
time you can just click the mouse. For 
example, if your compiler runs into an 
error, you'll find out about it in a 
message box. After you read the note, 
click the mouse and the message box 
disappears. Inappropriate menus are 
disabled. Thus, if you have not picked 
a file to edit, the Edit, Run and Compile 
menus will be disabled. 

The File menu allows the following 
options: Load a file. (You may choose 




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any available in the present environ- 
ment.) Abandon the file you are using. 
Count the characters, words and lines 
in a file, or check its syntax. Start an 
OS-9 Shell on another screen, or exit 
CCEnv. The Edit menu lets you select 
the editor to be used for a session. If you 
receive an error message during an 
assembler or compiler run, a two- 
window screen will appear on your 
CoCo. The possible error messages will 
appear in the six-row window at the 
bottom of the screen. You can then use 
them to correct the file in the top 
window. (This is certainly better than 
relying on my short memory.) 

The Run menu runs the program you 
just compiled. If the file hasn't been 
compiled or assembled, CCEnv will do 
this for you and then run the program. 
This menu will compile, assemble, link 
and run a program with one mouse 
click. 

The Compiler menu gives you four 
choices: 

• To Rssembly generates an assembly 
language file after compiling your C 
source code. 

• To Object converts your assembler, 
or C source code, to a relocatable 
object code file with an . r extension. 

• To Executable takes your C (assem- 
bly, or relocatable object) code file 
and produces an executable module, 
linking the new object code to other 
relocatable code listed in your link 
list. The file created is automatically 
stored in your execution directory. 

• To Cancel lets you change your mind. 

The Assembler, Compiler or 
Linker options from the options menu 
will show you CCEnv's pull-down 
menus. Center the mouse over your 
selection and click the button. Without 
moving the mouse, you will now see a 
second menu. For example, if you click 
over the word Compiler, you'll be 
offered three choices in a pull-down 
menu: optimize defaults, check the 6809 
stack, or run the C Profiler. You are 
presented similar choices when you 
click on Assembler, Linker, Link- 
List or Libraries. 

CCEnv was created to make pro- 
gramming less tedious and more pro- 
ductive. It fills that bill nicely. 

About Assemblers 

I received an interesting note from 
Duane M. Perkins of Mount Gretna, 
Pa. He suggested that I point out the 
advantages of RMR — the Relocating 
Macro Assembler found in OS-9 Level 



IPs Software Development package — 
over ASM — OS-9 Level I's original 
assembler. 

RMA's main advantage is that it 
creates object files that can be linked 
with others later. According to Perkins: 
"The ability to include assembled func- 
tions and subroutines in a module 
speeds up program development." 

Perkins submitted two short — but 
interesting and useful — listings to 
make his point: ClkSpd and ClkChk. 
ClkSpd, used with one of your pro- 
grams, determines the clock speed of 
your CoCo 3. This information is essen- 
tial if your program uses timing loops 
and must ensure a correct delay inter- 
val. ClkSpd calls ClkChk, which deter- 
mines whether the clock speed is fast or 
slow and then tells you through a 
printed message. 

You cannot directly execute a file 
created by the RMA assembler. It must be 
linked before it is run. However, you 
can assemble any number of source 
code files independently and use your 
linker to create an executable module 
that includes all of them. The linker also 
lets you use libraries, which can contain 



Listing 1: ClkSpd 

ifpl 

use /dd/def s/os9def s . a 
endc 

psect clkspd, $11, $81,0, 200, Enter 
Fast fee /Clock is fast/ 

feb $0D 
Slow fee /Clock is slow/ 

feb $0D 
Enter lbsr Clkchk 

tsta 

bne Skipl 

leax Slow, per 

bra Skip2 
Skipl leax Fast, per 
Skip2 ldy #32 

Ida #1 

os9 I$WritLn 
os9 F$Exit 
endsect 



any number of independently as- 
sembled files. When you have finished 
this work with RMA, you will never have 
to do it again. 

Some of the directives used in an RMA 
program are different than those used 
in an ASM program. For example, an 
RMA program uses Psect instead of Mod 
and Endsect instead of Emod. Another 
directive, Csect, marks the beginning 
of a data section and resets the base 
location counter for data offsets like 
ASM's directive, Org. In an RMA pro- 
gram, all data sections must end with an 
Endsect directive, and all rmb state- 
ments must be located in a Csect. Also, 
while your program may have any 
number of Csects, it can have only one 
Psect. Incidentally, RMA labels are case- 
sensitive. You'll need to be careful when 
typing the names of your subroutines 
and variables. Tandy supplies a file 
named 059Defs.a that contains the 
standard OS-9 variables in the required 
Csect or Endsect format. Make sure 
that the labels used in your source code 
agree with the listing in this file — letter 
for letter. 

The first module you link must con- 



Listing 2: ClkChk 

ifpl 

-use /dd/def s/os9defs .a 
endc 

psect Clkchk, 0,0, 0,0, Clkchk 
Clkchk: 

orcc #$50 
Ida $FF02 
sync 

Ida $FF02 
ldd #2542 
Clkchkl subd #1 

bne Clkchkl 
clra 

ldb $FF03 
andec #$AF 
bmi Clkchk2 
inca 

Clkchk2 ldb $FF02 
rts 

endsect 



Listing 3: DoMenu 


PROCEDURE 


DoMenu 


0000 


(* Adding functionality to MVShell 


0022 


(* 


0025 


(* Window menu data structures 


0043 


TYPE Mis tr-jwittl: STRING [15 ] ; mienbl : BYTE ; mires (5) : BYTE 


0064 


DIM MidScr:Mistr 


006D 




006E 


(* The next structure holds the definition of a menu. 


00A3 


TYPE mnstr=_mittl: STRING [15] ; _mnid,_mnxsiz ,_mnnits ,_mnenabl 




: BYTE ; _reser2 ,_mnitems : INTEGER 


00CF 


DIM MNDscr :mnstr 


00D8 




00D9 


(* The final structure defines the contents of an entire window. 



178 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



0119 TYPE \mstr-_vnttl: STRING [20] ; __nmens ,_wxmin ,_vymin : BYTE ; _wnsync 

: INTEGER; _vnres(7) : BYTS ; _vnmen : INTEGER 

014E DIM WndScr :wnstr 
0157 

0158 (* Now we set up our intercept code 

017B TYPE IntCeptCod=StBCode:BYTE; IntAddr : INTEGER ; RTICode, IntResult 
: BYTE 

0196 DIM IceptCode:IntCeptCod 
019F 

01A0 IceptCode .StBCode :=$F7 

01AC IceptCode. IntAddr :»ADDR( IceptCode) +4 

01BD IceptCode. RTICode:-$3B 

01C9 

01CA (* We must also define a data type to hold the 6809 registers 

0207 TYPE Registers-cc.ajbjdpzBYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 

022C DIM Regs :Registers 
0235 

0236 (* We must also tell our program what the mouse looks like. 

0271 TYPE rodent*valid , actv, totm : BYTE ; rsrv0 : INTEGER; ttto:BYTE; tsst 

: INTEGER; cbsa , cbsb , ccta , cctb , ttsa , ttsb , tlsa , t lsb : BYTE 

; rsrvl,bdx,bdy: INTEGER; stat , res : BYTE; acx,acy ,wrx,wry 

: INTEGER 

02E2 DIM msret: rodent 
02EB 

02EC (* To enhance readability 
0305 

0306 DIM Menu_ID,Menu_Itera: INTEGER 

0311 DIM DoMenuItem , IgnoreMenu , DoContent : BOOLEAN 

0320 DIM F_Icpt,F_Sleep:BYTE 

032B DIM I_Getstt,SS_MnSel,IJDup:BYTE 

033A DIM I_SetStt,SS_MsSig,StdIn,StdOut,SS_GIP,SS_Mouse:BYTE 

0355 DIM thePath ,MouseSig,Follow,HorPos: INTEGER 

0368 DIM Grp_Ptr,Ptr_Arr:BYTE 

0373 DIM oldpath(3) ,newpath: BYTE 

0383 DIM action: STRING 

038A 

038B DoMenuItem: -FALSE \DoContent :=FALSE \IgnoreMenu: -FALSE 

039D GrpJ?tr:=202 \Ptr_Arr :=»1 \F_Icpt : =$09 

03B3 F_Sleep:=$0A \I_Getstt :=$8D \I_SetStt :=$8E 

03CB SS_MsSig:«$8A \SS_MnSel :=$87 \SS_GIP:=$94 

03E3 SS_Mouse:=$89 \Follow:=l \StdIn:=0 

03F9 StdOut:=l \MouseSig :=10 

0407 IJ)up:=$82 

040F 

0410 DIM EndS tr : STRING [ 1 ] 

041C DIM Null, CallCode.FunCode: BYTE 

042B Null:=0 

0432 EndStr : =CHR$ (Null) 

043B 

043C (* Window type defs, 

0450 DIM WT_NBox ,WT_Ftfin ,WT_FSWin , WT_S Box, WT_DBox, WT_PBpox: INTEGER 

046B WT_NBox:=0 \WT_FWin:=«l \WT_FSWin:=2 

0480 WT_SBox:=3 \WT_DBox:«=4 \WT_PBox:=5 
0496 

0497 DIM MNEnbl .MNDsbl : BYTE 

04A2 MNEnbl :=1 \MNDsbl :=Null 
04B1 

04B2 DIM WINSync : INTEGER 

04B9 WINSync :=$C0C0 
04C1 

04C2 DIM MN_Move,MN_Clos,MN_Grow,MN_Uscrl,MN_Dscrl t MN_Rscrl,MN_Lscrl 
: BYTE 

04E1 DIM MNJTndy ,MN_File ,MN_Edit ,MN_Styl ,MN_Font ,MN_Char : BYTE 

04FC MN_Move:=l \MN_Clos:=2 \MN_Grow:=3 \MN_Uscrl:-4 

0518 MNJ)scrl:-5 \MN_Rscrl:=6 \MN_Lscrl :-7 

052D MNJTndy: -20 \MN_File:=21 \MN_Edit:-22 

0542 MN_Styl:=23 \MN_Font:=24 \MN_Char:=8 

0557 

0558 (* Here are some more definitions you'll need in almost all of your 

059B (* Basic09 / Multi-Vue application programs. This group takes care 

05DE (* of the many buffers used within OS -9 Level II. 
060F 

0610 DIM Grp_Font ,Grp_Clip t Grp_Pat2 ,Grp_Pat4 , Grp_Pat6 : BYTE 

0627 DIM Fnt_S8x8,Fnt_S 6x8, Fnt_G8x8: BYTE 

9636 DIM Ptr_Pen,Ptr_Lch,Ptr_Slp,Ptr_Ill,Ptr_Txt , Ptr_Sch: BYTE 

0651 DIM WR_Cntnt,WR_Cntrl,WR_OfWin:BYTE 



tain your main program with the mo- 
dule entry point. It must be assembled 
with a non-zero type/ language code. 
Modules that you plan to link with this 
first module must have the type /lan- 
guage byte set to zero. Any location in 
your modules that you want to refer- 
ence from another module must have a 
label ending with a colon. Thus, any 
variable name that ends with a colon 
will be recognized globally when you 
run your linker. 

Procedure Files 

I was happy to hear about Gil Shat- 
tuck's File Transfer Utilities at RAIN- 
BOWfest Chicago. I was even happier 
when I received a copy of Gil's latest 
version, based on Multi- Vue. However, 
I was delighted when I put the disk in 
Drive /d0 and clicked on the Multi- Vue 
icon. 

There were two procedure files on the 
disk from Granite Computer Systems, 
so I pointed to the first with the mouse 
and clicked to select it. I moved the 
pointer to the File menu and listed the 
file. It was an installation file. One of 
the procedure files Shattuck provides 
loads FTU from the GCS master disk to 
your system disk in Drive /d0. The 
other procedure copies the files to the 
disk in Drive 'h0. I use 'h0 and 
G Shell* from the OS-9 Users Group, so 
I clicked on the second procedure file's 
icon and returned to the keyboard to 
write a few more sentences. While I 
worked, GShell+ ran the procedure file. 
In a few minutes, Shattuck's FTU was 
installed. 

The procedure file supplied by GCS 
moved the file, RIF.ftu, to my CMDS 
directory. When it had finished, I copied 
that file to the directory where I group 
my RIF files. I then clicked on the 
update bar (located just below the 
Multi-Vue menu bar) and, like magic, 
the Ftll icon appeared on my screen. (I 
capitalize the letters "AIF" in my file 
names and use the GShelH sort routine 
so that the icons used with my most 
frequently run programs are placed at 
the top of the screen and sorted in 
alphabetical order. My CoCo 3 is turn- 
ing into a dream computer.) 

