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April 1988 



Canada $4.95 U.S. $3.95 




® 



THE COOK COMPUTE? MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



The Home Manager 



Plana 

Monthly 

Budget 



Compare 
Investment 
and Financing 
Alternatives 







Recipe Filing 



Minim 



Plus: 





A Mini Word 
Processor 



Auto 

Maintenance 
Scheduling 



Safeguard 
Your Valuables 



o 



44254 l! 00001 



04 



Guild of the Kingmaker, PALETTEable 
Color Mixing, Technical Q&A, 
1 0 New Product Reviews, and More! 







1 






1 





1 



1 



v^lci u.s- 




5££ 



$&3 



; 95 can- 




1- y 



rates 





SEE 8/lCK COVER 
FOR OTHER DIECOM GAMES 



r 
i 



omputer 




OU 





IG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 HX 1 Drive 256K 539.00 
Tandy 1000 TX 1 Drive 640K 889.00 
Tandy 1000 SX 1 Drive 384K 649.00 
Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 512K 899.00 
Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg. Ram1959.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 169.00 
Radio Shack DMM30A 120 CPS 279.00 
Radio Shack DMP-440 300 CPS 539.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel349.00 
Tandy LP-1000 Laser Printer 1699.00 
Star Micronics NX-1000 144 CPS 229.00 
Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 359.00 
Panasonic M080i 144 CPS 199.00 
Panasonic P-1091i 194 CPS 229.00 
Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 349.00 
Okidata 182+ 144 CPS 259.00 
Okidata 192 + 200 CPS 359.00 
Okidata 292 240 CPS 479.00 



MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Practical Peripheral 2400 Baud 229.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-143-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Interface 89.00 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 14,95 
CM-8 6' Extension Cable 19.95 
Serial to Parallel Conv. 59.95 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 329.00 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 99.00 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

Flight 16 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 



COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 
COCO Max III by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTerm by PXEComputing29.95 39.95 
TelePatch III by Spectrum 29.95 
TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 
TefeWriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo3512KRamDiskbyCerComp 19.95 
Home Publisher by Tandy (CoCo3)35.95 
Sub Battle Sim. by Epyx (CoCo3) 26.95 
Thexder by Sierra (CoCo3) 22.45 
Kings Quest Itl by Sierra (CoCo3) 31.45 
Flight Sim. II by SubLogic (CoCo3)31.45 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71.95 
OS-9 Development System 89.95 
Multi-View by Tandy 44.95 
VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 





P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 





F 




42 




■ 



20 

Operation ^ 
Child Protect 

James A. Upperman 
Generate a form to grant 
authorization for the medical 
treatment of a minor 

28 

Good Things Are^ 
Cookin' on CoCo 

Brad Spencer 

A database for all your 

old family recipes 

58 




34 

Financial ^ 
Time Conversions 

Dale Tinklepaugh 

A "personal finance tool box" 

to manage your resources 

Home *w 

Inventory Manager 

Bill Tottingham 

Keep track of your valuables 

and their I.D. numbers 

Color ^ 
Correspondent 

Arthur S. Hallock 

A mini word processor for 

your letter-writing needs 

58 

CoCo's Auto ^ 

Maintenance 

Manager 

Larry Anderson 

Keep maintenance schedules 

for up to five vehicles 



86 _ 

Guild of ^ 
the Kingmaker 

Scott Miller and 
Mike Cushing 
It's medieval mayhem as 
guildmasters battle It out 



April 1988 
Vol. VII No. 9 

Easy as Pie ^ 

Raymond Lueders 
Help for the amateur 
BASIC programmer 

112 ^ 

The Home ^ 
Financial Analyst 

Daniel Piersma 
Tax time help for organizing 
income, expenses and 
banking accounts 





124 



124 

PALETTEable^ 
Color Mixing 

H. Allen Curtis 

A utility to make color 

selection easier 




4 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 




72 

Backup and Restore 

Carl England 

73 

Undercover CoCo 

David Compton 

74 

CoCo Caliber 

Brian DeMarco 

74 

A CoCo Pop-Up 
Calendar 

Fred Kolesar 

75 

High-Tech Quilting Bee 

Bernice M. Shoobs 



g5^r The cassette tape/disk sym- 
bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on Page 41. 



Departm e nts 



Advertisers Index 

Back Issue 
Information 



.192 

.103 
. 18 



CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 14, 30 

Letters to Rainbow 6 

Maxwell Mouse 44 

One-Liner 123 

One-Liner Contest 
Information 164 

Racksellers 190 

Rainbow Info 10 

Received & Certified 140 

Scoreboard 76 

Scoreboard 

Pointers 78 

Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 162 

Subscription Info 16 



Columns 



80 

BASIC Training 

Joseph Kolar 

Typing down memory lane 

16 

Building April's Rainbow 

Jutta Kapfhammer 
Managing Editor's notes 

142 

CoCo Consultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

157 

Delphi Bureau 

Cray Augsburg 
Database downloads, and 
Hutchison's database report 

149 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

70 . 

Education Notes 

Steve Blyn 

Presidential election preview 



12 

PRINT#-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's notes 

154 

Turn of the Screw 

Tony DiStefano 
Build a half-megabyte 
ROM disk 

146 

Wishing Well % 

Fred Scerbo 
Revising the reservoir 



1 Rainbow teefr 



170 

Barden s Buffer ^ 

William Barden, Jr. 
Hands-on Hers hey 

160 . 

KISSable OS-9 

Dale L. Puckett 
New tools, new toys 



' Product R e vi e ws 



Avatex 1200e/C/nsoft 

Banker U/J&R Electronics 

Chemistry TutorM to Z Unlimited 

CoCo Max 1 1 I/Co/or ware 

CoCo XT/Burke & Burke 



ColorVenture RAMdisk/Dr. Preble's Programs 
The Director/SEESOF 



Flight Sim {/Tandy Corporation 
GrafFind Rainy Day Software _ 



Phantomgraph/Tanc/y Corporation 



.134 
.133 
.136 
.129 
.137 
.138 
.138 
.135 
.137 
.135 



THE RAINBOW Is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 
phone (502) 228-4492. THE RAINBOW, RAINBOWfest and THE RAINBOW and 
RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered *> trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705- 
050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 386, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding Postage Guaranteed. 
Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada 
Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by FALSOFT, Inc., 
1 988. THE RAINBOW is Intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers 
and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of 
information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use 
is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, 
without warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color 
BASIC and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • 
Subscriptions to THE rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian 
rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. 
All subscriptions begin with next available issue. * Limited back issues are 
available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment 
accepted by VISA, MasterCard, American Express, cash, check or money order 
in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/ 
1 2ths the subscription amount after two issues are mailed. No refund after 
mailing of three or more magazines. 



The Rainbow 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Jody Gilbert 

Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 

Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 

Copy Editor Lauren Willoughby 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, 
Ed Ellers 

Editorial Assistants Sue H. Evans, 
Wendy Falk, Toni Frank, 
Monica Wheat 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Robert Hatfield, Jr., 
Denise Webb 



Typesetter Jody Doyle 



Falsoft, Inc. 



President Lawrence 0. Falk 
General Manager Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst. to the Publisher 

Sarah Levin 
Executive Editor James E. Reed 
Editorial Director John Crawley 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Production Coordinator 

Cynthia L. Jones 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Guashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Representative 

Beverly Beardon 
Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 
Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 
Director of Production Jim Cleveland 
Dispatch Tony Olive, Sharon Smith 
Business Assistant Laurie Falk 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, 
see Page 192 



Cover illustration copyright © 1986 
by Fred Crawford 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 5 



Incentive to Upgrade 

Editor: 

I have been a fairly regular reader of THE 
rainbow since May of 1986, just a month 
or two after buying a 16K CoCo 2. I have 
since "graduated" to a CoCo 3 (128K) and 
added a printer. Hopefully, 111 be adding a 
disk drive next month. (I've been ordering 
hardware and software from advertisers in 
THE rainbow, with excellent results!) 

I want to commend all of your staff for 
a most helpful magazine! I save each issue, 
as I want to be able to refer to articles and 
programs from time to time. For example, 
when 1 first started reading it, I could not 
use any program that required more than 
16K standard BASIC (with cassette file 
storage only). So when I acquired my CoCo 
3, I had a large assortment of "brand new" 
programs to type in! This situation will 
repeat itself, obviously, when I have a disk 
drive! So, I don't get discouraged when a 
program I especially like is beyond my 
present system capabilities — it just gives me 
added incentive to upgrade! Hopefully, 
other readers feel the same way. 

One thing that has caused me some con- 
cern is Radio Shack's dropping of some 
CoCo accessories — the CCR-82 cassette 
recorder, the S/S cartridge and the RS-232 
Program Pak (for communications) come to 
mind. The RS-232 Pak is the easiest way (for 
me) to connect my Modemfone 100 to the 
CoCo — although I have made an adapter 
to connect it directly to the serial port. I have 
had lots of fun with the Sound/ Speech 
cartridge in connection with Fred Scerbo's 
programs in "The Wishing Well." I hope that 
there will be enough such programs in the 
future to make Radio Shack consider restor- 
ing that accessory to its catalogs. Perhaps if 
enough of us rainbow readers (and other 
CoCo users!) contacted Radio Shack about 
the various discontinued items, Radio 
Shack would at least consider making them 
once again available. 

Bill Swartz 
Washington, D.C. 

Controlling the Controller 

Editor: 

I recently purchased an appliance and 
light controller for the Color Computer 
from Radio Shack. Although it is by far the 
most versatile way I have found of control- 
ling many electrical devices, I am slightly 
disappointed in the lack of documentation, 
which significantly limits its potential uses. 
The instructions for the device describe only 
manual operation of the controller or 
manually programmed operation of the 
controller through its ROM cartridge pro- 
gram. 

Obviously, automatic operation of the 
controller by a user-developed program is 
also possible. Possible applications might 
include security systems, control systems, or 
use as a very inexpensive system clock. It 
6 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



would also be convenient to know how to 
fully access the controller's memory so that 
programmed information can be printed out 
or automatically altered by the computer as 
the amount of daylight throughout the year 
changes. 

1 have had no luck finding information 
describing the format for direct communi- 
cation with the controller, nor have I found 
any information regarding the ROM car- 
tridge subroutines that can be accessed to 
carry out communications and operating 
functions with the controller. Does anyone 
know where to obtain this information? 
Perhaps an article on the subject would be 
of interest to other readers, as well. 

Gary L. Beatty 
Hookstown, PA 

4,600 of these controllers were 
given away at the recent Princeton 
RAW BO Wf est, so it shouldn't be 
long before readers start submitting 
such articles to THE rainbow 

How 'bout it, folks? 



REVIEWING REVIEWS 

Editor: 

I wish to thank Kerry Armstrong for his 
January 1988 review of Kung-Fu Dude, but 
there is one modification that has since been 
made, which I want to be known. Kung-Fu 
Dude has been patched to now allow colors 
on the RGB monitor. This means that no 
longer will you get the black-and-white 
stripes on your Tandy CM-8 monitor. All 
new orders shipped will have this patch, but 
those who have the older version and want 
to upgrade can do so by sending their disk, 
a copy of their receipt and $5 (including 
shipping) to cover expenses, to Sundog 
Systems. Thank you. 

Glen R. Dahlgren 
President 
Sundog Systems 

ADOS-3 Version 1.00 

Editor: 

Recently I received reports of incompati- 
bilities between SpectroSystems' ADOS-3 
Version 1.00 and two games for the CoCo 
3: Pyramix (Dr. Preble's Programs) and The 
Wild West (Novas oft). In both cases, the 
programs would begin to load, then there 
would be banging of the drive head, then a 
message claiming "This is a backup copy" 
would appear. As I am quite proud of 
ADOS-3's virtual 100 percent compatibility 
record with commercial software, I was 
concerned about these reports. Upon inves- 
tigation, it developed that both games were 
protected by Sugar Software's Piratector 
copy protection scheme, and that some 
rather exotic disk operations performed by 
Piratector conflicted with ADOS-3's fix for 
the head-banging bug in Disk basic. 



Fortunately, a simple fix for "Piratected" 
programs is available that will allow them 
to be used under ADOS-3 Version 1.00. The 
fix consists of a line that must be added to 
the basic program that LOADMs the main file, 
to be placed immediately before the LORDM 
statement. This line is as follows: 

IF PEEK(&HDB09) = &H2A THEN 
POKE &HDB09,&H20 

If the main file is normally LDADMed directly, 
as with The Wild West, place a basic 
program on the disk consisting of the above 
line followed by the LDADM of the main file, 
and run this program instead of using 
LDADM. 

I also suggest that ADOS-3 users add 
another line to this basic loader program, 
consisting of the ADOS-3 command FAST. 
I have found that loading time of "Pira- 
tected" programs is cut by about 2/3 when 
the FAST (2 MHz) processor speed is used. 
(ADOS-3's disk I/O routines support 2 
MHz disk operations, which are normally 
unreliable under standard Disk basic.) 

I have passed along this information to 
the distributors of the two games mentioned 
above, and hope that they and other soft- 
ware vendors who are using Piratector will 
add the above fix to the commercial versions 
of their "Piratected" programs. (It will not 
affect compatibility with non-ADOS-3 
systems.) I also expect shortly to make a 
minor revision to ADOS-3 so that new 
copies designated as Version 1.01 will be 
compatible with unmodified "Piratected" 
programs. 

Arthur J. Flexer 
Owner, SpectroSystems 
and author of ADOS 

HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

One of your readers, Myitis F. Trexler, 
requested my assistance to add a feature to 
my program, Christmas List ("Making a 
Christmas Address List," December 1987, 
Page 66). 

I was asked how to make the left-hand 
margin greater for the purpose of printing 
envelopes. If Line 235 is added and Line 270 
changed, the printer will print at TAB (T) 
where T is the desired left-hand margin. 

235 INPUT"H0W MANY SPACES FDR 
LEFT MARGIN"; T 

270 PRINTtt-2, PRINTtt-2 , TAB ( T ) ; 
N$(A) :PRINTtt-2,TAB(T);A$(A): 
PRINTtt-2,TAB(T);C$(A);'\ 
S$(A):PRINTtt-2,TAB(T) ;Z$(A); 
PRINTtt-2 

This may be used for labels, envelopes or 
form letters with the appropriate value for 
T. For letters and/ or envelopes where there 
is no width restriction, the ZIP code may be 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S f* 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42, 51, 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 
They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! ^ 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



placed on the city, state line by changing 
Line 270 as follows: 

270 PRINTtt-2:PRINTtt-2,TRB(T) ; 
N$(R):PRINTH-2,TRB(T) ;fl$(fi): 
PRINTH-2,TRB(T) ;C$;", ";S$;" 
";Z$:PRINT«-2;PRINTtt-2 

These changes may be of interest to others. 

George F. Saunderson 
Houston, TX 

Calendar Modifications 

Editor: 

I am submitting some changes I have 
incorporated in William Holdorfs calendar 
program ("Appointment Calendar," Janu- 
ary 1988, Page 100), which may be of interest 
to other readers. The following lines are 
additions and/ or changes I have made: 

900 POKE 359,57:P0KE65314,85 
1355 P0KE2B2 , 0 
1395 P0KE282,255 
13B0 IF RN$="End" THEN 1430 
1390 IF RN$="SI<ip" THEN 1530 
1530 P0KE282,255:CL55 
2290 PRINTtt-2,CHR$(27); 
CHR$ ( 1G ) ; CHR$ ( 2 ) ; CHR$ ( 1 G0 ) ; 

Line 2290 is changed for use with the DMP- 
105 printer. 

The first four screens can be edited to 
upper- and lowercase as desired for true 
lowercase printing. 

R.M. (Bob) Drost 
Dawson Creek, British Columbia 



Pump Up the Volume 

Editor: 

I have modified Airplane ("CoCo's Dar- 
ing Flying Machine," January 1988, Page 
73) to make it more realistic. I thought that 
demonstrating just the graphics capabilities 
of our beloved CoCo is not enough, so I 
added sound effects in these lines: 

330 DRAW "R0"+P$:EXEC 43345 
350 DRRW "R1"+P$:EXEC 43345 
370 DRRW "R2"+P$:EXEC 43345 
390 DRRW "R3"+P$:EXEC 43345 



ted by television sets and monitors. Compu- 
ter users who wear glasses can have an 
invisible, permanent coating sprayed on 
their lenses to deflect this ultraviolet radia- 
tion, thereby greatly reducing eye irritation 
and discomfort. This service is provided by 
your local optometrist or vision care center. 
The cost is $10 to $15 and requires only a 
few minutes' time for the entire process. 

David Mills 
(davidmills) 
Huntington, WV 

INFO PLEASE 



Take note that deleting the 43345s in lines 
350, 370 and 390 will prevent the modifica- 
tion from working. You will get longer 
sounds if you do not specify what you are 
EXECuting. Another tip is to use a POKE 
140, x before the four modified lines, where 
x is any value from 1 to 255. 

Werner Daniel Streidt 
Cairo, Egypt 

UV Light Protection 

Editor: 

Dr. Larry Preble should be commended 
for his most informative article on "the 
hazards of spending long hours at the 
computer" ("A Healthy Interface," Febru- 
ary 1988, Page 118). I want all your glasses- 
wearing readers to know of an extraordinar- 
ily effective aid in protecting one's eyes from 
computer-related fatigue. To a significant 
degree, such eye strain is caused by accu- 
mulated exposure to ultraviolet light emit- 



Editor: 

I have been trying to contact Hemphill 
Electronics, but have had no luck. Have they 
moved, gone out of business, or what? 

Kyle Hagaward 
Los Angeles, CA 

Hemphill Electronic 's new address 
is 334 Paseo Tesoro, Walnut, CA 
91789, (7 17). 598-7799. 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

I'd like to take this opportunity to rave 
about one of your article writers, Nancy 
Ewart. I am sure I, like many others, got 
more from her "Stalking the Fire-Breathing 
Dragon" OS-9 dissertation (January 1988, 
Page 156) than from any other source. An 
example is her explanation of creating a 40- 
track, double-sided system disk using 
DSave. God only knows the hours I've spent 

April 1988 THE RAINBOW 7 



with the manuals, other articles and OS-9 
bibles trying to accomplish what she ex- 
plained in one paragraph plus the clarity of 
her printed command: dsave(space)- 
b(space)/d0(space)/dl(space) 
'(space)shel 1. We need more articles from 
this very proficient writer who knows how 
to take the fog-level out of difficult subjects. 
Tandy's writers and most of the other 
experts writing tech-info should take lessons 
from Nancy. Let us have more articles from 
this lady who gets stars from me on her 
report card! 

Michael Bernardi 
Sarasota, FL 

Monitor Madness 

Editor: 

I just want to thank you guys. I was about 
to buy a monitor for my new CoCo 3 when 
the model number sparked my memory. 
Turning to a back issue, I discovered that the 
model I was about to buy, the Motorola 
8CM562, wouldn't work. If it hadn't been 
for your magazine and one line in an article 
on monitors, I would have made a $300 
mistake. Again, thanks. 

Paul R. Broshear 

(GROUCHY) 

San Angelo, TX 



• I'm 17 years old. I have a CoCo 3 and a 
disk drive, printer, cassette recorder and 
modem. I'm looking for pen pals, whatever 
their system, age or country. 

Ana M. Rodriguez 
D #F-17 Torremolinos 
Guaynabo, PR 00657 

• My address has changed, but I still want 
pen pals! 

Norman L. Morris, Jr. 
7743 S. Paulina 
Chicago, IL 60620 



months and am just getting to know it. I 
would appreciate any pointers anyone might 
have in respect to graphics and animation. 
I will respond to any and all letters. 

Mike Tracey 
1220 Sherry Drive 
Alpharetta, GA 30201 

• 1 am a young 38-year-old stained glass 
artist and game, Adventure and utility 
fanatic. I have a CoCo 2, Epson RX-80 
printer, two drives and Multi-Pak, etc. I'll 
answer everyone and would especially like 
people who can talk to my printer as I 
cannot. Write soon. 

Kim Sinrod 
16 Scranton Ave. 
Lynbrook, NY 11563 

• I am 34 years old and am looking for pen 
pals from the U.S.A. and around the world. 
I have a Color Computer 2 with 64K, and 
a Multi-Pak Interface. I also have two disk 
drives, a cassette recorder and a DMP-430 
printer. 

Paul Nelson Dolliver 
115 Peach St. 
Snyder, TX 79549 

• I am 19 years old and have a 128K CoCo 
3, a 64K CoCo 2, disk drive, Multi-Pak, 
DM P- 105 printer and a DCM-3 modem. I 
am looking for pen pals from the United 
States and Canada. 

J.M. Whynot 
P. O. Box 50 
Port Medway, Nova Scotia 
Canada BO J 2 TO 

• I am 18 years old and would like to pen 
pal with anyone in the world. I have a CoCo 
2, FD 501 drive, CCR-81 recorder, DMP- 
105 printer, and I am going to buy a CoCo 
3 in the near future. 

Tito Voysest 
Male con Cisneros 124 DPTO 902 

Lima, Peru 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 



• I would like to have some pen pals. I am 
16 years old and own a 64K CoCo, a printer 
and a disk drive. 

Bosman Andreas 
Hoge Burg 52 
9371 Dendebelle 
Lebbeke 
Belgium 

• I am a late 40's single mother who would 
enjoy other single pen pals of my age 
bracket. I own a CoCo 2 and a 512K CoCo 
3 with monitor and cassette, two disk drives, 
a CGP 115 and 220, a DMP-130 and a 
modem. I also speak French. 

Nicole Pouliot Coors 
5059 Chauntecleer Ct. 
Mobile, AL 36693 

• I live in a small town about 40 miles north 
of Atlanta. I have a CoCo 3, FD-501 disk 
drive, CM-8 color monitor, DMP-106 
printer, CCR-81 recorder and deluxe joy- 
sticks. I wish to correspond with all Co- 
Coers. I have had my CoCo for only four 

8 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



• There is a new BBS in southeastern 
Kentucky. It includes Xmodem download- 
ing and uploading, a peek and pokes section, 
online games and more. Online from 10 p.m. 
to 8 a.m. Call (606) 439-1853. 

Kenny Napier 
P.O. Box 387 
Bulan, KY 41722 

• Call the Grand Rapids BBS Wyoming 
Pubb, (616) 538-8229. The BBS operates 
under the OS-9 and UNIX operating sys- 
tems on a CoCo 2 with 512K RAM. 

Robert M. Worth, Jr. 
1726 Millbank S.E. 
Grand Rapids, MI 49508 

• You are cordially invited to call The 
Highlandtown International Airport BBS at 
(301) 675-7626 (300/ 1200-7/ E/ 1). Online 
and open for incoming flights since June 1, 
1986, running highly modified Color ama 
BBS software. Instant access after filling out 



the new-user application. A donation is 
required for higher access. 

Tim Krahling, SysOp 
2930 E. Fayette St. 

Baltimore, MD 21224 



• The Franklin County Data Center has 
changed its online operating hours. We 
operate from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m., seven days 
a week. Call (703) 365-2018 at 300 baud, 7- 
E-l or 8-N-L 

Ricky Sutphin 
Rt. I Box 20 
Henry, VA 24102 

• There's a new CoCo BBS in Connecticut, 
"Strictly CoCo," running at 300/ 1200 baud, 
operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 
Running on a CoCo 2 with four disk drives 
under Co BBS with Xmodem upload/ down- 
load file section and expanding message 
bases. Call (203) 378-1572 with 8/N/ 1. 

Tom Cowley (SysOp) 
445 Slonybrook Road 
Stratford, CT 06497 

• Omega BBS of Cincinnati is now online 
with TuBBS 2.4 software, running on a 
CoCo 3. We support the CoCo with down- 
loads, online games, multiple message bases 
and 24-hour operation. Call (513) 671-2049, 
300/ 1200 baud, 8/N/ 1 protocol. 

Thomas Ahum 
1746 Continental 
Shatconville> OH 45246 

• I operate a bulletin board for the Cana- 
dian Forces Base (CFB) Summerside Com- 
puter Club. 

The C.F.B. Summerside BBS is online at 
(902) 436-2281; ask for Local 583. The 
system runs on the club's Model III with 
multiple drives. The system features Xmo- 
dem up /downloads for all computers, five 
messages bases, information, and soon, 
online games. Parameters are 8-N-l, 300 
baud, and the system is up 24 hours, seven 
days a week. There is no charge, and new 
users instantly receive access. SysOps are 
John Cunningham and Philippe Comeau. 

John Cunningham 
10 Glover's Shore Road 
Summerside, P.E.L, 
Canada C1N4G4 



;; ".""V"-"";" ' ..","; ' "". ; ......... , t - i ■ num . ■ 

THE RMNttOW welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: 
Letters to Rainbow, The Falsoft Build- 
ing, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
Letters should include the writer's full 
name and address. Letters may be edited 
for purposes of clarity or to conserve 
space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIC 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, type RRI 
to take you into the Rainbow Magazine 
Services area of the SIG. At the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type LET to reach the 
LETTERS> prompt and then select 
Letters for Publication. Be sure to in- 
clude your complete name and address. 




_Word 

Power 3 





(The Ultimate Word Processor for the CoCo 3) 



Power Unleashed! Unlike other word- processors; Word Power 
3.1 is written from scratch for the CoCo 3. It bridges the gap between 
"what is" and" what should be" in word- processors. No other word 
processor offers such a wide array of features that are so easy to 
learn and use. 

DISPLAY 

The 80- column display with true lowercase lets you view the full 
width of a standard page All prompts are displayed in plain 
English in neat colored windows (see display above). The 
current column number, line number, page number and percentage 
of free memory is displayed on the screen at all times The program 
even displays the bottom margin perforation so you know where 
one page ends and the other begins. You can also change foreground/ 
background color of screen and select menu and carriage return 
colors to suit your needs! Carriage returns can be visible or invisible 
Word Power 3.1 runs at double clock speed and can be used with 
RGB/ composite/ monochrome monitors as well as TV. 

AVAILABLE MEMORY 
No other word processor gives you so much memory. Word Power 
3.1 gives you over 72K on a 128K machine and over 450K on a 
512K machine to store text 

EDITING FEATURES 
Word Power 3.1 has one of the most powerful and user- friendly 
full- screen editors with word- wrap. All you do is type Word 
Power 3.1 takes care of the text arrangement It even has a built-in 
Auto- Save feature which saves the current text to disk at regular 
intervals; so you know that your latest version is saved to disk. Here 
are some of the impressive editing features of Word Power 3.1: 

Insert/ Overstrike Mode (Cursor style changes to indicate mode); 
OOPS recall during delete; Type- ahead buffer for fast typers; Key- 
repeat (adjustable) and Key- click; Four- way cursor control and 
scrolling; Cursor to beginning of text, end of text, beginning of line, 
end of line, top/ bottom of screen, next/ previous word; Page up/ 
down; Delete character, previous/ next word, beginning/ end of 
line, complete line, text before and after cursor; Locate/ Replace 
with wild- card search with auto/ manual replace; Block Mark, 
Unmark, Copy, Move and Delete; Line Positioning (Left/Centei/ 
Right); Set/ Reset 120 programmable tab stops; Word count Define 
left, right, top and bottom margins and page length. You can also 
highlight text (underline— with on-screen underlining, bold, 
italics* superscripts; etc). Word Power 3.1 even has a HELP screen 
which can be accessed any time during edit 



MAIL- MERGE 

Ever try mailing out the same letter to 50 different people or sending 
out several resumes? Could be quite a chore Not with Word Power 
3.1. Using this feature, you can type a letter, follow it with a list of 
addresses and have Word Power 3.1 print out personalized letters 
It's that easy! 

SAVING/LOADING TEXT 
Word Power 3.1 creates ASCII format files which are compatible 
with almost all terminal, spell- checking and other word- processing 
programs It allows you to load, save, append and kill files and also to 
create and edit Basic, Pascal C and Assembly files You can select files 
by simply cursoring through the disk directory. Supports double- 
sided drives and various step rates 

PRINTING 

Word Power 3.1 drives almost any printer (DMP series, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc) . Allows print options such as baud rates, 
line spacing page pause, partial print, page numbers, page number 
placement, linefeed option, multi-line headers/ footers, right 
justification and number of copies (see display above). The values 
for these parameters and the margins can be changed anytime in the 
text by embedding Printer Option Codes Word Power 3.1 has the 
WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET feature which allows you 
to preview the text on the screen as it will appear in print You can see 
margins, page breaks, justification and more 

SPELLING CHECKER 

Word Power 3.1 comes with a 50,000 word spelling checkei/ 
dictionary which finds and corrects mistakes within your text. You 
can add words to or delete from the dictionary or create a dictionary 
of your own. 

PUNCTUATION CHECKER 
This checker will proofread your text for punctuation errors such 
as capitalization, spaces after periods/ commas, double words and 
much more It's the perfect addition to any word processor 

DOCUMENTATION 
Writing with Word Power 3.1 is a breeze Word Power 3.1 comes 
with a well- written, easy- to- comprehend instruction manual which 
will lead you step- by^ step through the program. 

Word Power3. 1 comes on an UNPROTECTED disk and is compatible 
with RS DOS 1.0/1.1 and ADOS Only $79.95. 



MJF 



(Word Power 3 owners can get the 3.1 version by sending proof of 
purchase and $10.00 to cover the cost of shipping and the manual.) 

MICROCOM SOFTWARE 
P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, NY 14450 



Phone (716) 223-1477 
To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1 -800-654-5244 9 AM- 9 PM EST 7 days a week 

NY, Canada, Foreign Orders Information, Technical Advice and Order Status call 1-716-223-1477 
All orders within Continental US shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge 
VISA, MQ AMEX, Check, MO. No CODs. Please add $3.00 S&H (USA & Canada), other countries $5.00 S&H. NYS residents please add sales rax 




How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program listings in 
the rainbow are formatted for a 32-character 
screen — so they show up just as they do on your CoCo 
screen. One easy way to check on the accuracy of your 
typing is to compare what character "goes under" what. 
If the characters match - and your line endings come 
out the same — you have a pretty good way of knowing 
that your typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 

RAINBOW ON DISK or RAINBOWONTAPEservice, 

An order form for these services is on the insert card 
bound in the magazine. 



What's A CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was first given to 
the Tandy Color Computer by its many fans, users and 
owners. 

However, when we use the term CoCo, we refer to 
both the Tandy Color Computer and the TDP System- 
100 Computer. (While many TDP-100s are still in 
service, the TDP Electronics division of Tandy no longer 
markets the CoCo look-alike.) It is easier than using 
both of the "given" names throughout the rainbow. 

In most cases, when a specific computer is men- 
tioned, the application is for that specific computer. 
However, since the TDP System-100 and Tandy Color 
are, for all purposes, the same computer in a different 
case, these terms are almost always interchangeable. 



and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to be sure you typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=256*PEEK(35)+178 

20 CLEAR 25,X-1 

30 X=256*PEEI< (35)+17B 

40 FOR Z=X TO X+77 

50 RERD Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z f Y;W 

G0 POKE Z f YrNEXT 

70 IFW=79B5THEN00ELSEPRINT 

"DRTR ERROR": STOP 
80 EXEC X:END 

90 DRTR 182, 1, 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 183, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 48, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 128, 171, 128 
150 DATA 230, 132, 38, 250, 4B, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 166, 132, 28, 254 
180 DflTA 189, 173, 198, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 

1) Type load dir list copy and press ENTER. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd'de 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
on disk in Drive 1. Then type chd'dl and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read . me . f i r s t file to the screen by typing 
list read-me. f irst and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory ol the OS-9 
side of RAi nbow on disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMDS directory, enter dir cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the cmds directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system: copy /dO'cmds' filename 'd0/ 
cmds/ filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0, 
Two-drive system: copy /dl/cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 




rainbow 



CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. We ascertain 
that their products are, in actuality, what they purport 
to be and, upon such determination, award a Seal. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee of satisfac- 
tion." The certification process is different from the 
review process. You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whether the product is right for your 
needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



vr 



The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command RUN 
and press enter. Once the program has run, type new 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: cmds and source. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rs t, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMDS directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the source directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the source directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 
programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Compiete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 



10 THE RAINBOW April 1988 




COCO 3 UTILITIES GALORE 

(All utilities support 40/80 columns for CoCo3) 
(CoCo2 versions are available for most utilities) 



SUPER TAPE/DISK TRANSFER 

• Disk-to-Disk Copy (1-3 passes) • Tape- to- Disk Copy • Tape- to- Disk Automatic Relocate • Disk- 
to- Tape Copy • Tape- to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ML programs and DATA files CoCo 1, 2 & 3. 32K Disk System(Diskto Disk Copy requires 
64 K). Disk Only $24.95 



0S9 LEVEL II RAMDISK 

Lightning Fast Ramdisk with Auto Formatting A must for any 0S9 Level II User. Req. 51 2 K S29.95. (Only 
$14.95 with the purchase of 512 K Upgrade & Ramdisk!!). 



HI- RES JOYSTICK SOFTWARE 

Wish you could use the hi- res joystick interface from Basic? You can now. This program will let you access 
640 x 640 pixels from your joystick for extra precision CoCo3 Disk $14.95 



COCO NEWSROOM 

Now available for the CoCo III! You can design your own newspaper with Banner Headlines/6 articles using 
sophisticated Graphics, Fontsand Fill Patterns Comes with22 fonts&50 pictures! Over 140 Kof code Disk 
only $49.95 



MAILLIST PRO 

The ultimate mailing list program Allows you tc add, edit view, delete change, sort(by zipcode or name) and 
print labels Its indispensible! Disk Only SI 9.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! Allows elongated, normal and condensed format for text, 
double-strike, border creation and multiple- label printing Its a MUST for any user with a disk drive Disk 
Only$19.95. Supports DMP 105/1 10/1 20/1 30/430, GEMINI, STAR, EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo2 
version included) 



COMPUTERIZED CHECKBOOK 

Why bother with balancing your checkbook? Let the CoCo do it for you! Allows you to add view, search, edit, 
change, delete and printout (in a table or individual entry format) checkbook entries Updates balance after 
each entry. Allows files for checking, saving and other accounts Disk Only SI 9.95 (CoCo 2 version 
included) 



BOWLING SCORE KEEPER 

An excellent utility to keep track of your bowling scores Allows you to save scores under individuals or 
teams You can edit, change; delete and compare scores A must for anyone who wants to keep track of his or 
her bowling performance Disk SI 9.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 

Organize your videocassettes with this program! Allows you to index cassettes by title, rating, type, play 
time and comments Also allows you to sort titles alphabetically and view/ print selected tapes If you own a 
VCR, this program is a must Disk Only $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



SCREEN DUMP 

32, 40, 80 column text dump, PMODE 4 Graphics Dumpi Single Keystroke Operation allows 
you to take snapshots of screens even when programs are running! Works on DMFs, Epson 
and Gemini CoCol, 2 and 3. Disk Only $24.95 




HOME BILL MANAGER 

Let the CoCo keep track of your bills Allows you to enter bills under various categories and 
reminds you when they are due Disk Only. $19.95 




CALENDAR MAKER 

Generate monthly calendars on your printer for any year in the 20th century. Disk Only. 
$19.95 


COCO UTILII 

(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to IBM 
compatible computer. Transfer MS-DOS files to 
CoCo. Reo, 2- Drive IBM compatible $39.95 




AD0S3 

Advanced Disk Operating System for CoCo 3. 
$34.95 ADOS $27.95 


SPIT 5 N IMAGE 

Makes a BACKUP of ANY disk $32.95 


RGB PATCH 

Displays most games in color on RGB monitors 
For CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



OS 9 PRODUCTS 




OS 9 LEVEL Jl 
OPERATING SYSTEM 

Supports 51 2 K RAM dual speed multi-tasking^ 
multiple windows and more! Comes with disk and 
complete documentation Only $89.95 



MULTI-VUE 

User friendly graphics interface with multiple 
"window" applications for Level II. Only $54.95 



WIZ 

0S9 Level II Terminal Package with 300-19200 
baud rate and windowing capability. Requires 5 1 2 K 
and RS-232 Pack Only $79.95 



SCREEN STAR 

Best 0S9 Word Processor. Implements WordStar 
(R) editing capabilities Even has a built in spelfing 
checker. Use with OS-9 Text Formater to get 
beautiful printouts ForOS9 Level 1 and2. Disk Only 
$49.95. OS-9 Text Formatter: Printout beautiful docu- 
ments from any ASCII file. Only $34.95. Both Screen Star 
and OS-9 Text Formatter: $74.95 



OATA MASTER 

Excellent database for OS9. Features include: 
windows, pull down menus, sorting, eta Requires 
OS9 Level II&512K Only $64.95 



PC-Xfer UTILITIES 

Programs to format and transfer files to/from MS- 
DOS diskettes on CoCo Under OS9 Level 1 or 2. 
Requires SDISK or SDISK3. Only $44.95 



SDISK3 

Standard disk drive module replacement allows full 
use of 40/80 track double sided drives Reo, 0S9 
Level IL Only $29.95 



SDISK 

Same as SDISK 3 except for 0S9 Level I. Only 
$29.95 



BOOKS 

Inside 0S9 Level II: $39.95 

Rainbow Guide To 0S9 Level II: $19.95 

Rainbow Guide To 0S9 Level II Disk: $19.95 

0S9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola 
Inc 







MJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE] 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



r 












L 







All orders $50 and above shipped by UPS 2 nil Day Air within Continental US at no extra charge No 

CODs We accept Visa, MC, Amex, Check or MO. Please add $3.00 S&H 
(USA/Canada). Other countries $5.00 S&H. NYS residents please add sales tax 

To Place Credit Card Orders; Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pm est 7 daysawa 

NY, Canada, Foreign Orders, Information, Technical Advice and Order Status call 1-716-223-1477 



Seasons 

of Change 

There have been some pretty big changes taking place around here 
in the last month and I thought you would like to know something 
about them. 

First of all, we staged Falsoft's first "retirement" party ever when General 
Manager Pat Hirsch — who was the company's first paid employee (she 
got paid even before I did) — was honored at a luncheon the middle of 
February, Pat's last day was February 15. 

Bonnie Frowenfeld, who has been assistant general manager for 
fulfillment services, has moved into Pat's office. Bonnie brings a wealth 
of experience to the position and I know you will all join me in wishing 
her well at her new post. 

I know that many of you who have met Pat at RAINBOWfests will also 
join me in wishing her the best in her "retirement." As an old lady of 45 
(it has always been a great source of pleasure to me that she is six full 
months older than I am), Pat intends to spend more time traveling with 
her husband to pickle patches around the world and sharpening up her 
tennis game. 

Some explanation is in order for the first statement; a clarification for 
the second. 

"Mr. Pat," Ken Hirsch, is the head honcho at Paramount Foods here 
in Louisville, a firm that makes and sells pickles, relishes and other stuff 
like that. Additionally, Ken (known, obviously, as "Pickle" to many of his 
friends) is an Important Person in the International Pickle Packer's 
Association and needs to make numerous trips for them as well as his own 
business. Pat's duties at Falsoft had limited her ability to accompany him. 
Now they won't. (Incidentally, Pat is not known as "Mrs. Pickle." Their 
eldest daughter, Lisa, however, is known as "Little Pickle- ") 



500 
POKES, 
PEEKS, 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 

NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. 50 WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Basic/ ECB/ Disk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TROM, TROFF, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, RENUM, PRINT 
USIMQ, DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD, 
MERQE, RENAME, DSKINI, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

k Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 
Generate a Repeat-key, 
Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

Set 23 different 

QRAPHIC/SEMIQRAPHIC modes 
Merge two Basic programs. 

AND MUCH MUCH MORE! If 
COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16K/32K/64K/COLOR BASIC/ ECB/ DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1, 2, flf 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



★ 
★ 



★ 
★ 



SUPPLEMENT to 

500 POKES, 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 

ONLY $9.95 
L U U additional Pokes, Peeks ' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER 
Includes commands for 

• flompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm+® and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (for D MP printers) & Text Screen Oump 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES, PEEKS N EXECS is a prerequisite 



300 POKES 
PEEKS N EXECS 

FOR THE COCO III 

Get more POWER for your CoCo III. Includes 
commands for 

• 40/80 Column Screen Text Dump 

• Save Text/Graphics Screens to Disk 

• Command/ Function Disables 

• Enhancements for CoCo 3 Basic 

• 128K/512K Ram Test Program 

• HPRINT Character Modifier 

• AND MANY MORE COMMANDS ONLY $1 9.95 






"MUST" BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These books provide 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
BOTH UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
SUPER ECB(CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: $24.95 j 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLEO BOOKS: $59.95 
COCO 3 SERVICE MANUAL $39.95 
COCO 2 SERVICE MANUAL: $29.95 

INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II $39.95 

RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 LEVEL II ON COCO 3: $19.95 

RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 II OtSK: $19.95 
INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II DISK: $20.00 
COCO 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING": $18.00 

ADDENDUM FOR C0CD3: $12.00 
UTILITY ROUTINES VOL 1 BOOK: $19.95 

GAMES(Disk Only) (CoCo 1, 2, & 3 
except where mentioned) 
WILD WEST(CoCo3 Only) $24.95 
VEGAS SLOTS (CoCo 3 Only) $29.95 
VEGAS GAME PACK: $24.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 
IN QUEST OF STAR LORD 

(Animated Graphics Adventure 
CoCo 3): $34.95 

WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY: $19.95 
PYRAMIX(Cubix for CoCo 3): $24.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 

KUNG FU DUDE: $24.95 

APPROACH CONTROL SIMULATION: $34.95 
TREASURY PACK#1: Lunar Rover Patrol 
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of Wizard, Module Man, 
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a MINIMUM OF 32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 AND JDOS. 

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PICTURE DISK #1: 100 more pictures for 
CGD: $14.95 

FONT DISK #1 : 10 extra fonts! $19.95 
COLORED PAPER PACKS $24.95 

COCO MAX III (with hi- res interface): $79.95 

COCO MAX II: Disk $77.95 Tape $67.95 

MAX PATCH An excellent software patch to run 
COCO MAX II on COCO III. Req RS Hi- res 
Joystick Interface No chip replacements or 

soldering Disk only $24.95 

BOTH MAX PATCH & HI-RES INTERFACE: 

$34.95 

COLOR MAX 3 DELUXE: $69.95 

COLOR MAX 3: $59.95 

Telewriter-64: Best Word Processor for CoCo 1 & 
2(Cas) $47.95 (Disk) $57.95 
TW-80: 80 Column Display & more features for 
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any modem! (Cas) $29.95 (Disk) $39.95 

Pro Color File* Enhanced*: Multi-feature 
Database $59.95 Sidewise: $24.95 
Pro- Color Dir: $24.95 
EDT/ASM 640: Best Disk Based Editor- 
Assembler for CoCq$59.95 (Specify CoCo 1, 2 or 3) 

THE SOURCE: Best Disassembler for CoCo $34,9 5 
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$149.95 (Specify CoCo 1,2 or 3) 



MJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



All orders $ 50 and above shipped by U PS 2 nd Day Air within Continental U S at no extra charge No 

CO D& We accept Visa, M C, Amex, Check or M 0. Please add $3.00 S& H ( USA/ Canada). 
Other countries $5.00 S&H. NYS residents please add sales tax 



To Place Credit Card Orders; Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pmest7 days a week 

NY, Canada, Foreign Orders, Information, Technical Advice and Order Status call 1-716-223-1477 







T --.lih! 


mm 


,4 



My second comment, concerning 
tennis, is probably untrue. If Pat gets 
much better at tennis than she is, she 
may be banned from local courts. Her 
serve broke my secretary's arm one day. 
Bob Albrecht, the famous writer, once 
challenged her to a match until he found 
out how good she was. He backed out. 

* * * 

Another big change here sees a sort 
of triple shift, brought about by Jim 
Reed's decision to "explore new hori- 
zons" in the publishing world. 

Jim was the first managing editor of 
RAINBOW and guided it through its 
important stages of growth and devel- 
opment, His depth of knowledge of 
magazines and publications was a vital 
element in its metamorphosis from a 
"newsletter" to a slick magazine. 

Jim moved to other duties about six 
months ago, as executive editor for the 
company. Jutta Kapfhammer then 
moved into the editorial coordinator's 
job and became managing editor of 

RAINBOW. 

With Jim's departure, Jutta will 



devote full time to her managing edi- 
tor's position. John Crawley, who has 
been with Falsoft for almost five years, 
becomes director of editorial services. 
For those of you who wond er, John will 
also continue as editor of ScoreCARD, 
our sports weekly. 




"Change means that we 
are getting new blood, 
new ideas and looking 
at new ways to solve 
problems. " 




Jim's departure means we have 
placed, for now, anyway, our Color 
Computer history book on the back 
burner. We may move it back up front 
at any time, however, so stay tuned. 

While Jim will no longer work di- 
rectly with the magazines, he will con- 



tinue to oversee our operations on 
Delphi. So, he'll still be an important 
part of our CoCo Community. 

* * * 

We will miss Pat and Jim, but, despite 
that, I think change is, essentially, good. 
Change means that we are getting new 
blood, new ideas and looking at new 
ways to solve problems that we didn't 
have before. This is certainly not to say 
that the "old" ways didn't work or were 
no good, it is just that a fresh approach 
is always a good one. 

To that end, I remember a poem that 
Mrs. Howard, who taught Library at 
Crestline Grammar School, once made 
us learn. The essential part of it went: 

Make new friends; 
But keep the old. 
One is silver; 
And the other gold. 

I think it most appropriate to consider 
those sentiments at this time. 

— Lonnie Falk 



Corrections (See Page 30 for additional corrections.) 




To offDSR: 

S6NP CWBCK OK faoNEy 
ORDER FOR $ZS TO: 

GLENN CflLAF/lTI 
SV OAK ST. 
VOZTHPoRT, At./. 

~f$J\\NBOW C£RTJF7£P/ 

SZ. K #O70r</ftPV£fY7VR£ GfWE 
FOR Tfie Oxo/Z COMPUTER 
A 2, 3. 

n.y. res ft dp y.sy. sales -mx. 



14 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



"Making a Christmas Address List" (December 1987, 
Page 66): George Saunderson has written to correct 
a bug that will cause an AO Error to occur if certain 
conditions are met when running XMASLIST. To 
correct the problem, re-enter Line 440 as follows: 

440 NEXT A: GOTO 420 

"A Christmas Potpourri" (December 1987, Page 100): 

One of the HDRflW codes is missing from Line 2460 of 
XMflSPQRI. That line should be altered as follows: 

2 4 60 HDRAW" BR10 ; BU2 ; XZY $ ; BR8 ; BD6 

; BD1 ; XE$ ; BR9 ; BU2 ; XA$ ; BR3 ; BD1 ; XR$ 
. fi 

r 

"A Smooth Operator" (January 1988, Page 78): As 
written, SMODTHY does not work properly on 51 2K 
CoCo 3s. To fix this problem, change the value of 25 
in Line 170 to a value of 217. Also, change the value 
of 24 in Line 220 to a value of 216. 

"Taking Care of CoCo 3 Bugs"(Hint, February 1988, 
Page 115): The hint incorrectly states inat if a value 
greater than 23 and less than 127 is givafo as the vertical 
coordinate of the HPRINT^mman/, the text to be 
printed will appear on the firStscfeen line. Actually, 
any value greater than 23 but less than or equal to 127 
will cause the message to be printed on the bottom 
line, as it should. When the vertical coordinate is 
greater than 127 and less than or equal to 151, 
however, the text wilt be printed on the first screen 
line. 

For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DATA 
at the CoCo SKG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIO 

prompt. 



- 



DISK DRIVES 

Double Sided Double Density 360 K40 Track 1 /a Ht Disk Drives for CoCo2 and3. Buy from someone else and all you get is a disk drive Buy from us 
and not only do you get a quality disk drive but also $60 worth of disk utility software ( Super Tape/ Disk Transfer and Disk Tutorial) and our 
DISKMAX utility which allows you to use BOTH sides of our disk drives Its like buying TWO disk drives for the price of ONE!! 

Drive 0 (with J & M Controller & Cable): $229.95 Drive 1: $149.00 
TWOV2 ht Drives in one case with cable & controller: $339.95 Single Power- Supply & Case: $59.95 

Disk Drive Power Supply T Cables: $8.95 
(90 day warranty on all drives) 
J&M Controller (with RSOOS): $79.95 DISTO Super Controller: $99.95 
Mini Eprom Programmer Add- On: $54.95 Real Time Clock & Parallel Printer Interface Add-on: $39.95 

DISTO Super Controller II: $129.95 
1 Drive Cable: $19.95 2 Drive Cable: $24.95 4 Drive Cable: $39.95 

(For Drives add $7.00 S&H in USA/Canada) 



mm 



HARD DRIVES 

Finally! Hard Drive Interface for Basic and OS9 from Burke & Burke!! 

CoCo XT: Use up to2 5-1 20 Meg Hard Drives You buy WD1 002- WX1 or WD1 002-27 X Controller, Case and drive from your PC dealer and use CoCo 
XT to hook the drive up to your CoCq Includes drivers for 0S9/ Basic and complete documentation $69.85. 

HYPER I/O: Modifies RSDOS to allow use of floppy and hard drives If you are using hard drives from Basic, you will, need HYPER I/O to access the 
hard drives Disk Only $24.95. 

COCO XT ROM: Installs in hard disk controller. Boots OS9 from hard/floppy drive $19.95. 

CoCo XT- RTC: Same as CoCo XT with Real Time Clock/ battery backup: $99.95. Please note you need a 64 K CoCo or CoCo 3 and Multipak for all 
versions 



r 



COMMUNICATIONS 
-EXTRAVAGANZA 



r 



EPROM 



1) AVATEX 12Q0e MODEM: Fully Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 Baud, Auto-Dial/ 
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5) UPS 2nd DAY AIR Shipping. 

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(With AVATEX 1200 he instead of 
AVATEX 1 200: $1 74.95) 
AVATEX 2400: $229.95 




CABLES/INTERFACE/ 
ADAPTERS 



UPGRADES 



512K UPGRADE FOR COCO III 

Fast 120 ns chips. Fully tested. Easy installation. No 
soldering Comes with complete documentation and 
RAM test program on disk 

only $89.95 




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(With purchase of our 51 2 K RAMDISK program below) 

51 2 K Upgrade without chips $44.95 

512K RAMDISK $24.95 

Have 2 superfast RAMDISKs& a print spooler. 

64 K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/ B CoCo ll:$39.95 
64 K Upgrade for CoCo r* CoCo \X% with Cat 
#26-3026/7, 26-3134 & 26-3136: $29.95 



RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 
serial port ONLY $18.95 
Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with 
CoCo Max, DS69, eta 0NLYS24.95 
15' PRINTER/MODEM EXTENDER CABLE: 
ONLYS16.95 

MODEM CABLE: 4 pin to DB 25: $19.95 
15" MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER 
CABLE: $29.95 

3- POSITION SWITCHER: $37.95 
WICO TRACK BALL: $34.95 

RS HI- RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 
MAGNAVOX 8505/851 5/8CM643 Analog 
RGB Cable: $24.95 

CM-8 RGB Analog Ext. Cable: $19.95 
SONY Monitor Cable: $39.95 

VIDEO DRIVER: For Monochrome or Color. 
Specify CoCo 1 or 2. $34.95 

VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference. 
$1 9 95 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 
switch selectable baud rates (300-9600) 
Comes with all cables $44.95 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 

EPROM Programmer for the CoCo. 

Lowest Price Anywhere $137.95 

EPROM ERASER (Datarase): Fast erase of 

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EPROMS: 2764 -$8.00, 271 28- $9.00 

Call for other EPROMs. 

BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER and ERASER: 

$179.95 

ROMPAK w/ Blank PC Board 27xx Series: 
$12.95 



KEYBOARDS/ACCESSORIES 

' KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: Our keyboard 
extender cable allows you to move your keyboard 
away from the computer and type with ease. You 
can use your existing keyboard with this cable or 
leave your present keyboard intact and use a second 
keyboard. A MUST for all CoCo Users Only $39.95. 
Cable with CoCo II keyboard: $49.95 COCQ 3 
KEYBOARD (includes FREE FUNCTION KEYS 
software value $19.95) $39.95 
CoCo II keyboard: $19.95 



r. 



CHIPS, ETC. 



Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo III) S29.95. 
68B09E Chip: $14.95 ECB Rom 1.1: $29,95. Multi- 
Pak PAL Chip for CoCo 3 $1 9.95 PAL Switcher: Now 

you can switch between the CoCo II and CoCo III 
modes when using the Multi-Pak You need the 
OLDER and NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 
Multipak Only $39.95 With NEW PALChip$49.95 
W DS/DD Disks: $0.45 each. 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE All orders $50 and above (eicept Disk Drives) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air within Continental US 

P.O. Box 214 at no extra charge. NoCODs WeacceptVisa MC Amex, Check or MQ Please add $3.00 S&H 

Fairport, N.Y. 14450 (USA/Canada). Other countries $5.00 S&H. NYS residents please add sales tax 
Phone (716) 223-1477 



AAastefCord 



VISA 



To Place Credit Card Orders; Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pmest7 days a week 

NY, Canada, Foreign Orders, Information, Technical Advice and Order Status call 1-716-223-1477 



Buildi ng Apri l 's Rainbow 



About 
Your 
Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
youraddress. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster. 

For Canadian and other non- 
U.S. subscribers, there may be 
a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail; 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 




Our favorite "home helper" . . . 

. . . deserves a home of its very own! 



A far as I know, home builders are not yet incorporating computer rooms 

/% C*into their house plans, except when a house is custom designed, but 
JL Sl IkJjim Reed insists that architects will soon be sketching in computer 
rooms in the same routine manner they add utility rooms, breakfast nooks, half 
baths and sun rooms. I agree. And when that does become commonplace, what 
do you suppose the "standard" computer room will include, and where will it be? 

My first thought is that it would be nice to have the computer room look in 
on the family room, much as some kitchens are designed so you can look in on 
family members as you cook, or even follow what they're watching on TV I guess 
the computer room's window might need to be closed if you fire up a loud printer 
or if the family room activity becomes too distracting, but I dislike being separated 
from the rest of the household when I am computing. 

A friend down in Florida is building a house right now, and the computer room 
is one of his central interests. He is having three phone lines put in. One is to 
be a voice line while the other two are data lines. Two data lines? Well, he says, 
if he is running a BBS, how else will he be able to access other BBS systems or 
the online services? Obviously, all of us would have a bunch of electrical outlets, 
but he also says his computer stuff will be on a completely separate circuit from 
the rest of the house. He's even having 25-conductor, RS-232 cable run throughout 
the house with five leads going into the computer room. 

While I'd prefer to stay in touch with family activities, he wants to be in the 
remotest part of the house. He is also having acoustical insulation installed so 
any late night tap, tap, tap on the keyboard will not disturb those who think the 
wee hours are for sleeping. 

Regardless of where the room is located, the custom computer room for the 
home should, I would think, be laid out so that screen reflections from windows, 
lamps, ceiling fixtures or even other monitors would be minimized. Such things 
as carpeting, home intercom, shelving (make sure to know where the studs are 
for later addition of more shelves) and wall decor are, of course, a matter of 
individual taste. In discussing it around the office, though, a surprising consensus 
developed that it would be great to have built-in counters and sit on high stools . 
to compute! While none of the technical people around here have such a setup, 
all agreed they'd like to. In fact, such a prospect created more excitement than 
any other idea. 

Someone suggested a very large table be in the middle of the room (which all 
agree needs to be at least 10-by-14); the table would eliminate the hassle of where 
to put printouts and odds and ends. One programmer even wants a "whiteboard 
wall" in order to do flow-charting and the like on one entire wall. Everyone seemed 
in favor of allotting space for stereo equipment, if not cable TV as well. An easy 
chair and reading lamp for going over manuals met with wide agreement, but most 
felt one dreamer's desire for a cathedral ceiling and skylights was "pie in the sky. 
Still, if you are designing the ultimate computer room for your own needs, and 
the budget permits, why not? 

If you are one of the lucky ones who do get the chance to design your very 
own custom computer room, I'll offer this familiar recommendation: Allocate a 
place for storing all the back issues of THE rainbow and include enough room 
for a lot of issues yet to come. And, since this is our "Home Help" issue, why 
not have a subscription "installed" for even greater convenience! 



Jutta Kapfhammer 



16 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 




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• ••*•«••*■*••• 

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• ••■•*•«■•*••• 
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»•••«••»«*••««< 
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»••■»•!*•« * • » » • 

»••»•»•••**••• 
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• •••«•••«*•■•: 
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a a » a a a « a • a a a a 



HOW DO YOU GIVE A RAINBOW? 



