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THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Our Annual Education Issue 

Ahead of the Class 



ision Tutor 



m 1 it 



g Chart for Teachers 
in Geography 



o Cha 



Plus: 




H. Allen Curtis 1 
Desktop Publisher, 



ami much, much MORE! 




r 




w 





* Prices subject to change without notice. 

* No refunds or exchanges permitted due 

to the nature of the product. 



(Disk Only) Game, Phaser & Interface 

$29.95 U.S. $74.95 U.S. 
$37.95 Can. $93.95 Can. 




HIGH 
SCORE 



PLAYER 1 



IRON FOREST -CoCo 3 



' * ['J I 



RUSH'N ASSAULT- CoCo 1, 2 or 3 



ENERGY 

BULLETS 
50 

GRENADES 

56 

PLAYER 2 

ENERGY 

BULLETS 
50 

GRENADES 
20 







i •] i 




'PlSMiJIlMSlIlK 










liTT| 


ml 





jiid 


1 1 *1 1 1 1 1 













E 

UNC 




We accept: 



6715 FIFTH LINE, MILTON, ONT., CANADA L9T 2X8 




cheque or money order 



24 hr. order line: 
(416) 878-8358 
personal service 9-5 
E.S.T. 



Please add $2 for shipping and handling (add 
$5 each for The Rat and all Light Phaser 
Packages). Ontario residents add 8% sales 
tax. Looking for new software. 




128 k CoCo 3 joystick and disk drive required. 



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rom Computer Plus to YO 



LUS 



after 



PLUS 



after 









BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 HX 1 Drive 256K 539.00 

Tandy 1 000 TX 1 Drive 640K 889.00 

Tandy 3000 HL1 Drive 512K 1129.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg.Ram 1959.00 

Tandy 5000 MC 2 Meg. Ram 3699.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 169.00 

Radio Shack DMP-1 32 1 20 CPS 289.00 

Radio Shack DMP-440 300 CPS 549.00 

Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wh. 349.00 

Tandy LP-1000 Laser Printer 1899.00 

Star Micronics NX-1000 144 CPS 199.00 
Star Micronics NX-1000 Rainbow 269.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 144 CPS 199.00 

Panasonic P-1091i 194 CPS 249.00 

Panasonic P-1 092i 240 CPS 339.00 

Okidata 320 300 CPS 369.00 

Okidata 390 270 CPS 24 Wire Hd 515.00 

NEC Pinwriter P-2200 170 CPS 399.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM4 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Practical Peripheral 2400 Baud 229.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit (28 pin) 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit (2 or 8 chip) 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 14.95 
PBH Converter with 64K Buffer 1 19.00 
Serial to Parallel Converter 59.95 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 329.00 
Magnavox Green or Amber Mon. 99.00 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 19.95 
PBJ 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 1 39.00 
Tandy OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 24.95 
Tandy 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 149.00 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 



COCO Max III by Colorware 79.95 

AutoTerm by PXE Comput. 29.95 39.95 

TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 

Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Telewriter 128 79.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 

Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 

CoCo 3 512K Ram Disk-CerComp 19.95 
Home Publisher by Tandy (CoCo3) 35.95 

Sub Battle Sim. by Epyx (CoCo3) 26.95 

Thexder by Sierra (CoCo3) 22.45 

Kings Quest III by Sierra (CoCo3) 31 .45 

Flight Sim.ll by SubLogic (CoCo3) 31 .45 

OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71 .95 

OS-9 Development System 89.95 

Multi-View by Tandy 44.95 

VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 



Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
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• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

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P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 

Littleton, MA 01460 ■ SINCE 1973 

IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (508) 486-31 93 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 




T a b le of Cont e nts ! 




1 Fe a tur e s 



16 

Stalking 
the Used Car 

Richard Johnson 
This program guides you to 
an elusive creature — a good 
used car! 

30 > 

Mass Disk Formatter 

Neal Larson 

Cut down on time spent 

formatting disks 

34 



41 

RAINBOWfest 
Reporter 

Cray Augsburg 

The scoop on the Chicago 

Show 

34 

The Big Bad Wolf 

Rick Cooper 
Fantasy joins forces with 
CoCo to help children's 
reading skills 

A Seat for ^ 
Everyone and 
Everyone in His Seat 

Donald A. Turowski 
It's schooltime — do you 
know where your children 
sit? 

Long Division Drill ™ 

Richard D. Gordley 
An arcade game rewards 
students for the right answer 



60 % 

States and Capitals 

Rick Cooper 

Use this challenging game to 
help students remember their 
geography lessons 



September 1988 
Vol. VIII No. 2 




Clue Me In! + 

James and Mary Jean 
Lamonica 

Let's gather around the CoCo 
and play a game of one-word 
Charades 

98 ^ 

What a Dump! 

William P. Nee 

Part III: Machine Language 

Made BASIC 



102 



The Desktop 
Publisher: A Reprise 

H. Allen Curtis 

More choices, more creativity 

now available 

122 

On VCR Time 

Fred Hair, Jr. 
Calculating time intervals 
for VCR tape 55 





4 THE RAINBOW September 1988 




70 

See the World 

Bill Bernico 

71 

Mental Math Blocks 

Keiran Kenny 

71 

When in Rome 

Dan and John Weaver 

72 

Answers for Your 
Questions 

Keiran Kenny 

74 

CoCo Clowns Around 

Ana M. Rodriguez 

76 

Cider Sipping 

Darren Day 

76 

CoCo ASCI I Table 

Ken Ostrer 



,;«5^The cassette tape/disk sym- 
bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAI N- 

bow on disk Those with only the 
disk symbol are hot available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on Page 52. 




Advertisers Index 
Back Issue Info _ 



CoCo Gallery Live. 
Hints 



160 

155 

26 

134 

Letters to Rainbow 6 

One-Liners 37, 120, 137, 

140 

_158 

_ 14 

_135 



Racksellers _ 
Rainbow Info 



Received & Certified _ 

Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 144 

Subscription Info 148 




AS 



■MS.< 



86 

BASICally Speaking 

Bill Bernico 
BASIC programming 
questions answered in this 
new column 

80 

BASIC Training 

Joseph Kolar 

Creating a utility worksheet 

88 

CoCo Consultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

118 

Delphi Bureau 

Cray Augsburg 
Creating online and 
Hutchison's database report 

138 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

136 

Education Notes ^ 

Steve Blyn 
Locating the topic 



10 

PRINT#-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's notes 

140 

Turn of the Screw 

Tony DiStefano 
Summer cleanup 

Wishing Well ^ 

Fred Scerbo 
Opposite attraction 



1 Rainbowtech 



142 % 

Accessible Applications 

Richard A. White 

The magic and mysteries of 

OS-9 

150 

Barden's Buffer 

William Barden, Jr. 
Assembly language 
for the complete novice 

"KISSabfe OS-9" will return 
next month 



A Mazing World of Malcolm Mortar 

/Tandy Corporation 



Car Sign Designer/Zebra Systems 

Graphics-25/G/mmesoff 

Labyrinth/flrB Software 



MPI Locking Plate/ Gimmesoft 

Math Games/E.Z Friendly Software. 
Multi-Menu/A/pfta Soft 



Teddy Bears/E.Z. Friendly Software. 
VIP Writer lll/SD Enterprises 



.132 
.130 
.131 
.133 
.133 
.129 
.128 
.132 



.126 



THE rainbow is published ©very month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 

Shone (502) 228-4492. THE RAINBOW, R A I N B O Wf est and THE RAINBOW and 
AINBOWf est logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705- 
050 (ISSN No, 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Authorized as second class 
postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 
• Entire contents copyright © by FALSOFT, Inc., 1 988. THE rainbow is intended 
for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and 
reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of information herein is for the 
single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. Ail 
programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without warranty of any kind 
whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are 
registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. © Subscriptions to the rainbow 
are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail 
to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with 
next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for 
issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full 
refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount 
after two issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



The Rainbow 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapf hammer 

Associate Editor Sue Fomby 

Reviews Editor Lauren Willoughby 

Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 

Copy Editor Beth Haendiges 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, • 
Ed Eilers 

Technical Assistant David Horrar * 

Editorial Assistants Sue H: Evans, ; 
Wendy Falk 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., ■:.«;: 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, * 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Sharon Adams, 



Typesetter Eloise Gaines 

Falsoft, Inc. 

President Lawrence C. Falk 
General Manager Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst to the Publisher 

Sarah Levin 
Editorial Director John Crawley 
Asst. Editorial Director Judi Hutchinson 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Director of Production Jim Cleveland 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Manager 

Beverly Bearden 
Customer Service Representative 

Carolyn Fenwick 
Development Coordinator IraBarsky 
Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 
Dispatch Tony Olive 
Business Assistants Anne Brooks, 

Laurie Falk 
Chief of Building Security 
and Maintenance 

Jessie Brooks 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, 
see Page 160 



Cover illustration copyright © 1968 
by Fred Crawford 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 5 




BACK TALK 

Editor: 

Lonnie Falk's editorial ["Much Ado 
About 'The Suit"] in the June '88 issue 
brings to light several basic problems within 
the industry itself, one of which is the nit- 
pick, do-or-die competition among rivals. 
Trying to be the fastest with the most and 
the biggest, with more options, features, 
bells and whistles, has created confused, 
troubled and annoyed consumers — not 
only in the public but the industrial consum- 
er as well. The razzle-dazzle is the bait for 
the consumer to turn loose the buck. 

The industry itself has forgotten the roots 
of its existence: service. If the glitz is there, 
and there is no understanding of the equip- 
ment or programs on the consumer's part, 
then the service aspect is lost, probably 
forever. Confused complexity becomes the 
fountainhead on which most of the newest 
machines are now being criticized and 
rejected on a regular basis. 

The basic tenet in your editorial failed to 
mention why Tandy, and in particular the 
CoCo, has become the foundation and the 
cornerstone of a successful, popular home 
system. The CoCo exists today because of 
people. Thousands of people all across the 
United States, some in user groups, some 
acting alone, have supported, helped and 
taught others to use and understand the 
CoCo. No other machine enjoys such out- 
standing support. People's support means 
maximum service, whether you're a be- 
ginner or an engineer, and has made the 
CoCo what it is today. It is precisely because 
of this support that the CoCo is so delight- 
fully adaptable; your imagination is the only 
limit. 

Our littJe support group has demon- 
strated, experimented, taught, and argued 
over almost everything about the CoCo. 
Quite a few people obtained a great deal of 
help, support and encouragement without a 
huge investment of time and cost in a trial 
and error effort. 

Opening up various programs and sys- 
tems will allow a further simplicity and 
understanding of the basic machine, thus 
aiding everyone in its use. This is something 
Apple has failed to do and IBM is just now 
correcting. A machine will always remain 
just that until people themselves are sup- 
ported either at the corporate or grass-roots 
level, "the suit" not withstanding. 

Fred K. Garcia 
Santa Maria, CA 

Vaccinating Your System 

Editor: 

I want to comment on Jim Stafford's 
letter [July 1988, Page 6]. First, Trojan 



horses and viruses are not the same breed of 
pest. A Trojan horse program can only erase 
the disk on which it resides. A virus can 
replicate itself in a computer's memory and 
copy itself onto any disk placed in the drive. 
Therefore, a Trojan horse is the lesser of the 
two evils. 

Those who never boot up OS-9 have little 
to fear. To be effective, a virus must place 
itself in the system bootfile so that it is 
loaded at every computer use. Since Disk 
basic boots from ROM, a virus terminates 
when the machine shuts down. If you use 
ADOS-3 or a DOS you must first load, there 
is a small threat. Vaccinate the system by 
burning the original system (from the orig- 
inal disk) into an EPROM. 

OS-9 is a different story. Whoever created 
the original virus could easily build another 
that hides in the OS-9 pi module and infects 
every OS-9 disk you have. There are precau- 
tions you can take against these nuisances. 

OS-9 users should keep a backup of the 
system disk used to boot up. Use a current 
backup of the BASIC09 and system disks 
originally with the OS-9 system. Create and 
back up the customized disk and then store 
it. After downloading programs from a 
public domain BBS, use the Compare com- 
mand to compare the OS-9Boot file on your 
backup. Then run all of the downloaded 
programs individually, comparing your 
backup after each. If any changes occur, 
don't reboot with that disk or use it until 
someone competent has checked it out. 
Never use an unchecked program on your 
hard disk. Don't even access the hard disk 
until you are certain the new program is 
virus-free. 

Mike Stute 
Hays, KS 

An Anniversary Surprise 

Editor: 

I studied the cover of the July 1988 issue 
for a long time. I noticed that there were 
seven characters: one for each anniversary! 
At first I thought each character carried a 
sample copy of the rainbow, but then I 
found that they were each carrying a differ- 
ent anniversary issue. Dorothy carries the 
premier issue. The other characters carry the 
following issues: Toto, '83; Lion, '84; Wi- 
zard, '85; Tin Woodman, '86; Scarecrow, '87; 
and CoCo, '88. Toto shouldn't carry the July 
'83 issue in his mouth. That issue included 
a soundsheet (record) of the programs. Toto 
would have bent (and dampened) the sound- 
sheet. 

With the exception of the May '82 issue, 
my rainbow collection is complete. Does 
any reader have that issue for sale? 

I like the new clear plastic mailer. Now the 
postal service can see why we enjoy the 
rainbow so much. 

Lee Deuett 
Shell Rock, I A 



REQUEST HOTLINE 



Editor: 

We are a CoCo family. We have three: a 
CoCo 1 with 64K and two single-sided disk 
drives; a CoCo 3 with 51 2K and two double- 
sided drives; and a CoCo 3 with 128K and 
two double-sided disk drives, a monocrome 
monitor and NX 1000. 

Every month I read letters and articles in 
the rainbow questioning or defending the 
CoCo. The basic question seems to be: Is it 
a computer or a toy? 

The CoCo is a very talented computer; 
however, it lacks what is needed to keep it 
from being considered a toy. That is soft- 
ware, 

I am a knowledgeable computer user; I am 
not, and do not want to be, a programmer. 
That's my son's love, not mine. 

Two of my CoCos are used for two dif- 
ferent small businesses at two locations. To 
say that I have outgrown the business 
application software I have seen is an 
understatement. 

I do word processing and use TW-64 as 
modified by TW-80, with no complaints. I 
also do a lot of mail lists, some large, and 
most ranging between 200-500 names, and 
I know of no commercially available CoCo 
software that can handle these lists. We have 
modified a commercial software package 
that "only runs on the CoCo 1 and 2" to run 
on our CoCo 3s. We run both disk-resident 
versions and RAM disk versions. At this 
stage, it is more than adequate. 

I run DynaCalc, which is a fine spread- 
sheet. But when will we see a CoCo 3 version 
that uses the capabilities of our machine? 

I use a much-modified inventory control 
program that does the job for me, and a 
commercially available accounts receivable 
package whose general ledger portion is not 
adequate. Instead, I use a DynaCalc spread- 
sheet for this purpose. 

I do not feel the CoCo 3 has the business 
software available to make this most capable 
tool a true computer. I am ready for fully 
integrated business packages, but where are 
they? Am I alone? We have the hardware and 
the operating systems, but not the software. 

In addition, I would like to see THE 
rainbow do more for business applications. 
I know we have a yearly Business issue, but 
I would like to see a monthly business 
column — a forum where those of us who 
want to use the CoCo could exchange ideas, 
patches, reviews, comments on business 
software, modifications and programs. 

Paul M. Cornez 
Springfield, OH 

See SD Enterprises' ad for informa- 
tion on VIP Database III and Sugar 
Software's ad for information on 
TIMS Mail. 



6 THE RAINBOW September 1988 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S & 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42, 51 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 

They are sincere, hard working and 

appreciative. Thanks! _, „. 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/CO.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I have a TRS-80 II with disk. I would like 
to purchase a small printer that uses 3- or 
3 '/2-inch roll paper. 

Can you give me information on such a 
printer and where to purchase it? I have seen 
a Citizen's DP 560-CD being used on a 
Commodore, but the stores in Corpus 
Christi, Texas, don't know where I can buy 
this printer. 

1 would buy a larger printer if there is one 
available that you can use 3!/$-inch tape or 
perforated paper on. 

Marie Tucker 
Rt. 4, Box 178-C 
Robstown, TX 78380 

Printing Transparencies 

Editor: 

I have been a loyal reader and supporter 
of your advertisers since 1 purchased my 
CoCo 2 in October 1985. I have gradually 
added the CGP-220, CoCo Max II and 
hardcopy, as well as other font, border, and 
picture collections. 

As a college business instructor and 
management trainer, I use my CGP-220 to 
print graphics for use on plastic overhead 
projector transparencies. At present, I print 
out the graphics and then use a copier to 
transfer them onto the plastic transparency 
sheets. I recently learned that an ink jet 
printer may be used to print color graphics 



directly on transparency sheets. I have tried 
to do this, but on standard transparency 
plastic, the ink from my CGP-220 will not 
dry. A source at Tandy in Fort Worth told 
me that a transparency sheet was once 
available for the CGP-220, but it has been 
discontinued for over a year. 

In the February '88 rainbow, Charles R. 
Womble said that the CGP-220 is still made 
by Canon USA, Inc., as the PJ-1080A Ink 
Jet Printer. Canon makes the FPAL-10 
transparency sheet for this ink jet printer. 
Have any rainbow readers successfully 
used these sheets, or any other brand of 
transparency plastic, in the CGP-220 to 
make color overhead transparencies? 

Melanie Roy 
304 Stacie Ct. 
Savannah, GA 31406 

Help with DynaCalc 

Editor: 

In the January '88 issue of rainbow, you 
have what appears to be a fine program, 
Appointment Calendar, by W.J. Holdorf 
(Page 100). 

I have a 5 12K CoCo 3 with two drives and 
an Epson RX-80 printer. I am hoping that 
one of your readers can supply me with the 
needed corrections to use this program with 
my printer. (A programmer, I am not.) 

My second request is in regard to Dyna- 
Calc. When I enter /P, the screen shows I 
am formatted for single spacing; however, I 
am not getting single spacing on my print- 



outs. Some of my files are 50 to 60 lines long, 
and I want to put them on one sheet of paper. 

My third problem is also about Dyna- 
Calc. I can find no way to save my files on 
a separate disk. The only thing I have been 
able to do is save them on the same disk as 
the program. I want to be able to have a data 
disk. 

Charles W. Currier 
96 Shamrock Circle 
Santa Rosa, CA 95403 

To modify Appointment Calendar 
to run on your Epson RX-80, follow 
the instructions detailed in "Printer 
Diversions and Conversions" on Page 
142 of the August '88 issue. 

We assume you are using the 
OS-9 version of DynaCalc as sold by 
Radio Shack. To eliminate the extra 
linefeed, you will need to use Debug 
or Mod patch to make the following 
changes to DynaCalc; 

Offset Old Value New Value 



7 
8 

4BE2 
5215 



80 
63 
26 
16 



81 
62 
20 
17 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

Thanks to Microcom Software. A couple 
of weeks ago I ran into a problem with Word 
Power 3.1. Whenever I changed the parame- 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 7 



ter on the Option menu, the program locked 
up. 1 wrote Microcom, explained my prob- 
lem and asked if there was a software patch 
to fix the problem. One week later, I received 
a new copy of the program, a sincere apol- 
ogy and explanation. (Apparently the copy 
program contained an error that caused the 
Option menu to hang up.) Naturally, the 
new copy works perfectly. 

It's good to know there are some honest 
companies that offer prompt, sincere ser- 
vice. 1 hope other readers keep this in mind 
when looking for new CoCo products. 

Dave France 
Davenport, I A 

Far-Reaching Thanks 

Editor: 

I live on a little island in the Pacific Ocean 
(really, I do!). The nearest Radio Shack 
Store is over 5,000 miles away. I was reluc- 
tant to sustain my computing needs through 
mail order. 

THE rainbow is my only link with the real 
world. On the inside front cover of the 
magazine, I found a company that has met 
my needs with excellent service. My new 
CoCo 3 arrived in November, the disk drive 
in February and the software in June. Each 
order took less than two weeks to travel 
halfway across the world! My thanks go to 
Computer Plus for supporting rainbow and 
its readers around the world. 

Steve Knapik 
Technical Sgt, USAF 



I 

PKN PALS 



• 1 am a 20-year-old robotics assembly line 
electrician looking for pen pals from the 
U.S. and around the world. I have a 64K 
CoCo 2, a 128K CoCo 3, FD 501 drive, 
DMP-J05 printer, Multi-Pak and a Radio 
Shack modem. 

Tim Fultz 
Rt. 1, Box 275 
Bonneau, SC 29431 

• I am 18 years old and would like to have 
pen pals from anywhere. I have a CoCo 1, 
a CoCo 3, two drives, a modem and SG-10X 
printer. 

Pedro A, Torres 
Cuernavaca 1699 
Venus Gardens 
Rio Piedra, PR 00926 

• I am a 48-year-old man who would like 
to correspond with any individual who 
enjoys the CoCo 3 and enjoys typing in 
programs from the rainbow. I own a 128K 
CoCo 3, FD 50 1 disk drive, CCR-82 cassette 
recorder and D MP- 105 printer. 

Donald L. Villiard 
122 Cedar Lane 
Starkville, MS 39759 

• I am 15 years old and have a 64K CoCo 
2, 128K CoCo 3, TEAC 55bv DS/DD drive, 
STAR NX-10 printer, DMP-106 printer, a 



CCR-8 1 cassette recorder, and a CM-8 RGB 
monitor. I am looking for pen pals in the 
central Illinois area but would like pen pals 
anywhere in the United States also. 

Vance Evan Pierce 
1306 N Franklin 

Danville, IL 61832 

• I am 19 years old and looking for a pen 
pal from anywhere in the world. I have a 
CoCo 2, DMP-105 printer and a FD 501 
disk drive. If you enjoy using your computer 
and being able to learn new things every time 
you use it, like I do, write! 

Karen Rimiller 
RR #1, Box 8600 
Adams, NY 13605 

• I would like to have pen pals from every- 
where. I am new to computers. 1 have a 
CoCo 1, CoCo 3, SG-10 printer, modem, 
two disk drives and a Multi-Pak. I promise 
to answer every letter. 

Sharon Decoopman 
64 Devonshire Ave. 

Apt. 302 
Tillsonburg, Ontario 
Canada N4G 4 K9 

• I am 28 years old and have had my CoCo 
2 for three years. I have two disk drives, 
cassette, modem and a DMP-106 printer. I 
will respond to all who write. 

Norman Lamoureux 
254 l h Confederation Street 
Sarnia, Ontario 
Canada N7T 2 Al 

• I am 16 years old and am looking for pen 
pals anywhere in the world. I enjoy Adven- 
tures and programming. I have a CoCo 2 
and a disk drive and plan to buy a printer 
in the near future. I will answer all letters. 

Joseph Delaney 
3527 Kindling Drive 
Augusta, GA 30906 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 



• The Glass Menagerie BBS is now running 
at 300/ 1200/2400 baud. We have 43 Meg of 
hard disk storage online. We offer over 420 
public domain CoCo programs for the 
CoCo 2 and 3. We have a great game room 
and a large message base that includes SIGs 
for all major computer types. We also have 
workshops for BASIC, OS-9 and, soon, 
machine language programming. The BBS 
runs on a CoCo 2, using a highly modified 
Colorama BBS program. All support files 
and programs, and most games were written 
by the SysOp and Co-SysOp. The phone 
number is (215) 376-1819. 

Allen Cravener (SysOp) 
Lewis Brubaker (Co-SysOp) 
The Glass Menagerie 
1137 Cotton St 
Reading PA 19602 



• I am pleased to announce the grand 
opening of ComStar 3, Atlanta's first and 
only CoCo 3 BBS. We run the Tandy User's 
BBS v. 2.4 on a 512K CoCo 3. Features 
include CoCo 3 uploads and downloads, 
EMAIL and message bases for every inter- 
est. Online 24 hours a day, seven days a 
week, at 300/ 1200 baud, 8-N-l. New callers 
are granted immediate accounts. Call (404) 
980-0088 and log on today. 

Jeff Freeman (SysOp) 
ComStar 3 
1960 Spectrum Circle 
Atlanta, GA 30067 

• I invite all CoCo enthusiasts to call 
Trader's Hotline BBS. It features 40 Meg of 
storage, 17 subject boards ranging from 
movie reviews to political discussion, over 
400 online text files, and a CoCo AE with 
XModem, Y Modem and upload and down- 
load. We run 24 hours a day at 300/ 1200/ 
2400/4800/9600 baud, 7-E-l. Call (405) 436- 
6885. 

Colin J. Smith 
R 3, Box 212c 
Ada, OK 74820 

• The CoCoshop BBS of West Valley turns 
one year old in July '88. We are running our 
BBS on Color Connect BBS Software v. 1.1 
written by our SysOp, Terry Gray. We run 
at 7-E-l, 300/1200 baud. Call (801) 250- 
1941. 

The DataWarehouse of Spokane, Wash, 
and its sister-board in Salt Lake City, Utah, 
are both using software written by Spo- 
kane's Dennis Mott. Both boards run at 7- 
E-l, 300/1200 baud. The Spokane Data- 
Warehouse can be reached at (509) 325-6787. 
Call (801) 969-6051 to reach The DataWare- 
house in Salt Lake City, 

Dennis Gray (SysOp) 
CoCoshop 
3643 S. 6885 W. 
West Valley City, UT 84120 

• There is a new BBS in Philadelphia, Pa. 
It runs under CoBBS and is online 24 hours 
a day, seven days a week. The board is free 
to use and has XModem, upload and down- 
load. The board is 8 bit with one stop and 
no parity. No copywritten programs are 
allowed. Call (215) 426-8991. 

John L. Leach (SysOp) 
1353 Earl St. 
Philadelphia. PA 19125 



THE rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SI G> prompt, type RRI to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG* At the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 



8 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



Word 
Power 3.2 



More Versatile • More Powerful With 
Spooler • Calculator # Split-Screen • 2-Column Printing 



Unparalleled Power packed in this 100% ML Word Processor 
written from scratch for the CoCo 3! No other word processor 
offers such a wide array of features that are easy to learn & use. 



DISPLAY & SPEED 




Word Power 3.2 runs at double-clock speed 
and uses the true 80-column display with 
lowercase instead of the graphics screen. The 
result is lightning fast screen reformatting and 
added speed! All prompts are displayed in 
plain English in neat colored windows. The current column num- 
ber, line number, page number, percentage of free memory is dis- 
played at all times. Even the page break is displayed so you know 
where one page ends and the other begins. The Setup program 
allows you to change fore/background colors as well as (in) visible 
carriage returns. Word Power 3.2 can be used with RGB/Com- 
posite/Monochrome monitors as well as TV. 



MAXIMUM MEMORY 



!,M.tt i '**r* 1 ' ■•■-■» ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ > * j 




Word Power 3.2 gives you over 72 K on 128K and over 
450K on 512K CoCo 3 for Text Storage - more 
memory than any other CoCo word-processor. 
Period. 



Vi'i'iyiy.'iVi'i'f'tYiVtVt>v.yi ■ ».»* * » ■ » » * » ■ * • » » » * * ■ * » * * » « ■* »■«-« 



EFFORTLESS EDITING 

Word Power 3.2 has one of the most powerful and user-friendly 
full-screen editor with word-wrap. All you do is type. Word 
Power takes care of the text arrangement. The unique Auto-Save 
feature saves text to disk at regular intervals for peace of mind. 

Insert/Overstrike Mode (Cursor Style Changes to indicate mode);OOPS Recall 
during delete;Type-ahead Buffer for fast typers;Key-Repeat (adjustable); Key- 
Click; 4-way cursor and scrolling; Cursor to beginning/end of text, beginning/end 
of line, top/bottom of screen, next/previous word; Page up/down; Delete charac- 
ter, previous/next word, to beginning/end of line, complete line, text before/after 
cursor; Locate/Replace with Wild-Card Search with auto/manual replace; Block 
Mark, Unmark, Copy, Move & Delete; Line Positioning (Center/Right Jus- 
tified); Set/Reset 120 programmable tab stops; Word-Count; Define Top/Bot- 
tom/Left/Right margins & page length. You can also highlight text 
(underline-with on-screen underlining, bold, italics, superscripts, etc.). Word 
Power even has a HELP screen which an be accessed any time during edit. 



SPLIT-SCREEN EDITING 1 



Splits the screen in half so you can view one portion of your text 
while you edit another. You'll love it! 



MAIL-MERGE 



^ Ever try mailing out the same letter to 50 different 
people? Could be quite a chore. Not with Word 
Power 3.2! Using this feature, you can type a letter, 
follow it with a list of addresses and have Word Power 
print out personalized letters. It's that easy! 




CALCULATOR i : : fgf 

Pop-up a 4-function calculator while you edit! Great for tables! 



fig <**Mx 
:■ ■; 


i-S-f * y.<-> »>.■:*>■.■:• 
%jv£:U-9uC -xx-S i y. 
W ■!• >.■! * x ■>;■ y. <■ 


■m-x-!-; 


















x.i -!■>■■!-> x-S i*y. 




* 




rr 




Hi 


m 



SAVING/LOADING TEXT 

Word Power 3.2 creates ASCII format files which are compatible 
with almost all tenninal/spell-checking & other word-processing 
programs. Allows you to Display Free Space, Load, Save, Ap- 
pend & Kill files. The ARE YOU SURE? prompt prevents ac- 
cidental overwriting & deletion. You can select files by simply 
cursoring through the disk directory. Supports double-sided 
drives & step-rates. 



PRINTING 

Word Power 3.2 drives almost any printer (DMP, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc). Allows options such as baud rates, 
line spacing, page/print pause, partial print, page number- 
ing/placement, linefeeds, multi-line headers/footers, right jus- 
tification & number of copies. The values of these parameters & 
margins can be changed anytime in the text by embedding Printer 
Option Codes. The WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET fea- 
ture allows you to preview the text on the screen as it will appear 
in print. You can view margins, page breaks, justification & more. 



PRINT SPOOLER 

Why buy a hardware Print Spooler? Word Power 3.2 has a built- 
in Spooler which allows you to simultaneously edit one document 
& print another. 



I If 11 * I ' 1. 1 * * ' < ' > T_l_ f j t j f jr I ' < J ^ _ 1 ?W JCT " f * f f. J. I . ^ JULfJL 1 . 1. 4.*- J. VJJm E J J J I *l * F *f 'FT' 



■ ' "aW a'a'a^a a a , 



TWO-COLUMN PRINTING 

This unique feature allows you to print all or portion of your text 
in two columns! Create professional documents without hours 
of aligning text. 




SPELLING CHECKER 

, - - 7v w or( j Power 3.2 comes with spelling checker/dic- 



/ 



tionary which finds & corrects mistakes in your 
text. You can add words to /delete words from 
dictionary. 



..«II.I.H|U.LIJHtlMJt 111l'H1l11l*l«l''»1ttftttttt''Tft < 



PUNCTUATION CHECKER 

This checker will proofread your text for punctuation errors such 
as capitalization, double-words, spaces after periods/commas, 
and more. Its the perfect addition to any word processor. 

DOCUMENTATION 



iTTyyxyyryyyyTyyyrryyyyyjnt^ 



Word Power 3.2 comes with a well-written instruction manual & 
reference card which makes writing with Word 
Power a piece of cake! Word Power 3.2 comes on an 
UNPROTECTED disk and is compatible with 
RSDOS. Only $79.95 




MJF 



Fa me rica 

[EXPRESS 



(Word Power 3.1 owners can get Word Power 3.2 Upgrade FREE by sending 
proof of purchase & $5.00 to cover S&H costs & instructions) 

MICROCOM SOFTWARE PO Box 214, Fairport, NY 14450 Ph: 716-223-1477 S£] I3H 
All orders shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Amex, Check or MO. Sorry, no 
CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); Foreign 10% S&H(minimum $5). New York State residents please add sales tax. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-9pm EST 7 days /week 

Except NY. Order Status, Infomation, Technical Information, NY orders call 716-223-1477 




r 





The Computer's Place 
in Education 



This is our annual Education issue, and I am quite pleased that of 
all the themes we have used in THE RAINBOW over the years, this 
one seems to be the longest-lived. 
Even before there was a Games issue, there was an Education issue. 
Indeed, our first Education issue wasn't much, but it did appear. 

I see computers as vastly important in the education area. And while 
today there are a lot of fancy programs out for our CoCo and other 
machines, with spectacular graphics and the like, the simple fact is that 
you don't need all that stuff to make a computer a viable help for students. 
I know. 

Both of my daughters are past the time they ask "Daddy" for help in 
schoolwork — primarily because the elder has finished college and 
embarked on a career in advertising, and my "baby" is away at school and 
Daddy isn't there to help. 

But there were many nights — admittedly, the night before the test — 
when a small head would peek around the door with the question, "Can 
you test me?" Sometimes the "testing" was fun, sometimes not. The worst 
was in foreign languages, where the vocabulary drill was boring to me, and 
the "dumb" pronunciations I gave for the "right" answer often provoked 
some amount of laughter on the part of the testee. 

I fixed 'em. I wrote a short program in BASIC that would test for 
vocabulary words, selected them randomly, and even asked the questions 
"both ways." 

(For those of you unfamiliar with the term, asking "both ways" means 
asking the meaning of "gracias" one time and "thank you" another. Both 
ways. English-to-Spanish and Spanish-to-English.) 

This was a pretty simple program, done with data statements and a for- 
NEXT loop. But it worked. In fact, elder daughter Wendy's grade in first- 
year French went from a 'C to an 'A' in one grading period with the help 
of "Daddy's Program." Similar programs have appeared in the rainbow 
over the years. 



1 0 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



COCO NEWSROOM 




An excellent Desktop Publishing 
program for the CoCo 3. Design your 
own newspaper with Banner Head- 
lines/6 Articles using sophisticated 
Graphics,Fonts & Fill patterns. Comes 
with 22 fonts & 50 pictures! Over 140K 
of code. Compatible with Epson, 
Gemini & Compatibles, DMP 
105/106/1 10/120/130/200/400/420/500/ 
2110, CGP-220, Laser LP1000 & IBM 
Compatibles. "... a smash for CoCo 3 ..." 
-March 88 Rainbow Review. Comes on 3 
non copy-protected disks. Only $49.95 




Create distinctive bright yellow 
diamond shaped car signs. Includes 2 
resuable clear plastic sign holders with 
suction cups, and 50 sheets of bright yel- 
low fanfold paper. Printer Require- 
ments are the same as for the CoCo 
Graphics Designer. Only $29.95 



COLOR 

(SCHEMATIC 

DESIGNED 



By Prakash Mishra 

An excellent Circuit Schematic 
Design Software Package for CoCo 
3. Features: 

* Runs in 640x192 at 1.8 M hz 

* Pull Down Menus 

* Keyboard/Mouse/Joystck Support 

* RGB/ Composite/Monochrome 
Monitor Support 

* 72 Modifiable Symbols 

* Multiple Hi-Res Fonts 

* Multiple UNDO Command 

* Symbol Rotate/Line/Box Draw 

* Supports 3 Layers of Circuits 

* Powerful Screen Print Command 
for DMP/Gemini/Epson Printers 

* Complete Documentation 

Only $39.95 ^ j^- 



* * * * ' ~» 



HOOK . -\ 
UKIT ' 

ton 





- — • n r 



COCO 

GRAPHICS DESIGNER 

Create beautiful Greeting Cards, Signs & 
Banners for holidays, parties and other oc- 
casions. Comes with a library of pre-drawn 
pictures. Includes utilities to create your 
own character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires CoCo 1,2,3 or TDP-100 
with a min. of 32K, one Disk Drive and a 
Printer. Compatible with Disk Basic 
1.0/1.1/2.0/2.1, ADOS(3) and JDOS. Sup- 
ports the following printers: DMP 
100/105/106/ 110/130/ 430; CGP220, 
EPSON RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX- 10/1000 & OKIDATA. Latest Ver- 
sion! DISK Only $29.95 
PICTURE DISK #1,#2,#3,#4: Each pic- 
ture disk contains over 100 pictures !! Disk 
$14.95 each. ALL 4 Picture Disks: $54.95 
FONT DISK #1,#2AB: Each disk con- 
tains 10 extra fonts!! Disk $19.95 each. Buy 
any 3 Font Disks and get the 4th FREE!! 
COLORED PAPER PACK (with matching 
envelopes): $24.95 




GAMES 

(Disk only) e 
(CoCo 1,2 & 3 except where mentioned) 

WILD WEST (CoCo 3 Only): $24.95 
VEGAS SLOTS(CoCo 3 only): $29.95 
VEGAS GAME PACK: $24.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 

P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION; $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
PYRAMIX(Cubix for CoCo 3): $24.95 
KUNG FU DUDE: $24.95 CHAMPION: $19.95 

WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY: $19.95 
IN QUEST OF STAR LORD(Animated Graphics Adven- 
ture for CoCo 3): $34.95 

TREASURY PACK#1: Lunar Rover Patrol, Cubix, 
Declathon, Qix, keys of Wizard, Module Man, Pengon, 
Space Wreck & Roller Controller.Only $29.95 
TREASURY PACK #2: Lancer, Ms. Gobbler, Froggie, 
Madness & Minotaur, Ice Castles, Galagon, Devious and 
Syzygy. Only $29.95 

SPACE PAC: Color Zap, Invaders, Planet Invasion, Space 
Race, Space War, Galax Attax, Anaroid Attack, Whir- 
lybird, Space Sentry & Storm Arrows.Only $29.95 
WIZARD'S CASTLE: A hi-res graphics adventure game 
filled with traps, tricks, treasures. Only $19.95 





XENOCOPY-PC 

An amazingly versatile program that allows you to Format/Duplicate / 
Read/ Write disks from over 300 different computers. For example you 
could transfer programs between CoCo, IBM, PC-DOS, TRS-80 Model 
3, TRS-80 Model 4, TRS-80 Model 100, Xerox 820, Zenith, Kaypro II, 
Novell , NEC DOS and much much more!! Send for FREE List. Requires 
an IBM Compatible with 2 drives. Disk $79.95. 

512K BACKUP LIGHTNING 

The ultimate CoCo 3 disk copying utility!! Reads your master diskette 
once and then makes as many copies as you want. It automatically for- 
mats an unformatted disk while copying! Supports 35, 40 or 80 track drives 
with various step rates. A must for any disk user!! Only $19.95 

PRINTER LIGHTNING 

Never wait for your printer again!! This Print Spooler allows you to print 
to your printer and simultaneously continue with your programming. No 
need to wait for those long printouts! Disk Only $19.95 

BASIC FREEDOM 

A Full Screen Editor for Basic Programs!! A Must for anyone who writes 
Basic Programs. Only $24.95 

VOCAL FREEDOM 

Turn your computer into a digital voice / sound recorder. Produces 
natural voices/ sound effects. Req. inexpensive RS Amplifier (#277- 
1008) & any microphone. Only $34.95 

HACKER'S PAC 

Allows you to incorporate voices created by Vocal Freedom into your own 
Basic and ML programs. Only $14.95 




JIUP 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE PO Box 214, Fairport, NY 14450 Ph: 716-223-1477 
All orders $50 and above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Amex, Check or 

MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); Foreign 10% S&H(minimum $5). New York State residents please add sales tax. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-9pm EST 7 days /week 

Except NY. Order Status, Infomation, Technical Information, NY orders call 716-223-1477 



This program was later expanded to 
testing for singJe-name items — dates, 
phyla, capitals and things of that sort. 
It worked quite well. Later, I added a 
Score function at the end, and the kids 
were not allowed to stop studying until 
they got a 90 or better on the test. 

(If you think that's mean, a 90 is a 'B' 
in the Louisville public school system; 
you have to have a 93 for an 'A.' Of 
course, the girls thought it was mean.) 

Regardless, I read a great deal about 
how truly worthwhile educational pro- 
grams do much more than just drill 
students. I think the writers of that sort 
of thing are missing something. Cer- 
tainly, I believe we can enhance educa- 
tion by also entertaining our students — 
my sixth-grade teacher, Mrs. Dierking, 
was excellent at teaching grammar by 
letting us write short stories; my senior 
English teacher, Miss Mackey, really 
made Shakespeare come alive by acting 
out some of the scenes from Macbeth 
— but at the same time, I also think we 
can entertain 'em to death. 

The first business of learning is to 
learn. And there are some things — 
actually, a lot of things — that can only 
be learned by memorizing them. Yes, it 
is easier to memorize the phyla if you 
really understand the concept of what 
the types of living things in each of them 
are and do. But if you don't know the 
names in the first place, you're out of 
luck. 

Probably the most difficult course I 
ever had in my educational experience 
was one called "Geography of the 
Soviet Union." My professor, Dr. Wal- 
ter Koch, was one of the world's experts 
on the subject, and he was a good 
teacher. I had taken "Geography of 
North America" from him the semester 
before, liked him a great deal, thought 
he was extremely knowledgeable (I had 
also made an 'A'!) and wanted to take 



the course he taught for which he was 
nationally known. 

Dr. Koch was another of those gifted 
teachers who could make information 
come alive. But I had no frame of 
reference — I didn't even know there 
were "states" in the Soviet Union like 
there are in the United States. Besides, 
they all had strange-sounding names 
that were, at best, difficult to spell. And, 
while he told us something generally 
about each one in the first day's lecture 
(the concept), we still had to memorize 
the names. No other way to do it. 

Well, though on a more elementary 
level, of course, it is difficult enough to 
teach kids that Bismarck is the capital 
of North Dakota, but chances are they 
have at least heard of North Dakota 
(North Dakota readers will pardon this 
analogy, please, and substitute Jackson 
and Mississippi if they like). Try Tallinn 
and Estonia, Kiev and the Ukraine. And 
those are the easy ones to spell. 

I wrote them all down in two columns 
on a sheet of paper, holed up in the 
library for an hour or so and was ready 
for the second class. 

I do remember thinking at the time 
that there must be an easier way. There 
was, but, of course, at the time I had no 
access to a computer; if I had, they never 
would have allowed me to waste valu- 
able and expensive mainframe time 
learning the Soviet states and their 
capitals. 

What if I had had a CoCo? Truth is, 
if I had simply had the program I wrote 
years later with empty data statements, 
I would have most likely had everything 
half-memorized by the time I typed in 
the data statements to give me the 
questions and answers. I made a 'B' in 
the class; with a CoCo, it most likely 
would have been an 'A.' 

My only point is: Let's not disparage 
the ability of a computer to provide 



essential drill for students. It is a valu- 
able ability and, I think, something that 
you could certainly consider if you have 
school-age youngsters of any level in 
your home. 

Yes, it would be nice to have lots of 
graphics, songs and stuff for them when 
they get "the right answers." But they 
learn just as easily without them. And 
learn well. 

* * * 

This month's issue of THE RAINBOW, 
as you probably notice, is smaller than 
last month's. I know a lot of you worry 
when things change here, so I thought 
I would mention some of the reasons. 

First, the summer is always a slower 
period for us. Advertisers frequently cut 
back some in the summer and new 
advertisers do not "start up" as fast. 
This, obviously, reduces ad pages. 
Magazines must maintain a relation- 
ship between advertising pages and 
editorial pages. We have, for just this 
reason, done this almost every summer- 
time. And weVe put the pages back in 
when fall arrives. We expect to do so this 
year as well. 

Also, I am sure you have noticed that 
we have been missing a couple of mail- 
ing dates with the magazine, and your 
copies have come a bit later. We're 
trying to catch up, even though our 
business, like yours, finds people taking 
vacations in the summer. 

So, what we're doing is simply taking 
advantage of the natural slowdown of 
the summer to produce a few fewer 
pages and get started on the next 
month's issue a little earlier. In this way, 
we expect to catch up with things 
shortly and get back on schedule. 

It is no big deal, but I thought you 
would like to know. 

— Lonnie Falk 




"Assembly Language Programming for the CoCo" (The Book) and the CoCo 3 (The Addendum). 
Professionally produced (not just skimpy technical specifications). THE CoCo reference books. 



THE BOOK - 289 pages of teaching 
assembly language for the CoCo 1 & 2. 
It's used as a school text and is an 
intro to Computer Science. It describes 
the 6809E instructions, subroutines, 
interrupts, stacks, programming 
philosophy, and many examples. Also 
covered are PIAs, VDG, SAM, kybd, 
jystk, sound, serial port, and using 
cassette and disk. $18.00 + $1.50 s/h. 



THE ADDENDUM - Picks up 

where the BOOK left off. Describes 
ALL the CoCo 3 enhancements & how 
to use them with assembly language. 
The most complete GIME spec. 
WOW - Super-Res Graphics, 
Virtual Memory, New Interrupts, 
and more information not available 
elsewhere. Find out what the CoCo 3 
can really do. $12.00 + $1.00 s/h. 



COCO 3 SPECIAL US check or money 
Start your CoCo order. RI orders 

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save money - buy 1 f. I tr LU 

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ADDENDUM Portsmouth, RI 02871 

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$2.00 s/h. See Us On DELPHI 



12 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



COCO 3 UTILITIES GALORE 

(CoCo 2 Versions Included where specified) 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 





* Disk-to-Disk Copy * Tape-to-Disk Copy 

* Tape-to-Disk Auto Relocate 

* Disk-to-Tape Copy * Tape-to-Tape Copy 
Copies Basic/ML/Data Files. CoCo 1,2 or 3. 
Req. min. 64K Disk System. Disk Only $24*95 




COCO CHECKE 



Something possibly wrong with your CoCo? 
CoCo Checker is the answer. Will test your 
ROMs, RAMs, Disk Drives & Controller, 
Printer, Keyboard, Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, 
PIAs, VDG, Internal Clock Speed, Multi-Pak 
Interface and more! Only $24.95 



DISK UTILITY 2.1A 



A multi-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY 
disk handling. Utilize a directory window to 
selectively sort, move, rename & kill file entries. 
Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy & back- 
up. Single key execution of Basic/ML programs. 
This will become your MOST USED program ! ! 
CoCo 1,2 or 3. Req. Min. 64K. Disk Only $24.95 




MAILLIST PRO 



The ultimate mailing list program. Allows you 
to add, edit, view, delete, change, sort (by zip- 
code or name) and print labels. Its indispen- 
sable!! Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! 
Allows elongated, normal and condensed for- 
mat for text. Double Strike, Border Creation, 
and multiple label printing. Its a MUST for any 
user with a disk drive. Supports DMP 
105/106/110/120/ 130/430, GEMINI, STAR, 
EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo 2 version in- 
cluded). Only $19.95 




COCO UTIL II rcd^p^ 



(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to 
IBM compatible computer and vica -versa. Re- 
quires 2-Drive IBM Compatible. Disk $39.95 



RGB PATCH 



Displays most games in color on RGB monitors. 
CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



COMPUTERIZED 
CHECKBOOK 2*" 



Why bother with balancing your checkbook? 
Let the CoCo do it for you. Allows you to add, 
view, search, edit, change, delete and printout 
(in a table/individual entry format) checkbook 
entries. Updates balance after each entry. Al- 
lows files for checking, savings, and other ac- 
counts. Disk$19.95. (CoCo 2 version included) 




BOWLING SCORE 
KEEPER 



An excellent utility to keep track of your bowl- 
ing scores. Allows you to save scores under in- 
dividuals or teams. You can edit change, delete, 
and compare scores. A must for anyone who 
wants to keep track of his or her bowling perfor- 
mance. Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 



Organize your videotapes with this progiam. 
Allows you to index tapes by title, rating, type, 
play time and comments. Also allows you to sort 
titles alphabetically & view/print selected tapes. 
If you own a VCR, this program is a MUST!! 
Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



COCO 3 SCREEN DUMP 



32, 40, 80 column text dump, PMODE 4 
Graphics Dump. Single Keystroke Operation al - 
lows you to take snapshots of your screens even 
when programs are running! Works on DMP's, 
Epson, Gemini and compatibles. CoCo 1, 2 and 
3. Disk $24.95 



HOME BILL MANAGER m 




Let the CoCo keep track of your bills. Allows 
you to enter bills under various categories and 
reminds you when they are due. Disk $19.95 



CALENDAR MAKER ; :Z: ; i 

)*,«*!! I 



■ no* 

n m m w Mia 



Generate monthly calendars on your printer for 
any year in the 20th century. Disk Only $19.95 
(CoCo 2 version included) 



ADOS 3 

Advanced disk operating system for CoCo 3. 
Comes on disk and is EPROMable!! Disk 
$34.95. ADOS (for CoCo 1,2): $27.95 



OS 9 



OS9 LEVEL II 
OPERATING SYSTEM 

Supports 512K RAM dual speed, multi-tasking, 
multiple windows, and morel! Comes with disk 
and complete documentation. Only $89.95 



MULTI-VUE 

User friendly graphics interface with multiple 
"window" applications for Level II. Only $54.95 



WIZ 

OS9 Level II Terminal Package with 300-19200 
baud rate and windowing capability. Requires 
512K and RS-232 Pack. Only $79.95 




DYNASTAR 

Best OS9 Editor/Word Processor Text Format- 
ter. Has Keyboard Macros, supports terminals 
& windows simultaneously, configurable, auto- 
indent for C/Pascal programming, mail-merge. 
New Manual makes it easier than ever. Only 

$149.95. DynaSpell $49.95. Both 
Dynastar and Dynaspell: Only $174.95 



DYNACALC OS-9 

Excellent spreadsheet for OS-9 users. Only 

$99.95 



Mm 



OS9 LEVEL II BBS 

BBS program that supports multiple users and 
sysop definable menus. Includes the following: 
Tsmon, Login, Chat, Message Retrieval, Mail 
Retrieval, Uloadx, Dloadx, and much more! 
Req. 512IC Only $29.95 



PC-Xfer UTILITIES 

Programs to format and transfer files to/from 
MS DOS diskettes on CoCo Under OS9 Level 
1 and 2. Requires SDISK or SDISK 3. Only 
$44.95 

SDISK 3 

Standard disk drive module replacement allows 
full use of 40/80 track double-sided drives. Req. 
OS9 Level II. Only $29.95. SDISK: $29.95 



OS9 LEVEL II RAMDISK 

Lightning Fast Ramdiskwith Auto-Formatting. 
A must for any OS9 Level II user. Req 512K. 
Only $29.95 



OS9 BOOKS: 

Inside OS9 Level IP. $39.95 
Rainbow Guide to OS9 II: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide to OS9 II Disk: $19.95 



OS9 Reference Card: FREE with any 
OS9 Purchase!!! 




JliJF MICROCOM SOFTWARE PO Box 214, Fairport, NY 14450 Ph: 716-223-1477 
All orders $50 and above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Amex, Check or 

MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); Foreign 10% S&H(minimum $5). New York State residents please add sales tax. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1 -800-654-5244 9am-9pm EST 7 days /week 

Except NY. Order Status, Infomation, Technical Information, NY orders call 716-223-1477 



- Dirafe - 



How To Read Rainbow 



When we use the term CoCo, we refer to an affection- 
ate name that was first given to the Tandy Color 
Computer by its many fans, users and owners. 

The basic program listings printed in the rain- 
bow are formatted for a 32-character screen — so they 
show up just as they do on your CoCo screen. One easy 
way to check on the accuracy of your typing is to com- 
pare what character "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings come out the same 
— you have a pretty good way of knowing that your 
typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 

RAINBOW ON DISK Or RAINBOW ON TAPE service. 



Using Machine Language 



The easiest way to "put" a machine language program 
into memory is to use an editor/assembler, a program 
you can purchase from a number of sources. All you 
have to do, essentially, is copy the relevant instructions 
from the rainbow's listing into CoCo. 

Another method of putting an ML listing into CoCo 
is called "hand assembly" — assembly by hand, which 
sometimes causes problems with ORI G I N or EQUATE 
statements. You ought to know something about 
assembly to try this. 

Use the following program if you want to hand- 
assemble ML listings: 

10 CLEAR200,&H3F00:I=&H3FB0 

20 PRINT "ADDRE55:";HEX$(I); 

30 INPUT "BYTE";B$ 

40 POKE I, VflL("&H"+B$) 

50 I=I+l:GOTD 20 

This program assumes you have a 16K CoCo. If you 
have 32K, change the &H3FB0 in Line 10 to &H7F0O 
and change the value of I to &H7F88. 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: CMDS and SOURCE. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rs t, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMDS directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the SOURCE directory contains the 
ASCIJ source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the SOURCE directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 



programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 

1) Type load dir list copy and press ENTER. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd^d© 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
on disk in Drive 1. Then type chckdl and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read . me . f i rs t file to the screen by typing 
list read-me. first and pressing enter. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow on disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMDS directory, enter di r cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMDS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system; copy /d0/cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds/filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: copy /dl'cmds/ filename 'd®/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. 

The Seal is not a "guarantee of satisfaction." The 
certification process is different from the review 
process. You are encouraged to read our reviews to 
determine whether the product is right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 



taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



V 


f 









The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command run 
and press enter. Once the program has run, type NEW 
and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to be sure you typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=256*PEEI<(35)+178 

20 CLEAR 25,X-1 

30 X=256*PEEI< (35) +178 

40 FOR Z=X TO X+77 

50 READ Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

G0 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=7985THEN80EL5EPRINT 

"DATA ERROR": STOP 
B0 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 1B2, 1, 106, 1G7, 140, G0, 134 
100 DATA 12G, 183, 1, 10G, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 48, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 128, 171, 128 
150 DATA 230, 132, 38, 250, 48, 1, 32 
1G0 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 1GG, 1GG, 132, 28, 254 
180 DATA 189, 173, 198, 53, 22, 12G, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



14 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



Books That Can Launch A 1000 Programs!! 



Pokes, Peeks and Execs are your guides into the jungle of computer programming. These commands give you the power of 
Machine Language without leaving the security of BASIC. Each book is a collection of "inside" information, with explanations 
and examples to help you immediately put it to use. Everyone from the novice to the professional will find these handy books a 
wealth of information. ^qq pQKES 

PEEKS/N EXECS 

300 POKES, " 
PEEKS, 'N EXECS 
for COCO III 



*40/80 column Screen Text Dump 
*Save Text/Graphics Screen to Disk 
* Command/Functions Disables 
•Enhancements for CoCo3 BASIC 
•128K/512K RAM Test Program 
*HPRINT Character Modifier 

Only $19.95 




SUPPLEMENT TO 500 
POKES,PEEKS, 'N EXECS 



•Autostart your BASIC programs 
•Disable Color BASIC/ECB/Disk BASIC 
commands 

•Disable Break Key/ Clear Key/ Reset Button 
•Generate a Repeat-key 
•Transfer ROMPAKs to tape 
•Set 23 different GRAPHIC modes 
•Merge two BASIC programs 
•And much much more!!! 

For CoCo 1,2 and 3. Only $16.95 
ALL 3 BOOKS for $39.95 



200 additional Pokes,Peeks and Execs (500 Pokes 
Peeks *N Execs is a prerequisite) 
•ROMPAK transfer to disk 
•PAINT with 65000 styles 
•Use of 40 track single/double sided drives 
•High-speed Cassette Operation 
•Telewriter, EDTASM + CoCo Max enhancements 
* Graphics Dump (for DMP printers) /Text Screen 
Dump 



For CoCo 1,2 or 3. Only $9. 95 



UNRAVELLED SERIES 




COCO LIBRARY 



An invaluable aid for Basic and Machine Language programmers, these 
books provide a complete disassembly and annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and Disk ROMs. These listings give complete, uninterupted 
memory maps of the four ROMs. Gain complete control over all versions of 
the color computer. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: COLOR 
BASIC and EXTENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: DISK BASIC ROM 1.1 and 
1.0 Disassembly : $19.95 

BOTH ECB AND DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $49.95 
SUPER EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: SUPER EX- 
TENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly for CoCo 3. $24.95 
COMPLETE UNRAVELLED SERIES (all 3 books): $59.95 



CoCo 3 Service Manual: $39.95 
CoCo 2 Service Manual: $29.95 
Inside OS9 Level II: $39.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 Level II: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 II (disk): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (Level 1): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (2 Disk): $29.95 
CoCo 3 Secrets Revealed: $19.95 
Basic Programming Tricks: $12.95 
Assembly Language Programming(tepco): $18 

Addendum For CoCo3 (tepco): $12 
Utility Routines Vol 1 (book): $14.95 





OTHER SOFTWARE ... 

COCO MAX III (with hi-res interface): $79.95 
COCO MAX II: Disk $77.95 Tape $67.95 
MAXFONTS #1,.#2,#3,#4: Disk $19.95 Each 
CGP-220 Driver Kit For CoCo Max III: $19.95 
MAXPATCH: Run COCO MAX II on COCO 3. $24.95 

TELEWRITER 64 (COCO 1&2) :Disk $57.95 Tape $47.95 
TW-80: COC03 features for TW-64 Disk $39.95 
TELEFORM: Mailmerge/form letters for TW-64 Disk $19.95 

AUTOTERM:Universal modem software Disk $39.95 Cas 
$29.95 




PRO-COLOR FILE *ENHANCED*: Multi-feature Database 
$59.95 

PRO-COLOR FORM & DIR: Forms/directories for PCF. 
$24.95 SIDEWISE: Print ASCII files sideways $24.95 

EDT/ASM 64D: Editor-assembler (specify 1,2,3) $59.95 
SOURCE: CoCo Disassembler $34.95 SOURCE III: $49.95 
CBASIC: Best Basic compiler $149.95 CBASIC III: $149.95 




WINDOW MASTER 

The hottest program for your CoCo 3!! Imagine using Win- 
dows, Pull-Down Menus, Buttons, Icons, Edit Field, and 
Mouse Functions in your Basic Programs. No need to use OS9. 
It uses the 640x255 (or 320x255) hires graphics mode for the 
highest resolution. Up to 31 windows can appear on the screen 
at one time. Need extra character sets? Window Master sup- 
ports 5 fonts in 54 sizes! How about an enhanced Editor for 
Basic? It gives you a superb Basic Editor which leaves the 
standard EDIT command in the cold. And don't forget that 
many existing Basic/ML programs will operate under Window 
Master with little or no changes. In fact, it does NOT take up 
any memory from Basic. Requires 1 Disk Drive, RS Hi-res In- 
terface & Joystick or Mouse. Specify 128K/512K. $69. 95 Win- 
dow Master & Hi-Res Interface. Only $79.95 

F1 

FUNCTION KEYS Display 

Use F1,F2, ALT, CTRL Keys on your CoCo 3!!! If you 
program in Basic, this program is a must! Only $14.95 




(LookingFor New Software . If you have a Basic or ML program^ 
I which you would like to market, contact us! We pay excellent I 
^royalties!!! J 



JhJF 




'A MERICA^ 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE PO Box 214, Fairport, NY 14450 Ph: 716-223-1477 
All orders $50 and above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge within US. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Amex, Check or 

MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); Foreign 10% S&H(minimum $5). New York State residents please add sales tax. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-9pm EST 7 days /week 

Except NY. Order Status, Infomation, Technical Information, NY orders call 716-223-1477 



^Fe ature 



16K 





This program guides you to an elusive creature 
a good used car! 



Stalking the Used Car 



By Richard Johnson 



■ have just bought a used can What a 
nightmare! With all the used cars out 
there, how do you keep track of the 
ones you have looked* at? This program 
will help you do just that. Used Cars 
prints a form that will help you keep 
track of all the important information 
price, mileage, engine size, options, 
etc. — for each car. 

The program was written on a CoCo 
3 using a Radio Shack DMP 105 print- 
er, There's nothing fancy about it. You 
can use tape or disk, and it runs on a 
16K machine. The one poke, in line 270, 
f§ for the 600 baud needed for the 
printer. 

When you need a used car* you go to 
the lot and hope that an honest sales- 
man will sell you a good car at a fair 
price. 1 think I have a better way. 

First, decide what you can afford to 
spend on a used car. Next, go to your 
cal library and look at some consumer 

Richard Johnson, a machine operator 
at Corhart Refractories, enjoys boih 
bw$ fishing and programming on his 
3. Richard has been program- 
ming since i9S5. 

16 THE RAINBOW So-p-tamoer 19flB 



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? THERE r R **TY? VN ^ 5 ? 0c *S 



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DISK DRIVES 

Double-Sided Double-Density 360K 40-Track 1/2 ht drives for CoCo 2 & 3. These are the same quality drives that are used in IBM® 
compatible computers. Buy from someone else and all you get is a disk drive. Buy from us and not only do you get a quality drive 
but $50 of Free Disk Utility Software (Super Tape/Disk Transfer & Disk Utility 2.1A) and our DISKMAX utility which aUowgvou 
to access BOTH sides of our drives. It's like buying TWO drives for the price of ONE!! 90-day warranty on all drives! 

Drive 0 (With Disto Super Controller!, Case, Power Supply & Cable) :$229.95 Drive 1: $149.95 
TWO 1/2 ht Drives in one case with Cable, Case & Disto Controller:$339.95 
J & M Controller (with RSDOS): $79.95 1 Drive Cable:$19.95 2 Drive Cable: $24.95 4 Drive Cable: $39.95 

DISTO Super Controller: $99.95 DISTO Super Controller II: $129.95 
Add Ons: Mini Eprom Prog.: $54.95 Real Time Clock/Parallel Interface: $39.95 Hard Dj§U nterface: $49.95 

{ 



HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Complete w/Hard Drive, WD Controller, 
B&B Interface, Cables, Case, Power Supp- 
ly, Software (OS9/Basic) & Instruction 
Manual. Assembled/ tested/ formatted.. 
Just Plug'n'RunH Multipak Req. 
Seagate 20 Meg System: $509 
Seagate 30 Meg System: $539 



HARD DRIVE INTERFACES 

CoCo XT: Use 2 5-120 Meg Drives with^ 
CoCo. $69.95. w/Real Time Clock: $99.95 
Hyper IO: Allows Hard Drive use with 
RSDOS. Only $29.95 

CoCo XT ROM: Boots OS9 from 
Hard/Floppy Drives. Only $19.95 
(Multipak Required for Interface) 




RS232 SUPER PACK 

Here it is! True RS232 port for 
your CoCo. Compatible with 
Tandy ® Deluxe RS232 Pack! 
Add $10 Includes DB25 Cable. Req. 



W 1. 1 



S&H 
(US/ 
Canada) 



Multipak. From DISTO so you 
know its quality! Going fast! 
Only $54.95 (CoCo 1,2 or 3) 




COMMUNICATIONS 
EXTRAVAGANZA 

1) AVATEX 1200e MODEM: Fully Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 w/ speaker, Auto- 
Dial/Answer/Redial (Reg $109.95) 

2) MODEM CABLE: 4 pin to DB25. (Reg 

$19.95) 

3) AUTOTERM TERMINAL SOFT- 
WARE (Reg $39.95) 

4) FREE COMPUSERVE OFFER and 
Access Time 

5) UPS 2nd DAY AIR Shipping 

ONLY $149.95 
(With AVATEX 1200hc 
instead of Avatex 1200e: $174.95) 
with AVATEX 2400: $249.95 





MAGNAVOX 8CM515 
RGB MONITOR 

Razor-sharp picture 
quality for your CoCo! Has 
14" screen, Analog/TTL 
RGB, Composite inputs 
for CoCo 2 & 3, built-in 
Speaker & tilt-stand! With 
a push of a button you can go from RGB 
to composite mode. This means that ALL 
your CoCo programs that appear in B&W 
in RGB mode will appear in color!!! Only 
$294 (add $12 S&H US/$40 in Canada). 
FREE Magnavox Cable for CoCo 3, Com- 
posite & Audio Cable with purchase of 
monitor ($24.95 value). 



EPROM 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER 

(for CoCo): Programs 2516-27512 & 

more! Includes software and complete 

documentation. Latest Version. Lowest 

Price anywhere! $137.95 

EPROM ERASER Fast erase of 24/28 pin 

EPROMs. Only $49.95 

BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER and 

ERASER: $179.95 

EPROMS: 2764-$8 27128-$9 each 
Call for other EPROMs 
ROMPAK (w/Blank PC Board 27xx 
Series): $12.95 

BLANK CARTRIDGE (Disk Controller 
Size): Only $10.95 




KEYBOARDS , ETC. 

KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: 
Move your keyboard 0&, 
away from the com- \ 
puter & type with ease.<$L 
Use your existing 
keyboard with this 
cable or leave your present keyboard in- 
tact and use a second keyboard. Only 
$39.95. 

Cable with CoCo II Keyboard: $49.95 
CoCo 3 Keyboard (with free FUNCTION 
KEYS software value $14.95) :$39.95 

CoCo 2 Keyboard: $19.95 

NX-1000 Rainbow System 

* Star NX-1000 Color Printer 

* Serial-to-Parallel Interface 

* Free Software: Signs 'N Banners and 
Starscan (HSCREEN2 dump in 64 col.) 
Only $289 ( + $10 S&H) 



CABLES 

MAGNAVOX 8505/8515/8CM643 Analog 
RGB Cable: $24.95 

SERIAL-TO-PARALLEL INTERFACE: Use 

your parallel printer at high speed (300-9600 baud) with 
CoCo. Comes will all cables. Only $44.95 

15" MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER 
CABLE: $29.95 

VIDEO DRIVER: Use a monochrome/color monitor 
with your CoCo. Comes with audio/video cables. Specify 
CoCo 1 or 2. Excellent picture quality/resolution! $34.95 
RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 Devices to the serial port. 
Only $18.95 

Y CABLE: Use your disk system with Speech Pak,CoCo 

Max, DS69, etc. $27.95 

CM-8 RGB Analog Ext. Cable:$19.95 

SONY Monitor Cable: $39.95 

VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference.$19.95 

MODEM CABLE:4 pin to DB25,Only $19.95 

3-POSITION SWITCHER: $37.95 

HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 



CHIPS, ETC 

Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
3): $29.95 ECB ROM 1.1:$29.95 
68B09E or 6809E Chip: $14.95 
MultiPak PAL Chip for CoCo 3: 
$19.95 

PAL Switcher: Now you can switch be- 
tween the CoCo 2 and 3 modes when 
using the Multi-Pak. You need the 
OLDER & NEW PAL chip for the 26- 
3024 Multipak. Only $39.95. With 
NEW PAL Chip: $49.95. m ^ 
5 1/4" Disks: $0.45 each! 




UPGRADES 

512K Upgrades for CoCo 3: $CALL 
64K Upgrade for CoCo Ps, CoCo IPs 
with Cat #26-3026/27, 26-3134, 26- 
3136: $29.95 

64K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/B CoCo 
II: $39.95 



fl»gg 



JhJF MICROCOM SOFTWARE PO Box 214, Fairport, NY 14450 Ph: 716 
All orders $50 & above (except drives, monitors & printers) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air 

accept Visa, MasterCard, Amex, Check or MO. Sorry, no CODs. Please add $3 S&H (USA/CANADA); except 
S&H(minimum $5). New York State residents please add sales tax. 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9am-9pm EST 7 days /week 

Except NY. Order Status, Infomation, Technical Information, NY orders call 716-223-1477 



-223-1477 1 V/SA jl^pj^ 
at no extra charge within US. We 

where specified otherwise; Foreign 10% 



^ REAL DESKTOP 



ii 





AND 



File Edit Options Colors Font Size Style 




W =1 



• if? 



CoCo Max II! is absolutely the best drawing package 
available for the CoCo 3, and it does more than just let 
you draw. CoCo Max III includes animation, text, color 
mixing and more features than you would think 
possible. It combines incredible speed with dazzling 
graphics and it is a joy to use even its most powerful 
features. 

Pictures, graphs, flyers, cards, signs, school projects, 
labels, buttons and anything else you might dream of 
creating is now possible with CoCo Max III. Is it any 
wonder that the majority of CoCo Gallery pictures in the 
last five months were created with CoCo Max? 

Thousands of CoCo users have found that you don't 
have to be an artist to have fun with CoCo Max. You'll 
wonder why you waited so long to get the incredible 
CoCo Max III. 



CoCo Max III is the best because it includes: 

- a huge picture area {two full hi-res 320x192 screens) - a large 
editing window - Zoom mode for detail work - 28 drawing tools 
which you just point and click on - shrink and stretch - rotation at 
any angle (1.5 degree steps) - 51 2K memory support {all features 
work with 128K too) - an Undo feature to correct mistakes - you 
can even Undo an "Undo" - Animation - special effects - color 
sequencing (8 colors, variable speed) - thirteen fonts (more 
available) - each font has eight different sizes - five style options 
(bold, italic, 3D. etc.) for thousands of font/size/style combination 
possibilities. - the CoCo Show "slide show" program - color 
editing of patterns - automatic pattern alignment - prints in single 
and double size - smart lasso (move text over a background,..) 

- advanced tools: arc, ray, cube, etc, - select 16 of the 64 colors (all 
64 colors are displayed at once for selection!) - picture converter 
(CoCo Max il. MGE, BASIC) - extensive prompting - "glyphic" 
clipbook of rubber stamps double click shortcuts - color mixing 
(additive/subtractive/none) - money back guarantee ~ sophisticated 
data compression saves disk space - pull down menus (no 
commands to remember) - forty paintbrush shapes - two color 
lettering - spray can - scrapbooks of pictures error free 

- Y-cable or multipack not required - high speed hi- res interface 
included (plugs into joystick port) - disk is not copy protected 

- amazing "flowbrush" - RGB and composite monitor support 

- replace color - printing on black and white printers in five shades 
of gray - full color printing with optional drivers for the NX-1000 
Rainbow and CGP220 - entirely rewritten for the CoCo 3 



can 



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CoCo Max III: $79.95 

Max-10 owners: deduct $10 

System Requirements: 

CoCo 3 disk system and a Joystick 
or Mouse 

Printer drivers Included: 

IBM/Epson and compatibles, GEMINI, 
DMP1 05/1 06/1 30.OK1 182/1 92. CGP220 
(B&W), DMP110, DMP200 

Color printer drivers (prints 125 
different colors) Star NX-1 000, CGP- 
220, or Okimate 20 each $1 9.95 



For all CoCo Max Versions 

Max Edit Font Editor: A font is a set of 
characters of a particular style. With Max Edit vou can 
create new fonts or modify the existing ones.$1 9.95 

Max Font disks (send for list) each $1 9.95 

Max Font Set (95 fonts on 4 disks) $49.95 

DS69/69B Digitizers: allows you to capture the 
image from a VCR or video camera and bring it into 
your computer. CoCo Max will let you load digitized 
pictures and modify them. 

DS-69 (2 images per second. Requires 

multipak) $99.95 

DS-69B (8 images/second) $1 49.95 



CoCo 1 & 2 Owners 

Still Available: 

(See previous ads or 
write for information) 

CoCo Max II (works on 

ail disk CoCos) $69.95 

CoCo Max Tape 

(CoCol & 2 only) $59.95 

Y-Cable $24.95 

CoCo Max II Picture 

Disk Set 

set of 3 disks: $29.95 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max or Max-10 for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with either of them; 
we will refund every penny. 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc. 




TO ORDER 

(203)656-1806 M0N-FRI 9 to 5 EST^ 



Visa or Mastercard accepted. C.O.D. orders $3 extra 
Check or M.0. to Cokxware, 242- w West Ave. Danen CT 
Add $3 per order for stopping ($5 to Canada. 10% to overseas) 
CT residents add 7.5% sales tax 



PUBLISHING 



COLORWARE 




THE DAZZLING WORD PROCESSOR 

You probably already have a word processor, and you 
probably wish it had these features: 

► Fully menu driven (CoCo Max style) with point and 
click marking of text. You don't need the arrow keys! 

► True WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) 
including variable size fonts, styles (bold, italics, etc.) 
and graphics. 

► Can print multiple columns on a page. 

► Not limited by printer capabilities: fonts up to 24 
points (1/3") high, superscripts, small print, etc. 

► Fully integrated spelling checker (incredibly fast), no 
need to exit program to check spelling. 

► Graphics can be imported from just about anything 
(CoCo Max; MGE; BASIC: even Macintosh pictures 
from a BBS) and resized to fit your document. 

► Full screen preview including graphics. 

Max-10 has all these unique features, plus all the 
features you are used to in your current word 
processor. Even with all this, you don't give up anything. 
Max-10 is easier to use, more intuitive, faster and more 
powerful than anything else. It's not just a word 
processor, it's a desktop publisher. 

D M.St 




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Max-10: $79.95 

CoCo Max III owners: deduct $10 
Max-10 requires a CoCo 3. at least 1 disk. & joystick or mouse 
Printer drivers included: IBM/Epson and compatibles; DMP 
105. DMP106, DMP130; CGP220 (B&W): Gemini/Star 



TM 



File Edit search* Lauout Font 



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a ume choice if UtMij fonts and stylet. 



Some of the many features of Max-10: 

- Blinding speed - printing in multiple columns - online dictionary 

- spell checking - graphics can be mixed with text - full justification 
of proportionally sized characters - bold, italic, underline 
superscript and subscript type styles - superb file support, just point 
and click - "Undo" lets you correct mistakes - easy to use. no 
commands to remember - any graphics program can be used 

- pictures can be shrunk or stretched to fit - right and left alignment 

- centering - variable line spacing - page numbering - current 
page number displayed on the screen - variable tab stops - left and 
right margins - tabs and margins can vary in the same document 

- cut and paste text and graphics anywhere in the file - page break 
shows on the screen - pull down menus are quick and simple to use 

- lightning fast access to any point in the document with the scroll 
box - twenty fonts (styles and sizes), more available - any number 
of character sizes and styles can be mixed on the same tine - up to 
more than 120 characters per tine, depending on font size, style and 
letters - headers and footers, even with graphics - file compatibility 
with other word processors - right, left, bottom and top margins 

- word wrap - set starting page - type ahead - key repeat - key 
click - scroll up and down - ASCII file output for compatibility 

- disk directory - kill files- block cut. copy and move - global 
search and replace - paragraph indent - clipboard - merge 

- show file (on disk) - free memory display - page count 

- paragraph count - word count - graphics can be resized and 
moved - multiple fonts - error recovery - true lowercase - 51 2K 
memory support (all features work with 128K too) - complete point 
and click cursor control - moving, clearing and changing blocks of 
text is ridiculously easy, just point and click at each end of the text 
block - onscreen ruler - preview file before loading - search and 
replace - disk is not copy protected - more than 35 pages of text 

CoCo Max III and Max-10 
Perfect Together 

You do not need CoCo Max III to insert and print 
graphics in Max-10. Max-10 works with any graphics 
creation program, and you can also use graphics 
downloaded from bulletin boards. 

Similarly, you do not need Max-10 to create graphics 
with text in CoCo Max III. There are tremendous 
lettering capabilities in CoCo Max III, with its many 
fonts, styles, and sizes. 

Together Max-10 and CoCo Max III are an unbeatable 
combination. This desktop publishing system is better 
than anything youVe ever seen on a CoCo. We are so 
confident that you will use, and enjoy using *he two 
software packages, that we offer an unconditional 
money back guarantee. Stop wasting your time and 
effort using inferior or obsolete products. Move up to 
the new generation of CoCo software now. 



magazines. There are several; check 
them all out. These magazines will tell 
you which used cars are the best ones 
to buy. They will also show you the 
average repair record for each car. To 
find out if a car has ever been recalled, 
call the Auto Safety Hotline, 1-800-424- 
9393. 

Next, go to your bank or Credit 
Union and ask to see their National 
Automobile Dealers Association Book. 
This book lists cars by year, make and 
model. It also lists the national average 
trade-in, loan and retail price of each 
car. The book lists the main options for 
each car; and, in the front of the book, 
there is a High and Low Mileage Chart 
for each year. 



Once you know the car or cars that 
interest you, change the option section 
of the program to match your car 
choice. The option section is located in 
lines 420 to 490. 

When you run Used Cars the credits 
are displayed. After a few seconds, the 
program will remind you to start the 
paper at the top of the printer head and 
to make sure the printer is online. After 
you press enter, you will be asked for 
the number of copies you want. The 
program offers one to five copies, but 
if you want more you can change the 
five in lines 240 and 250 to any value. 

Now, the computer tells you that it is 
printing, and the printer will print all 
the copies you requested. 



Following are the printer codes used: 



CHR$(27) 
CHR$(10) 
CHR$(27) 
CHR$(27) 
CHR$(15) 
CHR$(14) 
CHR$(19) 



=Escape code 

= Executive line feed 

; CHR$ [14 j =Start elongation 

;CHR$(15)=End elongation 

=Start underline 

=End underline 

=Standard print 



The forms printed out should be used 
as you look at the cars. Fill each out 
completely and ask all the questions at 
the bottom of the page. Good luck!!! 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 826 Elmwood Ave., New 
Albany, IN 47150. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 




210 173 590 . 

340 23 680 . 

430 222 END 

490 33 



....90 
...167 
....44 



The listing: USEDCRRS 

10 REM $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

20 REM $$$ USED CARS $$$ 

30 REM $$$ BY $$$ 

40 REM $$$ RICHARD K.JOHNSON $$$ 



50 
60 
70 
80 
90 



REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 



USED CARS 



BY 



$$$ 826 ELMWOOD AVE. $$$ 

$$$ NEW ALBANY, IN. $$$ 

$$$ 47150 $$$ 

$$$ APRIL 88 $$$ 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

100 CLS:PRINT@101, "$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

$$$$$$$$$» 

110 PRINTS 13 3 , 11 $ 
$» 

120 PRINT@165," 
$" 

130 PRINT@197," 
$" 

140 PRINT@229," 
$" 

150 PRINT@2 61," 
$" 

160 PRINTQ293," 
SON $" 

170 PRINT@325," 
$" 

180 PRINT@357," 
$$$$$» 

190 FORP=1TO2000:NEXTP 

200 CLS: PRINT "SET PAPER TO TOP O 

F PRINTER HEAD" 

210 PRINT" WHEN PRINTER IS ON L 
INE PRESS <«ENTER>»" 
220 EXEC44539 

230 IF INKEY$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 240EL 



$ RICHARD K. JOHN 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



SE200 

240 CLS:INPUT"HOW MANY COPIES (1 
-5) " ; C 

250 IFC<1 OR C>5 THEN 2 40 ELSE260 
260 PR=1 

270 POKE150,87'POKE FOR 600 BAUD 
RATE FOR RADIO SHACK DMP 105 PR 
INTER 

280 FORPR=l TO C 

290 CLS : PRINT @ 2 3 4 , " NOW PRINTING" 
300 A$="USED CARS" 
310 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ;T 
AB( (45-LEN(A$) )/2) ;A$;CHR$(10) ;C 
HR$ ( 10 ) 

320 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) ;C 
HR$(15) ;CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ; " DEALE 
R 

OWNER 
ii 

330 PRINT #-2 , CHR$ (10) ; "ADDRESS 

ADDRESS 
ii 

340 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10) ;"TEL. 



TEL. 



ii 



350 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (10) ; "ASKING PR 
ICE LOWEST PRICE 

YOUR OFFER 



if 



"MAKE 

" f +"ST 



"YEAR 



360 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10) 

",+"MODEL 
YLE (2DR) (4DR) WAGON 
370 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10) 
",+"MILEAGE 

OLOR 
INT#-2,CHR$(14) 

380 PRINT#-2,TAB(1) ; " (4 ) - ( 6 ) - ( 8 ) 
CYL" ; : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 30 ) ; " ( ) TURBOC 
HARGED" ; : PRINT* -2 , TAB ( 60) ; " ( ) FUE 
L INJECTION" 



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20 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



The Amazing A-BUS 





I 






An A-BUS system wfth two Motherboards 
A' BUS adapter in foregrou rid 

The A* BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

theCoCoa and the CoCo 3. 

About the A-BUS system: 

• All trte A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Porter Memory, in BASIC, use IN P and OUT {or PEEK and 
POKE wittt Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• Thnv are all compatible with each other, You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit youi application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-123) and 
detailed manuals {including schematics and programming examples). 



the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control,; monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable ta connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards; The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries), 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for 



'A. 



. . (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LCD's show status Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
Card address is jumper selectable. 



RE-1 40: $129 



RE-1 56: $99 

Same.featuresas above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card ad-i 42: $1 29 

Eight analog Inputs. 0 to 4- 5V range can be expanded to 1 00 V by adding a 
resistor 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature/light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-i 46: $139 

Hits analog to digital converter is accurate \^3^S^^^Hii0i'^ ~4Vto 
44V Resolution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
hhiiis to read microyo^ time is 1 30ms. Ideal fdi; thermocouple, 

slrnin gauge, etc, I channel. (Expand lo 8 channels using the RE-1 56 card). 

Digital Input Card in-i41:$59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/olf" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-1 48: $65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for input latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O Uses the 8255 A chip. 

Clock with Ala rm cl-144: $89 

Powerful cfocfycalendar with: battery back^is forTtme, Date and Alarm 
setting (lime and date); built in alarm relay, led and buzzer; timing to 1/100 




RE-140 



■ '\ .V." 



5 Is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
ead the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pR-152: $1 5 

11 by 4V 2 in with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I.C.s 



Add S3. 00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC, checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT & NY residents add sates tax. 
C-O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada; shipping is $5 
Overseas add 10% 




Smart Stepper Controller sc-149: $299 

World's finest stepper controller. On board microprocessor controls; 4 
motors simultaneously. Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands tike 
"Move arm 10.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory. For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half, full. wave), 
scale factor. units v hofding power, etc. Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (350mA) for small steppers (MO-1 03). Send for SC-149 flyer. 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21: $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-123: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-1 22: $19 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board. 

Stepper Motor Driver st-i43: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with them. Each card 
drives two stepper motors (12V, bidirectional, 4 phase. 350 mA per phasel 
Special Package: 2 motors (MO-1 03) + ST-143: PA-1B1: $99 

Stepper Motors mo-io3: $isor4for$39 

Pancake type, 2 ft" dia. W- shaft. 7.5 y /step. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec, 12V, 36 ohm, bipolar, 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701-P2. 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter, 4 Channel 
' .I to Analog converter. Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 



AR-133...S69 
ArVl33..,$69 
AR-134...S49 
AR-136...S69 
AR-135 .$69 
AfM32...$49 
AR-137,.$62 
AR-13U$39 
AR-138...$49 



A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT, AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot. 
Tandy 1000,1 000EX&SX.1 200,3000. Usesonestiort slot. 
Apple II, II+. lie. uses any slot. 
TRS-80 Model 102, 200 Plugs into 40 pin "system bus" 
Model TOO. Uses 40 pin socket. {Socket is duplicated on adapter). 
TRS-80 Mod 3,4,4 D. Fits 50 pin bus (With hard disk, use Y-cable). 
TRS-80 Model 4 P. Includes extra cable. {50 pin bus is recessed). 
TRS-80 Model I. Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or E/l. 
Color Computers (Tandy). Fits ROM slot Multipak. or Y-cabie 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft, so cond.) ca-i63: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard. 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-120: $99 

Each Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 
161: $1 2). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 




a S' jma Industries Company 



ALPHA &m(&kmk 

242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



Technical info: (203) 656-1806 

SHn°cr y 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
Air lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




REAL DESKTOP 



file Edit options colors Font Size Sltile 





CoCo Max III is absolutely the best drawing package 
available far the CgCo 3. and It does more than just let 
you draw. CoCo Max III Includes animation, text, color 
mixing and more features than you would Ihink 
possible. It combines Incredlbfe speed with dazzling 
graphics and it is a Joy to use even its most powerful 
features, 

Pictures, graphs, flyers, cards, signs, school projects, 
labels, buttons and anything else you might dream of 
creating i& now possible with CoCo Max III, Is it any 
wonder that the majority of CoCo Gallery pictures in the 
last five months were created with GoCo Max? 

Thousands of CoCo users have found I hat you donl 
have to be an artist to have lun With CoCo Ma*. Youll 
wonder why you waited so Jong to get the Incredible 
CoCo Max 



CoCo Max III is the best because it Includes; 

- a Huge picture afaa [two full fii-res 320*192 screens) - a large 
editing window - Zoom mode for detail work - £6 drawing tools 
which you just point and click on - shrink and stretch - rotation at 
any angle (1.5 degree steps) - 512K memory support {afl features 
work with 12SK too) - an Undo feature to correct rn intakes - you 
can even Undo an "Under Animation - special effects - cotor 
sequencing (B colors, variable speed} - thirteen rents (more 
available) - each tent has erg lit different sizes - rive style options 
(fiold, klBfcc. 3D, etc.} for thousands of font/size/style combination 
poeslojhtles, - the Coco Ehow "slide show" program - color 
edrtfjia ol patterns - auiomfftic pattern allgnme?ni prints fin single 
and double size - smart lasso (move text over a backgrounds) 

- advanced tools: a<c, ray, cube, etc, - select 16 ot the 64 colors (aH 
64 colors are disproved at once for selectionO - picture converter 
(CoCo Ma* IL MGE, BASIC) - extensive prompting - "glyphlc" 
clipbook of rubber stamps - douoje click shtiitc-Jls c:oior mixing 
(addiiives'subltactlve/none) - money back guarantee - sophistrcaied 
daia compression saves disk space - pull down menus (no 
commands to remember) * forty paintbrush shapes - two color 
lettering - spray can - scrap books of pictures - error free 

- Y- cable or muKipack not required - high speed hi-res Interface 
tmludeo (plugs Into joy slick port) - disk is not copy prelected 

- amazing "fiowbruah - - RGB and composite monitor support 

- repJacti color - printing on black and white printers in five shades 
of gray - lull color printing with optional drivers for the NX-IOQO 
Rainbow and CGF22Q - entirely rewritten for the CoCo 3 



can 



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are 



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CO 



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pro 



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Co 



Co 



COCO Max III: $79.95 

Mai - 1 (l owTiera: deduct $10 

System Require merits: 
CoCo 3 disk system and a Joystick 
t?r Mouse 

Printer drivers Included: 

IBM/Epson and compatibles. GEMINI, 

OM P 1 05/1 06/1 30. OK1 1 32/ 1 02 . CGP330 
(B AW) . DMP1 1 0 . 0MP2DQ 

Color printer drivers (prints 125 
d«»Hrent colore) Star NX- 1000. CGP- 
220, or Ok i ma! e 20 each $1 B.95 



For oil CoCo Max Versions 

Max Edtt Font Editor: a ront is a set of 
characters or a particular style, With Max Editvou can 
create new fonts or modify ihe existing ones, $1 9,95 

M ax Font d [sks [send ror I isi) each $19.95 

Max Font Sei (95 fonts on 4 disks) $49 95 

OS69/69B Digitizers: mows you to capture tne 
Image from a VCR or video cameia and bring it into 
your Qwriputer. CoCo Max will jet you load digitized 
Matures and modify lhem. 

DS-6& (2 images per second. Requires 

muirjpak) $99.95 

DS-69B (a images/second) SI 49.95 



CoCo 1 & 2 Owners 
Still Available: 

(See previous ads or 
write tor Information) 

CoCo Max II (works on 
all disk CoCos) $69.95 
CoCo Max Tape 
(CoOol only) $59,95 
Y-Cabl* $24.95 
CoCo Max IJ Picture 
Disk Set 

seft of 3 disks: $29. 95 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max or Max-1 0 for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with either of them, 
we will refund every penny. 



CQLORWARIE 



inirins, iptc 




TO ORDER ^» 

(ZM) 656-1806 MON-FRI 9 to 5 EST^ 



■/sa of Uasforcard accepl&l C.O.D. orders $3 extra 
Check a M.O. to: Cotaware. Wes Ave. DarienCT 
Add $3 per order for shipping $5 to Canada. 10% to overseas) 
CT residents add 7.5% sales tax 



PUBLISHING 



[COLORWARE 





1 



* 



You probably already have a word processor, and you 
probably wish it had these features; 

* Fully menu driven (CoCo Max style) with point and 
click marking of text. You don't need the arrow keys! 

