Skip to main content

Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

See other formats


June 1988 



Canada $4.95 U.S. $3.95 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



CoCo in Concert 

Turn the PLAY Command into a Digital Synthesizer 

Feast Your Ears on Recordings 

of Ragtime, Blues and Country Music 

Learn the Chords 

on the Piano Keyboard 



A medley of CoCo 3 patches, modifications 
for the BASIC programming language, 
and much, much MORE! 






iter 



la*** 



Coco 



1 



Coco 



and 



on© 



7 



Ui ■' 



cr-n 



2* 



I-. Ti_l— f 



iff 



CO* 3 



■a a' 



1 



iL 



67A5 



0^ 



id**? 



woo * ° \ eS \de<* s 



dV\09, 



^ ea? V' and £ niat \o 



\\v\e-. 



^0^ 
e acO 



1°/o 



9* 



0^ 




From Computer Plus to YOU . . . 



after 




after 





BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 HX 1 Drive 256K 539.00 
Tandy 1000 TX 1 Drive 640K 889.00 
Tandy 1000 SX 1 Drive 384K 499.00* 
Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 51 2K 1129.00 
Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg. Ram 1959.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMM06 80 CPS 169.00 
Radio Shack DMM30A 120 CPS 279.00 
Radio Shack' DMP-440 300 CPS 549.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel349.00 
Tandy LP-1000 Laser Printer 1699.00 
Star Micronics NX-1000 144 CPS 229.00 
Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 359.00 
Panasonic P-1080i 144 CPS 199.00 
Panasonic P-1091i 194 CPS 229.00 
Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 349.00 
Okidata 182+ 144 CPS 259.00 
Okidata 192+ 200 CPS 359.00 
Okidata 292 240 CPS 479.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Practical Peripheral 2400 Baud 229.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
Hl-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Interface 89.00 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 14.95 
CM-8 6' Extension Cable 19.95 
Serial to Parallel Conv. 59.95 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 329.00 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 139.00 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 149.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

Flight 16 Flight SimuL 34.95 34.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 



COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 
COCO Max III by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTermbyPXECompu1ing29.95 39.95 
TelePatch 111 by Spectrum 29.95 
TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo3 512KRamDiskbyCerComp 19.95 
Home Publisher by Tandy (CoCo3)35.95 
Sub Battle Sim. by Epyx (CoCo3) 26.95 
Thexder by Sierra (CoCo3) 22.45 
Kings Quest III by Sierra (CoCo3) 31.45 
Flight Sim. II by SubLogic (CoCo3)31.45 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71.95 
OS-9 Development System 89,95 
Multi-View by Tandy 44.95 
VIP Writer (disk oniy) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Sale prices through 5/30/88 
Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 
















m 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 




Tabl e of Contents 1 




102 



1 F e atures 



14 

Help Is on the Way 

Stephen B. Goldberg 
Create online assistance 



20 

Playin' the Blues <w 

Val Burke 

Mellow music to set the 
mood 

26 

Beating % 

the College Crunch 

Larry P. Pittman 
Calculate easy monthly 
payments to meet your 
financial needs 



32 

CoCo 3 Auto-Boot 

Chuck Katsekes 

A utility to load and run a 

basic program at a specific 



time 




36 ^ 

CoCo Goes Country 

Becky F. Matthews 

A musical view of Nashville 

Color Composer *w 

Garry L. Shelton 

A "processor" to create 

and edit your songs 

52 

Print That Tune 

Greg Boots 

Turn your keyboard into 
more than a piano 

56 » 

Graphing 
Great Guitars 

Bill Bernico 

Calling all guitar buffs . . . 



60 

Tank Command 

George Phillips 

Defend your terrain against 

an enemy air force 

96 ^ 

Blast From the Past 

Ernie Thompson 
A jukebox of ragtime 
selections 



99 

Internal Sound 

David Huang 

A circuit to produce sound 

internally from your CoCo 

102 

Synthesizer % 
Sound-Off 

Jeremy Spiller 

Turn the PLA Y command 

into a digital synthesizer 



June 1988 
Vol. VII No. 11 



110 % 

Exercise Your Drives 

Scott Honaker 

Putting floppy controllers 

through their paces 

140 

Preventing % 
Dis-Chord 

Stuart C. Dods 
Learn the position of 
keyboard chords 

144 

Assembly Language: 
Back to BASICs 

David J. Gabler 

How to translate some basic 

keywords into assembly 

language 

158 

CoCo 3 Potpourri ^ 

Michael F. Wiens 

Two patches, a hardware 

modification and an 

alternative to the PALETTE 

command 

168 

Changing the ^ 
Language 

Marc Campbell 
A utility to customize your 
programming language 




Novic e s N fehe^ 

78 

Calibrate Your Ears 

Lauren Willoughby 

79 

Too Many (hie) Bottles 
of Beer 

Bernice Shoobs 

79 

Adventures in Music 

Gip Wayne Plaster fl 

80 

Listen to 

What They Done 

Lyn Arko 

81 

Lotsa Luck! 

Bob Nevin 

82 

Picking Up the Pieces 

Brian DeMarco 

82 

ASCII Answers 

Bernice Shoobs 



gSjfc The cassette tape/disk sym- 
bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on Page 58. 



Departments 



Advertisers Index 
Back Issue Info _ 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



192 

71 

34 

38 

Letters to Rainbow 6 

Maxwell Mouse 112 

One-Liners 12, 16, 39, 

105,146,188 



One-Liner Contest 
I n forma tion 

Racksellers 

Rainbow Info 



Received & Certified 

Scoreboard 

Scoreboard 
Pointers 



.189 
.190 
.109 
.136 
.148 

.150 



Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 186 

Subscription Info 187 



Columns 



88 

BASIC Training 

Joseph Kolar 

More adventures with 

beginning graphics 

83 

CoCo Consultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

163 

Delphi Bureau 

Cray Augsburg 
Database downloading, 
Part 2, and Hutchison's 
database report 

166 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

86 ^ 

Education Notes 

Steve Blyn 

A program to sharpen library 
reference skills 



10 

PRINT#-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's notes 

138 

Turn of the Screw 

Tony DiStefano 
Increasing character display 

154 

Wishing Well ^ 

Fred Scerbo 
Taking aim on direct 
and indirect objects 



The Rainbow 



1 Rainbowtech 



114 

Barden's Buffer 

William Barden, Jr. 
Digitizing the world, revisited 

180 

KISSable OS-9 ^ 

Dale L Puckett 
Another great beginning 



1 Product Revi ews 



Artificial Intelligence Tic-Tac-ToeM rcherware 133 

Assembly Language Programming 

for the CoCo Z/Tepco 

CCRAM/Dime-A-Byte 



CoCo Address Book/ Bob's Software 

Disk Editor W/Saint John Gallery 

Maxsound/Gimmesoft 



Sub Battle Simulator/Epyx 

Superdisk Utility/Sivnr/se Software 

Super Graphics 16/EZ. Friendly Software 
Zandar/K-Soft 



.132 
.130 
.133 
.130 
.126 
.134 
.134 
.132 
.131 



the rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 
phone (502) 228-4492. THE RAINBOW, RAINBOWfest and THE RAINBOW and 
RAINBOWfeat logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705- 
050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Authorized as second class 
postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 
• Entire contents copyright ® by FALSOFT, Inc., 1 988. the rainbow is intended 
for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and 
reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of information herein is for the 
single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All 
programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without warranty of any kind 
whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are 
registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to the rainbow 
are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail 
to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with 
next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for 
issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full 
refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/1 2ths the subscription amount 
after two issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Jody Gilbert 

Reviews Editor Lauren Willoughby 

Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 

Copy Editor SueFomby 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, 
Ed Ellers 

Editorial Assistants Sue H. Evans, 
Wendy Falk 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Robert Hatfield, Jr., 
Denise Webb 

Typesetter Jody Doyle 

Falsoft, Inc. 

President Lawrence C. Falk 
General Manager Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst. to the Publisher 

Sarah Levin 
Editorial Director John Crawley 
Asst. Editorial Director Judi. Hutchinson 
Executive Editor James E. Reed 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Production Coordinator 

Cynthia L Jones 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Manager 

Beverly Beardon 
Customer Service Representative 

Monica Wheat 
Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 
Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 
Director of Production Jim Cleveland 
Dispatch Tony Olive 
Business Assistant Laurie Falk 
Chief of Building Security 
and Maintenance 

Joe Lambirth 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, 
see Page 192 

Cover illustration copyright © 1988 

by Fred Crawford 

Art direction by Heidi Maxedon 




Editor: 

Lonnie Falk's reply to Alan Parker's letter 
in the March 1988 rainbow editorial has 
come as a welcome reassurance to the CoCo 
Community. Mr. Falk, through facts and 
figures, has dispelled the fears that the CoCo 
3 might be discontinued by Tandy. 

We at Microcom Software fully support 
Mr. Falk's views and reaffirm our dedication 
to the CoCo 3. We observe that the CoCo 
3 is stronger than ever, and a wide variety 
of software and hardware is continuously 
added to its arsenal. During the past three 
months, Microcom Software has added 
more than 25 new products for the CoCo 3 
market. We have seen an unprecedented 
demand for Utility software for the CoCo 3. 
This constant demand from our customers 
for newer and newer software and hardware 
has kept our programmers on their toes all 
the time. 

We have also witnessed an unprecedented 
growth in our technical support, with the 
number of technical inquiries more than 
quadrupling in the past few months. The 
customers are becoming more and more 
knowledgeable about many aspects of the 
CoCo 3 — a welcome sign. 

Besides the strong domestic and Canadian 
market, a number of overseas countries have 
developed strong CoCo bases. Notable 
among these are Australia, the largest 
importer of CoCo software and hardware. 
Other countries in Europe, the Middle East, 
and South and Central America have shown 
remarkable growth in the CoCo market. 

I am sure our experience and observations 
are shared by most other software compa- 
nies. Obviously, these cannot be the signs of 
a dying market. 

Manohar T. Santwani 
President 
Microcom Software 

CoCo-Commie Compatibility, Revisited 

Editor: 

Looking over the February issue, I no- 
ticed a letter in the "Doctor ASCII" column 
asking if Commodore 64 software could be 
run on the CoCo. 1 agree with Dr. ASCII's 
answer "Only if the program is in basic." 
However, he also mentioned "transferring 
the ASCII code" and "most likely requiring 
some modification," The truth is, the other 
system uses a different ASCII from that of 
the CoCo. The only compatibility between 
the two in this area is the ASCII codes 13, 
34 through 91 and 94. There's also a slight 
"thing" about "basic tokens": different 
address, sound, Lo-Res as well as Hi-Res 
graphics. The other system can access the 
underlying area of memory to manipulate 
the character set or store some program- 
ming. It also has the capability of using the 
C-B\ock (the area where the ROM- 
Cartridge memory is in the CoCo). 

The user would do better to type software 
in than try a transfer of anything other than 



text files, and he should make those mod- 
ifications as he goes along. 

I know a lot of the problems associated 
with this. I worked on one conversion 
program I received from a dealer who 
advertises in RAINBOW. Although 1 had a 
little success, I came to a blunt end and 
decided to write my own conversion pro- 
gram (Filedata, March ^8 rainbow, Page 
74). This was the initial steppingstone for a 
larger program to create dimensioned files. 
It was to be used for creating the files for 
the conversion program, but it got side- 
tracked and revolves around creating files 
for text Adventure games. It's still usable for 
other things, however. 

Raymond Doss 
Coos Bay, OR 

REVIEWING REVIEWS 

Editor: 

Several of our customers have had trouble 
using the parallel printer interface described 
in the "Turn of the Screw" by Tony DiSte- 
fano (RAINBOW, November and December 
1987). 

The difficulty stems from using VIP 
Writer III, which operates the CoCo 3 at 
double clock speed, with the parallel inter- 
face and a printer such as the Radio Shack 
D WP 430. At double clock speed the strobe 
pulse sent to the printer is so fast the data 
is never seen and therefore never printed. 
The D WP 430 printer requires a strobe pulse 
width of 1.5 microseconds minimum. Com- 
pare this to an Epson JX-80, requiring a 
strobe pulse width of only .5 microseconds. 

VIP Writer III now slows the CoCo 3 to 
normal speed during this time to ensure that 
the strobe pulse will be of sufficient width 
for even the D WP 430. Those who own VIP 
Writer III and are experiencing difficulty 
can contact us to obtain a replacement. 

Those using the parallel interface with 
basic should also be aware that they might 
have problems printing while operating their 
CoCo 3s at double clock speed. 

Paul Anderson 
SD Enterprises 
Gresham, OR 

New Version of Textform 

Editor: 

As a whole, I was tremendously pleased 
with Mr, McGarry's review of Textform, 
However, I feel that there is need for clar- 
ification on one item. In the review Mr. 
McGarry states that he finds the column 
length parameter option "redundant." I 
disagree. This option was intentionally 
included so that it will be possible to con- 
figure formats which are either longer or 
shorter than the standard 66 lines per page. 
This would allow the user to possibly use 
8'/i-by-7 inch fanfold paper or to use photo- 
reduction of overlength printouts for greater 
page density. As is apparent by Mr. McGar- 



ry's review, he is quite impressed with the 
program's flexibility. This added option 
allows yet another means for utilizing 
Textform and the user's imagination to 
create truly unique two-column documents. 

Mr. McGarry also commented on the 
program's lack of a disk directory routine. 
This option, along with several others, will 
be included in Version 1.1. All purchasers of 
Textform Version 1.0 will receive a free copy 
of Version 1.1 when it is released. 

One item I would like to make users aware 
of is the fact that the Hi-Res interface is not 
compatible with all Hi-Res input packs. For 
this reason, future versions of Textform will 
not attempt to support the Hi-Res option. 
I sincerely hope that this will not be of 
inconvenience to users. 

Ralph A. Dahlgren 
R.A.D. Products 
Jamestown, NY 

HINTS & TIPS 

Editor: 

Thanks for all the quality programs and 
articles I've seen from Fred Scerbo. 

However, I'd like to point out something 
misleading in the April "Wishing Well" 
column: It is possible to change the color set 
on a CoCo 3 from red to blue and vice versa. 
Just press Fl and the reset button simultane- 
ously. Pressing the reset button alone sets the 
colors back to the original. 

Brad Bansner 
Wyomissing, PA 

Putting It All Together 

Editor: 

With OS-9 Level II, the CoCo 3 with 5 12K 
and double-sided disk drives it is possible to: 

1. Obtain a single disk containing all 
components of OS-9 Level II, BAS1C09, 
DynaCalc and Profile with 213 free 
clusters, the largest a block of 191, 
remaining. 

2. Obtain a single disk containing all 
components of Mutli- Vue, BAS1C09, 
DynaCalc and Profile with 173 free 
clusters remaining. 

You must back up, configure, and patch 
the various programs in the regular manner. 
Format double-sided disks to 35 tracks and 
type os9gen to create 059Boo t with the OS- 
9 Level II disk (it is not necessary to create 
a new boot with Multi- Vue as Disk 2 pro- 
vides this function). Type dsave to save the 
rest of the OS-9 Level II program, or the 
Multi- Vue program, to your formatted disk. 

Using your various program disks, copy 
those elements not already present on the 
OS-9 Level II or Multi- Vue disks. 

Multi- Vue states that you should not use 
a customized system disk to create Bui ldMV. 
I used a customized disk so as to include 
D0_40D, D1_40D and DDD0-40D. 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S f** 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42, 51 , 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 
They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! ^ ^ 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 

DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 
MC/ VIS A/CO. D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or piay. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



You can save data to formatted 40-track 
disks. 

I find using the keyboard mouse just as 
convenient and sometimes easier than a 
regular mouse. 

Kenneth A. Conklin 
Alpena, MI 

Attention Frantic Fanatics! 

Editor: 

Frantic Fingers (January '88 RAINBOW, 
Page 69) was originally written for use with 
CoCo 1- and 2-style keyboards. The group- 
ing of the arrow keys on the CoCo 3 makes 
it difficult to do well in this game, so try 
substituting Z=64 for Z=94 and Z=1B9 for 
Z=10 in Line 1. Now you can use the ALT 
key for up and the CTRL key for down. Left 
and right still use the left and right arrow 
keys. 

To all you Frantic fanatics: I just com- 
pleted Level 94. Let's see your best in 
rainbow Scoreboard! 

Michael G. Toepke 
Oak Harbor, WA 

EDTASM+ to Disk Transfer 

Editor: 

I would like to pass on some information 
to your readers regarding EDTASM+. 
Using the program pack I typed in Roger 
Schrag's Superpatch to transfer the pack to 
disk. This was the first machine language 
program I had ever attempted, and it didn't 
work! 



Thanks to Gordon Shephard, Sr., who 
wrote to "Downloads" in August 1987, 1 find 
the original is for 1.0 ROM. His corrections 
for the 1.1. ROM were added in, and I now 
have a great program that is even greater on 
disk. 

Here is where all parts of the program can 
be found in RAINBOW: 

September 1983, Page 66 — "Superpatch 
for EDTASM+" 

March 1984, Page 156 — "FCC Fix for 
EDTASM+" 

August 1987, Page 154 — "Superpatch 
Fixes" (1.1 ROM) 

John A. Coldwell 
Prince Rupert, B. C. 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

I saw Spectro Systems' ad in rainbow for 
ADOS-3, read its review (June 1987), then 
decided to buy it. I just got it a few days ago 
. . . WOW! If anybody out there has been 
used to RS-DOS only (like me), I strongly 
recommend ADOS-3. It will knock your 
socks off. (Even if you have shoes on!) 

Is there anybody who knows how to 
integrate Bangert's Super Programming Aid 
Version 3.1 with ADOS-3? I think Spectro 
Systems and Bangert Software Systems 
should get together on this one. Such an 
integration would bring forth a great DOS! 

Frederick A. Lajoie 
Middleton, Nova Scotia 



An Apple for the rainbow 

Editor: 

I have been buying rainbow since Oc- 
tober 1984. From time to time I go back and 
read them over again. Your programs are the 
most important reason I buy rainbow. I 
have a 10-year-old son who uses your 
programs to help with his school work. He 
has gone from failing to a 98 average. He 
disliked school and did not do his home- 
work, but now with your help he finds his 
schoolwork fun and interesting. 

Education is very important, and your 
work is an inspiration to my son. Thank you 
so much for all your help. 

Patrick Leviker 
Schenectady, NY 



Marty Not "The Mouth 



Editor: 

On Page 160 of the March issue, Marty 
Goodman's biography calls him "sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world." My 
impression of Howard Cosell as a verbose, 
monotoned commentator does not fit this 
caring, sensitive man whom I have had the 
good fortune to meet. What began as an 
exchange of money for monitor drivers 
turned into a complete sharing experience! 
Marty opened up his head, his heart and his 
home as we discussed everything from 
science fiction to Hebrew and theology. Oh 
yes, we did talk about the CoCo and rain- 
bow and Delphi (inciuding a visual demon- 
stration). 

June 1988 THE RAINBOW 7 



I have enjoyed the rainbow, and at least 
two other people have subscribed after 
seeing my copies. It is only right, after all, 
because you enjoy and employ people like 
Marty. But please, strike the Howard Cosell 
line! 

The Rev. Doughs Jenkins 
San Anselmo, CA 

The Buck Stops . . . Where? 

Editor: 

I bought my CoCo nearly three years ago 
because it could use a standard tape player 
for saving and loading programs and be- 
cause there was this magazine packed full of 
programs for it (wonder who that is!). I 
stayed with my black and white TV, cassette 
player, and 64K CoCo 2 for quite a while. 
I added things like a printer and modem, but 
I was content until I got into telecommu- 
nications. Then I wanted to run my own 
BBS, and that required disk drives; I bought 
a pair. Then I started getting these programs 
that used the Speech/ Sound Pak, which I 
had, to produce sound. Now I needed a 
Multi-Pak, so I bought one just so I could 
hear the speech. I then added other hard- 
ware and eventually upgraded to a CoCo 3. 
With the CoCo 3 I bought a game called 
Rogue. But wait! The only way I could see 
the graphics on Rogue was to have 51 2K, so 
I bought the upgrade just to see them. I then 
bought OS-9 Level II because I had been 
using a friend's Leading Edge operating 
system and thought it was fun. 

It's interesting to look back and see just 
why we buy things. I'm glad I did. And even 
though my system has changed over the 
years, there's always been one source of 
information to help me through — the 
RAINBOW. I'd just like to say thanks for your 
excellent efforts and publication. You're the 
best! 

Floyd Resler 
Cincinnati, OH 



■ : - ■ ■ >\ PEN PALS ^ - 



• I am 14 years old and have a CoCo 2, disk 
drive, cassette recorder and modem. I am 
interested in a pen pal who likes Adventures 
and other games. 

Erik Swenson 
19 Ridge Road 
Enfield, CT 06082 

• I am 15 years old and would like to hear 
from other CoCo users around my age or 
o\der. My system consists of a CoCo 2 and 
3, disk drive, color composite monitor, Star 
NX-10 printer and an Avatex 1200 HC 
modem. 

Dan Garvin 
240 E. Ninth St. 
Traverse City, MI 49684 

• I would like a pen pal from anywhere. I 
have a CoCo 2, one disk drive and two 
joysticks. I am 10 years of age. 

Kevin Lewis 
256 Elron Circle 
Thunder Bay, Ontario 
Canada P7C5T5 

8 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



• I am 12 years old and want friends from 
all over the world. I have a CoCo 2, speed 
cartridge, two joysticks, LOGO, and a tape 
recorder. I want to hear from anyone inter- 
ested in the CoCo or just wanting to talk. 

Chris Phillips 
4461 Steuber Rd. 
Bethlehem, PA 18017 

• I am 49 years old and a retired school 
teacher. I have a 64K CoCo, FD 501 disk 
drive (0 and 1), speech pack, Modemfone 
100, Multi-Pak and a DMP-105. I would 
like pen pals anywhere in the world and will 
answer all letters. 

Henry Witcher 
6653 Columbus Circle 
Ocean Springs, MS 39564 

• I am a 13-year-old boy looking for a pen 
pal. I have a CoCo 2 with a disk drive. 1 
enjoy playing games and Adventures. I am 
especially looking for a pen pal outside the 
U.S.A. with a CoCo 2. 

Charles Bell 
15515 Kendall Creek Rd. 
Clinton, MT 59825 

• I am 9 years old. I am looking for an 
American pen pal who's a girl. I have a 64K 
CoCo 2, two disk drives, a DWP-230 printer 
and two joysticks. 

Angie Kenkel 
4700 West A St. 
Lincoln, NE 68502 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 



• I need to inform the people who call my 
BBS about some changes. When you con- 
nect to my system, press enter twice to 
select 300 baud. You must be in 300 baud 
to use my system. If you already have a code, 
then enter it. If you don't, write to me. Call 
(703) 365-2018, 300 baud, 7E1 or 8NI. 
Monday through Sunday, 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. 
EST. 

Ricky Sutphin, SysOp 
Rt. 1, Box 20 
Henry, VA 24102 

• The Dayton Area Color Computer Users 
Group sponsors the DACCUG BBS. It 
features uploads, downloads and E-Mail. 
Available 24 hours at 300 or 1200 baud, 8 
bits/no parity/ 1 stop bit. Call (513) 836- 
2741. 

John Teague 
Corresponding Secretary 
308 Orangewood Drive 
Kettering, OH 45429 

• I am delighted to announce a BBS ded- 
icated to CoCos and run on a CoCo 2 with 
eight drives. It is S.O.B.B.S. (Sandy Oregon 
B.B.S.), and the phone number is (503) 668- 
8397. 

We welcome the public, and also have a 
membership access available for $5 a year. 
We feature not only a message base, but also 
a public download, membership download 
and online games such as Galactic Conflict 
and Castle of Death. 

The BBS is run on CoBBS supporting 



300/ 1200 baud at any parity. We are online 
7 days a week, 24 hours a day. 

Tom Bair 
Steve Ricketts 
SOBBS SysOps 

• There is a super new BBS called "The 
CoCo Club BBS." Call (402) 375-1513 in 
Wayne, Nebraska. There is a direct-connect 
modem in use. When someone answers, ask 
for Nate. 

Nathan Tompkins 
420 Douglas 
Wayne, NE 68787 

• The Manton Modem BBS is now online, 
running at 300 baud, 7E1, 24 hours, using 
S.D. Roberson's PBBS Version 5.0 on a 
CoCo 2, OS-9 Level I. Call (616) 824-6026. 

Carl Johnson 
6030 N. 43rd. 
Manton, Ml 49663 

• ColorWorld 2 (SysOp: Edward Gray) is 
online from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. Monday 
through Friday, PST. Call (805) 949-1217. 
I am using CoBBS Version 1.3, running at 
300 baud, at the present time. I would 
appreciate hearing from everyone. 

Edward S. Gray 
45246 No. Ray sack #4 
Lancaster, CA 93535 

• The Bad Sector announces it supports the 
CoCo, running GT Powercomm. Phone: 
(517) 892-4881. N-8-1, 300/ 1200 baud, free! 
SysOp: Doug Stefaniak. Many CoCo files 
to download. Fill out the questionnaire for 
down and upload capability. Type C at the 
menu for a listing of all file areas. Type Q 
to fill out the questionnaire. Online 6 a.m. 
till 3 a.m. 

Ron Sujkowski 
1806 34th St. 
Bay City, MI 48708 

• I am pleased to announce that Duke's 
Shelbyville COLORAMA is celebrating its 
third year of 24-hour daily operation. There 
are no charges to use this highly modified 
COLORAMA. A new user application is 
required to obtain access. Protocol: 300/ 
1200 baud, 7 bit, even parity, 1 stop bit; 
phone (317) 392-2769. 

Duke Norris 
P. O. Box 241 
Shelbyville, IN 46176 



the rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type RRI to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBO W> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 




Word 
Power 3 





(The Ultimate Word Processor for the CoCo 3) 



Power Unleashed! Unlike other word- processors, Word Power 
3.1 is written from scratch for the CoCo 3. It bridges the gap between 
" what is" and" what should be" in word- processors. No other word 
processor offers such a wide array of features that are so easy to 
learn and use* 

DISPLAY 

The 80* column display with true lowercase lets you view the full 
width of a standard page All prompts are displayed in plain 
English in neat colored windows (see display above). The 
current column number, line number, page number and percentage 
of free memory is displayed on the screen at all times The program 
even displays the bottom margin perforation so you know where 
one page ends and the other begins You can also change foreground/ 
background color of screen and select menu and carriage return 
colors to suit your needs! Carriage returns can be visible or invisible 
Word Power 3.1 runs at double clock speed and can be used with 
RGB/ composite/ monochrome monitors as well as TV 

AVAILABLE MEMORY 

No other word processor gives you so much memory. Word Power 
3.1 gives you over 72 K on a 128K machine and over 450K on a 
5 1 2 K machine to store text 

EDITING FEATURES 
Word Power 3. 1 has one of the most powerful and user- friendly 
full- screen editors with word- wrap. All you do is type Word 
Power 3.1 takes care of the text arrangement It even has a built-in 
Auto- Save feature which saves the current text to disk at regular 
intervals; so you know that your latest version is saved to disk. Here 
are some of the impressive editing features of Word Power 3. 1 : 

Insert/Overstrike Mode (Cursor style changes to indicate mode); 
OOPS recall during delete; Type- ahead buffer for fast typers; Key- 
repeat (adjustable) and Key- click; Four- way cursor control and 
scrolling; Cursor to beginning of text, end of text, beginning of line, 
end of line, top/ bottom of screen, next/ previous word; Page up/ 
down; Delete character, previous/ next word, beginning/ end of 
line, complete line, text before and after cursor; Locate/ Replace 
with wild- card search with auto/ manual replace; Block Mark, 
Unmark, Copy, Move and Delete; Line Positioning ( Left/ Centei/ 
Right); Set/ Reset 120 programmable tab stops; Word count. Define 
left, right, top and bottom margins and page length. You can also 
highlight text (underline- with on-screen underlining, bold, 
italics, superscripts, etc). Word Power 3.1 even has a HELP screen 
which can be accessed any time during edit. 



JhJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 
P.O. Box214 
Fairport, NY 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 



MAIL MERGE 

Ever try mailing out the same letter to 50 different people or sending 
out several resumes? Could be quite a chore Not with Word Power 
3.1. Using this feature, you can type a letter, follow it with a list of 
addresses and have Word Power 3.1 print out personalized letters 
It's that easy! 

SAVING/LOADING TEXT 
Word Power 3.1 creates ASCII format files which are compatible 
with almost all terminal, spell- checking and other word- processing 
programs It allows you to load, save, append and kill files and also to 
create and edit Basic, Pascal, C and Assembly files You can select files 
by simply cursoring through the disk directory. Supports double- 
sided drives and various step rates 

PRINTING 

Word Power 3.1 drives almost any printer (DMP series, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc) . Allows print options such as baud rates, 
line spacing page pause, partial print, page numbers, page number 
placement, linefeed option, multi-line headers/footers, right 
justification and number of copies (see display above). The values 
for these parameters and the margins can be changed anytime in the 
text by embedding Printer Option Codes Word Power 3.1 has the 
WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET feature which allows you 
to preview the text on the screen as it will appear in print. You can see 
margins, page breaks, justification and more 

SPELLING CHECKER 
Word Power 3.1 comes with a 50,000 word spelling checkei/ 
dictionary which finds and corrects mistakes within your text. You 
can add words to or delete from the dictionary or create a dictionary 
of your own. 

PUNCTUATION CHECKER 
This checker will proofread your text for punctuation errors such 
as capitalization, spaces after periods/ commas, double words and 
much more It's the perfect addition to any word processor. 

DOCUMENTATION 

Writing with Word Power 3.1 is a breeze Word Power 3.1 comes 
with a well- written, easy- to- comprehend instruction manual which 
will lead you step- by- step through the program. 

Word Power3. 1 comes on an UNPROTECTED disk and is compatible 
with RS DOS 1.0/1. 1 and ADOS Only$79.95. 

(Word Power 3 owners can get the 3.1 version by sending proof of 
purchase and $10.00 to cover the cost of shipping and the manuaL) 

"I have had other programs in the past but find this the easiest to learn and 
use. The other programs I have used have presented problems. I just kept 
buying one after the other until I hit upon one that satisfied all my needs 
(Word Power 3.1)." 

- Kenneth C Brownson, R.N., Ph.D., Director 

Health Service Education Institute 



To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9 AM -9 PM est 7 days a week 

NY, Canada, Foreign Orders, Information, Technical Advice and Order Status call 1-716-223-1477 
All orders within Continental US shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge. 
VISA, MG AM EX, Check, MO. No CODs Please add $3.00 S&H (USA & Canada), other countries $5.00 S&H. NYS residents please add sales tax. 



VISA 



Much Ado 
About "The Suit" 

Pardon me this month if I make a small detour from the CoCo world 
here. The reason is simply that there is a very big issue floating 
around the microcomputer world these days, and I think it deserves 
some mention. 

There is, however, a Tandy aspect to it all. I'll get to that in a moment. 

The big issue is "the suit," which is what just about everyone seems to 
be calling the decision by Apple Computer Co. to sue Microsoft (and 
Hewlett-Packard) for allegedly violating its copyright on the audio-visual 
display that Apple uses in its Macintosh computers. 

As most of you no doubt know, Apple popularized (that's an important 
word) the concept of the graphical interface in its first Macs with the 
desktop concept. Now we have graphical interfaces in a number of products 
for the Tandy PCs and compatibles — and, of course, in the CoCo with 
Multi-Vue. In the PC world, the big Multi-Vue-likc interface is the 
Windows program from Microsoft. H-P gets into this because it, too, has 
a similar type of graphical interface, called New Wave, ready to be shipped. 

Longtime readers of THE RAINBOW will know that I have never been 
much of an Apple fan. Originally I thought its machines vastly overpriced 
(they still are), and I have always considered the Mac to be too slow to 
be really effective. I have, however, always admired the pioneering spirit 
of Steve Jobs, particularly, and Steve Wozniak in their "garage computer" 
development. 

Tandy and Apple fought it out for years in the early days of the computer 
business. Each side had its fans. And the original Mac, though slower than 
molasses in January in Peterborough, N.H., was probably the cutest 
computer to come down the pike in a long time — a brainchild of Jobs 
himself. 

It was probably what got him canned at Apple, as well. Jobs hired a 
guy named Vince Scully to run Apple; lo and behold, in a few years Scully 
took control and forced Jobs out. To my mind, that ended Apple's days 
of innovation. 

Instead, we have marketing by threat and intimidation. 




COCO 3 UTILITIES GALORE 

(All utilities support 40/80 columns for CoCo3) 
(CoCo 2 versions are available for most utilities) 




SUPER TAPE/DISK TRANSFER 

• Disk-to-Disk Copy (1-3 passes) • Tape- to- Disk Copy • Tape- to- Disk Automatic Relocate • Disk- 
to-Tape Copy • Tape- to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ ML programs and DATA files CoCo 1, 2 & 3, 32 K Disk System (Disk to Disk Copy requires 
64 K). Disk Only $24.95 



CoCo CHECKER 

Something possibly wrong with your CoCo? CoCo Checker is the answer! Will test your ROMs, RAMs, Disk 
Drives& Controller, Printer, Keyboard Cassette; Joysticks. Sound PIAs. VDG, Internal Clock Speed Multi- 
pak Interface and more! $24.95 



DISK UTILITY 2.1 A 

A multi- featured tool forUSER FRIENDLY disk handling Utilize a directory window to selectively sort move; 
rename& kill file entries Lightning fast Disk I/O for format copy & backup. Single execution of both Basic& 
ML programs 64 K DISK $29.95 NOW also CoCo III compatible! Upgrade only $15 w/proof of purchase. 



COCO NEWSROOM 

Now available for the CoCo III! You can design your own newspaper with Banner Headlines/6 articles using 
sophisticated Graphics. Fonts and Fill Patterns Comes with 22 fonts&50 pictures! Over 1 40 K of coda Disk 
only $49.95 



MAILLIST PRO 

The ultimate mailing list program Allows you to add edit view, delete, change, sort(byzipcodeorname) and 
print labels Its indispensible! Disk Only $1 9.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! Allows elongated normal and condensed format for text 
double- strike, border creation and multiple- label printing Its a MUST for any user with a disk driva Disk 
Only $19.95. Supports DMP 105/1 10/1 20/1 30/430, GEMINI, STAR, EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo2 
version included) 



COMPUTERIZED CHECKBOOK 

Why bother with balancing your checkbook? Let the CoCo do it for you! Allows you to add, view, search, edit 
change delete and printout (in a table or individual entry format) checkbook entries Updates balance after 
each entry. Allows files for checking saving and other accounts Disk Only $19.95 (CoCo 2 version 
included) 



BOWLING SCORE KEEPER 

An excellent utility to keep track of your bowling scores Allows you to save scores under individuals or 
teams You can edit, change; delete and compare scores A must for anyone who wants to keep track of his or 
her bowling performanca Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 

Organize your videocassettes with this program! Allows you to index cassettes by title; rating, type; play 
time and comments Also allows you to sort titles alphabetically and view/ print selected tapes If you own a 
VCR, this program is a must Disk Only $1 9.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



SCREEN DUMP 

32, 40, 80 column text dump, PMODE4 Graphics Dump. Single Keystroke Operation allows 
you to take snapshots of screens even when programs are running! Works on DMP's Epson 
and Gemini. CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Disk Only $24.95 



HOME BILL MANAGER 

Let the CoCo keep track of your bills Allows you to enter bills under various categories and 
reminds you when they are dua Disk Only. $19.95 




CALENDAR MAKER 

Generate monthly calendars on your printer for any year in the 20th century. Disk Only. ^§£s£ 
$19.95 


COCO UTIL II 

(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to IBM 
compatible computer. Transfer MS-DOS files to 
CoCa Req 2- Drive IBM compatibla $39.95 




AD0S3 

Advanced Disk Operating System for CoCo 3. 
$34.95 ADOS $27.95 


RGB PATCH 

Displays most games in color on RGB monitors 
For CoCo 3 Disk. $24.95 


SPIT'N IMAGE 

Makes a BACKUP of ANY disk $32.95 



OS 9 PRODUCTS 




OS 9 LEVEL II 
OPERATING SYSTEM 

Supports 51 2 K RAM dual speed multi- tasking 
multiple windows and more! Comes with disk and 
complete documentation Only $89.95 



MULTI* VUE 

User friendly graphics interface with multiple 
"window" applications for Level II. Only $54.95 



WIZ 

0S9 Level II Terminal Package with 300-19200 
baud rate and windowing capability. Requires 51 2 K 
and RS-232 Pack Only $79.95 



SCREEN STAR 

Best OS9 Word Processor. Implements WordStar 
(R) editing capabilities Even has a built in spelling 
checker. Use with OS-9 Text Formater to get 
beautiful printouts ForOS9 Leveh and2. DiskOnly 
$49.95. OS-9 Text Formatter: Printout beautiful docu- 
ments from any ASCII fila Only $34.95. Both Screen Star 
and OS-9 Text Formatter: $74.95 



DATA MASTER 

Excellent database for OS9. Features include: 
windows, pull down menus, sorting, etc Requires 
OS9 Level II&512K Only $64.95 




PC-Xfer UTILITIES 

Programs to format and transfer files to/from MS- 
DOS diskettes on CoCo Under 0S9 Level 1 or 2. 
Requires SDISK or SDJSK3. Only $44.95 




SDISK3 

Standard disk drive module replacement allows full 
use of 40/80 track double sided drives Req. 0S9 
Level IL Only $29.95 




SDISK 

Same as SDISK 3 except for OS9 Level I. Only 
$29.95 



0S9 LEVEL II RAMDISK 

Lightning Fast Ramdisk with Auto Formatting, A 
must for any OS9 Level II User. Req 512K$29.95. 
(Only $14.95 with purchase of 512 K Upgrade & 

Ramdisk!!). 



BOOKS 

Inside 0S9 Level II: $39.95 

Rainbow Guide To 0S9 Level II: $19.95 

Rainbow Guide To DS9 Level II Disk: $19.95 

OS9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola, 

Inc 



JhJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



C0D& We accept Visa, MC, Amex, Check or MO. Please add $3.00 S&H 
(USA/Canada). Other countries $5.00 S&H. NYS residents please add sales tax. 

To Place Credit Card Orders; Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 

NY, Canada, Foreign Orders, Information Technical Advice and Order Status call 1-716-223-1477 



See, Apple is contending that Micro- 
soft and H-P have taken its idea of a 
graphical interface and stolen it for 
Windows and New Wave. 

The suit has the industry in an uproar. 
And I happen to think that is just what 
Apple is trying to do. The company, 
unsuccessful in pushing any version of 
its Mac as an office machine — and thus 
losing a great deal of business to the PC 
field — is, I believe, hoping it will "scare 
off" enough people from buying PCs 
and using Windows. 

Some believe the Apple suit is really 
aimed at IBM, which is to launch its 
Presentation Manager for OS/2 soon. 
OS/2 and Windows are said to be very 
similar. Now, if Apple can slow sales of 
these two graphical interfaces — which 
certainly make PCs easier to use — 
where is a body to turn? To Apple, of 
course. 

This is what I believe to be the whole 
strategy behind the Apple action. I 
think the Scully-Apple group cannot 
compete with Tandy, IBM and every- 
one else in the big-time business market- 
place; so it is trying to put a kernel of 
concern in the mind of PC buyers that 
they might be running afoul of the legal 
system if they use any graphical inter- 
face other than Apple's. 

And how long will Apple have an 
advantage if its supposition is correct? 
Well, you know how long it takes to 
bring a lawsuit to trial, don't you? 

So far, this whole thing has seemed 
to backfire on the geniuses in Cuper- 
tino. The initial reaction of pundits, 



regular media, the computer press, 
industry analysts and corporate buyers 
was, generally, anger. Too, most seemed 
to make the same general analysis as did 
I: That Apple, losing the battle of the 
marketplace, had to try something; and 
"the suit" was as good a tactic as any. 
Some say it may be the only shot Apple 
has left to keep a significant hold on the 
market into the 1990s. 





winner 
in 'the suit'jmt may 
be Tandy/' 



An interesting footnote to all of this 
is that the first true graphical interface 
did not come from Apple, but from 
Xerox — which used a scheme called 
Viewpoint. Some have made the argu- 
ment that Viewpoint has never been 
popular, while the Mac desktop "pop- 
ularized" the concept; that argument 
just does not hold water. If it did, then 
the standard would have to be that a 
product must be a commercial success 
to be copyrightable, not just different. 

There are a whole lot of other issues 
in this mish-mash. But I think one point 
stands clear: Apple, after years of 
trying, has determined it cannot pene- 
trate the "real" computer market as 
Tandy, IBM and others have done. 



Is this the last gasp of a once-great 
company? I wouldn't be surprised. 

3fc 3|C 9§C 

The biggest winner in "the suit" just 
may be Tandy. Of all the major players 
in the PC world, only Tandy has gone 
to great expense and expended great 
energy to develop its own interface — 
the popular DeskMate. 

I use both DeskMate and Windows 
for different things. Tandy developed 
DeskMate originally for the 2000 to 
give an easy-to-use interface between its 
users and its computer systems. Over 
he years DeskMate has undergone 
numerous revisions; while not exactly a 
total graphical go-between, it does most 
of the things a graphical interface does 
— at considerably less cost and with a 
lot less learning time necessary. 

Although it was not announced until 
after "the suit," Tandy made the deci- 
sion to "open up" DeskMate to devel- 
opers before Apple's legal shenanigans. 
Initial reaction to this move was very 
positive, and no wonder, considering 
the success of the Tandy sales effort. 

So here we have an easy-to-use inter- 
face that does not engender the legal 
fears brought onto Windows by "the 
suit." And now Tandy is telling program 
developers that it will help them make 
their own products work with Desk- 
Mate. 

This could be very interesting. 

— Lonnie Falk 



One-Liner Contest Winner-, v * 

Dice are like paper clips and bobby pins y ou can't 
find them when you need them and you step on them 
when you don't. If loss of dice has prevented you from 
playing Monopoly, Aggravation or Trivial Pursuit, 
you're not totally out of luck! 

The listing: 

3 CLS : Ir*RND ( 6 ) : R-RND ( 6 j : PRINT@19 

4 - »*****« :PRINT@226 , ,, * ,, L fl * ,f rPRIN 
T@258, "*****" :PRINT@216, : 
PRINT© 2 4 8 , " * "R" * " : PRINT© 2 80 , " * * * 
** ,, ;INPUT"TO ROLL DICE AGAIN PRE 
SS ENTER OR ENTER <M>ENU» ;A$ : IP 
A$-"M ,f THEN0ELSE3 

Jerry Campbell 
Idaho Falls, ID 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape) 



Otie-Liner Contest Winner . . 

- '.V ■ '■■ ', <••:'/ ?$■ "< ? ' ;%y' ' : -.' " f a-- i £§r & : ' ■ , '&M{>& : 

Turn CoC6 ittto a New Wave art generator with titiff;- 
one-liner, which uses random numbers to draw ||||t 
paint circles and shapes on a PMODE 3 screen. 

The listing: 

J3 PMODE 3 , 1 : PCLS : S GREEN 1 , 1 :F-RND( 
4) :B=*RND(8) : COLORF, B: PCLSB: FORL= 
0TO5 : LINE- (RND (255) ,RND(191) ) ,PS 
" ET : CIRCLE (BND( 2 5'S) ,RND(191) ) ,RND 
( 100 ) : NEXT : FORP=0TO10 : PAINT (RND ( 
255) ,RND(191) ) ,RND(4) , F : NEXT : FOR 
H=1T07 : FORT=J3TO600 : NEXTT: GOTO 



Jim Martin 
Silver Bay, MM 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the; author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations m& its companion The 
Second Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



12 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



500 

POKES, 

PEEKs, 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 

MEYER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

* Autostart your basic programs 

* Disable Color Basic/ECB/Disk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TROM, TROFr, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, RENUM, PRINT 
USINQ, DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD, 
MERQE, RENAME, DSKIMI, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

* Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 
Generate a Repeat-key. 
Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

Set 23 different 

GRAPH IC/5EMIQRAPHIC modes 
Merge two Basic programs. 

AND MUCH MUCH NOREJU 
COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16K/32K/64K/COLOR BASIC/ECB/DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1, 2. & 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



★ 
★ 



★ 
★ 



SUPPLEMENT to 

500 POKES, 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 

ONLY$9.95 

L\3U additional Pokes, Peeks' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER 
Includes commands for 

• flompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 650D0 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/ double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• Nigh- Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm+® and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (for D MP printers) & Text Screen Dump 

• ANO MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES. PEEKS N EXECS is a prerequisite 



300 POKES 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 

FOR THE COCO III 

Get more POWER for your CoCo III. Includes 
commands for 

• 40/60 Column Screen Text Dump 

• Save Text/Graphics Screens to Disk 

• Command/Function Disables 

• Enhancements for CoCo 3 Basic 

• 128K/512K Ram Test Program 

• HPflINT Character Modifier 

• AND MANY MORE COMMANDS ONLY $ 1 9.95 






m 



"MUST" BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $39.95 

DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 

BOTH UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 

SUPER ECB (CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: $24.95 J 

ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $59.95 

COCO 3 SERVICE MANUAL $39.95 
COCO 2 SERVICE MANUAL: $29.95 

INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II $39.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TD 0S9 LEVEL II ON COCO 3: $19.95 

RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 II DISK: $19.95 
INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II DISK: $20.00 
COCO 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING": $18.00 

ADDENDUM FOR COCO 3: $12.00 
UTILITY ROUTINES VOL 1 BOOK: $19.95 

GAMES(Disk Only) (CoCo 1, 2, & 3 
except where mentioned) 
WILD WEST (CoCo 3 Only) $24.95 
VEGAS SLOTS (CoCo 3 Only) $29.95 
VEGAS GAME PACK: $24.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 
INQUEST OF STAR LORD 

(Animated Graphics Adventure 
CoCo 3): $34.95 




WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY: $19.95 
PYRAMIX(Cubix for CoCo 3): $24.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
KUNG FU DUDE: $24.95 




APPROACH CONTROL SIMULATION: $34.95 
TREASURY PACK #1: Lunar Rover Patrol 
Cubix, Declathon, Qix, Keys of Wizard, 
Module Man, Pengon, Space Wrek and 
Roller Controller. Only $29.95 

TREASURY PACK #2: Lancer, Ma Gobbler, 
Froggie^ M adness and M inotaur, I ce Castles, 
Galagon, Devious and Syzygy. Only $29.95 
SPACE PACK: Color Zap Invaders Planet 
Invasion, Space Race; Space War, Galax 
Attax, Anaroid Attack, Whirlybird, Space 
Sentry & Storm Arrows. Only $29.95 




MJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6] 223-1477 



COCO 

GRAPHICS DESIGNER 

rf^ Signs Greeting Cards Banners 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays 
birthdays, parties; anniversaries and other 
occasions Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III OR TDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM OF 32 K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1 .0/1 .1 , ADOS 1 .0/1 .1 AN D JDOS. 

Supports the following printers: DMP 

100/105/110/130/430, CGP220, 

EPSON RX/FX, GEMIN1 1 0X, SG-10, 

NX-10 & OKIDATA DISK $29.95 

PICTURE DISK #1: 100 more pictures for 

CGD: $14.95 

FONT DISK #1: 10 extra fonts! $19.95 

FONT DISK #2: 10+ extra fonts $19.95 
CAR SIGN DESIGNER 

Create distinctive bright yellow diamond 
shaped car signs Includes2 resuable clear 
plastic sign holders with suction cups; and 
50 sheets of bright yellow fanfold paper. 
Disk Only $29.95 

COLORED PAPER PACKS $24.95 

COCO MAX III (with hi-res interface): $79.95 
COCO MAX II: Disk$77.95 Tape$67.95 

MAX PATCH An excellent software patch to run 
COCO MAX II on COCO ill. Reo, RS Hi-res 
Joystick Interface No chip replacements or 

soldering Disk only $24.95 

COLOR MAX 3 DELUXE: $69.95 

COLOR MAX 3: $59.95 

Telewriter-64: Best Word Processor for CoCol & 
2(Cas) $47.95 (Disk) $57.95 
TIM-80: 80 Column Display & more features fpr 
TW-64. CoCo3 Disk $39.95 
TELEFORM: Mail Merge & Form Letters for TW- 
64. $19.95 

Autoterm: Superb Terminal Program Works with 
any modem! (Cas) $29.95 (Disk) $39.95 

Pro Color File* Enhanced*: Multi-feature 
Database $59.95 Sidewise: $24.95 
Pro- Color Dir: $24.95 
EDT/ASM 64 D: Best Disk Based Editor- 
Assembler for CoCq$59.95 (Specify CoCo A, 2 ot'J* 
THE SOURCE: Best Disassembler for CoCoS 34. 9 5 
THE SOURCE III $49.95 
CBASIC: Most powerful Basic Program Compiler 
$149.95 (Specify CoCo1,2 or 3) 

DYNACALC(C0C01,2&3): $99.95 



All ordersSSO and above shipped by U PS 2 nd Day Air within Continental US at no extra charge No 

CODs We accept Visa MC, Amex, Check or MO. Please add $3.00 S&H(USA/Canada). 
Other countries $5.00 S&H NYS residents please add sales tax 



To Place Credit Card Orders, Call Toll Free 1 -800-654-5244 9 AM- 9 PM EST 7 days a week 

NY, Canada, Foreign Orders, Information, Technical Advice and Order Status call 1-7 1 6-223- 1 477 



: MmtaCord 



Fe a ture 



OS-9 Level I Version 2.0 



Create online assistance for any program 



Help Is on the Way 

By Stephen B. Goldberg 



After using OS-9 for a while, you 
begin to collect a batch of utility 
programs in your CMD5 direc- 
tory from RAINBOW or other third-party 
suppliers. Some of these programs are 
used rather infrequently, and it's easy to 
forget the proper syntax for the com- 

Steve Goldberg is a dentist who relaxes 
by writing OS-9 utilities on his son's 
Co Co. 



mands. Starting with OS-9 Level I 
Version 2.0, Microware was nice 
enough to provide a Help command 
that can jog a fading memory with the 
correct way of entering a command. 
Unfortunately, help is available only for 
those utilities that are on the disk when 
you get it from Radio Shack. 

Helpmate is a BASIC09 program that 
provides the means to add the syntax 
and description of any new program for 



online assistance by the Help com- 
mand. The program descriptions are 
located in the /DCkSYS/cmds.hp file, 
and each one is 100 bytes in length. The 
name of the module starts at the first 
byte, the parameter and option list is 
located at the 13th byte and the descrip- 
tion of the program's function starts at 
the 36th byte. The maximum space 
available is 10 characters for the name, 
22 characters for the parameters and 



< 

The listing: Helpmate 

PROCEDURE helpmate 

0000 TYPE all=name : STRING [ 12 ] ; pram : STRING [23]; descr: STRING [ 65 ] 

0026 DIM entry rail 

002F DIM char, bell: STRING [1] 

003F DIM max: STRING [19] 

004B DIM path, els: BYTE 

0056 DIM pointer: REAL 

005D DIM x,y,z: INTEGER 

006 C bell=CHR$(7) 

0074 cls=»12 \(* CLEAR SCREEN *) 

008 D max=" CHARACTERS MAXIMUM" 

00A7 REPEAT 

00A9 REPEAT 

00AB pointer=0 

00B3 , PUT #l,cls 

00BC PRINT "HELPMATE . . ." 

00D8 PRINT \ PRINT "COPYRIGHT (c) 1987 S.B.Goldberg" 

00FD PRINT " 

0120 PRINT 

0122 REPEAT 

0124 INPUT "ENTER MODULE NAME: ", entry. name 

0143 ys=LEN ( entry . name ) 

014F IF y>10 THEN 

015B PRINT bell 

0160 . PRINT "10"; max 

016A ENDIF 

016C UNTIL y>0 AND y<ll 



14 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



SUPER 88 UTILITIES 

For Only $88 



40K FOR CASSETTE PROGRAMS: #200 

40K FOR DISK BASIC PROGRAMS: #201 

ALPHA-D I R Alphabetize DIR's #202 

APPOINTMENT CALENDAR: #203 

ASCII FILE UTILITY: #204 

AUTOMATIC DISK BACK-UP :Req. 2 drives #205 

AUTOMATIC 5 MIN. CASSETTE SAVE: #206 

AUTOMATIC 5 MIN. DISK SAVE: #207 

AUTO DIR BACK-UP:No more FS errors #208 

BASE CONVERTER: #209 

BANNER MAKER : 7" high letters #210 

BASIC SEARCH:Search for a string #211 

BORDER MAKER: 255 border styles #212 

CASSETTE LABEL MAKER: DM P's only #213 

CLOCK: Keeps time as you program #214 

COMMAND KEYS: Shorthand for BASIC #215 

COMMAND MAKER: Design own commands #216 

COMMAND SAVER: Saves/recalls commands #217 

CALCULATOR :0n-screen calculator #218 

CURSOR STYLES:65535 cursor styles #219 

DISK CATALOGER :DIR 1 s into master DIR #220 

DISK ENCRYPT: BASIC password protection #221 

DMP CHARACTER SET ED I TOR: #222 

DMP SUPERSCRIPTS: Great for term papers #223 

DOS COMMAND ENHANCER: #224 

DOUBLE BANK:64K only #225 

ENHANCED KILL:#226 

ENHANCED LL I ST: Beautiful LLISTings #227 

ENHANCED TRON: #228 

ERROR LOCATOR: #229 

E-Z DISK MASTER: #230 

FAST SORT: 100 strings in 3 seconds #231 

FILE SCRAMBLER: Hide your private files #232 

FULL ERRORS: English error messages #233 

FUNCTION KEYS: Speeds prog time #234 

GRADE BOOK: Great for teachers #235 

GRAPHICS SCREEN COMPRESSION: #236 

GRAPHICS SHIFTER: #237 

GRAPHICS TYPE SETTING:2 letter sizes #238 

GRAPHICS ZOOM: Magnify/edit graphics #239 

IN PUT /OUT PUT DATA MONITOR: #240 

KEY CLICKERrEnsures input accuracy #241 

KEY SAVER: Save/ recall keystrokes #242 

LAST COMMAND REPEATER: #243 



LINE COPY: Copy BASIC lines #244 

LINE CROSS-REFERENCE: #245 

LIST/DIR PAUSE: No more fly-bys #246 

LOWER CASE COMMANDS: #247 

MASS DISK INITIALIZATION: #248 

MESSAGE ANIMATOR: Great billboard #249 

METRIC CONVERSION: #250 

ML/BASIC PROGRAM MERGE: #251 

ML TO DATA CONVERTER: #252 

MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST MAKER: #253 

NUMERIC KEYPAD: #254 

ON BREAK GOTO COMMAND: #255 

ON ERROR GOTO COMMAND : #256 

ON RESET GOTO COMMAND: #257 

PHONE DIRECTORY: #258 

PAUSE CONTROL :Put progs on hold #259 

PRINTER TO SCREEN: #260 

PRINTER TUTORIAL: #261 

PROGRAM PACKER: For BASIC progs #262 

PURCHASE ORDER MAKER: #263 

RAMDISK:In-memory disk drive #264 

REPLACE/FIND STRINGS: #265 

REVERSE VIDEO (GREEN): #266 

REVERSE VIDEO (RED): #267 

RAM TEST: Checks your RAM #268 

ROM SWITCHER: #269 

SIGN MAKER : Runs on any DMP #270 

SINGLE STEPPER :Great de-bugger #271 

SPEEDUP TUTORIAL: #272 

SPOOLER: Speed up printouts #273 

SUPER INPUT/LINE INPUT: #274 

SUPER COMMAND KEYS: #275 

SUPER COPY:Copy multiple files #276 

SUPER EDITOR:Scroll BASIC progs #277 

SUPER PAINT:65535 patterns #278 

SUPER REPEAT: Repeat key #279 

SUPER SCROLLER: View scrolled lines #280 

TAB/SHIFT LOCK KEYS: #281 

TAPE ENCRYPT Password protect BASIC #282 

TAPE INDEX SYSTEM: For tape progs #283 

TEXT SCREEN SCROLL LOCK: #284 

TITLE SCREEN CREATOR: #285 

UNKILL: Recover KILLed disk progs #286 

VARIABLE CROSS-REFERENCE: #287 



All Above Utilities Only $88, Or 
1 Program $9 2 Programs $16 3 Programs $21 

4 Programs $24 5 Programs $5 each. 
All Programs On Disk. More Than One Program 

On Same Disk. Documentation Included 



COLOR 

(SCHEMATIC 
DESIGNED 



By Prakash Mishra 

An Excellent CACD Software 
Package for CoCo 3. Features: 



* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
* 



Runs in 640x192 at 1.8Mhz 
Pull Down Menus 
Keyboard/ Joystk/Mouse Support 
RGB/Comp/Monochrome Monitors 
72 Modifiable Symbols 
Multiple Hi-Res Fonts 
Multiple UNDO Command 
Symbol Rotate/Line/Box Draw 
Supports 3 layers of circuits 
Complete Window Scrolling 
Powerful Screen Print Command 
Complete Documentation 



Disk Only $39.95 




MUL TI-FONT PRINTER 

NX-1000 




For The First Time In History... 

Spectrum Projects Products Available On ^ , 
Toll- Free Line & Charge Cards at Microcom Software. 



NX-1000 Rainbow System 

* Star NX-1000 Color Printer 

* Serial To Parallel Inter/ace 

* Free Software: Screen Dump 
& Signs 'N Banners Program 

ONLY $299 

(Include $10 Shipping) 



AJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



Ail orders $50 and above (except Disk Drives) shipped by UPS2 nd Day Air within Continental US 
at no extra charge NoCODs We accept Visa MC. Amex, Check or M0. Please add $3.00 S&H 
(USA/Canada). Other countries $5.00 S&H. NYS residents please add sales tax 

No Free 2nd day shipping for Printer. 



VISA 



MasterCard 



C»r<5 




To Place Credit Card Orders, Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9 am-9 pm est7 days a 

NY, Canada, Foreign Orders, Information, Technical Advice and Order Status call 1-716-223-1477 



we 



ek 



017E 




JJ17F 


(* MAKE ALL CHARACTERS UPPER CASE *) 


JJ1A3 


FOR x-0 TO y-1 


JJ1B7 


z— LAND ( PEEK (ADDR ( entry . name ) +x) , 22 3 ) 


price 


IF z>64 AND z<91 THEN 


01DF 


POKE ADDR (en try. name )+x,z 


, 01F1 


ENDIF 


J2T1F3 


NEXT x 


JTIFE 




JJ1FF 


entry . name-entry . name+CHR$ (0) 


0212 


PRINT 


0214 


LOOP 


0216 


INPUT "ENTER PARAMETERS ) : " , entry . pram 


0236 


EXITIF LEN(entry.pram)<23 THEN 


0246 


ENDEXIT 


J2T24A 


PRINT bell 


024F 


PRINT "22"; max 


0259 


ENDLOOP 


025D 


entry . pram-entry . pram+CHR$ (0) 

mm mm * ^ & w 


0270 


PRINT 


0272 


REPEAT 


0274 


PRINT "ENTER DESCRIPTION: "; 


028C 


READ #0, entry. descr 

* " m 


0299 


y=»LEN ( entry . de s cr ) 


02A5 


IF y>64 THEN 


02B1 


PRINT bell 


02B6 


PRINT "64"; max 


02C0 


ENDIF 


02C2 


UNTIL y>0 AND y<65 

w 9 m 


02D4 


entry . descr=entry . descr+CHR$ (0) 

m m * 


02E7 


PRINT 


02E9 


PRINT entry. name+" "+entry.pram 

m mm 


02FC 


PRINT entry. descr 


0304 


PRINT 


0306 


REPEAT 


0308 


PRINT "Is this entry correct? (y/n) : "; 


032B 


GET #0,char 


0334 


PRINT 


0336 


UNTIL char-"Y" OR char-"y" OR char«"N" OR char-"n" 


03 5 A 




035B 


(* REPEAT IF NOT CORRECT *) 


0376 


UNTIL char-"y" OR char-"Y" 


i 038A 




038B 


PRINT 


038D 


OPEN #path , "/d0/sys/cmds . hp" : WRITE 


03A7 




03A8 


(* FIND END OF FILE *) 


03BE 


WHILE EOF (#path) -FALSE DO 


03 CA 


SEEK #path, pointer 


03D4 


point er-po int er +S IZE ( entry ) 


03E3 


, ENDWHILE 


03E7 




03E8 


PUT #path, entry 


03F2 


CLOSE #path 


03F8 


REPEAT 


03FA 


PRINT "Make another entry? (y/n) : " ; 


041A 


GET #0,char 


0423 


PRINT 


0425 


UNTIL char-"Y" OR char-"y" OR char-"N" OR char-"n" 


0449 




044A 


(* REPEAT FOR ANOTHER ENTRY *) 


0468 


UNTIL char-"N" OR char-"n" 


047C 


END 



options and 64 characters for the de- 
scription. Each section of the Help 
message is terminated with a null 
(CHR$(0)). 

Helpmate is self-explanatory. Exe- 
cute the Help command for a few 
utilities to see the form of the display; 
run Helpmate^ and answer the prompts 
on the screen to add help information 
for a new program. 

First, enter the module's name. You 
don't have to use uppercase; the pro- 
gram automatically converts any lower- 
case characters to uppercase. Next, list 
the parameters and options expected on 
the command line. Finally, type in a 
short description of the program's 
functions. 

After entering the requested informa- 
tion, you will be shown the entry exactly 
as it will be displayed by Help. If the 
entry is correct, it will be added to the 
Cmds-hp file. If in error, you are given 
the opportunity to re-enter the data. 
After saving the new information, you 
can either enter another or exit the 
program. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 695 Plainview Road, Bethpage, NY 
11714. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) /R\ 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 



CoCo goes LOGO in this short 
program, using sin/ cos tech- 
niques to draw a variety of designs 
in PMDDE 4. 

The listing: 

0 V«2.6:FORQl<LTOlJ30:P~9j3:LINE(7 
9, 15) -(79, 15) ,PSET:PHODE4:PCLS:S 
CREEN1 , 1 : FORX- 1TO 8 8 1STEPV : P«P- . 5 
;K-128-COS(X) *P:L»92-SIN(X) *P:LI 
NE- (K,L) t PSET : NEXT : V-V+ . 1 : FORG-1 
: KEXTG : NEXTQ1 



Frank Unger, Jr. 
Manchester, MO 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the 
author has been sent copies of both The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



1 6 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



r 



DISK DRIVES 




Double Sided Double Density 360 K40 Track Vz Ht Disk Drives for CoCo2 and 3. Buy from someone else and all you get is a disk drive Buy from us 
and not only do you get a quality disk drive but also $60 worth of disk utility software ( Super Tape/ Disk Transfer and Disk Tutorial) and our 
DISKMAX utility which allows you to use BOTH sides of our disk drives Its like buying TWO disk drives for the price of ONE!! 

Drive 0 (with J & M Controller & Cable): $229.95 Drive 1: $149.00 
TWO Vz ht Drives in one case with cable & controller: $339.95 
Single Power-Supply & Case: $59.95 Disk Drive Power Supply T Cables: $8.95 

(90 day warranty on all drives) 
J&M Controller (with RSDOS): $79.95 DISTO Super Controller: $99.95 
Mini Eprom Programmer Add- On: $54.95 Real Time Clock & Parallel Printer Interface Add-on: $39.95 

DISTO Super Controller II: $129.95 I 

1 Drive Cable: $19.95 2 Drive Cable: $24.95 4 Drive Cable: $39.95 

(For Drives, add $7.00 S&H in USA/Canada) 

HARD DRIVES 

Finally! Hard Drive Interface for Basic and OS9 from Burke& Burke!! 

CoCoXT: Useupto2 5-120 Meg Hard Drives YoubuyWD1002-WX1 orWD1002-27XController, Case and drive from your PC dealer and use CoCo 
XT to hook the drive up to your CoCa Includes drivers for OS9/ Basic and complete documentation $69.95. 

HYPER I/O: Modifies RSDOS to allow use of floppy and hard drives If you are using hard drives from Basic, you will need HYPER I/O to access the 
hard drives Disk Only $24.95. 

COCO XT ROM: Installs in hard disk controller. Boots OS9 from hard/floppy drive $19.95. 

CoCo XT- RTC: Same as CoCo XT with Real Time Clock/ battery backup: $99.95. Please note you need a 64 K CoCo or CoCo 3 and Multipak for all 
versions 



r 



MONOCHROME 
MONITOR $99 (Cable Extra) 

COMMUNICATIONS 
_ EXTRAVAGANZA 



MAGNAVOX 8CM515 RGB Monitor SO 

i vmwi wa 1 7% (arger screen than standar(J 1 2 „ monjtor& 

RGB TTU RGB Analog Composite inputs 
Green raster display switch Etched faceplate 
ONLY $294.00 Include $12 shipping 
FREE Magnavox cable for COCO 3 with the 
purchase of the monitor 




r 



EPROM 



1) AVATEX 1200e MODEM: Fully Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 Baud, Auto- Dial/ 
Answer/ Redial ( Reg $129.95) 

2) MODEM CABLE (Reg $19.95) 

3) AUTOTERM TERMINAL SOFTWARE 

4) FREE COMPUSERVE OFFER and Access Time 

5) UPS 2nd DAY AIR Shipping. 

only $149,95 

(With AVATEX 1200 he instead of 
AVATEX 1200: $174.95) 

AVATEX 2400: $229.95 




CABLES/INTERFACE 



UPGRADES 



uineiiiduui' din 



512K UPGRADE FOR COCO III 

Fast 120 ns chips Fully tested. Easy installation No 
soldering Comes with complete documentation and 
RAM test program on disk 

ONLY $ CALL 
(With purchase of our 51 2 K RAMDISK program below) 

51 2 K Upgrade without chips $44.95 

512K RAMDISK $24.95 

Have 2 superfast RAMDISKs & a print spooler. 

64 K Upgrade for 26-3 134 A/ B CoCo ll:$39.95 
64 K Upgrade lor CoCo Fs, CoCo I r s with Cat 
#26-3026/7, 26-3134 & 26-3136: $29.95 



RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 

serial port ONLY $18.95 

Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with 

CoCo Max, DS69, eta ONLY $24.95 

15' PRINTER/MODEM EXTENDER CABLE: 

ONLY$16.95 

MODEM CABLE: 4 pin to DB 25: $19.95 
15" MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER 
CABLE: $29.95 

3- POSITION SWITCHER: $37.95 
WICO TRACK BALL: $34.95 

RS HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $1 1.99 
MAGNAVOX 8505/851 5/8CM643 Analog 
RGB Cable: $24.95 

CM-8 RGB Analog Ext. Cable: $19.95 
SONY Monitor Cable: $39.95 

VIDEO DRIVER: For Monochrome or Color 
Specify CoCo 1 or 2. $34.95 

VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference. 
$1 9 95 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 
switch selectable baud rates(300-9600) 
Comes with all cables $44.95 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 

EPROM Programmer for the CoCa 

Lowest Price Anywhere $137.95 

EPROM ERASER (Datarase): Fast erase of 

24/28 pin EPROM& $49.95 

EPROMS: 2764 -$8.00, 271 28 -$9.00 

Call for other EPROMs. 

BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER and ERASER: 

$179.95 

ROMPAK w/Blank PC Board 27xx Series: 
$12.95 



KEYBOARDS/ACCESSORIES 

KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: Our keyboard 
extender cable allows you to move your keyboard 
away from the computer and type with easa You 
can use your existing keyboard with this cable or 
leave your present keyboard intact and use a second 
keyboard A MUST for all CoCo Users Only $39.95. 
Cable with CoCo II keyboard: $49.95 COCO 3 
KEYBOARD (includes FREE FUNCTION KEYS 
software value $19.95) $39.95 
CoCo II keyboard: $19.95 



CHIPS, ETC. 



Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo III) $29.95. 
68B09E Chip: $14.95 ECB Rom 1.1: $29.95. Multi- 
Pak PAL Chip for CoCo 3 $1 9.95 PAL Switcher: Now 

you can switch between the CoCo II and CoCo III 
modes when using the Multi-Pak You need the 
OLDER and NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 
Multipak Only $39.95 With NEW PALChlp$49.95 
5'/ 4 " DS/DD Disks: $0.45 each. 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE Aliorders$50 and afaovejexcept Disk Drives) shipped by UPS2nd Day Air within Continental US 

P 0 Box 2 1 4 at no extra charsa No C0D& We acce P t Visai MC » Amex ' Check or M0, P,ease add $3 0 ° 554 H 

Fairport N. Y. 1 4450 (USA/Canada). Other countries $5.00 S&H. NYS residents please add sales tax 

Phone(7i6) 223-1477 No Free 2nd Day Shipping ior Monitors. 



MaslerC aid 



VISA 




To Place Credit Card Orders; Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9 AM -9 PM EST 7 days a week 

NY, Canada Foreign Orders, Information, Technical Advice and Order Status call 1-716-223-1477 




/ 




KOLORWARE 



I 



BLINDING SPEED 

Max-10 is entirely written in 
machine language. Its speed will 
amsiife you. 



SLEEK 

A lot of word processors "do the 
job", but Max-10 makes word 
processing fun. 




INTUITIVE 

Max-10 is so well designed you 
can use it without reading the 
manual. 



FUN 

Max-10 is actually fun to use, 
which is quite an achievement for 
a word processor. 



FORMAT 

Unlimited choice of right or left 
alignment, centering, and line 
spacing. Screen is updated 
immediately to show exact effects 
of changes. 



PAGE NUMBERING 

On-screen page number helps 
you find your place. 




I PRINTERS 

Max-10 currently works with the following printers: 
DMP-105, DMP-106, DMP-130, Epson MX,RX,FX,LX 
and compatible, Gemini 10 series, CGP-220, and OKI-92. 



SUPERB FILE SUPPORT 

Max-10 menus let you load files 
without typing anything: simply 
point and click. 



FILE COMPATIBILITY 

Max-10 can import files from 
your outmoded word processor. 



FIT IT IN 

Pictures can be shrunk and 
stretched in both directions to fit 
the page and text 



TAB STOPS & MARGINS 

The rulers make tabs and margins 
easy to see, use, and change. 




GRAPHICS 

Mix text and graphics on your 
page. Pictures can be created by 
CoCo Max, the DS-69 Digitizer, 
or any graphics editor. 



File Edit searchn 

(J* If 

■ Him ■ i ■ l.i.i.i 1 1 , i , i 




/WTSIWIG adj. 
You See Is What 

a lake choice if §wi WHwf f 01 



rage: 2 



* 



f 



/ 



CUT AND PASTE 

Move anything (even graphics) 
anywhere in the document 



Max-10 Spi k c ii icattnns: L-ariabFe Un-e length; Hgh^ feft, top and bottom margin*; word 

wrap; undo; page uumbcsringj $£t starting page; left, and fvghX justification, UC< i*o< i n& margin* 
and centering, can be changed anywhero in the- document; variah^ fine J-pocing; 
programmable he-adori and lont^fi (with centering,, graphics etch type ahead, key repeat; k 
click; ten ill up and down: jump to any point In document; ASCII file uoptrt (at conipatibi lily; 
||||( directory; kill files; boldj italic.-, under Nn-e, superscript and subscript type styles; weudwiap 
^pekcut, enpp, mnve; global search and jeplace; paragraph indent, clipboard; merge: ^hew 
fife ion disk); ffee memory display, page count, paragraph count, word count; graph ic* can 
le&ized itnd moved; multiple ionrts; errnf recovery and more! 





BY DAVE STAMP E 

Author of CoCo Max 111, the best 
and most acclaimed CoCo 3 
Graphics Editor. 




GRAPHICS 

Max-10 can import pictures stored in the following 
formats: CoCo Max 1,11,111, MGE, MGF, 5 level DS-69, as 
well as any standard PMODE 4, HSCREEN 2 or 3 picture. 



THE DAZZLING WORD PROCESSOR 

AND DOCUMENT CREATOR FOR THE COCO 3 




Layout Font 



style 



•S Plain Tent 
Bold 



italics 



Underlined * cu 
Superscript cH 
subscript cL 



Ein«lruiniin.-» 



DUUUUUUUU 



wiz-ee-wig) 1. What 
You Get (acronym)- 



i and styles. 



PAGE BREAK 

Dotted lines on the screen show 
where pages begin and end. No 
more surprises at printing time. 



FULL JUSTIFICATION 

Proportionally spaced characters 
let you create text that looks 
really nice. No more squished 
"M"s and oversized T's. 



UNDO 

The undo feature lets you change 
your mind even AFTER you make 
a drastic change, such as a "block 

delete". 




SCROLL BOX 

Point and click for lightning fast 
access to any point in the entire 
document. 



MORE FONTS 

Max-10 features 20 different 
fonts (styles and sizes). It goes 
well beyond your printer's built in 
character sets. 





TOTAL CONTROL 

Any number of available 
character styles and sizes can be 
mixed on the same line. 



HEADERS & FOOTERS 

These are super easy to add and 
edit They can even include 
graphics and pictures! 




Why Max-1 0? 



Most of you already have ai 
"adequate 11 word processor 
so why di d we spend I 
considerable time and cffoH 
$p c reate Max- 10? 
Because you asked for it- ! 
CoCo Maa made graphic j 
lllatiori fun. It Is fast and ■ 
feature loaded, yet amazingly 
easy to use. You wanted your 
word processor to be as 
friendly, forgiving, and 
amazing a$ CoCo Max. We 
couldn't do it on the CoCo 
or 2, but with the advanced 
CoCo B graphics,, the ward 
processor you £fways wanted 
b here: Max-10 ^Bl 
Max-10 is not just a word 
processor, It gives you letter 
styles and sizes that your 
printer doesn't have. It lets 
you mix graphics and pictures 
m your text for a profession a I | 
looking output 

Additionally, the screen shows 
exactly what your output will 
look fike. Text is in the $mm 
and style that it will print. 
P^ge breaks, line length am' 
||||fcing are clearly show/n. Ne 
more hoping that l.he text will 
fit, no more guessing at type 
styles, no more messing with 
printer codes, no more cryptic 
commands to mer^on'^e^ and 
best of all, the undo feature 
lets you make a mistake arid 
still recover your text. 
Max- 10 myites typing ^ 
|||d you'll fove the new things 
you can do with the best word 
processor ever crested for the 

CoCo. Ijlli * 

PRICE: $79,95 




CoCo Max !!1 OWNERS 

If you already own CoCo Max Hi. 
deduct £10 from your order. 



SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS 

Any CoCo 3 (1 28K or 51 2 K) with at least 1 Disk Drive. 
Mouse or joystick. 
Monochrome, RGB or Composite monitor. 




COLORWARl 



A division of Sigma Industries. Inc 



^ TO ORDER 

NJ^Call (203) 656-1 806 9 to 5 Eastern time 

Vtu or Mastercard accepted. CO.D orders S3 extra 
Send check or MX), to: Cofaware, 242-W Wed Ave, Daren CT 06820 
Add $3 per order for sapping C$5 to Canada, 1 0% to oversea}. 
are9dent$add75%$a)estax 



r- — 

1 Feature 



Mellow music to set the mood 



J 1,^1 




9 




L 





By Val Burke 



here are blues for when you're happy, blues for 
when you're sad, blues for when you're good, 
blues for when you're bad — blues are written 
for just about every event in life. I decided to write 
Co Co Blues for all those CoCo enthusiasts who have 
spent many long hours, typing in and debugging 
programs and who need a little soothing blues music to 
help them relax after one of "those" days with the computer. 

The program plays a laid-back, 12-bar blues with some 
mellow graphics pizazz added for good measure. As simple 
as the music may sound, it's quite unique. 

When you LIST the program you will notice that I used 
T3 as the tempo at which Co Co Blues is played. In reality 
the tempo is somewhere between T2 and T3. T2 would have 
made the music sound like a funeral march, while T3 would 
have made it lose its "funky, down-home" feeling. 

It took me long, hard hours to figure out a scenario that 
would make CoCo Blues rhythmically correct. I had to use 
P commands all through the program to slow it down, and 
one of the lines even contains L128 commands. 

After a hectic day on the CoCo keyboard, there's no need 
to turn on your stereo to hear some soothing music. Just 
turn your monitor volume down low, sit back, relax and 
enjoy CoCo Blues, 

( Questions or comments regarding this program may be 
directed to the author at P. O. Box 86, Red Oak, GA 30272. 
Please enclose an SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



Val Burke, a professional musician who owns a CoCo 2 and 
lives in Red Oak, Georgia, enjoys writing computer 
programs in his spare time. 



20 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



The Amazing 4-B(/s\^ 




Plug into the future 

With the A- BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A- BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom' 1 system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching: 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards, The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
up to 25 cards in any 



An A-BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter in foreground 

The A-BUS system works with the original CoCo, 
the CoCo 2 and the CoCo 3. 

About the A-BUS system: 

• All the A-BUS cards are. very easy to use with any language that can, 
read or write to:a,Port or Memory. In BASIC ( use lN,P ancl:OUT(orPEEK an(i 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Cdfoput&s) \ ; 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to 2$ 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers: 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-1 23) and 
detailed manuals {including schematics and programming examples). 



v. x t 



The 



SMSiOnwsln over 60 countries). 



able for $10, 



RE-140: $1 29 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts, SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LEO'S show status. Easy fd.use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC), Card address is jumper selectable. 

Reed Relay Card re-156: $99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low leVei^hals- 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card A0-142;$129 

Eight analog inputs, 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 100V by adding a 
resistor. 8 bit resolution (20mV), Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-i 46; $139 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%, Input range is — 4V to 
-MV. Resolution: 1 millivolt The on board amplifier boosts Signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts, Conversion time is 1 30ms. Ideal for thermocouple^ 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE- "1 56 card) 

Digital input Card tN-i4i:$59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off devices, such as switches, thermostats, ataim loops, etc. Vo your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC IMP {or PEEK), •., 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-i48:$65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for. input, latched output, strobed output, 
Strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses (he 8255 A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cl-i44: $89 

Rbwerfuf cfock/catendar with: battery backup fOr Time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built in alarm relay, led and buzzer; timing to 1 /1 00 
second. Easy to use decimal format Lithium batfery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph-145:$79 

Each tone is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc, 

52: $15 




CM 44, 




HE-MO 




IN-141 



it 



41 A A 



A-BUS Prototyping Card pr-is 

3% by 4te ifl with power and ground bus, fits up to 10 J;Q.s 




Add S3. 00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC, checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT& NY residents add sates tax. 
C.O.D. add S3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is $5 
Overseas add 10% 



' I I 1 1 ? r / I r " 




mmt 



AO- 




3 Sigma Industries Company 



ALPHA • 

24 2- W West Avenue, Darren, CT08B20 




Smart Stepper Controller sc-i49:$299 

World's finest stepper controller On board microprocessor controls 4 
. hiptofs simultaneously. Incredibly; it acceptspfain English commands like 
"■'Move arm 10.2 inches teff. Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory. For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute}, ramping, speed, step type (half, full, wave), 
scale factor, units^olding power, etc. Many inputs: 8 limit & "waif until" 
switches, panic button, etc, On the f!y reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
, bQar(j drivers{35QmA)fpr smail steppers (MCM03). Send for SOt 49 flyer. 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-121: $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions, 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $83 

Boost controller drive to S amps per phase. Fortwo motors (eight drlver$)> 
Breakout Board Option BB-122: $19 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable endswith screw terminal board, 

Stepper Motor Driver st-i43: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with. them. Each card 
drives two stepper motors (12V, bidirectional 4 phase, 350mA per phase). 
Special Package: 2motofS(MO-103)4-ST-143: PA-181 : $99 

Stepper Motors mo-i o3: $i5or4for*39 

Pancake type, iVk n dia, ft' 1 shaft. 7.5 a /step. 4 phase bidirectional, 300 
step/sec, 1 2V, 36 ohm, bipolar, 5 oz-in torque, same as AirpaxK8270l 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter, 4 Channel 
Pigital to Analog converter, Goilnter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT, AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot. AR-133...$69 

Tandy 1000,1 Q00 EX& SX 1 200, 3000. Usesoneshort slot, AR43&.S69 
Apple II, lie. uses any slot, 134. ..$49: 

TRS-80 Model 102, 200 Plugs into 40 pift "system bus" AR-13069 

Model 1 00,Uses4O pin socket (Socket is duplicated on adapter). AR-1 35. .$69 

TRS-80 Mod.3,4,4 D. Fits 50 pin bits. (With hard disk; use Y-catfe)- AR-132..$49 

TRS^SO Model 4P. includesextracable. (50 pin bus te recessed). AR-137.J&62 

TRS-80 Model I. Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or E/l. ArV13L..$39 

; Color Computers (Tandy).Fits ROM slot. Multipak. or Y-cahle AR-138...S49 ' 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft, so cond.) ca-163: $24 

Connects tne A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard. 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards; CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i 20: $99 

Each Motherboard holds five A*8US cards. A.sixth Connector allows a 
y sebdhd Motherboard to be added WWm&-$m conhectiog cable CA* 
161 . $1 2). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a sin§(e A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and Gard guides included, 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Mutti-pak 



Technical info; (203) 656-1 806 

^M 3 ^ 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: ; (203) 348-9436 



■Mlines open w^^^'^B^^m$ 




C 



oco 




- FREE DEMO DISK 

- FREE COCOSHOW PROGRAM 

- FREE EXTRA FONTS DISK 





ii 



must be the most enjoyable, useful, 
and awesome program you've ever 

seen or your money back. 



CALL NOW TOLL FREE 1 -800 221 



Morv 
9 to 5 EST 



Instantly, 
no questions asked. 



AND LET THE FUN BEGIN 



A FEW QUOTES : 



An outstanding 



program 
CoCo 



that 

,nto a 



, There is absolute 

l elUonthe^ 
that is comparable 



!2^?^~te r ' wwe ^ 1 a computer l ever 
Family Computing 



y nothing 
Computer 
„e to CoCo 
and ease of use 



had. 



computer i - 
Computerware Bevies 



and again 



as 



anytWno »»ke* on t slng \e 

, screen. T Jf^ e rerT , e rnber. Even 
1 command to rem* draW mg . 
a person who has no te a 
SSwty like, myse f ca ; n nt 
presentable picwj en]oym9 I 

* oU L s l iSnas from silly to the 
all the things > v g 

sen0US .nce Buy it, you^ont 

be sorry. 
« fl f>9 Express^ 



Note: There is only one CoCo /Wax ///. Do not confuse lcolqrware 's CoCo Max with similar sounding imitations. 



I 





SP 



e^ 1 




6 




The best program ever written for the Color Computer" 



That's how thousands of enthusiastic users rated 
theCoCoMaxll drawing program. With CoCo Max 
III we are ready to amaze them again. Instead of 
"patching" CoCo Max II, we rewrote it from scratch 
to take advantage of the CoCo Max III hardware. 
The results will knock your socks off ! Below is a 
brief list of some of the new features, but some, 
such asanimation, color sequencing, ortheslide 
show, have to be seen. Send for the Demo Disk, and 
see for yourself. 

Everybody's favorite drawing package features: 

- A 50% larger editing window. - Zoom area 400% 
larger. - New drawing tools; rays, 3D cubes, arcs,... - 
New editing tools: shadow,text size,... Rotate by 1.5° 
steps - Select any 1 6 of the 64 possible colors (all 64 
colors displayed at once!) - Powerful color mix: additive, 
subtractive, overlay,.., - Full color editing of patterns 
and color changing patterns. - Incredible special eff- 
ects with color cycling up to 8 colors with variable 
speed, -Animation adds the dimension of motion to 
your image. (Must be seen.) - Sophisticated data com- 
pression saves up to 70% of disk space when saving 
pictures. 

In addition, there are dozens of enhancements to the 
multitude of features that made CoCo Max 1 1 a best seller. 

More about CoCo Max III 

• CoCo Max HI is not an upgrade of CoCo Max II, It is entirely 
rewritten to take advantage of the new CoCo 3 hardware 
(More memory, resolution, colors, speed,...) 

• The new CoCo Max HI Hi^Res Interface and the CoCo Max II 
Hi-Res Pack are not interchangable. 

• The new interface plugs into the joystick connector. 

• The CoCo Max II! disk is not copy protected. 

• CoCo Max III only works with the CoCo 3. 

• A Y-Cable or Multi-pak is not necessary. 

• Colors are printed in five shades of gray. 

• CoCo Max III can read CoCo Max II pictures. 



Note: CoCo Max II (for the CoCo 2) is still available on disk 
($79.95). CoCo Max I is still available on tape ($69.95). For 
details, refer to our double page ad in any Rainbow from 
January '86 to July '87 



Toll Free operators are for orders only, If you need precise answers, call 
Eh b tech One. (Detaitled CoCo Max specs are included with the Demo Disk.) 



Add $3.00 par orrinr for shipping, 
Vi», MC, chocks, M.O. welcome. 
CT residents idd sites lex. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
Canads: shipping Is $5 
Uuariau add 10% 



Technical info: (203) 656-1 806 

ft? 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



Jfr Beware ot inferior imitations that DO NOT include a Hi-Res Interface 
or charae extra tor each utility. 



File Edit Options colors Font Size Style 



BSJH 



^ ^^^^^^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^^j^^^ 





Imagine this picture in sixteen colors ! 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Us* CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with it, 
we will refund every penny. 




System Requirements: 

Any CoCo 3 disk system with a Joystick or a Mouse. 

We apologize to tape users, CoCo Max III needs the flexibility of a disfcf 

The CoCo Wax III system includes: • The special Hi-Res 
interface (foryour mouse orjoystick) • TheCoCo Maxltl disk • Many 
utilities: (Toconvert Max it pictures, Max colors. eta) • Adetailled User's 

Manual. Complete system; nothing else to buy CoCo Max HI : $79,95* 



WITH COUPON ONLY 



|" free" demo disk 

Name 

Street 




City 
State Zip 

Printer used: 



Please include $2 to help defray Processing and Shipping 
costs. (Check, Money Order, etc. Sorry, no COD or Credit 
Cards). Coupon (or copy) must be mailled to: 



I 
I 
I 
I 

! 

I 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc. 



COLORWARE 

242- W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 




190 120 

300 184 

560 163 

END 236 



The listing: COCOBLUZ 

1 '########################## 

2 '# COCO BLUES # 

3 '# BY # 

4 •# VAL BURKE # 

5 '########################## 

10 FOR S=l TO 20 STEP 5 

20 PMODE 3,1: PCLS4 : SCREEN 1,0 

3)3 DRAW"C2BM60,8R32D8L24D24R24D8 

L32U40" 

40 PAINT(64,24) ,3,2 

5J3 DRAW I, C2BM100,28R24D20L24U20BR 

8BD8R8D4L8U4" 

60 PAINT (1/34, 36) ,3,2 

7/3 DRAW"C2BM132,8R32D8L24D24R24D 
8L32U40" 

8/3 PAINT(136,28) ,3,2 

90 DRAW"C2BM172,28R24D20L24U20BR 

8BD8R8D4L8U4" 

1/30 PAINT (176, 36) ,3,2 

110 DRAW"C2BM68,56R12F4D4G4F4D4G 
4L12U24" 

120 DRAW"C2BM92,88D24R16 M 

130 DRAW"C2BM120,56D20F4R8E4U20" 

140 DRAW ,I C2BM150,88R16BL16D12R10 

BL10D12R16" 

150 DRAW"C2BM188,56L12G4D4F4R12F 
4D2G4L12" 

160* FOR P=lTO 400: NEXT P 

170 PLAY "O4T60L8BL8CL8EL8 GL8 BL8 D 

" : NEXT S 

180 DRAW"C2BM28,144D8E4H4BF4R132 
F8D8G8L96H8U8E12R30U6L3BR3R3BL3D 
6R12U6L3 BR3R3 BL3 D6R12U6L3 BR3R3 BL 

3D6R84E4U1E4U1E4U1E4D36H4U1H4U1H 
4U1H2L2U1" 

190 PAINT (128, 96) ,3,2 

200 PAINT(76,68) ,3,2 

210 PAINT (2 16, 144) ,3,2 

220 PAINT (116, 160) ,3,2 

230 PAINT(112,38) ,3,2 

240 PAINT (184, 38) ,3,2 

250 A$="03T3L8.EL16GP32L16AP8L64 

FL64G-L8L2GP8L8 . A04L16CP32L16DP8 

03L64B-L64B04L8L4CP803L16AP8L2 . 8 

P8P401L16BP3202L16CP801L16CP32L4 

CP32L4GP32L8L4G-P1603L8.A04L16CP 

32L16DP803L64B-L64B04L4.CP32P403 

L8.A04L16CP32L16DP803L64B-L64B04 

L8L4C03P8L16AP8L1G" 

260 B$="01T3P8L16BP3202L16CP801L 

16CP32L4B-P32L16AP32L16EP32L16CP 



32L4AP3203L8 . B04L16DP32L16EP8L64 
CL64C+L2DP803L8 . A04L16CP32L16DP8 
03L64B-L64B04L8L4C03P8L16AP8L1GP 
8P16P3201L16GP8GP32L4AP32L4B-P32 
L4B" 

270 C$="XA$;XB$;XA$;XB$; tt 
280 PLAY C$ 

290 PLAY"04T3L8CP16L8DP16L8D+P16 
L8EP16L8FP16L8F+P32L8GP16L16EP32 
L8FP16L16GL64DL64D+L8EL16CP1603L 
8GP16L8FP16L8EP16L804C03P16L2 . B- 
P2P4P8P1605L64C04L64BL64AL64GL64 
FL64EL64DL64C03L64BL64AL64GL64FL 
64EL64DL64C" 

300 PLAY"04T3L64CL64C+L16DP8L640 
3B-L64B04L16C03P8L16FP16L8AP1604 
L16CP8L128CL128DL16E-L128GL128C+ 
L16DL12803B-L128B04L16C03P4P4L8A 
P16L1G" 

310 PLAY"03T3P1P4P8L16GL16B04L16 

CL16C+L16DL16D+L16EL16FL16F+L16G 

L16EL16FL16GL128DL128E-L12EL16CO 

3 L16GL1 6G+L1 6 A04 L16F03 LI 6 AL1 6A-L 

16G04L16E-03L16GL16G-L16F04L16DO 

3L16FL16EL16E-04L16C03L16AP16L1. 

GP2P4P16" 

320 POKE 65495,0 

330 FOR B=l TO 20 STEP 5 

340 PLAY"O3T70L8CL8EL8GL8B-L8O4E 

350 
360 
370 
380 
390 
400 
410 
420 
430 
440 
450 
460 
470 
480 
490 
500 
510 
520 
530 
540 
550 
560 
570 
580 
590 
600 
610 
620 
630 



PCLS 

PMODE 3,1:PCLS7:SCREEN1,1 
COLOR 5,7 



LINE (16, 16) - 
LINE- (48, 52 
LINE- (64, 80 
LINE- (80, 16 
LINE- (64, 16 
LINE- (56, 3 6 
LINE- (48, 32 
LINE- (40, 36 
LINE- (32, 16 
LINE- (16, 16 
PAINT (48, 40 
LINE (88, 16) - 
LINE (104, 32 
PAINT (98, 48 
LINE (144,16 
LINE- (176, 52 
LINE- (192 , 80 
LINE- (208, 16 
LINE- (192, 16 
LINE- (184, 3 6 
LINE- (1*76, 32 

LINE- (168 , 36 
LINE- (160 , 16 
LINE- (144 , 16 
PAINT(176,42 



32,80) ,PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
8,5 

136,80) ,PSET,B 
-(120,64) ,PSET,B 
8,5 

-(160,80) ,PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
PSET 
8,5 



DRAW"C5BM216,16D48F4E4U48L8B 



L 



24 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



D56R8D8L8U8" 

640 PAINT (220, 40) ,5,5 

650 PAINT(220,76) ,5,5 

660 DRAW"C5BM232,16D48F4E4U48L8B 

D56R8D8L8U8" 

670 PAINT(236,40) ,5,5 

680 PAINT (236 ,76) ,5,5 

690 DRAW"C5BM16, 112D64R48U16L32U 

32R32U16L48" 

700 PAINT (24, 144) ,6,5 

710 LINE(72,144)-(120,176) ,PSET, 
B 

720 LINE(88,160)-(104,164) ,PSET, 
B 

730 PAINT(80,160) ,6,5 

740 DRAW"C5BM136,112D64R48U16L32 

U32R32U16L48" 

750 PAINT(144,140) ,6,5 

760 LINE (192, 144) -(240, 176) ,PSET 

,B 

770 LINE (208, 160) -(224, 164) ,PSET 
,B 

780 PAINT (200 , 160) ,6,5 

790 FOR P= 1TO 700: NEXT P 

800 NEXT B 

810 POKE 65494,0 

820 GOTO 250 




VIP Integrated Library 

The VIP Integrated Library combines all six popular VIP application programs 
VIP Writer*, Speller, Calc, Database, Terminal and Disk-Zap - into one pro- 
gram on one disk. The program is called VIP Desktop. From the desktop you have 
instant access to word processing with a spelling checker always in attendance, 
data management with mail-merge, spreadsheet financial analysis, telecommu- 
nications and disk maintenance. Just move the hand to the volume on the book- 
shelf and the application is there. 64K req'd. UNPROTECTED DISK $149.95 



* CoCo 3 owners: Purchase the VIP Integrated Library /WE (Writer Enhanced) 
which has VIP Writer 111 in place of VIP Writer. UNPROTECTED DISK $159,95 




VIP Database III 

DATABASE • MAILMERGE • PRINT SPOOLER 

The VIP Database III features selectable screencjsplays of 40, 64 or 80 

characters by 24 lines with choice of 64 foregro^^id background colors 
for maximum utility. It uses the CoC&3's t)|*^TWfft v and dibble clock 
speed to be the FASTEST databasoAswll^J ^plbase li nil handle 
as many records as will fit 0 A n ^^^k v ^ ,s structufiJjgA simple and 
easy to understand merws^^wr^Ojll PJSgpti^^^^to^tion. 

Your data is^tdfced j(ffi%?j%£^ ur own ^ e ^ffi^w^^^ indexed 
for speeded efficira^uflfsort of r§a$tels iSPWwbr easy listing of 
names, times, adjlrl&es etc., in ascenma or^ecending alphabetic or 
numericai^feJ^cordscanb^^rched™&pecilicentries, using multiple 
search criteria. With Datable a^ajl-merge you may also combine files, 
sort and print mailina lisffi^MTOrtetters, address envelopes - the list is 
endless. I^^y^^mf^^^ a 9 e even performs arithmetic operations 
and updat^^h^S|e.^vlP Database III also has a print spooler and 
report generl|k vSfunlimited print format capabilities including embed- 
able controlg^s for use with all printers UNPROTECTED DISK $69.95 



VIP Database owners: Upgrade to the VIP Database 
for $39.95. Send original disk. Include $3 shipping. 




VIP Database 



"ONE OF THE BEST" JULY 1984 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Database has all the features of VIP Database III except the screen 
widths are 51, 64 & 85. Screen colors are black, green and white, double 
speed is not supported, Spooler is unavailable. Even so, VIP Database is 
the fastest database for the CoCo 1 & 2! UNPROTECTED DISK $49.95 



VIP Calc 



"MORE USEABLE FEATURES"-Feb 1985 "Rainbow' 

Now every CoCo owner has access to a calculating and planning tool better 

than VisiCalc™, containing all its features and commands and then some. 
VIP Calc displays 32, 51 , 64 or 85 characters by 21 or 24 lines right on the 
screen. VIP Calc allows up to a 33K worksheet with up to 512 columns by 
1024 rows! In addition, VIP calc has multiple windows which allow you to 
compare and contrast results of changes. Other features include 16 DIGIT 
PRECISION • trig, functions • averaging • algebraic functions • column and 
row ascending or descending SORTS • locate formulas or titles in cells • 
block move and replicate • global or local column width • limitless 
programmable functions • works with any printer, Embed printer control 
codes for customized printing. Combine spreadsheet tables with VI P Writer 
documents to create ledgers, projections, statistical and financial budgets 
and reports. Requires 64K. UNPROTECTED DISK $59.95 

VIP Terminal 



RATED BEST IN JANUARY 1984 "RAINBOW" 

For your important communications needs you've got to go beyond software 

that only lets you chat. You need a smart terminal so that you can send and 
receive programs and messages and print them! The VIP Terminal features 
32, 51 , 64 or 85 characters by 21 or 24 lines on the screen and has a 43K 
byte buffer to store information. UNPROTECTED DISK $39.95 

VIP Disk-ZAP 

RAVED ABOUT IN THE APRIL 1983 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Disk-Zap is the ultimate repair utility for simple and quick repair of most 
disk errors. Designed with the non-programmer in mind, the VI P Disk-Zap will 
let you retrieve all types of bashed files, BASIC and ML programs. The 50 
page tutorial makes the novice an expert. UNPROTECTED DISK $24.95 



rim 



checks allow 3 weeis for defiyertfW 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 25 



SD Enterprises 

(503) 663-2865 P. O. Box 1233. Gresham, Or. 97030 
Please add $4 for shipping ViP Library. COD orders add an additional $2.25. 
Personal checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. All other orders shipped the same day. 



1 Feature 



16K ECB 




Calculate easy monthly payments to 
meet your financial needs 







By Larry IP. Pittman 




jf^i ollege Costs is designed to tell 
( f you the amount of money you 
need to invest monthly to meet 
your goal for college costs for your 
children. As my older children ap- 
proach college, this has become more of 
a priority for me. 

The program first asks you to enter 
the following information before calcu- 
lations are performed: 

1) the number of children you plan to 
send to college and their names 

2) the amount of money you would 
like to have available for each child 
at the beginning of the school year 

3) your guess on the annual inflation 
rate 

4) the amount of interest you expect 
to get on your money 

5) the current month and year 

The program also asks for additional 
information about each child: the year 
that child will begin college and the 
amount of money you have available 
now to invest for that child's education. 

To arrive at its answers, College Costs 
uses a few standard economics formulas 
dealing with present and future values 
of money. For instance, if you have a 
certain amount of money to invest (P) 
and a certain interest rate (i) for a given 
length of time (n), then the amount of 
money you will have at the end of that 
time (F) can be calculated by the 
following formula: 



F = P (1 + i) n 

This formula is used in 
the program to determine 
the effects oi inflation on 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



VIP Writer III Summer SPECIAL! 



"...High powered software for the CoCo 3. ..Fast, easy to use.. .a true 
bargain for the serious CoCo user." — Ted Paul 



VIP Writer HI vs The Competition 

VIP Writer has ALWAYS led the pack with features and now VIP Writer III 
still leads the way! The chart below illustrates this fact. Telewriter 128 only 
gives you 48K for text. Why is it called Telewriter 128? Word power 3 gives 
only 72K! Where's the rest? VIP Writer III makes use of over 106K! VIP 
Writer III is the ONLY CoCo 3 WORD PROCESSOR WORTHY of it's name! 



WORD PROCESSOR COMPARISON CHART 


CoCo3 with 128K 


VIP Writer ffl 


Telewriter 128 


Word Power 3 


Text Storage 


OVER 4^,000 


48,000 


72,000 


Print Spooler 


YES 57,000 


NONE 


NONE 


Total Storage 


106,000 


48,000 


72,000 


Spelling Checker 


VIP Speller 


NONE 


FREE WARE 


RGB HD Support 


100% 


NONE 


NONE 


Screen Display 


32/40/64/80 


40/80 


6o 



SCREEN DISPLAY OPTIONS 

As the chart above shows - VIP Writer III offers more screen width options - 
all with 24 lines and actual lower case letters using the CoCo 3s hardware 
display! You can choose fore and background colors from up to 64 different 
hues. Color can be turned ON or OFF for the best possible display using a 
color or monochrome monitor or TV set. VIP Writer III has a built in on-line 
context sensitive help facility which displays command usage in easy to read 
colored windows. VIP Writer III also runs at double clock speed and is FAST! 

TEXT FILE STORAGE 

VIP Writer III creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all other VIP 
Programs as well as other programs which use ASCII file format. You can use 
VIP Writer III to even create BASIC programs! There is a 49K text buffer 
and disk or cassette file linking allowing virtually unlimited text space. VIP 
Writer III works with up to four disk drives and lets you display disk 
directories and free space as well as rename or kill disk files. In addition VIP 
Writer III is 100% compatible with the RGB Computer Systems HARD DISK. 

EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer III has a full featured screen editor which can be used to edit text 
with lines up to 240 characters long with or without automatic word wrap 
around. You can select type-over mode or insert mode. There is even an 
OOPS command to recall a cleared text buffer. Other editing features 
include: Type-ahead, typamatic key repeat and key beep for flawless text 
entry, end of line bell, full four way cursor control with scrolling, top of 
textfile, bottom of textfile, page up, page down, top of screen, bottom of 
screen, beginning of line, end of line, left one word, right one word, DELETE 
character, to beginning or end of line, word to the left or right, or entire line, 
INSERT character or line, LOCATE and/or CHANGE or DELETE single or 
multiple occurrence using wildcards, BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to 
TEN simultaneous block manipulations, TAB key and programmable tab stops, 
word count, line restore, three PROGRAMMABLE FUNCTIONS to perform 
tasks such as auto column creation and disk file linking for continuous printing. 

TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text tor you or allows you to format 
your text in any way you wish. You can change the top, bottom, (eft or right 
margin and page length. You can set your text flush left, center or flush 
right. You can turn right hand justification on or off. You can have headers, 
footers, page numbers and TWO auxiliary lines which can appear on odd, even 
or all pages. You can also select the line on which they appear! You can even 
change the line spacing! Parameters can be altered ANYWHERE within text. 

PREVIEW PRINT WINDOW 

The VIP Writer III features a paper saving format window which allows you to 
preview your document BEFORE PRINTING IT! You are able to see centered 
text, margins, page breaks, orphan lines etc. This makes hyphenation a snap! 



PRINTING 

VIP Writer III prints TWICE as fast as any other CoCo word processor! VIP 
Writer III supports most any printer serial or parallel using the parallel 
interface described in Nov-Dec. '87 RAINBOW magazine, or ANY external 
serial to parallel Interface, and gives you the ability to select baud rates from 
110 to 19,200. You are able to imbed printer control codes anywhere in your 
text file EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT! VIP Writer III also has twenty 
PROGRAMMABLE PRINTER SEQUENCES which allow you to easily control 
all of your printers capabilities such as underline, bold, italics, superscript 
and subscript using simple keystrokes. Additional printer features include: 
single sheet pause, print pause, word length and line feed selection. 

PRINT SPOOLING 

VIP Writer III incorporates a built in print spooler with a 57,000 character 
buffer which allows you to print one document WHILE you are editing another. 
You donl have to wait until your printer is done before starting another job! 

DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer III is supplied with a 125 page instruction manual which is well 
written and includes many examples. The manual has a tutorial and glossary of 
terms for the beginner as well as a complete index! VIP Writer Hi includes 
VIP Speller at NO ADDfTfONAL COST. UNPROTECTED DISK $79.95 
Cassette version does not include VIP Speller. TAPE $59.95 



VIP Writer owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer III Disk for $49.95 or Tape| 
for $39.95. Send original disk or tape. Include $3 shipping. 



VIP Writer THE ORIGINAL 

VIP Writer is also available for CoCo 1 and 2 owners and has all the features 
found in the VIP Writer III including VIP Speller except for the following: The 
screen display is 32, 51, 64 or 85 columns by 21 or 24 rows. Screen colors 
are green, black or white. Help is not presented in colored windows. Double 
dock speed is not supported. Parallel printer interface is not supported. 
Print spooler is not available. Hard disk is not supported. Even so, VIP 
Writer still out-features the rest! It's a CoCo 1 or 2 owners best choice in 
word processors. Includes VIP Speller. UNPROTECTED DISK $69.95 
Cassette version does not include VIP Speller. TAPE $49.95 

VIP Speller spell checker 

VIP Speller works with ANY ASCII file created by most popular word 
processors. It automatically checks text files for words to be corrected, 
marked for special attention or even added to the dictionary. You can even 
view the misspelled word in context! VIP Speller comes with a specially 
edited 50,000 word dictionary, and words can be added to or deleted from 
the dictionary or you can create your own. UNPROTECTED DISK $34.95 

It's Word Processor Trade In Time 

For a limited time you can trade in your old software for the VIP Writer I or 
III and get the VIP Speller FREE! Send in your old disk or tape and manual. 
VIP Writer tape $34.95, disk $49.95. VIP Writer 111 tape $44.95, disk 
$59.95. Include $3 S/H. Tapes do not include VIP Speller. Expires 8/31/88 

See our other ads for more VIP Products! 

SID Enteiripki[SIRS 

©(503) 663-2865 ^POB 1233 Gresham. OR 97030 

Please add $3 for shipping and handling. COD 
orders add an additional $2.25. Checks allow 3 
weeks for delivery. All other orders are shipped 
the same day. 

TSrSr 126 S a tadamark d Cofinii&c. Wad Power 3 s a ladsmai* of Moocom Software 



your money. In other words, the 
amount of money you believe you need 
now must be adjusted for inflation so 
that you will have the proper amount 
when college time finally arrives. Here 
is the other main formula the program 
uses: 

fi = F( i ' ((1 + i) n - 1)) 

This formula calculates the unknown 
A, which represents the monthly (or 
other periodic) amount that is required 
if a future needed amount (F) at a given 
interest rate (i) is known. 

The program always assumes that the 
payout of money will be required in 
September of each school year. Al- 
though money is usually expended 
throughout the school year, I felt this 
was a conservative approach. It also 



assumes that each child will attend a 
four-year college. You may adjust it to 
allow for different lengths of time by 
changing Line 710. For a five-year 
program, change Line 710 to the follow- 
ing: 

F0RX=1TD4 

In other words, this FDR-NEXT loop 
should be repeated one less time than 
the total years of college to be attended. 

After the initial calculation, the 
program offers you the opportunity to 
revise either the inflation rate, the 
interest rate, or the amount of money 
required each year. This can be used to 
see what happens to your monthly 
payment as these variables are changed. 
It is certainly possible that your children 
may go to schools that cost vastly 



different amounts. If so, then it would 
be wise to enter each child separately. 

College Costs is designed to work 
with a CoCo 1, 2 or 3. Line 180 checks 
to see if your computer is a CoCo 3. If 
it is, then the graphics are adjusted 
throughout the program. I did this 
because I much prefer having the 40- 
column screen for text. By using this 
check, the program still runs fine on a 
CoCo 1 or 2, but will give you improved 
text when or if you decide to purchase 
a CoCo 3. If you use a CoCo 3 but prefer 
that this program run in the 32-column 
mode, simply delete lines 160 through 
210. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 11406 Majorca Place, Fenton, 
MI 48430. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



Him 



Ti«f 



240 21 

350 30 

460 149 

590 1 

770 2 



930 165 

1050 30 

1180 50 

END 229 



The listing: COLLEGE 



f H « 



SAVING FOR COLLEGE 

COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 

LARRY P PITTMAN 
11406 MAJORCA PL. 

, m 48 



I 

■yj 

160 ' 
170 « 

180 IFPEEK ( &HF6 3 6) »15THENCO*3 : WI 
DTH40 : PALETTE0 , 0 : PALETTE 8 , 63:CLS 
1 : ELSEGOTO220 : ' CHECK IF COCO 3 
190 PRINT' l *********** ; ***COLLEGE 
COSTS****** ***** * * " : PRINT : PRINT : 

print" this program will calculat 
e your monthlycosts that you nee 
d to save for your children f 
or college. you first need to"; 
200 print "enter some general inf 

ORMATION AND THEN SOME SPECIFIC 
INFORMATION ABOUT EACH CHILD. 
" : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT " " ; 
210 GOTO250 

220 CLS : PRINT *********** COLLEGE 
COSTS*********"; PRINTrPRINT "THIS 

WJLL CALCULATE YOURMONT 
COSTS THAT YOU NEED TO SAVE 
FOR YOUR CHILDREN FOR COLL 
EGE. YOU FIRST NEED TO" 
230 PRINT "ENTER SOME GENERAL INF 
ORMATION AND THEN SOME SPECIFIC 



INFORMATION ABOUT EACH 

CHILD." 
240 PRINT: PRINT 

250 PRINT" PRESS ANY KEY TO B 
EGIN" 

260 FORX= 1TO 200 : NEXT : SOUND 1 50 , 2 
270 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=""THEN270 
280 CLS : IFCO=3THENPRINT : PRINT 
290 PRINT" ENTER THE NUMBER OF CH 
ILDREN" ; 

300 IFCO*3THEN PRINT" YOU WISH T 
OPUT THROUGH COLLEGE" : PRINT : ELSE 
PRINT" YOU WISH TO PUT THROUG 
W COLLEGE": PRINT 
310 SOUND150 , 2 : LINEINPUT" 

";NC$:NC=VAL(NC$) : 1 NC-NUM 
BER OF CHILDREN (TEN MAX W/O ADD 
ING DIMENSION STATEMENTS) 
320 IF NC«1THENPRINT: PRINT "WHAT 
IS HIS/HER NAME?":GOTO340 
330 PRINT: PRINT "WHAT ARE THEIR N 
AMES?" 

3 40 FORX^ITONC: SOUND150 , 2 : LINEIN 
PUT" " ; NM$ ( X ) : NEXT : « NM$ ( X) »N 

AME OF CHILD (REN) 

3 50 PRINT : SOUND150, 2 : IFCO=3THENP 

RINT "ENTER WHAT YOU EXPECT THE A 

VERAGE INFLATION RATE TO B 

E (%):"; :ELSEPRINT"ENTER WHAT Y 
OU EXPECT THE AVERAGE INFL 

AT I ON RATE TO BE (%) : "; 

360 LINEINPUT" " ; IR$ : IR=>VAL ( IR$ ) 

/100 : 1 IR=INFLATION RATE 

370 PRINT : SOUND 150 , 2 : PRINT "ENTER 

WHAT INTEREST RATE YOU": PRINT "B 

ELI EVE YOU COULD GET FOR" : LINEIN 

PUT " YOUR MONEY ( % ) : " ; IT $ : IT=VAL 

( IT$ ) / 100 : • IT«INVESTMENT RATE 

3 80 PRINT t SC3UND150/2 : IFCO=3THENP 

RINT" ENTER THE AMOUNT OF MONEY Y 



JOS. 



_._ _ ' 



28 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



For over 5 years now, Telewriter has been 
the #1 Color Computer word processor, 
both in popularity and in performance. 
Telewriter's near perfect mix of sophisti- 
cated professional features and a very natu- 
ral user interface, has earned it the highest 
praise in numerous magazines, and an in- 
tensely loyal following among tens of thou- 
sands of Color Computer users all over the 
world. 



HISTORY 



Throughout the history of the Color Com- 
puter, Telewriter has pioneered software 
breakthroughs that set the standards. 