It's simple — 



a rainbow gift certificate 



Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
source for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
safe at home. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate 

and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by April 
25 and we'll begin your friends' 
subscriptions with the June 
issue of rainbow. 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



j From: 

! Name 



Address 
City 



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ZIP 



□ My payment is enclosed. 

Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Acct. # Exp, date 



i Signature 



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Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subscriptions to THE rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency on/y, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



CoCo Gallery 




This scene expressing tranquility at its best was developed with CoCo Max ///. Wally 
and his wife have four children and three grandchildren; they live in Hamilton, Ohio. 



Honorable Mention 



3TO 



I J ,1,1 




King 



Michael Stafford 



Michael, who is 21 years old and has cerebral 
palsy, used basic and the CoCo 3 to create this 
graphic illustration. His main hobby is working 
with the CoCo; he lives in Port Grange, Florida. 



18 THE RAINBOW April 1986 




Philip, of LauderhHI, Florida, used CoCo Max HI to show the 
beauty of this Scarlet Macaw, Philip is an engineering 
supervisor for a machinery building company In Miami and 
his hobbies include snorkeling, horticulture and CoColng. 




Lambo 



Eddie Mendonca 



©Co 



Eddie, a freshman in college, used CoCo 
Max II to create these views of a 
Lamborghini. He lives in Hanford, 
California. 



CoCo Max II converted for the CoCo 3 
through CC-3-MAX, from Lomiq, was used 
to illustrate this aggression. Francis, 
whose hobbies include drawing, role- 
playing games and computers, lives in the 
village of St-Honore, Quebec, Canada. 




Invasion 



Francis Leduc 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo, Gallery," Share your creations with the 
CoCo Community! Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you created your picture (What programs you 
used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please include a few facts about yourself. 

DoVt send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV programs or materiai that's al ready been submitted 
elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is nor an original work. . , , Vl ,, >}*> & J 

We will award two first prizes of $25, one for the CoCo 3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize 0fi$'t^l^:^i l jthfrcl prize of $10. Honorable Mentions 
may also be given. 

Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo Gallery, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Remember, this is a contest and your 
entry will not be returned. _ Angela Kapfhammer, Curator 

April 1966 THE RAINBOW 1 9 



Generate a form to grant authorization 
for the medical treatment of a minor 





yyp. 





By James A. Upperman 



magine you and your spouse are 
away on a trip while your children 
are staying at home with relatives. 
Or perhaps your child is on a camping 
trip with a friend's family. What would 
happen if your child were badly injured 
or became seriously ill? What if your 
child needed immediate medical treat- 
ment? 

If the illness or injury could cause 



James Upperman is an architect in 
Columbus, Ohio, and has had his Color 
Computer for almost four years. He is 
a past president of the Central Ohio 
Color Computer Club. 

20 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



death or loss of limb, the doctors would 
start medical treatment without delay. 
At the same time, they would make 
every effort to contact you to find out 
if your child has any medical conditions 
that might affect the treatment. 

On the other hand, if the situation 
were not quite as serious but still def- 
initely required medical treatment — 
and your child is a minor — there would 
be a serious complication. The doctors 
cannot — by law — start the necessary 
treatment until you are contacted and 
have given your consent. While the 
doctors try to reach you, your child 
must wait, without medical treatment, 
for hours or even days, until you are 



finally located. Only after you have 
given your consent can the doctors treat 
your child's injury or illness. 

Of course, when you and your chil- 
dren are apart, the people caring for 
your children should know how to 
reach you at all times. However, if you 
think there is a chance you may be hard 
to contact, you can temporarily assign 
the authority to approve your child's 
unexpected medical treatment to 
another adult in your place. The adult 
can be a relative, neighbor, minister or 
scoutmaster — anyone over the age of 
18 who will be with your child or who 
can be reached easily in case of an 
emergency. 



The Amazing A-BUS\& 




An A- BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter In foreground 

The A-BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

the CoCo 2 and the CoCo 3. 

About the A-BUS system: 

• Ail the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC, use IN P and OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-1 23) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 

Relay Card re<*40: $1 29 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LED's show status. Easy to use {OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable. fll 

Reed Relay Card re-i 56: $99 

Same features as above, but uses 6 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card ad-i42:$i29 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5 V range can be expanded to 1 00V by adding a 
resistor. 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an 1 46: $1 39 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%. Input range is -4 V to 
-MV. Resolution: 1 millivolt. "Rie on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 1 30ms. Ideal for thermocouple, 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-1 56 card). 

Digital Input Card IN-141:$59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC !NP (or PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-i48: $65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cm 44: $89 

Powerful clock/calendar with: battery backup for Time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built in alarm relay, fed and buzzer; timing to 1 /100 
second, Easy to use decimal format. Lithium battery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph-i45:$79 

EaCh tone is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pr-i 52: $1 5 

3% by 4te In. with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I.C.s 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 




RE-140 




IN-141 




Smart Stepper Controller sc-149:$299 

World's finest stepper controller, On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously. Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 10.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory. For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relatives absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half. full, wave), 
scale factor, units./iolding power, etc. Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (350mA) for small steppers(M0-1 03). Send for SC-1 49 flyer, 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach 11 sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-1 22: $1 9 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board. 

Stepper Motor Driver st-i43:$79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate In motion control. Hie special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with-them, Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V, bidirectional. 4 phase, 350mA per phase). 
Special Package: 2 motors (MO-1 03) + ST-1 43: PA-1 81 : $99 

Stepper Motors Mo-103: $isor4for$39 

Pancake type, 2W 1 dia, shaft, 7.5°/step. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec, 12V, 36 ohm, bipolar, 5 oz-ln torque, same as Airpax K82701-P2. 

Current Developments 

intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14- Bit Analog to Digital converter, 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT, AT and compatibles, Uses one short slot. 
Tandy 1000, 1000 EX &SX, 1200, 3000. Uses one short slot. 
Apple IUI+. lie, Uses any slot. 
TRS-80 Model 102, 200 Plugs into 40 pin "system bus". 
Model 1 00, Uses40 pin socket- (Socket Is duplicated on adapter), 
TRS-80 Mod 3,4,4 D, Fits 50 pin bus, {Withharddisk. use Y-qable). 
TRS-80 Model 4 P, Includes extra cable. (50 pin bus Is recessed). 
TRS-flD Mfldgl I. Plugs mle AO pin W bm on KB m n,H 
DliIui Dj ,r ipi;ler:i !Tandv"|.FIs RDM WHoiie or v < a hie 



4 Channel 



AR 
AR- 
AR- 
AR- 
AR- 
AR- 
AR- 
AR- 
AR 



133...S69 
133...S69 
134...S49 
t36..,$69 
135 .$69 
132 .$49 
137...S62 
131 . $19 
m S49 



A-BUS Cable (3 ft, so cond.) ca-i63-.$24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard. 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i20:$99 

Each Motherboard holds live A^ BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
f fl I it^w * secon(J Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 



* *. 'J 161: $1 2). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 



AD-142 



BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 



Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC, checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT & NY residents add sales tax. 
C.O.D. add S3. 00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is $5 
Overseas add 10% 




a Sigma industries Company 



ALPHA Ihmxm 

242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



Technical info: 
Orders only 



(203) 656-1806 

Except in CT 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348*9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




c 



oco 




- FREE DEMO DISK 

- FREE COCOSHOW PROGRAM 

- FREE EXTRA FONTS DISK 



aril 







must be the most enjoyable, useful, 
and awesome program you've ever 

seen or your money back. 



Instantly, 
no questions asked. 



CALL NOW TOLL FREE 1-800 221 



Mon-Fri 
9 to 5 EST 



A FEW QUOTES : 



[TerrWic W-res color, very 

to learn and use. 
{ Family Computing 



and again as 



— r^c7M^ ated ag f Lfl COCO 

fc B 2K^5S- ever .-^JS-O;* 



AND LET THE FUN BEGIN 



anything liKerto a single 
, screen. Tjer e mbe r. Even 
1 command to*™?* nQ drawing - 
a person who has n cre ate a 

ability » ke my lS.ire I've spent 
presentable P«c.^e.i nV . 

* oU L s WnS f ?oS sttW to the 1 

experience. d«» 
be sorry. 




Note: There is only one CoCo Max III. Do not confuse [colorware 's CoCo Max with similar sounding imitations. 



I 





r3 




77ie besf program ever written for the Color Computer 



9$ 



Thafs how thousands of enthusiastic users rated 
theCoCo Max II drawing program. With CoCo Max 
III we are ready to amaze them again. Instead of 
"patching" CoCo Max II, we rewrote it from scratch 
to take advantage of the CoCo Max lit hardware. 
The results will knock your socks off ! Below is a 
brief list of some of the new features, but some, 
such asanimation, color sequencing, or the slide 
show, have to be seen. Send for the Demo Disk, and 
see for yourself. 

Everybody's favorite drawing package features: 

■ A 50% larger editing window. - Zoom area 400% 
larger. - New drawing tools: rays, 3D cubes, arcs,... - 
New editing tools: shadow,text size,... - Rotate by 1.5° 
steps - Select any 16 of the 64 possible colors (all 64 
colors displayed at once!) - Powerful color mix: additive, 
subtractive, overlay,... - Full color editing of patterns 
and color changing patterns. - Incredible special eff- 
ects with color cycling up to 8 colors with variable 
speed. -Animation adds the dimension of motion to 
your image. (Must be seen.) - Sophisticated data com- 
pression saves up to 70% of disk space when saving 
pictures. 

In addition, there are dozens of enhancements to the 
multitude of features that made CoCo Max II a best seller. 

More about CoCo Max III 

• CoCo Max Hi is not an upgrade of CoCo Max II. It is entirely 
rewritten to take advantage of the new CoCo 3 hardware 
(More memory, resolution, colors, speed,...) 

• The new CoCo Max 111 Hi-Res Interface and the CoCo Max ii 
Hi-Res Pack are not interchangable. 

• The new interface plugs into the joystick connector. 

• The CoCo Max 111 disk is not copy protected. 

• CoCo Max III only works with the CoCo 3. 

• A Y-Cable or Multi-pak is not necessary. 

• Colors are printed in five shades of gray. 

• CoCo Max III can read CoCo Max II pictures. 



Note: CoCo Max II {for the CoCo 2) is still available on disk 
($79.95). CoCo Max I is still available on tape ($69.95). For 
details, refer to our double page ad in any Rainbow from 
January '86 to July '87 



Toll Free operators are for orders only. If you need precise answers, call 
the tech line. (Detained CoCo Max specs are included with the Demo Disk.) 



Add $3.00 par order for ahlpplrtQ. 
Visi, MC. checki. M.O. walcoms. 
CT residents add sales tax. 
C.0.0. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping Is $5 
Oversea* add 10% 



I Technical info: 
Orders only 



II 



(203) 656-1806 

Except in CT 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
All tines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



Jr Beware of inferior imitations that DO NOT Include a Hi-Res Interface 
or charae extra tor each utility. 



File Edit Options Colors Font Size Style 



■ ll. T .M ' 



£29 




Imagine this picture in sixteen colors ! 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 
Uaa CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with It, 
we will refund every penny* 



System Requirements: 

Any CoCo 3 disk system with a Joystick or a Mouse. 

We apologize to tape users, CoCo Max 111 needs the flexibility of a disk. 

The CoCo Max III system includes: • The special Hi-Res 
interface (foryourmouseorjoystick) • TheCoCo Max III disk • Many 
utilities: (To convert Max II pictures, Max coiors.etc.) • A detailled User's 

Manual. Complete system; nothing else to buy. CoCo Max III : $79,95* 

I 

I 
I 
I 
I 



|( WITH COUPON ONLY 



FREE DEMO DISK 




Name 
Street 
City 



HtlllH 



wm<"X. ■ 



State Zip 
Printer used: 



i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
I 



i • t* . " • • ■ i * It 



Please include $2 to help defray Processing and Shipping 
costs. (Check, Money Order, etc. Sorry, no COD or Credit 
Cards). Coupon (or copy) must be mailled to: 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc, 



COLORWARE 

242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 



AUTHORIZATION TO CONSENT FOR TREATMENT OF A MINOR 
I hereby grant tot Mrs. Rachel Smith 

Authority to give an informed consent for the treatment of i 
John E, Doe Jr. Born; January 1, 1978 

Should such child require medical care of any nature by reason 
of any condition or incident, except that the following procedures 
should not be performed without my consent unless the concurring 
medical opinion of two physicians Is that such procedures are 
necessary to relieve the suffering or preserve the life or limb 
of such child and I cannot be reached after reasonable attempts, 

A> Major Surgery 

B> Treatment with penicillin based antibiotics 

Facts concerning the child's history, including allergies, 
physical impairments and medications being taken, to which a 
physician should be alerted are as follows* 

John Jr. is allergic to Penicillin. 

m 

John is taking oral antibiotics for an infected sore on his 
left hand. He also had a tetanus booster on Feb. 12, 

Our Pediatrician iss A, Kiddadoc M.D, 
Phonej (614) 555-1234 

Our family physician isi I, Kurem, M.D, 
Phone J (614) 555-5678 

Our Dentist iss I Yankum D.D.S. 
Phone: (614) 555-9012 

Our Hospital of choice is ; County General Hospital West 

Our Health Insurance Plan isi Blue Cross 
I.D. Number? 1122-33445 * 

This authorization expires at noon on February 23, 1936 



Witness Parent's Signature Date 

Mrs, Jane Doe 

123 E. Main St, 

Anytown, Ohio 43210 

Home Phone: (614) 555-9875 

Work Phone? (614) 555-2345 

Figure 1 



Medical Authorization is a program 
that produces the document with which 
you temporarily assign the authority to 
another adult to approve unexpected 
medical treatment. The form also con- 
tains medical information that should 
be known by the doctors along with the 
names and phone numbers of your 
child's pediatrician, family doctor and 
dentist. You can also note any treatment 
that you prefer not to be performed 
until you are contacted (such as major 
surgery). 

You must sign the printed form and 
have your signature witnessed by an 
adult other than the adult to whom you 
are assigning the authority. The adult 
responsible for your child should keep 
the form handy and present it to the 
doctors if unexpected medical treat- 
ment is required. 

Running the Program 

When you load and run the program, 
the computer will display a title and 
your child's name. Please note that the 
computer uses a POKE 282 , 8 in Line 210 
to place you in lowercase when you 
type. 

You will be asked to enter the name 
of the person you are making respon- 
sible. Then you are asked to enter the 
date on which the authorization ex- 
pires. 

Next, the medical history perma- 
nently contained in the program is 
displayed. You are asked whether you 
want to add to the information. If you 
press Y (Yes), you will be prompted to 
type in up to 250 characters. Do not 
worry about the printout format — 
lines 620 to 670 contain a short word- 
wrap routine that ends each printed line 
at a space rather than in the middle of 
a word. 

Finally, the program displays the 
parents' names and asks which parent 
is signing the form. You will then be 
prompted to set up the printer and press 
ENTER when ready. 

Typing in the Program 

Lf youhave two or more children, you 
are required to have a separate form for 
each child. All information that relates 
directly to one child can easily be edited 
to create a version for another child. 
The MED in the sample program name 
should be changed to the child's initials 
or some other means of identification. 
The programs for my two children are 
RUTH CJU and RUTH EMU. 

When you type in the program, insert 
the permanent information concerning 
your child into the strings in lines 1000 

24 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



to 1200. Note that the information 
shown in the listing is only a sample to 
show the format of the entries. Do not 
use these entries; rather, substitute the 
information concerning your child in 
their places. Your permanent informa- 
tion will include your child's name; date 
of birth; any treatment you want re- 
stricted; permanent medical history; the 
names and phone numbers of your 
pediatrician, family doctor and dentist; 
hospital of choice; hospitalization; and 
the parents' names along with home and 
work phone numbers. 

Again, please note that the program 
uses POKE 282,0, so you should input 
all information in lower- and uppercase 
letters. You should use the shift-0 
combination before and after typing in 
the information that is printed in low- 
ercase in the listing. This gives a uni- 
form printout that looks quite distin- 
guished. (See Figure 1.) 

When you are typing in your child's 
medical history (HI$ in Line 1030), you 
do not have to worry about how the 



information will print out. I have in- 
cluded another simple wordwrap rou- 
tine in lines 550 to 600. 

You may not have anything to include 
for a particular entry. Perhaps your 
family physician is caring for your child 
and you do not have a specific pedia- 
trician. In this case, you may omit that 
particular line at the end of the pro- 
gram. Preferably, though, you should 
place an apostrophe O or the command 
REM after the line number to make that 
line into a remarked statement. This 
would allow you to use that entry in the 
future if the occasion arises. 

The computer will usually skip all 
lines referring to the omitted entry on 
the form. If the medical history section 
or the hospital of choice entry is omit- 
ted, the form will contain a note stating 
that there are no specific instructions at 
this time. This is to prevent confusion 
by emergency personnel who may think 
the information was accidentally omit- 
ted rather than deliberately deleted. 

Also, you can change or add to the 



doctors listed in the sample program. 
For example, you may want to list a 
specific allergist. You should change or 
add to the doctors' identification strings 
at the end of the program, along with 
the printing instructions located in lines 
690 to 710. The format used should be 
the same as for the other doctors. 

Special printer control codes are not 
required for the printing of the docu- 
ment, which makes the program easy to 
use by owners of all types of printers. 
A form feed, CHR$ ( 12 ) , is used in Line 
830 to advance the paper when printing 
is done; this can be deleted if your 
printer does not accept it. You can add 



special codes, as you wish, to dress up 
the document. Be careful, though, in 
adding too many features to the form: 
When the permanent medical history 
string and the additional information 
entry are both near maximum length, 
the form uses almost the entire length 
of an 1 1-inch sheet of paper. 

The document generated by this 
program is based on a form distributed 
as a public service by Riverside Meth- 
odist Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. It is 
the kind of form that every family 
should keep on hand and fill out when- 
ever parents or children will be away 
from home. Unfortunately in my case, 



when I need a form such as this one, I 
usually have no idea where I've put my 
copy for "safekeeping," or I've already 
used my last copy without making a 
duplicate blank. By using this program, 
you can make a ready copy quickly, 
without having to look up names and 
phone numbers and without acciden- 
tally omitting important information. 



(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 5201 Wilcox Road, Amlin, 
OH 43002, Please enclose an SASE 
when writing for a response,) □ 




260 


131 


410 


193 


500 


122 


660 


214 


760 


. .109 


920 


29 


END 


...157 



The listing: MED FORM 



10 
20 

3J3 
4J3 
5j3 
6j3 
70 

80 
9J3 

150 

160 

170 

18J3 



**************************** 

AUTHORIZATION TO CONSENT 

FOR THE TREATMENT OF A MINOR 
**************************** 

PROGRAM BY J. A. UPPERMAN 

BASED ON AN AUTHORIZATION 

FORM BY RIVERSIDE METHODIST 

HOSPITAL, COLUMBUS, OHIO 
**************************** 

1 ENTER THE INFORMATION THAT 
•APPLIES TO YOU AND YOUR 
'CHILD STARTING AT LINE 10J3J3 

I *************************** 

CLEAR 15J3J3: GOSUB Ij30j3 
210 POKE 282, j3 

22J3 CLS:PRINT"AUTHORIZATION TO C 

ONSENT FOR" : PRINT "TREATMENT OF:" 

: PRINT CH$:GOSUB 8 8j3 

2 3j3 PRINT "NAME OF PERSON BEING A 

PPOINTED GUARDIAN? " 

24J3 LINE INPUT GA$ : IF GA$="" THE 

N SOUND 1J80,1: SOUND 5j3,2:GOTO 23 

J3 ELSE GOSUB 880 

250 PRINT" AUTHORIZATION EXPIRES 
ON NOON": PRINT "OF WHAT DATE?" 
260 LINE INPUT EX$:IF EX$="" THE 
N SOUND 150,1: SOUND 100, 2: GOTO 2 
50 ELSE GOSUB 880 

270 PRINT "MEDICAL HISTORY ON FIL 
E: " : IF HI$="" THEN PRINT: PRINT" 
«NOTHING ON FILE AT THIS TIME» 
": PRINT: GOTO 29)3 
280 PRINT HI$ 

290 PRINT"DO YOU WISH TO ADD TO 



THIS INFORMATION <y/n>"; 

300 INPUT YN$:IF YN$="n" OR YN$= 
"N" THEN 3 30 ELSE IF YN$o"y" AN 
D YN$<>"Y" THEN 290 
310 CLS: PRINT "TYPE IN ADDITIONAL 
INFORMATION" : PRINT" (250 CHARACT 
ERS MAXIMUM) " : PRINT 
320 LINE INPUT MH$ 

3 30 GOSUB 880: PRINT "PARENT SIGNI 
NG FORM:" 

340 PRINT"1> " ;PA$(1) :PRINT"2> " 
; PA$ (2 ): INPUT "ENTER 1 OR 2";PN 
350 IF PNOI AND PN<>2 THEN 330 



n) -eJ ti ti tJ il •al'aJ ■H >zl ^jl 



by Vidicom Corp 



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Vidicom Corp 20 E n mam SI. 71 D 

ITlesa, HZ 85201 1602 J 827-D 1D7 Multi-pak is the trademark of 

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April 1988 THE RAINBOW 25 




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Please add $1.00 shipping 
Arizona Residients add 5.5% Sales tan 
Visa IllasterCard orders welcome 



360 GOSUB 880 

370 PRINT 11 SET THE PRINTER TO THE 

TOP OF THE PAPER" 
380 PRINT: INPUT "PRESS <ENTER> WH 
EN READY. ";YN$ 
390 

400 'PRINTING FORM 
410 CLS: PRINT "PLEASE WAIT - PRIN 
TING FORM": GOSUB 880 
420 FOR CT-1 TO 2 : PRINT #-2 : NEXT 
430 PRINT#-2,TAB(14) "AUTHORIZATI 
ON TO CONSENT FOR TREATMENT OF A 
MINOR" 

440 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(8) "I h 

ereby grant to : " ; GA$ 

450 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(8) "Aut 

hority to give an informed conse 
nt for the treatment of:":PRINT# 
-2 , TAB ( 12 ) CH$ ; " Born : » ; DA$ : PRI 

NT#-2 

460 PRINT#-2,TAB (8) "Should such 
child require medical care of an 
y nature by reason" : PRINT#-2 , TAB 
(8) "of any condition or incident 
, except that the following proc 
edures" : PRINT #-2, TAB (8) "should n 
ot be performed without my conse 
nt unless the concurring" 
470 PRINT#-2, TAB (8) "medical opin 
ion of two physicians is that su 
ch procedures are":PRINT#-2,TAB( 
8) "necessary to relieve the suff 
ering or preserve the life or li 
mb":PRINT#-2,TAB(8) "of such chil 
d and I cannot be reached after 
reasonable attempts." 
480 PRINT#-2 

490 PRINT#-2,TAB(12) "A> Major Su 
rg§ry" 

500 IF 0T$<>"" THEN PRINT#-2,TAB 
(12) "B> ";0T$ 
510 PRINT#-2 

520 PRINT#-2,TAB(6) "Facts concer 
ning the child's history , includ 
ing allergies, ":PRINT# -2, TAB (8) " 
physical impairments and medicat 
ions being taken, to which a": PR 
INT#-2 , TAB (8) "physician should b 
e alerted are as follows:" 

530 PRINT#-2 

540 IF HI$="" AND MH$="" THEN PR 

INT#-2,TAB(12) "No special instru 
ctions at this time.": GOTO 680 
550 A$=HI$+» " 

560 IF A$="" OR A$=" " THEN 610 

570 FOR CT=60 TO. 1 STEP-1 

580 IF MID$(A$,CT,1)<>" "THEN NE 

XT 

590 B$=LEFT$(A$,CT) : PRINT#-2 , TAB 
( 12 ) / B$ 

600 A=LEN(A$) :A$=RIGHT$(A$, (A-CT 



) ) :GOTO 560 
610 PRINT#-2 
620 C$=MH$+" " 

630 IF C$="'» OR C$=" " THEN 680 

640 FOR CT=60 TO 1 STEP-1 

650 IF MID$(C$,CT,1)<>" "THEN NE 

XT 

660 D$=LEFT$ (C$,CT) : PRINT#-2 , TAB 
(12) ;D$ 

670 C=LEN(C$) :C$=RIGHT$(C$, (C-CT 
) ) :GOTO 630 
680 PRINT#-2 

690 IF PE$<>"" THEN PRINT#-2,TAB 

(8) "Our Pediatrician is: ";PE$: 
PRINT # - 2 , T AB ( 1 2 ) " Phone : " ; PP $ : PRI 
NT#-2 

700 IF FA$<>"" THEN PRINT#-2,TAB 

(8) "Our family physician is: "; 
FA$ : PRINT#-2 , TAB (12 ) "Phone : " ; FP$ 
:PRINT#-2 

710 IF DE$<>"" THEN PRINT#-2,TAB 
(8) "Our Dentist is: ";DE$: PRINT 
#-2 , TAB (12) "Phone: " ; DP$ : PRINT#-2 
720 PRINT#-2,TAB(8) "Our Hospital 

of choice is: " ; 
730 IF H0$="" THEN PRINT#-2,"No 
specific Hospital" :PRINT#-2 ELSE 

PRINT#-2 ,H0$:PRINT#-2 
740 IF HE$<>"" THEN PRINT#-2,TAB 
(8) "Our Health Insurance Plan is 
: ";HE$:PRINT#-2,TAB(12)"I.D. Nu 
mber: " ;ID$:PRINT#-2 
750 PRINT#-2,TAB(8) "This authori 
zation expires at noon on ";EX$ 
760 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:P 
RINT # - 2 , TAB ( 8 ) STRING$ (24,"-") ; TA 
B(40) ;STRING$(32,"-") 
770 PRINT #-2, TAB (8) "Witness"; TAB 
(40) ; "Parent 1 s Signature 
Date" 

780 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(40) ;PA 
$(PN) 

790 PRINT#-2,TAB(40) ;ST$ 

800 PRINT#-2,TAB(40) ;CI$ 

810 PRINT#-2,TAB(40) ; "Home Phone 

: ";HP$ 

820 IF WP$(PN)<>"" THEN PRINT#-2 

, TAB (40) "Work Phone: ";WP$(PN) 

830 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (12) ; 1 FORM FEE 

D -OMIT IF YOUR PRINTER DOES NOT 

ACCEPT IT. 

840 CLS : PRINT "THE FORM FOR " : PRI 

NTCH$: PRINT" IS FINISHED PRINTING 
ii 

850 POKE 282,255 
860 END 

870 **************************** 

880 PRINT STRING$ (32, "*"): RETURN 
900 '*************************** 

910 'SUBSTITUTE THE INFORMATION 
THAT APPLIES TO YOU AND YOUR 



26 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



Run VIP on your Color 
Computer 1, 2 or 3! 



CHILD ON THE FOLLOWING LINES. 
920 'note! ANY LINE THAT DOES 
NOT APPLY TO YOU OR YOUR CHILD, 
SUCH AS A SPECIFIC TYPE OF DOC- 
TOR OR PARENT'S WORK PHONE NUM- 
BER MAY BE OMITTED OR PRECEDED 
WITH AN APOSTROPHE <'>. THE 
COMPUTER WILL SKIP THAT ENTRY ON 
THE FORM. 

99p **************************** 
1000 CH$=»John E. Doe Jr." 'CHI 

LD ! S NAME 

1010 DA$=" January 1, 1978" »CHIL 
D'S DATE OF BIRTH 
1020 OT$= !, Treatment with penicil 
lin based antibiotics"' OTHER TRE 

ATMENT RESTRICTED. 50 CHARACTERS 
MAXIMUM. 

1030 HI$="John Jr. is allergic t 

0 Penicillin. 11 

1040 'HI$ IS THE CHILD'S MEDICAL 
HISTORY. 240 CHARACTER MAXIMUM 
LENGTH . 

1050 PE$="A. Kiddedoc M.D." 'PED 
IATRICIAN 

1060 PP$="(614) 555-1234" ! PEDIA 
TRICIAN'S PHONE 

1070 FA$="I. Kurem, M.D. 11 1 FAM 
ILY DOCTOR 

1080 FP$="(614) 555-5678" 1 FAMIL 
Y DOCTOR'S PHONE 

1090 DE$="I Yankum D.D.S." 'FAMI 
LY DENTIST 

1100 DP$="(614) 555-9012" 1 DENTI 
ST'S PHONE 

1110 HO$="County General Hospita 

1 West" 'HOSPITAL OF CHOICE 
1120 HE$="Blue Cross" 'HEALTH IN 
SURANCE 

1130 ID$="1122-33445" 'I.D. NUMB 
ER 

1140 PA$(l)="Mr. John E. Doe, Sr 

'FATHER'S NAME 
1150 PA$(2)="Mrs. Jane Doe" 'MOT 
HER' S NAME 

1160 ST$="123 E. Main St." 'STRE 
ET ADDRESS 

1170 CI$="Anytown / Ohio 43210" 1 

CITY AND STATE 

1180 HP$="(614) 555-9876" 'HOME 
PHONE 

1190 WP$ (1)=" (614) 555-5432" ' F 

ATHER'S WORK PHONE 

1200 WP$(2)="(614) 555-2345" ' M 

OTHER'S WORK PHONE 

1210 RETURN 



VIP Calc 

"MORE USEABLE FEATURES"-Feb 1985 "Rainbow" 

Now every CoCo owner has access to a calculating and 

planning tool better than VisiCalc, containing all its 
features and commands and then some. VIP Calc displays 
32, 51, 64 or 85 characters by 21 or 24 lines right on the 
screen. VIP Calc allows up to a 33K worksheet with up to 
512 columns by 1024 rowsl In addition, VIP calc has multiple 
windows which allow you to compare and contrast results of 
changes. Other features include 1 6 DIGIT PRECISION • trig, 
functions • averaging • algebraic functions • column and row 
ascending or descending SORTS • locate formulas or titles in 
cells • block move and replicate • global or local column width 
• limitless programmable functions • works with any printer, 
Embed printer control codes for customized printing. 
Combine spreadsheet tables with VIP Writer documents to 
create ledgers, projections, statistical and financial budgets 
an rj repo rls. Reg uirea 64 K TAPE $4$M DISK $59,95 

VIP Database 

"ONE OF THE BEST" JULY 1984 "RAINBOW" 

The VIP Database features selectable screen displays of 51, 
64 or 85 characters by 24 lines for maximum utility. It will 
handle as many records as will fit on your disks and is 
structured in a simple and easy to understand menu system 
with full prompting for easy operation. Your data is stored in 
records of your own design. All files are fully indexed for 
speed and efficiency. Full sort of records is provided for easy 
listing of names, figures, addresses etc., in ascending or 
descending alphabetic or numerical order. Records can be 
searched for specific entries, using multiple search criteria. 
With Database mail-merge you may also combine files, sort 
and print mailing lists, print form letters, address envelopes - 
the list is endless. The built-in MATH package even performs 
arithmetic operations and updates other fields. VIP Database 
also has unlimited print format and report generation with em- 
bed able control codes for use with all printers, DISK $49.95 



Coming Soon: VIP Database III 



VIP Terminal 

RATED BEST IN JANUARY 1984 "RAINBOW" 

For your important communications needs you've got to go 

beyond software that only lets you chat. You need a smart 
terminal so that you can send and receive programs and 
messages and print them! The VIP Terminal features 32, 51, 
64 or 85 characters by 21 or 24 lines on the screen and has a 
43,000 byte buffer in a 64K computer to store information. 
Req u i res 32K TAPE $29 ,95 DISK $}9SS 



CoCo 3 owners upgrade your VIP Calc, Database or Termina 
to run on the CoCo 3 for $30 +$3 S/H. S end orig inal [product 



VIP Disk-Zap 

RAVED ABOUT IN THE APRIL 1983 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Disk-Zap is the ultimate repair utility for simple and quick 

repair of most disk errors. Designed with the non-programmer 
in mind> the VIP Disk-Zap wilt let you retrieve all types of 
bashed files, BASIC and Machine Code programs. The 50 
page tutorial makes the novice an expert. DISK $24*95 



SD Enterprises POIL 1233 Gresham, Or. 97030 (503) 663-2865 
Please add $3.00 for shipping. COD orders add an additional $2.25. Personal 
checks allow 3 wests for delivery. All other orders shipped the same day. 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 27 



1 F e atur e 



A database for all your old family recipes 

Good Things Are Cookin' 

on CoCo 

j-" — — • — ■ — — — — > — mmm im* mmm — — _ — — -~ «. ^ 

- - ^WOT ^^^m ^^^m ^^^m ^m^m ^^^m -^m^^ ^^^m 

By Brad Spencer 



Are you tired of the same sloppy, 
disorganized recipe box? With 
Recipe Filer you can say good- 
bye to all those greasy old cards and 
store your family secrets on your CoCo. 

Recipe Filer allows you to save, load, 
edit and print out your recipes in a 3- 
by-5 card format. You can even cate- 
gorize your concoctions so that finding 
them will be fast. 

The program i$ user-prompting, 
menu-driven and very easy to use. On 
running the program, you are presented 
with the main menu and its six num- 
bered options: Enter Recipe, List Rec- 
ipe, Print Recipe, Save Recipe, Load 
Recipe and Edit Recipe. Just press a 
number — you won't need to press 
ENTER, as 1 used INKEVS instead of an 
INPUT command. 

Filing It Away 

Before you can do anything else with 
this program, you must enter a recipe. 

— t -"""" ■ * i ..I, 

Brad Spencer is a student in Crawfords- 
ville, Indiana, and has been program- 
ming for the CoCo for four years. He 
enjoys making programs for the special 
education classes at his school. 



At the main menu, press 1 (Enter Rec- 
ipe). You are dropped into the Catego- 
ries submenu, where you must choose 
the category under which you will file 
your recipe — main dishes, cakes, 



\ 



\ 
\ 
\ 



coo*** s 



\ 



\ 



salads, pastry, soups, meats, etc. 

There are 10 categories, including 
^Other" for dishes that don't fit into the 
categories I have provided. For the 
submenu prompts, I used INPUT com- 



\ 

I 
v 

i 



„ coco coo*i* s 



V 

\ 

t 



\ 
\ 



1 «* u iff 

-> cup d rol 1 ^ 2-U 2 



\ 
\ 



\ 
\ 
\ 



\ 
\ 
\ 
\ 

I 

1 

V 
\ 

\ 



28 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



For over 5 years now, Telewriter has been 
the #1 Color Computer word processor, 
both in popularity and in performance. 
Telewriter's near perfect mix of sophisti- 
cated professional features and a very natu- 
ral user interface, has earned it the highest 
praise in numerous magazines, and an in- 
tensely loyal following among tens of thou- 
sands of Color Computer users all over the 
world. 



HISTORY 



Throughout the history of the Color Com- 
puter, Telewriter has pioneered software 
breakthroughs that set the standards. 

In 1981, it was Telewriter 1.0 that first took 
the Color Computer's inadequate 32X16 all- 
uppercase display, and replaced it with a 
graphics-based 51X24 upper and lowercase 
display. 

A few years later, Telewriter-64 added high 
density 64X24 and 85X24 displays and ac- 
cess to the full 64K of the newer Color 
Computers. 



THE NEW MiV 



Today, Telewriter-64 is recognized as the 
standard Color Computer word processor. It 
runs on all Tandy Color Computers — from 
the original Color Computer 1, to the Color 
Computer 2, and 3. 

But the Color Computer 3 brings a whole 
new level of power to low cost computing 
and, so, a new Telewriter is here to put that 
power to work for you. We call it Telewriter 
128. 



II I I WRIT! R MH 



You don't mess with a good thing, so 
Telewriter-128 is still Telewriter-64 at heart. 
The commands, and the user interface are 
essentially the same. If you know 
Telewriter-64, then you already know 
Telewriter-128. And, if you don't know 
Telewriter-64, you'll still have an easy time 
learning and using Telewriter-128. 



80 COLUMNS 



But there are major differences as well, First, 
Telewriter-128 uses the Color Computer 3's 
new 80 column screen display. 

This means, simply, that using Telewriter- 
1 28 on a low cost Color Computer 3 will look 
a lot like using a more expensive word 
processor on a much more expensive IBM 
PC, PS/2, or clone. 



SPEED 



Second, Telewriter-128 is lightning fast. 
Telewriter-64 was fast in its own right, but, 
by accessing the Color Computer 3's video 
hardware directly, and by running the 
machine in double speed mode, Telewriter- 
128 is able to provide extremely fast scroll- 
ing and instant paging — functions whose 
speed is crucial to serious word processing. 

In this department, Telewriter-128 doesn't 
simply keep up with IBM-based word proc- 
essors — it generally surpasses them! 



EASE 



Third, Telewriter-128 adds a host of new 
features big and small, that make it even 
easier to use. 

Features like: Quick function key access to 
the editor or the menus — an instant on-line 
help screen summarizing all Telewriter 
commands and special characters — an 
option file w here you store your personal set 
of format and screen settings so you only 
have to set them once! 

Then, there's a quick save feature which 
allows you to save all your current work 
without leaving the editor. There's a simple 
way to cursor through the disk directory and 
read in a file by just hitting ENTER. And 
there's more. 



NEW POWER 



Telewriter-64 always had the power to 
handle any kind of serious writing, from 
letters to textbooks. But, here too, 
Telewriter-128 adds major features. 



Like Macros — which let you insert whole 
words or phrases (even sets of control codes 
or format commands) into your text, with a 
single keypress. And every time you power 
up Telewriter-128, the macro definitions are 
automatically loaded*, so they're always 
there. 

Then there's a Print Preview feature that 
shows you. on-screen, the way your printed 
text will look — with margins f headers, 
centering, justification, page numbering, 
and page breaks. This guarantees letter 
perfect documents every time, and makes 
tasks like widow/orphan line elimination, a 
breeze, 



TELEWRITERS ok TEI E\\ RH ER 1 28 



We could go on listing features, but the point 
is this: If you own a Color Computer, you al- 
ready have the hardware for the most 
powerful, low cost word processor in town. 
All you need now is to add the heart and 
soul: 

Telewriter-64, for the Color Computer 1 
and 2, costs $59.95 on disk, $49.95 on 
cassette. 

Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 
costs $79.95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

To order by Mastercard or Visa call (619) 
755-1258 anytime, or send check or money 
order plus $2 shipping (Calif ornians add 6% 
sales tax) to: 

COGNTTEC 

704 Nob Ave. 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

To upgrade from Telewriter-64 to 
Telewriter-128, return your original disk or 
cassette with $39.95. (Add $10 if you're also 
upgrading from cassette to disk. Deduct $10 
with proof of Oct '87 - Feb '88, purchase of 
Telewriter-64.) 

When I first got Telewriter-64 last year, 
I was in heaven. I couldn't believe the 
program's versatility and ease of use. 

-The RAINBOW, Oct. 1985 



TELEWRITER-64 FEATURES: Compatibility with any printer that works with 
the Color Computer; embedded control codes for underlining, boldface, sub/ 
superscript, variable fonts; format commands for headers, centering, margin and 
spacing changes anywhere in the document; Format menu to set margins, 
spacing, page numbering, BAUD rate, lines per page, justification; Chain 
printing for one shot printing of multi-file documents. Fast, full-screen editor 
with wordwrap, block copy /move/delete, global search and replace, wild card 
search, fast 4-way auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward 
paging, text alignment, tabs, error protection, word and line counter. Insert or 
delete text anywhere on the screen. Simple, easy to remember commands. 
Optional ASCII files for compatibility with spell checkers, terminal programs, 



and BASIC. Load, save, append, partial save files to disk or cassette. Kill, rename 
and list disk files. Cassette verify and auto-retry on error. 
TELEWRITER- 1 28 - ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Print preview from editor; 
multiple copy print; footers; hanging indents; cursor thru disk directory to load, 
append, rename and kill files; quick file save from editor; keyclick; key repeat; 
true block move; 24, 25, or 28 line screen; 40 or 80 column screen; dual speed 
cursor; on-line help; overstrike mode; word delete; wordwrap at margin; user 
definable macros; nested macros; instant status window for information on 
cursor position, word count, etc.; instant function key access to menus or editor; 
options menu for setting character and screen colors, key repeat and delay rates, 
definable foreign symbols. 



IBM and PS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines Inc. 'disk version only 



mands, so press ENTER after pressing 
the category number of your choice. (As 
you may notice, I have reserved four 
categories for sweets. If you are not as 
sweetly inclined, feel free to edit lines 80 
and 140, substituting categories of your 
choice.) 

After you choose the category, you 
are dropped into the "Enter Recipe" 
screen. As you are reminded onscreen, 
you have 30 lines in which to write your 
recipe, and are limited to a maximum 
of 40 characters per line. You'll notice 
the cursor blinking at the beginning of 
the first line — that means start typing! 
If you want upper- and lowercase ca- 
pability, press the SHIFT-0 combination 
before you begin, but make sure you 
"turn it off by pressing the combina- 
tion again when you're finished. 

When you have reached the end of 
your first line (which you will probably 
want to reserve for the title), press 
ENTER. If you entered tob many char- 
acters, the program will tell you so and 
have you enter the line again. Just keep 
entering lines and pressing ENTER for 
each until you reach the 30th line. (Even 
if your recipe takes up only 10 lines, you 
must "use up" 30 lines — just keep 
pressing ENTER.) When you have en- 



tered the 30th line, you are told you 
have no lines left and are booted back 
to the main menu. YouVe done it! The 
hard part is over! . 

Your Options 

Now that you've entered a recipe, 
you'll probably want to look at it. Press 
2 (List Recipe) at the main menu to list 
your creation. Your recipe slowly scrolls 
up the screen. Press any key to return 
to the main menu. If you noticed any 
mistakes in the recipe, you can correct 
them by pressing main menu's Option 
6 (Edit Recipe). 

From the Edit screen, you must 
choose to edit either the category name 
or a line. If you choose to edit a line, 
you will again see the recipe scroll by. 
Find the line that needs fixing and type 
in its number. If, for example, Line 5 
needs editing, press 5 and then ENTER. 
A new, blank Line 5 appears; re-enter 
it. You are then booted back to the main 
menu. If there are more mistakes to 
correct, repeat the process. 

When you have the recipe corrected, 
you will want to save it. Just press 4 
(Save Recipe) at the main menu and 
follow the prompts. Recipe Filer was 
designed for a disk system, but if you 



have a cassette, you can modify the 
program for your use: Change all occur- 
rences of WRITE ttl to PRINT ttl; INPUT 
ttl to INPUTtt-1; OPEN ttl to OPENtt-1; 
and CLOSE ttl to CLOSE tt-1. 

Now that your recipe is saved, you 
can call it back into memory whenever 
you want by pressing 5 (Load Recipe) 
at the main menu and answering the 
prompts. 

Trying to follow your recipe from a 
monitor in the kitchen would not be 
very practical, so I have included an 
option that prints out your recipe in a 
3-by-5 inch format (in case you're 
missing those greasy cards). Just press 
3 (Print Recipe) at the main menu and 
follow the prompts. Most printers 
should work fine. 

You can cut out your new "cards" 
and store them in the old recipe box. 
But you won't have to worry about 
losing them or cramping your hand 
copying cooking instructions for 
dinner guests who must have your rec- 
ipe! 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at #2 McCormick Drive, Crawfords- 
ville, IN 47933. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing for a reply.) □ 



Corrections 



(See Page 14 for additional corrections.) 



The Post Office" (MarcJ 1988, Page 104): Due to a 

production error, a portio 1 of the Post Office program 
was inadvertently omittei from the magazine. The 
following lines should be added to the program. 
RAINBOW ON TAPE and I AINBOW ON DISK were not 
affected and include the c omplete program. 

6485 IF A*0^MD INSTR(DF$,SD$)>0 

THEN FL(2)=X& ETURN 
6490 IF A-0 AND INSTR (DO$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL (2 )-l: RETURN 
6495 RETURN 

6500 ' — PRINT AND INPUT SUBROUT 
INE — 

6505 PRINTTAB(TB) " CODE:" 
;:ATTR 1,0:PRINTV$(1) 
6510 PRINTTAB (TB) " NAME:" 
; : ATTR 1,0:PRINTV$(2) 
6515 PRINTTAB (TB) " ADDRESS : " 

; : ATTR 1,0: PRINT V$(3) 
6520 PRINTTAB (TB) " 
; : ATTR 1,0: PRINT V$(4) 
6525 PRINTTAB (TB) " 
;:ATTR 1,0:PRINTV$(5) 
6530 PRINTTAB (TB)" 
;:ATTR 1,0:PRINTV$ (6) 
6535 PRINTTAB (TB) " TELEPHONE #: 
; : ATTR 1,0:PRINTV$(7) 
6540 PRINTTAB (TB) " F,L NAME: " 
; : ATTR 1,0:PRINTV$(8) 
6545 PRINTTAB (TB) " COUNTRY : " 

;:ATTR 1,0:PRINTV$(9) 
6550 LOCATE 0,9 

6555 GU«0:R«9:C«DC:L-10:VN*1:GOS 
UB 7000: IF GU-1 THEN 6555 
6560 GU-0:R«10:C-DC:L-25:VN-2:GO 
SUB 7000 : IF GU-1 THEN 6555 



CITY: " 
STATE:" 
ZIP: " 



it 



6565 R-ll:C=DC:L-25:VN=3:GOSUB 7 

000: IF GU=1 THEN 6560 

6570 GU-0:R=12:C=DC:L=25:VN=4:GO 

SUB 7000: IF GU-1 THEN 6565 

6575 GU-0:R=13:C=DC:L=10:VN-5:GO 

SUB 7000: IF GU-1 THEN 6570 

6580 GU-0:FL(3)-1:GOSUB 7150:GOS 

UB 7040:R=14:C«DC:L-7:VNN=6:GOSU 

B 7000: IF GU-1 THEN 6575 

6585 GU=0:R=15:C=DC:L=14:VN=7:GO 

SUB 7000: IF GU-1 THEN 6580 

6590 GU=0:R-16:C-DC:L=25:VN-8:GO 

SUB 7000: IF GU=1 THEN 6585 

6595 GU=0:R-17:C=DC:L=25:VN-9:GO 

SUB 7000: IF GU-1 THEN 6590 

6600 RETURN 

6605 , — INPUT LIMIT SUB-ROUTINE 

6610 S$-"" 
6615 M-L+C 
6620 LOCATE C,R 
6625 P-C-l 

6630 LOCATE P+l,R:GOSUB 7190 
6635 IF IK$-CHR$(9) THEN 6630 
6640 IF IK$=" A " THEN UA-1 : RETURN 
6645 IF IK$=CHR$(8) AND P=(C-1) 
THEN S$-"":GOTO 6630 ELSE IF IK 
$-CHR$(8) THEN LOCATE P,R: ATTR 3 
,0:PRINT" ";:LOCATE P-1,R: P-P-l : 
S$-MID$(S$,1,LEN(S$)-1) :GOTO 663 

P 

For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DRTR 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIO 
prompt. 



30 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



Msik i n 



si 




MicroWorld 



) 1=3 + 



C o C o 



A, IF" F" OR S3 A, E3. LEE - 



CoCo III 


$145 


Drive 0 


$175 


Drive 0 (NEW) 


$199 


CM-8 Monitor 


$248 


Deluxe Joystick 


$ 24 


Mouse 


$40 


Joysticks (pair) 


$13 


Disk storage box (50) 


$12.50 


CCR-81 Cass. Rec. 


$42 



Disks (SS) 
Disks (DS) 



$7.00/box 
$7.50/box 



Includes free library case 



DMP-106 Special Offer $145 

DMP-130A(120CPS) $265 
DMP-440 $545 



_ Special 
Tandy 1000 SX Offer $499 

Tandy 1000 HX $555 

Tandy 1000 TX $899 



VM-4 Monitor 

CM-5 Monitor 
CM-11 Monitor 



$ 99 

$240 
$325 



CoCo3 512K Upgrade 
MultiPak Upgrade (26-3024) 
MultiPak Upgrade (26-3124) 
OS-9 Level 2 



$130 
$ 10 
$ 10 
$ 63.95 



Minimum Order $15.00 



* Please Note - Our ads are submitted 
early, so prices are subject to change!!! 
We appreciate your cooperation 8. 
understanding in this matter 



Method of Payment.- 

MC. Visa, Am.Ex. - Sorry, No Citiline! 

Certified Check or Money Order. 

Personal Checks - Allow 1 week to clear! 



if&£® s?&a©s slush* awmmlaihls 
mum, ass? <mw &jul vabhby m^sms^mm 



Full TANDY 

Warranty 
100* TANDY 

PRODUCTS 

FREE UPS Shipping 
ton orders over $50.00 
under $50 add $2.00 



==> CALL <== 

In Pa: 
215 863-8911 

In N. J. : 
201 735-6138 




COMPUTER CENTER 



MicroWorld 



230 Mo or est own Road, Wind Gap, PA 18091 



laneco Plaza, Clinton, N.J. 08809 



ALL F>R 



100% 



C.O.D. ADD $5.00 

ICES INCLUDE SHIPPING T! I I 

(In Continental US) 

TANDY EQUIPMENT WITH FULL 
RADIO SHACK WARRANTY 




249 



150 103 

260 147 

320 55 

430 97 

540 47 

END 101 



The listing: RECIPES 

10 • RECIPE FILER 

20 1 BY BRAD SPENCER 

30 CLEAR 2000:DIM W$(30) 

40 CLS : PRINT@4 1 , "RECIPE FILER" :P 

RINT@96,"1> ENTER RECIPE" : PRINT 

"2> LIST RECIPE" : PRINT "3> PRINT 

RECIPE": PRINT "4> SAVE RECIPE": 
PRINT "5> LOAD RECIPE" : PRINT "6> 

EDIT RECIPE" :PRINTS352, "SELECT 
(1-6) :"; 

5J3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=" ft THEN 50 
60 IF A$<>"1" AND A$<>"2" AND A$ 
<>"3" AND A$<>"4" AND A$<>"5" AN 
D A$<>"6" THEN 50 ELSE ON VAL(A$ 
) GOTO 80,180,230,370,440,520 
70 1 ENTER RECIPE 

80 CLS : PRINT@9 , "ENTER RECIPE": PR 
INTS64, "CATEGORIES: ": PRINT "1> B 
ROWNIES": PRINT "2> CAKES" :PRINT 
"3> COOKIES": PRINT "4> DESSERTS" 
: PRINT "5> MAIN DISHES" : PRINT "6 
> MEATS": PRINT "7> PASTRY" : PRINT 
"8> SALADS": PRINT "9> SOUPS": PR 
INT "10> OTHER" 

90 INPUT "CHOOSE (1-10) : " ;CA$ : IF 
VAL(CA$)>10 THEN 90 ELSE IF VAL 
(CA$)=10 THEN 130 ELSE CLS: PRINT 
@9 , "ENTER RECIPE" : PRINTS 64 , "LIMI 
T OF 30 LINES .": PRINT "(44 CHARA 
CTERS OR LESS) ": PRINT :LI=1:X=1: G 
OTO 140 

100 PRINT LI;"> ";:LINE INPUT "" 
;W$(X):IF LEN(W$(X) )>44 THEN PRI 
NT "TOO MANY CHARACTERS !": GOTO 1 
00 ELSE 110 

110 IF W$(X)="END" THEN 40 ELSE 
IF LI>29 THEN 120 ELSE LI=LI+1:X 
=X+l:GOTO 100 

120 LI=LI+1: PRINT "NO MORE LINES 
LEFT.": FOR D=l TO 1000: NEXT D:G 
OTO 40 

130 INPUT "NAME OF CATEGORY" ;CB$ 
:IF LEN(CB$)>13 THEN PRINT "13 C 
HARACTERS OR LESS!":GOTO 130 ELS 
E CLS: PRINTS 9, "ENTER RECIPE": PRI 
NTS 6 4, "LIMIT OF 30 LINES .": PRINT 
"(44 CHARACTERS OR LESS)": PRINT 

:LI=l:X=l:GOTO 100 



140 IF CA$="1" THEN CB$="BROWNIE 
S" ELSE IF CA$="2" THEN CB$="CAK 
ES" ELSE IF CA$="3" THEN CB$="CO 
OKIES" ELSE IF CA$="4" THEN CB$= 
"DESSERTS" ELSE IF CA$="5" THEN 
CB$="MAIN DISHES" ELSE IF CA$="6 
" THEN CB$="MEATS" ELSE 150 
150 IF CA$="7" THEN CB$="PASTRY" 
ELSE IF CA$="8" THEN CB$="SALAD 
S" ELSE IF CA$="9" THEN CB$="SOU 
PS" ELSE IF CA$<>"1" AND CA$<>"2 
" AND CA$<>"3" AND CA$<>"4" AND 
CA$<>"5" AND CA$<>"6" AND CA$<>" 
7" AND CA$<>"8" AND CA$<>"9" THE 
N CB$="BROWNIES" 
160 GOTO 100 
170 1 LIST RECIPE 

180 CLS: PRINTS 10, "LIST RECIPE" :P 
RINTS 64 , "CATAGORY : " ; CB$ : PRINT : I 
F LI=30 THEN 200 

190 FOR 1=1 TO LI-l:PRINT W$(I): 
FOR D=l TO 400:NEXT D:NEXT I:GOT 
O 210 

200 FOR 1=1 TO LI:PRINT W$(I):FO 

R D=l TO 400: NEXT D : NEXT I 

210 PRINT: PRINTS 4 5 2, "PRESS ANY K 

EY TO RETURN"; :A$=INKEY$: IF A$=" 

" THEN 210 ELSE GOTO 40 

220 1 PRINT RECIPE 

230 CLS: PRINTS 9, "PRINT RECIPE" :P 

RINTS228, "PRESS <CLEAR> TO PRINT 
it 

240 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=CHR$(12) THE 
N 250 ELSE 240 

250 CLS: PRINTS 2 3 4, "PRINTING. . . " ; 

PRINT#-2," ":P 

RINT#-2,"! \":P 
RINT#-2,"!";TAB(4) ;CB$;TAB(20) ; " 
\":PRINT#-2, "! 
\":PRINT#-2,"! 