* True WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) 
including variable size fonts, styles 
and graphics. 

ft Can print multiple columns on a page. 

Not limited by printer capabilities; fonts up to 24 
points (1/3") high, superscripts, small print, etc, 

* Fully integrated spelling checker (incredibly fast), no 
need to exit program to check spelling, 

U Graphics can be imported from just about anything 
(CoCo Max; MGE; BASIC; even Macintosh pictures 
from a 



Max- 10 has all these unique features, plus all the 
features you are used to in your current word 
processor. Even with all this, you don't give up anything. 
Max-10 is easier to use, more intuitive, faster and more 
powerful than anything else. It's not just a word 
processor, it's a desktop publisher. 





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Max-1 0: 

CoCo Max III owners: deduct $10 
Max-10 requires a CoCo 3, at least 1 disk, & joystick or mouse 
Printer drivers included: IBM/Epson and compatibles; DMP 
105, DMP106. DMP130; CGP220 (B&W); Gemini/Star 



File Edit Search* Layout Font 





( i . 1 . 1 . 1^, I 




mm 



style 



s/ Plain Tent 
Bold 




Italics 




CI 


Underlined 




cu 


Superscript 




CH 


subscript 




CL 










upuuuuiim 



WYSIWIG adj. (wiz-ee-vig) I What | 
You See Is What You Get (acronym) 



« uukc choice tf ltt kiij fonts and stjles. 



' • <>, .''c' ; 'i'>!v;''-'" 




5? ^ :> 



Some of the many features of Max-10: 

- Blinding speed - printing in multiple columns - online dictionary 

- spell checking - graphics can be mixed with text - full justification 
of proportionally sized characters - bold, italic* underline 
sufjerscript and subscript type styles - superb file support, just point 
and click - "Undo* lets you correct mistakes - easy to use, no 
commands to remember - any graphics program can be used 

- pictures can be shrunk or stretched to fit - right and left alignment 

- centering - variable line spacing - page numbering * current 
page number displayed on the screen - variable tab stops ~ left and 
right margins - tabs and margins can vary in the same document 

- cut and paste text and graphics anywhere in the file - page break 
shows on the screen - pull down menus are quick and simple to use 

- lightning fast access to any point in the document with the scroll 
box ~ twenty fonts (styles and sizes), more available - any number 
of character sizes and styles can be mixed on the same line - up to 
more than 1 20 characters per line, depending on font size, style and 
letters ^ headers and footers, even with graphics - file compatibility 
with other word processors ~ right, left, bottom and top margins 

- word wrap - set starting page - type ahead - key repeat - key 
click - scroll up and down - ASCII file output lor compatibility 

- disk directory - kilt fites- block cut, copy and move - global 
search and replace - paragraph indent - clipboard - merge 

- show file (on disk) - free memory display - page count 

- paragraph count - word count - graphics can be resized and 
moved - multiple fonts - error recovery - true lowercase - 512K 
memory support (all features work with 128K too) - complete point 
and click cursor control - moving, clearing and changing blocks of 
text is ridiculously easy, just point and click at each end of the text 
block - onscreen ruler - preview file before loading - search and 
replace - disk is not copy protected - more than 35 pages of text 



1 




■•Z 1 . .*-.'••«.. 



You do not need CoCo Max III to insert and print 
graphics in Max-10. Max-10 works with any graphics 
creation program, and you can also use graphics 
downloaded from bulletin boards. 

Similarly, you do not need Max-10 to create graphics 
with text in CoCo Max III. There are tremendous 
lettering capabilities in CoCo Max III. with its many 
fonts, styles, and sizes, 

Together Max-10 and CoCo Max III are an unbeatable 
combination. This desktop publishing system is better 
than anything youVe ever seen on a CoCo. We are so 
confident that you will use, and enjoy using *he two 
software packages, that we offer an unconditional 
money back guarantee. Stop wasting your time and 
effort using inferior or obsolete products. Move up to 
the new generation of CoCo software now. 



mm. 



I 



390 PRINT #-2, TAB (1) () FRONT WH 
EEL DRIVE " ; : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 30) ; " ( ) 
REAR WHEEL DRIVE" ; : PRINT #-2 , TAB 
(60);"() FOUR WHEEL DRIVE" 
400 B$="OPTIONS" 

410 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10) ;CHR$(27) ;C 
HR$(14) ; TAB ( (47-LEN(B$) )/2) ;B$:P 
RINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) 
420 PRINT#-2,TAB(1) ;" () AUTOMAT I 
C TRANS"; :PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;" () M 
ANUAL TRANS " ; : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 60 ) ; " 
() FLOOR SHIFT" 

43)3 PRINT#-2,TAB(1) ;" () AIR-COND 
" ; : PRINT# -2 , TAB ( 3 0 ) ; " ( ) POWER S 
TEERING " ; : PRINT #-2 , TAB ( 60) ; " ( ) 
POWER BRAKES " 

440 PRINT#-2,TAB(1) ;" () POWER WI 
NDOWS "; :PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;"() PO 
WER DR. LOCKS " ; : PRINT* -2 , TAB ( 60) 
;»() POWER SEATS " 
450 PRINT#-2,TAB(1) ;»() TILT STE 
ERING" ; : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 3 0 ) ; " ( ) CRU 
ISE CONTROL"; :PRINT#-2, TAB (60) ;" 
() REAR DEFROSTER" 
460 PRINT#-2,TAB(1) ;" () AM/FM RA 
DIO"; :PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;"() AM/FM 
STEREO"; :PRINT#-2, TAB (60) ;"() A 
M/FM STEREO/TP" 

470 PRINT#-2,TAB(1) ;" () VINYL RO 
OF"; :PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;" () SUN RO 
OF/T-TOP"; :PRINT#-2,TAB(60) ;" () 
LANDAU ROOF" 

480 PRINT#-2,TAB(1) ;" () TINTED G 
LASS"; :PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;"() BODY 
TRIM";:PRINT#-2,TAB(60) ;"() TRI 
P COMPUTER" 

490 PRINT#-2,TAB(1) ;" () ANTILOCK 
BRAKES" ;:PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;"() T 
HEFT DETERRENT"; : PRINT* -2, TAB (60 
) ; " () RUSTPROOFING" 
500 PRINT#-2 

510 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (15) ; "OTHER OPT 
IONS 



ii 



ti 



520 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, " 



ii 



530 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, " 



•i 



540 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, "COMMENTS 



ii 



550 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2," 



560 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, " 



ii 



570 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2," 



ii 



580 PRINT#-2,CHR$(14) 

590 C$="OBSERVATIONS" 

600 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ;T 

AB ( (44-LEN (C$) )/2) ;C$ : PRINT#-2 , C 

HR$(27) ;CHR$(15) 

610 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ;" 
HOW DOES THE PAINT LOOK? ()NEW ( 
)GOOD ( ) FAIR ( ) BEEN TOUCHED UP" 
620 PRINT#-2, "HOW DO THE TIRES L 
OOK? ()NEW ()GOOD ()WORN ON ONE 
SIDE OR THE OTHER" 
630 PRINT#-2, "ARE THERE ANY SCRA 
TCHES OR DENTS? ()YES ()NO" 
640 PRINT#-2, "HAS THIS CAR EVER 
BEEN WRECKED? ()YES ()NO**IF YES 

WHAT PART OF CAR?" 
650 PRINT#-2, "HOW DOES THE INTER 
IOR LOOK? ( ) VERY GOOD ( ) GOOD ()F 
AIR**DOES IT SMELL MUSTY ()YES ( 
)NO 

660 PRINT#-2, "HOW DOES THE ENGIN 
E SOUND?** ARE THERE ANY ODD NOI 
SES? ()YES ()NO" 

670 PRINT#-2, "ARE THERE ANY LEAK 
S UNDER THE CAR? ()YES ()NO** IF 
YES, WHERE ARE THEY COMING FR 
OM?" 

680 PRINT#-2, "DOES THE TRANSMISS 
ION SHIFT SMOOTHLY? ( ) YES ()NO" 
690 PRINT#-2,"DO THE BRAKES PULL 

TO ONE SIDE OR THE OTHER? ()YES 

()NO" 

700 PRINT#-2 , "DOES THE STEERING 

WORK OK? ()YES ()NO" 

710 PRINT #-2, "HOW IS THE SUSPENS 

ION?**DO THE SHOCKS AND SPRINGS 

SEEM TO BE OK? ()YES ()NO" 

720 PRINT#-2,"IS THERE A WARRANT 

Y ON THE CAR? ()YES ()NO **IF YE 

S HOW LONG AND WHAT IS COVEREDBY 

THIS WARRANTY?" 
730 PRINT#-2,"IS THERE A REPAIR 
RECORD FOR THIS CAR? ()YES ()NO" 
740 PRINT#-2,"DO YOU KNOW OF ANY 
THING THAT IS WRONG WITH THIS CA 
R? ()YES ()NO**IF YES WHAT?" 
750 NEXTPR 

760 CLS:PRINT@236,"GOOD LUCK" 
770 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:P 
RINT#-2 



24 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



VIP Writer III 

VIP Writer has ALWAYS led the pack with features and now VIP Writer III still leads the 
wayl The chart below illustrates this fact Telewriter 1 28 only gives you 48K for text 
Why is it called Telewriter 128? Word power 3 gives only 72KI VIP Writer III /makes use 
of over 106KI VIP Writer III is the ONLY CoCo 3 word processor worthy of m name! 




WORD PROCESSOR COMPARISON CI^RT 


CoCo3with 128K 


VIP Writer m 


Telewriter 128 


Word JSiWer 3 


Text Storage 


OVER 49.000 


48,000 


71000 


Print Soooier 


YbS 57,000 


NONfc 


NONE 


Total Storage 


106,000 


48,000 


72,000 


Soeiling Checker 


VIP Soeiler 


NONE 


FREE WARE 


RGB HD Support 


100% 


NONE 


N0N£ 


Screen Display 


32/40/54/30 


40/80 


80 



SCREEN DISPLAY OPTIONS 

As the chart above shows - VIP Writer lit offers more screen width options -ail with 24 
lines and actual lower case letters, tt uses the CoCo 3*s hardware display and double clock 
speed and is VERY VERY FAST! You can choose fore and background colors from up to 
64 different hues. Color can be turned ON or OFF for the best possible display using a 
color or monochrome monitor or TV set VIP Writer III has a built in on-line context 
sensitive help fatality which displays command usage in easy to read colored windows. 

CUSTOMIZER & PRINTER INSTALLER 

VIP Writer III comes with a configuration / printer installation program which lets you 
customize VIP Writer ill to suit your own liking. You can set screen width and colors as well 
as margins and more. You can also install your own printer and set interface type (serial, 
parallel or J&M), baud rate, line feeds, etc. Once done, you never have to enter these 
parameters again! VIP Writer III will toad n' go with your custom configuration every timet 

TEXT FILE STORAGE 

VIP Writer III creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all other VIP Programs 
as well as other programs which use ASCII file formal You can use VIP Writer III to even 
create BASIC programs! There is a 49K text buffer and disk or cassette file linking 
allowing virtually unlimited text space. VIP Writer HI works with up to four disk drives and 
lets you display disk directories and free soace as well as rename or kill disk flies, in 
addition VIP Writer III is 1 00% compatible with the RGB Computer Systems HARD DISK. 

EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer lit has a full featured screen editor which can be used to edit text with lines up 
to 240 characters long with or without automatic word wrap around. You can select 
type-over mode or insert mode. There is even an OOPS command to recall a cleared text 
buffer. Other editing features include: Type-ahead • rypamatie key repeat and key beep 
for flawless text entry • end of line bell ■ full four way cursor control with scrolling » top 
of textfile • bottom of textfile • page up • page down • top of screen ■ bottom of screen • 
beginning of line • end of line • left one word • right one word • DELETE character, to 
beginning or end of line, word to the left or right, or entire line • INSERT character or line 
• LOCATE and/or CHANGE or DELETE single or multiple occurrence using wildcards • 
BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to TEN simultaneous block manipulations • TAB key 
and programmable tab stops • word count • line restore • three PROGRAMMABLE 
FUNCTIONS to perform tasks such as auto column creation and multiple copy printing. 

TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you to format your text in 
any way you wish. You can change the top, bottom, left or right margin and page length. 
You can -set your text flush left, center or flush right. You can turn right hand 
justification on or off. You can have headers, footers, page numbers and TWO auxiliary 
tines which can appear on odd, even or all pages. You can also select the line on which they 
appear! You can even change the line spacing! Parameters can be altered ANYWHERE! 

PREVIEW PRINT WINDOW 

VIP Writer 111 features an exclusive format window which allows you to preview your 
document BEFORE PRINTING IT1 You are able to move up, down, left and right to see 
centered text, margins, page breaks, orphan lines eta This makes hyphenation a snap! 

PRINTING 

VIP Writer III prints TWICE as fast as any other CoCo word processor! It supports most 
serial or parallel printers using J&M JFD-CP or Rainbow interface and gives you the 
ability to select baud rates from 110 to 19,200. You can imbed printer control codes 
anywhere in your text file EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT I VIP Writer III also has 
TWENTY programmable printer macros which allow you to easily control all of your 
printers capabilities such as bold, underline, italics and superscript using simple key 
strokes. Other features include: multiple copy printing • single sheet pause • line feeds. 

PRINT SPOOLING 

Save up to $150 on a print spooler because VIP Writer HI has a built in print spooler with 
a 57,000 character buffer which allows you to print one document WHILE you are editing 
another. You don't have to wait until your printer is done before starting another jobl 

DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer III is supplied with a 125 page instruction manual which is well written and 
includes many examples. The manual has a tutorial and glossary of terms for the beginner 
as well as a complete index! VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller. DISK $79.95 

Cassette version does not include VIP Speller. TAPE $59.9 5 

VIP Writer owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer 111 Disk for $49.95 
or Tape for $39.95. Send original disk or tape. Include $3 S/H 



It's Word Processor Trade In Time 

For a limited time you can trade in your old software for the VIP Writer I or III and save up 
to $20! Send in your old disk or tape and manual. VIP Writer tape $34.95, disk $49.95. 
VIP Writer III tape $44.95, disk $59.95. include $3.00 shipping. Offer expires 8/31/88 



VIP Database III 

The VIP Database III features selectable screen displays of 40, 64 or 80 characters by 
24 lines with choice of 64 foreground and background colors for maximum utility, ft uses 
the CoCo 3's hardware screen and double clock speed to be the FASTEST database 
available! VIP Database III will handle as many records as will fit on your disks and is 
structured in a simple and easy to understand menu system with full prompting for easy 
operation. Your data is stored in records of your own design. All files are fulfy indexed for 
speed and efficiency. Full sort of records is provided for easy listing of names, figures, 
addresses, etc., in ascending or descending alphabetical or numeric order. Records can be 
searched for specific entnes using multiple search criteria. With Database III mail-merge 
you may also combine files, sort and print mailing lists, print form letters, address 
envelopes - the list is endless. The built-in MATH package even performs anthmetic 
operations and updates other fields. VIP Database (II also has a print spooler and report 
generator with unlimited print format capabilities including embeddabie control codes for 
use with ALL printers. ' DISK $6935 

VIP Database owners: Upgrade to the VIP Database 111 Disk for I 
$39.95. Send original disk. Include $3 shipping. I 



VIP Integrated Library 

The VIP Integrated Library combines all six popular VIP application programs - VIP 
Writer*, Speller, Calc, Database*, Terminal and Disk-ZAP - into one program on one disk! 
The program is called VIP Desktop. From the desktop you have instant access to word 
processing with a spelling checker always in attendance, data management with mail 
merge, spreadsheet financial analysis, telecommunications and disk maintenance. 64K. 
required . Indude $4.00 shipping for this product DISK $149.95 

•CoCo 3 owners: Purchase the VIP Integrated Library /WDE (Writer & Database 
Enhanced) which has the VIP Writer 111 and VIP Database Hi in place of the VIP Writer and 
VIP Database. Include $4.00 shipping for this product. DISK 51 69.95 



Previous VIP Library owners: Gail or write for upgrade pricing. | 



VIP Writer 



VIP Writer is also available for CoCo 1 and 2 owners and has all the features found in the 
VIP Writer 111 including VIP Speller except for the following: The screen display is 32, 51, 
64 or 85 columns by 21 or 24 rows. Screen colors are green, black or white. Help is not 
presented in colored windows. Double clock speed is not supported. Parallel printer 
interface is not supported. Print spooler is not available. Hard disk is not supported. 
Even so, VIP Writer still out-features the rest! ffs a CoCo 1 or 2 owners best choice in 
word processors. Includes VP Speller. DISK 569.95 

Cassette version does not include VIP Speller. TAPE $49.95 

VIP Speller 

VIP Speller works with ANY ASCII file created by most popular word processors. It 
automatically checks text files for words to be corrected, marked for speaal attention or 
even added to the dictionary. You can even view the misspelled word in context! VIP 
Speller comes with a specially edited 50,000 word dictionary, and words can be added to 
or deleted from the dictonary or you can create your own. DISK $34.95 



VIP Database 



VIP Database has all the features of VIP Database HI except the screen widths are 51 , 64 
and 85. Screen colors are green, black and white, double speed is not supported, spooler 
is not available. Still VIP Database is the best database for the CoCo 1 & 2! DISK $49.95 



VIP Calc 



Now every CoCo owner has access to a calculating and planning tool better than 
VisiCalc™, containing all its features and commands and then some. VIP Calc displays 32, 
51, 64 or 85 characters by 21 or 24 lines right on the screen. VIP Calc allows up to a 33K 
worksheet with up to 512 columns by 1024 rows! In addition, VIP Calc has multiple 
windows which allow you to compare and contrast results of changes. Other features 
include 16 DIGIT PRECISION * trig, functions * averaging • algebraic functions • column 
and row ascending and descending SORTS • locate formulas or titles in cells * block move 
and replicate * global or local column width • limitless programmable functions • works with 
ANY printer. Embed printer control codes for customized printing. Combine spreadsheet 
data with VIP Writer documents to create ledgers, projections, statistical and financial 
budgets and reports. Requires 64K. DISK $59 .95 

VIP Terminal 

For your important communications needs you've got to go beyond software that only lets 
you chat. You need a smart terminal so that you can send and receive programs and 
messages and print them! The VIP Terminal features 32, 51, 64 or 85 characters by 21 
or 24 lines on the screen and has a 43K byte buffer to store information. DISK $39.95 

VIP Disk-ZAP 

VIP Disk-ZAP is the ultimate disk repair utility for simple and quick repair of most disk 
errors. Designed with the non-programmer in mind, the VIP Disk-ZAP will let you retneve 
all types of bashed files, BASIC and Machine Language programs. It even works with 40 
track drives! The 50 page tutonal makes the novice an expert. DISK $24.95 

AH disk products are unprotected and run under RSDOS. 

SIE) IEntieirmiisies 

©(503) 663-2865 tSIpQB ^33 Gresham. OR 97Q30 

Please add S3 tor shipping and handling. Outside continental US add $4 S/H. COD oroers add an 
additional $2,25. Checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. AM other orders are shipped the same day. 
TSCwrSS 128 it a rademaifc ol Cogmwc Wad Power 3 * a JademaS of ttaocom Software. 




CoCo Gallery 7^ 2b-22, iwz 





26 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 



2 



(1) 1st Place (CoCo 3) 

Queen Angelfish by Hal Katschke 

Hal, of Frankfort, Illinois, used Color Max 3 to create this 
brightly colored tropical fish. He enjoys developing 
graphics and programming in basic and assembly 
language. 

(2) 2nd Place (CoCo 3) 

CoCo 3 Shop by Ed Hathaway 

Color Max Deluxe was used to develop Ed's depic- 
tion of what a rainbow store in Prospect, Kentucky, 
would look like. Ed is in partnership with Second 
City Software and is president of the Glenside 
Color Computer Club of Illinois. 

(3) 3rd Place (CoCo 3) Tie! 

Sunset by Tracy Lammardo 

Tracy, of Clifton Park, New York, used Color Max Deluxe 
to create this atmospheric phenomenon. She is a graphic 
designer and uses computer graphics and desktop 
publishing in her work. 

(4) 3rd Place (CoCo 3) Tie! 

Maine by Ed Hathaway 

Ed used Color Max Deluxe to create his rendition of the 
famous Portland Head Light lighthouse in Portland, 
Maine, as a reminder of his New England home. Ed now 
lives in Glendale Heights, Illinois, with his wife, Ruth, and 
3-year-old son, Scott. 

(5) 1st Place (CoCo 1 & 2) 

Sea Set by Randy Adams 

CoCo Max tl was used to create this graphic. Randy is 
the head shipping clerk at The Computer Center and is 
a member of the Memphis Color Computer Club Users 
Group. 

*M Place (Black & White) 
Memphis by Logan Ward 

Logan used Color Max 3 to illustrate his city's skyline. His 
interests include baseball card collecting and following 
NASCAR races. 





September 1988 THE RAINBOW 27 



Honorable Mention 



For details on the next CoCo Gallery Live 
competition, see Page 49. 




CoCo 3 

(7) Winter Home 

by Logan Ward 

Color Max 3 was used to draw this scene. 
Logan is the president of the Memphis 
Color Computer Club Users Group, and is 
the artist behind the rainbow's CoCo Cat 
and Maxwell Mouse cartoons. He and his 
wife, Stacey, live in Memphis, Tennessee. 

(8) Fire-Breathing Dragon 

by Howard C. Rouse 

(9) Pheasant in Flight 

by Howard C. Rouse 

Howard used CoCo Max III to create these 
two graphics. He is a 63-year-old retiree 
from Ocala, Florida. 

(10) Egyptian Dancer 

by Madeleine Dufour 

CoCo Max III was used to design this 
graphic. Madeleine, of Cacouna, Quebec, 
is the mother of three grown children and 
uses the CoCo for word processing, dat- 
abasing, playing Adventures and drawing. 

(11) Unicorn 

by Christine Dufour 

Christine used CoCo Max III to illustrate 
this mythical animal. She is studying 
mathematics at Laval University in Canada 
and enjoys playing piano, painting, read- 
ing and computing. 

CoCo 1 & 2 

(12) Bing 

by Terry Peck 

Terry used CoCo Max 11 to design this 
holiday scene. She is the editor of the 
Memphis Color Computer Club newsletter 
and enjoys fun in the sun, cross-stitching 
and drawing on her CoCo. 

Black & White 

(13) Axel Foley 

by Brian Gillaume 

Brian, of Green Bay, Wisconsin, used 
CoCo Max II to depict this character from 
the first of the Beverly Hills Cop movies. 




10 





1 



-V ■ * 



I r 



_L_L 






11 




13 



12 

SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in upcoming 
showings of "CoCo Gallery." Share your creations with the CoCo Community! Be sure to send a 
cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you created your picture 
(what programs you used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please include a lew tacts about yoursett. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images 
from TV programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture 
that appears in a book or magazine is nor an original work. 

We will award two first prizes of $25, one for the CoCo 3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one 
second prize of $15 and one third prize of $10. Honorable Mentions may also be given. 

Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo Gallery, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Remember, this is a contest and your entry will not be returned. 

— Angela Kapfhammer, Curator 



28 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 



Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



For over 5 years now, Telewriter has been 
the #1 Color Computer word processor, 
both in popularity and in performance. 
Telewriter's near perfect mix of sophisti- 
cated professional features and a very natu- 
ral user interface, has earned it the highest 
praise in numerous magazines, and an in- 
tensely loyal following among tens of thou- 
sands of Color Computer users all over the 
world. 



HISTORY 



Throughout the history of the Color Com- 
puter, Telewriter has pioneered software 
breakthroughs that set the standards. 

In 1981, it was Telewriter 1.0 that first took 
the Color Computer's inadequate 32X16 all- 
uppercase display, and replaced it with a 
graphics-based 51X24 upper and lowercase 
display. 

A few years later, Telewriter-64 added high 
density 64X24 and 85X24 displays and ac- 
cess to the full 64K of the newer Color 
Computers. 



THE NEW AGE 



Today, Telewriter-64 is recognized as the 
standard ColorComputer word processor. It 
runs on all Tandy Color Computers — from 
the original Color Computer 1, to the Color 
Computer 2, and 3. 

But the Color Computer 3 brings a whole 
new level of power to low cost computing 
and, so, a new Telewriter is here to put that 
power to work for you . We call it Telewriter- 
128. 



TELEWRITER- 1 28 



You don't mess with a good thing, so 
Telewriter-128 is still Telewriter-64 at heart. 
The commands, and the user interface are 
essentially the same. If you know 
Telewriter-64, then you already know 
Telewriter-128. And, if you don't know 
Telewriter-64, you'll still have an easy time 
learning and using Telewriter-128. 



80 CXMAJMNS 



But there are major differences as well. First, 
Telewriter-128 uses the Color Computer 3's 
new 80 column screen display. 

This means, simply, that using Telewriter- 
128 on a low cost ColorComputer 3 will look 
a lot like using a more expensive word 
processor on a much more expensive IBM 
PC, PS/2, or clone. 



SPEED 



Second, Telewriter-128 is lightning fast. 
Telewriter-64 was fast in its own right, but, 
by accessing the Color Computer 3's video 
hardware directly, and by running the 
machine in double speed mode, Telewriter- 
128 is able to provide extremely fast scroll- 
ing and instant paging — functions whose 
speed is crucial to serious word processing. 

In this department, Telewriter-128 doesn't 
simply keep up with IBM-based word proc- 
essors — it generally surpasses them! 



ease 



Third, Telewriter-128 adds a host of new 
features big and small, that make it even 
easier to use. 

Features like: Quick function key access to 
the editor or the menus — an instant on-line 
help screen summarizing all Telewriter 
commands and special characters — an 
option file where you store your personal set 
of format and screen settings so you only 
have to set them once! 

Then, there's a quick save feature which 
allows you to save all your current work 
without leaving the editor. There's a simple 
way to cursor through the disk directory and 
read in a file by just hitting ENTER. And 
there's more. 



NEW POWER 



Telewriter-64 always had the power to 
handle any kind of serious writing, from 
letters to textbooks. But, here too, 
Telewriter-128 adds major features. 



Like Macros — which let you insert whole 
words or phrases (even sets of control codes 
or format commands) into your text, with a 
single keypress. And every time you power 
up Telewriter-128, the macro definitions are 
automatically loaded*, so they're always 
there. 

Then there's a Print Preview feature that 
shows you, on-screen, the way your printed 
text will look — with margins, headers, 
centering, justification, page numbering, 
and page breaks. This guarantees letter 
perfect documents every time, and makes 
tasks like widow/orphan line elimination, a 
breeze. 



TFXEWRITER-64 OR TELEWRITER 1 28 



We could go on listing features, but the point 
is this: If you own a ColorComputer, you al- 
ready have the hardware for the most 
powerful, low cost word processor in town. 
All you need now is to add the heart and 
soul: 

Telewriter-64, for the Color Computer 1 
and 2, costs $59.95 on disk, $49.95 on 
cassette. 

Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 
costs $79-95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

To order by Mastercard or Visa call (619) 
755-1258 anytime, or send check or money 
order plus $2 shipping (Californians add 6% 
sales tax) to: 

COGNTTEC 

704 Nob Ave. 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

To upgrade from Telewriter-64 to 
Telewriter-128, return your original disk or 
cassette with $39.95. (Add $10 if you're also 
upgrading from cassette to disk. Deduct $ 10 
with proof of Oct '87 - Feb '88, purchase of 
Telewriter-64.) 

When I first got Telewriter-64 last year, 
I was in heaven. I couldn't believe the 
program's versatility and ease of use. 

-The RAINBOW, Oct. 1985 



TELEWRITER-64 FEATURES: Compatibility with any. printer that works with 
the ColorComputer; embedded control codes for underlining, boldface, sub/ 
superscript, variable fonts; format commands for headers, centering, margin and 
spacing changes anywhere in the document; Format menu to set margins, 
spacing, page numbering, BAUD rate, lines per page, justification; Chain 
printing for one shot printing of multi-file documents. Fast, full-screen editor 
with wordwrap, block copy /move/delete, global search and replace, wild card 
search, fast 4-way auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward 
paging, text alignment, tabs, error protection, word and line counter. Insert or 
delete text anywhere on the screen. Simple, easy to remember commands. 
Optional ASCII files for compatibility with spell checkers, terminal programs, 



and BASIC. Load, save, append, partial save files to disk or cassette. Kill, rename 
and list disk files. Cassette verify and auto-retry on error. 
TELEWRITER- 128 - ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Print preview from editor; 
multiple copy print; footers; hanging indents; cursor thru disk directory to load, 
append, rename and kill files; quick file save from editor; keyclick; key repeat 
true block move; 24, 25, or 28 line screen; 40 or 80 column screen; dual speed 
cursor; on-line help; overstrike mode; word delete; wordwrap at margin; user RAINBOW 

' ^ ^ ° CERTIFICATION 

definable macros; nested macros; instant status window for information on seal 
cursor position, word count, etc.; instant function key access to menus or editor; 
options menu for setting character and screen colors, key repeat and delay rates, 
definable foreign symbols. 



IBM and PS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines [nc. 'disk version only 



I F e atur e 



64K Disk 



i fc«^7 


the ' 

<on> 

RAINBOW 




LA- -;\ 





Cut down on time spent in formatting disks 

Mass Disk Formatter 



By Neal Larson 



I use a double-sided drive and buy 
large quantities of disks. If you are 
like me, you know how monoto- 
nous formatting lots of disks can be! I 
decided to modify parts of the DSKINI 
routine in Disk-BASIC. 

The code is broken into three simple 
but effective routines. The first section 
is simply a routine to put your C0C0 
into all-RAM mode. The second rou- 
tine prints a message to tell you when 
to put in a new disk. The final routine 
changes the drive number and inserts a 
jump into the DSKINI routine to return 
it to this program. The program allows 
the user to set up the number of drives 
and formatting order, then writes a 
stand-alone binary program that can be 
loaded and used separately. 
The number of actual in-program 



Neal Larson owns a home-based soft- 
ware business, Dualtronics Software, 
and holds a Ph. D. in computer science 
and in computer programming. 



messages is limited because of size 
limitations of the cassette buffer where 
the program resides. This was the eas- 
iest place to put the program since it 
isn't used by the DSKINI routine by 16K 
or 64K CoCos. 

1 have found this program works best 
with a straight drive system or with the 
hardware switch (DOS tricker) that 
allows the use of both sides. I use the 
hardware switch to make my Drive 0 
into drives 0 and 2 and my second drive 
as drives 1 and 3. When I have the 
program set to 0, 2, 1, 3, it will format 
0 and 2 then go to the next drive for 1 
and 3. Then it pauses until I press a key 
— definitely better than typing DSKINI 
over and over and over! 

To use the program, simply load and 
run it. There are intensive instructions 
and warnings to be sure to cold start 
your C0C0, because it does alter the 
memory, interferes with the normal use 
of DSKINI, and can cause the loss of 
data if a program uses the cassette 
buffer. 



The first instruction asks you to enter 
the first drive you want to format. Then 
it asks if this is the last drive; if you want 
to use only the first drive or you have 
only one drive, answer Y for yes. The 
program now saves the binary program 
(in my case 0, 2, 1, 3). 

Enter the numbers one at a time, 
because the basic program will step 
through the questions four times until 
you press Y, in which case it jumps to 
the save routine for the binary program. 

This program has reduced the 
amount of time I spend on formatting 
disks to one-tenth of the time needed 
when using DSKINI. It is very simple 
and easy to use, due in part to the help 
1 received from Ken Learman, who 
made the program even easier for the 
novice to use and to follow. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this utility may be directed to the author 
at 743 V2 W. College Avenue, #8, Ap- 
plet on, Wl 54911. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 




180 


91 


300 


221 


490 


50 


600 


101 


END 


....60 



The listing: FDRMfiTTR 



10 

20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 
90 



*************************** 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



MASS DISK FORMATTER 

BY 

NEAL LARSON 
(C)1988 BY 
DUALTRONICS SOFTWARE 
APPLETON WISCONSIN 
PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



*************************** 



100 CLS 

110 GOSUB 550 

120 PRINT@32,CHR$(128) ;"super ,, ;C 
HR$(128) ;"disk M ;CHR$(128) ;" forma 
tting" ; CHR$ (12 8); "routine" ; CHR$ ( 
128) ;CHR$(128) ; 

130 PRINT@224,STRING$ (9,128) ; "pr 

ess";CHR$(128) ; "a" ;CHR$ (128) ;"ke 
y " ; STRING $ (12,128); 
140 EXEC 44539 
150 CLS 

160 PRINT§3 2, "THIS PROGRAM WILL 
MAKE THE NESSARY CHANGES TO 

THE RS DOS IN ORDER TO MASS F 
ORMAT (DSKINI) DISKS THE WAY THIS 

IS DONE INVOLVES PUTTING T 

HE COCO INTO ALL RAM AND MAKING 

CHANGES TO THE FORMATTING ROU 



THE RAINBOW 





September 1988 



MieroWorld 11 
PO Box 5330 
Clinton, NJ 08891 



^^^^ COMPUTER CENTER 

1 MieroWorld ] 



Since 1982 




S*Mfi Pa; (215) 863-8911 
In NJ: (201) 735-6138 



&l Compute 

MieroWorld 
PO Box 69 

Wind Gap, Pa. 18091 



Since 1982 



Free Shipping* 



100% TANDY Products* 




CoCo 




CoCo III, 128K 


$145.00 


CM-8 


$248.00 


ndynaVuX-OLrlDlD W/CDI 


$Ji/ . uu 


FD-502 Drive 0. CoCo 


$225.00 


DMP-106 


$165.00 


DMP-130A (132) 


$265.00 


SEIK0SHA SP1000 lOOcps 


$159.00 


Same as DMP-130 




SEIKOSHA SP1200 120cps 


$199.00 


Same as DMP-130A/132 




Star Hi croni es NX15 


$399.00 


■ MM* " M% * * -a Afc Mm, 4% 

Star Hi crom cs NX1000 


$199.00 


rr** Qi 

LLr-oi 


5>4j.OO 


joysticks irairj 




Loior Mouse 


$33.00 


Deluxe toior House 


#oo aa 

$ Jo. 00 


Joystick * ULLuxt 


tlA Aft 

(24.00 


Serial Cables 


$3.25 


Hi -Res Joystick Interf. 


$8.00 


CoCo Upgrades 




CoCo III, 512K UPGRADE 


$135.00 


Hulti-pak upgrade OLD 


$12.00 


Multi-pak upgrade NEW 


$12.00 


COMPUTERS 




TANDY 1000 HX Computer 


$535.00 


TANDY 1000 TX Computer 


$860.00 


TANDY 1400 LT 


$1195.00 


TANDY 3000 


$1475.00 


TANDY 3000 HL. 


$1090.00 


TANDY 4000 


$1890.00 


MONITORS 




VM-4 Monochrome Monitor 


$95.00 


CM-5 RGB Color Monitor 


$220.00 


CM- 11 RGB Color Monitor 


$310.00 


EGM-1 color Monitor 


$525.00 


CM-8 


$248.00 


Magnavox - 8 CM 515 


$298.00 



HARD CARDS 




TANDY 20 Meg Hd Card 


$439.00 


30 Meg ZUCKER 


$499.00 


HARD DISKS 




(Kits include cable ic controller) 


Seagate 20 Mg Kit 


tonn AA 

$299.00 


Seagate 30 Mg Kit 


$349.00 


Seagate 40 Mg Kit 


$399.00 


rLUrr I UKIVijO 




TEAC Internal: 




TEAC 5 1/4 Disk-360kb 


$99.00 


TEAC 3 1/2 Disk-720kb 


$119.00 


FLOPPY DRIVES 




External: 




5 1/4 Ext. Drive-HX/EX 


$180.00 


3 1/2 Ext. Drive-HX/EX 


$199.00 


Internal: 




5 1/4 Disk-360kb 


$125.00 


3 1/2 Disk-720kb 


$125.00 


3 1/2 to 5 1/4 Adapter 


$24.00 


5 1/4 1.2M FDD Kit 


$215.00 


5 1/4 360K FDD Kit 


$140.00 


PRINTERS 




DMP-106 


$165.00 


DMP-130A (132) 


$265.00 


DHP 440 


$545.00 


DWP-520 


$719.00 


DMP 2120 


$1279.00 


LP1000 Laser 


$1699.00 


SEIKOSHA SP1000 (DMP-130) 


$159.00 


SEIKOSHA SP1200 (DMP-132) 


$199.00 


Star Mi cronies NX15 


$399.00 


Star Mi cronies NX1000 


$199.00 





HOARDS 




Smart watch 


>DU.UU 


r I us upgrade rtuap xer du 


ti? ^n 


nemory r i us txpansi on du 


ti in nn 

}JL 1U . UU 


CPA A/j^nfop 

tuA Muapter 


tiAR nn 

-9 JOO . UU 


MUUriMo 




1200 Baud Pc Modem 


$159.00 


Plus 300 Baud Pc Modem 


$75.00 


Plus 1200 Baud PC Modem 


$150.00 


Mlbl 




Serial House 


$36.00 


Joystick - DELUXE 


$24.00 


Monitor Platform 


$24.00 


* Ribbons - DMP-130 


$8.00 


<r\ * ii „ ntJA 1 AC! 1 1 AC 

Ribbons - DMP-105/106 


4>o. bU 


Flips - R/S 


$11.00 


Disk Clean Kits 


$5.00 


Cover - DMP-105/6 


$3.00 


Cover - CoCo I I/I I I 


$3.00 


Cover - DMP-130 


$3.00 


Bulk Erasers 


$12.00 


Flip n" Files w/lock 


$11.00 


(3-1/2 or 5-1/4) 




Library Case-Black 


$1.50 


Library Case-Tan 


$2.00 


Paper- Mini 20# 


$4.00 


Paper #15 


$14.00 


Paper #20 

DISKS 


$10.00 


Tandy SS 5 1/4 Di sks 


$9.00 
$10.00 


Tandy DS 5 1/4 Disks 


Tandy DS 3 1/2 Disks 


$28.00 


Winners DS/DD W/Lib case 


$7.50 


Winners SS/DD W/Lib case 


$7.00 










20% ^ &aAi& hkajck hopm/tib 





* 100% TANDY Warranty on TANDY products - Manufacturer's Warranty applies on all other items. 

* FREE UPS shipping on orders over $50 (In the Continental US) - under $50 add $5 for shipping. 

* The above prices are CASH prices - add 3% for credit cards. No COD's will be taken. Prices 

may be slightly higher in our retail stores. 

* All returns must have prior authorization and are subject to a re-stocking fee. 



TINE SO WHEN » 

170 PRINT "YOU ARE DONE FORMATTIN 
G BE SURE TO COLD START YOUR COC 
0 (TURN ITOFF THEN BACK ON AGAIN 
) JUST A RESET MAY NOT ALLWAYS 
REBOOT THE ROMS" 

180 PRINT : PRINT"PRESS A KEY TO C 

ONTINUE " : EXEC 44539 :CLS 

190 PRINT" PLEASE READ ALL OF THE 

QUESTIONSCARFULLY BECAUSE THIS 
PROGRAM WRITES A MACHINE LANGU 
AGE PROGRAM THAT IS STAND 

ALONE AND NEEDS NO OTHER PROGRAM 

TO WORK" 

200 PRINT :PRINT"PRESS A KEY TO C 

ONTINUE" 

210 EXEC 44539 

220 CLS 

230 PRINT@32 , "FIRST, THE NEXT SE 
T OF QUESTIONSWILL MAKE THE NESS 
ARY ADJUSTMENTS TO THE 

PROGRAM FOR YOUR NEEDS 1" 
240 PRINT© 2 2 4, "PRESS A KEY TO CO 
NTINUE ! " 
250 EXEC 44539 

260 PRINT@32,"SET ORDER OF DRIVE 

S FOR FORMAT" 

270 DR$="FIRST" 

280 FOR NU=1 TO 4 

290 CLS :PRINT@96, "WHAT DRIVE DO 

YOU WANT ";DR$: INPUT DR 

300 IF DR$=" FOURTH" THEN 410 

310 GOSUB 350 

320 PRINT@160,"IS THIS THE LAST 
DRIVE? [Y] OR [N] ";:LIN 

EINPUT QU$ 

330 IF QU$="Y" THEN 430 
340 NEXT NU 

350 IF NU=1 THEN DR$="SECOND" :GO 
TO 380 

360 IF NU=2 THEN DR$= " THIRD ": GOT 
0 380 

370 IF NU=3 THEN DR$="FOURTH" 
380 IF NU=1 THEN POKE&H255,DR:GO 
TO 420 

390 IF NU=2 THEN POKE&H264 , DR:GO 
TO 420 

400 IF NU=3 THEN POKE&H273 , DR:GO 
TO 420 

410 POKE&H282 / DR:GOTO 490 
420 RETURN 

430 IF NU=1 THEN POKE&H24F, &H01: 

POKE&H250,&HF2:GOTO 460 

440 IF NU=2 THEN POKE&H25E, &H01: 

POKE&H25F,&HF2:GOTO 460 

450 IF NU=3 THEN POKE&H26D, &H01: 

POKE&H2 6E , &HF2 : GOTO 460 

460 IF PEEK(&H250)=&HF2 THEN SAV 

EM" FORMAT" , &H1DA, &H25C, &H1DA:G0T 

0 500 



470 IF PEEK(&H25F)=&HF2 THEN SAV 
EM "FORMAT" , &H1DA, &H2 6B, &H1DA:G0T 
0 500 

480 IF PEEK(&H26E)=&HF2 THEN SAV 
EM" FORMAT" , &H1DA, &H27A, &H1DA:G0T 
0 500 

490 IF PEEK(&H27D)=&HF2 THEN SAV 
EM" FORMAT" , &H1DA, &H289 , &H1DA 
500 CLS 

510 PRINT@32, "YOU NOW HAVE A P 
ROGRAM LABELED [FORMAT . BIN] AND W 
HEN YOU USE ITIT WILL WORK AS A 
STAND ALONE PROGRAM THAT WILL 
NOT NEED A BASIC DRIVER. JUS 
T REMEMBER THEORDER OF THE DRIVE 
S YOU USED WHEN YOU USE THE P 
ROGRAM ! " 

520 PRINT "remember THIS PROGRAM 

AND [FORMAT . BIN] REALLY ME 

SSES WITH THE MEMORY AND YOU SHO 

ULD COLD START YOUR COMPUTER BE 

FORE YOU USE ANY OTHER PROGRAM! 
ii 

530 EXEC 44539 
540 END 
550 CLS 

560 PRINT@226, "STAND BY SETTING 

UP PROGRAM." 

570 FOR P=474 TO 651 

580 READ A 

590 POKE P,A 

600 NEXT P 

610 CLS0 

620 RETURN 

630 DATA 26,80,142,128, ,166,132, 
183,255,223,167 

640 DATA 128,140,224, ,39,5,183,2 

55,222,32,23 9,28,175,189,169,40 

650 DATA 142,4,32,16,142,2,32,14 

1,23,142,4,96,16,142,2,48 

660 DATA 141,14,189,173,251,142, 

4,224,16,142,2,67,141,2,141,57 

670 DATA 166,160,129, ,39,4,167,1 

28,32,246,57,73,78,83, 69,82 

680 DATA 84,96,78,69,87,96,68,73 

,83,75, ,82,69,65,68,89 

690 DATA 122,96,80,82,69,83,83,9 

6,65,96,75,69,89, ,70,79 

700 DATA 82,77,65,84,84,73,78,71 

, ,142,2,93,191,210,208,150 

710 DATA ,151,235,198,4,189,213, 

178,142,2,108 

720 DATA 191,210,208,134,1,151,2 
35,198,4,189,213,178,142,2,123,1 
91 

730 DATA 210,208,134,2,151,235,1 
98,4,189,213,178,142,1,242,191,2 
10 

740 DATA 208,134,3,151,235,198,4 
,189,213,178,18,255 



32 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



MasterCard VISA C.O.D. CHECKS 



Second City Software 



CoCo CALENDER : 

Organize all of your appointments 
with this 365 day CoCo Calender. 
64k DISK $9.95 

BLACKJACK ROYALE : 

Even your casino odds with this Black- 
jack card simulation and tutor! Pro- 
gram can be edited for different house 
rules. 64k DISK $16.95 

BSE - BASIC SCREEN EDITOR : 
Gives Basic a full-screen editor to 
supplement the regular EDIT commands, 
works on the CoCo 1&2 and with the CoCo 
3, WIDTH 32, 40 or 80 is supported! 
Complete screen cursor control with 
the arrow keys+features to make EDIT- 
ing Basic programs a snap! BSE, a must 
have CoCo utility. Our low price was 
the only corner that was cut on this 
quality program 

64k DISK $19.95 

CHECK-09 : 

Finally, a program that interacts with 
MultiVue for FAST and EASY check 
balancing. CHECK-09 and you can now 
take control of your bank checking 
account. No more waiting on your bank 
statement for an ending balance. 
CHECK-09 will provide a check-by-check 
balance in an easy to use format that 
eliminates those monthly surprizes! 
Bring your money and you closer to- 
gether and have the buck STOP HERE! 
512k DISK $22.95 

CoCoHAX II : By Colorware 

The 'CLASSIC CoCo graphic program. 

Draw great works of art with the 

program that set a standard for all 

others to follow. Supported by a Hi -Res 

interface and numerous printer drivers 

for complete configuration. 

64k DISK $78.45 

CoCoMAX III : By Colorware 

Al I new program based off the 'CLASSIC 

CoCoMax II software. Allows for full 

animation, select 16 colors from a 64 

color palette, fast & easy to use w/ 

pull down menus in a point-and-cl ick 

environment. 

128k or 512k DISK $78.45 

CoCo KEYBOARD : 

Program allows the user to utilize the 
function keys on the HJL-57 Pro- 
fessional, Deluxe CoCo, and Micronix 
keyboard. 32k DISK $6.95 



TELEPATCH: 



Turn Telewriter 64 into the best Word 
Processor for the CoCo 1&2! TELEPATCH 
is compatible with all CoCo's. Comes 
with complete documentations for easy 
upgrading and changes. 
64k DISK $24.95 

HI-RES FONT MODIFIER: 



Create, modify, save and re-use as many 
CoCo 3 fonts that you can imagine. 
128k DISK $14.95 

COLOR MAX III FONT EDITOR: 



Allows you to custom create your own 
special ColorMax III fonts. Program 
and manual is easy to use for out- 
standing results! 128k DISK $19.95 

SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR: 



A 'FAST' and 'EASY TO USE' ELECTRONIC 
DRAFTING PROCESSOR. Create pro-look- 
ing diagrams using a 480x540 pixel 
screen with 6 viewing windows! Over 
'30' electronic symbols with 10 defin- 
able symbols. Even supports Logic 
gates & Mult i pin chips! Print hardcopy 
or save to disk for later use. 
64k DISK $22.95 

OS-9 SOLUTION : 

Tame the hostile environment of OS-9 
with OS-9 SOLUTION! Replaces 20 of the 
command calls with single key- stroke, 
menu driven commands. No more long and 
complex pathnames or syntaxes to re- 
member! Works with either OS-9 Level 
One or Two $24.95 

TAPE/DISK UTILITY : 

A utility package that transfers TAPE 
to DISK or DISK to TAPE automatically. 
If you just got your first disk drive, 
TAPE/DISK is a MUST HAVE program. Will 
print tape & disk directories to any 
supported printer. 

64k DISK $19.95 

FAST DUPE 2 : 

Backup & Format as many copies of your 
original disk that you need. FAST DUPE 
2 reads source into memory for fast and 
realible disk transfer. Supports up to 
4 disk drives 

64k DISK $19.95 



SECOND CITY SOFTWARE 



ORDER 



P.O. Box 72956 
Roselle, IL 60172 
Order: 312-653-5610 
BBS: 312-307-1519 



ACCEPTS MASTER CARD, VISA, C.O.D. AND 
CHECK ORDERS. PLEASE ADD $2.50 FOR 
SHIPPING & ALLOW 1 TO 3 WEEKS FOR 
DELIVERY. C.O.D. ORDERS, ADD AN ADD- 
ITIONAL $2.00. 



MY DOS : By Chris Hawks 
Supports accesses to double sided 
drives, able to use the J&M Controller 
with the CoCo 3, DIR commands simpli- 
fied and a host of other special 
features. 64k DISK $14.95 

VIP LIBRARY: 



This popular ' intergraded' package 
includes, VIP Writer, Terminal, Data 
Base, Calc and Disk Zap which can fix 
a diskette with I/O errors. SCS special 
price. 64k DISK $125.00 

SOFTWARE SPOOLER & RAM DISK: 



Quick response or no disk swapping 
drive backups for 1 drive system. 
Printer spooler to free computer dur- 
ing printing. 512k DISK $19.95 

THE NEWSPAPER: 



Use your CoCo 3 for 'DESK TOP PUB- 
LISHING!' THE NEWSPAPER is a complete 
& sophisticated program for creating 
Banners, Headlines & Text columns. 
Allows for importing different pic- 
tures, fonts & full patterns from disk 
for that professional look! Includes 
22 fonts and 50 pictures. This one-of- 
a-kind program has over 140k of program 
code! 128k or 512k DISK $39.95 

THE NEWSPAPER GRAPHICS DISK I : 
The FIRST OFFICIAL supplementary pro- 
gram disk for THE NEWSPAPER. Contains 
'50' NEW PICTURE FILES, '10' NEW FILL 
PATTERNS and # 3' ADDITIONAL FONT SETS! 
GRAPHICS DISK I is available only from 
Second City Software at a special in- 
troductory price of $16.95 

COMING SOON . THE NEWSPAPER PLUS! 
If you bought THE NEWSPAPER from SCS 
then the updated program disk will be 
FREE! If you bought this program from 
someone else, there will be an upgrade 
fee of $19.95. 

NEW SCS SOFTWARE PROGRAMS 
A-DOS 3 : The very popular Disk Operat- 
ing System from Spec troSys terns for the 

CoCo 3 $34.95 

SCS can custom 'burn' your ADOS 3 pro- 
gram onto an EPROM. Call or write for 
full details. 

TELEWRITER-128 : Take your CoCo 3 to new 
word processing heights with this ALL 
NEW and IMPROVED program. Stop playing 
around with upgrades and patches to TW- 
64! 128k or 512k DISK $76.95 



1 Feature — 

Fantasy joins forces with Co Co to 
help children's reading skills 



CoCo3 








By Rick Cooper 





sing a CoCo 3, Badwolf helps 
young children learn their 
ABCs. In this program, a favor- 
ite fairy tale is used to teach children 
both the alphabet and keyboard skills. 

The program opens with a scene from 
the fairy tale, "The Three Little Pigs." 
The child is asked to help the smart pig 
along the path to its home by typing in 
the letters of the alphabet. For every 
correct answer, the little pig takes 

Rick Cooper, a principal, teacher and 
coach, enjoys writing programs more 
than using them. Although many of 
Rick's programs are used by his 
teachers and students, his best critics are 
his wife, Donna, and daughters, Kristin 
and Kasey. 





•iff, . 

\ 





THE RAINBOW September 1988 




Complftt Car Sign Designer 




Program Editing Screen 



♦ 




M HOT 



Sample Car Signs 



Make Your Own 
Professional Looking 
Custom Car Signs 

The Car Sign Designer™ 
includes everything you need: 

• 2 plastic sign holders with suction cups 

• SO sheets of bhght yellow 9 1/2" x 11" lanfokJ paper 

• Car Sign Designer program on disk 

• Ciaarty wnnen users manual. 

The Editor Screen: 

• Lets you select 1,2.3. or 4 lines of text. 

• Centers each line of text automatically. 

• Adjusts character width on each line automatically. 

• Uses special car-sign bold, easy to see. typ» faca. 

• Features WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get). 
All editing is performed on a full screen graphic 
representation of the actual sign that you are designing. 

• Character set includes letters A to Z, digits 0 to 9, 

special symbols, and punctuations. 

Make Signs in 4 Easy Steps: 

1. Design the sign on the computer screen. 

2. Print the sign on your dot-matrix printer." 

3. Fold the sign on- the indicated lines. 

4. Insert the sign into a reusable sign holder. 

Hundreds Of Uses: 

Express Yourself: Tell someone you love them, support your 
favorite sports team or political candidate, and more. 
Change your messege as often as you Ilka: With the Car 
Sign Designer's reusable plastic holders it costs just a few 
pennies to make a new sign. 

Use Them Everywhere: Put them in your car windows, rec- 
reational vehicles, on your refrigerator, room doors. Use them 
in stores and store windows for advertising. 
Special Occasions: Make signs and use them, or even sell 
them, at special events such as church fundraisers, high- 
school football games, political rallies, automobile shows and 
races. 



Requires 64K CoCo I, II, or III, same printers as 
CoCo Graphics Designer. Order #CSCC $29.95 




^-T | oo 0iifl on 





AMERICA 





ill A 



PARTY 




OFFICE 



Some Pictures from CoCo Graphics Designer Picture Disk #2 



VARIETY B0LD3 
UESTERN TYPE 




ft 



1 1 r «Ti""n 

u i u i 1 1 n_ 



STEICIL eCCCOT 

Sample fonts from CoCo Graphics Designer Font Disk A 



mm 




It's fun making your own Greeting Cards, Signs, and Banners. 



Coco 
Graphics 
Designer 

Only $29.95 



The Coco Graphics Designer pro- 
duces beautiful Greeting Cards, 
Banners, and Signs for holidays, 
birthdays and other occasions. 

The program features picture, 
border, and character font editors, 
so that you can modify or expand 
the already built in libraries. Plus 
a special "grabber" utility is includ- 
ed lo capture areas of high resolu- 
tion screens for your picture li- 
brary. 



Requirements: a Coco I, II or III 
with at least 32K, one disk drive, 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 or 
JDOS. Printers supported include: 
Epson RX/FX, Gemini 10X, SG10, 
NX10, DM P 100/105/110/130/430 
CGP220, many Okidata (check 
with Zebra), Seikosha GP1 00/250, 
Gorilla Banana, Legend 808. Or- 
der #C323 Coco Graphics De- 
signer 

Picture Disk #1 

This supplementary picture library 
diskette contains over one hun- 
dred additional pictures. 
#C333 Picture Disk #1 $14.95 

Colored Paper Packs 

150 sheets (50 each red, yellow, 
blue) with 60 matching envelopes. 
Perfect for making your produc- 
tions outstanding. 

#C274 Paper Pack $19.95 



Three New 
Picture Disks 

WeVe hired freelance professional art- 
ists to expand the selection of pictures, 
and fonts available' for our Coco Graphics 
Designer. We think you'll agree that the 
quaility of their work is excellent. Each 
picture disk contains 128 pictures. 

The selection of pictures has been guid- 
ed by the requests we've received Irom 
our many Coco Grahics Designer custom- 
ers. If we've missed drawing pictures for 
subjects that interest you, please submit 
your requests for our consideration. 

Picture Disk #2 $14.95 

Special Occasions: 

Party Hat, Cake, Gift 
Box, Champaigne, Juke 
Box, Saxaphone, etc. 

Sports: Baseball, Basketball, 
Tennis, Running, etc. 

Office: Computer, File Cabinet, 
Memo Pad, Clip Board, 
etc, 

American: Rag, Eagle, Astronaut, 
Indian, Liberty Bell, etc. 

Picture Disk #3 $14,95 

Religion: Church, Cross, Candles, 
Menorah, Bible, Star, etc. 

Animals: Dogs, Cats, Tiger, Cow, 
Giraffe, Birds, Elephant, 
Turtle, Pig, Horse, etc. 

Nature: Flowers, Trees, Sunsets, 
Mountains, Lakes, etc. 

Travel: Car, Bus, Airplane, Taxi, 
Gas Pump, Tickets, etc. 



Picture Disk #4 $14.95 

Includes these holidays and others... 
Christmas: Tree, Star, Wreath, etc. 
Easter: Egg, Bunny, Lillies, etc. 
New Years: Calendar, Fireworks 
Chanukah: Menorah, Star, etc. 
Hottoween: Pumpkin, Witch, etc. 
Independence Day: Liberty Bell, Indepen- 
dence Hall, Fireworks, etc. 
Presidents Day: Linclon, Washington, etc 
Ground Hog Day: Ground Hog, Etc. 



Two New I 
Font Disks 

Font Disk A $14.95 

Contains 10 Fonts 

Font Disk B $14.95 

Contains 10 Fonts 

NOTE: Our WICO Trackballs and Coco 
Car Sign Designer are still available. See 
our ad in the previous issue of Rainbow. 

Ordering Instructions: All or- 
ders add $3.00 Shipping & Han- 
dling. UPS COD add $3.00. 
VISA/MC Accepted. NY resi- 
dents add sales tax. 

Zebra Systems, Inc. 

78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



another step closer to home. If a letter 
is typed out of order, the poor pig must 
wait on the path until the correct letter 
has been typed. 

When all but the last three letters of 
the alphabet have been typed, the little 
pig reaches home. Now, which house 
should the little pig enter, X, Y or Z? 
In two of the houses, the little pig will 
be safe; but in one house, the hungry 
wolf waits for dinner. The wolf's hiding 
place is chosen randomly. Each time the 
program is run, the little pig runs the 
risk of becoming the wolfs next meal. 




The child must choose a house and hope 
that the little pig doesn't have a run of 
bad luck. 

Badwolf gives children an opportu- 
nity to learn both the correct order of 
the letters in the alphabet and their 
placement on a keyboard. Most impor- 
tant, the program lets children have fun 
while they learn. 

(Questions or comments concerning 

this program may be directed to the 
author at P.O. Box 276, Liberty, KY 
42539. Please include an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 




260 252 1300 28 

490 7 1550 225 

690 89 1820 128 

900 116 2060 253 

1080 213 END 38 



50 PALETTE 0,63: 'WHITE BACKGROUN 
D 
60 

80 
90 

1J3J3 



PALETTE 1 , J2J : 1 BLACK FOREGROUND 
PALETTE 
PALETTE 
PALETTE 
PALETTE 



9,32 
8, 17 
7,34 
6,7 



The listing: BADWOLF 



J8 



110 PALETTE 
120 PALETTE 



5,4 
4,61 



RED 
GREEN 
BROWN 
GRAY 
BLUE 
1 PURPLE 



BY RICK COOPER 



' BADWOLF 
C 1987 
10 PCLEAR8 
20 ON ERR GOTO 2290 
30 ON BRK GOTO 2290 
40 PALETTE 10,60: 'FLESH 



130 DIM PS(26,2) ,WS(11,2) ,PO(26) 
,CR$(26) 

140 POKE &HFFD9,0 
150 HBUFF 1,500 
160 HBUFF 2,700 
170 HBUFF 3,500 




36 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



18J3 HBUFF 4,7j3j3 
190 HCOLOR 1,0 
2f50 GOSUB 2030 

210 FOR X=l TO 24 :READ PS(X,1),P 
S(X,2) :NEXT X 

220 FOR X=l TO 11: READ WS(X,1),W 

S(X,2) :NEXTX 

230 HSCREEN2 

240 HCIRCLE(20,2j3)*, 10 

250 HDRAW ff BM16, 12 ;H4D5BR16U5G4BD 

6D1R1L2BL6L2R1U1" 

2 60 HCIRCLE(20,24) , 4 

270 HCIRCLE(20,24) ,1 

280 HCIRCLE(20,32) ,3 

290 HPAINT(23 ,27) , 10,1 

300 HPAINT ( 13 , 11) , 1)3 f 1 

310 HPAINT(27,11) ,10, 1 

220 HPAINT(20,23) ,10,1 

220 HDRAW M BM17 , 30 ; L1H2L1H2D9E2R1 

E2R1BR4R1F2R1F2U9G2L1G2L1" 

340 HPAINT (14, 32) , 9,1 

350 HPAINT (19 ,32) ,9,1 

360 HPAINT (25, 32) ,9,1 

270 HCIRCLE(50,20) ,8, ,1.5 

380 HDRAW ,f BM45 , 10 ;U4H3L2D6F4" 

390 HPAINT (43, 8) ,7,1 

400 HDRAW f, BM55,10;U4E3R2D6G4" 

410 HPAINT(57,8) ,7,1 

420 HCIRCLE(47,15) ,2 

430 HCIRCLE(53,15) ,2 



440 HDRAW !, BM4 8 , 23 ;U1E1R2F1D1BD3U 

1H1L2G1D1BD3U1E1R2F1D1G1L1H1BR6R 

5F3L25E3R5" 

450 HPAINT(52,30) ,5,1 

460 HPAINT(45,30) ,5,1 

470 HPAINT(50,18) ,7,1 

480 HLINE(70,0)-(70,40) ,PSET 

490 HLINE-(0,40) ,PSET 

500 HPAINT (1, 1) ,4,1 

510 HGET(7,7)-(33,37) ,1 

520 HGET(36,2)-(65,35) ,2 

530 HCLS 

540 HDRAW "BM25 , 10 ; G15E15F15H3U5 

L3D3F6D2 5L31U2 5BR10BD25U10R6D10 " 

550 HPAINT(30,30) ,7,1 

560 HDRAW M BM40 , 52 ;R5F8R14E9R2 6E1 

0R20" 

570 HDRAW 1 BM18 , 52 ; D8R25F8R17E9R2 
7E10R21" 

580 HDRAW »BM140,10;R3F2D2F3R1F2 

R1F2D2F3D2G1D1G2D3G1D2G2D2G3L2G2 

D15L8U15H1R11L11H1R2H3U2H2U2H1U3 

H2U1H1U2E3U2E2R1E2R1E3U2E2R3 " 

590 HPAINT(140,30) ,8,1 

600 HPAINT (140, 60) ,7,1 

610 HDRAW"BM156 , 30 ;E15R35U2R40U2 

R37F20D30R2D2 5G15L3 5U2L27" 

620 HDRAW M BM144 , 47 ;R6E22R35U2R40 

U2R30F15D25R2D20G10L30U2L31G7" 

630 HDRAW"BM260, 40 ;U2E2U1E2U1E3R 



One- Liner Contest Winner ... . 

Use your right joystick to control your horizontal 
motion as you ski between the trees. Try to get to the 
lower right-hand corner of the screen. An *L' means 
you crashed, and a C W means you made it. 



The listing: 

0 CLS : PMODE3 : PCLS ; SCREEN 1 : LINE (0 
:r 0 ) - ( 2 5 5 , 19 1 ) , PSET , B : FORS=0TO400 
:X=RND(210) :Y=RND(166) :LINE(X+40 
, Y+20 ) - ( X+3 9 , Y+2 5 ) , PSET : NEXT : X-2 
0 : Y=l : FORL=0TO99 9 : Y=Y+ . 2 : IFX+Y>4 
0 0THENPRINT 11 W" ELSEX=X+ ( JOYSTK ( 0 ) 
-3 2 ) * . 0 3 : IFPPOINT ( X , Y ) <4THENPSET 
(X,Y,2) : NEXTELSEPRINT 11 L" 



Michael Toepke 
Oak Harbor, WA 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 




P.O. Box 1283 Palatine, IL 60078-1283 
(312) 397-2898 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Our Famous Hard Disk Interface 

We'va sold hundreds of our affordable, high-performance CoCo XT and CoCo 
XT-RTC hard disk interfaces to a very hot Color Computer market in a single year! 
This year, 1988, is The Year of the Hard Disk" at Burke & Burke. 

The CoCo XT hard disk Interface lets you conned up to 2 low cost, PC compatible 
5-120 Megabyte capacity hard drives to your CoCo. You buy the drive, Western Digital 
WD1002-WX1 or WD1002-27X (HLL) controller, and a case from the PC dealer of 
your choice. Just plug them Into the CoCo XT, plug the CoCo XT into your Multi-PAK, 
and you have a 20 Meg OS9 hard disk system for under $4501 

Great for multi-user systems! The CoCo XT interface uses advanced "NO HALT" 
hard disk controllers, which do not halt your CoCo and do not disable or use interrupts 
during hard disk access. You get full type-ahead, and the system clock does not lose 
time during hard disk access. Fully compatible with most RS-232 expansion ports! 

CoCo XT (with anodized housing, 60 page user manual, hard disk back-up utility and 
new, Version 2.3 drivers for use with both OS9 & HYPER-I/O) - $69.95. Or choose 
the CoCo XT-RTC (Includes real-time clock / calendar with battery backup) - $99.95 

THE PROFESSIONAL TOUCH: XT-ROM - Automatically boots and reboots OS9 
from hard disk. Installs in your hard disk controller's BIOS ROM socket - $19.95. 

Now: Hard Disk for BASIC 

"Dynamic Disk Interface" runs hard drives, big floppies, and morel 

You or someone that you know may have the 35 Track Blues. It strikes hundreds of 
CoCo users every year. One day you wake up, and say to yourself, These 35 track 
floppy disks are just too small." 

There's only one cure. More storage. Get it. With HYPER-I/O, from Burke & Burke. 
BASIC for the Ws 

HYPER-I/O modifies the RS-DOS Disk BASIC in your CoCo 1 , 2, or 3 to provide a 
"Dynamic Disk Interface". Use your existing BASIC and RS-DOS software with hard disk 
interfaces (CoCo XT, DISTO), RAM Disks, and any mix of floppy drives from 160K to 
720 K each. Fully RESET protected, user configurable, expandable, OS9 compatible, 
EPROM-able HYPER-I/O may soon be TH E system of choice for the CoCo \ , CoCo 2, 
and CoCo 3. HYPER-I/O Version 2.5 now available for only $29.95. 

HYPER-III (RAM Disk and Print Spooler for CoCo 3 HYPER-I/O) -$19.95 
Shipping (within Iho USA) CoCo XT $2.00; Disk or ROM $1.50. COD's add $2.20. 

wawmamimamWammmiiammHawmm 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 37 



2E2R5F2R1F3D2F1D2F1D2L2 5" 

*-t XJ *—t XV —J X X4 1\ -X X «J X^ Xl X XJ X4 X X ±J 1 J ^ 


1040 I$=INKEY$ : IF IS= Mn THEN 104 

^» *• A* ^» — X » X \iU X. *ip * jX «X* +f JJ» X X XJ X » Jkk Jfc# 


640 HPAINT (270.351 .6.1 




650 HDRAW"BM217 . 95 ; G2 0D3 0G2 0L3 0H 

w ~ ' ^J X A w Xvti f I J— 'i. X X< X / VJ Xi XJ XJ «J JW Vj XJ XJ «J JfcV 1 1 


1050 IF I$<>CHR$ f J+641 AND fJ=4 


3 0U3 5H2 5L3 0G3 0D3 4 " 

w X/ VJ »J wllM <m/ JLJ wJ XJ \J w 1/ ^J 0/ ~ 


OR J=5 OR J=10 OR J=15 OR J=2 01 


660 HDRAW M BM228 .99 ; G2 0D3 0G25L4 0H 


THEN 1900 


3 5U35H2 0L2 5G2 5D3 0L6" 

•J «J VJ mJ Jllii XJ XJXl «J \J X* — ' la/ -J XJ XJ VJ 


1060 IF ISOCHRS f J+641 THEN 1040 

M Jb# ^b. wX X ^ ^ V^X XX X *p I VJ V# A y X> X X XJiX 1 \J 


67j3 HDRAW"BM22j3,75;Ulj3E5R14F5D10 


1070 HDRAW"BM"+STR$ f PO f Jl 1 +" . 9"+ 


G5L14H5BR11BD6D6R3U6" 

XJ X * X X «J 1J1\ X> XJ l—J VJ 1 — / VJ IV J ' — ' VJ 


CR$(J) 


680 HPAINTf 225 . 651*. 9 . 1 

W Sal JJ XX X AT. X I X* £ri «J . W J f *S . X. 

690 HDRAW"BM222 73"+CR£(191 

VJ — ' ^kJ lii/l\iiri XJXXxj Xj X* f 1 «J 1 V» I\ y I X «7 J 


108 0 J=J+1 


1090 GOSUB 1580 

*mm JU «^ JJ VJ V^ i— ' VJ X^ ^J V/ JU 


700 HDRAW"BM227 73"+CR£(201 


1100 GOTO 950 

X* yU mJf VJ V^ X» V^ ^J XJ 


710 HDRAW"BM2 34 . 73"+CRS (151 


1110 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=" 11 THEN 111 

-x* xj ^v >y xv x xjj x • x- x «x v* x x xxjxi ^> ^> .x» 


720 HDRAW"BM2 40,73"+CRS (161 




730 HDRAW ,f BM13 0 12 0 : D2 0R C 5U2 0T J C 5'R E 5 


1120 IF IS<"X" OR IS>"Z U THEN 11 

X X Xi XJ XX X y A VJ Xv X <Y ^ XJ X 11 Xj XI X X 


D3R4 0U3R5D2 0L5U2 0D17L5U14L5D14L5 


10 

x^/ 


U14L5D14L5U14L5D14L5U14D14L5R3 5 11 


1130 GOSUB 1580 


740 F0RX=2 TO 62 STEP 3 0 


1140 I-ASCfI$l-87 


750 HLINE fX, 1601 - fX+25 . 1901 . PSET 

f ' V X X A i i «X» X 1 XW ■ 4 X m XV M \ X^ « «L» «^ XV J / X> X^ X> 


1150 R=RND f 3 1 

«b *^ X X X XX 1 X«/ I mJ J 


. B 


1160 Xl= f 0+ f 1-11 *301 

^» V JfcJ X X X 1 XJ 1 X X» J W *J J 


760 HLINE fX. 1601 - (X+13 .14 01 . PSET 

< w iiux xi xj \ f xw ju/ / i a ■ x. ^ ^ x. " i i ru xj x 


1170 Yl=160 


770 HLINE fX+13 1401-fX+25 1601 P 

/ / JJ LXXJX.li XJ ^ A 1 X, ~J f X. *T ^LV J ^ A r Xi «J ^ X. \J fj 1 f X 


1180 HGET f XI . Yll - f Xl+26 . Yl+3 01 3 

■J- ^ w SJ 4iw XJ X I 41 X f X X / \ / XJ 1 . mj 


SET 

kJ 1 XJ X 


1190 HPUT f XI . Yll - f Xl+2 6 . Yl+301 1 

v xxx vj x i x x x> § x Xi j i j x i xj v# f x jl. i «j jy J / X» 


78 0 NEXT X 


, PSET 

/ X VJ XJ ^ 


790 HPAINTfl5 1551 9 1 


1200 FOR Z=l TO 100: NEXT Z 

Xi xj JtJ X V^ X x xj Xi X VJ JL JU» V * 1* Xj xx X XJ 


800 HPAINT ^45 1551 8 1 


1210 X2=f0+fR-ll*301 

^ £. ^ XJ J C V XJ ■ I XV X J J JJ J 


810 HPAINT f 75 1551 7.1 

*J X t/ XXX ii X. XI X I ' ^ / x>^«/ y ^ / / JL 


1220 Y2=160 

Xi XJ XJ \J X XJ JL w XJ 


820 HDRAW'BM 9 180 :E2U1E2U1E2U1E 

w X< 11X/XUX f 1 Lli X ^ ^ XU JLV f XJ \J JL> Xj Xt w X. XJ w _1_ XJ 


1230 HGET f X2 . Y2 1 - f X2 + 29 . Y2 + 33 1 4 

JW X< •J' >J X X VJ XJ X ^ ii M f X X< J \ f J f 


2U1E2BL10F2D1F2D1F2D1F2 D1F2 11 

6Uxij6 i-JXJX, X ^ XV XI Xj i— ' X. X Ct LJ XI 6 LJ X. X Xj 


1240 HPUTfX2 Y21-fX2+29 Y2+331 2 

X Xi » XJ XXX VJ X ^ Ax ^ X Xi J ^ A Xd 1 Li J ^ X X< 1 J J j ^ x< 


830 HDRAW !, BM44 . 180 ;U8E2U1E2BL8F2 


. PSET 

ff X kJ XJ X 




125 0 IF T=R THEN 19 8 0 

X Xi ~J ^ XX X Xv XIIXjIi X -7 O ^tj 


840 HDRAW"BM70 180 ;R10L10E2U1E2U 

<J x t/ X lUlul F I 1J1 X / >y f A- \J JJ f AX fJ XJX JbV XJ X> \J X J— I X> W 


1260 FOR X=l TO 255 STEP 10 

X Xj VJ XJ X VJXV A X X VJ Xi «J «J kJ X Xj X X XJ 


1E2U1E2U1E2L10" 

X XJ Xi W X XJ Xj \>J XJ X« XJ JW 


1270 SOUND X.l 

JL> Xi 1 JJ *-J VJ VJ X i XJ J k . X 


850 HPAINT fl 11 4.1 

\J mJ XJ XXX All" X I X j X 1 j ~ J X 


12 8 0 NEXT X 

X x< VJ XJ ll Xj A X A 


8 60 HCOLOR 9 0 


129 0 FOR Z = l TO 4 00- NEXT Z 

lb J jJ X VJXV XJ X XvJ '-t jj jj • 1 1 Xj -A. X xj 


870 HPRINTf31 151. "THE" 

U / JLV XXX XVXXl X I ^ X ^ X -J J f X X XXJ 


13 00 HPRTNT f 17 22 1 "YOU MADE IT 

X «J JtV jj Xxx Xv X li XIX / fXiXiJ ^ x vJ VJ x XxxXJXj X X 


880 HPRINTf27 161 "BIG BAD WOLF" 

\J \J fJ ill X\X 11 X I Xi / f JL \J J f LJ X w UaLLJ If vXJl 


HOMF 1 1 " 

XXVJl IXj a ■ 


890 HPRTNT f 3 1 171 . "AND" 

o J xj iirxvxii xiwx^x / j f nxi LJ 


1310 HPRINTM7 23 1 ."WANT TO PLAY 

X -J X XJ ill XvXXl XIX / f ~J f f " 1 nil X XVJ x XJnx 


900 HPRTNT f 27 181. "THE SMART PIG 

J JJ XJ IXx i\J. H 1 V / / / 1 XXJ kJ X XfiXX X XX w 


AGAIN Y/N" 

Awn x x i x / xi 


II 


1320 IS=INKEYS:IF 1$="" THEN 132 

X mJ fid JJ Jm *J Jm 11 XVXJj X ^ * X> X -X *Y X X XXJ X 1 Jto *J Xl 


910 HCOLOR 1.0 

■J X* li w VXJWi\ <x . x> 


0 


92 0 J=l 


1330 IF T$="N" THEN 2290 

XJJ XJ XX X tJ li XXX Xj li Xi Xi -7 1£J 


93 0 K=l 


1340 IF IS<>"Y" THEN 1320 

X <J " XJ XX X fcJ ^ ^ X X 1 1 Xj ll X «J Xi XJ 


940 GOSUB 1490 


1 TRCJ HrOT.OP 4 1 

1 J Jjf xxv^vJXjvJxv ** ^ X 


950 X1=PS f J 11 

-J -mJ XJ A X X \ f / 


1360 HT.TNF(0 01-^319 91 PSET BF 

X J UJf llXJXllXj ^ f jH ) ^ «J X -J ^ -J y ^JTvJXjX^XJX 


960 Yl=PSfJ.21 


1370 HLINEfl30 1761-f319 1911 PS 

X «J / XJ 1 1 XJ X 11 Xj I X <J XJ / X r VJ J l«JX«J^X.JXy ^ X kJ 


970 IF X1=0 THEN 1310 

J § XJ X X A K/ X X XXJ X 1 JV w X XJ 


FT RF 

xj X / XJx 


980 GOSUB 1420 

^ U JO V_I kj \J LJ X * Xi XJ 


X«J O ^ 11 \— W JjUXv A- j jj 


990 IF J=24 THEN 1110 


1390 HPUTfX2 Y21-fX2+29 Y2+331 4 

J. J Zs jj 11 x VJ X ^ A x> ^ X Xi y ^ Ax 1 fci J ^ 1 6 I J J J f *"t 


1000 IF J=6 THEN K=K+1: GOSUB 161 

X XJ XJ XJ XX \J \J XXXXJX1 XV XX 1 X • U vU w 1J X w X 


ixu£il 


0: GOSUB 1490 :K=K+1: GOSUB 1610: GO 


IxiClCi HPUT^YT Yll-^Xl + 26 Yl + 301 3 

J m L ± JJ JJ kl XT \J X ^ AX ^ XXy ^ A1T40 ^ IITJ^J 


SUB 149 0 • K=K+1 : GOSUB 1610* GOSUB 

kJ> w XJ XT*? Xy • X v X v I X a UW kJ w XJ X vJ X It/ • VJvVU VJ XJ 


pqpm 


1490 

X T -X K/ 


X'tx^C' UUIU j £tjJ 


1010 IF J=12 THEN K=K+1: GOSUB 16 

X XJ X XJ XX \J X Xi X 1 X Xj X l Xv X v i X • VJ vJ i_? VJ XJ X VJ 


1 AO Oi T?FM PTTT PTfZ 

146)11 XVXjI 1 i U X x X w 


10 # GO C 5UB 149 0 • TC=TC+1 • GOSUB 1610 -G 

X XJ • wVJkj U iJ X *± ZJ xj • X\ xv ' X • VJ VJ VJ XJ X VJ X lw • w 




OSUB 1490 

VJf W U JW ™ *^ 


1440 HPUT^YT Yl^— ^Xl+26 Yl+301 1 

X 1 t jt/ ill U 1 ^ J/V X / IX j ^ AX 1 Xi VJ ^ 1 XT jjy ^ f X 


1020 IF J=16 THEN K=K+1 : GOSUB 16 

X XJ X* XJ XX LJ X VJ XX XXJ 11 Xv XV 1 X • VJ VJ kj VJ XJ X VJ 


P^FT 

^ x O Xj X 


10: GOSUB 1490 : K=K+1 : GOSUB 1610'G 

X JJ • VJ VJ itJ VJ XJ Xt J JJ * X v X v ' X • Vj VJ \J VJ XJ X VJ X XJ • VJ 


14 j^y o u u 1 1 u 4 jj jj f ±. 


OSUB 1490 

w UJ> VJ xJ X> Jk — ' Xj 


14 6 0 PY=Y1 

It UyU lA Jx X 


103 0 IF J=2 2 THEN K=K+1 • GOSUB 16 

X JJ J JJ XX VJ Xj x« X XXXjXi Xv Xv I X • VJ VJ kJ VJ XJ X VJ 


147 0 PY=Y1 

J-'-t f jj XX X X 


10:GOSUB 149p:K=K+l: GOSUB 161j3:G 


14 8p RETURN 


OoUd 14 3p I x\=J\H-l : GOoUd 161)3 JGOSUB 


14 9)9 REM PUT WOLF 


149^ : GOSUB 161j3: SOUND 2,1 


15j3)3 X2=WS(K / 1) 



38 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 













CR$(1) = 


iijlUzri-LUXriXr -LJJXr JLJ-iJK 






\ AZ i 


, XZTJ J j ,*i 


J JJz r 1 


if 








UPTTTfY? V9 ^ — 


\ AZT Z -? 


, iZTJJ j ,Z 


2060 


CR$( 


:2) = 


IITT£T3 O "CI HOT ODTTTI HOT "3 II 

U oKzr XJJz LjKj r XJJzIjJ 


1 K A 0 

X J *T ^ 


U U U 1 1 iJ ^ ^ x 






2070 


CR$( 


:3) = 


II PTT 1 T? 1 DOT?! r*l T 9 IT 1 TTA TT* 1 


"1 ^ R 01 


rV A — AZ 






R2F1" 






WY=Y2 






2080 


CR$ ( 








RETURN 






2090 


CR$( 


:s) = 


JKZ JjZU 


158J3 


REM BLANK PIG 




2100 


CR$ ( 


;6) = 


HTTTP9T.9TT7P A H 


1590 


HPUT(PX,PY) - 


(PX+2 6 


, f iTjjfl ; , j 


2110 


*- 

CR$ ( 


7) = 


MPATT9T 1P1 noTlTTAPAm W 


,PSET 






2120 


CR$ ( 


:s) = 


HTT^HAP T TTA Fl£ " 


1600 


RETURN 






2130 


CR$ ( 




I\3 J_i J U D J_iZ X\D 


1610 


REM BLANK WOLF 




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Gain access 1c the uast tuarehcuse cf information 
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There are mini-programs or circuits in everyone's "non- 
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bridge of communication must be established between the 
conscious and the "non-conscious" parts of the mind. Six 
years of research and development have resulted in a proven 
aid for establishing this bridge. 

"The Answer" is a software package which aids you in 
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CALL (317) 962-6644 TO ORDER 
Alpha - Biotechnologies, Inc. 
P.O. Box 2203 • Richmond, IN 47375 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 39 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 



Fill out your CoCo library 
with these selections 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to take 
advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser features. An easy- 
to-read, step-by-step guide packed with hints, tips, tutorials and free 
software in the form of program listings. 
Book $19.95, Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 



The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first Simulations 
contest. You are a Civil War Commander, an air traffic controller, 
a civil defense coordinator, or a scientist on Mars . . . your wits are 
on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



The Windows and Applications Disk for The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I 

Puckett and Dibble have done it again! Here are all the great 
programs from the first volume of the Level II guide. Clever new 
applications ready to run. Disk $19.95 



The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid introduction 
to the realm of statistical processes and thinking for both the 
beginner and the professional. (80-column printer required.) 
Book $6.95, Tape or Disk $5.95, Package $11.95 



The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adventure contest. 
Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors, Horror House, One Room, Dr. 
Avaloe and more. Plus hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 



The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue Meanies, find a 
hidden fortune, or win the heart of a mysterious princess. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 



The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. Discover 
backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, attempt a daring space 
rescue, or defeat evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. Evil 
Crypt, Spy master, Time Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the 
beginning! Book $11.95, Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 




The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winners from our second Simulations contest. Fly through 
dense African jungle, bull your way down Wall Street, lead a bomb 
squad, or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and 
talents. Book $9.95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 



r 1 

/ want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Name 

Address 

City 

State 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number 



Card Expiration Date 

Signature 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 (book only) 

□ Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Disk Package (2 disks) 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Level II, Vol. I 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

□ The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

□ Guide to Statistics Package (indicate choice of tape or disk) 
Add $2 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) Total 



$ 9.95 
$ 9.95 
$ 9.95 
$ 9.95 
$10.95 
$19.95 
$31.00 

$19.95 
$ 7.95 
$ 7.95 
$13.95 
$13.95 
$11.95 
$ 9.95 
$14.95 
$ 6.95 
$ 5.95 
$11.95 



Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847- 
0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. 
That is, they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape 
or disk, you will still need the appropriate book. OS-9® is a registered trademark of the Microware 
Systems Corporation. 



Prospect, Kentucky 



Reporter: Cray Augsburg 




CHICAGO 



MAY 20-22 







©Falsoft Inc.. All Rights Reserved 



CoCo's Future Looks Clear and Bright at Chicago RAINBOWfesI 



The 15th RAiNBOwfest opened 
in Chicago, Illinois on May 20th, 
1988. Atiendance was strong 
throughout the three-day event. 
There were plenty of familiar 
faces and quite a few new ones, 
too. As people came through the 
exhibit hall door, it was clear that 
the only subject on everyone's 
mind was C0C0. 

When not taking advantage of 
the seminars or other meetings, 
people took time to make new 
acquaintances and chat with old 
friends. Of course, there were 
bargains at every booth (and 
many didn't cost a penny — the 
information shared at the show 
was immense). Any attendee 
could have walked away filled 
with knowledge about a favorite 



machine. This is what the C0C0 
Community is all about. 

On Saturday, one attendee was 
overheard in the exhibit hall 
saying, "This is just like going to 
DisneyWorld!" And it was. There 
were so many choices that it 
seemed there wouldn't be enough 
time to do everything. With all 
the things to do — the seminars, 
the C0C0 Cat Sandbox, the 
C0C0 Community Breakfast, 
voting on the entries to The C0C0 
Gallery Live and meeting all the 
C0C0 notables — everyone 
seemed satisfied at the close of the 
show on Sunday afternoon. They 
did all that they came to do. 
Perhaps you will, too, when the 
C0C0 Community joins together 
again in Princeton this October. 




A crowd of about 10,000 was in attendance at this year's Chicago show. 



C0C0 Community Breakfast: Looking Back and Looking Ahead 



At the Saturday morning 
C0C0 Community Breakfast, 
Kip Bryan, Vice President of 
General Videotex Corporation 
(Delphi), spoke about the growth 
of online communication ser- 
vices. The address covered where 
the telecommunications industry 
has been, where it is now and 
where it is going. According to 
Kip, the current trends include 
use of online graphics and inter- 
active online games. 



In the future, we can expect 
9600-baud modems and 56- 
Kilobit Integrated Services Dig- 
ital Networks (ISDNs). Work has 
also begun for "gateway" net- 
works through major telephone 
companies. These services will 
allow consolidated billing and 
immediate access to your choice 
of online services. 

After Kip's keynote address, 
Lonnie Falk invited the breakfast 
crowd to join in a C0C0 sing- 



along. The / was here in. . . song 
progressed one year, beginning 
with the first RAiNBOwfest in 1982. 
The attendees rose in accordance 
with the year in which they first 
attended a Yest. Of course, when 
the sing-along was finished (the 
last verse sung was 1989 — we all 
hope to be there), all were on their 
feet. This certainly was a new and 
fun way to bring the breakfast to 
a close. 



Speech Systems 
Opens the Show 

A common sight (and sound) 
at Chicago shows is Speech Sys- 
tems. The Test doesn't seem to get 
started until The Star Spangled 
Banner has been reproduced by 
the various electronic devices 
found at this booth. Music mas- 
ter Cecil Houk wowed the crowd 
with synthesizer antics, while 
owner Rich Parry offered sub- 
stantial savings across the board 
on Speech Systems' products. 



September 1 988 THE RAINBOW 41 



CoCo Gallery Goes Live! 




Logan Ward, who helped organize the first CoCo Gallery Live contest, 
found time to cast his vote in the competition. 



Immediately following the '87 
Princeton show, Logan Ward of 
The Computer Center suggested 
rainbow sponsor an art contest at 



the next 'fest. As the well-received 
idea jelled, Logan got down to the 
task of helping to organize the 
event. In the months prior to the 



Delphi Family Reunion 



As usual, it was standing room 
only at Delphi's booth. Kip 
Bryan, Paul Hodosh and John 
Gilbert of Delphi were on hand to 
answer general questions. In ad- 
dition to offering lifetime sub- 
scriptions, Delphi sold the new 
book by Michael Banks, DEL- 
PHI The Official Guide. 

Those having questions more 
specific to the CoCo SIG talked 
to Marty Goodman, Don Hut- 
chison and a host of others. Many 
people took the opportunity to 
place faces and voices with famil- 
iar usernames. It is unfortunate 
that all 7,000+ CoCo SIG 
members weren't there for a 
"family portrait." 

To promote the family envi- 
ronment, Delphi members were 
invited to attend "The Delphi 
Saturday Night Get Together." 
This gave Delphi users the oppor- 








Delphi vice president Kip Bryan 
delivered the keynote address. 

tunity to sit down and really talk 
without trying to overcome the 
madhouse atmosphere of the 
exhibit hall. And the free refresh- 
ments were a welcome sight after 
a long day. 




