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/bctober 1988 



Canada $4.95 U.S. $3.95 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Graphics View Masters 

Jeremy Spiller 

Manipulating PMODE Graphics Images - shrink 'em, 
stretch 'em, turn 'em upside down and inside out 



Patrick D. Grengs II 

Creating Whirlpools and Waves 
in an Undulating Grid 



Br 



o 



Er 

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rn 
r~ 

O 

o 
o 

W 
CO 



^ X If) 

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Four-Color Barrier 



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2: Oi 

CO 

I S : 0 Co 3's HPRINT 

a rn a f 

5£ X tar* 

a) 

S charge Your Keyboard; 

>dman Cures 
p dies,' the FD 500/502 Drives 
| Pak Interface; 
; iS-9 Files and MORE! 













J? ^ 






^^^^^ 






PLAYER 1 
4.900 

ENERGY 



BULLETS 
50 

GRENADES 

56 

PLAYER 2 
ENERGY 



BULLETS 
50 

GRENADES 
20 



RUSH'N ASSAULT- CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 




, WRESTLE M 
I OUT, B0UN( 

an. 



We accept: 




cheque or money order 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT., CANADA L9T 2X8 

24 hr. order line: Please add $2 for shipping and handling (add 

(416) 878-8358 $5 each for The Rat and all Light Phaser 

personal service 9-5 Packages). Ontario residents add 8% sales 

E.S.T. tax. Looking for new software. 



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^iJIIi&ffsllIiMt 1 



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128 k CoCo 3 joystick and disk drive required 



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SCORE: 
LEUEL: 5 
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128 k CoCo 3 and disk drive required. 



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From Computer Plus to YOU . . . 




after 



after 








BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1 000 HX 1 Drive 256K 439.00* 

Tandy 1000 TX 1 Drive 640K 889.00 

Tandy 3000 NL 1 Drive 542K 1279.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg.Ram 1959.00 

Tandy 5000 MC 2 Meg. Ram 3799.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 169.00 

Radio Shack DMP-132 120 CPS 289.00 

Radio Shack DMP-440 300 CPS 549.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wh. 269.00* 

Tandy LP-1 000 Laser Printer 1 899.00 
Star Micronics NX-1000 144 CPS 199.00 

Star Micronics NX-1000 Rainbow 269.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 144 CPS 199.00 

Panasonic P-10911 194 CPS 249.00 

Panasonic P-10921 240 CPS 339.00 

Okidata 320 300 CPS 369.00 

Okidata 390 270 CPS 24 Wire Hd 515.00 

NEC Pinwriter P-2200 170 CPS 399.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 
Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Practical Peripheral 2400 Baud 229.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99,00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit (28 pin) 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit (2 or 8 chip) 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 14.95 
PBH Converter with 64K Buffer 1 19.00 
Serial to Parallel Converter 59.95 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 329.00 
Magnavox Green or Amber Mon. 99.00 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 19.95 
PBJ 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 1 39.00 
Tandy OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 24.95 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 149.00 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wi Id West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 



COCO Max III by Colorware 79.95 

AutoTermbyPXEComput. 29.95 39.95 

TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 

Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Telewriter 128 79.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 

Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 

CoCo 3 512K Ram Disk-CerComp 19.95 

Home Publisher by Tandy (CoCo3) 35.95 

Sub Battle Sim. by Epyx (CoCo3) 26.95 

Thexder by Sierra (CoCo3) 22.45 

Kings Quest III by Sierra (CoCo3) 31 .45 

Flight Sim.il by SubLogic (CoCo3) 31 .45 



OS-9 Level II by Tandy 
OS-9 Development System 
Multi-View by Tandy 
VIP Writer (disk only) 
VIP Integrated Library (disJO 
*Sale prices through 10/31/88 



71.95 
89.95 
44.95 
69.95 
149.95 



Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 




CALL TOLL 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 






P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (508) 486-31 93 




Tabl e of Cont e nts 



October 1988 
Vol. VIII No. 3 





14 ®n> 
Bills! Bills! Bills! ^ 

David Turner 
Organize household 
expenses in a fair, precise 
manner 




28 

Super Stamper: ^* 
The Elastic Rubber 
Graphics Stamp 

Jeremy Spiller 
Two new graphics 
commands for PMODE 
image manipulation 



41 



The Font Master 

Eric Wolf 

Replace CoCo 3's built-in 
H PR I NT font 

48 am* 
Getting Graphic * 

William P. Nee 

Part IV: Machine Language 

Made BASIC 



51 



Breaking the Four- 
Color Barrier 

Rusty Cutchin 

Add many more than four 

colors in HSCREEN4 



58 

Quick Fixes 

Marty Goodman 

Three do-it-yourself fixes for 

the hardware hacker 




41 

72 % 

Getting More Power 
From Your CoCo 
Keyboard 

Michael Sweet 

Make your keyboard perform 

like the big boys — and more 



102 



Warped Animation 

Patrick D. Grengs II 
Create whirlpools and waves 
in an undulating grid 

102 




THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



1 Nov i c o s NteteS 
86 

Fright Night 

Patricia Moos 

87 

Ad Infinitum 

Rick Weshenflder 

87 

Typing Up DRAW 
Strings 

Keiran Kenny 

88 

Seeing the Bigger 
Picture 

Erich Sweaney 

88 

Taking on the One- 
Armed Bandit 

Kenneth Carlin 



rf^The cassette tape/disk sym- 
"^^^r bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on Page 126. 



Departments 



Advertisers Index 
Back Issue Info _ 
CoCo Cat 



CoCo Gallery 
Corrections— 
Hints 



.160 

. 93 

.104 
. 26 

. 84 

. 83 
_ 6 

. 36 



Letters to Rainbow 

Maxwell Mouse 

One-Liners 54, 134 

Racksellers 1 58 

Received & Certified 130 

Scoreboard 106 

Scoreboard 

Pointers 108 

Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 154 

Subscription Info 155 



Co l umns 



98 

BASIC Training 

Joseph Kolar 
New directions 

56 

CoCo Consultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

64 

Delphi Bureau 

Cray Augsburg 
Time for a change and 
Hutchison's database report 

40 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

10 

PRINT#-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's notes 



90 ^ 

Wishing Well ™ 

Fred Scerbo 

Two for the price of one 

"BASICally Speaking," 
"Education Notes" and 
"Turn of the Screw" 
will return next month. 



1 Rainbow teofr 



143 

Accessible Applications 

Richard A. White 
introducing the OS-9 Team 

132 **> 

Barden s Buffer ^ 

William Barden, Jr. 
Assembly language for the 
complete novice: Part 11 

147 ~ 

KISSable OS-9 V 

Dale L. Puckett 
Another cry for standards 



I Product R e vi e ws 



.117 
.116 



AI-Write/Dan/'e/ Jimenez 

BASIC Screen Editor/Second City Software 

Disk Manager Tree/ Alpha Software Technologies 115 

HELLO/BAS/RC. Pierce Software 125 

Home Bingo/ W/7//ams Enterprises 129 

Inventory Manager/ Forrest Enterprises 1 1 3 

Moon Runner/Nick Bradbury 112 

Night of the Living Dead/Adventure Novel Software 110 

Quest for the R'mg/RTB Software 128 

Shadow World/Prode/c 116 

Word Power 3.1 /Microcom Software 120 



the RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 
phone (502) 228-4492. the rainbow, RAINBOWfest and the RAINBOW and 
RAiNBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705- 
050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER; Send address changes to the 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Authorized as second class 
postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 
• Entire contents copyright © by FALSOFT, Inc., 1988. the RAINBOW is intended 
for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and 
reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of information herein is for the 
single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All 
programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without warranty of any kind 
whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are 
registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to the rainbow 
are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail 
to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with 
next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for 
issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full 
refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/I2ths the subscription amount 
after two issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



The Rainbow 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Sue Fomby 

Reviews Editor Lauren Willoughby 

Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 

Copy Editor Beth Haendiges 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, 
Ed Ellers 

Technical Assistant David Horrar 

Editorial Assistants Wendy Falk Barsky, 
Sue H. Evans 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., Biil Bernico 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D,, 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Sharon Adams, 
DemseWebb 

Typesetter Renee Hutchins 
Falsoft, inc. 

President Lawrence C. Falk 
General Manager Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst. to the Publisher 

Sarah Levin 
Editorial Director John Crawley 
Asst. Editorial Director Judi Hutchinson 
Senior Editor Ti Kevin Nickofs 
Director of Production Jim Cleveland 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Manager 

Beverly Bearden 
Customer Service Representative 

Carolyn Fenwick 
Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 
Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 
Dispatch Tony Olive 
Business Assistants Dawn Cecil, 

Laurie Falk 
Chief of Building Security 
and Maintenance 

Jessie Brooks 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, 
see Page 160 



L 



Cover photograph copyright © 1988 
by John Beckman 

Art direction by Heidi Maxedon 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 5 



HAMBOW 



BACK TALK 

Editor: 

I would like to comment on two articles 
in your June '88 issue: David Huag's article, 
"Internal Sound," Page 99, and Michael F. 
Wiens' article, "CoCo 3 Potpourri," Page 
158. David's article, which describes how to 
install a speaker and amplifier inside a CoCo 
to produce sound with monitors that lack 
this capacity, is flawed in several respects. 

First, David suggested using a 9-volt 
battery as the amplifier's power supply. Such 
extra power would be expensive. Instead, 
the correct way to power such an amplifier 
is off the CoCo's own power supply. For 
CoCo Is and 2s, a +10-volt source is avail- 
able at the positive side of the power supply 
circuit's 10,000 mfd filter capacitor. The big 
filter capacitor is a black or gray cylindrical 
object about 2 inches long and one-half inch 
in diameter, which is marked with its value 
(10,000 mfd or 4,700 mfd). The positive and 
negative sides are indicated by a marking 
and arrow. CoCo 3s have a convenient +10- 
volt source at the junction of the cathodes 
of the power supply's two biggest diodes. 
The diodes are black, cylindrical objects, 
one-half inch in diameter and one-half inch 
long, which are marked with a single silver 
band on the cathode side of the diode. 

Second, David recommended making 
your own amplifier from "scratch" with an 
LM 386 chip. While his circuit will probably 
work, why go to all the trouble? Radio 
Shack sells a speaker amplifier in a nice little 
package (Cat. No. 277-1008), which only 
costs $12 and has everything you need to 
install sound in your CoCo. It fits beneath 
the keyboard if you remove its back plate, 
and the Radio Shack's speaker has been 
baffled to provide better sound. 

Finally, though David showed how to 
find the sound on his CoCo, his instructions 
won't work on some other CoCo models. 
David's instructions work fine on CoCo Is. 
But on most CoCo 2 models, and all CoCo 
3 models, the sound line is at Pin 1 of the 
custom DAC chip. This is a 20-pin chip 
marked SCC77526P on most computers. On 
the CoCo 3 sound can also be obtained, of 
course, from the audio output jack in the 
computer. 

Next, Michael's article presents a rather 
faulty technical tip. His first hardware tip 
says that owners of the old CoCo 1 disk 
controller (Cat. No. 26-3022) can use the 
contoller on a CoCo 2 or 3 if they rig up a 
+ 12-volt source for that card. Although this 
is true for the CoCo 2, Michael does not 
mention that, even with the 12-volt source, 
the controller will not work properly at 
double CPU speed. Therefore, if you run 
OS-9 Level II or any Disk BASIC program 
that does disk I/O at double processor 
speed, at best the controller won't work, at 
worst it will operate unreliably — occasion- 
ally crashing disks. The reason is that the 

6 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



data separator circuitry on that old con- 
troller is a bit sloppy, and there is no simple 
fix for that problem. Both my column and 
the "Doctor ASCII" column have warned of 
this problem before. I strongly advise 
readers not to use that controller in their 
CoCo 3s. Buy a new one, instead. 

Marty Goodman 
San Pablo, CA 

REVIEWING REVIEWS 

Editor: 

Needless to say, we at SPORTSware were 
very pleased, even honored to see the treat- 
ment given to the War game Designer system 
in the August '88 issue [Page 126]. We tried 
to create a game-designing system that 
would fill what we saw a void in the wargame 
and Adventure game market. 

We would also like to comment on the 
reviews of John Herbert, reviewer of War- 
game Designer. We have noticed his reviews 
in the past and have always found them 
enjoyable. His unique style and humor are 
refreshing. Unlike some reviewers, who feel 
that a recitation of the user's manual is 
enough, you can always tell whether or not 
Mr. Herbert enjoyed a software package. 
Feelings are what reviews are all about, and 
John Herbert relates them with ease. Let's 
hope that he continues to share his time and 
talent with the CoCo Community. 

Paul L. Olmstead 
President 

Fair is Fair 

Editor: 

First, I would like to commend you for 
your fine magazine, rainbow's excellent 
articles and reviews have helped me enjoy 
my CoCo. I pay particular attention to 
rainbow's reviews. After reading reviews on 
CoCo Newsroom, Kung-Fu Dude, and 
Rommel 3D, I purchased the products. I 
found certain flaws that were not properly 
covered in the reviews, and I would like to 
comment on them now. 

Despite CoCo Newsroom's icons, you 
cannot return to the main menu from type- 
up. You must re-boot the program. Al- 
though knowing this may not have stopped 
me from buying this program (for it is 
excellent in all other ways), I think that the 
review should have mentioned this problem. 

Kung-Fu Dude's review mentions that the 
program is copy-protected. The copy- 
protection does not appear to be benign. I 
couldn't get the program to boot. When I 
called the author, he said that he had 
encountered this problem before. The fault 
seems to be with the timing of some drives 
and the way the program boots the en- 
crypted graphics from Track 0. I have 
returned the game, and the company is still 
working on the problem. Perhaps this is an 
example of the way a vendor can actually 
thwart future purchases through copy- 
protection. 



Finally, the graphics in Rommel 3D have 
been compromised by the program's de- 
mand for speed. Although the game moves 
quickly and is mildly entertaining, I've seen 
better games and graphics in BASIC pub- 
lished in the rainbow. I realize that some 
of my comments (especially for the last 
product) are subjective, and I see only two 
choices for me and for others who purchase 
"less than perfect" software: complain to the 
vendor or just accept the flaws. 

Product reviews should be fair. They let 
your readers know what is new on the 
market. They should also temper and con- 
firm the advertiser's claims. I will continue 
to read your magazine and purchase soft- 
ware from the vendors you review. 

Wayne Montague 
Mississauga, Ontario 

We agree that reviews should be 
fair. Therefore, we will be working 
toward more serious "play testing" in- 
house. We regret it if we've allowed 
recommendations for flawed prod- 
ucts to slip through. 



HINTS & TIPS 

Editor: 

Paul Pritchett [July '88, Page 7] requested 
a way to hard copy Micro Illustrator pic- 
tures. I suggest these steps. PCLEftR 8 your 
CoCo; boot up Micro Illustrator and load 
the picture from the disk. Return to Disk 
basic by removing the disk and pressing 
reset twice. Then, run the following pro- 
gram: 

10 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1,1 ' WfiTCH 

□UR PROGRESS 
20 FDR X=8252 TO 14396 'PICTURE 

SITS HERE 
30 ft=PEEI< ( X ) : POKE X-4668 , ft ' MOVE 

PICTURE 

40 NEXT X: SOUND 20,1 'BEEP WHEN 
DONE 

This will move Micro Illustrator's picture 
to Disk basic graphics pages I through 4, 
where any trusty graphic dump program can 
do its stuff. Hope this helps! 

Charles Doane 
Miami, FL 

CoCo 3 Artifacting 

Editor: 

I have tested some machine language 
programs with the CM-8 patch program 
listed in the February '88 issue ["Artifact 
Colors on CoCo 3's RGB," Page 114]. Each 
of the following will display color when 
executed on a CoCo 3 with a CM-8 monitor; 

From Tom Mix: Donkey King, Draconian, 
Buzzard Bait, Brew Master and Skyway. 
From Spectral Associates: Lancer, Miss 



> 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42, 51, 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 

They are sincere, hard working and 

appreciative. Thanks! „. 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



Gobbler, Devious, Color Zap, Qiks, Space 

At tax and Space Wrek. 

From Radio Shack: Shooting Gallery, 

Popcorn, Mega- Bug and Radio Ball. 

From Computer Shack: Time Bandit and 

Fury. 

From The Rugby Circle: Caterpillar. 
From Mark Data: Tut's Tomb. 
From Anteco Software: 8 Ball. 
From T&D Software: Able Builders. 
From Adventure International: Arex. 
From Factory Programming: Outhouse. 

Note: If you use the patch while playing 
a game that switches between the graphics 
screen and text screen, sometimes you will 
only see vertical and /or horizontal lines. 
Usually this is not critical because the text 
screen asks you to enter the number of 
players, the names, the level, etc. If you play 
the game without the patch and memorize 
the screen text, you should be able to play 
the game with the patch. Also, some of the 
programs mentioned were on a ROM pack 
but have been transferred to a disk. Don't 
try to use the patch with a ROM pack — 
you can't. 

Perry M. Dueck 
Rosenort, Manitoba 

A CoCo 2 Color Catalyst 

Editor: 

Thanks to everyone in the CoCo Com- 
munity who took the time to drop a line or 
call about Color Catalyst ["Changing the 
Language," June '88, Page 168]. As it 
appears in the magazine, the program will 



only run on the CoCo 3 and certain models 
of the CoCo 2. (Tandy changed more than 
the keyboard when it upgraded our favorite 
machine.) The following changes in Listing 
2 will allow you to use Color Catalyst on 
your CoCo 1 or 2: 

6 P0KE359,57:M=113:N=25:PRINT 
013, "COLOR"; :PRINT@36, A$; : 
PRINT@68,B$; :PRINT@100,C$; 

8 PRINT0166 , "CUSTOM BfiSIC 
UTILITY"; :PRINT@232, "BY MARC 
CAMPBELL"; :PRINT@489,"[C] 
MCMLXXXVII"; 

16 CLS:PRINT"D0 YOU WANT TO 
EXI T ? ( Y'N ) " : EXEC44539 : A$=INKEY 
$:IFA$="N"THEN10ELSECLS:NEW 

30 G0SUB82:PRINTS$"BLACI< CHAR 
ACTERS ON GREEN ",S$ "BLACK CHAR 
ACTERS ON ORANGE": 5=163 :E=195: 
G05UB83 

31 IFQ=1THENP0KE65314,7EL5E 
P0KE65314,8 

Delete Line 17 and lines 125 through 128. 

Please note that the reset patch and many 
of the custom display options will be lost, 
but the other aspects of the program should 
work properly. If you experience an I/O 
Error when loading a custom version of 
BASIC, put the machine in an all-RAM mode 
by running Listing 1 and try again. 

My thanks to Chuck Scharmann, presi- 
dent of Club 6809 in Massachusetts, for 
bringing this problem to my attention and 
helping me fix it. 

Marc Campbell 
Ephrata, PA 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I really enjoy your magazine, especially 
the letters. I've gotten quite a few ideas from 
this section. 

I enjoy Hall of Kings and would like to 
buy Hall of Kings II or ///. However, Prickly 
Pear Software is no longer in business. Is 
anyone else selling these games? I would like 
to continue the Adventure. 

Jerry M. Bedell 
St. Peters, MO 

Glen Dahlgren, the original pro- 
grammer of The Hall of Kings, has 
obtained all rights from Prickly Pear 
Software to market his trilogy. You 
can order the programs from Glen at: 
Sundog Systems, 21 Edinburg Drive, 
Pittsburgh, PA 1523; (412) 372-5674. 

Computer Musicians 

Editor: 

I am seeking help from all CoCoists who 
use their CoCos for MIDI applications and 
music composition or arrangement. Has 
anyone heard of a voicing program for the 
Yamaha FB-01 that will work with a CoCo 
2 or 3? I do some intricate MIDI work that 
involves the FB-01, and I need a voicing 
program that allows me to modify some of 
the voices on the FB-01. 

All other major brands of computers have 
voicing programs that let them modify the 
sounds of the FB-01. I hope that such a 

October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 7 



program exists for the CoCo. If it doesn't, 
such a program would be very lucrative to 
write. 

Val Burke 
P. O. Box 86 
Red Oak, GA 30272 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

I just finished wading through a stack of 
bills. The only one that I didn't mind was 
my RAINBOW subscription renewal. Indeed, 
you even include a postage-paid envelope 
for the subscription. Subtle touches like this 
keep CoCo fans coming back — even when 
Radio Shack ignores the CoCo and praises 
its PC compatibles. 

You are a class act, rainbow. 

Mike Shay 
Lebanon, PA 

In Praise of Rainbow Advertisers 

Editor: 

I just wanted you to know how much I 
enjoy rainbow each month. You perform a 
great service for all CoCoists. The software 
companies who advertise in your magazine 
also maintain high standards. One such 
company is Gimmesoft. Mr. DiMarco is 
helpful and considerate to all his customers. 
My thanks to you both. 

Fred Sharpe 
Scarborough, Ontario 

Confidence-Builder 

Editor: 

I would like to thank Marc Campbell for 
his basic editor, Buddy ["CoCo's Current 
Companion," July '88, Page 34]. New to 
computing, and only an average typist, I've 
been intimidated by long program listings. 
I've avoided some programs and typed in 
others with as much enthusiasm as I usually 
muster for a trip to the dentist. CoCo's built- 
in editor only added to my frustration. 

Buddy has changed all that. The program 
has more features than my present word 
processor, is simple to use and works well 
with my tape system. Since Buddy takes the 
frustration and tedium out of typing in long 
listings, I ordered several back issues of the 
rainbow. Buddy and rainbow are my 
CoCo's constant companions. 

Kay Greenwood 
Crystal Springs, MS 



PKN PALS 



• 1 am a 19-year-old who would like pen pals 
from anywhere in the United States. I have 
a CoCo 2, FD 501 disk drive, DMP-105 
printer, CCR-81 cassette recorder/ player 
and a speech/ sound cartridge. I would like 
someone who likes Doctor Who, writing 
and anything in between. It may take some 
time, but all letters will be answered. 

Dennis Duane Ferrell 
712 Gloria Grove 
Wiggins, MS 39577 

8 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



• My brother and I are looking for pen pals 
from all over the country. We are: Scott, age 
13, and Andy, age W/ 2 . We have an ECB 
CoCo 2, DMP-105 and DMP-230 printers, 
DCM-3 modem, FD 502 disk drive, and a 
CCR-81 cassette recorder. We will do our 
best to respond to all letters. 

Andy and Scott Brady 
51 Barberton Road 
Lake Worth, FL 33467 

• I'm 31 years old and own a CoCo 2, tape 
recorder and a DWP-230. My interests are 
BASIC and assembly programming (practical 
programs for me and games for my kids) and 
word processing. My other interests are 
history, literature, politics and religion. I 
will answer all letters. 

Dan Weaver 
66 Bunn St. 
Amsterdam, NY 12010 

• I am looking for a pen pal who has the 
same setup as my system. So far, I have a 
64K CoCo 2 and a cassette recorder. I am 
looking for someone who is a novice like 
myself who might be able to teach me more 
about this new computer of mine. 

Patti French 
Rt. 2, Box 9 
Grafton, ND 

• I am 37 years old and have a 64K CoCo 
with disk drive and a DM P- 130 printer. I 
enjoy anything that has to do with comput- 
ers. I would like to hear from anyone, any 
age and from anywhere in the world. 

Chuck Flowers 
P. O. Box 246 
Rio Dell, CA 95562 

• 1 would like a pen pal from anywhere. I 
have a CoCo 2 with one disk drive and two 
joysticks. I am 10 years old. 

Kevin Lewis 
256 Elron Cresent 
Thunder Bay, ON 
Canada P7C5T5 

• I am 16 years old and am looking for pen 
pals from all over the world. My computer 
system consists of a CoCo 3, DMP-105, two 
double-sided disk drives and a modem. I like 
to program in BASIC09, and I collect CoCo 
3 pictures. 

Heath Dingwell 
Rt. 2 Box 230 
Litchfield, CT 06759 

• I am 16 years old, and I have the CoCo 

2 and 3, FD 500 disk drive, DMP-105 
printer and CCR-81 cassette. I am looking 
for pen pals who enjoy arcade and Adven- 
ture games. 

Shane Pasiechnyk 
P.O. Box 344 
Marysville, BC 
Canada V0B 1Z0 

• I am 15 years old. My family and I own 
four computers — MC-10, CoCo 2, CoCo 

3 and Tandy 1000 EX. We have a DMP-106 
printer. I would like to have pen pals from 
anywhere in the world; age doesn't matter. 

Gretchen Silverheel 
1633 Summit 
Kansas City, MO 64108 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 



• The Port City Exchange is a "Phoenix" 
BBS system in the Mooresville area. It runs 
on a 64K CoCo 2 and is up 24 hours a day, 
seven days a week at (704) 663-6022. The 
parameters are 300 baud, 8-bit, 1 stop bit, 
no parity. There are multiple message bases 
and upload/ download capacity. Galactic 
Conflict is the online game. 

Douglas C. Henderson 

(NICKO) 

539 Dixie Drive 
Mooresville, NC 28115 

• There's a new BBS in southern California 
that needs CoCo users! We have room for 
uploads and downloads and have some great 
SIGs and message areas. We operate at 300/ 
1200 baud, N-8-1. Call (818) 995-2461. 

Scott Shell (SysOp) 
Allen Williams (Co-SysOp) 
3425 Clairton PL 
Encino, CA 91436 

• The Drunk Drive [call (517) 893-3091] 
now has a large archived CoCo download 
area. The Plastered Board [at (517) 892- 
7885] and Warped Board [(517) 686-7598] 
also support the CoCo with a variety of 
downloads. All are N-8-1, 300/1200 baud 
and run GT Powercomm. Press Q at the 
menu to have up- and download capacity. 
Press C to see all file categories. Press F to 
see all file descriptions. The Drunk Drive 
and The Plastered Board are online 24 hours 
a day. Warped Board is online from 6 a.m. 
to 3 a.m. 

Ron Sujkowski 
1806 34th St 
Bay City, MI 48708 

• The Chip to Chip is running at 300/1200 
baud, 24 hours a day on a512K CoCo 3. The 
system uses PBBS software and features 
message and software exchange for IBM, 
CoCo and CBM. New members must fill out 
an online application and use their real 
names. There is 20 Meg of disk storage 
space. The SysOp is Allen Jones. Call (902) 
539-7743. 

David Brown 
New Waterford, NS 
Canada B1H4K4 

THE rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor* Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type Rfll to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBO W> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTER S> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 



Word 
Power 3.2 



More Versatile • More Powerful With 
Spooler • Calculator # Split-Screen • 2-Column Printing 



Unparalleled Power packed in this 100% ML Word Processor 
written from scratch for the CoCo 3! No other word processor 
offers such a wide array of features that are easy to learn & use. 



DISPLAY & SPEED 




Word Power 3.2 runs at double-clock speed 
and uses the true 80-column display with 
lowercase instead of the graphics screen. The 
result is lightning fast screen reformatting and 
added speed! All prompts are displayed in 
plain English in neat colored windows. The current column num- 
ber, line number, page number, percentage of free memory is dis- 
played at all times. Even the page break is displayed so you know 
where one page ends and the other begins. The Setup program 
allows you to change fore/background colors as well as (in) visible 
carriage returns. Word Power 3.2 can be used with RGB/Com- 
posite/Monochrome monitors as well as TV. 

MAXIMUM MEMORY 



i . . • . • ■ "i 




Word Power 3.2 gives you over 72K on 128K and over 
450K on 512K CoCo 3 for Text Storage - more 
memory than any other CoCo word-processor. 
Period. 



EFFORTLESS EDITING 

Word Power 3.2 has one of the most powerful and user-friendly 
full-screen editor with word-wrap. All you do is type. Word 
Power takes care of the text arrangement. The unique Auto-Save 
feature saves text to disk at regular intervals for peace of mind. 

Insert/Overstrike Mode (Cursor Style Changes to indicate mode); OOPS Recall 
during delete;Type-ahead Buffer for fast typers;Key-Repeat (adjustable); Key- 
Click; 4-way cursor and scrolling; Cursor to beginning/end of text, beginning/end 
of line, top/bottom of screen, next/previous word; Page up/down; Delete charac- 
ter, previous/next word, to beginning/end of line, complete line, text before/after 
cursor; Locate/Replace with Wild-Card Search with auto/manual replace; Block 
Mark, Unmark, Copy, Move & Delete; Line Positioning (Center/Right Jus- 
tified); Set/Reset 120 programmable tab stops; Word-Count; Define Top/Bot- 
tom/Le ft/Right margins & page length. You can also highlight text 
(underline-with on-screen underlining, bold, italics, superscripts, etc.). Word 
Power even has a HELP screen which an be accessed any time during edit. 



SPLIT-SCREEN EDITING 

Splits the screen in half so you can view one portion of your text 
while you edit another. You'll love it! 



MAIL-MERGE 



pa 



□ 



Ever try mailing out the same Tetter to 50 different 
people? Could be quite a chore. Not with Word 
Power 3.2! Using this feature, you can type a letter, 
follow it with a list of addresses and have Word Power 
print out personalized letters. It's that easy! 



i ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 



rrrirrrrrrrrr 




CALCULATOR i 

Pop-up a 4-function calculator while you edit! Great for tables! 





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SAVING/LOADING TEXT 

Word Power 3.2 creates ASCII format files which are compatible 
with almost all terminal/spell-checking & other word-processing 
programs. Allows you to Display Free Space, Load, Save, Ap- 
pend & Kill files. The ARE YOU SURE? prompt prevents ac- 
cidental overwriting & deletion. You can select files by simply 
cursoring through the disk directory. Supports double-sided 
drives & step-rates. 



PRINTING 

Word Power 3.2 drives almost any printer (DMP, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc). Allows options such as baud rates, 
line spacing, page/print pause, partial print, page number- 
ing/placement, linefeeds, multi-line headers/footers, right jus- 
tification & number of copies. The values of these parameters & 
margins can be changed anytime in the text by embedding Printer 
Option Codes. The WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET fea- 
ture allows you to preview the text on the screen as it will appear 
in print. You can view margins, page breaks, justification & more. 







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w:wX'Xv^.v.-.v. 





PRINT SPOOLER 

Why buy a hardware Print Spooler? Word Power 3.2 has a built- 
in Spooler which allows you to simultaneously edit one document 
& print another. 











Kvw/Kvw 




X*X<'X«'X»X'M'X 













This unique feature allows you to print all or portion of your text 
in two columns! Create professional documents without hours 
of aligning text. 



SPELLING CHECKER 



■ :• ■ •: :■: :■ ■ 




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Word Power 3.2 comes with spelling checker/dic- 
tionary which finds & corrects mistakes in your 
text. You can add words to /delete words from 
dictionary. 



;XvX?x*x ; x-x ; : . 

:::: 



PUNCTUATION CHECKER 

This checker will proofread your text for punctuation errors such 
as capitalization, double-words, spaces after periods/commas, 
and more. Its the perfect addition to any word processor. 




Word Power 3.2 comes with a well-written instruction manual & 
reference card which makes writing with Word 
Power a piece of cake! Word Power 3.2 comes on an 
UNPROTECTED disk and is compatible with 
RSDOS. Only $79.95 




(Word Power 3.1 owners can get Word Power 3.2 Upgrade FREE by sending 
proof of purchase & $5.00 to cover S&H costs & instructions). 



CD! IE 



I Mf Hip 



1 



ilk JP MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618. Ph: (716) 383-8830 
All orders $50 & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. Wc accept Visa, MasterCard, Amex, Check or 
MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% S&l I(minimum $5). New York Slate rcsi- 
dents please add sales tax. Looking for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1 -800-654-5244 9am-8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 



October 
Magic 

This is a happy month! There are a whole bunch of things to be happy 
about right now. First of all, remember that I write these columns 
a lot earlier than they appear in the rainbow. Production schedules 
make this necessary, of course, so it is really an interesting exercise from 
an intellectual point of view: First, I have to project myself into the future 
and try to place myself in the time you will be reading this; second, I am 
as usual "full" of something that has just happened in real time (as they 
say) and want to tell you about it. 

As to what's happening in October itself — it is RAINBOWfest! That 
really makes me happy, because I sometimes liken RAINBOWfest to the 
ancient stories of the Scottish Clans' annual gathering. Each time I walk 
into our convention hotel, I can't help but think of the "Gatherin' o' th' 
Clans" from legend. Each show is alive with anticipation of new things, 
new products and, most important of all, new people. We all make new 
friends and we all renew old acquaintances. And we get an infusion of spirit 
for our CoCo Community. 

All of this is by way of saying I hope you will join us in Princeton October 
21st through 23rd. 

October, too, begins the start of our busiest half of the year. During the 
summer, with family vacations, with school out, with the weather so nice, 
almost everyone's CoCo activity drops a little bit. Why, I remember one 
year Dick White wanted to take his CoCo on a camping trip with his family, 
and his wife threatened to hide the batteries he had rigged up! 

September means back to work full time and back to school for so many 
of you (educators as well as students). I know computing sometimes takes 
a back seat to getting those schedules "set up." But things have usually 
settled down by October, and we're ready to go. October also means that 
we have lots of new things on the horizon. After all, the pre- and post- 



COCO NEWSROOM 




An excellent Desktop Publishing 
program for the CoCo 3. Design your 
own newspaper with Banner Head- 
lines/6 Articles using sophisticated 
Graphics,Fonts & Fill patterns. Comes 
with 22 fonts & 50 pictures! Over 140K 
of code. Compatible with Epson, 
Gemini & Compatibles, DMP 
105/106/110/120/130/200/400/420/500/ 
2110, CGP-220, Laser LP1000 & IBM 
Compatibles. "... a smash for CoCo 3 ..." 
-March 88 Rainbow Review. Comes on 3 
non copy-protected disks. Only $49.95 




Create distinctive bright yellow 
diamond shaped car signs. Includes 2 
resuable clear plastic sign holders with 
suction cups, and 50 sheets of bright yel- 
low fanfold paper. Printer Require- 
ments are the same as for the CoCo 
Graphics Designer. Only $29.95 



COLOD 
SCHEMATIC 

DESIGNED 



By Prakash Mishra 

An excellent Circuit Schematic 
Design Software Package for CoCo 
3. Features; 

* Runs in 640x192 at 1.8 Mhz 

* Pull Down Menus 

* Keyboard/Mouse/Joystck Support 

* RGB/ Composite/Monochrome 
Monitor Support 

* 72 Modifiable Symbols 

* Multiple Hi-Res Fonts 

* Multiple UNDO Command 

* Symbol Rotate/Line/Box Draw 

* Supports 3 Layers of Circuits 

* Powerful Screen Print Command 
for DMP/Gemini/Epson Printers 

* Complete Documentation 



Only $39.95 



K00K 2 

Tim 






coco 

GRAPHICS DESIGNER 

Create beautiful Greeting Cards, Signs & 
Banners for holidays, parties and other oc- 
casions. Comes with a library of pre-drawn 
pictures. Includes utilities to create your 
own character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires CoCo 1,2,3 or TDP-100 
with a min. of 32K, one Disk Drive and a 
Printer. Compatible with Disk Basic 
1.0/1.1/2.0/2.1, ADOS(3) and JDOS. Sup- 
ports the following printers: DMP 
100/105/106/ 110/130/ 430; CGP220, 
EPSON RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX-10/1000 & OKIDATA. Latest Ver- 
sion! DISK Only $29.95 
PICTURE DISK #1,#2,#3,#4: Each pic- 
ture disk contains over 100 pictures !! Disk 
$14.95 each. ALL 4 Picture Disks: $54.95 
FONT DISK #1,#2^B: Each disk con- 
tains 10 extra fonts!! Disk $19.95 each. Buy 
any 3 Font Disks and get the 4th FREE!! 
COLORED PAPER PACK (with matching 
envelopes): $24.95 




GAMES 

(Disk only) e 
(CoCo 1,2 & 3 except where mentioned) ^ 

WILD WEST (CoCo 3 Only): $24.95 
VEGAS SLOTS(CoCo 3 only): $29.95 
VEGAS GAME PACK- $24.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 

P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
PYRAMIX(Cubix for CoCo 3): $24.95 
KUNG FU DUDE: $24.95 CHAMPION: $19.95 

WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY: $19.95 
IN QUEST OF STAR LORD(Animated Graphics Adven- 
ture for CoCo 3): $34.95 

TREASURY PACK#1: Lunar Rover Patrol, Cubix, 
Declathon, Qix, keys of Wizard, Module Man, Pengon, 
Space Wreck & Roller Controller.Only $29.95 
TREASURY PACK #2: Lancer, Ms. Gobbler, Froggie, 
Madness & Minotaur, Ice Castles, Galagon, Devious and 
Syzygy. Only $29.95 

SPACE PAC: Color Zap, Invaders, Planet Invasion, Space 
! Race, Space War, Galax Attax, Anaroid Attack, Whir- 
lybird, Space Sentry & Storm Arrows.Only $29.95 
WIZARD'S CASTLE: A hi-res graphics adventure game 
filled with traps, tricks, treasures. Only $19.95 





XENOCOPY-PC 

An amazingly versatile program that allows you to Format/Duplicate / 
Read/ Write disks from over 300 different computers. For example you 
could transfer programs between CoCo, IBM, PC-DOS, TRS-80 Model 
3, TRS-80 Model 4, TRS-80 Model 100, Xerox 820, Zenith, Kaypro II, 
Novell , NEC DOS and much much more! ! Send for FREE List. Requires 
an IBM Compatible with 2 drives. Disk $79.95. 

51 2K BACKUP LIGHTNING 

The ultimate CoCo 3 disk copying utility!! Reads your master diskette 
once and then makes as many copies as you want. It automatically for- 
mats an unformatted disk while copying! Supports 35, 40 or 80 track drives 
with various step rates. A must for any disk user!! Only $19.95 

PRINTER LIGHTNING 

Never wait for your printer again!! This Print Spooler allows you to print 
to your printer and simultaneously continue with your programming. No 
need to wait for those long printouts! Disk Only $19.9$ 

BASIC FREEDOM 

A Full Screen Editor for Basic Programs! ! A Must for anyone who writes 
Basic Programs. Only $24.95 

VOCAL FREEDOM 

Turn your computer into a digital voice / sound recorder. Produces 
natural voices/ sound effects. Req. inexpensive RS Amplifier (#277- 
1008) & any microphone. Only $34.95 

HACKER'S PAC 

Allows you to incorporate voices created by Vocal Freedom into your own 
Basic and ML programs. Only $14.95 




JliJf MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618. Ph: (716) 383-8830 |J^Jj3|J^ |^^ 
All orders $5ft & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Amex, Check or ■■■■■■ 

MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&II (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% S&H(minimum $5). New York State rcsi- B&Bfl 
dents please add sales tax. Looking for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1 -800-654-5244 9am-8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 



holiday seasons are the prime sales 
times for Color Computers. All those 
software and hardware people are 
working hard to come up with some 
new ideas to make your CoCo even 
more enjoyable. 

* * * 

But here in Prospect, Kentucky, as I 
write this I am only projecting into 
October. Still, it is a very happy month 
right now — perhaps some "October 
magic" is taking place! 

Just a few days ago my daughter 
Wendy married Ira Barsky. Many of 
you who have been to RAINBOWfest 
may have met Wendy, and probably 
almost all of you have met Ira. My other 
daughter, Laurie, was Maid of Honor, 
and it was a very happy day for every 
one of us. 

Long-time readers of this column will 
probably be asking where Sacy is living, 
now that Wendy has "fled the nest." 
Sacy is Wendy's teddy bear of many 
years who was almost lost when Wendy 
took a "Semester At Sea" and someone 
picked up her duffle bag by mistake as 
she landed back in the United States in 
Seattle. 




Well, that's the other half of the story 
of why this is such a happy month for 
all of us here. 

Sacy put on a bow tie and was going 
to live with his "human grandfather" 
(me) for a couple of weeks, since Wendy 
somehow felt it inappropriate to take a 
teddy bear on her honeymoon. How- 
ever, several days before the wedding 
some chest pains sent me to the hospital, 
and a few days after the wedding I went 
in for an angioplasty — a procedure 
doctors use to remove fatty buildup in 
coronary arteries. 

Wendy and Ira delayed their wedding 
trip (much to my displeasure, I might 
add), and Sacy went to live at Wendy's 
new home while I was in the hospital. 
I am pleased to report the procedure 
came off splendidly, and I was back at 
the office — although on a limited basis 
for a while — three days after the 
angioplasty. Sacy is living here, super- 
vising my recovery, and will stay until 
Wendy and Ira return from their trip. 

So, it is a good month. We're glad 
you're with us. And we're glad to be 
with you! 

— Lonnie Falk 



METRIC INDUSTRIES, INC 



:-3« : 


m 




• 


0 








^ .' £gggg 





Model 101 

Serial to Parallel Printer Interface 

* Works with any COCO 

* Compatible with "Centronics" Parallel Input Printers 

* Just turn the knob to select any one of 6 baud rates 300-9600 

* Comes complete with cables to connect to your printer 
and computer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 104 Deluxe Interface 
with "Modem Switch" 

* Same Features as 1 01 Plus 

* Built in Serial Port for your Modem or other serial device 

* Switch between Serial Output and Parallel Output 

* Comes with cables to connect to your computer and printer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 105 Serial Switch 

* Connects to your COCO to give you 2 switch selectable 
Serial Ports 

* Comes with a 3 foot cable to connect to you r computer 

* Now you can connect your Printer (or printer interface) 
and your Modem (or other serial device) to your COCO 
and flip the switch to use either device 

* Does not require power 

Cassette Label Printing Program 

* New Version 2.1 prints 7 lines of information 
on Cassette labels 

Comes on Tape with instructions to transfer to disk 
Menu driven, very easy to use 
Save and Load Labels from Tape and Disk 
Uses the features of your printer to print standard, 
expanded, and condensed characters 
Automatically Centers Each Line of Text 
Allows editing of label before printing 
Program comes with 24 labels to get you started 
16KECB required 



Some of the Printers 
That Can - 

Supply power for the 101 and 
1 04 are Radio Shack, Star, 
Okidata, Brother, Juki, and 
Smith Corona. 

Some of the Printers 
That Cannot - 

Supply power for the interfaces 
are Epson, Seikosha, 
Panasonic, Silver Reed and 
NEC. If your printer cannot 
supply power to the interface 
you can order your interface 
with the "P" option or you can 
supply your own AC adapter. 
We recommend the Radio 
Shack 273-1431 AC adapter 
with a 274-328 connector 
adapter. 

Write or call for more 
information or for technical 
assistance. 



Price List 

Model 101 35.95 

Model! 01 P 41.95 
Model 104 44.95 
Model 104P 51.95 
Model 105 14.95 
Cassette Label Program 6.95 
Pin Feed Cassette Labels: 
White 3.00/100 
Colors (specify) 3.60/C 
Red-Blue-Yellow-Tan 



4 Pin Din Serial 
COCO Cables: 

Male/Male 6 foot 
Male/Female 6 foot 
Female/Female 6 foot 
Other Lengths Available. 

All items covered by a 
1 year warranty 



4.49 
4.49 
4.49 



Ordering Info 



Free Shipping in the 

U.S.A. (except AK and HI) 
on all orders over $50 
On orders under $50 
please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling - 
On orders outside the 
U.S.A. please write or call 
for shipping charges 



You Can Pay By: 

* VISA or MasterCard 

* C.O.D.- add $2.25 

* Or send check or money 
order payable in U.S. funds 



Metric Industries Inc. 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

(513) 677-0796 



12 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 



COCO 3 UTILITIES GALORE 

. (CoCo 2 Versions Included where specified) 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 




ifgB 



* Disk-to-Disk Copy * Tape-to-Disk Copy 

* Tape-to-Disk Auto Relocate 

* Disk-to-Tape Copy * Tape-to-Tape Copy 
Copies Basic/ML/Data Files. CoCo 1,2 or 3. 
Req. min. 64KDisk System. Disk Only $24.95 



COCO CHECKER 




Something possibly wrong with your CoCo? 
CoCo Checker is the answer. Will test your 
ROMs, RAMs, Disk Drives & Controller, 
Printer, Keyboard, Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, 
PIAs, VDG, Internal Clock Speed, Multi-Pak 
Interface and more! Only $24.95 



DISK UTILITY 2.1A 



A multi-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY 
disk handling. Utilize a directory window to 
selectively sort, move, rename & kill file entries. 
Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy & back- 
up. Single key execution of Basic/ML programs. 
Thiswill become your MOSTUSED program !! 
CoCo 1,2 or 3. Req. Min. 64K. Disk Only $24.95 




MAILLIST PRO 



The ultimate mailing list program. Allows you 
to add, edit, view, delete, change, sort (by zip- 
code or name) and print labels. Its indispen- 
sible!! Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! 
Allows elongated, normal and condensed for- 
mat for text. Double Strike, Border Creation, 
and multiple label printing. Its a MUST for any 
user with a disk drive. Supports DMP 
105/106/110/120/ 130/430, GEMINI, STAR, 
EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo 2 version in- 
cluded). Only $19.95 



COCO UTIL1I cocg 




— _ y 



(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to 
IBM compatible computer and vica-versa. Re- 
quires 2-Drive IBM Compatible. Disk $39.95 



RGB PATCH 

Displays most games in color on RGB monitors. 
CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



COMPUTERIZED 
CHECKBOOK I 




Why bother with balancing your checkbook? 
Let the CoCo do it for you. Allows you to add, 
view, search, edit, change, delete and printout 
(in a table/individual entry format) checkbook 
entries. Updates balance after each entry. Al- 
lows files for checking, savings, and other ac- 
counts. Disk $19.95. (CoCo 2 version included) 




BOWLING SCORE 
KEEPER 



An excellent utility to keep track of your bowl- 
ing scores. Allows you to save scores under in- 
dividuals or teams. You can edit change, delete, 
and compare scores. A must for anyone who 
wants to keep track of his or her bowling perfor- 
mance. Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 



Organize your videotapes with this progiam. 
Allows you to index tapes by title, rating, type, 
play time and comments. Also allows you to sort 
titles alphabetically & view/print selected tapes. 
If you own a VCR, this program is a MUST!! 
Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



COCO 3 SCREEN DUMP 



32, 40, 80 column text dump, PMODE 4 
Graphics Dump. Single Keystroke Operation al- 
lows you to take snapshots of your screens even 
when programs are running! Works on DMP's, 
Epson, Gemini and compatibles. CoCo 1, 2 and 
3. Disk $24.95 




HOME BILL MANAGER 



Let the CoCo keep track of your bills. Allows 
you to enter bills under various categories and 
reminds you when they are due. Disk $19.95 



CALENDAR MAKER 



t ,» ma a w » 

ma** m n m 

U u m k tl V 



Generate monthly calendars on your printer for 
any year in the 20th century. Disk Only $19.95 
(CoCo 2 version included) 



ADOS 3 

Advanced disk operating system for CoCo 3. 
Comes on disk and is EPROMable!! Disk 
$34.95. ADOS (for CoCo 1,2): $27.95 



OS 9 



OS9 LEVEL II 
OPERATING SYSTEM 

Supports 512K RAM dual speed, multi-tasking, 
multiple windows, and more!! Comes with disk 
and complete documentation. Only $89.95 



MULTI-VUE 

User friendly graphics interface with multiple 
"window" applications for Level II. Only $54.95 



WIZ 

OS9 Level II Terminal Package with 300-19200 
baud rate and windowing capability. Requires 
512K and RS-232 Pack. Only $79.95 




DYNASTAR 

Best OS9 Editor/Word Processor Text Format- 
ter. Has Keyboard Macros, supports terminals 
& windows simultaneously, configurable, auto- 
indent for C/Pascal programming, mail-merge. 
New Manual makes it easier than ever. Only 

$149.95. DynaSpell $49.95. Both 
Dynastar and Dynaspell: Only $174.95 



DYNACALC OS-9 

Excellent spreadsheet for OS-9 users. Only 

$99.95 




OS9 LEVEL II BBS 38$ 

BBS program that supports multiple users and 
sysop definable menus. Includes the following: 
Tsmon, Login, Chat, Message Retrieval, Mail 
Retrieval, Uloadx, Dloadx, and much more! 
Req. 512K. Only $29,95 



PC-Xfer UTILITIES 

Programs to format and transfer files to/from 
MS DOS diskettes on CoCo Under OS9 Level 
1 and 2. Requires SDISK or SDISK 3. Only 

$44.95 

SDISK 3 

Standard disk drive module replacement allows 
full use of 40/80 track doub/e-sided drives. Req. 
OS9 Level II. Only $29.95. SDISK: $29.95 



OS9 LEVEL II RAMDISK 

Lightning Fast Ramdisk with Auto-Formatting. 
A must for any OS9 Level II user. Req 512K. 
Only $29-95 



OS9 BOOKS: 

Inside OS9 Level II: $39.95 
Rainbow Guide to OS9 II: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide to OS9 II Disk: $19.95 



OS9 Reference Card: FREE with any 
OS9 Purchase!!! 



HiJf MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618. Ph: (716) 383-8830 jJ^J jjfijfrj [B 
All orders $50 & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. Wc accept Visa, MasterCard, Amcx, Check or 
MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&II (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% S&H(minimum $5). New York Slate resi- 
dents please add sales tax. Looking for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am~8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 




A program to help roommates organize 
expenses in a fair, precise manner 







• 1 1 ' . ' . | 

ii lii'iiVi 








rrrr. 





« ■ i ji, 1 . 1 ' ■ " 11 " " 

■ ■ ■• ■ - - ' ■' ' 





By David Turner 



Susan 

STATEMENT DUE DATE IBs 10-15-86 



RENT 

PHONE 

CATV 

WATER/SEWER 

GAS 

TRASH 

ELECTRICITY 
TOTAL 

UNPAID FROM LAST BILL 

PAYMENT 

TOTAL NOW DUE 

Susan TO DATE TOTALS 
PAYMENTS RENT 
$640.00 $350.00 



♦175.00 

$17. 10 

$17.50 

$15.00 
$=0.00 

$25.00 

♦62.25 
$3 1 1 . 85 

-$15.50 CREDIT 
$320.00 

-$23.63 CREDIT 



PHONE CATV ELECTRIC 

$36.60 $35.00 $114.75 



WATER 
$30 . 00 



6A5 
4-0.00 



TRASH 
$50. 00 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$$**$$$$$$$$$$*$*$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$*$$$$$$$$ 



Li sa 

STATEMENT DUE DATE IS: 

RENT 

PHONE 

CATV 

WATER /SEWER 

GAS 

TRASH 

ELECTRICITY 
TOTAL 

UNPAID FROM LAST BILL 

PAYMENT 

TOTAL NOW DUE 



10-15-08 
$175.00 
$39.90 
$17.50 
$15.00 
$38.00 
$0 . 00 
$20.75 
$306. 15 

$0.50 

$310.00 



-$3.35 CREDIT 



Lisa TO DATE TOTALS 

PAYMENTS RENT PHONE CATV ELECTRIC WATER GAS TRASH 

♦620.00 $350.00 $85.40 $35.00 $38.25 $30.00 $78.00 $0.00 
$$$$*$*$$$$$*$$$$$*$$$$*$*$$$$$*$$$$*** 




Many people today have room- 
mates. One of the main argu- 
ments that roommates have is 
bill payment — who pays what and how 
much. Roommate helps solve that 
problem and keeps a record of expenses 
and payments. 

When starting the program, you are 
asked if you are creating a new file or 
loading a previous file. If you are 
creating a new file, you are asked the 
name of the roommate and given a list 
of expenses. The percentage of each 
expense to be paid is entered as a whole 
number, i.e., 90 percent = 90 not .90. 
When you have entered all the expenses 
of that roommate, you are prompted for 
information on the next roommate. 
Once you have entered information on 
all roommates, press ENTER to continue 
the program. 

Next, you are asked if you want a 
printout of each expense that is percent- 
age paid. The printout lists the room- 
mate number and the corresponding 
percentage of payment per expense. 
Note that you may exceed 100 percent 
on any expense, total expenses, or the 
overall sum of expenses. 

You are then asked if you need to 
change a roommate. This will include 
the name and all expenses. Simply 
answer the questions. 



David Turner, an Emergency Medical 
Technician in Little Rock, is interested 
in computers, photography and astron- 
omy, and has written custom programs 
for business. 



14 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



Books That Can Launch A 1000 Programs!! 



Pokes, Peeks and Execs are your guides into the jungle of computer programming. These commands give you the power of 
Machine Language without leaving the security of BASIC. Each book is a collection of "inside" information, with explanations 
and examples to help you immediately put it to use. Everyone from the novice to the professional will find these handy books a 
wealth of information. qqq pQ j^^g 

PEEKS/N EXECS 



300 POKES, 
PEEKS, 'N EXECS 
for COCO III 



*40/80 column Screen Text Dump 
•Save Text/Graphics Screen to Disk 
•Command/Functions Disables 
♦Enhancements for CoCo3 BASIC 
•128K/512K RAM Test Program 
•HPRINT Character Modifier 




SUPPLEMENT TO 500 
POKES,PEEKS, 'N EXECS 



Only $19. 95 



•Autostart your BASIC programs 
•Disable Color BASIC/ECB/Disk BASIC 
commands 

♦Disable Break Key/ Clear Key/ Reset Button 
♦Generate a Repeat-key 
♦Transfer ROMPAKs to tape 
♦Set 23 different GRAPHIC modes 
♦Merge two BASIC programs 
♦And much much more!!! 

For CoCo 1,2 and 3. Only $16. 95 
ALL 3 BOOKS for $39-95 



200 additional Pokes,Peeks and Execs (500 Pokes 
Peeks 'N Execs is a prerequisite) 
♦ROMPAK transfer to disk 

♦ PAINT with 65000 styles 

♦Use of 40 track single/double sided drives 

♦High-speed Cassette Operation 

♦Telewriter, EDTASM + CoCo Max enhancements 

♦ Graphics Dump (for DMP printers) /Text Screen 
Dump 



For CoCo 1,2 or 3. Only $9.95 



UNRAVELLED SERIES 




COCO LIBRARY 



An invaluable aid for Basic and Machine Language programmers, these 
books provide a complete disassembly and annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and Disk ROMs. These listings give complete, uninterupted 
memory maps of the four ROMs. Gain complete control over all versions of 
the color computer. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: COLOR 
BASIC and EXTENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: DISK BASIC ROM 1.1 and 
1.0 Disassembly : $19.95 

BOTH ECB AND DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $49.95 
SUPER EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: SUPER EX- 
TENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly for CoCo 3. $24.95 
COMPLETE UNRAVELLED SERIES (all 3 books): $59.95 




CoCo 3 Service Manual: $39.95 
CoCo 2 Service Manual: $29.95 
Inside OS9 Level II: $39.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 Level II: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 II (disk): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (Level 1): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (2 Disk): $29.95 
CoCo 3 Secrets Revealed: $19.95 
Basic Programming Tricks: $12.95 
Assembly Language Programming(tepco): $18 

Addendum For CoCo3 (tepco): $12 
Color Computer Disk Manual (with ref card): $29.95 




OTHER SOFTWARE ... 

COCO MAX III (with hi-res interface): $79.95 
COCO MAX II: Disk $77.95 Tape $67.95 
MAXFONTS #1,.#2,#3,#4: Disk $19.95 Each 
CGP-220 Driver Kit For CoCo Max III: $19.95 
MAXPATCH: Run COCO MAX II on COCO 3. $24.95 

TELEWRITER 64 (COCO 1&2) :Disk $57.95 Tape $47.95 
TW-80: COC03 features for TW-64 Disk $39.95 
TELEFORM: Mailmerge/form letters for TW-64 Disk $19.95 

AUTOTERM:Universal modem software Disk $39.95 Cas 
$29.95 



PRO-COLOR FILE *ENHANCED*: Multi-feature Database 
$59.95 

PRO-COLOR FORM & DIR: Forms/directories for PCF. 
$24.95 SIDEWISE: Print ASCII files sideways $24.95 

EDT/ASM 64D: Editor-assembler (specify 1,2,3) $59.95 
SOURCE: CoCo Disassembler $34.95 SOURCE III: $49.95 
CBASIC: Best Basic compiler $149.95 CBASIC III: $149.95 




WINDOW MASTER 

The hottest program for your CoCo 3!! Imagine using Win- 
dows, Pull-Down Menus, Buttons, Icons, Edit Field, and 
Mouse Functions in your Basic Programs. No need to use OS9. 
It uses the 640x255 (or 320x255) hires graphics mode for the 
highest resolution. Up to 31 windows can appear on the screen 
at one time. Need extra character sets? Window Master sup- 
ports 5 fonts in 54 sizes! How about an enhanced Editor for 
Basic? It gives you a superb Basic Editor which leaves the 
standard EDIT command in the cold. And don't forget that 
many existing Basic/ML programs will operate under Window 
Master with little or no changes. In fact, it does NOT take up 
any memory from Basic. Requires 1 Disk Drive, RS Hi-res In- 
terface & Joystick or Mouse. Specify 128K/512K. $69. 95 Win- 
dow Master & Hi-Res Interface. Only $79.95 

F1 

FUNCTION KEYS Display 

Use F1,F2, ALT, CTRL Keys on your CoCo 31! I If you 
program in Basic, this program is a must! Only $14.95 




{Looking For New Software . If you have a Basic or ML program 
which you would like to market, contact us! We pay excellent 
^royalties!!! 



lliAT MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618. Ph: (716) 383-8830 jj^ij J^JKDj 
AH orders $5Q & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Amcx, Check or 
MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&II (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% S&II(minimum $5). New York State resi- 
dents please add sales tax. Looking for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 




The program now asks if you need to 
change the percentage paid. This is 
similar to the previous prompt. It 
simply verifies the percentages of pay- 
ment for each roommate. 

Now the program asks for the follow- 
ing expenses: Rent, Phone, CATV, 
Water/ Sewer, Gas, Trash and Electric- 
ity. Enter the monthly amounts. 

You may give the bill's due date and 
use the date as a reference for your 
statements. 

The printout option gives you a 
printout that details expenses and 
payments. The screen print option lists 
the expenses on the screen. This is 
generally used as a review. Use SHIFT- 
@ to stop scrolling. 



After completing the printouts, you 
are asked to save the data. The data file 
uses an extension to label each month. 
You might use the last digit of the year 
and the month number. For example, 
January, 1988 becomes 801. December 
1988 becomes 812. January 1989 be- 
comes 901. This enables you to keep 
monthly records on disk. The program 
also lets you delete the previous month. 

If you want to convert this program 
to cassette, change the following lines: 



1610 QPEN"I",8-1,EC$ 
1630 IFEDF(-1)THEN16G0 
1640 INPUTttl to INPUTtt-1 
1660 CLOSEtt-1 

And delete lines 1490, 1560, and 1590. 

Roommate solves many of the prob- 
lems involved with sharing apartment 
expenses. The program can help room- 
mates remain friends. 



1510 DPEN"[r\8-l,FP$ 
1530 WRITEttl to URITEtt-1 
1550 CLDSEtt-1 



(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at P. O. Box 5062, Little Rock, 
AR 72225. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 




270 141 

430 197 

630 248 

860 51 



1050 85 

1240 72 

1490 199 

END 204 



2 6)3 PRINT#J, "RMMT*RENT *PHONE *C 
ATV *APL *WATER *GAS * 

TRASH" 
27)3 Z=)3 

Z=Z+1 

IFZ>6THEN38)3 

PRINT # J , Z " " ; : PRINT # J , US ING 



The listing: ROOMMATE 

1J3 'COPYRIGHT 1988 

2) 3 'BY DAVID H. TURNER 

3) 3 'POB 5)362 

4) 3 'LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 72225 

5) 3 CLEAR1)3)3)3 

6) 3 VERIFYON 

7) 3 CLS 

8) 3 INPUT lf <L>OAD PREVIOUS DATA OR 

< ORE ATE NEW DATA";R$:I 
FR$="L"THEN158,0ELSEIFR$="C"THEN9 
)3ELSE7)3 

9) 3 Z=j3 

1) 3)3 Z=Z+1 

11) 3 IFZ>6THEN23)3 

12) 3 CLS 

13) 3 PRINT " RO OMMATE #"Z 

14) 3 LINE INPUT" NAME ";NA$(Z) 

15) 3 INPUT"% PAY FOR RENT" ;RC (Z) 

16) 3 INPUT "% PAY FOR PHONE" ; PC (Z) 

17) 3 INPUT" % PAY FOR CATV";CC(Z) 

18) 3 INPUT "% PAY FOR WATER ";WA(Z 

) 

19) 3 INPUT"% PAY FOR GAS ";GA(Z) 

2) 3)3 INPUT"% PAY FOR TRASH" ;SC(Z) 

21) 3 INPUT" % PAY FOR APL";AC(Z) 

22) 3 GOTO10)3 

23) 3 CLS 

24) 3 INPUT "DO YOU WANT A PRINTOUT 
Y/N:";R$ 

25) 3 IFR$="Y"THENJ=(-2)ELSEJ=)3 



»; : PRINT # J, US I 
"; : PRINT # J, USING 
11 ; : PRINT # J, USING" 
"; : PRINT # J 
" ; :PRINT#J,US 



ii 



:PRINT#J,USI 



28J3 
29)3 

3)3)3 

»###";RC(Z) ; 

31) 3 PRINT #J, " 
NG"###";PC(Z) 

32) 3 PRINT! J," 
"###";CC(Z) 7 

33) 3 PRINT# J, " 

###";AC(Z) ; 

34) 3 PRINT* J," 
,USING"###";WA(Z) 

35) 3 PRINT* J," 
ING»###»;GA(Z) ; 
3 6)3 PRINT* J," 
NG"###";SC(Z) 
37j3 GOTO280 

38J3 PRINT: PRINT: 

39J3 INPUT" DO YOU WANT TO CHANGE 
A ROOMMATE Y/N 11 ;R$ 

40J3 IFR$="Y"THEN41j3ELSEIFR$= I, N ,, T 
HEN51J3ELSE39J3 

41) 3 PRINT "NAME #" 

42) 3 Z=)3 

43) 3 Z=Z+1 

44) 3 IFZ>6THEN46)3 

4 5) 3 PRINTNA$ ( Z ) ; : PRINTTAB (13) Z :G 
OT043)3 

46) 3 INPUT "WHICH ONE";Z 

47) 3 LINEINPUT"NAME " ;NA$ ( Z) : INPU 
T"% PAY RENT" ;RC(Z) : INPUT "% PAY 
PHONE" ; PC ( Z ) : INPUT" % PAY CATV" ; C 
C(Z):INPUT"% PAY APL";AC(Z) 

480 INPUT "% PAY WATER ";WA(Z):IN 
PUT " % PAY GAS " ; GA ( Z ) : INPUT " % PA 
Y TRASH";SC(Z) 



16 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



DISK DRIVES 

New Double-Sided Double-Density 360K 40-Track 1/2 ht drives for CoCo 2 & 3. These are the same quality drives that are used in 
IBM® compatible computers. Buy from someone else and all you get is a disk drive. Buy from us and not only do you get a quality 
drive but $50 of Free Disk Utility Software (Super Tape/Disk Transfer & Disk Utility 2.1A) and our DISKMAX utility which al- 
lows you to access BOTH sides of our drives. It's like buying TWO drives for the price of ONE!! 90-day warranty on all drives! 

Drive 0 (With Disto Super Controller!, Case, Power Supply & Cable) :$229.95 Drive 1: $149.95 
TWO 1/2 ht Drives in one case with Cable, Case & Disto Controller:$339.95 Bare Drive: $89 
J & M Controller (with RSDOS): $79.95 1 Drive Cable:$19.95 2 Drive Cable: $24.95 4 Drive Cable: $39.95 

DISTO Super Controller: $99.95 DISTO Super Controller II: $129.95 

Add Ons: Mini Eprom Prog.: $54.95 RT Clock/Parallel Interface: $39.95 Hard Disk Interface: $49.95 Multi-Board Adapter $59.95 



HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Complete w/Hard Drive, WD Controller, 
B&B Interface, Cables, Case, Power Supp- 
ly, Software (OS9/Basic) & Instruction 
Manual. Assembled/ tested/ formatted. 
Just Plugn'RunU Multipak Req. 
Seagate 20 Meg System: $509 Best Hard 
Seagate 30 Meg System: $539 Drive Deal 



HARD DRIVE INTERFACES 

CoCo XT: Use 2 5-120 Meg Drives with 
CoCo. $69.95. w/Real Time Clock: $99.95 
Hyper 10: Allows Hard Drive use with 
RSDOS. Only $29.95 

CoCo XT ROM: Boots OS9 from 
Hard/Floppy Drives. Only $19.95 

(Multipak Required for Interface) 





RS232 SUPER PACK 

Here it is! True RS232 port for 
your CoCo. Compatible with 
Tandy ® Deluxe RS232 Pack! 
Includes DB25 Cable. Req. 
Multipak. From DISTO so you 
know its quality! Going fast! 
Only $54.95 (CoCo 1,2 or 3) 




COMMUNICATIONS 
EXTRAVAGANZA 

1) AVATEX 1200e MODEM: Fully Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 w/ speaker, Auto- 
Dial/Answer/Redial (Reg $109.95) 

2) MODEM CABLE: 4 pin to DB25. (Reg 
$19.95) 

3) AUTOTERM TERMINAL SOFT- 
WARE (Reg $39.95) 

4) FREE COMPUSERVE OFFER and 
Access Time 

5) UPS 2nd DAY AIR Shipping 

ONLY $149.95 
(With AVATEX 1200hc 
instead of Avatex 1200e: $174.95) 
with AVATEX 2400: $249.95 





MAGNAVOX 8CM515 
RGB MONITOR 

Razor-sharp picture 
quality for your CoCo! Has 
14" screen, Analog/TTL 
RGB, Composite inputs 
for CoCo 2/3, Speaker, 
tilt-stand & 2 year warranty! With a push 
of a button you can go from RGB to com- 
posite mode. This means that ALL your 
CoCo programs that appear in B&W in 
RGB mode will appear in color!! Only 
$265 (add$12S&H US/$40 in Canada). 
Magna vox Cable for CoCo 3, Com- 
posite/Audio Cable with purchase of 
monitor: $19.95 



EPROM 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER 

(for CoCo): Programs 2516-27512 & 

more! Includes software and complete 

documentation. Latest Version. Lowest 

Price anywhere! $137.95 

EPROM ERASER Fast erase of 24/28 pin 

EPROMs. Only $49.95 

BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER and 

ERASER: $179.95 

EPROMS: 2764-$8 27128-$9 each 
Call for other EPROMs 
ROMPAK (w/Blank PC Board 27xx 
Series): $12.95 

BLANK CARTRIDGE (Disk Controller 
Size): Only $10.95 



KEYBOARDS , ETC. 

KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: 
Move your keyboard |r 

mm the mm- iJ7 



1% 



L 



away from the com- 
puter & type with ease. 
Use your existing 
keyboard with this 
cable or leave your present keyboard in- 
tact and use a second keyboard. Only 
$39.95. 

Cable with CoCo 2 Keyboard: $49.95 
Cable with CoCo 3 Keyboard: $69.95 
CoCo 3 Keyboard (with free FUNCTION 
KEYS software value $14.95) :$39.95 

CoCo 2 Keyboard: $19.95 

NX-1000 Rainbow Printer 

Fully Epson Compatible 7 Color Printer. 

Only $259 



CABLES 

MAGNAVOX 8505/8515/8CM643 Analog 
RGB Cable: $24.95 

SERIAL-TO-PARALLEL INTERFACE: Use 

your parallel printer at high speed (300-9600 baud) with 
CoCo. Comes will ail cables. No software compatibility 
problems. Only $44.95 

15" MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER 
CABLE: $29.95 

VIDEO DRIVER: Use a monochrome/color monitor 
with your CoCo. Comes with audio/video cables. Specify 
CoCo 1 or 2. Excellent picture quality/resolution! $34.95 
RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 Devices to the serial port. 
Only $18.95 

Y CABLE: Use your disk system with Speech Pak,CoCo 
Max, DS69, etc. $27.95 
RGB Analog Extender Cable:$19.95 
SONY Monitor Cable: $29.95 

VIDEO CLEAR:Reduce TV interference^ 19.95 
MODEM CABLE:4 pin to DB25,Only $19.95 
3-POSITION SWITCHER: $37.95 
HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 



CHIPS, ETC 

Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
3): $29.95 ECB ROM 1.1:$29.95 
68B09E or 6809E Chip: $14.95 
MultiPak PAL Chip for CoCo 3: 
$19.95 

PAL Switcher: Now you can switch be- 
tween the CoCo 2 and 3 modes when 
using the Multi-Pak. You need the 
OLDER & NEW PAL chip for the 26- 
3024 Multipak. Only $39.95. With 
NEW PAL Chip: $49.95. 
5 1/4 B Disks: $0.45 each! 

UPGRADES 

512K Upgrades for CoCo 3: $CALL 
64K Upgrade for CoCo Ps, CoCo IPs 
with Cat #26-3026/27, 26-3134, 26- 
3136: $29.95 

64K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/B CoCo 
II: $39.95 

(Free 64 K Utility Software incl. with 64K Upgr.) 



jhJF MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochcster,NY 14618. Ph: (716) 383-8830 i VISA J j^2£) 
All orders $50 & above (except drives, printers & monitors) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. We 

accept Visa, MasterCard, Annex, Check or MO. Sony, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); except where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% 

S&H(minimum $5). New York State residents please add sales tax. Looking for new software/hardware. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-8pm Monday-Saturday 

Order Status, Information, Technical Information, call 716-383-8830 




^ REAL DESKTOP 






II 



AND 



File Edit options colors Font Size style 




CoCo Max Hi is absolutely the best drawing package 
available for the CoCo 3, and it does more than just let 
you draw. CoCo Max III includes animation, text, color 
mixing and more features than you would think 
possible. It combines incredible speed with dazzling 
graphics and it is a joy to use even its most powerful 
features. 

Pictures, graphs, flyers, cards, signs, school projects, 
labels, buttons and anything else you might dream of 
creating is now possible with CoCo Max III. Is it any 
wonder that the majority of CoCo Gallery pictures in the 
last five months were created with CoCo Max? 

Thousands of CoCo users have found that you don't 
have to be an artist to have fun with CoCo Max. You'll 
wonder why you waited so long to get the incredible 
CoCo Max III. 



CoCo Max III is the best because it includes: 

- a huge picture area {two full hi-res 320x192 screens) - a large 
editing window - Zoom mode for detail work - 28 drawing tools 
which you just point and click on - shrink and stretch - rotation at 
any angle (1.5 degree steps) - 51 2K memory support (all features 
work with 128K too) - an Undo feature to correct mistakes - you 
can even Undo an "Undo" - Animation - special effects - color 
sequencing (8 colors, variable speed) - thirteen fonts (more 
available) - each font has eight different sizes - five style options 
(bold, italic, 3D. etc.) for thousands of font/size/style combination 
possibilities. - the CoCo Show "slide show" program - color 
editing of patterns - automatic pattern alignment - prints in single 
and double size - smart lasso (move text over a background...) 

- advanced tools: arc. ray, cube. etc. - select 16 of the 64 colors (all 
64 colors are displayed at once for selection!) - picture converter 
(CoCo Max II, MGE, BASIC) - extensive prompting - "giyphic" 
clipbook of rubber stamps - double click shortcuts - color mixing 
(additive/subtractive/none) - money back guarantee - sophisticated 
data compression saves disk space - pull down menus (no 
commands to remember) - forty paintbrush shapes - two color 
lettering - spray can - scrapbooks of pictures - error free 

- Y-cable or multipack not required - high speed hi-res interface 
included (plugs into joystick port) - disk is not copy protected 

- amazing "flowbrush" - RGB and composite monitor support 

- replace color - printing on black and white printers in five shades 
of gray ~ full color printing with optional drivers for the NX-1000 
Rainbow and CGP220 - entirely rewritten for the CoCo 3 



can 



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CoCo Max III: $79.95 

Max-10 owners: deduct $10 

System Requirements: 

CoCo 3 disk system and a Joystick 
or Mouse 

Printer drivers included: 

IBM/Epson and compatibles. GEMINI, 
DMP1 05/106/1 30.OKI1 82/1 92. CGP220 
(B&W). DMP110, DMP200 

Color printer drivers (prints 125 
different colors) Star NX-1 000, CGP- 
220, or Okimate 20 each $1 9.95 



For all CoCo Max Versions 

Max Edit Font Editor: A font is a set of 
characters of a particular style. With Max Edit vou can 
create new fonts or modify the existing ones.$1 9,95 

Max Font disks (send for list) each $1 9.95 

Max Font Set (95 fonts on 4 disks) $49.95 

DS69/69B Digitizers: allows you to capture the 
image from a VCR or video camera and bring it into 
your computer. CoCo Max will let you load digitized 
pictures and modify them. 

DS-69 (2 images per second. Requires 

multipak) $99.95 

DS-69B (8 images/second) $1 49.95 



CoCo 1 & 2 Owners 
Still Available: 

(See previous ads or 
write for information) 

CoCo Max II (works on 

all disk Cocos) $69.95 

CoCo Max Tape 

(CoCol & 2 only) $59.95 

Y-Cable $24.95 

CoCo Max il Picture 

Disk Set 

set of 3 disks: $29.95 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max or Max-W for a fuU month. 
If you are not delighted with either of them, 
we will refund every penny. 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries. Inc 




TO ORDER 

(203) 656-1806 M0N-FRI 9 to 5 EST^ 

Visa or Mastercard accepted. C.O.D. orders $3 extra 
Check or M.0. to Cokxware, 242-W West Ave. Daren CT 06820 
Add S3 per order for shipping ($5 to Canada 10% to overseas) 
CT residents add 7.5% sales tax 



PUBLISHING 



COLORWARE 




THE DAZZLING WORD PROCESSOR 

You probably already have a word processor, and you 
probably wish it had these features: 

► Fully menu driven (CoCo Max style) with point and 
click marking of text. You don't need the arrow keys! 

► True WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) 
including variable size fonts, styles (bold, italics, eta) 
and graphics. 

► Can print multiple columns on a page. 

► Not limited by printer capabilities: fonts up to 24 
points (1 /3") high, superscripts, small print, etc. 

► Fully integrated spelling checker (incredibly fast), no 
need to exit program to check spelling. 

► Graphics can be imported from just about anything 
(CoCo Max; MGE: BASIC; even Macintosh pictures 
from a BBS) and resized to fit your document. 

► Full screen preview including graphics. 

Max-10 has all these unique features, plus all the 
features you are used to in your current word 
processor. Even with all this, you don't give up anything. 
Max-10 is easier to use, more intuitive, faster and more 
powerful than anything else. It's not just a word 
processor, it's a desktop publisher. 



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Max~1 0: $79.95 

CoCo Max III owners: deduct $10 
Max-10 requires a CoCo 3. at least 1 disk. & joystick or mouse 
Printer drivers included: IBM/Epson and compatibles: DMP 
105, DMP106, DMP130: CGP220 (B&W); Gemini/Star 



File Edit Search* Layout Font 



il |2 i3 i4 .v^Plain Tent 

'4 1 £ 



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Bold 



Italics 



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WYSIWIG adj. (wiz-ee-wig) L What 
You See Is What You Get (acronym) 

* LAN choice if /##/ iMkhi font: and ffjF/« i. 



pxge: 2 



Some of the many features of Max-10: 

- Blinding speed - printing in multiple columns - online dictionary 

- spell checking - graphics can be mixed with text - full justification 
of proportionally sized characters - bold, italic, underline 
superscript and subscript type styles - superb file support, just point 
and click - "Undo" lets you correct mistakes - easy to use. no 
commands to remember - any graphics program can be used 

- pictures can be shrunk or stretched to fit - right and left alignment 

- centering - variable line spacing - page numbering - current 
page number displayed on the screen - variable tab stops - left and 
right margins - tabs and margins can vary in the same document 

- cut and paste text and graphics anywhere in the file - page break 
shows on the screen - pull down menus are quick and simple to use 

- lightning fast access to any point in the document with the scroll 
box - twenty fonts (styles and sizes), more available - any number 
of character sizes and styles can be mixed on the same line - up to 
more than 120 characters per line, depending on font size, style and 
letters - headers and footers, even with graphics - file compatibility 
with other word processors - right, left, bottom and top margins 

- word wrap - set starting page - type ahead - key repeat - key 
click - scroll up and down - ASCII file output for compatibility 

- disk directory - kill files- block cut, copy and move - global 
search and replace - paragraph indent - clipboard - merge 

- show file (on disk) - free memory display - page count 

- paragraph count - word count - graphics can be resized and 
moved - multiple fonts - error recovery - true lowercase -512K 
memory support (ail features work with 128K too) - complete point 
and click cursor control - moving, clearing and changing blocks of 
text is ridiculously easy, Just point and click at each end of the text 
block - onscreen ruler - preview file before loading - search and 
replace - disk is not copy protected - more than 35 pages of text 

CoCo Max III and Max-10 
Perfect Together 

You do not need CoCo Max III to insert and print 
graphics in Max-10. Max-10 works with any graphics 
creation program, and you can also use graphics 
downloaded from bulletin boards. 

Similarly, you do not need Max-10 to create graphics 
with text in CoCo Max III. There are tremendous 
lettering capabilities in CoCo Max III, with its many 
fonts, styles, and sizes. 

Together Max-10 and CoCo Max III are an unbeatable 
combination. This desktop publishing system is better 
than anything youVe ever seen on a CoCo. We are so 
confident that you will use, and enjoy using f he two 
software packages, that we offer an unconditional 
money back guarantee. Stop wasting your time and 
effort using inferior or obsolete products. Move up to 
the new generation of CoCo software now. 



490 INPUT "ANOTHER CHANGE Y/N";R 
$:IFR$= ,, Y"THEN410ELSE500 
500 GOTO230 
510 ' 

520 'loaded data and preparation 

for printing new statement 
530 Z=0 

540 CLS: INPUT" DO YOU WANT TO CHA 
NGE % PAYS";R$ 

550 IFR$="Y"THEN4 10ELSEIFR$="N"T 
HEN560ELSE540 



560 INPUT 
570 INPUT 
580 INPUT 
590 INPUT 
600 INPUT 
610 INPUT 
620 INPUT 



'RENT: " ;RE 
• PHONE : " ; PH 
'CATV:";CA 
•WATER/ SEWER: " ;WA 

'GAS:";GA 

•TRASH: ";TR 

'ELECTRICITY: " ;KU 

630 LINEINPUT"DATE BILL IS DUE " 
;DD$ 
640 Z=0 
650 Z=Z+1 
660 IFZ>6THEN700 
670 IF NA$(Z)="" THEN 690 
680 CLS : PRINTNA$ ( Z ) : INPUT "AMOUNT 

PAID:";PD(Z) 

690 GOTO650 

700 'printing statement 
710 Z=0 



720 Z=Z+1:IFZ>6THEN1450 
730 IFNA$(Z)=""THEN1440 
740 PRINTNA$(Z) ;: INPUT" PRINTOUT 
Y/N";HC$ 

750 IFHC$="Y"THENJ=(-2)ELSEJ=0 
760 PRINT # J , NA$ ( Z ) 

770 PRINT # J, "STATEMENT DUE DATE 
IS: "DD$ 

780 PRINT # J, "RENT" ; 

790 PRINT#J,TAB(23) ; 

800 PRINT#J, USING" $$, #### . ##'• ; ( ( 

RC(Z) *RE)/100) 

8 10 PRINT # J , " PHONE " ; 

820 PRINT #J, TAB (26) ; 

830 PRINT#J,USING"$$##.##"; ( (PC( 

Z) *PH)/100) 

840 PRINT* J /'CATV"; 

850 PRINT#J,TAB(25) ; 

860 PRINT#J,USING"$$###.##»; ( (CC 

(Z)*CA)/100) 

870 PRINT # J, "WATER/SEWER ";:PRIN 

T#J,TAB(25) ; : PRINT#J,USING"$$### 

.##"7((WA(Z)*WA)/100) 

880 PRINT #J, "GAS " ; :PRINT#J,TAB( 

25) ; :PRINT#J, USING" $$###. ##" ; ( (G 

A(Z)*GA)/100) 

890 PRINT# J , "TRASH" ; : PRINT* J , TAB 
(26) ; :PRINT#J,USING"$$##. ##" ; ( (S 
C(Z)*TR)/100) 



Real BASIC for OS9! 



08-1 LEVEL TWO VH. 01,00.01 
COPYRIGHT 10M BY 
M1CROWARE SYSTEMS CORP. 
LICENSED TO TANDY CORP. 
ALL RjQHTS RESERVED 



July 11, 1 
Shall 



14:37:30 



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OSS: Inlx /w6 

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RSB COPR IBM BURKE A BURKE 
DISK EXTENDED COLOR BASIC 11 
COPR 1MX, IMS BY TANDY 
UNDER LICENSE FROM MICROSOFT 
AND MICROWARE SYSTEMS CORP. 

OK 

LDAD "DEMO" 

OK 

LIST 

10 PMOOE 4:SCREEN 1,1 

» X»RND(tNH:Y>RND(lMH 

30 X8sRN0(29«-X).1 : YS>RND<1 fl»-Y| -1 

40 UNE (X,YHX4-XS,Y*YS),PS£T.BF 




Welcome to 



R. S. B. 



R.S.B. and o4rwf Burik* A Bur** 
product! at ihm Prfciorton Rain bow t*«t 
Do*i1 mtm out HmM DM SxniMrl 



There is nothing wrong with your Coior Computer. Do not attempt to adjust it The BASiC you know and iove is now 
running under Level 2 OS9 windows. You are in command. 

Burke & Burke is proud to present another OS9 programming language: Disk Extended Color BASIC. 

You've probably heard of this language. If s the one your Color Computer was bom with. We're talking PMODE, DIR. COLOR, 
RENUM, PLAY and other familiar words. Under Level 2 OS9. In as many windows as your memory lets you create. 

Our R.S.B. software creates an OS9 -compatible version of Disk Extended Color BASIC by reading your CoCo s ROM chips. We add 
new software for OS 9- style graphics, sound, printer, and disk I/O. Of course, you can't use R.S.B. to run machine language programs, 
and some BASIC commands work slightly differently under R.S.B. Although R.S.B. loads and saves files using OS9's file format, 
we've also included utilities to transfer BASIC programs and data files between OS9 and BASIC disks. 

Did you know that Level 2 OS9 always runs at double-speed? This makes R.S.B. very fast. You must have a Co Co 3 with at least 
128K RAM, and a floppy controller with Disk Extended Color BASIC 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, or 2.1 ROM, or CoCo 3 CDOS ROM, to use R.S.B. 



wild & mv version 2.1 Use^idcards- check out these OS9 Utilities 

with most OS9 commands, or rearrange your _ . . . . . . . ... _ M 

directory tree. Features recursive directory Tocl9 t0 M *° u te " tim * flgMtng oso ' 
searches. A hard disk must! $19.95 



two* morm tin* using H. 



EZGen Version 1.04 Powerful OS9 
bootfile editor. Change module names, add 
or delete modules, patch bytes, or rearrange 
modules. Works on other files, too. $19.95 




P.O. Box 1283 Palatine IL 60078-1283 (312) 307-2808 



EJ 




ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE A0D 7% SALES TAX. 
COD's add $2.20. Shipping (within the USA) S2.00 per 
CoCo XT; S1.50 per disk or ROM. Plus* allow 2 weake 
for delivery (overnight delivery also available for in-stock 

Hems), Telephone orders accaptsd (312)307-2898. 



cernncATON 

SEAL 



20 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



The Amazing A-BUS\& 




An A- BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adaptor In foreground 

The A-BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3, 

About the A-BUS system: 

• Ail the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory: in BASIC, use INPandOUTforPEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PO-123) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 



RE-1 40: $1 29 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields: 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, eta 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you wilt be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal; 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available 



Includes eight industrial relays, {3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LEO's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable. 



RE-1 56: 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA; max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card ad-i 42: $1 29 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 100V by adding a 
resistor. 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-i 46: $1 39 

this analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%. Input range is -4 V to 
+4V. Resolution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts Conversion time is 130ms. Ideal for thermocouple 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-1 56 card) 

Digital Input Card in 1 Mt $59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK) 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-i 48: $65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output. 
Strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255 A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cl-i 44: $89 

Powerful clock/calendar yi/ittj: battery backup for Time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built alarm relay, led and buz2er; timing to 1/1 00 
second, tiisy to d^^jmai format. Lithium battery included. 

Toupfi Tone® Decoder ph-i 45: $79 

Each tone is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc 

A-BUS f^trtptyping Card pr-i 52: $1 5 

3Vfe tpf^jh. wrtH pipwer and ground bus ^itsi Up to 10 I.C.s 




< ,w; h».'../v v !2.J : 



Smart Stepper Controller sc-149: $299 

World's finest stepper controller. On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously. Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 1 0.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory. For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half, full, wave), 
scale factor, units, .holding power, etc. Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (3 50 mA) for small steppers (MO-103) Send for SC-149 flyer, 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC- 1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-122: $19 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board. 

Stepper Motor Driver sr^m $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with them. Each card 
drives two stepper motors (12V. bidirectional. 4 phase. 350mAper phase). 
Special Package: 2 motors (M(M 03) + ST-143: PA-1 81 : $99 

Stepper Motors wio-103: $isor4tor$39 

Pancake type, 2VV dia : Y«" shaft, 7.5 c /step. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec. 1 2VY36 ohm. bipolar, 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701 -P2. 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer. 1 4 Bit Analog to Digital converter. 4 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer. Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT. AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot. AR- 

Tandy1000, 1 000 EX & SX, 1 200, 3000 Usesone short slot. AR- 

Apple II, II -f. lie. uses any slot. AR- 

TRS-80 Model 1 02. 200 Plugs into 40 oin "system bus" Aft 

Model 1 00. Uses40 pin socket (Socket is duplicated on adapter) AR* 

TRS-80 Mod3.4.40. Fits 50 pin bus. (With hard disk, use Y-caPle) AR- 

TRS-80 Model 4 P. Includes extra cable. (50 pin bus is recessed) AR- 

TRS-80 Model I. Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or |if AR- 

Color Computers (Tandyj.Fits ROM slot. Muitipak. or Y-cabie AR- 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft, so cond.) ca-i 63: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to tirst Motherboard. 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-12o:$99 

, Lach Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
w£l : C^^^C second Motherboard to be added to the first {with connecting cable CA- 
m * ] 161: $12). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
, J BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum J 



RE-1 40 




$69 

133...S69 
134; $49 
136...$69 
135...S69 
132...S49 
137...$62 
131. ..$39 
138..S49 



• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 



Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
Visa. MC, checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT & NY residents add sales tax. 
C.O.O. add $3.00 extra, 
Canada: shipping^ $5 
Overseas add 1 0% 






242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



a S:gma Industries Company 



Technical info: (203) 656-1 806 

fe°cf 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders; {203} 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




«< GIWIESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 





M High Quality Digital Audio Sampler and Sequencer 

Turn your CoCo III into a REAL digital audio sampler with HIGH quality audio reproduction. Easily 
add exotic effects, ECHO, stuttering, speed shifting, sequencing, and reverse audio to BASIC or ML 
programs or GRAPHICS! Now includes Data Compression. Imagine recording any Voice, Music, or 
Sound effect and being able to use these DIGITAL recordings in your own programs! 3 disk sides 
includes: INTERFACT/BIN - ML driver for sound effects. G&M/BAS - Adds sound effects to 
Graphics. SHOWTIME and DEMO disks. SCOPE/BAS - Turns CRT into a Digital Oscilloscope to 
look at MAXSOUND waveforms. Version 3.0 upgrade .......... $6.95 + Shipping & Handling 

"Maxsound... bringing a new era to the CoCo Community" 
-Cray Augsburg, June '88 Rainbow Review 

CALL TO HEAR 'OVER THE PHONE* DEMO (128k or 512k CoCo ID only) $59.95 

^^it^ Maxsound Soundtracks & Graphics 

These exciting disks are samples of what can be created with MAXSOUND and CoCo Max III! 
Some work on 128k, some work without the MAXSOUND program and some are 512k 4 disk sides 
of unbelievable sounds and graphics! Just some of the tides are: Airwolf, Star Trek, Knight Rider, 
Warrior King Demo, Probe, and more are in the making! Prices range from just $5.95 to $9.95 

Call or write for a complete catalog of titles available! 