MM li 

2 60 PRINT#-2,"!";TAB(50) ;"1»:IF 
LI>16 THEN 310 

270 FOR 1=1 TO LI-l:PRINT#-2,"l 

";W$(I) ;TAB(50) ;"!":NEXT IMP L 
1=1 THEN LM=15 ELSE IF LI=2 THEN 

LM=14 ELSE IF LI=3 THEN LM=13 E 
LSE IF LI=4 THEN LM=12 ELSE IF L 
1=5 THEN LM=11 ELSE IF LI=6 THEN 

LM=10 ELSE IF LI=7 THEN LM=9 EL 
SE IF LI=8 THEN LM=8 
280 IF LI=9 THEN LM=7 ELSE IF LI 
=10 THEN LM=6 ELSE IF LI=11 THEN 

LM=5 ELSE IF LI=12 THEN LM=4 EL 
SE IF LI=13 THEN LM=3 ELSE IF LI 
=14 THEN LM=2 ELSE IF LI=15 THEN 

LM=1 ELSE IF LI=16 THEN 300 
290 FOR 1=1 TO LM:PRINT#-2,"!";T 



32 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



AB(50) ;"!":NEXT I 

300 PRINT#-2 , " ! " ; TAB ( 50 ) ; ■ ! * : PRI 

NT#-2, " 

":GOTO 

40 

310 FOR 1=1 TO 15:PRINT#-2, M ! " 
;W$(I) ;TAB(50) ;"!":NEXT I:PRINT# 
-2 , " ! " ;TAB(50) ; " ! » : PRINT #-2 , " 



. ii i ii 



M :PRINT#-2,"!";T 



AB(50). . 
320 FOR 1=16 TO LI-1 : PRINT#-2 , " ! 

n ;W$(I) ;TAB(50) ;"! M :NEXT I:IF 
LI=17 THEN LM=14 ELSE IF LI=18 T 
HEN LM=13 ELSE IF LI=19 THEN LM= 
12 ELSE IF LI=2j3 THEN LM=11 ELSE 

IF LI=21 THEN LM=10 ELSE 
330 IF LI=23 THEN LM=8 ELSE IF L 
1=24 THEN LM=7 ELSE IF LI=25 THE 
N LM=6 ELSE IF LI=26 THEN LM=5 E 
LSE IF LI=27 THEN LM=4 ELSE IF L 
1=28 THEN LM=3 ELSE IF LI=29 THE 
N LM=2 ELSE IF LI=30 THEN LM=1 E 
LSE IF LI=31 THEN 300 
340 FOR 1=1 TO LM:PRINT#-2,"!";T 
AB(50) ; M !":NEXT I 
350 GOTO 300 
360 ' SAVE RECIPE 

370 CLS : PRINT @ 10," SAVE RECIPE" :P 
RINT : LINE INPUT "NAME OF FILE: 11 

;F$ 

380 PRINT@228, "PRESS <ENTER> TO 
SAVE.":A$=INKEY$:IF A$=CHR$(13) 
THEN 390 ELSE 380 

390 CLS : PRINT© 2 34," SAVING . . .":OP 
EN "0",#1,F$: PRINT "CATEGORY: »;C 
B$: WRITE #1,CB$:IF LI=30 THEN 41 

400 FOR 1=1 TO LI-1:WRITE #1,W$( 
I) :NEXT I:GOTO 420 
410 FOR 1=1 TO LI: WRITE #1,W$(I) 
:NEXT I 

420 CLOSE #1: PRINT "GOT IT!": FOR 



D=l TO 500: NEXT D:GOTO 40 

430 ' load recipe 

440 cls: prints 10, "load recipe" :p 

rint: line input "name of file: " 

;f$ 

450 prints 2 2 8, "press <enter> to 

LOAD.":A$=INKEY$:IF A$=CHR$(13) 
THEN 460 ELSE 450 

460 CLS: PRINT© 2 3 3, "LOADING. . .":0 

PEN "I",#1,F$:LI=1:INPUT #1,CB$: 

PRINT "CATEGORY: ";CB$ 

470 IF EOF(l) THEN 490 

480 INPUT #1,W$ (LI) : PRINT W$(LI) 

:LI=LI+l:GOTO 470 

490 CLOSE # 1 : PRINT : PRINT "GOT IT 
J " : PRINT 

500 PRINTS 4 5 2, "PRESS ANY KEY TO 

RETURN" :A$=INKEY$: IF A$="" THEN 

500 ELSE 40 

510 ' EDIT RECIPE 

520 CLS: PRINT (§10, "EDIT RECIPE" :P 

RINTS 6 4 , " OPTIONS : " : PRINTS 12 8 , " 1> 
CHANGE CATEGORY": PRINT "2> EDIT 
A LINE" : PRINTS224 , "SELECT: " 

530 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="l" THEN 540 
ELSE IF A$="2" THEN 550 ELSE 53 

0 

540 CLS: PRINT "OLD CATEGORY: ";C 
B$ : LINE INPUT "NEW CATEGORY: ";C 
B$:GOTO 40 

550 CLS: IF LI=30 THEN 570 

560 FOR 1=1 TO LI-1: PRINT If") " 

;: PRINT W$(I):FOR D=l TO 400:NEX 

T D:NEXT I: GOTO 580 

570 FOR 1=1 TO LI: PRINT I;") ";: 

PRINT W$(I):FOR D=l TO 400: NEXT 

D : NEXT I 

580 PRINT: LINE INPUT "WHICH LINE 

:";L$:IF VAL(L$)>30 THEN 580 

590 PRINT L$;"> ";W$(VAL(L$)) :PR 

INT L$;"> ";:LINE INPUT "";W$(VA 

L(L$)) 

600 GOTO 40 



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April 1983 THE RAINBOW 33 



' WV 1 " ' J. 



' Fe a ture 

A "personal finance tool box" to help 
manage your resources 



Financial Time Conversions 



By Dale Tinklepaugh 





Money is a subject of vital inter- 
est to most people. And while 
there is more to life than the 
acquisition of wealth, there is nothing 
wrong with managing our financial 
resources wisely. 

Good management requires accurate 
knowledge upon which to base deci- 
sions. To compare investment or financ- 
ing alternatives, it is necessary to com- 
pare their value or cost at the same point 
in time. This article describes a program 
that performs the types of time conver- 
sions needed to do these comparisons. 



Dale Tinklepaugh is a software engineer 
for Hughes Aircraft Radar Systems 
Group and is pursuing a master's degree 
in computer engineering at USC. 



34 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



The program begins with a main 
menu and four entries: Present Value, 
Uniform Series Value, Future Value and 
Interest Rate Conversions. To compute 
a present dollar amount, select the first 
menu entry by pressing the 1 key and 
then ENTER. A secondary menu then 
pops up, allowing conversion from a 
uniform series, a gradient series, a 
proportional series, or a future amount. 

Similarly, the second and third main 
menu selections allow you to convert to 
uniform series values and future values, 
respectively. The fourth main menu 
selection allows you to convert between 
nominal annual and effective annual 
interest rates. 

Present Value of Uniform Series 

A uniform series is a set of equal 
payments for a number of time periods 
at a given rate of interest. Conversion 
from a uniform series to a present value 
is useful for determining how much 
money can be borrowed at a certain 
interest rate without overrunning your 
budget. 

For example, consider Harvey and 
Bridget, a couple who want to purchase 
a house. They can afford payments of 
$900 per month. After choosing the 
Uniform Series option in the Present 
Value menu, the couple would be 
prompted for the number of payment 
periods. For a 30-year loan, they would 
have 30 x 12 = 360 payment periods. 
After entering 360 they would be 
prompted for the interest rate per 
period. If the prevailing nominal annual 
interest rate were 12 percent, the peri- 
odic rate would be 12% / 12 = 1%. After 
entering 1 they would be prompted for 
the periodic amount, for which they 
would enter 900. 

The result is $87,496.50. So, depend- 
ing on the amount of cash they have 
available for the down payment and 
closing costs, they can look at houses 
worth up to $90,000 or $95,000. 

Note that in arriving at the monthly 
amount they can afford for a mortgage 
payment, the couple had to remember 
that there are other ownership costs 
besides the mortgage. Most significant 
are taxes and insurance. For an older 
home they would also want to budget 
a certain amount for maintenance and 
renovation. On the other side of the 
budgetary scale is the federal income 
tax savings resulting from interest 
payments and property taxes. 



Present Value of Gradient Series 

The next option in the Present Value 
menu, Gradient Series, begins with a 
payment of $0 and increases by a fixed 
amount each period. 

An example involving a gradient 
series is the calculation of the present 
value of the anticipated maintenance 
costs for an automobile. Suppose the 
owner's records indicate repair costs 
now average nearly $50 a month and 
seem to be increasing at about $2 per 
month. How much money would the 
owner have to put into his 7 percent 
savings account in order to cover all 
anticipated repairs for the next four 
years? 

The costs can be broken into two 
parts. First, there is a uniform series of 
$50 per month for 48 months at 7 
percent annual or 0.583 percent 
monthly interest. This part can be 
solved in the same manner as the exam- 
ple above. To cover the $50 per month, 
the program tells us the owner needs 
$2,088.17 in his savings account. 

Second, there is a gradient series for 
48 months, increasing by $2 a month. 
The program will ask for the periodic 
increase instead of a periodic amount as 
in the uniform series. The present value 
of this gradient series is $1,869.82. The 
total the owner would need to deposit 
is $3,957.99. 

The confidence in the program out- 
put should be no greater than the 
confidence in the input data. The last 
example was done using estimates of 
unknown reliability. The actual costs 
could be much different for this partic- 
ular car than would be predicted on the 
basis of its prior performance or of the 
performance of other cars of the same 
make. 

If this were the owner of a fleet of 
taxicabs or commercial trucks, how- 
ever, the chance variations in cost 
would tend to average out for the group. 
Therefore, the owner can know the 
present cost of maintaining his fleet and 
compare that with the cost of replacing 
it. . 

Present Value of Future Amount 

An example of conversion of a future 
amount to a present amount involves 
the future trade-in value of a car. Har- 
vey has learned that the kind of car he 
wants typically depreciates about 75 
percent in four years. If that car lists for 
$10,000 today, it will be worth about 



$2,500 after four years of average use. 
To see how $2,500 four years from now 
compares with $2,500 now, evaluate the 
present value of $2,500 at 9 percent 
annual interest for 48 months. The 
interest rate should be that paid by an 
investment that could be made if the 
money were not tied up in the car. The 
monthly interest rate is .09/12 - .75 
percent. The correct answer is 
$1,746.54. 

Uniform Series Value of a Present Sum 

To determine the monthly payment 
for a loan, choose the Uniform Series 
Value of a Present Sum. This option can 
be used for annuities or other types of 
transactions, also. It has been labeled 
"Loan" because that is its most likely 
use. After the number of payment 
periods, interest rate per period and 
initial amount are entered, the program 
displays the uniform payment amount. 

For example, the monthly payment 
on the $10,000 car mentioned above is 
computed by selecting Option 2, Uni- 
form Series Value, from the main menu 
and then selecting Option 1, Present 
Sum (Loan), from the secondary menu. 
Enter 4B for the number of pay periods, 
1 for the interest rate per period and 
6000 for the initial amount (allowing 
for $2,000 down). The uniform monthly 
payment displayed is $210.67. 

Present Value of a Proportional Series 
A proportional series is one in which 
the ratio of each payment to its prede- 
cessor is constant. One application for 
this conversion is the calculation of the 
present worth of a person's estimated 
lifetime earnings. 

For example, Harvey will earn 
$25,000 this year and expects raises to 
average about 5 percent a year. Since he 
is 25 years old, he expects to work 40 
more years before retiring. He goes to 
his computer, runs this program, and 
selects Present Value of a Proportional 
Series. 

When the program asks for the 
number of periods, he enters 40. The 
interest rate per period should be a rate 
that could be earned by a prudent but 
not overly cautious investor. Here we 
are talking about investing a large sum 
such as a life insurance settlement or 
court judgment based on permanent 
disability. We would not expect it all to 
be deposited in a passbook savings 
account. Harvey decides that 10 percent 

April 1988 THE RAINBOW 35 



» 



would be reasonable and enters 10. For 
rate of increase he enters 5. Next, he 
enters the first period amount, 25000. 
The program displays the answer, 
$422,225.98. 

It is interesting to note the effects of 
varying the interest rate and rate of 
annual increase on the answer. A higher 
interest rate reduces the answer, and a 
higher annual raise increases it. 

Interest Rate Conversions 

There are two kinds of annual interest 
rates, nominal and effective. They are 
the same if the interest is compounded 
once a year. If not, the effective annual 
rate is derived as in the following 
example: If the nominal annual rate is 
18 percent, the monthly rate is .18/12 
= 1.5 percent. The effective rate is 
obtained by computing (l.015*12)~l = 
19.56181715%, which is the equivalent 
interest rate with annual compounding 

To get the above result using the 
program, select the Nominal to Effec- 
tive conversion, enter 12 for the number 
of compounding periods, and enter 18 
for the nominal annual rate. 

This can be checked by selecting the 
Effective to Nominal conversion and 
entering 12 and 19.561B1715 when 
prompted. The answer is 18. Com- 
pounding may be less frequent (quar- 
terly) or more frequent (daily). A special 



case is called continuous compounding. 
For this case, entering 0 for the number 
of compounding periods per year causes 
the program to branch to use a different 
formula from that used for a finite 
number of periods. 



UNIFORM SERIES VALUE OF 
PRESENT SUM 

NUMBER OF PERIODS? 120 
INTEREST RATE/PERIOD (%)? .8 
PRESENT SUM? 12000 
UNIFORM VALUE IS: 

$155.93 
DO ANOTHER (Y OR N>? 



FUTURE VALUE OF PRESENT SUM 

NUMEER OF PERIODS? 96 
INTEREST RATE/ PERIOD? .6 
PRESENT SUM? 1000 
FUTURE VALUE IS: 

$1775.85 
DO ANOTHER (Y OR N)? 



Summary 

The rest of the conversion options are 
similar to those we have discussed, and 
involve the same concepts. This pro- 
gram is intended to be your personal 
finance tool box. You can customize 
any or all subroutines for your personal 
use. The program has been written more 



for readability and flexibility at the 
expense of memory. By leaving out 
comments and combining more state- 
ments onto one line, it should be pos- 
sible to squeeze this program into 16K. 
If you do this, you will need to delete 
H4000+ from lines 105 and 125, and 
change H7F80 to H3F00 in Line 140. 
You may want to check your printer 
status directly instead of asking the user. 
The program is written for the DMP- 
105 printer from Radio Shack. The 
baud rate is set to 2400 in Line 107. 

If you want to do only one or two of 
the conversions, you can type in just the 
relevent sections of the program. Com- 
ments are included in the program 
listing to identify subroutine functions. 
The mathematical formula for each 
conversion is usually accomplished in 
two or three program lines, so these 
subroutines should be easy to customize 
to your system and applications. 

(Questions or comments may be 
directed to the author at 14684 Joshua 
Tree Ave., Sunny mead t CA 92388. 
Please enclose an SASE when writing 
for a reply.) □ 

Reference 

Smith, G. W. Engineering Economy: 
Analysis of Capital Expenditures, 2nd 
Edition, Iowa State University Press, 
Ames, Iowa, 1973. 




1020 ... 
1290 ... 
1460 ... 
1675 ... 
1815 ... 
2090 . . . 
2600 192 



174 2840 214 

142 3050 178 

186 3420 31 

103 3640 179 

117 4315 201 

193 4620 15 

24 END 225 



The listing: FINANCE 

100 1 FINANCIAL TIME VALUE CONVE 
RSIONS 

105 CLEAR 200,&H4000+16127 'SAV 
E SPACE FOR TEXT DUMP CODE 

107 POKE 150,18 'SET PRINTER TO 
2400 

108 1 TEXT DUMP ROUTINE 

110 DATA &H86,&HFE / &HB7 / 0,&H6F,& 

H8E, 4,0, &H5F, &H5C, &HA6 , &H80 , &H81 
, &H60 

115 DATA &H2B,2,&H84,&HBF,&HAD,& 
H9F, &HA0 , 2 , &HC1 , &H20 , &H2B, &HEF, & 
H86,&H0D 

120 DATA &HAD,&H9F,&HA0,2,&H8C,6 



,0 , &H2B, &HE3 , &H7F,0 , &H6F, &H39 
125 FOR I=&H4000+16128 TO &H4000 
+16128+40 

130 READ A: POKE I, A 

135 NEXT I 

140 DEFUSR0=*&H7F00 

142 CLS: PRINT "ARE YOU USING A PR 
INTER? (Y OR N)»; 

143 Q$=INKEY$:IF 0$="" GOTO 143 
145 IF Q$=»Y" THEN QQ=1 ELSE QQ= 

147 PRINT 

150 IF QQ=1 THEN PRINT "TYPE P T 
O PRINT RESULTS AFTER A CONVERSI 
ON, THEN TYPE Y OR N AS":PRINT"P 
ROMPT REQUESTED . " : PRINT : PRINT "HI 
T ANY KEY TO CONTINUE" 
170 IF QQ=1 THEN A$=INKEY$:IF A$ 
=»"GOTO 170 

205 F1$«"$$#######.##":P$="PRESE 
NT VALUE IS: ":U$="UNIFORM VALUE 

IS: ":F$«" FUTURE VALUE IS: " 
210 CLS 

230 PRINT@5, "FINANCIAL CONVERSIO 
NS" 

240 PRINT@70,"BY DALE TINKLEPAUG 
H" 



36 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



250 PRINT ©131, "SELECT CONVERSION 
RESULT" 

260 PRINT @ 19 7, " 1 PRE S ENT VALUE " 
270 PRINTS 229 T , "2 UNIFORM SERIES 
VALUE" 

280 PRINT@261,"i FUTURE VALUE" 
290 PRINT@293,"4 INTEREST RATE" 
300 PRINT@385, "PRESS A NUMBER BE 
TWEEN 1 AND 4" 

310 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""GOTO 310 
3 20 CASE=INSTR ( 1 , " 12 34", A$ ) 
330 ON CASE GOSUB 1000,2000,3000 
,4000 

340 GOTO 210 

1000 'MENU FOR PRESENT VALUE 
1010 CLS 

1020 PRINTS 64, "WHICH WOULD YOU L 
IKE TO CONVERT" 

1030 PRINTS 9 6, "TO A PRESENT VALU 

E?« ** 

1040 PRINTS165,"1 UNIFORM SERIES 

1050 PRINTS 197 , "2 GRADIENT SERIE 
S" 

1060 PRINTS 2 2 9, "3 PROPORTIONAL S 
ERIES" 

1070 PRINTS261,"4 FUTURE SUM" 
1080 PRINTS293,"5 RETURN TO MAIN 
MENU" 

1090 PRINT® 3 8 5, "PRESS A NUMBER B 
ETWEEN 1 AND 5" 

1100 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""GOTO 1100 
1110 IF A$="5" THEN RETURN 
1120 CASE=INSTR(1, "1234",A$) 
1130 ON CASE GOSUB 1200,1400,160 
0,1800 

1140 GOTO 1000 

1200 'PRESENT VALUE OF UNIFORM S 

ERIES 

1210 CLS 

1215 PRINT "PRESENT VALUE OF UNIF 

ORM SERIES": PRINT 

1220 INPUT " NUMBER OF PERIODS" ,*N 

1230 INPUT "INTEREST RATE/PERIOD 

(%) ",*IP 

1240 I=IP/100 

1250 INPUT "PERIODIC AMOUNT" ; A 

1260 Q=(1+I) A N 

1270 PA=(Q-1)/(I*Q) 

1280 P=PA*A 

1285 PRINT P$ 

1290 PRINT USING F1$;P 

1300 PRINT "DO ANOTHER? (Y OR N) " 

• 

1305 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""GOTO 1305 
1307 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0 (0) 

1310 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 1210 EL 
SE IF A$="N" THEN RETURN ELSE GO 
TO 1305 




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April 1988 THE RAINBOW 37 



1400 ' PRESENT VALUE OF GRADIENT 

SERIES 

1405 CLS 

1407 PRINT "PRE SENT VALUE OF GRAD 
IENT" : PRINT" SERIES" : PRINT 
1410 INPUT 11 NUMBER OF PERIODS" ;N 
1415 INPUT "INTEREST RATE/PERIOD 

(%)";IP 

1420 I=IP/100 

1425 INPUT"PERIODIC INCREASE ($) 
";G 

1430 Q=(l+I) A N 
1435 A=(Q-1)/(I*Q) 
1440 B=N/Q 
1445 R=(A-B)/I 
1450 P=R*G 

1455 PRINT P$ : PRINTUSING F1$;P 
1460 PRINT"DO ANOTHER? (Y OR N) " 

• 

t 

1462 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN GOT 

0 1462 

1463 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0 (0 ) 

1464 IF A$="Y" AND QQ=1 THEN 140 
5 ELSE IF A$="N" THEN RETURN ELS 
E GOTO 1462 

1465 RETURN 

1600 'PRESENT VALUE OF PROPORTIO 
NAL SERIES 
1605 CLS 

1607 PRINT "PRESENT VALUE OF PROP 
ORTIONAL" : PRINT"SERIES " : PRINT 
1610 INPUT "NUMBER OF PERIODS", *N 
1615 INPUT" INTEREST RATE/PERIOD ( 
%)";IP 

1620 I=IP/100 

1625 INPUT "RATE OF INCREASE (%)" 
# RP 

1630 R=RP/100 

1635 INPUT"FIRST PERIOD AMOUNT"; 
C 

1640 Q=I+1 

1645 IF R=I THEN 1705 ELSE IF R< 

1 THEN 1675 ELSE 1650 
1650 1 R>I 

1655 X=((l+R)/Q)-1 

1660 FA=(((X+1) A N)-1)/X 

1665 PC=FA/Q 

1670 GOTO 1715 

1675 1 R<I 

1680 X=(Q/(1+R))-1 

1685 QX=(1+X) A N 

1690 PA=(QX-1)/(X*QX) 

1695 PC=PA/(1+R) 

1700 GOTO 1715 

1705 1 R=I 

1710 PC=N/Q 

1715 1 FINAL COMPUTATION 
1720 P=C*PC 

1725 PRINT P$ : PRINTUSING F1$;P 
1727 PRINT "DO ANOTHER? (Y OR N) " 



1730 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=" "THEN GOTO 
1730 

1732 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0 (0 ) 

1734 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 1605 EL 
SE IF A$«"N" THEN RETURN ELSE GO 
TO 1730 

1735 RETURN 

1800 'PRESENT VALUE OF FUTURE SU 
M 

1805 CLS 

1807 PRINT"PRESENT VALUE OF FUTU 
RE SUM": PRINT 

18l0 INPUT "NUMBER OF PERIODS" ;N 

1815 INPUT"INTEREST RATE/PERIOD 

(%)";IP 

1820 I=IP/100 

1825 INPUT "FUTURE SUM";F 

1830 PF=1/(1+I) A N 

1835 P=F*PF 

1840 PRINT P$ : PRINTUSING F1$;P 
1842 PRINT" DO ANOTHER? (Y OR N) " 

1845 A$=INKEY$:IF A$='»" THEN GOT 
O 1845 

1847 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0 (0 ) 

1849 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 1805 EL 
SE IFA$="N" THEN RETURN ELSE GOT 
0 1845 

2000 'MENU FOR UNIFORM SERIES VA 
LUE 

2010 CLS 

2020 PRINTS 64 , "WHICH WOULD YOU L 
IKE TO CONVERT" 

2030 PRINT@96,"TO A UNIFORM SERI 
ES VALUE?" 

2040 PRINT@165,"1 PRESENT SUM (L 
OAN) " 

2050 PRINT@197,"2 GRADIENT SERIE 
S" 

2060 PRINT@229,"3 FUTURE SUM" 
2070 PRINT@261,"4 RETURN TO MAIN 
MENU" 

2080 PRINT@353, "PRESS A NUMBER B 
ETWEEN 1 AND 4" 

2090 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""GOTO 2090 
2100 IF A$="4" THEN RETURN ELSE 
CASE=INSTR ( 1 , " 12 3 " , A$ ) 
2110 ON CASE GOSUB 2200,2600,280 

0 

2120 GOTO 2000 

2200 'UNIFORM SERIES VALUE OF PR 
ESENT SUM 
2205 CLS 

2207 PRINT"UNIFORM SERIES VALUE 
OF PRESENT" :PRINT"SUM": PRINT 
2210 INPUT"NUMBER OF PERIODS", 'N 
2215 INPUT "INTEREST RATE/PERIOD 

(%) ";IP 



38 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



2220 I=IP/10j3 

2225 INPUT "PRESENT SUM";P 

2230 Q=(1+I) A N 

2235 R=I*Q/(Q-1) 

2240 A=R*P 

2245 PRINT U$ : PRINTUSING F1$;A 
2247 PRINT"DO ANOTHER (Y OR N)?" 
2250 A$=INKEY$:IF A$« ,,M THEN GOT 
0 2250 

2252 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0(0) 

2255 IF A$= ,, Y" THEN GOTO 2250 EL 
SE RETURN 

2600 'UNIFORM SERIES VALUE OF GR 
ADIENT SERIES 
2605 CLS 

2607 PRINT"UNIFORM SERIES VALUE 
OF GRADIENT" : PRINT "SERIES" : PRINT 
2610 INPUT "NUMBER OF PERIODS" ;N 
2615 INPUT "INTEREST RATE/PERIOD 
(%) ";IP 
2620 I=IP/100 

2625 INPUT" PERIODIC INCREASE" ;G 
2630 AG=(1/I) -N/( ( (1+1) A N) -1) 
2635 A=G*AG 

2640 PRINT U$: PRINTUSING F1$;A 
2645 PRINT"DO ANOTHER (Y OR N) ?" 

• 

2650 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" GOTO 265 

2652 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0 (0 ) 

2655 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 2605 EL 
SE IF A$="N" THEN RETURN ELSE GO 
TO 2650 

2800 'UNIFORM SERIES VALUE OF FU 
TURE SUM 
2805 CLS 

2807 PRINT"UNIFORM SERIES VALUE 
OF FUTURE" :PRINT"SUM": PRINT 
2810 INPUT " NUMBER OF PERIODS" ;N 
2815 INPUT" INTEREST RATE/PERIOD 

(%)";iP 

2820 I=IP/100 
2825 INPUT" FUTURE SUM";F 
2830 AF=I/(((1+I) A N)-1) 
28 35 A=AF*F 

2840 PRINT U$: PRINTUSING F1$;A 
2845 PRINT"DO ANOTHER (Y OR N)?" 

• 

2850 A$=INKEY$:IF A$= tMI GOTO 285 

2852 IF A$= M P"AND QQ=1 THEN A=US 
R0(J3) 

2855 IF A$= H Y" THEN GOTO 28j35 EL 
SE IF A$= !, N" THEN RETURN ELSE GO 
TO 285J3 

30j3j3 'MENU FOR FUTURE VALUE 
3005 CLS 

3010 PRINTS 64 , "WHICH WOULD YOU L 
IKE TO CONVERT" 

3015 PRINTS, "TO A FUTURE VALUE 



9H 

• 

3020 PRINT@165 , "1 PRESENT SUM" 

3025 PRINT@197,"2 UNIFORM SERIES 
it 

3030 PRINT@229,"3 GRADIENT SERIE 
S" 

3035 PRINT@261, "4 RETURN TO MAIN 
MENU" 

3040 PRINT@353 , "PRESS A NUMBER B 
ETWEEN 1 AND 4" 

3045 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""GOTO 3045 
3050 IF A$="4" THEN RETURN ELSE 
CASE=INSTR ( 1 , " 12 3 " , A$ ) 
3055 ON CASE GOSUB 3200,3400,360 

3060 GOTO 3000 

3200 * FUTURE VALUE OF PRESENT SU 
M 

3205 CLS 

3207 print "future value of prese 
nt sum": print 

3210 i nput " number of periods" ;n 
3 215 input" interest rate/period" 
;ip 

3220 I=IP/100 

3225 INPUT "PRESENT SUM";P 

3230 FP=(1+I) A N 

3235 F=FP*P 

3240 PRINT F$: PRINTUSING F1$;F 



THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

CELEBRATING OUR 4TH YEAR KITH RAINBOW! 



D I SKS 




/100 
10/*4.95 



IPPY DISKS 10/*7.95 
FACTORY PUNCHED-USE BOTH SIDES. $75/100 
CERTIFIED ERROR FREE. N/SLEEVE8, LABELS, K.P. 

3 1/2"DISKS DS/DD 10/*14.95 



blt2B.it 
12/122.00 
5/M2.00 



PRINTER RIBBONS 

EPSON HX/RX/FX 70/80 *5.00 EA. 
6EHINI 10/10X/S6 12.00 EA. 

COLORS R-BR-BL-6R-PUR 13.00 EA. 
R.S. DHP 130 BLACK 16.95 EA. 

COLORS RED-8LUE-BRN 17.95 EA. . 
OTHER RIBBONS IN STOCK-CALL OR WRITE FOR QUOTE 

ALL ITEMS 100% GUARANTEED. OFFER ENDS IN 30 DAYS 



Add $2.50 S/H in USA - Canada Add $3.50 + $ 1.00/LB 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 
Send Check/Money Order Payable to: 
THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

9020 Hemingway, Redford, Ml 48239 
(313) 937-1313 

Send Card Number & Em, Date Uln. Charge Order «0.M 





April 1988 THE RAINBOW 39 



3245 PRINT"DO ANOTHER (Y OR N)? ,f 

3250 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" GOTO 325 
0 

3252 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0(0) 

3255 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 3205 EL 
SE IF A$="N" THEN RETURN ELSE GO 
TO 3250 

3400 'FUTURE VALUE OF UNIFORM SE 
RIES 

3405 CLS 

3407 PRINT 11 FUTURE VALUE OF UNIFO 
RM SERIES": PRINT 

3410 INPUT 11 NUMBER OF PERIODS" ;N 
3415 INPUT" INTEREST RATE/PERIOD 
(%) ";IP 
3420 I=IP/100 

3425 INPUT" PERIODIC AMOUNT" ;A 
3430 FA=(((1+I) A N)-1)/I 
3435 F=FA*A 

3440 PRINT F$:PRINTUSING F1$;F 

3445 PRINT"DO ANOTHER (Y OR N)?" 
• 

3450 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" GOTO 345 

3452 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0(0) 

3455 IF A$="Y"THEN GOTO 3405 ELS 
E IF A$="N" THEN RETURN ELSE GOT 
0 3450 

3600 'FUTURE VALUE OF GRADIENT S 

ERIES 

3 605 CLS 

3 607 PRINT 11 FUTURE VALUE OF GRADI 
ENT SERIES": PRINT 
3610 INPUT " NUMBER OF PERIODS" ;N 
3 615 INPUT " INTEREST RATE/PERIOD 

(%) ";IP 

3620 I=IP/100 

3625 INPUT"PERIODIC INCREASE" ;G 

3630 FG=(((((1+I) A N)-1)/I)-N)/I 

3635 F=FG*G 

3640 PRINT F$:PRINTUSING F1$;F 

3645 PRINT"DO ANOTHER (Y OR N)?" 
• 

3650 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""GOTO 3650 
3652 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0(0) 

3655 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 3 605 EL 
SE IF A$="N" THEN RETURN ELSE GO 
TO 3 650 

4000 'MENU FOR INTEREST RATE CON 

VERSIONS 

4010 CLS 

4020 PRINTS 6 4 , "WOULD YOU LIKE TO 

CONVERT : " 
4030 PRINT0165, "1 NOMINAL ANNUAL 

RATE TO" 

4040 PRINT@197," EFFECTIVE ANNU 
AL RATE" 

4050 PRINT@229,"2 EFFECTIVE ANNU 



AL RATE TO" 

4060 PRINT® 2 61," NOMINAL ANNUAL 
RATE" 

4070 PRINT@293,"3 RETURN TO MAIN 
MENU" 

4080 PRINTQ385 , "PRESS A NUMBER B 
ETWEEN 1 AND 3" 

4090 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""GOTO 4090 

4100 IF A$="3" THEN RETURN ELSE 

CASE=INSTR ( 1 , " 12 " , A$ ) 

4110 ON CASE GOSUB 4300,4600 

4120 GOTO 4000 

4300 • NOMINAL TO EFFECTIVE 

4310 CLS 

4315 PRINT"NOMINAL TO EFFECTIVE" 
: PRINT 

4320 PRINT"NUMBER OF COMPOUNDING 
" : PRINT" PERIODS/YEAR" 
4340 INPUT" (FOR CONTINUOUS INPUT 
0) ";M 

43 50 INPUT "NOMINAL ANNUAL RATE"; 
IP 

4355 I=IP/100 

4360 IF M=0 THEN 4380 

4370 IA=(1+I/M) A M-l:GOTO 4390 

4380 IA=EXP(I)-1 

4390 PRINT"EFFECTIVE ANNUAL RATE 

IS : " : PRINTIA* 100 ; " % " 

4400 PRINT"DO ANOTHER (Y OR N)?" 

4410 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" GOTO 441 

4415 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0(0) 

4420 IF A$="Y" THEN GOTO 4310 EL 
SE IF A$="N" THEN RETURN ELSE GO 
TO 4410 

4600 'EFFECTIVE TO NOMINAL 
4610 CLS 

4615 PRINT" EFFECTIVE TO NOMINAL" 
: PRINT 

4620 PRINT "NUMBER OF COMPOUNDING 

" : PRINT"PERIODS/YEAR" 

4630 INPUT" (FOR CONTINUOUS, INPU 

T 0)";M 

4640 INPUT"EFFECTIVE ANNUAL RATE 
" ; IP 

4650 IA=IP/100 
4660 IF M=0 THEN GOTO 4690 
4670 I=(1+IA) A (l/M)-1 
4680 NI=I*M:GOTO 4700 
4690 NI=LOG(l+IA) 

4700 PRINT "NOMINAL ANNUAL RATE I 

S : " : PRINTNI*100 ; "%" 

4710 PRINT"DO ANOTHER (Y OR N) ?" 

• 

4720 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""GOTO 4720 
4725 IF A$="P" AND QQ=1 THEN A=U 
SR0(0) 

4730 IF A$= S "Y"THEN GOTO 4610 ELS 
E IF A$="N" THEN RETURN ELSE GOT 
0 4720 /S\ 



40 THE RAINBOW April 1986 



Still pounding away at that keyboard? 




nd Money with a Combination S 



SAVE up to 19%" 

when you buy a joint sub- 
scription to the magazine and 
either rainbow on tape or 
rainbow on disk! A one-year 
subscription to the rainbow 
and rainbow on tape is only 
$91 in the U.S., $108 in Can- 
ada, $153 foreign surface rate 
and $188 foreign airmail. A 
one-year subscription to the 
rainbow and rainbow on 
DISK is only $115 in the U.S., 
$138 in Canada, $183 foreign 
surface rate and $218 foreign 
airmail.* 

Every month, these convenient 
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ready-to-run programs. Using the 
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documentation, all you have to do is 
load and run them. A one-year com- 
bination subscription to the rain- 



bow and rainbow on tape or rain- 
bow on disk give you more than 230 
new programs! The typing time you 
save can be spent enjoying your 
CoCo! 



RAINBOW ON TAPE 
For No-Fuss Fun 

Back issues of rainbow on tape 
are available beginning with the 
April 1982 issue. A single copy of 
rainbow on tape is $10 within the 
United States; U.S. $12 in all other 
countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow on tape is $80 
within the U.S.; U.S. $90 in Canada; 
and U.S. $105 for all other coun- 
tries.* 



RAINBOW ON DISK 

Offers OS-9 Programs 

In addition to all the programs 
offered on tape, part of one side of 
rainbow on disk is formatted for the 
OS-9 operating system. That means 
you can now get all the OS-9 pro- 
grams from the magazine — pro- 
grams that cannot be put on tape. 
Back issues of rainbow on disk are 
available beginning with October 
1986. Subscriptions to rainbow on 
disk are $99 a year in the U.S. Cana- 
dian rate is U.S. $115. All other 
countries, U.S. $130. Single copy 
rate is $12 in the U.S.; U.S. $14 in 
Canada; and U.S. $16 in all other 
countries.* 



To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847- 
0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228- 
4492. 

Look for our envelope located between pages 66 and 67 for 
ordering individual subscriptions to the rainbow, rainbow on 

TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. 



YES! Sign me up for a joint 1-year subscription (12 issues) to: 



□ THE RAINBOW and RAINBOW ON TAPE 

□ THE RAINBOW and RAINBOW ON DISK 

□ NEW □ RENEWAL (attach labels) 



Payment Enclosed □ (*payment must accompany order) 

Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ Am. Express 
Account Number 

City State ZIP Signature Exp 

*U.S. currency only, please. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks 
for delivery of first copies. Joint subscriptions to the rainbow and rainbow on tape or rainbow on disk begin with the current issue. 

Please note: While group purchases of rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are permitted (and multiple subscriptions are even discounted, if purchased in one 
order from a club), no license to make copies is conveyed or implied. Yes, your group may even purchase a subscription to our disk/tape services, but such purchase 
in no way authorizes that any copies be made of that original disk/tape. Specifically, this means that the original disk/tape itself may indeed be kept in a club library 
for use by members. However, a group purchase does not entitle club members, individually or as a group, to copy that disk/tape. 
Unauthorized copying of any copyright product is strictly illegal. The copyright (right to make copies) is in no way conveyed in the purchase transaction. 



Name _ 
Address 



c 


C #%. qtl 




16K ECB | 






fcj 


1 — 






■ 




C7 





Keep track of your valuables and their I. D. numbers 



Home Inventory 
Manager 

^^^r %yTou have just arrive 

Y ! 



By Bill Tottingham 




% JTou have just arrived home after a 
crime prevention seminar in time 
| to notice a couple of hairy thugs 
in a moving van driving off with what 
seems to be all your prize possessions. 
Indeed, upon examination of your 
abode, you come to the conclusion that 
you have been robbed. 

The police are very helpful, checking 
for fingerprints and such, and finally 
asking you for a list of the stolen items 
and their serial numbers. You imme- 
diately give them a printout of these 
items . . . What? . . . No to? 

Bill lives in Milton, Wisconsin, and is 
a free-lance programmer, an auto body 
worker and a programming consultant 
to high-tech developments. 




THE RAINBOW April 1988 



Unfortunately, this scenario is not 
uncommon, and anyone who has expe- 
rienced it knows that without a list of 
items and their serial numbers, your 
chances of ever recovering your posses- 
sions are greatly diminished. What's 
more, many insurance companies now 
require such a list before they pay off. 

Home Inventory File may be your 
answer. The program keeps track of all 
your items, their serial numbers, their 
brand names, their value, and any 
specific information that will make 
identification easy. 

The program works on a 16K ECB 
machine, tape or disk. If you have a 64K 
CoCo, you can clear more memory in 
Line 20 and change the value of DA in 
Line 30 to handle more items. The 
printer control codes, assigned in lines 
1040 through 1070, are set up for the 
Radio Shack DMP-130. 

The first screen you see after running 
the program gives you the option of 
creating a file for disk or tape or loading 
a file from disk or tape. As we're just 
starting, pick "Create File." 

Enter the data, keeping the length 
under 14 characters for each of the first 
four entries. The fifth entry can be up 
to 1 1 1 characters — this is where you 
enter any specific information. 

After the fifth entry, you are asked if 
the information is correct. If you answer 
no (N), you will be asked what line you 
want to change. After making any 
necessary changes, answer yes (Y) to the 
information prompt. 

Here you can press A to add another 
item, S to save to disk or tape, or V for 
view. 

After entering all the items, press S. 
You will be asked for a filename before 
operations continue. When you have 
supplied one, you will be put in the View 
mode, from which you can print your 
hard copy, delete an item, add more 
items, view items (use up and down 



INVENTORY 



ITEM 



TV 



BRAND 



PANASONIC 



VALUE 



31? 



SERIAL * 



2453564 



CUTS I CABLE-READY f REMOTE 




VCR 



MITSUBISHI 



400 



3532632 



CUTS? 4 HEADS, STEREO 



COLOR COMPUTER RADIO SHACK 



CUTS: COCO 3 



199 



4364345 



MONITOR 



CHTS: R6B/C0HP0SITE 



TANDY 



300 



347B94S 



DISK DRIVE 



CMTS: DUAL DRIVE 



IBM 



279 



39B73B2 



PRINTER 



CMTS; DMP-130 



TANDY 



330 



34B5793 



arrows to scroll through the file), save 
your file, or quit. 

The View mode is also the mode you 
enter after loading a file. This is a simple 
process — from the entry menu just 
select the load option and respond to 
the filename prompt. 

After you play with the program for 
a while, you will see how simple it is to 
use. On a 16K CoCo with disk, you may 



have to change the value of DA in Line 
30 to a lower value to avoid an OS 
Error. Most importantly, don't forget to 
put your disk and hard copy somewhere 
safe! 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 3916 Lake shore Drive, Milton, WI 
53563. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a response.) □ 



mm 




ffc- 



4 



J> tf^^^J* V&^J^' &^'^&C? w 



Online 
orders + free 
ce on Delphi 

C° . ^\ ^^%fO us check or mor »ey order 

V/ j3x RI orders add 6% sates tax 

s 

*y TEPCO 

68 James Court 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 



April 1 988 THE RAINBOW 43 




10 64 

390 135 

580 161 



820 74 

1000 79 

END 126 



** 
** 



The listing: INVNTDRY 

0 ************************ 

1 ■ * HOME INVENTORY ** 

2 '* (C)1986 

3 '* BY BILL TOTTINGHAM 

4 ■* BOX 331 MILTON, WI ** 

5 ************************ 

10 PCLEAR1 
20 CLEAR5000 
30 DA=40 

40 DIM IS (DA) / B$(DA) # C$(DA) f S$(D 
A) ,V$(DA) 
50 CLS0 

60 PRINT® 3 2," HOME INVENT 

ORY" 

70 PRINT@128,STRING$ (255,32) ;STR 
ING$(32,32) 

1) CREATE DI 

2) CREATE TA 

3) LOAD DIS 

4) LOAD TAP 



it 



it 



80 PRINT@160 , 1 
SK FILE" 
90 PRINT@224 / ,) 
PE FILE" 
100 PRINT@288 / 
K FILE" 

110 PRINT© 3 52, 

E FILE" 
120 I$=INKEY$ 

130 IF I$="1"THEN DN=1:GOTO180 
140 IF I$="2"THEN DN=-1:GOTO180 
150 IF I$="3"THEN DN=1:GOTO610 
160 IF I$="4"THEN DN=-1 : GOTO610 
170 GOTO120 
180 X=l 

190 GOSUB840:GOSUB850 
200 F0RZ=1T05 

210 ON Z GOSUB860, 880,900, 920,94 
J3 



Mouse Tales By Logan Ward 

j™n SUPiHIdlELL lilOUSE.™g 

EMS • «##«-#ii,«*««v*r«>»_« * Bfl 




220 IF I$(X)=""THEN210 
230 NEXT Z 

240 IF LEN(C$(X) )>111 THEN C$ (X) 
=" " : GOSUB84 0 : GOSUB8 50 : GOSUB9 40 :G 
OTO250 

250 PRINT@454, "INFORMATION CORRE 
CT?" 

260 I$=INKEY$ 

270 IF I$="N"THEN350 

280 IF I$O"Y"THEN260 

290 PRINT@454 , " (A) DD (V) IEW (S)A 

VE " 

300 I$=INKEY$ 

310 IF I$="A"THENX=X+1:GOTO190 
320 IF I$="V"THEN NF=X: X=l : GOT04 

10 

330 IF I$="S"THEN NF=X:GOTO560 
340 GOTO300 

350 PRINT§454 , "LINE TO BE CORREC 
TED? " 

360 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN3 60 
370 I=VAL(I$):IF 1=0 THEN -360 
380 IF I>5THEN3 60 

390 ON I GOSUB860,880,900,920,94 

400 GOSUB840:GOSUB850:GOTO240 
410 IF I$(X)=*""THEN470 
420 CLS:PRINT@32+(32-LEN(I$(X) ) ) 
/2 / 1$ (X) 

430 PRINT@129+(16-LEN(B$(X) ) )/2, 
B$(X) :PRINT@144+(16-LEN(S$(X) ) )/ 
2,"#";S$(X) 

440 PRINT@191+(32-LEN(V$(X) ) )/2, 
"$";V$(X) 

450 PRINT§256,C$(X) 

460 PRINT@384, " (D)ELETE (A) DD (H 

) ARDCOPY ( S ) AVE " : PRINT § 4 5 1 , " ( Q ) U 

IT < ARROWS TO SCROLL>" 

470 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""TKEN470 

480 IF I$=CHR$(94)THENX=X+1:IF X 

>NF THEN X=NF ELSE GOTO410 : GOT04 

10 

490 IF I$=CHR$ ( 10 ) THEN X=X-1:IF 
X<1 THENX=1 ELSE GOTO410 : GOTO410 
500 IF I$="D"THEN 1$ (X)="" :X=X-1 
:IF X<1THEN X=NF ELSE GOTO410-.GO 
TO 4 10 

510 IF I$="H" THEN 1030 

520 IF I$="A"THEN X=NF+1: GOTO 190 

530 IF I$="S"THEN560 

540 IF I$="Q" THEN END 

550 GOTO470 

560 GOSUB9 60 

570 I$=INKEY$:IF I$<>CHR$ (13 ) THE 
N570 

580 GOSUB740 

590 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN590 
600 X=1:GOTO410 
610 GOSUB 9 60 

620 I$=INKEY$:IF I$OCHR$ (13 ) THE 
N620 



44 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



630 GOSUB650 
640 :X-1:GOTO410 
650 'READ FILE 
660 X=0 

670 OPEN" I" , #DN, FILE$ 

680 X=X+1 :NF=X 

690 IF EOF (DN) THEN720 

700 INPUT#DN,I$(X) ,B$(X) ,S$(X) ,V 

$(X) ,C$(X) 

710 IF EOF(DN)=0THEN680 

720 CLOSE 

730 RETURN 

740 1 WRITE FILE 

750 OPEN"0' , / #DN,FILE$ 

760 FOR X=1T0 NF 

770 IF I$(X)=""THEN810 

780 IF DN=1 THEN WRITE #DN,I$(X) 

,B$(X) ,S$(X) ,V$(X) ,C$(X) 

790 IF DN=-1 THEN PRINT #DN,I$(X 

) ,B$(X) ,S$(X) ,V$(X) ,C$(X) 

800 IF X=NF THEN820 

810 NEXT X 

820 CLOSE 

830 RETURN 

840 CLS : PRINT @ 8 , "DATA ENTRY/EDIT 
" : RETURN 

850 PRINT@68,"1) ITEM: ";I$(X):P 
RINT@132,"2) BRAND: ";B$(X):PRIN 
T@196,"3) SERIAL*: " ;S$ (X) : PRINT 
@260,"4) VALUE: " ; V$ (X) : PRINT@32 
4, "5) COMMENTS: " ;C$ (X) : RETURN 
860 PRINT@77,STRING$(LEN(I$(X) ) , 
32) :PRINT@77,""; : LINEINPUTI$ (X) 
870 RETURN 

880 PRINT@142,STRING$(LEN(B$(X) ) 
,32) :PRINT@142, ""; :LINEINPUTB$ (X 

) 

890 RETURN 

900 PRINT@208,STRING$(LEN(S$(X) ) 
, 32) : PRINT© 20 8 , "" ; : LINEINPUTS$ (X 

) 

910 RETURN 

920 PRINT@270,STRING$(LEN(V$(X) ) 
,32) : PRINTS 2 70, ""; : LINEINPUTV$ (X 

) 

930 RETURN 



940 PRINT@337,STRING$(LEN(C$(X) ) 
,32) :PRINT@337, ""; :LINEINPUTC$ (X 

) 

950 RETURN 

960 CLS : PRINT @ 7 4, "FILE NAME??":P 

RINT@106, ""; :LINEINPUTFILE$ 

970 IF FILE$=""THEN960 

980 IF LEN (FILE$) >8THEN960 

990 IF DN=1THENPRINT@264, "PLACE 

DATA DISK":PRINT@298,"IN DRIVE - 

0-" 

1000 IF DN=-1 THEN PRINT@266, "PO 
SITION TAPE" :PRINT@294, "PRESS PL 
AY & RECORD" 

1010 PRINT@460, "<ENTER>" 

1020 RETURN 

1030 'PRINTER ROUTINE 

1040 EO$=CHR$ (27)+CHR$(14) : 'DOUB 

LEWIDTH ON 

1050 ED$=CHR$ (27) +CHR$ (15) : 'DOUB 
LEWIDTH OFF 

1060 UO$=CHR$ (15) : 'UNDERLINE 
1070 UE$=CHR$(14) : }END UNDERLINE 
1080 CLS :PRINT@37, "POSITION PRIN 
TER HEAD":PRINT@3 64,"<ENTER>" 
1090 I$=INKEY$:IF I$OCHR$(13) T 
HEN1090 

1100 PRINTtf-2,STRING$ (5,13) 

1110 PRINT#-2,TAB(31) ;EO$;"INVEN 

TORY" ; ED$ ; STRING $ (3,13) 

1120 PRINT#-2,TAB(0) ;UO$ ;TAB(80) 

;UE$ 

1130 print#-2,tab(0) ;uo$ ;tab(10) 
; " item" ; tab ( 30 ) ; " brand " ; tab ( 50 ) ; 
"value"; tab (65) ; "serial #";tab(8 
0) ;ue$ 

1140 PRINT#-2 

1150 FOR X=1T0NF 

1160 IF I$(X)=""THEN NEXT X 

1170 PRINT#-2,TAB(7) ;I$(X) ;TAB(2 

5) ;B$(X) ;TAB(48) ;V$(X) ;TAB(63) ;S 

$(X) ;CHR$ (13) 

1180 PRINT#-2,TAB(5) ;"CMTS: ";C$ 
(X) ;STRING$(2,13) 
1190 NEXT X 
1200 X=l:GOTO410 



PREMIUM COC03 51 2K UPGRADE 

•Made in USA by J&R Electronics 'Memory chips socketed, user replaceable 
•Rugged, long life construction »Top mounted Memory for cooling 

•Heavy duty POWER and GROUND planes to minimize memory errors due to noise 
•High performance design, permits use of less expensive 150ns memory chips 
•We supply Prime memory chips, not inferior pulls or fallouts* 
•Includes RAMDISK, Spooler and Memory Test software on disk with 28 page User's 
Manual (We set the standard for 512k support software. We believe our software 
is uniquely powerful, as opposed to those 'Me, too' companies that charge extra 
for software with much less powerl) 

SPECIAL PRICES 

#1010-29.95 JramR bare board plus connectors and software 

#1014-39.95 JramR assembled & tested 0K (No memory chips) and software 
*CALL (for latest price of #1014 with memory chips and other products) 

To place an order, write to: J&R Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MD 21045, 
OR call (301) 987-9067-Jesse or (301) 788-0861 -Ray 



wjy THE 

r^NTERTAINE 

H 12 NEW GAMES OR PUZZLES 

Will - Nibbles • Mark 7 & more 

For all Cocos with 64K min. 
To get all 12, send $10 in check or 
money order (no credit cards] to: 



disk 

n 

only 



George Aftamonow 

46 Howe St, 

Mi I ford, CT. 06460 




April 1988 THE RAINBOW 45 



FILE EDIT MIDI 


MISC 






d t n r n 




nrara 


n iti ra rsi 


MIDI 


Instruments: 






0: QJ01 




i:005 


S tr i no 




Q 2: 006 


Piano 


3*. 009 


Gu i t ar 






E Organ 


5: 014 






13 6s 003 


Trumpet 


7i 016 


Flute 




H 8s 018 


Oboe 


9J 019 


Clarnet 




N A5 021 


Vibrphn 


B: 026 


Harpsch 




C: 025 


Clavier 


D: 032 


T i npani 




J E: 043 


Snaredr 


F: 045 


Percusn 












1 



0ti! 




s 



Lyra 

COMPATIBLE! 




1 






so 



I 1 t t * % i i i 

I » » * J • ■» 1 i * , 
- t i i r » j v > 






' -V '. . •' ■ ' ■' ' 
ftp*, fit 


M W MM MM V 

/. V s * m >j» 

" ' ' 1 




i in it mil 


iumum\\m 

j ] V 

. , .i ...... . . ^ ^ _ _ ^ . ^ ^ ^ .... , - B35w 



S^ 5 



Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MUSICA MID! system that plays MUSiCA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system. 



Supports 16 Track recording and playback, 

i^ Adjustable tempo. 

\s Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible). 

Record to any track. 

Low Level track editing. 

LYRA editing, (one voice per track). 
^ Playback from any number of tracks. 
is Quantizing to Vie, V6g, Vfo intervals. 

Dynamic memory allocation. 



^ Filter out MIDI data: 
Key pressure 
Program change 
Pitch wheel 



Control Change 
Channel Pressure 
System Message 



]^ Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode. 

j«* Adjustable Key (Transposition) for each 
track. 

\* Save recording to disk for later playback or 
editing. 

i> Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE. 



V PUNCH IN and PUNCH OUT editing. 

Sequencer features. 

\* 100% machine code. 

is "Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 

i** Metronome 

^ Many songs included. 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64K CoCo, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 

DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 

TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173 ; . . . $34.95 



DX LIBRARIAN 



TM 



Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 



Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, 



memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 $29.95 




FILE EDIT H ID I HISC 



LEGE 



All Voic 



Tine Signamr 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 



Block delete 



j Block copy 




TM ,-,(> 



FILE EDIT HI D I WISC 



LEGEND 





lap 



3 



use ps 



LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music of a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA fpr musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7;95; We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not 
misprint!) 

Super Simple Editing Supports: 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 



Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 
12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 
drum machines. 

Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 

channels. 
k*\ Transpose music to any key. 
V* Modify music to any tempo. 
^ Automatically inserts bar for each measure 

as you compose. 
*^ Key signature lets you specify sharps and 

flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
^ Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 

(#LC164). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

\* Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 

LYRA OPTIONS 



Solo capability 

Block edits are highlighted. 
^ Tie notes together for musical continuity. 
\* Name of note pointed to is constantly 

displayed. 

Jump to any point in the score 
instantaneously. 

Memory remaining clearly displayed, 

however you will have plenty of memory 

even for the most demanding piece. 

Help menu makes manual virtually 

unnecessary. 
V LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 

hardware unless you want more power. 

Music easily saved to tape or disk. 

Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 
LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 $54.95 



These LYRA options are not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA 
files, 

(Disk) #LC164 $14.95 

VERSION UPDATE 

To receive the latest version of LYRA return your 
original disk. #UP162 $10.00 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer, 

#MC158 $19.95 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada ...,,„ , $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada . „ , . $5.00 

COD Charge .....»,...-... 7-4 $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6'/*% sales tax. 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play ail 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(Disk) #LS1 77 . , $19.95 

LYRA LIBRARY 

A collection of 50 songs ready to play for hours. 
Most have 7 and 8 voices. #LL137 . $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 




SEC 




COCO MID Seq/Editor 

A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 900 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 



COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorware. 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark of Radio Shack. 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 



1 F e atur e 




A mini word processor for your 
letter-writing needs 

Color 
Correspondent 

By Arthur S. Hallock 



tetter Writer is a simple menu- 
driven word processor that's 
great to use when you need to 
knock off something short, like a letter. 

To use the program, just load and 
run. It is 99.44 percent self-prompting, 
and gives a colorful (although perhaps 
non-professional) screen appearance, 
while attempting to help you compose 
a letter (a dying art in itself). 

After loading and running, you find 
yourself at the main menu, presented 
with eight options: 

C Commence a new letter 

A Add to an existing letter 

E Edit, inquire, view page 

L Load page — tape or disk 

H Hard copy on printer 

S Save page — tape or disk 

X Exit — terminate program 

P Print: fanfold envelope 

To begin a letter, press C. You must 
enter the line length of the letter by 
selecting your margins when prompted. 
For simplicity's sake, I usually use 8 and 
88, giving me an 81-character line, 
which works well for my DMP-110 
printer in its proportional font mode. 
(This program is presently set up for the 
Radio Shack DMP-110 at 1200 baud.) 

The tab guide helps to educate your 



Originally trained in electronics, with 
home courses and 13 years with the Bell 
Telephone System, Arthur Hallock 
switched to computers Jive years ago. 
He works as a police dispatcher and 
runs a computer repair service as a 
hobby. 



guess as to the indentation of your 
paragraphs, and the red "stopper" limits 
the line length to the length selected. If 
your line is too long, the program won't 
accept it and prompts you to re-enter 
(and shorten) the lines. Likewise, when 
in the Edit mode there is a series of dots 
that assist in the judgment of line length. 

The program starts out allowing you 
to enter 44 lines of text, which just about 
fill one page if you're using a letterhead. 
When you reach the limit, the program 
switches screens and prompts you to 
request another number of lines. This 
may be up to 200 lines as the program 
is written, unless you want to dimension 
a larger buffer area (L$ is now dimen- 
sioned to 200 in Line 40), and you're 
returned to the main menu. Press A to 
add to your letter, starting at Line 45. 

The Edit mode allows you to proof- 
read your letter, viewing five lines at a 
time, as long as the line length is 91 or 
less. This fills the screen; if you use 
longer lines, viewing is more difficult as 
the top lines will be lost. 

When used with cassette systems, the 
program pauses on a screen that allows 



you to adjust your tape to whatever 
position you want, and then requests a 
filename. If, at this point, you enter a 
null (by pressing ENTER alone), the 
program will abort the load or save and 
return you to the main menu. Exiting 
the program aborts also, unless con- 
firmed by a 'Y' for yes. 

If you're using a disk system, you may 
enter D IR at the prompt for the filename 
to load — this allows you to view the 
directory. When you're running on disk, 
of course, you bypass the motor routine 
for cassette. 

Everything else is self-prompting and 
self-explanatory. Although it was writ- 
ten for the 32K CoCo, with appropriate 
pruning the program will work in 16K. 
In either case, the program is very 
flexible. Unnecessary lines can be left 
out, and the I NSTR command can be 
added to, or subtracted from, quite 
handily. In that way, you can dedicate 
the program to 16K, tape or disk, and 
make room for more text. 

Change the printer baud rate in Line 
30 to your favorite rate. Lines 1620 and 
1730 check that the printer is online. 