This was the first show for the 
RAiNBOWfest photo buttons. 
For just $4, this memento was 
a really hot item to have. And 
test goers will be able to add 
to the collection at future 
shows. 



show, Logan, along with rainbow 
Managing Editor Jutta Kapf- 
hammer, spent a great deal of 
time planning entry guidelines 
and even built the colorful dis- 
play used to exhibit the artwork 
at the show. 

Logan said, "The graphics 
creations here are incredible. This 
is some of the best CoCo artwork 
I have ever seen. And, for a pre- 
mier event, the turnout and 
crowd acceptance is wonderful." 
Logan attributed part of the live 
Gallery's success to the crowd 
participation. He said, "Since the 
winners were picked by the atten- 
dees, enjoyment of the contest 
wasn't limited to the entrants." 

With more than 70 entries at 
the Chicago show, CoCo Gallery 
Live is considered a real success. 
It will be back at future rainbow- 
fests, so start exercising your 
artistic talents now. For a look at 
the winning creations, turn to 
Page 26 of this issue. 



All's Well 
In the 
0S-9 Market 



Clearbrook Software Group 
was on hand taking orders for 
products from its line of OS-9 
software and utilities. Paul 
Kehler of Clearbrook said, "I see 
an equilibrium between OS-9 and 
Disk basic forming. It appears 
that the interest in OS-9 is level- 
ing out, and we no longer have 
that mad rush to the system. 
Those people who are comforta- 
ble with OS-9 are staying, and 
others are holding their own with 
Disk basic." It speaks well for a 
market when the consumers are 
taking a little more time and 
looking at all of their options and 
alternatives. 

The OS-9 Users Group, with 
David Kaleita at the helm, was 
selling T-Shirts and group mem- 
berships and giving away copies 
of the new Multi-Vue enhance- 
ment shells, Shell+ and GShelfr, 
to UG members. 



New Games Were a Big Hit! 



Many RAiNBOWfest attendees 
enjoyed the chance to try — and 
purchase — the games offered by 
Diecom Products. While David 
Dies (president of Diecom) of- 
fered suggestions, several people 
played Iron Forest. While this 
program was introduced earlier, 
the Chicago '88 show was the first 
chance most in the CoCo Com- 
munity had to see this arcade- 
style action game utilizing a light- 
phaser gun. For many, it was the 
first time they had used any type 
of light phaser to interact with a 
computer. At the show, Diecom 
sold its $28.95 games for $23.95. 

RAiNBowfest attendees have 
learned to expect the exciting and 



unusual from SRB Software, 
which introduced more action- 
packed CoCo 3 games at this 
show. SRB's wares included Mine 
Rescue, Bash and Warp Fighter 
3-D. Adding to the excitement, 
the booth sported a clamp-on 
"cockpit" for use against the 
many space enemies. And for 
extra effect, owner Steve Bjork's 
partner, Monique Ellison, spent 
most of the weekend wearing a 
"tailor-made" Star Trek costume. 
As far as SRB's pricing policy is 
concerned, during the show, 
owner Steve Bjork got bold and 
announced: "No reasonable offer 
will be refused." And none were. 




Steve Bjork of SRB Software drew a crowd of special effects fanatics 
with Warp Fighter 3-D, glasses and all. 



42 THE RAINBOW September 1988 






As usual, Radio Shack drew a large crowd or bargain 
hunters to its oversized booth at the Chicago show. 



Tom DiMarco of Gimmesoft, left, compares notes 
with Marty Goodman. 



Peripherals 

Golore! 

Sales were brisk at The 
Computer Center booth as bare 
half-height drives went for just 
$49. Logan Ward, head techni- 
cian for The Computer Center, 
sees "an interesting move toward 
hard drive systems. As the price 
comes down and the end users 
increase their knowledge, this 
item seems to be a logical and 
rapidly approaching step in the 
advancement of the CoCo." 

Sharing a booth with The 
Computer Center was Spectro- 
Systems, back with its excellent 
Disk basic replacements, ADOS 
and ADOS-3 (for the CoCo 3.) 
The interest in this system has 
risen with the increased interest in 
power-usage and double-sided 
drives. As a show bonus, multi- 
CoCo owners could get both 
versions of ADOS for $45. 

Bargains abounded at the 
South Western Digital booth, 
and all sales pointed toward the 
future. Kevin Franciotti of South 
Western Digital sees a great fu- 
ture in the newer drive systems: 
"There really is a lot of interest in 
the 3'/ 2 -inch, 720K drives." In 
addition to disk drives and con- 
trollers, a Magnavox 8CM515 
monitor, complete with cable, 
sold for just $279. 

At Computer Plus, a 128K 
CoCo 3 could be purchased for 
just $129. While the CoCo 3 was 
selling strong, many at the show 
took the opportunity to upgrade 
their systems with peripherals. 
For instance, as in past Tests, the 
Magnavox 8CM515 sold well. 
Other specials from Computer 
Plus included bare 512K. upgrade 
boards for just $10 and full- 
featured printers (Star NX-10 
and Citizen 120-D) for $179. 



Glenside Lends 
a Hand 

The Glenside Color Computer 
Club was kept busy selling rain- 
Bowfest T-shirts at the Chicago 
show. (The response for the shirts 
was overwhelming.) Glenside 
also offered club memberships 
and newsletters to the Test atten- 
dees. The newsletter contained a 
humorous flowchart detailing the 
trials and tribulations of late- 
night programming as seen by the 
club president, Ed Hathaway. 



Cer-Comp Introduces 
Disk BASIC Windows 

Cer-Comp became very active 
when the CoCo 3 was introduced 
in mid-1986. Since that time it has 
provided the CoCo Community 
with CBASIC III Editor/ Com- 
piler, Hi- Res III Screen Com- 
mander, DataPack III Plus and 
TextPro IV. Now it's added an 
exciting new windowing user 
interface under Disk basic to its 
product line. This system, Win- 
dow Master, is designed to run in 
512K (at press time, Cer-Comp 
was working on a 128K version) 
and at the same time does not 
take up any user-available basic 
memory. Other features include 



Disto introduced two hot new 
items at the show: the Super 
Controller II, a no-halt disk con- 
troller, and the RS-232 Super 
Pack, an ACIA-driven serial card 
compatible with Radio Shack's 
now discontinued Deluxe RS- 
232 Pak. The Super Pack sold at 
the show for just $35. 

In keeping with the expandable 
design of the Super Controller, 
Tony DiStefano expects to com- 
plete a Serial/ Parallel/ Real Time 
Clock add-on board (it should be 
available by now). By the end of 
the year, Tony also hopes to have 
available a four-in-one add-on 
that includes a hard drive inter- 
face. Tony explained, "With the 
drastic increase in interest in hard 
drive systems, many people have 
expressed a desire for such a 
device." 

The growth of Gimmesoft's 
product line seems proof that the 
company is doing things right. 
Besides having its full line avail- 
able at the show, Gimmesoft 
displayed its new terminal pro- 
gram, V-Term. Written for the 
CoCo 3, V-Term rivals VT-52 and 



multiple windows, pull-down 
menus, buttons, icons and edit 
fields. The system adds its own 
commands to the CoCo 3 to 
allow event processing. 

While true multitasking on the 
CoCo is accomplished under OS- 
9, Window Master offers the 
diehard Disk basic user access to 
a very user-friendly environment. 
We look to the future to deter- 
mine the success of a package 
such as Window Master. But the 
future has been brought to the 
present with its introduction. It 
will be great to see Window Mas- 
ter applications appear on the 
CoCo market as programmers 
work to tap the power of this new 
product. It really is impressive to 
see something done that many 
have said couldn't be done. 



VT-100 terminals and will allow 
full use of all memory in a 512K 
machine. 

At the Public Domain Soft- 
ware booth, a disk full of utilities, 
applications or entertainment 
files went for $5; three disks for 
$12 (a 50-percent savings). 

T&D Subscription Software 
took reduced rate subscription 




Brandon Holt and CoCo Cat 
reunited one year later. 



orders for its growing line of 
software. Recent additions in- 
clude a gambling package, an 
electronics tutorial, game pack- 
ages and even a CoCo 3-only 
package. To keep the line grow- 
ing, owner Tom Dykema is al- 
ways ready to hear suggestions. 
He said, "The 'fests are the best 
source of new ideas around!" 




Growing to Meet the CoCo Community's Needs 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 43 



A Warm Welcome to New Vendors 




Microcom Software took the 
opportunity to present Word 
Power 3.1 to the Test attendees. 
This multi-featured word proces- 
sor is designed for the CoCo 3 
and sells for $79.95. Microcom 
also offered showgoers a 15- 
percent saving on all items. 




Tom Mix Software sold com- 
bined games packages (five 
games in each) for just $45. 
Breaking with tradition, Mix 
now offers the complete VIP line 
of CoCo applications software. 



Hard Drive Sales 
Going Strong 

One of the current ground- 
breakers in the CoCo hard drive 
arena is Burke & Burke of Pala- 
tine, Illinois. This "mom and 
pop" company has provided the 
Community with a well-designed, 
inexpensive opportunity to hook 
a hard drive to the CoCo. And, 
while the system is aimed at the 
OS-9 user, the CoCoXT and 
CoCoXT-RTC interfaces allow 
compatibility with most Disk 
basic software through the use of 
Hyper-I/ 0. 

Chris Burke also showed some 
other up-and-coming products: 
Wild, a wildcard utility for OS-9, 
EZGen, an interactive bootfile 
editor, and RSB, a gateway from 
Disk basic designed to make life 
easier for the novice OS-9 user. 

As hard drive systems were a 
major aspect of this show, the 
people from Arizona Small Com- 
puter Peripherals came to deliver. 
They offered a complete 20-Meg 



A newcomer to RAiNBOwfest, 
E.Z. Friendly, had much to offer. 
Its variety of software offerings 
included Enigma, a cipher pro- 
gram for the CoCo, and Leonar- 
do 's Pencil, a graphics utility that 
converts free-hand drawings into 
basic DRRW commands. A new 
product, Keyboard Commander, 
is a game-based typing tutor in 
which you use the keyboard as 
your spaceship controls and 
shoots down attacking letters and 
words. The action and graphics 
certainly make you forget that 
you are trying to learn something. 

Also at its first show, Granite 
Computer Systems sold its utili- 
ties package, which transfers files 
between MS-DOS, OS-9 and 
FLEX. Two versions of this pack- 
age were available: one for use 
with out-of-the-carton OS-9, and 
the other designed to work with 
Multi- Vue. 

If you wanted the perfect gift 
for someone who has everything, 
your best bet was to stop by the 
Specialty Projects booth. Offer- 
ings included picture disks from 
the Art Deli that contained 
hundreds of different PM0DE4 
images, disk boxes in bright col- 
ors, wooden disk racks, mouse 
mats and even cross-stitch pat- 
terns. 



system (including a Disto inter- 
face and OS-9 drivers) for $350 
and the bare CM1 6426 20-Meg 
drive for only $150. Realizing 
most users don't want to be stuck 
using just OS-9, owner Jim 
Blanden said his company would 
be supporting Disk basic "in the 
very near future." 

Frank Hogg Laboratory pre- 
sented its line of high-speed hard 
drive systems. Frank Hogg be- 
lieves "there is more than just 
interest in hard drives . . . people 
are buying them up across the 
market!" It would seem that the 
fear of hard drives is rapidly 
diminishing. 

Frank also had some great 
software deals. The Wiz was only 
$50, and DynaStar was going for 
just $75. But the big news was 
Sculptor, a fourth-generation 
database language. FHL gave 
away this $450 item for $120. 

Howard Medical offered com- 
plete hard drive systems for only 
$499 at the Chicago Test. And 
according to Ross Litton, man- 
ager of Howard Medical, now is 
the time to buy a hard drive. Ross 
explained, "If there is an era for 
the hard drive, it has arrived. I see 
purchasing a hard drive as a 
commitment to the machine." 




Lonnie Falk and Computer Vil- 
la's Terry Simons. 



The hot items at the Second 
City Software booth included 
Check09 for $19.95 and BSE 
{basic Screen Editor) for $15.95. 
While Check09 is designed to 
directly interface with Multi- Vue, 
BSE allows full-screen editing. A 
relative newcomer to the CoCo 
market, Second City looks good. 
We hope to see more in the future. 

A strong runner in the no-halt 
disk controller market is Per- 
formance Peripherals. Its dual- 
mode controller features two 
switchable ROM sockets (one 24- 
pin and one 28-pin) and 8K mem- 
ory cache (expandable to 32K.) 
Only for about the last year has 
no-halt technology been seen in 
the CoCo Community. But as 



Education was the cat's meow 
as the CoCo Cat Sandbox went 
off without a hitch for the third 
show in a row. Children (of all 
ages) were delighted to sit in front 
of a CoCo and learn during the 
four Sandboxes offered at this 
year's Chicago *fest. 

While CoCo education was the 
main point at the Sandboxes, 
emphasis at the Sugar Software 
booth was more of a "readin', 
'ritin' an' 'rithmetic" nature. Gary 




Ed Hathaway, of Second City 
Software, makes another sale. 



OS-9 gains popularity, the pres- 
ervation of the type-ahead buffer 
through the use of this technol- 
ogy has become much more de- 
sirable. In some cases it can even 
be considered a necessity. And 
Performance Peripherals has pro- 
vided an excellent alternative to 
CoCo disk users. 

Another newcomer in Chicago 
was Computer Villa. This com- 
pany was offering Home-Pac, a 
household software package for 
personal bookkeeping. The 80- 
column, CoCo 3 package, written 
by Computer Villa owner Terry 
Simmons, was going at a show 
price of $39.95. Other offerings 
included a full range of utility 
software from Bob Van der Poel. 



Davis created an educational 
package consisting of Galactic 
Hangman, Silly Syntax, Presi- 
dents of the United States, The 
Great USA and Trig Attack (a 
very popular game by itself) that 
sold for $29.95. If you were look- 
ing for more than educational 
products, Sugar Software was 
also selling a combination pack- 
age for its Calligrapher software 
for $69.95. 




Veronica Harder and Stephanie, David and Peggy Brach, take 
advantage of the Educational Sandbox. 



Learning With CoCo 



44 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



i tur e 



16K Disk 



the 

•a* 

l RAINB OW 



It's school time— do you know where 

your children sit? 

A SEAT FOR EVERYONE & 
EVERYONE IN HIS SEAT 

By Donald A. lurowski 



o 




When school starts, a certain 
series of events necessarily 
follow — parents rejoice, 
children complain, and teachers make 
out seating charts! This is a dreaded yet 
important task for most teachers, be- 
cause for the next school year, day in 
and day out, attendance in various 
classes must be taken — knowing where 
Johnny is supposed to be sitting cer- 
tainly keeps things in order. 

But the seating chart you make out 
the first day of school will invariably 
mutate many times, quickly becoming 
a maze of arrows and scratched-out 
names. The initial class shuffle of stu- 
dents changing their schedules (after 
realizing that Algebra I is a lot harder 
than 2 + 2, etc.) means that keeping an 



Donald Turowski has a bachelor's 
degree in education and teaches algebra 
and computer literacy in the Burrells 
School District in Natrona Heights, 
Pennsylvania. He is married and has 
two children. 



accurate seating chart for yourself or a 
substitute is almost an impossible task. 

Well, CoCo is coming to the rescue 
with Seating Chart, a program that will 
generate a printed copy of your seating 
chart and much more! All you need is 
a ]6K Color Computer with a single 
disk drive and a printer. With this 
program and your CoCo, you can keep 
an up-to-date version of your seating 
chart on hand at all times with a min- 
imum of effort. 

First, of course, type in, save and load 
the program. No special commands are 
needed. Enter RUN and a title screen 
appears, followed by a series of short 
instructions describing the program. 

The first entry to be made is the 
number of rows of seats in the class- 
room. Due to printer limitations, a 
maximum of five rows are permitted 
(lines 150 to 152). Then the number of 
seats in each row are entered. For 
example, if your classroom has six seats 
in each row, but you use only four per 
row, you may choose to input 4. A word 
of advice: If throughout the year you 
usually gain students, input a larger 



number of seats per row to allow for 
later additions. 

The CoCo uses these dimensions to 
define an array of names to be stored 
on disk for future reference and editing. 
Also, this array size is needed to load 
previously saved classroom seating 
charts for editing. 

To generate a chart, you will be asked 
to enter the first name of each child and 
then his or her last name. For example, 
you would enter JOHNNY and then 
SMITH. The CoCo would then present 
you with your entry and ask if it is OK 
to proceed. By answering no (N), you 
would be given a chance to correct your 
entry as needed. Also, Seating Chart 
will print onscreen the location of your 
entry as you proceed Row 1, Seat 3, 
etc. 

If your entry is too long, you are 
alerted to re-enter it in a shorter version. 
A maximum of 15 characters each for 
first and last names are allowed to 
achieve the formatted, printed copy. 

Once the names are entered, you will 
be asked for the class name, such as 
Algebra I or English 101, etc. Then, you 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 45 



Mr. Casey Stengel 



<<BACK OF ROOM>> 



Baseball 101 



«BACK OF ROOM» 



TED 


WILLIE 


LOU 


WILLIAMS 


MAYS 


GHERIG 


ROBERTO 


YOGI 


PETE 


CLEMENTE 


BERRA 


ROSE 


BABE 


MICKEY 


DON 


RUTH 


MANTLE 


DRYSDALE 



Baseball 101 



« FRONT OF ROOM» 

NUMBER OF STUDENTS - 9 



Sample seating chart 



are asked for the period number. Fi- 
nally, the teacher's name will be needed 
to produce these items on the printed 
copy. 

After these entries have been made, 
you are presented with an option to save 
this list of names for future reference. 
If you answer yes (Y), a filename will be 
requested and the list of names will be 
saved. You should try to save your 



names with the classroom size em- 
bedded, e.g., PER2-5X3 (this implies 
that the classroom size is five rows with 
three seats in each). Remember, this 
information will be needed to reload the 
file. But if you always teach in the same 
room and have saved every class with 
the same dimensions, then as long as 
you remember your initial dimensions, 
this type of filename is unnecessary — 



as long as you remember your initial 
dimensions. 

Now comes the part you've been 
waiting for — the hard copy of your 
seating chart. The CoCo will internally 
check to see if your printer is on and 
alert you if it is not. Also, it will prompt 
you to line up the blank sheet in the 
printer (lines 6000 through 6050). 

Sit back and watch. Your seating 
chart with all its appropritate titles will 
print out on the sheet, and the program 
will give you the option of printing out 
another copy for your records. If no 
other copies are required, an option to 
rerun the program is then offered. 

Seating Chart is a handy utility that 
will be used many times during the 
school year. An editing routine is pro- 
vided that eliminates the need for retyp- 
ing all the names over again whenever 
an insertion or deletion is required. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 1236 Ninth Ave., Natrona Heights, 
PA 15065. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 




141 153 

152 192 

210 81 

275 185 

370 127 

2060 4 

3100 53 

4010 56 

END ....235- 



$ ( 12 8 ) + 11 s « +CHR$ (12 8)+ » 1 amende la 11 



The listing: SERTCHRT 

20 '* SEATING * 

30 ■* CHART * 

40 ! * GENERATOR * 

50 ■* BY * 

60 '*D.A.TUROWSKI* 

70 •* NOV. 1987 * 
3p i************** 

90 CLEAR 5000 
95 NS=0 

100 CLS(RND(8) ) :PRINT@32*8+4,"se 
ating"+CHR$ (128) +"chart"+CHR$ (12 
8 ) + f 'generator" ; 
110 PRINT@32*9+14,"by"; 

120 PRINT@32*10+9, "d"+CHR$ ( 128 ) + 
"a"+CHR$ (128)+"turowski" ; 

121 PRINT@32*13+10, lf disk ,f +CHR$ (1 
28) +"version" ; 

125 PRINT@32*15+2 , "suggestions"* 
CHR$ ( 12 8 ) +"by "+CHR$ (12 8) +"r"+CHR 



130 SCREEN 0,1: FOR YY=1 TO 2500: 
NEXT YY 

140 FOR XX=32*16-1 TO 0 STEP -1: 
PRINT@XX, CHR$ (150) ; :NEXT XX:CLS 

141 PRINT"THIS PROGRAM WILL GENE 
RATE A SEATING CHART FOR YOUR 

CLASS. IN ORDER TO BEGIN THIS 
PROGRAM, YOU MUST ENTER THE NUM 
BER OF ROWS OF SEATS AND THE 
NUMBER OF SEATS IN EACH ROW IN Y 
OUR CLASS. ": PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY 
TO CONTINUE. . .":EXEC44539 

142 PRINTSTRING$ (32,128) :CLS:PRI 
NT "IF POSSIBLE, TRY TO INCORPORA 
TE THIS SIZE INTO THE NAME YOU G 
IVETO THIS LIST WHEN ASKED IN TH 
E PROGRAM, SUCH AS l PER2-5X6 l T 
O DESIGNATE 5 ROWS WITH 6 SEATS 



143 PRINTSTRING$(3 2,12 8) :PRINT"T 
HIS UTILITY ALSO HAS AN EDITINGF 
EATURE TO ALLOW CHANGES OR D 
ELETIONS 1 " : PRINT@3 2*14 , "PRESS AN 
Y KEY TO CONTINUE. . . ":EXEC44539 

150 CLS (RND (8) ): PRINT "ENTER THE 
NUMBER OF ROWS OF SEATS IN T 
HE CLASSROOM (MAXIMUM IS 5)":INP 
UT R:GOSUB 4000 

151 IF R>5 THEN PRINT" SORRY, YOU 
MUST ENTER A NUMBER LESS THAN 

OR EQUAL TO 5 FOR THE SEATING CH 



46 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



ART TO FIT ON THE PRINTER! 11 : 

FOR YY=1 TO 3 5j3j3:NEXT YY : GOTO 15 

0 

152 IF R<1 THEN PRINT "SORRY, INV 
ALID NUMBER OF ROWS . TRY AGAIN! 
!!":FOR YY=1 TO 3pj30:NEXT YYrGOT 
0 150 

lSja PRINT: PRINT "ENTER THE NUMBER 
OF SEATS (MAXIMUM) IN EAC 

H ROW";: INPUT S : PRINTSTRING$ (32, 

165 IF R=3 THEN V=16 ELSE V=0 

170 DIM LN$(R,S) ,F$(R,S) 

171 CLS(RND(8) ) :INPUT"DO YOU HAV 
E THIS SEATING CHART PREVIOUSLY 

SAVED ON DISK" ;R$ : IF LEFT$(R$,1 
)="Y" THEN 3000 

175 CLS(RND(8) ) : PRINTSTRING$ (32 , 
128) ; 

180 PRINT"YOU WILL NOW BE ASKED 
TO ENTER THE NAMES OF THE STUDE 
NTS IN YOUR CLASS BY ENTERING 

THEIR FIRST NAME AND THEN TH 
EIR LAST NAME." 

181 PRINTSTRING$ (32,128) ; :FOR YY 
=1 TO 2500: NEXT YY 

190 PRINT"note — >FOR THIS PROGRA 
M, ROW 1, SEAT 1 REFERS TO THE F 
ARTHEST ROW ON YOUR LEFT AS YO 
U STAND IN FRONT OF YOUR CLASS 

AND OF COURSE THE FIRST SEAT 
IN THAT ROW." 

195 PRINTSTRING$(3 2,128) ; : FOR YY 
=1 TO 3000: NEXT YY 
200 FOR XX=1 TO 1000: NEXT XX:PRI 
NT@32*14 , "PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTI 

NUE ":EXEC44539 

210 CLS(RND(8) ) 
220 FOR X=l TO R 
230 FOR Y=l TO S 

240 PRINT "ENTER first name FOR:" 
: PRINT" ROW "jX;", SEAT" ;Y: INPUT 
F$(X / Y):IF LEN(F$(X,Y) ) >15 THEN 
PRINT "NAME TOO LONG! PLEASE RE 
-ENTER!": GOTO 240 

250 PRINT "ENTER last name FOR:" 
: PRINT" ROW w ;X; lf , SEAT" ;Y: INPUT 

LN$(X / Y):IF LEN (LN$ (X, Y) ) >15 TH 
EN PRINT "NAME TOO LONG!! PLEASE 
RE-ENTER! ": GOTO 250 

251 PRINTF$(X,Y) ;" " ;LN$ (X, Y) :PR 
INT"correct (y/n) ": INPUT R$:IF F 
$(X / Y)<>"" THEN NS=NS+1 

252 IF LEFT$(R$ / 1)="Y" THEN 255 
ELSE 240 

255 PRINTSTRING$(32 / "=") 
260 NEXT Y 

270 NEXT X 

271 CLS(RND(8) ) :PRINT STRING$(32 
275 PRINTSTRING$(32,128) :PRINT"P 



LEASE ENTER CLASS NAME AT THIS T 
IME (MATH, ENGLISH, ETC.)":LINE 
INPUT CL$ 

276 PRINT "NOW ENTER THE PERIOD N 
UMBER": INPUT P$ 

277 PRINT "NOW ENTER THE TEACHER ■ 
S NAME": INPUT T$ 

280 PRINTSTRING$ (32,128) ;:PRINT" 
DATA ENTRY COMPLETED !!": PRINT "DO 

YOU WANT TO SAVE OR RE 
-SAVE THIS LIST OF NAMES?": LINE 
INPUT R$:IF LEFT$(R$,1)="Y" THEN 

2000 

281 GOSUB 6010:CLS(RND(8) ) :PRINT 
@32*8,STRING$ (32,128) ; :PRINT@32* 

8+6, "print ing"+CHR$( 128) +"in"+CH 
R$ (128) +"progress" ; 

284 Z=LEN(CL$) :TP=(80-Z)/2 

285 PRINT#-2,T$, ,,, "PERIOD ";P$: 
PRINT#-2,TAB(TP) ;CL$: 

286 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,T 
AB(2);"«BACK OF ROOM»" ;TAB(63) 
;"«BACK OF ROOM»" 

287 PRINT#-2,TAB(V) ;STRING$ (LL, " 

-") 

288 PRINT#-2 

290 FOR Y=S TO 1 STEP -1 
300 FOR X=l TO R 



NEW FROM RTB SOFTWARE 

Graphic Adventure Games 
Adventure Trilogy But Each Is j^^. 
A Stand Alone Game trr\\ 

LABYRINTH 

Can you escape and save your kingdom? 



RAINBOW 



QUEST 

FOR THE RING 

Wander your vast kingdom in search of the Wizards Ring 



RAINBOW 

| til it, ( »1ION 
St »t 



But beware! 



ADVENTURE IN^ 



LUMERIA 



RAINBOW 

St*. 



After resting from the last 2 adventures you go on the last 
and final quest to save a beautiful princess from an evil 
count in the far off land of Lumeria. 

All games may be backed up and use simple keystroke 
commands. All for 64K ECB Disk COCO 1 or 2. 
LABYRINTH $24.95 1 Disk 

Quest for the Ring ~$4&05. Now $34.95 2 Disk Set 
Adventure in Lumeria *$48t95l Now $36.95 2 Disk Set 
or get all 3 games for $74.95 Add $3.00 for S&H 



Send check or Money Order to: 

RTB Software 

P.O. Box 777 

W.Acton, MA 01 720-0011 



Phone # (508) 263-0563 
All programs are guaranteed 
to load and run 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 47 



31j3 PRINT#-2,TAB(V) ;F$(X,Y) , 

32,0 NEXT X 

325 PRINT#-2 

340 FOR X-l TO R 

350 PRINT* -2, TAB (V) ;LN$(X,Y) , 

360 NEXT X 

370 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,T 
AB(V) ; STRING $ (LL, '•-") :PRINT#-2 

380 NEXT Y 

381 PRINT#-2,TAB(32) ;"«FRONT OF 
ROOM»" : PRINT #-2 : PRINT#-2 : PRINT 

# -2 , CL$ ; TAB ( 40 ) ; "NUMBER OF STUDE 
NTS =";NS 

384 PRINT@32*8,STRING$(32,128) ; : 
PRINT§32*8+7 , ,, printing"+CHR$ (128 
)+" completed" ; 

385 PRINT§32*13, "DO YOU WANT ANO 
THER COPY (Y/N) " ; : INPUT R$ : IF LE 
FT$(R$,1)="Y" THEN 281 

386 PRINT@32*13 , "DO YOU WANT TO 
RE-RUN THIS PROGRAM" ; : INPUT 

R$:IF LEFT$(R$,1)="Y" THEN RUN 
ELSE END 
390 END 

2000 REM ROUTINE TO SAVE LIST OF 

NAMES FOR SEATING CHART 
2005 PRINT STRING$(32,"=") 
2010 INPUT "ENTER A NAME FOR THIS 

LIST. THE NAME MUST HAVE 8 



OR LESS LETTERS! " ;N$ 
2020 IF LEN(N$)>8 THEN PRINT "IN 
VALID FILENAME- TRY AGAIN!": GOTO 
2010 

2030 OPEN "0",#1,N$ 

2040 FOR X=l TO R 

2050 FOR Y=l TO S 

2060 WRITE#1 , F$ (X, Y) ,LN$(X,Y) 

2070 NEXT Y 

2080 NEXT X 

2085 CLOSE #1 

2090 PRINTN$ ; " IS SAVED TO DISK! 
!":SOUND 200, 2: FOR XX=1 TO 1500: 
NEXT XX:FL=l:GOTO 3015 
3000 REM ROUTINE TO LOAD PREVIOU 
S FILE NAMES 

3010 PRINTSTRING$ (32, "-") : INPUT" 
ENTER THE NAME OF THE 
LIST";N$ 

3011 IF LEN(N$)>8 THEN PRINT"INV 
ALID FILENAME, PLEASE RE- 
ENTER! !":GOTO 3010 

3015 PRINTSTRING$ (32, "-") :NS=0 

3020 OPEN "I",#1,N$ 

3030 FOR X=l TO R 

3040 FOR Y=l TO S 

3050 INPUT#1, F$(X,Y) ,LN$(X,Y) 

3055 IF FL=1 THEN 3065 

3060 PRINT F$(X,Y);" ";LN$(X,Y) 



I 
I 

! 

1 



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^fEjfjUrjJrzJ'jJ'jIijiJrjJijlrzIrz, 



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SSSD RS devices (-5-6,-3-9). Disk 
loaded version free on request! 
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Arizona Besidients add 5.5% Sales tan 
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7^777 



RAINBOW 

CfftTiricanoN 

•ML 




(Reviewed in Oct. 87 RAINBOW) Makes programming sensa- 
tional-looking graphics as easy as moving a joystick! Converts 
precision drawings into "DRAW* commands which can be stand- 
alone BASIC programs or merged into other programs. Also 
includes "DEMO" and "PAINT" programs. Requires a spring- 
centered joystick or touch-pad. 32k ECB tape or disk $14.95 

? ENKzMA? 

Transform your computer into an ultra-secret code machine cap- 
able of enciphering and deciphering In over 12 million virtually 
unbreakable codes! (not simple substitution codes). Print hard 
copy or store & retrieve coded data on tape or disk. Only the per- 
son who has the password can read it! 32k ECB tape or disk $12.95 

New! S^m^ 

Just answer the prompts & type your message; "EZ WRITER" will 
put it into perfect letter form and send it to your DMP or DWP. 
Professional-quality, 1 to 4 page letters every time! Do one letter 
or multiple copies for "personalized" mailings. Saves letters and 
mailing lists. Even does labels. Menu-driven. Undoubtedly the 
EZ-est letter writing system available! Free sample on request! 
32k ECB tape or disk $19.95 klsAkl I 

PTxPrSnP the EZ Screen dump jjfiSU 
Print detailed pictures (large or small size) of your PMODE4 
graphics. The "EZ Screen Dump" works with all major dot matrix 
printers and is fast and simple to use. See for yourself— send for 
free examples of what it can do! 32k ECB tape or disk only $14.95 

This fascinating educational program features 2 of the cutest 
dancing teddy bears you've ever seen! Child uses joystick, 
mouse, or arrow keys to point to bear who holds the correct 
answer. Teacher or parent can SAVE many different kinds of short 
quizzes to us e with this program. 32k ECB tape or disk $19.95 

WBumam e.z. friendly software hhbh 

118 CORLIES AVE. • POUGHKEEPSIE, NY 12601 • (914) 485-8150 
(Add $1.50 s/h to all orders. NY residents add state sales tax.) 



48 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



3J365 IF F$(X,Y)<>"" THEN NS=NS+1 
3J37J3 NEXT Y 
NEXT X 
3J39J3 CLOSE #1 
3J391 IF FL=1 THEN 281 
3)395 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "-") 
31J3J3 REM EDITING ROUTINE 
311J3 INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO CHANGE 
ANY OF THESE SEATS AT THIS T 
IME" ;R$ : IF LEFT$ (R$, 1) =»Y" THEN 
312J3 ELSE 275 

312j3 PRINT "PLEASE ENTER THE LOCA 
TION OF THESTUDENT 1 S SEAT THAT Y 
OU WANT TO CHANGE" : INPUT 11 ROW #"; 
X: INPUT "SEAT #";Y 

313) 3 PRINT "THE STUDENT IS:":PRI 
NTF$(X / Y);" ";LN$(X,Y) : INPUT "IS 

THIS CORRECT" ;R$: IF LEFT$(R$,1) 
="Y" THEN 314J3 ELSE 312)3 

314) 3 PRINT: PRINT "ENTER THE first 
NAME OF THE STUDENT WHO WIL 

L now BE SITTING IN THIS 

SEAT instead of ";F$(X,Y);" ";L 
N$ (X, Y) 

315) 3 INPUT F$(X,Y) 

316) 3 PRINT"NOW ENTER THEIR last 
NAME": INPUT LN$(X,Y) 

317) 3 PRINT " S TUDENT IS REPLACED B 
Y:":PRINTF$(X,Y) ; M ";LN$(X,Y) 



318)3 PRINT "ANY MORE CHANGES (Y/N 
)":INPUT R$:IF LEFT$(R$,1)="Y" T 
HEN 312)3ELSE 275 

4)3)3)3 REM ROUTINE TO SET PRINTED 
LINE WIDTH 

4)31)3 IF R=5 THEN LL=8j3 
4)32)3 IF R=4 THEN LL=64 
4)33)3 IF R=3 THEN LL=4 8 
4)34)3 IF R=2 THEN LL=32 
4)35)3 IF R=l THEN LL=16 
4)36)3 RETURN 

6)3)3)3 REM ROUTINE TO CHECK FOR PR 
INTER READINESS 

6)31)3 CLS:PRINT§32*3, "1)TURN ON P 
RINTER" : SOUND 2)3)3 , 3 : FORXX=lTO 1)3)3 
)3:NEXT XX:IF PEEK ( 65314) /2<>INT ( 
PEEK (653 14 )/2) THEN PRINT@32*11+ 

6, "printer is not on line!!!": PR 
INT@32*12, "turn printer on at th 
is time! ! !": FORXX^ITO 1)3)3)3 : NEXT X 
X:G0TO6)31# 

6)32)3 CLS:PRINT@32*5, "2) LINE UP S 
HEET IN PRINTER WITH PRINT HEAD 

AT THIS TIME": SOUND 23)3,2 
6)33)3 PRINT(§3 2*1)3, " PRESS ANY K 
EY TO CONTINUE" :EXEC4 4539 
6)34)3 PLAY"03;V31;L1^;A;V16;A;V8; 
A;V3;A;V1;L2£;A" 

6)35)3 RETURN /S\ 




SPbCIAL bYLMT? 

COCO GALLERY LIVE 
SHOWCASE YOUR BEST AT RAINBOWFEST 

We are taking the popular "CoCo Gallery" on the road to RAINBOWfest Princeton — and we'd like you 1 
submit your own graphics creations to be exhibited at the show! 

RVLbt 



• You can enter color or black-and-white photographs or printouts of your original artwork produced on 
the CoCo 1, 2 or 3. Entries must be framed, mounted or matted, and may not be smaller than 5-by-7 inches 
or larger than 11-by-14 inches. 

• Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV 
programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears 
in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

• Along with your entry, send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you 
created your picture (what programs you used, etc.). Please include a few facts about yourself, too! 

• Your name, address and phone number, along with the title of your work, must be clearly marked on the 
back of each entry, and a disk copy of each piece must also be included. 

• Entries must be mailed to THE RAINBOW before October 10, 1988, or brought to the RAINBOWfest 
registration booth by 10 a.m., Saturday, October 22. 

• All entries to CoCo Gallery Live become the property of Falsoft, Inc. 

There will be two categories: one for graphics produced on the CoCo 1 and 2, and one for CoCo 3 graphics. 
Several awards will be made in each category. Winners will be determined by votes from RAINBOWfest 
attendees. In case of any ties, winners will be determined by our chief judge, CoCo Cat. 

Prizes and ribbons will be presented Sunday, October 23, 1988, and winning entries will be published in 
the January '89 issue of the rainbow. Send your entry to "CoCo Gallery Live," the rainbow, 9509 U.S. Highway 
42, Prospect, KY 40059. 





September 1988 THE RAINBOW 49 





PRINCETO 



O 




AINBOWfest is the only computer show dedicated 
exclusively to your Tandy Color Computer. 
Nowhere else will you see as many CoCo-related 
products or be able to attend free seminars conducted 
by the top Color Computer experts. It's like receiving the 
latest issue of the rainbow in your mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for commercial 
programmers to show off new and innovative products 
for the first time. Princeton is the show to get information 
on capabilities for the new CoCo 3, along with a terrific 
selection of the latest CoCo 3 software. In exhibit after 
exhibit, there will be demonstrations, opportunities to 
experiment with software and hardware, and special 
RAINBOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace between visiting exhibits and 
attending the valuable, free seminars on all aspects of 
your CoCo — from improving basic skills to working with 
the sophisticated OS-9 operating system. 

Many people who write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are written about — are there 
to meet you and answer questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people who share your interest 
in the Color Computer. It's a person-to-person 
event and a tremendous learning experience in 
a fun and relaxed atmosphere. 

A special feature of RAINBOWfest is the 
Educational Sandbox, which features 
child-oriented workshops to give hands- 
on experience to an age group often 
5>N. \ neglected. There are sessions for the 

kindergarten through third-grad- 
ers, and for fourth- through sev- 



$6 




enth-graders. And, as an additional treat for CoCo Kids of 
all ages, we've invited frisky feline CoCo Cat to join us for 
the show. RAINBOWfest has something for everyone in the 
family! 

If you missed the fun at our last RAINBOWfest in Chicago, 
why don't you make plans now to join us in Prince- 
ton? For members of the family who don't share your 
affinity for CoCo, there are many other attractions in 
the Princeton area. 

The Hyatt Regency Princeton offers special rates for 
RAINBOWfest. The show opens Friday evening with a 
session from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's a daytime show 
Saturday — the CoCo Community Breakfast (separate 
tickets required) is at 8 a.m., then the exhibit hall opens 
promptly at 10 a.m. and runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, 
the exhibit hall opens at 11 a.m. and closes at 3 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained directly 
from the rainbow. We'll also send you a reserva- 
tion form so you can get a special room rate. 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH 
treatment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at 
(502) 893-3311. All POSH services are available at no 
charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 

3b THbRfa? 





If 



9 




^ 



IE 



, Mips 



5 



. » • • » * » r-< 
^» » » - 



Cray Augsburg 

RAINBOW Technical Editor 
OS-9 For Absolute Beginners 

Bruce K. Bell, O.D. 

Two-time Grand Prize Winner of 
RAINBOW'S Adventure Contest 
Writing Adventure Games 

Steve Bjork 

SRB Software 

Writing Game Software 

Chris Burke 

Burke & Burke 
Hard Drive Systems 

Ben Burnette 
Wayne Smith 

CY-BURNET-ICS 

CoCo as an Educational Tool 



Nancy Ewart 

Independent Programmer 
Starting with C 

Marty Goodman, M.D. 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Two CoCo Consultations Live 

Paul Hodash 

Delphi-Information Product Supervisor 
Telecommunications 

Cecil Houk 

Speech Systems 
Music and MIDI 

Jutta Kapfhammer 

RAINBOW Managing Editor 
Writing for Publication 



Dale Puckett 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Overview of OS-9 
Overview of BASIC09 



Ed Samuels 

New York Law School 
Copyright Laws 



Logan Ward. 

Computer Center 

Creative Uses for CoCo Max 




mm 



j 




I 



ۥۥ COMMUNITY MbAKFAS T 

Dick White — RAINBOW Contributing Editor 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo Community Breakfast is Dick 
White, contributing editor for the rainbow. Mr. White, who has a long back- 
ground with microcomputers, will discuss his personal experiences in the early 
years as he traces the development of the Color Computer since its introduc- 
tion in 1980. 

SPbCIAL faVbNT? 



We're pleased to present The Educational Sandbox, a joint Tandy/RMNBOW 
effort. This is a computer workshop for RAINBOWfest kids. There will be 
two sessions on both Saturday and Sunday. One workshop will be for the 
kindergarten through third-grade set, and the other for fourth- through 
seventh-graders. Each workshop will last between 45 minutes and one 
hour, and will give the children and their parents hands-on experience in 
using Tandy computers and software. 



RAINBOWfest - Princeton, New Jersey 
Dates: October 21-23, 1988 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Princeton 
Rooms: $88 per night, 
single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: Oct. 7, 1988 



RAINBOWfest - Chicago, Illinois 
Dates: April 14-16, 1989 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $66 per night, 
single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: March 31, 
1989 

FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket orders re- 
ceived from each state. 

First 500 ticket orders received get The 
Rainbow Book of Simulations. 




YES, I'm coming to Princeton! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special 
advance sale price. Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 



Please send me: 

Three-day ticket(s) at $9 each total 

One-day ticket(s) at $7 each total 



Name 

(please print) 

Address 



Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 



Saturday CoCo Breakfast 
at $12 each 

RAINBOWfest T-shirt(s) 

at $6 each 

Specify size: 

S M L . 



City 



State 



total 



total 



Telephone 
Company _ 



ZIP 



XL 



(T-shirts must be picked up at the door) 
Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 



(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 
□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the 
Hyatt Regency Princeton ($88, single or 
double room). 



Account Number 



Exp. Date 



Signature 



Advance ticket deadline: October 7, 1988. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at 
the door. Tickets will also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. 
Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky 
call (800) 847-0309. 




I 



Still pounding away at that keyboard? 




SAVE up to 19%" 

when you buy a joint sub- 
scription to the magazine and 
either rainbow on tape or 
rainbow on disk! A one-year 
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and rainbow on tape is only 
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ada, $153 foreign surface rate 
and $188 foreign airmail. A 
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rainbow and rainbow on 
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Every month, these convenient 
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documentation, all you have to do is 
load and run them. A one-year com- 
bination subscription to the rain- 



bow and rainbow on tape or rain- 
bow on disk give you more than 230 
new programs! The typing time you 
save can be spent enjoying your 
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For No-Fuss Fun 

Back issues of rainbow on tape 
are available beginning with the 
April 1982 issue. A single copy of 
rainbow on tape is $10 within the 
United States; U.S. $12 in all other 
countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow on tape is $80 
within the U.S.; U.S. $90 in Canada; 
and U.S. $105 for all other coun- 
tries.* 



RAINBOW ON DISK 
Offers OS-9 Programs 

In addition to all the programs 
offered on tape, part of one side of 
rainbow on disk is formatted for the 
OS-9 operating system. That means 
you can now get all the OS-9 pro- 
grams from the magazine — pro- 
grams that cannot be put on tape. 
Back issues of rainbow on disk are 
available beginning with October 
1986. Subscriptions to rainbow on 
disk are $99 a year in the U.S. Cana- 
dian rate is U.S. $115. All other 
countries, U.S. $130. Single copy 
rate is $12 in the U.S.; U.S. $14 in 
Canada; and U.S. $16 in all other 
countries.* 



To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847- 
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Look for our envelope located between pages 66 and 67 for 
ordering individual subscriptions to the rainbow, rainbow on 

TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. 



YES! Sign me up for a joint 1-year subscription (12 issues) to: 



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□ NEW □ RENEWAL (attach labels) 



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Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ Am. Express 
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*U.S. currency only, please. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks 
for delivery of first copies. Joint subscriptions to the rainbow and rainbow on tape or rainbow on disk begin with the current issue. 

Please note: While group purchases of rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are permitted (and multiple subscriptions are even discounted, if purchased in one 
order from a club), no license to make copies is conveyed or implied. Yes, your group may even purchase a subscription to our disk/tape services, but such purchase 
in no way authorizes that any copies be made of that original disk/tape. Specifically, this means that the original disk/tape itself may indeed be kept in a club library 
for use by members. However, a group purchase does not entitle club members, individually or as a group, to copy that disk/tape. 
Unauthorized copying of any copyright product is strictly illegal. The copyright (right to make copies) is in no way conveyed in the purchase transaction. 



Name _ 
Address 



























J"3 


Lit, 


as, 







32 K ECB 




Reward your students with an arcade game each time 
they correctly answer one of these problems 



Long Division Drill 



By Richard D. Gordfey 



Figure 1 



C, omputer drill as an educational 
tool has received a bad reputa- 
tion as an "animated work- 
book." Such criticism is frequently 
warranted, especially when, as in work- 
books, the student receives feedback 
only when the exercise is finished. At 
the Chillicothe Alternative School, our 
experience with teaching elementary 
mathematics had proved that com- 
puter-monitored drill can be very useful 
in the learning of new concepts of 
calculation if every step of the process 
is prompted, monitored and evaluated. 

Long Division demonstrates these 
concepts along with several program- 
ming techniques of manipulating fig- 
ures and prompts on the text screen. 

Type in or load the program and run. 
After the title screen the program tells 
the student to follow the screen instruc- 
tions exactly. This prompt has proved 
necessary because young students tend 
to react to a CRT by staring passively 
or asking an adult, "What do I do now?" 



Richard Gordley and his wife, Nancy, 
operate the Chillicothe Alternative 
School in Chillicothe, Hi Richard has 
a degree in Music Education, and his 
hobbies include leather craft, computing 
and wind instrument repair. 




60 
95 
100-191 



240-3 10 



Functioi 



480-530 
560-570 



720-730 



Strings of CHR$( 143 ) are 
set up to erase small 
screen areas. 

Selects length of division. 
Puts problem on screen. 
Select location for first 
digit of quotient and eval- 
uate. Lines 140 through 
150 move the question 
mark. 

Multiplication subrou- 
tine in separata wpi:|c 
area. 

Sets up subtraction prob- 
lem. •'" "•' 

Checks to see if trial qufe 
tient was too large. 
Subtraction routine. 
Flash arrow to show stu- 
dent what part of prob- 
lem is being worked on. 
Is the problem done? 



STEP 2 



MULT I PLYBBrtCK 



-246 
*6 



MULTI PLY 
AND 

YOUR ANSWER . 



Function 




Subroutines 

1000 Press any key to 
tinue, 

1050 Gets divisor and dividend 
and correct location of 
first digit of quotient. 
1 150 Erases prompt area. 
1200 Erases bottom of screen. 
1210 Erases work area. 
1220 Trial quotient too large? 
1 250 Subtraction error. 
1300 Remainder larger than 
.divisor; 

Brings down next digit of 
dividend. 

Prompts and gets answer 
for multiplication. 
1460 Prompts to subtract. 
1500 Gets value of current 

quotient 
1550 Prompts for remainder of 

the subtraction step. 
1570 Gets length of answer to 
the previous subtraction 
step. 

1580 Calculates location of 
subtraction answer. 

1 999 Remnant of defunct error 
trap 

2000 Division done f 
down remainder t|v 
tune — pink screen. 

2050 Do another? 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 



They seem to need a brief reminder to 
read the instructions on the screen. 

The user next selects the number of 
digits to be in the divisor. The drill then 
begins with every step prompted. Flash- 
ing prompts, questions marks and 
arrows show the student exactly what 
stage of the problem he or she is work- 
ing on. Separate work areas are pro- 
vided on the screen for the main prob- 
lem and for subordinate problem steps. 
Each step of the long division process 
is evaluated as it is done, and a specific 
message helps correct any errors. Any 
step done incorrectly is immediately 
corrected by the student, so that the 
final result is always a correctly com- 
pleted problem. In one special case — 
that of selecting a trial quotient — an 
error is allowed to ride until subsequent 
multiplication is done, so that the 
student may see the consequence of an 
erroneous choice. 



Program Outline 

The location of some of the more 
interesting routines are indicated in 
Figure 1. It was quite difficult to enable 
the program to properly locate the 
digits of each problem step and evaluate 
the intermediate answers as well as 
locate the proper digits on the screen. 
No wonder long division is tough — 
there's a lot going on! 

Program Enhancements 

It takes a long time to do a long 
division problem this way, but you 
always get the right answer. As a reward 
for their perseverance, our students get 
to play a bit of an arcade-style game 
after each completed problem. A GDSUB 
at Line 2045 sends the student to this 
game, which begins at Line 3000. Any 
short favorite game could be included 
here. 

The correct answer prompts could be 



more imaginative and encouraging, but 
they can't be selected from a random 
string bank because of the necessity of 
flashing the message. Certainly I would 
like more variety in the little tune played 
when a step is completed correctly, but 
the students don't seem to mind. 

Some teachers may feel the need to 
keep a record of the problems each 
student completes although we just tell 
our students how many digits to use in 
the divisor and how many problems to 
complete. However, information of this 
kind could be easily sent to a printer. 

It should be noted that Long Division 
contains a multiplication and subtrac- 
tion routine that could be enhanced and 
made to stand alone. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at P. O. Box 28, Castleton t IL 
61426 Please enclosed an SASE when 
requesting a reply,) □ 



r 



100 


19 


840 


157 


180 


* . 31 


1050 


50 


280 


• 238 


1220 


. . . * > 239 


430 ... 


...150 


1360 


.......2 


550 


209 


1580 


.♦.v,104 


690 . . 


27 


END 


»>*•« 1 70 



The listing: DIVISION 

1 1 LONG DIVISION DRILL 
M- t 1 COPYRIGHT RICHARD D. GORDLEY 

3 'BOX 28, CASTLETON, IL 6142 6 

4 1 SEPT. 24, 1985 

10 CLS0 : PRINT@96 , "chillicothe" ; : 
PRINTO108 , "alternative" ; :PRINT@1 
20, "school" ; :PRINT@172 , "presents 
" ; : PRINT@235 , "dynamic" ; 
14 CLEAR500 

20 PRINT§301, "daily" ; :PRINT@3 67, 

"drills" ; : PRINT@425 , "long" ; : PRIN 

T@430 , "division" ; 

25 XX=RND ( -TIMER ) 

30 FORX=1TO2500:NEXT 

40 CLS:PRINT"PLEASE FOLLOW INSTR 

UCTIONS ON THE SCREEN exactly 

TO ENJOY THIS DRILL I " : GOSUB1 

000 

50 CLS:PRINT»HOW MANY DIGITS DO 

YOU WISH IN THE DIVISOR? <l-3> 
ii 

51 QL=37:RT$="V1503L4T5G04CEL2GL 
4EL2G":NU$=*STRING$(14,143) :NL$=S 
TRING$(31,143) 

52 WR$=*"V3101T255CDCDCDCDCDCDCDC 
DCDCDCDCDCD" : WR$=WR$+WR$+WR$+WR$ 
60 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN60 

70 IFA$<"1" ORA$>"3" THEN50 



80 GOSUB1050 

95 CLS:PRINT@70,STRING$(LEN(DI$) 
,45) ; :PRINT@100-LEN(D$) , D ; : PRINT 
§101 , "/" ; : PRINT@102 , DI$ ; 

100 PRINT@37,"? "; 

101 QL=37 

105 PRINT @ 16, "STEP 1" ; : PRINT© 4 8 , 
"divide"; 

110 PRINT @ 3 0 6 , "WHERE WILL" ;: PRIN 
T@ 3 3 8, "FIRST DIGIT"; :PRINT@370," 
OF QUOTIENT " ; : PRINT @ 402 , "GO? " ; 

120 PRINT@448, "USE ARROW KEYS TO 
MOVE THE 1 ?'"; ;PRINT@480, "PRESS 
<enter> WHEN DONE."; 

121 FORX=1TO200:NEXT:PRINT@476,C 
HR$(143) ; :FORX=1TO200:NEXT 

12 2 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN120 
130 PRINT@476, "?" 

140 IFA$=CHR$(8) THENQL=QL-1 : PRI 
NT@QL, "? "; :GOT0122 
150 IFA$=CHR$ (9 ) THENPRINT@QL, » 
?" ; : QL=QL+1 : GOT0122 

160 IFA$OCHR$(13)THEN120 

170 IFQL<PL THENPLAYWR$:GOSUB115 

0 : PRINT@306 , "DIGIT TOO" ; :PRINT@3 

38, "FAR left! "; : PRINT @ 370 , "TRY A 

GAIN. " ; :GOSUB1000:GOSUB1150:GOTO 
100 

180 IFQL>PL THENPLAYWR$:GOSUB115 
0 :PRINT@306 , "DIGIT TOO"; :PRINT@3 
38, "FAR right! " ; :PRINT@370, "TRY 
AGAIN. "; :GOSUB1000:GOSUB1150:GOT 
0100 

190 PLAYRT$ 

191 GOSUB1150 : FORX=1T03 : PRINT@30 
6 , "VERY GOOD ! " ; : FORY J =1TO200 :NEXT 
: PRINT@306 , "very good" ; : FORY=lTO 



54 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



2j3j3: NEXT: NEXT 

200 GOSUB1150:GOSUB1000:GOSUB115 
0 

210 PRINT@QL,CHR$(191) ; : PRINT© 30 
6, "NOW press" ;: PRINT© 3 3 8," A NUMB 
ER TO" ; :PRINT@370, "USE AS FIRST" 
;: PRINT @ 40 2, "DIGIT OF"; :PRINT@43 
4 > "QUOTIENT. " ; 
215 A$="" 

220 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="" THEN220 
230 A=VAL(A$) :IFA<1 ORA>9 THEN 2 2 

0 

232 PRINT@QL,A$:SOUND100,3 

234 ML=153:GOSUB240:GOTO350 

240 PRINT@21,"2"; :PRINT@48, "mult 

iply back"; :GOSUB1150 

250 PRINT@ML-LEN(D$) ,D;:PRINT@ML 

+30, "X"; A; :PRINT@ML+65-LEN(D$) , S 

TRING$ (LEN(D$) ,45) ; : PRINT©ML+93 , 



it 



ii 



2 60 GOSUB1450 
270 GOSUB1150 
275 MA$=STR$ (MA) 

280 PRINT@ML+97-LEN(MA$) ,MA; 
290 PR=A*D:IFMA<>PR THENPLAYWR$ : 
F0RX=1T03 : PRINTS 30 6 , "MULTIPLICAT 
ION" ; :PRINT§338 , " ERROR 1 " ; : FORY— 1 
T03 00 : NEXT : PRINT@30 6 , "multipl ica 
tion" ; : PRINT© 3 3 8 , " error" > *FORY=l 
TO300 : NEXT : NEXT : PRINT© 4 02, "TRY A 
GAIN" ; : GOSUB1000 : GOTO2 40 
300 PLAYRT $ : FORX= 1TO 3 : PRINT ©306, 
"EXCELLENT ! " ; : FORY=1TO200 :NEXT : P 
RINT© 3 06, " excellent " ; : F0RY=1T02 0 
0 : NEXT : NEXT 
305 GOSUB1150 
310 RETURN 
350 GOSUB1210 

3 60 GOSUB1570 

365 IFQL=3 8 THENPRINT © 1 3 3, PR ; : PR 
INT©166,"-" 

370 IFQL=39 ANDLEN (PR$)*1 THENP 
RINT© 13 4 , PR; : PRINT© 166 , " — " ; 
380 IFLEN (D$) =1 ANDLEN ( PR$) =2 TH 
ENPRINT@133 ,PR; :PRINT@166," — "; 
390 IFQL=39 ANDLEN (D$) =2 THENPRI 
NT© 13 3 , PR; : PRINT© 16 6 , " — "; 
400 IFQL=40 ANDLEN ( PR$ ) =2 THENP 
RINT@134,PR; :PRINT@166, " — "; 
410 IFLEN (D$) ~2 ANDLEN (PR$) =3 TH 

ENPRINT@133 , PR; : PRINT ©16 6 , " " ; 

420 IFQL=40 ANDLEN (PR$) =3 THENPR 

INT© 13 3 , PR; : PRINT© 16 6 , " " 

430 IFQL=41 ANDLEN (PR$) =3 THENPR 
440 IFQL=41 AND LEN ( PR$ ) =4 THENP 

RINT©133 , PR; :PRINT@166 , " "; 

445 ER==133 

450 PRINT@133, "-" ; :GOSUB1200 
460 IFPR>VAL(LEFT$(DI$,QL-37) ) T 
HENGOSUB1220 : GOT02 10 
470 MN=VAL(LEFT$(DI$,QL-37) ) 



480 PRINT© 2 1, "3" ; : PRINT @ 4 8, "sub t 

ract " ; ■ ^IWM^ - v : 

490 GOSUB1460 ■ ':*M : W&'' : 

4 9 5 DF$=STR$ ( DF) : DF$=RIGHT$ (DF$ , 
LEN(DF$)-1) 

500 IF DFO(MN-PR) THENG0SUB12 50 
:GOTO490 ■ 

505 PR I NT © Q L+ 5 * 3 2 - LEN ( DF $ ) t DF; 
510 IFDF=>D THENPRINT© 2 10, CHR$ ( 9 
5 ) : GOSUB1300 : PRINT ©133," » ; : P 
RINT©165, " " ; : PRINT© 197," 
"; : GOTO 2 10 

520 GOSUB1150 : PLAYRT $ : F0RX=1T03 : 
PRINT© 306 , "WELL DONE • " ; : FORY=lT0 
200 : NEXT : PRINT ©30 6 , "well done" ; : 
FORY=1TO300: NEXT: NEXT: TL=QL:QL=Q 
L+l 

525 PRINT@QL+5 *3 2 -LEN (DF$) -1 , DF ; 

530 BL=96 J BD-1024+QL+64 : GOSUB135 
0 

540 PRINT@21,»1"; : PRINT@48 , "divi 



ii • • 



550 GOSUB1550 

555 PRINT@QL,CHR$ (143) ; 

557 PB=197 : PN=203 :GOSUB1500 

'558 MN=CU 

560 PRINT@203,CHR$(95) ; : F0RX=1T0 
200: NEXT 

570 PRINT@203,CHR$(143) ; : F0RX=1T 
0200: NEXT 

580 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="" THEN 5 60 
590 IFA$<"0" OR A$>"9" THEN560 
594 A=VAL(A$) 

600 PRINT @QL,A$ ; : SOUND 100 , 3 

610 GOSUB240 

611 ER=2 29 
618 GOSUB1570 

620 PB=197:GOSUB1580 

630 PR$="-"+PR$:PRINT©SL-LEN(PR$ 

) , PR$ ; 

640 PRINT@SL+32-LEN(PR$) ,STRING$ 
( LEN ( PR$ ) , 4 5) ; 

650 IFPR>MN THENG0SUB12 2 0 : G0SUB1 
210 :GOTO540 

6 60 PRINT@2 1 , "3"; :PRINT@48 , "subt 

ract : &M.ttfj', 

670 GOSUB1460 

680 IFDFOMN-PR THENGOSUB1250 : GO 
TO670 :' : Mi J ih- 

690 IFDF=>D THENG0SUB13 0 0 : G0SUB1 

210 ;PRINT@229 , " " ; : PRINT© 2 6 

1, " " ; :GOTO540 

700 GOSUB1150 : PLAYRT $ : F0RX=1T03 : 

PRINT© 30 6, "RIGHT i " ; : FORY=1TO200 : 

NEXT: PRINT@306, "right" ; : F0RY=1T0 

200 : NEXT : NEXT :TL=QL :QL=QL+1 

710 DF$=STR$(DF) : DF$=RIGHT$ (DF$, 

LEN (DF$) -1) :PRINT@QL+8*32-LEN(DF 

$)-l,DF 

720 PB«37:PN=45:GOSUB1500 
730 IFCU=INT(DI/D) THEN2000 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 55 



735 BL=192 : BD=1024+QL+64 : G0SUB13 
50 

740 GOSUB115j3:PRINTS21, l 'l" ; :PRIN 

TS48, "divide " ; 

750 GOSUB155J3 

755 PRINTSQL,CHR$(143) ; 

757 PB«294:PN«3J81:GOSUB15J|p' 

758 MN=CU , 

760 PRINTS 30 1, CHR$ ( 95);? ; F0RX=1T0 
2)30: NEXT 

770 PRINTS301,CHR$(143) ; : F0RX=1T 
0200: NEXT 

78)3 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=" "THEN760 
790 IFA$< H j3" 0RA$>»'9 ,r THEN760 
794 A=VAL(A$) 

800 PRINT@QL, A$ ; : SOUND100 , 3 

81) 3 GOSUB240 
811 ER=325 
818 GOSUB1570 

82) 3 PB=*294:GOSUB1580 

83) 3 PR$="-"+PR$ : PRINTSSL-LEN (PR$ 
) , PR$ ; *» 

84) 3 PRINTSSL+32-LEN(PR$) , STRING $ 
(LEN(PR$) ,45) ; 

85) 3 IFPR>MN THENGOSUB1220 : GOSUB1 
210/.GOTO740 

8 6)3 PRINT© 2 1,"3 »»|$S PRINTS 4 8 , " SUbt 

ract 11 ; 

87) 3 GOSUB14 6)3 

88) 3 IFDFOMN-PR THENGOSUB1250 : GO 
T087)3 

89) 3 IFDF= s >D THENGOSUB1300 : G0SUB1 
2 1)3 : PRINT §326," » ; : PRINT § 3 5 
8 , " " ; :GOT074)3 

9)3)3 GOSUB1150:PLAYRT$:FORX=1TO3: 
PRINTS 30 6, "CORRECT! "; :FORY=1TO20 
0: NEXT: PRINTS 30 6, "correct" ; : FORY 
=1TO200 : NEXT : NEXT : TL=QL: QL^QL+l 
91)3 DF$=STR$(DF) : DF$=RIGHT$ (DF$ , 
LEN(DF$)-1) :PRINTSQL+11*3 2-LEN(D 
F$)-1,DF 

920 PB=3 7:PN=45:GOSUB1500 
93)3 -.IFCU»INT(DI/D) THEN2)3)3)3 
999 END 

1)3)3)3 PRINTS448, "PRESS ANY KEY TO 

CONTINUE"; 
1)3)35 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN1005 
1)31)3 RETURN 

1050 IFA$="1* THEND=RND(9) ELS EI 
FA$="2" THEND=RND ( 89 ) +1)3 ELSEIF 
A$="3" THEND=RND(899)+100 
1060 IFA$="1" THENDI=RND(899)+10 
0 ELSEIFA$="2" THENDI=RND (8999)+ 
1)3)3)3 ELSEIFA$="3" THENDI=RND (899 
99) +1)3)3)3)3 

1075 D1$=STR$(D) :D$=RIGHT$(D1$,L 

EN(D1$)-1) :D2$=STR$(DI) :DI$=RIGH 

T$(D2$,LEN(D2$)-1) 

1080 DC$=LEFT$(DI$,LEN(D$) ) : DC=V 

AL(DC$) 

1090 IFLEN(D$)=1 AND D<=DC THENP 



I>3 8: RETURN 

1095 IF LEN(D$)=1 THENPL=39 :RETU 
RN 

1100 IFLEN (D$) =2 AND D<=DC THENP 
L=3 9 : RETURN 

1105 IFLEN (D$) =2 THENPL=40 : RETUR 
N 

1110 IFLEN (D$ ) =3 ANDD<=DC THENPL 
-40: RETURN 

1115 IFLEN (D$) =3 THENPL=4 1 
1120 RETURN 

1150 FORX=306TO43 4STEP3 2:PRINT§X 
, NU$ ; : NEXT : PRINTS 4 4 8 , NL$ : PRINT §4 
80,NL$; : RETURN 
1160 RETURN 

1200 PRINTS3 20,STRING$(185,14 3) ; 
: RETURN 

12 10 PRINTS 14 9," ";:PRINT@1 
49+32," "; :PRINTSl49+64>" 

" ; : PRINTS 14 9+9 6 , » "; :RE 

TURN 

1220 PLAYWR$:G0SUB115)3:F0RX=1T03 
:PRINT@448, "TRIAL QUOTIENT TOO L 
ARGE SUBTRACTION IMPOSSIB 

LE" ; :F0RY=1T0 5)8)3: NEXT: PRINTS 4 48 
/'trial quotient too large 

subtraction impossible" ; : FORY- 
1T05 00 : NEXT ; NEXT : GOSUB1150 
1230 PRINTSER," ";:PRINTSER+ 
32," 11 ; ; RETURN 

1250 PLAYWR$:GOSUB1150:FORX=1TO3 
: PRINTS306 , "SUBTRACTION" ; : PRINTS 
338, " ERROR ! " ; : FORY^ITO 300: NEXT : P 
RINTS 30 6, "subtraction" ; :PRINTS33 
8 , "error" ; : F0RY=1T0 300 : NEXT : NEXT 
:G0SUB115)3: RETURN 

1300 GOSUB115)3:PLAY WR$ : FORX^ITO 

5 : PRINTS 30 6 , "REMAINDER" ; :PRINT@3 

38, "LARGER THAN"; : PRINT S3 7)3 , "DIV 

ISOR ! " ; : FORY=1TO400 : NEXT 

1310 PRINTS3)36, "remainder" ; :PRIN 

TS338, "larger than"; : PRINTS37)3, " 

divisor" ; : FORY=1TO400 : NEXT: NEXT: 

GOSUB1150:PRINT@21, "1" ; :PRINTS48 

, "divide " ; : RETURN 

1350 PE=PEEK ( BD ) : PRINTS 2 1 , " 4 " ; : P 

RINTS 4 8 , "bring down " ; : POKEBD 

,PE-64 

1360 GOSUB1 15)3 : PRINTS 3 0 6 , "USE AR 
ROW" ; : PRINT83 3 8 , "TO BRING DOWN" ; 
: PRINTS 3 70 , "NEXT NUMBER" ; : PRINTS 
4)32, "FROM"; : PRINTS43 4 , "DIVIDEND . 



it • 

/ 



1370 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="" THEN1370 
138)3 IFA$OCHR$(l)3) THEN1370 
1390 POKEBD, PE:F0RX=1T03 :POKEBD+ 
BL, PE-64 : FORY=1TO100 : NEXT: POKEBD 
+BL, PE : FORY=1TO10)3 : NEXT : NEXT 
14)3)3 RETURN 

145)3 PRINTS 30 6, "MULTIPLY"; : PRINT 
S338 , "AND < ent er> " j i PRINTS 3 70 , "Y 



56 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



OUR ANSWER . " ; : PRINT § 40 2 , " " ; : INPU 
TMA : RETURN 

146J3 PRINT@3j36 , "SUBTRACT" ; : PRINT 
§338, "AND <enter>" ; : PRINT@37J3 , "Y 
OUR ANSWER. " ; : PRINT@4j32 , " » ; : INPU 
TDF: RETURN 

1500 CU$="":FORX=lj324+PB TO 1024 
+PN 

1510 IFPEEK(X)>111 ANDPEEK(X)<12 

2 THENCU$=CU$+CHR$ (PEEK (X) -64) 

1520 NEXT 

1530 CU=VAL(CU$) 

1540 RETURN 

1550 GOSUB1150 : PRINT@306 , "NOW DI 
VIDE"; :PRINT@338 f "THIS NUMBER" ; : 
PRINTS 3 70 / "BY DIVISOR" ; :PRINT@40 
2 , "AND press" ; : PRINT@434 , "ANSWER 



ir • 

.» t 



1560 RETURN 

157 0 PR$=STR$ (PR) J PR$=RIGHT$ ( PR$ 
, LEN (PR$ ) -1 ) : RETURN 
1580 PB=PB+1024 

1590 PP=PEEK(PB) :IFPP<112 0RPP>1 

2 1THENPB=PB+ 1 : GOTO 1 5 90 

16J30 PP=PEEK(PB) :IFPP>111 ANDPP< 

122 THENPB=PB+1 ! GOTO 1600 

1610 SL=PB-1024+32 

1620 RETURN 

1999 CLS:DF=1 



2000 GOSUB1150:IFDF<>0 THENPRINT 
@306 , "DIVISION DONE . " ; : PRINTQ3 38 
, "PRESS <enter>"; :PRINT@370, "TO 
BRING UP " ; : PRINT @ 4 0 2 , " REMAINDER . 
" ; : SOUND150 , 1 : A$=INKEY$ : IFA$OCH 
R$ ( 13 ) THEN2000 ELSEPRINTQ44 , "R" ; 
DF; 

2010 PRINT@16,STRING$ (10,32) ; : PR 
INT@48,STRING$(10,32) ; :FORX=12 8T 
0448 STEP3 2:PRINT@X,STRING$(32,3 
2);:NEXT 

2020 PRINT@0," problem successfu 
lly completed! " ; 

2030 POKE65314,9 

2040 PLAY"T2V15L604CL16DC03A#L8A 
AAGFGL4AL8F04L6CL16DC03A#L8AA#AG 
FGL3F" 

2045 'PUT A "GOSUB" HERE TO SEND 
STUDENT TO A GAME ROUTINE USED 

AS A REWARD 
2050 PRINT: PRINT "WOULD YOU LIKE 
TO DO ANOTHER PROBLEM (Y/N) ?" 
2060 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="" THEN2060 
2070 IFA$<>"Y" ANDA$<>"N" THEN20 
60 

2080 IFA$="Y" THENRUN50 

2090 PRINT: PRINT "LONG DIVISION D 

RILL COMPLETED." 

2100 END ffs 




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ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 

COVER 1 
RACE TRACK 
HANGMAN 
MUSIC ALBUM 
LIFE EXPECTANCY 
WORD TESTS 
KILLER MANSION 
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CALENDAR 
ROBOT WAR 

ISSUE #2, AUG. 1982 

UFO COVER PT . i : • 
BlDRYTHM 
BOMBARDMENT 
BLACK JACK 
COST OP LIVING 
FRENZY 

BUSINESS LETTER 
QUICK THINK 
QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 
QUEST FOR LENORE 

ISSUE #3, SEPT, 1982 

UFO COVER PT.2 
BASKET8ALL 
CHUCKLUCK 
SLOT MACHINE 
ALPHABETIZER 
NFL PREDICTIONS 
FLAG CAPTURE 
ROBOT BOMBER 



ISSUE #4, OCT. 19EJ2 

UFO RESCUE 

TANK BATTLE 

DRIVEWAY 

SOUNDS 

BALLOON DROP 

MIND BOGGLE 

COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 

CALORIE COUNTER 

JACK-O-LANTERN 

ISSUE #5, NOV, 1982 

CATALOG COVER 
BOWLING 

PROGRAM INVENTORY 
PROMISSORY-LOANS 
VHECKBQOK BALMCW 
TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 
CONVOY 



SPECTRA SOUND 
CONVEYOR BELT 

ISSUE #6, DEC 1982 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
RAINDROPS 
STOCK MARKET 

ADVANCE; PONG 
DESTROY 

SOUND ANALYZER; 
CREATIVITY TEST 
VOICE DATA 
ML TUTORIAL PT1 



ISSUE #7, JAN. 1983 


ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 


ISSUE #19, JAN. 1984 


ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 


ISSUE #31, JAN. 1985 


NEW YEARS COVER 


THIRTEENTH COVER 


BANNER 


CLOCK 


TREASURES OF BARSOOM 


* x * » v t * 1 ■ 1 rfk mm mm. 

LIST ENHANCER 


FLASH CARD 


PROBE 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT.3 


BATTLEGROUND 


SUPER PRECISION DIV, 


ICE BLOCK 


DISK DIR. PROTECTOR 


SKID ROW ADVENTURE 


STRUCT. COMPILED LANG. 


r • • BOMB DIFFUSE 


COSMIC FORTRESS 


OPTICAL CONFUSION 


MONEY MAKER 


MINIATURE GOLF 


SPAGE STATION 


MAIL LIST 


WORD PROCESSOR 


PIN-HEAD CLEANING 


STAR DUEL 


ML TUTORIAL PT. 2 


DOLLARS & CENTS 


WORD SEARCH 


LINE EDITOR INST. 


ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 


. \-.- SHOOT OUT 


ML TUTORIAL PT.8 


ASTRONAUT RESCUE 


LINE EDITOR 


GRID RUN 


• , find Utility 


SDSK COPY 


STAR TRAP 


BOOMERANG 


SPIRAL ATTACK 


: " CYBORG INS. 


MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 


PIE CHART 


BUBBLE BUSTER 


FAST SORT 


CYBDRG FACES 


CRAWLER 


FORCE FIELD 


ROCOCHET 


MUNCHMAN 


ISSUE #8, FEB., 1983 

9 9m mm 9m 9m J I , ^ mr l ■ ■ mm mm w w 9 9 9m W IP , 


ISSUE #14, AUG. 1983 

■9 9m 9W '9^91 9m* M p p 1 9 m 9mr 999 9 9 9mT 9m mm* 


ISSUE #20, FEB. 1984 

9 9mW 9mgt 9m 7 9W If mm 9mT J ■ HfeT • ■ 9m 9mr ^9 


ISSUE #26, AUG. 1984 

9 9mT 9fF 9m m* II WW} V ■ 9mW ™* ■ * 9m 9m 9 


ISSUE #32, FEB. 1985 

• mm* 9m 9m mm r 999 mm y 9 9m 9m ■ ■ %mw 9m 9mj 


/ COVER 8- : 


MYSTERY COVER 


INTRODUCTION 


PEEK POKE & EXECUTE 


DR. SIGMUND 


DEFEND 


ROW BOAT 


HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 


SAUCER RESCUE 


ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 


3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 


COMPUTER TUTL PT. 1 


ESCAPE ADVENTURE 


YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 


LOTTERY ANALYST 


COCO CONCENTRATION 


INDEX DATA BASE 


SEEKERS 


O-TEL-0 


BASIC COMPILER 


AUTO LINE NUMBERING 


DISK ZAPPER 


MASTER BRAIN 


OLYMPIC EVENTS 


MUSIC CREATOR 


ML TUTORIAL PT.3A 


COCO-MONITOR 


LIST CONTROLLER 


DOUBLE DICE 


MEANIE PATROL 


ML TUTORIAL PT.3B 


COCO-ARTIST 


DISKETTE CERTIFIER 


COCO DATABASE 


TRI-COLOR CARDS 


■; NUCLEAR ROWER PLANT 


ROBOT COMMAND 


ROM COPY 


BATTLE STAR 


SHAPE RECOGNITION 


DUAL BARRIER 


TEST SCREEN PRINT 


BASIC RAM 


COCO-PIN BALL 


DISK BACKUP 


BRICKS 


HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 


SNAFUS 


MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 


SPACE PROTECTOR 


ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

■ 9kW 9m mm* mm I f *W J 9mW ■ 9 9 9m79t0%^ 


ISSUE #15, SEPT. 1983 

■ 9m 9m 9m mm II • 9m 9 9m 9m 9 99 • 909m 9mr 


ISSUE #21, MAR. 1984 

■ 9m 9m m m 9m ft w& if 99 ■ a • %mW 9m 9 


ISSUE #27, SEPT. 1984 

9 m m 9m m m mm r I mm 9 9 9m wm 999 ■ 9m 90 9 


ISSUE #33, MAR. 1985 

l 9m 9m 9m mm ■ j wm f mi ■■ i» ■ www 


TIME MACHINE COVER 


MYSTERY COVER PT.2 


BASIC CONVERSIONS 


COCO TO COM 64 


LIGHT CYCLE 


Trig demo 


GOLD VALUES 


FINANCIAL ADVISE 


GALACTIC SMUGGLER 


PAINT 


PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 


TREK INSTRUCTIONS 


CASTLE STORM 


INDY RACE 


SKEET SHOOTING 


PROGRAM PACKER 


TREK 


DDS HEAD CLEANER 


ACCOUNT MANAGER 


GUITAR NOTES 


BUDGET 


HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 


COCO TERMINAL 


CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 


Ml DISK ANALYZER 


ELECTRONIC DATE BOOK 


ASTRO DODGE 


SNAKE CRAWLER 


STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 


PERSONAL DIRECTORY 


ML TUTORIAL PT.4 


DR. COCO 


WAR CASTLE 


SPACE DUEL 


NAUGHA ADVENTURE 


- TAPE DIRECTORY 


PEG JUMP 


SKY FIRE 


BUGS 


EGGS GAME 


BLOCK-STIR 


MORSE CODE 


EASY BASIC 


TRAP-BALL 


DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 


COGO ADDING MACHINE 


PURGE UTILITY 


DOTS 3-D ' 


BALLOON FIRE 


SPEED KEy 


ISSUE #10; APRIL 1983 

■ Sm %mf 9*0 9m* +f ■ 9mT f If P 1 111* • W 9rf 9mT 


ISSUE #16, OCT. 1983 

■ 9mW 9mf %mJ 9mA II ■ 9tW f %mT 90 9 9 I WV 


ISSUE #22. APRIL 1984 

■ W * » mm ■ fll II* mm 1 tfVT 


ISSUE #28, OCT. 1984 

■ W W 9mt U II 9m» 9m * 9m. W f • • WW ^9 


ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

1 9mt 9mr Wm 1 1 9m 9 % W ■ 1 f 9 9 mm S WWW 


TENTH COVER 


MYSTERY COVER 


HEALTH HINTS 


HANGING TREE 


HOVER TANK 


PYRAMID OF DANGER 


BOPOTRON 


GLIBLIBS 


CHECKERS 


POWER SWORD 


TYPING TUTOR 


DIRECTORY RECALL 


CLOTHER SLITHER 


FOOTBALL 


TERMITE INVASION 


ML TUTORIAL PT.5 


VECTOR GRAPHICS INST, 


BIBLE 1 & 2 


MORE PEEKS & POKES 


SPELLING CHECKER 


TINYCALC 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


BIBLE 3 & 4 


SPELLING CHECKER 


DOS BOSS 


STOCK MARKET COMP 


SKYDIVER 


CATCH ALL 


SOUND DEVELOPMENT 


NINE CARD CHOICE 


YAH-HOO 


SWERVE AND DODGE 


INVADER 


WORD GAME 


MUSIC GENERATOR 


MISSILE; ATTACK 


NIMBO BATTLE 


ALIEN RAID 


SCREEN REVERSE 


FYR-DRACA 


SCREEN PRINT 


TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 


MOON ROVER 


AUTO COPY 


DRIVE TEST 


BRIKPONG 


LIFE GENERATIONS 


IO ERROR IGNORER 


RAT ATTACK 


GRAPHIC TOUR 


ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 


ISSUE #17, NOV. 1983 


ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

■ 9m 9m 9mr 9m If m9 9m f llll • ■ ■ mm 90 ■ 


ISSUE #29, NOV. 1984 

■ 9m 9m 9m mm g r mm 9m* ■ 9 m 9m w 9 9 w 9m y 


ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 

■ 9m 9m 9m mm 1 1 9m 9mr 1 I'lf | 1 ■ 9mt 9m 9m* 


ELEVENTH COVER 


THANKSGIVING COVER 


MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 


DISK ROLL OUT 


SELECT A GAME 1 


ARCHERY 


3-D TIC-TAC-TOE 


STOCKS OR BOMBS 


ROBOT ON 


TAPE PROBLEMS 


FROG JUMP 


INDY 500 


WALL AROUND 


MULTIPONG 


STROLL TRIVIA 


ML TUTORIAL PT.6 


COLLEGE ADVENTURE 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT.1 


ADVENTURE GENERATOR 


SOFTBALL MANAGER 


MLT DICTIONARY 


MEMORY GAME 


NUCLEAR WAR INST; 


QUEST ADVENTURE 


FONTS DEMO 


BASIC SPEED UP TOT. 


DUNGEON MASTER 


THERMONUCLEAR WAR 


QUARTER BOUNCE 


CLOWN DUNK MATH 


METRIC CONVERTOR 


WEATHER FORECASTER 


CIRCUIT BREAKER 


DUAL OUTPUT 


ALPHA MISSIDN 


GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 


GRID FACTOR INST. 


MOUSE RACES 


KEY REPEAT 


DOS ENHANCER 


GRAPHICS PROGRAM 


GRID FACTOR 


SUPER SQUEEZE 


FULL EDITOR 


KNOCK OUT 


CATERPILLAR CAVE 


DRAW 


DATA FALL 


METEOR 


HAUNTED HOUSE 


ifinur ii4A iih.ii- jnnn 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 


llllll IP II mm t% m m %9 ma mJ% J Alt ft 

ISSUE #18, DEC. 1983 


t #1 Ml IV* it A M ft 1 1 1| f* JflliJ 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 


ISSUE #30, DEC. 1984 


ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 


TWELFTH COVER 


CHRISTMAS COVER 


DIR PACK & SORT 


MATH HELP 


SELECT A GAME 2 


SHOOTING GALLERY 


CLIMBER 


BRICK OUT 


ZECTOR ADVENTURE 


VIDEO COMPUTER 


BOMB STOPPER 


GALACTIC CONQUEST 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PL 2 


WORLD CONQUEST 


SPEECH SYNTHESIS 


VALLEY BOMBER 


WARLORDS 


USA SLIDE PUZZLE 


DRAG RACE 


SPEECH RECOGNITION 


STAR FIGHTER 


STATES REVIEW 


51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 


MINE FIELD 


SPACE LAB 


WHEEL OF FORTUNE 


MATH TUTOR 


51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 


T-NOTES TUTORIAL 


AUTO COMMAND 


ML TUTORIAL PT7 


MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 


CITY INVADERS 


T & D PROGRAM INDEXER 


COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 


MERGE UTILITY 


PRINTER UTILITY INST. 


PRINTER SPODLER 


SYSTEM STATUS 


KNIGHT & THE LABYRINTH 


RAM TEST 


PRINTER UTILITY 


STEPS 


ERROR TRAP 


STAR SIEGE 


LANDER 


MUTANT WAFFLES 


SNAKE 


DROLL ATTACK 


TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 



VISA 




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issue #37, julv m§ 

CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE 57 

SHIP WEEK ADVENTURE 
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CAlACOMU 
AUTO TAL* 
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ISSUE m AUG. 1985 

GOLF PARS 

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Kfl¥ DESIGN 

ROBOTS 

DDtfGKlJ 

AMULET OF POWER 
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DISK PLUMBER 
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ISSUE m SEPT. 1IB5 

□FfiJHK DRIVING 
CAR MA IMAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHIHF 
Arm-AlflCPWFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING- ALPHABET 
SUPER VflDE-RS 

automatic editor 

issue m, Oct. im 

star trek 
ham raoiq log 

GQDti WAR 
QtSK LAGELEP 

WAH 
EL FCTHfc COST 
MUlTIKEY B4JFFFR 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
sm ROVER 

issue iv41 nuv. ms 

■3RU+^. 

DISK DHlVf SPEED TEST 
SOW CONOUEST 
HAS COST 

tita \W\ 0 mission 

WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EOITDP 
GRAPHIC TEST 
GRAPHIC LilOPV 
BOLD- AGINf 

ISSUE #42, DEC, IMS 

HOWE PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAI+TZEE 
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MAGK II 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

SUPER MANSION AtftENlUAE 
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ISSUE #43, JAN. 

DUBJNG CANNONS 
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ISSUE #45, MAR, 
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COCO KEENO 
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ISSUE =46. APRIL im 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
LiiliK 1 OCK 

SMALL BUSlNLSS IAANAGER 

Gii" ii RUN 

TANKS 

tah Pits 
baseball 

number -relationships 

ROULETTE 
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ISSUE #47, frtAf 1MB 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLAGK HULL 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYVSHUC DIH- 
BUG SPHAY 
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COMPUTER I.CMJ, 
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ISSUE *5U. AUG. 138B 

BUSINESS IWENT&HV 
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DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GfNEflATOfl 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFl SCORES 
ElARN STORMING 
StoASTl SAME 

issue p, SEPT. \m 

ASSET MANAGER 
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THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
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FLIPPY THE SEAL 
SCfttEN CALCULATOR 
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ISSUE #53, NOV. \m 

CORE eflLL 
LUCKY MOWEY 
COOKIES ADVLN'lURE 
NICE i!Sr 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CARVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MfGA RACF 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DEC, 19BB 

JDE LOG 
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ISSUE #55, JAN. 19B7 

GRADE BOOK 
MALL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALiOWS 
UriR MANAGER 
FIRF RU'NNFP 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE «5fi, FEB. IIIB7 

CALENOAR PRINT 
CRUSH 
GALACTA 
CCEAfcl [JIVER 
Cl ill SUSPECT 
WOBO EDITOH 
ALIEN HUM 
LEMON'S CASTLE 
TOURE DRAW 

issue m, mar. mi 

THE BAKERV 

£NCHANGEU VALL£Y ADV 
SAF£ KEEPEfl 
V/AR 1 

liOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYE-P 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #53, APRIL 19S7 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HEiPER 
«UtTl CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
&A1 LI TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRflD 

ISSUE #39, MAY 19S7 

GENEOLOGV 

HOME PLANT SEtEC HON 

CHECK WRITLI- 

lliLHESCUE 

KABOCW 

NEW PONG 

CHQDUET 

FUNCTION KFVS 1 

ZOOM 

ELECTRONICS J 

ISSUE tf&fl. JUNE 1W7 

JDB COSTS^JG 
J.ABFI S 
CATCH A CAKE 
COCO MATCH 
ROBOTS 

STHEET RACERS 

FOWLING a 
ELECTRONICS 3 
GPADX 
KHON 



ISSUE #61 r JULY 1917 

E7 ORDER 

SUBMISSION WRkTBR 
KE^S ADVENTURE 
WALLPAPLH 
CHOPF^R COMMAND 
UNDERSTANDING DfPOSITES 
BIT CODE PLOTTING 
ELECTRONICS 4 
KING PEDE 
RAIDED 

ISSUE m, AUGUST 

PFNSION MANAGE^FNT 
HERB GROWING 
MTOLQGER UTUlTV 
RAIOERS 
ALPHABETIZING 
U.F.O. 

ELECTRONICS i 
RAMflO ADl/EMTUTIE 
BLOCKS 

MULTI SCREEN CAVES 



ISSUE *ti3, SEPT. mi 

GEMOL0GI3T HELPER 
SMART COPY 

MAINTENANCE REPORTING 

oacoa cuco 2 helpeh 

DIRECTnRV PiPURf 
SUE ATTACK 
SAVE THF MAIDEN 
CAV*A"OR 
ELECmONICS & 
MONKEV SHINE 

ISSUE m< OCT, 1BI7 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE kN 1 HE GRASS 
CVCLE JUMP 
GtDMETRV TUnOH 
W1ZARII 
GAME OF LLFE 
ELECTRONICS 7 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 

ISSUE NOV, T&97 
"AKMAN 

DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 
CHLDSTONE ADVENIUHE 
SIR iGGEEftt 
CflDWN QUEST 
GVM KMANA 
COCO -1 DRAWER 
FOOTRALL 
ELECTRONICS ft 
CHOP 

issue #f&. dec. m? 