V-Term Terminal Emulator 

Communicate with VAX, UNIX, Mainframe, and BBS Systems! 

FEATURES: 



-VT-100, VT-52, Vidtex (includes RLE graphics display), and standard CRT emulations. 
•Developed and tested on a UNIX system using the EMACS and VI full-screen editors. 
•All 128 ASCII characters accessible from the keyboard. 

•Uses a high-resolution graphics screen to implement a highly readable 80-column screen. 

•Menus can be operated concurrently with other terminal functions. (Disk Basic!) 

•Full 28 line by 80 column screen, with 3 bottom lines protected for menus. 

•Serial port up to 2400 baud, RS-232 Pak up to 9600 baud, DCModem Pak at 300 baud. 

•XModem, XModem-CRC, Y-Modem, and ASCII file transfers directly to disk or memory. 

•Prints disk or buffer files with settable margins, baud rate and word wrap. 

-Full 128k or 512k support with a RAMDISK like buffer. Monochrome monitor support. 

•Capture buffer, Snapshot, Conference mode, 35/40/80 Tracks, and over 56 pages of docs! 

Verekm 02.00.00 upgrade $6.95 + S&H Disk (128k or 512k CoCo HI only) ...... $39.95 





| oil Free 


l-800-441-<iIME 


Order line | 


Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
Information: Delphi's CoCo Sig 


GIMMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301-256-7558 or 301-256-2953 


Add $3.00 for shipping and handling 
Add $2.50 for COD (USA only) 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VISA/ MC/ Check/ Money Order/COD 




«< GIWJESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer product^/-^^ , 




GRAPHICS-25 (512k CoCo IU only) Great with MAXSOUND and/or CoCo Max ID! 

Utilize the FULL 512k memory range of your CoCo III from BASIC for graphics! Create up to 25 ONBOARD HIRES 
SCREENS! Six new BASIC commands allow instant display switching while secretly drawing other screens. Save and load 
screens to and from disk. Copy one screen to another. Fast Graphics action, Smooth animation, and 100% Machine Language 
code. Requires DECB 1.0, DECB 1.1, or FKEYS HI. Complete with documentation. Disk $24.95 



MAX-10 



(CoCo HI only) The dazzling Word Processor and document creator for the CoCo III! 
MAX-10 is the perfect partner for CoCo MAX III! Mix graphics and text to get great looking newsletters, 
flyers, ect... Includes Spelling checker ! Requires Joystick. (CoCo Max III owners deduct $10) Disk .... $79.95 



CoCo Max III 



(CoCo HI only) See April '88 review. Built in Animation! / Amazing Color Sequencing!!! 
Comes with Hi-Res Interface, MINILOAD/BAS, Demo Disk, CoCo Show Pgm. Requires Joystick or mouse. Sale .... $74*95 



MULTI-LABEL 11 -L (CoCo III only) See July '87 review. An easy to use, versatile label creating program 
including many new CoCo HI features. Print multiple fonts on each label! This one's a MUST for the CoCo III!! Disk .... $16.95 



fyfyyyy/fi "Iff* 

JTJvCr X*y ill (CoCo I/U/UI) See April '87 review. A user friendly, programmable function key utility that creates up to 20 
function keys. EDITOR, DOS mods, Single or Double sided, 35/40 tracks, DISABLE, and it's EPROMable!. Disk $19.95 

SDCDRIVE (CoCo I/U/UI) This machine language utility modifies DECB 1.0, 1.1, FKEYS HI, or ADOS to allow the 
use of 3 double-sided drives (or 2 D/S drives and J&R's RAM DISKS) as 6 S/S drives. Disk $16.95 



AUTO DIM (CoCo IU only) See Jan. '88 review. This hardware device protects your monitor, or TV from IMAGE 
BURN after a few minutes of inactivity from your keyboard. Illustrated and easy to install. Hardware $29.95 

MPI-CoCo Locking Plate (CoCo III only) Now 2 styles-^Brotects your CoCo III and Multi Pak 

Interface from destroying each other! Please specify MPI number 26-3024 o\ 26-3124 Jwhen ordering! Sale $7.95 



3h4e£LWarrior King (CoCo UI only) Become Rastann, Warrior King, on a quest to regain his rightful 

crown hidden deep within his sinister land. Battle monsters, gain magic & weapons, and travel thru harsh wilderness 
& dark castle dungeons in this medieval realm. From the creator of Kung-Fu Dude comes this awesome arcade game for the 
CoCo IU! Uses the most detailed 320 x 200 16 color graphics & high speed ML code to vault you into a world of fantasy! Dare 
ye challenge the many perils ahead to become Warrior King? Requires 128k CoCo III, Disk drive, and Joystick .... $29.95 



HALL OF THE KING TRILOGY (CoCo I/II/IH) See June '86 & Nov '87 reviews. The epic 

adventure is back! The largest adventure campaign ever seen for the CoCo is again available. A total of 6 DISK SIDES of 
intense graphics adventure will have you playing for weeks! Each section is a 2 disk stand alone adventure, but all 3 together 
form an epic saga! Quest for the legendary earthstone in the ancient dwelling of the dwarfs while you enjoy the classic graphics 
that made this trilogy famous! Each adventure can be purchased separately for only $29.95, the lowest price ever , or you can 
SAVE and purchase the entire set for only $74.95. Requires 64k, Disk drive, (and composite monitor for the CoCo HI). 
Please specify HALL of the King I, U, or HI $29.95 each or the entire 6 DISK Trilogy for only $74.95 



In Quest of the Star Lord (CoCo HI only) See Aug '88 review. This is THE graphics 

adventure for the CoCo IU! UnparaUed 320 x 200 animated graphics will leave you gasping for more! You quest for the Phoenix 
Crossbow in this post-holocaust world of science and fantasy. Full 4 Disk sides of mind loving adventure! Requires 128k 
CoCo III and Disk drive. HINT SHEET $3.95 (+ $1.00 S&H by itself) Disk $34.95 



KUNG-FU DUDE (CoCo 1/H/UI) See Feb. '88 review. An exciting arcade game. The BEST karate game ever for 
the CoCo! Destroy opponents and evade obstacles as you grow even closer to your ultimate objective! Spectacular graphics, 
sound effects, and animation! Requires 64k, Disk drive, and Joystick. Now displays color on CM8. Disk $24.95 

PYRAMDC (CoCo IU only) See Dec. '87 review. Brilliant colors, sharp graphics, and hot action in this 100% ML arcade 
game. You'll enjoy hopping Kubix around the pyramid, avoiding Kaderf, Smack, Smuck, & the Death Square! Disk •• $19.95 

AD&D Character's Companion (CoCo 1/11/ III) This great timesaving 

utility helps create compatible AD&D characters. Includes dice roUing routine, pick ability, race & class. Buy from 
the Players Handbook, magic items & spell materials. Save, load, and print character info. 3 Disk sides .... $24.95 

White Fire of Eternity (CoCo I/II/1II) See Dec '86 review. Enter the era of monsters & magic. Search for the 
legendary power of White Fire throughout the Forbidden Wood & Dark Caverns in this 64k animated adventure! Disk. .$19.95 

QiampiOIl (CoCo I/U/IU) See May '87 review. Become a superhero in this action adventure! Disk.. $19.95 

OtagOn Blade (CoCo I/U/IU) See Nov '86 review. Slay evil dragon in this 64k animated adventure! Disk.. $19.95 




900 PRINT # J , "ELECTRICITY" ; 

910 PRINT#J,TAB(23) 7 

920 PRINT* J, USING" $$, ####.##"; (K 

tJ*(AC(3)/W)) 

930 PRINT#J,"TOTAL "; 

940 PRINT # J, TAB (23) ; 

950 X(Z)=RC(Z) *RE/100 

960 W(Z)=PC(Z) *PH/100 

970 V(Z)=CC(Z) *CA/100 

980 U(Z)=KU*(AC(Z) )/100 

990 L(Z)=WA(Z) *WA/100 

1000 M(Z)=GA(Z)*GA/100 

1010 0(Z)=SC(Z) *TR/100 

1020 PRINT # J, USING" $$, ####.##"; ( 

X(Z)+W(Z)+V(Z)+U(Z)+L(Z)+M(Z)+0( 

Z)) 

1030 T(Z)=X(Z)+W(Z)+V(Z)+U(Z)+L( 
Z)+M(Z)+0(Z) 

1040 PRINT* J, "" : PRINT* J, "UNPAID 
FROM LAST BILL" ; : PRINT#J, TAB (25) 
;:PRINT#J,USING"$$###.##"; (BB(Z) 
) ; : IF BB ( Z ) <0THENPRINT# J , " CREDI 
T"ELSEPRINT#J," " 

1050 PRINT#J, "" : PRINT# J, "PAYMENT 
it i 

1060 PRINT#J,TAB(23) ; 

1070 PRINT # J , US ING »$$,####.##"; P 

D(Z) 

1080 PRINT#J,'«": PRINT* J, "TOTAL N 
OW DUE"; 

1090 PRINT#J,TAB(23) ; 

1100 BA(Z)-(T(Z))-(PD(Z))+(BB(Z) 

) 

1110 BB(Z)=BA(Z) 

1120 PRINT* J, US ING" $$, ####.##"; ( 
BA(Z)) ; 

1130 IF (BA(Z) )>0THENPRINT*J," N 
OW DUE" 

1140 IF (BA(Z) )<0THENPRINT*J," C 
RED IT" 

1150 PRINT* J, " " 

1160 PRINT#J,NA$(Z) " TO DATE TOT 
ALS" 

1170 RT(Z)=RT(Z)+X(Z) 

1180 PR(Z)=PR(Z)+W(Z) 

1190 CT(Z)=CT(Z)+V(Z) 

1200 UT(Z)=UT(Z)+U(Z) 

1210 PT(Z)=PT(Z)+PD(Z) 

1220 F(Z)-F(Z)+L(Z) 

1230 G(Z)=G(Z)+M(Z) 

1240 H(Z)=H(Z)+0(Z) 

1250 IFHC$O"Y"THEN720 

12 60 PRINT # J , TAB ( 2 ) " PAYMENTS " ; 

1270 PRINT* J, TAB (16) "RENT"; 

1280 PRINT* J, TAB (25) "PHONE"; 

1290 PRINT* J, TAB (3 6) "CATV"; 

1300 PRINT* J, TAB (42) "ELECTRIC" ; 

1310 PRINT#J, TAB (55) "WATER"; 

1320 PRINTS, TAB (67) "GAS"; 



24 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



1330 PRINT #J, TAB (75) "TRASH" 
1340 PRINT#J,USING"$$, ####.*#' 
PT ( Z ) ) / 

13 50 PRINT* J , TAB ( 10 ) ; : PRINT* J , 

ING»$$,####.#*»;(RT(Z)) ; 

13 60 PRINT* J , TAB ( 19 ) ; ; PRINT* J , 

ING"$$,####.##";(PR(Z)) ; 

1370 PRINT#J, TAB (26) ;: PRINT #J. 

ING"$$,#*##.##";(CT(Z)); 

1380 PRINT#J, TAB ( 40) ;: PRINT #J, 

ING»$$,##*#.*#";(UT(Z)) ; 

1390 PRINT#J,TAB(49) ; : PRINT* J, Uw 

ING"$$#,##*.##";(F(Z)) ; 

1400 PRINT#J,TAB(57) ;:PRINT#J,US 

ING"$$#,###.##»;(G(Z)) ; 

1410 PRINT #J , TAB (65) ;:PRINT#J,US 
ING»$$#,###.##";(H(Z)) 
1420 PRINT* J, STRING $ (80,36) 
1430 PRINT#J,"": PRINT #J,"" 
1440 GOTO720 

1450 'save to disk 

1460 CLS : INPUT "READY TO SAVE TO 
DISK Y/N" ;R$ ; IFR$="Y"THEN1470EL 
SEEND 

1470 INPUT" LAST THREE LETTERS FO 
R PASSCODE";LT$ 
1480 FP$="MATE" 
1490 PC$=FP$+LT$ 

1500 VERIFYON;INPUT"PRESS < ENTER 
> WHEN READY" ;R$ 
1510 OPEN "0",#1,PC$ 
1520 FORZ=1T06 

1530 WRITE#1,NA$(Z) ,PT(Z) ,RT(Z) , 
PR(Z) ,CT(Z) ,UT(Z) ,BB(Z) ,F(Z) ,G(Z 
) ,H(Z) ,RE,PH,CA,AP,WA,GA,TR,RC(Z 
) ,PC(Z) ,CC(Z) ,AC(Z) ,WA(Z) ,GA(Z) , 
SC(Z) 

1540 NEXTZ 
1550 CLOSE#l 

1560 INPUT "READY TO DELETE OLD F 
ILE Y/N" ;RD$ : IFRD$="Y"THENINPUT 
"NAME OF OLD FILE :" ;OF$ : OF$= "MAT 
E"+OF$+"/DAT":KILL OF$ 
1570 END 

1580 'load old data from disk 

1590 INPUT "ENTER LAST THREE LETT 

ERS OF CODE";LC$ 

1600 EC$="MATE":LE$=EC$+LC$ 

1610 OPEN"I", #1,LE$ 

1620 F0RZ=1T06 

1630 IFEOF(1)THEN1660 

1640 INPUT* 1,NA$(Z) ,PT(Z) ,RT(Z) , 

PR(Z) ,CT(Z) ,UT(Z) ,BB(Z) ,F(Z) ,G(Z 

) ,H(Z) ^EfP^CA^PjWAfGA^R^CtZ 

) ,PC(Z) ,CC(Z) ,AC(Z) ,WA(Z) ,GA(Z) , 

SC(Z) 

1650 NEXTZ 
1660 CLOSE#l 
1670 GOTO520 

as 



7%ere!?£Z7ew twrtf^ FTP FFr/'/er/ZZ 




VIP WRITER III VS THE COMPETITION 

VIP Writer has ALWAYS led the peck with features and now VIP Writer 111 still leads the 
way) The chart below illustrates this fact. Telewriter 128 only gives you 43K for text. 
Why is it called Telewriter 128? Word power 3 gives only 72KI VIP Writer 111 makes use 
of over 106KI VIP Writer III is the ONLY CoCo 3 word processor worthy of it's name! 



WORD PROCESSOR 
COMPARISON CHART 



|CoCo3 with 128K 


VIP Writer III 


Telewriter 128 


Word Power 3 


I Text Storage 


OVER 49,000 


48,000 


72,000 


Print Spooler 


YES 57,000 


NONE 


NONE 


Total Storage 


106,000 


48,000 


72,000 


I Spelling Checker 


VIP Speller 


NONE 


FREE WARE 


| Screen Display 


32/40/64/80 


40/80 


80 



SCREEN DISPLAY OPTIONS 

As the chart above shows VIP Writer III offers more screen width options -ail with 24 
lines and actual lower case letters. It uses the CoCo 7s hardware display and double clock 
speed and is VERY VERY FASTI You can choose fore and backflround colors from up to 
64 different hues. Color can be turned ON or OFF for the best possible display using a 
color or monochrome monitor or TV set. VIP Writer III has a built in on-line context 
sensitive help facility which displays command usage in easy to read colored windows. 

CUSTOMIZER & PRINTER INSTALLER 

VIP Writer 111 comes with a configuration / printer installation program which lets you 
customize VIP Writer III to suit your own liking. You can set screen width and colors as well 
as margins and more You can also Install your own printer and set interface type (serial, 
parallel or J&M), baud rate, line feeds, etc. Once done, you never have to enter these 
parameters again I VIP Writer III will load n' go with your custom configuration every timet 

TEXT FILE STORAGE 

VIP Writer 111 creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all other VIP Programs 
as well as other programs which use ASCII file format You can use VIP Writer ill to even 
create BASIC programs! There is a 49K text buffer and disk or cassette file linking 
allowing virtually unlimited text space. VIP Writer III works with up to four disk drives and 
lets you display disk directories and free space as well as rename or kill disk files. In 
addition VIP Writer 111 is 100% compatible with the RGB Computer Systems HARD DISK. 

EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer 111 has a fut! featured screen editor which can be used to edit text with lines up 
to 240 characters long with or without automatic word wrap around. You can soled 
type-over mode or insert mode. There is even an OOPS command to recall a cleared text 
buffer. Other editing features include: Type-ahead * typamatic key repeat and key beep 



for flawless text entry * end of lino bail • full four way cursor control with scrolling • top 
of textfite • bottom of loxtfile • paoe up • page down • top of screen • bottom of screen • 
beginning ol line ♦ end of line • left one word * right one word • DELETE character, to 
beginning or end of line, word to the left or right, or entire line • INSERT character or line 
• LOCATE and/or CHANGE or DELETE single or multiple occurrence using wildcards • 
BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to TEN simultaneous block manipulations • TA8 key 
and proQrammable tab stops * word count • line restore ■ three PROGRAMMABLE 
FUNCTIONS to perform tasks such as auto column creation and multiple copy printing. 

TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you to format your text in 
any way you wish. You can chanae the top, bottom, left or right margin and page length. 
You can set your text flush left, center or flush right You can turn right hand 
justification on or off. You can have headers, footers, page numbers and TWO auxiliary 
lines which can appear on odd, even or al pages. You can also select the fine on which they 
aopearl You can even change the line spacing) Parameters can be altered ANYWHERE 
within your text file I 

PREVIEW PRINT WINDOW 

VIP Writer HI features an exclusive format window which allows you to preview your 
document BEFORE PRINTING ITI You are able to move up, down, left and right to see 
centered and justified text, margins, page breaks, orphan lines etc. 

PRINTING 

VIP Writer IK prints TWICE as fast as any other CoCo word processor! ft supports most 
serial or parallel printers using J&M JFD-CP or Rainbow interface and gives you the 
ability to select baud rates from 110 to 19,200. You can imbed printer control codes 
anywhere in your text file EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT) VIP Writer ill also has 
TWENTY programmable printer macros which allow you to easily control ail of your 
printers capabilities such as bold, underline, italics and superscript using simple key 
strokes. Other features include: multiple copy printing • single sheet pause * line feeds. 

PRINT SPOOLING 

Save up to $150 on a print spooler because VIP Writer ill has a built in print spooler with 
a 57,000 character buffer which allows you to print one document WHILE you are editing 
another. You donl have to wait until your printer is done before starting another job! 

SPELLLING CHECKER 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller AT NO ADDITIONAL COSTI VIP Speller checks text 
for misspelled words and has a 50,000 word dictionary that can be added to or edited. 

DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer III is supplied with a 125 page instruction manual which is 
well written and includes many examples. The manual has a tutorial and 
glossary of terms for ma beginner as well as a complete index! VIP 
Writer III includes VIP Speller. DISK $79.95 



VIP Writer owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer \\\ Disk for 
$49.95 * S3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and 552.95 total 



VIP Database III 

VIP Database III features selectable screen displays of 40, 64 or 80 
characters by 24 lines with choice of 64 foreground, background, hilite 
and cursor colors for EASY DATA ENTRY. It uses the CoCo 3's 
hardware screen and double clock speed to be the FASTEST database 
available! VIP Database III will handle as many records as will fit on your 
disks and is structured in a simple and easy to understand menu system 
with full prompting for easy operation. Your data is stored in records 
of your own design. All files are fully indexed for speed and efficiency, 
IN-MEMORY SORT of records is LIGHTNING FAST and provides for 
easy listing of names, figures, addresses, etc., in ascending or 
descending alphabetical or numeric order. Records can be searched for 
specific entries using multiple search criteria. The built-in mail-merge 
lets you sort and print mailing lists, print form letters, address 
envelopes - the list is endless. The built-in MATH PACKAGE even 
performs arithmetic operations and updates other fields. VIP 
Database III also has a print spooler and report generator with 
unlimited print tormat capabilities including embeddable control codes 
for use with ALL printers. DISK $69.95 



VIP Library 

/Writer Database Enhanced 

The VIP Library /WDE combines ail six popular VIP application 
programs - VIP Database III, VIP Writer III, VIP Speller, VIP Calc, VIP 
Terminal and VIP Disk-ZAP - into one program on one disk! The 
program is called VIP Desktop. From the desktop you have instant 
access to word processing with a spelling checker always in attendance, 
data management with mail merge, spreadsheet financial analysis, 
telecommunications and disk maintenance. * DISK $169.95 



VIP Library owners: Upgrade to the ViP Library /WOE lor 
369.90* + S3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and S92.90 total. 



VIP Database owners: Upgrade to ttie VIP Database III for 
$39.95 * $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $42.95 total 



*_ Future VI F Library upgrades available at reduced cost. 

All products run under RSDOS and are not copy protected. 

ID) Entteiripmsies 

©(503) 663-2865 ^POB 1233 Gresham. OR 97030 

Please add $3 for shipping and handling. Outside continental US add (4 SAi. COD orders add an 
additional S2.2S. Checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. Al other orders are shipped the same day. 






3*0 



it 



Mill 

Gerald E. Adams 

Gerald used CoCo Max 
III to illustrate this 
graphic scene. He is 
retired and lives in 
Bremen, Indiana. 



Sr 






Multichromatic Spheres 

Mark Sexton 

Mark, of Madera, California, used 
basic and the CoCo 3 for this 
interesting graphic, then 
compressed it with an ML 
program he developed. He is a 
senior in high school and is 
fascinated with graphic arts. 



°cfober 



1988 



We are taking "CoCo Gallery" 
to RAINBOWfest Princeton! 
See Page 117 for details. 




c« alei Sft> teo ' pl this 
hniN W dispiav someone eiwv^y 



. no qa^ e ^rJSivs a^ Teadv ?38& aopear* in 
means no J^^-W^ 

Sfe. * em tf 23* curator 




Dragon's Lair, 
Dragon Slayer 

Ke/f/? Schuler 

Using the CoCo 3 
and a program he 
wrote, Keith devel- 
oped this depiction 
of a mythological 
battle. He enjoys 
drawing, swimming 
and using his CoCo. 



HONORABLE MENTION 




Independence Hall 

Brad Bansner 

Brad, of Wyomissing, Pennsylvania, used Color 
Max Deluxe to create this illustration of Inde- 
pendence Hail, located in Philadelphia. 



Cm! 



it 



1 i 



Pirate 

Bill & Bob Flock 

basic and the CoCo 2 were 
used to develop this depiction. 

Brothers Bill and Bob live in 
Norwalk, Wisconsin, and enjoy 
working with computers and 
programming in basic. 




October 1988 



THE* 





.......... v;> ,. <v . „ ,,fi N ijg;».. f . 



■a» -jr.,-* f 



if* 1 t'/} i V/VM< , » ,, 'Vi»l* , i,'? t- •*•«*,•'"/'"•■"••'■•''.'• '■■j.f-\\^ .V'.'.. ^ .v.:-- s «■« '_-;.':*.•*■■%" < •••..><.']■ 



v r i.-'i.^ 1 :.f -.3- -'-r ''^.'.'.v: r,^ i ./.>'■":,<■•■•- y >-.J-* ^VBH 




t .t * • 




.» * i " V •* < ^ 



VMyi../ /-^ ••'»> -J.-. *- J • r*' J ,f ' -r v - ,•- •■"«-4 '-r* 1 •'' V ■ -' 5 ■ , ■ • 

. <.J # r.'-''^-"" / «-*.►'•' ;»;•.-• >»».*' *>, • •'«.*./'••••' » •» i ti". > •• * ••" 

♦i*.*V' ■;«*•.».*■ ftj*^""!.'*"-!'-* • *"■..:"•> .■ ->"**• ;.«.•»«» 



- ..>..•••;•;*•';:: - •-• >.c v f a-* \>».:; ■/ v. .■>■*-•*,.»•'•* - r > ----- A : - j-v^vf 





i; and inside out. Eiii^ent, -rotate 
your T V ' sc^^ 

want. Each time - yaU . dolroOe simple; * 
i : ;■ distorted or rotated as 'you K 



Stamped u\\o^ yxm alt; t 
'use; \Vith PMODE 3 ot 4 • ser^fis, ;si 



■01 



-1. •, -»•.(.. ' 



} ; seyeral sizable: d iifferences . If i^ aynS 

5 ^ ^..> :>.5T^ -V- i a^n^iJ^a^& ]p r o^x^anrx: that ^^^asily 11 
• v 75 Sbeepme; a part of basic iii^oixr ^4J^ r 

p^J^jEoGol; or 2, pr ^.^6urv GoCti 3.4':T0;: : r:'' : ^ 
5K^! ;S^ ^new com-. 

reptaee: BAsidV^ET and PUT i ; ; 
:statemeiits,;bUt;op^ 
■p^QuT'vv,. . ; .Thiey ?Hve; in: hi^^^^ and do 



•>-*'i»i ..»''v,i|t 



this saves valuable"; 



Memory fctf^oiir ppqgram; u:^ 



Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



For over 5 years now, Telewriter has been 
the #1 Color Computer word processor, 
both in popularity and in performance. 
Telewriter's near perfect mix of sophisti- 
cated professional features and a very natu- 
ral user interface, has earned it the highest 
praise in numerous magazines, and an in- 
tensely loyal following among tens of thou- 
sands of Color Computer users all over the 
world. 



HISTORY 



Throughout the history of the Color Com- 
puter, Telewriter has pioneered software 
breakthroughs that set the standards. 

In 1981, it was Telewriter 1.0 that first took 
the Color Computer's inadequate 32X16 all- 
uppercase display, and replaced it with a 
graphics-based 51X24 upper and lowercase 
display. 

A few years later, Telewriter-64 added high 
density 64X24 and 85X24 displays and ac- 
cess to the full 64K of the newer Color 
Computers. 



THE NEW AGE 



Today, Telewriter-64 is recognized as the 
standard Color Computer word processor. It 
runs on all Tandy Color Computers — from 
the original Color Computer 1, to the Color 
Computer 2, and 3. 

But the Color Computer 3 brings a whole 
new level of power to low cost computing 
and, so, a new Telewriter is here to put that 
power to work for you . We call it Telewriter- 
128. 



TFJJiWRITER-128 



You don't mess with a good thing, so 
Telewriter-128 is still Telewriter-64 at heart. 
The commands, and the user interface are 
essentially the same. If you know 
Telewriter-64, then you already know 
Telewriter-128. And, if you don't know 
Telewriter-64, you'll still have an easy time 
learning and using Telewriter-128. 



80 COLUMNS 



But there are major differences as well. First, 
Telewriter-128 uses the Color Computer 3's 
new 80 column screen display. 

This means, simply, that using Telewriter- 
128 on a low cost Color Compu ter 3 will look 
a lot like using a more expensive word 
processor on a much more expensive IBM 
PC, PS/2, or clone. 



SFEri) 



Second, Telewriter-128 is lightning fast. 
Telewriter-64 was fast in its own right, but, 
by accessing the Color Computer 3's video 
hardware directly, and by running the 
machine in double speed mode, Telewriter- 
128 is able to provide extremely fast scroll- 
ing and instant paging — functions whose 
speed is crucial to serious word processing. 

In this department, Telewriter-128 doesn't 
simply keep up with IBM-based word proc- 
essors — it generally surpasses them! 



EASE 



Third, Telewriter-128 adds a host of new 
features big and small, that make it even 
easier to use. 

Features like: Quick function key access to 
the editor or the menus — an instant on-line 
help screen summarizing all Telewriter 
commands and special characters — an 
option file where you store your personal set 
of format and screen settings so you only 
have to set them once! 

Then, there's a quick save feature which 
allows you to save all your current work 
without leaving the editor. There's a simple 
way to cursor through the disk directory and 
read in a file by just hitting ENTER. And 
there's more. 



NEW POWER 



Telewriter-64 always had the power to 
handle any kind of serious writing, from 
letters to textbooks. But, here too, 
Telewriter-128 adds major features. 



Like Macros — which let you insert whole 
words or phrases (even sets of control codes 
or format commands) into your text, with a 
single keypress. And every time you power 
up Telewriter-128, the macro definitions are 
automatically loaded*, so they're always 
there. 

Then there's a Print Preview feature th?t 
shows you, on-screen, the way your printed 
text will look — with margins, headers, 
centering, justification, page numbering, 
and page breaks. This guarantees letter 
perfect documents every time, and makes 
tasks like widow/orphan line elimination, a 
breeze. 



TELEWRITER-64 ok TELEWRITER-128 



We could go on listing features, but the point 
is this: If you own a Color Computer, you al- 
ready have the hardware for the most 
powerful, low cost word processor in town. 
All you need now is to add the heart and 
soul: 

Telewriter-64, for the Color Computer 1 
and 2, costs $59-95 on disk, $49.95 on 
cassette. 

Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 
costs $79-95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

To order by Mastercard or Visa call (619) 
755-1258 anytime, or send check or money 
order plus $2 shipping (Californiansadd 6% 
sales tax) to: 

COGNITEC 

704 Nob Ave. 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

To upgrade from Telewriter-64 to 
Telewriter-128, return your original disk or 
cassette with $39.95. (Add $10 if you're also 
upgrading from cassette to disk. Deduct $10 
with proof of Oct '87 - Feb '88, purchase of 
Telewriter-64.) 

When I first got Telewriter-64 last year, 
I was in heaven. I couldn't believe the 
program's versatility and ease of use. 

-The RAINBOW, Oct. 1985 



TELEWRITER-64 FEATURES: Compatibility with any printer that works with 
the Color Computer; embedded control codes for underlining, boldface, sub/ 
superscript, variable fonts; format commands for headers, centering, margin and 
spacing changes anywhere in the document; Format menu to set margins, 
spacing, page numbering, BAUD rate, lines per page, justification; Chain 
printing for one shot printing of multi-file documents. Fast, full-screen editor 
with wordwrap, block copy/move/delete, global search and replace, wild card 
search, fast 4-way auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward 
paging, text alignment, tabs, error protection, word and line counter. Insert or 
delete text anywhere on the screen. Simple, easy to remember commands. 
Optional ASCII files for compatibility with spell checkers, terminal programs, 



and BASIC. Load, save, append, partial save files to disk or cassette. Kill, rename 
and list disk files. Cassette verify and auto-retry on error. 
TELEWRITER- 128 - ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Print preview from editor; 
multiple copy print; footers; hanging indents; cursor thru disk directory to load, 
append, rename and kill files; quick file save from editor; keyclick; key repeat; i{j?Sf^ 
true block move; 24, 25, or 28 line screen; 40 or 80 column screen; dual speed ■ ■ ■ « ■ 
cursor; on-line help; overstrike mode; word delete; wordwrap at margin; user Jf^f^ 
definable macros; nested macros; instant status window for information on seal 
cursor position, word count, etc.; instant function key access to menus or editor; 
options menu for setting character and screen colors, key repeat and delay rates, 
definable foreign symbols. 



IBM and PS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines Inc. 'disk version only 



A 3d, SuperStamper remains 
USIC until you reset or 
the computer. It will not 
hines without Extended 
memory less than 64K. 
_^yrcrrits - only on PMODE 3 or 4 screens 
and does not work on the high resolu- 
tion screens of the Color Computer 3. 
However, CoCo 3 owners can still use 
SuperStamper on their PMODE 3 or 4 
screens (provided they switch to CoCo 
2 mode — more on this later). 

How It Works 

Like the GET and PUT commands, 
SGET and SPLIT allow you to specify a 
rectangle on your graphics screen for 
storage. Unlike the GET and PUT com- 
mands, however, SGET and SPUT allow 
you to specify three points instead of 
two. This turns the rectangle into a true 
parallelogram. 

A parallelogram is a four-sided figure 
in which opposite sides are parallel. 
Squares and rectangles are special kinds 
of parallelograms, having right angles 
at the corners; but the corners don't 
have to be right angles in order for the 
opposite sides to remain parallel. By 
"SGETting" a piece of your graphics 
screen in a rectangular parallelogram 
and then "SPUTting" it in a parallelo- 
gram of another size, shape and orien- 
tation, you can distort, invert, shrink, 
enlarge or rotate whatever graphic 
elements were in the original parallelo- 
gram. 

SuperStamper performs a beautiful 
mathematical ballet that recalculates 
the position of every pixel within your 
SGET parallelogram, and with SPUT, 
distorts the picture just as if it were 
made of rubber. The program is made 
even more versatile by its facility to 
lengthen or shorten the sides of the 
parallelogram, thereby enlarging or 
shrinking the picture. 

You can shorten a picture in one 
dimension while elongating it in the 
other, giving the image a stretched 
appearance. Finally, you can rotate 
your parallelogram so that objects 
appear right-side-up, upside-down — 
or any rotational angle in between. 

Once you have used the SGET com- 
mand to specify your graphics parallel- 
ogram, you may stamp it all over the 
screen as many times as you want, using 
a newly defined parallelogram each 
time you SPUT it. With this stamping 
feature, you can draw a small picture in 
one part of the screen and use that 
picture to create many screenfuls of 
striking images. And because SGET and 
SPUT are compatible with all aspects of 



BASIC, you can use SuperStamper as 
part of any BASIC graphics program. 

SuperStamper allows you to SGET 
any part of your PMODE 3 or 4 screen 
up to 256 pixels wide by up to 128 pixels 
deep. Any attempt to SGET or SPUT with 
larger numbers will give unexpected 
results. 



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Usage Syntax 

The syntax for using SGET and SPUT 
in your BASIC statements is as follows: 

SGET (flX,FlY)-(BX,BY)-(CX,CY) 
SPUT (FlX,FlY)-(BX,BY)-(CX,CY) 

X specifies the horizontal position of 
each of the three points that define the 
parallelogram — a number from 0 to 
255; 0 is on the left side of the screen. 

Y specifies the vertical position of 
each of the three points — a number 
from 0 to 191; 0 is at the top of the 
screen, and 191 is at the bottom. AX , AY 
specifies the position of Point A. BX , BY 
specifies the position of Point B. CX , CY 
specifies the position of Point C. 

Note that you do not have to specify 
an array or an action as you do in the 
GET and PUT commands. SuperStamper 
uses its own secret array hidden away 
in high memory, so you won't have to 
sacrifice any memory that would other- 
wise be used for your own program. 

The SGET command will "lasso" any 
part of your graphics picture by draw- 
ing an imaginary parallelogram around 
it. The three arguments that follow 
SGET specify the three points on the 
screen that define the parallelogram: 

SGET (Point A)-(Point B)-(Point C). 

The computer always draws four 
imaginary lines. The first is drawn 
between points A and B, and the second 
between points B and C. These two lines 
define the parallelogram. The other two 
imaginary lines are drawn opposite and 
parallel to the first two so as to complete 
the parallelogram. They meet at imagi- 
nary Point D, which is always diago- 
nally across from Point B. (Note that no 



line is drawn between points A and C.) 

You may choose any shape parallel- 
ogram for "SGETting;" however, in most 
cases you will probably want to define 
a rectangle, as it is the easiest shape to 
keep track of. Once you have defined 
your SGET parallelogram, the computer 
copies it into a secret buffer where it is 
stored in a "standard" form for later 
stamping with the SPUT command. 

SPUT has the same syntax as SGET. 
The first pair of coordinates following 
the SPUT define Point A; the second pair 
define Point B; and the third, Point C. 
The main thing to remember when 
using SPUT is that graphics elements 
that were near any given point when you 
defined your SGET parallelogram al- 
ways remain near that point no matter 
where they are SPUT. For example, let's 
say you have a picture of a man with his 
arms and legs outstretched. His right 
hand is gloved and his left is not. You 
SGET him by specifying Point A near his 
right foot (the lower-left corner of the 
SGET rectangle); Point B near his right 
hand (the upper-left corner of the 
rectangle) and Point C near his left hand 
(the upper-right corner of the rectan- 
gle). Now you can stamp him with the 
SPUT command. If you specify Point A 
(the first pair of coordinates following 
the SPUT command) to be the upper-left 
corner of your SPUT rectangle, leaving 
points B and C to be the lower-left and 
lower-right corners, respectively, your 
man will appear upside down and back- 
wards (inverted), just as if he were 
viewed in a mirror placed under his feet. 
His left hand now wears the glove 
instead of his right hand (see the figure 
for a screen dump of Listing 2's demo). 

You can elongate your stick figure by 
specifying SPUT points farther apart 
than they were in the original SGET 
command. You could elongate him 
right to left while shortening him up and 
down. You can rotate him by having 
three points draw a non-vertical line 
between points A and B, and specifying 
a line between points B and C at a right 
angle to the line between points A and 
B. You can skew him by making Line 
AB non-vertical, but keeping line BC 
horizontal. And, of course, you can 
stamp him with no distortion at all. 

Keying In for CoCo 3 

Before trying to key in or run Super- 
Stamper on a CoCo 3, you must put it 
into CoCo 2 mode by typing the follow- 
ing lines: 

10 POKE &HFFDE,0 
20 POKE 113,0 
30 EXEC 40999 



30 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



Program Organization 

Listing 1 is the utility that boots the 
Super Stamper algorithm. It should be 
saved under the filename SUPRSTMP 
-BRS. Its function is twofold. First, it 
transfers the ROM into the all-RAM 
mode and installs the SuperStamper 
algorithm into the BASIC interpreter, 
giving it the ability to understand the 
SGET and SPLIT commands, Second, it 
gives birth to a machine language 
"clone" of itself that can be saved to disk 
or tape and later reloaded to perform 
the same functions, only much faster. 

Lines 1000 through 1170 contain the 
algorithm itself. Every character in 
these lines must be correct or Super- 
Stamper mil not work. For this reason, 
I have included check sums so the 
computer can tell you if you have made 
an error. Do not renumber these lines! 

The DRTfl lines do not contain the 
letter '0*1 They do, however, contain 
many zeros! If you get an error message 
when running the program, check to see 
if you have included an 'O' instead of 
a zero. It is helpful to know that these 
lines contain only the digits 0 through 
9 and the letters A through F and that 
all the lines are the same length except 
for Line 1170. 



The ML Clone 

When executed, the ML clone 
transfers the computer into the all- 
RAM mode and installs the algorithm. 
Note that the ML clone is not the same 
program you keyed in; it is created by 
SUPRSTMP and lives in a special place in 
high memory protected from basic by 
Line 70 (CLERR200 , &H7E00). After 
creating the ML clone, SUPRSTMP will 
prompt you for a save to disk or tape. 
When you answer the prompt, the clone 
will be saved as STPMP.BIN. Once 
saved, you may install SuperStamper 
very quickly by loading and executing 
STRMP - BIN. You must use the following 
boot to load and execute: 

10 CLERR 200,&H7E00 
20 LORDM"STRMP" 

(CLORDM for tape users) 
30 EXEC 

40 CLERR 200,&H7FFF 

Note that you cannot key in or run 
any program that contains SPUT or 
SGET unless you have first installed the 
SuperStamper algorithm by either 
running SUPRSTMP or by executing 
STRMP -BIN. The computer cannot un- 
derstand the syntax of SPUT or SGET 



unless the operating system has been 
properly modified. The demo is no 
exception. Therefore, key in SUPRSTMP 
first and create an easily accessible copy 
of STRMP -BIN before beginning work 
on the demo. 

It is important to your understanding 
of the program that you key in and 
study Listing 2. The listing is very much 
a part of the documentation for Super- 
Stamper and a graphic demonstration 
of what happens when you relocate 
points A, B and C. It contains examples 
of how to create mirror images and 
skewed, stretched, inverted and rotated 
stampings. 

The REM statements attached to each 
SPUT line explain what it does. The 
important thing to note is not the exact 
location of each point, but the relative 
position of points A, B and C in each 
SPUT statement. 

The SGET is always done in a rectan- 
gle with Point A in the lower-left corner, 
Point B in the upper-left and C in the 
upper-right. If your SPUT statement 
places Point A in the lower-right corner, 
Point B in the upper-right and Point C 
in the upper-left, you get a mirror image 
(see Line 540). If you leave Point A at 
the lower-left, but displace points B and 



in 
1 



A DISK DIRECTORY UTILITY 

WHAT WILL 




by Roy C. Pierce 
HELLO DO 



1988 



Display Alphabetically Sorted Directory of 

any Drive. (0-3) 
Print a Hardcopy of Sorted Directory w/Date 

and Disk Name. 
Run ANY BASIC Program with Ease. 
RUNS ON ANY COCO. 
(32K Disk Extended BASIC Required) 
Single Kay Stroke Commands. 



Easy to Read Display. 

ALL BAS IC so it won't Mess up your System. 

SUPER FAST OPERATION. 

Reads Any Drive at Will. 

Low Disk Overhead - Only 1 Gran. 

Easy to Copy to All your Disks, Comes with 

Handy DISKINIT/ Utility for 

Aulobooting HELLO/BAS. 




Challenging Two Player Games 

ADI OTHELLO 






by Roy C. Pierce (c) 1988 

CONNECT 5 



FAST AND FUN FOR ALL AGES 
EASY TO RUN 
ALL BASIC COMPLETELY LISTABLE 



INDIVIDUAL ORDERS $19.95 U.S. $22.95 CDN. 

INTERNATIONAL $22.95 U.S. 
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SHIPPING & HANDLING INCLUDED 

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SOFTWARE PH: (403) 474-8435 



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No 1200 baud restriction. Baud rates to 19,200 baud! 
Compatible with all RSDOS and OS-9 software that 
uses the Radio Shack Deluxe RS232 Pack. 
PRICED TO FIT YOUR BUDGET? 
TELEPAK 

For use with Coco 1 or multipack only, taking 
advantage of their built-in power supplies. 



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For use with ANY CoCo in any configuration. 

Even with ft F-CWe/ 



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October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 31 



C to the right, your graphics will be 
skewed in that direction. The box 
around the stick figure is 80 pixels wide 
and 60 pixels high. Note that in some 
of the lines I have allowed basic to add 
these dimensions right inside the paren- 
theses. The term ( 0 , 65+60 ) is the same 
as (0,125). 

You can use any numerical expres- 
sion or variable inside the parentheses. 

Program Quirks 

Keep in mind that you are working 



with digitalized images whose resolu- 
tion depends upon the exact size and 
location of each pixel. Whenever you 
shrink an image using Super Stamper, 
you will lose some detail. Because each 
pixel is longer up and down than it is 
right to left, rotations will produce some 
distortion that you may be able to 
minimize by adjusting the exact size and 
position of each SPUT point. 

You may be surprised at some of your 
results. When you skew a picture, you 
may find that it wraps around to the 



opposite side of the screen or is partly 
off the screen because you inadvertently 
placed Point D (the last corner of the 
parallelogram that you didn't specify in 
your SPLIT statement) outside the 256- 
by-128 pixel limit. 



(Questions or comments regarding 
these programs may be directed to the 
author at P.O. Box 1094, Townsend, 
MA 01469. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing for a reply.) □ 




80 1 

330 56 

1080 34 

END 250 



* 
* 



Listing 1: SUPRSTMP 

5 REM COCO 3 USERS MUST SWITCH 

TO COCO 2 MODE BEFORE KEY- 
ING IN OR RUNNING THIS 
PROGRAM. TYPE 
POKE&HFFDE,0 : POKE113 , 0 : 
EXEC&HA027 

10 REM ************************* 

20 REM * SUPERSTAMPER 
30 REM * BY 
40 REM * JEREMY SPILLER 
50 REM * COPYRIGHT 1988 
60 REM ************************* 

70 CLEAR 1000 / &H7E00 
80 PO=&H7E00 

90 FOR X-17 TO 0 STEP -1 
100 CLS : PRINT "COUNTDOWN =";X 
110 PRINT "LINE"; (17-X) *10+1000 
120 READ A$:CS=0 

130 FOR Y=l TO LEN(A$)-3 STEP 2: 

A=VAL ( " &H"+MID$ (A$ , Y , 2 ) ) : POKE PO 

,A:PO=PO+l:CS=CS+A:NEXT Y 

140 IF RIGHT$(HEX$(CS) ,3)<>RIGHT 

$(A$ / 3) THEN PRINT"ERROR":STOP 

150 NEXT X 

160 EXEC &H7E00 

170 CLS: PRINT "SUPERSTAMPER HAS N 
OW BEEN IN- STALLED AS A PART 
OF BASIC": PRINT 

180 PRINT "IT HAS ALSO BEEN STORE 
D IN MEMORY AS A MACHINE LA 

NGUAGE CLONE WHICH CAN BE SAV 
ED TO DISKOR TAPE, ONCE SAVED, 
THIS CLONEMAY BE USED TO INSTALL 
SUPER- STAMPER WITHOUT RUNNIN 
G SUPRSTMP . BAS . 

190 PRINT : LINE INPUT"PLEASE PREP 



ARE DEVICE AND PRESS (D)ISK OR ( 
T) APE AND (ENTER) WHEN READY, 

YOU MAY ALSO PRESS (BREAK) TO 
QUIT.";A$ 

200 IF A$="D" THEN S AVEM" STAMP . B 
IN",&H7E00,&H7FB8,&H7E00 ELSE IF 

A$=»T" THEN GOSUB 330 ELSE 180 
210 PRINT 
220 CLS 

230 PRINT"TO INSTALL SUPER STAMP 
, PLACE THIS AT THE BEGINING O 
F YOUR PROGRAMS : " 
240 PRINT 

250 PRINT" 10 CLEAR 200,&H7E00" 

260 PRINT"20 "; 

270 IF A$="T" THEN PRINT"C"; 

280 PRINT "LOADM"+CHR$(34) ; 

290 PRINT" STAMP "+CHR$ (34) 

300 PRINT "30 EXEC" 

310 PRINT "40 CLEAR 200,&H7FFF" 

320 CLEAR 1000 , &H7FFF : END 

3 30 CS AVEM" STAMP. BIN" , &H7E00 , &H7 

FB8 , &H7E00 : RETURN 

340 REM THE FOLLOWING DATA 

CONTAINS ONLY ZEROS, NO 

LETTER "OH" 1 S 
1000 DATA 1A508E8000A6846384A184 
27036384397 FFFDEEC8 4 7 FFFDFEDD0E 
1010 DATA 818CE00025F18E013E8602 
A780CCE015ED81C621ED81C6066FC3E 
1020 DATA 805A26FB8EE015338D000E 
C6C010AEC110AF815A26F71CAF39B0C 
1030 DATA 534745D4535055D4E0A6E0 
7E80E2 8EE01D7EADD49602D604DDD9E 
1040 DATA 008EE0028D038EE00B6F01 
6F03E604E0841D58ED04E606E0029DD 
1050 DATA 1D58ED068680A708399602 
D604DD008EE0028D1426F28EE00BA47 
1060 DATA 8D0D960BD60D9702D70486 
80970A39EC04E384ED84EC06E302B11 
1070 DATA ED026A0839170098A6C08D 
128D108D0E8D0C1183F18525F04F98D 
1080 DATA 1F8B1CAF395F46594659D7 
143 402 8D2B8DAC3 582 8D718D148D940 
1090 DATA 128D108D0EA7C01183F185 
25F04F1F8B1CAF3934028D378D8C9E0 



32 



THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



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Send me a 
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computer catalog. 

Mail To: Radio Shack 
Dept. 89-A-320 
300 One Tandy Center 
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The Complete Rainbow Guide 
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1100 DATA 350208144608144639DC00 
C1C024F91E8958445644564456F386E 
1110 DATA 00BA1F02D600C403041459 
041459588EE165A6A43AAA80A48495C 
1120 DATA A7A439DC001E8958445644 
564456F300BA1F02E6A4960084039A2 
1130 DATA 270548584A26FCD714398D 
33B7E00FF7E0118D3C8D29B7E00BACB 



1140 DATA F7E00DB7E002F7E0048D2C 
8D19B7E006F7E0081A507FFF4086CE1 
1150 DATA E01F8BCEE18517FEDF397E 
B277BDB26ABDB7343404BDB26735D56 
1160 DATA 04962C4439C6ACBDB26F39 
003F80BF407FC0FF00CF20EF10DFB95 
1170 DATA 30FF00F308FB04F70CFF00 
FC02FE01FD03FF204D994 





\S 120 110 

250 153 

350 188 



530 3 

640 107 

END 11 



Listing 2: STMPDEMO 

5 REM COCO 3 USERS MUST SWITCH 

TO COCO 2 MODE BEFORE KEY- 
ING THIS PROGRAM IN. TYPE 
POKE &HFFDE , 0 : POKE 1 1 3 , jt : 
EXEC&HAJ327 

8 REM BEFORE KEYING THIS LISTING 
INTO YOUR COCO, THE SUPER- 
STAMPER ALGORITHM MUST BE 
RESIDENT. YOU MAY DO THIS 
BY FIRST RUNNING LISTING 
#1 (SUPRSTMP.BAS) , OR BY 
EXECUTING THE ML CLONE 
(STAMP. BIN) 

2j3 REM FAILURE TO DO THIS WILL 
RESULT IN SYNTAX ERRORS 
AND NONSENSE LISTINGS! 

3J3 CLEAR 1J3J3J3, &H7EJ30 

4j3 REM ************************* 

5j3 REM * SUPERSTAMPER DEMO * 
6P REM * BY * 

7J3 REM * JEREMY SPILLER * 



Mouse Tales 

By Logan Ward 




;K?twli,L oiSKSO fOTJ HSU 



80 REM * COPYRIGHT 1988 * 

90 REM ************************* 

100 CLS: PRINT" IN ORDER TO RUN AN 
Y PROGRAM WHICH USES 1 SGET 1 

OR 'SPUT 1 , YOU MUST FIRST INS 
TALL THE SUPERSTAMPER ALGOR 

ITHM BY EITHERRUNNING SUPRSTMP.B 
AS OR BY EXECUTING STAMP. BI 

N." 

110 PRINT 

120 LINE INPUT"PLEASE PREPARE YO 
UR DEVICE AND INPUT (T) APE OR ( 
D)ISK TO LOAD AND EXECUTE STAMP 
.BIN, OR (A)BORT IF YOU HA 

VE ALREADY RUN SUPRSTMP . BAS . 

";A$ 

130 IF A$-"T" THEN CLOADM 11 STAMP. 

BIN"ELSE IF A$="D"THEN LOADM"STA 

MP. BIN"ELSE GOTO 150 

140 EXEC: GOTO 160 

150 IF A$="A"THEN GOTO 160 ELSE 

GOTO 100 

160 PRINT : PRINT STRING$ (31, "-") : 
INPUT "CAN YOUR TV SUPORT ARTIFIC 
IAL COLORS (Y/N) " ; A$ : IF A$="Y" 
THEN PMODE 4,1: SCREEN l,l:PMODE 
3,1 ELSE IF A$="N" THEN PMODE 3 
,1: SCREEN 1,0 ELSE 160 
170 PCLS 

U3 ; L6 ; U3 ; R6 ; BD6 ; BR4 " 
R6 ; D3 ; L6 ; BR 6 ; BD3 ; BR4 " 
R6 ; D3 ; L6 ;M+6 , +3 ; BR4 
M+4 , +6 ;M+4 , -6 ; D6 ; BR4" 
BD6;R6;BR4" 
R6 ; BD3 ; L6 ; BD3 ; R6 ; BR4 " 
240 Y$="BR4 ;U3 ;M-3 , -3 ;BR7 ;M-4 , +3 
; BD3 ; BR 7 " 

250 DRAWBM74 , 12 "+S$+" ;U6 ; BD6 ;R6 

;U6;BR4 ;BD6"+P$+E$+R$ 

260 DRAW S$+"BR4;U6;BL3;R8;BD6;B 

R3 ;U6 ; R6 ; D6 ; BU3 ; L6 ; BD3 ; BR11 "+M$+ 

P$+E$+R$ 

270 DRAW"BM12 4 , 2 2 ; L6 ; U6 ; R6 ; D6 ; BU 
3 ; L6 ; BD3 ; BR10"+Y$ 

280 DRAW" BM9 9,30; D3 ; R6 ; U6 ; BR3 ; BD 
6"+E$+R$+E$+M$+Y$ 

290 DRAW"BM99, 44"+S$+P$+"U6;BR6; 
BD6"+L$+L$+E$+R$ 

300 SGET(74,13)-(74,5)-(200,5) :R 
EM GETS THE WORD "SUPERSTAMPER" 



180 
190 

200 
210 
220 
230 



S$="R6 
P$="U6 
R$="U6 
M$="U6 
L$="U6 
E$="U6 



36 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 



310 SPUTfj3,85)-(20,65)-(25j3,65) : 
REM STAMPS WORD ELONGATED & SKEW 
ED 

320 SPUT(j5 / 9j3)-(2j3,lljJ)-(250,110 
) :REM STAMPS WORD UPSIDEDOWN &BA 
CKWARD (INVERTED) AND ELONGATED 
& SKEWED 

33J3 SGET(97,46)-(97,16)-(166,16) 

34j3 SFUT(50, 19)8) -(50, 110) -(220,1 
10) 

350 GOSUB 670 

360 REM DRAWS FIGURE IN BOX 

370 PCLS:LINE(88,125)-(168,65) ,P 
SET, B 

380 DRAW»C2BM92 , 123 ;M+4 , -6 ;M+4 , + 
6;BM-2,-2;L2" 

390 DRAW "BM92,67;D6;R8;U6;L8;BD 
3 ; R8 " 

400 DRAW"BM164,67;L8;D6;R8" 

410 DRAW" BM1 2 8 , 8 2 ; D 1 8 ; M- 10 , + 20 ; B 

R20;M-10,-20" 

420 CIRCLE (128, 74) ,8 

430 LINE(114,86)-(142,86) , PSET 

440 CIRCLE (112, 86) ,4,2 

450 PAINT (112,86) ,2,2 

460 CIRCLE (144, 86) ,4,3 

470 PAINT (144, 86) ,3,3 

480 LINE(114, 122)-(120, 118) , PSET 

,BF 

490 COLOR3 

500 LINE(136, 122)-(142, 118) , PSET 
,BF 

510 SGET(88,126)-(88,65)-(170,65 
) : REM GETS STICK FIGURE 
520 PCLS 

530 SPUT(0, 62) - (0 ,0) - (82 ,0) :REM 

NO DISTORTION 
540 SPUT( 168, 62) -(168,0) -(84,0) : 
REM STAMPS AS MIRROR IMMAGE 
550 SPUT(0,65)-(0,65+60)-(82,65+ 
60) :REM INVERTED (UPSIDEDOWN & B 
ACKWARDS ) 

555 SPUT(84,65)-(168,65)-(168,12 
6) : REM SIDEWAYS (90 DEGREE ROTAT 
ION) 

560 SPUT(0,191)-(0,129)-(255,129 

) :REM ELONGATED RIGHT-LEFT 

570 SPUT(172,127W172,0)-(255,0 

) :REM ELONGATED UP-DOWN 

580 REM THE FOLLOWING DEMONSTRAT 

ES SKEWING (TILTING) & ROTATION 

590 GOSUB 670 : PCLS :SPUT(0, 127) -( 

0,0)-(255,0) :REM ENLARGED ONLY 

600 GOSUB 670 : PCLS :SPUT(0, 127) -( 

50,0) - (255,0) :REM ENLARGED & SL 

IGHT SKEW 

610 GOSUB 670 : PCLS :SPUT(0, 127) -( 
128,0) -(255,0) :REM ENLARGED & LA 
RGER SKEW 

620 GOSUB 670 : PCLS :SPUT (200, 0)-( 
200, 127) - (0, 127) :REM 180 DEGREE 



ROTATION (UPSIDEDOWN) 
630 GOSUB 670:PCLS:SPUT(128,50)- 
(190, 110) -(128, 160) :REM 135 DEGR 
EE ROTATION 

640 GOSUB 670:PCLS:SPUT(42,95)-( 

170, 31) -(212 , 95) :REM ELONGATED & 

45 DEGREE ROTATION 

650 SOUND 150, 5: SOUND 100,10 

660 GOSUB 670:GOTO 680 

670 FOR X=220 TO 255:SOUND X,1:N 

EXT : RETURN 

680 CLS:PRINT"NOW YOU MAY TRY IN 
SERTING YOUR OWN POINTS A, B AN 
D C. YOU DO NOT NEED PARENTHES 
ES. TYPE THE X AND Y COORDINATE 
S SEPARATED BYA COMMA. REMEMBER 
THAT THE TOTAL HEIGHT CANNO 

T EXCEED 128 PIXELS ": PRINT 
690 PRINT"EXAMPLE AX, AY ? 0,127" 
: PRINT 

700 INPUT "AX, AY"; AX, AY 
710 INPUT"BX,BY";BX,BY 
720 INPUT"CX,CY";CX,CY 
725 IF A$="N"THEN PMODE 3,1:SCRE 
EN 1,0 ELSE IF A$="Y"THEN PMODE 
4,1: SCREEN 1,1: PMODE 3,1 
730 PCLS:SPUT(AX,AY)-(BX,BY) -(CX 
CY) 

740 GOSUB 670: GOTO 680 



FILE TRANSFER UTILITIES 

You asked for it at the Chicago RainbowFest - 

RLE TRANSFER UTILrriES NOW HANDLE RSDOS DISKS! 

Need to transfer text files to and from PC (MSDOS). RSDOS and FLEX disks into 
your CoCo (OS-9) system? Have text fHes on a PC (MSDOS ) system at work and 
want to work on them at home on your CoCo? 

With GCS File Transfer Utilities you just place the PC (MSDOS), RSDOS or FLEX 
disk into your CoCo disk drive - enter a simple command and the file is copied into 
a CoCo OS-9 file. File transfer back to PC (MSDOS), RSDOS and FLEX disks is 
just as simple. 



PCDR 
PCDUMP 
PC READ 
PCWRITE 

PCRENAME 

PCDELETE 

PCFORMAT 



Extensive 
Options 



directory of PC disk 
display PC disk sector 
read PC file 
write file to PC disk 

rename PC file 
delete PC file 
format PC disk 



RSDfR 
RSDUMP 
RSREAD 
RSWRfTE 

FLEXDIR 
FLEXDUMP 
FLEXREAD 
FLEXWRfTE 



directory of RSDOS disk 
display RSDOS disk sector 
read file from RSDOS disk 
write file to RSDOS disk 

directory of FLEX disk 
display FLEX disk sector 
read FLEX file 
write file to FLEX disk 



Single, double sided disks. 40 or 80 track floppy drives. 
8 or 9 sectors. First level sub-directories - PC (MSDOS). 
FLEX transfers binary files also. 



Requires OS-9 (Level 2 for MultiVue), 2 drives (one can be hard), MultiVue 
for MultiVue version, SDISK (SDISK3 lor MultiVue) - see D.P. 
Johnson ad for SDISK 

GSC File Transfer Utilities for CoCo - MultiVue version $54.95 

GSC File Transfer Utilities for CoCo - Standard version $44.95 

All diskettes are CoCo OS-9 format. Orders must be prepaid or COD, VISA/MC 
accepted, add $1 .50 SAM, additional charge for COD. 



GRANITE COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

Route 2 Box 445 Hiilsboro, N.H. 03244 
(603) 464-3650 

OS-9 is a frademark of Microware Systems Corporation and Motorola Inc. 
MS-DOS » a trademark of Microsoft Corp. FLEX is a trademark of TSC, he. 



RAINBOW 

CWUICMPON 



October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 37 



*** *** *** *** COLOR COMPUTER III SOFTWARE *** *** *** *** 



CBASIC III EDITOR/COMPILER 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer III BASIC COMPILER!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient machine language programs and you don't 
want to spend the next few years trying to learn how to write them in Assembly 
language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!!! 

CBASIC III is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full advantage 
of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K RAM, without 
having to spend years trying to learn assembly language programming. CBASIC 
III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you are 
already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Res Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). We even 
added advanced commands not available in Basic to give you a level of control 
only avialable to very advanced Machine Language Programmers. Plus we made it 
exceptionally easy to use, not like some other compilers. CBASIC III is the 
friendliest and easiest compiler available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced Basic 
or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs without having to 
worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory allocations and so on, because 
CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. For Advanced users, CBASIC III 
will let you control every aspect of your program, even generating machine code 
directly in a program easily, 

CBASIC III features well over 150 Compiled Basic Commands and Functions 
that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, Tape, Printer and 
Screen I/O. It supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play 
and String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/Put, H/Play and H/DRAW, all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable 
printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
PRINT, INPUT, INKEY, GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands. 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the Color 
Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and install 2 Ultra 
Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation, Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 5 1 2K of memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8K blocks 
and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor which allows 
you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a full featured editor 
designed specifically for writing Basic programs. It has block move and copy, 
program renumbering, automatic line number generation, screen editing, printer 
control and much more. 

The documentation provided with CBASIC III is an 8 1/2 by It Spiral Bound 
book which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. We went to 
great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and understand, but 
complete and comprehensive enough for even the most sophisticated user. 

CBASIC III is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and 
well worth the investment. You can buy a less expensive compiler for your 
CoCo-3, and then find out how difficult it is to use, or how limited its features are. 
Then you'll wish you had bought CBASIC III in the first place. Dollar for dollar, 
CBASIC III gives you more than any other compiler available. If you can find a 
better CoCo-3 Basic Compiler then buy it!!! 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

DATAPACK III PLUS V1.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 

AUTOPILOT & AUTO-LOG PROCESSORS 
X-MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT-I00 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

" No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port. 

• 8 Display Formats, 32/40/64/80 columns at 192 or 225 Res. 

• 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display & Disk. 

• ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 
" Directly record receive data to a disk file (Data Logging). 

' VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

• VT-100/52 cursor keys, position, insert/delete, PF & Alt. keys. 
' Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates. 

• Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

• 9 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers. 
" Programmable Printer rates from 110 to 9600 baud. 

• Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 

• Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

• Freeze Display & Review information On Line with no data loss. 
" Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

• Built in 2 Drive Ramdisk for 512K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R.S. Modem- Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128K & Disk, $59.95 

EDT/ASM III 

128/512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler. It is 
designed to take advantage of the new features available in the CoCo-3 with either 
128K or 512Kof memory. It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 
lines in 192 or 225 Resolution, so you use the best display mode whether you are 
using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your display. Plus you can 
select any foreground or background colors or even monochrome display modes. 
It will even support 512K by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fasl Ramdisk for 
lightning fast assembly of program source code larger than memory. There is also 
a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug your assembled programs. 
EDT/ASM III has the most powerful, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/Assembler package for the Color Computer. 

• Supports Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

• Full Screen line editing with immediate line update. 

• Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

" Load & Save standard ASCII formatted file formats. 

• Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM III features include: 

• Supports the full 6809 instruction set & cross assembles 6800 code. 

• Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

• Supports Disk Library file (include) up to 9 levels deep. 

• Supports standard Motorola assembler directives. 

• Allows multiple values for FCB & FDB directives (unlike R.S. EDT/ASM) 

• Allows assembly from the Editor Buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 128K & Disk $59.95 



TEXTPRO IV 

The ADVANCED COCO-3 Word Processing System" 

• 9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 

• On Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 

• Up to 8 Proportional Character Sets Supported with Justification. 

• Up to 80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function keysets. 

• Fully Buffered keyboard accepts data even duiring disk access. 

• Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system configuration. 

• 8 Pre-Defined Printer function commands & 10 Programmable ones. 

• Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

• Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 

■ Completely Automatic Justification, Centering. Flush left & right. 
" Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

• Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 

• Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 512K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most advanced word processing system available for the 
COCO-3, designed for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is 
not like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
short documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional spacing, 
then most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simpler word processors. 
But, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is what your looking for. It works 
in a totally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
formatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
There are no time comsuming, and often frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
control at all times. You can see what the formatted document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, 
Italic, Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters right on the 
screen. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts. 
take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKI DATA 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All the character sets used on this AD are 
proportional spaced characters, all centering, justification, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

Requires 118K & Disk $89.95 

HI-RES III Screen Commander 

The DISPLAY vou wanted but didn't get on your CoCo-3 

" 54 Different Character Sizes available from 14 to 212 cpl. 

• Bold, Italic, Underline, Subscript, Superscript and Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad width characters. 

• Scroll Protect form 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

• Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN 3 mode. 

• PRINT @ is available in all character sizes & styles. 

' Programmable Automatic Key repeat for fast editing. 

• Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

• Selectable Character & Background color. 

• Uses only 4K of Extended (2nd 64K) or Basic RAM. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES III will improve the standard display capabilities of the Color 
Computer 3, even the 40 and 80 column displays have several features missing. 
For example, you can't use PRINT @ or have different character sizes on the same 
screen, even when mixing text and graphics with the HPRINT command. Hi-RES 
III can give you the kind of display you always dreamed about having on your 
CoCo-3 t with a wide variety of display options that you can easily use with your 
Basic or ML programs. 

HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color Basic and its operation 
is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the normal screen display with an 
extremely versatile display package. With the full control code keyboard, you can 
control many of HI-RES III extended functions with just a couple of simple 
keystrokes. 

Requires 128K Tape or Disk $34,95 

512K RAMDISK & MEMORY TESTER 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 ULTRA 
High Speed Ram Disks in you CoCo-3. It does not need or require the OS-9 
operating system. It works with R.S. DOS VI. 0 or VI. 1 and it is completely 
compatible with Enhanced Color Disk Basic! Plus it allows your CoCo-3 to run at 
double speed all the time even for floppy disk access!!! It will not disappear when 
you press reset like some other ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
ML program to test the 512K ram. It performs several bit tests as well as an 
address test so you know that your5I2K of memory is working perfectly. 

Requires 512K & Disk $19.95 

'The SOURCE IN" 

DISASSEMBLER & SOURCE CODE GENERATOR 

The SOURCE III will allow you to easily Disassemble Color Computer 
machine language programs Directly from Disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
compatible Source code. 

• Automatic label generation and allows specifying FCB, FDB and FCC areas. 
" Disassemble programs Directly from disk, unlike other disassemblers. 

• Automatically locates Begin, End and Execution address. 

• Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

• Generates Assembler source files directly to disk or printer, 

• Built in Hex/Ascii dump/display to locate FCB, FCC & FDB areas. 

• 8 Selectable Display formats 32/40/64/BO columns in 192 or 225 Res. 

• Selectable Foreground & Background colors & Printer Baud rates. 
" Built in Disk Directory an Kill file commands. 

" Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

Requires 128K & Disk $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 

purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 



" bJ± n dow Mast-en" 





Fkeys | 


K#u« ll«c#d 1 


o 
l e 
o 






leleie Key 
Display Keys 

Save Keys 
Load Keys 


0PEN:?CHR* 

BUTTON 
OPEN 255,7 


Tl = URI Vt 1 

0NHENU1 BAS 8 B 2 
CONFIG BAS 9 B £ 
CHECK BAS 0 B 1 
AUTOEXEC BAS 8 B 1 
COHFIG SYS 1 A 1 

~L, . . TIDTUr i "' ... ~ 


<: 

B 2 
( 

B 3 




l hi i h: uinmiv q m 






Uindov Master 
Finder VI. 9 

Unit ten by Bill Vernon a 
Copyright <c> 1388 by Cer-Comp Ltd 



Screen Display Fonts 



Window Master supports up to 54 different character sizes on 
the screen with 5 different character styles. You can have Bold, 
Italic, Underlined, Super-Script, Sub-script or Plain character 
styles or any combination of them in any character size. You 
can also change the text color and background at any time to get 
really colorful displays. 

Fully Basic Compatible 

Window Master is fully compatible with Enhanced Color 
Disk basic with over 50 Commands & functions added to fully 
support the Point & Click Window System. Window Master 
does not take any memory away from Basic, so you still have all 
the Basic Program memory available. 

Hi-Resolution Displays 

Window Master uses the full potential of the Color 
Computer 3 display by using the 225 vertical resolution display 
modes instead of the 192 or 200 resolution modes like most 
other programs. It uses either the 320/16 color mode or the 
640/4 color display to give you the best display resolution 
possible, and can be switched to either mode at any time. 

Mixed Text & Graphics 

Window Master fully supports both Text & Graphics displays 
and even has a Graphics Pen that can be used with HLINE, 
HCIRCLE, HSET and more. You can change the Pen width & 
depth and turn it on or off with simple commands. We also 
added Enhanced Graphics Attributes that allow graphics 
statements to use And, Or, Xor and Copy modes to display 
graphic information. With the Graphics enhancements added 
by Window Master, you could write a "COCOMAX" type 
program in Basic! In fact we provide a small graphics demo 
program written in Basic. 

Event Processing 

Window Master adds a powerful new programming feature to 
Basic that enables you to do "Real Time" Programming in Basic. 
It's called Event Trapping, and it allows a program to detect and 
respond to certain "events" as they occur. You can trap Dialog 
activity, Time passage, Menu Selections, Keyboard activity and 
Mouse Activity with simple On Gosub statements, and when the 
specified event occurs, program control is automatically routed 
to the event handling routine, just like a Basic Gosub. After 
servicing the event, the sub-routine executes a Return statement 
and the program resumes execution at the statement where the 
event occured. 

Enhanced Editing Features 

Window Master adds an enhanced editor to Basic that allows 
you to see what you edit. It allows you to insert & delete by 
character or word, move left or right a word or character at a 
time, move to begin or end of line, toggle automatic insert 
on/off or just type over to replace characters. The editor can 
also recall the last line entered or edited with a single key stroke. 
You can even change the line number in line to copy it to a new 
location in the program. 



Window Master Features 

Multiple Windows 

Window Master supports multiple window displays with up to 
a maximum of 31 windows on the screen. Overlapping windows 
are supported, and any window can be made active or brought to 
the top of the screen. Windows can be picked up and moved 
anywhere on the screen with the mouse. There are 6 different 
Window styles to choose from and the window text, border and 
background color is selectable. 

Pull Down Menus 

Menus are completely programmable with up to 16 menus 
available. They can be added or deleted at any time in a 
program. Menu items can be enabled, disabled, checked or 
cleared easily under program control. Menu selection is 
automatically handled by Window Master & all you have to do 
is read a function variable to find out which menu was selected. 

Buttons, Icons & Edit Fields 

Each Window can have up to 128 buttons, Icons or Edit fields 
active, if you can fit that many. Buttons, Icons and Edit field 
selection is handled automatically by Window Master when the 
mouse is clicked on one. All you have to do is read a Dialog 
function to find out which Button, Icon, or Edit field was 
selected, its very simple. 

Mouse & Keyboard Functions 

Window Master automatically handles the Mouse pointer 
movement, display and button clicks. It will tell you the current 
screen coordinate, the local window coordinate, window number 
the mouse is in, the number of times the button was pressed, 
which window number it was clicked in and more. The 
Keyboard is completely buffered, and supports up to 80 
programmable Function keys that can contain any kind of 
information or command sequences you can imagine. You can 
load and save function key sets at any time. So, you can have 
special sets of function keys for different tasks. The "Ctrl" key is 
supported so that you have a full control code keyboard 
available. 



Window Master Applications 

Window Master pushs the Color Computer 3 far beyond its 
normal capabilities, into the world of a "User Friendly" 
operating enviornment. We are already planning several new 
programs for use with Window Master. So you don't have to 
worry about having to write all your own programs. And don't 
forget that many existing Basic and M.L. programs will run 
under Window Master with little or no changes. The 
Possibilities for Application programs are endless: Spread 
Sheets, Word Processing, Communications, Education, Games, 
Graphic Design, Desk Top Publishing and on and on. 

Hardware Requirements 

Window Master requires 512K of memory, at least 1 Disk 
Drive, a Hi-Res Joystick Interface and a Mouse or Joystick. 

Technical Assistance 

If you run into difficulty trying to use some of Window 
Master's features, we will be happy to assist you in any way 
possible. You can write to us at the address below or call us 
between 10am and 2pm Pacific Standard Time for a more timely 
response. Sorry, no collect calls will be accepted. 

Ordering Information 

To order WINDOW MASTER by mail, send check or money 

order for S69.95, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the 
address below. To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD 

call us at (702)-452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP Ltd. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702)-452-0632 



Doctor ASC i l 



Some Terms Defined 

I've had my CoCo 2 for about a year 
now. Before that I knew very little 
about writing programs. Could you 
print a column on what PEEK, POKE, 
text, screen dump, HDRAW, HPRINT, 
DPTP and SOUND mean. I need this 
information so I can become a better 
Co Co 2 user. 

Chris Provence 
Saranac, NY 

§?, I can define those terms for you: 
PEEK is used to determine the 
value stored at an address in memory; 
e.g. PRINT PEEK (1463) will print the 
value stored at address 1463 in memory. 
The opposite of PEEK is POKE. 

POKE is used to change the value 
stored at an address in memory; e.g. 
POKE 1463,2 changes the value stored 
at Address 1463 to two. 

Text files are files comprised of 
ASCII values. ASCII is an industry- 
standard code for representing text 
(components of alphabetic and numeric 
strings) using one-byte values (eight bits 
stored at a single address). 'A' = 65, 
= 66, . . . '0' = 48, T = 49, etc. 

A screen dump is a printer's repre- 
sentation of what can be viewed on a 
computer's screen. 

HDRRW, similar to the DRfiW command 
on the CoCo 1 , draws lines and boxes 
and works only with the newer Hi-Res 
modes on the CoCo 3. 

HPRINT allows you to put text on a 
CoCo 3's Hi-Res screen. 

DflTfi statements are used in conjunc- 
tion with READ statements; e.g.: 

10 READ X 

20 DATA 23, 46, 55 

The READ statement in Line 10 will pick 
up the value 23 for X. If another READ 
statement is encountered, it will use the 
value 46, etc. 

The SOUND command is used to send 
audio effects to your TV speaker. SOUND 
3,30 sends a low-pitched sound for 30 
six-hundredths seconds. 

Richard Esposito is the principal engi- 
neer for EDM Corporation. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 



I 



■ 




By Richard £. Esposito 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

with Richard W. Libra 



A Good Deal 

/ have recently come across a super 
deal on IBM disk drives. They are the 
double-sided drives found on the 
discontinued IBM PCjr. Will these 
drives fit and work in the FD500 case? 
Also, can I use both sides of the drive 
from Disk BASIC, or just from OS-9? If 
I can't use both sides, will I be able to 
use one side of the drive? 

Kent Signorini 
Grimshaw, Alberta 

J?, The IBM disk drive should fit the 
/£. FD500 case and use your power 
supply, but you may need to modify 
your cable. SpectroSystem's ADOS or 
Burke & Burke's Hyper-IO can provide 
the double-sided capability. 

CoCo 2 and 3 — Programs Dont Mix 

I own a CoCo 2, Version 1, Release 
1, with disk drive. Is there any way 
to get Co Co 3 programs to run on my 
machine? 

Duane Shwartz 
Merrill WI 

Unfortunately, no. CoCo 3- 
/L specific programs take advantage 
of its additional memory and unique 
hardware. 



Problems With the Humidity 

Whenever the humidity is high my 
^ CoCo 2 does not function properly. 

(I get a blank gray screen, and the 
ROM packs do not work.) I have no 
problems using my neighbor's comput- 
er in the same environment. 

Steve Pawlowski 
Elmont, NY 

13 There are environmental specifi- 
/L cations associated with all elec- 
tronic equipment. Tandy specs for the 
CoCo are as follows: temperature, 55 to 
85 degrees Fahrenheit; and altitude, 100 
to 6,000 feet. Some CoCos may operate 
outside these specs due to relative age, 
small differences in parts, manufactur- 
ing, etc. As long as your machine op- 
erates within the published specs, there 
is nothing wrong with it. As mentioned 
before, for many years air-conditioned 
environments were required to operate 
computers at all. 

IBM Software on a CoCo 

D) In past articles, readers have asked if 
IBM software could run on the 
CoCo. I have heard that it was pos- 
sible to run Apple software on the 
Tandy 1000. If this is so, why couldn't 
something be made to run IBM soft- 
ware on the CoCo? 

Jared Hawley 
Honolulu, HA 

V\j Granted, with Tandy's Trackstar 
/Cl28 board installed in a Tandy 
1000, you can run Apple II software; 
but it costs $399 — twice the price of 
a CoCo 3! IBM PC coprocessors for the 
Atari ST and Apple Macintosh run 
around $1,000 each. Who would buy 
such a card for a CoCo when a separate 
Tandy 1000 could be purchased for the 
same price — or less? 

For a quicker response, your 
questions may also be submit- 
ted through rainbow's CoCo 
SIG on Delphi. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, 
then, at the RAINBOW> 
prompt, type ASK for "Ask the 
Experts" to arrive at the EX- 
PERTS> prompt, where you 
can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has com- 
plete instructions. 



40 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



Replace CoCo 3's built-in H PRINT font 

i 



The Font 
Master 



By Eric Wolf 




Stored in the new CoCo 3 is a high 
resolution font, a specially de- 
signed HPRINT character set. The 
area of memory in which the font is 
stored is called upon whenever the 
command HPRINT is performed. Each 
letter of the message is referenced in the 
font table of the high resolution graph- 
ics screen. 

The font table is stored in RAM, 
which means you can read and write to 
it. (Its memory location is SF09D 
through $F49C, for characters 32-127.) 
Font Master allows you to easily change 
these characters, giving your Hi-Res 
screens that personal touch. 

Font Master uses the 16-color, 320- 
by-192 graphics screen of the CoCo 3. 
It offers onscreen menu selection, com- 
plete error trapping, choice of tape or 
disk, editing commands, and easy inte- 
gration with BASIC and machine lan- 
guage. 

Upon saving, loading and running 
the program, the main screen appears, 
consisting of a command set (upper- 

Eric Wolf is a free-lance programmer 
and attends LaSalle High School He is 
currently writing a line of computer 
software that deals with games and 
utilities, and ML applications for the 
CoCo. 



FONT RASTER 

Bm: Eric A. Holf 




Arrows 
Spacebar 
Clear key 
'X* key 
**** key 
key 
;ey 
:ey 



Hove Cursor 
Sets a dot 
Clears dot 
Change Char 
Clears char 
Inverts ohr 
Loads a set 
Saves a set 



C 

Number 



65 




Edit Box 



The Current character set: 

i 

!"tt*V,&' t >X+ JL - .✓0123456783: ; < = >?3[2BCBEFG 
HIJKl_nNOPgRStlJVUXYZI\lT*~abcdefghi jklnno 



right), editing window (upper-left) and 
the current character set (bottom). Let's 
look at these one at a time. 

The Edit window shows an enlarged 
version of the character you are work- 
ing on and how it presently looks. The 
current character set is what the entire 
character set in memory looks like. The 
highlighted letter is the letter you are 
currently editing. The command set is 
a brief listing of all the commands 
recognized by the Font Master, and 
includes the following: 



space bar 



CLEAR 



X 



I 




arrows control the cursor 

within the edHiftg wi#? 
dow 

sets (turns on) a dot ift 
the editing window 
resets (turns off) a dot 
in the editing window 
clears entire editing 
window 

saves current charac- 
ter and allows you to 
select a new character 
to edit 

loads a character set 
from tape or disk 
saves a character set to 
tape or disk 
inverts the grid (chang- 
es white to black and 
black to white) 

I have included two pre-designed font 
files (cursive and bold) for you to use 
and modify for your own purposes. 
They are included on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and DISK. 

After you have saved your character 
set (using Font Master), you can inte- 
grate it into your own BASIC programs. 
First, load the program that uses the 
HPRINT command. Then load your 
character set — type (C)LORDM and press 
ENTER. Then, just run your program 
and the new character set will be in use. 

Be careful about pressing the reset 
button. Doing so restores the original 
HPRINT font set. After pressing reset, 
you must reload the character set if you 
want to use it again. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 1630 N. Johnson St., South Bend, IN 
46628. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a reply.) □ 

October 1988 THE RAINBOW 41 



130 191 425 23 

180 31 495 6 

260 243 555 200 

305 63 640 16 

375 84 END 194 



The listing: FDNTMSTR 

15 REM RAINBOW MAGAZINE PRESENTS 
20 REM 

2 5 REM ************************* 
30 REM * The Font Master !!i * 
35 REM * By: Eric A. Wolf * 
40 REM * Don't Panic Software * 
45 REM * For a CoCo 3 and 128k * 
50 REM ************************* 
55 REM 

65 ONBRK GOTO 710 
70 ONERR GOTO 530 
75 PALETTE RGB 
80 POKE65497,0 

85 RESTORE :FORY=0TO15: READ A: PAL 
ETTE Y , A : NEXTY 

90 DATA 8,56,0,3,3,63,3,0,63,9,0 

,0,0,0,0,63 

95 ATTR 7,0 

100 WIDTH 40 

105 HBUFF 1,5000 

110 HBUFF 2,12 8 

115 CH=65 

120 HSCREEN2 : HCLS 

125 HCOLOR15:HPRINT(21,l) , "FONT 
MASTER" : HCOLOR1 : HPRINT ( 19 , 2 ) , " By 
: Eric A. Wolf ":HCOLOR6: HPRINT (1 
7, 3), "Don't Panic Software" :HCOL 
OR2:HPRINT(16,4) , "For the CoCo 3 

and 128k" 
130 HCOLORl:HPRINT(6,19) , "The Cu 
rrent character set : " : HPRINT (0 , 1 
6) , "Character: ": HPRINT (0, 17) , "Nu 
mber : ":HCOLOR15 
135 HPRINT (16, 6) , "Arrows 
Move Cursor" : HPRINT (16,7) , "Space 
bar - Sets a dot" : HPRINT (16 , 8) 
, "Clear key - Clears dot":HPRIN 
T(16,9),"'X f key - Change Cha 

140 HPRINT (16, 10) , " »C« key 

Clears char" : HPRINT (16 , 11) , fM I' 

key - Inverts chr" 

145 HPRINT (16 , 12 ) , " 1 L f key 

Loads a set" : HPRINT (16, 13) , " f S ■ 

key - Saves a set" 

150 HPRINT (22, 16) , "Edit Box" 

155 GOSUB2 50 : GOSUB305 : GOSUB2 60 : G 

OSUB280 

160 C1=0:C2=0 

165 HGET(20+Cl*12,20+C2*12)-(20+ 
Cl*12+ll,20+C2*12+ll) , l:HCOLOR15 



:HLINE(20+C1*12, 20+C2*12) -(20+C1 

*12+11, 20+C2*12+ll) ,PSET,BF 

170 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN170 ELS 

E HPUT(20+Cl*12,20+C2*12)-(20+Cl 

*12+11,20+C2*12+11) ,1,PSET 

175 IF A$=CHR$(8) THEN C1=C1-1:I 

F CK0 THEN C1=0 : SOUND100 , 1 

180 IF A$=CHR$(9) THEN C1=C1+1:I 

F Cl>7 THEN C1=7:SOUND100, 1 

185 IFA$=CHR$(10) THEN C2=C2+1:I 

F C2>7 THEN C2=7 : SOUND100 , 1 

190 IFA$=CHR$ (94) THEN C2=C2-1:I 

F C2<0 THEN C2=0 : SOUND100 , 1 

195 IFA$=CHR$(32) THEN HCOLORl:H 

PAINT ( 24+Cl*12, 24+C2*12) , 1, 15:HS 

ET(151+C1, 128+C2, 15) :PLAY"V31T25 

5L255;CC" 

200 IFA$=CHR$(12) THEN HCOLOR2:H 
PAINT (24+Cl*12 , 24+C2*12) , 2 , 15 : HS 
ET(151+C1, 128+C2,0) : PLAY"V3 1T255 
L255;CC" 

205 IFA$=CHR$(67) THEN SOUND100, 
l:GOSUB2 65 

210 IFA$=CHR$ (73) THEN GOSUB320 
215 IFA$=CHR$(88) THEN GOSUB3 85: 
GOSUB3 4 0 : GOSUB2 5 0 : GOSUB30 5 : GOSUB 
265:GOSUB280 

220 IFA$=CHR$ (76) THEN GOSUB385: 
Z$=A$:GOTO405 

225 IFA$=CHR$ (83) THEN GOSUB385: 
Z$=A$:GOTO405 
230 GOTO 165 
235 1 

240 1 PROGRAM SUBROUTINES 
245 1 

250 HCOLOR0:HLINE(0,168)-(319,19 

2 ) , PSET , BF : HCOLOR15 : T=2 1 : FORY=3 2 
TO 128 STEP 40:A$="":FOR X=Y TO 
Y+39:A$=A$+CHR$ (X) : NEXTX : HPRINT 

(0,T) ,A$:T=T+1: NEXTY 

255 RETURN 

260 HCOLOR3:HLINE(12,12)-(116,ll 
6 ) , PSET , BF : HCOLOR1 : HLINE (16,16)- 
(120,120) ,PSET,BF 

265 HCOLOR0:HLINE(144,124)-(166, 
140 ) , PSET , BF : HCOLOR1 : HLINE (144,1 
24)-(166,140) ,PSET,B: 
270 HCOLOR2:HLINE(20,20)-(116,11 
6) , PSET, BF:HCOLOR15: FOR X=0 TO 8 
: HLINE (20+X* 12 , 20) - (20+X*12 , 20+8 
*12) , PSET: HLINE (20 , 20+X*12 ) - (20+ 
8*12, 20+X* 12) , PSET: NEXTX: RETURN 
275 GOTO 275 

280 T=24:Tl=0:A=CH-3 2 :A=A*8:FOR 
Y=&HF09D+A TO &HF09D+A+7 : P=PEEK ( 
Y) :FOR X=7 TO 0 STEP-1:IF P>=INT 
(2 A X) THEN P=P-INT(2 A X) :HPAINT(2 
4+((7-X)*12) ,T) ,l,15:HSET(151+(7 
-X) ,128+T1,15) 

285 NEXTX : T=T+12 : T1^T1+1 : NEXTY : H 



42 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



The Professional 
Color Computer 




Enhancements 
for Productivity 
from HJL Products 




I r 





uw, of Toticn»tane 




,i«r 



H3 



■UP" 



gjCtoidStar 



0 





For peak performance with any computer, 
you have to get Information into and out 
of the system as easily as possible, 

This is the purpose of the HJL family of 
professional enhancements for ALL 
MODELS of the Color Computer, 
Including CoCo3. 



The Self-contained 
ProCa8e-57 Keyboard - $79.95 

It's the popular HJL keyboard perfectly 
fitted Into its own sleek, low-profile 
case. Put your CoCo on a shelf or hang 
it on the side of your desk, ProCase-57 
comes with 5»foot cable; installs in 
Just a few minutes with no soldering. 

The HJL-57 

Keyboard Kit - $59.95/69.95 

Overwhelming favorlteof serious CoCo 
users worldwide, the HJL-57 keyboard 
provides the smooth consistent feel and 
reliability you need for maximum speed 
with minimum Input errors. Installs in 
your color computer without spidering. 
Just $59.96 for Original or F-version. 
Kits for CoCo 2 and CoCo 3 are $69.95. 

The NumborJack Keypad - $59.95 

A self-contained numeric keypad for 
serious number-crunching. Besides the 



numbers, It has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, Including autoshlfted 
ADD and MULTIPLY. Includes cable and 
connectors forsolderiess installation. 

The Monitor Adapter - $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors. Easily installed 
without clips, jumpers or soldering 
(except some CoCo 2s with soidered-in 
video Chips), Here's crisp, flicker-free 
monitor output with all the reliability 
you've come to expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor $99.95 

Our hiflh-resolutlon amber monitor gives 
you the display preferred by most 
computer pros, Once you've used it, 
you'll never go back to the TV set. 
12-Inch CRT has etched non-glare face- 
plate. (Requires adapter sold above) 

Quick Basic Plus • $19*95 

High-performance programming aid works 
with any CoCo that has 4 function keys. 
26 one-touch BASIC statements, 10 user- 
defined macros at a time (save as many 
sets of macros as you like), auto line- 
numbering, Instant screen dump to 
printer, and global search, make this 
software ideal for any BASIC programmer. 
Specify disk or cassette. 



The Softswitch - $89.95 

Connect any two parallel printers to one 
computer, select printers manually or 
insert a simple printer code in the text 
to be printed for fully-automatic, all 
solid-state switching. Complete with 
three cables and operating instructions. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one^year warranty and the exclusive HJL 
15-day unconditional guarantee (except 
software). 