CHR$(27) 
CHR$(27) 
CHR$(27) 
CHR$(27) 
CHR$(27) 
CHR$(27) 
CHR$(27) 



CHR$(14) 
CHR$(15) 
CHR$(17) 
CHR$(19) 
CHR$(2j2T) 
CHR$(29) 
CHR$(66) 



start elongation 
end elongation 

select proportional character 
select standard character Iff CPI 
select condensed character 17 CPI 
select elite character 12 CPI 
select italic character 



Table 1: DMP-110 Printer Control Codes 



48 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



The control codes used in this program 
(see Table 1) are for the Radio Shack 
DMP-110 printer. Most Radio Shack 
dot matrix printers will work just fine 
with these codes. For other printers, you 
will find the listed control codes in lines 
1500, 1590 and many lines from Line 
2050 through Line 2360. One final note 



on control codes. The code CHR$(12) 
appears in several lines in the program. 
This code is interpreted by nearly every 
printer to mean "perform a form feed." 

To use the envelope routine, just edit 
LH$ and ADS in lines 2010 and 2020, and 
adjust the block in lines 1900 through 
2370 to read with your name. 



As the entire program is written in 
block form, any area can easily be 
tailored to your specifications. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at Route 1, Box 198 HHH, Deming, 
NM 88030. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing for a reply.) □ 




180 . , 


43 


1570 , . 


133 


300 . . , 


■ « • » 235 


1770 


...225 


590 


...171 


1920 . 


, 42 


820 


, 206 


2150 . . 


229 


1000 . 


. . .234 


2310 . . 


, ,205 


1200 


99 


2550 . . 


. ,198 


1390 


87 


END , 


....42 



The listing: LETRRITR 



10 GOTO 30 * LETRWRTR/BAS 
14 JAN 84 * ASHALLOCK 

30 PCLEAR1 : POKE 150 , 41 : CLS3 '*** 
BAUDRATE SET TO 1200 DMP110* 

40 CLEAR10000:DIML$(200) 

50 DIMC(180) ,L(25) ,M(60) ,P(60) ,Q 

(60),R(96),Z(96) 



90 GOTO2440 

100 IP C>0 THEN3 0ELSE110 

110 CLS3:PRINT@33,"** "BK$" start 

-up"BK$ ll routine l, BK$" **" ;: PRINT© 

96 , STRING $ (3 2 , 182 ) ; : POKE10 66 , 45 
120 PRINT@162," WHEN ENTERING TE 
XT, ENTER " ; :PRINTSTRING$(5,175) 
;:PRINT@194," A PERIOD ( . ) T 
O EXIT 

130 P«0 : PRINT@258 , ; : INPUT" ENTER 
LEFT MARGIN ; L: L=L-1 : IFL<0 THE 
N L=0 : PRINT@257 , STRING$ (5 ,175) J 
140 PRINTS 2 58," RIGHT MARGIN MUS 
T BE '•; :PRINTSTRING$(5,175) 

" EQUAL TO OR LESS THAN 96 '•; 
150 PRINT@354, •' ; :INPUT"ENTER R 
IGHT MARGIN ";R 

160 IFR=0 THEN90ELSEIFR<L THEN15 
0ELSE170 



J 




SPbCIAL bYbNT? 



COCO GALLERY LIVE 
SHOWCASE YOUR BEST AT RAINBOWFEST 

We are taking the popular "CoCo Gallery" on the road to RAINBOWfest Chicago — and we'd 
like you to submit your own graphics creations to be exhibited at the show! 




• You can enter color or black-and-white photographs or printouts of your original artwork produced 
on the CoCo 1, 2 or 3. Entries should be framed, mounted or matted, and may not be smaller than 
5-by-7 inches or larger than 11-by-14 inches. 

• Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from 
TV programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that 
appears in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

• Along with your entry, send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how 
you created your picture (what programs you used, etc.). Please include a few facts about yourself, 
too! 

• Your name, address and phone number, along with the title of your work, must be clearly marked 
on the back of each entry, and a disk copy of each piece must also be included. 

• Entries may be mailed to the rainbow before May 1 , 1 988, or brought to the RAINBOWfest registration 
booth by 10 a.m., Saturday, May 21. 

• Your work will be returned if sent with a postage paid return envelope, or entries can be picked up 
at the close of the show — Sunday, May 22, at 4 p.m. 

There will be two categories: one for graphics produced on the CoCo 1 and 2, and one for 
CoCo 3 graphics. Several awards will be made in each category. Winners will be determined 
by votes from RAINBOWfest attendees. In case of any ties, winners will be determined by 
our chief judge, CoCo Cat. 

Prizes and ribbons will be presented Sunday, May 22, and winning entries will be published 
in the September '88 issue of the rainbow. Send your entry to "CoCo Gallery Live," THE 
rainbow, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, Prospect, KY 40059. 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 49 




CHICAGO 



MAY 20-22 



AINBOWfest is the only computer show dedicated 
exclusively to your Tandy Color Computer. 
Nowhere else will you see as many CoCo-related 
products or be able to attend free seminars conducted 
by the top Color Computer experts. It's like receiving the 
latest issue of the rainbow in your mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for commercial 
programmers to show off new and Innovative products 
for the first time. Chicago is the show to get information 
on capabilities for the new CoCo 3, along with a terrific 
selection of the latest CoCo 3 software. In exhibit after 
exhibit, there will be demonstrations, opportunities to 
experiment with software and hardware, and special 
RAINBOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace between visiting exhibits and 
attending the valuable, free seminars on all aspects of 
your CoCo — from improving basic skills to working with 
the sophisticated OS-9 operating system. 

Many people who write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are written about — are there 
to meet you and answer questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people who share your interest 
in the Color Computer. It's a person-to-person 
event and a tremendous learning experience in 
a fun and relaxed atmosphere. 

A special feature of RAINBOWfest is the 
Educational Sandbox, which features 
child-oriented workshops to give hands- 
on experience to an age group often 
neglected. There are sessions for the 
kindergarten through third-grad- 
ers, and for fourth- through sev- 



enth-graders. And, as an additional treat for CoCo Kids of 
all ages, we've invited frisky feline CoCo Cat to join us for 
the show. RAINBOWfest has something for everyone in the 
family! 

If you missed the fun at our last RAINBOWfest in Prince- 
ton, why don't you make plans now to join us in 
Chicago? For members of the family who don't share 
your affinity for CoCo, there are many other attrac- 
tions in the Chicago area. 

The Hyatt Regency Woodf ield offers special rates for 
RAINBOWfest. The show opens Friday evening with a 
session from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's a daytime show 
Saturday — the CoCo Community Breakfast (separate 
tickets required) is at 8 a.m., then the exhibit hall opens 
promptly at 10 a.m. and runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, 
the exhibit hall opens at 1 1 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained directly 
from the rainbow. We'll also send you a reserva- 
tion form so you can get a special room rate. 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH 
treatment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at 
(502) 893-331 1. All POSH services are available at no 
charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 

3b THbRb? 



FRbb SbMIMARS 




Rick Adams 

Independent Programmer 
Writing Commercial Software 

Cray Augsburg 

RAINBOW Technical Editor 
OS-9 For Absolute Beginners 

Bill Bernico 

Independent Programmer 
Writing in BASIC 

Tom DiMarco, Sr. 

Gimmesoft 

Hard Drive Installation, 
Operation and Maintenance 

Marty Goodman, M.D 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
CoCo Consultations 



Ed Hathaway 

Glenside CoCo Club 
Organizing a CoCo Club 

A. Buddy Hogan 

Independent programmer 
Integrating CoCo 3 Into 
Organizational Work 

Donald Hutchison 

RAINBOW CoCo SIG Database Manager 
Introduction to RAINBOW'S 
CoCo SIG on Delphi 

Jutta Kapfhammer 

RAINBOW Managing Editor 
Writing for Publication 

Dale Lear 

RAINBOW Contributor 

Elements of Programming Games 

Originality in Game Programming 



Ross Litton 

Howard Medical 
Monitor Interfacing 

Richard Parry 
Cecil Houk 

Speech Systems 
Music and MIDI 

Dale Puckett 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Beginners Overview of OS-9 
Beginners Overview of BASIC09 

Logan Ward 

Computer Center 

Creative Uses for CoCo Max 

Dick White 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Spreadsheets for the CoCo 



ۥۥ COMMUNITY UbAKFAST 

Dan Bruns — President, General Videotex Corporation 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo Community Breakfast is Dan 
Bruns, president and chief executive officer of General Videotex Corporation 
(Delphi). Formerly a systems analyst for Sperry Univac, Mr. Bruns has helped 
Delphi grow into a major telecomputing information service and an important 
meeting place for the CoCo Community. 

IPbCIAL LYfcMT? 



We're pleased to present The Educational Sandbox, a joint Tandy/RAiNBOW 
effort. This is a computer workshop for RAINBOWfest kids. There will be 
two sessions on both Saturday and Sunday. One workshop will be for the 
kindergarten through third-grade set, and the other for fourth- through 
seventh-graders. Each workshop will last between 45 minutes and one 
hour, and will give the children and their parents hands-on experience in 
using Tandy computers and software. 



RAINBOWfest - Chicago, Illinois 
Dates: May 20-22, 1988 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $64 per night, 
single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: May 6, 1988 

Join us at a future RAINBOWfest! 

RAINBOWfest - Princeton, New Jersey 
Dates: October 21-23, 1988 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Princeton 
Rooms: $88 per night, 
single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: Oct. 7, 1988 

FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket orders re* 
ceived from each state. 

First 500 ticket orders received get The 
Rainbow Book of Simulations. 




YES, I'm coming to Chicago! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special advance 
sale price. Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 



Please send me: 



Three-day tickets at $9 each total 

One-day tickets at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 



Name 

(please print) 

Address 



Saturday CoCo Breakfast 
at $12 each 



City 



State 



total 



RAINBOWfest T-shirts 
at $6 each total 
(Advance sale-priced T-shirts 
must be picked up at the door) 

Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 



Telephone 
Company . 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 



Account Number 



(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 

□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the 
Hyatt Regency Woodfield ($64, single or double 
room). 



Exp. Date 



Signature 



Advance ticket deadline: May 6, 1988. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the 
door. Tickets will also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. Children 
4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. 
Box 385. Prospect, KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky 
call (800) 847-0309. 



170 IFR>(K+L+2) THENR=0 : SOUND150 

,5:GOTO140 ELSE180 

180 R=R-1:Z=R-L:M=44:GOTO210 

200 IFC=0 THEN90ELSE210 

210 C=C+1:IFC=>M THEN1360 

220 POKE282,0:CLS3:PRINT@128,STR 

ING$(32,182) ; :PRINT@160,TAB(4) ;C 

HR$ ( 18 8 ) " 5 " ; : PRINTTAB ( 9 ) ; CHR$ (18 

8 ) " 10 " ; : PRINTTAB ( 14 ) ; CHR$ ( 18 8 ) " 1 

5"; :PRINTTAB(19) ;CHR$(188) "20"; 

230 PRINTTAB (24) ;CHR$ (188) "25" ;T 

AB(29) ;CHR$(188) "30" ; :PRINT@0, "t 

ab " BK$ " guide " BK$ " and" BK$ " end" BK$ 

" of " BK$ " text " BK$ "marker " ; 

240 EN=96-Z : PRINT@192 , " " ; : PRINTT 

AB(Z) ;STRING$(EN,191) ; :PRINTSTRI 

NG$(32,183) ; 

250 PRINT<§357," MARGINS ARE"L+1" 
AND"R+1; :PRINT@417, " LINE LENGTH 

IS "R+l-L" CHARACTERS "; 
260 PRINT@480,STRING$(4,128) ; : PR 
INT@484 , "enter"BK$"a"BK$"period" 
BK$" . "BK$"to"BK$"end" ; : PRINTSTRI 
NG$(4,128) ; :POKE1535,128:POKE152 
3,46 

270 PRINT@71," LINE NUMBER "C" " 
; : PRINT@192 , ; : LINEINPUTL$ (C) 
280 IFL$(C)="."THEN C=C-1:GOTO90 
290 IF LEN(L$(C))>Z THEN300ELSE3 
10 

300 L$(C)="":PRINT§320," TOO LON 

G- TRY AGAIN ": SOUND100 , 10 : SOUND 
50 , 10 : FORD=1TO1000 : NEXT : GOTO220 
310 IFLEN(L$(C) )«0 THENL$(C)=" " 
320 GOTO210 

400 IFC=0 THEN90ELSEPOKE282,0 

410 CLS3:PRINT<§33,"** edit"BK$"r 

outine **"; :PRINT@96, ; 

420 Q=0 : P=0 

430 Q=Q+1:P=P+1 

440 PRINTQ ; TAB ( 4 ) ;L$(Q) 

450 IFQ=C THEN480 ELSE460 

460 IFP=5 THEN480 

470 GOTO430 

480 P=0 

4 90 Y Y=0 : PRINT " ent er " BK$ " 1 ine " BK 
$"number"BK$"or"BK$"enter" ; : INPU 
TYY 

500 IF YY>C THEN490 ELSE510 
510 IFYY<=0 THEN520 ELSE540 
520 IFQ=C ANDP=0 THEN90ELSE530 
530 CLS3:GOTO470 
540 EE=0:EE=YY:YY=0:CLS3 
550 PRINTQ 9 7," OLD LINE: ";:PRIN 
TL$ (EE) :L$(EF)=L$(EE) :L$(EE)="" 
560 PRINT@257, ;: : POKE282 ,0: PRINT 
" NEW LINE; " ; : PRINTSTRING$ ( Z , " . 
") ; : PRINT@268 , ; : LINEINPUTL$ (EE) 
570 IFL$(EE)="" THENL$(EE)=L$(LF 
) :GOTO410 



580 IFL$(EE)="."THEN L$(EE)="":E 
E=EE-1:C=C-1 

590 IF LEN (L$ (EE) ) >Z THENPRINT" 
TOO LONG - TRY AGAIN" : L$ (EE) ="" : 
GOTO560 
600 GOTO410 

690 PRINT@480,BK$"touch"BK$"any" 
BK$ " other " BK$ » key " BK$ " t o " BK$ " ret 
um"BK$; :POKE153 5, 128: RETURN 
700 POKE282,255:CLOSE 
710 CLS4:PRINTSTRING$(64,182) ; : P 
RINT@97," DID YOU SAVE YOUR LAST 
PAGE? " ; : PRINT@160 , STRING$ (64,1 
82) ; :PRINT@257, " TERMINATE ?...( 
y"BK$"to"BK$"conf irm) "BK$; 
720 POKE1296,40:POKE1309,41:GOSU 
B690 

730 Q$=INKEY$:IFQ$=""THEN730 
740 IFQ$="Y" ORQ$="y"THEN790 
750 IFQ$<>"Y" ORQ$O"y"THEN90 
790 CLS3 :PRINT"THE LETTER WRITER 

PROGRAM IS", "TERMINATED (C)19 
84 ASHALLOCK" , "TYPE "CHR$ ( 34 ) "CO 
NT"CHR$(34)" TO CONTINUE WITHOUT 

LOSS OF DATA " ; : END 
800 IFC=0 THEN2440ELSE810 
810 CLS4:PRINT@39,"** save"BK$"r 
outine **" ; :GOSUB2700 : FORD=1TO10 
00: NEXT 

820 IF DV=-1 THENPRINT© 9 8," * * 
* ready"BK$"cassette * * * ";ELS 
EPRINT@98," * * * touch" BK$"S"BK 
$"to"BK$"save * * *";:GOTO920 
830 PRINT@227," [space] TURNS MO 
TOR OFF "; 

840 PRINTQ291," [enter] TURNS MO 
TOR ON "; 

850 PRINT@358," TOUCH [s] TO SAV 
E ";:GOSUB690 

860 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN860 

870 IFI$=" "THEN910 

880 IFI$=CHR$(13)THEN900 

890 IFI$="S" ORI$="S"THEN920 ELS 

E90 

900 PRINT@424," MOTOR IS on " ; : 

AUDIOON : MOTORON : GOT08 60 

910 PRINT@424," MOTOR IS off ";: 

AUDIOOFF : MOTOROFF : GOT08 60 

920 CLS3:PRINT@97," NAME MUST BE 

BETWEEN 1 AND 8 " ; : PRINT@129 , " 
CHARACTERS LONG only " ; 
930 NE$="":PRINT@225," ENTER NAM 
E YOU WISH TO SAVE " ; : PRINT@257 , 
;:LINEINPUT" THIS FILE AS: ";NE$ 
940 IF LEN(NE$)=0 THEN2440 
950 IF LEN(NE$)>8 THEN810ELSE960 
960 PRINT6321," SAVING TO "TD$" 
AS ";NE$" ";STRING$(5,175) ; 
970 IF DV=-1 THENMOTORON : F0RD=1T 
0300 : NEXT : MOTOROFF 



52 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



980 OPEN"0" / #DV / NE$ 
990 PRINT#DV,C,L,R,Z,M 

FOR RR=1 TOC 
1010 PRINT#DV / L$(RR) 
lp2p NEXT 
1030 CLOSE 

1040 PRINT@321," FILE IS SAVED A 

S "NE$" ";STRING$(5,175) ; 

1050 IF DV=-1 THENMOTORON : FORD=l 

TO 100 : NEXT : MOTORO FF 

1060 GOTO2440 

1070 GOTO2440 

1100 IF C>0 THEN30ELSE1110 
1110 CLS3:PRINT@38,"** load"BK$ 
"routine **" ; :GOSUB2700:FORD=1T 
01000 :NEXT 

1120 IF DV— 1 THENPRINT098 , 11 * * 
* ready"BK$"cassette * * * ";EL 
SEIF DV=1THEN1220 
1130 PRINT@227," [space] TURNS M 
OTOR OFF 11 ; 

1140 PRINT@291," [enter] TURNS M 
OTOR ON 11 ; 

1150 PRINT@358," TOUCH [1] TO LO 
AD " ;:GOSUB690 

1160 I$=INKEY$:IFI$= IM, THEN1160 

1170 IFI$=" "THEN 1210 

1180 IFI$=CHR$(13)THEN1200 

1190 IFI$="L" ORI$="1"THEN1220 E 

LSE90 

1200 PRINT@424," MOTOR IS on ": 

: AUDIOON : MOTORON : GOTO1160 

1210 PRINT@424," MOTOR IS off "; 

: AUDIOOFF : MOTOROFF : GOTO1160 

1220 CLS3:GOSUB2700:PRINT@1, 11 SY 

STEM SET TO "TD$" "; 

1230 '* SAVE ROUTINE 

1240 NE$= S " " : PRINT@225 , ; : INPUT" E 

NTER NAME OF FILE ";NE$ 

1250 IF LEN(NE$)=0 THEN90 ELSEIF 

NE$="DIR" THEN2 600 ELSE12 60 

1260 IF LEN(NE$)>8 THEN1240 ELSE 

1270 

1270 OPEN"I",#DV,NE$ 

1280 INPUT#DV, C,L,R, Z ,M 

1290 PRINT: PRINT" LEFT MARGIN SE 

T AT ";L+1 

1300 PRINT: PRINT" RIGHT MARGIN S 
ET AT ";R+1 

1310 PRINT: PRINT" PAGE LENGTH SE 
T AT ";M 

1320 FOR RR=1T0 C 

13 30 IF EOF(DV) THEN 90 

13 40 LINEINPUT#DV,L$ (RR) 

1350 NEXT: CLOSE :GOTO2440 

13 60 CLS3 : PRINT@3 3 , " YOU HAVE RE 

ACHED THE LIMIT ";: PRINTS 65 , 11 OF 

YOUR PAGE LENGTH " ; 
1370 PRINT@129," DO YOU WANT TO 
INCREASE THE " ; : PRINT8161, " LENG 



TH ( y OR ANY OTHER KEY) 11 ; 

1380 Y$=INKEY$:IFY$=""THEN1380EL 

SE1390 

1390 IFY$="Y"OR Y$="y"THEN1400EL 
SE1430 

1400 PRINT@2 25 , ; :MM=0 : INPUT" ENT 
ER NEW PAGE LENGTH " ;MM 
1410 IFMM <M THEN1400 ELSE142.0 
1420 M=MM:GOSUB690 
1430 IFINKEY$=""THEN1430 ELSE90 
1490 ■* PRINT FANFOLD ENVELOPE 
ALL PRINTER CODES FOR DMP110 
1500 CLS4: PRINT© 130, 11 READY PRIN 
TER PAPER " ; :GOSUB1620:PRINT@480 
," ANY KEY WHEN READY ,f ;:EXEC&HA 
17 1 : PRINT* -2 , STRING$ ( 18 , 10 ) : PRIN 
T#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(17) ? 
1510 PRINT#-2 , "Arthur S, Hallock 
":PRINT#-2, "Route 1, Box 198HHH" 
:PRINT#-2 / "Deming / NM 88030" 
1520 PRINT#-2,STRING$(12,10) 
1530 CLS4:PRINT@130, " ENTER ADDR 
ESSEE: ":PRINT@224 / " NAME: ";:PR 
INT@256," ADDR: " ; : PRINT@288 , " C 
TST: " ; :PRINT@3 20, " ZIP : ";:PRI 
NT@224 • 

1540 POKE2 82 ,0 : LINEINPUT" NAME: 
" / A$ 

1550 LINEINPUT" ADDR: ";B$ 



"I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now, it's time to 
give BASIC a shot in the arm, with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your 
choice, with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3. our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs 
Into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use It in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S 15-20; we provide information concerning haw you can 
have this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35, 40. or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC programs, auto-edit of error line, and 
many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/67 

Disk . . . S34.95 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 . . . $27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 

Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitask* with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid for the expert. 
CoCo 1, 2. or 3 compatible. 

Disk . . . S23.95 Assembler source listing . . . Add S3.00 



MONITOR CABLES lor CoCo 3 

Magnavox8CM515/8CM505/8CM643 . , 



$19.95 SonyKV1311CR . . . S29.95 



SPECTROSYSJEMS; 



NO delay on personal checks • Please add $2.00 shipping 



— 11111 N. Kendall Drive. 

7 Suite A 108 

Miami. Florida 33176 
(305) 274-3699Day or Eve 

Sorry no credit cards or COD'S 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 53 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 

12 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Help! 

DISCOUNT PRICE LIST 



30 Meg Burke&Burke System Complete 
20 Meg High Speed System Complete 
40 Meg High Speed System Complete 



$580.00 
$799.00 
$899.00 



CoCo Hard Drive Interfaces 

FHL HCA/WD High Speed Interface 1 1 9.00 

(Uses WD 1002-05 above, includes software OS9 only) 
Burke & Burke XT PC style interface 69 .95 

B&B XT RTC w/battery clock/calendar 99.95 
(See software listed under B&B to right) 



Hard Drive Controllers 

WD PC RLL for Burke & Burke Interface 
Western Digital WD 1002-05 $289.00 

(For FHL High Speed Hard Disk Interface) 
Adaptec 4000 SCSI/SASI 
Adaptec 4070 SCSI/SASI RLL — 

(For Owl and Disto interfaces) 



92.00 
210.00 

162.00 
162.00 



HARD DRIVES (5.25- half height) 

MiniSciibe High Quality Drives - 1 Year Warr. 
M3425+ 21.4MB 53MS $395.00 
M3438 32.7MB RLL 55MS $415.00 
M3650 41.9MB 61MS $455.00 
M3053 44.6MB 25MS 
M6085 :$l.mB 28MS Full Height — 



28 1 .00 
291.00 
376.00 
711.00 
975.00 



DISK DRIVES (5.25" and 3.5" FLOPPY DISKS) 
TEAC High Quality Drives - 1 Year Warr. 
FD55B 360K 40 Track DS 5.25" 
FD55F 720K 80 Track DS 5.25: 
FD35F 720K 80 Track DS 3.5" 



118.00 
151.00 
147.00 



DISK DRIVE CASES 

Hard Drive case with 65W PS and Fan 103.50 

(Holds 2 HH hard or floppy drives + controller) 
Dual Half Height Floppy Case w/PS — 75.00 
XT with AT aspect with 150 Watt PS — 125,00 



CABLES 

ST506 Hard disk to controller, set 2 
FHL HCA/WD 40 Pin Card edge 4' 
FHL HCA/WD 34 Pin Card edge 4 f 
B&B 4' Cable Set 



28.00 
25.00 
25.00 
35.00 



CoCo DECB SOFTWARE 

B&B Hyper I/O run DECB on B&B hard drive 
B&B Hyper m Ramdisk/spooler for above 

©Forth closeout continues (Hurry) $79.95 

CoCo OS9 Level II w/512K * 



29.95 
19.95 

30.00 



The WiZ Cannnraications loftwire for CoCo 3 


$79.95 


69 95 


Sculptor (BIG SALE!!!) 


$450.00 


149.00 


Database - 4th generation language 




DynaStar Word Processor 


$150.00 


100.00 


DynaSpell spelling checker 


$94.50 


45.00 


by Dale Puckett 






Font Editor 


$29.95 


19.95 


Super Sleuth disassembler 


$50.00 


40.00 


Utllix utilities set 


$49.95 


40.00 


UniCharger Unix like utilities 


$150.00 


75.00 


DYNACALC Spreadsheet 


$99.95 


85.00 


FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 


$150.00 


75.00 


Pascal (Limited quamty) 


$99.95 


55.00 


B&B Wild and MV 




19.95 


BOOKS 






Inside OS9 Level H 


i $39.95 


29.95 


Starting Forth (Limited) 


$18.95: 




PRINTERS 






Citizen 






120D 10" carriage 120CPS Draft 


$229.00 


1193.00 


120D-S Serial version of above 


$265.00 


: 228.00 


Star micronics 






ND10 10" carriage 180CPS Draft 


$499.00 


332.00 


NX15 15" carriage 120CPS Draft 


$499.00 


374.00 


NB15 15" carriage 300CPS Draft 


$1399.00 


945.00 


Panasonic 






P1080i 144CPS Draft 


$269.00 


198.00 


P1092i 240CPS Draft 


$499.00 


392.00 


MODEMS 






Packard Bell 






PB1200+ 300/1200 


$199.00 


129.00 


PB2400EM 2400 baud 


$595.00 


256.00 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA, M/C and AMEX. NY 
residents add 1% sales tax. US shipping add $3.50. Please call 
for Air Express shipping. Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and 
catalog. 

* Most of our software requires OS9 LH and 512K. 



Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 
Telex 646740 - FAX 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856 



HARD DISK 
SYSTEMS 
INFORMATION 



For the best and fastest hard disk- 
systems, trust Frank Hogg Laboratory. 

At Frank Hogg Laboratory, we have 

taken over 3 years of our knowledge and 

expertise in the manufacture of the well 

known QT 68000 based computers and 

applied it to the CoQov Many of the 

components used in oiir hard disk 

systems are the same as that used in the 
071 

Hard disk systems have been available 
for the CoCo for some years now, most 
are good reliable systems. However we 
have two new systems for the CoCo that 
are better. They are just as reliable as 
other systems, perhaps even more so. 
But they are both faster and less 
expensive. 

Our top of the line system features Bruce 
Isted's interface for the Western Digital 
WD 1002-05 high speed controller. 
Features; fastest system available, 1 
megabyte transfer in 37 seconds!!, twice 
as fast as other systems!, supports 4 
floppy and 3 hard drives, type ahead for 
both floppy and hard disk, auto boot 
OS9 L1 or L2 from hard or floppy disk. 
Disadvantage; does not support DECB, 
This is the system of choice for the 
serious OS9 user. 20 Meg systems are 
$799 and 40 Meg systems are $899. 
Other sizes are available. 

•• ■ • ' r. /J^fc&i^S ; 

Our second system features the Burke & 
Burke XT and XT RTC interface. This 
interface uses popular and inexpensive 
IBM PC type controllers. For this reason it 
is the least expensive hard disk system 
available today. Not as fast as the Isted 
system but faster than any other system 
available. It also supports RLL drives so 
we are able to offer a 30 Megabyte 
system for only $580 COMPLETE! See 
the price list for other options. 
Disadvantage; requires a multi-pak. 
Note: DECB support and other software 
options are listed on our price list. 




ANNOUNCEMENT! 



FRANK HOGG LABORATORY 
BUYS OUT INVENTORY OF 

Sculptor! 
SELLS FOR LESS THAN 
DISTRIBUTOR COST!!! 



Frank Hogg Laboratory purchased the remaining inventory of another 
Sculptor distributor! Because we got them so low we can offer them to you 

at tremendous savings. 

Sculptor for the CoCo III with OS9 Level II* is 




ONLY $ 1 49 



$149 is below distributor cost! The list price is $450!! Once the/ are gone 
the prices will go back to normal. This is a great opportunity to buy the most 
powerful Database/4th Generation Language available today!!. * Requires 
OS9 LI I and 512K. 

They won't last long. 
Hurry and get yours today!!! ! 



Also on SALE Sculp tor MS/DOS $149 
Sculptor OS9/68K $499 



See Dale Puckett's February and March 1 988 
Rainbow columns for more information on this 

great package. 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA, M/C and AMEX. NY 
residents add 1% sales tax. US shipping add $3.50. Please call 
for Air Express shipping. Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and 
catalog. 

* Most of our software requires OS9 LH and 512KL 



Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 
Telex 646740 - FAX 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856 



1560 LINE IN PUT 11 CTST: ";C$ 

1570 LINEINPUT" ZIP : ";D$:P0KE2 

82,255 

1580 PRINT#-2,TAB(45)A$:PRINT#-2 
,TAB(45)B$:PRINT#-2,TAB(45)C$ 
1590 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ; 
: PRINT#-2 , TAB (4 8 ) D$ : PRINT#-2 , CHR 
$(27) ;CHR$(15) ; 

1600 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ; 
:PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) :GOTO90 
1610 '* PRINTER TEST ROUTINE 
1620 IF (PEEK( &HFF22 ) AND1) THEN163 
0ELSERETURN 

1630 SOUND200,3:PRINT@483,"*** P 

RINTER NOT READY *** ";:FORD=lTO 

1000: NEXT :GOTO90 

1700 IFC=0 THEN90ELSE1720 

1710 '* CHECK PRINTER OPTIONS 

1720 CLS3:PRINT@33,"** hardcopy 

" BK$ " routine **"; 

1730 IF(PEEK(&HFF22) AND1) THENSOU 

ND150,5:PRINT@129, » printer IS n 
ot TURNED on " ; : PRINT@225 , " PLEA 
SE CHECK, THEN TOUCH " ;:PRINT@25 
7,;: PRINT" [SPACE] ENTER FOR MEN 
U " ; : PRINT@289 , ; : LINEINPUT" EN 
TER TO CONTINUE ";K$:IFK$=" "TH 
EN90ELSE1720 

1740 PRINT@97," DO YOU NEED A FO 

RM FEED ? ";:PRINT@129," (y OR 

TOUCH ANY KEY ) " ; 

1750 Y$=INKEY$:IFY$=""THEN1750 

1760 IFY$="Y"OR Y$="y"THEN 1770E 

LSE1780 

1770 PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) 

1780 GOSUB1900:CLS3 

1790 CP=0:PRINT@352,STRING$(2,12 

8) "enter"CHR$(128) " zero" CHR$ (128 

) "to"CHR$(128) "return"CHR$(128) " 

to"CHR$ (128) "menu" STRING $ ( 2 , 128) 

; :PRINT@417," "; 

1800 INPUT" NUMBER OF COPIES NEE 

DED ";CP:IFCP=0 THEN90 

1810 FORZZ=lTO CP 

1820 FORE=lTO C 

1830 PRINT* -2, TAB (L) ;L$(E) 

1840 IF E=44 ORE=95 THENPRINT#-2 

,CHR$ (12) :ELSE1860 

1850 IFST$="Y"THENPRINT<a481, " TO 

UCH [ENTER] TO CONTINUE ";ELSE18 

60 

1860 NEXT 
1870 E=0:NEXT 

1880 E=0:PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) ;:GOTO 
90 

1900 CLS3:PRINT@33, "** LETTERHEA 
D AND " ; : PRINT@67 , " SALUTATION 
ROUTINE **"; 

1910 PRINT@129," SELECT LETTERHE 
AD "; 

1920 PRINT@195, " [a]RTHUR S. HALL 
OCK "; 



1922 PRINT@227 , " [t]EXT ONLY 
it . 

1930 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN 1930 
1940 IFI$="A" ORI$="a" THEN1960 
1942 IFI$="T" ORI$="t" THEN2180 
1950 IFI$="" THENRETURNELSE1940 
I960 CLS3:PRINT@33," LETTERHEAD 
FOR . . . ASHALLOCK " ; 
1970 POKE282,0 

1980 PRINT@97," ";: LINEINPUT" DAT 
E ";D$ 

1990 PRINT@225," SALUTATION OR H 
EADING " ; : PRINT@289 , "" ; : LINEINPU 
TSA$ 

2000 POKE282,255 

2010 LH$="Arthur S. Hallock" 

2020 AD$="Route 1, Box 198HHH 

Deming, New Mexico 88030" 
2030 GOTO2040 
2040 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 
2050 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(66) ; 
CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ; 
2060 PRINT #-2, TAB (8) ;LH$ 
2070 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) ; 
2080 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(29) ; 
2090 PRINT#-2,TAB(44) ;D$ 
2100 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(66) 
2110 PRINT#-2,TAB(12)AD$ 
2120 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(29) ; 
2130 PRINT#-2,STRING$ (95,167) 
2140 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 
2150 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(29) 
2160 PRINT#-2,TAB(L+1) ;SA$: PRINT 
#-2 

2170 RETURN 

2180 CLS:PRINT@33,"** TEXT ENTRY 

ROUTINE **" 
2190 POKE282,0 

2200 PRINT@128," ";: INPUT " DATE " 

;d$ 

2210 print§192," " ; : input"page n 

UMBER ";P$ 

2220 PRINT@256," LINE INPUT "HE 
ADER (96 CHARACTERS, MAXIMUM) " ;H 
E$ 

2230 PRINT: PRINT" ";: INPUT "NUMBE 
R OF LINES OF SPACE FROM THE P 
OP OF PAGE ";N 

2240 PRINT: PRINT" ";: LINE INPUT "T 
ITLE OF ARTICLE OR PAGE " ; 

TT$ 

2250 TT=LEN(TT$) : TU=9 6 -TT : TA=TU/ 
6 

2260 POKE282,255 

2270 PRINT#-2,STRING$(N,10) 

2280 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(20) ; 

2290 PRINT! -2, D$; TAB (80) "Page "P 

$ 

2300 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(29) 
2310 PRINT#-2,HE$ 
2320 PRINT#-2,STRING$(9 6,167) 
2330 PRINT#-2 :PRINT#-2 



56 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



2340 
2350 
2360 
CHR$ 
17) ; 

2370 
2440 
28) : 
2450 
BK$" 



PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ; 
PRINT#-2 / TAB (TA) ;TT$ 
PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(2 9) ; 
(27) ;CHR$(15) ;CHR$(27) ;CHR$( 

RETURN 

K=95 : POKE282., 255 : BK$=CHR$ (1 
CLS3 

PRINTBK$ "letter" BK$ "writer" 
program" BK$ " in" BK$ "bas ic" BK$ 



2460 PRINT@71,"** "BK$"main"BK$" 
menu"BK$" **■•; 

2470 PRINT@129,"c" ; : PRINT@132 , 11 
COMMENCE A NEW LETTER "; 
2480 PRINT@161, "a" ; : PRINT(§164 , " 
ADD TO EXISTING LETTER "; 
2490 PRINT@193,"e"; :PRINT@196," 
EDIT, INQUIRE, VIEW PAGE » ; 
2500 PRINT@225,"1" ; :PRINT@228," 
LOAD PAGE - TAPE OR DISK " ; 
2510 PRINT@257 , "h" ; : PRINT@260 , " 
HARDCOPY ON LINE PRINTER "; 
2520 PRINT@289,"S"; : PRINTS 292 , " 
SAVE PAGE - TAPE OR DISK " ; 
2530 PRINT6321, "x" ; : PRINT@324 , " 
EXIT - TERMINATE PROGRAM 
2540 PRINT@353,"p"; :PRINT@356," 
PRINT : FANFOLD ENVELOPE 



ii 



2550 PRINT@416," NOTE: "BK$"sav 
e"BK$"page»BK$"if"BK$ l, you"BK$"ha 
ve " BK$ BK$ BK$ BK$ " made " BK$ " any " BK$ 
" changes " BK$ "since " BK$ " entry" BK$ 
BK$; 

2560 PRINT@486, " touch MENU choi 
ce " ; 

2570 M$=INKEY$:IFM$=""THEN257 / 0 
2580 ON INSTR("PWACNELHSQXTpwacn 
elhsqxt" ,M$) GOTO1500 , 100, 200, 100 
, 100 , 400 , 1100 , 1700 , 800 , 700 , 700 , 7 
00 , 1500 , 100 , 200 , 100 , 100 , 400 , 1100 
, 1700 , 800 , 700 , 700 , 700 
2590 GOTO2570 
2600 DIR 

2610 IFINKEY$=""THEN2610 ELSE122 
0 

2700 TD$="":IFPEEK(188)=14 THENT 

D$="DISK" ELSETD$="TAPE" 

2710 IF TD$="TAPE" THENDV=-1 ELS 

E IFTD$="DISK" THENDV=1 

2720 RETURN 

9999 SV$="LETRWRTR" :F0RC=1T03:CL 
S3: PRINTS 9 6," SAVING "SV$" TO TA 
PE : "C ; : CSAVESV$ : MOTORON : FORD=lTO 
3000 : NEXT : NEXT : FORD=1TO5000 : NEXT 
:MOTOROFF:CLS3 :PRINT(396, " "SV$" 
IS SAVED"C-1"TIMES" ; : PRINT@416 , ; 
:END 



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April 1988 THE RAINBOW 57 



I F ea tur e 



— 




Keep maintenance schedules for up 

CoCo's Auto 



wrote it down on a piece of paper 
somewhere. It was about 5,000 miles 
ago ... or was it 7,000? Maybe it was 
my wife's car, instead. My note is lost, 
and who remembers when they get oil 
changes anyway? 

Folks agree that regular maintenance 
will save*them money down the road* 
but they hate the bother. Remember is 
a program to help you with the tiresome 
details. Just enter your car's mainte- 
nance schedule (by the owner's manual 
or by your own preferences) and the 
work that has already been done, and 
you have finished the hardest part. 

Later on, you enter current mileage 
and date to receive a report of what's 
needed. You can also record receipts 
such as gasoline and oil, and get a 
summary (cost per thousand miles) of 
operating expenses. You can keep track 
of up to five vehicles as the program is 
written. And, if you want, you can 
change the checklist items to suit your 



own requirements. 

Running the Program 

There are three "modules" or subpro- 
grams comprising Remember. To use 
the program, type in and save the main 
module to disk as MRIN.BflS, the data- 
base module as EXPNS.BflS, and the 
title screen as REM.BflS. Load MR IN and 

Larry Anderson is an auto mechanic 
presently employed as an electronic 
technician by the U.S. Postal Service. 
He holds a bachelor's degree in English 
with minors in math and physics, and 
enjoys programming on the Co Co 3 and 
the 1000 SX. His wife, Linda, uses the 
1000 SX in her job as a church secretary. 
Their daughter, Kacy, enjoys Adven- 
tures and programming. 



to five vehicles 




aint 




V 



anager 



B{ Urn Alteram 



enter RUN 1400 to set up two blank files 
(vehicle names will go in these), then 
RUN "REM". Line 45 sets the baud rate 
for your printer to 9600 — you can edit 
it to whatever rate you choose. Your 
selection from the main menu sets the 
value of R, which automatically sets up 
the proper sequence through the pro- 
gram and back to the main menu. 

Selection V will set up new vehicle 
files, not allowing duplicate names or 
names of more than eight characters. 
The variable N$ names the currently 
accessed vehicle, while M ( Q ) and H$ ( 0 ) 
contain data about service requirements 
and the latest services done. This is 
where you enter the maintenance sched- 
ule of your choice, which can be differ- 
ent for each vehicle. Data is finalized by 
a press of the ENTER key, which allows 
for corrections by backspacing. Note 
that dates must be entered without 
slashes or dashes (/ or -). So, July 18, 
1986, would be entered as 071886. You 
do have the chance to start a screen over 
by pressing ENTER several times until 
the "Entries Correct Y/N?" prompt 
appears, and then pressing N. 

Select C and you will be prompted for 
a car's name, its current mileage and 
today's date. Notice that the last name 
used (which should be in the upper-right 
corner of the screen) may be entered 
without retyping, just press ENTER. 
Remember computes whether or not 
service is due. M(0) is the current 
mileage and H$ ( 0 ) is the current date. 
Service is "due" if within 500 miles 
below to 1,000 miles above the desired 
interval, and "overdue" when above 
that figure. Submenu selection P gets 
you a printed copy with maintenance 
guides, and Selection E calculates a 
summary from the expenses you have 



kept for that car. The total sum of your 
expenses is SUM, which is multiplied by 
100 and divided by the mileage interval 
(in thousands) you select; the resulting 
number is converted to an integer and 
finally divided by 100. This assures a 
value in dollars and cents, not several 
decimal places. To return to the main 
menu at any time, just enter a @. 

Selection U brings you to another 
submenu to update service or expense 
records. The service update screen 
shows your previous services completed 
and allows you to change or update any 
one or all items. Pressing the ENTER key 
steps you past any entries you don't 
want to change. Step through all entries 
until the message "Entries Correct Y/ 
N?" appears. Pressing N at this point 
allows re-entry of this screen, but the 
old data displayed will not be shown. To 
redisplay old data, enter @ and again 
select U. Within the record-keeping 
section, submenus allow you to review 
or change your expense records or 
return to the main menu. 

Selection I shows you the names of 
cars you already have files for, and Q 
quits the program. 

Remember accesses several files on 
your disk drive: VEH.NDX, which 
stores the names you assign to your 
' vehicles; CRNT.NDX, which con- 
tains the name of the vehicle 
you last accessed; EXP 
NS.BflS, the database 
and the . DRT and 
-DTL files for each 
vehicle, which 
contain 



( 



schedules of maintenance and expense 
records. There is, of course, the main 
program section, MAIN. BPS; and the 
title screen is handled by REM.BAS. 

A large part of this program consists 
of error traps and screen formatting. 
For instance, Line 550 ensures that 
current mileage isn't less than that of the 
last service performed. Lines 575 
through 620 make sure that your cur- 
rent date includes not more than 12 
months in the year, nor more than 31 
days in a month; nor can the dates be 
zero. Also, the current date can't be 
earlier than the last service date! Tests 
for valid names are used to avoid "near 
misses" in spelling, which could cause 
an NE Error or other errors to crash the 
program. You can always consult the 
Index to see what names you have 
already "remembered." 



The EXPNS module is a small data- 
base geared to work with the MR IN 
module. Three fields titled DfiTE, 
RMOUNT and DETRIL5 are filed in the 
. DTL file with that vehicle's name 
preceding it, and probably will contain 
only a few characters each. Records 
may be added, removed, or merely 
reviewed. Thanks go to Keith Baker for 
some good ideas from his cassette-based 
File-it database, The Color Computer 
Magazine, January 1984, Page 117. 

No search or sort capabilities were 
included in EXPNS, and data is automat- 
ically posted to the - DTL disk files. The 
blank -DTL file was set up by MR IN so 
that you would not crash at this point 
by attempting to read a file not yet 
created. Though it has no contents at 
first, the Co Co will recognize its exist- 
ence, and later you can add records to 
it 

You can change the items of sug- 
gested maintenance to suit your own 
preferences. The ones included are the 
items 1 rate most important. Take care 
of your car, let Remember do the detail 
work that nobody likes, and enjoy a real 
advantage in reliability and savings! 



♦♦♦MAINTENANCE FOR SAMPLE*** 
02/W2/BB A0W00 MILES 



I tern: 

OIL CHANGE 
OIL CHANGE 
LUBE 
TUNE UP 
BELTS/HOSES 



Due 

C 



Overdue 



M 
M 
M 



M i I es tp go 



C=Calendar interval, M=Mileage interval 



CHECK LISTS 



Change oil and f i 1 ter ... check fluid levels under hood. ..check for any 
leakage, battery corrosion, loose belts* etc. 



Lube all ti tt ings. . . oi 1 door hinges and strikers, hood hinges, etc... 
check transmission & differential. Inspect exhaust system. Check for 
damage under car. 



Tune up engine. .. change spark plugs, air and fuel filters, check plug 
wires and ignition system. .. check PCV and breather ... check timing and 
idle speed. .. choke action when appl i cable. .. check overall performance. 



Bel ts/hoses. .. check belt tension and condi t ion. .. hoses for softness or 
deter iorat ion. .. clamps for tightness. .* radiator should be free of debris 
in cooling fins, and should be free from leakage. Also inspect brake linings 
and operation. Check tires for tread depth and even wear. 

PERFORMED ABOVE ITEMS (MILEAGE & DATE FOR SERVICE UPDATE) 



Happy motoring (and computing)! 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 



at 202 Jackson St., Benton, LA 71066. 
Please enclose an SASE when writing 
for a response.) □ 




85 '« .... * > « 235 

140 ,108 

230 . . ..210 
270. ■ ■ - >♦.::« » « . 9 
350 . ♦.. .> .202 
425 ■■» * . .237 
« » • % * . » 59 



590 . . . . .119 

665 ....... 87 

735 . , ...101 



810 ... 
915 ... 
1000 .. 
1075 .., 
1135 . . 
1160*, 
1220 .. 
1280 . . 
1375 . . 
END .. 



...86 
.« » 25 
...67 
..151 
j * « 39 
» . 242 
. .189 
..250 
..235 
..106 



Listing 1: MR IN 



5 ' 

m 

15 

20 
25 

30 
35 



*******pj2MEMBER******** 

*********vi .pi********* 

• *****COPYRIGHT 1985**** 
*********************** 
************************ 

***BY LARRY ANDERSON*** 
i *********************** 

***BOX 180 BENTON LA*** 
************************ 

*********************** 

i 
i 



40 CLS3: CLEARS 000 

45 POKE150,1 ****** 9600BAUD POKE 
50 GOTO1350 '***** PCLEAR ROUTIN 

E " ; " " 

55 DIMA$(150) ,B$(150) ,C$(15p) 

6p u$="r e m e m b e r":Ul$=STRI 

NG$ (8 , 128) +"MAIN MENU" :U2$=STRIN 
G$ (6 , 12 8) + "NEW VEHICLE" : Z$=CHR$ ( 
128) 

65 W$=STRING$ (8, 128) +"§escapes"+ 

Z$+"to"+Z$+ ,l menu"+STRING$ (7 , 128) 

70 CLS3 : PRINTU$ ; : GOT0855 

75 CLS3:PRINT@ 0 ,U$ ; : PRINT@15 ,U1 

$ ; : PRINT @ 105 , "Vehicle "+Z $+ '• entry 

11 ; STRING$ (3,128) ; : PRINT@16 9 , "Che 

ck"+Z$+"if "+Z$+"service" ; : PRINT@ 

201," is"+Z$+"due"; 

80 PRINT @ 20 8 , STRING$ (9 , 128) ; 

85 PRINT@265, "Update" +Z$+"vehicl 

e";STRING$ (2,128) ; : PRINT&297 , " h 

istory" ;STRING$ (8 , 128) ; : PRINT@36 

1, "Index" ;STRING$ (11, 128) ; 

9/3 PRINT@425, "Quit" ;STRING$ (12,1 

28) ; 

95 GOSUB1440 

100 B$="VCUIQ" :A=INSTR(B$,A$) 
105 ON A GOTO385,450,745,1375,13 
10:GOTO95 

Hp ****** ENTER MAINTENANCE SCH 
EDULE 



60 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



115 CLS:PRINT@0,U$+STRING$(17,12 
8) ;: PRINTS 32, " ENTER INTERVALS F 
OR: ";N$; :PRINT@64,STRING$(32,1 
28) ; 

120 PRINT@96," OIL CHANGE EVERY 

MILES": PRINTS 12 8," 

OR WITHIN .. MOS." 

125 PRINT© 19 2," 1UBRICATE EVERY 

MILES" :PRINT@224," 

OR WITHIN . . MOS . " 

130 PRINT@288," tUNE UP EVERY 

MILES" : PRINT© 3 20, " - 

OR WITHIN . . MOS . " 

135 PRINT@384," bELTS/ETC . EVERY 

MILES" :PRINT@416," 

OR WITHIN . . MOS . " 

140 PRINT@48J3,W$; : POKE1535 , 128 : L 
=114:Q=1 

145 F0RP=1T04 : F0RC=1T02 : IFC=1THE 
NN=5ELSEN=C 

150 D$="":PRINT@L,CHR$(133) ; 
155 GOSUB1440 

160 IFA$="@"THEN1355ELSEIFASC(A$ 
)=8THEN710 

165 IFASC(A$)=13THEN Z=LEN(D$):P 

RINT@L,STRING$(Z+1,143) ; :PRINT@L 

,D$;:D(Q)=VAL(D$) :GOT0195 

170 IFASC(A$)<48 0RASC(A$)>57 TH 

EN155ELSED$=D$+A$ : PRINT@L, D$ ; : D ( 

Q)=VAL(D$) 

175 IFLEN(D$)=>N THEN 180 ELSEPR 
INT@L+LEN(D$) ,CHR$(133) ; :GOT0155 
180 PRINT@L+LEN(D$) ,CHR$(133) ; 
185 GOSUB1440 

190 IFASC(A$)=8THEN710ELSEIFASC( 
A$)<>13THEN185 

195 PRINT@L+LEN(D$) ,CHR$(143) ; :P 
RINT@L+N+1,CHR$(143) ; : 3>L+35 :Q=Q 
+1 

200 NEXT C 
205 L=L+26 
210 NEXTP 

215 PRINT@0,STRING$ (32,191) :PRIN 

T@32 , " entries"+Z$+"correct" ; 
: POKE1075 , 63 : PRINT@52 , "Yes" ; :POK 
E1079 , 47 : PRINT@56 , "No" 
220 GOSUB1440 

225 B$="NY@":W=INSTR(B$,A$) 
230 ONW GOT0115, 240, 1355 :GOTO220 
235 ****** REQUEST CURRENT DATA 
240 CLS0:PRINT@0,U$; : PRINTS 32, "C 
URRENT DATA FOR: " ;N$ :PRINT@64, 
STRING$ ( 32 , 128) ; : PRINT "LAST OIL 
CHG. ...... MILES?"; : PRINT" 

DATE PERFORMED ?" 

245 PRINT: PRINT "LAST LUBED 

MILES?"; : PRINT" DATE P 

ERFORMED ?" 

250 PRINT: PRINT "LAST TUNED 



MILES?" ;: PRINT" DATE P 

ERFORMED ?" 