In 1981, it was Telewriter 1.0 that first took 
the Color Computer's inadequate 32X16 all- 
uppercase display, and replaced it with a 
graphics-based 51X24 upper and lowercase 
display. 

A few years later, Telewriter-64 added high 
density 64X24 and 85X24 displays and ac- 
cess to the full 64K of the newer Color 
Computers. 



THE NF.W AGE 



Today, Telewriter-64 is recognized as the 
standard Color Computer word processor. It 
runs on all Tandy Color Computers — from 
the original Color Computer 1, to the Color 
Computer 2, and 3. 

But the Color Computer 3 brings a whole 
new level of power to low cost computing 
and. so, a new Telewriter is here to put that 
power to work for you . We call it Telewriter- 
128. 



TFJJRWRITER-128 



You don't mess with a good thing, so 
Telewriter-128 is still Telewriter-64 at heart. 
The commands, and the user interface are 
essentially the same. If you know 
Telewriter-64, then you already know 
Telewriter-128. And, if you don't know 
Telewriter-64, you'll still have an easy time 
learning and using Telewriter-128. 



80 COLUMNS 



But there are major differences as well. First, 
Telewriter-128 uses the Color Computer 3's 
new 80 column screen display. 

This means, simply, that using Telewriter- 
128 on a low cost Color Computer 3 will look 
a lot like using a more expensive word 
processor on a much more expensive IBM 
PC, PS/2, or clone. 



SPEED 



Second, Telewriter-128 is lightning fast. 
Telewriter-64 was fast in its own right, but, 
by accessing the Color Computer 3's video 
hardware directly, and by running the 
machine in double speed mode, Telewriter- 
128 is able to provide extremely fast scroll- 
ing and instant paging — functions whose 
speed is crucial to serious word processing. 

In this department, Telewriter-128 doesn't 
simply keep up with IBM-based word proc- 
essors — it generally surpasses them! 



Third, Telewriter-128 adds a host of new 
features big and small, that make it even 
easier to use. 

Features like: Quick function key access to 
the editor or the menus — an instant on-line 
help screen summarizing all Telewriter 
commands and special characters — an 
option file where you store your personal set 
of format and screen settings so you only 
have to set them once! 

Then, there's a quick save feature which 
allows you to save all your current work 
without leaving the editor. There's a simple 
way to cursor through the disk directory and 
read in a file by just hitting ENTER. And 
there's more. 



NEW POWER 



Telewriter-64 always had the power to 
handle any kind of serious writing, from 
letters to textbooks. But, here too, 
Telewriter-128 adds major features. 



Like Macros — which let you insert whole 
words orphrases (even sets of control codes 
or format commands) into your text, with a 
single keypress. And every time you power 
up Telewriter-128, the macro definitions are 
automatically loaded', so they're always 
there. 

Then there's a Print Preview feature that 
shows you, on-screen, the way your printed 
text will look — with margins, headers, 
centering, justification, page numbering, 
and page breaks. This guarantees letter 
perfect documents every time, and makes 
tasks like widow/orphan line elimination, a 
breeze. 



TELEWRITER-64 or TELEWRITER 128 



We could go on listing features, but the point 
is this: If you own a Color Computer, you al- 
ready have the hardware for the most 
powerful, low cost word processor in town. 
All you need now is to add the heart and 
soul: 

Telewriter-64, for the Color Computer 1 
and 2, costs $59.95 on disk, $49.95 on 
cassette. 

Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 
costs $79.95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

To order by Mastercard or Visa call (619) 
755-1258 anytime, or send check or money 
order plus $2 shipping (Californians add 6% 
sales tax) to: 

COGNITEC 

704 Nob Ave. 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

To upgrade from Telewriter-64 to 
Telewriter-128, return your original disk or 
cassette with $39.95. (Add $10 if you're also 
upgrading from cassette to disk. Deduct $10 
with proof of Oct '87 - Feb '88, purchase of 
Telewriter-64.) 

When I first got Telewriter-64 last year, 
I was in heaven. I couldn't believe the 
program's versatility and ease of use. 

-The RAINBOW, Oct. 1985 



TELEWRITER-64 FEATURES: Compatibility with any. printer that works with 
the Color Computer; embedded control codes for underlining, boldface, sub/ 
superscript, variable fonts; format commands for headers, centering, margin and 
spacing changes anywhere in the document; Format menu to set margins, 
spacing, page numbering, BAUD rate, lines per page, justification; Chain 
printing for one shot printing of multi-file documents. Fast, full-screen editor 
with wordwrap, block copy/move/delete, global search and replace, wild card 
search, fast 4-way auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward 
paging, text alignment, tabs, error protection, word and line counter. Insert or 
delete text anywhere on the screen. Simple, easy to remember commands. 
Optional ASCII files for compatibility with spell checkers, terminal programs, 



and BASIC. Load, save, append, partial save files to disk or cassette. Kill, rename 
and list disk files. Cassette verify and auto-retry on error. 
TELEWRITER- 128 - ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Print preview from editor; 
multiple copy print; footers; hanging indents; cursor thru disk directory to load, 
append, rename and kill files; quick file save from editor; key click; key repeat; 
true block move; 24, 25, or 28 line screen; 40 or 80 column screen; dual speed 
cursor; on-line help; overstrike mode; word delete; wordwrap at margin; user RAM 
definable macros; nested macros; instant status window for information on 
cursor position, word count, etc.; instant function key access to menus or editor; 
options menu for setting character and screen colors, key repeat and delay rates, 
definable foreign symbols. 



CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



IBM and PS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines Inc. 'disk version only 



OU WOULD LIKETO HAVE AVAILABLE A 
T THE BEGINNING OF EACH SCHOOL 

YEAR (IN SEPT): 11 ; : GOT04J3J3 
390 PRINT "ENTER THE AMOUNT OF MO 
NEY YOU WOULD LIKE TO HAVE AVA 
ILABLE AT THE BEGINNING OF EA 
CH SCHOOL YEAR (IN SEPT): " ; 
40j3 LINEINPUT"$";RA$:RA=VAL(RA$) 
: 'RA=REQUIRED AMOUNT PER CHILD P 
ER YEAR 

41J3 PRINT : SOUND150 , 2 : PRINT" ENTER 
THE CURRENT MONTH (1-12): 



ii • 



420 IFCO= 3 THENPRINT " 



ii 



430 LINEINPUT" " ;TM$:TM=VAL(TM$) 
: 1 TM=TODAY 1 S MONTH 
440 IFTM<1ORTM>12THEN410 
450 PRINT : SOUND150 , 2 : LINE INPUT "E 
NTER THE CURRENT YEAR: ";TY$:TY= 
VAL(TY$) : »TY=TODAY'S YEAR 
460 IFTY<1987THEN450 
470 IFCO=3THENLS=40:ELSELS=32 
480 FORX=lTONC:CLS: PRINT" INFORMA 
TION ABOUT ";NM$(X) :PRINTSTRING$ 
(LS, "*") :PRINT:SOUND150,2:LINEIN 
PUT "BEGINNING YEAR OF COLLEGE: " 
;FD$(X) :FD(X)=VAL(FD$(X) ) : 'FD(X) 
=FUTURE COLLEGE DATE FOR CHILD X 
490 PRINT: SOUND150, 2: PRINT "AMOUN 
T AVAILABLE TO INVEST NOW " 
; : IFCO=3THENPRINT" " ; 

500 LINEINPUT"$";OA$(X) :OA(X)=VA 
L(OA$(X) ) : NEXT : 'OA(X)=ORIGINAL A 
MOUNT AVAILABLE TO INVEST NOW FO 
R CHILD X 
510 • 

520 'CALCULATION ROUTINE BEGINS 
530 • 

540 CLS : PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" CALCUL 
ATIONS NOW BEING PERFORMED" 
550 MT=0 : • MT=MONTHLY PAYMENT TOT 
AL 

560 FORC=1TONC:MP(C)=0: 'MP(C)=MO 
NTHLY PAYMENT FOR CHILD C 
570 IFTY>FD(C) THEN930 
580 




590 'Tl & T2 USED FOR NO OF PAYM 
ENT PERIODS (MONTHS) CALCULATION 
600 ' 

610 IFTY=FD(C)THENIFTM>8THEN930: 

ELSET1=FD ( C ) -TM : GOT067 0 

620 Tl=12-TM+9+(12*(FD(C)-TY-l) ) 

630 AM(C)=OA(C) : 'SAVE ORIGINAL A 

MOUNT AVAIL FOR POSSIBLE REVISIO 

NS 

640 1 

650 'Al & A2 USED FOR CALCULATIN 
G INFLATION EFFECTS 
660 • 

670 A1=RA * ( (1+ ( IR/12 ) ) A T1) : IF 
AM(C)<>0 THEN AM(C) =AM(C) * ( (1+ (I 
T/12) ) A T1) 

680 IF AM(C) >A1 THEN AM(C)=AM(C 
)-Al:GOTO700:ELSEAl=Al-AM(C) :AM( 
C)=0 

690 v MP (C) =A1* ( (IT/12) / ( ( (1+ (IT/1 
2)) A T1)-1)) 
700 T2=T1 
710 F0RX=1T03 

720 T2=T2+12 : A2=RA* ( ( 1+ (IR/12 ) ) A 
T2):IF AM(C)<>0 THEN AM(C)=AM(C) 
*( (1+ (IT/12) ) A 12) : IF AM(C)>A2 TH 
EN AM(C)=AM(C)-A2:GOTO770:ELSEA2 
=A2-AM(C) :AM(C)=0 

730 MP(C)=MP(C)+(A2*((IT/12)/((( 
1+ ( IT/12 ) ) A T2)-1) ) ) :NEXTX,C 
740 ' 

750 'SUMMARY SCREEN 
760 1 

770 cls:printir*100;"% inflation 

" ; : ifco=3 thenprint" " ; 

780 printit*100;"% interest" : pri 
ntstring$ (ls , "*") : print "monthly 
amount required for " 
790 forx=ltonc: printtab (9) ;nm$(x 
) ; " : " ; : printtab ( 12 ) ; : printusing" 
$#####. ##";mp(x) 
800 mt=mt+mp(x) :next 
810 ifco=3thentb=26:elsetb=15 
820 print: print: print "total mont 
hly payment required: ": printtab ( 
tb) ; :printusing"$#####.##'»;mt 
830 ifco=3thenlocate0 ,21: print" * 

****************ENTER*** ******** 
******* <e> END <R> REVI 

SE ENTRIES"; :LOCATE0, 23: GOTO850 
840 PRINTQ448, "*************ENTE 
R**************<E> END <R> 
REVISE ENTRIES"; 
850 SOUND150,2 

8 60 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN860 
870 I FA$ = " E " THENEND 
880 IFA$="R"THEN1010 
890 GOTO860 
900 

910 'DATE ENTRY ERROR 
920 

Jr. 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



930 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(LS, »*■•) :PRI 
NT: PRINT "TO DAY'S DATE IS LATER T 
HAN "; 

940 IFC0=3THENPRINT" COLLEGE 
START DATE FOR: " ; :ELSEPRINT" 
COLLEGE START DATE FOR: 11 : PR 
INT" 11 ; 

950 PRINTNM$(C) :IFCO=3THENPT=15: 
ELSEPT=6 

960 FORX=lTOPT: PRINT: NEXT: PRINT" 
ENTER <R> TO REVISE" : PRINTSTR 
ING$(LS f "*") :SOUND15j3,2 
970 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN970ELSE 
IFA$O"R"THEN970 : ELSECLS : GOTO410 
980 1 

990 'REVISION MENU 
1000 1 

1010 CLS : IFC0O3THENPRINT" ****** 
***** PREVISION** **********": ELSE 
PRINT" ********* *******REVIS ION** 
*************** 

1020 PRINT : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 4 ) " 1 . 
CHANGE INFLATION RATE" : PRINTTAB ( 
4) "2. CHANGE INTEREST RATE" : PRIN 
TT AB ( 4 ) " 3 . CHANGE ANNUAL AMT AVA 
IL» 

1030 PRINTTAB (4) "4. RECALCULATE" 
: IFCO=3THENPRINT : PRINT : PRINT 
1040 PRINT: PRINTTAB (8) "ENTER 1, 
2, 3, OR 4" 

1050 PRINTSTRING$(LS / "*") :PRINT" 
CURRENT SETTINGS: " :GOSUB12 70 :P 

RINT " 1= " ; IR* 100 ; " % " : GOS 

UB1270 : PRINT" 2=" ; IT* 100 

; "%" : GOSUB1270 : PRINT" 3= 

"; :PRINTUSING"$#####.##";RA; 
1060 SOUND150,2 

1070 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN1070 
1080 ONVAL(A$)GOTO1120 / 1180 / 1240 
,540 
1090 1 

1100 'INFLATION RATE REVISION 
1110 ' 

1120 CLS : I FCO= 3 THENPRINT ******** 
******INFLATION RATE************ 
* " : LOCATES , 18 : PRINT " CURRENT RATE 
* " ; IR*100 ; "%" : LOCATE 11 , 5 : PRINT 
"ENTER" : LOCATE 5 , 6 : GOTO1140 
1130 PRINT"*********INFLATION RA 
TE*********" :PRINT@455, "CURRENT 
RATE - »;IR*100;"%":PRINT@105 / "E 
NTER":PRINT@131, ""; 
1140 SOUND150 / 2:LINEINPUT"NEW IN 
FLATION RATE (%) : " ;IR$ : IR=VAL(I 
R$)/100:GOTO1010 
1150 ' 

1160 'INVESTMENT RATE REVISION 
1170 1 

1180 CLS : I FCO==3 THENPRINT ******** 
******INVESTMENT RATE*********** 
* " : LOCATE 6,16: PRINT " CURRENT RATE 



= " ; IT* 100 ; " %" : LOCATE 12 , 5 : PRINT 
"ENTER" : LOCATE 6 , 6 : GOTO1200 
1190 PRINT" ********INVESTMENT RA 
TE********* 1 ': PRINT@455, " CURRENT 
RATE = ";IT*100;"%":PRINT@106 / "E 
NTER" : PRINT @1 30 , " " ; 
1200 SOUND150 / 2:LINEINPUT"NEW IN 
VESTMENT RATE ( % ) : " ; IT$ : IT=VAL ( 
IT$)/100:GOTO1010 
1210 ' 

1220 'ANNUAL AMOUNT REVISION 
1230 ' 

1240 CLS : I F CO= 3 THENPRINT ******** 
******ANNUAL AMOUNT************* 
* " : LOCATE 5 , 18 : PRINT "CURRENT AMOU 
NT " ; : PRINTUSING" $#####.##»; RA : 
LOCATES, 4: PRINT "ENTER NEW ANNUAL 
AMOUNT TO": PRINT" BE AVAILA 

BLE: ";:GOTO1260 

1250 PRINT"*********ANNUAL AHOUN 
T**********" : PRINT (§450, "CURRENT 
AMOUNT " ; : PRINTUSING"$##### . ##"'; 
RA: PRINT @ 130 , "NEW ANNUAL AMOUNT 
TO BE AVAILABLE: "; 

12 60 SOUND 150 , 2 : LINE INPUT" $ " ; RA$ 
:RA=VAL(RA$) : GOTO 10 10 
1270 IFCO=3THENPRINT: RETURN: ELSE 

RETURN 



TANDY COMPUTER 
DISCOUNTS 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-3334 CoCo 3 

26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 



170.00 
259.95 



PRINTERS 



26-2802 DMP 106 
26-2808 DMP 440 
26-1280 DMP-130 

Complete line of Tandy (Daisy Wheel) print wheels 



179.95 
599.00 
279.00 



MSDOS COMPUTERS 



25-1052 Tandy 1000 SX 
25-1053 TANDY 1000 HX 
25-1600 TANDY 1000 TX 
25-1023 CM-5 color monitor 
25-1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 



750.00 
599.00 
999.95 
249.95 
110.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, NJ. 08098 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 31 



F e ature 



CoCo3 Disk 




I. V 



is,-' 



uto 5 is a utility that will load 
and run a BASIC program at a 
specified time. After typing in 
and loading Auto 5, just enter RUN and 
the name of the program you want to 
auto-load. 

Upon start-up, you are given com- 
plete instructions on how to use the 
program on an 80-column screen. If you 
would rather use a 40-column screen, 
change the WIDTH commands to 40 in 
lines 30 and 180. Also, you must enter 
a WIDTH 32 command in Line 370 for 
CoCo 2 programs requiring a 32- 
. column screen. Examples of the com- 
mands are presented on the programs's 
start-up screen. 

, After configuring Line 370, resave 
and run Auto 3, following the screen 
prompts. All times must be entered in 
military hours (e.g., 2 p.m. is 14 
hundred hours). 

After providing all the required infor- 
mation, at the prompt, place the disk 
containing the program to be booted in 
the drive. On the hour and minute 
specified in Line 370, the program will 
automatically load and run. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 410 Scott Drive, Newport, NC 
28570. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a response.) □ 



Chuck Katsekes is currently serving in 
the U.S. Marine Corps. He enjoys 
working with computers and writing 
programs during his off-duty time. /* 



CoCo 3 
Auto- Boot 



By Chuck Katsekes 



The listing: AUT03 • 

********************* 

* AUTO 3 UTILITY * 

* * 

* BY * 

* CHUCK KATSEKES * 

* * 
********************* 

3 J3 PALETTE p , 4 : PALETTE 8 , 6 3 : WIDT 
H8j3:CLSl 

40 LOCATE 13,1: PRINT" INSTRUCTION 
S" 

41 LOCATE 1, 3:PRINT M THIS UTILITY 
WILL LOAD ANY BASIC (BAS) PROGR 

AM BY TIMER" 



*•*'"* • / / 

M • hi ' 



/ r 



fj 



32 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



42 LOCATE 1,4: PRINT "IT WILL LOAD 
BOTH COCO II AND COCO III PROGR 

AMS . " 

43 LOCATE 1 , 5 : PRINT "TO LOAD COCO 
II PROGRAMS YOU CAN EITHER PLAC 

E WIDTH32" 

44 LOCATE 1,6:PRINT"AT THE BEGIN 
NING OF THE PROGRAM YOU WANT TO 
LOAD, OR 

45 LOCATE 1,7 : PRINT "PLACE WIDTH3 
2 AFTER THE CLS IN LINE 370" 

46 LOCATE 1, 8 : PRINT" YOU MUST HOW 
EVER, ENTER THE NAME OF THE PROG 
RAM YOU" 

47 LOCATE 1, 9 : PRINT "WANT TO AUTO 
LOAD AFTER THE (RUN) IN LINE 37 

0" 

48 LOCATE 1, 10 : PRINT"SEE THE EXA 

MPLE BELOW 

ii 

• 

49 LOCATE 1 , 13 : PRINT" (FOR COCO I 

I PROGRAM) " 

50 LOCATE 1,14: PRINT" 370 CLS:WID 
TH32 : RUN 1 DEMO" 

51 LOCATE 1,16: PRINT" (FOR COCO I 

II PROGRAM) " 

52 LOCATE 1 , 17 : PRINT" 370 CLS: RUN 
'DEMO" 

53 LOCATE 5,22 :PRINT"PRESS <ENT 
ER> TO CONTINUE" 

54 E$=INKEY$:IF E$="" THEN 54: GO 
TO 55 

55 CLS: LOCATE 1 , 6 : PRINT"TO CHANG 
E LINE 37j3 PRESS <BREAK> KEY AND 

TYPE" 

56 LOCATE 1 , 7 : PRINT"LIST 370. MA 

KE THE APPROPRIATE CHANGES PRESS 
it 

57 LOCATE 1,8: PRINT" <ENTER> THEN 
TYPE RUN. FOLLOW THE PROMPTS AF 

TER" 

58 LOCATE 1,9: PRINT"TYPING RUN.. 



it 



59 LOCATE 1 , 13 : PRINT"PRESS <ENTE 
R> TO START PRQGRAM" 

60 LOCATE 1,15: PRINT" PRESS <BREA 
K> TO CHANGE LINE 370" 

70 E$=INKEY$:IF E$=" "THEN 70: GOT 



PREMIUM COC03 51 2K UPGRADE 

•Made in USA by J&R Electronics •Memory chips socketed, user replaceable 
•Rugged, long life construction «Top mounted Memory for cooling 

•Heavy duty POWER and GROUND planes to minimize memory errors due to noise 
•High performance design, permits use of less expensive 150ns memory chips 

•We supply Prime memory chips, not inferior pulls or fallouts* 

•Includes RAMDISK, Spooler and Memory Test software on disk with 28 page User's 
Manual (We set the standard for 51 2K support software. We believe our software 
is uniquely powerful, as opposed to those 'Me, too' companies that charge extra 
for software with much less power I) 

SPECIAL PRICES 

#1010-29.95 JramR bare board plus connectors and software 

#1014-39.95 JramR assembled & tested 0K (No memory chips) and software 
'CALL (for latest price of #1014 with memory chips end other products) 

To place an order, write to: J&R Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MD 21 045, 
OR call (301) 987-9067 Jesse or (301) 788-0861-Ray 



O 170 
170 CLS 

180 PALETTE 0,8: PALETTE 8,63:WID 
TH80:CLS1 
190 CLS 
200 INPUT 
210 INPUT 
220 INPUT 
230 INPUT 
240 INPUT 
250 CLS 

2 60 LOCATE 10 , 12 : PRINT"* 



"PROGRAM" ;P$ 
"HOUR";H 
"MINUTES" ;M 
"START HOUR";SH 
"START MINUTE" ;SM 



OADING ";P$;" 
* * *'• 

270 FOR H = H TO 23 
280 FOR M = M TO 59 
290 FOR S - O TO 59 
300 
70 

310 LOCATE l,2:PRINTH;:LOCATEll, 
2 : PRINTM ; : LOCATE2 1,2: PRINTS ; : LOC 
ATE0,2 

320 FOR T = 1 TO 493 

330 NEXT T 

340 NEXT S 

350 NEXT M 

360 NEXT H 

370 CLS: RUN" 

380 END 



@ 

TO 
TO 
TO 



";SH;":";SM;" 



IF H=SH AND M=SM THEN GOTO 3 




PROGRAMS « P£ flfPNf «4L S • SUPPLif S • Sf flViCf 



Fast Delivery... 
Friendly Service 

Now in our 6th year! 



SUPER VALUE! SUPER SPEED! 




Avatex1200e 



$ 99 



with Coco Cable 109 



Reviewed in 
April, 1988 
Rainbow! 



Avatex 1200e, Cable 
AUTOTERM ... $1 39 




Avatex 2400 $219 

with Coco Cable 229 
(Coco 3 only) 

with RS-232 Cable* 245 



RAINBOW 



Avatex 2400, Cable 
AUTOTERM . . . $259 



•Coco 1, 2 requires Deluxe RS-232 Pak 



• Call* 

513-396 SOFT 



• Shop by Modem • 

513-396-SHOP 





2235 Losantiville. Cincinnati, OH 45237 

SHIPPING will be charged ai our ACTUAL COST 

Ohio residents add 5.5% Safes Tax COD add 2.50 




June 1988 THE RAINBOW 33 



.. . K i n V.i . I i n » m i m , M | | . i .| in » u; i ..I. - - i It jji iiii . |H | i . , ;i i ' . | i ii f ' 

1 1 ■ i . i .ii h .« ^ <«»ii.i,i«. " i 'i n n m i 'n *p..i » i n ii «n i» nn i n iii n ''i' ,M i , i ■ n ,%»i0^i^^miu^m^^ 

;. . I l L^V;: , i/;., . - . ' .i i i C , ij u'l .d i . , , .I. '- .. 'i . " , ,.. ' ..i.i, ' i n - .I 1 ' ,1^, | IM i ^ i ^im j »(»p i> ^)>iiri' " i ^ j ^« n i^w f < ' ■ ' ' ' ii ' ii W lliliill n iii m I ' ii ii t n' li ' i nn i ni l n i 



-r 



***** 



■ taaa> »^>l>Wllll>lll ^ l>l''< W ^.l. l ) M .i.l|W N ■ MM l| . .1 M l. I' M i n II U I J | W 



' "' ■i ffr i nMM m *\ n 



l&mvrfftm+li ™ >i — i-i — — 



MM Ml 




CoCo Gallery 



MM* 




Figment 



John Owens 




Planning a summer vacation? This graphic illustration of Epcot Center in Florida may 
influence your decision as to where you vacation. John lives in Rome, New York, 
and used Color Max 3 to create this view of a popular vacation spot* 



Honorable Mention 




Lunar Scape 



Jeff Edlund 




Curtis P-51 



Chuck Nivison 



This view of outer space was produced In basic 
on the CoCo 2. Jeff, of Crystal, Minnesota, 
en/oys making model airplanes and driving 
radio-controlled cars. 



This view of the plane used primarily in World War M was 
developed with Color Max 3. Chuck, of Ciarksville, Mich- 
igan, is a college student who uses his CoCo for playing 
games, data processing and file organization. 



34 THE RAINBOW JufiG t^G 



v {' ' ^O i w'.y 1' i l l" 1 " ? i ' .a . i mjuH i i i 





This queen of goddesses from Greek 
mythology was created with CoCo Max II. 
Troy, of Arnold, Maryland, is 16 years old, 
writes programs for himself and would like 
to make programming a career someday.: 



Brad, of Wyomissing, Pennsylvania, used 
Color Max Deluxe to create this 
mountainous view. He is a sophomore in 
high school who enjoys long-distance 
running and working with graphics on the 

CoCo. 




SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! You are invited to nominate original Wp7fi^ of "CoCo Gallery," Share your creations with the 

CoCo Community! Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you created your picture (what programs you 
used, etc) and how to display it. Also, please include a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens* digitized images from TV programs or material thal's already beon auurr-lttad 
elsewhere. A digitized Copy of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is nor an original work. 

We will award two first prizes of $25, one for the CoCo 3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize of $15 and one third prize of $10. Honorable Mentions 
may also be given. . 

Please send your entry on either tape or disk la the CoCo Gallery, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Remember, this is a contest and your 

entry will not be returned. ' 1 Angela kapl hammer, Curator 

June 1988 THE RAINBOW 35 



tr 



oes 





Ask any country music fan, 
"Where is Music City, 
U.S.A.?" You will hear the 
reply, "Nashville, Tennessee!" And 
what song captures the down-home 
flavor of traditional country music 
better than "Rockytop"? If you have 
never had the opportunity to visit 
Music City, U.S.A., now's your 
chance. Come on, y'all! Run Rocky- 
top and you can view the Nashville 
skyline and feast your ears on a CoCo 
rendition of the song "Rockytop." 
Grab your partner and clog, buck- 
dance or two-step till the cows come 
home. 

Rockytop uses DRAW, LINE, CIR- 
CLE, PSET, and PAINT commands to 
draw the city of Nashville. The false 
red / blue colors of PMDDE4 , 1 are used. 
If the words "Music City, U.S.A." 
appear red and the full moon appears 
blue, press the BREAK key, then press 




Becky Matthews, who lives in Nash- 
ville, holds a music education degree 
from the University of Mississippi 
She and her husband, David, freelance 
with computers, music and electron- 



36 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 




the reset button on the back of your 
computer, type RUN and press ENTER. 
Do this until the words are blue and 
the moon red. CoCo 3 users will see 
this resolution screen in black and 
white. Also, CoCo 3 users should edit 
Line 30 to read POKE 65497,0 (the 
CoCo 3 high speed poke) instead of 
POKE 65495,0. To edit Line 30 CoCo 
3 users should type EDIT 30 and press 
ENTER. Type 255 to search for the 
second occurrence of the number 5. 
Then type C7 to change that 5 to a 7. 
Press ENTER to end the editing. 

Now let's see what colors the Music 
City skyline will be using different 
graphics screens. (The following 
changes will display some interesting 
color combinations for the skyline on 
all CoCo models, CoCo 3 included.) 
First we'll try the other screen of 
PMDDE4. Type EDIT 40 and press 
ENTER. Type 351 to search for the 
third occurrence of the number I. 
Type C0 to change that 1 to a 0 and 
press ENTER. Line 40 should read: 40 
PMDDE4,1: SCREEN1,0: PCL50. Now 
type RUN and press ENTER to see the 



skyline on the new graphics screen, 
PMODE4,1:SCREEN1,0. p re ss BREAK 
when ready to continue, and use EDIT 
to see the skyline in other colors. 
Change the first part of Line 40 from 
PM0DE4,1 to PM0DE3,1 by typing 
EDIT 40 and pressing ENTER, then 54, 
C3 and press ENTER. Once again, run 
Rockytop to see the colors of 
Pt1QDE3,l:SCREEN 1,0. 

There is one more graphics screen 
that works well with this program. 
Edit Line 40 with the method we have 
been using to change PMQDE3,1 
:5CREEN1,0 to PMDDE3 , 1 : SCREEN 
1,1 and run to see the last color 
combinacion we will try. (This combi- 
nation is especially nice on the CoCo 
3's color monitor.) If you want to 
return to the original colors, change 
Line 40 back to PMQDE4 , 1 : 
5CREEN1,1:PCLS0 (using EDIT, of 
course). Becoming familiar with the 
EDIT commands can save you time. 
Instead of retyping a whole line to 
make a minor change, learn to use 
EDIT. 



The music routine for Rockytop 
begins at Line 310. Line 320 reads the 
note and duration values from DRTfl 
statements (lines 370 through 580) and 
then plays the notes with SOUND state- 
ments. The notes are arranged in 
three-note groups (A, B and C) fol- 
lowed by their duration value (D). 
These note groups are played as arpeg- 
gios (the tones of the chord played in 
rapid succession instead of simultane- 
ously), and 89 groups make up the 
song. After the computer reads the 
DRTfl statements, it "forgets" them. 
Line 340 restores the data so the song 
can be played again. Line 350 returns 
to the start of the music routine to play 
the song again. 

Of course, truckers call Nashville 
"Guitar," but that's another story. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 6729 Waller Road, Brent- 
wood, 77V 37027. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 





June 1988 THE RAINBOW 37 




120 104 490 . 

200 63 END 

390 69 



34 
63 



The listing: ROCKYTDP 

10 '**ROCKYTOP ARRANGED BY BECKY 

F. MATTHEWS 
20 'SPEED-UP POKE 
30 POKE65495,0 
40 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PCLS0 
50 1 DRAW BUILDINGS 
60 DRAW"C1BM213 , 115S3L2G1D5R3BR2 
BU2U2BR3U2E1NR2G1D4F1R2 " 
70 DRAW"S4BM0,114C1ND64R10NR14U7 
R7U14F2D2H2D12R7D7R10D64BR5U18H2 
U6R9NR18U2NR10L1H1U1NR14L1H1U1R8 
NR4U3R4D3R8D1G1L1D1G1L1D2R8D6G2D 
18BR6U8NR20BR3D8BR3U8BR3D8BR3U8B 
R3D8BR3U8BR3D8" 

80 DRAW"C1BM69, 170M81, 166M93 , 170 
BM78 , 166U2NR6U1E1NR4U2NR4H1NR5U1 
E1NR4U4NR4E2U8F2D2H2D6F2D4F1D1G1 
D2F1D4BD11BR13U14R4NR8U2R6D2R4D1 
4BR4U56NR36M+13 , -5ND5R10ND5M+13 , 
+5D55BR10U25NL10" 



Corrections 



"Phantom graph — Professional Graphs on the CoCo 
3" (Review, April 1988, Page 135): The review of this 
product incorrectly states that Phantomgraph re- 
quires only 128K of memory. According to the 
Phantomgraph documentation, the program requires 
512K. Although the program appears to work fine 
with 128K, some features won't work properly 
without 5 12K. 

"Do You Hear What I Hear?" (December 1987, Page 
86): John Mosley has written to offer the following 
correction for Listing 2, MLEDIT0R. Just change Line 
8 to read as follows: 

8 A$="&H"+A$:POKE X,VAL(A$) 

"Backup And Go" (Novices Niche, July 1987, Page 
98): After receiving some reports of garbled disks, 
Matt Lawson, author of Fast Copy, suggests the 
following corrections: 

1) Add WIDTH32: to the beginning of Line 20. 

2) Add the following line to the program: 

155 IF PG=58 AND 1=1 THEN AD=&H0 
E: RETURN 

For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DATA 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIO 
prompt. 



90 DRAWC1BM166 , 177U3 2R2NR10U2R1 
0ND34U1R10D2NL10R6ND34U4NR6U4R6N 
D41U16R6ND58NR12U6R3ND6R7NU8R4D6 
L8D58R8NU58BR5U30E2U20M+6 , -6R14M 
+6,+6D20F2D30BL16U32BR3ND32BL6ND 
32L2U20NR10M+4,-6R3M+4,+6D20L2BU 
20R2R3F1R3F1BL26E1R3E1R3 " 
100 ' DRAW WINDOWS 

110 COLOR0,1:LINE(12,109)-(22,11 
1) , PRESET , BF : LINE ( 12 , 113 ) - ( 22 , 11 
4) , PRESET , BF : LINE ( 3 , 116) - (31, 120 
) , PRESET, BF 

120 FORY=122T0176STEP3:LINE(3 / Y) 

-(31,Y+1) , PRESET , BF : NEXTY 

130 PAINT (244, 123) , 1, 1:PAINT(234 

, 123 ) , 1 , 1 : FORY-154T0178STEP2 : FOR 

X=47T056STEP3 : LINE (X, Y) - (X+l, Y) , 

PRESET : NEXTX : NEXTY 

140 FORY=166T0178STEP2:FORX=98TO 

110STEP3:PSET(X,Y,1) : NEXTX: NEXTY 

150 FORY=122T0177STEP3 : LINE (115, 

Y) - ( 150 , Y+l) , PRESET , BF : NEXTY : FOR 

Y=156T0177STEP3: LINE (151, Y)-( 158 

,Y+1) , PRESET, BF: NEXTY 

160 FORY=148T0176STEP2:FORX=167T 

0176STEP3 : LINE (X, Y) - (X+l , Y) , PRES 

ET : NEXTX : NEXTY : FORY=147T0177STEP 

2 : FORX=179T0193STEP3 

170 LINE (X,Y) -(X+l, Y) , PRESET :NEX 

TX : NEXTY : FORY=142T017 6STEP2 : LINE 

(197,Y)-(200,Y) , PRESET : NEXTY 

180 FORY=12 2T017 6STEP2 : FORX=201T 

O206STEP2 : LINE (X, Y) - (X, Y) , PRESET 

: LINE (X+12 , Y) - (X+12 , Y) , PRESET : NE 

XTX : NEXTY 

190 DRAW"C1BM220,178R40BM237,142 
U12BR5D12": PAINT (230, 170) ,1,1: PA 
INT(245,170) ,1,1 
200 'DRAW STREET 

210 PMODE3 : COLOR2 : LINE (0,178) -(2 
55,182) , PSET , BF : PAINT ( 5 , 190) ,3,2 
220 COLOR1:LINE(1,0)-(255,191) ,P 
SET, B 

230 'DRAW/PAINT MOON 

240 CIRCLE (170, 80) ,20,2, .9:PAINT 

(170,80) ,2,2 

250 • WRITE "MUSIC" 

260 DRAW"C3BM20,15S4ND20F10E10ND 

20BR8D20R12U20BR8NR12D10R12D10NL 

12BR8R2NR2U20NL2R2BR8NR12D20R12 " 

270 'WRITE "CITY," 

280 DRAW"BM156,15NR12D20R12BR8R2 

NR2U20NL2R2BR8R6NR6D20BR22U10NH1 

0E10BD20BR2U2R2D2L2G3 " 

290 'WRITE "U.S.A." 

300 DRAW"BM40,50D20R12NU20BR6U2R 

2D2NL2BR10R12U10L12U10R12BD20BR6 

U2R2D2NL2BR10U12NR12U2E6F6D14BR6 

U2R2D2L2" 

310 'PLAY NOTES 

320 FOR N = 1 TO 8 9 : READ A,B,C,D 



38 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



Two-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

If factoring numbers is a pastime of yours, this two- 
liner should be a timesaver. 

The listing: 

j& SOUNDl)^: CLS: PRINT" — ==::** 
FACTOR TREE ** : : »* — " : PRINT: INPU 
T" ENTER ANY POSITVE WHOLE NUMBER 
NOT * TO j3";N:PRINT l, A FACTOR T 
REE FOR THE NUMBER"N" WOULD BE: 
11 : PRINT" 1 " ; : FORX=*2TON-l 
1 IFN/X=INT (N/X) THENN=N/X: PRINT" 
*"X;:GOT01ELSENEXTX:IFX=N THEN P 
RINT"*" N 

Ed Westberg 
Jensen Beach, FL 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape) 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Experiment with radius and degrees to have fun 
with circles in PNODE 4. 

The listing: 

j3 CLS : PRINT"CIRCLES» : INPUT"STEP 
(DEG. ) " ;S : INPUT" CIRCLE RADIUS" ;R 
C: INPUT"RADIUS (PATH) " ;L: PMODE4 : 
PCLS : SCREEN1 : FORD=j3TO-3 6J3STEP-S t 
R=D/57 • 29577951 : X=INT (COS (R) *L+. 
5) :Y=INT(SIN(R)*L+.5) : CIRCLE (X+l 
28,Y+96) ,RC:NEXTD:FORA=lT02STEPj3 
: IFINKEY$<>" "THENJ3ELSENEXT 

Darin Herr 
Ephrata, PA 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This one-liner prints out a chart that shows Celsius- 
to-Fahrenheit conversions. 

The listing: 

P CLS: INPUT "DEGREE TO START AND 
STOP AT" ;S,T: INPUT "DEGREE INCREM 
ENT";I:IF I=j3 THEN I=*l ELSE PRIN 
T#-2,"DEG. CELIUS DEG. FAH 
REN FORCES TO T STEP I:F«(C*9) 
/5+32:PRINT#-2 /USING" ### 
###";C,F:NEXTC 

Charles Farris 
APO.NY 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 




SUPER PRODUCTS 



INTRODUCES 
THE 

FANTASTIC 
SUPER CONTROLLER 




POWER BEYOND BELIEF 

O Radio Shack/Tandy controller compatible. 
O Works on all COCOs! 1, 2 or 3, with or without Multi-pak 
interface. 

□ One 24/28 pin socket, for 8K ROM, 2764, 27128 or 27256. 

□ Internal Mini-Expansion-Bus Connector for one DISTO 
Super Adapter board. 

H Low Power draw; Within COCO's power requirements. 
n Gold Plated edge connectors. 
a Under OS-9: 

• Buffered Read/Write sector achieved without 
halting the CPU. 

• Continual use of keyboard even while Reading 
or Writing to disk. 

• System's Clock no longer looses time during 
Read & Write. 

• NMI is blocked and transferred to IRQ in software 
for low CPU overhead.. 

• Completely Interrupt driven for fast and smooth 
Multi-Tasking operations.. 

• Drivers (written by Kevin Darling) for Level 1 and 2. 



Introductory Price $130 



□ISTD 



SUPER ADD-ONS 



REAL TIME CLOCK AND PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE 

Have the Real Time, date and year displayed on your screen at a 

simple command. $39.95 

MINI EPROM PROGRAMMER A low cost EPROM programmer 
that attaches directly to your Disto Super Controller to program 
those often used utilities. $54.95 

HARD DISK INTERFACE A hard disk interface fully compatible 
with S.A.S.I.controller. Fits inside the Super Controllers, Ramdisk 
or MEB adapter. OS-9 Drivers are included. $49.95 

SUPER RAMDISK 512K Imagine having access to 51 2K of virtual 
disk memory in close to no time. Upgradable to 1 Meg $ CALL 

MEB ADAPTER A Stand-Alone Mini-Expansion-Bus in which you 
can plug any other DISTO Adapter directly in a Multi-pak without 
the need for a Super Controller or Ramdisk $24.95 




DISTD 



3 



ZeroK 



$29.95 



SUPER RAM \J Full 5 12K $ CALL 
Free software included (for BASIC) 



SEND FOR FREE 1988 CATALOG 



CTC CRC COMPUTERS inc. 

10802 Lajeunesse, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3L 2E8 

1-514-383-5293 

We accept phone orders. 
Call for Canadian prices. 
Include S&H of $4 or $8 if order exceeds $75. 



MASTER CARD 
AND VISA 
ACCEPTED 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 39 







The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 



Nineteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our third 
Adventure competition. Discover backstage intrigue at the London 
Theatre, attempt a daring space rescue, or travel through time to save the 
universe, and that's only the beginning! 

Challenge yourself! Put your wits to the test with Adventures like: 

Evil Crypt — Encounter bottomless pits, graves that kill, flesh-frying fires. 
Even the rocks and trees conceal dangers. 

The Professional — You're hot on the trail of international jewel thieves. 

Cleopatra's Pyramid — Perilous action along the banks of the treacherous 
Nile River. 

Johnny Zero — Fight against evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. 
And when you're at the end of your rope, revenge is in reach with: 

Balm — You are the Adventure, determined to exterminate anyone fool 
enough to travel your cavern. 

Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these 
winning authors: Mark and Mike Anderson, Jon Blow, Jason Dolinsky, Matt 
Hazard, Joab Jackson, Curtis Keisler, Franklin Marrs, Ann Mayeux, Scott 
McCleary, Chris McKernan, Philip Newton, Fred Provoncha, Carlos Rocha, 
Michael Shay, Don Sheerin, and WaitThinnes. 

The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures is only $11.95! 



the Third 



Save yourself from typing listings with - 
Adventures Tape or Disk Set. 

Get on with your game and eliminate typing hassles. Just load these great 
programs into your computer and run. 

Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 

The tape and disks are adjuncts and complements to the book; the book is necessary for 
introductory material and loading instructions. 



Please send me: The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures $11.95 

The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape $9.95 





The Third Rainbow Adventures Disk Set $14,95 



Name _ 
Address 
City _ 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of 



is enclosed* 



■V . V* »--v"*«\\-* 




Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Acct. No. Exp. Date 

Signature 

Mail to: The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures, The Faisoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492 

'Add $1.50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S. add $4. Allow 6 to 8 weeks 
for delivery. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax for book and tape. In order to hold 
down costs, we do not bill. U.S. currency only please. 




mil* iipr ~ 




:SOUND A,D:SOUND B,D:SOUND C,D 
330 NEXT N 

34) 3 RESTORE 

35) 3 GOT032)3 

36) 3 'NOTE DATA 

370 DATA 147,170,185,2,1)38,17)3,1 
85,2,147,170,185,2,1)38,17)3,185,2 
380 DATA 147,176,193,2,89,176,19 
3,2,147,170,185,1,108,147,170,1, 
78,108,147,2 

390 DATA 78,108,147,2,108,147,17 
0,2,89,108,159,1,78,108,147,1,89 
,108,159,2 

400 DATA 108,147,170,2,147,170,1 

85,2,170,185,204,1 

410 DATA 108,185,108,1,125,193,1 

25,1,140,200,140,1 

420 DATA 147,170,185,2,108,170,1 

85 , 2 , 147 , 170 , 185 , 2 , 108 , 170 , 185 , 2 

430 DATA 147,176,193,2,89,176,19 

3 , 2 , 147 , 170 , 185 , 1, 108 , 147 , 170 , 1, 

78,108,147,2 

440 DATA 78,108,147,2,108,147,17 
0,2,89,108,159,1,78,108,147,1,89 
,108,159,2 

450 DATA 78,108,147,1,32,147,32, 
1,78,170,78,1,108,185,108,1,147, 
204,147,1 



460 DATA 147,204,147,1,140,200,1 

40/1,147,204,147,1 

470 DATA 125,170,193,2,78,170,19 

3,2,125,170,193,2,78,170,193,2 

480 DATA 108,159,185,2,58,159,18 

5,2,108,159,185,2,108,143,159,2 

490 DATA 133,176,197,2,89,176,19 

7,2,133,176,197,1,89,176,193,2,1 

33,159,185,1 

500 DATA 89,176,193,2,89,125,147 

,1,32,147,185,1,89,147,176,2,32, 

89,125,2 

510 DATA 147,176,193,2,32,89,125 
, 2 , 147 ,17 6, 19 3, 2, 32, 89, 125, 2 
520 DATA 32,170,185,1,32,147,170 
,1,32,108,147,2,32, 147,32,1,32,1 
47,32,1,78,170,78,1,108,185,108, 
1 

530 DATA 32,78,147,1,32,78,147,1 
,32,78,147,2 

540 DATA 5,89,159,2,58,89,159,2 

550 DATA 32,78,147,2,32,147,32,2 

,78,170,78,2,108,185,108,2 

560 DATA 32,78,147,1,32,78,147,1 

,32,78,147,2 

570 DATA 5,89,159,2,58,89,159,2 
580 DATA 32,78,147,2,32,147,32,2 . 
,78,170,78,2,108,185,108,2 



vundog wmm 



In Qj* es t of tl|C^&r* J^d 

A new animated graphic adventure for the Color 
Computer 3 from the author of the Hall of the King 
trilogy! Enjoy the mixture of science and fantasy as 
you quest for the Phoenix Crossbow, the only thing 
that can save you in the post-holocaust world, A full 
4 disk sides of adventure! Outstanding 320x200 
graphics will make this your favorite CoCo adven- 
ture! Req. 128K CoCo 3 and disk drive. Only $34.95. 



^ un£~ f u "5)ude 

An exciting new arcade game. This is the long-awaited response to the huge 
demand for a Kung-Fu program for the CoCo. The graphics, sound effects, 
and animation are spectacular! This is the BEST karate game ever available 
for the Color Computer. Req. 64K. disk drive, and joystick. Only $24.95. 

"The CoCo karate gap has been filled and Kung-Fu Dude does it excellent- 
ly, f highly recommend (it)!" -2/88 Rainbow review 
"A definite 5 stars!" -12/87 Wizard's Castle review 



STAC NC T M J»j«M?»i«nff*it A»»Mjitffii i"f 11 J" 



WHITE FIRE 
OF ETERNITY 

64K Animated Graphic Adven- 
ture. See 12/86 Rainbow review. 
Only $19.95. 

CHAMPION 

64K Superhero Action Adventure. 
See 5/87 Rainbow review. Only 
$19.95. 



All programs CoCo I 2, 3 compatible unless stated otherwise. 




systems <^ 



v v#>*#>X.*.*.v.v* ****** 



Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 

Personal checks, money orders, and CCD. orders 
accepted. 



Include $2.50 for S/H. $3.00 
extra for C.O.D. orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax. 
Authorship and dealer Inquiries 
welcome. 



■»»:•»»:•:* 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 41 



Featur e 



A music processor 

to help you create and edit your own songs 



Color 




poser 



By Garry L. Shelton 




w 



ant to write a sorig? Wishing 
for an easier way to do it? If 
you've ever written music for 
Basic's PLAY statement, then you know 
how tiring it can be. 

Song Writer helps you develop a tune 
faster and easier than "by hand," re- 
members tunes as they are typed in and 
lets yoii edit them if you make a mis-, 
take. Tunes can even be saved to tape 
and reloaded for future use. 

To use Song Writer, you must have 
a 32K Color Computer with Extended 
Color BASIC. Simply load and run to 
start. I have used POKE 65495,0 and 
POKE S54 34 ,0 in several lities to speed 
up program execution. If your system 
cannot handle these, they should be 
deleted from lines 100, 1050, 1 1 10, 1400, 
1440, 1450, 1460 and 1480. 

As the program begins, you are 
greeted by the introductory screen 



Garry Sheit on is a Brokerage consultant 
for a life insurance company, where he 
handles computer operations within the 
office. His wife is the inspiration for 
most of his computer projects, and their 
Wo-year-old child is already "inter- 
ested" in the keyboard. 



42 



THE RAINBOW June 1966 




accompanied by a short melody. The 
main screen automatically follows, 
displaying octave, note length, tempo, 
stanza number, learn mode and piano 
keyboard. The letters on the piano 
keyboard correspond to the computer 
keys that are to be used. Table 1 lists the 
initial values used, range of values and 
the commands used to change these. 

The term "stanza" does not mean the 
same here as in sheet music: A stanza 
for our purposes means a string of 90 
characters or less. If you exceed the 
allowed number of characters in a 
string, the stanza count is advanced one; 
and you begin ^ new string. You in$y 
have up to 25 stanzas in one song. 

Learn Mode 

Initially, this feature is set to off but 
may be toggled on by using the @ key. 
When it is off, Song Writer may be used 
for practice or as a "piano" of sorts and 
will not remember anything that is 
typed. To "play for real," just turn on 
the learn mode and type away. You will 
notice that the notes, tempo, octave, 
rests and note length are displayed as 
you type. One nice aspect of the learn 
mode is that it may be toggled on and 
off in the middle of a song. This way you 



Octave 



Note Length 



Tempo 
Rest 



Initially set at middle C octave of two. Ranges from one 
to five. Increase using up arrow key; decrease using down 
arrow key. 

Initial length of four. Ranges from 1 to 64 where: 1=whole 
note, 2=half note, 3=% note, 4=quarter note, 8=eighth 
note, 16=16th note, 32=32nd note, 64=64th note. Increase 
using left arrow key; decrease using right arrow key. 

Initially set at two. Ranges from 1 to 255. Press hyphen 
key, type the value and press enter. 

Value is always same as note length. Press space bar. 
Table 1: Music Functions 




may practice awhile, then turn on the 
learn mode and play the perfected 
portion. It is important to remember 
that when you are switching between on 
and off, any values for octave, note 
length and tempo must be displayed on 
the screen; otherwise they will not be 
remembered by the program. 

The help screen aids you in recalling 
the various keys used to control differ- 
ent functions. Press the SHIFT and up 
arrow keys to access this screen. It lists 
the keys and their uses, 

Sub-Menu Options 

To access Song Writer's other func- 
tions, press the CLEAR key to bring up 
the sub-menu, where any of the follow- 
ing options may be selected by presing 
the first letter of that option: 



Edit song — brings up the edit screen 
and displays the first stanza. To 
make a change, press the space bar. 
Press the down arrow to move to the 
next stanza or press clear to leave 
the edit mode. To edit a stanza, use 
the right and left arrow keys to move 
the cursor that appears in the edit 
mode. To insert a character, place 
the cursor above the character that 
will follow the inserted one, then 
type the insertion. To delete a char- 
acter, place the cursor above the one 
to be removed and press clear. 
Press ENTER when you have com- 
pleted your changes. If you make an 
incorrect change, Song Writer will 
not permit you to leave the edit mode 
until your error lis corrected. Note: 
Although volume is not entered in 



the main screen you may edit volume 
into a stanza. The format for volume 
is Vx"i where x is a value from 1 to 
31. 

• Play song — simply plays the song 
that you have typed in. 

• New song — initializes all values and 
erases any current song in memory. 
You will be asked if you are sure — 
choose Y or N. 

• Save song — saves the current song 
and all values under the filename 
SONG. When the recorder prompt is 
displayed, prepare the recorder and 
press ENTER. 

• Load song — loads a previously 
saved song using the filename SONG. 
Any song in memory will be over- 
written and all values changed to 
that of the new song. 

• Return — takes program execution 
back to the main screen. Use this 
after you have completed using a 
sub-menu function. 

When you have finished, press the 
SHIFT and clear keys. Song Writer 
will ask if you want to quit; respond 
with Y or N. 

Program Design 

Song Writer was designed using a 
modular concept. That is, each function 
is a small subroutine of the larger 
program. Table 2 gives the line numbers 
for and a description of each module. 
I have included an abundance of re- 
marks iii the program to aid you in 
deciphering the logic flow. Due to the 
modular construction, changes could be 
made rather easily. 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 43 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 




1 2 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Helpl 

DISCOUNT PRICE LIST 



f 



CoCo Hard Drive Kits 



KIT INCLUDES: Burke & Burke (B&B) XT PC interface. Hard drive with controller, 3 foot ST506 
cable set. Hard Drive Case with 60 watt power supply and fan. Includes OS 9 LI and LII software. 1 
megabyte transfer in 45 seconds! Type ahead under OS 9. Complete instructions. Easy one evening 
assembly. 




20 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 

30 Meg Kit Complete 60MS RLL 

40 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 

80 Meg Kit Complete 28MS 

Assemble and test any of the above add 

OPTIONS: 

B&B Real Time Clock (add to above) 
B&B XT ROM Auto Boot from hard disk 
B&B Hyper I/O run DECB on hard drive 
B&B Hyper HI Ramdisk/spooler for above 
FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 



539.00 
584.00 
630.00 
996.00 
50.00 

30.00 
19.95 
29.95 
19.95 
75.00 



CoCo FHL High Speed Hard Drive Kits 

KIT INCLUDES: FHL HCA/WD High Speed interface, Hard drive with WD 1002-05 controller, ST506 
cable set, 4 foot 40 pin cable, Hard Drive Case with 60 watt power supply and fan, OS9 software far LI 
and LII with source, Complete instructions. Easy one evening assembly. 

(INTERFACE SPECIFICATIONS: Size is the same as a floppy controller. Interfaces the WD 1002-05 
controller to the CoCo. This controller handles 3 hard and 4 floppy drives. Type ahead under OS9for 
both floppy and hard drive. Includes OS9 LI and LII software with source. Auloboot ROM included to 
boot from floppy or hard drive. Supports 0S9 only. I megabyte transfer in 37 seconds!) , 



Cables 

ST506 Hard drive to controller set 36" 
ST506 Hard drive to controller set 12" 
FHL HCA/WD 40 Pin, 2 connectors 48" 
Floppy cable 34 pin, 2 connectors 36" 



35.00 
28.00 
25.00 
20.00 



Floppy Drives (5.25" and 3.5" FLOPPY DISKS) 
TEAC High Quality Drives - 1 Year Warr. 
FD55B 360K 40 Track DS 5.25" 118.00 
FD55F 720K 80 Track DS 5.25: 151.00 
FD35F 720K 80 Track DS 3.5" 147.00 
(Bare drives, requires case and power supply) 



CoCo DECB Software 

eForth closeout continues (Hurry) $79.95 



30.00 



CoCo OS9 Level H w/512K Software* 

The Wiz $79.95 69.95 

FEATURES: Mac-Like interface with windows, text and binary upload/download with xmodem, kennit, 
on line HELP, AUTOLOGGING, Macros, VT52 emulation, Usage log and much more. The Wiz 
requires a R5232 Pak or similar device, LII and 512K. 



Sculptor (BIG SALE!!!) $450.00 
Database - 4th generation language 



149.00 



20 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 
40 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 
80 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 
Assemble & Test any of the above add 
OPTIONS: 

Floppy Drive (Mounted in case) 

FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up $150.00 



766.00 
861.00 
1227.00 
60.00 

128.00 
75.00 



Hard Drive Bits and Pieces 



DynaStar Word Processor $150.00 125.00 

FEATURES: Best OS 9 editor/word processor/text formatter, has everything you would expect and more, 
keyboard macros, supports terminals and windows simultaneously, configurable, auto-indent for C and 
Pascal programming, index and contents generation, mail merge, bug free, solid, works with big files 
and much more. New manual makes it easier to use than ever. Most papular word processor since 1982! 




69.95 
99.95 



119.00 
210.00 



B&B XT PC style interface 
B&B XT RTC interface w/clock/calendar 
(Call for Hard Drive and Kit prices) 

FHL HCA/WD High Speed Interface 
WD 1002-05 High Speed for FHL Interface 

(Supports both Hard and Floppy drives) 

(Call for Hard Drive prices) 



Hard Drive case with 60W P/S and Fan 103.50 

(Can also be used for floppy drives) 

SPECIFICATIONS: size 16" deep, 5.5" high, 7" wide. 60 "Watt power supply with 3 drive type power 
connectors, quiet 12 volt DC fan, LED power indicator, color matches CoCo. Holds 2 1/2 height hard 
or floppy drives and has card guided space for a PCB the size of a drive (like the WD 1002-05 
corsrolfcr) 



DynaSpell spelling checker 

by Dale Puckett 
Font Editor 

Super Sleuth disassembler 
FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 
B&B Wild and MV 

Books 

Inside OS9 Level II 



$94.50 

$29.95 
$50.00 
$150.00 



45.00 

19.95 
45.00 
75.00 
19.95 



$39.95 



29.95 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA and WC. NY residents add 7% sales 
tax. US shipping add $3.50. Please call for Air Express shipping. 

Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. 
* Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 

Telex 646740 

Call 315/474-7856 



HARD DISK 
SYSTEMS 
INFORMATION 



For the best and fastest hard disk systems, trust Frank 
Hogg Laboratory. 

At Frank Hogg Laboratory, we have taken over 3 years of 
knowledge and expertise in the manufacture of the well 
known QT 68000 based computers and applied it to the 
CoCo. Many of the components used in our hard disk 
systems are the same as that used in the QT! 

Hard disk systems have been available for the CoCo for 
some years now, most are good reliable systems. 
However we have two new systems for the CoCo that are 
better. They are just as reliable as other systems, perhaps 
even more so. But they are both faster and less 
expensive. 

Our top of the line system features Bruce Isted's interface 
for the Western Digital WD 1002-05 high speed 
controller. Features; fastest system available, 1 
megabyte transfer in only 37 seconds! ! Ttwice as fast as 
other systems! Supports 4 floppy and 3 hard drives, type 
ahead for both floppy and hard disk, auto boot OS9 
LI or L2 from hard or floppy disk. 
Disadvantage; does not support DECB. This is the 
system of choice for the serious OS9 user. 

Our second system features the Burke & Burke XT and 
XT RTC interface. This interface uses popular and 
inexpensive IBM PC type controllers. For this reason it is 
the least expensive hard disk system available today. Not 
as fast as the Isted system but faster than any other system 
available. It also supports RLL drives. 
Disadvantage; requires a mulu-pak. 

Note: DECB support and other software options are 
listed on our price list. 



QT OOx 68000 & 
QT 20x 68020 
Computers 

These powerful computers are now 
available in kit form as well as fully 
assembled and tested systems. We 
also do custom systems based on 
these computers. Kit prices for floppy 
based QT OOx systems start at only 
$1995 while floppy based QT 20x 
systems start at only $2650. 

All systems include OS9lProfessional 
Operating System with both C and 
Basic programming languages. Also 
included is QCom communications 
and backup software. 

Call or write for a brochure. 



ANNOUNCEMENT! 



FRANK HOGG LABORATORY 
BUYS OUT INVENTORY OF 

Sculptor! 
SELLS FOR LESS THAN 
DISTRIBUTOR COST!!! 



Frank Hogg Laboratory purchased the remaining inventory of another 
Sculptor distributor! Because we got them so low we can offer them to you at 

tremendous savings. 

Sculptor for the CoCo III with OS9 Level II* is 




$149 is below distributor cost! The list price is $450!! Once they are 
gone the prices will go back to normal. This is a great opportunity to buy 
the most powerful Database/4th Generation Language available today!!. * 
Requires OS9 LII and 512K. 

They won't last long. 
Hurry and get yours today!!! ! 



Also on SALE Sculptor MS/DOS $149 
Sculptor OS9/68K $295 



See Dale Puckett's February and March 
1988 Rainbow columns for more 
information on this great package. 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA and M/C. NY residents add 7% sales tax. US shipping 
add $3.50. Please call for Air Express shipping. 

Send for your FREE FHL NewsLetter and Catalog. 

* Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 

Telex 646740 

Call 315/474-7856 



Line Number Description 


50-60 


Introductory screen and melody. 


100-130 


Program initialization. 


500 


Set initial piay values. 


510-550 


Set up main screen. 


1000-1050 


Input main screen command and branch. 


1100-1120 


O.K. to end? 


1130-1160 


Check main screen input for invalid characters. 


1170 


Toggle on/off learn mode. 


1180-1200 


Set up sub-menu, Input command and branch. 


1210-1390, 




1500-1580 


Edit subroutines. 


2000 


Increase octave. 


2010-2020 


Decrease octave. 


2030 


Place item into song if learn mode is on. 


2040 


Increase note length. 


2050-2060 


Decrease note length. 


2070 


Rest. 


2080-2090 


Change tempo. 


3000 


Change stanza. 


3010-3040 


Display help screen. 




Table 2: Subroutine Locations 



fii Various uses — string manipulation. 

Ci String of spaces to clear display areas. 

CC Lenth of song "learned." 

CP Cursor position in edit mode. 

D$ String of spaces to clear stanza area. 

t ASCII value of E$. 

E$ Input variable (inkeys function). 

FG$ Valid/invalid character flag when in edit mode. 
0 = invalid, 1 = valid. 

FL$ Learn flag. 0 - OFF, It- ON. 

hs play function header, i.e., octave is 0. 

IT(l$ Function value (octave, tempo, etc.) to place into song. 

L High value of function (octave, tempo, etc.) 

N Number of stanzas. 

ns Notes to be placed into song. 

NL Note length value. 

NV$ Valid/not valid character input. 

OCT Octave value. 

p$ Opening melody. 

S Stanza displayed during edit mode. 

S$ Song strings. 

TP$ Tempo value. 

vs Notes which may be sharp. 

x,y Loop and miscellaneous variables. 

Table 3: Variable List 



Variables are defined in Table 3. You will note that some 
variables are used for different purposes and serve no single 
function. 



(Questions or comments concerning this program may be 
directed to the author at 521 Annex Ave., Kannapolis> NC 
28081. Please enclose an SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 




500 , 


. 89 


1420 . . 


216 


550 


.184 


1540 . . 


26 


1160 


....92 


2010 


203 


1240 


215 


2090 , , 


.180 


1339 . . 


. . .249 


END 


...235 



The listing: S0NGWRTR 

10 **************************** 
20 ******** SONG WRITER ******* 
30 •**** BY GARRY L SHELTON *** 
40 ******** MARCH 1986 ******** 

49 i*** INTRODUCTORY SCREEN *** 

50 CLS:PRINT@33,STRING$(30,214) ; 
: PRINT 9449, STRING $ ( 3 0 , 2 14 ) ? : FORX 
=65T0417STEP32 : PRINTQX , CHR$ (214) 
; : PRINT@X+2 9 , CHR$ (214);: NEXTX : PR 
INT@138 , "song writer" ; : PRINT© 20 6 
, "by" ; : PRINT.<§264 , "garry 1 shelto 
n"; 

60 P$="02;L4;T3;GGAL3;F+;L16;GL4 
; ABB03 ; C02 ; L3 ; BL16 ; AL4GAGF+L2 ; G" 
: PLAYP$ 

99 •*** PROGRAM INITIALIZATION * 
** 

100 POKE65495,0:CLEAR5000:DIMK$( 



12) ,N$(21) ,S$(25) :FORX=lT012:REA 
DK$(X) : NEXTX : FORX=lT02 1 : READN$ ( X 
) : NEXTX : FORX=lT07 : READV$ (X) : NEXT 
X: C$=STRING$ (12,32): D$=STRING$ ( 9 
0,32) 

110 DATA Z,S,X,D,C,V,G,B,H,N,J,M 
120 DATA C,C+,D,D+,E,F,F+,G,G+,A 
,A+,B, 94, 10, 8, 9, 32, 12, 64, 45, 95 
130 DATA C,D,F,G,A,E,B 

499 i*** SET INITIAL "PLAY" VALU 
ES *** 

500 OCT=2 :NL=4 : TP$="2 " : N=l : NV$=" 
0":FL$="0" 

509 i*** SET UP MAIN SCREEN *** 

510 CLS : PRINT@0 , "SONG : " ; : PRINTH9 
6 , "OCTAVE : " ; : PRINT® 10 8 , "NOTE LEN 
GTH : " ; : PRINT@128 , "LEARN MODE : " : P 
RINT % 1 60 , " S TANZA NUMBER : " : PRINTS 
179 , "TEMPO : " : FORX=16T02 7 : FORY=10 
T051 : SET ( Y , X , 5 ) : NEXTY : FORY=15T04 
5STEP6: RESET (Y,X) : NEXTY, X 

520 FORX=16TO21:FORY=14TO20STEP6 
:RESET(Y,X) : RESET (Y+2,X) : NEXTY :F 
ORY=32T044STEP6:RESET(Y,X) : RESET 
( Y+2 ,X) : NEXTY , X : PRINT §19 2 , STRING 
$(32,230) ;:PRINT@327,"s»; : PRINT© 
330 , "d" ; : PRINTQ336 , "g" ; : PRINTQ33 
9 , "h" ; : PRINT@342 , " j " ; : PRINTQ422 , 



46 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



H z ,, ;:PRINT@425,"x" ; 

53j3 PRINT@428, I, C I » ; : PRINT (§431, "v" 

; : PRINT@434 , ,f b ,f ; : PRINT@437 , "n" ; : 
PRINT@44j3 / "m"; 

54j3 PRINT@6,D$; :PRINT§6, S$(N) ;:P 
RINT@103," " ; :PRINT@1J33,0CT; :P 
RINT@120 , » " PRINT@12j3 , NL; : PR 
INT@145 , C$ ; : PRINT@175 , " " ; : PRI 
NT@175,N; :PRINT@186, " " ; :PRIN 
T@186,TP$; :IFFL$= ,I 1" THENPRINT@1 
40, "ON " ;ELSEPRINT@140, "OFF" ; 
550 PLAY"0"+STR$ (OCT) + " ; "+"L"+ST 

R$(NL)+";"+"T"+TP$ 

999 • *** INPUT A COMMAND *** 

10j3j3 E$=INKEY$:IFE$="" THEN10J3J3E 
LSEE=ASC(E$) 

101J3 IFE=92 THENllj3j3ELSEGOSUB113 
J3:IFNV$="0" THEN100j3ELSENV$="0" 
1020 IFE=64 THENGOSUB1170;GOTO10 

00 

1030 IFE=12 THEN1180ELSEIFE=94 T 
HEN2000ELSEIFE=10THEN2010ELSEIFE 
=8 THEN2040ELSEIFE=9 THEN2050ELS 
EIFE=32 THEN2070ELSEIFE=45 THENT 
P$="":GOTO2080ELSEIFE=95 THEN301 

0 

1040 IFFL$="1" THENS$(N)=S$(N)+E 
$:PRINT@6,S$(N) ; :IFLEN(S$(N) ) >80 

THENGOSUB3000 
1050 POKE65494,0:PLAYE$:POKE6549 
5,0:GOTO1000 

1099 1 *** END *** 

1100 PRINT@145,"end? y/n" ; 

1110 E$=INKEY$:IFE$="" THEN1110E 
LSEIFE$="Y" THENPOKE65494,0:END 
1120 PRINT@145,C$; :GOTO1000 

1129 '*** CHECK FOR VALID CHARAC 
TER *** 

1130 F0RX=1T012:IFE$=K$(X) THENE 
$=N$(X) :X=12:NV$="1" 

1140 NEXTX:IFNV$="1" THENRETURN 
115jS FORX=13T021:IFE=VAL(N$(X) ) 
THENX=21:NV$="1" 
1160 NEXTX: RETURN 

1169 '*** CHANGE LEARN FLAG *** 

1170 IFFL$="1" THENFL$="0" : PRINT 
@140, "OFF" ; : RETURNELSEFL$=" 1" : PR 
INT@140 , "ON " ; : RETURN 

1179 i*** SET UP SUB-MENU *** 

118j3 PRINT@145,"e p n s 1 r " ; 
1190 E$=INKEY$:IFE$="" THEN1190E 
LSEIFE$=*"P" THEN1400ELSEIFE$="E" 
THEN1210ELSEIFE$="N"THEN1410ELS 
EIFE$="S"THEN144j3ELSEIFE$="L"THE 
N1460ELSEIFE$="R" THENPRINT @ 14 5 , 
C$; :GOTO1000 
1200 GOTO1190 

1209 •*** EDIT SONG *** 

1210 CLS : S=l : CP=1 : PRINT@29 6 , "EDI 
T COMMANDS " : PRINT @ 3 6 , "STANZA : 



S : PRINT@56 , "edit" : PRINT@3 20 , "cle 
ar TO QUIT space TO EDIT": PRI 
NT@352,"UP ARROW - DISPLAY PREV. 

STANZA. " : PRINT© 3 84 , "DN ARROW - 
DISPLAY NEXT STANZA. ": GOSUB12 60 
1220 E$=INKEY$:IFE$="" THEN1220E 
LSEE=ASC(E$) 

1230 IFE=10 THEN1240ELSEIFE=94 T 
HEN1250ELSEIFE=32 THENPRINT @4 4 8 , 
STRING$(20 / 32) ; : GOTO1270ELSEIFE= 
12 THEN510ELSE1220 

1239 '*** NEXT STANZA *** 

1240 IFS<N THENS=S+1:GOSUB12 60:G 
OTO1220ELSE1220 

1249 '*** PREVIOUS STANZA *** 

1250 IF S>1 THENS=S-1:GOSUB12 60: 
GOTO1220ELSE1220 

1259 '*** DISPLAY STANZA *** 

1260 PRINT@44,S;:CC=LEN(S$(S)) :P 
RINT@96,D$; :PRINT@96,S$(S) ; :RETU 
RN 

1269 f *** EDIT STANZA *** 

1270 A$=MID$(S$(S) ,CP,1) :E$=INKE 
Y$:PRINT§95+CP, CHR$(191) ;:PRINT@ 
9 5+CP , CHR$ (191);: PRINTS9 5+CP , A$ ; 
:IFE$="" THEN1270ELSEE=ASC(E$) 
1280 IFE=8 THEN13 20ELSEIFE=9 THE 
N13 30ELSEIFE=12 THEN13 40ELSEIFE= 



it . 




"1 cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now, it's time to 
give BASIC a shot In the arm. with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-cclumn display, in the colors of your 
choice with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3. our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs 
into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S 15-20; we provide information concerning how you can 
have this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35. 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC programs, auto-edit of error fine, and 
many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, 1 RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk . . . $34.95 aiglnal ADOS tor CoCo 1 or 2 , . . $27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 

Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid tor the expert. 
CoCo 1. 2. or 3 compatible. 

Disk . . . S23.95 Assembier source listing . . . Add S3.00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

Magnovox8CM515/6CM505/8CM643 . 



S19.95 SonyKV1311CR . . . S29.95 



SPECTROSVSJEMS 




11111 N. KendaD Drive, 
Suite A1C8 
Miami, Florida 33173 
(305) 274-3899 Day or Eve. 



No delay on fKsrwntf tfiecta • PteoM add S2.00 shtopkig * S^ry no credit cards or COD's. 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 47 



13 THEN1370 

1289 •*** PLACE INPUT CHAR. INTO 
STANZA *** 

1290 IF CC>=90 THENSOUND5,5:GOTO 
1270 

1300 IFCP-1 THENS$(S)=E$+S$(S) E 
LSES$(S)=LEFT$(S$(S) ,CP-1)+E$+RI 
GHT$(S$(S) ,CC-(CP-1) ) 
1310 PRINT@96,S$ (S) ; : CC=CC+1 : CP= 
CP+1: GOTO 1270 

1319 i*** MOVE EDIT CURSOR LEFT 

1320 IFCP=1 THEN1270ELSECP=CP-1: 
GOTO1270 

1329 '*** MOVE EDIT CURSOR RIGHT 
*** 

1330 IFCP=CC THEN1270ELSECP=CP+1 
:GOTO1270 

1339 •*** DELETE CHAR *** 

1340 IFCC<=1 THENSOUND5,5:GOT012 
70 

1350 IFCP-1 THENS$(S)=RIGHT$(S$( 
S),CC-1) ELSEIFCP=CC THENS$(S)=L 
EFT$(S$(S) ,CC-1) ELSES$(S)=LEFT$ 
(S$(S) ,CP-1)+RIGHT$(S$(S) ,CC-CP) 
1360 PRINT@96,D$; :PRINT@96,S$(S) 
; : IFCP=CC THENCP=CP-1 : CC=CC-1 : GO 
TO1270ELSECC=CC-1 : GOTO1270 

1369 '*** CHECK FOR VALID EDIT C 
HARS *** 

1370 CP=1:Y=LEN(S$(S) ) :FG$="0" 
1380 IFCP>Y THENPRINT@448 , STRING 

$(20,32) ; :PRINT<§448, "edit comple 

te" ; : CP=1 : GOTO1220ELSEE$=MID$ (S$ 

(S),CP,1) 

1390 GOTO1500 

1399 '*** PLAY THE SONG *** 

1400 POKE65494 , 0 : PLAY"02 ; L4 ;T2 ; V 
15" : FORX=lTO N: PRINTS 6, D$ ; : PRINT 
@6,S$(X) ; :PRINT@175,X; :PLAYS$(X) 
:NEXTX:POKE65495,0:GOTO1190 

1409 '*** NEW SONG? *** 

1410 PRINT© 14 5, "new song? yn"; 

1420 E$=INKEY$:IFE$="" THEN1420E 
LSEIFE$="Y" THENFORX= 1TO N:S$(X) 
=" " : NEXT : OCT=2 : NL=4 : TP$="2 " : N=l : 
NV$="0":FL$="0":GOTO540 
1430 GOTO1180 

1439 «*** SAVE "SONG" *** 

1440 POKE65494,0:PRINT@145, "reco 
rder " ; : IFINKEY$=" " THEN1440 
1450 OPEN"0",#-l, "SONG":PRINT#-l 
,OCT,NL,TP$:FORX=lTO N:PRINT#-1, 
S$(X) : NEXT: CLOSE :POKE65495,0: GOT 
01180 

1459 i*** LOAD "SONG" *** 

1460 POKE65494,0:PRINT@145, "reco 
rder ";:IFINKEY$="" THEN1460 
1470 N=0 : OPEN" I" , #-1 , "SONG" : INPU 



T#-1,0CT,NL,TP$ 

1480 IFEOF(-l) THENCLOSE:FL$="0" 
:NV$="0" :POKE65495,0:GOTO540 
1490 N=N+l:INPUT#-l,S$(N) :G0T014 
80 

1499 •*** EDIT SUBROUTINE *** 

1500 L=255:IFE$="T" OR E$="P" OR 
E$="L" THEN1570ELSEIFE$="O" THEN 
L=5:GOTO1570ELSEIFE$="V" THENL=3 
1:GOTO1570 

1509 '*** CHECK FOR CORRECT NOTE 
S *** 

1510 F0RX=1T07:IFE$=V$(X) THENX= 
7:FG$="1" 

1520 NEXTX:IFFG$="1" THEN1560 
1530 IFE$="+" THEN1540 ELSEPRINT 
@448,STRING$(20,32) ; : PRINTQ448 , " 
invalid note" ; : SOUNDS , 5 : GOTO1270 

1539 '*** CHECK FOR CORRECT SHAR 
PS *** 

1540 F0RX=1T05:IFMID$(S$(S) , CP-1 
,1)=V$(X) THENFG$="1":X=5 

1550 NEXTX:IFFG$="1" THEN1560ELS 
EPRINT@448,STRING$(20,32) ; :PRINT 
@448 , "invalid use of sharp";: SOU 
ND5,5:GOTO1270 

1559 i*** UP CURS POS. BY ONE - 
CONTINUE EDIT *** 

1560 FG$="0":CP=CP+1:GOTO1380 

1569 '*** CHECK FOR CORRECT FORM 
AT OF FUNCTIONS *** 

1570 F0RX=1T0 L: A$=E$+RIGHT$ (STR 
$(X) ,LEN(STR$(X) )-l)+";":PRINT@4 
16,A$,E$; :IFA$=MID$(S$(S) ,CP,LEN 
(A$) ) THENX=255:FG$="1" 

1580 NEXTX:IFFG$="1" THENCP=CP+L 
EN (A$) :FG$="0":GOTO1380 ELSEPRIN 
T@448 , STRING $ (20 , 32 ) ; : PRINT@448 , 
"invalid format" ;: SOUNDS, 5: G0T01 
270 

1999 i*** INCREASE OCTAVE *** 

2000 IF0CT=5 THEN1000ELSEOCT=OCT 
+1:GOTO2020 

2009 '*** DECREASE OCTAVE *** 

2010 IF0CT=1 THEN1000ELSEOCT=OCT 
-1 

2020 ITM$=RIGHT$(STR$(OCT) ,1) :PL 
AY"0"+ITM$ : PRINT@ 103 , OCT ; : H$="0" 
: IFFL$="1" THENGOSUB2030 : GOTO100 
0ELSE1000 

2029 '*** PLACE INTO SONG IF FLA 
G IS SET *** 

2030 S$ (N) =S$ (N) +H$+ITM$+" ; " : PRI 
NT@6,S$(N) ; :IFLEN(S$(N) )>80 THEN 
GOSUB3000 : RETURNELSERETURN 

2039 »*** INCREASE NOTE LENGTH * 
** 

2040 IFNL=1 THEN1000ELSEIFNL<8 T 
HENNL=NL-1 : GOTO2060ELSENL=NL/2 : G 



48 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



f 



DECREASE NOTE LENGTH * 



OTO2060 
2j349 '*** 

2050 IFNL=64 THEN10J30ELSEIFNL>3 

THENNL=NL*2 ELSENL=NL+1 

2060 ITM$=RIGHT$ (STR$ (NL) ,LEN(ST 

R$(NL) )-l) :PLAY»L"+ITM$:PRINT@12 

0,NL; :H$="L" : IFFL$="1" THENGOSUB 

2030:GOTO1000ELSE1000 

2069 1 *** REST *** 

2070 IFFL$= ,I J8 W THEN1000ELSEH$="P 
» : ITM$=RIGHT$ (STR$ (NL) ; LEN (STR$ ( 
NL) ) -1) : GOSUB2030 : IFLEN (S$ (N) ) >8 
0 THENGOSUB3000: GOTO 10 00 ELSE 1000 

2079 •*** CHANGE TEMPO *** 

2080 E$=INKEY$:IFE$= !,,, THEN2080 E 
LSEIFASC(E$)=13 THEN2090ELSEIFAS 
C(E$)=8 THENTP$=LEFT$ (TP$ , LEN (TP 
$)-l) :PRINT§186,» ";:PRINT@18 
6 , TP$ ; : GOTO2080ELSETP$=TP$+E$ : PR 
INT@ 18 6 , 11 » ; : PRINT 918 6 , TP$ ; : G 
OTO2080 

2090 IFVAL(TP$)<1 OR VAL(TP$)>25 
5 THENSOUND5 , 5 : GOTO2080ELSEPLAY 11 
T"+TP$ : IFFL$= fl l" THENITM$=TP$ : H$ 
= ,f T" :GOSUB2030:GOTO1000ELSE1000 
2999 ■*** CHANGE STANZA *** 



3000 N=N+1:PRINT@6,D$;:PRINT@175 
,N; : RETURN 

3009 •*** HELP SCREEN *** 

3010 CLS:PRINT@0, "***** SONG WRI 
TER COMMANDS *****";: PRINT "UP AR 
ROW INCREASE OCTAVE" : PRINT" D 
N ARROW DECREASE OCTAVE" :PRI 
NT"<- INCREASE NOTE":P 
RINT"-> DECREASE NOTE" 
:PRINT"SPACE BAR REST" 

3020 PRINT"- CHANGE T 

EMPO " : PRINT " @ TOGGLE 
ON/OFF LEARN";: PRINT "SHIFT CLEAR 
END PROGRAM" : PRINT "CLEAR 
DISPLAY SUB-MENU" -.PRINT" eDIT 
SONG SAVE SONG": PRINT" pLAY 

SONG 10AD SONG": PRINT" nEW S 

ONG rETURN" 

3030 PRINT: PRINT "SHI FT UP ARROW 
HELP SCREEN" : PLAY" T2 ;03 ;L8 ;C02 ; 
EE03 ; CL2 ; CL8 ; C02 ; EE03 ; CC02 ; EFEDD 
DBL2 ; BL8 ; BDDBBDEDCCCAL2 ; AL8 ; ACCA 
ACDCOl ;BBB02 ;G+L2 ;G+L8 ; G+ABFL1 ;E 

" :PRINT@484, "press any key to re 
turn" ; : PRINT §0 , ; 

3040 IFINKEY$=" " THEN3040ELSE510 



0 ^ M('fW»HH 




New, Lowest Prices Ever On Interfaces 




0 vom *4 mum metm+t* © 





Model 101 

Serial to Parallel Printer Interface 

★ Works with any COCO 

★ Compatible with "Centronics" Parallel Input Printers 

★ Just turn the knob to select any one of 6 baud rates 300-9600 

★ Comes complete with cables to connect to your printer 
and computer 

★ Can be powered by most printers 

Model 104 Deluxe Interface 
with "Modem Switch" 

★ Same Features as 1 01 Plus 

★ Built in Serial Port for your Modem or other serial device 

★ Switch between Serial Output and Parallel Output 

★ Comes with cables to connect to your computer and printer 

★ Can be powered by most printers 

Model 1 05 Serial Switch 

★ Connects to your COCO to give you 2 switch selectable 
Serial Ports 

★ Comes with a 3 foot cable to connect to your computer 

★ Now you can connect your Printer (or printer interface) 
and your Modem (or other serial device) to your COCO 
and flip the switch to use either device 

★ Does not require power 



Cassette Label Printing Program 



New Version 2.1 prints 7 lines of information 
on Cassette labels 

Comes on Tape with instructions to transfer to disk 
Menu driven, very easy to use 
Save and Load Labels from Tape and Disk 
Uses the features of your printer to print standard, 
expanded, and condensed characters 
Automatically Centers Each Line of Text 
Allows editing of label before printing 
Program comes with 24 labels to get you started 
16KECB required 



Some of the Printers 
That Can - 

Supply power for the 101 and 
104 are Radio Shack, Star, 
Okidata, Brother, Juki, and 
Smith Corona. 

Some of the Printers 
That Cannot - 

Supply power for the interfaces 
are Epson, Seikosha, 
Panasonic, Silver Reed and 
NEC. If your printer cannot 
supply power to the interface 
you can order your interface 
with the "P" option or you can 
supply your own AC adapter. 
We recommend the Radio 
Shack 273- 1431 AC adapter 
with a 274-328 connector 
adapter. 

Write or call for more 
information or for technical 
assistance. 



Price List 



35.95 

41.95 
44.95 
51.95 
14.95 



Model 101 

Model 1 01 P 

Model 104 

Model 104P 

Model 105 

Cassette Label Program 6.95 

Pin Feed Cassette Labels: 
White 3.00/100 
Colors (specify) 3.60/C 
Red-Blue-Yellow-Tan 

C-10 Cassette 
Tapes 

Cassette Storage 
Boxes 

4 Pin Din Serial 

COCO Cables: 

Male/Mate 6 foot 

Male/Female 6 foot 

Female/Female 6 foot 

Other Lengths Available. 

All items covered by a 
1 year warranty 



7.50/dozen 



2.50/dozen 



4.49 
4.49 
4.49 



Ordering info 

★ Free Shipping in the 

U.S.A. and Canada 
(except AK and HI) 
on all orders over $50 

★ On orders under $50 please 
add $2.50 for shipping 

and handling 

★ On orders outside the 
U.S.A. and Canada please 
write or call for shipping 
charges 



You Can Pay By: 

★ VISA or MasterCard 

★ C.O.D.- add $2.25 

★ Or send check or money 
order payable in U.S. funds 

Metric Industries Inc. 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 
P.O. Box 42396 

(513)677-0796 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 49 




RAINBOWS 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from Tht 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $25 to give 
your account a positive balance. 
This will be refunded after your first 
free hour if you choose to no longer 
use the system or it will be applied 
to future connect charges. If you do 
not maintain a positive balance, you 
will be charged $3.50 each month 
for direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — on 
a regular basis. Conference sched- 
ules will appear in the rainbow 
each month. Be sure to check online 
announcements for changes and 
additions. 

THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $24.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to the rainbow entitles 
you to this $32.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

If you're not a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hour of connect time. 

SAVE EVEN MORE 

Want to save even more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29.95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21 .95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21.60). 

Delphi provides us all with 
Immediate CoCo Community. 

Check it out today. After all, you can 
sample it for free! 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



DELPHI 



TYPE: 

GROUP COCO 



COMMUNITY TOGETHER 



How to reach RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and the 
rainbow's CoCo SIG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Telenet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1 200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and one stop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge for Telenet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $10.80 (U.S.) per 
hour. 

On Telenet: Uninet network has merged with Telenet. 
To get the Telenet number for your area, call (800) 336- 
0437. After you call the local access number and make 
connection, press ENTER twice. When the "TERMINAL=" 
prompt appears, press enter again. When the "@" prompt 
appears, type C DELPHI and press enter. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage" or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier." At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press 'A'. 
When "please log in:" appears, type DELPHI and press 

ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (.) and 
ENTER (use two periods if you're using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1, 3:126 and press ENTER. Now type p 1 3106, 
DELPHI ; and press enter. Delphi's new rates indicate an 
additional $10.80 hourly surcharge for evening use of 
Datapac, which means a total of $18 (U.S.) for connect 
time. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Telenet or 
Tymnet. Check with the telephone authorities in your 
country for details on how to sign up for this service. When 
you have an account set up, you can reach Delphi with 
a "host code" of 3110 6170 3088 through Telenet, or 3106 
90 6015 through Tymnet. (YouH have to pay the toll 
charges for this connection.) 
Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to the rainbow, at the 



"USERNAME:" prompt, type JDINDELPHI and press 
ENTER. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type RAINBOW. 
Then, at the "NUMBER:" prompt, type your individual 
subscription number from the mailing label of your latest 
issue of the rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros at 
the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you don't already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type JDINDELPHI and press enter. At 
the "PASSWORD:"prompt, type SENDRAINBOW and press 
enter. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because youll be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your rainbow and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill for subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just use Control-X and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BYE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter the CoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. We'll 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP CDCD 

After you sign in, youll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "user name" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and you'll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. Youll also 
be assigned a temporary password. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next day. Once an account is verified and opened, each 
rainbow subscriber will be credited with an hour of free 
time! 

When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into your 
own personal password. This is the password you will use 
for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 

After Max bids you goodbye, youll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 



F ea ture 




Print 
That Tune! 



By Greg Boots 



52 




rn your 




into 



more 
a piano 




x'z* v.- 



Want to use the advantages of 
the Extended BASIC PLAV 
command to put a tune into 
a program, but not sure how to get the 
numbers? Print Tune turns the key- 
board into more than a piano; With the 
aid of the Radio Shack disk drive and 
a TP- 10 printer, you can print the 
complete PLRY statement for that tune 
by simply pressing a key. Type in and 
save Print Tune. Run the program and 
you are prompted with the main menu. 

Notice that you are at Sound #1 . Turn 
tip the TV volume and press one of the 
top row of 12 keys (1 -across), being 
careful not to press break. The key 
pressed represents a note and is printed 
on the menu with a corresponding 
sound. The top row keys are the com- 
plete octave; there are five octaves 
selected by pressing the up or down 
arrow key Press one of the note keys 
and adjust the octave to hear the desired 

Greg Boots, an electronic engineering 
technician for a small accoustic 
emission^testing company, is a self- 
taught programmer who owns two 
Co Cos. 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 




16K Disk 




note. The length of the note can be made 
shorter (=1) or longer (=255) by pressing 
the left or right arrow key. Pressing X 
changes the amount incremented (1 or 
10). After choosing a note, press ENTER 
to store that note in memory. 

Now the screen shows that you are at 
the next sound. Press the space bar, and 
the note that had been entered is played. 
Once a few notes have been entered and 
you press the space bar, you will hear 
a string of sounds that may sound a little 
funny. In most cases some editing will 
have to be done. To edit a note you must 
single-step to the sound you want to edit 
by pressing S and enter the starting 
sound number (e.g., #1 — Sound #1 or 
the beginning of the tune). 

If you enter nothing or a letter or 
incorrect number, the program will 
return to the main menu. In the single- 
step mode the lower portion of the 
screen gives you a new menu of options, 
takes you to the starting sound number 
and plays the sound. At this point press 
P to repeat the sound for further inves- 
tigation, or continue single-stepping. 
You can single-step through each sound 
to the end of the tune, although you will 
have to enter a new starting number. 

At any point up to the last sound 
entered, you can go back to the starting 
sound by pressing R. You can loop 
through a section of the tune to lobk for 
the sound you want to edit by single- 
stepping through the tune and returning 
to the starting sound. 

There are two ways out of the single- 
step mode: single-stepping or editing. 



When you find the sound you want to 
edit, press E. The menu is changed, and 
the numbers for that particular sound 
are placed on the screen. At this point 
you have to know what you want to 
change; for example, the Pause Length, 
which is the length of the pause after the 
sound, is determined by pressing the 
SHIFT and left or right arrow key 
(l=longest, 255=shortest). 

Sound volume is adjusted by the 
SHIFT up or down arrow key (l=quiet, 
31=loud). Pressing the space bar plays 
the tune /Up; to the editing sound. You 
have the option to change any or none 
of the numbers in the editing sound. 
Once you press ENTER, the numbers, 
changed or not, are placed back into 
that particular sound in memory. Edit 
is a fast way out of the single-step mode, 
press E and ENTER, returning to the 
main menu for options. 

Press the space bar to be sure your 
tune is safely stored. You can save it on 
disk by pressing $. The disk drive comes 
to life as CoCo looks at the directory, 
prints the name of the tunes on file and 
prompts you to enter a filename for the 
tune. Enter the name of the tune in eight 
letters or less. (Entering nothing returns 
you to the main menu.) Once entered, 
the tune is stored on disk, and you are 
returned to the main menu. 

To enter a new tune, BREAK the 
program and run. Now you are at 
Sound #1. Breaking the program is not 
necessary when loading a new tune from 
disk. To load a tune into memory from 
disk, press & and the directory is read; 



the tunes on file are printed, prompting 
you to enter the tune desired. 

After lengthening or editing, press ?; 
the tune you have made can be printed 
as a PLAY statement that can be used in 
a BASIC program. If the PLAY statement 
is greater than 255 bytes, consecutive 
statements are printed. The pause 
length will be shorter (divide 13.4) on 
the printout due to the computer time 
required for playing the tune while 
pressing the space bar. 

Except during input/ output or play- 
ing the tune, the program uses the "fast 
BASIC" (POKE 65495,0) to give the 
keyboard better response. For those of 
you who can't use it, delete the pokes 
in lines 770 and 780. Also, the printout 
is written for normal BASIC. If you save 
a tune on disk using the name of one 
already on file, the new tune will write 
over the old one. The new tune should 
be equal in length or longer than the old 
one, or they will mix. 

Keep the program and tunes together 
on a separate (formatted) disk, because 
the program will see other data files. 
Each sound uses five bytes of memory 
and the program presently allows for 
200 sounds. This can be changed by 
altering the DIM statement on Line 10. 
Line 110 will change both 996s to 
whatever DIM- 9 is in the program. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 1438 Thayer Dr., Richland, 
WA 99352. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 




160 218 

310 251 

370 36 



460 60 

580 53 

680 251 

END 134 



The listing: PRINTLINE 

r 

5 1 "PRINTUNE" 

6 1 WRITTEN BY GREG BOOTS 

1JJ GOSUB770:CLEAR1300:DIMDAT(10j3 

5) :DAT=1:PLAY"T2" 

15 »**BASIC VARIABLES** 

20 A=1:B=30:C=31:D=1:E=255:X=10: 

S=0 

25 '**MAIN MENU** 

30 CLS:PRINT@33, "NOTE=l ACROSS T 



O 12" 

40 PRINT" OCTAVE=UP OR DOWN" 
50 PRINT" LENGTH=LEFT OR RIGHT" 
60 PRINT" PAUSE LENGTH= A (L)OR(R 

) H 

70 PRINT" VOLUME= A UP OR DOWN" 
80 PRINT@1,"X="X 

90 GOSUB770 : PRINT @ 7 , "SOUND* "INT ( 
DAT/5) +1 

100 IFED=0 THENPRINT@193 , "PRESS 
<S> TO SINGLE STEP": PRINT" <SPAC 
EBAR> PLAYS TUNE": PRINT" <ENTER> 
KEEPS SOUND* "INT (DAT/ 5 )+l: PRINT 
<$> TO SAVE TUNE": PRINT" < 
&> TO LOAD A TUNE": PRINT" <?> 
TO PRINT TUNE" 

110 I FD AT=9 9 6 THENPRINT 919,"* LAS T 

SOUND* "ELSEIFDAT>996THENS=1 
120 PRINT@58,D 



it 



June 1 988 THE RAINBOW 53 



130 PRINT@90,A 

140 PRINT@122,B 

150 PRINT@154,E 

160 PRINT@186,C 

165 1 **KEYBOARD INPUT** 

170 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN170ELSE 

NUM=VAL(A$) 

180 I FNUM>= 1ANDNUM< 1 0THEND=NUM : G 
OTO400 

190 IFA$="0"THEND=10:GOTO400 
200 IFA$=" : "THEND=11 : GOTO400 
210 IFA$="-"THEND=12:GOTO400 
220 IFA$=" AI, ANDA<5THENA=A+1: GOTO 
130 

230 IFA$=CHR$(10)ANDA>1THENA=A-1 
: GOTO130 

240 IFA$=CHR$ (9) ANDB<256-X THENB 
=B+X: GOTO 140 

250 IFA$=CHR$(8)ANDB>0+X THENB=B 
-X: GOTO 140 

260 IFA$=CHR$(93)ANDE<256-X THEN 
E=E+X:GOTO150 

270 IFA$=CHR$(21)ANDE>0+X THENE= 
E-X:GOTO150 

280 IFA$=CHR$(95)ANDC<32-X THENC 
=C+X: GOTO 160 

290 IFA$=CHR$ (91) ANDO0+X THENC= 
C-X:GOTO160 

300 IFA$="X"THENIFX=1THENX=10 : GO 
TO80 

3 10 I F A$ = " X " THEN IFX= 10THENX= 1 : GO 
TO80 

320 IFA$=CHR$ (32) THENFORPL=l TOD 
AT STEP5 : IFPL=DAT THEN9 0ELSEPRIN 
T@13 , INT (PL/5) +1: GOSUB780 : PLAY"0 
"+STR$ (DAT (PL) ) +" ;L"+STR$ (DAT (PL 
+1) ) +" ; V"+STR$ (DAT (PL+2 ) ) +« ; "+ST 
R$ ( DAT ( PL+3 ) ) +" ; P"+STR$ ( DAT ( PL+4 
) ) : NEXTPL 

330 IFA$=CHR$ ( 13 ) ANDED=1 THENED= 
0 : DAT ( DAT ) =A : DAT ( DAT+ 1 ) =B : DAT ( DA 
T+2 ) =C : DAT ( DAT+3 ) =D : DAT ( DAT+4 ) =E 
: DAT=PAT: A=DAT (DAT) : B=DAT (DAT+1) 
: C=DAT ( DAT+2 ) : D=DAT ( DAT+ 3 ) : E=DAT 
(DAT+4) :GOTO20 

340 IFA$=CHR$ (13) ANDS=0 THENDAT ( 
DAT) =A: DAT (DAT+1) =B: DAT (DAT+2) =C 
: DAT ( DAT+3 ) =D : DAD ( DAT+4 ) =E : DAT=D 
AT+5 

350 IFA$="S"ANDED=0 THENPRINT § 2 2 
5 : PRINTTAB ( 120 ) : PRINT© 19 1 : INPUT" 
ENTER STARTING SOUND# ";I$:I=VA 
L(I$) :IFI=0ORI> (DAT/5) +1 THEN90E 
LSEI=I-1:I=(I*5)+1:PRINT@193, "PR 
ESS *S* TO SINGLE STEP" : PRINT@22 
5: GOTO 4 10 

3 60 IFA$=CHR$ (36) ANDED=0 ANDPL>1 
THENPRINTTAB ( 183 ) : PRINT@256 : GOSU 
B590: PRINT" TO SAVE TUNE ENTER": 
LINE INPUT" LESS THAN 9 LETTERS: 
" ;ND$ : IFND$=" " THEN30ELSE490 
370 IFA$=CHR$(38)ANDED=0 THENPRI 



NTT AB (183): PRINT @ 2 2 5 : GO SUB5 9 0 : LI 

NEINPUT" ENTER NAME OF TUNE: ";N 

D$ : IFND$=" "THEN3 0ELSE540 

380 IFA$=CHR$(63)ANDED=0ANDPL>1T 

HEN650 

390 GOTO80 

395 1 ** KEYBOARD NOTE** 

400 GOSUB780 : PLAY"0"+STR$ (A) +" ; L 

"+STR$ (B) +" ; V"+STR$ (C) +" ; "+STR$ ( 

D) +" ; P"+STR$ (E) : GOSUB770 : GOTO90 

405 '**SPACEBAR PLAY** 

410 FORPL=I TODAT STEP5 : IFPL=DAT 

THEN9 0ELSEPRINT@ 13 , INT (PL/5) +1 : 
GOSUB780:PLAY"O"+STR$ (DAT (PL) )+" 
;L"+STR$ (DAT (PL+1) ) +" ;V"+STR$ (DA 
T(PL+2) )+";"+STR$ (DAT (PL+3) )+";P 
"+STR$( DAT (PL+4) ) -.GOSUB770 
415 '**SINGLE STEP ROUTINE** 
420 A$=INKEY$:PRINT@225, "PRESS * 
E* TO EDIT SOUND" -.PRINT" PRESS * 
P* TO REPEAT SOUND": PRINT" PRESS 

*R* RETURN TO START SOUND" :IFA$ 
=" "THEN420 

430 IFA$="S"THEN NEXTPL 

440 IFA$="E"THEN480 . 

450 IFA$="R"THEN410 

460 IFA$= " P " THENGOSUB7 8 0 : PLAY " 0 " 

+STR$ (DAT (PL) ) +" ;L"+STR$ (DAT (PL+ 

1) )+";V"+STR$ (DAT (PL+2) )+";"+STR 

$ (DAT (PL+3) ) +" ;P"+STR$ (DAT (PL+4) 

) :GOSUB770 

470 GOTO420 

475 '**EDIT ROUTINE** 

480 PRINT8193, "*EDIT* PRESS ENTE 

R TO KEEP": PRINT: PRINT: PRINT :ED= 

1 : PAT=DAT : DAT=PL : A=DAT ( PL) : B=DAT 

(PL+1) :C=DAT(PL+2) :D=DAT(PL+3) :E 

=DAT(PL+4) :GOTO90 

485 ' **DISC SAVE ROUTINE** 

490 IFLEN(ND$)>8 THENCLS : GOT03 60 

495 GOSUB780:OPEN"D",#1,ND$ > 25 

500 FIELD#1,5 AS A$,5 AS B$,5 AS 

C$,5 AS D$,5 AS E$ 
510 FOROD=l TODAT STEP5 
520 LSETA$=MKN$ (DAT (OD) ) :LSETB$= 
MKN$ (DAT (OD+1) ) : LSETC$=MKN$ (DAT ( 
OD+2) ) : LSETD$=MKN$ (DAT (OD+3 ) ) :LS 
ETE$=MKN$ (DAT(OD+4) ) 
530 PUT#1,INT( (OD/5)+l) :NEXTOD:C 
LOSE#l: PRINT" **»ND$"** IS SAVED 
: " :FORT=1TO1500:NEXTT:GOSUB770:C 
LS:GOTO20 

535 '**DISC LOAD ROUTINE** 

540 GOSUB790 : GOSUB780 :OPEN"D" , #1 

,ND$,25 

550 FIELD#1,5 AS A$,5 AS B$,5 AS 

C$,5 AS D$,5 AS E$ 
560 FORDAT=lTOLOF(l)-l:GET#l,DAT 
570 DAT (DAT*5-4) =CVN (A$) : DAT (DAT 
*5-3)=CVN(B$) :DAT(DAT*5-2)=CVN(C 
$) :DAT(DAT*5-1)=CVN(D$) : DAT (DAT* 
5)=CVN(E$) 



54 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



580 NEXTDAT : DAT=DAT*5-4 : CL0SE#1 : 

GOSUB770 : CLS : GOTO 20 

585 '**DISC DIRECTORY SUB** 

59/3 PRINT" TUNES ON FILE: " : FORSE 

C=3T011 

600 GOSUB78j3:DSKI$0,17,SEC,L$,R$ 
:GOSUB770 

61)3 DI$=L$+LEFT$(R$,127) 
620 FORT=0TO7 

630 IFMID$(DI$,T*32+9,3)="DAT"AN 
DMID$(DI$,T*32+1,1)OCHR$(0) THE 
NPRINT" "MID$(DI$,T*32+1,8) 
640 NEXTT : NEXTSEC : DI$=" " : L$= H " : R 
$=»•": RETURN 

645 ' ** PRINTER ROUTINE** 

650 PRINTTAB ( 180 ) : PRINT@ 225: LINE 

INPUT" NAME OF TUNE: " ?N$ : IFN$=" 

"THEN30ELSEGOSUB780 : PRINT#-2 ,N$ : 

GOSUB7 7 0 : T=0 : S $= " PLAY " +CHR$ (34) + 

"T2;":FORP=lTODAT-l STEP5 

660 A=DAT(P) :B=DAT(P+1) :C=DAT(P+ 

2) :D=DAT(P+3) :E=INT(DAT(P+4)/13 . 

4+1) 

670 IFAOAA THENS$=S$+"0"+RIGHT$ 
(STR$ (A) ,LEN(STR$(A) ) -1) :AA=A:GO 
SUB740 

680 IFBOBB THENS$=S$+"L"+RIGHT$ 
(STR$(B) , LEN(STR$ (B) ) -1) :BB=B:GO 
SUB740 

690 IFCOCC THENS$=S$+"V"+RIGHT$ 



(STR$(C) ,LEN(STR$(C) )-l) :CC=C:GO 
SUB740 

700 S$=S$+RIGHT$(STR$(D) ,LEN(STR 
$(D) )-l) :GOSUB740 

710 S$=S$+"P M +RIGHT$ (STR$ (E) , LEN 

(STR$(E) )-l) 

720 IFP=DAT-5 THENT=1 

730 GOSUB740:NEXTP:AA=0:BB=0:CC= 
0:3$="" :GOTO20 

740 IFLEN(S$)<242ANDT=0 THENS$=S 
$+";": RETURN 

750 IFLEN(S$)>=242 OR T=l THENS$ 
=S$+CHR$(34) :GOSUB780:PRINT#-2,S 
$:GOSUB770:S$=LEFT$(S$,5) :T=0 
760 RETURN 

765 ' **KEYBOARD RESPONSE POKES** 

770 POKE65495,0: RETURN 

780 POKE65494,0: RETURN 

785 'ERROR TRAP FOR LOADING TUNE 

NOT ON FILE 
790 L=LEN(ND$) : F0RSEC=3T011 : GOSU 
B780 : DSKI $0 , 17 , SEC , L$ , R$ : G0SUB7 7 
0 : DI$=L$+LEFT$ (R$ , 127 ) : FORT=0TO7 
800 IFND$=MID$(DI$,T*32+1,L)ANDM 
ID$(DI$,T*32+9,3)="DAT" THENRETU 
RN 

8 10 NEXTT : NEXTSEC : DI $=" " : L$=" " : R 
$="": PRINT" **»ND$"**IS NOT ON F 
ILE : " : SOUND60 , 10 : FORN=1TO500 : NEX 
TN:CLS:GOTO360 ' 



4 ■ • » • f I « 




* • « 

• • • 



ACCESSORIES 



«ni *;n *m 




■•• ' • AV 




>V?OV 



Hardware 



2 Drius Systen(2 DSDD Driues In one case)" 
$329,95 

Drlue 1 Upgraded DSDD For your 26-3129 or 
3131) SpeciFy Catalog* when ordering 1 1 
$119.95 

Driue 0-SSDD Full Height" $209,95 

Driue 1-3SDD Full Height $135,95 

COCO 3 512K UpgradetNew Low Price)-$99. 95 
COCO 3 Keyboard $34.95 



Software & Misc. 




LBQ CP5 - DRAFT 
30 CPS - ULQ 
3H BUFFER 

REQUIRES SERIAL TO 
PARALLEL INTERFACE 



Art Deli(440 Plx on 10 disks)— 
COCO Graphics Oesigner — — 
ADOS - $29.95 ADOS 
Plonitor Interface — —— — 



3 - 



$99.95 
$29.95 
$39.95 

$29.95 

Serial to Parallel Converters $54.95 
FKEYS III - $19.95 Sixdriue - $19.95 
Telewriter 64 - $59.95 COCO-Util - $39.95 
Gauntlet - $26,95 Pyramix - $24.95 

Disto Super Controller $99,95 

COCO in Stitch (X-Stitch Patterns)- $ 3.95 



Specify R.S. or Disto 
Controller. 



The Computer Center 



IF YOU DON'T SEE 
IT, ASK US 1 



ALL DI5K DRIUES 
CARRY A DAY 
WARRANTY. 



5512 Poplar Ave. Memphis, TN 38119 901-761-4565 

Add $4.90 for Shipping & Handling, UISA, Piaster Card, 4 Honey Orders Accepted. 
Allow 3 Weeks For personal checks, NO CODS, Prices nay change without notice, 




June 1988 THE RAINBOW 55 



1 



1 6K ECB 



J** 




Featur e 



Calling all guitar buffs . . . 




tig Great Guitars 







+ + + 



mi 




▼ ▼ ▼ 



TTT 



56 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



I started playing guitar the summer I 
turned 14 and The Beatles were at 
their height. Now, 23 years later, 
I'm still playing; I've owned or played 
almost every kind of guitar available to 
me at the time. 

Now that my newfound interest is the 
computer, I decided to combine the two 
interests and present in graphics form 
three of my favorite guitars: The Rick- 
enbacker Model 360, the Fender Strato- 
caster and the Gibson Les Paul. You can 
see these guitars one at a time by press- 
ing any key as each is displayed. Three 
REM lines in the program show you 
where each guitar is drawn. 

If you only want to draw the Fender, 
for example, enter lines 9 through 15; 
be sure to insert before Line 9 PMODE 
4,1-PCLS 1: SCREEN 1,1: COLOR 0,1 
and EXEC 44539 after Line 15 so that 
your picture will remain on the screen. 

There must be other CoCo enthusi- 
asts out there who were or still are guitar 
buffs. If so, I think you'll enjoy Graphic 
Guitars, The program is a teaching aid 
as well as an entertaining diversion. By 
dissecting the individual blocks of the 
program, you can see how things like 
knobs, strings, pick guards, and even 
the guitar's body shape were formed 
with the DRAW, LINE, CIRCLE and 
PRINT commands. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 709 Michigan Avenue, She- 
boygan, WI 53081. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a response,) □ 

Bill Bernico is the author of over 200 
Color Computer programs and is a 
frequent rainbow contributor whose 
hobbies include golf writing music and 
programming. Bill is a drummer in a 
rock band and lives in Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin. 




7 19d 


11 


207 


15 


....39 


20 


. . 138 


END 


....95 



The listing: GUITARS 

1 • GUITARS by Bill Bernico 

2 1 RICKENBACKER MODEL 360 

3 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : COLOR 
0,1:DRAW"BM196,92S4L68D8R68U8R3E 
RER14FRDFDFDFDFD2 LGLGL1 6HLHLHLUR 
15FR4UH4LHL3HLlj3":PAINT(216,92) , 
p : CIRCLE (214,88) , 1 : CIRCLE ( 2)39 , 8 8 
) ,1:CIRCLE(204,88) , 1 : CIRCLE (206 , 
105) ,1: CIRCLE (211,105) ,1 

4 CIRCLE (216, 105) ,1: CIRCLE (153 ,9 
5) ,25,0,1, .35, .70: CIRCLE (133, 87) 
,20,0,1, .68, .85: CIRCLE (130, 105) , 
15,0,1, .13, .35: CIRCLE (94, 94) ,30, 
0,1, .15, .84:DRAW"BM110,69HF2RFRF 
R3ERER2BD46BL2L6GLBM125,102U12L6 
D12R6BL15U12R6D12L6BL10U12R6D12L 
6BL5BD3U18L4D18R4BL14BU2 

5 DRAW"U14L16R16D14L14BM126,105L 
22GL2GL2 GL2 GL2 GLGLG LGLGLD 2 F3RFRF 
R10 ERERERERERERERERERERERERERERE 
UL" : PAINT ( 85 , 85 ) , 0 : DRAW" BM19 6,94 
L100D2R100D2L100D2R30U8L30R37D8R 
3U8R3D8R4U8R4D8R5U8R6D8R7U8R7D8R 
8U8R8D8": CIRCLE (87, 116) ,1: CIRCLE 
(92,113) ,2 

6 CIRCLE(94, 117) ,2: CIRCLE (97,112 
) ,2:CIRCLE(99,116) , 2 : CIRCLE ( 102 , 
112) ,1: CIRCLE (199, 96) ,1:DRAW"BM2 
00 , 97S3R4NU2R4NU2R4NU2R4U2BM69 , 9 
6S4D4U8R5FD3GL3F4BM5 , 32S8U12L2R7 
FD4GL4F6NL9R4U6BU3UDBD3D6R4U6R5N 
D2L5D6R5U 

7 DRAW"DR4EDU12D8E4RDULG3F5L7R11 
U2EHU2ER3FDUHL3GD2FR2L2GDFL5R12E 
U6DER3FD6L9UDR4UDR9U12D12UFR6U5H 
L2 DFRDFRFRFL2 0R2 4 LU5 ER4 FUD6L6R10 
U6R5D2U2L5D6R5UDR4U12D8E4RDULG3F 
5L7R11U2EHU2ER3FDUHL3GD2FR2BM199 
, 32R4NUR4U7DER3FDBD5L5R7 

8 'FENDER STRATOC ASTER 

9 EXEC44539:PCLS:DRAW"BM104,95S4 
;R100D10L100U10R7U4HU2HL2G" : LINE 
(106,88) -(100,89) ,PSET:LINE-(94, 
89 ) , PSET : DRAW"L4HLH" : LINE (88,87) 
-(80,85) ,PSET:LINE-(76,84) ,PSET: 
DRAW" L2HL5GL2GLGLGDGD2R3D17L9U17 
R6BD17D3GDGDGDGDGDGDGDFDFR3ER2ER 
ERERERER2 ERER2 ER2 ER4 " 

10 LINE(85,118)-(108,124) ,PSET:D 
RAW"R5URUHL2HL2ULHLHLHUHUHU2EUEU 
E2": CIRCLE (59, 12 2) , 3 : CIRCLE ( 64, 1 



16) ,3:DRAW"BM98,95D11GL2HU11ER2F 
BL11D11GL2HU11ER2FD11BM77 , 95DGDG 
DGDGDGDGL2 HUEUEUEUEUEUER2 F " : CIRC 
LE(117,111) ,8,0,1, .25, .65: CIRCLE 
(109,110) ,19,0,1, .17, .33 

11 CIRCLE(87, 157) ,35,0,1, .65, .83 
: DRAW"BM115 , 117 ; FRFRDRDGDGDL" : CI 
RCLE(53,109) ,24,0,1, .23, .5:DRAW" 
BM65,130;LGLGL3BH29D5U18": CIRCLE 
(53,89) ,24,0,1, .5, . 73 :DRAW"BM51, 
66R3FR2FR2 

12 CIRCLE(90,48) ,30,0,1, .18, .33: 
DRAW "BM 6 2 , 68 ; FRFRFRFRFRFR2 " : CIRC 
LE (118, 100) ,30,0,1, .68, .85:CIRCL 
E (12 6, 89) ,8,0,1, .4, . 79 : DRAW"BM12 
8,82R2ERERU3":CIRCLE(49,115) ,4,0 
,1, .6, .99:DRAW"BM46,114GDGDGD3E2 
RE2RERER": CIRCLE (49, 115) ,2 

13 CIRCLE (49, 115) ,1: PAINT (107, 89 
) ,0:DRAW"BM204,95;R2ERERERM243,1 
02D2": CIRCLE (238, 102) ,7,0,1, .1, . 
4:DRAW"BM232 , 106 ;M214 , 110LULUHLH 
LHL2 " : CIRCLE ( 2 1 6 , 90 ) , 2 : CIRCLE ( 2 2 
1,92) ,2:CIRCLE(226,94) ,2:CIRCLE( 
231,95) ,2:CIRCLE(23 6,97) ,2:CIRCL 
E(241,99) ,2 

14 CIRCLE (214, 96) ,1: CIRCLE (219, 9 
8) ,1:CIRCLE(224,99) , 1 : CIRCLE (229 
,101) ,1: CIRCLE (234, 102) ,1: CIRCLE 



BOWLING LEAGUE SECRETARY 



©1986 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Reviewed 
Sept. April 
1986 1987 
pg 141 pg 140 



Now for the Co-Co 1, 2 or 3 with disc drive, 
printer, 32K. 