ONE RDDM ADVENTURE 
DSB WGRlAi 
RIVER CAPTAIN 
SOUND EFFECTS 
BETTING POOL 
ADVANCE 
MATH TABLFS 
ELECTTOMC5 D 
LOWEft TO UfpER 

hodos 



ISSUE #07, JAN. f9Btt 

AUDW LIBRARY 
SAVE THE EAHTH 
WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
LOW HES PMjTL/RES 
WORD COUNTER 
RACARAT 
BATTLE SHIP 
ELECTRICS 1ft 
TAPE CONVENIENCE 
PENDU-IN 

ISSUE #66, FEU 1989 

C01NFILE 
WORO COUNTER 
SDUIRREL ADVENTURE 
AREA CODES 
DRAW POKER 
TURTLE RACES 
ELECTRONICS t1 
MU_n SCREEN 
CANON PRINT 
COCD TENNIS 

ISSUE #63, MAR. 19B8 

POUCE CADE I 
STAMP COLLECTION 
BARRACKS ADVENTURE 

crrmiMF 

HI-LOVCRAPS 
Ol YVIPICS 
HI- RES CRESS 
ELECTRONICS 12 
DOUBLE EDITOR 
UOUBLE &HEAK0U1 

ISSUE #70. APRIL WW 

BLOTTO OWE. 
SUPER COM 
GENESIS ADVENTUHE 
PLANETS 
PHKflNAR 
S10N LAjfJGUAGE 
ARK SHOOTOUT 
ELECTRONICS 15 
MAGIC :<EY 
SNAP PRINT 

issue ^71. mr 1SBB 

SUP1R LOtTD 
HOBDT ADVENTURE 
MAZE 

YAHTZEE 3 
PHASER 

SHAPES ^ PLATES 
S~AR. WARS 
ELECTRONICS 14 
PfllttfTFR CONTROL 
MAZE 2 

ISSUE tf72. JUKE 1MB 

FlTOG DBJEtTTB 

THREE STOOGE5 

HOSTAGE 

PROGRAM I HiD 

GLADIATOR 

US & CAN DWZ 

JEOPARDY 

ELECTRONICb 1 j 

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7 15 23 31 39 47 55 63 71 

8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 

PLEASE CIRCLE 

TAPE or DISK 



Help students remember their geography lessons 
by using this challenging game as a study tool 




States and Capitals 



brown. Press any key to move to the 
next state. 

US States runs on the CoCo 3 and 
uses 128K. If you do not have an RGB 
monitor, you may want to modify six 
lines of the program. Put REMs in lines 
70, 90 and 410, and delete the REMs from 
lines 80, 100 and 400. This will make the 
program readable on your screen. You 
may also wish to use different colors for 
better results. 

US States makes learning the states 
and their capitals fun. As a game, the 
program gives students a reason to 
remember the information long after 
they have completed the assignment 
and passed the test. As a study guide, 
US States helps you make an important 
lesson come to life. 

(Questions or comments about the 
program may be directed to the author 
at P.O. Box 276, Liberty, KY 42539. 
Please include an SASE when request- 
ing a reply.) 



Teaching students the names of 
the states and their capitals can 
be a struggle. Your students balk 
at memorizing the names and capitals 
of 50 (gasp!) states, and you can't think 
of any way to make the task any less 
dismal. Worse, once your students have 
completed the test or quiz on this 
information, it's gone. Few students will 
feel any need to remember the names of 
states and capitals that are far away. 
Even if they wanted to remember the 
lesson, when will they use those names? 
How will they retain this information? 




Rick Cooper, a principal teacher and 
coach, enjoys writing programs more 
than using them. Although many of his 
programs are used by his teachers and 
students, Rick's best critics are his wife, 
Donna, and daughters, Kristin and 
Kasey. 



* By Rick Cooper * 



US States is a great way to teach 
students the states and the capitals of 
the United States, or for anyone to 
brush up on geography skills. The 
program begins by drawing a map of the 
United States — including Alaska and 
Hawaii. It then asks you to choose 
between naming states or capitals. Once 
you have indicated your choice, the 
program asks that you choose the hard 
or easy version. The map shown in the 
harder version is a darker color than the 
map in the easy one. This makes it more 
difficult to use the adjoining states as 
reference points when identifying the 
individual states. 

When you are playing US States, the 
states will be illuminated one by one. 
You must identify either the state or the 
capital, correctly type its name and 
press ENTER. If you are correct, the state 
will become light blue. If you have made 
a mistake, the correct name and spelling 
will appear and the state will turn 



60 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



1 



58 1200 21 

117 1250 253 

110 1320 239 

139 1360 158 

88 END 24 

0 62 



The listing: STATES 

10 ON ERR GOTO 1520 

20 ON BRK GOTO 1520 

30 £QK2 "&HE6E4 V'SHE?^ ' I 

40 GOSUB 1150 

50 POKE &HFFD9,0 

60 HCOLOR 1,0 

70 DATA 63,0,54,36,1,15,62,32 
80 REM DATA 7,0,63,52,0,27,48,23 
90 P2=54 
100 REM P2=63 

110 DIM PN$(50) ,PC$(50) ,UD(50) ,S 

L(50,2) ,CP$(50) 

120 FOR X=l TO 50 

130 READ PN$(X) ,PC$ (X) 

140 NEXT X 

150 FOR X=l TO 50 

160 READ SL(X,1) ,SL(X,2) 

170 NEXT X 

180 HCOLOR 0,1 

190 HLINE(228,90)-(319,142) ,PSET 
,B 

200 HCOLOR 4,1 

210 HLINE(229,91)-(318, 141) , PSET 
,BF 

220 HCOLOR 0,1 

230 HPRINT (2 9, 12) , "CHOOSE ONE" 
240 HPRINT(29,14) , "1) STATES" 
250 HPRINT (29, 16) , "2) CAPITALS" 
260 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 260 
270 IF I$<"1" OR I$>"2" THEN 260 
280 IF I$="l" THEN FOR X=l TO 50 
:CP$(X)=PN$(X) : NEXTX 
290 IF I $="2" THEN FOR X=l TO 50 
:CP$(X)=PC$(X) : NEXTX 
300 HCOLOR 0,1 

310 HLINE(228,90)-(319,142) , PSET 
,B 

320 HCOLOR 4,1 

330 HLINE(229,91)-(318,141) , PSET 
,BF 

340 HCOLOR 0,1 

350 HPRINT(29, 12) , "CHOOSE ONE" 
360 HPRINT (29, 14) , "1) EASIER" 
370 HPRINT(29,16) , "2) HARDER" 
380 I$=INKEY$;IF 1$="" THEN 380 



390 IF I$<"1" OR I$>"2" THEN 380 
400 IF I$="l" THEN DF=56 ELSE DF 
=1 

410 REM IF I$-"l" THEN DF=32 ELS 
E DF=0 

420 PALETTE 4 , DF 
430 HCOLOR 1,0 
440 TIMER=RND ( -0 ) 
450 SS=0 : BC=0 
4 60 GOSUB 670 

470 FOR X=l TO50:UD(X)=0:NEXT X 

480 IF BC=50 THEN 1040 

490 R=RND(50) 

500 IF UD(R)<>0 THEN 490 

510 UD(R)=1 

520 BC=BC+1 

530 HPAINT(SL(R,1) ,SL(R,2) ) ,2,1 
540 IF mti THEN HPAINT ( 9 1 , 155 ) , 
2,1: HPAINT (99,162) ,2,1: HPAINT ( 9 8 
,170) ,2,1: HPAINT (107, 165) ,2,1: HP 
AINT ( 105 , 17 3 ) ,2,1: HPAINT ( 120 , 177 
)/2,l 

550 IF R=35 THEN HPAINT (184 , 40) , 

2,i . %:l 

560 K=5 

570 GOSUB 790 

580 IF R$=CP$(R) THEN SS=SS+1:K== 
5: HCOLOR 0 ,1 : HPRINT (28 , 22 ) ,"CORR 
ECT!":HCOLOR 1,0 

590 IF R$OCP$(R) THEN K=7:HC0L0 
R 6,1:HPRINT(25,22) ,CP$(R) :HCOLO 

600 IF R$OCP$(R) AND INKEY$=" " 
THEN 600 

610 IF R$=CP$(R) THEN FOR X=0 TO 
63: PALETTE 2, X: NEXT X: PALETTE 2 
/P2 

620 HPAINT (SL(R,1) ,SL(R,2) ) ,K,1 
630 IF R=ll THEN HPAINT ( 91 , 155 ) , 
K, 1 : HPAINT (99,162),K,1 : HPAINT (98 
,170) ,K, 1: HPAINT (107, 165) ,K,1:HP 
AINT ( 105 , 173 ) , K, 1 : HPAINT ( 120 , 177 

) ,K,i 

640 IF R=35 THEN HPAINT ( 184 , 40 ) , 
K,l 

650 GOSUB 670 
660 GOTO 480 
670 HCOLOR 0,1 

680 HLINE (228, 90) -(319,142) , PSET 
,B 

690 HCOLOR 4,1 

700 HLINE(229, 91)-(318, 141) , PSET 
,BF 

710 HCOLOR 0,1 

720 HPRINT (3 2, 12 ), "SCORE" 

730 Sl$="CORRECT "+STR$(SS) 

740 HPRINT (29, 14) ,S1$ 

750 S2$= n WRONG "+STR$ (BC-SS) 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 61 



760 HPRINT(29,16) ,S2$ 

770 HCOLOR 1,0 

7 80 RETURN 

790 REM GET INPUT 

800 HCOLOR 0,l:HLINE(186,158)-(3 
19,191) ,PSET,B 
810 R$="" 

820 HCOLOR 4 , 1 :HLINE (187 , 159) - (3 
18,190) ,PSET,BF 
830 HCOLOR 0,1 

840 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 840 
850 IF I$=CHR$(13) THEN HCOLOR 1 
, 0 : RETURN 

860 IF I$=CHR$(8) AND LEN(R$)<=1 
THEN 790 

870 IF I$=CHR$(8) THEN HCOLOR 4, 
1 : HPRINT ( 2 5 , 20 ) , R$ : R$=LEFT$ (R$ , L 
EN(R$)-1) :HCOLOR 0 , 1 : HPRINT (25 , 2 
0) ,R$:GOTO 840 
880 R$=R$+I$ 

890 HPRINT (25, 20) ,R$ 

900 GOTO 840 

910 FOR X=l TO 50 

920 HPAINT(SL(X,1) ,SL(X,2) ) ,4,1 
930 IF X=ll THEN HPAINT (91 , 155 ) , 

HP 
177 



T. PAUL", IOWA, DES MOINES ,MISSOUR 
I, JEFFERSON CITY, ARKANSAS , LITTLE 
ROCK, LOUISIANA, BATON ROUGE, MISS 
ISSIPPI, JACKSON 

990 DATA ALABAMA, MONTGOMERY, GEOR v 

GIA , ATLANTA , FLORIDA , TALLAHASSEE , 

SOUTH CAROLINA, COLUMBIA, NORTH CA 

ROLINA , RALEIGH , TENNESSEE , NASHVIL 

LE , KENTUCKY , FRANKFORT , ILLINOIS , S 
DDTMr:rTPT.n wtcphmctm nTcnu mtp 



JERSEY, TRENTON, NEW YORK, ALBANY, 
CONNECTICUT, HARTFORD, RHODE ISLAN 
D, PROVIDENCE 

1010 DATA MASSACHUSETTS, BOSTON, V 
ERMONT , MONTPELIER, NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
CONCORD , MAINE , AUGUSTA 
1020 DATA 25,24,25,41,17,68,26,7 
4,42, 54,55,79,55,93,73,93,110,11 
8,40, 14 6,82,158,122,97,122,77,85 
,77,75, 51,75,29, 108 , 24, 108,44, 10 
8,60,13 5,38,135,54,143,76,147,95 
,151,114,165,114,180,114,194,114 
,201,126 

1030 DATA 207,99,207,90,185,90,1 
88,81, 165, 62,165,3 9,169,26,179,5 
7,192 , 57,208,57, 208,70, 214,78,22 
0,68,2 2 9, 67,2 30, 62,230,49,2 3 6,51 
,244,49, 244,45, 235, 37,240, 37,248 
,28 

1040 HCOLOR 0,1 

1050 HLINE(186,158)-(319,191) , PS 
ET,B 

1060 HCOLOR 4,1 

1070 HLINE(187,159)-(318,190) , PS 
ET, BF 

1080 HCOLOR 6,1 

1090 HPRINT (25, 20) , "YOUR SCORE I 
S " 

1100 HPRINT (29,21) , STR$ (SS*2 ) +" 
%" 

1110 HPRINT(25,22) , "TRY AGAIN? 
Y/N" 

1120 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 112 
0 

1130 IF I$="Y" THEN GOSUB 910 :GO 
TO 180 

1140 GOTO 1520 

1150 REM DRAW US MAP 

1160 FOR X=0 TO 7 : READ SC: PALETT 

E X,SC:NEXT X 

1170 HCOLOR 1,3 

1180 HSCREEN2 

1190 HDRAW"BM9,13 ; D3R1D4R1D4R1D3 
R1D2L1D4L1D5L1D1L1D1G2D2L1D11R1D 
10R1D4R1D7R1D4R1D3R1D5R1D3R1D4F3 
D1F1D1F1D1F3R4D4R1D2R1D4R1D1R6D1 
R3D1R4D1R3D1R9D1R2 6D1R1D1R4F3R1F 
2R1F2" 

1200 HDRAW"D1F4D1F1R3U1R2U1R2E2R 

1F3D1F2D1F5D1F6R4D1R2E1U4L1U2L1U 

4R1U3R1U3R3D1R1U1R2E5R1E4R15D1R5 

E1U2L1U2R17F2R7F1D3R1F3D1F1D1F2D 

1F3D1F4D6F3R3E2U8H2U2H1L1U6L1" 

1210 HDRAW"U4L1U2L1U2L1U15R1U2E2 

U1E2R1E1R1U1E2U3E3R1U1E3U2E2R1U3 

H2U3L1U4H2U1E1R2D2R1D3R1E3U4E1U1 

E2G1U3E1U3H2U4R2D1R2E2R2U1R5E1R3 

E3U2H1G1H2F1L1H2E1" 

1220 HDRAW"H2F1L2U1E1R1E3R1E3G1U 

2E1R2E2G1U1E3U1H1U1H1U1H2L1H2L3G 

2D3L1G2D1G2L2G2L9G1L2G1L2G2D2G1D 



62 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



1G4L1G1L1G1L1G2L1G1L1G1L1G1L1G1L 

2G1L7H1E1R1E2U2R1U4R1L2 11 

123)3 HDRAWR1U1H2U1L1D1L3U2R1U4H 

5L1D1G2D2G2D1G3D1G1D14L1D2L3H2U1 

R1U17E1U2H1E2U1E1U1R4U1R1U1R2U1R 

1U1H1L3D1L5D1L4U2H2D1L1D3G1L3G2L 

5H3E5U1L11H1L6G1L42H1L14H1L17H1L 

1PH1L14H1L17H1D1L3D5L1H2U2H1G1D1 

L2 M 

1240 HPAINT(100,lj30) ,4,1 
125J3 HDRAW ff BM3 9 , 12 ;D22L9G1L6H1L2 
H2L5BM39 , 34 ; D4L1D19L18H1L3G1L7BM 
22,58 ;D2 6F21D14U15E1U4E1U10R1U2E 
1R1J39F2R1F1R1E1R1U5D3R7E2R3 7E1R1 
1E1R1E1R3 " 

126)3 HDRAW"BM22j3, 96 ; L2H3L2H1L2G1 
L7G1L5G1F1D1F4R1F3R2F4BM209 , 119 ; 
L13G1L3H1L12D1L1D3BM173 , 123 ;U28L 
11U4E1U1L1U1BM199 , 8 3 ; D1G2D1L1G1D 
3L1G1D3R2L21R10D3F1D2F1D1F1D1F1D 
9F1D1F1D1" 

127j3 HDRAW"BM168 , 123 ;U1L1U2L9U3E 
1U15E1U4E1BM158, 1)37;L14D1F1D3R1D 
3F1D2R1D9BM143 , 1)37 ;U2L1U5L1U4H1U 
4H1U1H2U2L2U1R1U8H2U2L1H1U2H1L3 3 
D23R14D12R30" 

1280 HDRAW M BM78,121;U3R2J3U54L36U 
6L23R8D29U1BM61 , 85 ;R14BM68 , 122 ;U 
58BM62 ,57 ;U16R29D23U42H1U6BM44 , 1 
2;D9F1D1F2D2F2D2F2D2F1R1F2D1F2D1 
R1F1D1R1F1" 

12 9)3 HDRAW" BM9 1 , 54 ; R2 3 F1R1F1R4 Fl 
R3F2R1D3F1D2L1D1F1D1BM129 , 65 ;R23 
D1R1D1R1D4R1D1R2F1D2F2D1F2D3BM15 
3 , 64 ;E1U1R1U2R1E1U1H1L1H1U5H1U1H 
2U1H1U1H1L1U2H1U11R1U4E1R4U1" 
13^)3 HDRAW !I BM126,16;D16L3D1L31R3 
4D24U9R1D1R25F2R2U1R10D1R2D1R3F2 
D11G2D3L1D3R1D6L1D1L2D1L1D1L3D1B 
M172 , 78 ;R2U1R2U1R4E4R1U2L1U19L2G 
1L4G2L1BM185 , 5)3 ;R5E1R8E1R2E1" 

131) 3 HDRAW"BM204 , 47 ; D17E1G8H2L6G 
1L2G1D1L1G1BM194 , 8 3U1R1E1U1R1E3R 
1H1U1H1U1H2BM2)3)3 , 75 ; F1D1F3R1E1R1 
E3R1E1R2E3R1U2H1L4U3L8U2BM214 , 66 
;R11D2R1F1R5 11 

132) 3 HDRAW"BM2 2 5,71;L1H1L1G1L2BM 
224 , 65E1R4F2R2BM226 , 64 ;U7H1U5H1L 
15U5BM225 , 52 ; F3R3F2BM233 , 53 ;U5R9 
D3U4R4D1R1D2BM233,48U7L1H1U3H1U8 
BM2 38,28 ? D7G1D5L5R12E1BM2 4 6 , 3 8 ; L 
1U1H1U1H1U8" 

133) 3 HDRAW"BM127,177;D4L2G1L1D1L 
1D2L3H2U1H1L1U2L2U4R1U3H1U1E1R3F 
1R1D2R3D3U1R1F2R1F1BM107 , 172 ; D2L 
1G1L1H1U2E1R1F1BM1)38 , 168 ;R1E1H2U 
1H1L1G1D2F1R1F1" 

134) 3 HDRAW 11 BM101, 168 ; D2G1L1G1L2H 
1U3E1F1R3 BM99, 164 ; L1H1L1E1U1E1R2 
F1D1G2BM93 , 157 ;U3H1L2G1D3F1R2E1B 
M84 , 157 ? D1G1L3H1E1R1E1R1F1BM67 , 1 



66;U1H1U2H1U2H1U2H1U2H1U3H1U2H1U 
2H1U2H1U2H1U3H1L5H1L6H1L6H1L15H1 
L3G1L3G1D2L2G1L4D4G3D3G1D2F1R1F1 
R3F1R1F1" 

135) 3 HDRAW" L1G2L1G1L2G2D11R1E1R3 
E1R2D2L1D1L2D2L1D1F1R1F1R1D2F1R2 
E1R1E1R1E1R1E1U1R1E1R2F1G4F1L1G1 
D1G3L2D3R3U1R1E1R1E2U1E1R3E1R1E5 
R1E3H1F1U1E3R1F1G2D1G1D4R1)3U1R1U 
2R1U2E2R3F1R1F1R1E1R2E1R2" 

136) 3 HDRAW 11 BM172 , 3)3 ;H1L3H1L3H3 " 

137) 3 HPAINT (6)3, 16)3) ,4,1 

138) 3 HPAINT (91, 155) ,4,1 

139) 3 HPAINT (99, 162) ,4,1 

140) 3 HPAINT (98, 17)3) ,4,1 

141) 3 HPAINT(1)37,165) ,4,1 

142) 3 HPAINT (1)35, 173) ,4,1 

143) 3 HPAINT(12J3,177) ,4,1 

144) 3 HPAINT (82, 158) ,4,1 
1450 HCOLOR )3,1 

14 60 HPRINT (2,0), "THE UNITED ST 

ATES OF AMERICA" 

1470 HPRINT (19, 17), "by" 

1480 HPRINT (18,18) , "RICK" 

1490 HPRINT (17,19) , "COOPER" 

1500 HPRINT (3,23) ,"C 1987" 

1510 RETURN 

1520 POKE &HFFD8,0 

1530 END /S\ 



COLOR RIBBONS & PAPER 



COLOR RIBBONS 



RED • BLUE • GREEN • BROWN • PURPLE • YELLOW 



Ribbons Price Each: 


Black 


Color 


Heat 
Transfer 


Radio Shack - DMP 100 


6.00 


9.00 




- DMP 110 


4.15 


4.75 


5.75 


- DMP 120 


6.75 


8.50 




- DMP 130 


5.25 


6.50 


7.95 


- DMP 200 


6.75 


8.50 




- DMP 230/520 


4.00 


5.25 




- DMP 2100 


5.75 






- DMP 410/510 


5.00 


7.00 




- DMP 430 


12.00 






Apple Imagewriter l/ll 


3.75 


4.50 


6.50 


Citizen 120 D 


5.00 


6.00 


7.95 


Epson MX80/LX800 


3.75 


4.25 


6.75 


Okidata 182/192 


6.50 


7.50 




Panasonic K-XP 1090 


6.75 


7.75 




Seikosha SP 800/1000 


5.25 


6.50 


7.95 


Star NX10/NL10 


5.00 


6.00 


7.95 



Star NX 1000 Call For Price 



COLOR PAPER 

BRIGHT PACK- 200 Sheets/50 each color: Red, 
Blue, Green, Yellow. 9 1/2 X 11 - $10.90/pk. 

PASTEL PACK— 200 Sheets/50 each color: Pink, 
Yellow, Blue, Ivory. 9 1/2 x 11 - $10.90/pk. 



T-SHIRT RIBBONS (Heat Transfer) - Call For Price. 



COLOR DISKETTES 

5 1/4" DS/DD Rainbow Pack. 10/pack - $12.50 



For ribbons & paper not listed above, call for price & avail. Price & spec, subject to 
change w/o notice. Min. order $25.00. Min. S & H $3.50. Add $2.25 C.O.D. add'l. 
IL res. add 6.25% tax. MC & Visa accepted. 

RENCO COMPUTER SUPPLIES 

P.O. Box 475, Manteno, IL 60950 U.S.A. 
1-B00-522-6922 • (IL) 1-800-356-9981 • 815-468-8081 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 63 



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For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Gather up to five of your friends around the computer 

for a game of one-word Charades 



Clue Me In! 




By James and Mary Jean Lamonica 



Clueword is a talking word game for up to six players. 
You are given four cluewords, one at a time, and 
asked to guess what they have in common or what 
they describe. After each clueword, the computer waits for 
you to enter an answer. Type in your answer and press 
ENTER. If you have no guess, just press ENTER. If you are 
wrong, the computer will give you the next clueword in the 
set. If you are correct, the computer will go on to the next 
set of cluewords. The fewer cluewords you use, the more 
points you will get. 

The cluewords and the answers are saved by a separate 
program called Cluefile. When you enter your answers, 
follow these five simple rules: 

1) The answer should be singular and not plural. 

2) When the answer is a name, use the last name only. 

3) When the answer is a set of initials, put periods 
between them. 

4) When the answers are numbers, enter them numeri- 
cally. 

5) The answer must match exactly; so spelling counts! 

The programs can be used without the Speech/ Sound 
Pak and can be converted to use with a tape system. 

How Cluefile Works 

To see how the game works, let's begin with the Cluefile 
program. This program is used to enter up to 300 sets of 
four cluewords and an answer. Lines 1 through 20 are the 
introduction. Lines 30 through 70 ask if you want to load 



Jim and Mary Lamonica are both proud to be teachers in 
the El Paso, Texas, school system. They have had two 
previous programs published in THE RAINBOW. 



a partially completed set file. The program allows you to 
add to an existing set file so that you don't have to enter 
all 300 sets at a time. If you answer 'Y' to that question, 
the computer will go to the subroutine at Line 500. Lines 
500 through 550 enter the partial file, and Line 540 inputs 
the data into an array called D$. The DS=X statement counts 
the number of sets already in the file so that the computer 
can tell you how many can be added. 

Lines 90 through 100 give you instructions. Line 95 was 
added to allow you to make copies of the file. To do this, 
enter zero when asked how many sets you want to enter; 
then put in a different, initialized disk in the drive. The 
computer will go to the SAVE routine at Line 180. 

Lines 110 through 160 contain the loop to enter the 
clueword sets. When prompted by the computer, enter each 
of the four cluewords, one at a time. Press ENTER after 
entering each clueword. If you notice an error after you have 
pressed ENTER, you may use the up arrow key to go back 
to the previous clueword. Before you press ENTER for the 
fourth clueword, go back over all four to double-check 
them. The PRINT 6 statement in Line 130 keeps the 
cluewords in order on the screen, even if you go back one 
to make a correction. Line 132 allows you to make the 
correction, and Line 1 50 inputs the answer to the cluewords. 

Lines 180 through 220 save the clueword file on disk as 
Cluedata. A 300-set file will use about seven granules, so 
be sure the disk has room. 

To get you started with your own sets of cluewords, here 
are four examples: 

Chicago Cubs 

National 

League 

Baseball 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 65 



OWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 

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* 5 STAR FINAL 



SEPTEMBER '88 



CLEAR 



HMC CUTS *515 to *269 



Hundreds of $ off Monitors sighted as Major Factor. HMC is reported to 
have made a special purchase on Magnavox monitors. These items, listed, 
are being offered at remarkable savings. 

MAGNAVOX 7622 12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 350 lines resolu- 
tion at 20 MHz on a dark glass anti-glare CRT with built-in audio and 1 year 
warranty. ($7 shipping) $ 88 7652 green screen also available $88 

MAGNAVOX 8 CM 515 has analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB for 
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speaker. 14" screen with 640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 2 years parts 
and labor warranty, reg. list $499 was $298 $269 + $14 Shipping 

CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable only $ 19.95 with Magnavox Monitor 
order. $29. 95 w/o monitor. 





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capability, Zenith quality and a 90-day warranty valid at any of Zenith's 1200 
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double density 360K. ($5 shipping) 
Add $24 for a Disto DC-3 




HMC's Guarantee— 
A Promise you can take to the Bank. 



Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
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any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states. APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 




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Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. DISTO $ 98 DC-3[aJ 
($2 shipping on all DISTO products) 

ADD-ON BOARDS 

DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer 
includes all software to program 
2764 or 27128 chips(B] $ 55 
DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
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Items featured as evidence 
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THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
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A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
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Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
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ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 




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Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
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Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
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Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
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As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
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John 
Paul 
George 
RingO 

President 
Writer 
Virginian 
Declaration 



General 
Indian 
Fighter 
Bighftrn 



Beatles 



Jefferson 



Custer 



How Clueword Works 

Lines 1 through 20 are the introduc- 
tion, and lines 21 through 70 load the 
Cluedata file into the game. Lines 80 
through 220 contain the basic game 
loop. Lines 80 and 90 allow you to enter 
the names of up to six players; these 
names should be limited to 12 charac- 
ters for proper placement. Line 95 
begins the game loop, and Line 100 
prints the players' names at the top of 
the screen with their scores and an 



arrow pointing to the name of the player 
whose turn it is. Line 110 chooses a set 
number randomly and tests to see if the 
set has been used. If it has, another set 
is chosen. The used set numbers are 
stored in array DU. 

Line 120 presents the clue words both 
on the screen and vocally. If you do not 
have the Speech/ Sound Pak, delete 
lines 500 through 507 and all GOSUB 500 
statements. The cluewords are centered 
by dividing the length of the clueword 
in half and subtracting that amount 
from the center point of the line. 

Line 130 determines the point value 
for each clueword. If you guess cor- 
rectly on the first clueword, you get 16 
points; on the second, 8; on the third, 
4; and on the fourth, 2. Line 140 allows 
you to input your answer. Line 145 
allows you to quit the game at any time 
by entering a 'Q' for a clueword answer. 
If you enter the correct answer, the 
computer goes to the subroutine at Line 
400. If you are incorrect, the next 
clueword is presented. If you fail to 
guess after all cluewords, the computer 
goes to the subroutine at Line 460. 



D$ 

PN 
PS 



P. 



8 



clueword sets and answers 
players' names 
players' scores in game 
data used in game !||p 
random number generator 
points given for correct 
answer 

used for Speech/Sound 
Pak 

number of data sets irff|$ 
number of players in gaift 
master game loop 
determ ines PR INT § loca- 
tion for players' names and 



PR determines PRINT § foea 
tion of cluewordi; Jon 
screen 



" As 



Figure 1: Variable List 



(Questions or comments regarding 
these programs may be directed to the 
authors at 10456 Orpheus Dr., El Paso, 
TX 79924. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



Listing 1: CLUEF1LE 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



*********************** 

1 * cluef ile * 

■* (C) 1987 * 

1 *BY JAMES PH LAMONICA* 
'*& MARY JEAN LAMONICA* 
'* EL PASO, TEXAS * 

1J3 PMODEj8:PCLEARl:CLEAR12pj3j3:DIM 
D$(5,3J3J3) 

2j3 CLS(3) :PRINT@32,"THIS IS A PR 
OGRAM TO CREATE THE WORD FILE FO 
R THE clueword GAME PLEASE PRESS 

ANY KEY TO BEGIN" : EXEC4 4539 
3J0 PRINT@224, "TO LOAD A PART I ALL 
Y COMPLETED FILE PRESS y, OR E 
LSE PRESS n" 
40 I$=INKEY$ 

5j3 IFI$="Y"THENGOSUB5j30:GOTO90 
60 IFI$="N"THENGOTO90 
7 S3 GOTO40 

9j3 CLS (3) : PRINTS 3 2, "YOU MAY ENTE 
R" ; 3J30-DS ; " SETS OF WORDS FOR cl 
ueword. ENTER THE NUMBER OF ADDI 
TIONAL SETS YOU WISH ADD" ; : INPUT 
NS 

95 IF NS=0 THENGOTO180 

IjSp CLS (3) :PRINT@64, "YOU WILL BE 

ASKED FOR FOUR CLUE WORDS AND T 
HEN THE ANSWER WORD. PRESS RETUR 
N AFTER EACH ENTRY. PRESS A KEY 

WHEN READY TO BEGIN" : EXEC44539 




$500 CASH PRIZE 

TO THE FIRST PLAYER TO SURVIVE! 

NIGHT OF THE 

LIVING DEAD 



AN INTERACTIVE 
NIGHTMARE 




^uRf ^ ADUEnTLIRE ("DUEL SOFTWARE 




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P.O. BOX 8176, SPARTANBURG, SC 29305 

24 hr. order HOTLINE 
(803) 578-7421 

C.O.D. ADD $5 





RAINBOW 

CtOTiFCJTioa 
MM. 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 67 



110 F0RX=DS4-1T0DS+NS 

115 CLS(6) : PRINT "SET NUMBER M ;X 

120 F0RY=1T04 

130 PRINT@Y*64 , "ENTER clueword # 

";Y;:INPUTD$(Y,X) 

132 IF D$(Y,X)=" A "THENY=Y-2:GOTO 
140 

140 NEXTY 

150 PRINTS 3 20, "ENTER THE ANSWER" 
; :INPUTD$ (5,X) 
160 NEXTX 

180 CLS(5) : PRINT@96 , "TO SAVE THE 
clueword FILE, PUT IN A DISK A 
ND PRESS A KEY PLEASE" : EXEC44539 
190 OPEN"0",#l, "CLUEDATA" 
200 PRINTS 200 , "SAVING cluedata" ; 
210 FOR X=1T0DS+NS:F0RY=1T05:WRI 



TE#1,D$(Y,X) : NEXTY, X 

22,0 CLOSE # 1 : GOTO 2)3 

500 CLS(4) :PRINT@3 2,"TO LOAD A P 

ARTIALLY COMPLETED FILE, PUT I 

N THE PROPER DISK ANDPRESS A KEY 

PLEASE" :EXEC4453 9 
505 PRINTS264 , "FINDING cluedata" 

510 OPEN"I", #1, "CLUEDATA" 

515 PRINTS 2 6 4, "LOADING cluedata" 

520 FOR X=1TO300 

530 IF EOF(1)=-1THEN550 

540 F0RY=1T05:INPUT#1,D$(Y,X) : DS 

=X: NEXTY 

545 NEXTX 

550 CLOSE#l: RETURN 



Listing 2: CLUEWORD 

1 *********************** 

3 ! *BY JAMES PH LAMONICA* 

4 f *& MARY JEAN LAMONICA* 

5 ■* EL PASO, TEXAS * 

6 »* (C) 1987 * 

7 *********************** 

10 PMODE0:PCLEARl:CLEAR12000:DIM 
D$(5,300) ,PN$(6) ,PS(6) ,DU(300) 

20 V$="WELCOME TO CLUEWORD. YOU 
WILL BE GIVEN 4 WORDS, ONE AT 
A TIME DETERMIN WHAT THE WORDS H 
AVE IN COMMON AND TYPE IN THE AN 
SWER. THE FEWER CLUEWORDS YOU N 
EED, THE MORE POINTS YOU WILL 
GET. " 

21 CLS(RND(6) ) :PRINT@64,V$ 

25 V$="PRESS A KEY TO BEGIN" :GOS 
UB500 : PRINTS448 , V$ : EXEC44539 : PRI 
NTS 4 4 8, "LOADING clueword FILE FR 
OM DISK" 

30 OPEN" I ",#1, "CLUEDATA" 

40 FORX=1TO300 

50 IFEOF(1)=-1THEN70 

60 F0RY=1T05:INPUT#1, D$(Y,X) : DS= 

X : NEXTY 

65 NEXTX 

70 CLOSE #1 

80 CLS (RND ( 6) ) : V$="HOW MANY PLAY 
ERS (1 TO 6) ":GOSUB500: PRINT@ 64, 
V$ ? : INPUTNP 

90 V$="ENTER PLAYERS BELOW" : GOSU 

B500 : FORX=lTONP : PRINTS128 , "NAME 

OF PLAYER" ;X; : INPUTPN$ (X) : PRINT© 

128," ": NEXTX 

95 FOR GL=1T0INT(DS/NP) 

100 FORG=lTONP:CLS(RND(6) ) :FORX= 

1T0NP:PRINTS17+(X*16) ,PN$(X) ;PS( 

X) ; : NEXTX : PRINTS 16+ (G*16) ,CHR$(6 

2 ) ; 

110 Q=RND(DS):IF DU(Q)=Q THEN110 

111 PA=272 



115 FOR L=1T04 

120 DU(Q)==Q:PRINT@PA-INT(.5*LEN( 
D$(L,Q) ) ) ,D$(L,Q) ; :V$=D$(L,Q) :GO 
SUB500 

130 S=INT(2 A (5-L)) 

140 PRINTS44 8 , " " : PRINTS448 , "FOR 

";S; "POINTS" ; : INPUTA$ 

145 IF A$="Q"THENGOTO300 

150 IF A$=D$(5,Q) THEN PS(G)=PS( 

G)+S:GOSUB400:GOTO220 

190 PA=PA+3 2 

200 NEXT L 

210 GOSUB460 

220 NEXTG : NEXTGL 

300 CLS:V$="THE GAME IS OVER AND 
THESE ARE THE FINAL SCORES" :GOS 
UB500 

310 FOR X=1T0NP : PRINTS (X*3 2) ,PN$ 
(X) ;PS(X) 
3 20 NEXTX • 

399 END ' 

400 V$="YOU ARE CORRECT"+PN$ (G) : 
GOSUB500 

405 V$="PRESS A KEY FOR THE NEXT 

SET" :GOSUB500 
410 EXEC4453 9: RETURN 
460 V$="THE CORRECT ANSWER WAS " 
+D$(5,Q) :GOSUB500 

465 PRINT@448, "" :PRINT@464-INT(. 

5*LEN(D$(5,Q) ) ) ,D$(5,Q) 

470 V$="PRESS A KEY FOR THE NEXT 

SET" :GOSUB500 
480 EXEC44539 : RETURN 

500 XX=&HFF00:YY=&HFF7E:POKEXX+1 
, 52 : POKEXX+3 , 63 : POKEXX+3 5 , 60 

501 FOR I=1T0LEN(V$) 

502 IFPEEK(YY) AND128=0THEN502 

503 POKEYY,ASC(MID$ (V$,I,1) ) 

504 NEXTI 

505 IFPEEK(YY) AND128=0THEN505 

506 POKE YY,13 

507 RETURN 



68 THE RAINBOW September 1988 







OS-9 version 2 
OS-9 Levef 2 



XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program 



Menu oriented 
UploaaVdownload Ascii 
or XMODEM protocol 



■ Definable macro keys 
• Works with standard serial port, RS232 
Pak, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers 
Execute OS-9 commands • Works with standard screen, Xscreen 
from within XTERM WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board 

.95 



$49 



with source $89.95 



XDIR & XCAL 



Hierarchial directory OS-9 calculator 

■ Full sorting • Decimal, Hex, Binary 

• Complete pattern matching • +,-,*,/,AND,OR,XOR,NOT 

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XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 
$34.95 with source $54.95 



HARDWARE 



512k memory upgrade 
Ram Software 

Ram Disk 

Print Spooler 

Quick Backup 

♦Software by Col or Venture 



$124.95 



All three for only 
$19.95 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

True character oriented full screen editing 

Full block commands 

Find and Replace commands 

Execute OS-9 commands from within 

Proportional spacing supported 

Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, overstrike, 
underline, super/sub-scripts 
10 header/footers 

Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source $49.95 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 

XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 with source $199.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 
$39.95 with source $79.95 






SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUTING 

This sales-based accounting package is de- 
signed for the non-accountant oriented busi- 
nessman. It also contains the flexibility for 
the accounting oriented user to set up a double 
entry journal with an almost unlimited chart 
of accounts. Includes Sales Entry, transaction 
driven Accounts Receivable and Accounts Pay- 
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and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income State- 
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Accounts Receivable and Payable Aging Re- 
ports, Check Register, Sales Reports, Account 
Status Lists, and a Journal Posting List. 

$79.95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory 
control, with user defined product codes, and 
produce a detailed analysis of the business' 
sales and the sales force. One may enter/update 
inventory data, enter sales, run five sales anal- 
ysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter/update salesman records, 
and update the SBAP inventory* 

$59.95 



PAYROLL 



Designed for maintaining personnel and 
payroll data for up to 200 hourly and salar- 
ied employees with 8 deductions each. Cal- 
culates payroll and tax amounts, prints 
checks and maintains year-to-date totals 
which can be automatically transferred to 
the SBA package. Computes each pay peri- 
od's totals for straight time, overtime and 
bonus pay and determines taxes to be with- 
held. Aditional outputs include mailing list, 
listing of employees, year-to-date federal 
and/or state tax listing, and a listing of cur- 
rent misc. deductions. Suited for use in all 
states except Oklahoma and Delaware 

$59.95 



PERSONAL BOOKKEEPING 2000 
Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense catego- 
ries. Menu driven and user friendly. 

$39.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history 
reports for each customer, perpares in- 
voices and monthly statements, mailing la- 
bels, aging lists, and an alphabetized cus- 
tomer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance 
charges for revolving accounts. This pack- 
age functions as a standalone A/R system or 
integrates with the Small Business Accting 
package. 

$59.95 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor 
and A/P invoice files. The system prints 
checks, voids checks, cancels checks, de- 
letes cancelled checks, and deletes paid A/P 
invoices. The user can run a Vendor List, 
Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged report, 
and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P sys- 
tem or can be integrated with the Small 
Business Accounting Package. 

$59.95 






MutcrCard 



Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $3.50), personal checks. 






the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 




Buy a CoCo and See the World g 

By Bill Bernico 

This program will draw, frame and label a detailed map 
of the world — and then duplicate it side-by-side, creating 
a wraparound version. The last command of Line 60 and all 
of Line 70 duplicate and label the map. You can eliminate 
these if you need a world map in one of your own programs. 
To reposition the map on your screen, simply change the first 
coordinate in Line 10 from BM4 , 19 to wherever you want to 
start drawing. 

The listing: WORLD 

10 PMODE4,l:PCLSl:SCREENl,l:COLO 

R0,1:DIM A(20,20) :DRAW M BM4,19D3B 

D7D28BD4DFU3BU3U28BU2UBU3U3DFD35 

BD3D3EUBU4U35FD3 4BD7DRU2BU7U33FD 

2BD2D28BD8DBRBU3UBU6U2 6RD25BD6D3 

BD4D4FDU6BU6UBUl£U21RD2j3BD6D4BD7 

D6EU6BU6U5BU5U20D3RD15BD5DBD2D4B 

D6D6RU6BU13U2BU4U14ED15BD4D 

20 DRAW"BD14D6RU6BU17UBU5U13BU4U 

2RD3BD3D12BD6D2BD16D6RU5BU17U2BU 

7U11BU4U2BD8RD9BD27D5FU6BU27U8RD 

9BD25D8UEU4BU8U£BU16U12RND13RD12 

BD18D#BU3£RND8RD7BD24RBU25U6RND6 

FD5BD27D0BU32RD5RU4FD3EU2FBD11L2 

E2D2BD8FBU9U2BU4Uj3BU7ED2BD5D2BD2 

D3UEU12RD11BD14DFU2BU14U12R 

30 DRAW"ND10RD9BD19DBU29RD9RU9FD 

9RU1£BU7ED2BD4D14FU15BU4U2RD3BD2 

D17FD3U2 6RD27FU29EUD32FU3 3ED34FU 

37RD38NLRU39EUD3 6BD3D2FU3BU4U35E 

D3 6BD4D3BD2D2FDU6BU7U2 j 0BU6Ulj3D9B 

D8D22BD4D7FU9BU3U2j3BU9Ul^RD12BDl 




j3D3BD2Dl£BD5D10BD9D9F2HU14BU3U12 

BU6U8BU4U2BU9U13FD13BD7D3 

40 DRAWBD4D7BD7D27U2EU24BU8U3BU 

2U2BU12U12FD12BD11DBD3D2BD9D22EU 

2j3BUlj3U3BU13U14EUD27BD3DBD12D19E 

U17BU17U2 6ED2 8BD17D15U2EU11BU20U 

28RD2 5BD2 4D8EU6BU2 6U25RD24BD27D4 

EU2BU2 9U2 3FD21BD30D2BRBU2 7U2BU14 

U5FD3BD14D4RU3BU16U2BR9BD39D4FU6 

ED7RU8BU2U2BU6U2EUD4BD6D2 

5j3 DRAW"BD2D8RU8BU2U2BU2UBU3NU4F 

D6BD3D8FU10BU3U5RBU23D3BD13D2BD4 

D6BD3D11FD6U18BU3U6BU3U5BU10U5RD 

5BD9D6BD3D6BD3D19FD4U24BU3U7BU2U 

7BU8U6RD4BD9D6BD3D8BD3D24FU25BU3 

U9BU3U5BUl£U3FD2BD9D6BD2Dlj3BD3D2 

4EU22BU3U19RD20BD2D21EU2j3BU2LUEU 

17DFD15BD5D13EU11BU6U14RD16 

60 DRAW n BDRD3BD12D2BU17U6BU3U12B 

U4U2BUlj2U2ED4BD9D2BD4Dlj3BD4D8BDl 

1D5RU5BU11U8BU3U12BU4U3BU8U4RD4B 

D6D4BD5D2j3FU2 2BU6U2BU6U3RD2BD7D2 

BD5D2 4FD3U3 2H3GFRD3 3RU3 3RD32EU3 2 

ED3 2RU3 3BU4HU2EUND5RD5BD4D33FU34 

BU3U6FD5BD3D3 8FU3 9BU3U3RD3BD3D4j3 

":GET(4,90) -(127,10) ,A,G 



70 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



70 PUT ( 127 / 90) (25j3 , 1)3) ,A, PSET: L 
INE (0/0) -(255,97) , PSET , B : LINE ( 4 , 
4) -(251,93) ,PSET,B:POKE178,2:PAI 
NT (2, 2) , ,0:POKE178,0:DRAW"BM85,1 



0 5R6L3 D8 BR6U8 D4R6U4 D8 BR3NR6U4NR4 
U4R6BR12D6F2E2F2E2U6BR3D8R6U8L6B 
R9ND8R6D4L6R2F4BR3NR6U8BR9D8R5EU 
6HL5" :PLAY"05C" :EXEC44539 



Mental Math Blocks 4K 

By Keiran Kenny 

Mathematical relationships are often more easily grasped 
when you can examine them visually. Remember back to the 
first grade, when adding and subtracting were learned in 
terms of apples and oranges, not just abstract symbols. In 
that vein, Add Blocks can help children with math by 
accompanying simple addition problems with counting 
blocks. The program is easy to use, but a small child may 
need some initial help. 

The listing: RDDBLQKS 

0 1 ADDBLOKS 1 BY KEIRAN KENNY , 

THE HAGUE, 1987, 
10 CLS 
20 P=96 

30 FORX=lTO 1+RND(8) 



40 PRINT@P,CHR$(159) 
50 P=P+2 
60 NEXT 
70 Y=X-1 

80 Z=Y+RND(16-Y) :IFZ=Y THEN8J3 
90 W=Z-Y 

100 PRINT: PRINT "HERE ARE "Y" BLOCK 
S. HOW MANY MOREDO YOU NEED TO M 
AKE"Z"?" 
110 PRINT 
120 INPUTK 

130 IFK=Z-Y THENPRINT : PRINT"RIGH 
T ! 11 ; ELSEPRINT : PRINT 11 SORRY 1 " ; 
140 PRINT" YOU NEEDED" W" BLOCK" ; : 
IFW>1THENPRINT"S . "ELSEPRINT" . " 
150 FORX=lTOW 
160 PRINT@P,CHR$(175) 
170 P=P+2 
180 NEXT 

190 PRINT@385, "TO TRY AGAIN, PRE 
SS ANY KEY. " 

200 EXEC44539:CLS:GOT02j3 




When in Rome 

By Dan and John Weaver 

Although modern Western civilization adopted the Roman 
alphabet, it rejected the Roman numeral system in favor of 
the Arabic, But in many schools students are still expected 
to learn the Roman system to some degree. Some may feel 
this is a useless exercise, but I feel it is helpful for children 
to see that there are other ways to represent numbers besides 
the usual 1, 2, 3, etc. 

Roman Numeral tests your child (or you) in Roman 
numerals. The program presents you with a simple menu that 
asks you to choose Arabic-Roman or Roman-Arabic 
translation. Then the program selects a random number and 
puts it onscreen; you must type in its equivalent in the other 
system. The computer indicates whether you are right or 
wrong. If you are wrong, it provides the correct answer. It 
also keeps a running count of the number of problems 
completed and the percentage of correct responses. After 20 
problems, your final score is given and you are returned to 
the menu. 

There are two levels of play. The easy level covers the 
numbers 1 through 25. The hard level includes more difficult 
numbers, such as XCIX and CDXCIX. 

The listing: ROMRNMRL 

0 CLS0:FORG=1TO500:NEXTG 

1 FORU=488TO9STEP-32:CLS0 



2 PRINT @U, "roman numerals"; 

3 IF U+70<511THEN PRINT@U+70 , "by 



it 



4 IF U+130<511THENPRINT@U+130, "d 
an & john" ; 

5 IF U+196<511THENPRINT(§U+19 6,"W 
eaver" ; 

6 FORG=1TO100:NEXTG:NEXTU:FORX=1 
TO1000:NEXTX 

7 TT=0:C=0:T=J3:CLS:PRINT§137, "rO 
MAN TO ARABIC 

8 PRINT@201,"aRABIC TO ROMAN 

9 PRINT@265,"qUIT 

10 I$=INKEY$:IFI$="»THEN10 

11 IFI$="A"THEN13ELSEIFI$="R"THE 

N13ELSEIFI$=»Q"THEN3 6 

12 GOTO10 

13 CLS: PRINT "eASY OR hARD? 

14 E$=INKEY$:IFE$=""THEN14 

15 IFE$="E"THEN17ELSEIFE$="H"THE 
N16ELSE14 

16 N=RND(39) :GOT018 

17 N=RND(24) :GOT018 

18 RESTORE : CLS :PRINT§48 2, "YOU HA 
VE GOTTEN "TT"% RIGHT" : PRINT" YO 
U HAVE DONE "T" PROBLEMS 

19 IF T=20THEN3 5 

2 0 FORX= 1TON : RE ADA$ : NEXTX 

21 FORY=N TON+3 8 : READX$ : NEXTY 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 



22 DATA M 1 , V I 2 ,I , M 3 , V I 4 , V I 5 I », II 6 H , 
» 7 11 , " 8 " , " 9 " , » 10 11 , 11 1 1 " , 11 1 2 " , « 1 3 » , 
"14" , "15" , "16" , "17" , "18" , "19" , "2 
j3","21", "22", "23", "24","25","4i3" 
, " 4 4 " , " 4 9 " , " 50 " , " 90 " , " 9 9 " , " 100 " , 
it 4ppn f 1145^11 # "499", "500", "9)3)3", "9 
90" , "1000" 

23 DATA I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VII 

I, IX, X, XI, XII , XIII , XIV, XV, XVI , XV 

II , XVIII , XIX , XX , XXI , XXII , XXIII , X 
XIV , XXV, XL , XLIV , XLIX , L , XC , XCIX , C 
, CD , CDL , CDXCIX , D , CM , CMXC , M 

24 IFI$="A"THENGOSUB2 6ELSEIFI$=" 
R"THENGOSUB29 

25 G0T015 

2 6 PRINT@0, "WHAT IS THE ROMAN NU 
MERAL FOR" : PRINTA$ ; : INPUT" " ; B$ 

27 IFB$=X$THENGOSUB3 2ELSEGOSUB3 3 

28 RETURN 



29 PRINT @0 , "WHAT IS THE ARABIC N 
UMERAL FOR":PRINTX$; : INPUT" ";B$ 

30 IFB$=A$THENGOSUB3 2ELSEGOSUB3 3 

31 RETURN 

3 2 PRINT"correct " : FORF=13 0TO14 5S 
TEP5 : SOUNDF , 1 : NEXTF : SOUND120 , 1 : S 

OUND12 5 , 1 : T=T+1 : C=C+1 : TT=INT ( ( C/ 
T) *100) : RETURN 

3 3 PRINT"oops! " :PRINT"THE CORREC 

T ANSWER IS "; :IFI$="A"THENPRINT 
X$ELSEPRINTA$ 

34 T=T+1:TT=INT( (C/T) *100) : SOUND 
1,1: SOUND50 , 1 : SOUND1 , 1 : F0RG=1T09 

00 : NEXTG : RETURN 

35 PRINT @0, "PRESS ANY KEY TO STA 
RT NEW GAME": PRINT: PRINT :PRINT@2 
68, "game over" : EXEC4453 9 : GOT07 

3 6 CLS : END 



Answers for Your Questions I 4K 

By Keiran Kenny 

Quiz programs are very popular, but programming them 
can be difficult — a correct answer can exist in many forms. 
For example, the answer to the question in Line 1000 of the 
listing would not only be John Francis Kennedy, but John 
F. Kennedy, John or J.F. Kennedy, or simply Kennedy. In 
this program, Flexiquiz, any of these answers would be 
accepted. Spelling errors will not be accepted, however. 

To use Flexiquiz to generate your own quizzes, enter your 
question and answer as in the examples in lines 1000 through 
1090. Because the program uses INPUT and is written in Color 
BASIC, statements must be enclosed in quotes if the question 
or answer requires a comma or colon. If your CoCo has 
Extended Color BASIC, you could use LINE INPUT instead of 
INPUT. The program's last line must always read DRTR 
END, END, END. 

The question is read as fl$ and the answer as B$ in Line 
20. Lines 60, 70 and 90 establish^ strings to account for all 
variants of a name. The answer can take from one to three 
words. 

The listing: FLEXQUIZ 

0 'FLEXIQIZ 1 by Keiran Kenny, 

Sydney, 1988. 
10 CLS 

20 READA$,B$:IFA$="END"THEN160EL 
SECLS 

30 PRINT@32,A$ 

40 FORT=lTOLEN(B$) :E$=MID$(B$,T, 
1) :D$=D$+E$ 

50 IFE$=" "THENZ=Z+1ELSE80 
60 IFZ=1THENF$=D$:L1=LEN(F$) 
LEFT$(F$,1)+" ."+" " IGOTO80 



70 IFZ=2THENG$=RIGHT$ (D$ , T-Ll) :L 
2=LEN(G$) : J$=LEFT$(G$,1) +".»+» » 
80 NEXT 

90 H$=RIGHT$(B$,LEN(B$)-L1-L2) 
100 PRINT@128, ""; :INPUTC$ 
110 IFC$=B$ ORC$=H$ ORC$=F$+H$ O 
RC$=G$+H$ ORC$=I$+G$+H$ ORC$=F$+ 
J$+H$ ORC$=I$+J$+H$ ORC$=I$+H$ O 
RC$=J$+H$ THENR=R+1 : PRINT §2^5 , "R 
IGHT! "ELSEW=W+1 : Q==l : PRINT@205 , "W 
RONG ! " 

120 IFQ ORC$=B$ THENAN $ = 11 THE ANS 
WER IS : H ELSEAN$= M THE FULL NAME I 

S: M 

130 PRINT@256,AN$:PRINT@33 6-LEN( 
B$)/2,B$ 

140 PRINTS 3 93 , "PRESS ANY KEY. 11 
150 EXEC4 453 9: D$=» " : Q=0 : Z=0 : L1=0 
:L2=0:GOTO20 

160 IFR=0THENR$= n NONE"ELSER$=ST 
R$(R) 

170 IFW=0THENW$=" NONE"ELSEW$=ST 
R$(W) 

180 N$=A$+» :"+R$+" RIGHT ;"+W$+" 
WRONG . " 

190 PRINT@400-LEN(N$)/2 ; N$ 
200 PRINT: END 

1000 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT WAS AS 
SASSINATEDIN 19 63?, JOHN FRANCIS 
KENNEDY 

1010 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT INTROD 
UCED THE 1 NEW DEAL * , FRANKLIN DEL 
ANO ROOSEVELT 

1020 DATA WHO LED THE RAID ON HA 
RPER'S FERRY?, JOHN BROWN 
1030 DATA WHO WAS THE ORIGINATOR 
OF THE THEORY OF RELATIVITY?, 



72 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



ftware 



03" 28 New Calligrapher Fonts! 

Save $10.00 when you order the new Calligrapher Economy Font 
Package #4, known as the Hershey fonts. The introductory price of just 
$19.95 is available through September 30, 1988. Specify RSDOS or OS9. 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Includes the Calligrapher 
and Economy Font Packages ^1 and #2, 54 fonts in all; 
specify RSDOS or OS9; $69.95. 



NEW! Hershey Fonts Now Available 
For the Calligrapher! 

These 28 fonts are known as the Hershey fonts developed by Dr. A. 
Hershey. All fonts come in both standard and reverse. Set #10 in- 
cludes Roman (Simplex, Complex Small, Complex, and Triplex) - 8 
fonts. Set #11 includes Script (Simplex Small, Simplex, Complex 
Small and Complex) and Gothic English - 10 fonts. Set #12 in- 




fants) for $29.95. See special offer above. 



Koman birnp 

Roman Comp] 





Roman Triplex mm m 



Jorljii %wt\jiMK J ■will 

J mi jit bmnjmx 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Calligrapher - (Hybrid 
BASIC/ML) Turn your CoCo and 
do t- matrix printer into a 
calligrapher's quill. Make beauti- 
ful invitations, flyers, certificates, 
labels and more. Includes 3 
fonts: Gay Nineties, Old English 
and Cartoon. The letters are 
inch high and variably spaced. 
Works with many printers includ- 
ing Epson, Gemini, Radio Shack, 
Okiclata 92A, Banana and Pro- 
writer, Additional fonts are avail- 
able (see below). Tape /Disk; 
$24.95. 

OS9 Calligrapher - (C) Although 
a different program from the 
CoCo Calligrapher, the OS9 Cal- 
ligrapher prints all the same 
fonts. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and formats 
ting directives. You may specify 
the font to use, change fonts at 
any time, centering, left, right or 
full justification, line fill, margin, 
line width, page size, page break 
and indentation. Similar to troff 
on UNIX systems. Includes Gay 
Nineties, Old English and Car- 
toon fonts. Additional fonts are 
available (see below). Disk only; 
OS9 Level I or II; $24.95. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires 
Calligrapher above. Each set on 
tape or disk; specify RSDOS or 
OS9 version; $14.95 each. Set 
#1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, reversed 
and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and 
Cartoon; Set #2 - (8 fonts) Old 
Style and Broadway; Set #3 - (8 
fonts) Antique and Business; Set 
#4 - (8 fonts) Wild West and 
Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) 
Stars, Hebrew and Victorian* Set 
#6 - (8 fonts) Block and Com- 
puter; Set #7 - (5 small fonts) 
Roman. Italics, Cubes, Digital 
and Old World. 

Economy Font Packages on 

disk; specify RSDOS or OS9; 
$29.95: Font Package #1 - 
Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 
fonts) on one disk. Font Pack- 
age #2 - Above font sets 4, 5 
and 6 (26 fonts) on one disk. 
Both Packages #1 and #2 (51 
fonts) on one disk; 49.95. 

For a complete catalog of Sugar Software products and fonts, send a stamp and a label. 



. 1 ; 

^!l ''r 

»V, ! 

i i l l. .; 







Italic Comdex 




w« w« fete y w wi 





I 

ti-.-' .■I'WhfThlirM 1 ' 

i:i|nT»fe l "?HU^ |,| ii l: li ;; .:!' 



Roman Duplex tell 



4mm 



■ i- 



Roman Complex Tiny 



^iiiilBifcjfei 




RAINBOW 

centiftCATKM 

SEAL 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and 8, S2K 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.50 per tape or disk for shipping and han- 
dling. Florida residents add 6% sales tax. COD 
orders add $5. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders 
generally shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds 
or exchanges without prior authorization. 



ALBERT EINSTEIN 

1)34)3 DATA WHO COMPOSED THE MUSIC 
FOR 'THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA 1 ? 
, ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
1)35)3 DATA WHICH PHILOSOPHER WAS 
THE HERO OF PLATO'S DIALOGUES?, 
SOCRATES 

1)36)3 DATA WHO WROTE THE FAMOUS S 
TAGE PLAY 1 PYGMALION 1 ? , GEORGE BE 
RNARD SHAW 



1)37)3 DATA WHICH PRESIDENT PRECED 
ED ANDREW JACKS ON?, JOHN QUINCY A 
DAMS 

108)8 DATA WHICH AMERICAN ADMIRAL 
SAID 1 DAMM THE TORPEDOES'?, 

JOHN PAUL JONES 

1) 39)3 DATA WHICH ACTOR ASSASSINAT 
ED ABRAHAMLINCOLN? , JOHN WILKES B 
OOTH ' 

2) 30)3 DATA END, END 



CoCo Clowns Around 

By Ana M. Rodriguez 




See the lighter side of CoCo with Payaso, which is also 
the Spanish word for clown. I wrote this graphics program 
for all you CoCo owners to wish you a happy day. 



The listing: PAYASO 




1 REM ** PAYASO ** 

2 REM ** BY ** 

3 REM ** ANA RODRIGUEZ ** 
10 PMODE3,l:PCLS:SCREENl,l 

20 CLS 5 

3)3 CIRCLE (100, 120) ,55, ,1, .85, .66 

40 CIRCLE (100, 127) ,12 

50 LINE(50, 75) -(150,71) ,PSET,B 

55 LINE(63,71) -(137,22) ,PSET,B 

60 PAINT(65, 69) ,6,0 

65 LINE(63,60)-(137,60) , PSET 

70 PAINT (52, 73) ,6,0 

75 CIRCLE(80,95) ,9 

80 CIRCLE (120, 95) ,9 

90 LINE (80, 102) -(80,107) , PSET 

100 LINE(120, 102)-(120, 107) , PSET 

110 LINE (80, 88) -(80,85) , PSET 

120 LINE(120,88)-(120,85) ,PSET 

130 CIRCLE (100, 91) , 57 , , 1 , . 16 , . 35 

140 CIRCLE (100, 100) ,60, ,1, .16, .3 

5 

150 CIRCLE (72, 142) ,8, ,1, .30, .70 
16,0 CIRCLE (128, 142) ,8, ,1, .80, .20 
170 LINE(125,22)-(140,6) , PSET 
180 LINE(140,6)-(192,46) , PSET 
190 CIRCLE (212, 65) ,12 
200 CIRCLE (186, 62) ,17 



210 CIRCLE (200 
220 CIRCLE (230 
230 CIRCLE (237 
240 CIRCLE (209 
250 LINE (60, 75 
260 LINE(57,75 
270 LINE(55,75 
280 LINE(140,7 
290 LINE(143,7 
300 LINE (145, 7 
310 PAINT (100, 
320 PAINT (100, 
330 PAINT (212, 
340 PAINT (186, 
350 PAINT (200, 
3 60 PAINT (2 30, 
370 PAINT (237, 
380 PAINT(209, 
390 PAINT(80,9 
400 PAINT (120, 

999 GOTO 999 

1000 END 



,89) ,17 
,84) ,17 
,55) ,17 
,40) ,17 




150) ,7,0 
65) ,7,0 
62) ,8,0 
89) ,8,0 
84) ,8,0 
55) ,8,0 
40) ,8,0 
5) ,7,0 
95) ,7,0 



74 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 



New Low Prices! New Products! 
HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 



FEATURES: 

• Gold Plated Edge Cards 

• Dual Selectable ROM Sockets 

* Compatible With All COCO Versions 

* One Year Wart^!ty r . t " , 

HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST lias iramufoaurcci l\o\ipy drive 
controllers for i he Color Computer for SIX years- Buy the 
controller alone to upgrade your present drive system* or 
purchase a complete drive 0 to gel a high quality drive system 
loaded with features. Tin's controller fallows the use of either 
two 24 pin ROMS, or one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM. Using 
Ifrfe hoard wiili th^stand&rd Radio Shack ROM gives you 1 00% 
compatibility with all Radio Shack software. 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 

COLOR COMPOTE* CQHTfKHUH 




NEW! 



5.25 inch 3,5 indi 



Completed and Tested Board with ROM. 

(includes Case and DOS instructions} 
Com pit ted and Tested Hoard „ ,«« $79. 

without ROM {includes case) 

Bare Board wilh Instruction Manual* *... + .., + ^^.p.,.,«.*.*. + S30, 
Parts Kit for Bare Board without ROM 

Radio Sliaek ROM (current version),*.*,,...* *, $30. 

Double Sided Compatible ROM S20, 

NEW! Magnavox 8CM515 Monitor ^ ^*$M% 

with Cable for COCO 3 

NEW! 2400 BAUD ZOOM External Modem iM „ 

villi C;ihfe, 



Drive 0 Com pfete. SW9. 

13 live 1 Complete tt<i k4«f^n4f r« i-. 1 1^. 

Drive 0&1 Dual Drive Complete ~ $259, 

Bare Drive 



."h t K ? . 

$134, 
$289, 



Drive Kits are complete with half height double sided drives 
mounted in a case witfi powesr supply. Drive Q kits ajso 
include cable and controller with ROM. 3.5 inch dri ves yfeld 
720K when used with appropriate DOS (ADOS. 0S<J T cie.) 



Otde-ring lnft?rrn»tijon; Use our WATS line to place yuur order via 
VISA> MasterCard, or Wire Transfer. Or mail >-our payment directly 
to us, Any u on certified funds wiil dl- \wU\ nruii proper clearance is 
made. COD orders ere welcome as well as purchase orders frum 

1 government 4r£cneies t Shining coste arc av tillable upon request, It 
you arc nor satisfied with your purchase within 30days T yf?u may return 
jircwJueL for full refund including stupping eosus. 



- 




ORDER TODAY!! 

HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 

16208 Hickory Knoll ■ Houston, Texas ■ 77059 
i-7J3-4fW-600() ■ 1-800-23 J -6671 EXT 437 




Cider Sipping 

By Darren Day 

Among the things associated with school are apples, the 
crisp odor of new books and "kid" songs (you know, 
"School's out, school's out, teachers let the monkeys out, " 
or "Billy and Betty, sitting in a tree . . — I'm sure you can 
finish that one). No "kid" song repertoire would be complete 
without "Sipping Cider Through a Straw," and CoCo will 
make sure you remember it. 

When run, the program accompanies the music with an 
onscreen printout of the lyrics. And to make the program 
even more exciting, the words have been encoded in DRTR 
statements. Note: Cider contains the high-speed poke. 

The listing: CIDER 

j3 CLEAR 4j3j3:DIM A$(4,5) 

1 GOSUB 18 1 DISPLAY TITLE 

2 POKE 65495, J3 

3 FOR X=l TO 5: GOSUB 21:NEXT X:P 
OKE 65494 ,j3 'DECODE DATA 

4 1 PLAY SONG & DISPLAY WORDS 

5 FOR X=l TO 5 

6 PRINT TAB (4) ;A$(1,X) :PLAY "L8B 
L16BA#L8BL2G": PRINT TAB (4) 7A$(2, 
X):PLAY "L8GO+DL16DC#L8DL20-A" 

7 PRINT TAB (4) ;A$ (3 >X) : PLAY "L8A 
0+DDDL2DL8D": PRINT TAB (4) ;A$(4,X 
):PLAY "CO-BAL2GL8G" 

8 PRINT: PRINT 

9 NEXT X 



1J3 1 ENCODED DATA 

11 DATA "UIFlQSFU.UJ.FTUlHJSM", " 
UIBU I FWFS ! J ! TBX" , "XBT ! T JQQJOH ! DJ 
. EFS 11 , "UISP( IB! TUSBX" 

12 DATA "J!UPME!UIBU!HJSM","J!EJ 
EO (U ! TFF ! IPX" , "TIF ! TJQQFE ! DJEFS " 
, "UISPVHI ! UIBU ! TUSBX" 

13 DATA "BOE!DIFFL!CZ!DIFFL","BO 
E ! KBX ! CZ ! KBX" , "XFl TJQQFE ! UIBU! DJ 
EFS" , "UISPVHI! UIBU! TUSBX" 

14 DATA " BOE ! BMM ! BU ! PODF " , "UIBU ! 
TUS BX 1 E JE ! TMJQ< " , "J! TJQQFE ! TPNF ! 
DJEFS " , "GSPN ! IFS ! MJQ" 

15 DATA "BOEIOPX! J(WF!HPU!NF",B! 
NPUIFS ! JO ! MBX" , " GSPN ! T JQQJOH ! DJE 
FS", "UISPVHI !B! TUSBX" 

16 GOSUB 25: END 

17 1 TITLE SCREEN SUBROUTINE 

18 CLS : PRINT@2 , "SIPPING CIDER TH 
ROUGH A STRAW": PRINT (§32+9, "BY D 
ARREN DAY": PRINT STRING$ (32 , 131) 

19 RETURN 

2J3 1 DECODE DATA SUBROUTINE 

21 FOR Y=l TO 4: READ L$ 

22 FOR P=l TO LEN(L$) 

23 B$=MID$(L$,P, 1) :C=ASC(B$) 

24 C=C-1:A$(Y,X)=A$(Y,X)+CHR$(C) 
:NEXT P:NEXT Y: RETURN 

25 FOR Y=j3 TO 31 

26 FOR X=0 TO 63 

27 SET (X,Y,0) :NEXT X:NEXT Y 

28 RETURN 






CoCo ASCII Table 

By Ken Ostrer 

Time after time in my programming escapades, it seems 
Fm looking for just the right character to spice up my 
program. It helps to see all the possible characters in one 
place. If you have a CoCo 3, this program will display the 
entire CoCo 3 character set and its respective ASCII codes 
on the 80-column screen. You can alternate between decimal 
and hexadecimal values by pressing any key when the display 
is complete. 

The listing: ASCIIS 

lj3 ON BRK GOTO110 

2ft POKE65497 , J3 : WIDTH8j3 : CLS3 : ATTR 



6,4: CLS : S=3 2 : E=51 : Z=j3 : V=j3 
3j3 FORX=S TO E : IFX>255THEN80 
4j3 LOCATEZ+l,V:PRINTCHR$(X) ; :LOC 
ATEZ , V+l: IFT=j3THENPRINTX;ELSEPRI 
NT"$"HEX$(X) ; 

5j3 I FX= 3 2 THENLOCATE 1 , fi : PRINT " Sp 11 
• 

6J3 Z=Z+4:NEXTX 

7j3 V=V+2:S==E+l:E=E+2j3:Z=j3:GOT03j3 
8j3 PRINT" The entire Color Com 
puter 3 character set. . . 11 ; :K$=IN 
KEY$ 

9J3 K$=INKEY$:IFK$= ,l,, THEN9j3ELSEIF 

T=-1THENT=^ELSET=-1 

Ij3j3 GOT02j3 

11J3 POKE65496,j3:CLS:END 



76 THE RAINBOW September 1988 




PRINTER LIGHTNING 

A great print spooler which gives you 
44K print buffer from a 128K CoCo and 
up to 438K (200 pages!) from a 512K 
CoCo. With this spooler you can run a 
program while you are printing a file. 
The spooler does not slow down the 
computer to any noticeable extent while 
you are running a second program and 
no lost characters arise. Baud rates 
selectable. Printer Lightning can reside 
in memory along with RAMDISKl 



Proven Technology 

New CoCo 3 Utilities 

Great for 512K Systems! From Color Venture and OWl^WARE 







NEW NEW 



Using 512K CoCo 3 you have access to 
2 additional disk drives in RAM. All 
disk commands are supported, and the 
data are Reset button protected. You 
can now have up to 5 disk drive capa- 
cities on line at once and can assign the 
ram disks to any drive number. By 
making the ramdisk Drive 0, all pro- 
grams which require a lot of drive 
access will run much faster. You can 
have the RAMDISK in memory at the 
same time as the Printer Lightning] 



BACKUP LIGHTNING 

This program is the fastest way to make 
backup copies of your files using a 512K 
CoCo. You can backup 35, 40, or 80 
track disks single or double sided. Both 
RS and OS-9 disks may be backed up. 
The original disk is saved to memory 
and a copy can be made on an 
unformatted disk every 45 seconds! The 
lightning read, write, format, and verify 
routines that were developed make this 
program much quicker that RSDOS or 
OS-9 for backups. This will become one 



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i 



" ' 



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Modify each color from 64 available colors 

Use composite or RGB monitor 

Draw with custom paintbrushes 

Futt resolution 320 X 192 

Picture converter for conversion of 

COCO 2 pictures to COCO 3 
Multiple text fonts 
Accepts input from joystick, X-pad, 

mouse, or touch-pad 
Boxes, circles, line, paint generation 
Screen dump for Tandy mono and color ink-jet 

printers, (NX- 10 and others pending) 
Sensible price 

No additional hardware required because of 

course/fine joystick movement modes 
Zoom mode for individual pixel editing 
Great on screen menu which is removable at 
the touch of a key to allow full screen edit 



128K or512K COCO 3 



$37.95 




Super I/O Board for OS-9 

Each Board Provides 2 Serial Ports and Centronics Parallel Port 

First Board has Real Time Clock and Beeper... With Second Board up to 5 Users 

2 Serial Ports 



The serial ports are usable up to 19,200 Baud, and 
the parallel port is a true Centronics standard. 
Plug into your multi-pak. On CoCo 3, nmlti-pak 
must be upgraded. You will have a multi-user 
system with additional computers or terminals 
plugged into the serial ports. An OWL hard drive 
and 512K upgrade are stronelv recommended for 
multi-user systems. 

Intro Price... 

BOARD 2. ..$145. 



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CENTRONICS 
PARALLEL 
PORT 



P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 
- ORDER LINES (only) — 
(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 



Pro ven 

On the Razor's Edge of 



Basic and OS-9 Hard 
Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or 

Business Users 

Every hard drive which has been Because of many requests for a lower 

produced by OWL- WARE during the price system in kit form, we are now 

last 3 years is complete. A system con- selling a kit of all parts at a significant 

sistsof software, hard drive, controller, discount compared to our regular 

heavy-duty power supply, and LR Tech prices. We recommend this kit (or any 

Interface. There are no hidden costs for kits offered by any other supplier) only 

assembly or testing. When a drive sys- to those who have experience in 

tem is ordered, we fully assemble, test, electronic assembly and OS-9. 
and burn-in the system for 3 full days. 
This ensures dependability and op- 
timum performance. 




We have now been supplying CoCo 
hard drive systems and parts for more 
than 3 years. This is the longest history 
in the CoCo market of any system. 
Some other advertisers are stating that 
they have one of the most reliable sys- 
tems for the CoCo with all of 4 months 
history in the CoCo hard drive market] 
We have reached our position in the 
hard drive market by providing our cus- 
tomers with a quality product that they 
(and we) can be proud to own and use. 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and 2 




OWL Hard Drive BASIC 3 

There have been several ads in this 
magazine about BASIC for Color 
Computer hard drive systems. These 
ads sometimes only tell a part of the 
story. Our BASIC system price in- 
cludes assembly, testing, and 3-day 
burn-in period. We do not require a 
Multi-pak to operate. 

Our hard drive systems are fast, reli- 
able, and reasonable in price. This has 
been proven by hundreds of users over 
the past 3 years. We do not have to turn 
off error checking for speed. We 
achieve high speed BASIC from a uni- 
que indexing method. 

The table below will summarize some 
of the key points about our BASIC hard 
drive system and two other systems. We 
believe that we have the best BASIC in- 
terface for CoCo hard drives available. 



BASIC Hard Drive Systems 

Feature OWL B&B RGB 


Drive Portion 
Available 


Entire 


Entire(?) 


Entire 


User Sets 

BASIC/OS-9 

Partitions 


YES 


Yes 


No 


Add to Exist- 
ing OS-9 
Drive Without 
Reformat 


YES 


Yes(?) 


No 


Drives 0-3 
Hard/Floppy 


YES 


No 


Yes 


Built in Park 


YES 


No 


Yes 


Speed* 


FAST 


Fast 


Fast 



*A11 feature details are believed to be 
true at time of writing and are subject 
to change. We believe that our BASIC 
hard drives are the fastest due to our in- 
dexing method, but all three systems 
are fast. On ours all BASIC commands 
work including DSKINI, DSKI$, and 
DSKO$. 

Prices: Wigi^gthout Hard 

$35./$79. 





Technology 



the Color Computer Frontier 




Bonus! 
Special 
Bundled 
Software 
with any 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 






Floppy Drive Systems 

The Highest Quality for Service Now and for Years to 

Come 

Use our WHISPER DRIVE for the finest, quietist drive 

Drive 0 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $219. 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, 

cable, case, power supply, and manual 

Drive 1 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $129. 

New 3.5", 720K Drives for OS-9 with case & 

Power Supply $179. 

Drive 1 Systems have drive, case, power supply. (You may 
require optional cable and/or DOS chip to use) 

Special for 0/1 Combos (Drives 0,1,2,3) $315. 



HALF- HEIGHT DRIVE 



llllllliliiBiiiiiiii 

ilHMIl 





All drives are new and fully assembled. 
We ship only FULLY TESTED and 
CERTIFIED at these low prices. We 
use Fuji, YE Data, and other fine 
brands. No drives are used or surplus 
unless otherwise stated to you when 
you order. We appear to be the one of 
the few advertisers in Rainbow who 
can truly make this claim. We have 5 
years experience in the CoCo disk 
drive market! We are able to provide 
support when you have a problem. 



Drives 1 Year Warranty 



1-215-837-1917 



OWL WARE Software Bundle 



Disk Tutorial/Utilities/Games 
DISK TUTOR Ver 1.1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language 
program. This tutor takes you through 
your lessons and corrects your mistakes 
for a quick, painless disk drive introduc- 
tion. (This professionally written tutor 
is easily worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster 
disk access and allows the use of 
double-sided drives. Corrects a floating 
point number error on early CoCo sys- 
tems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs be- 
tween disks. A wild card option selects 
groups of programs to copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad 
sectors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is more than $125 
worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with 
cheap, non-professional "Public 
Domain" software which is being of- 
fered by others. All of this software is 
copyrighted and professional in quality. 
The tutor is unique with us and has 
helped thousands of new users learn 
their disk drive. • 

only $27.95 
(or even better) 
only $6.95 with 
any Disk Drive Purchase!! 

Our prices, include a. discount for cash 
but do not mcluae snipping. 

OWL-WARE has a liberal warranty policy. During the warran- 
ty period, all defective items will be repaired or replaced at our 
option at no cost to the buyer except for shipping costs. Call 
our tech number for return. Return of non-defective or un- 
authorized returns are subject to a service charge. 




1 BASIC Tra i ning 



16KECB H 



During our stroll through CoCo- 
land's BASIC, we can't fail to 
stumble over the statements 

used to create graphics. If we wander 
past them, we wistfully dream of creat- 
ing masterpieces. We visualize ourselves 
as the Rembrandts of the keyboard. 

As a newcomer to CoCo graphics, 
remember that if you fail to grasp some 
of the fine points of any tutorial pre- 
sented, work along anyway. You are 
certainly going to find interesting hints 
and techniques and say, "I didnt know 
that!" You can always set this issue of 
THE rainbow aside. After you have 
progressed further in mastering BASIC, 
you can pick it up and, fortified with 
more knowledge, tackle it at a later 
time. There is little in THE RAINBOW that 
becomes obsolete. 

For the umpteenth time, you are 
urged to guard the back issues with your 
life. You'll find them to be your prime 
source of reference material. So much 
for the unsolicited commercial! 

The subject for today is the DRAW 
statement, complete with our usual 
hands-on programming practice. To get 
the maximum utilization from DRAW, 
you are requested to purchase graph 
paper in an 8l4-by-ll-inch pad, with 
four squares to the inch (also known as 
quad-ruled paper). You will also find 
valuable a black and/ or red nylon- 
tipped pen that makes a heavy line. You 
will need these items later, when we 
really get warmed to our subject. 

Michelangelo made sketches, as you 
will — his modern day counterpart — 
at the CoCo easel. In the meantime, 
take a few deep breaths to relax you and 
fire up the computer. We will create a 
neat utility that you will enjoy using. 

Look at Listing 1. The secret is out 
— you are going to make graph paper 
on your CoCo. Key in the program lines 
as they are requested. Key in Line 10. 

If you are curious about why we must 
CLEAR 500, omit Line 5 for the moment. 
At some point, as we work through this 
tutorial together, you will get an Out of 
String Space error message. The solu- 
tion is to key in Line 5. 

Key in Line 50 until you reach the 
closing quote mark; press ENTER. Key 
in the "hold" line, Line 300. Press ENTER 
and the BREAK key, and list Line 50. 

Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 



A tutorial for the DRA W 
statement in producing 
CoCo graphics 



Creating a 
Utility 
Screen 

Worksheet 



By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Using the DRRN statement and Color 
C2 at grid coordinates horizontal 0 and 
vertical 0 on the Hi-Res screen, we use 
D10 to move ten spaces or units down 
on the vertical, (0,10). R240 proceeds to 
make a horizontal line from (0,10) to 
(240,10). We now have one line. This is 
half of our work-horse, D10R240. Since 
we want to place another horizontal line 
ten units below our first line, we use D10 
again to drop down to (240,20). We 
continue by using L240 to draw our 
second horizontal line to end at (0,20). 
This is the other half of our work-horse. 

Note that CoCo gave you a break and 
printed a continuous, zigzag line 
whether or not you closed Line 50 with 
a closing quotation mark. Make it a 
point to enclose any necessary informa- 
tion between quotation marks. You may 
not be so lucky the next time. Note also 
that the coordinates in parentheses can 
be ignored. They are for the inquisitive 
beginner who may want to use LINE 
statements. LINE can do a lot of things 
that DRRN does. Finally, you may have 
guessed how we expect to proceed. 

D10R240D10L240 was repeated 
again. You can see that using our com- 
plete work-horse makes for a long, 
boring program line that is subject to 
error and a pain in the neck to debug. 

Key in Line 20. We are going to put 



the first half of our work-horse into 
String fi$ and the other half into B$. 

Right away, the more astute beginner 
will wonder, "Why not put both of them 
into one string?" There are many ways 
to accomplish the mission, but this way 
is easier for the newcomer to grasp. 

We are going to use concatenation to 
finish our horizontal lines. Think of 
each string and its contents as a freight 
train boxcar. Each boxcar is coupled to 
the end of the train with the coupler *+.' 
fl$ creates the zig and B$ creates the zag. 

Key in and list only the E$ string in 
Line 40. The new string, E$, makes 
bigger boxcars. Look carefully and you 
will deduce that E$ is equal to the 
contents of Line 50 as it now stands. 
Hook up three E$ boxcars to Line 50 
so it looks exactly like the listing of Line 
50, and run. Isn't that easy? 

If that is the case, try this: type 
EDIT50 and press ENTER and the space 
bar until the cursor is under the first T).' 
Count the number of characters (28) to 
be deleted; type 28 D to remove them, 
and press ENTER to get out of the Edit 
mode. E$ replaces the components of 
the zigzag. Did you add an E$ boxcar? 

The horizontal lines are finished. 
What about those pesky vertical lines? 
Just as Rembrandt paints over other 
colors, so will we artists when we get 
around to the border. 

To create vertical lines, we use the 
same format. Key in Line 60 as far as 
the closing quote mark, and press 
ENTER. The zigzag will progress from 
left to right. Run the line and look it 
over! Can you conceptualize it? If not, 
put a REM at the beginning of Line 50 
and run it, then take out the REM. Can 
you figure out why the color of the 
vertical zigzag is different? In masking 
Line 50, we hid Color C2, and default 
Color C4 was used. 

Key in Line 30. Note C$ is the first 
half of the work-horse R10D160, and D$ 
is the second half. 

Edit Line 40 to add the F$ boxcar that 
contains C$D$C$D$. Make sure you use 
a colon to separate the two giant box- 
cars, E$ and F$. 

Edit Line 60 to add five F$ boxcars. 
Compare it with the listing to make sure 
you are doing it right, and run it. We 
have a 240-by-160 sheet of graph paper. 
Each box is ten units wide and ten units 
long. 

We may as well add a nice border. Key 
in Line 70. Using Color C4 and begin- 
ning at (0,0), we make one continuous 



80 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



line to box it in. Run the line. For 
practice put a REM in front of Line 70, 
and using Line 71, create the same 
border with the LINE statement. If you 
have trouble getting the correct color, 
insert at the beginning of Line 71 
C0L0R4: or DRfiW"C4":. Either will 
work. 

If you get Line 71 correct, you can 
leave Line 70 masked and use Line 71, 
or you could mask Line 71 and unmask 
Line 70. It is a shame to kill such good 
work; it never hurts to save your work, 
even if it's hidden in REMs. 

Notice that lines 80 and 90 are 
masked with REMs. They are reference 
lines that break up the graph into 4-by- 
4 boxes. On occasion you will find them 
useful. 

Key in lines 80 and 90 without the 
REMs. You will note that they were 
composed using the same technique as 
in lines 50 and 60. 

Since each line is +10 units from the 
previous one, Line 95 is a test line. We 
put a dark dot at (20,20). Can you see 
it? Now you know where (20,20) is. 
Change Line 95 to some other coordi- 
nates, such as (60,60) or (100,150). Play 
around until you get bored. Remember, 
P5ET is a valuable command in graphic 
applications. For instance, it can be 
used to locate a spot inside a small area 
that you want to PAINT but have diffi- 
culty in picking up the PAINT coordi- 
nates. 

Delete Line 95. Make a REM Line 95, 
and type: 

95 'USE S4 IN DRRW STATEMENTS TO 
GET fl REALISTIC GRAPHIC SCREEN. 
EACH SQUARE IS 10 UNITS TO THE 
SIDE. 

96 'USE S40 NHEN YOU ARE USING IT 
AS A SCREEN WORK-SHEET WHICH WILL 
BE EQUIVALENT TO GRAPH PAPER. 
EACH SQUARE WILL BE ONE UNIT TO A 
SIDE. 



Mask or unmask lines 80 and 90 to 
suit yourself, and save a few copies on 
tape. You are the proud possessor of 
your own utility screen worksheet. 



"You are urged to 
guard the back 
issues with your life. 
¥ou*ll find them to 

be your prime 
source of reference 
material. ** 



Delete lines 95 and 96. We will use 
S40 so we have a graphic worksheet. 
You may want to enter a single direction 
at a time to see what is being created. 

Key in Line 100. Beginning at a point 
10 units to the right and 20 down, using 
Color C3, we go one unit in Direction 
E, then one space in Direction F. (You 
may use El, Fl, etc., instead of E, F, 
etc. Be professional and leave out the 
redundant 1). 

At Point (10,20), we drew a "pencil" 
line one space in Direction E, (20,10). 
Starting at this location, we went one 
space in Direction F, (30,20); one space 
in Direction G, (20,30); and linked to 
the first point, (10,20), using H. 

Stop at any time and make designs at 



other locations. Experiment! Satisfy 
your curiosity! 

Key in Line 110. A square one unit 
or space per side is created demonstrat- 
ing RDLU directions. 

Key in Line 115. There are many ways 
to duplicate this pattern. One way is 
demonstrated. If you wanted that pat- 
tern in exactly the same location, your 
initial starting point could be at any 
point on the pattern. If you wanted to 
begin at the upper left-hand corner, 
your line would read: 

DRAW''BM90,10RD2RULU2U'' 

Beginning at (110,30) in the lower 
left-hand corner, type: 

DRfiH // BMU0,30UL2URD2R" 

Key in Line 120. The initial point is 
(130,20). Type 121 PSET (130,20,2) 
and run. You can hardly make it out, 
but the left side is broken. That is the 
starting point. Study Line 120 to see 
how the square was created. 

You may ask, "Why don't you start 
in a corner?" In the real world, you may 
have to start at locations that are 
inconvenient in order to create a specific 
design. That's life! 

Delete Line 121, and key in Line 130. 
We demonstrate how to create a cross 
from a central point. We use N, a neat 
DRRW command that tells CoCo to draw 
a line X units long in a desired direction 
and, upon completion, to return to the 
point where the specific line originated. 
From (180,20), a line is drawn up and 
back to its origin using NU , ( 1B0 , 20 ) . 
From this point a line is drawn one unit 
to the right and back, NR; then one unit 
down and back up and finally one unit 
to the left, L. We didn't bother using NL 
because it didn't matter where we 
ended. We ended at (170,20). For prac- 



Lyra is the best music composition program you can buy for your CoCo and MIDI synthesizer. Write music with 8 parts, 
change volumes, tempo, and instruments anywhere in the score. Set synthesizer configurations or even upload new instrument 
patches from the score! Now includes LyraPrint which prints your music on a dot matrix printer (Epson, Gemini, Radio 
Shack, or OkiData 92). Comes with a cable to connect the CoCo to a MIDI synthesizer. Requires a disk drive and mouse. 
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September 1 988 THE RAINBOW 81 



tice, using L add G and using NL add G. 
Run the lines to compare them. 

Key in Line 140. This is double the 
size of the cross in Line 130. Note the 
last element, NR2, was used to make sure 
it ended at mid-point, (20,60). The end 
point is at (0,80). 

Key in Line 160 and run it. This is a 
reference point, around which some 
pattern will be drawn. A box two units 
per side will be drawn around it. 

Key in Line 170. We use the B com- 
mand to move to some point along 
which the line will pass. We could have 
chosen to begin at any one of eight 
points. In Line 170, we move one unit 
left without leaving a visible line, using 
0 (move but don't leave a line in direc- 
tion L, left one unit). At this point, 
(50,60), you could go up one unit and 
proceed clockwise or down one unit and 
go counter-clockwise. 