Pick a Pair and Save 15% 

Take 15'^ off the pride of any two or 
more products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 



Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1-800«462-4891 
International calls: 716-235-8358 




Ordering Information: Specify model (Original, F-vereion, or CoCo 2 Model Number), Payment by c.o.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa, Credit card customers Include oomplete card number and expiration date. Add $2,00 for 
shipping, 3*50 to Canada; except monitors (call for snipping charges before ordering monitors), New York state 
teeldente add 7% Bales tax. Deeier Inquiries Invited 



PRODUCTS 



Div, of Touchstone Technology Inq. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 



COLORS : HLINE (88,16*8)-(112,18*8) 
PSET , BF : HCOLOR15 : HPRINT ( 10 , 17 ) , 
CH:HPRINT(11,16) ,CHR$(CH) 
29 0 RETURN 
295 NEXTX, Y 
300 RETURN 

305 W2=INT( (CH-32)/40) :Wl=(CH-32 
)-W2*40 

310 HGET(W1*8,168+W2*8) -(Wl*8+7, 
168+W2*8+7) ,2 :HPUT(W1*8, 168+W2*8 
) - (Wl*8+7 , 168+W2*8+7 ) , 2 , NOT : RETU 
RN 

315 HPUT(Wl*8,168+W2*8)-(Wl*8+7, 
168+W2 *8+7 ) ,2, PSET : RETURN 
320 SOUND200,1:FORY=0TO7:FORX=0 
TO 7 

325 IF HPOINT(24+(X*12) ,24+(Y*12 
))=1 THEN HPAINT(24+(X*12) ,24+(Y 
*12) ) ,2,15:HSET(151+X,128+Y,0) E 
LSE HPAINT(24+(X*12) ,24+(Y*12) ) , 
1 , 15 : HSET ( 151+X, 12 8+Y , 15 ) 
330 NEXTX , Y : RETURN 
335 GOT0335 

340 HCOLOR0 : HPRINT ( 6 , 19 ) , "The Cu 
rrent character set : " : HCOLOR1 : HP 
RINT(8 , 19) , "Select new character 
" : SOUND100 , 1 : GOSUB3 15 
345 GOSUB305 

350 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN350 ELS 
E GOSUB315 

355 IF A$=CHR$(94) THEN CH=CH-40 

:IF CH<32 THEN CH=CH+40 

360 IF A$=CHR$(10) THEN CH=CH+40 

:IF CH>127 THEN CH=CH-40 

3 65 IF A$=CHR$(8) THEN CH=CH-1:I 

F CH<32 THEN CH=3 2 

370 IF A$=CHR$(9) THEN CH=CH+1:I 

F CH>128 THEN CH=127 

375 IF A$OCHR$(13) THEN 345 ELS 

E SOUND100,1:HCOLOR0:HPRINT(8,19 

), "Select new character" :HCOLORl 

: HPRINT (6,19), "The Current chara 

cter set : " 

380 RETURN 

385 SOUND200,1:A=CH-32:A=A*8:FOR 

Y=0TO7 : P=0 : FORX=0 TO 7 

390 IF HPOINT(24+(X*12) ,24+(Y*12 

) )=1 THEN P=P+(2 A (7-X) ) 

395 NEXTX: POKE &HF09D+A+Y, P:NEXT 

Y 

400 RETURN 

405 IF Z$="L" THEN 410 ELSE IF Z 
$="S" THEN 580 ELSE RUN 
410 HSCREEN0 : ATTR 7 , 0 : CLS : LOCATE 
9,l:ATTR 7,0,U:PRINT"Load a char 
acter set:" ;: ATTR 7,0: LOCATE 1,7 
:PRINT"Use arrows to select & Pr 
ess <ENTER> . " 
415 CR=1 

420 ATTR 7,0: LOCATE 14,3:PRINT"F 
rom disk": LOCATE 14,4: PRINT "From 



tape":LOCATE14,5:PRINT"Exit bac 

k M 

425 IF CR=1 THEN LOCATE 14, 3: ATT 
R 1,5: PRINT" From disk"; ELSE IFC 
R=2 THEN LOCATE 14, 4: ATTR 1,5: PR 
INT "From tape"; ELSE LOCATE 14,5 
: ATTR 1,5: PRINT "Exit back"; 
430 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN4 30 
435 IFA$=CHR$(13) THEN 450 ELSE 
IF A$=" A " THEN CR=CR-1:IF CR<1 T 
HEN CR=3 

440 IF A$=CHR$(10) THEN CR=CR+1: 
IF CR>3 THEN CR=1 
445 GOTO 420 

450 ATTR 7,0: IF CR=3 THEN GOT012 

455 ON CR GOTO 460,475 
460 POKE 6 5 4 9 6 , 0 : CLS : PRINT " INS ERT 
"+CHR$ (34)+"CHARACTER SET"+CHR$ 
(34)+" DISK IN DRIVE": PRINT "#0 A 
ND PRESS ANY KEY FOR A DIRECTORY 

• 

465 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN465 ELS 
E DIR0 

470 GOTO 480 

475 CLS : POKE65496 , 0 : PRINT "Prepar 
e the cassette recorder" : PRINT" f 

or loading a character set " 

: PRINT 

480 PRINT : LINEINPUT"Enter Filena 
me: ";A$ 

485 IF LEN(A$)=0 THEN 495 ELSE I 

F LEN(A$)>8 AND CR=2 THEN 490 EL 

SE IF LEN(A$)>14 AND CR=1 THEN 4 

90 ELSE IF LEN(A$)>8 AND INSTR(A 

$,"/") =0 THEN 490 ELSE 500 

490 PRINT "Filename too long !":G 

OTO480 

495 PRINT"Please enter a filenam 
e !!":GOTO480 

500 IF INSTR(A$,"/")=0 AND LEN (A 
$)=<8 AND CR=1 THEN A$=A$+"/BIN: 
0" 

505 ON CR GOTO 510,520 
510 LOADM A$ 
515 GOTO 525 
520 C LOADM A$ 

525 PRINT: PRINT"Loaded ":FOR 

X=1TO1000: NEXTX : POKE65497 ,0 : GOTO 
120 

530 CLS:B$="Unkwown Error... #"+ 
STR$(ERNO)+" In "+STR$ (ERLIN) 
535 IF ERNO=20 THENB$="I/0 ERROR 
" ELSEIF ERNO=19 THEN B$="Device 
number error" ELSE IF(ERNO=31 0 
R ERNO=26) THEN B$="Can't find co 
rrect character file" ELSEIF ERN 
0=23 THEN B$="Input past end of 
file . . . "\ 

540 IF ERN0=1 THEN B$="Syntax Er 
ror in line "+STR$ (ERLIN) 



44 



THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



545 F0RY=1T02: LOCATE (20-LEN(B$)/ 
2) / 6:PRINTB$:NEXTY 
550 LOCATE 4 , 13 : PRINT"Do you wis 
h to try again (Y/N) " 

555 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="Y" THEN GOTO 
405 ELSE IFA$="N" THEN 120 ELSE 
555 

560 IF Z$="L" THEN 455 ELSE 115 
565 ATTR7 , 1 : CLS : LOCATE 5,11:PRIN 
T"File not on device specified": 
GOTO550 

570 CLS: LOCATE 10 ,11: PRINT "Input 

past end of f ile" :GOTO550 

575 CLS: PRINT "ATTENTION USER !!! 

" : : PRINT " ERROR # " ; ERNO ; " IN LINE 

" ; : PRINT ERLIN : PRINT : END 

580 HSCREEN0 : ATTR 7 , 0 : CLS : LOCATE 

9,1: ATTR 7 / 0,U:PRINT"Save a char 

acter set: " ; : ATTR 7,0: LOCATE 1,7 

:PRINT"Use arrows to select & Pr 

ess <ENTER> . " 

585 CR=1 

590 ATTR 7,0: LOCATE 14,3:PRINT"T 
o disk":LOCATE14,4:PRINT"To tape 
":LOCATE14, 5: PRINT "Exit back" 
595 IF CR=1 THEN LOCATE 14, 3: ATT 
R l,5:PRINT"To disk"; ELSE IFCR= 
2 THEN LOCATE 14, 4: ATTR 1,5:PRIN 
T"To tape"; ELSE LOCATE 14,5:ATT 
R 1,5: PRINT "Exit back"; 
600 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN600 
605 IFA$=CHR$(13) THEN 620 ELSE 
IF A$=" A " THEN CR=CR-l:IF CR<1 T 
HEN CR=3 

610 IF A$=CHR$(10) THEN CR=CR+1: 
IF CR>3 THEN CR=1 
615 GOTO 590 

620 ATTR 7,0: IF CR=3 THEN GOT012 
0 

625 ON CR GOTO 630,640 
630 POKE 6 5496 ,0 : CLS : PRINT "Insert 
disk to save character set upon 
into drive #0" 

635 GOTO 645 

640 POKE 65496,0: CLS : PRINT 11 Prepar 
e cassette to save character set 



it 



645 PRINT :LINEINPUT"Enter Filena 



PREMIUM COC03 512K UPGRADE 



•Memory chips socketed, user replaceable 
•Top mounted Memory for cooling 



Made in USA by J&R Electronics 
Rugged, long life construction 

Heavy duty POWER and GROUND planes to minimize memory errors due to noise 

High performance design, permits use of less expensive 150ns memory chips 

We supply Prime memory chips, not inferior pulls or fallouts* 

Includes RAMDISK, Spooler and Memory Test software on disk with 28 page User's 
Manual (We set the standard for 51 2K support software. We believe our software 
is uniquely powerful, as opposed to those 'Me, too' companies that charge extra 
for software with much less power!) 

SPECIAL PRICES 

#1010-29.95 JramR bare board plus connectors and software 

If 1014-39.95 JramR assembled & tested 0K (No memory chips) and software 
*CALL (for latest price of #1014 with memory chips and other products) 

To place an order, write to: J&R Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MD 21045, 
OR call (301) 987-9067-Jesse or (301) 788-0861 -Ray 



me: " ;A$ 

650 IF LEN(A$)=p THEN 660 ELSE I 

F LEN(A$)>8 AND CR=2 THEN 655 EL 

SE IF LEN(A$)>14 AND CR=1 THEN 6 

55 ELSE IF LEN(A$)>8 AND INSTR(A 

$/"/") -0 THEN 655 ELSE 665 

655 PRINT'Tilename too long !" :G 

OT0645 

660 PRINT"Please enter a filenam 
e !!":GOT0645 

665 IF LEN(A$)=<8 AND INSTR(A$," 
/")=0 AND CR-1 THEN A$=A$+"/BIN: 
0" 

670 PRINT: PRINT"Press any key to 

save. . . 11 
675 B$=INKEY$:IFB$=""THEN675 
680 ON CR GOTO 685,695 
685 VERIFYON : SAVEM A$ , &HF09D, &HF 
49C,&HF09D 
690 GOTO 700 

695 CSAVEM A$ , &HF09D, &HF49C, &HF0 
9D 

700 PRINT: PRINT"Saved ... 11 : FORX= 
1TO1000 : NEXTX : POKE 6 54 9 7 , 0 : GOTO 12 

705 REM ** END OF PROGRAM ** 
710 HSCREEN 0:STOP 




CocoTeclx 



RAINBOW 



With MAC PL AY and a CoCo 3 you can play MAC sound 
files (Included on the second diskette) with pure 
6 BIT sound quality that the CoCo can produce! Or 
download other MAC sound files from a computer 
information service or MAC bulletin board systems 
to hear even more. Sound files can last for a few 
seconds or up to 1/2 minute. MAC sound files 
included on the second diskette contain excerpts 
from the 3 Stooges to the Road Runnner and more!! 

MACPLAY is only $ 19.95 




You can use DltiHai as a normal HX-REZ 
joystick interface or switch it to be 
used with a popular Max III graphics 
program. The other feature of UltiHaz 
is the option to have a large or email 
stick area so you can be more accurate 
with your drawings! 

The UltiHaz interface is only $29.95 

Or trade in your ociginal HiRes inter- 
face ( sent postage prepaid ) and get 
UltiHaz for only 514.95 



Send to: 
CocoTech 

PA residents 208 Cathy Ann Drive 

add 6% sales Reading/ PA 19606 

tax (215)-779-7768 

Shipping and handling: 
USA and Canada add $2.50 
Other countries add $5.00 




Please allow 
1 to 3 weeks 
for delivery 

Sorry no 
credit cards 
YET1 



** We now hand i c C.O.D. »s**_ 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 45 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 



1 2 Years of Seru&i 

DISCOIIH^er 



and Friendly Help! 

E LIST 



CoCo Burke & Burke Hard Drive Kits 

FLASH! More Burke and Burke systems 
have been bought in the last six months 
than other systems have sold in the last 
3 years!!!! 

Our first system features the Burke & Burke XT or XT RTC 
interface. This interface uses popular and inexpensive IBM PC 
type controllers. For this reason it is the least expensive hard 
disk system available today. Not as fast as the Isted system but 
faster than any other system available. It also supports RLL 
drives. Note: Disk Extended Color Basic support and other 
software options are listed on our price list. 
Disadvantage; requires a multi-pak. 

KIT INCLUDES: Burke & Burke (B&B) XT PC interface. Hard 
drive with controller, 3 foot ST506 cable set. Hard Drive Case 
with 60 watt power supply and fan . Includes OS 9 LI and LII 
software. 1 megabyte transfer in 45 seconds! Type ahead under 
OS9. Complete instructions. Easy one evening assen&lj 



1 YEAR WARRANTY ON ALL SYSTEM 

20 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 

30 Meg Kit Complete 60MS RLL 

40 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 

Assemble and test any of the above add 

OPTIONS: 

B&B Real Time Clock (add to above) 
B&B XT ROM Auto Boot from hard disk 
B&B Hyper I/O run DECB on hard drive 
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1 F e atur e 




The fourth in a series of tutorials for 
the beginner to intermediate machine 
language programmer 



Machine Language Made BASIC 

Part IV: Getting Graphic 



By William P. Nee 



With this article we start to 
explore the Color Comput- 
er's best capability: the speed 
and ease with which it can create graph- 
ics. The standard way to begin any 
graphics program is with PMDDE, PCLS 
and SCREEN. These three commands, 
along with PCLEflR, will set certain 
locations within the memory. The main 
locations we will use for graphics and 
their meanings are shown in Figure 1. 

When you first power up, the 
computer assumes PCLEflR 4, PMDDE 0, 
PAGE 1, and sets the addresses as indi- 
cated under START. Since PMDDE 0,1 
uses only the first graphics page, the 
computer assumes that you will be using 
$600 to $C00-1 for graphics ($E00 to 
$1400-1 with disk). If not, you must tell 
the computer something different. The 
three main graphic commands in ma- 
chine language are shown in Figure 2. 

Nothing is as easy as it looks. If you 
try these commands, your machine 
language program will become lost. The 
problem arises between the PCLS com- 
mand and where EDTASM+ stores 
the program. On power-up with ED- 
TASM+, Location $FF/100 is #$600; 
this is where the edit buffer (your typed- 
in program) and the symbol table will 
begin. Since graphics also begin at $600, 
a PCLS will set all graphic bits to 0 and, 

Bill Nee bucked the "snowbird" trend 
by retiring to Wisconsin from a banking 
career in Florida. He spends the long, 
cold winters writing programs for his 
Co Co. 



Location 


Indicates 


Start 


W/Disk 


$B6 


PMODE (1 - 4) 


(0) 


(0) 


$B7/B8 


end of graphics page +1 


(#$C00) 


(#$1400) 


$B9 


bytes per line (#$10 or #§20) 


(#$10) 


(#$10) 


$BA/BB 


start of graphics page 


(#$600) 


(#$E00) 


$BC/BD 


(#$600 if not disk, #$E00 if 

Figure 1 


disk) 





1) 


PMODE 


LDB 


#(0 - 


4) 


PMODE 0 to PMODE 4 






JSR 


$9628 








PAGE 


LDB 


#(1 - 


8) 


PAGE 1 to PAGE 8 






JSR 


$9653 






2) 


PCLS 


JSR 


$9542 




PCLS 


3) 


SCREEN 


LDB 


#(0 - 


1) 


graphics - 1, text = 0 






JSR 


$95AA 










LDB 


#(0 - 


1) 


color set 0 or color set 1 






JSR 


$9682 




Figure 2 



Address 


Description 




PCLEAR4 


W/Disk 


PCLEAR8 


W/Disk 


$19/1A 


basic starts @ 




#$1E01 


#$2601 


#$3601 


#$3E01 


$1B/1C 


variables start 


e 


#$1E03 


#$2603 


#$3603 


#$3E03 


$1D/1E 


arrays start @ 




#$1E03 


#$2603 


#$3603 


#$3E03 


$lF/20 


free memory @ 




#$1E03 


#$2603 


#$3603 


#$3E03 


$33/34 


data statements 


@ 


#$1E00 


#$2600 


#$3600 


#$3E00 


$A6/A7 


input buffer @ 




#$1E00 

Figure 3 


#$2600 


#$3600 


#$3E00 





PCLEAR 1 2 3 4 5 


6 


7 


8 




W/Out Disk 0C 12 18 IE 24 


2A 


30 


36 




With Disk 14 1A 20 26 2C 


32 


38 


3E 


LDB #$ ( 


* ) 


* use number from table above 








STB $19 












- OR - 












LDB #(1 


- 8) 


PCLEAR 1 to PCLEAR 8 








LDA #6 












MUL 












ADDB $BC 




#$E00 if disk, else #$600 








STB $19 




Figure 4 









48 THE RAINBOW October 1 9B8 



in the process, wipe out the buffer. To 
avoid this problem we must change the 
contents of SFF/100. 

Graphic pages 1 to 4 are from $600 
to S1DFF (with disk, from $E00 to 
S25FF), and we must put the edit buffer 
above graphics. Whatever number we 
put into Location $FF/ 100 must end in 
00 and allow enough room for the text 
program before the ORG address. Let's 
use $2800 for the buffer address at $FF/ 
100. This will allow locations $2800 to 
$3000 for the text and symbols and 
leave $3000 and up for the assembled 
program. This is done in the following 
manner: 

1) insert EDTASM+ cartridge and 
power up 

2) press Z and ENTER to get into 
ZBUG 

3) press W and ENTER to read two 
bytes at a time 

4) type FFV to look at $FF/ 100 

5) type 2800 and press ENTER to 
change to #$2800 

6) type GC006 and press ENTER to 
execute $C006 (keeps $FF/ 100 the 
same) 



The assembler will now store the 
written program and symbols in a 
buffer starting at $2800. You can actu- 
ally read the program in the "A" mode 
starting at $2A00. The "S" stack starts 
at the buffer location plus #$177, de- 
creasing from there. 

The next problem arises if you try to 
use '5' to '8' in the PAGE command at 
$9653. Since the computer is set only for 
PCLERR 4, any higher number will give 
you a Function Call error message. To 
avoid this, we must PCLERR some more 
pages. The BASIC PCLERR command 
affects the addresses shown in Figure 3. 

These numbers change as your BASIC 
program increases and becomes more 
complicated, but their initial value is 
assigned by the PCLERR you select. So, 
in machine language, any PCLERR must 
be put at least into Location $19. Either 
the program or table shown in Figure 
4 can be used to get the PCLERR HEX 
value you desire. 

The second method, while a few bytes 
longer, is preferable because it will 
recognize whether or not disk is being 
used. 

If you want to use PCLERR 8, the 



EDTASM+ buffer must begin at $3600 
($3E00 with disk) or higher. The pro- 
gram must execute at an address even 
higher — generally the length of your 
text program plus an additional 200 
bytes. The EDTASM+ will give you a 
Bad Memory error message if you try 
to write your program over the execu- 
tion address. If it does, increase the ORG 
location until it is above the text portion 
of your program. 

The program for this article is in 
machine language only. It can be exe- 
cuted entirely from ZBUG and will 
break when you hit any key without 
losing the program. Initially, Location 
$FF/ 100 is set to #$3E00 to get above 
disk graphics; the program will ORG at 
$4382 to leave room for the editor 
buffer and symbol table. Once you've 
typed in the program, switch to ZBUG. 
In the "A" mode you can follow the 
program and symbols from $4000 to 
$4381. That is why the program must 
□RG at least at $4382. 

Once the program has been checked 
for errors, you can examine the buffer 
locations in the "W" mode for the 
following information. 



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October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 



49 



Location 



buffer start +02 
+0E 
+10 
+40 
+9F 
+A5 
+A9 
+AB 



program end +1 
symbols start at 
symbols end at 
"S" stack location 
text start 
text end 
text start 
text end 



The location in Buffer +10 plus 1 will 
give you the lowest ORG location that 
will not conflict with the buffer. 

Using the EQU command makes typ- 
ing in routine addresses unnecessary 
and makes the program easier to follow. 
Eight pages are cleared; the program is 
set for PMODE 3,1; PCLS. The screen is 
filled, then displayed with SCREEN 1,1. 
The program switches to PMODE 3,5 
and then fills and displays the screen. 
The action keeps alternating until you 
hit any key — JSR ($A000). When you 
do, the computer is reset for text screen 
and the program ends. In ZBUG, type 
FINISH = to see that the program ends 
at $43 DA. Type FINISH - PCLERR +1 
= to get the length of the program, 
which is #$59 bytes. 

A good technique to prevent the 
slight flicker on the graphics screen 
when alternating pages is to fill the 
screen first, then display it with the 
SCREEN command. This also gives the 
best animation effect. Since the pro- 
gram starts with PCLEfiR, type GPCLEAR 
or G4382 to execute it. The END must 
be followed with PCLEfiR. 

You are not limited, by the way, to 
eight graphic pages of #$600 bytes each 
as long as you have enough memory to 
go higher without running into the edit 
buffer or the assembled program. The 
PCLEfiR table continues in Figure 5. 
Generally, though, PCLEfiR 12 is the 
highest you will use. The buffer must 
start at least at $4E00 ($5600 with disk) 
and execute even higher (text programs 
plus symbol length plus #$200). 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this tutorial may be directed to the 
author at Route 2, Box 216 C, Mason, 
WI 54846-9302. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



PCLEAR 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


W/Out Disk 


3C 


42 


48 4E 


54 


5A 


60 


66 


6G 


72 


With Disk 


44 


4A 


50 56 


5C 


62 


68 


6E 


74 










Figure 5 















The listing: PfiGER 



EDTASM+/01 . 00 . pp PAGE 1 







00050 * $FF/100-#$3E00 




4382 




P010P 


ORG 


$4382 






9628 


PP11P PMODE 


EQU 


$9628 






9653 


PP12P PAGE 


EQU 


$9653 






9542 


PP13P PCLS 


EQU 


$9542 






95AA 


PP14P SCREEN 


EQU 


$95AA 






9682 


PP15P CSET 


EQU 


$9682 




4382 C6 


P8 


PP16p PCLEAR 


LDB 


#8 


FOR 8 PAGES 


4384 86 


P6 


PP17P 


LDA 


#6 


#$600 BYTES PER PAGE 


4386 3D 




00180 


MUL 






4387 DB 


BC 


00190 


ADDB 


$BC 


WITH OR WITHOUT DISK? 


4389 D7 


19 


00200 


STB 


$19 


WHERE BASIC WOULD START 


438B C6 


03 


00210 


LDB 


#3 


PMODE 3 

A m m ^0 .mm mr 


438D BD 


9628 


pp22p 


JSR 


PMODE 




439P C6 


PI 


00230 PAG El 


LDB 


#1 


PAGE 1 


4392 BD 


9653 


00240 


JSR 


PAGE 




4395 BD 


9542 


00250 


JSR 


PCLS 




4398 9E 


BA 


00260 


LDX 


$BA 


START OF GRAPHICS ON PAGF 


439A CC 


0000 

r r r r 


PP27P 


LDD 






43 9D ED 


81 


00230 LOOP1 


STD 


,x++ 




439F C3 


POO 3 


00290 


ADDD 


#3 




43A2 9C 


B7 


00300 


CMPX 


$B7 


END OF GRAPHICS ON PAGE 1 


43A4 25 


F7 


00310 


BLO 


LOOP1 




43A6 C6 


n 


00320 


LDB 


#1 




43A8 BD 


95AA 


00330 


JSR 


SCREEN 


DISPLAY THE SCREEN 


43AB C6 


PI 


00340 


LDB 


#1 




43AD BD 


9682 


00350 


JSR 


CSET 


COLOR SET 1 


43BP C6 


05 


00360 


LDB 


#5 


PAGE 5 


43B2 BD 


9653 


PP37P 


JSR 


PAGE 




43B5 BD 


9542 


00380 


JSR 


PCLS 




43B8 9E 


BA 


PP39P 


LDX 


$BA 


START OF GRAPHICS ON PAGE 


43BA CC 


PPPP 


00400 


LDD 


#0 




43BD ED 


81 


PP41P LOOPS 


STD 


,X++ 




43BF 83 


0003 


00420 


SUBD 


#3 




43C2 9C 


B7 


PP43P 


CMPX 


$B7 




43C4 25 


F7 


00440 


BLO 


LOOPS 




43C6 C6 


01 


00450 


LDB 


#1 




43C8 BD 


95AA 


00460 


JSR 


SCREEN 




43CB C6 


PI 


PP47P 


LDB 


#1 




43CD BD 


9682 


00430 


JSR 


CSET 




43 Dp AD 


9F A000 


00490 DONE 


JSR 


[$A000] 




43D4 27 


BA 


00500 


BEQ 


PAGE1 




43D6 5F 




P0510 


CLRB 






43D7 BD 


95AA 


00520 


JSR 


SCREEN 




43DA 3F 




00530 FINISH 


SWI 




RTS IF IN BASIC 




4382 


00540 


END 


PCLEAR 





0P0PP TOTAL ERRORS 



<7S 




50 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



dd many more than four colors in HSCREEN 4 f 
plus some techniques to put more style and depth into your graphics 




■ everal years ago n as a yearbook 
editor for two trade associations 
of electronic technicians, I had 
the idea of putting the two groups" logos 
on the cover of the yearbook via the hot 
new medium of computer graphics, J 
programmed the designs at home on my 
CoCo 1 with good old PMOQE A com- 
mands (and Jots of artifact colors). But 
what i remember most about the project 
was transferring the program^ varia- 
bles to the Zenith Z-lfH) computer at the 
office and watching the designs come up 
in glorious G4G-dot-wide resolution and 
16 colors. Imagine — diagonal Jines 
became Jines instead of staircases,, and 
circles became circles instead of Ferris 
wheels! 

As a part-time layout artist I came to 
appreciate detail and resolution as 
much as — perhaps more than — color. 
Now that the CoCo 3 supports 640-by- 
192 graphics, l*ve been surprised to see 
that the excellent programmers writing 
graphics editors for the CoCo 3 are 
sticking with what is essentially a wide 

PKGOE 4 screen (HSCREEN. 2) in order to 
convenient ty access 16 colors, This 
probably ha* something to do with the 
number of CoCo users not yet using 
RGB monitors, without which mixed 

Rusty Cuichito is a for trier editor of 
CaKhbox, the record-industry news- 
paper. He owns Bass Nh Productions* 
which produces records and markets, 
music software for (he CoCo. 

OcJafaer 1 m THE RAINBOW 5 1 



text and graphics in the highest resolu- 
tion leaves a lot to be desired. 

For those of you who do have an 
RGB monitor and don't mind spending 
a little extra time for more professional- 
looking results, particularly in business- 
oriented graphics, I have a couple of 
programs to easily get many more than 
four colors in HSCREEN 4, plus some 
techniques to put more style and depth 
into your graphics. 

These techniques are not sophisti- 
cated, and anyone with a rudimentary 
knowledge of Enhanced BASIC can 
duplicate and expand on them. Creat- 
ing new colors is simply a matter of 
using alternating vertical lines of differ- 
ent colors to create a new color. In 
HSCREEN 4, the distance between lines 
is so narrow that a new color or shade 
is created by the two adjacent lines. 

Listing 1, NUCOLORS, illustrates this. 
After setting up the screen and varia- 
bles, the program uses the HLINE com- 
mand to draw 16 boxes on the screen 
and fill these boxes with lines of differ- 
ent colors to create new colors and 
shades. The program tells you the step 
rate of the line loops used, as well as the 
two color codes that make up the new 
color in each box. I chose black, white, 
blue and red as the four default colors 
in Line 10. As neutral and primary 
colors, they create the secondary colors 
purple and gray and pleasing lighter or 
darker shades of themselves. You can 
substitute yellow for white and create 
different shades of green and orange, as 
well as browns or any other shade that 
can be created out of four colors. 

How you control the actual color 
depends on the palette colors you use 
and the step rate of the line loops in lines 
45 and 50, where the vertical lines are 
actually drawn. The step rate 'S' (dis- 
tance between vertical lines of one 
color) is initially set to 1 in Line 20, so 
that the first four boxes will contain the 
default colors just as if you had set them 



with HPAINT. If you set 'S'to '2' in Line 
20, the first four boxes will have new 
colors in them. 'S' will increase by 1 in 
Line 65 for the next four boxes, return- 
ing to a value of 2 in Line 70 for boxes 
9 through 12 unless you change these 
lines. When you leave more than two 
lines of space between lines being drawn 
(Step 3 or higher), the area begins to 
look more like vertical lines than solid 
colors. If you modify the program by 
adding another line loop before Line 45 
or 50 to use three colors instead of two 
to make up your new color, however, 
you'll need Step 3 or higher. NUCOLORS 
tells you the step rate you're using 
(above the box), as well as the color 
codes (below the box). 




But how to use these new colors 
practically, and how to fill areas other 
than boxes? Listing 2, DEMO, draws a 
dual business graph, creates a pie chart 
and bar graph using these new colors, 
adds colored text to the screen, and 
illustrates a few simple techniques to 
make your Hi-Res pictures more ap- 
pealing. Many business users and hob- 
byists alike have bought expensive 
graphics packages, only to find that 
software doesn't turn you into an artist. 
A knowledge of basic design and layout 
principles is just as important when 
you're creating an advertisement or 
business graph. 

DEMO first draws a background grid 
in lines 30 through 50. This gives a high- 



tech look to your design from the 
outset, and though a little overused in 
broadcast graphics, is still effective. It's 
kept in a darker color so it will stay a 
background design. Then in lines 60 
through 130, the program creates two 
gray background boxes containing 
shadowed white boxes in which are 
printed the questions our graphs will 
answer. The outer box, the inner box 
and its shadow have given the graphics 
some 3-D depth with just a few com- 
mands. In lines 40 through 190 we use 
another default color to print the back- 
ground data for our bar graphs. Notice 
that we always erase just enough of the 
blue grid before drawing something new 
in its place. This keeps images from 
interfering with each other and also 
highlights foreground designs. 

In Line 200 the real fun begins. We 
create a blank box in Line 210 that we 
fill with new colors by going to the 
subroutine at Line 500 to draw our 
alternating colored lines. The subrou- 
tine at Line 600 draws the circle for our 
pie chart (Line 225). Then at lines 230 
and 240 we call a subroutine to clean up 
the area outside our circle and presto — 
a new shape with two colors not in our 
default HSCREEN 4 palette! The rest of 
the program uses the lines subroutine 
(Line 500) to give us new colors for our 
bars, a new section for our pie chart and 
text to finish things up. 

As you can see, a professional- 
looking graph or picture with full 
resolution and more than four colors is 
easily available, thanks to the great 
features of the CoCo 3. Here's hoping 
those talented 6809 programmers out 
there will enhance their fine products 
with a professional graphics editor that 
fully utilizes the CoCo 3's capabilities! 

(Questions or comments concerning 
these programs may be addressed to the 
author at 1313 Cricket Lane, Wood- 
bridge, NJ 07095. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



Listing 1: NUCOLORS 

1 'NUCOLORS 

2 'BY RUSTY CUTCHIN 
5 1 

10 PALETTE 1 , 63 : PALETTE 2 , 15 : PALET 

TE3,38;PALETTE0,0 

15 HSCREEN4 : HCLS4 : HCOLOR1 

20 Cl=l : C2=4: S=l; A=15 : B=15 : Pl=l : 

P2*=10 

25 FOR Y«15 TO 110 STEP 95 

30 FOR T=l TO 2 

31 S$=STR$(S) : 



32 HPRINT(P1,P2-10) ,"Step"+S$ 
3 5 FOR X=A TO (A+240) STEP 80 
40 HLINE (X,Y) -(X+48, Y+64) ,PSET,B 
45 HCOLOR Cl:FORVl~X TO (X+45) S 
TEP S : HLINE (Vl+2 , Y+I) - (Vl+2 , Y+63 
) ,PSET:NEXTV1 

50 HCOLOR C2:FORV2=X TO (X+45) S 
TEP S: HLINE (V2+1,Y+1) ~(V2+l,Y+63 
) , PSET : NEXT V2 

51 C1$=STR$(C1) :C2$==STR$(C2) 

52 HCOLORl:HPRINT(Pl,P2) ,01$+" / 
"+C2$ 

54 P1=P1+10 



52 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



CoCo 
Graphics 
Designer 
$29.95 




The Coco Graphics Designer produces beautiful 
Greeting Cards, Banners, and Signs for holidays, 
birthdays and other occasions. 

The program features picture, border, and character font editors, so that you can 
modify or expand the already built in libraries. Plus a special "grabber" utility is 
included to capture areas of high resolution screens for your picture library. 

Requirements: a Coco I, II or IH with at least 32K, one disk drive, BASIC 
1.0/U.ADOS 1.0/1.1 or JDOS. Printers supported include: Epson RX/FX, Ge- 
mini 10X, SG10, NX10, DMP 100/105/110/130/430 CGP220, many Okidata 
(check with Zebra), Seikosha GP100/250, Gorilla Banana, Legend 808. Order 
#C323 Coco Graphics Designer $29.95. Ordering Instructions: All or- 
ders add $3.00 Shipping & Handling. UPS COD add $3.00. VISA/MC Accepted. 
NY residents add sales tax. 

Zebra Systems, Inc., 78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 (718) 296-2385 
Orders shipped same or next day! 
Optional Font Disks A, and B, Picture Disks 1, 2, 
3 and 4 (some samples shown here) $14.95 each. 



Font Disk A 



Font Disk B 




B0LD3 

i TOM 
UOJ I i ML 

mum 

STlsICIL 



TYPE 
VARIETY 

UESTERU 
a 4- ai 



ALIEH 

DIJ0GG 
COMPUTER 



©0(30(1©© 




CIUUBUE 



DIEGO 

£C&<J9><? 



Samples Ram 

Picture Disk #2 




America 




Party 




itHKHHHJi 
MEMO- 



IR 



• cuo 

■ CO 

□ Do0 
nno. 

□ □□I 






Offi 



m 

JLJ 



in r 

DUT r 



samples Rom 

Picture Disk #3 




Religion 




IS 



Samp res Rom 

Picture Disk #4 




Christmas 




Easter & Thanksgiving 




Jewish Holidays 




T rave I 



New Years, July 4th, Halloween, 
Pnmdos, St.P.ily'x JL Valentine's 



55 


C2=C2+1 : IFC2=5THENC2=1 


66 


A=A+3 2J3:C1=C1+1:NEXT T 


6j3 


NEXTX 


70 


S=2 : A=15 : Pl=l : P2=2 2 : NEXTY 


65 


S=S+1 


75 


GOTO 75 




110 206 410 . 

180 23 END 

285 77 



174 

.73 



Listing 2: DEMO 

10 PALETTE j3 , J8 : PALETTE 1 , 63 : PALETT 
E2,38:PALETTE3,15 
2j3 HSCREEN4:HCOLOR3 
21 1 

3j3 'Draw Grid 
35 ' 

4j3 HLINE (j3 ,j3) - (639 , 191) ,PSET,B 

45 F0RG1=41T0639 STEP40 : HLINE (Gl 

,J3)-(G1,191) ,PSET:NEXTG1 

5J3 FORG2=j3T0191 STEP 16: HLINE (J3, 

G2)-(639,G2) ,PSET:NEXTG2 

55 1 

6J3 'Draw Question Boxes 
61 1 

65 HCOLOR4: HLINE (0,0) -(280,10) ,P 
SET, BF 

70 HCOLOR1:HPRINT(0,0) , "WHAT AME 

RICANS THINK OF THE ECONOMY 

75 HCOLOR1:FORX=5TO2 60STEP2:HLIN 

E(X,19) -(X,52) , PSET: NEXTX 

80 HCOLOR4:HLINE(12,24)-(255,50) 

,PSET,BFlHCOLORl 

85 HLINE(7, 22) -(250,48) , PSET, BF 
90 HCOLOR4:HPRINT(l,3) , "Do you t 
hink what has happened 
95 HPRINT(1,4) , "to the stock mar 
ket recently 



One-Liner Contest Winner , . . 



This one-liner displays the poke and peek values for 
the CoCo 3 keyboard. Just press a key. It comes in 
handy when you're working on key-repeating rou- 

(ftyi yflifo 



The listing: 

0 CLS 

1 W=3 37: PRINT @0 , " POKE LOCATIONS 
AND VALUES FOR THE KEYBOARD" 
FORT-1T08 : PRINTg (W-33 6) + (T*32 ) +6 
4 , W+'T ,r «» , PEEK (W+T) : IFPEEK (W+T) <> 
255THENSOUNDPEEK(W+T) , 1: NEXT: GOT 
OlELSENEXT : GOTOl 

^ ^? Larry Lim 

Cincinnati, OH 



7 



ii 



■:<!.-..i 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



100 HPRINT(1,5) , "will lead to a 
recession? 

105 HCOLOR1:FORX=285TO560STEP2:H 
LINE (X , 19 ) - (X , 52 ) , PSET : NEXTX 
110 HCOLOR4:HLINE(292,24)-(558,5 
0) ,PSET,BF 

115 HCOLORl:HLINE(287, 22) -(553,4 
8) ,PSET,BF 

120 HCOLOR4:HPRINT(3 6,3) ,"Do you 

think the national economy 
125 HPRINT(3 6,4) ,"is getting bet 
ter, getting worse, 
13)3 HPRINT(3 6,5) , "or staying abo 
ut the same? 
135 1 

140 'Print Bar Graph Data 
145 1 

150 HCOLOR4:FORX=281TO639STEP40: 
HLINE ( X , 6 4 ) - ( X , 190 ) , PS ET : NEXTX 
155 FORY=64T0191STEP16:HLINE(281 
,Y) -(638, Y) , PSET: NEXTY 
160 HCOLOR2:HPRINT(35,7) ,"50 



165 HPRINT(35,10) ,"40 
170 HPRINT(35,13) , "30 
175 HPRINT(35,16) ,"20 
180 HPRINT(35,19) ,"10 

185 HPRINT(35,22) ," 0 



190 HCOLORl:HPRINT(3 8,23) , " 
Better Worse Same 

195 ' 

200 'Draw Pie Chart 
205 1 

210 HCOLOR1:HLINE(25,70)-(255,19 
0) ,PSET,B 

215 X=25:Y=70:A=140:B=190:C1=3:C 

2=2 : 31=2 : S2=2 : GOSUB500 

220 X=140 : A=255 : Cl=2 : C2=l : GOSUB5 

00 

225 X=25:A=255:HC0L0R1:G0SUB 600 
2 30 H=4:P=1:E=X+2:F=Y+2:GOSUB700 
235 HCOLOR4 : HLINE (25, 70) -(255,19 
0) ,PSET,B:GOSUB 600 
240 H=4:P=4:E=A-2:F=B-2:GOSUB700 
245 1 

250 1 Draw Bars 
255 ■ 

260 X=325: Y=142 : A=3 65 : B=180 : Cl=4 
: C2«l : 31=1 : S2=2 : GOSUB500 



54 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



265 X=366:Y=151:A=4j36:C2=3:S2=3: 


+1 4*M. MM 

385 


■ 

V » ■ ■■ MMk MM* «. <M MMM > MJ M»f MJ J ■ * A MJ A 

HPRINT(10. 14) , "31% 


GOSUB 5j3j3 


39j3 


HPRINT(6, 18) , "Don' t Know/ 


270 X=43j3 : Y=97 : A=47j3 : Cl=4 : C2=l : S 


395 


HPRINT (7 , 19) , "No Answer 


2=2:GOSUB5j3j3 


4J30 


HPRINT(10,20) ,"19% 


275 X=471:Y=87:A=511:C2=3:S2=3:G 


4J35 


HC0L0R4 : HPRINT ( 2 3 , 15 ) , "No 


OSUB 5j3j3 


41j3 


HPRINT(23,16) ,"50% 


280 X= S 535:Y=62:A=575:C2=1:S2=2:G 


415 


GOTO 415 


OSUB50j3 


42j3 


i 


^Bk. Ml M M Ml M§ M M ^M MM) Ml ^M Ml .^M -■ — - — 

285 X=576:Y=67:A=616:C2=3:S2=3:G 




'Fill boxes to make new colo 


_*"V MM M> M> MM MM /M/ _W 

OSUB5j3j3 


rs 


(SR) 


29j3 1 


MM MB* MM 

505 


1 


30j3 'Draw Graph Key 


MM M M 

51j3 


F0RV1=X+1T0A-1 STEP S1:HC0L0 


3j35 1 


RC1 


: HLINE ( VI , Y+l ) - ( VI , B-l ) , PSET : 


31j3 X=315: Y=62 : A=3 35 : B=7j3 : C2=l : S 


NEXTV1 


MW Ml M) MM. MM ^M# 

2=2 :GOSUB5j3j3 


515 


F0RV2=X+2T0A-1 STEP S2:HC0L0 


315 Y=72:B=8j3:C2=3:S2=3:GOSUB5j3j3 


RC2 


: HLINE ( V2 , Y+l) - (V2 , B-l) , PSET : 


Jk MV .M# M ^ Mm. MM MMM M M^ MMk MMl Mt M Ml MM # • ^M. .MK. m ■ ■ MM. 

3 2 j3 HC0L0R1 : H PRINT (43,8) , " Before 


NEXTV2 


the plunge 


520 


RETURN 


325 HPRINT(43,9) , "After the plun 


525 


i 


ge 


6j3j3 


'Draw circle (SR) 


— — _ * ■ 

33j3 1 


6j35 


i 


35j3 'Finish circle 


61j3 


Ml=X+( (A-X)/2) :M2=Y+( (B-Y)/2 


355 ' 


) :R= 


=(A-X)/2 


360 HC0L0R4 : HLINE (Ml , M2 ) - (Ml-R , M 


615 


HCIRCLE(M1,M2) ,R-2: RETURN 


2+10) , PSET 


62j3 


t 


JfeA M» ^^M A M Ml ^ M Ml ^ ^ M\ M^ Ml Ml ^> M Mh t MV MM ^M^K M^Ml 

3 65 HLINE (Ml , M2 ) - (Ml , M2+R) , PSET 


7j3j3 


'Clean circle border (SR) 


37j3 PT=3:HPAINT(Ml-2 ; M2+4) ,PT,4 


705 


i 


375 HC0L0R1 


71j3 


HPAINT (E, F) ,H,P 


38j3 HPRINT(lj3 7 13) /'Yes 


715 


RETURN rzs 




—Dual Program Specials— 

• TIME/MONEY $39.95 

• ADDITION/SUBTRACTION $39.95 

• MULTIPLICATION/ 

BEAT THE COMPUTER $21.95 

supports CoCo 1 2, 8c 3 
specify cass/disk/Network II 
school RO.s welcome 
add $2.00 shipping and handling 
Network orders add $10.00 per disk 
Write for Free Catalog 

= C_Y B URN E T_I CJS „ _ £ — t 

a -V r> 5705 CHESSWOOD DR. ✓ -> 

<J ^ KNOXVILLE, TN 37912 O 

<?4f 615-688-4865 



WIN THE 
LOTTO 

WITH YOUR HOME COMPUTER! 



Use your home computer and Soft- 
Byte's amazing new "Lotto Program" to 
get more winning rickets. 

In just seconds this software analyzes 
past winners and produces a powerful 
probability study on easy-to-read charts. 
With a single press of a key, you'll see 
trends, patterns, odds/evens, sum totals, 
number frequencies, and much more. It 
also includes automatic number wheeling, 
instant updating, and a built-in tutorial. 
Ask your software dealer. 

APPLE, IBM, and Commodore $24.95 

Atari, Radio Shack $21.95 

Macintosh $29.95 

Back-up Copies $3.00 

Add $2.00 shipping and handling. Credit card 
orders approved by phone and shipped same day. 

Make checks payable to SOFT-BYTE and mail to: 

P.O. Box 556 Forest Park 
Dayton, Ohio 45405 

513" 
"soft* 278UW 





E3 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 55 



CoCo Consultat i ons 



ihis and in future 
"Co Co Consultations, " 
I will be trying some-' 
thing new. In addition to the 
familiar Q&A column, Twill also 
include tidbits of information 
con tributed by various folks and, 
in some cases, comment on the 
information. Thus, even if you 
don't have a question, I invite you 
to send W any little hints or de- 
scriptions of experiences you have 
had with the Co Co that you think 
might be of interest to the Co Co- 
owning public in general. 



Using the CoCo 3's MMU 

Where would I get the information 
needed to properly use the MMU of the 
CoCo 3 to access all 512K of memory 
via assembly language? 

Brian O'Neill 
Kirkland, WA 



The best reference for that is the 
service manual for the CoCo 3. This 
book, which costs about $14 and can be 
ordered from the people at your local 
Radio Shack store (they will have to call 
Tandy National Parts to order it for 
you), is the reference that all commer- 
cial CoCo 3 software developers use. 
After a bit of time spent experimenting 
to clear up a few minor ambiguities in 
the information there, any assembly 
language programmer should be fully 
able to use the MMU of the CoCo 3. 
If you need to see some examples of its 
use, however, you might want to order 
a copy of Spectral's Super Extended 
BASIC Unravelled from Microcom. 
This is a complete, commented disas- 
sembly of the ROM in the CoCo 3 that 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non- computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 



COCO 




CONSULTATIONS 



By Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



includes a guide to the GIME chip 
similar to that found in the CoCo 3 
service manual. By paying careful atten- 
tion to the start-up code and Hi-Res 
screen handling code found there, you 
will see examples of the use of the MMU 
by Microware's programmers. 

CoCo 3 Cold Start 

How do I do a cold start on the CoCo 

Randall Reid 

(RANDOMR) 

Wiarton, Ont. 

From BASIC you can type POKE 
&H71 , 0 : EXEC&H8C1B and press ENTER. 
This resets the cold start flag at $71 (the 
same flag used by the CoCo 1 and 2) and 
then jumps to the special CoCo 3 cold 
start sequence. That special CoCo 3 
cold start routine was "snuck in" on top 
of what used to be the (unusable) DLORD 
command. In fact, you can accomplish 
the same thing by typing POKE 
&H71 , 0 : DLDRD and pressing ENTER! Of 
course, you can also just hold down the 
CTRL and ALT keys, press the reset 
button, then release those keys and 
press the reset button again. But then 
you have to gaze briefly at the ugly faces 
of the "three mugateers." 



A Sound Deal 

I'm using a NEC Multisync monitor 
with my Co Co 3 and get an exception- 
ally crisp, sharp image. But the NEC 
Multisync doesn 't have an audio input. 
Can you recommend a means of getting 
sound out of the CoCo 3? 

Lewis Kurfist 

(LEWKA Y) 

Parkridge, NJ 



The back of the CoCo 3 has an RCA 
phono-type audio output jack. You can 
connect that to the Aux or Line Input 
of any nearby hi-fi system and get sound 
that way. Or, you can buy a $12 Radio 
Shack "speaker amplifier" (Cat. No. 
277-1008) and hook that to the CoCo 
3 via a cable that has an RCA phono 
plug at one end and a l /s-inch mini 
phono plug at the other. This "speaker 
amplifier" requires a 9-volt battery, but 
you may be able to run it off a battery 
eliminator if the eliminator in question 
has sufficiently cleanly-filtered DC 
power so as to prevent a nasty hum in 
the amplifier. 

If you're a hacker, you may want to 
mount that unit inside the CoCo 3 
under the keyboard and "steal" 10 volts 
to run it from the CoCo's main power 
supply at the junction of Dl and D2. If 
you get a hum, you can smooth it out 
by regulating that power down to about 
seven volts by using a 7805 regulator 
whose ground is floated with a small- 
value (100 ohm or so) resistor. 



Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, THE rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type ASK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 




56 THE RAINBOW October 1988 




The COCO hardware store 





Controller 



$99*95 



Fantastic 
Super Controller 

Radio Shack/Tandy controller compatible. 

Works on all COCOs - 1 , 2 or 3 with or without Multi-Pak Interface. 
One 24/28 pin socket for 8K ROM, 2764, or 27128 EPROM. 

Internal MINI-EXPANSION-BUS connector for one DISTO Super Add-On. 
Low Power draw; within COCO's requirements. 
Gold Plated edge connectors. 
Under OS-9: 

• Buffered Read/Write sector achieved without halting the CPU. 

• Continual use of keyboard even while reading or writing to disk. 

• System's clock no longer looses time during Read & Write. 

• Iwll is blocked and transferred to IRQ in software for low CPU overhead. 

• Completely Interrupt driven for fast & smooth Multi-Tasking operations. 

• Drivers written by KEVIN DARLING 



A Superb Controller. Along with the included C-DOS, plug-in 
three more software selectable DOSes or 2764 or 27128 EPROMs 
burned to your liking. 

The Internal Mini-Expansion-Bus lets you add some 
incredible features to the controller. Disto Super Add-Ons 
were designed to fit neatly inside the controller case. 




$130. 



ADD-ONS 




3?a 



rfC* 




Real Time Clock & Printer Interface 

Have the Real Time, Date and Year displayed 
on your screen at a simple command 




■ 

i 





$59.95 




ulti-Board Adapter 



Mini EPROM Programmer 

A LOW COST EPROM Programmer that attaches 
directly to any Disto Super Controller or MEB 
adapter to program those often used utilities. 



This Muti-Board is an adapter that plugs in any Disto Super Controller, 
Ramdisk or MEB Adapter. 

It includes a new and improved Printer Port (Centronics compatible), a faster 
Real Time Clock (works at 2MHz.) and a true RS-232 Serial Port (external 
1 2 volt AC adapter required). DB25 cable included. 

It fits neatly inside the metal case and is still within Tandy's power 
limits. It also works with or without a Multi-Pak. 



Hard Disk Interface 

A Hard Disk Interface fully compatible with 
SASI controller. Fits inside the Super 
Controller, Ramdisk or MEB Adapter. 
OS-9 drivers included. Also available 
with RS-232 Serial Port. 






$49.95 



-232 SuperPack 



A Stand-Alone (Multi-Pak required) adapter 
that gives the user a true RS-232 Serial Port. 
Completely compatible with 0S9's ACIA software. 
Compatible with software that requires 
the Tandy Deluxe RS-232 Pack. n n n 

DB-25 cable included. U R U 

COMPUTERS 




Super RAM 3 ZeroK Board 

Now is the time to upgrade your COCO 3 to 
51 2K of memory. Just add the memory chips 
and install in your COCO 3. 

MEB Adapter 

A Stand-Alone Mini-Expansion-Bus in which 
you can plug any other Disto Adapter directly 
in a Multi-Pak without the need for a Super 
Controller or Ramdisk. . 

Mtffc 





Super Board 



Coming this fail to a dealer near you 



1-514-383-5293 



10802 Lajeunesse, Montreal, 
Quebec, Canada H3L 2E8 

We accept phone orders • Call for Canadian Prices 
Include S&H of $4 or $8 if order exceeds $75 



Real Time Clock, Printer Port, 
RS-232 & Hard Disk Interface 
all in one neat package 



Master Card and Visa Accepted 



Sorry: No personal cheques 



See You At Princeton RAINBOWfest! 



Ff* jifr i iff* 



Three do-it-yourself fixes for the hardware hacker 





By Marty Goodman 



Each of the following three discus- 
sions present information to 
enable hardware tinkerers to 
make inexpensive repairs and upgrades 
to their CoCo equipment. These three 
projects have the following in common: 
They address widespread problems with 
CoCo systems; they take no more than 
an hour or two to complete; they require 
little hardware construction expertise; 
and the total cost of parts for any of the 
projects is under $5. 

Although the information will not be 
presented in a strictly for-the-beginner 
fashion, anyone with modest experience 
building electronic projects should be 
able to follow these instructions. In- 
deed, only one of the three projects 



^S\',S%vS','.'.-.'--.- - . - -'"\-, 



Martin H Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOWS CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online, His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 



requires that you even read a schematic 
diagram. 

Project One: Sparklies 

Many CoCo 3 users have complained 
of "sparklies." These are little linear 
flashes of light that appear on a monitor 
screen some — or all — of the time. 
Generally, OS-9 Level II users with 
RGB monitors and 512K of memory 
report seeing them during disk I/O, but 
they have been reported by Disk Ex- 
tended BASIC users on monochrome 
monitors — even appearing when the 
disk is not in operation. These are 
caused by subtle timing problems be- 
tween the GIME chip and the DRAM 
chips it needs to address. 

Until recently the only known ways 
to cure the problem were complex, 
tedious, expensive or all three. You 
could buy a different brand of DRAMs 
for your upgrade board, replace the old 

(1986) GIME chip with a newer variant 

(1987) of that chip. You could also 
unsolder your 68B09E chip, replace it 
with a socket, and insert a 6309E 
(Hitachi-made CMOS version of the 
6809E) in that socket. The DRAM chip 
and GIME chip replacements cost $180 
and $50, respectively. The 6309E chip 
costs $12 to $25, is difficult to get and, 
because the replacement process re- 
quires the removal of the CoCo moth- 
erboard and the unsoldering of a 40-pin 
chip, is a viable alternative only for the 




58 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



most experienced and well-equipped 
hardware tinkerer. 

History of the Fix 

In March of this year, Roger Krupski 
of RGB Systems reported some star- 
tling news on Delphi: He had found a 
way to cure the sparklies with a quick, 
cheap modification. Roger was exper- 
imenting with various-length Y cables 
on his system (something I have repeat- 
edly warned RAINBOW readers not to 
do) and found that when he added a 
cable to the system, his sparklie prob- 
lem got worse. He then decided to 
manipulate the system-timing in a 
simple, direct way. He hooked an AM 
radio-type, 10- to 365-pF variable 
capacitor in parallel with CIO, (a timing 
fudge factor/ RFI suppression capaci- 
tor present on the E clock). In this 
manner, he could tune out the sparklies. 
When he had his long Y cable hooked 
up, it took more capacity to tune out the 
sparklies than when he was not using 
the cable. Roger examined the wave- 
form with his 100-MHz oscilloscope 
and found that his modification re- 
moved some of the overshoot in the E 
clock waveform and smoothed out a jog 
in the middle of it. It also shifted the 
time constant for that E clock fudge 
factor circuit that Tandy had provided. 

After considerable experimentation, 
observation and measurement, Roger 
arrived at the modification that seemed 



to work best. A few other tinkerers on 
Delphi who had sparklie problems tried 
it and reported considerable success in 
curing them. Of course, the following 
suggestion is still quite experimental. It 
is possible that such manipulation of the 
clock timing could cause problems 
(including decreased system reliability.) 
I recommend that only those CoCo 3 
owners with serious sparklie problem 
try the following fix, and I urge those 
who try it to report to me, in care of 
RAINBOW, what success they have with 
the fix. 

The Fix 

The fix that worked best for Roger is 
as follows: 

Remove R9 and RIO from the CoCo 3 
motherboard and replace those 47-ohm 
resistors with 100-ohm resistors. Then 
remove CIO and Cll from the board 
and replace those 39-pF capacitors with 
100-pF capacitors. 

Help with the Details 

With the computer open in front of 
you, R9 and RIO are the two small, side 
by side cylinders just in front (front = 
toward the keyboard) and near the left- 
hand corner of the GIME chip (the 64- 
pin, square, socketted chip). On the 
CoCo motherboard, they are clearly 
marked R9 and RIO in white silk- 
screened letters. Each has yellow, pur- 



ple and black color-bands. Remove and 
replace these resistors with 100-ohm 
resistors. The resistors may be pur- 
chased at Radio Shack, Cat. No. 271- 
1311, 271-152 or 271-012. While any 
one of these three will work, the first 
(No. 271-1311) will probably fit best 
physically in the space available. 

CIO is a tiny green blob located 
behind the GIME chip, to the left of a 
prominent black cylindrical electrolytic 
capacitor (C9). Cll is an identical tiny 
green blob located near the right-hand 
edge of the board, to the left of the front 
screw that holds down the 40-pin system 
bus connector. It, too, is located to the 
left of a prominent black cylindrical 
electrolytic capacitor (C27), and imme- 
diately to the left of the resistor Rll. 
Both of these capacitors are clearly 
labeled on the motherboard as CIO and 
Cll in white silk-screened lettering. 
Remove both capacitors and replace 
them with 100-pF capacitors (Radio 
Shack Cat. No. 272-123). 

Your total parts cost for this project 
should be under $2. 

If the sparklies are not completely 
cured (or at least considerably less- 
ened), put things back the way they 
were. Although you will probably de- 
stroy the original resistors and capaci- 
tors you removed, replacement parts 
are available at Radio Shack (Cat. No. 
271-009 for the 47-ohm resistors; Cat. 
No. 272-121 47-pF cap will do to replace 






October 1988 THE RAINBOW 59 



DETAILED VIEW 
OF 5 JUMPERS 



Two pairs of solder pads, 
both tabled 5 

Move jumper from position 
shown to other pair 




install jumper here 
cut this jumper 



notch | 




3-wlre Track 0 
sensor cable 



Component 
side FD602 
Logic Board 



n /P" 




i 








0 


O 


i 

i 


> 






W 


i 


► 






E 


O 


i 
i 

i 


> 


» 

: 






i 









4-wire Index hole and 



— j EErEE9 write-protect cable 



^^ySzzzzzf 



Figure 1 



the original 39-pF cap). If the sparklies 
are not quite cured, you might want to 
experiment with different capacitor 
values. Try values ranging between 50 
and 500 pF. 

Remember that opening the case of 
the computer voids any warranty you 
might have with Tandy, and that Tandy 
repair services does reserve the right to 
refuse to repair computers that, in the 
opinion of the repairperson who sees 
the machine, are butchered beyond 
repair by their owners. 

Project Two: FD 500/FD 502 Drive Fix 

There is a potentially serious problem 
that will plague some owners of the 
newest disk drive systems sold by Tandy 
for the CoCo. This problem only occurs 
if you buy both your Drive 0 system and 
your second drive from Radio Shack, 
and you own a model FD 500 or the 
latest FD 502 double-sided drive sys- 
tems. The problem will cause crashed 
disks when copying from Drive 0 to 
Drive 1 under both Disk basic and OS- 
9 (although the problem is more serious 
and frequent under OS-9). However, 

60 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



there is a simple hardware fix for the 
problem. 

Essential Background 

By convention, the disk drive hard- 
ware for the CoCo was set up so that 
when any one drive was being accessed, 
the drive spindle motors on all drives in 
the system are on. All software written 
for the CoCo, especially the Disk Ex- 
tended BASIC and the OS-9 Levels I and 
II operating systems, expect such be- 
havior. This convention differs from the 
conventions of other PC Compatible, 
hardware. There, when any one floppy 
disk is accessed, only that disk's spindle 
motor spins. 

Now, because CoCo's disk-access 
software expects all drive spindle mo- 
tors in the system to be running when 
any one drive is accessed, if you tell the 
computer to read something from one 
drive and copy it to another drive, the 
system software will not wait for the 
motor on the other drive to come up to 
speed. (It knows you have one drive 
running and assumes that all other drive 
motors are at speed.) 



The Tandon TM65L type drives used 
in the FD 500 CoCo drive system and 
the drives used in the FD 502 double- 
sided CoCo drive system have jumpers 
that determine if the drive motor will 
start in response to just a motor-on 
signal (as required for proper CoCo 
operation) or if the motor-on line must 
be active and the drive selected. These 
jumpers were properly set for CoCo 
operation on the Drive 0 unit of the FD 
500 and FD 502 drives. 

However, those buying an addition 
(Drive 1) to their FD 500 and FD 502 
drives are in for a rude surprise. The 
Tandy stock-added drive for the FD 500 
and FD 502 is generally supplied with 
incorrectly set motor logic jumpers. If 
you own a two-drive FD 500 or FD 502 
system, and both drives were purchased 
from Tandy, check to see if your system 
has this problem. 

Under Disk Extended basic, type 
POKE &HFF40,2 and press ENTER. If the 
Drive 1 light and motor are on, there is 
a problem that you can correct using the 
fix described as follows. (If your drives 
were set up properly, only the Drive 1 



» 



light — not the motor — would go on.) 
You can also check this problem by 
opening your drive case to see the 
spindle motors of both drives, typing 
PDKE&HFF40.9 and pressing ENTER. 
Drive O's drive light will go on, and its 
motor should go on, too. If the the 
spindle motor for Drive 1 does not go 
on as well, you will need to correct this 
with the fix described below. 

The FD 500 Fix: 

Open the drive case and expose the 
bare Drive 1 drive. You may need to 
completely remove it, disconnecting the 
34-pin connector and the four-wire 
power connector and removing the two 
screws holding it to the case. Look on 
the drive's circuit board for three stak- 
ing pins arranged in a 90-degree angle 
and labeled JP 7. If pins B and C are 
jumpered, you have found the problem. 
Remove the jumper that connects pins 
B and C, and shift it so that it joins pins 
A and C. If your drive is a different 
version, you may have to hunt for the 
jumper that correctly affects the motor's 
operation. Look for a jumper with zero 
resistance to Pin 16 (motor status) of the 
drive's 34-pin connector. 



The FD 502 Drive Fix: 

The FD 502 drive is a bit more com- 
plicated to fix. The FD 502 drive's 
motor logic control jumper is soldered 
in, and the jumper is relatively inaccess- 
ible, requiring that you not only remove 
the drive from the case, but that you 
also partly or completely remove the 
logic control board from the bare drive 
to gain access to the right jumper. 

Open up the disk drive case and 
remove the top (Drive 1) drive (see 
Figure 1). This will entail removing four 
screws to open the case, the four-wire 
power connector and the 34-wire edge 
card connector from the drive and the 
two screws that hold the drive in place. 

Next, look at the component side of 
the drive's printed circuit logic board. 
The component side has prominent 
cylindrical electrolytic capacitors and a 
number of connectors attached to it. 
(The underside of that board has some 
surface-mount resistors and capacitors 
soldered to it.) Position the board so 
that the edge connector is facing you, 
and the little notch in that connector is 
to your left. You must now identify 
three connectors. 

To the left of the four-wire power 



connector's original position is a con- 
nector that hooks to a three-wire mylar 
cable going to the Track 0 detect sensor. 
Further back and to the right of the 
power connector is a four-wire mylar 
cable that plugs into the circuit board, 
carrying Index-Hole and Write-Protect 
detector information. Behind the four 
wire power connector, some cylindrical 
capacitors and some bare staking pins, 
is an eight-wire mylar connector that 
carries signals from the drive motor's 
heads to the logic board. You will 
probably have to remove all three of 
these cables at their logic board connec- 
tion. 

These three mylar cables are attached 
to little white connectors that, in turn, 
plug into mating connectors on the 
circuit board. Do not tear the mylar 
when removing these connectors. Note, 
too, that the mylar is not plugged 
directly into the connector, as is the case 
with the CoCo keyboard connector. It 
is bonded to a connector, which mates 
to another connector that is soldered to 
the PC board. Do not try to pull the 
connector out by the mylar ribbon. Try 
using a jewelers' screwdriver to carefully 
remove those connectors. 




CEED 

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Hllow 3 Weeks For personal checks, NO CODS, Prices nay change without notice, 



IF YOU DDLI'T BEE 
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October 1988 THE RAINBOW 61 



IC1 pin 19 
(*ENBS line 
going to 
pin 52 of IC6) 



ICS Pin 8 



IKA 



—a 

ground 



14 



13 



12 



11 



10 



3 



rFi 



.1 mfd 



+5VoftsVCC , C5 

*— Pin 16 



74LS10 triple 3 input NAND gate 



L_ 



IC6 
Pin 52 

(*ENBS line) 



IC4 Pin 11 
(A7) 

IC4 Pin 9 
(*CTS) 

IC4 P\ri£b 
(*SCS) 




Be sure to also cut the trace on the printed circuit board of the Mufti- Pak that 
connects Pin 19 of IC1 to Pin 52 of IC6 



Figure 2: Upgrade for Multi-Pak 



After you have removed these three 
connectors, you will find three hold- 
down screws that attach the printed 
circuit board to the disk drive. Remove 
these, and lift out the printed circuit 
board from the drive. 

To the left and behind the notch that 
marks Pin 2 of the 34-pin connector, 
you will see two pairs of pads on the 
circuit board labeled '5'. While the right 
pair is jumpered, the left pair is not. 
Remove the jumper from the right pair 
of pads, and solder one across the other 
pair of pads. 

Put the drive back together, attach 
the connectors and reinstall the drive in 
the cabinet. 

Testing Your Work: 

From Disk BASIC, type POKE 
&HFF40 , 2 and press ENTER. The Drive 
1 light should come on, but none of the 
motors should go on. While PDKE 
&HFF40 , B should cause both motors to 
go on, none of the drive lights should 
go on. PDKE&HFF40,10 should cause 
both motors and the Drive 1 light to go 
on, and PDKE &HFF40,0 should turn 
everything off. If your system behaves 
in that fashion, you've fixed it properly. 
If it behaved in that fashion originally, 
you should not attempt to fix it. 

Thanks to Kevin Darling (KDAR- 
LING) of Raleigh, NC. Kevin was, to my 
knowledge, the first person to discover 
the FD 502 drive problem. Kevin was 
developing driver software for Tony 
DiStefano's No Halt Controller using a 
two-drive FD 502 system and kept 
running into problems. Eventually, he 
discovered the improperly jumpered 
FD 502 Drive 1 unit. It was an impres- 
sive detective job. Kevin later collected 
reports that the FD 500 system had a 
similar problem. Thanks, also, to Glen 
Hathaway (HATHAWAY) who informed 
me of the JP 7 on his Tandon TM65L 
jumper and its effect on the motor logic. 

Project Three: Multi-Pak Upgrade 

As I wrote over a year ago, Tandy has 
recommended that owners of all Multi- 
Pak models who want to use them with 
a CoCo 3 must upgrade them. At pres- 
ent, I am uncertain whether the upgrade 
is required for the new Multi-Paks (Cat. 
No. 26-3124), but still recommend it be 
done. Some of the Cat. No. 26-3134 
Multi-Paks currently sold have an 'A' 
suffix after the catalog number (26- 
3 124 A), and have the upgrade board 
already installed. Those with older Cat. 
No. 26-3124 Multi-Paks should read on 
for instructions on how to make up and 
add this upgrade board themselves. 



The needed upgrade for the older 
Multi-Pak (Cat No. 26-3024) was easy. 
You obtained a new PAL chip for it, and 
replaced the old, socketted PAL chip in 
the Multi-Pak with this new one. For a 
while, that upgrade PAL chip was 
available through Tandy National 
Parts. More recently, National Parts has 
refused to provide that part to end 
users. However, the part is still available 
from third-party CoCo retailers, such as 
Microcom. 

Owners of the smaller, newer (Cat. 
No. 26-3124) Multi-Paks faced a more 
difficult upgrade. A Satellite Board had 
to be ordered from National Parts and 
then properly installed. This board is 
currently hard to get, and the instruc- 
tions for its installation that I provided 
over a year ago are also dated, because 
those old instructions were keyed to 
particular wire colors. Tandy has since 
changed the wire colors of the upgrade 
board, making my original instructions 
nearly useless. 

One of our members on Delphi took 
the trouble to "reverse engineer" the 
Multi-Pak Satellite Board upgrade and 
post a schematic for it. The upgrade 
consists of a single, 35-cent small scale 
TTL logic chip, a 10-cent deglitching 
capacitor and a 5-cent resistor. With the 
information provided in the schematic 
diagram (Figure 2) and a small printed 



circuit board, hardware tinkerers 
should be able to do their own upgrade 
for a fraction of the cost charged by 
Tandy repair. 

Those who would attempt this up- 
grade must be sure to first cut the trace 
that connects Pin 19 of IC 1 to Pin 52 
of IC 6 on the printed circuit board of 
their Multi-Paks. Note that IC 6 is a 
monster square integrated circuit. It is 
a custom chip made just for the Multi- 
Pak. Note, too, that its pins are smaller 
than those of the other ICs — soldering 
to Pin 52, as called for in the upgrade, 
can be a delicate matter. Skill and fine 
tips on your soldering iron are both 
essential. 

The schematic diagram shows the 
74LS10 (triple three input NAND gate) 
IC with its pins arranged as they actu- 
ally are on the chip, but it also shows 
what the pins connect to internally. This 
upgrade turns off the Multi-Pak's data 
bus when addresses that have Bit 7 set 
are presented to it. This protects the 
GIME chip registers from bus conflicts 
with any I/O devices plugged into the 
the Multi-Pak that try to use addresses 
greater than $FF7F. Addresses accessed 
via the *CTS line (SC000 through 
SDFFF) and the *SCS line (SFF40 
through $FF5F) are unaffected. 

Thanks to Jim Johnson (REINDEER), 
who provided this information. /55\ 



62 THE RAINBOW October1988 



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Kuny- fu Dude 



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Delphi Bureau 



Those who have been using Delphi 
for a year or so may be familiar 
with the Delphi Advantage plan. 
Essentially, this plan offers reduced 
rates for members who guarantee to use 
at least $24 worth of online time each 
month. Now Delphi has reduced Ad- 
vantage Plan usage rates to $4.80 per 
online hour. Figure 1 shows a compar- 
ison between Delphi Advantage rates 
and the hourly rates of two other ser- 
vices. 

To sign up for the Delphi Advantage, 
enter USING ADVANTAGE at the Main> 
prompt on Delphi. There is a one-time 
entry fee of $19, and you must commit 
to using at least $24 of online time each 
month (unused portions of the $24 do 
not carry forward to the next month.) 
The $24 usage commitment is applied at 
the beginning of each month. Many of 
you probably use Delphi quite a bit 
more than this already. A quick review 
of your account should be all that is 
necessary to determine if the Delphi 
Advantage would be beneficial to you. 

In addition to the reduced access 
rates, Delphi Advantage members re- 
ceive the monthly Delphi newsletter and 
a monthly summary of usage. The plan 
is open to all members in good standing 
(no outstanding accounts). You can 
cancel online anytime you decide the 
plan is not helping you. 

A New Development 

Through an agreement with Dave 
Thomas (Mortimer), Falsoft, Inc., 
publishers of the rainbow and PCM, 
now manages the Portable Place SIG on 
Delphi. PCM has covered the Tandy 
portables for more than five years now. 
While PCM's magazine coverage of 
portable computers will still exclude 
non-Tandy products, the newly ac- 
quired SIG welcomes users of all port- 
ables. Good luck to the staff as they 
embark in this new direction. 

Oldie, But Goldie 

Last month we covered some useful 
applications of files in the Delphi 
Workspace. Now, let's focus our discus- 



Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is CRAY. 



Lower rates, expansion 
and online editing 

Time for 
a Change 

By Cray Augsburg 

Rainbow Technical Editor 



sion on the files themselves or, rather, 
the text editors used to create them. 

In the past, we have used the CREATE 
command to build text files online. This 
is OK for simple notes. But what if we 
want to correct mistakes in longer files? 



The CRERTE command only lets us write 
the file. Once a file is saved, the only way 
to make corrections is to retype the 
entire file. Here is where Delphi's online 
text editors really come in handy. 

Delphi offers a choice between two 
different line-oriented editors: EDTand 
Oldie. I prefer to use Oldie because its 
command structure is based on slash 
commands as are other areas of Delphi. 
In addition, Oldie shows you exactly 
where you are in the file by supplying 
you with two numbers. The first 
number indicates your current position 
in the file. The second number indicates 
the total number of lines in the file. 

We'll save discussion of EDT for a 
future column. Use the Settings section 
of Workspace to set Oldie as your 
default online text editor. To invoke the 
editor while in Workspace, enter EDIT 
filename. Listed below are the com- 
mands available with Oldie. Please note 
the slashes are used as delimiters in the 
command lines. They are required. 

• /APPEND/j/r/«£/ adds the text string 
to the end of the current line. 




By Don Hutchison 

Rainbow CoCo SIG Database Manager 




v' >'" v y ,4' 



This month in the CoCo SIG, 
we've got some great graphics 
that I'm sure you will enjoy. 

.... ■•. , . ", ■'■ I . ' = Vi ''■<' ; - > '"'^; :">4" '* '• ■' 

OS-9 Online 

In the General topic of the data- 
base, Keith Alphonso (ALPHASOFT) 
uploaded a text file describing Alpha 
Software Technologies* BBS system. 
Jim Johnson (REINDEER) sent in an 
article about creating a customized 
system disk that boots up into an 80- 
column text window. 

The Utilities topic includes Bill 
Brady (OS9UGED), who posted a file 
management utility called Runner, 
and John Beveridge (JOHNTO- 
RONTO), who uploaded a program to 
remove the first block from files sent 
in CoCoBin format by the Wiz. 



In the Patches topic, Chris Burke 
(COCOXT) sent us a patch to correct 
a bug in the Rename command of 
EZGen Version 1.04. Chris also 
uploaded an EZGen script to fix an 
error processing bug in Version 2.2b 
of the Burke & Burke BBFHDlsk.dr 
hard disk driver. Kevin Darling 
(KDARLING) uploaded an 80-column 
patch for TS/Edit, provided by Bob 
Santy. 

In the Telcom topic, Merle Kem* 
merly (TOOK3) uploaded Vision 
3.0.0 of Telstar, a terminal program 
for the CoCo 3 under Level II OS- 
9. Bill Brady uploaded the WizAcia 
device driver and M2w descriptor (the 
ACIA port driver used by the Wiz). 
Bill also posted the source code for 
the SuperBoard version. Warren 



64 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



Time Period 


Speed 


Advantaae 1 


ConiDuServe 2 


GEnie 3 


Evenings/Weekends 
Evenings/Weekends 
Evenings/Weekends 


2400 bps 
1200 bps 
300 bps 


$4 . 80/hr 
$4. 80/hr 
$4 . 80/hr 


$12 . 75/hr 
$12 . 75/hr 
$6.25/hr 


$12 . 50/hr 
$5.00/hr 
$5.00/hr 


Daytime 
Daytime 
Daytime 


2400 bps 
1200 bps 
300 bps 


$12 . 60/hr 
$12 . 60/hr 
$12 . 60/hr 


$12. 75/hr 
$12. 75/hr 
$6.25/hr 


$42 . 50/hr 
$35.00/hr 
$35.00/hr 



1) Delphi Advantage evenings/weekends rate via Tymnet, Telenet or Direct Dial. Daytime Advantage rate via 
Tymnet. Daytime Direct Dial is $8.40/hr and for access via Telenet is $16.20/hr. International pre-paid rate is 
$7.20/hr at all times. Higher rates for access from some locations. Go to USING ADVANTAGE online for details. 

2) CompuServe access via CompuServe network. Add $10 to daytime rate and $2 to evenings/weekend rate for 
access via Tymnet and Telenet. 

3) GEnie access via GEISCO network at half-duplex only. 



Figure 1: Service access rates as of August 1, 1988. 




JOYSTICK 
ALTERNATIVE 
CONTROLLER 

with 



$1 



RAPID FIRE 

ARCADE-TYPE ACTION 
CONTROL USING YOUR 
ATARI-TYPE JOYSTICK. 
SPECIAL PRICE $4 OFF 
O. ou REG. $22.50 

"UNIQUE RAPID FIRE OPTION" 



s$ 

p 9 
K 5 



SAVE TIME ON PAUSE! OUR ORIGI- 
NAL PAUSE CONTROL PLUGS INTO 
YOUR MULTI-PAK, Y-CABLE, OR PRO- 
GRAM SLOT. PAUSE ANY COMPUTER 
FUNCTION AT THE TOUCH OF A 
BUTTON. $14<95 




4-TECHS — NEW HORIZONS 
= FOR THE COCO = 




TECHS 



4-TECHS 
P.O. BOX 2575 
MERRIFIELD, VA 
22116-2575 



Check or money orders, American funds only. For orders 
up to 5 add $2.50 postage and handling, Canada $4 P/H. 4-6 
wks. delivery 



THE POWER STONES 

OFARD 



THE QUEST FOR 
THE SPIRIT STONE 





■i V 



You Ye tired, you're hungry, not to mention you're badly injured. No 
one in town seems to want to talk to you. Your magic sword has stopped 
glowing, the room is dark, you're out of spells, you can't get your wand 
to work, you won't swear to it but you may be lost, you have no idea what 
that last puzzle meant, and you hear something large moving just beyond 
the only door. The old sage warned you there would be days like this! 

"QUEST FOR THE SPIRIT STONE" is an Adventure that will keep 
you playing for hours. It features single keystroke commands, 16 color 
graphics, 100% Hi-Res graphics screens, full game save, extensive playing 
area, level advancement, and the disk is not copy-protected. You choose 
your character's name, race, sex, and ability scores. The use of arrow keys 
simplify movement. This one is easy to play but a challenge to complete! 

"Fun and challenging . . . should find its way into many CoCo 3 software 
collections, " 8/88 RAIN BO W review 

ONLY $18.00 AND WE PAY SHIPPING! 

COLOR COMPUTER 3 AND ONE DISK DRIVE REQUIRED 
North Carolina residents add 5% sales tax 



Send check or money order to: 
or call: 

(919) 582-5121 



THREE C S 
PROJECTS 

P.O. Box 1323, 
Hamlet, NC 28345 



October 1968 THE RAINBOW 65 



HOWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 

1690 N. Elston • Chicago, IL 60622 * orders (800) 443-1444 * inquiries and order status (31 2) 278-1440 



* 5 STAR FINAL 



OCTOBER '88 



CLEAR 



h 
t. » 



HMC CUTS 515 to ®269 



r. 



* < 
• » 



Hundreds of $ off Monitors sighted as Major Factor. HMC is reported to 
have made a special purchase on Magnavox monitors. These items, listed, 
are being offered at remarkable savings. 

MAGNAVOX 7622 12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 350 lines resolu- 
tion at 20 MHz on a dark glass anti-glare CRT with built-in audio and 1 year 
warranty. ($7 shipping) $ 88 7652 green screen also available $88 

MAGNAVOX 8 CM 515 has analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB for 
Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. Built-in 
speaker. 14" screen with 640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 2 years parts 
and labor warranty, reg. list $499 was $298 $269 + $14 Shipping 

CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable only $ 19.95 with Magnavox Monitor 
order. $29.95 w/o monitor. 






» # 
0 



• * 



7622 8CM515 123A 

123A 12" This 12" green screen high resolution monitor offers 80 column 
capability, Zenith quality and a 90-day warranty valid at any of Zenith's 1200 
locations. Retail $199. Our price $ 67.50 ($7 shipping) REPACK 

VA-1 for monochrome and color monitors delivers video interface for CoCo's 
1&2 $ 29.45 ($2 shipping) 

DRIVE 0 +. Howards Drive 0 
gives you a DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 
cable and a HDS DC-5 Disk Control- 
ler for only $ 178 ,45. Double sided 
double density 360K. ($5 shipping) 
Add $24 for a Disto DC-3 




HMC's Guarantee— 
A Promise you can take to the Bank. 



■.. . 



■ < 
» < 



Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compat- 
ibility. If you're not happy with it for 




any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states. APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 



*.* • * • . . • • 

- :v . y:.:. , .*..y. j •»* « : »• 



Buyout on DISTO 
Disk Controllers 

Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. DISTO $ 98 DC-3[a] 
($2 shipping on all DISTO products) 

ADD-ON BOARDS 

DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer 
includes all software to program 
2764 or 27128 chips [B] $ 55 
DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port[Cl $ 40 



tii 




RS-232 $49.95 

($2 ship) 

Replaces R.S. RS-232 board. Plugs in 
drive port or multi pack. 2 MHz 
operation works with OS-9. 

MEB $30 

($2 ship) 

Plugs into multi pak to expand 
DISTO DC-3 bus. Use clock in DC- 
3 and eprom programmer in MEB. 



hotline 



number 

DON'T MSS OUT, 
D0NT MISS OUT, ORDER T6DAY! 

800 / 443-1444 

WE ACCEPT VISA . MASTERCARD : 
. AMERICAN EXPRESS • C.O.D. OR..' 
CHECKS . SCHOOL P.O. 
NEW - DISCOVER CARD 



3 




Use our 800 number! 



For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

inquiries please call (502) 228-4492. 

We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 a year in the United States. Canadian 

rate is $38 (U.S. funds only). Surface rate elsewhere is $68 (U.S.). Airmail 

is $103 (U.S.). All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 

6 to 8 weeks for the first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 

In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 

Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
THE RAINBOW today! 

YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

□ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 

Signature - Card Expiration Date 



Our 800 number is also good for ordering 

RAINBOW ON TAPE or RAINBOW ON DISK! 

Just call (800) 847-0309 anytime from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. Credit card orders only. 
Subscriptions to rainbow on tape are $80 a year in the United States, $90 (U.S. 
funds) in Canada and $105 (U.S.) in all other countries. 

rainbow on disk is $99 a year in the United States, $115 (U.S.) in Canada and $130 
(U.S.) in all other countries. 

Individual issues of rainbow on tape are $10 in the U.S., $12 (U.S.) in Canada and 
all other countries. Individual issues of rainbow on disk are $12 in the U.S., $14 
(U.S.) in Canada, and $16 (U.S.) in all other countries. Kentucky residents please 
add 5% sales tax. 

rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are not stand-alone products; you need the 
magazine for loading and operating instructions and the necessary documentation. 
the rainbow magazine is a separate purchase. 



Give Your Fingers A Break! 

YES! Sign me up: □ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

□ RAINBOW ON TAPE □ RAINBOW ON DISK 

(Available beginning with the October 
1986 issue) 

□ A Full Year □ Single Issue (specify month & year) 

Name - 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number __ , 



Signature 



Card Expiration Date 




TJ 

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The Bigge st 
The Best 
The indispensable 





The 

THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZiRE 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy C0C0 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products' Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
C0C0. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 



Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and 
run. No work. No wait. 

Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
250 new programs: games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications. And, with RAINBOW 
ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at a price that's 
"small potatoes." And now you even have a choice 
about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
sary. 





fiDUEflTURE ("DUEL SOFTWARE 

P.O. BOX 8176, SPARTANBURG, SC 29305 

24 hr. order HOTLINE 

(803) 578-7421 

I. ADD $5 





RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



• /BOTTOM moves the edit pointer to the 
bottom of the file. 

• /CHfMGE/string]/string2/ replaces 
stringl in the current line with string2. 

• /DELETE removes the current line 
from the file. 

• /DIRECTORY shows a directory of 
Workspace files. 

• /EDT invokes EDT. (You can always 
move to EDT from Oldie, but you 
cannot call Oldie from within EDT.) 

• /EXIT leaves the editor and saves the 
file. 

• /FETCH merges an existing Work- 
space file into the file you are now 
editing. 

• 'GLQBftL/ stringl 'string2/ changes 
all occurrences of stringl in the file to 
stringl. 

• /HELP shows the HELP command list 
onscreen. 

• /INVISIBLE toggles the line number 



display on and off. 

• /LOCflTE/s/ri/zg/ finds the next oc- 
currence of string in the file and moves 
the edit pointer to that line. 

• /NEXT moves the edit pointer to the 
next line in the file. You can also use 
/+ to move one line forward and /- 
to move one line backward. 

• /PRINT prints the current line on the 
screen. 

• /QUIT leaves the editor without sav- 
ing the file. 

• /REPLfiCE/Jiew/me/ replaces the cur- 
rent line of text with newline. 

• /5RVE saves the current file — as it 
stands — as a Workspace file. 

• /TOP moves the edit pointer to the top 
of the file. 

• /UPLOAD merges a file from your 
computer into the file you are editing 
at the current position of the edit 
pointer. Uses buffer capture (^R/^T 



flow control). 

• /VIEW toggles display of the text on 
and off. It affects display of text while 
using /NEXT. 

• /WHERE is used to find the current 
position of the edit pointer. (Espe- 
cially useful for those who have used 
/INVISIBLE to turn off the line 
number display.) 



These slash commands can be abbre- 
viated if enough characters are supplied 
for the command to be unique. In fact, 
you can abbreviate all the commands 
down to one character except /DIREC- 
TORY and /EDT (/D defaults to delete 
and /E will exit the editor). 

Next month we'll learn to use these 
commands to make online editing of 
text files a breeze. /R\ 



:. v-w;%. v; ^ v*- zW'l i§kp0 : -'^-'H^ 'i^.''^ • - ? ••••.x- iU>^jw 
Hrach (warock) posted MDBS- Barrett (jbarrett) sent us two of his 

TVe/c, a rework of the public domain Co Co Max 3 pictures. Eric Robi- 

Star Trek game for use on RiBBS chaud (EG ROBICH A UD) uploaded an 

mm m m^&wwm wm, mm m m *™ 

J Term Version 2.9, an upgraded utility for MS-DOS machines. (The 
version of the popular Jimmy Term MS-DOS programs, PKXARC or 
program. Bob Ayella (BOBAYELLA) ARC are required to unARC these 


no-hassle check register for the 
CoCo 3. While Ken Halter (KENH AL- 
TER) posted a program that prints 
four disk directories in a row, Craig 
Moore (craigmoore) posted 
CM Audio, a freeware sound- 
sampling program designed for the 


i jxploaded BBTerm, a freeware termi- files. TC, as used on the CoCo, will 
nal program. Finally, Paul Pollock not work.) Bob Wharton (BOB- 


CoCo 3. Troy House (AMTEX) up- 
loaded his TV Guide Companion. 


(paulbell) posted a set of accessory w HARTON) posted s o me fantasy 
programs ior use wun a L,omy. drawings, a picture oi ine v^anias 
Barry Aaron (barryaaron) up- koala, an NFL logo, and the 1988 
loaded a BASIC09 program for the Baseball All-Stars logo. David Mills 
Graphics and Music topic. Barry's (DAVID MILLS) uploaded a nude 
program generates complicated and drawn by Brad Bansner. Finally, 


In the Hardware Hacking topic, 
jviany vjoouman (maki i uuuf- 
MAN) uploaded a text file that de- 
scribes how to modify a standard Hi- 
Res joystick adapter for use with 
CoCo Max 5. 


attractive patterns of dots. Zack Sessions (Zacks) uploaded 
The Programmers Den topic gives some PM0DE4-to-f1GE conversions 
us Mike Stute (gridbug), who and a program he wrote to do them, 
uploaded the Printf and Scanf The Source for 6809 Assemblers 
functions for the standard C library. topic includes Roger Krupski 

(hardwarehack), who posted an 
CoCo SIG 80-column screen dump program for 
Jerry Semones (JERRYS) posted a the CoCo 3, and Jason Forbes (co- 
humorous text file called And It Was C03K1D), who posted the source code 


The Classic Graphics topic in- 
eluded my posting of the CoCo 
Gallery files for t W elve previous 
months, Jason Forbes' Life tutorial 
graphics and some graphics simula- 
tions for the game and some of John 
Barrett's favorite cute faces. 

Dick White (DICK WHITE) posted 
six archived poll results files in the 


\ pood, which describes the corporate for his game Life. 
decision-making process, in the In the Utilities & Applications 
General Information topic of the topic, Robert Pierce (RplERCE) sent 
database. us a disk editor package, and Eric 
In the CoCo 3 Graphics topic, Tilenius (tilenius) uploaded a util- 


Archives topic. 

Product Reviews & Announce- 
ments included Mike State's review 
of Lyra Version 2.52, and Spencer 
Lepley^s (SPENCELEPLEY) review of 


; #ruce Nelson (docnelson) up- ity that breaks the long lines in 
jloaded his picture of the galaxy. ASCII files (created by many word 
Mark Garbarini (FI9) uploaded four processors) into files containing lines 
^original drawings that he created of a specified length. (This utility 
! %ith The Rat, and I (DONHUTCHI- inserts carriage returns as needed to 
SON) posted the CoCo Gallery files ensure that line length.) Malcolm 
forithrjee previous months. John Heath (MACHEATH) uploaded his 

'i'iw^^^^W : '' i ^^^^m^^$M ,t w^^- 


Max-10. 