• User friendly — full menu driven selections. 

• Any number of teams, and over 200 bowlers. 

• Calculates and stores all team and bowlers 
stats. 

• Men, women, mixed, scratch or handicap; 
blinds and substitutes. 

• Start up any time in season. 

• Full edit capability. 

• Automatic backups and weekly, mid-season 
and end-season resets. 

• ABC/WIBC style printouts. 

• Includes 20-page instruction manual. 

• Upgrade for individual tally sheets. 
($9.95 separate; free when ordered 
with program.) 

Priced at $49.95 including Shipping, Handling & 
Sales Tax. To order, send check or M.O. 

Specify Version number (1.0 for men or women; 
1.1 for mixed) and number of disc drives. 

TOMELA*CO 

P.O. Box 2162 • Doylestown, Pa. 18901-2162 • (215) 348-5822 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 57 



Still pounding away at that keyboard? 




SAVE up to 19% 

when you buy a joint sub- 
scription to the magazine and 
either rainbow on tape or 
rainbow ON disk! A one-year 
subscription to the rainbow 
and rainbow on tape is only 
$91 in the U.S., $108 in Can- 
ada, $153 foreign surface rate 
and $188 foreign airmail. A 
one-year subscription to the 
rainbow and rainbow on 
disk is only $115 in the U.S., 
$138 in Canada, $183 foreign 
surface rate and $218 foreign 
airmail.* 

Every month, these convenient 
services bring you as many as 24 
ready-to-run programs. Using the 
current issue of the rainbow as 
documentation, all you have to do is 
load and run them. A one-year com- 
bination subscription to the rain- 



bow and rainbow on tape or rain- 
bow on disk give you more than 230 
new programs! The typing time you 
save can be spent enjoying your 
CoCo! 



RAINBOW ON TAPE 

For No-Fuss Fun 

Back issues of rainbow on tape 
are available beginning with the 
April 1982 issue. A single copy of 
rainbow on tape is $10 within the 
United States; U.S. $12 in all other 
countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow on tape is $80 
within the U.S.; U.S. $90 in Canada; 
and U.S. $105 for all other coun- 
tries.* 



RAINBOW ON DISK 
Offers OS-9 Programs 

In addition to all the programs 
offered on tape, part of one side of 
rainbow on disk is formatted for the 
OS-9 operating system. That means 
you can now get all the OS-9 pro- 
grams from the magazine — pro- 
grams that cannot be put on tape. 
Back issues of rainbow on disk are 
available beginning with October 
1986. Subscriptions to rainbow on 
disk are $99 a year in the U.S. Cana- 
dian rate is U.S. $115. All other 
countries, U.S. $130. Single copy 
rate is $12 in the U.S.; U.S. $14 in 
Canada; and U.S. $16 in all other 
countries.* 



To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847- 
0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228- 
4492. 

Look for our envelope located between pages 66 and 67 for 
ordering individual subscriptions to the rainbow, rainbow on 

TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. 



YES! Sign me up for a joint 1-year subscription (12 issues) to: 



□ THE RAINBOW and RAINBOW ON TAPE 

□ THE RAINBOW and RAINBOW ON DISK 

□ NEW □ RENEWAL (attach labels) 



Payment Enclosed □ ('payment must accompany order) 

Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ Am. Express 
Account Number 

City State ZIP Signature Exp 

*U.S. currency only, please. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks 
for delivery of first copies. Joint subscriptions to the rainbow and rainbow on tape or rainbow on disk begin with the current issue. 

Please note: While group purchases of rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are permitted (and multiple subscriptions are even discounted, if purchased in one 
order from a club), no license to make copies is conveyed or implied. Yes, your group may even purchase a subscription to our disk/tape services, but such purchase 
in no way authorizes that any copies be made of that original disk/tape. Specifically, this means that the original disk/tape itself may indeed be kept in a club library 
for use by members. However, a group purchase does not entitle club members, individually or as a group, to copy that disk/tape. 
Unauthorized copying of any copyright product is strictly illegal. The copyright (right to make copies) is in no way conveyed in the purchase transaction. 



Name _ 
Address 



(239,104) , l:DRAW M BM213,95L16j3D2N 
R165D2NR171D2NR176D2NR181D2R186B 
M196 , 95Dlj3L8Ulj3L8Dlj3L8Ulj3L7Dlj3L7 
UlpL7DlpL6Ulj3L6Dlj3L5UlpL5Dlj3L5Ul 
pL4Dlj3L4UlpLDipL3UlpL3Dlp 

15 DRAW H L3BM205,95D10BM184,1J3,0LB 
L14LBL13LBL12LBL14LBM25,39S4U16H 
LG4D2BF3E7BF4BDHL2GD2FR2L2GD2FR2 
ERERU8DERERFD5FERU7ERERFU8D14UGL 
GLGEREREFREU3 ER2 L2HU2 ER2 FHL2GD2 F 

GD 2 FR3 EREREU7 LDR2 FRFD 2 FRE " : EXEC 4 
4539:PCLS 

16 'GIBSON LES PAUL 

17 DRAW"BM45 , 28S4U6HLGLGLGLG2D25 
RE2RERERE2U9D25U10E7U10BU15URDLB 
D15D10RFRERE2U27D27R2ER2EREU10HL 
GLRERFD9R2 E2DU2R2 FR2 EREU2 HL2 HL2 H 
U2ERER2 FRDU2 D2 ERERD7 FREREREU8 BL3 
BU2 GLGLD2 BF7U2 ERERD2 Ul 2 D2 ERERERF 
D19FRERBM105,60":CIRCLE(29,138) , 
3:CIRCLE(41,137) ,3 

18 CIRCLE (3 3, 149) , 3 : CIRCLE (45 , 14 
8) ,3:CIRCLE(22,146) , 2 : CIRCLE ( 3 6 , 
128) ,2:CIRCLE(36,109) ,2:LINE(38, 
109) -(38, 128) ,PSET:LINE(34,109)- 
( 3 4 , 12 8 ) , PSET : DRAW" BM4 4 , 111D16R4 
U16L4BR1J3U2D2 0R11U2 J3L11BR2 5D16NL 
13D4R11U2,0L11 

19 CIRCLE (90, 1J30) , 2 : DRAWBM54 , 12 



9D7M53 , 144FR2M70, 140ERER2M81, 136 
R4EREREU7R115U12L115R115L8D12L8U 
12L8D12L8U12L7D12L7U12L7D12L7U12 
L6D12L6U12L6D12L5U12L5D12L5U12L5 
D12L5U12L4D12L4U12L4D12U12R119ER 
ERERM229 , 113M239 , 111ER3FDFDFDFDF 
DGLRFDGDGDGDGDBM56 , 111 

20 DRAW " RBR2 RBR2 RBR1 8 RBR2 RBR2 RBM 
56 , 127 RBR2 RBR2 RBR1 8 RBR2 RBR2 RBM2 4 
3 , 131L3HL3HL4UL5DL6DL5H2LHLHL4BM 
20 6 , 114 D12 * : PAINT ( 56 , 13 1 ) , p : CIRC 
LE (219, 107) ,2:CIRCLE(228,108) ,2: 
CIRCLE (2 37, 107) , 2 : CIRCLE (219 , 134 

) ,2:CIRCLE(229,133) , 2 : CIRCLE (238 
,134) ,2:CIRCLE(219,115) ,1 

21 CIRCLE (228, 116) , 1 : CIRCLE (237 , 
117) ,1: CIRCLE (219 ,126) ,1: CIRCLE ( 
229,125) ,1: CIRCLE (238, 124) ,1:CIR 
CLE (37, 120) ,35,0,1, .15, .86: CIRCL 
E(67,86) ,11,0,1, .16, .39: CIRCLE (8 
5,110) ,19,0,1, .65, .04: CIRCLE (69, 
154) ,12,0,1, .63, .85: CIRCLE (85, 13 
0), 18, 0,1, .11, .33 

22 CIRCLE (109, 129) ,18,0,1, .39, .5 
5: CIRCLE (1,120) ,2:DRAW»BM206,114 
L168D2R168D2L168D2R168D2L168D2R1 
68BM185 , 119LBL15LBL13LBL12LBM206 
, 11 5R12 D2 L12R2 1D2L2 1NR3 1D3NR3 1D2 
NR21D2R12 " : EXEC44539 : RUN 



■ f«T""°*r ,, -~'~™«ii 

■ 1* % at | 

1 1 GARAGE I 
1 1 SALE I 












f; i 

>; DANGER 1; 


If 1 








1] JWK i 

fj £ ' 


' 3 R & 5)1 




HP* m 




il linli , 




It's fun making your own Greeting Cards, Signs, and Banners. 

Coco 



Get a 
Custom Car Sign 

Send us the wording , from 1 to 4 
lines of text of your choice, and well 
print it out on bright yellow paper us- 
ing the CoCo Car Sign Designer, put 
it into a reusable clear plastic sign 
holder with suction cup, and mail it to 
you. Please send a check for $3.00 
to cover S&H unless accompanying 
an order. 




Graphics 
Designer 

Only $29.95 



The Coco Graphics Designer pro- 
duces beautiful Greeting Cards, 
Banners, and Signs for holidays, 
birthdays and other occasions. 

The program features picture, 
border, and character font editors, 
so that you can modify or expand 
the already built in libraries. Plus 
a special "grabber" utility is includ- 
ed to capture areas of high resolu- 
tion screens for your picture li- 
brary. 



Requirements: a Coco I, li or III 
with at least 32 K, one disk drive, 
BASIC 1.0/1.1 .ADOS 1.0/1.1 or 
JDOS. Printers supported include: 
Epson RX/FX, Gemini 10X, SG10, 
NX10, DM P 100/105/110/130/430 
CGP220, many Okidata (check 
with Zebra), Seikosha GP1 00/250, 
Gorilla Banana, Legend 808. Or- 
der #C323 Coco Graphics De- 
signer 

Picture Disk #1 

This supplementary picture library 
diskette contains over one hun- 
dred additional pictures. 
#C333 Picture Disk #1 $14.95 

Colored Paper Packs 

150 sheets (50 each red, yellow, 
blue) with 60 matching envelopes. 
Perfect for making your produc- 
tions outstanding. 
#C274 Paper Pack $19.95 




The Car Sign Designer program ena- 
bles you to easily create distinctive 
bright yellow diamond shaped car 
signs. Everything you need is provid- 
ed including two reusable clear plas- 
tic sign holders with suction cups, 50 
sheets of bright yellow fanfold paper, 
and the Car Sign Designer program 
disk and instructions. ••• Hardware, 
DOS, and printer requirements are 
the same as for our CoCq Graphics 
Designer. Order Cat#CSCC, 
$29.95. For six additional sign hold- 
ers, order Cat#CS6PK $9.95. 



WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Only $29.95 

Order CattfTBCC 

WICO designed these trackballs 
specifically for the Radio Shack Co- 
lor Computer joystick port. They fea- 
ture 360-degree movement and 
quick-action fire button for smooth, 
arade response and feel. Works 
great with Coco joystick and mouse 
software. 



Ordering Instructions: All or- 
ders add $3,00 Shipping & Han- 
dling. UPS COD add $3.00. 
VISA/MC Accepted. NY resi- 
dents add sales tax. 



Zebra Systems, Inc. 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 59 



Defend your terrain against an enemy air force 






George Philips 





^kj^our tank is your defense against 
bombs dropping from enemy 
I I planes. The planes' pilots do 
their best to hit you, but they sometimes 
collide with each other. The action is 
fast and often over before realizing what 
has happened. This is Blitz, an arcade 
game requiring 32K ECB for use on the 
Color Computer. 

Loading Blitz 

Blitz consists of three BASIC pro- 
grams which combine to create a ma- 
chine language program. The program 
in Listing 1 pokes in the actual machine 
language code, Listing 2 pokes in the 
data for the planes, bombs, explosions, 
etc. and Listing 3 saves the program to 
disk or tape and^Jjen runs Blitz. 

Type in all tjiroe programs and save 
them befor^j^j^^fi them. Now run the 
programs Listing 1 will take 

some time as will Listing 2, but 
you can se| r ^t^ is happening — the 
graphics charters for the tank, planes, 
bombs and explosions are drawn on the 
screen as they are created. Should any 
of the programs give you an error, fix 
any typos, save the program and start 
over. Once you have made as many 
ijpopies of Blitz as you need, you can run 
;.|he program by typing CLDADf1"BLITZ" 
ior LDGDM-BLITZ" if you have a disk) 
and then typing EX EG. 

7 

George Phillips js currently finishMg his 
master's degree in computer science m 
the Universiptf of British Columbia and 
believes if is easier to write programs in 
assembly languagmhan in BASIC 



THE Ft ANY HOW June 1988 



Troubleshooting 

I have tried to make the program easy 
to enter and modify. 

The program in Listing 1 is the most 
important, since it pokes in the code for 
Blitz. The code is stored as data lines, 
with each line having at its end a check- 
sum that is the sum of all the data bytes. 
Should the sum of the data bytes not 
equal the checksum, the program will 
show a checksum error for that line. 
This means that either the data is 
incorrect or the checksum is incorrect. 
In any case, check the line and make the 
necessary changes to correct the error. 

The line checksum should cover 
almost any typing errors you may make, 
but an overall checksum is provided as 
an extra check. It is the sum of all the 
data bytes, line checksums and data 
preceded by asterisks. If you get no line 
checksum errors, yet the overall check- 
sum is incorrect, check the overall 
checksum itself and the asterisk data. If 
those are correct, check for line dupli- 
cation. If that is not the problem, you 
have no choice but to review all the 
data. It is probable that you will never 
have to resort to the last step. 

Listing 2 is a lot less important to 
Blitz's operation. It pokes in the shapes, 



so all you have to do is be careful in 
making the shapes the correct size; do 
not add any dots or lines. 




Listing 3 is a nice short one; it simply 
pokes in a little machine language 
routine to move Blitz to the proper 
place in memory and then saves it to 
disk or tape. Make sure that you get that 
machine language program typed in 
correctly. 

Game Play 

If you have managed to get Blitz 
typed in, loaded and executed, you're 
ready to play the game! Select the level 
of play by pressing a number from 0 to 
9. Level 0 is the easiest, Level 9 the 
hardest. After you have pressed a 



number, the game starts. Your tank falls 
from your reserve at the top of the 
screen, and once it has bounced to a 
stop, the enemy attack begins in earnest. 
When the game is over (or you have no 
more tanks or are frustrated), press 
BREAK to get back to the title page and 
start another game. 

The controls consist of the left arrow, 
right arrow and F key. The F key fires 
your bullets (hold it down for rapid 
fire). The arrow keys move your tank's 
barrel; but when the barrel can no 
longer move left or right, your tank will 
move instead. Although this method 
may seem strange, it works better than 
a five-key system. To pause during the 
game, press P; use the R key to resume 
play. 

How hard the enemy attacks is based 
on the level of play. At level 0 bombs 
are not even dropped, but on Level 9 
many planes, dropping multiple bombs, 
are launched. Enemy planes are of four 
varieties: Non-bombers, single 
bombers, constant bombers and stick 
bombers. They all travel at three differ- 
ent speeds, so the only way to tell them 
apart is to see what they do as they fly 
over. The non-bombers are harmless. 
The single-bombers drop one bomb. 



heck Account Information System 



If you have one or more checking 
accounts then you need CAI S . This is 
not just another checkbook program but 
an easy to use, menu driven, disk based 
information system for the CoCo 1, 2, 3. 

Record all account activity. Keep track 
of your expenses using the 36_ cateqor i es 
that you define. Set up automat i c 
transact! ons for such items as direct 
deposits and deductions. Reconcile and 
balance your account is) iji minutes ! 
Other features include check search on 
any field, edit and del et e capabi 1 i ty , 
display and or i nt options, mul ti -dr i ve 
capability and more. Requires 1 driv*, 
pri nter opt i onal . 

Reviewed in RAINBOW, February 1966. 



After Five Software 

P.O. Box 210975 
Columbia, SC 29221-0975 
(B03) 788-5995- 



RAINBOW 

Ct*T*CAVK>* 
MAI 



To order send chEck or M.O. for $34.95 
plus $3.00 S/H. COD orders add $1.00. 
(SC residents please add 52 sales tax) 






ERiN A — Symbolic User-mode Debugger for OS9 

is a must for serious assembler and C programers. 
ERINA helps to find bugs quickly by displaying the 
machine state and the instruction being executed. Set 
address and register break points, assemble/disas- 
semble code, dump, search, and change memory, and 
more! This program pays for itself over and over! 

SERINA — System-mode Debugger for OS9 Level 2 
is invaluable when developing OS9 System Modules 
(device drivers, file managers, etc.). Trace execution, 
set break points, assemble and disassemble code, ex- 
amine/change memory and much more. SERINA has 
special provisions for debugging code with critical 
timing loops. A must for system programmers! 

MSF — MS-DOS File Manager for CoCo3/OS9L2 al- 
lows you to read/write MS-DOS format diskettes while 
running OS9. No need for complex data conversions! 

ERINA (requires 80 col. display, OS9 L1/2 $69.00 

SERINA (call for requirements) $139.00 

MSF (requires CoCo3, OS9L2, SDISK3 driver) $45.00 

MSF with SDISK3 $65.00 

CSG IMS for CoCo3 OS9-L2 512K $169.95 

Shipping — N. America: $5, Overseas: $10 



Clearbrook Software Group, Inc. 

U.S.: P.O. Box 8000-499, Sumas, WA 98295 
CANADA: P.O. Box 8000-499, Abbotsford, B.C. V2S 6H1 

Phone: (604)853-9118 

OS9 is a trademaik of Microware Systems Corp., 
MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. 




June 1988 THE RAINBOW 



61 



For Tandy 1000, SX, TX 



1000, SX, TX 



1000, SX, TX 




1000, SX, TX 



Hard Drive 




10 Meg 
20 Meg 
30 Meg 
40 Meg 



$279.95 
$339.95 
$379.95 
$499.95 



1000, SX, TX 



Cards 



300/1200 Modem 

300/1200/2400 
Modem 

Mini IO 

2 Meg Board 



$119.95 

$149.95 
$79.95 

$169.95 



Tandy 3000 & 3000HL 

Hard Drive Kits 

Includes Drive, Controller & Cable 

20 Meg $399.95 

30 Meg $599.95 
40 Meg $699.95 
80 Meg $999.95 




^ TANDY 

1000, SX, TX 
49 Meg Hard Card 
32 MS (speed) 

$599.95 



TANDY 1000 

1000, SX, TX, 3000, 4000 



2nd Floppy 

360K TEAC $119.95 
72QK Mitsubishi $99.95 
31/2" Mitsubishi $119.95 




Tandy Model 3, 4, 4P 

Hard Drive Systems 

External 
Complete - ready to run 

10 Meg $499.95 
20 Meg $699.95 




TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 
115 So Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 

Tel. 617-278-6555 
1 -800-635-0300 

Hours: 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 



Rodime 




NEW 

Cardinal 
Modems 

2400 Baud 300/ 1200/2400 
(Hayes Compatible) 

Complete with software manuals 

only $149.95 



1000, 1000A 



Memory Cards 

Zucker Memory 

• DMA & 512K CALL 

Zucker Multifunction 

• Serial 

• Real Time Clock 

• 512K DMA pyvi I 

• Software OALL 





Tandy 1000, 
1000SX, 
3000 & 3000HL 



Tape Backup 



20, 30, 40 Meg 
Tape Backup 

60 Meg Tape Backup 
Archive 



$399.95 



$659.95 



NEW 

DISK 
DRIVES 



i "fiuy- :J " " i — t? w " 



Starting at 




89 



95 



with case & 
Power Supply 
129.95 



TANDON MPI TEAC 

Speed 6ms tk to tk and up 
Capacity 250k unformatted 
Tracks 40 

Warranty HOW 1 Year 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!! 

ALL DRIVES FULLY TESTED AND WARRANTEED 

We carry only the finest quality disk drives 
no seconds • no surplus 



New Low Price! 




/ 

40 Tks 6Ms 
Double Sided 
Double Density 

40 or 80 Tracks 
V2 Hght. Teac/Panasonic 




Free Software for Drive O Systems 

CoCo Checker...Test roms, rams, disk drives and & controller printer, keyboard cassette & more. 
Tape/Disk Utility.. .Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



169 



95 



Drive 0 



189 



95 



Drive 0 



289 



95 



Drive 0 & 1 



• Full Ht Drive 

• Single Case 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & manuals 



• Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



• 2 Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



Other Drive Specials 



119 



95 



2nd Drive 

for new Radio Shack 
includes: 

• Slim Line DS/DD Drive 

• Cabling & Instructions 

• Mounting Hardware 



Drives cleaned, aligned & tested, 29 



95 



Full Ht Drive 


89 95 


Full Ht Drive Ps/Case. 


129 95 




9995 


Slim Line Drive Ps/Case. 


139 95 


2 Slim Drives Ps/Case.... 


239 95 




59 95 



Single Ps& Case 

Dual V2M Ps & Case 

Dual Full Ht. Ps & Case 
Disk Controller 



10 Diskettes 

with free library case 



44 95 

54 95 
79 95 

59 95 

995 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 
617-278-6555 



MM' 




V 



TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 



We welcome 

• Visa/Mastercard 

• Checks (allow 2 weeks for clearing) 

• C.O.D. Add $2. 



9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 

Hours: Mon.-Sat., 9-6 (EST) 



Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



The constant bombers drop bombs at 
regularly spaced intervals; your tank 
may be able to go between them. The 
stick bombers drop a "stick" of five 
bombs spaced so tightly that you will be 
hit if you are caught under it. 

Playing the game is simple: Shoot the 
planes (and the bombs if necessary) and 
stay alive. Shooting down a plane is 
worth 75 points; accumulating 10,000 
points gets you another tank and moves 
you up a level. 

Modifications 

You can easily make some very simple 
modifications to Blitz, You can change 
the shapes of the places and tanks by 
drawing in new ones in Listing 2. Just 
make sure that you do not draw outside 
the border of dots for each shape. I 
suggest you use my shapes first, but 
changing them (i.e., making the tank 
smaller) could make the game easier. 

Since Blitz defaults to artifacting 
(PMDDE4,1:SCREEN1,1), you might 



want to change the graphics mode in 
which the game runs, especially if you 
live in Europe or Australia. The way to 
do this is to type in a poke before 
executing Blitz. After loading Blitz, 
type POKE 16399, x where x is one of 
the following: 

224 PMODE3,1:SCREEN1,0 
232 PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN! , 1 
240 PMDDE4, 1 : SCREEN1 , 0 



Hints 

Blitz can be tough to play, so here are 
a few hints to help you along. Do not 
waste too much time shooting the 
bombs; they are hard to hit and pose no 
danger if you aren't sitting directly 
below. When a bomb is dropped, decide 
whether to shoot or move; both are 
possible, but you have to move quickly. 

The bombs are aimed when the 
planes come onto the screen, so if you 
move after they are shown on the 



screen, your tank will be safe (unless the 
plane is a constant bomber). And keep 
moving, the bombers will have a harder 
time hitting you. Be aware, however, on 
the higher levels the planes appear so 
often that one or two will be able to 
"target" your location. 

One last trick is to create a "cloud." 
Since your bullets explode on contact, 
you can form a "cloud" of explosions 
above your tank by holding down the 
fire key (F). You now have a bit of cover 
which can be held over your tank even 
while moving left (or right, but it's 
harder). To let the cloud fade away, 
relinquish the fire key. You can use this 
"cloud "to great advantage, especially at 
the higher levels; while you are safe, the 
planes can collide with each other and 
score points for you. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at RR#1, Creston, British Co- 
lumbia, VOB 1G0. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 




116 198 

142 186 

174 119 

202 149 

234 143 

262 164 

293 178 

322 170 



354 79 

382 93 

415 32 

442 68 

474 185 

502 8 

527 244 

END 27 



Listing 1: BLITZ1 

10 CLEAR200, 23199 : P=32768 : L=99 : B 
=0 

20 L=L+1 : READA$ : IFA$="END I, THENIF 
BO 4 0 1 9 4 0THENC LS 4 : PRINT 11 OVERALL 
CHECKSUM IS INCORRECT — DATA BAD 
! !":ENDELSECLS5:PRINT ,f OK, NOW RU 
N PROGRAM 2": END 

3 0 IFASC (A$ ) =42THENP=VAL ( 11 &H"+MI 
D$ ( A$ , 2 ) ) : B=B+P : GOT02 0 
50 C=0:FORN=0TO5:V=VAL( H &H"+A$) : 
C=C+V : POKEP+N , V : READ A $ : NEXT : P=P+ 
6 ; CK=VAL ( " &H"+A$ ) : B=B+CK : IFC=CK 
THEN 20 ' 

60 CLS4 : PRINT 11 CHECKSUM ERROR IN" 
L: PRINT "VALUE "HEX$(C) fl SHOULD B 
E "A$:STOP 

100 DATA *6EE0 

101 DATA B7,FF,C5,B7,FF,C3,4F4 

102 DATA B7,FF,C0,B6,FF,22,44D 

103 DATA 84,7,8A,F8,B7,FF,3C3 

104 DATA 22,8E,FF,D2,10,BE,34F 

105 DATA 41,52,C6,7,4F,78,227 

106 DATA 41, 52, 49, A7, 86,30,239 



107 


DATA 


IE, 


( 5A, 


,26, 


,F4 


,10 


,BF 


,261 


108 


DATA 


41, 


,52, 


-39, 


, BE 


,41 


,50 


,21B 


109 


DATA 


10, 


, 8E, 


,18, 


'0,< 


5F,I 


30, 


1A5 


110 


DATA 


31, 


r3F, 


,26, 


, FA 


,39 


,34 


,1FD 


111 


DATA 


76, 


r8D, 


'61, 


r7F 


,41 


,4F 


,273 


112 


DATA 


F6, 


-41, 


'48, 


f A6 


,80 


,A4 


,349 


113 


DATA 


C0, 


, BA, 


-41, 


r4F 


,B7 


/41 


,302 


114 


DATA 


4F, 


,5A, 


,26, 


r F3 


,F6 


,41 


,2F9 


115 


DATA 


4C, 


,3A, 


,F6, 


r 41 


,4D 


,33 


,23D 


116 


DATA 


C5, 


,7A, 


,41, 


,49 


,26 


,E2 


,2D1 


117 


DATA 


7D, 


-41, 


,4F, 


,35 


t F6 


,34 


,26C 


118 


DATA 


76, 


,8D, 


'37, 


rl0 


, BE 


,41 


,249 


119 


DATA 


A5, 


,B6, 


'41, 


,A3 


,C6 


,4,: 


309 


120 


DATA 


3D, 


-31, 


,AB, 


, AF 


,A1 


,B6 


,31F 


121 


DATA 


41, 


,49, 


,A7, 


'A0, 


, B6 


,41 


,2C8 


122 


DATA 


48, 


,A7, 


,A4, 


,7C 


,41 


,A3 


,2F3 


123 


DATA 


F6, 


,41, 


,48, 


,A6 


,84 


,AA 


,353 


124 


DATA 


C0, 


,A7, 


,80, 


,5A 


,26 


,F7 


,35E 


125 


DATA 


F6, 


,41, 


,4C, 


,3A, 


,F6 


,41 


,2F4 


126 


DATA 


4D, 


,33, 


,C5, 


,7A, 


,41 


,49 


,249 


127 


DATA 


26, 


,E6, 


,35, 


-F6, 


r 7F 


,41 


,2F7 


128 


DATA 


4D ( 


, BE, 


,41, 


-50, 


, FD 


,41 


,2DA 


129 


DATA 


4A ( 


,EC, 


, CI, 


,FD 


,41 


,46 


, 37B 


130 


DATA 


FD, 


,41, 


,48, 


,B6, 


,41 


,4A 


,2C7 


131 


DATA 


81, 


,7F, 


23, 


,26, 


r7F, 


,41 


,209 


132 


DATA 


4E, 


■5F, 


44, 


,56, 


'44, 


,59 


, 1E4 


133 


DATA 


59, 


,B6, 


41, 


, 4A, 


,40 


,4A 


,224 


134 


DATA 


44, 


,44, 


4C, 


,B1, 


,41, 


,46 


,20C 


135 


DATA 


24, 


,72, 


33, 


,C6, 


,B7, 


'41, 


r 287 


136 


DATA 


4D, 


B6, 


41, 


46, 


-B0, 


,41, 


r 27B 


137 


DATA 


4D, 


B7, 


41, 


48, 


,20, 


'IF, 


,1CC 


138 


DATA 


5F, 


44, 


56, 


44, 


,59, 


-59, 


, 1EF 


139 


DATA 


B7, 


41, 


4E, 


86, 


,20, 


'B0, 


,29C 


140 


DATA 


41, 


4E, 


Bl, 


41, 


,46, 


,24, 


,1EB 


141 


DATA 


0,37,41,48,86,41,243 



64 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



Wise up to nightly savings 
online with GEnier 

**GEnie has opened my eyes to what an online service 
can do for me. I thought I knew it all until I discovered 
GEnie's vast array of Special Interest Groups, offering 
thousands of software files, dynamic bulletin boards, 
lively discussions and "tips" from the experts. Not to 
mention services like Comp-u-store Online® shopping 
service, USA Today Decisionlines and access to 
Dow Jones News/Retrieval.® And those friendly people 
at GEnie really give a hoot about being helpful, 
day or night a 

Compare GEnie for selection, ^ wji/ 

services and price, night after night yM[ 
It will open your eyes too. Only jfi T *[.' 
GEnie offers you so much online, i 
for less." 



Services Available 


Compare 

& 
Save 


Pricing ** 


Electronic Mail • CB 

• SIGs/User Groups 

• Travel • Shopping 
• Finance • Reference 
Professional • Leisure 

• Games • News 


Registration 
Fee 


Monthly 
Minimum 


Non-prime Time Rates 


300 baud 


1200 baud 


GEniet 


$29.95 


None 


$5.00 


$5.00 


CompuServe 


$39.95 


None 


$6.00 


$12.50 


Other 


$49.95 


$10.00 


$8.40 


$10.80 



*Get 2 Free Hours with Sign- Up. 

Still just $5 per hour. Get online today! 

1. Have your major credit card or checking account number ready. 

2. Set your modem for local echo (half duplex)— 300 or 1200 baud. 

3. Dial 1-800-638-8369. When connected, enter HHH 

4. At the prompt enter XJM11807,GEnie then RETURN. 

Need help or more information? No modem yet? We can help. 
In U.S. or Canada call 1-800-638-9636 or write GEnie, 401 N. 
Washington St., Rockville, MD 20850. 




We bring good things to life. 



**Bauc rates and imioe* in effect VB& apply in US. only. tNon-prime time rates apply Mon.-Fri. 6PM- 8AM local time and all 
day SaL, Sua, and nail holidays. Subject to service availability. Some services offered nn GEnie may include additional charges. 
• $10 credit applies. Offer good for SO days from sign-up. 
O 1988 General Electric Company. USA. 



Save $200 on Magnavox Monitors 
Magnavox 8CM643 RGB Analog only $385!! 



MONITORS 

rfMJfH 




123 A 



MAGNAVOX 7622 

12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 
350 lines resolution at 20 MHz on a 
dark glass anti-glare CRT with built- 
in audio and 1 year warranty. 



REPEAT OF A SELL-OUT 

We closed out Zenith's line of 123A 
12" Green Screen Monitors with 640 
x 240 resolution one year ago. Now 
with a special puchase we offer them 
one more time. This monitor offers 
80 column resolution at 15 MHz. 



$67.50 



($7 Shipping) 



$88 



(*7 shipping) 

MAGNAVOX 
8 CM 515 has 

analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB 
for Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and 
composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. 
Built-in speaker. 14" screen with 
640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 
2 years parts and labor warranty. 

reg. list $499 

SAVE 
$200 



VA-1 for monochrome monitors 
only, fits all color computers 



$24.45 



($2 Shipping) 



$298 




+ $14 Shipping 

CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable. 

only $19.95 with 

Magnavox Monitor order. 
$29.95 w/o monitor. 



MASNAVOX 

CM 8505 has analog RGB 
and TTL RGB and composite 
color input. Built in speaker. 13" 
screen with 390 dots x 240 reso- 
lution in RGB mode. Plus 1 year 
parts & labor warranty. 

reg. list *299 

SAVE 
$79 



$220 

+ $14 Shipping 




DRIVE 0 + . Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 



for only Double sided double density 360K 



$17845 

mm %df Double sided 

/sc ehin«mn\ Double density 

( s 5 shipping) 360K 

Add $34 for a Disto DC-3. 




20 MEG HARD DRIVE 



$499 ($9 Shipping) 



• pre-installed, formatted and ready to run 

• equivalent to 125 R.S. 501's on line 

• includes Western Digital WD1002-WX1 Controller 

• and Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 

• will also work with Tandy, IBM & clones 

• complete package includes 20 meg drive, case & power supply, controller and interface 
that plugs into slot #3 of multipack interface. 

• 1 year warranty 

BASIC driver lets you access this hard drive without need for OS-9 $49.95 



DISTO 




Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. DISTO 



$98 



DC-3 fa 



B mm c 

ADD-ON BOARDS 

DC-38 includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and all 
software $138 

DC-3P Mini Epron programmer in- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips 

B 



$55 



DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port 

C HO 



$2 shipping on all DISTO products 

NEW FROM DISTO 

Super Controller II works 
with CoCo 1, 2 & 3. It buffers 
keyboard input so that no 
keystrokes are lost when 
disk is reading or writing. 
Especially useful with OS-9, 
but also works with BASIC. 

$129 DC6 ($2 Shipping) 

C-DOS 3 28 pin Eprom makes Disto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

«20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 



Payrol/BAS™,, 

' (»2 shipping) 

• Nonprotected basic is modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
federal calculation 

• Custom code for each state (*25 option) 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 

• Print payroll and n on payroll 
checks 



Pay rol ABAS™ 
30 Day Trial 

$29.95 

VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package in- 
cludes VIP Writer Terminal Data 
Base, Calc and Disk Zap which 
can fix a diskette that is giving II 
O errors djJ Ar 

*1 £0 reg. 5149 
($2 Shipping) 

VIPwriter $68 



MEMORY 

64-2 for CoCo 2. Kit requires one 
solder point, no trace cuts. 

$24.45 



('2 shipping) 



64-E1 for E Boards with complete 
instructions. Remove old chips and 
replace with preassembled package 
— no soldering or trace cuts. 

($2 shipping) $28.45 

64-F1 for F Boards. No soldering 
needed. Capacitor leads must be cut. 

{$2 shipping) $24.45 

64-22 Two chip set for 26-31 34A and 
B, 26-3136A and B. Koren Color 
Computers require 1 solder point. 

(*2 shipping) $28.45 



GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day 
guarantee is meant to 
eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. 
Once you receive our 
hardware, try it out; test it 
for compatibility. If you're 
not happy with it for any 
reason, return it in 30 
days and well give you 
your money back (less 
shipping). 

Shipping charges are for 
48 states. 

APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

COD. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO/S 



Use our 800 number! 

For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

inquiries please call (502) 228-4492. 

We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 a year in the United States. Canadian 

rate is $38 (U.S. funds only). Surface rate elsewhere is $68 (U.S.). Airmail 

is $103 (U.S.). All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 

6 to 8 weeks for the first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 

In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 



Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
THE RAINBOW today! 

YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

□ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

Name . 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number __^_ 



Signature 



Card Expiration Date 



Our 800 number is also good for ordering 

RAINBOW ON TAPE or RAINBOW ON DISK! 

Just call (800) 847-0309 anytime from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. Credit card orders only. 
Subscriptions to rainbow on tape are $80 a year in the United States, $90 (U.S. 
funds) in Canada and $105 (U.S.) in all other countries. 

rainbow on disk is $99 a year in the United States, $115 (U.S.) in Canada and $130 
(U.S.) in all other countries. 

Individual issues of rainbow on tape are $10 in the U.S., $12 (U.S.) in Canada and 
all other countries, individual issues of rainbow on disk are $12 in the U.S., $14 
(U.S.) in Canada, and $16 (U.S.) in all other countries. Kentucky residents please 
add 5% sales tax. 

rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are not stand-alone products; you need the 
magazine for loading and operating instructions and the necessary documentation. 
the rainbow magazine is a separate purchase. 



Give Your Fingers A Break! 

YES! Sign me up: □ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

□ RAINBOW ON TAPE □ RAINBOW ON DISK 

(Available beginning with the October 
1986 issue) 

□ A Full Year □ Single Issue (specify month & year) 

Name _ 

Address , 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number - - --- - - - . - -. 

Signature Card Expiration Date 



The Big^ 
The Best 
The indispensable 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever hadi THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 




Q 

3 



w> [{J 

5 < uj uj £ 

p 2 s q 

cl g 5 z uj 

n uj u. — t 



>- 

H 

O 
UJ 
CL 
CO 
O 

tr 

CL 



CL - 
LU i 
DC t 

CO I 
CO °- 

yj co 

z § 

CO 

CD LL 




UJ 
UJ 
CO 
CO 
UJ 

tr 

Q 
Q 

< 
> 

CO 



I 

UJ 
CO 



UJ 

1 

CO 

o 

CL 




Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and 
run. No work. No wait. 

Just think how your Software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
250 new programs: games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications. And, with RAINBOW 
ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at a price that's 
"small potatoes." And now you even have a choice 
about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
sary. 



Q 


>- 




O 


3 


UJ 

n 




PROSI 


CL 


■ 


LU 


O 
Z 


OC 




CO 




tr 

UJ 


CO 


CL 


LU 

z 


CO 
CO 

< 


CO 


_J 

o 


D 


co 


CO 


OC 
LL 



LU 
LU 
CO 
CO 
LU 
DC 
Q 

Q 
< 

5 



i 

LU 
CD 



LU 

o 

co 

o 

CL 




142 

143 

144 

145 

146 

147 

148 

149 

150 

151 

152 

153 

154 

155 

156 

157 

158 

159 

16j3 

161 

162 

163 

164 

165 

166 

167 

168 

169 

170 

171 

172 

173 

174 

175 

176 

177 

178 

179 

180 

181 

182 

183 

184 

185 

186 

187 

188 

189 

190 

191 

192 

193 

194 

195 

196 

197 

198 

199 

200 
201 



DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 



46, B0 

4D,B6 
41,47 
41, 4E 
41,48 
41, 4B 
BB,41 
41,49 
41, 4B 
39, C6 
86, C0 
41,47 
49,39 
35, F6 
0,0,0 

50,0,68,0,0 
0,B6,4 



52, B7 
50, BE 
41, A7 
BF,41 
F6,41 
F7,41 
A3, 27 
AE,C1 
34,10 
FB,35 
4A,26 
41, A3 



B6,20 
41,54 
A6,A4 
6C,A0 
EE,C6 
9D,7A 
39, 7A 
54,81 



3, 3D, 
A6,C0 
F9,31 
18,46 
92,48 
24,49 
*5EE0 
16,3, 
7F,32 
32, 4D 
FF,40 
8E,10 
0,6F, 
FA, 8E 

J3,1P, 
C0,A7 

80,31 



41,48 
41,46 
3D, 33 
3A,86 
B7,41 
81, BF 
47, 2F 
F6,41 
40, 3D 
20, 3D 
B0,41 



41,52 
41, A5 
BF,41 
A5,B6 
A4,B7 
A3, 39 
IF, FE 
A6,C0 
6F,80 
10,30 
EF,33 



B7,41,277 

3D,B6,27D 
CB,F6,2B9 

20, B0,21F 
4C,B6,283 
23,13,202 

21, B7,24A 
46,B6,2BD 
33,CB,207 
30,8B,217 
4B,B1,333 



24,3,B7,41,1A7 
35,10,1A,4,E5 
0,0,0,0, 12B 

0,B8 
1,50,F6,41,27E 



F7,41,2D4 
10,BE,2C2 
A7,10,29F 
41,A3,33F 
41,A4,377 
7D,41,2D2 
41,A5,2CD 
E6,C4,47F 
5A,26,1B3 
88,20,218 
41,7A,24D 
39,0,227 



26, E4 

0,41,A9,43,A9,41,217 
*7489 

0,27,1F,B7,1D3 
10, 8E, 20, 1,154 
81,7,22,13,207 
CE,45,F0,48,357 
EC,A1,17,FA,452 
41,54,26,E8,2BA 
20,0,B6,41,1CA 
1,27,F5,CE,2C0 



20,1,B6,20,0,C6,1BD 



3,CB,C6,3,207 
A7,A0,5A,26,32D 
3D,20,D8,48,2A7 
86,47, C, 47, 17E 
18, 48, 9E, 49, 221 
AA,3,B,0,125 



F,8E,32,27,10F 
4E,86,3,B7,23F 
BF,1,D,7F,1CB 
10,CE,30,0,24D 
0,10,8E,F,14B 
80, 31, 3F, 26, 185 
50,0,CE,4E,2F4 
8E,2,0,A6, 146 
89,18,0, A7 , 2 AF 
3F,26,F4, 17,221 
F,C2,B6,FF,22,84,32C 
7,B7,FF,22,7F,FF,35D 
C4,7F,FF,C2,7F,FF, 482 




WIN THE 
LOTTO 

WITH YOUR HOME COMPUTER! 



Use your home computer and Soft- 
Byte's amazing new "Lotto Program" to 
get more winning tickets. 

In just seconds this software analyzes 

past winners and produces a powerful 

probability study on easy- to-read charts. 

With a single press of a key, you'll see 

trends, patterns, odds/evens, sum totals, 

number frequencies, and much more. It 

also includes automatic number wheeling, 

instant updating, and a built-in tutorial. 

Ask your software dealer. 

APPLE, IBM, and Commodore $24.95 

Atari, Radio Shack $21.95 

Macintosh (requires M/S basic) $29.95 

Back-up Copies $3.00 

Add $2.00 shipping and handling. Credit card 
orders approved by phone and shipped same day. 

Make checks payable to SOFT-BYTE and mail to: 

P.O. Box 556 Forest Park 
Dayton. Ohio 45405 

513- 
r sott 21M110 

Byte 




June 1988 THE RAINBOW 67 



230 

231 

232 

233 

234 

235 

236 

237 

238 

239 

240 

241 

242 

243 

244 

245 

246 

247 

248 

249 

250 

251 

252 

253 

254 

255 

256 

257 

258 

259 

260 

261 

262 

263 

264 

265 

266 

267 

268 

269 

270 

271 

272 

273 

274 

275 

276 

277 

278 

279 

280 

281 

282 

283 

284 

285 

286 

287 

288 

289 

290 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 




277 
293 
378 

26,5,A6,C0,B7,24 

FF 
3F 
32 
FB 



0,10,26,FF,3E,7D,1F0 

2D,FE,10,27,FF,37,298 

7A,2D,FE,86,38,B7,31A 

2D,FC,86, 6,B7,2D,299 

FD,7A,2D,FF,7F,32,354 

4F,7F,3 2,50,7F,32,201 

51, 7F, 32 ,52, 86 ,46 ,220 

1ST 1A UQ T7 TO At 1 A1 



__, 32,52, 86, 46,220 
B7,34,E9,17,19,43,247 
17,3,4,B6,34,E9,1F1 

-".,27,3,7a, 34, 191 
__ ,_ :i,4F,C3, 0,329 
80,FD,32,4F,F3,32,323 
51, FD, 32 - 51 . 7n. "K0. . 2Rfl 



81,38,27 



4F,2B,21,81,B5,23,1F4 
1D,86,B5,B7,32,51,292 
74,32,4F,76,32,50,1ED 
,32,4F,10,27,FE,233 
DC,FC,32,4F,43,53,2EF 



7D 



4F,F3,32,323 
51, 7D, 32, 280 
81,B5,23,1F4 

R7 . 10. . 51 . 392 



tF,10,27, FE ,23 3 
. !2,4F,43,53,2EF 
C3,0,1,FD,32,4F,242 
B6,2D,FC,F6,32,51,35° 
CE,2B,C0,17,E,55,23: 
C0,6 

E,4D, .... 
4E,7D,32,4E,26,FB,26C 

17, P, 
FF,3 

2,7D 

7A, 32 , 4D, 20, 13 , 7D, 1A9 
32, 4E 
4E,86 
17, F, 



291 
292 
293 
294 
295 
296 
297 
298 
299 
300 
301 
302 
303 
304 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 
315 
316 
317 
318 
319 
320 
321 
322 
323 
324 
325 
326 
327 
328 
329 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 




A4 
C4 
EC 
D, 
CE 
31 
A0 

41,54 
CE,24 
C6,8 

8,A6,C0,A7,A0,5A,30F 
26,F9,31,38,20,D8,280 
2, 5, F0, 0,60, 0,157 
F0,0,F0, 0,60, 0,240 
3C,0,18,0,3C,0,90 
3C,0,18,0,F,0,63 
6,0,F,0,F,0,24 
6,0,3,C0,1,80,14A 
3,C0,3,C0,1,80,207 
CC,1B,C,FD, 33 ,7A, 29D 
CC,B1,75,FD,33,7C,39E 
86,4,B7,41,55,10,1E7 
8E,3 3,81,F6,41,55,2CE 
CE,3B,0,8E,33,76,240 
3A,F7,41,54,7F,33,278 
83,A6,C2,E6,A4,3D,3B2 
F3 , 33 , 82 , E7 , 82 , B7 , 3C8 
33,83,7A,41,54,26,1EB 



E7,82,B7,3C8 
—,41, 54,26, 1EB 
EE,F6,41,55,CE,33,37B 
76,8E,33,7A,33,C5,2A9 
_ ~,FE,A6,C2,A9,365 
" 5A,26,F7,324 
31,3F,7A,41,55,26,1A6 
C0,FC,33-7A.84.7F.36C 



FD,3A 
FD, 3 A 



7A,41,55,26,1A6 
33,7A,84,7F,36C 
3A,FC,FC,33,7C,3DE 
. 3A,FE, 39,0,0, 26E 

0. 0.0.0.0.0.0 

32, 43, F6, AD, 0,0, 218 

1, B,8,B6,4B,1,116 
B1,34.EA.27.17.B7.2< 



1,B,8,B6,4B,1,116 
Bl, 34,EA,27, 17,B7,2C4 
34,EA,7C,2D,FE,B6,37B 
32, 53, 81, A, 27, A, 141 




68 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



c *^ 

352 


DATA 




353 


DATA 


Bl 


354 


DATA 


22 


*5 c e 

355 


DATA 


8, 


356 


DATA 


8B 


OCT 
JO / 


t\tv m T\ 

DATA 


A7 


358 


DATA 


i ft 


O R Q 

Joy 


T\ TV rn TV 

DAI A 


A 

4, 


3oJ3 


t\tv m 7V 

DATA 


2D 


3 61 


DATA 


AC 


362 


i^tv m TV 

DATA 


A 

4 , 


^ ^ 
363 


T"MV m TV 

DATA 


2D 


364 


^\TV m TV 

DATA 


3A 


365 


T-\ TV m TV 

DATA 


3, 


o c c 

366 


t^tv m TV 

DATA 


^ TV 

6A 


*5 *t 

367 


i-\ TV m 7V 

DATA 


6C 


368 


t^tv m TV 

DATA 


B6 


369 


t*\ TV m TV 

DATA 


23 


o ol 

37)5 


T> tv m TV 

DATA 


49 


371 


TV m TV 

DATA 


FE 


372 


T> TV m TV 

DATA 


59 


*S T o 

373 


TV m TV 

DATA 


71 


374 


T> TV m TV 

DATA 


71 


375 


T> TV m TV 

DATA 


81 


376 


DATA 


81 


377 


DATA 


84 


378 


DATA 


84 


379 


DATA 


84 




380 
381 
382 
383 
384 
385 
386 
387 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
395 
396 
397 
398 
399 
400 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
407 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 




CocoTecfr 



Don't bug a high priced CoCo 

III Interface that can only 
ehangc between tvo CoCo III 
Max-type graphics programs!' 

Vtth UltiMax you can 
switch between two popular 
CoCo Ml Max-type programs 
and also select the sensitivity 
of your joystick! You can use 
UltiMax as a normal Hi-Rez joystick inter faoe or switch 1t 
to be used with a popular Max-type graphics program. The 
other feature of UltiMax is the Sensitivity Selector for 
added accuracy In your drawings! So why pay more for an 
Interface with one option when with UltiMax you get two 
options for a cheaper price than our competitors! 



The UltiMax tnterfaoe is only 



$ 29.95 



Send to: 
CocoTech 
208 Catty Ann Drive 
Reading, PA 19606 



PA residents 
add 62 sales 
tax 

Please make checks or money 



Please allow 
2 to 3 weeks 
for delivery 

orders 



payable to: Thomas E, Keller 



Shipping and Handling: 
USA and Canada add $2.50 
Other countries add $5.00 



Sorry no 
credit cards 
or COD's YETJ 



As EASY As WRITING A CHECK 

that's how easy it is to: 

* 

" RECONCILE YOUR CHECK BOOK 

- USE A BUDGET 

KEEP TRACK OF CASH EXPENSES 

•• TRACK CHECK, ATM & CASH EXPENSES 
BY TYPE OR PAYEE 

» SUMMARIZE YOUR EXPENSES FOR TAX TIME- 
OR FOR ANY OTHER PURPOSE 



GREAT DOCUMENTATION 
ON SCREEN MENU'S & PROMPTS 
DEFINATELY USER FRIENDLY 
REQUIRES 32K CoCo 1,2, or 3 AND SINGLE DISK DRIVE 
REVIEWED IN DECEMBER' 87 RAINBOW 

THE CoCo CHECKBOOK - 

$25.00 + $2.50 shipping and handling 

PROGRAMS for PEOPLE 

from 







OR trade 1n your original Hi-Res Interface (sent 
postage prepaid) and get UltiMax for only $14.95 

[*t reserve the riphl lu rt±*Qt cmjin. .iTjdc* In pffiril 



P.O.Box 391 Cleveland, Ohio 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 69 



408 

409 

4 10 

411 

412 

413 

414 

415 

416 

417 

418 

419 

420 

421 

422 

423 

424 

425 

426 

427 

428 

429 

430 

431 

432 

433 

434 

435 

436 

437 

438 

439 

440 

441 

442 

443 

444 

445 

446 

447 

448 

449 

450 

451 

452 

453 

454 

455 

456 

457 

458 

459 

460 

461 

462 

463 

464 

465 

466 

467 

468 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 

DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 




FC, 27,8,7C,2D,FC,2D0 
20,3,7C,2D,FD,C6,28F 
AF,CE, 35,B4,B6,2D,349 

FD, 48,EE,C6,B6,2D,3DC 
FC,17,B,D,C6,B5,2A6 



469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 

477 
478 
479 
480 
481 
482 
483 
484 
485 
486 
487 
488 
489 
490 
491 
492 
493 
494 
495 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 
528 
529 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 



CE 
10 
CE 
7D 
36 
81 



1,B7,FF,2,F4,FF,3AC 



9>, 
B6 

C6 
FD 
BB 
CI 
FD 
AF 
2C 
38 
2D 
38 
2D 
4, 
7, 
27 
8E 
41 
AB 
3B 
36 
15 
ED 

A, 
54 
C0 

1, 
3D 



2B,C0,17,A,DB,2B5 
26,1,60,C6,B5,212 
2B,C0,17,A,F9,2D3 
36,C3,27,4,7F,220 
C3,39,B6,26,0,20E 
A,27,37,CC,BF,274 



6,2C,CE,26,1,147 
26, 0,48, 48, 33, 19F 
7C,26,0,B6,2D,24B 
8E,35,CE,A6,86,3BA 
2D,FC,C6,AD,ED,444 
8E,36,5B,B6,2D,2C3 
48, 48, 48, 30, 86, 28B 
C4,73,36,C3,39,318 
72,38,0,2C,BC,1BE 
AC, 3A,0, 39,40, 197 
6,39,8A,3A,4A,17A 
F6,2D,50,38,4A,22D 
9A,1,2,3,4,D1 
4 , 5 , 6 , 6 , 6 , IF 
8,9,B6,26,0,F4 
37,B7,41,54,10,1BA 
26,1,86,8,B7,1FA 
55,EC,A4,AE,22,2F6 
80, 5A, CI, 9, 27, 276 
85,80,26,37,CE,26B 
51, 17, A, 3A, 26, 108 
7A,41,55,26,E8, 233 
A1,CE,36,51,17,2FA 
55,31,22,7A,41,16D 
26, D0, 39, 80, 5, 208 
5,34,6,CE,20,1ED 
B6,20,0,C6,3,1A0 

33,CB,6F,C0,35,29F 



6,ED,C4,7C,20,0,253 

7A,26,0,B6,41,54,1EB 

81,1,27,D6,CE,26,273 

1,B6,26,0,C6,4,1A7 

3D,33,CB,EC,C4,ED,3D8 

A4, EC, 42, ED, 22, 20, 301 

C1,1,2,C0,C0,30,274 

30,C,C,3,3,FF,14D 

FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 5FA 

FF , FF , 0 , FF , FF , FF , 4 FB 

0 , FF , FF , FF , 0 , FF , 3 FC 

0,FF,0,FF,0,0,1FE 

0,FF,0,0,FF,0,1FE 

FF > 0 , 0 , FF , 0 , 0 , 1FE 

0,FF,0,0,0,0,FF 

FF,0,0,0,0,0,FF 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

0,0,0,0,1,0,1 

0,0,0,0,0,1,1 

0,0,0,1,0,1,2 

0,0,1,0,1,0,2 

0,1,0,1,0,1,3 

0,1,0,1,1,1,4 

0,1,1,1,0,1,4 

1,1,1,1,1,1,6 

1,0,86,28,B7,41,1A7 



70 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



530 
531 
532 
533 
534 
535 
536 
537 
538 
539 
54J3 
541 
542 
543 
544 
545 
546 
547 
548 
549 
55J3 
551 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 




^ 

W 230 74 

— I 1010 75 

1320 86 

1610 164 

1920 61 

2210 195 



2510 133 

2810 126 

3190 139 

3530 188 

END 130 



Listing 2: BLITZ2 

10 CLEAR2j3j3 / 23199:CLS:DIMG(lj3j3) : 

A=PEEK(186) *256+PEEK(187) 

2J3 READP:IFP=j3THEN21j3ELSEP=P+12j3 

3J3 READW,H,F:PMODE4,1:PCLS0:SCRE 
EN1 , 1 : PMODE3 , 1 : IFF==j3THENPOKEP , W : 
P0KEP+l,H:P=P+2 

4j3 FORY=j3TOH-l : READA$ : FORX—1TOLE 

N (A$) : PSET (X*2-2 , Y , INSTR ( " . OBW" , 

MID$ ( A$ , X, 1) ) ) : NEXT : NEXT 

5J3 GET(j3,j3)-(4j3,4j3) , G, G:GOSUB90 : 

IFF THEN20ELSEPUT(2,j3) -(42,40) ,G 

,PSET:GOSUB90 

6J3 PUT(4,0)-(44,4j3) ,G,PSET:GOSUB 
9J3: PUT (6,0) -(46,40) ,G,PSET:GOSUB 
9)3 

70 GOTO20 

90 FORY=0TOH-1:FORX==0TOW-1:POKEP 
,PEEK(A+X+Y*32) :P=P+1: NEXT: NEXT: 
PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS)3 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PMODE3 , 
1: RETURN 

2pj3 PRINT@P+16-LEN(A$)/2 / A$; :P=P 
+32:RETURN 

21J3 CLS^:C=2:FORX=^T063:C=INT(X/ 
8)+l:SVI(63-X,!i,C) :SET(63-X,4 f C) 
: SET (X , 3 1 , C) : NEXT : F0RY=1T03 1 : OI 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Back Issue 
Availability 




BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
pages of material, it's all just for CoCo users 
— a great way to expand your library! 

A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents for 
each additional issue for postage and han- 
dling if sent by United Parcel Service. There 
is a $5 charge for the first issue, plus a $1 
charge for each additional issue on orders 
sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not deliver to a 
post office box or to another country. 

MOST ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 are 
available on white paper in a reprint form. All 
others are in regular magazine form. VISA, 
MasterCard and American Express ac- 
cepted. Kentucky residents please add 5 
percent state sales tax. In order to hold down 
costs, we do not bill, and no C.O.D. orders 
are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To check availability and order, review and 
fill out the form on the next page and mail 
it with your payment to: 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 71 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 



Please send me the following back issues: 



MONTH/YEAR 


PRICE 


MONTH/YEAR 








VOLUME 1 








VOLUME 5 






JUL '81 


Premier Issue 


$2.00 


a 


AUG '85 


Games 


$395 


□ 


AUG '81 




$200 


□ 


SEP '85 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '81 


Education 


$2.00 


□ 


OCT '85 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT '81 


Printer 


$2.00 


□ 


NOV '85 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 


NOV '81 




$2.00 


□ 


JAN '86 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


DEC '81 


Holiday 


$2.00 


□ 


FEB '86 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN *82 




$200 


□ 


MAR '86 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB "82 




$2.00 


□ 


APR '86 


Home Help 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR '82 




$250 


□ 


MAY '86 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '82 




$250 


□ 


JUN '86 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '82 




$2.50 


□ 


JUL '86 


Anniversary 


$395 


□ 




VOLUME 2 








VOLUME 6 






JUN '83 


Printers 


$2.95 


□ 


AUG '86 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '83 


Anniversary 


$2.95 


□ 


SEP '86 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 




VOLUME 3 






OCT '86 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


AUG '83 


Games 


$2.95 


□ 


NOV '86 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '83 


Education 


$2.95 


□ 


DEC '86 


Holiday 


$3.95 


n 


OCT '83 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '87 


Beginners 


$3.93 


i — i 
l_l 


DEC '83 


Holiday 


$3,95 


□ 


FEB '87 


Utilities 


$3.95 


n 
□ 


MAR '84 


Business 


$395 


□ 


MAR '87 


Business 


$3.9b 


t— i 


APR '84 


Gaming 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '87 


Home Help 


$3.9b 


■ — i 


MAY '84 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


MAY '87 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '84 


Music, 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '87 


Music 


$39b 


i — i 
U 


JUL '84 


Anniversary 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '87 


Anniversary 


$3.95 


□ 




VOLUME 4 








VOLUME 7 






AUG*84 


Games 


$395 


□ 


AUG '87 


Games 




1 1 


SEP '84 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '87 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT '84 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT 87 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


NOV '84 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 


NOV '87 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 


DEC '84 


Holiday 


$3.95 


□ 


DEC '87 


Holiday 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '85 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '88 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '85 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '88 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR "85 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR '88 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '85 


Simulations 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '88 


Home Help 


$3.95 


□ 


MAY '85 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


MAY '88 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '85 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '88 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '85 


Anniversary 


$3.95 


□ 











RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1981 through June 
1984, Is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes including rainbow on tape are in the July 
1985 and July 1986 Issues, respectively. The Sixth Year Index is in the July 1987 
issue. 



TOTAL 

KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 

U.S. MAIL CHARGE 
SHIPPING & HANDLING 
U.P.S. CHARGE 
TOTAL AMOUNT 
ENCLOSED 



Article Reprints 

In instances where a given issue is now out of print and not available for purchase, 
we do provide photocopies of specific articles. The cost for this service is $1.50 
plus 50 cents S/H per article. This service is provided only in the case of out-of- 
stock issues. 

Name 

t 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed, or 

Charge to my: □ VISA □ MC □ AE 

CARD # 

EXPIRATION DATE PHONE ( ) 

SIGNATURE 



TO ORDER BY PHONE (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



NT(Y/4)+l:SET(0,Y,C) :SET(1,Y,C) : 
SET(62,31-Y,C) :SET(63,31-Y,C) :NE 
XT 

220 PRINT@11,"B LIT Z"; 

230 PRINT@34,"»» BY GEORGE PHI 

LLIPS ««"; 

240 P=96:A$="USE THE LEFT AND RI 
GHT ARROWS ":GOSUB200 
250 A$="TO MOVE THE GUN BARREL A 
ND THE":GOSUB200 

260 A$— "TANK TO SHOOT DOWN THE P 
LANES. ":GOSUB200:A$="PRESS ' F* T 
O FIRE BULLETS" :GOSUB200 
270 A$="PRESS 'P' TO PAUSE THE G 
AME, " : GOSUB200 : A$ ss " 'R* TO RESUME 
THE GAME, " : GOSUB200 : A$=" BREAK T 
O STOP THE GAME.":GOSUB200 
280 A$="G O O D LUCK l":GOS 
UB200) 

290 A$=" (YOU'LL NEED ITi)":GOSUB 
200 

300 P=P+32:A$="STARTING LEVEL (0 
-9)?":GOSUB200 

310 A$="0 = EASY, 9 = HARD":GOSU 
B200 

320 FORN=1024TO1535:POKEN+30944, 
PEEK(N) :NEXT 

330 P=23776:FORX=0TO191:POKEP+X, 
INT ( 2 *SQR ( 19 1-X) + . 5 ) : NEXT 
340 CLS5: PRINT" OK, NOW RUN PROGR 
AM 3 ." 

1000 DATA 17920,3,11,0 

1010 DATA 

1020 DATA 

1030 DATA 

1040 DATA 

1050 DATA . . . .W. . . . 
1060 DATA . . .WWW. . . 
1070 DATA . . . .W. . . . 

1080 DATA 

* 1090 DATA 

1100 DATA 

1110 DATA 

1120 DATA 18054,3,11,0 

1130 DATA 

1140 DATA 

1150 DATA 

1160 DATA . . . .W 

1170 DATA . . .WWW. . . 
1180 DATA ..WWWWW. . 
1190 DATA . . .WWW. . . 
1200 DATA . . . .W. . . . 

1210 DATA 

1220 DATA 

1230 DATA 

1240 DATA 18188,3,11,0 

1250 DATA 

1260 DATA 

1270 DATA 

1280 DATA . . .WWW. . . 
1290 DATA ..WWWWW.. 



72 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



featu reS 




pata 



• Data Merge capability to interface with our OS-9 Text 

Formatter - perfect for using data master information 
imbedded in letters, forms, and morel 

• Expanded file list display capabilities make it easier to 

scan through your data files. 
Update for current users: 

Data Master users can receive this new version by- 
ordering "Data Master Update" for only $10. (Data 
Master registration card must be on file!/ 




IRON CROSS 

by John & Michael Galus 

The German invasion of Russia 
began at 0300 on 22 June 1941. 
Two massive armies faced each 
other in a titanic struggle which 
would decide World War II. The 
object of IRON CROSS is to 
defeat the Russian forces con- 
J "*? trolled by the computer & to 
3 take control of the Russian cities. 

Requires 64K, Ext. Basic, Disk. $24.95 




Screen Star 

by Scott Cabit 



Data Master 

byBJ Chambless 

Simplify with pull-down menus 

All options are available from any where in the program. 
To make it even simpler, each menu option can be invoked 
by a single character! 
Dialog boxes 

Pop-up windows display current settings and available 
choices. 

Unique LIST display format 

You view data in easy-to-read rows & columns. From this 
easy-to-read screen you may edit your data, without hav- 
ing to exit. Mass changes are a snap! 

For even more power/use an access key to selectively dis- 
play a subset of records and can change them right on the 
screen! 

Compatibility with OS-9 Profile & Data Bank 

You won't lose any of your valuable data! 
Easy Expansion 

with re-definition of records and transfer of files. 
Elements & Records: 

Each record can contain up to 512 characters used within 
35 elements. Elements are defined as: alphanumeric 
(descriptive data], math (real numbers including dollars & 
cents), date, and derived (formulas calculated from other ele- 
ments in the same record]. You can store any type of data 
using these field types! 



Vs 9 Aiso available from Radio Shack 
through Express Order Software 

^^cr^^^imp}emenii ; fe^plar WordStar editing 
capabilities. If you know WordStar you already know how; 
to! use Screen Star! 

ildft flies larger than memory since Screen Star uses the 
disk as an extension of memory. 

♦ Block Commands - with a keystroke you can mark the 
start and end of a block, then move, copy, or delete the 
block. 

If &sor Movement is easy with an array of commands to 

; move left or right one character, or one word, or one line; 
scroll forward or back one line, one screen, one block; routes os-9 Disk 
jump to the start or end of the line or tfie^een^toiock^ vwith Text Formatter 

or file; '§?[ 

♦ Find & Find/Replace Commands make mass changes and 
searches a snap^l 

♦ Pop-Up Help Menus are as dose as a keystroke 



Closing Commands let you exit the editor with or with- 
out save, and can import or export files whenever you 
need them. 

Smart Speller is include^ I 
Parameter commands persdhalize your environment 
Access the OS-9 Shell. 

Up to 10 functions keys can be defined by CoCo 3 useri 
for fast, repetitive functions. 
Use with the Text Formatter for a full word processing 
team, Simply imbed the Text Formatter commands in your 
Screen Star file and it will be printed in style!' 
level 1 & Level 2 are supported and both versions are 
included. 



$49.95 
$74,9$ 



Call or Write to: 



Display & Entry Screens 

Design up to 9 different screen formats for data display 
and data entry for each data base. This is helpful for access- 
ing your data for different purposes. 
Sorts & Selections; 

Up to 9 different access keys can be defined. These are 
used for displaying data on the screen or selecting data for 
printing. You may use several levels of sorts as well as logi- 
cal operators to select just the right data. A powerful generic 
search is also available. 
Reports: 

See your data any way you want by designing your own 
reports! Data Master offers easy-to-use tools to design pro- 
fessional reports including report headings, titles, column 
headings, automatic page numbers, column totals, and 
more. Store up to 9 report formats for each data base. 
File Management 

Built-in file management capabilities allow easy file 
manipulation for transferring data files, renaming data files, 
expanding data files, and more. 
Upload/Download 

Data Master cm read and write standard sequential files 
which aids in data transfer between DynaCalc and many 
others. 

Full keyboard ease 

taking full advantage of the CoCo 3's cursor and function 
keys. 

OS-9 accessible 

Even whife operaring^l^jn^^Ateer. 



Requires OS-9 Level (I 
CoCo 3, 51 2K 



S 64.95 




OS-9 Text 
Formatter 

. \vV ■ ><:■■?'■ 7 - :•' ■ . s^.-,:: i r\^>SvS 'f. a- - :\'.:'; • 

Also amiable from Radio Shack 
through Express Order Software 

An easy way to get beautiful documents and letters with 
OS-9; text Formatter interfaces vwth any editor that pro- 
duces standam ASCI text f;ies. 

hatures include 'eft and right justification/ page breaks, 
special spacing, automatic pagination, automatic page 
numbering, centering, indenting, tabs, and sencfng 
escape and control codes to your printer as well as sophis- 
ticated headers and footers. Special functions induce 
macros for often used sequences, relative argum^tslf^ 
i per^nd ldwe remarks, and more! 



Quires OS-9 



$34.9$ 




call or write today for 



COMPUTERWARE « 6,9 » «*-»« 

Box 668 • Enclnitas, CA • 92024 



FREE Catalog 



Color Connection 

This is the most comprehensive modem package for the CoCo! All protocols are 
supported including Compuserve Protocol B, XMODEM, and XON/XOFF. Auto dial 
feature for both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems. You can use all 
baud rates when using the Radio Shack Deluxe RS232 program pack! Printer baud 
rate* are selectable. 

You can print from the buffer and files bigger than the buffer can be uploaded and 
downloaded. Download direct to disk with automatic XON/XOFF protocol, Single 
key macros allow easy entry of often used passwords and IPs; Hl-res screens with 
a choice of colors are used. All printable characters are available and all control charac- 
ters are supported. 

RSDOS Disk $49.95 OS-9 Disk RS232 pak is required. $49.95 



Name _ 
Address 
City 



Yes! Send me your FREE catalog! 

VISA ' MasterCard 

Card * 

Signature 



State 



CoCo □ 



Zip 



Exp. 



Item 



Format 



Price 



Shipping 6'/2% Calif. Sales Tax 

Surface — S3 minimum. COD Add $5 

3% for orders over $100 Shipping* 
Air or Canada — S6 minimum. TOTAL 

6% for orders over $100 
Checks are delayed for bank clearance 



1300 


DATA 


. . WWWWW. . 


1910 


DATA 




1310 


DATA 


. .WWWWW. . 


1920 


DATA 




1320 


DATA 


• • • WWW • • • 


1930 


DATA 


• WW. . .WW. 


1330 


DATA 




1940 


DATA 


. .WW. WW. . 


1340 


DATA 




1950 


DATA 


... www ... 


1350 


DATA 




1960 


DATA 


19515,3,7,0 

WWW / 


1360 


DATA 


18322,3,11,0 

WW W 1 


1970 


DATA 




1370 


DATA 




1980 


DATA 




1380 


DATA 




1990 


DATA 


•BBBBBWW. 


1390 


DATA 


• •"• WWW • • • 


2000 


DATA 


. BBBBBBBB 


1400 


DATA 


• .WWWWW. . 


2010 


DATA 


. . OOOO . . . 


14 10 


DATA 


.wwwwwww. 


2020 


DATA 


. . BBB .... 


1420 


DATA 


.wwwwwww. 


2030 


DATA 




1430 


DATA 


.wwwwwww. 


2040 


DATA 


19601,3.7.0 

I t * w f 


1440 


DATA 


. .WWWWW. . 


2050 


DATA 




1450 


DATA 


. . .www. . . 


2060 


DATA 




1460 


DATA 




2070 


DATA 


. WWBBBBB . 


1470 


DATA 




2080 


DATA 


BBBBBBBB . 


. 1480 


DATA 


18456,3,11,0 

W W Wf 


2090 


DATA 


. . .0000. . 


1490 


DATA 


. . • WWW • • • 


2100 


DATA 


.... BBB . . 


1500 


DATA 


. .WWWWW. . 


2110 


DATA 




1510 


DATA 


.wwwwwww. 


2120 


DATA 


11200.4,11.0 

W 1 w w w f 


1520 


DATA 


wwwwwwwww 


2130 


DATA 


OOWO . BBB . OOWO 


1530 


DATA 


wwwwwwwww 


2140 


DATA 


OOWO . BBB . OOWO 


1540 


DATA 


wwwwwwwww 


2150 


DATA 


OOWOBBBBBOOWO 


1550 


DATA 


wwwwwwwww 


2160 


DATA 


... BBBBBBB ... 


1560 


DATA 


wwwwwwwww 


2170 


DATA 


. wwwwwwwwwww . 


1570 


DATA 


.wwwwwww. 


2180 


DATA 


WWOOOOOOOOOWW 


1580 


DATA 


. .WWWWW. . 


2190 


DATA 


W . BBBBBBBBB . W 


1590 


DATA 


... www ... 


2200 


DATA 


•B.W. *W. • W • B • 


1600 


DATA 


18590,3,11,0 

W w W 9 w 


2210 


DATA 


. BOWBOWBOWBB . 


1610 


DATA 


• . • www ... 


2220 


DATA 


. B . . • W . . V7 . B * 


1620 


DATA 


. .WWWWW. . 


2230 


DATA 


. .BBBBBBBBB. . 


1630 


DATA 


.wwwwwww. 


2240 


DATA 


11378 .3, 6.0 

www ~ 


1640 


DATA 


wwwwwwwww 


2250 


DATA 


. ....... 


1650 


DATA 


WWWB.OWWW 


2260 


DATA 




1660 


DATA 


www. . .www 


2270 


DATA 




1670 


DATA 


WWWB.OWWW 


2280 


DATA 




1680 


DATA 


wwwwwwwww 


2290 

mm mm mr pm 


DATA 




1690 


DATA 


.wwwwwww. 


2300 


DATA 


W. . 


1700 


DATA 


. .WWWWW. . 


2310 


DATA 


14336,3, 6,0 

*mm m mm mm j mm m w f f 


1710 


DATA 


... www ... 


2320 


DATA 




1720 


DATA 


18724,3,11,0 

W W W J 


2330 


DATA 


. . .w 


1730 


DATA 


... www ... 


2340 


DATA 




1740 


DATA 


. .WWWWW. . 


2350 


DATA 




1750 


DATA 


.www. www. 


2360 


DATA 




1760 


DATA 


www. . .www 


2370 


DATA 




1770 


DATA 




2380 


DATA 


11452,3,6.0 

W W W 1 


1780 


DATA 


WW WW 


2390 


DATA 


. . . .w. . . . 


1790 


DATA 




2400 


DATA 




1800 


DATA 


www. . .www 


2410 


DATA 


w. . . 


1810 


DATA 


.www. www. 


2420 


DATA 




1820 


DATA 


. .WWWWW. . 


2430 


DATA 




1830 


DATA 


... www ... 


2440 


DATA 




1840 


DATA 


18858.3/11,0 

¥ W W ~ 


2450 


DATA 


14508,3,6,0 

W W W w w 


1850 


DATA 


... WW"V? ... 


2460 


DATA 




I860 


DATA 


. . WW . WW . . 


2470 


DATA 




1870 


DATA 


• WW ... WW . 


2480 


DATA 




1880 


DATA 




2490 


DATA 




1890 


DATA 




2500 


DATA 




1900 


DATA 




2510 


DATA 





THE RAINBOW June 1988 



TEXTPRO-IV 

"The ULTIMATE Color Computer III Word Processing System" 



9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 
Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 
9 Proportional Character Sets Supported with full Justification. 
80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function key sets. 
Three Programmable Headers and One Programmable Footer. 
Automatic Footnote System places lines at the bottom of a page. 

7 Tab Commands, with: Center, Left, Right and Decimal align. 
Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system setup. 

8 Pre-Defined & 10 Programmable printer function commands. 
1 Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

1 Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 
1 Complete Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left & right. 
1 Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 
1 Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 
r Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 
1 Compatible with all printers including Laser printers. 
' Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 512K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most Powerful Word Processing System available for the 
30CO-3, designed for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is 
tot like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
hort documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional printing, 
hen most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simple word processors. 
3ut, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
eatures to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
)roblems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is the answer. It works in a 
otally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
nformation that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
ormatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
["here are no time comsuming and frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
:ontrol at all times. You can display the formatted document on the screen before 
i single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, footers, 
3age numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, Italic, 
Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts, 
:ake a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKI DATA 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All of the character sets used on this AD are 
sroportional, all centering, justification, font selection, and text printing was 
Derformed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

What you see is what you get! 

TEXTPRO IV has 9 Hi-Resolution screen fonts to choose from, with 58 to 212 
:haracters per line in 225 Resolution, for the best display possible. You can easily 
natch the width of your printed page to the screen and you can have it 
automatically change display widths as you change printer fonts so you can even 
iisplay the "fine print". All of the screen fonts can display, Bold, Italic, Underline, 
superscript, Subscript and Double Width characters. When you you want to see 
srhat your printed document will look like, TEXTPRO IV will let you see it on the 
icreen in all its glory, so that, "What you see is what you get". 

Standard Commands 

TEXTPRO IV has all the document formatting commands you expect in a 
word processor and then some. The setup commands include: line length, top 
margin, bottom margin, page length, page numbering on/off, page format on/off, 
automatic word fill on/off and justification left, center, right or full. Some of the 
Vertical control features include: Test for a number of lines left on a page, skip to 
next page, set page number, page pause, single and multiple line spacing, 

TEXTPRO IV features 3 programmable Header lines that can be centered, left 
or right justified and one programmable Footer line. There are 3 commands for 
xmtinious, single and paragraph indenting, Center Text, Center Line and Right 
Justify text with character fill. 

Printer & Special Commands 

TEXTPRO IV has 8 pre-defined printer & screen commands for Bold, Italic, 
Double Width, Underline, Subscript, Superscript, Condensed and Double Strike 
print. It also has 10 programmable functions that you can use to access intelligent 
printer features like: Graphics, variable line spacing, half line feed, horizontal & 
vertical positioning. There are also 3 other printer commands that allow you to 
imbed control code sequences anywhere in the text. 

There is a Footnote command that will automatically place footnotes at the 
bottom of the page. Another command allows you to display a message on the 
screen and input text from the keyboard, to be included in your printed document. 
There is also a repeat command that allows you to repeat an entire document or 
part of one, up to 255 times. 

Tab Functions 

TEXTPRO IV features an elaborate system of tab commands for complete 
control over column formatting. There are 10 programmable tab stops that can be 
defined and re-defined at any time. They can be used to: Center over Tab 
column, Right Justify to Tab column, Decimal Align over Tab column, Left 
Justify to Tab column (Normal Tab) and Horizontal Tab. They can also be used 
with a numeric column position for maximum flexibility. 



Proportional Fonts & Printing 

TEXTPRO IV is the only Color Computer III Word Processing system that 
gives you Justified Proportion Printing, which can give your documents and letters 
that professional touch that just isn't obtainable with fixed or mono spaced 
printing. And just about all printers today support proportional fonts, and with 
Laser Printers you can get typesetting quality output for just pennies a page. 
TEXTPRO IV supports up to 9 proportional fonts, with full justification. And, 
you can even mix mono spaced and proportional fonts for maximum flexability. 
Even if you don't use proportional printing, you can select between Pica, Elite and 
Condensed fixed width fonts to get fully justified printing. 

Mail Merge and Text Processing Disk Functions 

TEXTPRO IV supports several commands that allow you to import data or 
text from other disk files. They allow you to include information like names and 
addresses for Mail Merge capability, Import standard paragraphs or other 
information for Boiler Plate type functions and more. Some of the commands 
include: Open a file, Field a Record, Read a Record into fielded variables, Read 
single or multiple lines and Trim spaces from the trailing end of fielded variables. 

Another powerful disk function not to be overlooked is the "LIBRARY" 
command that allows you to include the entire contents of a file in your text. This 
can be very useful for a great many applications. You can use a Library command 
to automatically include a standard or optional printer setup command file, or to 
include standard paragraphs, headers or information created from a spread sheet 
or any other program. And, for printing very large documents that consist of 
several files linked together. 

Autoexec Startup Files 

TEXTPRO IV will automatically load and execute a command text file when it 
first executes. This allows you to customize the program configuration for your 
system and printer whenever you startup TEXTPRO IV. You can setup the 
screen display format, colors, adjust automatic key repeat, printer baud rate, load 
a set of function keys, load your printers control codes and more. 

80 Programmable Function Keys 

TEXTPRO IV allows you to have up to 80 function keys with just about any 
kind of information or command sequences you can imagine. Once programmed, 
you can have a command sequence execute using a single function key. You can 
also Save and Load function key sets at any time. So, you can have several sets for 
different writing tasks or projects, the possibilities are endless. Just think, with a 
single function key you could, load a disk file, search for and replace all the 
occurances of a phrase, save the file back to disk, have it processed and printed! 

Text Editing 

TEXTPRO IV has a powerful, full featured, line oriented screen editor that is 
faster and more efficient then most editors you've ever worked with. It supports 
single or multiple line copy and move, global or local search and replace, word and 
character insert/delete, block delete and much more. It features adjustable 
automatic key repeat, selectable display foreground and background colors, screen 
line width and more. 

TEXTPRO IV uses fully compatible ASCII formatted files. You can even 
direct formatted output files to a standard ASCII disk file. It will Load, Save, 
Append. Kill, Text Process files from disk, Roll part of a file to disk, Get next 
portion of a file, display a Directory and Backup Ramdisk to & from Floppy disks. 

TEXTPRO IV's files are also compatible with spelling checker programs like 
Spell 'n Fix from Star Kits, a shareware program, available with TEXTPRO IV for 
your evaluation, just for the asking. 

Fully Buffered Keyboard 

While many word processing programs are slow and often lose keystrokes. 
TEXTPRO IV has a fully buffered keyboard that is virtually impossible to out 
type. Even when it's busy, it will still remember the keystrokes entered. You can 
enter in commands or whatever, even during insert mode you'll never lose a key. 

Professional Word Processing Power 

TEXTPRO IV is a powerful tool for both the Casual and Professional Word 
Processing user. It offers a wide range of features and functions that can satisfy 
even the most demanding writer. Even though you may not need all of 
TEXTPRO IV's power and flexability right now, its not a program that you can 
easily outgrow. As your needs and skills improve, you'll discover that you won't 
need to go out and buy another word processing program, TEXTPRO IV will 
already be ready and waiting. No Text Processing program available for the Color 
Computer III gives you more Text Processing Power than TEOTPRO IV. It can 
make your writing appear more professional than you ever thought possible. 
Check around, see what other word processing programs have to offer in terms of 
power, speed and flexability. When your finished comparing them against 
TEXTPRO IV, you'll see that it's the only real choice for the Color Computer III. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89.95 

To order TEXTPRO IV by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 
Coining Soon: CoCo 1 & 2 versions of TEXTPRO IV 



2520 DATA 14848, 3, 6 ,0 

2530 DATA W. . . 

2540 DATA W. . . 

2550 DATA W. . . 

2560 DATA W. . 

2570 DATA W. . 

2530 DATA W. . 

2590 DATA 14656,3,6,0 
2600 DATA .... .W. . . 

2610 DATA W. . . 

2620 DATA W. . 

2630 DATA W. . 

2640 DATA W. . 

2650 DATA W. . 

2660 DATA 11526,3,6,0 

2670 DATA W. . 

2680 DATA W. . 

2690 DATA W. . 

2700 DATA W. . 

2710 DATA ..... .W. . 

2720 DATA W. . 

2730 DATA 14730,3,6,0 
2740 DATA ...... .W. 

2750 DATA W. 

2760 DATA W. . 

2770 DATA W. . 

2780 DATA W. . 

2790 DATA W. . 

2800 DATA 14922,3,6,0 

2810 DATA W. 

2820 DATA W. 

2830 DATA W. 

2840 DATA W. . 

2850 DATA W. . 

2860 DATA W. . 

2870 DATA 14582,3,6,0 

2880 DATA W. 

2890 DATA W. 

2900 DATA W. 

2910 DATA W. 

2920 DATA W. . 

2930 DATA W. . 

2940 DATA 11600,3,6,0 

2950 DATA W 

2960 DATA W 



2970 DATA W. 

2980 DATA W. 

2990 DATA W. . 

3000 DATA W. . 

3010 DATA 14410,4,6,0 

3020 DATA W. . . 

3030 DATA W. . . 

3040 DATA W 

3050 DATA W 

3060 DATA W 

3070 DATA W 

3080 DATA 11674,4,6,0 

3090 DATA W. 

3100 DATA W. . 

3110 DATA W. . . 

3120 DATA W. . . . 

3130 DATA W 

3140 DATA W 

3150 DATA 19687,1,70,1 

3160 DATA . .W. . 

3170 DATA .W.W. 

3180 DATA .W.W. 

3190 DATA .W.W. 

3200 DATA .W.W. 

3210 DATA .W.W. 

3220 DATA . .W. . 

3230 DATA . .W. . 

3240 DATA .WW. . 

3250 DATA . .W. . 

3260 DATA . .W. . 

3270 DATA . .W. . 

3280 DATA . .W. . 

3290 DATA .WWW. 

3300 DATA . .W. . 

3310 DATA .W.W. 

3320 DATA . . .W. 

3330 DATA . .W. . 

3340 DATA .W. . . 

3350 DATA .W. . . 

3360 DATA .WWW. 

3370 DATA . .W. . 

3380 DATA .W.W. 

3390 DATA . . .W. 

3400 DATA . .W. . 

3410 DATA . . .W. 



3420 
3430 
3440 
3450 
3460 
3470 
3480 
3490 
3500 
3510 
3520 
3530 
3540 
3550 
3560 
3570 
3580 
3590 
3600 
3610 
3620 
3630 
3640 
3650 
3660 
3670 
3 680 
3690 
3700 
3710 
3720 
3730 
3740 
3750 
3760 
3770 
3780 
3790 
3800 
3810 
3820 
3830 
3840 
3850 
3860 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 



• W a W • 

• • W • • 

• W • . « 

. W • W • 

• W • W . 

.www. 
. • . w « 
. . . w . 

• • « W • 

.www. 

. w . . . 
. w . . . 

a WW . . 

. . . w . 

. . . W • 
. WW . . 

. . w . . 
. w ... 
. w . . . 

.WW. . 

• W.W. 

• W.W. 

. . w . . 
.www. 
... w . 

. . . W • 
. . WW . 

. . w . . 
. . w . . 
. . w . . 
. . w . . 

. W . W • 

• W.W. 
. • w . . 

. w . w . 

. W . W • 

. . w . . 
. . w . . 

. W . W • 

• W.W. 
. • WW • 

• . . W • 
. W . W • 

. . w . . 

J3 



Listing 3: BLITZ3 

10 CLS;CLEAR200,&H29FF:C=*0:FORN= 
0TO14 : RE AD A $ : A=VAL ( " &H" +A$ ) : C=C+ 
A: P0KEN+&H2 A00 , A : NEXT : RE ADD : IFD< 
>C THENPRINT" CHECKSUM ERROR! 11 : EN 
DELSEEXEC&H2A00 

20 INPUT 11 FILENAME TO SAVE AS";F$ 
:IFF$= ,,f, THEN20 

30 INPUT"TO (T) APE OR (D)ISK";A$ 
:A$=LEFT$(A$,1) :IFA$="T"THEN50EL 
SEIFA$o"D f, THEN30 

40 SAVEM F$, &H2B00,&H5000,&H3003 
: GOTO 60 



50 CSAVEM F$, &H2B00 , &H5000 , &H300 
3 

60 INPUT "ANOTHER COPY (Y/N) " ;A$: 
A$=LEFT$ ( A$ , 1 ) : IFA$=" Y" THEN50ELS 
EIFA$O"N"THEN60 

70 EXEC&H3003 'BUSINESS IS FINI 

SHED, LET'S PLAY THAT GAME! 

80 DATA 8E,2A,0F 

90 DATA A6,89,2E,E0 

100 DATA A7,80 

110 DATA 8C, 51,20 

120 DATA 26, F5 

130 DATA 39 

140 DATA 1660 



76 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



CBASIC- I I I 
The ULTIMATE Color Computer III Basic Compiler!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient Machine Language Programs and you don't want to spend the next few 
years trying to learn how to write them in Assembly language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!!! 



CBASIC III is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full 
advantage of all the capabilities available in your C6Co-3 including 512K RAM, 
without having to spend years trying to learn assembly language programming. 
CBASIC III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you 
are already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Res Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). It is 99% 
syntax compatible with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, so most Basic programs can 
be loaded and compiled with little or no changes required. 

The compiler is an optomizing two-pass integer compiler that converts 
programs written in Basic into 100% pure 6809 Machine Language programs 
which are written directly to disk in a LOADM compatible format. The programs 
generated by the compiler are run as complete stand alone programs. A built in 
linker/editor will automatically select one and only one copy of each run-time 
library subroutine that is required and insert them directly in the program. This 
eliminates the need for cumbersome, often wasteful "run-time" packages. 

CBASIC III is for both Beginning & Advanced Users 

CBASIC III is a Powerful tool for the Beginner or Novice programmer as well 
as the Advanced Basic or Machine Language programmer. You can write 
programs without having to worry about Stack Pointers, DP registers, memory 
allocation, and so on, because CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. 
All you have to do is write programs using the standard Basic statements and 
syntax. For the Advanced Basic and Machine Language programmers, CBASIC 
III will let you take command and control every aspect of your program, even 
generating machine code directly in a program for specialized routines. 

CBASIC III adds many features not found in Color Basic, like Interrupt and 
Reset handling, to give you a level of control only available to very advanced 
Machine Language programmers. Plus, we made it exceptionally easy to use, not 
like some other compilers. CBASIC III is the friendliest and easiest compiler 
available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III has Full Command Support & Speed 

CBASIC III features well over ISO Basic Commands and Functions that fully 
support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. It 
also supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play and 
String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/PUT, H/PLAY and H/DRAW, all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable 
printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
PRINT, INPUT, INKEY , GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands. 

CBASIC III is FAST. Not only will CBASIC III compiled programs execute 10 
to several 100 times faster than Basic, but the time it takes to develop a CBASIC 
III program verses writing a machine language program is much, much shorter. A 
machine language program that might take several months to write and debug 
could be created using CBASIC III in a matter of days or hours, even for a well 
experienced machine language programmer. We had a report from one CBASIC 
user that claimed "a Basic program that used to take 3 hours to run, now runs in 7 
to 8 minutes". Another user reported a program that took 1 to 1 & 1/2 hours to 
run in Basic, Now runs in 5 to 6 minutes!!!. 

CBASIC III is more than just a Compiler 

CBASIC III has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor, that can 
be used to create and/or Edit programs for the compiler. It is a full featured 
editor with functions designed specifically for writing and editing Basic programs. 
It has built in block Move and Copy functions with automatic program 
renumbering. Complete, easy to use inserting, deleting, extending and overtyping 
of existing program lines. It is also used for Loading, Saving, Appending 
(merging), Killing disk files and displaying a disk Directory. It also has automatic 
line number generation for use when creating programs or inserting sequential 
lines between existing lines. You can set the printer baud rate and direct normal 
or compiled listings to the printer for hard copy. The built in editor makes 
program corrections and changes as easy as "falling off a log". If CBASIC III 
finds an error when compiling, it points to the place in the program line where the 
error occured. All you have to do is tell the editor what line you want to start 
editing and when it is displayed, move the cursor with the arrow keys to the place 
where the error is and correct it. Just like that, it's simple. 

Selectable 32/40/64/80 Column Displays in 192 or 225 Res. 

CBASIC III is the only Color Basic Compiler that includes it's own 32, 40, 64 
or 80 by 24 line display in 192 or 225 Resolution. All of these display formats are 
part of the standard CBASIC III compiler package. Not only can they be used for 
normal program editing and compiling, but can also be included in your compiled 
programs, with a single command, "HIRES"!! The run-time display package is 
not just a simple "WIDTH 80" display, but a full featured package, far more 
advanced than the "WIDTH 40 or 80" displays. It will let you do things you 
expect like "PRINT @" as well as X,Y positioning. You can select characters per 
line, underline, character highlight, erase to end of line or screen, home cursor, 
home & clear screen, protect screen lines, and much more. 



128K and 512K RAM Support 

CBASIC III makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the 
Color Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128Kof RAM available and install 2 
Ultra Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 512K of memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8K block 
and single or double bytes. CBASIC III also allows your program to use the 
upper 32K of RAM space automatically for variables or even program storage at 
run-time. It will automatically switch the RAMs in and out when needed. There 
are also two other commands that allow you to control the upper 32K of RAM 
manually, under program control. No other Color Basic compiler directly 
supports the use of Extended RAM like CBASIC III. 

AH Machine Language 

CBASIC III is completely written in fast efficient Machine Language, not 
Basic, like some other Color Basic compilers. Because of this, CBASIC III can 
edit and compile very large programs, even using the 80 column displays it can 
handle almost 40K of program. Some of the other Basic compilers can only 
work with 16K or about 200 lines. Even working with large programs, CBASIC 
III compiles programs with lightning fast speed. It will compile a 24K program 
to disk in less than 2 minutes! That's without a listing being generated. We've 
heard stories about some other compilers that take almost 10 minutes to 
compile a simple 2-3K program. You might inquire about this when you look at 
some of the other compilers available. 

Compare the Difference 

CBASIC III is not just another Color Basic Compiler. It is the only complete 
Basic Compiler System for the Color Computer. Compare CBASIC Ill's 
features to what other compilers offer and you'll see the difference. When 
comparing CBASIC III to other compilers you might want to keep some of these 
questions in mind. Does it support I/O functions? You can't write much of a 
program without PRINT, INPUT and so on. What about complex string 
statements, or strings statements at all? Can you compile a complex string like: 
MID$(RIGHT$(DA$(VAL(IN$),LEN(LE$)),3,3)? How large of a programcan 
you write? Can you use two character variable names for string & numeric 
variables, like Basic? Does it support all the Hi-Res graphics statements 
including H/PLAY, H/DRAW, H/GET and H/PUT, using the same syntax as 
Basic? Do you ever have to use a separate Basic program? How long would it 
take to compile a 24K program? Can you take complete Basic programs an 
compile them without extensive changes? Will they work? How do you edit a 
program when it has errors compiling? 

The Finished Product 

Since CBASIC III contains statements to support ALL of the I/O devices 
(Disk, Tape, Screen & Printer), Hi-Res Graphics, Sound, and Enhanced Screen 
displays, it is well suited for a wide range of programming applications. When 
CBASIC III compiles a program, it generates a complete, Ready to Run 
machine language program. The finished product or program does not have to 
be interfaced to a Basic program to perform some of its functions or commands. 
This may seem obvious to you, but some of the other Color Basic compilers 
don't necessarily work this way. Some of their compiler commands need a 
separate Basic program in order for them to work. In some cases, they require 
that a separate Basic program be interfaced to the compiled program to perform 
I/O functions, like INPUT, PRINT and so on. CBASIC III doesn't do this, ALL 
of it's commands are compiled into a single machine language program, that 
does not require any kind of Basic program to make it work. 

Price Verses Performance 

The price of CBASIC III is $149.00, it is the most expensive Color Basic 
Compiler on the market, and well worth the investment. We spent over 3 years 
writing and refining CBASIC III, to make it the Best, most Compatible Color 
Basic compiler available. Most of our CBASIC III users already bought one or 
more of the other compilers on the market and have since discarded them. 
Before you buy a compiler, compare the performance of CBASIC III against any 
Color Basic compiler. Dollar for Dollar CBASIC III gives you more than any 
other Color Basic compiler available. 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

"Over the years, few products have impressed me 
as much as this one." The Rainbow, December 1987 

To order CBASIC III by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 



the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 



4K 



What's the reviews editor doing writing a program? 
Making a fool of herself, probably. But I have another title 
around here: head novice (as in the novice behind Novices 
Niche). Seeing all the neat applications that can be shoe- 
horned into just a few inches of coding made me itch to write 
a short program myself. So here it is. 

Pitch Tester is based on a display I saw several years ago 
at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. One 
whole wall was taken up by a "music computer" that could 
test your ability to remember pitches. Having had a little 
musical training (I do stress "little"), I smugly put my ear to 
the test. The computer sang a pitch for me to memorize. Then 
I was given a second pitch, which I had to adjust higher or 
lower to match the first. The results were not encouraging. 
(Maybe I was the source of all those funny noises coming 
from the woodwind section!) 

Pitch Tester works the same way. It gives you a pitch to 
memorize and then instructs you to match a second pitch to 
the first by using your right joystick. You'll find out if your 
ear is sharp, flat or just right. 

The listing: PITCHER 

0 'PITCH TESTER 

2 CLS6:PRINT@256," MEMORIZE 
THIS PITCH I " 



5 X=RND(255) :SOUNDX,50 

8 CLS4:PRINT@192," NOW MATCH I 
Tl USE YOUR RIGHT JOYSTICK TO AD 
JUST THE TONE UP OR DOWN. PRESS 

THE BUTTON WHEN YOU THINK YOU 
HAVE IT." 

9 FOR D=1TO300:NEXTD 

10 S=RND(255) 

27 IF S>255 THEN S=255 

28 IF S<1 THEN S=l 

29 SOUND S,l 

30 H=JOYSTK(0) :V=JOYSTK(l) 
35 IF V<1 THEN S=*S+3 

37 IF V<25 THEN S=S+1 

40 IF V>37 THEN S=S-1 

43 IF V>62 THEN S=S-3 

50 P=PEEK(65280) 

60 IF P=126 THEN 83 

70 IF P=254 THEN 83 

80 GOTO 27 

83 A^ABS(S-X) 

85 IF S>X THEN E$="SHARP" 

87 IF S<X THEN E$^"FLAT" 

89 IF S=X THEN E $ = " PERFE CT " 

91 IF A<4 AND A>0 THEN E$="GOOD" 

100 CLS3 : PRINTQ32 , "MY PITCH WAS" 

;X:PRINT@128 , "YOUR PITCH WAS";S 

110 PRINT© 2 2 4, "DIFFERENCE OF";A; 

"PITCH UNITS" 

120 PRINT@320 , "YOUR EAR IS M ;E$ 
130 PRINT@416, "DO YOU WANT TO PL 
AY AGAIN? " : INPUT" Y/N" ;R$ 
135 IF R$="Y" THEN0 ELSE CLS : END 




Calibrate Your Ears 

By Lauren Willoughby 

Rainbow Reviews Editor 



78 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 




Too Many (hie) Bottles of Beer 

By Bernice Shoobs 



Do you need some happenin' music for that ultimate party? 
Let CoCo spin the ultimate party song for you — "99 Bottles 
of Beer" (that's "99 Bottles of Root Beer" for those of you 
under 21). 

The listing: 99BEERS 

1 1 "THE BEER SONG" 

2 'BY: BERNICE SHOOBS , CLIFTON, N.J 
• 

10 ! THIS WILL PLAY 99 BOTTLES OF 
20 'BEER ALL THE WAY DOWN TO ONE 
30 ! IF YOU DON'T WANT TO GET 
40 1 BOOZED TO THE GILLS, 

50 'KEY IN A NO. LOWER THAN 99 

51 'AT LINE 70 

52 CLS 

53 PRINT@265 , "THE BEER SONG" 

54 PRINT§297,STRING$(13, "-") 

55 FOR T= 1 TO 2000: NEXT T 
60 CLS 2 

70 FORN=99TO 1 STEP -1 



80 PRINT @0 , N ; "BOTTLES OF BEER O 
N THE WALL" 

90 PLAY "L8;G;G;G;D;D;D;G;G;G;L2 
;G" 

100 PRINT @96 ,N; "BOTTLES OF BEER 
it 

110 PLAY "L8;A;A;A;E;E;E;L2;A" 
120 PRINT §192," TAKE ON 

E DOWN, PASS IT 

AROUND • . " 

13J3 PIAY»G ; L8 ; F# ; F# ; F# ; F# ; F# ; F# ; 
F#;F#;F#;L2F#; 

14 j3 PRINT @352 ,N-1; "BOTTLES OF B 
EER ON THE WALL" 

15)3 PLAY" L8 ; D ; D ; D ; D ; E ; F# ; G ; G ; G ; L 
2;G" 

16 fi NEXT N 
17p CLS 

18) 3 PALETTE 13,36: PALETTE 12, )3 

19) 3 PRINT @263, "ALL GONE 
I I i " 

... 

2)3)3 PRINT@295,STRING$(19,"=") 

21) 3 PLAY "L2;D L1G" 

22) 3 GOTO 22)3 

23) 3 'PLEASE KEY PALETTE CMP/RGB 

24) 3 * AFTER BREAKING THE PROGRAM 

25) 3 'TO GO BACK TO NORMAL SCREEN 



Adventures in Music 

By Gip Wayne Plaster 




The first program I had published was a simple music 
program I called Explorers (June 1987 Novices Niche, Page 
81), but I thought it was unique in that it told a story along 
with playing music. I've written two more hair-raising, 
musically enhanced narrations for people who like a little 
adventure with their music, Explorers — the CoCo Strikes 
Back and The Unexplored Cave. 

Listing 1: EXPL0RE2 
1J3 CLS 

20 PRINT@128,STRING$(32,"*") ; 

30 PRINT@288,STRING$(32,"*") ; 

40 PRINTQ194, "EXPLORERS — BY GIP 

W. PLASTER"; 

50 FORX=1TO500:NEXTX 

60 PRINT§161,"m o r e" 

70 PRINT@416," REMEMBER THAT SOU 

ND ??????????" 

80 F0RP=1T03 

90 FORI=255TO200STEP-1 

100 P0KE14J3, 1:EXEC43345:NEXTI 

110 NEXTP 

12) 3 FORI=255T01STEP-l 

13) 8 P0KE14)3,I:EXEC43345:NEXTI 
140 PRINT@416 

150 PLAY"01 ; T3 ; CDEFGAB ; P8 ; B ; P8 ; B 



AB" 

160 PLAY"T5 ;L3 ; CDEFGCCDDEEFGGFFE 
EDDCC" 

170 PLAY " L6 ; C DE FG FE DCAG AGAG AGAF A 
FAFADADADAEAEAEACACACABABABBBBAA 
AGGGFFF ; LI ; GF ; P4 ; " 
180 F0RN=1T02 

190 PLAY " L5 ; GFDCDFGFDCDFEDFCGFDD 
AEDCFGDFGFDEDCFGFDA ; L4 ; GGGGFFFFE 
EEECDCECFCGCCFCDCEDECEFEGEDECEFE 
GEFEDECE ; L4 ; F ; 11 
200 NEXTN 

210 PRINT@416 , "SOMETHING ELSE IS 

ATTACKING ..." 
220 FORAA=1TO150:POKE140,200:EXE 
C43345:NEXTAA 
230 FORL=1TO500:NEXTL 
240 PLAY " ED ; T2 ; C ; Tl ; CCC ; V8 ; B ; VI 3 
• C" 

250 PLAY"01;L2. ;GAG;V22 ;P10 ;G" 
260 FORL=1TO500:NEXTL:CLS 

Listing 2: THECRVE 

10 CLS0 : FORLL=1TO500 : NEXTLL 
20 CLS 

30 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 

"THE UNEXPLORED CAVE " 

40 PRINT" WHAT IS AWAITING IN 

SIDE ???" 

50 PLAY"01;T5 ; 11 

60 PLAY"L16 ; CDEFGABCDEFGABCDEFGA 



June 1 988 THE RAINBOW 



BCDEFGABCDEFGAB ; L8 ; CDEFGABCDEFGA 
B;" 

70 PRINT "LET 1 S GO CHECK IT OUT. • 
it 

80 PRINT "EVERYTHING'S GOOD SO FA 

RH 
• • • 

90 PLAY" CCCCCDDDDEEEFFG ; FFFFFEEE 
EDDDCC ; DDDDDEEEEFFFGGG ; L4 ; FF ; L2 ; 

G;L4;CC;L2;D;" 

Ipft PRINT "THERE ' S SOMETHING STRA 
NGE ..." 

110 PRINT "JUST MY IMAGINATION. . . 
it 

12 0 PLAY " LI ; CDE ; L2 ; CDEDC ; L4 ; CDED 
C ; LI ; FF ; GG ; 02 ; GFDFGFDFGFECCDEAB ; 
03 ; CFEDGACFEDGA ; 02 ; GGFEDC ; " 
130 CLS0:CLS:CLS2:CLS3:CLS4:CLS5 

:CLS: PRINT: PRINT "I WAS RIGHT 

IT IS THE PURPLE COLOR COMPUTE 
R EATER !!!!!!!" 



140 F0RA=1T03 

150 FORAA=1TO130:POKE140,AA:EXEC 
43345: NEXTAA : FORAA=30TO1STEP- 1 : P 
OKE140 , AA : EXEC4 3 3 4 5 : NEXTAA 
160 NEXTA 

170 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT "I THINK WE 

WILL GET AWAY. . ." 
180 PLAY"L3;AABBAAGGFFGGDDEECCDD 
EECCFFEEGG ; " 

190 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"UNLESS ..." 
: PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT "WE RUN 
OUT OF GAS !!!!!!! I " 
200 PLAY " LI ; FDE ; T 3 ; FDE ; T 1 ; DFC ; " 
2 10 PLAY"FGC ; T2 ; C ;T7 ; PI ; D ; PI ; D ; P 
1 ;T1 ; D ;T5 ; L16 ; C ; 01 ; BAGFEDC" 
220 CLS : PRINT "THE UNEXPLORED CAV 
E WAS WRITTEN AND PREPARED FOR P 
UBLI CATION BY GIP WAYNE PLASTER. 



230 PRINT" GOOD-BYE 



i it 



Listen to What They Done 



By Lyn Arko 




Musical arrangements frequently change key from verse to 
verse (the melody is the same but played higher or lower). 
This is a nice effect, but if you try to program it you must 
create new PLRY strings for every key change rather than 
repeat the original strings. Load and run MusicPro to hear 
"Look What They Done to my Song," which has a key 
change. 

MusicPro uses musical numbers to create both strings from 
the same data. Note numbers are listed as DRTR in lines 160 
through 220. Lines 230 through 290 arrange the data into 
musical phrases and, on return from the subroutine, define 
the strings created by the subroutine. The subroutine at Line 
330 reads the data and creates PLRY strings. 

Line 330 clears previous strings, and Line 340 creates J$ 
in the original key. Line 350 prints a "countdown" on the title 
screen while the subroutine is working. Line 360 tells the 
computer that length, octave, pause, tempo and volume data 
remain the same. Line 370 adds 3 to each note number, and 
Line 380 deletes the leading spaces left by 5TR$(Y) and 
changes the octave as necessary. Line 390 creates l<$ in a 
higher key. 

You can adapt MusicPro for your own songs, but there 
are a few things you must look out for. The 3 in the +3 in 
Line 370 can be any number from 1 to 12. Anything greater 
than 12 may put you in an octave out of CoCo's range, giving 
you an FC Error (illegal function call). You might also get 
this error if you use 05 in your original DRTR statements. 

To change an octave, Line 380 uses 0+ (up one octave) and 
0- (down one octave) and may generate an LS Error (string 
too long). If this happens, put the data in two musical phrases 
rather than one. 

The listing: MUSICPRO 



80 



10 CLEAR10000 

20 DIM B$(15) ,P$(15) 

THE RAINBOW June 1 988 



if 



MA 



30 CLS:Z$=" "+STRING$ (23,42) : 
PRINT §12 8 , Z$ : PRINT" * WHAT HA 
VE THEY DONE * * TO MY 

SONG, MA * " : PRINTTAB ( 4 ) " * " ; T 
AB ( 26 )"*": PRINT" * WORDS AND 
MUSIC BY * " : PRINTTAB ( 4 ) " * " ; TAB ( 
26) "*":PRINT" * MELANIE SA 
FKA *":PRINTZ$ 
40 PRINT§476,"8" 
50 B$(l)="LOOK WHAT THEY DONE 
60 A$(l)="TO MY SONG":A$(2)=" 
":B$(2)=A$(1)+A$(2) 
70 B$(3)=B$(1)+A$(1) 
80 B$(4)="WELL ITS THE ONLY THIN 
G" 

90 B$(5)="THAT I COULD DO HALF R 
IGHT" 

100 B$(6)="AND ITS TURNIN OUT AL 
L WRONG"+A$(2) 

110 B$(7)=B$(3) :B$(8)=CHR$(13)+B 

$(1) :B$(9)=B$(2) :B$(10)=B$(3) 

120 B$(11)="WELL THEY TIED IT UP 
it 

130 B$(12)="IN A PLASTIC BAG" 
140 B$(13)="AND TURNED IT UPSIDE 

DOWN"+A$(2) 
150 B$(14)=B$(3) 

160 DATA T5,O2,P4,L4,10,9,10,O3, 
L2, 1 

170 DATA O2,L4,9,10,L1,6,3 

180 DATA 03,P4,L4,3,2,3,L2,6,L4, 

2, 3, 02, LI. ,11 

190 DATA P8,P8,L8,6,8,6,L4,10,L8 
,9,L4,10 

200 DATA L8,9,10,6,L4,8,8,L8,10 
210 DATA L8,3,L4,3,6,L4,6,8,10,L 
2,6,3 

220 DATA P4,L4,10,9,10,O3,L2,1,O 
2,L4,8,10,L1,6 

230 V=1:W«10:GOSUB3 30:P$(1)=J$:P 



$(8)«K$ 

240 V=11:W=17:GOSUB330:P$ (2)=J$ 
P$(9)=K$ 

250 V=18:W=31:GOSUB330:P$(3)=J$ 
P$ ( 10 ) =K$ 

260 V=32:W=43:GOSUB330:P$(4)=J$ 
P$(11)=K$ 

270 V=44:W=52:GOSUB330:P$(5)=J$ 
P$(12)=K$ 

280 V=53:W=64:GOSUB330:P$(6)=J$ 
P$(13)=K$ 

290 V=65:W=78:GOSUB330:P$(7)=J$ 
P$(14)=K$ 

300 CLS : PRINT @ 4 80, ; :F0RP=1T014 : P 
RINT : PRINTB$ (P) ; : PLAYP$ (P) :NEXTP 
: PRINT 

310 PRINT@485 , "<ENTER> TO PLAY A 



GAIN" ; 

320 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN320ELSE 
IFI$=CHR$ (13 ) THEN3 0 0ELSEEND 
330 J$="":K$="" 

340 FORX=V TO W: READX$ : J$=J$+» ; 
+X$ 

350 R=X/10:IFINT(X/10)=R THENPRI 
NT@475, (8-R) : IF8-R=0THENPRINT§47 
5," " 

360 Q=ASC(X$) :IFQ=76ORQ=79ORQ=80 
ORQ=8 4 ORQ=8 6THEN3 9 0 

370 Y=VAL(X$)+3:IFY>12THENY=Y-12 
:Z=1 

380 X$=STR$(Y) :L=LEN(X$) :X$=RIGH 
T$ (X$ , L-l) : IFZ=1THENX$="0+ ; "+X$+ 
";O-":Z=0 

390 K$=K$+" ; "+X$ : NEXTX: RETURN 



Lotsa Luck! 

By Bob Nevin 



16K 
ECB 



Lotto 48 is for people who like to take chances on lotteries 
and have given up on the scientific methods of choosing 
numbers (consulting the arrangement of the planets, the fall 
of tea leaves and birthdays, etc.). Now your CoCo will pick 
them for you! 

This program uses PLAY commands to supply music, but 
you can easily omit them if you don't have Extended Color 
BASIC. Also, if you have a printer, you can print out your 
results. 

The listing: LOTT048 

1J3 1 THE 48 CAN BE CHANGED TO AN 
Y OTHER NUMBER AS WELL AS THE 2 
FOR THE SETS. 