As soon as the FTU icon appeared, I 
clicked it on. A new screen with a 
pleasant border color and a standard 
Multi-Vue framed window with a five- 
item menu bar appeared on the screen. 
The standard Close box appears to the 
left of the menu, followed by a Quit 
menu that lets you exit FTU imme- 
diately. Three menus unique to FTU 
appeared to the right. These are PC 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 179 



Transfer, RS-DOS Transfer and FLEX 
Transfer. I took an old FLEX disk and 
an MS-DOS disk and tried the different 
menus. 

You may notice that I haven't men- 
tioned the manual. That's because I 
haven't read at it yet. I like to try 
software before I read the manual. The 
FTU manual is clear, complete, concise 
and quite useful. My only problem 
occurred because I had booted my 
CoCo 3 with an 0S9Bdd t file containing 
CC3Disl< instead of 5Disl<3, and GCS 
FTU requires Dan Johnson's SDisl<3 
package. 

Shattuck has put a lot of thought into 
this utility package. For example, if you 
put a new FLEX, PC or Disk BASIC disk 
in Drive /d0 and click on the appro- 
priate menu title in the pull-down menu, 
a list of the files on that disk will appear 
instantly on your CoCo 3 screen. You 
can even ask for an extended directory 
listing that gives you the size and age of 
the files you might want to transfer. 

One of the best features of this utility 
occurs when you are ready to read one 
of these foreign files. You just click on 
the proper menu title, move the pointer 
down and click on the "Read File" 
selection, FTU immediately presents a 
dialog box in the lower right hand 
corner of your screen, so you can type 
in any additional information it might 
need. Never fear, you won't need to 
remember a filename — or the file's 
extension — with this program. GCS 
leaves the directory listing on the screen 
so you can refer to it while you type the 
name of the file you want to transfer. 
The small dialog box doesn't get in the 
way at all. Nice job, Gil! 

Speaking of File Transfers . . . 

Recently, Jane C. Sherratt of Omaha, 
Neb:, who uses VIP Database and VIP 
Calc packages and has many ASCII 
files, wrote to ask how she could read 
these files into an OS-9 word processing 
package to avoid retyping all the 
numbers. Sherratt can use a package 
like GCS's File Transfer Utilities to 
move the files from her Disk BASIC disks 
to an OS-9 disk. Once she has the files 
stored On an OS-9 disk, she should be 
able to open them with most OS-9 
editors and word processors. Many of 
them recognize tabs, so the formatting 
from her spreadsheets should stay 
intact. She may even be able to load the 
ASCII data from VIP Calc into Dyna- 
Calc. 

Even straightforward BASIC pro- 
grams — those that do not use com- 
mands unique to Color Computer 



0660 


DIM Pat_Sld , Pat_Dot , Pat_Vrt , Pat_Hrz , Pa t_Xhtc , Pat_Lsnt : BYTE 


067B 


DIM Pat_Rsnt , Pat_Sdot , Pat_Bdot : BYTE 


068A 




068B 


(* First, the Buffer Numbers 


06A7 


Grp_Font : -200 \Grp_Clip:=201 \Grp_Ptr :=202 


06BC 


Grp_Pat2:-203 \Grp_Pat4 :=204 \Grp_Pat6 :=205 


06D1 




06D2 


(* The Font Buffers 


06E5 


Fnt_S8x8:-l \Fnt_S6x8:=2 \Fnt_G8x8:=3 


06FA 




06FB 


(* The Mouse Pointer Buffers 


0717 


Ptr_Arr:-l \Ftr_Pen:-2 \Ptr_Lch:-3 \Ptr_Slp:=4 


0733 


Ptr_Ill:-5 \Ptr_Txt:«6 \Ptr_Sch:-7 


0748 




0749 


(* The Window regions for the Mouse 


076C 


WR_Cntnt:»0 \WR_Cntrl:=l \WR_Of Win : =2 


0781 




0782 


(* The Pattern Buffers 


0798 


Pat_Sld:=0 \Pat_Dot:-l \Pat_Vrt:=2 \Pat_Hrz:=3 \Pat_Xhtc:=4 


G7RR 


Pat Lsnf-5 \Pat Rsnt:— 6 \Pat Sdot:— 7 \Pat Bdot:=8 


07D7 




07D8 


D IM update , wxm in , wymin , t imout , c ur_w ind , mous s ig , mis c s ig , wa i t 




: BYTE 


07FB 


DIM sigcode , status ,wpath: INTEGER 


080A 




080B 


wxmin:=40 \(* minimum screen width for our window 


0838 


wymin: -24 \(* minimum screen height 


0857 




0858 


_update:»3 \(* update rate for the mouse 


087B 


t imout: =10 \(* timeout between clicks 


089B 


Follow:-l \(* update cursor when mouse moves, 0 for no follow. 


08D5 




08D6 


cur_wind:-0 \(* flag to fork a process on current window 


0908 


moussig:=10 \(* signal code returned by the mouse when 


0938 


miscsig:-15 \(* miscellaneous signal code 


095B 


wait: =20 \(* signal code to wait for button to be pressed 


0991 




0992 


(* After we define or "type" -- the special data structures 


09D0 


(* we need for a Multi-Vue based program, we must initialize 


0A0C 


(* the data in those structures. 


0A2C 




0A2D 


DIM _tanitms(9) :Mistr 


0A3B 


_tanitms(l) ._mnttl:="Calc"+EndStr \_tanitms(l) . _mienbl : =MNEnbl 


0A5E 


_tanitms(2) ._mnttl:-"Clock"+EndStr \_tanitms(2) ._mienbl:=MNEnbl 


0A82 


_tanitms(3) ,_mnttl Calendar" +EndStr \_tanitms(3) ,_mienbl : =MNEnbl 


0AA9 


_tanitms(4) ._mnttl :-" Control "+EndStr \_tanitms(4) ,_mienbl :=MNEnbl 


0ACF 


_tanitms(5) ._mnttl :-" Printer "+EndStr \_tanitms(5) . __mi e nb 1 : =MNEnb 1 


0AF5 


_tanitms(6) ._mnttl:="Port"+EndStr \_tanitms(6) .jnienbl :=MNEnbl 


0B18 


tanifcms (7^ mnttl ! — M HelT5 M +EndStr \ tanitmsf7^ mienbl *=MND<sh1 

Wall J. l^LUO \ i y B UU4 W • ilw J. U TuLIUkJ *— *. \ L 0 .fJ-ll_l_ 4 «Ui»* , y / J • 111 -1* w 11 U i- * O U J. 


0B3B 


_tanitms(8) ,_mnttl : -"Shell "+EndStr \_tanitms(8) ._mienbl :=MNEnbl 


0B5F 


_tanitms(9) ._ranttl;-"Clipboard"+EndStr \_tanitms(9) ._mienbl 




:=MNDsbl 


0B87 




0B88 


DIM filitms(6):Mistr 


0B96 


_filitms(l) , jnnttl:-"New"+EndStr \_f ilitms(l) ._mienbl :*MNDsbl 


0BB8 


_f ilitms(2) ._mnttl:-"Open"+EndStr \_f ilitms(2) . jnienbl :=MNDsbl 


0BDB 


_filitms(3)._mnttl:-"Save"+EndStr \_filitms(3) ._mienbl :=MNDsbl 


0BFE 


_f ilitms (4) ._mnttl :- M Abandon"+EndStr \_f ilitms (4) , mienbl : -MNDsbl 


0C24 


_f ilitms(5) . jnnttl: -"Print "+EndStr \_f ilitms(5) .jnienbl :»MNDsbl 


0C48 


JE ilitms (6) ._mnttl:-"Quit"+EndStr \_f ilitms (6) . jnienbl :=MNEnbl 


0C6B 




0C6C 


DIM _editms(6) :Mistr 


0C7A 


_editms(l) . jnnttl : -"Undo" +EndStr \_editms(l) .jnienbl :=MNDsbl 


0C9D 


_editms(2) . jnnttl:="Cut"+EndStr \_editms(2) . jnienbl : «MNDsbl 


0CBF 


__editms(3) . jnnttl:="Copy"+EndStr \_editms(3) ._mienbl:=MNDsbl 


0CE2 


_editms(4) . jnnttl:-"Paste"+EndStr \_editms(4) ._mienbl:=MNDsbl 


0D06 


_editms(5) ._ranttl :-"Clear"+EndStr \_editms(5) . _mienbl : =MNEnb 1 


0D2A 


_editms(6) .__mnttl :="Show"+EndStr \_editms(6) ._mienbl :-MNDsbl 


0D4D 




0D4E 


(* Now we* 11 set up the entire menu 


0D71 




0D72 


DIM Tndy_Mn:mnstr 


0D7B 


Tndy_Mn ._mittl : =»'Tandy"+EndStr \Tndy_Mn . _mnid : =MN_Tndy 


0D9B 


Tndy Mn. mnxsiz:=10 \Tndy_Mn._mnnits :=9 


0DB1 


Tndy Mn. mnenabl :=MNEnbl \Tndy_Mn._mnitems :=ADDR(_tanitms) 


0DCB 




0DCC 


DIM File Mn:mnstr 


0DD5 


File_Mn._mittl:="Files"+EndStr \File_Mn._mnid:-MN_File 


0DF5 


File_Mn._mnxsiz :-10 \File_Mn._mnnits :=»6 


0E0B 


File_Mn._mnenabl:-MNEnbl \File_Mn ._mni terns :=ADDR(_f ilitms) 



180 THE RAINBOW November 1988 




ar, 



ftware 



O* TIMS Combo Special - Save 15% "O 

Order The Information Management System (TIMS) Combo package 
described below for only $29.95. This special is good through 
November 30, 1988. 



CAL LI GRAPH ER 

CbCo Calligrapher - Turn your 
CoCo and dot-matrix printer into 
a calligrapher's quill. Make beau- 
tiful invitations, flyers, 
certificates, labels and more. In- 
cludes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon, The letters 
are x k inch high and variably 
spaced. Works with many 
printers such as Epson, Gemini 
and Radio Shack. Additional 
fonts are available (see below). 
Tape /Disk; $24.95. 

OS9 Calligrapher - Prints all the 
same fonts as the CoCo Calligra- 
pher. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and format- 
ting codes. You may specify the 
font to use, change fonts at any 
time, centering, left, right or full 
justify, line fill, margin, line 
width, page size, page break and 
indentation. Similar to troff on 
UNIX systems. Includes the 
same 3 fonts and additional fonts 
are available (see below). Disk 
only; OS9 Level I or II; $24,95. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires 
Calligraplier above. Each set on 
tape or disk; specify RSDOS or 
OS9 version- $14.95 each. Set 
#1 (9 fonts) Reduced and re- 
versed versions of Gay Nineties, 
Old Engl ish and Cartoon; Set #2 
(8 fonts) Old Style and Broadway: 
Set #3 (8 fonts) Antique and 
Business; Set #4 (8 fonts) Wild 
West and Checkers; Set #5 (10 
fonts] Stars, Hebrew and Victori- 
an; Set #6 (8 fonts) Block and 
Computer* Set #7 (5 small fonts) 
Roman, Italics. Cubes, Digital 
and Old World, cr NEW; Set 
#10 (8 fonts) several Roman 
styles: Set #11 (10 fonts) Gothic 
and Script; Set #12 (10 fonts) 
more Roman and Italic. 

Economy Font Packages on 

disk; specify RSDOS or OS9: 
29.95 each or $59.95 for all 
three: Font Package #1 - Above 
font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 fonts). 
Font Package #2 - Above font 
sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts). Font 
Package #4 (also known as the 
Hershey fonts) - Above font sets 
10, 11 and 12 (28 fonts). 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Includes the Calligrapher 
and Economy Font Packages #1 and #2, 54 fonts in all 
$69.95, or $84.90 to also include Package #4 (82 fonts). 



Sample Calligrapher Hershey Fonts 

3U %(jJl^ 



NEW! OS9 Font Massacer - 
This OS9 utility program allows 
you to do all sorts of things to 
Calligrapher font files. You may 
create new fonts, modify exists 
ing fonts. invert fonts, 
compress fonts, double the 
height and/or width, halve the 
height and/or width and con- 
vert between OS9 and RSDOS 
formats. $19.95 (or only $14.95 
if ordered with any other Calli- 
grapher item). A listing of the 
C source code for the Font 
Massager is available for an ad- 
ditional $14.95. 



INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information 
Management System) - Tape or 
disk, fast and simple general data 
base program. Create files of 
records that can be quickly sortr 
ed, searched, deleted and update 
ed. Powerful printer formatting. 
Up to 8 user fields, sort on up to 
3 fields. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

TIMS Mail - Tape or Disk based 
mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with 
TIMS. Fast and simple to use. 
Supports labels 1, 2 or 3 across, 
2% to 4 inches wide. Tape /Disk; 
$19.95. 

TIMS Utility - Utility compan- 
ion for TIMS'and TIMS Mail for 
multi-term search (AND and OR 
logic), global change and delete, 
split large files and more! 
Tape/Disk; $14.95. 



TIMS Combo Package - All 

three of the above programs: 
TIMS, TIMS Mail and TIMS 
U tility on one disk - $34.95. 



EDUCATIONAL 

TVig Attack - Ages 9 and up. An 
educational arcade game where 
players learn important math 
concepts as they play. Sound 
effects, colorful graphics. Excel- 
lent manual includes an introduc- 
tion to trigonometry. Tape/Disk; 
$19.95. 



The Educational Combo - The 

Combo includes these educa- 
tional (and entertaining) games: 

Silly Syntax (ages 5 and up) 
story creation game with 2 
stories 

Galactic Hangman (ages 7 and 
up) animated graphics, with a 
700 word vocabulary 
The Presidents of the USA 
(ages 10 and up) a presidential 
trivia game 

The Great USA (ages 9 and 
up) a trivia game oi the states 
Trig Attack (ages 9 and up) 
Zap those Trigs 

All five programs on one disk; 
$49.95 (save $50!). 



SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Ex- 
pense Management Package - 
Maintain rental property income 
and expense records and print re- 
ports. z8 expense categories. Tliis 
program may be tax deductible. 
Disk only; $29.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use pro- 
gram to display or print instruc- 
tions to knit a sweater: Cardigan 
or Pullover; Round or V-neck; 
Raglan or Set-in Sleeve* 3 
weights of yarn; 8 sizes from 
baby to man. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and S, S2K 
Extended Basic, unices otherwiee noted. Add 
$1.50 per tape or disk for shipping and han- 
dling. Florida residents add 6% sales tax. COD 
orders add $5. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders 
generally shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds 
or exchanges without prior authorization. 



V 



BASIC — can be transferred over to an 
OS-9 file and run with BAS1C09. To do 
this, make sure that you save the source 
code of your Disk BASIC file in ASCII. 
Before you attempt to load the file into 
BASIC09, however, use your favorite 
editor to insert the line: 

PROCEDURE nameafprogram 

at the front of your Disk BASIC pro- 
gram, (The 4 P* must be the first charac- 
ter in the file.) 



"Error 221 means OS-9 couldn't 
locate the module requested, 
while Error 249 means the disk 
inserted in a drive isn't compati- 
ble with the drive's present con- 
figuration. 99 



Getting Started With Multi-Vue 

Melvin Grow in Alameda, Calif., 
wrote to ask for help in starting Multi- 
Vue, In its present format, he can't 
access his files in Drive 1. Having 
transferred all his OS-9 files to a 40- 
track disk, Grow finds Multi-Vue un- 
friendly, and wonders why Tandy used 
Bui ldMV instead of Config so that users 
could match their hardware configura- 
tion. 

Grow reported receiving the infa- 
mous 221 and 249 errors. Let's look at 
those first. Error 221 means that OS-9 
could not locate the module requested. 
Error 249 means that the disk inserted 
in a drive is not compatible with the 
present configuration of the drive (Le., 
you would get Error 249 if you inserted 
a double-sided disk in a drive with its 
device descriptor configured for single- 
sided disks. My hardware setup is also 
a hybrid and would not work with 
Bui ldMV. When I couldn't run Bui ldMV 
the first time, 1 just installed Multi-Vue 
myself. Grow may also find this ap- 
proach simpler. To see if we can solve 
his problem, however, let's look at 
BuildMV. 

To begin, the procedure file saves 
most of the modules that it expects in 
your OS-9 Level II boot file to a MOD- 
ULES directory. This directory is on the 
reverse side of the Multi-Vue release 
disk from Tandy. Mount this disk in 
Drive /d0. 



0E25 

0E26 DIM Edit Mnimnstr 

0E2F Edit_Mn. jnittl:-"Edit"+EndStr \Edit_Mn .jnnid :=MNJEdit 

0E4E Edit_Mn._mnxsiz :=10 \Edit_Mn._nmnits :-6 

0E64 Edit_Mn._mnenabl:=MNEnbl \Edit_Mn._mni terns :=ADDR(_editms) 
0E7E 

0E7F (* Now that we have defined the items in the menu and the menu itself, 

0EC5 (* we can define the window that we want the menu to appear in. 
0F04 

0F05 DIM Menus(3) :mnstr 
0F13 

0F14 Menus (l):=Tndy_Mn \Menus (2) :~File_Mn \Menus (3) :=Edit_Mn 
0F35 

0F36 WndScr ._wnttl:-"KISSDraw , '+EndStr \WndScr ._nmens :=3 

0F58 WndScr._vxmin:«80 \WndScr ._wymin:=24 

0F6E 

0F6F (* _wnres, an array of seven reserved bytes, sits here 

0FA5 WndScr ._vnsync:=wTNSync \WndScr ._wnmen:=ADDR( Menus) 
0FBF 

0FC0 (* Let's create a window 
0FD8 

0FD9 RUN Gfx2(Std0ut,"Cur0ff") 

0FEC RUN gf x3 (StdOut , "ss . wnset", ADDR(WndScr) , WT_FSWin) 

100C RUN gfx3(StdIn, M ss.gip»,$0101,$FFFF) 

1027 RUN gfx3(StdIn,"ss.mous", §0301, Follow) 
1044 

1045 (* Now we can the call to set up the intercept. 
1074 

1075 CallCode:-F_Icpt 

107D Regs.x:=ADDR(IceptCode) 

108B Regs.u:=ADDR(IceptCode)+4 

109C RUN SysCall(CallCode,Regs) 

10AB 

10AC RUN Gfx2("gcset" , Grp_Ptr , Ptr_Arr) 
10C3 

10C4 (* The main loop of our program starts here 
10EF 

10F0 LOOP \(* Do this forever 
1104 

1105 PRINT 

1107 PRINT "Type <Control E> or <BREAK> to stop 1 ! 1" 
1132 

1133 IceptCode . IntResult :=0 \(* Initialize Signal Report 

1159 RUN gfx3(StdIn,"ss.msig ,, ,MouseSig) 

1172 

1173 (* Now we must tell the process to go to sleep until 

11A7 (* it receives a signal to wake up. 

11CA 

11CB CallCode:«F__Sleep 

11D3 Regs.x:=0 \(* Sleep forever at least till signal 

1206 RUN SysCall(CallCode,Regs) 

1215 

1216 EXITIF IceptCode. IntResult=2 THEN \<* Escape with BREAK key 

123D ENDEXIT 

1241 

1242 IF IceptCode. IntResult~MouseSig THEN 

1252 RUN gfx3(StdIn, H gs.mous",ADDR(rasret)) \<* Go Read Mouse 

127C IF msret . stat«WR_Cntrl AND msret.cbsaO0 THEN 

1296 DoMenuItem:=TRUE 

129C ELSE 

12A0 DoMenuItem: -FALSE 

12A6 END IF 

12A8 END IF 

12AA 

12AB IF DoMenuItem-TRUE THEN 

12B6 RUN gfx3(StdIn,"ss.mnsel H ,Menu_ID,Menu_Item) 

12D5 PRINT "The Menu ID is Menu_ID 

12EC PRINT "The Menu Item is Menu_Item 
1305 

1306 IF Menu_IDO0 THEN 

1312 GOSUB 1000 \(* Go handle menus 

1328 END IF 

132A ENDIF 

132C 

132D ENDLOOP 
1331 

1332 (* Your Program code that deals with events 

135D (* in the content region of the window goes here. 

138E 



182 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



138F END 
1391 

1392 1PP0 IF Menu_ID-MN_Clos OR Menu_ID=MNJFile AND Menu_Item=6 THEN 

13B1 act ion: -"Alert" 

13BD RUN DoAlert(action,"Quit Demo? ","Yes ","" f "No " , ADDR 

(WndScr)) 

13F1 IF LEFT$ (action, 3)=" Yes" THEN 

1403 PRINT "Thank you for trying DoMenu" 

1422 GOTO 9999 

1426 END IF 

1428 ELSE 

14 2C IF Menu_ID=MN_Tndy THEN 

1439 RUN Gfx2("gcset",Grp_Ptr,Ptr_Arr) 

1450 RUN Gfx2("curoff") 

145E ON Henu_Item GOSUB 1110,1120,1130,1140,1150,1160,1170,1180 

,1190 

1489 ELSE 

148D IF Menu_ID=MN_Edit AND Menu_Item-5 THEN 

14A1 PRINT CHR$($0C); \(* Clear Screen 

14B7 ENDIF 

14B9 ENDIF 

14BB ENDIF 

14BD RETURN 

14BF 

14C0 1110 (* Calc 

14CA RUN Gfx2("OWSet ,, ,l,0,l,36,12,0,l) 

14EC SHELL "gcalc" 

14F5 RUN Gfx2( ,, 0WEnd") 

1502 RETURN 

1504 

1505 1120 (* Clock 

1510 RUN Gfx2("OWSet",l,0,l,30,12,0,l) 

1532 GOSUB 2000 \(* Draw nice looking box 

154E SHELL "gclock" 

1558 GOSUB 3000 \(* Close box 

1568 RETURN 

156A 

156B 1130 (* Calendar 

1579 (* To run this desk accessory, you must dup the old standard 

15B5 (* paths, close them, and dup new windowpath into them. After 

15F3 (* you run gcal, you must restore the old paths 
1622 

1623 BASE 0 

1625 OPEN #newpath,V wM 

1630 RUN Gfx2(newpath, M DWSef\ 6,0,0,40,24,0,1,2) 

165A PRINT #newpath,CHR$($lB); CHR$($21); \(* select the window 

167F FOR thePath=0 TO 2 

168F Regs.a:=thePath 

169B RUN SysCall(I_Dup,Regs) 

16AA oldpath(thePath) :=Regs .a 

16B9 CLOSE #thePath 

16 BF Regs .a :=newpath 

16CB RUN SysCall(IJ)up,Regs) 

16 DA NEXT the Path 

16E5 

16E6 SHELL "gcal" 
16EE 

16EF FOR thePath=0 TO 2 

16FF CLOSE #thePath 

1705 Regs.a:=oldpath(thePath) 

1714 RUN Sys Call (I_Dup, Regs) 

1723 CLOSE #oldpath(thePath) 

172C NEXT thePath 

1737 PRINT #0,CHR$($1B) ; CHR?($21); \(* re-select standard paths 

1762 CLOSE #newpath 

1768 BASE 1 

17 6 A RETURN 

176C 

176D 1140 (* Control 

177A GOSUB 4000 \(* Go open overlay window 

1797 SHELL "Control" 

17A2 GOSUB 3000 \(* Close overlay window 

17BD RETURN 

17BF 

17C0 1150 (* Print 

17CB GOSUB 4000 \(* Open overlay window 

17E5 SHELL "gprint" 

17EF GOSUB 3000 \(* Close overlay window 



Next, BuildMV prompts you to copy 
the modules term.wind.dt and CC3go 
from the MODULES directory on your 
OS-9 Config disk to the MODULES direc- 
tory on the reverse side of the Multi- Vue 
release disk. When this is complete, 
BuildMV copies the GrfDrv file from 
your original OS-9 system disk to the 
CMDS directory on the reverse side of the 
Multi- Vue release disk. 

After it moves the files, BuildMV 
changes its current data directory to the 
MODULES directory and runs the 059Gen 
utility to create a new OSSBoot file. 

The procedure file is complicated by 
several factors. First, BuildMV expects 
you to copy to a single disk, using only 
Drive /d0. Second, it expects to find the 
needed modules in your 0S9Boot file. 
If you have a hybrid system, this may 
not be the case, and you will receive the 
Error 221 message. 

Evidently, Grow also received an 
Error 249 message when he tried to copy 
the files from his double-sided disk, 
which the procedure file had instructed 
him to mount in Drive /d0. Since 
Multi- Vue instructed him to boot with 
his original OS-9 system disk, he was 
running a single-sided device descriptor 
in Drive 'd0 that could not read the 
double-sided disk containing the files. 
Therefore, he received an Error 249. 