Key in Line 171. Using the reference 
point we determined in Line 160, an 
eight-cornered star one unit per side was 
diffused. 

Key in lines 180 through 186 to see 
the solution to a problem presented in 
a former article. The idea is to make the 
resultant shape in one continuous line, 
without lifting the pencil from the paper 
and not crossing any line. Remember, 
the screen is a substitute for a page of 
quad-ruled graph paper. To see the 
shape germinate, run the line, delete 
lines 181 through 186, and run again 
after entering each line separately. 

Key in and run Line 190. This is the 
reference point around which we will 
create a design. 



Key in and run Line 191. Around this 
central point, we will create a diamond 
two units per side. It was chosen to 
move in invisible units to the left, BL2, 
and create a design in a clockwise 
direction. 

Key in Line 192. We began at the 
reference location and picked up our 
point of departure by moving one 
invisible unit in Direction H. We went 
two units left, two units down and two 
units right, L2D2R2, ending at ( 1 10, 1 30). 

You've probably figured out that we 
are going to add that shape to all four 
points of the diamond. 

Key in Line 194 and run. Key in and 
run Line 195. We ended up at Point 
(110,110). From lines 192 to 196, we 
move without taking our imaginary 
pencil from the paper. 

Key in Line 196, beginning where we 
left off in Line 195. Look at the line in 
the listing to see how we created it and 
where we ended, (110,130). 

Continuing our design, we will make 
a diagonal three units long emanating 
outward, starting at the points where 
the four arms of the one unit X end. 

Key in Line 197. Beginning at 
(110,130), we made a line three units 
long in G direction and return to point 
of origin, (110,130), NG3. 

Key in Line 198. We made an invisible 
line two units up, BU2; using NH3, we 
made a line three units long in H direc- 
tion and returned to the initial point. 

Lines 199 and 200 complete the de- 
sign. Put them on, one at a time, and 
check them out. 

Now, for homework. If you have the 



guidelines in lines 80 and 90 set, mask 
them with REM. 

Remove the clutter. Type and run 
DEL100-190. How about that? 

Recall that we must use S40. We 
wiped it out! Type EDIT191, press 
ENTER and the space bar so that the 
cursor is under 'C Press I for insert 
mode and type 540; press ENTER. You 
got it! 

Change the location in lines 191 and 
192 so that the design is centered on the 
graph paper. After you center your 
objet d'art, determine where your final 
resting point is, or use your new central 
reference point to create enhancements 
to this design. If you prefer, copy this 
shape onto real graph paper. From 
either the listing or the screen, sketch 
something out, van Gogh! Using your 
new tool and program lines, transfer it 
to the screen. 

You can begin at any point you 
choose, go in any direction you like, 
skip around from area to area. This is 
where I use a heavy pen. After the 
sketch on real graph paper is finalized, 
go over the lines boldly with the heavy 
pen to accent the lines. It makes for easy 
counting of line lengths and directions. 

When you get something you like and 
figure you can't work your will any 
further, delete lines 20 through 90. Bye- 
bye, graph paper. Hello, design! Re- 
member, though, that it is not centered 
on the screen! If you want to truly center 
it, adjust it to center at (128,96). 

Save your new graphic tool. Next 
month we will continue to give Leo- 
nardo da Vinci a bit of competition. □ 



The listing: 


150 


DRAW"BM20, 60NH2NE2NF2G2 " 


0 1 GRAPHPAP 


160 


PSET(60,60,4) 


5 CLEAR500 


170 


DRAW"BM60 , 60BLUR2D2L2U" 


10 PMODE3,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 


171 


DRAW"BM60 , 60NLNHNUNENRNFNDG" 


20 A$="D10R240":B$="D10L240" 


180 


DRAW"BM10 , 110U2" 


30 C$="R10D160":D$="R10U160" 


181 


DRAW"EF" 


40 E$=A$+B$+A$+B$:F$=C$+D$+C$+D$ 


182 


DRAW"L2 " 


5j3 DRAW"C2BM0,0D10R240D10L240D10 


183 


DRAWFG" 


R240D10L240"+E$+E$+E$ 


184 


DRAWR2H" 


60 DRAW"BM0,0R10D160R10U160R10D1 


185 


DRAW'E" 


60R10U160 "+F$+F$+F$+F$+F$ 


186 


DRAW" D2 11 


7 0 DRAW" C4 BM0 , 0R2 40 D 1 60 L2 40U1 60 " 


190 


PSET(120 / 120 / 1) 


80 1 DRAW"C4BM0,40R240D40L240D40R 


191 


DRAW"C3BM120 / 120BL2E2F2G2H2" 


240D40L240" 


192 


DRAW "BM120, 120BHL2D2R2" 


90 ! DRAW"BM40,0D160R40U160R40D16 


193 


DRAW"D2R2U2 " 


0R40U160R40D160" 


194 


DRAW"R2U2L2 " 


95 PSET(20,20,4) 


195 


DRAW"U2L2D2" 


100 DRAW f, S40C3BM10 / 20EFGH ,, 


196 


DRAW"FNFNEG" 


110 DRAW"BM60, 20RDLU" 


197 


DRAW 11 NG 3 11 


115 DRAW"BM100,20ULDR2DLU" 


198 


DRAW"BU2NH3 " 


120 DRAW"BM130,20UR2D2L2U" 


199 


DRAW"BR2NE3" 


130 DRAW"BM180 , 20NUNRNDL" 


200 


DRAW"BD2F3" 


140 DRAW"BM220 / 20NU2ND2NL2NR2" 


300 


GOTO300 /R\ 



82 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 



Computer Island 




BEYOND WORDS 

32K Brt. - $19.95 tape/ $24 ,9 5 disk 
These Language Arts programs cover 
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program has three parts and con- 
tains- over 400 questions and use* 
over 800 words. All tests are grade 
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Lave) 3 Grades 9-12 




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Printer option. Specify Level. 
Level 1 Grades 3-5 
bavgl 2 8r&d05 fi-B. 
Level 3 Grades 9-13 



CONTEXT CLUES - 4 P 5. 6, 7 

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Each reading program contains 
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32K Bet '$1ftfi6 tape/$a4-9S disk 
A reading program wherein theohiid 
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TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 

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A step by step tutonal tor (earning to 
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3&K Ext. - S24.Q5 disk only 
A ml of programs designed to intro- 
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32K Ex(, - St 7.535 taps/SgZ.95 dish 
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RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Compute^ 





(718) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 
Please add $1 .00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds 



" U±ndow Waster" 

A Point & Click Uindow System 

for the rest of us fff 

Fully Compatible with ff.S. Dos 

Enhanced Basic, it does not need 

or use QS-3, and you don ' t have to 
be a Rocket Scientist or a PM.D, 
to use Windows, Pull Down Menus, 
Buttons, Icons, Edit fields or 
House Functions in your Programs* 



UUMlFkeys 



P 




Prwai Ke 



Delete Key 
Bisplay Keys 

Save Keys 
Load Keys 



r 



0P £ N;?CHR$ / aii ^ JL OlJL 



BUTTON 
OPEN 255,7 



ai t UTHimu cube (M 



GHI1EHU1 B AS 
CONFIG BAS 
CHECK BAS 
AUTOEXEC BAS 
CONFIG SYS 



DRIVE 1 

O B £ 

6 B 2 

0 B 1 
9 B 1 

1 A 1 



DRIVE 3 



U indent Master 
Finder VI. 9 

lirit ten by Bill Very on a 
Copyright Col 1388 by Cer-Comp Ltd 



Screen Display Fonts 



Window Master supports up to 54 different character sizes on 
the screen with 5 different character styles. You can have Bold, 
Italic, Underlined, Super-Script, Sub-script or Plain character 
styles or any combination of them in any character size. You 
can also change the text color and background at any time to get 
really colorful displays. 

Fully Basic Compatible 

Window Master is fully compatible with Enhanced Color 
Disk basic with over 50 Commands & functions added to fully 
support the Point & Click Window System. Window Master 
does not take any memory away from Basic, so you still have all 
the Basic Program memory available. 

Hi-Resolution Displays 

Window Master uses the full potential of the Color 
Computer 3 display by using the 225 vertical resolution display 
modes instead of the 192 or 200 resolution modes like most 
other programs. It uses either the 320/16 color mode or the 
640/4 color display to give you the best display resolution 
possible, and can be switched to either mode at any time. 



Window Master Features 

Multiple Windows 

Window Master supports multiple window displays with up to 
a maximum of 31 windows on the screen, Overlapping windows 
are supported, and any window can be made active or brought to 
the top of the screen. Windows can be picked up and moved 
anywhere on the screen with the mouse. There are 6 different 
Window styles to choose from and the window text, border and 
background color is selectable. 

Pull Down Menus 

Menus are completely programmable with up to 16 menus 
available. They can be added or deleted at any time in a 
program. Menu items can be enabled, disabled, checked or 
cleared easily under program control. Menu selection is 
automatically handled by Window Master & all you have to do 
is read a function variable to find out which menu was selected. 

Buttons, Icons & Edit Fields 

Each Window can have up to 128 buttons, Icons or Edit fields 
active, if you can fit that many. Buttons, Icons and Edit field 
selection is handled automatically by Window Master when the 
mouse is clicked on one. All you have to do is read a Dialog 
function to find out which Button, Icon, or Edit field was 
selected, its very simple. 

Mouse & Keyboard Functions 

Window Master automatically handles the Mouse pointer 
movement, display and button clicks. It will tell you the current 
screen coordinate, the local window coordinate, window number 
the mouse is in, the number of times the button was pressed, 
which window number it was clicked in and more. The 
Keyboard is completely buffered, and supports up to 80 
programmable Function keys that can contain any kind of 
information or command sequences you can imagine. You can 
load and save function key sets at any time. So, you can have 
special sets of function keys for different tasks. The "Ctrl" key is 
supported so that you have a full control code keyboard 
available. 



ur i i una 

CLEAR SCREEN 

SOTS 

BOX 

CIRCLE 

LINE 

QUIT 

LOAD 



SAVE 



IB, 1,60, 1,0,3,2,0 



UIHOOU GRAPH 



FOREGROUND 
COLOR 




DEHO 



fcPHICS DEHO ~ g 5 

IONS", "CLEAR SCR 
", "CIRCLE", "LINE 
OAD" , "SAVE" 



30 WINDOU OPEN 1,44,16,1,06,1,0, 
3,2,0, "UINDOU GRAPHICS DEMO" 
40 MU=1 : ' MY UINDOU #=1 
50 ON MENU GOSUB 540 
7& MENU ON 
86 PROTECT 3 

86 ON DIALOG GOSUB 630: DIALOG 0 
N 



BREAK 

OK 

RUN 



ENTER FILE TO SAVE 



GAVE FILE 



GFXTEST.PIC:£ 



Mixed Text & Graphics 



Window Master fully supports both Text & Graphics displays 
and even has a Graphics Pen that can be used with HLINE, 
HCIRCLE, HSETand more. You can change the Pen width & 
depth and turn it on or off with simple commands. We also 
added Enhanced Graphics Attributes that allow graphics 
statements to use And, Or, Xor and Copy modes to display 
graphic information. With the Graphics enhancements added 
by Window Master, you could write a "COCOMAX" type 
program in Basic! In fact we provide a small graphics demo 
program written in Basic. 



Event Processing 



Window Master adds a powerful new programming feature to 
Basic that enables you to do "Real Time" Programming in Basic. 
It's called Event Trapping, and it allows a program to detect and 
respond to certain "events" as they occur. You can trap Dialog 
activity, Time passage, Menu Selections, Keyboard activity and 
Mouse Activity with simple On Gosub statements, and when the 
specified event occurs, program control is automatically routed 
to the event handling routine, just like a Basic Gosub. After 
servicing the event, the sub-routine executes a Return statement 
and the program resumes execution at the statement where the 
event occured. 



Enhanced Editing Features 



Window Master adds an enhanced editor to Basic that allows 
you to see what you edit. It allows you to insert & delete by 
character or word, move left or right a word or character at a 
time, move to begin or end of line, toggle automatic insert 
on/off or just type over to replace characters. The editor can 
also recall the last line entered or edited with a single key stroke. 
You can even change the line number in line to copy it to a new 
location in the program. 



Window Master Applications 

Window Master pushs the Color Computer 3 far beyond its 
normal capabilities, into the world of a "User Friendly" 
operating enviornment. We are already planning several new 
programs for use with Window Master. So you don't have to 
worry about having to write all your own programs. And don't 
forget that many existing Basic and M.L. programs will run 
under Window Master with little or no changes. The 
Possibilities for Application programs are endless: Spread 
Sheets, Word Processing, Communications, Education, Games, 
Graphic Design, DeskTop Publishing and on and on. 

Hardware Requirements 

Window Master requires 512K of memory, at least 1 Disk 
Drive, a Hi-Res Joystick Interface and a Mouse or Joystick. 

Technical Assistance 

If you run into difficulty trying to use some of Window 
Master's features, we will be happy to assist you in any way 
possible. You can write to us at the address below or call us 
between 10am and 2pm Pacific Standard Time for a more timely 
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Ordering Information 

To order WINDOW MASTER by mail, send check or money 

order for $69.95, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the 
address below. To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD 

call us at (702)-452-O632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP Ltd. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702)-452-0632 



FILES jl | » ■ 




New 

Open 


rr r. ■ CAL 1 IIULft V i* U 

May 1988 


HON 


TUE 


UED 


THU 


FRI 


SAT 


■ III — — 1 


Save As . . . 

Init 

Quit 


a 


3 


4 


5 


& 




3 


1 © 


1 1 


i a 


1 3 


1 4 






1 5 


l & 




1 3 


1 3 


a & 


a l 


a a 


a 3 


a <* 




a & 


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3 @ 


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Call for availability of 128K version! 



BAS I Cally Sp e ak i ng 



] 



This issue marks the premiere 
monthly technical column just for 
BASIC hackers. If you are working on 
a BASIC program that has you 
[stumped, write in to Bill for a fix. He 
cm help solve your programming 




problems^ 



Easy Erasure 

D^r Bill: 

I know this may sound simple, but 
I'm stumped. I'm writing a graphics 
program that has pictures as well as text 
on the screen. I have no trouble erasing 
the text when I need to. I just redraw 
it in the background color to make it 
disappear. My trouble comes when I 
want to remove larger items from the 
screen. Drawing them again would take 
up too much time and memory. How 
can I accomplish this and still keep the 
number of lines to a minimum? 

Keith Steffen 
Boise, ID 

Dear Keith: 

As a matter of fact, this very question 
used to puzzle me. Until I did some 
research and experimenting, I used to 
erase my pictures by using the LINE 
command, drawing lines back and forth 
across the picture in the background 
color. Needless to say, this took more 
time and memory than I wanted to 
spend. Here's how I solved it. 

Let's suppose my picture, in this case 
a picture of a car and two circles, is 
drawn (with DRAW) at Coordinate 
50,125 and is about 125 pixels long by 
65 pixels high. Your first step is to form 
a box around the object you want 
erased. Using the LINE command, start 
at coordinates that are just a bit larger 
than the object. For example, you could 
begin your box at Coordinate 48,127 — 
which would put you two pixels to the 
left and two pixels below your picture. 
Next, end your box at Coordinate 
177,58, which would extend the box two 
pixels to the right and two pixels above 
your picture. Here's the syntax: 

LINE (48,127)- (177,58) ,P5ET,B 

Bill Bernico is the author of over 200 
Color Computer programs and is a 
frequent rainbow contributor whose 
hobbies include golf writing music and 
programming. Bill is a drummer in a 
rock band and lives in Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin. 



BASICally 





a k i n g 



By Bill Bernico 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The B at the end of your line will draw 
a box around your picture. While you 
still haven't erased the picture yet, at 
least now you know how big to make 
the box in order to completely surround 
it. Keep in mind you may not always 
know how big your picture is just by 
looking at it, so you may have to sur- 
round the object. Once you have the 
box the size you need, change the 
program line to read like this: 

L I NE ( 48 , 127 ) - ( 177 , 58 ) , PRESET , BF 

You will notice that P5ET was changed 
to PRESET and B was changed to BF. 
PRESET changes your box to the back- 
ground color, which makes it invisible. 
BF, or background fill, fills in that box 
with the background color almost as the 
PAINT command does. To get a better 
idea of what's really happening, leave 
the BF but change PRESET back to PSET 
and try it again. The object will be 
surrounded but will be filled in with the 
foreground color. Now do you see 
what's happening? The short program 
in Listing 1 will help demonstrate this 
process. 

Debugging Demo 

Dear Bill: 

I typed in your English font program 
from the May '88 issue f 4 Ye Olde Font, " 
Page 36]. It's a neat concept and I 



wanted to try my own version but I can 't 
get it to work. I keep getting an FC 
Error when I try to run it. Can you tell 
me what I'm doing wrong? I've enclosed 
a printout for you to examine. Thanks 
for your help. 

Ricky Geason 
Los Alamos, NM 

Dear Ricky: 

I looked over your listing and found 
that you have the steps in the right 
order. The three steps, as you know, are 
to define the contents of A$ (or what you 
want the message to say), to define 
where that message will appear on the 
screen by including the DRAW statement 
with horizontal and vertical coordinates 
— so far, so good — and to BOSUB to 
the routine that does the actual drawing 
of the letters on the graphics screen. 

Since you did those steps correctly, I 
have to assume that what you are trying 
to draw is incorrectly defined. In Listing 
2, I have included a segment of your 
program as written. 

If you will look at your listing once 
more, you will see that in Line 350 you 
defined A$(65), the ASCII symbol for 
a capital A, so that it will draw off the 
screen, creating that FC (function call) 
Error. You probably meant to type in 
"U8R4D8U4L4D4BR8". Instead, you 
inadvertently entered "U800R4D8U4L 
4D4BRB". 

It's an easy enough mistake to make. 
But when you got to Part 3, the GOSUB, 
that routine told the program to go to 
DRAW Coordinate 10,10 and start draw- 
ing up 800 pixels. Since you were al- 
ready at a vertical coordinate of 10, 
drawing up 800 pixels put you off the 
top of the screen, causing the FC Error 
in Line 700. 

So, you see, the error message doesn't 
always point to the line with the actual 
error. It stopped on Line 700 because 
that's where the drawing was taking 
place. Let's look at Line 700 and see just 
how it's done. Maybe it will help you to 
understand the procedure a little better. 

Line 700 starts by making a FOR- 
NEXT loop to scan the entire contents of 
A$ by checking the length (LEN). Each 
character is temporarily stored in the 
Variable X. Next, the MID$ function 
checks A$ for each of the values stored 
in X and assigns it to Variable Y. The 
third step is to do the actual drawing of 
A$(Y), which contains each character 
within the original A$. The FOR -NEXT 
loop is continued until all characters in 



86 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



fl$ are checked, assigned and drawn before it returns to see 
if another line containing fi$ has been defined. 

A good way to find which line has the error is to modify 
Line 610. The easiest way would be to shorten fi$ by one 
character at a time. For example, have R$ contain the letters 
A through F and try it. If there's still an error, try A through 
E, A through D, A through C, and so on until the error no 
longer shows up. When that happens, you'll know that the 
last character you omitted from R$ was the troublemaker and 
can easily modify that particular line. 

The debugging procedure can even get to be fun after a 
while. You may discover through trial and error new and 
exciting ways of doing what used to be bothersome. □ 



Listing 1: 

lj3 PM0DE4,1:PCLS1:SCREEN1, l:COLO 
110,1 

20 CIRCLE(20,20) ,15 

30 CIRCLE (200, 170) ,15 

40 DRAW M BM50,125R20U10R20D10R45U 

10R20D10R20U35L30U30L75D30L20D35 

50 PAINT(55,115) ,0,0 

60 FOR X=l TO 2000:NEXT X 

70 LINE(48, 127)-(177, 58) , PRESET, 

BF 

80 DRAW"BM70,80U2L4D8R4U3L2BD3BR 
6U8R4D8L4BR7U8D2F4U6D8BR3NR4U4NR 
3U4R4 

90 GOTO 90 



Listing 2: 

10 DIMA$(90) :PMODE4,l:PCLSl:SCRE 
EN1 , 1 : COLOR0 , 1 
20 ' . . . 
30 «... 
40 1 . • . 

350 A$(65)=»U8R4D8U4L4D4BR8 

3 60 A$ ( 6 6 ) = "U8 R3 FD2GNL3 FD2 GL3 BR8 

370 A$(67)="BUU6ER2FBD6GL2BR7 

380 A$(68)="U8R3FD6GL3BR8 

390 A$(69)="NR4U4NR3U4R4BD8BR4 

400 A$(70)="U4NR3U4R4BD8BR4 

410 f ... 

420 ■ . • . 

430 1 . . . 

610 A$="ABCDEF" : DRAW"BM10 , 10" : GO 

SUB700 

620 1 ... 

630 1 . . . 

640 GOTO 640 

700 FOR X=l TO LEN(A$) :Y=ASC(MID 
$ (A$ , X, 1) ) : DRAW A$(Y) :NEXT:RETUR 
N 

Q ucstic.is a bout specific b ask pro, ramming problems 
can be addressed to BASICally Speaking, the R^iNBOWi 
P.O. Box 385, Prospect KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only questibiis of general 
interest and to edit for brevity and clarity. We are unable 
to answer letters individually. 



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September 1988 THE RAINBOW 87 



CoCo Consultations 



y this and in future 
M "CoCo C&timl^dns,* 1 

JL m %/ I will be trying some- 
thing new. In addition to the 
familiar Q & A column, I will also 
include tidbits of information 
contributed by various folks and, 
in some cases, comment on the 
information. Thus, even if you 
don't have a question, I invite you 
to send in any little hints or de- 
scriptions of experiences you have 
had with the CoCo that you think 
might be of interest to the Co Co- 
owning public in general. 




o 



A Fix for the TW-80 

I noticed that the TW-80 won 't load 
anything other than ASCII text files. 
That is, it won't load an ASCII BASIC 
program. Here's the fix: Take a backup 
copy of your configured TW-80 disk, 
typt L OR DM "DISK MENU " and press 
ENTER. Now type PRINT HEX- 
$(PEEK(&H2285) ) and press ENTER. 
You should get the number 27. Type 
PRINT HEX$(PEEK(&H243D) ) and 
press ENTER. You should get back the 
number 26. If you do not get back those 
numbers, you have a different version 
of TW-80 and should stop here. If you 
do get back those numbers, then type 
the following, pressing enter after each 
line: 

POKE &H2285, &H20 
POKE &H24SD, &H21 
SRVEM"DISKMENU'\ &H2000, 
&H3818.&H2000 

This should fix the problem. 

Mike Ward 

(M1KEWARD) 

Mikeyterm author 
Coral Gables, FL 



Martin H Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 




CONSULTATIONS 



By Marty Goodman 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Printer Hookup 

How does one hook a printer that has 
only a parallel C Centronics") port to a 
Color Computer? 

Edward Jr. Rosi, Jr. 
Lake Park, FL 

Color Computers normally hook to 
printers via their serial ports. Thus, to 
hook up a parallel printer, you need to 
purchase a Serial-to-Parallel Converter. 
Several companies advertise such de- 
vices in RAINBOW. They tend to cost 
about $50 with cables. If you are in an 
area that features computer swap meets, 
you may be able to get a deal on a high- 
quality Microfazer or other brand of 
converter that has a built-in printer 
buffer as well. Note that some of the less 
expensive converters often have prob- 
lems operating properly at the higher 
(4800 and 9600) baud rates. 

OS-9 users have another option. 
They can purchase a Disto parallel 
printer adapter device or a Disk Con- 
troller from J&M that has such a port 
built in. This port can then be used 
under OS-9 with supplied driver soft- 
ware. Unfortunately, it is far harder to 
use any of those ports with programs 
that run under Radio Shack Disk 

BASIC. 



Showing the Colors 

I have an RGB monitor that cannot 
show most of the CoCo 3's colors. It is 
the kind that has not only R, G and B 
inputs, but an I (intensity) input as well. 
How can I get it to show more colors 
on my CoCo 3? 

Rick Weshenfelder 
Pell Lake, WI 

I'm afraid your monitor is one of the 
many that provide only for RGB 
digital-type (IBM CGA standard) 
input, not the analog capability re- 
quired by the CoCo 3. There is no way 
to modify the CoCo 3 to make this 
monitor show more than the six colors 
plus black and white you are getting 
now. If you have a schematic for the 
monitor and a moderate understanding 
of video circuitry, it should be relatively 
easy to modify the monitor internally to 
provide it with an RGB analog input. 
Usually this involves removing the 
digital input circuitry and feeding the R, 
G and B signals directly into the bases 
of the transistors at the start of the 
analog RGB part of the monitor's 
insides. Sometimes some amount of 
biasing of the input signals is needed, 
too. However, I fear if you have to ask 
how to do it, you'd better not even try. 
Unless you're a fearless and knowledge- 
able electronics hacker, your only alter- 
native is to buy another monitor that 
comes with RGB analog input capabil- 
ities. 

Monitoring the CoCo 3 

Will a Thompson 4120 RGB monitor 
work properly with a CoCo 3? 

Bob Zukerman 

(ELVIS2) 

Jackson Heights, NY 

The Thompson model 4120 monitor 
will accept analog RGB signals and will 
work properly with a CoCo 3 once you 
make up the proper custom video cable 
for it. The monitor also accepts 
composite video inputs, allowing you to 
view games in PMDDE4 artifact colors — 
a nice plus. It also has the option of 
working with an IBM CGA-type video 
signal (digital RGB I-type video). Thus, 
it is a nice, flexible monitor. 

On the negative side, its screen reso- 
lution is limited by a dot width of .51 
mm. This is a bit coarse and, in my 
opinion, not quite acceptable for de- 
cently sharp 80-column display. Note 



88 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 



that this is the same dot width as that 
used by Tandy's CM-8 monitor. The 
Thompson is excellent for displaying 
CoCo 3 graphics, but might be just a bit 
blurry when used to display 80-column 
text. Note also the Magnavox 8CM-515 
monitor that I — and many others — 
frequently recommend has all the input 
flexibility of the Thompson but features 
a dot width of .41 mm, which results in 
a visibly sharper, crisper display of 80- 
column text. Magnavox 8CM-515s are 
available from a lot of rainbow adver- 
tisers, too. So unless you're getting an 
exceptional deal on the Thompson, I'd 
suggest you get a Magnavox instead. 

Where's the Audio? 

Where inside a Co Co 2 do I grab line 
level audio? 

Roger Bouchard 
(HA RBI E) 
Montreal, Que. 

On all models of CoCo 2 you can find 
a line level audio signal on Pin 1 of the 
20-pin custom DAC chip (often labeled 
SC77526P). I recommend grabbing the 
signal there, feeding it through a 1000- 
ohm resistor to attenuate it a bit and 
protect the CoCo sound circuit, then 
running a .022-mfd capacitor to ground 
from the other side of that resistor to act 
as a filter to reduce high-frequency hiss. 

Board Population 

Will it do any harm if I populate a 
CoCo 5 12 K board with 15 120-ns NEC 
brand 41256 memory chips and one 
150-ns NEC memory chip? 

Aaron Wadkins 
Kernersville, NC 

I doubt you'll have any problem. 
Note that the speed rating on the chip 
specifies the minimum access time the 
chip will work. at. The CoCo 3, in 
theory, demands chips that work at 
around 140-ns access time, but due to 
other, more subtle aspects of the timing 
in NEC chips, even those rated at 150- 
ns access time tend to work quite well 
in CoCo 3 memory upgrade boards. 

Pin Compatibility 

Is it true that the latest Radio Shack 
FD502 disk controllers now are using 
28-pin ROMs that are pin-for-pin com- 
patible with 2764-type EPROMs? 

Art Flexser 

(ARTFLEXSER) 

ADOS author 

It's true! It's true! 



Beware of Cats Drinking Coffee! 

I own a CoCo 3-type keyboard made 
by Tandy on which my cat spilled 
coffee. Now most of the keys no longer 
work. I tried to rinse it with alcohol, but 
this did not fix the problem. Can you 
save me the $30 that a new keyboard 
costs with any advice? 

John Gordon 
(TICTOC) 
Woodside t NY 

To have any chance of fixing that 
keyboard, you must open it up com- 
pletely. This is a tedious matter, involv- 
ing the removal of a couple of dozen 
tiny screws that hold the back metal 
plate on. Then you must very carefully 
remove the mylar sheet that constitutes 
the keyboard circuitry. Gently unfold 
this sheet, and clean it by soaking it in 
lukewarm water that has a small 
amount of liquid dishwashing detergent 
in it. Then rinse it off thoroughly with 
lukewarm water. Be careful not to scrub 
it, since that can remove the irreplace- 
able, flexible circuit material printed on 
the mylar. This approach allows the 
water to get to the area between the 
folds in the mylar, which is the critical 
contact area. It is possible that gentle 
wiping of the inner surfaces of the mylar 
and the printed circuit material on that 
mylar will help, but I'd again be very 
careful not to rub that printed circuit 
material off. Alcohol will not hurt the 
mylar, but be sure not to use acetone! 
Frankly, though, for coffee (and sugar 
and cream?), just plain detergent and 
water is probably best. 

By the way, your question reminds 
me of one of the best and oldest Com- 
puter Repairperson jokes I've ever 
heard: "It says in the instructions for my 
computer that there is nothing I can 
enter into the keyboard that can harm 
the computer. The other day I entered 
a milkshake into the keyboard . . ." 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, the rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type ASK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 




TANDY COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000-HX 256K 1 Drive 535.00 

Tandy 1000-TX 640K 1 Drive 860.00 

Tandy 3000-HL 51 2K 1 Drive 1090.00 

Tandy 3000 640K 1 Drive 1475.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Meg 1 Drive 1890.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 1 Drive 4250.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 40 Meg 5525.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 84 Meg 5950.00 

Tandy 1 400LT 768 K 2 Drives 1 285.00 

Tandy 102 24K 430.00 

Tandy Color 3 128K 155.00 

MONITORS & BOARDS 

VM-4 Monochrome Green 95.00 

VM-5 Monochrome Green 115.00 

CM-5 Color RGB 220.00 

CM-1 1 Color RGB 335.00 

EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 510.00 

VGM-1 00 Monochrome Analog 169.00 

VGM-200 Color Analog 425.00 

VGM-300 Color Analog 535.00 

Tandy Dual Display Card 145.00 

Tandy EGA Card 185.00 

Paradise Basic EGA Card 135.00 

Zucker Mono Graphics Card 75.00 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 225.00 

5 1/4" External Drive 1000EX 180.00 

3 1/2" External Drive 1000EX 200.00 

Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 509.00 

Tandy 40 Meg Hardcard 679.00 

Zycker 30 Meg Hardcard 435.00 

Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 265.00 

Tandy 1000/SX7TX Controller 80.00 

ZUCKER BOARDS 

Zucker Serial Board 45.00 

Zucker OK Memory Board 1000 47.00 

Zucker MFB OK for 1000 106.00 
Zucker 1200 Baud Modem Card 75.00 

PRINTERS 

DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 165.00 

DMP-1 32 Dot-Matrix 285.00 

DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 349.00 

Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 205.00 

Epson FX-850 Dot-Matrix 375.00 

Epson FX-1050 Dot-Matrix 540.00 

Epson LQ-500 Dot-Matrix 375.00 

Epson LQ-850 Dot-Matrix 579.00 

Please write for complete price list. 
We carry more items than listed here. 



All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Adver- 
tised prices are cash prices. CO D accepted add 2% (minimum charge 
$1 0.00). M.C.. Visa add 2<Vb. All non detective items require return 
merchandise authorization. Call for RMA Number before returning. 
Delivery is subject to product availability. Add for shipping and 
handling, $5.00 minimum charge. 

TM - Registered Trademark of Tandy, Epson, and IBM 
Monday thru Friday 9am - 5pm EST. 

□□□□□ 

□ □□□□ 
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124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



p 


EH 


in 


19 


1 







September 1988 THE RAINBOW 89 



For Tandy 1000, SX, TX 




1000, SX, TX 



Hard Drive 
Kits 





10 Meg 
20 Meg 
30 Meg 
40 Meg 



$279.95 
$339.95 
$379.95 
$499.95 



1000, SX, TX 



Cards 

300/1200 Modem $119.95 



300/1200/2400 
Modem 

Mini IO 

2 Meg Board 



$149.95 
$79.95 
$169.95 



Tandy 3000 & 3000HL 

Hard Drive Kits 

Includes Drive, Controller & Cable 



20 Meg 
30 Meg 
40 Meg 
80 Meg 



$399.95 
$599.95 
$699.95 
$999.95 



1000, SX, TX 




TANDY 

^ 1000, SX, TX 
49 Meg Hard Card 
32 MS (speed) 

$599.95 



TANDY 1000 

1000, SX, TX, 3000, 4000 



2nd Floppy 



360K 
720K 

3V 2 " 



TEAC $119.95 

If 

Mitsubishi $99.95 

Mitsubishi $119.95 




Tandy Model 3, 4, 4P 

Hard Drive Systems 

External 
Complete - ready to run 

10 Meg $499.95 
20 Meg $699.95 



1000, SX, TX 




Rodime 




NEW 

Cardinal 
Modems 

2400 Baud 300/ 1200/2400 
(Hayes Compatible) 

Complete with software manuals 

only $149.95 



1000, 1000A 



Memory Cards 

Zucker Memory 

• DMA&512K CALL 

Zucker Multifunction 

• Serial 

• Real Time Clock 

• 512K DMA pAI I 

• Software OMI_l_ 




Tandy 1000, 

1000SX, 
3000 & 3000HL 

Tape Backup 



20, 30, 40 Meg 
Tape Backup 

60 Meg Tape Backup 
Archive 



$399.95 



$659.95 



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Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



1 W is hing Weti 



If you have an idea for the fi Wishing 
Well/' submit it to Fred c/o the 
rainbow. Remember, keep your 
ideas specific, and don 't forget this is 
BASIC. All programs resulting from 
your wishes are f®K your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 

Last month I introduced a lengthy 
BASIC listing called Opposites, 
which was designed to teach 
some basic vocabulary words and oppo- 
site concepts to younger, elementary- 
aged students. For months I have been 
promising you a real game, so this 
month we will incorporate the best 
features of last month's educational 
program with all the real elements of a 
game the whole family, ages 6 to 60, can 
play. The game is called Match Game 
of Opposites. 

The Purpose 

As you may recall, last month's pro- 
gram was designed to train younger 
students how to associate certain oppo- 
site concepts with pictures illustrating 
the action or object. When it came to 
the quiz part, however, the user needed 
only to match from three choices on the 
screen. In many cases this is easy, since 
the student might just match pictures. 
With repeated use the student eventu- 
ally learns the words as well. 

This new game, however, is designed 
to take those skills one step further, 
since up to 16 possible choices exist on 
the screen at one time. There is even an 
option that blocks out the graphics, so 
the student must play the game knowing 
only the words. In other words, even 
though this game can be played just for 
fun by all ages, it provides an educa- 
tional value using the skills covered last 
month. 

Playing the Game 

You all remember the TV game show, 
Concentration. This game works on the 
same principle. There are 16 boxes on 

Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 

92 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



A Concentration-like 
game for the entire 

family, based on last 
month's program, 
Opposites 

Opposite 
Attraction 

By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



the screen. Two players are required for 
the game. Each takes a turn uncovering 
two boxes. If a match is discovered, the 
two boxes will be awarded to that 
player. The trick in this game, much like 
the TV show, is to remember where you 
saw a certain picture or word on the 
screen. 

Unlike the TV show, however, you 
are not looking for identical matches. 
Instead, you are looking for opposites. 
Also, the TV show gives you another try 
if you get a match. This I have changed. 
Since there are only eight possible 
matches, a really lucky player might 
clear the board before the other player 
gets many tries. This ensures that the 
final score is not a total wipeout. (Since 
the last player gets the last match, even 
a loser scores some points. This is 
important when working with young 
students who might be upset at a wipe- 
out.) 

A flashing box surrounds each 
square. You may move the box with the 
arrow keys to make your selection. 
Pressing enter selects a box, and each 
player selects two. The boxes are then 
revealed. If a match occurs, they are 
awarded to the player (1 or 2). You may 
continue with game play by pressing the 
space bar. 

When the screen is clear, pressing the 
space bar gives you the final score. 

Since there are over 40 graphics in the 
program (the same as last month's), and 
only 16 are shown at one time, the game 



is never the same twice. There is enough 
of an assortment to keep it interesting. 

That's all there is to it. As I men- 
tioned, even adults will enjoy this game. 
Its greatest value is in the fact that an 
adult can play against a child. This 
offers one more opportunity for parent- 
child interaction, which is so valuable 
today. 

« 

Saving Some Time 

If you typed in last month's program 
{Opposite Concepts Vol 7), you may 
use some of the data from that program 
to save yourself some typing time. 
Here's what you do: 

1. Load in last month's program. 

2. Type DEL 0-390 and press 
ENTER. 

3. Type DEL 795- and press ENTER. 

4. Delete lines: 400 500 600 700 

410 510 610 710 
420 520 620 720 
430 530 630 730 
440 540 640 740 
450 550 650 750 
460 560 660 760 
470 570 670 770 
480 580 680 780 
490 590 690 790 

(These are data lines containing 
information we do not need in this 
program. Simply type DEL followed 
by the line number and press ENTER 
to delete it.) 

5. Type RENUM 110 , 395 , 0 and press 
ENTER. This will renumber the lines 
to match the new program. 

6. Important! Retype lines 190 and 
195 as they appear in the new listing. 

You are now ready to type in the rest 
of the program. This will save you some 
time if you went to the trouble of typing 
in last month's longer listing rather than 
buying rainbow on tape or disk. 

Be sure to save this program with a 
different filename than last month's 
program, especially if you are using a 
disk. 

An Error? 

Since these DfiTfl lines are quite long, 
if you are receiving this program on 
rainbow on tape or disk and resave 
the file in ASCII, be sure to check Line 
165 [It's packed!]. Some of it may get 
chopped off in loading. The end of Line 
165 should be R12, not Rl. You may edit 



the correction into the line if it is 
missing. (This quirk only occurs if you 
resave the file in ASCII.) You may also 
need to make the same change in Line 
505 in last month's program. This 
prevents the letter T in the word RIGHT 
from being chopped off. 

If you are typing in the listing, you 
will notice that the cursor freezes before 
you reach the end of this "packed" line. 



At this point, go ahead and press 
ENTER. Then type EDIT 165 and press 
X for extend. Type in the last few 
characters and press ENTER. [This tech- 
nique of packing lines is not recom- 
mended, however.] 

Conclusion 

I think you will enjoy this game. Even 



if you do not have youngsters, you will 
find that the game can be a great deal 
of fun, especially if you try it without 
the graphics clues. (Then it is really 
tough!) 

Next month we will continue with 
another installment in this series: a 
tutorial on using the MERGE command 
with our listings. Until then, keep your 
ideas coming in. □ 




40 36 

90 180 

135 62 

160 159 

190 135 

210 105 

235 42 



260 191 

290 92 

335 96 

415 13 

500 209 

570 70 

END 213 



The listing: MfiTCH 

1 REM*************************** 

2 REM* MATCH GAME OF OPPOSITES * 

3 REM* COPYRIGHT (C) 1988 * 

4 REM* BY FRED B. SCERBO * 

5 REM* 60 HARDING AVENUE * 

6 REM* NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 * 



INC- 



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7 REM*************************** 

8 PCLEAR8 

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15 DATA46,46,42,46, 44, 42,46,46,4 
2,46,45,3 6,4 2,37,40,101,108,108, 
1J31, 108 , 109 , 101, 109 , 109 , 101, 108 , 
108,53,60,58,48,48 

20 DATA42, 42 ,42,43,35,42, ,42, ,42 
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"I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now, it's time to 
give BASIC a shot in the arm, with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your 
choice, with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned Info an ERROM fhaf plugs 
into the Disk BASIC ROM socket or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S 15-20; we provide information concerning how you can 
have this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35, 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC programs, auto-edit of error line, and 
many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/67 

Disk . , . $34.95 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 . . . $27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 

Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid for the expert. 
CoCo 1, 2, or 3 compatible. 

Disk . . . $23.95 Assembler source listing . , . Add $3.00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

Magnavox8CM515/8CM505/8CM643 . , 



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SPECTROSY^EMS^Ovrr- We aios 

Z. x Miami. Florida 33176 

{305} 274-3899Day or Eve 
No delay on personal checks • Please add $2.00 shipping* Sorry, no credit cards or COD's. 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 93 



3j3 DATA40, ,40, 40, ,40,36,44, ,44,4 
4 , 36 , 40 , 36 , 4)3 , 100 , 108 , 108 , 100 , , 1 
00,100, ,100,100,108,108, , , ,56, 
35 DATA126, 124, 124, 125, 117, 124,1 
24 , 122 , 126 , 124 , 125 , 117 , 124 , 124 , 1 
25 , 117 , 124 , 124 , 124 , 116 , 126 , 117 , 1 
24,126,125,117,124,124,117,124,1 
24,124 

40 DATA122 ,., ,117,117,115,115,122 
,123,115,119,117, , ,117,117,115,1 
15,115, ,122, , ,122, ,117,115,114,1 
17,115,115,115 

45 DATA122 , , , 117 , 117 , , , , 122 , , , 11 
7 , , , 117 , , , , 117 , , 122 , , , 122 , , 117 , , 
, , , , 117 

50 DATA124,124,124,124,116, , ,32, 
120, , ,116,124,124,124,116,124,12 
4,124,116,124, ,116,124, ,116,124, 
124,116,124,124,124 
55 PRINT@422," BY FRED B.SCERBO 
" ; :PRINT@454," COPYRIGHT (C) 1 
988 "; :PRINT@486, " GRAPHICS (Y O 
R N)? 

60 X$=INKEY$ : X=RND (-TIMER) :IFX$= 
" "THEN60 

65 IFX$="Y"THEN GR=1:GOTO80 
70 IFX$="N"THEN GR=0:GOTO80 
75 GOTO60 

80 DIM SC(2) ,M(2) ,HH(2) ,W(2) ,H( 
4) ,V(4) ,K$(4,4),K(4,4,2) ,P$(40) , 
P(16) ,B$(20) ,C$(20) ,A(20) ,N(40) , 
B(4) ,C(4) ,D(4) ,E(4) ,F(4) ,AO(20) 
85 FORI=1TO40 :READP$ (I) :NEXT 
90 COLOR1,0:P$(16)=P$(15) :P$(15) 
=P$(15)+"BU28BR4F6NU16NE6U2NH4NE 
4BD38BL6NR10D4NR10D6BR18NU10BR8U 

10R10D4L10R4F6BR6R10U6L10U4R10BR 
6R6ND10R6" 

95 P$(16)=P$(16)+"BU24BR74F6NU16 

NE6U2NH4NE4BD44BL74NU10R8BR6U6NR 

10U4R10D10BR6R10U6L10U4R10BR6R6N 

D10R6" 

100 CLS0 

105 GOT0315 

110 DATA"BR60BD4F20L10D24L20U24L 
10E20BD52BL14D10R10U10BR8ND10R10 
D6L10" 

115 DATA"BR60BD4L10D24L10F20E20L 
10U24L10BD52BL32R4ND10R10D10L14B 
R2 0U10R10D10NL10BR6NU10R6NU8R6NU 
10BR6U10F10U10" 

120 DATA"BR16BD20R80M-4,+20L36M- 
4 , - 1 8 NL3 6 BR1 2 BU4 E 4UH4UE 4 BR10G4 DF 
4DG4BR10E4UH4UE4BD50BL50D10U6R10 
U4D10BR8U10R10D10NL10BR12U10L6R1 
2" 

125 DATA"BR60BD20L4ND6L6ND2L4ND4 
L2M+16 , +32M+16 , -32L16R4ND8R6ND4R 
6L2U4H2U2H2L2H2L12G2L2G2D2G2D4BD 
3 6BL10L10D10R10BR8U10R10D10NL10B 
R8NU10R10BR6R14U10L14R4D10" 



130 DATA"BR10BD14R26F4D16G4L22NU 
24D24L4R2 6E4U16H4BR12U24NL4NR4D4 
8NL4R4BR10H4U40E4R16F4D10BD10NL1 
6D20G4L14BR24R4U30R4U10R2U10E2U6 
RD6F2D10R2D10R4D30R4L22BR8BU2U24 
BR4D24" 

135 DATA" BR38BD56D8R4BR4U8BR4R2N 
D8R2BR4R2ND8R2BR4D8R4BR4NR4U4NR4 
U4 NR4 BU6 BL6H4 L4U 2NR4 D2 L4 NUND4 L4U 
2L4D2R4NH6L2G4" 

140 DATA"BR24BD3 6E12G6F20R20E20F 
6H12BL14H2G4L4H4G2BU10BL4NU4L2U6 
E4R2BR2 6L2G4D6L2U4BD56BL4 6U10D4R 
10U4D10BR6U10NR10D4R10U4D10BR6U1 
0R10D4L10D6BR16U10R10D4L10BR18BD 
6U6NH4NE4" 

145 DATA"BR34BD50H12F6E12R3 6F12G 

6E12BU16BL28H2G4L4H4G2BU10BL4NU4 

L2U6E4R2BR2 6L2G4D6L2U4BD58BL34R1 

0U6L10U4R10BR6NR10D4NR10D6BR10NU 

10BR6R4U10L4R14D10L10" 

150 DATA"BR20BD22D20M+30,+10NU20 

R50U20NL50M-30,-10ND8L50M+30,+10 

M-30,-10E20R50G20L10NE20L10NE20L 

10NE20L10NE20BD34BR6NR10D10R10NU 

10BR6U10R6D4L6D6BR12NR6U6NR6U4R6 

BR6ND10F10U10" 

155 DATA"BR12BD16D20M+30,+10NU20 
R60U20NL60M-30,-10L60M+30,+10R12 
M-30 , -10R12M+30 , +10R12M-30 , -10R1 
2M+30 , +10BD40BL78NR10U10R10BD10B 
R6NU10R8BR6U10R10D10NL10BR6R10U6 
L10U4R10BR6NR6D4NR6D6R6BR6R4NU10 
R10U10L14" 

160 DATA"BR90BD52U2E8U32H4L4G2D1 
0F2R4E4BL12U12H4L4G4D12F4R4E4BL1 
2U12H4L4G4D12F4R4E4BL12U12H4L4G4 
D12F4R4E4BL12D2G4L4M-10 , -6M-10 , - 
2L2G4D4M+8 , +4D2M+20 , +12F10M+6 , +2 
F2BE10H10M-8 , -3BD36BL20NU10R10BR 
6NR8U6NR8U4R8BR6NR10D4NR10D6BR22 
U10L6R12" 

165 DATA"BR2 8BD52U2H8U32E4R4F2D1 

0G2L4H4BR12U12E4R4F4D12G4L4H4BR1 

2U12E4R4F4D12G4L4H4BR12U12E4R4F4 

D12G4L4H4BR12D2F4R4M+10 , -6M+10 , - 

2R2F4D4M-8 ,+4D2M-20 , +12G14G2BH10 

E10M+8 , -3BD24BL40ND10R10D4L10R4F 

6BR6NU10BR6U10NR10D10R10U6NL4BR6 

NU4ND6R10U4D10BR10U10L6R12 " 

170 DATA"BR30BD6D34R4E2U10R12F4R 

12E4R12F4D12R10U20H8L18H4L4U8R12 

U4L28D4R12D8L4G4L12U8H2L4BM+60,+ 

40F4D4G2L4H2U4E4BL54BD10D10R6NU8 

R6NU10BR6NR8U6NR8U4R8BR6R6ND10R6 
it 

175 DATA"BR30BD6D34R4E2U10R12F4R 
12E4R12F4D12R10U20H8L18H4L4U8R12 
U4L28D4R12D8L4G4L12U8H2L4BD50BR8 
R4ND10R10D10NL14BR6U10R10D4L10R4 
F6BR10U6NH4E4 " 



94 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



18j3 DATA"BR10BD40Rl,02L8Elj3M-8 / +4 
L6U4H2L2G4R4D4F4L20E10M-8 , +4L6U4 
H2L2G4R4D4F4L20E10M-8 , +4L6U4H2L2 
G4R4D4F4L2J3E20M-16,+8L12U8H4L4G8 
R8BE4NLBG4D8F8" 
185 DATA BR 2 

19j3 DATA"BR56BD2 6M+18 , +5F8LH2L2G 
2H2L2G2H2L2G2H2L2G3D11GLNHREU11H 
3L2G2H2L2G2H2L2G2H2L2G2E8M+18 , -5 
BU10R1J8E4NH4R6E4U2H4L10G4L12NG4H 
6L8G4D6F4R6F4R4E2R2R6R4BR16NE6NR 
2j3NF6BD5j3BL5j3Ulj3Rlj3D10NL10BR6BU4 
NU6F4E4U6BR6NR10D4NR10D6Rlj3BR6Ul 
J3R8D4L6F6" 

195 DATA M BR56BD2M+18,+5F8LH2L2G2 

H2L2G2H2L2G2H2L2G3D9GLNHREU9H3L2 

G2H2L2G2H2L2G2H2L2G2E8M+18 , -5BD3 

6NE6NH6NG6NF6BR16NE6NF6R22BD28BL 

74NU10R10NUlj3BR6U10Flj3NUlj3BR6R4U 

lj3L4R14Dl^NLlj3BR6NRlj3U6NRlj3U4Rl)3 

BR6NDlpR8D4L8R2F6" 

2j3j3 DATA"BR16BD2J3E2NR80R16E8R6NG 

4R6NG4R6NG4R6NG4R6NG4R6NG4NG4R6N 

G4R6NG4R6NG4R6NG4F8D2G8NH4L6NH4L 

6NH4L6NH4L6NH4L6NH4L6NH4L6NH4L6N 

H4L6NH4L6H8L16NR8 J3BD4 6BR10NU10R8 

BR6NUlj3BR6U10Rlj3BD4NL4D6NL10BR6U 

6NU4Rlj3U4Dlj3BR12Ulj3L6R12 11 

205 DATA"BR2 6BD4 6R68M-14,-30L1J3U 



6H4L12G4D6L1J3M-14,+30BR18BU8U12B 

R6NR6D12R6NU12BR6U12R6D12NL6BR4N 

U6BR4NU6U4R4D4L4BU22BL14L4U4R4D4 

BD5j3BL3 6U10D4R10U4D10BR6NRlpU6NR 

10U4Rlj3BR6NDlj3Rlj3D4NL10D6BR6BU4N 

U6F4E4U6BR6F4ND6E4 » 

21)3 DATA"BR60BD48R8E4Ulj3R4U6L4U6 

H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D10F4R8BU6NE4NH4B 

U8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2 BR6R2BU16R6E2H2L 

2pG2F2R12BD2j3BL2j3H16D16F16R3 6E16 

U16G16BD34BL5J3U10R1J3BD4NL4D6NL1J3 

BR6Ulj3Rlj3D10NL10BR6U10R10Dlj3NLlj3 

BR6R4NRlj3U10L4R14Dlj3" 

215 DATA"BR6j3BD48R8E4Ulj3R4U6L4U6 

H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D1J3F4R8BU1J3NG4NF4 

BU4NLNR2 BU6 BL4NR2 BR6R2 BU12E6D8L2 

0U8F6BL20D6G4L6NU10ND20L6H4U6BR7 

8NG4NF4D2j3G10BD2j3BL48Ulj3R10D4NLl 

0D6NLlj3BR6U6NR10U4Rlj3D10BR6R4NRl 

0U1J3L4R14D10" 

22j3 DATA ll BR20BD16D3j3NR56U30R6U16 

Rlj3F4G4Llj3D8Rlj3D6Rlj3D6Rlj3D6R10D6 

R1J3D6R26BU42BL30L2J3NE4NF4BD52BL2 

^Dlj3U6Rli3U4DlpBR8NUlpBR8NRlj2IUlj3R 

10BD4NL4D6BR6U10D4R10U4Dlj3" 

225 DATA" BR20BD16D3j3NR56U3j3R16D6 

Rlj3D6Rlj3D6RlpD6Rlj3D6R2 6L16U16Rlj3 

F4G4L10D8BU2 6BR6NU16NH4NE4BD46BL 

5j3NUlj3R8BR6U10R10D10NL10BR6NU10R 



VIDEO ENTERTAINMENT 




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GRAPHICS. • • 

^Expand, shrink &m 
&t; stretch 'em with !e * s ' t 



SZOOMDUMP^ 




.-IZOOMDUMP requires an ext. BASIC CoCo fcffi 
& DMP-105 or compatible printer. Print V; 
out "PMQDE4 M or "PMQDE3" graphics acrsene 
to within a fraction of an inch of ajQy 
hei oht or width you. sp ecify — up to T.B" 
wide 9 in normal or negative image* MAKE 
YOUR GRAPHICS DUMPS FIT THE JOB — NOT 
VICE VERSA! V V* - ' : • 

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RAINBOW 



C€ »TlflC*TICW 



September 1 988 THE RAINBOW 



6NU8R6U10" 

230 DATA" BR3 2 BD2 6NR5 0 D2NR50D2R5 0 

D6L2D4R14U4L2U12H2U4H2U2H4L6D2F2 

D2F2D8BL50BD30D4ND6R10D6U10BR6ND 

10R10D4NL10D6BR6U10R10D4L10R4F6B 

R6R4NU10R10U10L14" 

235 DATA"BR36BD18H8U8R8F8E4R20F4 

E8R8D8G8D10G4D2G8L2G4L8H4L2H8U2H 

4U10BR10BD4R4NU2ND2NR4NE2NH2BR12 

R4NU2ND2NR4NE2NH2BG8BD4NE4NH4D6N 

F4NG4U6BR6NR20BL12NL20BR6D4BF4NF 

10BH4BG4G10BL14BD14R10U6L10U4R10 

BR6ND10R10D10NL10BR6U6NR10U4R10B 

R6R6ND10R6" 

240 DATA"BR30BD2D10NR30D4NR30L2D 

4L2D4L2D4L2D12NR88D6R8NU6R8NU6R8 

NU6R8NU6R8NU6R8NU6R8NU6R8NU6R8NU 

6R8NU6R8U6U4H4M-10 , -4L4ND10M-30 , 

-10NU16NE6D4M+30,+10BL58ND8NH8BD 

22BR16ND10R10D10NL10BR6U10F10U10 
ii 

245 DATA " BR2 6BD2D14L2D4L2D4L2D4L 

2D12F6R20E2R30F2R14E2F2R10E2U6H2 

L10H2L8M-30 , -10H4U18BL18BD20G4D4 

F4BD20D10R10U10NL10BR6NR10D4NR10 

D6BR16U6NR10U4R10" 

250 DATA"BR20BD6ND20R80G10NL50M+ 

10 , +30G4L62H4M+10 , -30H4L8D14L6BD 

30BR16NR10D4NR10D6BR16NU10R10NU1 

0BR6NU10R8BR4NU10R8 " 

255 DATA"BR20BD6ND2 0R8 0G10M+10 , + 

30G4L62H4M+10,-30H4L8D14L6BD30NR 

10D4NR10D6R10BR6U10R6ND6R6D10BR6 

U10R10D4NL10BR6BU4R6ND10R6BR6F4N 

D6E4" 

260 DATA"BR50BD14ND20R12D10NL12N 

D10BR8R6NU6ND6R6BR10U18L60D36R60 

U18BD30BL60NL4ND10R10D4NL10D6NL1 

4BR6NR10U6NR10U4R10BR6BD10R10U6L 

10U4R10BR6R6ND10R6" 

265 DATA"BR50BD14ND20R12BD10NL12 

BR8R12BR10U18L60D36R60U18BD30BL7 

0D10R6NU8R6U10BR6ND10R10D10NL10B 

R6U10R10D4L10R4F6BR6R10U6L10U4R1 

0BR6R6ND10R6" 

270 DATA"BR30BD4ND6R60D6NL60D4L6 

0NU4G4D28F4R60E4U28H4BL20BD32H4L 

4U2NR4D2L4NUND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4 

BD10BL26ND10BR6ND10F10U10BR6BD10 

R10U6L10U4R10BR6ND10BR6R4ND10R10 

D10NL14BR6NR10U6NR10U4R10" 

275 DATA"BR12BD4ND6R60D6NL60D4L6 

0NU4G4D28F4R60E4U28H4BR3 6BD32H4L 

4U2NR4D2L4NUND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4 

BD10BL76ND10R10D10NL10BR6NU10R10 

U10BR6R6ND10R6BR6BD10R10U6L10U4R 

10BR6ND10BR6R4ND10R10D10NL14BR6N 

R8U6NR8U4R8 " 

280 DATA"BR16BD30NR30U2NR30U2R18 
BR4R2BR4R2BL30U2R90G12M-48,+4U10 



BD3 6BL2 2R10U6L10U4R10BR6D10U6R10 

U4D10BR6U10R10D4NL10D6BR6U10R10D 

4L10R4F6BR6U10R10D4L10" 

285 DATA"BR16BD30NR40H2U4E2R40ND 

8R48F2D2G2L2G2L2G2L36H2BD36BL28R 

4NU10R10U10NL14BR6D10R10U10BR6D1 

0R8BR6NU10R8" 

290 DATA"BR2 2BD6R3 0D6F4R8E4U6R3 0 
D16L8NU16L8D2 6L22NU30L22U26L8NU1 
6L8U16BD60NR10U10R10BR6D10R8BR6N 
R10U6NR10U4R10BR6ND10R10D4NL10D6 
BR6U10F10U10" 

295 DATA"BR22BD6R30D6F4R8E4U6R30 

D16L8NU16L8D26L8NU12L4NU2J3L2NU8L 

4NU6L4NU30L8NU12L4NU20L2NU8L4NU6 

L2NU18L2U2 6L8NU16L8U16BD50R4ND10 

R10D10NL14BR8NU10BR8U10R10D4L10R 

4F6BR6BU10R6ND10R6BR6F4ND6E4" 

300 DATA"BR20BD3 0NR84BD3 6BL6R10U 

6L10U4R10BR6ND10R6ND8R6D10BR6U10 

R10D10NL10BR6U10R10D10NL10BR6BU1 

0R6ND10R6BR6D10U6R10U4D10" 

305 DATA"BR14BD30BRE4R4F4R4E4R4F 

4R4E4R4F4R4E4R4F4R4E4R4F4R4E4R4F 

4BL84BD3 6U10R10D4L10R4F6BR6U10R1 

0D10NL10BR6NU10R10NU10BR6U10R10B 

D4NL4D6NL10BR6U10D4R10U4D10" 

310 DIMK$(4,4) ,K(4,4,2) ,P$(40) 

315 PMODE4,1:PCLS0:SCREEN0,0:CLS 

0:PRINT@2 63, " PLEASE STAND BY "; 

320 PT$ (1)="NG4D10NL4NR4" :PT$(2) 

="BL4ND2R6D4L6D6R6" : PL=2 

325 FORY=4TO250STEP63 : YY=YY+1 

330 H(YY)=Y 

3 35 II=0:FORI=2TO148STEP44:II=II 

+1:V(II)=I:LINE(Y,I) -(Y+58,I+40) 

,PSET, BF:K$ (YY, II) ="BM"+STR$ (Y) + 

","+STR$(I) :NEXTI,Y 

340 POKE178,0:COLOR1,0: LINE (0,17 

8)-(256,192) ,PSET,BF 

345 CR$="S4C0R58D40L58U40C1R58D4 

0L58U40" 

350 COLOR1,0:FORI=1TO4:FORY=1TO4 
:FORQ=0TO20STEP2:LINE(H(I)+Q,V(Y 
)+Q) -(H(I)+58-Q,V(Y)+40-Q) , PRESE 
T , B : NEXTQ , Y , I 

355 F0RI=1T04:F0RY=1T04:DRAWK$(I 

,Y)+CR$:NEXTY,I 

3 60 FORI=1TO40:N(I)=0:NEXTI 

3 65 F0RI=1T08 

370 P(I)=RND(20) *2:IFN(P(I) )«1TH 
EN370 

375 N(P(I) )=1:NEXTI 

380 F0RI=1T08 : P (1+8 ) =P (I) -1 : NEXT 

I 

385 FORI=1TO40:N(I)=0:NEXTI 
390 F0RI=1T04:F0RY=1T04 
395 K(I,Y,1)=RND(16) :IFN(K(I,Y,1 
) )=1THEN395 

400 N(K(I,Y,1) )=1:NEXTY,I 



96 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



405 F0RI=1T04:F0RY=1T04:K(I,Y,1) 
=P(K(I,Y,1) ) :NEXTY,I 
4 10 REM : FORI = 1TO 4 : FOR Y= 1TO 4 : DRAW 
K$ (I, Y) +"BD4C0S2 " : DRAWP$ (K (I , Y, 1 
) ) : NEXTY , I 

415 DRAW"C0BM76,190S4U8R10D4NL10 
BR6U4 D8R8 BR6U8R10 D4NL10 D4 BR1J3U4N 
H4E4BR4NR10D4NR10D4R10BR6U8R10D4 
L10R6F4" 

420 SCREEN1,1:IFPL=2THENPL=1ELSE 
IFPL=1THENPL=2 

425 IF SC(1)+SC(2)=16THEN585 
430 COLOR1,0: LINE (170, 180) -(182, 
192) ,PSET,BF 

435 IFPL=1THENDRAW ,, BM174,190S4C0 

R8L4U8G2 "ELSEIFPL=2THENDRAW"BM17 

4, 190S4C0NR8U4R8U4L8D2" 

440 V=l:H=l:FOR TR=1T02 

445 DRAWK$(H,V) :DRAWCR$ 

450 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN445 

455 IFX$=CHR$(13)THEN500 

460 P=ASC(X$) 

465 IFP=8THENH=H-1 

470 IFP=9THENH=H+1 

475 IFH=0THENH=1:GOTO445:ELSEIFH 

=5THENH=4 : GOT0445 

480 IFP=94THENV=V-1 

485 IFP=10THENV=V+1 

490 IFV=0THENV=l:GOTO445ELSEIFV= 

5THENV=4 : GOT0445 

495 GOT0445 

500 IFK(H,V,2)<>0THEN445 

505 COLOR1,0:LINE(H(H) ,V(V) )-(H( 

H)+58,V(V)+40) ,PSET,BF 

510 F0RI=1T04 : PCOPY I TO I+4:NEX 

T:PMODE4,5 

515 DRAWK$(H,V)+"BD4C0S2":DRAWP$ 
(K(H,V,1) ) :K(H,V,2)=-1:IF GR=1TH 
EN525 

520 COLOR1,0:LINE(H(H) ,V(V) )-(H( 

H)+58,V(V)+30) ,PSET,BF 

525 FORI=lT04t PCOPY 1+4 TO I:NEX 

T : PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN 1 , 1 

530 M(TR)=K(H,V,1) 

535 HH(TR)=H:W(TR) =V 

540 NEXT TR 

545 IFINT( ( (M(l)/2)+.5) )<>INT( ( ( 

M(2)/2)+.5) )THEN555 

550 F0RI=1T02:DRAWK$(HH(I) ,W(I) 

)+"BD8C0S2":DRAWP$(K(HH(I) ,W(I) 

,1)):NEXTI 

555 IFINKEY$<>CHR$ (32)THEN555 

560 COLOR1,0:FORI=1TO2:LINE(H(HH 

(I)) ,V(W(I)))-(H(HH(I))+58,V(W 

(I) )+40) ,PSET,BF:NEXTI 

565 IFINT( ( (M(l)/2)+.5) )<>INT( ( ( 

M(2)/2)+.5) )THEN580 

570 COLOR1,0:FORI=1TO2:FORQ=0TO2 

8STEP2:LINE(H(HH(I) )+Q,V(W(I) ) + 

Q) - (H(HH(I) )+58-Q,V(W(I) )+40-Q) 



,PRESET,B:NEXTQ:LINE(H(HH(I) J+Q- 
S^Wfl) )+Q)-(H(HH(I) )+58-Q+8,V 
(W(I) )+40-Q) , PRESET , BF : NEXTI 
575 FORQ=1T02:DRAWK$(HH(Q) ,W(Q) 
) +"S4BR30BD14C1" : DRAW PT$(PL) :NE 
XTQ: SC (PL) =SC (PL) +2 : GOTO420 
580 F0RZ=1T02:K(HH(Z) ,W(Z) ,2)=0 
: NEXTZ : COLOR1 , 0 : F0RI=1T02 : FORQ=0 
TO20STEP2:LINE(H(HH(I) )+Q,V(W(I 
))+Q)-(H(HH(I))+58-Q,V(W(I))+40 
-Q) , PRESET, B: NEXTQ, I :GOT04 20 
585 FORI=1TO2000:NEXT 
590 CLS : PRINT @ 10 4, "FINAL SCORECA 
RD" 

595 PRINT @ 168 , "PLAYER ONE ="/SC( 
1) 

600 PRINT@232, "PLAYER TWO =";SC( 
2) 

605 PRINT© 2 9 6, "PLAYER ";:IFSC(1) 

>SC (2 ) THENPRINT " ONE WINS 1 " ;ELSEI 

FSC(2) >SC(l)THENPRINT"TWO WINS ! " 

610 IFSC(1)=SC(2)THENPRINT<3296, " 

THE GAME IS TIED!" 

615 PRINTS 3 60, "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N) 
f it • 

620 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$— "Y"THENRUNELS 
EIFX$="N"THENCLS:END:ELSE620 



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Your OS 9 Solution 

Presents . . . 



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(Requires 512k 0S9 Level II) $29.95 

Tha Zappa it: Edit files and entire disks with this versatile 

utility. Allows editing in hexadecimal and ascii formats. 
Patch commands directly on the disk and fix CRC's 
automatically! Retrieves lost or crashed disks! 
(Requries 64k 0S9 Level I or II) .\..$19.95 

Miiici-Manu ; Create your own Multi-View compatible menus, 
then run them by clicking on an ICON! 

(Requires 512k 0S9 Level II and Multi-View) 519. 9S 

ngqT.3BBfi * BBS program that supports multiple users and 

sysop definable menus. Includes: Tsmon, Login, Chat, 
message retrieval, mail retrieval, Oloadx, Oloadx, and 
more! 

(Requires 512k 0S9 Level II) 519.95 

nso Taatirit; Includes: Hmatch, wcopy, wdel, Wattr, 

Otree, Dtree, Pause, Soto, Ascii, Convert, Oevneme, Oirsort, 
Upcase, Locase, Oislex, and Calendar. 

(Requires 64k 0S9 Level I or II) 519.95 

r.agul ti Tools: Includes all of the above plus: Bcolor, 

Fcolor, Border, Mmap, Wconfig, Palette, Browse, Window, and 
Wend. 

(Requires 128k 0S9 Level II) 524.95 

Add $3.00 per order for shipping and handling. 

Send check or money order to: Alpha Software Technologies 

2810 Buffon St. 

Chalmecte, La. 70043 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 97 



The third in a series of tutorials for the 
beginner to intermediate machine 
language programmer 



Machine Language Made BASIC 

Part III: What a Dump! 



By William P. Nee 



Dumps are simply programs that 
transfer images from the screen 
to paper by way of a printer. 
The programs shown in Listings 1 and 
2 are for a seven-dot printer that adds 
128 to the total value of the dots used 
for graphic printing. Listing 1 is the 
BASIC version and Listing 2 is a machine 
language version.The seven dots in a 
column have a value of 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 
and 64, starting from the top. The 
values of the dots you want to print are 
added together and then added to 128. 
The total value is sent to the printer as 
a CHR$ value. Printer commands used 
in this program are: 

CHR$ ( IB ) - set for graphics 
CHR$(27); CHR$(16) - position the 
print head 

CHR$ ( 0 ) ; CHR$ ( 50 ) - 50 spaces over 
CHR$(30) - end graphics mode 

Check your printer manual for any 
changes to these CHR$. 

Location $6F tells the computer 



which device will display or receive 
information as follows: 



Bill Nee bucked the "snowbird'* trend 
by retiring to Wisconsin from a banking 
career in Florida. He spends the long, 
cold winters writing programs for his 
Co Co. 



$6F 

2(tt$FE) 
■l(ttSFF) 
0 

1 - 15 



Device 

printer 
tape recorder 
screen 
disk 



Locations $BR and BB give the location 
of beginning graphics — usually at 
$600, or $E00 with disk. 

The BIT command is a quick way to 
test each bit in a byte and branch 
accordingly. We will check each bit to 
see if it is a zero, and we'll branch if it 
is. The BIT command flNDs a number in 
registers A or B with any other number 
you select; but unlike the RND com- 
mand, the number in registers A or B 
remains unchanged — only the values 
of the condition codes (CC) register are 
affected. The CC register is the register 
to which all branches look to see if the 
conditions for a branch have been met 
(plus, minus, equal, zero, etc.). The 
rules for RND are: 



0 RND 0 

0 AND 1 

1 RND 0 
1 AND 1 



0 
0 
0 

1 



Another way to think of this is: any 
number RND 0 = 0/ any number RND 1 
= the same number. 
Now, how do we test the left bit (Bit 



7) in Register A to see if it is a 0 or a 
1? We must BITR with the number 128. 
This is easier to see when written in the 
binary format (Base 2): 

let Register A = 149 = 10010101 
BITR with #128 = 10000000 
CC register = 10000000 

Since the result is not 0, the CC 
register will not be set to 0 and a BEQ 
(Branch if EQual to 0) will not execute, 
so the program will continue with its 
next command. If you continue to BITR 
with 64, 32, 16, 8, 4, 2 and 1, you can 
check each bit and branch accordingly. 

Since the printer can type a column 
seven bytes high, this program will look 
at the left bit in each of the seven stacked 
bytes, then the next bit over, and the 
next, etc., until reaching the right bit 
(Bit 0). 

If a bit is 1, the value of the CHR$ to 
be printed is increased by the dot's value 
according to its location in the column: 



Dot 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



Value 
1 

2 

4 

8 
16 
32 
64 



98 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



Finally, 128 is added to the total value 
and the result is sent to the printer as 
a CHR$ (value). The routine at $RQ02 
sends the value in Register A to what- 
ever device is indicated by Location $6F. 
The brackets around PRINT in the 
program mean to use the values in 
$fi002 and $R003 as the JSR address. 
Those values may differ in various 
Color Computer models, but the $fl002 
should remain the same. 

The end of the program uses CLR $BF 
to set Location $GF to 0, the device 
number for the screen. CLR is the fastest 
command available to set any memory 
byte or single-byte register such as A, B 
or CC to 0. CLRR executes more quickly 
and uses less memory than LDfl 80. 

In one portion of the program we 
used LBNE (Long Branch if Not Equal) 
instead of BNE. This is because a regular 
Branch can only move backward -128 
spaces or forward +127 spaces (re- 
member "signed" numbers?); a Long 
Branch can branch anywhere in the 
program but consumes a little more 
memory. Use the regular branch when- 
ever possible; EDTASM+ will let you 
know if a Long Branch is necessary. It 
is good, though, to use JSR when ref- 
erring to ROM routines. 



The BASIC program for the "dump" 
takes advantage of the BASIC PPOINT 
command to see if each bit in the seven- 
byte column is set or not. If it is set, the 
value of the CHR$ is increased and 128 
is added to the total value. The resulting 
character is sent to the printer. 



i::: 



A 



,»:■, ml An 



m o 



i:::: 



-I1l|||nl- 





"'■'|. IEHI 


•Hi- ' 


Hi 


i' 

llll 


llll 


IUI.H,, 




till""""" 


n 



IB 



,r»i 



4 



A 



„,...OI...„ 



A llll [ill 

hi:::: 



<lll|||lll 



in. 



HNIIIII 



III HI 



Sample printout using a Radio Shack 
DMP-105 

The PPOINT method could have been 
used in the machine language program, 
but it is still a slow command. We will, 
however, use this command in future 
articles to write programs involving 
graphics. 

Both programs will run for a while 
without printing anything since the 
printer buffer must be filled before 
printing. The buffer stores what the 
computer has been sending it until 



ready. Then it prints it all at once, rather 
than printing out one CHR$ at a time. 
Both programs also skip printing the 
bottom three lines of graphics. You can 
add your own routines if you want 
them. Be sure to clear space before 
running the machine language program 
from BASIC: CLEAR 200, &H3000-1. 

The time difference between the two 
programs is amazing. The BASIC pro- 
gram can take up to twenty minutes to 
copy a graphics page, while the machine 
language program can do the job in 
about three minutes. It's a longer pro- 
gram, but if you're doing a lot of repe- 
titious dumping (Christmas cards, for 
example) it is quite a time-saver. The 
machine language program is designed 
for PMODE 4, since we're not using a 
color printer. 

Try experimenting with a program 
that dumps from top to bottom of the 
page rather than from left to right. This 
prints the picture sideways but allows 
you to double its size. You might also 
try to reverse the picture. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this tutorial may be addressed to the 
author at Route 2, Box 2I6C, Mason, 
Wl 54856-9302. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



Listing 1: DUMPBAS 

10 CLEAR200,£cH300£-l 

20 1 SAMPLE GRAPHICS PROGRAM 

30 PMODE 4,1:PCLS5:SCREEN1,1 

40 FOR X=0 TO 254 STEP 2 

50 LINE(X,0)-(255-X, 191) , PRESET 

60 NEXT 

70 FOR Y=190 TO 0 STEP -2 

80 LINE (0,Y) -(255, 191-Y) , PRESET 

90 NEXT 

100 DRAW"C5BM80, 60M+6 , +10E5F5M+6 

, -10BR6D5ND5R18NU5D5BR6E10F6NL12 

F4BR16U10NL10R10 11 

110 DRAW H BM120,100E10F6NL12F4 M 

120 DRAW ,! BM80,130U10R18F2D6G2NL1 

8BR8BU2NU8F2R14E2U8BD10BR6M+6 , -1 

0F5E5M+6 / +10BR6U10R18F2D3G2L18 M 

130 'THE DUMP PROGRAM 

140 'EXEC &H3000 OR - 

150 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (18) 

160 FOR V=0 TO 182 STEP 7 

170 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$ (16) ;C 

HR$(0) ;CHR$(50) ; 

180 FOR H=0 TO 2 55:P=0 

190 FOR N=0 TO 6 

200 IF PPOINT (H,V+N)<>0 THEN P=P 
+2 A N 

210 NEXT N 

220 PRINT#-2, CHR$ (P+128) ; :NEXT H 
2 30 PRINT#-2 :NEXT V 
240 PRINT#-2,CHR$(30) 



HAWKSof t HAWKSo-f t HAWKSo-f t 



HAWKSo-f t 



HAWKSof t 



RAINBOW 



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planet— lord today! ! ! Requires 1 disk and joystick 
or mouse. See Rainbow Review JULY 88 



MYDOS »15.00 

CUSTOM I Z ABLE ! EPROMABLE ! ! 
The commands Tandy left out! 
MYDQS is an enhancement to Disk Extended Basic 2.1 
on the CoCo 3. One command loadm and execute for 
M/L programs. Lowercase command entry and display 
on ALL screens. Screen echo and SAY command for 
RS Speech Pak. Point and click mouse directory, 

NEW FEATURES! ! ! ! ! 
Supports double-sided and 40 track drives. Set 
any palettes you want on power — up (RGB or CMP) . 
Power — up in any screen width and colors (or 
monochrome) you wish! More options than you can 
shake a joystick at ! ! ! See Rainbow Review JUNE 07 



HAWKSoft KEYBOARD CABLE S25.00 

UNCHAIN YOUR KEYBOARD! 
Five foot extender cable for Coca II and 3. Move 
your keyboard where you want it! Installation 
instructions and tips included! Custom lengths 
avai 1 i abl e. 




HAWKSoft P.O. Box 7112 
Elgin, II. &B121-7112 
312-742-3084 



SScH always included. II. orders add 7% sales tax 



September 1 988 THE RAINBOW 99 



Listing 2: DUMPBIN 



3j?W 






00100 


ORG 


$3000 








A002 


00110 PRINT 


EQU 


$A002 


PRINT ROUTINE 


3W 


86 


FE 


00120 START 


LDA 


#-2 


USING THE PRINTER , 


3002 


97 


6F 


00130 


STA 


$6F 




3004 


86 


12 


00150 


LDA 


#18 


TEXT TO GRAPHICS 


3006 


AD 


9F A002 


00160 


JSR 


[PRINT] 




3 00 A 


8E 


30CC 


00170 


LDX 


#VTABLE 




300D 


DE 


BA 


00180 


LDU 


$BA 


START OF GRAPHICS 


300F 


86 


IB 


00190 


LDA 


#27 


NUMBER OF ROWS 


3011 


B7 


30CA 


00200 


STA 


DOWN 




3014 


86 


IB 


00210 LOOP 3 


LDA 


#27 


MOVE THE 


3016 


AD 


9F A002 


00220 


JSR 


[PRINT] 




301A 


86 


10 


00230 


LDA 


#16 


PRINTER HEAD 


301C 


AD 


9F A002 


00240 


JSR 


[PRINT] 




3020 


86 


00 


00250 


LDA 


#0 


OVER 


3022 


AD 


9F A002 


00260 


JSR 


[PRINT] 




3026 


86 


32 


00270 


LDA 


#50 


50 SPACES 


3028 


AD 


9F A002 


00280 


JSR 


[PRINT] 




302C 


86 


20 


00290 


LDA 


#32 


BYTES PER LINE 


302E 


B7 


30C9 


00300 


STA 


ROW 




3031 


C6 


08 


00310 LOOP2 


LDB 


#8 


BITS PER BYTE 


3033 


7F 


30CB 


00320 LOOP1 


CLR 


VALUE 




3036 


A6 


40 


00330 


LDA 


M 


FIRST BIT IN THE COLUMN 


3038 


A5 


85 


00340 


BITA 


B,X 


AND A WITH B,X 


303A 


27 


03 


00350 


BEQ 


NEXT 2 




303C 


7C 


30CB 


00360 


INC 


VALUE 




303F 


A6 


C8 20 


00370 NEXT 2 


LDA 


32, U 


SECOND BIT IN THE COLUMN 


3042 


A5 


85 


00380 


BITA 


B,X 


AND A WITH B,X 


3044 


27 


08 


00390 


BEQ 


NEXT 3 




3046 


B6 


30CB 


00400 


LDA 


VALUE 




3049 


8B 


02 


00410 


ADDA 


#2 




304B 


B7 


30CB 


00420 


STA 


VALUE 




304E 


A6 


C8 40 


00430 NEXT 3 


LDA 


64,U 


THIRD BIT IN THE COLUMN 


3051 


A5 


85 


00440 


BITA 


B,X 


AND A WITH B,X 


3053 


27 


08 


00450 


BEQ 


NEXT 4 


. 


3055 


B6 


30CB 


00460 


LDA 


VALUE . 




3058 


8B 


04 


00470 


ADDA 


#4 




305A 


B7 


30CB 


00480 


STA 


VALUE 




305D 


A6 


C8 60 


00490 NEXT 4 


LDA 


96, U 


FOURTH BIT IN THE COLUMN 


3060 


A5 


85 


00500 


BITA 


B,X 


AND A WITH B,X 


3062 


27 


08 


00510 


BEQ 


NEXT 5 




3064 


B6 


30CB 


00520 


LDA 


VALUE 




3067 


8B 


08 


00530 


ADDA 


#8 




3069 


B7 


30CB 


00540 


STA 


VALUE 




306C 


A6 


C9 0080 


00550 NEXT 5 


LDA 


128, U 


FIFTH BIT IN THE COLUMN 


3070 


A5 


85 


00560 


BITA 


B,X 


AND A WITH B,X 


3072 


27 


08 


00570 


BEQ 


NEXT 6 




3074 


B6 


30CB 


00580 


LDA 


VALUE 




3077 


8B 


10 


00590 


ADDA 


#16 




3079 


B7 


30CB 


00600 


STA 


VALUE 




307C 


A6 


C9 00 A0 


00610 NEXT 6 


LDA 


160, U 


SIXTH BIT IN THE COLUMN 


3080 


A5 


85 


00620 


BITA 


B,X 


AND A WITH B,X 


3082 


27 


08 


00630 


BEQ 


NEXT 7 




3084 


B6 


30CB 


00640 


LDA 


VALUE 




3087 


8B 


20 


00650 


ADDA 


#32 




3089 


B7 


30CB 


00660 


STA 


VALUE 




308C 


A6 


C9 00C0 


00670 NEXT 7 


LDA 


192, U 


SEVENTH BIT IN THE COLUMN 


3090 


A5 


85 


00680 


BITA 


B,X 


AND A WITH B,X 


3092 


27 


08 


00690 


BEQ 


PRNT 




3094 


B6 


30CB 


00700 


LDA 


VALUE 




3097 


8B 


40 


00710 


ADDA 


#64 





100 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



3099 


B7 


30CB 


00720 


STA 


VALUE 




309C 


B6 


3J2fCB 


00730 PRNT 


IDA 


VALUE 




309F 


8B 


80 


00740 


ADDA 


#128 


FILL IN THE EIGHTH BIT 


3J2TA1 


AD 


9F A002 


00750 


JSR 


[PRINT] 




30A5 


5A 




00760 


DECB 






30A6 


26 


8B 


00770 


BNE 


LOOP1 


FINISHED THE BYTE? 


30A8 


33 


41 


00780 


LEAU 


i,u 


MOVE OVER TO THE NEXT BYTE 


30AA 


7A 


30C9 


00790 

9 9 f 


DEC 


ROW 


FINISHED THE ROW YET? 


30AD 


26 


82 


00800 


BNE 


LOOP2 




30AF 


86 


0A 


00810 


LDA 


#10 


CARRIAGE RETURN 


30B1 


AD 


9F A002 


00820 


JSR 


[PRINT] 




30B5 


33 


C9 00C0 


00830 

9 9 9 


LEAU 


192, U 


SKIP DOWN 7 ROWS 


3J2fB9 


7A 


30CA 


00840 


DEC 


DOWN 




30BC 


1026 


FF54 


00850 


LBNE 


LOOP3 




3ffCj? 


86 


IE 


00860 FIN 


LDA 


#30 


BACK TO TEXT 


30C2 


AD 


9F A002 


00870 


JSR 


[PRINT] 




30C6 

r 


0F 

¥ 


6F 


00880 


CLR 


$6F 


BACK TO THE SCREEN 


30C8 


39 




00890 


RTS 




BACK TO BASIC 


3J2fC9 






00900 ROW 


RMB 


1 




3J?CA 






00910 DOWN 


RMB 


i. 




30CB 






00920 VALUE 


RMB 


1 




3J2fCC 




0001 


00930 VTABLE 


FDB 


$0001 




30CE 




0204 


00940 


FDB 


$0204 




30D0 

r r 




0810 


00950 


FDB 


$0810 




30D2 




2040 


00960 


FDB 


$2040 




30D4 




80 


00970 


FCB 


$80 








3000 


00980 


END 


START 





00000 TOTAL ERRORS 



BOWLING LEAGUE SECRETARY 



©1986 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Reviewed 
Sept. April 
1986 1987 
pg141 pg140 



Now for the Co-Co 1, 2 or 3 with disc drive, 
printer, 32K. 

• User friendly— full menu driven selections. 

• Any number of teams, and over 200 bowlers. 

• Calculates and stores all team and bowlers 
stats. 

• Men, women, mixed, scratch or handicap; 
blinds and substitutes. 

• Start up any time in season. 

• Full edit capability. 

• Automatic backups and weekly, mid-season 
and end-season resets. 

• ABC/WIBC style printouts. 

• Includes 20-page instruction manual. 

• Upgrade for individual tally sheets. 

1 ($9.95 separate; free when ordered 
with program.) 

Priced at $49.95 including Shipping, Handling & 
Sales Tax. To order, send check or M.O. 

Specify Version number (1.0 for men or women; 
1.1 for mixed) and number of disc drives. 

TOMELA*CO 

P.O. Box 2162 • Doylestown, Pa. 18901-2162 • (215) 348-5822 



A DISK DIRECTORY UTILITY 



HELLO /BAS 



by Roy C. Pierce 



fc) 1988 



WHAT HELLO WILL DO 

Display Alphabetically Sorted Directory 
of any Drive. (0-3) 

Print a Hardcopy of Sorted Directory 
w/Date and Disk Name. 
Run ANY BASIC Program with Ease. 
RUNS ON ANY COCO. 
(32K Disk Extended BASIC Required) 
Single Key Stroke Commands. 
Easy to Read Display. 
ALL BASIC so it won't mess up your 
System. 

SUPER FAST OPERATION. 
Reads Any Drive at Will. 
Low Disk Overhead - Only 1 Gran. 
Easy to Copy to All your Disks, comes 
with Handy Diskinit Utility for Auto- 
booting HELLO/ BAS. 

$19.95 U.S. $22.95 cdn. 

INTERNATIONAL $22.95 U.S. 

SHIPPING & HANDLING INCLUDED 



* 
* 

* 

* 

+ 
* 
* 



RCPlERCE 

SOFTWARE 



P.O.BOX 1787, 

Main Post Office, 
Edmonton, AB. Canada 
T5J-2P2 

PH: (403) 474-8435 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 101 



^Feature 



More choices, more creativity now available 



The Desktop 
Publisher: A Reprise 

By H. Allen Curtis 




I first ventured into desktop publish- 
ing with "A Desktop Publisher on 
a Shoestring," (October '87, Page 
58). The article met with success well 
beyond my expectations. 

Through the hundreds of letters I 
received about my article, I was able to 
meet some truly fine people. Many 
readers sent me beautifully executed 
sample documents and told of their 
intended uses for the publisher: news- 
letters, business advertising, greeting 
cards, special school projects, class- 
room aid, improvement of student 
writing skills, etc. Those letters pro- 
vided the motivations for my continu- 
ing attempts to enhance the desktop 
publisher and to write this article. 

Many personal and home computer 
owners prize word processors as one of 
their most valuable software pieces. The 
designers of the leading, more expensive 
($300 to $500) desktop publishers are 
aware of this and have enabled their 
programs to enter files from word 
processors. Thus, at the initial stage of 
desktop publishing, users of such desk- 
top publishers have the convenience of 
composing and editing their texts on 
their favorite word processors. This 

H. Allen Curtis lives in Williamsburg, 
Virginia. He is interested in 17th and 
18th century history and enjoys biking 
through the colonial capital. He balan- 
ces past and present with his computer 
work. 



102 



THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



article brings a similar capability to the 
shoestring desktop publisher programs, 
Desktop Low for the CoCos 1 and 2 and 
Desktop High for CoCo 3. Whether or 
not you use a word processor, you can 
benefit from the information contained 
in this article. 

To accommodate the addition of the 
word processor input feature to Desk- 
top Low and Desktop High, more 
program memory must be made avail- 
able. All lines of BASIC involved in 
drawing the font menu for the files 
DESKTDPL and DE5KT0PH can be deleted 
if that information is stored in a disk file 
and brought in serially whenever a new 
font is selected. Deletion of those lines 
of BASIC would provide a significant 
savings of program memory. Further- 
more, if one font menu can be stored on 
disk and loaded into the computer on 
demand, the same can be done with 
other font menus. This allows an in- 
crease in the number of available fonts. 
In fact, I have developed a supplemen- 
tary set of nine new fonts, so that there 
are 19 fonts now available. An explana- 
tion of how you can obtain the extra 
font set is given at the conclusion of this 
article. 