255 PRINT :PRI NT "CKD BELTS&HOSES 

MILES?"; : PRINT" DATE P 

ERFORMED ?" : PRINTQ480 , 

W$; :POKE1535,128 

260 IFA=3THENPRINT@82 , "new" ;STRI 
NG$(6,128) ;"old»; 
265 IFA=3THENPRINT@121, " "; 
:PRINT@128-LEN(H$(1) ) ,H$(1) ;:PRI 
NT@152,LEFT$(H$(2) ,2) ;"/";MID$(H 
$(2) ,3,2) ;"/";RIGHT$(H$(2) ,2) ; :P 
RINTS217 , " " ; : PRINT@224-LEN 

(H$(3) ) ,H$(3) ; :PRINT@248,LEFT$(H 
$(4) ,2) ;"/";MID$(H$(4) ,3,2) ;»/»; 
RIGHT$(H$(4) ,2) ; 

270 IFA=3THENPRINT@312," "; 
:PRINT@320-LEN(H$(5) ) ,H$(5) ;:PRI 
NT0344 , LEFT$ (H$ (6) , 2 ) ; "/" ;MID$ (H 
$(6) ,3,2) ;"/";RIGHT$(H$(6) ,2) ; :P 
RINTQ409," "; : PRINT@416-LEN 

(H$(7) ) ,H$(7) ; :PRINT(a440,LEFT$(H 
$(8) ,2) ;"/";MID$(H$(8) ,3,2) ;»/"; 

RIGHT$(H$(8) ,2) ; 
275 1 

280 L=112 :Q=1:N=6 



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April 1966 THE RAINBOW 61 



285 FORP= 1T0 4 : FORC= 1TO 2 

290 D$="":PRINT@L,CHR$(133) ; 

295 GOSUB1440 

300 IFA$="@"THEN1355ELSEIFASC(A$ 
)=8THEN705 

3,05 IFASC(A$)=13THEN Z=LEN(D$) :P 

RINT@L, STRING$ (Z+l, 143) ; :PRINT§L 

,D$; :H$(Q)=D$:GOT0335 

310 IFASC(A$)<48 ORASC(A$)>57 TH 

EN295ELSED$=D$+A$ : PRINT@L, D$ ; :H$ 

(Q)=D$ 

315 IFLEN(D$)=>N THEN 3 2,0 ELSEPRI 
NT@L+LEN (D$) ,CHR$(133) ;:GOT0295 
320 PRINT @ L+LEN (D$) ,CHR$(133) ; 
325 GOSUB1440 

330 IFASC (A$)=8THEN705ELSEIFASC( 

A$)=13THEN335 ELSE325 

335 PRINT@L+LEN(D$) ,CHR$(143) ;:P 

RINT6 L+N+l , CHR$ (143);: L=L+3 2 : Q=Q 

+1 

340 NEXT C 
345 L=L+32 
350 NEXTP 

355 PRINT@0,STRING$(32,191) :PRIN 
T@32 , entries"+Z$+"correct" ; 

: POKE 10 7 5 , 63 : PRINT@52 , "Yes" ; : POK 

E1079 , 47 : PRINTQ56 , "No" 
360 GOSUB1440 

365 B$="NY@":W=INSTR(B$,A$) 
370 ONW GOTO240,800,1355:GOTO360 
375 ****** (A=l) NEW VEHICLE ENT 
RY 

380 Z$=CHR$(128) 

385 CLS3:PRINT@0,U$+U2$; :PRINT@1 

99 , "name"+Z$+"you"+Z$+"will"+Z$+ 
"use"+Z$ ; :"PRINT@231, Z$+"f or"+Z$+ 
"this"+Z$+"vehicle"+Z$ ; : PRINT@48 

0,W$; :P0KE1535,128 

390 PRINT@364 , " ";:PRINT@ 

3 64 , " " ; : LINEINPUTN1$ 

395 PRINT@372,STRING$(12,175) ;:I 

FN 1 $= " " THEN3 85ELSEIF Nl$="@" THEN 

75 

400 FORQ=lTO LEN (Nl$) : IFASC (MID$ 
(N1$,Q,1) )<48 OR ASC(MID$(N1$,Q / 
1))>90 THEN N1$="":GOT0385 
405 NEXT Q 

410 TEMP$=N$:N$=N1$:GOTO1170 
415 CLS3:PRINT@266,"SAVING DATA" 

• 

420 OPEN"0",#l,N$+"/DAT" 

425 FOR Q=1T08:WRITE#1,D(Q) ,H$(Q 

) 

430 NEXT Q 
435 CLOSE#l 
440 GOT0965 

445 ****** (A=2) CHECK FOR SERVI 
CE DUE 

450 CLS3: PRINT §0,U$; :PRINT@24,N$ 

; : PRINT@169 , Z$+"what"+Z$+"is"+Z$ 
+ " the "+Z $+Z $ ; : PRINT @ 20 1 , Z $+ " vehi 



cle"+Z$+"name"+Z$; :PRINT@480, W$; 
:POKE1535, 128:PRINT@3 3 2, " 

"; :PRINT@332, ""; 
455 LINEINPUTN1$:PRINT@340,STRIN 
G$(12,175) ; :TEMP$=N$:IFN1$=""AND 
N$<> " "THEN7 90ELSEIFN1 $=" @ "THEN7 5 
ELSEN$=N1$ : GOTO1170 
460 IFN$=""ORN$="@"THEN75 
4 65 OPEN"I", #l,N$+"/DAT" 
470 FOR Q=1T08:INPUT#1, D(Q),H$( 
Q) 

475 H(Q)=VAL(H$(Q) ) 

480 J(Q)=0:J1(Q)=0 

485 NEXT Q 

490 CLOSEtfl 

495 IFA=3THEN2 40 

500 CLS3: PRINT @0,U$; :PRINT@24,N$ 
; :PRINT@196,Z$+"enter"+Z$+"curre 
nt"+Z$+"mileage"+Z$; :PRINT@300, " 
"; :PRINT@480,W$; :POKE1535, 

128 

505 D$="":N=1 
510 GOSUB1440 

515 IFA$="@"THEN75ELSEIFASC (A$) = 
8THEN700ELSEIFASC(A$)=13THEN545 
520 IFASC (A$)<48 ORASC(A$)>57 TH 
EN510 ELSE525 

525 D$=D$+A$:PRINT@300,D$; 
530 N=N+1:IF N<=6 THEN 510 
535 GOSUB1440 

540 IFASC (A$)=8THEN700ELSEIFASC( 

A$)=13THEN545ELSE535 

545 M(0)=VAL(D$) 

550 FORQ=1TO7STEP2:IFM(0)<VAL(H$ 
(Q) ) THEN1365 
555 NEXTQ 

560 CLS3 : PRINT@0 ,U$ ; :PRINT@24,N$ 
; : PRINT @197,Z$+" ent er " +Z $+ " curre 
nt"+Z$+"date"+Z$ ; : PRINT@300 , " 

"; :PRINT@480,W$; : POKE1535 , 128 
:D$=" ":N=1 
565 GOSUB1440 

570 IFA$=" @ "THEN75ELSEIFASC ( A$ ) = 
8THEN715ELSEIFASC(A$)=13THEN625 
575 IFASC (A$)<48 ORASC(A$)>57 TH 
EN565 

580 D$=D$+A$:PRINT@300,D$; 

585 IFN=2THENV$=MID$(D$,1,2) :IFV 

AL(V$)>12 OR VAL(V$)=0 THEN 1030 

590 IFN=4THENV$=MID$(D$,3,2) : IFV 

AL(V$)>31 OR VAL(V$)=0THEN1030 

595 N=N+1:IFN<=6 THEN 565 

600 GOSUB1440 

605 IFASC ( A$ ) =8THEN7 15ELSEIFASC ( 

A$)=13THEN610ELSE600 

610 FORQ=2T08STEP2:IFRIGHT$(D$,2 

)<RIGHT$(H$(Q) ,2)THEN1030 

615 IFRIGHT$(D$,2)=RIGHT$(H$(Q) , 

2 ) ANDLEFT$ (D$ , 2 ) <LEFT$ (H$ (Q) , 2 ) T 

HEN1030 

620 NEXT Q 



62 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



625 H$(0)=D$ 

63 0 FORT=1TO300:NEXTT 

635 M$=STR$(M(0) ) :Z=LEN(M$) :CLS3 

: PRINTS, U$; : PRINT© 67, N$;". . . »:P 

RINT@85-Z,M(0) " MILES"; :PRINT@96 
, " MAINTENANCE DUE ";:P0KE1117, 
175 : P0KE1118 , 175 : P0KE1119 , 175 
640 PRINT" FOR / / ";:PRIN 
T@117,LEFT$(H$(0) ,2) ; :PRINT@120, 
MID$ (H$(0) ,3,2) ; :PRINT@123,RIGHT 
$(H$ (0),2); 

645 PRINT@128,STRING$(32,32) ; 
650 F0RQ=1T07STEP2:M(Q)=D(Q)+H(Q 
) 

655 T$(l)="OIL CHANGE" :T$ (3)=" LU 
BE " : T$ ( 5 ) ■ "TUNE UP" : T$ ( 7 ) = " BELTS 
/HOSES" : IF M (0 ) >=M (Q) +1000THEN72 
5 

660 IF M(0)<M(Q)+1000 AND M(0)>M 
(Q)-500 THEN735ELSEPRINTCHR$(143 
) ,*T$(Q) ;" IN";M(Q)-M(0) ; "MILES": 
J(Q)=3 
665 NEXT Q 
670 GOSUB910 

675 PRINT @ 4 8 7 , " Pr int " ; : POKE 1 5 1 6 , 
47 : PRINT@493 , "Expenses" ; : POKE152 
5,47: POKE1526 , 128 : POKE1527 , 64 
680 GOSUB1440 

685 B$="PE@":W=INSTR(B$,A$) 
690 ONW GOTO1040,1210,75:GOTO680 
695 ****** BACKSPACE/CORRECTION 
700 Z=LEN(D$) :IFZ<1THEN510ELSED$ 
=LEFT$(D$,Z-1) : PRINT© 300," 
"; :PRINT@300,D$; :N=N-1:GOTO510 
705 Z=LEN(D$) :IFZ<1THEN295ELSE D 
$=LEFT$ (D$ , Z-l) : PRINTQL, STRING $ ( 
Z-1,143) ;CHR$(133) ;CHR$(143) ;:PR 
INT@L,D$; :GOT0295 

710 Z=LEN(D$) :IFZ<1THEN155ELSE D 
$=LEFT$ (D$, Z-l) : PRINTSL, STRING$ ( 
Z-1,143) ;CHR$(133) ;CHR$(143) ; :PR 
INT@L,D$; :G0TO155 

715 Z=LEN(D$) :IFZ<1 THEN 565ELSE 
D$=LEFT$(D$,Z-1) :PRINT@300," 

" ; : PRINT<§300 , D$ ; :N=N-1 : GOT0565 
720 ****** SERVICE 'FLAGS' 
725 PRINTCHR$(191) ; T$ (Q) ; " OVER 
DUE":J(Q)=2 
730 GOT0665 

735 PRINT CHR$(159) ;T$(Q) ;" SVC 

DUE":J(Q)=1 

740 GOT0665 

745 ****** (A=3) UPDATE RECORDS 
750 CLS3:PRINT@0,U$; :PRINT@24,N$ 
; :PRINT@233, "Service"+Z$+"update 
"; :PRINT@297, "Expense"+Z$+"recor 
d"; 

755 GOSUB1440 

760 B$="ES@":W=INSTR(B$,A$) 
765 ONW GOTO1300,775,75:GOTO755 
77^ i***** SERVICE UPDATE 



775 CLS3:PRINT@0,U$; :PRINT@24,N$ 

; : PRINT@232 , Z$+"new"+Z$+"data"+Z 
$+"for"+Z$+Z$ ; : PRINT@264 , Z$+"veh 
icle"+Z$+"named"+Z$ ; : PRINT© 4 80 , W 
$; :POKE1535,128:PRINT@331," 

";:PRINT@331,""; 
780 LINEINPUTN1$ : IFN1$="@"THEN75 
ELSEIFN1$=" "ANDN$<>" "THEN790ELSE 
IFN1$<>""THENN$=N1$ 
785 GOTO1170 

790 PRINT@332,N$; : PRINTQ340 , STRI 

NG$(12,175) ; :GOTO460 

795 IFA=2THEN445ELSEIFA=3THEN775 

:GOT075 

800 IFA=1THEN4 15ELSEIFA=3THEN8 10 
:GOT075 

805 ****** WRITE UPDATES TO "/DA 
T" FILE 

810 CLS3:PRINT§266," SAVING DATA 
" / 

815 OPEN"I",#l,N$ 

820 0PEN"O", #2, "TEMP/DAT" 

825 FOR Q=1T08:INPUT#1, B(Q),E$( 

Q) 

830 IF H$(Q)<>"" THEN E$(Q)=H$(Q 
) 

835 WRITE#2,B(Q) ,E$(Q) 
840 NEXTQ 
845 CLOSE 

850 KILLN$+"/DAT" : RENAME "TEMP/DA 

T " TO N$+ "/ DAT " : G0TO7 5 

855 '***** CHK. VEH/NDX AND CRNT 

/NDX 

860 OPEN" I", #1, "VEH/NDX" 
865 F0RQ=1T05 

870 INPUT#1,N$(Q) : IFN$ (Q) =" "THEN 
885 

875 IF EOF(l)=-l THEN885 
880 NEXTQ 
885 CLOSE#l 

890 IFA=0THENOPEN" I" , #1, "CRNT/ND 
X"ELSE75 ' *****READ FIRST TIME 
ONLY 

895 INPUT#1,N$ 
900 CLOSE#l:GOT075 
905 ****** DATE CALCULATIONS 
910 FOR Q=2T08STEP2 
915 MO(Q)=VAL(LEFT$(H$(Q) ,2) ) :DA 
(Q)=VAL(MID$(H$(Q) ,3,2)) :YR(Q)=V 
AL(RIGHT$(H$(Q) ,2)) 
920 M0=VAL(LEFT$(H$(0) ,2) ) :D0=VA 
L(MID$(H$(0) ,3,2) ) : Y0=VAL (RIGHT$ 
(H$(0) ,2)) 

925 Y(Q)=(Y0-YR(Q))*360 

930 T$(2)="OIL CHANGE" :T$ (4) ="LU 

BE":T$(6)="TUNE UP" : T$ (8 ) =" BELTS 

/HOSES" 

935 I(Q)=(((M0-l)*30+D0+Y(Q))-(( 

MO(Q)-1)*30+DA(Q))) 

940 IF I(Q)>D(Q)*30-15 THEN PRIN 

TCHR$(175); T$(Q);" BY CALENDAR" 



April 1968 THE RAINBOW 63 



:J1(Q-1)=1 

945 NEXTQ 
950 RETURN 

955 CLS3 : PRINT@0 , U$+STRING$ ( 6 , 12 
8) ;:PRINT@21,"NEW VEHICLE" ; :PRIN 
T@231, "NAME ALREADY USED" ; : SOUND 
200 , 5 : SOUND150 , 10 : F0RT=1T0425 : NE 
XT:GOT03 85 

960 ****** WRITE NEW VEH. TO FIL 
E AND OPEN BLANK "/DTL" FILE 
965 OPEN"0" / #l / "VEH/NDX" 
970 F0RN=1T05:WRITE#1,N$(N) 
975 NEXT N 
980 CLOSE#l 

985 OPEN"0",#l,N$+"/DTL" 

990 WRITE#1,A$(0) ,B$(0) ,C$(0) 

995 CLOSE#l:GOT075 

1000 '***** CHECK MAX. # VEHICLE 

S 

1005 N=l 

101)8 IFN$(N)=N$THEN955 

1015 I FN $ ( N ) = " " THENN $ ( N ) =N$ : M=N : 

GOT0115 

1020 N=N+1:IFN>5THENCLS3:PRINT@2 
60, "LIMIT 5 VEHICLES"; :FORT=0TO3 
00:NEXTT:GOTO75 
1025 GOTO1010 

1030 CLS3:PRINT@264,"NOT A VALID 

DATE" ; :FORX=0TO300:NEXT 
1035 GOTO560 

1040 '***** PRINTOUT OF SERVICE 
DUE 

1045 PRINT@448," BE SURE THE PRI 
NTER IS ONLINE " 
1050 PRINT#-2,STRING$(6,13) 
1055 PRINT@448,STRING$(32,175) ; 
1060 PRINT#-2 , TAB (28) "***MAINTEN 
ANCE FOR "N$"***" 

1065 PRINT#-2,TAB(28)LEFT$(H$(0) 
,2) ;"/";MID$(H$(0) ,3,2) ;"/";RIGH 
T$(H$(0) ,2) ;TAB(44)M(0) " MILES": 
PRINT#-2 , STRING$ (80 , 61) : PRINT#-2 

, " I tent : " ; TAB ( 30 ) " Due " ; TAB ( 40 ) " Ov 
erdue" ; TAB (55) "Miles to go" 
1070 F0RQ=1T07STEP2 
1075 P (Q) =0 : IFJ (Q) =2THENJ$ (Q) ="M 
":T=43:GOTO1090 1 ****SVC. OVERDU 
E 'FLAG' 

1080 P (Q) =0 : IFJ (Q) =1THENJ$ (Q) ="M 
» :T=31: GOTO 1090 1 ****SVC. DUE ! F 
LAG 1 

1085 P (Q) =0 : IFJ1 (Q) =1THENJ$ (Q) 
C":T=31ELSE1095 »****DUE BY CALE 
NDAR 'FLAG' 

1090 P(Q)=1:PRINT#-2,TAB(3)T$(Q) 
;TAB(T) J$(Q) 

1095 M$=STR$(M(Q)-M(0) ) :IFJ(Q)=3 
THENPRINT # - 2 , TAB (3) T$ (Q) ; TAB ( 65- 
LEN(M$) )M$ 
1100 NEXTQ 
1105 GOTO1130 



1110 F0RQ=1T07STEP2:IFP(Q)=1THEN 
1120 ■****• FLAG 1 TO PRINT SVC. S 
UMMARIES 
1115 NEXTQ 

1120 IFQ=1THEN1135ELSEIFQ=3THEN1 
140ELSEIFQ=5THEN1145ELSEIFQ=7THE 
N1155 

1125 IFQ<7THEN1115ELSEPRINT#-2 , 11 

PERFORMED ABOVE ITEMS 

(MILEAGE & DATE FOR SERVI 

CE UPDATE) ";STRING$(5,13) :GOT012 
10 

1130 PRINT#-2,CHR$(13) ;TAB(15) "C 
=Calendar interval, M=Mileage in 
terval";STRING$(3,13) :GOTO1110 
1135 PRINT#-2, "CHECK LIST:";CHR$ 
(13) ;CHR$ (13) ;TAB(3) "Change oil 
and filter. . •check fluid levels 
under hood... check for any 

leakage, battery corrosion, 
loose belts, etc. " ;STRING$ (2 , 13 
):GOT01125 

1140 PRINT#-2,CHR$(13) ;TAB(3)"Lu 
be all f ittings. . . oil door hinge 
s and strikers, hood hinges, etc 

check transmission 
& differential. Inspect exhaus 
t system. Check for da 
mage under car . " ;STRING$ (2 , 13) : G 
OT01125 

1145 PRINT#-2,CHR$(13) ;TAB(3)"Tu 

ne up engine. . .change spark plug 
s, air and fuel filters, check p 
lug wires and ignition 

system. . .check PCV and breather 
. . . check timing and " 
1150 PRINT#-2,TAB(3) "idle speed. 
..choke action when applicable., 
.check overall performance. " ;STR 
ING$(2,13) :GOT01125 
1155 PRINT#-2,CHR$(13) ;TAB(3)"Be 
Its/hoses. .. check belt tension a 
nd condition. . .hoses for softnes 
s or deterioration. .. cl 

amps for tightness. . .radiator sh 
ould be free of debris" 
1160 PRINT#-2,TAB(3) "in cooling 
fins, and should be free from le 
akage. Also inspect brake lining 
s and operation. Check tires 

for tread depth and even wear." 
;STRING$(2,13) :GOT01125 
1165 ****** CHECK MAX. 8 CHARACT 
ERS 

1170 IFLEN(N$)>8THENCLS3:PRINT@0 
,U$; :PRINT@2 60, "ONLY 8 LETTERS A 
LLOWED "; :N$=TEMP$:SOUND200,5:SO 
UND150,10:FORT=1TO400:NEXT T:ON 
A GOT0385, 445, 775,855 
1175 ON A GOTO1005, 1185, 1185,855 
1180 ****** CHK. FOR NAME IN "V 



64 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



EH/NDX" 

1185 FORQ=1TO5:IFN$(Q)=N$THEN460 
1190 IFN$ (Q)=""THENCLS3 : PRINT @j8 , 
U$; :PRINT§260, "NO VEHICLE BY THA 
T NAME" ; :SOUND200,5:SOUND150, 10: 
FORT=1TO450 : NEXTT : N$=TEMP$ : GOTO 7 
95 

1195 NEXTQ 

12pp CLS3:PRINT@2 60,"NO VEHICLE 
BY THAT NAME" ; : F0RT=1T03 50 : NEXT 
T:GOT0795 

1205 '***** CPTM COMPUTATION 

12 10 CLS3 : SUM=0 : PRINTU$ ; : PRINT§2 

4 ,N$ : PRINT@266 , "please"+Z$+"wait 



it 



1215 FORQ=1TO150 : B$ (Q) =" " : NEXTQ 

1220 OPEN"I" / #l / N$+"/DTL" 

1225 FORQ=1TO150:INPUT#1,A$(Q) ,B 

$(Q) ,C$(Q) :IFA$(Q)=""THEN1245 

1230 IFE0F(1)=-1THEN1245 

1235 SUM=SUM+VAL(B$(Q) ) 

1240 NEXTQ 

1245 CL0SE#1 

1250 CLS3:PRINT@229, "start"+Z$+" 
figuring"+Z$+"costs"+Z$+Z$+Z$; :P 
RINT@261 / Z$+Z$+Z$+"at"+Z$+"what" 
+Z$+ f, mileage ft ;STRING$ (5 , 128) ; :PR 
INT@3 64," "; 

1255 PRINT@0 / U$; : PRINT@24 ,N$ ; :PR 
INT@3 64 , " " ; : LINEINPUTMI$ : PRINT@3 
70 / STRING$ (14,175) ;:Z=LEN(MI$) :I 
FMI$ SS " " THEN 1250ELSEIFMI$="@" THEN 
75 

1260 F0RQ=1T0Z:IFASC(MID$(MI$ / Q / 
1) ) <480RASC (MID$ (MI$ , Q, 1) ) >57THE 
NMI$=" ":GOTO1250 
1265 NEXTQ 

1270 MI=VAL(MI$) :Y=(M(0)-MI)/100 

1275 CLS3:PRINTU$; : PRINT@24 ,N$ ; : 

PRINT@99,STRING$(25,32) ; :PRINT@9 

9, "FROM M MI"TO"M(0) "MILES"; 

1280 PRINT@163,STRING$(25,32) ; :P 

RINT@163 , "EXPENSE TOTAL: " ; : PRINT 

@179 / USING"$$###.##";SUM; 

1285 PRINT@259," COST PER THOUSA 

ND MILES ";:PRINT@291 / " OF DRIVI 

NG: "; :PRINT@307 / USING"$$###. 

# # " ; INT ( SUM* 100/ Y ) / 100 ; : PRINTCHR 

$(32) ; 

1290 PRINT@480 / W$;:POKE1535,128 
1295 A$=INKE Y $ : IFA$= " @ " THEN 7 5 ELS 
E1295 

1300 ****** LEAVE "MAIN/ BAS" PRO 

GRAM 

1305 ' 

1310 OPEN"©", #1, "CRNT/NDX" 
1315 WRITE #1,N$ 
1320 CLOSE 

1325 IFA=5THEN1340 • *****CALLING 
IT QUITS 



Coco Graphics Designer 

Only $29.95 



The Coco Graphics Designer pro- 
duces beautiful Greeting Cards, 
Banners, and Signs for holidays, 
birthdays and other occasions. 

The program features picture, 
border, and character font editors, 
so that you can modify or expand 
the already built in libraries. Plus 
a special "grabber" utility is in- 
cluded to capture areas of high 
resolution screens for your picture 
library. 

Requirements: a Coco I, II or IN 
with at least 32K, one disk drive, 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 or 
JDOS. Printers supported in- 
clude: Epson RX/FX, Gemini 10X, 
SG10, NX10, C-ltoh 8510, DMP 



100/105/110/130/430 CGP220, 
many Okidata (check with Ze- 
bra), Seikosha GP1 00/250, Goril- 
la Banana, Legend 808. 
#C323 Coco Graphics Designer 



Picture Disk #1 

This supplementary picture li- 
brary diskette contains over one 
hundred additional pictures. 
#C333 Picture Disk #1 $14.95 



Colored Paper Racks 

150 sheets (50 each red, yellow, 
blue) with 60 matching enve- 
lopes. Perfect for making your 
productions outstanding. 
#C274 Paper Pack $19.95 




It's fun making your own Greeting Cards, Signs, and Banners with Ze- 
bra's Coco Graphics Designer. 



WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Only $29.95 

Order Cat#TBCC 





WICO designed these trackballs 
specifically for the Radio Shack 
Color Computer joystick port. Fea- 
tures 360-degree movement and 
quick-action fire button for smooth, 
arcade response and feel. Works 
great with Coco joystick and 
mouse software. 



The Car Sign Designer program en- 
ables you to easily create distinc- 
tive bright yellow diamond shaped 
car signs. Everything you need is 
provided including two reusable clear 
plastic sign holders with suction 
cups, 50 sheets of bright yellow 
fanfold paper, and the Car Sign De- 
signer program disk and instruc- 
tions. ••• Hardware, DOS, and 
printer requirements are the same 
as for our CoCo Graphics Designer 
above. Order Cat#CSCC, $29.95. 
For six additional sign holders, order 
Cat#CS6PK $9.95. 



Ordering Instructions: All or- 
ders add $3.00 Shipping & Han- 
dling. UPS COD add $3.00. VI- 
SA/MC Accepted. NY residents 
add sales tax. 



Zebra Systems, Inc. 

78-06 Jamaica Avenue 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 65 



Save $200 on Magnavox Monitors 
Magnavox 8CM643 RGB Analog only $385!! 



MONITORS 




123 A 



MAGNAVOX 7622 

12" Amber Screen otfers 900 dots x 
350 lines resolution at 20 MHz on a 
dark glass anti-glare CRT with built- 
in audio and 1 year warranty. 



REPEAT OF A SALE OUT 

We closed out Zenith's line of 123A 
12" Green Screen Monitors with 640 
x 240 resolution one year ago. Now 
with a special puchase we offer them 
one more time. This monitor offers 
80 column resolution at 15 MHz. 



$67.50 



($7 Shipping) 



$88 



(•7 shipping) 

MAGNAVOX 
8 CM 515 has 

analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB 
for Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and 
composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. 
Built-in speaker. 14" screen with 
640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 
2 years parts and labor warranty. 

reg. list $499 

SAVE 
$200 



VA-1 for monochrome monitors 
only, fits all color computers 



$24.45 



($2 Shipping) 



$298 




+ $14 Shipping 

CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable. 

only $19.95 with 

Magnavox Monitor order. 
$29.95 w/o monitor. 



MAGNAVOX 

CM 8505 has analog RGB 

and TTL RGB and composite 
color input. Built in speaker. 13" 
screen with 390 dots x 240 reso- 
lution in RGB mode. Plus 1 year 
parts & labor warranty. 

reg. list *299 

SAVE 
*79 



$220 

+ $14 Shipping 




DRIVE 0 + ■ Howards Drive (9 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cabie and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 

for onl y. Dou ble sided double density 360! 

$178 45 Double sided mt 

(•S shipping) 3 D 6 ° u K b, < ***** W *A ^ 

Add S3 4 for a Disto DC-3. 



20 MEG HARD DRIVE 



J$699T 
$499 



• pre-lnstalled, formatted and ready to run 

• equivalent to 125 R.S. 50V8 on line 

• includes Western Digital WD1002-WK1 Controller 

• and Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 

• will also work with IBM & clones l*» snipping) 

• complete package includes 20 meg drive, case & power supply, controller and Interface 
that plugs Into slot #3 of multipack interface. 

• t year warranty 

BASIC driver lets yau access this hard drive without need for OS-9 S4&.3-5 



DISTO 




ADD-ON BOARDS 

DC-38 includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and all 
software $138 

DC-3P Mini Epron programmer In- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips 

B 



$55 



DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port 

C *40 



Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. DISTO 

$98 DC-3 A 

$2 shipping on all DISTO products 

NEW FROM DISTO 

Super Controller II works 
with CoCo 1, 2 & 3. It buffers 
keyboard input so that no 
keystrokes are lost when 
disk is reading or writing. 
Especially useful with OS-9, 
but also works with BASIC. 

$129 DC6 ($2 Shipping) 

C-DOS 3 28 pin Eprom makes Disto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

$20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 



Payrol/BAS™ ((28hlpplng) 

• Nonprotected basic is modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
federal calculation 

• Custom code for each state (*25 option) 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 

• Print payroll and nonpayroll 
checks 



Payrol/BAS™ 
30 Day Trial 

$29.95 

VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package in- 
cludes VIP Writer Terminal Data 
Base, Caic and Disk Zap which 
can fix a diskette that is giving \l 
O errors (jap 

* I ZD reg. $149 

($2 Shipping) 

VIPwriter $68 



MEMORY 

Memory for CoCo 3 PC memory 
board plugs into the spare slots 
inside the computer and is pop- 
ulated with 256K ram chips. 
Completely solderless with com- 
plete easy to install instructions. 

CALL FOR PRICE 

PC MEMORY BOARD without 
RAM $49,50 

Software spooler and RAM disk 

for lightning quick response or 
no disk swapping drive backup 
for 1 drive system and printer 
spooler to free computer during 
long listings. 

For CoCo 3 with **f% *e 
512KRAM *l9-45 
($2 shipping on Memory products) 



GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day 
guarantee is meant to 
eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. 
Once you receive our 
hardware, try it out; test it 
for compatibility. If you're 
not happy with it for any 
reason, return it in 30 
days and we'll give you 
your money back (less 
shipping). 

Shipping charges are for 
48 states. 

APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 

ORDERS INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS J 

(800) 443-1444 =(312) 278-1440=1= 




Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO'S 




The Bigger 

The Best 
indispensable 




THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 




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Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and 
run. No work. No wait. 

Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
250 new programs: games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications. And, with RAINBOW 
ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at a price that's 
"small potatoes." And now you even have a choice 
about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
sary. 



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Use our 800 number! 

For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

inquiries please call (502) 228-4492. 

We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 a year in the United States. Canadian 

rate is $38 (U.S. funds only). Surface rate elsewhere is $68 (U.S.). Airmail 

is $103 (U.S.). All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 

6 to 8 weeks for the first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 

In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 



Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
THE RAINBOW today! 



YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

□ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

Name — 

Address - 

City State - ZIP 

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Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
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Our 800 number is also good for ordering 

RAINBOW ON TAPE or RAINBOW ON DISK! 

Just call (800) 847-0309 anytime from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. Credit card orders only. 
Subscriptions to rainbow on tape are $80 a year in the United States, $90 (U.S. 
funds) in Canada and $105 (U.S.) in all other countries. 

rainbow on disk is $99 a year in the United States, $115 (U.S.) in Canada and $130 
(U.S.) in all other countries. 

Individual issues of rainbow on tape are $10 in the U.S., $12 (U.S.) in Canada and 
all other countries. Individual issues of rainbow on disk are $12 in the U.S., $14 
(U.S.) in Canada, and $16 (U.S.) in all other countries. Kentucky residents please 
add 5% sales tax. 

rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are not stand-alone products; you need the 
magazine for loading and operating instructions and the necessary documentation. 
the rainbow magazine is a separate purchase. 



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YES! Sign me up: □ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

□ RAINBOW ON TAPE □ RAINBOW ON DISK 

(Available beginning with the October 
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Signature 



Card Expiration Date 



VIP Writer I 9 Ill 

WORD PROCESSOR • SPELLING CHECKER • PRINT SPOOLER 



SCREEN DISPLAY OPTIONS 

VIP Writer III has a screen of 32, 40, 64, or 80 characters wide by 
24 lines using the Co Co 3's hardware display with actual lower 
case letters. You can choose fore and background colors from 
up to 64 different hues. Color can be turned ON or OFF for the 
best possible display using a color or monochrome monitor or 
TV set. VIP Writer 111 has a built in on-line context sensitive help 
facility which displays command usage in easy to read colored 
windows. VIP Writer IN also runs at double clock speed! 

TEXT FILE STORAGE 

There is a 49K text buffer and disk or cassette file linking 
allowing virtually unlimited text space. In addition VIP Writer III is 
compatible with the RGB Computer Systems HARD DISK. 

"...Nearly every feature and option possible to 
implement on the Color Computer. The design of 
the program is excellent; the programming is 

flawless." -The RAINBOW October 1983 

EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer III has a full featured screen editor which can be used 
to edit text with lines up to 240 characters long with or without 
automatic word wrap around. You can select type-over mode or 
insert mode. There is even an OOPS command to recall a 
cleared text buffer. Other editing features include: Type- 
ahead, typamatic key repeat and key beep for flawless text 
entry, end of line bell, full four way cursor control with scrolling, 
top of textfile, bottom of textfile, page up, page down, top of 
screen, bottom of screen, beginning of line, end of line, left 
one word, right one word, DELETE character, to beginning or 
end of line, word to the left or right, or entire line, INSERT 
character or line, LOCATE and/or CHANGE or DELETE single 
or multiple occurrence using wildcards, BLOCK copy, move or 
delete with up to TEN simultaneous block manipulations, TAB 
key and programmable tab stops, three PROGRAMMABLE 
FUNCTIONS to perform tasks such as auto column creation and 
disk file linking for continuous printing. 

TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you 
to format your text in any way you wish. You can change the 
top, bottom, left or right margin and page length. You can set 
your text flush left, center or flush right. You can turn right hand 
justification on or off. You can have headers, footers, page 
numbers and TWO auxiliary lines which can appear on odd, 
even or all pages. You can also select the line on which they 
appear! You can even change the line spacing! All of these 
parameters can be altered ANYWHERE within your text file. 

TEXT FILE COMPATIBILITY 

VIP Writer III creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all 
other VIP Programs as well as other programs whtch use ASCII 
file format. You can use VIP Writer III to create BASIC, assembly, 
PASCAL or C files. VIP Writer 111 also albws you to save and bad 
files using DISK or CASSETTE in the case of an emergency. 
You can even read disk directories, display free space on a disk 
and rename or kill disk files. 

SID IENTTEKIPIRnSES 

(503) 663-2865 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM PST 

P. O. Box 1233 Gresham, OR 97030 



PREVIEW PRINT WINDOW 

The VIP Writer III features a paper saving format window which 
allows you to preview your document BEFORE PRINTING IT! 
You are able to see centered text, margins, page breaks, 
orphan lines etc. This feature makes hyphenation a snap! 

PRINTING 

VIP Writer IH supports most any printer serial or parallel using the 
parallel interface described in Nov-Dec. *87 RAINBOW 
magazine, or an external serial to parallel interface, and gives 
you the ability to select baud rates from 1 1 0 to 9600. You are 
able to imbed printer control codes anywhere in your text file 
EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT! VIP Writer 111 also has twenty 
PROGRAMMABLE PRINTER SEQUENCES which allow you to 
easily control all of your printers capabilities such as underline, 
bold, italics, superscript and subscript using simple keystrokes. 
Additional printer features include: single sheet pause, print 
pause, word length and line feed selection. 

PRINT SPOOLING 

VIP Writer III incorporates a built in print spooler with a 49,000 
character buffer which allows you to print one document WHILE 
you are editing another. You no longer have to wait until your 
printer is done printing before starting another job! 

DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer III is supplied with a 125 page instruction manual 
which includes a tutorial, glossary of terms and a complete 
index. The manual is well written and includes many examples 
to aid in understanding and application. VIP Writer ill includes 
VIP Speller at NO ADDITIONAL COST. DISK $79.95 

Cassette version does not include VIP Speller. TAPE $59.95 



VIP Writer owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer III Disk for $49,951 
or Tape for $39.95. Send original product. Include $3 shipping. | 

VIP WRITER - THE ORIGINAL 

VIP Writer is also available for CoCo 1 and 2 owners and has all 
the features found in the VIP Writer 111 including VIP Speller 
except for the following: The screen display is 32, 51 , 64 or 85 
columns by 21 or 24 rows. Colors other than green, black or 
white are not supported. Help is not presented in colored 
windows. Double clock speed is not supported. Parallel printer 
interface is not supported. Print spooler is not available. Hard 
disk is not supported. Even so, the VIP Writer is a CoCo 1 or 2 
owners best choice in word processors. VIP Writer includes 
VIP Speller at NO ADDITIONAL COST. DISK $69.95 

Cassette version does not include VIP Speller. TAPE $49.95 

VIP SPELLER SPELLING CHECKER 

VIP Speller works with ANY ASCII file created by most popular 
word processors. It automatically checks text files for words to 
be corrected, marked for special attention or even added to the 
dictionary. You can even view the misspelled word in context! 
VIP Speller comes with a specialty edited 50,000 word 
dictionary, and words can be added to or deleted from the 
dictionary or you can create one of your own. DISK $34.95 

Please add $3,00 for shipping and handling. COD orders add 
an additional $2.25. Personal checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. 
AH other orders are shipped the same day. 



13 30 LOAD"EXPNS/BAS",R 
1335 ****** (A=5) QUIT 
1340 CLS:NEW 
1345 ■ 

1350 PCLEAR1:G0T055 
1355 IFA=1THENN$=TEMP$:N1$="":A$ 
=" " : N$ (M) =" » : G0T075ELSE GOT075 
136)3 ****** 

1365CLS3:PRINT@2 64,"NOT VALID M 
ILEAGE"; :FORX=0TO300:NEXT X:GOTO 
5)30 

1370 ****** (A=4) VEHICLE INDEX 
SCREEN 

1375 CLS:PRINTU$; : PRINT@19 , "vehi 
cle";CHR$(128) ; "index"; 
1380 PRINT: PRINT 

1385 F0RM=1T05 : PRINTN$ (M) , : NEXTM 



1390 PRINT@480,W$; : POKE1535 , 128 
1395 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$<>"@"THEN1395 
ELSE75 

1400 ****** UTILITY TO INITIALIZ 

E "VEHICLE INDEX" FILE 

1405 , N$(1)="S AMPLE" 

1410 OPEN"0",#l,"VEH/NDX" 

1415 FOR Q= S 1T05:WRITE#1 / N$ (Q) :NE 

XTQ 

1420 CLOSE #1 

1425 OPEN"0" / #l / "CRNT/NDX" 
1430 WRITE#1,N$(0) 
1435 CLOSE#l:END 

1440 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN1440EL 
SE RETURN 

1445 f *****MAIN MODULE/ BY L. AN 
DERSON/ (C)1985 




70 49 

165 114 

255 247 



355 103 

485 219 

END 12 



Listing 2: EXPNS 

5 » *********EXPNS ********** 
lj3 » *********vi. 01** ******** 
************************ 

15 i *****C0PYRIGHT 1985***** 
**BY LARRY ANDERSON***** 
20 CLEAR5000:DIMA$(150) ,B$(150) , 
C$(150) 

25 Z$=CHR$(128) : V$=STRING$ (8 , 128 
)+"@escapes"+Z$+"to"+Z$+"raenu"+S 

TRING$ (7,128) 

30 U$="r e m e m b e r"+STRING$ ( 
17,128) 

3 5 W$=" <—LAST"+STRING$ (5,128)+" 
Exit"+STRING$ (5 , 128 ) +"NEXT~>" 
40 GOTO4 30 

45 CLS3:PRINT@0,U$; :PRINT@24,N$: 
PRINT @ 4 80 , V$ ; : PRINT § 2 3 3 , Z $+ Z $+ " r 
ecords "+Z $+" f or "+Z $+Z $ ; : PRINT@2 6 
5,Z$+"which"+Z$+"vehicle"+Z$; :PO 
KE1535,128 

50 PRINT@3 32 / " ";:PRINT@3 
32,"";: LINEINPUT Nl$ : PRINT© 3 40 , S 
TRING$ ( 12 , 17 5 ) ; : IFN1$=" "THEN65EL 
SEIFN1$="@"THEN70 
55 TEMP$=N$:N$=N1$ 
60 ON A GOTO480,480,405 
65 IFN$<>" "THENN1$=" " : PRINT@332 , 
N$;:ONA GOTO505,505,295:GOTO45 
70 CLS3:PRINT@0,U$; :PRINT@24,N$: 
PRINTS 2 0 0 , "Review" ; CHR$ ( 12 8 ) ; " it 
ems" ; : PRINT© 2 64 , "Update" ; CHR$ (12 
8) ; "items" ; :PRINT@328 , "Main" ;CHR 
. $(128) ;"menu";STRING$(3,128) ; 
75 F1$="DATE- ": F2$=" AMOUNT- $": 



F3$="DETAILS- " 
80 GOSUB555 

85 B$="RUM":A=INSTR(B$,A$) 

90 ONA GOTO45,45,405:GOTO80 
95 ****** 

100 CLS3:PRINT@0,U$; :PRINT@24,N$ 
105 PRINT@232 , "Add"+Z$+"records" 
;STRING$ (3,128) ; 

110 PRINT@296, "Remove"+Z$+"recor 
ds"; 

120 GOSUB555 

125 B$="AR@":W=INSTR(B$,A$) 

130 CLSrONW GOTO140 , 210, 70 :GOT01 

20 

135 '***** 
140 RC=RC+1 

145 CLS:PRINTU$+STRING$(3,128) ;: 

PRINT@19," ADD# " ;RC 

15J3 PRINT@32,STRING$(3,143) ;:PRI 

NT@48-LEN (N$) /2 , N$ 

155 PRINT@48p,STRING$(ll,128) ;"<§ 

"+Z$+' l escapes" ; STRING$ (11,12 8);: 

POKE1535 , 128 : PRINT@64 , " " ; 

16j3 PRINTF1$ / : LINEINPUTA$ (RC) 

165 IFA$ (RC) ="@"THENA$ (RC) ="'• :GO 

TO290 

17)3 PRINTF2$ ; : LINEINPUTB$ (RC) 

175 IFB$(RC)="@"THENB$(RC)= ,II, :A$ 

(RC)=» ":GOT029j3 

18J3 PRINTF3 $ ; : LINEINPUTC$ (RC) 

185 I FC $ (RC ) = " @ 11 THENC $ (RC) =" " : A$ 

(RC) =" " : B$ (RC) =" •• : GOT029j3 

19j3 PRINT@48j3,STRING$(5,128) ; M ok 

,, +Z$+"to"+Z$+ ll enter ,, +Z$+"Yes No" 

; STRING$ (8,128);: POKE 15 2 4,47: POK 

E1535,128 

195 GOSUB555 

2j5fS B$="YN":W=INSTR(B$,A$) 
2J35 ONW GOT0135,145:GOT0195 
210 CLS(7) :PRINT@j3,U$; :PRINT@48j3 
,V$; :POKE1535,128 



68 THE RAINBOW April! 988 



215 PRINT@32 , "record"+Z$+ l, remova 


44j3 IFEOF(1)=-1THEN450 


1";STRING$(4,128) ; 

220 PRINT@50 , "REC. # : " ; : LINEINPUT 


445 NEXTQ 


450 CLOSE#l 


Q$ 


455 0PEN"I",#1,"CRNT/NDX" 
46)3 INPUT#1,N$ 


225 IFQ$="@" THEN 70ELSE230 


23j3 Q=VAL(Q$) :IFQ>RC OR Q<1THEN2 


465 CLOSE#l 


10 


470 GOTO70 


235 PRINT@64,F1$;A$(Q) :PRINTF2$; 
B$(Q) :PRINTF3$;C$(Q) 


475 ****** 


480 FOR N=1T05:IFN$(N)=N$ THEN50 


240 PRINT@480,STRING$(6,128) ; M re 




move";STRING$ (4,128) ; "Yes"+Z$+"o 


485 IFN$(N)="" THENCLS3:PRINT@0, 


r»+Z$+"No";STRING$(6,128) ; :POKEl 


U$; :PRINT@2 60, "NO VEHICLE BY THA 


535,128 


T NAME" ; : SOUND200 , 5 : SOUND150 , 10 : 


245 GOSUB555 


FORT=1TO300:NEXT T:N$=TEMP$ :GOTO 


250 B$="YN@":W=INSTR(B$,A$) 


45 


255 ONW GOTO260,210,70:GOTO245 


490 NEXT N 


260 A$(Q)=A$(0) :B$(Q)=B$(0) :C$(Q 


495 CLS3:PRINT@2 60,"NO VEHICLE B 


)=c$(0) 


Y THAT NAME" ; : SOUND200, 5 : SOUND15 


265 FORN=Q TO RCD 


0,1)3: FORT=1TO300 : NEXTT: TEMP$=N$ : 


270 A$ (N) =A$ (N+l) : B$ (N) =B$ (N+l) : 


GOTO 4 5 


C$(N)=C$(N+1) 


500 ONA GOTO505, 505,405 


275 NEXTN 


505 IFN1$=""ANDA$(1)O""THEN550E 


.280 RCD=RCD-1:IF RCD<1THENRCD=0 


LSEFORQ=1TO150 : A$ (Q) ="" : B$ (Q) =" " 


285 GOT0295 


:C$(Q)="": NEXTQ 


290 RC=RC-1 


510 OPEN"I",#l,N$+"/DTL" 


295 CLS0:L1=LEN(N$)/2:C=207-L1:P 


515 FORQ=1TO150 


RINT@171," SAVING " ; : PRINT@203 , 


520 IFEOF(1)=-1THEN540 


" ";:PRINT@C,N$; :PRINT@2 


525 INPUT#1,A$(Q) ,B$(Q) ,C$(Q) 


35, "DATA FILE"; 


530 IFA$(Q)=""THEN540 


300 PRINTQ299 ,RCD; "RECORDS" ; 
305 OPEN"0",#l,N$+"/DTL" 


535 NEXTQ 


540 RC=Q-1 


310 FORQ=lTO 150:IFA$ (Q)=""THEN3 


545 CLOSE #1 


25 


550 ONA GOT0335,95,295 

555 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN555ELSE 


315 WRITE#1,A$(Q) ,B$(Q) ,C$(Q) 


320 NEXTQ 


RETURN 


325 CLOSEil 
330 GOTO70 


9 


m 


335 ****** 




340 CLS3 : FORQ=lTO RC 


Listing J: REn 


345 CLS : PRINT @0 , U$ : PRINT @ 15 , STRI 




NG$ (5,128) ;Q"OF"RC:PRINT@80-LEN( 


5 * ********«piTLE SCREEN******** 


N$)/2,N$ 


**************************** 


350 PRINT :PRINTF1$;A$(Q) 


10 i*******FOR "REMEMBER" ******* 


355 PRINTF2$;B$ (Q) 


**************************** 


3 6j3 PRINTF3$;C$ (Q) 


. 15 • . 


365 PRINT@482,W$; 


20 CLS:T$="r e m e m b e r" 


370 GOSUB555 


25 G$=CHR$(128)+" "+CHR$ ( 159 ) +" 


375 IFASC(A$)=9THEN395 


"+CHR$ (255)+" "+CHR$ (191)+" "+CH 


380 IFA$="E"THEN70 


R$(223)+" "+CHR$(175)+" "+CHR$(2 


385 IFASC(A$)=8THENQ=Q-1:IFQ<1TH 


39)+" "+CHR$(207) 


ENQ=RC 


30 FORX=0TO150:PRINT@456,T$:NEXT 


390 GOT0345 


35 FORL=456T039STEP-32:PRINT@L,T 


395 CLS 3: NEXTQ 


$ : PRINTQL+3 2 , G$ : NEXT 


400 GOTO340 


40 FORX=0TO300:NEXT 


405 OPEN"0",#1,"CRNT/NDX" 
410 WRITE#1,N$ 


45 PRINTQ352 , " b y 


1 a r r y an 


415 CLOSE#l 


d e r s o n" 


420 LOAD"MAIN" ,R 


50 FORX=0TO300:NEXT 


425 ****** 


55 PRINT@450,"C. 1985 BENTON, 


430 OPEN" I ",#1, "VEH/NDX" 
435 FORQ=1T05:INPUT#1 / N$(Q) 


LA. 71006" 


60 LOAD"MAIN",R ^ 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 69 



Education Notes 



16K Disk 



This month's program is a political 
"thermometer" for students of all 
ages. It concerns the upcoming 
presidential election, which affects all of 
us. 

Election Preview polls a test group, 
keeping score of, and updating, candi- 
dates' votes, and can be used in a variety 
of ways. We have used this program to 
track presidential candidates' true 
number of electoral votes, students' 
candidate preferences as time goes on, 
and classroom or schoolwide voting for 
various student elections. 

The names of the top seven candi- 
dates for both parties are listed on the 
screen. The student "votes" by typing in 
his or her preference, or that of some 
authoritative source, and the candidate 
receives one point. The student merely 
types in the candidate's name. We 
purposely decided to have the student 
type in the name of the candidate rather 
than a number in order for the student 
to obtain practice in recognizing and 
spelling these names. One of them, after 
all, is bound to be our next president. 

Bear in mind this program was writ- 
ten at the end of January, about the time 
of the Iowa primaries. By the time of 
publication, the list of probable candi- 
dates may very well be quite different. 
Governor Cuomo, for example, may 
announce his intention to become a 
candidate. At periodic intervals, you 
should update the program to include 
or delete candidates as events change. 
This is easily done by revising the names 
in the data statements in lines 260 
through 320. 

Each of the seven data lines contains 
the last name of a current Democratic 
candidate, his number of votes, the 
name of a current Republican and his 
current number of votes. The numbers 
all start out as zeros for placeholders. 
They are updated by the DATfi . DAT file, 
which the user may optionally update 
each time the program is used. 

After the student has finished his or 
her current polling, the S key may be 



A polling program to track 
voting trends 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



Presidential 
Election 
Preview 



By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



pressed to save the current results. The 
E key is used to end the session. To 
begin a new session, the student must 
press the L key to load the saved infor- 
mation. 

The information is optionally saved 
and loaded on disk for the convenience 
of the user, stored in a file called 
DATA. DAT on your disk. If additional 
independent surveys were taken on the 
same disk, the data of the second would 
wipe out the data of the first unless they 
were given different names. 

For example, a second student named 
Freddy may take his own surveys, 
change the name of his file in lines 340 
and 410 from DATA to FREDDY, and save 
this revised program as FREDDY. When 



Freddy uses the computer, he will load 
the program called FREDDY and the file 
used will automatically be FREDDY . DAT. 
This procedure can be repeated for all 
of the student users if desired. 

Program lines 30 and 40 dimension 
and read in the data. You may alter 
these two lines if the list of candidates 
becomes significantly shorter or longer. 
We chose seven of each as a safe middle 
ground. 

Lines 60 through 140 set up and print 
the screen. Lines 150 and 160 ask for the 
user's current choice or update. Lines 
200 through 230 add a value of 1 to that 
candidate's score. 

Line 170 checks to see whether the E 
key was pressed to end the program. 
Line 180 checks for the L key and will 
load the data file: This routine is on lines 
410 through 450. Line 190 checks for the 
S key and saves the data file: This 
routine is on lines 340 through 380. If 
you want to preserve your current data, 
be sure to save the file before ending the 
program. 

If you choose never to use the files 
option, then there is no need to type in 
the two routines mentioned above. You 
would key in the program up to Line 
320. Lines 180 and 190 would also be 
unnecessary. 

We hope that you and your children/ 
students can use this program to help 
make our country's electoral process 
more meaningful Remember that your 
personal teaching and input into the 
children's understanding is the most 
valuable tool of all. As always, Comput- 
er Island appreciates hearing about the 
children's experiences and reactions to 
our programs. □ 



The listing: ELECTION 



10 REM" ELECTION PREVIEW" 

20 REM"<C>STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER IS 

LAND, STATEN ISLEAND , NY , 1988 " 

30 DIM A$(7) ,B$(7) ,A(7) ,B(7) 

40 FOR T=l TO 7 : READ A$ (T) , A(T) , 

B$(T) ,B(T) :NEXT T 

50 N=0:CLS:Q$=STRING$(32,239) 

60 PRINTS 5 , "OUR ELECTION PREVI 

EW"; : PRINTS 32, Q$ 

70 PRINT@64," DEMOCRATS R 
EPUBLICANS " : PRINT@9 6 , Q$ 



70 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



80 SOUND 20J3,3:N=J3:FOR T«l TO 7: 
PRINT@128+N,A$(T) ; 
90 PRINT 1 1 3 8 +N , A ( T ) ; 
1)30 N=N+32:NEXT T 

110 N=0:FOR T=l TO 7:PRINT@143+N 
/ CHR$(233)+» ,f +B$(T) ; 
120 PRINT@352,Q$ 

130 PRINT@156+N f B(T) ; 
140 N=N+32:NEXT T 

150 PRINT@416," ": PRINT© 4 16, "YOU 

R CHOICE IS «; 

160 INPUT C$ 

170 IF C$= fl E l! THEN 250 

180 IF C$="L lf THEN GOTO 410 

190 IF C$= fl S" THEN GOTO 340 

200 FOR Y-l TO 7 

210 IF C$=A$(Y) THEN A(Y)=A(Y)+1 
:GOTO 50 

220 IF C$=B$(Y) THEN B(Y)=B(Y)+1 
:GOTO 50 
230 NEXT Y 
240 GOTO 150 

250 PRINT@416," VOTING COMPLETED 

THANKYOU" ; : END 

2 60 DATA HART, 0, BUSH, 0 
270 DATA JACKSON,0,DOLE,0 



280 DATA SIMON, 0, KEMP, 0 

290 DATA DUKAKIS, 0, ROBERTS ON ,0 

300 DATA GORE,0,HAIG,0 

310 DATA GEPHARDT , 0 , DUPONT , 0 

320 DATA BABBITT, 0 ,KIRKPATRICK,0 

330 REM OPTION TO SAVE THE FILE 

340 PRINTQ448 , "saving data";: OPE 

N"0",#1,"DATA" 

350 FOR T= 1 TO 7 

360 WRITE #1,A$(T) ,A(T) ,B$(T) ,B( 
T) 

370 NEXT T 
380 CLOSE #1 
390 GOTO 50 

400 REM OPTION TO LOAD THE FILE 
410 PRINT@448, "loading data";: OP 
EN"I",#1, "DATA" 
420 FOR T= 1 TO 7 

430 INPUT #1,A$(T) ,A(T) ,B$(T) ,B( 
T) 

440 NEXT T 
450 CLOSE #1 
460 GOTO 50 



Hardware 




Communications 




300/1200 baud Fully Hayes 

compatible 
Modem - 1 Year Warranty 

$1 09.00 

[Modem Si Cable] 

3DO/1 20Q/2400 baud 
Fully Hayes . 
Compatible Modem - CCITT 
1 Year Warranty 

$1 79.00 

[Modem & Cable] 



I 
I 



THE OTHER GUYS CoCo 

55 North Mam Street 
Suite 301-D 
PO Box H 

Logan Utah S^321 



'KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. $69.95— Only $39.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k, 
32k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement [current & 'YTD'], journal, ledger, 899 accounts ( 2350 entries on 
32k & 64k [71 0 eccounts & entries on 1 6k] [disk only]. Version 1 .2 has screen printouts. 

Rainbow Review 1.1- 9/84 : 1 .2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95 — ONLY $24.95 

Fling data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can heve up to 16 fields 
with 255 characters per field [4080 characters/record]. Sort, match & print any field. 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only]. 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate 8A5IC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles, elipses, boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on line HELPS at all 
times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects on the screen. Can be 
used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. GRAPHICS EDITOR. REG. 
S39.95— ONLY $24.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 

Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/85 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

C KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & more. User friendly/menu 
driven. Includes manual. $39.95 or $49.95 General Ledger & Accounts Receivables. 

[Disk Only] 'COCO WINDOWS' 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 1 Q programmable function keys. Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering. Four function 
calculator, with memory. The above options can be called anytime while running or writing 
in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES. YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. $24.95 [disk 
or tape] includes manual. 




CBOD 753-7620 
C800) 942-94D2 



[Add S3.00 for postage & handling] 
C.O.D., Money Order, Check in U.S. Funds [Pleeas specify if JBM 

controller) 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 71 



» 




the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 



Backup and Restore 

By Carl England 




Most disk crashes are actually directory crashes. Some- 
times the crash occurs when you try to save data while using 
the high-speed poke. Sometimes it occurs when you're trying 
to read or write to a direct access file record that doesn't exist, 
and sometimes it is just caused by gremlins on your disk. My 
program, BRU, allows you to restore files you thought would 
be lost forever. 

BR U was designed to back up just the directory, allowiiig 
you to keep a file copy of your directory in case the gremlins 
get you. Eight unused sectors on Track 17 (where the 
directory is found) are used to store the backup. A directory 
normally uses 10 sectors, so I had to find a way to compress 
the backup into eight. 

Lines 100 through 150 contain a trap that checks for data 
that may already exist on the sectors BRU uses to back up 
the directory. Some programs, especially those that run under 
OS-9, may use these sectors, and you may overwrite valuable 
data if you use BRU on them, so be careful. Line 260 is a 
trap to prevent you from attempting to restore a directory 
that has not been backed up. 

BRU Is simple to use — just load it and follow the prompts. 
Though it won't recover from crashes that involve data, it 
can provide useful and rapid recovery from directory crashes, 
which by far comprise most of all disk crashes. For a quick 
test to see that BRU is working properly, save a file on a blank 
formatted disk, run BRU and select Option 1. Kill the file, 
run BRU again and select Option 2. You should now be able 
to load the killed file. 



The listing: BRU 

1J3 'BACK UP AND RESTORE DIRECTOR 
Y 

2J3 1 COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 

3J3 'CARL ENGLAND 

40 CLS:CLEAR50j3j3 

5J3 PRINT"<1> BACKUP DIRECTORY 

6J3 PRINT"<2> RESTORE DIRECTORY 

7j3 I$=INKEY$:IFI$<'»l ,, ORI$>"2»THE 

N70 

8J3 0NVAL(I$)G0T09J3,2 6J3 

9J3 FORI=13T018 

lj3J3 DSKI$J3,17,I,A$,B$ 

11JJ IFB$="BRU I, +STRING$(125,255)T 

HEN16J3 

12J3 IFA$=STRING$(128,255)ANDB$=A 
$THEN150 

13 J3 PRINTA$B$:PRINT"TRACK 17, SE 

CTOR"I: PRINT" CONTAINS DATA. DO 

YOU WISH TO OVERWRITE IT? 

14J3 I$=INKEY$ : IFI$="N M THENENDELS 

EIFI$<> f, Y"THEN14,0 

150 NEXT 

160 DSKI$J3 , 17 , 2 , A$ , B$ : B$= ,I BRU"+S 
TRING$ ( 125 , 255 ) : DSK0$J3 , 17 , 13 , A$ , 
B$ 

17)3 FORI=3T012STEP2 

180 DSKI$0,17,I,A$,B$:DSKI$0,17, 

I+1,C$,D$ 

190 A$=A$+LEFT$(B$, 112) :C$=C$+LE 
FT$(D$,112) 



72 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



200 B$="":D$= lf " 
210 FORJ=0TO7 

22) 3 B$=B$+MID$(A$,J*32+1,16) :D$= 
D$+MID$(C$,J*32+1,16) 

23) 3 NEXT 

240 DSKO$0,17, (I+25)/2,B$,D$ 
250 NEXT: END 

26)3 DSKI$0,17,13,A$,B$:IFB$o"BR 
U"+STRING$ (125,255) THENCLS : PRINT 
"ERROR: " , , "DISK DOES NOT CONTAIN 

BRU FILE": END 
270 DSKO$0,17,2,A$,B$ 
280 FORI=3T012STEP2 



290 DSKI$0,17, (I+25J/2, A$,B$ 

300 GOSUB350 

310 DSKO$0,17,I,C$,D$ 

320 A$=B$:GOSUB350 

330 DSKO$0, 17,I+1,C$,D$ 

340 NEXT: END 

350 C$="":D$="" 

360 FORJ=0TO3 

370 C$=C$+MID$(A$, J*16+l, 16)+STR 
ING$(16,255) 

380 D$=D$+MID$(A$, J*16+65 , 16) +ST 
RING$ (16,255) 
3 90 NEXT: RETURN 




Undercover CoCo 

By David Compton 




Almost everyone has experimented with "secret codes" at 
one time or another, and many work the cryptograms in the 
daily paper. These codes, which are technically simple 
substitution codes, are time-consuming to construct, and it 
is easy to make a mistake when working from the original 
to the cipher. 

Now CoCo takes the work out of constructing cryptograms 
for you. Just run Encrypt and, in a few seconds, CoCo 
generates a new code. Type in your message, and it will be 
encoded. If you have a printer, you can print it out and give 
your friends a challenge. (To be fair, you should make your 
message long so they'll have a better chance of cracking the 
code.) 

There's a small chance that the cipher alphabet won't 
appear a few seconds after the normal alphabet, as it should. 
If the computer has not substituted 4 Z' for another letter by 
the time it reaches 4 Z', it will go into an infinite loop trying 
to find another letter. Just press BREAK and run again. 

4 

The listing: ENCRYPT 

10 REM ENCRYPT 
20 REM COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 
25 REM BY DAVID COMPTON 
30 CLS 

40 CLEAR1000 

50 AL$ (1) ="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTU 

VWXYZ" : AL$ (2) =AL$ (1) 

60 PRINTAL$(1) 

70 CR=RND( -TIMER) 

80 F0RX=1T02 6 

90 CR=RND(26) 

100 IFMID$(AL$(1) ,CR,1)=" "THEN9 

110 CR$=CR$+MID$(AL$(1) ,CR,1) 
120 IFMID$(CR$,CR,1)=MID$(AL$(1) 
, CR, 1) THENCR$=LEFT$ (CR$ , LEN ( CR$ ) 
-1) :GOTO90 




Calling all cryptologists! If you think you have figured out 
this encrypted message, send the translation to us here at THE 
RAINBOW by May 1, 1988. If you're right, you could win a 
copy of The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its 
companion tape or disk (be sure to specify which). In case 
of a tie, we will hold a drawing. Send your entry to The 
Cryptogram Contest, c/o Novices Niche, The Falsoft 
Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 



ii 



130 MID$(AL$(1) ,CR,1)=" 
140 NEXT 
150 PRINTCR$ 

160 PRINT : PRINT"MESSAGE : 11 
170 LINEINPUTM$ 
180 M=LEN(M$) 
190 DIMM$(M) 
200 FORY=lTOM 

210 F=INSTR(AL$(2) ,MID$ (M$ , Y, 1) ) 
2 20 IFF=0THENMC$=MC$+MID$(M$,Y, 1 
) ZGOTO2 40 

230 MC$=MC$+MID$(CR$,F,1) 
240 NEXTY 
250 PRINTMC$ 
260 PRINT 

270 INPUT "HARDCOPY ( Y/N) " ; Y$ 

280 IFLEFT$ (Y$ , 1) = 1 1 Y " THENPRINT # - 

2,MC$:END 

290 IFLEFT? (Y$ / l)="N n THENEND 
300 GOTO270 

April 1988 THE RAINBOW 73 



CoCo Caliber 

By Brian DeMarco 




Ready, aim, fire! Set your sights for action on the shooting 
range with Shoot 'em. Use your left and right arrow keys to 
take aim, and press the space bar to fire. 