I will now attempt to make Multi- 
Vue's installation process easier to 
understand. Start by listing the MOD- 
ULES and CMDS directories on the re- 
verse side of the Multi- Vue release disk 
(the side the instructions tell you to use). 
In the MODULES directory youll find a 
HELP directory, aWindlnt.io module, 
eight new window device descriptors 
and a file named Bootlist.mv. 

Because you use the bootlist file to tell 
059Gen which modules you want in 
your new OSSBoot file, we'll need to 
look at that file as well. When Boot- 
list.mv is listed, it will instruct 
OSSGen to use the files that BuildMV 
attempted to save for you, as well as the 
modules on the reverse side of the 
Multi- Vue release disk, in the MODULES 
directory. 

You will need to copy the CC3go 
module from the MODULES directory on 
your Config disk because the copy in 
memory is marked busy and cannot be 
saved with the OS-9 save command. If 
you try, you will receive an Error 209, 
or "Module Busy," message. Copy 
term-wind, dt from the Config disk as 
well because it does not exist in the 
OSSBoot file of the standard OS-9 Level 
II release disk, which BuildMV expects 
you to use. 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 183 



After looking at this procedure, you 
may feel that things should not be this 
complicated. They aren't. To run Multi- 
Vue you only need to remove the 
Grf int module from the 0S9Boot file 
and replace it with the Windlnt.io 
module that comes with Multi- Vue, add 
the Term-wind. dt window device 
descriptor and the new window device 
descriptors /wB through /wl2 to the 
0S9Boot file, and keep the modules 
already in the 059Boot file that work 



"A fter you save the mod- 
ules from your own DS9- 
Boot file, copy the new 
module files from the MOD- 
ULES directory on the re- 
verse side of the Multi- Vue 
release disk to the directory 
on your freshly formatted 
disk." 



with your hardware. In other words, 
start by formatting a fresh disk. Create 
a MODULES directory on this disk with 
the OS-9 makd i r utility, and save all the 
modules in your present 0S9Boot file, 
except grfdrv, in the MODULES direc- 
tory. Next, either create a procedure file 
of Save command lines (like those in 
Bui ldMV) with the build utility or your 
favorite editor, or just copy them one at 
a time from the keyboard. 

After you save the modules from your 
own 0S9Baa t file, copy the new module 
files from the MODULES directory on the 
reverse side of the Multi- Vue release 
disk to the directory on your freshly 
formatted disk. Again, you can either 
create a procedure file to do this for you, 
or copy them one by one from the 
keyboard. Do whatever is easier for 
you. You must also copy the 
Term-uind-dt and CC3go modules to 
your MDDULES directory. 

Next, create a Bootlist.mv file in 
that directory, using either the build 
utility or your editor. That bootlist 
should include both the names of each 
module you saved earlier and the mod- 
ules copied from the Multi- Vue release 
disk and the OS-9 Config disk. 

Now run 0S9Gen and create your new 
059Boot file. If you mounted your new 
disk in Drive /dl and are running from 
an execution directory in a disk 



180A 




RETURN 


180C 






180D 


1160 


(* Port 


1817 




GOSUB 4000 \(* Open Overlay 


182A 




SHELL "gport" 


1833 




RUN Gfx2("0WEnd") 


184)3 




RETURN 


1842 






1843 


1170 


(* Help 


184D 




RETURN 


184F 






185)21 118)3 


(* Shell 


185B 




RUN Gfx2("GCSet" ,0,0) \(* Turn graphic cursor off 


1888 




RUN Gfx2("OWSet",l,l,8,72,12,l,0) \(* Create Overlay Window 


18C2 




RUN Gfx2("Cur0ff") 


18D0 




RUN gfx3(Std0ut,"ss.wnset",ADDR(WndScr) ,WT_DBox) \(* Make Window 


18FE 




RUN Gfx2("Cur0n") 


190B 




RUN G fx2 (" Color ",1) 


191B 




SHELL 


191F 




RUN Gfx2("0WEnd") 


192C 




RUN Gfx2("GCSet",Grp Ptr , Ptr_Arr ) 


1943 




RETURN 


1945 






1946 


1190 


(* Clipboard 


1955 




RETURN 


1957 






1958 


2000 


(* Dress up the opening box 


1976 




RUN Gfx2("Logic»,"X0R") 


1989 




RUN Gf x2 ("Color M ,l) 


1999 




HorrOS ' «=*1JJ 


19A0 




REPEAT 


19A2 




RUN Gfx2 ("Box" , 320-HorPos , 96-HorPos/4 , 320+HorPos , 96+HorPos 








19D1 




RUN Gfx2("Box" , 320-HorPos , 96-HorPos/4 , 320+HorPos , 96+HorPos 






/4) 


1A00 




HorPos : =HorPos*l . 3 


1A11 




UNTIL HorPos>300 


1A1D 




RUN Gfx2("LogicV*0FF") 


1A30 




RUN Gfx2("Color M ,0) 


1A40 




RETURN 


1A42 






1A43 


3000 


(* Close the Box 


1A56 




RUN Gfx2("Logic","X0R") 


1A69 




RUN Gfx2("Color",l) 


1A79 




77 -v- T) ^ a _ O ft (1 

Horros ; 


1A81 




REPEAT 


1A83 




RUN Gfx2 ("Box" , 320-HorPos , 96-HorPos/4 , 320+HorPos , 96+HorPos 






/A) 


1AB2 




RUN Gfx2("Box" , 320-HorPos , 96-HorPos/4 , 320+HorPos , 96+HorPos 








1AE1 




HorPos :-HorPos/l . 5 


1AF2 




UNTIL HorPos<10 


1AFD 




RUN Gfx2( M Logic","0f£") 


1B10 




RUN Gfx2("Color",0) 


1B20 




RUN Gfx2("0WEnd") 


1B2D 




RETURN 


1B2F 






1B30 4000 


(* Make Overlay Window for Tandy Desk Acessories 


1B63 




RUN Gfx2("OWSet",l t 0,0,38,21,0,l) 


1B85 




GOSUB 2000 \(* Make the open flashy 


1BA0 




RUN Gfx2("Box", 0,0, 639,191) 


1BB8 




RUN Gfx2("CurXY",l,2) 


1BCB 




PRINT "Please wait ... getting desk accesory from disk." 


1BFF 




RETURN 


1C01 






1C02 


9999 


(* Always turn off graphics cursor before leaving program 


1C3E 




RUN Gfx2("gcset",0,0) 


1C51 




END 


1C53 







Listing 4: DoRiert 

PROCEDURE DoAlert 
0000 (* display Alert boxes and get response for DoMenu 

0032 PARAM action » query ,msgl ,msg2 ,msg3 : STRING 

0049 PARAM WindowAddr : INTEGER 



184 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



0050 

0051 DIM buttonl , button2 , button3 : STRING 

0060 DIM F_Sleep,CallCode,StdIn,StdOut:BYTE 

0073 DIM WT_DBox: INTEGER 

007A DIM Mous eS ig , HorP , VerP : INTEGER 

0089 

008A TYPE rodent=valid , actv , totm : BYTE ; rsrv0 : INTEGER; ttto : BYTE ; tsst 

: INTEGER; cbsa , cbsb , ccta , cctb , ttsa , ttsb , tlsa , tlsb: BYTE 

; rsrvl ,bdx ,bdy: INTEGER; s tat, res: BYTE; acx,acy, vrx.wry 

: INTEGER 

00FB DIM msret: rodent 
0104 

0105 TYPE Reglsters=cc,a.b,dp:BYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 

012A DIM Regs : Registers 

0133 

0134 TYPE IntCeptCod=StBCode:BYTE; IntAddr : INTEGER; RTICode , IntResult 
: BYTE 

014F DIM IceptCoderlntCeptCod 
0158 

0159 IceptCode.StBCodet-$F7 

0165 IceptCode . IntAddr :=ADDR(IceptCode)+4 

0176 IceptCode.RTICode:=$3B 

0182 

0183 Stdln:=0 \StdOtat:-l \F_Sleep :-$0A \WT_DBox:-=4 \MouseSig :-10 
01A7 

01A8 RUN gfx2("0WSet", 1,3,4,28, 6, 2,3) 

01CA RUN gfx2("Cur0ff ") 

01D8 RUN gfx3(Std0ut,"ss.wnset" ,WindovAddr ,WT_DBox) 
01F7 

01F8 IF LEN(query)=0 THEN query :="What is your choice? " 

0220 ENDIF 

0222 

0223 PRINT query \ PRINT 

022A buttonl :*msgl \button2:=*rasg2 \button3 :=msg3 
0242 

0243 WHILE LEN(buttonl)<8 DO 

0250 buttonl :=" "+buttonl 

02 5E ENDWHILE 
0262 

0263 WHILE LEN(button2)<8 DO 

0270 button2:=" "+button2 

027E ENDWHILE 
0282 

0283 WHILE LEN(button3)<8 DO 

0290 button3:=»" H +button3 

029E ENDWHILE 
02A2 

02A3 PRINT buttonl; button2; button3; 
02B1 

02B2 IF buttonlo" " THEN 

02C8 RUN gfx2 ("Box", 20, 80, 208, 160) 

02DF F.NDTF 
02E1 

02E2 IF LEFT$(button2,8)0» » THEN 

02F9 RUN gfx2 ("Box", 220, 80, 405, 160) 

0311 ENDIF 
0313 

0314 RUN gfx2("Box",420,80,605,160) \RUN gfx2("Box" , 430 , 85 , 595 , 155 



) 



0346 




0347 


RUN gfx3(StdIn, "ss.msig" ,MouseSig) \(* Set Mouse Signal 


0373 




0374 


CallCode : =F_Sleep 


037C 


Regs.x:=0 \(* Sleep until mouse is clicked 


03A6 


RUN SysCall(CallCode,Regs) 


03B5 




03B6 


RUN gf x3 (Stdln , "gs . mous" , ADDR(msret) ) 


03D0 




03D1 


HorP : -msret . acx 


03DC 


VerP:=msret.acy 


03E7 




03E8 


HorP:-HorP*80/18 


03F6 


VerP :-VerP*2 4/4 


0404 




0405 


action :="No" 


040E 




040F 


IF msret. stat=0 AND VerP>192/6*3 THEN 



mounted in Drive /d0, just type the 
following command line and enter to 
finish the job: 

□s9gen /di <boatl ist .mv 

When DS9Gen finishes, you'll have a 
new OSgBaot. Now, create a CMD5 
directory on your new disk and copy the 
Shel 1 and Grf Drv/ files from the CMDS 
directory on the disk you had been 
using. If you want to run Multi-Vue 
immediately upon startup, add to your 
new CMDSdirectory the new files supp- 
lied in the CMDS directory on the front 
side of the Multi- Vue release disk, along 
with the AutoEx and Multi Start files 
from the directory on the back of that 
disk. 

You can also boot up from the disk 
you just made if both Shell and 
GrfDru are on its CMDS directory. You 
can then remove that disk and mount 
the system disk you normally use. After 
you put your old disk in the drive, type 
the following: 

chd 'd0 and chx /d0/cmds 

to switch your current directories to it. 
To run Multi- Vue from your disk, copy 
the new Multi-Vue files for the CMDS 
directories on both sides of the Multi- 
Vue release disk into your own CMDS 
directory. To start Multi- Vue from your 
disk, just type "mul tistart". 

I hope I've taken some of the mystery 
out of Multi- Vue\ installation process. 

Our Listings 

Youll find the source for ClkSpd and 
ClUChk, additional code with liberal 
comments for MVShell and another 
handy utility from Stephen Goldberg in 
this issue. Goldberg's Strip removes any 
leading or trailing spaces from your text 
files to save space on your disk. The 
command lines look like this: 

strip myf i le 
strip 8 myf ile 
strip +30 myf ile 
strip -10 myf ile 

The first line removes all leading 
spaces from each line. The second strips 
eight characters from each line. The 
next strips all characters past column 
30, and the last strips the last 10 char- 
acters from each line. Strip, another fine 
example of OS-9 assembly language 
programming, certainly beats editing 
each line. 

That's it for this month. Until next 
month, keep on hacking! □ 



Novem ber 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 85 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 

J 2 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly 

Christmas SALE 



CoCo Burke & Burke Hard Drive Kits 



More Burke and Burke systems 
have been bought in the last six months 
than other systems have sold in the last 
3 years, WITH NO RETURNS!!! 