In the Data Communications 
lopic, Malcolm Heath posted a ver- 
sion of the WeFax program for the i 
DMP-105/106 printer. 

That does it for this month. See 
you online o n Delphi ! ^ 

■ • Lf^J?? *&H$ti ''>H-?;'" ;■ r 

"'J"??.-" •! h" ■ ■ 'i'iif'-.' J\A > ■ H'tii '/>■ 

• 



68 THE RAINBOW October 1988 




Proven Technology 

New CoCo 3 Utilities 

Great for 512K Systems! From Color Venture and OWl^WARE 



PRINTER LIGHTNING 

A great print spooler which gives you 
44K print buffer from a 128K CoCo and 
up to 438K (200 pages!) from a 512K 
CoCo. With this spooler you can run a 
program while you are printing a file. 
The spooler does not slow down the 
computer to any noticeable extent while 
you are running a second program and 
no lost characters arise. Baud rates 
selectable. Printer Lightning can reside 
in memory along with RAMDISKl 




NEW NEW 



Using 512K CoCo 3 you have access to 
2 additional disk drives in RAM. All 
disk commands are supported, and the 
data are Reset button protected. You 
can now have up to 5 disk drive capa- 
cities on line at once and can assign the 
ram disks to any drive number. By 
making the ramdisk Drive 0, all pro- 
grams which require a lot of drive 
access will run much faster. You can 
have the RAMDISK in memory at the 
same time as the Printer Lightningl 



BACKUP LIGHTNING 

This program is the fastest way to make 
backup copies of your files using a 512K 
CoCo. You can backup 35, 40, or 80 
track disks single or double sided. Both 
RS and OS-9 disks may be backed up. 
The original disk is saved to memory 
and a copy can be made on an 
unformatted disk every 45 seconds! The 
lightning read, write, format, and verify 
routines that were developed make this 
program much quicker that RSDOS or 
OS-9 for backups. This will become one 



of your most used programs! 

Only $19.95 each. 3 for $39.95. 
SPECIAL With our 512K Upgrade (Next page) only $2. each Or 3 for $5! 




The finest graphics/drawing program for the COCO 3! 




r; v-' ■■' w ■■ « - v. v.--* •.■-v.- — ... v . — — 



Da Vinci 3 



16 colors on screen at one time 

Modify each color from 64 available colors 

Use composite or RGB monitor 

Draw with custom paintbrushes 

Full resolution 320 X 192 

Picture converter for conversion of 

COCO 2 pictures to COCO 3 
Multiple text fonts 
Accepts input from joystick, X-pad, 

mouse, or touch-pad 
Boxes, circles, line, paint generation 
Screen dump for Tandy mono and color ink-jet 

printers, (NX- 10 and others pending) 
Sensible price 

No additional hardware required because of 

course/fine joystick movement modes 
Zoom mode for individual pixel editing 
Great on screen menu which is removable at 
the touch of a key to allow full screen edit 



>•:- ..- ■/.• ••»■>'•:-.-•■>.- -.- *■ ■■■■■ - *. . 

£ ■ -■'-•;■•>■■ , ;:.„::: 
. » - '•. ■ ' '■- ■ - - • 



:^:y.:^::»?^:i::r^.:x- 
^:v:x^::fe:^::i:i:::>*:;::::::: 

::3:::'::f:/::'x:^::::::*:>::::::::::: 

■ •■ v ••••• ■"• y 

::<c^::>::^:: K ^^: ? ^:k:::::::::: 



t^*i':::::::::::::::Hn:H:nn:i:^ 



— ................. ... iVrV; ..,,.,.. < . . t 




:v^.::i-.::~^ 

.w..v..i J. . . /■V.V.. .'. _*. .*. . ' - ■ t t T ..Tilll . 

;"::::::::::::::::::::::vn->::":::::xK::;:f::>:^^ 
|:::::::::::::::::::::::::p:vv:>::::::;:::^^ 



filliiliilil? 



: ~ ; : •+ " ~ ^ } 



• .v-jr - ■ E — •• «fe • • •••• • •— - ■ • •■ ■■-''■•• < -+ ■•- • - v-i:" ■ • -Y^aa 

iMiHiliiiiiiBiiii*^ 



»VyV''- 

* „r.::::|:p::™::~p^j3 




128Kor512K COCO 3 



$37.95 



Super I/O Board for OS-9 

Each Board Provides 2 Serial Ports and Centronics Parallel Port 

First Board has Real Time Clock and Beeper.*. With Second Board up to 5 Users 

2 Serial Ports 



The serial ports are usable up to 19,200 Baud, and 
(he parallel port is a true Centronics standard. 
Plug into your multi-pak. On CoCo 3, multi'pak 
must be upgraded. You will have a multi-user 
system with additional computers or terminals 
plugged into the serial ports. An OWL hard drive 
and 512K upgrade are stronelv recommended for 
multi-user systems. 

Intro Price... 

BOARD 2. ..$145. 



(up to 10,200 BAUD) 



$1 69. 



Into 
MULTI PACK 









CENTRONICS 
PARALLEL 
PORT 



P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 
ORDER LINES (only) — 

(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 




Pro ven 

On the Razor's Edge of 



Basic and OS-9 Hard 
Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or 

Business Users 



Every hard drive which has been 
produced by OWL- WARE during the 
last 3 years is complete. A system con- 
sists of software, hard drive, controller, 
heavy-duty power supply, and LR Tech 
Interface. There are no hidden costs for 
assembly or testing. When a drive sys- 
tem is ordered, we fully assemble, test, 
and burn-in the system for 3 full days. 
This ensures dependability and op- 
timum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo 
hard drive systems and parts for more 
than 3 years. This is the longest history 
in the CoCo market of any system. 
Some other advertisers are stating that 
they have one of the most reliable sys- 
tems for the CoCo with ail of 4 months 
history in the CoCo hard drive market* 
We have reached our position in the 
hard drive market by providing our cus- 
tomers with a quality product that they 
(and we) can be proud to own and use. 



Because of many requests for a lower 
price system in kit form, we are now 
selling a kit of all parts at a significant 
discount compared to our regular 
prices. We recommend this kit (or any 
kits offered by any other supplier) only 
to those who have experience in 
electronic assembly and OS-9. 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 

and t 




TO Meg, 






§|||i^ 













in 










OWL Hard Drive BASIC 3 

There have been several ads in this 
magazine about BASIC for Color 
Computer hard drive systems. These 
ads sometimes only tell a part of the 
story. Our BASIC system price in- 
cludes assembly, testing, and 3-day 
burn-in period. We do not require a 
Multi-pak to operate. 

Our hard drive systems are fast, reli- 
able, and reasonable in price. This has 
been proven by hundreds of users over 
the past 3 years. We do not have to turn 
off error checking for speed. We 
achieve high speed BASIC from a uni- 
que indexing method. 

The table below will summarize some 
of the key points about our BASIC hard 
drive system and two other systems. We 
believe that we have the best BASIC in- 
terface for CoCo hard drives available. 



BASIC Hard Drive Systems 

Feature OWL B&B RGB 


Drive Portion Entire 
Available 


Entire (?) 


Entire 


User Sets YES 

BASIC/OS-9 

Partitions 


Yes 


No 


Add to Exist- YES 
ing OS-9 
Drive Without 
Reformat 


Yes(?) 


No 


Drives 0-3 YES 
Hard/Floppy 


No 


Yes 


Built in Park YES 


No 


Yes 


Soeed* FAST 


Fast 


Fast 



* All feature details are believed to be 
true at time of writing and are subject 
to change. We believe that our BASIC 
hard drives are the fastest due to our in- 
dexing method, but all three systems 
are fast. On ours all BASIC commands 
work including DSKINI, DSKI$, and 
DSKOl 



Prices: Wi^jWjthout Hard 

$35./$79. 





Technology 



the Color Computer Frontier 




Bonus! 

Special 

Bundled 

Software 

with any 

Disk Drive 

Purchase! 




Floppy Drive Systems 

The Highest Quality for Service Now and for Years to 

Come 

Use our WHISPER DRIVE for the finest, quietist drive 

Drive 0 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $219. 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, 

cable, case, power supply, and manual 

Drive 1 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

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A program to make your keyboard perform like 
the big boys — and more 



Get More Power 

m/ ■ ■ M |^very month more and more hard- 

m m wT | | III W 111 I f Beware and software seems to come 

1 | Vr III I \^ Vl I Lout for the CoCo, and the first 

thing most CoCo owners get is a new 

^flfe ■ ^ | | keyboard. Most available keyboards 

m f\M S\ m£ /\lf M fM contain four extra keys, either four 

I 111 | I |V fr' m# III 1 ^fl ill function keys or two function keys and 

%/F lUr I m W ^# \# W, I the ALT and CTRL keys. The program 

J presented in this article will patch BASIC 

so the extra keys will perform functions 
similar to those of the PC Compatibles. 
Also added are a print spooler (32K 
buffer for 64K machines), an added 
device number for owners of the Radio 
m Shack Sound-Speech Pak, and a screen 

By ^llChflGl SwCGt print (dump to printer) routine for both 

Mike Sweet is a student at Cayugo 
County Community College. He has 
won awards for programming in the 
New York state math symposium and 
hopes to make programming his career. 




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* alt + letter or number = 


Command 


* ctrl + letter = Command 


@ 


PRINT @ 


S 


SIN( 


@ 


screen print (dump to pnnterj 


A 


RTN( 


T 


TAN( 


A 


CHR$(1) 


B 


BfiCKUP 


u 


USING 


"T"\ 

B 


CHR$(2) 


C 


COS( 


V 


VERIFY 


C 


CHR$(3) or BREAK 


D 


DRTR 


w 


WRITE 


D 


CHR$(4) 


E 


EDIT 


X 


PEEK 


E 


CHR$(5) 


F 


FILES 


Y 


POKE 


F 


CHR$(G) 


G 


GOTO 


z 


PPOINT( 


G 


CHR$(7) 


H 


HEX$( 


0 


RND(0) 


H 


CHR$ ( B ) or leit arrow 


I 


INPUT 


1 

1 


tt-1, 


I 


CHR$(9) or right arrow 


J 


JOYSTi<( 


2 


»-2, 


J 


CHR$(10) or down arrow 


K 


KILL 


3 


tt-3, 


K 


CHR$(11) 


L 


LINE 


4 


&H 


L 


CHR$(12) or clear 


M 


MEM 


5 


&0 


M 


CHR$(13) or ENTER 


N 


NEW 


6 


CHR$( 


N 


CHR$(14) 


0 


□PEN 


1 


STRINGS ( 


0 


CHR$(15) 


P 


PRINT 


8 


INSTR( 


P 


CHR$(1G) 


Q 


P5ET 


9 


MID$( 


Q 


CHR$(17) 


R 


PRESET 






R 


CHR$(1B) Or SH1FT-U 










S 


CHR$(19) 


Unshifted 






T 


CHR$(20) 


* Fl 


RUN and ENTER 






XT 

u 


CHR$(21) or sH/FT-leit arrow 


* F2 


LIST and ENTER 






V 


CHR$(22) 










w 


CHR$(23) 


Shifted 






X 


CHR$(24) 


* Fl 


SCREEN 0 and enter 




Y 


CHR$(25) 


* F2 


POKE 111, 254 :D IB and enter 


z 


CHR$(2G) 



* Keyboards with four function keys: Use Fl for ALT, F2 for CTRL, and F3 and 
F4 for Fl and F2. 

Figure 1 



the text screen and any graphics screens. 

The standard CoCo keyboard con- 
tains 54 keys, with the SHIFT keys tied 
to the same input so that the computer 
"sees" only 53 keys. Radio Shack did 
not allow for the four extra keys,, so the 
normal key scan will not return correct 
codes for these keys. To utilize the extra 
keys, you will need an assembler (ED- 
TASM+ or similar). As listed, the 
program will work on a 32K CoCo or 
a CoCo 3. It can be altered to work with 
16K and 64K machines as follows: 

For 64K systems, make the following 
changes: 

100 ORG $7800 

1690 CMPX 8$FF00 

2100 CMPX 8$FF00 

and add the following lines: 

1660 STfi $FFDF 

1680 STA $FFDE 

2070 STfi $FFDF 

2090 STfi $FFDE 

For 16K systems make the following 
changes: 

100 ORG $3000 

1690 CMPX tt$4000 

2100 CMPX tt$4000 

Please note that the 64K version will not 
work properly on a CoCo 3. 

Once you have assembled the pro- 
gram to tape or disk, go into BASIC, type 
CLEAR 200,&H6FFF for 64K or CLEfiR 
200,&H27FF for 16K and load the 
program. Execute the program, remem- 
bering that you must never type EXEC 
more than once after you have loaded 
it — doing so will destroy all the old 1/ 
O routine pointers. If you have typed 
the program hi correctly, all the keys 
should function normally. Holding 
them down should yield auto-repeat. 
The extra keys should work as shown 
in Figure 1. 

The program initializes itself at 
START by redirecting Basic's I/O rou- 
tines (screen output, keyboard input 
and printer output). Note that the 
INKEY$ function address is changed to 
point to a new routine (lines 340 
through 430) so that it will check the 
keyboard buffer. The between- 
statements routine is also redirected for 
the same reason (lines 440 through 450). 
BASIC also checks to see if you have 
specified a legal device number (as in a 
PRINTtt-1 statement) and reports an 
FC error if you haven't. In order to 
allow a device number of -3 for the 
Speech Pak, this also had to be changed 



(lines 460 through 470). The next 550 
lines contain the code for the interrupt 
routine (NEWIRQ, for keyboard entry 
checking and print spooling); the out- 
put to the Speech Pak (SPEECH); for 
output to the screen (CHRDUT); for 
spooler use (both PRINTR for entry of 
print data into the buffer and SERIRQ 
for spooler output to the printer); and 
the keyboard scan routine itself 
(P0LKEY, PDLCAT, NEW16A, GET|<EY and 
NEW19A). 

Now the screen print program 
(SCRKEY) is encountered. Since SCRKEY 
is called from P0LKEY, the stack has to 
be reset in order for it to return cor- 
rectly. Then Location SFF22 is read. If 
it is >127 (negative), then the program 
goes to GRAPH. Otherwise the text 
screen is assumed to be seen, and text 
from $400 to $5FF is converted to 
ASCII format and sent to the printer. 
If it is a graphics' screen, the starting 
address of the screen is assumed to be 
in Address $BA (Basic's screen 
pointer). 

A page code, CHR$ ( 12 ) , is sent to the 
printer, along with a half forward 
linefeed code. On most Tandy printers 
this is a CHR$(27) plus CHR$(28) 
combination; if yours is different, 
change lines 6480 and 6500 to LDA 
numbers, putting the codes after the 
number signs. 



Then the old line length is saved, and 
the width is set for the graphics mode 
you are in. If it is one of the four-color 
modes, the program moves to COLOR for 
the dump. Otherwise, it produces a 
reversed screen image to the printer 
(white dots appear black). This can be 
changed by de-commenting (removing 
the asterisks) in lines 6930 and 7440. 

Once the dump is done, the program 
restores the old line length and full 
linefeed. The codes used by Tandy are 
CHR$ ( 27 ) and CHR$ ( 54 ) . If your print- 
er uses different codes, change lines 
7050 and 7070 the same way you did 
before. 

In order to produce a large image, I 
decided to use the block graphics char- 
acters available on Tandy printers (lines 
7660 through 7730). If your printer does 
not use the same codes (two codes per 
line, in Hex), replace them with codes 
corresponding to the low-resolution 
graphics characters (see Getting Started 
With Color BASIC). If your printer 
does not support these characters, the 
screen print routine will work only for 
the text mode. One possible solution is 
to add a graphics dump routine. 

A note to Tandy printer owners: 
Look in your printer manual for details 
on the block graphics characters. Some 
print modes (Correspondence, etc.) do 
not allow graphics. 



74 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



Details of the I/O Routines 

Several changes were made to the 
printer routine, the first one being the 
addition of a print spooler. Memory 
locations &H9B and &H9C contain the 
carriage width (number of characters 



per line) and the current printer head 
position. When the end of a line is 
reached, a carriage return, CHR$ ( 13 ) , is 
sent. Also, locations &H97 and &H98 
are the current page line number and the 
maximum page line number. When the 



The listing: KEYPOWER 










00100 


ORG 


S7000 


7000 BE 

r r r 


010D 


00110 START 


LDX 


S10D 


7003 BF 


70B6 


00120 


STX 


1+NEWRTI 


7006 8E 


70AF 


00130 


LDX 


#NEWIRO 


7009 BF 


010D 

r r 


00140 


STX 


S10D 


700C B6 


010C 

r r 


00150 


LDA 


810C 


700F B7 


70B5 


00160 


STA 


NEVRTI 


7012 BE 


0168 

r 


00170 


LDX 


$168 


7015 BF 


70CC 


00180 


STX 


1+NEW67 


7018 8E 


70B8 


00190 


LDX 


#NEV167 


701B BF 


0168 


00200 


STX 


3168 


7#1E B6 


0167 


30210 


LDA 


S167 


7021 B7 


70CB 


00220 


STA 


NEW67 


7024 BE 


016B 


00230 


LDX 


S16B 


7027 BF 


758B 


00240 


STX 


1+HEW6A 

■L 1 11 u ff* V CL 


7JJ2A 8E 


7586 


00250 


LDX 


#NEW16A 


702D BF 


016B 


00260 


STX 


S16B 


7030 B6 


016A 


00270 


LDA 


S16A 


7033 B7 


758A 


00280 


STA 


NEW 6 A 


7036 CC 


2950 


00290 


inn 


#S295ff 


7039 97 


96 


00300 




* " 


703B D7 


9B 






7 X# 


703D qc 


0040 


00320 


LDD 


#$40 


7040 DD 


97 


00330 


STD 


<$97 


7042 BE 


0128 


00340 


T nv 

lAJJL 


ei or cw UTTWfTTnM Pitt innorcc TnrATTniu 


7045 86 


14 


00350 


LDA 


#$14 # OF ADDRESSES 


7047 108E 


7087 


00360 


LDY 


#NEW128 NEW TABLE LOCATION 


704B 10BF 0128 


00370 


STY 


$128 


704F EE 


81 


00380 SI 


LDU 


f X++ 


7051 EF 


Al 


00390 


STU 


» Y++ 


7053 4A 




00400 


DECA 




7054 26 


F9 


00410 


BNE 


Si • 


7056 GE 


75D3 


00420 


LDU 


#INKEY 


7059 EF 


3C 


00430 


STU 


-4,Y 


705B 8E 


75E6 


00440 


LDX 


#NEW19A BETWEEN STATEMENTS BREAK CHECK 



current page line number is equal to the 
maximum, a form feed, CHR$(12), is 
sent. This way you won't print over the 
perforations in the printer paper. The 
page length (in Line 320) and the line 
length (second two digits of Line 290) 
can be from. 01 to FF Hex (1 to 255 
decimal) arid can be changed without 
affecting the. program's function. Also, 
the baud rate is set to 29 Hex (1200 
baud) and can be changed for printers 
that handle faster baud rates. Replace 
the first two digits in Line 290 with the 
Hex value for the baud rate you want. 

The Speech Pak output routine (lines 
1470 through 1610) merely does what 
Radio Shack's program on Page 1 1 of 
the C0C0 manual does, but now all you 
have to do is type: 

• PRINT tt-3, "HELLO" 

arid you will hear the computer say 
"hello." One interesting side effect of 
this is that Extended BASIC uses Device 
8-3 for input from a modem. That 
could make writing terminal software 
considerably easier! The SPEECH rou- 
tine itself keeps scanning Address 
&HFF7E until Bit 7 is set (ready to 
receive signal — >127). Then it sends a 



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October 1988 THE RAINBOW 75 



character to the Speech Pak and re- 
turns. 

The spooler routine is standard issue. 
After putting the character into a circu- 
lar buffer, it updates the line position 
and page line values as necessary. The 
actual printing is done during an IRQ 
interrupt, where the routine checks to 
see if the printer is busy or not. If not, 
it will, if possible, pull a character out 
of the buffer and send it to the printer. 

POLKEY is quite similar to BASIC'S 
keyscan routine at $A1C1, but the 
addition of the four keys and their 
functions required some overhauling. 
First, the SHIFT key is not masked from 
the rollover any longer, although press- 
ing it alone will not return a code. The 
same holds true for the ALT and CTRL 
keys. For this reason, holding down one 
of these keys for more than a second and 
then pressing another key with it gives 
an instant repeat of that key. 

Following the POLKEY routine is the 
PDLCfiT routine, which is called during 
the IRQ interrupt. First it calls POLKEY 
to see if a key has been pressed. If not, 
it returns. If the code returned is 
negative, the corresponding eight- 
character string is put into the keyboard 



type-ahead buffer. Otherwise, the code 
returned is put into the buffer. The 
buffer will hold up to 128 characters. If 
the buffer is full, the speaker will beep 
a warning to you. 

At Line 4170 the ALT keys are de- 
fined, starting with ALT-@. Each defini- 
tion may be up to eight characters long, 
and the ASCII code of the last character 
must be 128 or greater for the program 
to recognize the end of its definition. 
Also, each definition must start on an 
even eight-byte boundary from RLTCHR. 
Thus, RMBs are used to fill up the rest 
of the unused bytes between definitions. 

The function key definitions come at 
Line 5270 and may be up to 16 charac- 
ters long. Therefore, they must come at 
even 16-byte boundaries to each other, 
again using RMBs. 

NEW16A is called during the input 
routine and at the OK prompt. If the 
keyboard is being called for input, the 
routine will wait, with the cursor flash- 
ing, until the buffer has some characters 
in it. Once a key has been pressed, the 
cursor is erased and the buffer is up- 
dated, moving the buffer contents down 
one character. Then the keystroke is 
returned to the input routine. 



NEW1SR is the between-statements 
break and shift-@ check. The key- 
board buffer is checked to see if a 
keypress has been made. If so, NEW19A 
checks to see if it was BREAK or SHIFT- 
@. If it was neither, it continues with the 
Extended BASIC routine at $82C0 (for 
TRDN tracing). If BREAK was pressed, 
the screen is restored to text and the 
spooler buffer is reset. The BASIC rou- 
tine waits until another key is pressed, 
and then goes to the Extended BASIC 
between-statements routine. 

Conclusion 

Once you get this program up and 
running, you'll probably wonder how 
you got along without the use of your 
function keys. I also own a Tandy 1000, 
and it was the basis for my new key- 
board driver. I must say, though, that 
even though that computer is supposed 
to run five times faster than the CoCo, 
it lacks the ease and friendliness of the 
CoCo. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 206 E. Main St., Elbridge, NY 
13060. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 



705E BF 


019B 


00450 


STX 


$19B 


70FA ED 


81 


00930 


STD 


,X++ 


7061 8E 


7079 


00460 


LDX 


#NEW161 


70FC 


8C 


0600 


00940 


CMPX 


#$600 


7fJ64 BF 


0162 


00470 


STX 


$162 


70FF 


25 


F3 


00950 


BLO 


SCLOOP 


7067 86 


7E 


00480 


LDA 


#S7E 


7101 


35 


96 


00960 C0NT1 


PULS 


A,B,X,PC 


7069 B7 


0167 


00490 


STA 


$167 


7103 AF 


61 


00970 CHROUT 


STX 


l.s 


706C B7 


016A 


00500 


STA 


$16A 


7105 


34 


02 


00980 


PSHS 


A 


706F B7 


010C 


00510 


STA 


$10C 


7107 


9E 


88 


00990 


LDX 


<$88 


7072 B7 


019A 


00520 


STA 


$19A 


7109 


81 


20 


01000 


CMPA 


#$20 


7075 B7 


0161 


00530 


STA 


9161 


710B 


25 


15 


01010 


BLO 


CTRLCH 


7078 39 




00540 


RTS 




710D 


4D 




01020 


TSTA 




7079 32 


62 


00550 NEW161 


LEAS 


2,S 


710E 


2B 


0A 


01030 


BMI 


CONT2 


707B CI 


FD 


00560 


CMPB 


#$FD 


7110 81 


60 


01040 


CMPA 


#$60 


707D 2D 


05 


00570 


BLT 


DNERR 


7112 


24 


04 


01050 


BHS 


*+6 


707F CI 


0F 


00580 


CMPB 


#15 


7114 


8A 


40 


01060 


ORA 


#$40 


7081 2E 


01 


00590 


BGT 


DNERR 


7116 


20 


02 


01070 


8RA 


CONT2 


7083 39 




00600 


RTS 




7118 


80 


60 


01080 


SUBA 


#560 


7084 7E 


A61F 


00610 DNERR 


JMP 


SA61F 


711A A7 


80 


£1090 C0NT2 


STA 


,x+ 


7087 




00620 NEW128 


RMB 


40 


711C 


9F 


88 


01100 


STX 


<$88 


70AF BD 


734B 


00630 NEWIRQ 


JSR 


POLCAT 


711E 20 


AE 


01110 


BRA 


SCR 


70B2 BD 


71DF 


00640 


JSR 


SERIRQ 


7120 


35 


96 


01120 CRTS 


PULS 


A.B.X.PC 


70B5 7E 


8000 


00650 NEWRTI 


JMP 


$8000 


7122 


81 


08 


01130 CTRLCH 


CMPA 


#8 


70B8 34 


04 


00660 NEV167 


PSHS 


B 


7124 


26 


0F 


01140 


BNE 


CONT3 


70BA D6 


6F 


00670 


LDB 


<S6F 


7126 


9E 


88 


01150 


LDX 


<$88 


70BC 27 


45 


00680 


BEQ 


CHROUT 


7128 


BC 


0400 


01160 


CMPX 


#$400 


70BE CI 


FD 


00690 


CMPB 


#$FD 


712B 


27 


F3 


01170 


BEQ 


CRTS 


70C0 1027 


00A4 


00700 


LBEQ 


SPEECH 


712D 


86 


60 


01180 


LDA 


#$60 


70C4 5C 




00710 


INCB 




712F 


A7 


82 


01190 


STA 


.-x 


70C5 35 


04 


00720 


PULS 


B 


7131 


9F 


88 


01200 


STX 


<$88 


70C7 102B 


00C2 


00730 


LBMI 


PRINTR 


7133 


35 


96 


01210 


PULS 


A,B,X,PC 


70CB 7E 


8000 


00740 NEW67 


JMP 


$8000 


7135 


81 


0D 


01220 C0NT3 


CMPA 


#$0D 


70CE 8C 


0600 


00750 SCR 


CMPX 


#$600 


7137 


26 


14 


01230 


BNE 


C5 


70D1 25 


2E 


00760 


BLO 


CONT1 


7139 


86 


60 


01240 


LDA 


#$60 


70D3 8E 


0400 


00770 


LDX 


#$400 


713B 


D6 


89 


01250 


LDB 


<$89 


70D6 EC 


88 20 


00780 SCROLL 


LDD 


32.X 


713D 


C4 


IF 


01260 


ANDB 


#$1F 


70D9 ED 


81 


00790 


STD 


,X+-h 


713F 


50 




01270 


NEGB 




70DB EC 


88 20 


00800 


LDD 


32.X 


7140 


CB 


20 


01280 


ADDB 


#$20 


70DE ED 


81 


00810 


STD 


,X++ 


7142 


9E 


88 


01290 


LDX 


<$88 


70E0 EC 


88 20 


00820 


LDD 


32, X 


7144 


A7 


80 


01300 C0NT4 


STA 


,x+ 


70E3 ED 


Bl 


00830 


STD 


,X++ 


7146 


5A 




01310 


DECB 




70E5 EC 


88 20 


00840 


LDD 


32, X 


7147 


26 


FB 


01320 


BNE 


C0NT4 


70E8 ED 


81 


00850 


STD 


,X-t-+ 


7149 


9F 


88 


01330 


STX 


<$88 


70EA 8C 


05E0 


00860 


CMPX 


#$5E0 


714B 


20 


81 


01340 


BRA 


SCR 


70ED 25 


E7 


00870 


BLO 


SCROLL 


714D 


81 


0C 


01350 C5 


CMPA 


#$0C 


70EF 9F 


88 


00880 


STX 


<$88 


714F 


26 


CF 


01360 


BNE 


CRTS 


70F1 CC 


6060 


00890 


LDD 


#$6060 


7151 


8E 


0400 


01370 


LDX 


#$400 


70F4 ED 


81 


00900 SCLOOP 


STD 


,X++ 


7154 


CC 


6060 


01380 


LDD 


#$6060 


70F6 ED 


81 


00910 


STD 


,x++ 


7157 


9F 


88 


01390 


STX 


<$88 


70F8 ED 


81 


00920 


STD 


,x++ 


7159 


ED 


81 


01400 C6 


STD 


,X++ 



76 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



71 *»n pn 

/ 13 O Lit 


0 1 


ai a.i a 


t> I u 


,X++ 


71C2 0F 


A rt 

9C 


rt?*t i 

01870 




CLR 


<$9C 


71 *»n VT\ 


fli 

Ol 


cm no 


CTT\ 


,A++ 


71C4 0F 


97 


rt 1 rt fl rt 

01880 




CLR 


<$97 


71 *»TT VTl 


fli 

Ol 




o 1U 


,X++ 


71C6 


35 


A 1 

93 


rt 1 n rt 

01890 




PULS 


A,X,CC,PC 


71<?1 nr 

/ID J. Oli 


aaact 
yoyy 


fli A Art 

y i44y 




#5600 


71C8 0C 


A rt 

9C 


01900 


UP2 


INC 


<$9C 




r J 


rt 1 /. B rt 

y 14 jj? 


BLO 


rt £ 

Co 


71CA 


96 


rt rt 

9C 


01910 




LDA 


<$9C 


71 fiH ^ 


OA 
70 


fli A £ fl 


rULS 


A,B ,X, PC 


71CC 


91 


rt n 

9B 


01920 




CMPA 


<?9B 


71 £fl 1 *I 


a a 
j?4 


rt1 A 7 fl curr «u 
yl47y SFtECti 


T1TTT r» 

PULS 


B 


71CE 


25 


EC 


01930 




BLO 


UPRTS 


/ 10A J/ 


ft* 
OA 


mi /.an 

y i4oy 


T I? A d 

I.KAS 


a rt 

2.S 


71D0 0F 


rt 

9C 


01940 




CLR 


<$9C 


71 ?n 
71oG 7D 


FF7E 


JJ1h9J? SPwAIT 


TST 


>s r"77«i t-» 

$FF7E 


71 n9 

/ 1UA 


us 

0 0 


0D 


01950 




LDA 


#$0D 


7 1 C V k 

/lor 2A 


FB 


01500 


BPL 


SPWAIT 


71 nA 


ah 


9F A002 


01960 




JSR 


[$A002] 


71 71 D7 


PP7P 


ni c i 

01510 


r-» r*f> * 

STA 


SFF7E 


71 nfl 


j j 


A **1 

93 


01970 




PULS 


A.X.CC.PC 


7 1 7 A 1 A 

717** 34 


02 


rti c on 

01520 


*nrt Ttrt 

PS us 


A 


7115A 




7774 


01980 


SPPOS 


FDB 


BUFSTR 


71 7 £ D C 

7170 Bo 


mnl 

FF01 


01530 


T T** A 

LDA 


A v«T*rt1 

$FF01 


7inc 




•I **• m t 

7774 


01990 


SPSTRT 


FDB 


BUFSTR 


TITO OA 

7179 oh 


P7 

F7 




ANDA 


mA Apt n 1 

#9F7 




■J 7 




02000 


SERRTI 


RTS 




717B B7 


F ryjl 




STA 


4*> T?» rt 1 

9FF01 


7 IDS 

* i-iV A7 


Bfi 


FF22 


02010 


SERIRQ 


LDA 


$FF22 


71 IP it 

/17c. Bo 


FFJJ3 




LDA 


<*• ti rt rt *1 

SFF03 


71E2 


*T*T 




02020 




LSRA 




71B1 8A 


08 


01570 


ORA 


#8 


71E3 


25 

*C J 


F9 


02030 




BCS 


SERRTI 


718J B7 


FF03 


/fl cart 

01580 


STA 


/*■ nn/1 1 

SFF03 


71 PS 


DL 


7 IDC 


02040 




LDX 


SPSTRT 


A/ n £ 

7186 86 


3C 


rt 1 C Art 

01590 


T TV. A 

LDA 


#60 


71E8 


BC 


71DA 


02050 




CMPX 


SPPOS 


linn H T 

7188 B7 


FF23 


rti if. fl fl 


STA 


SFF23 


71EB 


27 


Fl 


02060 




BEQ 


SERRTI 


Ti an i c 

718B 35 


82 


rti £1 rt 


TITTT rt 

PULS 


a *nrt 

A, PC 


71ED 


A6 


80 


02080 




LDA 


,X+ 


"Finn m. 0 

718D AF 


PA 

E*> 


01620 rRINTR 


STX 


rt 

»s 


71EF 


8C 


8000 


02100 




CMPX 


#$8000 


718F 34 


03 


rti £7rt PBftAT 

yiojy spool 


*n rt T_?rt 

PSHS 


rt rt a 

CC , A 


71F2 


25 


rt rt 

03 


rt n 1 1 /t 

02110 




BLO 


SERPRT 


7191 BE 


7 IDA 


/ti C t n 

01o*+0 


LDX 


rt n Tirt rt 

SPPOS 


71FA 


8E 


*i •*> *%) # 

7774 


02120 




LDX 


# BUFSTR 


7194 1A 


50 


rt1 £ Crt 

01650 


An rt rt 

ORCC 


H A C rt 

#$50 


71F7 


BF 


71DC 


02130 


SERPRT 


STX 


SPSTRT 


7196 A7 




rti £7(1 

01670 


STA 


,x+ 


71FA 


8D 


M] M% 

13 


02140 


SERIAL 


BSR 


STOPBT 


Tina o 

7198 8C 


8000 


rti £<\(\ 

01690 


CM FX 


jiffl fi tin 

#$8000 


71FC 


5F 




02150 




CLRB 




71 A» t K 


03 


rti T/'lrt 

01700 


T>T rt 

iJU) 


rt , nT5'T , C , 


71FD 


8D 


12 


02160 




BSR 


SENDBT 


71 An a c* 

719D 8E 


7774 


rti ii n 

01710 


T f.U 

LDX 


#BUFSTR 


71FF 


C6 


08 


02170 




LDB 


#8 


71Ay BF 


*J 1 T»l 

7 IDA 


01720 SPRTS 


STX 


SPPOS 


7201 


34 


/v y 

04 


02180 




PSHS 


B 


71A3 BC 


71DC 


01730 VAITSF 


CMPX 


/-* 7-. j7| . ■ ■ |\ mk 

SPSTRT 


7203 


5F 




02190 


SLOOP 


CLRB 




71A6 27 


FB 


rt 1 *i y. rt 

017*+0 


Ti TE*rt 

BEQ 


WAITS P 


7204 44 




yrf rt rt rt rtf 

02200 




LSRA 




71A8 81 


0D 


rti l c rt rtnn & tf* 

017 50 UPDATE 


CMPA 


n rt n+\ 

#$0D 


7205 


59 




02210 




ROLB 




71 a a 4 £ 

71AA 26 


1 7 

12 


rti t £ n 

yi7oy 


BNE 


TTT5 1 

UP1 


7206 


58 




rtj i«* rt |-h « 

02220 




ASLB 




7 LAG JJF 


AM 

9C 


rt 1 *T *1 rt 

01770 


rt T Y*i 

CLR 


J J*J rt /** 

<$9C 


7207 


8D 


08 


02230 




BSR 


SENDBT 


71 IP rtr» 

71AE 0C 


a 7 
97 




INC 


<$97 


7209 


6A 


E4 


02240 




DEC 


,s 


71B0 96 


97 


rti i rt rt 

01790 


LDA 


<$97 


720B 26 


F6 


02250 




BNE 


SLOOP 


710 7 Q1 

71BZ 91 


9o 


rti o flrt 

01800 


rt\/ TJ A 

CnrA 


<S98 


720D 


32 


C 1 

61 


fl *> f> £ fl 

02260 




T "rt a rt 

LEAS 


1 rt 

1,S 


7 1 B A *> C 

71B4 Z5 


06 


rt 1 o 1 rt 


BLO 


ttt*iti mrt 

UPRTS 


720F C6 


rtrt 

02 


/I rt rt rt) rtT 

02270 


rt fH rti Trt rti 

STOPBT 


LDB 


. . rt 

#2 


71 « f Of 

71B6 86 


0C 


rti a A rt 

01820 


T T\ A 

LDA 


#$0C 


7211 


F7 


FF20 


rt rt rt rt /rr 

02230 


><Mj P« h«ffk Mb 

SENDBT 


STB 


$FF20 


71B8 AO 


9F A002 


rti n o /v 

01830 


JSR 


r a a rtrt rt 1 

[SA002] 


7214 


9E 


95 


02290 




LDX 


<$95 


71BC 35 


93 


01840 UPRTS 


PULS 


A,X,CC,PC 


7216 


34 


10 


02300 




PSHS 


X 


71BE 81 




01850 DPI 


CMPA 


#$0C 


7218 


BD 


7346 


02310 




JSR 


DELAY 


71C0 26 


06 


01860 


BNE 


UP2 


721B 


35 


1? 


02320 




PULS 


X 



MJK & MJK3 



DOS 



WHY BUY ADOS 
WHEN YOU CAN HAVE 



RAINBOW 

CWTtflCATtOI* 



THIS 



»rt T: Mjr-DOS for COCO I. 2. and 3 JJ9.93 
H«?it poverfull operotine system for the CoCo ererl 
llloTi up to 3 DS-80 track drives or standard drirei. The 
DS-80 drirej ore xoftvare configurable to standard Radio 
SSdtt* format in order to maintain compatibility. Allo-vs 
L 'lLnl file name specification vith wildcards. All the files will 
be displayed alphabetically, including the date that the file 
▼ as tared. Dse one command to HILL or COPT a number of 
(Mini that meet the global filename specification (can be a 
full disk!) in one run or one at a time upon user prompt 
iT -try). Use the poTerfull CHAIN command to use programs of 
any length. Use the built in FULL SCREEN EDITOR to ellotr 
Fait and easy program modification Tou can even use the IMJ'K 
coHKUDd that ▼ill put you (after an error) in the modified 
line editor or get the automatic error trap routine vith 
fully spelled out error names. Hit one key to repeat the last 
command. Tou -rill also get error trap, repeat key, AUTO, 
DATE. CAT (tvo columns of directory vith only the filenames 
ft extensions). VAIT. ROHM . BAUD. FIND, OLD. DATES, (string in 
basic program), LCOPT (groups of basic lines), REPL (to 
replace a string). TYPE (list a text file on screen/printer). 
SPLIT or JOIN basic lines. SAY for reel spoken text, -rord peek 
& poke and many more.... MJC-DOS is primarily intended For 
double-sided 80-track drires (7201! each) 

•ALLOVS YOU TO RE AD/ V RITE/ TOR MAT 35/40 DISCS ON A SOT DRIVE* 

"""" IFTE M" A BLE »»** FA EI ^■-■ATEFi FO B J T E jL B *•«» 

HJ tM2 DUsTcCirujOliir^ 149.93 

BUILT IN RAM DISC AND RAM TEST COMMANDS 
Monitor-Dif assembler (COCO 1. 24,3) £J9.9> 
Source-Code Gen erator/LabelCenerator (C0C01.2A.3) 1*19. 9"J 

JB REMOTE rs-2J2 pack driver for bbs etc. (C0C01.2.A3) Jlfl.H} 
NEVCEY (C0C03) nev key scan— girei you true ALT A CTRL ^ ! 5. an 
VEVEEY232(COC03)~*-JB REMOTE and KEVCEY in one package ?2' liTi 
RTC -real time hardware clock for the coco 1.2. A3 jj^.D*! 

CALL OR VRITE (COD ORDERS OC) 
COCO CONNECTION Of PHTL-A. P-A. 
5003 11 ST. 
PHTLA-, VA. 19120 
PHONlv* 215-457-1809 POXClv -AND D-AT-A 
COnPUSfRiyi 1D« 72317.437(Li:-Al>i: pkone*) 




< 

> 
n 



VIP Calc 

"MORE USEABLE FEATURES" 

FEBRUARY 1985 "RAINBOW" 

Now every CoCo owner has access to a calculating and planning 
tool better than VisiCalc™, containing all its features and 
commands and then some. VIP Calc displays 32, 51 , 64 or 85 
characters by 21 or 24 lines right on the screen. VIP Calc allows up 
to a 33K worksheet with up to 512 columns by 1024 rows I In 
addition, VIP calc has multiple windows which allow you to 
compare and contrast results of changes. Other features include 
16 DIGIT PRECISION • trig, functions • averaging • algebraic 
functions • column and row ascending or descending SORTS • 
locate formulas or titles in cells • block move and replicate • global 
or local column width • limitless programmable functions • works 
with any printer, Embed printer control codes for customized 
printing. Combine spreadsheet tables with VIP Writer documents to 
create ledgers, projections, statistical and financial budgets and 
reports. Requires 64K. DISK $59.95 



VIP Speller 

INCLUDES 50,000 WORD DICTIONARY 

VIP Speller works with ANY ASCII file 
created by most popular word processors. 
It automatically checks text files for words 
to be corrected, marked for special 
attention or even added to the 50,000 
word Dictionary. You can even view the 
word in context. Words can be added to or 
deleted from the dictionary or you can 
create your own dictionary! DISK $34.95 




< 

r 
r 



Turn the page for more VIP software! 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 77 



721D 16 


?126 


0233? 


LBRA 


DELAY 




722? 32 


7B 


02340 POLKEY 


LEAS 


-5,S 


SET ASIDE STACK SPACE 


7222 6F 


63 


0235? 


CLR 


3,S 


NO KEY HELD DOWN 


7224 7A 


7345 


?236? 


DEC 


TIMER 


TIME HELD-1 


7227 26 


05 


0237? 


BNE 


POLL1 


IF NOT HELD LONG ENOUGH FOR REPEAT 


7229 86 


S>3 


0238? 


LDA 


#$3 


REPEAT DELAY 


722B BD 


7318 


?239? 


JSR 


RESET 


RESET ROLLOVER TABLE FOR RECOGNITION 


722E 8E 


?152 


?24?? POLL1 


LDX 


#$152 


ROLLOVER TABLE 


7231 4F 




?241? 


CLRA 






7232 4A 




?242? 


DECA 




A— 1 


7233 A7 


E4 


?243? 


STA 


,s 


SCAN # 


7235 A7 


62 


?244? 


STA 


2,S 


ROW MASK 


7237 A6 


62 


0245? FOLL2 


LDA 


2,S 


ROW MASK 


7239 49 




?246? 


ROLA 




NEXT ROW 


723A 1JJ24 JJ0AF 


0247? 


LBHS 


PDONE 


IF NO KEY PRESSED 


723E A7 


62 


?248? 


STA 


2.S 


SAVE NEW ROW MASK 


724? 6C 


E4 


?249? 


INC 


,s 


NEXT SCAN ROW 


7242 BD 


7303 


0250? 


JSR 


SCAN 


GET THIS ROW'S KEY PRESSES 


7245 A7 


61 


?251? 


STA 


i,s 


SAVE BIT MASK 


7247 AS 


84 


?252? 


EORA 


,x 




7249 A4 


84 


?253? 


ANDA 


,x 


NO REPEAT(UNLESS TABLE RESET) 


724B E6 


61 


?254? 


LDB 


1.8 




724D E7 


8? 


?255? 


STB 


,X+ 


NEW POLL VALUE 


724F 5C 




?256? 


INCB 




+1 


725J? 27 


E5 


0257? 


BEQ 


FOLL2 


IF NO BITS OFF (KEY PRESS) 


7252 6C 


63 


?258? 


INC 


3,S 


KEY PRESSED 


7254 4D 




0259? 


TSTA 






7255 27 


E? 


02600 


BEQ 


P0LL2 


IF ITS A KEY THAT IS BEING HELD DOWN, IGNOR 


E IT 












7257 C6 


F8 


0261? 


LDB 


#$F8 


-8 


7259 CB 


?8 


?262? P0LL3 


ADDB 


#$?8 


+8 


725B 44 




?2630 


LSRA 






725C 24 


FB 


?264? 


BHS 


POLL3 


LOOP UNTIL ROW*8 IS COMPUTED 


725E 8E 


7343 


?265? 


LDX 


#DELAY- 


3 POINT TO @ SIGN 


7261 EB 


E4 


?266? 


ADDB 


,s 


ADD TO COL FOR SCAN CODE 


7263 27 


3? 


0267? 


BEQ 


EXCEPT 


IF @ SIGN KEY, IT'S AN EXCEPTION 


7265 CI 


1A 


?268? 


CMPB 


#$1A 




7267 2F 


IE 


?269? 


BLE 


LETTER 


IF A-Z 


7269 8E 


72F1 


027?? 


LDX 


#TSTART 


-$36 


726C CI 


29 


?271? 


CMPB 


#$20 




726E 2F 


25 


?272? 


BLE 


EXCEPT 


IF ARROW KEYS OR SPACE BAR 


727? 8E 


72D3 


?273? 


LDX 


#TSTART 


-$54 


7273 CI 


3? 


?27/,? 


CMPB 


#$3? 




7275 2C 


IE 


0275? 


BGE 


EXCEPT 


IF ENTER OR OTHER KEY 


7277 BD 


73?C 


?276? 


JSR 


SHIFT 


ELSE ITS CHR$(33)-CHR$(63),DO SHIFT CHECK 


727A CI 


2B 


02770 


CMPB 


#S2B 




727C 2F 


02 


?278? 


BLE 


*+4 




727E 88 


40 


?279? 


EORA 


#?4? 





TANDY COMPUTER 
DISCOUNTS 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-3334 CoCo 3 

26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 

PRINTERS 

26-2802 DMP 106 
26-2808 DMP 440 
26-1280 DMP-1 30 

Complete line of Tandy (Daisy Wheel) print wheels 

MSDOS COMPUTERS 

25-1053 TANDY 1000 HX 
25-1 600 TANDY 1000 TX 
25-4071 TANDY 3000 HL 
25-1023 CM-5 color monitor 
25-1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 



165.00 
259.95 



179.95 
599.00 
279.00 



599.00 
999.95 
1,300.00 
249.95 
110.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 




PROGRAMS • PERIPHERAL S • SUPPLIES • Sf RVlCt 



Fast Delivery... 
Friendly Service 

Now in our6th year! 




Avatex 1200e 
with Coco Cable 



* NEW LOW PRICES * 

$89 
99 



$199 
209 



Reviewed in 
this month's 
Rainbow! 



Avatex 1200e, Cable 
AUTOTERM... $129 




Avatex 2400 

with Coco Cable 
(Coco 3 only) 

with RS232 Cable* 225 



RAINBOW 

CUrmcATOM 



Avatex 2400, Cable 
AUTOTERM . . . $239 



'Coco 1. 2 requires Deluxe RS-232 Pak 



• Call • • Shop by Modem • 

51 3-396 SOFT 51 3-396 SHOP 



vtSA 




2235 Losantiville. Cincinnati, OH 45237 

&HlfPlh4 wiUM-cfiirgld II bur ACTUAL CDS* 
OMfr rtcldtrtlu Add 5.5% T j:h COD add 2.50 



J. 



78 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 







U70/Jrt 


TSTA 






79R1 OH 
I *\0 1 


1 A 
-LA 






PTM ATI 






i a 


170 0711 




#S1}J 




/toj zp 


1 £ 
10 


ft o a i/i 
02830 


BRA 


tSTVI ATI 

FINAL1 




70B7 A 

/ Zo 7 UA 


40 


no 0 /. n T PTTrD 

02840 LETTER 


ad n 

ORB 


#S4jJ 




7 Lav bu 


7 o. nn 
1 JJ4C 


/JO gcA 


JSR. 


SHIFT 




7«OP Qi 

7Z8C BA 


flfl 7 A 

pilA 




0RA 


H 1 T A 

S11A 




Hoc Zo 


JJC 


>JZS7J? 


BNE 


V T V"T ATI 

FINAL1 




7901 f*A 


0 CI 




nD n 
UKo 


11(77 


nt! TPffl T7T\ T PMHIU'n 

SHIFTED LETTER 


/zyj zy 


0 Q 
JO 


no o an 


BRA 


FINAL3 




to Q c eg 

/ZtO Do 




(T7flfl7 T7V^t?nfP 

y2yyjy EXCEPT 


AS LB 




2 CODES /KEY 


to □ c on 


7 /■ 
74 


/to nil] 

y/yip 


BSR 


SHIFT 


SHIFT KEY CHECK 


70QQ O 7 


J* 1 


/TO A7/1 

y2V2y 


Tl 17' A 

BEQ 


*+3 


IF NOT PRESSED 


7Z9A 5C 




/to o o n 
JJ29 JJ* 


INCB 






729B Eo 


85 


JJ294j3 


LDB 


B ,X 


CHARACTER CODE RETURNED 


7Z9D CI 


£ n 

60 


J?295y FINAL1 


CM?B 






7Z9F 24 


o /* 
2C 


/f O n £ /I 

y296y 


BHS 


FINAL3 


IF A LOWERCASE LETTER, NO ALT CODE FOR IT 


/ ZA1 UJL 




(1007(1 

]#Z77y 


CnrB 


#S3B 




7«iQ O C 

/ZAJ 


0 Q 
£0 


>*i 9oJ? 


BLO 


FINAL3 


IF LOWER THAN A #, NO CODE FOR IT EITHER 


77A e /»1 

7ZA5 CI 


/. n 

40 


no n n n 

yZ99JJ 


/^W77 v> 

CpCPB 


#S40 




7A l 1 o C 

7ZA7 25 


/T A 


WW? 


BLO 


ALT2 


IF ITS A #, GET ITS CODE 


70 AO Q C 

7ZA9 86 




J?Jj71j7 ALT1 


Y n a 

LDA 


#SF7 


ELSE DO 


7 0 A D Q n 


£ 1 
01 


no non 


rj <7 n 


SHIFT+Z 


A "IT ft T tniip /7Tt 

AN ALT CHECK 


72 AD 27 


7 O 

12 


ft i ft i n 

j?3J33y 


ti p a 

BEQ 


FINAL2 


IF NOT PRESSED 


7ZAF CB 


/. n 
40 


n *a ft/, ft 


ADDB 


i j o y n 

#54JJ 




7An1 on 

7ZB1 2JJ 


1 A 

1A 


JJ3J35^ 


BRA 


FINAL3 


RETURN AN ALT CODE 


7ZBJ CI 


i a 


non£n itpti 
JJjjVoy ALTZ 


UMr B 


#339 


> # 


7«n c O O 

/ Lai ZZ 


10 


JJ3JJ7JJ 


BHI 


T* T XT A T ^ 

FINAL 3 


YES 


70 O 7 Q £ 

1 La 1 o o 


U7 

r 7 


/it ota n 


T T\ A 

LDA 


dAA T? 7 

#SF7 


PT «T* T\rt A VT 

ELSE DO AN 


72B9 oO 


c O 


J?3j39j7 


fi 77, 

BSR 


SHIFT+2 


ALT CHECK 


70 PO O 7 

7ZBB *7 


1 fi 




BEQ 


X\T ATI 

FINAL J 


IF NOT PRESSED 


77 DI\ Q 

/ZBD CB 


OB 


/in i A 
J7311JI 


A T> T\ T> 

ADDB 


ju /71 f 7> 


T"* ▼ A 19 T7 f7ftlf TT) 11 a V 7 A V IW y% a 1*s w 

ELSE RETURN AN ALT CODE 


7 0 or O n 
i Las ZJff 


JJC 


y3l2j? 


OS A 

BRA 


TJTW ATT 

FINAL J 




TOf*7 0£ 

7ZC1 oo 


Er 


nil on PTM1T7 
JJjl3y HNAL2 


LDA 


j. App 

#§EF 


DO A CTRL CHECK 


7ZCJ oD 


49 


n o 1 /. n 
JJ J14JJ 


r> r* n 

BSR 


SHIFT+2 




77/1 e 77 

7ZC3 Zl 


TIC 

0° 


mien 
J3315J? 


BEQ 


FINAL3 


IF NOT PRESSED 


7ZC7 C0 


4? 


316)7 


SUBB 


#54JJ 


ELSE RETURNED IS 64 LESS 


7ZC9 1)127 


ft O £ O 

JJ369 


JJ317JJ 


T TJ t? r\ 

LbLQ 


SCRKEY 


IF CTRL-@, DO A SCREEN DUMP 


7ZCD E7 


64 


JJ318(J FINAL3 


STB 


4,S 


SAVE ASCII CHARACTER 


7ZCF 8E 


JJ45E 


y319y 


LDX 


#$45E 




7ZD2 BD 


77*£ 

7346 


{332JJJ3 


JSR 


f\T7'f a «* 

DELAY 




7ZDS oo 


FF 


JJ321JJ 


Y n a 
LDA 




NO ROW MASK 


T A fx 7 An 

7ZD7 8D 


O A 

2A 


"322j7 


BSR 


SCAN 




72D9 4G 




nil AAM 


INCA 






72DA 26 


11 


{1324}? 


BNE 


FD0NE 


IF KEY STILL BEING PRESSED 


72DC A6 


62 


?325? 


LDA 


2.S 


ELSE MAYBE SCAN WAS A MISTAKE 


72DE 8D 


23 


03260 


BSR 


SCAN 




72E0 Al 


61 


03270 


CMPA 


i,s 





8& 



ArYvwhalr Admiral 



" Avast ye swabbies!" Roars Captain 
Blackboard. "Hoist the JoLLy Roger! When 
I gives the word, give 'em a broadside! 11 
As Blackbeard's flotilla closes upon 
it's prey, a lookout suddenly cries, 
"Captain, a British Man-of-War!" 



The time-honored parlor game of Battleship, 
enhanced by intelligent computer opponents, 
comes to your Coco3 complete with sloops and 

galleons. Up to eight opponents, any mix of human 
or computer. Available for the Coco3 with 80 

column display and one disk drive. $14.95 + $2 
S&H. WA residents please add 7.6% sales tax. 



Order from: Eversoft 
P.O. Box 3354 
Arlington, Wa 98223-3354 



Personal check, money orders, and COD orders 

welcome. 
GEnie mailbox: EVERSOFT 





VIP Writer 

RATED "BEST" IN SEPT '88 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Writer has all the features of VIP Writer 
III described elsewhere in this magazine 
except the screen widths are 32, 51, 64 & 
85. Screen colors are black, green and 
white, double clock speed is not supported, 
Spooler is unavailable. Hard disk is not 
supported. Even so, VIP Writer is the 
BEST word processor for the CoCo 1 & 2! 
VIP Writer includes VIP Speller AT NO 
ADDITIONAL COST. DISK $69.95 



VIP Database 

"ONE OF THE BEST" JULY 
1984 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Database has all the features of VIP 
Database III described elsewhere in this 
magazine except the screen widths are 51, 
64 & 85. Screen colors are black, green 
and white, double clock speed is not 
supported, Spooler is unavailable. Even so, 
VIP Database is the most complete 
database for the CoCo 1 & 2! DISK $49.95 




< 
> 

> 
> 



Turn the page for more VIP software! 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 79 



72E2 26 


09 


03280 


BNE 


PDONE 


72E4 CI 


12 


03290 


CMPB 


#$12 


72£6 26 


17 


03300 


BNE 


PRTS 


72E8 73 


011A 


03310 


COM 


SUA 


72EB 20 


10 


03320 


BRA 


NOKEY 


72ED 6D 


63 


03330 PDONE 


TST 


3,S 


72EF 27 


07 


03340 


BEQ 


PD1 


72F1 B6 


7345 


03350 


LDA 


TIMER 


72F4 81 


5B 


03360 


CMPA 


#$5B 


72F6 26 


05 


03370 


BNE 


NOKEY 


72F8 86 


5C 


03380 PD1 


LDA 


#$5C 


72FA BD 


7318 


03390 


JSR 


RESET 


72FD 6F 


64 


03400 NOKEY 


CLR 


4,S 


72FF 32 


64 


03410 PRTS 


LEAS 


4,S 


7301 35 


82 


03420 


PULS 


A, PC 


7303 B7 


FF02 


03430 SCAN 


STA 


SFF02 


7306 B6 


FF00 


03440 


LDA 


SFF00 


7309 8A 


80 


03450 


ORA 


#$80 


730B 39 




03460 


RTS 




730C 86 


7F 


03470 SHIFT 


LDA 


#$7F 


730E B7 


FF02 


03480 


STA 


$FF02 


7311 B6 


FF00 


03490 


LDA 


SFF00 


7314 43 




03500 


COMA 




7315 84 


40 


03510 


AN DA 


#$40 


7317 39 




03520 


RTS 




7318 B7 


7345 


03530 RESET 


STA 


TIMER 


731B CC 


FF08 


03540 


LDD 


#$FF08 


731E 8E 


0152 


03550 


LDX 


#$152 


7321 A7 


80 


03560 RLOOP 


STA 


,x+ 


7323 5A 




03570 


DECB 




7324 26 


FB 


03580 


BNE 


RLOOP 


7326 39 




03590 


RTS 




7327 


5E5F 


03600 TSTART 


FDB 


$5E5F 


7329 


0A5B 


03610 


FDB 


$0A5B 


732B 


0815 


03620 


FDB 


$0815 


732D 


095D 


03630 


FDB 


$095D 


732F 


2020 


03640 


FDB 


$2020 


7331 


3012 


03650 


FDB 


$3012 


7333 


0D0D 


03660 


FDB 


$0D0D 


7335 


0C5C 


03670 


FDB 


$0C5C 


7337 


0303 


03680 


FDB 


$0303 


7339 


9m 


03690 


FDB 


$0000 


733B 


9999 


03700 


FDB 


$0000 


733D 


A5A9 


03710 


FDB 


$A5A9 


733F 


A7AB 


03720 


FDB 


$A7AB 


7341 


9999 


03730 


FDB 


$0000 


7343 


4013 


03740 


FDB 


$4013 


7345 


5C 


03750 TIMER 


FCB 


$5C 


7346 30 


IF 


03760 DELAY 


LEAX 


-l.X 


7348 26 


FC 


03770 


BNE 


DELAY 


734A 39 




03780 


RTS 




734B BD 


7220 


03790 POLCAT 


JSR 


POLKEY 


734E 4D 




03800 


TSTA 




734F 27 


0F 


03810 


BEQ 


BEEP-1 


7351 2B 


31 


03820 


BMI 


FILLBF 


7353 F6 


739D 


03830 PUTBUF 


LDB 


NUMCHR 


7356 2B 


09 


03840 


BMI 


BEEP 


7358 7C 


739D 


03850 


INC 


NUMCHR 


735B 8E 


739E 


03860 


LDX 


#CHRBUF 


735E A7 


85 


03870 


STA 


B,X 


7360 39 




03880 


RTS 




7361 B6 


FF23 


03890 BEEF 


LDA 


SFF23 


7364 84 


F3 


03900 


ANDA 


#$F3 


7366 B7 


FF23 


03910 


STA 


$FF23 


7369 F6 


FF22 


03920 


LDB 


?FF22 


736C CA 


02 


03930 


ORB 


#S02 


736E F7 


FF22 


03940 


STB 


$FF22 


7371 8A 


04 


03950 


ORA 


#$04 


7373 B7 


FF23 


03960 


STA 


$FF23 


7376 86 


40 


03970 


LDA 


#$40 


7378 F6 


FF22 


03980 


LDB 


SFF22 


737B C8 


92 


03990 BLOOP1 


EORB 


#$02 


737D F7 


FF22 


04000 


STB 


$FF22 


7380 4A 




04010 


DECA 




7381 26 


F8 


04020 


BNE 


BLOOP1 


7383 39 




04030 


RTS 




7384 C6 


08 


04040 FILLBF 


LDB 


#8 


7386 80 


80 


04050 


SUBA 


#$80 


7388 3D 




04060 


MUL 




7389 108E 


741E 


04070 


LDY 


#ALTCHR 


738D 31 


AB 


04080 


LEAY 


D,Y 


738F A6 


A0 


04090 FLOOP1 


LDA 


,Y+ 


7391 2B 


05 


04100 


BMI 


FNEXTl 


7393 BD 


7353 


04110 


JSR 


PUTBUF 


7396 20 


F7 


04120 


BRA 


FLOOPl 


7398 84 


7F 


04130 FNEXT1 


ANDA 


#$7F 


739A 16 


FFB6 


04140 


LBRA 


PUTBUF 


739D 


99 


04150 NUMCHR 


FCB 


9 


739E 




04160 CHRBUF 


RMB 


128 


741E 


50 


04170 ALT CUR 


FCC 


/PRINT/ 



NO, IT WAS RIGHT, BUT KEY RELEASED 
ELSE MAYBE IT WAS SHIFT- 0 
NO 

ELSE SWITCH BETWEEN UPPER/LOWERCASE 
DON'T RETURN A KEY CODE FOR IT 

IFKEY NOT PRESSED 



7423 
7424 
7426 



7429 
7 42 A 



52 
49 
4E 
54 
C0 

41 
54 
4E 
A8 



NO KEY CODE RETURNED 



04180 
04190 
04200 



04210 
04220 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 



$C0 
2 

/ATN/ 



$A8 
4 



742E 



7433 
7434 
7436 



7439 
743A 
743E 



7441 
7442 
7446 



7449 
744A 
744E 



7452 
7453 
7456 



7459 
745A 
745E 



7462 
7463 
7466 



746A 
746B 
746E 



7474 
7475 
7476 



7479 
747A 
747E 



7482 
7483 
7486 

7488 
7489 
748E 

7490 
7491 
7496 



7499 
749A 
749E 



74A2 
7 4 A3 
74A6 



74AA 
74AB 
74AE 



74B4 
74B5 
74B6 



74B9 



42 
41 
43 
4B 
55 
D0 

43 
4F 
53 
A8 

44 
41 
54 
CI 

45 
44 
49 
D4 

46 
49 
4C 
45 
D3 

47 
4F 
54 
CF 

48 
45 
58 
24 
A8 

49 
4E 
50 
55 
D4 

4A 
4F 
59 
53 
54 
4B 
A8 

4B 
49 
4C 
CC 

4C 
49 
4E 
45 
A8 

4D 
45 
CD 

4E 
45 
D7 

4F 
50 
45 
CE 

50 
52 
49 
4E 
D4 

50 
53 
45 
54 
A8 

50 
52 
45 
53 
45 
54 
A8 

53 
49 
4E 
A8 



04230 



FCC 



/BACKU/ 



04240 
04250 
04260 



04270 
04280 
04290 



04300 
04310 
04320 



04330 
04340 
04350 



04360 
04370 
04380 



04390 
04400 
04410 



04420 
04430 
04440 



04450 
04460 
04470 



04480 
04490 
04500 



04510 
04520 
04530 



04540 
04550 
04560 

04570 
04580 
04590 

04600 
04610 
04620 



04630 
04640 
04650 



04660 
04670 
04680 



04690 
04700 
04710 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 

FCB 
RMB 
FCC 

FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



?D0 
2 

/COS/ 



$A8 
4 

/DAT/ 



$C1 
4 

/EDI/ 



$D4 
4 

/FILE/ 



$D3 
3 

/GOT/ 



$CF 
4 

/HEX$/ 



$A8 
3 

/INPU/ 



$D4 
3 

/JOYSTK/ 



$A8 
1 

/KIL/ 



$0CC 
4 

/LINE/ 



$A8 
3 

/ME/ 

$0CD 
5 

/NE/ 

$D7 
5 

/OPE/ 



$CE 
4 

/PRIN/ 



$D4 
3 

/PSET/ 



$A8 
3 

/PRESET/ 



04720 
04730 
04740 



04750 



FCB 
RMB 
FCC 



FCB 



$A8 
1 

/SIN/ 



$A8 



80 THE RAINBOW October1988 



74BA 




0476J7 


RMB 


4 




28 








74BE 


54 


04770 


FCC 


/TAN/ 




30 










41 








74FB 


A9 


n i A A /¥ 

04990 


FCB 


A a A 

§A9 




4E 








74FC 




05000 


RMB 


A 

2 


74C1 


A8 


04780 


FCB 


3A8 


74FE 


23 


05010 


FCC 


J ■ . m M 

/#-!/ 


74C2 




04790 


RMB 


4 




2D 








74C6 


55 


04800 


FCC 


/US IN/ 




31 










53 








7501 


AC 


05020 


FCB 


SAC 




49 








7502 




05030 


RMB 


4 




4E 








7506 


A A 

23 


05040 


FCC 


/#-2/ 


74CA 


C7 


04810 


FCB 


$C7 




2D 








74CB 




04820 


RMB 


3 




A A 

32 








74CE 


56 
45 


04830 


FCC 


/VERIF/ 


7509 
750A 


AC 


05050 
05060 


FCB 
RMB 


A A A> 

$AC 
4 




52 








750E 


23 


05070 


FCC 


/#-3/ 




49 










2D 










46 










33 








74D3 


D9 


04840 


FCB 


$D9 


7511 


AC 


05080 


FCB 


SAC 


74D4 




04850 


RMB 


2 


7512 




05090 


RMB 


4 


74D6 


57 


04860 


FCC 


/WRITE/ 


7516 


26 


05100 


FCC 


/ & / 




52 








7517 


C8 


05110 


FCB 


$C8 




49 








7518 




05120 


RMB 


6 




54 








751E 


26 


05130 


FCC 


/V 




45 








751F 


CF 


05140 


FCB 




74DB 


A3 


04870 


FCB 


$A3 


7520 




05150 


RMB 


6 


74DC 




04880 


RMB 


2 


7526 


43 


05160 


FCC 


/CHRS/ 


74DE 


5? 

45 
45 


04890 


FCC 


/PEEK/ 




48 
52 
24 










4B 








75 2A 


A8 


API ^fl 

05170 


FCB 




74E2 


A8 


04900 


FCB 


$A8 


752B 




05180 


RMB 


3 


74E3 




04910 


RMB 


3 


752E 


53 


05190 


FCC 


/STRINGS/ 


74E6 


5? 
4F 
4B 


04920 


FCC 


/POK/ 




f- i 

54 
52 
49 








74E9 


C5 


04930 


FCB 


SC5 




4E 








74EA 




04940 


RMB 


4 




47 








74EE 


5? 


04950 


FCC 


/PPOINT/ 




24 






A A Q 
f AO 




5? 








7535 


A8 


05200 


FCB 




4F 








7536 


49 


A? E rt 1 

05210 


FCC 






49 




















4E 








■ 


53 










54 










54 








74F4 


A8 


04960 


FCB 


$A8 




c A 

52 






A O 

§AB 


74F5 




04970 


RMB 


1 


753B 


A6 


05220 


FCB 


74F6 


52 


04980 


FCC 


. /RNDC0/ 


753C 




05230 


RMB 


2 




4E 






4D 


05240 


FCC 


/MIDS/ 




44 










49 









Si 



^^^'.^^'AW.WA^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^V■^^W 

★ ★ * NEW ★ ★ ★ 

BASH by Steve Bjork 

Based on a popular arcade game which we can't mention (But sounds like "Art 
Gannoyed"). BASH challenges you to clear the screen by "BASHING" your ball 
through multiple brick layers. Of course you'll have help getting through this 20 
level game by activating options like, Slow Ball, Expanded Paddle, Multi-Ball 
and morel 

Reg $29.95 Introductory Special $24.95 
Color Computer 3 only 

★ * ★ NEW ★ ★ ★ 
WARP FIGHTER 3-D by Steve Bjork 

Blast into Hyper-Drive with, this fun-filled starship shoot-em-up! You'll have a 
captain's eye view out of your 3-D cockpit as you try to rid the galaxy of the evil 
enemy forces. Game includes 3-D glasses and works on any Color T. V., 
Composite or RGB monitor. 

Reg $29.95 Introductory Special $24.95 EXTRA GLASSES $2.95 

Color Computer 3 only 

★ ★ ★ NEW ★ ★ ★ 

MINE RESCUE by Steve Bjork 

A terrible mine disaster has just occurred and it will be up to you and your talents 
to enter the mine, jump the pits, avoid the spikes, fight off the bats and other 
creepy crawlers and get air to the needy victims. Mine rescue features over 2 
megabytes of arcade-style graphics, real time music and multiple mine levels. 
Hours of fun I 

Reg $29.95 Introductory Special $24.95 

Color Computer 3 only 

★ ★ ★ NEW ★ ★ ★ 

SAMPLE DISK 

Tired of getting burned on games you haven't seen? Try our sample disk. Well 
ship the above three games on a demo disk for you to see for yourself how good 
they are. if you decide to purchase the full versions, we will deduct the sample 
disk price from your order (3-D Glasses Not Included). 
Demo Disk $4.95 

SUPER SPECIAL GET ALL THREE GAMES FOR $60,001 

ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS - Game Point Software is looking for talented 
writers. Top royalties guaranteed. 

GAME POINT SOFTWARE 
Send Check or Money Order to: p. 0. BOX 6907 

Add $3.00 S/H BURB ANK, CA 91 51 0-6907 



V, 



i 



I 




The VIP Integrated Library combines all six popular VIP 
programs - VIP Writer*, Speller, Calc, Database*, Terminal 
and Disk-Zap - into one program on one disk. The program 
is called VIP Desktop. From the desktop you have instant 
access to word processing with a spelling checker always in 
attendance, data management with mail-merge, spread- 
sheet financial" analysis, telecommunications and disk 
maintenance. Just move the hand to the volume on the 
bookshelf and the application is there. 64K req'd. $149.95 
*CoCo 3 owners: See our FULL PAGE AD! 



SD Enterprises 

(503)663-2865 P.O. BOX 1233. Gresham, OR. 97030 
Please add $3 for shipping. COD orders add an additional $2.25. Personal 
checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. All other orders shipped the same day. 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 81 





44 








75F6 81 


13 


05920 


CMPA 


#$13 




24 








75F8 26 


09 


05930 


BNE 


NEW9A 


7542 


A8 


05250 


FCB 


$A8 


75FA 8D 


D3 


05940 


BSR 


POLL 


7543 




05260 


RUB 


3 


75FC 7D 


739D 


05950 PI 


TST 


NUMCHR 


7546 


52 


05270 


FCC 


/RUN/ 


75FF 27 


FB 


05960 


BEQ 


PI 




55 








7601 8D 


CC 


05970 


BSR 


POLL 


•■ 


4E 








7603 7E 


82C0 


05980 NEW 9 A 


JMP 


$82C0 


7549 


8D 


05280 


FCB 


$8D 


7606 8D 


C7 


05990 BREAK 


BSR 


POLL 


754A 




05290 


RMB 


12 


7608 8E 


7774 


06000 


LDX 


#BUFSTR 


7556 


4C 


05300 


FCC 


/LIST/ 


760B BF 


7 IDA 


06010 


STX 


SPPOS 




49 








760E BF 


71DC 


06020 


STX 


SPSTRT 




53 








7611 4F 




06030 


CLRA 






54 








7612 B7 


FF22 


06040 


STA 


$FF22 


755A 


8D 


05310 


FCB 


$8D 


7615 B7 


FFC0 


06050 


STA 


$FFC0 


755B 




05320 


RMB 


11 


7618 B7 


FFC2 


06060 


STA 


$FFC2 


7566 


53 


05330 


FCC 


/SCREEN 0/ 


761B B7 


FFC4 


06070 


STA 


$FFC4 




43 








761E B7 


FFC6 


06080 


STA 


$FFC6 




52 








7621 B7 


FFC9 


06090 


STA 


$FFC9 




45 








7624 B7 


FFCA 


06100 


STA 


$FFCA 




45 








7627 B7 


FFCC 


06110 


STA 


$FFCC 




4E 








762A B7 


FFCE 


06120 


STA 


$FFCE 




20 








762D B7 


FFD0 


06130 


STA 


$FFD0 




30 








7630 B7 


FFD2 


06140 


STA 


SFFD2 


756E 


8D 


05340 


FCB 


$8D 


7633 7E 


AE09 


06150 


JMP 


$AE09 BRE 


756F 




05350 


RMB 


7 


7636 32 


65 


06160 SCRKEY 


LEAS 


5,S 


7576 


50 


05360 


FCC 


/P0KE111,254:DIR/ 


7638 96 


6F 


06170 


LDA 


<$6F 




4F 








763A 34 


02 


06180 


PSHS 


A 




4B 








763C C6 


FE 


06190 


LDB 


#$FE 




45 








763E D7 


6F 


06200 


STB 


<$6F 




31 








7640 86 


0C 


06210 


LDA 


#$0C 




31 








7642 AD 


9F A002 


06220 


JSR 


[$A002] 




31 








7646 F6 


FF22 


06230 


LDB 


SFF22 




2C 








7649 2B 


34 


06240 


BMI 


GRAPH 




32 








764B 8E 


0400 


06250 


LDX 


#$400 




35 








764E A 6 


80 


06260 SLOOPA 


LDA 


,X+ 




34 








7650 2A 


02 


06270 


BPL 


SNEXTA 




3A 








7652 86 


60 


06280 


LDA 


#$60 




44 








7654 81 


40 


06290 SNEXTA 


CMPA 


#$40 




49 








7656 24 


06 


06300 


BHS 


SLOOPB 




52 








7658 8B 


60 


06310 


ADDA 


#$60 


7585 


8D 


05370 


FCB 


$8D 


765A AD 


9F A002 


06320 


JSR 


[$A002] 


7586 0D 


6F 


05380 NEW16A 


TST 


<$6F 


765E 81 


60 


06330 SLOOPB 


CMPA 


#$60 


7588 27 


P3 


05390 


BEQ 


*+5 


7660 25 


02 


06340 


BLO 


*+4 


758A 7E 


*m 


05400 NEW6A 


JMP 


§8000 


7662 80 


40 


06350 


SUBA 


#$40 


758D AF 


E4 


05410 


STX 


,s 


7664 AD 


9F A002 


06360 


JSR 


[$A002] 


758F 34 


04 


05420 


PSHS 


B 


7668 IF 


10 


06370 SNEXTB 


TFR 


X,D 


7591 7D 


739D 


05430 


TST 


NUMCHR 


766A C4 


IF 


06380 


ANDB 


#$1F 


7594 26 


21 


05440 


BNE 


GETKEY 


766C 26 


E0 


06390 


BNE 


SLOOPA 


7596 9E 


88 


05450 


LDX 


<$88 


766E 86 


0D 


06400 


LDA 


#$0D 


7598 A6 


84 


05460 Nl 


IDA 


»x 


7670 AD 


9F A002 


06410 


JSR 


[$A002] 


759A 8B 


10 


05470 


ADDA 


#$10 


7674 8C 


0600 


06420 


CMPX 


#$600 


759C 8A 


8F 


05480 


ORA 


#S8F 


7677 25 


D5 


06430 


BLO 


SLOOPA 


759E A7 


84 


05490 


STA 


,x 


7679 35 


02 


06440 


PULS 


A 


75A0 C6 


20 


05500 


LDB 


#32 


767B 97 


6F 


06450 


STA 


<$6F 


75A2 4A 




05510 N2 


DECA 




767D 4F 




06460 


CLRA 




75A3 12 




05520 


NOP 




767E 39 




06470 


RTS 




75A4 12 




05530 


NOP 




767F 86 


IB 


06480 GRAPH 


LDA 


#27 


75A5 12 




05540 


NOP 




7681 AD 


9F A002 


06490 


JSR 


[$A002] 


75A6 12 




05550 


NOP 




7685 4C 




06500 


INCA 


75A7 26 


F9 


05560 


BNE 


N2 


7686 AD 


9F A002 


06510 


JSR 


[$A002] 


75A9 7D 


739D 


05570 


TST 


NUMCHR 


768A 0F 


9C 


06520 


CLR 


<S9C 


75AC 26 


05 


05580 


BNE 


N4 


768C C4 


70 


06530 


ANDB 


#$70 


75AE 5A 




05590 


DECB 




768E 54 




06540 


LSRB 




75AF 26 


Fl 


05600 


BNE 


N2 


768F 54 




06550 


LSRB 




75B1 2? 


E5 


05610 


BRA 


Nl 


7690 54 




06560 


LSRB 




75B3 86 


60 


05620 N4 


LDA 


#$60 


7691 8E 


7754 


06570 


LDX 


#GTABLE 


75B5 A7 


84 


05630 


STA 


,x 


7694 3A 




06580 


ABX 




75B7 F6 


739D 


05640 GETKEY 


LDB 


NUMCHR 


7695 96 


9B 


06590 


LDA 


<$9B 


75BA 8E 


739E 


05650 


LDX 


#CHRBUF 


7697 34 


02 


06600 


PSHS 


A 


75BD A6 


84 


05660 


LDA 


,x 


7699 A6 


84 


06610 


LDA 


,x 


75BF 7A 


739D 


05670 


DEC 


NUMCHR 


769B 48 




06620 


LSLA 




75C2 34 


n 


05680 


PSHS 


A 


769C 48 




06630 


LSLA 




75C4 A6 


01 


05690 N3 


LDA 


1.X 


769D 97 


9B 


06640 


STA 


<$9B 


75C6 A7 


80 


05700 


STA 


,x+ 


769F C5 


02 


06650 


BITB 


#$02 


75C8 5A 




05710 


DECB 




76A1 27 


63 


06660 


BEQ 


COLOR 


75C9 26 


F9 


05720 


BNE 


N3 


76A3 EC 


84 


06670 MONO 


LDD 


.X 


75CB A6 


E0 


05730 


LDA 


iS+ 


76A5 34 


06 


06680 


PSHS 


D 


75CD 35 


94 


05740 


PULS 


B,X,?C 


76A7 34 


02 


06690 


PSHS 


A 


75CF 34 


14 


057 50 POLL 


PSHS 


X,B 


76A9 9E 


BA 


06700 


LDX 


<$BA 


75D1 20 


E4 


05760 


BRA 


GETKEY 


76AB CE 


7764 


06710 


LDU 


#GTABLE+16 


7 5D3 7D 


739D 


05770 INKEY 


TST 


NUMCHR 


76AE B7 


76G5 


06720 


STA 


Mlt2 


75D6 27 


07 


05780 


BEQ 


N0KEY2 


76B1 B7 


76D3 


06730 


STA 


M3+2 


75D8 8D 


F5 


05790 


BSR 


POLL 


76B4 08 


98 


06740 


LSL 


<$98 


75DA 97 


53 


05800 


STA 


<$53 


76B6 A6 


61 


06750 MLOOP1 


LDA 


i.s 


75DC 7E 


B68F 


05810 


JMP 


$B68F 


76B8 A7 


E4 


06760 


STA 




75DF 0F 


56 


05820 NOKEY2 


CLR 


<$56 


76BA C6 


80 


06770 MLOOP2 


LDB 


#880 


75E1 JJF 


53 


05830 


CLR 


<$53 


76BC 4F 




06780 MLOOP3 


CLRA 




75E3 7E 


B69B 


05840 


JMP 


$B69B 


76BD E5 


84 


06790 


BITB 


,x 


75E6 32 


62 


05850 NEW19A 


LEAS 


2,S 


76BF 27 


02 


06800 


BEQ 


Ml 


75E8 1C 


AF 


05860 


ANDCC 


#$AF 


76C1 8A 


08 


06810 


ORA 


#8 


75EA 7D 


739D 


05870 


TST 


NUMCHR 


76C3 E5 


88 20 


06820 Ml 


BITB 


32.X 


75ED 27 


14 


05880 


BEQ 


NEW9A 


76C6 27 


02 


06830 


BEQ 


M2 


75EF B6 


739E 


05890 


LDA 


CHRBUF 


76C8 8A 


02 


06840 


ORA 


#2 


75F2 81 


J» 


05900 


CMPA 


#$03 


76CA 54 




06850 M2 


LSRB 




75F4 27 


10 


05910 


BEQ 


BREAK 


76CB E5 


84 


06860 


BITB 


,x 



BREAK ROUTINE ADDRESS 



82 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 



76CD 21 


92 


96*19 


BEQ 


M3 


76CF 8A 


9k 


0688? 


ORA 


#S04 


76D1 E5 


88 29 


06890 M3 


BITB 


32 ,X 


76D4 27 




96999 


BEQ 


M4 


76D6 AG 




96919 


INCA 




76D7 




96929 H4 












EORA 


#S0F DE- COMMENT THIS IF Y 


OU WANT 


THE OUTPUT 


INVE 






RTED (WHITE LINES) 








/OUf AO 


fC 


06940 


IDA 


A,U • 


70D9 AD 


9F 


06950 


JSR 


[8A002] 


7 CTiT\ R A 

/oDD jh 




06960 


LSRB 




t /out zo 




96919 


BNE 


MLOOP3 


7firtf TO 

/oc.)f jy 


cm 


969*9 


LEAX 




/Oil/ OA 




96999 


DEC 


,s 


(Ot 1 ) to 




91999 


BNE 


MLOOP2 


f Qf.0 CO 


£1 
OX 


9m9 


LDB 


l.S 


/0£.O JA 




91929 


ABX 




70E9 OA 


C 1 

02 


919W 


DEC 


2,S 


7£PB ■>£ 


C9 


919*9 


BNE 


MLOOP1 


/ OaD oo 


lis 


91959 FULL 


IDA 


#27 


7£pp AI\ 


»t A^Jtfi 


91969 


JSR 


[SA002] 


7£S"l AO 

/or J **o 




97919 


LSLA 






at? Anno 


9W9 


JSR 


[SA002] 


7oco hu 


O J 


91999 


LDD 


3,S 


/OCA J4 


op 


97199 


LEAS 


5,S, 


7orC 97 


9B 


97119 


STA 


<S9B 


7 6FE 9 7 


or 


97129 


STA 


<S6F 


/ /J*)l *tr 




91139 


CLRA 




^ ^ i m. 

77f#l jJ4 


98 


91U9 


LSR 


<S98 


77j*J JJ4 


97 


97159 


LSR 


<S97 


■t "Tfli c 'y ft 

77JJ5 39 




91169 


RTS 




77JJ6 JI4 


9B 


91X19 COLOR 


LSR 


<S9B 


77JJ8 EC 


84 


07180 


LDD 


.X 


7 7(Ti «»A 

/ /JJA J«» 


nc 


J7719JJ 


PSHS 


D 


77JJC 34 


J72 


97299 


PSHS 


A 


77JJE 8E 


7764 


97219 


LDX 


#GTABLE+16 


77H B7 


7728 


97229 


STA 


Cl+2 


7714 B7 


7737 


91239 


STA 


C3+2 


7717 JI8 


98 


912*9 


LSL 


<598 


7719 A6 


£ 1 

61 


91259 CLOOP1 


IDA 


l,s 


771B A7 


E4 


07260 


STA 




771D Co 


CJJ 


07270 CL00P2 


LDB ' 


#SC0 


771F 4F 




07280 CL00P3 


CLRA 




*7 7 t» C 

772JJ E5 


84 


07290 


BITB 


,x 


77">^ 17 
/ /// A / 


flf 0 


07300 


BEQ 


CI 


7724 8A 


JJ8 


07310 


ORA 


#8 


7726 E5 


88 20 


07320 CI 


BITB 


32 ,X 


7729 27 


92 


07330 


BEQ 


C2 


772B 8A 


92 


07340 


ORA 


#2 


772D 54 




07350 C2 


LSRB 




772E 54 




07360 


LSRB 




772F E5 


84 


07370 


BITB 


»x 


7731 27 


02 


07380 


BEQ 


C3 


7733 8A 


04 


07390 


ORA 


#4 


7735 E5 


88 29 


07400 C3 


BITB 


32.X 


7738 27 


91 


07410 


BEQ 


C4 


773A 4C 




07420 


INCA 




773B 




07430 C4 










07440 ★ 


EORA 


#S0F DE- COMMENT THIS I 


F YOU VANT THE OUTPUT INVE 






RTED 










773B A6 


C6 


07450 


IDA 


A.U 


773D AD 


9F 


07460 


JSR 


[5A002] 


7741 54 




07470 


LSRB 




7742 54 




07480 


LSRB 




7743 26 


DA 


07490 


BNE 


CLOOP3 


7745 3jJ 


PI 


07500 


LEAX 


i,x 


7747 6A 


E4 


07510 


DEC 


,s 


7749 26 


D2 


07520 


BNE 


CL0OP2 


774B E6 




07530 


LDB 


1,S 


774D 3A 




07540 


ABX 




774E 6A 


62 


07550 


DEC 


2,S- . 


775JJ 26 


C7 


07560 


BNE 


CLOOP1 


7752 2J> 


99 


07570 


BRA 


FULL 


7754 




07580 GTABLE 


FDB 


51020 


7756 


1929 


07590 


FDB 


S1020 


7758 


2929 


07600 


FDB 


$2020 


775A 


W9 


07610 


FDB 


51030 


775C 


2939 


07620 


FDB 


52030 


775E 


1969 


07630 


FDB 


51060 


7760 


2969 


07640 


FDB 


52060 


7762 


2969 


07650 


FDB 


52060 


7764 


E0E4 


07660 


FDB 


5E0E4 


7766 


E3EB 


07670 


FDB 


5E3E8 


7768 


E2EA 


07680 


FDB 


$E2EA 


776A 


E6EE 


07690 


FDB 


$E6EE 


776C 


E1E5 


07700 


FDB 


$E1E5 


776E 


E9ED 


07710 


FDB 


5E9ED 


1119 


E7EC 


07720 


FDB 


5E7EC 


1111 


EBEF 


07730 


r ud 




111k 




07740 BUFSTR 








1999 


07750 


END 


START 


99999 TOTAL ERRORS 














... . 



Hint . . . 

Windows Three 

Here are three handy screens to keep on your work 
disks to call when you want to develop a new 
procedure or run an old one. Use the BAS1C09 editor 
to create the three procedures. Note: The vdgint 
command is not usually found on the System disk 
supplied but is in the MODULES directory of the 
Configuration disk. You will need it in your com- 
mands directory if you want to call up a 32-column 
screen. 

A 32-column C0C0 1 and 2 Screen 

PROCEDURE scrn32 

SHELL "load vdgint" 

SHELL "deiniz /u3" 

SHELL "xmode /w3 type=l pag=16" 

SHELL "shell i=/W3&" 

PRINT "Press <CLEfiR . . 

A 40-column C0C0 3 Graphics Screen 

PROCEDURE scrn40 
DIM path: INTEGER 
SHELL "iniz /wl" 

OPEN ttpath,"/ w r':WRiTE 

RUN gfx2(path,"DWSET",6,0,0,40,24,0,l,l) 

SHELL "merge sys/stdfonts >/wl" 

SHELL "merge sys/stdptrs >/ul" 

SHELL "merge sys/s tdpats_4 >/wl" 

SHELL "display lb 3a c8 01>/wl" 

RUN gfx2(path, "SELECT") 

SHELL "shell i=/ulS." 

SHELL "shell" 

An 80-column C0C0 3 Graphics Screen 

PROCEDURE scrn80 
DIM path: INTEGER 
SHELL "iniz /u2" 
OPEN ttpath,"/w2":WRITE 

RUN gfx2(path, "DWSET",7,0,0,B0,24,0,1,1) 

SHELL "merge sys/stdfonts >/u2" 

SHELL "merge sys's tdptrs> >/u2" 

SHELL "merge sys/s tdpats-4 >/w2" 

SHELL "display lb 3a cB 01>/u2" 

RUN gfx2(path, "SELECT") 

SHELL "shell i=/u2&" 

SHELL "shell" 

At the BASIC09 B prompt, save each screen separ- 
ately as source code that ends up in your root directory 
(/D0); e.g., save scrn32. Then pack each of them 
separately as packed code, which ends up in your 
commands directory (/D0/CMDS); e.g., pack scrn32. 
You may then call a screen by typing, say, scrn40 at 
the OS-9 prompt, or by typing $scrn40 at the BAS1C09 
prompt. 

By keeping the source code in your root directory, 
you can amend the features of any of the screens by 
loading the code into BASIC09. For instance, you might 
want to change the scrn40 blue color to black by 
editing RUN gfx2( path, "DWSET", 6,0,0,40,24,0, 
1,1) to read RUN gfx2(path, "DWSET" , 6,0,0, 
40,24,0,2,1). 