2J3 INPUT "DO YOU HAVE EXTENDED CO 
LOR BASIC (yES OR n)3)";E$:IF E$=" 
Y" THEN GOTO 3j3 ELSE GOTO 

60 

3j3 PRINT "LOTTO 48 MUSIC IS 'WIT 
H A LITTLE BIT OF LUCK 1 FROM »MY 
FAIR LADY 1 IF YOU SING ALONG, T 
HE CHANCES OF WINNING ARE MUCH G 
REATER!" 

4J3 PRINT "THE WORDS FOR THE SONG 
ARE AS FOLLOWS. — > 'with a lit 

-tie bit with a lit-tle bit- 

with a lit-tle bit of bloom- 
ing luck 1 " 

5J3 PLAY "L4. ;E;L8;D#;E;D;L4;D;P2 
;L4. ;D;L8;C#;D;C;L4;C;P2;L4. ;C;L 
8;D;L4;E;C;E;C;L2;D;D;L2. ;C" 



2 SETS OF LOTTO a a 
^.WX^ 2 SETS ALIKE 



60 CLS: INPUT "SCREEN OR pRINTER"; 
SP$ 

7j3 IF SP$="S"THEN Q=j3:G0T0 10)8 
80 IF SP$«"P"THEN Q=-2:G0T0 100 
90 GOTO 60 

100 CLS : PRINT #Q," 2 SETS OF LOTTO 

48" :PRINT#Q, "NUMBERS WITH NO 2 
SETS ALIKE" :PRINT#Q,STRING$ (32," 

110 FOR Z=l TO 2 

120 FOR X=l TO 6 

130 A=RND(48) 

140 A1(X)=A. 

150 IF X=l THEN 190 

160 FOR C=l TO X-l 

170 IF A1(X)=A1(C) THEN 130 

180 NEXT C 

190 NEXT X 

200 FOR X=l TO 48 

210 FOR C=l TO 6 

220 IF A1(C)=X THEN PRINT#Q,A1(C 
\ . ii ii . 

230 NEXT C,X 
240 PRINT#Q, " " 
250 NEXT Z 

260 PRINTS481, "aNOTHER SET OF NU 
MBERS - qUIT"; 

270 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN270 

June 1988 THE RAINBOW 81 



280 IF A$="A"THEN100 
290 IF A$="Q"THEN300 
3£I0 PRINT #Q," ======== 

■>IF THIS IS A WINNER, DON'T FOR 
GET ME<========" ; 

310 CLS:PRINT#Q, " ": PRINT #Q,"T 
HIS PROGRAM WAS PREPARED ON THE 
RADIO SHACK COLOR COMPUTER TRS-8 
0 2 BY BOB NEVIN, 29-30 BELL BLV 




Picking Up the Pieces 

By Brian DeMarco 

You've got to be quick in this game! You are a black box, 
and your goal is to collect all the blue boxes as quickly as 
possible. Use the arrow keys to scoot around the screen and 
gather them up, but remember that you're being timed. 

Lines 5 through 15 set up variables and the screen. Lines 
20 through 60 control your movement by checking to see if 
a key is pressed. Lines 70 and 80 check to see if you have 
touched a block and also if you have collected all the boxes. 
After you have cleared the screen, CoCo tells you how long 
it took you. 

The fisting: COLLECT 
5 F1=0 

10 A=RND (-TIMER) :PO=RND (478) :CLS 
:DIM El(512):FOR X=1T024 

11 R=RND(478) :IF E1(R)=1 THEN 11 

12 El (R)=l: PRINTER, CHR$ (175) ; :NE 




D. BAYS IDE NEW YORK 113 60. TEL. 
(718) 224-0728. GOOD 
LUCK" 

320 PRINT@294 , "THANKS TO BILL BE 
RNICO FOR HIS INVALUABLE ASSIST 
ANCE . " 

330 PRINT@4 16, "=========> IF THIS 

is a winner, don't forget 

me<========" ; 



XTX 

15 EN=24 

20 IF PEEK(341)<>255 OR PEEK(342 
)<>255 OR PEEK (343)0255 OR PEEK 
(344)<>255 THEN 25 ELSE F1=F1+1: 
GOTO 20 

25 PRINT@PO,CHR$(32) ; 

30 IF PEEK(342)<>255 AND P0<478 

THEN PO=PO+3 2 

40 IF PEEK(341)<>255 AND P0>31 T 
HEN P0=P0-32 

50 IF PEEK(343)<>255 AND PO>0 TH 
EN P0=P0-1 

60 IF PEEK(344)<>255 ANDPO<478 T 
HEN P0=P0+1 

70 PRINT@PO,CHR$(128) ;:IF El(PO) 
=1 THEN 80 ELSE F1=F1+1 : GOTO20 
80 E1(P0)=-1:EN=EN-1:F1=F1+1:IF 
EN=0 THEN PRINT@480:PRINT"IT TOO 
K" ; Fl ; "TURNS" : FORX=1TO500 : NEXTX: 
RUN ELSE GOTO20 



CoCo3 



ASCII Answers 

By Bernice Shoobs 

Programs are often written using the ASCII (decimal) 
counterparts of letters, numbers and other keyboard 
characters. With this program, you won't have to spend time 
referencing charts or typing PRINT flSC(x). 

The listing: FISCIIREF 

10 REM ** PROGRAM TO DEMONSTRATE 
** 

20 REM ***** THE ASCII FUNCTION 
****** 

30 REM 

40 ON ERR GOTO 200 
50 REM 

60 WIDTH 40: LOCATE 0,0 

70 PALETTE 8,0: PALETTE 0,63:CLS1 

80 PRINT STRING$(40,"*") 

90 LOCATE 5,2 

100 PRINT 11 TYPE A WORD, PHRASE OR 
NUMBERS " 



110 PRINT STRING$(40, "*") 

120 LINE INPUT C$ 

130 PRINT "" 

140 FOR 1=1 TO LEN(C$) 

150 C=ASC (MID$(C$,I,1) ) 

160 IFC032THEN PRINT USING "### 

#";C;ELSEPRINT 

170 NEXT I: PRINT 

180 FOR T=l TO 1000: NEXT 

190 GOTO 100 

200 PRINT "PLEASE, TRY AGAIN!" 
210 FOR T= 1 TO 500: NEXT T 
220 GOTO 100 

Submissions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We like 
to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in at one sitting 
and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, although the short 
programs are limited in scope, many novice programmers find it 
enjoyable and quite educational to improve the software written by 
others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but we 
cannot key in program listings. AH programs should be supported by 
some editorial commentary, explaining how the program works. If your 
submission is accepted for publication, the payment rate will be 
established and agreed upon prior to publication. 



82 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



CoCo Consultations 




this and in future 
"Co Co Consultations, v 
I will be trying some- 
thing new. In addition to the 
familiar Q & A column, I will also 
include tidbits of information 
contributed by various folks and, 
in some cases* comment on the 
information Thus, even if you 
rffan'thave a question, / invite you 
to send in any Utile hints or de- 
scriptions of experiences you have 
had with the CoCo that you think 
might be of interest to the Co Co- 
owning public in general. 



CoCo 





CoCo Hard Drive 

How can I use an IBM- type hard 
drive on a CoCo? 

Thomas E. Montgomery 

( TOM MONT) 

Spring, TX 

Two rainbow advertisers, Owl- Ware 
and Burke & Burke, sell systems for 
hooking standard bare hard drives (like 
those used in IBM PCs) to Color Com- 
puters. These systems include host 
adapter, hard drive controller, and 
software to run the drive under OS-9 
and — to a limited extent — under Disk 
BASIC, too. However, you will have to 
know quite a bit about hardware and 
software to get such a "do-it-yourself 
system running; such systems are pri- 
marily of use only under OS-9 Level II. 
Among other things, you will have to 
build or supply a case and power supply 
for the drive. Such drives use consider- 
ably more power than floppy drives, so 
a floppy drive case and power supply 
will not do! Both of the aforementioned 
companies, as well as RGB Computer 
Systems, sell complete working sys- 
tems. RGB points out that its system 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinker er and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 




CONSULTATIONS 



By Marty Goodman 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



was specifically developed to allow 
maximum compatibility with OS-9 and 
Disk BASIC. Burke & Burke says its 
system also offers considerable compat- 
ibility with Disk BASIC. 

EPROM Availability 

/ observed that Motorola is discon- 
tinuing production of the 68766 
EPROM. I would like to know of a 
source for this part in quantities under 
100. 

Roger Krupski 
(HA RD WA RE HA CK) 
Kenmore, NY 

Micro ware Exceltek, located in San 
Francisco, was selling the 68766 
EPROM for about $10 a chip the last 
time I checked. Its phone numbers are 
(415) 952-5375 and (415) 588-7541. 

Impractical Upgrade 

Is there any low-cost way of upgrad- 
ing my CoCo 2 with 64K to 128K 
without spending more than I originally 
paid for my CoCo? 

Eric Beck 
Akron, OH 

Generally speaking, now that the 
CoCo 3 is out, the answer is no. It makes 



little sense to tack more memory onto 
a CoCo 2 since almost no commercial 
software will take advantage of such 
extra memory. It is true that J&R 
Systems has a proven 256K and 512K 
memory upgrade for the CoCo 2, but 
you are probably better off buying a 
CoCo 3 if you want more memory. And 
even on a CoCo 3, Disk basic does not 
allow use of more than 30K. J&R 
Systems is one of several companies 
that also sell a 512K upgrade board for 
the CoCo 3, and its board (like that of 
Performance Peripherals, Disto and 
others) is of good quality. If you want 
more memory, I would suggest that a 
CoCo 3 is the way to go, but only if you 
are prepared to get involved with OS- 
9 or commercial application programs 
that utilize the extra memory. 

Trading Files 

How can I hook my CoCo 3 to my 
Tandy 1000 so that lean exchange files 
between them? Do I need to use mo- 
dems on both the CoCo and the Tandy 
1000, or is there another way to do this 
that directly connects the serial ports to 
each other? I use DeskMate on both the 
CoCo and the Tandy 1000. My comput- 
ers are 60 feet apart. 

Carl F. Rusher 
Fordland, MO 

The right way to handle the hardware 
part of what you want to do (trade files 
between computers) is to hook the serial 
ports of both computers to each other 
using a null modem cable. If you are 
taking out the "bit-banger" (four-pin 
DIN) serial connector on the CoCo ? 
then make up a cable in the following 
way: 



Male 4 pin DIN 
(to CoCo) 

3 (ground) 

2 (data in to CoCo) 

4 (data from CoCo) 



DB 25 

(to Tandy 1000) 

7 (ground) 

2 (data from 
Tandy 1000 

3 (data to 
Tandy 1000) 



Then connect pins 4 and 5 of the DB 
connector to each other, and connect 
pins 6, 8 and 20 to each other. Finally, 
connect a wire from Pin 1 of the CoCo 
DIN connector to the jumper that 
connects pins 8, 6 and 20 on the DB 

June 1988 THE RAINBOW 83 



his cable can also be used 
IS? pack. 

I using an RS-232 pack, then 

fall modem cable as follows: 

~RS332pat Tandy 1000 

serial port serial port 

DB 25 connector DB 25 connector 

2 3 

3 2 
7 7 

Then, on both ends, hook Pin 4 to Pin 
5, and pins 6, 8 and 20 to each other. 
There is no need to run more than three 
wires, however, between the computers 
themselves. 

Sixty feet is more than the books say 
is proper for sending such serial data 
signals, but I doubt if you will have any 
trouble. I routinely send serial data 
between computers in my house using 
similar null modem cables at 9600 baud 
over as much as 60 feet of cable with no 
problems at all. I do use heavy duty 
cable with 22-gauge wire, however. 

There is also a software side to the 
problem. When transferring files rap- 
idly at high baud rates, it is essential to 
use Xmodem file transfer protocol. 
DeskMate's terminal program is quite 
primitive. Some versions of DeskMate 
do not even support Xmodem at all. 
Instead of using DeskMate on both 
computers, you might consider switch- 
ing to ProComm on your Tandy 1000 
(this program is available as shareware 
for $10 from Datastorm Technologies, 
Inc., P.O. Box 1471, Columbia, MO 
65205). I would also recommend 
switching to MikeyTerm, Greg-E-Term 
or Rickyterm on your CoCo 3. All three 
of those programs support Xmodem 
quite nicely and can be obtained for $10 
each from their authors (Mike Ward, 
1807 Cortez, Coral Gables, FL 33134; 
Greg Miller, 9575 Royston Road, 
Grand Ledge, MI 48837; and Rick 
Adams, 712 Brett Ave, Rohonert Park, 
CA 94928). 

Disappointing Image 

The image I get from my Co Co 3 on 
my Magnavox 8 CMS 15 monitor is 
superbly clear when I use RGB. But 
when I try to use the composite video 
output of the CoCo3into the composite 
video input of the same Magnavox, the 
image is unusually poor. I tried the 
Magnavox with a VCR using composite 
video, and it produced a much better 
image than it did on composite video 
with the Co Co 3. What is going on here? 



Also, my Smith Corona SD275 type- 
writer has a nine-pin serial connector on 
the back. The manual says you can 
hook up a computer to this typewriter 
to make it a printer, but you need an 
interface box sold by Smith Corona. 
Can I hook this nine-pin serial port 
directly to my Co Co 3? 

Ray Jungmann 
Buckholts, TX 

To answer your first question, you 
have discovered what others have found 
— that the composite video signal 
coming out of the CoCo 3 is very poor. 
This is due to fundamentally bad hard- 
ware design in the CoCo 3. I currently 
know of no fix for this flaw, although 
some hardware hackers I know have 
suggested that using higher quality 
transistors in the composite video 
buffer circuit of the CoCo 3 might 
improve matters. It is also possible that 
the flaw lies within the GIME chip. 

As to your second question, without 
extensive technical documentation on 
that nine-pin serial port, there is no way 
I can tell if you can hook it to a CoCo. 
I would guess not, though. Those ports 
often use weird, special signal levels 
and/ or protocols that are quite differ- 
ent from those of RS-232 standard. 
Worse, the adapter devices are usually 
priced from $100 to $150. For that price 
you can buy a decent near letter-quality 
dot matrix printer. I have also seen 
high-quality, serial daisy wheel printers 
in that price range at computer swap 
meets in my area. 

RTTY Upgrade 

/ use your RTTY program with a 
Drake TR7. I want to send its output 
to a printer. How can I do this? How 
can I operate it at different wpm rates? 
Are you working on a packet radio 
program? 

James N. To bey 

(N9DYN) 
Rochester, NY 

An upgrade of the old RTTY pro- 
gram is available on the Delphi CoCo 
SIG in the Data Communications sec- 
tion of the database. With this program, 
you can receive RTTY data, save it to 
disk, then later load that file into your 
favorite CoCo word processor, format 
it as you like, and print it out. The 
program offers operation at four wpm 
rates. For those who don't have access 
to Delphi I will be glad to supply a copy 
of the new R TTY program if you send 
me a check or money order for $10, 



along with a stamped, self-addressed 
disk mailer with a disk enclosed. The 
program is public domain, and you are 
invited to give it away to others once 
you receive a copy. You can reach me 
at 1633 Bayo Vista Ave, San Pablo, CA 
94806. This new RTTY program is an 
upgrade of the one by the same authors 
(N6LQV and KB6IRQ) who produced 
WEFAX and Graphicom. There are no 
plans by those folks to support packet 
radio on the CoCo at this time. 

Missing Characters 

I've been using the Mterm 4.3 with an 
Avatex 1200HC modem and RS-232 
pack. I find characters are being 
dropped when I read forum messages 
non-stop into the buffer. Is this a sign 
that the 6551 in the pack needs to be 
replaced with a 6551 A, as you recom- 
mended on the OS-9 SIG for a similar 
problem? 

Jay Browning 

(ZARATHUSTRA) 

Savannah, GA 

No, I don't think the problem is a 
"slow 6551." You see, in all versions 
prior to the MikeyTerm 4.3, the CoCo 
3 is running only at slow (.87) MHz. At 
no time is it being run at "double speed," 
so an ordinary 6551 chip should do fine. 

It is possible that your 6551 is defec- 
tive; more likely, some communications 
parameters are not set correctly. Be sure 
that both MikeyTerm and Delphi are 
set up for XON/XOFF control. Mikey- 
Term should function smoothly at 1200 
baud and not miss any characters. 

Note that had you been using the 
pack under OS-9 Level II, I would have 
suspected you might benefit from a 
6551 A chip, as also might have been the 
case had you been using MikeyTerm 4.7 
at 2400 baud. 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, THE rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type flSK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



84 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



f 



Vi 



iiP^iifoND WORD§ 

32K Ext. ^ $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Ipi^l^anguage Arts programs cover 
common misspellings, and synonyns/ 
antonyms on each level. Additionally, 
Level 1 tests contractions and abbre- 
viations, Level 2 tests homonyms, 
and Level 3 tests analogies. Each 
program has three parish and at- 
tains over 400 questions and uses 
over 800 words. All tests are grade 
appropriate. User modifiable (direc- 
ts included). Printer option. Speci- 
fy Level. 



CONTEXT CLUES - 4, 5, 6, 7 
16K Ext. - $17.95 tape/$22.95 disk 
Each reading program contains 
about 50 situational paragraphs with 
one key word missing. Child uses 
context clues to find correct answer 



EQUATIONS TUTOR Hltf 
32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
Elementary-Intermediate algebra 
step tutorials. Multi-level. 



SPECIFY Linear or Quadratic; 




in multiple choice format. Random 

selection of readings each round. lip"/"'' :p 'WSm 



•I •VM*:?0:y'3i'''.* ; : ; '» ' 



#.;?.-'' % .V;S0'5s 



Level 2 
Level 3 




Specify 4th, 5th, 6th, or 7th grade. 

CONTEXT CLUES - 2-3 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
A reading program wherein the child 
uses the context to choose the cor- 
rect answer. Multiple choice format 
-res screen. 



<\-o- , 




























^§;3 








■ ■ y. ■■ ■ > , 



TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR ___ 1M _ TFn 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tapo/$24.95 disk E S ^9 9 7ta^7$24 95 disk 

A step by step tutorial for learning to ^ ^ ^f^^ ^^ 

compute the sides and angles of right Tr| a n 9les, rectangle^ ana arcies 

triangles. All examples have graphic and « overed In th,s H, " res text and 

representation. Help commands and graphic program. 

cursor aids assist throughout. 

COCO WHEEL OF FORTUNE 



' \> "-' ->- :- :0."-'--V " >; 



VOCABULARY BUILDER 

32K. Ext. -$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
200 Vocabulary questions on appro- 
priate grade levels in a 4 part multiple 
choice format. 1000 words used. Ex- 
tensive research has provided chal- 
lenging words on all levels. When 
mastered, the words may be changed 
by the user (full directions included). 
Printer option. Specify Level. 
1 Grades 3-5 




32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 



Hi-res graphics and screen in this 
version of the popular TV show. One 
to six players. Spin the wheel for 
points and guess a letter to solve the 
puzzle. Over 200 puzzles. Have fun 
while strengthening language arts 
skills. 




... 



Level 2 
Level 3 



ippi" ' llii 

MATH INVADERS 

OPENING A BANK ACCOUNT 32K Ext. - $17.95 tape/$22.95 disk 
32K Ext. - $24.95 disk only A mu | t i-|evei "Space Invaders" type 
A set of programs designed to intro- game to reinforce the 4 basic math 
duce and provide practice in the skills operations (addition, subtraction , 
of filling out bank applications, deposit multiplication and division). Prob- 
and withdrawal slips, and computing |ems become more difficult as your 

res graphics. Joystick 

required. 

, ^■•x ; "^-'S^ , ^''- r ''^v." ^ : ;K \« ' ; ^*;'-' ^":* : ' : ■;":*>*:.- *■•. ■'• , ^ ''.vc,^:^'^ : 





RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 




(718) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 



Please add $1 .00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 

All Payments in U.S. Funds. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



Education Not e s 



16K ECB 




This month's article is about THE 
RAINBOW itself. The program, 
Using the Parts of a Magazine , 
is really a language arts skills lesson, but 
I won't tell if you won't! 

A professional magazine such as THE 
rainbow has many parts that appear 
regularly each month. These include the 
Table of Contents, the Advertisers 
Index and the list of Racksellers (stores 
that sell the magazine), as well as 
various subscription forms, etc. We will 
concern ourselves with locating infor- 
mation from these sources. 

This program presents the student 
with questions that may be answered in 
the regularly appearing sections of the 
magazine. The student's task is to locate 
and type in the information asked for. 
The quiz format is a fill-in. 

It is sometimes difficult to know on 
a fill-in quiz such as this one exactly 
which answer the designer of the pro- 
gram is seeking. For example, in re- 
sponse to the question, "Who owns THE 
rainbow?" the acceptable answers 
might be: (1) Falk (2) Lonnie Falk or (3) 
Lawrence Falk. We, however, want to 
limit the answer to only one response. 
In this case, we would like the answer 
to be only Lonnie Falk. To encourage 
this, we have included a dash feature. 
Under the place for the student's re- 
sponse to each question, a series of 
dashes appear. These correspond to the 
correct number of characters in the 
answer. 

This program contains 15 questions 
and answers contained in the DRTR 
lines. These questions were chosen as 
examples of possible questions. Dozens 
of other questions could be added to the 
program. The counter for these ques- 
tions is the variable N on Line 30. If you 
choose to add questions, simply update 
the N value and proceed to add more 
questions. 

Lines 30 through 50 dimension and 
read the questions and answers con- 
tained in the DRTR lines. Lines 70 
through 140 draw our screen. Line 160 
prints the question. The routine in lines 
170 through 180 computes and prints 
the proper number of dashes in the 

Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



A program to sharpen 
library reference skills 

Who, What 

and Where? 

By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



answer. Line 190 accepts the student's 
answer. Lines 200 through 220 process 
the answer and inform the student 
whether or not the answer was correct. 

The question is randomly selected in 
each round in Line 60. This is repre- 
sented by variable R. Variable M in Line 
130 is the round counter, and variable 
C in Line 140 is the counter for the 
number of correct answers. These are 
always updated and printed on the 
screen at the beginning of each round. 
After each question is answered, the 
student may press either the letter G to 
go on to the next question or the letter 
E to end the program. 

No final score card is included in this 
program as we assume that all of the 



questions and answers will be either 
learned quickly or memorized. We are 
really hoping that the adult helping the 
user of th is program will stress using the 
parts of the magazine rather than the 
particular answers in the program. The 
adult can verbally make up many ques- 
tions for each of the topic ideas (such 
as Table of Contents) used in the pro- 
gram. 

The time between the writing and the 
publication of this article precluded the 
inclusion of any specific questions 
about this month's issue. The program 
becomes more interesting and useful if 
you add such questions as: 

• What page(s) is the Delphi Bureau 
article on this month? (Table of 
Contents) 

• Where is CoCo Cat in this issue? 
(skimming skills) 

• Who has the highest current score in 
the Dallas Quest game? (on the 
RAINBOW Scoreboard) 

• What month is this issue for? (see 
cover) 

• How many pages are in this issue? 

Adding your own questions such as 
these makes for a more interesting 
program. Your child or students may 
also help to think of additional ques- 
tions. Children always appreciate and 
therefore learn well when they are 
included in the designing of the pro- 
gram used. As always, the Computer 
Island staff hopes that you and your 
children enjoy these programs. □ 



The listing: MRGPRRT5 

10 REM"USING THE PARTS OF A MAGA 
ZINE" 

20 REM" STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 

D, STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1988" 

30 N=15:R=RND(N) 

40 DIM A$(N) ,B$(N) 

50 FOR T=l TO NlREAD A$(T),B$(T) 

:NEXT T 

60 CLS5:M*=M+l2R-R+l:IF R=N THEN 
R=l 

70 FOR H=14 TO 27 : SET (H, 3 , 7) :NEX 
T H 

80 FOR H-14 TO 27 : SET (H, 16 , 7 ) ;NE 
XT H 

90 FOR J=3 TO 16:SET(13,J,7) :NEX 

- T J 

100 FOR J= 3 TO 16:SET(28, J, 7) :N 
EXT J 



86 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



110 FOR H=15 TO 26: FOR J=7 TO 15 

:SET(H,J,V) :V=RND(8) :NEXT J,H 

12)3 PRINT@71, "RAINBOW" ; 

13j3 PRINT(ail8, f, # ,f ;M; 

140 PRINT@182 / "R";C; 

150 PRINT9288," " 

160 PRINT@288,A$(R) 

17 0 W=LEN(B$(R) ) 

180 PRINT@384,STRING$(W,"-») 

19)3 PRINT @ 3 5 2," LINE INPUT C$ 

200 IF C$=B$(R) THEN PRINT@372," 

CORRECT" ; : C=*C+1 : GOTO 230 

210 IF C$OB$(R) THEN PRINT@372 , 

"SORRY 11 

220 PRINT@416,B$(R) IS THE ANS 
WER" 

230 PRINT@487 , "PRESS OR f E 



i ii 



240 EN$=INKEY$ 

250 IF EN$="G" THEN 60 ELSE IF E 
N$="E" THEN CLS: END: ELSE 240 
2 60 GOTO 260 

270 DATA WHO WRITES THE BASIC TR 
AINING ARTICLE EACH MONTH?, JOS 
EPH KOLAR 

280 DATA WHO IS THE MANAGING EDI 
TOR?,JUTTA KAPFHAMMAR 
290 DATA WHAT IS THE NAME OF THE 
BULLETINBOARD THE RAINBOW USES? 
, DELPHI 



300 DATA HOW OFTEN IS RAINBOW PU 
BLISHED? , MONTHLY 

310 DATA IN WHICH CITY IS THE RA 
INBOW PUBLISHED? , PROSPECT 
3 20 DATA HOW MUCH IS A SINGLE CO 
PY OF THERAINBOW MAGAZINE? , $3 . 95 
3 30 DATA HOW MUCH DOES A YEARLY 
MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION COST? ,$31. 
00 

3 40 DATA HOW MUCH IS RAINBOW ON 

DISK FOR ONE YEAR? ,$99 .00 

3 50 DATA HOW MUCH IS ONE ISSUE 0 

F THE RAINBOW ON TAPE?, $10.00 

360 DATA ON WHAT PAGE IS THE ADV 

ERTISERS INDEX? ,192 

370 DATA WHAT STORE IN ATLANTA-G 

EORGIA SELLS THE RAINBOW? , BORD 

ER f S 

380 DATA WHAT STORE IN DESOTO-TE 
XAS SELLSTHE RAINBOW? , MAXWELL BO 
OKS 

390 DATA WHICH EDITOR IS IN CHAR 
GE OF THEREVIEWS?,JUDI HUTCHINSO 
N 

400 DATA WHO WRITES ARTICLES ABO 
UT THE DELPHI?, CRAY AUGSBURG 
410 DATA WHO OWNS THE RAINBOW?, L 
ONNIE FALK 

420 DATA IN WHICH STATE IS THE T 
OWN OF PROSPECT?, KENTUCKY 







ARE YOU TIRED OF BEING TOLD 
THAT YOU NEED OS-9 TO RUN A 

HARD DISK 

ON YOUR COLOR COMPUTER? 

WELL, THE SEARCH IS OVER! 
ANNOUNCING THE BEST HARD DISK 
SYSTEM FOR THE COCO 1, 2 AND 3 
THAT FULLY SUPPORTS DISK BASIC 









TOP QUALITY COMPONENTS, ALL GOLD 
CONTACTS, PROFESSIONAL SOFTWARE 

STEP UP TO A LIGHTENING FAST 
HARD DISK - CALL NOW! 

COMPUTER 
SYSTEMS 







294 STILLWELL AVE 
KENMORE, N Y 14217 



(716) 876-7538 






RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



FILE TRANSFER UTILITIES 



Need to transfer files to and from MS-DOS and FLEX disks into your CoCo? 

Much Public Domain software source Is out there - CUG, Doctor Dobbs, Austin 
Software Works and others • on MS-DOS format disks. 

Have files on a MS-DOS system at work and want to work on them at home on 
your CoCo? 

What do you do with a MS-DOS disk? With GCS File Transfer Utilities you just 
place the MS-DOS disk into you CoCo disk drive - enter a simple command and 
the file is copied Into a CoCo file. Do the same with FLEX disks. File transfer back 
to MS-DOS and FLEX disks Is just as simple. 



MS-DOS Transfer Programs 

PCDIR Directory of PC disk 

PCDUMP display PC disk sector 

PCREAD read PC file 

PCWRITE write file to PC disk 

PCRENAME rename PC file 
PC DELETE delete PC file 



FLEX 



Transfer Programs 



FLEXDI R directory of FLEX disk 

FLEXDUMP display FLEX disk sector 

FLEXREAD read FLEX file 

FLEXWRITE write file to FLEX disk 

PC FOR MAT format PC disk 



Extensive Single, double sided disks. 40 or BO track floppy drives. 
Options 8 or 9 sectors. First level sub-directories. Data (M S-DOS) 
Data or binary files. (FLEX). Others 

Requires: OS-9, 2 drives (one can be hard), SD1SK (see D.P. Johnson ad) 

GSC File Transfer Utilities for CoCo - $44.95 

Ask about MuKi-Vue version! 

All diskettes are CoCo OS-9 format. Orders must be prepaid or COD, V1SA/MC 
accepted, add $1 .50 S&H, additional charge for COD. 

GRANITE COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

Route 2 Box 445 Hillsboro, N.H. 03244 
(603) 464-3850 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corporation and Motorola he. 
MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. FLEX is a trademark of TSC, Inc. 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 



1 BASIC T remmg 



What a happy rut we are in! We 
are having lots of colorful fun 
as we veer off onto new and 
promising paths in our Super Extended 
Lesson Two. 

Load RRCE, the last program we 
created before we waded out of the 
swamp to recharge our batteries. From 
lines 70 to 140, edit each line to change 
the value in STEP from 2 to 1. Run. This 
suggests doing the same to lines 230 
through 260. Run. This maneuver 
prompts us to change the border color 
in lines 230 to 260. Run. The FC Error 
means that we must restore Line 66, 
which tells CoCo to recycle the color 
sequence if the color variable gets out 
of range. 

Add this line: 66 IF C+l=9 THEN C=l 
and run. This suggests making the 
second and fourth border into light 
bulbs. Edit lines 110 to 140, STEP 1 to 
STEP 2 and STEP-1 to STEP-2. Edit 
lines 150 to 180, reversing the procedure 
to change the light bulbs to a neon sign. 
Run. 

Feel free to save any variation as you 
work along. This is an important rule. 
You can use each of the saved programs 
as a jumping-off point to splash around 
uncharted swamp waters and explore 
new areas. 

Rekey Line 0 as 0 'RACE1 and save 
it. Suppose we REM the four lines, 150 
to 180, in the middle border; try it and 
run. It starts out poorly, with the saw- 
tooth frame, but quickly recovers. 

Two suggestions come to mind. First, 
mask lines 70 to 100 and run. We are 
hitting pay dirt, which leads to masking 
the inner row. Mask lines 230 to 260 and 
run. I like it! I like it! 

How quickly my mind bounces from 
one idea to the next. I forgot that second 
suggestion. Maybe I can refresh my 
memory by stripping the remarks (') 
from lines 230 to 260 and running the 
program. Do so, if you are still with me. 
Notice also how minor, seemingly in- 
consequential one- and two-keystroke 
changes radically alter the programs. 

If you forget an idea, another will 
come along and send you hurtling down 
a new trail. I must repeat: Save all your 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 

88 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



More adventures 
with beginning graphics 

Wading 
out of the 
Swamp 

By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



promising programs, especially when 
you are in hot pursuit of some will-o - 
the-wisp. 

Time to fool around with the colors. 
Enter and run: 

65 FOR C=0 TO 7 STEP2 

Enter EDIT65 and press the space bar 
until the cursor is on 4. Press C, enter 
1 and run. This last seems better. What 
about the other colors? 

Enter EDIT65 and press X to jump to 
the end of the line, enter :F0R D=2 TO 
B 5TEP2 and run. 

Note that in C=0 TO 7 STEP2, CoCo 
will call colors 0, 2, 4 and 6, never 
reaching 7, which is out of range. In C=0 
TO B 5TEP2, CoCo calls 0, 2, 4, 6 and 
8. These facts presuppose that some of 
the sloppy FOR/NEXT lines in RACE 
should be re-examined. But, back to 
variable colors that were set up and 
remain dormant. Suppose we change 
the color variable in the SET statement 
in the outer frame to D in lines 70 to 100? 
Also, unmask these masked lines. 

Enter EDIT70. Press D (for Delete) 
and the space bar. Move the cursor to 
C, then press C and D. (Caution: Once 
you change the length of an in-process 
edited line, you can*t line up on the top 
line. You must place the cursor above 
the character you would otherwise line 
up on.) Run. Now, carefully change 
lines 80 to 100, observing the cautionary 
note above; run. 



This loop is still not operative. Why? 

Enter EDIT261 and press the space 
bar; move the cursor under C. Press I 
and D and then run. This variation is 
awfully slow-moving. What if we gave 
it a little push by unmasking and chang- 
ing the C values to D values in lines 150 
to 180, the middle border? Run. This is 
as slow as molasses, but the combina- 
tions of borders and colors and fairly 
random motion is pleasing. Enter 0 
'<RfiCE2>. I want a copy, so save 
RACE2. 

What would happen if lines 150 to 
1 80 were further altered so that each of 
these lines was in a nested loop? Enter 
EDIT150 and press X to move to the 
end. Use the left arrow key to backspace 
once; enter D,H and run. No-go on a 
number of counts; unless you want a 
long, dreary program, this path is 
abandoned. 

Type EDIT150 and press X. Using the 
left arrow key, backspace three times; 
press H and enter. The line is restored 
and we are in business. 

Why not try it out in the inner border? 
Let us examine it. Type LI5T230-270. 
We could make a smaller nested loop. 
Change all C+l's to E, then insert E in 
the next part in each of lines 230 to 260. 
For instance: Enter EDIT230, type 25 
and press the space bar to advance 25 
spaces. Right on target! Enter 3D to 
delete three characters. Press I (for 
Insert), type E and press a shifted up 
arrow to get out of the Insert mode. 
Press X, backspace once, enter E , H and 
run. That single square looks cute. We 
got an NF Error because we have not 
established a FOR statement. Enter 
LIST-261. 

Enter EDIT230 and press the space 
bar until the cursor is on the S in SET. 
Press I and type FOR D=2 TO B STEP2. 
Press a shifted up arrow and the space 
bar until you reach the D in the SET 
statement. Press C, E and X to move to 
the end of the line. Backspace three 
times, type E , H and press ENTER. Edit 
lines 240 to 260 similarly and run. This 
is slow and disconcerting. Still, it does 
have some charm. 

Observe that the right side of the 
inner "circle" could be dropped two 
spaces from V=B to V=10 in Line 240. 
This same adjustment is called for in 
Line 260. 

Pretend that CoCo is the Li'l 01' 



Cursor scooting around the inner 
border. Enter 0 'RRCE3 and save the 
program as RACE3. This is my Waterloo 
... a dead end. Enter NEW. 

Load RACE. Correct lines 240 and 
260, change the V values from 8 to 10 
and run. 

There is a long vertical segment at the 
fourth row from the left. It is some kind 
of oversight (a nice name for a mistake). 
For some reason that escapes me now, 
I was interrupted and when I returned 
to continue working on this tutorial, 1 
got lost in the swamp. I loaded RRCE, 
looked it over and didn't get any inspi- 
ration. Then I checked out RACEl; as I 
watched the action, I thought, "Why 
not select two or three colors that go 
well together?" 

Off and running, with RflCEl in mem- 
ory, I entered and ran 65 FOR C=4 TO 
6 STEP2. This gave a 4th of July aspect, 
primarily due to the red, white and blue. 
Here is a quick problem: Insert 
SCREEN® , 1 into the program to turn the 
text orange. Did you get it on the first 
try? Well, I didn't either. After you put 
it in the program, run and remove it. 

A similar red-white-blue version: 
Type 65 FOR C=3 TO 5 and run. 

Now enter and run 10 CL55. This 
presents another problem to solve. Can 
you recover the missing parts of the 
design? It might be beneficial to know 
this. You never know when you can put 
this knowledge to good use. 

You won't believe the display that 
uncovering this blemish produced. 
Instinctively, I deduced that Line 20 
should be remarked, because the lack of 
blank screen lines must have been the 
reason for the lost light bulbs. Running 
this pulled the three-liner up to the top. 
Since it contained only five rows, it was 
completely obliterated and left a goofy, 
unsatisfactory design. Adding the line 
25 PRINT0160,"" pulled the display 
back to its original location. The 
PRINTS statement was used to accom- 
;plish this feat. We simply told CoCo 
that on the text screen, beginning with 
the leftmost space on the sixth row, it 
should "print nothing." It did and 
activated the three-liner. When I ran it, 
the light bulb effect was lost and CoCo 
went bananas. 

Still, the display must be considered 
unique. I never expected the result I 
obtained; this should prove to any 
skeptics that when you experiment, the 
unexpected is apt to occur. There is no 
way in the world that I would have 
created this display on purpose. 

If you would like to put a couple of 



blank spaces within the quotes in Line 
25, the results would be the same. Just 
make sure you confine the blank spaces 
to the sixth row. Enter 0 'ODDBALL and 
DEL270-370. Save the program as 
ODDBALL. 

Could you investigate this goofy 
program any further? You certainly 
could. There is no such animal as the 
final, definitive program. It is just that 
your mind is at rest. 

Why not take out the light bulbs on 
each side of ODDBALL? Enter LIST-150 
and search out any STEP+ or -2s. Mask 
lines 100 and 120 (you know these are 
the lines you are looking for because 
they run vertically) and run. Enter 
LI5T150-250, mask lines 200 and 220 
and run. The newly produced white side 
bars are of different lengths because of 
the convolution. Make them the same 
length. Adjust . . . but how? 

We have to shorten the right, vertical 
line and set it to whatever color is 
currently produced. Enter and run these 
lines: 

115 FOR H=60 TO 59 STEP-1: 

5ET(H,29,C) :NEXTH 

195 FOR H=57 TO 56 STEP-1: 

SET(H,29,C):NEXTH 

Why did we decide to shorten the 
right side bars? Mask lines 115 and 195 
and run; you will understand. By short- 
ening these two bars, a more symmet- 
rical design is obtained. The resultant 
display isn't perfect, yet it is attractive. 
You may want to save this as 0DDBALL1. 
If you do, change Line 0. 

Purists must have been irritated at the 
haphazard use of the FOR/NEXT loops. 
The squares line up poorly. However, 
we were experimenting and exploring 
the dismal swamp. Consider the good 
stuff we were able to isolate, identify 
and create. 

It is time to make the proper template 
for our designs and set them in concrete. 

Enter NEW and key in lines 0 to 41 of 
listing DOTZ. Unmask lines 30 and 31; 
run. This is the way the light bulbs 
should look along the top row. Enter 
LIST-41; Line 30 gives the correct H 
(horizontal) and V (vertical) values. 
Unmask lines 40 and 41, mask Line 31 
and run. Note that the square at 
H=0;V=0 is a duplication. The yellow 
bulb is superimposed on the green bulb. 
In making convoluted designs, avoid 
overlapping bulbs to maintain conti- 
nuity and uniformity. This is apparent 
when only a few bulbs are lit simultane- 
ously in a short bulb row. Type DEL30- 
41, key in Line 50 and run. This is the 



template we shall use as a basis for 
making a triple frame convoluting into 
the center. 

Key lines 60 to 8 1 , one line at a time, 
and run each. Each line segment is in a 
different color to highlight the bulbs 
that are lit. If you copy the SET seg- 
ments of the paired lines, 60 and 61, 70 
and 71, 80 and 81, and place each set 
of four SET statements under each 
other, you will discover the offset you 
will need, to utilize to get to the center 
of the screen. You may want to save this 
portion of DOTZ and later race the bulbs 
to the center. 

Key in lines 100 to 1 15. We are creat- 
ing a border that will skip along on an 
existing bulb track between the outer 
and inner borders, bypassing the middle 
border. Line 100 sets a color, yellow, so 
you can follow the length and direction 
of each line segment. 

Note the three lit bulbs. We try to 
light as many bulbs in short lines as 
possible. For instance, depending on 
how we drew the horizontal and vertical 
lines, we could have either overlapping 
bulbs on the diagonal or just one or two 
bulbs lit. Our purpose is to avoid jerky, 
non-uniform, back-and-forth motions. 

Since we have an underlying tem- 
plate, we can set three individual bulbs 
in Line 100. Note Line 1 10; we did not 
use FOR H=0 TO 62. This would have 
over-printed a bulb at 0,0 and 62,0 
squares. This is a precautionary meas- 
ure; at CoCo's rapid execution the eye 
might not catch the relit bulb, but who 
knows? Later we might slow down the 
presentation, and it would look dis- 
quietingly disjointed. The lines are 
paired: 110 and 115, 120 and 125, etc. 
(a straight segment and a diagonal one). 

In Line 150, we change color to aid 
you in observing which boxes are lit. 
Notice that the four diagonal program 
lines are repeated (in the same direc- 
tion). 

They could have been put into G0SUB 
routines. This was not done to avoid 
confusing the newcomer. It isn't a big 
deal, but every bit of programming 
practice is good for your CoCo health. 
When you finish Line 185, save your 
work as DOTZ. Line 505 is a fossil. If we 
didn't recycle in Line 185 (GOTDG0), 
then Line 505 would be alive and well. 

To get G0SUB practice, enter and run 
these lines: 

600 SET(4,4,C) :SET(2,2,C) : 
SET(0,0,C) : RETURN 
100 C=2:GDSUBG00 
145 GOSUB600 

June 1988 THE RAINBOW 89 



Make similar routines at lines 700, 
800 and 900 for the three other diagonal 
pairs and rekey the supported lines. 
Save your modification. 

Mask Line 50 to remove our tem- 
plate. So, what do you think? Did you 
enjoy the catch-as-catch-can explora- 
tion or do you prefer the plodding, 
structured procedure? I believe in free- 
form. The more structured work you 
create, the less creative you become; in 
short order, your mind gets set in 
concrete. 

Beginning with Line 60, edit out all 
occurrences of C=x, where x is some 
color from 1 to 8. 



Edit lines 70 and 71, changing STEP- 
2 and STEP+2 to STEP-1 and STEP+1. 
Edit Line 100 to insert at the beginning 
FDR C=l TO 8. In Line 185, in front of 
:GDTOG0, insert :NEXTC and run. This 
will poop out eventually in Line 60. 
Change the GDTO60 in Line 185 to 
GOTO100. Run and save if desired. 

This is an unfinished program. You 
are the boss; take over! 

I suggest making two more convo- 
luted frames for a total of five. The 
middle one could be one color, the 
second and fourth ones a second color. 
These three sandwiched frames could be 
neon signs. Add SET values in your SET 



line for the diagonal. Here is where 
those GDSUB routines become useful. 

Then tighten up the three inner 
borders, linking them by adjusting 
values in the FOR/NEXT loops. Play with 
it and let your fantasy take over. 
. If you need a jolt to awaken your 
creative juices, change steps in lines 70 
and 71 to 4 or 6 and run. Mask lines 
70 and 7 1 and run. Further, change Line 
10 to CLS5 and run. Oh, you know what 
to do. 

Next month, we shall use RRCE to 
demonstrate its use in a real live educa- 
tional program. ^ □ 



Listing 1 



0 '<RACE1> 
10 CLS 

20 FOR X=*l TO 5 : PRINT : NEXTX 
30 PRINTTAB ( 10 ) " DOCHITA D MAY" 
40 PRINT 

50 PRINTTAB (8) "510 HIGHLANDS AVE 



ii 



60 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) " INVERNESS , 
FL, 32652 

65 FOR C*l TO 8 

66 IF C+l=9 THEN C=l 

70 FOR H=0 TO 63STEP1 : SET (H,0 , C) 
: NEXTH 

80 FOR V=0 TO 31STEP+1:SET(63,V, 
C) :NEXTV 

90 FOR H=63 TO 0 STEP-1: SET (H, 31 
,C) : NEXTH 

100 FOR V=31 TO 2 STEP-1 : SET (0 , V 
,C) :NEXTV 

110 FOR H=2 TO 61 STEP 2 ? SET (H , 2 , 
C) : NEXTH 

120 FOR V«2 TO 29 STEP2 : SET (61 , V 
,C):NEXTV 

130 FOR H=59 TO 2 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 
9,C) : NEXTH 

140 FOR V=27 TO 4 STEP-2 : SET (2 , V 
,C) :NEXTV 

150 FOR H=4T059 STEP1 : SET (H, 4 , C) 
; NEXTH 

160 FOR V=4T027 STEP1 : SET (59 , V, C 
) :NEXTV 

170 FOR H=57 T04STEP-1 : SET (H, 27 , 
C) : NEXTH 

180 FOR V=25 TO 6 STEP-1: SET ( 4, V 
,C):NEXTV 

190 FOR H=6T057 STEP2 : SET (H, 6, C) 
: NEXTH 

200 FOR V=6T025 STEP2 : SET (57 , V, C 
) : NEXTV 

210 FOR H=55 TO 6 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 
5,0) : NEXTH 

220 FOR V=23 T06 STEP-2 : SET ( 6 , V, 



C) : NEXTV 

230 FOR H=8T055STEP1:SET(H,8,C+1 
) : NEXTH 

240 FOR V=8 T023 STEP1 : SET (55 , V, 
C+l) : NEXTV 

250 FOR H=53 T08STEP-1: SET (H, 23 , 
C+l) : NEXTH 

260 FOR V-21 TO 8STEP-1 : SET (8 , V, 
C+l) : NEXTV 

261 NEXTC:GOT065 

270 FORH=10TO53STEP2:SET(H,10,C) 
: NEXTH 

280 FOR V=10 T021STEP2:SET(53,V, 
C) : NEXTV 

290 FOR H=5I TO10STEP-2 : SET (H, 21 
,C) : NEXTH 

300 FOR V=19 TO 12STEP-2 : SET (10 , 
V,C) : NEXTV 

310 FORH=12 T051 STEP2 : SET (H, 12 , 
C) : NEXTH 

320 FOR V=12 T019 STEP2 : SET (51 , V 
,C): NEXTV 

330 FORH=49 T012 STEP-2 : SET (H, 19 
,C) : NEXTH 

340 FOR V=17 T014 STEP-2 : SET (12 , 
V,C) : NEXTV 

350 FORH=14T049STEP2:SET(H,14,C) 
: NEXTH 

360 SET(49,16,C) 

370 FOR H=47 T014STEP-2 : SET (H, 16 
,C) : NEXTH 
400 NEXTC 
410 GOTO410 

Listing 2 

0 '<RACE2> 

10 CLS 

20 FOR X=l TO 5 : PRINT : NEXTX 

30 PRINTTAB (10) "DOCHITA D MAY" 

40 PRINT 

50 PRINTTAB (8) "510 HIGHLANDS AVE 
if 

6 0 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) " INVERNE S S , 



90 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



FL, 32652 


: NEXTH ' , 


65 FOR C=l TO 7 STEP2:FORD=2 TO 


200 FOR V=6T025 STEP2 : SET (57 , V, C ( 


8 STEP2 


) : NEXTV 


66 IF 0+1=9 THEN C=l 


210 FOR H=55 TO 6 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 


70 FOR H=0 TO 63STEP1:SET(H,0,D) 


5,C) : NEXTH 


: NEXTH 


220 FOR V=23 T06 STEP-2 i SET (6 ,V, 


80 FOR V=0 TO 31STEP+1:SET(63,V, 


C): NEXTV 


D) :NEXTV 


230 FOR H=8T055STEP1:SET(H,8,C+1 


90 FOR H=63 TO 0 STEP-1 : SET (H, 31 


) : NEXTH 


,D) : NEXTH 


240 FOR V=8 T023 STEP1 : SET (55 , V, 


100 FOR V=31 TO 2 STEP-1 : SET (0 , V 


C+l) : NEXTV 


,D) :NEXTV 


250 FOR H=53 T08 STEP-1 : SET (H, 23 , i 


lip FOR H=2 TO 61 STEP2 : SET (H, 2 , 


C+l) : NEXTH 


C) : NEXTH 


260 FOR V=21 TO 8STEP-1: SET (8 , V f 


120 FOR V=2 TO 29 STEP2 : SET ( 61, V 


C+l) : NEXTV 


,C) :NEXTV 


2 61 NEXTD,C:GOT065 


130 FOR H=59 TO 2 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 


270 FORH=10TO53STEP2:SET(H / 10 / C) 


9,C) : NEXTH 


: NEXTH 


140 FOR V=27 TO 4 STEP-2 : SET (2 ,V 


280 FOR V=10 T021STEP2:SET(53,V, 


,C) :NEXTV 


C) : NEXTV 


150 FOR H=4T059 STEP1 : SET (H, 4 , D) 


290 FOR H=51 TO10STEP-2:SET(H,21 


: NEXTH 


,C) : NEXTH 


160 FOR V=4T027 STEP1 : SET ( 59 , V, D 


300 FOR V=19 TO 12STEP-2 : SET ( 10 , 


) : NEXTV 


V,C): NEXTV 


170 FOR H=*57 T04STEP-1 : SET (H, 27 , 


310 F0RH=12 T051 STEP2 : SET (H, 12 , . 


D) : NEXTH 


C): NEXTH 


180 FOR V=25 TO 6 STEP-1:SET (4 ,V 


320 FOR V=12 T019 STEP2 : SET (51 , V 


,D): NEXTV 


,C): NEXTV 


190 FOR H=6T057 STEP2 : SET (H, 6 , C) 


330 F0RH=49 T012 STEP-2 : SET (H, 19 



Hardware 

Specia 

Communications 




300/1200 baud Fully Hayes 

compatible 
Modem - 1 Yean Warranty 

$109.00 

[Modem & Cable] 

300/1200/2-400 baud 
Fully Hayes 
Compatible Modem - CCITT 
1 Year Warranty 

$179.00 

[Modem & Cable] 



THE OTHER GUVS CoCo 

55 North Main Street 
Suite 301-D 
PD Box H 

Logan Utah S<4321 




'KEEP-IRAK' General Ledger Reg. S69.95— Only S39.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k, 
32k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement [current & 'YTD'], journal, ledger, 899 accounts ( 2350 entries on 
32k & 64k [71 0 accounts & entries on 1 6k] [disk only). Version 1 .2 has screen printouts. 

Rainbow Review 1 .1 - 9/84 : 1 .2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE 11 Reg. $69.95 — DIMLY S24.95 

Rling data base. Rle any information with Omega Hie. Records can have up to 16 fields 
with 255 characters per field [4Q8Q characters/record]. Sort, match & print any field. 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only]. 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles, elipses, boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on line HELPS at all 
times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects on the screen. Can be 
used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. GRAPHICS EDITOR. REG. 
S3S.95— ONLY $24.95 for disk or tape. 64k EC8. 

Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/B5 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

C KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & more. User friendly/menu 
driven. Includes manual. S39.95 or $49.95 General Ledger & Accounts Receivables. 

[Disomy] 'COCO WINDOWS' 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 1 0 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering. Four function 
calculator, with memory. The above options can be called anytime while running or writing 
in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES. YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. $24.95 [disk 
or tape] includes manual. 





CBOD 753-7620 
CBOOJ 94S-9402 



(Add S3.00 for postage & handling] 
C.O.ED., Money Order, Check in U.S. Funds (Please specify if J&M 

controller] 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 91 



,C) :NEXTH 

340 FOR V=17 T014 STEP-2 : SET ( 12 , 
V,C) :NEXTV 

350 FORH=14T049STEP2:SET(H / 14 / C) 
: NEXTH 

360 SET(49 / 16 / C) 

370 FOR H=47 T014STEP-2 : SET (H, 16 
,C) : NEXTH 
40 0 NEXTC 
410 GOTO410 



Listing 3 

0 '<RACE3> 
10 CLS 

20 FOR X=l TO 5 : PRINT : NEXTX 
30 PRINTTAB(10) "DOCHITA D MAY" 
40 PRINT 

50 PRINTTAB(8) "510 HIGHLANDS AVE 
n 

60 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) " INVERNES S , 
FL, 32652 

65 FOR C=l TO 7 STEP2 : FORD=2 TO 
8 STEP2 

66 IF C+l=9 THEN C=l 

70 FOR H=0 TO 63STEP1 : SET (H,0 , D) 
: NEXTH 

80 FOR V=0 TO 31STEP+1:SET(63,V, 
D) :NEXTV 

90 FOR H=63 TO 0 STEP-1 : SET (H, 31 
,D) : NEXTH 

100 FOR V=31 TO 2 STEP-1 : SET (0 , V 
,D) :NEXTV 

110 FOR H=2 TO 61 STEP2 : SET (H, 2 , 

C) : NEXTH 

120 FOR V=2 TO 29 STEP2 :SET(61,V 
,C) :NEXTV 

130 FOR H=59 TO 2 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 
9,C) : NEXTH 

140 FOR V=27 TO 4 STEP-2 : SET (2 ,V 
,C) :NEXTV 

150 FOR H=4T059 STEP1 : SET (H, 4 , D) 
: NEXTH 

160 FOR V=4T027 STEP1: SET (59,V, D 
) :NEXTV 

170 FOR H=57 T04STEP-1: SET (H, 27 , 

D) : NEXTH 

180 FOR V=25 TO 6 STEP-1: SET (4 , V 
,D) :NEXTV 

190 FOR H=6T057 STEP2 : SET (H, 6 , C) 
: NEXTH 

200 FOR V=6T025 STEP2 : SET (57 , V, C 
) :NEXTV 

210 FOR H=55 TO 6 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 
5,0) : NEXTH 

220 FOR V=23 T06 STEP-2 : SET ( 6 ,V, 
C) :NEXTV 

230 FOR H=8T055STEP1:F0RE=2 TO 4 
STEP2 : SET (H, 8 , E) : NEXTE , H 



240 FOR V=10 T023 STEP1 : F0RE=2T0 

8STEP2:SET(55,V,E) : NEXTE, V 

250 FOR H=53 T08STEP-1 : FORE=2T08 

STEP2:SET(H,23,E) : NEXTE, H 

260 FOR V=21 TO10STEP-1:FORE=2TO 

8STEP2:SET(8 / V / E) : NEXTE ,V 

2 61 NEXTD , C : GOTO 6 5 

270 FORH=10TO53STEP2:SET(H,10,C) 

: NEXTH 

280 FOR V=10 T021STEP2:SET(53 / V / 
C) :NEXTV 

290 FOR H=51 TO10STEP-2 : SET (H, 21 
,C): NEXTH 

300 FOR V=19 TO 12STEP-2 : SET ( 10 , 
V,C) :NEXTV 

310 F0RH=12 T051 STEP2 : SET (H, 12 / 
C) : NEXTH 

320 FOR V=12 T019 STEP2 : SET (51, V 
,C) :NEXTV 

330 F0RH=49 T012 STEP-2 : SET (H, 19 
, C) : NEXTH 

340 FOR V=17 T014 STEP-2 : SET (12 , 
V,C) :NEXTV 

350 FORH=14T049STEP2:SET(H,14,C) 
: NEXTH 

360 SET(49 / 16 / C) 

370 FOR H=47 T014STEP-2 : SET (H, 16 
,C) : NEXTH 
400 NEXTC 
410 GOTO410 



Listing 4 

0 1 <ODDBALL> 
10 CLS 5 

20 •FOR X=l TO 5: PRINT: NEXTX 
25 PRINTS 160 , " " 
30 PRINTTAB (10) "DOCHITA D MAY" 
40 PRINT 

50 PRINTTAB (8) "510 HIGHLANDS AVE 
it 

60 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) "INVERNESS , 
FL, 32652 

65 FOR C=3 TO 5 

66 IF C+l=9 THEN C=l 

70 FOR H=0 TO 63STEP1 : SET (H, 0 , C) 
: NEXTH 

80 FOR V=0 TO 31STEP+1:SET(63,V, 
C) :NEXTV 

90 FOR H=63 TO 0 STEP-1: SET (H, 31 
,C) : NEXTH 

100 FOR V=31 TO 2 STEP-1 : SET (0 ,V 
,C):NEXTV 

110 FOR H=2 TO 61 STEP2 : SET (H, 2 , 
C) : NEXTH 

120 FOR V=2 TO 29 STEP2 : SET (61, V 
,C) :NEXTV 

130 FOR H=59 TO 2 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 
9,C) : NEXTH 



92 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



14j3 FOR V=27 TO 4 STEP-2 : SET (2 , V 
,C) :NEXTV 

15j3 FOR H=4T059 STEP1 : SET (H, 4 , C) 
: NEXTH 

160 FOR V=4T027 STEP1 : SET (59 , V, C 
) : NEXTV 

170 FOR H>57 T04STEP-1:SET(H,27, 
C) : NEXTH 

180 FOR V=25 TO 6 STEP-1 : SET (4 , V 
,C) : NEXTV 

190 FOR H=6T057 STEP2 : SET (H, 6 , C) 
: NEXTH 

200 FOR V=6T025 STEP2 : SET (57 , V, C 
) : NEXTV 

210 FOR H=55 TO 6 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 
5,C) : NEXTH 

220 FOR V=»23 T06 STEP-2 : SET (6, V, 
C) : NEXTV 

230 FOR H=8T055STEP1:SET(H,8,C+1 
) : NEXTH 

240 FOR V=8 T023 STEP1:SET (55,V, 
C+1) : NEXTV 

250 FOR H>53 T08STEP-1 : SET (H, 23 , 
C+1): NEXTH 

260 FOR V=21 TO 8STEP-1 : SET (8 , V, 
C+1) : NEXTV 

261 NEXTC:GOT065 
400 NEXTC 

410 GOTO410 



Listing 5 

0 1 <ODDBALLl> 
IjS CLS5 

20 1 FOR X=l TO 5 : PRINT : NEXTX 
25 PRINT@16j3, M 11 
3j3 PRINTTAB ( lj3 ) 11 DOCHITA D MAY 11 
4)3 PRINT 

5j3 PRINTTAB ( 8 ) " 5 10 HIGHLANDS AVE 
it 

6 jS PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) 11 INVERNESS , 
FL, 32652 

65 FOR C=3 TO 5 

66 IF C+l=9 THEN C=l 

70 FOR H=0 TO 63STEP1 : SET (H, 0 , C) 
: NEXTH 

80 FOR V=)3 TO 3 1STEP+1 : SET ( 63 , V, 
C) : NEXTV 

9)3 FOR H=63 TO 0 STEP-1 : SET (H, 31 
,C) : NEXTH 

1)30 FOR V=31 TO 2 STEP-1: SET (0,V 
,C) : NEXTV 

110 FOR H=2 TO 61 STEP2 : SET (H, 2 , 
C) : NEXTH 

115 FOR H=60 TO 59 STEP-1 : SET (H, 
29, C) : NEXTH 

120 'FOR V=2 TO 29 STEP2 : SET (61, 
V, C) : NEXTV 

130 FOR H=59 TO 2 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 



9,C) : NEXTH 

140 'FOR V=27 TO 4 STEP-2 : SET (2 , 
V,C) : NEXTV 

150 FOR H=4T059 STEP1 : SET (H, 4 , C) 
: NEXTH 

160 FOR V=4T027 STEP1 : SET (59 , V, C 
) : NEXTV 

170 FOR H=57 T04STEP-1 : SET (H, 27 , 
C) : NEXTH 

180 FOR V=25 TO 6 STEP-1: SET ( 4, V 
,C) : NEXTV 

190 FOR H=6T057 STEP2 : SET (H, 6 , C) 
: NEXTH 

195 FOR H=57 TO 56 STEP-1 : SET (H, 
25 ,C) : NEXTH 

200 •FOR V=6T025 STEP2 : SET (57 , V, 
C) : NEXTV 

210 FOR H=55 TO 6 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 
5,C) : NEXTH 

220 'FOR V=23 T06 STEP-2 : SET (6 ,V 
,C) : NEXTV 

230 FOR H=8T055STEP1:SET(H,8,C+1 
) : NEXTH 

240 FOR V=8 T023 STEP1:SET(55, V, 
C+1): NEXTV 

250 FOR H=53 T08STEP-1 : SET (H, 23 , 
C+1) : NEXTH 

260 FOR V=21 TO 8STEP-1 : SET (8 , V, 
C+1) : NEXTV 

261 NEXTC: GOTO 6 5 
400 NEXTC 

410 GOTO410 



Listing 6 

0 »<DOTZ> 
10 CLS0 
20 C=l 

30 'FOR H=0TO62 STEP2 : SET (H, 0 , C) 
: NEXTH 

31 «GOT031 

40 'FOR V=0TO30 STEP2 : SET (j3 , V, C+ 
1) : NEXTV 

41 'GOT041 

50 FOR H=0TO62STEP2:FORV=0TO30ST 
EP2:SET(H / V / C) :NEXTV / H 



DINO PICTURE DATA BASE- 194 Dinosaurs! Names, areas, T ^\ 
latin meanings, time periods, pull down menu, world map . — J 

on screen. Powerful, colorful, educational. OOOD3 29.95 IJgg \ 




RAINBOW 



Build your own coin-operated Video Game using the COCO! 
Complete instruction book with plans, schematics, parts 
sources. All software provided and includes a 4 in 1 
video game that you can use. COCO 1 and 2. DISK 29.95 



Autoboot your computer- This hardware project will 
RUN a program as soon as the COCO is turned on, 
without you having to touch the keyboard! Schematics 
and instructions only 9.95 COCOl and 2. Will work 
on most switch matrix type computers. 




I 




FRAZE CRAZE- Wheel a fortune with this popularword 
game. COCO 1,2 64K or COC03. 14.95 DISK /f^^ 

RAINBQW 



Send CHECK or MONEY ORDER in U.S. funds to 

RAM Electronics, 814 Josephine, Monmouth, Or. 97361 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 93 



60 C=5:F0R H=0TO62 STEP2 : SET (H,0 
,C) : NEXTH :C=6:FORV=2TO30 STEP2:S 
ET(62 / V / C) :NEXTV 

61 C=8:FORH=60 TO0STEP-2 : SET (H, 3 
0,C) : NEXTH : C=7 : F0RV=2 8 TO 2 STEP 
-2:SET(0,V,C) :NEXTV 

70 C=3:FORH=2TO60 STEP2 : SET (H, 2 , 
C) : NEXTH : C=2 : FORV=4T02 8 STEP2 : SE 
T(60,V,C) :NEXTV 

71 C=5:FORH=58T02 STEP-2 : SET (H, 2 
8, C) : NEXTH :C=4:FORV=2 6T04 STEP-2 
:SET(2,V,C) :NEXTV 

80 C=6:FOR H=4T058STEP2 : SET (H, 4 , 
C) : NEXTH : C=7 : FORV=6T02 6 STEP2 : SE 
T(58,V,C) :NEXTV 

81 C=3:FORH=56T04STEP-2:SET(H,26 
, C) : NEXTH: C=5 : FORV=24T06STEP-2 : S 
ET(4,V,C) :NEXTV 

100 C=2:SET(4,4,C) :SET(2,2,C) :SE 
T(0,0,C) 

11^ FORH=2TO60 STEP2 : SET (H, 0 , C) : 
NEXTH 

115 SET(62,0,C) r3BT(S0,2,C) :SET( 
58,4,0) 

120 F0RV=6T024 STEP2 : SET (58 , V, C) 
:NEXTV 

125 SET(58,26,C) :SET(60,28,C) :SE 
1(62,30,0) 

130 FORH=60 T02 STEP-2 : SET (H, 30 , 
C) : NEXTH 

135 SET(0,30,C) :SET(2,28,C) :SET( 
4,26,0) 

140 FORV=24T06STEP-2:SET(4,V,C) : 
NEXTV 

145 SET(4,4,C) :SET(2,2,C) :SET(0, 
0,C) 

150 C=6:FORV=2T028 STEP2 : SET (0 , V 
,C) : NEXTV 

155 SET(0,30,C) :SET(2,28,C) :SET( 
4,26,0) 

160 FORH=6T056STEP2: SET (H, 26,0) : 
NEXTH 

165 SET(58,26,C) : SET ( 60 , 28 , C) :SE 
T(62,30,C) 

170 FORV=28T02STEP-2:SET(62,V,C) 
: NEXTV 

175 SET(62,0,C) :SET(60,2,C) :SET( 
58,4,0) 

180 FORH=56T06STEP-2:SET(H,4,C) : 
NEXTH 

185 SET(4,4,C) :SET(2,2,C) :SET(0, 
0,0) :GOTO60 
505 GOTO505 

Listing 7 

0 '<D0TZ1> 
10 CLS0 
20 0=1 

30 •FOR H=0TO62 STEP2 : SET (H,0 , C) 



: NEXTH 

31 'G0T031 

40 'FOR V=0TO30 STEP2 : SET (0 , V, C+ 
1) : NEXTV 

41 'G0T041 

50 'FOR H=0TO62STEP2:FORV=0TO30S 
TEP2:SET(H,V,C) : NEXTV, H 

60 FOR H=0TO62 STEP2 : SET (H,0 , C) : 
NEXTH:FORV=2TO30 STEP2 : SET (62 , V, 
C) : NEXTV 

61 FORH=60 TO0STEP-2:SET(H,30,C) 
:NEXTH:FORV=28 TO 2 STEP-2: SET (0 
,V,C) : NEXTV 

70 FORH=2TO60 STEP1 : SET (H, 2 , C) :N 
EXTH:FORV=4T028 STEP1:SET(60, V, C 
) : NEXTV 

71 FORH=58T02 STEP-1 : SET (H, 28 , C) 
: NEXTH :FORV=26T04 STEP-1: SET ( 2, V 
,C) : NEXTV 

80 FOR H=4T058STEP2:SET(H,4,C) :N 
EXTH:FORV=6T02 6 STEP2 : SET (58 , V, C 
) : NEXTV 

81 FORH=56T04STEP-2:SET(H,26,C) : 
NEXTH : F0RV= 24T06STEP-2:SET(4,V,C 
) : NEXTV 

100 F0RC=1T08:SET(4,4,C) :SET(2,2 
,C) :SET(0,0,C) 

110 FORH=2TO60 STEP2 : SET (H,0 , C) : 
NEXTH 

115 SET(62,0,C) :SET(60,2,C) :SET( 
58, 4, C) 

120 FORV=6T024 STEP2 : SET (58 , V, C) 
: NEXTV 

125 SET(58,26,C) : SET (60 , 28 , C) :SE 
T(62,30,C) 

130 FORH=60 T02 STEP-2 : SET (H, 30 , 
C) : NEXTH 

135 SET(0, 30, C) :SET(2,28,C) :SET( 
4,26,C) 

140 FORV=24T06STEP-2 :SET(4,V,C) : 
NEXTV 

145 SET(4,4,C) :SET(2,2,C) :SET(0, 
0,C) 

150 FORV=2T028 STEP2 : SET (0 , V, C) : 
NEXTV 

155 SET(0,30,C) :SET(2,28,C) :SET( 
4,26,C) 

160 FORH=6T056STEP2:SET(H,2 6,C) : 
NEXTH 

165 SET(58,26,C) : SET ( 60 , 28 , C) :SE 
T(62,30,C) 

170 FORV=28T02STEP-2:SET(62,V,C) 
: NEXTV 

175 SET(62,0,C) :SET(60,2,C) :SET( 
58, 4, C) 

180 FORH=56T06STEP-2:SET(H,4,C) : 
NEXTH 

185 SET(4,4,C) :SET(2,2,C) :SET(0, 
0,C) :NEXTC: GOTO 100 
505 GOTO505 



94 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 




> VIDEO 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS 7 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR™ 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



COCO 3 SCREEN 



Purveyors of Fin© Video Digitizers Since 1977. 




Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



A jukebox of ragtime selections 




From the 




By Ernie Thompson 



Ragtime recordings are very diffi- 
cult to find. The sheet music is 
readily available, however, so 
there must be some demand. 

In my program, Jukebox, I translated 
five songs from sheet music: "North 
Shore," "High Level Hornpipe," "Pa- 
tronella,""Dill Pickle Rag" and "Black 
& White." Not all of them are rags, but 
they're all fast! Two of the ragtime 
selections, "Dill Pickle Rag" and "Black 
& White, "are seldom heard because few 

A retired engineer and plant manager, 
Ernie Thompson has devoted himself to 
becoming a "sometime" programmer 
with the aid of his son Bob, also an 
engineer. Except for his time in the 
military, Ernie has always lived on the 
Canadian prairie; he makes his home in 
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. 



pianists have proficiency enough to play 
them. CoCo doesn't have a problem 
keeping ahead of the fast licks, though. 

Jukebox is menu-driven and very 
easy to use. After you type in, save and 
run the program, all you have to do is 
select the number of the song you want 
to hear. When the song has finished 
playing, you will be returned to the 
menu. All functions of this program are 
evoked with a single key press. 

I wrote Jukebox for the CoCo 3, but 
it can easily be modified for operation 
on a CoCo 1 or 2 — just delete lines 5 
and 70. 

( Questions or comments about this 
program may be addressed to the 
author at 1209 5th Ave. N. W.> Moose 
Jaw, SK, Canada S6H 3Y8. Please 
enclose an SASE when requesting a 
reply.) □ 



\/ 220 77 890 

380 204 1030 

560 255 END 

690 254 



14 

25 
50 



The listing: JUKEBOX 



5 RGB 

1J8 CLS : PRINTQ 16 6 , "MUSICAL ARRANG 
EMENTS " 

2)3 PRINT@238, "BY" 

30 PRINT@490," <any key>" 

40 PRINT @297 , "ERNIE THOMPSON" 

45 PRINT@366, "1987" 

50 EXEC44539 

60 CLS 

70 PALETTE13 / l:PALETTE12 / 63 

80 C=RND(8) :CLS(C) 

90 PRINTSTRING$ (32,42) ; 



96 



THE RAINBOW June 1 988 



100 F0RX=1T014 

110 PRINT"*" ; : PRINTSTRING$ (30 , CH 
R$(255)) ;: PRINT"*"; 
120 NEXT 

130 PRINTSTRING$(31,42) ; 

140 POKE1535,106:POKE359,57:POKE 

65314,20 

150 PRINT@3 6,"**Favorite Fiddle 
Tunes**" ; 



160 PRINT § 100, 

BREAKDOWN" ; 
170 PRINT § 164, 
HORNPIPE"; 
180 PRINT @ 228, 



"1 



"2 



"3 



"4 



NORTH SHORE 



HIGH LEVEL 



PATRONELLA" 



DILL PICKLE 



BLACK & WOT 



END JOB"; 



190 PRINT g 292, 

RAG" ; 
200 PRINT @ 356, "5 
TE RAG"; 

210 PRINT @ 426, "6 
220 EXEC44539 
230 AN$=INKEY$ 
240 IF AN$ ="" THEN 230 
250 IF AN$ = "4" THEN 270 
260 FOR 1=1 TO 40: NEXT I 
270 ON VAL (AN$) GOTO 280,420,57 
0,690,890,1220 
280 C=RND(8) 
290 CLS(C) 

300 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 

310 PRINT@35, " *THE NORTH SHORE 

BREAKDOWN*" 

320 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 

330 A$="03T2V15L8DDL16D02AB03C#L 

8DDL16D02AB03C#DC#DEF#EDC#02L8BG 

G03L16C#DL8EEL16E02L16A03C#D" 

340 B$="03L8EEL16E02A03C#DEF#EDC 

#02AB03C#L8DF#DP8" 

350 C$="03L4.F#L16G" 

360 D$="03L16ABAF#L8D02L16A03DC# 

02BBBL8B03L16EF#" 

370 E$="03L16GAGEL8C#L1602A03C#0 
2BAAAL8A03L16F#GABAF#L8D02L16A03 
DC#02BBBL8B03L16EF#GAGEC#02AB03C 
#L8DF#DP4" 

3 80 X$="XA$ ; XB$ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; XC$ ; XD$ ; 
XE$ ; XD$ ; XE$ ; XD$ ; XE $ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; XC$ ; 
XD$;XE$;" 

390 PLAY X$ 

400 PRINTQ227, "OFTEN PLAYED AT 
CONTESTS" ; 

410 PRINT@4 80, "press <enter> to 
continue" : INPUT L: IF L= ENTER GO 
TO60 

420 CLS(8) 

430 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 

440 PRINT @ 35, "*THE HIGH LEVEL 

HORNPIPE*" 
450 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 
460 A$="03T2L8.DL16C" 



470 B$="02L16B-03D02FB-DFB-03DFB 
-DF02B-03DC02B-03CE-C02B-AFA03CA 
GFAGFDC" 

480 C$="02L16B-03D02FB-DFB-03DFB 
-DF02 B-03 DC02 B-GAB-03 CDEFGAGC02 A 
L8B-" 

490 D$="03L8.C02L16B-" 

500 E$="02L16A03FCF02A03FCF02AFA 

03CFC02AFO3DF02B-03FDF02B-O3FD02 

B-03DFB-FD02B-" 

510 F$="03L16EGCGEGCGECEGB-GECFE 
FAGFEGL8 FFF " 

520 X$="XA$ ;XB$ ;XC$ ;XB$;XC$ ;XD$ ; 
XE$;XF$;XE$;XF$;" 
530 PLAY X$ 
540 PLAY X$ 

550 PRINT @227,"A LONG TIME FAVO 
RITE AT FIDDLING CONTESTS"; 

560 PRINT@480 , "press <enter> to 
continue" : INPUT L: IF L=ENTER TH 
EN GOTO 60 
570 CLS(4) 

580 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 

590 PRINT@35, "*THE PATRONELLA BR 

EAKDOWN* " 

600 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 

610 A$="T202L16D03AL8F#L16AF#L8E 

L16AF#L8DDDL16F#A03L8DL16C#DL8ED 



I NC - 



(THE SOFTWARE HOUSE HAS A NEW NAHE) 



O I SKS 




/100 
10/*4.95 



IPPY DISKS 10/*7.95 
FACTORY PUNCHED-USE BOTH SIDES. *75/100 
CERTIFIED ERROR FREE. H/SLEEVES, LABELS. H.P. 



. B" DISKS PS/DD 

HAILING LABELS I9.N/N M5.95/5H 
FILE CARDS 3 » 5 $3.50/250 $9.95/1000 

POST CARDS 4 > b $3.95/200 $8.95/500 

PRINTER RIBBONS 
GEHINI 10/X/SG $2.00 EA. 12/122.00 
COLORS R-BR-BL-6R-PUR $3.00 EA 5/tl2.00 
R.S. DHP 130 BLACK $6.95 EA. 
COLORS RED-BLUE -GREEN $7.95 EA. 
OTHER RIBBONS IN STOCK-CALL OR WRITE FOR QUOTE 
ALL ITEMS 100% GUARANTEED 
OFFER ENDS IN 30 DAYS 

Add $2.50 S/H in U.S.A. ■ Canada Add $3.50 + $ 1.QQ/LB 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 
Send Check/Money Order Payable to: 

DAT AMATCH , INC. 

9020 Hemingway, Redford, Ml 48239 
(313) 937-1313 

Send Card Number & E xf>. Date Min. C harce Order $20.00 





June 1988 THE RAINBOW 97 



L16C#D02B03C#02L8A03L16D02A" 
620 B$="02L8F#L16AF#L8EL16AF#L8D 
DDL16F#A03L8DL16C# DL8 EC # L4 DL8 D " 
630 C$="03L16D02AL8F#L1603F#L802 
AL16AF#L8DL16GF#EDC#02BL8A03L16E 
C#02L8A03L16GEL8F#L16F#D02A03D02 
AF#" 

640 D$="02L8D03L16F#D02L8A03L16A 
F#L8GL16GF#EDC#02BL8AL1603EC#02A 
03GEC#L4DL8D" 

650 X$= "XA$;XB$;XA$;XB$;XC$;XD$ 
; XC$ ; XD$ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; XC$ ; XD$ ; " 
660 PLAY X$ 

670 PRINTS 2 27 , "THE BREAKDOWN — TH 
E FINAL SET OF A SQUARE DANCE"; 
680 PRINTQ480, "press <enter> to 
continue" : INPUT L:IF L=ENTER THE 
N GOTO 60 
690 CLS(4) 

700 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 

71/3 PRINT @ 38, "*THE DILL PICKL 

E RAG*" 

720 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 

730 A$="L4T302B03CC#" 

740 B$="03T4L8 DEGDEGDEGDEGGEL4 DO 

2 L8 G ABGABGABGAB BAL4 GL8 DEF # DEF # DE 

F#DEF#F#EL4D" 

750 C$="02L8GF#GEEF#GG#AG#A03DDO 
2B03CC#" 

760 D$="02L8AG#A03DD02BL4AL2GL8G 
GF#E" 

770 E$="02L4DE-EF#G03L8EDDEL4D02 
L4 F # 0 2 L8 EDDEL4 DO 2 L4 GO 3 L8 EDDEL4 DO 
2 L8 DAEAFAF # AL4 G03L8EDDEL4D" 
780 F$="02L8AB03C#02ABL4.C#L2DL8 
D02GF#E" 

790 G$="03L8DEF#DEL4F#L2G" ' 

800 H$="03L8C02AG03C02AGEFGEGAAG 

L4 EL8 DC # DGGEL4 DL2 CL4AB03 L8 C02 AGO 

3C02AGEFGEGAAGL4EL8AG#AO2DDO2BAL 

2GL4AB" 

810 I$="03L8C02AG03C02AGEFGEGAAG 
L4EL8 DC # DGGEL4 DL2 C03 L4 C02 BAL8 ABO 
3C02B03CDED# EAAGEDC # DGGEL4 D " 
820 J$="03L2.C02L8AB" 
830 K$="03L2.C" 

840 X$="XA$ ; XB$ ; XC$ ; XB$ ; XD$ ; XE$ ; 
XF$ ; XE$ ; XG$ ; XH$ ; XI$ ; XJ$ ; XH$ ; XI$ ; 
XK$ ; " 

850 PLAY X$ 

860 PLAY "XB$;XC$;XB$;XD$;XE$;XF 
$ ; XE$ ; XG$ ;XH$ ; XI$ ;XJ$ ; XH$ ;XI$ ; XK 
$;" 

870 PRINT @ 225, "HOW IS THAT FO 

R A DILL PICKLE?"; 

880 PRINT@480, "press <enter> to 

continue": INPUT L:IF L=ENTER THE 

N GOTO 60 

890 C=RND ( 8 ) 

900 CLS (C) 



910 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 

920 PRINT@35,"*THE BLACK AND WHI 

TE RAG*" 

930 PRINTSTRING$(32,42) 

940 A$="T403L8DDDDC#C#" 

950 B$="T402L8CDF#CDF#CDF#CDF#F# 

CDC02A#B03E02AB03E02AB" 

960 C$="T403L8E02A#B03EED02BG03L 

8CDB03CC02B03C02AG#AB03C02AF#DGO 

2F#AG02B03CC#D" 

970 D$="T402L8BGEGL4G03L8DC#CDF# 
CDF#CDF#CDF#F#CDC02A#B03E02AB03E 
02AB" 

980 E$="T403L8E02A#B03EED02BGL4E 
L8G#B03EGC02AAG#A03 CEDC02ABDGBBG 
L4A" 

990 F$="T402L8GG03DDDDC#C#" 
1000 G$="T402L1G" 

1010 H$="T402L4GL8F#GGF#L4G03L4E 

L8D#EEDL4EDL8C#DDC#L4D" 

1020 I$="T402L4AAAG#L8F#GBF#GBF# 

GBF#GBBAGF#D#EADEADEAD#EAA03C02A 

EGGF#GGFL4G03L4EL8D#EEDL4EDL8C#D 

DC # L4 DO 2 L4AAAG # " 

1030 J$="T402L8GAB03CDEFGAGFEDCO 

2BAGF#G03EECL4DCCCC" . 

1040 K$="02L8B03DG02GB03D02DGB01 

BO 2 DGG BO 3 DO 2 AF # AF # CF # DCFGG # AAGL4 

A" 

1050 L$="T403L8CDF#02A03CE02F#AO 
3D02FA03CCDF#D02L4BL8DGB03C02L4G 
L8 B03 CC # DDC02 BA" 

1060 M$="T402L8G#B03E02BGEOlBO2E 
G#01BO2EGL4OlBB02L8AO3C#EO2EA03C 
02C#EAOlA02C#E01L4AA02L8BO3DG02G 
B03D02DGB01B02DGGB03D02BFGA03DDO 
2ABDL4GGGG" 

1070 X$="XA$ ;XB$ ;XC$ ;XD$ ;XE$ ; " 

1080 Y$="XF$;" 

1090 V$="XG$;" 

1100 PLAY X$ 

1110 PLAY Y$ 

1120 PLAY X$ 

1130 PLAY V$ 

1140 0$="XH$;XI$;XJ$;" 

1150 PLAY 0$ 

1160 PLAY 0$ 

1J.70 S$="XK$;XL$;XM$;" . 

1180 PLAY S$ 

1190 PLAY S$ 

1200 PRINT@231," A PIANO SHOW PI 
ECE" ; 

1210 PRINT@480, "press <enter> to 
continue": INPUT L:IF L=ENTER GO 
TO60 

1220 CLS : PRINTQ 13 5 , "THAT • S ALL F 
OLKS . . " 

1230 PRINTS 19 9, "HAVE A GOOD DAY I 
ii 

1240 GOTO 1240 

ISIS 



98 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



A circuit enabling you to produce 
sound internally from your Co Co 




BY DAVID HUANG 




ince I am a novice in elec- 
tronics, I decided to test 
my ability by making an 
internal sound circuit for 
my CoCo. This circuit 
enables you to produce 
sound internally from your CoCo with- 
out having your TV or monitor on. The 
circuit is an audio amplifier; it makes 
the weak sound signal from the comput- 
er strong enough to drive a speaker 
separate from that of the TV or moni- 
tor. The audio amplifier utilizes an 
audio amp IC, which can be bought at 
your local Radio Shack store along with 
the other parts for the circuit. To build 
this circuit you will need a soldering 
iron, solder, 22-gauge wire or higher, 
and the parts shown in Table 1, all of 
which are also available at Radio 
Shack. 



David Huang is a high school freshman 
who has been programming the CoCo 
for over three years. 







Table 1 


Cat. No 


Part 


♦ 

Description 


272-121 


C1 


47 uF capacitor 


271-338 


R1 


mini 100K potentiometer 


275-406 


S1 


SPST mini switch 


40-245 


SP1 


8-ohm speaker 


276-1731 


IC1 


audio amp IC 


276-1995 




8-pin DIP socket 


270-325 




9-volt battery snap 


276-148 




mini PC board 




June 1988 THE RAINBOW 99 



To build the audio amp, follow the 
schematic diagram of the circuit in 
Figure 1. Use the 22-gauge wire to 
interconnect the parts on the PC board. 
You must solder the 8-pin DIP onto the 
board first, then install the audio amp 
IC when you have finished building the 
project. The 9-volt battery snap is to be 
soldered with the red wire to the +9V 
and the black wire to the ground sym- 
bol. ' 

You may substitute any PC board or 
speaker for those listed above, but 
remember that the speaker must be 
small enough for the circuit to drive. 
After the project is complete, solder the 
input leads of the circuit to the wires 
that contain the computer's sound 
signal going to the RF modulator; 
follow the diagram in Figure 2. Then 
plug in a 9-volt battery to the circuit, 
turn on the computer and switch the 
circuit on. 

You may use any program or com- 
mand that produces sound on the com- 
puter. Sound should emerge from the 
circuit speaker rather than from that of 
the TV or monitor. If it doesn't, check 
the circuit for flaws or mistakes. If you 
want the sound routed to the TV or 



Figure 2 





1 




2 


DC 

nr 


J 


MODULATOR 






i 1 




i -H 


TO INPUTS 



* 1 



2 



monitor speaker, simply switch off the 
circuit. The 100K mini PC potentiome- 
ter controls the gain or volume of the 
circuit. 

I placed the circuit on top of the 
computer's RF modulator, with an 
insulator between the two to prevent a 
short circuit. It may be a little more 
difficult to place the circuit on the 
modulator of a CoCo 2, since that 
modulator is vertical rather than hori- 
zontal. The circuit doesn't have to be 
placed on the modulator, but there's no 



other better place to put it since the 
circuit is right over the wires onto which 
you have to solder your inputs. I used 
detachable wires to connect the circuit 
speaker to the top of the cover so that 
I could lift the cover without breaking 
any wires. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this project may be directed to the 
author at 19138 Frankfort St., North- 
ridge, CA 91324. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) /5C\ 




* I 



ill? ^*™*^k * f 

Rainbow Introductory Guide to 

" * - - f \ i N ^ i >S 



X i 1 

^NvAv* .«■«■.-.■,«, \.j!v.V... ■■•S.-'V-juV.-A.'vtfj V.'A .- ."rtff. 

rill 



| I { 1 i t I 

\ J [ ? 5 ' ~ 




a; J 



i 



— r 



v .;„. rv ..^ r — »~-r-* ? " 

i J A I 



I t _j _^ /• | | f { i 



Please send me: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Book $6.95* 

The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk $5.95 
The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Book/ Disk Set $1 1.95 



Mbstpeopk^^^^to 

M to taUc. Statistical results and concepts turn up everywhere. Statistics book together %ith the tape or disk. Get both for 
large part of our daily consists M statistics. Results \ only $ll;95j 
of opinio^ polis^ su^ 
^ industrial 'average -^ncj < toif ^qdrs^;- our sports hews are 
J 'statistics^ Biit st|j|i^ti^%^^en misused. The informed 
person needs to understand basic concepts in order to I 
j udge the appropriateness of applications. ^ ' I 
% Rainbow Contributirig^ E Michael Plog and co- I 

. author Pr ^Kpfman Stenzel have written Th^ Rainbo#^^l Name 
Inlroductpry Guide ta^S 1 1 

easy-to-understahd guide to this sometirnes py$terious area . I 
> %of matkematics. Their aim sl^ to introduce re ade fs to the • ^1 
^realm thinking, arid they belfeye: ^ I 
fhat the Tkridy I 

;Shar^A %oUr skills; >%fitf Th^ RiinboW Ihttoduc^ - I 
Y ^uide to iSt^fisticis for only $6.95Clnclu^ed in the; bodJc is ^ J 
: J ih^fa a BASlC statistics program just for ; r I 

1 - the Color Computer. (80-column printer r^qutred.) Forget; I I 
^Ahe taping hassle by ordering the accompanying Statistic^ V j 

//tape or Disk for only $5.95. Spend your time learning s &d 1 , , 

^SM4% the new material, not debugging your %ping; ^ist^j costs ' we do not bilL Please aUow 6-8 weeks for dclivcry 



Address 

City 

□ My check in the amount of. 



State 



ZIP 



. is enclosed* 



Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Acct. No. Exp. Date 

Signature — 

Mail to: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics. The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 

*Add $1.50 per book for shipping and handling in the U.S. Outside the U.S. add $4 per 
book (U.S. currency only). Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. In order to hold down 



jr iivy j j«s " 7 c j -y I — ~JC - / \ ~ t / 

in the tape or disk and you're ready for actidh! 7 -^j \ 



Note: The tape and disk are not stand-alone products. If you buy either the tape or disk, 
you still need to purchase the book for instructions. 



1 
I 
I 



100 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



■ * • • « 

• ••••••••*»**»•••••• 

• •«>»■■•*■■■•»«**■>•* 
■ * »*••■•*«•»««• • • ■ ■ • 

• *»•»•••■»#•#«(■•••••*■ 
«•»*•*•••••••••••*»•» " 

*»»»•**••••■**••*•»»• 

»•»«•«•**»■■■»•■**••• 
*»•**•*«••••■»•*•■*■■ . 

• ■•••««*••«•••••••••*•••. 

• ••••••*•••••««*»••••«•• 

« • •••••••»•»»*• 

4 <••#•*•»•*»..**»***•»«• 

• •••*••••»■•»«« ■•»■#«*»** 

• ••■»*■•■•*■••«•*-■«-••■•* 

• ••••••»»•*•»••« » • ■ ■ a • • I « • « 




• «•*■■««*•#'--••* t « ^ ♦ » « • • * 

y.v.v.v.v.vt * I 



• »■•»•*■••««»»*••••* 

• »»«••■•«•••»»*« ■*»• 
«•*»*»•••••••»••*•••< 

• « *•••■••••••■•«•••« 

■ •■•••»••«••*■•••••«< 

• ••*••»*•«««••••■■•• 
«■**«•»•■•«••«•«*•■ 

« ■ »•■«•*»»*»**•**** 

*«•••••••»•■•«««■■* 

»*•••■•••»»•••«••»* 

»*••••■■••••««*»•** 

• •»*••■••••••* » » • ■ * 

»«««••»•■••••••*•* 

■ « « •■•*««** ■»•••«< ■ * * • 4 

■ ••••»•■«••«•»•***•■•*■••««•«• 

• ■■■■*•»■***«•«•■•«*■*■■■•■ 

• »*««*•* «'•«««■•«• 

• ♦ » * «■••*«**«**<■■ t • • • 

• **»«•••«•#• *••«•*«««•••*••• 

• •***••«*••■ •••••#••«*■»»••• 
#••••»»«*•• *• • •••••••«*■••*•' 

• *••«««*•«••«■•••••••«•••■•• 

*•••••••»•»•«•••««•«»»••*•■•••< 

* • ««*•••■•«•»••*•«•• »•**«*••• 

• «•««•»«•*•••*•«*•*••*« « t 4 * • 

• •*«•*•«««»« »•••••••»•«■••«» 

' ■ Mi 



HOW DO YOU GIVE A RAINBOW? 



It's simple — 



a rainbow gift certificate . . . 



Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 

source fortheTandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
safe at home. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate 
and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by June 
25 and well begin your friends' 
subscriptions with the August 

issue of RAINBOW. 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 



Name 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



j From: 



I 



Name 



Address 
City 



-State 



ZIP 



□ My payment is enclosed. 

Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Acct. # Exp. date 

i Signature 

! Mail to: 



Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

■ 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subscriptions to THE rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Turn the PLA Y command into a 
digital synthesizer 




By Jeremy Spiller 



/\ rerft you tired of the raspy 
£\\ sound produced by BASIC'S 
JTm^PLfiV statement? Wouldn't you 
really like your BASIC programs to play 
smooth and varied musical tones? Now 
with Super Play they can! 

SuperPlay is a BASIC program that 
installs a machine language algorithm 
within the BASIC interpreter and turns 
the PLAY command into a true digital 
synthesizer. Because you can program 
your own sounds, your PLRY com- 
mands now sing out mellow, sharp-and- 
snappy, funky, squeaky or in almost 
any harmonic tone. Even more exciting, 
SuperPlay stores three separate sounds 
and allows you to switch among them 
in the middle of a PLPY string by using 
the newly created W (for waveform) 
command. You can even change all 
three sounds in the middle of a pro- 
gram, as new waveforms can be loaded 
directly into the interpreter from disk or 
tape. 

Once installed, the SuperPlay algo- 
rithm remains a part of BASIC'S operat- 
ing system until you power down or 
press the reset button. You may type 
NEW and then program in basic as 
usual. You can load and run any BASIC 
program, and SuperPlay remains in 
place. Once installed, SuperPlay takes 
up no extra memory, and it is totally 



Jeremy Spiller is a high school junior 
who has been programming in assembly 
language for four years. He has recently 
begun writing commercial software and 
has launched his own software com- 
pany. 



invisible to the programmer — until he 
or she executes the PLRY command. 
SuperPlay works on any CoCo 1 or 2 
with 64K and Extended Color BASIC, or 
on any CoCo 3. 

What's a Waveform? 

Sounds are simply variations in air 
pressure produced by the vibrations of 
a flexible sheet called a diaphragm. 
Your TV loudspeaker has a diaphragm, 
and its vibrations are controlled elec- 
tronically. If you can vary the voltage to 
the loudspeaker in the same way that 
the sound of, say, a flute varies the air 
pressure, you can reproduce the sound 
of the flute. Computerized sound syn- 
thesis means that your CoCo uses 
numbers in its memory to tell the dia- 
phragm exactly where to position itself 
nanosecond by nanosecond. We decide 
what numbers to place in memory by 
drawing a curve, called a waveform. As 
the wave curves upward, the diaphragm 
of the loudspeaker expands. As the 
wave curves down, the diaphragm con- 
tracts. SuperPlay allows you to deter- 
mine the exact nature of the sound by 
specifying the exact position of the 
diaphragm through one cycle of move- 
ment. This cycle is repeated over and 
over again for as long as the sound is 
being produced. 

Keying in the Program 

There are two separate listings. List- 
ing 1 is the SuperPlay program itself; if 
you don't intend to create your own 
waveforms, it is the only listing you 
have to key in. Listing 2 is the wave 
editor, which allows you either to 



modify an existing wave or create a 
totally new wave by hand. 

The machine language algorithm is 
contained in DPTfl lines 630 through 730 
of Listing 1. These lines must be keyed 
in exactly as printed. One misplaced or 
missing digit, and SuperPlay will not 
work. I have encoded checksums into 
these lines, so if you make any errors the 
program will tell you in which of these 
1 1 lines the error occurred. The strings 
in the data lines do not contain the letter 
'O'; they do, however, contain numer- 
ous zeros. Exchanging a letter 'O' for a 
zero will be the most common error, so 
please check this carefully. 

Save the program before running it! 
When saving SuperPlay, be sure to 
shorten the filename to eight letters, or 
you will get an FN Error. You must also 
be especially careful about keying in 
poke statements. Machine language 
programs are very unforgiving, and you 
could end up losing everything you have 
typed in if you mistakenly poke the 
wrong number into the wrong place. 
Double-check the arguments for all 
poke statements before running the 
program. Note that all pokes are in 
hexadecimal. The argument is always 
preceded by &H and contains only zeros 
— no O's. 

Now run the program. If you make 
it through the algorithm installation 
without error messages, you should see 
a PMQDE4 screen drawing out the three 
default waves. It does this by using the 
formulas in lines 490 through 620. 
(Every curve has a mathematical for- 
mula, and every mathematical formula 
can be used to draw a curve.) 



102 THE RAINBOW June 1988 




64K ECB 





Mi 



L-jf'J 








r i 



if i 



1 " ir. i 



I ■ • T. • 




L i ■< ■ 



pff-l 




June 1988 THE RAINBOW 103 



I have included 14 different wave 
formulas in SuperPlay, of which only 
three may be installed at one time. 
However, you can easily substitute 
different waves by plugging their line 
numbers into Line 82, which reads DN 
W GOSUB 490,600,510. You may 
choose any three of the line numbers 
between 490 and 620 to substitute for 
490, 600 or 510. 

Each formula produces its own 
unique sound. Some of these waves 
sound better playing low octaves, while 
some sound better in higher octaves. 
Some produce subtle harmonic under- 
tones and sound like two octaves play- 
ing at once. Note that each formula is 
followed by : RETURN. If you forget to 
include this part of the line, the wave 
won't work! Each time you make your 
formula substitutions in Line 82, save 
each version of SuperPlay under a 
different filename. 

After the waves are installed, the 
program plays a short demo (lines 100 
through 350), comparing the old sound 
produced by BASIC and the much more 
exciting sounds produced after Super- 
Play has been installed. It introduces 
you to the W command and demon- 
strates several ways to use it in your own 
programs. After you are familiar with 
the inner workings of SuperPlay, the 
entire demo may safely be deleted 
without affecting the program's execu- 
tion. 

During installation, SuperPlay has 
secretly given birth to a machine lan- 
guage version of itself, complete with 
wave tables and everything needed to 
install itself in the BASIC interpreter. 
Once you have saved this "ML clone," 
you will no longer have to run the 
original SuperPlay program that you 
have so laboriously keyed in. Simply 
load the clone and execute. You will not 
have to wait for the long computations 
necessary to install the three waves. 

After the demo, SuperPlay will 
prompt you for tape or disk and a 
filename. I assume you will create 
numerous clones, each with its own set 
of waveforms, and, of course, its own 
filename. 

Using SuperPlay with your BASIC 
Programs 

There are two ways to configure your 
CoCo to use SuperPlay. The most time- 
consuming way is to run SuperPlay (the 
one you keyed in) after powering up the 
computer. This installs SuperPlay and 
its waveforms. After it has run, you may 
type NEW and use the computer for any 



BASIC programming task. The Super- 
Play algorithm remains a part of BAS- 
IC'S operating system until you press 
reset or power down. 

The fastest way to install SuperPlay 
is to use one of your ML clones. These 
are loaded directly off tape or disk, and 
you won't have to sit around waiting for 
the waves to be poked in. Let's say that 
you saved an ML version of SuperPlay 
as SILYWfiVE. Load it by using the 
following boot program: 

m CLEAR 2^ 1 £ r H.?B7C 

0 LOR DM "SILVUftVE 
(tape users substitute CLDflDM) 
30 EXEC 

40 CLERR ?m, 3.H7FFF 
50 PLRV y 'V31 




■ 




This boot program may be saved 
separately with the same filename as the 
version of SuperPlay it calls. You can 
then just type RUN"SILYWfiVE" if you 
have a disk drive, or you can type 
CLOAD"SILYWfiVE":RUN if you are 
using tape. Note that it is important to 
include a volume command or else your 
PLRY statements will play too softly. 

The W Command 

We have added new dimension to the 
sound available to your BASIC programs 
through PLRY statements. Unlocking 
the full potential of SuperPlay requires 
a mechanism to change waveforms 
instantly, and the W command does just 
that! The syntax to use is PLRY Ull or 
W2 or W3. An example might be: 




* fl$'- "L2D3 W2CW1CU3LSCG " : PLAY 




The W command may be placed any- 
where within the string just like any 
other PLRY command. It takes up no 
real time so it doesn't change the beat 
or tempo of your song. It produces no 
sound itself, but it does change the 
sound of all the notes played after its 
occurrence (just like the L and □ com- 
mands). 

Remember, however, that the last 
wave used remains the default wave, 
even if you load and run a different 
program. It is best, therefore, to place 
a W command early in your new pro- 
gram in order to avoid beginning your 
songs in an unwanted wave table. 

Creating and Editing Waveforms 

The simplest method of installing 
coherent waveforms is to use any three 
of the mathematical formulas provided 



in SuperPlay. If you are good at mathe- 
matics and have an understanding of 
Fourier theory, you can have a good 
time making up your own wave formu- 
las. (I can tell you from experience that 
it isn't that difficult, and all of mine were 
produced by trial and error.) First, be 
sure that SuperPlay is installed. Then 
save lines 80 through 84 as a separate 
program. This little program can be 
used to poke your experimental formu- 
las into the interpreter and graph them 
at the same time. All values of the 
variable R must be between zero and 
255. Begin with a simple trigonometric 
function such as A=j/nfa)* 127+128, 
which produces a compatible sine wave; 
vary the numbers to see how the shape 
and position of the wave changes, and 
then begin to elaborate. As time goes 
on, youll get a feel for how the func- 
tions vary, and then youll be creating 
your own waves from scratch. A friend 
of mine became obsessed with creating 
waves, and I am guessing a few of you 
will, too. If you come up with any good 
ones, send them to me and I'll forward 
them to readers who inquire about the 
program. 

Unfortunately, most people don't 
enjoy this form of self-torture, and for 
that reason WAVED IT is provided in 
Listing 2. 

The Wave Editor 

The wave editor is itself a great toy 
because it allows you to experiment 
with sound. It is menu-driven. To return 
to the menu while editing, just press the 
M key. You can edit or save the waves 
currently in memory, or you can load 
previously saved wave sets, provided 
they have been saved from the editor in 
immediate-load format. 

In order to edit a wave, you must first 
have installed Super Play using Listing 
1 or one of your ML clones. When you 
run WRVED IT, it peeks into high memory 
and draws out one of the resident 
waveforms on your screen. You can now 
use the arrow keys to move the cursor 
anywhere on the page. Pressing the 
SHIFT key while pressing the arrows 
moves the cursor faster. When you want 
to set a point, press the ENTER key. This 
resets the old point, sets the new one and 
advances the cursor to the next position 
to the right. It also immediately changes 
the resident waveform so that the one 
SuperPlay uses looks like the one you 
see. There are 256 points, each of which 
can be set to a value between 0 and 255 
(determined by the vertical position of 
the point you set). 



104 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



You can test your curve at any time 
during editing by pressing one of the 
number keys 1 through 5. Pressing one 
of these keys plays a C note in that 
octave using your waveform. You can 
play the wave each time you set a new 
point and listen to the way its sound 
changes. While the smoothest and most 
harmonic waves have no sharp points in 
them and always start and end at the 
same vertical position, you are by no 
means obligated to follow any rules in 
creating your own waveforms. 

For instance, change the smooth 
curves on the resident wave to make 
sharp points; then play the new wave- 



form by pressing the number keys. Try 
building a triangular wave that looks 
like a pyramid, or try two disjointed 
horizontal lines. You can even use 
random points scattered all over the 
screen. This will produce a buzz instead 
of a tone, but your PLAY statements will 
play that buzz at the correct pitch, so 
you will still get a reasonable rendition 
of your tune. A single flat, horizontal 
line produces only silence. 

Quick-Changing Waveforms 

After editing any or all of the waves, 
you can then save your new waveset 
under an appropriate filename. These 



wavesets are different from the ML 
clones that you created earlier. They are 
in immediate-load format. In order to 
use them, SuperPlay must already be 
installed. You simply LOflDM a waveset 
to substitute the new waves for the old. 
You do not have to EXEC them like you 
did for the ML clone. This means that 
you can quickly change wavesets in the 
middle of a program. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at P.O. Box 1094, Townsend, 
MA 01469. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



Listing 1: 5UPRPLRY 




1 i **************************** 

2 f * SUPERPLAY * 

3 •* (C) 1987 BY * 



4 •* JEREMY SPILLER * 

5 • **************************** 

10 CLEAR 2J3J3J3,&H7B7C:REST0RE 

2J3 PO=&H7B7D:CH=j3:FOR D=l TO 11: 

CLS: PRINT "WORKING ON LINE" ;D:CH= 

J3 

30 READ D$:FOR X=l TO LEN(D$)/2- 

1:P=VAL("&H"+MID$(D$ / X*2-1,2) ) :P 
OKE PO,P:CH=CH+P:PO=PO+l:NEXT X 
4J3 IF RIGHT$(D$,2) <>RIGHT$ (")8J3"+ 
HEX$(CH) / 2) THEN PRINT "ERROR IN 
LINE" ;D: STOP 



"-5 .'- '-■■ ?>,* 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 



Attention, algebra students! Do quadratics give you 
nightmares? With this shortie, CoCo will solve 
quadratics in the form of AX 2 +BY+C=0. All you have 
to do is enter the values for ?A, B and C 



J3 CtS: INPUT" SOLVE A*X*X+B*X+C=»J3 
ENTER A , B , C " ; A , B,C: D= (B*B-4*A*C) 
: IFD=j3THENPRINT"Xl-X2=: " ; ^b/2 *A : E 
LSEIFD<0THEND=SQR(ABS (D) ) : PRINT" 
X1«";-B/(2*A) "+"D/(2*A) "I":PRINT 
"X2«" ;-B/2*A»-»D/ (2*A) "I" ;ELSEIF 
D>J3THEND=SQR ( D) :PRINT"X1=" ( -B+D) 
/2 *A : PRINT"X2=" ( -B-D) /2 *A 



Richard Larson 
Apple Valley, MN 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventum m& its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) ... 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGIES 

Your OS9 Solution 



Presents . . . 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Diak Mmaqir Tm: Takes the labor out of managing your 

files by allowing you to create, copy, delete, and view files 
and entire directories with simple keystrokes from a graphic 
display of your disk's directory. 

(Requires 512k OS9 Level II) $29.95 



Tha Zapper: Edit files and entire disks with this versatile 

utility. Allows editing in hexadecimal and ascii formats. 
Patch commands directly on the disk and fix CRC's 
automatically! Retrieves lost or crashed disks! 
(Requries 128k 0S9 Level II) $19.95 

Mulfci-Manu : Create your own Multi-View compatible menus, 
then run them by clicking on an ICON! 

(Requires 128k OS9 Level II and Multi-View) $19.95 

Qff 9L2BBS : BBS program that supports multiple users and 

sysop definable menus. Includes: Tsmon, Login, Chat, 
message retrieval, mail retrieval, Uloadx, Dloadx, and 
more! 

(Requires 512k OS9 Level II) «.$19.95 

OS 9 Toolkit: Includes: Wmatch, Wcopy, Wdel, Wattr, 

Otree, Dtree, Pause, Goto, Ascii, Convert, Devname, Dirsort, 
Upcase, Locase, Dislex, and Calendar. 

(Requires 64k 0S9 Level I or II) $19.95 



Layl II Toola: Includes all of the above plus: Bcolor, 

Fcolor, Border, Mmap, Wconfig, Palette, Browse, Window, and 
Wend. 

(Requires 128k 0S9 Level II) $24.95 

Add $3.00 per order for shipping and handling. 

Send check or money order to: Alpha Software Technologies 

2810 Buff on St. 

Chalmette, La. 70043 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 105 



50 NEXT D 

60 CLS : PRINT "POKING PITCH TABLE" 

:R=1.0594631:PITCH=545:REM 

— MODIFY 'PITCH' IF THE NOTES 

SEEM OFF. 
70 Z=&H7C80:S=1:FORX=0TO60:P=S*P 
ITCH:A=INT(P/256) : B=P-A*256 : POKE 
Z , A: POKEZ+1, B: Z=Z+2 : S=S*R:NEXT 
80 PMODE 4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 1,1:B=& 
H7C00:FOR W=l TO 3 :PCLS:B=B+256: 
A=0:Z=0:FOR X=0 TO 6.2831853 STE 
P 0.0246399424 
82 ON W GOSUB 490,600,510 
84 POKE B+Z,A:PSET(Z,A/2) :Z=Z+1: 
NEXT X,W 
90 EXEC &H7B7D 
100 JS$="V31W1 
110 J1$="T4L203CD" 
120 J2$="L4EGFFAGG04C03B04C03GEC 
DEFGAGFE" 

130 J3$="DEC02GB03DFED" 

140 J4$="ECD" 

150 J5$="02G03C02B03C" 

160 J6$="L4EG04CP2 

170 J7$="W3T3L103EL2FGCGFDED 

180 J8$="T4L4DW2FEFD02BGB03DFED 

190 J9$="W1ECD 

2 00 J$= "Wl "+ J2 $+ J3 $+ "W2 M + J4 $+ J2 $ 
+J5$+J6$ 

210 POKE&HFFDE,0:CLS:PRINT"THIS 
IS HOW THE Old PLAY STATE- MENT 
SOUNDS ! " 

220 PLAY Jl$+J2$+J3$+J4$+J2$+J5$ 
+"P1" 

230 POKE&HFFDF,0:CLS:PRINT@140," 
SUPERPLAY" :PRINT@200, "BY JEREMY 
SPILLER" 

240 PLAY "P1 M +JS$+J1$+J$ 

250 PLAY J7$+J8$+J7$+J8$+J9$+J$ 

260 D1$="V31W1T403L8C" 

270 D2$="L8CFFL4EDC02A03L401W3AA 

280 D3$="W203L8CCFFL4EDD+E04W301 

EE 

290 D4$="T4W303L4EECDW1EECDW2L8E 
EL4EDC02A 

300 D5$="T4L401W3F03AAP401C03AAP 

4O1F03AO1C03A01F03AA 

310 PLAY D1$+D2$+D3$+D4$+D5$+D1$ 

+D2$+D3$+D4$+"L201FP1" 

320 L1$="V31T503L3EL8DL4CDEDECDD 

DL1D 

330 L2$="L4DL8CL402B03CDCD02B03C 
CCL1C 

340 L3$="L302GL8G+L3 AL8 G+L3GL8G+ 
L3AL8G+L4G 

350 PLAY "W1"+L1$+"W2"+L2$+"W3"+ 
L3$+"03DDL1DW2 M +L3$+"03EEL1E"+"W 
1 M +L1$+"W3L4DL2C+L4DL2EEL1G" 
360 CLS : PRINT813 6 , "THATS ALL FOL 



KS ! '* 

370 PRINT @ 2 5 6 , "WELL , NOT QUITE A 
LL! IF YOU WANT TO SAVE THIS 

VERSION OF SUPERPLAY AS AN M 
L PROGRAM, PRESS <T>APE, <D> 

ISK OR <Q>UIT" 

380 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=" "THEN 380 
390 IF A$="Q"THEN END ELSE IF A$ 
="T"THEN 400 ELSE IF A$="D" THEN 

430 ELSE 380 
400 CLS : PRINT "YOU HAVE CHOSEN A 
SAVE TO TAPE. PLEASE PLACE A TAP 
E IN YOUR RECORDER AND PRE PA 

RE TO RECORD THIS VERSION OF SU 
PERPLAY . " : Q$="CLOADM" : GOSUB 450 
410 IF F$="" THEN 360 
420 CSAVEM F$, &H7B7D, &H7FFF, &H7B 
7D:GOTO 460 

430 CLS: PRINT "YOU HAVE CHOSEN A 
SAVE TO DISK. PLEASE PLACE A DIS 
KETTE IN YOUR DRIVE TO SAVE THIS 
VERSION OF SUPERPLAY. ":Q$="LO 
ADM": GOSUB 450 

440 IF F$=" "THEN 360 ELSE SAVEM 
F$,&H7B7D,&H7FFF,&H7B7D:GOTO 460 
450 PRINT: PRINT "PLEASE TYPE A SU 
ITABLE FILENAME (8 LETTERS OR LE 
SS) OR <ENTER> ALONE TO ABORT." 
: INPUT F$: RETURN 

460 CLS: PRINT F$:PRINT"HAS NOW B 
EEN SAVED AS A STAND- ALONE ML 
PROGRAM. TO INSTALL IT SIMPLY 
RUN THE FOLLOWING PROGRAM:" 
470 PRINT: PRINT" 10 CLEAR 200, &H7 
B7C":PRINT"20 " ;Q$;CHR$ (34) ;F$;C 
HR$(34) : PRINT "30 EXEC": PRINT" 40 
CLEAR 200, &H7FFF": PRINT "50 PLAY" 
;CHR$(34) ;"V31";CHR$(34) 
480 PRINT :INPUT"ANOTHER SAVE (Y 
OR N)";A$:IF A$="Y" THEN 360 ELS 
E END 

485 REM THE LINE NUMBERS OF ANY 
OF THE FOLLOWING FORMULAS 
MAY BE PLUGGED INTO LINE 82. 
(ON W GOSUB XXX, XXX, XXX) 
490 A=COS(X)*88+COS(X*2)*44+SIN( 
X*3) *22+COS(X*4) *11+95:RETURN 
500 A=SIN(X)*64+SIN(X*2)*32+SIN( 
X*3) *16+SIN(X*4) *8+SIN(X*8) *8+12 
8 : RETURN 

510 A=80*ATN(SIN(5*X)+TAN(.2*X)+ 

COS ( 3 *X) ) +12 8 : RETURN 

520 A=SIN (X) *32+COS (X*2) *32+SIN ( 

X*3) *32+COS (X*4) * 3 2+ 12 8: RETURN 

530 A=20*TAN(SIN(X)+COS(X) )+128: 

RETURN 

540 A=SIN(X*X) *63+COS(X*X)*63+12 
8 : RETURN 

550 A=COS (X/2) *127+128: RETURN 



106 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



I 
m 



~V1 



m 
s 



S 

! 



i 



Mak i n «=; 
C o C a J 



3«N 



MicnoWorld 



J 



AFFORDAB 



CoCo III 


$145 


Drive 0 


$175 


Drive 0 (NEW) 


$235 


CM-8 Monitor 


$248 


Deluxe Joystick 


$ 24 


Mouse 


$40 


Joysticks (pair) 


$13 


Disk storage box (50) 


$12.50 


CCR-81 Cass. Rec. 