The listing: SHODTEM 

2 CLS 

3 CLEAR2000 

4 T$=CHR$(13 6)+CHR$(132) 

5 DIM A$(3) 

6 PO=495 

10 A=RND (-TIMER) 

2)3 A$(1)=STRING$(255,32) :A$(2)=S 
TRING$ (255, 32) : A$ ( 3 ) =STRING$ ( 255 
, 32 ) 

30 FORX=1TO100 

40 R=RND(254) : IP MID$ (A$ (1) , R, 1) 
<>CHR$(175) THEN MID$ (A$ ( 1) , R, 1) 
=CHR$(175) :MID$(A$(2) ,R,1)=CHR$( 
159) :MID$(A$(3) , R, 1) =CHR$ ( 175) :N 
EXTX ELSE GOTO 40 

50 M1=RND(254) :M2=RND(254) :M3=RN 
D(254) 

55 PRINT@PO-l,T$; 

56 El=300 

60 Y$=INKEY$:IF Y$= MM THEN GOSUB 
490:GOTO60 

61 IF Y$=CHR$(8) AND PO-1>480 TH 
EN PRINT@PO-l / CHR$(32)+CHR$(32) ; 
: PO=PO-l : PRINT@PO-l , T$ ; : GOTO60 

62 IF Y$=CHR$(9) AND PO<510 THEN 



PRINT0PO-1 , CHR$ (32) +CHR$ ( 3 2 ) ; : P 
0=PO+l : PRINT@PO-l , T$ ; : GOTO60 
70 FORX=PO-3 2 TO PO-480 STEP -32 

75 IFX=E1 THEN E1=0 

76 IF X=E2 THEN E2=0 

80 IF PEEK(1024+X)=175 OR PEEK(1 
024+X)=159THEN 100 ELSE 90 
90 PRINT@X,CHR$ (133) ; :NEXTX 
95 GOTO 120 

100 IF X>128 AND X<159 THEN MID$ 
(A$(3) ,M3+(X-128) ,1)=CHR$(32) EL 

SE IF X>64 AND X<95 THEN MID$ (A$ 
(2) ,M2+(X-64) ,1)=CHR$(32) ELSE I 

F X>J3 AND X<31 THEN MID$(A$(1),M 

l+(X-j3) ,1)=CHR$(32) 

11) 3 GOTO90 

12) 3 FOR X=PO-3 2 TO PO-48)3 STEP 
-3 2: PRINT@X , CHR$ (32);: NEXTX : GOTO 
6)3 

49)3 G0SUB1)3)3)3:M1=M1+1:M2=M2-1:M3 
=M3+1:IF Ml=255 THEN Ml=l ELSE I 
F M2=l THEN M2=255 ELSE IF M3=25 
5 THEN M3=l 

5)3)3 PRINT@)3 / MID$(A$(1) ,M1,32) : PR 
INT@64,MID$(A$(2) ^2,32) :PRINT@1 
28 / MID$(A$(3) ^3,32) : RETURN 
lpp)3 IF El=)3 THEN El=PO-48)3 
1)31)3 IF E2=)3 THEN E2=RND(31)-1 
1020 PRINT@E1,CHR$ (32) ;:PRINT@E2 
,CHR$(32) ; :El=El+32:E2=E2+32 
1)330 IF El>511 THEN E1=0 
1035 IF E2>511 THEN E2=0 
1040 PRINT@E1 / CHR$ (134+64) ; : PRIN 
T@E2 / CHR$ (134 + 64) ;. : IF PEEK(PO+10 
24) =134+64 OR PEEK(PO-1+1024) =13 
4+64 THEN END ELSE RETURN 



A CoCo Pop-Up Calendar 



By Fred Kolesar 




Picture this: You're laboring away at the CoCo and need 
to know the date of the first Saturday in May. Ransacking 
your desk yields no calendar. Then you remember — there's 
a calendar installed as a subroutine in the very program 
you're using. A few quick keystrokes and the information is 
found. 

Calendar is, of course, a program in its own right. But if 
you opt to add Calendar to another program as a subroutine, 
you'll need to keep your variables separate. Calendar uses 
these five variables: L — loop start value for the PRINT 
TRB(P) F/N loop; P — PRINT TRB position; D — day of the 
month; M — month of the year; and MS — month names. If 
the larger program uses any of these variables, you will need 
to rename Calendar's. 



To change the calendar to another year, just change the 
date in Line 5 from 19BB to the year you want displayed. 
Edit Line 1 and set the variable L to the print position of the 
first day of that year (Sunday, L=2; Monday, L=6; Tuesday, 
L=10; Wednesday, L=14; Thursday, L=18; Friday, L=22; 
Saturday, L=26). January 1, 1988, was on a Friday, so 
Variable L has a value of 22 this year. Since 1988 is a leap 
year, you'll need to change the value on Line 2 from IF D=2S 
AND M=2 to IF D=2B FIND M=2 for non-leap years. Press the 
space bar to advance to the month you want. 

To end Calendar, just press the CLEAR key. To escape the 
program as a subroutine, edit Line 4 and change the 
statement END to RETURN. 

The listing: CALENDAR 

0 'calendar 1 by: fred kolesar 

7 ladd road, westfield,pa 
16950 4/87 

1 L=2 2:M=0:GOSUB5:M$="JANFEB]y[ARA 



74 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



PRMAYJUNJULAUGSEPOCTNOVDEC 

2 FORP=L T026STEP4:D=D+1:PRINTTA 
B(P) D; :IFD=29ANDM=2GOSUB4ELSEIFD 
=3j3THENIFM=40RM=60RM=90RM=llGOSU 
B4ELSEELSEIFD=3 1GOSUB4 

3 NEXT : PRINT : L=2 : GOTO 2 



4 EXEC44539:IFPEEK(135)=12THENEN 
D 

5 IFM=12THEN1ELSECLS0 : D=0 : PRINT@ 
76,MID$(M$,M*3+1,3) " 1988"; :M=M+ 
1: PRINT @19 2 , " SUN MON TUE WED T 
HU FRI SAT": RETURN 



High-Tech Quilting Bee 

By Bernice M. Shoobs 



CoCo3 



I call my program Quilt, but you can call it a game, 
tapestry, window shade, wall hanging or whatever you want. 
The program creates designs on your PMODE 4 screen with 
the use of the composite monitor (to see the simulated colors). 

The designs are created by concentric and overlapping 
circles forming vertically down the screen. When prompted, 
the user inputs the x step increment, the y step increment and 
the radius of the circle. Keeping the x and y increment values 
between step 5 and step 20 and keeping the radius value 
between 6 and 25 make the most striking designs. 

Quilt begins by giving the user some sample x, y and radius 
figures, which I have found to produce interesting patterns. 
Once you get the idea and begin to see the patterns take form, 
use your imagination. Some advice: Do not make the 
increments extremely small while the radius is large, and vice 
versa. Also, let the entire pattern develop before you decide 
to break the program. You will be surprised at the results. 

The listing: QUILT 

1)3 CLS 

20 ON BRK GOTO 220 
30 Fl$=" ### ### 
###" 

40 PRINT @0 , "BEGIN MAKING PATTER 
NS WITH THESE 11 

50 PRINT §40, -"NUMBERS THEN — " 
60 PRINT@67,"C R E A T E YOUR 
OWN !" 

70 PRINT@96,STRING$(32, "-") 

80 PRINT@128,"X INCREMENT Y INC 

REMENT RADIUS" 

90 PRINT@160,STRING$(3 2,"-") :GOS 
UB 270: RESTORE 

100 REM ********************** 
110 REM 

120 INPUT"NO. OF X STEP INCREMEN 

T" ; A 

130 INPUT "NO. OF Y STEP INCREME 
NT M ; B 

140 INPUT "NO. RADIUS OF CIRCLE" 

• Q 

150 WIDTH 3 2 

160 PMODE 4, l:PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 

170 FOR X=0 TO 255 STEP A 




INPUT "ANOTHER ONE? <Y/N> 



if 



IF A$="Y" THEN 10 ELSE 
REM ****************** 

REM 



END 



180 FOR Y=0 TO 191 STEP B 
190 CIRCLE (X,Y) ,C 
200 NEXT Y,X 

210 FOR T=l TO 2 400: NEXT T 
220 CLS 
230 
A$ 
240 
250 

2 60 *vw* 

270 READ X,Y,C 

2 80 IF X=99 THEN RETURN 
290 PRINT USING F1$;X,Y,C 
300 GOTO 270 

310 DATA 11,11,17 
320 DATA 10,7,10 
330 DATA 12,10,21 
340 DATA 13,6,11 
350 DATA 16,8,14 

3 60 DATA 5,10,15 
370 DATA 99,99,99 

Submissions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. 
We like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in 
at one sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, 
although the short programs are limited in scope, many novice 
programmers find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve 
the software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, 
but we cannot key in program listings. All programs should be 
supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how the 
program works. If your submission is accepted for publication, 
the payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior to 
publication. 

April 1988 THE RAINBOW 75 




Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE RAINBOW'S 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed — 
legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high score. 
Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE RAINBOW. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



* Current Record Holder 



Shutout 



ADVANCED STAR*TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 



4,750 
4,475 
4,300 
3,960 



3,960 



67,760 
40,435 
28.780 
16,995 



9,650 
9,450 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 

¥ I 

¥ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
* 

¥ 

¥ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥i 

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



★Stephana Martel, Laval, Quebec 
David Schaller, Clarkston, WA 
Jeffrey Warren, Waynesville, NC 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
Robbi Smith, Helena, HI 
ALPINE SLOPES (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 

13,140 *Ron Siivestro, Lindenwold, NJ 
9,880 Walter Schilling, Lindenwold, NJ 
7,340 Gary Demerest, Lindenwold, NJ 
6,1 10 Rick McElroy, Lindenwold, NJ 
ASTRO BLAST (Mark Data) 

48,825 *Tony Bacon, ML Vernon, IN 
BEE 2APPER (THE RAINBOW, 9/87) 

★Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 
Phillip Holsten, Modesto, OA 
BIOSPHERE (Radio Shack) 

47,360 ★Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
BUZZARD BAIT ( Tom Mix) 
22,931,850 *Skip Taday, East Lyme, CT 
763,550 Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
187,750 Keith Janas, Kitwanga, British 
Columbia 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 



623,550 

75,000 
40,800 



1,627,500 
202,000 



★Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
David Brown, New Waterford, Nova 
Scotia 

Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
Gregory Speer, Emporia, KS 
Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
Brian Lewis, Baltimore, MD 
Michael Petry, Kansas, AL 
Eric Rose, Grand Coulee, WA 
Joanna Wanagel, Freevilie, NY 
BALLOONS (Radio Shack) 
*Faye Keefer, Augusta, GA 
Charles Andrews, Delta Jet, AK 
Melody Webb, Lakeport, CA 
Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
COLOR CAR (NOVASOFT) 

218,773 ★Alan Martin, Cornwall, Ontario 
COLOR POKER (THE RAINBOW, 4/83) 
21,504,600 ★Earl Foster, Lynchburg, VA 
CRYSTLE CASTLES (ThunderVision) 

554,979 ^Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
60,107 Alphonse Brown, Houston, TX 
DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 



178,200 
169,000 
165,500 
159,200 
150,200 
141,400 
135,600 
130,400 
CLOWNS & 
688,960 
70,180 
36,650 
15,950 



81 
85 



★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
David and Shirley Johnson, Leicester, 
NC 

Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
Melanie Moor, Florence, AL . . . 
Paul Summers, Orenge Park.fpfc 
Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 
Chris Piche, White Rock, 

British Columbia 
Milan Parekh, Fullerton, CA 
Andrew Urquhart, Metairie, LA 
Steve Zemaitis, Howelf, Ml 
DECATHALON (Spectral Associates) 

10,400 ★Tom DiVittorfo, Glaesboro, NJ 
7,440 Wayne Hufford, Kincardine, Ontario 
7,218 Martin Parada, Arcadia. CA 
DEFENSE (Spectral Associates) 

1 6,305 ★Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 



8$ 
86 
86 
87 
89 

89 
89 
89 



DEF MOV (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

35,331 ★David Schaller, Clarkston, WA 
30,253 Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

25,739 John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 
DEMON ATTACK (Imagic) 

72,410 *Glenn Hodgson, Aberdeenshire, 
Scotland 
Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
Todd VanNatta, Isle of Palms, SC 
DESERT PATROL (Arcade Animation) 

377,050 ★Jason Lakes, Franklin, OH 
DESERT RIDER (Radio Shack) 

80,703 ★Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
50,797 Patrick Devitt, Lombard, IL 
26,125 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
24,355 Roby Janssen, Clear Lake, IA 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Tom Mix) 
1,866,100 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Dale Krueger, Maple Ridge, 

British Columbia 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

DISCRIMINATION (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

15 *Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
DONPAN (Radio Shack) 

53,100 ★Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
52,600 Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 

172,320 ★Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
Don Muilis, Delavan, Wl 
Betty Mullis, Delavan, Wl 
Tristan Terkuc, Richmond, Ontario 
Darren Lowe, White Rock, British 
Columbia 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

99,980 *Danny Wimett, Rome, NY 

Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
Stephane Deshaies, Betoeil, Quebec 
Neil Edge, Wiliiston, FL 
Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 
Jean*Francois Morin, Lorettevllle, 
Quebec 

Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
Keith Yampanis, Jaffrey, NH 
Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
Patrico Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 
Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge, VA 
Kevin Pater, Port AlbernL British 

Columbia 
David Brown, New Waterford, Nova 

Scotia 
Mike Ells, Charlotte, Ml 
Antonio Hidalgo, San Jose, 

Costa Rica 
Jesse Binns. Phoenix, AZ 
Andrea Mayfield, Melbourne, FL 
Michelle Murray, Salem, IN 
Timothy O'Neal, Commerce, TX 
Kyle Sheppard, Fairview, NC 
DRAGON BLADE (Prickly-Pear) 

69 *Anna Kurtz, Bath, \H 



11,250 
5,680 
3,760 
3,505 



136,510 
51,470 
50,700 
34,990 



98,985 
97,740 
89,490 
77,254 
73,346 

70,142 
68,142 

67,721 
62,442 

55,300 

49,500 
49,441 

49,254 

43,502 
41,696 

40,360 
34,424 
25,148 
25,147 
22,739 



328,820 
249,960 
169,410 
149,520 



DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

160,835 ★Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
146,325 Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
9,861 Michael Adams, Columbia, SC 
5,561 Chris Lorenz, Kiester, MN 
DRAC (Tom Mix) 

104,850 *Don Mullis, Delavan, Wl 
ESCAPE 2012 (Computerware) 

202 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
F(RE COPTER (Adventure International) 

77,030 ★Mike LeBrun, Cornwall, Ontario 
56,840 Michael Adams, Columbia, SC 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/66) 

22,505 *Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 
Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
Rick Beevers, Bloomfield, MN 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
FRACTION FEVER (Spinnaker) 

10,480 *Shawn Riggins, Orangevale, CA 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

26,370 ★Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
10,600 Brian Crabtree, College Park, WA 
9,930 Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
GALACTIC FIGHTER ('four Star Software) 
153,725 ★Michael Heitz, Chicago, IL 
GAL AGON (Spectral Associates) 

357,890 ★Jason Clough, Houston, TX 

Bernard Burke, Lee's Summit, MO 
Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
Danny Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
Vernon Johnson III, Parkville, MD 
GALAX ATTACK (Spectral Associates) 

236,350 *Corey Leopold, Nada, TX ; 
28,300 Augusto Voysest, Lima, Peru 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
23,643,720 ★Geran Stalker. Rivordalo, GA 
Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
Clinton Morel!. Sacramento, CA 
Ken Hubbard, Madison, Wl 
Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
Jason Steele, Pensacola, FL 
Rory Kostman, Hershey, NE 
Jerry Honigman, Waggoner, IL 
Jerry Colbert, Bakersfield, CA 
Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
Jonathan Wanagel, Freevilie, NY 
GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 
2,350,750 ★Michael Heitz, Chicago, IL 
702,520 Joseph Delaney, Augusta, GA 
GIN CHAMPION (flaoVo Shack) 

1,074 ★William Ehardt, Darien, IL 
GROBOT (Children's Computer Workshop) 

8,090 *Curt Lebel, Louisville, KY 
HALLOWEEN (THE RAINBOW, 10/86) 

625 ★Clara Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 

HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY (fntocom) 
400/422 *Jeff Holtham, Waterloo, Ontario 
400/510 Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 

INTERBANK INCIDENT (Radio Shack) 

4,861 *Shara and Chris Euton, Lilburn, GA 
IRON FOREST (Diecom Products) 

1,013.100 ★William Weller, Kailua, HI 
JOKER POKER (THE RAINBOW, 3/87) 
2,793,285 *Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
205,239 Paul Dykes, Baton Rouge, LA 



20,921 ,490 
10,222,940 
10,020,500 
7,493,340 
2,626.950 
2,512,620 
2,312,640 
2,115,790 
2,011,200 
1,245,550 
1,224,190 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 




44,010 
25.850 
16,720 



184,180 
184,120 
174,810 
133,990 



1,404,000 
1.003,104 
326,192 
205.335 



270,000 
190,915 
167,947 
148.932 



* 
* 



13,377 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
1 1 ,000 Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computerware) 
2,503.000 ★Stephane Martei, Laval, Quebec 
257.600 Keith Cohen, Rocky Mount, NC 
JUNKFOOD (THE RAINBOW, 11/84) 

25,670 ★John Guptill, Columbia. MO 
18,650 Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
KARATE (Diecom Products) 

31 ,000 *Wayne Hufford. Kincardine, Ontario 
1 1 ,600 Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
6,300 David Darling. Longiac. Ontario 
THE KING ( Tom Mix) 
3,824,280 ★Andre Grenier, Quebec, Canada 
49,400 Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

22,400 Spencer Metcalf, Longview, TX 
KING TUT (Tom Mix) 

44.500 ★Curt Lebel, Louisville, KY 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 

186.710 ★Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 

Russell Johnson, Sarnia, Ontario 
John Farrar, Lebanon, TN 
Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 
KUNG-FU DUDE (Sundog Systems) 

32,000 *Tony Geitgey, University Park, PA 
LUNAR RESCUE (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 
260.427 ★Tom Beeker, Gracey, KY 
246.668 Phillip Holsten, Modesto, CA 
175,771 Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
1 13.579 Jeff Remick. Warren, Ml 
MAGIC OF ZANTH (Computerware) 

47 ★Robert Williams, Yellowknife, 
Northwest Territory 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

9,016 ★Heather Richwalski, Medford, Wl 
5.172 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
46B,750 ★Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
Jeremy Pruski, Sandwich, IL 
Donald Cathcart, Halirax, Nova Scotia 
Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
MUNCHKIN BLASTER (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
11,950 ★Jim Davis, Sandwich, I L 

Gabe Emerson, Baraboo, Wl 
Tom Beeker, Gracey, KY 
John Weaver. Amsterdam, NY 
Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 
ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1 ,302-0 ★•Thomas Pay ton, Anderson, SC 
•Jonathan Dorrts, Indianapolis, IN 
•Gregg Thompson, Chesterfield, VA 
•Chad Johnson, Benton, AR 
•Mark Lang, Downieville, CA 
PANIC BUTTON (Radio Shack) 

2,192 ★Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
190 Roby Janssen, Clear Lake, IA 
PAPER ROUTE (Diecom Products) 

1.550,110 ★Mike LeBrun, Cornwall, Ontario 
PARAMISSION (THE RAINBOW, 5/87) 

3,500 *Jim Davis. Sandwich. IL 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM RIDERS (Radio Shack) 
329,000 ★Joseph Delaney. Augusta, GA 
303,100 Mike Grant, Fresno. CA 
244.100 Martinez Domingo, Miami, FL 
67,100 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
PINBALL (Radio Shack) 

399,350 *Troy Stoll, Washington, IN 
369.463 Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
213,300 Patrick Martei, Laval, Quebec 
142,400 Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 



355,570 
318,160 
144,510 
137,920 



10,420 
9,760 
9,080 
9,000 



1.276-0 
1.210-0 
1,204-0 
1,160-0 



PITSTOP II (Epyx) 

54 ★Rusty Breitbach, Rickardsville, IA 
★Jeff Coburn, Easton, PA 
★Waiter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
★Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
★Jeff Szczerba, Sturtevant, Wl 
★Sean Noonan, Green Bay, Wl 
★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
Randy Venable, Coal City, WV 
Laundre Clemon, Sacramento, CA 
PLANETFALL (Iniocom) 

400/210 *Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 



54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
51 
49 
9 



POLARIS (Radio Shack) 

919,085 *Clinton Terry, Toronto. Ontario 
POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 

4,855 * Darren Lowe, White Rock, British 
Columbia 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

94,470 ★Patrick Martei, Laval, Quebec 

Kevin Pater, Port Alberni, British 

Columbia 
Matthew Leitman, Beaconsfield, 

Quebec 
Michael Bacon, ML Vernon, IN 
PYRAMID (Radio Shack) 

220 ★Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
PYRAMID 2000 (Radio Shack) 

220 ★Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
100 Peter Antonacopoulos, Toa Baja, 
Puerto Rico 
PYRAMIX (CotorVenture) 

17,170 ★Janet Kim, Pinckneyville, IL 
QUIX (Tom Mix) 
8,407,772 *John Haldane, Tempe, A2 

Curtis Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
Elisa Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
John Hotaling, Duanesburg, NY 
RESCUE ON FRACTALUS (Epyx) 

288,084 ★Donald Cathcart, Halirax, Nova Scotia 
Russell Johnson, Samia, Ontario 
Leon Beggs, Bellingham, WA 
Roger Smith, High Prairie, Alberta 
Mike LeBrun, Cornwall, Ontario 
RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Coiorware) 
1,792,800 ★Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 
RETURN OF THE JET-I (ThunderVision) 

309,250 ★Melody Webb, Lakeport, CA 
ROGUE (Epyx) 

43,222 ★Hans Lutenegger, Madison, I A 
Melanie Lapoint, Fitchburg, MA 
Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 
Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
Allen Houk, San Diego, CA 
SAILOR MAN (Tom Mix) 
1,019,200 ★Gabriel Assel, Cameron, MO 
341,800 Jason Clough, Houston, TX 
332,600 Jeremy Carter, Spring Lake Park, MN 
267,200 Patrick Devitt, Lombard, IL 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

67 ★Tristan Terkuc, Richmond, Ontario 
Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 
John Lente, Austin, TX 
SANDWORM (THE RAINBOW, 8/86) 

995 ★Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 

23,100 ★Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
SHOOTN RANGE (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
1 3,794 ★Phillip Holsten, Modesto, CA 
5,998 Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
5,433 Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

SHORT-TERM MEMORY TEST (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 
20 ★Brian and Harold Matherne, 
Gretna, LA 
SLAY THE NERIUS ( Radio Shack) 

53,788 ★Jim Davis, Sandwich, IL 
SNAKER (THE RAINBOW, 1/84) 

1 :22 ★Dan Sobczak, Mesa, AZ 
SPACE ASSAULT (Radio Shack) 

6,200 *John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

81.020 ★Wayne Hufford, Kincardine, Ontario 
SPEEDSTER (THE RAINBOW 8/67) 

32,1 10 *Lisa Williamson, Watauga, TX 
Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 

Quebec 
Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
Andrea Reelitz, Greenville, IL 
Kevin Hilton, Gurdon, AR 



27,542 
21,682 
17,851 
8,812 



82 
86 
87 
117 



22,750 



10,500 
4,710 
3,380 



STRATEGY FOOTBALL (THE RAINBOW, 8/83) 

153-0 ★Michael Heitz, Chicago, IL 
STORM (Computerware) 

113,315 *Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
69,645 Michael Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
SUCCESS MANSION (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

13/13 ★Dave Allessi, Iselin, NJ 
SUPER ROOTER (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

15,180 ★Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 
11,090 Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

3,910 Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

303,600 ★Tim Hennon, Highland, IN 
138,400 Gary Budzak, Westerville, OH 
125,200 Michelle Murray, Salem, IN 
TREASURE QUEST (THE RAINBOW, 11/86) 

29,340 ★Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

132 ★Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
123 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
TUTS TUMB (Mark Data) 

1 1 8,720 ★Reina Roy, Carieton, Quebec 
Mack Haynes, Nice, CA 
Chad Presley, Luseland, 

Saskatchewan 
Don Siler, Muncie, IN 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) 

2,032 *Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 

★Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
Philip Puffinburger, Winchester, VA 
Denise Rowan, Minneapolis, MN 
Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
Bernard Florence, Croydon, Australia 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
18,813 ★Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 

Martha James, Swarthmore, PA 
Karl Gultiford, Summerviile, SC 
Pat O'Neill, Nepean, Ontario 
Martha James, Swarthmore, PA 
Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 
THE VORTEX FACTOR (Mark Date) 

100/276 ★Tommy Crouser, Dunbar, WV 
Rick & Brenda Stump, 

Laureldale, PA 
Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 
British Columbia 
WARP FACTOR X (Prickly-Pear) 
10,577,051 *Doug Lute, Clymer, PA 
WISHBRINGER (tnfocom) 

400/201 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
WRESTLE MANIAC (Diecom) 

956,971 *Marc Reiter, Cincinnati, OH 
546,315 Louis Bouchard, Gatineau, Quebec 
45,483 Tony Bacon, ML Vernon, IN 

David Brown, New Waterford, Nova 
Scotia 

Billy Helmick, Independence, KY 
ZAKSUND (Elite Software) 

357,550 ★Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
268,350 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
44,900 Michael Adams, Columbia, SC 
39,950 Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
ZAXXON (Datasoit) 
2,061 ,000 ★Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
Dan Brown, Ptttsford, NY 
Andrew Urquhart, Metairie, LA 
Bob Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 
Matthew Yarrows, East Hampton, MA 
Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
ZONERUNNER (Radio Shack) 

65,535 ★Donald Cathcart, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
ZONX (THE RAINBOW, 10/85) 

6.500 ★Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
ZORK I (Infocom) 

400/720 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
ZUES (Aardvark) 

3,380 ★Martin Kertz, Forrest City, AR 



74,780 
72,000 

60,020 
45,000 



2,032 
2,008 
1,995 
1.991 
1,988 
1,975 



11,902 
10,489 
6,294 
4,643 
3,285 



100/483 
210 



42,105 
39,086 



1,950,000 
1,300,500 
1,100,600 
253,400 
170,600 
163,700 
137.200 



SPIDERCIDE (Radio Shack) 

7,290 ★Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 

STELLAR LIFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 

629.000 ★Steven Smith. Matthews. NC 
114,620 Martinez Domingo, Miami, FL 



— Jody Doyle 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 77 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 













•*>■- - -. 



In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column 
of pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, 
we encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



Feedback 

In response to questions from: 

• Curtis Schaaf, Eric Reitz and Matt 
Hoyer: In Sands of Egypt, the dates are 
in the tree. Feed the dates to the camel 
and ride to the scepter. The snake oil is 
to oil the scepter. Check the pyramid 
after you get the scepter. 

• Patrick Slagle: In the Interbank Inci- 
dent, the slot in the yacht is a tape player. 

• Cory Harris: Get in the boat and give 
the monkey some tobacco in Dallas 
Quest. 

• Thomas Crowe: In Dallas Quest, to 
pass the rat, get the sunglasses at the pool 
and give them to the owl. Go to the barn 
and drop the owl. Read the tombstone or 
get lost in the field. 

• David Whyburd: In Vortex Factor, & 
clue to the combination to the safe is 
found in the office deck in London. 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, how do I 
incant the wizard's supreme ring? 

David A. Ellis 
Hopkinsville, KY 

• John Austin: In Hitchhikers Guide to 
the Galaxy, when the bugblatter beast 
asks for your name, tell him Arthur Dent, 
then go east. Type PUT TOWEL OVER MY 
EYES and get the sharp stone. Carve 
"Arthur Dent" and remove the towel. Go 
west then southwest and get the interface. 
Wait until the beasthunters come. 

• Marc Paulin: In Dallas Quest, to stop 
sinking, you should try giving the mon- 
key some tobacco out of the pouch. He 
will then plug the hole with his tail. 

• Ted Scarbrough: In Sea Quest, the 
piece you are missing is the ruby statue. 
It can be found by digging where the 
weather balloon is. 

I found the anchor, pearl, silver atjdy 
the statue. Where is the diamond ring? 

Chris Holcomb 
Syracuse, NY 

• Paul King: In Dallas Quest, bribe the 
monkey with the tobacco to plug the 
hole. Then, just row with the shovel. 



• Ric Yates: In Dallas Quest, get to the 
trading post and type PULL CURTAIN. '"['■ 

Al Adams 
Windsor, PA 

• Stevie Nakahara: In order to get the 
vector plotter in Hitchhiker s Guide to 
the Galaxy, turn the switch that is located 
in the Vogon Hold. You don*t need the 
keyboard. Remember, take it easy and 
try to enjoy the Vogon poetry. In order 
to get past the screening door, you must 
show it tea and no tea at the same time. 

In The Magic of Zanth, how do I get 
past the lake and how do I open the 
bottle? 

Jeff Holtham 
Waterloo, Ontario 

• Graham Stinson: In Sands of Egypt, 
the axe can be found at the top of the 
pyramid, It is used to cut the palm fronds 
at the tree. In order to get to the tree, go 
to the pool and type WALK TREE. 

How do you get into KrhTs Lair in 
Enchanter*! 

Joseph Delaney 
Augusta, GA 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, try not to 
keep everything you find. It will weigh 
you down, make your heart speed up and 
make you faint more easily. 

If you find an object and cannot reveal 
it, then stow it in your backpack and try 
to reveal it again after killing more 
creatures. 

When using rings, be sure your heart 
is rested or the use of the ring may kill 
you. 

Once you go down a level, don't go 
back up or the wizard will send stronger 
creatures to destroy you on that level. 

Try to learn to recognize the sound of 
each monster; this will help you to get 
ready to fight them. 

If you have a cassette player, try to save 
your place on the tape because it will save 
you a lot of time and is very handy. 

Brian Liguori 
Bangor, PA 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, how do 
you incant the Supreme ring? 



In Pyramid, how do you water the 
bean plant? When do you use PLUGH? 

In Raaka-tu, how can you find the 
gem? What do you do after you go down 
the secret passage and climb the holet 

Stephane Martet 
Laval, Quebec 

Scoreboard: 

How do you defeat the wizard's image 
in Dungeons of Daggorath? 

How do you get past the rug and the 
statue after it turns toward the west door 
in Raaka-Tul 

Matthew Lohse 
Camarillo, CA 

Scoreboard: 

In Hall of the King, I cannot burn the 
fermenting grain and get to the hidden 
room. I have the match and the stick, but 
whenever I try to light it, the game says 
"You can't do that now!" What is the acid 
in the vial used for, and what is the 
purpose of the "still air** in the high 
priest's chamber? 

David Galloway 

. t , Phoenix, MB 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, I'm in the outer 
chamber. I Ve translated the hieroglyph- 
ics but need specific instructions on what 
to do with the scepter. The hole in the 
roof just brings me back to the emptied 
pool. 

In Dallas Quest, I'm in Chugalug's 
Emporium and need to know where the 
flashlight is so I can light the basement. 

George Lane 
Chicago, IL 

To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, well share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi Co Co SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 



ft ft ft ft * ft ft ftnftft**ft*ft*rti^ftifrft*iftft'ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ftft 



78 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



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1 BASIC Tra i ning 



16KECB I 



This month's tutorial is geared to 
you beginners who are struggling 
with the complexities of PRINT, 
EDIT and SET as you get on familiar 
terms with your new companion, the 
CoCo. 

Whenever I capture a new convert to 
CoColand and plop him down in front 
of the virgin screen, he is taught to 
create a first program. This usually 
consists of name and address in three 
lines, tastefully centered on the Lo-Res 
text screen. The young student is invar- 
iably captivated by seeing his name and 
vital statistics portrayed on the screen. 
A copy of My First Program is saved 
for posterity. 

The second lesson is an expansion of 
the first program, both to reinforce 
what was previously learned and to 
augment budding skills, and adds new 
personalized data such as birthday, age, 
school, parents' and friends' names, etc. 
The first thing you know, a personal 
database or file is created, a file that 
reflects items of interest to the student 
that he has committed to memory, 
allowing him to concentrate on hunting 
and pecking. 

It is strongly recommended that the 
student have a copy of My First Pro- 
gram. Like a photo of oneself, taken in 
days long gone, running through the 
first programs can be a nostalgic and 
emotional experience. 

What has this chatter got to do with 
you? Most demo programs the 
newcomer encounters in his march 
through a manual are wrung-out, bare- 
bones, uninspiring programs that ig- 
nore the student's desire to create 
something both personal and useful. 

My object is to prepare a follow-up, 
second lesson that will both inform a 
student and sustain his interest. The 
program should be personalized and 
pleasing to the eye. Rather than blow 
my own horn and bore you stiff with the 
niceties of my lesson plan, let's pretend. 

Let's pretend you are truly a newcom- 
er and have plowed laboriously through 
the first lesson in your BASIC manual. 
Pretend you are in a classroom setting 
in a hands-on session at the CoCo. You 
are paying close attention to the instruc- 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 



Do you still have 
your very first program? 

Reliving 
Your First 



By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



tor. I bet you will learn or recall some 
tidbits you may have forgotten. 

"Turn on CoCo! Sssh! Program lines 
shall begin at 10 and move up by 10s. 
Line 0 will be reserved for whatever 
eight-character or less title you choose 
for the, as yet, unknown and unfinished 
graphic." 

Entering 10 CLS clears the screen and 
gives us a fresh drawing tablet. A PRINT 
will conveniently drop the cursor down 
one horizontal row. Type and enter the 
following: 

20 PRINT 
30 PRINT 

Continue to create three more PRINT 
lines — 40, 50 and 60. Now run your 
program (by typing RUN and pressing 
ENTER). Not very impressive, but we 
have created five blank rows — no 
inconsiderable achievement. 

To get CoCo to print something on 
the screen, the desired word or words 
must be enclosed within quote marks. 
To be printed, any combination of 
characters/ spaces must be so enclosed. 

Rekey Line 20 as 20 PRINT 
"DOCHITA" and run. You will see DO- 
CHI Tfl printed on the top line with four 
innocuous blank lines followed by OK 
and the cursor ready for action on the 
sixth line, presently occupied by OK. 
This means that CoCo is announcing it 



has complied with your wishes. So far, 
so good! It is awaiting more instruc- 
tions. 

To put DOCHITA on Line 60 is no 
problem. Rekey Line 60, and note that 
the closing quote is often optional; if 
you omit it, CoCo assumes it knows 
your intentions. Try entering and run- 
ning this: 

50 PRINT"DDCHITA 

You see, it prints with no difference. 
However, until you have progressed a 
lot further in your studies, add the 
closing quote wherever possible. 

To add DOCHITfl on the third line 
(and without dismantling the existing 
line), use the EDIT statement. Enter 
EDIT40 and press X to jump to the end 
of the line. Type "DOCHITfl" and press 
ENTER. This stuffs the word into CoCo's 
memory. Now run. 

Whenever possible, use the EDIT 
statement rather than rekeying a pro- 
gram line. I advocate the use of EDIT 
as soon as the second lesson. When you 
begin to program, you will make plenty 
of mistakes that must be corrected. To 
me, EDIT is the eraser at the end of a 
pencil. Use it! 

If you want to indent two spaces in 
Line 20, enter EDIT20 and press the 
space bar until your cursor is over D. 
Pressing I (for insert) opens up the space 
between the opening quote and the first 
character, D. Press the space bar once 
for each desired space; in this instance, 
press the space bar twice and then press 
enter. CoCo inserts two spaces and 
closes up with the balance of the line. 
Run. 

Line 30 will contain DOCHITfl but 
take care of space by using PR I NT - 
TflB(x). Enter EDIT30 and press X to 
jump to the end of the line. Enter 
TAB(0). CoCo will indent the desired 
number of spaces in the row designated 
by whatever value is currently between 
the parentheses, To indent two spaces, 
enter EDIT30 and press the space bar 
until the cursor is over 0. Type C2 — 
CoCo is told to change (C) the character 
above the cursor to 2. Press SHIFT and 
the up arrow to get out of the Change 
mode. Press ENTER, and then run. 

On your own, add the missing DO- 
CHITfl on Line 50. Be sure to indent two 
spaces. Use the PRINTTAB statement. 

Did you notice that Line 50 may have 



80 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



been indented four spaces? This would 
occur if you used a TAB value of 2 and 
also left two blank spaces between the 
opening quote and the first character. 
The rule to follow whenever using 
PR I NTT AB is to indent with the number 
value and begin the first character right 
after the opening quote. Run. Now use 
EDIT to indent Lines 40 and 60 to get 
a nice, straight column. 

Enter LIST to take a look at our 
program listing. We want to delete 
TAB (2) from Lines 30 and 50. Enter 
EDI T30 and press the space bar until the 
cursor is over the second T. Six charac- 
ters (TfiB ( 2 ) ) are to be deleted. Type 6D 
and press ENTER. Do the same for Line 
50. Run the program and then list it. On 
your own, delete the two indenting 
spaces in the three remaining lines using 
EDIT. 

Press CLEAR and run again. Five 
DDCHITAs are bunched up in the upper 
left-hand corner. What have we done? 
We have written a name to the screen 
on five successive lines. Enter LIST to 
see the program listing. If we wanted 
only blank rows, we could rekey the five 
PRINT lines. We could edit out the 
quotes and the enclosed name. But that 
is a lot of work. Let's do it the easy way! 



Enter DEL20- and key in this line: 20 
PRINT: PRINT: PR I NT: PR INT: PR I NT. 
Run the program to see what our new 
line has done. Let's try it another way. 
Enter DEL20 and replace our defunct 
line with a new Line 20: 20 FOR X=l TO 
5:PRINT:NEXT. Run. The X is the 
number of rows involved. In this case, 
the first through fifth rows. At each 
row, CoCo prints a blank line (PRINT:) 
and goes on to the next X until all five 
PRINTS are executed. 

If we want to use this loop to print 
a three-space indented DOCHITfl, we 
enter EDIT20 and press the space bar 
until the cursor is over the second colon. 
Press I, enter "DO CHITA'' and run. If 
you forgot the closing quote, disaster 
strikes! Make this error to see what 
happens. 

Note, also, that :NEXT is the proper 
format to agree with the X in the loop. 
In a single loop, with a F0R-NEXT item, 
CoCo is forgiving. It is best to use the 
variable indicator after NEXT because 
sometimes CoCo is very demanding and 
wants to know precisely which variable 
you are referring to. 

From Line 20, edit out all instructions 
to CoCo to print DDCHITA. This in- 
cludes the quotes. Enter EDIT20 and 



press the space bar until the cursor is 
over the opening quote. Entering 12D 
deletes both quotes, three spaces and 
seven letters. Run the program to see 
the difference. 

Now that we know how to move text 
around the screen, well personalize the 
program. First, bear with me and use 
my example. I am using the name and 
address of a good colleague. Re- 
member, if you use your name and 
address or that of a close associate, 
aside from yourself, the author, you will 
have an approving audience of one. 

Line 30 will contain the centered 
name. Enter this line: 30 PRINT- 
TAB (9) "DDCHITA D- MAY" and run. We 
indicate a skipped line by using PRINT: 

40 PRINT 

50 PRINTTAB(7)"510 HIGHLANDS 
AVE - " 

We add the town, etc., after an inter- 
vening blank line. This time we will use 
a multiple-line statement. We include 
both the empty row and the last line, 
separated by a colon: 

G0 PRINT: PRINTTRB(5 ) " 
INVERNESS, FL. , 32652" 



Check Account Information System 

If you have one or more checking 
accounts then you need C A I S ■ This is 
not just another checkbook program but 
an easy to use, menu driven, disk based 
information system for the CoCo 1, 2, 



Record all account activity. Keep track 
of your expenses using the 36^ cateqori es 
that you define. Set up automat i c 
transactions for such items as direct 
deposits and deductions. Reconcile and 
bal ance your account is) in. minutes I 
Other features include check search on 
any field, edi t and delete capability, 
display and print options, mul ti -dr i ve 
capability and more. Requires 1 drive, 
printer optional. 

Reviewed in RAINBOW, February 1 9 B 6 . 



After Five Software 

P.O. Box 210975 
Columbia, SC 29221-0975 
(B03) 788-5995 



RAINBOW 

CI*T»!CATtON 

Mm 



To order send check or M.O. for 134.95 
plus $3.00 S/H. COD orders add $1.00. 
(SC residents please add 57. sales tax) 



MLBASIC 2.0 - BASIC Compiler 

The wait is over. WASATCHWABE announces the latest version 
of MLBASIC designed to allow more compatibility with existing BASIC 
programs than ever available before for the Color Computer. This 
version also allows full use of the capabilities and memory of the 
CoCo 3. Written in machine language, MLBASIC can compile programs as 
large as 64K bytes. Standard floating point (9 digit precision), 
INTEGER, and String type variables and arrays supported. 

COMMANDS SUPPORTED: 



1. I/O commands 

CLOSE CLOADM CSAVEM DIR 
FILES GET INPUT KILL 
RSET USING LINEINPUT 

2. Program control commands 



CALL DEFUSR END 

iF THEN ELSE 

3. Functions 

ABS ASC ATN 

HPOINT INSTR INT 

PEEK POINT PPOINT 

TIMER VAL VARPTR 

4. String functions 
CHRS INKEYS LEFT$ 



EXEC 
ERROR 

COS 

LEN 

RND 



DRIVE 
LSET 



FOR 
ON 

CVN 
LOG 
SGN 



DSKI$ 
OPEN 



NEXT 
RETURN 

EOF 

LPEEK 

SIN 



DSKOS 
PRINT 



GOSUB 
STOP 

EXP 

LOC 

SQR 



MID$ MKN$ RIGHTS STR$ 



DRAW 
HCIRCLE 
PCLEAR 
SET 



HCOLOR 
HCLS 
PCLS 
SOUND 



HSCREEN 
HSET 
PLAY 
WIDTH 



LPOKE RESTORE READ 



FIELD 
PUT 



GOTO 
USR 

FIX 
LOF 

TAN 



STRINGS 

HDRAW 
JOYSTK 
PMODE 



REM 



5. Graphic/Screen commands 
ATTR COLOR CLS CIRCLE 
HLINE H PAINT H PRINT HRESET 
LINE LOCATE PALETTE PAINT 
PRESET PSET RESET SCREEN 

6. Other commands 
DATA DIM MOTOR POKE 
TRON TROFF TAB VERIFY 

Plus many more commands not available with regular BASIC which allow 
interfacing with hardware registers and machinelanguage programs. 

<<< ONXY *59 9B 

COCO 3 "WITH DISK REQUIRED -Add $4.00 Postage. 
CHECK or MONEY ORDERS only. No C.O.D. or Bank cards. 
Foreign orders use U.S. MONEY ORDERS only. 



WASATCHWARE 

7350 Nutree Drive 
Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 
Phone (801) 943-1546 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 81 



Notice that the three lines are neatly 
centered, both horizontally and verti- 
cally. There are five rows above the 
legend and six rows below. If you count 
all the rows, you will confirm there are 
16 text lines available. If you begin at 
the left margin and watch the cursor as 
you space over to the right, you will 
count to 32, verifying that the text 
screen is 32-by-16. 

At this point, substitute a name and 
address of your choice. Re-center it by 
changing values in each TAB line. Use a 
6-inch ruler if you are in doubt about 
the centering. Remember, it need not be 
centered exactly, so long as it looks 
pleasing to you. 

This program cries out for a border. 
In Lo-Res graphics, the screen's resolu- 
tion is 64-by-32 and the color chosen 
will be orange, 8. 

We begin by making a nice orange 
line across the top of the screen on the 
first, horizontal row. The leftmost space 
is designated as '0' and proceeds to the 
rightmost, 63rd, space. The vertical 
column ranges from 0 (at the top) down 
to 31. 

To start our border, enter this line: 

70 FDR H=0TO63:5ET(H,0,8) : 
NEXTH 

Compare this loop with the PRINT loop 
in Line 20. Instead of five blank rows, 
we are going to place (SET) a dab of 
orange color (8) in every column of the 
top row (Column 0), commencing with 
0 through 63, horizontally. Run to see 
the top part of our border. 

We will proceed clockwise. This 
means our next border segment will run 
down the right side of the screen. 

On the last horizontal space, 63, 
beginning at the top, 0, we shall run 
down vertically and put a dab of orange 
in every space until we reach 31, the 
bottom right-hand corner. Enter this 
line: 

80 FDR V=0TO31:SET(G3, V,B) : 
NEXTV 

Run the program. If the chewed-out 
space bugs you, enter 200 GOTO200 and 
run. This makes a never-ending loop, so 
the OK is never reached and displayed. 

To do the bottom line of our border, 
we want to continue from right to left 
to maintain our clockwise direction. 
Enter this line: 

90 FOR H=63TO0 5TEP-1 : SET (H , 
31,8) : NEXTH 



Run. Going along the bottom, verti- 
cal column 31, we place our orange 
color in every horizontal location from 
63, the rightmost spot, left until we 
reach 0. We indicate that we want every 
space filled in succession by telling 
CoCo STEP-1, which means to count 
backward by increments of 1. 

This STEP part of the FDR-NEXT 
statement was not required in the as- 
cending sequences. CoCo figures if you 
don't make your wishes known, it will 
default to 5TEP+1 and assume that is 
your intention. 

I think you can figure out the ration- 
ale for the fourth side — we'd like to 
move upward and end at the point of 
origin (H=0;V=0). Enter this line to 
finish the border and then run the 
program: 

100 FDR V=31TD0 5TEP-1:5ET 
(0,V,B):NEXTV 

At this time, I prefer to give the 
program a name, hidden from view by 
a REM statement. Enter 0' TITLE, sub- 
stituting whatever name you want for 
the title. Using Line 0 for the title is a 
handy convention. Now save your 
program by whatever name you gave it 
in Line 0. 

You can use any Lo-Res color you 
desire. Merely substitute the new color 
value for the third variable in each SET 
statement. 

Which makes me note . . . four sides 
. . . four different colors. One solid 
color makes a neat border but you may 
want to experiment by changing colors 
in various combinations. Do so now. 
When finished, enter NEW and 
CLORD"TITLE", substituting your pro- 
gram name for TITLE. My idea is to use 
all eight colors in succession, one to a 
side, and see what it looks like. 

Enter EDIT70, type 22 and press the 
space bar. This is an alternate method 
of moving around within a line. Press- 
ing the space bar 100 times within Edit 
is not very efficient. Just use a likely 
number and press the space bar. If your 
guess was too low, keep tapping the 
space bar until you are over the target. 
If you overshot the landing field, use left 
arrow key to back up. Type C twice and 
press ENTER. Run the program. 

This time we are going to change B 
to C and insert +1. To get where you 
want to go faster within Edit mode, 
enter EDITB0, type 23 and press the 
space bar. Press C twice, type 1+1 and 
then press ENTER. Run. 

Let's edit Line 90 using our shortcut. 



Enter EDIT90, type 33 and press the 
space bar (this moves you 33 spaces 
within the line, remember?). Press the 
left arrow key three times, press C twice 
and I once, then type +2, press ENTER, 
and run. 

On your own, change the color in 
Line 100 to C+3, and run. It is not quite 
right, but we are not finished. To move 
this border through the range of colors 
from 1 to 8 (not 0 to 8), we have to 
enclose lines 70 through 100 in a nested 
loop. Enter LIST and examine the 
listing. 

Can you see why we left all that space 
between line numbers? There is plenty 
of room to insert bits and pieces of our 
program without the annoyance of 
renumbering lines and throwing our 
minds into turmoil as we adjust to 
remembering a new set of line numbers. 
Enter these lines: 

G5 FOR C=l TO 8 
110 NEXTC 

Run the program and you'll see it 
goes along nicely , but runs out of steam 
when we get an FC Error in Line 100 
Enter LIST to search for the problem. 
Ah, when C became 6, C+3=9, a no-no. 
The solution is to explain what is what 
to CoCo (somewhere within the outer 
loop). When C gets unruly and out of 
range, it should shape up and get back 
to the first color (green) and Go! Go! 
Go! 

A good place is just before Line 70. 
Enter this line: 

GG IF C+3=9 THEN C=l 

Run, This would be a good time to 
save this version. Give it a title (0 
' CLRTITLE) and save it by that title. 

Suppose I used IF C=9 THEN C-l? 
Would it work? Further, why didn't I 
use FOR C=0 TO 8? This is really splitting 
hairs. 

Take time out for a breather When 
renewed, revise the program to run in 
a counterclockwise direction. 

Enter NEW to start from scratch, and 
load CLRTITLE (LORD "CLRTITLE'' or 
CLDRD "CLRTITLE"). Let's see how it 
looks if we skip every second space. 

Enter EDIT70 and press the space bar 
until the cursor is over the first colon, 
press I, type 5TEP+2 or STEP2 and press 

ENTER. 

Ditto for Line 80. 

For Line 90, enter EDIT90 and press 
the space bar until the cursor is over the 
1 of -1, press C and enter 2. Ditto for 
Line 100. Run. 



82 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



Not bad! It looks like a movie mar- 
quee. Change Line 0 and save the 
program as MARQUEE. 

What is wrong with all four sides in 
one color, which is perpetually chang- 
ing? Try this: Enter EDIT66 and press 
the space bar until the cursor is over the 
3, press C, type 1 and press ENTER. 
Enter EDIT80, press X to jump to the 
end of the line, press the left arrow key 
to chop off the +, and enter ) :NEXTV. 

Ditto for I ine 90, C+2 to C. 

Edit these lines whichever way you 
please. I prefer to use X, backspace and 
make my adjustment. Another way is to 
enter EDIT90 and press the space bar 
until the cursor is over the +, press H 
and enter ( :NEXTH. 

Now, in Line 100, change C+3 to C. 
You know how! 

To make the color change occur in the 
lower-left corner, edit Line 100 to C+l. 

I like the last way better because your 
eye wanders to the upper-left corner 
where you expect the color change to 
occur. Save your revision as MRRQUEE 
after you change Line 0. 

We haven't exhausted the possibili- 
ties. Mask lines 80 and 100. This elim- 
inates the vertical sides. Run. 

Now edit Line 70 to STEP+1 and Line 



90 to STEP-1, and run again. 

Just for kicks, let's advance the 
STEP+3 in Line 70 and STEP-3 in Line 
90 and run. 

This is getting out of hand. Unmask 
Lines 80 and 100 and run. This is an odd 
combo of plus and minus STEPs 2 and 
3. We might as well see what the whole 
thing looks line in STEP plus and minus 
3. 

Edit lines 80 and 100. By mistake, I 
changed lines 80 and 100 to STEP +1 and 
-1, respectively. That looks fine! 

Save whatever catches your eye. 
There are other combos to investigate. 
What do you say to a two-color, flash- 
ing screen? Enter these lines: 

67 SCREEN0,1 
105 SCREEN0,0 

Now run. Talk about googly-eyed! Try 
these: 

75 SCREEN0,0 
85 SCREEN0,1 
95 SHREEN0,0: 
105 SCREEN0,1 

Run, and delete Line 85. Care to save 
anything? 



. . . And so it goes! Have you noticed 
every time we attempt some new vari- 
ation, our effort is rewarded by suggest- 
ing some new experiment? The only 
thing to stop us is exhaustion or getting 
bleary-eyed from the constant blinking 
and rotational motion. 

Imagine what we turned up when we 
lifted the rock of ignorance from the 
nest of such BASIC concepts. We are 
scratching around in the most rudimen- 
tary BASIC program areas and looking 
at the wealth of goodies we uncovered. 
At the rate we are going, we have 
enough material to be mired down 
investigating various aspects of Lo-Res 
graphics that we may never graduate to 
-ponder the wonders of CoCo 3's Super 
Extended BASIC. 

By the same token, we will never tire 
of our romp through BASIC and Ex- 
tended BASIC with CoCos 1 and 2. 

If you are a newcomer to CoColand, 
you have just taken a giant step on your 
way to computer literacy ... or should 
I say, artistry? Now, get back to your 
CoCo and kick over a few more rocks 
that we left undisturbed, and experi- 
ment with more variations on our 
simple, but fun, theme. □ 



Model 101 
Interface $39.95 




• Serial to parallel interface 

• Works with any COCO 

• Compatible with "Centron- 
ics" parallel input printers 

• 6 switch selectable baud 
rates 300-600-1200-2400 
4800-9600 

• Small size 

4 5" x 2.5" x 1 25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 



Other Quality 
Items 

High quality 5 screw shell C- 
10 cassette tapes $7.50/ 
dozen 

Hard plastic storage boxes for 
cassette tapes $2.50/dozen 

Pin-Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00/100 
Colors $3.60/100 (specify 
red, blue.- yellow, tan) 



Model 104 Deluxe 
Interface $51.95 




<>ame features as 101 plus 

• Built in serial port for your 
modem or other serial device 

• Switch between parallel 
output and serial output 

• Size is 4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 



NEW! Cables for 
your COCO 

• U.L listed foil-shielded cable 

• 2 Types' male/female exten- 
sion cables (used between 
a serial device and existing 
cable) male/male cables 
{used between two serial 
devices such as a modem 
and one of our switchers). 

• 3 ft./$3.95, 6 ft./$4.49, 

10 ft. '$5.59 Specify M/M 
or M/F and length. 



Model 102 
Switcher $35.95 




• Connect to your COCO 
serial port and have 3 switch 
selectable serial ports 

• Color coded indicator lights 
show switch position 

• Lights also serve as a 
power on indicator for your 
COCO 

• Heavy guage blueanodized 
aluminum cabinet with non- 
slip rubber feet 



The 101 and 104 require 
power to operate Most print- 
ers can supply power to your 
interface. (Star, Radio Shack 
and Okidata are just a few that 
do - Epson and Seikosha do 
not). The interfaces can also 
be powered by an AC adap- 
tor; Radio Shack model 273- 
1 431 plugs into all models. If 
you require a power supply, 
add a "P" to the model number 
and add $5.00 to the price. 
(Model 1 01 P $44.95, Model 
104P $56.95). 



Model 105 
Switcher $14.95 















m 
















* 





• Connects to your COCO 
to give you 2 switch select- 
able serial ports 

• 3 foot cable to connect .to 
your COCO's serial port 

• The perfect item to use to 
connect a printer and a 
modem to your COCO 

• Small in size, only 4.5x2.5 
x 1.25 



The Model 101, 102, 104 and 
1 05 work with any COCO, any 
level baste and any memory 
size. These products are co- 
vered by a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101 and 104 work 
with any standard parallel 
input printer including Gemini, 
Epson, Radio Shack, 
Okidata, C. loth, Seikosha, 
Panasonic and many others. 
They support BASIC print 
commands, word processors 
and graphic commands. 

We manufacture these 
products - dealer inquiries 
are invited. 



Cassette Label V2.1 
Program $6.95 

• New Version - tape trans- 
ferable to disk - save and 
load labels from tape to disk 

• Prints 7, lines of information 
on pin-feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven, easy to use 

• Standard, expanded and 
condensed characters 

• Each line of text auto- 
matically centered. 