Del Turner, Kamloops, BC 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 83 



Corrections 



"Barden's Buffer" (August 1988, Page 170): Bill 
Barden has written to make a few points about his 
timing program. In Mr. Barden's words, "Art Flexser, 
author of ADOS, correctly points out that the timing 
program will work only under Radio Shack Disk 
basic 1.1. He [Art Flexser] also adds a few sugges- 
tions: 1) Use PDKE&HFF03,&H34 to disable the 
interrupts from BASIC and PDKE&HFF03,&H35 to 
enable them. 2) Use an ORCC instruction to disable and 
enable the interrupts in assembly language rather than 
a TFR (a TFR will work, however.)" 

"The Old Switcheroo II" (August 1988, Page 120): 

Mark Haverstock wrote to correct some errors in part 
numbers given in his article. The correct Radio Shack 
catalog number for the experimenter's box is 270-030, 
not 270-2301. Similarly, the number for the five-pin 
in-line DIN jack is 274-006, not 274-005. 

"Flight Simulator II" (Review, August 1988): The 

correct price for Flight Simulator II is $34.95, not 
$24.95 as stated in the review. The program is available 
only through Radio Shack and cannot be purchased 
directly from SubLOGIC. 

"Escape From Tut's Tomb" (August 1988, Page 58): 

Due to a production error, part of the listing for 
2PRRT1 is missing from the printed magazine. The 
missing portions are reproduced below. The files on 
RAINBOW ON TAPE and rainbow ON DISK are unaf- 
fected and include the complete program. 



690 DATA 
700 DATA 
710 DATA 

72) 3 DATA 

73) 3 DATA 

74) 3 DATA 

75) 3 DATA 

76) 3 DATA 

77) 3 DATA 

78) 3 DATA 
3,198 

79) 3 DATA 
83,43 
8)3)3 DATA 
67,57 

81) 3 DATA 
)3,182 

82) 3 DATA 
,37 



32,3, 
21,12 
32,6, 
4,32, 
15,12 
24,2)3 

0/0/0 

0/0/0 
43,19 



15,14,7,18,1,2)3 

,1,20,9,15,14,19 

9,14,9,19,8,5 

16,1,18,2)3,2)3,23 

,15,1,4,32,14,5 

, 32, 16, 1,18, 20, )3 

/0/0, 0/0/0 
,)3,)3,)3,)3,)3 

,0,0, 134, 255,183 

6,183,43,197,183,4 



183,43,199,183,43,164,1 
165 , 183 , 43 , 166 , 183 ,43,1 
18 2 , 15 , 16)3 , 12 9 , 56 , 3 8 , 1)3 
3)3,2 2)3,177,30,23)3,34,32 



83) 3 DATA 54,182,30,221,177,3)3,23 
1,34 

84) 3 DATA 22,37,44,182,3)3,222,177 

/30 * 

85) 3 DATA 232,34,12,37,34,182,30, 
223 

86) 3 DATA 177,30,233,34,2,32,24,1 
82 

87) 3 DATA 30,220,183,3)3,230,182,3 
0,221 

88) 3 DATA 183,30,231,182,30,222,1 
83,3)3 

89) 3 DATA 232 , 182,3)3, 223,183, 3)3,2 
33,189 

9)3)3 DATA 21,224,189,21,224,134,3 
,183 

91)3 DATA 3)3,237,182,15,161,183,3 
0,220 

920 DATA 182,15,162,183,3)3,221,1 
82,15 

93)3 DATA 163,183,30,222,182,15,1 
64,183 

940 DATA 3)3,223,57,63,4,0,0,0 

95) 3 DATA )3 , )3 , 4 ,)3 , 4 ,0 , 4 , 0 

96) 3 DATA 4 ,0 ,0 ,)3 ,)3 ,)3 ,0 , 0 
970 DATA )3,)3,)3,)3,)3,)3,0,)3 

98) 3 DATA 194,251,255,255,255,255 
,255,255 

99) 3 DATA 255,187,185,197,161,222 
,7,255 

1)3)3)3 DATA 82,161,197,11,0,0,171, 
238 

1)310 DATA 161,181,1,2,221,161,16 
1,2 

1)32)3 DATA 4 , 16)3 , 24)3 , )3 , 255 , 255 , 25 
5,255 

1)33)3 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,25 
5,255,255 

1)34)3 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,25 
5,255,255 

1)35)3 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,25 
5,255,255 



For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DATA 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIO 
prompt. 



84 THE RAINBOW October 1988 





ECTOR 

IS-69B 
» VIDEO 

DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 

COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS 1 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR™ 

If you already have one of The Micro Works* DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. DS-88 version available for IBM PC. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



i 



COCO 3 SCREEN 



THE 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. ^/©[Mf^^ 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



We're Looking for a Few Good Shorties 

Help! The Niche needs more submissions! If you have written 
a good shortie, please send it in. We're looking for graphics, 
utilities, educational programs and games (especially games!). 
How short is a shortie? Well, if you printed out your listing in 32 
columns, as we do, it should fit on one half of an 8 1 /2-by-11 inch 
page (be under 12 inches). (Entering print«-2,chr$(27) 
CHR$(8i)CHR$(32) will allow most Epson-compatible printers to 
llist a program in 32 columns if you want to check this.) 



Fright Night 

By Patricia Moos 




Spook is a short but flashy Halloween program. It draws 
a jack-o-lantern on the PMDDE 3 graphics screen, then starts 
playing an eerie tune. At first the music is slow, but as it 
repeats it plays faster and faster. Finally, the music stops and 
the image flashes. 

Because of the GOTO 230 statement in Line 270, the 
pumpkin will flash endlessly after it finishes its song. If you 
would like your jack-o -lantern to run endlessly from start 
to finish, replace Line 270's GOTD 230 statement with GOTO 
10 and add these two lines: 

225 FDR T=l TO 20 
265 NEXT T 

Put the monitor in your window and share the specter with 
trick-or-treaters on Halloween night. 

The listing: SPOOK 

10 PMODE 3,1 

20 PCLS 

30 SCREEN 1,1 

40 CIRCLE(128,96) ,95,8 

50 CIRCLE(128, 96) ,60,8,1,0, .08 

60 DRAW ,f BM183,118;H10;G10;F14" 

70 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,60,8,1, .10, .18 

80 DRAW"BM158,143 ;U15 ;L15 ; D25" 

90 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,60,8,1, .21, .32 

100 DRAW"BM108 , 150 ;E10 ;H10 ;G14" 

110 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,60,8,1, .35, .4 

2 

120 DRAW»BM78,128;E10;H10;G5" 
130 CIRCLE (128, 9 6) ,60,8,1, .46, .5 

0 

140 CIRCLE (12 8,74) ,75,8, .50, .10, 
.20 

150 DRAW ,f BM156,107;D10;L20;U8 ,l 
160 CIRCLE (12 8, 74) ,75,8, .50, .24, 

86 THE RAINBOW October 1988 




.27 
170 
180 
.40 
190 
200 
210 
215 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
290 

300 
310 
320 
327 
328 
329 
340 
350 
370 
380 
390 
400 



DRAW"BM125 , 111 ; D10 ; L20 ;U12 
CIRCLE (128,74) , 75 , 8 , . 50 , . 31 , 

DRAW M BM80 , 70 ; E20 ; F20 ; L3 7 " 
DRAW"BM140,70;E20;F20;L37" 
PAINT (100, 40) ,8,8 
PAINT (1,1) ,6,8 
GOSUB 290 

PMODE 4,1:SCREEN1,1 
FOR X=1TO100 :NEXT X 
PMODE 3 ,1:SCREEN1,1 
FORX=1TO100:NEXT X 
GOTO 2 30 

B$= f, P4;E#;D;E+;P4;D+;C;D+;P4 

C$= ,f 04 ;C;03 ;A+;G;E-;G;A+;P2 11 
D$="T3 ;C;D;E-;F;G;D+G;" 
E$= "T4 ; C ; D ; E- ; F ; G ; D+G ; " 
G $ = " T 7 ; C ; D ; E - ; F ; G ; D + ; G 
H$="T10 ; C ; D ; E- ; F ; G ; D+ ; G" 
I$= M T15;C;D;E-;F;G;D+;G" 
PLAY D$+B$+D$+C$ 
PLAY E$+B$+E$+C$ 
PLAY G$+B$+G$+C$ 

PLAY H$+B$+H$+C$ 
PLAY I$+B$+I$+C$ 
RETURN 



Ad Infinitum 

By Rick Weshenfelder 



CoCo 3 



If you're one of those people who liked the Lava Lamp, 
youll love Eyecatcher. Just type in, load and run the program 
to see an infinite number of CoCo 3 graphics. Press any key 
to start the program over again. 

I used the speed-up poke (POKE 65497,0) because the 
program has to do quite a bit of number crunching. (Note: 
CoCo 2 users should use the CoCo 2-specific speed-up poke 
in translating this program to their machines.) 

If you like to fiddle with the programs you type in, you 
might try changing the values of some of the variables to see 
what will happen. F controls the spacing between lines as they 
are drawn. TI controls how often the colors will change, and 
TM is responsible for resetting the program. There are more, 
but these will do for a start. 

If you want to tinker more with the program, I have some 
suggestions. Try, for example, adding a routine to let the 
number keys change the background color. Remove the 
variable TM entirely for a continuous picture, or make an 
option that switches between continuous and timed pictures. 

The listing: EYECflTCH 

10 ■>» EYE CATCHER «< 

20 1 RICK WESHENFELDER 

30 CLS:POKE65497 ,0 : ONBRKGOTO180 : 



TIMER=0 

40 WIDTH80 ; PALETTERGB : PALETTE0 , 0 

:HSCREEN2 :HCOLOR1,0 

50 F=2:F1=.995 A F:F2=1-F1 

60 HA=RND(320) :HB=RND(320) ;VA==RN 

D(192) :VB=RND(192) 

70 H1=RND(0) *SGN(160-HA) :V1=(1-A 

BS(H1))*SGN(96-VA) 

80 H1=H1*F:V1==V1*F 

90 PC=RND (8 ): PALETTE (8+PC) -1, (PC 

*8 ) -1 : TI=TIMER : IFTI>=50THENTI=0 : 

TIMER=0:TM=TM+1:HC==(HC+1) *-(HC<l 

5) 

100 IFTM=5THENTM=0:HCLS:GOTO50 
110 IF HA+H1>319 OR HA+HK0 THEN 

HA=HA-H1 : HCOLORHC , 0 : GOT07 0 
120 IF VA+V1>191 OR VA+VK0 THEN 

VA=VA-V1 : HCOLORHC, 0 : GOTO70 
130 HA=HA+H1:VA=VA+V1:HB=HB*F1+H 
A*F2 : VB=VB*F1+VA*F2 
140 HLINE (HA, VA) - (HB, VB) , PSET 
150 HLINE (319-HB, VB) - (319-HA, VA) 
,PSET 

160 HSET (HA, VA, 15-HC) :HSET(HB,VB 

, 15-HC) :HSET(319-HA,VA, 15-HC) :HS 

ET(319-HB / VB / 15-HC) 

170 IFINKEY$= M "THEN110ELSEHCLS :T 

IMER=0 : TM=0 : GOT05 0 

180 POKE65496,0:PALETTE0,32:WIDT 

H3 2 : PALETTERGB : END 



Tying up DRAW Strings I g 

By Keiran Kenny 

With Copy Fix you can use LINE INPUT to enter DRRN 
commands and see what you have drawn as soon as you press 

ENTER. 

On running the program you will see a text screen with 
the word Draw at the upper-left corner. Type in one of the 
DRAW commands (U15, for example — see your Extended 
Color BASIC manual) and press ENTER. The program then 
shifts you to the PMDDE 4 screen to show what you have done. 
Pressing the space bar returns you to the text screen for 
another prompt. Add a few more commands, press ENTER 
again, and watch your drawing grow. You can enter DRRW 
strings up to a maximum of about four text screen lines in 
length, but you may find that entering commands one to four 
at a time is preferable. 

When the program starts, the cursor is at the center of the 
screen (128,96). Enter a BM or B command if you want to 
change the cursor position at any time. Otherwise, each new 
line will follow on from the end of the last line you drew. 

If a cassette recorder is connected to your CoCo, you can 
save your pictures to tape. To save a picture, position the tape 
and enter 5P (save picture) at the LINEINPUT prompt, then 
press Record and Play. To load a saved picture, position your 
tape and enter LP (load picture), then press Play on the 
recorder. (Do not put space between the DRRN prompt and 
either 5P or LP; doing so will result in an error.) When you 
load a picture from tape, the cursor will be at Position 128,96. 



The listing: COPYPIX 

0 1 COPYPIX 1 BY KEIRAN KENNY, 

SYDNEY, 1988. 
10 CLS 
20 GOTO170 

30 LINEINPUT" DRAW" ; D$ 

40 IFD$= ,, SP ,, THENPMODE4 , 1 : COLORS , 

1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 : GOSUB8 0 : CSAVEM" 

11 , PEEK( &HBA) *256,PEEK(&HB7) *256- 

1,&HB44A:GOTO150 

50 IFD$="LP"THENN=0 : PMODE4 , 1 : COL 
OR0 , 5 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 : CLOADM : GOTO 
120 

60 PMODE4 , 1 : COLOR0 , 5 : PCLS : SCREEN 
1/1 

70 IFN THENGOSUB80:GOTO110ELSE11 
0 

80 PG=1 

90 FORT=5T08 : PCOPYT TOPG:PG=PG+l 
:NEXT 

100 RETURN 
110 DRAWD$ 
120 N=l 
130 PG=5 

140 F0RT=1T04: PCOPYT TOPG:PG=PG+ 
1 : NEXT 

150 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$OCHR$ (32) THEN 
150 

160 GOTO30 

170 PCLEAR8 : GOTO30 

October 1988 THE RAINBOW 87 



Seeing the Bigger Picture 

By Erich Sweaney 



CoCo3 



Co Co Plus is a short program that increases the CoCo 3's 
HSCREEN 2 or 4 screen by six vertical pixels (from 192 to 198). 
To use 198 vertical pixels in your own programs, type in lines 
40 and 70 every time you use the HSCREEN 2 or 4 command. 

The HCIRCLE command does not work properly when you 
enter it between vertical locations 192 and 198, and the 
HPflINT command requires a little experimentation, but all 
the other commands work fine. Type in and run this listing 
for a demonstration. 

The listing: C0C0PLUS 

0 REM COCO PLUS 

1J3 REM INCREASES GRAPHICS FOR TH 
E COCO 3 FROM 192 TO 198 
20 REM BY ERICH SWEANEY 
30 PALETTE RGB 

40 HSCREEN 2 : POKE &HFF98 , 128 : POK 
E &HFF99,62 

50 REM MAKES SCREEN LARGER 

60 REM CHANGE POKE &HFF99,62 TO 

POKE &HFF99,61 TO USE HSCREEN 4 

70 POKE &HE7BA,201 

80 REM LET'S HLINE GOTO 198 

90 HCLS8 

100 PALETTE 7,37 
110 HCOLOR 7 

120 HLINE (0,0)-(320 / 198) , PSET, B 



130 HCOLOR 2:HLINE(0,0)-(320,192 
) ,PSET,B 

140 HPRINT (2,23) , "OLD 192":HCOLO 
R 7:HPRINT(20,24) , "NEW 198" 
150 HCOLOR 3:HLINE(0,192)-(320 / l 
98) ,PSET,B 

160 HPAINT(10,197) ,4,3 
170 REM YOU MUST SET THE LOWEST 
POINT DOWN, WHEN HPAINTING BETWEE 
N 192-198 OR IT WONT WORK WRIGHT 
180 HCOLOR 2:HCIRCLE(250,194) ,10 
190 REM SORRY HCIRCLE DOES NOT W 
ORK GOOD 

200 REM MOST OTHER HSCREEN GRAPH 
IC COMMANDS WORK 

210 REM TO USE HSCREEN 2,4 IN YO 
UR PROGRAMS JUST TYPE LINE 10 AN 
D 40 IN WHEN EVER YOU USE HSCREE 
N 

220 HPRINT (2, 2) , "NEW GRAPHICS CA 
PABILTY" 

230 HCOLOR 5 : HPRINT (2 , 3 ), "FOR HS 
CREEN 2 AND 4" 

240 HCOLOR 4 : HPRINT (2 , 4 ), "CHANGE 

S FROM 192 TO 198" 

250 HCOLOR 6:HPRINT(2,5) ,"BY" 

260 HCOLOR 7 : HPRINT (2, 6) , "ERICH 

SWEANEY" 

270 POKE 65497, 0:FOR L=0 TO 300 
STEP 2:HCOLOR RND ( 8 ) : HLINE ( L , 80 ) 
-(L+20,180) , PSET : HLINE (L, 180) -(L 
+50,80) ,PSET:NEXT L 
280 GOTO 280 




Taking on the One-Armed Bandit 



By Kenneth Carlin 




I recently rediscovered a game I had written more than five 
years ago that is still fun to play (and it will run on every 
CoCo there is, from the old 4K non-extended all the way to 
the 512K CoCo 3) — it's a Low-Res interpretation of the 
classic slot machine. 

Game play is extremely simple. After the title screen, you 
are prompted to press P to play the game; this constantly 
seeds the random number generator with new values, 
ensuring a completely new game every time. You are then 
prompted for a bet between one and five tokens. The windows 



will flash random blocks of graphics, simulating the spin of 
the wheel. If the symbols match after the machine has 
stopped, you win. Payoff is as follows: 



Window 

yellow in 1st 
yellow in 1st and 2nd 
3 blue or 2 blue and a bar 
3 red or 2 red and a bar 
3 white or 2 white and a bar 
3 cyan or 2 cyan and a bar 
3 magenta or 2 magenta and a bar 
3 orange or 2 orange and a bar 



Payoff 

2x 
5x 
lOx 
20x 
35x 
50x 
lOOx 
200x 



In case you hadn't guessed, the bar mentioned above is the 



88 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



***** in Window 3. With any winning combination, the 
payoff is flashed on the screen along with the message 
"Winner!" Play ceases only when you run out of money or 
grow tired of playing. 

There are a few things you may want to add to this game 
to make it more enjoyable. Personally, I like to pull back on 
some sort of "arm" when I play a slot machine. If you have 
a joystick, you can incorporate it into the program by 
following a few short steps. First, retype Line 28 so that it 
reads as follows: 

28 Q=JOYSTK(0) : IFJOYSTK ( 1) >3 OTHE 
NPRINT@389," PLEASE RESET THE AR 
M":GOT028 

Now retype Line 29 to read: 

29 PRINT@389," PULL THE ARM BAC 
K" : Z=JOYSTK ( 0 ) : IFJOYSTK (1) <>63TH 
EN2 9 ELSEPRINTg 3 4 0 , " " GOT04 

These two changes allow the joystick to function as the slot 
machine's arm. If prompted to reset the arm, push the joystick 
all the way up. Then give it a pull. Once the joystick is pulled 
all the way down, the machine will engage. If you want sound 
in the game, add :SOUND100,1 to the end of Line 8, and 
change the end of Line 23 to read ML=M_+1 :50UND1,1:NEXT. 
That's about it. It's rather short, but I wrote it to stay within 
the constraints of a 4K computer. Feel free to dress it up in 
any way you see fit. Chances are you have more than enough 
memory to add quite a few features. 

The listing: SLOTS 

1 CLS:CLEAR27j3:ML=25:PRINT@41,"0 
NE ARM BANDIT" : PRINT@3 6j3 , "BY KE 
N CARLIN":A$=" ":B$=" ":C$=" 

":D$=CHR$(142) :E$=CHR$(139) 

2 F0RA=1T05:D$=D$+CHR$(131) :E$=E 
$+CHR$(14j3) :NEXT:D$=D$+CHR$(141) 
: E$=E$+CHR$.( 135 ) : F$=CHR$ (133) +C$ 
+CHR$(138) :G$=A$+D$+B$+D$+B$+D$: 
H$=A$+F$+B$+F$+B$+F$ : I$=A$+E$+B$ 
+E$+B$+E$ : J$=G$+B$+H$+B$+I$ : DIMK 
$(8) :D=159:F0RC=1T07:F0RE=1T02 

3 K$(C)=K$(C)+CHR$(D)+" " : NEXTE : 
K$ (C) =K$ (C) +CHR$ (D) : D=D+16 :NEXTC 
:K$(8)= "*****": GOSUB3 2 : CLS : DIMG ( 
3) :PRINT@192, J$:GOT024 

4 H(1)=RND(RND(7) ) : H (2 ) =RND (RND ( 
7)) :H(3)=RND(7)+1 

5 F0RK=1T03:F0RE=1T05J3:0N K GOTO 
6, 7, 8 

6^PRINT@227,K$(RND(7) ) ; 

7 PRINT@237,K$(RND(7) ) ; 

8 PRINT@247,K$(RND(7)+1) ; 

9 NEXTE :PRINT@227+( (K-l) *lj3) ,K$( 
H(K)); 

12 NEXTK:FORT=lT05j3j3:NEXT:Cl=POI 
NT (6, 14) :C2=P0INT(2 6,14) :C3=POIN 
T(46,14) 

13 IF( (C1=C2)AND(C2=C3) )0R( (C1=C 
2 ) AND (C3=-l) ) THEN14ELSEIF ( C1=C2 ) 
ANDC1=2THEN14ELSEIFC1=2THENM0=BE 



*2:PA$=" 2 TO 1" :GOT023ELSE24 

14 C1=C1-1 

15 ON CI GOTO 16, 17, 18, 19, 2)3 
, 21, 22 

16 MO a* BE*5:PA$=" 5 TO l":GOT02 
3 

17 MO = BE*1J3:PA$="1J3 TO 1":G0T0 
23 

18 MO = BE*2J3:PA$="2J3 TO l":GOTO 
23 

19 MO = BE*3 5:PA$="35 TO l":GOTO 
23 

20 MO = BE*5j3:PA$="5j3 TO l":GOTO 
23 

21 MO = BE*lj3j3:PA$="10j3 TO l":GO 
T023 

22 MO = BE*2j3j3:PA$="2j3j3 TO 1" 

23 PRINTS 3 3 2, "WINNER !":PRINT@13 
5, "PAYOFF IS "PA$:FORX=lTOMO:PRI 
NT@56,ML; : ML=ML+1 : NEXT 

24 IFML=0THEN30ELSEPRINT@45, "MON 
EY LEFT: "ML; :PRINT@79, "THIS BET: 

?": PRINT© 38 9, "PLACE YOUR BET ( 
1-5)":Y$=INKEY$ 

25 BE$=INKEY$:Z=RND(99999) :IFBE$ 
« mi THEN 2 5ELSE PRI NT @ 3 2 J3 , " " : PRINT @ 
135, 11 " :BE=VAL(BE$) : IFBE<10RBE>5T 
HEN2 5 

26 IFML-BE<j3THENPRINT@44 8 , "*YOU 
DO NOT HAVE THAT MUCH LEFT*";:FO 
RT= 1TO 1 8 j3 : NEXT : PRINT @ 4 4 8 , " " : GOT 
025 

27 PRINT@88,BE:ML=ML-BE:PRINT@56 
,ML:PRINT@3 89, "" 

28 1 

29 PRINT@39j3,"":GOT04 
3j3 CLS 

31 PRINT@198, "YOU ARE OUT OF MON 
EY" : PRINT@294 , "CARE TO PLAY AGAI 
N ?":PRINT@334,"(Y/N) ":P$=INKEY$ 
: IFP$=" "THEN3 1ELSEIFP$=" Y"THEN1E 
LSECLEAR2j3j3 : END 

32 PRINT@192, J$ : PRINT@227 , K$ (RND 
(7) ) ; :PRINT@237,K$(RND(7) ) ; : PRIN 
T@247,K$ (RND (8) ) ; :PRINT@455 , "PRE 
SS <P> TO PLAY":Z=RND(9999) :W$=I 
NKEY$ : IFW$<>"P"THEN32ELSERETURN 



Submissions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of short programs that can 
be typed in at one sitting and are useful, educational and fun* 
Keep in mind, although the short programs are limited in 
scope, many novice programmers find it enjoyable and quite 
educational to improve the software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We Ye sorry, 
but we cannot key in program listings. All programs should 
be supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how 
the program works. If your submission is accepted for 
publication, the payment rate will be established and agreed 
upon prior to publication. 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 89 




If you have an idea for the "Wishing 
Well * submit it to Fred c/o the 
rainbow. Remember , keep your 
ideas specific, and don't forget this is 
BASIC All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 

Over the last two months I've 
introduced two brand-new pro- 
grams, Opposite Concepts 1 
and Match Game of Opposites 1. These 
programs were designed to train the 
young user in telling the difference 
between opposite concepts by employ- 
ing a set of 20 pairs of examples (i.e., 
hot versus cold). Match Game took 
these concepts one step further and 
made recall of the terms a great deal of 
fun. (You could even have adults play 
this variation of Concentration just for 
fun, since both young and old would 
have the same chances of winning. 
Remember, you can't put a price tag on 
quality time you spend with your kids 
— this is just another tool for that goal.) 

This month, Fm offering you a set of 
20 additional opposite concepts. These 
concepts will be a little more abstract, 
with terms like "in front of and "be- 
hind" or "talk" and "listen." Those of 
you who want details on how these 
programs work should refer to the last 
two months' articles, rather than having 
all the technical lingo repeated here. 

How these 20 came into being is 
almost an adventure in itself. After I 
had struggled to come up with the first 
set, one of the elementary teachers who 
has since started using these programs 
commented that she would hardly be 
able to come up with 20 sets of opposites 
to begin with. When I remarked to her 
that I had already developed a second 
set of 20, with the graphics to go along 
with it, she was quite surprised. She 
then dared me to come up with a third 
set of 20. (Believe it or not, after sitting 
down with a few of my own upper-level 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master 's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



A continuation of last 
month's "opposites" 
game, for more advanced 

students 

Two for 
the Price 
of One 

By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



students for a half hour, we actually 
were able to come up with 20 more, as 
well as the graphics to go along with 
them. I'll save those for several months, 
though, to see what your reaction is to 
these first installments. We don't want 
to overdo a good thing.) 

Too Much Typing! 

If you have typed in the last two 
months' programs, I am going to give 
you a few pointers on how to save some 
time in getting both new programs 
quickly into your CoCo. Remember, 
the easiest way to get these programs 
error-free is by subscribing to either 

RAINBOW ON TAPE Or RAINBOW ON 

DISK. If you don't have a subscription, 
111 now mention two quick ways to save 
some hacking time. 

Tape Only? 

Those of you without a disk drive will 
not be able to use the MERGE command 
found in Extended Disk BASIC. In that 
case, if you want to type in the listing 
shown here, you should load your error- 
free copy of Opposite Concepts 1 from 
two months ago. Next, follow ihe steps 
shown below. 

1. With the program loaded, type DEL 
395-790 and press ENTER. 

2. Retype lines 2, 85, 90 and 95 from 
this month's new listing. 



3. Type in lines 395 through 790 from 
the new listing. 

4. Save your new listing to tape with 
a different filename, such as 0P0- 
SITE2. 

Now you may take some steps to use 
this data in Match Game of Opposites, 
following these steps: 

1. Reload 0P05ITE2. 

2. Type DEL 0-390 and press ENTER. 

3. Type DEL 795- and press ENTER. 

4. Delete lines: 



400 


500 


600 


700 


410 


510 


610 


710 


420 


520 


620 


720 


430 


530 


630 


730 


440 


540 


640 


740 


450 


550 


650 


750 


460 


560 


660 


760 


470 


570 


670 


770 


480 


580 


680 


780 


490 


590 


690 


790 



We do not need these DATA lines in 
Match Game of Opposites. Simply type 
the line number and press ENTER. 

5. Type RENUM 110,395,0 and press 

ENTER. 

6. From last month's listing type in 
lines 1 through 105 and 310 
through 620. Also, retype Line 2 to 
read 2 REM*MATCH GAME OF OPPO- 
SITES 2*. 

7. Save the entire program and test it 
for errors. You may want to use a 
different filename, such as 
MATCH2. 

You will now have copies of both 
programs with all the new data in place. 
If you find this too confusing, simply 
type in the listing as you see it here. 

Disk Users Only! 

Disk users have a much easier time 
with this, since you can use the MERGE 
command. To get 0P0SITE2, follow the 
same instructions as you would above 
for tape. What you are actually doing 
is deleting the old DATA lines from 
0P0SITE1 and typing in the new lines 
395 through 790. Also be sure to retype 
lines 2, 85, 90 and 95. 

However, for the next program you 
can save a great deal of time by using 
the MERGE command. To do this, after 
you have saved 0P0SITE2 to disk, 



90 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



follow steps 1 through 5 above for 
Match Game of Opposites. From that 
point on, do the following: 

6. On a new formatted disk, save this 
new DATA list by typing 
SAVE"V0L2",A and press ENTER. 
This saves the lines to your disk in 
ASCII. 

7. Load your copy of Match Game of 
Opposites from last month's issue. 
Next, place the new disk with V0L2 
on it in your drive, type MERGE 
"VDL2" and press ENTER. The new 



lines will now take the place of all 
the old data, and the program 
should be ready to run, provided 
you have not made any typing 
errors. Also, retype Line 2 as 2 REM 
*Match Game of Opposites 2*. 

8. Save this new version with the 
filename MATCH2 or some other 
appropriate name. You don't want 
to use the same filename as V0L1, 
since you would be killing the old 
file and writing over it with your 
new program. 

Both programs are now ready to run. 



Refer to the last two months' issues for 
instructions on how to run the pro- 
grams. Only the material covered will be 
different. 

Next month will be the final chapter 
in this series of early childhood educa- 
tion programs. IT1 list a third, totally 
different program, which will introduce 
this material inserted into sentences 
while still using our graphics. Let me 
know if these programs prove as valu- 
able to you as you they have to our 
elementary students! □ 



Editor's Note: For your convenience, both 
programs (DP0SITE2 and MATCH2> will appear on 
this month's issue of ftAlNBOW ON TAPE and 
RAINBOW ON DISK. This will ensure that those of 
you who want bug-free copies will not have to 
tnerge for MATCH2. ;:f|$ 




D 170 

95 127 

165 .71 

260 237 

340 174 

400 194 

440 93 

475 241 

525 4 



565 95 

605 108 

635 94 

675 235 

705 151 

750 192 

785 187 

910 32 

END 113 



* 
* 
* 



The listing: 0PD5ITE2 

1 REM*************************** 

2 REM* OPPOSITE CONCEPTS VOL.2 * 

3 REM* COPYRIGHT (C) 1988 * 

4 REM* BY FRED B. SCERBO 

5 REM* 6j3 HARDING AVENUE 

6 REM* NORTH ADAMS , MA 01247 

7 REM*************************** 
1)8 CLEAR3j30j3' 

15 CLS0:PRINTSTRING$ (32,188) ;STR 
ING$(32,156) ; :FORI=lTO 256 :READ 

A: PRINTCHR$ (A+128) ;:NEXT 
20 PRINTSTRING$ (32,195) ;STRING$( 
32,179); 

25 PRINT@422," BY FRED B. SCERBO 
"; :PRINT@454, 11 COPYRIGHT (C) 1 
988 "; 

30 DATA126, 124, 124, 125, 117, 124,1 
24 , 12 2 , 12 6 , 12 4 , 12 5 , 117 ,124,124,1 
25,117,124,124,124,116,12 6,117,1 
24 , 12 6 , 125 , 117 , 124 , 124 , 117 , 124 , 1 
24,124 

35 DATA122, , ,117,117,115,115,122 
,123,115,119,117, , ,117,117,115,1 
15,115, ,122, , ,122, ,117,115,114,1 
17,115,115,115 



40 DATA122, , ,117,117, ,, ,122, , ,11 
7, , ,117, ,, ,117, ,122, , ,122, ,117, , 
,,,,117 ■ ' 

45 DATA124, 124,124, 124,116, , ,32, 
120, , ,116,124,124,124,116,124,12 
4,124,116,124, ,116,124, ,116,124, 
124,116,124,124,124 
50 DATA46, 44, 44,45,37, , ,32,42, , , 
37,44,44,45,3 6,44,44,45,36,46, ,3 
6,46,32,37,44,44,36,44,44,45 
55 DATA42, , ,37,37,35,35,34,43,35 
,35,37, , ,37,33,35,35,39, ,42, , ,42 
, ,37,35,34,33,35,35,39 
60 DATA42, , ,37,37, , ,42,42, ,37,37 
,, ,37,37,32, ,, ,42,33,32,42,33,37 

65'dATA44,44,44,44,3 6,44,44,40,4 
4,44,44, 3 6,44,44,44, 3 6,44,44,44, 
36,44,36,44,44,44,36,44,44,36,44 
,44,44 

70 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$(13)THEN7 

75 DIM P$(20,2) ,A$(6) ,B$(20) ,C$( 
20) ,A(20),N(20) ,B(4),C(4) ,D(4) ,E 
(4),F(4),AO(20) 

80 FORI=lT03:READ C (I) , D (I) ,E (I) 
,F(I) :NEXT:F0RI=1T06:READA$(I) :N 
EXT : FORI=lT02 0 : READP$ (1 , 1) , B$ (I) 
,P$(I,2) ,C$(I) :NEXT 
85 COLOR1,0 
90 REM TITLE 

95 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(32,"=") ; : PRI 
NT@68 , "OPPOSITE CONCEPTS VOL. 2": 




Its our all new 

SOQDDMSQDD¥ QSSQDE 

Graphic* Clipbook 

17 pages of High Res. graphics 
works on CoCo 1,2, and 3 
64K * Disk Only * $15.00 



Baron Products 
3937 Shady Hill 
Dallas, TX 75229 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 91 



PRINT§134,"A) REVIEW ALL TERMS": 
PRINT@198 , "B) QUIZ GRAPHICS" : PRI 
NT@262,"C) QUIZ TERMS ONLY" 
100 PRINT@324,"«<SELECT YOUR CH 
OICE»>" 

105 PRINT:PRINTSTRING$(32," = ") ; : 
PRINT§420, "DEDICATED TO THE STUD 
ENTS!' :PRINTTAB(8) "OF JOHNSON SCH 
OOL" 

llj3 X$=INKEY$ : X=RND (-TIMER) : IFX$ 

="A"THEN3 65ELSEIFX$="B"THEN115EL 

SEIFX$="C"THEN795ELSE110 

115 CLS0:PMODE0,1:PCLS1 

120 LINE (0,0) -(254, 170) , PRESET, B 

125 LINE(6, 4)-(122, 82) , PRESET, BF 

130 LINE (12 8, 4)-(248, 82) , PRESET, 

B 

135 LINE (6, 86)-(122, 164) , PRESET, 
B 

140 LINE (12 8, 86) -(248,164) ,PRESE 
T,B 

145 DRAW"BM26,188C0NU10R10NU10BR 
6R10U6L10U4R10BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10 
BR12BU6NE4D2F4BR6R10U6L10U4R10BR 
6ND10R10D4NL10BR6NR10D6U10R10D10 
BR6NR10U10R10BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10B 
R10U10NL4R10D4NL10D6NL14BR6U10R1 
0D4NL10D6BR6U10R10D4L10R4F6BR6E4 
U2H4" 

150 DATA130,6,246,80,6,86,120,16 

2,130,86,246,162 

155 PAINT(2,2) ,0 ,0 : PCOPY1T03 

160 PMODE0,4:PCLS1 

165 LINE(0, 0)-(254, 170) , PRESET, B 
F 

170 LINE(8,6)-(120,80) ,PSET,BF 
175 PCOPY4TO2:PMODE0,1:SCREEN1,1 
180 DATA" BM2 , 8 CI" , "BM130 , 8C0" , "B 
M2 , 90C0" , "BM130 , 90C0" , "BM2 , 48C0" 
,"BM130,48C0" 
185 FORI=1TO20 

190 A (I) =RND (20 ) : IFN (A (I) ) =1THEN 
190 

195 N(A(I) )=1:NEXTI:FORY=1TO20:C 

OLOR1,0 

200 FORI=2T04 

205 B(I)=RND(3)+1:IFN(B(I) )=0THE 
N205 

210 N(B(I) )=0:NEXTI:FORI=1TO4:N( 
I) =1: NEXT 

215 B=RND ( 20) : IFB=A ( (Y) ) THEN215 
220 C=RND(20) :IFC=B OR C=A((Y))T 
HEN2 2 0 

225 DRAW A$(l) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,1) 

230 DRAW A$(B(2) ) :DRAWP$(B,2) 

235 DRAW A$(B(3) ) :DRAWP$(C,2) 

240 DRAW A$(B(4) ) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,2) 

245 COLOR1,0 

250 Z=0 

255 PMODE0,4 

260 DRAW A$(1)+"C0":DRAWP$(A(Y) , 



1) 

265 DRAW A$(B(2) )+"Cl":DRAWP$(B, 
2) 

270 DRAW A$ (B(3) )+"Cl":DRAWP$ (C, 
2) 

275 DRAW A$ (B(4) )+"Cl":DRAWP$ (A( 
Y) ,2) 

2 80 PMODE0,1:SCREEN1,1 

285 LINE(8,6)-(120,80) ,PSET,B 
290 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$=" "THEN300ELS 
EIFX$="§"THEN9 65 

295 COLOR1,0:LINE(8,6)-(120,80) , 

PRESET,B:GOT0285 

300 Z=Z+1:IFZ=4THENZ=1 

305 COLOR1,0:LINE(C(Z) ,D(Z) )-(E( 

Z) ,F(Z) ) ,PSET,B 

310 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=" "THEN300ELS 
EIFX$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN3 2 0ELSEIFX$=" @ 
"THEN9 65 

315 COLOR1,0:LINE(C(Z) ,D(Z) ) -(E( 

Z) ,F(Z) ) , PRESET, B:GOTO305 

320 IFZ+1=B(4)THEN330 

325 NW=NW+1:FORK=1TO5:PMODE0,4:S 

CREEN1 , 1 : SOUND10 , 3 : PMODE0 , 1 : SCRE 

EN1 , 1 : SOUND1 , 3 : NEXTK: GOTO305 

3 30 NC=NC+1:PMODE0,4:PCLS1:LINE( 
0,40) -(256, 12 6) , PRESET, B: LINE (6, 
44 ) - ( 124 , 12 2 ) , PRESET , B : LINE ( 130 , 
44) -(248, 122) , PRESET , B: PAINT (2 , 4 
2), 0,0 

335 DRAW A$(5) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,1) 
340 DRAW A$(6) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,2) 
345 SCREEN1,1 

350 X$=INKEY$:IFX$<>CHR$(13)THEN 
350 

355 PMODE0,1 

360 PCOPY3T01:SCREENl,l:PCOPY2TO 
4:NEXTY:GOT09 65 

3 65 PMODE0,2:PCLS1:SCREEN1,1:LIN 

E (0,40) -(256,126) , PRESET, B: LINE ( 

6,44) -(124,122) , PRESET , B: LINE (13 

0,44) -(248,122) , PRESET, B: PAINT (2 
42) 0 ,0 

370 FORI=1TO20:DRAW A$(5):DRAWP$ 
(I,D 

375 DRAW A$(6) :DRAWP$(I,2) 

3 80 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$(13)THEN 

380 

385 COLOR1,0:LINE(8,46)-(122, 120 
) ,PSET,BF:LINE(132,46) -(246, 120) 
,PSET,BF:NEXTI 
390 RUN 

395 DATA"BR24BD10R20F10L20NH10R6 

0M+20 , +8BL20NL60BR20M-20 , +8L60G1 

0R20E10L20U16BL8NL16BD4NL16BD4NL 

16BD4NL16BD4NL16BD32BR10U6NR10U4 

R10BR6ND10R10D4NL10D6BR6R10U6L10 

U4R10BR6R6ND10R6" 

400 DATA FAST 

405 DATA"BR42BD44NR30H10U10E10R2 
0F8D10G4L16H6U4E4R8F4D2G2L4H2BD8 



92 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



R16E6R6NE6F4D4NL4G4L6BU8BR4RBD3 4 
BL46Rlj3U6Llj3U4Rlj3BR6Dlj3R6BR6UipR 
lj3Dli3NLlj3BR6NUlj3R6NU8R6Ul^ fl 
41j3 DATA SLOW 

415 DATA"BR32BD4R6j3D46L6j3U46BF2R 

lj3NF4R18ND6R18NG4Rlj3D5NG4D16NL6D 

16NH4D5Llj3NH4L18NU6L18NE4Llj3U5NE 

4U16NR6U16NF4U5BD23BR2 8F8U2H8NU2 

M-18 / -4BD46BL26NUlj3Rlj3U6NLipU4NL 

lj3BR6NRlj3D4NRlj3D6R10BR6U6NRlj3U4R 

lj3BR6NDlj3Rlj3DlpNLlj3BR6Ulj3Rlj3D4Ll 

J3R4F6BR6NR1J3U6NR1J3U4R1J3" 

42J3 DATA BEFORE 

425 DATA"BR3 2 BD4R6j3D4 6L60U4 6BF2R 
1J3NF4R18ND6R18NG4R10D5NG4D16NL6D 
16NH4D5Llj3NH4L18NU6L18NE4Llj3U5NE 
4U16NR6U16NF4U5BD23BR28F8U2H8NU2 
M+18 , -4BD4 6BL56U1J3R10D4NL1J3D6BR6 
U6NRlj3U4RlJ3BR6R6NDlj3R6BR6NRlJ3D4N 
Rlj3D6Rlj3BR6U10Rlj3D4Llj3R4F6" 
43J3 DATA AFTER 

435 DATABF30E8R2E2NH6R2E2R4E2NH6 

R6E2R6NH6R4F2R6F2R4NH8F2R2F2R2F8 

H2L2G2L2G2L4G2L6G2L2J3H2L6H2L4H2L 

2H2NL2F2R2F2R4F2R6H4U2H2U4E2BR3J3 

F2D4G2D2G4BU4BL1J3U8F2D4L4U6D8H2U 

4BG3 6BD8U10R1J3D4NL10D6BR6NU10R6N 

U8R61^J3BR6U1J3R1J3D4NL1J8D6BR6U1J3D 

4NE4F6BR6NR10U6NRlj3U4Rlj3 

440 DATA AWAKE 

445 DATA"BF24BR4F2R2F2NG6R2F2R6F 

2NG6F2R8NG6R8E2R6NG8E2R4E2R2E2R2 

NGlj3E2BU2j3BL7j3Rlj3Glj3Rlj3BR6RBR6RB 

R6NR10E1J3NL1J3BD10BR6RBR6RBR6NR1)J 

El i 0NLlj3BDlj3BR6RBR6RBL86BD54Ulj3Rl 

j3D4NLlj3D6BR6Rlj3U6Llj3U4Rlj3BR6Dl^R 

8BR6NRlj3U6NRlj3U4Rlj3BR6NRl^D4NRl^ 

D6Rlj3BR6Ulj3Rlj3D4Llj3" 

45j3 DATA ASLEEP 

455 DATA ! 'BD6BF38R8E4Ulj3R4U6L4U6H 
4L16G4D6L4D6R4Dlj3F4R8BU6NE4NH4BU 
8NLNR2 BU6BL4NR2 BR6R2 BR4 J3BD2 j3R8E4 
Ulj3R4U6L4U6H4L16G4D6L4D6R4Dlj3F4R 
8 BU 6 NE 4 NH 4 BU 8 N LNR2 BU 6 B L4 NR 2 BR 6 R 2 
BL54BD44NUlj3R6NU8R6NUlj3BR6Ulj3BR6 
R6ND10R6BR6Dlj3U6Rlj3U4Dlj3" 
460 DATA WITH 

465 DATA"BR6J3BD44R8E4U1J3R4U6L4U6 

H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU6NE4NH4B 

U8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BL52BD44NU1 

J3R6NU8R6NU1J3BR6U10BR6R6ND1J3R6BR6 

D1J3U6R1J3U4D1J3BR6U10R1J3D10NL10BR6 

NUlj3Rlj3U10BR6R4ND10R4 " 

47j3 DATA WITHOUT 

475 DATA"BR6J3BD5J3R8E4U1J3R4U6L4U6 

H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D1J3F4R8BU6NE4NH4B 

U8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BU12NL12R4U 

2NL16U2NL30R14L2D8NF2NG2BD46BL44 

NUlj3R6NU8R6NUlj3BR6NU10BR6R10U6Ll 

j3U4Rl/JBR6NRlj3D4NRlj3D6R10" 

480 DATA WISE 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Back Issue 
Availability 




BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
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— a great way to expand your library! 

A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
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To check availability and order, review and 
fill out the form on the next page and mail 
it with your payment to: 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 93 



» 



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RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1981 through June 
1984, is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Year Indexes including RAINBOW ON tape are printed 
in the July 1985, 1986 and 1987 Issues, respectively. The Seventh Year Index is 
printed in the July 1988 issue. 

TOTAI 

KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 



U.S. MAIL CHARGE 

SHIPPING & HANDLING 

U.P.S. CHARGE 

TOTAL AMOUNT 

ENCLOSED 

Article Reprints 

In instances where a given issue is now out of print and not available for purchase, 
we do provide photocopies of specific articles. The cost for this service is $1.50 
plus 50 cents S/H per article. This service is provided only in the case of out-of- 
stock issues. 

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Charge to my: □ VISA □ MC □ AE 

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TO ORDER BY PHONE (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



485 DATA" BR60BD50R8E4U10R4U6L4U6 
H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU10NG4NF4 
BU4NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BU10R6M-10 
, -20M-10 , +2j3BD48BL3 6U6NR10U4R10B 
R6ND10R10D10NL10BR6U10R10D10NL10 
BR6NU10R8BR6NU10BR6R10U6L10U4R10 
BR6D10U6R10U4D10 M 
490 DATA FOOLISH 

49 5 DATA 11 BRBD2 6 BR2 4R7 6M-30 , -10L4 
G4L4H4L4M-30 , +10D2M+30 , +6R4E2R8F 
2R4M+30 , -6BD40BL80U10R10D4NL10BR 
6D6U10R10D4L10R4F6BR6NR10U6NR10U 
4R10BR6R4ND10R4BR6R4ND10R4BR6F4N 
E4D6" 

500 DATA PRETTY 

505 DATA" BD2 2 BR20NE4NG4R7 6NH4NF4 

G12L52H12F6R10NU6ND6R10NU6ND6R2N 

U6R2NU6R2NU6R2NU6ND6R10NU6ND6R2N 

D6R2ND6R2ND6R2ND6NU6R10NU6ND6R6B 

D40BL56NU10R10NU10BR6NR10U10R10B 

D4NL4D6BR6NU10R8BR10U6NE4NH4" 

510 DATA UGLY 

515 DATA"BR16BD20R80M-4,+20L3 6M- 

4,-18NL36E4R36H2L32R12U4R8D4BD42 

BL56NR8D10R8BR6U10R8D10NL8BR12M- 

6,-10BR12M-6,+10BR12NR8U6NR8U4R8 

BR6ND10R10D4L10R4F6" 

520 DATA COVER 

525 DATA"BR16BD20R80M-4,+20L36M- 
4,-18NL3 6BU8BE4R3 6H2L32R12U4R8D4 
BD60BL70NU10R10NU10BR6U10F10U10B 
R6NR8D10R8BR6U10R8D10NL8BR12M-6, 
-10BR12M-6 , +10BR12NR8U6NR8U4R8BR 
6ND1 0R1 0D4L10R4F6" 
530 DATA UNCOVER 

535 DATA"BD2BR5 6F12D4G2L4D2F2D2M 
-16 , +4M+12 , +3F2D2G4D4G2L14G2D4BE 
20BR12NR2 6BD4M+20 , +6BU20M-20 , +6B 
H18L4F2BD4 6BL2 2R6ND10R6BR6ND10R1 
0D4NL10D6BR6NU10R8BR6U10D4R4NE4F 
6" 

540 DATA TALK 

545 DATABD18BR9 4U4H4L4NU8L8G4D2G 

2D12F2DF8R4ND6R6E4BH6L4H2U4BL28B 

D20E2R2E2U4E2U20H2U4H2L2H2BL12BD 

34E2R2E2U4E2U10H2U4H2L2H2BL12BD2 

8E2R2E2U4E2U4H2U4H2L2H2BL12BD4NF 

6D14L6F2L2BD2 6BR4D10R8BR6NU10BR8 

R10U6L10U4R10BR6R6ND10R6BR6NR10D 

4NR10D6R10BR6U10F10U10 

550 DATA LISTEN 

555 DATA f, BR30BD8NE4NU8NH4BL8D10N 

R60D20NR60D10R60BR6F4H2G2E4BR6U2 

0NL60U20L60BD60BL14R10U6L10U4R10 

BR6R6ND10R6BR6ND10R10D4NL10D6BR6 

U10R10D4L10R4F6BR12U10L6R12" 

560 DATA START 

565 DATA"BR20BD8D10NR60D20NR60D1 

0R60BR6F4H2G2E4BR6U20NL60U20NL60 
D40BR6NE4NR8NF4BD20BL82U6NR10U4R 
10BR8D10BR8U10F10U10BR8D10BR8R10 



94 



THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



U6L10U4R10BR6D10U6R10U4D10 » 
570 DATA FINISH 

575 DATA"BR44BD4R6F4R2E4R2F4R2E4 

R6G8L20NH8D4R20NU4F12D14G6L30H6U 

14E12BF6BD4NR8L4D6R12D6L12R6ND4N 

U16BD30BL26U10R10D4L10R4F6BR8NU1 

0BR8NR10U10R10BR6D10U6R10U4D10" 

580 DATA RICH 

585 DATA"BR58BD6R6F2R2F2R2F4R2F4 

D4F2D6G2D4G4L2G4L2G2L2G2L12H2L2H 

2L2H4L2H4U4H2U6E2U4E4R2E4R2E2R2E 

2R4BD12BL2NG4D16L4R8BR8BU4U4R2L6 

U4R6L2U4BD50BL3 6U10R10D4NL10BR6D 

6U10R10D10NL10BR6U10R10D10NL10BR 

6U10R10D4L10R4F6" 

590 DATA POOR 

595 DATA"BR3 6BD20R50D30L50U30BF6 

ND16BR4ND16BR4ND16BR4ND16BR4ND16 

BR4ND16BR4D16BD4NL24BR8BU4R4U2L4 

U2R4BU6L4U2R4U2L4BR32BU18M-14,+6 

BL12NE8BL10NE8BL10NU8BL10NH8BL12 

NH8BL12M-14 , -6BD58BR14U10F10U10B 

R6ND10R10D10NL10BR8NU10BR8R10U6L 

10U4R10BR6F4NE4D6" 

600 DATA NOISY 

605 DATA"BD2BR3 6F12D4G2L4D2F2D2G 

4NL10F2D2G4D4G2L14G2D4BR28U24E4R 

2F4D10E2R2F2E2R2F2E2R2F2D10G4BU2 

0BL8R6U4L6U4R6BR6D8U4R8U4D8BR6U8 

D4R8U4D8BR4R2BR4R2BL84BD38U10R10 

D10NL10NF2NH4BR6NU10R10NU10BR8NU 

10BR8NR10U6NR10U4R10BR6R6ND10R6B 

L64BU48L6" 

610 DATA QUIET 

615 DATA"BR40BD2R44F4D2M-8,+20G8 
L4D4F4NL20D6L20U6E4U4L4H8M-8 , -20 
U2E4BD4BR2G2M+6 , +16R2U18NL4BR28D 
18R2M+6 / -16H2L4BL22BD4NG2D16NL2R 
2BR2BU6R4U4L4U4R4BR4R2ND8R2BD56B 
L32NU10R8NU8R8NU10BR8NU10BR8U10F 
10U10 11 

620 DATA WIN 

625 DATA" BR3 4BD16R6U4L6U4R6BR4NR 

6D8R6BR4U8R6D8NL6BR4U8R6D4L6R2F4 

BR4NR6U4NR6U4R6BD20BL50D10R10U10 

NL10BR6BD4R6BR10BD6R4NR4U10NG4BR 

10D10R10U10L10BF18L74U44R74D44BD 

22BL64NU10R8BR6U10R10D10NL10BR6R 

10U6L10U4R10BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10" 

630 DATA LOSE 

635 DATA"BR62BD3 6R8E4U10R4U6L4U6 
H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU10NG4NF4 
BU4 NLNR2 BU6BL4 NR2 BR6R2 BD10BF8M-1 
2 , +18M-12 , -18BU24BR38D30R4U30L4U 
6R12D2R8F6D4L4H4L6U2L10BL50BD8L2 
2D2NR22R2D4F6G6D4L2NR22D2R22U2L2 
U4H6E6U4BD48U10R10D10NL10BR6NU10 
R8 BR6R2NR10U10L2R12 D10 11 
640 DATA OLD 

645 DATA"BR60BD44R8E4U8R4U6L4U6H 



4L16G4D6L4D6R4D8F4R8BU6NE4NH4BU8 
NLNR2 BU6BL4NR2 BR6R2 BU8U2H2 L4 BR2 6 
BD6R10D20L10U20E2R6L2U2L2BL58BD4 
L2G2D4F2R2D10G2D2F2E2U2H2U10R2E2 
U4H2L2BD40BL6F4ND6E4BR6D10R10U10 
NL10BR6D10R10NU10BR6U10F10NU10BR 
6NR10U10R10BD4NL4D6 11 
650 DATA YOUNG 

655 DATA"BR18BD4R60D4 6L60U4 6BF2R 

10NF4R18ND4R18NG4R10D5NG4D16NL6D 

16NH4D5L10NH4L18NU6L18NE4L10U5NE 

4U16NR6U16NF4U5BD2 3 BR2 8F8U2H8NU2 

U12BR40ND8R12D4NL12D4BD8ND8G6H6D 

8BD28BL60NR8U6NR8U4R8BR6ND10R10D 

4NL10D6BR6U10R8D4L8R2F6BR6NU10R8 

BR10U6NE4NH4 " 

660 DATA EARLY 

665 DATA"BR18BD4R60D46L60U46BF2R 
10NF4R18ND4R18NG4R10D5NG4D16NL6D 
16NH4D5L10NH4L18NU6L18NE4L1 > 0U5NE 
4U16NR6U16NF4U5BD23BR28H8U2F8NU2 
U12BR40ND8R12D4NL12BD4BD8ND8G6H6 
D8BD28BL56NU10R8BR6U10R10D4NL10D 
6BR12U10L6R12BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10" 
670 DATA LATE 

675 DATABR12BD40R100L14BU2E2NR6U 

2H2L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L 

10U4R4U2E6R20F4R10D8NR2BL54L4NG2 

U2H2L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2 

L10U20R2 8D6R6D6R8ND8BE22D8NE4NH4 

BL60BD42D10BR6U10F10NU10BR12U6NR 

8U4R8BR6ND10R8D4L6F6BR6U10R8D10N 

L8BR6U10F10U10BR6R8L4D10 

680 DATA IN FRONT OF 

685 DATABR12BD40R98L8BU4NG2U2H2L 

2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L10U2 

0R28D6R6D6R8D8L4BL5 6BD2E2NR6U2H2 

L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L10U 

4R4U2E6R20F4R10D8NR2BH22NU8NH4NE 

4BD52BL14NU10R8U6NL8U4NL8BR6NR8D 

4NR8D6R8BR6U10D4R8U4D10BR8U10BR8 

ND10F10U10BR6R8D10L8R2U8 

690 DATA BEHIND 

695 DATA"BR12BD40R100L64BU2E2NR6 

U2H2L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2 

L10U4R4U2E6R20F4R10D8R2BD4R8U24N 

G4U4NR44L8E12NR40BG16BL12NL14NH4 

NG4BD42BL20NR10D4NR10D6R10BR6U10 

F10U10BR6R6ND10R6BR6NR10D4NR10D6 

R10BR6U10R10D4L10R4F6" 

700 DATA ENTER 

705 DATA !I BR12BD40R100L14BU2E2NR6 

U2H2L2G2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2 

L10U4R4U2E6R20F4R10D8NR2BD4L52U2 

4NF4U4NL44R8H12NL40BF16BR12R14NH 

4NG4BD4 2BL60NR10D4NR10D6R10BR6E6 

NH4NE4F6BR8U10BR8R6ND10R6 11 

710 DATA EXIT 

715 DATA"BR30BD24ND10F10M+28 , -8R 
10F10G4NL10G6L10M-28 , -8G10U10U2B 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 95 



- 



R36NH4NG4BR10BU4R2BR12R2BU6R2BU6 

R2BU6R2BU10BR4NF4G4L8H4G4L8H4G4L 

8H4G4L8H4G4L8.H4G4BD60BR10U10R10D 

4NL10D6BR6NU10R8BR8U10BR6D4F6E6U 

4BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10" 

720 DATA ALIVE 

725 DATA 11 BR3 0BD24ND20F1 0NG 10 R 6 NU 
4ND4R6NU6ND6R6NU8ND8R6NU8ND8R6NU 
8ND8R6ND8U8R4F8G4NL4G4L4BD2 6BL4 6 
NL2U10L2R12D10NL10BR6NR10U6NR10U 
4R10BR6ND10R10D4NL10D6BR6R2NU10R 
10U10L12BU38BL10E2U2H2U2E2U2H2U2 
BL12D2F2D2G2D2F2D2G2 " 
730 DATA DEAD 

735 DATA" BR3 4 BD3 4NU8R6NU8R6NU8 BR 
6U8R8D4NL8D4BR6NU8R8BR6U8D4R4NE4 
F4BR6ND4U12L68D16NR68U18R68U2L68 
U2R68U2L68U2R68U2L68U2R68U2NL68L 
28NU6L10NU6BD3 2ND6BR10ND6BD20BL1 
8ND10R10BD4NL4D6NL10BR6U10R10D10 
L10" 

740 DATA GO 

745 DATA"BR34BD34NU8R6NU8R6NU8BR 

6U8R8D4NL8D4BR6NU8R8BR6U8D4R4NE4 

F4BR6ND4U12L68D16NR68U32R68ND32L 

28NU6L10NU6BD3 2ND6BR10ND6BU20BL3 

4R2NU8R8U8NL10BR6ND8R8D8NL8BR6U8 

F8U8BR6R2ND2BR4R4ND8R4BD58BL60R1 

0U6L10U4R10BR6R6ND10R6BR6ND10R10 

D10NL10BR6U10R10D4L10 « 

750 DATA STOP 

755 DATA"BR22BD16NR68M+4,+10F16G 
6R40H6E16M+4 , -10BD10BR6R10F4D6G1 
0M-10,+3L10E6R10E6U2H2L4U4BU10BL 
30G6D4NF4G8BD32BL36R2NU10R10U6NL 
10U4NL12BR6ND10R10D4L10R4F6BR6U1 
0R10D10NL10BR6NU10U6R4NE4F6BR6NR 
10U6NR10U4R10BR6ND10F10U10" 
760 DATA BROKEN 

765 DATA"BR22BD16NR68M+4,+10F16G 
6R40H6E16M+4 , -10R10F4D6G10M-10 , + 
3L10E6R10E6U2H2L4BD46BL66U6NR10U 
4R10BR8D10BR8E6NH4NE4F6BR6NR10U6 
NR10U4R10BR6R2ND10R10D10NL12 " 
770 DATA FIXED 

775 DATA"BR30BD42R50E4U6M-6,-16E 

2U4H4L12G2D6F2R4NE2D10H2L2H2L4H2 

L6G2L4G2L2G2L4BU10R12U2L12U2R12N 

R16U2NR16L12U2R12U2L12BR60R12D2L 

12D2NL16R12D2L12NL16D2R12D2L12BD 

52BL74R8U6L8U4R8BR6R4ND10R4BR6ND 

10R8D4L8R2F6BR8U10R8D10NL8BR6U10 

F10U10BR6NR8D10R8U6L2 " 

780 DATA STRONG 

785 DATA"BR30BD42R12D2R10D2R6U2R 
10U2R12E4U6M-6 , -16E2U4H4L12G2D6F 
2R4NE2D12L34BU16NR2 6NU4ND2U2R2 6B 
R2 2R2 2NU2ND4 D2 L2 2 BD5 6BL5 2NU10R6N 
U8R6NU10BR6NR10U6NR10U4R10BR6ND1 
0R10D4NL10D6BR6NU10U6R4NE4F6" 
790 DATA WEAK 



795 CLS:V=1 

800 FORI=1TO20 

805 AO(I)=RND(20) 

810 IF N(AO(I))=l THEN 805 

815 N(AO(I) )=1:NEXTI 

820 FOR P=1TO20 

825 CLS 

830 PRINT@68 , "WHAT IS THE OPPOSI 
TE OF" 

835 PRINT@132,C$(AO(P) )+" ?" 
840 FOR Q=1T02 

845 C(Q)=RND(20) : IF C(Q)=AO(P) T 
HEN845 

8 50 FOR K=Q-1 TO 0STEP-1:IF C(K) 
=C(Q) THEN845 

855 NEXTK 

860 NEXTQ:C(3)=AO(P) 
865 FOR E=1T03 
870 F(E)=RND(3) 

875 FOR K=E-1 TO 0 STEP-1:IF F(K 
)=F(E) THEN870 
880 NEXTK :NEXTE 
885 PRINT 

890 PRINTTAB ( 8 ) "l-"+B$ (C (F (1) ) ) : 
PRINT 

895 PRINTTAB(8)"2-"+B$(C(F(2) ) ) : 
PRINT 

900 PRINTTAB ( 8 ) "3-"+B$ (C (F (3) ) ) : 
PRINT 

905 G$=INKEY$:IFG$="(§"THEN965 

910 IF G$=""THEN905 

915 G=VAL(G$) 

920 IF G<1 THEN 905 

925 IF G>5 THEN 905 

930 IF C(F(G) )<>AO(P) THEN945 

935 PRINT: PRINT" RIGHT! THE ANS 

WER IS: "+B$(AO(P) ) 

940 NC=NC+l:GOT0955 

945 PRINT: PRINT" SORRY I THE AN 

SWER IS: l! +B$(AO(P) ) 

950 NW=NW+1 

955 X$=INKEY$:IFX$<>CHR$(13)THEN 
955 

9 60 NEXT P 

965 CLS:PRINT@101,"YOU TRIED"NC+ 
NW"TIMES &" : PRINT@165 , "ANSWERED" 
NC " CORRECTLY " 

970 PRINT@229 , "WHILE DOING"NW"WR 
ONG . " 

975 NQ=NC+NW:IF NQ=0THEN NQ=1 

980 MS=INT(NC/NQ*100) 

985 PRINT@2 93 , "YOUR SCORE IS"MS" 

%." 

990 PRINT@3 57 , "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N/ 
C) ?"; 

995 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 
1000 IFX$="N"THENCLS : END 
1005 IFX$="C"THEN1015 
1010 GOT0995 
1015 IFV=1THEN825 

1020 IFV=0THEN280 /R\ 



96 THE RAINBOW October 1988 




Ftware 



NEW! The OS9 Calligrapher Font MassagerO 

This 0S9 utility program allows you to do all sorts of things to Calligrapher font files. 
You may create new fonts, modify existing fonts, invert fonts, compress fonts, double 
the height and/or width, halve the height and/or width and convert between OS9 and 
RSDOS formats. $19.95 (or only $14.95 if ordered with any other Calligrapher item) . 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Includes the Calligrapher 
and Economy Font Packages #1 and #2, 54 fonts in all; 
specify RSDOS or 0S9: $69.95. 



NEW! Hershey Fonts Now Available 
For the Calligrapher! 

These 28 fonts are known as the Hershey fonts developed by Dr. A. 
Hershey. All fonts come in both standard and reverse. Set #10 in- 
cludes Roman (Simplex, Complex Small, Complex ? and Triplex) - 8 
fonts. Set #ll includes Script (Simplex Small, Simplex, Complex 
Small and Complex] and Gothic English - 10 fonts. Set #12 in- 
cludes Italic (Complex Small, Complex and Triplex), and Roman 
(Duplex and Complex Tiny) - 10 fonts. Each set is $14.95. Sets 10, 
11 and 12 on one disk make up the Economy Font Package #4, (28 
fonts) for $29.95. See special offer above. 



Koman bimpex 

Roman Complex Small 

Roman Complex 
Roman Triplex 1 



lit!: 

Slit 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Calligrapher - (Hybrid 
BASIC/ML) Turn; your CoCo and 
do \r matrix printer into a, 
calligrapher's quill. Make beauti- 
ful invitations, flyers, certificates, 
labels and more. Includes 3 
fonts: Gay Nineties, Old English 
and Cartoon. The letters are 
inch high and variably spaced. 
Works with many printers includ- 
ing Epson, Gemini, Radio Shack, 
Okidata 92A, Banana and Pro- 
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OS9 Calligrapher - (C) Although 
a different program from the 
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fonts. It reads a standard text file 
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any time, centering, left, right or 
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line width, page size, page break 
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on UNIX systems. Includes Gay 
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Calligrapher Fonts - Requires 
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Koman. Italics, Cubes, Digital 
and Old World. 

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For a complete catalog of Sugar Software products and fonts, send a stamp and a label. 



Italic Complex Small 

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1 B ASIC Tra i ning 



16K ECB 



Last month, we studied the eight 
directional motion DRAW com- 
mands and developed a design 
on our graph paper screen. That is not 
the end of CoCo's abilities, however. 
CoCo can use other directions. CLORD 
and run the Graphic Paper program 
you saved onto tape. If your program 
doesn't have a holding line, type 300 
GOTO 300. (Note: When using these new 
direction commands, first plot the 
drawing on graph paper.) 

Look at Listing 1, but don't copy and 
run it. You will only get junk. Follow the 
instructions found in this article and 
have fun learning this new concept. 

Using LHUERFDG motion commands 
you created angular drawings. The 
results of these artistic efforts, even in 
PtIODE 4, have jagged outlines. You see 
the telltale step syndrome. To mute 
these angular forms and give them the 
semblance of gentle curves, use the M 
motion command. Use real graph paper 
to draw the lines as they are explained. 

We will now make some changes in 
last month's Graph Paper program. 
Key in 97 PSET(110,90,3) and run. 
This is the point of origin, around which 
we shall build a design. Both horizontal 
and vertical lines are in increments of 10 
(i.e., 0,10,20, to 240). Dark guide lines 
are in increments of 40 (i.e., 0,40,80, 
etc.). The dark lines are an overlay to 
help locate specific points. They are 
created in lines 80 and 90. You may use 
them or remove them by inserting a REM 
in front of the lines. 

Look at the graph on the computer 
screen. Starting at the left margin, we 
have three white lines and then a dark 
line. Along the horizontal line that 
displays the dot, count the first dark line 
as 40, the next dark line as 40, and the 
three white lines between (each having 
a value of 10) as a total of 30. Together 
the lines total 110. 

Count down from the top border, 
along the vertical line on which the dot 
is displayed. There are two dark lines 
with one white line between (90 total). 

Delete Line 97 and key in Line 100. 
Use 540 to make the lines created by the 
UDLREFGH DRRW command 10 times as 
large as they appear in the default mode. 
This way the lines drawn with the 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 



Modify last month's 
program to smooth out 
your art work 

New 
Directions 

4 

By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



computer are equivalent to lines drawn 
on real graph paper. Thus, everything 
you draw on the screen can be dupli- 
cated on real graph paper and vice 
versa. 

For this tutorial we will use the 
coordinates (110,90), oriented so that 
any line created will begin and end at 
some intersection where a vertical line 
crosses a horizontal one. We won't use 
the guide lines in lines 80 and 90, so 
mask them with a REM. Unless the color 
Cx (where x is the color used) is 
changed, it is only necessary when using 
the DRRW statement to enter the color in 
the first program line. CoCo will re- 
member to use the same color until you 
give it new instructions. 

Once we put in the starting point, 
BM110 , 90, we can make each successive 
move begin where the previous move 
ended. You will see how much easier it 
is to draw in this manner than to draw 
lines located by using BV\x,y (where x is 
the horizontal component, and y is the 
vertical component). 

Run the program, study it, press 
break and type LIST100, The elements 
that created the line on our screen graph 
paper were NM+1,2. On the real graph 
paper, put a heavy dot at an intersec- 
tion. N tells CoCo that after it moves 
M+1,2 it must return to its original 
position (back to the dot). M+l tells 
CoCo to move one space in a positive 
direction — from the starting point of 
the move, to the right. On your graph 
paper, draw a line from the dot to the 
first horizontal/ vertical intersection on 
the right. M+l is followed by ,2. The 2 



or +2 tells CoCo to move down two 
spaces in the positive vertical direction. 
Now draw a perpendicular line that 
starts at the end of the last pencil line 
and ends at the second horizontal/ 
vertical intersection. Put a heavy dot at 
the end. 

CoCo will draw a line between the 
two dots, M+1,2 or M+l, +2. The N 
made the cursor return to its starting 
point. 

To see the lines on the screen, type 
EDI T100 and press ENTER and X to end. 
Press the left arrow once to remove the 
closing quotation mark, type RD2 and 
enter. Type RUN, and press BREAK. To 
edit Line 100, use the spacebar to move 
under the R. Press 3D to remove RD2. 
Press ENTER and run. 

Look at Line 101 in the listing (DRRW 
"NM+1 ,-2"). On real graph paper, draw 
a line in a positive direction (R) from 
the dot at (110,90). In the program, a 
comma separates the vertical and hori- 
zontal directions. The vertical element 
is -2 (i.e., it moves up two from the end 
of the horizontal line just drawn). Draw 
the line (U2) and make a dot. CoCo will 
use NM+lj-2 to connect the dots and 
return. Key in Line 101 and run. , 

There are two components to these 
new moves. The first (horizontal) is 
separated by a comma from the second 
(vertical) component: Mh,v. If this 
move is prefixed by an N (NMh,v), the 
cursor will return to its original position 
after the move is completed. If the 
command is prefixed by a B (BMh,v), 
an invisible line will be drawn. In effect, 
it is a jump move to a new location. 

If the movement of the horizontal is 
negative, it moves to the left of the 
starting point. If it is a positive value, 
the movement is to the right. If the 
movement of the vertical component is 
negative, the cursor moves up from the 
starting point; if it is a positive value, 
it moves down. 

The formula is as follows: 

M(+ or -)h,(+ or -)v 
M = movement 
+h = right 
-h = left 

, f separates elements 
tv = down 
-v = up 

Key in and list Line 102 (DRRW "NM- 
1,-2"). We have returned to (110,90). 
On real graph paper, we will move M- 



98 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



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1, which moves us one unit to the left. 
Draw in the line and end with a heavy 
dot. The vertical component is -2, which 
is two units up. Continue the line you 
began, moving up two spaces. End with 
a heavy dot. Connect the two dots. 
CoCo will draw this line when you run 
the program. 

Next look at Line 103. We move one 
unit to the left because the first element 
is -1. Draw the appropriate line. The 
comma tells us that the next compo- 
nent, 2 or +2, is the vertical element. 
Draw a line down two units and make 
a dot. Draw a line between the two dots. 
CoCo will draw this line and return to 
its point of origin. 

Key in Line 103 and run. You should 
now have an X on your screen. (To show 
you the importance of those N prefixes, 
delete them from lines 100-103. Can you 
guess what your drawing will look like? 
Try it! Replace all the N's and let's 
continue.) 

Key in and list Line 110. We keep 
returning to our original position 
(1 10,90) so that our design will emanate 
from a single point. We are now going 
to make a two-unit-long X, using the 
directions, EFGH. Run the program. 
Now we will make another X that 
emanates from (1 10,90) and goes to the 
following points in succession: 
(130,100), (130,80), (90,80) and 
(90,100). 

Get out your graph paper. Put a dot 
at some intersection and label it 
(110,90). Find the four points listed 
above, and put a dot at each set of 
coordinates. Connect them one at a 
time to the central dot. Use this infor- 
mation to determine the NMh,v loca- 
tions. Use NM so we can return to 
(110,90). 

When you find the first location, 
check Line 111. Key in Line 1 1 1 and see 
how you have done. Do the same for the 
other coordinates and key in lines 112, 
113 and 114. We now have a triple X. 
The temptation is to add the routine, 
NL2NR2NU2ND2, but we want to be more 
creative than that. 

Key in Line 120. This tells CoCo to 
draw an invisible line (jump move) two 
units to the left and one unit up. (CoCo 
connects the beginning point with the 
end point.) Then it asks CoCo to make 
a conventional move, one unit up and, 
from there, one unit right. 

Key in Line 121. BR2 caused the 
cursor to jump two spaces to the right, 
and then draw one space to the right of 
and one space down from the jump. 
Now work out the other arms of the 
design, lines 122 and 123. Use your 



graph paper to visualize what you are 
creating. After you key in those lines 
and run the program, you should have 
a symmetrical design. We are going to 
add one-unit lines to the four segments. 
Key in Line 130 and run. 

There is always more than one way 
to do anything. The simplest way to 
make this design is to pick the central 
point (110,90) and proceed as we have 
already done (the old N ploy). 

Your last move ended at (90,100). 
Pick out an intersection and mark a dot. 
I usually label the 90 to the left of and 
the 100 above the dot so I know where 
I am starting. Since each line is 10 units 
from the next, I know that to get from 
90 to 1 10 on the horizontal, I must move 
to the right two units, or M+2. To get 
from 100 to 90 on the vertical, I must 
go up one unit, or -1. Run the program. 

You will notice that you are able to 
print over an existing line. I chose to 
make it invisible with a jump move by 
prefixing my command with B. 

Key in Line 131. Use your graph 
paper to draw this, so you can visualize 
the program as you read it. We are back 
at (1 10,90). Run the program. Next key 
in and run Line 140. We moved four 
units in each direction and made a 
square. 

The last instruction of Line 140 is not 
NU4, which would return us to the 
center, but U4, which keeps us in a 
corner. There is method to our madness. 
Lines 150 through 157 connect the eight 
spokes of our drawing in a clockwise 
direction. Work out the movement 
statements one at a time using the 
formula we used earlier. If you look at 
the tips of the U and E spokes, you can 
count the three lines between them on 
the horizontal plane. They are to the 
right of the center, so they are positive 
(M+3). Add the comma to separate the 
components. Note that the E spoke is 
one unit down (+1). Thus, your direc- 
tion would be M+3,1 or M+3,+1. Con- 
tinue to calculate the formula for each 
section until you have completed the 
octagon. After you complete this, check 
with the listing to see if your calcula- 
tions are the same as those in lines 150 
through 157. 

We will now edit Line 100 and center 
the design on CoCo's screen at (128,96). 
Move the cursor under the second 1 and 
press 2C to tell CoCo that you want to 
change the next two characters. Press 
28 and SHlFT-up arrow. Move the cur- 
sor under the 0 of 90, press C to tell 
CoCo that one letter will change, enter 
and run the program. 

We now have a pie figure, and we will 



paint alternating pieces of this pie. 
Unmasking the guide lines (80 and 90) 
will help when locating the coordinates 
for the PAINT command. Any pair of 
coordinates in the green background 
area within the segment are satisfactory. 

Look at the coordinates given in lines 
170 through 173 of the listing. They are 
located somewhere in the background. 
Convert the PRINT lines to P5ET lines 
if you want to see the point chosen: 

170 PSET(132,71,4) 

171 P5ET( 155,109, 4) 

172 PSET (116, 125, 4) 

173 P5ET( 105,94, 4) 

Run the program. 

When you plan to use the PRINT 
command, find a point within the 
boundaries to be painted. Then change 
the P5ET line to a PRINT line in this 
manner: Change P5ET( 116, 125, 4) to 
PRINT(116,125) ,4,*, where x is the 
border color. See how easily you can 
make the big switch? 

Key in lines 170 through 173. You 
dont have to delete the original lines; 
use them as a guide and key in the 
proper data. When you run the pro- 
gram, the guide lines (in Color 4) will 
block part of your PRINT command. 
Next, paint the right half of the four 
"propeller blades" (that is what they 
look like to me). Use PSET to find points 
within the boundaries of these blades, 
and convert the PSET command to a 
PRINT command. If you would prefer, 
key in lines 180 through 183 and run. 
(The program uses Color 1, so there is 
little difference.) 

At this point we want to get rid of the 
Graph Paper program. It is sacrilege to 
delete it, so we will bypass it. Key in 
lines 6 and 99 without the REM and run. 
Now for the masterpiece: Mask lines 6 
and 99, key in Line 15 without the REM 
and run. 

Want another masterpiece? Change 
the foreground from Color 4 to 3 in lines 
170 through 173 and from Color 2 to 1 
in lines 180 through 183. Unmask lines 
6 and 99 and run. Who wants to prac- 
tice? Gain more confidence in handling 
your new skill by changing all the fours 
in Line 140 to fives. Choose a starting 
point on one of the spokes and link up 
the eight spokes in lines 150 to 157. The 
modified program will be in next 
month's article. 

This tutorial is not just a game; it has 
practical value. Have your utility pro- 
gram ready for the next lesson, and we 
will create more beautiful works next 
month. □ 



1 00 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



The listing: 


112 

MJ MJ a 

113 

aa aa a 

114 


DRAW"NM+2,-l" 

aaa aaa aa a a a a M a a mm Mmm. mm a m 

DRAW' f NM-2 , -1" 

aaa aa a a a a ■ a a-a mm mm a ai 

DRAW"NM-2 , 1" 






ft I T "T* f^ m TIT/^ ^ 

p 1 LISTING1 


^ *^ rt 

120 


ak aaa aa av a ■ ■ mm mm ^ a ^h^^k. m a> 

DRAW"BM-2 , -1UR 11 


• 




5 CLEARS j3p 


121 


DRAW"BR2RD" 






6 'GOT099 


122 


mmm^ mm mm mm §t m\ _ m m\ 

DRAW M BD2DL M 






lp PMODE3,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 


M gmm ^ 

123 


T— _ i — m a • ■ a^ a - a. a a> a a B 

«DRAW !, BL2LU fl 






1 I- ■ sm Am /*\ ft ft 

15 'GOTO 1,00 


t *^ rt 

130 


V\Mt aa a a ■ ■ aa a at* t -a a a> — a at A a a 

DRAW"BM+2 , -1NH3 " 






20 A$="D1J3R24#" : B$="Dlj3L24 i 0 11 


M ^m aa 

131 


aa aaa a a a a ■ « a aa ^a. a a aaa ^a, — — a a 

DRAW"NE3NF3NG3 " 






30 C$= ,, R1#D160 11 :D$= ,l Rlj3U16#" 


^ j rt 

140 


av aa a. a a t | a a aw j a, aa aaa. ■ _ 4_ » a» a 

DRAW U NL4ND4NR4U4 


a a 

II 




40 E$=A$+B$+A$+B$ : F$=C$+D$+C$+D$ 


n r - rt 

150 


aa_ aaa aa a< a | ■ • _ _ a a 

DRAW"M+3 , 1" 






50 DRAW M C2BM0 ,0D10R240D10L240D10 


151 


w aa- a * t 1 1 <a a* • a a a 

DRAW fl M+l f 3 11 






R240D10L240"+E$+E$+E$ 


*1 r— *m. 

152 


aaL aaa. mm a a || a a a _ m _ a a 

DRAW"M-1, 3" 






atm a# •*« wm, mm m 1 ■ Mfc m a* #W a» m%, m amm awmf aa> m ^af aa am aa .^v _f «a -af m% aa 

60 DRAW n BM0,0R10D160R10U160R10Dl 


aj a ^a. 

153 


aaa aa a a a ■ ■ a mm mm. mm a a 

DRAW"M-3 , 1" 






^af -m^ mm frnf mm — — j«af | | » mm >a| » mm ^m) » mm Jb mm -a)| » mm «m| 

60R10U160 M +F$+F$+F$+F$+F$ 


M aM a 

154 


aa a mm a a a • a> _p a. a a a 

DRAW"M-3 , -1" 






70 DRAW"C4BMp / 0R240D160L240U160" 


155 


aa aa. am a a Bf a a a ^a *g 

DRAW"M-l,-3" 






80 DRAW"C4BM0 , 40R240D40L240D40R2 


156 


•a aaa a a a II a a , a -a a a 

DRAW'M+l, -3" 






A ft T™\ J ft T *\ A ft II 

40D40L240" 


"1 aa«» 

157 


DRAW"M+3,-l" 






/», T™\ T""l Tl T.T II > *" A ft ft T"\ T ^ ft J rt TT "1 ^ ft T*> J rt T*\ "1 rt 

90 DRAW"BM40 f 0D160R40U160R40D160 


n T rt 

170 


PAINT (132 , 71) ,4, 
PAINT (155, 109) ,4 


3 




mm. a ^af aa aa aa ^af aaaw a ^af ax «a A wmt % 9 

R40U160R40D160 11 


aa aaa aa 

171 


,3 




#*4 1 M^m Af Mb m j aa aa, ^aa m> ^m ^m a aaav mm *m at aa aa aa 

99 'PM0DE4, 1:PCLS:SCREEN1, 1 


172 


aaa «_ asaaaai / a a ^a> a aa aa \ a 

PAINT (116, 125) ,4 

«a -» aM a a aaa y a W aa a a \ a 

PAINT (105 ,94) ,4 , 


a*h 

/3 




mm M m m f Awmf aa. aa. am a» aa 1 1 ^m a ^af ^aa> ^a. m%. am aa aa «m — — . d tm m mm a> » aa mm* ■ ■ 

100 DRAW fl S40C3BM128 , 96NM+1, 2" 


M aa >a> 

173 


_a 

3 




M mmt Ml *k «k ■ a || ■ M*ai flF M aaw ■ ■ 

101 DRAW fl NM+l,-2 n 


mm _ W 

180 


am a aa< — . a aaa y a « ■ aa. aaa m aw 

PAINT (144 ,85) ,2, 


3 




m _a# _m aa mv *a a a | I um mawm. _ a a\ | ■ 

102 DRAW fl NM-l, -2" 


a aa 

181 


aaa. <a a»«aaM f aa ■ _ a a a \ a, 

PAINT (144, 114) ,2 


ja 

/3 




mm * - bk a ■ ■ ai am a> M «v ■ ■ 

1^(3 DRAW"NM-1,2" 


a M — aa 

182 


aaa m aaa a a#aa # a a -a a _a< a \ a. 

PAINT(116,104) ,2 


,3 




lip DRAWNE2NF2NG2NH2 " 


183 


PAINT(115,78) ,2, 


3 




111 DRAW"NM+2,1" 


300 


GOTO 3 00 








RAINBOW review B/B8 



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RAINBOW 

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H Files Edit Run Compile Options 


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Prograi 


To Assembly .a I 
To Object .r j 
To ExecutaBTel 
Cancel ^ 

mming 1 


"a 



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CCENV is a mouse-and-menu driver forall 0S9 compilers and assemblers. CCENV is interactive 
and easy to use. A single mouse-click can take a C program from source code to executable module 
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set all compiler, assembler, and linker options. Temporary files are automatically written on the 
RAMdisk if available, reducing compile-time. Go from edit mode to compile and back to edit with 
mouse-clicks. Error messages are saved and can be scrolled in a window during your next editing 
session. 

CCENV maintains configuration files so all options can be rechosen automatically. A PROJECT 
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October 1988 THE RAINBOW 101 



Create whirlpools and waves in an 

undulating grid 





nimation 



By Patrick D. Grengs II 



Gravitational Grid uses several 
user-entered parameters to 
simulate a warped checker- 
board. These parameters control both 
the resolution of the display and the 
characteristic deformations in the grid. 
Although a joystick allows faster 
"gravity-center" entry, its use is not 
necessary. 

As you run the program, you will be 
asked a number of questions. The first 
of these concerns screen resolution. If 
you want your display to be animated, 
press N at the prompt, "High Resolu- 
tion (Y/ N)." Since the animated display 
must create four consecutive screens, it 
will take about four times longer to 
generate an animated display than a 
high resolution display. The next 
prompt, "Enter X Linear Step," per- 
tains to the width, in pixels, of each of 
the displayed checkers. Similarly, 
"Enter Y Linear Step" designates the 
height, in pixels, of each checker square. 

The next prompt asks for the gravity 
type: Linear or Normal. This deter- 

Patrick Grengs, a math and computer 
science major, works part-time at 3M's 
CADj CAM center, Patrick enjoys 
graphics and animation programming 
on his Co Co. 



mines the gravity that the checker board 
will experience during its creation. 
Linear gravity produces sharp blips in 
the grid while normal gravity produces 
smooth blips. 




"<1> Points <2> Grid <3> Checkers" 
asks for the type of grid to be created. 
While the Points option produces a grid 
composed of points where the vertices 
should be located, Grid creates the 
actual grid, with corresponding vertices 
connected by line segments. Checkers 
creates a grid with every other region 
filled in. If you choose the Checker 
option, you will be asked to enter a 
filling — paint or linear. If you choose 
the Paint option, every other block will 
be filled using CoCo's PRINT command. 



If you choose the Linear option, a filling 
algorithm will be used to fill alternating 
blocks. The time requirement for this 
algorithm is costly, so only use this 
option on complex grids. (If the PRINT 
command is used on complex or folded 
grids, too many blocks may be acciden- 
tally painted. 

Those of you who want to create an 
animated display will also be asked for 
the horizontal and vertical direction of 
movement on the grid. 

Finally, you must choose the size 
(magnitude) of the blips and the degree 
of twist imposed on them. 

After the numeric parameters have 
been entered, each blip's center must be 
defined. To do this, move the cursor to 
the point at which you want to place a 
center of gravity. Press the space bar or 
joystick button. Now move the dot to 
the outer region of influence. (The 
distance between the center and outer 
region is called the radius of influence 
of the blip.) You now have four choices: 

Press U for an upward blip — the top 
of the grid will appear pushed up at 
one point. 

Press D for a downward blip — the 
grid will appear pulled down at one 
point. 



102 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



Press R for a right twist — a tornado, 
moving in a clockwise direction, will 
appear on the grid. 
Press L for a left twist — The tornado 
will move in a counter-clockwise 
direction on the grid. 

A circle, which indicates the radius of 
influence, will appear after each blip is 
completed. Press ENTER after all blips 
have been defined. The screen will be 
cleared and the grid created. 

A number of nested FOR NEXT loops 
control the grid creation process, but 
the key to the program is the gravity and 
twisting algorithms. The gravity algo- 
rithms push or pull the grid's vertices 
toward or away from the various cen- 
ters of gravity. The distance is deter- 
mined by a distance function: The 
further the vertex is from the center of 
gravity, the less the vertex will be 
affected. With Linear Gravity, the 
function is directly proportional to the 
distance between the vertex and the 
center of influence. With Normal Grav- 
ity, the effect is based on a simple 
sinusoidal function of distance. Normal 
Gravity will produce more realistic 
deformations in the grid. 

The twisting algorithms rotate the 
vertices of the grid in either a clockwise 
or counter-clockwise manner. The angle 
of rotation is based on the distance. 
Linear Twisting gives us an angle di- 



rectly proportional to the distance. The 
angle from Normal Twisting is based on 
a sinusoidal function of distance. As 
with Normal Gravity, Normal Twisting 
produces more realistic results. 

Here are the parameters for a generic 
animated grid: 



Prompt Question: Answer: 

High Resolution (Y/N): N 

Enter X Linear Step: 16 

Enter Y Linear Step: 12 

Gravity Type: 2 (Normal) 
1. Points 2.Grid 

3. Checkers: 3 

Filling: 1 (Paint) 

Horizontal Direction: 2 (Right) 

Vertical Direction: 2 (Down) 

Enter Magnitude: 1 

Max. Angle Twist: 90 



Enter a blip at the screen's center, 
with a large radius of influence. Use 
either gravity or twisting as the force on 
the grid. Press ENTER. Now go and get 
yourself a cup of coffee, since it will take 
about a half an hour to create your 
animated display. 

In order to save your high- 
resolution/ animated display, press 
BREAK to exit from the display, and use 
these commands for each of the follow- 
ing: 

•Enter £SMZY\" filename" V 1S3G* 



7679 , 0 to save a high-resolution grid 
onto tape. 

• Enter SflVEM* filename" ,3584 , 
9727 , 0 to save a high-resolution grid 
onto disk. 