$42 



Disks (SS) $7.00/box 
Disks (DS) $7.50/box 
"Includes free library case 



DMP-106 Special Offer $145 
DMP-130A (120 CPS) $265 
DMP-440 $545 



Tandy 1000 HX 
Tandy 1 000 TX 



$555 
$899 



VM-4 Monitor 

CM-5 Monitor 
CM-11 Monitor 



$ 99 

$240 
$325 



CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 
MultiPak Upgrade (26-3024) 
MultiPak Upgrade (26-3124) 
OS-9 Level 2 



$130 
$ 10 
$ 10 
$ 63.95 



Minimum Order $15.00 



* Please Note - Our ads are submitted 
early, so prices are subject to change!!! 
We appreciate your cooperation & 
understanding in this matter 



Method of Payment: 

MC, Visa. Am.Ex. - Sorry, No Citiline! 

Certified Check or Money Order. 

Personal Checks - Allow 1 week to clear! 



!>S&a<§£ SW&m&WU3i 



Full TANDY 

Warranty 
100* TANDY 

PRODUCTS 

FREE UPS Shipping 
ton orders over $50.00 
under $50 add $2.00 



==> CALL <== 

In Pa: 
215 863-8911 

In N. J. : 
201 735-6138 




0 



COMPUTER CENTER 



'C 



3o 



MicroWorld 



230 Moorestown Road, Wind Gap, PA 18091 



Laneco Plaza, Clinton, NJF. 08809 



ALL 



C.O.D. ADD $5.00 

ICES INCLUDE SHI1PJPING T I I I 

(In Continental US) 

TANDY EQUIPMENT WITH FULL 
RADIO SHACK WARRANTY 



560 A=C0S(X/2) *32+SIN(X) *96+128: 
RETURN 

570 A=SIN(X) *127+128:RETURN 

580 A=114*ATN(COS(4*X)+SIN(3*X) ) 

+127:RETURN 

590 A=230*TAN(SIN(X)*COS(X) )+128 
: RETURN 

600 A=210*TAN(SIN(X*.99) *C0S(X*1 
.01) )+133:RETURN 

610 A=127*LOG(X+.01) *SIN(X) *COS ( 
X) +12 7: RETURN 

620 A=100*ATN(COS(4*X)*SIN(X))+1 
18: RETURN 

625 REM THE DATA BELOW CONTAINS 
ONLY ZEROS. THERE ARE NO 
LETTER O'S, AND NO COMMAS. 
ALL LINES ARE EXACTLY THE 
SAME LENGTH ! 
630 DATA 86FB97F9B6FA8043B7FA80B 
1FA8027161A508E80007FFFDEF1 
640 DATA EC847FFFDFED818CFA8025F 
11CAF3 38D001E308CD3ECC12763 
650 DATA 16308B10AEC1ECC13402A68 
0A7A0350283000126F320E339B0 
660 DATA 00629A6D001B007D9AC7002 
400A19B2900620103FA8003804E 
670 DATA 00008157271481562 6168D4 
9C11F2252D7DF585858CA07D7B6 
680 DATA E0397E9ADCBD9CCB5D26037 
EB44A96E23DDDD50FFD0FFE7E31 
690 DATA 9B44BD9CCB5AC102230220E 
7CBFBD7F93996DEC60C7FFF401F 
700 DATA 3DEBE0588EFA80EC85DDFDD 
6F9D7FADCE 13DDDD58D46DDE392 
710 DATA 8E00AB1F12CEFFFF1A501E8 
81E881E881E88A69F00FAD6E02D 
720 DATA 3D8A03B7FF20DCFBD3FDDDF 
B301F26E21F21334112DCE3938E 
730 DATA D5 DDE 3 2 2 DDFC0 1 1 2 3 3 CBFF0 
112CC0000DDE339DDD5DDE3220C 



3) EDIT WAVEF 



ii 



Listing 2: WflVEDIT 



***************************** 

* WAVE EDITOR * 

* BY JEREMY SPILLER * 

* (C) 1987 * 
***************************** 



1. 
2 
3 
4 
5 

15 S$=CHR$(13)+CHR$(94)+CHR$(10) 
+CHR$ ( 8 ) +CHR$ ( 9 ) +CHR$ ( 95 ) +CHR$ ( 9 
1)+CHR$(21)+CHR$ (93) +"12345": DIM 
P(6,6) 

20 CLS: PRINT" WAVE EDIT BY JE 
REMY SPILLER" 

30 PRINT: PRINT" 1) LOAD WAV 

EFORMS": PRINT" 2) SAVE WAVE 



FORMS": PRINT" 
ORM" : PRINT 

40 LINE INPUT " ENTER SELECTION: 
/ 1$ 

50 ON VAL(I$) GOSUB 100,200,300: 
GOTO 20 

100 CLS: PRINT "LOAD WAVEFORM" : GOS 
UB 250: IF T$= , .'T" THEN CLOADM N$ 
ELSE LOADM N$ 
110 RETURN 

200 CLS: PRINT "SAVE WAVEFORM" : GOS 
UB 250: IF T$="T" THEN GOTO 205 E 
LSE SAVEM N$,&HFB00,&HFDFF,&HB44 
A: GOTO 210 

205 CSAVEM N$ , &HFB00 , &HFDFF, &HB4 
4A 

210 RETURN 

250 PRINT: INPUT" (D) ISK OR (T) APE 
" ;T$:IFT$<>"D"ANDT$O"T"THEN250 
260 LINE INPUT "ENTER FILE NAME: 
";N$: RETURN 

300 CLS :LINEINPUT "WHICH WAVE FOR 
M WOULD YOU LIKE TO WORK ON (1- 
3 ) : " ,*W$ : W=VAL (W$) : IF WOINT (W) 
OR W<1 OR W>3 THEN 300 
310 PMODE4,l:PCLS:SCREENl,l:X=12 
8:LINE(0,X) -(255, X) ,PSET:Y=64 
320 W=&HFB00+(W-1) *256:FOR 1=0 T 
0 255:PSET(I,PEEK(W+I)/2) :NEXT 
330 H=((X-3<0)+l)*(X-3) :V=((Y-3< 
0)+l) *(Y-3) :GET(H,V) -(X+3,Y+3) ,P 
, G : DRAW" BM=X ; , =Y ; NE 3NF3 NG3NH3 " 
340 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 340 
ELSE PUT(H,V) -(X+3,Y+3) ,P,PSET:0 
N INSTR(1,S$,I$) GOSUB 500,550,6 
00,650,700,750,800,850,900,950,9 
50, 950, 950, 950: IF I$<>"M" THEN 3 
30 ELSE RETURN 

500 PRESET (X, PEEK (W+X)/2) :PSET(X 
,Y):POKE W+X,Y*2:X=X+1:IF X>255 
THEN X=2 55: RETURN ELSE RETURN 



550 Y=Y-1 
560 RETURN 
600 Y=Y+1 
610 RETURN 



IF Y<0 THEN Y=0 
IF Y>127 THEN Y=127 
IF X<0 THEN X=0 



650 X=X-1 
660 RETURN 
700 X=X+1 
710 RETURN 
750 Y=Y-4 
760 RETURN 
800 Y=Y+4 
810 RETURN 
850 X=X-8 
860 RETURN 
900 X=X+8 
910 RETURN 

950 PLAY"V31L4T4W"+W$+"0"+I$+"C" 
: RETURN 



IF X>255 THEN X=255 

IF Y<0 THEN Y=0 

IF Y>127 THEN Y=127 

IF X<0 THEN X=0 

IF X>255 THEN X=255 



108 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



How To;l|^iilljiBi 



When we use the term CoCo, we refer to an affection- 
ate name that was first given to the Tandy Color 
Computer by its many fans, users and owners. 

The basic program listings printed in the rain- 
bow are formatted for a 32-character screen — so they 
show up just as they do on your CoCo screen. One easy 
way to check on the accuracy of your typing is to com- 
pare what character "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings come out the same 
— you have a pretty good way of knowing that your 
typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 
rainbow ON disk or rainbow ON tape service. 



Using Machine L^npap 



The easiest way to "put" a machine language program 
into memory is to use an editor/assembler, a program 
you can purchase from a number of sources. All you 
have to do, essentially, is copy the relevant instructions 
from the rainbow's listing into CoCo. 

Another method of putting an ML listing into CoCo 
is called "hand assembly" — assembly by hand, which 
sometimes causes problems with ORIGIN or equate 
statements. You ought to know something about 
assembly to try this. 

Use the following program if you want to hand- 
assemble ML listings: 

10 CLEAR200,&H3F00:I=&H3FB0 

20 PRINT "ADDRESS : " ; HEXS ( I ) ; 

30 INPUT "BYTE";BS 

40 POKE I, VAL("&H"+B$) 

50 1=1+1 :GOTO 20 

This program assumes you have a 16K CoCo. If you 
have 32K, change the &H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00 
and change the value of I to &H7FB0. 



QS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: cmds and source. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rst, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMDS directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the source directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. basico9 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the SOURCE directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 



programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 

1) Type load dir list copy and press ENTER. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd'dB 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the RAINBOW 
ON disk in Drive 1. Then type chd/dl and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read . me . f i rs t file to the screen by typing 

list read. me. first and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow ON disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMDS directory, enter dir cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
source directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMDS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system: copy /d0/cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds/filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: copy /dl/cmds/ filename 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 




rainbow 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product thai carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. 

The Seal is not a "guarantee of satisfaction." The 
certification process is different from the review 
process. You are encouraged to read our reviews to 
determine whether the product is right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 



taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



sr 



The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command RUN 
and press enter. Once the program has run, type new 
and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to be sure you typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=256*PEEK(35)+17B 

20 CLEAR 25,X-1 

30 X=256*PEEI< (35)+17B ' 

40 FOR Z=X TO X+77 

50 RERD Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

60 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=7985THENB0ELSEPRINT 

"DATA ERR0R":5T0P 
B0 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 182, 1, 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 183, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 48, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 12B, 171, 128 
150 DATA 230, 132, 38, 250, 48, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 166, 132, 28, 254 
180 DATA 189, 173, 198, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 109 



Putting floppy controllers through their paces 






f\ description of the floppy disk 
/ \ controller ICs from Western 
U \A Digital appeared in Tony Di- 
Stefano's article in the October 1987 
rainbow (Page 126). Here, I will show 
you how to make the WD 1773/1793 
floppy disk controllers perform. 

The controllers are almost computers 
in themselves. Not only do they provide 
all the hardware connections, but they 
are also programmable by means of a 
set of registers and commands. The 
commands are broken into different 
types, depending on function. Type I 
commands move the Read/ Write head; 
Type II are the Read and Write sector 
commands; Type III commands read 
track and sector header blocks and read 
and write (format) tracks; and Type IV 
commands cause the current command 
to terminate. 

In this article only basic functions 
and Type I commands are presented. 
The most convenient feature of these 
commands is that they can be accessed 
from BASIC, since they don't need to 
keep pace with the drive. 

There are four registers in the con- 
troller ICs that are memory-mapped, 
meaning they can be poked and peeked 
like memory. The first is the Status/ 
Command register at SFF48, followed 
by the Track register at $FF49, the 
Sector register at SFF4A and the Data 
register at SFF4B. When writing (pok- 
ing) to the Status/ Command register, 
you send it a command; during a read 
(peek), you will get the error status of 



All information shown in tables was provided by Western 
Digital in its Storage Management Products Handbook. 



Scott Honaker is a senior at Western 
Washington University, where he is 
majoring in computer science and Ger- 
man. He owns several computers, in- 
cluding a new Co Co 3. 



Table 1: Error Codes 


Bit 7 


Drive not ready 


Bit 6 


Write-protected 


Bit5 


Head loaded/engaged 
(the head is against the 
disk surface) 


Bit 4 


Seek error (when 

verifv acttvp track not 
verified) 


Bit 3 
Bit 2 


CRC error (bad data) 

Track 0 (indicates 
head is at outermost 
track) 


Bit 1 


Index (when set, indi- 
cates index hole has 
been detected) 


BitO 


Busy (another com- 
mand in progress) 






Table 2 

Bit* 


: Control Bits at SFF40 

Wait enable (tells drive 
to HALT CPU) 


Bit6 


Drive select 4 


Bit 5 


Double density enable 


Bit 4 


Start precompensa- 
tion (on inner tracks) 


Bit 3 


Motor on 


Bit 2 


Drive select 2 


Bit 1 


Drive select 1 


Bit 0 


Drive select 0 



the drive (see Table 1). It is possible by 
peeking this location to find the real 
error (or anticipate one), instead of 
puzzling out DOS's ambiguous I/O 
Error. In addition to the registers, a byte 
is devoted to external controls at $FF40 
(see Table 2). By executing POKE 
&HFF40 , 9 (setting bits 0 and 3) you will 



110 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



activate the motor in Drive 0. (If you 








have difficulty with binary, you might 




Table 3: Tvoe I Command Codes 




consider a converting calculator* I keen 




Bits 




one next to my computer at all times.) 






There are five Type I commands: 


Common 


d 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 


0 


Restore, Seek, Step, and Step-in and 


Restore 


0 0 0 0 h v r1 


rO 


Step-out. All Type I commands with 


Seek 


0 0 0 1 h v r1 


rO 


their respective options have codes less 


Step ; 


0 0 1 t h v r1 


rO 


than 128 (see Table 3 and 4). The 


Step-in 


0 1 0 t h v M 


rO 


Restore command brings the Read/ 


Step-out 


0 1 1 t h v r1 


rO 


Write head to Track 0, as do many 









mand goes to a specific track number, 
which is loaded into the data register 
before the command is issued. This is 
the only Type I command that requires 
use of another register. The Step com- 
mand steps one track in the same direc- 
tion of the last movement. The Step-in 
command moves one track toward the 
higher-numbered tracks, while the 
Step-out command moves toward 
Track 0. 

To issue any commands, you must 
first choose a drive and turn the motor 
on:, POKE &HFF40, 9 for Drive 0. Then 
set up any extra registers, in the case of 
the Seek command, followed by a poke 
to the command register of the desired 
command. A few options must be con- 
sidered when calculating the command. 
The step rate depends entirely on how 
fast your drive will step. Tandy uses a 
30-millisecond rate to ensure that any 
drive will work; but don't think that by 
changing it once, it stays that fast. Since 
each command contains this code, it 
resets with the next command. Loading 
the head is also optional. By loading the 
head, you simply cause the Read / Write 
head(s) to clamp down on the disk 
surface in preparation for a read or 
write command. It is released when the 
next command is issued. To verify the 
destination track, the drive must read 
the disk to see that it has arrived on the 
proper track (track and sector numbers 





Table 4: Bit 

rO, r1 ~ Step rate 


[ Flag Summary 

rO = 0, n = 0 6 milliseconds 


mm 


at 1 MHz(CqCo) 


rO - 1 , r1 = G 12 ms 
r0 * 6, r1 = 1 20 ms 




y " Track number verify flag 


r0 -1,n =1 30 ms 
v = 0 No verify 






y * 1 Verify on destination track 




h = Head load /engage flag. 


h = 0 Unload head at beginning 






h = 1 Load head at beginning 




t * Track update flag 


t = 0 No update 






t = 1 Update track register 



are written to the disk during format- 
ting). The track update flag determines 
only whether the track register on the 
FDC will be loaded with the new track 
value upon completion of the com- 
mand. 

For example, if you wanted to restore 
the head to Track 0 as quickly as pos- 
sible, you could activate Drive 0 (POKE 
&HFF40, 9), then calculate a Restore 
command. The controllers will step up 
to 6 ms; by not engaging the head you 
can save from 30 to 300 ms (depending 
on the drive) and an additional 15 ms 
by not verifying the destination track. 
This would make the binary command 
00000000 or simply zero in decimal. By 
poking this number in the command 
register after the drive select, you will 
cause the heads to move at 6 ms to 
Track 0. Try it: POKE &HFF40, 9 then 



POKE &HFF4B, 0 and listen to your 
drives scream, if they can move that 
fast! If not, use POKE &HFF4B, 3 (bits 
0 and 1 set); this will step at 30 ms, as 
Radio Shack's does. 

After a study of these commands, 
you'll find the Driver program very 
simple to use. It was written basically as 
an example of the various Type I com- 
mands. It does have one additional 
useful function: To clean the drive by 
loading the head and moving the head 
in and out. Take a look at the code, play 
with it and have a good time being a real 
hacker! 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 1701 Lakeway Drive, Apt. 1, 
Bellingham, WA 98225. Please enclose 
an SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 




210 5 

290 42 

2010 196 



4040 199 

7020 43 

END 0 



I COMMANDS 
40 » 



$FF40 - CONTROL REGISTER 
$FF48 - COMMAND/ STATUS REGI 



The listing: FDCR ID 

lj3 1 DRIVE EXERCIZER 

15 1 BY SCOTT HONAKER 11/87 

2J3 1 THIS PROGRAM DIRECTLY PROGR 

AMS THE 1773/1793 FDC WITH TYPE 



45 1 
50 ' 
STER 

55 1 $FF49 - TRACK REGISTER 
6j3 • $FF4A - SECTOR REGISTER 
65 1 $FF4B - DATA REGISTER 
7J3 1 

13 j3 CLS: PRINT -.PRINT" 
VE DEMONSTRATOR" 



DISK DRI 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 111 



135 PRINT : PRINT" BY SCOTT 

HONAKER" 

145 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" USED 
TO DEMONSTRATE": PRINT" western d 
igital 1773/1793 FDC" 
150 PRINT" TYPE I COMMANDS AND 
ERRORS " 

155 FOR T=l TO 3000: IF INKEY$="" 

THEN NEXT 

160 • INITIALIZE VARIABLES 

165 HE=0:MO=0:DR=0:R=30:RT=3:DD= 

9:A=0:BL$=" 

it 

200 1 PRINT MENU SCREEN 

205 T=PEEK(&HFF49) :S=PEEK(&HFF48 

) 

210 CLS: PRINT "TRACK: ";T, "STATUS 

: ";S, "DRIVE: ";D,"RATE: ";R;"MS 
it 

215 PRINT: PRINT "<i> STEP IN (HIG 
HER TRACK)" 

220 PRINT "<o> STEP OUT (TOWARDS 
TRACK 0 ) " 

225 PRINT"<m> STEP- MOVE IN LAST 

DIRECTION" ; 
230 PRINT" <r> RESTORE- MOVE TO T 
RACK 0" 

235 PRINT "<S> SEEK- MOVE TO SPEC 
IFIC TRACK" 

240 PRINT "<C> CLEAN DRIVE MODE" 
245 PRINT"<d> DEFAULT DRIVE" 
250 PRINT"<t> STEPPING RATE" 
255 IF HE=0 THEN PRINT"<h> LOAD 
HEAD "ELSE PRINT "<h> UNLOAD HEAD" 



Mouse Tales 

By Logan Ward 



IHfiHUIELL 




260 IF A=0 THEN PRINT"<a> KEEP D 
RIVE ACTIVE" ELSE PRINT"<a> DEAC 
TIVATE DRIVE" 

265 PRINT: PRINT "command:"; 

270 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 270 

275 PRINT A$; 

280 IF A$="I" THEN 1000 

285 IF A$="0" THEN 2000 

290 IF A$="M" THEN 3000 

295 IF A$="R" THEN 4000 

300 IF A$="S" THEN 5000 

305 IF A$="C" THEN 6000 

310 IF A$="D" THEN 7000 

315 IF A$-"T" THEN 7500 

320 IF A$="H" THEN 8000 

325 IF A$="A" THEN 8500 

330 IF A$="Q" THEN CLS : POKE&HFF4 

0,0: END 

335 GOTO 205 

500 IF(PEEK(&HFF48)/2)<>INT(PEEK 
(&HFF48)/2)THEN500: ' DELAY UNTIL 
NOT BUSY 
510 RETURN 

600 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""THEN610 EL 
SE X=30 : RETURN 

610 IF ( PEEK (&HFF4 8 )/2 JOINT (PEEK 
( &HFF48 ) /2 ) THEN600 
620 RETURN 

1000 C=80+HE+RT: • STEP IN "N" NU 
MBER OF TRACKS 

1010 PRINTQ480, "step in how many 

tracks"; : INPUT N 
1020 IF A=0 THEN POKE&HFF40 , DD 
1030 FOR X=l TO N 
1040 POKE&HFF48,C 
1050 GOSUB 500 
1060 NEXT X 

1070 IF A=0 THEN POKE&HFF40,0 
1080 GOTO 205 

2000 C=112+HE+RT: • STEP OUT "N" 
TRACKS 

2010 PRINT@480, "step out how man 

y tracks"; : INPUT N 

2020 IF A=0 THEN POKE&HFF40 , DD 

2030 FOR X=l TO N 

2040 POKE&HFF48 / C 

2050 GOSUB 500 

2060 NEXT X 

2070 IF A=0 THEN POKE&HFF40,0 
2080 GOTO 205 

3000 C=48+HE+RT: » STEP IN DIRECT 
ION OF LAST MOVEMENT "N" TIMES 
3010 PRINT@480, "step how many tr 
acks";: INPUT N 

3020 IF A=0 THEN POKE&HFF40 , DD 
3030 FOR X=l TO N 
3040 POKE&HFF48,C 
3050 GOSUB 500 
3060 NEXT X 

3070 IF A=0 THEN POKE&HFF40,0 
3080 GOTO 205 



112 THE RAINBOW June 1988 





C=0+HE+RT: 1 RESTORE TO TRAC 


6110 GOTO 205 


K 0 




7000 PRINTS 4 80, "enter new defaul 


4010 


IF A=0 THEN POKE&HFF40 , DD 


t drive (0-3)"; 


4020 


POKE&HFF48,C 


7010 INPUT D 


4030 


GOSUB 500 


7020 IF D>3 OR D<0 THEN7010 


4040 


IF A=0 THEN POKE&HFF40,0 


7030 IF D=0 THEN DD=9 


4050 


GOTO 205 


7040 IF D=l THEN DD=10 


5000 


C=16+HE+RT: 1 SEEK A TRACK 


7050 IF D=2 THEN DD=12 


5010 


PRINT@480, "enter track to s 


7060 IF D=3 THEN DD=72 


eek" 


;: INPUT ST 


7070 GOTO 205 


5020 


IF ST>80 THEN 5010 


7500 PRINT@480, "new step rate (6 


5030 


IF A=0 THEN POKE &HFF40,DD 


, 12 , 20 , 30ms ) " ; • CHANGE STEPPING 


5040 


POKE&HFF4B , ST : POKE&HFF48 , C 


RATE j 


5050 


GOSUB 500 


7510 INPUT R 


5060 


IF A=0 THEN POKE &HFF 40,0 


7520 RT=-1 


5070 


GOTO 205 


7530 IF R=6 THEN RT=0 | 


6000 


PRINT @ 4 80, "insert head clea 


7540 IF R= 12 THEN RT=1 


ner <hit a key>"; 


7550 IF R=2 0THEN RT=2 


6010 


POKE&HFF40,0 


7560 IF R=3 0THEN RT=3 


6020 


A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN6010 


7570 IF RT<0 OR RT>3 THEN7510 


6030 


POKE&HFF40 , DD 


7580 GOTO205 


6040 


FOR X=l TO 30 


8000 IF HE=0 THEN HE=8 ELSE HE=0 


6050 


P0KE&HFF48 , 8+HE+RT 


: • SET LOAD/UNLOAD FLAG 


6060 


GOSUB 600 


8010 GOTO205 


6070 


POKE&HFF4B , 34 : POKE&HFF48 , 24 


8500 IF A=0 THEN A=DD ELSE A=0 ' 


+HE+RT 


SET DRIVE ACTIVITY FLAG AND (DE) 


6080 


GOSUB 600 


ACTIVATE DRIVE 


6090 


NEXT X 


8510 POKE&HFF40.A 


6100 


IF A=0 THEN POKE&HFF40,0 


852j3 GOTO205 ^ 



NEW ! FROM RTB SOFTWARE 

LABYRINTH 

A GRAPHICS ADVENTURE GAME 
CAN YOU ESCAPE THE LABYRINTH 
AND SAVE YOUR KINGDOM? 



YOU MUST GET THROUGH 2 LARGE 
LEVELS OF SECRET TUNNELS AND DANGERS 
A DELIGHT FOR THE AVID ADVENTURER 



ORDER NOW 
Tel. 617-263-0563 



COCO 1 OR 2 ONLY 
64 Kext. Disk 



After July 16th, AREA CODE $24.95 disk only 

will change to (508) 

Send check or money order to: Add $3.00 for 
RTB SOFTWARE shipping and handling 

P.O Box 777 

W.Acton, MA. 01720-0011 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



NEW, LOW PRICES! 
SAVE 40% TO 33% 



RJUNTCW 



MONEY-BACK GUARANTEI 
ZBLE MITH 



BCREENPRINTS ON ANY 



^Picture !Per$ed 



I NTI 



■ ■ 



GRAPHIC QCREEMPRINT PROGRAM 
FULL-PAGE PRINTDUT8 UJ I TH- 

RADIO SHACK a 



EPSON/IBHl 



ANDs 



ONLY 



LPVII, LPVIU, DMPIOO, DMP105, 0HP1O6, DMPUO 
DMP120, DNP130, DMP130A, DMP200, DKP430, CGP220. 

ALL COMPATIBLE PRINTERS - MX/RX/FX/EX/LX/LQ 
SERIES, STAR SEMINI 10X/15X, NX10/15, NXiOOO. 

ZENITH HPI99, NORTH ATLANTIC QANTEX, BROTHER 
0M-4O, CANON INK— JET, PANASONIC, C-ITOH AND 
LEADING EDGE PROWRITER, OLIVETTI INK-JET, 
TOSHIBA, OKI DATA, GORILLA BANANA, AND MORE! ! 

IS.OO(UB) ON DI8K OR 



TURN DATA INTO ARTWORK 



ITU— 



LOADS SPREADSHEETS 
AUTO SCALES & LABELS 
SMOOTHS & INTEGRATES 
291 GRAPHING SYMBOLS 
UNLIMITED OVERLAYS 
STORE COMPLETE GRAPHS £g 
MANUAL & TUTORIAL 



SPECIFY PRINTER 
WITH YOUR ORDER ! 



FINANCIAL ANALYSIS: Moving Averages 

T 



TAPEs »25.CK> (US) 
DISKe *3O.O0 (US) 




81 82 83 84 

Calendar Year <Jan. 1 to Dec- 31 > 



SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER TO ■ 

HAMKES RESEARCH SERVICES! 659 STANFORD AVE, OAKLAND, CA 94608 
FOR INFORMATION - (415) 547-7557. SHIPMENT WITHIN 48 HOURS! 



ADD *3.00 SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS. 



CA. RESIDENTS ADD SALES TAX 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 113 



RAINBOWTECH 




Digitizing the World, 

Revisited 



CO 

CD 

O 
O 

O 

PQ 



O 
00 
CO 



By William Barden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Cl. 
X 
LU O 



LU 



One of the first articles I did for RAINBOW was called 
"Digitizing the World" (January 1986). In it I 
lamented the fact that it wasn't easy to "digitize" 
characters or other shapes — that is, to convert them from 
printed form into CoCo graphics. In this month's column I'd 
like to tell you how I found a method to digitize just about 
anything in a few seconds. My picture in Figure 1, warts and 
all, shows the power of this digitizing method. Figure 2 shows 
another example of the technique — a digitized Mayan 
glyphic character taken from a book. In the book, the 
character is approximately three-eighths of an inch high. 

Video Signals 

In case you haven't guessed, the digitization method used 
here is called video digitizing. Before telling you how it works, 
let me give you some background about television sig- 
nals. . . . 

A standard television signal is called "composite video." 
This is not the same type of off-the-air signal your television 
gets, but is the "stripped down" video signal. Composite video 
is the type of signal that goes into a monitor rather than a 
television receiver. 

Composite video is generated in your CoCo 1, 2 or 3. In 
the CoCo 1 and 2 it's then modulated, or converted, to a 
signal that can be received on television channels 3 or 4. This 
step is necessary so that an ordinary television receiver can 
be used to receive the CoCo 1 or 2 color picture. The CoCo 
3 is more sophisticated. The CoCo 3 can also use a standard 
television with 256-by-192 resolution, a composite monitor, 
or an RGB analog monitor like the CM-8. There are three 
separate outputs. 

Look upon composite video as the "raw" video image 
generated by a television camera. The modulated rf video is 
the signal that goes out on the air as Channel 3 or Channel 
4, either from the miniature modulator contained within your 
CoCo, or from the huge transmitters of your local television 
station. 

Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 

114 THE RAINBOW June 1988 





Figure 1 (top) and Figure 2 



VISA 




«< GJMESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 

sciwn^td aW^to 





PYRAMIX (Co Co HI only) 

(See Dec "87 review) Disk $19.95 

CHAMPION <coCo m\\> 

(See May '87 review) Disk $19.95 



Kung-Fu Dude (coco 

(See Feb "88 review) Disk , $24.95 

White Fire of Eternity 

(See Dec '86 review) Disk $19.95 



CoCo Max III 

(CoCo 111 only) 

More resolution, power, color, speed, tools, & type styles!]! 
Built in Animation! / Amazing Color Sequencing!!! Comes 
with HI-RES INTERFACE, MINILOAD/BAS, DEMO 
DISK, COCO SHOW PGM. Sale Price $74.95 



AUTO DIM 



(CoCo III only) 

This hardware device protects your RGB or composite 
monitor, or your TV from IMAGE BURN after a few 
minutes of inactivity from your keyboard. Illustrated 

instructions and easy to install. Just $29.95 

(See January '88 review) 



now 2 styles MPI-CoCo Locking Plate *»• •»> 

Protects your CoCo III and Multi Pak Interface from destroying each other! Installs in seconds. MPI 26-3124 or 26-3024 
& CoCo III 26-3334 only. Please specify MPI number 26-3024 or 26-3124 when ordering! Only $9.95 



mmmm^ 

stu^rihgi spe^ 
Voice; !^ 
irSTFERRA^BI^ 

^unteo!::;h 



NEW 



V-Term Terminal Emulator 



444 NEW 



(128k or 512k CoCo III only) 
V-Term is one of the most advanced terminal programs for the CoCo HI ever!!! 

FEATURES: VT-100, VT-52, and standard CRT emulations. Full use of 51 2K, 80X28 text or graphics characters, 
Windows & Multi-tasking (Disk Basic!), RAMDISK like buffer, Xmodem, Xon/Xoff, Monochrome monitor support, Capture 
buffer, Snapshot, Conference mode, and much much more! Complete with documentation. Disk. « $39.95 



MULTI-LABEL III 

(CoCo III only) 

An easy to use, versatile label creating program including 
many new CoCo HI features. Even if you already own a 
label program, this one's a must for the 3! 
(See July '87 review) Disk $16.95 

Custom Palette Designer 

(CoCo III only) 

Easily alter the contents of any palette without having to 
remember numbers or colors! All sixteen palettes can be 
saved to disk as a single subroutine which may then be 
used in a basic program. (Aug '87 review) Disk $14.95 



FKEYS III 



(CoCo l/lt/lll) 

A user friendly, user programmable function key utility 
that creates up to 20 function keys. Other features include 
an EDITOR, DOS mods, RESET, and DISABLE. Includes 
enhanced CoCo III version and it's EPROMable! 
(See April '87 review) Disk.. $19.95 

SIXDRIVE 

(CoCo l/ll/lll) 

This machine language utility modifies DECB 1.0, 1.1, 
FKEYS III, or ADOS to allow the use of 3 double-sided 
drives (or 2 D/S drives and J&R's RAM DISKS) as 6 

singled-sided drives. Disk........... $16.95 




: :A:;:r^v:anim^ 
tludei 



Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
information: Delphi's CoCo Sig 



GIMMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301-256-7558 or 301-256-2953 



Add $3.00 for shipping and handling 
Add $2.50 for COD (USA only) 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VISA/MC/Check/Money Order/COD 



To put things into better perspective, a composite video 
signal is the same type of video signal that comes out of the 
VIDEO OUT jacks of your VCR. You may never have used this 
signal unless you have a combination television receiver/ 
monitor. If you look at your VCR, though, youll see a phono 
jack with that labeling, as shown in Figure 3. 

Camcorders, those expensive alternatives to the home 
movie camera, also have two types of output. One type is 
composite video, which can be used with a composite 
monitor. The second type is a modulated rf signal that can 
be received on an ordinary television receiver. Again, the 
modulated signal is nearly identical in format to the one from 
your CoCo phono jack that drives your color television 
receiver. 

OK, got it straight? Composite video feeds into a composite 
monitor, and modulated rf is composite video that has been 
converted to Channel 3 or Channel 4 signal. 

How Video Digitizers Work 

Video digitizers take a composite video signal, such as the 
one you get out of your home camcorder or VCR, and 
convert the analog signal to digital. Figure 4 shows a 
representation of a portion of the composite signal. The wavy 
line represents the brightness along one horizontal line — 



Perspective View 
of Phono Jack 




Video 



R L 




© © 


%\y^ [ 


© © 


0Out 


Audio 


Video 

( 





Phono Plug 



Figure 3: Phono Plugs and Jacks 



Brightness 




i |-«- 1 /256 of a Line 



1111 
1110 
1101 
1100 
1011 
1010 
1001 
1000 
0111 
0110 
0101 
0100 
0011 
0010 
0001 
0000 



o 
> 



CO 

■4— ' 

* — 

Q 

CD 



Figure 4: Digitization of a Composite Video Signal 



either the brightness associated with a black-and-white 
picture or the luminance associated with a color picture. 

Typical digitization is shown in the figure. A total of 256 
samples across the line are digitized. This amounts to dividing 
the line into 256 steps. For each step, the height of the 
brightness signal is sampled and converted to a digital value. 
Why 256 steps? Any number of steps could be used, the more 
the better. However, the CoCo 1 and 2 can display only 256 
pixels (picture elements) horizontally, so any more steps are 
overkill for those systems. 

Now here's a problem: The analog brightness signal 
represents an infinite number of levels. One small step in 
brightness results in influencing the electron beam shot out 
toward the screen. However, to digitize the brightness level, 
we can't have an infinite number of levels. Two levels, on and 
off, would be all right for displaying text. It takes one bit 
to store two levels — a 0 and a 1 can be used. Four levels 
would give four brightness levels on the screen. It takes two 
bits to store the digital form of the four levels — 00, 01, 10 
and 11. Eight levels would require three bits to store 000, 001, 
010, 011, 100, 101, 110 and 111. Sixteen levels require four 
bits — 0000, 0001, 0010, 0011, 0100, 0101, 0110, 0111, 1000, 
1001, 1010, 1011, 1100, 1101, 1110 and 1111. Although we'd 
like to have hundreds of levels, again, it's a kind of overkill 
— the human eye can't distinguish minute changes in 
brightness. Sixteen levels are a good compromise for 
digitization, and the four bits fit nicely into a byte of eight 
bits used in the CoCo. 

This digitization process continues for all the screen lines 
of a composite video picture. A normal television picture has 
525 lines. However, most VCRs and televisions are capable 
of a resolution of only 350 to 400 lines. This means, by the 
way, not that the screen will show only a partial picture, but 
that those lines will be spread over the screen from top to 
bottom. Again, the ideal is to digitize at least 525 lines, but 
since the original CoCo 1 and 2 display only 192 rows, 525 
lines would be overkill. 

A good compromise on digitization, then, is to digitize 256 
pixels horizontally for each line, and to digitize 256 lines. 
Each pixel is digitized to 16 different levels, held in four bits. 
The result is 65,536 samples, each four bits. Since each sample 
can be held in one-half of a byte, it takes 32,768 bytes to hold 
all of the samples. 

Another term for the 16 levels is "a gray scale of 16 levels," 
as each level represents a progressively darker shade of gray 
from white to black, at least for a black-and-white picture. 

Putting It All Together 

I wanted to start off digitizing as inexpensively as possible. 
Here's what I had to begin with: 

• CoCo 3 

• CM-8 monitor 

• Two disk drives 

• Y cable 

After perusing the ads in the RAINBOW, I settled on the 
least expensive Micro Works digitizer, the DS-69 with 
digitizing software, selling for $99.95. The DS-69 digitizes at 
a slower rate (two images per second) than the DS-69B (eight 
images per second). With the DS-69, 1 planned on using my 
VCR to generate a composite output for digitization. True, 
this would only allow me to digitize pictures from video tape, 
but I wanted to start small. 

Thanks to the miracle of overnight delivery, I had the DS- 



116 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



69 the next day. The DS-69 is a small interface, about the 
size of other CoCo ROM cartridges. It plugs into the 
cartridge slot on the side of the CoCo or into a Y cable, or 
so I thought. However, after reading over the Micro Works 
documentation, one thing was obvious — I needed a Multi- 
Pak interface. To verify this, I plugged in my Y cable and 
tried to run the software. The C-See software wouldn't 
recognize DS-69 while attached to the Y cable. 

Ah well, I thought, so I buy a Multi-Pak interface. I had 
avoided the ugly Multi-Pak for some time. It made the CoCo 
60 percent wider, and I was running out of room on my desks. 
I had to have one, however. Somewhere in the back of my 
mind, though, I remembered hearing something about the 
CoCo 3 and Multi-Paks. . . . 

Firing up my communications program, I checked into 
Delphi and scanned for messages relating to the Multi-Pak 
on the Color Computer SIG. I found a bundle. I noted a 
reference to Marty Goodman's article on the subject in the 
January 1987 issue of RAINBOW and read that. It appeared 
that Multi-Paks and the CoCo 3 have some compatibility 
problems that can be (partially) solved by a repair center 
update to the Multi-Pak. In spite of potential problems, I paid 
a visit to my local Radio Shack and bought a new version 
of the Multi-Pak. 

Plugging in the Multi-Pak, I tried it out. The disks 
appeared to be working properly in spite of the horror stories 
I had read. I tried running C-See, the Micro Works digitizer 
program. It also appeared to be working. I put the Multi- 
Pak update plans on hold. 

My next problem was getting something to digitize. 
Although my original plans for using a VCR sounded good 



at the time, I couldn't really find any images that held still 
for several seconds at a time. My VCR is an older model and 
doesn't have freeze-frarne. Besides, most VCRs, except for 
the newer digital models, freeze-frame poorly with "tear" 
lines across the bottom of the picture. I thought briefly of 
running a composite input from another computer to the 
phono jack input of the DS-69. That would work, but the 
program material wouldn't be that great. 

The only solution seemed to be to use a video camera. 
Unfortunately, I did not have a camcorder. I was waiting until 
the price dropped significantly below $1,000. Maybe a cheap 
monochrome camera, I thought ... By now, my budget for 
the project had been shot to Hades (one DS-69 plus shipping 
plus one Multi-Pak came to $180), but I was in too deep. 

I remembered that the ACP swap meet, a once-per-year 
extravaganza, was being held the next day, a Saturday. The 
next morning I rose early, carefully putting in my pocket 
protector and pens and strapping on my Ham Handy Talkie 
in my disguise as a computer nerd. 

I saw several color camcorders at prices close to $1,000. 
But then, rounding a corner, I saw what I was looking for 
— a surplus industrial closed-circuit television camera. 
(These cameras generally have composite video output). 
Perfect, and for $35. Offering $40 (business has never been 
my strong point), I closed the deal and drove away. 

On my way home, I made a detour to my friendly Radio 
Shack store and bought a converter plug to convert the BNC- 
type plug on the back of the camera to a phono jack. I also 
bought a video cable with phone plugs on each end. 

At home, I tried out the camera on my large monitor/ 
television, plugging the camera output into the VIDEO IN 




CoCo Cat 

SayiL 

NOT 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 117 



Come to Radio Shack for the Very 




Flight Simulator II/TM subLOGIC. Sub Battle Simularor/TM EPYX. Thexder/TM Sierra On-Line. Shanghai and Microscopic Mission/TM Activision. Where in the World is 
Carmen Sandiego?/TM Broderbund. OS-9 and BASIC09/TM Microware and Motorola, Inc. 



Tandy Computers: 
Because there is 
no better value ™ 



Best in Color Computer Software 




What a selection! 

At Radio Shack, we're dedicated to 
making sure that you never run out of 
ways to use and enjoy your Color 
Computer. We've got a terrific line of 
software— -here's just a sample. 

Games for the whole family 

Let your Color Computer open the 
door to an amazing world of fun and 
adventure. Radio Shack has a dazzling 
selection of games. 

You can become a pilot in Flight 
Simulator II, destroy enemy subs in 
Sub Battle Simulator, or track down a 
missing communications satellite in 
The Interbank Incident. 

Pop in an instant-loading Program 
Pak™ to explore a cave in Downland, 
or battle enemy robots in Thexder. 
Uncover hidden treasure in Spring* 
ster. Play Mahjong in Shanghai ... or 
play ball with Color Baseball. Dun* 
geons of Daggorath pits you against 
awesome beasts. Explore mazes in A 
Mazing World ofMalcom Mortar. 

Make learning fun 

One of the greatest potential uses of 
your Color Computer is giving your 
child a head start in education. 

Children will learn computer skills 
with BASIC-09™ Tour Guide. The 
Color Computer Artist may bf ing out 
the Van Gogh in your child! Geogra- 
phy is made easy in Where in the 
World is Carmen Sandiego? And Mi" 
croscopic Mission lets your child ex- 
plore the human body— from the 
inside out. 

Boost home productivity 

Our easy-to-use plug-in programs in- 
clude Spectaculator—a great spread- 
sheet and forecaster. Create a house- 
hold budget with Personal Finance. 
Word processing is easy with Color 



SCRIPSIT® IL And you'll have no 
more tiresome piles of paper with 
Color File II. 

Our disk-based DeskMate 3™ fea- 
tures seven popular applications from 
Paint to Text— all on one diskette. 
Phantomgraph helps you create com- 
plex charts and graphs. And for the 
writer of the house, Home Publisher 
creates newsletters and certificates 
with ease that are perfect for business, 
club, or church-related functions. 

Programming tools 

You'll find your Color Computer is 
much more than a game computer. 
Our programming software lets you 
fully enjoy the benefits of owning a 
home computer and designing and 
running your own programs. 

OS-9™ Level Two will let you pro- 
gram your own data system. The 
Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level Two is 
a complete tutorial. Create in Assem- 
bly language with Editor/Assembler 
Development System. And Multi-Vue 
is a user-friendly graphics interface for 
OS-9 Level Two programs. 

Come in today! 

Need more suggestions? Just clip 
out the coupon and send for a 1988 
Computer Catalog & Software Refer- 
ence Guide. Radio Shack is your one- 
stop software center. 



Send me a 1988 computer catalog. 



I 
I 
I 

I 
I 



Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. 88-A-708 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76T02 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



Phone 



I 
I 

I 

I 
I 




Radio /hack 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



TM 




Small 
Black/White 
TV 



75 Ohm to 
300 Ohm , 
Matching 
Transformer 



Y 



CM-8 
RGB 
Monitor 



DS-69 



Modulator 




IT 



VHF/UHF 
Splitter 



Monochrome 
TV Camera 



Figure 5: Final DS-69 Setup 




Figure 6 



phone plug on the back of the set. The picture wasn't bad, 
but what was that wiggly, meandering line across the screen? 
Then I remembered. Walking through the crowds at the swap 
meet, I had inadvertently pointed the camera up in the air. 
Since camera tubes are sensitive to strong light, I must have 
burned the tube face by pointing the camera at the sun. 
Another $35 wasted! 

I regrouped. Checking around, I found that new mono- 
chrome cameras ranged in price from about $160 to $400 
without lens. I located a supplier specializing in closed-circuit 
monochrome cameras and made the drive up to Anaheim. 
The demo camera was a Sanyo VCV1224 and had excellent 
resolution. I made the purchase, buying the camera without 
lens. My plan was to add a C-mount adapter so that I could 
use the lenses from my Canon camera. The C-mount adapter 
converts the screw-type fitting on the video camera so that 
a photographic lens can be mounted. 

I now had everything I needed. I took the camera home, 
plugged it in (it uses 24 volts DC, a plus since the camera 
can be moved a distance away from any monitor), and ran 
the cable output from the camera to the DS-69 input. Aiming 
the camera at my bookcase, I realized that I was not yet done 



buying equipment! Although by trial and error I was able 
to focus the camera by watching the digitization on the screen 
of the CoCo, I needed some way of monitoring the picture 
from the camera. My CM-8 is an analog monitor and does 
not take composite video input, so that was out. 

I considered the possibilities. I could buy a small televi- 
sion/monitor such as a Radio Shack Pocket TV, but 
unfortunately, the resolution on the inexpensive LCD models 
was not that good. I could buy a larger monitor, or I could 
use an existing TV and add a modulator. As described above, 
a modulator converts the composite video signal into a 
television signal that can be received on Channel 3 or Channel 
4. Since I had a small black-and-white TV, I opted for the 
modulator, only $29.95 at the Shack. I also had to buy several 
cables and adapters to split the signal for the "monitor" and 
DS-69 input. The setup is shown in Figure 5. 

After hooking everything up, I was ready to begin 
digitizing the world. . . . 

What the C~See Software Sees 

The basic task of the Micro Works C-See software is to 
control the digitizing of the video input. Digitized images can 
be displayed on the screen of the CoCo in black-and-white 
or color, saved on disk as files, retrieved from disk, or printed 
on a variety of Radio Shack printers. The brightness and 
contrast of the incoming video can be adjusted by the 
program, so that the software can compensate for lighting 
conditions used with the camera. 

When displayed on the screen, 128-by-128 or 256-by-256 
resolution can be used. Five levels of gray scale, 16 levels of 
gray scale, or color can be used for the display. The five levels 
of gray scale are digitized faster than 16 levels. The 16-level 
digitizing takes about 30 seconds in 256-by-256 mode. In all 
modes you can see the picture being digitized on the screen, 
and you can adjust the brightness and contrast. 

The color display mode displays a "false color" imaging 
(see Figure 6). In this type of display, the 16 gray scale 
(brightness) levels of the picture are equated to 16 different 
colors and then displayed on the CoCo 3. You have complete 
control of which colors are used by palette controls in the 
software (there's a color bar at the top of the screen). 

Figures 1 and 2 are taken off the CM-8, so you can see 
the exact way pictures are displayed on the CoCo screen. The 
figures are slightly squashed (I haven't gained that much 
weight), and the DS-69 has a width control that needs some 
adjustment. These pictures do not have the best contrast. 
Lighting is an important factor, and my lighting left 
something to be desired. 

In addition to the screen display, you can also print any 
five-level or 16-level picture. The CONFIG (configuration) 
program for C-See lets you choose from a menu of Radio 
Shack and non-Radio Shack printers. Unfortunately, my 
DMP-130 is not included — I chose the DMP-100 option 
and got good graphics printout, but the picture was 
somewhat flattened. 

Graphics Files 

One of the things I'm interested in is processing the raw 
video data in the files. Lots of things can be done with the 
video data — software zoom and windowing, image recog- 
nition, and video enhancement. 

C-See uses two types of video image files, a 128-by-128 file 
(8,192 bytes) and a 256-by-256 file (32,768 bytes). Data is held 
in these files the same way that data is held in memory during 
C-See operation. Video files can be accessed by basic 



120 THE RAINBOW June 1988 




The Best 




Can Buy 




HDS Floppy Drive Controller 




Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drive Specialist 
Floppy Drive Contra liar for the Color Computer. Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the bast available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 prn and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shack ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software, 
Completed end Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM $99, 

(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 

Completed and Tested Board without ROM ... $79. 

(Includes Case] 

Bare Board with Instruction manual ,$30. 
Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack HOM 14) > . ♦ * . . - - - , . $40, 



Of tssrirfl InlCriTOitiah . 

pl* WATS Ima 1g ptoC4 ycfti!" order tfiaa. ttiiSWrCard, or Wire Prurigo* Qf 
f-oil your ptvTTiartf direct in us */iy non CH^ili«J Ignda #||| ba hfl*.1 urlM prupfrr 
•clta'tpca 'I mad*. COO <KH«n are act#pi«| as aa curcrfraaa orders hom 
gOVirrurSfirtf Aff&tttlflf Most Mcrrta on? flUippwd oil fhB sHsil wild Ehti *>-{:rtp*ion cjl hp'tf 
-Invfl products IH*4 fa LUslbin bum. Uf!? ground is nw 5ilaiKl«rd mnnni of shipping 
li.'iiaas eilnar^g apecilir*a Shipping oasis nra &vaii»We i*pah re-qi^u. 



Drive 0 Complete . . 
Drive 1 Complete 
Drive 0 & 1 Dual Drive 



m i 



$199. 
$129. 
$319. 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 



1 -713-480 6000 
Order Line 1-900*231-6671 
16209 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, Texas 77059 



programs or other languages to allow you to do your own 
processing. 

Both the 128-by-128 files and the 256-by-256 files use 16 
gray scales. As I mentioned before, 16 gray scales are 
represented by 16 four-bit binary values. These values, called 
"nibbles" by some, are 0000, 0001, 0010, 0011, 0100, 0101, 
0110,0111, 1000, 1001, 1010, 1011, 1100, 1101, lllOand 1111. 

Each nibble takes one-half byte. 

A 128-by-128-by-4-bit image takes 128 * 128 * Vi bytes, 
or 8,192 bytes. A 256-by-256-by-4-bit image takes 256 * 256 
* Vi bytes, or 32,768 bytes. 

These bytes are arranged in column major form. This is 
a fancy way of saying that the x and y coordinates are 
transposed from CoCo video memory format. There are 128 
column values in the first column of a 128-by-128 digitization. 
The 64 bytes of column data are arranged in bytes 0 through 
63 ($00 through $3F) of the disk file data. The next column 
is held in bytes 64 through 127 ($40 through $7F) of the disk 
file data. This arrangement is shown in Figure 7. 

For 256-by-256 digitized data, the arrangement is similar, 
but each column takes 128 bytes (the first column is held in 
bytes 0 through $7F). 

I am now using a Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Series II Laser 
Printer. Since the C-See software doesn't support the 
LaserJet, I had to write my own driver to take advantage of 
the 300-dots-per-inch resolution of the LaserJet. The results 
are shown in figures 8 and 9, which are printouts of figures 
1 and 2. Each figure uses a type of halftone printing in which 
the 16 gray-scale levels print progressively darker points. I 
used eight gray-scale shadings, converting the 16 gray-scale 
levels to eight by dividing by two. 

The half-tone process is similar to newspaper photo 
screenings and is shown in Figure 10, which gives the dot 
configurations for the eight levels from white to black. 

Perhaps I can write more about this type of processing 
either next month or in the future. Some very interesting 
effects can be created, similar to the type of video processing 
that is done on television these days. 



7 6 5 4 3 2 10 



Nibble 1 



Nibble 2 



ByteO 



63 



Each Byte 
Consists of 
Two 4-Bit 
Nibbles 

63 



Column 0 
1 
2 
3 



Row 
0 


Row 
1 


Row 

2 


Row 
3 


Row 
4 


Row 
5 


1H 

(f 


Row 
252 


Row 
253 


Row 
254 


Row 
255 





128 x 128 x 4 Bits = 
8192 Bytes 



125 
126 
127 



// 


Row 
0 


Row 
1 


Row 

2 


Row 

3 


Row 
4 


Row 
5 




Row 
252 


Row 
253 


Row 
254 


Row 
255 



Byte 8128 8129 8130 



8190 8191 



Figure 7: Video Image File Format 




TIT. 



—.■Li | fchJ 1-1 3-- 
, i inJ ■ ■ ■ »J I • 
■ ■ ji i.jii i r*Tt I i 



. . . 



I !• L ■ J I I »_ I ffmmm p -1 - - - I J I IJ I TJ* ■ I ' 

\ ! [j!/ I .u-i 'lj.i" i ■ I 

. ._M- i li i i.-ijiij iJ-i I ■ i 'f-f f ! P r 
J. ,11 ...I. 

;-::::r!::ci[5;:^Jr,V, 

nii'.ii',; ::::;! 




.jjjjiiiiiiiiirrri! 
. i Jiihimtii ri i i n " ~ - 

. •■IILIklllll Blllllli^ 



I I I I I ■ I ■ ' 



■ : ; v. r 



...Lhhkkbi i i miin" 1 ■ -pi " ■ 1 r ■ 

.L.k-iLLi i n usirrpp-rrrrln^Ji ---- -. 
.k.^.ikLiiiniiiiiirri r ■ i I * ■ jr | I *r ■ ■ ■ 
Lllllbbli ■ i i inimrrrr' pi i ■ i I i r fc - 
, |, ■ ki.ii kii liiiiirrri pit-" i i » 1 1"" " " " " 
.L-k. l ■ Liu niirn" I ■ i I I * -- r - - - - ■ 



ijjjjjii?rrUfi4-| 
ijiimrrlii irn Ii 



E 2 fl a. ■ liiiji i t n nirPii"- skll ' ,,,M1, 1 

_ . . . 4 ■ ■ ■■■■■■■■■Jiii-P""- 

urMiliPiriiii"- 1 '"' .,, 

ijiir-jjikiimi J 4-i 1 1 ! ! ! 1 1 ! I ! . . . 

jjiiki l i i kf ■■■■i^iiii j-* \ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ! I 



■ ■ ■ 

i i i i i i i 



1 1 +4c 
i i i i i mi 1 



krrku n I i r* 
■ kinri ri i i rv i ■ tm 1 1 
..kkk. 1 !. i ■ i i i i ■ i ■ i i i 

k.i -ki i ri I rk *u~ 



... IIM«" ^""'"K'Ml L. ^ 

1 jj2 r- r ...iJUJJIlJllll^j/|4l|4l 

ITITui . , [.I.... jjiitfiiuiutn 

HHI'TI ■ ■iiM i - --mvr*' ' ' • I I IlilUlkkl 



!, 



i ■■JJiimiiri 
... iimiiiirrri 

■ i i i i i i i ri ■ rp* 

i.N 1- 11 II I I. I I I 



I PI I ! ■ 

ri I i i i 



lira 

•I i p ■ 
j i it 



■ i p ■ i ■ ■ 

BBBB BB1 IT PP 

1 I * 



ipa3 i I ri f^rppf ffM"""" 1 - 

uajjj i i 1 1 i i ! ! ! T; 

.-■j- j i»l t!tM.M 

i i i i i pp+rr: . . fc 
i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




i .mi nrrrrr 
I j> i nriir rr- I i - - ■ p* -- * 
..kiikkkii i l ii|J"^' -piibi 
' if'"" i i iiiiiiPiriPiriP 
-ril44+H u ' JM1iaaa !![ [' 

ir^TJuiili'JiaiiiiPPi rri i i 1 



ikimrrr 



• • • - • i bbbi% 

iniii nni 

iiniirr 1 ,i-iiii 

•uniirrii-Mi 

„iiiiiiiiiiiiiirrPrpp , f"|"'CM i l 11 

-"■■■miripppp-"i""E i £JP'!;L 

a- mum r.ppp-p fc "' t±Zl\ Pr-4 i 

JJiiriPi r--" ■";"5^---.3-i kPiii 



LBPBLLirri ■ p rfTlTt 
-*1h3ii- >|BiBBBBlBLflflBBi "PiPi ,, ""M ' 

. « a . ■ . . IJJJJJJJ.-J4II •iriPP"P' 

uiii | |fliijiipii ■ - ' ifpprrii- 

! I I j LL| IJ Jil»»l«l'»"»> ■ kliBPPBm 

. I - MiTl JJa-aar ...i ------ 

• inn Ri T fct (3 B1, 

— 

..bahLBMBibr far' ■ « i i ■- 



■ ipipprr k> kLI 1 i*i*Lk - ■ ■ ■ kjj'i 
iiippii I -I I N 4^ * ■ J t L 1 ■ 

■ ■PBri-miniTt , ""J! i ^"l" 

■ kki i i i UIIJI111H i - " i - * * " ' 

.... I I I I I I I 1 IT 111111 PBJTfl-P ■ 

kkUJJIIIH Pll BIBB! BBPf B I 

llllllllllli B B B ■ akP if 1 ■ 

I J I jaBBVBBB I B fl B a I I b a I 

ft. j i i i a i I ii j iiijj uiii 
ij jjjjjja a a a m**! ■ a- 



pippr- 

, .iiipirn 

kBIla 




.iBBBi^rf Crr 
/in-* r* 

• " 1 1 W B P B f 



inn 

£L 

■ ■ 

■ i i i i ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 
i p i ■ I n m m m 

■ kkl I I I I I ' 

-■■■■IjLi.bi ptrpi 

. /kkkkl 

a- ^-i ^i 



\\ ! '. J"" ' ... 

fyaaaaJ- - - J a . - ft- «. - ■ 

..:::.!:: :;;!^L"- ; 
:::::BBPr:L:r_:;::: :J ^S3i t: J 

i imv i-p-ri 
■ i i i iiiimip 



.jippprrp 
.■■ppn r i 

klllPPI I 



i*i lAir 
■ ■■■i.lr 



■ ■■■■Mri.1 
iliitliisi 



■i-i ■ 



tl ! . Ill ripijBfii.-l.bLII 




. — <i. ijjihjj4| 

11Z \m'. .^aa-i 
..• aia 
. .-aaa 

irn nrni ■ I 


! 


JBBP 
1IB1 
1BBB 
1 1 «^ 
. I fl 1 ■ 
..II 


..in i ii 
.. i i i i i i i 

-iai ■ ■ I I I 
..." kiPii r pi 

■ *TIT1 < 1 Tiiii 




LI 1 1 
Iflfifl 
. . J 
. 1 

. ia 




. i ------- • 

jjiiiiI vfrfJi 

■!!!!:::-:::: 



• ii i ■iiiiniif 
' i ia i fiii j i ri r - 

i I II I III111 I ft BBB1 
L.Lk.i IkkfiBllllB 

.flkiifli.fi-a-a i ■ i b fl 

IfiP* 



i44IPt1 



urn 



mi .fail i ri 
, i kiui i nr 
ki I I I I I ii I 



I I LB I I 

JLailial 



Figure 8 




■ ■■ii «rr 



•■EH 



. Ill 
. . 

All " 





- 1 1 1 1 

_ INI 






Lpbb 1 


















■ .j i i - i 'it 1 ■lSH' 


mm 1 




1111 "L* " 7 »4- •La-a. - - a a insprnl 

T * - rrr?3iM"i*ifcip 



Figure 9 



Thoughts About the Project and the DS-69 

This is not really an objective review of the DS-69. From 
the time I saw the first digitization, I was hooked! The Micro 
Works hardware works as represented, the software is high- 
quality, and the documentation is adequate. Pm having a 
great time digitizing everything within camera range. 

The digitization project turned out to be a little more 
expensive than first imagined. Here's a breakdown: 



DS-69 
Multi-Pak 

Monochrome camera 
Modulator 
Cables, adapters 



$104.50 
74.20 
170.00 
31.75 
18.75 

$399.20 



If you have your own camcorder, monitor and Multi-Pak, 
you can probably get by for under $125. Even my expendi- 
ture, however, is relatively inexpensive when the prices of 



122 THE RAINBOW June 1988 




hardware and software for the Tandy 1000 systems and MS- 
DOS systems are considered. Once again, CoCo prices are 
a real bargain. 

I showed my friend Ron, a dyed-in-the-wool IBM main- 



frame and IBM PC bigot, the results on the CoCo. He uttered 
the highest praise that such a person can give. "I'm im- 
pressed!" he said. So am I. 
See you next month with more CoCo topics. 



NEW FROM K-SOFT 



FROGDAY AFTERNOON 



m 



It ain't easy being a Frogman, and 
somebody's gotta keep the subs and 
torpedos and squids off his back. 
That's you! 

You won't want to quit! 

8 Levels - Disk only 
Not Protected - Coco 3 only 



ZANDAR 

(See Feb. and March Ads in Rainbow) 



$24.95 each 
Spring Special 
Save $15 - Both for $34.90 

WA State residents add 7.5% sates tax 
Overseas send U.S. Money Order 

Check - Money Order - C.O.D. 
Phone (509) 884-0338 

K-Soft 
300 13th N.E. 



ViSA' 



E. Wenatchee, WA 98802 



00 

oo 

On 
rH 



TEXTF0RM 




m 

CN 



oo 

CO 



on 



O 



CO 
4-J 

O 

■3 

O 

u 

PL. 



•H < 
O 

CD & 
CO 



m 

00 

-ee- 



O <r 

4-1 CN 
CO tH 
CD CN 

LP) 



CO tH 

CO w 
CO 
•H 

a 

I ) 

a 



CD 
O 

Tj RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



O 

o 

CO 

•ee- 

^ ccj 
M 

O CO 

>4 H 

CD 

CD ^ 
25 O 



U Q OX) 
CD • C 
X) O *H 

S • 9- 

O O Cu 

•H 

^ • & 

CD X CO 

S O 
CO M-4 
~ CD 

• rH O 

Q cOO 

• CO • 

O oo 

O CO 
CD CO 
_d CO M 

O 4-1 QJ 

P T> 
••(DM 

CO X) O 
P *H 
M CO i — I 
CD CD rH 

H J-4 <C 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 123 



T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE CONTINUES IT 



ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 

COVER 1 
RACETRACK 
HANGMAN 
MUSIC ALBUM 
LIFE EXPECTANCY 
WORD TESTS 
KILLER MANSION 
BARTENDER 
CALENDAR 
ROBOT WAR 

ISSUE #2, AUGUST 1982 

UFO COVER PT 1 

BIORHYTHM 

BOMBARDMENT 

BLACKJACK 

COST OF LIVING 

FRENZY 

BUSINESS LETTER 
QUICK THINK 
QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 
QUEST FOR LENORE 

ISSUE #3, SEPTEMBER 1982 

UFO COVER PT 2 
BASKETBALL 
CHUCKLUCK 
SLOT MACHINE 
ALPHABETfZER 
NFL PREDICTIONS 
FLAG CAPTURE 
ROBOT BOMBER 

ISSUE #4, OCTOBER 1982 

UFO RESCUE 

TANK BATTLE 

DRIVEWAY 

SOUNDS 

BALLOON DROP 

MIND BOGGLE 

COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 

CALORIE COUNTER 

JACK-O-LANTERN 

ISSUE #5, NOVEMBER 1982 

CATALOG COVER 
BOWLING 

PROGRAM INVENTORY 

PROMISSORY-LOANS 

CHECKBOOK BALANCER 

TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 

CONVOY 

BAG-IT 

SPECTRA SOUND 
CONVEYOR BELT 

ISSUE #6. DECEMBER 1982 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
RAINDROPS 
STOCK MARKET 
ADVANCED PONG 
DESTROY 
SOUND ANALYZER 
CREATIVITY TEST 
VOICE DATA 
ML TUTORIAL PT 1 
LOONY LANDER 

ISSUE #7, JANUARY 1983 

NEW YEARS COVER 
LIST ENHANCER 
SUPER PRECISION DIV. 
BOMB DIFFUSE 
SPACE STATION 
ML TUTORIAL PI 2 
SHOOT OUT 
FIND UTILITY 
CYRORG INS. 
CYBORG FACES 



ISSUE #8, FEBRUARY 1983 

COVER 8 
DEFEND 

3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 
COCO CONCENTRATION 
AUTO LINE NUMBERING 
ML TUTORIAL PI 3A 
ML TUTORIAL PI3B 
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 
DUAL BARRIER 
BRICKS 

ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

TIME MACHINE COVER 
TRIG DEMO 
PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 
PROGRAM PACKER 
BUDGET 

ELECTRONIC DATEBOOK 
ML TUTORIAL PI 4 
TAPE DIRECTORY 
BLOCK-STIR 

COCO ADDING MACHINE 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 

TENTH COVER 
PYRAMID OF DANGER 
TYPING TUTOR 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 5 
T1NYCALC 

STOCK MARKET COMP 
YAH-HOO 
MISSILE ATTACK 
SCREEN PRINT 
BRIKPONG 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 

ELEVENTH COVER 
ARCHERY 
FROG JUMP 
ML TUTORIAL PI 6 
MLT DICTIONARY 
BASIC SPEED UP TOT. 
METRIC CONVERTOR 
GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 
GRAPHICS PROGRAM 
CATERPILLAR CAVE 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 

TWELFTH COVER 
SHOOTING GALLERY 
BOMB STOPPER 
VALLEY BOMBER 
STARFIGHTER 
WHEEL OF FORTUNE 
ML TUTORIAL PI 7 
MERGE UTILITY 
RAM TEST 
LANDER 

ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 

THIRTEENTH COVER 
FLASH CARD 
ICE BLOCK 
COSMIC FORTRESS 
MAIL LIST 
DOLLARS & CENTS 
ML TUTORIAL PI 8 
SDSK COPY 
MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 
CRAWLER 

ISSUE #14, AUGUST 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
ROW BOAT 

COMPUTER TUTL P1 1 
INDEX DATABASE 
DISKZAPPER 
COCO-MONITOR 
COCO-ARTIST 
ROBOT COMMAND 
TEST SCREEN PRINT 
HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 



ISSUE #15, SEPTEMBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER PI 2 
GOLD VALUES 
TREK INSTRUCTIONS 
TREK 

HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 
ASTRO DODGE 
DR. COCO 
PEG JUMP 
MORSE CODE 
PURGE UTILITY 

ISSUE #16, OCTOBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
BOPOTRON 
DIRECTORY RECALL 
VECTOR GRAPHICS INST 
VECTOR GRAPHICS 
SKYDIVER 

SWERVE AND DODGE 
NIMBO BATTLE 
TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 
LIFE GENERATIONS 

ISSUE #17, NOVEMBER 1983 

THANKSGIVING COVER 

3-DTIC-TAC-TOE 

INDY500 

COLLEGE ADVENTURE 
MEMORY GAME 
DUNGEON MASTER 
WEATHER FORECASTER 
GRID FACTOR INST 
GRID FACTOR 
DRAW 

ISSUE #18, DECEMBER 1983 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
CLIMBER 

GALACTIC CONQUEST 
WARLORDS 
STATES REVIEW 
MATH TUTOR 

MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 
PRINTER UTILITY INST. 
PRINTER UTILITY 
MUTANT WAFFLES 

ISSUE #19, JANUARY 1984 

BANNER 
PROBE 

DISK DIRECTORY PROTECTOR 
OPTICAL CONFUSION 
WORD PROCESSOR 
WORD SEARCH 
ASTRONAUT RESCUE 
STAR TRAP 
PIE CHART 
FORCE FIELD 

ISSUE #20, FEBRUARY 1984 

INTRODUCTION: 
HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 
ESCAPE ADVENTURE 
SEEKERS 
MASTER BRAIN 
LIST CONTROLLER 
DISKETTE CERTIFIER 
ROM COPY 
BASIC RAM 
SNAFUS 

ISSUE #21, MARCH 1984 

BASIC CONVERSIONS 
FINANCIAL ADVISE 
CASTLE STORM 
DOS HEAD CLEANER 
COCO TERMINAL 
SNAKE CRAWLER 
WAR CASTLE 
SKY FIRE 
EASY BASIC 
DOTS 3-D 



ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 

HEALTH HINTS 
GLIBLIBS 

CLOTHER SLITHER 
BIBLE 1 & 2 
BIBLE 3 & 4 
CATCH ALL 
INVADER 
ALIEN RAID 
MOON ROVER 
10 ERROR IGNORER 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 
STOCKS OR BOMBS 
WALL AROUND 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK Pit 
NUCLEAR WAR INST 
THERMONUCLEAR WAR 
CIRCUIT DRAWER 
MOUSE RACES 
SUPER-SQUEEZE 
DATA FALL 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 

DIR PACK & SORT 
BRICK OUT 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PI 2 

USA SLIDE PUZZLE 

51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 

51 *24 SCREEN 

CITY INVADERS 

PRINTER SPOOLER 

STEPS 

SNAKE 

ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PI 3' 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEY MAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDITOR INST 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLE BUSTER 
RECOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUGUST 1984 

PEEK, POLE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 
O-TEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
COCO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

ISSUE #27, SEPTEMBER 198 

COCO TO COM 64 

GALACTIC SMUGGLER 

INDY RACE 

ACCOUNT MANAGER 

CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 

STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 

SPACE DUEL 

BUGS 

TRAP-BALL 

BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCTOBER 19&4 

HANGINGTREE 
CHECKERS 
FOOTBALL * 
MORE PEEKS, POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RAT ATTACK 



ISSUE #29, NOVEMBER 191 

DISK ROLL OUT 
ROBOT ON 
MUITIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
QUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 



1984 



ISSUE #30, DECEMBER 

MATH HELP 
ZECTOR ADVENTURE 
WORLD CONQUEST 
DRAG RACE 
MINE FIELD 
T-NOTES TUTORIAL 
T & D PROGRAM INDEXER 
SYSTEM STATUS 
ERROR TRAP 
DROLL ATTACK 

ISSUE #31, JANUARY 1985 

TREASURES OF BARSOOM 
BATTLE GROUND 
STRUCTURED COMPILED LANGUA 
LIBRARY MODULE 
MINIATURE GOLF 
STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEBRUARY 1985 

DR. SIGMUND 

ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 

LOTTERY ANALYST 

BASIC COMPILER 

MUSIC CREATOR 

MEANIE PATROL. --<:■-..■ 

TRI-COLOR CARDS - / ; ) 

SHAPE RECOGNITION : - : :<-r : 

DISK BACKUP '7 : ^\':: 

SPACE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MARCH 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 
PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
ML DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 
DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEED KEY 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

HOVER TANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSIC GENERATOR 
. FYR-DRACA 
DRIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 

SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 
SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
HAUNTED HOUSE 



VISA 




SUPER SAVINGS 

Single Issue $8.00 

2-5 Issues $6.00 ea. 

6-10 Issues $5.00 ea. 

11 or more Issues . $4.50 ea. 
All 67 Issues $185.00 

Purchase 20 or more issues and 
receive a free 6 month subscription 



Every Issue Contains 
10 or More Programs 
Many Machine Language 
Programs 

Available for COCO I, Hand 
All Programs Include 
Documentation 



We send 
1 st Class 
No Charge 

Personal 

Checks 

Welcome! 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



BACK ISSUE SALE OFOVER 670 PROGRAMS! 



ISSUE #36. JUNE 1985 

SEliGf A GAMES 
VIDEO COfWli^ TIZEft 
SPEECH SVNThCSIS 
SPEECH RtCOGWmOh 
SfrSGE LAB 
MJTCi CEXMMtfl 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 

WJIGHTAIW THE WBNRWTh 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING OUG 

ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 

CHESS WASTE* 
SI&LE 5-7 

SHIP WfiE* ADVENTURE 

file transfer 
sour in a now 

TAPE CONTROLLER 
AlfaUttK 

ISSUED, AUGUST 19tt 

WIZARD YMN T URE 
KITE DESIGN 
ROBOTS 

amulet qf rower 

L*JE COPV UDLfTY 
DISti PLUMBER 
SUPER. RAM CPEC-ViER 
GRAPHIC NQH5E PACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPTEMBER 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
CAP MANAGER 
SCUEE2E PLAV 
SUP£R BACKUP 

ClPE MACHNf; 
AMTI<AIACrWT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 

mLKlNG ALPHABET 
SUPER W)F^ 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

ISSUE #40, OCTOBER 19B& 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
C0C0-7>fi£| 
DISK LABELER 
Shf.PWAfi 
EL£CTHIC COST 
MUL71KEV BUFFER 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KJNG 
SANO HOYCT 

ISSUE NOVEMBER 1985 

GRJMPS 

disk drive speed test 
soar conoue&t 
gas cost 

fllMEWCflLD MtSSrDN 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 
GRAIWTEST 
GRAPHIC LOQPV 
BOLD PRINT 

ISiUE #42. DECEMBER 1985 

HOWE PRODUCT EWLUATftfy 
YAH TZ EE 
DISK UTILFY 
MAJGHH 

EI.ET^fiOJfC fliLLflOAftD 
CAP CKASE 

SUPER MANSION ADVENTURfi 
SUOr WCHINP. GIVE AWAV 
TEXT BUFFER 
"UNNELRUli 



ISSUED JANUARY 1«« 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER COST 
ZlGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHCRD5 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
b UN FIGHT 
KEYrAD ENTRY 
BTVX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #«, FEBRUARY 19S6 

HOME 'NVEilTORV 
NME BALL 
FRNTEF REVlEVJ 
EJtPLOTER ADVENTURE 
SRANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 

ISSUE #45, MARCH 1986 

inccm^ property mm. 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COLO KEDtO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
I IBERTY SHIP 
SINGLE STEP RUN 

ISSUE #46, APftH 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DUSK LOCK 

SMALL SJSINESS MANAGER 
BGMB RL^ 



TAT* PITS 
RASE&ALt 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

*WIAETT€ 

GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1906 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
SLACK HfrE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFr 
BUG SPRAY 
CrtARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOIIRNEY 
■SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL EHRGR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #46. JUNE J9B6 

CHESTER' 
TV SCHEDULE 
BJ^E RACE 
ROfAftig NUMERALS 
ASTaOCOOGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
ML'lTI COPY 
AUTO MATE 
SCROll PROTECT 
WC1SE CENFRATCR 

ISSUE #49. JULY19G6 

CC^PUTEft I.O.U. 
DISK DISASSEMBLER 
3AKCHEK 
RACHW 
STOCK CHARTING 
HAuNtEUSrAlFKJA&t 

CANYON bobbers 

GRA6GN5 i & 2 

GRAPHS SCROLL ROUTINE 

A'JTD BORC€Fl 



IBSUEMO. AUGUST 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D40 ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCC-RES 
BARN STCFMING 
SF/ASH GAME 

ISSUE #11, SEPTEMBER 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET 51 
WJ GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 

ISSUE i*52, OCTOBER I9B6 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 

Invasion 

THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOT RACE 
SLIPPY THE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
AhLE BUILDERS 
SUPER EPPOP 2 

ISSUE #53, NOVEMBER 1986 

CQREKIU 

LUGKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 

NICE LIST 

Quizzes 

RAIKT EDFOR 
CAVEfiN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK. GUY 

ISSUE #54. DECEMBER 

>OBLDG 
PEGS 

DJGTTAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLf ADVENTURE 
PAlMT COCO S 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TVFE 
RftNSR TANKS 
MRSPAC 
B&NUM 

ISSUE #5$, JANUARY 1997 

GfiADE BOOK 
MAIL LiST 
DOWN HILL 
FlRfi ^0>: 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
CnR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS EOEOEP 
CDSMt RA*£ 

ISSUE FEBRUARY \W 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRUSH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WOflCnDlfGK 
ALIEN HUNT 
GEMOTS CAS R. E 
PICTURE DRAW 
DO 



ISSUE #57, MARCH 1987 

THE BAKERY 
ENCHANTED VALLtY AUW 
SAPE KEEPER 
WAR I 

boms psabue 

P^ANO FLAYER 
5^EAD 5HEET 
?^OT J i1ANELfv"ER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEAHCri 

ISSUE m t APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS RAYA&.H 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANEL^G helper 

MLlTl CA<£S 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
■flEIFOO 

ISSUE #5$, MAY 1987 

GENE<XQGY 

HOME PIANT SELECTION 

C^CK WRITER 

HELIflESCUE 

ttABOOM 

NEW PONG 

CPOQUF 

FUNCTION K6Y5 

200M 

ElECTRDNICS 2 

ISSUE #60. JU«NE 19&T 

JOB COSTING 
LABELS 
CATCH A CAKE 
COOO MATCH 
ROBOTS 
STREET FACERS 
BOAllMG 3- 

ElECIRfJNIOS 3 

GRAFIK 

KRON 

ISSUE #61 JULY 1987 

EZQP0F3 

SUBMISSION WHiTEF 
KEYS ACWEKTURE 
WALLPAFEF 
CHOPPEH COMMAND 
UNDDlSfANDir^ OPPOSES 
m CODE PLO^C 
tL^CTBCWCS IV 
K2NG PEDE 
RAIDER 

ISSUE m AUGUST 1987 

PENSION MANAGEMENT 
HERB GflOMNd 
CATALOGER UTlUTY 
RAIDERS 
ALPHABET ZING 
W.FG. 

ELECrflOWICSV 

RAMe0.iD\'ErHrrURE 

BLOCKS 

MbLtj SCREEN CAVES 

ESSUE #63, SEPTEMBER 19&T 

GE*IE0LCGIST HELP€a 
SMART COPY 

MAINTENANCE REPORT&JG 
COCO 1-COCO ? HELPEfi 
&JRECTORV PICTURE 

Sub &t rACK 
SAVE THE MVOEK 
CAVIATOR 
ELEOTRCNICSV* 
MONKEY SMiNE 



ISSUE m t OCTOBER 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FOHT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE m THE GPASS 
CYCILE JUMP 
GEOMETPv TUTOR 
WIZARD 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS VH 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 

ISSUE m t NOVEMBER 1987 

TAXMAN 

DAISY WHEel PICTURES 
SIP E&GfiERT 
CRCWN CUE&l 
flYM KHAW. 
CCCC- 3 DRAWER 
'OCT&ALL 
ELECTRONICS 3 
CHOP 

ISSUE #66, DECEMBER 1937 

O^E ROOM AO^ENTURt 
OS9 TUTORIAL 
RWEFI CAPTAfJ 
SOUND EFFECTS 
BET7IMG POOL 
ADVANCE 
MATH TABLES 
ELECTflONlCS 3 
LCAtfl TO UPPER 
Kt3iPS 

ISSUE #67, JANUARY l&BE 

AUEHO LIBRAfTT 
SAVE THE tAfTTK 
'.VEiGrtTSAifJD MEASURES 
LOM/RES PICTURES 
i^OflD COUNTER 
BACARAT 
BATTLE SHIP 
ELECTTWNIC5 10 
TAPE CONVENIENCE 
PIfflQIIlN 



* saAt received my 
ttftfer atwf % am 
pjiid.vwf / i K 'rfc/rj.yert is *x 

/ ma put/I- /j/ E^rSi^z r. 'jjfie 



_ 



MAIL TO: 



Name 



T & D Subscription Software 

2490 Miles Standish Drive 
Holland, Michigan 49424 
(616) 399-9648 



Address 

City _ 



State 



ZIP 




Credit Card # 
Expires 



TOTAL AMOUNT $ 



CIRCLE ISSUES DESIRED 

1 9 17 25 33 41 49 57 65 

2 10 18 26 34 42 50 58 66 

3 11 19 27 35 43 51 59 67 

4 12 20 28 36 44 52 60 

5 13 21 29 37 45 53 61 

6 14 22 30 38 46 54 62 

7 15 23 31 39 47 55 63 

8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 

PLEASE CIRCLE 
TAPE or DISK 




CiririESOFT 



Presents 




MaKsound? 



Tom Di Marco Sr. and his son, Tom Di Marco Jr., join in the fun in the demonstration 
program for Maxsound. The demo shows how Maxsound can be used in conjunction with 
graphics. 



Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



Maxsound 
Breaking the Sound Barrier 



Eyes in the audience glow with 
wonder, and imaginations run rampant 
as the performance continues. No, it 
isn't a magician they are witnessing. 
Rather, it is Maxsound, an audio dig- 
itizer that is bringing a new era to the 
CoCo Community. But to many, Max- 
sound is magic in its own right. 

Maxsound, written by Don Lucas of 
Lucas Industries 2000 and marketed 
exclusively through Gimmesoft, is a 
major commercial application of sound 
digitization for the Color Computer. 
Unlike other CoCo digitizers we've 
seen, Maxsound is designed to accept 
nearly any type of sound input and then 



allow the user to manipulate the digital 
sound image in memory. 

' When I first received the package, [ 
was excited by the idea of digitized 
sound but at the same time somewhat 
skeptical. Surely the results couldn't be 
that great. And when I read the manual 
and learned there were so many options, 
I just knew this package was going to 
be too complex for most users (includ- 
ing me). But it would have been difficult 
for me to have been more wrong — I 
had a complete sample of digitized 
sound running 10 minutes after I 
opened the package (and that included 
creating a backup disk). 



Maxsound is a hardware/ software 
digital recorder/ sequencer designed for 
128K and 512K CoCo 3s. The package 
includes three disks, a complete user's 
manual and a cable to connect the 
CoCo 3 to an audio source. The soft- 
ware includes the Maxsound program, 
several utilities and plenty of demon- 
strations on how to gain the maximum 
benefit from Maxsound. Helpful exam- 
ples showing how to interface digitized 
sound with basic and machine lan- 
guage programs are also provided. 

Four main menus are used in Max- 
sound. Most of the "play" functions are 
included on menus 1 and 2, which give 
the user the ability to manually play the 
digitized sound. Menu 3 is referred to 
as the Disk Routines menu and allows 
for the loading and saving of sound 
files. The final menu is the Sequencer 
menu. 

What are MaxsouncTs capabilities? A 
sound sample you have recorded in 



126 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



memory can be played forward or 
backward at nearly any speed (speed is 
controlled using the Playback Delay 
option). This leads to some rather 
unusual effects. And the magic of it is 
that it takes only a few quick keystrokes 
to play the digitized sound in either 
direction. It surely beats ruining the 
stylus on your turntable by turning the 
record backward when looking for 
those "hidden messages." 

Maxsound also allows the user to 
define the starting and ending points of 
the sound sample. So, if you record 
more than what you want or need into 
memory, you can change the size of that 
sample. In fact, you have control down 
to the byte over just what part of the 
digitized sample you want to keep. And 
then you can save it to disk or manip- 
ulate it further. To simplify the task of 
locating specific points in the sample, 
the user can simply press 0 (zero) while 
the sound is being replayed; the current 
memory location will be printed on the 
screen. This is important; in a 512K 
CoCo 3 the start and end points can 
take on values from 0 to 507,57 1 . Trying 
to guess just where a certain point is 
would be difficult without this little 
addition. 

Menu 1 includes an option for loop- 



While many Color Computer users are 
willing to sit back and wait for someone 
else to provide the software, others do 
th&ir best to realize the full potential of 
|lie machine. Don Lucas, of Alliance, 
Ohio, is just such a CoCo user. Don 
started with the CoCo back in 1984. He 
quickly became frustrated about the lack 
of support for the things he saw in the 
CoCo. Rather than accept that situation, 
he chose to do what he could to change 
it. Don says, "The things I wanted to do 
with my CoCo weren't available from 
others, so I taught myself everything I 
could about the system. If there wasn't a 
way to do something, I made a way to 
do it * ... 

Being the hobbyist that he is, Don was 
probably the first CoCo enthusiast to 
actually computerize a car with a CoCo. 
He soon had his Datsun B-210 operating 
like Kitt in the TV series Knight Rider. 
Complete with front scanner and swish- 
ing sound effects, it was the basis for 
Maxsound, Because sound digitization 
was not supported by anyone else, and a 



ing the sound sample. In other words, 
it is possible to have Maxsound contin- 
ually cycle through the selected portion 
of the memory contents. 




Another option offered on Menu 1 is 
Sampling Delay. Using this option to 
change the delay value alters the 
number of samples, or analog to digitial 
conversions, taken each second in the 
recording mode. The default value is 
zero, which sets up Maxsound for 
15,000 samples per second. In a 512K 
machine, this allows for about 35 sec- 
onds of recorded sound. You can in- 
crease the amount of recording time 
available by decreasing the number of 
sound samples per second. The tradeoff 
is sound quality. It decreases as fewer 
samples are used and as the samples are 
taken farther apart in time. For speech, 



Knight Rider car (Don calls his Datsun 
"Viper") wouldn't be complete without 
sound, Don found a way to do it. 

As has been the case with other proj- 
ects Don has worked on, the sound 
effects idea quickly grew into what we 
now know as Maxsound. Other contrib- 
uting factors include Don's interest in 
music, "However," he says, " while I like 
music, I am most certainly not inclined 
to enter all that data/' Maxsound gives 
him the ability to make the music sound 
the way he wants without the fuss. 
Don adds, "Also, I think there are a lot 
of CoCo users out there who are really 
proud of their graphics creations. But 
adding PLRY statements is a little bother- 
some. Maxsound will allow them to 
enhance their graphics presentations 
with music. This just opens another 
creative avenue for those people." 

Other projects Don has worked on 
include a CoCo-operated alarm system 
that not only tells you where the break- 
in occurred, but will follow the intruder 
as he moves through the building. 



Tom Di Marco 
The Founder of 
Gimmesoft 

Gimmesoft was created in early 1987 
as a direct outgrowth of the introduction 
of the Radio Shack Color Computer 3. 
Owner Tom DiMarco, Sr., had written 
several programs for his personal use. 
When the CoCo 3 was introduced, it 
became necessary to rewrite much of his 
software to work with the new machine. 
"The first program I modified was 
FKeys" he said. "Because I was involved 
with rewriting and also because of the 
opportunity created by the CoCo 3, 1 
decided to market my work." 

In May 1987 Gimmesoft attended its 
first RAINBOWfest. The company's 
product line at that time included FKeys 
HI, Custom Palette Designer and Six 
Drive. Since that time, Gimmesoft has 
added several new products, including 
Auto Dim, MPI-CoCo Locking Plate 
and V-Term. Also, Gimmesoft's opera- 
tion has expanded to include products 
offered by other third -party vendors. 

Product design at Gimmesoft may be 
handled differently from that at most 
other companies. "I don't design things 
in order to sell them," DiMarco said. 
"The products we offer were created 
mostly for myself. I don't really sit back 
and try to dream up new products. 
However, we are always looking for 
possible additions to our product line 
from other vendors and especially from 
independent programmers." This is how 
Gimmesoft came to market Maxsound. 

Don Lucas, programmer of Max- 
sound, and Gimmesoft arrived at a 
mutually beneficial agreement in order to 
provide the CoCo Community with the 
package. And this may very well open a 
new marketing area for Gimmesoft as 
well as create greater interest in the Color 
Computer as a professional tool. At the 
same time, there are those who see other 
aspects to Maxsound. DiMarco admits, 
"Well, I was a singer for 10 years, and I 
do dabble with the keyboard. All that 
aside, I love Maxsound and the kids love 
it, too. I'd really like to see someone write 
a game using all the capabilities of the 
package." 

The future looks bright for this young 
company from Perry Hall, Maryland. Its 
product line is growing and the Com- 
munity is buying. Yet one of the most 
important factors to success is the fun 
involved. And it is apparent that, while 
it is in a serious business, Gimmesoft 
hasn't lost sight of the old adage, "Half 
the fun is in getting there." 



Don Lucas 

The Programmer Behind Maxsound 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 127 



this isn't too important. However, with 
music samples, the user will want to use 
the greatest number of samples possi- 
ble. 

Menu 2, the Recorder Memory Sta- 
tus menu, offers control over the start 
and end points of the music sample as 
mentioned above. In addition, this 
menu allows the user to set up as many 
as seven jump point locations. After you 
define these, you simply press an asso- 
ciated number key to jump to any 
location in the sound sample as it is 
played. 

The saving and loading of sound 
samples is handled through the Disk 
Routines menu. Maxsound allows the 
user to save samples in one of two 
formats: Maxsound or Game. The 



Maxsound format is used for files to be 
loaded back into Maxsound for further 
manipulation. To support the vast 
amount of memory available, this fea- 
ture will prompt the user to change 
disks when the current disk is full. Keep 
in mind that a full recorder in a 512K 
machine can hold over 500K of data and 
that a standard disk can hold only about 
156K. The Game format supports files 
up to 156,000 bytes in length. 

The Game format is offered for those 
who want to interface sound samples 
from Maxsound with their BASIC or 
machine language programs. In fact, 
Maxsound includes a utility, Interfac, 
which makes this interface an easy task. 
I found Interfac to be quite easy to use. 
Learning a few simple concepts is all 



that is required, and most of the work 
. is done for you. The manual contains a 
wealth of information to guide you. In 
addition, several examples are provided 
in the manual and on the included disks. 

Other options on Menu 3 include 
Granules Free, Directory and Kill file. 
I feel these are good examples of the 
"small" things that make any program 
more user-friendly. 

Once the user has become familiar 
with the way Maxsound works, he will 
want to move on to Menu 4, the Se- 
quencer menu. It is here that Maxsound 
really comes to life. 

Maxsound's sequencer allows manip- 
ulation of sound blocks taken from the 
recorder memory. First, the user defines 
up to 15 different sound blocks based 



What's in a Sound? 



As most people know; sound travels in 
waves. However, it is sometimes difficult 
to visualize what such a%ave looks like. 



A "picture" of a single sound wave is 
shown in Figure \< Depicted there is one 
complete cycle, a very small portion of a 



f=1/T(Hz) 



Amplitude 




time 



Figure 1: Sound Wave 



loudness 




Decay 



Sustain 




Time 



R 



Figure 2: Sound Envelope (ADSR) 



sound indeed. To visualize sound, imag- 
ine several of these waves connected 
together, end-to-end. 

The period of a single wave is the time 
it takes for one cycle to be completed, 
represented by the variable T. On the flip 
side, the frequency (/) of a particular 
sound is the number of complete cycles 
that occur in exactly one second. This 
value is often given in cycles per second 
(cps) or Hertz (Hz). In simple terms, the 
greater the frequency, the higher the 
sound seems to the ear. As the vibrations 
causing the sound increase in speed, the 
pitch of the sound gets higher and higher. 
Mathematically, the frequency of a wave 
is the inverse of the period: f=l/T. 

The height of the sound cycle shown 
in Figure 1 is called the amplitude. In 
simple terms, this refers to the volume or 
loudness of the sound in question. 

Those familiar with acoustics know 
every sound has two characteristics that 
make it unique: the envelope and the 
timbre (sounds like "timber")- The enve- 
lope (shown in Figure 2) of a particular 
sound is often called its ADSR (Attack, 
Decay, Sustain and Release). This refers 
to how the loudness of the sound varies 
as time passes. For example, the sound 
of a door slamming shut usually has a 
very short envelope; the attack, decay, 
sustain and release happen very quickly. 
On the other hand, a bell usually has a 
very short attack, decay and sustain, but 
the release is very long; the sound of the 
bell dies away gradually. 

Every musical pitch has associated 
with it several related higher pitches, as 
shown in Figure 3. The intended or 
primary pitch is called the fundamental 
The "extraneous" pitches are known as 
partials. The relative amplitude (loud- 
ness) of each of these partials varies from 
musical instrument to instrument and 
from sound to sound. This is known as 



128 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1988 



on the starting and ending addresses for 
each desired block. This is accom- 
plished by altering the memory using 
Menu 2. Once the blocks are deter- 
mined, the user tells the sequencer the 
order in which to play the blocks. 
Because repetition is common in music 
and sound, this allows a great deal of 
flexibility while using as little memory 
as possible. A very good example of the 
use of Maxsound's sequencer with a 
music sample is described in the man- 
ual. The sequencer's possibilities are 
limited only by your imagination. 

I was told by Gimmesoft's Tom Di- 
Marco, Sr., that a newer version of 
Maxsound, now being shipped, in- 
cludes an echo feature as well as data 
compression. Needless to say, these 




1 st Seven 
partials 



Fundamental 



Figure 3: Major partials for a 
C3 fundamental. 



I ¥ 



the timbre of the sound and accounts for 
why different sounds sound different. A 
trumpet sounds different from a flute. 
The flute sound is almost pure; the 
partials are not very loud, A trumpet, oft 
the other hand, is fairly rich in harmon- 
ics; the associated partials are louder. 

This gives the trumpet a more distorted 
(the polite term is "brassy") sound as the 
partials tend to fight with each other, 
causing confusion for the human ear. The 
timbre of a particular sound or instru- 
ment is very important. Without it, 
everything would sound pretty much the 
same. And quite a few professional 
musicians would be out of their jobs. 

Now when the ADSR and timbre are 
taken into account, the resultant sound 
wave looks less and less like th^dft^ 
Figure I. This is complicated bytM^'- 
other characteristics of the instrument 
(voice or music) used to create the sound. 
However, the complex way in which each 
of these characteristics interact is beyond 
the scope of this text. Several books have 
been written on the subject. If you are 
interested in learning more, you might 
want to visit your local library or book 
store. 




additions will only enhance Max- 
sound's usefulness. Unfortunately, 
because of time limitations, I did not 
have a copy of the newer version for 
reviewing purposes. 

For this review, I used several of my 
own sound samples in addition to those 
provided with Maxsound. Some of the 
samples were of a musical nature while 
others were strictly voice. At the pres- 
ent, Maxsound does work better with 
voice than with most music. In general, 
music contains frequencies that are too 
high for Maxsound to reproduce with- 
out some audible distortion. The ap- 
plied rule of thumb is that distortion 
doesn't become a major factor until the 
frequency of the input signal becomes 
higher than half the number of samples 
taken per second. This limits Maxsound 
to about 7500Hz. Maxsound isn't to be 
blamed for the speed limitations of the 
Color Computer, however. And I was 
actually impressed by how little distor- 
tion was present, considering that some 
of the samples I used contained frequen- 
cies well in excess of 7500Hz. 

Maxsound allows the Color Comput- 
er to serve as a central part of a home 
recording studio. As a musician, I found 
that its capabilities enhanced my work 
by freeing me from more mundane 
tasks. It allowed me to more fully take 
advantage of my creativity. You don't 
have to be a musician or sound engineer 
to enjoy Maxsound. It is just plain fun 
to use! And it's easy, too. 

But a little knowledge of sound 
wouldn't hurt. In fact, an understanding 
of such things as timbre and the sound 
envelope will help you push Maxsound 
to the limits, whether in imitating an 
orchestral instrument or creating your 
own special effects. If you're interested 
in digging deeper into Maxsound, see 
the sidebar "What's In a Sound?" for an 
introduction to the mechanical proper- 
ties of sound. 

Maxsound is one of the few Color 
Computer products I have used that I 
felt to be complete. The manual is well- 
written, and the software is well- 
designed and very user-friendly. While 
I had no problems with Maxsound, I 
did have occasion to call both Gimme- 
soft and Don Lucas. In both cases, I was 
impressed by the amount of support 
they are willing to provide. I have no 
reservations recommending Maxsound 
to any C0C0 user — for serious appli- 
cations or simple fun. 

(Gimmesoft, P.O. Box 421, Perry Hall, MD 
21128; 301-256-7558; $59.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Editor 




Reviewer 
Information 



In order to continue to bring 
Tandy Color Computer users 
all the best information about 
new hardware and software 
products each month, we are 
expanding our independent 
review staff. Therefore, we in- 
vite you to join the rainbow's 
elite fleet of reviewers. 

You read the rainbow be- 
cause you love your Tandy 
Color Computer, so if you want 
a creative outlet and a chance 
to examine quality hardware 
and software, with your obser- 
vations published nationwide, 
we want to hear from you. 

Send us a cover letter with 
your name, address, occupa- 
tion, list of equipment, areas of 
general interests, and a sample 
review of a C0C0 product you 
are currently using. We look 
forward to your response. After 
all, we already see you have the 
best taste in computers. 



Reply to: 
Reviews Editor 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



June 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 29 



1 Softwar e- 



CoCo3 



CCRAM — 

A Second Drive Via 

Software 

So you recently bought a CoCo 3 and 
perhaps have upgraded to 5 12K, but the 
family budget won't allow much more. 
You're able to use the old disk drive 
system and can get OS-9 Level I up and 
running, but you have only one drive 
and, as everyone (including yourself) 
keeps saying — you need two drives for 
OS-9 to really shine. For a fairly low 
cost you can get that second drive via 
software. CCRAM is a RAM disk 



program available for OS-9 Level I, 
Version 2.00, running on a 512K CoCo. 

Just what is a RAM disk, you ask? 
A RAM disk is simply a portion of 
memory configured to "look" like a disk 
drive. CCRAM consists of two mod- 
ules: the device driver, CCRAM; and 
the device descriptor, R0. After loading 
these modules into an OS-9 Level I 
system and formatting with the stand- 
ard OS-9 format command, you will 
have 1,792 sectors. As a standard 35- 
track disk contains 630 sectors, the 
RAM disk is roughly equivalent to 
three disks. 

Once the RAM disk is loaded and 
formatted, it is used in the same fashion 
as a regular disk drive. You can do a di r 
/r0, a cd /r0, etc. For really fast 
operation, you can move the CMDS 
directory to /T0/CMD5 (use MakDir to 




micronics 

MUL TI-FONT PRINTER 

NX-1000 



NEW 



The NX-1000 gives you plenty of print 
options for attractive printing. Four 
typestyles. Four pitch sizes, in standard 
and italics for a total of 32 NLQ modes. The 
NX-1000 Rainbow gives you all these 
features plus online access to 7 color 
printing and graphics. Black, blue, red, 
yellow, green, violet, and orange. Both 
models have a 1 year warranty, nationwide 
service and a 30 day online trial. 




NX-1000 SPECS: 144 cps Draft, 36 cps NLQ (18 x 23 dot matrix), 
4 NLQ Fonts, Italics, Sub & Superscripts, Emphasized, Dou- 
blestrike, Proportional, Condensed, International, Downloadable, 
Quad TaH, Double Tall, Underline, 9+ Pflchs, Forward and Reverse 
n/216" Line Feeds, Absolute or Relative Vert. 4 Horz. Tabs, Left, 
Center or Right Justification, 8 Graphics Modesto 1 920dpi, Macro 
Instruction, Bidirection, Adjustable Tractor Feed, 200+ Printable 
Characters, Semi Auto Sheet Feed, Front Panel Soft Touch 
Control, Epson and IBM Emulate, 4k Data Buffer, Hex Dump. 
Rainbow: Same plus color. 



NX-1000 SYSTEM INCLUDES?**-**' 

• Star NX-1000 Printer * 1 QQ ^ 

• Blue Streak Ultima ■ „V *^ . 

. Software Support Trio ^jJJS^SSS? 

COMPLETE 

NX-1000 RAINBOW SYSTEM INCLUDES: 

95 



$ 299 



Star NX-1000 
Colour Printer 
Blue Streak Ultima +w sw flP' n 0 and insurance 
Software Trio COMPLETE 
Color Imaging Software 




oftware 



ort Trto 



SUPER 
GEMPRINT 



TYPE 
SELECTION/ 
TUTORIAL 

Online instructional program Will transfer a Pmode 0, 1, 2, 3, or 

that will select 24 special features 4 picture screen to printer 8'x11' 

of your printer or display methods hardcopy. Black/white, white/black 

to incorporate them into your or grey level shading for color. 



HI-RES 
SUPER 
GEMPRINT 

Disk software that will 
transfer a Hscreen 1,2,3 or 4 
picture screen to printer. 
Grey level shading for color. 



Software Trio 

$1Q95 



programs. 

Price, availability and specifications subject to change without notice. 



PERSONAL SERVICE 

(513) 236-1454 

Visa & MasterCard 
within the continental U.S. 



create / r0/CMD5). For those with the C 
compiler, you can really speed up those 
long compilation processes using 
CCRAM. 

CCRAM comes with several shell 
scripts that assist the user in installing 
CCRAM as well as show how to make 
a new OS9Boot with CCRAM incorpo- 
rated into the boot file. The documen- 
tation consists of four pages of step-by- 
step instructions. 

Overall, CCRAM performed as ex- 
pected for a RAM disk. It worked fine 
with my "plain vanilla" OS-9 system as 
provided by Tandy, but, unfortunately, 
did not work with my modified system, 
which includes an 80-column screen. I 
suspect there is a memory conflict 
between the screen and the RAM disk. 
This is not a fault of the author, but it 
is disappointing. The price may seem a 
bit high for this type of product, but it 
is certainly much lower than the cost of 
another drive! 

(Dime-A-Byte Software, 116 Webster Ave., 
Bangor, ME 04401, 207-942-0739; $28 plus 
$2 S/H) 

— Donald Dollberg 



I Softwar e 



CoCo1 t 2&3 



Disk Editor II — 
Doctor Your Disks 

Disk Editor II is a handy utility you 
can use to modify a disk. It will handle 
both RS-DOS and OS-9 disks and 
works with all versions of the Color 
Computer. 

When you start the program, you are 
asked for the track you want to begin 
editing. The screen then changes, dis- 
playing on the top of the screen the 
current half-sector to be edited. Editing 
commands appear on the bottom por- 
tion. 

Using Disk Editor II is much like 
using a word processor on a small file. 
A cursor appears at the top of the screen 
and may be moved by the arrow keys. 
Pressing the CTRL key toggles between 
insert and typeover modes. The CLEAR 
key deletes characters under the cursor. 
It's easy to change each byte by typing 
the appropriate information from the 
keyboard. Pressing the @ key changes 
the byte digitally. To move along to the 
next half of the sector, simply press 

RETURN. 

Along with its simplicity, there are 
some drawbacks. When you move 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES ffi ,INC 

7201 CLAIRCREST, BLDG. D 
DAYTON-, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX • C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



130 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



through the sectors, the editor always 
goes forward. To go back to a previous 
sector, you have to press break to 
return to the main screen, reenter the 
track number, and start again from the 
beginning of the track. The editor could 
use both a forward and reverse. There 
are no search features, either. If you 
have a particular string in mind, you 
have to search for it half-sector by half- 
sector. Needless to say, this can become 
time-consuming. 

The documentation can be scrolled 
on the screen or dumped to a printer, 
but it looks a lot better on the screen — 
it came out looking like gobbledygook 
on my printer. The author should pro- 
vide printed documentation, or at least 
an ASCII RERDME file that can be more 
neatly printed. Although the documen- 
tation was adequate for describing the 
program's operation, someone not 
familiar with disk editing may have 
trouble. 

To test Disk Editor II 9 I tried one of 
the more "fun" uses of a disk editor — 
modifying a machine language text 
game. Dallas Quest will never be quite 
the same. All the characters now ad- 
dress me by name, and I control every- 
thing J.R. says. 

(Saint John Gallery, P.O. Box 613, Mount 
Sinai, NY 11766, 516-928-6991; $18 plus 
$1.75 S/H) 

— Mark Haverstock 

' Software CoCo3 ' 

Zandar — 
Watch Out, Luke 
Skywalker 

Now that my gunfighting days are 
over, the thought of taking on yet 
another fast-draw video game normally 
fills me with horror. Zandar, by K-Soft, 
is different. Oh, sure, you have the usual 
display of the spacecraft's weapons, and 
your joystick is at the ready. But the 
joystick — instead of controlling a 
moving blip or crosshair — controls 
two arrows, one on the vertical edge, the 
other on the bottom horizontal. 

Unless you stand across the room, 
you really can't see both arrows at once, 
so, while looking at one arrow and the 
moving target, you have to sense where 
the other arrow is. It's sort of like the 
scene in Star Wars where a blindfolded 



Luke Skywalker learns to go with the 
Force rather than fight it. In fact, it's a 
lot like that. 




This non-protected disk program is, 
unfortunately, only for the CoCo 3. The 
startup menus allow you to choose a 
color TV or RGB monitor, enter your 



name for scorekeeping and select one of 
three difficulty levels. 

The disk must be left in the drive, 
because scores will be posted to it. The 
primary differences between difficulty 
levels are the number of planets to the 
final destination, the number of bad 
guys between planets, the number of 
laser bolts you have at the beginning, 
and the laser bonus you receive when 
passing a planet. In other words, Luke, 
the higher the level, the tougher it is. 

If you're not good enough at control- 
ling the "force," you just may run out 
of ammunition well before reaching 
your destination. Getting stuck without 
ammo puts a galactic warrior in the 
unenviable position of watching as 
drones destroy his nine-ship fleet. Yeah, 
this happened to me, the guy who 
should have practiced mare at the easier 




7 Swjtchabra&ud Rates 

Use itiis "sfrtarf cndU la connect a Centronics parate/ 
.printer to any wrsivn CoCo qc u$$ it to iinprove 
performance of ypur-ctjrmnt printer, 
Try it on your system tor 30 flays Rt$K FREE. On& year 
warranty. D^atet<ir}^ui(ies on quantity 3+. 





print 
on 

StflT. 



Color 




Bwp-1 



Color Imaainct System 



Super Gemprint Color Imaging System 



Use your favorite program to create apmode orhi-res graphic image, but don't 
stop there! Run our color graphics software and print a color image using a 
pailette of 81+ colors onyourNX-10orDMP-130fromaCoCo 1,2,or3. This 
system superimposes 4 graphic screen dumps (black, blue, yeliow & red) 

includes: Color Super Gemprint, t^f^^^L^ "** ^ 

Hl-Res Color Super Gemprint, mx add t0 g,ve you your om color masft "P /eca 
Plus 1_blue, 1 red & 1 yellow fle9U/ren)en(s . Ksl; Bhie , _ 2i 3 or u&m $ O Q^5 



ribbon cartridges, gpecificati&TTs subjeel to change without notice. 



+$3 Stifttog 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES ^ INC. 

7201 CLAIRCREST, BLDG. D 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX • C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



PERSONAL SERVICE 

(513) 236-1454 

Visa & MasterCard 
within the continental U.S. 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 131 



levels before tackling Expert. Obi-wan 
Kenobi need not fear competition from 
me. 

The 80-column graphics are nice even 
on a color TV and could be spectacular 
on an RGB monitor. At least one of the 
enemy spacecraft looks a little familiar, 
but how many possible spaceship de- 
signs are there, anyway? 

All in all, I like this game a lot. It will 
take some time to really get good at it, 
and leaving it alone for a while will 
undoubtedly mean a considerable de- 
crease in ability. 

In the meantime, does anybody know 
Yoda's address or telephone number? 

(K-Soft, 300 13th NE, E. Wenatchee, WA 
98802, 509-884-0338; $24.95) 

— John M. Hebert 



1 Book 



CoCo3 



Assembly Language 
Programming For 
The CoCo 3 — 
ML Reference for 
the CoCo 3 

A few short years ago, Laurence 
Tepolt and TEPCO Publishing pro- 
duced a book for CoCo 1 and 2 machine 
language programmers and enthusiasts. 
That book, Assembly Language Pro- 
gramming for the TRS-80 Color Com- 
puter ', has since become one of the 
standard references on the subject. 
Now, Mr. Tepolt has written an adden- 
dum in the form of a 59-page booklet 
titled Assembly Language Program- 
ming For The CoCo 3. 

This book gets right down to business 
with an overview of the MC68B09E 
microprocessor and the ways in which 
it differs from its predecessor, the 
MC6809E. The overview includes a 
brief discussion of new interrupts, 
display modes, I/O connectors and the 
GIME chip. 

In Chapter 2, the author goes into 
detail on color definition, monitors and 
generation of the available colors. 
Physical and virtual memory is the 
subject of Chapter 3, with explanations 
of memory management and memory 
mapping in the CoCo 3 as the main 
topics. Other chapters cover interrupts, 
and Hi-Res and Lo-Res displays. Plus, 
there is a general "other subjects" 



discussion. The chapter on high resolu- 
tion displays is given particularly de- 
tailed coverage. 

4 The wealth of diagrams and charts 
should provide users with important 
aids in their machine language pro- 
gramming. With the scant printed doc- 
umentation available to CoCo 3 ML 
enthusiasts, this book should prove to 
be very popular. The text is clear and 
concise, with print styles large and 
easily readable. I was surprised to find 
that the booklet contains no index, but 
at the same time I had no problem 
locating specific topics using the con- 
tents page. However, there is a cross- 
reference of control registers and page 
numbers. 

Overall, this is a nicely done and well- 
written document. It should not be 
considered a stand-alone product, how- 
ever, but one that serves as an addi- 
tional reference for CoCo programmers 
already possessing some ML program- 
ming knowledge. 

(Tepco, 68 James Court, Portsmouth, RI 
02871, 401-848-0656; $12 plus $1 S/H) 

— Leonard Hyre 



I Softwar e 



CoCo 2 & 3 



Super Graphics 16 — 
Graphics for 
Starving CoCo 
Artists 

Super Graphics-16 is a drawing pro- 
gram that combines some of the fea- 
tures of more expensive programs at an 
unbelievable price. Although it requires 
Extended Color BASIC, it uses only 16K 
of memory. Youll need a joystick, but 
no other interfaces or cables are re- 
quired. 

After the program is booted, the title 
screen appears, along with an alphabet 
soup of letters down either side of the 
screen. Pressing the CLEAR key removes 
the title screen, and you're ready to 
begin to draw. 

The functions on this program are 
keyboard-oriented, hence the letters on 
the side of the screen. No icons or pull- 
down menus are present. If you want to 
change colors, for example, you press C 
to bring up the list of four drawing 
colors available. Other options include 
Drawing Speed, Fat Bits, Get, Put, 
Undo, Line, Box, Circle, Paint (27 



colors), Text, and an Input/ Output 
function for saving, loading and print- 
ing pictures. Disk users have three 
additional functions available: Flip, 
Zoom and a Palette of dot colors. 




Super Graphics-16 is simple to use, 
and the directions are easy to under- 
stand. When you're running the pro- 
gram for the first few times, I suggest 
you keep handy the option list at the 
back of the manual until you get used 
to the letter commands. Be aware that 
each time you execute one of the op- 
tions, you are automatically returned to 
the Draw mode. For instance, to make 
two boxes, you'd need to choose the B 
option twice. 

Pictures can be saved to and loaded 
from the program disk, but I recom- 
mend using a separate picture disk. The 
program does give screen prompts for 
changing disks. 

Printing your artwork is simple, but 
there are some limitations. First of all, 
the program was written for Radio 
Shack DMP-105/106 printers. As the 
screen dump routine was written in 
BASIC, it can be rewritten for most 
printers. However, I feel this might be 
a problem for inexperienced users and 
that drivers for the more popular print- 
ers should have been included. 

Resolution in the print mode is not 
exceptional, as it relies on block graph- 
ics. Fortunately, the author chose to 
have them printed in condensed mode. 
This provides a little more detail, but 
not the detail of dot-addressable graph- 
ics. Print time was not particularly fast; 
at 600 baud, a dump of the title screen 
took about HV2 minutes on my Star 
SG-10. 

CoCo 3 owners will find that the 
printer dump does not work on their 
computers. I was greeted with a "Printer 
is off" message every time I tried to print 
using the CoCo 3, even though the 
printer was online. I have been notified 
that the author has fixed this bug, 
however. The rest of the program works 



132 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 



fine, provided you use a composite 
color monitor. An RGB monitor pro- 
vides some very strange color combina- 
tions. 