• Label display on CRT, en- 
abling editing before printing 

• Program comes on tape 
and is supplied with 24 
labels to get you started 

• 16K ECB required 



Ordering 
Information 

Free shipping in the United 
States (except Alaska and 
Hawaii) on all orders over 
$50.00. Please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling on or- 
ders under $50 00. 
Ohio residents add 6% 
sales tax. 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use 
your VISA or MASTERCARD 
or request C.O.D. (Please 
add $2.25 for C.O.D. orders). 
If you prefer, send check or 
money order; payable in U.S. 
Funds to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 83 



Listing 1: 

0 «<TITLE> 
10 CLS 

20 FOR X=l TO 5 : PRINT : NEXTX 
30 PRINTTAB (9 ) "DOCHITA D. MAY" 
40 PRINT 

50 PRINTTAB (7) "51)3 HIGHLANDS AVE 
it 

• 

60 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 5 ) " INVERNESS , j 
FL., 32652" 

70 FOR H=0 TO 63 : SET (H ,0 , 8 ) : NEXT 
H 

Bp FOR V=0 TO 31:SET(63,V,8) :NEX 
TV 

9p FOR H=63 TO p STEP-1 : SET (H, 31 
, 8 ) : NEXTH 

100 FOR V=31 TO p STEP-1: SET (0,V 
,8) :NEXTV 
200 GOTO200 


C+l) :NEXTV 

9p FOR H=63 TO p STEP-2 : SET (H, 31 
, C+2 ) : NEXTH 

Ipp FOR V=31 TO p STEP-2 : SET (p ,V 
,C+3) :NEXTV 
110 NEXTC 
2pp GOT02 pp 


Listing 4: 

p 1 <MARQUEE1> 1 
lp CLS 1 
2p FOR X=l TO 5: PRINT: NEXTX 
3p PRINTTAB (9) "DOCHITA D. MAY" 
Ap PRINT 

5p PRINTTAB (7) "510 HIGHLANDS AVE 
ii 

• 

60 PRINT: PRINTTAB (5) "INVERNESS, 

FL., 32652" j 

65 FOR Ol TO 8 1 

66 IF C+l=9 THEN Ol 

70 FOR H=0 TO 63STEP2 : SET (H, 0 , C) j 
: NEXTH 

80 FOR V=0 TO 31STEP+2:SET(63,V, 
C) :NEXTV 

90 FOR H=63 TO 0 STEP-2 : SET (H, 3 1 ! 
,C): NEXTH 

100 FOR V=31 TO 0 STEP-2 : SET (0 , V 
,C+1) :NEXTV | 
110 NEXTC 
200 GOTO200 


Listing 2: 

p ■ <CLRTITLE> 
lp CLS 

2p FOR X=l TO 5: PRINT: NEXTX 

3p PRINTTAB (9) "DOCHITA D. MAY" 

40 PRINT | 

5p PRINTTAB (7) "510 HIGHLANDS AVE j 
it 

• 

6p PRINT: PRINTTAB (5) "INVERNESS, J 
FL., 32652" 

65 FOR Ol TO 8 

66 IF C+3=9 THEN C=l 

lp FOR H=0 TO 63 : SET (H,0 , C) :NEXT 
H 

8p FOR V=0 TO 31:SET(63,V,C+1) :N 
EXTV ! 
9p FOR H=63 TO p STEP-1 : SET (H, 31 
,C+2) : NEXTH 

Ipp FOR V=31 TO p STEP-1: SET (0,V 
,C+3) :NEXTV 
lip NEXTC 
2pp GOT02pp 


Listing 5: 

0 ! <BONUS> 
10 CLS 

20 FOR X=l TO 5 : PRINT : NEXTX 
30 PRINTTAB (9) "DOCHITA D. MAY" 
40 PRINT 

50 PRINTTAB (7) "510 HIGHLANDS AVE 
." i 
60 PRINT: PRINTTAB (5) "INVERNESS, 
FL., 32652" 

65 FOR Ol TO 8 ! 

66 IF C+l=9 THEN Ol j 

67 SCREEN0,1 

70 FOR H=0 TO 63STEP3 : SET (H , 0 , C) 
: NEXTH 

75 SCREEN0,0 

80 FOR V=0 TO 31STEP+1:SET(63,V, 
C) : NEXTV 1 
90 FOR H=63 TO 0 STEP-3 : SET (H, 3 1 1 
,C): NEXTH 1 
95 SCREEN0,0 ; 
100 FOR V=3i TO 0 STEP-1: SET (0,V 
,C+1) : NEXTV ! 
105 SCREEN0,1 | 
110 NEXTC 

200 GOTO200 ' 
1 fib 


Listing 3: 

p ' <MARQUEE> 
i lp CLS 

20 FOR X=l TO 5 : PRINT : NEXTX 
30 PRINTTAB (9) "DOCHITA D. MAY" 
40 PRINT 

5p PRINTTAB (7) "510 HIGHLANDS AVE 
it 

• 

60 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 5 ) " INVERNESS , 
FL., 32652" 

65 FOR Ol TO 8 

66 IF C+3=9 THEN C=l 

lp FOR H=p TO 63STEP2 : SET (H, J3 , C) , 
: NEXTH , 
8J3 FOR V=j3 TO 3 1STEP+2 : SET ( 63 , V, 



84 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 



VIDEO 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS 1 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



ITM 



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P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



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CoCo 3 Disk 64K Disk Mod. 





It 's medieval mayhem as up to 
four guildmasters battle to promote their 

candidates to kingship 







mgmafeer 



he room grew suddenly quiet as the door swung 
,slowly inward. All eyes were glued to the en- 
trance as an old man, his frame bent and frail, 
hobbled into the room. As he approached the gathering, 
he spoke. 

As you all know by now," he said in a voice that was 
surprisingly strong and unwavering, "the king is dead, 
and has left no heir. This could not have come at a better 
time, and we must exploit it to the fullest extent. The king 
was one of our worst antagonists, and we must be sure 
that the new king does not follow suit." He paused for 
a moment, letting the damp smell of earth surround him, 
then he sank down heavily into a chair. 

Here is what I propose," he continued. "We will 
support a candidate in the upcoming election. If he is 
elected, he will have no recourse other than putting our 
guild in a position of power. Do not be overconfident 
of victory, however. My fear is that one or all of our rivals 
will likewise support candidates. If that happens, this city 
will no longer be a haven for operations such as ours. 
It will be a battlefield." 

Scott Miller is a student at Fort Hays University. He 
enjoys role-playing games and medieval studies. Mike 
Cushing is a member of the U.S. Army Reserve, and also 
enjoys role-playing games. He and Scott have written 
several programs for the Co Co. 



^*att ptlkr an* ^xht (£n*km$ 




WW 

'v. » 




THE RAINBOW April 1988 



To Be King is a Simulation that 
allows two to four players to take on the 
role of a guildmaster who wants his 
candidate to be the next king. A 128K 
CoCo 3 is required to run To Be King 
as written; however, the program will 
also run on a 64K CoCo 1 or 2 if the 
title screen in Listing 1 (lines 10 through 
80 and Line 99) and Line 120 of Listing 
2 are omitted. 

In order to run the programs, type in 
both listings, one at a time, and save 
them under the names KINGBQ0T.BR5 
and KING . BflS. Do not write protect the 
disk, as a data file is written in the 
KINGBQOT program. When you play To 
Be King, always begin with a cold start, 
because most of BASIC'S available mem- 
ory is used by the programs. 

The Ultimate Managerial Resource 

Running a guild is hard work, but all 
guildmasters have a magical box from 
the far future known as a CoCo. This 
is a wonderful item indeed, for it allows 
actions to be performed instantane- 
ously, with the results being known 
almost immediately. There are seven 
main functions that can be performed 
by this tool of potent enchantment, as 
shown on the main menu. 

A View to a Kill 

First, you have the ability to hire and 
dispatch thieves and assassins. Assas- 
sins are used to eliminate rival candi- 
dates and to close businesses that are 
allied with rival guilds. Spies are used 
to determine the relative strengths and 
weaknesses of the opposition, as well as 
to scout possible targets for your guild 
to take over. 

When a player chooses Option 1, he 
may hire spies, assassins, or both. Spies 
and assassins send contacts to each 
guild only once per turn, so if a guild- 
master wants to hire assassins, for 
example, he needs to hire these assassins 
all at once. Any further contact for that 
week will be avoided as it poses an 
unnecessary risk. A third choice under 
Option 1 (which is also included in most 
other options) is that of listing the 144 
businesses that are currently in the city. 

- * 

Horse Trading 

The second choice on the main menu 
is negotiation. Negotiation is the pri- 
mary way to gain constant income for 
a guild. The first choice on the negoti- 
ation menu is to form an alliance with 
a neutral business. This action requires 
an amount of gold that you specify and 
the efforts of two of your guildsmen. 

If the negotiations prove successful, 



r vJKp' *~ , * - - i ■ 

Table 1: Chart of Commands 

I. Hire Spies and Assassins 

A. Hire Assassins 

B. Hire Spies 

C. Main Menu 
II. Negotiate 

A. Form an Alliance 

B. Invest in Allies 

C. List Businesses 

D. Main Menu 
III. Protection 

A. Assign Guards to Candidate 

B. Assign Guards to Business 

C. Hide Candidate 

D. Magically Hide Candidate 

E. Main Menu 
IV. Discredit 

A. Magically Discredit 

B. Spread Rumors 

C. Blackmail 

D. Main Menu 
V. Raise Funds 

A. Beg From Wizard 

B. Steal 

1. From Guild 

2. From Business 

3. From The Wizard 

C. Main Menu 
VI. Armed Conflict 

A. Recruit Locals 

B. Hire Mercenaries 

C. Train Locals 

D. Ambush a Guild 

E. Ambush a Business 

F. Main Menu 
VII. Status 

A. Main Menu 

B. End Turn 



Table 2: Investment Costs 



Moneylender: 


2,000 


Inns & Taverns: 


2,600 


Craftsmen: 


280 


Farmers: 


200 


Livestock traders: 


2,100 




the guild will gain a variable amount of 
income dependent on the type of busi- 
ness that is being courted. 

A guild may also invest in allied 
businesses. This action requires a set 
amount of gold (see Table 2) and, 
although expensive, generally increases 
the income from that business by a large 
extent. Any number of negotiations and 



investments may be done in a turn, 
subject to available manpower and 
gold, of course. 

Self-Protection 

The third set of actions available are 
those that allow protection of candi- 
dates or allied businesses. Either may be 
protected with any or all men you have 
at your disposal. Protection helps guard 
both against assassination of candidates 
or business owners to prevent a loss of 
income, and it also works well against 
overt assault. 

Candidates may also be hidden at a 
cost of 200 gold pieces. Hidden candi- 
dates may not be guarded by guild 
members, but they have 20 guards 
protecting them who are loyal support- 
ers, but not guild members. Thus, no 
men are required for this action. 

The last option a guild may use to 
protect a candidate is to hire the wizard 
to magically protect him. Only guilds 
that are allied with the wizard may use 
this function. Magical protection costs 
1,000 gold pieces and provides the 
candidate with a horde of fearsome 
creations that function as his body- 
guards while he is hiding. Both forms of 
hiding must be renewed for every turn. 

Mud Slinging 

Another way to impede the flow of 
coins into rival guilds' coffers is to 
discredit their allies, which is the fourth 
option on the main menu. If the wizard 
is currently allied with a guild, then that 
guild may magically discredit an enemy 
business. This action costs 100 gold 
pieces and eliminates income from the 
target business for that week. 

The same effect can be garnered in a 
more general fashion by hiring rumor- 
mongers to discredit a guild. These 
rumor-mongers cost 25 gold pieces to 
hire for one turn. They have the effect 
of taking away from one to 50 gold 
pieces of a rival guild's income. Note 
that you could possibly lose money by 
plying this tactic. 

The final option to discredit a guild 
is quite different — blackmail. Black- 
mail costs 150 gold pieces per target 
and, if successful, the target will end any 
alliances it may have, making it neutral 
once more. This action may be partic- 
ularly useful against businesses that are 
invested in, as opposed to merely allied 
with. 

Beg, Borrow or Steal 

The fifth option available to the guild 
masters is to raise funds. The first 
method of doing this is to ask for a 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 87 



contribution from the wizard, who is 
notoriously fickle and prone to drastic 
mood swings. 

A guild need not be allied with the 
wizard to gain money in this manner, 
but it does help. It is always best to ask 
for very small quantities of money, and 
it is inadvisable to ask more than once 
per turn. When the wizard feels that a 
guild is being overly greedy, he has been 
known to destroy businesses allied with 
that guild. Only those in dire straits 
should ever ask for such a contribution. 

The other way to gain money is to 
send some of your men to steal from a 
rival guild, business or the wizard. A 
guild master may steal as many times per 
turn as he wants, subject to the amount 
of men available. The guildmaster 
determines how many men to send on 
each mission. Note that stealing is an 
all-or-nothing proposition. The penalty 
for failure is the death of the thieves. 

On to Battle 

The sixth option on CoCo's magic 
menu is armed conflict. This option 
allows the training and recruiting of 
more guildmembers, which will allow 
you to ambush rival guilds in order to 
kill their candidate, and to destroy their 
businesses and thus remove a source of 
income. Local people can be recruited 
to join the guild, but they are considered 
untrained, and the guild must pay the 
cost of the training. 

Recruitment of locals requires two 
guild members and an amount of gold 
the guildmaster specifies. Training 
requires no guild members, but does 
require an amount of gold. An alterna- 



tive to such recruiting is to hire merce- 
naries at the rate of 100 gold pieces each. 
It takes one guild member to hire 
mercenaries, who are already fully 
trained when hired. 

Other options under this menu in- 
volve overt armed actions. These func- 
tions are similar to the sending of 
assassins in regard to the effects of 
success. It is important to note that 
attackers are at a disadvantage, and 
even if they face no guards from a rival 
guild, they run the risk of death at the 
hands of normal citizens and traps 
meant to dissuade such activities. 

Statement of Conditions 

The last option on the main menu is 
the status report, which shows how 
much gold a guild's treasury contains as 
well as current income and income for 
the previous turns. It also lists how 
many untrained recruits are awaiting 
training, how many guildmembers cur- 
rently exist, and how many are available 
for action on the current turn. 

The second page of the report lists the 
businesses that are allies as well as those 
that the guild invests in. This screen also 
contains the method for ending a guild's 
turn and going on to the next guild mas- 
ter's actions. 

Order of Play 

When KINGB00T is run, it asks how 
many guilds there will be in the game, 
how many weeks (turns) the game is to 
last, and what the names of the guilds 
are. It will then generate a data file 
called KING. DAT and run KING. 

Each player starts the game with 



1,000 gold pieces, no income, and 10 
guild members. Before each player's 
turn, he will be asked how much he 
wants to bid on the wizard's services for 
the next turn. The high bidder can then 
use any magical commands for the next 
turn. 

The game continues until there is 
either one candidate left or until the 
specified amount of weeks is concluded. 
If time runs out, the computer selects a 
winner using several criteria. If the same 
players want to play again, the comput- 
er will start the Simulation using the 
same parameters as were specified in 
KINGBOOT. If the players elect not to 
play again, the computer will return to 
BASIC with a cold start. The game may 
be ended at any time by pressing the 
BREAK key. 

Hints 

The best way to win at To Be King 
is to develop a strategy that extends a 
few turns into the future. It may appear 
to some people that emphasis in only 
one or two areas is good, but if an 
opponent finds a weakness, the game 
might soon be over! It may be a good 
idea to have all of the players agree not 
to use assassins for the first two or three 
turns, as a lucky break could remove 
candidates before they could even build 
a power base. Above all, never leave a 
candidate totally unprotected, and try 
to quickly gain a sizable income. 

(Questions or comments may be 
directed to the authors at 210 W, 15th, 
Hays, KS 67601. Please enclose an 
SASE when writing for a reply.) □ 




Listing 1: KINGBOOT 



80 


181 


161 


177 


183 


173 


202 


14 


END 


...118 



0 PCLEAR 1 

5 CLS 

6 X=RND ( -TIMER) 
10 HSCREEN 1 

15 HCLS0 : PALETTE 0,0: PALETTE 1,0 

20 HDRAW"BM10 , 10S8BR3BDG3ERE2NR5 

DR6DR3NEGL2HLG3RND3ED3G2UH3NRNE3 

D2RDRDF2NU2R5NE3UL4BR10BU11BR4BD 

G4ND3RD4ED2ED2FNU7NR5ER5E3NU3LU4 

GU2GU2NGNL3 HL2 G3 NGRD4 " 

30 HDRAW"S8BD10BL3BR3BDNG3R5GL4N 

GR4G4NUFDLDBU8BR8ND2FDG5U3NE3LD4 

GL3 NG2R2 DRNR2 DR4E 3 UGUGBR5 BU9 BR3 B 



DG3ERE2R4GNL3G4ND2RNDBR2NRE5D2ED 
NRD2NE3G2NR3L4D2NEDR3D2R2ENEL6HL 
2G2" 

40 HDRAW"S8BD8BR3BDG3ERE2NR4DR3G 
4NRNFD2BD2LNG2R3GNR3FR3LH2ENU3EU 
3 E4 D2 EDR2NEL2 BD2 L3 NGR3 DLG2FRD3E2 
HDBR5 BU10 BR3 BDG3 ERE 2 NR4 DR3G3 LGLN 
GR3 DL2 FBD2 LNG2R2 DFU2RU4RND2UE4 ■ 
50 HDRAW " S 8 BR2 BU 1 BR2 BDG 2 ER3 NHGD7 
LNG 2 R 2 GR 3 GNL BR 4 HUH 2 UHUH 2RF2DFDF2 
DFU1 1NRGR3 GR3 NEGLBR4 BU4 BR4 BDG4ND 
3RD4F3R5E3U2LND2L4NLE4NEL3NDNFLN 
EU2G4RND6ED4GD2R5" 
60 HDRAW " BR7 DR2 DBR2 BU2 DR2 DBR2 BU 
2DR2D" 

70 HPRINT(16,19) ,"(C) 1988":HPRI 
NT (14 ,20) , "S&M Software" 
80 PALETTE 1,64: PALETTE 12 ,64: PA 
LETTE 13,0 

90 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 90 
95 CLEAR 5000 



88 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



♦ 



97 DIM ML$ ( 6) , IN$ (2j3) , CM$ (5j3) , FM 
$(6j3) ,LT$(8) ,BT(2j3j3) ,BS(2j3j3) ,BG( 
2j3j3) 

99 HSCREEN J3 



99 HSCREEN fS 

1J3J3 INPUT M HOW MANY PLAYERS (2-4) 
" ;NP:IF NP<2 OR NP>4 THEN CLStGO 
TO Ij3j3 

11J3 CLS:FOR X=l TO NP: PRINT"WHAT 
IS THE GUILD NAME FOR PLAY 
ER n X ,, ? < * : INPUT GN$(X) :GP(X) =lj30j3: 
AF(X)=lj3:GG(X)=lj3:NEXT X 
120 INPUT "HOW MANY WEEKS UNTIL T 
HE NEW KING IS ELECTED" ;W 
14J8 FOR X=l TO 6: READ ML$(X):NEX 
T X 

141 DATA GUIDO'S MONEY HOUSE, TH 
E KING'S ENVY , SHARKEY 1 S LOAN EMP 
ORIUM,ALPHONSE f S FAMILY, HAPPY ED 
DIE'S FINANCING, THE GOLD EXCHANG 
E 

160 FOR X=l TO 2 j3 : READ IN$(X):NE 
XT X 

161 DATA THE ALE HOUSE, DRINKS A 
ROUND, THE BATTERED MACE, THE MI 
NSTREL, EHD'S PLACE , HARNEY 1 S LIQ 
UORS, PEACEFUL REST INN, THE DRA 
GON'S DEN, THE IMPERIAL HOSTEL, T 
HE BLUE HERRING INN 

162 DATA THE ELFIN DAMSEL, THE BL 
ACK ORCHID, THE ADVENTURERS GUILD 
,THE CROSSED SWORDS INN, BLOODHA 
WK TAVERN, THE GOLDEN UNICORN, K 
ING'S CASTLE, THE LOQUACIOUS BARD 
, ALL THE KING'S MEN, ELYSIUM ON E 
ARTH 

18J8 FOR X=l TO 50 :READ CM$(X): 
XT X 

181 DATA SENSUOUS 
LOTHES , CLAY CREAT 



NE 



XT X 

181 DATA SENSUOUS SILKS, MARKAN C 
LOTHES, CLAY CREATIONS , GOLDEN TIM 
BRE MUSIC, SEA WORTHY SHIPPING, F 
ROW'S SMITHY, BANNERS FOR PROCLAM 
AT I ON, FLASKS BOTTLES AND JARS,LO 
WAN'S CABINETS , FINE PARCHMENTS A 
ND INK 

18 2 DATA SWEETS AND CONFECTIONS, 
DEWQUAS ' BARBERY , GLIMMER OF GOLD 
, THE GOOD BAKER, SUITS AND CLOAKS 
, PLEASURE OF PLATINUM, BRITE SKEI 
N WEAVERY , DELGAR THE ARMORER, SAM 
'S CHANDLERY , WOVEN DREAM CARPETS 
18 3 DATA PERFECT ESSENCE, THE MI 
NERAL BATHS , MACWEN ' S LEATHER SHO 
P, BROKEN HEEL COBBLER, LEXIS ' SCR 
IPT, LOKAN THE FLETCHER, BARREL M 
AKERS 1 GUILD, TITAN LUMBER COMPAN 
Y , S AVAR THE PHYSICIAN , SARL ' S MOR 
TUARY 

184 DATA SORAHAN'S COLORS, RARE S 
PICE, CLASH OF STEEL, SIGNOR' S STU 
DIO,THE GRANITE MINER, HELKEN ' S F 
INE WEAPONRY , ETCHED PANES, MOLTEN 



WAX, WOOLEN WONDERS , TRUSTY 1 S SMI 
THY 

185 DATA LIQUID CURES ALCHEMY, BU 
TCHER'S BLEND, GLAZED POTTERY, GER 
WEK'S PAWN SHOP,QUESTEN THE SHAR 
PENER , TAROT REVEALED, ADDER ' S STI 
NG POISONS, BESVAN'S CUTLERY, FOR 
LADIES ONLY, YE OLDE TOY SHOP 

200 FOR X=l TO 60 : READ FM$(X):NE 
XT X 

201 DATA MILLER, CUSHING, FIELDS 
, BARNETT, HARTMAN, LINDEN, HERL 
, ROHLEDER, BROOKS, LUEHRS , KLEI 
N, LEE, SMITH, JONES, BROWN, WHI 
TE, MINOR, WOLF, CASEY, VILLINES 

202 DATA ETHAM, STORM, STACEY, H 
AGEN, CULVER, MC FLY, WEIS, KASS 
ON, DINKEL, LAMB, BERRYMAN, MEAD 
E, WITT, FABER, CAMPBELL, HORN, 
VINCENT, BREWSTER, DILLON, HEIL 

203 DATA FURMANSKI , BARBOUR, MAR 
SHALL, SCHUSTER, LUCAS, BIRD, WI 
LSON, SLOOP, DOAN, GRAFF, STURGE 
ON, THISSEN, ANDERSON, BACH, BOO 
R, PAGE, NEWTON, SOOK, LEIKER, B 
REIT 

220 FOR X=l TO 8 : READ LT$(X):NEX 
T X 

221 DATA ARABIAN KNIGHTS HORSES, 



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April 1988 THE RAINBOW 89 



JUSAN 1 S CATTLE PENS, THE GOAT HER 
D,THE KING'S MOUNT , THE SHEEP AUC 
TION,KEB'S STOCKYARD , YEWLON 1 S AN 
IMALS , THE MULE BARN 

222 OPEN " 0 " , # 1 , " KING . DAT " 

223 WRITE #l,NP,W:FOR X=l TO 6:W 
RITE #1,ML$ (X) :NEXT X:FOR X=l TO 



100 45 810 147 1465 133 

250 69 890 103 1520 37 

340 33 950 36 1660 80 

400 174 1060 113 1800 25 

490 76 1160 20 1940 217 

570 160 1230 12 2040 217 

630 181 1330 68 2140 12 

730 97 1410 230 END 232 



Listing 2: KING 
0 PCLEAR 1 

1J3 CLEAR 2000:ZZ=0:XX=0 

2)3 DIM ML$ (6) , IN$ (20) , CM$ (50) , FM 

$(60) ,LT$(8) ,BT(144) ,BS(144) ,BG( 

144) ,QD(144) ,ZX(144) 

25 FOR X=l TO 4:FQ(X)=0:NEXTX 

30 OPEN"I",#l, "KING. DAT" 

40 INPUT #l,NP,W:FOR X=1T06 : INPU 

T #1,ML$ (X) :NEXT X:FOR X=1TO20:I 

NPUT #1 , IN$ (X) : NEXT X:FOR X=1T05 

0:INPUT #1,CM$(X) :NEXT X:FOR X=l 

TO60:INPUT #1, FM$ (X) :NEXT X:FOR 

X=1T08:INPUT #1,LT$(X) :NEXT X:FO 

R X=1T04: INPUT #1, GG (X) ,GP(X) ,GN 

$(X) ,AF(X) :NEXT X 

45 CLOSE #1 

50 ZZ=ZZ+1:XX=0:IF ZZ>W OR DB+1= 
NP THEN 170 

60 XX=XX+1:GG(XX)=0:WV=0:AF=0:MH 
=0:SF=0: GOSUB 1750:WD=0:IF GS(XX 
)=1 AND DF(~XX)=0 THEN 180 ELSE I 
F GS(XX)=1 THEN 160 
70 CLS 

80 PR I NT "WHAT NEXT GUILDMASTER? " 
90 IF FQ(XX)=0 THEN GG (XX) =0:AF( 
XX) =10 : SF (XX) =0 : MH=0 : FQ (XX) =1 

100 PRINT" 1. HIRE ASSASSINS OR S 
PYS" : PRINT" 2 . NEGOTIATE" : PRINT "3 
• PROTECT CANDIDATE OR ALLIES" :P 
RINT"4. DISCREDIT OTHER CANDIDAT 
ES":PRINT"5. RAISE FUNDS" : PRINT" 
6. ARMED CONFLICT" :PRINT"7. STAT 
US" 

110 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 110 
120 ON BRK GOTO 2130: ON ERR GOTO 

2210 
130 I«VAL(I$) 

140 ON I GOSUB 200,490,650,830,9 



20:WRITE #1,IN$(X) :NEXTX:FOR X= 
1TO50:WRITE #1,CM$(X) :NEXTX:FORX 
=1TO60:WRITE #1,FM$ (X) :NEXTX:FOR 
X=1T08:WRITE #1,LT$ (X) :NEXTX:FOR 

X=1T04:WRITE #1,GG(X) ,GP(X) ,GN$ 
(X) ,AF(X) :NEXTX 
224 CLOSE #l:CLS: :RUN"KING" 



70,1350,1660 
150 GOTO 70 

160 GOSUB 1885: IF XX<NP THEN 60 

ELSE 50 

170 GOTO 1530 

180 DB=DB+1: PRINT "YOUR CANDIDATE* 
IS DEAD . • . YOU LOSE . . . YOU BE 
TTER START PRAYING FOR THE KING' 
S MERCY ! 1 ! " 

190 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 190 

ELSE DF(XX)=l:GOTO 160 

200 CLS:PRINT"HIRE ASSASSINS OR 

SPYS." 

210 PRINT" 1. HIRE ASSASSIN" : PRIN 
T"2* HIRE SPYS": PRINT" 3- MAIN ME 
NU" 

220 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 220 

230 I=VAL(I$) 

240 ON I GOTO 260,360,250 

250 RETURN 

2 60 CLS:PRINT"HIRE ASSASSINS .": I 
NPUT"HOW MANY DO YOU WISH TO HIR 
E";NA:IF AF=1 THEN PRINT"YOU ALR 
EADY HAD YOUR CHANCE, ":FOR PP=1 
TO 920:NEXT PP:GOTO 200 ELSE 270 
270 CO=NA* (100+RND(100) ) :AF=l:PR 
INTNA" ASSASSINS COST"CO:FOR PP=1 
TO 920 : NEXTPP : GP (XX) =GP (XX) -CO : 
IF GP(XX)<0 THEN PRINT"WE DON'T 
DO CHARITY. ":GP (XX) =GP (XX) +CO:FO 
R PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 200 E 
LSE 280 

280 IF X=0 THEN 200 ELSE FOR X=l 
TO NA 

285 CLS: PRINT "SEND ASSASSIN"X"TO 
— — ti 

290 PRINT"1. CANDIDATE": PRINT" 2. 

BUSINESS": PRINT" 3. LIST BUSINES 
SES" 

300 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 300 
310 I=VAL(I$):ON I GOTO 320,340, 
335 ' 

320 INPUT"WHICH CANDIDATE" ; AT: PD 
=RND(100):IF PD<3 OR PD<=20-GG(A 
T) THEN PRINT"SUCCESS! ! ! CANDIDA 
TE "AT" IS DEAD ! ! I " : GS (AT) =1 : 
FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:NEXT X:G 
OTO 200 

330 PRINT" YOUR ASSASSIN FAILS IN 

HIS MISSION.": FOR PP=1 TO 

920: NEXT PP:NEXT X:GOTO 200 



90 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



335 GOSUB 2030:GOTO 285 

340 INPUT"WHICH BUSINESS" ; AT : PD= 

RND(100):IF PD<=5 OR PD<=40-BG(A 

T) THEN PRINT" SUCCESS !! ! BUSINES 

S "AT" 1 S OWNER IS DEAD • " : PM=1 : GO 

SUB 2050:BT(AT)=1:FOR PP=1 TO 92 

0 : NEXT PP:NEXT X:GOTO 200 

3 50 PRINT" YOUR ASSASSIN FAILS IN 

HIS MISSION.": FOR PP=1 TO 

920:NEXT PPtNEXT X:GOTO 200 
360 CLS:PRINT"HIRE SPYS" : INPUT"H 
OW MANY DO YOU WISH TO HIRE";NS: 
IF SF=1 THEN PRINT"TOO LATE, ONE 

CHANCE IS ALL YOU GET.": FOR PP= 
1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 200 ELSE 3 
70 

370 CO=NS*(50+RND(50) ) :SF=l:PRIN 
TNS "SPY ( S ) COST" CO : GP (XX) =GP (XX) 
-CO:IF GP(XX)<0 THEN PRINT"WE DO 
N'T WORK FOR PAUPERS .": FOR PP=1 
TO 920: NEXT PP : GP (XX) =GP (XX) H-CO : 
GOTO 200 ELSE FOR PP=1 TO 920:NE 
XT PP 

380 IF X=0 THEN 200 ELSEFOR X=l 
TO NS 

385 CLS: PRINT" SEND SPY"X"TO— ":P 
RINT"1. GUILD": PRINT" 2. BUSINESS 
": PRINT" 3. LIST BUSINESSES" 
390 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 390 
400 I=VAL(I$):ON I GOTO 410,430, 
425 

410 INPUT"WHICH GUILD" ; ST: PD=RND 
(100) :IF PD>40 THEN 420 ELSE PRI 
NT" YOUR SPY IS CAUGHT": FOR PP=1 
TO 920:NEXT PP:NEXT X:GOTO 200 
420 CLS:PRINT"GUILD"ST"HAS: ":PRI 
NTGP(ST) "GOLD PIECES .": PRINT AF ( 
ST) "MEN.": PRINT IC (ST) "INCOME PE 
R TURN.": PRINT AL (ST) "ALLIES .»: F 
OR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:NEXT X:GO 
TO 200 

425 GOSUB 2030: GOTO 385 

430 INPUT" WHICH BUSINESS" ; ST: PD= 

RND(100):IF PD<20 THEN PRINT"YOU 

R SPY IS CAUGHT.": FOR PP=1 TO 92 

0:NEXT PP:NEXT X:GOTO 200 

440 CLS : PRINT"BUSINESS"ST"IS : " : I 

F BT(ST)=1 THEN PRINT" CLOSED" : GO 

TO 480 

450 IF BS(ST)=0 THEN PRINT "NEUTR 
AL":GOTO 480 

460 IF BS(ST)<C5=4 THEN PRINT"AL 
LIED WITH GUILD"BS(ST) :GOTO 480 
470 PRINT"GUILD"BS(ST)-4" INVEST 
S IN THIS BUSINESS." 
480 FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:NEXT 

X:GOTO 200 
490 CLS : PRINT " NEGOTIATE " : PRINT " 1 
. TRY TO FORM AN ALLIANCE" : PRINT 
"2. INVEST IN AN ALLIED BUSINESS 
": PRINT" 3. LIST BUSINESSES " : PRIN 



T"4. MAIN MENU" 

500 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 500 
510 I=VAL(I$):ON I GOSUB 530,590 
,640,520 
520 RETURN 
- 530 CLS: INPUT "WHICH BUSINESS DO 
YOU WISH TO ALLY WITH";AT 
540 IF BS(AT)<>0 THEN PRINT "THAT 
BUSINESS CLAIMS ALLEGIANCE TO A 
NOTHER GUILD": FOR PP=1 TO 920 :NE 
XT PP:GOTO 490 ELSE IF BT(AT)<>0 
THEN PRI NT "THAT BUSINESS IS CLO 
SED":FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOT 

0 490 

550 TB(XX)=TB(XX) -2 : IF TB(XX)<0 
THEN PRINT "YOU HAVE TOO FEW MEN 
TO PERFORM THIS ACTION.": FOR PP= 

1 TO 920: NEXT PP: TB (XX) =TB (XX) +2 
:GOTO 490 

560 INPUT "HOW MUCH GOLD DO YOU W 
ISH TO SEND ALONG" ;BB:GP (XX) = 
GP(XX)-BB:IF GP(XX)<0 THEN PRINT 
"SMART GU I LDMAS TERS DON'T MAKE 

EMPTY PROMISES" : FOR PP=1 TO 920 
:NEXT PP:GP(XX)=GP(XX)+BB:GOTO 4 
90 

570 PD=RND(100) : IF PD<=(30+BB) T 
HEN 580 ELSE PRINT "NEGOTIATIONS 
FAIL TO PRODUCE FAVORABLE RES 
ULTS.":FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:G 
OTO 490 

580 PM=0 : BS ( AT )=XX: PRINT "YOUR AL 
LIANCE OFFER IS ACCEPTED .": FOR P 
P=l TO 920:NEXT PP:GOSUB 2050:PR 
INT"YOU GAIN" ZX (AT) "GOLD PIECES' 
INCOME.": FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP 
: AL(BS (AT) ) =AL(BS (AT) ) +1: GOTO 49 

J3 

590 CLS:INPUT"WHICH ALLIED BUSIN 
ESS DO YOU WISH TO INVEST IN" 
; AT 

600 IF BS(AT)=XX THEN 610 ELSE I 
F (BS(AT) -4)=XX THEN PRINT"YOU H 
AVE ALREADY INVESTED WITH THAT 
BUSINESS. ": FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT 
PP:GOTO 490 ELSE PRINT" YOU AREN 1 
T ALLIED WITH THEM YET.": FOR PP= 
1 TO 920:NEXT PPrGOTO 490 
610 IF AT<7 THEN CI=2000 ELSE IF 

AT<27 THEN CI=2 600 ELSE IF AT<7 
7 THEN CI=280 ELSE IF AT<137 THE 
N CI=200 ELSE CI=2100 
620 GP(XX)=GP(XX)-CI:IF GP(XX)<0 

THEN PRINT"MAN CAN'T LIVE ON EM 
PTY PROMISES.": FOR PP=1 TO 920 :N 
EXT PP:GP(XX)=GP(XX)+CI:GOTO 490 

ELSE PRINT"IT COSTS "CI 11 GOLD PIE 
CES . " : PM=0 : BS (AT) =XX+4 
630 GOSUB 2050:PRINT"IT ADDS"ZX( 
AT) "GOLD PIECES TO YOUR INCOME." 
:FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 49 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 91 



640 GOSUB 2030:GOTO 490 
650 CLS: PRINT "PROTECT CANDIDATES 
AND BUSINESSES . " : PRINT 

"1. ASSIGN GUARDS TO CANDIDATE": 
PRINT"2. ASSIGN GUARDS TO BUSINE 
SS": PRINT" 3. HIDE CANDIDATE" : PRI 
NT"4. MAGICALLY HIDE CANDIDATE": 
PRINT" 5. MAIN MENU" 
660 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 660 
670 I=VAL(I$):ON I GOSUB 690,740 
,780,800,820 
680 RETURN 

690 IF MH=1 THEN PRINT "YOUR CAND 
IDATE IS HIDING": FOR PP=1 TO 920 
:NEXT PP:GOTO 650 

700 PRINT"YOU HAVE "GG (XX) "GUARDS 
CURRENTLY ON YOUR CANDIDATE, ": I 
NPUT"HOW MANY DO YOU WISH TO HAV 
E NOW";NG:IF NG<0 THEN NG=0 
710 IF TB(XX)-(NG-GG(XX) )< 0 THE 
N PRINT" YOU CAN'T GUARD WITH GHO 
STS!":FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GO 
TO 650 

720 IF NG>GG(XX) THEN TB(XX)=TB( 
XX)-(NG-GG(XX) ) ELSE TB(XX)=TB(X 
X)+(GG(XX)-NG) 
730 GG(XX)=NG:GOTO 650 
■ 740 GOSUB 2030: INPUT"WHICH BUSIN 
ESS DO YOU WISH TO GUARD" ;PX:P 
RINT"THERE ARE" BG (PX) "GUARDS THE . 
RE NOW. ": INPUT "HOW MANY DO YOU W 
ISH TO HAVE NOW" ;NG:IF NG<0 THEN 
NG=0 

750 IF TB-(NG-BG(PX) )<0 THEN PRI 
NT"YOU MUST THINK THIS ALLY IS 

BLIND!": FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT 
PP:GOTO 650 

760 IF NG>BG(PX) THEN TB(XX)=TB( 
XX)-(NG-BG(PX) ) ELSE TB(XX)=TB(X 
X)+BG(PX) -NG 
770 BG(PX)=NG:GOTO 650 
780 PRINT"HIDE CANTIDATE" : GP (XX) 
=GP(XX) -200: IF GP(XX)<0 THEN PRI 
NT "LOYALTY ONLY GOES SO FAR.":GP 
(XX) =GP (XX) +200: FOR PP=1 TO 920: 
NEXT PP:GOTO 650 

790 PRINT"YOUR CANDIDATE IS HIDD 
EN. ":GG (XX) =20: FOR PP=1 TO 920:N 
EXT PP:MH=l:GOTO 650 
800 PRINT "MAGICALLY HIDE CANDIDA 
TE.":IF WFOXX THEN PRINT "THE WI 
ZARD ONLY PROTECTS ALLIES": FOR P 
P=l TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 650 ELSE 

GP (XX) =GP (XX) -1000 
805 IF GP(XX)<0 THEN PRINT "THE W 
IZARD IS YOUR ALLY, NOT YOUR 
SLAVE. ":GP(XX)=GP(XX) +1000: FOR P 
P=1TO920:NEXT PP:GOTO 650 
810 PRI NT "THE WIZARD WEAVES MAGI 
C AROUND YOUR CANDIDATE, AND HE 

IS THUS HIDDEN. ":GG (XX) =100 :FO 



R PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:MH=l:GOTO 
650 

820 RETURN 

830 CLS: PRINT" DISCREDIT BUSINESS 
ES": PRINT" 1. MAGICALLY DISCREDIT 
. ":PRINT"2. SPREAD RUMORS ": PRINT 
"3. BLACKMAIL": PRINT" 4. RETURN T 
0 MAIN MENU" 

840 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" OR I$<"1" 

OR I$>"4" THEN 840 
850 I=VAL(I$):ON I GOSUB 880,900 
,930,870 
860 RETURN 
870 RETURN 

880 CLS: IF WFOOCX THEN PRINT "THE 
WIZARD ONLY HELPS HIS SUP 
PORTERS .": FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT P 
P:GOTO 830 ELSE GP (XX) =GP (XX) -10 
0:IF GP(XX)<0 THENPRINT " THE WIZA 
RD DOESN'T DO CHARITY WORK.":F 
OR PP=1 TO 920 -.NEXT PP:GP(XX)=GP 
(XX) +100: GOTO 830 

890 GOSUB 2030: INPUT "WHICH BUS I 
NESS DO YOU WANT THE WIZARD TO 
ZAP" ; AT : DV (XX) =IC (XX) : IC (XX) =TI ( 
XX) :PM=1: GOSUB 2050:PM=0:TI (XX) = 
IC(XX) :IC(XX)=DV(XX) : PRINT "THE W 
IZARD'S SPELL DRIVES AWAY ALL C 
USTOMERS THIS WEEK.": FOR PP=1 TO 

920: NEXT PP:GOTO 830 
900 PRINT "SPREAD RUMORS" 
910 GP(XX) =GP(XX) -25: IF GP(XX)<0 

THEN PRI NT "EVEN RUMORMONGERS NE 
ED TO EAT . " : GP (XX) =GP (XX) +25 : FOR 

PP=1 TO 920:NEXT PP:GOTO 830 
920 INPUT"WHICH GUILD DO YOU WIS 
H TO ATTACK" ;AT: PRINT "THE RUMORM 
ONGERS WORK TO STOP CUSTOMERS 
FROM DEALING WITH GUILD"AT:T 
I(AT)=TI(AT) -RND(50) : FOR PP=1 TO 

920: NEXT PP:GOTO 830 
930 CLS : PRINT " BLACKMAI L" : INPUT "W 
HICH BUSINESS DO YOU WISH TO P 
LY THIS TACTIC ON" ; AT : GP (XX) =GP ( 
XX) -150: IF GP(XX)<0 THEN PRINT "B 
LACKMAIL'S A CRIME AND WE AIN'TD 
OIN 1 IT FOR FREE. " : GP (XX) =GP (XX) 
+150: FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOT 
O 830 

940 PD=RND(100) : IF PD>40 THEN PR 
INT"THEIR AIN'T ENOUGH DIRT ON T 
HAT BUSINESS": FOR PP=1 TO 920 :NE 
XT PP:GOTO 8 30 ELSE PM=1: GOSUB 2 
050:GOSUB 950 : AL(BS (AT) ) =AL(BS (A 
T) ) -1 : BS (AT) =0 : PRINT"THEY BROKE 
THEIR ALLIANCE !": FOR PP=1 TO 920 
:NEXT PP:GOTO 830 

950 IF BS(AT)>4 THEN BS(AT)=BS(A 
T)-4 

960 RETURN 

970 CLS: PRINT "RAISE FUNDS": PRINT 
"1. SOLICIT CONTRIBUTIONS FROM 



92 THE RAINBOW April 1988 





ARK ROYAL! 







M » • I I I I I I I I 



S&^Ls 

d »3j *!? 



rrt'i'fr i'rtTi'i*t*i*ri T !'i tTf'rrri't* "H""!^ PBft 



rvr t* r f i*t*r EC >' M 'I . K IKK I ^li^TC 1 ' 




~i lg~ n a~ 



I • I I I I I I I I ■ I I I 1 I uVt i_r* -"•« 



I.I.I, 1. 1. <.«.•. t.I.l.l.l 



'.'.VAC'.* t*»M.*A 

i,«.«|iVri'i'i'<'i'ri'i'r«' 



.1,1,1.1. 1,1, •.•.•.I,'. • * 

'XO.v.vXvX'Xv 



■ML 'A* 

£ix!'x&"& 




A C E S is a high resolution, completely machine 
language game of aerial warfare in WWI. Player flies on 
many missions to bomb enemy targets including airfields, 
enemy headquarters, anti-aircraft batteries, bridges and 
factories, but not player's own air base. He must dodge 
mountains and dogfight with the enemy's best, including, 
if unlucky, members of the dreaded Flying Circus. After 
he shoots down five planes he becomes an ACE and 
receives special consideration; but the game is far from 
finished. ACES averages about 82 targets and over 
100 enemy aircraft per game. 

ACES plays in real time and displays flight simulated 
dash and controls. Operates from the keyboard. Included 
in the display is a high resolution mini-screen featuring 
terrain, targets, and player's relative ground position. 
There are 8 zones in each map which changes as player 
flies over it. Game Save. (It could take days to win!) In 
addition, NEWMAP is included to allow for the creation of 
a zillion new maps. ACES was created in part with 
AGS, developed by Ken Schunk. For all CoCo's. 



WAR AT SEA: Wooden Ships simulate ship to ship battles during the 
18th Century. Player controls a number of sailing ships from different 
nations and must pit his seamanship against the computer or another 
player. 

NEW 

ACES: WWI Aerial Warfare (CC64K D HR ML) 

RED ALERT: Star Ship Warfare (CC64K D HR MLS J) 

WAR AT SEA: Wooden Ships (CC64K D HR MLS J) 



RED ALERT: a starship combat simulator. Object of the game is to 
defeat the computer controlled enemy vessel by using your ship's 
capacities, strategic maneuvers, and your own smarts. 



$29 
$27 
$25 



Pro Football: Strategy Gridiron game (CC3 128K HR B) $20 

Okinawa: The Big Invasion (Screen Dump inc) 

(CC64K D HR ML) • $27 

Blitzkrieg West: A Bigger Bulge (CC64K D HR ML) $27 

Bataan: Historial & Hypothetical games in one 

(CC64K D HR ML) $29 

Desert Fox: Rommel (CC64K D HR MLS) $27 

Task Force: Modern Naval War in the Med 

(CC64K D HR MLS J) $27 

D DAY: The 6th of June (CC64K HR ML) $25 

Battle Hymn: Battle of Gettysburg (CC64K D HR ML) $25 

Company Commander: Squad Level Wargame 

(CC32K SG MLS) .* $25 

(House to House Module included in Company Commander) 
Additional Modules for Company Company 3.0 

River Crossing $17 

Gemini $17 

Cauldron $17 

Beach Head $17 

Fire One! Submarine Simulation (CC3 D HR B) $25 

Fire & Steel: Waterloo Campaign (CC64K D HR MLS) $22 

Keyboard General: Bi-monthly newsletter yearly sub 

Barbarossa, Luftflotte, Battle Hymn (256K) available Tandy 1000 

New for the Tandy 1000 

Gray Storm Rising: War in the North Atlantic 



Luftflotte: Battle of Britain (CC32KSG MLS) $25 

Stalingrad: The turning point. (CC64K HR ML) $25 

Final Frontier: War in Space (CC32K D HR MLS) $25 

Barbarossa: The War in Russia (CC64KHR ML) $22 

RedStar: Nato vs Warsaw Pact (CC32K D HR ML) $22 

DarkHorse: Redstar Sequel (CC64KDHR ML) $22 

Midway: The Turning Point in the Pacific 

(CC32K HR MLS) $20 

Escape From Denna: Dungeons! (CC32K SG MLS) $15 

Tunis: War in the Desert (CC32KSGB) $15 

Battle of the Bulge 1 or 2 player (CC32K SG B) $15 

Phalanx: Alexander the Great (CC32K HR ML) $15 

Rubicon II: Invasion game (CC32K SG B) $10 

Guadalcanal: America Strikes Back (CC32K SG MLS) $10 

Waterloo: Napoleon (CC32K SG MLS) $10 

Bomber Command: Strategic Bombing Mission 

(CC32K SG MLS) $10 

Kamikaze: Naval War in the Pacific (CC32K Hf{ B) $10 

Starblazer: Strategy Star Trek (CC32K SG MLS) $10 

Mission Empire: Build an Empire in Space (CC32KSGB) $10 

Galactic Taipan: Economics in Space (CC32K SG B) $10 

$15 



$25 



Codes: CC — Color Computer, all versions CC3 — CoCo 3 only 

D — Disk only (no D means program available tape or disk) 

HR — High Resolution SG — Semigraphics ML — Machine Language 

MLS — Machine Language Subroutines B — Basic J — Joystick 

Write for free catalog! 

Prices include shipping to USA and Canada. Others add $3.00. COD's available 
in USA only, add $3.50. Personal Checks accepted with no delays in USA. Others 
must send M.O. or Bank Draft in U.S. funds. Programs shipped within 24 hours 
except on weekends. Sorry, no bankcards. Color Computer and Tandy 1000, 
TM Tandy Corp. 

Florida residents add 6% sales tax. 

Canadians may order direct from: M & M Software, Post Office Box 1945, Slave 
Lake, Alberta T06 2A0. Write M & M Software for information. 



ARK ROYAL GAMES 

P.O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 
(904) 786-8603 




WIZARD." : PRINT "2. STEAL" :PRI 
NT" 3, RETURN TO MAIN MENU" 
980 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" OR I$<"1" 

OR I$>"3" THEN 980 
990 I=VAL(I$):ON I GOSUB 1020,10 
90,1010 
1000 RETURN 
1010 RETURN 

1020 CLS:PRINT"ASK THE WIZARD TO 
DONATE MONEY" :INPUT"HOW MUCH MO 
NEY ARE YOU GOING TO ASK HIM FOR 
";AD:WR=AD+RND(200) :IF WF=XX THE 
N WR=WR-RND(50) 

1030 IF WV=1 THEN WR=200 ELSE WV 
=1 

1040 IF WR<100 THENPRINT"THE WIZ 
ARD SMILES AND GRANTS YOU"AD"GOL 
D PIECES. ": GP (XX) =GP (XX) +AD: FOR 
PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1050 IF WR<175 THEN PRINT "THE WI 
ZARD TELLS YOU TO GO STICK 
YOUR HEAD IN A PIG.": FOR PP=1 TO 

9 20: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1060 PRINT "THE WIZARD GROWS ANGR 

Y AT YOUR UNMITIGATED OBNOXIOUS 
NESS . " 

1070 FOR FE=1 TO 144: IF BS(FE)= 
XX OR BS(FE)=(XX+4) THEN PRINT "T 
HE WIZARD DESTROYS BUSINESS 11 
; FE : PM=1 : BT ( FE ) =1 : GOSUB 2050 : NEX 
T FE 

1080 PRINT "YOU ARE THROWN FROM H 
IS HOUSE.": FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT 
PP:GOTO 970 

1090 CLS:PRINT"STEAL":PRINT"1. F 

ROM A GUILD": PRINT" 2. FROM A BUS 

INESS":PRINT"3. FROM THE WIZARD" 

1100 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" OR I$<"1 

" OR I$>"3" THEN 1100 • 

1110 I=VAL(I$):ON I GOTO 1120,12 

00,1270 

1120 CLS : INPUT"WHICH GUILD DO YO 
U WANT TO STEALFROM" ;GS: INPUT "H 
OW MANY MEN DO YOU WISH TO S 
END" ;SM: IF SM>TB(XX) OR SM<1 THE 
N PRINT" ILLUSIONARY MEN TAKE ONL 

Y ILLU- SIONARY GOLD": FOR PP=1 T 
0 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 ELSE TB(X 
X)=TB(XX) -SM 

1130 IF TI (XX) =-10000 THEN TI(XX 
) =IC (XX) 

1140 PD=RND(100) :IF PD+(SM*2)-(G 
G(GS)+60)>0 THEN 1150 ELSE 1170 
1150 PD=RND(250) :IF PD>GP(GS) TH 
EN PD=GP(GS) 

1160 PRINT"YOUR THIEVES SUCCEEDE 
D IN TAKING "PD" GOLD PIECES 

. ":GP(XX)=GP(XX)+PD:FOR PP=1 TO 
920:NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1170 PD=RND(100) :IF PD<51 THEN 1 
180 ELSE 1190 

1180 PRINT"YOUR THIEVES WERE CAU 



GHT. . .AND EXECUTED" :AF (XX) =AF(X 
X)-SM:FOR PP=1 TO 9 20: NEXT PP:GO 
TO 970 

1190 PRINT"YOUR THIEVES WERE DIS 
COVERED... BUT THEY ESCAPED. ":FO 
R PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1200 CLS:INPUT"WHICH BUSINESS DO 
YOU WISH TO STEAL FROM (0 FOR 
LIST)"; AT: IF AT=0 THEN GOSUB 19 
00: GOTO 1200 

1210 INPUT"HOW MANY MEN ARE YOU 
SENDING" ;SM: IF SM>TB(XX) OR SM<1 
THEN PRINT" YOUR MATH SKILLS WER 
E PROBABLY WHAT CAUSED YOUR POV 
ERTY IN THE FIRST PLACE": FOR PP= 
1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1220 TB(XX)=TB(XX)-SM:PD=RND(100 
):IF (PD+SM*2) - (BG (AT) +40) >0 THE 
N 1230 ELSE 1250 

1230 PD=RND(100) :PRINT"YOUR THIE 
VES STRUCK SWIFTLY AND STOLE"PD" 
GOLD PIECES" :GP (XX) =GP (XX) +PD:FO 
R PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1240 PD=RND(100): IF PD>36 THEN 
1260 ELSE 1250 

1250 PRINT "THE CITY GUARD JUST L 
OVED KILLING YOUR THIEVES 

FOR 1 RES ISTING ARREST 1 . " : 

AF(XX)=AF(XX) -SM:FOR PP=1 TO 920 
" :NEXT PPrGOTO 970 
12 60 PRINT" YOUR THIEVES MESSED U 
P, BUT WERENOT CAPTURED" : FOR PP= 
1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1270 CLS:INPUT"HOW MANY BRAVE SO 
ULS ARE GOING TO ROB THE WIZARD 
» ; SM 

1280 IF TB(XX)<SM OR SM<1 THEN P 
RINT"THE WIZARD DOESN'T BELIEVE 
IN NON-MAGICAL ILLUSIONS" : FOR 
PP=1 TO 920:NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1290 TB(XX)=TB(XX)-SM:PD=RND(100 
):IF PD<50 THEN WQ=1 ELSE WQ=10 
1300 PD=RND(100) : IF (PD-SM)<(WQ+ 
1) THEN 1310 ELSE 1320 
1310 PD=RND ( 10000 ): PRINT "YOUR ME 
N ARE SURE TO REACH LEGENDA 
RY STATUS. YOU GOT LUCKY AND STO 
LE"PD"GOLD PIECES FROM A CARELES 
S WIZARD. ":GP (XX) =GP (XX) +PD: FOR 
PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1320 IF WQ<2 THEN 13 30 ELSE 1340 
1330 PRINT "THE WIZARD WAS HOME. 
ALL YOUR MEN MET HORRIBLE DEAT 
HS BUT THE PROPERTY DAMAGE WAS M 
INIMAL.":AF(XX)=AF(XX)-SM:FOR PP 
=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1340 PRINT "THE WIZARD'S DEADLY M 
AGIC TRAPS DESTROYED YOUR HAPLES 
S THIEVES . " : AF (XX) =AF (XX) -SM: FOR 

PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 970 
1350 CLS : PRINT "ARMED CONFLICT" :P 
RINT"1. RECRUIT LOCALS" : PRINT "2 . 



94 THE RAINBOW April 1988 




«< GJIWESOFT >» 

A new generation of Color Computer products 








Utilize ^ 

SGREj^$l^:^ 
scran^^ 

^rig^e : :>^ 



MULTI-LABEL 

(See July '87 review) Disk $16.95 

FKEYS 111 

(See April '87 review) Disk $19.95 



<CoCo III only> Custom Palette Designer 

(See Aug '87 review) Disk $14.95 

<CoCo |/l|/lll> SIXDRIVE 

Disk $16.95 



CoCo Max III 



AUTO DIM 



(CoCo III only) 

More resolution, power, color, speed, tools, & type styles!!! 
Built in Animation! / Amazing Color Sequencing!!! Comes 
with HI-RES INTERFACE, MINILOAD/BAS, DEMO 
DISK, COCO SHOW PGM. Complete package $79.95 



(CoCo III only) 

This hardware device protects your RGB or composite 
monitor, or your TV from IMAGE BURN after a few 
minutes of inactivity from your keyboard. Illustrated 

instructions and easy to install. Just. $29.95 

(See January '88 review) 



now 2 styles MPI-CoCo Locking Plate ™* old «* «w 

Protects your CoCo III and Multi Pak Interface from destroying each other! Installs in seconds. MPI 26-3124 or 26-3024 
& CoCo III 26-3334 only. Please specify MPI number 26-3024 or 26-3124 when ordering! Only $9.95 




I 






or 512k 



lllon 



Turn your & 
stuttering; sj^ 

Voice- Music, or Sound effect :a^ 

iiSttebIfag^ 

disks; ^ 
;:Haurrtetf:vhou 



NEW 



V-Term Terminal Emulator 



444 NEW 



(128k or 512k CoCo III only) 
V-Term is one of the most advanced terminal programs for the CoCo 111 ever!!! 