•Enter CSftVZft" filename" % 1S3£ , 
13833,0 to save an animated grid 
onto tape. 

• Enter SfiVEM" filename" ,3584 , 
15B81,0 to save an animated grid 
onto disk. 

Use the following procedure to view 
any files you save: 

1. RUN "GRfiVGRID". 

2. Press break. 

3. L 0 fi D M "filename " . 

4. Type GOTO 190, and press ENTER 

5. Control the keyboard speed using A 
through Z. Pressing A creates a fast 
display. The farther you move 
through the alphabet, the slower 
your display will become. 

I hope that you enjoy Gravitational 
Grid and its demonstration of the 
CoCo's graphics display power, I wel- 
come any improvements or questions 
you might have about the program. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 375 West Hathorn, River 
Falls, WI 54022. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 1 03 













V 


57 , 


2 


370 


106 




69 .... 


"7fl 




one 


150 ... 


. . .205 


END 


12 


194 


.. . ,48 







The listing: GRAVGRID 

J3 GOTO 2 

1 GOTO 5 

2 PCLEAR 8 

3 GOTO 1 
5 



GRAVITATIONAL GRID 
VR: 3.1 
BY: PATRICK D. GRENGS II 

DECEMBER , 19 85 
RV: JULY 27, 1986 



lj3 CLEAR2j3j3 : PLAY 11 L2 5 5 11 

15 E$=STRING$(32,128) 

16 PI=ATN(lE+9) 

2p DIM X(5J3) ,Y(50) ,D(5j3) ,V(5j3) , 
G(50) ,XT(256) ,YT(192) ,N(1) 

25 GOSUB90j3 

3 J3 IF H$="Y" THEN 45 

3 2 R1=XS/4*XM:IF XM=1 THEN 
S1=-3*R1 ELSE S1=0 

3 4 R2=YS/4*YM:IF YM=1 THEN 
S2=-3*R2 ELSE S2=0 

45 P$= II 05V15CAFDB" 

5J3 PMODE4,l:PCLS:SCREENl,l 

52 X=12 8 : Y=9 6:TG= > 0 

55 IF JOYSTK(0)<9 AND X>7 THEN 
X=X-8 

56 IF JOYSTK(0)>54 AND X<248THEN 
X=X+8 

57 IF JOYSTK(l)<9 AND Y>7 THEN 
Y=Y-8 

58 IF JOYSTK(l)>54 AND Y<184THEN 
Y=Y+8 

60 IF(PEEK(343) AND8)=j3 AND X>1 
THEN X=X-2 

61 IF(PEEK(3 44)AND8)=j3 AND X<254 
THEN X=X+2 

62 IF(PEEK(341) AND8)=j3 AND Y>1 



THEN Y=Y-2 
63 IF(PEEK(342)AND8)=j3 AND Y<19j3 

THEN Y=Y+2 
65 PUT (X, Y) - (X+l, Y+l) ,N, NOT: PLAY 

H L2 55 ,f :PUT(X,Y) -(X+1,Y+1) ,N, 

NOT 

67 IFPEEK(345)<>255 AND TG=j3THEN 
TG=TG+ 1 : A=X : B=Y : PUT (A, B) - (A+l 
,B+1) , N, NOT :PLAYP$: GOTO 55 

68 I$=INKEY$:IF(I$= M U" OR I$="D" 
) AND TG=1 THEN C=C+1 : X (C) =A: 
Y (C) =B : D (C) =SQR ( (A-X) A 2+ (B-Y) 
A 2) *MM:PUT(A,B) -(A+1,B+1) ,N, 
NOT: CIRCLE (A, B) ,D(C) :PLAYP$: 
G(C)=1:IF I$= M U" THEN V(C)=-1 
:GOT052 ELSE V (C) =1 : GOT052 

69 IF(I$="R M OR I$="L") AND TG=1 
THEN C=C+1:X(C)=A:Y(C)=B:D(C) 
=SQR( (A-X) A 2+(B-Y) A 2) :PUT(A,B 
) -(A+1,B+1) ,N,NOT:CIRCLE(A,B) 
,D(C) :PLAYP$:G(C)=2:IF I$="R lf 
THEN V(C)=l:GOT052 ELSE V(C)= 
-l:GOT052 

7j3 IF I$<>»»" THEN IF ASC(I$)=13 

THEN GP=C:GOT01j3j3 
71 GOT055 
Ij3j3 PCLS 

IIP IF H$<>"Y" THEN FOR PM=1 TO 
7 STEP 2 :PMODE2,PM: SCREEN 1,1 
:PCLS: J=p:CC=j3 

115 FOR K=S2-YS*1 TO 192+YS STEP 
YS: J=J+l:X=Sl-XS:Y=K:ON G 
GOSUB5J3J3 , 510 : XT (J) =X : YT (J) =Y 

:next 

12j3 FOR X1=S1 TO 256+XS STEP XS : 
Z=0:CC=CC+1:IFCC=2 THEN CC=J3 
121 C=CC 

125 X=X1: Y=S2-YS:ON G GOSUB5J30, 
51p:XT=X:YT=Y 

130 FOR Y1=S2 TO 192+YS STEP YS : 
C=C+1:Z=Z+1 

135 X=X1:Y=Y1:0N G GOSUB5j3j3 , 510 : 
PSET(X,Y,5) :IF CH>1 THEN 
LINE (XT (Z) ,YT(Z) )-(XT,YT) , 
PSET:LINE-(X,Y) ,PSET:LINE- 
(XT(Z+1) ,YT(Z+1) ) ,PSET:LINE- 



CoCo Cat By Logan Ward 




104 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



140 

142 
145 

150 
160 

165 
170 



171 



172 



175 
177 



179 



180 



190 
192 
194 



196 
199 

200 
22J3 



230 
250 
270 



280 
290 
295 
296 
300 
340 



(XT(Z) ,YT(Z) ) ,PSET 

IF CH=3 AND C/2=INT(C/2) 

THEN ON PT GOSUB170,171 

XT ( Z ) =XT : YT ( Z ) =YT : XT=X : YT=Y 

NEXT Y1:XT(Z+1)=X:YT(Z+1)=Y: 

NEXT XI 

S1=S1+R1 : S2=S2+R2 

IF H$<>"Y" THEN NEXT PM: 

GOTO190 

GOT0999 

PAINT ( (XT(Z)+XT+X+XT(Z+1) )/4 
, (YT(Z)+YT+Y+YT(Z+1) )/4) ,1,1 
: RETURN 

D=0 : D1=X : D2 =XT : GOSUB29 0 : 
D2=XT(Z) :GOSUB290:D2=XT(Z+1) 
: GOSUB2 9 0 : D1=XT : GOSUB2 9 0 : 
D1=XT(Z) :GOSUB290:D2=XT: 
GOSUB290 

D1=Y : D2=YT : GOSUB2 9 0 : D2=YT ( Z ) 
:GOSUB290:D2=YT(Z+1) : GOSUB 
290:D1=YT:GOSUB290:D1=YT(Z) : 
GOSUB2 9 0 : D2=YT : GOSUB29 0 
D=D+.0001 

X3=(XT(Z+1)-XT(Z) )/D: 
Y3=(YT(Z+1)-YT(Z) )/D: 
X4= (X-XT) /D : Y4= ( Y-YT) /D 
A1=XT(Z) :B1=YT(Z) :A2=XT: 
B2=YT 

FOR 1=0 TO D:LINE(A1,B1)- 

( A2 , B2 ) , PSET : A1=A1+X3 : B1=B1+ 

Y3:A2=A2+X4:B2=B2+Y4:NEXT: 

RETURN 

•DISPLAY FRAMES 
X$=INKEY$:T=10 

FOR P=l TO 7 STEP 2 : PMODE2 , P 
:SCREEN1,1:I$=INKEY$:IF I$<> 
""THEN T=ASC(I$) *4-256 
FORI=l TO T:NEXTI,P:GOT0194 
FOR P=l TO 7 STEP 2 : PMODE2 , P 
:SCREEN1, l:NEXT:GOT0199 
'LINEAR GRAVITY 
IF D<D(I) THEN DF=(D(I)-D)/ 
D(I) :A=A+V(I) * (X(I) -X) *DF: 
B=B+V(I) * (Y (I) -Y) *DF 
RETURN 

'NORMAL GRAVITY 

IF D<D(I) THEN DF=(D(I)-D)/ 

D(I) :DX=(X(I)-X) :A=A+V(I)* 

(DX-DX*SIN(PI*D/D(I) ) ) :DY=(Y 

(I) -Y) :B=B+V(I) *(DY~DY*SIN 

(PI*D/D(I))) 

RETURN 

'RETURN MAX 

E=ABS(D1-D2) :IF E>D THEN D=E 
RETURN 

•LINEAR TWIST 

IF D<D(I) THEN AG=AN*V(I)* 
(D(I)-D)/D(I) :X4=X-X(I) :Y4= 
Y-Y(I) :X=X4*COS(AG)-Y4*SIN 
(AG)+X(I) :Y=X4*SIN(AG)+Y4* 
COS (AG) +Y (I) :A=A+X5-X: 



B=B+Y5-Y 

3 50 RETURN 

370 'NORMAL TWIST 

410 IF D<D(I) THEN AG=AN*V(I)* 
(l-COS(PI*(D(I)-D)/D(I) ) ) : 
X4=X-X(I) :Y4=Y-Y(I) :X=X4* 
COS (AG) -Y4*SIN (AG) +X (I) : Y= 
X4*SIN(AG)+Y4*COS (AG)+Y(I) 

420 RETURN 

500 A=0:B=0:FOR 1=1 TO GP:D=SQR( 
(X-X(I) ) *(X-X(I) )+(Y-Y(I) )* 
(Y-Y(I)))^ON G(I) GOSUB 200, 
300:GOTO520 

510 A=0:B=0:FOR 1=1 TO GP:D=SQR( 
(X-X(I) ) *(X-X(I) )+(Y-Y(I) ) * 
(Y-Y(I))):ON G(I) GOSUB 250, 
370 

520 NEXT I:X=X+A:Y=Y+B:IF X<0 

THEN X=0 ELSE IF X>2 55 THEN 
X=2 55 

525 IFY<0 THEN Y=0 ELSE IF Y>191 

THEN Y=191 
530 RETURN 
900 CLS0 

910 PRINT@4,"-=< GRAVITY INFLUXO 
R >=-" ; 

915 PRINT@9 6, "HIGH RESOLUTION (Y 
/N)";:INPUT H$ 

920 PRINT@128, "ENTER X LINEAR ST 
EP:";:INPUT XS:IF XS<1 OR XS>64 

THEN PRINT@12 8,E$; :GOTO920 
930 PRINTS 160, "ENTER Y LINEAR ST 
EP:";:INPUT YS:IF YS<1 OR YS>64 

THEN PRINT@160,E$; :GOTO930 
950 PRINT© 19 2, "GRAVITY TYPE: 1>L 
INEAR 2>NORMAL"; : INPUT G:IF G<1 

OR G>2 THEN PRINT@192 , E$ ;E$ ; 

:GOTO9 50 

955 PRINT@224, "<1> POINTS <2> GR 
ID <3> CHECKERS"; : INPUT CH 
957 IF CH=3 THEN PRINT@256, 

"FILLING: 1>PAINT 2>LINEAR"; 
: INPUT PT:IF PT<1 OR PT>2 
THEN PRINT@256,E$:GOT0957 

959 IF H$="Y" THEN 970 

960 PRINT@2 8 8,"HORZ. DIR. 1-LEFT 
2-RIGHT"; : INPUT XM:IF XM<1 OR 

XM>2 THEN PRINT@2 88,E$:GOTO 
960 

962 XM=XM*2-3 

965 PRINT @ 3 20, "VERT. DIR. 1-UP 2 
-DOWN" ;: INPUT YM: IF YM<1 OR YM>2 

THEN PRINT@320,E$; :GOT0965 
967 YM=YM*2-3 

970 PRINT@3 52,"ENTER MAGNITUDE:" 
;: INPUT MM: IF MM=0 THEN MM=1 
980 PRINT@3 84 , "ENTER MAX. ANG. T 
WIST:"; : INPUT AN 
985 AN=AN/90*PI 
990 RETURN 

999 SCREEN1 , 1 : GOT0999 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 



105 




Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in the rainbow's 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed — 
legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high score. 
Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



12,825 

12,350 
12,175 
11,675 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 

{ 

* 

* 

* ____ 

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



ADVANCED STAR*TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
4,750 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
4,475 David Schaller, Clarkston, WA 
4,500 Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
4,300 Jeffrey Warren, Waynesville, NC 
3,960 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 
British Columbia 
ASTRO BLAST {Mark Data) 

48,825 ★Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
BEE ZAPPER (THE RAINBOW, 9/87) 

15,785 ★David Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 
Frederick Lajoie, Middleton, Nova 

Scotia ; 
Tom Carpenter, Palenville, NY 
Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
Daniel Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 
BLITZ (THE RAINBOW, 6/88) 

32,440 ★Joel Klein, Indianapolis, IN 
BOUNCING BOULDERS (Diecom Products) 

10,930 ★Patrick Garneau, Ste-Croix, Quebec 
BREWM ASTER (NOVASOFT) 

46,175 *Wendy Staub, Moundsville, WV 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 
1,725,100 ★John Guptitl, Columbia, MO 
1,627,500 Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
293,200 Alan Kramer, Gooksville, MD 
213,400 Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
202,000 David Brown, New Waterford, Nova 
Scotia 
CASHMAN (MichTron) 

9,870 ★Martin Parada, Arcadia.CA 
COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

238-0 ★•John Valentine, Marlborough, CT 
•Jennifer Johnson, Meriden, CT 
•Matthew Snider, Pinehurst, TX 
•Andrew Smith, Cincinnati, OH 
•Adam Silverstein, Chicago, IL 

David Gzarnecki, Northhampton, MA 
•Chad Blick, Irwin, PA 
•Mike Korte, Vienna, VA 
•Jason Kopp, Downs, IL 
•Kelly Jones, West Salem, OH 
COLOR CAR (NOVASOFT) 

343,075 ★Duncan Cameron, Chippewa Falls, 
Wl 

Alan Martin, Cornwall, Ontario 
Chad Blick, Irwin, PA 
Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
COLOR POKER (THE RAINBOW, 4/83) 
44,022,600 ★Earl Foster, Lynchburg, VA 
THE CONTROLLERS (THE RAINBOW, 2/88) 
148 ★Phil Hoisten, Moraga, CA 
188 Frederick Lajoie, Middleton, Nova 
Scotia 

DEF MOV (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

43,806 ★Domingo Martinez, Miami, FL 
35,331 David Schaller, Clarkston, WA 
31,673 Douglas Bacon, Midtfietown, CT 
30,753 Pasha Irshad, Silver Spring, MD 
30,326 Frederick Lajoie, Middleton, Nova 
Scotia 

DEMOLITION DERBY (Radio Shack) 

100,500 ★Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 

DEMON ATTACK (imagic) 

279,435 *Jon Hobson, Plainfield, Wl 
202,260 Tom Briggs, Hillsdale, NY 
89,285 Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 



137-0 
130-0 
125-0 
119-0 
111-2 
96-0 
74-0 
43-0 
28-0 



316,550 
113,970 
110,870 



* Current Record Holder • Shutout 

DEMON ATTACK (continued) 

72,410 Glenn Hodgson, Aberdeenshire, 

Scotland 
67,760 Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
DESERT PATROL (Arcade Animation) 

234,300 ★Steven Turcotte, Matane, Quebec 
DESERT RIDER (Radio Shack) 

80,703 ★Thomas Payton, Anderson, SO 
65,351 Jason Hackley, Clinton, CT 
64,789 Roby Janssen, Clear Lake, IA 
63,014 Rebecca Henderson, Ballston Spa, 
NY 

62,702 William Currie, Bryans Road, MD 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Tom Mix) 
1,866,100 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
623,550 Dale Krueger, Maple Ridge, 

British Columbia 
75,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
40,800 Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 
DONPAN (Radio Shack) 

53,100 ★Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
52,600 Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

99,980 *Danny Wimett, Rome, NY 
98,985 Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
97,740 Stephane Deshaies, Beloetl, Quebec 
89,490 Neil Edge, Williston, FL 
77,254 Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 
73,346 Jean-Francois Morin, Loretteville, 
Quebec 

70,142 Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
68,142 Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
; 67,721 Keith Yampanis, Jaffrey, NH 
62,442 Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
55,300 Patrico Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 

50,362 Jennifer Johnson, Meriden, CT 
49,500 Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge, VA 
49,441 Kevin Pater, Port Aiberni, British 
Columbia 

49,254 David Brown, New Waterford, Nova 

'J ■>■'"■ j i- Scotia 

44,281 Kelly Jones, West Saiem, OH 
43,502 Mike Elts, Charlotte, Ml 
43,369 Jason Kloostra, Jenison, Ml 
41 ,896 Antonio Hidalgo, San Jose, 

Costa Rica 
40,360 Jesse Binns, Phoenix, AZ 
35,611 Adam Broughton, Morris, PA 
35,169 Daniel Norris, New Albany, IN 
23,649 Jim Herr, NeWton, Wl 
23,257 Courtney Shaffer, La Grangeville, NY 
DRACONIAN (Tom Mix) 

114,470 ★Donna Ashby, Annandale, VA 
ENCHANTER (infocom) 

400/223 *Konnie Grant, Toledo, OH 
ESCAPE 2012 (Computerware) 

202 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
199 Milan Parekh, Anaheim, CA 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/86) 
22,505 ★Chad Presley, Luseland, 

Saskatchewan 
11,250 Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
5,680 Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
3,760 Rick Beevers, Bloomfield, MN 
3,505 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 



29,030 
26,370 
22,250 
11,830 



357,890 
328,820 
249,960 
169,410 



23,643,720 
20,921,490 
10,222,940 
7,493,340 
515,980 



GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

31,100 ★Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 

David Czarnecki, Northhampton, MA 
Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
Sheldon Penney, Green Bay, 
Newfoundland 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 

751,020 ★Sofia Giorgi, Brasilia, Brazil 
Jason Clough, Houston, TX 
Bernard Burke, Lee's Summit, MO 
Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
Danny Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
45,235,820 *Ken Hubbard, Madison, Wl 
Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
Clinton Morel I, Sacramento, CA 
Stirling Dell, Dundaik, Ontario 
Matthew Heid, Fifelake, Ml 
GANTELET II (Diecom Products) V 
17,701 ,060 ★Bryan Bell, Manassas, VA 
GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 
2,350,750 ★Michael Heftz, Chicago, IL 
702,520 Joseph Delaney, Augusta, GA 
282,070 Kelly Jones, West Salem, OH 
105,820 David Reash, Hadley, PA 
GIN CHAMPION (Radio Shack) 

1 ,120-0 ★•Kim Johns, Port Cog., British 
Columbia 

GRANDPRIX CHALLENGE (Diecom Products) 

67,710 *H. Dingwell, Litchfield, CT 
GROBOT (Children's Computer Workshop) 

9,665 *Wendy Staub, Moundsville, WV 
8,090 Curt Lebel, Louisville, KY 
HELICOPTER HERO (THE RAINBOW, 3/88) 

103 ★Phil Hoisten, Moraga, CA 
HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY (Infocom) 
400/359 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
400/422 Jeff Holtham, Waterloo, Ontario 
400/510 Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
INTERBANK INCIDENT (Radio Shack) 

4,861 ★Shara and Chris Euton, Lilburn, GA 
IRON FOREST (Diecom Products) 
3, 1 73,200 ★Charles Boyd, Amarillo, TX 
Janet Boyd, Amarilio, TX 
Craig Pennell, Amarillo, TX 
WUMam Weller, Kailua, HI 
Daniel Wtbier, Santa Rosa, CA 
JOKER POKER (THE RAINBOW, 3/87) 
62,067,906 ★Carole Rueckert, Mansfield, OH 
Jon Fogarty, Yale, Ml 
Brenda Kim, Athens, OH 
Curtis Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 
Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computerware) 
2,503,000 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
257,600 Keith Cohen, Rocky Mount, NC 
JUNKFOOD (THE RAINBOW, 11/84) 

535,760 ★Charlie Glnn, Augusta, GA 
18,990 Joel Klein, Indianapolis, IN 
KING PEDE/T & D Software) 

83,855 ★Mike Snyder; Allen, OK 
KNOCK OUT (Diecom Products) 

183,675 ★Rush Caley. Port Orchard, WA 
162,555 Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
147,235 Mike LeBrun, Cornwall, Ontario 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 

186,710 *Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 



2,676,300 
1,141,650 
1,013,100 
595,700 



21,733,284 
8,179,710 
3,796,898 
2,793,285 



106 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 




KORONIS RIFT (continued) 

184,180 Russell Johnson, Sarnia, Ontario 
184,1 20 John Farrar, Lebanon, TN 
174,810 Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
1 33,990 Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 
KUNG-FU DUDE (Sundog Systems) 

32,000 ★Tony Geitgey, University Park, PA 
12,150 Cody Deegan, Fallon, NV 
THE LAIR (Freebooter Software) 

1 1 2,940 ★James Walton, Pittsburgh, PA 
LASER SURGEON: THE MICROSCOPIC 
MISSION (Activision) 

42,767 *Joe Stanley, Harrisburg, !L 
LUNAR-ROVER PATROL (Spectral Associates) 
37,890 ★Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
30,000 Vincent Tremblay, Matane, Quebec 
MAGIC OF ZANTH (Computerwara) 

31 *Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 

44 Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 

Columbia 

45 Michael Green, Ware, MA 

47 Robert Williams, Yellowknife, 
Northwest Territory 
MARBLE MAZE (Diecom Products) 

353,220 ★David Boland, Dubuque, IA 
1 7,530 Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

10,044 ★Douglas Bacon, Middletown, CT 
9,016 Heather Richwalski, Medford, Wl 
8,756 Gait Bacon, Middletown, CT 
8,199 Eric Mellon, Newark, DE 
6,404 David Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 
MEMOCARDS (THE RAINBOW, 8/67) 

1,418 *Edward Kavanaugh, North Easton, 
MA 

1 ,414 Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
1,122 Phil Holsten, Moraga, CA 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
468,750 ★Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
355,570 Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
318,160 Jeremy Pruski, Sandwich, IL 
144,510 Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
137,920 Mike Grant, Fresno. CA 
MISSION: RUSH'N ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
361 ,750 *Clay Jones, Wooster, OH 
195,250 Kelly Jones, West Salem, OH 
MOON SHUTTLE (Datasoft) 

16,220 ★Christopher Cromwell, Monument, 
CO 

ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1,302-0 ★•Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
1,276-0 ^Jonathan Dorris, Indianapolis, IN 
1,260-0 •Brandon Reece, Chickamauga, GA 
1,242-0 •William Currie, Bryans Road, MD 
1 ,210-0 «Gregg Thompson, Chesterfield, VA 
OUTHOUSE (MichTron) 

38,640 ★Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
PAC PANIC (Cougar) 

34,950 ★Heather Hamblen, Bar Harbor, ME 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTON RIDERS (Radio Shack) 
329,000 ★Joseph Delaney, August, GA 
303,100 Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
261,000 Domingo Martinez, Miami, FL 
225,300 Richard Adams, Jr., Alvarado, TX 
1 14,100 Kreig Bryson, Woodstock, GA 
85,000 Ronald Reynolds, Ottawa, IL 
PITFALL II (Activision) 

1 97,048 ★Keith Catrett, Montgomery, AL 
164,088 John Akan, Chippewa Falls, Wl 
159,400 David Cornette, Green Bay, Wl 
104,479 David Stewart, Kent, OH 
PITSTOP II (Epyx) 

54 ★David Boland, Dubuque, IA 
54 *Rusty Breitbach, Rickardsville, IA 
54 ★Jeff Coburn, Easton, PA 
54 ★Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
54 ★Sean Noonan, Green Bay, Wl 
54 ★Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
54 *Jeff Szczerba, Sturtevant, Wl 
54 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
51 Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
49 Randy Venable, Coal City, WV 
POOYAN (DafasofrJ 

373,900 ^Duncan Cameron, Chippewa Falls, 
Wl 

236,650 Jeff Mrochuk, Edmonton. Alberta 



POOYAN (continued) 

1 1 1 ,600 William Cathey, Kings Mtn., NC 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

105,560 *Heather Condit, Grafton, ND 
26,869 Claude Jalbert, Matane, Quebec 
20,800 Kristopher Santos, Laurel, MD 
PYRAMID (Radio Shack) 

220 ★Jason Ebbeiing, Berkshire, MA 
PYRAMID 2000 (Radio Shack) 

220 ★Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
220 *Mike Snyder, Allen, OK 
125 Chris VanOosbree, Emmetsburg, IA 
100 Peter Antonacopoulos, Toa Baja, 
Puerto Rico 

QUIXrTom Mix) 
8,407,772 ★John Haldane, Tempe, AZ 
1 ,404,000 Curtis Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
1,201,383 Milan Parekh, Anaheim, CA 
1,003,104 Eiisa Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
326,192 Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
RADIO BALL (Radio Shack) 
1 ,1 1 6,050 ★Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
1,062,190 Eric Mellon, Newark, DE 
800,150 Mike Snyder, Allen, OK 
760,380 Jake Runge, Franklin, OH 
581,730 David Morrison, Brewer, ME 
RED ALERT (Ar* Royal) 
Ensign- 
Class 4 ★Richard Kelton, Newport News, VA 
RESCUE ON FRACTALUS (Epyx) 
1,000,948 ★Steven Ujvary, Calgary, Alberta 
323,167 Kenneth Hill, Severna Park, MD 
292,633 David Richards, Huntington, WV 
288,084 Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
270,000 Russell Johnson, Sarnia, Ontario 
RETURN OF THE JET-I (ThunderVision) 

336,563 ★Jesse Collicott, Inman, KS 
RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Coiorware) 
1,792,800 *Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 

ROGUE (Epyx) 

71,833 *Jon Fogarty, Yale, Ml 
63,934 Marshall Weisenburger, Quincy, IL 
43,222 Hans Lutenegger, Madison, IA 
27,542 Melanie Lapoint, Fitchburg, MA 
21,682 Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 
SAILOR MAN (Tom Mix) 

231,700 *Luis Camino, Lima, Peru 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

67 ★Tristan Terkuc, Richmond, Ontario 
82 Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 

85 Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 

86 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 

87 Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 
SAUCER DEFENSE (THE RAINBOW, 4/87) 

40,000 ★David Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 

4,000 Frankie DiGiovanni, Oiney, MD 
SHAMUS (Radio Shack) 

25,450 ★John Garness, Newell, SD 
SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 

27,270 ★Jocelyn Hellyer, Montgomery, IL 
25,510 Donald Knudson, Minot, ND 
20,480 Kevin Pereira, Corsicana, TX 
SHOOTN RANGE (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
55,623 ★Paul Robbins, Picayune, MS 
14,702 Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
13,794 Phillip Holsten, Modesto, CA 
6,082 David Morrison, Brewer, ME 
5,433 Benoit Landry, Drummondviile, 
Quebec 

SLAY THE NERIUS f Radio Shack) 

73,091 ★Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
SPACE ASSAULT (Radio Shack) 

13,1 10 ★Jeff Remick, Warren. Ml 
7,280 Jason Kopp, Downs, IL 
6,200 John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

94,430 ★Christopher Cromwell, Monument, 
CO 

SPEEDSTER (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 

103,140 *Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
88,090 Jason Landreth, Texico, IL 
60,430 Jennifer Johnson, Meriden, CT 
44,540 Kevin Pereira, Corsicana, TX 
37,970 Frederick Lajoie, Middleton, Nova 
Scotia 



SPIDERCIDE (Radio Shack) 

27,730 ★Mike LeBrun, Cornwall, Ontario 
3,460 David Morrison, Brewer, ME 
2,040 Wendy Straub, Moundsville, WV 
1 ,840 Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
SPRINGSTER (Radio Shack) 

303,520 ★Mavis Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 

200,670 Denise Root, Thorndale, PA 
STAR BLAZE (Radio Shack) 

6,550 ★Flint Weller, Swarthmore, PA 
STRATA (THE RAINBOW, 5/88) 

2,768 *H. Dingwell, Litchfield, CT 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

604,000 *Troy Graham, Arnold, MD 
507,700 Adam Broughton, Morris, PA 
303,600 Tim Hennon, Highland, IN 
138,400 Gary Budzak, Westerviile, OH 
125,200 Michelle Murray, Salem, IN 
THEXDER (Sierra On-Line) 

1 ,41 1 ,700 ★Steve Hallin, Biloxi, MS 
1,314,100 Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney. MD 
312,300 Timothy DeJong, Rock Valley, IA 
274,300 H. Dingwell, Litchfield, CT 
195,000 Emmett Keyser, Napa, CA 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

123 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
132 Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN ^ 
TRIG ATTACK (Sugar Software) 

196,000 ★Cassaundra Stewart, Sacramento, CA 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) « 



2,032 
2,032 
2,011 

2,006 



★Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 
★Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
Antonio Souza III, North Dartmouth, 
MA 



Philip Puffinburger, Winchester, VA 
1,995 Denise Rowan, Minneapolis, MN W 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) "^V 
18,813 *Talib Khan, Bronx, NY ^ 
15,063 John Conley, Everett, WA 
1 4,61 3 Carolyn de Lambert, Everett, WA 
11,902 Martha James, Swarthmore, PA 
10,489 Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
WARP FACTOR X (Prickly-Pear) 
10,577,051 ★Doug Lute, Clymer, PA 
WILD WEST (Tom Mix) 

35 *Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 
WISHBRINGER (Infocom) 

400/201 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
WIZARD'S DEN (Tom Mix) 

593,950 *Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
195,050 Mark Touchette, Preston, CT 
ZAKSUND (Elite Software) 

357,550 ★Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
268,350 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
44,900 Michael Adams, Columbia, SC 
39,950 Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
2,061,000 ★Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
1 ,950,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
1,630,150 Jon Fogarty, Yale, Ml 
1 ,300,500 Dan Brown, Pittsford, NY 
1,100,600 Andrew Urquhart, Metairie, LA 
376,600 Matthew Yarrows, Easthampton, MA Jat 
126,300 Roberto Hidalgo, San Jose, Costa 
Rica 

ZEUS (Aardvark) 

4,500 ★Benoit St-Jean, Gaiineau, Quebec 
3,380 Martin Kertz, Forrest City, AR 
ZORK I (Infocom) ^ 
350/328 ★Konnie Grant, Toledo, OH <m 
350/587 Matthew Yarrows, Easthampton, MA 
ZONX (THE RAINBOW, 10/85) <+t 
1 2,000 *Adam Broughton, Morris, PA 

—-Angela Kapfhammer ^( 

* 




October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 07 





In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column 
of pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, 
we encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



In response to questions from: 

• George Lane: In order for you J to; 
complete your quest in Sands of Egypt, 
you must drop the scepter. When the 
computer says where, type ON MUMMY. 
After you do that, type GO CRACK,- get the 
ladder and type GO CRACK again. In 
Dallas Quest, type PULL CURTAIN. 

In White Fire of Eternity, ! have the 
ring and I need the pick, but I do not 
know how to get it 

Michael Duvall 
Zanesville, OH 

• Troy Ferguson: In order to kill the 
gargoyle in Raaka-Tu, you first have to 
get the burning lamp and the candle. 
After you get these two items, go back 
into the room and go north until the 
gargoyle comes at you. Type LIGHT 
CANDLE WITH LAMP and immediately 
leave the room after you drop it. 

When you get to the vault and decide 
to go inside, whatever you do, don't pull 
the handle. 

How do you get past the bronze gates? 

Tracy Nahas 
New London, CT 

• Dan Breault: In Gates of Delirium, the 
people are located in towns, except two; 
they are located in a dungeon and a 
castle. The dungeons are the guardians of 
all but one of 10 gate keys. These gate 
keys will be needed to win the game. The 
shrines are in the second world 18 levels 
below Twin City I. Use the Moon Gates 
to get to Twin City I. Enter the dungeon 
inside the town, but make sure you have 
all your party with 2,400 hitpoints or the 
depths of the dungeons will kill you. 

Duane Whit lock 
North East, MD 

• Mike Duvall: To get the palm fronds 
in Sands of Egypt, you must go to the 
pool. From the cliff, go down, west, south 
and east. Type GO TREE and you'll be at 
the palm tree. Drop all the items and type 
CLIMB TREE. At the top of the tree, type 
GET DATES. Climb down and get your 
items. Go south and then east. At the 
pool, type FEED CAMEL and he will kneel 
so you can mount him, Ride the camel 
and dismount him. You will be at the 
pyramid. Climb it and get the axe. Go 
back to the pool by riding the camel. Go 
to the tree and climb it with the axe. At 



the top, type CHOP FRONDS. Get the 
fronds and go down. Type BRAID 
FRONDS and you will have a sturdy rope. 

Shawn Moloney 
Ozone Park, NY 



• Jim Barkel: In Downland, to get off the 
rope, go to the right end and push the 
joystick over to the right while pushing 
the button. As soon as you are on the 
slatted part, push the handle to the 
middle, then push to the right and you'll 
be on the rope. 

In Chamber 6, what is the rope used 
for when you first walk in? 

David Breyer 
Cincinnati, OH 



Scoreboard: 

In Bedlam, after getting stuck with the 
hypodermic needle and returning to your 
cell, to stop running into the walls type 
PLUGH and you will return to your nor- 
mal self again. 

To get Houdini down, type UNTIE 
HOUDINI. How do you get the strait- 
jacket off him? 

How do you wake up the "real doctor" 
lying unconscious in the corner? 

Jerry Hagerty 
North Syracuse, NY 



Scoreboard: 

In the Interbank Incident, how can I 
get into the Air Force base in Germany? 

In Enchanter, how do I find water? 

In Sands of Egypt, where can I find the 
scepter? 



Scoreboard: 

How do you get Roger the Rogue 
Elephant to cooperate in Dallas Quest! 
How do you get past the cannibals in 
order to enter the cave? 

Eric Costello 
Pine Bluff, AR 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, if you want to get the 
flashlight, you have to pull the curtain in 
the trading post. 

In Dragon Blade, how do you get past 
the stone door after the whirling pool? 

Eric Vermette 
La Tuque, Quebec 

Scoreboard: 

I have successfully landed the Heart of 
Gold on Magrathea in Hitchhiker's 
Guide to the Galaxy, but I cannot unjam 
the hatch or enter the screening door. 

John Knight 
Kalamazoo, MI 



Little RockAFB, AR 

Scoreboard: 

In the Interbank Incident,! found the 
code book, computer, disk, cartridge and 
the 1BC special card, but I am not able 
to find the secret hideout. Please help. 

In To Preserve Quandic, how do I pass 
the helicopter on the roof? 

Georges Fortin 
Baie-St. Paul, Quebec 

Scoreboard: 

In the Interbank Incident, I can't seem 
to find the crooks. 

In Dallas Quest, after you enter the 
barn with the owl, you must kill the rat 
by typing DROP OWL. 

In Sands of Egypt, the magnifier is 
used to light the torch from the sun's rays. 

Katie Miller 
Chino, CA 

Scoreboard: 

In Madness and the Minotaur, in order 
to get the third spell, I must tie the Hydra 
up so I can enter the room with the 
parchment, but after I get the spell, I am 
told that I need the rope for the next spell. 
Is there a way to untie the Hydra or to 
kill it so I can get the rope back? 

Duane Whit lock 
Northeast, MD 



To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will share your reply with all "Score- 
board" readers in an upcoming issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 



108 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 







XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program 



• Menu oriented 

• Upload/download Ascil 
or XMODEM protocol 

• Execute OS-9 commands 
from within XTERM 



• Definable macro keys 

■ Works with standard serial port, RS232 
Pak, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers 

• Works with standard screen, Xscreen 
WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board 



$49.95 with source $89.95 



XDIR & XCAL 



Hierarchial directory 
• Full sorting 



OS-9 calculator 

■ Decimal, Hex, Binary 



• Complete pattern matching • +,-,*,/,AND,OR,XOR,NOT 
$24.95 with source $49.95 



XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 
$34.95 with source $54.95 



HARDWARE 



512k memory upgrade 

Ram Software 
Ram Disk 
Print Spooler 
Quick Backup 



$124.95 



All three for only 
$19.95 



•Software by CciarVentme 



I fl'fflWW. ' . l I 1 1 1 I 'I 11 ) 1 1 1 H I H I ■ I ■ I 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

True character oriented full screen editing 

Full block commands 

Find and Replace commands 

Execute OS-9 commands from within 

Proportional spacing supported 

Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, overstrike, 
underline, super/sub-scripts 
10 header/footers 

Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 
$24.95 with source $49.95 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 

XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 with source $199.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 
$39.95 with source $79.95 



I 1 1 i i m mtymiw my r nmy i n 






SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUTING 

This sales-based accounting package is de- 
signed for the non-accountant oriented busi- 
nessman. It also contains the flexibility for 
the accounting oriented user to set up a double 
entry journal with an almost unlimited chart 
of accounts. Includes Sales Entry, transaction 
driven Accounts Receivable and Accounts Pay- 
able, Journal Entry, Payroll Disbursement, 
and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income State- 
ment, Customer and Vender status Reports, 
Accounts Receivable and Payable Aging Re- 
ports, Check Register, Sales Reports, Account 
Status Lists, and a Journal Posting List. 

$79.95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module Is designed to handle inventory 
control, with user defined product codes, and 
produce a detailed analysis of the business 1 
sales and the sales force. One may enter/update 
inventory data, enter sales, run five sales anal- 
ysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter/update salesman records, 
and update the SBAP inventory. 

$59.95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and 
payroll data for up to 200 hourly and salar- 
ied employees with 8 deductions each. Cal- 
culates payroll and tax amounts, prints 
checks and maintains year-to-date totals 
which can be automatically transferred to 
the SBA package. Computes each pay peri- 
od's totals for straight time, overtime and 
bonus pay and determines taxes to be with- 
held. Aditional outputs include mailing list, 
listing of employees, year-to-date federal 
and/or state tax listing, and a listing of cur- 
rent misc. deductions. Suited for use in all 
states except Oklahoma and Delaware 

$59.95 



PERSONAL BOOKKEEPING 2000 
Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense catego- 
ries. Menu driven and user friendly. 

$39.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history 
reports for each customer, perpares in- 
voices and monthly statements, mailing la- 
bels, aging lists, and an alphabetized cus- 
tomer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance 
charges for revolving accounts. This pack- 
age functions as a standalone A/R system or 
integrates with the Small Business Accting 
package. 

$59.95 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor 
and A/P invoice files. The system prints 
checks, voids checks, cancels checks, de- 
letes cancelled checks, and deletes paid A/P 
invoices. The user can run a Vendor List, 
Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged report, 
and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P sys- 
tem or can be integrated with the Small 
Business Accounting Package. 

$59.95 



mmmmt 





^UHHHH 




|7=5r\i 

Muter Cud 
! - ■ - 1 



Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $3.50), personal checks. 






oftw a r o coc 0 i,2 73j 

Night of the Living Dead 
An Interactive Nightmare 



Apparently you were wrong about 
thai roud you thought was a shortcut a 
couple of hours ago. 

You've managed to get yourself to* 
taliy tost, and it f s looking less and less 
likely that you're going to muke it back 
to school in time for your first day of 
classes tomorrow. 

The only person you *ve seen for miles 
is the hitchhiker you picked up over an 
hour ago. She says her name is Shecna. 

Night of the Living Dead begins 
innocuoLJ sly enough* but just wait afcW 
minutes. You see, the dead are waking 
up — they're very hungry. And your car 
is out of gas. 

1101 THE RAINBOW October 13BB 



Night of the Living Dead from Ad- 
vent are Novel Software is a iwo-disk 
text Adventure for 64K ECB disk-based 
CoCos, Unlike the movie of the same 
name (zombies are the only thing in 
common), it begins with your character 
stranded in the middle of nowhere. 
Without gas, your 1970 Mercury Mon- 
tego "might as wel] be a rabbit." You : re 
stuck with a strange woman who wears 
a Frank Zappa T-shirt and is by turns 
threatening and polite. 

To the east is a cemetery and a 
church. To the west is an impenetrable 
thicket. To the north and south the 
gravel road stretches endlessly and will 



take you nowhere. But things don't 
seem hopeless, at least not until a 
heavily made-up man (like a corpse?) 
with a gaping hole in his neck shambles 
toward you. What to do? I tried run- 
nmg„ but there's nowhere to run. 

Adventure Novel Software says that 
the only goal in .Wight of the Living 
Dead is to stay alive, which is not an 
easv feat. Tm embarrassed to tell how 

■i 

far I got and I even had help. 

Unlike most games, there is more 
reward in solving this Adventure than 
just the satisfaction in knowing youVe 
done it: A cash prize of £500 is offered 
to the first person who "survives." To 
win, an Adventurer must be a registered 
owner and send in a transcript or writ- 
ten solution by registered mail The 
correct, entry with the earliest postmark 
wins. If by December 3i, there is 
no winner, one will be chosen at random 
from the owner registration cards 
mailed back. 



Putting the Savage in Savage Software 
(And the Novel in Adventure Novel) 



There are a lot of people who would 
just as soon read a good book as go to 
a movie. Some writers can evoke images 
more vivid than any movie screen can. 
From his narrative in Night of the Living 
Dead, Curtis Fennell, known to the 
CoCo market as Savage Software, has 
shown he is one such writer. 

Curtis and Bob Schuette, the writing 
and programming team behind Night of 
the Living Dead, have been friends since 
college. It was during those years that 
Curtis first found out about a new form 
of computer entertainment — Adventure 
games. Back then, the games were in their 
infancy. Even the better ones limited 
players to two-word commands, and the 
puzzles did not always make a lot of 
sense. 

When Bob recently contacted Curtis 
about writing an Adventure for the 
CoCo, he had no idea that Curtis was 
already working on one. The game design 
systems Curtis tried were limiting, and he 
was invariably disappointed in how the 
final product worked. 

So they decided to join forces. Using 
Bob's Adventure Novel design system, 
Curtis brought Night of the Living Dead 
to life. It was a challenge for Curtis to 
develop the story line without going 
overboard in grotesque descriptions. 
Much of the debugging process, in fact, 
involved rewriting text some players 
found unappealing. Graphics were re- 
moved from the game because they 
simply could not do it justice. "Without 
question, the scariest visions exist in the 
player's own mind," Curtis says. 

Schuette believes his exclusive game 
design system will provide a fresh, new 
outlook for Adventures. "We're in the 



business of entertainment. Our goal is to 
supply the computer industry with u- 
nique games that, while challenging, can 
be solved by most players," he explains. 

"Don't get me wrong. These games will 
never be pushovers. The players will 
definitely get their money's worth from 
us. But I also don't want them to get so 
completely stumped and frustrated that 
they never get the full enjoyment from 
finishing the game on their own." A self- 
taught programmer and chemical engi- 
neer, Bob's experience ranges from writ- 
ing game software to programming in- 
dustrial process controllers. But he has 
found some innovative uses for the 
CoCo: "As an avid fan of windsurfing, 
I'm constantly interested in what the 
wind is doing — how fast it is blowing, 
and whether it is picking up or falling off. 
By rewiring an old DC motor and putting 
a set of annometer cups on it, I can 
constantly monitor the wind speed 
through my CoCo joystick port. It's kept 
me from making quite a few useless trips 
to the lake." 

Bob still uses one of the original 64K 
CoCo Is and says he has never expe- 
rienced a failure, even after he has left it 
on for weeks at a time. This love of his 
CoCo 1 helped Bob decide to keep his 
games compatible with all three CoCos. 

"I've had some opportunities to work 
with the new CoCo 3, and I think it is a 
fine machine," he says, "but I'm sure 
there are many people out there who 
want to stay with the older models. It 
would be a shame if all the new software 
developed was designed specifically for 
the CoCo 3. At least for now, you can be 
sure that one company will still be pro- 
ducing software for all three CoCos." □ 



Needless to say s I do not have a ghost 
of a chance of claiming the loot. L died 
more limvs than I cm rememhtx and 
in. the most horrible ways. The further 
along 1 got, the more spectacular my 
deaths, 

"If you are faint of 
heart or squeamish of 
stomach, I recommend 
you not try this game. 
Literally, heads will 
roll " 

In my very first death my head struck 
a sharp object; fortunately, 1 died 
immediately, h'or my .second death, 1 
was treated to a screwdriver through Lh^ 
skull (watch ou I for that man with the 
gaping hok in his neck), In my third 
death, my jugular was ripped open and 
the last thing my dying eyes saw was a 
zombie having my arm for lunch, For 
the benefit of those of you swallowing 
to hold back your last meal, 1 shall 
refrain from regaling you with more 
vivid accounts of my demises. 

Night of the Living Dead provides 
some pretty grotesque descriptions. If 
you are faint of heart or squeamish of 
stomach, I rcovmmend you not try this 
game. LiteniUy, heads will roll And 
there are colorful descriptions, of oozing 
flesh and sucking sounds (sorry, I had 
to throw that in) — yet Adventure 
Novel Software's Bob Schuette says 
that the gory descriptions have even 
been toned down in the latest version! 

When you see Lhe disk jackets (or if 
youVe seen the Adventure Novel Soft- 
ware ad), you may wonder where "Sav- 
age Software" fit* into the scheme of 
things. "Savage Software" is Curtis 
Fennell, the "editorial" half of Night of 
the Living Dead — Adventure Novel 
and Schuette are the programming half. 

Descriptions of the characters cur- 
rent location are provided at the top of 
the screen above a black bar, A * l clock" 
in the upper-right corner keeps track of 
the time and moves. As this is a text 
Adventure, there are no graphics 
{Schuette and Fennel* say graphics 
would ft\ do the story justice - your 
imagination serves better). Text is 
shown on the 32-eharacter screen. The 



game is disk-intensive — so leave the 
Data disk in the drive. 

(liLme play h typical for Adventures 
of the verb- noun command variety. But 
commands of many more than two 
words may be given. There is a help 
function Chat shows how to use a variety 
of commands. You can talk jto the 
character question them or ask thorn 
to perform a specific task, e.g.: SHEEN A, 
TELL MET ABOUT FRANK ZAPPA. 

The usual command abbreviations 
ate supported {N t 5, E, U, U and D), The 
"examine" command can be shortened 



to X, the ^inventory'* command to I. 
Also, there is no inventory limit. The 
SCRIPT command sends all test to the 
printer. 

1 am not very experienced with Ad- 
ventures and so was frustrated v/hen 
sometimes my "interpreter" would not 
recognize a reference to something it 
informed me of just a few moves earlier, 
or when it wouldn't understand some- 
thing I thought was totally obvious. A 
quick rereading of the help screen 
vieided this advice: "If the game does 
not understand a verb, try a synonym 



October' i gsB TH W RAINBOW 111 



Zombies 10, People Zip 



No, you fool! Stay away from that 
door — don't go in there! Oh, well, 
another one bites the dust. 

How many times have you watched a 
hack-and-slash movie and actually 
cheered for the monster because the 
characters are so stupid they deserve to 
die? 

I mean, if you're staying in a hotel (or 
a summer camp) where a body count is 
taken daily, would you traipse off la-ti- 
da by yourself to the remotest, spookiest 
place around and then appear surprised 
when the ax falls? Would you even stick 
around after the first body is found? Not 
me — I'd get the @#$%\ outta there! You 
think that you would, too? We think 
we're so smart. In their shoes, we 
wouldn't be so stupid, and we'd live a lot 
longer. 

We can be smug in our superiority 
most of our lives. It is doubtful we'll be 
menaced by Jason, Freddy or Zombie 
(thank God!). But what if? What if by 
some means we could pass through the 
other side of the camera lens and put our 
wits on the line against the ghoulies. 

Night of the Living Dead and Adven- 
tures like it let us do this. I tried the game, 
and I wasn't very successful at surviving. 
I now have new respect (or sympathy, at 
least) for those stupid people who 
blunder boldly into the attic, the cellar 



and the cemetery. You see — they had no 
choice. The script wouldn't let them back 
out and run. 

In playing Night of the Living Dead, 
as I knew the goal was to "survive," I 
thought I would just run up the gravel 
road until I was safe (zombies are rather 
sluggish, you know). Well, the game 
wouldn't let me. It forced me into a 
situation and made me follow its "script." 
Of course, how I acted within the con- 
fines of the situation was up to me — so 
I promptly got knocked off. 

I knew the zombie was steadily 
creeping up on me, but what was I doing? 
Checking out the scenery, examining my 
inventory for a possible weapon, 
twiddling my thumbs. If I were a 
character in a horror movie, the audience 
would probably be cheering my 
imminent demise. I feel two sayings are 
applicable here (I'm fond of sayings): 
"Don't knock something 'til youVe tried 
it," and "Don't criticize unless you've 
been in someone else's shoes." 

And now for the moral of this lunacy: 
"Don't make fun of horror movie victims 
just because they walk into obvious traps 
— unless youVe survived Night of the 
Living Dead.*' 

Have a happy Halloween, and watch 
out for zombies. □ 





CoCo 1 , 2 & 3~| 



for it." (Hint: 5ERRCH is sometimes 
more revealing than EXRMINE.) 




The SRVE command allows you to 
stop and save your progress at any game 
prompt — this is very handy, as it 
"saves" you from having to start back 
from the beginning of the game every 
time you die (which, if you are like me, 
you will do frequently). When you type 
SfiVE, a mini-menu pops up that 
prompts you for the drive of your "save" 
disk, then for the game number — you 
can save five. 

After you die, you are asked if you 
want to restore a previously saved 

112 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



game. If you do, a similar menu 
prompts you for the drive and the game 
number. If you indicate you don 't want 
to restore a game, you must do a cold 
start to get back to Disk BASIC. 

I tried Night of the Living Dead on 
a CoCo 1, 2 and 3, and it worked fine 
on all. The only thing it wouldn't work 
on was an old, gray-case E-board CoCo 
1, and that was because of the high- 
speed poke, I suspect. But most CoCo- 
ists will be able to play the game. 

I found Night of the Living Dead fun 
to play, and I especially appreciated the 
exciting and smooth narrative flow — 
this Adventure reads better than most. 
I expect that those who are fans of 
zombie movies will like the game, and 
connoisseurs of "ordinary" Adventures 
will get a kick out of it, too. 

(Adventure Novel Software, P.O. Box 8176, 
Spartanburg, SC 29305, 803-578-7421; 
$34.95 introductory offer: First product 
review from this company appearing in THE 

RAINBOW) 

— Lauren Willoughby 



Moon-Runner — 
Souped-Up Lunar 
Buggy 

In Moon Runner you command an 
amphibious patroller armed with laser 
and overhead missiles. Your mission is 
to battle enemy forces across the lengths 
of eight moons and then destroy the 
Trigan base. 




Opposing you is an array of strong 
enemy forces, including attacking 
spacecraft, tanks, mines and surface 
rockets. Even the moon's surface is 
against you. There are crevices, rocks, 
trees and cacti among the obstacles you 
must either jump over or destroy. 

While you have nine patrollers to 
accomplish your mission, they are thin- 
skinned craft and easily destroyed. 
When they are gone, the mission is 
terminated. Also, the patrollers use up 
fuel quickly. To keep going, you must 
shoot down the fuel satellites that orbit 
the moons. 

Once you have fought your way to the 
Trigan base, the game gets harder! You 
must blast holes in the rotating force 
shield protecting the Trigan generator. 
This is not easy — the base shoots back! 
Because your laser is short-ranged, you 
must move close to the base, firing your 
laser constantly. It's a heavyweight 
slugfest. 

Moon Runner is a well-crafted pro- 
gram that takes up a full disk. You must 
leave the disk in the drive while you are 
playing because the program accesses 
the disk throughout the game. Since the 
nine top scores are recorded, do not 
write-protect the disk. 

Besides joystick control, you also 
have two keyboard controls. The ENTER 
key pauses the action, as well as resumes 
game play. The Q key ends a particular 
game (your patroller blows up!). You 



are returned to the main menu to begin 
again. 

The game has complete instructions 
and is easy to play, but hard to master. 

A nice programming touch is the 
flexibility with which you can play at 
different levels. For example, if you 
complete Level 2, you can select levels 
3, 2 or 1 to play next. A frustration with 
most arcade games is losing all your 
men, tanks, etc., and having to start all 
over again. That's boring — Moon 
Runner is not! 

This is one good arcade game. It runs 
on the CoCo 1, 2 and 3, with RGB or 
composite monitors. You will need 32K, 
one disk drive and a joystick. The 
scrolling graphics and animation are 
exceptional, and the CoCo 3 version 
makes use of the PRLETTE command. 

For its combination of affordability 
and playability, Moon Runner is one 
first-class addition to the CoCo library. 

(Nick Bradbury, 10500 Sandpiper Lane, 
Knoxville, TN 37922, 615-966-0172; $15: 
First product review from this company 
appearing in the rainbow) 

- T.C. Taulli 



1 Softwar e «**^** \ 

Inventory 
Manager — 
A Program You Can 
Count On 

Being in business myself, I was more 
than happy to receive a copy of Inven- 
tory Manager by Forrest Enterprises for 
my latest review assignment. Nor could 
the timing have been any better, as the 
program arrived in time for me to use 
with my own inventory. 

Inventory Manager is just what the 
title says. It basically handles all the 
necessary (not to mention dreaded) 
tasks involved in recording and updat- 
ing your inventory records. Actually, 
about the only thing it doesn't do is take 
inventory for you. 

One of the first things I would like to 
point out is that Inventory Manager 
comes on a non-protected disk, which 
makes it possible for you to make a 
backup copy. Another welcome feature 



is that the program is written mainly in 
basic, which makes it easy to modify to 
suit your personal needs. 

Modification was necessary in my 
particular case because I am in the food 
service business, and the inventory 
procedure differs a little from that of 
other types of businesses. I work a lot 
with weights and fractions, whereas 
most businesses need only be concerned 
with the physical count of a particular 
item. All it took was a phone call to the 
distributor and my problem was solved. 

Upon loading Inventory Manager 
you are greeted with a simple title 
screen. Pressing any key takes you to the 
configuration menu, where you tell the 
program the number of disk drives 
used, the printer's baud rate, the 
company name and address, and which 
version (there are two) of Inventory 
Manager you would like to run. This 
configuration is a nice feature — 
systems change. (To save you the time 
of having to answer these questions 
every time you load the program, you 
can use a second boot-up program after 
configuration. You change the appro- 
priate program lines to match your 
system, as described in the manual.) 



JUBILEX 

A fast paced game that requires both skill and 
quick thinking. Pilot your ship over the planet 
Jubilex. Avoid shots from the ground while you 
destroy their aircraft. Complex weapon system. 
Requires joystick, CoCo III, and disk drive. $25 

GAT BACKUP 

A 128k CoCo III backup utility that gives you the 
options to backup only the granules used, a section, 
or the entire disk. Makes multiple copies. Copies 
35 tracks in two passes. Formats and gives 
directories. Requires CoCo III and disk drive. $15 

D1ASM 

A disassembler that loads a file and allows you to 
disassemble it as if it were in memory, no matter 
where the program is really located. Works with 
auto-executing programs. Many other features. 
Supports printer. CoCo I, II, or III. Disk only. $20 

All programs are in machine language. Add $5 per 
program if you want the source file included. We 
pay shipping and sales tax. Write for more 
information, or send check or money order to: 

GSW Software 
8345 Glenwood 
Overland Park, ICS 66212 



DON'T JUST DUMP YOUR "PMODE4", "PMODE3 
GRAPHICS... 



! Expand, shrink 8 

]g stretch 'em with 

$P~i% i -/--sue 

^iZOOMDUMP^%tei 

J fc J ! ZOOMDUMP requires an ext. BASIC C0C0 & DMP-lbsX 
E or compatible printer. Print out "PMODE4" or "PMODE3" >'A 
J graphics screens or any rect. section thereof to within. \ d 
a fraction of an inch of ANY HEIGHT OR WIDTH you spec- 
ify - up to 7.9" wide, in normal or negative & upright or 
sideways image. MAKE YOUR GRAPHICS DUMPS FIT THE 
JGB-NqT V I C E V E R S A ! f 




m ' 



Specify tape or disk. 

Send check or money order for $14* to: 

- „ : . • 

\ CODIS ENTERPRISES ; 
2301-C CENTRAL DR., STE.684 
BEDFORD, TX 76021 

■ 

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? Sample printouts available upon request if 
return postage provided. 



■ 'if - ■■• • 1 ■ ' ~ 

•""'«!?!•*" "Texas residents add 7% sales rax - or else! 
'iv'niS 1 ->-■ 



RAINBOW 

CCRTIFICATION 



October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 113 



Once you have configured the pro- 
gram for your system, you are presented 
with the main menu. From here you are 
given the option of doing such things as 
creating a new file or printing out 
inventory, purchase orders and item 
lists. Or you can sort, edit and move any 
number of items within your various 
files. 

The first time you run the program 
you will naturally have to start by 
creating a file. You will be prompted for 
the name of the file to be created and 
then for all the necessary information to 
set up your own inventory system (this 
is where the only real difference between 
Version 1 and 2 will be of any impor- 
tance). 

The first two things you are prompted 
for are the identification number (up to 
four digits) and the item order number 



(a code of up to 10 characters that your 
supplier uses to identify a particular 
item), such as a part number. 

If your particular business does not 
require an order number, you may want 
to use Version 2, which handles all its 
sorting and file management by use of 
the item I.D. number alone. This saves 
a lot of unnecessary typing — you can 
just press ENTER when prompted for 
information. 

Next you will be asked for an item 
description (up to 40 characters), the 
inventory quantity (the amount you 
have on hand) and the "trigger" order 
quantity. The trigger order quantity is 
a useful feature that "triggers" auto- 
matic ordering of an item when the 
inventory quantity of an item matches 
or falls below the specified trigger 
quantity. 




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Next you will be prompted for the 
"after order" quantity. This along with 
the trigger order number is how the 
program decides how much of a partic- 
ular item needs to be ordered when 
using the auto-order feature. The last 
two prompts are the item cost (how 
much a particular item costs you) and 
the retail cost (how much you plan to 
charge for the item). 

The best part is that if you should 
make a mistake while entering any of 
this information, you can update it at 
a later time. You can even delete the 
entire record if you decide you no longer 
want to carry a particular item. Items 
can be moved from one file to another 
or converted to allow files created with 
Version 1 to be used on Version 2, or vice 
versa. All of this makes Inventory 
Manager a very flexible and full- 
featured inventory control and pur- 
chase order entry system. 

After all the items have been entered 
into inventory files, Inventory Manager 
can complete what to me used to be 
some very time-consuming tasks. To 
start with, placing a purchase order is 
now as simple as just answering a few 
prompts. For example, I was able to 
print out a purchase order containing 7 1 
items, with individual prices calculated 
and totaled at the bottom, including 
additional charges (postage and han- 
dling, etc.), all in just a couple of 
minutes. This is a welcome improve- 
ment to the usual 30 to 45 minutes spent 
doing the same thing by hand. 

With the inventory printout option I 
was able to get an entire listing of my 
stock, including unit cost and total cost 
for each item — not to mention the total 
value of my entire stock — with just a 
few keystrokes. I found this to be 
exactly what I needed to help determine 
my operating costs and to prepare my 
inventory/ sales reports (which are 
required by the company I work for), 
and I could do it in just a few steps 
taking less than a half-hour. Now that's 
a lot of power for your dollar, especially 
if you compare it to expensive programs 
out there for some of the other ma- 
chines. 

Everything considered, I must say I 
am very pleased with the performance 
of Inventory Manager. It does every- 
thing I would expect of a program of 
this type, and maybe even a little more. 
In my opinion, if you own a business 
and find inventory to be a tedious and 
time-consuming job, I think buying this 
product would definitely be money well 
spent! 

Inventory Manager comes on a non- 



114 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 



protected disk and will run on any 
CoCo with at least 64K and one disk 
drive (although I recommend two 
drives). Be sure to specify which Co Co 
you have when you order (1, 2 or 3). A 
printer is also optional but highly 
recommended if you hope to use the full 
potential of this program. It comes with 
a 13-page manual that tells you 
everything you need to know. If for 
some reason you do run into a problem, 
you can call the author, Mike Forrest. 

I found him to be more than happy to 
help me, and within two days after the 
call I had an updated version in my 
mailbox. Now that's service! 

(Forrest Enterprises, 6266 Melody Lane, 
#3074, Dallas, TX 75231,214-369-5425; $25: 
First product review from this company 
appearing in the rainbow) 

— Bryan Gridley 

* Software c oco3_ 
Disk 

Manager Tree — 
OS-9 File 
Management 

Managing files on a disk with the 
limited file management utilities pro- 
vided with OS-9 Level II is not an easy 
task — especially if you have a hard 
disk. The simple copy and delete com- 
mands do the job . . . one file at a time. 
But what if you want to copy or delete 
a number of files on a disk? Well, you 
could type the appropriate command 
over and over again, changing the 
filename each time, or you could use 
Disk Manager Tree from Alpha Soft- 
ware. 

Disk Manager Tree is a file manipu- 
lation utility that runs under OS-9 Level 

II and makes excellent use of the win- 
dowing capability built into the operat- 
ing system. The package is designed to 
work with standard floppy disk sys- 
tems, hard disk systems and RAM 
disks. When you execute DMT, it scans 
the entire disk that is mounted in the 
specified device, say /d0, and displays 
the disk structure graphically. For my 
system disk, ZWJdisplayed the follow- 
ing: 

---/d0 

--CMDS 

|--ICDNS 

--SYS 

This tree structure is displayed in one 



of three windows. A second window is 
used to display the files in the selected 
directory, and the third window dis- 
plays the various commands available 
and serves as a dialog box. From the 
main menu you can change to another 
directory or create and delete directo- 
ries. 

Using the up and down arrow keys 
you can select a subdirectory; by press- 
ing the ENTER key you can display its 
list of files in Window 2. A submenu 
appears providing options to view, tag, 
copy and delete files. A file is selected 
by moving the up and down arrow keys 
and pressing the ENTER key to tag it. If 
you press C the file can be copied; 
pressing D deletes the file, and Fl allows 
you to view the file. When you view the 
file, a pop-up window appears and the 
file scrolls through the window. 



The Ultima 



Copying and deleting multiple files is 
a piece of cake with DMT Simply move 
the arrow keys to the appropriate files 
and press ENTER to tag them. Once all 
the files have been tagged, simply press 
C or D. When copying, DMT prompts 
for the new directory; when deleting 
files, DMT asks if you are sure all of the 
tagged files should be deleted. If you 
agree, DMT proceeds to delete them. 

DMT is a useful "workhorse" type 
program for managing the OS-9 disk 
system. Although I don't have a hard 
disk system, I can see that such a utility 
would be quite useful. I found the utility 
especially useful for rearranging files on 
floppy disks. Being able to select a 
number of files to be copied to other 
floppies really speeds up disk 
maintenance. 

The only problem I found with DMT 




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pallette of 8U colors on your NX-1 000 Rainbow from a CoCo 1,2, or3. This 
system superimposes 4 graphic screen dumps (black, blue, yeiiow & red). The 
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October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 115 



is in the View File option. Once a text 
file is selected for viewing, there is no 
way to terminate the listing other than 
by scrolling through the entire file. This 
is, of course, a major concern if you 
happen to choose a large file to view. I 
hope that Alpha Software will correct 
this in the next revision of the program. 

I should also mention that DMT 
comes with an icon and instructions on 
how to include DMT in Multi- Vue. 
And, finally, DMT takes up about 70K 
of memory — which is not a problem 
on a 512K CoCo but might be for a 
128K CoCo. 

I strongly recommend DMT for new 
and advanced users to OS-9. It is an 
efficient and easy way to manage files. 
The program is very simple to use, has 
a good manual and an online help 
capability. 

(Alpha Software Technologies, 2810 Buff on 
St., Chalmette, LA 70043, 504-279-1653; 
$29.95) 

— Donald Dollberg 



oft ware 



GoCo 1.2&3 



Shadow World — 
Adventures in Time 

Shadow World is a text-only Adven- 
ture written for your 64K ECB Color 
Computer. It also runs fine on the CoCo 
3. In Shadow World, your goal as a 
scientist is to find out why experimental 
lab animals have been dying as a result 
of time-travel experiments performed 
by a company that has stolen your time- 
travel formula. 

This is a difficult Adventure to solve, 
but it is possible. The author has placed 
many items and locations in the game 
that are not necessary for the solution, 
and the result is a tough yet challenging 
Adventure. 

As with most Adventures, this one 
also recognizes various abbreviated 
commands, such as N for north and INV 
for inventory. Your progress is best 
monitored with the use of a map, and 
provisions are made to save and reload 
a game using the standard (C)SfiVE and 
(C)LOAD commands. A perfect score is 
10, and I scored 8 — but only with the 
help of a solution sheet the author sent 
for the purpose of the review. 

The game scenario is interesting and 
challenging. The only flaw I can see is 
that Shadow World is a text-only Ad- 

116 THE RAINBOW October 1 9B8 



venture. Our CoCos are outstanding 
graphics computers, and this good 
Adventure could be a great one with 
graphics. 

Shadow World is available on either 
tape or disk and is not copy-protected, 
so backup copies for your own protec- 
tion is not a problem. 

(Prodek Software, c/o Mike Snyder, Route 
2, Box 81, Allen, OK 74825, 405-857-2852; 
$10.50 for tape, $12.50 for disk: First 
product review for this company appearing 
in THE RAINBOW.) 

— Robert Gray 



1 Software CoCq1 2&3 



BASIC Screen 
Editor — 

Full-Screen Editing 
Capabilities 

I learned BASIC by typing in listings 
from magazines. I started with plain 
BASIC, which meant erasing the line and 
typing it over (really tough on those 
255-character packed lines). Then I 
expanded my CoCo with Extended 
Color BASIC and, bless Tandy, there was 
a line editor built-in. Now I could fix 
those typos with relative ease. Coinci- 
dentally, as my experience on the CoCc 
expanded, I also became a "profes- 
sional" programmer and had access to 
a multitude of editors. 

Most of these editors I used in my 
work allowed me to load in whole files 
to edit a full screen at a time. What a 
pleasure that was. Then I would come 
home to CoCo's humble line editor and 
wish for better things. Well, let me tell 
you, better things could be here. 

BASIC Screen Editor by Douglas 
Pokorny and Gil Winograd takes the 
CoCo line editor one step further. It 
provides a full-screen editor especially 
for BASIC programs. It allows you to 
edit anything that appears on the screen 
— including direct commands. 

BSE includes a short formatting 
program that must be run before using 
the editor the first time. It initializes and 
customizes the editor to your current 
CoCo setup and favorite features. Once 
you've set everything up, all you have 
to do is type DOS if your CoCo supports 
that command, else type RUN "BSE". If 
you ever change your mind or your 



CoCo, just run the configuration pro- 
gram to change the initialization pa- 
rameters. 

What does BSE do for you? After the 
title screen, you don't even know it's 
there. So start typing in that great 
program you found in THE RAINBOW 
and run it. Oh, no, the dreaded SN 
Error! List the line in question and use 
the BASIC line editor to fix your typo. 
The normal Tandy editing commands 
are still active. What happened to the 
BSE program? Oh, it's still there, wait- 
ing for you to decide that you need a 
heavy-duty fixer. 

List a bunch of lines. Say you want 
to customize the program with your 
own name in the PRINT statements. 
Great, just use the arrow keys to put the 
cursor over the word you want to 
change and type away. Press the arrow 
keys to get to the next change and type 
away again. If you hold down an arrow 
key for about a second, it starts auto- 
repeating. Slick, I can travel all over the 
screen with hardly a thought. 

Here is a complete list of all the 
features of BSE and the keystrokes to 
generate them: 



arrow keys 

BREAK 

SHIFT-Ieft arrow 

FI 
F2 

CLEAR-® 

CLEAR-up arrow 



move cursor one 
character 
deletes character 
under the cursor 
backspaces 
recalls custom 
palette (CoCo 3) 
uses default 
CoCo 3 palette 
erases screen 
puts caret on- 
screen 

CLEAR-down arrow toggles insert 

mode 

CLEAR-left arrow moves cursor to 

beginning of 
line 

CLEAR-right arrow moves cursor to 

end of line 
deletes from 
cursor to end of 
line 

splits the line at 
the cursor 
toggles BSE on 
and off 



CLEAR-BREAK 



CLEAR-ENTER 
SHIFT-@ 



The program is reset-proof, and other 
features include automatic lowercase- 
to-uppercase conversion, compatibility 
with the CoCo 1, 2 and 3, and compat- 
ibility with JDOS and ADOS. I'm using 
it with a 128K CoCo 3. It is written in 
position-independent machine lan- 



guage and comes on an unprotected 
disk. 

The manual is eight pages of ex- 
tremely readable text that fully explains 
the program's use and operation. It has 
plenty of examples and is written in 
fairly plain English so that even an 
inexperienced user should have no 
trouble understanding it. There were 
one or two minor typos, but I'm really 
fussy about manuals. 

BSE performed as described with 
some minor problems. I couldn't get 
some of the shifted characters to auto- 
repeat — strange things got printed on 
the screen (the distributor says this can't 
be fixed so they are going to put a notice 
in the manuals). Another point I am 
concerned with is that the program 
allows you to type in more characters 
on a BASIC line than the CoCo allows; 
this could present a minor retyping 
chore if you get carried away packing 
lines. 

But on the other hand, no matter 
what I did, I couldn't get the program 
to have a major malfunction. In fact, I 
found it really neat to be able to re- 
execute command lines by just moving 
the cursor back to the beginning of the 



line (like a DIR command) and pressing 
ENTER. Another fun feature is the 
program's ability to recover programs 
after a NEW command. As long as it is 
on the screen, a line can be recovered 
by simply moving the cursor to the 
beginning of each line and pressing 
ENTER. Presto! Recovered code. 

I would not call this program a full- 
featured editor because some features 
are missing that I would consider essen-' 
tial — like being able to scroll through 
the whole file and having cut-and-paste 
capabilities. Nonetheless, it has plenty 
of useful features that makes the CoCo 
easier to use. Given the reasonable price 
and the program's resident state, this 
looks like a good deal for all you BASIC 



programmers. 





(SecoHd City Software, P.O. Box 72956, 
Roselle, IL 60172, 312-653-5610; $19.95 plus 
$2.50 S/H) 



— C.L. Pilipauskas 




oftware 



A I- Write — 
CoCo 3 Editor/ 
Assembler 

Al- Write is an editor/ assembler writ- 
ten just for the CoCo 3. When the 
package first arrived, I was excited with 
the idea of a new tool for writing 
assembly programs that might allow me 
to retire my old super-patched ED- 
TASM+, which has been modified to 
run on the CoCo 3. 

Al-Write comes on one unprotected 
disk with a 57-page manual. The disk 
may be backed up with the BACKUP 
command; in fact, this is the only way 
a working copy can be made because the 
program makes use of the command 
DOS for. starting the program. Do not 
just copy the files! Instructions for this 
should have been included in the man- 
ual. Backing up your master disk is 
always important — but especially so 
when working with assembly language. 



SPbCIAL LYbMT? 

COCO GALLERY LIVE 
SHOWCASE YOUR BEST AT RAINBOWFEST 

We are taking the popular "CoCo Gallery" on the road to RAINBOWfest Princeton — and we'd like you 1 
submit your own graphics creations to be exhibited at the show! 

RVLLf 



• You can enter color or black-and-white photographs or printouts of your original artwork produced on 
the CoCo 1 , 2 or 3. Entries must be framed, mounted or matted, and may not be smaller than 5-by-7 inches 
or larger than 11-by-14 inches. 

• Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV 
programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears 
in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

• Along with your entry, send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you 
created your picture (what programs you used, etc.). Please include a few facts about yourself, too! 

• Your name, address and phone number, along with the title of your work, must be clearly marked on the 
back of each entry, and a disk copy of each piece must also be included. 

• Entries must be mailed to THE RAINBOW before October 10, 1988, or brought to the RAINBOWfest 
1 registration booth by 10 a.m., Saturday, October 22. 

• All entries to CoCo Gallery Live become the property of Falsoft, Inc. 

There will be two categories: one for graphics produced on the CoCo 1 and 2, and one for CoCo 3 graphics. 
Several awards will be made in each category. Winners will be determined by votes from RAINBOWfest 
attendees. In case of any ties, winners will be determined by our chief judge, CoCo Cat. 

Prizes and ribbons will be presented Sunday, October 23, 1988, and winning entries will be published in 
the February '89 issue of THE RAINBOW. Send your entry to "CoCo Gallery Live," THE RAINBOW, 9509 
U.S. Highway 42, Prospect, KY 40059. 



October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 117 



AINBOWfest is the only computer show dedicated 
exclusively to your Tandy Color Computer. 
Nowhere else will you see as many CoCo-related 
products or be able to attend free seminars conducted 
by the top Color Computer experts. It's like receiving the 
latest issue of the rainbow in your mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for commercial 
programmers to show off new and innovative products 
for the first time. Princeton is the show to get information 
on capabilities for the new CoCo 3, along with a terrific 
selection of the latest CoCo 3 software. In exhibit after 
exhibit, there will be demonstrations, opportunities to 
experiment with software and hardware, and special 
RAINBOWfest prices. 
Set your own pace between visiting exhibits and 
ttending the valuable, free seminars on all aspects of 
your CoCo —from improving basic skills to working with 
the sophisticated OS-9 operating system. 

Many people who write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are written about — are there 
to meet you and answer questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people who share your interest 
in the Color Computer. It's a person-to-person 
event and a tremendous learning experience in 
a fun and relaxed atmosphere. 

A special feature of RAI NBOWfest is the 
Educational Sandbox, which features 
child-oriented workshops to give hands- 
on experience to an age group often 
neglected. There are sessions for the 
kindergarten through third-grad- 
ers, and for fourth- through sev- 



enth-graders. And, as an additional treat for CoCo Kids of 
all ages, we've invited frisky feline CoCo Cat to join us for 
the show. RAINBOWfest has something for everyone in the 
family! 

If you missed the fun at our last RAINBOWfest in Chicago, 
why don't you make plans now to join us in Prince- 
ton? For members of the family who don't share your 
affinity for CoCo, there are many other attractions in 
the Princeton area. 

The Hyatt Regency Princeton offers special rates for 
RAINBOWfest. The show opens Friday evening with a 
session from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's a daytime show 
Saturday — the CoCo Community Breakfast (separate 
tickets required) is at 8 a.m., then the exhibit hall opens 
promptly at 10 a.m. and runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, 
the exhibit hall opens at 1 1 a.m. and closes at 3 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained directly 
from the rainbow. We'll also send you a reserva- 
tion form so you can get a special room rate. 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH 
treatment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at 
(502) 893-3311. All POSH services are available at no 
charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 

3b THMb? 



$1 





Fitbfa SLMINAitS 



Cray Augsburg 

RAINBOW Technical Editor 
OS-9 For Absolute Beginners 

Bruce K. Bell, O.D. 

Two-time Grand Prize Winner of 
RAINBOW'S Adventure Contest 
Writing Adventure Games 

Steve Bjork 

SRB Software 

Writing Game Software 

Chris Burke 

Burke & Burke 
Hard Drive Systems 

Ben Burnette 
Wayne Smith 

CY-BURNET-ICS 

CoCo as an Educational Tool 



Nancy Ewart 

Independent Programmer 
Starting with C 

Marty Goodman, M.D. 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Two CoCo Consultations Live 

Paul Hodash 

Delphhlnformation Product Supervisor 
Telecommunications 

Cecil Houk 

Rulaford Research 
Music and MIDI 

Jutta Kapfhammer 

RAINBOW Managing Editor 
Writing for Publication 



Dale Puckett 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Overview of OS-9 
Overview of BASIC09 



Ed Samuels 

New York Law School 
Copyright Laws 



Logan Ward 

Computer Center 
CoCo Cartooning 



€#€• COMMUNITY MLAKFAST 

Dick White — RAINBOW Contributing Editor 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo Community Breakfast is Dick 
White, contributing editor for the rainbow. Mr. White, who has a long back- 
ground with microcomputers, will discuss his personal experiences in the early 
years as he traces the development of the Color Computer since its introduc- 
tion in 1980. 

SPbCIAL bVbNT* 



We're pleased to present The Educational Sandbox, a joint Tandy/RAiNBOW 
effort. This is a computer workshop for RAINBOWfest kids. There will be 
two sessions on both Saturday and Sunday. One workshop will be for the 
kindergarten through third-grade set, and the other for fourth- through 
seventh-graders. Each workshop will last between 45 minutes and one 
hour, and will give the children and their parents hands-on experience in 
using Tandy computers and software. 



RAINBOWfest - Princeton, New Jersey 
Dates: October 21-23, 1988 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Princeton 
Rooms: $88 per night, 
single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: Oct. 7, 1988 



RAINBOWfest - Chicago, Illinois 
Dates: April 14-16, 1989 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $66 per night, 
single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: March 31, 
1989 

FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket orders re- 
ceived from each state. 

First 500 ticket orders received get The 
Rainbow Book of Simulations. 



YES, I'm coming to Princeton! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special 
advance sale price. Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 



Please send me: 



Three-day ticket(s) at $9 each total 

One-day ticket(s) at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 



Name 

(please print) 

Address 



Saturday CoCo Breakfast 
at $12 each 

RAINBOWfest T-shirt(s) 

at $6 each 

Specify size: 

S M L _ 



City 



State 



total 



total 



Telephone 
Company _ 



ZIP 



XL 



(T-shirts must be picked up at the door) 
Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 



(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 
□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the 
Hyatt Regency Princeton ($88, single or 
double room). 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 

Exp. Date — 



■■mm 





Signature 



Advance ticket deadline: October 7, 1988. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at 
the door. Tickets will also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. 
Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky 
call (800) 847-0309. 




Several times while I was running Al- 
Write the disk did a self-destruct. 

Al- Write will run only on a CoCo 3 
using Disk basic 1.1 and one or more 
disk drives. If you are not sure which 
version you have, look at the start-up 
logo when you first turn your computer 
on. It should read Disk Extended Color 
BASIC 2.1; if it reads 2.0, you have Disk 
basic 1.0. 

First I tried to run the program on my 
512K CoCo 3 and was presented with 
a blank screen and blinking cursor. 
Since I also have 128K CoCo 3s for the 
kids, I took command and used them 
for testing. I had a few problems with 
Al- Write, but a request for help brought 
a new disk with Version 1.1 and addi- 
tional information not in the manual. 
Because almost any new product is 
likely to have bugs, I expect the manual 
may be updated by the time you read 
this. The new 1.1 version also fixed the 
ghosting bug and works with 512K. 

When you type DOS you are presented 
with the copyright notice; pressing any 
key will put you in the main menu. 
From here your first option is Edit, 
which will put you in a BASIC full-screen 
editor that can support 32- or 40- 
column screens. While the 80-column 
screen is not supported, most pro- 
grammers should find the 40-column 
screen satisfactory. The colors used in 
the display (black, white and green) are 
compatible with any type of monitor or 
TV. 

While the manual is sizable, I must 
take exception to some of the terms 
used and other inaccurate information 
that it contained. More about using Al- 
Write and some of its excellent features 
would be a real help. An index would 
have helped greatly in locating needed 
information. Very important instruc- 
tions for using Al- Write were missing or 
hard to find. 

From the menu you can view your 
disk directory in a neat two-column 
format; load or save your source file; 
assemble code; run assembled code; 
quit Ah Write or select the Options 
menu. You must use the Options menu 
to name your binary/ object code disk 
file. When you load or save your source 
text file you are prompted for a file- 
name. In the Options menu you can 
select screen or printer output for your 
assembly listing. 

No method is provided for listing 
your text file to a printer! The Options 
menu lets you set a default origin for 
your assembled program, but it must 
reside totally in the range of $6000 to 
S7FFF, which is fine for some 



applications. You may also use the 
origin directive in your source code, but 
only one ORG is allowed. 

Another stated limitation is that the 
assembled program must not "handle" 
memory outside the $6000 to $7FFF 
range if it is to run within the Al- Write 
environment. This eliminates the ability 
to access any graphics or text screens, 
system registers, basic hooks in low 
memory, etc. Some utilities published in 
the rainbow require access to these 
memory areas. This also means you 
cannot take advantage of the extended 
memory of the CoCo 3 system within 
Al-Write. But programmers can write 
and assemble a program anywhere in 
memory with Al-Write, then load and 
execute it from BASIC. 

SfiMPLE . fiSM is a text file you can test 
the assembler with. Several times I was 
greeted by an unknown system error 
even with the sample. If you do get this 
error you must turn your CoCo 3 off 
and then on to recover, even if it was 
run from Al- Writers menu. The start 
label is not supported and is not al- 
lowed, but you can use any other valid 
Tabel name to specify the execution 
point in your program. To do this you 
follow the END statement with the label 
you have chosen; if you fail to do this 
the program will crash the system when 
you try to run it. Al- Write uses a default 
execute address of $000 unless you 
specify the address directly or with a 
label in the END statement. 

One feature I really like is the ability 
to write subroutine source code and 
save it in a disk file — thus you can build 
yourself a subroutine library. The 
subroutines may then be added to your 
main program using the Include 
function; this can save a lot of typing or 
reinventing of the wheel, so to speak. 
The Include feature works very well. 
While assembling the source code, it 
loads in and includes (merges) source 
text from disk files. Includes may not be 
nested. There's no need to worry about 
conflicting line numbers because Al- 
Write does not need or use them. 

Al-Write follows some predefined 
conventions for register usage allowing 
easy parameter passing. Parameter 
passing is well-explained in the manual, 
which provided examples. Al-Write 
does allow you to do a trial assembly; 
the program assembles your text, listing 
errors found while assembling your 
source file. Al-Write does provide error 
messages, but it usually overprints the 
line with the error. Normally when the 
assembler encounters an error the as- 
sembly process is aborted and you are 



returned to the editor, but this may be 
overridden with the NoEdit directive. 
Other directives include List/NoList, 
CLS (clear the screen) and Wait, which 
will stop and wait for a key press before 
continuing during assembly. 

Well, if you are a person who reads 
only the last paragraph of a review, here 
is mine in a CoCo-nutshell. While Al- 
Write has some excellent features, its 
limitations preclude it for many 
practical uses. If the memory location 
and access restrictions within the 
environment could be eliminated, Al- 
Write could set a new standard for 
assembly language programming under 
Disk BASIC Al-Write will run on any 
CoCo 3 with Disk BASIC 1.1. Though 
the manual was sizable, some very 
important information was either 
missing or hard to find. While I had 
problems at first getting Al-Write to 
work as expected, I received a quick 
response from the author, a new version 
with bugs fixed and additional 
information not in the manual. 
(Daniel Jimenez, P.O. Box 4967, San 
Antonio, TX 78285, 512-690-1788; $30: 
First product review from this company 
appearing in the rainbow) 

— J.D. Walker 

1 Software CoCo3 1 

Word Power 3.1 — 
80 Columns and 
Windows, Too 

After using VIP Writer with my 
CoCo 2 and a composite monitor for 
several years, I looked forward to 
viewing an 80-column screen with the 
CoCo 3. But I was greatly disappointed 
at the lack of good "friendly" word 
processing software that followed. I 
tried two systems advertised in RAIN- 
BOW, but they failed to meet my require- 
ments — versatility and the KISS factor 
(Keep It Simple, Stupid). 

Sol continued using VIP with its 64- 
column window until Microcom came 
out with Word Power 3. The first 
version of the system had a few bugs, 
but it showed great promise. Through 
close coordination and cooperation 
with those who recognized this promise, 
Microcom now offers CoCoists a very 
useful system that is fun and a joy to use. 

Before going into a detailed review of 
this system, I would like to point out 
that I am impressed with the software 
development capability of Microcom. 



120 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 



After I received the initial version and 
noted a few problems, I received their 
3.1 version, which took care of these 
problems and included many other 
enhancements. I called to express my 
thanks and was told that they plan to 
revise the program as necessary to make 
it more responsive to the needs of the 
public based on recommendations and 
to provide previous customers updated 
versions for cost and handling. This is 
real PR! 

One of the most impressive things 
about this word processor is that it was 
developed for the CoCo 3 from scratch 
and, unlike other word processors, is 
not "patchwork." This makes it more 
sufficient in fully utilizing the versatile 
capabilities of the CoCo 3. Written in 
machine language and operating in the 
double-speed mode, it has amazing 
execution speed and enables very fast 
screen reformatting. Also, Word Power 
3.1 is not copy-protected, which means 
you can make copies for your own use. 

The system's ease of learning really 
impressed me. Memorizing the key 
commands is a snap because most 
follow a logical pattern, and the system 
employs an effective use of colorful 



windows. It is much easier to use than 
the VIP software and two other CoCo 
3 word processing systems I had tried. 
Even WordStar, which I use in my 
work, is nightmarish in comparison 
with Word Power 3.1. 




The first requirement in using Word 
Power is running the program SETUP, 
which establishes your defaults, some of 
which can be changed while typing and 
editing. 

When you run SETUP, the first thing 
you see is the main menu: 

1. Set Colors 

2. Set Parameters 

3. Set Printer Codes 

4. Save Setup File 



Word Power 3.1 opens beautiful 
horizons of colors that you pick out 
yourself, and you can change them if 
you tire of a particular set. I have an 
RGB color monitor, and I use a beau- 
tiful sky blue background with black 
letters when I am in the edit mode, and 
my linefeed symbols are purple. In the 
window mode I have a red border with 
an amber background on the inside. 
There are many colors and combina- 
tions from which to choose. If you have 
a monochrome monitor, you still go 
through the color selection routine to 
get the "mix" that appeals to you. 

When selecting parameters you are 
asked whether you want a key-click, 
automatic key repeat and automatic 
saving (which is great in my case, 
because I live in "the lightning capital 
of the world," which seasonally expe- 
riences frequent power disruptions). I 
set my left and right margins at 1 and 
79, respectively, so that I can see as 
much as possible on the screen without 
scrolling to the right. But before print- 
ing I change the margins to give me a 
1-inch border. 

After entering your default parame- 
ters, vou need to enter the various codes 



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ISSUE #2, AUG. 1982 


ISSUE #8, FEB 1983 

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ISSUE #21, MAR. 1984 

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MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 


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NUCLEAR WAR INST. 


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icciic nci> -moo 


iccilc tfio iii Lie -moo 
IdSUc #12, JUNE 19B3 


ISSUc #io, DcU. 1983 


ICCIIC 1L*%A IIIMC -4 CIO 4 

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iociic uim\ nine 4noe 

ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 


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T-NOTES TUTORIAL 


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SYSTEM STATUS 


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ISSUE #39, SEPT. 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
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ISSUE #40, OCT. 1985 

STAR TREK 
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ISSUE #41, NOV. 1985 

GRUMPS 

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ISSUE #42, DEC. 1985 

Home product evaluation 

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ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
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SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
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ISSUE #43, JAN. 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
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GUNFIGHT • 
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STYX GAME 
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ISSUE #44, FEB. 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
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ISSUE #45, MAR 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT. 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
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COCO KEENO 
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LOGICAL PATTERNS 
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ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
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TANKS 

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NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

ROULETTE 

GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFF. 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
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ROMAN NUMERALS 
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ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER LO.U, 
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BAKCHEK 
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STOCK CHARTING 
HAUNTED STAIRCASE 
CANYON BOMBERS 
DRAGONS 1 & 2 
GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 
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ISSUE #50, AUG. 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
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ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPT. 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
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FISHING CONTEST 
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BUDGET 51 
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DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 

ISSUE #52, OCT. 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES . 
CALENDAR 
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FLIPPY THE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS 
SUPER ERROR2 

ISSUE #53, NOV. 1986 

CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CARVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DEC. 1986 

JOB LOG 

PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
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MRS PAC 
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ISSUE #55, JAN. 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
DIR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEB. 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRUSH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EDITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 

ISSUE #57, MAR. 1987 

THE BAKERY 

ENCHANGED VALLEY ADV, 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR t 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELEGTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 

ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 

HO)VIE PLANT SELECTION 

CHECK WRITER 

HEURESCUE 

KABOOM 

NEW PONG 

CROQUET 

FUNCTION KEYS 

ZODM 

ELECTRONICS 2 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
LABELS 

CATCH A CAKE 
COCO MATCH 
ROBOTS 

STREET RACERS 
BOWLING 3 
ELECTRONICS 3 
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ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 

EZ ORDER 

SUBMISSION WRITER 
KEYS ADVENTURE 
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CHOPPER COMMAND .. 
UNDERSTANDING OPPOSITES 
BIT CODE PLOTTING 
ELECTRONICS 4 
KING PEDE 
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ISSUE #62, AUG. 1987 
PENSION MANAGEMENT 
HERB GROWING 
CATOLOGER UTILITY 
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ELECTRONICS 5 
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MULTI SCREEN CAVES 

ISSUE #63, SEPT. 1987 
GENEOLOGIST HELPER 
SMART COPY 
MAINTENANCE REPORTING 
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ELECTRONICS 6 
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ISSUE #64, OCT. 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE IN THE GRASS 
CYCLE JUMP 
GEOMETRY TUTDR 
WIZARD 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS 7 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 

ISSUE #65, NOV. 1987 

TAXMAN 

DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 
CHILDSTONE ADVENTURE 
SIR EGGBERT 
CROWN QUEST 
GYM KH ANA 
COCO 3 DRAWER 
FOOTBALL 
ELECTRONICS 8 
CHOP 

ISSUE #66, DEC. 1987 

ONE ROOM ADVENTURE 
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RIVER CAPTAIN 
SOUND EFFECTS 
BETTING POOL 
ADVANCE 
MATH TABLES 
ELECTRONICS 9 
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NOIDS ■' .■■-V'' 



ISSUE #67, JAN. 1988 

AUDIO LIBRARY 
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ISSUE #68, FEB. 1988 

COINFILE 
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ELECTRONICS 11 
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COCO TENNIS 

ISSUE #69, MAR. 1988 

POLICE CADET 
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BARRACKS ADVENTURE 
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ELECTRONICS 12 
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ISSUE #70, APRIL 1988 

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ELECTRONICS 13 
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ISSUE #71, MAY 1988 

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ISSUE #72, JUNE 1988 

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63 


71 


8 


16 


24 


32 


40 


48 


56 


64 


72 



PLEASE CIRCLE 

TAPE or DISK 



for your printer to underline and print 
in bold, script or italics, etc. There are 
provisions to handle all your printing 
needs. 