Our first system features the Burke & Burke XT or XT RTC 
interface. This interface uses popular and inexpensive IBM PC 
type controllers. For this reason it is the least expensive hard 
disk system available today. Not as fast as the Is ted system but 
faster than any other system available. It also supports RLL 
drives. Note: Disk Extended Color Basic support and other 
software options are listed on our price list. 

Disadvantage; requires a multi-pak. 

KIT INCLUDES: Burke & Burke (B&B) XT PC interface. Hard 
drive with controller, 3 foot ST506 cable set. Hard Drive Case 
with 60 watt power supply and fan . Includes OS9 LI and LII 
software. 1 megabyte transfer in 45 seconds! Type ahead under 
OS9. Complete instructions. Easy one evening ass< 



1 YEAR WARRANTY ON ALL SYSTEMS! 

20 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 
30 Meg Kit Complete 60MS RLL 
40 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 
Assemble and test any of the above add 
OPTIONS: 

B&B Real Time Clock (add to above) 
B&B XT ROM Auto Boot from hard disk 
B&B Hyper I/O run DECB on hard drive 
B&B Hyper III Ramdisk/spooler for above 
FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 
R.S.B. RS Disk Basic under OS9 

Hard Drive Bits and Pieces 




B&B XT PC style interface 




B&B XT RTC interface w/clock/calendar 

(Call for Hard Drive and Kit prices) 
FHL HCA/WD High Speed Interface 
WD 1002-05 High Speed for FHL Interface 

(Supports both Hard and Floppy drives) 
(Call for Hard Drive prices) 

Hard Drive case with 60 W P/S and Fan 



•498.00 
•548.00 
♦618.00 
50.00 

30.00 
19.95 
29.95 
19.95 
75.00 
9.95 



69.95 
99.95 



•99.95 
•196.00 

•98.00 



(Can also be used for floppy drives) 
SPECIFICATIONS: size 16" deep, 5.5" high, T wide. 60 Watt power supply 
with 3 drive type power connectors, quiet 12 volt DC fan, LED power indicator, 
color matches CoCo. Holds 2 1/2 height hard or floppy drives and has card 
guided space for a PCB the size of a drive (like the WD1 002-05 controller) 

Floppy Drives (5.25 M and 3.5" FLOPPY DISKS) 
TEAC High Quality Drives - 1 Year Warr. 
FD55B 360K 40 Track DS 5.25" 118.00 
FD55F 720K 80 Track DS 5.25: 151.00 
FD35F 720K 80 Track DS 3.5" 147.00 
(Bare drives, requires case and power supply $75.00) 




CoCo FHL High Speed Hard 



Our top of the line system features Bruce Isted's interface for 
the Western Digital WD 1002-05 high speed controller. 
Features; fastest system available, 1 megabyte transfer in 
only 37 seconds!! Twice as fast as other systems! Supports 4 
floppy and 3 hard drives, type ahead for both floppy and hard 
disk, autoboot OS9 LI or L2 from hard or floppy disk. 
Disadvantage; does not support DECB. This is the system of 
choice for the serious OS9 user. 

KIT INCLUDES: FHL HCA/WD High Speed interface, Hard drive 
with WD 1002-05 controller, ST506 cable set, 4 foot 40 pin 
cable, Hard Drive Case with 60 watt power supply and fan . 
OS9 software for LI and LII with source . Complete instructions. 
Easy one evening assembly. 

( INTERFACE SPECIFICATIONS: Size is the same as a floppy 
controller. Interfaces the WD 1002-05 controller to the CoCo. 
This controller handles 3 hard and 4 floppy drives. Type ahead 
under OS9 for both floppy and hard drive. Includes OS9 LI and 
LII software with source. Autoboot ROM included to boot from 
floppy or hard drive. Supports OS9 only unless you use R.S.B.. 
1 megabyte transfer in 37 seconds!) 

1 YEAR WARRANTY ON ALL SYSTEMS! 




20 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 
40 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 
70 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 
Assemble & Test any of the above add 

OPTIONS: 

Floppy Drive (Mounted in case) 
Floppy Cable Int & Ext 
FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 
R.S.B. RS Disk Basic Under OS9 



•699.00 
*799.00 
♦1235.00 
60.00 



128.00 
25.00 
75.00 
39.95 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA and M/C. NY residents add 7% sales 
tax. US shipping add $3.50 for software. Hardware is more. Please call for Air 
Express shipping. 

Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. 
♦♦Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 

* New LOWER PRICES!!! 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 

Fax 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 

12 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Help! 

OS9 Software Christmas SALE 



The WIZ 



by Bill Brady 

Did you ever wonder why there is only one really good communications 
package for OS 9? The WIZ is so good that no one has been able to belter it in 
over a year on the market! Simply the best package there is for OS9 and the 

CoCo in. 

FEATURES: Mac-Like interface with windows, text and binary upload/download 
with xmodem, kermit, on line HELP, 

AUTOLOGGING lets you dial up and log on to your favorite service, Macros, 
VT52 emulation, Usage log and much more. 

The Wiz requires a RS232 Pak or similar device, LII and 512K. 
Supports the Owl-Ware Super I/O board. 

The WIZ 79.95 



Christmas SPECIAL ONLY 59.95 



Disto RS232 Pak 



49.95 



See our NEW 2400 Baud Modem for under $200 



N 



WIZPro 

By Bill Brady 



PRODUCTS 




Read about WIZPro in Dale Puckett's October 1988 column 
on page 147! We'll have more about WIZPro in coming ads. 
Available November 1988. 



Christmas SPECIAL ONLY 99.95 



Inside OS9 Level II 

The Book by Kevin Darling 
$39.95 



Christmas SPECIAL ONLY 19.95 



Are your tired of playing games with Level II? Do you want to find out what's go- 
ing on inside OS9? This is the book for you! Over 200 pages of hints, kinks, 
bugs, source listings and much more. Written by the well known Compuserve 
SysOp, Kevin Darling. 'Must reading* says Dale Puckett in Rainbow! 



Sculptor Users 
Exciting News is Coming 
Watch For More 
Information!!!!! 




PRODUCT! 



N 



Midget 24 
2400 Baud Modem - 5 Year Warranty 

300/1200/2400 baud, Hayes compatible, Non- Volatile 
Memory (RAM) Automatic Adaptive Equalization (Error Free 
Transmission) 5 YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY!! Perhaps the 
last modem you will ever have to buy! (Well... for 5 years 
an yway!) 



Christmas SPECIAL ONLY 195.00 



DynaStar 



Used by more OS9 users than any other! 

FEATURES: Best OS9 editor/word processor/text formatter, has everything 
you would expect and more, supports terminals and windows simultaneously, 
auto-configurable, auto-indent for C and Pascal programming, mail merge for 
form letters, bug free, solid. New manual makes it easier to use than ever. 
Most popular word processor since 1982! Uses CoCo 3*s windows for pop-up 
help menus, can be disabled. Two key sequence to move from anywhere to 
anywhere in your text. WordStar command style. Will work with files larger 
than memory. Merge function allows stringing many files together at print time. 
Full block manipulation, mark, move, copy, delete, read from disk, write to 
disk. Keyboard Macros: Define or redefine any control key (up to 29) to 
reproduce any key sequences, including commands! Macros can be read in at 
startup automatically or created on the fly as needed. Printer Control: Supports 
multiple printers via a print control file that transforms imbedded control 
characters to printer control characters. Changing printers is easy. Formatting 
Commands: Justification, word wrap, centering, headers, footers, macros, odd 
and even support, multiple index generation, multiple table of contents 
generation and more! DynaStar is the last word processor you will ever have to 
buy! Level I version also included on disk. 



DynaStar word processor/formatter 



150.00 



Christmas SPECIAL ONLY 99.95 



DynaSpell 

by Dale Puckett 

102,000 and 20,000 word dictionaries included. Supports both Level I and II. 
Fast, slick, the best available for OS9. Written by Rainbowtech columnist Dale 
Puckett. 



DynaSpell spelling checker 
SPECIAL WHEN PURCHASED WITH DYNASTAR 



75.00 
25.00 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA and M/C. NY residents add 1% sales 
tax. US software shipping add $3.50. Please call for Air Express shipping. 

Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. 
**Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 

Fax 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856 



042B 
0438 
0440 
0442 
0444 
0451 
045E 
0460 



IF &dxP<U8P THEN 

action: =msgl 
ENDIF 
ENDIF 

RUN gfx2( ,, CurOn") 
RUN gfx2("OWEnd") 
END 



Listing 5: strip 



* 
* 

* 
* 
* 



STRIP 



COPYRIGHT (c) 1987 by S.B.GOLDBERG 



Strip all leading spaces or indicated number 
of leading or trailing characters from lines 

Use: strip [[+/-] count] [filename] [...] 
no count = strip leading spaces 
count = strip # leading characters 
+count =* strip characters after # column 
-count = strip # trailing characters 
count limits = 1 - 255 characters 

Standard output path can be redirected 

Omit filename (s) for standard input path to 
use in pipeline or with input redirection 

ifpl 

use /d0/def s/os9def s 
endc 



BASIC UTILITY DISKETTE 

A real time saver for the person who develops 
software using COCO Basic. 

— DUMPDIR: Prints a hard copy of a disk's 
directory. No more searching one disk after 
another looking for a lost file. 

— DUMPCRT: Copies text from the screen to the 
printer. Versions included for 40 and 80 column 
COCO 3 text screens. 

— DUMPFILE: Dumps any disk file to the printer. 
Printout can be in either decimal or in hex values. 

— CROSSREF: Prints cross reference of source 
and destination line numbers for basic jump 
instructions (GOTO, GOSUB, etc.). 

— COMPARE: Reads two BASIC Programs from 
diskette and compares them line by line. Lists all 
lines that are not identical. 

Requires COCO 2 or 3, disk and printer. 
Order at $19.95 plus $2 p&h. 
Calif, residents add $1.20 tax. 

T.E.M. of California 

Box 4311 RAINBOW 

_ | - ~ . m . _ . CERTIFICATION 

Fullerton, CA 92634-4311 seal 





mod 


j.en f name , prgrm+ooj ct , reent+i , entry, qsxz 


rlag 


rmb 


1 t unction rlag 


paun 


>~ rrt i-\ 


j. input pa En numoer 


count 


rmb 


2 count storage 


pointer 


rmb 


2 parameter pointer 


buffer 


rmb 


Zjj I/O line butter 




rmb 


200 stack 




rmo 


zjjjj parameters 


dsiz 


equ 




name 


f cs 


/Strip/ 




fcb 


1 edition number 




fee 


/(c)1987 S.B.Goldberg/ 



^^V^Vo-r^A^A* "A* "A A , v^VoVVcV<'A^VVoV*A*~A'"A'^rA r }V 

* CONVERT DECIMAL TO BINARY 

ITTCTOT WtOCtW Wk 7C 7C7V W W >wi W Y wK WiK Y(T« 

binary bsr convert convert first digit 

convert convert next 2 digits 
,x get character 
#•0 make binary 
back not valid digit 
#9 valid digit? 
back no 
a yes, save it 
1+count get previous total 
#10 multiply by 10 



back 



bsr 
bsr 
Ida 
suba 
bmi 
cmpa 
bhi 
pshs 
Ida 
ldb 
mul 
addb 
stb 
leax 
rts 



, s+ add current value 
1+count save new total 
l,x bump pointer 
return 



* INITIALIZE 

kkftk*kk***kkkk*k*kkic****ick * *** 

clra 



entry 



plus 



bump it 
chknum 



clrb 

std flag standard input & clear flag 

std count zero count 

Ida ,x parameter character 

cmpa end strip? 

bne plus no, check for plus 

dec flag yes, set flag 

bra bumpit continue 

cmpa #' + strip past offset? 

bne chknum no, check for count 

inc flag yes, set flag 

leax l,x bump pointer 

bsr binary decimal count to binary 



kicft**kk*\ttkkk**ickkkk******k*^ 

* FIND FILENAME AND OPEN FILE 
look 



Ida 
cmpa 
bio 
bhi 
leax 
bra 
Ida 
os 9 
bes 
sta 

savpoint stx 



open 



,x parameter character 
#$20 filename? 
savpoint no, standard input 
open yes, open file 
l,x bump pointer 
look look again 
#read. read mode 
i$open open file 
out exit with error 
path save path number 
pointer save parameter pointer 

irkkk*irk**k****kkirk**k* ^ ^^^ A k 

* READ LINES FROM FILE 

k***k**k***k*k*k'k~k~k*k-k-k'k trick*** 

read ldy #255 maximum line length 

leax buffer,u line buffer 

Ida path input path number 

os9 i$readln get line 

bes error branch on error 

* STRIP CHARACTERS 

ldd count strip spaces? 