The GENMENU program shown in 
Listing 1 will be employed in drawing 
the present DESKTDPL and DESKTOPH 
font menus. After carefully typing 
Listing 1, save GENMENU on disk. Then 
make a backup copy of your desktop 
publisher disk (the latest version if you 
have the enhancements). Next, load 
GENMENU from its disk. Insert the 
backup desktop publisher disk in your 
disk drive and run GENMENU. This will 
record the data file FDNTMENU on your 
new desktop publisher disk. 

You must now modify DESKTOPL or 
DESKTOPH on that disk as follows: In 
DESKTOPL delete lines 350 through 430 
and delete the complete DRRN statement 
from the end of Line 345. Similarly, in 
DESKTOPH delete lines 395 through 475 
and delete the entire HDRflW statement 
from the end of Line 390. Save the 
abbreviated DESKTOPL or DESKTOPH on 
the new desktop publisher disk. 

When the programs PflTCHWPL and 
PRTCHWPH (listings 2 and 3) are patched 
into the shortened DESKTOPL and 
DESKTOPH, respectively, the patched 
program can enter files derived from the 
ASCII files of a word processor. Addi- 
tionally, the patched program will load 
the font menu from disk when you select 
F from the main menu. Type NEW and 
press ENTER to clear the memory of 



DESKTOPL or DESKTOPH. Carefully type 
Listing 2 or 3. If your CoCo 1 or 2 
cannot safely support the high speed, 
omit POKE&HFFD7,0 from Line 342 of 
PflTCHWPL and omit all three statements 
in Line 2020 of PflTCHWPL. Next save 
Listing 2 or 3 on the disk containing 
GENMENU as follows: For use with DESK - 
TOPL, type SAVE"PATCHWPL", A and 
press ENTER; for use with DESKTOPH, 
type SfiVE "PfifTCHWPH " , A and press 

ENTER. 

To patch PATCHWPL or PATCHWPH 
into the abbreviated DESKTOPL or 
DESKTOPH, respectively, simply insert 
the new desktop publisher disk in your 
disk drive and load DESKTOPL or DESK- 
TOPH. Insert the disk containing 
PATCHWPL or PATCHWPH in your drive. 
Next, type MERGE "PATCHWPL " and 
press ENTER for DESKTOPL; or type 
MERGE "PATCHWPH" and press ENTER 
for DESKTOPH. Finally, insert the new 
desktop publisher disk in your drive and 
save the patched DESKTOPL or DESK- 
TOPH on the disk. Retain its filename, 
DESKTOPL or DESKTOPH, when you save 
it, in order to overwrite the unpatched 
version. 

The new DESKTOPL and DESKTOPH 
will not accept a word processor's 
ASCII file directly. The file must first be 
converted to a form compatible with 
DESKTOPL and DESKTOPH. The pro- 
grams CONVERTL and CONVERTH (list- 
ings 4 and 5, respectively) will convert 
the ASCII files of any word processor 
designed to work with the CoCo 1, 2 or 
3 to a DESKTOPL- or DESKTOPH- com- 
patible file. CONVERTL and CONVERTH 
not only perform the conversion but 
also explain precisely what you must do 
to produce acceptable ASCII files from 
your word processor. After typing NEW, 
carefully type Listing 4 or 5. In typing 
either of these listings, you will have to 
type the characters [ and ]. This is 
accomplished by use of the SHlFT-down 
arrow and SHIFT-right arrow, respec- 
tively. Save CONVERTL or CONVERTH on 
the disk containing GENMENU. 

The MONROE program (Listing 6) 
creates a simulated word processor 
ASCII file. After its conversion by 
CONVERTL or CONVERTH, this file will be 
used to illustrate and explain the work- 
ings of the ASCII file input feature of 
the desktop publisher. Therefore, em- 
ploy NEW to clear program memory and 
type Listing 6. Save MONROE on the 
GENMENU disk. Then run MONROE to 
produce the simulated word processor 
ASCII file, HISTDOC/TXT. 



To convert H ISTD0C/TXT to the desk- 
top publisher-compatible form, load 
CONVERTL for DESKTOPL or CONVERTH 
for DESKTOPH. Run the program. To 
learn the word processor requirements, 
answer the first prompt by pressing Y. 
After you have digested all the informa- 
tion, answer the next prompt by press- 
ing Y. HI5TD0C/TXT is ready to be 
converted. For the final prompt, type 
HI5TD0C/TXT and press ENTER. HIST- 
DOC/TXT will be converted to HISTDOC/ 
DAT. 



If you have only one disk drive, you 
must copy HI 5TD0C/DAT from the 
GENMENU disk to the desktop publisher 
disk. To copy, refer to the GENMENU disk 
as the source disk and the desktop 
publisher disk as the destination disk. 
Insert the source disk in your disk drive. 
Next, type C0PY"HI5TD0C/DAT : 0" and 
press ENTER. Your computer will give 
you the steps needed to copy HISTDOC/ 
DAT onto the destination disk. 

Those of you who have two or more 
disk drives don't need to copy HIST- 
DOC/DAT, because DESKTOPL or DESK- 
TOPH can input compatible files from 
any drive. 

Now you are ready to try the ASCII 
file input feature. If you have a single 
disk drive, insert the new desktop 
publisher disk in your drive. (Two-drive 
owners should insert the desktop pub- 
lisher disk in Drive 0 and the GENMENU 
disk in Drive 1.) Then load and run 
DESKTOPL or DESKTOPH. For greater 
screen capacity select F, Font 2 via the 
main menu. To reach the main menu, 
press CLEAR for DESKTOPL or F2 for 
DESKTOPH. While DESKTOPH users have 
a choice of two screen resolutions on 
which to input the ASCII files, initially 
keep it at low resolution. The word 
processor ASCII file input feature is 
accessed by employing the main menu 
input command. When you press I from 



To the House of Representatives of the United States! 

f.y • ftr'.fitiiUi* el ifttiuffcrf apprwui on the 27th of Hmh, 1818, it 
»«? -hircied tkt the journal, acts, m\ pRujeeainasj oi the Convention 
s»fei».Ji imM the pitr i-rit GaftytjUtyflii ui ;hf United States should be 
vufchsiwil, under 6* dimtufl of the Fi-eiitlent of the United States, 

»'j'Jt thr :-??j'et iwumsis of ™*= and proceedings, and the 
forogn ftvAtSfMifaftt itfitii a seHajn rtyieycton), of the Confess of 
the limied SWm fr-tm the first wettiiA thereof down to the date of the 
ratification of the definitive toaty of yeace between Great Britain and 
uH United States i» »k yea? 1783, and \hA 1.898 copies thereof should 
be printed, ui ooe copy slmuid he furnished to each nenber af tha 
(the Fifteenth; Oongr-es.s arm the residue should renam subject to the 
future disposition of Congress. 

And bv a iwlutloii ui Coft&ress approved on the 21st April, 1328, i 
was provided that the secret journal, together with all the papers ana 
docuneMs tonnpf;te« with that journal, and all other papers and docuuen 
heretofuir cto&sifiered umfiitefttial, of the old Congress. froH the date i 
foe ranficwofl uf the defirutivf treaty of the year 1783 to the 
tadtioh of the present Government which were routining in the office 
s\ u* ir»(tretaiHi <!{ tie. 5»oul(l be published under the uirection of th 
iV liden! of the Hinted States, -rid thai ij&b'b' copies thereof should he 
Mutwi «nd deposited in the Library subject to the disposition of 

In jursitawsH of these two resolution 4 !. 1 MB cnpies of the journals 
«nd arts of the Coriv^fttion wiM iu<w<i in* Constitution i>ave been 
heretofore printed M placed at the disposal of Congress, and 1,888 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 103 



the main menu, a new screen appears, 
offering you two options: 

1 , Screen File 

2. ASCII File 

Formerly, the I command had only one 
function — loading a previously saved 
screen from disk. That function is now 
Option 1. Option 2 loads the word 
processor ASCII file. Hence, press 2. 
The desktop publisher will respond by 
requesting that you supply the filename 
of the desired ASCII file. Those with 
single-drive systems should type HI5T- 
DOC and press ENTER. Two-drive users 
should type HISTDOC :1 and press 
ENTER, because HISTDOC/DRT is on the 
Drive 1 disk. 

The computer switches to the work- 
ing screen, and the cursor moves across 
the screen and prints out the word 
"Example." This word, centered hor- 
izontally in the original document, is 
now offset to the right. Included in the 
new version of DESKTOPL or DESKTOPH 
is an easy way to center an offset word 
or line of characters. You will have to 
wait until the screen is full before 
employing the centering process, how- 
ever. 



When the ASCII file input feature is 
invoked, the desktop publisher auto- 
matically turns on wordwrap. Thus, any 
word not fitting at the end of one line 
will be erased and printed in its entirety 
at the beginning of the next line. When 
full, the screen will be replaced by a 
prompt asking if you want to save the 
HISTDOC contents that have not been 
entered. The saved contents will be in 
a file called REST : □ if you have a one- 
disk drive or REST : 1 if you have a two- 
disk drive. This will leave the file HIST- 
DOC/DRT unchanged and intact. In 
order to continue printing the rest of the 
contents of HISTDOC, answer the 
prompt by pressing Y for yes. You are 
then returned to the working screen. 

In the main menu, press K to view the 
list of special keys used by DESKTOPL or 
DESKTOPH. The final key listed is SHIFT- 
up arrow. According to the list, this key 
combination's function is to move the 
character line toward the cursor half of 
the screen. This means that SHlFT-up 
arrow causes a line of characters to 
move left or right, depending on 
whether the cursor is located in the left 
or right half of that line. Return to the 
working screen. Since the cursor is 
already located in the left half of the line 



containing the word "Example," keep 
pressing SHlFT-up arrow until "Exam- 
ple" is centered. If you happen to move 
"Example" too far left, select T from the 
main menu to set both tabs to 240 for 
DESKTOPL or 300 for DESKTOPH. After 
returning to the working screen, press 
the down arrow to move the cursor to 
the right half of the top line. Press 
SHlFT-up arrow to complete the center- 
ing process. In general, the line of 
characters to be moved must begin or 
end with a blank space, depending on 
whether you wish to move the line left 
or right. Otherwise, you will leave a 
wake of partial characters as you move 
the line. 

At this point you have several op- 
tions. With DESKTOPL, you may save 
the screen, make a screen dump or 
consider what you have done explora- 
tory and take neither of the two options. 
Because you have two screens with 
DESKTOPH, you can defer saving the 
screen on disk and making a screen 
dump until the second screen is full. At 
this point, let's consider the example 
exploratory. 

To do this, use SHIFT-CLEAR to clear 
the screen for DESKTOPL or use S from 
the main menu to switch the other 



Real BASIC for OS9! 



OS-9 LEVEL TWO VR. 02.00.01 
COPYRIGHT 1986 BY 
Ml CROW ARC SYSTEMS CORP. 
LICEN5EO TO TANDY CORP. 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

July 11, 1988 1 4:37:30 

Shell 

OS9: xmoda /w5 typesO 

OS9: Infz /w5 

OS9: rsb o»/w5 A 

4007 





DISK EXTENDED COLOR BASIC 3.1 
COPR. 1982, 1986 BY TANDY 
UNDER LICENSE FROM MICROSOFT 
ANO MICROWARE SYSTEMS CORP. 

OK 

LOAD "DEMO" 

OK 

LIST 

10 CLS 5 

20 X=RND(63):Y=RND(31):ZsRND(B) 
30 SET(X,Y,Z) 
40 GOTO 20 
OK 





There is nothing wrong with your Coior Computer. Do not attempt to adjust it. The BASIC you know and love is now 
running under Level 2 OS9 windows. You are in command. 

Burke & Burke is proud to present another OS9 programming language: Disk Extended Color BASIC. 

YouVe probably heard of this language. It's the one your Color Computer was born with. We're talking PMODE, DIR, COLOR, 
RENUM, PLAY and other familiar words. Under Level 2 OS9. In as many windows as your memory lets you create. 

Our R.S.B. software creates an OS9-compatible version of Disk Extended Color BASIC by reading your CoCo's ROM chips. We add 
new software for OS9-style graphics, sound, printer, and disk I/O. Of course, you can't use R.S.B. to run machine language programs, 
and some BASIC commands work slightly differently under R.S.B. Although R.S.B. loads and saves files using OS9's file format, 
we've also included utilities to transfer BASIC programs and data files between OS9 and BASIC disks. 

Did you know that Level 2 OS9 always runs at double-speed? This makes R.S.B. very fast. You must have a CoCo 3 with at least 
1 28K RAM, and a floppy controller with Disk Extended Color BASIC 1 .0, 1 .1 , 2.0, or 2.1 ROM, or CoCo 3 CDOS ROM, to use R.S.B. 



w lL d & ^Xo V Q ersion 2 'a Use ,Vvi,dcards " Check out these OS9 Utilities 

with most OS9 commands, or rearrange your ~™ 

directory tree. Features recursive directory Tools to fe ' you '«"* ****** OS9, 
searches. A hard disk must! $19.95 



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bootfile editor. Change module names, add 
or delete modules, patch bytes, or rearrange 
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P.O. Box 1283 Palatine, IL 60078-1283 (312) 397-2898 



m 




ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 7% SALES TAX. 
COD's add $2.20. Shipping (within the USA) $2.00 per 
CoCo XT; $1.50 per disk or ROM. Please allow 2 weeks 
for delivery (overnight delivery also available for in-stock 
items). Telephone orders accepted (312)397-2898. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



104 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



screen for DESKTDPH. Continuing to 
explore, specify left, right and bottom 
screen margins before the input of the 
next portion of HISTDOC. 

Specifying a bottom margin of the 
screen is new. It sets the place at which 
the ASCII file input feature quits filling 
the screen. If you want to specify the 
bottom margin as three lines from the 
bottom of the screen, press ENTER until 
the cursor will go down no farther. Then 
press the up arrow three times for the 
cursor to reach the desired bottom 
margin. Select M from the main menu. 
After you set the top and left margins 
at 0 and 24, for instance, you will be 
asked whether you want to change the 
bottom margin. Because the bottom 
margin has been the bottom of the 
screen, press Y for yes. Immediately you 
will be asked whether you want the 
bottom margin set to the most recent 
cursor position. Press Y for yes because 
the present cursor position is at the 
desired position. The yes answer is 
generally made when the screen is 
intended to represent a whole page or 
when the bottom half of a page is to be 
dumped. The no answer is important 
for fonts whose character sizes are such 
that a top margin setting of 0 does not 



allow the cursor to reach the bottom of 
the screen. To set the right margin, press 
W from the main menu and enter the 
value 232 for DESKTOPL or 296 for 
DESKTDPH. 

Follow the W command with the 
second option of the I command. When 
a filename is requested, type REST and 
press ENTER if you have a one-disk 
drive; otherwise, type RESTrl and press 
ENTER. The ASCII file input will re- 
sume and continue until the specified 
bottom margin is reached. When the 
screen is full within the specified mar- 
gins, the prompt screen will appear. 
Press Y for yes so that a new REST file 
is produced, including all of HISTDOC 
not already brought to the screen. 

Continuing the exploration, clear the 
screen. Press ENTER three times to move 
the cursor down three lines. The ASCII 
file input feature brings in text starting 
at the current cursor position. There- 
fore, you can establish left, right, upper 
and lower boundaries to confine the 
input. Use the second option of the I 
command to resume the ASCII file 
input process. The required filename is 
again REST for single-disk drives or 
REST : 1 for multiple-disk drives. 

The ability to confine text input 



within boundaries is important even to 
those with screen dumps that provide 
ample margins on each printed page. If 
you want to print a border design 
around the text of your document, you 
can draw the border, appropriately 
specify margins and bring in the text. Or 
you could also specify margins, bring in 
text and then draw the border. Confin- 
ing the input text within boundaries is 
essential when you develop a document 
composed of two columns of text. For 
such a document, boundaries are set for 
the left side of the screen and text is 
brought to the screen. Then margins are 
reset for the right side of that same 
screen, and more text is brought in 
through the second option of the I 
command. 

When the present screen is full and 
you have answered the ensuing prompt 
by pressing Y, draw a border design 
around the text. To do so, set the top 
and left margins to 0. Set the bottom 
margin to the bottom of the screen by 
answering the two prompts of the main 
menu command M, pressing Y and N 
in that order. Using the main menu 
command W, set the right margin to 256 
for DESKTOPL or 320 for DESKTDPH. You 
must make use of the W command a 




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September 1988 THE RAINBOW 105 



second time to turn off wordwrap. In 
drawing the border design, select Font 
I because most of the designs (except 
CoCo Cat) are size-compatible with 
Font I. To simplify the drawing of the 
right border, set both tabs to 240 
(DE5KT0PL) or to 304 (DESKTOPH). 

Use your imagination and experi- 
ment in employing the ASCII file input 
feature to bring in the remainder of the 
HISTDOC text to further screens. You 
might change fonts; Desktop High users 



might switch to the higher resolution 
screen and develop a screen for a two- 
column document. 

Depending on the margin values 
specified and the font selected, some 
Desktop Low users may encounter a 
problem with the last line of text entered 
in the final screen. The problem results 
from composing the simulated word 
processor document at 60 characters 
per line. Desktop Low users should 
write their word processor documents 



at 30 to 40 characters per line. 

Both the original eight font files 
(offered in "A Desktop Publisher on a 
Shoestring") as well as an additional 
nine font files may be obtained by 
ordering them from me at 172 Dennis 
Drive, Williamsburg, VA 23185. The 
disk containing all 17 font files costs 
$13.50. The supplemental nine font files 
may be purchased separately for $7. 
Please include payment by check or 
money order. □ 



Editor's Note: The files PflTCHWPL tfm/PfiTCHWPH 
are stored in binary format on this month's 
RAINBOW ON TAPE and DISK. To resave the files in 
the required ASCII format and j or transfer them 
from tape to disk, first load the file using (C)L0fiD- 
' filename" Once the file is in memory, save it to 
disk by entering SfiVE "filename"^. RAINBOW ON 
DISK users please note: You will have to use a disk 
other than the original since it is write-protected. 
This should not be an inconvenience, as you should 
be using a backup of the original anyway. 



Listing 1: GENMENU 

0 »*** GENMENU *** 

1 1 BY H. ALLEN CURTIS 

2 1 COPYRIGHT 1988 

10 D$ (1) ="BM50 , 24G3ERE2R4GNL3G4D 
5EU4BR2D5G4UH2LG2ER3FERE2URUE2NF 
G2U4E4F2DH2DFBM64 , 29G2ND4LD4NHFR 
E2NU5RU4FBM72 , 29G2RD4NHFNEU4NU2E 
3ND6FNFD6E2BM83 , 25G3LR3NR2NUD8NE 
2H2RU5 

20 D$ ( 2 ) =" BM4 9 , 4 3R6NDNGL5D3NR3D3 
NLR2HU4BM59 , 45ND3GD2FR3NU3EU2HL2 
BM66,45D4RU4R3D4RU3BM76, 43ND5G2N 
R4FD2FRE 



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30 D$ (3 ) ="BM50 , 56R5BR2DNLNRDRNRD 

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2DFNDRURE2U9NE3RD3ND4REFBM64 , 61G 

2ND6LD5LF2RE2NU7RU6FBM72 , 61NG2D3 

E3DRFLD7NE2HNU6BL2GNU5LNHU7BM83 , 

57G2RD11NE2H2RU8L2R5 

40 D$(4)="BM46,78R11D2RHL2BL6D6R 

3D2ENRHL3D6GU13LBM62 , 82G3D2F3R5E 

3U2H3L4G3D2F3R3E3U2H2BM72 , 82R3GN 

LD7RU5NU2E3R2DRD7LNUE2U4BM88,80D 

LGR7 NR5G5 UNE 2 FDRDRDR4 E 2 

50 D$(5)="BM48,96NR6D8RU4NU3R3BM 

56 / 99ND4GD3FR4NU5EU3HL3BM64 / 99D5 

RU5R4D5U4BM74,96D7FRHU5NL3NR2U2 

60 D$(6)="BM48,109R7NDL6D8NLR2HU 

3NU3R3NUDBM58 , 112ND4GD3FR4NU4EU3 

HL3 BM6 6 , 1 1 2 RD5NLR2 HU3 ER3 D5NLR2HU 

3BM79 , 109D8REBL3U4NR3NL2U2 

70 D$ (7) ="BM52 , 123R4NFL4G2D2NR3D 

4BM60 , 125G2D2F2R2E2U2H2LBM68 , 125 

ND6FER2F2D4BM78 , 12 3DND7GR4 

80 D$ ( 8 ) ="BM50 , 1 3 6NGR3NR4 D4 L2NGR 

3NU3NR2D2HD2GL3BM62 , 138G2DED2R3E 

2UGU2L2BM70 , 138NGD4RUNU3E3RD4RNE 

U3BM8 1 , 13 6D6R2NEL2HU4GR4 

90 D$(9)="BM50,148NG3NR7ND3FD3NR 

4L3NGR3ND7LD8GL3BM60 , 148G3NRF2NU 

3R3E2NU2LU3L2BM68 , 148G2RD3RU2NU2 

E3RD5RNE2U4BM79 , 147NG2D2NR2ND3LD 

3FR2E2 

100 D$ (10)="BM50,164NR3D2NR2D3BM 
56, 166GDFREUHBM61, 166D2NDE2FD2BM 
68 , 164D2NLNRD2FE 
200 N$(1)= M BR2NGD6NL2R2BU6BR6 

210 N$(2)«"NGNDR3ND2FDGL2NG2DG2R 
5ULBR6BU5 

220 N$ (3 ) ="NGNDR3ND5FDGNL2FDGL3U 
LBU5BR11 

230 N$(4)="BR2BD6G3DE4D6NLRNRU2N 
RNL4U4BR6 

240 N$ (5) = ,f BD6NR5D2EDR3ND3FD2GL3 
ULBU5R5BR6 

250 N$ (6)= M BR2BD4NR2G2D3FR3NU2EU 
HL3 ND2UEBU3 BD2 BR 8 

260 N$ (7 ) = ,f BD2NDNFR5D2HDG2D2RU2E 
BU3BR6 

270 N$ (8 ) =" BRBU2ND5GDFGDFR3NU5EU 



106 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



HNL2 EUHL2 BUBR 6BDBR4 

28j3 N$(9)="BR2BU5ND2GDFR3DG2NLRE 

2U3HND2L2BR6 

29j3 N$(lj3)="BR2BU8ND5GD4FR3U5G2D 



E3ND4HL2 

300 OPEN"*}", #1, "FONTMENU" 

310 FORI=lT01j3:PRINT#l,N$(I)+D$( 

I) : NEXT: CLOSE #1 




197 112 2305 194 

492 249 END 204 

2030 212 



Listing 2: PRTCHWPL 

6 SS=1 : SF=1 : FC=1 : CD=7 

50 IFQ=1 AND ZOU AND L+4>W-1THE 

NFL=1:G0T0175 

62 IFSCI=1THEN9 60ELSEIFSCI=2 AND 
KS=1THEN2020ELSEIFSCI=2THEN2030 
95 IFK=32THENZ=L+S:IFL+8<W THENL 
INE(L,T) -(L+7,T+D) , PRESET , BF: L=L 
+S : GOT04 5ELSELINE (L,T) - (L+1,T+D) 
, PRESET ,BF:L=U:IFT<P AND K191-D 
*2THENT=T+1+D : GOT04 5ELSEFL=0 : GOT 
02080 

110 IFK=8THENLINE(L,T)-(L+1,T+D) 
, PRESET, BF: IFL>1THENL=L- 2 : GOT045 
ELSEL=0:GOTO45 

151 IFK=95THENI=4:PUT(L,T) -(L+l, 
T+D) , S : IFL>W* . 5THENGET (U , T) - (W-I 



-1,T+D) ,G, G:PUT(U+I,T) -(W-1,T+D) 
, G, PSETELSEGET (U+I , T) - (W-l, T+D) , 
G,G:PUT(U,T)-(W-1-I,T+D) ,G,PSET 
155 IFK<>95THENPUT(L,T)-(L+1,T+D 
) ,S:GOT045ELSE45 

165 IFQ=0 OR Z=U THENL=U: IFT<P A 
ND T<191-D*2THENT=T+D+1:GOTO70EL 
SE70 

170 FL=2 

175 Z1=2*INT( .5*Z) :Z=Z1 

180 GET(Z,T)-(L,T+D) ,G,G:GOSUB19 

7:L1=L-Z:L=U:Z==U:IFT<P AND T<191 

-D*2THENT=T+D+1ELSE2080 

190 IFSCI<>2THENPUT(L,T)-(L+L1,T 

+D) ,G, PSET: L=L+L1+L2 : L=2 * INT ( . 5 * 

L+.5) :L2=0ELSEL=U:GOSUB2400:KS=K 

S+1:GOTO2030 

193 N=FL+l:ON N GOTO45 / 55 / 70 

197 IFCC=j3THENPUT(Z,T) -(L,T+D) ,R 
, PSET : RETURNELSEPUT ( Z , T) - (L, T+D) 
, R, PRESET : RETURN 

198 IFCC=0THENPUT(U / T) -(W-1,T+D) 
, R , PSET : RETURNELSEPUT (U,T) - (W-l, 




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September 1988 THE RAINBOW 107 



T+D) ,R, PRESET: RETURN 

199 IFCC=0THENPUT ( 18 ,20) -(113,17 

0) ,R,PSET:RETURNELSEPUT(18,20)-( 

113,170) ,R, PRESET: RETURN 

23)3 IFK$="I" OR K$="i"THEN3060 

34J3 SCREEN1,C 

341 DRAW"S"+STR$(4*SF) 

342 GET(L,T) -(L+1,T+D) ,S:POKE&HF 
FD7,0:GOTO45 

345 SCREEN1,C:GET(18,20)-(113,17 
0) / F / G:GOSUB199 

355 Y=10:OPEN"I" , #1, "FONTMENU" 
3 65 FORI=0TO9:GOSUB440:LINEINPUT 
# 1 , A$ : Y= Y+ 16 : DRAW " S 4 BM2 4 , " +STR$ ( 
Y ) +A$ : NEXT : CLOS E # 1 

490 CLS: PRINTS 19 5, "DO YOU WANT T 
O CHANGE THE": PRINT" BOTTOM MA 
RGIN? (Y/N) "; 

491 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN4 91ELSE 
IFK$="N" OR K$="n"THENL=U:T=V:RE 

TURNELSEIFK$="Y" OR K$="y"THEN49 
2ELSESOUND60 , 5 : GOT0491 

492 PRINT@323,"DO YOU WANT IT AT 
THE MOST" : PRINT" RECENT CURSO 

R POSITION?": PRINT" (Y/N)":PR 
INT" IF NOT, IT WILL BE SET TO 
": PRINT" THE LOWEST POSSIBLE C 
URSOR" : PRINT" POSITION" : IFV$=" 
B" OR V$="b"THENGOSUB980 

493 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN493ELSE 
IFK$="N" OR K$="n"THENGOSUB98j3:G 
OT0495ELSEIFK$="Y" OR K$="y"THEN 
P=T : L=U : T=V : RETURNELSESOUND60 , 5 : 
GOT0493 

495 P-V+(D+1)*(-1+INT((192-V)/(D 
+1) ) ) : RETURN 

551 PRINT" SHIFT " ;CHR$ (94) ; " : M 
OVE CHAR- LINE TOWARD" : PRINT" 

CURSOR HALF OF SCREEN" :PRI 

NT 

960 POKE&H23,Al:POKE&H2 4,A2:IFKS 
<=LEN (AC$) THENK$=MID$ ( AC$ , KS , 1) : 
KS=KS+1 : GOSUB970 : GOTO70ELSESCI=0 
:PUT(L,T) -(L+1,T+D) ,S:U=UT:GOT04 
5 

970 IFASC(K$)=94THENK$=CHR$(13) : 
RETURNELSERETURN 

980 V«192-(D+1) *INT(192/(D+1) ) :T 
=V : RETURN 

2020 POKE&HFFD6,0:IFEOF(1)=-1THE 
NCLOSE # 1 : POKE&HFFD7 , 0 : SCI=0 : PUT ( 
L,T) -(L+1,T+D) ,S:U=UT:GOT045ELSE 
G0SUB445 : LINEINPUT#1 , SK$ : POKE&HF 
FD7,0 

2025 IFSK=0THENSCI=0:U=UT:GOTO22 
00 

2030 POKE&H23,Al:POKE&H24,A2:IFK 
S<=LEN (SK$ ) THENK$=MID$ (SK$ , KS , 1) 
ELSE2100 

2032 IFASC(K$)=91THENK$=CHR$(13) 
:RS=1 



2035 IFL>U AND KS=1 AND K$=" "TH 
ENPUT(L,T)-(L+1,T+D) , S : L=U : IFT<P 
AND T<191-2*D THENT=T+1+D ELSES 
K=0:GOTO2025 
2040 KS=KS+1:GOTO70 
2080 IFSCIO2THEN193ELSESK=0:GOT 
02025 

2100 IFSK$=""THENPUT(L,T) -(L+1,T 
+D),S:L=U ELSEKS=1:IFRS=1THENRS= 
0:GOTO2020ELSEIFL+S+8>W THEN3100 
ELSEK$=" ":GOTO70 

2110 IFT<P AND T<191-2*D THENT=T 
+1+D : G0T07 0ELSESK=0 : G0T02 025 
2200 T=V: CLS : PRINT @ 19 5 , "SAVE RES 
T OF ";FA$;":";ZA$: PRINT" FOR 
LATER INPUT? (Y/N) »■ ; 
2220 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN2220 
2230 IFK$="N" OR K$="n"THENCLOSE 
#1:GOTO280 

2240 IFK$="Y" OR K$="y"THENPRINT 
@386,"THE REST WILL BE SAVED IN 
THE FILE CALLED REST:";ZA$ 

2300 IFFA$="REST"THENRE$="TEMP"E 
LSERE$="REST 

2301 POKE&HFFD6,0 :OPEN"0" , #2 ,RE$ 
+":"+ZA$ 

2305 GOSUB2400:IFKS>=LEN(SK$)THE 
N2310 

2307 PRINT#2,RIGHT$(SK$,LEN(SK$) 
-KS) 

2310 IFE0F(1)=-1THENCL0SE#1:CL0S 
E#2:GOTO2330 

2320 GOSUB44 5:LINEINPUT#l,SK$:PR 
INT#2 , SK$ : G0T02 3 10 

23 30 I FRE $= " TEMP " THENKILL "REST/ D 
AT: "+ZA$: RENAME "TEMP/DAT : "+ZA$ T 
0"REST/DAT: "+ZA$ 
2340 GOTO280 

2400 KS=KS-1 : IFKS=0THENRETURNELS 
EIFMID$ (SK$ , KS , 1) <>" "THEN2400EL 
SERETURN 

3040 GOSUB440:SK=6:KS=1:SCI=2:CL 
S : PRINT @ 200, "FILENAME: "; :LINEIN 
PUTFA$ : Z$=RIGHT$ (FA$,2) : ZA$="0" : 
IFASC (Z$) =58THENZA$=RIGHT$ (Z$ , 1) 
: FA$=LEFT$ ( FA$ , LEN ( FA$ ) -2 ) 
3050 POKE&HFFD6,0:OPEN"I", #1,FA$ 
+":"+ZA$: RETURN 

3060 GOSUB440:CLS:PRINT@200, "1: 
SCREEN FILE":PRINT@232,"2: ASCII 
FILE" 

3070 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN3070EL 
SEIFK$="1"THENGOSUB20 : GOTO200ELS 
EIFK$="2 "THEN3080ELSESOUND60 , 5 : G 
OTO200 

3080 Q=1:UT=U:GOSUB3040:GOTO280 

3100 PUT(L,T) -(L+1,T+D) ,S:L=U:IF 

T<P AND T<191-2*D THENT=T+D+1 : GO 

TO2020ELSESK$=" ":GOTO2110 

3600 CLOSE#1:FORI=0TO3000:NEXT:G 

OTO200 



108 



THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



OVER 




Vz OFF 



NOW Your Computer Writes 

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Listing 3: PP.TCHWPH 

11 SS=1 : SF=1 : FC=1 : CD=7 

16 HCOLOR3:ON BRK GOT0715 

18 ON ERR GOTO7000 

50 HSCREENH : HBUFF1 , 399: HGET ( 8 t 15 

2)-(9,152+D) ,1 

70 IFQ=1 AND ZOU AND L+4>W-1THE 
NFL=l:GOT0195 

82 IFSCI=1THEN960ELSEIFSCI=2 AND 
KS=1THEN2020ELSEIFSCI=2THEN2030 
115 IFK=32THENZ=L+S:IFL+8<W THEN 
HLINE (L, T) - (L+7 , T+D) , PRESET, BF:L 
=L+S : G0T06 5ELSEHLINE ( L , T ) - ( L+l , T 
+D) , PRESET ,BF:L=U: IFT<P AND T<19 
1-2 *D THENT=T+1+D:GOTO65ELSEFL=0 
:GOTO2080 

130 IFK=8THENL=2*INT ( • 5*L) : HLINE 
( L, T) - ( L+l , T+D) , PRESET , BF : IFL> IT 
HENL=L-2 : GOTO65ELSEL=0 : GOT065 
171 IFK=95THENI=2*H+2 :HPUT(L,T) - 
(L+l, T+D) , 1 : IFL>W* . 5THENHGET (U , T 
) - (W-I-l , T+D) , 6 : HPUT (U+I , T) - (W-l 
, T+D) , 6ELSEHGET (U+I , T) - (W-l, T+D) 
,6:HPUT(U,T) -(W-1-I,T+D) ,6 
175 IFK09 5THENHPUT (L, T) - (L+l, T+ 
D) ,l:GOT065ELSE65 

185 IFQ=0 OR Z=U THENL=U : IFT<P A 
ND T<191-2*D THENT=T+D+1:GOTO90E 
LSE90 
190 FL=2 

21J3 HGET ( Z , T) - (L, T+D) , 6 : HPUT ( Z , T 
) - (L, T+D) , 4 : L1=L-Z : L=U : Z=U : IFT<P 
AND T<191-2*D THENT=T+D+1ELSE20 
80 

22J3 IFSCK>2THENHPUT(L,T) -(L+Ll, 
T+D) ,6:L=L+Ll+L2:L=2*INT(.5*L+.5 
) : L2=0ELSEL=U : GOSUB2400 : KS=KS+1 : 
GOTO2030 

223 N=FL+l:ON N GOTO65,75,90 
265 IFK$="I" OR K$="i"THEN3060 
38 5 GOSUB545 

387 HGET (L,T) -(L+l, T+D) ,l:GOT065 
390 POKE&HE6E4, &HE6: HSCREENH :POK 
E&HE6E4 , &HE7 : HGET (16, 20) - ( 111 , 17 
0) ,5:HPUT(16,20)-(111,95) ,4:HPUT 
(16,96)-(111,170) ,4 
400 Y=10 : OPEN 11 !" , #1, "FONTMENU" 
410 FORI=0TO9:GOSUB485:LINEINPUT 
# 1 , A$ : Y=Y+16 : HDRAW" S4BM2 4 , "+STR$ 
( Y) +A$ : NEXT : CLOSE # 1 
541 CLS:LOCATE6,12:PRINT"DO YOU 



WANT TO CHANGE THE" : LOCATE 6 , 13 : P 
RINT" BOTTOM MARGIN? (Y/N) } 

542 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=""THEN542ELSE 
IFK$="N" OR K$="n"THENL=U:T=V:RE 
TURNELSEIFK$="Y" OR K$="y"THEN54 
3ELSESOUND60 , 5 :GOT0542 

543 LOCATE 6, 16: PRINT" DO YOU WANT 
IT AT THE MOST": LOCATE 6, 17 :PRIN 

T "RECENT CURSOR POSITION? (Y/N) 

" :LOCATE6, 18 : PRINT" IF NOT, IT W 
ILL BE SET TO THE" : LOCATE6 , 19 : PR 
INT" LOWEST POSSIBLE CURSOR POSIT 
ION.":LOCATE37,17:IFV$="B" OR V$ 
="b"THENGOSUB980 

544 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN544ELSE 
IFK$="N" OR K$="n"THENGOSUB980:G 
OT0545ELSEIFK$="Y" OR K$="y"THEN 
P=T : L=U : T=V : RETURNE LS ES OUND 6 5,0: 
GOT0544 

545 P=V+(D+1) *(-l+INT( (192-V)/(D 
+1) ) ) : RETURN 

617 PRINT" SHIFT ";CHR$(94)+ 

": MOVE CHAR- LINE TOWARD" : PRINT" 

CURSOR HALF OF SCR 

EEN" 

715 RGB:CLS3 : POKE&HFFD8 ,0 : DRIVE0 
720 END 

960 POKE&H2 3,Al:POKE&H24,A2:IFKS 
<=LEN(AC$)THENK$=MID$(AC$,KS,1) : 
KS=KS+1 : GOSUB970 : GOTO90ELSESCI=0 
:HPUT(L,T) -(L+l, T+D) ,l:U=UT:GOTO 
65 

970 IFASC(K$)=94THENK$=CHR$ (13) : 
RETURNELS ERETURN 

980 V=192-(D+1) *INT(192/ (D+l) ) :T 
=V: RETURN 

2020 POKE&HFFD8,0:IFEOF(1)=-1THE 
NCLOSE#l : POKE&HFFD9 , 0 : SCI=0 : HPUT 
(L, T) - (L+l , T+D) , l:U=UT:GOT065ELS 
EGOSUB490 : LINEINPUT#1 , SK$ : POKE&H 
FFD9,0 

2025 IFSK=0THENSCI=0:U=UT:GOTO22 
00 

2030 POKE&H23,Al:POKE&H24,A2:IFK 
S<=LEN ( SK$ ) THENK$=MID$ ( SK$ , KS , 1) 
ELSE2100 

2032 IFASC(K$)=91THENK$=CHR$ (13) 
:RS=1 

2035 IFL>U AND KS=1 AND K$=" "TH 

ENHPUT (L, T) - (L+l , T+D) ,1:L=U:IFT< 

P AND T<191-2*D THENT=T+ 1+ D ELSE 

SK=0:GOTO2025 

2040 KS=KS+1:GOTO90 

2050 IFH=1THENU=4*INT ( . 25*L) :RET 

URNELSEU=8*INT( . 125*L) : RETURN 

2080 IFSCIO2THEN223ELSESK=0:GOT 

02025 

2100 IFSK$=""THENHPUT(L,T) -(L+l, 
T+D),1:L=U ELSEKS=1:IFRS=1THENRS 
=0:GOTO2020ELSEIFL+S+8>W THEN310 
0ELSEK$=" ":GOTO90 



110 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



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211,0 IFT<P AND T<191-2*D THENT=T 
+1+D:GOTO90ELSESK=0:GOTO2025 
2200 T=V:HSCREEN0:CLS:ATTR0,4 
2210 LOCATE 4, 8: PRINT "Do you want 
to save on disk the res 
t of the ASCII strings of" :LOCAT 
E13 , 10 : PRINTFA$ ; " : " ; ZA$ : L0CATE4 , 
11: PRINT" for later translation t 
o their font images? (Y 

/N) " ; 

222j3 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN2220 
2230 IFK$="N" OR K$="n"THENCLOSE 
#1:GOTO320 

2240 IFK$="Y" OR K$="y"THENLOCAT 

E4, 14: PRINT "The rest of the stri 
ngs will be saved in RES 

T : " ; ZA$ ; 

2300 IFFA$="REST"THENRE$="TEMP"E 
LSERE$= 5 "REST 

2301 POKE&HFFD8,0:OPEN"O",#2,RE$ 
+" : "+ZA$ 

2305 GOSUB2400:IFKS>=LEN(SK$)THE 
N2310 

2307 PRINT#2,RIGHT$(SK$,LEN(SK$) 
-KS) 

2310 IFE0F(1)=-1THENCL0SE#1:CL0S 
E#2:GOTO2330 

2320 GOSUB490:LINEINPUT#1,SK$:PR 

INT# 2 , SK$ : G0T02 3 10 

2330 I FRE $= " TEMP " THENKI LL" RES T / D 

AT : "+ZA$ : RENAME "TEMP/ DAT : "+ZA$ T 

0"REST/DAT:"+ZA$ 

2340 GOTO320 

2 400 KS=KS-1 : IFKS=0THENRETURNELS 
EIFMID$(SK$,KS / 1)<>" "THEN2400EL 
SERETURN 

3040 G0SUB4 8 5 : SK=6 : KS=1 : SCI=2 : CL 
S : LOCATE 4 , 8 : PRINT "Type filename 
of ASCII file you want t 



ranslated : " ; : LINEINPUTFA$ : Z$=R 

IGHT$ (FA$ , 2) : ZA$="0" : IFASC (Z$) =5 
8THENZA$=RIGHT$ (Z$ , 1) : FA$=LEFT$ ( 
FA$,LEN(FA$)-2) 

3050 POKE&HFFD8,0:OPEN"I", #1,FA$ 
+":"+ZA$: RETURN 

3060 GOSUB485:CLS:LOCATE11,10:PR 

INT"1: SCREEN FILE" : L0CATE11 , 11 : 

PRINT"2: ASCII FILE" 

3070 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN3070EL 

SEIFK$=" 1 "THENG0SUB3 0 : G0T02 3 0ELS 

EIFK$«"2 "THEN3080ELSESOUND60 , 5 : G 

OTO230 

3080 Q=1:UT=U:GOSUB3040:GOTO320 
3100 HPUT(L,T) -(L+1,T+D) ,1:L=U:I 
FT<P AND T<191-2*D THENT=T+D+ 1 : G 
OTO2020ELSESK$=" " : G0T02 110 
3600 CLOSE#1:FORI=0TO3000:NEXT:G 
OTO230 

7000 IFERLIN=2330THEN2 340 

7005 I FERLIN= 1 70THENT 1=T : F0RI=1T 

OSF:HPUT(U,T) -(W-1,T+INT(D/SF) ) , 

4 : T=T+INT ( D/ S F ) : NEXT : T=T1 : L=U : GO 

T065 

7010 IFERLIN=2320 AND ERNO=23 TH 
ENCLOSE#l:CLOSE#2 :GOTO2330 
7020 IFERLIN=30 OR ERLIN=3050 TH 
ENSCI=0 : SOUND60 , 5 : LOCATES , 12 : PRI 
NT "THERE IS NO FILE BY THAT NAME 
":L0CATE7,13:PRINT"ON THE DISK I 
N DRIVE "; :IFZ$=""THENPRINT"0":G 
OTO3600ELSEIFASC (Z$) =58THENPRINT 
RIGHT $ ( Z$ , 1) : G0T03 600ELSEPRINT"0 
" : GOTO 3 600 

7030 IFERLIN=25THENKILLF$+"/HRl" 
: KILLF$+ "/HR2 " : RENAME " OUT 1/ B IN " T 
OF$+"/HRl":RENAME"OUT2/BIN"TOF$+ 
"/HR2 " :GOTO230 
7040 GOT0715 



150 


172 


300 


, 233 


460 


, 133 


END 


...251 



Listing 4: CQNVERTL 



10 CLEAR3000 

20 CLS:PRINT@140,"CONVERTL":PRIN 
T@199,"BY H. ALLEN CURTIS ": PRINT 
@2 3 3, "COPYRIGHT 1988 
30 PRINT: PRINT" DO YOU NEED INST 
RUCTIONS ABOUT" : PRINT" WHAT THIS 
PROGRAM DOES & WHAT": PRINT" ITS 

REQUIREMENTS ARE? (Y/N)": PRINT 

11 ii . 

40 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN40ELSEPR 



INTK$ ; : IFK$="N"THEN380ELSEIFK$<> 

"Y"THEN40 

50 DIMA$(25) 

60 A$(0)=" THIS PROGRAM CONVER 
TS A 

70 A$(l)="WORD PROCESSOR FILE TO 
ANOTHER 

80 A$(2)="DISK FILE WITH A STRUC 
TURE 

90 A$ (3)=" COMPATIBLE WITH DESKTO 
PL 

100 A$(4)="USAGE. 

110 A$(5)=" THE WORD PROCESSOR 
FILE 

120 A$(6)="MUST BE A "+CHR$(34)+ 
"PURE"+CHR$(34)+" ASCII FILE: 
130 A$(7)="NO IMBEDDED CODES, NO 
PRINTER 

140 A$ (8) ="CODES, NO HYPHEN ENDI 
NG LINES, 



112 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



150 A$(9)= 

IN THE 
160 A$(10 
KTOPL. 
170 A$(ll 
R FILE 
' 180 A$(12 
D AS 

190 A$(13 
200 A$(14 
HE 

210 A$(15 
ND OF ANY 
220 A$(16 
MORE 

230 A$(17 
ER OF 
240 A$(18 
RST WORD 
250 A$(19 
THAT NEXT 
260 A$(20 
WITH ONE 
270 A$(21 
280 A$(22 
HE 

290 A$(23) 
ND OF THE 



"AND NO CHARACTERS NOT 



=" CHARACTER SET OF DES 



THE WORD PROCESSO 



= '*MUST ALSO BE MODIFIE 
=" FOLLOWS: 

=»1. YOU MUST APPEND T 



= 11 CHARACTER [ TO THE E ) 



="LINE THAT ENDS WITH 

= ff SPACES THAN THE NUMB 

= 11 CHARACTERS IN THE FI 

="OF THE NEXT LINE IF 

="LINE DOES NOT START 

="OR MORE SPACES. 
="2. YOU MUST APPEND T 

= 11 CHARACTER ] TO THE E 



300 A$(24) ="LAST LINE OF THE DOC 
UMENT • 

320 CLS:FORI=0TO13 

330 PRINT" » ;A$(I) : NEXT : PRINT : PR 

INT" PRESS SPACE TO CONTINUE" 

340 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN340 
350 CLS : PRINT : FORI=14T024 : PRINT" 

";A$(I) :NEXT 
3 60 PRINT: PRINT" DO YOU HAVE A S 
UITABLE FILE" : PRINT" READY? (Y/N 



ii 



370 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=""THEN370ELSE 
IFK$=" Y"THEN3 8 0ELSEEND 
380 CLS: PRINT© 19 3, "ENTER FILENAM 
E OF ASCII FILE. ": PRINT" INCLUDE 
THE EXTENSION. ": PRINT" " 
; :LINEINPUTF$ 

390 N=INSTR(F$, "/") : IFN=0THEN380 

ELSEG$=LEFT$ (F$ ,N) +»DAT" 

400 IFRIGHT$ (F$ , 3 ) ="DAT"THENRENA 

MEF$ TO LEFT$ (F$ ,N) +"TXT" 

410 CLS :PRINT@235, "CONVERTING "; 

420 OPEN"D", #1,F$:FIELD#1,128 AS 

A$,128 AS B$ 
430 OPEN"©", #2,G$ 

440 IFDONE=lTHENCLOSE#l : PRINT" . " 
; : PRINT#2 , Q$ : CLOSE#2 : PRINT: PRINT 



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A real time saver for the person who develops 
software using COCO Basic. 

— DUMPDIR: Prints a hard copy of a disk's 
directory. No more searching one disk after 
another looking for a lost file. 

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printer. Versions included for 40 and 80 column 
COCO 3 text screens. 

— DUMPFILE: Dumps any disk file to the printer. 
Printout can be in either decimal or in hex values. 

— CROSSREF: Prints cross reference of source 
and destination line numbers for basic jump 
instructions (GOTO, GOSUB, etc.). 

— COMPARE: Reads two BASIC Programs from 
diskette and compares them line by line. Lists all 
lines that are not identical. 

Requires COCO 2 or 3, disk and printer. 
Order at $19.95 plus $2 p&h. 
Calif, residents add $1.20 tax. _ 



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Use alone or with 
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September 1988 THE RAINBOW 113 




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Idaho Residents Add * 

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9-6 M-F (MST) $ 



DONE " : ENDSTOPE 
LSENO=NO+l : GET#1, NO : Q$=A$ 
450 M$="] ,, :A=INSTR(A$,M$) :B=INST 
R(B$,M$) :IFA>0 OR B>0THENDONE=1: 
IFB>j3THENB$=LEFT$ (B$ , B-l) ELSEQ$= 
LEFT$(Q$,A-1) :B$="" 
46J3 N=INSTR(Q$,CHR$(13) ) 
470 IFN>J3THENG0SUB62J3 : PRINT" . " ; : 
Q$=RIGHT$ (Q$,LEN(Q$) -N) : IFQ$= ,,,, T 
HENQ$=B$:GOTO530ELSE4 60 
480 1=1 

490 IFLEN(Q$)=I THENK=0 : GOTO520 
500 K=INSTR(LEN(Q$)+1-I,Q$," ") : 
IFK=0THENI=I+1 : GOTO490 
510 PRINT#2,LEFT$(Q$,K-1) : PRINT" 
• " 7 

520 Q$=RIGHT$ (Q$,LEN(Q$) -K)+B$ 
530 N=INSTR (Q$ , CHR$ ( 13 ) ) 



540 IFN>0THENGOSUB620 : PRINT" . " ; : 
Q$=RIGHT$ (Q$ , LEN (Q$) -N) : IFQ$=" "T 
HEN440ELSE530 
550 1=1 

560 IFLEN(Q$)=I THENK=0 : GOTO 5 9 0 
570 K=INSTR(LEN(Q$)+1-I,Q$," ") : 
IFK=0THENI=I+1 : GOTO560 
580 PRINT#2 , LEFT$ (Q$, K-l) : PRINT" 
» " * 

590 Q$=RIGHT$(Q$,LEN(Q$)-K) 
600 IFDONE=lTHENCLOSE#l: PRINT" . " 
; : PRINT#2 , Q$ : CLOSE#2 : PRINT: PRINT 
" DONE " : ENDE LS ENO=N 

0+1 : GET# 1 , NO : Q$=Q$+A$ 
61.0 GOTO450 

620 IFLEFT$ (Q$ ,N) =CHR$ (13 ) THENPR 
INT#2," [ " : RETURNELSEPRINT#2 , LEF 
T$(Q$,N-1) : RETURN 




150 


142 


300 


199 


450 


51 


END 


...197 



Listing 5: CDNVERTH 




AT' 

MENTS 

40 K$"-JLWXVCji 

INTK$ ; : IFK$ : 
"Y"THEN40 
50 DIMA$(25) 

60 A$(0)=" THIS PROGRAM CONVER 
TS A 

70 A$(l)= fl WORD PROCESSOR FILE TO 
ANOTHER 

80 A$(2)="DISK FILE WITH A STRUC 
TURE 

90 A$ (3)=" COMPATIBLE WITH DESKTO 
PH 

100 A$(4)="USAGE. 

110 A$(5)=" THE WORD PROCESSOR 
FILE 

120 A$(6)="MUST BE A "+CHR$(34)+ 
"PURE"+CHR$(34)+" ASCII FILE: 
130 A$(7)=*"NO IMBEDDED CODES, NO 
PRINTER 

140 A$ (8)=" CODES, NO HYPHEN ENDI 
NG LINES, 

150 A$(9)«"AND NO CHARACTERS NOT 



IN THE 
160 A$ (10 
KTOPH. 
170 A$ (11 
R FILE 
180 A$ (12 
D AS 

190 A$ (13 
200 A$ (14 
HE 

210 A$ (15 
ND OF ANY 
220 A$(16 
MORE 

230 A$(17 
ER OF 
240 A$(18 
RST WORD 
250 A$(19 
THAT NEXT 
260 A$(20 
WITH ONE 
270 A$(21 
280 A$(22 
HE 

290 A$(23 
ND OF THE 
300 A$(24 



=" CHARACTER SET OF DES 
THE WORD PROCESSO 
="MUST ALSO BE MODIFIE 
=" FOLLOWS: 

="1. YOU MUST APPEND T 

= " CHARACTER [ TO THE E 

="LINE THAT ENDS WITH 

= " SPACES THAN THE NUMB 

=" CHARACTERS IN THE FI 

—"OF THE NEXT LINE IF 

="LINE DOES NOT START 

= "OR MORE SPACES. 

="2. YOU MUST APPEND T 

=" CHARACTER ] TO THE E 
="LAST LINE OF THE DOC 



UMENT. 

310 WIDTH40:ATTR0,4 

320 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: 

FOR I=0TO13 

330 PRINT " 11 ;A$ (I) : NEXT : PRINT 

: PRINT : PRINT : PRINT" " ; : AT 

TR7,4,B:PRINT"HIT SPACE TO CONTI 
NUE"; :ATTR0,4 

340 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN340 
350 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : 
FORI=14T02 4: PRINT" ";A$(I) :NE 

XT 

360 ATTR7,4:L0CATE5,18:PRINT"D0 



114 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 



YOU HAVE A SUITABLE FILE" : LOCATE 
5, 19: PRINT "READY? (Y/N) " ; : ATTR 
0 4 

37J3 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN37J3ELSE 

IFK$="Y"THEN38pELSEEND 

38j3 CLS : LOCATE5 , 9 : PRINT"ENTER FI 

LENAME OF ASCII FILE . " : LOCATE5 , 1 

J3 : PRINT " INCLUDE THE EXTENSION.": 

LOCATE 12 , 12 : LINEINPUTF$ 

39j3 N=INSTR(F$,"/") : IFN=0THEN38j3 

ELSEG$=LEFT$(F$,N)+"DAT" 

4J30 I FRIGHT $ (F$ , 3 ) = " DAT " THENRENA 

MEF$ TO LEFT$ (F$ ,N) +"TXT" 

410 CLS:LOCATE15, lj3 : PRINT"CONVER 

TING "; 

420 OPEN"D" ,#1,F$:FIELD#1,128 AS 

A$,128 AS B$ 
430 OPEN"0",#2,G$ 

44J3 IFDONE=lTHENCLOSE#l : PRINT" . " 
; : PRINT #2 , Q$ : CLOSE # 2 : PRINT : PRINT 
" DONE": ENDS 

TOPELSENO=NO+l : GET# 1 , NO : Q$=A$ 
45J3 M$="]" :A=INSTR(A$,M$) :B=INST 
R(B$,M$) :IFA>0 OR B>0THENDONE=1 : 
IFB>0THENB$=LEFT$ (B$ , B-l) ELSEQ$= 
LEFT$(Q$,A-1) :B$="" 
460 N=INSTR(Q$,CHR$ (13) ) 
47j3 IFN>j3THENGOSUB620: PRINT 



ii ii . . 



Q$=RIGHT$ (Q$ , LEN (Q$ ) -N) : IFQ$=» "T 

HENQ$=B$:GOT053j3ELSE46j3 

480 1=1 

49j3 IFLEN(Q$)«I THENK= : GOTO 5 2 J3 

500 K=INSTR(LEN(Q$)+1-I,Q$," ■• ) : 

IFK=J3THENI=I+1:G0T049P 

510 PRINT#2,LEFT$(Q$,K-1) : PRINT" 



tt • 



520 Q$=RIGHT$ (Q$ , LEN (Q$) -K) +B$ 

530 N=INSTR(Q$,CHR$(13) ) 

540 IFN>0THENGOSUB62j3 : PRINT" . " ; : 

Q$=RIGHT$ (Q$ , LEN (Q$) -N) : IFQ$=" "T 

HEN440ELSE53j3 

550 1=1 

560 IFLEN(Q$)=I THENK= 0 : GOTO 5 9 
570 K=INSTR(LEN(Q$)+1-I,Q$, » »): 
IFK=0THENI=I+1 : GOTO560 
580 PRINT#2,LEFT$(Q$,K-1) : PRINT" 



ii . 



ii 



590 Q$=RIGHT$ (Q$,LEN(Q$) -K) 
600 IFDONE=lTHENCLOSE#l: PRINT" 
; : PRINT #2 , Q$ : CLOSE #2 : PRINT: PRINT 
" DONE" :ENDELSE 

NO=NO+l : GET# 1 , NO : Q$=Q$+A$ 
610 GOTO450 

620 IFLEFT$(Q$,N)=CHR$(13)THENPR 
INT#2," [ " : RETURNELSEPRINT#2 , LEF 
T$(Q$,N-1) : RETURN 



• - » • • i » • * • . .* 

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t-y. •. . J. .v": 



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September 1988 THE RAINBOW 115 




1R0 




280 


85 


380 ... 


8 


480 , 


, 77 


580 , . 


. 175 


END , , 


...222 



Listing 6: MONROE 

10 DIMA$(64) 
20 A$(0)=" 

Example: 
30 A$(l)=" 
40 A$(2)=" 

50 A$(3)="ASCII File[ 

60 A$ (4)="Historical Document [ 

70 A$(5)="To Desktop Screen 

80 A$(6)=" 

90 A$(7)=" 

100 A$(8)=" 

110 A$(9)=" 

120 A$(10)=" To the House of R 
epresentatives of the United Sta 
tes: 

130 A$(ll)=" 

140 A$(12)=" By a resolution 
of Congress approved on the 27t 
h of 

150 A$(13)="March, 1818, it was 
directed that the journal, acts, 
and 

160 A$ (14) ="proceedings of the C 
onvention which formed the prese 
nt 

170 A$(15)="Constitution of the 
United States should be publishe 
d , under 

180 A$(16)="the direction of the 
President of the United States, 
190 A$(17)="together with the se 
cret journals of the acts and 
200 A$ (18) ="proceedings, and the 

foreign correspondence (with a 
certain 

210 A$ (19)="exception) , of the C 
ongress of the United States fro 
m the 

220 A$ (20) =" first meeting thereo 
f down to the date of the ratifi 
cation 

230 A$(21)="of the definitive tr 
eaty of peace between Great Brit 
ain and 

240 A$(22)="the United States in 
the year 1783, and that 1,000 c 
opies 

250 A$ (23)="thereof should be pr 
inted, of which one copy should 
be 



260 A$ (24) =" furnished to each me 
mber of that (the Fifteenth) Con 
gress , 

270 A$(25)="and the residue shou 
Id remain subject to the future 
280 A$ (26) ^"disposition of Congr 
ess, 

290 A$(27)=" And by a resolu 

tion of Congress approved on the 
21st 

300 A$ (2 8)=" April, 1820, it was 
provided that the secret journal 

310 A$ (29)=" together with all th 
e papers and documents connected 
with 

320 A$(30)="that journal, and al 
1 other papers and documents her 
etofore 

330 A$ (31) ^"considered confident 
ial, of the old Congress, from t 
he date 

340 A$(32)="of the ratification 
of the definitive treaty of the 
year 

350 A$ (33) ="1783 to the formatio 
n of the present Government, whi 
ch were 

3 60 A$ (34) ="remaining in the off 
ice of the Secretary of State, s 
hould be 

370 A$ (35)="published under the 
direction of the President of th 
e United 

380 A$(36)="States, and that 1,0 
00 copies thereof should be prin 
ted and 

390 A$(37)="deposited in the Lib 
rary subject to the disposition 
of 

400 A$(38)="Congress. 
410 A$(39)=" In pursuance of 

these two resolutions, 1,000 co 
pies of 

420 A$(40)="the journals and act 
s of the Convention which formed 
the 

430 A$ (41) ="Constitution have be 
en heretofore printed and placed 
at the 

440 A$ (42 ) ="disposal of Congress 
, and 1,000 copies of the secret 
450 A$ (43)=" journals of the Cong 
ress of the Confederation, compl 
ete, 

460 A$(44)="have been printed, 2 
50 copies of which have been res 
erved to 

470 A$ (45) ="comply with the dire 
ction of furnishing one copy to 
each 



116 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 



48)3 A$ (46)="member of the Fiftee 
nth Congress; the remaining 75J3 
copies 

49J3 A$ (47) ="have been deposited 
in the Library and are now at th 
e 

5j3j3 A$ (48) ="disposal of Congress 

51J3 A$(49)=" By the general 
appropriation act of 9th April, 
1818, 

52j3 A$(5J3)="the sum of $lj3,J3j3j3 w 
as appropriated for defraying th 
e 

53j3 A$ (51)=" expenses of printing 
done pursuant to the resolution 
of the 

54J3 A$(52)="27th of March of tha 
t year. No appropriation has ye 
t been 

55) 3 A$ (53)= "made to defray the e 
xpenses incident to the executio 
n of the 

56) 3 A$ (54)="resolution of 21st A 
pril, 182j3. The whole expense h 
itherto 

57) 3 A$ (55)=" incurred in carrying 
both resolutions into effect ha 

s 



58) 3 A$ (56)=" exceeded by $542.56 
the appropriation of April, 1818 

This 

59) 3 A$ (57) ="balance remains due 
to the printers, and is included 

in the 

6) 3)3 A$ (58) =" estimates of appropr 
iation for the year 1822. That 
part of 

61) 3 A$(59)="the resolution of th 
e 27th March, 1818, which direct 
s the 

62) 3 A$(6)3)="publication of the f 
oreign correspondence of the Con 
gress of 

63) 3 A$(61)="the Confederation re 
mains yet to be executed, and a 
further 

64) 3 A$ (62)="appropriation will b 
e necessary for carrying it into 

effect. 

65) 3 A$(63)=" 

66) 3 A$(64)=" 

James Monroe] 

7) 3)3 OPEN"0" , #1, "HISTDOC/TXT" 

72) 3 FORI=)3T064:PRINT#l,A$(I) :NEX 
T 

73) 3 CL0SE#1 



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September 1 988 THE RAINBOW 117 



The CREATE command in Work- 
space can be very useful, as we 
learned last month. However, 
some of the benefits of building text files 
may not be readily apparent to the 
novice user. 1 am always discovering 
new ways to make the system work. 

Writing Letters "Offline" 

Keep in mind, a file in workspace is 
just that — a file. Delphi allows files to 
be in either text format (ASCII) or 
binary format. Source code falls under 
the text category, while an executable 
program is usually in binary. 

In any case, let's suppose you want to 
send a letter describing some new CoCo 
fact you have discovered. You know you 
want to send it to one specific user, but 
it would be very time-consuming to type 
the letter over again should someone 
else want the information. We can use 
Workspace to help us save some time 
and effort. Use CREATE to write the 
letter in Workspace instead of writing it 
in Mail. When you have pressed CTRL- 
z to save the letter in Workspace, you 
are ready to send it. 

Just exit Workspace and go to Mail. 
At the Mail prompt, enter SEND file- 
name, where filename is the name of the 
letter you wrote using the CREATE 
command. Delphi will respond with 
To : , just as if you were getting ready to 
write a new letter. However, after an- 
swering the expected prompts, you will 
not be given the usual opportunity to 
enter text. Instead, Delphi will send the 
file you specified with the SEND com- 
mand to the username(s) supplied. And 
the file is stored in Workspace ready to 
be sent to anyone else you might choose 
at a later time. 

Incidentally, there is another way to 
accomplish the above feat. Write your 
letter in Mail as usual, but send a copy 
of the letter to yourself as well by 
including your username at the To: 
prompt. Now when reading your new 
Mail messages, as soon as you have read 
the letter in question, enter EXTRACT/ 
NQHEADER filename. This will cause the 
text of the letter to be saved in your 
Workspace under the name filename, 



Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is CRA Y. 



Broaden your online 
horizons using the create 
command 

Creating 
Online 

By Cray Augsburg 

Rainbow Technical Editor 



and you can send the letter to other 
users as described. 

Online APB's? 

Let's say you and a bunch of your 
online cohorts form a little club in 
which you trade jokes via the Mail 
system. As the group grows, you notice 
it's getting harder and harder to type out 
all the group's usernames every time 
you want to send them all the same 
letter. After all, entering one or two 
usernames isn't too tedious, but seven 
or eight gets to be a real bummer. A 
distribution list can really help us here. 

Go to your Workspace and enter 
CREATE filename. DI5. The filename 
can be any descriptive name you choose 
(a good one for this example might be 



Database Report 

By Don Hutchison 

Rainbow CoCo SIG Database Manager 



Through the kindness of James Farmer 

(modemmaster), we now have over 20 
digitized pictures online of the people 
attending the Chicago RAlNBOWfestl You'll 
find these DS-69B pictures in the CoCo 3 
Graphics topic of the database. Included 
are pictures of these notables: Lonnie and 
Willo Falk; Marty Goodman; Steve Bjork; 
Dale Lear; Kip Bryan of Delphi; Belinda 
Kirby, Kim Vincent, Cray Augsburg, 
Wendy Falk, and Donna Shuck of THE 
RAINBOW; and such commercial vendors as 
Burke & Burke, Computer Plus, Speech 
Systems, Tom Mix, Granite Computer 
Systems, Howard Medical, Cer-Comp and 
Diecom. Thanks, James! 

OS-9 Online 
Of General interest is Chris Burke 

(cocoxt) who uploaded his fifth Applica- 
tion Note with many hard disk installation 
tips and information on Burke & Burke 
products. 

In the Utilities topic of the database, 
Rick Adams (RICKADAMS) posted LS, a 
public domain directory listing utility 
similar to the UNIX LS command. Warren 
Moore (wjmoore) posted his popular 
Wmode program, which can save and 
restore window attributes in memory and 
can also change colors and palette regis- 
ters. (The assembly source files are in- 
cluded.) Bruce Isted (bruceisted) posted 
a revision to his MS-DOS/ RS-DOS to 
OS-9 transfer utilities, courtesy of Bob 
Santy. (PCDOS . fiR was updated 6/9/ 88 and 
RSDQS.flR was updated 6/22/88 to correct 
some bugs, particularly ones pertaining to 



80-track drives.) Bruce also posted WAIT, 
a screen saver/ blanker utility. Mike Knud- 
sen (ragtimer) uploaded SIZEFIX, a 
utility in BASIC09, to modify the size or 
length of a disk file. Bert Schneider (os- 
9BERT) posted flIFGEN, a BASIC09 utility 
that helps create AIFs for OS-9 Level II 
on a CoCo 3* The AIFs are used by Multi- 
Vue to identify icons, screen type, and 
memory modifiers. Brian Wright (polter- 
geist) uploaded SORTDIR, a"pure vanilla" 
directory sort utility. Brian also sent us a 
window disk utility and a disassembler. 

Ken Schunk (KENSCHUNK) posted a 
modified SCF driver in the Device Drivers 
topic of the database. Ken's driver can 
properly handle non-sharable devices, 
such as the printer (/p). 

The Patches topic gives us Jerry Yates 
(BAGMAN) who uploaded CC3G0.PAT, a 
text file that allows those using the Burke 
& Burke XT-ROM to patch the CC3go 
module and use an alternate startup and/ 
or autoex file. 

In the Telcom topic, John Beveridge 
(johntoronto) uploaded JTERM, a Level 
II terminal program that supports YMo- 
dem, X Modem-checksum and XModem- 
CRC. Merle Kemmerly III (TOOK3) posted 
TEL5TAR, a terminal program for the 
CoCo 3 that features pull-down menus, 
Ron Bihler (raab) uploaded an ARCed 
file containing various patches and fixes 
for the RiBBS system. Bill Brady 
(OS9UGED) uploaded the "official" Wiz 
icon and AIF set, and preliminary docu- 
mentation for Wiz Pro. 

In the Graphics & Music topic, Dennis 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 




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Weldy (0S9ER) uploaded QUflDDUMP, a 
utility for printing a Hi-Res VEF image 
from st din on a Quadram Quadjet print- 
er. Mike Veal (LVEAL) uploaded his version 
of the Mandelbrot set- Kevin Darling 
(KDARLING) uploaded his fix for the 
"VDGINT blip,'* the infamous flowing 
waterfall demo and viewer program, and 
a CAD-like picture of the space shuttle, 
modified using his Gfx editor. Kevin also 
posted sixteen icons for Multi- Vue and a 
humorous "Meep" sound module. Bob 
Montowski (graphicspub) uploaded 
some D&D "Clip Art" as well as some 
erotic "Clip Art" for CoCo 3's Home 
Publisher. Mike Knudsen (RAGTIMER) 
posted a patch to fix a bug in the new (6/ 



JOKELIST). The extension, however, 
must be _ D IS. This lets Delphi know the 
file is really going to be used as a 
distribution list, a list of several user- 
names to whom you want to send a 
single piece of Mail. 

When Delphi is ready for you to 
create the file, simply type the user- 
names in question, making sure to press 
ENTER after each one. It is important 
that each username is spelled correctly 
and that there is only one username on 
each line of the file. When you have 
entered the list, press CTRL-Z and Del- 
phi will save the list in Workspace. 

To send a joke to all of these people 
at once, enter SEND at the Mail prompt. 
If you have already entered your joke 
using CREATE, enter SEND filename. 
When Delphi responds with To:, enter 
0JOKELIST. You need not include the 
extension, but you must precede the 
filename with the @ sign. Enter your 
letter as you desire; when you press 
CTRL-Z to finalize the send, your joke 
will be sent to all the usernames listed 
in the JOKELIST -D IS distribution list. 
As the group grows, you can add new 
members to the list by simply editing the 
file in Workspace. You can also take 
usernames off the list in the event that 
someone doesn't laugh at one of your 
jokes. And you can apply this same 



8/88) version of UltiMusE. Mike also 
posted a piano music file called NOLA . LIME 
(version 1.1.1 of his Umuse program), two 
scores for Umuse called Gabrieli and 
Naiarag, and a hints file for getting the 
most use out of the UltiMusE music score 
editor and MIDI player. 

The Programmers Den gives us Brian 
Wright's file with two C source files: 
DES .C,va utility to encrypt files, and 
BACON . G, a tutorial program. 

CoCo SIG 

At the request of a SIG member, Dick 
White (dickwhite) posted the constitu- 
tion for the Cincinnati Tandy Users Group 
in the General topic of the database. Gary 



technique to many other applications as 
well. 

The SIG staff uses distribution lists 
liberally. And while I understand the 
need may not be as prevalent among 
individual users, the example shows one 
application where it can be used. 

Simpler Workspace Directories 

Last month, I described how to get a 
directory of Workspace using the DIR/ 
EXCLUDE* , MRI option. This command 
line will show you a directory of all 
Workspace files with the exclusion of 
Mail files and folders (those having the 
-MRI extension.) It seems I have been 
going the long way about it — there is 
an easier way! Simply enter DIR/ND- 
MRIL, which will accomplish the same 
thing. Of course the ^EXCLUDE option 
is still quite useful in other situations. 

Another option for the DIR com- 
mand is DIR/fi. This option gives an 
abbreviated directory listing in which 
all the information regarding file size, 
etc., is left out. Each file in the directory 
listing will be on a separate line. Ob- 
viously, such a listing will go much more 
quickly depending on the number of 
files you have in your Workspace. 

Another handy feature is that these 
options can be combined. You can enter 
DIR/fVNDMRIL to get an abbreviated 



McCarty (bandman) uploaded an index 
for the 1983-84 issues of Color Computer, 
and Zack Sessions (ZACKS) provided a file 
discussing computer "viruses." 

In the CoCo 3 Graphics topic, John 
Barrett (jbarrett) uploaded a picture of 
a nude woman on a bearskin rug and some 
digitized pictures from "Lost In Space." 
Bob Wharton (bobwharton) posted his 
drawings of the "Miami Vice" logo, a 
Garfield cartoon, and several humorous 
pictures admonishing others not to use 
other computers. Eric Robichaud (egro- 
BICHAUD) uploaded an ARCed file con- 
taining an MGE viewer utility for those 
using MS-DOS machines. (The MS-DOS 
programs called PkxArc or Arc are re- 



directory and still exclude the Mail files. 
DIR/fi/EXCLUDE*.TXT produces a di- 
rectory excluding any file with an 
extension of .TXT, 

Wildcards 

You might have noticed in this and 
last month's Delphi Bureau that some 
of the command lines include an aster- 
isk. This asterisk is known as a wildcard 
character. It is something many CoCo 
users are not aware of because wild- 
cards are not directly supported by Disk 
BASIC or even OS-9. 

A wildcard causes a Workspace com- 
mand to act on many related files in the 
same way. The asterisk is used simply to 
replace "unknown" parts of the file- 
name. For instance, if you want to get 
a directory of only those files with a 
.TXT extension, enter DIR *.TXT. The 
asterisk tells Delphi that you don't care 
what the first part of the filename is. 
You can break this down even further. 
If you have several files in Workspace 
with MEMO as the first four characters of 
the regular filename, you might enter 
DIR MEMO* . * to get a directory. 

Obviously, these wildcards offer a 
great deal of power to the user. If you 
want to delete all text files in your 
Workspace, you might enter DEL * . TXT. 
On the other hand, use of wildcards 
with a destructive command such as 
DELETE can be dangerous. I urge you to 
use it cautiously. 

CREATE Revisited 

1 want to mention some aspects to the 
Workspace CREATE command that have 
not been covered. First, you can use the 
standard Delphi commands while using 
CRERTE. For instance, pressing CTRL-X 
or CTRL-U will cause Delphi to cancel 
the current line (any text typed since the 
last time you pressed enter). Similarly, 
CTRL-R will cause Delphi to redisplay 



One-Liner Contest Winner , . * 
This short program converts fractions to their decimal counterparts. 

The listing: 1 CLS : PRINT : PRINT 11 NUMERATOR" : P 

RINT"-- — — " : PRINT" DENOMINA 

TOR" : PRINT : INPUT" INPUT NUMERATOR 

11 ; A: PRINT" 
-» : INPUT "INPUT DENOMINATOR" ; B : D* 
( 1/ B ) * A : PRINT @ 3 3 0 , A ; "/ " ; B ; " m » ; : P 
RINTUS ING ".#####■■; D Charles A. Kiedaisch 

Mokena, IL 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of both The Third Rainbow Book 
of Adventures and its companion The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



120 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



in much the same way as allowed by the 
BASIC command AUDIO ON. Larry Binen- 
feld (MRBAS1C) uploaded a set of patches 
for EP ZA P from Michtron, which allows 
operation on 40-track, 6~ms drives (either 
single- or double-sided). Marc Genois 
(marcgenois) uploaded a disk label pro- 
gram for the Tandy DMP-130. Richard 
Ortman (R AO) posted Co Co Log, a cata- 
loging system. 

•(ruhnow) uploaded a Hangman game 
R thejGibCp 3 in the Games topic of the 
database. 

In the Classic Graphics topic, John 
Barrett posted three pictures of the group, 
The Bangles. 

The Music & Sound topic includes Mike 



Carey (spoolframe) who uploaded six- 
teen Lyra music files for the enjoyment of 
SIG members; Mark Raphael (mark Ra- 
phael), who posted an ARCed file con- 
taining several of his favorite Orchestra-90 
tunes; and Mike Stute (gridbug), who 
uploaded three musical selections as well. 

In Product Reviews & Announcements, 
Richard Trasborg posted Mike Trammell's 
review of MAX-10, the new word proces- 
sor and document creator for the CoCo 3. 

Data Communications gives us Joe 
Josey (COCOJOE) who uploaded a text file 
describing a hardware modification to a 
modem, which allows it to detect the 
different incoming baud rates. 
See you online on Delphi! 



quired to unARC these MS-DOS files; 
TC y as used on the CoCo, will not work.) 
John Britton (scirocco) uploaded several 
pictures from the series, "Star Trek, the 
Next Generation." Billy Hambric 
(SNOOPYDOG) uploaded some more of his 
popular MGE graphics, and Richard 
Trasborg (tras) uploaded an ARCed file 
containing a collection of popular utilities 
for use with CoCo 3 pictures. 

In Utilities and Applications, Alan 
DeKok (alandekok) posted patches to 
allow faster writing on the CoCo 3's Hi- 
Res screens and a utility for utilizing the 
Hi-Res adapter from Tandy. David Mills 
(david mills) posted a utility to allow disk 
users to hear the data transfer to/ from disk 



the current line on your screen. This 
command can be very useful if someone 
should send you a message while you 
are in the middle of writing a file. 

Second, slash commands do work in 
the CREATE mode. In other words, if you 
are in the middle of creating a file and 
want to know what time it is, just enter 
/T at the beginning of a line (all slash 
commands must start at the beginning 
of a new line of text). The /SEND com- 
mand works very well in this situation. 
The problem this might cause is if you 



want to start a line of text in the file with 
a slash. Delphi will think you want it 
immediately to execute the command, 
which is really just a line of text. The 
solution to this problem is to precede 
any such line with two slashes. To have 
the line /FIRST LINE ON TEXT appear 
in the file, you must enter it as //FIRST 
LINE OF TEXT. 

I hope the information I have pre- 
sented here will help you gain a little 
more use out of your online time. I also 
want to spark your interest (OK, I'm 



really looking for a raging inferno!) in 
the many ways Delphi can be used to 
your advantage, whether you use it for 
business purposes or personal pleasure. 
The more we know about something, 
the less fearful we are of it. And it is not 
difficult to overcome the challenge 
Delphi presents to many users. It only 
takes a little time and effort. 

Join me next month as I delve into 
the workings of the Workspace EDIT 
command. Better yet, delve into it 
yourself and learn! 



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September 1988 THE RAINBOW 121 




4K 




Calculating time intervals for VCR tape 



On VCR Time 



By Fred Hair, Jr. 




_ 



i 



r ave you ever picked up a par- 
tially used video cassette and 
wondered how much recording 
time is left on it? The video tape counter 
on the recorder indicates that the last 
recorded segment ends at 3640, but 
what does this number measure? Video 
tape cassettes are manufactured in 
standard sizes and labelled according to 
the amount of recording time available 
on each cassette. It would be convenient 
to have a tape counter which indicated 
elapsed time. Unfortunately, this is not 
the case. Modern VCR tape counters 
are electronic event counters which 
receive their input from the spindle 
driving the take-up reel in the cassette. 
The tape count is a measure of the 
number of revolutions made by the 
take-up reel. The counter is a conven- 
ient and simple way to mark the begin- 
ning and the end of a recording seg- 
ment. With a little programming 
expertise and the use of your CoCo, 
these numbers can be used to determine 
the running time of the tape segment. 



Fred Hair holds a B.S. degree in Phys- 
ics. He is an instrument technician 
specializing in the installation and 
servicing of industrial process control 
equipment. 






122 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



The BASIC program, Video Timer, is 
designed to perform this task. 

Video Timer was written in BASIC for 
the CoCo 2 and was developed for VHS 
VCRs using T-120 video cassettes. The 
tape counter should range from 0 to 
approximately 5800 over the length of 
the cassette. If your VCR meets this 
specification, then the program may be 
used without modification. If not, the 
section on program theory will show 
you how to modify the program to meet 
your needs. 

"The tape count i$ 
a measure of the 
number of 
revolutions made 
by the take-up 
reel i 

Let us solve the following problem to 
demonstrate the use of program. You 
have a video cassette on which the last 
recorded segment ends at count 4620. 
The counter indicates the end of the 
tape at 5820. You want to know how 
much recording time is available at 
medium speed. Load VIDTIME and 
execute. The program begins by 
prompting: 
INPUT TfiPE SPEED 

F FDR FAST 

M FOR MEDIUM 

5 FOR 5L0U 

? 

Enter M for medium speed. Entering 
any character other than an F, M, or S, 
terminates the program. [If you have a 
VHS VCR, use 'F' for the SP speed, 'M' 
for LP and 'S'for EP or SLP. For Beta, 
use 'F'for Beta I or XI, 'NT for Beta II 
or X2 and 'S' for Beta III. On 8mm 
recorders, use 'F' for SP (or if there is 
only one speed) and 'M' for LP.] 



The program will then prompt: 
COUNT 1 = ?. This is the number indi- 
cating the beginning of the tape seg- 
ment. Enter 4620. The program then 
prompts COUNT 2 = ?. This is the count- 
er number at the end of the tape seg- 
ment. Enter 5820. The program will 
respond with TIME INTERVAL = 71 
MINUTES. There are 71 minutes of 
running time at medium speed left on 
the tape. The program will then return 
to the initial prompt. 
Program Theory 

Video information is encoded on 
magnetic tape by a cylindrical, rotating 
magnetic head. The tape must be pulled 
across the head at a constant speed. As 
the diameter of the tape spool on the 
take-up reel in the cassette increases, the 
frequency of rotation of the take-up reel 
decreases. The number of tape counts 
per unit time also decreases. A graph of 
tape running time versus counter 
number will represent a curve that may 
be defined by the quadratic equation: 



T = AX 2 + BX + C. 



Eq. 1 



where T is the elapsed time since the 
beginning of the tape; X is the counter 
number; and A, B, and C are constants 
to be determined. Let XI be the number 
indicating the beginning of a tape 
segment. Placing this in Equation 1 
yields: 

Tl = AX1 2 + BX1 + C. Eq. 2 

Let X2 be the counter number indicat- 
ing the end of a tape segment. Equation 
1 would then yield 



T2 = AX2 2 + BX2 + C. 



Eq. 3 



The running time of the tape segment 
will be T2 minus Tl, or 

T = T2 - Tl = A(X2 2 - XI 2 ) +B(X2 
-XI), Eq.4 



where T is now the running time of the 
tape segment between the counter XI 
and X2. 

So far, so good. But modern VCRs 
are capable of operating at fast, medium 
and slow speeds. Medium speed in one 
half of fast speed, and slow speed is one 
third of fast speed. If we let Equation 
4 represent running time at fast speed, 
we can write: 



TF = A(X2 2 - XI 2 ) + B(X2- XI) 



TM = 2T 
TS = 3T 



Eq. 5 
Eq. 6 
Eq. 7 



where TF, TM, and TS are the running 
times at fast, medium, and slow speeds 
respectively. All that remains is to 
determine the value of the constants A 
and B. 

Equation 1 defines the curve which 
represents the relationship between 
running time and tape counter indica- 
tion. Given a set of points which lie on 
the curve, there are several mathemat- 
ical techniques for determining the 
constants A and B. I have selected a 
method based on the Principle of Least 
Squares, as given in program LER5TQ. 
(See Listing 2.) 

A detailed discussion of the Principle 
of Least Squares may be found in many 
introductory texts on numerical analy- 
sis, such as Methods In Numerical 
Analysis by Kaj L. Nielsen. 

Select a video tape from your tape 
library. Its entire length should be 
recorded at fast speed. Use a rented pre- 
recorded tape only if you are certain it 
is recorded at fast speed and is a full two 
hours long. Make sure the cassette is 
fully rewound, reset the tape counter on 
your VCR, insert the cassette, and press 
the play button. Write down the initial 
counter number (zero) and the initial 
time in minutes (also zero). Continue to 
write down the counter number and 
elapsed time every ten minutes or so. It 



Dr. 

Nibble 

By Kelly 
Taylor 






r 4 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 123 



is not necessary that the measurements 
be taken at exact ten minute intervals. 
You might take one measurement at 
nine minutes, another at twenty-one 
minutes, another at thirty-two, etc. 
Simply be sure you record the count 
measurement as close to the minute as 
possible. The following chart was made 
with my RCA VCR using a T-120 video 
cassette: 



9. 4365 

10. 4732 

11. 5080 

12. 5414 

13. 5735 

14. 5804 



* 

* 
* 



80 
90 
100 
110 
120 
122 



* Elapsed Time 

* (minutes) 



Counter 
Number 

- 1 - —I - ^0 — t - - 1 ■ b.^P — I - ■Jr ■A' 

^T* 



1. 0 

2. 857 

3. 1541 

4. 2128 

5. 2651 

6. 3126 

7. 3566 

8. 3976 



* 

* 
* 

* 
* 



0 
10 
20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 



Now load LER5TQ and begin execu- 
tion. The program prompts NUMBER OF 
DflTR POINTS? Enter the number of 
data points, in this case 14. The pro- 
gram will then prompt for the first data 
point. State the counter number, fol- 
lowed by a comma, then the time. Press 
ENTER. The program will then prompt 
for the second measurement. Continue 
in this manner until all measurements 
have been entered. The program will 
then proceed to calculate and display 
the constants A and B: 

fi = .01B8418559 
B = 1.01131207 



These are the constants which define 
equations 5 through 7. Because Video 
Timer uses equations 5 through 7 to 
compute the time intervals, the con- 
stants A and B must be defined in line 
40 of the program. 

The listings for VIDTIME, and 
LER5TQ are given in BASIC. Computer 
memory requirements are modest (less 
than 8K for each program), the pro- 
grams are unpretentious and simple in 
structure; there should be no difficulty 
in modifying them for use with other 
systems. Use the programs to gauge 
your tape-time on any video recording, 
and never lose the end of another 
television film or show. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
these programs may be directed to the 
author at 1314 Kim Street, Sulphur, LA 
70663. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 



Listing 1: VIDTIME 



10 REM 
20 REM 
30 REM 
4{J A = 
207 

5)3 PRINT f, INPUT TAPE SPEED" 
NT" F FOR FAST" : PRINT" 



************* 

* VIDTIME * 
************* 

.0188418559 : B = 1.01131 



PRI 
M F 



OR MEDIUM" 
ii 



PRINT" S FOR SLOW 



THEN D=l 
THEN D=2 
THEN D=3 



1 = ";X1 



GOTO 110 
GOTO 11^ 
GOTO lip 

: X1=X1 
: X2=X2 



60 INPUT Q$ 
70 IF Q$="F" 
80 IF Q$="M" 
90 IF Q$="S" 
100 END 

110 INPUT "COUNT 
/100 

120 INPUT"COUNT 2 - ";X2 
/100 

130 Y=D*(A*(X2*X2-X1*X1)+B*(X2-X 
1)) 

140 PRINT"TIME INTERVAL = ";INT( 
Y) ; " MINUTES" : GOTO 50 

Listing 2: LEflSTQ 

10 REM ************ 
20 REM * LEASTQ * 
30 REM ************ 

40 DIM A(3,4) ,X(100) ,Y(100) ,Z(3) 
50 N=2 : N1=N+1 : N2=N1+1 
60 INPUT "NUMBER OF DATA POINTS " 
;M : FOR K=l TO M : PRINT K ; TAB ( 
5) > 

70 INPUT X(K),Y(K) : X(K)=X(K)/1 
00 : NEXT K 

80 A(1,1)=M : FOR J=2 TO Nl : A( 
1,J)=0 : L=J-1 

90 FOR K=l TO M : A(l, J) =A(1, J) + 



X(K) A L : NEXT K : NEXT J 
100 FOR 1=2 TO Nl : FOR J=l TO N 
1 : A(I,J)=0 : L=I+J-2 
110 FOR K=l TO M : A ( I , J) =A ( I ; J) 
+X(K) A L : NEXT K : NEXT J : NEXT 
I 

120 A(1,N2)=0 : FOR 1=1 TO M : A 
(1,N2)=A(1,N2)+Y(I) : NEXT I 
130 FOR K=2 TO Nl : A(K,N2)=0 : 
L=K-1 

140 FOR 1=1 TO M : A(K,N2)=A(K,N 
2)+X(I) A L*Y(I) : NEXT I : NEXT K 
150 FOR L=l TO Nl : IF A(L,L)<>0 

THEN 200 
160 IF L>=N1 THEN 190 
170 H=L+1 : FOR I=H TO Nl 
J=l TO N2 

180 A ( L , J ) = A ( L , J ) + A ( I , J ) 

J : NEXT I : IF A(L,L)<>0 
00 

190 PRINT"NO SOLUTION POSSIBLE." 
: STOP 

Nl : 



FOR 



NEXT 
THEN 2 



200 FOR 1=1 TO 
THEN 230 
210 D=A(I,L) 
220 FOR J=l TO N2 : 
)/D : NEXT J 
230 NEXT I 
240 FOR 1=1 TO Nl : 
I,L)=0 THEN 2 60 
2 50 FOR J=l TO N2 : 
)-A(I,J) : NEXT J 
260 NEXT I : NEXT L 
270 FOR 1=1 TO Nl : 
/A(I,I) : 



IF A(I,L)=0 

A(I,J)=A(I,J 

IF I=L OR A( 
A(I, J)=A(L,J 



280 PRINT 

290 PRINT 

300 PRINT 

310 END 



: Z(I)=A(I,N2) 

NEXT I 
: PRINT "COEFFICIENTS" 
"A = ";Z(3) 
"B = ";Z(2) 



124 THE RAINBOW September 1988 






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C 1988 General Electric Company, USA 







CoCo 3 



F/P Writer /// 
Setting the Standard 



In the beginning there was VIP Writ- 
er, and users saw that it was good. Even 
though they had to squint at tiny black- 
on-green letters and wait on the scroll- 
ing, it was still the best thing around for 
the CoCo. But it's not the best anymore. 