When you have finished entering 
your printer codes, you save your setup, 
write-protect your backup disk, cold- 
start your computer and run BOOT. You 
then see the main menu inside a colored 
window border on the background 
color you selected: 

Type/ Edit 
Options 
Load File 
Save File 
Print 

Exit to DOS 

If you wanted to load a file, you 
would select Load File using the arrow 
keys. You would then see an instruction 
window and the directory of your file 
disk within another colorful window. 
These helpful windows and the logical 
use of the control and other function 
keys make Word Power 3.1 very user- 
friendly. 

In the Type/ Edit mode, you create or 
edit documents. At the top of the 80- 
column screen display is shown the 
percentage of memory used and the 
current column, line and page number; 
it also indicates whether type is in the 
upper- or lowercase mode and insert or 
overstrike mode. Another nice feature 
is the page-break display, which enables 
you to see exactly where the page ends; 
this improves the aesthetic appeal of 
your documents. 

The type-ahead feature lets you type 
as fast as you want — without losing 
text. It is very easy to center or right- 
justify text, as well as to underline text 
or use boldface, italics, super- and 
subscripts. Underlining is displayed 



onscreen, and the bold/ italicized/ etc. 
text is displayed in different colors. I 
find this preferable to inserting printer 
codes within the text that throw off line 
lengths and page-break locations, and 
which require much more memorizing. 

The Locate/ Replace feature lets you 
find a phrase and replace it with 
another. I especially like the wild card 
feature that lets you search similarly 
spelled words with a single reference. 

An instant display of all the com- 
mands is available in the help screen, 
which can be accessed with CTRL-?. The 
word count feature is great for students. 
It instantly displays the total number of 
words in the entire text, regardless of 
the cursor position. 

Another feature is option code em- 
bedding, which enables you to change 
margins, spacing, etc., in a portion of 
text (for example, a single-spaced quote 
in double-spaced text). Word Power 3. 1 
has logical embedded codes (for exam- 
ple, LM for left margin, LS for line 
spacing, etc.). These codes are listed in 
the help screen. 

Word Power 3.1 has a very user- 
friendly disk input/ output menu. The 
directory, which shows the remaining 
granules on the disk, is displayed on the 
left side of the screen. You can select 
files by simply cursoring through this 
window and pressing CLEAR; or you 
may enter your own filename. If you 
have text in memory and load another 
file, it will be appended to the text in 
memory. All saving and loading is done 
in ASCII format, making Word Power 
3.1 compatible with most other word 
processors, spelling checkers and text 
formatting utilities. 

Of all the word processors I have 
used, Word Power has the maximum 
text storage capacity. On a 512K CoCo 
3, it gives you over 460K of text space, 



which is roughly 336 pages of double- 
spaced text. On a 128K CoCo, the 
storage capacity is more than 72K. 

In the printing mode, you select 
parameters such as baud rate, line 
spacing, page numbering, right justifi- 
cation, number of copies, headers, 
footers, etc. The single-sheet pause 
feature lets me use single sheets instead 
of perforated paper. The WYSIWYG 
(What You See Is What You Get) fea- 
ture is excellent! If you elect not to print 
to the printer, you can view the docu- 
ment onscreen as it will appear after 
printing. Also, Word Power is "printer 
independent"; that is, it is compatible 
with almost any printer. 

With the mail merge feature, you can 
type a letter, follow it with a list of 
addresses and print out personalized 
letters. This is a useful feature for clubs, 
schools and other organizations that 
send bulk mail. 

The program comes with a spelling 
checker/ dictionary program on a sepa- 
rate disk. It will work with any ASCII 
file. I find it very handy to proofread my 
text for spelling errors. It shows how the 
incorrect word appears in the text and 
lists possible correct spellings. At this 
point I have the option to ignore or 
substitute the correct word. I also have 
an option to add words for a "person- 
alized" dictionary. 

A nifty little punctuation-checking 
program included on the Word Power 
disk will check the text for punctuation 
errors such as capitalization, words 
appearing twice in a row, spacing and 
more. Note that the program will not 
correct errors, but mark them. The user 
can then choose to go back into the file 
and correct the errors. I am not aware 
of any similar program for the CoCo. 

The package comes with a 40-page 
manual and a command reference card. 



Rulaford Research is proud to announce a new "customer satisfaction" program. When you buy a program from us, you may 
return it within 30 days if you are not satisfied with it for a complete refund (less a restocking charge of $5.00). In addition, you 
may purchase a year's free updates for only $10.00 when you buy a program. We want you to be happy with what we sell, and 
we're ready to go the second mile to make sure that you are! 




Lyra, a powerful yet easy-to-use MIDI music composition program, now comes with LyraPrint. Print your music on a Tandy, Epson, or 
OkiData 92A compatible printer. Hundreds of users use it for fun, as part of a teaching program, or professionally. $59.95 

Love music but don't know one note from the other? Or do you like to just sit back and let your computer and synthesizer make beautiful 
music for you? Lyra Lybrary is for you. Over 11 disks packed with music of a wide range of styles. Send SASE for complete list of titles and 
details on how you can have a custom disk made. each disk $14.95 

Other good stuff: + FB-01 Calc is a simple basic program that creates event files 
for Lyra so you can set up custom configurations for your FB-01 from Lyra. A must if 
you have an FB-01! $19.95 • Coming soon—complete FB-01 and MT-32 voice 
editor/librarians. Inquire for availability and price. 

Ordering information: send check or money order. Sorry, no credit cards. COD is ok. 
Shipping and handling included in price. CA residents add 6% tax. 




Rulaford Research 

P.O. Box 143 

Imperial Beach, CA 92032 
($19) MMMi^6mn^ 6-m PT) 



124 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 



The manual is well-written and guides 
you step-by-step through the various 
features. 

There is no capability lacking in 
Word Power 3. 1 that would preclude its 
ranking with the highest among word 
processors, and future enhancements 
promise to make it a system not to be 
without. Couple the great text features 
of Word Power 3.1 with the vivid, 
beautiful colors, and you really have 
"something to write home about"! 

(Microcom Software, 2900 Monroe Ave., 
Rochester, NY 14618, 800-654-5244; $79.95) 

— Thomas Poor 

'Software CoCo ^ &3 1 

HELLO /B AS - 
Menu Greetings 

I'll admit it: I am not a one-computer 
woman. Though the CoCo is nearest 
and dearest to my heart, I dabble with 
MS-DOS machines (in my work) and 
halve been know to dally with Commo- 
dores. But don't judge me too harshly 
— I always come back to the CoCo, the 
friendliest and most versatile computer 
around. 

Sometimes, though, I can't help but 
compare features and inwardly com- 
pose a wish list. One thing I wish is that 
IBM compatibles had a disk operating 
system built in, like CoCo's Disk BASIC 
(some Tandy IBM compatibles do have 
MS-DOS built in). It takes IBM ma- 
chines and their look-alikes so long to 
boot. In comparison, CoCo springs 
awake, ready to go. 

One thing MS-DOS can do is auto- 



matically execute an RUTOEXEC - BRT 
file, which can carry out instructions 
and load specific files for you. With my 
MS-DOS machine, all I have to do is 
turn it on — by following the RUTO- 
EXEC . BflT file I wrote, it calls up a menu 
program that lets me boot (with just one 
keystroke!) any program on my hard 
disk. If there's one thing I'm bonkers 
about, it's menus. And since I'm com- 
piling a wish list, I wish CoCo had an 
RUTOEXEC . BRT function that could give 
me a menu of programs on my floppy 
disk for "point-and-shoot" loading. 
(Tony DiStefano's projects look inter- 
esting, but I am not a hardware person.) 

Now, you're probably wondering 
why I've wasted three paragraphs of 
what is supposed to be a review, spout- 
ing off in left field. There's a reason for 
this: menus. 

HELLO/ bas gives 32K ECB CoCos 
menus. With the program's little auto- 
repeating cursor, I can zip around an 
alphabetized menu presentation of a 
floppy disk directory, press ENTER 
when I come to a BASIC program I want 
to load and — bingo — it loads and 
runs. Just as nifty as my MS-DOS 
menu. 

And what's more, a utility provided 
allows me to boot HELLO/ BAS from a 
floppy by entering the DOS command 
(this works a lot faster than waiting for 
MS-DOS's RUTOEXEC . BRT file to finish 
executing — hello/ BAS does use the 
high-speed poke). Typing a three-letter 
command is better than typing the 10- 
character command, RUN"HELL0". 

What's the big deal in saving seven 
keystrokes? Well, computers are sup- 
posed to save time — why did you ditch 
your typewriter in favor of a word 
processor, anyway? Another reason for 
using menus is ease of operation. Menus 
let you set up a sort of "turnkey" system. 



New users may stare blankly at you 
when you try to describe the process of 
calling up a directory, then loading and 
running a program, but even a child can 
quickly figure out how to "point and 
shoot." 

The hello/ BAS disk comes with five 
files: HELLO, DOS BOOT, HELP, DISK 
I NIT and LOG BOOK. HELLO, of course, 
is the main program. When you run 
HELLO, the program will read the disk 
directory, alphabetize and display it. 
The program can be configured to run 
on any drive. The screen can show 24 
files at a time, but there are extra 
"pages" that can take care of the 25th 
file and beyond. 

In addition to the alphabetized direc- 
tory display, the screen also shows you 
the default drive number, which screen 
"page" you are currently in, the number 
of files on the disk and the number of 
granules free. You select and load a 
program by moving a cursor to the file 
(via any arrow key) and pressing enter. 
The auto-repeating "cursor wrap" fea- 
ture is nice — pressing the down arrow 
key at File 24 takes you back to the top 
of the directory list. The program does 
not induce finger sweat. Pressing P 
allows you to print out a hard copy of 
the directory; pressing CLEAR lets you 
read another disk in the current default 
drive. 

DISKINIT creates "autobootable" 
hello/BAS disks. It is best to run 
DISKINIT on newly formatted disks, 
because the DOS BOOT program it gener- 
ates is sector-dependent; on a semi-full 
disk there may already be programs 
occupying the intended sector. This 
means that you will probably have to 
create your own hello/ bas bootable 
disks from scratch (a bootable disk 
must contain DOS BOOT and HELLO — 
HELP is helpful, but not necessary) and 



Ch ec Acc oun t In -f 



Not just another checkbook program but a user -friendly, menu driven, disk based 
information system. Keep track of deposits, checks, ATM withdrawals and other 
account transactions. De-Fine up to 36 categories to monitor expenses. Set up 
automatic transactions -for such items as direct deposits and deductions. Balance 
your account(s) in minutes! Other -features include multi-drive capability, display 
and print options, check search on any -field, edit and delete capability and more. 

j^SS^l After Five Software Send check or M . 0 ■ -for 

CoCo 3 compatible ff^\\ P . 0 . Box 210975 $34.95 plus $3.00 S/H 

Printer optional RAINBOW Columbia, SC 29221-0975 COD orders: add $2.00 

" m ™?"» (803) 788-5995 (SC res. add 57. sales tax) 

Reviewed in RAINBOW, February 1988. 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 125 



Still pounding away at that keyboard? 




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copy your favorite BASIC programs to 
the disk. DOS BOOT and HELLO take up 
one gran each of disk space, and HELP 
takes up two. 

hello I BAS will not load machine 
language programs, which is a downer. 
The author apologizes for this lack on 
one "page" of the nine-page help file. 

HELLO/ BAS is one professional- 
looking, well-behaved (as long as you 
stay away from ML) and user-friendly 
utility for BASIC programs. Once you 
start using it, you may find yourself 
growing spoiled. I like hello/ BAS and 
have put it on the same disk with some 
of my favorite rainbow programs. 

The applications are varied. Whether 
you're a new CoCoist or an old pro, 
you'll find a use for HELLO/ BAS. Sea- 
soned hackers can see whole alphabet- 
ized directories at a time (without the 
SHlFT-@ shuffle), along with other 
information. New users can circumvent 
syntax errors. And it would be espe- 
cially useful for handicapped people 
and children. Do your fingers a favor 
and introduce the CoCo in your life to 

HELLO/ BAS. 

(RCPierce Software, P.O. Box 1787, Main 
Post Office, Edmonton, Alta., Canada T5J- 
2P2, 403-474-8435; $19.95 US, $22.95 CDN: 
First product review from this company 
appearing in the rainbow) 

— Carol Hartman 

1 Software WMMB 

Quest for the Ring — 
The Vanished 
Kingdom 

You say you've solved Labyrinth and 
have already congratulated yourself for 
a job well done? Not so fast, King 
William. Zarth, the evil wizard, found 
out you were escaping and did some fast 
work before he was destroyed. He hid 
your crown, locked your castle and 
made all the people in your kingdom 
vanish. Then he hid the ring he used to 
cast all those spells. Now you have to 
find the ring so you can undo all the 
spells and get your people back. 

You start this graphics Adventure in 
front of your castle. From there you can 
wander around the kingdom, looking 
for your crown and Zarth 's ring. The 
kingdom contains mountains, streams, 
chasms and a lake, but no people to ask 
for help. (I happen to think the piranha 
fish ate them, but the author says Zarth 
made them disappear!) You're on your 

128 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



own, but you can use any objects you 
find and the clues they provide. The 
only living thing you'll ever see is the 
dragon, and he's not about to help you, 
believe me! 

The first thing that struck me when 
I loaded the game was the excellent 
graphics. (If you don't have a color 
monitor, borrow somebody's. The 
graphics are much better in color.) 
Every time I went to a different screen 
I sat there for a minute just soaking up 
the scenery. The second thing I noticed 
was the sound. A little song plays during 
the title and "RIP" screens. A note 
sounds at every keystroke, and a little 
bird chirps when it's your turn to input. 

After I died the first time (on my 
second move!), I discovered the self- 
booting feature. By just pressing the 
CLEAR key you can start the game over 
without reloading. Those of us who die 
often really appreciate this; I've seen 
this feature only in programs written in 
machine language. 

I thoroughly enjoyed this Adventure. 
The graphics and the logic used are a 
definite plus. Games that have you do 
illogical things (i.e., go through mirrors) 
leave me frustrated. In duplicate scenes 
(like fields), the trees, rocks and chasms 
are shown in different places, so it's easy 
to know where you are. Quest for the 
Ring has a limited vocabulary, but I 
found that more of a help than a hin- 
drance. Everything I needed to do could 
be accomplished with a dozen com- 
mands. And speaking of help, I got all 
the help I needed when I looked at 
objects. 

I also got all the help I needed from 
my 10- and 11 -year-old sons (and half 
the neighborhood children). I'd start 
playing the game and the next thing I 
knew there'd be three or four chairs 
pulled up around me, with the occu- 
pants offering advice on what to do 
next. If I left my chair for a cup of 
coffee, I'd come back to find it occupied 
by one of the kids, who'd look excitedly 
at me and say, "I'll take over from here." 

Quest for the Ring is a fun game, 
simple yet challenging. You have to 
reason things out, but it isn't so com- 
plicated that it will take you months of 
playing to solve. The kingdom is laid 
out very neatly, and what you have to 
do is straightforward. Also, you can 
carry as much as you want. Your hands 
never seem to get full. This eliminates 
the decision of what to drop in order to 
pick up something else. Decisions like 
those in other games cause a lot of 
backtracking and frustration for novice 
Adventurers. 



There is no save feature, so you lose 
everything you've collected whenever 
you die. However, starting the game 
over and recollecting everything is fairly 
easy if you draw a map as you go along. 
You score points for every object you 
find, with a possible score of 504 at the 
end of the game. Don't let the number 
504 scare you, though — there aren't 
504 objects in the game. Some things 
you pick up are worth 30 points, others 
maybe 50. To see what you are carrying, 
you have to type USE INV instead of just 
INV, 




Like its predecessor, Quest for the 
Ring is also a stand-alone Adventure 
for the CoCo 1 or 2, with 64K disk 
Extended Color BASIC. Note that it will 
not work on CoCo Is earlier than an F 
board. This two-disk set has 59 Hi-Res 
screens and can run on either a one or 
two-drive system. The optional high- 
speed poke is also available. The disks 
aren't copy-protected, so workable 
backups can be made, but only with the 
BACKUP command. Files cannot be 
copied one at a time. This protection, 
the only one the authors put in, prevents 
the loading and running of any of the 
single "modules" of the game. 

RTB guarantees all its software to 
load, or you can return it for a prompt 
replacement at no cost to you. I can 
personally vouch for this service, be- 
cause my original review copy didn't 
load. When I called the company, I 
expected to hear an answering machine 
at the other end (it was late Saturday 
afternoon). What I got was a real 
person. He was very helpful and sup- 
portive, and once he realized he couldn't 
solve my problem over the phone he 
sent out a replacement copy imme- 
diately. 

All in all, I think RTB Software has 
a real winner here. Quest for the Ring 
is a game that can be played and enj oyed 
by all ages and skills, and is well worth 
the price. I'd recommend completing 
the trilogy with Labyrinth and Adven- 
ture in Lumeria, and watching for other 



games from this company, which seems 
to be getting better with each program. 

(RTB Software, P.O. Box 777, West Acton, 
MA 01720, 508-263-0563; $34.95 plus 
$3 S/H) 

— Gail Allore 

' Softwar e 

Home Bingo — 
CoCo Calls the 
Numbers 

Home Bingo is a handy program to 
have around the house if you like to play 
this popular game with your family. It's 
also suited to the commercial bingo 
halls, although one might have a tough 
time convincing hard-core bingo pa- 
trons that a computer is selecting the 
numbers randomly. I suppose that being 
able to see and hear those rattling ping- 
pong balls provides an added sense of 
honesty and randomness to the typical 
bingo player. 



Home Bingo is supplied on either 
disk or cassette and is written in BASIC. 
It requires a minimum of 32K RAM 
and Extended Color BASIC, and it 
works fine on the CoCo 3, as well. The 
program loads simply by entering RUN 
"BINGD". A short menu of options is 
displayed. Both regular bingo games 
and round robin games are supported. 




In regular games, the computer first 
displays the number sequence, such as 
No. 5, followed by the actual bingo 
number being called. Numbers such as 
G58 are extremely large and take up 
most of the screen. 

If the round robin selection is made, 
the sequence is not counted but the 



displayed bingo numbers are just as 
large as in the regular games. The 
program keeps track of the numbers it 
calls so that the same number is never 
duplicated in a game. 

All 75 bingo numbers are available in 
the program and all are displayed in 
large green characters on a black back- 
ground with the prefix, such as *B', 
being only about half the size of the 
actual number. This is helpful in that it 
tends not to distract from the impor- 
tance of the number itself. Most profes- 
sional bingo players don't even need to 
see or hear the prefix. They have played 
enough games to know that "58" be- 
longs in the 'G' column. 

Home Bingo is a good program at a 
fair price and provides the CoCo user 
with a way to bring a little more high- 
tech into those smoke-filled bingo halls 
across America. 



(Williams Enterprises, 53 Old Derry Road, 
Box 7, Hudson, NH 03051, 603-883-2859; 
Cassette $9.95 or Disk $11.95, plus $2 S/H: 
First product review from this company 
appearing in THE RAINBOW) 

— Jerry Semones 



HAWKSo-f t HAWKSo-f t 



HAWKSo-f t 



HAWKSo-ft HAWKSo-f t 




DOMINATION *18.00 

MULT I -PLAYER STRATEGY GAME ! 
Try to take over the planet o-f YCNAN- Battle 
other players armies to take control o-f their 
provinces and defend yours- Play on a Hi— res map 
of the planet. Take the "RISK" and be a 
planet-lord today!!! Requires Coca 3 1 disk and 
joystick or mouse. See Rainbow Review JULY 88 



MYDOS 315.00 

CUSTOMIZABLE! EPROMABLE ! ! 

The commands Tandy left out! 
MYDOS is an enhancement to Disk Extended Basic 2.1 
an the CoCo 3. One command laadm and execute for 
M/L programs. Lowercase command entry and display 
on ALL screens. Screen echo and SAY command for 
RS Speech Pak. Point and click mouse directory. 

NEW FEATURES i ! ! i ! 
Supports double-sided and 40 track drives. Set 
any palettes you want an power — up (RGB or CMP). 
Power— up in any screen width and colors (or 
monochrome) you wish! Mare options than you can 
shake a joystick at!!! See Rainbow Review JUNE B7 



HAWKSoft KEYBOARD CABLE S25.00 

UNCHAIN YOUR KEYBOARD! 
Five foot extender cable for Coco II and 3. Move 
your keyboard where you want it! Installation 
instructions and tips included! Custom lengths 
avai 1 i ab 1 e. 




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Elgin, II. 60121-7112 
312-742-3084 



SfeH always included. II. orders add 7% sales tax 
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MLBASIC 2.0 - BASIC Compiler 

If you want your BASIC programs to run up to 50 times faster, or want more 
programming features without learning another language, MLBASIC is for you. 

MLBASIC is the most compatible BASIC compiler available for the Color Com- 
puter. WHY? Because MLBASIC fully supports: 

- Low- and high-resolution graphics 
- All types of I/O (disk, screen, printer, RS232) 

- All available commands offered with BASIC 
- Floating point functions and expressions 

- Integer, floating point and string type variables and arrays 

- Use of all available 512K RAM in the COCO 3 

- 80,40 or 32 column text displays 

MLBASIC not only contains everything that you would expect a BASIC pro- 
gramming language should contain, MLBASIC has features that offer flexibility 
of other languages like C, Pascal, FORTRAN and even assembly language. These 
features will allow programmers to directly access the CPU registers on the 
COCO, produce modular program code with SUBROUTINES, manipulate memory 
in blocks, and even call ROM routines in other areas of memory. 

MLBASIC revision 2.0 has incorporated all enhancements that were 
suggested by MLBASIC 1.0 users and more. Revision 2.0 did away with all the in- 
compatibility problems that existed with revision 1.0. 

MLBASIC allows for the first time user to quickly compile a program using 
default compiler settings. The advanced user has the capability of controlling 
over a dozen settings which control where the program is compiled, which 
medium to compile to (memory or disk), string space, compiler listings and 
more. 

With all this going for MLBASIC, your might expect the cost to be a little out 
of your budget. After looking at prices of other BASIC compilers for the COCO 3 
you might be correct. But look again at this ad; for only $59.95, you can have a 
programming language that will spark your interest once again In the COCO. 

Before you buy another BASIC compiler for the COCO, find out if it supports 
everything MLBASIC supports. Then look at the price tag. We feel that it won't be 
long before you place an order for MLBASIC. 

"MLBASIC is a fine program for any serious programmer, 9 
said David Gerald in the December 1 987 RAINBOW. 

OJSTLY $ 59 95 >> 

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Foreign orders use U.S. MONEY ORDERS only. 



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7350 Nutree Drive 
Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 
Phone (801) 943-1546 



October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 29 




The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 



Bug Buster, an upgraded arcade game that has 
you chasing specimens of the species Bugus 
computerum out of the disk drive, ROM, RAM, 
power supply and the printer. (The bugs infested 
your CoCo "a long time ago, while you were 
looking the other way.") This upgrade to Bug 
Buster features faster action and smaller targets. 
Requires a 32K CoCo, a disk drive and a joystick. 
Tothian Software, Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 
16248; $19.95. 




CMM, a stock market trading program "that 
will make money on a particular stock, whether 
the stock increases or decreases in price, providing 
the stock returns to its original price." For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Requires a disk drive and a DMP 
printer. Weller Enterprises, P.O. Box 8004, La 
Crescenta, CA 91214, (818) 352-6811; $49.95. 




Good Games Trio, a collection of 3 two-player 
games: ADI y Othello and Connect Five. ADI is 
a computerized version of a "board" game 
invented hundreds of years ago in Africa. Othello 
uses an 8-by-8 board and permits the user to 
obtain printouts of current games. Connect Five 
is based on the pencil-and-paper game and is 
mapped out in 10 columns. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 
3; uses the high-speed poke. RCPierce Software, 
P.O. Box 1787, Main Post Office, Edmonton, AB, 
Canada T5J 2P2, (403) 474-8435; $19.95 US, 
$22.95 CDN. 

Hall of the King Trilogy, a trio consisting of Hall 
of the King, Hall of the King II: The Inner 
Chamber and Hall of the King III: The Earthstone 
Revealed. Each graphics Adventure takes place in 
Firrhest, where a dwarven race once lived, and 
where the powerful Earthstone is hidden. Each 
program comes on a flippy — two sides of the disk 
are used. Requirements include 64K and a disk 
drive. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Sundog Systems, 
21 Edinburg Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15235, (412) 
372-5674; $7 f 95 for set, $29.95 each, plus $2.50 

jJPlHard Bodies, an on-disk swimsuit issue — 
"page after page of models in swimsuits that will 
make your CoCo screen sizzle." For the CoCo 1, 
2 and 3; requires 64K disk. Baron Products, 3937 
Shady Hill, Dallas, TX 75229, (214) 350-3900; 

HELLO/BAS, a directory Utility that lets you 
list and print a disk directory in alphabetical 
order, swap default drives with a key press and 



load and run basic programs from a menu. For 
the CoCo 1, 2 and 3, Requires 32K. ECB and uses 
the high-speed poke. RCPierce Software, P.O. 
Box 1787, Main Post Office, Edmonton, AB, 
Canada T5J 2P2, (403) 474-8435; $19.95 US, 
$22.95 CDN. 

In Quest of the Star Lord Hint Sheet, a listing of 
the commands necessary to solve Sundog Sys- 
tems' CoCo 3 In Quest of the Star Lord Adven- 
ture. The commands are encoded (but you have 
the key) in order that you dont learn more than 
you wanted to by a careless glance. The hint sheet 
is intended to be sold only to registered owners 
of In Quest of the Star Lord. Sundog Systems, 
21 Edinburg Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15235, (412) 
372-5674; $3.95. 

Moneyman II, a menu-driven program composed 
of seven modules designed to perform common 
financial calculations: Savings Planner, Loan 
Planner, Budget Planner, Checking Account, 
Savings Account, Reconcile Bank Statement and 
Summarize Deductibles. The modules interact 
and call on each other as needed. Requires 32 K 
ECB and a disk drive. An additional drive is 
optional, and a printer is recommended. Tothian 
Software, Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 16248; 
$24.95. 

Night of the Living Dead, a text Adventure 
with a ghoulish turn: You are lost in a remote area, 
and the dead are waking up. The only goal is to 
survive. As an incentive, the company is offering 
$500 to the first player whose character can live 
through it (deadline December 31, 1988). For the 



CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Requires 64K and a disk drive. 
Adventure Novel Software, P.O. Box 8176, 
Spartanburg, SC 29305, (803) 578-7421; $34.95 
introductory offer. 

VIP Database III, a CoCo 3 database that 
supports 40-, 64- and 80-column screens, uses 
separate text and highlight colors for easy data 
entry, features in-memory sort of all records and 
a built-in print spooler. The database can store up 
to 550 records of 256 characters on a one-disk 
system, and it supports multi-criteria searches 
with up to 16 separate relational keys. Requires 
the CoCo 3. SD Enterprises, P.O. Box 1233, 
Gresham, OR 97030, (503) 663-2865; $69.95. 




Wildcard Copy, a Disk basic supplement that 
lets you do a multiple copy with one command, 
equivalent to the COPY * command on other 
systems. It can be used to copy files with the same 
name but different extensions and files that share 
an extension. The program is written in basic for 
two disk drives and the CoCo I, 2 and 3. RVC 
Software, P.O. Box 560, Englishtown, N J 07726, 
(201) 446-2033; $15. 



Word Processing: TRS-80 & Star NX-10, a 

word processing program written in basic for the 
duo of the CoCo and the Star Micronics NX-10 
dot matrix printer. The program takes advantage 
of the printer's capabilities, including underlining, 
italics, NLQ print, emphasized and bold print, 
superscripts and subscripts, Pica and Elite, etc. 
For 64K CoCo 1, 2 and 3; comes on cassette only. 
Lee Sullivan, P.O. Box 8718, Penacook, NH 
03303, (603) 753-4497; $12. 



First product received from this company 




The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Lauren Willoughby 



130 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



Computer Island Educational Software 



7/ 



ARROW GAMES 

32K Ext. - $21.95 tape/ $26.95 disk 
Six menu driven games for young 
children (ages 3-6) to teach direc- 
tions. All games involve using the 
arrow keys ONLY. Games include: 
LADYBUG, BUTTERFLY, ARROW 
MATCH, KALEIDOSCOPE, RABBIT, 
and DOODLE. Colorful graphics. 

FIRST GAMES 

32K Ext. - $24.95 tape/$29.95 disk 
First Games contains 6 menu driven 
programs to delight and teach your 
early learners (ages 3-6). These 
games enrich the learning of colors, 
numbers, lower case letters, shapes, 
memory visual discrimination and 
counting. 




CLOZE STORIES 

32K Ext. - $19.95 Tape/$24.95 Disk 
These programs give students prac- 
tice using the popular CLOZE read- 
ing technique. Each program contains 
grade appropriate short stories with 
key missing words to be deduced oy 
the student. Available for grades 3, 4, 
5. 6, OR 7. Please specify. 

DRAWING CONCLUSIONS 

32K Ext. - tape $19.95/disk $24.95 
These programs contain short stories. 
Each story has two accompanying 
questions that ask the student to draw 
conclusions from the text. Available 
for grades 3-4 OR 5-6. Please specify. 



LOCATING STORY DETAILS 

32K Ext. - disk only - $24.95 
These programs contain short stories. 
Each has an accompanying picture. 
Questions about story details refer to 
either the text or pictures. The disSk 
generated graphics are an integral 
part of these attractive programs. 
Available for grades 2-3 OR 4-5. 
Please specify. 




FOREIGN LANGUAGE GAMES 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 

(500 words) 
French or Spanish Baseball 
Score base hits or home runs for 
correct answers. You're out if wrong. 
Correct answers supplied. Fun way 
to learn and practice vocabuiary. 
PLEASE SPECIFY LANGUAGE. 




PUNCTUATION PRACTICE 

32K Ext, - tape $19.95/disk $24.95 
On screen practice in proper usage 
of the familiar punctuation marks. 
Grades 3-7. 



! its 
VS. 
13Z5 
36S 




MATH TUTOR SERIES 

16K Ext. 

These tutorials take the child through 
each step of the example. All pro- 
grams include HELP tables, cursor 
and graphic aids. All allow user to 
create the example, or let the com- 
puter choose. Multi-level. Great 
teaching programs. 

LONG DIVISION TUTOR 
$14.95 tape/$19.95 disk 
MULTIPLICATION TUTOR 
$14.95 tape/$19.95 disk 

FACTORS TUTOR 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (addition) 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (subtraction) 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (mult.) 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 

COMPUTER LITERACY 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$29.95 disk 
A computer literacy quiz exclusively 
for the Color Computer. Tests and 
scores from over 60 questions on a 
Hi-res upper and lower case screen. 
Reviews computer literacy and 
beginning programming knowledge. 
Ages 10 and up. 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



ComputerLand 




(718) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 



Please add $1 .00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 



RAINBOWTECH 




16K 




Assembly Language for the 
Complete Novice: Part II 



By William Barden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing 



Last month's column looked at the basic architecture of 
the 6809 microprocessor used in the Color Computers, 
and many of the instructions and addressing modes of 
the 6809. In this column, I'll write some simple programs, 
assemble them by hand and by assembler and incorporate 
them in BASIC programs. This column will present the basic 
ideas of assembly language programming. Let's see if you're 
brave enough to learn it. 

Hand Assembling 

A sort usually arranges items in alphabetical order, 
generally from A to Z. Therefore, if we want to sort all the 
characters on a text screen in order, we would use a sort — 
probably a bubble sort. 

A Bubble Sort 

A bubble sort compares the first entry in a list with the 
next one. If that entry is smaller, swap the entries. The bubble 
sort continues, one entry at a time, until it reaches the end 
of the list. If any entries are switched, the process repeats. 
When no swap has been switched, the list is sorted. Look at 
the following example: 



*F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


G 


*G 


A 


A 


A 


A 


A 


A 


A 


*G 


B 


B 


B 


B 


B 


B 


B 


*G 


G 


G 


G 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


*Y 


C 


C 


C 


C 


C 


C 


C 


*Y 


D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


*Y 


*A 


A 


A 


A 


A 


A 


A 


F 


*B 


B 


B 


B 


B 


B 


B 


F 


*F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


G 


G 


G 


*C 


C 


C 


C 


C 


C 


C 


G 


*D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


G 


*G 


G 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


*Y 



(one pass over) 



*A 


A 


A 


A 


A 


A 


A 


B 


*B 


B 


B 


B 


B 


B 


F 


F 


*C 


C 


C 


C 


C 


C 


C 


F 


*D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


F 


*F 


F 


F 


G 


G 


G 


G 


G 


*G 


G 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


*Y 



(three passes over, 
sorted) 



In the preceding example, the asterisk shows the suspect 
item. While the list is sorted after three passes, another pass 
must be made to verify that no switch has occurred. 

The text screen starts at location $400 in CoCo memory 
and goes to $5FF, 512 characters. Here is a BASIC program 
that would complete this sort: 



100 Y = 0 

110 FDR X = &H400 TO &H5FE 
120 fl = PEEI<( X ) 

130 IF fl <= PEEK ( X + 1 ) THEN GOTO 1701 

140 B = PEEK( X + 1 ) 

150 POKE X, B:P0KE X + 1, fl 

160 Y = 1 

170 NEXT X 

1B0 IF Y<> 0 THEN GOTO 100 
190 END 



(two passes over) 



If you run this program, youH see the characters on the 
screen rearrange themselves in alphabetical order — really 
a CoCo-coded order, like ASCII. Figure 1 shows the results 
of the sort after the program is listed on the screen. The sort 
takes quite a long time in BASIC — about 58 minutes, 
depending on the characters' random order. How would this 
be done in assembly language? 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 

1 32 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



The Assembly Language Version 

The sort compares two values, the current location and the 
current location + 1. To compare in assembly language, we 
must have one value in a register — typically the A or B 
register — and compare it with another value in memory. In 



AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAABCCDDDDDDD E E E E E E 
EEEEFFFFFFFFGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH 
HHHHHHHHHHHHHHIIKKNNOOOOOOPRRRRR 
SSTTTTTTTUUUX 



& 

&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&& 
()>>5?5JJ?555JJJ5)55>J>JJ>5>> 000 

00000000000000000000000000000000 
00000011111111111111112222222333 
33334444445666677888888889: : :=== 

Figure 1: After the Sort 



machine language, the compare instruction would be 
presented in this manner: 

LDfl ,X+ BET FIRST ENTRY 

CMPfl ,X COMPARE TO 1+1 

BL5 ONE70 GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 



The LDfl instruction loads the A register with the curreiu 
entry from the screen. LDfl uses the X register as a pointer 
to the screen. X changes from $400 to $5FF and has been 
loaded with an address in this range before the compare 
instruction. The plus sign on the LDfl adds one to the contents 
of X after the load, so that X now points to the next location 
on the screen. 

The CMPfl instruction compares the contents of the A 
register with the contents found at the screen location 
indicated by the X register. The X register now points to the 
Screen Location +L CMPfl affects the condition codes in the 
CPU. The condition codes have a bit for a zero condition, 
negative condition and carry condition. Both signed and 
unsigned comparisons can be tested. In this case the 
comparison is unsigned, and is a BLS (Branch on Less Than 
or Same). A branch is made to Location ONE70 only if the 
contents of A were less than or equal to the contents of the 
next screen location. 

If the next screen location had been greater than A, the 
two locations would have been switched. Because the A 
register already contains the current value, the B register can 
be loaded with the next value for the swap. The two locations 
can be switched by storing A in the next location and B in 
the current location in this manner: 

LDB ,X GET SECOND ENTRY 

STB -1,X SWAP B TO A 

STfl ,X SNAP A TO B 

A change flag must also be set. Use the Y register for the 




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OctobeM988 THE RAINBOW 133 



ag. A '1' is loaded into the register to indicate the 
* f no change occurs, the register will hold 0): LDY 81 

ANGE". 

_ ntire code, including a compare instruction, swap (if 
necessary) and set change flag, now looks like this: 



LDfl 


,x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 


CMPfl 


,x 


COMPRRE TO 1+1 


BLS 


□NE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


STB 




SWRP B TO R 


STfi 


,x 


SWRP R TO B 


LDY 


81 


SET "CHANGE" 



At this point, we also know that the Y register is initially 
set to 0 and that the X register points to the start of the screen 
memory: 



If we use labels instead of line numbers, as in BASIC, we have: 



HUNDRD 



ONE70 



LDX 


tt$400 


POINT TO SCREEN 


LDY 


tl0 


SET CHRNGE FLRG TO 0 ONE10 


LDR 


x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 


CMPR 

V-J III II 




COMPRRE TO 1+1 


BLS 

i— 


ONE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


LDB 




GET SECOND ENTRY 


STB 


-l.X 


SWRP B TO R 


zj i n 






LDY 


ttl 


SET "CHRNGE" 


CMPX 


tt$5FF 


TEST FOR SCREEN END 


BNE 


ONE10 


GO IF NOT ONE PRSS 


CMPY 


80 


TEST CHRNGE FLRG 


BNE 


HUNDRD 


GO IF CHRNGE OCCURRED 



(IVe indented to indicate the inner loop.) 



LDX 


8S400 


POINT TO SCREEN 


LDY 


80 


SET CHRNGE FLRG TO 0 


LDR 


,x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 


CMPR 


,x 


COMPRRE TO 1+1 


BLS 


ONE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


STB 


-i,x 


SWRP B TO R 


STR 


,x 


SWRP R TO B 


LDY 


81 


SET "CHRNGE" 



Since this action is taken for every screen location from 
$400 to $5FE, stopping at $5FE, we must have a way to stop 
the compare instruction. X is incremented from $400 through 
$5FE. When it reaches $5FF, we should stop to see if the 
change flag has been set. If it has, we must go back for another 
pass. If it has not, the sort is complete. If X does not stop 
at $5FF, however, we'll continue looping and compare for 
this pass: 

CMPX 8$5FF TEST FOR SCREEN END 
BNE ONE10 GO IF NOT ONE PRSS 

If one pass has been completed, test the change flag by 
comparing the contents of the Y register with 0 and branching 
back if Y = 1 (indicating that at least one swap has occurred): 



CMPY 80 TEST CHRNGE FLRG 

BNE HUNDRD GO IF CHRNGE OCCURRED 

The whole sequence now looks like this: 



LDX 


8$400 


POINT TO SCREEN 


LDY 


80 


SET CHRNGE FLRG TO 0 


LDR 


,x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 


CMPR 




COMPARE TO 1 + 1 


BLS 


ONE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


STB 


-i,x 


SWRP B TO R 


STR 


,x 


SWRP R TO B 


LDY 


81 


SET "CHRNGE" 


CMPX 


8S5FF 


TEST FOR SCREEN END 


BNE 


ONE10 


GO IF NOT ONE PRSS 


CMPY 


80 


TEST CHRNGE FLRG 


BNE 


HUNDRD 


GO IF CHRNGE OCCURRED 



There are several branches in this sequence. We've named 
them to correspond to the BASIC implementation of this sort. 



Hand Coding 

My first program — one that read a single punched card 
from a card reader and then boot the system — was 
completely hand coded. In one card, I made a quantum leap 
in my understanding of assembly language programming. I'm 
not saying that hand coding this program will do the trick 
for you, but it may help. 

The first step in hand coding is to make a skeleton of the 
instructions based upon instruction length. You can find the 
instruction length in the list of instructions found in the back 
of assembler manuals, on a 6809 instruction sheet or in books 
on 6809 programming. As I explained in the last column, 
different addressing modes require different instruction 
lengths, as do different types of instructions. Branch 
instructions are always two bytes — opcode followed by 
displacement value. Load immediate instructions are two or 
three bytes — opcode followed by a 1-byte (A or B) value 
or a 2-byte (D, X or Y) value. Load from memory instructions 
are 3-byte instructions — opcode followed by two bytes of 



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to keep up with DIR's fast scroll-through. It handles 
up to 72 files; - 0- J I J / 

The listing: I 0^ I 

j3 CLS : CLEAR2j3j3^ : K=j3 tS® FORA=3TO 
11 : DSKI$ )3 f 17 , A,'B$ f C$: D$*B$+LEPT 
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(FortittT winning two-Hner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 




134 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



memory address. Indexed addressing instructions vary 
depending upon the offset. The skeleton here looks like this: 



xxxxxx 


HUNDRD LDX 


tt$400 


POINT TD SCREEN 


xxxxxxxx 




LDV 


00 


SET CHANGE FLAG TD 0 


xxxx 


ONE10 


LDA 


,x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 


xxxx 




CMPfl 


,x 


COMPARE TO 1+1 


xxxx 




BLS 


ONE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


xxxx 




LOB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


xxxx 




STB 


-i,x 


SNAP B TO A 


xxxx 




STA 


,x 


SWAP A TO B 


xxxxxxxx 




LDY 


81 


SET "CHANGE" 


xxxxxx 


ONE70 


CMPX 


tt$5FF 


TEST FOR SCREEN END 


xxxx 




BNE 


ONE10 


GO IF NOT ONE PASS 


xxxxxxxx 




CMPY 




TEST CHANGE FLAG 


xxxx 




BNE 


HUNDRD 


GO IF CHANGE OCCURRED 



Each two X's represent two hexadecimal digits or one byte. 
Now we can add the opcodes for the instructions by finding 
them in the instruction list: 



8EXXXX 


HUNDRD LDX 


8$400 


POINT TO SCREEN 


10BEXXXX 


LDY 


80 


SET CHANGE FLAG TO 0 


AGXX 


ONE10 LDA 


,x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 


A1XX 


CMPA 


,x 


COMPARE TO 1+1 


23XX 


BLS 


ONE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


E6XX 


LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


E7XX 


STB 


-1,X 


SWAP B TO A 


E7XX 


STA 


,x 


SWAP A TO B 


10BEXXXX 


LDY 


ttl 


SET "CHANGE" 



BCXXXX 
2GXX 

10BCXXXX 
2GXX 



ONE70 CMPX 
BNE 
CMPY 
BNE 



8$5FF TEST FOR SCREEN END 
ONE10 GO IF NOT ONE PASS 

80 TEST CHANGE FLAG 

HUNDRD GO IF CHANGE OCCURRED 



Note that some opcodes are made up of two bytes. 
Motorola ran out of opcodes and also wanted to make 
frequently used instructions shorten 

Now we can add the immediate values — values loaded 
into a register and found within the instruction. For example, 
the LDX instruction loads $400 into the X register: 



BE0400 


HUNDRD LDX 


8$400 


POINT TO SCREEN 


10BE0000 




LDY 


80 


SET CHANGE FLAG TO 0 


AGXX 


ONE10 


LDA 


,x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 


A1XX 




CMPA 


,x 


COMPARE TO 1+1 


23XX 




BLS 


ONE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


EGXX 




LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


E7XX 




STB 


-i,x 


SWAP B TO A 


A7XX 




STA 


,x 


SWAP A TO B 


10BE0001 




LDY 


81 


SET "CHANGE" 


BC05FF 


ONE70 


CMPX 


8$5FF 


TEST FOR SCREEN END 


2GXX 




BNE 


ONE10 


GO IF NOT ONE PASS 


10BC0000 




CMPY 


80 


TEST CHANGE FLAG 


26XX 




BNE 


HUNDRD 


GO IF CHANGE OCCURRED 



Now let's tackle the branches. In the last column, we 
learned that branches use a relative addressing mode, which 
adds the current location to a displacement field in the 
instruction. To hand code this value, do the following: For 
a forward branch, start at 0=next instruction after the 



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branch and add one for each following byte. For a backward 
branch, start at the $FF=second byte of the branch and 
subtract one for each of the above. Thus, if BNE ONE10 
branches back 21 bytes, start at FF (the second byte of BNE), 
and move back in the following manner; FF, FE, FD, FC, 
FB, FA, F9, F8, F7, F6, F5, F4, F3, F2, Fl, FO, EF, EE, 
ED, EC to EB (first byte of LDfl). The machine language 
commands would look like this: 



BE0400 


HUNDRD LDX 


tt$400 


POINT TO SCREEN 


10BE0000 




LDY 


80 


SET CHANGE FLAG TO 0 




ONE10 


LDfi 


Y+ 


RFT FTRQT FWTDV 
bL 1 r 1KD 1 LIN 1 KT 


A1XX 




CMPA 


,x 


COMPARE TO 1+1 


230A 




BL5 


DNE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


E6XX 




LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


E7XX 




STB 


-1,X 


SWAP B TO A 


FI7XX 




STA 


,x 


SWAP A TO B 


108E0001 




LDY 


ttl 


SET "CHANGE" 


8C05FF 


ONE70 


CMPX 


tt$5FF 


TEST FOR SCREEN END 


26EB 




8NE 


ONE10 


GO IF NOT ONE PASS 


108C0000 




CMPY 


m 


TEST CHANGE FLAG 


2GDE 




BNE 


HUNDRD 


GO IF CHANGE OCCURRED 



Now we can fill in the second byte of the indexed 
instructions. These are a bit tricky. You must note what type 
of indexing is being used and whether there's a displacement 
value. You must also code in the index register field, RR. Here 
the code value for the index register is 00, for X. The trickiest 
coding is for the STB -1,X, which is coded as 00011111. The 
RR register code is 00, so the result is 00011111. The five- 
bit field holds the displacement value of 111111, equal to 
-1 in two's complement notation. 



8E0400 

105E0000 

AG80 



HUNDRD LDX 
LDY 

ONE10 LDA 



tt$400 POINT TO SCREEN 

tt0 SET CHANGE FLAG TO 0 

,X+ GET FIRST ENTRY 



A1B4 


CMPA 


,x 


COMPARE TO 1+1 


230A 


BLS 


ONE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


E6B4 


LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


E71F 


STB 


-i,x 


SWAP B TO A 


A7B4 


STA 


,x 


SWAP A TO B 


10BE0001 


LDY 


ttl 


SET "CHANGE" 


BC05FF 


ONE70 CMPX 


tt$5FF 


TEST FOR SCREEN END 


2GEB 


BNE 


ONE10 


GO IF NOT ONE PASS 


10BC0000 


CMPY 


«0 


TEST CHANGE FLAG 


26DE 


BNE 


HUNDRD 


GO IF CHANGE OCCURRED 



Finding a Place for the Code 

Now that we have the code, we need to know where to put 
it. If we use assembly language code with BASIC, we must 
place the code out of harm's way. We don't want basic to 
clobber the machine language bytes as it stores variables or 
internal variables. One way to do this is by using the CLEAR 
command in BASIC. This command allocates string space and 
protects a block of memory. For example, CLEAR 
300,&H3EFF allocates 300 bytes of string space and protects 
all memory above $3EFF — just a little under the 16K point. 
There's still enough room for BASIC to function in the 
memory under this point. 

There are other places we could put the machine language 
bytes (such as in the middle of large arrays or in strings), but 
this is the safest place — a place that will never be touched 
by basic. 

Now that we know where the machine language bytes go, 
we can assign locations to each of the instructions. Because 
some instructions refer to absolute memory locations (such 
as LDA CONSNT, instruction locations should be assigned after 
making the skeleton of instruction lengths. We are going to 
do it now. (We are lucky that the program above is relocatable 
anywhere in memory — it contains no absolute addresses.) 

We can see from the code shown in Figure 2 that the 
machine language bytes occupy memory from $3F00 to 
S3F21. Now, how do we get them there? Assuming that we're 



3F00 


8E0400 


HUNDRD 


LDX 


8$400 


PDINT TO SCREEN 


3F03 


10BE0000 




LDY 


m 


SET CHANGE FLAG TO 0 


3F07 


A680 


ONE10 


LDA 


,x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 


3F09 


A1B4 




CMPA 


,x 


COMPARE TO 1+1 


3F0B 


230A 




BLS 


ONE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


3F0D 


E6B4 




LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


3F0F 


E71F 




STB 


-M 


SWAP B TO A 


3F11 


A784 




STA 


,x 


SWAP A TO B 


3F13 


10BE0001 




LDY 


ttl 


SET "CHANGE" 


3F17 


8C05FF 


ONE70 


CMPX 


tt$5FF 


TEST FOR SCREEN END 


3F1A 


2GEB 




BNE 


ONE10 


GO IF NOT ONE PASS 


3F1C 


10BC0000 




CMPY 


m 


TEST CHANGE FLAG 


3F20 


26DE 




BNE 


HUNDRD 


GO IF CHANGE OCCURRED 


3F22 













Figure 2 



1 38 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



going to be working in BASIC, we can use the BASIC POKE 
statements to move any type of data anywhere we want within 
the 64K addressing space of BASIC. The easiest way to do this 
is to list the data in DRTfl statements and then to use a loop 
to move the data: 

900 CLEAR 300, &H3EFF 

1000 DATA &H8E,&H04,&H00,&H10,&HBE,&H00, &H00, 
&HA6 

1001 DATA &H80,&HA1,&H84,&H23,&H0A,&HEG, &H84, 
&HE7 

1002 DATA &HlF,&HA7,&H84 t &H10,&H8E,&H00, &H01, 
&HBC 

1003 DATA &H05,&HFF,&H26,&HEB,&H10,&H8C, &H00, 
&H00 

1004 DATA &H26,&HDE 

1010 FOR I = &H3F00 TO &H3F21: READ A: POKE I, A: 
NEXT 



the defined location and transfer control to the machine 
language program found there: 



900 CLEAR 300, &H3EFF 

1000 DATA &HBE,&H04,&H00,&H10,&H8E,&H00, &H00, 
&HAG 

1001 DATA &H80,&HA1,&H84,&H23,&H0A,&HE6, &H84, 
&HE7 

1002 DATA &H1F,&HA7,&H84,&H10,&H8E,&H00, &H01, 
&H8C 

1003 DATA &H05,&HFF,&H2G,&HEB,&H10,&H8C, &H00, 

&H00 

1004 DATA &H26,&HDE 

1010 FOR I = &H3F00 TO &H3F21: READ A: POKE I, A: 
NEXT 

1020 DEFUSR0 = &H3F00 
1030 A+USR0(0) 
1040 GOTO 1040 



The loop at Line 1010 moves the 22 bytes of data into the 
S3F00 protected area. 

Next, now that we have the machine language code there, 
how do we get to it? Here again, BASIC has the answer. The 
DEFU5R statement defines where the code is. There's an ID 
number attached to this statement so it becomes DEFUSR0 - 
DEFU5R9, but since we have only one machine language 
program we'll use DEFUSR0. Once defined, the code is called 
by a U5R0 statement, which tells the BASIC interpreter to use 



We are now all set to call the program, or are we? Once 
the program is executed, what will happen? The last 
instruction was a BNE. It branches back to the beginning of 
the bubble sort if the data is not sorted. However, if the data 
is sorted, the next instruction in sequence is executed. But 
there is no next instruction. Since the next instruction will 
be garbage, the program will probably blow up in some 
strange loop after the sort is done. 

After the sort let's return to a BASIC calling program by 




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P.O. Box 2203 • Richmond, IN 47375 



151 



October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 39 



using a stack (described last month). The stack saves the 
return address of a control point in the BASIC interpreter. We 
can pop that return address by including a 6809 RTS (Return 
from subroutine) instruction as the last instruction of the 
machine language code as shown in Figure 3. 



"Assembly language is tedious, 
and it is hard to learn. But if you 
want to do things that you just 
can't do in compiled languages, 
assembly language is the only 
way to go. " 



We'll have to include that in the storage portion of the 
BASIC program as well: 

900 CLEAR 300, &H3EFF 

1000 DRTR &HBE , &H04 , &H00 , &H10 , &HBE , &H00 , &H00 , 
&HR6 

1001 DATfi &HB0,&Hfil,&HB4,&H23,&H0fi,&HEG, &H84, 
&HE7 

1002 DATA &H1F,&HA7,&HB4,&H10,&HBE,&H00, &H01, 
&H8C 

1003 DATA &H05,&HFF,&H26,&HEB,&H10,&H8C, &H00, 
&H00 

1004 DATA &H26,&HDE,&H39 

1010 FDR I = &H3F00 TD &H3F22: READ A: POKE I, A: 
NEXT 

1020 DEFU5R0 = &H3F00 
1030 A = USR0(0) 
1040 GOTO 1040 



Now we are all set to run the sort. The USR0 will transfer 
control to the machine language code; the screen sort will be 
done; the RTS will return control to BASIC. BASIC will execute 
the next instruction after the USR0 that is, in this case, a 
continual loop so screen result is not disturbed. 

If you run this code, you'll see a rapid sort of the screen. 
This is several times faster than the equivalent basic code, 
and speed is the reason that assembly language is used. 

Assembler Assembling 

You can see that it is possible to hand assemble machine 
language code. However, it's very tedious. Grace Hopper, the 
major force behind COBOL, says that it's almost impossible 
to assemble a string of 40 ones and zeroes and not make a 
mistake. For this reason, it's much easier to assemble the code 
automatically. The symbolic code: 



HUNDRD 


LDX 


8S400 


POINT TD SCREEN 




LDY 


m 


SET CHRNGE FLAG TO 0 


ONE10 


LDfi 


,x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 




CMPA 


,x 


COMPARE TO 1+1 




BLS 


0NE78 


GO IF ENTRY 1 GE ENTRY 1+1 




LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 




STB 


-i,x 


SWAP B TO A 




STA 


,x 


SWAP A TO B 




LDY 


ttl 


SET "CHANGE" 


ONE70 


CMPX 


tt$5FF 


TEST FOR SCREEN END 




BNE 


ONE10 


GO IF NOT ONE PASS 




CMPY 


tt0 


TEST CHANGE FLAG 




BNE 


HUNDRD 


GO IF CHANGE OCCURRED 




RTS 




RETURN TO BASIC 



is entered into the assembler program. This source code is 
the actual assembly language. The assembler then proceeds 
in the same way that we proceeded in hand assembling. It 
makes one pass through the lines of code, allocates space for 



3F00 


BE0400 


HUNDRD 


LDX 


tt$400 


POINT TO SCREEN 


3F03 


108E0000 




LDY 


m 


SET CHANGE FLAG TO 0 


3F07 


AGB0 


ONE10 


LDA 


,x+ 


GET FIRST ENTRY 


3F09 


A1B4 




CMPA 


,x 


COMPARE TO 1+1 


3F0B 


230A 




BLS 


ONE70 


GO IF ENTRY I GE ENTRY 1+1 


3F0D 


EGB4 




LDB 


,x 


GET SECOND ENTRY 


3F0F 


E71F 




STB 


-i,x 


SWAP B TO A 


3F11 


A7B4 




STA 


,x 


SWAP A TO B 


3F13 


10BE0001 




LDY 


ttl 


SET "CHANGE" 


3F17 


BC05FF 


ONE70 


CMPX 


tt$5FF 


TEST FOR SCREEN END 


3F1A 


2GEB 




BNE 


ONE10 


GO IF NOT ONE PASS 


3F1C 


108C0000 




CMPY 


tt0 


TEST CHANGE FLAG 


3F20 


2GDE 




BNE 


HUNDRD 


GO IF CHANGE OCCURRED 


3F22 


39 




RTS 




RETURN TO BASIC 



3F23 



Figure 3 



1 40 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



each instruction and assigns opcodes. It also builds a symbol 
table of all labels and symbols in the code. The symbol table 
for this code would look like this: 

HUNDRD $3F00 
□NE10 $3F07 
ONE70 tt3F17 

The assembler now makes a second pass and fills in 
opcodes, displacements, and absolute addresses. The result 
is object code that looks much like the machine language code 
we generated. This object code is usually loaded by a loader, 
resulting in true machine language code — ones and zeroes. 

If you understand what's happening in the process above, 
the assembler won't pose any problems for you. Assemblers 
have a few more commands called pseudo-operations or 
pseudo-ops that allow you to define the origin of the 
program, allocate space for constants or define constants, 
define text strings, etc., but these are relatively easy to 
understand. 

As I mentioned in the previous column, one of the best 
assemblers for the CoCo was Disk EDTASM, I say was 
because Radio Shack has discontinued it. Disk EDTASM 
was like Turbo PASCAL for the PC compatibles — it 
operated in a highly interactive environment that allowed you 
to edit a program, quickly assemble it in memory and then 
debug the assembled code, all in the same program. It was 
a one-step process. If you want to learn assembly language, 
I suggest that you look for a copy of this. Once you know 
assembly language, the assembler you use is not as critical, 
but Disk EDTASM is a great learning tool. 

A Second Example 

Let's try a second example: 

100 CL5 110 X = 16: Y = 0 

120 DX = 1: DY = 1 

130 L = &H400 + 8 * 32 + 16 

140 X = X + DX 

150 Y = Y + DY 

160 IF ( X < 0 OR X > 31 ) THEN DX = -DX: X = X + DX 

170 IF ( Y < 0 OR Y> 14 ) THEN DY = -DY : Y = Y + DY 

180 POKE &H400 + L, 96 

190 L = Y * 32 + X 

200 POKE &H400 + L, 79 

210 GOTO 140 



This BASIC code clears the text screen and then moves an 
'O' around inside the screen on a diagonal path. As the 'O' 
is moved, the old position is erased. The effect is like the 
cursor in an old Pong game — the cursor bounces around 
within the screen. 

As in the first example, each poke is used to set characters 
on the screen directly. Character 96 is a space, which clears 
the character position. Character 79 is an uppercase 4 0\ 
Variable X, the column, varies from 0 to 31. Variable Y, the 
row, varies from 0 to 14. Using up to 15 rows traces the same 
path, and the display is not very interesting. 

The variables DX and DY are the increments to add to X 
and Y, At the start, the increments are one and one, which 
results in the movement of one character position over and 
one down. When Character O hits the side of the screen, 
however, one or both of the increments are changed by 
negation. This changes the direction of the move. Both 
change at a corner. 

How would this be coded in assembly language? The 
assembly language program for this is shown in Listing 1. 
It follows the same logic as the BASIC program. As you can 
see, this is an EDTASM+ (Disk EDTASM) listing. The 
source code (the text) contains the pseudo-op ORG to set the 
origin to S3F00 and several FCB pseudo-ops to initialize 
variables. Otherwise, you'll find it easy to follow. The listing 
also includes absolute addresses in some of the instructions, 
unlike our first example. Variables XR, YR, DX, and DY are 
located in absolute addresses. 

The BASIC code for the program is shown in Listing 2. It 
uses the same scheme of relocation by DATA values we used 
in the first example. There is no RT5; however, the display 
runs continuously (reset to regain control). If you run the 
program, you'll be amazed — nothing shows up on the screen. 
Why? 

This program is so much faster than the BASIC version that 
the 'O' is moving too fast to be seen. If you don't believe me, 
substitute &H12, &H12 for the &HA7, &H84 in Line 180. This 
will prevent the old character from being erased. Now when 
you run the program you see the screen fill up with O's as 
the "cursor" moves around the entire screen in the wink of 
an eye. 

This is a very brief introduction to assembly language. 
Assembly language is tedious, and it is hard to learn. But if 
you want to do things that you just can't do in compiled 
languages, assembly language is the only way to go. 

See you next month with more CoCo topics. □ 




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October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 41 



Listing 1: PONGBIN 



3F00 




00100 


ORG 


S3F00 




3F00 8E 


0510 


00110 PINGPO 


LDY 


#$51 0 

Try J 1 W 


Y_1 £ Y— fi 


3F03 B6 


3F4F 


PPM 


LDA 


YR 


v 

A. 


3F06 BB 


3F51 


001 30 

^ff Jff 1 J yi 


ADDA 




Y— Y+HY 


3F09 2C 


06 

yo 


00140 
iff if it w 




PP1 

HI 


nn TF OF 0 
ir oil Vff 


3F0B 70 


3F51 

jr Ji 


001 S0 


IN d 




FT TP Y nTPFrTTntJ 
rLli A U1I\Iju ± ±Uu 


3F0F BB 


3F51 

Jr Jl 


001 60 

iff iff 1 O iff 


AHTjA 

A ITU A 


HY 


RA fV 


3F1 1 81 


1 F 
1 r 


001 70 PP1 

VffVffl/jff ill 


fMPA 
urir a 


ff Jl 


TFQT 


Q-Pl Q OF 
Jrij r 


(76 

iff o 


001 80 

Vff Jff 1 O Vff 


RT F 


PP9 

Z Z £. 




3F15 70 


3F51 

J 1 J 1 


001 90 

iff Jff 1 7 iff 


IN J-j VJ 


TjY 

U A. 


FT TP Y rvTRFPTTOKT 

r Lli A 1/tLJXlLU 1 1ULN 


3F1 8 BB 


3F51 

jr ji 


00200 

iff Iff £ iff iff 


ADDA 

AUUA 


DY 

UA 


DAvA 


3F1 B F6 
jr id to 


3F50 

j r j^v 


0091 0 PP9 

VffV0£»lJff Z Z C, 


T TiR 


YR 


QAMF FOR V TTJ R 
oAnr* r Uix x iin d 


3F1 F FB 

jr iu r ii 


3F52 

jr jl 


00290 

iff iff 


ATjDR 


DY 

L/ 1 




3F21 2C 

jr £.1 £. 


06 

iff o 


00930 

iff V£> J iff 


RfiF 


PP^ 

i i J 




3F23 70 

jr l j /if 


3F52 

J 1 J £• 


00940 

iff id *T iff 


IN IjU 






3F?6 FB 

J 1 O r D 


3F52 

jt ji 


00950 
iff id j iff 


ADDB 


DY 




3F9 9 fSl 

JTl? ul 


0F 


00960 PP1 




i£l L 




3F9B 9F 


06 

iff o 


yjyj £• / iff 


RT F 


PP4 

1 i *T 




3F9D 70 

jr £.17 / iff 


3F52 

J 1 J £• 


00980 


NFO 


nY 




3F30 FR 


3F59 
j r j £ 


009Q0 

yjy) y y) 


AUUD 


U I 




3F33 B7 


3F4F 

j i tr 


00300 PP4 

y)y/ -Jyfy) i it 




YR 


CTflPTT "MTTIJ Y 
olUlxt INHW A 


31736 P"7 


3F50 
j i j if 


00^1 0 
Jff Jff J l)ff 


QTR 
DID 


YR 


CTHPTT "MT7T.T V 


3F39 86 

jr J7 o o 


60 

O iff 


00390 


T HA 




"RT AWV 
D1iALNJ\. 


3F3R A7 
jr jd a / 


84 


00T10 
yr yt J 3 y> 


o 1 A 


v 

9 A 


TTP ACT? nT TV 


or ju o o 


90 
Z}ff 


y)y) -j Hy> 


T f>A 


tF jZ 




jr or ju 




00^50 

yfyfO jy) 


MTTT 






1FA0 F*3 


*}F&F 
Jr < tJL 


00^60 

Vff V0 J O Vff 


AUUU 


YP _ 1 
Ai\- 1 


V* ^ 0 _i_Y 


31743 H3 


0A00 


00*370 

yjy) O l y) 


AUUU 


rryHyty/ 




3F46 IF 


01 


00380 

fr V J U Iff 


TFR 


D Y 


NDU TN Y 

lHKJYi 1 IN A 


3F48 86 

J 1 to o o 


4F 


00390 

iff iff J 7 iff 


t r>A 

lil^A 


tt / y 




3F4A A7 


84 


00400 


STA 

O X A 


Y 


TN NFU Pn^TTTHN 
iin iNiiW ruoi 1 1U1M 


3F4C 20 


B5 

J-> J 


00410 

WWtlJff 


BRA 


PPM 


\J \J IN 1 11NUWUO liVJ W 1 


3F4E 


00 


00420 


Ff!B 


0 




3F4F 


10 
1)0 


00430 YR 

jffjfft jjff yvx\. 


Ff!B 


1 6 

1 o 


MTl^T RF 1 6 RTTQ 

flUOl DCi 1 U D11D 


3F50 


08 


00440 YR 


FCB 


8 




3F51 


01 


00450 DX 


FCB 


1 




3F52 


01 


00460 DY 


FCB 


1 






WW 


00470 


END 







J2fJ2fJ2fj2fJ? TOTAL ERRORS 



Listing 2: PONGBRS 

CLEAR 3j3p 7 &H3EFF 

lip DATA &Hj2(5 , ,&HS6 , &H3 

F f &H4F,&HBB,&H3F 

120 DATA &H51 / &H2C / &H06,&H7J3 / &H3 
F,Siif51,&HBB # &H3F 

130 DATA &H51 / &H81 / &H1F,&H2F,&H0 
6 / &H70 / &H3F,&H51 

140 DATA &HBB , &H3F , &H51 , &HF6 , &H3 
F / &H50,&HFB / &H3F 

150 DATA &H52 / &H2C / &H06 / &H70 # SH3 
F / &H52,&HFB / &H3F 

160 DATA &H52 / &HC1 / &H0E,&H2F / &H0 
6 / &H70 / &H3F / &H52 

170 DATA &HFB, &H3F, &H52 , &HB7 , &H3 



F / £H4F / &HF7 / &H3F 

180 DATA &H50 / &H8 6 / &H60 / &HA7 / &H8 
4 / &H86 / &H20 / &H3D 

190 DATA &HF3 / &H3F / &H4E / &HC3 , &H0 
4,&H00 / &H1F / &H01 

200 DATA &H8 6 / &H4F / &HA7 / &H84 / &H2 

0,&HB5 / &H00 / &H10 

210 DATA &H08, ScH01, &H01 

220 FOR I=&H3F00 TO &H3F52: READ 

A: POKE I,A: NEXT I 
230 FOR I=&H3F00 TO &H3F52: PR1N 
T HEX$( PEEK( I ) );"";: NEXT I 
240 CLS 

250 DEFUSR0 = &H3F00 

260 A = USR0( 0 ) /Rv 



142 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



RAINBOWTECH 




Introducing the OS-9 Team 



By Richard A. White 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Last month, we discussed some 
general operating system ideas 
and the ways in which OS-9 dif- 
fered from them. All operating systems 
must connect the computer's computing 
and memory areas to its input and 
output components. An operating sys- 
tem provides the connections to the 
outside world. Most operating systems 
hide this connecting code in a program 
that is loaded when the computer is 
booted. 

Because you seldom need to know 
this code, you would not need to know 
its location. There is a problem, how- 
ever, if the operating system is not set 
up for new hardware you want to add. 

One solution to this problem is buy- 
ing a new version of the operating 
system. Owners of MS-DOS machines 
have done this many times. ("Want a 
hard disk? Fine. But Version 2. 1 of DOS 
won't work with this. A 3.1 will work 
just fine. $50 please. You only have 
256K of RAM? That's a little small for 
Version 3.1. Oh, it will fit fine, but 
nothing else will fit with it. For $250 we 
have this memory upgrade board to 
take you to 640K.") 



Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in BASIC pro- 
gramming. With Don Dollberg, he is 
the co-author of the TIMS database 
management program. 



OS-9 was designed to handle such 
situations without causing the trauma 
that other systems cause. Higher-per- 
formance options are not quite free, but 
the cost is compensated by the intellec- 
tual challenge. OS-9 can be altered so 
easily because the user can get to each 
of the operating system modules and 
change or replace them, or add others. 
In this article, we will discuss why and 
how you make changes in your OS-9 
system. 

Modules 

There is a distinction between user 
and system modules. While user mod- 
ules are loaded and used after booting 
a system, system modules are included 
in the kernel and boot files. Kernel files 
contain the programs that start and 
manage the system's operation. Input 
and output (I/O) files communicate 
with attached hardware. All system 
modules should be in the kernel or in 
□59BoDt. As we go along, note which 
modules should be in 059Boot and 
which should not. Under Level II, the 
kernel includes REL, Boot, DS9pl, 
□S9p2, Init, CC3Go and Clock. The 
first three are stored on Track 34 of the 
boot disk and are loaded when you type 
DOS to start up OS-9. REL resets the 
system hardware, prepares it for OS-9 
and calls 0S9pl. 0S9pl initializes the 
system, and Boot loads D59BQot. 

Ini t, DS9p2, CC3Go and Clock must 
be in your 0S9Boot file. Init is not a 



program. It is a data module containing 
system constants. 0S9p2 handles mem- 
ory management, the module directory 
and functions associated with module 
management, and process control. This 
is the heart of multitasking capability in 
OS-9. CC3Go now loads Shell and 
GrfDrv, establishes communications 
with Shell and starts the Startup file. 

Shell handles communication be- 
tween you and the computer. The pro- 
gram interprets commands that are 
typed in and calls the proper operating 
system code to execute them. Though 
not part of the operating system, it may 
be considered an application program 
that interfaces with the operating sys- 
tem. Shell is designed to be loaded 
separately from 0S9Boot as is GrfDrv. 
Do not put either of these into your 
□S9Boot. 

Shell's input may come from sources 
other than the keyboard. Input can also 
be redirected from any source managed 
by OS-9. Typically, alternate input 
comes from a disk file containing com- 
mands identical to those typed from the 
keyboard. The Startup file is one such 
disk file. But CC3Go automatically starts 
the process of reading this file on boot. 
Shell interprets commands from 
Startup as if they had been typed. A 
simple Startup file provided with OS- 
9 sends a welcome message to the screen 
and runs Setime to set Clock to the 
present date and time. Startup can be 
quite long. Mine exceeds 50 lines. 



October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 43 



About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . . 

the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
oneortwo line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




Managers and Submanagers 

We have discussed some of the OS- 
9 modules that get things started, but 
other modules that have been involved 
deserve our attention. The Startup file 
was read in. The modules that manage 
system startup need help reading it. The 
Boot module contains enough code to 
find and read in D59Boot, but any other 
disk access is beyond its capability. It 
finds 059Boot by its length. Boot reads 
sectors in sequence looking for 059 
Boot's length. If OSSBoot were split 
into two parts, Boot would be defeated. 
Startup may be anywhere on the disk 
and may be split into separated sectors. 
A more competent disk handler than 
Boot is needed. 

"OS-9 can be altered 
so easily because the 
user can get to each 
of the operating 
system modules and 
change or replace 
them, or add 
others. n 

All data transfer from and to the 
computer's hardware (drives, printer 
and terminal) is managed by the I/O 
manager called IDMan. In addition, 
IOMan takes care of communications 
between processes — tasks that do not 
involve hardware but have functional 
similarities. To accomplish its role, 
IOMan uses three submanagers that are 
designed to handle different types of 
communications. 

The simplest type of communication 
is a stream of characters. The keyboard 
generates such a stream, which is irreg- 
ular and unpredictable in terms of when 
characters are sent and how characters 
are grouped. The computer deals with 
the characters one at a time as they are 
presented to it. This stream is called a 
sequential character file and its sub- 
manager is named SCF. The screen, 
printer and modem are also SCF devi- 
ces. SCF can handle any number of these 
devices and is limited only by what can 
be attached to a CoCo. 

Disk drives are organized into blocks 
of data called sectors. When a disk is 
read, a block of data of known size (256 
bytes on the CoCo) is loaded in. A block 
of memory must be received, stored in 



a defined area of memory (the buffer). 
It must then be read (out of the buffer), 
as needed, to the using application in 
the character stream. Because the sec- 
tors containing the required data may 
be distributed at random locations on 
the disk, the submanager must read the 
disk's file allocation table and deter- 
mine the sectors and the order it needs 
to call. This submanager's basic func- 
tion is to handle random blocks. The 
submanager's name, RBF, refers to 
random block files. 

RBF manages any storage device 
based on blocks of data, including 
floppy disks, hard drives and RAM 
disks. Compare this with Boot's disk 
access code that reads in DSSBoot. Boot 
can only find where DSSBoot starts on 
a disk and the number of contiguous 
sectors it occupies. If OSSBoot is di- 
vided into parts that are at different 
locations on a disk, Boot cannot oper- 
ate. For this reason, always use a newly 
formatted disk to make a new boot disk 
so that DSSBoo t will not be saved in two 
places. 

Communications between processes 
have complexities all their own. The 
sending process cannot generate data 
faster than the receiving process can 
handle it. The submanager controlling 
the process must know the needs of the 
receiving process and control the send- 
ing process so that it does not exceed 
these needs. In this respect, this sub- 
manager is like RBF, which ensures that 
the data rate does not exceed the storage 
rate of the storage device. However, 
there is no block organization to the 
data. The process of transferring data 
from one operating process to another 
is called piping; therefore, the subman- 
ager is named PipeMan. 

Drivers 

Human managers organize, direct 
and control, but seldom do any of the 
actual work that makes something 
happen. OS-9 managers and submanag- 
ers are no different. Their management 
duties are all they can handle, and they 
need help carrying out their functions. 
Their helpers are called drivers, and 
these do the actual work of transferring 
data to and from processes and hard- 
ware. 

The standard device drivers supplied 
with OS-9 are CC3I0 (handles the 
terminal functions), CC3Disl< (handles 
floppy disks), Piper (works with 
pipes), Printer, RS-232 and Modem. 
fiCIflPflK replaces RS-232 if you use the 
RS-232 in your Multi-Pak Interface. 
Most specialized hardware use special 



144 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 



drivers. The hard disk, for instance, 
requires an additional driver. Like 
CC3Disk, this driver works with RBF. 

If the basic OS-9 design philosophy 
is followed, a driver can handle a variety 
of similar devices having different 
characteristics. Floppy drives, for ex- 
ample, have changed drastically in the 
last eight years. When the first CoCo 
came out, a 5!4-inch drive was typically 
a single-sided, single-density, 35-track 
device that stored less than 100K. The 
first CoCo drive added double-density, 
156K storage. A friend who owned a 
Model I told me I would only need four 
or five disks because of their large 
capacity. I almost believed him. 

A couple of years later, double-sided, 
40-track drives were standard on IBM 
PC's. Now single-sided drives are not 
even made, and 3 J /4-inch drives that 
store 720K are common. 

When Radio Shack brought out OS- 
9 Level I for the CoCo, it must have 
believed my friend. The disk driver was 
hard-coded to use 35-track, single-sided 
disks only. This change in OS-9 design 
made it impossible to use larger drive 
capacities with the stock driver. How 
should it have been done? 



With OS-9, the driver obtains the 
characteristics of a device from a data 
module (a device descriptor) each time 
it needs to access that device. This is 
what Level II CC3Disl< does. The device 
descriptors carry the names used to call 
the drive. If you want to load a program 
in the CMDS directory on disk 1 , you type 
LDfiD/Dl/CMDS/MYPRDG. Shell inter- 
prets this request and sends it to RBF, 
which works with CC3Disl< to load the 
file. A first step is to read the drive 
characteristics from the device descrip- 
tor module, Dl. 

The characteristics stored in a device 
descriptor are the maximum capabili- 
ties of the drive. They tell OS-9 nothing 
about how the disk in that drive is 
formatted. The specifics about the disk 
itself are read from the disk and com- 
pared with the capacity given by the 
descriptor. As long as the disk charac- 
teristics are equal to or less than those 
reported by the descriptor, the disk can 
be read and written. So a 35-track, 
single sided disk works just fine in a 40- 
track, double-sided drive. 

As noted, Level II comes with 
CC3Disk, which uses its device descrip- 
tors to determine the capabilities of 



each drive. It also comes with various 
pre-made device descriptors covering 
some of the more popular drive choices. 
Not all possible descriptors are pro- 
vided, and Murphy's Law requires that 
at least one that you want will not be 
there. For example, there is no 40-track 
single-sided descriptor. If you have such 
a drive, you can use the 35-track de- 
scriptor but not use the last five tracks. 
There are descriptors for the current 
standard 5!4-inch drive, which is 40- 
track, double-sided with a 6-ms step rate. 

One of the favorite pastimes of OS- 
9 addicts is hacking the code. That 
means changing modules to make them 
better (though a pessimist, in a fit of 
kindness, might say to make them 
different). This has led to all sorts of 
patches, modified modules, rewritten 
modules and programs to do some of 
this. OS-9's database on Delphi is full 
of such information. Some of the infor- 
mation is quite useful. One in particu- 
lar, DMode by Kevin Darling, provides 
a way to patch a module that is on a 
disk. With DMode and information in 
the OS-9 manuals, you can make any 
device descriptor you need. 

Programs to make device descriptors 



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October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 45 



are included in commercial packages 
such as SDisk. There are ways to do 
whatever is needed. When I installed my 
3!^-inch drive, I only needed to make a 
device descriptor and a new OSSBoot 
that included the descriptor. 

CC3Disk cannot manage a hard 
drive, so a new driver is needed. Hard 
drive suppliers provide drivers with 
their packages and descriptors when 
appropriate. The user must make a new 
0S9Boot, which includes these mod- 
ules, and proceed with the installations 
— it takes a little more than just a new 
boot. Burke & Burke began by provid- 
ing only an interface and software, 
leaving users to supply their own hard 
drive. Thus, a wide variety of drives can 
be used. To solve the descriptor prob- 
lem, Chris Burke wrote a program to 
make a descriptor that matches the 
drive used. This is fine for a person who 
can get a real deal on an older drive and 
the data to make the descriptor. How- 
ever, it is a problem for the non- 
technical person. Burke & Burke now 
provides a complete package. 

Next we have Printer and its de- 
scriptor P, which drives a printer 
through the serial port. Unless you have 
a very old printer, you will want to run 
it faster than the 600-baud default rate. 
OS-9 provides Xmcide to change SCF 
descriptors. Initially, run Xmode at the 
beginning of a session by typing Xmode 
/p baud=4 to run at 2400 baud. (I have 
a serial-to-parallel converter, so I use 
Xmode /p baud=6 and work at 9600 
baud.) Next, automate the procedure by 
putting the Xmode statement in your 
Startup file. It will look exactly as you 
would type it from the keyboard, but it 
takes a few seconds for Xmode to load 
and run — a waste of precious time. So, 
the final step in the automation is to 
make a new boot using P after you have 
changed it with Xmode. (More about 
that in a later column. 

Use Xmode to change the 300-baud 
default of Tl or T2 as well. These 
descriptors work with RS-232 and the 
serial port, or the RCIflPflK and the RS- 
232 Pak respectively. 

The last I/O system to be discussed 
is the terminal made up of your key- 
board and your video display. In Level 
I, this was pretty simple. It consisted of 
the driver CCIO and the device descrip- 
tor TERM. With the arrival of the CoCo 
3, a number of people wrote 80-column 
drivers, which were made available on 
information services like Delphi and 
allowed us to use the 80-column screen 
before the release of OS-9 Level II. 
Here, again, new hardware required 



only a new driver and a new device 
descriptor. 

OS-9 Level I does not provide graph- 
ics support, but the BASIC09 package for 
Level I supplies a graphics interface 
module, Gfx. This is an assembly lan- 
guage program that handles both color 
graphics and joystick functions. Gfx is 
loaded, either before running BASIC09 or 
by a Shell statement in the program, 
and then called by the program with the 
BASIC09 RUN statement. Like Shell, Gfx 
can be viewed as an applications pro- 
gram that interfaces with the operating 
system. Remember that all applications 
programs must be loaded separately 
and never be put into your DS9Boot. 

One of the real strengths of OS-9 
Level II is its windowing and graphics 
capabilities. The windowing capability 
coupled with multitasking sets OS-9 
apart from all other microcomputer 
operating systems. (The much bally- 
hooed OS-2 for PC Compatibles lacks 
windowing, though windows will be 
provided by either Microsoft Windows 
or IBM's Presentation Manager.) 

The modules involved in windows 
and graphics fit into the OS-9 pattern. 
As always, there is a driver, CC3I0, and 
a number of device descriptors. Each 
active window needs a separate device 
descriptor, but you can have more 
descriptors in your boot than you have 
active windows. In fact, you should so 
there are free descriptors for the new 
windows you open. Think of each 
window as a separate terminal, availa- 
ble to run its own program. 

Two basic window device descriptors 
should be in your boot: TERM, a 32- or 
40-character display in which OS-9 
boots up, and W, a generic descriptor is 
not used alone to run a window. 

Your OS-9 option may have addi- 
tional window descriptors in your boot, 
generally named Wl, W2, etc. Wl through 
W7 come with OS-9 Level II, and several 
are pre-configured. WB through WIS 
come with Multi-Vue. Additional de- 
scriptors are available from the Delphi 
OS-9 Database, or can be made by you. 
Six or eight descriptors are generally 
sufficient; 15 is more than most people 
need. 

Level II provides the major graphics 
capabilities available from the Shell 
level. To accomplish this, you need an 
interface module for your DS98oot and 
an application program named Grf Drv, 
which OS-9 automatically loads on 
boot. Two interface modules, VDGInt 
and GRFInt, come with Level II. 
VDGInt interface provides the CoCo 1 
and 2 with 192-by-256 pixel graphics 



and a 32-character screen when using 
the TERM window. To use 40- or 80- 
character windows and the CoCo 3's 
high resolution graphics, GRFInt must 
be in your boot. The Conf ig program 
lets you choose which interface to 
include in your boot, but you can 
include both. Windlnt is an enhanced 
version of GRFInt that comes with 
Multi-Vue. It should replace GRFInt if 
you use it. 

Remember, GrfDrv is a graphics 
application program required by Level 
II and automatically loaded at boot. It 
must not be in your 0S9Boot. Like 
Shell, GrfDrv provides functions the 
system needs to handle the screen, but 
it is not part of the operating system. 

The Summary 

Those are the OS-9 system modules, 
supporting application modules and 
their basic functions. To end, let us 
summarize the principle differences 
between Level I and Level II. 

• Many of the Level I modules are 
unchanged in Level II. The kernel of the 
operating system was changed to deal 
with the expanded memory and its 
GIME memory manager chip. 

• CC3Disk replaced the CCDisk of 
Level I and reads the disk drive device 
descriptors. CC3Disk lets you fully 
customize your system to your drive. 

• CC3I0 is the new keyboard and video 
graphics device driver that deals with 
the window device descriptors. 

• GrfDrv is an entirely new program 
containing a complete set of graphics 
primitives accessible from the key- 
board, batch files or machine language 
programs. There are few limits: If you 
want 15 windows, you can have 15 
windows. Each will support what is, in 
effect, a separate terminal with a separ- 
ate application running or ready to run. 

• If you get a hard disk, describe it in 
a device descriptor and add it, and its 
driver, to your boot. 

There is a lot of effort involved in 
learning how to set up and use OS-9. 
Actually, the setup is the hard part. A 
Startup file can load program mod- 
ules, initialize windows, start applica- 
tions and hand the user a machine that 
is ready to edit text, work on a spread- 
sheet, and call up a Bulletin Board 
System at the press of the clear key. 
The investment comes in learning to 
configure the boot, write Startup files 
and do this work. Those not wanting to 
make this investment in time may not 
want to dabble in OS-9. But who knows 
when they will change their minds? /R\ 



146 THE RAINBOW October 1988 




Another Cry for Standards 



By Dale L. Puckett 

Rainbow Contributing 



This month's column will explain 
why a standard, intuitive user 
interface is needed in OS-9 appli- 
cation programs and will present a 
listing of Bill Brady's FMenu, a proce- 
dure file that modifies OS-9 Level I 
CCDisk drivers and a format utility that 
recognizes and uses double-sided disk 
drives. I'll pass along a small correction 
to last month's Gfx3 listing and give you 
a few lines of code that put the new 
functions to good use. 

Designed With the User in Mind 

Why do we keep coming back to 
standards? Most of us buy a CoCo 
because we have a job for it to do. 
However, after we bring it home, we 
discover that it can do many jobs. 
Unfortunately, every time we buy a new 
software package, we have to learn how 
to run the CoCo again. This is neither 
fair nor productive. 

For OS-9 to survive in the CoCo 
market, the number of application 
programs must rival the number avail- 



Dale L. Puckett, a freelance writer and 
programmer, serves as director-at-large 
of the OS-9 Users Group and is a 
member of the Computer Press Associ- 
ation. His username on Delphi is 
DALE?: on packet-radio, KOHYD @ 
N4QQ; on GEnie, D.PUCKETT2; and 
on CIS, 71446,736. 



able for Disk BASlc-based Color Com- 
puters. Moreover, these new applica- 
tions must be easier to use than the 
present crop of Disk basic programs, 
and they all must work the same way. 

Tandy recognized the problem sev- 
eral years ago and had Microware 
develop Multi-Vue. Now we must force 
the software developers (who depend on 
us to buy their products) to use Multi- 
Vue and create a standard way to do 
everything that a program must do. We 
must also insist that the forum SysOps 
(whose royalty checks depend on the 
time we use their databases) show 
others how to use Multi- Vue so that our 
hackers can standardize and enhance 
the public domain software they make 
available to us. 

We can't insist that newcomers to OS- 
9 learn to use its internal power. Every- 
one would be better off if this work were 
done inside all OS-9 application pro- 
grams. Indeed, the millions of CoCo 
owners now stuck with Disk BASIC 
applications might join us if they could 
use OS-9 to do their work without 
learning a new routine for every appli- 
cation. 

Wouldn't we rather sell our applica- 
tion software to abase of several million 
users than to three or four thousand 
hackers? Don't we need the money? 

Take this indictment seriously, but 
don't absorb too much guilt. After all, 
the MS-DOS world suffers from the 



same problem. When you buy a new 
MS-DOS application program for your 
business, you still need to send your 
employees to school for two or three 
days — and pay the expert $695 per 
employee for the honor. 

However, MS-DOS machines are 
generally owned by large companies 
that can afford to pay for this training. 
CoCo owners, on the other hand, can 
barely afford the price of new software. 
(They certainly can't afford the time to 
learn excessively complex operating 
system details that have nothing to do 
with the work at hand.) We must hide 
these complexities from these CoCo 
owners if we want them to use our 
products and buy OS-9 application 
software. 

During a recent conversation with a 
Tandy official, I asked if there was 
anything new and exciting on the ho- 
rizon. "New and exciting?" he asked. 
"We've made the tools available. Now, 
we're anxiously waiting to see what 
people do with them." How can we 
ignore this challenge? 

Model for Future OS-9 Applications 

Bill Brady addressed the OS-9 stand- 
ards problem best when he said, "After 
you learn your 50th piece of software, 
you lose interest." That may be the 
reason you only need to double click on 
a Multi-Vue icon to run WizPro. It's 
quite relaxing to lean back and watch 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 147 



VizPro connect you to your favorite 
bulletin board or forum. WizPro is an 
important product with an impressive 
list of features. The program's most 
important feature, however, is the 
standard it sets for future OS-9 appli- 
cation software — especially in the user- 
interface arena. 