At $16, the program is a bargain for 
the starving CoCo artist. It's not a Color 
Max or Co Co Max, but the fact that it 
doesn't have any special hardware 
requirements and needs only 16K of 
memory makes it an attractive buy. I 
recommend it for CoCo 1 and 2 owners 
who want a basic and easy-to-use draw- 
ing program. 

(E.Z. Friendly Software, Hutton & Orchard 
Streets, Rhinecliff, NY 12574; disk, $16 plus 
$1.50 S/H; tape, $12 plus $1.50 S/H) 

— Mark Haverstock 

'Softwar e CoCo3 1 

A rtificial Intelligence 
Tic-Tac-Toe — . 
Learning Can 
Be Fun 

Playing tic-tac-toe on a personal 
computer is nothing new. In fact, com- 
puterized tic-tac-toe was probably one 
of the first games ever developed for the 
personal computer. The new twist in 
this version, Artificial Intelligence Tic- 
Tac-Toe, however, is that it is designed 
to be an exercise in AI (artificial intel- 
ligence). In short, the computer starts 
off as a rather "dumb" opponent, but as 
more rounds of the game are played, it 
gets "smarter." The primary purpose of 
this program is to teach the CoCo 3 to 
play tic-tac-toe. 

If Archerware, the company behind 
AI Tic-Tac-Toe, were simply trying to 
market a colorful tic-tac-toe program 
with optional embedded speech for the 
CoCo 3, it certainly wouldn't sell many 
copies at the asking price of $29.95. But 
that's not all there is to the package. 
What Archerware is really selling under 
the name of Artificial Intelligence Tic- 
Tac-Toe is a tutorial on AI and its 
implementation on the CoCo 3. 

AI Tic-Tac-Toe began as a science 
fair project. And like most science fair 
projects I know of, a lot of research and 
study went into it. Much of the author's 
research is included in the documenta- 
tion. Also included is a highly detailed 
flow chart of the program and a hard 
copy of the author's BASIC program- 
ming code. The source code for one of 
the machine language routines, used to 



speed up the processing, is not pro- 
vided. However, the majority of the 
program is in BASIC, and valuable 
information on AI programming can be 
gleaned from a careful study of its flow 
charts and BASIC subroutines. 

AI Tic-Tac-Toe is targeted to a lim- 
ited audience — those who want to 
learn more about the development and 
methods of implementation of artificial 
intelligence — although it does make 
for a nice game on the CoCo 3. 




AI Tic-Tac-Toe works on the 
CoCo 3 with at least one disk drive. 
Support is provided for the optional use 
of a joystick or mouse and a Radio 
Shack Speech/ Sound cartridge. 

Curious about how the program did 
in the science fair? Well, according to 
the author, in the mathematics, engi- 
neering and computer division, it took 
the grand prize. It placed second in the 
Junior Engineering Society category, 
and grand prize overall for the middle 
division — a job very well done. 

(Archerware, 1602 Aster Street, Beaufort, 
SC 29902, 803 524-9452; $29.95: First 
product review for this company appearing 

in THE RAINBOW.) 

— Kerry Armstrong 

1 Softwar e c ° Co1 > 2 * 3 1 

CoCo A ddress 
Book — 

Maintain Mailing 
Lists 

Have lots of friends? A big Christmas 
card list? A mailing list of any type to 
maintain? If so, CoCo Address Book 
may be just what you've been looking 
for. This program allows you to manip- 
ulate names and addresses, along with 
telephone numbers and free-form re- 
marks, for up to 100 entries in each of 
multiple files on one disk. It is extremely 
easy to use, provides a number of 



thoughtful features, and the documen- 
tation is excellent. 

To use CoCo Address Book you need 
one disk drive and a CoCo 1, 2 or 3 with 
a minimum of 32K. A printer and an 
additional disk drive are useful, al- 
though not necessary. The program is 
not copy-protected and is written en- 
tirely in BASIC, which makes it easy to 
modify. 

CoCo Address Book offers a number 
of standard features, and there are 
menu options for adding, deleting and 
updating records. The fields consist of 
first and last names, title, street address, 
apartment number, city, state, ZIP 
code, telephone number and remarks. 
Once entered, this information can be 
edited at any time; and the entire file can 
be sorted in alphabetical order by last 
name. 

There is a search option, which en- 
ables you to locate specified entries in 
these fields: last name, city, state, ZIP 
code, area code and remarks. Another 
handy feature is the ability to maintain 
a number of separate files on any one 
disk. When the program begins, it asks 
if you want to work on a new or existing 
file. If you want an existing one, a list 
of available files to choose from is 
displayed. While working on one file, 
you can change to another from the 
main menu. 

Still another useful function is the 
ability to review the file one record at 
a time. After displaying each entry, you 
can choose to print a label, edit, delete, 
go on to the next entry or return to the 
main menu. 

Without question the strongest ele- 
ment of CoCo Address Book is the 
documentation. The user's manual is 
clear, concise, complete and entirely 
accurate. Each feature of the program 
is covered, and no attempt is made to 
artificially "pump up" the program. In 
fact, the author points out potential 
problems (and how to avoid and solve 
them). The first section of the manual 
is a walk-through of all the features and 
is easy reading. When I first opened the 
package, I read through the manual and 
knew exactly what the program would 
do, even before I turned on my comput- 
er. 

Following the walk-through are three 
sample sessions, which thoroughly 
illustrate actual use of the program's 
features. Two appendices complete the 
manual, the first a list of U.S. state and 
Canadian province abbreviations and 
the second a quick reference sheet 
showing all the program's constraints, 
such as maximum records per file, etc. 

June 1988 THE RAINBOW 133 



There are a number of weaknesses in 
Co Co Address Book that I found an- 
noying. Several are also quite restric- 
tive, such as the maximum of 100 
records per file and field sizes that are 
frequently too small. Twelve characters 
maximum for a city name is insufficient 
for certain out-of-the-way places like 
San Francisco or Oklahoma City. 
Twenty characters into the street ad- 
dress field I was brought up short when 
I tried to enter "1400 Arroyo Grande 
Dr." 

When printing labels, the program 
does not ask you for your printer baud 
rate, nor does it print a test pattern to 
let you align your labels. It simply starts 
printing with the first record and 
doesn't stop until it reaches the end of 
the file. Should you have a paper jam 
or other printing difficulty, there is no 
way to interrupt printing and resume at 
a specified point. 

In spite of these few shortcomings, 
though, I found Co Co Address Book to 
be a quality program, simple and effec- 
tive to use, and well worth the asking 
price. 

(Bob's Software, P.O. Box 391, Cleveland, 
OH 44107, 216-871-8858; $20 plus $2.50 
S/H) 

— Jim K. Issel 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 1, 2 &3 



Superdisk Utility - 

Simplifies 

Disk Maintenance 



Superdisk Utility is a utility package 
that acts as a DOS shell, allowing DOS 
operations to be selected and executed 
from its main menu screen. From the 
shell, you can run programs; back up 
files, directories or disks; examine or 
edit the contents of files on a bit-by-bit 
basis in ASCII and hexadecimal; kill 
(delete) files and print a directory. There 
are also options to name and date a 
disk, and to determine machine lan- 
guage start, end and execute locations. 
All these features are just a representa- 
tive sampling of Superdisk's capabili- 
ties. 

I call the program a "mini DOS" 
because each option from the main 
menu in turn calls a program that has 



its own menu of choices. The value of 
Superdisk is in its user-friendliness — it 
is very easy to operate and simply 
structured, and it makes disk file main- 
tenance easier to live with. 

I tested all of the programs thor- 
oughly, examined each feature and 
attempted to stump the program, but I 
could not crash it. Superdisk worked 
properly every time, even under adverse 
conditions. I had Superdisk read a disk 
on which the directory was not on Track 
17, where it normally should be under 
CoCo DOS. This program is a gem — 
you can actually make a backup copy 
of the disk directory on an unused area 
of the same disk; should the disk crash, 
the directory, as it existed when it was 
saved, can be reinstalled on Track 17. 
Now, there are some limitations with 
Superdisk. You cannot edit, view, mod- 
ify, or in any way work with the backup 
directory. You cannot move it to 
another disk for archive purposes, for 
example. 

There are two version of this utility 
program, one for CoCos 1 and 2 (Su- 
perdisk), the other for the CoCo 3 
(Superdisk +3). Both are included in the 
purchase price and come on a single 
disk. While the two programs are func- 
tionally identical, there are two differ- 
ences. First, CoCo 3 users get a Hi-Res 
screen with upper- and lowercase let- 
ters, as opposed to Lo-Res for CoCos 
1 and 2. Second, the program runs twice 
as fast on the CoCo 3 — a startling and 
welcome enhancement to the program, 
though I attribute this to the new 
CoCo's faster processing and not neces- 
sarily to the software. 

Superdisk Utility also has a hardware 
element: a code plug, which when in- 
serted into the right joystick port makes 
the program operable. Superdisk can- 
not run without it, so if you are using 
another program that requires a mouse 
or joystick in the right port, the two 
programs will not work simultaneously. 

The Superdisk Utility package comes 
with a five-page set of photocopied 
instructions, in which each of Super- 
disk's features is explained; and a small 
sample program is provided to let you 
"autoload" Superdisk. Although the 
manual does not differentiate between 
Superdisk's two versions, it does a 
satisfactory job of explaining the pro- 
gram's features. There are more than a 
few typing errors, but they are only of 
annoyance value and will cause no 
confusion. I do think the manual should 
remind the user to remove the code plug 
on program shutdown, as other pro- 
grams will not like it. 



All in all, the Superdisk Utility pack- 
age is an excellent value, and I would 
recommend it to anyone who wants to 
make disk file-handling a welcome relief 
instead of a tedious chore. 



(Sunrise Software, 8901 NW 26 St., Sunrise, 
FL 33322; $19.95 plus $2 S/H) 



— Jeffrey S. Parker 



* Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



Sub Battle 

Simulator — 

War Under the Seas 

In Sub Battle Simulator for the CoCo 
3, your goal is to command a World War 
II submarine, complete a mission and 
return safely to port. Your initial action 
in this Simulation can take place in any 
of three modes: target practice against 
an enemy convoy, single mission in a 
real combat setting, and wartime com- 
mand over the course of the entire war. 

There are 60 different missions (24 
American, 36 German) in addition to 
the target practice mode. While Amer- 
ican missions are very close to historical 
accounts, German missions are not as 
exact, as most of the patrol records were 
destroyed after the war. 

Although the program is written in 
OS-9 Level II, you do not need a Level 
II system disk to run it — you just have 
to type DOS. Everything you need is on 
the disk and ready to go. Sub Battle 
Simulator is a refreshing diversion from 
the popular airplane Simulations. In 
Sub Battle, you have more of a chance 
to think before you react. The pace is 
slower, like the fox sneaking up on the 
henhouse; but battle, when it breaks 
out, is fast and furious. 

If you are on the surface and get too 
close to enemy ships or planes, you will 
see splashes of water as the shells hit 
near your sub. If you can sneak up on 
the enemy, raise your periscope and 
launch a torpedo or two, you will see the 
characteristic V-shaped tail as it ap- 
proaches and hits the target. I was 
somewhat disappointed with the jerky 
animation of the torpedo traces — I 
would have expected better of an OS- 
9 program. Antiaircraft fire is more 
smoothly animated, though, and has 
tracers to assist your aim. The radar and 
sonar displays are realistic and useful in 
locating the enemy. 



134 



THE RAINBOW June 1 988 



Sub Battle is played in real time, 
which means you could sit for hours 
doing nothing but cruising around the 
ocean in search of enemy vessels. For- 
tunately (unless you're a stickler for 
absolute realism), you won't have to 
wait that long. There is a time compres- 
sion feature, and I used that feature a 
lot. As time can be sped up by selectable 
factors of up to one second equalling 
four hours, I was able to get to the 
enemy quicker and make necessary 
repairs to my sub after battle. 

As in real submarine warfare, you are 
not totally safe even when submerged. 
Ships on the surface will drop depth 
charges on you, and the resultant red 
flashes seem very realistic. 

The graphics are good, but they are 
by no means the best I have seen on the 
CoCo 3. The outdoor scenes are fair — 
a dark blue sea against a lighter blue 
sky, complete with a moon during the 
nighttime. In the day, the sky is white 
with a glaring yellow sun. Streaks of 
white randomly litter the sea to simulate 
white caps. I mention the graphics only 
because many of us have come to expect 
nothing short of the superb for the 
CoCo 3; but, after all, this is a Simu- 
lation, not an artistic program. Its claim 
to fame is in the sophisticated program- 
ming techniques used to create the 
illusion that you are actually engaged in 
combat. You must keep track of your 
location and headings through the 
instrumentation. Sub Battle is, without 
a doubt, the most detailed and realistic 
Simulation I have seen for the CoCo 3. 

The various ships and planes appear 
in silhouette form as black objects 
against a blue or white background. A 
built-in target book lets you examine 
them in their silhouette forms just as 
you will encounter them during war- 
fare. One of the target book's interesting 



features is that it lets you use the left and 
right arrow keys to view the target at 
various angles, including head-on. The 
idea here is that the better you know 
your enemy, the better your chances are 
for survival and victory. Because you 
can choose sides in this Simulation, 
American as well as foreign ships and 
planes are displayed. There are battle- 
ships, aircraft carriers, destroyers and 
escorts, as well as merchant ships, 
patrol boats, tankers and troop trans- 
ports. Aircraft you will encounter in- 
clude the Avenger, Catalina PBY, Aichi 
Seaplane and the infamous Zero. 




You navigate your submarine by 
using the View, Heading and Speed 
gauges. The screen you see during most 
of the Simulation is loaded with instru- 
ments and gauges that provide you with 
degrees of view, heading, speed and 
depth. Other instruments indicate sta- 
tus of electric or diesel operation, 
battery charge level, scope depth, anti- 
aircraft and deck guns, as well as for- 
ward and aft torpedoes. Keeping an eye 
on the map display will prevent you 
from running aground as frequently as 
I did while pursuing the enemy. Also, 
the welHllustrated 36-page instruction 
manual contains information on deter- 
mining longitude and latitude. 

The CoCo 3 keyboard is used exten- 



sively during the Simulation. Every 
number key, 15 of the alphabetic keys, 
the up and down arrows and two of the 
function keys are each assigned a func- 
tion. Suffice it to say that virtually every 
aspect of submarine warfare and crew 
operation is covered. 

In another gesture to realism, the 
crew members converse with you 
through short statements shown on the 
screen. They warn you of impending 
danger, such as shallow water, and 
advise you when it is inappropriate to 
view from the tower (like when you are 
under water). They also announce any 
damage during battle and tell you how 
long it will take to repair each damaged 
component. 

Sub Battle Simulator is both fun and 
challenging and is nicely packaged. 
However, the instruction booklet refers 
to most popular computers other than 
the CoCo 3. References to the CoCo 3 
are made in the form of two added 
hardback cards that contain all the 
keyboard commands, difficulty levels 
and loading instructions. I got the 
impression that rather than reprint the 
colorful manual just to add the words 
CoCo 3, it would be a lot cheaper just 
to add the cards. I agree with that 
approach, since it has to help keep 
unnecessary reprinting costs down, but 
I am sure that some will take exception 
to the technique. I hope the savings are 
passed on to CoCo 3 customers. Be- 
sides, it's refreshing to see the CoCo 3 
finally included in some of the popular 
programs written for other computers. 



(Epyx, Sunnyvale, CA; $29.95. Available in 
Radio Shack stores nationwide.) 



— David Gerald 







CONNECT YOUR COCO TO THE REAL WORLD 
WITH A SERIAL OUTPUT I NTERFA 




EDUCATIONAL 
.. THE LIST 






^HUNDREDS OF APPLICATIONS. . .ENERGY MANAGEMENT, EXPERIMENTS, 
USE, ROBOTICS, EQUIPMENT AUTOMATION, LIGHTING CONTROLLERS . 
GOES ON AND ON, LIMITED ONLY BY YOUR IMAGINATION. 

>PROVI0ES 16 OUTPUT CHANNELS WHICH ALLOW SOFTWARE CONTROL OF 16 
DIFFERENT DEVICES, AOD I T I ONAL CHANNELS CAN BE ADO ED WITH OUR EXPANSION 
CARDS TO INDEPENDENTLY CONTROL HUNDREDS OF DIFFERENT DEVICES. 

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS PROVIDED. INCLUDING SOFTWARE EXAMPLES WHICH USE 
SIMPLE BASIC COMMANDS TO TURN OUTPUT DEVICES ON OR OFF. FULL TECHNICAL 
SUPPORT PROVIDED OVER THE TELEPHONE BY OUR STAFF. 

CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO COCO SERIAL I/O PORT WITH A STANDARD PRINTER 
CABLE. BAUD RATE ANO PROTOCOL FACTORY SET TO STANDARD PRINTER 
CONFIGURATION FOR COCO 1, 2, OR 3 (600 BAUD). 

COMPATIBLE WITH MOST COMPUTERS WHICH UTILIZE THE STANDARD 25 PIN 
RS 232 CONNECTOR WITH OUR OPTIONAL R5 232 CABLE. 

IDES I GNED FOR CONTINIOUS OPERATION 2k HOURS A DAY, 365 DAYS A YEAR. 
HIGH QUALITY INDUSTRIAL GRADE COMPONENTS WITH PROVEN RELIABILITY. 



AR-16 SERIAL OUTPUT IHTF^^LE^ . 
"(REQUIRES CABLES, RELAY* '■Nil f.ilPH,*] 

273-1652A 12V 500MA POWER SUPPLY 

26-3020 PRINTER CABLE FOR COCO. . 
RD-8 REED RELAY CARD (8 RELAYS SP HO) 

ACCESSORIES 
EX-16 EXPANSION CARD (16 CHANNEL) . ■ S^Q 

E-1 EXPANSION CARD CONNECTOR j 

RS 232 CABLE CONNECTOR (25 PIN) J 

ADD $3.00 SHIPPING CHARGE — - 





$89,95 

|iD-"55 



24 HOUR ORDER LINE 
(614) 464-4470 



VISA 



June 1 988 THE RAINBOW 



135 




The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 




Basic Screen Editor, a 1.5K ML full- 
screen editor that features full cursor 
control using the arrow keys and has 
capability for forward delete, automatic 
custom PRLETTE setting, case conver- 
sion, and insert and overwrite modes. 
For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Howard 
Medical Company, 1690 N. Elston, 
Chicago, IL 60622, (312)278-1440; $25. 

Bowling League Secretary, a bowling 
manager that has been updated with 
new features, including the ability to 
generate final tally sheets. Upgrades 
include installation and instruction 
sheets. For the CoCo 1 , 2 and 3. TOME- 
LA* CO, P.O. Box 2162, Doylestown, 
PA 18901, (215) 348-5822; $9.95 for 
upgrade. 

Car Sign Designer, a WYSIWYG disk 
program that lets you design, print and 
display a car sign, and includes a re- 
usable sign holder. For the CoCo 2 and 
3. Zebra Systems, Inc., 78-06 Jamaica 
Ave,, Woodhaven, NY 11421, (718) 
296-2385; $29.95. 




CCAD, a BASIC computer-aided 
design package requiring a 64K CoCo, 
disk drive, color monitor and the TRS- 
80 Multi-Pen Plotter. For the CoCo 1, 
2 and 3. R.B. Dunbar, 14 Ingham Way, 
New Hope, PA 18938, (215) 862-2674; 
$50. 

Frogday Afternoon, arcade action on 
the ocean floor — protect the frogmen 
as they swim to and fro in their mission 
to keep the underwater city's generators 
supplied with solarian crystals. For the 
CoCo 3. K-SOFT, 300 13th NE, E. 
Wenatchee, WA 98802, (509) 662-9365; 
$24.95. 

In Quest of the Star Lord, an animated 
mix of science and fantasy in which you 

136 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



quest for the Phoenix Crossbow in a 
post-holocaust world. Two-disk graph- 
ics Adventure for the CoCo 3. Sundog 
Systems, 21 Edinburg Drive, Pitts- 
burgh, PA 15235, (412) 372-5674; 
$34.95 plus $2.50 SjH. 

W Labyrinth, a 64K ECB Adventure in 
which you must fight to wrest your 
kingdom from an evil wizard who has 
imprisoned you and taken over your 
throne. For the CoCo 1 and 2. R.T.B. 
Software, P.O. Box 777, West Acton, 
MA 01720, (617) 263-0563; $24.95 plus 
$3 SjH. 



Race-Timer, a program to time 
Tyco, AFX and H-0 slot cars. A seg- 
ment of track included connects to the 
joystick ports. Designed for the CoCo 
2. Ken Dittmar, 1905 Brandywine 
Court, Fayetteville, NC 28304, (919) 
424-6777; $39 plus $3 S/H. 

Type-It, a menu-driven BASIC word 
processor that has options for justified 
text; it works with the DMP-105, 
DMP-106 and Epson-compatible print- 
ers. For the CoCo 3. R.J.F. Software, 
R.R. #2, White Lake, Ontario, Canada 
KOA 3L0, (613) 623-7824; $19.95 plus 
$3 S/H. 



VALENTIN, a 64K disk program 
that generates personalized valentines 
to your computer screen and to the 
TRS-80 Multi-Pen Plotter. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. R.B Dunbar, 14 
Ingham Way, New Hope, PA 18938, 
(215) 862-2674; $10. 

VIP Writer III, an upgrade of the VIP 
Writer word processor for the CoCo 3. 
New features include screen widths of 
up to 80 characters, foreground and 
background color selection from CoCo 
3's PALETTE, fast screen action, and a 
built-in print spooler with a 49,000- 
character buffer. SD Enterprises, P.O. 
Box 1233, Gresham, OR 97030, 503- 
663-2865; $79.95. 

Wargame Designer, a military Simula- 
tion that has been updated to include a 
PALETTE function and two more games, 
including Invasion North, Attack on 
Moscow, Robot Command and Dun- 
geon Warrior. For the CoCo 3. 
SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, 
Suite 414, Toledo, OH 43615, (419)389- 
1515; $29. 




First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE rainbow reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Lauren Willoughby 





XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program 



Menu oriented 
Upload/download Ascii 
or XMODEM protocol 
Execute OS-9 commands 
from within XTERM 



Definable macro keys 
Works with standard serial port, RS232 
Pak, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers 
Works with standard screen, Xscreen 
WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board 



$49.95 with source $89.95 



XDIR & XCAL 



Hierarchial directory 
> Full sorting 

• Complete pattern matching 



OS-9 calculator 

• Decimal, Hex, Binary 

• +,-,*,/,AND,OR,XOR,NOT 



$24.95 with source $49.95 



XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 
$34.95 with source $54.95 



HARDWARE 



512k memory upgrade 
Ram Software 

Ram Disk 

Print Spooler 

Quick Backup 

•Software by ColarVentmc 



$80.00 



All three for only 
$19.95 




XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

- Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

■ Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

- Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, overstrike, 
underline, super/sub-scripts 

• 10 header/footers 

■ Page numbering In decimal or Roman numerals 

• Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 
$24.95 with source $49.95 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 

XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 with source $199.95 

XED 

full screen editor 
with source $79.95 



OS-9 
$39.95 






SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUTING 

This sales-based accounting package Is de- 
signed for the non-accountant oriented busi- 
nessman. It also contains the flexibility for 
the accounting oriented user lo set up a double 
entry journal with an almost unlimited chart 
of accounts. Includes Sales Entry, transaction 
driven Accounts Receivable and Accounts Pay- 
able, Journal Entry, Payroll Disbursement, 
and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income State- 
ment, Customer and Vender status Reports, 
Accounts Receivable and Payable Aging Re- 
ports, Check Register, Sales Reports, Account 
Status Lists, and a Journal Posting List 

$79.95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle Inventory 
control, with user defined product codes, and 
produce a detailed analysis of the business 1 
sales and the sales force. One may enter/update 
inventory data, enter sales, run five sales anal- 
ysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter/update salesman records, 
and update the SBAP Inventory. 

$59.95 



PAYROLL 



Designed for maintaining personnel and 
payroll data for up to 200 hourly and salar- 
ied employees with 8 deductions each. Cal- 
culates payroll and tax amounts, prints 
checks and maintains year-to-date totals 
which can be automatically transferred to 
the SBA package. Computes each pay peri- 
od's totals for straight time, overtime and 
bonus pay and determines taxes to be with- 
Aditional outputs include mailing list, 
of employees, year-to-date federal 
and/or state tax listing, and a listing of cur- 
rent misc. deductions. Suited for use in all 
states except Oklahoma and Delaware 



held, 
listing 



$59.95 



PERSONAL BOOKKEEPING 2000 
Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense catego- 
ries. Menu driven and user friendly. 

$39.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history 
reports for each customer, perpares in- 
voices and monthly statements, mailing la- 
bels, aging lists, and an alphabetized cus- 
tomer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance 
charges for revolving accounts. This pack- 
age functions as a standalone A/R system or 
integrates with the Small Business Accting 
package. 

$59.95 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor 
and A/P invoice files. The system prints 
checks, voids checks, cancels checks, de- 
letes cancelled checks, and deletes paid A/P 
Invoices. The user can run a Vendor L\st, 
Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged report, 
and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P sys- 
tem or can be Integrated with the Small 
Business Accounting Package. 

$59.95 





0£~9 is a trademark of Micro wart 




MutaOard 



Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $3.50), personal checks. 






Turn of th e Scr e w 



□ 



CoCo 1 and 2 users, remember 
when the CoCo 3 came out? One 
of the good things built right 
into the CoCo 3 is an 80-character-by- 
24-line display screen. I guess you must 
have felt left out in the cold. If you have 
a CoCo 1 or 2 with a Multi-Pak and are 
using OS-9, your luck will change; you 
too can now have an 80- by 24-character 
display. 

I say this is a big project not because 
it is hard to build, but because the 
overall project will take a bit of time and 
some hardware considerations. For 
instance, if you want an 80-by-24 dis- 
play, you must have a monitor capable 
of displaying 80-by-24 characters. That 
requires an RS-70 compatible monitor 
of about 20 MHz resolution. You will 
also need a Multi-Pak and software. 
(You know what I think of software — 
leave it to the programmers.) CRC will 
send you OS-9 Level I Version 2 soft- 
ware to drive this display for about $10. 

In the old days, an 80-by-24 character 
display required many chips, starting 
with the display chip. For many years, 
the most common display chip was the 
Motorola MC6845, back then a very 
powerful chip. It had a bunch of regis- 
ters and counters that would divide a 
high-frequency clock into two lower 
frequencies. The higher of the two was 
the horizontal frequency, usually about 
15 KHz; the other was the vertical 
frequency, at about 60 Hz. Also coming 
from this display chip was a character 
address. Part of this address went 
directly to a character-generator ROM. 
Now, a character-generator ROM is 
nothing more than a ROM with bit- 
mapped graphics of what letters and 
numbers are made of. 

The other part of the character ad- 
dress went to the address lines of one 
side of some dual-ported RAM, which 
was ordinary RAM with some extra 
circuitry allowing two devices to read 
and write data to the same RAM. Also 
included in this circuitry was a circuit 
to switch between the two. 

The other side of the dual-ported 
RAM usually was connected to a CPU, 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Quest, Quebec. 
Tony's username on Delphi is DISTO. 



An 80-column 
adapter project for the 
CoCo 1 and 2 

Increasing 
Character 
Display 

By Tony DiStefano 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



like the MC6809 CPU that is in all 
CoCos. The data lines of the RAM fed 
the rest of the address lines of the 
character ROM, and the ROM's data 
lines fed into a parallel-to-serial shift 
register. This shift register is the dot 
pattern that flows out of the display 
adapter and onto your screen. This dot 
pattern is mixed with the vertical and 
horizontal frequencies, called sync 
signals, into one signal that is called 
composite video. 

Sound a little complicated? It might 
be at first, but read it again a couple of 
times and you'll understand it. Think of 
it like this: The CPU writes data char- 
acters into RAM, one character per 
byte of memory. The display chip, along 
with its support circuitry, reads this 
data and converts it into a stream of 
dots. With these dots come the signals 
necessary to control your monitor's 
circuitry to keep these dots in sync so 
that, to you, they look like characters 
such as letters and numbers. 

What I have described requires a 
display chip (such as the MC6845), a 
character ROM, a RAM chip, about 20 
other TTL support chips like the shifter 
and dual port circuitry. That makes 
quite a big job to design, let alone to do 
the board space and the wiring. But in 
the past, that's the way that technology 
was used. 

Today things are different. Super LSI 
(Large Scale Integration) chips are here: 



The CoCo 3 is proof of that. The GIME 
chip is a video display adapter, a mem- 
ory map decoder and a memory man- 
agement adapter all in one. Chips like 
that contain thousands of TTL equiva- 
lents. 

To make this 80-column display, I 
will use an LSI chip made by Standard 
Microsystems Corporation (SMC), the 
CRT 9128. This chip by itself does most 
of the work I described above. It has 
built-in character ROM, all porting 
circuitry, and all decoding and shifting 
chips. The only support chip it requires 
is RAM. Add that and a couple of 
decoding chips, and you are done. 

As you can see from the diagram in 
Figure 1, there are not many compo- 
nents in this project. Ul is the SMC 
chip, U2 is the RAM chip. A 6116 is a 
2K-by-8-bit RAM chip. U3 is used for 
decoding, and U4 is used for the video 
output and mixing to form composite 
video. In the diagram all the pins of Ul 
are numbered and have abbreviated 
names. Most of the names are self- 
explanatory; the ones that are not are 
listed below: 

Pin No. Name Function • 

7 VI D serial video data 

18 HS horizontal sync 

19 VS vertical sync 

20 CS composite sync, (HS 

and VS combined) 

8 INT intensity pin 

Before I get into the project's con- 
struction, a little information on the 
SMC chip in needed. The SMC chip has 
internal registers that control the many 
aspects required to display characters 
on the screen. In order to talk to this 
chip, we must know where it is in the 
memory map below: 



Location 


Direction 


Function 


$FF54 


Write 


Writes to data 






register 


$F554 


Read 


Reads from 






data register 


$FF55 


Write 


Writes to ad- 






dress register 


$FF55 


Read 


Reads status 






register 



The CPU communicates with the 
video chip via seven registers. Access to 
these registers is made by first storing 
the register number in the address 



1 38 THE RAINBOW June 1 988 



.20 


1 




■ - -.s 
Z 


5,23 


3 


.06 


6 






*22 


*> 

3c 



U3 




J1 

RCA JACK 



Figure 1 



register and then accessing the register's 
data through the data register. The 
following is a list of the addresses and 
functions of available registers. 

Address Register Function 

$6 Chip Reset 

$8 TOS Add 

$9 CUR Lo 

$A CUR Hi 

$B Fil Add 

$C ATT Dat 

$D Character 

$E Mode Register 

For example, if you want to address 
the CUR Lo register, store the value $9 
at $FF55 then store the CUR Lo byte 
at $FF54. Each of the seven registers 
has a specific function: 

Chip Reset — The first thing done 
after powering up the chip. Stores $6 in 
$FF55 then stores a 0 value in the data 
register. 

TOS Add — TOS stands for Top Of 
Screen. Top of screen address bits are 
DA 10 to DA4, for D6 to DO, respec- 
tively. DA 3 to DAO are internally set to 
0, forcing the first address at the begin- 
ning of each row to be 00, 16, 32 and 
so forth. 

CUR LO — Cursor low address po- 
sition of flashing cursor. This is the first 
eight bits of the cursor address. 

CUR Hi — Cursor high address 
position of flashing cursor. Bits D2 to 
DO are DA 10 to DA8, respectively. 
Other bits set to 0. 

Fil Add — Fills address locations 
starting from cursor position to the fill 
address. Bits D6 to DO are addresses 
from DA 10 to DA4, respectively. As 



with TOS, the least three bits are always 
0. 

ATT Dat — Attribute Data, a regis- 
ter that changes the way things appear 
on the screen. The attribute byte: 

D7 - 1 Enables block graphics 

= 0 Enables Alpha Mode 
D6 = 1 Disables cursor (Invisible) 

= 0 Enables cursor (Visible) 
D5 = 1 Underlines cursor 

= 0 Blocks cursor 
D4 = 1 White screen and black 

characters 

= 0 Black screen and white 

characters 
D3 = 1 Enables video suppress 

= 0 Allows character blinking 
D2 = 1 Hi intensity 

= 0 Lo intensity 
D 1 = 1 Character underlined 

= 0 Character not underlined 
DO = 1 Character in inverse video 

= 0 Character in normal video 

Character — Register where the 
ASCII character is placed to appear on 
the screen. If Bit D7 is set, the attributes 
described in the above byte (bits D3 to 
DO) will take effect on that character. 

Mode — Auto increment mode. If Bit 
D7 is set to 1, the cursor address will 
automatically increment by one every 
time a byte is written to the character 
byte. If D7 is set to 0, the auto increment 
is disabled. 

The basics for this display chip ought 
to be enough to get you started. If you 
want more detail, contact SMC at 35 
Marcus Blvd., Hauppauge, NY 11788. 



For this project you will need all the 
parts shown in Figure 1 and sockets for 
all the chips. The following is a list of 
socket sizes and the pin numbers for 
+5V and ground: 



Chip 


Socket 






No. 


Size 


+5V 


GND 


U1 


40 


21 


4 


U2 


24 


24 


12 


U3 


16 


16 


8 


U4 


14 


14 


7 



You can get the SMC chip, project 
board, OS-9 software driver and RAM 
chip from CRC. Call (514) 383-5293 for 
prices. 

There is one more interesting thing 
about the project. If you happen to have 
a Disto Super Controller or Disto 
Super Controller II, you can wire this 
project to the MEB connector. Two 
changes to the diagram in Figure 1 are 
necessary: Instead of A4, connect Pin 3 
of U3 to VCC. Then, instead of A3, 
connect Pin 5 of U3 to GND. The rest 
of the connections appear on the bus. 
Instead of a project board, you can use 
just about any double-sided PC board. 
You will need, however, a 17-pin single 
inline female header. This way, you will 
not need a Multi-Pak. 

Regarding the Multi-Pak, remember 
that when using the addresses from 
SFF40 to $FF5F, you must do a slot 
swap to whatever slot your hardware is, 
and swap back after you are finished. If 
you are in a multitasking environment 
remember to turn off the interrupts 
before swapping slots, and turn them 
back on again afterward, ^ 

June 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 39 



Featur e 



Learn, the positions of keyboard chords 





CP 




O 



iFowimimini-jDr 




ai(D)ff(D 



;1V :;•'< 

" % V* ". .! 

•j 



M arly in the career of every piano 
=\ student, it becomes necessary to 
=^llearn the names and keyboard 



positions of some of the more common 
chords. This educational program, 
Chord Producer, can assist in the learn- 
ing of these chords. 

Chord Producer displays the key- 
board position, the musical note posi- 
tion on the G clef staff, and the names 
of the notes of six different chords. The 
chords are displayed in root position 
and are available for every musical key. 
Chord Producer also plays a tone that 
corresponds to each note of the chord. 

Using the Program 

When the program is executed, the 
first screen to appear is the Chord 
Producer menu. This text screen first 
asks the user to select the particular 
musical note that will determine the 
root position ot; the chord. The user 
makes this selection by entering the 
number that corresponds to the musical 
key. There are 12 musical keys, L 

Some musical keys have two distinct 

Stuart Dods, a teacher of computer 
science on the high school and univer- 
sity level, is also a professional musician 
and composer. He is the author of A 
Collection of Points: Mathematics 
Problem Solving With A Computer, 



forms of representation. The same 
piano keyboard keys are pressed foj; 
each representation, but the names pi 
the notes are different. For example, 
Selection Five on the menu can either 
be represented as the key of C-Sharp or 
of D-Flat. When one of these musical 
keys is selected, the menu then asks the 
user to choose between the sharp or flat 
representation by pressing either S or F. 

Sharp keys are indicated in the menu 
by the number sign (#), and the flat keys 
are denoted by the negative sign (-)< 
Musical key selections 2, 5, 7, 10 and 12 
require the user to specify either the 
sharp or flat representation. 

The next decision is to indicate the 
type ; of chord. The chord selection 
incluii^ major, minor, augmented and 
diminished chord types. The user enters 
the number corresponding to pfte of the 
six chord types listed. 

A graphics screen then appears. This 
screen displays a musical staff (G clef) 
and a portion of a keyboard that ift^ 
eludes middle C. Each note of the 
selected chord is displayed on the stall 
as well as signified on the keyboard 
while the appropriate tone is sounded. 
The notes of the chord are displayed one 
at a time. The letter name for each note 
is provided at both the piano keyboard 
and the staff positions. 

Once the selected chord has been 



displayed, two options are available to 
the user; Return to the menu or exit 
from the program. To return to the 
Chord Producer menu, the user must 
press the spacebar; to exit, press E. 

Program Description 

The following is a list of variables and 
their descriptions: ;; 



KP( J 

m ) 

5Y 



Bl<$ 

K : 
Sl<(; 



XIVY1 - 



Keyboard horizcffital posi- 
tions 

Musical tones 
Staff vertical positions 
Specific staff vertical coor 
dinate 

Sharp or flat key 
Key selection 
Used to determine sharp or 
flat sign display 
Letter name horizontal and 
vertical positions 
Number of notes in a se- 
lected chord. 



^pmls 10 through 25 establish the 
menu routine, and lines 100 through 160 
set up a graphics screen. Lines 1100 
through 1600 install chord formats and 
display chord names. Lines 2100 
through 3100 establish key formats and 
display letter names, and lines 4000 
through 4700 set up note name formats. 




140 



THE RAINBOW June 1088 




(Questions or comments about this 
program may he directed to the author 
at 231 Thelma Avenue, Merrick, NY 
11566. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply ) □ 













V 


25 


45 


2000 


224 




330 


,193 


2420 


132 






422 


45 


4300 


197 






1102 


, 48 


END 


247 






1401 


...161 







The listing: CHORDS 

1 DATA 8,16,26,46,54,64,74,84,10 
3, 112 , 123 , 132 , 141, 151, 161, 179 , 18 
9,198,209,217,237,243,58,69,78,8 
9 , 99 , 108 , 117 , 125 , 133 , 140 , 147 , 153 
,159,165,170,176,180,185,189,193 
, 197, 200, 63, 63, 59, 55, 55, 51, 51, 47 
,43,43,39,39,35 

2 REM ***** CHORD PRODUCER **** 

3 REM ***** BY STUART DODS **** 
5 DIM K(13) ,N(4) ,SF(4) ,KP(22) ,S( 
22) ,SP(13) 

7 FOR 1=1 TO 22: READ KP(I) :NEXTI 
:FOR 1=1 TO 22 : READ S(I):NEXTI:F 
OR 1=1 TO 13 :READ SP(I):NEXTI 
10 SK=0 : BK$="N" : BK=0 : CLS : PRINT@9 
," CHORD PRODUCER" 

12 PRINT@129,"1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12":PRINT@161,"A A# B 

C C# D D# E F F# G G#" 

13 PRINT@193," B- D- E- 
G- A-" 

15 PRINT @ 6 6, "WHAT KEY (ENTER NUM 
BER) ";:INPUT K:IF K<1 OR K>12 T 
HEN SOUND 89,1:PRINT@92," ":GO 
T015 

17 IF K=2 OR K=5 OR K=7 OR K=10 
OR K=12 THEN PRINT§258 , " (s) HARP 
OR (f)LAT ";: INPUT BK$ 
20 PRINT@320,"(1) MAJOR" : PRINT @ 3 
52, "(2) MINOR" :PRINT@384," (3) SE 
VEN":PRINT@416," (4) AUG.": PRINT© 
448, "(5) DIM.7":PRINT@480," (6) M 
INOR 7"; 

25 PRINT© 3 3 2, "WHICH CHORD TYPE"; 
: INPUT C:IF C<1 OR C>6 THEN SOUN 
D 89,l:GOTO 25 

90 PMODE 3 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 1,1 



100 FOR Y=15 TO 49 STEP 8: LINE (4 
,Y) -(60, Y) ,PSET:NEXT Y:FOR X=l T 
O 3:LINE(X,14)-(X,48) ,PSET:NEXTX 
110 IF K=l OR (K=2 AND BK$="S") 
THEN 120 

115 IF K=3 OR K=4 OR (K=2 AND BK 
$="F") OR (K=5 AND BK$="S") THEN 

125 ELSE 150 
120 LINE(40,63)-(60,63) ,PSET 
125 LINE(40, 55) -(60,55) ,PSET 
150 LINE(10, 50) -(14,55) ,PSET:LIN 
E( 14, 55) -(14,4) ,PSET:CIRCLE(7,16 
) ,17,0,1.2, .89, .15: CIRCLE (15, 39) 

,9 

300 FOR X=0 TO 249 STEP 19: LINE ( 
X,90) -(X+15,130) ,PSET,B:NEXT X 
320 LINE(0, 90) -(5,112) ,PSET,BF:L 
INE( 10, 90) -(24,112) , PSET , BF : LINE 
(237,90)-(250,112) ,PSET,BF 
3 30 FOR X=48 TO 71 STEP 19: LINE ( 
X, 90) -(X+14,112) , PSET, BF: LINE (X+ 
133,90) -(X+147, 112) , PSET , BF : NEXT 
X 

340 FOR X=107 TO 150 STEP 19: LIN 
E(X,90) -(X+14,112) , PSET , BF : NEXT 
X 

390 SK=K:IF BK$="F" THEN SK=K+1: 
BK = 1 

394 IF SK=13 THEN GOSUB 2000 :GOT 
O 397 

395 ON SK GOSUB 2000,2000,2100,2 
200,2200,2300,2300,2400,2410,241 
0,2190,2190 

397 IF BK$="F" THEN GOSUB 3000 :G 
OTO400 

398 IF BK$="S" THEN GOSUB 3100 
400 ON C GOSUB 1100,1200,1300,14 
00,1500,1200 

410 K(l)=K:FOR 1=1 TO N:KY=120:X 

1=KP(K(I) ) -4:Y1=142:CC=3:IF K(I) 

=2 OR K(I)=5 OR K(I)=7 THEN KY=1 

03:CC=1:Y1=85:GOTO 416 

412 IF K(I)=10 OR K(I)=12 OR K(I 

)=14 THEN KY=103:Y1=85:CC=1:GOTO 

416 

414 IF K(I)=17 OR K(I)=19 OR K(I 

) =22 THEN KY=103:Y1=85:CC=1 

416 IF BK$="F" THEN SF(I)=SF(I)- 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 141 



1 

418 IF BK$= ,, S , » THEN SF(I)=SF(I) + 

s. 1 

420 CIRCLE (KP(K(I) ) ,KY) ,6, CC:ON 
N(I) GOSUB 4000, 4100, 4200, 4400, 4 
290,4300,4190 

422 ON SF(I) GOSUB 4490,4500,110 

5,4600,4700 

425 SOUNDS (K(I) ) ,6 

430 IF 1=1 THEN SY=SP(K(I) +BK) :G 

OTO 440 

435 SY=SY-8 

440 CIRCLE (51, SY) ,6,2, .6:X1=66:Y 

l=SY+4:ON N(I) GOSUB 4000,4100,4 

200,4400,4290,4300,4190 

442 ON SF(I) GOSUB 4490,4500,110 

5,4600,4700 

450 NEXT I 

500 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=CHR$(32) THE 
N 10 

510 IF A$= ,, E" THEN 600 ELSE 500 
,600 CLS : END 

'1099 REM *** MAJOR CHORD ** 

1100 N=3:K(2)=K+4:K(3)=K+7 

1101 LINE(154,35)-(154,21) ,PSET: 
LINE (155, 21) -(159,24) ,PSET:LINE( 
159, 26) -(164, 21) , PSET: LINE ( 164 , 2 
1) -(164, 35) , PSET: LINE (166, 35) -(1 
70,26) , PSET: LINE (170, 26) -(174, 35 
) , PSET: LINE (168, 27) -(172, 29) ,PSE 
T 

1102 LINE(176,33)-(176,35) ,PSET: 
LINE(176,35)-(180,35) , PSET: LINE ( 
180,35) -(180,26) , PSET: LINE (176 , 2 
6) -(184, 26) , PSET: LINE (187, 26) -(1 
93,35) ;PSET,B:LINE(196,35)-(196, 
26) , PSET: LINE (196, 26) -(203, 29) ,P 
SET, B: LINE (200, 29) -(204, 35) ,PSET 
1105 RETURN 

1199 REM *** MINOR CHORD ** 

1200 N=3:K(2)=K+3:K(3)=K+7:SF(2) 
=SF(2)-1 

1201 LINE (154, 35) -(154, 21) , PSET: 
LINE (154, 21) -(159, 24) , PSET: LINE ( 
159,24) -(164,21) , PSET: LINE ( 164 , 2 
1) -(164, 35) , PSET: LINE (170, 26) -(1 
70,35) , PSET: LINE (176, 35) -(176, 26 
) ,PSET:LINE(176,26)-(184,35) ,PSE 
T:LINE(184,35)-(184,26) ,PSET 

1202 LINE(188,26)-(194,35) ,PSET, 
B:LINE (198, 35) -(198,26) , PSET: LIN 
E (198, 26) -(205, 29) , PSET, B: LINE (2 
02,29)-(206,35) ,PSET 

1204 IF C=6 THEN N=4 :M=60 :K(4) =K 
+10: GOSUB 1600 

1205 RETURN 

1299 REM *** SEVEN CHORD ** 

1300 N=4:M=0:K(2)=K+4:K(3)=K+7:K 
(4)=K+10:GOSUB 1600:RETURN 

1399 REM *** AUG. CHORD ** 

1400 N=3:K(2)=K+4:K(3)=K+8:SF(3) 



142 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



=SF(3)+1 

1401 LINE(154,35)-(162,20) ,PSET: 
LINE (162,20)-(169,35),PSET: LINE ( 
158,28) -(164,28) , PSET: LINE (175 , 2 
4) -(183, 35) , PSET, B: LINE (177, 24) - 
(181,24) ,PRESET:LINE(186,24)-(19 
4,35) , PSET, B: LINE (194, 24) -(194,2 
9) , PRESET: LINE (190, 29) -(194, 29) , 
PSET 

1402 LINE(197,33)-(199,35) ,PSET, 
B: RETURN 

1499 REM *** DIM. CHORD ** 

1500 N=4:K(2)=K+3:K(3)=K+6:K(4)= 
K+9:SF(2)=SF(2)-1:SF(3)=SF(3)-1: 
SF(4)=»SF(4)-1 

1505 LINE(154,35)-(154,21) ,PSET: 
CIRCLE (154, 28) ,15,0, .7, .77, .24:L 
INE (172, 26) -(172, 35) , PSET: LINE (1 
77,35) -(177,26) , PSET : LINE (177 , 26 
) -(182, 30) ,PSET:LINE(182,30)-(18 
7,26) , PSET: LINE (187, 26) -(187 ,35) 
, PSET :M=40: GOSUB 1600: RETURN 
1600 LINE(154+M,23)-(154+M,21) ,P 
SET:LINE(154+M,21)-(164+M,21) ,PS 
ET:LINE(164+M,21)-(161+M,35) ,PSE 
T : RETURN 

1999 REM *** BIG A ** 

2000 LINE(105,35)-(120,21) ,PSET: 
LINE(120,21)-(135,35) , PSET: LINE ( 
112,28) -(128,28) , PSET:N (1) =1 : N (2 
)=3:N(3)=5:N(4)=7:SF(1)=3 :SF(2)= 
4 : SF ( 3 ) =3 : SF ( 4 ) =3 : RETURN 

2099 REM *** BIG B ** 

2100 LINE(105,21)-(130,28) ,PSET, 
B: LINE (105 ,28) -(135, 35) ,PSET,B:N 
(1)=2:N(2)=4:N(3)=6:N(4)=1:SF(1) 
=3:SF(2)=4:SF(3)=4:SF(4)=3:RETUR 
N 

2189 REM *** BIG G ** 

2190 LINE(125, 33) -(125,30) , PSET: 
LINE (125, 31) -(136,31) ,PSET:N(1)= 
7:N(2)=2:N(3)=4:N(4)=6:SF(4)=3 

2199 REM *** BIG C ** 

2200 CIRCLE (125, 28) ,15,0, .7, .09, 
.89: IF SK=4 OR SK=5 THEN N(l)=3: 
N(2)=5:N(3)=7:N(4)=2:SF(4)=2 
2205 SF(1)=3:SF(2)=3:SF(3)=3:RET 
URN 

2299 REM *** BIG D ** . 

2300 LINE(107,35)-(107,21) ,PSET: 
CIRCLE (106, 28) ,23,0, -38, .77, .24: 
N(1)=4:N(2)=6:N(3)=1:N(4)=3:SF(1 
)=3:SF(2)=4:SF(3)=3:SF(4)=3:RETU 
RN 

2399 REM *** BIG E ** 

2400 LINE(133,35)-(107,35) ,PSET: 
N(1)=5:N(2)=7:N(3)=2:N(4)=4:SF(1 
) =3 : SF (2 ) =4 : SF ( 3 ) =3 : SF (4 ) =3 

2409 REM *** BIG F ** 

2410 LINE(107, 35) -(1.07,21) ,PSET: 
LINE(107, 21) -(133,21) ,PSET:LINE( 



107,27)-(128,27) ,PSET:IF SK-9 OR 
SK=10 THEN N(1)=6:N(2)=1:N(3)=3 
:N(4)=5:SF(1)=3:SF(2)=3:SF(3)=3: 
SF(4)=2 
242j3 RETURN 

2999 REM *** BIG FLAT ** 

3000 LINE(140,32)-(140,18) ,PSET: 
LINE (140 ,26) -(146,32) ,PSET,B:RET 
URN 

3099 REM *** BIG SHARP ** 

3100 LINE(140,27) -(152,27) ,PSET: 
LINE ( 140 , 2 2 ) - ( 152 , 22 ) , PSET : LINE ( 
143 , 18 ) - ( 143 , 3 2 ) , PSET : LINE ( 149 , 1 
8)-(149,32) , PSET : RETURN 

3999 REM *** A *** 

4000 LINE(X1,Y1) -(Xl+4,Yl-6) ,PSE 
T: LINE (Xl+4 , Yl-6 ) - (Xl+9 , Yl) , PSET 
: LINE (Xl+3 , Yl-3 ) - (Xl+6 , Yl-3 ) , PSE 
T : RETURN 

4099 REM *** B *** 

4100 LINE(X1, Yl-6) -(Xl+6, Yl-3) ,P 
SET, B: LINE (XI, Yl-3 ) -(X1+8,Y1) ,PS 
ET , B : RETURN 

4190 LINE (Xl+4, Yl-2 ) -(Xl+7,Yl-2) 
, PSET 

4199 REM *** C *** 

4200 LINE (XI , Yl-6 ) - (Xl+7 , Yl) , PSE 
T , B : LINE (Xl+7 , Yl-5 ) - (Xl+7 , Yl-2 ) , 
PRESET: RETURN 



4289 REM *** E *** 

4290 LINE(X1,Y1) -(Xl+7, Yl) , PSET 
4300 LINE(X1, Yl) -(XI, Yl-6) ,PSET: 
LINE (XI , Yl-6 ) - (Xl+7 , Yl-6 ) , PSET : L 
INE (XI , Yl-3 ) - (Xl+5 , Yl-3 ) , PSET : RE 
TURN 

4399 REM *** D *** 

4400 LINE(X1, Yl) -(XI, Yl-6) ,PSET: 
CIRCLE (XI, Yl-3) ,9,0, .5, .77, .24: R 
ETURN 

4490 LINE (Xl+16, Yl-4 )-(Xl+16,Yl- 
6) , PSET : LINE (Xl+16 , Yl-3 ) - (Xl+20 , 
Yl) ,PSET,B 

4500 LINE (Xl+11, Yl-4)- (Xl+11, Yl- 
6) ,PSET:LINE(Xl+ll,Yl-3) -(Xl+14, 
Yl) ,PSET,B 
4510 RETURN 

4599 REM *** SHARP *** 

4600 LINE(Xl+ll,Yl-2)-(Xl+17,Yl- 
2 ) , PSET : LINE (Xl+11, Yl-4) - (Xl+17 , 
Yl-4) , PSET: LINE (Xl+13 , Yl) - (Xl+13 
, Yl-6 ) , PSET : LINE (Xl+15 , Yl) - (Xl+1 
5, Yl-6) , PSET: RETURN 

4699 REM *** DOUBLE SHARP ** 

4700 LINE (Xl+11, Yl-2) -(Xl+13, Yl) 
, PSET , B : LINE (Xl+17 , Yl-2 ) - (Xl+19 , 
Yl) , PSET , B : LINE (Xl+11 , Yl-6 ) - (X1+ 
13 , Yl-4 ) , PSET , B : LINE (Xl+17 , Yl-6 ) 
- (Xl+19 , Yl-4 ) , PSET , B : RETURN 



SPECIAL DEAL ON 500 
PROGRAMS IS BACK! 



BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND! GET OUR LATEST 
50 DISKS OR TAPES FULL OF OVER 500 PROGRAMS. 
HERE IS WHAT YOU'LL RECEIVE: 

★Over 250 Utility/Home Application Programs including a 
Word Processor, Database, Spreadsheet, Disk Utilities, 
Business Software, Electronics Series, Educational Pro- 
grams for Kids, plus much more! 

★Over 200 exciting games including King Pede, Kron, Star 
Trek, Flight Simulator, Wizard, Horse Races, Football, plus 
much more. 

★Over 30 adventures including Rambo, Haunted House, 
Power Sword, Skid Row, plus 32k graphic adventures. 

Individual issues sell for s 9°° each or *450 00 
for all 50, We slashed the price to 

only $ 150 00 ! 



REG. $ 450 




$ 150 ( 



★★THIS MONTH ONLY** 



VISA 



Buy this package of 500 
programs and receive a free 
6 month subscription. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



WARM UPTO OUR WINTERPRICES 
ON SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE 



THERE IS NO BETTER WAYTO ENJOYTHE WINTER THAN TREAT- 
ING YOUR COLOR COMPUTER TO 10 READY-TO-RUN PRO- 
GRAMS EACH MONTH. GET 12 DISKS OR TAPES A YEAR CON- 
TAINING OVER 120 QUALITY PROGRAMS. A SUBSCRIPTION TO 
T&D SOFTWARE CONSISTS OF 10 READY-TO-LOAD PROGRAMS 
DELIVERED BY FIRST CLASS MAIL EVERY MONTH. 

NO, WE ARE NOT THE SAME AS THE RAINBOW ON TAPE. IN 
FACT, MANY SUBSCRIBERS HAVE WRITTEN IN AND SAID THAT 
WE ARE MUCH BETTER THAN RAINBOW ON TAPE! 




1 YEAR (12 issues) 
6 MO. (6 issues) 
1 1SSUE 



PRICES- 
TAPE 
OR DISK 
J&Otf 



THIS 
MONTH ONLY 
60.00 
35.00 
8.00 



Michigan Residents Add 4% 
Overseas Add $1 0 to Subscription Price 
Personal Checks Welcome! 



★ Available on COC0 1, 2, and 3 

* Includes Documentation 

★ Over 4,500 Satisfied 
Customers 

* Back Issues Available From 
July '82 (Over 670 Programs) 



TURN TO PAGE 124 & 125 
FOR A COMPLETE LISTING 



PLEASE SPECIFY TAPE OR DISK 




T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, 2490 MILES STANDISH DR., HOLLAND, Ml 49424 (616) 399-9648 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 143 



I 

! , 

TWWlo translate some BASIC keywords 
into assembly language 



Assembly Language: Getting 

Back to BASICs 

By David J. Gabler 



Have you ever wondered what lies beneath BASIC? In 
the Color Computer, BASIC is an interpretive 
language that sorts through your files line by line, 
looking for errors. If there are no errors, it then executes the 
commands in machine language. 

This makes BASIC a comparatively slow language to work 
with. For the most part, the speed of machine language is 
not all that critical; but certain applications like sorts, 
graphics animation and data communications often require 
greater speed than BASIC will allow. 

The hardest part of learning assembly language (the text 
files that are then translated into the binary Vs and O's of 
machine language), is learning to recognize how BASIC 
functions are created. This is a real stumbling block for some 
people. For the most part, things that can be accomplished 
in BASIC with one or two commands will require a few more 
commands in assembly. This is because, with assembly 
language, you have more direct control over each function. 
You can manipulate the bits yourself. 

For as long as you have been programming, you have put 
information on the screen by using the PRINT statement. In 
assembly language, you have to do all the internal manip- 
ulations of each character yourself. This causes some people 
to run away in fear, but it does not have to be an excruciating 
experience. Let's take it one step at a time. 

In assembly language, certain registers are used to hold 
data temporarily. If you want to hold the data more 
permanently, you must poke it into memory. This is because 
there are so few registers, and they are constantly needed to 
pass and compare data. 

It is a good idea to have several subroutines that act as 
BASIC keywords imbedded in your programs. Then, when a 
specific function is needed, it is simple to load the registers 
and GOSUB to that subroutine. It makes the program much 



David Gabler teaches computer science at a special needs 
high school He has been involved with the CoCo since 1984 
and enjoys writing fiction, playing his guitar, and, of course, 
tinkering with his Co Co. 

144 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



easier to code and debug and to read later, especially if 
remarks are used (heavy commenting never hurt the 
readability of an assembly listing). 

What follows is a short dictionary of 29 BASIC commands 
and how they are accomplished in assembly. Since assembly 
is much more unregimented than BASIC, there are several 
ways to go about a task. There are also some BASIC keywords 
that are no longer needed in assembly. 

CLEAR 

In BASIC this command saves string space. In assembly, we 
might think of it as an initialization statement that clears an 
area of memory for variables. Unlike BASIC, however, the 
memory area set aside is not protected. It is up to you to set 
it aside, clear it, and then make sure you do not write over 
it with something else. It is up to you to keep track of it. 

The memory area can be cleared with a simple loop: 



START LDX #$7F00 LOAD X WITH START ADDRESS 

NOTEND CLR ,X+ CLEAR MEMORY AND INCREMENT X 

CMPX #$7FFF COMPARE X TO END ADDRESS 
BNE NOTEND IF NOT DONE, GO BACK AGAIN 

• MEMORY IS CLEAR AND THE PROGRAM PROCEEDS 



CLEAR 200,&H7F00 

In BASIC this is used to protect an area of memory from 
BASIC, so that it can be used for ML programs or data. In 
assembly, it is up to you to make sure that you do not interfere 
with memory reserved for other uses. It is a good idea to draw 
up a rough memory map that defines those areas of memory 
used by your program, those used by the system and those 
that are not used. In this way, it will be easier to keep track 
of memory. 

CLS 

In BASIC this clears the screen. In assembly it is simply a 
matter of clearing all the memory locations that are used by 



the screen display. In the CoCo, these addresses reside in 
memory from 1024 to 1535. A short loop will accomplish this: 



START 
NOTEND 



IDA #96 
LDX #1024 
STA ,X+ 
CMPX #1535 
BNE NOTEND 



LOAD A WITH A BLANK CHARACTER 
LOAD X WITH SCREEN LOCATION 
STORE A AT SCREEN AND INC X 
COMPARE X WITH SCREEN END 
IF NOT AT END, GO BACK AGAIN 



' SCREEN CLEAR AND PROGRAM PROCEEDS 

This loop will continue from 1024 to 1535, at which time 
program execution will continue; whatever instruction comes 
after the last line will be executed. If this is a subroutine, that 
instruction is RT5. 

DATA 

In BASIC DATA tells the BASIC interpreter that what follows 
is information, not to be confused as part of the program. 
BASIC will then ignore the data until a READ instruction is 
given. In assembly you must be sure to pass over the data 
yourself, or the microprocessor will continue to interpret the 
data as opcodes, or instructions. For this reason, it is best 
to keep data tables at the beginning or ending of your 
program. To define tables, you can use the following 
instructions: 



FCC »THIS IS A TABLER OF LETTERS * 

FCB 0 A DELIMETER FOR THE TABLE 

FDB $FF27 A TABLE OF TWO NUMBERS 



DIM 

In assembly the programmer keeps track of all variables. 
A particular chunk of memory is set aside for storing 
information. Where and how much memory are up to you. 
It is not difficult to manage this memory, but it is your 
responsibility. 

END 

There are several ways to gracefully exit a machine 
language program. One way is to do a cold start on the 
machine. On the CoCo, this is accomplished with: 



START 



CLR $71 
JMP $A027 



CLEAR MEMORY LOCATION $71 
GOTO $A027 AND EXECUTE 



If the program was called from BASIC, an RT5 or RETURN 
instruction will return control to the BASIC interpreter; more 
popularly, the program might not have an end. This is the 
case if you want your code protected in some way. Once it 
is executed, it will be difficult to stop without destroying 
memory contents. 

FOR-NEXT-STEP 

In BASIC this sets up a loop. We have already seen several 
loops in our first examples. In BASIC a convenient counter 
is established for you, but in assembly you must set up a 
counter and check it yourself: 



START LDX #$1650 COUNT FROM $1650 
NOTYET LEAX -1,X DECREASE COUNTER BY 1. 

BNE NOTYET IF X O 0 THEN GO BACK AGAIN 
» COUNTER - 0 AND PROGRAM CAN PROCEED 



In the case of FDR -NEXT -STEP, we simply decrement X by 
the value we want to step by; for example, LEflX -3,X would 
cause the counter to step by -3 every time the loop is executed. 

GOSUB 

In assembly this is accomplished by a JSR or B5R. Which 
command you use depends on whether you are writing 
address-dependent code. In either case, the program 
execution branches to the subroutine; and the return address 
is put on the stack, so that a return can be accomplished using 
the RT5 command. 

GOTO 

In assembly, you use JMP or BRfl. This is an unconditional 
jump. Unlike JSR, it is used to jump over data, or to 
unconditionally GOTO another part of the program. Of 
course, one may ask why you wrote a part of the program 
that you must always jump over. Sometimes the need arises, 
but it is best to avoid this situation. 

IF-THEN-ELSE 

In assembly this is accomplished using conditional 
operators. Conditional means that a certain condition must 
exist for the program to branch: 



IF 



THEN 



ELSE 



LDA $1)7)72 
CMPA #$46 
BNE ELSE 
LDA #$1)72 
STA $1002 
BRA CONT 
LDA #$FF 
STA $1002 



WHAT IS IN MEMORY AT $1002 

IS IT A $46? 

NO, SO GOTO ELSE 

YES, THEN PUT $102 IN A 

POKE $1002,$102 

JUMP OVER ELSE PART OF PROGRAM 
ELSE PUT 255 IN A 
POKE $1002 , $FF 



CONT 'REST OF PROGRAM CONTINUES HERE 



INKEYS 

In assembly this is accomplished simply by setting up a 
small loop to check the keyboard. If the value in A is 0, no 
key was found, and we can either stay in the loop until a key 
is found, or continue program execution and come back later 
to check again: 

ENTRY EQU $A000 ROM ROUTINE TO POLL KEYBOARD 

START JSR [ENTRY] GOTO ROM KEY INPUT ROUTINE 

CMPA #0 WAS A KEY PRESSED? 

BEQ START NO, GO BACK AND CHECK AGAIN 

'KEY IS IN REGISTER A, PROGRAM PROCEEDS 



INPUT 

For INPUT we set up an area of memory, called a buffer, 
to hold the string. In our example the computer continues 
to get input from the keyboard, and puts it in the buffer until 
a CHR$(13) (RETURN) is encountered. You can set up the 
loop to accept only certain keys, or a certain number of keys. 
That is the beauty of assembly — the cards are in your hands, 
and you can set up the input routine to your liking. 



ENTRY EQU $A000 

BUFFER EQU $400 
START LDX #BUFFER 

LOOP JSR [ENTRY] 

CMPA #0 
BEQ LOOP 
CMPA #13 
BEQ DONE 
STA ,X+ 
BRA LOOP 
DONE 'STRING IS IN THE 



POINT TO INKEY$ ROUTINE 
SCREEN IS THE BUFFER 
REGISTER X POINTS TO THE BUFFER 
GOTO ROM KEY INPUT ROUTINE 
WAS A KEY PRESSED? 
NO, GO BACK AND CHECK AGAIN 
YES, WAS IT A RETURN KEY? 
YES, WE ARE ALL DONE 
NO, SO PUT IT IN THE BUFFER 
GO AND GET ANOTHER KEY 
BUFFER , PROGRAM PROCEEDS 

June 1988 THE RAINBOW 145 



LET 

This is a dead keyword, but we will discuss its use. It is 
used to assign a value to a variable, as in LET Z = 10. In 
assembly we must put aside an area of memory to hold our 
variable and then store the value there: 



START LDX #$7FE0 POINT X TO VARIABLE Z 

LDA #$7F LOAD REGISTER A WITH $7F 

STA ,X LET Z - $7F 

• PROGRAM EXECUTION CONTINUES HERE 



ON-GOSUB:ON-GOTO 

In basic the computer tests several values and then 
branches to another part of the program, depending on the 
values found. ON G05UB branches to a subroutine and then 
returns, whereas ON GOTO branches without necessarily 
returning. Our examples show the use of these commands in 
assembly language: 

ON GOSUB 



Please note that, although the program execution resumes 
at N0TIT2, the two subroutines called do not necessarily 
return to that point in the program. 

PEEKrPOKE 

These two commands are very easy to emulate in assembly. 
To read a value from memory: 

LDA $1002 

To write a value into memory: 

LDfi tt$32 
STA $1002 

PRINT 

Printing on the screen is essentially a matter of poking a 
screen memory location with the value of a character. To put 
a character A on the upper left hand portion of the screen, 
for instance: 



START 



NOTIT1 



N0TIT2 



LDA $150 
CMPA #80 
BNE NOTIT1 
BSR CASE1 
BRA N0TIT2 
CMPA #100 
BNE N0TIT2 
BSR CASE2 



GET A VALUE TO TEST 
IS IT 80? 

NO, TRY ANOTHER TEST 
YES, GOSUB CASE1 
JUMP PAST SECOND TEST 
IS IT 100? 

NO, FITS NEITHER CASE 
YES, GOSUB CASE2 



•PROGRAM EXECUTION RESUMES HERE 



In this case the subroutines, CASE1 and CA5E2, must be 
used carefully, so that the value of Register A will not be 
changed. This can be accomplished by simply clearing A 
before returning from the subroutine. 



ON GOTO 
START 



N0TIT1 



N0TIT2 



LDA $150 
CMPA #80 
BNE NOTITl 
JMP CASE1 
CMPA #100 
BNE N0TIT2 
JMP CASE2 



PUT A VALUE TO TEST IN A 
IS IT 80? 

NO, GOTO NEXT TEST 
YES, GOTO CASE1 
IS IT 100? 

NO, FITS NEITHER CASE 
YES, GOTO CASE2 



START 



LDA #65 
STA $400 



LOAD A WITH A 65 (LETTER A) 
PRINT IT TO THE SCREEN 



PRINT@ 

To print a string to a certain place on the screen, put it 
in a table, and output it to the screen one character at a time. 
This is how basic does it. The string should have a zero, 
known as a delimiter, at the end, so that the program can 
find the end of the message: 

$7FE0 - H 
$7FE1 - I 
$7FE2 - 0 



START 



LOOP 



CLRA 

LDX #$7FE0 
LDY #$400 
LDB A,X 
BEQ NOMORE 
STB A,Y 
INCA 

BRA LOOP 



CLEAR THE A REGISTER 

SET X TO POINT AT THE MESSAGE 

SET Y TO POINT AT THE SCREEN 

GET CHARACTER TO PRINT FROM TABLE 

IF B-0, NO MORE TO PRINT 

PRINT TO SCREEN 

INCREMENT COUNTER 

GO BACK FOR NEXT CHARACTER 



PROGRAM CONTINUES HERE 



NOMORE 



PROGRAM CONTINUES HERE 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

If you need address labels fast, this one-liner should 
fill the bill. Just follow the prompts and type in the 
name and address and how many labels you want 
printed. 

The listing: 

1 CLS : K~fi : INPUT "INPUT # OF LABEL 
S, NAME, ADDRESS , CITY STATE ZIP 
*A, B$ , C$ , D$ : PRINT@224 , "LABELS T 
0 BE PRINTED "A: FORE«lTOA: PRINT* 
-2 , B$ : PRINT#-2 , C$ : PRINT#-2 , D$ : FO 
RF=1T03 : PRINT#-2 : NEXT : SOUND2 J3j3 , 1 
: G=G+1 : PRINT@2 5 6 , "LABELS PRINTED 
" ;G : NEXT: GOTO 1 

James R. Demers 
Chicopee, MA 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Simulations Tape,) 



PRINT#-2 

To print to the printer, set the baud rate value to the 
appropriate amount by poking it in Location 150, and then 
send each character to the ROM print routine after setting 
the device number. The device number simply tells the 
computer which device to print to. In this case, it will be 
#-2, the printer: 



START 



LDA #-2 
STA $6F 
LDA #18 
STA $96 
LDA #65 
JSR [$A0JJ2] 



SET REGISTER A TO PRINTER 
STORE A TO DEVICE NUMBER 
SET A TO 24?? BAUD 
STORE A IN BASIC BAUD COUNTER 
PUT CHARACTER A IN REGISTER A 
GOSUB ROM PRINT ROUTINE 



* PROGRAM EXECUTION CONTINUES HERE 



REM 

Comments can be scattered throughout the source code 
and should be used abundantly. It is very easy to forget what 
a particular segment of the program does, but with ample 
comments this should not happen often. 



146 



THE RAINBOW June 1 988 



RETURN 

RTS works the same way that RETURN does in BASIC. After 
a BSR or JSR instruction is given, the return address is placed 
on the stack. When the microprocessor encounters an RTS 
instruction, the return address is pulled off the stack and put 
into the program counter, effectively bringing program 
execution back to just after the place where the JSR was 
encountered. 

ASC:CHR$ 

In BASIC these are used to "translate" between the actual 
character and its ASCII equivalent. There is no need for this 
in assembly. If you are working with 865, you only need to 
output it to the string to turn it into an A. In assembly G5 
= fl; there is no such statement as CHR$(65). Any value is 
dealt with directly. You, as programmer, are responsible for 
knowing what type of value you are dealing with. 

LEN 

In order to perform functions on strings such as LEFTS, 
RIGHTS and MIDS, it is necessary to first know the length of 
the string. Since your strings will be stored with a zero 
delimiter, it will be relatively easy to find their length. 



START 
LOOP 



FOUND 



CLRB 

LDX #$7FEJJ 
IDA ,X+ 
BEQ FOUND 
INCB 

BRA LOOP 
'THE LENGTH 



ZERO THE COUNTER OF THE STRING 
POINT TO THE STRING WITH X 
GET A CHARACTER FROM THE STRING 
IF A-P THEN tfE HAVE THE LENGTH 
INCREMENT THE COUNTER 
GO BACK FOR MORE DATA 
IS NOW IN THE B REGISTER 



RIGHTS 

After having returned from the length subroutine, you may 
want to find the RIGHTS (X$, 5) letters in the string. Since 
you know the length, and it is already in the B register, this 
poses few problems: 



START 



LOOP 



LDX #$7FE0 
LDY #$6000 
SUBB #5 
LEAX B,X 
LDA ,X+ 
BEQ FOUND 
STA ,Y+ 
BRA LOOP 



POINT TO THE STRING WITH X 
TEMPORARY STORAGE AREA 
SUBTRACT # OF CHARS FROM LENGTH 
POINT TO RIGHT 5 CHARS 
LOAD A WITH CHARACTER 
HAVE WE FOUND THEM ALL? 
NO, SO STORE IT IN BUFFER 
GO BACK FOR ANOTHER ONE 



FOUND 



'YES , THE RIGHT$(X$,5) IS NOW AT $6000 



Now that we have shown in detail how some of the BASIC 
keywords are translated in assembly language, it should be 
easier for you to translate other commands and functions. 
At any rate, these subroutines, spruced up a bit, will make 
your job as a programmer much simpler. At the very least, 
this small dictionary will have fullfilled its purpose in making 
assembly language a bit less mysterious. Above all, I must 
stress: Do not be satisfied with the routines I have shown you\ 
The only way to learn anything is to do it. Find other and 
better ways to do these functions. The world of assembly is 
out there waiting for you to master it, but you can only start 
at the beginning. 

(Questions or comments regarding this tutorial may be 
directed to the author at 1173 Niagara Street, Denver, CO 
80220. Please enclose an SASE when requesting a reply, 



TURBO RAM 
BOARD 




$39.95 



DUAL-MODE 
CONTROLLER 



ZERQK 



$119.95 

51 2 K 



Fast 1 20 nsecRAM chips 
Easy-to-follow instructions 
No soldering 

includes RAM Board Utilities 



PYRAMIX Arcade Game $19.95 




PAL UPGRADE 

$7.95 

for grey or white 
MULTI-PACK (26-3024) 



BACKUP LIGHTNING (disk duplicator) $14.95 



RAM BOARD UTILITIES 

• RAM Disk for RSDOS 

• Print Spooler 

• Sophisticated MEMORY TEST Program 



$19.95 



S&H: S3.50 U.S. and Canada ($1 5 foreign) 
COD: $2.25 U.S. only 
2ND Day Air: $1 .50 (contiguous U.S. only) 
Tax: inside California add 6%- 

VISA or MC accepted _ , 



$99.95 



WM not included (8$ DOS 



100% Compatible with existing H/W & §/W 

No MULTI-PACK required {low power draw) 

8K Cache memory (expandable to 32K) 

Track Reads(programs load up to 2x faster) 

Bo Switched Sockets [supports 8K fiOM, 

2764/271 28/27256 EPRQMs) 

Gold Contacts for reliability 

Easy Installation (no cutting, soldering, jumpers or 

external wires) 

Runs under OS-9 with: 

• no-halt read/write 

• interrupts and multi-tasking enabled 
reliable clock and type-ahead 



30 DAY MONEY-BACK 
GUARANTEE PLUS FULL 1 YEAR 
WARRANTY ON ALL PRODUCTS! 



Prices subject to change without notice 



-Send check or 'money- order to: 

Per forma nfce 
eripherals 

1 1 432 PeTfa Way 
[Mira'LiDma, CA 91:752 
Or Gall (714) 681 -3007 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 147 




Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE RAINBOW'S 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed — 
legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high score. 
Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE RAINBOW. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



* Current Record Holder 



Shutout 



4,475 
4,500 
4,300 
3,960 

3,960 



12,825 

11,675 

10,650 
10,500 
10,475 



ADVANCED STAR'TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
4,750 ★Stephane Martel. Laval, Quebec 
David Schaller, Clarkston, WA 
Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney. MD 
Jeffrey Warren, Waynesville, NC 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
Robbi Smith, Helena, HI 
ASTRO BLAST (Mark Data) 

48,825 *Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
BALLOON (THE RAINBOW, 6/87) 

7,000 *Jon Hobson, Plainfield, Wl 
BEE ZAPPER (THE RAINBOW, 9/87) 

15,785 *David Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 
Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

Daniel Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 

Columbia 
Matthew Yarrows, Easthampton, MA 
Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
Edward Kavanaugh, North Easton, 
MA 

BOUNCING BOULDERS (Diecom Products) 

10,930 ★Patrick Garneau, Ste-Croix, Quebec 
BUZZARD BAIT ( Tom Mix) 
22,931,850 ★Skip Taday, East Lyme, CT 
763,550 Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
t87,750 Keith Janas, Kitwanga, British 
Columbia 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 
1,627,500 *Matthew Fumieh, Munford, TN 

David Brown, New Waterford, Nova 
Scotia 

Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
Gregory Speer, Emporia, KS 
Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wi 
CLOWNS & BALLOONS (Radio Shack) 
688,960 ★Faye Keefer, Augusta, GA 

Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
Charles Andrews, Delta Jet, AK 
Melody Webb, Lakeport, CA 
Timm Capped, Freeland, Mi 
COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

119-0 ★eAdam Silversteln, Chicago, IL 
111-2 David Czarnecki, Northhampton, MA 
43-0 Jason Kopp, Downs, IL 
COLOR CAR (NOVASOFT) 

252,928 *Alan Martin, Cornwall, Ontario 
110,870 Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
COLOR POKER (THE RAINBOW. 4/83) 
34,136,600 ★Earl Foster, Lynchburg, VA 
THE CONTROLLERS (THE RAINBOW, 2/88) 
188 ★Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

CRYSTAL CASTLES (ThunderVision) 

381,138 ★Jason Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 
DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 

81 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 
David and Shirley Johnson, Leicester, 
NC 

Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
Melanie Moor, Florence, AL 
Andrew Yarrows, Easthampton, MA 
Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 



35,331 
31,673 
30,326 

30,253 



202,260 
89,285 
72,410 

67,760 



65,351 
62,702 
50,797 
26,205 



623,550 

75,000 
40,800 



202,000 

178,200 
169,000 
165,500 



217,500 
70,180 
36,650 
33,710 



85 
85 

86 
86 
87 
87 



DEFENSE (Spectral Associates) 

16,305 ★Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
DEF MOV (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

43,806 ★Domingo Martinez, Miami, FL 
David Schaller, Clarkston, WA 
Douglas Bacon, Middletown, CT 
Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

DEMON ATTACK (Imagic) 

279,435 *Jon Hobson, Plainfield, Wl 
Tom Briggs. Hillsdale, NY 
Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
Glenn Hodgson, Aberdeenshire, 

Scotland 
Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
DESERT RIDER (Radio Shack) 

80,703 ★Thomas Payton, Anderson, SO 
Jason Hackley, Clinton, CT 
William Currie, Bryans Road, MD 
Patrick Devitt, Lombard, IL 
David Cornette, Green Bay, Wl 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Tom Mix) 
1,866,100 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Dale Krueger, Maple Ridge, 

British Columbia 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 
DONPAN (Radio Shack) 

53,100 ★Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
52,600 Eric Olson. Wheaton, IL 
DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 

207,860 *Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 

Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
Don Mullis, Delavan, Wl 
Betty Mullis, Delavan, Wi 
Tristan Terkuc, Richmond, Ontario 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

99,980 *Danny Wimett, Rome, NY 

Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
Stephane Des hales, Beioeil, Quebec 
Neil Edge, Wiliiston, FL 
Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 
Jean-Francois Morin, Loretteviile, 
Quebec 

Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
Keith Yampanis, Jeffrey, NH 
Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
Patrlco Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 
Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge, VA 
Kevin Pater, Port Alberni, British 

Columbia 
David Brown, New Waterford, Nova 

Scotia 
Mike Efts, Charlotte, Mi 
Antonio Hidalgo, San Jose, 

Costa Rica 
Jesse Binns, Phoenix, AZ 
Andrea Mayfleld, Melbourne, FL 
Michelle Murray, Salem, IN 



25,147 
22,908 

22,739 
22,037 



DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 



Timothy O'Neal, Commerce, TX 
Sheldon Penney, Green Bay, 

Newfoundland 
Kyle Sheppard, Fairview, NC 
David Czarnecki, Northhampton, MA 



160,835 
146,325 
11,726 
9,861 
9,200 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 

¥ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

t 

¥ 
¥ 

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^^ 



★Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Marcos Rodriguez, New York, NY 
Michael Adams, Columbia, SC 
Jesse Cogdeit, Wilmington, DE 
ENCHANTER (infocom) 

400/223 *Konnie Grant, Toledo, OH 
ESCAPE 2012 (Computerware) 

202 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
199 Milan Parekh, Anaheim, CA 
FIRE COPTER (Adventure international) 

77,030 ★Mike LeBrun, Cornwall, Ontario 
56,840 Michael Adams, Columbia, SC 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/86) 



22,505 

11,250 
5,680 
3,760 
3,505 



★Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 
Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wi 
Rick Beevers, Bioomfield, MN 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 



GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 



★Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
David Czarnecki, Northhampton, MA 
Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
Sheldon Penney, Green Bay, 
Newfoundland 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 



31,100 
29,030 
26,370 
22,250 
11,830 



172,320 
136,510 
51,470 
50,700 



98,985 
97,740 
69,490 
77,254 
73,346 

70,142 
68,142 

67,721 
62,442 

55,300 

49,500 
49,441 

49,254 

43,502 
41,896 

40,360 
34,424 
25,148 



751,020 
357,890 
328.820 
249,960 
169,410 



★Sofia Giorgi, Brasilia, Brazil 
Jason Clough, Houston, TX 
Bernard Burke, Lee's Summit, MO 
Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
Danny Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 



GANTELET (Diecom Products) 



23,643,720 
20,921,490 
10,222,940 
10,020,500 
7,493,340 
2,626,950 
2,512,620 
2,312,640 
2,115.790 
2,011,200 
1,245,550 
1,224,190 
1,210,540 



★Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
Clinton Morell, Sacramento, CA 
Ken Hubbard, Madison, Wl 
Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
Jason Steele, Pensacola, FL 
Rory Kostman, Hershey, NE 
Jerry Honigman, Waggoner, IL 
Jerry Colbert, Bakersfield, CA 
Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
Jonathan Wanagel, Freeville, NY 
Troy Graham, Arnold, MD 



GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 
2,350,750 ★Michael Heitz, Chicago, IL 
702,520 Joseph Delaney, Augusta, GA 
105,820 David Reash, Hadley, PA 
GONE FISHING (THE RAINBOW. 1/84) 

7 ★Benoit St-Jean, Gatineau, Quebec 
GROBOT (Children's Computer Workshop) 

8,090 ★Curt Lebel, Louisville, KY 
HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY (Infocom) 
400/359 ★Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
400/422 Jeff Holtham, Waterloo, Ontario 
400/510 Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 





INTERBANK INCIDENT (Radio Shack) 

4,861 ★Shara and Chris Euton, Lilburn, GA 
IRON FOREST (Diecom Products) 
3,173,200 ★Charles Boyd, Amarillo, TX 
2,676,300 Janet Boyd, Amarillo, TX 
1,141,650 Craig Pennell, Amarillo, TX 
1,013,100 William Welter. Kailua, HI 
595,700 Daniel Wibier, Santa Rosa, CA 
JOKER POKER (THE RAINBOW, 3/87) 
43,616,750 * Carole Rueckert, Mansfield, OH 
8,1 79,710 Brenda Kim, Athens, OH 
3,796,898 Curtis Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 
2,793,285 Blain Jamiason, Kingston, Ontario 
205,239 Paul Dykes, Baton Rouge, LA 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computerware) 
2,503,000 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
257,600 Keith Cohen, Rocky Mount, NC 
KARATE (Diecom Products) 

31,000 *Wayne Hufford, Kincardine, Ontario 
21,800 Daniel Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia !•; 
1 1 ,600 Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, Mb 
6,300 David Darling, Longlac, Ontario 
KNOCK OUT (Diecom Products) 

162,555 ★Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 

186,710 *Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 
184,180 Russell Johnson, Sarnia, Ontario 
184,120 John Farrar, Lebanon, TN 
174,810 Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
133,990 Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 
KUNG-FU DUDE (Sundog Systems) 

32,000 *Tony Geitgey, University Park, PA 
12,150 Cody Deegan, Fallon, NV 
LUNAR RESCUE (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 
260,427 *Tom Beeker, Gracey, KY 
259,493 Cody Deegan, Fallon, NV 
246,668 Phillip Holsten, Modesto, CA 
175,771 Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
1 13,579 Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
LUNAR-ROVER PATROL (Spectral Associates) 

37,890 *Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
MAGIC OF ZANTH (Computerware) 

31 ★Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 
,47 Robert Williams, Yellowknife, 
Northwest Territory 
MARBLE MAZE ( Diecom Products) 

17,530 *Dave Staub, Moundsville. WV 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

9,016 ★Heather Richwaiski, Medford, Wl 
8,199 Eric Mellon, Newark, DE 
6,404 David Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 

5,528 Douglas Bacon, Middletown, CT 
5,172 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
MEMOCARDS (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 

1,418 *Edward Kavanaugh, North Easton, 
MA 

MICROBES (Radio Shack) 

1 53,790 ★Jeff Spiller, Sinclairville, NY 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
468,750 ★Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
355,570 Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
318,160 Jeremy Pruski, Sandwich, IL 
144,510 Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
137,920 Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
41,550 Benott St-Jean, Gatineau, Quebec 
MUNCHKIN BLASTER (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
11,950 ★Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
10,420 Gabe Emerson, Baraboo, Wl 
9,760 Tom Beeker, Gracey, KY 
9,270 Edward Kavanaugh, North Easton, 
MA 

9,080 John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 

ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1,302-0 ★•Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
1,276-0 •Jonathan Dorrls, Indianapolis, IN 
1,260-0 •Brandon Reece, Chickamauga, GA 
1,242-0 •William Currie, Bryans Road, MD 
1,210-0 »Gregg Thompson, Chesterfield, VA 

OUTHOUSE (MichTron) 

38,640 ★Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 

PAC PANIC (Cougar) 

34,950 *Heather Hamblen, Bar Harbor, ME 

PAPER ROUTE (Diecom Products) 

150,560 ★Heather Hamblen, Bar Harbor, ME 

PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM RIDERS (Radio Shack) 
329,000 ★Joseph Delaney, Augusta, GA 



303,100 Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
261,000 Domingo Martinez, Miami, FL 
114,100 Kreig Bryson, Woodstock, GA 
67,100 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
62,500 Richard Adams, Jr., Alvarado, TX 
PINBALL (Radio Shack) 
1,139,450 ★Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

399,350 Troy Stoli, Washington, IN 
389,463 Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
213,300 Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
142,400 Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
PITFALL II (Activision) 

159.400 ★David Cornette, Green Bay, Wl 
PITSTOP II (Epyx) 

54 ★Rusty Breitbach, Rickardsville, IA 
54 ★Jeff Coburn, Easton, PA 
54 ★Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
54 ★Sean Noonan, Green Bay, Wl 
54 ★Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
54 *Jeff Szczerba, Sturtevant, Wl 
54 *Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
51 Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
49 Randy Venable, Coal City, WV 
14 Eric Mellon, Newark, DE 
9 Laundre Clemon, Sacramento, CA 
POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 

4,855 ★ Darren Lowe, White Rock, British 
Columbia 

3,140 Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
PYRAMID (Radio Shack) 

220 ★Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
PYRAMID 2000 (Radio Shack) 

220 ★Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
100 Peter Antonacopoulos, Toa Baja, 
Puerto Rico 
PYRAMIX (ColorVenture) 

67.850 ★Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
26,900 Todd Kopke, Giendate Heights, IL 
17,170 Janet Kim, Pinckneyville, IL 

QUIX (Tom Mix) 
8,407,772 ★John Haldane, Tempe, AZ 
1,404,000 Curtis Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
1,201,383 Milan Parekh, Anaheim, CA 
1,003,104 Elisa Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
326,192 Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
RADIO BALL (Radio Shack) 

760,380 *Jake Runge, Franklin, OH 
399,999 Eric Mellon, Newark, DE 
RESCUE ON FRACTALUS (Epyx) 

323,167 ★Kenneth Hill, Severna Park, MD 
292,633 David Richards, Huntington, WV 
288,084 Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
270,000 Russell Johnson, Sarnia, Ontario 
190,915 Leon Beggs, Bellingham, WA 
167,947 Roger Smith, High Prairie, Alberta 
148,932 Mike LeBrun, Cornwall, Ontario 
123,766 Corey Brazell, Newberry, SC 
RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Coforwara) 
1,792,800 ★Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 

ROGUE (Epyx) 

63,934 ★Marshall Weisenburger, Quincy, IL 
43,222 Hans Lutenegger, Madison, IA 
27.542 Melanie Lapoint, Fitchburg, MA 
21,682 Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 

17.851 Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
8,812 Allen Houk, San Diego, CA 
5,967 Royce Menning, Farwell, TX 

SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

67 ★Tristan Terkuc, Richmond, Ontario 
82 Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 

85 Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 

86 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 

87 Nell Haupt, Elyria, OH 
SAUCER DEFENSE (THE RAINBOW, 4/87) 

40,000 ★David Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 

4,000 Frankle DiGiovanni, Oiney, MD 
SHOOTN RANGE (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 

14,702 ★Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
13,794 Phillip Holsten, Modesto, CA 
5,433 Benoit Landry, Drummondvilie, 
Quebec 

SPACE ASSAULT (Radio Shack) 

13,110 ★Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
7,280 Jason Kopp, Downs, IL 
6,200 John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 



SPEEDSTER (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 

103,140 *Richard Winkefbauer, Bronx, NY 
37,970 Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

32,110 Lisa Williamson, Watauga, TX 
27,160 Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

26,190 Melissa Clayton, Hoosick Falls, NY 
SPIDERCiDE (Radio Shack) 

1 ,840 *Dave Slaub, Moundsville, WV 
SPRINGSTER (Radio Shack) 

303,520 ★Mavis Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 

SUPER ROOTER (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

19,090 ★Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

15,180 Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 
3,910 Daniel Bradford. Birmingham, AL 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

604,000 *Troy Graham, Arnold, MD 
303,600 Tim Hennon, Highland, IN 
138,400 Gary Budzak, Westerville, OH 
125,200 Michelle Murray, Salem, IN 
THEXDER (Sierra On-Une) 
1,314,100 ★Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
195,000 Emmett Keyser, Napa, CA 
TREASURE QUEST (THE RAINBOW, 11/86) 

29,340 *Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

123 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
132 Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
TUTS TUMB (Mark Data) 

1 18,720 ★Reina Roy, Carfeton, Quebec 
74,780 Mack Haynes, Nice, CA 
72,000 Chad Presley, Luseland, 

Saskatchewan 
60,020 Don Siler, Muncie, IN 
45.000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) 

2,032 *Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 
2,032 *Edward Rocha, Cobleskiil, NY 
2,008 Philip Puffinburger, Winchester, VA 
1,995 Denise Rowan, Minneapolis, MN 
1,991 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
1,988 Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
18,813 ★Taiib Khan, Bronx, NY 
1 1 ,902 Martha James, Swarthmore, PA 
10,489 Karl Guliiford, Summerville, SC 
6,294 Pat O'Neill, Nepean, Ontario 
4,643 Martha James, Swarthmore, PA 
THE VORTEX FACTOR (Mark Data) 

100/276 ★Tommy Crouser, Dunbar, WV 
100/483 Rick & Brenda Stump, 
Laureldale, PA 
210 Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 
British Columbia 
WARP FACTOR X (Prickly-Pear) 
10,577,051 *Doug Lute, Ciymer, PA 
WISHBRINGER (Infocom) 

400/201 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
WIZARD'S DEN (Tom Mix) 

1 95,050 ★Mark Touchette, Preston, CT 
WRESTLE MANIAC (Diecom) 

956,971 ★Marc Reiter, Cincinnati, OH 
546,315 Louis Bouchard, Gatineau, Quebec 
45.483 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
42,105 David Brown, New Waterford, Nova 
Scotia 

39,086 Billy Helmick, Independence, KY 
ZAKSUND (Elite Software) 

357,550 ★Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
268,350 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
44,900 Michael Adams, Columbia, SC 
39,950 Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
ZAXXON (DafasofO 
2,061,000 *Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
1,950,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
1 ,300,500 Dan Brown, Pittsford, NY 
1,100,600 Andrew Urquhart, Metairie. LA 
376,600 Matthew Yarrows, Easthampton, MA 
ZORK I (Infocom) 

350/328 ★Konnie Grant, Toledo, OH 
350/587 Matthew Yarrows, Easthampton, MA 
ZEUS (Aardvark) 

4,500 ★Benoit St-Jean, Gatineau, Quebec 
3,380 Martin Kertz, Forrest City, AR 



— Jody Doyle 

^★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 149 



************************************* 





I 





In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column 
of pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, 
we encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



In response to questions from: 

• Deborah Micallef: In Black Sanctum, 
make sure you have all of the materials 
and take them to the room with the 
coffin. You may be missing the bedsheet. 

In Shenanigans, how do you get past 
the snake? 

In the Interbank Incident, what do you 
do in the back rooms of the Louvre and 
the museum in Seattle? How do you enter 
the apartment in Seattle? I have unlocked 
the door with both keys, but I still can't 
get in. 

In Sea Quest, to get past the pirate, you 
must give him the pearl. Where is Ba- 
shan, and how do you get there? 

Jim Forster 
Medina, OH 

• Quinn Granfor: In Rogue, when the 
amulet is obtained, take it back to Level 
L 

How do you convince the screening 
door in Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy 
that you have the ability to time-travel? 
After you put the towel around your 
head, what do you do to get out of the 
beast's lair? 

In Wishbringer, drop everything, get 
the dead branch off the tree, go to the pit, 
pick up the platypus with the branch, and 
dig in 'X*. Then give the hat to the 
pelican. How does the seahorse aid you? 

• ;• MM Smith 
Spotsylvania, VA 

Scoreboard: 

How do I get the owl and the small 
shovel in Dallas Questl 

Julie Finn 
M>ri Smith, AR 

Scoreboard: 

In Sea Search, I know the ring is in an 
obvious place that I have overlooked, 
because many people wrote in saying 
they had it, but I cant seem to find it. 
And yes, there is another treasure besides 
the anchor, pearl, silver and ring. 

Chris Amato 
Long Island, NY 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid 2000, don't waste your 
coins on batteries. To set the vase down, 
you need to set it on the pillow. 

Darren King 
Yorkton, Saskatchewan 



Scoreboard: 

In Vortex Factor, how do you get the 
battery working in the time machine, and 
how do you open the safe? When I look 
for the document in the desk it says there 
is nothing special here. 

Jamin Dorward 
Canton, OH 

Scoreboard: 

In Raaka-Tu, I have the food, the 
sword, lamp, lever, candle, idol and ring, 
but how do I get to the gargoyle room? 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, how do 
you kill the image of the wizard? 

Matthew Lohse 
Camarillo, CA 

Scoreboard: 

After I get the plant in Trekboer, I 
can't get out of the underground com- 
plex. How do you kill the spider? 

Chris Owens 
typhawk, NY 

Scoreboard: 

In Magic ofZanth, try typing EXRMINE 
GROUND at the crevice of the nickelpedes. 

Robert D. Williams 
Yellowknife, Northwest Territory 

Scoreboard: 

I n Shenanigans, where is the clover 
field and the woman who is supposed to 
be in it? 

Jeremy Carter 
Spring Lake Park, MN 

Scoreboard: 

In Gates of Delirium, I can only find 
the extra party member, Gazer. Where 
can I find any others? 

Ian Fuchs 
St. Albert, Alberta 

Scoreboard: 

In White Fire of Eternity, in the under- 
ground tunnel at the corner of the cor- 
ridor, when I go south I can't breathe! 
Please help! 

Noah Burns 
Peru, NY 

Scoreboard: 

I have solved Level 1 in Robot Odyssey 
J, but on Level 2, I can't get the subway 
pass the sentry is guarding. I have tried 



the red robot, but it won't pick it up. The 
magnet won't detect it either. 

John Riddle 
Linthicum, MD 

Scoreboard: 

In ZorkI, how do you get past the gate 
to Hades? 

In Sands of Egypt, dram the pool by 
using the scepter. Drop the scepter on the 
mummy in the mummy room. 

Jeff Arey 
Bucksport, ME 

Scoreboard: 

In Downland, which key do you have 
to get in order to get into Chamber 8? 

In Pyramid 2000, how do you get past 
the bottomless pit? 

In Gantelet, how do you get past Level 

8? 

Trevor Goode 
Bardstown, KY 

Scoreboard: 

How can I enter the pyramid in Graph- 
ic Pyramid* I'm in front of the pyramid's 
doors, with vines, etc., and no word 
works. 

In Shenanigans, how do I use the pole 
and what do I do with the glass of beer? 
How can I cross over the rainbow? 

In Major Is tar, how do I make the 
vaccine against the radiation? > 

> German Moure 
Buenos Aires, Argentina 

Scoreboard: 

In Ghostown, how do you open the 
safe and get by the snake so you can dig? 

jilan Coe 
Trail, British Columbia 



To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will share your reply with all "Score- 
board" readers in an upcoming issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 



***ir**ic********* * ** * ** ****** * ******* * 



150 



THE RAINBOW June 1988 




Proven Technology 

New CoCo 3 Utilities 

Great for 512K Systems! From Color Venture and OWI^WARE 



PRINTER LIGHTNING 

A great print spooler which gives you 
44K print buffer from a 128K CoCo and 
up to 438K (200 pages!) from a 512K 
CoCo. With this spooler you can run a 
program while you are printing a file. 
The spooler does not slow down the 
computer to any noticeable extent while 
you are running a second program and 
no lost characters arise. Baud rates 
selectable. Printer Lightning can reside 
in memory along with RAMDISKl 




NEW NEW 



Using 512K CoCo 3 you have access to 
2 additional disk drives in RAM. All 
disk commands are supported, and the 
data are Reset button protected. You 
can now have up to 5 disk drive capa- 
cities on line at once and can assign the 
ram disks to any drive number. By 
making the ramdisk Drive 0, all pro- 
grams which require a lot of drive 
access will run much faster. You can 
have the RAMDISK in memory at the 
same time as the Printer Lightningl 



BACKUP LIGHTNING 

This program is the fastest way to make 
backup copies of your files using a 512K 
CoCo. You can backup 35, 40, or 80 
track disks single or double sided. Both 
RS and OS-9 disks may be backed up. 
The original disk is saved to memory 
and a copy can be made on an 
unformatted disk every 45 seconds! The 
lightning read, write, format, and verify 
routines that were developed make this 
program much quicker that RSDOS or 
OS-9 for backups. This will become one 



of your most used programs! 

Only $19.95 each. 3 for $39.95. 

SPECIAL With our 51 2K Upgrade (Next page) only $2. each Of 3 for $5! 



Announcing; 



The finest graphics/drawing program for the COCO 3! 



L 



Da Vinci 3 



16 colors on screen at one time 
Modify each color from 64 available colors 
Use composite or RGB monitor 
Draw with custom paintbrushes 
Full resolution 320 X 192 
Picture converter for conversion of 

COCO 2 pictures to COCO 3 
Multiple text fonts 
Accepts input from joystick, X-pad, 

mouse, or touch-pad 
Boxes, circles, line, paint generation 
Screen dump for Tandy mono and color ink-jet 

printers, (NX- 10 and others pending) 
Sensible price 

No additional hardware required because of 

course/fine joystick movement modes 
Zoom mode for individual pixel editing 
Great on screen menu which is removable at 
the touch of a key to allow full screen edit 



128Kor512K COCO 3 




Super I/O Board for OS-9 

Each Board Provides 2 Serial Ports and Centronics Parallel Port 

First Board has Real Time Clock and Beeper... With Second Board up to 5 Users 

2 Serial Porta 



The serial ports are usable up to 19,200 Baud, and 
the parallel port is a true Centronics standard. 
Plug into your multi-pak. On CoCo 3, multi-pa k 
must he upgraded. You will have a multi-user 
system with additional computers or terminals 
plugged into the serial ports. An OWL hard drive 
and 512K upgrade are stronslv recommended for 
multi-user systems. 

Intro Price... 

BOARD 2. ..$145. 



(up to 19,200 BAUO) 



$169. 



■BP 

MULTI PACK 







CENTRONICS 
PARALLEL 
PORT 



P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 

ORDER LINES (only) — 

(800) 245-6228 
(215) 682-6855 (PA) 



Proven Technology 

On the Razor's Ed^ of the C olor Computer Frontier 



OS-9 Hard Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or Business Use 
Drive Access is at Least 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives 
Control up to 2 Drives per Controller each as Continuous Storage 



Every hard drive system is complete with software, 
hard drive, controller, heavy-duty power supply, and 
LR Tech Interface. When a complete drive system is 
ordered, the drive is fully assembled, tested, and 
burned in for 3 full days. This ensures dependability 
and optimum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo hard drive 
systems and parts for systems for more than 2 years. 
This is the longest history in the CoCo market of any 
available drive system. About Va of all hard drive 
systems currently in use in the CoCo market use the 
LR Tcch/OWL-WARE system. We have reached 
this position in the CoCo hard drive market by 
providing our customers with a quality product that 
they (a ml we) can be proud to own and use. 

System Prices: New! 



A number of drive systems were in the market place 
when the LR Tech Interface was introduced and 2 
have been introduced since. Most of these are no 
longer available. We provide the only system which 
provides a combination of standard interface (SAS1), 
rugged unit construction (not hacked to a floppy 
drive controller), high speed, and reasonable price. 
These systems are even several times faster than 
the standard XT hard drive system. Ideal for 
multi-user system because processor does not stop 
for hard drive access. 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and 2 




Dealers 



$469. $619. $739. $1,069. 

10 Meg. 20 Meg. 40 Meg. 80 Meg. (2x40 Meg.) Inquiries Invited! 



Hard Drive Interface 

(Includes Software) 

For those who want to put together their own 
system, we have an exclusive arrangement to 
distribute the LR Tech Interface. Please note 
that an interface is not a controller. A Xebec, 
WD, or Adaptec SASI controller are required 
for a drive system. 

To assemble a hard drive system yourself re- 
quires some reasonable knowledge of OS-9 and 
electronic construction and a hard drive that 
works. CoCo 3 users will have to upgrade their 
Multi-pak. 

Only $119. 

Xebec Controller $ 135. 

CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 

The LR Tech 512K upgrade uses all gold con- 
tacts and 120 nanosecond 256K chips. Provides 
large system memory from OS-9 Level 2. 



Without 

Mem Chips $49. 



With (CALL: Sorry, 
Chips the price of 
RAM CHIPS is 
going up) 

Special! See software offer on previous page. 



Hard Drive Basic 



New For the CoCo 3! 

In Answer for the Many Reqests to Run BASIC from a Hard Drive 



With the development of the CoCo 3, OWL Ware has been able to 
provide a truly professional Hard Drive System using OS-9. There has 
not, however, been a method of running your programs from the 
standard BASIC With this latest development of the CoCo software 
aces, it is now possible to partition your hard drive into RSDOS and 
OS-9 sections. The OS-9 partition runs your OS-9 normally. The RSDOS 
section is further divided into a number of floppy sized units to run 
RSDOS programs. The familiar RS disk commands work normally. 



There is little more that must be learned. 

All of these RS drive sections are available at all times. It is not necessary 
to use assign commands and get access to only a few of these sections. 
Programs that use RS-BASIC should work as will all programs which do 
not force their own disk drivers. 

Call about prices. This should be availabile by the time you read this ad! 




OWL-WARE PHONES 

ORDERS 

(800) 245-6228 
PA (21 5) 682-6855 

TECHNICAL HELP 
(21 5) 433-8695 

Call for advice 




t, quietest drive a\ 

$219. 



Ask for the WHISPER DRIVE for the finest, quietest drive available! 

Drive 0 Systems (Fuii H g t) $169 ■ (Half Hgt -DS) 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, cable, case & power supply, and manual. 

Drive 1 Systems (Fuii Hgt) $95. (HalfHgt-DS) $129. 

New! New! (3.5" 720K Drive for OS-9) $189. 

Drive 1 has drive, case & power supply, and instructions for use with your drive, 



(Call for Special Prices on Drive 0, 1, 2, 3 Combos.) 



HALF HEIGHT DRIVE 
UPGRADE KIT FOR 
RS HORIZONTAL CASES 

Why only double the capacity of your 
system when you can triple in the same 
case? Kit includes: double sided drive to fit 
your case, chip to run both sides of new 
drive, hardware, and detailed instructions. 
Takes only 5 minutes. 

Model $119. Model $129. 

500 501 or 502 



All drives are new and fully assembled. We 
ship only FULLY TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at these low prices. Full height 
drives are unused surplus and not always 
available. 

We use Fuji, Teac and Other Fine brands. We 
have 5 years experience in the CoCo disk drive 
market! We are able to provide support when 
you have a problem. 



Bonus! 
Special 
Bundled 
Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 



NOWFORCoCol 



Our prices do not include shipping costs, but do 
include a discount for cash. 

OWL- WARE has a liberal warranty policy. During 
the warranty period, all defective items will be 
repaired or replaced at our option and at no cost to 
the buyer except for shipping costs. 

Call our technical help line for return authorization 
numbers. Return of non -defective items or unauthor- 
ized returns are subject to a service charge. 



WARRANTIES 

Full Hgt 90 days Half Hgt 1 Year 

- ORDER LINES (only) — 

(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 

— TECH HELP LINE 

(21 5) 433-8695 

Call for Latest Prices! 







P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 



OWL-WARE 

Software Bundle 

Disk Tutorial - 3 Utilities - 2 Games 

DISK TUTOR Ver. 1 .1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language pro- 
gram. This tutor takes you through your 
lessons and corrects your mistakes for a 
quick, painless disk drive intoduction. 
(This professionally written tutor is easily 
worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster disk 
access and allows the use of double-sided 
drives. Corrects a floating point number 
error on early CoCo systems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs between 
disks. A wild card option selects groups of 
programs for copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad sec- 
tors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These have sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is over 
$125 worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with cheap, 
non-professional "Public Domain" soft- 
ware which is being offered by others. All 
of this software is copyrighted and pro- 
fessional in quality. The tutor is unique 
with us and has helped hundreds of new 
users learn their disk drive. 

onfy $27.95 

(or even better) 

only $6.95 with 

any Disk Drive Purchase!! 



Wishin $4Ateti 




If you have an idea for the "Wishing 
Well " submit it to Fred c/o THE 
RAINBOW. Remember, keep your 
ideas specific, and don't forget this is 
BASIC. All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 

Several months ago I introduced a 
program called Sentence Struc- 
ture 1 (January 1988, Page 90) to 
bring the world of learning English 
grammar skills into the memory of your 
Color Computer. Designed more for 
junior high or high school students than 
elementary schoolers, the program 
allowed the user to scan a set of com- 
plete sentences and then pick out the 
simple subjects and simple predicates. 
As with most of my "Wishing Well" 
software, the program was also de- 
signed to allow you to add your own 
examples in the DATA statements at the 
end of the program. This seems to be a 
feature most of you like, judging from 
my maiL 

This month we will examine another 
field of English grammar with Sentence 
Structure 2: Recognizing Direct and 
Indirect Objects. The program, which 
requires at least 16K, will include many 
of the features of the first program with 
a few added twists. 

Truly Educational??? 

Many readers will recall my endless 
monologues about how much of the 
commercially available software claim- 
ing to be educational really isn't. In fact, 
several programs that have appeared in 
these pages in the past have tried to 
address the problem of being "just 
another quiz of material you already 
know." 

Sentence Structure 2 is designed not 
only to quiz the user on the identifica- 
tion of both direct and indirect objects 



Fred Seer bo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



Taking aim on direct and 
indirect objects 



Grammar 



Sentences can have direct objects 
without having indirect objects, such as 
in the sentence: 

He mailed the letter. 

Letter is still the direct object in this 
sentence because it answers the question 
"mailed whatV 



101 

Part II 

By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



in complete sentences, but also to help 
the student actually learn their use. The 
beginning of the program contains an 
instruction section; besides containing 
the instructions for running the pro- 
gram (another reader request), this 
section also teaches identification of 
direct or indirect objects. 

For those of you who may be a little 
rusty on the "hows and whys" of English 
grammar, a direct object is a word 
naming the thing that is being acted 
upon by the verb. For example, in the 
sentence: 

He mailed me a letter. 

Letter is the thing that is mailed. To 
check, we ask ourselves: 

Mailed what! 

Mailed the letterl 

The direct object answers the question 
"what?" after the verb. 

The indirect object, on the other 
hand, names the person or thing to 
whom or to which the action is directed. 
In the same sample sentence, the indi- 
rect object is the word me. Using the 
verb mail, we would ask the question: 

Mailed to whom! 

Mailed to mel 



Why on Computer? 

Why are we using the computer to 
study this grammar skill? To be honest, 
repetition is the most effective way to 
master certain English skills. By review- 
ing and quizzing this material on the 
computer, the following is accom- 
plished: 

• We allow the student to pace himself 
or herself through the material at an 
appropriate rate. The computer 
always waits for the student's re- 
sponse. 

• We allow the same material to be 
presented in a new and random way 
without becoming too familiar. 

• We provide the material in the least 
restrictive and most interesting fash- 
ion: on a computer screen. 

• The student must still use all his 
regular reasoning functions and 
accumulated skills to successfully 
proceed with the program. Reading, 
writing, and keyboarding skills are 
also enhanced as a bonus. 

Using the Program 

When you run the program, our 
standard title card appears (in slightly 
different colors from the last time). You 
are asked if you want (T)alking with the 
optional Tandy Speech Pak, or (N)ot. 
Next, you may proceed to the instruc- 
tions by pressing I or the quiz by press- 
ing Q. 

In the instruction section, you need 
only press ENTER to advance to the next 
screen. The text will explain the differ- 
ences between direct and indirect ob- 
jects. You will also be given instructions 
on how to operate the program. 

Once you arrive at the quiz section, 
you will be given a number of sample 
sentences. You must select either the 



154 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



direct or indirect object and enter it 
using the keyboard. Pressing the @ 
symbol brings you to the score card. 
From the score card, pressing C will 
continue the program. 

The computer will next tell you if you 
are correct or incorrect. After both 
parts have been answered, the screen 
will review the sentence, pointing out 
the verb and its relation to both the 
direct object and indirect object. At the 
conclusion, the score card will show you 
how well you have done. 

Adding Your Own Sentences 

If you find this program useful, you 
can add up to 50 of your own sentences 
for review. To delete my data, type and 
enter: 

DEL 999-4999 
Line 5000 must read; 

5000 DATA END, END, END, END 



For each sentence you enter, you 
must have four pieces of information, 
separated by a comma: the sentence, the 
direct object, the indirect object and the 
verb. For example, in the sentence "He 
mailed me a letter," the DATA line should 
read: 

1000 DATA HE MAILED ME A 
LETTER. , LETTER, ME, MAILED 

If your sentence is going to use com- 
mas, be sure to wrap each piece of 
information in quotation marks: 

1000 DATA "YESTERDAY, HE 
MAILED ME A LETTER.", 
"LETTER", "ME", "MAILED" . 



I know I have explained this tech- 
nique many times, but some readers 
might be new to the "Wishing Well"; I 
want to avoid a bag of letters asking, 



"Why do I keep getting an OD Error?" 
Always check your data for errors. 

As always, save your program to tape 
or disk with a different filename from 
the original version with my data. You 
can accumulate a collection of pro- 
grams with your own data that will be 
useful to your child or students as they 
advance. 

Conclusion 

Many of you have written to say that 
a particular program has helped your 
son or daughter get through a difficult 
subject. Hearing this makes me very 
satisfied. Therefore, keep submitting 
ideas on subjects you would like to see 
covered; I may be able to grant your 
wish. 