beq spacloop yes , do it 

tst flag strip past offset? 

bgt setend yes, set new line end 

cmpy count strip entire line? 

bhi test no, continue 



1 88 THE RAINBOW November 1 988 



test 



tfr 
bra 
tst 
bmi 
leax 
endstrip tfr 
subd 



x,y buffer address 
cr make blank line 
flag end strip? 
endstrip yes, % «.ep buffer 
d,x no, reset buffer point 
y,d length read 
count less strip count 
tst flag end strip? 
bpl setend no, continue 
decb strip carriage return 
setend leay d.x end of line 
cr ldb #$0d carriage return 

stb ,y to end of line 

* OUTPUT STRIPPED LINES 

write inca standard output path 

ldy #256 maximum length 

os9 i$writln to screen 

bcc read continue if no error 

* ERROR CHECK AND TERMINATE 

error cmpb #e$eof end of file? 

bne out quit with other error 

ldx pointer parameter pointer 

Ida ,x parameter character 

cmpa #$JJd another filename? 

bne open yes , open file 

clrb clear error 

out os9 f$exit quit 

* STRIP LEADING SPACES 

spacloop ldb ,x character 

cmpb #$20 space to skip? 

bne andstrip no, display line 

leay -l,y decrement length 



pointer 
er 



len 



leax l,x increment pointer 
bra spacloop 

emod 
equ * 
end 



Listing 6: 

PROCEDURE 

9999 

0038 
006F 
P0A4 
00DD 
00E8 

01J38 
0118 
011D 
0127 
0132 
0138 
0154 
0156 
0187 
01B8 
01E6 
021A 
024B 
027C 
02AD 
02DE 
030F 
0340 
0371 
03A2 
03D3 




roke f r Broker 



by Ftoy C. Pierce 



(c) 1986 



Buy & Sell your way to Power in this Exciting Stock Market Simulation. 

2 - 6 Players Ages 10 & Up. 

7*/ since Stick Ticker® have I had so much Funr F.G. Dawson 
'Easy to Learn, Fun to Pfayr A.R Fazackedey 

128 K CoCo Required, Disk a Cassette. $23.95 



Ytn^U^ ESS 

by Roy C. Pierce (c) 1988 






/A 





Challenging Two Player Games 

ADI OTHELLO 



CONNECT 5 

FAST AMD FUN FOR ALL AGES 
EASY TO RUN 
ALL BASIC COMPLETELY USTABLE 



$19.95 



Am 

^jssr InJ 



RAINBOW 





LI © / US /A © ^ Directory Utility 

(See September & October Rainbow) 
"...One Professional Looking, Well Behaved...and User Friendty Utfity for BASIC Pmoramsf 
'Do your Fingers a Favor and htoduce the CoCo in your Life to HELLOSAS. " October Rainbow 

Review . $19 95 

Prices Shown are In U.S. Funds. 

Include Cheque or Money Order when Ordering. 

On Ciders of 2 or more Programs Deduct 10% from Total Price. 

We Ray the Freight 

In Canada Please Phone for Prices. 

ALL Foreign Orders Add $5.00 

N 0 c OD P.O.BOX 1787, 

|< I* Ptt?PPT? Main Post Office, 

IHiIU^JIi Edmonton, AB. Canada 

T5J-2P2 

PH: (403) 474-8435 



SOFTWARE 



MakeStrip 

makestrip 

(* Generates the module "Strip" in the CMDS directory *) 
(* The "Attr" utility MUST be in execution direcrory *) 
(* or in memory for Makestrip to operate correctly *) 
(* For Level I OS -9 change "/dd" in pathlists to "/dpf" *) 
DIM path,byt:BYTE 
DIM count : INTEGER 

CREATE #path , "/dd/emds /strip" : V7RITE 
FOR count=l TO 208 

READ byt 

PUT #path,byt 
NEXT count 
CLOSE #path 

SHELL "attr /dd/emds/strip e pe" 
END 

DATA 135,205,0,208,0,13,17,129,248,0,67,2,149,83,116 
DATA 114,105,240,1,40,99,41,49,57,56,55,32,83,46,66 
DATA 46,71,111,108,100,98,101,114,103,141,2,141,0,166 
DATA 132,128,48,43,17,129,9,34,13,52,2,150,3,198,10,61 
DATA 235,224,215,3,48,1,57,79,95,221,0,221,2,166,132 
DATA 129,45,38,4,10,0,32,6,129,43,38,4,12,0,48 
DATA 1,141,202,166,132,129,32,37,15,34,4,48,1.32,244 
DATA 134,1,16,63,132,37,78,151,1,159,4,16,142,0,255 
DATA 48,70,150,1,16,63,139,37,48,220,2,39,60,13,0 
DATA 46,24,16,156,2,34,4,31,18,32,17,13,0,43,2 
DATA 48,139,31,32,147,2,13,0,42,1,90,49,139,198,13 
DATA 231,164,76,16,142,1,0,16,63,140,36,195,193,211,38 
DATA 9,158,4,166,132,129,13,38,172,95,16,63,6,230,132 
DATA 193,32,38,209,49,63,48,1,32,244,159,244.189 



THE 



PAK 



IS 



BACK! 



Truly Compatible RS232 interface 

— NKW PROMT 





TECHNO LOG I E 5 



No compatibility hassles! Uses standard DB25 cable. 
No 1200 baud restriction. Baud rates to 19,200 baud! 
Compatible with all RSDOS and OS-9 software that 
uses the Radio Shack Deluxe RS232 Pack. 
PRICED TO FIT YOUR BUDGET? 

TELEPAK 



For use with Coco 1 or multipack only, taking 
advantage of their built-in power supplies. 

TF.tFPAK * 

For use with ANY CoCo in any configuration. 
Even with a Y -Cable! 



44 M 



Orion Htchnotogi&s 
T.O. <Bo?c63196 

Wichita, 2Q. 67203 
(316)346-0440 



All orders add 3.00 shpg/hdlg. 

C.O.D. additional 3.00 
No delay for personal checks. 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 189 



Racksellers 



The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis and 
may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We 
suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

Tuscaloosa 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Cottonwood 
Lake Havasu 

City 
Phoenix 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayettevilte 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Berkeley 
Citrus Heights 
Hollywood 

La Jolia 

Los Angeles 

Marysville 

Napa 

Oakland 

Rancho 

Murieta 
Sacramento 

San Francisco 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvale 
Torrance 

COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Glenwood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 

DELAWARE 

Middletown 
Newark 
Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington, 
DC 



.Jefferson flfews Ca. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 
Injun John's, Inc. 

Arrow Appliance/Radio Shack 

A & W Graphics Co. 

Book Nook 
TRj-TEK Computers 
Books, Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Lyon Enterprises 
Software Plus 
Levity Distributors 
Stef-Jen, Inc. 

Butler & Mayes Booksellers 
Circus of Books (2 Locations) 
Bookland 

Bookends Bookstore 
DeLauer's News Agency 

Software Plus 
Deibert's Readerama 
Tower Magazine 
Booksmith 
Bookworks 
Castro Kiosk 

Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Comino College Bookstore 

Aurora Newsstand 

Hathaway's 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Readmore Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 



Delmar Co. 
Newark Newsstand 
Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Clearwater 

Cocoa 

Dania 

Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 



Gainesville 
Jacksonville 
North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
ftensaeoto 
Pinellas Park 
South 

Pasadena 
Starke 

Sunrise 
Tallahossee 



Titusville 



Chronichles 
News Room 
World News, Inc. 

Great American Book Co. 
The Avid Reader 
The Open Door 
Dania News & Books 
Software Plus More 
Bob's News & Book-Store 
Clarks Out of Town News 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 

Aimar Bookstore 
Boyd-Ebert Corp 
Andettson News Co. 
Wolfs Newsstand 

Poling Place Bookstore 
Record Junction, Inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Sunn/s at Sunset 
Anderson News Co. 
Du Bey's News Center 
Computrac 



GEORGIA 




Atln ntn 


OKJl Uwl o 


L2I Wl i IO| I 


Did I iCJi I citr^i iu\ iiui/ kuhjhj ai 


Fnrost Pnrk 

1 vlvvl I »wjl fV 














Mnr+fn Ml \<iir Rnrfrn ^hrvk 

IVIVJT1III rviUglU l\UUIv Oi IUwK 


IDAHO 




Boise 


Book Shelf, Inc. 


Moscow 


Johnson News Agency 






Beiseviife 


software or systems 


ChamDaian 


Bookmark 


Chicago 


B. Dalton Booksellers 


Decatur 


Book Emporium 




K-Mart Plaza 




Northgate Mall 


East Mollne 


Book Emporium 


Evanston 


Norrls Center Bookstore 


Kewanee 


Book Emporium 


Lisle 


Book Nook 


Lombard 


Empire Periodicals 


Newton 


Bill's TV Radio Shack 


Paris 


Book Emporium 


Peoria 


Book Emporium 




Sheridan Village 




Westlake Shopping Center 




Illinois News Service 


Springfield 


Book Emporium 




Sangamon Center North 




Town & Country Shopping Ctr, 


Sunnytand 


Book Emporium 


West Frankfort 


Paper Place 


Wheeling 


North Shore Distributors 


INDIANA 




Angolo 


0 & D Electronics 




Radio Shack 



Berne 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

Crawfordsville 

Dyer 

Franklin 

Ft. Wayne 

Garrett 

Indianapolis 



Lebanon 
Martinsville 
Richmond 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Des Moines 
Fairfield 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson 
Topeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Hopkinsville 

Louisville 

Middletown 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 
Lockport 
New Orleans 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Oxford 

Sanford 

MARYLAND 

College Park 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 
Brockton 
Cambridge 
Ipswich 



White Cottage Electronics 
Book Corner 

Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 

Koch's Books 

Miles Books 

Gallery Book Shop 

Michiana News Service 

Finn News Agency, Inc. 

Bookland, Inc. 

Borders Bookshop 

Indiana News 

Southside News 

Gallery Book Shop 

Radio Shack 

Voyles News Agency, inc. 

Mlttlng's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 
mockery's Books, Inc. 
Kramers Books & Gifts 

Crossroads, Inc. 

Palmer News, Inc. 

Town Crier of Topeka, Inc. 

Dandy's/ Radio Shack Dealer 

Lloyd's Radio 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Mart's News & Gifts 
Hobby Shop 

Hawley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 
Software City 
Radio Shack 

City News Stand 
TV Doctor/Radio Shack 
Sidney's News Stand Uptown 
The Book Rack 

Magazines, Inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Books-N -Things 
Radio Shack 

University Bookstore 

Eastern Newsstand 
Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Ipswich News 



MASSACHUSETTS (cont'd) 

Littleton Computer Plus 

Lynn North Shore News Co. 

Swansea Newsbreak, Inc. 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 
Birmingham 
Durand 
E. Detroit 
Hillsdale 
Holland 
Kalamazoo 
Lowell 
Muskegon 
Niles 
Perry 
Riverview 
Roseville 

MINNESOTA 

Burnsville 
Crystal 
Edina 

Minneapolis 
Minnetonka 
Roseville 
St. Paul 



Wlllmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmlngton 
Flat River 
Florissant 
Jefferson City 
Kirksville 
St. Louis 

MONTANA 

Butte 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Keene 
Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 
Cedar Knolls 
Clinton 
Pennsvtlle 
Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 
Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockporf 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Fails 
Huntington 
Johnson City 
New York 



Pawling 
Rochester 



Book Nook, Inc. 
Border's Book Shop 
Robbins Electronics 
Merit Book Center 
Electronics Express/Radio Shack 
Fris News Company 
The Book Raft 
Lowell Electronics 
The Eight Bit Comer 
Michiana News Service 
Perry Computers 
Riverview Book Store 
New Horizons Book Shop 

Shinder's Burnsville 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Shinder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shinder's Ridge Square 
Shinder's Roseville 
Shinder's Annex 
Shinder's Maplewood 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Book Emparium 

Plaza Books 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Bookcelior 

Hurley Electronics 

Steve's Books & Magazines 

Radio Shack Associate Store 
Book wrights 
Verham News Corp. 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 
Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 
Software Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 



Village Green-Buffalo Books 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Cromland, inc. 