Brady has always encouraged fellow 
developers to release software that's 
intuitive and friendly. The CoCoBin 
standard he designed and placed in the 
public domain is a perfect example. Yet, 
many of the people who should pro- 
mote this move toward an intuitive and 
detail-free user interface, discourage 
and prevent its growth. 

I write this after downloading my first 
CoCoBin XModem file from GEnie 
recently. Brady, the OS-9 SysOp on 
GEnie, had E-Mailed me an updated 
pre-alpha version of WizPro. After 
starting the XModem download, I 
instructed WizPro to receive it. A few 
seconds later, I was amazed when my 
screen displayed a window that looked 
like a MacBinary file from one of the 
many Macintosh bulletin boards. 

As if by magic, WizPro knew the 
name of the file it was receiving and the 
number of blocks in the file. As the 
download proceeded, WizPro kept me 
informed of the download's progress. 
Later it saved the program in a file and 
gave it the name that file had on Brady's 
computer. CoCoBin also automatically 
took care of the file attributes and other 
details I once handled manually. All I 
had to do was run the new program. 

Automatic file transfer is only the 
beginning. Now that Brady has shipped 
the alpha test version of WizPro, he's 
installing the full CoCoBin II standard. 
Now when you download a Multi- Vue- 
based program with WizPro, you will 
receive the program, the Multi- Vue RIF 
file and the icon file for the program — 
all automatically. When the download 
is complete, each file will be stored 
individually. You only need to move the 
program file to your CMD5 directory, the 
icon file to your CMDS/ICDN5 directory 
and the AIF file to any working direc- 
tory. To run your new program, just 
double click on the icon. 

Once you use WizPro to download a 
file uploaded in CoCoBin format, you'll 
never want to return to straight XMo- 
dem. Knowing that we published the 
CoCoBin standard more than a year 
ago and the CoCoBin II standard more 
recently, I asked Bill why CompuServe 
and Delphi have no files available in this 
format. 

Brady said that the SysOps have been 



discouraging the use of the CoCoBin 
standard and seem to prefer that every- 
one download on XModem. "Unfortu- 
nately, after you download a straight 
XModem file you aren't finished," Bill 
explained. "Before you can run the 
program you just downloaded, you 
must load it into memory and save it to 
a new file or run the OS-9 verify utility 
against it. Then you must run the OS- 
9 fittr utility to set the execute bits on 
the new file, or you still won't be able 
to run your new program. Who needs 
it?" he ended. 

"For OS-9 to 
survive in the CoCo 
market, the number 

of application 
programs must rival 
the number 
available for Disk 
BASIC -based Color 
Computers. " 



The Macintosh SIGs on the major 
national data services were leaders in 
the creation of the MacBinary standard. 
The SysOps recognized that it was 
unnecessarily complicated for the end 
user to download a file containing a 
Macintosh application program. They 
needed a better way. If they didn't find 
it, their subscribers would stop down- 
loading files. They would lose online 
time, and worse, their users wouldn't 
have access to the many new tools that 
were being developed and placed in the 
public domain. Our own SysOps should 
follow this wise decision. 

In addition to the CoCoBin standard, 
Bill Brady has donated other products 
to the public domain. His WizXmod — 
a BASIC09 procedure used to add XMo- 
dem transfer capability to a program — 
has been available in rainbow's Delphi 
OS-9 Online and other national data 
services for nearly a year. 

FMenu 

This month we feature FMenu — a 
new creation that Brady has put in the 
public domain. Use FMenu in WizPro 
when you send a file to the host com- 
puter. Adding FMenu as a subroutine or 
procedure to your BASIC09 application 
program allows you to select a file from 
any OS-9 directory. The code for FMenu 
appears in Listing 1. 



FMenu works like — though better 
than — the standard file dialog Apple 
gives Macintosh users. The standard file 
dialog box is one of the major reasons 
every Macintosh application program 
opens, closes and saves files in a similar 
manner. If we want OS-9 to survive in 
today's market, we must create a con- 
sistent and intuitive user interface. We 
can begin this process by including 
FMenu in our OS-9 programs. 

Use FMenu to move up and down a 
list of files in any directory by striking 
the up and down arrow keys. When the 
file you want appears in the window at 
the bottom of your screen, press ENTER 
to select it. Brady uses the arrow keys 
instead of a mouse because the comput- 
er cannot display the mouse's position 
on a text-only screen, and WizPro is 
designed to work in a text window (for 
increased display speed) or in a graphics 
window. I suggested that Bill add a 
GMenu subroutine that would allow 
mouse selection of files when WizPro is 
run in a graphics window. (I think he 
agreed.) Perhaps we will soon have 
GMenu in the public domain as well. 

FMenu offers a quick-find feature. 
Thus, if you think you know a filename 
but you don't know its spelling, type the 
first few character of the filename. 
FMenu will move to the first file with a 
similar name. (You might even find it 
the first try.) When you select a direc- 
tory, press ENTER to move into it. You 
can skip the directory names and move 
to the filenames by pressing the space 
bar. You can return to the beginning of 
the directory you are listing by pressing 
ALT-up arrow. Pressing ALT-down 
arrow takes you to the bottom of the 
directory listing. 

WizPro — A Closer Look 

When I asked him to define WizPro, 
Brady said, "It's a telecommunications 
program that does terminal emulation, 
but those definitions only scratch the 
surface. WizPro is entirely user re- 
definable. You can run in a text window 
or a graphics screen. WizPro is also user 
extendible. You can replace any proce- 
dure and add new protocols, autopilots 
and procedure creation programs. You 
can even add another terminal program 
as an extension." 

Why would you want to modify your 
terminal program? Hosts and data 
services often change their protocol. 
With WizPro, you won't have to rewrite 
an entire Comms program to adopt to 
a new host — you only need to change 
the extension. Brady feels WizPro's 
extendibility should remove much of 



148 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



the delay that follows the changes made 
by host systems. 

Brady also explains why you might 
add another terminal program as an 
extension of WizPro: "If you really like 
a particular public domain terminal 
program, you can run it as an extension 
of WizPro. When you do this, you pick 
up a few fringe benefits, too. WizPro 
takes care care of all the autologging, 
record keeping, screen initialization, 
colors, fonts, etc. — all the dirty work 
— before it gives control to the other 
program." 

WizPro makes it easy for you to run 
extension programs, too. When you call 
these from the menu, WizPro passes an 
initialization string that contains all of 
the parameters you once had to re- 
member and type at the OS-9 prompt. 

What makes WizPro different from 
other terminal programs available on 
OS-9? According to Brady: "The others 
are designed to be used in a limited set 
of circumstances with a specific host or 
a specific computer and a single baud 
rate. WizPro works with any host at any 
rate." 

Although WizPro has grown from 
the discoveries made during the de- 
velopment and servicing of Wiz, Wiz- 
Pro does not replace Wiz. Rather, 
the program is designed to combat 
obsolescence. 

WizPro includes mouse pause (or is 
it mouse paws?) that brings the host to 
a halt when you click the mouse. Now 
youll never watch a message scroll off 
the screen before you can read it. 

Clipper is another new feature 
Brady has added to the program. By 
pressing ALT-up arrow, you can browse 
through an 8K buffer that contains the 



most recently received text. With 
Clipper, you can receive new text 
online while you view the buffer. You 
can mark a series of lines and send a 
snapshot of them to a file, your printer 
or modem. You can even load the buffer 
from a file stored on your computer and 
send a snapshot to the modem or prin- 
ter. 

Brady has improved his conference 
mode. Now you can use all the control 
keys except CTRL-X while in the confer- 
ence mode. Brady can add this function 
because WizPro knows what is happen- 
ing when it calls an extension. So if you 
enter Clipper while in the conference 
mode and try to send some text or a file 
to the host, WizPro will switch into the 
half-duplex time delay mode and send 
the information. This is the only mode 
most services will let you use in confer- 
ence mode. WizPro knows that and acts 
accordingly. 

Writing a Program Longer Than 64K 

WizPro is so functional because it 
uses more than 64K of memory (128K 
of memory in your CoCo 3). Brady 
shared a few of his secrets with me: 

"I can use more than 64K of memory 
because I overlay procedures and move 
them in and out of the 64K process 
space WizPro uses," Brady said. "Wiz- 
Pro always leaves two 8K blocks of 
memory free in its 64K process space. 
All the real-time spacecraft telemetry 
and command software used by NASA 
is written in a similar manner." 

Through careful design and construc- 
tion of the program, Brady makes sure 
that there are always two 8K blocks 
available. He uses three blocks for data 
storage, one block as an 8K buffer and 



two others to hold an additional 4K of 
WizPro's variables. Out of the eight 8K 
blocks in a 64K workspace, six blocks 
have been used. There are two blocks 
left. 

Brady keeps those two 8K blocks free 
and uses them to run the WizPro exten- 
sion procedures. He switches them into 
the 64K process space with the BASIC09 
RUN command. After they have done 
their job, he switches them out of 
Wiz Pro's 64K space by using the KILL 
command. Because of BASIC09 and OS- 
9's excellent design, these extension 
programs can be located either in the 
remainder of your CoCo 3's 512K of 
memory or in a file on one of your disks. 

If you want to use Brady's trick to 
build your own giant BASIC09 programs, 
you'll need to be aware of one more 
detail. Brady loads the name of the 
command he wants to run in a string 
variable and then runs the string. An 
example helps clarify this procedure. 

First, Brady dimensions a 32-byte 
string variable named Proc. Before 
WizPro calls the XModem procedure, 
it initializes Proc in this manner: 
proc:= "XModem''. The program then 
runs Proc and passes any necessary 
variables. The command line should 
read something like this: 

run proc ( pa ths , colors , flags 
. . . fonts, port) 

The ellipsis in the program line stands 
for a number of variable names not 
typed. In some cases, Brady passes 23 
variables to a WizPro extension proce- 
dure. When he passes these parameters, 
he is giving the extension procedure 
access to everything WizPro knows. 



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Simitar keys and screen formats for ail 
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Routines for file maintenance, data backup 
and setup. 

Context-sensitive help screens. 



FOCUS-MATE Correspondence 
Module 

An integrated Text Editor, Text Formatter and 
Mailing List Database: 

• Import text or database files for mail merge 
facilities. 

• Control ail printer functions, change 
formats anywhere in text, save formats. 

• Preview final text on screen. 

• Print with left, right, full or centered 
justification, tabs, auto headers/footers, 
page numbering and dictionary lookup. 

• Multiple text colu mn capability. 



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A sophisticated General Ledger package for small 
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• All features integrate with other 
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• Number of accounts and transactions 
limited only by disk space. 

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consolidated ledger and batching 
capabilities. 

• Reports: Balance Sheet, Trial Balance, P&L 
Statement, Transaction Journal, 
Transaction Aging. 



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OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc. 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 1 49 



To use this BASIC09 feature, Brady 
had to carefully organize his program. 
You will need to do the same. You must 
also kill each procedure after it runs, or 
you will run out of space. Most of the 
time — all the time if you load your 
packed modules into memory before 
you run your program — your program 
won't slow down. When you run the 
procedures, OS-9 just switches them 
into the program's workspace. When 
you kill them, they are switched out. 
The program does this by toggling a 
few bytes on your CoCo 3's GIME/ 
memory-management chip. 

Because WizPro is interrupt-driven, 
it is fast and behaves well in OS-9's 
multitasking environment. WizPro 
doesn't take over your computer. Wiz- 
Pro XModem can download a long file 
in one window while you play flight 
simulator in another window. In addi- 
tion, WizPro^ front end driver Wiz- 
Rcia ( also released to the public do- 
main) is signal driven. Therefore, 
program extensions can be called by the 
host if a certain byte or byte sequence 
is received, and all of this happens 
automatically, transparent to the user at 
the host's command. 

Another look at Gfx3 

If you're a seasoned BASIC pro- 
grammer, I'll bet you've already caught 
the mistake in the two nested IF -THEN- 
ELSE decision trees in Gfx3, I should 
have assigned the variable Ret to a 
value of 1, 2, 3, etc., instead of 100, 200, 
300, etc. You must make this change to 
get Gfx3 to perform properly. 

When you get ready to create your 
own Gfx3, make sure that you type the 
names of the actions exactly the way 
you defined them in Gfx3 in the calling 
program. For example, if your Gfx3 
decision tree is looking for an action 
named ss. unset, then you must type 
ss. unset exactly that way in the run 
gfx3 (^ss.wnsBt") line in your 
calling program. Gfx3 is extremely 
case-sensitive. The calling program 
must spell the action verb right. 

After writing Gfx3, 1 discovered that 
the module is 2,089 bytes when packed. 
The original BASIC09 code was 3,806 
bytes long and uses 76 bytes to store 
data. Since this data memory comes out 
of RunB's 8K memory pool, this will not 
take any additional 8K memory blocks. 

Listings Show Gfx3 Benefits 

To see the benefit of having a subrou- 
tine package like Gfx3 available for 
your own BASIC09 programs, compare 
the two different modifications of the 



MV Shell code (listings 2 and 3). The 
first listing comes from a program I 
named MVShell2. It exercises the menu 
bar we created in June and July with 
OS-9 System Calls. The other listing 
comes from Gfx3Test and exercises the 
menu bar in the same manner as does 
the MVShelU, Compare the two list- 
ings. You'll want to get right to work on 
your own Gfx3. 

"Because WizPro is 
interrupt-driven, it is 
fast and behaves 
wellinOS-9's 
multitasking 
environment 
WizPro doesn't take 
over your computer. 

WizPro XModem 
can download a long 
file in one window 
while you play flight 
simulator in another 
window. " 

We're starting both listings cold with 
RUN Gfx2(5tdDut,"CurDff ") from 
the July column's listing. This will let 
you add both versions of the code to 
different copies of MVShell. When you 
run it, you will see the menus pop down 
and receive a report telling you which 
menu number and item was selected 
when you clicked the mouse. Unfortu- 
nately, I didn't get a chance to write the 
code that runs when you make a menu 
selection. It's designed, however, and 
should be in a later column. 

My Gfx2 file is 2,497 bytes long — 
2,250 for the original Gfx2, 94 bytes for 
InKey, 99 bytes for SysCall and 54 
bytes for Cls. If I merge my present 
Gfx2 and the Gfx3 files, I will use 4,586 
bytes out of an 8K block. That leaves 
3,605 bytes in the 8K block of memory 
used by OS-9 when it loads Gfx2 and 
Gfx3 from the same file. There are an 
additional 3,605 bytes to use as we like. 

We could do several things with this 
memory. We could, in fact, use it to 
make the Tandy Menu functions avail- 
able on all our BAS1C09 programs. Yes, 
I think a 3,600 byte subroutine module 
is in order. We'll shoot for that listing 
in the November column. 



About Those Missing Lines 

The laser-writer gremlins zapped 
John Lind's listing, Skipmuf .p in the 
June issue. Lines 71 through 78 are 
missing. Lines 71 through 76 contained 
definitions, so you definitely need them. 
Here are the missing lines from Skip- 
muf , p: 



70 mo rfiRRRY [1-.12] of real; 

71 results : RRRAY [1--24] of 
real ; 

72 moname, printpath :RRRRY 
[1.-12] of char; 

73 call :RRRRY [1..12] of char; 

74 ccntnt : RRRRY [1. .12] of 
char; 

75 name, ocity, ocntry :RRRRY 
[1. .12] of char; 

7G moarray :RRRRY [1..12] of 
mcnthstr ; 

77 $PRGE 

78 SSUBTITLE Procedure duiset 

79 * 80 * DWset - procedure to 
create a device in a window of 
Bl * type 'sty. ' 

B2 * 

John is presently working on a satel- 
lite orbit computation program. He's 
writing it in BASIC09 first and promises 
to share that version with you here. 
Thanks, John. 



Double-Sided Disk Access 

If OS-9 Level I users don't love Steve 
Goldberg, they will after they look at 
this month's listings. Goldberg has 
created an OS-9 procedure file that will 
patch your CCDisk driver and Format 
command to use double-sided disk 
drives with OS-9 Level I, Version 2.00. 
He asked me to pass it along. 

Disk fix adds the new code to the 
end of the existing CCDisk module and 
leaves you with your new CCDisk mod- 
ule in a file on Drive 'd0. After you run 
Disk fix, run DS9Gen to produce a new 
boot file. Once 059Gen has created your 
new DS9Boot file, you'll be off and 
running on double-sided disks. 

Disk fix is compatible with all pre- 
vious patches to change the step rate of 
the drives. In fact, the other patches can 
be done either before or after you run 
Diskfix. However, you must re- 
member to change IT. SID at an offset 
of $19 bytes in your device descriptors 
/d0 and 'dl from one to two, so that 
OS-9 will know that you have installed 
double-sided drives. 

The day I was going to send a copy 
of Diskfix to RAINBOW, I got another 



1 50 THE RAINBOW October 1 988 



letter from Goldberg: "Hold the 
presses! Pull the front page! Here's the 
ultimate patch for CCDisk," he wrote. 
Goldberg's new version reads the track 
count, number of sides and the head 
step rate from the device descriptor. 
Now you can have several drives with 
different step rates, and numbers of 
tracks and sides on the same Level I, 
Version 2.0 system. 

Set the step rate to your disk drives 
by patching your device descriptor 
modules at an offset of $ 14 hex from the 
beginning of the module. You can do 
this with debug or modpatch. An easier 
way, however, is to use a Dmode utility. 

You will not be able to boot from a 
double-sided disk since the Boot mod- 
ule is hard-coded for one side only. 
However, you can boot up with a single- 
sided disk and then switch to a double- 
sided disk or keep the original drive as 
your system drive and use a double- 
sided drive for your data. 

Steve's procedure, Forma tFix, gives 
you the ability to format single-sided 
disks on double-sided drives. It uses a 
trick submitted by Ray Nicklas pub- 
lished in the May '84 issue of RAINBOW 
[Page 300]. 



Making Text Windows Fast 

Let's review MakeGW, a procedure for 
making graphics windows first pub- 
lished in The Complete Rainbow Guide 
to OS-9 Level II: A Beginners Guide to 
Windows. I have been merging mgw ever 
since we wrote the book. Recently, I 
began thinking about being able to 
change a window to a text window 
quickly. With one small change and a 
few more OS-9 command lines, the 
change was complete. Here's the orig- 
inal MakeGW: 

* First, kill the window we're 
running in 

display lb 24 

* Now, create a new window 

* This one is the standard 80 X 
24, four color one we use most 
of the time 

display lb 20 7 0 0 50 IB 1 0 4 

* Set the window to the right 
font 

display lb 3a c8 01 

* find finally, select the win- 
dow we just created 

display lb 21 

Type the display commands above 
(You can skip the comment lines if you 



want) into an OS-9 file, using your 
favorite editor. Then put the output of 
the procedure file into a file using OS- 
9's merge abilities. 

makegw > mgw 

Any time you need to change any 
screen to a four-color, 80-by-24 graph- 
ics window, type merge mgw and press 
ENTER. Your new screen will appear like 
magic. After you make mgw, copy Ma- 
keGW to a new file named MakeTW (for 
Make Text Window). Use your editor to 
make the second display command line 
read: 

display lb 20 2 0 0 50 IB 1 0 4 

After you have edited MakeTW, run it 
and merge its output into a new file 
named mtw. Now when you want to 
change that slow graphics window into 
a fast text-only window, type merge 
mtw, and press ENTER. 

That's it for October. Join me next 
month, and we will continue to explore 
the functions of OS-9 Level II and 
Multi- Vue. □ 



NEW FOR OS-9 : FORTH09 ™ 

from D. P. JOHNSON 

FORTH09 is a FORTH-83 Standard implementation specially taylored for OS-9. Includes the double number extension 
word set, system extension word set, complete forth 6809 assembler and more. Programs written in forth can instantly be 
saved as compact executable machine language modules. The FORTH09 system runs on any level I or level II OS-9 (6809) 
machine with at least 32k of available memory and one disk drive. Saved Forth09 application code is romable, reentrant and 
fully position independent, requiring as little as 3k for a small program. Where maximum speed is required the user can force 
small code words to be automatically compiled as in line code rather than subroutines. Supplied with complete printed docu- 
mentation. $150.00 (+ $3 S&H) Specify disk format if other than CoCo OS-9 format desired. 

Other OS-9 SOFTWARE from D. P. JOHNSON 

L1 UTILITY PAK - Contains 40 useful utilities that run under both level I and II OS-9. Included are a complete set of "wild card" file handling 
utilities, a disassembler, a disk sector editor, and the MacGen command language compiler. MacGen will allow you to generate many useful 
command macros in minutes, much more useful than procedure files. Macro source is included for a macro to implement an archival backup 
type function. $49.95 

L2 UTILITY PAK - Contains a Level II "printerr" function that also shows the pathname being searched for when "not found" or per- 
mission type errors occur. Also contains level II software ram disk driver. Ten other utilities included, some useful for level I also . $39.95 

L1+L2 COMBINATION PAK both of above together for $75.00 

SDISK - Standard disk driver module replacement allows full use of 40 or 80 track double sided drives with OS-9 Level I. Full compatibility with 
CoCo 35 track format and access all other OS-9 non-CoCo formats. Easy installation. $29.95 

SDISK+BOOTFIX - As above plus boot directly from a double sided diskette. $35.95 

SDISK3 - Level II version of SDISK driver. Same features as level I (except bootfix not required to boot from double sided). $29.95 

PC-XFER UTILITIES - Programs to format and transfer files to/from MS-DOS tm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. (Requires either SDISK or 
SDISK3 to run depending on which level of OS-9 you are using) $45.00 

MSF - MS-DOS disk format file manager. More complete file transfer capabiltites for level II only. (Requires SDISK3 to operate). 
Now supports 720K 5-1/4" and 3-1/2" MS-DOS Formats. $45.00 MSF+SDISK3 together $65.00 

Alt diskettes are in CoCo OS-9 format unless otherwise requested; other OS-9 formats can be supplied for $2.00 additional charge. All orders must be prepaid or 
COD, VISA/MC accepted, add $1 .75 S&H for first software item, + .25 for each additional item, $5.00 for CCRD, additional charge for COD. 

D. P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St., Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-815 * (For best service can between 9-11 am 

Pacific Time, Mon.-Fri.) 

* NOTE: There will be no phone order or consultation service between Oct. 7 and Oct. 31 1988 due to vacations,., mail orders will still be processed weekly. 
OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc., MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc., FORTH09 is a trademark of D. P. Johnson 



October 1988 THE RAINBOW 151 



Dr. Nibble 

By Kelly Taylor 



WHATS TIC MflTERCHlLKlfPf 
NOT STILL WORRIED ABQUITW 




[TOTWTHM IN TWO 



DAY5 /\GO J 




DlDNTTf 

RUN? 




THAT'S THE 




...IT'S STILL 




Listing 1: FMenu 



PROCEDURE FMenu 



mi 

007E 

mi 

0134 
0178 
0179 
01BC 
01FB 
JJ23C 
027A 
028F 
j729j7 



JJ2E5 
02EE 
02EF 



9356 
035F 
0360 



03D2 
03DB 
03DC 



0437 
0440 
0441 



04AC 
04BS 
04B6 



04F0 
04F9 
04FA 



0526 
052F 
0530 



0560 
0569 
056A 
058F 
0598 
0599 
05BD 
05CD 
05E1 
05E8 
05E9 
05EA 
062D 
0674 
069B 
06B4 
06CC 
06E4 
06F0 
06FC 
0707 
0714 
0738 
0757 
0776 
0793 
079F 
07A0 
07B1 
07D6 

07 FA 
0813 

08 IF 
08 2A 
0856 
0882 
088D 
08A3 



* A demonstration program that shovs you how to build a standard 

* file handling menu into your Basic09 programs. FMenu vas 

* written by WizPro author Bill Brady who is presently adding 

* mouse support. Brady has released this code into 

* the public domain. He plans on releasing the final version with 

* full mouse support even in a text screen also. Stay tuned! 

* First we must define a few data types that are built into WizPro 

* then we'll be on with the demo. You may find many of these 

* equates useful in your own Basic09 programs. They are similar 

* to those used in the KISSDraw and MVShell code we published 

* earlier this year. 

TYPE wpaths-sp ', spa , wpa , dpa , ppa ; BYTE ; siop,piop:STRING[3] ; ho 

,rxf lie, host: STRING; spd(32) ,oldesc(32) ,newdesc(32) : BYTE 
DIM paths :wpaths 

TYPE windows-flatl.flat, Stat, bottom: STRING [9] ; vt80,vt40,gwin 

,maln:STRING[12] ; menu : STRING [ 63 ] ; me s : STRING [42] ; tmenu 

, tme s : STRING (15] ; ask,prmpt:STRING[9] 
DIM win: windows 

TYPE commands-dvend , dwsel , owend , def color . ulon , ulof f , pal , hdds 

: STRING [2] ; DLpos.PRpos , ATpos ,br , bufnum.gr oup.revoff , 

rev, prop, propof f ,bold,boldof f :STRING[3] ; four, palette 

: STRING [4] 
DIM cmds ; commands 

TYPE flg-acia6551, TEXT, gmode, roll, buf roll, chdf 1 ,vt52 ,vtansi 

, OPLOPEN , spopen , WPAOPEN , SPAOPEN , PSP , BLDF , conf , pf 1 , df 1 

, exit , ex , dup , mu : BOOLEAN 
DIM flags: fig 

TYPE calls-ststat , gtstat , cursr , screen , reed ,wrt ,wrtln, creat , 

s leep , pid , setpr 1 , pag , bau , typ , pau , alf , ech , eor , endof , qut 

, intrpt, opt ,bsp,bso,bse : BYTE 
DIM caw: calls 

TYPE con-eac,cr,lf ,bs,bl, home, els, pcabl,lbrk,BK: STRING [1] ; Mkey 

: BYTE 
DIM cntrl:con 

TYPE str ings-ddir , crtc , aktc , pnr : STRING ; ontime : STRING [8] ; hh 

, mm '.INTEGER 
DIM strg: strings 

TYPE PRNeq-f orePRN . backPRN , menuf orePRN , menubackPRN , otherf orePRN 
, otherbackPRN , cur PRN , menucurPRN , o thercur PRN : STRING [ 1 ] 



DIM PRNs : PRNeq 

TYPE regs-ccode,a,b,dp:BYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 
DIM s:regs 

DIM menwin , point 2 , point , point 1 , box , boxl , box2 : STRING [ 6 ] 
DIM vindTYPE.borderPRN: STRING [1] 
DIM dwset,owset,cwarea:STRING[2] 
DIM comm: STRING 



C* tfe must also initialize a few of the fields that are used in the 

(* demo program. The data types above are Just a few of the parameters 

C* passed to UlzPro extension programs. 

cntrl. cls-CHRS(S0C) \cntrl.home-CHR$(l) 

ener 1 . cr-CHR$ (13) \cntrl. If -CHRS < 10 ) 

cntrl.bs-CHR$<8) \cntrl .bl-CHRS (7) 

cntrl. lbrk-CHR$ (133) 

cntrl . esc-CHRS (27) 

cntrl. Mkey-3 

cmds.hdds-"02" 

cmds . f our-cntrl . cr+cntrl . cr+cntrl . cr+cntrl . cr 
strg. aktc-" Any Key to Continue" 
strg. crtc-" <ENTER> to Continue" 
strg. pnr-" Path not Ready " 
cntrl. ptabl-CHR? (127) 

(* System Equates 

caw. screen-$8C \ \caw.reed-$89 \caw. cursr-$25 
caw.ststat-$8E \caw. sleep-S0A \caw.gtstat-SBD 
cav.vrt-S8A \caw.wrtln-S8C \ 
caw. creat-S83 
caw.pau-8 

caw.eor-12 \caw. endof-13 \caw.qut-18 \caw. intrpt-17 
caw.opt-0 \caw.bsp-L0 \caw.bso-3 \caw.bse-19 
caw. alf-6 

caw. bau- 2 2 \caw.typ-21 
caw.pag-9 \caw.ech-5 



152 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



08B9 
J»8D1 
08E2 
08E3 

JJ90C 
J39L6 



^951 



JJ979 
099? 
JJ9A4 
09BB 

?9E7 
JJ9F3 

J3 A J. 6 
0A25 
0A34 
0A38 



?AS? 
0A98 
JJA9A 



J3ABE 
JJABY 
(7 AD? 
0AF3 
0AFF 
J7BJJ7 
0B1F 
0B2B 
0B43 
0B4F 
0B67 
0B73 
0B77 
0B7F 
0B9D 
33 BE 
0BBD 
0BBE 



0BFA 



0C2A 
0C2B 



JZC59 



0C87 



peep 



0CEE 



0D1C 
?D1D 
0D5B 
0D9C 
0DE3 
0E1B 
0E5D 
JJEA3 
0EE3 
0F29 
?F2A 
J7F6B 
JJF7F 
0F80 
0F89 
0F92 



0FBE 



jJFEA 



102? 
1021 
1022 
1043 
1044 
105D 
1)766 



caw.pid-$0C \cav. setpri-S0D 
cmds . def color-CHR$ (27)+CHR$ ($30) 

(* Screen Equates 
cntrl.BK-STRS(15) 
cmds .hdds-"2" 
flags. TEXT-TRUE 

cmds . owend-cntrl . esc+CHR$($23) \cmds . dvend-cntrl . esc+CHRS (24 

) \cmds.pal-cntrl.esc+CHR$(S31) 
cmds . daf color-cntrl . esc+CHRS (S3?) \cmds . dwsel-cntrl . esc+CHR$ 

($21) 

cmds. DLpos-CHRS(2)+CHRS (32+16 )+"!" 

cmds.PRpos-CHR$(2)+" »+»|" 

cmds . ATpos-GHRS (2)+CHR$ (32+48)+" ! " 

cmds.rev-CHR$($lF)+CHR$($2?)+CHR$(?) \cmds . revof f-CHR$ ($1F) 

+CHR$($21)+CHR$ (?) 
IF flags. TEXT THEN 

cmds . bold-CHR$ (?)+CHR$ (?)+CHRS (?) 

cmds , bo Id of f ~cmds .bold 

cmds . prop-cmds . bold 

cmds . propof f — cmds . bold 
ELSE 

cmds . bold-cntr 1 . e sc+CHRS ( S 3D) +CHR$ ( 1 ) 

cmds . boldof f -cntrl , esc+CHRS ( $3D)+CHRS (?) \cmds . prop-cntrl . esc 

+CHRS($3F)+CHRS(1) 
cmds . propof f-cntrl . esc+CHRS ( S 3F) +CHRS (?) 
ENDIF 

cmds . ulon-CHRS ($1F)+CHR$ ( $22 ) \cmds . ulof f -CHRS ( $ IF) +CHRS ( S 2 3 
) 

(* Window Equates 

PRNs . f or eFRN— CHRS (?) \PRNs.backPRN-CHRS(l) \bordarPRN-PRNs . backPRK 
IF flags. TEXT THEN 
wlndTYPE-CHRS(2) 

PRNs . cur PRN-CHRS (?) \PRNs , f orePRN-CHRS (8) 
PRNs . backPRN-CHRS(l) 

PRNs . memicur PRN-CHRS (2 ) \PRNs . menuf ore PRN-CHRS ( 1?) 
PRNs . menubackFRN-CHR$ ( 3 ) 

PRNs .other cur PRN-CHRS (4) \PRNs . otherf oreFRN-CHR$ (12) 
PRNs . otherbackPRN-CHRS ( 5 ) 
ELSE 

windTYPE-CHRS (5) 

PRNs. menuf ore PRN-PRNs .fore PRN \PRNs .menubackPRN-FRNs . backPRN 
PRNs . otherf ore PRN-PRNs , backPRN \PRNs . otherbackPRN-PRNs . fore PRN 
ENDIF 

cmds . ovend-cntr 1 . esc+CHRS (523) \cmds . dvend-cntrl .esc+CHRS ( $24 

) \cmds. dwsel-cntrl. esc+CHRS (S21) 
dwset-cntrl. esc+CHRS (S 2?) \owset-cntrl.esc+CHR$($22) \cwarea 

-cncrl . esc+CHRS (525 ) 

win . bo ttom-dwset +CHR5 ( ? ) +CHR$ (?) +CHRS (23) +CHR$ ( 8? ) +CHRS ( 1 ) + 

PRNs . ocherbackPRN+PRNs . othercurPRN 
wln.stac-dwset+CHR$(?)+CHR$(?)+CHR$(?)+CHRS(8?)+CHRS(2)+PRNs.ochercurPRN 

+PRNs .otherbackPRN 
win . maln-cmds . dwend+dwset+wlndTYPE+CHR$ (?) +CHRS (2)+CHR$ (8?) 

+CHRS (21) +PRNs . curFRN+PRNs . backPRN+borderPRN 
win . ask-owse t+CHRS ( 1)+CHR$ ( 18 ) +CHRS ( 18 ) +CHR$ ( 44)+CHR$ ( 3 )+PRNs . menucur PRN 

-t-PRNs . menubackPRN 
win . prmpt-owse c+CHR$ (? ) +CHRS ( 2 4 ) +CHRS ( 19 ) +CHR$ ( 3 3 ) +CHR9 ( 1) + 

PRNs . curPRN+PRNs . backPRN 

(* Note here that everyone who purchases Viz Pro will receive a 

(* copy of the entire VizEquaces file in source form. VlzEquates 

(* is so well done chat it will make writing your own WizPro extensions 

(* much easier. All of Che boring work of defining data 

(* types and other variables has been done for you. VizPro can be 

(* cold to pass the entire equates packet to your own VLzFro extension 

(* when you run them. This means you can use all of the VizPro 

(* definitions inscead of starting from scratch and building your own. 

(* The next code sequence puts the windows on your Color Computer 
(* screen for FHenu. 

PRINT win. main; 
PRINT cmds.dwsel; 

OPEN #paths . wpa , **/w" : UPDATE \f lags . WPAOPEN-TRUE \ POT #pachs.wpa 
, win. bottom 

OPEN #paths.spa,"/w":UFDATE \f lags . SPAOPEN-TRUE \ PUT #paths.spa 
.win. stat 

PRINT ♦paths-vpa," Viz \ PRINT #paths . spa , cmds .bold; \ 

PRINT #paths.spa," Viz "; 



(* Fmenu actually begins here III 

1??? TYPE record— d(29) :BYTE; lsn: BYTE 
DIM fnentry: record 



35* 



TANDY COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000-HX 256K 5 1/4'*D. 535.00 

Tandy 1000-SL 384K 5 1/4"D. 675.00 

Tandy 1000-TL 640K 3 1/2"D. 955.00 

Tandy 3000-NL 51 2K 3 1/2"D. 1275.00 

Tandy 4000-LX 2 Meg 3 1/2"D. 2999.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Meg 3 1/2" D. 1890.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 1 Drive 3825.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 40 Meg 4955.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 84 Meg 5395.00 

Tandy 1 400LT 768K 2 Drives 1 285.00 

Tandy 1 02 24K 430.00 

Tandy Color 3 128K 155.00 

MONITORS & BOARDS 

VM-4 Monochrome Green 95.00 

VM-5 Monochrome Green 1 1 5.00 

CM-5 Color RGB 220.00 

CM-11 Color RGB 335.00 

EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 510.00 

VGM-100 Monochrome Analog 169.00 

VGM-200 Color Analog 425.00 

VGM-300 Cofor Analog 535.00 

Tandy Dual Display Card 145.00 

Tandy EGA Card 185.00 

Paradise Basic EGA Card 160.00 

Zucker Mono Graphics Card 75.00 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 225.00 

5 1/4" External Drive 1000EX 180.00 

3 1/2" External Drive 1000EX 200.00 

Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 450.00 

5 1/4 lf External for Tandy 1400 215.00 

Zucker 30 Meg Hardcard 435.00 

Seagate 20 Meq Hard Drive 265.00 

Tandy 1000/SXTTX Controller 80.00 

ZUCKER BOARDS 

Zucker Serial Board 45.00 

Zucker OK Memory Board 1000 47.00 

Zucker MFB OK for 1000 106.00 
Zucker 1200 Baud Modem Card 75.00 

PRINTERS 

DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 165.00 

DMP-132 Dot-Matrix 285.00 

DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 345.00 

Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 205.00 

Epson FX-850 Dot-Matrix 375.00 

Epson FX-1050 Dot-Matrix 540.00 

Epson LQ-500 Dot-Matrix 375.00 

Epson LQ-850 Dot-Matrix 579.00 

Please write for complete price list. 

We carry more items than listed here. 



All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Adver- 
tised prices am cash prices. C.O.D. accepted add 2% (minimum charge 
$10.00) M.C., Visa add 2%. All non defective items require return 
merchandise automation. Call tor RMA Number before reluming. 
Delivery is subjBct to product availability Add 1V»% for shipping and 
handling, $5.00 minimum charge. 

TM - Registered Trademark of Tandy, Epson, and IBM 
Monday thru Friday 9am - 5pm EST. 

□ □□□□ 

□ □□□□ 
■ 

□ □□□□ 

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124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



PI 




n 


in 


m 











October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 53 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 



1067 
1078 
1079 

W9 

109B 

10A6 

10B2 

10B9 

10C3 

10CA 

10D9 

ljJDF 

10E5 

lfJEE 

10FB 

1122 

1128 

112F 

1134 

1148 

116? 

U6B 

116C 

11AE 

11E8 

1207 

1208 

1215 

1232 

124A 

124B 

125D 

12 7F 

12 8A 

128C 

129D 

12A6 

12A7 

12BF 

12CB 

12DA 

12F0 



1376 
1381 



DIM ant<88): STRING [19] 

DIM f mi i,kk,lU,xx,yy: INTEGER 

DIM «« ( cch: BYTE 

DIM dirpopen.more : BOOLEAN 

DIM char : STRING ( 1 ] 

DIM search: STRING 
1002 f ml 1-0 

comm— M " 
1010 OPEN #aa , " . M i READ+DIR 

dlrpopen-TRUE 

ON ERROR GOTO 1060 

SEEK #ftft,0 

POT #l f cntrl.cl8 

FOR kk-1 TO 88 \ent<kk)-" . " \NEXT kk 
more-FALSE 
kk-1 
1020 REPEAT 

SEEK #aa.fmii \ GET #aa, fmentry 
IF fmantry.d(l)>0 THEN \xx-0 
ent(kk>-"" 

(* scrub the entry, files can be mada invisible here with a filter 
(* like if you see a an dont vant files with extension 
(* let fmil go ahead back up kk 

REPEAT \xx-xx+l 

ent (kk)-ent(kk)+CHRS (LAND (fmentry . d(xx) , 127 ) ) 
UNTIL fmentry. d(xx)>127 OR xx-18 

ent(kk)-ent(kk)+"" 

IF kk-88 THEN more-TRUE \fmli-fmii- 32 \ GOTO 1030 \ ENDIF 
kk-kk+1 
ENDIF 

fmii-fmii+32. 
UNTIL E0F(#aa) 

1030 (* print the suckers! 

CLOSE #aa \dirpopen-FALSE 

111-kk \kk-l 

FOR yy-1 TO 111 STEP 8 

PRINT USING w s8<,x2,s8<,x2, s8<,x2 , s8< ( ac2 , s8<,x2 , s8<,x2,s8<,x2 , s8<" 

, ent (yy ) , en t ( yy+1 ) , en t (yy +2 ) , en t ( yy+3 ) , ent (yy+4 ) , en t 

(yy+5),ent(yy+6) ,ent(yy+7) 
NEXT yy 

IF more THEN PRINT " ** Overflow, 88 or more files in this directory: type + for mor 



1303 
13D5 1040 
13E9 
13F9 
140B 
14 1C 
lower case" 



ENDIF 

(* make selection 
PRINT #paths.vpa,cntrl.cls 
PRINT *patha.wpa,TAB(34); 1 
PUT #paths. spa, cntrl. home 

PRINT #paths. spa , "DnArrov-next UpArrov-back ALT -Up-Top ALT-Dn-Bottom Space-find next 



1476 
1483 
148 F 
14B2 
14B4 
14DF 
14F1 
1525 
1532 
153E 
154E 
1555 
1556 
1558 
1559 

1576 1042 

15A2 

15B1 

15BD 

15DA 

1603 

1617 

1618 

1625 

1639 



166B 
166F 
1671 
1672 
167D 
1691 
16A9 
16AB 
16 AC 
16B9 
16CD 
16E6 
16E8 
16E9 



PUT #1, win. ask 
olays-olays+1 

PRINT USING "s42 A ", "Select name hit <Enter>" 
PRINT 

PRINT USING "s42 A " t *<filename> or </f ull/pathname>" ; 
(* enable keysense 

s.a-0 \s.b-$27 \s.x-l \RUN s9scall(caw.ststat,s) 

PUT #l,win.prmpt 

olays-olays+1 

PRINT USING "s28* B ,erit(l); 
search-"" 

REPEAT 

(* software key bounce filter 
s.a-0 \a.b«$27 \RUN s9scall(caw, gtstat ,s) 
IF s.a>4 THEN 
f mentryo— s . a 

a.x-5 \RUN s9scdll(caw. sleep , s) 

i.A-0 \s.b-S27 \RUN s9scall(caw.gtstat,s) 

IF s.aof mentryo THEN 1042 



(* Space Bar 

IF LAND(s.a,$80)-$80 THEN 

REPEAT \ IF kk<lll THEN kk-kk+1 \ ENDIF 

111 OR ASC(ent(kk))>97 
GOTO 1044 
ENDIF 

(* up arrow 

IF LAND(s.a,$08)-$08 THEN 

IF kkol THEN kit- kk-1 \ ENDIF 
ENDIF 

(* down arrow 

IF LAND(s.a,S10)-$10 THEN 

IF kk<lll THEN kk-kk+1 \ ENDIF 
ENDIF 

(* ftlt-up 



\ UNTIL kk- 



154 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



X6F2 IP LAND (a. a, 12) -12 THEN 

17JJ4 kk-1 

17?S ENDIF 
170D 

17^E (* alt-down 

1719 IP LaND(s.a,$14)-$14 THEN 

172D kk-1 11 

1735 END I? 

1737 

1738 (* print current selection 

1752 1$744 PUT #l,cntrl.els \ PRINT USING "s30 A " ,ent(kk) ; 
1773 

1774 ENDIP 
1776 

1777 (* end of keysense processing 
1794 

1795 (* dp * regular key 

17A8 RUN gtkey (char) \ IP char>"" THEN 

17 BE PUT #paths .wpa.char 

17C8 IF char-"+" OR char-"-" THEN GOSUB 2000 \ GOTO 1010 \ END IF 



17E9 IF charocntrl . cr AND charo"/" THEN 

1801 PUT #l,cntrl.cls 

180E (* user is typing filename 

1828 search-search+char \kk-l 

18 3 B REPEAT \ IF kk<lll THEN kk-kk+1 \ ENDIP 

1856 UNTIL kk-111 OR LEFTS (ent(kk) ,LEN(search))-search 

1872 IF kk-111 THEN PRINT #paths .wpa ,cntrl. bl; cntrl.cls \ 



PRINT #paths.wpa,TAB(34); ">"; Vsearch-"'? \ END IF 



18 BP GOTO 1^44 

18 B4 ENDIP 

18B6 ENDIF 
18B8 

18B9 s.x-4 \RUN s9scall (caw . sleep , s) 
18D6 

18D7 UNTIL char-cntrl.cr OR char-"/" 

18EE PUT #1, cntrl.cls 

18FB 

18FC (* user wants to type a pathname 

191C IP char-"/" THEN INPUT "/".coma 

1931 comm-"/"+comm 

193D GOTO 1058 

1941 ENDIP 

1943 comm-ant(kk) 

194E 

194F (* Find out if our selection is a Dir or a file 

197E C* If a Dir make it our new DDIR (current working dir) 

1984 1058 ON ERROR GOTO 1059 \en-0 \ CHD comm 

19CA 1059 en-ERR \ IF en-0 THEN IF connaO-"." THEN strg.ddir-cona \ ENDIF 

\ GOSUB 2000 \ GOTO 1000 \ ENDIF 

1A04 ON ERROR GOTO 1070 

1A0A 1060 en-ERR 

1A14 IF en-211 THEN 1030 

1A24 IF en>0 AND enoi95 THEN PRINT #paths.vpa,"*err"; en; \ ENDIF 



1A4P ON ERROR GOTO 1070 
1A55 

1A56 (* keysense off 

1A65 s.a-0 \s.b-$27 \s.x-0 \RUN s9scall(cav. ststat , s) 

1A99 IP dirpopen THEN CLOSE #aa \ ENDIF 

1AA9 

1AAA GOSUB 2000 

1AAE PUT #1, cntrl.cls 

1ABB PRINT #l,"You have selected a file named, "; comm 

1AE7 PRINT #1, "Let's call the Shell and find its attributes I" 

1B1C PRINT 

IB IE SHELL "attr "+comm 

1B2B PRINT 

1B2D PRINT "Type 'CCNT' to try for another file!" 

1B55 PAUSE 

1B57 GOTO 1000 

1B5B END 

1B5D 

1B5E (* This is the normal exit of FHenu. 

1B82 (* 5000 is the FHenu' s normal error exit. 
1BAB 

1BAC 1070 en-ERR \ ON ERROR GOTO 5000 

1BBC GOSUB 2000 

1BC0 IF en>2 THEN 

1BCD PRINT frpaths.wpa,? Directory Error"; en; 

1BEE GOTO 5000 

1BF2 ENDIF 

1BF4 RETURN 

1BF6 

1BF7 2000 (* close windows 

1C0A ON ERROR GOTO 2004 

1C10 PUT #l,cmds.owend 

1C1D olaya-olays-1 

1G29 PUT #l,cmds.owend 

1C36 olays-olays-1 
1C42 2004 en-ERR \.en-0 \ RETURN 
1C56 

1C57 5000 PRINT "You have exited with error number M ; an 
1C84 1 END 




About 
Your 
Subscription 

Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
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Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
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date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
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will help us help you better and 
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For Canadian and other non- 
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a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 




October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 155 



Listing 2: Modi 



(* Insert this code in HVShell from the August Issue of 
(* KISSAbLe OS- 9. It should follow the line that reads 
(* "RUN Gfx2(Std0ut,"Cur0ff") 

(* First, we'll make a SysCall vith the Set Window function 
(* code to prove that it works. 

CallCode :-$8E \(* Set Status Code 
Regs . a:-StdOut 

Regs.b:-$86 \(* SS.UnSet function code 
Regs . x : -ADDR(VndScr) 
Regs .y:«VT_FVin 

RON SysCallf CallCode , Regs) 

(* Ve must turn on the mouse and set its global parameters 
(* Here we tell the system we are using a high resolution 
(* mouse plugged into the right Joystick port. 

Regs .a:-StdIn 
Regs.b:-SS_GIP 

Regs. x: -$0101 \(* HiRes, Right Joystick 
Regs.y:-$FFTF \(* Do not change timing 
CallCode : -I_SetStt 
RUN SysCall(CallCode,Regs) 

(* Now ve must tell the mouse how often to update itself 

C* and when it should timeout. Ue also must tell the 

(* graphics cursor to follow the mouse. Ve do the latter 

(* by setting the 6809 Y-register to "Follow" or "1" before 

(* the call. This parameter is undocumented in early versions 

(+ of the OS-9 Level II documentation. 

Regs .a:-StdIn 
Regs.b:-SS_House 

Regs. x: -$0301 \(* Update / timeout info 

Regs .y : -Follow 

CallCode :-I_SetStt 

RUN SysCall (CallCode, Regs) 



(* it to return when the button is pushed. Do 
.(* this with the SS_MsSig set status call 

Rega.a:-Stdln 

Re g s . b : «S S _Hs S i g 

Regs .x:-HouseSig 

CallCode : -I_Se t S t 1 

RUN SysCall(CallCode,Regs) 

(* Now we must tell the process to go to sleep until 
(* it receives a signal to wake up. 

CallCode : -F_Sleep 

Regs.x:-0 \(* Sleep forever -- at least till signal 
RUN SysCall(CallCode.Regs) 

(* After a signal or interrupt wakes up the system, we 

<* should be able to find out if it was the mouse 

(* that generated the signal by looking at IceptCode. Result 

(* When we arrive here, the process has Just awakened 

(* and we will test to see if the signal came from the 

(* mouse. 

EXITIF IceptCode. IntReault-2 THEN 
END EXIT 

IF IceptCode. IntResult-MouseSig THEN 

GOSUB 1000 \(* Go Read Mouse 

IF msret.stat-WR_Cntrl AND msret .cbsao0 THEN 

DoHenuItem: -TRUE 

ELSE 

DoMenuItem: -FALSE 

ENDIF 

ENDIF 

GOSUB 200 \(* Go Check Menu 
IF Henu_IDO0 THEN 
RUN DoHenu 
ENDIF 

IF DoMenuItem-TRUE THEN 

PRINT "The Menu ID is: "j Henu_ID 

PRINT "The Henu Item No. is Menu_Item 

ENDIF 

ENDLOOP 



(* Now ve can set up the 6809 registers and make the call 
(* to set up the intercept. 

CallCode :-F_Icpt 
Regs. x:-ADDR( IceptCode) 
Regs ,u:-ADDR( IceptCode )+4 
RUN SysCall(CallCode ,Regs) 

(* Ve'll turn on the Graphics Cursor so you can 
(* watch mouse movement on the screen. Ve'll make 
(* it an arrow. 

RUN Gfx2("gcset".Grp_Ptr,Ptr_Arr) 

(* The main loop of our future program will start here 

LOOP \(* Do this forever 

PRINT 

PRINT "Type <Control E> or <BREAK> to stop ! 1 1" 
IceptCode. IntResult:-0 \(* Initialize Signal Report 

(* Tell mouse which signal you want 



(* Always turn off graphics cursor before leaving program 

RUN Gfx2("gcset",0,0) 

END 

200 (* Subroutine to check Menu 

Regs . a : -Stdln 

Regs .b:-SS_MnSel 

CallCode :-I_Getstt 

RUN SysCall(CallCode.Regs) 

MenuID :-Regs .a 

Menu_Item : -Regs . b 

RETURN 

1000 (* Subroutine to get mouse packet 

Regs, a: "St din 

Regs . b : -SS_Mouse 

Regs .x:-ADDR(msret) 

CallCode :-I_Gecstt 

RUN SysCall(CallCode,Regs) 

RETURN 



Listing 3: Mod2 



(* We'll turn on the Graphics Cursor so you can 
(* watch mouse movement on the screen. Ve'll make 
(* it an arrow. 



(* Insert this code in the file MVShell from the August 
(* issue of KISSable OS-9. It should replace everything 
(* after the line that reads: "RUN Gfx2(Std0ut , "CurOff ") 

(* Now we'll make a SysCall with the Set Vindow function 
(* code to prove that it works. 

RUN gfx3(Std0ut,"ss.vnset",ADDR(VndScr) ,VT_FVin) 

(* Ve must turn on the mouse and set its global parameters 
(* Here we tell the system we are using a high resolution 
(* mouse plugged into the right joystick port. 

RUN gfx3(StdIn , "ss .gip" , $0101 , $FFFF) 

<* Now ve must tell the mouse how often to update itself 

(* and when it should timeout. Ve also must tell the 

(* graphics cursor to follow the mouse. Ve do the latter 

(* by setting the 6809 Y-register to "Follow" or "1" before 

(* the call. This parameter is undocumented in early versions 

(* of the OS-9 Level II do crimen tat ion . 

RUN gf x3 (Stdln , " ss . mous " , $0301 , Follow) 

(* Now ve can set up the 6809 registers and make the call 
(* to set up the Intercept. 

CallCode :-F_Icpt 
Regs ,x:-aDDR( IceptCode) 
Regs . u : -ADDR( IceptCode )+4 
RUN SysCall (CallCode, Regs) 



RUN Gfx2("gcset",Grp_Ptr,Ptr_Arr) 

(* The main loop of our future program will start here 

LOOP \(* Do this forever 

PRINT 

PRINT "Type <Control E> or <BREAK> to stop I ! ! " 
IceptCode. IntResult:-0 \(* Initialize Signal Report 

(* Tell mouse which signal you want 

(* it to return when the button is pushed. Do 

(* this with the SS_MsSig set status call 

RUN gf x3 (Stdln, "ss.msig" .MouseSig) 

(* Now we must tell the process to go to sleep until 
(* it receives a signal to wake up. 

CallCode : -F_Sleep 

Regs.x:-0 \(* Sleep forever at least till signal 
RUN SysCall(CallCode,Regs) 

(* After a signal or interrupt wakes up the system, we 

(* should be able to find out if it was the mouse 

(* that generated the signal by looking at IceptCode. Result 

(* Vhen we arrive here, the process has just awakened 

(* and ve will test to see if the signal came from the 

(* mouse. 

EXITIF IceptCode. IntResult-2 THEN 



156 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



END EXIT 

IF IceptCode.IntResult-MouseSig THEN 
GOSUB 1000 \(* Go Read Mouse 

IF msret.stat-WR_Cntrl AND msret . cbsaO0 THEN 

DoMenuI t em : -TRUE 

ELSE 

DoMenuI t em : -FALSE 
END IF 
END IF 

IF DoMenuItem-TRUE THEN 

GOSUB 200 \(* Go Check Menu 

PRINT "The Menu ID is "; Menu_ID 

PRINT "The Menu Item is Menu_Item 

IF Menu_IDO0 THEN 

RUN DoMenu 

END IF 



END IF 
ENDLOOP 

(* Always turn off graphics cursor before leaving program 

RUN Gfx2<"gcset",0,0) 

END 

2?? (* Subroutine to check Henu 

RUN gfx3(StdIn , "ss .mnsel" ,Menu_ID ,Menu_Item) 
RETURN 

100? (* Subroutine to get mouse packet 

RUN gfx3(StdIn,"gs.mous" ,ADDR(msret) > 
RETURN 



Listing 4: DiskFix 

* Patches Level I Ver. 2 

* CCDisk to read, write 

* and format both single 

* and double sided disks 
t 

tmode .1 - pause 

save /d0/ccdisk ccdisk 

debug 

lccdlsk 

. .+7 

-a? 

31oad /djl/ccdisk 

lccdisk 

. .+3 

-82 

lccdisk 
. .+lc9 
-16 
-01 
-84 

lccdisk 

. .+lf6 

-5f 

-17 

-01 

-76 

lccdisk 
. . +2ae 
-A 6 
-c9 

-00 
-a9 
-16 

-99 

-8c 
-12 
-23 
-92 

lccdisk 

. .+2dd 

-40 

-12 

-12 

-12 

-17 

-99 
-90 

. .+3 

-5f 

-16 

-00 

-81 

lccdisk 
. .+341 
.46 
-07 
-85 

-01 
-26 
-02 
-ca 
-40 
-a6 
-09 
-81 
-15 
-16 
-ff 
-66 
-a6 
-83 
-10 
-85 
-01 
-27 
-0e 
-64 
— «4 
-24 
-0a 



-a6 
-c9 

-00 
-a9 
-8a 
-40 
-a7 
-c9 

-00 
-a9 
-35 
-02 
-81 
-15 
-16 
-fe 
-61 
-ea 
-a8 
-22 
-16 
-ff 
-01 
-cb 

-10 
-ea 
-ad 
-22 
-34 
-02 
-17 
-fe 
-f7 
-35 
-02 
-39 

q 

del /d0/ccdisk 

save /d0/temp ccdisk 

verify u </d0/tamp >/d0/ccdisk 

del temp 

tmode . 1 pause 

-t 



Listing 5: FormatFix 




* Patches the Format utility to 




* permit formatting single sided 




* disks on double sided drives and 




* provides for a choice of number 




* of tracks. Use * (asterisk) as an 




* option for single sided formatting. 




* Use number of tracks in parentheses 




* as option to change track count. 




t 

load format 




debug 




1 format 




. . +la3 




-49 




. .+4 




-2a 




-01 




. .+1 




-0f 




1 format 




. .+a35 




-a0 




-8 c 




-39 




q 




del -x format 




save /d0/cmds/format format 




unlink format 




-t 










October 1988 THE RAINBOW 157 



Racksellers 



The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis and 
may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We 
suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

Tuscaloosa 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Cottonwood 
Lake Havasu 

City 
Phoenix 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayettevllle 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Berkeley 
Citrus Heights 
Grass Valley 
Hollywood 

Ld Jolla 

Los Angeles 

Marysvllle 

Napa 

Oakland 

Rancho 

Murieta 
Sacramento 

San Francisco 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvaie 
Torrance 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 
Injun John's, Inc. 

Arrow Appliance/Radio Shack 
Electronic Worid 



A&WGraphlcsCa 

Book Nook 
TR1-TEK Computers 
Books, Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 



Vaughn Efectronlcs/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Lyon Enterprises 
Software Pius 
Advance Radio, Inc.' -' 
Levity Distributors 
Stef-Jen, Inc. 

Butler & Mayes Booksellers 
Circus of Books (2 Locations) 
Bookiand 

Bookends Bookstore 
DeLauers News Agency 

Software Plus 
Deiberf s Readerama 
Tower Magazine 
Booksmtth 
Bookworks 
Castro Kiosk 

Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News. Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Camino College Bookstore 



COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Glen wood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 

DELAWARE 

Middletown 
Newark 
Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington, 
DC 



Aurora Newsstand 

Hathaway's 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Readmore Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 



Deimar Co. 
Newark Newsstand^ 
Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA 

Boco Raton 

Clearwater 

Cocoa 

Dania 

Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 



Gainesville 
Jacksonville 
North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Park 
South 

Pasadena 
Starke 

Sunrise 
Tallahassee 

Titusviile 



Chronichles 
News Room 
World News, Inc. 

Great American Book Co. 
The Avid Reader 
The Open Door 
Danta News & Books 
Software Pius More 
Bob's News & Book-Store 
Clarks Out of Town News 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 

Aimar Bookstore 
Boyd-Ebert Corp, 
Anderson News Co, 
Wolfs Newsstand 

Poling Place Bookstore 
Record Junction, inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Sunny's at Sunset 
Anderson News Co. 
Du Bey's News Center 
Computroc 



GEORGIA 




Atlanta 


Border's 


Bremen 


Bremen Electronics/Radio Shack 


Forest Park 


Eliers News Center 


Jesup 


Radio Shack 


Thomasville 


Smokehouse Newsstand 


Toccoa 


Martin Music Radio Shack 


IDAHO 


Book Shelf, Inc. 


Boise 


Moscow 


Johnson News Agency 


ILLINOIS 




Belleville 


Software or Systems 


Champaign 


Bookmark 


Chicago 


B. Dalton Booksellers 


Decatur 


Book Emporium 



MASSACHUSETTS (cont'd) 



K-Mart Plaza 

Northgate Mall 
East Moline Book Emporium 
Evanston Norris Center Bookstore 

Kewanee Book Emporium 
Lisle Book Nook 

Lombard Empire Periodicals 

Newton Bill's TV Radio Shack 

Paris Book Emporium 

Peoria Book Emporium 

Sheridan village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Illinois News Service 



Springfield 


Book Emporium 


Sangamon Center North 


■ : "V v! 


Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 


Sunnyland 


Book Emporium 


wsst rronKrorr 


raper nace 


vvi rcfiu iy 


North Qh/"vo HictriKi i+/~>re 


INDIANA 




Angola 


D & D Electronics 




Radio Shack 


Berne 


White Cottage Electronics 


tiioomtngTon 


Book corner 


Columbus 


Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 


Crawfordsvllle 


Koch's Books 


Dyer 


Miles Books 


Franklin 


Gallery Book Shop 


Ft. Wayne 


Michiana News Service 


Garrett 


Finn News Agency, inc. 


Indianapolis 


Bookiand, Inc. 




Borders Bookshop 




Deimar News 




Indiana News 




Southslde News 


Lebanon 


Gallery Book Shop . 


Martinsville 


Radio Shack 


Richmond 


Voyles News Agency, Inc. 


Wabash 


Mltting's Electronics 


IOWA 




Davenport 


Interstate Book Store 


Des Moines 


Thackery's Books, Inc. 


Fairfield 


Kramers Books & Gifts 


KANSAS 




■Hutchinson 


Crossroads, Inc. 


^Topeka 


Palmer News, Inc. 




Town Crier of Topeka, inc. 


Wellington 


Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 


Wichita 


Lloyd's Radio 


KENTUCKY 




Hazard 


Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 


Henderson 


Matfs News & Gifts 


Hopkinsville 


Hobby Shop 


Louisville 


Hawley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 


Middletown 


Software City 


Paducah 


Radio Shack 


LOUISIANA 




Baton Rouge 


City News stand 


Lockport 


TV Doctor/Radio Shack 


New Orleans 


Sidney's News Stand Uptown 


Monroe 


The Book Rack 


MAINE 




Bangor 


Magazines, Inc. 


Brockton 


Voyager Bookstore 


Caribou 


Radio Shack 


Oxford 


Books-N-Thlngs 


Sanford 


Radio Shack 


MARYLAND 




College Park 


University Bookstore 


MASSACHUSETTS 




Boston 


Eastern Newsstand 


Brockton 


Voyager Bookstore 


Cambridge 


Out Of Town News 


Ipswich 


Ipswich News 


Littleton 


Computer Plus 



Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Harrison 

Hillsdale 

Holland 

Kalamazoo 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Nlles 

Perry 

Riverview 

Rosevilie 

MINNESOTA 

Bumsville 

Crystal 

Edina 

Minneapolis 
Minnetonka 
Rosevilie 
St. Paul 



WllimaW 

MISSOURI 

Farmlngton 
Flat River 
Florissant 
Jefferson City 
Klrksville 
St. Louis 
St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Butte 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Keene 
Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 
Cedar Knolls 
Clinton 
Pennsvilie 
Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 
Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brock port 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Falls 
Huntington 
Johnson City 
New York 



Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhaven 



North Shore News GoVJ 
Newsbreak, Inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Border's Book Shop 

Robbins Electronics 

Merit Book Center 

Harrison Radio Shack 

Electronics Express/Radio Shack 

Fris News Company . 

The Book Raft 

Lowell Electronics 

The Eight Bit Corner 

Michiana News Service 

Perry Computers 

Riverview Book Store 

New Horizons Book Shop 

Shinder's Bumsville 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Shinder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shinder's Ridge Square 
Shinder's Rosevilie 
Shinder's Annex 
Shinder's Maplewcod 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Book Emporium 
Bailey's TV & Radio 

Flora Bttki 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Bookcellar 
Huriey Electronics 
Steve's Books & Magazines 

Radio Shack Associate Store 

Bookwrights 

Verham News Corp. 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 
Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 
Software Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 

Village Green-Buffalo Books 

Lift. Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Cromiand, inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

G.A. West & Co. 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicorn Electronics 

Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station, Track 37 

200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1 ) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonil Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Walden Books 
Worid Wide Media Services 
Universal Computer Service 
Village Green 
World Wide News 
Spectrum Projects 



158 



THE RAINBOW October 1988 



NORTH CAROLINA 


UTAH 


Ccry 


Mftii/c r^onfar In (^nr\j V/illnr-ic 
iNovy* v_»wi Hoi ti I VwiVJiy VlllvJQo 




Chapel Hill 


ui iivcjiaiiy iicwo w ounory 




V^l )KJt IL/I It? 


INowmIUIKJ iill 1 


VIRGINIA 


Hickory 


C 2 Books & Comics 


Danville 


Jacksonville 


Michele's, Inc. 


Hampton 


Kernersviue 


K oc b Newsstand 


. .Norfolk 




dvjoi ntjfs wnyrriru ^©nrer 


Richmond 


Winston-Salem 


K & S Newsstand (3 Locations) 




l\v_JH IUUW ItcWS LIU. 


WASHINGTON 


OHIO 


*w.nurciuit iNfcjwi ot iocxjcco 


Port Angeles 
Seattle 


Canton 


Little ProtessoT Book Center 


Tacoma 


Chardon 


Thrasher Radio & TV 


Cincinnati 


Cinsoft 




Cleveland 


Erieview News 


WEST VIRGINIA 


Columbiana 


fidelity Sound & Electronics 


Huntington 


Columbus 


B5 Software 


Logan 




Micro Center 


Madison 




The Newsstand 


Parkersburg 


Dayton 


Books & Co. 


South 


Huber Heights Book & Card 


Charleston 


Dublin 


Wllke News 

Wright News & Books 

Book Bam 


WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy . 
Kenosha 
Madison 


Falrborn 


News-Readers 


Findley 


Wllke's University Shoppe 
Open Book 


Kent 

Lakewood 
Lima 


The News Shop 

Lakewood International News 1 : 
Edu -Caterers 


Milwaukee 
Waukesha 



Miamisburg 

Parma 

Toledo 

Warren 

Xenla 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 
Altoona 
Bryn Mawr 
Corry 
Danville 
Feasterville 
King of Prussia 
Malvern 
Reading 
Temple 
West Chester 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Newport 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts, 
Oemson 
Florence 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 

TENNESSEE 

Brentwood 
Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxvllle 

Memphis 
Nashville 



Wilke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Plaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, Inc. dba Radio Shack 

Sieve's Book store 

Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owl Services 

Newborn Enterprises 

Bryn Mawr News 

Corry Books & Cards 

Mclndoe's Stationery & Radio Shack 

Global Books 

Gene's Books 

Personal Software 

Smith's News & Card Canter 

Software Corner 

Chester County Book Co. 

Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Tollgate Bookstore 

Bellevue News 

Software Haus, Inc. 
Clemson Newsstand 
Ray's #1 

Palmetto News Co. 
Software City 



Smyrna 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 

Desoto 

Elgin 

Hariingron 



Bookworld #5 
Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books 8c Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Davis-Kidd Bookseller 
Computer Center 
Davis-Kidd Booksellers 
Mosko's Place 
R.M. Mills Bookstore 
Deiker Electronics 



ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Kingsford 

CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Fairvlew 

Fox Creek 

Ft, Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hinton 
innisfall 
Lecombe 
Leduc 
Lethbrfdge 
Lloydminster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 

Stettler 

Strath more 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetaskiwin 



VolM^i Ekxrt Center 



K & S Newsstand 

Benders 

fc-O Computers 

Turn The Page 

Volume I Bookstore 

Port Book & News 
Adams News Co., Inc. 
Bulldog News 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News service 

Spring Hiil News 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
R.K. News, inc. 
Pic A Book 
University Bookstore 
Juneau Village Reader 
Holt Variety 



Information Telecommunicationes 



Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
Paul Tercler 

Double "D" A.S.C. fiodlo Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shack, asd 
D.N.R. Furniture &TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
A.S.C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack. ASC 

fteSterwHui 

The Book Nook 

Jim Cooper 

L&S Stereo 

Brian's Electronics 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 

Datatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Waiter's Electronics 
Stettler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA (cont'd) 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Burnaby 
Bums Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chilllwack 
Coquitlam 



Compulrt 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 
Cody Books LTD 



Coorfenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Langley 
Nelson 
New West- 
minster 
Parksville 
Penticton 

Sidney 
Smithers 
Squamish 
Vancouver 



100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altona 

Lundar 

Morden 

The Pas 

Selkirk 

Vtrden 

Winnipeg 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood 
Carbonear 



NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsville 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

Toronto 
QUEBEC 

iaSallei 
Pont. Rouge 
Ville St. Gabriel 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assiniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Ttsdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whltehorse 



Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesoft Marketing 
Langley Radio Shack 
Oliver's Books 

Cody Books LTD- 
Parksville TV 

DJ.'s 

Four Comer Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 
Active Components 
Frlendlyware Computers 
Granville Book Co. 
Siticonnections Books LTD 

Tip Top Radio & TV 

LA Wlebr Ltd. 
Goranson Elec. 
Central Sound 
Jodi's Sight & Sound 
G.L Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Ltd. 



Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewitt Elec. 



Seaport Elec. 
Slade Realties 



Atlantic New$/ ; 

Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Huntsville Elec. 

Donny U B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Gordon and Gotch 

Messageries de Presse BehjamirvinK 

Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Gilles Comeau Enr/Radib Shack ; 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 



H&O Holdings 



JAPAN 



America Ado, Inc. 



PUERTO RICO 

San Juan Software City 



Poncho's News 
Maxwell Books 
The Homing Pigeon 
Book Mark 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles and W.H. Smith in Canada, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, 
Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, Tower Book & 
Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



October 1 988 THE RAINBOW 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



4-TECHS ..... ,,..,.65 

Adventure Novel Software . . . . . .67 

After-Five Software 1 25 

Alpha Products ..21 

Alpha Software Technologies 1 33 

Alpha-Biotechnologies Inc. 139 

Baron Products . . . .. > *^7* .' P .91 

Bob's Software. . . . . > > . + , ► . . 75 

Burke & Burke. , : . . . > \ . 20, 139 
Cer-Comp ............. *38» 39 

^^insoft 1 1 1, 1 1 • 1 1 1 1 ^ • • • 1 1 • '• • . 78 

CoCo Connection .77 

CoCo Gallery Live 117 

CJoooTech ............ ..... .... . .45 

Codis Enterprises ...... ..... 1 1 3 

^Dognitec ............ . ■ . . ^ . >. . 29 

Colorware > . . . . .18^1 9 

Computer Center . + . . . .61 

Computer Island .131 

Computer Plus .3 

CRC/Disto ...... . ... ...... ... . . . 57 

CY-BURNET— ICS .55 

D.P. Johnson .... . . .... ; .151 

DATAMATCH, INC . . 135 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc. .......114, 115 

Diecom ;IFC 

Dr. Preble's Programs IBC 

E-Z Friendly Software . . . . . . ... .145 

Easy Street Data Systems . . . I .149 
Eversoft, Inc. . . . . . . ♦ ♦.. . , ». . . .79 

Fox\A/are . . • • • . . . .^v . * . ^ ..101 

Frank Hogg Laboratory . . . . .46, 47 

Game Point Software .81 

Gimmesoft ..22, 23 

Granite Computer Systems . . .37 
GSW Software . , . p . . , . ....... 113: 

Hard Drive Specialist . . .73 
Hawkes Research ; SI 

Services . . . . . K + i .121 

HawkSoft, Inc. . ..,.,,....*.> 129 

HJL Products .v. . + . , .43 

Howard Medical . . ..... . . . .66, 162 

J & R Electronics. .... , ... _ . . . .45 

Metric Industries . . . . ..... r ^ . . .1 2 



Michtron...,. ... . .BC 

Micro Works, The .95 

Microcom Software 9, 11, 13, 15, 17 
Microtech Consultants 

Inc. . . . . . .v.VV. ; . . .109 

MicroWorld ........... 99 

Orion Technologies . 31 

Owl-Ware . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .69, 70, 71 

Perry Computers. . I . . ....... 1. 1 53 

PXE Computing ....... * . . . . .7 

R.C. Pierce Software . . . > . . . . % .31 

Rainbow Bookshelf . . .34, 35 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 127 

Rain bo wf est . J . . - m ......118, 119 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk 126 

Rulaford Research .124 

SO Enterprises ...25, 75, 77, 79, 81 

^'^^ ^ ' 



Call: 

Belinda Kirty 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



•*'. * » » 



* • » 



Seed nd City Software 

Soft-Byte ...... r 

SpectroSystems 

SPORTSWARE ..... 
St. John Gallery 
Sugar Software 
Sundog Systems . * 

T & D Software 

Tandy/Radio Shack .. 
I~epco . . . . . . . . . ..• . ... 

Three C's Projects . . . 

Tomela & Co. . . . . 

True Data Products . . < 
Vidicom Corporation . 
Wasatch ware . . . . 
Woodstown Electronics 
Zebra Systems . . . . . . . . ,, 



49 



161 

55 

.....135 
.....101 

+ + #riV* 1 33 

97 

*«.«/• ■ • 63 

122, 1 23 
% . . . 33 
.... .141 

. * »..'•*. 65 

...;V121 

,136, 137 
• .... 1 45 
♦ « . . ■». 129 
»*...« ( 8 
. . . . . * 53 



o 

O 

ft 



□ Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 




1 60 THE RAINBOW October 1988 



MasterCard VISA C.O.D. CHECKS 




CoCo CALENDER : 
Organize all of your appointments with 
this 365 day CoCo Calender. 64k DISK $9.95 

BLACKJACK ROYALE : 

Even your casino odds with this Blackjack 
card simulation and tutor! Program can be 
edited for different house rules. 
64k DISK $16.95 

BSE - BASIC SCREEN EDITOR : 
Gives Basic a full -screen editor to sup- 
plement the regular EDIT commands. Works 
on the CoCo 1&2 and with the CoCo 3, WIDTH 
32, 40 or 80 is supported! Complete screen 
cursor control with the arrow keys plus 
features to make ED I Ting Basic programs a 
snap! BSE, a must have CoCo utility. Our 
low price was the only corner that was cut 
on this quality program. 64k DISK. .$19.95 

CHECK -09 : 

Finally, a program that interacts with 
MultiVue for FAST and EASY check 
balancing. CHECK -09 and you can now take 
control of your bank checking account. No 
more waiting on your bank statement for an 
ending balance. CHECK-09 will provide a 
check- by- check balance in an easy to use 
format that eliminates those monthly sur- 
prizes! Bring your money and you closer 
together and have the buck STOP HERE! 
512k DISK $22.95 

CoCoMAX II : By Colorware 
The 'CLASSIC CoCo graphic program. Draw 
great works of art with the program that 
set a standard for all others to follow. 
Supported by a Hi -Res interface and 
numerous printer drivers for complete 
configuration. 64k DISK $78.45 

CoCoMAX III : By Colorware 
All new program based off the 'CLASSIC 
CoCoMax II software. Allows for full ani- 
mation, select 16 colors from a 64 color 
palette, fast & easy to use w/pull down 
menus in a point-and-click environment. 
128k or 512k DISK $78.45 

CoCo KEYBOARD : 

Program allows the user to utilize the 
function keys on the HJL-57 Pro-fes- 
sional. Deluxe CoCo, and Micronix key- 
board. 32k DISK $6.95 

HULTI-PAK CRACK : 

Allows you to save your ROM-PAK programs 
over to disk... WHERE THEY BELONG! In- 
cludes POKES for problem PAKs and the new 
16k PAKs. 64k DISK $24.95 



Turn Telewriter 64 into the best Word 
Processor for the CoCo 1&2! TELEPATCH 
is compatible with all CoCo' s. Comes 
with complete documentations for easy 
upgrading and changes. 64k DISK $24.95 

HI-RES FONT MODIFIER $14.95 

COLOR MAX III FONT EDITOR $19.95 

SOFTWARE SPOOLER & RAM DISK $19.95 

SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR : 
A 'FAST' and 'EASY TO USE' ELECTRONIC 
DRAFTING PROCESSOR. Create pro-look- 
i ng d i ag rams us i ng a 480x540 pixel 
screen with 6 viewing windows! Over 
'30' electronic symbols with 10 defin- 
able symbols. Even supports Logic 
gates & Multipin chips! Print hardcopy 
or save to disk for later editing. 
64k DISK $22.95 

OS -9 SOLUTION: 



Tame the hostile environment of OS-9 
with OS-9 SOLUTION! Replaces 20 of the 
command calls with single keystroke, 
menu driven commands. No more long and 
complex pathnames or syntaxes to re- 
member! Works with either OS-9 Level 
One or Two $24.95 

TAPE/DISK UTILITY : 

A utility package that transfers TAPE 
to DISK or DISK to TAPE automatically. 
If you just got your first disk drive, 
TAPE/DISK is a MUST HAVE program. Will 
print tape & disk directories to any 
supported printer. 64k DISK $19.95 

FAST DUPE 2 : 

Backup & Format as many copies of your 
original disk that you need. FAST DUPE 
2 reads source into memory for fast and 
realible transfer. Supports 4 disk 
drives. 64k DISK $19.95 

DISCOUNT SOFTWARE BY ColorVenture 

RAM DISK LIGHTNING DISK $16.95 

PRINTER LIGHTNING S16.95 

BACKUP LIGHTNING $16.95 

BUY ALL THREE FOR ONLY $42.95 

HI -RES JOYSTICK DRIVER $19.95 

MAX PATCH $19.95 

BUY BOTH FOR ONLY $34.95 



ORDER 



P.O. Box 72956 
Roselle, IL 60172 
Order: 312-653-5610 

BBS: 312-307-1519 



I 



SECOND CITY SOFTWARE 



ACCEPTS MASTER CARD, VISA, C.O.D. AND CHECK 
ORDERS. PLEASE ADD $2.50 FOR SHIPPING ($4.50 
for Canada orders) k ALLOW 1 TO 3 WEEKS FOR 
DELIVERY. C.O.D. ORDERS, ADD AN ADDITIONAL 
$2.00. 



MY DOS ; By Chris Hawks 
Supports accesses to double sided 
drives, able to use the J&M Controller 
with the CoCo 3, DIR commands simplified 
and a host of other special features. 
64k DISK $14.95 

SCS DOS : 

Add 24 new disk commands with 2 Hi -Res 
Screens! Supports 40 track & Double 
Sided drives, 6ms stepping, auto disk 
search, error trapping and burnable into 
an EPROM. 64k DISK $24.95 

A-DOS 3 : 

The very popular Disk Operating System 
from Spec troSyst ems for the CoCo 3. 

128k DISK $34.95 

SCS can custom 'burn' your purchased DOS 
program for only $15.00! This includes 
the price of the EPROM chip and the BURN 
charge. Call or write for details. 

VIP LIBRARY : 

This popular ' intergraded' package in- 
cludes, VIP Writer, Terminal, Data Base, 
Calc and Disk Zap which can fix a 
diskette with I/O errors. SCS special 
price. 64k DISK $125.00 

VIP WRITER III u/SPELL CHECKER .. .$79.95 
VIP DATABASE III $69.95 

TELEWRITER - 128 $76.95 

THE NEWSPAPER PLUS : 

DeskTop Publishing for the CoCo 3? With 
the ALL NEW NEWSPAPER PLUS, you now can 
create complete and sophisticated Ban- 
ners, Headlines along with Text Columns 
and Graphics. THE NEWSPAPER PLUS allows 
for importing different pictures, fonts 
and fill patterns from disk for that pro- 
look. Comes complete with 22 fonts and 
50 clip art pictures. THE NEWSPAPER PLUS 
is an all new upgraded program based on 
the original NEWSPAPER program. SCS is 
the ONLY company authorized to handle 
THE NEWSPAPER PLUS program. Why buy the 
old, overpriced and outdated program 
when you can get the newest release for 
less! 128k DISK $48.95 

THE NEWSPAPER GRAPHICS DISK I : 
The FIRST OFFICIAL supplementary pro- 
gram disk for THE NEWSPAPER. Contains 
'50' NEW PICTURE FILES, '10' NEW FILL 
PATTERNS and '3' ADDITIONAL FONT SETS! 
GRAPHICS DISK I is available only from 
Second City Software for $19.95 



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HOWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 

1690 N. Elston • Chicago, IL 60622 • orders (800) 443-1444 • inquiries and order status (312) 278-1440 



* 5 STAR FINAL 



OCTOBER '88 



CLEAR 



HD 



DC-5 CONTROLLER 




Sale Extended 



from Hard Drive Specialist gives 
great Radio Shack compatability 
and double sided access to DSDD 
Drives like Howard's DD-3. Two 
ROM sockets, one 24 pin and one 
28 pin allows use of RS LI ROM 
by jumper selection. Gold plated 
contacts reduce I/O Errors. 
$75 ($2 Shipping) 





RS DOS ROM CHIP 

ROM chip fits inside disk controller. 
24 pin fits both J&M and RS controller 
Release LL For CoCo 3 Compatibility. 
$ 25 each Reg. $40 ($2 shipping) 

NEW FROM DISTO $ 129 DC6 

($2 Shipping) Super Controller II 
works with CoCo i 2 & 3. It buffers 
keyboard input so that no keystrokes 



are lost when disk is reading or writ- 
ing. Especially useful with OS-9, but 
also works with BASIC. 

MONITOR 

Sony KV-1311CR $ 499 

Regular $625 ($15 shipping) 

• Vivid Color • Vertically flat 13" 
screen • Monitor/Trinitron TV with 
remote control • 640 x 240 reso- 
lution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and 
composite inputs • VCR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 




HARD DRIVE ACCESSORIES 

3' Hard Drive Cable $ 20 

Clock Upgrade $ 20 

Burke & Burke $ 78.45 

Y Cable $ 29.45 

TEAC 55B $ 118 

Hard Drive ROM Boot $ 20 



"Guarantee" As 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compat- 
ibility. If you're not happy with it for 




good as Gold. 

any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states. APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 




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Hard Drive— Ready to Run! 

■ * 

20,000,000 Bytes or the equivalent to ; 
a 125 R.S. 501 's on line are packed •■. 
into this hard drive, pre installed and 
ready to run. All you need to do is 
plug it in and go! This complete easy \ 
to use package includes a Seagate 20 
Meg Hard Drive, a Western Digital 
WD 1002-WX 1 Controller and 
interface* that plugs into slot #3 of 
multipack interface, plus the case & 
power supply. You even get a 1 year 
warranty. This 20 meg Hard Drive 
will work with IBM & clone. Basic 
driver, $49.95, lets you access this 
hard drive without need for OS-9. 

HD-1 %99 

* Burke & Burke ($9 Shipping) 

Sale ends Nov. 15 

RAINBOWfest 

Surprise! 

We can't mention this till the fest 
except to say its the most unique 
product for the CoCo we have seen. 
See us at booths 3 & 4. 

DON'T MISS OUT, ORDER TODAY! 

800 / 443-1444 

WE ACCEPT VISA • MASTERCARD/;: 
. AMERICAN EXPRESS . C.O.D. OR 
CHECKS . SCHOOL P.O. 
NEW — DISCOVER CARD 



: o\i\ 




Dear Friends, 

Thank you. 1988 marks oar 
fifth year of providing quality 
software for ttue Color computer. 
Only your support has made it 
possible. So, from, our hearts. Peg 
and I thank you And remember oar 
promise --If yoa buy it from U3, we 
sapport it If yoa are unhappy for 
any reason, send it back for a fall 
refand within 30 days of purchase. 



Pyramix 



This facinating CoCo 3 &ame 
continues to be one of our best 
seller3. Pyramix is 100^ machine 
language written exclusively to take 
advantage of all the power in your 
128K CoCo 3* The Colors are 
brilliant, the gjfaphic3 sharp, the 
action fast Vritten by Jordon 
Tsvetkoff and a product of Color- 
Venture, 

The Freedom Series 

Vocal Freedom 

I've got to admit, this is one 
nifty computer program Vocal 
Freedom turns your computer into a 
digital voice or sound recorder, 

The optional Hacker's PaC lets 
you incorporate voices or sounds 
that you record into your own 
BASIC or ML programs. This is not 
a synthesizer. Sounds are digitized 
directly into computer memory 30 
that voices or sound effects 30und 
very natural One "off-the-shelf " 
application for Vocal Freedom is an 
automatic message -minder. Record 
a message for your family into 
memory. Set Vocal Freedom on 
automatic. Vhen Vocal Freedom 
"hears" any noise in the room, it 




©r. tyvtbk'B programs 

For Color Computer Software 

Since 1983 




plays the pre-recorded message! 
Disk operations are supported. VF 
also tests memory to take advantage 
of from 64K up to a full 51 2K. Re- 
quires low cost amplifiler (RS cat. 
* 2??- 1008) and any microphone. 

Mental Freedom 

Would your friends be impressed 
if your computer could read their 
minds? Mental Freedom U3es the 
techniques of Biofeedback to 
control video game action on the 
screen. Telekinesis? Yes, you con- 
trol the action with your thoughts 
and emotions And, oh ye3, it talks 
in a perfectly natural voice without 
using a speech synthesiser! 
Requires Radio Shack '3 low cost 
Biofeedback monitor. Cat. •63-675 

BASIC Freedom 

Do you ever type in BASIC 
programs - -manually, I mean. If you 
do, you know it can be a real chore. 
Basic Freedom changes all that It 
gives you a full screen editor just 
like a word processor, but for 
BASIC programs. Once loaded in* it 
is always on-line. It hides invis- 
ibly until you call it forth with a 
3ingje keypress! This program 13 a 
mu3t for programers or anyone who 
types in programs. By Chri3 
Babcock and a product of Color - 
Venture. 

Lightning Series 

These three utilities give real 
power to your CoCo 3. 

Ramdisk Lightning 

This is the best Ramdisk 
available. It let3 you have up to 4 
mechanical di3k drives and 2 Ram 
drives on-line and is fully compat- 
ible with our printer spooler below. 

Printer Lightning 

Load it and forget it --except lor 
the versatility it gives you. Never 
wait for your printer again! Printer 
runs at high speed while you 
continue to work at the keyboard! 

Backup Lightning 

This utility requires 51 2K. Read3 
your master disk once and then 



makes 3uperfast multiple di3k 
backups on all your dirves! No 
need to format blank di3k3 first! 
Supports 35, 40 or 80 track drive3. 

Prices 
CoCo 3 only 

Ram Disk Lightning, Disk.. .. $19.95 

Printer Lightning Disk $19 95 

Backup Lightning, Di3k $19-95 

All three. Disk $49.95 

Pyramix. Di3k $24.95 

CoCo 1,2, or 3 

Vocal Freedom, Di3k $34.95 

Vocal Freedom Hackers Pac...$14 95 

CoCo 2 or 3 only 

Mental Freedom, Disk $24.95 

Basic Freedom, Di3k $24 95 

CoCo 1 or 2 only 

VDOS, The Undi3k, ramdisk for the 

CoCo 1 or 2 only. Tape $24.95 

VDUWP, backup Undisk file3 to 

singje tape file, Tape $14 95 

VPRINT, Print Undisk directory. 
Tape $9 95 

Everyone 

Add $2.50 shipping/ handling 
in USA or CANADA 
Add $5.00 to ship to other 
countries 

Dr. Preble "s Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KT 40226 



24 Hour Hot Line 




Visa, MC, COD, Check 




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rf Racer 



•••Asithe checkered flag drops your pulse rises in this livelyafcade 
game. The road twists to the horizon on the 3-D panorama that sets 

; the stage 1 for exciting racing, Vie for time as you glide through the 
curves at incredible speeds. Step through the gears to stay ahead of 
the pack, but be quick! Some will stop at nothing to see the end of 
the race, or the end of you! Four challenging raceways, complete 
with obstacles and colorful 3-D scenery test your skills in this Pole 
Position™ type game. 1 

I 32K Color Computer required. . .$34.95 





MILES 



CARS PASfeED 

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SCORE 4 i 00 ' 



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Pinball Factory 

Video garries come full circle in this tribute to the original arcade 
game, Pinball. Classic pinball springs to life as never before, with 
fresh new angles that only a computer can offer. Crisp graphics, 
sound, and fast smooth action give this machine-langyagb arcade 
game a realistic, responsive feel you'll hardly believe. There are 
even "tilt" buttons that let you "bump" the machine. 5 In addition to 
playing a great game of pinball, you can enjoy hours of creative 
pleasure as you design, build, edit, and play your own screens. 

64K Color Computer required. . . $34.95 



I % h ^ s 

Demon Seed 

i 

The first waves of flying, diving, bloodthirsty bats are arriving. 
Move, fire, and move again. It's a never ending battle. If you are 
lucky enough to defeat the bats,, be ready for a much greater 
challenge, The Evil Demons themselves. Destroy a wing and 
another takes its place. Only a direct hit can save you npw. It will 
take great skill to triumph. If you do, then you better be ready for 
i the End. 1fhe Demon Flag Ship descends to destroy your remaining 
ships. Your only hope is tc penetrate the hull, break through the 
shield, and destroy the drentled Gargoyle. f f ; 



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J1K Color Computer required... $19.95 



■ * 

MichTron is always looking for programmers and programs. If you are interested in working with 6ne 
of the most respected company 's in the computer software field please give us a call. 





• For more information 
'On these or other fine products 
call our knowledgeable staff! 



MichTron 

576 S. Telegraph 
Pontiac, MI 48053 
(313) 334-5700 




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Dealer inquiries welcGfrrie. 
/visa and Mastercard accepted.