There's a new word processor to 
claim the crown, but at least the title is 
kept in the family. As the CoCo 1 and 
2 gave way to the 3, VIP Writer gives 
way to VIP Writer III — an upgrade for 
tape or disk that takes advantage of the 
CoCo 3's native 64-color palette and 80- 
column screen, and even adds a print 
spooler. 



Users of the original VIP Writer will 
have no problems using VIP Writer III, 
and can dive in right away with hardly 
a glance at the documentation. 

The first thing you'll notice upon 
boot-up is the inviting blank, blue 
screen that makes you want to wade in 
and write! On my RGB monitor, the 
color was so lovely that 1 sat for a few 
moments just staring at the screen. 
What a delightful change from the 
generic CoCo green! But if the default 
blue screen does not serve as your muse, 
you have CoCo 3's palette of 63 colors 
(64, counting black) to choose from for 



background and text — that's 4,032 
possible combinations if my memory of 
statistics serves me right. Surely one of 
those combinations would appeal to 
any user (personally, 1 prefer the default 
white-on-blue display). A configuration 
program supplied allows you to modify 
VIP Writer III so that it boots up with 
your chosen defaults. 

The second thing you'll notice is the 
faster scrolling speed. Traveling up and 
down screen pages, and to and from the 
top and bottom of a document is nearly 
instantaneous. Old VIP Writer users 
won't believe the pep. It came as a 
pleasant surprise to me. 

When it comes time to print out, 
you'll notice the print spooler, which 
has increased in size in the latest edition 
of VIP Writer ///from 49,000 to 57,000 
characters. This means you won't have 
to sit twiddling your thumbs while your 
20-page magnum opus prints out so 
slowly on your dot matrix printer. 



1 26 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



While one document is being printed 
out, another can be called up and 
edited. 

These three enhancements (color, 
speed and spooler) are the only major 
differences between VIP Writer ///and 
the older version. SD Enterprises' Paul 
Anderson said that the program is "now 
100 percent compatible with RGB com- 
puter systems, RGB DOS and hard 
disk." He added, "This is the key to 
using VIP Writer ///with double-sided 
drives, faster stepping rates and up to 
two hard disks." 



To 9nt$r- & cottaand aode cpanaad 



to ?nt»r the text bode 



SLOCK 
COLOR 



Jj ] r .#r-.-i * L* airbiri 



!■ rdC 



■■*r-s ttxt bt+ort cursor 



I B?k .-sin ifuilU u r, 
urns 1r\ EQ:or t. □ i 



l,D-4<d fJlf f^c-ii stiFfl'i liPt 
JifPlaV J r *Ct tap* n*B.+ 





The VIP commands still hinge on the 
CLEAR key: Commands in text mode 
are issued with a CLEAR key combina- 
tion; a double press of the clear key 
still moves the user from the text mode 



into the command mode. The window 
mode has not changed. 

One disadvantage of a command- 
oriented program like VIP is that the 
commands sometimes just don't make 
a lot of sense (e.g., clear-G is VIP's 
"undo" command). However, an ad- 
vantage of such programs is their speed 
of operation — once you learn the 
commands. If you're into just plain- 
vanilla word processing (as am I), VIP 
Writer III (and the original program) 
treats you kindly. Only if you dig into 
the more esoteric functions and com- 
mands will you have to do a lot of 
memorizing. I stick pretty much with 
disk I/O, deletion and cursor move- 
ment commands, leaving header, footer 
and formatting commands alone. The 
default formats are fine for me. 

My one big gripe with VIP Writer, 
both old and new, is its save command. 
When you invoke the command, only 
what follows the cursor is saved. This 
means that to save a document whole 
you must travel to its beginning. If you 
make frequent saves (and it is advised 
that you do!), this can become a pain. 
Several times I have tapped the final 
keystrokes of a document and blithely 
saved what I thought was the whole 
document — but which turned out to be 



The Company Behind VIP 

SD Enterprises acquired all the rights 
to the VIP library of Color Computer 
products from VIP Technologies in 
November 1986. SDE owner Paul And- 
erson said, "We were offered the products 
and jumped at the chance to obtain them 
as we knew they were superior products 
with a recognized brand name," 

In March 1987, SD Enterprises offered 
upgrades to the VIP stand-alone prod- 
ucts to allow them to run on the CoCo 
3 as they did on the 64K CoCo 1 or 2. 
The VIP Integrated Library needed no 
upgrade as it ran on the CoCo 3 without 
any modifications. 

SDE continued to sell K/P products 
through Tandy Express Order, and And- 
erson decided to advertise in THE RAIN- 
BOW. Pleased with the response regard- 
ing the "revival of the VIP Library" 
Anderson said he "decided to rewrite the 
VIP products to take advantage of the 
CoCo 3's increased speed, memory and 
hardware screen display." 

The first product released specifically 
for the CoCo 3 is VIP Writer IIL And- 
erson said he was amazed at how fast it 
worked. " VIP Writer III ran as fast of 
faster than IBM word processors we've 

used." ^Iftrip^C- 
Anderson, wffo \vorked on program- 



Word Processors: The Ultimate in Procrastination Technology 



^There's a saying that the process of 
writing is easy — you just load a piece 
of paper into a typewriter and stare at the 
blank white page until droplets of blood 
appear on your forehead. Another saying 
insists that whatever amount of time you 
have to complete a job, that's how much 
time it takes. 

At the root of both of these sayings is 
the matter of procrastination, a state of 
metabolic-overdrive, ulcer-inducing 
madness — and an art form in itself. 

From my observations working here at 
THE RAINBOW, I have discovered this 
absolute — there can be no procrastina- 
tion without deadlines. You cannot have 
one without the other ^ it would be like 
having peanut butter without jelly, 
spaghetti without meatballs. (What, me 
procrastinate? I always begin an assign- 
ment at least three hours before it's due.) 

These observations give new meaning 
to the party line depicting computers as 
irniQ-r and labor-saving devices. They are, 
they really are. But human nature plugs 
itself into the equation in the most 
unpredictable ways. 

Think back to your pre-word process- 



ling highlchool orSollege days when 
having a term paper due on Monday 

gjnieant sweeping through the library on 
Friday night, hastily scribbling and 
rescribbling rough drafts all through 
Saturday, and finally tracking down a 
typist who just might be able to bring 

tbrder to your handwritten chaos on 
Sunday night. 

Now think how different it would be 
if you could do it all again — this time 
using your word processor. Why, you 
could wait until Sunday afternoon to get 
started! 

Of course, the library rush would not 
change (unless you were fortunate 
enough to be connected to an online 
database), but the nq^e-taking procedure 
Meaii be performed within the word proc- 
essor. From there, with your trusty word 
v processor's cut-and-paste ability, you can 
move seamlessly through the rough draft 
phase and flow into the finished product. 
^Run the spelling checker on the final 
document, print out on a letter-quality 
printer, and your professor will be so 
pleased he'll give you an A, right? (One 
can hope. I have a nagging suspicion 



professors are beginning to catch on to 
woi^ processing.) 

I've found that word processors can bj$s; 
of help in other labor-saving ways. For 
example, paper-wadding is no longer 
required. (Paper-wadding is generally a 
dangerous activity for those under dead- 
line, because it invariably leads tq an 
impromptu basketball game with th£ 
trash can.) 

They can also eliminate the fore1ieao> 
slaps and wistful "Oh, yeah" that accom- 
panies the realization that one has left out 
several vital sentences in the thesis para- 
graph of a carefully hand-typed paper. 
With word processing, reprints are not a 
problem. And ftiither are VY@rd coutitsl ' 
You If never haw- to write a word over 
whsyi^bu were assigned. 

But I don't think we've yet reached the 
zenith of this procrastination technology. 
I'm waiting for the day when speech digi- 
tizing computers can take dictation and 
zip out a hard copy the second I shut my 
mouthL 

Now, if youll excuse me, it's 3 a.m. 
Monday, and I'm going to need a little 
sleep if I'm to hand this in by 9. & 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 127 



ming the original VIP Writer, said he is 
encouraged by the speed and capabilities 
of the CoCo 3 and plans to rewrite the 
rest o£ the VIP product to take full 
advantage of them. 

According to Anderson, VIP Data- 
base III will have been released in July, 
and will feature the following: support 
for 40-, 64- and 80-column screens; 
double clock speed; and a print spooler 
added to the report generator. He also 
said that VIP Calc III, VIP Speller III 
and VIP Terminal mil be completed in 
the fall All will support 32-, 40s 64- and 
80-column screen size and double clock 
speed. He said Calc *s spreadsheet size will 
be increased and thai Speller's spell 
checking will be performed in memory 
for maximum speed. 
^*When we are finished v we will have a 
very powerful package,* he concluded □ 



nothing! In K/P's defense, the post-save 
response on the command line read 
"part saved," signifying that I had saved 
only a part of the document. 

1 have two little gripes. The first little 
gripe concerns the way VIP handles 
type-overs of more than one line in the 
overstrike mode — it creates lines 
between lines. Once you have finished 
with your additions you must delete all 
the text beyond that first line. The 
second little gripe many of you may not 
find relevant (especially if you have 
never flexed your fingers over the 
keyboard of an IBM-compatible like 
the Tandy 1000) — the lack of a back- 
space key. I admit I may be spoiled, but 
1 prefer to backspace rather than back 
up and delete. 

The documentation for VIP Writer 
III comes in the form of the original VIP 
Writer manual and a four-page adden- 
dum listing all the new commands and 
features. As in the older version, there 
is a help screen. 

1 saved the best for last! The VIP 
Writer III program I received came 
packaged with VIP Speller. The word 
processor is on Side 1 of the disk and 
the spell checker is on Side 2. Spell 
checking makes editing and proofread- 
ing a heckuva lot easier! The program 
maintains a dictionary of a respectable 
50,000 words, and the user can create a 
number of personalized auxiliary dic- 
tionaries. 

VIP Speller requires only a disk drive 
and 32K ECB — which means that it 
can be used with the original VIP 
Writer, It can also perform a spell check 
on practically any file that's saved in 
ASCII. I will be using VIP Speller on 
this review; a copy editor and a proof- 
reader will clean up behind me. If you 

128 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



find a misspelling in this review, I don't 
want to hear about it! 

If you are in the market for a CoCo 
3 word processor, you should definitely 
look into VIP Writer III. If you own a 
CoCo 3 and a copy of the original VIP 
Writer, you should consider upgrading. 




(SD Enterprises, P.O. Box 1233, Gresham, 
OR 97030, 503-663-2865; $79.95 for disk, 
$59.95 for tape; $34.95 for VIP Speller; add 
$3 for S/H) 

— Lauren Willoughby 



* Softwa re 



CoCo 3 



Multi-Menu — 
A Custom Menu 
System under / 
Multi-Vue 



Multi-Menu is a very user-friendly 
program for creating custom menus 
under Multi-Vue. Until now, to use a 
utility program or OS-9 command from 
Multi- Vue, the user had to either write 
his own A IF file, find the program in 
the commands directory (this can get 
tiresome if the directory is very large) 
and open it from the Files menu, or get 
a shell and type it in the old-fashioned 
way. Now, after the quick construction 
of a menu, all of your most-used com- 
mands and utilities can be accessed by 
a simple pull-down sequence. 

Multi- Menu requires a 5 1 2K CoCo 3, 
OS-9 Level II and Multi-Vue. It comes 
with an 1 1-page instruction manual that 
explains how to get started by making 
a backup and copying the Menu files to 
the Multi- Vue disk. Once this is com- 
pleted, the user is ready to start creating 
menus. 



After double-clicking on the icon, the 
program takes over and prompts the 
user for all the information needed. The 
program is so user-friendly that I only 
really needed to look at the instructions 
for one thing — how to enter com- 
mands. Along with entering anything 
that could normally be entered at the 
OS-9 prompt, the user can have the 
program request parameters by enter- 
ing a prompt surrounded by percent 
signs. 

For example, if the user wanted the 
Ident command to be in his menu, he 
could type ident ^Enter Filename^ 
as the command for that menu option. 
Then, after selecting the Ident option 
on the menu, the user would be asked 
for the filename with an "Enter File- 
name:" prompt. The command line 
would then be executed, and the user 
would see the statistics for the file 
requested, all with a simple menu se- 
quence. 

I use my computer mostly for pro- 
gramming and so wondered how Multi- 
Menu could help me to write. I con- I 
structed a menu screen called Develop- 
ment containing four menus titled 
Basic, Pascal, C and Assembly. Clicking 
on the C menu bar pulls down a menu 
with three options — Edit, Compile and 
Execute. 

The Edit option prompts me for a 
filename and then calls up Scred (an 
OS-9 screen editor). After I've edited 
the program, I exit Scred and I'm back 
at the menu screen. I then pull down the 
C menu and click on the Compile 
option. The program again prompts me 
for a filename, which it proceeds to 
compile. Finally, I click on the Execute 
option to test the program. If it's not 
right, I can go back to the editor. This 
seems to greatly increase productivity 
and makes the rather old-fashioned OS- 
9 C compiler perform like Borland's 
Turbo C. 

As nice as it is, however, Multi-Menu 
is not perfect. The first thing 1 noticed 
was that the cursor is constantly hang- 
ing around the screen. This, of course, 
is not a problem, but I find it annoying 
to see the cursor sitting in the corner of 
the screen and of any dialog box that 
pops up. It seems that this could have 
been eliminated by simply issuing the 
commands to turn the cursor off when 
keyboard input is not being accepted, 
and on when it is. 

When editing a menu, there seems to 
be no way to get a list of the commands 
under a particular menu option. If that 
option is not working, the user has to 
retype the entire command list. It is not 



possible to change just part of it. Once 
the menu is working as desired, though, 
this is no longer a factor. 

The only real problem is that each 
command line can be only 80 characters 
or less. This fact is not mentioned in the 
documentation. Although it's seldom 
necessary for a command to be longer 
than 80 characters, it would be nice if 
it were possible. A link list I needed to 
type for my C compiler was just too long 
to fit. I got around the problem by 
putting the line in a script file and 
merely calling the file from the com- 
mand line. This allowed me to do what 
I wanted, but it was not the ideal 
solution. 

Multi-Menu is very useful and user- 
friendly. Aside from the minor prob- 
lems, it is a pleasure to use. It should 
greatly increase the usefulness of many 
older programs and aid productivity, as 
well. I highly recommend it. 



! Alpha Software Technologies, 2810 Button 
St., Chalmette, LA 70043, 504-279-1653; 
$19.95 plus $3 S/H) 



Robert Marsa 



I Softwar e 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



Math Games — 
The Pluses 
and Minuses 

I'll always remember how boring it 
was to learn basic math. As children, 
most of us experienced the frustration 
of having to learn math by seemingly 
endless hours of drilling. 

While there is no substitute for con- 
tinuing practice, the contribution of 
home computers makes the task a lot 
more fun and challenging. There is a 
kind of added enjoyment in computer- 
aided learning. The computer provides 
the user with a sense of security and 
confidence in knowing that it won't get 
angry and scold if the same mistake is 
made over and over again. 

Math Games is a package of four 
educational programs designed to take 
the boredom out of math drills and at 
the same time provide a game-like 
atmosphere more conducive to a solid 
learning experience. The fact that each 
of the four programs is designed as a 



game helps to motivate the student and 
hold his or her attention. 

The set of four programs enables the 
student to improve skills in addition, 
subtraction, multiplication and divi- 
sion, using increasing levels of difficulty. 
They are supplied on disk or cassette 
and require a minimum of 16K Ex- 
tended Color BASIC on your CoCo 1, 2 
or 3. 

I found that two of the four programs 
use the high-speed poke and would not 
run on my old CoCo 1 until I edited out 
the POKE65495,0 statements. This 
editing should not present much of a 
problem to the average CoCo 1 user; 
but if you don't know how to edit in 
BASIC or don't care to, you won't be able 
to run Raceway or Pyramid. 

Raceway is a Hi-Res program that 
pits the student against the computer in 
solving basic math problems as quickly 
as possible. Three race cars are shown 
at the top of the screen, and they move 
after each answer is given. The quicker 
you respond, the farther your car moves 
ahead of the rest of the pack. Incorrect 
responses cause your car to lag behind, 
and possibly lose the race. 

Raceway times the student's response 
only after the problem is presented. 



FILE TRANSFER UTILITIES 

You asked for it at the Chicago RainbowFest - 

FILE TRANSFER UTILITIES NOW HANDLE RSDOS DISKS! 

Need to transfer text files to and from PC (MS DOS), RSDOS and FLEX disks into 
your CoCo (OS-9) system? Have text files on a PC (MS DOS ) system at work and 
want to work on them at home on your CoCo? 

With GCS File Transfer Utilities you just place the PC (MSDOS), RSDOS or FLEX 
disk into your CoCo disk drive - enter a simple command and the file is copied into 
a CoCo OS-9 file. File transfer back to PC (MSDOS), RSDOS and FLEX disks is 
just as simple. 




PCDF 
PCDUMP 
PCREAD 
PCWRfTE 

PCRENAME 

PCDELETE 

PCFORMAT 



Extensive 
Options 

Requires 



directory of PC disk 
display PC disk sector 
read PC file 
wrte file to PC disk 

rename PC file 
delete PC file 
format PC disk 



RSDfR 
RSDUMP 
RSREAD 
RSWRFTE 

FLEXDIR 
FLEXDUMP 
FLEXREAD 
FLEXWRFTE 



directory of RSDOS disk 
display RSDOS disk sector 
read f lie from RSDOS disk 
write file to RSDOS disk 

directory of FLEX disk 
display FLEX disk sector 
read FLEX file 
write file to FLEX disk 



Single, double sided disks. 40 or 80 track floppy drives. 
8 or 9 sectors. First level sub-directories - PC (MSDOS). 
FLEX transfers binary files also. 

OS-9 (Level 2 for MurtiVue), 2 drives (one can be hard). MultiVue 
for MultiVue version, SD1SK (SDISK3 for MultiVue) - sea D.P. 
Johnson ad for S DISK 



GSC File Transfer Utilities for CoCo - MultiVue version $54.95 
GSC File Transfer Utilities for CoCo • Standard version $44.95 

Ail diskettes are CoCo OS-9 format. Orders must be prepaid or COD. ViSA/MC 
accepted, add $1.50 S&H. additional charge for COD. 



GRANITE COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

Route 2 Box 445 Hilteboro, N.H. 03244 
(603) 464-3850 

OS-9 is a trademark of Mkxoware Systems Corporation and Motorola Inc. 
MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. FLEX is a trademark ol TSC, Inc. 



RAINBOW 

tMTWTC»TIOt« 



CocoTeclr 



SfflP 



With MACPLAY and a CoCo 3 you can play MAC sound 
files (Included on the second diskette) with pure 
6 BIT sound quality that the CoCo can produce! Or 
download other MAC sound files from a computer 
information service or MAC bulletin board systems 
to hear even -more. Sound files can last for a few 
seconds or up to 1/2 minute. MAC sound files 
included on the second diskette contain excerpts 
from the 3 Stooges to the Road Runnner and more!! 

MACPLAY is only $ 19-95 




You can use DltiHax as s normal HI-REZ 
joystick interface or switch it to be 
used with a popular Max III graphics 
program. The other feature of DltiHax 
is the option to have a large or small 
stick area so you can be more accurate 
with your drawings! 

The UltiMax interface is only $29.95 

Or trade in your original HiRes inter- 
face ( sent postage prepaid ) and get 
UltiMax for only $14.95 



Send to: 
CocoTech 

PA residents 208 Cathy Ann Drive 

add 6% sales Reading/ PA 19606 

tax (215)-779~7768 

Shipping and handl ing : 
USA and Canada add $2.50 
Other countries add $5.00 

** He fittw handle C.O-fi- 




Please allow 
1 to 3 weeks 
for delivery 

Sorry no 
credit cards 
YET1 



** 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 1 29 



Pressing the space bar starts the timer, 
so the student is able to think before 
beginning each problem. The program 
uses artifact colors and is best viewed on 
either a composite color monitor or 
color TV. If you are using a CoCo 3 with 
an RGB monitor, you won't be able to 
see the colors. 

Pyramid is also a speed drill that 
should prove to be challenging to the 
student. In this program, the timer runs 
constantly and the object is to answer 
each problem as quickly as possible 
before running out of time. Each correct 
answer results in a colorful block being 
added to a pyramid under "construc- 
tion." Three levels of difficulty are 
provided — the higher the pyramid 
grows, the shorter the amount of time 
allotted on the timer. 

Pyramid was my favorite of the four 



programs, and I had to try several times 
to complete my pyramid. The game also 
uses the high-speed poke and will have 
to be modified if your CoCo 1 won't 
accept this higher speed. 

Go to the Top is a multiplication 
program that requires the student to 
achieve instant recall of the multiplica- 
tion tables through the 9s. Each prob- 
lem is presented in a random nature, 
and again a timer is used. Enough time 
is allowed to find the right keys on the 
keyboard but not to calculate the 
answer. Incorrect answers are noted and 
the problem is repeated until a correct 
response is given. . 

As each level of the table is success- 
fully mastered, the computer provides 
the student with an encouraging pat on 
the back. After all of the problems are 
solved, the computer responds with a 




i c r o 



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Price, availability and specifications subject to change without notice 



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DAYTON ASSOCIATES VH, INC. 

720/ CLAIRCREST, BLDG: D 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX • C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



PERSONAL SERVICE 

(513) 236-1454 

Visa & MasterCard 
within the continental U.S. 



series of colorful bars and sound effects. 

Math Word Problems forces the 
student to apply his or her knowledge 
of addition, subtraction, multiplication 
and division in solving word problems. 
Most students hate word problems, but 
we all know how necessary they are if 
the student is to master math facts. 
Math Word Problems will help the 
student learn which operations are 
required to solve different kinds of 
problems. 

I found the Math Games package to 
be a very user-friendly series of educa- 
tional programs. All of the programs 
are useful to elementary students 
through about the 6th grade, and would 
be beneficial to any student who needs 
further help in learning basic math 
facts. With the exception of the high- 
speed poke problem, I like all of the 
programs and believe that students, 
parents and teachers will find it helpful. 

(E.Z. Friendly Software, Hutton & Orchard 
Streets, Rhinecliff, NY 12574, 914-876-3935; 
$19.95 plus $1.50 S/H) 

— David Gerald 



1 Software 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



Car Sign Designer — 
Creative Program 
on Board 

You've seen them . . . those little, 
yellow, diamond-shaped signs stuck to 
the back window of passing cars. What 
began as a novel way of alerting other 
motorists that babies are on board has 
turned into not-so-serious and often 
hilarious message-bashing, with such 
parting shots as "EX-HUSBAND IN 
TRUNK." They seem to sprout as fast 
as dandelions in the spring. 

For those of you who enjoy creativity, 
Zebra Systems' Car Sign Designer kit 
provides everything you need to make 
your own custom yellow car signs — 
even yellow printer paper. The program 
is supplied on a single unprotected disk 
and works on the CoCo 1, 2 or 3. The 
handsomely packaged product also 
includes two reusable plastic sign 
holders with suction cups. The 21 -page 
instruction manual is easy to follow and 
well-illustrated. 

The first thing you do after making 
a backup copy is run the configuration 



130 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 



program, which allows you to select 
your type of printer and baud rate. The 
program supports a full line of DMP 
and Epson-compatibles. Baud rates 
from 300 to 9600 are supported. 

When you run the program, you see 
the diamond-shaped sign area and a list 
of commands on the right. Messages 
can include alphanumeric characters, as 
well as standard punctuation charac- 
ters. Special key presses will call up 
graphics such as smiley faces and musi- 
cal notes. Text and graphics are auto- 
matically centered, and you can select 
from one to four lines of text. 




An important thing to note about Car 
Sign Designer is that the sign itself is not 
the result of a screen dump to your 
printer — the configuration program 
ensures that a high resolution image is 
generated. The quality of the printed 
image is exceptional, and on my Gemini 
10X printer the printout approached 
commercial quality. 

(Zebra Systems, Inc., 78-06 Jamaica Ave., 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, 718-296-2385; 
$29.95) 

— Jerry Semones 



1 Softwar e 

Graphics-25 — 
Animation Station 
for Your CoCo 3 

Graphics-25, a machine language 
utility that enhances Basic's graphics 
capabilities on a 512K CoCo 3, allows 
you to use the maximum amount of 
memory available to create and store up 
to 25 individual graphics screens. Quick 
display and palette changes are availa- 
ble to facilitate smooth and rapid ani- 
mation. 



According to the documentation, 
Graphics-25 provides six new BASIC 
commands. WPRGE specifies the position 
in memory where your graphics com- 
mands will do their work. DPAGE in- 
structs the computer which page to 
display on the screen. HCDPY takes the 
contents of one graphics screen and 
copies it to another. HLOAD and HSfiVE 
respectively load and save graphics to 
disk. HCLEAR clears the entire graphics 
memory. 

Actually, most of these commands 
are improvements on existing Extended 
BASIC commands to make Hi-Res 
graphics work easier. For example, 
HCLERR is a more sophisticated HCLS 
command. HCLS clears only one screen 
at a time, but HCLEAR does all of them 
at once. HCDPY is a Hi-Res version of 
PCDPY. Others, like WPAGE, combine the 



characteristics of HSCREEN, HGET and 
HBUFF to make a more powerful and 
easy command. 

The manual is excellent and goes into 
more detail than the documentation of 
the majority of utility programs I've 
seen. However, it assumes that you have 
some basic knowledge of CoCo 3 graph- 
ics. I suggest that you review parts 3 and 
4 of Tandy's Color Computer 3 Ex- 
tended BASIC manual before using the 
program. Additional support is also 
available from the author at Gosub 
Software. 

There are a few guidelines that must 
be followed in using the program. It will 
work only with Disk Extended Color 
BASIC 1.0 or 1.1. It cannot be used with 
J&M DOS, ADOS, OS-9, RAM drives 
or most other system enhancements 
except Gimmesoft's Fkeys III and Six- 



The Ulti 




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Screens 
in Color 





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Color Screen Dump Software 

Use your favorite program to create a pmode or hi-res graphic image, but don't 
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system superimposes 4 graphic screen dumps (black, blue, yellow & red). The 
colors mix and add to give you your own color masterpiece. 

$-fg95 



System Requirements: 32k ECB Disk, Blue Streak 1 ,2,3 or Ultima 



Price, specifiers subject to change without notice. 



ytx- 1 tfflr fre. D i bo w mn re r 



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OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX • C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



,INC. 



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(513) 236-1454 

Visa & MasterCard 
within the continental U.S. 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 131 



drive. Graphics-25 must be loaded and 
memory-resident before you load pro- 
grams that contain these new com- 
mands. When saving graphics screens, 
be aware of the memory limitations on 
the disk. Each page you H5AVE will take 
up eight granules, allowing a total of 
eight pages per empty formatted disk. 

The four demos included with the 
program were done in BASIC using 
Graphics-25. They're simple, but good 
samples of what the program can do. In 
writing my own routines, I found it 
helpful to use the listings from the 
demos as a starting point. The program 
does not create graphics; the user must 
do this from BASIC. 

Graphics-25 would be best used by 
someone who has some graphics expe- 
rience and wants to animate from 
BASIC. It's reasonably priced and in- 
cludes excellent documentation. 

(Gimmesoft, P.O. Box 421, Perry Hall, MD 
21128; 800-441-GIME; $24.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Mark Haverstock 



I Softwar e 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



Teddy Bears — 
Quizzes and 
Dancing Bears 

Teddy Bears is an educational pro- 
gram intended for pre-school children. 
It features a very simple user interface 
that allows the child to answer simple 
questions contained within the pro- 
gram, or supplemental questions you 
create yourself. 













Tb«r e were . 
floor - 


.toys left on the 



Two cuddly teddy bears are displayed 
in color at the top of the screen. The 
computer asks a question and the child 
must point an arrow to the teddy who 
bears (excuse the pun) the correct 
answer. The arrow can be moved either 

1 32 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



with the arrow keys, a joystick or mouse 
if you have one connected. If the student 
provides the correct answer, the bears 
dance to a short, lively tune. A wrong 
answer results in a "no-no" kind of 
sound and a blinking screen. 

While the program loads quickly, it 
takes about 30 seconds for the bears to 
be created in the graphics pages in 
memory. Teddy Bears requires a min- 
imum of 64K RAM and Extended 
Color BASIC, and is available on either 
disk or tape. Because the program uses 
artifact colors, it looks best on a com- 
posite color monitor or color TV. It 
works on the CoCo 3, but the colors 
won't show up on an RGB monitor. 

Teddy Bears allows you to create 
your own quizzes. The questions should 
be kept short but can be in the form of 
fill-in-the-blank or true/false, math 
problem or spelling, and so forth. 

By examining the program's self- 
contained quiz, you will get a good idea 
on how to construct your own. The 
quizzes you create may be saved to disk 
for later use; they can be repeated after 
all the questions have been answered. 
The computer keeps track of the 
answers and displays the number 
missed. 

Teddy Bears is a fine teaching pro- 
gram that will delight most youngsters. 
The graphics are clean, clear and color- 
ful. The musical interludes and sound 
effects are appropriately placed and 
instill a sense of accomplishment in the 
student as the learning process unfolds. 

(E.Z. Friendly Software, Hutton & Orchard 
Streets, Rhinecliff, NY 12574, 914-876-3935; 
$19.95 plus $1.50 S/H) 

— Robert Gray 



I Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



A Mazing World of 
Malcolm Mortar — 
Mayhem in a 
Mansion Gone Mad 

In A Mazing World of Malcolm 
Mortar, you play the part of B. Rick, 
an apprentice bricklayer working on the 
renovation of a huge mansion full of 
many, many rooms and hallways. 

One day as you work and slave under 
the weight of numerous loads of bricks, 



the mansion magically transforms into 
a sinister maze. You are confronted with 
many fuzzy creatures (armed with poi- 
soned quills) that can jump out at you 
at any time. The bearded foreman — 
Malcolm Mortar — is hostile to you. 
Your goal is to find a way out of the 
endless mazes in search of his evil lair, 
where he can be trapped. 




Supplied on a cartridge, this colorful 
128K CoCo 3 arcade game can be 
played with keyboard controls, al- 
though it works best with a joystick. 

The game consists of many screens 
and levels of difficulty. You have several 
tools to assist you in your efforts of 
trying to trap Malcolm Mortar: ordi- 
nary bricks, magic bricks and dynamite. 
As you "wall in" the many fuzzies, your 
work is made harder by a "Borehead" 
who just loves to bore holes in your 
newly bricked walls to let those little 
rascals back out. 

Points are awarded for the number of 
mazes you master, the number of bricks 
you lay and sticks of dynamite you use. 
To win the game you must trap Mal- 
colm in his lair by building an enclosure 
of magic bricks around him. 

The game screen is divided into two 
portions — the maze display and a 
scoreboard. The scoreboard lists your 
current score, brick count, dynamite 
count, and the number of magic bricks 
you have. Sound can be toggled on and 
off by pressing the S key. You can press 
alt to pause the game. 

A Mazing World of Malcolm Mortar 
is a fun game that's right for all ages. 
The action is fast and furious, the 
graphics are excellent and the price is 
reasonable. It's nice to see a game with 
a new theme for a change. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102; $29.95: 
Available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide.) 

— Robert Gray 



* Softwar e 



CoCo 1 & 2 



Labyrinth — 
Lost in a Dungeon 
Maze 

The definition of labyrinth in the 
dictionary is "a place constructed of or 
full of intricate passageways and blind 
alleys." That is truly the description of 
this graphics Adventure, which is full of 
tunnels and rooms. The top half of the 
screen provides a graphic display of the 
surroundings, and the bottom half gives 
text descriptions. 

Labyrinth is written for a 64K CoCo 
1 or 2 with Extended Disk BASIC, but 
it will not work on CoCos earlier than 
an F board. The program comes on an 
unprotected disk, so you can make 
backup copies. I found the people at 
RTB Software to be very helpful with 
my problems — they even supplied me 
with some hints. 

Your character in Labyrinth is King 
William, the ruler of the kingdom of 
Templeton. But an evil wizard by the 
name of Zarth cast a spell that made you 



a prisoner in his labyrinth, and then 
took over your kingdom. Your mission 
is to return to Templeton, destroy the 
evil wizard and reclaim your throne. 

This puzzle is not something the 
average Adventurer is going to solve in 
one night. In fact, it took me two hours 
and finally a call to the author to get out 
of the first room. The loading instruc- 
tions are adequate, but the documenta- 
tion should include a list of the verbs 
used to get a beginning Adventurer 
started. 

Labyrinth is played on two levels, and 
secret passwords are required. You can 
carry as many objects as you want, so 
there is no need for a DROP command. 
There is also no game save feature, 
which is another slight flaw — but 
should you die in Level 2, you will start 
again at Level 2. 

Also, Labyrinth never plays the same 
way twice. In one game you may be able 
to successfully get through a certain 
room, but in another game you may fall 
through the floor in that same room. 
There is no warning as to when this type 
of thing will happen (be wary or you 
may get torn to shreds by Jerrad the 
Creature). 

You must periodically look at the 



objects in your inventory, as well, to gt 
clues. The command USE INV will call 
up an inventory listing. The "review 
situation" command, LOOK, is useful if 
you clear a screen of text and have to 
remember the exit directions or go back 
where you came from and try again. 

I found Labyrinth very exciting and 
fun for the whole family. With the 
exception of a few flaws (a game save 
feature would be a nice addition), I 
think it is well worth its price. 

(RTB Software, P.O. Box 777, W. Acton, 
MA 01720, 508-263-0563; $24.95 plus $3 
S/H) 

— Robin Thon 



Ok 



cc e ssory 



CoCo1,2&3 



MPI-CoCo Locking 
Plate — 

Keeping Connections 
Solid 

We have all heard the expression 
about building a better mousetrap and 




Ihit, ■!(•[" fir > lo tip o *. i tie uind'ju. I h* 
curiums Of e uroun ond 1 < on hokp out 
the fi«>i»r«" ol o nun »r.«>i<J«>, 



t-Xt lb? U 




9UN006 W7EM 

A new animated graphic adventure for the Color 
Computer 3 from the author of the Halt of the King 
trilogy! Enjoy the mixture of science and fantasy as 
you quest for the Phoenix Crossbow, the only thing 
that can save you in the post-holocaust world. A full 
4 disk sides of adventure! Outstanding 320x200 
graphics will make this your favorite CoCo adven- 
ture! Req. 128K CoCo 3 and disk drive. Only $34.95. 



J^un^ ru Dude 

An exciting new arcade game. This Is the long-awaited response to the huge 
demand for a Kung-Fu program for the CoCo. The graphics, sound effects, 
and animation are spectacular! This Is the BEST karate game ever available 
far the Color Computer. Req. 64K, disk drive, and Joystick. Only $24.95. 

"The CoCo karate gap has been filled and Kung-Fu Dude does it excellent- 
ly. I highly recommend (if)!" -2/88 Rainbow review 
"A definite 5 stars!" -12/87 Wizard's Castle review 




WHITE FIRE 
OF ETERNITY 

64K Animated Graphic Adven- 
ture. See 12/86 Rainbow review. 
Only $19.95. 

CHAMPION 

64K Superhero Action Adventure. 
See 5/87 Rainbow review. Only 
$19.95. 



All programs CoCo 1 2, 3 compatible unless stated otherwise. 



•»:•:•:•:■ 




cinpoa 



Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 

Personal checks, money orders, and C O D. orders 
accepted. 



'.ViV.V.'.VifAV-NW. 
WiViWAWViVA 



Include $2.50 for S/H. $3.00 
extra for C.O.D. orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax. 
Authorship and dealer inquiries 
welcome. 



....#.. . 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 133 



\1 beating a path to your door, 
mmesoft has built a better 
'ap in the form of a handy 
"gadget that prevents accidental shorting 
of the Multi-Pak pins to the cartridge 
port pins on the side of the CoCo 3. And 
if I'm not mistaken, they are soon about 
to have the world beating down their 
door. 

Many of us have suffered the unpleas- 
ant experience of having to take our 
burnt-out CoCos to the repair shop 
after accidentally bumping the Multi- 
Pak Interface. Gimmesoft has designed 
a rather simple, yet effective, way to 
prevent such accidents from ever hap- 
pening again. 



The solution is in the form of an re- 
shaped, 10!/2-by-6 inch piece of 3 / 16 -inch 
thick plastic with four holes that match 
rubber feet locations on the MPI and 
CoCo 3. Two long screws come with the 
package and are driven through two 
smaller holes in the locking plate to 
secure it in place. The locking plate is 
simple to install and very effective. I 
tried several deliberate bumps, hits and 
slides, but was unable to unseat the MPI 
from my CoCo 3. 

Two versions of the locking plate are 
available, one for use with the older 
style MPI (26-3024) and another for the 
newer (26-3124). 

This is one of those gadgets you will 



be tempted to build yourself. But don't 
be too hasty. Gimmesoft has saved you 
a lot of trouble in finding material of 
just the right thickness, and even in a 
color that is a fair match to the CoCo 
3 and MPI. In my opinion, the locking 
plate is well worth its $9.95 price tag. 
For the cost, you'd have a hard time 
constructing one for yourself that has 
the quality and finished appearance 
Gimmesoft has provided. (Even the 
mounting holes are counter-sunk.) 

(Gimmesoft, P.O. Box 421, Perry Hall, MD 
21128, 301-256-7558; $9.95) 

— Jerry Semones 



At Your Command 



Three main directories are found on the OS-9 
System disk. The "root" directory is at the top, and 
you can look inM by using the directory (dir) 
command: Type dir /dG at the OS-9 prompt. If you 
do this you will see the other two directories men- 
tioned: 



Dl rec 
QSSBoot 



of /d0 12 :33:08 
T CMDS 



startup 



w i ndow . 1 38s window- t80s window « g 1 r4 



Because you are in the root directory you can see 
the names of /d0 (disk zero) titles in the listing on the 
screen. You can also see five "files" in lowercase letters 
and the other two directories in uppercase letters. You 
can take a peek at the SYS (system directory) using 
the directory command if you want, but it is the CUDS 
(commands) directory that interests us at the moment. 
Typing dir ^dft^cmds will produce something like 
this: 



Directory of cmds i2:38: 12 



attr; 

cobbler; 

deifrizfT 

display 

errSr- 

help 

list 

merge 

os9gen 

rename 

tuneport 



backup 

copy 

del 

dsave 

format 



ident 
load 



ree 
prods 
setltfie 
wcrea te 



bui id 

date 

deldir 

echo 

free 

in i z 

makdir 

modpatch 




dcheck 

dir 

edit 

grfdrv 

link 

mdi r 

m on type 

pxd 

tmode 

xmode 



Each item stored in 
respond with an action 
the OS-9 prompt. The, 1 
to try but; it lets yoii 



the CMOS directory should 
if you type the command at 
1st command is a useful one 
into any unprotected file 
to fsee its contents^ jtb6t OS-9 prompt, type list 



startup, and youll get a peek into that file. Try files 
like window. t3Bs or sys/logbook, and ypull see 
how useful the command can be. It won't, however, 
let you see what is in files like 0S9Boot or the 
command files themselves, because they are protected 
by the authors. 

Another useful command is copy. Typing 
OSSrcopy window. t38s /d0/cmds/window. t38s 
would put an exact copy of the window . t38s file into 
the cmds directory. Notice the space after copy and 
the space after the filename. Translated into English, 
this OS-9 command line says that the operating system 
(059) is instructed to copy a file (window . t38s) in the 
root directory following a path (/d0^cmds'win- 
dowv t38s) to the CMDS directory. 

Having done it, you had better undo things by 
deleting the file, which doesn't belong in the com- 
mands directory: 0S9:del /d0/cmds/window. t3Bs. 

The backup command copies everything on one 
disk to another disk; if you want to copy just one file 
from one disk to another, use the copy command. For 
instance, you might want to put a copy of a new OS- 
9 word processor onto a disk where you have your OS- 
9 database. On a single-disk system, you would type 
059: copy 'd0/cmds/newword /d0/cmds/new- 
word -s tt40k. This means to copy from the CMDS 
directory of one disk to the CMDS directory of another 
disk using Drive 0 (/d0) in each case. The -s tells OS- 
9 you are using a single drive, and the Jt40k sets aside 
memory so that you won't have to swap disks as often. 

It turns out that many of the commands found in 
the commands directory are also in memory all the 
time, but that is another story for another time. There 
are nearly 50 different commands to try, and you are 
unlikely to do any harm trying them. Risk a little and 
see what you have at your command. 

Del Turner 
Karnloqps, British Columbia 



134 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 



Adventure in Lumeria, the third chapter of the 
Labyrinth I Quest for the Ring series. In this 
Adventure, King William, finding himself lonely 
after defeating Zarth and regaining his throne, 
decides to rescue the princess of Lumeria, who has 
been kidnapped by an evil count. For the CoCo 
I and 2 (does not work on CoCo Is earlier than 
an F board). RTB Software, P.O. Box 777, W. 
Acton, MA 01720, (508) 263-0563; $36.95. 

AR-16 Serial Output Interface, a board that 
provides 16 output channels, allowing software 
control of 16 different devices. Additional chan- 
nels can be added with expansion cards. Connects 
directly to the serial port of the CoCo J, 2 or 3. 
Requires cables, relays and supply. Electronic 
Energy Control, Inc., 380 S. Fifth St., Suite 604, 
Columbus, OH 43215, (614)464-4470; $89.95 plus 
$3 S/H. 

Castle of Tharoggad, a totally icon- and menu- 
driven Adventure of the D&D genre. Your 
character's mission is to storm the treacherous 
castle to rescue the good wizard, slaying beasts 
and evading traps set by the evil wizard. Tandy 
Corporation, 1700 One Tandy Center, Fort 
Worth, TX 76102; $29.95. Available in Radio 
Shack stores nationwide. 




Extender Board, a board that extends bus and 
control lines for easy access, provides one hori- 
zontal and two vertical sockets, a logic analyzer 
plug-in, and gold connectors. Designed for the 
educator and experimenter, with possible appli- 
cations in robotics and synthesizers. Eraser 
Instrument Co., P.O. Box 712, Meridian, ID 
83642, (208) 888-5728; $45 plus $3.50 S/H. 

Gantelet II, a sequel to the popular game that 
turns you loose among monsters, wizards, war- 
riors and potions. Requires a 128K CoCo 3 with 
one disk drive and optional joystick. Diecom 
Products, Inc., 6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ont., 
Canada L9T 2X8, (416) 878-8358; $29.95 U.S., 
$37.95 CDN. 

Ironsides & Crimson Sails, a two-player game 
for the 512K CoCo 3 running OS-9 Level II and 
utilizing 640-by-192 graphics. The game comes on 
a single disk that contains five separate naval 
scenarios, which range from fictional settings to 
actual simulations of historical naval engage- 
ments. There is a game save/ load feature, soft- 
WAR Technologies, The Ameritrust Building, 
17140 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, OH 44111, (216) 
251-8085; $8.95. 

KDSK3, a machine language, menu-driven 
collection of disk utilities written for the CoCo 3. 
It is an upgrade of KDSK V2.6, written to take 
advantage of the CoCo 3's 80-column display and 
additional memory. Options include an ASCII 
dumg, sector editing and a fast copy routine. 



Requires CoCo 3, Disk Extended Color BASIC 
and at least one disk drive. An RGB monitor is 
recommended. Kenneth L. Wuelzer, 113 Arrow- 
head Drive, Montgomery, AL 36117, (205) 277- 
9880; $15. 

Keyboard Commander, a "space age" typing tutor 
that utilizes the action of an arcade game to teach 
confidence in students learning to touch type. 
Numbers, upper- and lowercase letters are cov- 
ered while defending your ships against alien 
attack. Requires 64K ECB. E.Z. Friendly Soft- 
ware, Hut ton & Orchard streets, Rhinecliff NY 
12574, (914) 876-3935; $24.95 plus $1.50 S/H. 

Legend Quest, an Adventure in which, as Profes- 
sor Ludwig, the first expert in the field of legend 
science, you set out to find the gold at the end of 
the rainbow. Unfortunately, your prospective 
rainbow shatters and falls into an enchanted land. 
(Of course you must follow.) Requires a 64K, disk- 
based CoCo with at least one joystick. Nick 
Bradbury, 10500 Sandpiper Lane, Knoxville, TN 
37922, (615)966-0172; $15. 




Lyra Lybrary, an 1 1-disk collection of music 
(all Lyra transcriptions) to be played in conjunc- 
tion with MIDI synthesizers. The music can be 
edited with Lyra or just played by using the 
included "jukebox" type program. Requires a 64K 
CoCo, a Disk basic drive, a joystick or mouse, 
at least one MIDI synthesizer, a MIDI connector 
and LYRA - BIN or LYRABDX.BIN. Rulaford 
Research, P.O. Box 143, Imperial Beach, CA 
92032, (616) 690-3648; $14.95 per disk. 

<^^>PIA Board, a board that provides an addi- 
tional 6821 PI A chip to the CoCo. It has a gold 
edge connector and four control lines. Designed 
for experimenters and educators, it can be used 
alone or with Fraser's Extender board. Fraser 
Instrument Co., P.O. Box 712, Meridian, ID 
83642, (208) 888-5728; $45 plus $3.50 S/H 

RI-8 Relay Card, an eight-relay card that con- 
nects to the AR-16 Serial Output Interface to 
allow direct control of connected appliances. 



Possible applications include energy manage- 
ment, robotics, equipment automation, etc. 
Requires AR-16 Serial Output Interface. Elec- 
tronic Energy Control, Inc., 380 S. Fifth St., Suite 
604, Columbus, OH 43215, (614)464-4470; $76.95 
plus $3 S/H 

Shadow World, a text Adventure in which you 
have discovered a formula for time travel and 
have tested your discovery by sending laboratory 
animals on a trip through time — only to have 
them burst into flames. You decide you must find 
out what's wrong with the experiment, even at the 
risk of your own life. Requires 64K ECB; for the 
CoCo J, 2 and 3. Prodek Software, c/o Mike 
Snyder, Route 2, Box 81, Allen, OK 74825, (405) 
857-2852; $10.50 for tape, $12.50 for disk. 




SpellBound, a D&D type Adventure in which, 
as the brave leader, you select a band of Adven- 
turers to defend the village of Midgard against the 
forces of darkness in the Archwizard's lair. 
Possible recruits include elves, dwarves, fighters,, 
thieves, priests and wizards. Requires a 32K CoCo 
and disk drive. Thor Software, Suite 162, 9431 
Westport Road, Louisville, KY 40241, (502)588- 
5969; $20. 




StarScan, a program to allow CoCoists to use 
the new Star NX 1000 Rainbow color printer to 
print full-color dumps of H5CREEN2 graphics. The 
program is 100 percent machine language and can 
perform a full-color dump in about 5 minutes 
(from parallel printer port). For the CoCo 3. J.D. 
Walker, 363 Oakwood Ave., Jackson, MI 49203, 
(517) 787-2667; $11.95 plus $3 S/H. 

Ultra-Base, a database programmed in a combi- 
nation of BASIC and machine language to keep 
track of more than 500 records, with up to 32K 
information in memory, at one time. It offers the 
ability to alphabetize by first or last word in any 
category. Requires 64 K, and is available on tape 
or disk. Tothian Software, Inc., Box 663, Rimers- 
burg, PA 16248; $24.95^ 

Word Power 3.1, a CoCo J \#brd processor that 
comes with a spelling checker and mail merge 
capability. Other features include a listing of 
available memory for text storage, autosaving, 
punctuation checker, window display, block 
moves, search and replace, word count and wild 
card searches. Microcom Software, P.O. Box 2 14, 
Fairport, NY 14450, (716) 223-1477; $79.95. 



First product received from this company 





The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Lauren Willoughby 



September 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 35 



E ducation Not e s 



Learning to use cross-references in 
a reference book is the topic of 
this month's article. This is a 
language arts skill that is applicable to 
social studies, science and any other 
subject where information needs to be 
found in reference books. The skill 
should be taught in the middle grades 
of elementary school, and practiced 
throughout one's life. 

"This set of encyclopedias doesn't 
have that information.That topic isn't 
here at all." These familiar statements 
are made by new users of reference 
books. Children often look under only 
one heading for information needed 
and give up if it is not there. If infor- 
mation is not in one location, it may be 
found in the same reference set under a 
different, but related, heading. Students 
must be taught to find and use cross- 
references for their information. 

One teacher may require that a stu- 
dent find information on, say, disk 
drives. It is quite possible that Volume 
D of the encyclopedia does not list 
anything under that topic. The next step 
would be to look for larger topic areas 
that might include disk drives. Volume 
C, under Computers, would be a good 
place to look. Another choice might be 
Volume T for Technology. 

The idea is to teach children to be 
detectives. They need to keep searching 
for additional clues (key words) to use 
in locating the original subject. Ap- 
proaching this as a puzzle, mystery or 
game helps to create interest in this 
concept. Students might be encouraged 
to make a list of key words on paper or 
at the blackboard before introducing 
the computer program. 

The program itself is a game wherein 
the user must match an original subject 
with a larger, corresponding, topic area. 
The program will let students practice 
looking up information needed for 
reports and essays — any research task, 
whether for school or pleasure. 

The data consists of 10 subjects and 
10 larger topic areas. These represent a 
random selection of 10 subjects about 
which a student might have to write a 
report or present a speech. The subjects 
comprise the data elements of Line 280. 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



Cross-referencing for 
information 



Locating 
the Topic 

By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Line 290 is comprised of the corre- 
sponding 10 larger categories or topics 
which are likely cross-references to the 
original 10 subjects. 

Since there are only 10 topics and 10 
subjects, we not only welcome but 
encourage you to alter the data as the 
game is played. This program will soon 
be memorized by most students if the 
data is not updated periodically. Once 
the idea behind the program is grasped, 



The listing: REFERNCE 



your child or the students in your class 
can create data for their own versions 
of the game. Creating the data teaches 
this concept as well as does playing the 
game. Lines 20-70 dimension and read 
in the DfiTfi statements. 

Line 100 chooses among the 20 data 
options and prints 20 topics, subjects or 
both. These original elements are not 
presented in a random order. Rather, 
they are presented in a manner that 
contains some duplication and several 
matches. This gives the game an element 
of variety. 

This game is more enjoyable when a 
scorecard is included. We use a two-part 
scoring system. The player is required 
to answer two questions during each 
round. Lines 120-140 ask the player to 
select one of the subjects. Encourage 
students to read the entire list to make 
certain there is a correct pair to match 
before they answer the first part of the 
question. Five points will be scored for 
a correct response at this point. Lines 
150-200 ask the user to match the 
subject with the correct topic. Five 
points is given for a correct answer here. 
The variable SC is the scorekeeper. The 
score is given after 10 rounds. 

We hope you and your children enjoy 
using and modifying The Cross- 
Reference Game. Your comments are 
always appreciated by the staff of 
Computer Island. □ 



10 REM" CROSS REFERENCES GAME" 
20 REM" STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 
D, STATEN ISLAND, NY ,1988" 
30 DIM A$(10) ,B$(10) ,C$(20) 
40 FOR S=l TO 10 : READ A$(S):NEXT 
S 

50 FOR T=l TO 10 : READ B$(T):NEXT 
T 

60 RESTORE 

70 FOR T= 1 TO 2 0 : READ C$(T):NEX 
T T 

80 CLS:Z=Z+l:IF Z>10 THEN 2 40 
90 PRINT§0 , 11 # » ; Z ; "MATCH ONE SUBJ 
ECT AND TOPIC"; 

100 FOR T=l TO 20:A=RND(20) :PRIN 
T@32+B,C$(A) :B=B+16:NEXT T:B=0 
110 PRINT" 



120 PRINT"CHOOSE A SUBJECT " ; : LI 
NEINPUT AA$ 

130 FOR T-l TO 10: IF AA$=A$(T) T 
HEN 150 ELSE NEXT T 



1 36 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



140 SOUND 10, 3: PRINT "THAT'S NOT 
ANY OF OUR SUBJECTS.": GOTO 210 
150 SOUND 200,2 : PRINT "GOOD-NOW M 
ATCH THE LARGER TOPIC. ";: SOSC+5 
160 LINEINPUT BB$ 
170 PRINT@464, 1,11 ; 

180 IF BB$=B$(T) THEN PLAY"L100C 
DEGGG 11 : PRINT" CORRECT"ELSE 200 
190 SC=SC+5:GOTO 210 
200 PRINT"* 11 ;B$ (T) :PLAY"L2F" 
210 PRINT@484, "PRESS ENTER TO GO 

ON" ; 
220 EN$=INKEY$ 

230 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 80 ELSE 
220 

240 CLS:PRINT@97, "YOUR SCORE WAS 
";SC;"THIS TIME" 

250 PRINTQ192 , "PRESS A TO GO AGA 
IN OR E TO END"; 
2 60 EN$=INKEY$ 

270 IF EN$="A" THEN RUN ELSE IF 

EN$="E" THEN END ELSE 2 60 

280 DATA FILM , ALGAE , HAWAI I , BRONT 

OSAURUS , WHALES , CLOUDS , MARS , HALLO 

WEEN, AUTOMOBILES , COLLIES 

290 DATA MOTION PTCTTTR'ES . PLANTS . 



RAINBOW review 8/88 




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The completely menu driven system allows you to create your own lull color Hi-res icons 
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WGD comes wtlh a 23 page manual and 2 Hippy diskettes in a rigid vinyl case wKh these 
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(419) 389-1515 



One-Liner Contest Winner : < , 

Create a four-by-four "magic square" having a sum 
equal to the number you input (between 34 and 366). 



The listing: 

J3 CLS:INPUT"# (34-366) »;S : IFS<34 
ORS>3 6 6THEN0ELSEV= (S+3J3 ) / 4 : H—INT 

(V) :T=V-H:F0RI=1T016:READR:V=INT 

( R/ 4 ) : PRI NT @ 3 *R+ 2 j3 * V+ 64 / USING ll ## 
# M ; H- ( T># ) ; t T»T- . fl 6 2 5 : H=H-1 : NEXT 

: PRINT@224 : DATA9 , 15,2,4,7,1,12 , 1 
0 , 0 ,6, 11,13,14,8, 5,3 : 1 (C) 1988 

MICHAEL G. TOEPKE 



Michael Toepke 
Oak Harbor, WA 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



Files Edit Run Compile Options 



To Assembly .a 



To Object 



To Executal 



Cancel 



mining 




• CCENV® PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT 

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set all compiler, assembler, and linker options. Temporary files are automatically written on the 
RAMdisk if available, reducing compile-time. Go from edit mode to compile and back to edit with 
mouse-clicks. Error messages are saved and can be scrolled in a window during your next editing 
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CCENV maintains configuration files so all options can be rechosen automatically. A PROJECT 
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• Fox Ware 5101 W. 12th Kennewick, WA 99337 * 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 137 



Garbled Sound 

I have a Color Computer 1 with 64 K 
and an f F' board. I recently upgraded 
from a TV set to a Magnavox CM- 
80 and am using the Mark Data Uni- 
versal Video Driver. When I run pro- 
grams that use a joystick, I get constant 
garbled sound with the sounds of the 
program on top of it. This happens on 
programs such as Polaris, Galactic 
Attack and Gopher It, but does not 
happen in programs such as Bats and 
Bugs or Whirlybird Run. Can this be 
fixed, or is it a side effect of adding 
things such as a video driver onto the 
computer? 

Corby Goodman 
Lexington, KY 

13 The only way to diagnose this 
/C kind of problem is to remove the 
suspect part from the machine and see 
if that solves the problem. If the prob- 
lem disappears but returns upon rein- 
stallation, recheck the instructions for 
proper installation; if it's still a problem, 
contact the manufacturer. 

More Memory, BASICally 

/ am a relatively new programmer, 
and I don 't have a lot of knowledge 
about machine language. Recently, I 
upgraded my CoCo 3 to 512K. To my 
surprise, I haven't been able to access 
anything more than 27 K and only then 
using the PCLEFlRl command. I'm no 
better off than when I started. Is the 
only way to access this memory through 
machine language? I know that many 
programs do, CoCo Max III for one. 
When I upgraded, I envisioned writing 
large programs in BASIC with huge 
string storage areas. Am I out of luck, 
or is there a fix? 

Andrew Wiest 
Anderson, SC 



Richard Esposito is the principal engi- 
neer for BDM Corporation. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 

1 38 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 




By Richard E. Esposito 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

with Richard W. Libra 



T> The ROM BASIC in the CoCo 3 is 
/L a vestige from the past, designed 
primarily for backward compatibility 
with the older machines. The IBM PC 
line has the same problem. No matter 
how much memory there is (even with 
a 3-megabyte PS/2 Model 80), you only 
have 61 K available to BASIC. And the 
CoCo is limited to around 30K. Micro- 
soft, the author of both, has not made 
a commitment to upgrade its interpret- 
ers to use the extra RAM. 

Colorizing the Oldies 

Several years ago I purchased a 
couple of programs that I used for 
relaxation, enjoyment and relief 
from the pressure of my work. These 
worked very well on the CoCo 1 and 
accomplished precisely what I wanted 
to get done with them. The programs 
are 8 Ball, by CM. Cook and C.J. 
Roslund, and Solitaire, which appeared 
in RAINBOW Magazine. Now that I have 
bought the CoCo 3, 1 still would like to 
use these fine programs; but I get black- 
and-white programs instead of color. 
Since I'm not a programmer, is there an 
easy way in which I can adapt them to 
the CoCo 3 so that the colors come out 
suitable enough to make the programs 



again most enjoyable? They work fine 
but are pale imitations of the real thing. 

M.L. Brown 
Bellevue, OH 

13 Since the Tandy CM-8 monitor 
/C does not support artifacting, if 
you change the PMDDE4 statements in 
the programs to PMDDE3, you will re- 
store the color, albeit at the expense of 
some detail. The Magnavox 8CM-515 
monitor does not share this problem, 
for it can be operated in composite 
video mode for artifacting older games. 

No Can Do! 



The VIP Library runs fine (with one 
or two minor quirks) on my CoCo 3/ 
RGB combination. I would like, 
however, to be able to load it with a RUN 
* using the following program: 

10 PRLETTE9 , G3:Pfil_ETTE13, G3 
20 LOflDtTDESKTDP 



A scan of the disk indicates space is 
available; however, a PRINT FREE (□) 
command shows 0 granules available, 
and the disk will not load the program 
program in normal fashion. 

Elbert Jenkins 
St. Simons Island, GA 

Another copy protection victim. 

Weary Plugs and Disappearing Letters 

I've recently bought a Deluxe Color 
Mouse, and I think that plugging and 
unplugging the mouse and joystick 
may harm the ports and the jacks. Is 
there a way to have both joysticks and 
the mouse connected at the same time? 
Also, I have Telewriter-64 and am not 
able to save my files on disk. Is there a 
way to do it? If I press the same key 
more than once, it won 't appear on the 
screen. (For example, the word "ap- 
pear" shows up as "apear.") Do you 
know how I can solve this problem? 

Tito Voysest 
Lima, Peru 



You can always rig up a cable to 
/L toggle between the mouse and 
joystick. Sounds like you have a really 
old version of Telewriter-64 that was 



written for the old gray CoCo 1. Since 
then, the keyboard scanning routine 
was moved, causing your problem. 
Contact Cognitec for an upgrade. 

Editor's Note: See Mark Haver- 
stock's "The Old Switcheroo" (August 
'86, Page 108), a hardware project that 
gives details for building a switchbox 
allowing you to connect three devices 
into the joystick port. 

Telewriter's Disk Driving Routine 



I have two Teac 55 B drives in a Hard 
Z\ Drive Specialist's case and con- 
troller. Used with a Co Co 2, these 
have no problems. I now have a Co Co 
3 that works fine until I install the disk 
drive controller. Commands such as 
PALETTE and WIDTH won't work; but 
more importantly, I can 't address the 
second side of the drives. I put a friend's 
old Radio Shack EPROM into the 
spare slot of the controller; now all 
commands function on the computer, 
but I've lost Side 2 of the drives. I 
purchased A DOSS, which when 
loaded into BASIC gives me access to 
both sides of the drives. The problem is 
that when I run Telewriter-64 with TW- 
80, / only have access to drives 0 and 
L The A DOSS doesn't seem to have an 
effect when I load it into BASIC and use 
Telewriter. Will ADOSS burned into 
an EPROM make four drives usable 
with TW-807 Is there an EPROM avail- 
able that will access two DSDD drives 
as drives 0 and 1 instead of drives 0, 2, 
land 3? 

Grant Masini 
Granger, WA 



ADOS-3 works just fine. Telewrit- 
er has its own disk driving rou- 
tine that overrides the routine in 
ROM. 

Bootable Backup 



I have a CoCo 3 running DeskMate 
3. 1 can't make a bootable backup of 
the masters but can only piece to- 
gether a somewhat workable version. I 
have Radio Shack's old drives and 
controller. I have not had much luck 
with any backups except /dl to /d0. 

Ted Crafton 
Miami, FL 

X) All OS-9 software distributed by 
/C Radio Shack is on 35-track single- 
sided 5Vi-inch disks and can be backed 
up easily using Disk Color Basic's 
BACKUP command. 



Fixing DeskMate 3 

/ have a CoCo 3 and DeskMate 3 
with a DCMS connected to the 
serial port. I can't get communica- 
tion through the serial port. Is there a 
fix for DeskMate 3? 

Mike Becker 
Woodstock CT 

ID OS-9 Level II only supports two- 
/C way serial communication via a 
Modem Pak or RS-232 Pak, so you 
cannot use DeskMate 3 for communi- 
cations over the /Tl serial port. 

A Patch for OS-9 

How can I change the sequence of 
bytes on VIP software? VIP Disk- 
Zap doesn't work with OS-9. Is there 
an OS-9 Disk-Zap program? 

Serge Alepins 
Lemoyne, Quebec 

There is an excellent on-disk OS- 
/C 9 program patcher, called Patch, 
marketed by Computerware. Also, 
since the format for OS-9 and Disk 
BASIC is the same (the actual physical 
disk format), you can use VIP Disk-Zap 
to edit OS-9 disks. You just can't zap 
them. 

A Vote for the Hard Drive 

[1 lam planning to purchase a vertical- 
^ slot, dual double-sided disk drive, 
lJ compatible to OS-9 Level II, in a 
slimline case for my CoCo 3. Do you 
know who sells one? If you were buying 
one for yourself, which would you put 
at the top of the list? Is it true that 
someone in the United States is devel- 
oping a 1 -megabyte RAM board for the 
CoCo 3? 

Ryan Plammer 
Vancouver, British Columbia 

13 I would get one floppy and one 
/C hard disk and put them both in 
one case. CoCo hard drives are much 
faster and cheaper than the floppies 
were a few years back, hold much more 
data, and should no longer be ignored. 

Updating Disk Controllers 

Quite a few letters have been pub- 
lished in THE RAINBOW from people 
who have old-style disk controllers 
requiring 12 volts. They wish to use 
them with CoCo 2s or 3s but can't 
because the Co Co 2 and 3 don 't have 12 
volts available. The usual suggestion is 
to bring 12 volts out to the plug from 



inside the computer. It is also possible 
to add a 5- to 12-volt converter, avail- 
able from Marlin P. Jones, Lake Park, 
FL, (305) 848-8236. It's Part Number 
PS-1934 and costs $2.50. I've done this 
with two controllers and find that it also 
requires a 12-volt zener diode. 

Another way is to replace the disk 
controller chip, WD-1793, with an MB- 
8877, available from Jameco Electron- 
ics with a $20 minumum order or from 
JDR Electronics, (800) 538-5000. I buy 
them locally from Arkline Electronics 
Toledo, (419) 476-6727. I've done 
three this way, and they work just fine. 

Your February column states that 
some CoCo 2 programs such as VIP 
have a problem easily fixed with the 
GIME chip in the CoCo 3. So how do 
you fix it already? This is the only thing 
stopping me from going to a CoCo 3. 

Robert W. Klahn 
Sylvania, OH 

13 The easiest way is to use a disk- 
/C zapper program. Assuming you 
don't have one, the next best way is to 
write a BASIC program that reads the 
offending file as a random access file 
with records of one character each. 
When your program reads the code that 
needs changing, write out the corrected 
bytes. Be sure to do this on a backup 
of the original. 

Printing While Online 

/ am presently using Greg-E-Term 
with my CoCo 3. I heard that there 
is a way to have my printer print 
while I am on-line. I'm using a DMP- 
130 printer with a DCM-3 Modem. Do 
you know of any way to print while in 
Communications mode? Also, have you 
heard of people using a DCM-3 and 
being unable to use MikeyTerm as a 
result? 

13 It is possible to construct an RS- 
/L 232 Y-cable so that your printer 
can be online; however, the printer must 
be able to run at the same speed as your 
modem without overflowing its RAM 
buffer. 

For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
RAINBOW'S CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, 
at the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
ASK for "Ask the Experts'* to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete 
instructions. 



September 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 39 



This month we will look at two 
short items. The first is an update 
on an earlier project, and the 
other is a hardware patch for the Multi- 
Pak's IRQ problem. 

In a two-part project in November 
and December of 1987, I described 
making a parallel interface and building 
it right into the CoCo. It turns out that 
some people are having problems. Paul 
Anderson of SD Enterprises said that 
the D WP 430 printer from Radio Shack 
requires a longer strobe pulse width 
than my circuit delivered. At 2 MHz 
(the double speed for the CoCo 3), the 
problem was even greater. 
I have an Epson FX-80 printer. When 

1 tested my circuit on it, it worked fine. 
The pulse width for the strobe signal 
(even at 2 M Hz) is wide enough to make 
it work. If you look back to the circuit 
in the November '87 RAINBOW, you see 
that the signal connecting the data into 
the latch is also the signal that drives the 
strobe signal of the printer. That signal 
is derived from the memory mapping of 
data from the CPU. This makes the 
width of the signal directly proportional 
to the clock speed of the CPU. The 
faster the CPU is clocked, the shorter 
the strobe pulse is. For my printer this 
is no problem, but for slower strobe 
printers like the DMP 430, it is a 
problem that must be addressed. 

To solve this problem, I looked at the 
spec sheets of several popular printers. 
Much to my surprise, I found out that 
printers have a wide range of strobe 
pulse widths, from .5 microseconds to 
a full 2 microseconds. Not only that, 1 
also found out some printers require 
that data be valid up to 1 microsecond 
before the strobe line goes active. If you 
look again at my circuit, the strobe line 
is active at the same time as the data. 
Oopsl I guess I should have done my 
homework before putting out that 
article. Well, fortunately, 1 have a good 
fix. After looking through my TTL data 
books, 1 came up with a circuit that will 
give the strobe signal both a 1- 
microsecond delay and a pulse width of 

2 microseconds. That should be enough 
to satisfy any printer's needs. 

The chip 1 decided to use is a 
74HC123, which is a dual retriggerable 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Ouest, Quebec. 
Tonys username on Delphi is DISTO. 



An update on the parallel 
interface and a hardware 
patch for the Multi-Pak 

Summer 
Cleanup 

By Tony DiStefano 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



monostable multivibrator — a mouth- 
ful, but not that complicated. Basically, 
there is an input signal and an output 
signal. An R/C (resistor/ capacitor) 
constant determines how long the pulse 
is. Every time the input is strobed, the 
output becomes active for the duration 
of the pulse width, which is controlled 
by the R/C constant. I chained the 
output of the first multivibrator to the 
input of the second, which then goes to 
the strobe of the printer. The first gives 
me the delay to set up the data; the 
second gives me a pulse width that is 
controllable by the R/C constant and 
not the clock speed of the CPU. 

Construction of this, I hope, won't be 
too hard. If you have already built the 
parallel printer adapter and have 
enough room to fit one more chip and 
four components, you're home free. If 
you have not built it yet but want to, just 
make sure that you have enough room 
to place one more chip. The rest of it 
is the same as in the November '87 issue. 

If you don't have enough room, you 
have two choices: Start over again, or 
make a small piggypack board. I sug- 
gest that you start over, since it makes 
for a cleaner job and is easier to trace 
if you have a problem. 

The circuit in Figure 1 is the fix only 
and does not include the rest of the 
circuit needed to make the complete 
parallel adapter. The 74HC123 chip 
requires +5 volts on Pin 16 and ground 
on Pin 8. To interface it into the rest of 
the original circuit, follow these instruc- 
tions: 



1) Remove the wire that goes to Pin 
1 of the printer connector. 

2) Connect that wire to the point 
marked "input" in Figure 1. 

3) Connect the wire marked "output" 
in Figure 1 to Pin 1 of the printer 
connector left vacant by Step 1. 

4) Connect +5V and ground to the 
chip. 

With this modification, no other 
changes are required; the software 
remains the same, and all printers 
should work at either slow or fast speed. 

The second part of this article deals 
with interrupts and the Multi-Pak. 
Many people may never come acoss this 
problem, which will show up only in 
certain cases. First, I think that explain- 
ing what the Multi-Pak does will help 
you understand the problem. 

The Radio Shack Multi-Pak has four 
slots and was Radio Shack's original 
idea to expand the CoCo; the idea was 
that people who bought the expander 
would plug four game packs into it. As 
we all know, Radio Shack game packs 
auto start. That means when you plug 
in a pack (without a Multi-Pak) and 
turn the computer on, the game (or 
whatever) starts to play all by itself. To 
do that, the computer must be able to 
sense the presence of the pack. One pin 
on the connector connects to the CPU's 
interrupt pin via a PIA. On an auto- 
starting game pack, this pin is con- 
nected to the Q clock. The Q clock is 
a signal coming from the internal cir- 
cuits that runs at 1 or 2 MHz, depending 
on the mode of the computer. This 
signal is fed into the interrupt pin of the 
CPU. The CPU responds to this inter- 
rupt by a small routine in ROM that 
jumps to the software inside the game 
pack. 

In making the Multi-Pak, Radio 
Shack wanted to be able to handle four 
packs instead of one. To choose which 
one of the packs works requires a 
switch, so a four-position switch was 
added. The first part of the switch is a 
block of memory known as CTS. This 
block, as long as 16K, is found from 
SC000 to SFEFF for a CoCo 1 and 2 and 
from $C000 to $FDFF for the CoCo 3. 
The second is another block of memory 
known as the SCS area and is mapped 
from $FF40 to $FF5F on all CoCos. The 
third part of the switch reroutes the 
interrupt signal from the selected slot or 
game pack to the CPU. 

To make the Multi-Pak software 



1 40 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



1 



1 INPUT > 




U1B 



CEXT 




REXT/CEXT 




A 


Q 


B 




CLR 


Q 


74HC123 


U1 A 



1 2 



<OUTPUT I 



CEXT 




REXT/CEXT 




A 


Q 


B 




CLR 


Q 



1 3 



74HC1 23 



Figure 1 



selectable as well, Radio Shack made 
one memory location, SFF7F, into a 
software switch. The 8-bit location was 
divided into four 2-bit decoders, two of 
which control which of the four slots are 
active. Since the two memory blocks are 
controlled separately, the CTS block 
can be selected to one slot and the SCS 
block to another. This was a good idea, 
since the CTS block usually contained 
software and the SCS block usually 
contained hardware I/O. 

At this point Radio Shack decided to 
tie the interrupt router to the same 
circuitry that controls the CTS, so that 
whatever CTS slot is active originates 
the interrupts. This arrangement is OK 
for game packs, since changing the 
switch to another slot means that 
whichever slot has the interrupts also 
has the right software. Good for game 
packs, but not so good for OS-9 users 
— OS-9 relies heavily on interrupts. 
Most hardware handshaking is done 
with interrupts. OS-9 uses the all-RAM 
mode, so the CTS signal is not used. But 
with the Multi-Pak, the software switch 
still switches the interrupt signal. The 
problem is mostly seen when someone 
uses the Deluxe RS-232 Pak. 

Under OS-9, drivers and hardware 
devices can be added and left out to suit 
the owner's particular needs, but no one 
driver knows what else is using the 
hardware. When one device driver 
needs the interrupt line, it changes the 
software switch to the slot the hardware 
is in. If another driver needs the inter- 
rupts, it switches it back; this is where 



the problem starts. When you change 
the software switch away from one slot, 
the interrupt has a chance of getting 
lost. The problem gets worse when a 
device like the RS-232 Pak is online. 
The registers for this pack are memory- 
mapped in an area not covered by the 
software switch, while the interrupts are 
covered by the software switch. So if 
one driver switches the software switch 
away from the slot the RS-232 pack is 
in, it can no longer produce an inter- 
rupt. Even though the registers are still 
in the memory map, data is lost and 
things start to get confused. 

One solution for this is a small mod- 
ification in the Multi-Pak. Interrupt 
signals in non-game packs are usually 
"open collector," meaning that more 
than one signal can be connected to- 
gether to form an "OR" type of config- 
uration. A simple way to avoid the 
problems is to connect all the interrupts 



together, so that no matter which slot 
the interrupt comes from, the signal 
comes through. This mod is simple and 
quick. A little soldering experience, a 
few tools and a short piece of wire are 
all you need. Unplug the Multi-Pak and 
remove the bottom screws. Remove the 
top and disconnect the power to the 
board. Now, remove the screws that 
hold down the PC board. Carefully 
remove all the pins that hold the bottom 
shield to the board. Locate Pin 8 on 
each of the four slot connectors. Solder 
a piece of wire from one to the other 
until all slots are done. Reassemble the 
Multi-Pak in reverse order, and that's 
all there is to it. 

With this modification you should be 
able to use the RS-232 Pak under OS- 
9 with any one device that changes the 
software slot switch and without losing 
characters on the Pak. 



One- Liner Contest Winner . . , 

This one-liner is for killing files one at a time, without having to type the 
KILL command and drive number for each and every file. 



The listing: 



1 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: INPUT "ENTER DR 
IVE ,r ;A:DRIVEA:DIR:INPUT»FILE TO 
KILL" ; 33$ : KILLB$ : PRINT"KILL ANOTH 
ER?(Y OR N) » : INPUTC$ : IFC$=' t Y»GOT 
O1ELSEDRIVE0 

Brian Carter 
Santa Ana, CA 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of both ftte Third Rainbow Book 
of Adventures and its companion The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape ) 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 141 





RAINBOWTECH 










p 




D©nfto©inis 





The Magic and 
Mysteries of OS-9 

By Richard A. White 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



This begins a new series on OS-9. 
It is directed at current and po- 
tential Level II users who usually 
run a 512K CoCo 3. This combination 
provides a powerful, flexible computing 
system. Often, the price for power and 
flexibility is complexity, and learning 
OS-9 is not simple. Trying to take full 
advantage of OS-9 and to use any or all 
of the various drives (double sided, Z x /i 
720K or hard drives), can be confusing 
for awhile. (And these are just a few of 
the configuration options possible 
under OS-9.) Don't expect to be able to 
do all those things you wanted to do 
under Disk BASIC, but couldn't without 
investing some sweat. 

Much of the fun in using OS-9 comes 
from its power, but with this power 
come many complexities. If fun were all 
there was to OS-9, it might not be worth 
the effort to address some of the head 
bangers out there . But personal pro- 
ductivity is another driving force, and 
in this regard, a CoCo 3 with OS-9 Level 
II offers more than most other systems. 
So there is considerable value in learn- 
ing OS-9. This column will try to aid in 
mastering OS-9. 



Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in BASIC pro- 
gramming. With Don Dollberg, he is 
the co-author of the TIMS database 
management program. 



Where's The Magic? 

For over a year now, OS-9 Level II 
has been available for CoCo 3s, and 
many have become addicted to it. 
There's magic in that code. It's sort of 
like the magic of getting your first disk 
drive after using a cassette recorder, and 
it's sort of like the step from a floppy 
to a hard drive. But it's not quite like 
those improvements either. 

It's hard for people to really imagine 
how they would use a multitasking 
system. There are times when having 
your computer do two things at once 
can be handy. Exploring another level 
in Rogue or knocking off a quick note 
in your word processor while down- 
loading a long file from Delphi or a 
Computer BBS is one use. Those five or 
10 minute waits for a download to 
complete are some of the world's most 
boring moments. 

Many files under OS-9 are now ar- 
chived using special programs such as 
Ar and Pale. These compress one or 
more individual files into one file that 
generally is much shorter than the 
combined length of the original files. A 
particularly impressive process is to 
start a download of an archived file to 
a disk in one window and then move to 
another window and to de-archive it 
into its original, uncompressed compo- 
nent files. Until the download is com- 
plete, the file on the disk is open. OS- 
9 manages the de-archiving process so 
that it proceeds at the rate the down- 
loading file is extended. The download- 
ing process is in no way delayed if the 



de-archiving process progresses at the 
same pace. There is a catch. You need 
a no-halt disk controller or a hard drive 
so that the de-archiving disk accesses 
don't interfere with your downloading. 

George, a local CoCo 3 owner, called 
me and asked how to set up his Burke 
& Burke hard drive under Disk BASIC. 
George's CoCo XT interface board had 
arrived that morning, and he had just 
walked in the house with a new hard 
drive. He was ready to use his drive, and 
didn't want to get bogged down in 
reading the start-up instructions. 

1 told him I had set up mine under 
OS-9 and could talk him through the 
OS-9 setup. George didn't want to 
attempt OS-9, but he owned Level II, 
so I talked him into it. Two days later, 
he called to say that his system was 
running well and that I had ruined him. 
It seems that he downloaded an ar- 
chived file and tried the concurrent de- 
archiving trick described above. It 
worked! He was both astonished by and 
delighted with OS-9. After two more 
days passed, he called to report that he 
had downloaded RiBBS (the bulletin 
board program available from the OS- 
9 SIG on Delphi). Now, George has 
RiBBS running full time on his CoCo 
3 while programming. 

That George is not your typical per- 
sonal computer owner is beside the 
point. He was in the process of writing 
a BBS to run under Disk BASIC, so he 
had the hardware, including the phone 
line, ready. Probably, he would have 
bought a second CoCo 3 once he ded- 



142 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 



icated the first one to the BBS. He had 
not given a thought to an OS-9-based 
BBS, but in the space of four days, he 
had one running and still had use of the 
CoCo for his own computing. He is 
using the same hardware I am. I have 
everything needed to do the same thing 
and so do many of you. The key is in 
OS-9, which has the power to make 
things like this possible. 

I just read a column in a PC magazine 
that discussed multitasking with the 
new OS-2 operating system offered for 
IBM PS-2 and clone machines. But, 
OS-2 alone does not provide windows, 
so multitasking is in the traditional 
"background mode" that OS-9 pro- 
vided before the CoCo version of Level 
II became available, and OS-2 costs 
about $400. 

Magic For Us Mortals 

Multitasking BBSs is not the real 
value of multitasking on a personal 
computer, however. More important is 
the ability to move from one application 
program to another with one or two 
keystrokes. For this, one needs multi- 
tasking and windows. This ability is not 
unique to the CoCo 3 running OS-9 
Level II, but one must pay much more 



to get the capability in other systems. I 
am not talking about a program that 
has windows. I mean an operating 
system that lets you run any program in 
any appropriate window. This task is 
much more complex. 

More examples are in order. I am 
running a 5I2K machine, which is 
necessary to do what 1 will describe. 
When I boot into OS-9, I load the 
operating system, and a number of 
utilities and programs. Right now, I 
have 88 separate executable modules in 
memory. Of these, 46 are operating 
system components, which include 
managers, drivers and device descrip- 
tors. Many have functional counter- 
parts in Disk BASIC that cannot be listed 
separately as under OS-9, but they are 
still there. The remaining 42 modules 
include utilities like Dir, Copy, etc., 
which have their Disk BASIC counter- 
parts, as well as my word processor, 
terminal package and a selection of 
other frequently used programs. Right 
now, I have 2I6K of free memory into 
which I could load and run other pro- 
grams. 

When I wrote, "Right now, I have 
. . ."I meant right now. At each of those 
points, I went to another window and 



typed to list what I had in memory and 
then, to find the free memory at that 
instant. In fact, I went back and forth 
between the word processing window 
and the memory directory list window 
several times to make sure I got the text 
right. 

Something else I often do is go to 
another window to get a directory 
listing and make a new directory on the 
spur of the moment. After four years of 
using an IBM AT at the office 1 got this 
capability, but I had to spend $200 on 
Sidekick Plus to get it. 

The combination of multitasking and 
having multiple windows is a major 
performance improvement. It allows us 
to attack those computing delays that 
are not addressable by speeding up the 
hardware and software. It changes the 
basic ways we use the computer. The 
CoCo 3 works smarter, not harder. 

What Is An Operating System? 

At the most basic level, an operating 
system is the program that makes the 
various components of a computer 
work together. Consider a 64K CoCo 2. 
The 6809 microprocessor knows that on 
start-up it must look at the very top 
bytes of memory to find the address of 



METRIC INDUSTRIES, INC. 




\ f B 




mSSSi 





Model 101 

Serial to Parallel Printer Interface 

* Works with any COCO 

* Compatible with "Centronics" Parallel Input Printers 

* Just turn the knob to select any one of 6 baud rates 300-9600 

* Comes complete with cables to connect to your printer 
and computer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 104 Deluxe Interface 
with "Modem Switch" 

* Same Features as 1 01 Plus 

* Built in Serial Port for your Modem or other serial device 

* Switch between Serial Output and Parallel Output 

* Comes with cables to connect to your computer and printer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 1 05 Serial Switch 

* Connects to your COCO to give you 2 switch selectable 
Serial Ports 

* Comes with a 3 foot cable to connect to your computer 

* Now you can connect your Printer {or printer interface) 
and your Modem (or other serial device) to your COCO 
and flip the switch to use either device 

* Does not require power 



Cassette Label Printing Program 



New Version 2.1 prints 7 lines of information 
on Cassette labels 

Comes on Tape with instructions to transfer to disk 
Menu driven, very easy to use 
Save and Load Labels from Tape and Disk 
Uses the features of your printer to print standard, 
expanded, and condensed characters 
Automatically Centers Each Line of Text 
Allows editing of label before printing 
Program comes with 24 labels to get you started 
1 6K ECB required 



Some of the Printers 
That Can- 

Supply power for the 101 and 
1 04 are Radio Shack, Star, 
Okidata, Brother, Juki, and 
Smith Corona. 

Some of the Printers 
That Cannot - 

Supply power for the interfaces 
are Epson, Seikosha, 
Panasonic, Silver Reed and 
NEC. If your printer cannot 
supply power to the interface 
you can order your interface 
with the "P" option or you can 
supply your own AC adapter. 
We recommend the Radio 
Shack 273-1 431 AC adapter 
with a 274-328 connector 
adapter. 

Write or call for more 
information or for technical 
assistance. 



Price List 

Model 101 35.95 
Model 1 01 P 41.95 
Model 104 44.95 
Model 104P 51.95 
Model 105 14.95 
Cassette Label Program 6.95 
Pin Feed Cassette Labels: 
White 3.00/100 
Colors (specify) 3.60/C 
Red-Blue-Yellow-Tan 



4 Pin Din Serial 
COCO Cables: 

Male/Male 6 foot 
Male/Female 6 foot 
Female/Female 6 foot 
Other Lengths Available. 

All items covered by a 
1 year warranty 



4.49 
4.49 
4.49 



Free Shipping in the 

U.S.A. (except AK and HI) 
on all orders over $50 
On orders under $50 
please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling 
On orders outside the 
U.S.A. please write or call 
for shipping charges 



Metric Industries Inc. 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

(513) 677-0796 



September 1988 THE RAINBOW 1 43 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing/to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 




144 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



its start-up program. It finds memory 
locations that are really in the MC6883 
SAM chip which hold an address that 
turns out to be in the CoCo BASIC ROM 
chip. At this point the top 32K bytes of 
read-and-write memory (RAM) are 
turned off so the 6809 can read the 
Read-Only Memory (ROM) chips. The 
6809 doesn't care whether it is seeing 
ROM or RAM as long as what it reads 
makes sense. Obviously, what the 6809 
sees does make sense. The designers of 
the CoCo made sure of that. What the 
6809 reads is its start-up program which 
it dutifully performs. One of the first 
tasks in the start-up code is to display 
the message you see when you start your 
computer. The code for the characters 
in the words is there so the problem is 
getting the words onto your screen. 

One primary task of an operating 
system is handling communications 
with components of the computer sys- 
tem external to the computer itself. 
These include the screen and keyboard, 
which comprise the terminal; the exter- 
nal storage, including tape and disk 
drives; the printer and other ports such 
as CoCo's RS-232. As a group, these are 
called I/O for Input/ Output. 

On the earliest digital computers, 
input and output were switches and 
lights only. Programmers needed to talk 
the computer's language — on and off. 
Everything was hard to make, hard to 
do and hard to afford. Memory was a 
major barrier. As permanent memory 
capacity became available, simple oper- 
ating systems were written and stored in 
internal memory, allowing the comput- 
er to reach the point where it could load 
programs from cheaper, external, 
memory-like punched cards. As mem- 
ory became cheaper and more available, 
programs and operating systems grew 
larger letting the computer do more of 
the repetitive tasks. 

Returning to 1988 and the CoCo we 
left booting a bit ago, we find it ready. 
It found the operating system code to 
display the message and sent along the 
right letters and words. It wrote some 
start-up data on its "scratch pad" in 
RAM where it can change data if neces- 
sary. CoCo found out whether or not 
Extended and Disk BASIC were availa- 
ble and set itself up accordingly. Finally, 
it sent you an OK on the screen and 
waited for you to type something. 

If you have Disk BASIC, you might 
type DIR. The computer will read the 
directory of the disk in Drive 0 and 
display it on your screen. Simple 
enough, right? Well maybe, but neither 
you nor I had to write the programs the 



CoCo used to get the directory. First, it 
used a program called a command 
interpreter which in some systems, 
including OS-9, is called the Shell. The 
command interpreter takes the charac- 
ters you typed up to the carriage return 
(ENTER) and analyzes them. When it 
finds that the first word you typed 
matches a command word it knows, it 
processes the rest of the characters for 
data that goes with that command and 
calls the program for that command to 
do the work. The process of analyzing 
the string of characters is called parsing. 

Parsing a character string to find a 
command and its parameters is one of 
the most basic computer functions. It's 
part of all modern operating systems 
and many programs. Since the process 
is to compare a character string with 
character strings found in memory, a 
command could consist of any charac- 
ters, in any order, that the computer will 
recognize. 

You could have typed FOR X = 1 TO 
1000: NEXT and your CoCo would 
accept it. There would be a short delay 
and then the OK would reappear. Wait 
a minute, that's BASIC! Right. On the 
CoCo, the operating system and BASIC 
use the same command interpreter and 
are co-resident in the ROMs. This is not 
true of programming languages under 
OS-9 — they must be loaded separately. 

What are BASIC commands, and what 
are operating system commands? One 
answer is that those commands regu- 
larly part of a separately loaded BASIC 
on other machines are language, and all 
others are operating system commands. 
Perhaps this is not the clearest answer, 
but it is the best available since BASIC 
is more defined than an operating 
system. Another way to look at the 
question in the Disk BASIC context is to 
consider all non-BASlC commands as 
operating system utilities and to restrict 
the definition of an operating system to 
presently unnamed pieces of program 
that directly interface with the system's 
hardware. 