Southern Tier News Co.. Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

GA West & Co. 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicorn Electronics 

Bames & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station, Track 37 

200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonii Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Waiden Books 
World Wide Media Services 
Universal Computer Service 
Village Green 
World Wide News 



190 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Caiy 

Chapel Hill 
Charlotte 
Hickory 
Jacksonville 
Kemersville 
Marlon 

Winston-Salem 



News Center in Cary Village 
University News & Sundry 
Newsstand Inf I 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Michele's. Inc. 
K & S Newsstand 
Boomers Rhythm Center 
K&S Newsstand (3 Locations) 
Rainbow News Ltd. 



OHIO 

Akron 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbiano 

Columbus 



Dayton 



Dublin 
Fdirbom 

findtey 
Kent 

Lakewood 
Lima 

Miamisburg 

Parma 

Toledo 

Warren 

Xenia 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

AJIentown 
Altoona 
Bryn Mawr 
Corry 

Feasrervllle 
King of Prussia 
Malvern 
Reading 
Temple 
West Chester 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Newport 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Clemson 
Florence 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 

TENNESSEE 

Brentwood 
Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxvllle 

Memphis 
Nashville 



Smyrna 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Desoto 
Elgin 
Ft. Worth 
Hariington 



Churchill News & Tobacco 

Little Professor Book Center 

Thrasher Radio & TV 

Cinsoft 

Erieview News 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

B5 Softwore 

Micro Center 

The Newsstand 

Books & Co. 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wilke News 

Wright News & Books 

Book Bam 

News-Readers 

Wilke's University Shoppe 

Open Book 

The News Shop 

Lakewood International News 

Edu-Caterers 

Wilke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Plaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sates. Inc. dba Rodio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store, Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owl Services 

Newborn Enterprises 

Bryn Mawr News 

Cony Books & Cards 

Global Books 

Gene's Books 

Personal Software 

Smith's News & Card Center 

Software Corner 

Chester County Book Co. 

Micro* World 

The Computer Center of York 
Tollgate Bookstore 

Bellevue News 

Software Haus, Inc. 
Clemson Newsstand 
Ray's #1 

Palmetto News Co. 
Software City 

Bookworld #5 
Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Davis-Kidd Bookseller 
Computer Center 
Davis-Kidd Booksellers 
Mosko's Place 
R.M. Mills Bookstore 
Delker Electronics 



UTAH 

Provo 

VIRGINIA 

Danville 
Hampton 
Lynchburg 
Norfolk 

Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Port Angeles 
Seattle 

Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 
South 
Charleston 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Kenosha 
Madison 

Milwaukee 
Waukesha 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Kingsford 

CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Falrvlew 

Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hinton 
Innisfail 
Lecombe 
Leduc 
Lethbridge 
Lloydminster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 

Stettler 

Strathmore 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetaskiwin 



Valley Book Center 

K&S Newsstand 
Benders 

Self Serve Software 
l-O Computers 
Turn The Page 
Volume i Bookstore 

Port Book & News 
Adams News Co., Inc. 
Bulldog News 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Spring Hill News 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
R.K. News, Inc. 
Re A Book 
University Bookstore 
Juneau Village Reader 
Holt Variety 



Information Telecommunlcatlones 



Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
Paul Tercler 

Double "D" A.S.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shack asd 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
AS.C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack, ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 

Jim Cooper 

L & S Stereo 

Brian's Electronics 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 

Datatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's Electronics 
Stettler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA (cont'd) 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Bumaby 
Bums Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chilliwack 



Compulit 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 



Coquitiam 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Langley 
Nelson 
New West- 
minster 
Parksville 
Penticton 

Sidney 
Smithers 
Squamish 
Vancouver 



Cody Books LTD 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesoft Marketing 
Langley Radio Shack 
Oliver's Books 

Cody Books LTD 
Parksville TV 
DJ/s 

Four Comer Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 
Active Components 
Friendlyware Computers 
Granville Book Co. 
Siliconnectians Books LTD 



100 Mile 




House 


Tip Top Radio & TV 


MANITOBA 




Altona 


LA Wiebr Ltd. 


Lundar 


Goranson Elec. 


Morden 


Central Sound 


The Pas 


Jodl's Sight & Sound 


Selkirk 


G.L. Enns Elec. 


Vlrden 


Archer Enterprises 


Winnipeg 


J & J Electronics Ltd. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 




Moncton 


Jeffries Enterprises 


Sussex 


Dewttt Elec. 


NEWFOUNDLAND 




Botwood 


Seaport Elec. 


Carbonear 


Slade Realties 


NOVA SCOTIA 




Halifax 


Atlantic News 



ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsville 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

Toronto 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assiniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tisdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Huntsville Elec. 

Donny "B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Gordon and Gotch 

Messageries de Presse Benjamin Enr. 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 

» 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H & O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 



Software City 



Poncho's News 
Maxwell Books 
The Homing Pigeon 
Trinity News 
Book Mark 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles and W.H. Smith in Canada, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, 
Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, Tower Book & 
Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



November 1988 THE RAINBOW 1 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



4-TECHS, ^„.> r .* 175 

Adventure Novel Software .67 

After-Five Software . , . .. . , v 1 73 

Alpha Products ... . . .> I . . . . . .21 

Alpha Software Technologies . . .81 

Alpha-Biotechnologies Inc 37 

Arizona Small Computer 

Company , . . .w .... 105 

Ark Royal Games .141 

Burke & Burke f 35, 81 

Cer-Comp ..... ... ....... > 1 54, 1 55 

Cinsoft , , 159 

CoCo Connection 1 53 

Codis Enterprises * 1 07 

Cognitec . , 29 

Colorware — 18, 19 

Computer Center ........ .169 

Computer Island . . . , . v ^v * . 87 

Computer Plus . , 3 

CRC/Disto 115 

CY-BURNET-ICS 89 

D.P. Johnson .. . .... 165 

DATAMATCH, INC 55 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R Hall, Inc. , > . , ;:132, 1 33 

Delphi 34, 35 

Diecom Products IFC 

Dorsett Educational Systems. . .119 
Dr. Preble's Programs ........ . IBC 

E-Z Friendly Software 39 

Eversoft ...*.*... •*....• ». ..... 1 59 

Frank Hogg Laboratory j . .186, 187 
Game Point Software. . . , , r . . . .131 

Gimmesoft 100, 101 

Granite Computer Systems . . . ,175 
GSW Software .... .1 05 



Hard Drive Specialist ; . .... 171 

Hawkes Research 

Services...... ..141 

HawkSoft, Inc ......99 

HJL Products 1 09 

Howard Medical .66, 194 

J & R Electronics ......... 170 

JR & JR Softstuff. 67 

Kenneth Leigh Enterprises 135 



Metric Industries 14 

Michtron BC 

Micro Works, The « , 1 21 

Microcom Software 9, 11,13, 15, 17 
Microtech Consultants 

Inc. , 31 

MicroWorld . . . ♦ , .65 

Orion Technologies * , . . — 189 

Owl-Ware 69, 70, 71 

Performance Peripherals ..137 

Perry Computers 1 13 

Public Domain Software 170 

PXE Computing 7 

R.C. Pierce Software 189 

Rainbow Adventures Book IV . . .24 

Rainbow Binder 10 

Rainbow Bookshelf 50, 51 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 112 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk 12 

Renco Computer Supplies 107 



Rulaford Research 85 

Saint John Gallery 89 

SD Enterprises ... 25, 1 47, 1 49, 1 51 , 
153 

Second City Software . 193 

SpectroSystems 39 

SPORTSWARE 158 

Sugar Software .181 

Sundog Systems 61 

T & D Software 22, 23, 57, 125 

T.E.M. of California . , 188 

Tandy/Radio Shack 20, 117 

Tepco 1 77 

Three C's Projects 149 

Tomela & Co 158 

Tothian Software 131 

True Data Products 78, 79 

Vidicom Corporation 37 

Woodstown Electronics 147 

Zebra Systems 63 



t' - 1 N 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



□ 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 




1 92 THE RAINBOW November 1988 



MasterCard VISA COO. CHECKS 




ORDER 



CoCo CALENDER: 
Organize all of your appointments with this 365 day 
CoCo Calender. 64k DISK. $9.95 

BLACKJACK RO YALE: 
Even your casino odds with this Blackjack card 
simulation and tutor! Program can be edited for 
different house rules. 64k DISK. $16.95 

BSE - BASIC SCREEN EDITOR: 
Gives Basic a full-screen editor to supplement the 
regular EDIT commands. Works on the CoCo 1&2 
and with the CoCo 3, WIDTH 32, 40 or 80 is sup- 
ported! Complete screen cursor control with the 
arrow keys plus features to make EDITing Basic 
programs a snap! BSE, a must have CoCo utility. 
Our low price was the only corner that was cut on 
thisquality program. 64k DISK. $19.95 

CHECK-09MV : 

Finally, aprogram that interacts with MultiVue for 
FAST and EASY check balancing. CHECK-09MV 
and you can now take control of your bank checking 
account. No more waiting on your bank statement 
for an ending balance. CHECK-09MV will provide 
a check-by-check balance in an easy to use format 
that eliminates those monthly surprizes! Bringyour 
money and you closer together and have the buck I 
STOP HERE! 512k DISK. $22.95 

CoCoMAXn : By Colorware 
The 'CLASSIC CoCo graphic program. Draw great 
works of art with the program that set a standard for 
all others to follow. Supported by a Hi-Res interface 
and numerous printer drivers for complete set-up. 
64k DISK. $78.45 

CoCoMAX in: By Colorware 
All new program based off the 'CLASSIC CoCo- 
Max II software. Allows for full animation, select 16 
colors from a 64 color palette, fast & easy to use w/ 
pull down menus in a point-and-click environment. 
128k or512k DISK. $78.45 

DISK UTILITY 2.1A PLUS : 
Acomplete disk utility package for all CoCo's. Full 
Disk I/O for FORMAT, COPY, and BACKUP. 
Supports single or double sided 35 or 40 track 
drives. With DISK UTILITY 2.1A PLUS from 
SCS, you get TWO programs for ONE low price. 
DISK UTILITY for the CoCo 1 & 2 and DISK 
UTILITY for the CoCo 3. Find it anywhere in this 
magazine for less and we'l l raj 
64 k Ej J ^2 fCi liiLi in ■ ■ ■ in in L^H^^ri^M IL * 5**^ 3 . ?5 




■>ver 
ft 



ELEPATCH : 

'urn Telewriter 64 into the best Word Proces-| 
Isor f or t he CoCo 1&2 ! TELEPATCH is compat- 
ible with all CoCo's. Comes with complete docu-| 
mentations for easy upgrading and changes. 
64k DISK. $24.95| 

IsCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR: 

'FAST' and 'EASY TO USE' ELECTRONIC! 
ID RAFTING PROCESSOR. Create pro-look- 
ing diagrams using a 480x540 pixel screen with 6 
kdewing windows! Over '30' electronic symbols 
Kvith 10 definable symbols. Even supports Logic 
gates & Multipin chips! Print hardcopy or save 
todisk for later editing. 64k DISK $22.95| 

pS-9 SOLUTION : 
[Tame the hostile environment of OS-9 with OS-I 
9 SOLUTION! Replaces 20 of the command 
tails with single keystroke, menu driven com- 
mands. No more long and complex pathnames! 
or syntaxes to remember! Workswith either OS- 
9 Level One orTwo $24.95 1 

[TAPE/DISK UTILITY : 
k utility package that transfers TAPE to DISKI 
or DISK to TAPE automatically. If you just got! 
Uur first disk drive, TAPE/DISK is a MUST 
[HAVE program. Will print tape & disk directo- 
ries to any supported prin ter. 64 k DISK.. . , $19.95 1 

FAST DUPE 2: 
Backup & Format as many copies of your origi-| 
nal disk that you need. FAST DUPE 2 reads 
source into memory for fast and realible trans- 
fer. Supports 4 drives. 64k DISK $19.95| 

DISCOUNT SOFTWARE By ColorVenture 

|RAM DISK LIGHTNING DISK. $16.95] 

PRINTER LIGHTNING $16.95 

BACKUP LIGHTNING $16.95 

BUY ALL THREE FOR ONLY $42.95 

HI-RES JOYSTICK DRIVER. $19.95 

MAX PATCH $19.95 

BUY BOTH FOR ONLY $34.95| 

HGRXDUMP: 
IProduce hardcopy graphic files with yourl 
|DMP105 or DMP130 printer. CoCo 1, 2 & 3 

:ompatible. 64k DISK. $19.95| 

[CoCo KEYBOARD : 

[Program allows the user to utilize the functionl 
Ikeyson the HJL-57 Pro-fessional, Deluxe CoCo,| 
|& Micronix keyboard. 