Also, to those who have sent in their 
old used CoCos for my special needs 
students: They have been extremely 
helpful, and I cannot thank you all 
enough. □ 




40 91 

125 94 

200 35 

240 80 

355 31 



440 106 

525 181 

1010 .135 

END 120 



The listing: SENTENCE 



1 REM ************************ 

2 REM * RECOGNIZING DIRECT * 

3 REM * AND INDIRECT OBJECTS 

4 REM * BY FRED B.SCERBO 

5 REM * 6j3 HARDING AVE. 

6 REM * NORTH ADAMS, MA 012 47 

7 REM * COPYRIGHT (C) 1988 

8 REM ************************ 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



9 CLEAR3000 



10 CLS0:FORI=1TO64:PRINTCHR$(172 
) ; :NEXT • 

15 F0RI=1T0192:READA:PRINTCHR$(A 
+128) ; :NEXT 

20 DATA12 6,124,124,120,53,60,6/8, 
53,60, 56,59,48,58,60,61,60,56, 62 
,60,53,50,53,53,60,60,53,60,56,1 
12,126,124,124 

25 DATA122, ,, ,52,60,61,53,56, ,58 

,57,58, ,53, ,48,62,48,53,52,55,53 

, , ,53,56, ,112, 122, , 

30 DATA123,115,115,114,52,60,60, 

52,60,56,56, ,56, ,52, ,48,60,60,52 

,48,52, 52, 60, 60,52,60,56,112,123 

,115,115 

35 DATA80, ,80,122,124,125,124,12 
0 , 126 , 124 , 122 , 122 , 80 , 117 , 117 , 124 
, 124 , 124 , 116 , 124 , 12 6 , 124 , 117 , 80 , 
80 , 122 , 126 , 124 /122 , 122 , 112 , 112 
40 DATA80,80,80,122,80,117,80,80 




"Assembly Language Programming for the CoCo" (The Book) and the CoCo 3 (The Addendum). 
Professionally produced (not just skimpy technical specifications). THE CoCo reference books. 



THE BOOK - 289 pages of teaching 
assembly language for the CoCo 1 & 2. 
It's used as a school text and is an 
intro to Computer Science. It describes 
the 6809E instructions, subroutines, 
interrupts, stacks, programming 
philosophy, and many examples. Also 
covered are PIAs, VDG; SAM, kybd, 
jystk, sound, serial port, and using 
cassette and disk. $18.00 + $1.50 s/h. 



THE ADDENDUM - Picks up 

where the BOOK left off. Describes 
ALL the CoCo 3 enhancements & how 
to use them with assembly language. 
The most complete GIME spec. 
WOW - Super-Res Graphics (up 
to 1280 pixcels across), Virtual 
Memory, Interrupts, and more 
information not available 
elsewhere. $12.00 + $1.00 s/h. 



US check or money 
order. RI orders 
add 6% sales tax 



COCO 3 SPECIAL 

Start your CoCo 
library right. 
See what the CoCo 

can really do and TCD/^/^l 

save money - buy tr LU 

the book and 68 James Court 

ADDENDUM Portsmouth, RI 02871 

for only $27.00 + 

$2.00 s/h. See Us On DELPHI 



June 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 55 



, 12 6 , 12 6 , 120 , 12 2 , 80 , 117 , 117 , 80 , 8 
0,80,80,80,122,80,117,80, ,122,12 
6,126,120,122, ,80 

45 DATA123,115,115,122,80,117,11 
2 , , 122 , 116, 114 , 123 , 115, 119 , 117 , 1 
15 , 115 , 115 , 112 , 80 , 122 , , 117 , 115 , 1 
15,122,122, 116 , 114 , 123 , 115 , 115 
50 F0RI=1T064 : PRINTCHR$ ( 163 ) ; : NE 
XT 

55 PRINTQ357," RECOGNIZING DIRE 
CT " ; :PRINT@389, " AND INDIRECT 
OBJECTS ";:PRINT@421," (T)ALKI 
NG OR (N)OT ? "; 

60 PRINT@453," BY FRED B.SCERB 
0 "; 

65 PRINT@485," COPYRIGHT (C) 19 
88 "; 

70 X$=INKEY$ : XX=RND ( -TIMER) : IFX$ 

="T"THEN90 

75 IFX$="N"THEN85 

80 GOTO70 

85 NT=l:GOTO150 

90 CLS0 

95 XX=&HFF00: YY=&HFF7E 

100 POKEXX+ 1 , 5 2 : POKEXX+ 3,63 

105 POKEXX+35,60:GOTO150 

110 IFNT=1THENRETURN 

115 FORII=lTOLEN(AA$) 

120 IF PEEK (YY) AND 128=0 THEN120 

125 POKEYY,ASC(MID$(AA$,II,l) ) 

130 NEXTII 

135 IFPEEK(YY) AND128=0THEN135 
140 POKEYY,13 

145 FORI=1TO1000:NEXT:RETURN 
150 SW=31 

155 CLS: PRINTS 2 2 8," (I INSTRUCTION 

OR (Q)UIZ"; 
160 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Q"THEN250ELS 
EIFX$="I"THEN165ELSE160 
165 CLS0 

170 CLS : PRINT :JK$=" IN THIS PR 
OGRAM WE WILL QUIZ YOUR KNOWLEDG 
E OF DIRECT OBJECTS AND INDIRECT 

OBJECTS . : GOSUB2 60 
175 PRINT :JK$=" BEFORE WE DO T 
HAT WE MUST DEFINE SOME TERMS.": 
GOSUB260 

180 PRINT :JK$=" FIRST, A DIREC 
T OBJECT IS A WORD IN A SENTENCE 
WHICH RECEIVES THE ACTION EXPRE 
SSED BY THE VERB . " : GOSUB2 60 
185 GOSUB530 

190 CLS: PRINT :JK$=" IN THE SEN 
TENCE, 'I GAVE MY GIRLFRIEND A D 
IAMOND RING • , THE WORD 1 RING 1 IS 

THE DIRECT OBJECT. " :GOSUB260 
195 PRINT :JK$=" 'RING' RECEIVE 
S THE ACTION EXPRESSED BY THE VE 
RB ' GAVE 1 . " : GOSUB2 60 
200 PRINT :JK$=" THE DIRECT OBJ 
ECT ANSWERS THE QUESTION 'GAVE W 



HAT?'. I •GAVE* THE 1 RING • (DIRE 
CT OBJECT) .":GOSUB260 
205 GOSUB530 

210 CLS: PRINT :JK$=" THE INDIRE 
CT OBJECT NAMES THE THING OR PER 
SON TO WHOM THE ACTION IS DIRECT 
ED.":GOSUB260 

215 PRINT :JK$=" IN THE SENTENC 
E, 'I GAVE MY GIRLFRIEND A DIAMO 
ND RING 1 , THE WORD 'GIRLFRIEND' 
IS THE INDIRECT OBJECT. " '.GOSUB26 

0 

220 PRINT :JK$=" 'GIRLFRIEND' T 
ELLS TO WHOM THE ACTION OF THE V 
ERB 'GAVE' IS EXPRESSED. " :GOSUB2 
60 

225 GOSUB530 

230 CLS: PRINT :JK$=" IN THE FOL 
LOWING QUIZ YOU WILL BE ASKED TO 

IDENTIFY BOTH THE DIRECT OBJECT 

AND THE INDIRECT OBJECT IN A SA 
MPLE SENTENCE . " : GOSUB2 60 
235 JK$=" SIMPLY TYPE IN THE C 
ORRECT ANSWER. THE COMPUTER WILL 

TELL YOU IF YOU ARE CORRECT OR 
INCORRECT . " : GOSUB2 60 
240 JK$=" PRESSING THE <@> KEY 

WILL SHOW YOUR SCORE. YOU MAY P 
RESS <C> TO CONTINUE THE QUIZ. G 

OOD LUCK. ":GOSUB260 
245 GOSUB530 

250 CLS0:DIMAO(50) ,A$(50) ,D$(50) 

,I$(50) ,V$(50) ,NP(50) 

255 CLS0:GOTO295 

260 AA$=JK$:GOSUB110 

265 IF LEN(JK$)<=SW THEN285 

270 FOR T=SW TO 0STEP-1:IF MID$ ( 

JK$,T,1)=" "THEN280 

275 NEXT T:GOT0285 

280 L$=LEFT$(JK$,T) :W$=L$:GOSUB2 

90 : JK$=" "+RIGHT$ (JK$, (LEN(JK$ 

) ) -T) :GOT0265 

285 W$=JK$ : PRINTW$ : RETURN 

290 PRINTW$ : RETURN 

295 FORJ=1TO50:READ A$(J),D$(J), 

I$(J) ,V$(J) :IF A$(J)="END'' THEN3 

05 

300 NEXT J 

305 REM START QUIZ 

310 J=J-1: FORI=l TO J 

315 AO(I)=RND(J) 

320 IF NP(AO(I))=l THEN 315 

325 NP ( AO ( I ) ) =1 : NEXTI 

330 FOR Y=1TO1000:NEXTY 

335 GOT0475 

340 FX=0:CLS 

345 PRINTS 35, "HERE IS EXAMPLE NU 
MBER" ;P 
350 RETURN 

3 55 AA$=" WHAT IS THE DIRECT 0 
BJECT OF THIS SENTENCE ?": 



156 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



: GOSUB110 : PRINTS 9 6 , AA$ 

360 PRINT@192, "" ; : JK$=" "+A$ (A 

O(P) ) :GOSUB260 

365 PRINT: PRINT" => ";:LINEINP 
UTA$ 

370 IFA$="@"THENGOSUB545 

375 IF FX=1 THENGOSUB340:GOTO355 

380 IF A$OD$(AO(P) )THEN395 

385 PRINT :JK$=" YOU ARE CORREC 

Tl THE DIRECT OBJECT IS: "+D$ (AO 

(P) ) :GOSUB2 60 

390 CR=CR+1:GOTO405 

395 PRINT :JK$=" WRONG! THE COR 

RECT DIRECT OBJECT IS: "+D$(AO(P 

)) :GOSUB260 

400 IR=IR+1 

405 GOSUB530 

410 RETURN 

415 AA$=" WHAT IS THE INDIRECT 

OBJECT OF THIS SENTE 
NCE ?":GOSUB110:PRINT@96,AA$ 
420 PRINT@192,»";:JK$=" "+A$ (A 
O(P) ) :GOSUB2 60 

425 PRINT: PRINT" => ";:LINEINP 
UTA$ 

430 IFA$="@"THENGOSUB545 
435 IF FX=1 THENGOSUB340:GOTO415 
440 IF A$<>I$(AO(P) )THEN455 
445 PRINT: JK$=" YOU ARE CORREC 
T! THE INDIRECT OBJECT IS: "+I$( 
AO(P) ) :GOSUB260 
450 CR=CR+l:GOT0465 
455 PRINT :JK$=" SORRY! THE COR 
RECT INDIRECT OBJECT IS: "+I$(AO 
(P) ) :GOSUB260 
460 IR=IR+1 
465 GOSUB530 
470 RETURN 
475 FORP=lTOJ 

480 WW=RND(2) : IFWW=1THEN490 

485 FX=0:GOSUB340:GOSUB355:GOSUB 

340 : GOSUB415 : GOT0495 

490 FX=0:GOSUB340:GOSUB415:GOSUB 

340:GOSUB355 

495 CLS 

5pj3 PRINTQ32, ""; :JK$=" IN THE 
SENTENCE 1 "+A$ (AO (P) )+"',": GOSUB 
260 

5j35 PRINT :JK$=" THE DIRECT OBJ 
ECT, M, +D$(AO(P))+ fl \ IS THE THI 
NG WHICH IS BEING ACTED UPON BY 
THE VERB, lfi +V$(AO(P) )+» M, :GOSUB 
260 

510 JK$=" WHILE THE INDIRECT O 

BJECT, 1 "+I$ (AO (P) ) +" 1 NAMES TO 

WHOM OR WHAT THE ACTION OF THE V 

ERB IS DIRECTED . " : GOSUB2 60 

515 GOSUB530 

520 NEXT P 

525 GOSUB545:RUN 

530 PRINT§483 , " PRESS <ENTER> TO 
CONTINUE"; 



535 X$=INKEY$:IFX$<>CHR$(13)THEN 
535 

540 RETURN 

545 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 
550 PQ=CR+IR:IF PQ=0THSN PQ=1 
555 PRINT" NUMBER CORRECT = " 
CR 

560 PRINT 

565 PRINT" NUMBER WRONG = " 
IR 

570 PRINT: PRINT" STUDENT SCOR 

E = ";INT(CR*100/PQ) ;"%" 

575 PRINT: PRINT" ANOTHER TRY 

(Y/N/C)"; 

580 W$=INKEY$:IF W$=""THEN580 
585 IF W$="C"THEN FX=1: RETURN 
590 IF W$="Y" THEN RUN 
595 IF W$="N" THEN CLS: END 
600 GOTO580 

990 REM ENTER DATA AT LINE 1000 
IN THIS ORDER: SENTENCE, DIRECT 
OBJECT, INDIRECT OBJECT, VERB 
1000 DATA I MAILED MY BROTHER A 
LARGE PACKAGE . , PACKAGE , BROTHER , M 
AILED 

1010 DATA MY UNCLE GAVE ME A NEW 

FOOTBALL HELMET. , HELMET, ME, GAVE 
1020 DATA WILL YOU TELL ME A BED 
TIME STORY? , STORY , ME , TELL 
1030 DATA DON'T ASK ME ANY MORE 
QUESTIONS , QUESTIONS , ME , ASK 
1040 DATA I JUST BOUGHT MYSELF A 

BRAND NEW AUTOMOBILE. ,AUTOMOBIL 
E, MYSELF, BOUGHT 

1050 DATA FEED YOUR CAT THIS BRA 
ND OF CAT FOOD. , BRAND, CAT, FEED 
1060 DATA HE SENT ME A BEAUTIFUL 
BIRTHDAY CARD FOR MY BIRTHDAY . , 
CARD, ME, SENT 

1070 DATA COULD YOU LEND ME TEN 
DOLLARS UNTIL TUESDAY? , DOLLARS ,M 
E,LEND 

1080 DATA I DO NOT OWE YOU ANYTH 
ING . , ANYTHING , YOU , OWE 
1090 DATA THE BROKER OFFERED US 
A GOOD PRICE FOR THE PROPERTY. ,P 
RICE, US, OFFERED 

1100 DATA WE SENT HARRY A NEW TI 

E. , TIE, HARRY, SENT 

1110 DATA THOMAS OFFERED BILL A 

NEW JOB AT THE OFFICE ., JOB, BILL, 

OFFERED 

1120 DATA BRING ME THE LATEST CO 
PY OF THE RAINBOW. , COPY, ME, BRING 
1130 DATA THE TEAM GAVE THE CO AC 
H A TROPHY FOR HIS HARD WORK. ,TR 
OPHY , COACH , GAVE 

1140 DATA I SOLD HIM THE FIRST H 
OUSE HE LOOKED AT. , HOUSE, HIM, SOL 
D 

5000 DATA END , END , END , END 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 157 



Two patches, a hardware modification 

and an alternative 
to the PALETTE command 



CoCo 3 Potpourri 



I guess I am one of the "old men" of 
the CoCo Community. At least I 
feel like an old man when I re- 
member how fantastic my new CoCo 
seemed back in 1980 and how far the 
CoCo 3 surpasses it today. My trusty 
CoCo 1 (Serial Number 9372) served me 
well, outlasting three keyboards, three 
memory upgrades, and numerous hard- 
ware modifications and explorations. 
However, I knew it was time to retire 
it when the CoCo 3 came along. 

I don't intend to give you another 
glowing overview of the CoCo 3. That 
has been admirably handled several 
times here in THE rainbow since Tan- 
dy's first announcement. 

In this article, instead, I want to give 
you some hard facts based on my first 
month with the machine. Ill touch on 
three areas: patches for two bugs I 
found in the new Super Extended por- 
tion of BASIC, a very simple hardware 
modification for those of you with the 
old black-case CoCo 1 Disk Con- 
trollers, and an alternative to the 
PALETTE command that will make your 
graphics programs really fly when 
rotating colors through the palette 
registers, as Rick Adams and Dale Lear 
did in the program Rainbow Tunnel 
(RAINBOW, October 1986). This new 
USR routine updates the palette slots 16 
times faster than the PALETTE com- 
mand. 



Michael Wiens works as a firefighter 
while he pursues a degree in computer 
science. He has been a CoCo enthusiast 
since the purchase of his first CoCo 
eight years ago. 



By Michael F. Wiens 



New System, New Bugs 

It seems to be a fact of life that when 
first released, new computer systems 
will have some undiscovered bugs. This 
is probably because eager new users put 
the machine through paces never antic- 
ipated by the software authors. Here are 
the first two that I've run across, al- 
though I'm sure more will turn up. 
Listing 1 is a short program that fixes 
both bugs. I recommend that the non- 
REM lines from Listing 1 be included in 
all your programs that may need them, 
because the patches will be wiped out 
whenever you do a reset, either cold or 
warm. Re-installing the patches when- 
ever your program runs is perfectly OK, 
and neither patch requires allocation of 
any user memory. 

The first bug is in the code that 
handles PALETTE RGB and PRLETTE 
CMP. These two commands restore the 
palette registers to the default values for 
your type of monitor. They keep you 
out of trouble if your graphics program 
ends with the foreground and back- 
ground registers both set to the same 
color or in some other unusable com- 
bination. However, because of a count- 
er initialized to the wrong value, these 
commands only restore the first 15 
registers. This won't often be a problem, 
but it can lead to some head-scratching 
at times. Fortunately, it can be fixed 
with a single poke, since the whole 
system is transferred to RAM on 
power-up or reset in the CoCo 3. Fixing 
this bug is important if you plan to use 
the nifty USR routine I'm going to show 
you later. 

The second bug is not as minor as the 
first, but the fix for it is only 32 bytes 



long and can be placed in a section of 
RAM not used by BASIC. On 40- and 80- 
column screens, the PRINT statement 
does not correctly handle the printing of 
tabs, either explicit (as in 'PRINT 
TRB(B)R$') or implicit (as in 'PRINT 
A,B'). For example, key in the follow- 
ing two lines and run them in the 32- 
column mode and again in the 40- or 80- 
column mode: 

« 

10 PRINT "HI", "THERE" 
20 PRINT "HELLO", "THERE" 

You would expect "THERE" to be in the 
same column in both lines when this is 
run, but on the two wide screens it 
appears three columns to the right in the 
second line. 

After several lengthy sessions with 
the disassembler, I traced the problem 
to the routine that sets up the tab table 
for the current device just before each 
tab is performed. Somehow the fact that 
the 40- and 80-column screens are new 
devices was overlooked. When the 
system printed on the wide screens, it 
used the cursor position, tab widths and 
maximum tab position from the old 32- 
column screen. The fix: Jump out of this 
routine if a video screen is selected, 
determine the screen width, set the tab 
table accordingly and jump back in. In 
order to do this, I also had to locate 
several new basic pointers. Since these 
may be of general interest I have in- 
cluded the source code for the patch in 
Listing 1. 

CoCo 1 Hardware Compatibility 

When Tandy introduced the CoCo 2, 
one of the first things users discovered 



158 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



was that the disk controllers for the 
CoCo 1 wouldn't work with the CoCo 

2. Eventually someone figured out that 
the 12-volt power supply had been 
eliminated from the CoCo 2 since the 
new controller didn't need it. If you 
owned one of the older controllers and 
wanted to upgrade to a CoCo 2, you had 
three choices: Buy a new CoCo 2 com- 
patible controller, buy a Multi-Pak 
Interface (at $100), or open your new 
CoCo 2 (voiding the warranty) and add 
a 12-volt power supply under the key- 
board (see "Turn of the Screw," rain- 
bow, April 1984). This was never a 
widespread problem, since the CoCo 2 
is pretty much the same machine as the 
old CoCo 1; not that many people 
wanted to move up. 

However, the problem has re- 
surfaced in a big way with the release 
of the CoCo 3. The new machine simply 
has too many advantages to be ignored, 
and many of us "old-timers" want to 
upgrade. Here, then, is a fourth alter- 
native for those of you with the old 
black-case CoCo 1 disk controller who 
want to upgrade to a CoCo 2 or CoCo 

3. Since I didn't want to open the case 
and void the warranty on my brand-new 
computer, I attacked the problem from 
the other end. On exploration, I found 
12 volts available in each of my disk 
drives (one a Tandy and the other not). 

1 suspect that this is the case with all 5!4- 
inch drives, but I can't guarantee it. I 
also found several unused leads in the 
ribbon cable that runs from the drives 
to the controller. From this point, it was 
a simple task to route the 12 volts back 
to the controller. 

Those of you with hardware savvy are 
probably already running for the sol- 
dering irons. For those needing a little 
more help, read on. Lead 2 in the ribbon 
cable is the one we want to use, since 
it isn't in use and isn't tied to ground at 
the controller or in any of the drives I 
have examined. You should check all 
drives in your system to make sure Lead 

2 isn't grounded; otherwise, putting 12 
volts on it will cause a short-circuit. If 
it is grounded in one or more of your 
drives, you need to isolate it by cutting 
the trace on the board in that drive, 
preferably where the ribbon cable plugs 
into the circuit board in the drive. Don't 
cut Lead 2 in the cable. 

You will need to open your disk 
controller and the drive you decide to 
steal the 12 volts from. To open the 
controller, carefully peel off the label 
from the top (it can be replaced later); 
remove the screw hidden underneath. 
Gently pry the top off, remove the two 



screws holding the board in the case, 
and remove the board. At the end of the 
board opposite the screws, you will see 
two snap-in rivets that hold the RF 
shield in place. These should be gently 
pried out and the RF shield removed, 
since we want to make connections on 
the bottom of the board. 

Now, with the board upside down 
and the ribbon cable connection on 
your right, Lead 2 is the lead nearest to 
you, on the right side of the board. 
Solder an 8-inch piece of 28-gauge 
solid-core wire to this lead. Make the 
connection as close to the inside end of 
this and all other leads as you can, so 
that the connector will still slide on. 

The other end of this wire attaches to 
a lead on the connector at the other end 
of the board. This is also Lead 2 on this 
connector. Again, it is the closest lead 
to you. You can recognize it easily 
because it is wider than the other leads 
on that connector. After you have made 
both of these solder connections, re- 
verse your steps to put the controller 
back together. 

After opening whichever drive you 
want to draw 12 volts from, locate Lead 
2 where the ribbon cable connects to the 
circuit board in the drive. It is the 
bottom pin on the connector, on the 
outside of the drive. Solder one end of 
a 10-inch piece of solid-core wire to the 
end of this lead, and locate a point from 
which to draw 12 volts. I can't help you 
with specifics here, since drives will vary 
with make and model. However, some- 
where on the board there will be a 
connector from the drive power supply. 
Four wires go into it: two ground wires, 
one 5-volt wire and one 12-volt wire. It 
should be easy to locate the four points 
at which the socket for this connector 
is soldered to the board and to test them 
with a voltmeter to find which is 12 
volts. The other end of the 10-inch wire 
goes here. You may also find other 12- 
volt supply points on the board if it is 
well-labeled; unfortunately, many 
aren't. 

Once the connections are made and 
checked for short circuits and bad 
connections, you should again have a 
working disk system. The only sticking 
point is that now you must turn on the 
drive before (or at the same time as) the 
computer. This is because the 12 volts 
must be supplied to the WD 1793 chip 
in the controller before or at the same 
time the 5 volts is supplied. I recom- 
mend using an outlet strip to turn your 
whole system on and off. It takes care 
of this problem and is also a more 
convenient way to boot your system. 



Rainbow Tunnel Revisited 

The first program I keyed in when I 
finally got my hands on the CoCo 3 was 
Rainbow TunneL It is a truly amazing 
demonstration and shows quite well the 
super possibilities of our new machine. 

After the initial amazement wore off, 
I noticed that even with the clock speed 
doubled, there was a noticeable "ripple" 
effect from the center out as each of the 
palette slots was changed. I began to 
wonder about a way to change all 16 
slots at once, and I hauled out my 
disassembler to begin looking around in 
the new system. I found that the 
PRLETTE CMP and PRLETTE RGB com- 
mands point to a string of 16 bytes in 
ROM and then call a routine to reset all 
16 slots from the values in that string. 
From there, it was a snap to write a USR 
routine to do the same thing. It is 
probably the shortest USR routine ever 
written, since it is only two instructions 
long. It simply points the X register at 
the string and jumps into the same 
routine that PALETTE RGB and PRLETTE 
CMP use. 

To use this technique, install the USR 
routine as shown in lines 100 through 
140 of Listing 2. Then call it with a 16- 
byte string of color values as a parame- 
ter, such as: fl$=USR0(C$). The color 
values in the string will be placed in the 
palette slots, with the first byte in the 
string going to Slot 0, the second byte 
going to Slot 1, etc. Make sure the string 
you use is at least 16 bytes long, or the 
slots beyond the end of the string will 
be set to unpredictable values. 

Listing 2 duplicates the original 
Rainbow Tunnel program using this 
faster technique. I have added a timing 
loop that can be adjusted with the up 
and down arrow keys. Notice that there 
is no visible ripple as the colors change, 
even when the program is looping quite 
slowly. When you want to change only 
one or two palette slots at a time, it is 
probably easier to use the PRLETTE 
command than to manipulate the 16- 
byte string that this USR routine re- 
quires. When you must change most or 
all of the registers fast, however, this is 
the way to go. Again, for those that are 
interested in the nuts and bolts, I have 
included the source code for the USR 
routine in Listing 2. 

Now It's Your Turn 

I hope the information I have pro- 
vided here will help some of you new 
CoCo 3 owners get more from this 
wonderful computer. It is quite exciting 
for me to begin exploring a brand-new 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 159 



machine. However, one thing the last 
six years should have taught us is that, 
alone, no one can expect to learn every- 
thing about a system. We successfully 
opened up the original CoCo system by 
using THE rainbow as a communica- 



tion center to contribute our findings. 
Now we can do the same thing again 
with the CoCo 3. 1 will be waiting with 
the rest of you each month to see what 
tidbits someone else has learned about 
my (new) favorite computer. 



(Questions or comments concerning 
these modifications may be directed to 
the author at 1905 Spruce St., La 
Grande, OR 97850. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



Listing 1: CC3PRTCH 

1 'COCO 3 PATCH - NOVEMBER 23, 1 
986 

2 ' 

3 ' BY MICHAEL F. WIENS 

4 1 19)35 SPRUCE ST, 

5 ' LA GRANDE, OREGON 9785)3 

6 1 PHONE (5)33) 963-6991 

7 1 

8 1 

9 'THIS PROGRAM PATCHES 2 BUGS I 
N THE COCO 3 SYSTEM: 

1) 3 1 1) FORCES 'PALETTE CMP 1 AND 
'PALETTE RGB' TO RESET ALL SIXT 

EEN COLOR SLOTS, INSTEAD OF ONLY 
FIFTEEN. 

11 • 2) CORRECTS HANDLING OF TAB 
S ON THE HI-RES TEXT (4)3 AND 8j3 
CHAR) SCREENS. 

12 1 1 * # * 

13 1 

14 ' THE NON-REM LINES HERE SHOU 
LD BE INCLUDED IN ALL YOUR PROGR 
AMS, SINCE THE PATCHES WILL NOT 
REMAIN IN EFFECT AFTER A RESET, 
EITHER WARM OR COLD. 

15 ' 

19 'FIRST, PATCH PALETTE COMMAND 
- ONLY TAKES A SINGLE POKE: 

2) 3 POKE &HE649,&H1)3 

26 ' 

27 'NOW, PATCH THE PRINT ROUTINE 
S TO PROPERLY TAB ON WIDE SCREEN 
S. 

28 1 

39 'PUT NEW ROUTINE IN PLACE: I 
CHOSE TO PUT IT IN A PORTION OF 
THE MEMORY WHICH IS ONLY USED ON 

POWER-UP AND RESET. THIS DOESN 
•T USE ANY BASIC PROGRAM MEMORY. 

40 B=&HFj39D:FORX=j3T031:READ HX$: 
POKE X+B , VAL ( " &H"+HX$ ) : NEXT 

48 ' 

49 'HERE IS THE CODE 

5) 3 DATA 86 / 28,D6,E7,26,j37,D6,89, 
C4,1F,7E,A3,77,C1,)31,26,)35,8E,1)3 
,2j3,2j3,j34,48,8E,lj3,4j3,F6,FE,j32,7 
E,A3,7C 

58 ' 

59 'NOW PUT PATCH IN PLACE TO PA 
SS CONTROL TO THE NEW ROUTINE. 

6) 3 B=&HA373:POKE B,&H7E:POKE B+l 



,&HFj3:POKE B+2 , &H9D: POKE B+3 , &H1 
2 

9J3 ' 

1) 3)3 'HERE IS THE SOURCE CODE, FO 
R THOSE THAT ARE INTERESTED. WE 

ARE PATCHING THE ROUTINE THAT S 
ETS TAB PARAMETERS FOR EACH I/O 
DEVICE. THE PATCH CODE SETS UP 
THE REGISTERS AND THEN JUMPS BAC 
K TO THE APPROPRIATE RE-ENTRY PO 
INTS . 

11) 3 ' 

12) 3 ' THE PATCH: 

13) 3 ' ORG $A373 

14) 3 '$A373 JMP PATCH 

15) 3 '$A376 NOP 

16) 3 ' 

17) 3 ' NOW THE NEW CODE 

18) 3 • ORG $F)39D 

19) 3 'PATCH LDA #4)3 = MAXIMUM 
CHARACTERS PER LINE 

2) 3)3 ' LDB $E7 = MODE SWI 
TCH: )3=32, 1=4)3, 2=8)3 CHAR 

21) 3 ' BNE WIDE IF 1 OR 2 
, SKIP AHEAD 

22) 3 ' 

23) 3 ' MUST BE A 32 CHAR SC 
REEN 

24) 3 'NARROW LDB $89 = LSB OF C 
URSOR POSITION 

25) 3 ' ANDB #$1F CONVERT TO 
LINE POSITION 

26) 3 ' JMP $A377 RETURN TO 
REST OF THE OLD REGISTER SET-UP 
ROUTINE 

27) 3 ' 

28) 3 ' IT'S EITHER A 4)3 OR 
8)3 CHAR SCREEN 

290 'WIDE CMPB #1 WIDE OR WIDE 
R? 

3) 3)3 1 BNE WIDER 

31) 3 ' LDX #$1)32)3 = COLUM 
N WIDTH AND MAXIMUM TAB POSITION 

32) 3 1 BRA OUT 

33) 3 ' 

34) 3 ' MUST BE AN 8)3 CHAR S 
CREEN 

35) 3 'WIDER AS LA CHANGE NUMBER 
OF CHARACTERS PER LINE TO 8)3 

36) 3 ' LDX #$1)34)3 = COLUM 
N WIDTH AND MAXIMUM TAB POSITION 

37) 3 'OUT LDB $FE)32 = HI-RES 
CURRENT LINE POSITION 

38) 3 ' JMP $A37C REGISTERS 
ARE SET, GO PUT THEM IN PLACE 



160 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1988 



Listing 2: TUNNLMOD 

1 1 RAINBOW TUNNEL, REVISITED 

2 ' 

3 1 DEMONSTRATION OF A SPEEDIER A 
LTERNATIVE TO THE PALETTE COMMAN 
D 

4 1 

5 1 ORIGINAL 'RAINBOW TUNNEL 1 BY 
RICK ADAMS AND DALE LEAR 

6 » 

•MODIFICATIONS, AND ADDITION O 

A NEW USR ROUTINE BY 
i 

• MICHAEL F. WIENS 

19j35 SPRUCE ST. 
LA GRANDE, OREGON 9785)3 
(5)33) 963-6991 



7 
F 
8 
9 

1J3 
11 
12 
13 
14 
99 




RESERVE MEMORY FOR NEW PALET 
TE CODE 

Ij3j3 CLEAR Ij30j3, &H7FFj3 

118 ■ 

119 1 DATA FOR NEW PALETTE CODE 
12j3 DATA AE,j32,7E,E6,34 

128 1 

129 'PUT THE CODE IN PROTECTED R 
AM AND TELL BASIC ABOUT IT 

13) 3 FOR X=&H7FF)3 TO &H7FF4 :READ 
Z$:POKEX,VAL("&H H +Z$) :NEXT 

14) 3 DEFUSRj3=&H7FFj3 

148 • 

149 'FIX BUG IN 'PALETTE CMP' AN 
D 'PALETTE RGB' 

15) 3 POKE&HE649, &H1)3 

158 ' 

159 'SET HIGH CLOCK SPEED, BREAK 
KEY VECTOR, AND INITIALIZE VARI 

ABLES 

J6J3 POKE&HFFD9,)3:DIMC$(15) :T-1:0 
N BRK GOT027)3 

168 ' 

169 'SET UP COLOR STRINGS AND RE 
SET PALETTE 



18) 3 C$03)="":FORI=)3TO15:READZ 
$(0)=C$()3)+CHR$ (VAL('»&H , '+Z$) ) 
XT 

19) 3 FOR I=)3T014:C$(I+1)=MID$(C$( 
I) ,2)+LEFT$(C$(I) ,1) :NEXT:A$=USR 
0(C$(0)) 
198 



199 'PAINT CIRCLES 
2)3)3 FORI=0TO19:R=8+I*8:C=I AND 1 
* : HCIRCLE (16)3, 96) , R, 1: HPAINT (156 
R,96) ,C,1:HPAINT(164-R,96) ,C,1: 
EXT 



5 

+R 
NEXT 
2)38 • 

2)39 'PAINT THE LINES BETWEEN 
CIRCLES 

21)3 FORI=)3T019: HCIRCLE (160 " 



THE 
96) ,8 



+1*8,1 AND15 :NEXT 

218 ' 

219 'MAIN LOOP - ROTATE PALETTE 
AND CHANGE SPEED ACCORDING TO KE 
YBOARD INPUT 

220 A$=USR0(C$(K) ) : K= (K-l) AND15 
230 FOR X=1T0 T 

240 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THENNEXT : GO 
TO220 

250 IFA$=CHR$ ( 10) THENT=T*2 ELSEI 
FA$= IIA "THENT=T/2 : 1 FT< 1THENT=1 
260 GOTO220 
268 ' 

*269 'BREAK KEY PRESSED, SO RESET 

PALETTE, SLOW DOWN, AND STOP 
270 PALETTE CMP: POKE &HFFD8 ,0 : STO 

280 ' 

290 'FOR THOSE OF YOU THAT ARE I 
NTERESTED, HERE IS THE SOURCE CO 
DE FOR THE USR ROUTINE. IT IS V 
ERY SHORT: 
300 ' 

310 'ON ENTRY, X REG. POINTS TO 
STRING CONTROL BLOCK. 
315 ' 

320 'PALI 6 LDX 2,X POINT X 
TO STRING. 

330 ' JMP $E634 RESET PA 

LETTE SLOTS 



KLC SOFTWARE 

1121 Finfrock • Pasadena, TX 77506 

(713) 472-0078 

AVATEX 1200e Auto Answer/Dial 

100% Hayes compatible with 
FREE Compuserve Time - $95.00 

STAR NX-1000 Multi-Font Printer 

144 cps Draft/36 cps NLQ - 20 TYPE STYLES! 

$199.95 

DS/DD DISKETTES 
10 for $5.95 • 100 for $44.95 
Lifetime Guarantee! 

QUME DS/DD half-height Disk Drive 

ONLY $89.95 

Send your check or money order or call 

(713) 472-0078 

C.O.D. accepted • Sorry, no credit cards 
Please add $4.00 for shipping/handling charges 

Texas residents: add 7% sales tax 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 



161 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 



Fill out your Co Co library 
with these selections 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to take 
advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser features. An easy- 
to-read, step-by-step guide packed with hints, tips, tutorials and free 
software in the form of program listings. 
Book $19.95, Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 



The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first Simulations 
contest. You are a Civil War Commander, an air traffic controller, 
a civil defense coordinator, or a scientist on Mars . . . your wits are 
on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



The Windows and Applications Disk for The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I 

Puckett and Dibble have done it again! Here are all the great 
programs from the first volume of the Level II guide. Clever new 
applications ready to run. Disk $19.95 

The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid introduction 
to the realm of statistical processes and thinking for both the 
beginner and the professional. (80-column printer required.) 
Book $6.95, Tape or Disk $5.95, Package $11.95 

The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adventure contest. 
Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors, Horror House, One Room, Dr. 
Avatoe and more. Plus hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 

The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue Meanies, find a 
hidden fortune, or win the heart of a mysterious princess. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 



The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. Discover 
backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, attempt a daring space 
rescue, or defeat evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. Evil 
Crypt, Spymaster, Time Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the 
beginning! Book $11.95, Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 




The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winners from our second Simulations contest. Fly through 
dense African jungle, bull your way down Wall Street, lead a bomb 
squad, or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and 
talents. Book $9.95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 



r \ 

I want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Name 

Address , 

City 

State 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 (book only) 

□ Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Disk Package (2 disks) 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Level II, Vol. I 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

□ The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

□ Guide to Statistics Package (indicate choice of tape or disk) 
Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) Total 



$ 9.95 
$ 9.95 
$ 9.95 
$ 9.95 
$10.95 
$19.95 
$31,00 

$19.95 
$ 7.95 
$ 7.95 
$13.95 
$13,95 
$11.95 
$ 9.95 
$14.95 
$ 6.95 
$ 5.95 
$11.95 



Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847- 
0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. 
That is, they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape 
or disk, you will still need the appropriate book. OS-9 9 is a registered trademark of the Microware 
Systems Corporation, 



D el ph i Bur eau 



All right. We have our terminal 
software. We know the exten- 
sions used for filenames in the 
CoCo SIG, and we know how the SIG 
databases are structured. We also have 
an understanding of the differences 
between ASCII and binary files. I do 
believe we are ready to take the plunge 
and go for a download or two. 

For our first download together, let's 
just pick a program out of the data- 
bases. I choose Intersteller Kamikaze, 
which is stored in the Games topic area. 
So fire up the CoCo, load your terminal 
program and let's get started. 

While this discussion will be generic 
in terms of overall procedure, the ac- 
tions performed are those utilized by 
MikeyTerm. This is not to demean the 
excellent commercially available termi- 
nal programs, nor is it intended to 
detract from any of the other shareware 
products. Simply put, I prefer to use 
MikeyTerm. I "grew up" with it. It 
meets my telecommunications needs, 
and I am comfortable with it. If you use 
a different program, consult your man- 
ual for the necessary information as you 
follow these procedures. To clarify 
things a bit, those actions that are 
MikeyTerm-speciiic will be indicated as 
such. 

To get to the Games database, enter 
DRTRBR5E GRME (or DR GR for short) at 
the CoCo SIG prompt. You should then 
find yourself at the DBR5E5 : Gam> 
prompt. At this point you can enter DIR 
or simply press ENTER to obtain a 
directory. However, unless Delphi gets 
hit by lightning or some fiend erases the 
system storage, you can get to the file 
by entering RERD INTERSTELLER KRM- 
IKRZE at the database prompt. The file 
should be there. Keep in mind, too, that 
you can shorten the filename in the 
RERD command above. Just make sure 
you enter enough characters to make it 
unique. RERD INTER5T worked fine for 
me. 

After entering the RERD command, 



Cray Augsburg is RAINBOWS technical 
editor and has an associates degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is CRAY. 



Database downloading, 
Part 2 

Bringing It 
on Down! 

By Cray Augsburg 

Rainbow Technical Editor 



you should see the following informa- 
tion scroll down your screen: 

Name: INTERSTELLER KAMIKAZE 
Type: PROGRAM 

Date: 21-FEB-1988 11:58 by 
JBARRETT 

Size: 11466 Count: 62 
/Entry; 4114 Published by 
DONHUTCHISON 

INTERSTELLER KAMIKAZE. 
Simulation of a star-fighter. 
Keep a calculator handy. Far 
CoCo 1, 2, or 3. 

Keywords: SIMULATIONS , GAME, 
SPACE, JOYSTICK 

/File: 06$JBARR$INTKAM. BAS Acc: 
2 9 -MAR- 19 8 8 14:23 

ACTION> 



What you are reading is the group 
description for the program we are 
going to download, Intersteller Kami- 
kaze. Note the file is 1 1 ,466 bytes long. 
The filename used to store the file is 
near the bottom, hidden in the line 
06$JBflRR$INTKAM.BflS. The number 
(06) indicates which database the file is 
"hooked" to. Following that, and separ- 
ated by dollar signs, are the first five 
characters of the username of the per- 
son who uploaded the file. Finally, the 
filename is INTKAM.BAS. In most cases 
you will want to use this filename when 
the time comes to save your program. 
The extension .BAS tells us the file is 
stored in ASCII format, so we can use 
Xmodem or the buffer capture protocol 
to download it. 

Finally, you should see the ACTIDN> 
prompt at the bottom of your screen. 
This prompt tells you, among other 
things, that it is now possible to down- 
load the file. 

Buffer Capture Method 

You've entered the proper database 
and read the description for the file you 
want to download. You're sitting at the 
ACTIDN> prompt, and Delphi is waiting 
for you to decide what to do next. Let's 
download the file. To initiate a buffer 
capture download of Intersteller Kam- 
ikaze, enter DOWNLOAD at the ACTI0N> 
prompt. You will now see the following 



Database Report 



By Don Hutchison 

Rainbow CoCo CIG Database Manager 



Both rainbow SIGs had very active 
months, both in the forum areas and 
in the databases. We had a lot of sophis- 
ticated, useful software uploaded to us. 
Let's check out the new material! 

OS-9 Online 

In the General topic area of the data- 
base, Bill Brady (wbrady) uploaded a file 
called HELP ! , a collection of his help files 
for use with the user's group help utility 

In the Programmers Den topic Mark 
Griffith (markgriff) provided Carl 
Kreider's C library. Included are the 
replacement and transcendental math 
libraries, as well as the archived documents 
describing the additions to the standard 



library including the transcendental math 
functions. Also included is an archived file 
of all the header files needed to work with 
the new library functions. 

In the Applications topic Stephen Macri 
(DRACMAN) uploaded CREATE. Wl, a file 
useful for creating a 640-by-192 four-color 
window for graphics under Level II. Bill 
Brady (OS9UGED) uploaded some Austral- 
ian public domain Sculptor files. These 
files include several tricks for menus, etc. 
Mark Griffith uploaded MVSKEL.flR, 
which contains a skeleton C source file to 
help new C programmers start writing 
applications for Multi- Vue. The files fully 
support all Multi- Vue utilities such as 
Gcal, Gclock, etc., and are written to 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 



163 



Download Method Menu scroll down 
your screen: 

Xmodem (128 byte blocks) 
Kermit 

WXmodem (Windowed Xmodem) 
Ymodem (1,024 byte blocks) 
Buffer Capture 
RT Buffer Capture 
YB (Ymodem batch) 

At this point, it would be wise to 
make sure the buffer created by your 
terminal program is empty. To do this 
with MikeyTerm, first go to Mikey- 
Term's main menu by pressing 
CONTROL-7. Now press 4 to clear the 
buffer, Y to acknowledge your request 



and 1 to return to communications. 
Pick the buffer capture method by 
entering BUFFER from the download 
menu. The following will appear on 
your screen: 

Ready . . . Press RETURN to 
begin: 

Tell your terminal program to start 
receiving information into its buffer. 
With MikeyTerm this is done by press- 
ing control-1, which tells MikeyTerm 
to open its buffer. Once your terminal 
program is ready to receive informa- 
tion, simply press ENTER. As the file is 



received by your computer you will see 
it scroll down your screen. When the 
transfer is complete, the following 
message will appear on your screen: 

»Dounload of 21B lines: 
Complete . 

Your file transfer method 
is now Buffer Capture 

Great! The program has been trans- 
ferred and you can now save it to tape 
or disk. We will assume for the purposes 
of this discussion that you are using a 
disk system. To do this with Mikey- 



allow the user to include his own program 
code. Bruce Isted (bruceisted) sent us 
XCODES.AR, a subroutine archive for the 
XWord (XBd) editor. Source, binary and 
documentation files are included. John 
Beveridge (JOHNTORONTO) uploaded MI- 
CRO-EM ACS, a simple text editor. The 
grouping includes the source code. 

In the Utilities topic Bruce Isted up- 
loaded PARK .AR, a park utility to replace 
the Radio Shack park utility. This utility 
fixes a small bug and adds an "unpark" 
feature. Bruce also provided two MS- 
DOS / RS-DOS to OS-9 transfer utilities: 
PC DOS . AR will read or write MS-DOS 
disks, while RSDOS.AR will read or write 
Disk basic disks, (Thanks to Bob Santy 
for these programs.) Jim Sanford 
(WB4GCS) uploaded a utility to aid in 
debugging G language programs, as well as 
documentation and C source for two 
programs that merge and unmerge files 
without compression. This allows transfer 
from MS-DOS to OS-9 and vice versa. 

In the Device Drivers topic Dave Phi- 
lipsen (DPH1L1PSEN) posted PR INTER . AR, 
aft ARCed file with driver and descriptor for 
the Disto RTIME printer adapter. He 
included both binary and source files plus 
a hardware hacker's tip as a bonus. 

In the Telecommunications topic Bill 
Brady sent us WizCsum, which computes 
the checksum for the new version of 
WiXmod, (Xmodem) for the Wiz. Bill also 
uploaded W I XMDD . CCB, which is a replace- 
ment Xmodem module for the Wiz. This 
version is much faster than the original and 
fixes a few problems. Users may leave 
Co Co Bin enabled all the time on down- 
loads with this version. Brian Wright 
(poltergeist) posted X-Dial, an auto- 
dialer designed for use with XCOM9. Ron 
Bihler (RAAB) sent us the RiBBS Files, an 
OS-9 BBS system to support all CoCos. 
RiBBS requires the RS-232 pack and at 
least two disk drives. It provides full 
Xmodem support and operation up to 
2400 baud and is supported under levels I 
and II. 

In the Graphics and Music topic Mike 
Knudsen (ragtimer) uploaded Ulti- 
MusE, a complete graphics editor for 
creating and editing music scores in stand- 
ard musical notation and for playing them 



to any MIDI synthesizer. It includes full 
documentation and several ready-to-play 
music files. Three years in the making, 
UltiMusE is quite similar to the popular 
commercial program Lyra, UltiMusE 
requires a CoCo 3 with OS-9 Level IL 
Steve Clark (steveclark) uploaded an 
updated version of the Macintosh Mac- 
Paint display and print programs. The 
display program creates its own window 
and includes icon and AIF files for Multi- 
Yutl Toni Ryan (tntrhodan) sent us 
some new fonts for use with Home Pub- 
lisher by Spectral Associates. Toni also 
included a BASIC09 conversion utility to 
allow the user to make OS-9 eight-by-eight 
format fonts into a "publisher" font. Jason 
Forbes (COC03K1D) posted FEDIT.AR, a 
full-featured Level II font editor by Shawn 
Cokus. 



CoCo SIG 

In the General topic area, I (DONHUT- 
CHISON) provided an updated file listing 
the database standards for the CoCo SIG 
and a current listing of Telenet local access 
numbers. Kevin Nickols (nickols) posted 
the Tandy Newsletter for March 1988. 

In the CoCo 3 Graphics topic, Bob 
Wharton (bobwharton) uploaded his 
logo of the Boston Celtics in both MGE 
and CM3 versions. Bob also uploaded Part 
3 of his popular MGE Rocks series, feat- 
uring the logos of various rock groups. 
Ron Potter (RONP) posted a humorous file 
called CHIPS .CM3, inspired by some pic- 
tures of the Princeton RAINBOWfest, and 
a picture of a "Death Star." Alan DeKok 
(alandekok) uploaded a patch for CoCo 
Max 3 that allows using the program with 
a standard Radio Shack Hi-Res adapter. 
George Hoffman (hoffberger) posted 
his Pink Floyd album covers. James 
Mackenzie (ZIMBO) uploaded a Color 
Max 3 font editor. Donald Ricketts (ste- 
vepdx) uploaded still more of his well- 
done CM3 conversions from DS-69 im- 
ages. 

In the Utilities and Applications topic 
Dexter Greener (GDI) uploaded a one-liner 
BASIC program for examining memory. 
Bob Wharton uploaded a revision to his 
program for making labels for disk sleeves. 



Michael Schneider (mschneider) up- 
loaded TC31, the iteviest version tif the 
popular archiving program for 5T2K 
CoCo 3s. Paul Dion (paulnormand) 
posted his Quick- E word processor. David 
Mills (davidmills) uploaded a special 
1 28K CoCo 3 utility for copying a disk in 
only two swaps on a single-drive system 
and Pirate's Assassin, a utility for protect- 
ing disk-based programs on all CoCos. 
David politely included source code and a 
well-written documentation file, also. 
Robert Pierce (rpierce) uploaded a utility 
for editing a disk's file allocation table. He 
called it Eat Editor, so don't be confused! 

In the Hardware Hacking topic I posted 
a transcript of a forum thread concerning 
"sparklies" on the CoCo 3. The file is a 
detailed description of the problem and a 
cure, which was originally begun by Roger 
Krupski (hardwarehack). Michael 
Banks (kzin) posted a text file that de- 
scribes some telecommunications basics 
for beginners. 

In the Games topic John Barrett (jbar- 
rett) uploaded his popular Mars Voyage 
game. 

In the Classic Graphics topic Mark 
Garbarini (F19) posted his freehand draw- 
ing of an Ingram MAC-10 weapon. 

In the Music and Sound topic Orman 
Beckles (orman) posted the theme song 
from "The Munsters." Mike Stute (GRID- 
BUG) uploaded the song "Love Walks In," 
and George Hoffman posted a Lyra file 
called TRFAITH. 

In the Product Reviews and Announce- 
ments topic Donald Ricketts uploaded his 
review of VIP Writer HI for the CoCo 3, 

In the Data Communications topic Alan 
Imrie (aceofswords) provided the latest 
version of Ultimaterm Version 4.0 and its 
associated utilities. I posted a file of 

miscellaneous customization for the 
popular CoCo 3 terminal program Rick- 
ey term. Joe Josey (cocojoe) uploaded % 
user survey program for use with the 
Co BBS system, and John Barrett provided 
his interest log program, also for Co BBS. 

As you can see, the RAINBOW SIGs are 
always very active. No matter what you're 
interested in, you'll find it here. Join us 
online to keep in touch with all the latest! 



164 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1988 



Term, press control-7 to return to the 
menu and choose Option 6, Disk Utility. 
MikeyTerm will ask if you want to read 
a file into the buffer (Option 1) or write 
the buffer contents to disk (Option 2.) 
We want to save the buffer to disk, so 
press 2. Enter the filename at the next 
prompt. After checking the disk, Mi- 
key Term will present you with a menu 
of five different formats in which to save 
the file. The options are: 

1) Basic pgm / fiSCII 

2) Basic pgm / COMPRESSED 

3) Machine language pgm 

4) ASCII data 

5) Binary data 

Since we know the file is a BASIC 
program and that it was stored in 
ASCII format, use Selection 1. Now 
you can log off Delphi and load the 
program in BASIC. Chances are you will 
get a DS (direct statement) Error during 
the loading. This is normal. Simply 
resave the file. Now, try to run the 
program. If the transfer was error-free, 
you won't have a problem. If line noise 
interfered with the download, you may 
have to edit the program before it will 
run correctly. 



Let me remind you, a buffer capture 
transfer is only useful for files that are 
stored in ASCII format. To transfer 
binary files (machine language, token- 
ized BASIC, etc.), you will need an error- 
checking protocol such as Xmodem. 

Xmodem Method 

A terminal program supporting the 
Xmodem file transfer protocol can be 
used to download any file whether it is 
in ASCII or binary format. We have just 
seen how the process works for a buffer 
capture download. Let's download the 
same file using Xmodem. 

After reading the group description 
for Intersteller Kamikaze, you should 
again find the ftCTIDN> prompt at the 
bottom of your screen. While it is 
possible to initiate the Xmodem down- 
load by going through the download 
menu, we can also do it straight from 
the prompt. Just enter XMODEM or XM. 
Delphi will respond with: 

Type three consectutive 
<Control-C>'s to abort. 
OK, receive! (11466 bytes 
= 90 XMODEM blocks, text) 

This message tells you that Delphi is 



ready to send you a file stored in ASCII 
format ("text' 5 ) and that the file is 1 1466 
bytes, or 90 Xmodem blocks, long. To 
receive the file, tell your terminal pro- 
gram to start an Xmodem download. 
With MikeyTerm, press CONTROL-4. 
When the transfer is finished, follow the 
guidelines above to save the file to disk. 

Before downloading a program al- 
ways check the extension, and make 
sure you know how to save the file once 
it has been downloaded. Beginners very 
often save a file as if it were a different 
format, and they don't understand why 
it won't work. The mistake is not a 
serious one, yet it is very confusing and 
frustrating. And it can be avoided. 

Next month we will try to address 
some of the problems you might en- 
counter in downloading programs from 
Delphi. In the meantime, try download- 
ing some files. It really is easy once you 
get the hang of it. If you have a problem, 
just send Mail or a Forum message to 
me (CRAY), Don Hutchison (DON- 
HUTCHlSON) or Marty Goodman 

(MARTYGOODMAN). □ 



$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 

$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 



rtj* & flj- (fc rtj ^ (Jj 



IF YOU PLAY LOTTO TO WIN 
THEN YOU NEED 
LOT— PRO 



$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 
$ 

$ 

LOT-PRO IS SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED $ 
FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER $ 
and features: $ 

$ 

-A handicapping system for any $ 
pick-6 lotto $ 

$ 

-Choice of 6 wheeling systems to $ 
increase your winning probabilities $ 

' $ 

-LOT-PRO SYSTEM 60 number selection $ 

routine option $ 

$ 

ONLY $25.95 (specify disk or tape) $ 
(Ca. residents add 6% sales tax) $ 

$ 



INTRODUCING THE 
WARGAME DESIGNER 



CJN Enterprises 
P.O. Box 40487 

T m Bakersfield, CA. 93384-0487 

$ ( 805 ) -836- 1 323 

$ RAINBOW 

$ «™ 0N Invest in LOT— PRO. 
$ It might make YOU RICH! 

$ (printer needed) 

(£• <£ <£• (£> <t» it 1 ■£ & 



$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 





TAKE COMMAND! Now you can create your own 1 & 2 player war games and more. 
If you are into wargames, science fiction or Dungeons and dragons, you'll love the WGD 
system. 

The completely menu driven system allows you to create your own full color Hi-res icons 
for units and map features. Take control of the number of units, strength, movement, turn 
of entry, range of fire, terrain modifiers and objectives. No programming required! 
WGD comes with a 23 page manual and 2 flippy diskettes in a rigid vinyl case with these 
four ready to play scenarios: 



INVASION NORTH 
ATTACK ON MOSCOW 
ROBOT COMMAND 
DUNGEON WARRIOR 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 

SEAL 



a river crossing challenge 
a historic simulation 1941 
a si-fi thriller 

save the damsel in distress 

Complete WGD system ONLY $29.00 Each scenario available separately with WGD 
system demo for ONLY $10.00. 
COCO 3 128K Disk 

GRIDIRON STRATEGY 

The FIRST and still the BEST 2 player football strategy game for 
the COCO 3 128K disk. 

Over 20 offensive plays and 10 defensive allignments. See the 
RAINBOW review 8/87. '..fascinating.' Totally unique playing 

RAINBOW 




Disk, manual and playing aids only $21.00. 



St <u 



$$$$$$$$$$$ WEEKLY WINNER 2.0 $$$$$$$$$$ 

A graphics oriented PROVEN WINNER! Features statistical analysis, intuition and luck. 

Manual contains little known facts about winning number characteristics. Works with all 

state lotteries, all number combinations. 

'I won $90.00 the first time I used it.* KJO, OH 

ONLY $10.00 

Orders shipped first class FREE within 24 hrs. of receipt. 

SPORTSware 1251 S. Reynolds Rd. t Suite 414, Toledo, OH 43615 



tfffr (419) 389-1515 



VISA 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 165 



I 



Doctor ASCII 



Of Dumps and Degrees . 

Some time ago, I purchased an 
Epson RX-80 printer I do not have 
drives or CoCo Max, but I would 
like to print my Hi-Res designs. How 
can I do that? Also, when the temper- 
ature around Rio was near 40 degrees 
Celsius, the printer would not print 
correctly; after it rained and the temper- 
ature went down, however, it started to 
print correctly again. The manual says 
that the operating temperature is from 
5 to 35 degrees C. Could the tempera- 
ture cause the problem? 

Michael Lees 
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 



13 True Data Products (a RAINBOW 
^/C advertiser) markets a screen dump 
program for $19.95 that is claimed to 
work with Epson printers. Microcom- 
puters and printers (which contain 
dedicated microprocessors) are 
temperature-sensitive devices. As you 
indicated, you were trying to operate 
your printer at a temperature 5 degrees 
Celsius above its rating. For years, most 
computers required special air condi- 
tioned environments in order to run at 
all. 

Upgrade Problems 



I have VIP Speller, which works well 
on my CoCo 2. I recently upgraded 
to a 512K CoCo 3, and now my 
spelling checker doesn't work. Does 
anyone have a fix or a patch for this? 
Also, I do a lot of my own program- 
ming, for myself and others. Can you 
tell me how I can access all of the full 
512K of RA Mfrom BA SIC? 

Joel Briere 
Lethbridge, Alberta 

13 Most VIP software can be fixed 
A }Lfor CoCo 3 operation by locating 
and changing the sequence of bytes 
from $8C $FF $00 to $8C $FE $00. 



Richard Esposito is the principal engi- 
neer for BDM Corporation. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




By Richard E. Esposito 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

with Richard W. Libra 

Without using OS-9, you can use the 
extra memory with your existing soft- 
ware as a RAM disk or a print spooler 
with a software package such as the one 
supplied with the JramR memory up- 
grade, rainbow advertiser J&R Elec- 
tronics' software package is available 
without the hardware for $19.95 for 
owners of competing CoCo 3 memory 
upgrades. 

Altering Disk BASIC 

Can I alter Disk BASIC to support the 
6-millisecond stepping rate, two 80- 
track double-sided drives and a 9600 
baud rate? I would like to upgrade my 
RS-DOS (Disk basic) to meet these 
needs. ADOS does not work on some 
of my programs. I have found similar 
programs in HOT CoCo magazine: 
Disk Pokes (March 1985, Page 90), 64K 
Enable (June 1985, Page 45), and 80 
Track Pokes program (September 1985, 
Page 13). Can all these programs be 
combined to do the job that I want? 
Another program that I found is 
Charger in RAINBOW (June 1985, Page 
113). With this information, can I 
permanently upgrade my RS-DOS to 
run under 9600 baud? I do have an 
EPROM burner and a 68766 EPROM. 

Don Peters 
Middletown, OH 



ID You can incorporate just the 
pokes you mentioned for step 
rate, 80-track drives and baud rate into 
a revised Disk BASIC and burn it into an 
EPROM. 

Unnecessary Repair 

/ have a Korean Model B CoCo 2 
and am having a problem. When I set 
the switch on the back of the com- 
puter to Channel 3 and turn it on, all 
I get is a mess. The screen is black-and- 
white and pushed over to the right, and 
I can't read anything on the screen. 
When I switch to Channel 4 everything 
works fine. This problem occurred 
suddenly; the computer used to work on 
Channel 3 all the time. Is this a problem 
with the TV set or the computer, or even 
something I should worry about? 

Greg Teets 
Cedar Hill, MO 



ID With used CoCo 2s going for 
/C under $50 and new CoCo 3s 
around $100, I'd forego having any 
repairs made to a CoCo 2 as long as it 
still runs. 

Inadequate Memory 



/ recently encountered a problem in 
a DeskMate program. When I at- 
tempted to use Ledger, it worked fine 
until I finished my formulas and tried 
to input all the numbers. It was then 
that I got a "Not enough memory" 
error. What is the reason for this? I have 
a CoCo 2 Extended Color BASIC sys- 
tem. I burned an EPROM with ADOS. 
I also have an FD-501 disk drive, 
Speech Systems' Super Voice and 
EARS connected with a triple- Y cable, 
a DMP-105 Printer and a DCM-3 
modem. Could the "Not enough mem- 
ory" error stem from one of these? 
Maybe having Super Voice, EARS and 
my disk drive controller connected at 
the same time is causing my problem. 

Todd Greene 
Star, NC 



ID On a 64K CoCo 2, the OS-9 op- 
erating system grabs about half 
the available memory. The remaining 
32K must be shared with the application 
program and data. Since DeskMate 
runs under OS-9, its memory available 



166 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1988 



for formulas and data is quite limited. 
As I have preached for years, FLEX was 
a much better operating system for 64K 
machines. OS-9 really requires Level II 
with the additional memory (up to 
512K) that is available in the CoCo 3. 



program at a modest cost, so the con- 
version would not be worth the time or 
effort. It would be much less trouble to 
purchase a bare double-sided drive than 
to attempt to retrofit double-sided 
components into your single-sided 
drive. 



files directly from MS-DOS disks in 
programs that are written to run on the 
CoCo. I have purchased MS-DOS File 
Manager from Clearbrook Software 
Group and the "No Halt" controller 
from Sardis Technologies, which used 
the D.P. Johnson SDISK-3 program to 
give the same file reading format to the 
CoCo 3 running OS-9 Level II that MS- 
DOS has, I would very much appreciate 
whatever programming hints you might 
want to pass on to me about writing 
programs for the CoCo that have MS- 
DOS capabilities built into them. Also, 
is there other hardware for the CoCo 
that I should consider purchasing in 
order to give the CoCo MS-DOS acces- 
sibility? I feel that better programs can 
be written for the CoCo than those 
written for the MS-DOS machines, 
especially since we have windows, 
multitasking and multiuser capabilities 
under OS-9 Level II. Also, I believe that 
OS-9 Level II conforms more to ANSI 
and UNIX standards than the OS/2 
system that is supposed to be coming for 
the MS-DOS machines. I think that a 
program similar to Excel that has MS- 
DOS read and use capability and is 
written for the 68000 Apple Macintosh 
computer can be written for the CoCo. 
It should be an immediate priority to 
bring into being. 

Donald Adams 
Kokomo, IN 

[<, I agree with you in principle that 
/Cmost popular PC compatible 
programs could be ported over to the 
512K CoCo 3. Since most of this soft- 
ware is now written in C, porting appli- 
cations over to the UNIX-like OS-9 is 
relatively easy. I would especially like to 
see a WordPerfect port, as there is even 
one for the relatively impotent Apple II. 
I discussed this with Tandy's Mark 
Siegel at the Princeton RAINBOWfest 
and expressed the opinion that if Word- 
Perfect ran on the CoCo 3, especially 
with an MS-DOS file manager, it would 
be a best-seller. 



For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, 
at the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
RSK for "Ask the Experts" to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete 
instructions* 



Drive Compatibility 



An MMU for the CoCo 3 



I have an ancient, gray-cased CoCo 
that I want to replace with a CoCo 
3 and 5I2K. With my old Color 
Computer, I am using two white-cased 
drives, Cat. No. 26-3029. Drive 0 is si 
n 011042. If I install a Version 1.1 chip 
in the Drive Controller, will these drives 
be compatible with the new CoCo 3? I 
realize that there can be power supply 
problems, and I really need to be sure 
of the compatibility before I buy. 

Charles Burch 
Thompson Station, TN 



13 Since the white Radio Shack 
drives you have were designed to 
work with the CoCo 2, the controller 
does not need a 12-volt supply; thus you 
should not have any problem using 
them with a CoCo 3. The older gray 
drives can also be used with the CoCo 
3, but a newer 5-volt-only controller is 
required. 



Modifying Scripsit 

I have an old 'D' Board CoCo 1 that 
I have self-upgraded to 64K from 
16 K with Extended Color BASIC. For 
years I ran a cassette system, but I 
recently added the FD-501 disk drive. 
One of the first things I did was to 
transfer several ROM pack programs to 
disk, including Scripsit. Is it possible to 
get into the program and modify it for 
saving to and recalling from disk in- 
stead of tape? How hard is it, and is it 
possible to make hardware modifica- 
tions to alter my FD-501 disk Drive 0 
from a single- to a double-sided drive? 
I also plan soon to purchase a double- 
sided Drive 1 to fit into the same case. 

Thomas Breaux 
Baker, LA 

13 Modifying Scripsit to run off disk 
/C would be a major task. The pro- 
gram would first need to be relocated 
out of the way of Disk basic (address 
$C000 +) and the cassette routines 
replaced with their disk counterparts, 
Tandy markets a disk version of this 



/ understand from looking at the IC 
Master Volumes there is a Memory- 
Management Unit or coprocessor 
that allows the 6809 access up to 2 Meg. 
Can a satellite board be made to take 
advantage of the coprocessor and added 
memory? It would break the 64K bar- 
rier of the 6809 working on its own. 
Also, what is the maximum memory the 
GIMEchip (MMU) can handle? Speak- 
ing of GIMEchip, what has the upgrade 
Spectrum offers on that chip done to it? 
Does Tandy not support an upgrade 
also? 

Alan Parker 
Grissom AFB, IN 

13 The CoCo 3 already has a Mem- 
/£ory Management unit. The 
Motorola MMU that you speak of was 
announced but never put into produc- 
tion. The few samples that were pro- 
duced switched memory in 4K blocks 
and were not compatible with the CoCo 
3's 8K block scheme. It is possible to 
augment the CoCo 3's GIME to address 
2 Meg; I met someone at the Princeton 
RAINBOWfest who had done so. With 
the current OS-9 software base, 512K is 
more than adequate; installation of 
additional memory, especially in light 
of the recent run up in DRAM prices, 
would not be practical for most users. 
The new GIME chip with the *A' suffix 
can be ordered from Tandy National 
Parts, but the price is high (about $50). 
It is purported to cure the "sparklie" 
problem on the CoCo 3. 

MS-DOS Capabilities 



I very much appreciate your "telling 
all" in the January 1988 issue of 
RAINBOW about the hardware con- 
figuration of your system. I have a 
computer system very similar to yours 
with the CoCo; like you, I also own a 
Sharp 7000 MS-DOS portable compat- 
ible. I haven't found an MS-DOS pro- 
gram yet that it won't run. Since there 
is a flood (some have said it is an ocean !) 
of MS-DOS programs available now, I 
feel the CoCo needs the capability to 
access and use MS-DOS records and 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 167 



A utility to help you customize your 
programming language 



Changing 
the Language 



By Marc Campbell 

I am sure that if you have been com- 
puting for any length of time, you 
have encountered the "novelty pro- 
gram syndrome" — that strange and 
unpredictable phenomenon wherein an 
accident, chance occurrence, or just 
plain luck altered the mediocre project 
you were working on and transformed 
it into one of the finest programming 
achievements you ever developed. 
Color Catalyst is a perfect example of 
the "novelty program" gone berserk, 
and all three of the syndrome's criteria 
were at work on that fateful day when 
I stumbled into the forbidden outer 
reaches of Random Access Memory. 

Color Catalyst is a menu-driven 
utility that allows you to change, among 
other things, the BASIC programming 
language. You can easily customize any 
Extended Color BASIC command to suit 
your liking. For example, you could 
change PRINT to PT to save you time at 
the keyboard. Color Catalyst can mod- 
ify more than just commands; the dis- 
play, startup messages, error messages, 
the prompt, the cursor, and even mes- 
sages like BREAK, ERROR, and IN (as in 
BREAK IN 20 or ?SN ERROR IN 35) are 
fully supported. With the disk drive and 
CoCo 3 modifications provided, you 
can expand Color Catalyst as you 
expand your system. Color Catalyst 
also allows you to save your custom 
Extended Color BASIC to either disk or 
tape. 

Marc Campbell, a self-taught pro- 
grammer, is a senior in high school, 
where he participates in drama and is an 
editor and award-winning writer for the 
school newspaper. 



As you exit Color Catalyst, the com- 
puter asks if you want a RESET patch. 
Under normal circumstances, if you 
press the reset button, the computer will 
reinitialize, and you'll lose your custom 
version of BASIC. The RESET patch will 
retain all of your modifications except 
for the custom display (see the peeks, 
pokes and execs list for working around 
this) when you press the reset button; it 
was adapted from a program written by 
Thomas Kocourek and Kenneth Rock- 



well ("Thanks For The Memory," THE 
RAINBOW, May '87, Page 187, program 
lines 83 through 87). If you opt not to 
use this feature, the reset button will 
operate normally. If you do a cold start 
(CLS : EXEC49152 or similar command), 
the RESET patch will be lost. 

Using the Program 

In order for Color Catalyst to work 
properly, your CoCo must first be in 
"all-RAM" mode. This simply means 
that everything the computer stores in 
ROM (Read-Only Memory, the portion 
of a computer's memory that cannot be 
written over) must be copied into RAM 
(Random Access Memory, memory 
that both the user and the computer can 
read and/ or revise). A short machine 
language routine by Joseph Furgione 
("Prompt Attention," THE RAINBOW, 
July '87, Page 97) does the trick quite 
nicely and is found in Listing 1. On 
certain machines, you may experience a 
lock-up when you run Listing 1. If so, 
precede POKE 6 55 03* @ with EX- 
EC&HE00. (If you happen to own a 
CoCo 3, then youVe lucked out again 
because it is always in all-RAM mode.) 
Once you have your computer operat- 
ing in all-RAM mode, you are ready to 
boot Color Catalyst, simply load and 



How the Program Works 



This line-by-line breakdown supports 
listings 2 and 4. (The other listings are short 
enough so that you can see what's going on 
without a guided tour.) 



Line 
1 



3-5 



6-9 

10-15 

16-17 

18-28 
29-32 



Function 

Clears the screen black and 
checks whether the computer 
has a disk drive or not. If no 
disk drive is present, the com- 
puter jumps to Line 3 
Merges the disk modifications 
with Color Catalyst and reruns 
the composite program 
Define the graphics portion of 
the title display and put it in R$, 
8$ and C$ 
Title screen 
Main menu 

Return to BASIC routine. Line 
17 enables the RESET patch 
Input/ Output menu 
Modify display routine. Line 31 
actually changes the display 
according to the selection made 
on the menu 



33-39 Modify startup messages rou- 
tine 

40-43 Modify prompt routine 
44-46 Modify cursor routine. You are 
asked to input the new cursor 
character set and flash pattern, 
both of which are numbers 
between 0 and 255. Line 46 
pokes the new values into mem- 
ory 

47-50 Modify commands routine. 

After you input the modify 
command, the computer checks 
its location in memory. You are 
then taken to the editor screen 

51-55 The new command is poked 
into memory. The last character 
in the command is stored as a 
different ASCII code so the 
computer can locate the end of 
the command. If the new com- 
mand is shorter than the orig- 
inal, the remaining spaces are 
filled with Character String 2 

56-63 Modify error messages routine. 

This works the same as the 



168 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



64K ECB 




Peeks, Pokes and Execs 



P0KE359 , 57 Prepares the computer 

for a custom display 
color set. Disables cer- 
tain ASCII disk oper- 
ations. PQI<E359,126 
to restore disk com- 
mands 

PEEK (188 ) Returns a 14 if the sys- 
tem has a disk drive or 
a 6 if not 

PEEK ( 330211 Returns a 50 if the ma- 
chine is a Color Com- 
puter 3 

EXEC44533 Pauses until you press 

any key 

CLS:EXEC43152Does a cold start; 

RESET patch is lost 

Even after you use the RESET patch, the 
custom display will vanish. However, 
you will be able to restore your custom 



display by typing PDKE359 , 57 and the 
appropriate command below; 



PDKE65314, 7 Turns display black on 

green with a black 
border 

PDKEG5314 , G4 Turns display black on 

green with a green 
border 

P0KE65314 , 32 Turns display green on 

black with a black 
border 

P0KEG5314 , 8 Turns display black on 

orange with a black 
border 

PDKE65314 , 72 Turns display black on 

orange with an orange 
border 

PDKEG5314, 40 Turns display orange 

on black with a black 
border 



run. (If you are using the disk version, 
be sure to keep the disk in the drive until 
you see the title screen.) 

Color Catalyst was designed to be a 
hard-working, user-friendly piece of 
software. It utilizes a main menu that 
can access every general feature Color 
Catalyst has to offer: Input/ Output 
Menu, Modify Startup Messages, Mod- 
ify Display, Modify Prompt, Modify 
Cursor, Modify Commands, Modify 
Error Messages, Modify Miscellaneous 
Messages, and Modify Disk Extensions 
for disk systems only. When possible, 
the selection you choose in the main 
menu will take you to a submenu with 
more specific options. To select items 
from a menu, press the up arrow and 
down arrow keys until the cursor is 
pointing to the option you want to use. 
The cursor does a "wrap-around" if it 
goes past the first or last item on the 
menu. Press ENTER to select an option 
or the space bar to return to the main 
menu. If you are unsure about how to 
properly select items from the menu, 
onscreen instructions are present at all 
times. 

Certain selections from the main 
menu will eventually lead to an editor 
screen, where modification of Extended 
Color BASIC usually takes place. At the 

routine for modifying com- 
mands, except the last charac- 
ter is stored normally and any 
leftover characters are filled 
with blanks (Character String 

0) 

64-74 Modify miscellaneous mes- 
sages routine 

75-81 Modify disk extensions rou- 
tine, usable only with a disk 
system 

82-9p Format the menu screen and 
cause the cursor (>) to move 
when the up and down arrow 
keys are pressed. If the space 
bar is pressed, the computer 
jumps back to the main menu. 
If ENTER is pressed, the com- 
puter calculates the number of 
the selection and returns 

91-95 Display contents of the 
computer's memory. You are 
then asked if you want to mod- 
ify what you see through the 
"window" 

96 Initializes the editor screen 

97 Displays the current values of 
LENGTH and LEFT. The com- 
puter waits for a key to be 
pressed and then stores it in R$ 



top of the editor screen, you will see the 
words Length and Left. Length tells you 
the number of characters in the item you 
are modifying; Left tells you the amount 
of free space remaining in your modi- 
fication. Use the keyboard to type in the 

98 Checks to see if the down arrow 
key was pressed. If so, the com- 
puter jumps to Line 100. Any 
key that generates a character 
code lower than 13 (except the 
left arrow and BREAK) is dis- 
abled 

99 Checks to see if the left arrow 
key was pressed; if so, the com- 
puter backspaces one charac- 
ter, if possible 

100 Checks to see if any room is left 
on the editor screen; if not, the 
computer exits 

101 Redraws the cursor and up- 
dates the contents of your mod- 
ification 

102 Does a carriage return if the 
cursor disappears off the right 
side of the screen 

103 Updates the position of the 
cursor 

104 Checks to see if there is any 
more room in the modification; 
if not, the computer exits 

105-106 Exit editor screen routine 
107-112 Poke the modification into 
memory 

113-114 DRTR lines containing the 
Color BASIC commands 



new version of whatever you are mod- 
ifying. If you make a mistake, you may 
press the left arrow key to erase one 
character to the left. (Unfortunately, I 
was never able to work out a subroutine 
that enabled movement of the cursor 

115 DRTR line containing the Ex- 
tended Color BASIC commands 

116 DRTR line containing the Disk 
Extended Color BASIC com- 
mands (disk version only) 

117-118 DRTR lines containing the start 
addresses of the Color BASIC 
commands 

1 19 DRTR line containing the start 
addresses of the Extended 
Color BASIC commands 

120 DRTR line containing the start 
addresses of the Disk Extended 
Color BASIC commands (disk 
version only) 

121 DRTR line containing Extended 
Color BASIC error messages 

122 DRTR line containing Disk Ex- 
tended Color BASIC error mes- 
sages (disk version only) 

123 DRTR line containing the start 
addresses of the Extended 
Color BASIC error messages 

124 DRTR line containing the start 
addresses of the Disk Extended 
Color BASIC error messages 
(disk version only) 

125-127 DRTR lines containing the 
values to be poked into memory 
for the RESET patch routine 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 169 



up, down or right, compensated for 
carriage returns, and occupied only a 
small portion of memory. Any ideas out 
there in RAiNBOWland?) Pressing ENTER 
does a carriage return, and the down 
arrow allows you to exit the editor 
screen when you are finished modifying. 
(The computer automatically exits if 
you take up more room than is available 

Variables List 

fi$ Dummy variable, usually 
stores an INKEY$ character. 
In Line 3 it stores the upper 
graphics characters of the 
title screen 

B$ : Contains the middle graph- 
ics characters of the title 
screen 

G$ Contains the lower graphics 
characters of the title screen 

M Number of commands 

N Number of error messages 
S$ Contains spaces (Character 
String 13), used for format- 
ting menus 

S Start address of whatever 
you are modifying; also 
stores the PRINTS location 
of the first item on a menu 

■|; End address of whatever 
you are modifying; also 
stores the PRINTS location 
of the last item on a menu 

0 Dummy variable sometimes 
containing the number of 
the item you selected in a 
menu 

fl Dummy variable used in 
reading data and the RESET 
patch 

B Dummy variable used in the 

RESET patch 
W Dummy variable 
F$ Stores the last filename used 
C$ Stores the command or 
error message being modi- 
fied 

W$ Stores the modified com- 
mand or error message 
L Length of item being modi- 
fied 

Z Length of custom replace- 
ment 

P PRINTS position of the 
menu cursor and starting 
location of cursor in the 
editor screen 

CM Column position of cursor 
in editor screen 

RW Row position of cursor in 
editor screen 

170 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



on the editor screen or if you have no 
free space left in your modification.) 

Remember that you are toying with 
a very clean and efficient programming 
language; it is only logical to assume 
you will eventually do something that 
will result in an ugly syntax error. 
Therefore, several guidelines must be 
followed when modifying Extended 
Color basic commands for maximum 
efficiency and a minimum number of 
SN Errors. 

• Do not assign variables with the 
same name as a command. (If you've 
changed PRINT to PT, make sure you 
don't have a variable PT as well.) 

• You may disable any Extended 
Color basic command by pressing 
the down arrow immediately upon 
entering the editor screen. If you 
disable a command, don't try to use 
it in a program. 

• Do not have two identical com- 
mands. 

• Do not use spaces, quotation marks, 
numbers or carriage returns as part 
of a command. 

• The computer gets confused if you 
shorten the commands ELSE, FOR 
and REfiD, 

• If you don't have much experience 
with Color Catalyst, stay clear of 
single-character commands when at 
all possible. (Notice how few Ex- 
tended Color BASIC uses.) Once you 
have become used to the program, 
you might try experimenting with 
them, but be prepared for SN Errors. 

• Probably the hardest error to spot is 
something like this: You've changed 
FDR to FR and then try to type PR INT 
FREE(0). (The computer mistakes 
the FR in FREE as the modified com- 
mand FOR.) The only solution is to 
have your wits about you at all times! 

As a general rule, you may disregard 
these guidelines when working with 
anything else. If you run into any other 
problems that were excluded from this 
list, I'd like to hear from you. 

Modifications For Your Disk System 

Listing 3 contains the modifications 
required to run the disk version of Color 
Catalyst, Type in Listing 2, save it to 
disk, erase memory, and type in Listing 
3. Save the disk modifications in ASCII 
format under the filename DISK . BPS. It 
would be best to keep Color Catalyst 
and the disk modifications on the same 
disk. If you are using a CoCo 2 that 
supports true lowercase, you can make 
the changes shown in Listing 6 to allow 



this. These changes also correct the 
display problem during ASCII I/O 
(discussed later). 

Color Catalyst 3 

If you own a Color Computer 3, you 
might want a version of Color Catalyst 
that can customize the features of Super 
Extended Color BASIC. Listing 4 con- 
tains modifications for Color Catalyst 
that will accomplish this. Type in List- 
ing 2, save it to tape or disk, delete lines 
7, 12, 15, 29 to 32, 40 to 46, 66, 70 to 
73, 114 to 116, 118 to 120, 122 and 124, 
and then type in Listing 4. It should be 
noted that Color Catalyst and Color 
Catalyst 3 are separate programs. You 
can modify the CoCo 3 enhancements 
only with Color Catalyst 3; the cursor, 
the prompt and the display cannot be 
customized with this program. As with 
the original version, disk modifications 
for Color Catalyst 3 are found in Listing 
5. The disk modifications must be saved 
in ASCII under the filename DISK. 3. 
Both Color Catalyst 3 and its disk 
system modifications work in the same 
way as their standard Extended Color 
BASIC counterparts. Finally, the modi- 
fications shown in Listing 7 allow 
support for true lowercase on the CoCo 
3 and correct the display problems 
during ASCII I/O operations. 

The Strange Case of T. Harris 
and T. Earles 

If you have a CoCo 3, turn it on (or 
press the reset button if it is already on) 
and get into a Hi-Res text screen (either 
40-column or 80-column; it doesn't 
matter). Type CLS100. See that? 
"T.Harris & T.Earles," says the screen 
. . . nice touch, huh? Try it again. You 
now get the standard "Microware Sys- 
tems Corp." Press the reset button, and 
you'll be able to see the names again. 
Those two faces belong to the creators 
of the GIME chip or of Super Extended 
Color BASIC At any rate, Color Cata- 
lyst 3 allows you to modify this message 
as well. Put your own name there; that'll 
make the custom BASIC version you 
designed about as personal and offi- 
cially "yours" as it's going to get. 

Loading Your Modifications From 

BASIC 

Your custom BASIC modifications can 
be used as a stand-alone machine lan- 
guage program. First of all, insert the 
tape or disk into the proper device. Type 
( C ) LOfiDM "filename" and press ENTER. 
When loading is complete, type 
CLS:EXEC and press enter. Welcome 
to your custom BASIC! If you'd like, you 



can save the RESET patch (Listing 2, 
Line 17, starting at FOR fl=, and lines 
125-128) as a separate program and 
load and run it at this time; make sure 
you're in all-RAM mode. (If you choose 
not to load in a RESET patch program, 
you will lose your custom BASIC mod- 
ifications if you press the reset button.) 



Troubleshooting 

With Color Catalyst, it is very easy to 
make a mistake and not realize it until 
after you think everything is running 
smoothly. Every attempt was made for 
you to enjoy an error-free session at the 
keyboard, but there is no program on 
the market today that can protect itself 
completely from human error. Here are 



several frequent problems you might 
encounter and their solutions: 

• Program crashes aren't fun. If some- 
thing goes wrong with a program 
written in your custom version of 
BASIC, try editing the modifications 
with Color Catalyst. 

• If you want to perform any kind of 
ASCII input or output function (like 
CSmE"filename"\ft or MERGE), first 
type PDKE359 , 126. This will restore 
some lost I/O functions taken away 
by Color Catalyst, but it will also 
change the screen back to its normal 
colors. After the ASCII I/O opera- 
tions are finished, poke the proper 
value (as found in the peeks, pokes 
and execs list) to memory address 



65314; the screen will be returned to 
its custom display mode. 

• Programs written in Extended Color 
BASIC and saved normally will be 
instantly translated if loaded into a 
customized system. However, 
ASCII-saved programs will not be 
handled in this way and therefore 
will not run properly. 

• Follow the guidelines established 
previously in this article when mod- 
ifying commands to avoid those 
nasty SN Errors. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
these programs may be directed to the 
author at 266 Riverview Drive, Eph- 
rata, PA 17522. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



Editor's note: All of the following listings will be 
present on RAINBOW ON DISK/ TAPE in "com- 
pressed" form. The reader will need to manually 
rewve DISK -BRS, DISK. 3, CATALVST.3, LCPRTCH2 
and LCPRTCH3 in ASCII if they are to be used. 



Listing 1: RAM 

1 DATA26,80,142, 128,0,127,255,22 
2,166,132,127,255,223,167,132,48 
,1,14)3,255,0,38,239,28,159,57 

2 FORA=&HEj30 TO &HE18 :READX:POKE 
A,X:NEXT:POKE65503,0 




6 ■ ■ • « 


29 


74 .... 


...113 


16 . . 


82 


86 ... 


77 


26 ... 


100 


103 


i * . . . 51 


37 , , 


38 


114 


77 


50 . . 


72 


119 


238 


58 .. 


138 


END . . 


...238 



Listing 2: CRTflLYST 

1 CLEAR3j3j3:POKE359,126:CLS0:IFPE 
EK(188) 014THEN3 

2 PRINT@231,"one"CHR$(128) "momen 
t"CHR$(128) "please" ; :SCREENJ3,1:M 
ERGE " DISK . BAS " , R 

3 A$=CHR$(254)+CHR$(252)+CHR$(24 
8) +CHR$ (245)+CHR$ (252) +CHR$ (250) 
+CHR$(244)+CHR$(255)+CHR$(248)+C 
HR$(245) +CHR$ (252) +CHR$ (25J3) +CHR 
$ (245 ) +CHR$ ( 128 ) +CHR$ ( 128 ) +CHR$ ( 
249)+CHR$ (128)+CHR$ (24 6) +CHR$ (24 
5)+CHR$ (252)+CHR$(248)+CHR$(244) 
+GHR$ (255) +CHR$ (248) 

4 B$=CHR$(250)+CHR$(128)+CHR$(12 



128)+CHR$(255)+CHR$ (128) +CHR$ (24 

5)+CHR$(255)+CHR$(250)+CHR$(128) 

+CHR$ (255) +CHR$ (128) 

5 C$=CHR$(251)+CHR$(243)+CHR$(24 

2)+CHR$ (245)+CHR$ (128)+CHR$ (250) 



giiiaBBagBEMaagjSlijj^ 



% 
i 

\ 
I 

I 



I 



k 
I 



I 



I 



1 



a 
1 



©SStsHH^©™ byVidicom Corp 



@ TO - a ramdisk 
that doesn't forget! Fullg 
Static, battery backed CUlos 
ram makes Sol id Drive™ 
ready to use instantly. You 
can forget formatting and 
copying njork files to 
ramdisk then copying back 
your changes to floppy. You 
can forget fear of power 
failures. The instant pomer 
loss occurs, isM^ilr^©™ 
ujrite-protecls itself and 
your valuable work. 



gives you 




by Vidicom Corp 
512K (521.288 bytes) $395,00 

2 ITleg (1.018.576 bytes) $695.00 
Please add $4,00 shipping 
Rrizona Residienls add 5.5% Sales tax 
Visa niasterCard orders welcome 



state-of-the-art surface 
mount technology. That's 
xuhy we have the best 
guarantee in the industry - 
Tivo years limited repair or 
replacement! i®aSffi?S^@ ,w 
is compatible with ITlulti- 
Pak© and comes complete 
with 059® Level 1 or 11 

device driver, formatter and self-test software. Available in 512K 
and 1 megabyte versions. Factory upgrades available for 512K 
version. RSDos Driver now available, treats MS^M^©™ as 3 or 6 

SSSD RS devices (4-6,4-9), Disk 
loaded version free on request! 
27C64 EProm version $19.00 

MMM^™ is lhaiaslesl . most 
reliable long-term storage available |j 
to the small computer user! 

Vidicom Corp 20 E. main St. Suite 710 OS9 is the trademark of Microware 

/« n r*\ „ , Systems Inc and Motorola Inc. 

mesa.flz S5201 (602) 827-Q107 
Hours IT1-F 9:00 am - 5:00 pm ITIST 



■a 

1 
I 

Multi-pak is the trademark of 
Tandy Corp. 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 



171 



Protect and highlight 
gour important 
magaiine collection 

with sturdy 
RAINBOW binders 




Distinctive, Durable RAINBOW Binders 

the rainbow is a vital resource to be referred to 
again and again. Keep your copies of the rainbow safe 
in our quality, distinctive binders that provide com- 
plete protection. 

These attractive red vinyl binders showcase your 
collection and ensure your rainbows are in mint 
condition for future use. Each binder is richly em- 
bossed with the magazine's name in gold on the front 
and spine. They make a handsome addition to any 
room. 

Put an End to Clutter 

Organize your workspace with these tasteful bind- 
ers, Spend more time with your CoCo and eliminate 
those frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two binders, which holds a full 12 issues of 
the rainbow, is only $13*50 (plus $2.50 shipping and 
handling). 

Special Discounts on Past Issues 

To help you complete your collection of the rain- 
bow, we're offering a special discount on past issues 
of the magazine. 

When you place an order for six or more back issues 
of the rainbow at the same time you order binders, 
you are entitled to $1 off the regular back issue price. 
To order, please see the "Back Issue information" 
page in this issue. 

Know Where to Look 

You may purchase the "Official And Compleat Index 
To THE RAINBOW" for $1 when you purchase a set 
of binders. This comprehensive index of rainbow's 
first three years (July 1981 through July 1984) is 
usually priced at $2.50. 



YES. Please send me 



set(s) of rainbow binders 




Take advantage of these special offers with your binder purchase: 

Save $1 off the single issue cover price for back issues. Minimum order of 6 magazines. Please 
enclose a back issue order form from a recent issue indicating magazines wanted. 

Purchase the "Official and Compleat Index to THE RAINBOW" for $1. (Regular price $2.50.) 



(These offers good only with the purchase of a rainbow binder set) 

Name - — 

Address 

City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of 

Charge to: □ VISA 

Account Number 

Signature 



is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

□ MasterCard □ American Express 

Expiration Date 



Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Binders are $13.50 per two-binder set plus $2.50 shipping and handling. If your order is to be sent via U.S. mail to 
a post office box or foreign country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, please. 
In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



+CHR$ (128) +CHR$ (255) +CHR$ ( 12 8 ) +C 
HR$ (245)+CHR$ (128) +CHR$ (250) +CHR 
$(245)+CHR$(243)+CHR$(242)+CHR$( 
128)+CHR$(255)+CHR$(128)+CHR$(24 
1)+CHR$(243)+CHR$(250)+CHR$(128) 
+CHR$ ( 2 5 5 ) +CHR$ ( 1 2 8 ) 

6 POKE359,57:POKE65314,40:M=113: 
N=25 : PRINT@13 , "COLOR" :PRINT@3 6,A 
$:PRINT@68,B$:PRINT@100,C$ 

7 'DISK LINE HERE 

8 PRINT9166 , "CUSTOM BASIC UTILIT 
Y":PRINT@232,"BY MARC CAMPBELL": 
PRINT@489,"[C] MCMLXXXVII"; 

9 EXEC44539:POKE65314,7 

10 CLS:X=l:PRINT"********** MAIN 
MENU ***********": S$=" ":GOS 

UB8 2 : X=0 

11 PRINTS $" INPUT/ OUTPUT MENU",S$ 
"MODIFY STARTUP MESSAGES" , S$"MOD 
IFY DISPLAY ",S$ "MODIFY PROMPT", S 
$"MODIFY CURSOR", S$ "MODIFY COMMA 
NDS",S$"MODIFY ERROR MESSAGES", S 
$"MODIFY MISC. MESSAGES" :S=163:E 
=419 

12 'DISK LINE HERE 

13 PRINTS $" RETURN TO BASIC" :GOSU 
B83 

14 IFQ=1THEN18ELSEIFQ=2THEN3 3ELS 
EIFQ=3THEN29ELSEIFQ=4THEN40ELSEI 
FQ=5THEN44ELSEIFQ=6THEN47ELSEIFQ 
=7THEN56ELSEIFQ=8THEN64 

15 'DISK LINE HERE 

16 CLS:PRINT"DO YOU WANT TO EXIT 
? (Y/N) " : EXEC44539 : A$=INKEY$ : IFA 
$="N"THEN10ELSEPRINT"DO YOU WANT 

A RESET PATCH? (Y/N) " : EXEC44539 
:A$=INKEY$ : IFA$="N"THENCLS : NEW 

17 RESTORE : FORQ=lTO (M*2 ) + (N*2 ) : R 
EADA$ : NEXT : FORA=12 2 8 8T012 3 54 : REA 
DB : POKEA , B : NEXT : EXEC12 2 8 8 : CLS : NE 
W 

18 CLS: PRINT"******* INPUT/OUTPU 
T MENU ******" 

19 GOSUB8 2: PRINTS $ 11 LIST BASIC CO 
MMANDS",S$"LIST BASIC ERROR MESS 
AGES",S$"SAVE CUSTOM BASIC TO TA 
PE",S$"LOAD CUSTOM BASIC FROM TA 
PE":S=163:E=259 

20 'DISK LINE HERE 

21 GOSUB83 

22 W=0:PRINT@406, "" : IFQ=1THENCLS 
: RESTORE : FORQ=lTO M : READA$ : PRINT 
A$, :W=W+1:IFW=30THENEXEC44539:CL 
S : W=0 : NEXTELSENEXT : EXEC44 53 9 : GOT 
010 

23 IFQ=2THENCLS: RESTORE :F0RQ=1T0 
M*2:READA$:NEXT:F0RQ=1T0 N:READ 

A$ : PRINTA$ , : W=W+1 : IFW=3 0THENEXEC 
44539 : CLS : W=0 : NEXTELSENEXT : EXEC4 
4539:GOTO10 



24 I FQ= 3 THENI NPUT " WHAT IS THE F 
ILENAME" ;F$:F$=LEFT$ (F$,8) : CSAVE 
MF$ ,33000 , 54168 , 49152 :GOTO10 

25 I FQ=4 THENINPUT " WHAT IS THE F 
ILENAME", *F$:F$=LEFT$(F$, 8) :CLOAD 
MF$:GOTO10 

26 IFQ=5THENINPUT" WHAT IS THE F 
ILENAME" ;F$:F$=LEFT$(F$, 8) :SAVEM 
F$, 33000, 54168, 49152 :GOTO10 

27 I FQ= 6 THENI NPUT " WHAT IS THE F 
ILENAME" ;F$:F$=LEFT$(F$, 8) : LOADM 
F$:GOTO10 

28 IFQ=7THENCLS : DIR: PRINT "FREE : " 
FREE (0) :EXEC44539:GOTO10 

29 CLS: PRINT"******** MODIFY DIS 
PLAY ********" 

30 GOSUB82: PRINTS $" BLACK / GREEN 
/ BLACK", S$" BLACK / GREEN / GRE 

EN" , S$ "GREEN / BLACK / BLACK", S$ 
"BLACK / ORANGE / BLACK" , S$"BLAC 
K / ORANGE / ORANGE ",S$ "ORANGE / 
BLACK / BLACK" :S=163:E=323:GOSU 
B83 

31 IFQ=1THENP0KE65314,7ELSEIFQ=2 
THENPOKE 65314 , 6 4 E LS E I FQ= 3 THENPOK 
E65314,32ELSEIFQ=4THENPOKE65314, 
8ELSEIFQ=5THENPOKE653 14 , 72ELSEIF 
Q= 6THENP0KE 65314,40 

32 GOTO 10 

3 3 CLS: PRINT"**** MODIFY STARTUP 
MESSAGE ****•• 

34 G0SUB8 2 : PRINTS $" EXTENDED COLO 
R BASIC" :S=163:E=163 

35 'DISK LINE HERE 
3 6 GOSUB8 3 

37 IFQ=1THENS=33000:E=33080 

38 IFQ=2THENS=49465:E=49550 

39 GOSUB91:GOSUB107:GOTO10 

40 CLS :PRINT@194, "WHICH PROMPT? 
(1) OK (2) ?":EXEC44539:A$=INK 

EY$:IFA$="1"THENS=44014:E=44015E 
LSES=4753 6:E=47536 

41 G0SUB91 

42 GOSUB107 

43 GOTO10 

44 CLS: PRINT"******** MODIFY CUR 
SOR *********" :PRINT"OLD CURSOR 
CHARACTER SET: "PEEK(41384) :PRINT 
"OLD CURSOR FLASH PATTERN: "PEEK ( 
41382) : PRINT: PRINT" INPUT THE NEW 

CHARACTER SET AND FLASH PATTERN 



ii 



45 INPUTQ,W:IFQ>255 OR W>255 OR 
Q<0 OR W<0 THENS0UND1, l:GOT045EL 
SE PRINT: PRINT "NEW CURSOR CHARAC 
TER SET: "Q: PRINT" NEW CURSOR FLAS 
H PATTERN: "W: PRINT: PRINT "IS THIS 

MODIFICATION O.K.? (Y/N) " : EXEC 4 
4539 : A$«INKEY$ : IFA$="N"THEN44 

46 POKE41384,Q:POKE41382,W:GOT01 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 173 



0 

47 RESTORE :CLS: PRINT" ******** MO 
DIFY COMMANDS *******": PRINT "INP 
UT THE BASIC COMMAND YOU WISHTO 
MODIFY. H 

48 INPUTC$ : FORQ=lTO M : READA$ : IFA 
$=C$THEN4 9ELSENEXT : SOUND1 , 1 : REST 
ORE: GOTO 4 8 

49 RESTORE :FORW=lTOM:READQ$:NEX 
T 

5)3 FORW=M TO M+Q-l : READA : NEXT : S= 
A:E=S+(LEN(C$)-1) :GOSUB91 

51 RESTORE :IFZ=J3THENW$=CHR$ (2) :Z 
=1 

52 IFZ=1ANDC$<>"?"THENP0KES / ASC( 
W$)-64+192ELSEIFZ=lANDC$="?"THEN 
POKES ,ASC(W$) 

53 IFZ>1THENF0RQ=S TO LEN(W$)+S- 
2: POKEQ, ASC (MID$(W$, Q+l-S, 1) ) :NE 
XT : POKEQ , ASC (MID$ (W$ , Q+l-S , 1) ) -6 
4+192 

54 IFZ=L THEN55ELSEFORQ=LEN(W$)+ 
S TO E: POKEQ, 2: NEXT 

55 PRINTS 491 , "MORE? (Y/N)";:EXEC 
44539 :A$=INKEY$:IFA$="Y"THEN47EL 
SE10 

56 RESTORE :CLS: PRINT"**** MODIFY 
ERROR MESSAGES *****": PRINT"INP 

UT THE ERROR MESSAGE YOU WISHTO 
MODIFY." 

57 INPUTC$ : FORQ=lTO M*2 :READA$:N 
EXT:Q=Q-l:FORW=Q TO Q+N : READA$ : I 
FA$=C$THEN58ELSENEXT : RESTORE : SOU 
ND1,1:G0T057 

58 RESTORE :FORQ=lTO (M*2)+N:READ 
A$ : NEXT 

59 FORQ=(M*2)+N TO W+N : READA : NEX 
T : S=A : E=S+ 1 : GOSUB9 1 

6J3 RESTORE : IFZ=J3THENF0RQ=S TO S+ 
1 : POKEQ / J3 : NEXT 

61 IFZ=1THENP0KES,ASC(W$) :POKES+ 

62 I F Z = 2 THENFORQ=S TO S+l: POKEQ, 
ASC (MID$(W$, Q+l-S, 1) ) :NEXT 

63 PRINT§491, "MORE? (Y/N) " ; :EXEC 
44539 :A$=INKEY$ : IFA$="Y"THEN56EL 
SE1J3 

64 CLS: PRINT"***** MODIFY MISC. 
MESSAGES ****•• 

65 GOSUB8 2 :PRINTS$ "MODIFY 1 ?REDO 
•",S$"MODIFY 1 ?EXTRA IGNORED' ",S 
$ "MODIFY 'MICROSOFT' " ,S$ "MODIFY 

' ERROR '", S $ "MODIFY ' BREAK "• , S $ "M 
ODIFY 'IN'", ,S$"MODIFY +/- SIGNS 
":S=163:E=355 

66 'DISK LINE HERE 

67 GOSUB83 

68 IFQ=1THENS=45J307:E=45J311 

69 IFQ=2THENS=45288:E=453J31 
7fS IFQ=3THENS=41318:E=41326 



71 IFQ=4THENS=44J302:E=44006 

72 IFQ=5THENS=44j319:E=44j323 

73 IFQ=»6THENS=44j3j39:E=44j31j3ELSEI 
FQ=8THENS=54111:E=54123ELSEIFQ=9 
THENS=54124:E=54141ELSEIFQ=lj3THE 
NS=54142:E=54168ELSEIFQ=7THENCLS 
:PRINT@226, "+ (POSITIVE) OR - (N 
EGATIVE) ?":EXEC44539:A$=INKEY$:I 
FA$="+"THENS=486J35:E=486J35ELSES= 
48611:E=48611 

74 G0SUB91:G0SUB1J37:PRINT@491, "M 
ORE? (Y/N) " ; : EXEC44539 : A$=INKEY$ 
: IFA$="Y"THEN64ELSE1J3 

75 CLS: PRINT"**** MODIFY DISK EX 
TENSIONS ****•• 

76 GOSUB8 2: PRINTS $" BASIC EXTENSI 
ON (BAS) " , S$"DATA EXTENSION (DAT 
)",S$"BINARY EXTENSION (BIN)",S$ 
"NO EXTENSION ( ) " : S=163 : E=259 
:GOSUB83 

77 IFQ=1THENS=4983J3:E=49832 

78 IFQ=2THENS=49836:E=49838 

79 IFQ=3THENS=49839:E=49841 
8J3 IFQ=4THENS=49833:E=49835 

81 GOSUB91:GOSUB1J37:GOT01J3 

82 PRINT" POSITION THE CURSOR AT 
YOUR SEL-ECTION AND PRESS <ENTER 
> . " : PRINT : I FXO 1THENPRINT @ 4 8 1 , "P 
RESS THE SPACE BAR TO RETURN.";: 
PRINT@128, " " : RETURNELSERETURN 

83 P=S 

84 PRINT@P,">"; 

85 EXEC44539:A$=INKEY$:IFA$=" A "T 
HENPRINTQP, " " ; : P-P-32 : IFP<S THE 
NP=E 

86 IFA$=CHR$(1J3)THENPRINT@P," "; 
:P=P+32:IFP>E THENP=S 

87 IFA$=CHR$ (13)THEN9J3 

88 IFA$=" "THEN1J3 

89 GOT084 

9J3 Q=((P-3)/32) :Q=Q-((S-3)/32)+l 
: RETURN 

91 CLS: PRINT" THE COMPUTER'S 
MEMORY" : :PRINTSTRING$ (32 ,"*");: 

FORQ=S TO E 

92 PRINTCHR$ (PEEK(Q) ) ; 

93 NEXT 

94 PRINT : PRINTSTRING$ ( 3 2 ,"*");: L 
=E-S+1 

95 CM=J3 : W$=" " : Z=J3 : P=3 2 : RW=0 : PRIN 
T" DO YOU WANT TO MODIFY? (Y/N) 
" :EXEC44539 : A$=INKEY$ : IFA$="N"TH 
EN10ELSECLS 

96 CM=P0S(J3) + (RW*32) :PRINT@P+CM, 
CHR$(2^J7); 

97 PRINT @0, "LENGTH: "L, "LEFT: "L-Z 
: EXEC4 4 539: A$=INKEY$ 

98 IFA$=CHR$ (1J3)THEN1J35ELSEIFASC 
( A$ ) <13ANDASC ( A$ ) <>8THEN97 

99 IFA$OCHR$(8)THENlj3^ELSEIFZ>j3 



174 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



ANDCM/32-RW+lOl THENZ=Z-1 : W$=LE 

FT$ (W$, Z) : PRINT @P+CM, " " ; : PRINT© 

P+CM, A$ ; : GOT01J33ELSESOUND1 , 1 : GOT 
097 

100 IFP+CM>479THENlj35 

101 PRINT@P+CM+1 , CHR$ ( 2J37 ) ; : PRIN 
T@P+CM,A$; :Z=Z+1:W$=W$+A$ 

102 IFPOS (0 ) =0THENRW=RW+1 

1J33 CM=POS(0)+(RW*32) :IFA$=CHR$( 
8) ORA$=CHR$ (13 ) THENPRINT@P+CM, CH 
R$(207) ; 

104 IFZ=L THEN105ELSE97 

105 PRINT@P+CM, M " ; : S0UND1 , 1 : PRI 
NT@0,»IS THIS MODIFICATION O.K.? 

(Y/N) •'; :EXEC44539:A$=INKEY$:IFA 
$="N"THEN91 

106 RETURN 

107 IFZ=0THEN110ELSEFORQ=S TO LE 
N(W$)+S-1 

108 P0KEQ,ASC(MID$(W$,Q+1-S,1) ) 

109 NEXT:IFZ=L THENRETURN 
11)3 FORQ=LEN(W$)+S TO E 

111 POKEQ,0 

112 NEXT: RETURN 

113 DATAFOR, GO , REM, • , ELSE , IF , DAT 
A , PRINT , ON , INPUT , END , NEXT , DIM , RE 
AD , RUN , RESTORE , RETURN , STOP , POKE , 
CONT , LIST , CLEAR , NEW , CLOAD , CSAVE , 



OPEN , CLOSE , LLIST , SET , RESET , CLS , M 
OTOR , SOUND , AUDIO , EXEC , SKIPF , TAB ( 
, TO , SUB , THEN , NOT , STEP , OFF ,+,-,*, 
/, A ,AND,OR,>,=,<,SGN,INT 

114 DATAABS,USR,RND, SIN, PEEK, LEN 

, STR$ , VAL, ASC, CHR$ , EOF, JOYSTK, LE 

FT$ , RIGHT $ , MID$ , POINT, INKEY$ , MEM 
-> 

115 DATADEL, EDIT , TRON , TROFF , DEF , 
LET , LINE , PCLS , PSET , PRESET , SCREEN 
, PCLEAR , COLOR , CIRCLE , PAINT , GET , P 
UT , DRAW , PCOPY , PMODE , PLAY , DLOAD , R 
ENUM , FN , US ING , ATN , COS , TAN , EXP , FI 
X , LOG , POS , SQR , HEX$ , VARPTR , INSTR , 
TIMER , PPOINT , STRING$ 

116 'DISK LINE HERE 

117 DATA43622, 43625, 43627, 43630, 
43631,43635,43637,43641,43646,43 
648,43653,43656,43 660,43663,4366 
7,43670,43677,43683,43687,43691, 
43695,43699,43704,43707,43712,43 
717,43721,43726,43731,43734,4373 
9,43742,43747,43752,43757,43761, 
43766,43770,43772,43775 

118 DATA43779 , 43782 , 43786 , 43789 , 
43790,43791,43792,43793,43794,43 
797,43799,43800,43801,43802,4380 
5,43808,43811,43814,43817,43820, 



1988 - The Year of the Hard Disk! 

The CoCo XT hard disk interface from Burke & Burke lets you 
connect up to 2 low cost, PC compatible 5-1 20 Megabyte capacity 
hard drives to your CoCo. You buy the drive, Western Digital 
WD1002-WX1 or WD1002-27X (RLL) controller, anda case from the 
PC dealer of your choice. Just plug them into the CoCo XT, plug the 
CoCo XT into your Multi-PAK, and you have a 20 Meg OS9 hard disk 
system for under $450! 

Great for multi-user systems! The CoCo XT interface uses 
advanced "NO HALT* hard disk controllers, which do not halt your 
CoCo and do not disable or use interrupts during hard disk access. 
You get full type-ahead, and the system clock does not lose time 
during hard disk access. Fully compatible with most RS-232 
expansion ports! 

CoCo XT (with anodized housing, 60 page user manual, hard disk 
back-up utility and new, Version 2.0 drivers for use with both OS9 & 
HYPER-I/O) -- $69.95. Or choose the CoCo XT-RTC (includes 
real-time clock / calendar with battery backup) - $99.95 


Announcing the Dynamic Disk Interface! 1 

Got the 35-track floppy disk blues? Burke & Burke proudly presents 
HYPER-I/O Version 2.0 - the program that modifies the RS-DOS 
Disk BASIC in your CoCo 1 , 2, or 3 to provide a "Dynamic Disk 
Interface". This program lets you use your existing BASIC and 
RS-DOS software with hard disk interfaces (such as the CoCo XT), 
RAM Disks, and any mix of floppy drives from 160K to 720K each. 
HYPER-I/O can even read standard disks in those quad-density, 160 j 
track floppy drives. Fully RESET protected, user-configurabfe, i 
expandable, OS9 compatible, EPROM-able HYPER-I/O may soon 
be TH E RS-DOS enhancement of choice for the CoCo 1 , (JoCo 2, 
and CoCo 3! 

HYPER-I/O (64K, includes 88 page user manual , BASIC & OS9 
utilities) - $29.95 

Access the full power of your machinel CoCo 3 owners can add a 
RAM Disk (512K only) and Print Spooler to HYPER-I/O with our 
HYPER-III package. Supports both parallel and serial printers 
(special driver required for parallel printer) HYPER-III - $1 9.95 


CoCo Immortality (and other wonders . - .) 

Wouldn't it be nice if OS9 was just "there" whenever you turned on 
your computer? Wouldn't it be nice if your BBS or home control 
system would reboot automatically after a power failure? 

Have you ever wished you could store two different OS9 boot files 
on your hard disk -- one for running games, another for normal 
operation? 

Your CoCo can work these and other wonders if you install Burke & 
Burke's XT-ROM in your CoCo XT hard disk interface. XT-ROM 
automatically boots and reboots OS9 from your hard disk. Installs in 
the BIOS ROM socket of your hard disk controller - $19.95. 


OS9 Directory Assistants I 

Wl LD lets you use "wild cards" to specify groups of files instead of 
individual files with OS9's commands. You can even specify that a 
command be performed on an entire directory tree I 

MV moves directory entries from place to place on your hard or 
floppy disks. MV may be safely used on OS9Boot, HYPER-I/O 
MSA's, and other special files as well as ordinary OS9 files and 
directories. 

WILD & MV -one disk, two great utilities, only $19.95! 
Don't miss tine Chicago Rainbowfest for great deals 
and exciting new products from Burke &. Burke! 