The utilities DIR, COPY, LORD, RE- 
NAME, BACKUP, etc., all need to read 
information from a disk. Each does a 
different thing with the information 
once it has it. Each uses the same code 
to read the disk, so that code only needs 
to be present once so that each utility 
can call it when needed. Do you start 
to see a building block process? There 
are some basic function code pieces, 
let's call them primitives, that are used 
by higher level utilities. In turn, these 
utilities can be called by other utility 
programs. Keep this hieraf<5Rv in mind, 



for this type of structure is more evident 
in OS-9. 

Although CoCo BASIC does some 
unexpected things (like including a 
resident BASIC), there are some things 
that operating systems on larger com- 
puters can do that CoCo BASIC does 
not. One difference is CoCo's inability 
to read commands from a file on disk. 
Another, it is not easily changed. CoCo 
Is and 2s are particularly difficult since 
the operating system and BASIC are 
normally run from ROM, which cannot 
be changed. 

While the CoCo 3 has ROMs, it runs 
from RAM. On start-up, the ROMs are 
enabled. Part of the start-up sequence 
is to read the ROMs into RAM and 
then change the code. This is why the 
old Version 1.0 Disk BASIC ROM will 
work in a CoCo 3 even though it was 
replaced by Version 1.1 five years ago. 

If the CoCo 3 has Disk BASIC in 
RAM, theoretically one can poke in 
bytes to change it. Fine, what do I poke 
where? Ah, there's the rub. Although 
few people have taken Disk BASIC apart 
to see what makes it tick, and some have 
written software to change or enhance 
it, this is not a task for a typical BASIC 
programmer. Further, software that 
does enhance Disk BASIC is typically 
written into larger programs like a disk 
management or a fancy terminal pro- 
gram. When you want to run a BASIC 
program, these enhancement programs 
are not running, so you are back to to 
what Disk BASIC offers. 

What's wrong with what Disk BASIC 
gives you? Single sided, 30-ms step rate 
drives have not been manufactured for 
several years. My 80-track, double- 
sided, six-ms step rate, 720K, 3!4-inch 
drive works just fine under Disk BASIC. 
It uses 35 tracks on one side at 30-ms 
and stores 156K bytes. Using a special 
driver, I can access my hard drive from 
Disk BASIC, but then some machine 



language software I like won't work. 
Disk basic does not support disk direc- 
tories, but that is no problem with a 
small disk capacity. While MS-DOS 
and OS-9 have type-ahead buffers built 
into the operating system, Disk BASIC 
does not. One of the reasons I went to 
OS-9 in the first place was that I got 
tired of losing characters in my Disk 
BASIC word processor. To have all the 
features I wanted, I needed a more 
powerful system. 

How Does OS-9 Do It? 

The first CoCo went on sale in Sep- 
tember, 1980. Extended BASIC was 
ready in March of the following year. 
Disk basic followed in the fall. The 
design of the system reflects good 
consumer, microcomputer technology 
for the CoCo's intended time and 
market. OS-9 took an entirely different 
path. A look at its history sheds light on 
this difference. 

OS-9's characteristics reflect different 
goals from other microcomputer oper- 
ating systems. The 6809 appeared in the 
late 1970s, and Motorola contracted 
with Microware to provide an operating 
system to utilize the special character- 
istics of the chip. The 6809 had been 
designed with multitasking in mind, and 
this operating system was to provide 
this capability. Since memory was costly 
in those days, memory economy was an 
important factor. To access the indus- 
trial instruments and controls market, 
the system needed to be in ROM. In 
addition, programming utilities would 
not need to be in the operating system 
included in the final hardware. The final 
operating system would be different 
than the development system, and the 
memory in the final hardware would be 
smaller than in the machine that devel- 
oped the software. The program mod- 
ules in the final machine would not be 
in the memory location used while being 



written. 

Remember I said I have 88 modules 
in memory. Except for a few, each is 
relocatable — it can be loaded into any 
location in memory. Over the past year, 
I have revised my operating system a 
number of times. Many of the modules 
are the same, but relocated. Moreover, 
none of the programs today occupy the 
memory locations they did six months 
ago. Clearly OS-9 is a modular system 
that can be shaped one way for one 
application and another for the next 

Today OS-9 is true to its original 
design objectives and provides out- 
standing performance at very low cost. 
With OS-9, any program module can be 
loaded anywhere in the memory space 
and still be executed // the code is 
written in relocatable form. This means 
that addresses are expressed relative to 
the program counter register in the 6809 
and not in absolute terms. Data is 
accessed by offsets from the beginning 
of the data space, which can then be 
located anywhere in the logical memory 
space. 

Traditionally, multitasking submits a 
task to the operating system using some 
form of job control language. The 
operating system works on the job in the 
background while the user has use of the 
terminal for another task. Output from 
the job goes to a disk or printer — 
seldom to the terminal. This is the way 
multitasking works in the brand new 
OS-2 operating system. 

But a new idea was developing — 
windows through which a user could 
quickly access different programs and 
jobs. Thus, you are able to switch 
between different jobs without actually 
running those jobs concurrently. An 
outgrowth of this idea is TSR (termi- 
nate and stay resident) software for MS- 
DOS. The first was Sidekick which is 
generally loaded on bootup and then 
called by pressing cntrl-alt keys. One 



DMC "No Halt" Disk Controller 




$137.50* 

•without ROM 

Unleash your CoCo's potential! 

Our new Dual Mode Controller (DMC) implements a new 
"no halt" mode of operation so it can read from or write 
to disk all by itself. The 6809 is freed to process other 
tasks and respond to interrupts. This is how OS-9 was 
meant to run! But the Radio Shack "halt" mode of 
operation is also retained to maintain full compatibility 
with existing non-OS-9 software. 



Other DMC features: 



r 4| 



New! OF-Link (FLEX under OS-9) 

Lets you run FLEX in a window under OS-9 Level II. 
Ask for more details. Introductory price $49 



Did you know? 

. . .that all the older floppy disk controllers for the 
CoCo completely tie up (and even halt) the 6809 pro- 
cessor during disk reads and writes? No wonder 
your keyboard is constantly "losing" characters! Or 
that your serial port often gives you garbage. 




• works with original CoCo, CoCo2, or CoCo3 
(Multi-Pak usually required) " 

• no adjustments — all digital data separator and write 
precompensation 

• gold plated card-edge connectors for reliability 

• ROM socket takes 24 pin or 28 pin chip; dual DOS capability 

• Radio Shack DOS 1.1 ROM for complete compatibility 

• 8K bytes cache memory on board (32K optional) 

• D.P. Johnson's SDISK package (specially modified for DMC) 
is included at no charge ($30 value) 

• disk caching software included free 

• fully assembled and tested; 120 day limited warranty 

• call or write for free brochure for more details 

To ordtr: DMC controller with RSDOS 1.1 and SDISK (specify 
OS-9 Level I or II) $149.50 plus $5 SIH ($12 overseas). Add $16 
for 32K RAM option. Terms (prices in $US); check, money 
order, VISA. U.S.A. orders shipped via UPS from WA state. 




2261 East 11th Ave., Vancouver, B.C., Canada V5N 1Z7 



(Also ask about our ST-2900 
6809 based expandable 
single board computer) 

(604) 255-4485 (Pacific Time) 



September 1 988 THE RAINBOW 145 




J.?V:i<t-*";. 



_ 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 



J 2 Years of Servj£ 

DISCO 







NEW LOWER 
PRICES!! 



and Friendly Help! 

E LIST 



CoCo Burke & Burke Hard Drive Kits 

FLASH! More Burke and Burke systems 
have been bought in the last six months 
than other systems have sold in the last 
3 years!!!! 

Our first system features the Burke & Burke XT or XT RTC 
interface. This interface uses popular and inexpensive IBM PC 
type controllers. For this reason it is the least expensive hard 
disk system available today. Not as fast as the Isted system but 
faster than any other system available. It also supports RLL 
drives. Note: Disk Extended Color Basic support and other 
software options are listed on our price list. 
Disadvantage; requires a multi-pak. 

KIT INCLUDES: Burke & Burke (B&B) XT PC interface. Hard 
drive with controller, 3 foot ST506 cable set. Hard Drive Case 
with 60 watt power supply and £aji. Includes OS9 LI and LII 
software. 1 megabyte transfer in 45 seconds! Type ahead under 
OS9. Complete instructions. Easy one evening assembl: 



1 YEAR WARRANTY ON ALL SYSTEM 

20 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 

30 Meg Kit Complete 60MS RLL 

40 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 

Assemble and test any of the above add 

OPTIONS: 

B&B Real Time Clock (add to above) 
B&B XT ROM Auto Boot from hard disk 
B&B Hyper I/O run DECB on hard drive 
B&B Hyper III Ramdisk/spooler for above 
FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 



♦498.00 
♦548.00 
♦618.00 
50.00 

30.00 
19.95 
29.95 
19.95 
75.00 



Hard Drive Bits and Pieces 

B&B XT PC style interface 
B&B XT RTC interface w/clock/calendar 

(Call for Hard Drive and Kit prices) 
FHL HCA/WD High Speed Interface 
WD 1002-05 High Speed for FHL Interface 

(Supports both Hara and Fli 
(Call for Hard Drive prices) 




(Supports both Hard and Floppy drives) 
(Call for Hard Drive prices) 

Hard Drive case with 60W P/S and Fan 



69.95 
99.95 



♦99.95 
♦196.00 

♦98.00 



(Can also be used for floppy drives) 
SPECIFICATIONS: size 16" deep, 5.5^ high, V wide. 60 Watt power supply 
with 3 drive type power connectors, quiet 12 volt DC fan, LED power indicator, 
color matches CoCo. Holds 2 1/2 height hard or floppy drives and has card 
guided space for a PCB the size of a drive (like the WD 1002-05 controller) 

Floppy Drives (5.25" and 3.5" FLOPPY DISKS) 
TEAC High Quality Drives - 1 Year Warr. 

FD55B 360K 40 Track DS 5.25" 118.00 
FD55F 720K 80 Track DS 5.25: 151.00 
FD35F 720K 80 Track DS 3.5" 14 7.00 

(Bare drives, requires case and power supply $75.00) 



— - 



i iniiiii 



Mm 






"f'V"^* 

































CoCo FHL High Speed Hard Drive Kits 

Our top of the line system features Bruce Isted's interface for 
the Western Digital WD 1002-05 high speed controller. 
Features; fastest system available, 1 megabyte transfer in 
only 37 seconds!! Twice as fast as other systems! Supports 4 
floppy and 3 hard drives, type ahead for both floppy and hard 
disk, autoboot OS9 LI or L2 from hard or floppy disk. 
Disadvantage; does not support DECB. This is the system of 
choice for the serious OS9 user. 

KIT INCLUDES: FHL HCA/WD High Speed interface, Hard drive 
with WD 1002-05 controller, ST506 cable set, 4 foot 40 pin 
cable, Hard Drive Case with 60 watt power supply and fan . 
OS9 software for LI and LII with source . Complete instructions. 
Easy one evening assembly. 

( INTERFACE SPECIFICATIONS: Size is the same as a floppy 
controller. Interfaces the WD 1002-05 controller to the CoCo. 
This controller handles 3 hard and 4 floppy drives. Type ahead 
under OS9 for both floppy and hard drive. Includes OS9 LI and 
LII software with source. Autoboot ROM included to boot from 
floppy or hard drive. Supports OS9 only. 1 megabyte transfer 
in 37 seconds!) 

1 YEAR WARRANTY ON ALL SYSTEMS! 




20 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 
40 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 
70 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 
Assemble & Test any of the above add 

OPTIONS: 

Floppy Drive (Mounted in case) 
FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 



*725.00 
*825.00 
1260.00 
60.00 



128.00 
75.00 







mi 



7m 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA and M/C. NY residents add 7% sales 
tax. US shipping add $3.50. Please call for Air Express shipping. 

Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. 
♦•Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 

* New LOWER PRICES!!! 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 

Telex 646740 

Call 315/474-7856 



■•• ■■■■ "j ' yw 



J"."" ' 



- :...<;-y ■■ . ■ . i 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 

12 Weam of Service, Support, and Friendly Help! 

OS9 




The WIZ 

by Bill Brady 

Did you ever wonder why there is only one really good 
communications package for OS 9? The WIZ is so good that no 
one has been able to better it in over a year on the market! 
Simply the best package there is for OS 9 and the CoCo JSL 
FEATURES: Mac-Like interface with windows, text and 
binary upload/download with xmodem, kermit, on line HELP, 
AUTOLOGGING lets you dial up and log on to your favorite 
service, Macros, VT52 emulation, Usage log and much more. 

The Wiz requires a RS232 Pak or similar device, LIE and 512K. 
Supports the Owl-Ware Super I/O board. 



The WIZ 



Disto RS232 Pak 



79.95 
49.95 



OS9 Users Group Disk Library 

We have the complete OS9 Users Group Library available 
for immediate delivery. We pay the UG a royalty so you will be 
helping a worthy cause when you buy these disks. All the 
programs include source and some documentation. The 11 disk 
library is the best deal if you can read 80 track double sided 
disks. These disks are 720K each and are all almost full. That's 
almost 8 megabytes of programs for only $156! The individual 
disks are on 35 or 40 track disks and some are double sided. 
Call or send for the list. 



OS9 Users Group Disks each (50+ disks) 
Complete 11 disk library 



10.00 
156.00 



Inside OS9 Level II 

The Book by Kevin Darling 
$39.95 

Are your tired of playing games with Level II? Do you want to 
find out what's going on inside OS9? This is the book for you! 
Over 200 pages of hints, kinks, bugs, source listings and much 
more. Written by the well known Compuserve SysOp, Kevin 
Darling. 'Must reading' says Dale Puckett in Rainbow! 



Sculptor 



Sculptor is a applications language, commonly referred to as a 
4th Generation Language. Basically this means that you can 
create applications in one tenth the time it would normally take. 
Sculptors screen and print formatting make screen displays and 
reports easy and fast. Sculptors B+ tree index system makes 
record lookup lighting fast. Programs are portable too. 
Sculptor 249.00 
Sculptor Special (If we have any left, (call)) 149.00 



DynaStar 



Used by more OS9 users than any other! 

FEATURES: Best OS 9 editor/word processor/text formatter, has 
everything you would expect and more, supports terminals and 
windows simultaneously, auto-configurable, auto-indent for C 
and Pascal programming, mail merge for form letters, bug free, 
solid. New manual makes it easier to use than ever. Most pop- 
ular word processor since 19821 Uses CoCo 3's windows for 
pop-up help menus, can be disabled. Two key sequence to move 
from anywhere to anywhere in your text. WordStar command 
style. Will work with files larger than memory. Merge function 
allows stringing many files together at print time. Full block 
manipulation, mark, move, copy, delete, read from disk, write 
to disk. Keyboard Macros: Define or redefine any control 
key (up to 29) to reproduce any key sequences, including 
commands! Macros can be read in at startup automatically or 
created on the fly as needed. Printer Control: Supports 
multiple printers via a print control file that transforms 
imbedded control characters to printer control characters. 
Changing printers is easy. Formatting Commands: 
Justification, word wrap, centering, headers, footers, macros, 
odd and even support, multiple index generation, multiple table 
of contents generation and more! DynaStar is the last word 
processor you will ever have to buy! Level I version also 
included on disk. 



DynaStar word processor/formatter 



150.00 



DynaSpell 

by Dale Puckett 

102,000 and 20,000 word dictionaries included. Supports both 
Level I and II. Fast, slick, the best available for OS9. Written 
by Rainbowtech columnist Dale Puckett. 

DynaSpell spelling checker 75.00 
SPECIAL WHEN PURCHASED WITH DYNASTAR 25.00 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA and M/C. NY residents add 7% sales 
tax. US shipping add $3.50. Please call for Air Express shipping. 

Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. 
♦♦Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 

Telex 646740 

Call 315/474-7856 



About 
Your 
Subscription 

Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you betterand 
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For Canadian and other non- 
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tralia. 




148 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



can be working on a spreadsheet or 
using a wordprocessor, instantly switch 
to Sidekick to use one of its utilities and 
then pick up where the first job was left 
off. 

There are problems here. If you try 
to have a number of TSR programs in 
the machine at once, they will fight to 
use the same DOS connections. Docu- 
mentation and magazine articles recog- 
nize this problem and give sage advice 
like "load this program first." When you 
have two programs that give this same 
advice, you really have problems. Is it 
any wonder that an owner of an MS- 
DOS machine who has had this prob- 
lem would doubt us when we promise 
no problem under OS-9 — particularly 
when our CoCo system costs half as 
much? 

The key to OS-9's success lies in the 
way the operating system manages the 
program modules so that each has 
access to the operating system resources 
as needed. Each running module is 
allocated a time share of the computer. 
If it has nothing to do, it goes to sleep, 
and OS-9 wakes it up when work ar- 
rives. The operating system keeps a list 
of where each module is in memory and 
sees that other modules don't interfere 
with it. 

Each piece of OS-9's operating sys- 
tem is reasonably accessible, change- 
able and replaceable. The system can 
grow with the computer. When I added 
a double-sided drive, 1 changed my 
device descriptor, and all my applica- 
tions used it as double-sided. When I 
got a hard disk, I added a new driver 
and device descriptor, and all my appli- 
cations now run from the hard disk. 

It's almost like managing a baseball 
team and changing the lineup from time 
to time. And, like members of a team, 
each player has special skills. Next 
month, we will introduce some of the 
players and see how they operate. 

Getting Started With OS-9 

When purchasing OS-9, the best 
advice is to start slow and easy. Don't 
begin with hardware for OS-9 alone. 
This is particularly true of RAM up- 
grades with prices inflated by high chip 
costs. Chip costs should stay high until 
the end of 1988. Watch for before- 
Christmas sale prices. October through 
December are good months to buy 
CoCos. Level I OS-9 is obsolete so don't 
pay the $69.95 list. 

BAS1C09 in the OS-9 Level II package, 
which costs $79.95 list, is identical to 
software that sells separately for $99.95. 
The Level II package has better docu- 



mentation and the complete Level II 
operating system. CoCo 1 and 2 owners 
who are running Level 1 and are con- 
sidering buying BASIC09, should buy 
OS-9 Level II. 

CoCo 1 and 2 owners who need to 
buy OS-9, should make sure to get Level 
I, Version 2. This is an upgrade and 
includes many new features not pre- 
viously available. It is available through 
Radio Shack (Cat. No. 700-2331) for 
about $25. It will run on a CoCo 3 when 
you upgrade; Version 1 will not. 

Watch for real deals on Level I. It has 
an assembler, Def files and a number of 
utilities like DeBug, Save and Verify 
that will run under Level II, but are not 
in the Level 11 package. Make sure the 
Level I package is complete with the 
three manuals included. 

OS-9 documentation is terse, though 
fairly complete. It's not bug free. Those 
with photographic memories will ap- 
preciate it. If you want something not 
so industrial strength, try The Complete 
Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puck- 
ett and Peter Dibble, $19.95. Most of 
this basic primer for Level I is directly 
useable in Level II. There is a rumor 
that this book is not for Level II. This 
is not necessarily true. Just remember 
that some of the examples in the book 
are particular to Level I. 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to 
OS-9 Level II: A Beginner's Guide to 
Windows, Volume 1 by Dale Puckett 
and Peter Dibble, $19.95, offers more 
OS-9 in easy doses, neat Level II graph- 
ics using operating system commands 
only and a good discussion of Level II 
graphics using BASIC09 — available 
from Radio Shack (Cat. No. 26-3188) 
or from the rainbow. 

Basic OS-9 Tour Guide, by Dale 
Puckett, $14.95, (Cat. No. 26-3189) 
discusses Level I and II, but not win- 
dows. Puckett takes you through 
BASIC09 at his typical, comfortable rate 
and provides plenty of easy keyboard 
exercises along the way. 

Software and Hardware 

Ar and Pak are public domain util- 
ities available for download from many 
BBS's and from the Delphi OS-9 SIG 
Database under Utilities. RiBBS is in 
the Delphi OS-9 SIG Database under 
the Telcommunication topic. 

The CoCo XT hard drive system was 
developed by Chris Burke of Burke & 
Burke. Other RAINBOW advertisers sell- 
ing the Burke & Burke interface, sepa- 
rately and in systems, include Frank 
Hogg Labs and Howard Medical. ^ 




«< G1MWES0FT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 







of thm isioat advanced t 

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MAX- 10 Is the perfect partner for CoCo MAX 1111 Mix graphics and text to get great looking newsletters, 
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ttitn CoCb 
ECHO* stutteriiig^s 
mcJudes Data 

recordrogs to your own program^ ^ 



MAXSOUND SOUNDTRACKS W/ GRAPHICS (MAXSOUND program NOT req'd) Call for Titles .... $5.95 




Utilize the FULL 512k memory 
SCREENS! Six new BASIC comm^ 

ioad sxafe^ Smooth animation, and 100% 

Machme Language code. Recuses DECB 1.0^ documentation. Disk $24.95 



MULTI-LABEL H 1 (Co Co ID only) See July '87 review. An easy to use, versatile label creating program 
including many new CoCo 111 features. Print multiple fonts on each label! Disk $16.95 



creates up 



111 ^ 

l^c«<^ keysi 



(CoCo 1/M/JX$ Trds machine lavage utility modifies DECB 1.0, la, FKEYS ID, or ADOS to 



$29, 



AUTO DIM (CoCo in only) See Jan. '88 review. This hardware device protects your monitor, or TV 
IMAGE BURN after a few minutes of inactivity from your keyboard. Illustrated and easy to install. Hdwe ../d 

MPI~CoCO Locking Plate (CoCo HI only) Now 2 styl««_^tects your CoCo III and MultX/Puk/ 
Interface from destroying each other! Please specify MP1 number 26-3024 oi^26-3124) when ordering! Only 




QUCSt Of tile StUf JLordf (CoCo HI only) Efcjoy the mixture of science and fantasy 

asi^you'-o^ 

of animated graphics advents 320x200 graphics! Disk $34.95 Hint Sheet 



Kung-Fu Dude (CoCo I/U/III) See Feb. '88 review. A Kung-Fu program for the CoCo. Destroy opponents 
and evade obstacles as you grow even closer to your ultimate objective! Disk $24.95 

PYRAMDC (CoCo 111 only) See Dec. '87 review. Brilliant colors, sharp graphics, and hot action! Disk .. $19.95 




AD&D Character's Companion (coco i/n/w) Great umesaving 



the 1^ 



i 



White FlTe Of Etemity (CoCo I/O/Ill) See Dec. '86 review. A great graphics adventure! Disk.. $19.95 
CHAMPION (CoCo I /II /HI) See May '87 review. Become a superhero in this action adventure! Disk. .919.95 



Order line 



Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
information: Delphi's CoCo Sig 



GIMMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301-256*7558 or 301-256-2953 



Add $3.00 for shipping and handling 
Add $2.50 for COD (USA only) 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VlSA/MC/Check/Money Order/ COD 



RAINBOWTECH 




Assembly Language for 
the Complete Novice 

By William Barden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Assembly language has a special mystique. No matter 
how many "high-level" languages come out, people 
keep coming back to assembly language as the 
ultimate programming language for the CoCo and all other 
computers. There are three good reasons for this: 

• Assembly language is fast. 

• Assembly language is really fast. 

• Assembly language is really darn fast. 

Assembly language is sometimes hundreds of times faster 
than interpretive BASIC. Usually, it's at least dozens of times 
faster than interpretive basic and ten times as fast as 
compiled BASIC09. 

Can you learn assembly language? Maybe, but maybe not. 
If you're fairly proficient in at least one other language, such 
as BASIC, you'll probably be able to learn assembly language. 
If you're a "hardware type," you'll probably be able to learn 
it as well. It doesn't require math beyond arithmetic, and it 
doesn't require a great deal of abstract thinking. It does 
require a hacker's love of computers. (Being a masochist also 
helps.) 

In this column and the next, I'll start you from the ground 
up to give you an idea of what's involved in assembly 
language. Then you can decide whether assembly language 
is for you. 

The Advantages of Assembly Language 

Besides speed, there are several advantages to learning 
assembly language: 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 

1 50 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



• Short AL subroutines can be used to speed up your 
critical BASIC code. 

• Learning one AL makes it easy to learn assembly 
languages for different microprocessors or systems. 

• AL knowledge is a marketable programming commodity. 

The Disadvantages of Assembly Language 

There are some severe disadvantages to assembly language 
as well: 

• Learning assembly language is a major undertaking. 

• Programming in assembly language takes much longer 
than programming in BASIC or another language — as 
much as ten times longer. 

If you're still with me in spite of the disadvantages, let's 
start from the ground up. 

How to Talk to a Machine 

The CoCo 1, 2 and 3 use versions of the Motorola 6809 
microprocessor. This microprocessor is similar in power to 
the Intel 8088 used in MS-DOS systems, but it has a much 
cleaner instruction set. The 6809 instruction set is known as 
a "classic" programmer's instruction set, 

A microprocessor is just a conveniently packaged part that 
includes a great deal of electronic circuitry in a single package 
— circuitry that previously required tens of thousands of 
transistors, resistors, capacitors and other parts to imple- 
ment. 

Instruction Set 

One of the things hard wired into the microprocessor is 
an instruction set. What instructions should be implemented 
in a microprocessor? Since even the simplest instruction takes 
a great deal of electronic logic, microprocessor instruction 
sets are limited to simple instructions. Certainly there should 
be instructions to add two numbers, to subtract two numbers, 
and possibly even multiply two numbers. There should also 
be instructions to jump to another sequence of instructions 



(similar to a BASIC GOTO or GOSUB), to compare two numbers 
(similar to a BASIC IF. . .THEN. . .GOTO. . .), to move 
data between memory and the microprocessor and to 
perform Input/ Output. 

The built-in instruction set is determined by many things 
— the instructions used in the company's previous micro- 
processors, the complexity of the instructions, the instruc- 
tions used in competing microprocessors, and the whim of 
the microprocessor designer. 

Machine Language 

The total instruction set of the microprocessor is called the 
machine language of the microprocessor. A program consists 
of a sequence of machine language instructions. Before 
assemblers were available, programmers (they were called 
computer engineers then) had to sit down with the instruction 
set of the microprocessor and hand code a long list of machine 
language instructions to perform some function. Suppose we 
wanted to find the largest number of a list of ten signed 
(positive or negative) numbers. The ten numbers are located 
in memory at locations $4000 through $4009, where the dollar 
sign stands for hexadecimal (in decimal these locations are 
16384 through 16393). 

Working from the entire list of machine language instruc- 
tions, we might come up with this program: 

1. Load accumulator with 0. 

2. Set memory pointer to $4000. 

3. Compare the number in the accumulator with the 
current memory location. 

4. If the number in memory is larger, put that number in 



the accumulator. 

5. Increment the memory pointer by one (from $4000 to 
$4001, etc.). 

6. If the pointer is not $400fi, loop back to Step 3. 

This sequence of instructions is typical of the level of 
programming used by machine and assembly language. All 
assembly language works with such rudimentary operations 
and builds from these low-level operations to more complex 
programs. 

The actual machine-language instructions to perform this 
operation are shown here: 



1. LDfl »0 

2. LDX tt$4000 

3. CMPfl ,X 

4. BGT (Step 5) 
LDfi ,X 

5. LEfiX +1,X 

6. CMPX tt$400A 

7. BLT (Step 3) 



10000110 00000000 

10001110 01000000 00000000 

10100001 10000100 

00101110 00000010 

10100110 10000100 

00110000 00000001 

10001100 01000000 00001010 

00101101 11110011 



We've numbered our steps in the same way our original 
series was numbered. 

Some of these steps may seem mysterious to you. You may 
not know what an accumulator is or what the +1,X repre- 
sents. However, you can see the flow of steps necessary to 
perform the operations. 

Binary and Hexadecimal 

In coding-up the machine language instructions, we 
converted from the abbreviated form, such as CMPfl to binary 



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September 1988 THE RAINBOW 1 51 



numbers, (10100001). In machine language coding, the 
instruction set of the microprocessor is listed as a series of 
mnemonics — abbreviations of the instructions. It's much 
easier to type in LDfl, for example, then Load the R 
accumulator. These mnemonics are established by the 
microprocessor's manufacturer (in this case Motorola) and 
used in both machine language and assembly language 
programming. 

The numbers to the right of the mnemonics are the actual 
machine language of the program. A microprocessor, like all 
computer circuitry, works only with binary numbers — an 
electrical circuit can only be off or on, a signal can be present 
or not present, and so forth. The machine language instruc- 
tions are encoded as binary digits — bits — of 0 or 1. The 
10000110 code above, for example, stands for the LDfl 
instruction. Whenever the 6809 encounters that code, it 
knows that the instruction will load the accumulator with the 
value immediately following in the next byte (eight bits). In 
this case the next byte is 00000000, a zero value. Since bytes 
are commonly used in memory and other computer circuitry, 
the 6809 instructions are geared to byte multiples — 
instructions are one, two, three, four, or five bytes. 

Therefore, the entire program for finding the largest 
number exists in computer memory as 144 bits (18 bytes). 
This is an actual hand-coding of the program and you could 
enter this code in CoCo memory to find the largest number 
of the ten in memory locations $4000 through $4009. 

Hexadecimal notation is a shorthand version of binary. To 
convert a binary number into a hex digit, use this table: 



Binary 


Hex 


Binary 


Hex 


Binary 


Hex 


0000 


0 


0110 


6 


1100 


C 


0001 


1 


0111 


7 


1101 


D 


0010 


2 


1000 


8 


1110 


E 


0011 


3 


1001 


9 


1111 


F 


0100 


4 


1010 


10 






0101 


5 


1011 


11 







The hexadecimal representation of the machine language 
above is: 



1. LDR »0 

2. LDX tt$4000 

3. CMPfl ,X 

4. BGT (Step 5) 

LDR ,X 

5. LEflX +1,X 

6. CMPX tt$400R 

7. BLT (Step 3) 



10000110 00000000 

10001110 01000000 00000000 

10100001 10000100 

00101110 00000010 

10100110 10000100 

00110000 00000001 

10001100 01000000 00001010 

00101101 11110011 



B6 00 
BE 40 00 
Rl 84 
2E 02 
R6 84 
30 01 
8C 40 0R 
2D F3 



Hex is represented in BASIC by the prefix &H. The number 
&H30 is hexadecimal 30, binary 001 10000, and decimal 48. 
CoCo BASIC has no way to represent binary numbers, so hex 
is often used in place of binary. In machine or assembly 
language coding, hex numbers are prefixed by a dollar sign 
($). The number $2E is hexadecimal 2E, binary 00 1 0 1 1 10, and 
decimal 46. Because decimal numbers are often used without 
any prefix, one of the more common errors in assembly 
language coding is to mistake decimal numbers and hexadec- 
imal numbers for each other. 

6809 Architecture 

The 6809 microprocessor design is called its architecture. 
The word architecture is a fancy way of telling you what's 
inside the chip. 



Registers 

Every microprocessor has from two to dozens of registers. 
The 6809 registers are shown in Figure 1 . A microprocessor 
register is very similar to a memory location. In fact, it's a 
fast memory location within the microprocessor. Registers 
are used to hold temporary results. The microprocessor 
register is usually denoted by a letter, such as A (accumulator) 
or X (index register). In ML instructions, a register is denoted 
by a binary code such as 00, 01, 10 or 1 1. 



i6Brrs 



8 BITS 



r 
D 



B 



Accumulators 



Index Registers 



Stack Pointers 



U 



PC 



1 Program Counter 



DP 



] Direct Page 



H |l jN Z |V T5] Condition Codes 



Figure 1: 6801 Registers 



The A and B registers are called accumulator registers. This 
term dates back to the origins of computers in the '40s. The 
A and B accumulators are used for addition, subtraction and 
other instructions. The A and B registers are eight-bit 
registers. Taken together they make up one double-sized 
register called the D accumulator. 

Typically, one operand for an instruction is held in A, B, 
or D and the second operand is taken from memory. The 
result goes back into A, B, or D. In the compare instruction 
(CMPfl), the number in A was compared with a number 
somewhere in memory. 

The X and Y registers are 16-bit registers, twice the size 
of the A and B accumulators. They are index registers. Index 
registers are used to address memory. Although an absolute 
memory location can be used in an instruction (such as LDA 
$4000 to load the contents of memory location $4000 into 
accumulator A), memory can also be addressed with an index 
register. In the code above, the X index register was loaded 
with a value of $4000. This value points to a memory location. 
The CMPfl , X instruction used the contents of X as a pointer 



152 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



to access memory. The X register contents had one added to 
it at the end of the loop to point to the next location. Since 
many operations in assembly language involve accessing 
(reading and writing) data in sequential locations, index 
registers are often used. Imagine trying to scan a list of values 
from $4000 through $4300 by using direct addresses (CMPft 
$4000, CMPA $4001, CMPA $4002, etc.). 

The U and S registers are stack pointer registers. These 
registers refer to an area in memory called a stack. The stack 
area is a small area (a few hundred bytes) located anywhere 
you choose to put it — preferably somewhere it won't be 
overwritten by other data. 

The stack records return addresses for subroutine calls, 
temporary data, and addresses for interrupt processing. The 
6809 instruction set makes provision for subroutines. 
Subroutines are code sequences that can be called from many 
points within a program, rather than replicating the code in 
many places. Subroutines are like BASIC G05UB subroutines. 
Like the GOSUB subroutines, the return point is saved. In the 
6809, the return point is saved in the S stack. An RT5 
instruction retrieves the return address from the stack and 
performs an action similar to the BASIC RETURN. 

The S stack is used automatically for subroutine and 
interrupt actions — the logic is hard-wired into the micro- 
processor design. The U stack is a user stack. It is a second 
stack that can be used for any storage that is convenient for 
the user. 

The PC register is a program counter. The program counter 
is a memory pointer that points to the next instruction to be 
executed. Machine language instructions are stored in 
memory, read a byte at a time, and processed by the 6809. 



The program counter points to the next byte of the current 
instruction. It's automatically incremented by the micro- 
processor logic, based upon the length of the instruction. It 
is changed by jump or branch instructions, which cause a 
conditional (based upon results) or unconditional (always 
done) jump to a new sequence of instructions. The jump or 
branch may be one instruction away or thousands of 
instructions away, just as BASIC GOTOs jump to program lines 
that are close or far away. The program counter is normally 
not used by the programmer. 

The DP, direct page, register is used in a special form of 
addressing, which addresses data in a 256-byte page. Any 256- 
byte page in memory can be specified. 

Condition codes are treated as an eight-bit register. 
However, they are really separate bits. The condition codes 
are set or reset upon the results of operations. When adding 
two numbers, for example, the Z condition code is set if the 
result is 0, and the N condition code is set if the result is 
negative. The condition codes are used in conditional 
branching instructions such as BNE (Branch on Not Equal). 

Memory 

The 6809 microprocessor uses a 64K- (65,536) byte address 
space. This means that the 6809 can address locations within 
this 64K-byte range. It requires a 16-bit address to do so. The 
lowest address in this range is 0000000000000000 in binary 
($0000 or 0 decimal). The highest address in this range is 
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 in binary ($FFFF or 65,535 decimal). The 
basic 64K limitation of the microprocessor can be extended 
by memory banking or by special hardware. This is the 
scheme used in the CoCo 3, which allows up to 5I2K bytes 




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of memory, controlled by the GIME chip. Even though 
different 64K blocks of memory can be rapidly mapped in 
and out in the CoCo 3, the 6809 can only address 64K at any 
given time. 

Certain addresses in high memory must be reserved by the 
microprocessor for interrupt vectors (addresses of interrupt 
processing subroutines). In general, however, the division of 
the 64K of memory is up to the computer designer and not 
to the microprocessor manufacturer. In the CoCos, the first 
32K is generally RAM (random-access or read/write 
memory), while the high 32K is ROM (read only or cartridge 
memory) and hardware addresses (disk controller, PIAs, 
etc.). 

Opcodes and Memory Addressing 

Some instructions in the 6809 require no memory operand. 
The CLRR instruction, for example, simply puts a zero into 
the A accumulator. These are generally one-byte instructions. 
In the CLRR instruction, the machine language code is 
01001111 ($4F). 

Other 6809 instructions, though, do require the address of 
an operand in memory. For example RDDR adds the contents 
of the A accumulator and a memory operand and puts the 
result back into A. The first byte of this instruction is 
10111011 ($BB), which is an opcode, or operation code, 
informing the microprocessor of the instruction. However, 
a memory address is also required. Two bytes of memory 
address would allow us to add the contents of any memory 
location within the 64K bytes. Thus, to add the contents of 
memory location $4000, the complete instruction would be 
10111011 01000000 00000000; the first byte is the operation 
code, while the second and third bytes is the memory address 
($4000) of the memory operand. 

All of the 6809 instructions could have the opcode in the 
first byte, and the memory address in the second and third 
bytes. However, when the 6809 was designed, memory was 
expensive, and memory space was limited. Therefore, the 
6809 instruction set uses a variety of addressing modes to save 
memory by making the instructions shorter. Here are the 
types available: 

• Inherent 

• Direct 

• Extended 

• Immediate 

• Indexed 

• Relative 

In the inherent addressing mode, the instruction needs no 
memory address. The R5LR instruction (01001000) shifts the 
A register left one bit and requires no memory address. 

Direct addressing mode forms the memory address by 
taking the contents of the Direct Page register and adding 
the second byte. The result is an effective memory address. 
RDDR $09 adds the contents of $4009, providing that the DP 
register contained $40. The instruction is 1001 1011 00001001. 
The first byte is an opcode and the second byte is half of the 
address. 

Extended is the "normal" addressing type where the second 
and third bytes of the instruction represent the memory 
address to be used. RDD $4009 adds the contents of memory 
location $4009 to the A register. The instruction is 10111011 
01000000 00001001, where the first byte is an opcode and the 
second and third bytes are the memory address. 

Immediate addressing mode tells the microprocessor that 



the data in the second byte of the instruction (or second and 
third bytes, for certain instructions) is to be used as the 
operand. Thus, RDDR tt$45 adds $45 (decimal 69) to the 
contents of the A register. The instruction, 10001001 
01000101, has an opcode in the first byte and an operand in 
the second. An RDDD tt$1000 would have three bytes since 
the operand would be two bytes long for the D register — 
10001011 00010000 00000000. 

In the indexed addressing mode, the effective memory 
address is computed by adding the contents of a register, 
usually X or Y, to the value of a displacement field in the 
instruction. The instruction RDDR 100, X for example, would 
find the effective memory address by adding the contents of 
the X register to 100 decimal. This address would then be 
used to get the memory operand. The instruction here would 
be 10101011 10001000 01100100. The first byte is an opcode 
as before. The second byte is code to specify the index register 
to be used and the length of the displacement field. The third 
byte is the value of the displacement field ($64 = 100 decimal). 
This is the hardest type of addressing mode to decode, so it 
may seem a little abstract. We're not giving you all the details 
here, either. 

"If you're fairly proficient in at 
least one other language, such as 
BASIC, you'll probably be able 
to learn assembly language. 99 

There are many different indexed addressing modes, some 
of which are mutually exclusive. These include an indexed 
addressing mode in which the index register is automatically 
incremented or decremented by one, one in which the U stack 
pointer is used, one in which the program counter is used as 
a memory pointer, etc. 

Branch Instructions 

Relative addressing mode is used for branch instructions. 
Branches allow you to test the condition codes after an 
operation like load (move an operand from memory into a 
register) or add. Short branches have an opcode in the first 
byte and a displacement field (positive or negative) in the 
second byte. The effective address for the branch is computed 
by adding the contents of the program counter, which points 
to the instruction following the branch, to the value of the 
displacement field. 

Let's return back to our original example. The BGT 
instruction there tested the condition codes after a compare 
(CMPR). If the condition codes represented a greater than 
condition, a branch was made to the instruction after the LDR 
, X instruction. The instruction code was 00101 1 10 00000010. 
The first byte is an opcode. The second byte is a displacement 
value of 2. If the condition codes represent greater than, this 
displacement field is added to the contents of the program 
counter. This results in a branch to the LERX 1 , X instruction, 
two bytes further away. 

The rationale behind relative addressing is that a branch 
instruction uses a two-byte- instead of a three-byte- 
instruction for a full 64K memory address. The branch 
address can only be 126 bytes back or 129 bytes forward from 



1 54 THE RAINBOW September 1 988 



the short branch instruction, but this is usually enough to get 
to a new set of instructions. (A Western-sounding long branch 
allows a branch anywhere within the 64K address space.) 

When to Use Which Addressing Mode 

Unfortunately, not every addressing mode can be used with 
every instruction. You can't use a relative addressing mode 
with an ADDA, for example, and you can't use an indexed 
addressing mode with a BNE instruction. Knowing which 
addressing mode is valid comes with using the instruction set 
with reference to a table of opcodes and addressing modes. 
This is one of the joys of using assembly language. 

The 6809 Instruction Set 

There are about 60 different instructions for the 6809. As 
we mentioned earlier, most of these perform very basic 
operations compared to high-level languages. We'll describe 
the instructions here by function. 

Load Instructions 

These instructions load a register with either a memory 
operand or an immediate value. This is typically the way to 
get memory data into a microprocessor register where it can 
be used to add, subtract, compare, shift, etc. The LDA, LDB, 
LDD, LD5, LDU, LDX and LDY instruction mnemonics load the 

A, B, D, S, U, X or Y registers. The first two instructions 
transfer one byte from a memory location or immediate 
value. The other instructions transfer two bytes from two 
consecutive memory locations or from immediate value. The 
sign (N) and zero (Z) condition codes are determined by the 
result of the load. 

CLRA, CLRB and CLR clear either the A or B registers or 
a memory location — a zero is loaded. 

Store Instructions 

These are the opposite of the loads. They store a value from 
a microprocessor register to memory. The STA, STB, 5TD, 5TS, 
STU, STX and STY instructions store the contents of the A, 

B, D, S, U, X or Y registers to a specified memory location. 
The first two instructions transfer one byte to a memory 
location. The other instructions transfer two bytes to two 
consecutive memory locations. The sign (N) and zero (Z) 
condition codes are determined by the result of the store. 

Add Instructions 

These instructions add a memory operand or immediate 
value to the contents of a register, while the result goes back 
to the register. The condition codes are set on the result. ADDA, 
ADDB and ADDD add an operand to the A, B or D registers, 
respectively. The ADDD instruction adds two bytes from two 
consecutive memory locations; the others add one byte. 

The ADCA and ADCB instructions are like the ADDA and ADDB 
except that the state of the carry condition code (C) is 
included. The carry condition code can be either a zero or 
a one, so the result is either the same as an ADDA or ADDB 
or one greater. These instructions are used in multiple- 
precision arithmetic where more than one or two bytes 
constitutes a value. 

The condition codes are determined by the results of the 
add operation. 

The INCA, INCB and INC instructions add one to A, B or 
a memory location contents. 

The ABX instruction is a unique instruction, which adds the 
contents of the B register and the X register with the result 
going into X. 



The 




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$3.95 


□ 


SEP '84 


Education 


$395 


□ 


SEP '87 


Education 


$395 


n 


OCT '84 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT '87 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


* ■ 111 fx A 

NOV 84 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


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NOV '87 


Data Comm. 


$396 


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DEC '84 


Hofidav 

1 IUMUU 1 


$3.95 


□ 


UCu 0 1 


nu 1 1 uuy 


$395 


n 

[_J 


JAN *85 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '88 


Beginners 


$395 


□ 


FEB '85 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '88 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR '85 


Business 


$395 


□ 


MAR '88 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '85 


Simulations 


$395 


□ 


APR '88 


Home Help 


$3.95 


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MAY '85 


Printer 


$3.95 


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MAY '88 


Printer 


$3.95 


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JUN '85 


Music 


$3.95 


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JUN '88 


Music 


$3.95 


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JUL '85 


Anniversary 


$395 


□ 


JUL '88 


Anniversary 


$395 


□ 










• 


VOLUME 8 














AUG '88 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 










SEP '88 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 



RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1981 through June 
1984, is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Year Indexes including rainbow on TAPE are printed 
in the July 1985, 1986 and 1987 issues, respectively. The Seventh Year Index is 
printed in the July 1988 issue. 

TOTAI 

KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 

U.S. MAIL CHARGE 

SHIPPING & HANDLING 

U.P.S. CHARGE 

TOTAL AMOUNT 

ENCLOSED 

Article Reprints 

In instances where a given issue is now out of print and not available for purchase, 
we do provide photocopies of specific articles. The cost for this service is $1.50 
plus 50 cents S/H per article. This service is provided only in the case of out-of- 
stock issues. 

Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed, or 

Charge to my: □ VISA □ MC □ AE 

CARD # 

EXPIRATION DATE PHONE ( ) 

SIGNATURE 

TO ORDER BY PHONE (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subtract Instructions 

The SUBA, SUBB, SUBD, SBCfl and 5BCB work much like the 
add instructions, except that the memory or immediate 
operand is subtracted from the register with the result going 
back to the register. The SBCfi and SBCB subtract the current 
state of the carry condition code. As in the add, the condition 
codes are determined by the result. 

The DECfl, DECB or DEC subtract one from the contents of 
A, B or a memory location. 

Compare Instructions 

The Compare instructions, CMPA, CMPB, CMPD, CMPS, CMPU, 
CMPX and CMPY, work like the subtract instruction, setting the 
condition codes on the results. However, the result is not 
stored in the register. The compares are a way of setting the 
condition codes for a conditional branch without destroying 
the contents of a register. 

TSTR, T5TB and T5T test the sign and zero state of the 
contents of A, B or a memory location, setting the N and 
Z condition codes accordingly. 

Logical Instructions 

The ANDA, ANDB, 0RA, ORB, EORfi and E0RB instructions 
work like add instructions, except that a logical AND, OR or 
exclusive OR are performed. The result is put back into the 
register and the N and Z condition codes are affected. The 
result is identical to a BASIC FIND or OR (the exclusive OR is 
like an OR, except that a one and a one produce a zero instead 
of a one as in the OR). 

ANDs are used to test certain bits within a byte. ORs are used 
to set certain bits within a byte. EORs are used less frequently 
for other bit operations. 

Shift Instructions 

ASRA, ASRB, ASR, L5RR, LSLA, LSR, LSRB, LSLB, L5L, R0LA, 
R0LB, R0L, R0RA, R0RB and R0R perform an arithmetic shift 
right, a logical shift right or left, or a rotate left on either 
the contents of A, B or a memory location. 

A logical shift moves an operand one bit left or right. If 
the operand is 10101111, an LSR would produce 01010111. 

A rotate moves the bit shifted-out the to the other end of 
the register. Doing an R0R of 11110001 would result in 
1111 1000 (-64) results in 1 1 100000 (-32). 

Shifts are used to align and test individual bits of a register. 
The carry condition code receives the shifted-out bit. A 
branch on carry can test the bit. 

Conditional Branch Instructions 

Conditional branch instructions are relative addressing 
instructions that test one or more condition codes set on a 
prior operation (add, subtract or shift). If the condition is 
met, the branch is made. If not, the instruction does nothing 
and the next instruction in sequence is executed. 

BCC and BC5 test the carry condition code and branch if 
the carry is clear(O) or set(l). 

BEQ and BNE test the zero condition code and branch if the 
zero condition code is set (equal) or reset (not equal). 

BPL and BMI test the sign condition code and branch if the 
previous result was plus (0) or minus (1). 

BVC and BV5 test the parity bit and branch if parity is 
clear(O) or set(l). The parity condition code reflects the 
number of one-bits in an operand and is used infrequently. 

BLT, BLE, BGE and BGT branch if the previous result was 
less than, less than or equal, greater than or equal, or greater 
than. These conditional branches are typically used after a 



156 THE RAINBOW September 1988 



• 



compare instruction, which. compares two signed operands. 

BLO, BLS, BH5 and BHI branch if the previous result was 
lower, lower or the same, higher or the same, or higher. These 
conditional branches are typically used after a compare of 
unsigned operands, such as two memory addresses. 

BRR and BRN branch Always and Never. The first is an 
unconditional branch, and the second is a "no operation" 
instruction. 

Jump Instructions 

The JMP instruction causes a jump to a specified memory 
location. The J5R instruction causes a jump to a subroutine. 
The return address is stored in the S stack. The RT5 
instruction retrieves the return address from that stack and 
causes a return to the instruction following the J5R. 

Stack Instructions 

PSHS, PSHU, PUL5 and PULU push or pull data from the 
S or U stack. These instructions are used in storing temporary 
results in the stack, to allow the stack to pass parameters to 
subroutines or to reset the stack. 

Miscellaneous Instructions 

COMA, COMB and COM change all ones to zeroes and all zeroes 
to ones for the contents of A, B or memory location. This 
is a ones complement operation. 

The NEGR, NEGB and NEG are like a ones complement, but 
add one to the result making them twos complements. This 
changes the sign of signed data. A -5 is changed to a +5. 

The DAA instruction allows the 6809 to perform decimal 
arithmetic add and subtract instructions. The result is 
adjusted from binary to a binary-coded-decimal form. 

The SEX instruction (some engineer at Motorola has guts) 
sign extends the sign of the B register into the A register. This 
is used to create a proper 16-bit signed number in D. 

MUL is a multiply instruction that multiplies A times B and 
puts the result into D (A and B). A powerful instruction, as 
microprocessors go. 

5WI causes a software interrupt, an instruction used in 



multitasking programming. SYNC is another interrupt-related 
instruction not used in the CoCo. RTI is like an RT5, but 
causes a return from interrupt processing. CWAI is used in 
some systems as a wait for an interrupt. 

NOP is a no operation instruction that does nothing but 
waste time and fill up space (yes, NOPs are used for those 
purposes). 

Using the Instruction Set 

Now that we know what's inside the 6809, we can put the 
instructions and addressing modes together to create some 
useful programs. Next month I'll describe how to do this by 
hand with machine language and BASIC, and automatically 
with an assembler. In the meantime, you might try to locate 
a book called Color Computer Assembly Language Pro- 
gramming by William Barden, Jr. (no relation). Although it's 
been discontinued by the Shack, it still may be found at some 
stores. It covers beginning assembly language on the CoCo. 

Also useful is the Motorola 6809 Programming Manual. 
Check with Motorola Semiconductor Products, Inc., 3501 Ed 
Bluestein Blvd., Austin, TX 78721. This book is the definitive 
source document for 6809 instructions and contains instruc- 
tion definitions and some programming tricks. 

Alas, Radio Shack has discontinued the EDTASM+ disk 
assembler in favor of the OS-9 assembly language develop- 
ment system. Although the OS-9 assembler works, ED- 
TASM+ is perfect for beginners. It operates in an environ- 
ment that combines an editor, assembler and debugger in one 
powerful package. If you can locate this in any version, it's 
worth the trouble. See RAINBOW, September '83 (Page 66), 
March '84 (Page 156), and August '87 (Page 154) for 
information on Roger Schrag's Superpatch, a patch to 
transfer and convert the EDTASM ROM pack to disk. 
Please do not write to me. I can't legally supply the assembly 
language or any version of EDTASM+, and I don't have the 
Superpatch data. Sorry. 

If you're still with me, next month we'll conclude this 
assembly language discussion with some interesting program 
examples. 



Introducing the FOCUS™ software system for OS-9™ Level II— serious business for your CoCo3! 


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• Two level menu system with company code 
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• Unique filing, sorting, searching and record 
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• Works with most printers, floppy/hard 
drives and terminals. 

• Similar keys and screen formats for all 
FOCUS-MATE programs. 

• Routines for file maintenance, data backup 
and setup. 

• Conte)ct-sensitive help screens. 

OS-9 Programmers:FOCUS is a great tool-b 

with purchase of OS-9 Level II and FOCUS, boot tile is free, mult 

Reg. Now 

FOCUS $65.95 $55.95 
Correspondence Module 49.95 39.95 
General Ledger Module 49.95 39.95 
FOCUS Technical Manual 19.95 15.95 

Min. Sys. Req.: CoCo3, OS-9 Level II, 360K disk drive, 80 col. displ 


FOCUS-MATE Correspondence 
Module 

An integrated Text Editor, Text Formatter and 
Mailing List Database: 

• Import text or database files for mail merge 
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• Control all printer functions, change 
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• Preview final text on screen . 

• Print with left, right, full or centered 
justification, tabs, auto headers/footers, 
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• Multiple text colu mn capability. 

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A sophisticated General Ledger package for small 
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• All features integrate with other 
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• Number of accounts and transactions 
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OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc. 



September 1 988 THE RAJNBOW 1 57 



Racksellers 



The retail stores fisted below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis and 
may have other products of Interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We 
suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 




fiEOfiGIA 




Hii.Tijn^ram 


.iMUlMKn NSMrf Co 


Atifltfiu 


(kordon 


drewton 




Ekomyn 


Jiremsn Eiacircjrtrrj/RrjdiDSrinai 


Horenca 


^nHftrsan Nev^s Co 


forrir,! Fttik 


&teiE.-4ewECen1nr' 


£reenwlle 


W A B Flficlronics 




Radio 3".ack 




MCrf<5Uft ISxftS 


ThomasviJlF 


5mc4er , iOdw toewssStBid 


MoTilgomBrv 


Trade "N" Prtcto 


Toe COT 


Madln Mustc Radio Shook 


lusealcosa 


mjun ilphns. Inc. 


IDAHO 




ALASKA 






BookSnelL Inc. 


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Mii* Aapyance/flddb Shack 




Johnson New Agonny 






ItUNOB 


ARIZONA 




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Cottonwood 


A* WGraphki Co. 




Hf:j:k;»VJrk 


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& riullcm Booksellers. 


Cily 


fltdH Noo* 


D&cdIlt 


fledk Emp^iurTn 


Phoenix 


IRI-IEK CompvilsfF 




K-Wurl Pii.j/o 


Tempe 


totes, Pc, 




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CtfTipgier LbfOry 


Lcur h/taine 


Bocft Fmpcuiniii 




AndBraon Nows Co 


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Nuirss Colli*}* Baaj^loia 


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n 5niil'i 
UHta Rock 


Vauohn Eleorir^c^Rr/jcLrt fihaok 
His; ufr hhe Pes? NeWstorXl 
Arderton. -News Co 


Kewanee 
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NowlOn 

Paris 


Book Nook 
Emptei PBrlodsoals 
HH"£ i'v r-rado Shwi; 
Baa k, tTficfUjm 


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Peoria 


Book ciT\xrfHjm 



Massachusetts <™rd> 



Dlritf I Ic^hb 

La /olio 
Los Angeles 
rVtaryjvlrte 

Oakland 
f^anchc 

Mllll£lQ 

:^j.:njinenro 
odfi RrinEiicc 



Santo Monlfcd 

Santa Rosa 
5tack1on 

^unnv'v' | j , -=- 
lorrancB 



lyori bnte/pTsss 
Strtuore Pftis 
^jdvame Radio. Inc 
Le^ty tfcstrrculors 
Oh/I JfeO, Inc. 

Ri iHn A. Mi^j Bookseller 

Cpovj OS Backs (^uircHlohs) 
Bookie* kJ 

£ooker-d& Bookstore 
Detauei's I4ev-T Agencv 

5a*twcpe Hue 
-eibeifs Reacteran^. 
lower Mag a^ne 
Hcaksmirh 
^cakv^ks 
CqlIiti Kioik 

Midnlghl Special bcoksia'o 
0-\n\pv\f? literacy aadkehopa 
Sawyer's NflwJ, Inc, 
Hordlnn W^v Ntewrt. 
Pcpeibacks hniimilex* 
Computer Ukurjcy 
B Gamino CoUrjotf tooiciltre 



COLOWDQ 

AJJrtKd 
Cotoodo 

GlonwOotJ 

5r>!f>ui 
Gnnrrt 

JUhcHtJrt 
Lonrjmnnr 

WtAWABE 

Mlt^iHi?**^ 

fclSffilCT OF OOlUMBIA 

WtaErtnalon. 

DC 



^iQ^naWay'i 
frJewi Gatery 

ri* Book \tcln 

fltadfivj'ti acok ft Magazine 
Cily Ne^sl-and 

D^rr>cc Co. 

Normal, ft- ins Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA 

fcoiftllon 

Drama 

n LdudeidJle 



GalnsE^ilie 
JooscscnviliB 
^trtrti hAarrii 
teach 

TO C'ily 
^r:,ji:i- a 

PlneltK kir* 

Raiadana 
StpVe 

Sunrae 
TaltihaEEee 



U^IIei 



CniorytJV^ 
WoilrJ Now. Int 

^1 Avfd Readar 
rAieOperi Door 
iianla New & Books 
Software Rls Mon© 
Bob's r^ewE. S. Boch-Skws 
ClartE-Cul 01 Town N^w^ 
MIcb's EfeclTDnlcsDEtFttKflcr 
Papef Oras© 
BockCa 

Afcrvar Baokstcae 
Bayd-Eced Ccrp 
•Srtdu t&j CO 

Woff's rie^Eslanri 

Pollnp P^ce Baakslora 
I'eccfd Jundion Hit. 
Radio Shacii Dualm 
5unnv'5 nl oun-zjl 

CnrTq&Uliac- 



^ar>ngr^ad 



;ljinivicind 
WhaeJir^ 

mom* 

Berne 

Blaomlngrion 

CaRJmPUB 

Qa^loidsvlle 

L3vw 

hanfclin 

PI Woy™ 

Goin?i|l 

indhxiCipallt 



"uetjanon 
Manns/r'iie 
Richmond 
^WdbaEfi 

IOWA 

Dcri^npor 
Des Moinej 
rojiiield 

KANSAS 

llurchinEon 

TrrfrfffeO! 

WlChlia 
KENTUCKY 

HerKltii^M 

uouls^iliii 

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Paducah 

LOUI3UMA 

Balcn RdUp^ 
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r^e-w Orleans 
Monroe 

MAIN I 

Bonoar 

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Cfrltiirj 

SartJnrd 

MABVLAMD 

CollijyFj Pc*. 

MASSACHUEJEfR 

Basron 

Brocklon 

Cambridat 

L'flEF'cn 



Tihtiiidar^ Wage 

Wifa^lcte SJioppna Ceniei 
Illinois- Newi SfKMce 
Bonk EmWr^m 

Scinanl-ntf h Cis-ika Nullh 

'aw S CaunlTy^hi'Tf3plnBC1r 
boot: Emporium 
'"'□per T'dce 
North 5ho*B DiETlnbulcHB 

PAD ElBcNonlCE 

ViTMIt Cottage ElBc^rcrJcE 
ROak Carter 

Qgh^juiei ^^erm. Inc. 

Wii: 5 |Vk1f:!. 

Galfefv Book ?ihop 
Mcnlana NbwS ferric* 
linn iMe^E- Aaenay: Inc; 
rjocklana he- 
Benders Bookshop 
f.v.-rT Cii t\is+i 

Soufasluft News 
GdlksrV Pc<*r SJ^&p 

Vbvle& -Ntf^s A^iWjr, lite 
MIHihg'LBodrOhta 

Inreipiole Eod< 5acrO 
■'Hackery's BoOk^ Int 
r&cnr-etE. Books ft GlPh 

Crnsauad^ Inc. 

rumar Neufr, inc: 

Town Cilar of Topeko, Inn. 

Cand/^T^acko ShcK^ Hn in** 

LJovd's Roaic 

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Mafl'iftewE.aG&ts 
If.-bcy Shop 

iluvUev-Coa^e BcckEeMBrs ^(^flffirft) 
JlT^aie Oft 
Radio ?*vnck 

C^V iNaws: Stand 
TV fXiskWoado Shack 
SlcSftev^ New* Bland U p»own 
"1 ■ • iki^t Rac< 

f^aaazlnet. ina 
VKvage Bookstore 
Radoohack 
Bafiks-N-Thlngi 
Ract'o Shade 

LyiterEJty Bookstore 

6asiem HRWt*qnd 
Vovagar Roo^rom 
Cul CH Twi 1 M&wj 
CKWKin Nfiwfl 
'j^npuN F'liU 



L.Vnn 
^waniea 

MICHIGAN 

AllpiiLPank 

rjJrrvi^gham 

PiIIGul? 

E- Oarfrwl 
hgniiKn 

Hoitend 
Kalcmmoy 
Lowell 
^L^jegon 
!i ■ 
F^IV 

RinLTzew 
RWb 

MINNESOTA 

Fkirfriviiie 

Crvsial 

Ecllmi 

Mlnnono4:Ji:- 
^Innelonk^j 
Rose villa 
St. Haul 



Wim-.cf 

MISSOURI 

Fuiininglon 

R»l T?tvbi 

fldri55onl 

jetferwji'i nry 

ftr^illP 

Sf.Lrxili 

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MONTANA 

Buhe 

NMKA5KA 

Lincoln 
Oroha 

MEVflDA 

Carson Dry 

I ;js VeoaE 
NEWMAHPSHlKE 

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■AMnd l^banopi 

NEW JHSIY 

Cedar ftnotfe 
Clinton 
Pemsyille 
I Joe ka way 

NEW MEXICO 

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AUxiqoerauo 
Sdnia fe 

N&WVORX 

Amharsl 
Brock poH 
ftooVlyri 
Eln-rta weight 
firadofila 
|4udfion P-allE- 
hftjntingkin 

rHawVc^ik 



■^s'jllhrj 
Jtannflil&r 

WjodhcMn 



iWh STOie Ne^ Oa 
P-^A-d-ibreak. Inc. 

ptio'ft l^s&dHi Ire 

Burks Book Snop 

Robc«f^ QJecttonlcE. 

M^iil Bitok Center 

HanisC^ nado Shook 

Bectronii.'s t^p^£&.i'Radkj Shuifc 

Fra Nawi^ CL^ponv 

IhE Boci-- Rtih 

<.a-rteJl EiantTorrKs 

Th*i pign> Sir Conner 

MTJii^a Ne*s- £et%i!ce 

Poiry Compurer& 

Rivervir : ^jw Book Sfore 

Nevj Hr^ctfuBook Stop 

ShO^rv'i Bum^lla 
ShrnctH'& qryilal Goleiv 
3hlndej-'& islsUreiana 
Shlnaers {2 teffolffifiaj 
Shlnder's RickjaSc^ iceis 
Gl'iinder's RasevHb 
Shlnders Annofc 
^hinders rV'apiprtood 
Shlncters; Sr. r^aws 
The PJttiro .^tDp 

Ray's tV l h. rcaao Shack 
•■"itsy's TV ^ rjodia- Sf-ac-K 
Book Bro^is i^lmi^d 
CcMey Di^rrtfuHng- 
■SJ^ ElBciro^ic= 
Boak Emporium 
BallEys TV i Ro*^ 

rioza boofe 

"Ns&aika BookslD-r 
Nfjlfjiri Newt 

BaaktMtai 

Hurloy Eloelronici 

5flB\.e-'s Fkxika S Magazlnas 

Radio !jhcirk Associate Slorer 

Bookyjaiphts. 

'viemamNnwt'l^iFj 

Allnnho Oly Nowfl Agency 
^lllacja Ccrrpu^i A Sotiy-ciie 
rv*c^ Word i' 

DOvB S ElBOl. Pc+rin ^t /juk 

ScttvAHE Sroiicn 

r-4ew i lonsons Compuior F.rtlwn i . 
Page Orra Newsstand 
Drtwniown SytKcrkstior - - 

Vilacje Green-8uMdiO fewjn 

li'I Bridge sSocfr Shop. Ir^r. 

CrcjmfcrKd. 10c 

?ot.plh«n Tkar H=ws Co . Inc. 

On Unfc Cflfrpurer AcoeaQF'il^ 

6A Wdsl a Co. 

Dscars Eoafcsroio 

Unicorn E*ecboriir;r, 

Barne&fti ^obJf? S^jlt^ Anne^ 

Oolbaum Book-i 

LaE-lem NewsSlnrtd 

v^and C&nrroii Stolior- irack 37 

a£J0 Fort Aw, fPa^, Am ¥■}) 

as Water Sir«r 

World ~rad9Ce#^lei*y 
Flrit B«ap Now? 
tile Hcuns Book^Offi 
inteniaf omi Srr:tiaa Stop 

11 SiYick* 
SoftWOTB CiW 

State f^tews 

Waiden Soak& 

Wo'id Wdo r'/ndiu S«(MlceE 

Universal Comp^ih:! 1 Seizes 

'viliageGrwi 

VifbfidVW^Nftw.i 

^pecJr >m Prp,LHilE 



158 



THE RAINBOW SSplemb&fT9E3 



MGH-IH casolina 



Can/ 

OiopelHil 
Chan a\ht 

lyirmon 



Newi Ce?tfYlef in Ccny V*lae* 
Unholy News S Jiunary 
Newsstand Infl 
CBf>:ii:s& Comics 

K & ? F-kr^tancI 
&50rrpg^fi!Tvttvn Comer 
Wr^tcfi-Scf&n- K & " rs^Eiloiid f 3 Lacallofta) 
Rainbow Mfcwr i fa 1 . 



OHIO 

do^dfl 
Chcrdon 
C-rcinnah 
Ct-elan-j 

ColumL.iCi'Yi 
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Dtibin 
raliL>inri 

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Parma 
Toledo 
Wan en 
\eniu 

Yocrosltv^n 

OKLAHOMA. 

QkbhSiYiU 

ary 

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Popiand 



Satem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

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fvtaTwiam 

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Churchill N£w$ S Tobacco 
|j Ufa Rttf&MtK Boo* Cenrei 
ttuatfust Rndb ft TV 

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86 Software- 

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Book bam 

Ne*ft- Readers 

WlHe'a "ijni^^f^lv Shoppe 

Cpen. ik>3k 

Ihe Ntn^A 9^iop 

Ickswccfcl Ihtmralonal Wevrt 

6dU-Cal«ii:ir; 

■A"ike- fowws 

BQCkrnqfik MffiVECHn^lEf 

Lino's fiook & Wre Shop 
Back Nock. Inc. 
FjnePnni beaks. 
PIczd Book & Srnafcd ^hap 



Mens Mtra Sattvtfjiy 

Thomat Safes, me dbo Jfcidlo Srack 

Steve's Book src/ei 

Lemo Bocks Itab Mart 
RtlhAwtifA.ss Nw* 
Rich O'goi Sr-rHR. Inc. 
Sirfh 0 W05hiria^ News 
OJpilo! tJews Center 
Checkmate Bcc* 

Owl Services 

Newtown £ntefpr'Ki5 

&yn Ma^ Newi 

Corry Sccte 1 C<nrfc 

MclndaQ'$ ^ftl'cnefv * Rcrao L Jhoil: 

Gkfccrf titxito 

flerscmal Software 
S«iiNi^ News & Card Genlw 
Software Comer 
Ouster County book Ga 
Wcro World 

Thg Compute* Cefiifn 1 cl Yom 
TcJ'nate Baa&sSore 

E*Bl8vijt News 



SOyTH CAROLINA 

dr*artfts1cn tors. SotTwEPe I Iojlh, |i>" 
CferrBon H&wsi^rnri 
Ra^'i #1 

PotmeNo New^ Co- 
SortwcrdCiv 



Cfifttr^oci 
ITixnhOT 
■Sn>ijfnn||e 



ItNWESSEE 

B'en"fwood 
i>taifancoga 

Kno^llg 

MemphLs 
Nta+wifle 



Sm>7ne 
TEJfAi 

Rgln 

Hannvjiori 



Elijinicwla 

GuiJU 0oc+f5 & Peikocfscals. 
Highkir:^ BeotroniCfi 
Ar<ifi!!Kiri New; Co. 
P4vi?-KkJd BaakEellei 
Cwnpurer Ceritei 
Z>d".'is Kidd Book»ii=#s 

R.N' Mlfc Boaktic*e- 

Dekei FlnclTOTHCL 



£oc+ 



UTAH 

VIKUNIA 

C-TJiii^ln 

Ncfl'dk 

Rkhmorv: 

WASHINGTON' 

Port ^tgafe 
S^arllle 

■accur^ 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Logan 

Modlson 

Pc»l!efEburg 

Sourh 

ChQllftSlQT* 

W|SCQN5iH 

Apptarcm 
Cudohy 

rVMsrr-! 

MFTwXikee 
Wagh<£!ha 

ARGENTINA 

AUSreAAIA 

K^SPrrord 

CANADA; 
ALBEPTA 

BrtrlH 

Fk^TnyvillB 

Brco^t 

Calgarv 
Gareahdn^ 
DraytcnVaiuy 
Ec^nonran 

faliv 

Fan Criiek- 

Ff SaE^arahe- 

wan 

Grande 

QschH 
Grande 

Cen^i? 
HlnFon- 
InAftTgh 
I pccirribe 
L«duc 
Ujmbfldge 
Ifrjydmnstei 

Peace.- Miver 

3h i-tiul 
Sieiilef 
^irar hi nf)fC3 
labfti 

Wi-l^tl^Fwln 



Vtillev Etook Conier 



Kft SNewssland 

■"kiryjekrs 

! O Ccmpule** 

TiKrl The Page- 

VoTLin^B ' Bfra^cne 



fw faoak a Nowib 

Aocwh Nhm? Co. Inc. 

FMctigNfrws 

8 fl. I NVjijgElnesii Barf** 

r-^vbb^ir "N Bv^es 

Nttfs Neyr& 

a wi'S Sechcnta a r^c*o Shack 

Co-^-nLnicariaf* Ltd 

V^le"/ News fierv-c x i 
Spnnci Hi* l\kt*5 

FJadpe* PerirxJlcals 
Cudahv Nij^i fl. Hotsoy 

U n nfl i?i ftoota tore 
iLirwou Wilrifle 4^sade^ 
Hair "/oil«rv 



InTCf mjHon TeceoarniT^sscailanes 

E!l cm cshici Computed 
FtnlLi^jrjo Elecirorsca 



liarJI Raaio Shoe* 
fVjiiI Tarclar 

Double "EV A.S.C rZc?db Srack 
HlrV^lsteWI 

Radks Srack A^^iaied Stereo 
Lcmaard BecTraniw 
CVD Micro 
Radto ShocS(. rj&s 
D.N.H. Fuinjrureft TV 

A5.C. Rac4o Shack 

Ft rVNI rtaao ShacJf. ASC: 

Tre Stereo Hul 

The Boak Ho&t 

JmCooiiar 

L ft S SteihO 

iifiart'ft qn&cf-onicE 

Radlj fek Asaocbtftd 5mr^] 

CteitCalrgn 

Ll^ Radio Shccti: 
O^loloRcKJIoShci^ 
Radio Bhcok AisodinKid Slwes 
: ijvoner SohV-cr-M 
Waited ectocjnk^ 
S^gHfer (^adloSrx^k 
Wheahand Eleciranlcs 
PvnetoceyJ Sight Si Sound 
^teLllcck Skveo 
f?adirj SlvKt- 



BftlirSH COLUMBIA (cont'd) 



9RIT<SM COLVMtMA 



HuivHl nke 
Canrnsbell 
f^ei 
iiwoci 
Coimiiam 



Corn:*, i 

VT. Vdw Wnrha 

TRSclechonM 
ChaHe& Fti^ef 
Cr^f [kic+isilb 



Gcsortsnay 

Oa^tffic^ota^k 

Go!aen 

kelcwuD 

Langlev 

r-^luj-, 

IT|lfi4f6ir 

Ftiihtuille 

wetMidco 

Sidney 

Squomsn 
Vmccuvs 



tUO Milri 

MANITOBA 

Allenai 

l.iifidar 

NVxolen 

Tho Pa& 

Selkirk 

When 

NEWIPUNSWJCK 

(Wcrcron 

3uE3e>: 

HF^FOqjNDLAND 

Sorw'oad 
Cooonear 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Haifa 

ONIAUH3 

AnguB 

Amafa 

Ccnccid 

LVoeter 

Hanavet 

Hunls^lle- 

Kencra 

SdJh PUier 

Tcrar.lo 

QJUEbeC 
LaSclle 
Fen*. ft&JQrt 
V^lle St. Gahnci 

5A5KAICHRNAU 

■^sslnlboJa 
ttlevan 

T^jiiir: 

KJ&kaloon 
l^lbrcoke 

TiwICP'B 

^hllenaree 



Rick'LWuak: & Sh?ieo 
FJ-=a ^idic ^ 
Tak5 ho.n>e FUmis.hings 
Teteaaft rvloriwlha! 
Laogle^Badto STraci- 
Oft^s'? Books 

COL^y feokg LTD 
Fuikjvil© "H^ 

R iur Comer Gfctety 
Sidney Eleclrortca 
wairiHome KLtnirurfla 
Korvk Bectionici 
Artive. Compief^nrS 
Frlendliy^^ Co^ppu-refE 
Gran^ATe Etiak Co. 
^lca^F^»tanfBdc*5 LID 

llprcHnnrxllo&IV 

LA-Wfrbrrld. 
SorOr\50h£bc. 
conlm J Sour.d 
ki-i-5 3igi-i4kSaund 
G.L BinrBac: 
Ahc?w Enraccseii 
J fl. .1 Elecirorrts L|d. 



.Inf-'riBs Enterpil»ei> 
Priori Eiec. 



Soopoil Elec. 
Siade tfealrJiei 

AlkJNic rMews 

HSdo Compuref ^civlcos 

Co rnco vision 

inujuni Scftwar^i 

J Macleane & Syns 

^cdefn Applicinco Cenhe 

Hunr^llle Else 

Donny H" 

T.M- dan^Dule^ 

r^tid'ts.Tri App lance £en\t\* 

Ma* TV 

Dianni&TV 

Q&tkm andtalch 

MesKigenea de Firo&w Benjamin cm. 

Eo^ique Biura LOroche 

Giiles. Ccmeoi i Fnr/ftcdld Shack 

Tetstar ttejj* 
Koh* £Jec1r<nh:;f; 
[>iS Conir^.jlCr Paoe 1 
Comefttfjftfs Sound 
rteginja CtJCo Club 
SarrVi-ciin Supermarket 
f^(yticdv'& Software U^ary 
LobergeHaclo Sh^cU 
fWs Service 
GiL:nr'5 Hsuse ctSain-d 



'ISOHoyinrjs 



JAPA4 

1 0k H O 



ruERrORICD 

Son-k^r, bcftwareCiry 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles and W.H. Smith in Canada, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, 
Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, Tower Book & 
Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



September P&SB THE RAINHOW 



159 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning THE rainbow when you contact these firms. 



4-TECHS i 




MicroWorld . , ■«, 


■ . ... 3 1 


oecond uity bonware , 


• : *' T T • « .7 .OO 


Adventure Novel Software P 


. % 67 


Owl-Ware . . . v . ... .77, 78, 79 


Soft-Byte . . ........... 


117 

....... I If 


Alpha Products 


r * « . • *-« ■ 


rerrormance reripnerais 


Q7 


[ ™ B^Bh .^BM, ^am. bL B^ .^BB. bL ™ . a> ^bV .L ^Bfe BBMB. ^S— 

SpectroSystems ..... . . 


. *• A .... . i?0 


Alpha Software Technologies ...97 


rerry oompuiers . . . . ■ . . + . + 


QQ 


oPORTSWARE ........ 


1 QT 

....... I O r 


Alpha-Biotechnologies Inc. 


■ » • . #39 


rAt computing ........... 


: :^l---. : 7 

. ... a • # 


Sugar Software .% + . . + . . 


.......a/O 


Burke & Burke. . *• 4f 


.37, 104 


R.A.D. Products ....... . 


....117 


Sundog Systems . . . . . T . 


1 

....... I OO 




. . 84, 85 




. . . ,101 




58, 59, 121 
. : v . . . ..113 


(3 in SO ft * . * « h * . r y F + '».+ + + ->- + + 4- 


j . • • 1 53 


Rainbow Binder . . . , . .. . . 


. . . . .64 


T.E.M. of California 


CoCo Cat Anti-Drug ♦ 


* » * * . 36 


Rainbow Bookshelf ....... 


40 


Tandy/Radio Shack 


L ..... . . ^K'Vb^ 


OocoTech • • ^••v ....->•._ 


....129 


Rainbowfest , . ..... . . . . .45 


I 50, 51 


^epCO ■ - .« • • i m '. + n . .' > • 


. . it.- .' a ..12 


Cod is Enterprises . * 


. . . * i 95 


Rainbow on Tape and Disk 


. . ... .52 


Three C's Projects .... . 


... . • . • 1 05 


C^ognitec •..«*. . . «/• » ■ • « . 


« « « « (a. W 


RAM Electronics .... .. 


• 95 


Tomela & Co. . ...... . > . 


.......101 


Colorware . . . . .18, 15 


), 22, 23 


Rericb Computer . f> 


, 4 . . . 63 


Tothian Software ..... * . . . 


• ♦ ; >v 4 ♦ • 1 07 


Computer Center . . . . . . 


. ... 1 1 5 


RTB Software . 


. . . . . 4*7 


True Data Products .... 


90, 91 


Computer Island > . , . . - 


. F ♦ ♦ ,00 


Rulaford Research . . 


. . . . . 81 


Vidicom Corporation ..>.* 


48 


Computer Plus...... 


. » . • • .3 i 


Sardis Technologies ...... 


....145 


Woodstown Electronics 


• * .. . • . . a 1 53 


CY-BURNET— ICS . 


,,..107 


SD Enterprises ..... . . ,m 


• • «■ . . 25 


Zebra Systems 


a . « t ■ « • a 35 



........ ..»■ 4 + . ■ ■ + 



D.P. Johnson . . 
DATAMATCH, INC. .... gsw« . . . .93 
Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc. .......130,131 

1^1600^) • + * 1 .. + + + a a a a . . a | FCf 
DiStO/CRC a . a » a • . a i ■ . a a » 1 1 9 

Dorsett Educational 

Systems . . * ... » ..11 1 

Dr. Preble's Programs , IBC 

E-Z Friendly Software . . . ...... .48 

Easy Street Data Systems ... . ,157 

Federal Hill Software , . . ... . . . . .57 

FoxWare ......137 

Frank Hogg Laboratory . . .146, 147 

Fraser Instrument ......113 

^iEnie .....a.... .......... • « * . 1 25 

Gimmesoft . . . . ... . ... ... . . . . . .149 

Granite Computer Systems . . . .129 

Hard Drive Specialist .75 

Hawkes Research 

Services ■» .v. * . . *- j £<■■.. 57 

HawkSoft, Inc. .... * . . . . . ...... .99 

Howard Medical . . , .66, 162 

ICR Futuresoft ....109 

J & R Electronics > . . . 106 

Metric Industrie^ . . .... 

Micro Works, The . ... .... , . 

Microcom Software 9^1 1 ;03, 1 5* 1 7 
Microtech Consultants 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



□ Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 




160 



THE RAINBOW September 1988 




DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 



VIDEO 



S 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 

COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS 1 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



tTM 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



COCO 3 SCREEN 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



T, 7&0©[^9) 

Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. YhfJ($)\$FtZ-^ 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



HOWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 

1690 N. Elston • Chicago, IL 60622 • orders (800) 443-1444 • inquiries and order status (312) 278-1440 



* 5 STAR FINAL 



SEPTEMBER 88 



CLEAR 



HD 




DC-5 CONTROLLER 

from Hard Drive Specialist gives 
great Radio Shack compatability 
and double sided access to DSDD 
Drives like Howard's DD-3. Two 
ROM sockets, one 24 pin and one 
28 pin allows use of RS 1.1 ROM 
by jumper selection. Gold plated 
contacts reduce I/O Errors. 
$75 ($2 Shipping) 



RS DOS ROM CHIP 

ROM chip fits inside disk controller. 
24 pin fits both J&M and RS controller 
Release LL For CoCo 3 Compatibility. 
$ 25 each Reg. $40 ($2 shipping) 

NEW FROM DISTO $ 129 DC6 

($2 Shipping) Super Controller II 
works with CoCo \ 2 & 3. It buffers 
keyboard input so that no keystrokes 



Sale Ends 9/3 



are lost when disk is reading or writ- 
ing. Especially useful with OS-9, but 
also works with BASIC. 

MONITOR 

Sony KV-1311CR $ 499 

Regular $625 ($15 shipping) 

• Vivid Color • Vertically flat 13" 
screen • Monitor/Trinitron TV with 
remote control • 640 x 240 reso- 
lution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and 
composite inputs • VCR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 




HARD DRIVE ADD-ONS 

3' Hard Drive Cable $20 

Clock Upgrade $ 20 

Hyper I/O $ 30 

Y Cable $ 29 50 

TEAC 55B $ 118 

Hard Drive ROM Boot $ 20 



Guarantee" As good as Gold. 



Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compat- 
\. ibility. If you're not happy with it for 



any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states. APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 




Hard Drive— Ready to Run! 

20,000,000 Bytes or the equivalent to a •' 
125 R.S. 50 Ts on line are packed into 
this hard drive, pre installed and ready '*: 
to run. All you need to do is plug it in 
and go! This complete easy to use ;• 
package includes a Seagate 20 Meg 1 
Hard Drive, a Western Digital WD 
1002-WX 1 Controller and interface 
that plugs into slot #3 of multipack 
interface, plus the case & power supply. 
You even get a 1 year warranty. This 20 
meg Hard Drive will work with IBM & 
clone. Basic driver, $49.95, lets you 
access this hard drive without need for 
OS-9. Howard's low price is aimed to 
get as many units as possible into the 
hands of "evaluators" to spread the 
word on it's quality. 

HD-1 $499 (59 Shipping) 

Sale ends September 3 

Exclusive from Burke & Burke. 

Howard announces its SASI Connection 
featuring the low-power (15-watt) 
XEBEC 20 Meg highly reliable (15 steps 
per track) Hard Drive $ 525. Completely 
assembled and ready to run. 

DON'T MISS OUT, ORDER TODAY! 

800 / 443-1444 

WE ACCEPT VISA • MASTERCARD/:; 
. AMERICAN EXPRESS . C.O.D. OR - 
CHECKS . SCHOOL P.O. 
NEW - DISCOVER CARD 



! 



a 





For Color Computer Software 
Since 1983 




Dear Friends, 

Thank you. 1988 marks oar 
lifth year of providing quality 
software for ttue Color computer. 
Only your support hag made it 
possible. So, from our heart3. Peg 
aruJ I thank you And remember our 
promise --If you buy it from U3, we 
support it If you are unhappy for 
any reason, 3end it back for a full 
refund within 30 days of purchase . 

Pyramix 

This facinating CoCo 3 game 
continues to be one of our best 
sellers. Pyramix is 100% machine 
language written exclusively to take 
advantage of all the power in your 
128K CoCo 3- The Colors are 
brilliant, the graphics sharp, the 
action fast. Written by Jordon 
T3vetkoff and a product of Color- 
Venture. 

The Freedom Series 

Vocal Freedom 

I've got to admit, this is one 
nifty computer program Vocal 
Freedom turns your computer into a 
digital voice or sound recorder, 

The optional Hacker's PaC lets 
you incorporate voices or sounds 
that you record into your own 
BASIC or ML programs. Thi3 is not 
a synthesiser. Sounds are digitized 
directly into computer memory 30 
that vx)ice3 or sound effects sound 
very natural One "off-the-shelf " 
application for Vocal Freedom is an 
automatic me33age -minder. Record 
a message for your family into 
memory. Set Vocal Freedom on 
automatic. When Vocal Freedom 
"hears" any noise in the room, it 



plays the pre-recorded message! 
Disk operations are supported. VF 
3lso tests memory to take advantage 
of from 64K up to a full 51 2K. Re- 
quires low cost amplifiler (RS cat. 
•277- 1008) and any microphone. 

Mental Freedom 

Would your fnend3 be impre33ed 
if your computer could read their 
minds? Mental Freedom U3e3 the 
techniques of Biofeedback to 
control video game action on the 
screen. Telekinesis? Ye3, you con- 
trol the action with, your thoughts 
and emotions. And, ohye3, it talk3 
in a perfectly natural voice without 
U3ing a speech synthesizer! 
Requires Radio Shacks low co3t 
Biofeedback monitor. Cat. »63-675 

BASIC Freedom 

Do you ever type in BASIC 
programs - -manually, I mean. If you 
do, you know it can be a real chore. 
Basic Freedom changes all that It 
gives you a full screen editor just 
like a word processor, but for 
BASIC programs Once loaded in. it 
is always on-line. It hide3 invis- 
ibly until you call it forth with a 
3ingle keypress! This program 13 a 
mu3t for programmers or anyone who 
type3 in programs. By Chris 
Babcock and a product of Color - 
Venture. 

Lightning Series 

The3e three utilities give real 
power to your CoCo 3. 

Ramdisk Lightning 

This is the best Ramdisk 
available. It let3 you have up to 4 
mechanical di3k drives and 2 Ram 
drives on-line and is fully compat- 
ible with our printer spooler below. 

Printer Lightning 

Load it and forget it --except for 
the versatility it gjv*3 you. Never 
wait for your printer again! Printer 
runa at higb 3peed while you 
continue to work at the keyboard! 

Backup Lightning 

This utility requires 51 2K Reads 
your ma3ter di3k once and then 



make3 3uperfast multiple disk 
backup3 on all your dirves! No 
need to format blank disk3 first! 
Supports 35, 40 or 80 track drives. 

Prices 

CoCo 3 only 

Ram Disk Ligjitning, Disk. ..$19 95 

Printer Lightning Disk $19 95 

Backup Ligjitrung, Di3k $1 9-95 

All three. Disk $49.95 

Pyramix, Di3k $24.95 

CoCo 1,2, or 3 

Vocal Freedom Di3k $34.95 

Vocal Freedom Hackers Pac ..$14.95 

CoCo 2 or 3 only 

Mental Freedom Disk. $24.95 

Basic Freedom Disk $24.95 

CoCo 1 or 2 only 

VDOS. The Undisk, ramdi3k for the 

CoCo 1 or 2 only. Tape $24.95 

VDUMP, backup Undisk file3 to 

single tape file. Tape $14 95 

VPRINT, Print Undisk directory. 
Tape $9 95 

Everyone 

Add $2.50 shipping/handling 
in USA or CMKXOA 
Add $5.00 to ship to other 
countries 

Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KT 40226 




Visa, MC, COD, Check 




The Best in Color Computer Software 



WeVe got the selection! 

At Radio Shack, we're dedicated 
to making sure that you never run 
out of ways to use and enjoy your 
Color Computer. WeVe got a ter- 
rific line of software of all types. 

Games for the whole family 

Let your Color Computer open 
the door to a world of fun and ad- 
venture. Choose from a dazzling 
selection of popular and challeng- 
ing games. 

Make learning fun 

One of the most valuable poten- 
tials of your Color Computer is in 
providing your children a head 
start in their education. WeVe got 



learning programs for children of 
all ages that will provide hours of 
productive fun! With this selec- 
tion, you'll find programs that help 
develop hundreds of useful skills. 

Boost your productivity 

No matter what your personal 
needs, we've got programs that'll 
put your Color Computer to work 
where you need it most —like per- 
sonal filing, word processing, 
spreadsheets and communications. 

Need more suggestions? 

Send in the coupon for a free 
copy of our 1989 Software Refer- 
ence Guide. Radio Shack is your 
one-stop software center. 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 



I 

133 15 

0 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 




Send me a new 1989 Software Guide. 

Mail to: Radio Shack, Dept. 89-A-319 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102 



sm 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 
ZIP_ 



Phone 



i 

1 

I 

I 
I 






tMC WUCROSCOMC WUSSION 



y i 



THE 

MICROSCOPIC 
MISStO 



Em