52k DISK $6,951 



SECOND CITY SOFTWARE 



T 



Accepts MasterCard, Visa, C.O.D. and 
Check orders. Please add $2.50 for ship- 
pi ng (£4.50 for Canada ordc rs) & allow 1 to 
3 weeks for delivery. C.O.D. orders, add 
■n additional $2.50. 



P.O. Box 72956 
Roselle, IL 60172 
Voice: 312-653-5610 
BBS: 312-307-1519 

MY DOS: By Chris Hawks 
Supports accesses to double sided drives, able to 
use the J&M Controller with the CoCo 3, DIR 
commands simplified and a host of other special 
features. 64k DISK. $14.95 

SCS DOS : 

Add 24 new disk commands with 2 Hi-Res 
Screens! Supports 40 txack&Doubte Sided drives, 
6ms stepping, auto disk search, error trapping and 
burnable into an EPROM 64k DISK. $24.95 

A-DOS 3: 

The popular Disk Operating System from Spec- 
troSystems for the CoCo 3. 128k DISK. $34.95 

SCS can custom 'burn' your purchased DOS pro- 
gram for only $15.00! This includes the price of the 
EPROM chip and the BURN charge. Call or write 
for details. 

VIP LIBRARY: 

This popular 'in tergraded' package includes, VIP 
Writer, Terminal, Data Base, Calc and Disk Zap 
which can fix a diskette with I/O errors. SCS 
special price. 64k DISK $125.00 

VIP WRITER III w/SPELL CHECKER...$79.95 
VIP DATABASE m $69.95 

TELEWRITER - 128 $76.95 

THE NEWSPAPER PLUS : 
DeskTop Publishing for the CoCo 3? With the 
ALL NEW NEWSPAPER PLUS, you now can 
create complete and sophisticated Banners, 
Headlines along withText Columns and Graphics. 
THE NEWSPAPER PLUS allows for importing 
different pictures, fonts and fill patterns from disk 
for that pro-look. Comes complete with 22 fonts 
and 50 clip art pictures. THE NEWSPAPER 
PLUS is an all new upgraded program based on 
the original NEWSPAPER program. SCS is the 
ONLY company authorized to handle THE 
NEWSPAPER PLUS program. Why buy the old, 
overpriced and outdated program when you can 
get the newest release for less! 
128k DISK. $48.95 

THE NEWSPAPER GRAPHICS DISK I : 
The FIRST OFFICIAL supplementary program 
disk for THE NEWSPAPER. Contains '50' NEW 
PICTURE FILES, '10' NEW FILL PATTERNS 
and '3' ADDITIONAL FONT SETS! GRAPH- 
ICS DISK I is available only from Second City 
Software for $19.95 

| NEW FROM SECOND CITY SOFTWARE 
MAX-10 : By Colorware 

The 'Dazzling Word Processor & Document 
Creator for the CoCo3'. You asked for it and now 
it is available at an SCS special price. 
128k DISK. $78.45 




» > 

; •. 



f 



V 
V 



t 




HOWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 

1690 N. Elston • Chicago, IL 60622 • ORDERS (800) 443-1444* INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS (312) 278-1440 



* 5 STAR FINAL 



NOVEMBER 88 



RAINY 



HD 



DC-5 CONTROLLER 




Sale Extended 



from Hard Drive Specialist gives 
great Radio Shack compatability 
and double sided access to DSDD 
Drives like Howard's DD-3. Two 
ROM sockets, one 24 pin and one 
28 pin allows use of RS 1.1 ROM 
by jumper selection. Gold plated 
contacts reduce I/O Errors. 
$75 ($2 Shipping) 




> ■ 



> > 



' ■ • • ./ :,a; 




RS DOS ROM CHIP 

ROM chip fits inside disk controller. 
24 pin fits both J&M and RS controller 
Release 11 For CoCo 3 Compatibility. 
$ 25 each Reg. $40 ($2 shipping) 

NEW FROM DISTO $ 129 DC6 

($2 Shipping) Super Controller II 
works with CoCo \ 2 & 3. It buffers 
keyboard input so that no keystrokes 



are lost when disk is reading or writ- 
ing. Especially useful with OS-9, but 
also works with BASIC. 

MONITOR 

Sony KV-1311CR $ 499 

Regular $625 ($15 shipping) 

• Vivid Color • Vertically flat 13" 
screen • Monitor/Trinitron TV with 
remote control • 640 x 240 reso- 
lution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and 
composite inputs • VCR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 




HARD DRIVE ACCESSORIES 
3' Hard Drive Cable $ 20 
Clock Upgrade $ 20 

Burke & Burke Interface 

RSB $ 39.95 
TEAC 55B $ 118 

Hard Drive ROM Boot s 20 



« * 



"Guarantee" As good as Gold, 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compat- 
ibility. If you're not happy with it for 



any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states. APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 




Hard Drive— Ready to Run! 

20,000,000 Bytes or the equivalent to 
a 125 R.S. 501's on line are packed 
into this hard drive, pre installed and 
ready tp run. All you need to do is 
plug it in and go! This complete easy 
to use package includes a Seagate 20 
Meg Hard Drive, a Western Digital 
WD 1002-WX 1 Controller and 
interface* that plugs into slot #3 of 
multipack interface, plus the case & 
power supply. You even get a 1 year 
warranty. This 20 meg Hard Drive 
will work with IBM & clone. Basic 
driver, $29.95, lets you access this 
hard drive without need for OS-9. 



HD-l 

* Burke & Burke 



*499 

($9 Shipping) 
Sale ends Nov. 15 

PAL UPGRADE 
FOR MULTI-PAK 

specify for 26-3024 or 26-3 124 
14.95 ($2 ship) 

D0NT MISS OUT, ORDER TODAY! 

800 / 443-1444 

WE ACCEPT VISA . MASTERCARD/;: j 
• AMERICAN EXPRESS . C.O.D. OR 
CHECKS . SCHOOL P.O. 
NEW — DISCOVER CARD 



• -Vti I T 






JBr. tyvtbh's program* 

For Color Computer Software 

Since 1983 




Dear Friends, 

Thank you, 1988 marks oar 
fifth year of providing qcrality 
software for the Color computer. 
Only your sapport has made it 
possible. So, from our hearts. Peg 
and I thank yoa And remember our 
promise --If you buy it from U3, we 
support it If you are unhappy for 
any reason. 3end it back for a full 
refund within 30 day3 of purchase. 

Pyramix 

This facinating CoCc 3 fcame 
continues to be on* of our best 
sellers, Pyramix is 100% machine 
language written exclusively to take 
advantage of all the power in your 
128K CoCo 3- The Colors are 
brilliant, the graphics sharp, the 
action fast Written by Jordon 
Tsvetkoff and a product of Color- 
Venture. 

The Freedom Series 

Vocal Freedom 

I've got to admit, this 13 one 
nifty computer program Vocal 
Freedom turi\3 your computer into a 
digital voice or sound recorder, 

The optional Hackers PaC lets 
you incorporate voices or sounds 
that you record into your own 
BASIC or ML programs. Thi3 13 not 
a synthesizer. Sounds are digitized 
directly into computer memory 30 
that voices or 30und effects sound 
very natural. One "off-the-shelf " 
application for Vocal Freedom i3 an 
automatic message -minder Record 
a message for your family into 
memory. Set Vocal Freedom on 
automatic. When Vocal Freedom 
"hears" any noise in the room, it 



plays the pre-recorded message! 
Disk operations are supported VF 
also tests memory to take advantage 
of from 64K up to a full 512K Re- 
quires low cost amplifiler (RS cat. 
•277-1008} and any microphone. 

Mental Freedom 

Would your friend3 be impre33ed 
if your computer could read their 
minds? Mental Freedom use3 the 
techniques of Biofeedback to 
control video game action on the 
3creen. Telekinesis? Yes, you con- 
trol the action with your thoughts 
and emotions And. oh yes, it talk3 
in a perfectly natural voice without 
U3ing a speech synthesizer! 
Requires Radio Shack '3 low co3t 
Biofeedback monitor. Cat. •63-675 

BASIC Freedom 

Do you ever type in BASIC 
programs- -manually, I mean. If you 
do, you know it can be a real chore. 
Basic Freedom changes all that It 
gives you a full screen editor just 
like a word processor, but for 
BASIC programs. Once loaded in, it 
is alway3 on-line. It hides invis- 
ibly until you call it forth with a 
single keypress! This program 13 a 
must for programed or anyone who 
type3 in programs. By Chris 
Babcock and a product of Color- 
Venture. 

Lightning Series 

The3e three utilities give real 
power to your CoCo 3. 

Ramdisk Lightning 

This is the best Ramdisk 
available. It let3 you have up to 4 
mechanical di3k drives and 2 Ram 
drives on-line and ts fully compat- 
ible with our printer spooler below. 

Printer Lightning 

Load it and forget it --except for 
the versatility it gives you. Never 
wait for your printer again! Printer 
runs at high speed while you 
continue to work at the keyboard! 

Backup Lightning 

This utility requires 51 2K. Reads 
your ma3ter disk once and then 



make3 superfast multiple disk 
backups on all your dirves! No 
need to format blank di3k3 first! 
Supports 35. 40 or 80 track drives. 

Prices 

CoCo 3 only 

Ram Disk Lightning, Disk ..$19 95 

Printer Lightning Disk $19 95 

Backup Lightning, Di3k $1 9-95 

All three. Disk $49.95 

Pyramix, Di3k $24.95 

CoCo 1,2, or 3 

Vocal Freedom, Di3k $34.95 

Vocal Freedom Hackers Pac. $14.95 

CoCo 2 or 3 only 

Mental Freedom, Di3k $24.95 

Basic Freedom, Disk $24 95 

CoCo 1 or 2 only 

VDOS, The Undisk. ramdi3k for the 

CoCo 1 or 2 only. Tape $24.95 

VDUMP, backup Undisk file3 to 

single tape file, Tape $14 95 

VPRINT, Print Undi3k directory. 
Tape $9 95 

Everyone 

Add $2.50 shipping/handling 
in USA or CJUWMt 
Add $5.00 to ship to other 
cow tries 

Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
L ouisville KY 4022 6 

[IM^mM^i Line 



Visa, MC, COD, Check 




Speed Racer 

As the checkered flag drops your pulse rises in this lively arcade 
game. The road twists to the horizon on the 3-D panorama that sets 
the stage for exciting racing. Vie for time as you glide through the 
curves at incredible speeds. Step through the gears to stay ahead of 
the pack, but be quick! Some will stop at nothing to see the end of 
the race, or the end of you! Four challenging raceways, complete 
with obstacles and colorful 3-D scenery test your skills in this Pole 
Position™ type game. ■ ' 

» 

32K Color Computer required... $34.95 





MILES 



CARS PASSED 
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SCORE 4100 ' 




PIHBflLL 

FACTORY! 




OTKflRY MCFADDEH 

PUr/Eft 1 PIAVER 2 



PLh/ER 3 FLAYER ^ 

66<TCEe) [9264561 



Demon Seed 



Pinball Factory 

Video games come full circle in this tribute to the original arcade 
game, PinbalL Classic pinball springs to life as never before, with 
fresh new angles that only a computer can offer. Crisp graphics; 
sound, and fast smooth action give this machine-language arcade 
game a realistic, responsive feel you'll hardly believe. There are 
even "tilt" buttons that let you "bump" the machine. In addition to 
playing a great game of pinball, you can enjoy hours of creative 
pleasure as you design, build, edit, and play your own screens* 

/ 

64K Color Computer required. . .$34.95 



m . _ . I I I L I I UJ I I ^HffW 



1.1 II I.I 

I I i> i r 




■ii nir ii M- J i 



The first waves of flying, diving, hluodlhirs^ bats are arriving. 
Move, fire, and move again. It's a never ending battle. If you are 
lucky enough to defeat the bats, be ne^dy for a much greater 
challenge, The Evil Demons them^el^s. Destroy a wing and 
another takes its place. Only a direct Hit can save you now. It will 
take great skill to triumph, If you do, then you better be ready for 
the End. The Demon Flag Ship descends to destroy your remaining 
ships. Your only hope is to penetrate the hull, break through the 
shield, and destroy the dreaded Gargoyle* 



i 



32K Color Computer required... $19.95 



MichTron is always looking for programmers and programs. If you are interested in working with one 
of the most respected company's in the computer software field please give us a call. 



For more in format ion 

on these or other fine products 

call our knowledgeable staff! 



MichTron 

576 S. Telegraph 
Pontiac, MI 48053 
(313) 334-5700 




Dealer inquiries welcome, 
Visa and Mastercard accepted.