[Sfrpr , *fr> V 4> «fr% V" i 1 ^^^^^m ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 7% SALES TAX. >^^V 

&ymwB?i A 1 ft 1 1 Yf •& A IkC 1 1 YT Jfe^^ C0D<8 add * 2 - 20 - Shipping (within the USA) $2.00 per //>"^\ 

pil^iSpif /M* V+V *Y V /Lii* 14 > *>-V I D I VISA 1 CoCo XT; $1.50 per disk or ROM. Please allow 2 weeks 
\ lft : :J J I I for delivery (overnight delivery also available for in-stock RAINBOW 
NilX P.O. BOX 1233 Palatine. IL 60078-1283 (312) 397-289B 1 1 items). Telephone orders accepted (31 2) 397-2898. verification 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 175 



43824,43827,43831,43834,43837,43 
841, 43844, 43850, 43855, 43861, 4386 
5,4387)3,43876,47212 

119 DATA33155, 33158, 33162, 33166, 
33171,33174,33177,33181,33185,33 
189, 33195,33201, 33207,33212, 3321 
8,33223,33226,33229,33233,33238, 
33243,33247,33252,33257,33259,33 
310,33313,33316,33319,33322,3332 
5,33328,33331,33334,33338,33344, 
33349,33354,33360 

120 'DISK LINE HERE 

121 DATANF,SN,RG,OD,FC,OV,OM,UL, 
BS,DD,/0,ID,TM,OS,LS,ST,CN,FD,AO 
,DN,IO,FM,NO,IE,DS 

122 1 DISK LINE HERE 

123 DATA43951, 43953, 43955, 43957, 
43959,43961,43963,43965,43967,43 
969,43971,43973,43975,43977,4397 
9,43981,43983,43985,43987,43989, 
43991,43993,43995,43997,43999 

124 'DISK LINE HERE 

125 DATA52,23,142,127,249,134,12 
6,167,4,220,114,237,5,134,183,16 
7,1,204,255,223 

126 DATA237, 2, 134, 18, 167, 0,159,1 
14,48,30,159,35,159,39,204,159,1 
14,190,192,0 

127 DATA140,68,75,38,5,142,192,0 
,32,3,142,128,0,48,1,16,63,132,3 
8,249 

128 DATA204,18,18,237,132,53,151 



Listing 3:DISK.BRS 

2 'COLOR CATALYST DISK VERSION 
7 M=139:N=36 

12 PRINTS $ "MODIFY DISK EXTENSION 

S":E=451 

15 IFQ=9THEN75 

20 PRINTS $ " SAVE CUSTOM BASIC TO 
DISK",S$"LOAD CUSTOM BASIC FROM 
DISK",S$"DISK DIRECTORY" :E=355 
35 PRINTS$"DISK EXTENDED BASIC 1 
.1":E=195 

66 PRINTS $ "MODIFY 'INSERT SOURCE 
'",S$"MODIFY 'INSERT DESTINATION 
'",S$"MODIFY 'AND PRESS ENTER'": 
E=451 

116 DATADIR, DRIVE, FIELD, FILES, KI 

LL , LOAD , LSET , MERGE , RENAME , RSET , S 

AVE , WRITE , VERIFY , UNLOAD , DSKINI , B 

ACKUP , COPY , DSKI $ , DSKO$ , DOS , CVN , F 

REE , LOC , LOF , MKN$ , AS 

120 DATA49554, 49557,49562, 49567, 

49572,49576,49580,49584,49589,49 

595,49599,49603,49608,49614,4962 

0,49626,49632,49636,49641,49646, 

49689,49692,49696,49699,49702,49 



706 

122 DATABR, DF , OB , WP , FN , FS , AE , FO , 
SE,VF,ER 

124 DATA49808, 49810, 49812, 49814, 
49816,49818,49820,49822,49824,49 
826,49828 



Listing 4: CATLY5T3 

1 CLEAR300:ONBRKGOTO10:POKE359,1 

2 6 : IFPEEK (33021) O50THENCLS : PRIN 
T@192 , "COLOR CATALYST "3 WILL NOT 

RUN ONA STANDARD COLOR COMPUTER 
1 OR 2":EXEC44539:CLS:ENDELSECL 

S0 : IFPEEK ( 188 ) <>14THEN3 

2 PRINT @231,"one" CHR$ (128) "momen 

t"CHR$(128) "please"; :SCREEN0,1:M 

ERGE"DISK.3",R 

6 POKE359,57:POKE65314,40:M=28:N 
=2 : PRINT§13 , "COLOR" : PRINT §3 6 , A$ : 
PRINTQ68 , B$ : PRINT@100 , C$ : PRINT @ 1 
43, "3" 

9 EXEC44539:POKE65314,7:POKE359, 
126 

11 PRINTS $" INPUT/ OUTPUT MENU",S$ 
"MODIFY STARTUP MESSAGES" , S$"MOD 
IFY COMMANDS" ,S$"MODIDFY ERROR M 
ESSAGES",S$ "MODIFY MISC. MESSAGE 
S":S=163:E«323 

14 IFQ=1THEN18ELSEIFQ=2THEN33ELS 
EIFQ=3THEN47ELSEIFQ=4THEN56ELSEI 
FQ=5THEN64 

24 IFQ=3THENINPUT" WHAT IS THE F 
ILENAME" ;F$ : F$=LEFT$ (F$ , 8) : CSAVE 
MF$, 57797, 63 278, 49152 
26 IFQ=5THENINPUT" WHAT IS THE F 
ILENAME", -F$:F$=LEFT$(F$, 8) :SAVEM 
F$, 57797, 63278, 49152 
38 IFQ=2THENS=58019:E=58130ELSEI 
FQ=3THENS=58134:E=58245 
65 GOSUB82: PRINTS $ "MODIFY 'MICRO 
WARE SYSTEMS 1 ",S$ "MODIFY 'HARRIS 
& EARLES"':S=163:E=195 

68 IFQ=1THENS=63 234:E=63256 

69 IFQ=2THENS=63 259:E=63277 

113 DATAWIDTH, PALETTE, HSCREEN, LP 
OKE , HCLS , HCOLOR, HPAINT, HCIRCLE , H 
LINE , HGET , HPUT , HBUFF , HPRINT , ERR , 
BRK , LOCATE , HSTAT , HSET , HRESET , HDR 
AW , CMP , RGB , ATTR , LPEEK , BUTTON , HPO 
INT , ERNO , ERLIN 

117 DATA57797, 57802, 57809, 57816, 

57821,57825,57831,57837,57844,57 

849,57853 ,57857,57862,57868,5787 

1,57874,57880,57885,57889,57895, 

57900,57903,57906,57956,57961,57 

967,57973,57977 

121 DATAHR, HP 

123 DATA58572, 58574 



176 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



Listing 5: DISK. 3 



2 'COLOR CATALYST 3 DISK VERSION 
20 PRINTS $•• SAVE CUSTOM BASIC TO 
DISK" ,S$ "LOAD CUSTOM BASIC FROM 
DISK",S$"DISK DIRECTORY" :E=3 55 
35 PRINTS $" DISK EXTENDED BASIC 2 
.0",S$"DISK EXTENDED BASIC 2.1": 
E=227 



Listing 6: LCPATCH2 



1 CLEAR300:POKE&H95C9,&HFF:CLS0: 
IFPEEK(188) <>14THEN3 

2 POKE65314,40:PRINT@231,"ONE MO 
MENT PLEASE"; : SCREEN^ ,1:MERGE"DI 
SK.BAS",R 

6 POKE65314,4j3:M=112:N=25:PRINT§ 
13 , "COLOR" : PRINT§3 6 , A$ : PRINT§68 , 
B$:PRINT§1J3J3,C$ 

31 GOSUB129:IFQ=lTHENPOKE65314,j3 
ELSEIFQ=2THENPOKE65314 , 64ELSEIFQ 
=3THENPOKE65314 , 32ELSEIFQ=4THENP 



OKE65314,8ELSEIFQ=5THENPOKE65314 
, 72ELSEIFQ=6THENPOKE65314 , 40 

129 PRINTQ384, "1) ALL CAPS 2) U 
PPER/ LOWERCAS E " ; : EXE C4 4 5 3 9 : A$=IN 
KEY$ : IFA$="1"THENRETURNELSEIFA$= 
"2"THEN130ELSE129 

130 IFQ=1THENP0KE65314,16ELSEIFQ 
=2THENPOKE65314,80ELSEIFQ=3THENP 
OKE65314,48ELSEIFQ=4THENPOKE6531 
4 , 24ELSEIFQ=5THENPOKE65314 , 88ELS 
EIFQ=6THENPOKE65314,56 

131 GOTO 3 2 



Listing 7: LCPRTCH3 

1 CLE AR3 0 0 : ONBRKGOTO 1 0 : POKE &H9 5 C 
9 , &HFF : IFPEEK (33021) <>5 0THENCLS : 
PRINT0192, "COLOR CATALYST 3 WILL 

NOT RUN ONA STANDARD COLOR COMP 
UTER .1 OR 2":EXEC44539:CLS:ENDEL 
SECLS0 : IFPEEK ( 188) <>14THEN3 

2 POKE65314,40:PRINT@231,"ONE MO 
MENT PLEASE" ; : S CREEN0 , 1 : MERGE " DI 
SK.3",R 

6 POKE65314,40:M=28:N=2:PRINT@13 
, "COLOR" : PRINT§36 , A$ : PRINT© 68 , B$ 
:PRINT§100,C$:PRINT§143, "3" 



■'■'■■.'■'■■■■■'.■.■■'.■.'■■.'.'.'.■■'.■i'.-.'.'.'Iy:'.'.','.' 



COCO i, L i 3 COMPUTABLE 



SOFTWARE DIV. 



Chemistry Tutor 



A 1WO DISK S£1T THAT IS I >t SIGNED TO B€ EXTREMELY US£H 
FRIENDLY AND IS AN AID JO LEARNING HIGH SCHOOL OR 
COLLEGE LEVEL CHEMISTRY PRINCIPLES. TEXT LESSONS ARE 
COMBINED WITH HIGH RESOLUTION GRAPHIC ILLUSTRATIONS. 

COMPREHENSIVE TESTING SECTIONS COVER fHE PR1M1HLES 
NECESSARY FOR A FIRM BASE IN THE CHEMICAL FIELD. 

AN ELEMENT SECTION THAT ALLOWS THE STUDY OF ALL «W» 
ELEMENTS THAT HAVE BEEN DISCOVERED AND CONFIRMED. 

ELEMENT DATABASE ALLOWS FINDING DATA ON THE ELEMENTS 
IF THE ATOMIC SYMBOL. NUMBER, OR ELEMENT NAME IS KNOWN, 



/^\ Disk Only: 

$42.00 + S&H 



BTU Analysis 

ANALYZES HEAT LOSS Zt GAIN 
AND CALCULATES PROPER 
HEATING AND COOLING UNIT 
SIZE. 

NEW LOW PRICE! ! ! 
NOT COPY PROTECTED! ? ! 

SAVE YOUR DATA ON DISK!!! 

S INSTRUCTIONS INCLUDED 
IN SOFTWARE 

« EASY TO USE, FOR DO IT 
YOURSELF ADDICTS. 

l/^Disk Only: 
££527.00 + S&H 



IRA Analysts 

COMPARE i.R.A. *S AND GET 
MORE ON YOUR INVESTMENT. 

NEW LOW PRICE! ! ! 

NOT COPY PROTECTED! ! ! 

SAVE YOUR DATA ON DISK!'! 

\ BUILT-IN DEPOSIT LIMITS 
I PERSONAL I ZED PROFES- 
SIONAL RESULTS 
EACH ANALYSIS IS UNIQUE 
WITH A YEAR BY YEAR 
BREAK DOWN OF RESULTS. 

Disk Only: 
$17.00 + S&H^ 



SOFTWARE MY, 901 FERNDALE BLVD 

HIGH POINT, NC £?£60 



Shipping &. Handling Charge S3.00 




★ 
★ 

★ 
★ 
* 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 

★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
* 
★ 
* 
* 
★ 

★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 



EDUCATORS-EXPERIMENTORS 
CoCo EXPANDERS 

Robotics - Synthesizers - Control, -A/D 



EXTENDER 




Extends Bus & 
control lines for 
easy access 

1 horizontal & 

2 vertical sockets 
Logic Analyzer 
Plug In 

Gold connectors 



★★★★★★★★★★★**★★★*★**★★*******★**★******+* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 

* 

★ 
* 
* 
* 
★ 

* 
* 
* 
★ 
★ 
* 
* 
* 
★ 
* 
★ 
* 
★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 
★ 
* 
* 
★ 

★ 
★ 

★ 
★ 

Please add $3.50 S/H J 
Idaho Residents Add * 
5% Sales Tax * 

9-6 M-F (MST) * 



$45.00 

• 6821 PIA Chip 

• 2-8 bit l/O's + 
4 control lines, E, R/W 

• Bread board style 
output connectors 

• Use alone or with 
extender 

• Gold edge connector 

SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER TO: 



— PIA — 




$45.00 




FRASER INSTRUMENT CO. 

P.O. BOX 712 
MERIDIAN, ID 83642 

208-888-5728 
***************************************** 

June 1988 THE RAINBOW 177 



%ginbouuftst SaCe 

^^V^ V y° u can 't make it Rainbowfest, 

you can still make it to the sale. 



Speech 



EARS (Now you can really talk to your computer) .... 

SUPER VOICE (COCO's Premier Speech Synthesizer) 

VOICE CONTROL (Control your TV with your voice) 

RS TRANSLATOR (Enhance your RS Speech & Sound cartdrige) 

Music 







.$69.95 
.$49.95 
$19.95 
$19.95 



SYMPHONY 12 (A real 12 voice music synthesizer) 

MUSICA 2 (Complete 4 voice music composition & printing program) 

MUSIC LIBRARY (900 songs, 100 per volume) 

STEREO PAK (Make Music in Stereo with MUSICA) 







$49.95 
$19.95 
$19.95 
$29.95 



MIDI Music 





COCO MIDI 2 (Complete hardware & software for MIDI) 

MUSICA MIDI (Play MUSICA Files to your MIDI synth, includes cable) ^S^rSO. 

LYRA (The musical COCO MAX) 

LYRA PRINT (Print your music) , ... 

LYRA LYBRARY (50 songs of 7 & 8 voice music, 3 disks) 

LYRA LYBRARY Supplement 1 (More LYRA music) 

LYRA LYBRARY Supplement 2 (Even More ) 

LYRA LYBRARY Supplement 3(stm more) 

LYRA LYBRARY Supplement 4 (Even Still more) $29f§5. 







$99.95 
$29.95 
$39.95 
$19.95 
.$29.95 
$19.95 
$19.95 
$19.95 
$19.95 



Extras 



TRIPLE Y-Cable (Connect 3 hardware paks together),.., 

DOUBLE Y-Cable (Connect 2 hardware paks together) 

PROTO BOARD & CASE (For the experimenter) 

For Your COCO 3 






$24.95 
$18.95 
..$9.95 



512K TURBO RAM (Complete memory upgrade with extras) 

512K TURBO RAM W/O Chips 





$89.95 
$34.95 



*** FREE Disk or Tape With Order *** 

See December 87 Rainbow pages 40,41,42,43,44,45 For Detailed Product Information 




EARS 



TM 



Electronic 
Audio 

Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 

QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 




Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of In- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phras 
Training EARS to your particular voi 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. ^^J^ 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- , 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, orFrench. In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do Lii rou^h a 
keyboard can now be dnne by fust 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commahds have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

II Talks* EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 
Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 





FREE 
BUNK DISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 






Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



-//- 



Speech Si 



tfdtentd 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6 1 A% sales tax 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 




Another Great Beginning 



Things continue to get better in the 
OS-9 world. Since I hadn't 
checked into the OS-9 SIG on 
CompuServe for several months, I 
logged on this weekend and looked 
around. Moving to the DL 10 data 
library, which is packed full of Color 
Computer OS-9 programs, I asked for 
a description of all the files that had 
been uploaded in the last 60 days. Much 
to my surprise, I wound up staring at 
nine pages of 9-point type describing 65 
programs. The SysOps have received 
more than one program a day from their 
members. 

To a large degree, this new breath of 
excitement and productivity in the 
Color Computer OS-9 world has been 
caused by the release of Multi- Vue. This 
visual interface has started to excite 
software developers and end users alike. 
If all goes well, Multi- Vue will be the 
first step on a path to prosperity for 
both, as the increased productivity 
made possible by a consistent and 
intuitive user interface opens the gate to 
thousands of new OS-9 users. We start 
another great adventure this month 
with the first installment of a "shell," or 
skeleton program, which you can use 
each time you write a BASIC09 applica- 
tion for Multi- Vue. But first . . . 



Dale L. Puckett, a freelance writer and 
programmer, serves as director-at-large 
of the OS-9 Users Group and is a 
member of the Computer Press Associ- 
ation. His user name on Delphi is 
DALE?: on packet-radio, KOHYD @ 
N4QQ; on GEnie, D.PUCKET2; and on 
CIS, 71446,736. 

♦ 

1 80 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



By Dale L. Puckett 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



OS-9 PASCAL at Its Best 

We're holding the dialogue short this 
month because we have a lot of code for 
you. John Lind, KD7XG, came through 
with a PASCAL program that calculates 
the radio frequencies you can use to 
reach any point on earth at a particular 
time. First, it computes the propagation 
values for the area you request for each 
day of the month. Then it draws a chart 
that gives you a graphic representation 
of the data. 

Lind originally wrote the calculation 



part of the program in BASIC09. He 
reports that the compiled PASCAL code 
runs three to four times faster. He also 
found that the PASCAL code here per- 
forms much faster than a C version he 
experimented with. 

When you get ready to compile the 
assembler output of your OS-9 Pcode 
translator, you'll need to use the OS-9 
Level I assembler. The translator code 
is not compatible with RMfl, the macro 
assembler that comes with the OS-9 
Level II development package. 



Listing 1: MVShell 

PROCEDURE MVShell 



WW 


(* 


MVSheLl The beginning of an adventure in Multi-Vue 


0038 


c* 




003 B 


c* 


You'll need this code' in each Basic09 Application program 


0077 


(* 


you write for Multi-Vue. 


0092 


c* 




0095 


(* 


This month we show you how to create Basic09 Type statements 


00D4 


c* 


that emulate the C header files presented in the Multi-Vue 


0111 


(* 


documentation and supplied as part of the Tandy Program 


014B 


(* 


Developers package. We tacked on a quick SysCall routine 


0187 


c* 


at the end that will let you see that your definitions 


01C1 


(* 


actually work. We'll add the File, Edit and other menus 


01FC 


(* 


soon and show you how to add your own. We'll also be showing 


023C 


(* 


you how to set up a mouse routine that runs in the background 


027C 


(* 


and sends signals to your application when the user clicks the 


02BD 


(* 


mouse button. When we finish this "Shell" or "skeleton" 


02F8 


(* 


application, all you'll need will be your own application 


0335 


(* 


code. 


033D 


(* 




0340 


(* 


First, we must define the variables we will use in every 


037B 


(* 


Multi-Vue based program. These definitions use the same 


03 B6 


(* 


names as the C header files that come with the Developers 


03F3 


(* 


Pak. Our first group of definitions is an emulation of the 


0432 


(* 


Wind.H file. 


0441 




• 


0442 


<* 


General definitions 


0458 


DIM Null , Stdln , CallCode , FunCode : BYTE 


046B 


DIM StdOut : INTEGER 


0472 


DIM Ends tr : STRING [ 1 J 


047E 


Null:-0 


0485 


EndStr:-CHRS(Null) 


048E 


StdOut:-! \StdIn:-0 


049C 






049D 






049E 


(* 


Define 6809 registers so we can use the get 


04CC 


(* 


and set status calls with syscall 


04F0 






04F1 


TYPE Registers-cc,a,b,dp:BYTE; x.y.u: INTEGER 



j7516 
051F 
052JJ 
JJ55C 
J759L 
05AC 
J35C1 
J75D7 
05D8 
0603 
0612 
|I613 
J36LA 
0622 
0623 



0642 
0659 
0675 
068A 
069F 

06 AD 
06AE 
06CC 

07 0F 
0755 
0770 
0771 
0792 
079B 
079C 
07E1 
0825 
0364 
08A5 
08E5 
08F9 
093E 
0979 
097A 

09A6 



DIM Regs: Registers 

(* Window type defs. They tell the Windlnt code within OS-9 

(* what type of box you want to create on the screen. 

DIM WT_NBox , WT_FVin , WT_FSWin , WT_SBox , WT_DBox , WT_PBpox : INTEGER 

WT_NBox:-0 \WT_Fffin:-l \WT_FSWin:-2 

WT_SBox:-3 \WT~DBox:-4 \WT_PBox : -5 

DIM MNEnbl , MNDsbl : BYTE \(* HV talk for Enable and MNDsbl 
MNEnbl : -1 \MNDsbl:-Null 

DIM WINSync : INTEGER 
WINSync:-$C0C0 

DIM MN_Move , MN_C los , MN_Grov , MN_Us cr 1 , HN_D s crl , MN_Rscr 1 , MN_Ls cr 1 
: BYTE 

DIM MN_Tndy,MN_File ,HN_Edit ,MN_Styl ,MN__Font: BYTE 
MN_Move:-l \MN_Clos : -2~\MN_Grow : -3 \HN~Uscrl : -4 
MN_Dscrl:-5 \MN_Rscrl:-6 \MN_Lscrl :-7 
MN_Tndy.-20 \MN_File:-21 \MB_Edit:-22 
MN~Styl:-23 \HN_Font : -24 

(* Window menu data structures 

(* The first structure holds a menu item descriptor which includes: 
(* the name of the item, a byte to tell if the item is enabled or not, 
(* and five reserved bytes. 

TYPE Mistr-_mnttl: STRING [15] ; _mienbl : BYTE ; _mires (5) : BYTE 
DIM MidScr:Mistr 

(* The next structure holds the definition of a menu. This includes: 
(* The name of the menu, the id number of the menu, the vidth of the 
(* menu, the number of items in the menu and a byte that tells 
(* if the item is available or not. Two "reserved" bytes must be 
(* inserted before the last field. Make this correction in your 
(* Multi-Vue manual. 

(* The final item in the structure is a pointer to the address of the 
(* array of structures that hold the individual menu items. 

TYPE mn9tr-_raittl: STRING [15]; _mnid, _nmxsiz,_mnnits , mnenabl 

: BYTE; _r e s er 2, _mni terns: INTEGER 
DIM MNDscr :mnstr 



The files Skipmuf^dat and Confix 
_muf must be present in your current 
data directory when you run Skipmuf . 
SUipmuf^dat contains data the pro- 
gram needs to compute propagation 
conditions for many of the locations in 
the world that interest amateur radio 
operators and short wave listeners. 
Config_muf data is personalized for 
my home QTH — that's ham radio 
speak for location — in Rockville, 
Maryland. You can edit it with your 
favorite text editor to set up the pro- 
gram for your location. In fact, you can 
also use an editor to add other locations 
in the world to Skipmuf^dat. 

When you start the program you will 
be asked to pick the area of the world 
for which you want the propagation 
prediction. After you select a location, 
you will be asked for the "Zurich 
smoothed sunspot number" or the 
"solar flux index." The flux index is 
broadcast every hour, 17 minutes after 
the hour, on WWV and WWVH. Youll 
find these National Bureau of Stand- 
ards stations on exactly 5, 10 and 15 
MHz, 24 hours a day. You can find the 
sunspot number in the monthly "How's 
DX" column in QST magazine. How- 
ever, the flux index method is more 



OS-9 SOFTWARE from D. P. JOHNSON 

L1 UTILITY PAK - Contains 40 useful utilities that run under both level I and II 
OS-9. Included are a complete set of "wild card" file handling utilities, a disas- 
sembler, a disk sector editor, and the MacGen command language compiler. 
MacGen will allow you to generate many useful command macros in minutes, 
much more useful than procedure files. Macro source is included for a macro to 
implement an archival backup type function. $49.95 

12 UTILITY PAK - Contains a Level li "printerr" function that also shows the 
pathname being searched for when "not found" or permission type errors oc- 
cur. Also contains level il software ram disk driver. Ten other utilities included, 
some useful for level I also . $39.95 

L1+L2 COMBINATION PAK both of above together for $75.00 

SDISK - Standard disk driver module replacement allows full use of 40 or 80 
track double sided drives with OS-9 Level I. Full compatibility with CoCo 35 track 
format and access all other OS-9 non-CoCo formats. Easy installation. $29.95 

SDISK+BOOTFIX - As above plus boot directly from a double sided diskette. 
$35.95 

SDISK3 - Level II version of SDISK driver. Same features as level I (except 
bootfix not required to boot from double sided). $29.95 

PC-XFER UTILITIES - Programs to format and transfer files to/from MS- 

DOS tm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. (Requires either SDISK or SDISK3 to run 
depending on which level of OS-9 you are using) $45.00 

MSF - MS-DOS disk format file manager. More complete file transfer capabil- 
tites for level II only. (Requires SDISK3 to operate). $45.00 

CCRD 51 2K byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE - Operates faster than similar 
device sold by others. Requires RS Multipak interface, two units may be used to- 
gether for 1 MB. OS-9 Level I & II drivers and test software included. $CALL 

All diskettes are in CoCo OS-9 format; other OS-9 formats can be supplied for 
$2.00 additional charge. All orders must be prepaid or COD, VISA/MC accepted, 
add $1 .50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD, additional charge for COD. 

D. P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St., 
Portland, OR 97223 

(503) 244-8152 (For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time, Mon.-Fri.) 
OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc., MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, 
Inc. 



DISKMASTER HARD DISK SYSTEM 

The DISKMASTER system has features no other system has: 

- 20 MB SCSI hard disk 

- High Density floppy drive with over 1 MB storage per disk 
(The ONLY HD floppy system available for the COCO, 

at least twice the speed of normal floppies.) 

- Battery backed up Clock/Calender 

- 3 Serial ports 

- Bi-directional parallel (printer) port 

- Expansion port for additional Floppy drives 

- Single cable interface to COCO 3 

- All interface software for OS-9 level II included 

$1295.00 

- Optional RAMDtSK up to 1 .5 MB (Call for price) 

A dual HD floppy model is available with all the features listed above 
except the hard disk is replaced by a second floppy. $795.00 

You can get a cheaper system elsewhere but not with all the features 
and performance of the DISKMASTER. 

PLUS-100 512K MEMORY EXPANSION 
(Call for current pricing) 

The most reliable 51 2K memory expansion board for the COCO 3. Our 
products are designed to be the most reliable, not the cheapest. 

Send for a COLOR BROCHURE fully describing the DISKMASTER and 
PLUS-100 Memory Expansion. 

Visa and Mastercard accepted, call for Dtskmaster shipping charges. 

HEMPHILL ELECTRONICS INC. 
334 Paseo Tesoro 
Walnut, CA 91789 

(714) 598-7799 (Phone hrs. 10 AM-2 PM Mon.-Thurs. Pacific Time) 

You may also contact D. P. Johnson (see left) to answer your techni- 
cal questions about the DISKMASTER system. 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 181 



since the sunspot data must be 
d and averaged several months 
time for publication. 
Ji to watch this program run, 



but the main reason we wanted to share 
it with you is its tremendous tutorial 
value. It demonstrates clearly how to 
create device windows and draw images 
on them using OS-9 PASCAL. Look over 
the columns in which we featured 
KISSdraw and compare the BASIC09 
drawing techniques to those used in 

PASCAL. 



"To a large degree, this 
new breath of excite- 
ment and productivity 
has been caused by the 
release of Multi-Vue. " 



Lind sends out the code using pascal 
Write statements. He did not create 
special data types for drawing and "put" 
them on the screen like we did in KISS- 
DrawPut in the January column, but 
you will notice that because of the 
similarity between BASIC09 and PASCAL, 
it would be very easy to do this. John 
considers Skipmuf "freeware" and 
hopes it will help you hear or "work the 
world." We'll be sending a copy of this 
program to the OS-9 Users Group 
librarian, Carl Kreider. We're also 
sending a detailed documentation file to 
Kreider and to the RAINBOW ON DISK 
editor, so disk subscribers and RAIN- 
BOW'S Delphi OS-9 OnLine SIG 
members can pick up additional facts 
about propagation calculations that 
simply will not fit in the magazine. In 
fact, we had to split Skipmuf into three 
installments. 



The Road to Multi-Vue 

One of the outstanding files I noticed 
while surveying the OS-9 SIG data 
library was MVSKEL-fiR. Mark D. Grif- 
fith has put together what he calls a 
skeleton file. It will move C pro- 
grammers into the Multi-Vue world 
painlessly. A seasoned C programmer 
can download MVSKEL, add his own 
application code, and wind up with a 
program that follows the standard 
Multi- Vue interface provided by Micro- 
ware and Tandy. At the same time, 
Griffith has commented his offering 
quite heavily, making it an ideal learn- 
ing tool for beginners. 

We talked about the importance of a 
consistent and intuitive user interface at 
great length during the KISSDraw se- 

182 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



09AF 
?9B? 
JJ9FJJ 
0A30 
0A6C 
0AAB 
0AEB 
JJB18 
0B19 



0B4E 
JJB57 
0B58 
JJB96 
0BD2 
pC0E 
0C4C 
0C8A 
0CC7 
J3DJJ1 
0D1B 
0D1C 
0D2A 
JJD3F 
0D4D 
0D63 
0D71 
0D8A 
PD98 
JJDB? 
JJDBE 
JJDD6 
0DE4 
0DF9 

J3S1C 
0E2A 
0E40 
J3E4E 
JJE68 
?E76 
0E77 
0E9A 
JJE9B 
?EA4 
JJEBB 
0EC4 
0ECF 
0EDA 
0EE6 
0EF4 
0EF5 
0F3B 
0F7A 
0F7B 
0F92 
0F9D 
0FA8 
0FB3 
JJFBF 
0FCD 
JJIFCE 
1014 
105D 
10A5 
10DA 
10DB 
1104 
113D 
1175 
1191 
11A4 
11A5 
HDD 
HFC 
11FD 
1217 
1223 
1248 
1256 
1262 
1263 
1272 
1298 
129A 



(* The final structure defines the contents of an entire window. 
(* This includes the title of the window, the number of menus on 
(* the window, the minimum height of the window, the minimum 
(* width of the window, a special pair of synch bytes and seven 
(* reserved bytes. A pointer to an array of menus -.- or data of 
(* the type "mnstr 1 ' which we just defined. 

TYPE vnstr-_wnttl : STRING [ 20] ; _nmens , _wxmin ,_wymin : BYTE ; _wnsync 

: INTEGER; _wnres<7) : BYTE; jmmen : INTEGER 
DIM VndScr:wnstr 

(* After we define -- or "type" — the special data structures 
(* we need for a Haiti- Vue based program, we must initialize 
(* the data in those structures. We start with the items we 
(* want to appear on our lone menu. Notice that we needed to 
(* add a "null" character or 00 Hex at the end of each string, 
(* Ve must do this because Basic09 uses SFF hex to define the 
(* end of its strings and Multi-Vue expects the "C" style 
(* 00 hex for a delimiter. 



DIM _tanitms 
_tanitms(l) . 
_tanitms(l) . 
_tanitm&(2) . 
_tanitms(2) . 
_tanitms(3) . 
_tanitms(3) . 
_tanltms(4) . 
_tanitms(4) . 
_tanitms(5) . 
_tanitms(5) . 
_tanitms(6) . 
_tanitms(6) . 
_tanitms(7) . 
_tanitms(7) . 
_tanitms(8) . 
_tanitms(8) . 
_tanitms(9) . 
_tanitms(9). 



(9):Mistr 

jnnttl :-"Calc"+EndStr 
jnienbl : -MNEnbl 
janttl : -"Clock"+EndStr 
jnienbl : -MNEnbl 
jnnttl : Calendar "+EndStr 
jnienbl : -MNEnbl 
_nmttl : Control "+EndStr 
jnienbl : -MNEnbl 
jnnttl :-" Printer "+EndStr 
jnienbl : -MNEnbl 
_mn t t 1 : - " Por t " +End S tr 
_mienbl : -MNEnbl 
jnnttl: -"Help "+EndStr 
_mienbl : -MNEnbl 
jnnttl : -"Shell "+EndStr 

jnienbl: -MNEnbl 
jnnttl : -"Clipboard"+EndStr 
~mienbl:-MNDsbl 



(* Now we'll set up the entire menu 

DIM Tndy_Mn:mnstr 

Tndy_Mn .jnittl : -"Tandy"+EndStr 

Tndy Jta . jrniid : -MNJTndy 

Tndy_Hn . jnnxs iz : -10 

Tndy_Mn . _mnnits : -9 

Tndy Jin . jnnenabl : -MNEnbl 

Tndyjfn. jani terns : -ADDR(TndyJfa) 

(* Now that ve have defined the items in the menu and the menu itself, 
(* we can define the window that we want the menu to appear in. 

VndScr . jratt 1 : -"KISSDraw" +EndStr 
VndScr . jimens : -1 
VndScr . _vxmin : -80 
VndScr . jrymin : -24 
VndScr . jmsync : -WINSync 
VndScr . _wnmen : -ADDR(Tndy_Mn) 

(* The data structures have all been set up now. it is time to make a 
(* set status call to initialize the window. Ve will use _ss_wset. This 
(* call needs three parameters. The path number, the window type and a 
<* pointer to the data structure defining the window. 

(* But first, we must turn off the cursor 

(* If we don't, we will occasionally write garbage on the 

(* screen where we don't want it. A ■ , gfx2 w routine will 

(* take care of this for us. 

RON Gfx2(StdOut,"Cur0ff") 

(* Now we'll make a SysCall with the Set Vindow function 
(* code to prove that it works. 

CallCode:-38E \(* Set Status Code 
Regs.a:-StdOut 

Regs.b:-S86 \(* SS.VnSet function code 

Regs.x:-ADDR(VndScr) 

Regs . y : -VT_FVin 

RUN Sy8Call(CallCode,Regs) 

PRINT #StdOut. "Hello <Insert Your Name Here>" 
END 







Editor's note: Due to space restrictions, all portions of Skipmuf are not 


listed here, but will be continued over the next two months. However, the 


entire file will appear on this month i RAINBOW ON DISK. 


Listing 2: Skipmuf 


3 


JJD 


9 


(* 


4 


0D 


9 


* Skipmuf - A program for computing the maximum usable 


5 


JJD 


9 


* frequency (HUT 1 ) , highest possible frequency (HPF) , and 


6 




9 


* optimum frequency for traffic (OFT) between two points on 


7 


JJD 


9 


* the Earth's surface over a 24-hour period for a specified 


8 


JJD 


9 


* date, and Zurich Smoothed Sunspot Number or 1JJ.7 cm Solar 


9 


JJD 


9 


* Flux Index. This program is written for the Tandy Color 


10 


JJD 


9 


* Computer 3 under the OS-9 Level II Operating System using 


11 


JJD 


9 


* a high-resolution RGB color monitor. The algorithm for 


12 


JJD 


9 


* this program is an adaptation of the HINIHUF 3.5 


13 


JJD 


9 


* algorithm. MlNIMuT 3.5 is a public domain program in 


14 


JJD 


9 


* BASIC that was published in the December 1982 issue of 


15 


JJD 


9 


* QST. This Pascal program was compiled on the Microware 


16 


JJD 


9 


* OS-9 Pascal Compiler version 2.JJJJ.JJJJ. OS-9 Pascal 


17 


JJD 


9 


* conforms to the ISO Standard 7185.1 Level JJ (Wirth and 


18 


JJD 


9 


* Jensen) definition of Pascal. 


19 


JJD 


9 


* 


29 


JJD 


9 


* Copyright (c) 1988 by: 


21 


JJD 


9 


* John Alan Lind, KD7XG 


22 


?D 


9 


* 2194 Conejo Street 


23 


JJD 


JJ 


* Corona, California 9172JJ-4JJJJ1 


24 


JJD 


9 


* 


25 


JJD 


9 


* Release Version 2.1 


26 


JJD 


9 


* 


27 


JJD 


9 


* Distributed as "freeware" to the amateur 


28 


JJD 


JJ 


* radio community. If you like this program 


29 


JJD 


JJ 


* give it to a friend. This program may 


3JJ 


JJD 


9 


* not be sold and the copyright notice must 


31 


JJD 


9 


* be retained in the program code. 


32 


JJD 


JJ 


* Commercial/business use of this software 


33 


JJD 


JJ 


* is strictly prohibited. 


34 


JJD 


JJ 


*} 


37 


JJD 


9 


PROGRAM Skipmuf (input , output, screen, printer, lnfile); 


38 


JJD 


9 




39 


0D 


9 


CONST 


40 


pro 


JJ 


cursrpos - 2; (ASCII value for cursor positioning } 


41 


JJD 


jj 


(The two values following this one } 


42 


JJD 


JJ 


(set the y and x position of the } 


43 


JJD 


Jl 


(cursor on the terminal screen } 


44 




JJ 


scmoset -31; ( Offset value used in placing cursor) 


45 


JJD 


JJ 


els - 12; (ASCII screen clear character } 


46 


0D 


9 


lineclr - 3; . (clears line at cursor position } 


47 


JJD 


9 


eolclr - 4; (clears from cursor to end of line } 


48 


9P 


9 


eoscrcl - 11; (clears from cursor to end of screen } 


49 


JJD 


9 


dlsptime * 3JJJJJJJJ; (loop count for display time ) 


5? 


JJD 


9 


degtorad - JJ.JJ174532925; (degrees X degtorad - radians ) 


51 


pro 


9 


radtodeg - 57.29577951; (radians X radtodeg - degrees ) 


52 


JJD 


9 


window -'/¥»; (OS-9 name for next avail window) 


53 


JJD 


JJ 


title - ■ --— KD7XG OS-9 SKIPMUF — -'; 


54 


JJD 


9 




55 


JJD 


9 


TYPE 


56 


JJD 


9 


monthstr - ARRAY [1..3] OF char; 


57 


JJD 


9 




58 


JJD 


9 


VAR 


59 


JJD 


9 


printout : boolean; 


6? 


-ID 


9 


loopent, Index, errnum : Integer; 


61 


-7D 


9 


mylat, mylon, myalt : real; 


62 


-22D 


9 


olat, olon, oalt : real; 


63 


-37D 


9 


month, day : real; 


64 


-47D 


9 


sunspot, flux : real; 



ries. But the topic is so important to the 
future of the Color Computer and OS- 
9, it bears mentioning again. This time, 
we'll quote Griffith: 

"Without going too much into the 
theory of a standard interface, let me 
say that this is one of the primary 
reasons so many Macintosh users love 
their machines. Each application pro- 
gram runs, looks and feels like all the 
others because they all are used in the 
same manner. Multi-Vue gives us the 
same capability and, in my opinion, 
should be taken advantage of." 

Griffith's comments are appropriate 
this month, because we're now starting 
down a road that we hope will eventu- 
ally bring a basic understanding of 
Multi-Vue programming to "KISSable 
OS-9" readers. However, since many 
readers do not own C, or don't want to 
learn the language, we plan to see what 
we can accomplish using the BASIC09 
compiler that comes bundled with every 
copy of OS-9 Level II for the Color 
Computer. 

We attempted to give you a thorough 
introduction to Grflnt programming 
techniques during our KISSDraw se- 
ries. Now that Multi-Vue is readily 
available, you'll be able to use these 
skills as you tap the power hidden 
within G r f I n t 's replacement, W i nd I n t. 
There's a wealth of information about 
Windlnt data structures in the manual 
that comes with Multi-Vue. However, 
much of it is expressed in the terms of 
C data structures. We'll start by trans- 
lating a few of these structures into 
BASIC09 data types. I'm not sure how far 
we'll get this month, but hang in there. 
There's enough material hidden in 
Multi-Vue to sustain you for months. 

One of the first things you notice 
when you look at a C program listing 
are the tt Include statements at the 
beginning. In the case of programs 



DMC "No Halt" Disk Controller 




Did you know? 

. . .that all the older floppy disk controllers for the 
CoCo completely tie up (and even halt) the 6609 pro- 
cessor during disk reads and writes? No wonder 
your keyboard is constantly "losing" characters! Or 
that your serial port ofton gives you garbage. 



Unleash your CoCo's potential! 

Our new Dual Mode Controller (DMC) implements a new 
"no halt" mode of operation so it can read from or write 
to disk all by Itself. The 6809 is freed to process other 
tasks and respond to interrupts. This is how OS-9 was 
meant to run! But the Radio Shack "halt" mode of 
operation is also retained to maintain ful! compatibility 
with existing non-OS-9 software. 

Fr««t Disk caching software included can speed up 
OS-9 disk accesses. 



£ 5ARt>l> 

«HNOLOOI« 



Other DMC features: 

• works with original CoCo, CoCo 2, or CoCo 
(Multi-Pak required) 

• no adjustments — all-digital data separator and write 
precompensation 

• gold plated card-edge connectors for reliability 

• ROM socket takes 24 pin or 28 pin chip; dual DOS capability 

• Radio Shack DOS 1.1 ROM installed 

• 8K bytes cache memory on board (32K optional) 

• D.R Johnson's SDISK package (specially modified for DMC) is 
included at no charge ($30 value) 

• aluminum case 

• fully assembled and tested; 120 day limited warranty 

To ord«r: DMC controller with RSDOS 1.1 and SDISK (specify 
OS-9 Level I or II) $149.50 plus $5 S/H ($12 overseas). Add $16 
for 32K RAM option. Terms (prices in $US); check, money 
order, VISA. U.S.A. orders shipped via UPS from WA state. 





2261 East 11th Ave., Vancouver, B.C., Canada V5N 1Z7 



(Also ask about our ST-2900 
6809 based expandable 
single board computer) 

(604)255-4485 (Pacific Time) 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 183 



using Windlnt routines, that list often 
includes these lines: 

ttlnclude <Wind.h> 
8 Include <Mouse.h> 
BInclude <Buffs.h> 
8 Include. <5tmenu.h-> 

Additionally, most C programs con- 
tain a number of 8Def ine statements at 
the beginning. These statements are 
used to set the initial value to a number 
of variables. We can accomplish the 
same thing with a number of assignment 
statements (:=) in BASIC09. 

One starting point, then, is for us to 
write our own Wind.h, Mouse. h, 
Buf fs.h and Stdmenu.h for BASIC09. 
However, since BASIC09 does not have 
an 8 Include statement, we'll have to 
come up with a handy way to include 
these headers in the beginning of all our 
programs. 

The easiest way to maintain these 
statements is to store them in a separate 
text file, which you can load and edit 
with your favorite text editor. Each time 
you get ready to create a BASIC09 appli- 
cation program for use with Multi- Vue, 
you can copy these files in at the start 
of your application program. You might 
call it a manual 8 Include file. You 
could call your listings Wind.b, 
Mouse. b, Buffs. b and Stdmenu.b — 
or bundle them all in one file and call 
them — Headers, b. 

When you begin to assemble your 
BASIC09 application program with your 
text editor, remember to make the very 
first character of any file you plan to 
load into BASIC09 a *P' or 'p\ In fact, 
your first line must look something like 
this: 

Procedure NameOf fippl ication 

As we develop our BASIC09 versions 
of the C header files, we'll attempt to use 
the same variable names as those used 
by the C programmers who wrote 
Multi- Vue. This will make it easier for 
you to compare your definitions to 
those in the Multi-Vue manual. 

We have added liberal comments to 
this month's project, MVShell. Look 
through this code and compare it to the 
C code in the Multi- Vue manual that 
carries out a similar task. Then type it 
in and give it a try. Next month we'll try 
to type and initialize the data structures 
for the rest of the standard Tandy 
menus and show you how to create your 
own. With a little luck, we'll also be able 
to bring those menus to life. Till July, 
enjoy the future! □ 

184 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



65 


-57D 


0 


hour, hpf, mu£, oft : real; 


66 


-77D 


0 


answer : char ; 


67 


-78D 


0 


screen : text; 


68 


A A A** 

-223D 


at- 

0 


printer : text ; 


69 


-368D 


0 


lnxlle : text; 


7 0 


-513D 


0 


mo : ARRAY [1..12] OF real; 


79 


-821D 


0 


{* 


30 


-821D 


0 


* Dvset - procedure to create a device in a window of 


81 


-821D 


0 


* type 'sty 1 . 


82 


-821D 


0 


*) 


83 


-821D 


0 




84 


-821D 


0 


<% aiiK aMh <M mm. m mm m #* <i 

PROCEDURE Dvset (VAR path: text; sty, cpx, cpy, szx, 


85 


-2D 


1 


szy, fprn, bprn, bdprn: integer) ; 


86 


0D 


m 

1 




87 


0D 


1 


BEGIN 


A A 

88 


A? 

0 


2 


write (path, Chr($ IB) ,Chr($20; ,Chr(sty) ,Chr(cpx) t Chr(cpy) , 


89 


43 


Z 


Chr(szx) , cnr(szy) ,cnr(iprn; ,Cnr(oprn) ,Chr(Daprn) ) ; 


n ft 

90 


79 


2 


Prompt (patn ; ; t 


91 


ft 1 

84 


2 


END; 


94 


0 


1 


* 

{* 


95 


0 


1 


* Font - procedure to specify the get/put buffer from 


96 


0 


1 


* which to get font data for generating graphics 


97 


0 


1 


* text . 


98 


0 


1 


*) 


99 


0 


1 




100 


0 


1 


PROCEDURE Font (VAR path: text; grpnum, bufnum: integer) ; 


m ft 1 

101 


0 


1 




1JJZ 


a 
0 


1 
1 




i fit 
10 J 


a 
0 


Z 


wnte^patn, unr^us^, unr^jA^, unr q grpnum^ , onrQDUinum; ; ; 


1 ft A 

1)14 


1 1 


z 


rrompt Qpatn.; ; 


t n c 

105 


tc 
36 


z 


end; 


108 


0 


1 


{* 


109 


0 


1 


* Select - procedure to cause the current process 1 window 


110 


0 


1 


* to become the active (display) window. 


111 


0 


1 


*} 


112 


0 


1 




113 


0 


1 


PROCEDURE Select (VAR path: text); 


114 


0 


1 




115 


0 


1 


BEGIN 


116 


0 


2 


ffrite(path, Chr(SlB), Chr($21)); 


117 


17 


2 


Prorapt(path) ; 


118 


20 


2 


END; 


121 


0 


1 


{* 


122 


0 


1 


* Owset - procedure to create an overlay window. 


123 


0 


1 


*) 


124 


0 


1 




125 


0 


1 


PROCEDURE Owset (VAR path: text ; svs , cpx , cpy, 


126 


0 


1 


szx , szy , pral , pm2 : integer) ; 


127 


0 


1 




128 


0 


1 


BEGIN 


129 


0 


2 


write(path, Chr(51B) ,Chr(522) ,Chr(svs) ,Chr(cpx) ,Chr(cpy) , 


130 


43 


2 


Chr(szx) ,Chr(3zy) .Chr(prnl) ,Chr(pm2)) ; 


tot 
131 


"7 t 

71 


Z 


TM mm *m.mm*mm< mm w mm * \^ X * 

Prompt (path; ; 


132 


76 


Z 


END; 


135 


0 


1 


{* 


136 


0 


1 


* Curoff - turns off text cursor. 


137 


0 


1 


*) 


138 


0 


1 




139 


0 


1 


mm *m *m W ah mmmm mm m ^ M mm — mm m V 

PROCEDURE Curoff (VAR path : text); 


140 


0 


1 




141 


0 


* 

1 


Tt t*% T %T 

BEGIN 


142 


0 


2 


Write (path, Chr($05), Chr($20)); 


143 


17 


2 


Prompt (path) ; 


144 


20 


2 


END; 


147 


0 


1 


{* 


148 


0 


1 


* Scslesw - disables and enables automatic scaling to allow 


149 


0 


1 


* scaling of full screen to window size or allow 


150 


0 


1 


* use of absolute coordinates within the window. 


151 


0 


1 


*) 


152 


0 


1 




153 


0 


1 


PROCEDURE Scalesw(VAR path : text; bsw : integer); 


154 


0 


1 




155 


0 


1 


BEGIN 


156 


0 


2 


Write(path, Chr($lB), Chr($35), Chr(bsw)); 


157 


23 


2 


Prompt (path) ; 


158 


26 


2 


END; 


161 


0 


1 


<* 


162 


0 


1 


* Setdptr - Seta the draw pointer to the specified coordinates. 


163 


0 


1 


*) 


164 


0 


1 




165 


0 


1 


PROCEDURE Setdptr (VAR path : text; bx, by : integer); 


166 


0 


1 


* 


167 


0 


1 


VAR 


168 


0D 


1 


hbx, Ibx, hby, lby : integer; 


169 


-8D 


1 




170 


-8D 


1 


BEGIN 


171 


0 


2 


hbx :- bx div $100; 


172 


8 


2 


lbx :- bx mod $100; 


173 


14 


2 


hby :- by div $100; 


174 


20 


2 


lby by mod $100; 


175 


26 


2 


Write(path,Chr($lB) t Chr($40) ,Chr(hbx) .Chr(lbx) ,Chr(hby) ,Chr(lby) 


176 


67 


2 


Prompt (path) ; 


177 


72 


2 


END; 


180 


0 


1 


{* 



181 


9 


l 


* Box - 


Dravs a rectangle defined by by the diagonal line from 


182 


9 


l 




the current draw pointer position to the specified 


183 


9 


l 




position. Draw pointer is NOT updated. 


184 


9 


l 


*} 






185 


9 


l 








186 


9 


l 


PROCEDURE Box(VAR path : text; bx, by : integer): 


187 


9 


1 








188 


9 


1 


VAR 






189 


00 


1 


hbx, 


lbx, hby, lby 


: integer; 


19? 


-8D 


1 








191 


-8D 


1 


BEGIN 






192 


9 


2 


hbx 


:- bx div $100 




193 


8 


2 


lbx 


bx mod $100 




194 


14 


2 


hby 


by div $100 




195 


20 


2 


lby 


:- by mod $100 




196 


26 


2 


Write (path, Chr($lB) ,Chr($48) , Chr(hbx) ,Chr(lbx) ,Chr(hby) ,Chr(lby)) ; 


197 


67 


2 


Prompt (path) ; 




198 


72 


2 


END; 






2)11 


9 


1 


(* 






202 


9 


1 


* Line « 


- Draws a line 


from the current draw pointer position to 


203 


9 


1 


* 


the specified position. Draw pointer is NOT updated. 


204 


9 


1 


*) 






205 


9 


1 








206 


9 


1 


PROCEDURE Line(VAR path : text; bx, by : integer); 


207 


9 


1 








208 


9 


1 


VAR 






209 


0D 


1 


hbx, 


lbx, hby, lby 


: integer; 


210 


-8D 


1 




> 




211 


-8D 


1 


BEGIN 






212 


9 


2 


hbx 


bx div $100; 




213 


8 


2 


lbx 


bx mod $100; 




214 


14 


2 


hby 


:- by div $100; 




215 


20 


2 


lby 


by mod $100; 




216 


26 


2 


tfrite(path,Chr($lB),Chr($44),Chr(hbx) ,Chr(lbx) ,Chr(hby) .Chr(lby)) ; 


217 


67 


2 


Prompt (path) ; 




218 


72 


2 


END; 




a 


221 


9 


1 


{* 






222 


9 


1 


* Curxy 


- positions text cursor to specific coordinates. 


223 


9 


1 


*) 






224 


9 


1 








225 


9 


1 


PROCEDURE Curxy(VAR path : text; x, y : integer); 


226 


9 


1 








227 


9 


1 


BEGIN 






228 


9 


2 


x 


x + $20; 




229 


7 


2 


y 


y + $20; 




230 


12 


2 


Write (path, Chr($02), Chr(x) , Chr(y)); 


231 


34 


2 


Prompt (path) ; 




232 


39 


2 


END; 






235 


9 


1 


f* 






236 


9 


1 


* Lin em 


- Draws a line from the current draw pointer position to 


237 


9 


1 


* 


the specified position. Draw pointer IS updated. 


238 


9 


1 


*) 




• 


239 


9 


1 








240 


9 


1 


PROCEDURE Linem(VAR path : text; bx, by : integer); 


241 


9 


1 








242 


9 


1 


VAR 






243 


0D 


1 


hbx, 


lbx, hby, lby 


: integer; 


244 


-8D 


1 








245 


-8D 


1 


BEGIN 






246 


9 


2 


hbx j 


- bx div $100; 




247 


8 


2 


lbx J 


- bx mod $100; 




248 


14 


2 


hby : 


- by div $100; 




249 


20 


2 


lby : 


- by mod $100; 




250 


26 


2 


Write (path, Chr( 5 IB) ,Chr($46) ,Chr(hbx) ,Chr(lbx) .Chr(hby) .Chr(lby)) ; 


251 


67 


2 


Prompt (pach) ; 




252 


72 


2 


END; 






255 


9 


1 


{* 






256 


9 


1 


* Fcolor - Sets foreground color. Argument is the palette 


257 


0 


1 


* 


register number to use as the color. 


258 


9 


1 


*) 






259 


9 


1 








260 


9 


1 


PROCEDURE Fcolor(VAR path : text; prn : integer); 


261 


9 


1 








262 


9 


1 


BEGIN 






263 


9 


2 


Write(path, Chr($lB), Chr($32) 1 Chr(prn)); 


264 


23 


2 


Prompt (pach) ; 


* 


265 


26 


2 


END; 






268 


9 


1 


(* 






269 


9 


1 


* Curon 


- turns the text cursor on. 


270 


9 


1 


*) 






271 


9 


1 








272 


9 


1 


PROCEDURE Curon(VAR path : text); 


273 


9 


1 








274 


9 


1 


BEGIN 






275 


9 


2 


Write(path, Chr($05), Chr($21)); 


276 


17 


2 


Prompt (path) ; 




277 


20 


2 


END; 






280 


9 


1 


{* 






281 


9 


1 


* Owend 


- Ends the current overlay window by closing it and 


282 


9 


1 


* 


deallocating system memory used by the window. 


283 


9 


1 


*) 






284 

£m V *T 


a 
r 










285 


9 


1 


PROCEDURE Ovend(VAR path : text); 


286 


9 


1 






4 



.800 



5»» 



TANDY COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000-HX256K 1 Drive. 535.00 

Tandy 1000-TX640K 1 Drive 860.00 

Tandy 3000-HL 51 2K 1 Drive 1090.00 

Tandy 3000 640K 1 Drive 1475.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Meg 1 Drive 1890.00 

Tandy 1400LT 768K 2 Drives 1 195.00 

Tandy 102 24K 375.00 

Tandy Color 3 128K 155.00 

MONITORS & BOARDS 

VM-4 Monochrome Green 95.00 

CM-5 Color RGB 220.00 

CM-1 1 Color RGB 335.00 

EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 510.00 

Tandy Dual Display Card 145.00 

Tandy EGA Card 185.00 

Zucker Mono Graphics Card 72.00 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 225.00 

5 1/4" External Drive 1000EX 180.00 

3 1/2" External Drive 1000EX 200.00 

Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 509.00 

Tandy 40 Meg Hardcard 679.00 

Zucker 30 Meg Hardcard 435.00 

Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 265.00 

Tandy 1000/SX/TX Controller 90.00 

EXPANSION BOARDS 

Zucker Serial Board 45.00 

Zucker OK Memory Board 1000 47.50 

Zucker MFB OK for 1 000 1 03.00 
Zucker 1200 Baud Modem Card 72.00 

PRINTERS 

DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 165.00 

DMP-130 Dot-Matrix 255.00 

DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 335.00 

DWP-520 Daisy Wheel 730.00 

DMP^40 Dot-Matrix 595.00 

DMP-2120 Dot-Matrix 1325.00 

LP-1000 Laser Printer 1635.00 

Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 205.00 

Epson FX-86E Dot-Matrix 375.00 

Epson FX-286E Dot-Matrix 475.00 

Epson EX-800 Dot-Matrix 425.00 

Epson LQ-500 Dot-Matrix 375.00 

Epson LQ-850 Dot-Matrix 579.00 

Epson LQ-1 050 Dot-Matrix 820.00 

Epson LQ-2500 Dot-Matrix 905.00 

Please write for complete price list. 
We carry more items than listed here. 



All prices and otters may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Adver- 
tised prices are cash prices. C.O.D. accepted add 2% (minimum charge 
$10.00) M.C., Visa add 2%. AH non defective items require return 
merchandise authorization. Call for RMA Number before returning. 
Delivery is subject to product availability. Add for shipping and 
handling, $5.00 minimum charge. 

TM - Registered Trademark of Tandy, Epson, and IBM 
Monday thru Friday 9am-6pm EST. 



□□□□□ 
□□□□□ 

□□□□□ 
□□□□□ 

124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 185 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We re sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 




186 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



287 


9 


1 


BEGIN 


Ann 

288 


9 


2 


Write (path, Chr(SlB), Chr(S23)); 


o ft r» 

2B9 


17 


2 


Prompt (path) ; 


A All 


2)7 


2 


END; 


293 


9 




{* 


294 


9 




* LoglJ7 - returns base 1)7 logarithm for real or 


295 


9 




* Integer argument. Value returned is real. 


296 


9 


! 


*) 


297 


9 






298 


9 




ww^kv mmm mm m± m\m mt m 49 A m ^ m 

FUNCTION Logl)7(x : real) : real; 


299 


9 






3)7)7 


mm 

9 




VAR 


3)71 


J7D 




1, err : real; 


3)72 


-1J7D 


1 


result : real; 


3)73 


-15D 




e : integer; 


3)74 


-17D 






3)75 


-17D 


* 


PROCEDURE Norm(x : real; VAR e : integer; VAR z : real); 


3)76 


)7D 


2 




3)77 


J7D 


2 


VAR 


3)78 


)7D 


2 


k : integer; 


3J79 


-2D 


2 




3LJ7 


-2D 


2 


BEGIN 


311 


9 


3 


k :- 9', 


312 


4 


3 


IF x >- 1 THEN 


313 


13 


4 


WHILE x >- 1)7 DO BEGIN 


314 


22 


5 


k k + 1; 


315 


26 


5 


x x/l)7 


316 


29 


5 


END 


317 


35 


5 


ELSE 


318 


41 


4 


WHILE x < 1 DO BEGIN 


319 


50 


5 


k :- k - 1; 


32)7 


54 


5 


x :- 1)7 * x; 


321 


63 


5 


END; 


322 


66 


3 


e :- k; 


323 


69 


3 


z x; 


324 


74 


3 


END; 


325 


9 


2 




326 


9 


2 


BEGIN 


327 


9 


2 


mm mm at m, Jtm _ _ _ 

IF (x - 1.J7) THEN 


328 


15 


3 


result J7 


329 


15 


3 


ELSE BEGIN 


33)7 


23 


3 


Norm(x, e, x) J 


331 


33 


3 


1 J7; 


332 


38 


3 


err 1; 


333 


43 


3 


result im e; 


334 


48 


3 


REPEAT 


335 


48 


3 


x x * x; 


336 


58 


4 


err err/2; 


337 


67 


4 


IF x >- 1)7 THEN BEGIN 


338 


76 


5 


1 :» result; 


339 


82 


5 


x x/l)7; 


34)7 


91 


5 


result 1 + err; 


341 




5 


• 

END; 


342 


1)71 


4 


UNTIL ((err < 6.)7e-39) OR ((result - 1) AND (result o )7))); 


343 


■f ft, rt 

129 


3 


END; 


344 


1 ft) A 

129 


2 


Loglj? :» result; 


345 


tie 

135 


A 

2 


END; 


348 


9 


1 


(* 


349 


9 


1 


* Clrscrn - Clears the screen and leaves the header behind. 


35)7 


9 


1 


*) 


351 


9 


1 


• 


352 


mm 

9 


* 

1 


— & jm^ M ok m mm* mm mu 4 a* — — - m . 

PROCEDURE Clrscrn(VAR path:text); 


A m A 

353 


9 


1 


354 


9 


1 


BEGIN 


355 


9 


2 


Curxy(path, J7, 2); 


356 


8 


A 

2 


tfrite(path, Chr($0B)); 


lei 

357 


16 


2 


Prompt (path) ; 


35B 


19 


2 


END; 


361 


9 


1 


(* 


362 


9 


1 


* Logo - print program logo on screen 


363 


9 


1 


*) 


364 


9 


1 




365 


9 


1 


PROCEDURE Logo (VAR path: text); 


366 


9 


1 




367 


9 


1 


CONST 


368 


J7D 


1 


dlsptime - 3)7)7)7)7; 


369 


J7D 


1 




37)7 


J7D 


1 


VAR 


371 


J7D 


1 


loopl, Loop2 : integer; 


372 


-4D 


1 




A pm a 

373 


-4D 


1 


BEGIN 


374 


mm 

9 


2 


Page (path); 


375 


5 


2 


Writeln(path, 'OS- 9 SKIPMUF y 2.1»); 


376 


1 A 

18 


2 


Vriteln(path, 'Copyright (c) 1988'); 


*i m mm 

377 


31 


2 


Writeln(path, 'by John Alan Lind, KD7XG'); 


*5 f ft 

378 


44 


A 

2 


f f ■ m Af 4 m mm ^m a ■ f— m _ m 

Writeln(path, 'Corona, California'); 


379 


57 


A 

2 


Writeln(path) ; 


38)7 


** A 

62 


2 


Writeln(path, 'Distributed as "freeware" to the amateur'); 


4 ft) 1 

381 


m» m. 

79 


2 


Writeln(path, 'radio community. If you like this program'); 


AAA 

382 


A /* 

96 


2 


Vriteln(path, 'give it to a friend. This program may ') ; 


363 


113 


2 


Writeln(path, 'not be sold and the copyright notice must'); 


384 


13)7 


2 


Writeln(path, 'be retained in the program code.'): 

• 97 x mr f 9 


385 


147 


2 


Writeln(path, 'Commercial/business use of this software'); 


386 


164 


2 


Writeln(path, 'is strictly prohibited. •) ; 



JO/ 


1 70 
1/7 




FOR. lOOpl ' m 1 CO 2 DO 


J00 


191 


«J 

J 


FOR loopZ : — 1 to disptime DO; 


389 


AAA 

233 


2 


END; 


392 


9 




(* 


393 


9 




* Header - procedure to clear screen and place 


394 


9 


1 


* program title header at the top. 


395 


9 


1 


*) 


396 


9 


1 




397 


9 




PROCEDURE Header (VAR path: text); 


(t A A 

398 


9 


1 




t A A 

399 


9 


1 


CONST 




jJD 




title - » KD7XG OS -9 SKI PHUT 




J7D 








)TO 




BEGIN 


HJ# 0 


9 




fage(patn; ; 


Afli 


E 

9 


z 


writemvpacn , citidj ; 






<& 


writeimpatnj j 




25 


2 


END; 


4pT9 


9 


1 


{* 




9 


1 


* Init - procedure to read configuration file and 


411 


9 


1 


* initialize program vith user's callsign, 


412 


9 


1 


* station location, etc. 


413 


9 


1 


*) 


414 


JM 


1 


« 


415 




1 


PROCEDURE Init; 


416 




1 




417 




1 


VAR 


418 


J3D 


1 


index : integer; 


419 


-2D 


1 




42)7 


-2D 


1 


BEGIN 


421 


J* 


2 


Reset (infile, ' conf ig_muf * ) ; 


422 


14 


2 


• 


423 


14 


2 


FOR index 1 TO 1(7 DO 


424 


24 


3 


cail[index] :- Chr(J7) ; 


425 


5)7 


2 


index 1; 


426 


52 


2 


WHILE NOT eoln( infile) AND (index <- 1)7) DO BEGIN 


427 


65 


3 


Read( infile, call( index] ) ; 


428 


81 


3 


index :» Succ( index) ; 


429 


84 


3 


END; 


430 


87 


2 


Readln< infile); 


431 


92 


2 




432 


92 


2 


FOR index :- 1 TO 2)7 DO 


433 


1)72 


3 


name [ index J :- Chr(J7); 


434 


128 


2 


index 1; 


435 


13)7 


2 


WHILE NOT Eoln( infile) AND (index <- 2)7) DO BEGIN 


436 


4 # A 

143 


3 


Read (infile, name ( index] ) ; 


/AM 

437 


159 


3 


index Succ( index); 


438 


162 


3 


END; 


439 


165 


2 


Readln( infile) ; . 


44)7 


17J7 


2 




441 


17J7 


2 


Readln(inf ile , mylat) ; 


442 


182 


2 




443 


182 


2 


Readln( infile , mylon) ; 


444 


194 


2 




445 


194 


2 


( next line is data not used by this program, but is ] 


446 


1 A / 

194 


2 


I embeded to allow altitude use in future software ) 


447 


194 


2 


( that will use the same configuration file. ) 


448 


4 A # 

194 


2 




449 


194 


2 


Readln( infile , myalt) ; 


45)7 


2)76 


2 




451 


A M ■ 

2)76 


2 


4Bfe 04L 9 4J 4J Mmm A «4t 

FOR index 1 TO 3 DO 


452 


216 


3 


printpath[ index] Chr(J7); 


453 


242 


2 


index :- 1; 


454 


244 


2 


WHILE NOT Eoln( infile) AND (index <- 3) DO BEGIN 


455 


259 


3 


Read(infile, prlntpath[ index] ) ; 


456 


275 


3 


index :- Succ ( index) ; 


457 


A ^ A 

278 


3 


END; 


458 


281 


2 


Readln(inrile) ; 


459 


A A jC 

286 


n 
2 


Close (infile) ; 


46)7 


291 


2 


END; 


463 


J? 


1 


{* 


464 




1 


* Menu - procedure to select distant location for 


465 




1 


* computation of MUF. 


466 




1 


*) 


467 


9 


1 




468 


9 


1 


PROCEDURE Menu (VAR path: text); 


469 


9 


1 




470 


9 


1 


VAR 


471 


0D 


1 


loopcount, index, choice : integer; 


472 


-6D 


1 


test : ARRAY (1. .16] OF char; 


473 


-22D 


1 


474 


-22D 


1 


BEGIN 


475 


9 


2 


test" :- '*** EOF »; 


476 


9 


2 


FOR index 8 TO 16 DO 


477 


21 


3 


test [index] Chr(j7) ; 


478 


46 


2 


REPEAT 


479 


46 


2 


Reset (Infile, » skipmuf _dat ' ) ; 


48)7 


58 


3 


Clrscrn(path) ; 


481 


62 


3 


loopcount )7; 


482 


64 


3 


FOR index 1 TO 16 DO 


483 


76 


4 


ocntnt [index] Chr(J7); 


484 


1)72 


3 


index :» 1; 


485 


1)74 


3 


WHILE NOT Eoln(infile) AND (index <- lfi) DO BEGIN 


486 


117 


4 


Read (infile, ocntnt [ index] ) ; 




About 
Your 
Subscription 

Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster. 

For Canadian and other non- 
U.S. subscribers, there may be 
a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 




June 1988 THE RAINBOW 187 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . ♦ 

This one-liner prints insert 
cards for your cassette boxes. Just 
load and run while your printer is 
online. When the printer stops, 
type PRINT8-2,fi$ (this is a one- 
liner, you know, and can hold 
only so much) to finish the pro- 
gram. Then cut out your card and 
fold it> and it's ready to document 
the contents of your cassette. 

The listing: 

1 A$«STRING$(41,".«) :PRINT#-2 F A$ 
: PRXNT#-2 , » : S 1" ? : FORX-1T017 : PRIN 
T#-2," ,, ?:NEXT:PRINT#-2, ,, :S2 ,, :B$ 
■STRINGS ( 19 , » ») : F0RX-1T014 : PRIN 
T#-2 , " : ?B$ ? " : " ;B$ ? rt :NEXT: PRIN 
T#-2 , A$ : PRINT#-2 : PRINT #-2 : PRINT # 
-2 , A$ : F0RX-1T06 : C$-STRING$ ( 39 , " 
») :PRINT#-2,»:»;C$;":" 

2 NEXT 



Keith Selbee 
Akrons OH 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the 
author has been sent copies of both The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



One-Liner Contest Winner . , » 

Catch the wave! The sine wave, 
that is. Run this short program 
and watch THE rainbow waving 
to you via the magic of trigonom- 
etry. If that gets boring, edit in 
your name and wave to yourself. 

The listing: 



1 FORA»180TO-179STEP-10:RD-A/57. 
29577951 :CL-SIN(RD) * 12+12 :PRINTT 
AB(CZi) ; "RAINBOW" : NEXTA : GOTO 1 



Nick Fladung 
Big Spring. TX 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the 
author has been sent copies of both The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



HO / 


1 44 
13 J 


4 


Index Succ(lndex); 


A O O 
HOO 


136 


4 


END; 


489 


139 


3 


Readln(inf lie) ; 


I O ft 

49JI 


144 


3 


REPEAT 


a n 1 

491 


144 


3 


loopcount Succ Cloopcotant) ; 


492 


147 


4 


•Write(path, loopcount:2, »); 


J n o 

493 


164 


4 


Right just (FALSE) ; 


AO A 
HVH 


1 £0. 

loo 


H 


write (path, ocntnt:16, ' - *); 


/.AC 

493 


1 o o 
loo 


4 


Right Just (TRUE) ; 


AO £ 
H* 0 


1 oo 


A 

H 




AO 7 


1 09 

l7l 


A 
H 


r uk index : ■ l to zj# do 




1 AA 
Z^H 


e 

5 


ocity[ index] : ■ Chr(?); 


/.OA 

499 


1)4(1 

23JJ 


4 


index : «■ 1; 




4 JZ 


H 


TTTT TT P WAtffl **" mm, 1 f A mm. XT J O N A 1**4 ^ » _ ^ AA^* A «« A> OT«« 

WHILE NOT Eoln(intile) AND (index o 2?) DO BEGIN 


5JJ1 


0 A C 

Zh3 


e 
3 


Reaa(lnflle t oc ity[ index] ) ; 


5JJ2 


Of q 
ZoZ 


e 

5 


index : — Succ ( index) ; 


5JJ3 


o c c 
265 


c 

3 


END; 


3 JIH 


o<ta 

ZOO 


A 
H 


Keaain( mtlie) ; 


c/te 


OOO 

Z7 J 


4 


T 1 mm) J A- - / „ t-Xm ■ ^ • • V 

Write (path, ocity, '); 


Cf1£ 

3JPO 


ZV J 


H 




5JJ7 


o o O 
29 J 


4 


WAB i m J a,_ a 1 HO A A> /-\ 

FOR index 1 TO zJJ DO 


c rta 


one 
3"5 


5 


ocntry[ index] Chr(?); 


c /t n 


A A 1 

331 


J 

4 


index 1; 


C 1 f7 

51W 


o o o 
333 


4 


WHILE NOT Eoln(infile) AND (index <— 2?) DO BEGIN 


311 


41* 

346 


5 


Read(infile, ocntry [index] ) ; 


CIO 

312 


O £ o 

362 


5 


index Succ (index); 


513 


O £ C 

365 


5 


END ; 




JOO 


A 
H 


Keaainuniiie ) ; 


515 


373 


4 


w s a i-c ■Hi ^ po til , uuitiyy , 


516 

J X V 


388 


A 




517 


388 


■f 




518 


400 


4 




ma 

3 17 


A! 9 
HlZ 


H 


R«aain( infile , oalt); 


con 
520 


A O A 
HZ*f 


4 




5Z1 


A O A 

424 


4 


FOR index 1 TO 16 DO 


coo 

322 


/.OA 

438 


5 


* P _A f O AM ^ V 

ocntnt [index] Chr(0); 


523 


466 


4 


• 1 A] 

Index 1; 


e o A 

524 


ICQ 

468 


§ 

H 


WHILE NOT Eoln( infile) AND (index <» 16) DO BEGIN 


eoc 

525 


481 


5 


mm. ■ y • ■ a _ _ » ■ « « v 

Read (infile, ocntnt [ index] ) ; 


C A £ 

526 


497 


5 


0 # A m A 

index Succ (index); 


3Z f 


can 


e 
5 


END ; 


OB 
328 


5JP3 


4 


Reaain( infile) ; 


eon 
3Zir 


3J#0 


A 
H 


until (ocntnt — test) ; 


com 

530 


con 

520 


3 


>OI 0] _ ^ / 1 ^ # O) v 

Close (inf ile) ; 


3 Jl 


CO c 

3Z3 


o 
j 


TTmm, 2 *J Al ii « / Ak M a 

write in( path) ; 


3 


3 JH 


o 
J 


T,Toa> a! '#m / «k ^_ Ab'Lk f £i mm ^ mm -~ AW _ B A_ 1— 4 1 ^* At A 

write(path, 'Select area of the world for prediction: 


<.7 7 
3 J J 


35JJ 


o 
J 


Prompt (path) ; 


CI* 

534 


e e 4 

553 


o 

3 


Reset(path) ; 


3 J3 


C £ O 

36 J 


o 

J 


Readln(path, choice); 


C.O.H 
3 JO 


57 o 

3/7 


o 
J 


^7j — _ _ J Al W mm* mm A> Am ■ — 

Rewrite (path) ; 


537 


coo 
589 


o 

3 


UNTIL ((choice >- 1) AND (choice <- loopcount)); 


3 JO 


399 


o 

2 


c t a 
3 J» 


3»» 


O 

2 


Da*A^ /iMATi 1 A • \m.A\ mmm e _l A_ t \ 

Reset (infile , ' akipmuf_dat ' ) ; 


c/.n 


Oil 


q 
2 


FOR loopcount 1 TO (choice - 1) DO BEGIN 


e/,i 

541 


f44 

627 


o 

3 


Readln( infile) ; 


C AO 


£00 
O JZ 


3 


Readin( infile) ; 


c / o 

543 


£ *i ~9 

637 


3 


4>h mm a a mt m mt a. 

Readln( infile); 


544 


642 


3 


Read In ( infile) ; 


eye 

545 


647 


3 


AV 1 A' m Mmr t A v 

Readln( Infile) ; 


C /. £ 

546 


652 


3 


A A 7 x J ^ J 4 % 

Readln( infile) ; 


547 


£ c 4 

657 


3 


END; 


C AO 

3 Ho 


£ 71 
0/1 


Z 




3Hy 


fi7 1 
O / X 


o 
Z 


17 AD 4 mm A Am* * mmm M fTOz-V 1 £ A/\ 

r UK index : — l TO 16 DO 


C c,a 
33JI 


fine 

00 3 


q 
J 


AAk AB-tfAi Ar*« A> T jf J _ mmmw 7 A^L_, - — ✓ A} \ 

ocntnt [ index ] Chr(JJ) ; 


331 


T1 O 

71 J 


q 
2 


index 1; 


3 jZ 


71 K 
/ 1 3 


q 
2 


T HI T T 17 MA Iff W _ 1 _ f M _ r J 1 V 1 A »«k /> | A - A A L _ A — , — — 

WHILE NOT Eoln( infile) AND (index <- 16) DO BEGIN 


ceo 

553 


7 n n 

723 


3 


Read( infile , ocntnt [ index] ) ; 


CCA 

554 


/ A 

744 


3 


J mmm 1 ^"1 >- A A v 

index : - Succ (index); 


ret 

355 


OAT 

747 


q 

3 


T7*VTTV a 

END; 


c c c 

556 


750 


A 

2 


Readln( infile) ; 


e e t 

557 


755 


q 
2 




c c a 
558 


o c c 

753 


q 
2 


FOR index :■ 1 TO 2? DO 


CCD 

559 


771 


3 


ocity[index] :- Chr(0); 


56? 


799 


2 


index 1; 


561 


8j#l 


2 


m^ Wm %«A AAB ■ ^ m j ■ * a V . fc _ m m m mm mm A> — — - - _ 

WHILE NOT Eo In (infile) AND (index <- 20) DO BEGIN 


562 


814 


3 


Read(infile, ocity( index] ) ; 


563 


830 


3 


index : - Succ ( index) ; 


564 


833 


A 

3 


END; 


e* r* 

565 


836 


A 

2 


O mi mm aa t A v 

Readln( infile) ; 


566 


841 


2 




567 


841 


2 


mm mm mm mm A _ mm mm mm. mm. 

FOR index :- 1 TO 2J7 DO 


568 


855 


3 


ocntry [index] :- Chr(0) ; 


569 


n m A 

883 


2 


index :- 1; 


570 


ft f> c 

885 


A 

2 


WHILE NOT Eoln( infile) AND (index <- 2jJ) DO BEGIN 


571 


898 


3 


f% % J M mt - m r A ■ | . 

Read(lnflle, ocntry [index] ) ; 


c n o 

572 




3 


index Succ (index); 


C "7 1 

573 


917 


A 

3 


END; 


574 


n i ftr 

92? 


A 

2 


Readln( infile) ; 


C ~t C 

575 


925 


o 

2 




C T t" 

576 


i e 

925 


o 

2 


f>*. J1 - /i mfi 1 * mm. 1 ^ Am \ A 

Readln( infile , olat) ; 


577 


937 


2 


Readln ( inf ile , olon) ; 


578 


949 


2 


ReadlnC infile, oalt); 


579 


961 


2 


Close (inf ile); 


58? 


966 


2 


END; 



188 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



583 


0 


1 


{* 


584 


0 


1 


%»c u jjcua ua.ua UIIC user » QaCB f SUHSTJOC illllTl D C1T 


585 


0 


1 


* or Solar "fl_iur i nrlpT afr 


586 


0 

r 


1 


*} 


587 


a 

r 


1 




588 


a 

r 


1 


PROCEDURE GetdatCVAR oath* text V 


589 


0 


1 




590 


0 


1 


CONST 


591 


0D 

r 


1 


disotime » 30000: 


592 


0D 


1 




593 


0D 


1 


VAR 


594 


0D 


1 


choice , choicel . choice2 : intecer: 


595 


-6D 


1 


loopl,loop2 : integer; 


596 


-10D 


1 




597 


-10D 


1 


BEGIN 


598 


0 


2 


REPEAT 


599 


2 


2 


Clrscm(path) ; 


600 


6 


3 


Write Coach. 'Enter prediction month fl - 12^* t ^• 


601 


18 


3 


Pronrot ( nath") : 

i A* VUlK » \ Irfs*- toil 7 • 


602 


21 


3 


Rese t fo&fch) i 


603 


31 


3 




604 


41 


3 


Rewr t r e ^ nafch^ • 


605 


51 


3 


UNTIL ((choicel > 0) AND (choicel < 13)); 


606 


61 


2 


month choicel; 


607 


66 


2 


moneme :— moarray [ choicel ] ; 


608 

r 


84 


2 




609 


84 


2 


REPEAT 


610 


84 


2 


Clrscm(path) ; 


611 


88 


3 


WritelnCcath. 'Enter Drediction month fl - 12V • eholc*l•?^♦ 


612 


108 


3 


Writefoath. 'Enter Drediction davfl - ' TnoTchol r «1 1 • 7 • 0 M« 


613 


149 


3 


Promnt loathe : 


614 


152 


3 


Reset ( oath) • 


615 


162 


3 


Readln(path, choice2); 


616 


174 


3 


Rewrite(path) ; 


617 


184 


3 


UNTIL ((choice2 > 0) AND (choice2 <- mo { choicel])) ; 


618 


210 


2 


day cholce2; 


619 


215 


2 




620 


215 


2 


REPEAT 


621 


215 


2 


Clrscm(path) ; 


622 


219 


3 


Writeln(path f 'Use:'); 


623 


234 


3 


tfriteln(path, '1. Sunspot number'); 


624 


249 


3 


Writeln(path, '2. Solar Flux Index'); 


625 


267 


3 


Write (path, 'Enter 1 or 2: •); 


626 


279 


3 


Pronrot ( oath) : 


627 


282 


3 


ResetC oath"i : 


628 


292 


3 


Readlnf'Dath choice^: 


629 


304 


3 


Rewrite foath^ t 


630 

V w V 


314 


3 

mf 


UNTIL (( choice - 1^ OR ^choice - 2^V 


631 


324 


2 




632 


324 


2 


IF (choice - 1) THEN BEGIN 


633 


330 


3 


REPEAT 


634 


330 


3 


Clrscm(path) ; 


635 


334 


4 


Write(path, 'Enter Zurich Smoothed Sunspot Number (SSN >- 0) : 


636 


348 


4 


Prompt (path) ; 


637 


351 


4 


Reset (path) ; 


638 


361 


4 


Readln ( path , sunspot) ; 


639 


373 


4 


Rewrite(path) ; 


640 


383 


4 


UNTIL (sunsDot > 0.0V 

* V mm 1mm m mm mw*w mm mr m* 1 WF M « 


641 


396 

■J J 


3 

mf 


17 Csunsoor - 0 d"\ THEN 


642 


409 


4 


flux 65 0 


643 


409 

r 


4 


ELSE 


644 


421 


4 


flux ((0.0008 * (sunspot * sunsoot)) + (0.73 * sunspot") + 


645 


456 


3 


Writeln(path , 'Equivalent Solar Flux Index is: *. flux: 3 :0V 


646 


481 


3 


' END 


647 


481 


3 


ELSE BEGIN 


648 


484 


3 


REPEAT 


649 


484 


3 


Clrscrn(nath) : 

mt m^ mm mm m m ^ h# mm M m 


650 


488 


4 


Writefoath 'Enter 10.7cm Solar Flux Index ffltix >« 65V , ^• 


651 


502 




Promot fna th^ i 

m -r-c WIMh mm \ mm mm mm km f * 


652 


505 


4 


Reset(path) ; 


653 

Www 


517 


4 


Reading path flux") t 


654 


533 


4 


Rewrite (path) ; 


655 


543 


4 


UNTIL (flux >- 65.0); 


656 


556 

mf mf W 


3 


IF (flux - 65 0*5 THEN 


657 


569 


4 


sunftoot^ *m 0 Q 


658 


569 


4 


ELSE 


659 


581 

J W X 


4 


sunspot >™ OiJ.)# " ^ ocji . j JaI> « ^0J.)# - rxuxj J y J# 


660 


624 


3 


Writeln(path, 'Equivalent Sunspot Number is: *, sunspot : 3 : 0) ; 


661 


653 


3 


END; 


662 


653 


2 


FOR loopl :- 1 TO 2 DO 


663 


667 


3 


FOR loop 2 :- 1 TO disptime DO; 


664 


711 


2 


END; 



f ); 



*); 




About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . . 

the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have ''really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
oneortwo line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




June 1988 THE RAINBOW 189 



Racksellers 



The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis and 
may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We 
suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 




Birmingham 


Jefferson News Co. 


Brewton 


McDowell Electronics 


Florence 


Anderson News Co. 


Greenville 


M&B Electronics 


Madison 


Madison Books 


Montgomery 


Trade W Books 


Tuscaloosa 


Injun John's, Inc. 


ARIZONA 




V_/(JI l\Jl IWUUU 


n a vv v^rupi nuo 


1 I/O Ur*njf"ici i 
LUKW nUVUoU 






DOOK INOOn 




TDLTCW f"*r»rr*f-u i tore 








^ornpuisr uurary 


lucson 


rvjiaerson inbws ^o. 


ARKANSAS 




Fayetteville 


Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 


Ft. Smith 


Hot Off the Press Newsstand 


Little Rock 


Anderson News Co. 


CALIFORNIA 




Berkeley 


Lyon Enterprises 


Cftrus Heights 


Software Plus 


Grass Valley 


Advance Radio, Inc. 


Holf Moon Bay 


Strawflower Electronics 


Hollywood 


Levity Distributors 




Stef-Jen, Inc. 


LaJolla 


Butler & Mayes Booksellers 


Los Angeles 


Circus of Books (2 Locations) 


Marysville 


Bookland 


Napa 


Bookends Bookstore 


Oakland 


DeLauer's News Agency 


Sacramento 


Deiberfs Readerama 




Tower Magazine 


San Francisco 


Booksmlth 




Bookworks 




Castro Kiosk 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvale 
Torrance 



Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Camino College Bookstore 



COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Glenwood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 

DELAWARE 

Mlddletown 
Newark 
Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COL 

Washington, 
DC 



Aurora Newsstand 

Hathaway's 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Readmore Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 



Delmar Co. 
Newark Newsstand 
Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Clearwater 

Cocoa 

Danla 

Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 



Gainesville 
Jacksonville 
North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Park 
South 

Pasadena 
Starke 

Sunrise 
Tallahassee 



Titusville 



Chronichies 
News Room 
World News, Inc. 

Great American Book Co. 
The Avid Reader 
The Open Door 
Dania News & Books 
Software Plus More 
Bob's News & Book-Store 
Clarks Out of Town News 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 

Almar Bookstore 
Boyd-Ebert Corp, 
Anderson News Co, 
Wolf's Newsstand 

Poling Place Bookstore 
Record Junctioa Inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Sunn/s at Sunset 
Anderson News Co. 
Du Bey's News Center 
Computrac 



GEQDGIA 
OEvKVIn 




Attn ntn 

nl IUI II U 


Rnrrier'c 

□UIUOI 0 


R rnmon 
Pi Ol 1 lol 1 


Rramort r-lia/^tronlr^/RnHIo QKnr^l/ 


FVwA<rt PnrV 


Fl Icirc Wdwic (""enter 


leu in 


Rnrilo Rhnpk 

1 \ V_J V—I \J ) lUV/n 


Thomasville 


Smokehouse Newsstand 


Toccna 


Martin Musir Radio Shack 

IV IV*41 Ml | IVIUwIw l\WUlw wl l^lw^ 


IDAHO 




Boise 


Book Shelf, Inc. 


Moscow 


Johnson News Agency 


ILLINOIS 

ILLIIVVIO 






oottwuio or oyoTerns 


Champaign 


Bookmark 


Chicago 


B. Dalton Booksellers 


Decatur 


Book Emporium 




K-Marf Plaza 




Northgate Mall 


East Motlne 


Book Emporium 


Evanston 


Norris Center Bookstore 


Kewanee 


Book Emporium 


Lisle 


Book Nook 


Lombard 


Empire Periodicals 


Newton 


Bill's TV Radio Shack 


Paris 


Book Emporium 


Peoria 


Book Emporium 




Sheridan Village 




Westlake Shopping Center 




Illinois News Service 


Springfield 


Book Emporium 




Sangamon Center North 




Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 


Sunnyland 


Book Emporium 


West Frankfort 


Paper Race 


Wheeling 


North Shore Distributors 


INDIANA 




Angolo 


D & D Electronics 




Radio Shack 



Berne 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

Crawfordsville 

Dyer 

Franklin 

Ft. Wayne 

Garrett 

Indianapolis 



Lebanon 
Martinsville 
Richmond 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Des Moines 
Fairfield 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson 
Topeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Hopkinsville 

Louisville 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 
New Orleans 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Oxford 

Sanford 



White Cottage Electronics 
Book Comer 

Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 
Koch's Books 
Miles Books 
Gallery Book Shop 
Michlana News Service 
Finn News Agency, Inc. 
Bookland, Inc. 
Borders Bookshop 
Delmar News 
Indiana News 
Southside News 
Gallery Book Shop 
Rodio Shack 

Voyles News Agency, Inc. 
Mirting's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 
mockery's Books, Inc. 
Kramers Books 8c Gifts 

Crossroads, Inc. 

Palmer News, Inc. 

Town Crier of Topeka, Inc. 

Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 

Lloyd's Radio 

» 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Matfs News & Gifts 
Hobby Shop 

Hawley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 
Radio Shack 

City News Stand 

Sidney's News Stand Uptown 

The Book Rack 



Magazines, Inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Books-N-Thlngs 
Radio Shack 



Cambridge 

Ipswich 

Uttieton 

Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Harrison 

Hillsdale 

Holland 

Muskegon 

Niies 

Perry 

Riverview 

Roseville 

MINNESOTA 

Burnsville 

Crystal 

Edina 

Minneapolis 
Minnetonka 
Roseville 
St Paul 



Willmar 

MISSOURI 

Famnington 
Rat River 
Florissant 
Jefferson CJty 
Kirksville 
St. Louis 
St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Butte 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Keene 
Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 
Cedar Knolls 
Clinton 
Pennsville 
Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 
Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmlra Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Falls 
Huntington 
Johnson City 
New York 



MARYLAND 

College Park University Bookstore 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston Eastern Newsstand 

Brockton Voyager Bookstore 



Out Of Town News 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak, Inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 
Border's Book Shop 
Robbins Electronics 
Merit Book Center 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Electronics Express/Radio Shack 
Fris News Company 
The Eight Bit Corner 
Michlana News Service 
Perry Computers 
Riverview Book Store 
New Horizons Book Shop 

Shinder's Burnsville 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Shinder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shinder's Ridge Square 
Shinder's Roseville 
Shinder's Annex 
Shinder's Maplewood 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Rcr/s TV & Radio Shack 
Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Book Emporium 
Bailey's TV & Radio 

Plaza Books 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Bookcellar 

Hurley Electronics 

Steve's Books & Magazines 

Radio Shack Associate Store 

Bookwrights 

Verham News Corp, 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 
Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 
Software Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 

Village Green-Buffalo Books 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Cromland, Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Une: Computer Access Center 

GAWest&Co. 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicom Electronics 

Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eostern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station, Track 37 

200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1 ) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
idle Hours Bookstore 
Internationol Smoke Shop 
Jonll Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Walden Books 
World Wide Media Services 



190 THE RAINBOW June 1988 



NEW YORK (cont'd) 

Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhaven 



Universal Computer Service 
Village Green 
World Wide News 
Spectrum Projects 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Cay 

Chapel Hill 

Charlotte 

Hickory 

Jacksonville 

Kemersvllle 

Marion 

Winston-Salem 

OHIO 

Akron 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbiana 

Columbus 



Dayton 



Dublin 
Fdirbom 

Flndley 
Kent 

Lakewood 
Lima 

Miamisburg 

Parma 

Toledo 

Warren 

Xenla 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 
Altoona 
BrynMawr 
Cony 

Feasterville 
King of Prussia 
Malvern 
Reading 
Temple 
West Chester 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 



News Center In Cary Village 
University News & Sundry 
Newsstand Infl 
C 3 Books & Comics 
Mlchele's, Inc. 
K&S Newsstand 
Boomers Rhythm Center 
K&S Newsstand (3 Locations) 
Rainbow News Ltd. 

Churchill News & Tobacco 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Cinsoft 

Erieview News 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

B6 Software 

Micro Center 

The Newsstand 

Books & Co. 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wllke News 

Wright News & Books 

Book Bam 

News-Readers 

Wllke's University Shoppe 

Open Book 

The News Shop 

Lakewood International News 

Edu-Caterers 

Witke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Rne Print Books 

Plaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, Iric dba Radia Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store, Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owl Services 

Newborn Enterprises 

Bryn Mawr News 

Corry Books & Cords 

Global Books 

Gene's Books 

Personal Software 

Smith's News & Card Center 

Software Corner 

Chester County Book Co, 

Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Tollgate Bookstore 



Newport 


Bellevue News 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Charleston Hts. 


Software Haus, Inc. 


Clemson 


Clemson Newsstand 


Florence 


Ray's #1 


Greenville 


Palmetto News Co 


Spartanburg 


Software City 


TENNESSEE 




Brentwood 


Bookworid #5 


Chattanooga 


Anderson News Co. 


Guild Books & Periodicals 


Dickson 


Highland Electronics 


Knoxvflle 


Anderson News Co. 




Davis-Kidd Bookseller 


Memphis 


Computer Center 


Nashville 


Davis-Kidd Booksellers 




Mosko's Place 




R.M. Mllis Bookstore 


Smyrna 


Delker Electronics 


TEXAS 




Big Spring 


Poncho's News 


Desoto 


Maxwell Books 


Elgin 


The Homing Pigeon 


Harilngton 


Book Mark 


UTAH 




Provo 


Valley Book Center 



VIRGINIA 

Danville 

Hampton 

Norfolk 

Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Port Angeles 
Seattle 

Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 
South 
Charleston 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Kenosha 
Madison 

Milwaukee 
Waukesha 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Klngsford 

CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Falrvlew 

Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hlnton 
innisfall 
Lecombe 
Leduc 
Lethbridge 
Lloydminster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 

Stettler 

Strathmore 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetaskiwln 



K&S Newsstand 

Benders 

\-0 Computers 

Turn The Page 

Volume I Bookstore 

Port Book & News 
Adams News Co., Inc. 
Bulldog News 
B & I MagozJnes & Books 
Nybbles'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Spring Hill News 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
R.K. News, Inc. 
Pic A Book 
University Bookstore 
Juneau Village Reader 
Holt Variety 



Information Telecommunicationes 



Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radb Shack 
Paul Tercier 

Double "D" A.S.C Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shack, asd 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
A.S.C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack, ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 

Jim Cooper 

L & S Stereo 

Brian's Electronics 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 

Datatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's Electronics 
Stettler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Burnaby 
Bums Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chllliwack 
Coquitlam 



Compulit 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 
Cody Books LTD 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Coortero^ 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Langley 
Nelson 
New West- 
minster 
Parksville 
Penticton 

Sidney 
Smlthers 
Squamlsh 
Vancouver 



100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altona 

Lundar 

Morden 

The Pas 

Selkirk 

vlrden 

Winnipeg 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood 
Carbonear 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsvifle 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 
Vllle St. Gabriel 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assiniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tisdate 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



(confd) 

Rick's. Music &. Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesoft Marketing 
Langley Radio Shack 
Oliver's Books 

Cody Books LTD 
Parksville TV 
D.J.'s 

Four Comer Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 
Active Components 
Friendlyware Computers 
Granville Book Co. 
Siliconnectlons Books LTD 

Tip Top Radio & TV 

LA Wlebr Ltd. 
Goranson Elec 
Central Sound 
Jodl's Sight & Sound 
G.L Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Ltd. 

Jeffries Enterprises 
DewittElec 



Seaport Elec. 
Slade Realties 



Atlantic News 

Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Mocleane & Sons 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Huntsville Elec. 

Donny "B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Messageries de Press© Benjamin Enr. 

Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Gliles Corneau Enr/Radb Shack 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H&O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 
Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles — in Canada, Waldenbooks, Pickwick 
Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & 
Brentano's, and Community Newscenters. 



June 1988 THE RAINBOW 191 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



A to Z Unlimited 177 

After Five Software 61 

Alpha Products 21 

Alpha Software Technologies 105 

Bob's Software 69 

Bu rke & Bu rke . , , . 1 75 

Cer-Comp > -.>■ .... .75, 77 

Cinsoft .....33 

CJN Enterprises > . . ..165 

Clearbrook Software 

Group 61 

CoCo Cat Anti Drug 117 

CocoTech 69 

Cognitec 29 

Colorware .18, 19, 22, 23 

Computer Center .............. 55 

Computer Island 85 

Computer Plus H . « . . .3 

Computerware 73 

D.P. Johnson . . . . . . . . *.->■* , ♦ ♦ , , .181 

Datamatch, Inc. . , , 97 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc. .......130, 131 

Delphi 50,51 

Diecom ..IFC 

Disto/CRC 39 

Electronic Energy Control 135 

Frank Hogg Laboratory . . . . .44, 45 

Fraser Instrument > . . . ... .177 

GEnie ............... .65 

Gimmesoft 115 

Granite Computer Systems . . . . .87 

Hard Drive Specialists 121 

Hawkes Research 

Services ....... .*••*. .....113 

HJL Products IBC 

Howard Medical .... 66, 194 

J & R Electronics 33 

K """""" S (3 F*T" •».«««.. ....j. . 1 23 

KLC Software . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 61 

Metric Industries . . . , f . .49 

Micro Works, The . . * * . .95 

Microcom Software 9, 11, 13, 15, 17 
Microtech Consultants 

Inc 137 



MicroWorld..... 107 

Other Guys CoCo, The 91 

Owl-Ware ......151, 152, 153 

Performance Peripherals 147 

Perry Computers 185 

Preble's Programs, Dr. , » . BC 

PXE Computing 7 

R.A.D. Products 1 23 

R.G.B. Computer Systems 87 

Rainbow Binder 172 

Rainbow Bookshelf 162 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 101 

Rainbow Introductory 

Guide to Statistics 100 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk .... .58 

Rainbow Adventure Book III 40 

RAM Electronics 93 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



RTB Software 113 

Sardis Technologies 183 

SD Enterprises .27, 25 

Softbyte 67 

SpectroSystems 47 

Speech Systems 178, 179 

SPORTSWARE 165 

Sugar Software , 1 93 

Sundog Systems 41 

T&DSoftware 124,125,143 

Tandy/Radio Shack 1 1 8, 1 1 9 

Tepco 155 

Tomela & Co 57 

True Data Products 62, 63 

Vidicom Corporation ......... J 71 

Woodstown Electronics 31 

Zebra Systems 59 



□ 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 




192 THE RAINBOW June 1988 




ffarare 



Special: Calligro.pher font set #7 - Five new small fonts 
(this is "Roman"). $18.50 - Specify tape/disk; 0S9/RSD0S. 
Deduct $5 on ANY additional program thru Mas 31, 1988. 



CALLI GRAPH ER 

CoCo Calllgrapher - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) 
Turn your CoCo and dot/matrix printer 
into a calligrapher's quill. Make beautiful 
invitations, flyers, certificates, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are % 
inch high and variably spaced. Works 
with many printers including Epson, 
Gemini, Radio Shack, Okidata 92A, Ba- 
nana and Pro writer. Additional fonts are 
available (see below). Tape /Disk; $24.05. 

OS9 Calllgrapher - (Q Although a 
different program from the CoCo Calli- 
grapher, the OS9 Calligrapher prints all 
the same fonts. It reads a standard text 
file which contains text and formatting 
directives. You may specify the font to 
use, change fonts at any time, centering, 
left, right or full justification, line fill, 
margin, line width, page size, page break 
and indentation. Similar to iroff on 
UNIXlM systems. Includes Gay Nineties, 
Old English and Cartoon fonts. Addition- 
al fonts are available (see below). Disk 
only; OS9 Level I or II; $24.95. 

Calllgrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $14.95 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - (8 fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
way; Set #3 - (8 fonts) Antique and 
Business; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West 
and Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, 
Hebrew and Victorian; Set #8- (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; specify 
RSDOS or OS9; 29.95: Font Package #1 
- Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 fonts) 
on one disk. Font Package #2 - Above 
font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on one 
disk. Both Packages #1 and #2 (51 
fonts) on one disk; 49.95. 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Every- 
thing!] specify RSDOS or OS9; Includes 
the Calligrapher and both Font Pack- 
ages on two disks; $69.95. 



UTILITIES 

Plratector- (ioo%ml) Utility to allow your 
own disk-based BASIC or ML programs 
to display a graphics title screen and then 
self-start after loading. Adds copy protec- 
tion to your programs but still allows 
users to create non- executable backups! In- 
cludes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo 1, 2, 3 
(except Semigraf); $39.95. 

Super Screen Machine - (ioo% ML) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. 
Smooth scroll, key click, lower case with 
colored characters. Tape /Disk; 32K .CB; 
CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except 64K mode); $19.95. 



Color Disk Manager - (ioo%ml) Disk util- 
ity with these features: Disk repair, selec- 
tive track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except for 64K 
mode); $24.95. 

Color Tape Manager - (ioo% ML) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert ML programs into DATA state- 
ments, append ML to BASIC, much 
more! Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 
3 (except for 64K mode); $19.95. 

OS9 Patcher- (Q Display and modify the 
contents of a file or memory module. 
Hexidecimal, decimal and ASCII modes. 
Search feature. Calculates module CRCs; 
Generates patch command files. Disk 
only; OS9 Level I or II; $19.95. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (Hybrid basic/ml) Tape or disk, 
fast and simple general data base pro- 
gram. Create files of records that can be 
quickly sorted, searched, deleted and up- 
dated. Powerful printer formatting. Up 
'to 8 user fields, sort on up to 3 fields. 
Tape/Disk; $19*95 (see combo pkg 
below). 

TIMS Mail - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape or 
Disk based mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with - TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 
1, 2 or 3 across, 2V6 to 4 inches wide. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95 (see combo pkg 
below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Utility 
companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail to 
allow multi-term search (AND and OR 
logic), global change and delete, split 
large files and more! Tape /Disk; $14.95 
(see combo pkg below). 



TIMS Combo Package - All three of 
the above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail 
and TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.95. 



SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer, Disk only; $19.95 each. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Trig Attack - (ioo95ML) Ages 9 and up. In 
this educational arcade game, enemy trigs 
travel along math curves. Players learn 
important mathematical concepts as they 
play. Sound effects, colorful graphics. 
Excellent manual Includes an introduc- 
tion to trigonometry. Tape 16K CB/Disk 
32K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3; $19.95. 



Silly Syntax - (Hybrid basic/ml) Ages 5 
and up. Story creation game; output to 
screen or printer; includes 2 stories or 
create your own. Tape /Disk; $19.95 or 
disk with 62 stories for $29.95. Sets of 10 
stories on tape/disk for $4.95: Fairy 
Tales, Current Events, X-Rated, Sing- 
Along, Adventure, Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
basic/ml) Ages 4 & up. A graphics ad- 
venture game for young children & their 
families. Old testament. Tape /Disk; 
$19.95. 

The Presidents of the USA - (ioo%ML) 
Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, user 
modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 and up. Trivia 
game of the 50 states. Capitals, nick- 
names, abbreviations, flowers, trees and 
birds. Tape /Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist to the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word 
vocabulary. Tape/Disk; 16KECB; $19.95. 

PreReader - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 3-5 
(level I); Ages 5-7 (level 2); Great graph- 
ics and music. Level 1: match colors, 
shapes, letters and numbers; Level 2: 
match letters and consonant blends with 
their sounds. Tape /Disk; Joystick; 
$19.95. 

Statgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
rint graph with screen print program 
not supplied); Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
pense categories. This program may be tax 
deductible. Disk only; $29.95. 

Radio Systems Design. Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations com- 
monly used in design or evaluation of 
land mobile radio systems, satellite TV, 
etc. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or SeMn Sleeve; 3 
weights or yarn; 8 sizes from baby to 
man. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

Flying Tigers - (ioo%ml) Fast Defenders 
style arcade game. 5 levels of difficulty; 
Outstanding graphics and sound effects. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $19.95. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
Sf Al 













mmmmm 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and S, SSK 
Extended Bane, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.60 per tape or disk for shipping and han- 
dling. Florida residents add Z% aales tax. COD 
orders add $5. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders 
generally shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds 
or exchaages without prior authorization. 



FAX Order Number 



Corporate/School: (312)278-9513 






The DC-4 Is a scaled-down version of the popular DC- 
2 without a parallel port. It includes a switch with 2 ROM 
sockets, J DOS, manual and such features as gold 
connectors and metal box. It accesses double sided 
drives and accepts RSDOS 1.1 for Radio Shack compat- 
ibility 



$65 




($2 Shipping) 




RS 1.1 R.S. ROM Chip $25 

DC-2 ^ 




$98 



J6YM Disk Controller with parallel 
port/Hard Drive expansion bus 
makes a revival with the CoCo 3. 



($2 Shipping) 



DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 
DRIVE 0 



DD-3 MP! drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only. Add $34 for a Disto DC-3 replacement. ($5 •hipping) 

|1 _■ MJ ■ r DOUBLE SIDED 

s 178 45 s bledens,ty ^4 




Separate Disk Drive Components 

DD-3 An MPI 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



$98 



(S2shipping) DRIVE ONE 



NEW FROM DISTO $129 



DC6 

($2 Shipping) 

Super Controller (( works with CoCo 1, 2 & 3, It buffers keyboard input so 
that no keystrokes are lost when disk is reading or writing. Especially useful 
with OS-9, but also works with BASIC. 



TEAC 55B bare drive, Va height, double-sided, double density with 
all mounting hardware, needs CA-2 below to fit R.S. 501. 



$118 



(«2 shipping) 



BARE 



sp-c 

Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial output to run 
a parallel printer like Star or Epson, Includes all cables. Add $10 for 
modem attachment. ($2 shipping) 45 



CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to the drive. 

CA-2 




One Drive 



$29 95 

Two Drive 



ft 



GUARANTEE — Howard Medical s 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try 
it out, test it for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for 
any reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your 
money back (less shipping). 




This space could feature YOUR Hardware Project. Call Chike at HMC for details. 



WORD PACK RS 
BASIC SCREEN EDITOR 

• Looks like Atari screen editor 

• Works on CoCo 1, 2 & 3 

• Now with 80 column support 

MYDOS by Chris Hawks 

• Simplify your directory 

• Accesses double sided drives 

• Use J&M Printer Port on CoCo 3 

CoCo MAX by Colorware 

• Specify II or III 

• Includes high res interface 

• Animation 

• Printers supported include, R.S. 105, 106, 130: Star: & Epson 




$49 

$19.95 




$78.45 

('2 shipping on software) 



MONITORS 



$499 



Regular *695 
(51 5 shipping) 



Sony KV-1311CR 

• Vivid Color 

• Vertically flat 13" screen 

• Monitor/Trinitron TV with remote control 

• 640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot 
pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and composite 
inputs 

• VCR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 

$88 

12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 350 lines . . 

resolution at 20 MHz on a dark glass anti-glare CRT snipping) 
with built-in audio and 1 year warranty. 

7652 Green Screen • Same Specs • Same Price 




MAGNA VOX 7622 




20 MEG HARD DRIVE 



$499 

($9 Shipping) 




• pre-lnstalled, formatted and ready to run 

• equivalent to 125 R.S. 501 's on line 

• Includes Western Digital WD1002-WK1 Controller 

• and Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 

• will also work with IBM & clones 




• complete package includes 20 meg drive, case & power supply, controller and Interface 
that plugs into slot #3 of multipack interface. 

* l year warranty 



IC- driver lets you access this hard drive without need for OS-9 $49.95 




oward Medical Computers 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



90 N. Elston 

INQUIRIES AND ORDER 

(312) 278-1440 



Chicago, IL 60622 

R STATUS | 

-1440 ===== 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sal. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 



C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO.'S 



Shipping charges are for 48 states. 
APO and Canada order slightly Jllfllwd 



The Professional 
Color Computer 



Enhancements 
for Productivity 
from HJL Products 








7 

t 1 I 1 P' ■ . i l » 






For peak performance with any computer, 
you have to get information into and out 
of the system as easily as possible. 

This is the purpose of the HJL family of 
professional enhancements for ALL 
MODELS of the Color Computer, 
including CoCo 3. 



The Self-contained 
ProCase-57 Keyboard • $79.95 

It's the popular HJL keyboard perfectly 
fitted into Its own sleek, low-profile 
case. Put your CoCo on a shelf or hang 
it on the side of your desk. ProCase-57 
comes with 5-foot cable; installs in 
just a few minutes with no soldering. 

The HJL-57 

Keyboard Kit - $59.95/69.95 

Overwhelming favorite of serious CoCo 
users worldwide, the HJL-57 keyboard 
provides the smooth consistent feel and 
reliability you need for maximum speed 
with minimum input errors. Installs in 
your color computer without soldering. 
Just $59.95 for Original or F-verslon. 
Kits for CoCo 2 and CoCo 3 are $69.95. 

The NumberJack Keypad - $59.95 

A self-contained numeric keypad for 
serious number-crunching. Besides the 



numbers, it has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, Including autoshifted 
ADD and MULTIPLY. Includes cable and 
connectors for solderless installation. 

The Monitor Adapter - $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors. Easily installed 
without clips, jumpers or soldering 
(except some CoCo 2s with soldered-ln 
video chips). Here's crisp, flicker-free 
monitor output with all the reliability 
you've come to expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor- $99.95 

Our high-resolution amber monitor gives 
you the display preferred by most 
computer pros. Once you've used It, 
you'll never go back to the TV set. 
12-inch CRT has etched non-glare face- 
plate. (Requires adapter sold above) 

Quick Basic Plus - $1 9.95 

High-performance programming aid works 
with any CoCo that has 4 function keys. 
25 one-touch BASIC statements, 10 user- 
defined macros at a time (save as many 
sets of macros as you like), auto Hne- 
numberlng, instant screen dump to 
printer, and global search, make this 
software ideal for any BASIC programmer. 
Specify disk or cassette. 



Ordering information: specify model (Original, F-verelon, or CoCo 2 Model Number). Payment by c,0,D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa. Credit card customers Include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2.00 for 
shipping, 3.60 to Canada; except monitors {call for shipping charges before ordering monitors). New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax. Dealer Inquiries Invited 



The Softswitch - $89.95 

Connect any two parallel printers to one 
computer; select printers manually or 
insert a simple printer code in the text 
to be printed for fully-automatic, all 
solid-state switching. Complete with 
three cables and operating instructions. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive HJL 
15-day unconditional guarantee (except 
software). 

Pick a Pair and Save 1 5% 

Take 15% off the price of any two or 
more products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 



Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1*800-462-4891 
Internationa) calls: 716*235-8358 



mm 



PRODUCT 





Div. of Touchstone Technology Inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 





1 1 1 
1 I 1 
Itl 




Br. treble's ftroaram* 

For Color Computer Software 
Since 1983 




Dear Friends, 

Thank yoa. 1988 marks our 
fifth year of providing qcrality 
software for the Color cotttputer. 
Only yocrr support has made it 
p033ifcle. So, from our heart3. Peg 
and I thank you And rememJber our 
promise --If you buy it from U3, we 
support it. If you are unhappy for 
any reason, 3end it back for a full 
refund within 30 days of purchase. 

Pyramix 

This f actuating CoCo 3 gam* 
continues to be one of our best 
sellers. Pyramix is 100% machine 
language written exclusively to take 
advantage of all the power in your 
128K CoCo 3- The Colors are 
brilliant, the graphics sharp, the 
action fast. Written by Jordon 
T3vetkoff and a product of Color- 
Venture. 

The Freedom Series 

Vocal Freedom 

I've got to admit, this is one 
nifty computer program Vocal 
Freedom turx\3 your computer into a 
digital voice or sound recorder. 

The optional Hacker s Pac lets 
you incorporate voices or sounds 
that you record into your own 
BASIC or ML programs. Tin 3 i3 not 
a synthesizer. Sounds are digitized 
directly into computer memory so 
that voices or sound effects sound 
very natural. One "off-the-shelf" 
application for Vocal Freedom is an 
automatic message -minder. Record 
a message for your family into 
memory. Set Vocal Freedom on 
automatic. When Vocal Freedom 
"hears" any noise in the room, it 



plays the pre-recorded message! 
Disk operations are supported VF 
also tests memory to take advantage 
of from 64K up to a full 51 2K Re- 
quires low cost amplifiler (RS cat. 
°277-1008) and any microphone. 

Mental Freedom 

Would your friends be impressed 
if your computer could read their 
minds? Mental Freedom uses the 
techniques of Biofeedback to 
control video game action on the 
screen. Telekinesis? Yes, you con- 
trol the action with your thoughts 
and emotions And, oh yes, it talk3 
in a perfectly natural voice without 
using a speech synthesiser! 
Requires Radio Shack '3 low co3t 
Biofeedback monitor. Cat. *63~6?5. 

BASIC Freedom 

Do you ever type in BASIC 
programs —manually, I mean. If you 
do, you know it can be a real chore. 
Basic Freedom changes all that It 
gives you a full screen editor just 
like a word processor, but for 
BASIC programs. Once loaded in, it 
is always on-line. It hides invis- 
ibly until you call it forth with a 
single keypress! This program 13 a 
must for programers or anyone who 
types in programs. By Chris 
Babcock and a product of Color - 
Venture. 

Lightning Series 

These three utilities give real 
power to your CoCo 3. 

Ramdisk Lightning 

This is the best Ramdisk 
available. It lets you have up to 4 
mechanical disk drives and 2 Ram 
drives on-line and is fully compat- 
ible with our printer spooler below. 

Printer Lightning 

Load it and forget it --except for 
the versatility it gives you. Never 
wait for your printer again! Printer 
rem? at high speed while you 
continue to work at the keyboard! 

Backup Lightning 

This utility requires 51 2K. Reads 
your master disk once and then 



make3 superfast multiple di3k 
backups on all your dirves! No 
need to format blank disks first! 
Supports 35, 40 or 80 track drives. 

Prices 

CoCo 3 only 

Ram Disk Lightning, Disk $1 9-95 

Printer Lightning Disk $1 9 95 

Backup Lightning, Disk $1 9 95 

All three. Disk $49.95 

Pyramix, Di3k $24.95 

CoCo 1,2, or 3 

Vocal Freedom Disk $34.95 

Vocal Freedom Hackers Pac... $14. 9 5 

CoCo 2 or 3 only 

Mental Freedom, Disk $24.95 

Basic Freedom, Disk $24.95 

CoCo 1 or 2 only 

VDOS, The Undisk, ramdisk for the 

CoCo 1 or 2 only. Tape $24.95 

VDUMP, backup Undi3k files to 

3ingle tape file, Tape $14 95 

VPRINT, Print Undi3k directory. 
Tape $9-95 

Everyone 

Add $2.50 shipping/ handling 

in vsA or cjuoma 

Add $5.00 to ship to other 
countries 

Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 4022 6 

[24 Hour Hot Line 
(502) 969 1616 



Visa, MC, COD, Check