FEATURES: VT-100, VT-52, and standard CRT emulations. Full use of 51 2K, 80X28 text or graphics characters, 
Windows & Multi-tasking (Disk Basic!), RAMDISK like buffer, Xmodem, Xon/Xoff, Monochrome monitor support, Capture 
buffer, Snapshot, Conference mode, and much much more! Complete with documentation. Disk.. $39.95 



PYRAMIX 



(CoCo III only) 

This 100% machine language arcade game was written 
exclusively to take advantage of your CoCo 3. The colors 
are brilliant, the graphics are sharp, and the action is hot! 
(See Dec. '87 review) Disk $19.95 



CHAMPION 



(CoCo i/h/iii) 

Become a superhero in your fight to rid the world of the 
evil forces of Mr. Bigg in this action adventure. The 
combat is hot and heavy and requires a fast joystick! 
(See May '87 review) Disk $19.95 



Kung-Fu Dude 

(CoCo l/ll/lll) 

This is the long-awaited response to the huge demand for 
a Kung-Fu program for the CoCo. Destroy opponents and 
evade obstacles as you grow even closer to your ultimate 
objective! (See Feb. *88 review) Disk.. $24.95 

White Fire of Eternity 

(CoCo l/ll/lll) 

Enter the age of monsters, magic, and adventure. Here 
you will search for the legendary power of White Fire 
throughout the Forbidden Wood and dark caverns. 
(See Dec. '86 review) Disk $19.95 




: :A;new;anima 



Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
information: Delphi's CoCo Sig 



GIMMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301-256-7558 or 301-256-2953 



Add $3.00 for shipping and handling 
Add $2.00 for COD (USA only) 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VISA/MC/Check/Money Order/COD 



HIRE MERCENARIES": PRINT" 3. TRAI 
N AND EQUIP RECRUITS": PRINT" 4. A 
MBUSH A GUILD": PRINT" 5. AMBUSH A 

BUSINESS": PRINT" 6. RETURN TO MA 
IN MENU" 

1360 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" OR I$<"1 

" OR I$>"6" THEN 13 60 

1370 I=VAL(I$):ON I GOSUB 1400,1 

420,1450, 1470,1500, 1390 

1380 RETURN 

1390 RETURN 

1400 IF TB(XX)<2 THEN PRINT"YOU 
DON'T HAVE ENOUGH MEN TO RECR 
UIT.":FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GO 
TO 1350 ELSE TB (XX) =TB (XX) -2 : INP 
UT"HOW MUCH MONEY ARE YOU GOING 
TO SPEND" ;SM 

1410 IF SM>GP(XX) THEN PRINT"PRO 
MISES . • . BUT WHERE ' S THE MON 
EY" : FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 

1350 ELSE GP(XX)=GP(XX) -SM:PD=R 
ND(50) :SR=INT(SM/PD) :RC(XX)=RC(X 
X)+SR: PRINT 11 YOU BEAT THE BUSHES 
AND FOUND"SR"NEW RECRUITS" : FOR P 
P=l TO 920 .-NEXT PP:GOTO 1 
1420 IF TB(XX)<1 THEN PRINT "THEY 

WON'T JUST COME TO YOU, YOU MUS 
T GO TO THEM.": FOR PP=1 TO 920 :N 
EXT PP-.GOTO 13 50 ELSE TB(XX)=TB( 
XX) -1 

1430 INPUT"HOW MUCH TO YOU WISH 
TO SPEND ON MERCS" ;SM: IF SM>GP 
(XX) THEN PRINT"MERCENARIES ARE 
PAID SOLDIERS .": FOR PP=1 TO 920: 
NEXT PP:GOTO 13 50 ELSE GP(XX)=GP 
( XX ) -SM : S R=INT ( SM/ 100 ) : PRINT " YOU 
HIRED" SR"MERCS . " : AF (XX) =AF (XX) + 
SR:FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT P 
1440 GOTO 1350 

1450 CLS:PRINT"YOU HAVE"RC (XX) "R 
ECRUITS. ": INPUT "HOW MUCH DO YOU 
WANT TO SPEND ONTRAINING" ;SM: IF 
GP(XX)<SM THEN PRINT "TEACHERS 1 S 
ALARIES ARE A BIT HIGHER THAN 

WHAT YOU HAVE, BUT YOUR OFFER 
WAS NICE.": FOR PP=1 TO 9 20: NEXT 
PP:GOTO 13 50 

1460 GP(XX)=GP(XX)-SM:PD=RND(150 
) :SR=INT(SM/PD) :IF SR>RC(XX) THE 
N SR=RC(XX) 

1465 PRINT "YOU TRAINED AND EQUIP 
ED"SR" RECRUITS . " :RC (XX) =RC ( 

XX)-SR:AF(XX)=AF(XX)+SR:FOR PP=1 

TO 9 20: NEXT PP:GOTO 13 50 
1470 CLS: INPUT "WHICH GUILD DO YO 
U WISH TO AMBUSH" ;AG: INPUT" 

HOW MANY MEN WILL YOU SEND";SM:I 
F SM>TB(XX) THEN PRINT "DON'T SEN 
D MORE MEN THAN YOU HAVE": FOR 

PP^l TO 920>:NEXT PP:GOTO 1350 
1475 TB(XX)=TB(XX)-SM 
1480 OF=GG (AG) : GOSUB 2155:IF LO= 



XX THEN PRINT "YOU HAVE LOST YOUR 
BID TO DESTROY GUILD"AG:F 

OR PP=1 TO 920:NEXT PP:GOTO 1350 
1490 PRINT"YOU HAVE WON!!! CANDI 
DATE "AG" IS DEAD" : GS (AG) =1 : FOR P 
P=l TO 920: NEXT PP:GOTO 1350 
1500 CLS: INPUT "WHICH BUSINESS WI 
LL YOU AMBUSH"; AG: INPUT "HOW MANY 
MEN WILL YOU SEND";SM:IF SM>TB( 
XX) THEN PRINT "YOU HAVE TOO FEW 
TROOPS LEFT.": FOR PP=1 TO 920:NE 
XT PP:GOTO 13 50 
1505 TB(XX)=TB(XX)-SM 
1510 OF=BG (AG) : GOSUB 2155:IF LO= 
XX THENPRINT"BUSINESS"AG"IS STIL 
L OPEN.": FOR PP=1 TO 920: NEXT PP 
:GOTO 13 50 

1520 PRINT"YOU HAVE SUCCEEDED IN 
CLOSING BUSINESS "AG" . " : BT (AG) 
=1:PM=1:AT=AG: GOSUB 2050:FOR PP= 
1 TO 920:NEXT PP:GOTO 1350 
1530 IF DB+1=NP THEN FOR X=l TO 
4: IF GS(X)<>1 THEN CLS: SOUND 100 
,1: PRINT "PLAYER "X" REPRESENTING 
THE GUILD "GN$(X)" IS THE W 

INNER": GOTO 1640 

1540 CLS: PRINT "ELECTION DAY HAS 
COME... WHO WILLBE THE NEXT KING" 
:FOR X=l TO NP:TV(X)=( (IC(X) *2)+ 
(GP(X) *5)+(AL(X) )+RC(X)+AF(X) *3) 
1550 KK(X)=TV(X) :NEXT X:PRINT"TH 
E KING IS THE CANDIDATE FROM" 
1560 Y=0 
1570 Y=Y+1 

1580 IF Y>NP THEN 1630 

1590 IF TV(X)<0 THEN 1630 

1600 FOR 2=1 TO NP 

1610 IF KK(Y)>KK(X) THEN X=Y 

1620 NEXT Z 

1625 GOTO 1570 

1630 PRINTGN$ (X) ;" (GUILD"X") " 
1640 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 164 

1650 INPUT "DO YOU WISH TO PLAY A 
GAIN";X$:IF LEFT$(X$,1)="Y" THEN 

RUN ELSE POKE 113,0: EXEC 40999 
1660 CLS: PRINT "STATUS REPORT": PR 
INT "GOLD PIECES "GP (XX) :PRINT"INC 
OME"IC (XX) : PRINT "INCOME THIS TUR 
N"TI (XX) : PRINT "LAST TURN ' S INCOM 
E"LI(XX) :PRINT"RECRUITS"RC(XX) :P 
RINT"TROOPS" ;AF(XX) : PRINT"UNCOMI 
TTED TROOPS"TB(XX) 
1670 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 167 

1680 CLS:PRINT"ALLIES"AL(XX) :PRI 
NT"ALLY NUMBERS :";: FOR FF=1 TO 1 
44: IF BS(FF)=XX AND BT(FF)<>1 TH 
EN PRINTFF ; : NEXT FF ELSE NEXT FF 
1690 PRINT: PRINT 

1700 PRINT"INVESTMENTS:";:FOR FF 
=1 TO 144: IF BS (FF) =XX+4 AND BT ( 



96 THE RAINBOW April 1988 




Orders up to $50 subtract 15% OFF 
Orders over $50 subtract 20% OFF 

offer expires 4/30/88 . 



GAMES 



Address. 
City 



State. 



Zip 



Add shipping: $3 surface in the US 
or $6 for air/Canada. 

This coupon must be presented or 
mentioned with order to receive 
discounts. 



Yes! Send me your FREE catalog! 

VISA MasterCard 

Card # Exp. 

Signature 




Item 


Format 


Price 





















GOMPUTERWARE (619) 436 . 3512 

Box 668 • Encinitas, CA • 92024 



6% Calif. Sales Tax 
COD Add $5 
Shipping* 
TOTAL 



| ^ ■ 

j Return ot Junior's Revenge 

I Arcade of Donkey King Junior. 
I Req CoCo 3 Disk, joystick 
i . ^hviv ' 

I Nuke the love Boat 
'I Strategy simulation/adventure. 
I Req CoCo 3 Disk, mouse or joystick 
I 

I Magic ol Zanth 

I Dragons, demons, graphics $ advcntiifr; 
I Req CoCo 3 Disk 

■i ' v.;;.,':; 

I Iron Cross 

I World War II simulation, 
j Req 64K, Ext Basic, RSDOS 



$24.95 



$24.95 



$24.95 



$24.95 



PROGRAMMING TOOLS 



CoCo 3 Ramdisk & Diagnostics 

512K memory diagnostics; double rampk, &mastercopy 
utility, 

CoCo 3 Disk $19.95 

Color Basic Compiler 

Compiles Basic cqrjej into . machin^jangu^ge. List of 
commands available. 

Req 32K RSDOS $29.95 

• ' :> \-/> ?1 • .' ••: •••• ■"■ • • , „• v - sv -. ' ' 

Macro Conditional Assembler 

Supports 6809 mheumoriics & rjiricftves, macros, 
Conditional assembly, repeat sequences, source library 
files... 

32K RSDOS $34.95 
64K OS-9 $39.95 



Sourcerer 

Disassembler & source generator. 
32K RSDOS 
64K OS-9 



$29.95 
$29.95 



BUSINESS APPLICATIONS' 

(all require 64K& dual drives) 

General Ledger 
Check Ledger 
Inventory Control 
Accts Payable 
Accts Receivable 
Payroll 



••••• 



$99.00 
$99.00 
$99.00 
$99.00 
599,00 
$125.00 



-MODEM SOFTWARE- 



Color Connection 

Comprehensive (nodem software supports Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol, & X0N/X0FF; all baud rates, expand- 
able buffer, macros; CoCo I, II, & III included. 
Req 32K RSDOS $49.95 

0S-9 Connection 

Comprehensive modem software supports Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol. & XON/XOFF; all baud rates, expand- 
able buffer, macros. Level I & II included. 
Req RS232 pak, 0S-9 $49.95 



PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 



CoCo Cookbook 

Recipe file stores title, ingredients & instructions in free- 
format data base. 

Req 32K RSDOS $29.95 
C.E.0. 

Electronic desktop organizer - appointment calendar, 
calculator, clock with alarm, phone directory, & file- 
drawer for memos. 

Req 64K RSDOS $34.95 

Personal Finance System 

Checkbook organizer with personal chart of accounts, 
budgets, & special investments loan calculation module. 
Req 32K, RSDOS, printer $29.95 



Merge 'n Mail 

Name & address data base with reports, label printing, 
& merge feature for word processor letters. For CoCo I 
or II only. 
Req 64K RSDOS 



$29.95 



.OS-9 ONLY 



Textoois 

Utilities for text file manipulation: 
Req OS-9 



- V- 



$29.95 



OS-9 Combo Utilities 

Utilities for every advanced user! 
Req OS 9 

■ ■ 

OS-9 Basic 

Writte n for prog ramm ers by prog ra m me rs. 
Req OS n 

Data Master 

Full featured data base system. 
Req OS-9 Level 2 



$49,95 



$39.95 



$64.95 



Screen Star 

Screen editor implementation of WordStar edit set. 
Req OS-9 $49.95 
w/Formatter $74.95 

OS-9 Text Formatter 

Advanced formatter interfaces with any ASCII editor. 
Req OS-9 $34.95 
w/Screen Star $74.95 



Pac Attack 

Popular arcade action. 
16K cass 
32K RSDOS 

Bit!; Head 
Q-bert jumps over cubic su Mates 
16K cass 
32K RSDOS 

Mr. Dig \;.^$--[%- 
Dig-Dug arcade^n. • 
32K Casi Ri^ 
32K RSDOS 

Treasure of the Aztecs 

Unique graphic adventure in Mexico City. 
64K cass 
64K RSDOS 



$16.95 
$19.95 



$16.95 
$19.95 



$16.95 
$19,95 



$19.95 
$24.95 



Escape: 2012 

Graphics space adventure with over 35 objects & 137 
rooms in 3 dimension maze of 4 levels with 2 arcade 
sequences, 

64K cass $19.95 
64K RSDOS $24.95 

Sam Sleuth 

Work as a Private Eye to solve 3 cases - different every 
time! Req joystick or mouse 
64K cass $19.95 
64K RSDOS $24.95 

Pro Goil 

Challenging simulation includes practice on putting green 
& driving range. 36 holes with life-like conditions to 
master. 

Req 32K r RSDOS, Ext Basic $24.95 

Colorbowi Football 

Each team has 6 players & you control the quarterback 
or roving safety using joysticks. Practice alone or play 
against your opponent. 

32K cass $19.95 
32K RSDOS $24.95 

Bio Detector . 

Bio teedback & Lie detector game. Ail hardware & soft- 
ware included. 

Req 16K $24.95 



FF)<>1 THEN PRINTFF; INEXT FF ELS 

E NEXT FF 

1710 PRINT: PRINT 

1720 PRINT M HIT 1 FOR MENU OR 2 T 

0 END TURN." 

1730 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" OR I$<»1 
" OR I$>"2" THEN 173 0 
1740 I==VAL(I$) :ON I GOTO 70,160 
1750 IF DF(XX)=1 THEN 160 ELSE I 
F ZZ<2 THEN 1835 

1760 FOR PP=1 TO NP: Z (PP) =WB (PP) 
:X=0:NEXT PP 
1770 X=X+1 

1780 IF X>4 THEN 1800 

1790 IF Z(X)<0 THEN 1770 

1800 FOR Y=l TO 4 

1810 IF Z(Y)>Z(X) THEN X=Y 

1820 NEXT Y 

183)3 WF=X 

183 5 FOR RR=1 TO 144: IF BS(RR)=X 
X OR BS(RR)=XX+4 THEN BG(RR)=0:N 
EXT RR ELSE NEXT RR 
1840 CLS:PRINT@2 68, "PLAYER" XX: PR 
INT@301,"WEEK"ZZ: SOUND 100,1 
1850 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 185 

1860 PRINT" WELCOME GUILDMASTER O 
F THE GUILD"GN$ (XX) : IF WF=XX THE 
N PRINT "THE WIZARD SENDS A NOTE 
OF * ALLIANCE . " 

1870 FOR PP-1 TO 920: NEXT PP 
1875 INPUT"HOW MUCH GOLD DO YOU 
WISH TO SPEND ON THE WIZARD"; 
WB(XX) :GP(XX)=GP(XX)-WB(XX) 
1880 GP(XX)=GP(XX)+TI(XX) :TI(XX) 
=IC(XX) :TB(XX)=AF(XX) :LI(XX)=QI( 
XX) 

1883 RETURN 

1885 TI(XX)=IC(XX) :TB(XX)=AF(XX) 
1890 RETURN 

1900 CLS : PRINT"MONEYLENDERS" : FOR 
Y=l TO 6 : PRINT Y ; : PRINTML$ ( Y) : NE 
XT Y:GOTO 2010 

1910 CLS:PRINT"INNS":FOR Y=l TO 
20 

1920 IF Y=15 THEN I$=INKEY$:IF I 
$=hh THEN 1920 

1930 PRINTY+6; : PRINT IN$(Y):NEXT 

Y:GOTO 2010 
1940 CLS : PRINT" CRAFTSMEN" : FOR Y= 

1 TO 50 

1950 IF Y=15 OR Y=30 OR Y=45 THE 
N I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 1950 
1960 PRINTY+26; : PRINT CM$(Y):NEX 
T Y:GOTO 2010 

1970 CLS : PRINT "FARMERS" : FOR Y=l 
TO 60 

1980 IF Y=15 OR Y=30 OR Y=45 OR 
Y=55 THEN I$KENKEY$:IF 1$="" THE 
N 1980 

1990 PRINTY+76; : PRINT FM$(Y):NEX 
T Y:GOTO 2010 



2000 CLS: PRINT "LIVESTOCK TRADERS 
":FOR Y=l TO 8 : PRINT Y+ 136 ;: PRINT 

LT$(Y) :NEXT Y 
2010 PRINT" (R)ETURN OR (C)ONTINU 
E 

2020 I$=INKEY$:IF I$="R" THEN RE 
TURN ELSE IF I$="C" THEN 2030 EL 
SE 2020 

2030 CLS: PRINT" 1. MONEYLENDERS " : 
PRINT"2. INNS": PRINT" 3. CRAFTSME 
N":PRINT"4. FARMERS" : PRINT" 5 . LI 
VESTOCK TRADERS" 

2040 INPUT WG:IF WG<1 OR WG>5 TH 
EN 2030 ELSE ON WG GOTO 1900,191 
0,1940,1970,2000 

2050 IF BS(AT)<1 THEN 2060 ELSE 
IF BS(AT)<5 THEN 2070 ELSE 2090 
2060 RETURN 

2070 QD (AT) =BS (AT) : IF AT<7 THEN 
RN=200 ELSE IF AT<27 THEN RN=260 
ELSE IF AT<77 THEN RN=28 ELSE I 
F AT<137 THEN RN=20 ELSE RN=210 
2080 GOTO 2100 

2090 QD (AT) =BS (AT) : BS (AT) =BS (AT) 
-4: IF AT<7 THEN RN=450 ELSE IF A 
T<27 THEN RN=600 ELSE IF AT<77 T 
HEN RN=60 ELSE IF AT<137 THEN RN 
=40 ELSE RN=420 

2100 IF PM=1 THEN 2110 ELSE 2120 
2110 IC(BS(AT))=IC(BS(AT))-ZX(AT 
) : AL(BS (AT) ) =AL(BS (AT) )-l:BS(AT) 
=QD (AT) : RETURN 

2120 ZX(AT)=ZX(AT)+RND(RN-ZX(AT) 
) :IC(BS(AT) )=IC(BS(AT) )+ZX(AT) :B 
S (AT) =QD (AT) :QI(BS(AT) )=IC(BS(AT 
) ) : RETURN 

2130 CLS: PRINT "DO YOU REALLY, REA 
LLY WANT TO QUIT THIS AWESOME 
LLY FUN GAME? (ARE YOU POSITIVE 
??? ) " 

2140 INPUT W$:IF W$="Y" OR W$ 
=»YES" THEN END 
2150 GOTO 70 
2155 HA=SM:HB=OF 

2160 OA=(OF*2)+20:AA=SM:PRINTAA" 

ATTACKERS" ; " "OF "DEFENDERS" 

2170 XF=RND(10) :YF=RND(15) : IF (X 

F+OA) > ( YF+AA) THEN SM=SM-INT ( ( (X 

F+OA)-(YF+AA) )/2) ELSE OF=OF-INT 

( ( (YF+AA) - (OA+XF) )/2) 

2180 IF OF<0 THEN OF=*0:LO=AG ELS 

E IF SM<0 THEN SM=0:LO=XX 

2190 PRINT "ATTACKING FORCES :"SM: 

PRINT" DEFENDING FORCES : "OF 

2200 IF OF=0 OR SM=0 THEN HA=ABS 

(SM-HA) : AF (XX) =AF (XX) -HA: HB=ABS ( 

OF-HB) : AF( AT )=AF( AT ) -HB: RETURN E 

LSE 2160 

2210 CLS : PRINT "BAD GONZO WHOPPER 
ERROR, IT'S ALL YOUR FAULT!": 
END 



98 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



F e atur e 



32K ECB 




Help for the amateur BASIC programmer 




By Raymond Loseders 



YT y tilities 1 is a simple program to aid amateur; 
I J i programmers in performing certain functions from 
within their BASIC programs. It can also be used 
as a utility program to perform certain functions, such as 
Set Maximum Memory or Change Printer Line Width, etc. 

This program is based strictly on PEEK and POKE 
commands. Upon execution, some of these commands will 
erase all of the memory contents. For this reason I highly 
recommend making a backup copy before running it. For 
example, Set Maximum Memory command allows you to 
access those addresses of memory set aside by the CoCo for 
graphics and, upon execution, will erase all the memory 
contents. Cold Start (re-boot) also erases the memory. 

There are two uses for this program. First, it can be used 
as an aid for performing a certain function in your BASIC 
program. Let's say you want your program to cold start 
after execution and don't know what command to use. At 
the main menu, type the number for Cold Start and you 



Raymond Lueders lives in Hanover Park, Illinois, and is 
employed as purchasing manager with 
Heinz Plastic Mold Company. 
Raymond is 26 years old 
and is an active Del- 
phi member. His 
username is 

MOONSHINE. 




will see the command to use preceded with Line 100, which 
I used as an example. Copy down the command and place 
it in your program as it applies. 

You can use Utilities 1 as a utility program to perform 
a certain function such as Set Printer Line Width (depending 
on your printer type). From the main menu, enter the 
number for Set Printer Line Width. You are prompted to 
execute it. After execution, you will have set your printer's 
line width to that specified. 

Take special care when typing in this program because 
typing in the wrong PEEK or POKE command may give 
unpredictable results. I also have included remarks and reset 
commands to complete the function. After executing one 
PEEK or POKE command, others executed may not function 
properly, depending on which ones were used prior to 
execution. 

After running Utilities 1 a couple of times, you will notice 
that I used many of the commands myself. One example 
is Printer Not Ready, which is very useful in programs that 
use the printer (a simple error-trapping routine, you might 
say). To exit Utilities 1, type 14. 

( Questions about this program may be 
directed to the author at 1341 Sea 
Biscuit Lane, Hanover Park, 
IL 60103. Please enclose 
an SASE when 
writing for a 
reply.) □ 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 99 



For Tandy 1000, SX, TX 




1000, SX, TX 



Hard Drive 
Kits 




10 Meg 
20 Meg 
30 Meg 
40 Meg 



$279.95 
$339.95 
$379.95 
$499.95 



1000, SX, TX 



Cards 

300/1200 Modem $119.95 



300/1200/2400 
Modem 

Mini IO 

2 Meg Board 



$149.95 
$79.95 

$169.95 



Tandy 3000 & 3000HL 

Hard Drive Kits 

Includes Drive, Controller & Cable 



20 Meg 
30 Meg 
40 Meg 
80 Meg 



$399.95 
$599.95 
$699.95 
$999.95 



TANDY ADD-ON 



1000, SX, TX 




TANDY 

^ 1000, SX, TX 
49 Meg Hard Card 
32 MS (speed) 

$599.95 



TANDY 1000 

1000, SX, TX, 3000, 4000 



2nd Floppy 

360K TEAC $119.95 
72QK Mitsubishi $99.95 
31/2" Mitsubishi $119.95 




Tandy Model 3, 4, 4P 

Hard Drive Systems 

External 
Complete - ready to run 

10 Meg $499.95 
20 Meg $699.95 



TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 
1 1 5 So Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 

Tel. 617-278-6555 
1 -800-635-0300 

Hours: 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 



1000, SX, TX 




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Cardinal 
Modems 

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Complete with software manuals 

only $149.95 



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1000, 1000 A 



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• DMA&512K CALL 

Zucker Multifunction 



• Serial 

• Real Time Clock 

• 51 2K DMA 

• Software 



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Tandy 1000, 
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Tape Backup 



20, 30, 40 Meg 
Tape Backup 

60 Meg Tape Backup 
Archive 



$399.95 



$659.95 



Software Included 

• Pc-Write word processor 

• Pc-Calc Spreadsheet 

• Pc-File Database 

• Print Spooler 

• Ram Disk 

• Runs all popular software 




IBM XT 
COMPATIBLE 



Complete 
system 



only 



699 



95 



Hardware Included 

• 4.77 mhz and 8mhz Turbo 

• 360k Floppy Disk Drive 

• Monochrome or Color Card 

• At style Case w/pwr light & key 

• Game, Printer and Serial Port 

• Real Time Clock 
•150 watt power supply 

• 640k memory 

• At keyboard optional expanded 

• Monochrome Monitor 

• Optional Hard Disk Drive 




PRINTER CABLES AND 
INTERFACES AVAILABLE 
Call for current pricing 



PRINTERS 



'> . ,■•<>:■. .Cr'.-«*«' : • 




V X- .OfiiSy'.-V 



NX10 (New 120CPS NLQ 80 col.) 

19995 

NX15 (New 120CPS NLQ 132 col.) 

34995 



PANASONIC PRINTER H -7005 

10801 (New 120CPS NLQ 80 col.) I 57'** 



Complete Packages 



229 95 



259 95 



10801 ^^C#" NX10 
includes: includes: 

• Panasonic 10801 Printer* Star NX10 Printer 

• Interface • Interface 

• Screen Dump Program • Screen Dump Program 




Serial to Parallel Interface 
for Color Computer I, II, III 

• 300-19,200 BAUD rates only 

• External to printer — No AC plugs _ m Qc 

• Built in modem/printer switch — 54 
No need for Y-cables or plugging/ w ™ 
unplugging cables Power ^PP* + 500 



64 K Upgrades 


19 9 5 


Video Driver 


29 95 


Enables your CoCo to operate 


with a video monitor 


instead of a television! 

10 






TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 

9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 




Screen Dump Program 19 95 

The best screen dump program for the Epson & 
Star printers ever!! Have the option of standard 
images reverse w/regular or double sized pictures. 

Dealer Inquiries invited 
617-278-6555 

Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 




10 169 

360 108 

570 179 

780 95 

1100 144 

1270 88 

1470 201 

1640 207 

1830 115 

1990 252 



2210 93 

2420 31 

2670 43 

2840 202 

3020 112 

3200 59 

3420 235 

3560 202 

3750 155 

END 65 



The listing: UTILITYl 



• **************************** 
» * * 

■* UTILITIES 1 * 

■ * * 

«* BY: RAYMOND LUEDERS * 

•* HANOVER PK, IL * 

■ * * 

• * * 
* **************************** 

i 



10 

20 
30 
40 
5/3 
60 

70 
80 
90 
100 
110 ' 
120 ' 
130 1 
140 • 
150 ' 

160 GOTO230 

170 A=PEEK(116) *256+PEEK(117)-10 
0:X=INT (A/256) :Y=A-(X*256) : FORI= 
A TO A +72:READB:POKEI,B:NEXTI:P 
OKE362 / 126:POKE363 / X:POKE364 / Y:C 
LEAR200,A: DATA50, 100 , 52 , 20 , 189 , 1 
61,121,132,127,52,2,189,161,193, 
142,4,254,189,167,211,182,1,83,1 
29,191,38,37 

180 DATA53,22,150,255,129,8,38,7 
,90,39,31,48,31,32,15,129,32,37, 
22,129,123,36,18,193,249,36,14,1 
67,128,92,189,162,130,52,20,32,2 
01,53,22,151,255,57,198, 1,32,251 
190 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" KEY REPEAT 
NOW ACTIVATED." 

200 PRINT" HOLD DOWN A KEY AND P 
RESS " 

210 PRINT" THE <CLEAR> KEY.":PRI 

NT: 

220 END 
230 » 
240 CLS0 

250 PRINT: PRINT" ARE YOU USING A 

COCO 3? (Y/N) ";: 
260 COCO$=INKEY$ : IF COCO$="" THE 
N 260 

270 IF COCO$="Y" THEN 280 ELSE 2 



"BM+1,0U6BD6R5BR3 " 

"BM+1 ,0U6R1F2D1U1E2R1D6B 

" BM+1 , 0U6F5BU5D6BR3 
"BM+1,0BR3L2K1U4E1R2F1D4 



90 

280 PALETTE12,0:PALETTE13,48:ON 

BRK GOTO 2 80: GOTO 300 

290 IF COCO$="N" THEN 300 ELSE 2 

60 

300 GOTO3900 

310 'DEFINITIONS FOR HI -RES CHR 
320 LA$="BM+1,0U4E2F2D2BL4R4D2BR 
3" 

330 LB$="BM+1,0U6R3F1D1G1BL3R3F1 
D1G1BL3R3BR4" 

340 LD$="BM+1,0BR3E1U4H1L3D6R3BR 
4" 

350 LE$="BM+1,0BR5BU6L5D3R3BL3D3 
R5BR3 » 

3 60 LI$="BM+1,0BU6R4BL2D6BL2R4BR 
3" 

370 LL$ ! 
380 LM$ : 
R3" 

390 LN$ : 
400 LO$< 
G1BR4 » 

410 LR$="BM+1,0U6R3F1D1G1BL3R3F1 
D2BR3 " 

420 LS$="BM+1,0BU1F1R2E1U1H1L2H1 
U1E1R2F1BD5BR3 " 

430 LT$="BM+1,0BR6BU6L6BR3D6BR5" 
440 LU$="BM+1,0BU6D5F1R3E1U5BD6B 
R3" 

450 LY$="BM+1,0BU6D2F2E2U2BL2BD4 
D2BR5" 

460 NO$(1)="BM+1,0BU4E2D6BR3" 

4 70 NO$ ( 9 ) ="BM+1 , 0BU1F1R2E1U4H1L 

2G1D1F1R3BD3BR4" 

480 NO$(8)="BM+1,0BR3L2H1U1E1H1U 

1E1R2F1D1G1L2BR2F1D1G1BR4" 

490 NO$(6)="BM+1,0BR5BU5H1L2G1D4 

F1R2E1U1H1L3BD3BR6" 

500 MUS$="O4;T10;V12 ;A;V9;A;V6;A 

;V3;A;V2;A;V1;A;" 

510 'DISPLAY TITLE PAGE 
520 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 
530 PLAYMUS$ 

540 LINE(8, 8) -(246,162) ,PSET,B 



550 LINE(10,10)-(244,160 
560 LINE(12,12)-(242,158 
570 LINE(14,14)-(240,156 
580 LINE(16,16)-(238,154 
590 LINE(18,18)-(236,152 
600 LINE(20,20)-(234,150 
610 LINE(22,22)-(232,148 
620 LINE(27,26)-(227,144 
630 FOR X=1TO500:NEXT 
640 DRAW" BM8 4,44; XLU$ ; XLT$ ; XLI $ ; 
XLL$ ; XLI $ ; XLT $ ; XLI $ ; XLE $ ; XLS $ ; " 



,PSET,B 
,PSET,B 
,PSET,B 
,PSET,B 
,PSET,B 
,PSET,B 
, PSET , B 
,PSET,B 



102 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



650 DRAW"BM174,44;XNO$(l) ; 11 

660 FORX=1TO500:NEXT 

670 DRAW"BM118 , 64 ;XLB$ ; XLY$ ; " 

680 FORX=1TO500:NEXT 

690 DRAWBM67 , 104 ;XLR$ ;XLA$ ;XLY$ 

; XLM$ ; XLO$ ; XLN$ ; XLD$ ; " 

700 DRAWBM134 , 104 ;XLL$ ;XLU$ ;XLE 

$ ; XLD$ ; XLE$ ; XLR$ ; XLS $ ; " 

710 FORX=1TO500:NEXT 

720 DRAW" BM6 6 , 10 4 ; XLR$ ; XLA$ ; XLY$ 

; XLM$ ; XLO$ ; XLN$ ; XLD$ ; " 

730 FORX=1TO200:NEXT 

740 DRAW" BM13 3 , 104 ; XLL$ ; XLU$ ; XLE 

$ ; XLD$ ; XLE$ ; XLR$ ; XLS $ ; " 

750 FORX=1TO1000:NEXT 

760 DRAWBM68, 104;XLR$;XLA$;XLY$ 

; XLM$ ; XLO$ 7 XLN$ ; XLD$ ; " 

770 FORX=1TO200:NEXT 

780 DRAW"BM135, 104 ;XLL$ ;XLU$;XLE 

$ ; XLD$ ; XLE$ ; XLR$ ; XLS $ ; " 

790 FORX=1TO500:NEXT 

800 DRAW"BM110 / 120;XNO$(1) ;XNO$( 

9) ;XN0$(8) ;XN0$(6) ; " 

810 FORX=1TO500:NEXTX 

820 Y=244:Z=160 

830 FORX=10TO85STEP2 

840 LINE(X,X)-(Y,Z) ,PSET,B 

850 Y=Y-2:Z=Z-2 

860 NEXTX 

870 FORX=1TO100;NEXT 
880 Y=244:Z=160 
890 FORX=10TO85 
900 LINE(X,X)-(Y,Z) ,PSET,B 
910 Y=Y-1:Z=Z-1 
920 NEXTX 
930 PLAYMUS$ 
940 GOSUB1330 
950 IF MAIN$= 
960 IF MAIN$= 
970 IF MAIN$= 
980 IF MAIN$= 
990 IF MAIN$= 
1000 IF MAIN$= 
1010 IF MAIN$= 
1020 IF MAIN$= 
1030 IF MAIN$= 
1040 IF MAIN$= 
1050 IF MAIN$= 
1060 IF MAIN$= 
1070 IF MAIN$= 
1080 IF MAIN$= 
1090 GOTO940 

1100 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" YOU MAY 
RECT QUESTIONS TO ME" 
1110 PRINT" PLEASE SEND A SASE 



MAIN MENU 
1"THENGOSUB1530 
2"THENGOSUB1650 
3"THENGOSUB1770 
4"THENGOSUB1870 
5"THENGOSUB2190 
6"THENGOSUB2710 
7"THENGOSUB2860 
8"THENGOSUB3080 
9"THENGOSUB3210 
10"THENGOSUB3 340 
11" THENGOSUB3 4 50 
12"THENGOSUB3700 
13"THENGOSUB1230 
14"THENGOSUB1100 



DI 



0:": PRINT" " 
1120 PRINT" 
1130 PRINT" 
LN" 



RAYMOND LUEDERS 
1341 SEA BISCUIT 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Back Issue 
Availability 



BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 



Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
pages of material, it's all just for CoCo users 
— a great way to expand your library! 

A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents for 
each additional issue for postage and han- 
dling if sent by United Parcel Service. There 
is a $5 charge for the first issue, plus a $1 
charge for each additional issue on orders 
sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not deliver to a 
post office box or to another country. 

MOST ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 are 
available on white paper in a reprint form. All 
others are in regular magazine form. VISA, 
MasterCard and American Express ac- 
cepted. Kentucky residents please add 5 
percent state sales tax. I n order to hold down 
costs, we do not bill, and no C.O.D. orders 
are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To check availability and order, review and 
fill out the form on the next page and mail 
it with your payment to: 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 103 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 

Please send me the following back issues: 



MONTH/YEAR 


PRICE 


MONTH/YEAR 


PRICE 






VOLUME 1 








VOLUME 5 






JUL '81 


Premier Issue $2.00 


□ 


AUG '85 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


AUG '81 




$2.00 


□ 


SEP '85 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '81 


Education 


$2.00 


□ 


OCT '85 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT '81 


Printer 


$2.00 


□ 


NOV '85 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 


NOV '81 




$200 


□ 


JAN '86 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


DEC '81 


Holiday 


$2.00 


□ 


FEB *86 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '82 


$2.00 


□ 


MAR '86 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '82 




$200 


□ 


APR '86 


Home Help 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR '82 




$250 


□ 


MAY '86 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '82 




$2.50 


□ 


JUN '86 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '82 




$250 


□ 


JUL '86 


Anniversary 


$3.95 


□ 





VOLUME 2 








. VOLUME 6 






JUN '83 


Printers 


$295 


□ 


AUG '86 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '83 


Anniversary 


$295 


□ 


SEP '86 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 




VOLUME 3 






OCT *86 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


AUG '83 


Games 


$2.95 


□ 


NOV '86 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '83 


Education 


$2.95 


□ 


DEC '86 


Holiday 


$395 


□ 


OCT *83 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '87 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


DEC '83 


Holiday 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '87 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR '84 


Business 


$395 


□ 


MAR '87 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '84 


Gaming 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '87 


Home Help 


$3.95 


□ 


MAY '84 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


MAY '87 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '84 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '87 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '84 


Anniversary 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '87 


Anniversary 


$395 


□ 




VOLUME 4 








VOLUME 7 






AUG '84 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


AUG '87 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '84 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '87 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT '84 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT "87 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


NOV '84 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 


NOV '87 


Data Comm. 


S3.95 


n 


DEC '84 


Holiday 


$3.95 


□ 


DEC '87 


Holiday 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN *85 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '88 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '85 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '88 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR '85 


Business 


$395 


□ 


MAR '88 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '85 


Simulations 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '88 


Home Help 


$3.95 


□ 


MAY '85 


Printer 


$395 


□ 










JUN '85 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 










JUL '85 


Anniversary 


$3.95 


□ 











RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1981 through June 
1984, is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes including rainbow ON TAPE are in the July 
1985 and July 1986 issues, respectively. The Sixth Year Index is in the July 1987 
issue. 



TOTAL 

KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 

U.S. MAIL CHARGE 
SHIPPING & HANDLING 
U.P.S. CHARGE 
TOTAL AMOUNT 
ENCLOSED 



Article Reprints 

In instances where a given issue is now out of print and not available for purchase, 
we do provide photocopies of specific articles. The cost for this service is $1.50 
plus 50 cents S/H per article. This service is provided only in the case of out-of- 
stock issues. 

♦ 

Name 



Address 



City 



State 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or 

Charge to my: □ VISA □ MC CAE 

CARD # 



EXPIRATION DATE 



SIGNATURE 



PHONE ( ) 



TO ORDER BY PHONE (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



HANOVER PARK IL 6 



YOU CAN ALSO GET HOL 
DELPHI . " 

USERNAME 'MOONSHINE ' 



114)3 PRINT" 
0103" 

1150 PRINT 

116) 3 PRINT" 
D OF ME ON" 

117) 3 PRINT" 

118) 3 PRINT" 
FROM THE" 

119) 3 PRINT" COCO SIG." 
12)3)3 PRINT" -RAY-";: 

121) 3 PRINT: PRINT"": PRINT" HIT AN 
Y KEY." 

122) 3 EXEC44539:END 

123) 3 ' EXIT TO BASIC 

124) 3 CLS: PRINT §8, "COLD START POK 
E" 

125) 3 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 10)3 POKE1 
13 ,0 : EXEC4)3999" : PRINT : PRINT" COM 
MENTS: COLD-START" 

126) 3 PLAYMUS$ 

127) 3 PRINT: PRINT" warning MEMORY 

WILL BE ERASED" :GOSUB 3880 
IF A$="Y" THEN1 2 9 0ELSERETUR 



1280 
N 
1290 
1300 
1310 
1320 



POKE113,0:EXEC40999 

RETURN 
i 



r 'MAIN MENU 

1330 CLS:PRINT@7, "*** MAIN MENU 
***•• 

1340 PRINT 
1350 PRINT" (1) 
1360 PRINT" (2) 
Y PEEK" 
1370 PRINT" 
T BUTTON" 
1380 PRINT" (4) 
1390 PRINT" (5) 

WIDTH" 
1400 PRINT" (6) 
RY" 

1410 PRINT" (7) 
D" 

1420 PRINT" (8) 
R INKEY$" 
1430 PRINT" (9) 
SPONSE" 

1440 PRINT" (10) 

PEEK" 
1450 PRINT" (11) 

POKE" 
1460 PRINT" (12) 
TIONS" 

1470 PRINT" (13) 



1490 
1500 



IF VAL 
IF VAL 
1510 RETURN 



PRINT DIRECTORY" 
PRINTER NOT READ 

3) DISABLE THE RESE 

KEY REPEAT" 
SET PRINTER LINE 

SET MAXIMUM MEMO 

HI SPEED POKE CM 

ALTERNATE CMD FO 

SLOW KEYBOARD RE 

DISK OR CASSETTE 

DISK DRIVE LIGHT 

DISABLE ALL FUNC 

COLD-START POKE" 



1480 PRINT "ENTER NUMBER :";: INPUT 
MAIN$ 

MAIN$)<1 THEN1520 
MAIN$)>14 THEN1520 



104 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



The Professional 
Color Computer 



Enhancements 
for Productivity 
from HJL Products 





1^ Trt T I 





For peak performance with any computer, 
you have to get Information Into and out 
of the system as easily as possible 

This Is the purpose of the HJL family of 
professional enhancements for ALL 
MODELS of the Color Computer, 
Including CoCo3 



The Self -contained 
ProCase-57 Keyboard $79.95 

Ifn, the popular HJL keyboard perfectly 
rltted into its own sleek, low profile 
iinaa, Put your CoCo on a shelf or hang 
It on the side of your desk. ProCase-57 
comes with 5-foot cable; Installs in 
Just a few minutes with no soldering. 

The H J 1-57 

Keyboard Kit $59.95/69.95 

Overwhelming favorite of serious CoCo 
users worldwide, the H JL-57 keyboard 
provides the smooth consistent feel and 
reliability you need for maximum speed 
with minimum input errors. Installs in 
your color computer without soldering. 
Just $59 95 for Original or F-versloa 
Kits for CoCo 2 and CoCo 3 are $69.95. 

The Number Jack Keypad $59.95 

A self contained numeric keypad for 
serious number-crunching. Besides the 



numbers, it has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, including autoshifted 
ADD and MULTIPLY, includes cable and 
connectors for solderless Installation. 

The Monitor Adapter $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors, Easily installed 
without clips, jumpers or soldering 
(except some CoCo 2s with soldered-in 
video chips). Here's crisp, flicker-free 
monitor output with alt the reliability 
you've come to expect from HJL Products. 

The Monitor -$99.95 

Our high-resolution amber monitor gives 
you the display preferred by most 
computer pros. Once you've used It, 
you'll never go back to the TV set. 
12-inch CRT has etched non-glare face- 
plate. (Requires adapter sold above) 

Quick Basic Plus • $19.95 

High-performance programming aid works 
with any CoCo that has 4 function keys. 
26 one-touch BASIC statements, 10 user- 
defined macros at a time (save as many 
sets of macros as you like), auto line- 
numbering, Instant screen dump to 
printer, and global search, make this 
software ideal for any BASIC programmer. 
Specify disk or cassette. 



The Softswitch * $89.95 

Connect any two parallel printers to one 
computer; select printers manually or 
insert a simple printer code In the text 
to be printed for fully-automatic, all 
solid-state switching. Complete with 
three cables and operating instructions. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive HJL 
15-day unconditional guarantee (except 
software). 

Pick a Pair and Save 15% 

Take 1 5% off the price of any two or 
more products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 



Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1400-462-4891 
International calls: 716-235-8358 




Ordering Information: Speolfy model (Original, F-verslon, or CoCo 2 Model Number). Payment by C.O.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa. Credit card customers Include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2.00 for 
shipping, 3,50 to Canada; except monitors (call for shipping charges before ordering monitors), New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax Dealer Inquiries Invited 



PRODUCTS 



Div, of Touchstone Technology Ino, 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 



WE'RE BRINGING THE COCO 



RAINBOW'S 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from Thu 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $25 to give 
your account a positive balance. 
This will be refunded after your first 
free hour if you choose to no longer 
use the system or it will be applied 
to future connect charges. If you do 
not maintain a positive balance, you 
will be charged $3.50 each month 
for direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — on 
a regular basis. Conference sched- 
ules will appear in the rainbow 
each month. Be sure to check online 
announcements for changes and 
additions. 

THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $24.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to the rainbow entitles 
you to this $32.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

If you're not a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hour of connect time. 

SAVE EVEN MORE 

Want to save even more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29.95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21.95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21.60). 

Delphi provides us all with 
Immediate CoCo Community. 

Check it out today. After all, you can 
sample it for free! 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



DELPH I 



TYPE: 

GROUP COCO 




How to reach RAINBOWS Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and THE 
rainbow's CoCo SIG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Telenet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and one stop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge for Telenet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $10.80 (U.S.) per 
hour. 

On Telenet: Uninet network has merged with Telenet. 
To get the Telenet number for your area, call (800) 336- 
0437. After you call the local access number and make 
connection, press ENTER twice. When the "TERMINAL=" 
prompt appears, press ENTER again. When the "@"prompt 
appears, type C DELPHI and press ENTER. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage 11 or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier." At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press 'A'. 
When "please log in: 11 appears, type DELPHI and press 

ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (.) and 
enter (use two periods if you're using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1 f 3:126 and press enter. Now type p 1 3106, 
DELPHI ; and press enter. Delphi's new rates indicate an 
additional $10.80 hourly surcharge for evening use of 
Datapac, which means a total of $18 (U.S.) for connect 
time. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Telenet or 
Tymnet. Check with the telephone authorities in your 
country for details on how to sign up for this service. When 
you have an account set up, you can reach Delphi with 
a "host code" of 31 10 6170 3088 through Telenet, or 3106 
90 6015 through Tymnet. (YouH have to pay the toll 
charges for this connection.) 
Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to the rainbow, at the 



"USERNAME:" prompt, type JOINDELPHI and press 
ENTER. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type RAINBOW. 
Then, at the "NUMBER:" prompt, type your individual 
subscription number from the mailing label of your latest 
issue of the rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros at 
the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you dont already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type JOINDELPHI and press enter. At 
the "PASSWORD: "prompt, type SENDRA I NBOW and press 
ENTER. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because youH be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your RAINBOW and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill for subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just use Control-X and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BYE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter the CoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. We'll 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP COCO 

After you sign in, youll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "user name" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and youll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. Youll also 
be assigned a temporary password. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next day Once an account is verified and opened, each 
rainbow subscriber will be credited with an hour of free 
time! 

When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into your 
own personal password. This is the password you will use 
for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 

After Max bids you goodbye, youll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 



1520 PLAYMUS $ : RETURN 
153)3 • 

1540 ' PRINT DIRECTORY 

1550 CLS : PRINT© 8 , "PRINT DIRECTOR 

Y" 

156)3 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 1)3)3 POKE 
111 254:DIR" 

1570 PRINT: PRINT" COMMENTS: DISK 
BASIC ONLY" 

158) 3 GOSUB388)3 

159) 3 IF A$ s = " Y " THEN1 60 )3 ELSERETURN 
1600 PRINT: PRINT" PLEASE WAIT":F 
ORX=1T03 )3)3)3 : NEXT : IF ( PEEK ( 6 5 3 14 ) A 
ND1)=1 THEN GOTO 161)3 ELSE GOTO 
164)3 

161) 3 PLAYMUS$: PRINT: PRINT" PRINT 
ER NOT READY" 

162) 3 GOT0158)3 

163) 3 IF A$="Y" THEN 1 5 8 0 ELS ERETUR 
N 

164) 3 DIR:POKElll, 254 :DIR: PRINT: R 

ETURN 

165) 3 1 

166) 3 ' PRINTER NOT READY PEEK 

167) 3 CLS: PRINT© 6, "PRINTER NOT RE 
ADY PEEK" 

168) 3 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 1)3)3 IF (P 
EEK(65314)AND1)=1"; : 

169) 3 PRINT" THEN GOTO.. 



it 



17)3)3 PRINT: PRINT" COMMENTS: IF L 
INE 10)3 RETURNS 1" 

171) 3 PRINT" PRINTER IS 
NOT READY" 

172) 3 GOSUB388)3 

173) 3 IF A$="Y"THEN174)3ELSERETURN 

174) 3 PRINT: PRINT" PLEASE WAIT":F 
ORX=1TO3000:NEXT:IF (PEEK(65314) 
AND1)=1 THEN GOTO1750 ELSE GOTOl 
760 

1750 PLAYMUS $: PRINT: PRINT" PRINT 

ER NOT READY": GOTO 1720 

1760 PRINT: PRINT" PRINTER READY" 

:GOTO 1720 

1770 ' 

1780 1 PRINTER SCREEN MODE 

1790 CLS: PRINT© 4, "DISABLE THE RE 

SET BUTTON" 

1800 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE1 
13,0" 

1810 PRINT: PRINT" COMMENTS: RESE 
T COMMAND" 

1820 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE1 
13,85" 

1830 PRINT: PRINT" COLDSTARTS WHE 
N RESET IS PUSHED" 
1840 GOSUB3880 

1850 IF A$= " Y " THEN 1 8 60 E LS ERETURN 
1860 POKE113 ,0 : RETURN 



=A-(X*256) :F 

+72:READB:PO 

I:POKE3 62,12 

X:POKE364,Y: 

: DATA50 , 100 , 

161,121,132, 

89,161,193,1 

89,167,211,1 
9,191,38,37" 



1870 ' 

1880 'KEY REPEAT I 
1890 CLS: PRINT© 11," KEY REPEAT" 
1900 PRINT: PRINT" CMD 100 A=PEEK 
(116) *256+PEEK(l" 

1910 PRINT" 17)-100:X=IN 
T(A/256) :Y 
1920 PRINT 
ORI=A TO A 
1930 PRINT 
KEI , B : NEXT 
1940 PRINT 
6:POKE363, 
1950 PRINT 
CLEAR200,A 
1960 PRINT 
52,20,189, 
1970 PRINT 
127,52,2,1 
1980 PRINT 
42,4,254,1 
1990 PRINT 

82,1,83,12 
2000 PRINT 
2010 PRINT 

2020 PRINT" MORE. HIT ANY KEY";: 
2030 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""THEN2030 
2040 CLS: PRINT"": PRINT" CMD 110 
DAT A5 3 , 22 , 150 , 255 , 129 , " 
2050 PRINT" 8,38,7,90,39 
,31,48,31," 
2060 PRINT" 
129,32,37," 
2070 PRINT" 
6,18,193,2" 
2080 PRINT" 
,128,92,18" 
2090 PRINT" 
,20,32,201" 
2100 PRINT" 
55,57,198," 
2110 PRINT" 
2120 PRINT: PRINT" 
<CLEAR> KEY TO" 
2130 PRINT" 

KEY . 11 
2140 GOSUB 3880 

2150 IF A$=" Y "THEN2 1 60 ELS ERETURN 
2160 GOTO170 
2170 ' 

2180 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" KEY REPEAT 

IN EFFECT.": END 
2190 1 

2200 'PRINTER LINE WIDTH 

2210 CLS : PRINT@5 , "SET PRINTER LI 

NE WIDTH" 

2220 PRINT: PRINT" (1) 16 CPL" 
2230 PRINT" (2) 32 CPL" 
2240 PRINT" (3) 64 CPL" 



48,31,32,15, 

22,129,123,3 

49,36,14,167 

9,162,130,52 

,53,22,151,2 

1,32,251" 
COMMENTS: USE 

REPEAT THE 



108 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



(4) 132 CPL (DEFAULT 



(5) 255 CPL" 

(6) EXIT TO MAIN MEN 



2250 PRINT" 
)" 

2260 PRINT" 

2270 PRINT" 

U" 

228/3 PRINT: PRINT" ENTER NUMBER:" 
: PRINT: PRINT" ALL MAY not BE COM 
PATIBLE,": PRINT" CONSULT YOUR PR 
INTER MANUAL";: 

2290 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN229J3 
2300 IF VAL(A$)<1 THEN233j3 
2310 IF VAL(A$)>6 THEN2330 
232)3 GOT0234J3 
2330 PLAYMUS$:G0T0219J3 
2340 IF A$="l" THENGOSUB241j3 

THENGOSUB2 4 7J3 
THENGOSUB2 53J3 
THENGOSUB2 59J3 
THENGOSUB2 65J3 
THEN RETURN 



235)3 
236J3 
2370 
2380 
2390 



A$="2" 
A$="3" 
A$="4" 
A$="5" 
A$="6" 



IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 

2400 RETURN 

241) 3 '16 CPL 

242) 3 CLS:PRINT@5, "16 CHARACTERS 
PER LINE" 

243) 3 PRINT"": PRINT" CMD: 100 POK 
E155,16" 

244) 3 GOSUB388)3 

245) 3 IF A$= " Y " THEN2 4 6)3 E LS ERETURN 

246) 3 POKE155, 16: RETURN 

247) 3 '32 CPL 

248) 3 CLS : PRINT @ 5, "32 CHARACTERS 
PER LINE" 

249) 3 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE1 
55,32" 

2500 GOSUB388)3 

2510 IF A$=" Y"THEN2 5 2)3ELSERETURN 
2520 POKE155, 32: RETURN 
2530 '64 CPL 

254)3 CLS:PRINT@5,"64 CHARACTERS 
PER LINE" 

2550 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE1 
55,64" 

2560 GOSUB388)3 

2570 IF A$="Y"THEN258)3ELSERETURN 
2580 POKE 15 5, 64: RETURN 
2590 '132 CPL 

2600 CLS: PRINT© 4, "132 CHARACTERS 

PER LINE" 
2610 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE1 
55,132" 

2620 GOSUB388)3 

2630 IF A$= " Y " THEN2 6 4 )3 E LS ERETURN 
264)3 POKE155, 132 : RETURN 
2650 "255 CPL 

2660 CLS: PRINT© 4, "255 CHARACTERS 

PER LINE" 
2670 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE1 
55,255" 

2680 GOSUB388)3 



POKE1536,j3: 



2690 IF A$= " Y " THEN2 7 )3)3ELSERETURN 
2700 POKE155, 255: RETURN 
2710 1 

2720 'SET MAX MEMORY 

2730 CLS : PRINT @ 7, "SET MAXIMUN ME 

MORY" 

274J3 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 1)3J3 POKE 2 
5,6:POKE2 6,l:" 
2750 PRINT" 
NEW" 

2760 PRINT: PRINT" USE BELOW POKE 

FOR DISK SYSTEMS" 
2770 PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE25,14:P 
OKE2 6,1:" 

2780 PRINT" POKE3584,j3: 
NEW 

2790 PLAYMUS$:PRINT:PRINT" warni 

ng WILL ERASE MEMORY ! ! i " 

2800 PRINT" DOES NOT ALLOW USE O 

F GRAPHICS" 

2810 GOSUB388j3 

2820 IF A$="Y"THEN2830ELSERETURN 
2830 IF PEEK(188)=14 THEN 2850 
284)3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" CASS.SYSTE 
M POKE CMD EXECUTED! ":F0RX=1T02)3 
00 : NEXT : POKE25 , 6 : POKE 2 6,1: POKE 15 
36,)3:NEW 

2850 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" DISK SYSTE 




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April 1988 THE RAINBOW 109 



M POKE CMD EXECUTED! ":FORX=1TO20 
00 : NEXT : POKE25 , 14 : POKE 2 6,1: POKE 3 
584,0:NEW 
2860 ' 

2870 'SET HI-SPEED POKE 

2880 CLS:PRINT@9, "HI-SPEED POKE" 

2890 IF COCO$="Y"THEN2930 

2900 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE 6 

5495,0" 

2910 PRINT: PRINT" RESET POKE FOR 
ABOVE : " 

2920 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE 6 
5494,0" :GOTO2960 

2930 PRINT .-PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE& 
HFFD9 ,0" 

2940 PRINT: PRINT" RESET POKE FOR 
ABOVE : " 

2950 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKES 
HFFD8 , 0 " : GOTO 2 9 60 

2960 PRINT: PRINT" COMMENTS: DOUB 
LES RUNNING SPEED" 
2970 PLAYMUS$ 

2980 PRINT" warning USING HI-SPE 

ED HEATS" 

2990 IF COCO$="Y"THEN3000:ELSE30 
10 

3000 PRINT" UP CHIPS. ":GOTO3030 
3010 PRINT" UP CHIPS, ALSO WILL 
NOT WORK" 

3020 PRINT" ON DISK OR CASSETTE 
I/O" 

3030 GOSUB3880 

3040 IF A$="Y"THEN3050ELSERETURN 
3050 IF COCO$="Y"THEN3060 ELSE 3 
070 

3060 POKE &HFFD9,0: RETURN 
3070 POKE65495,0: RETURN 
3080 ' 

3090 'ALTERNATE CMD FOR INKEY$ 
3100 CLS : PRINT @ 3, "ALTERNATE CMD 
FOR ' INKEY$ ' " 

3110 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 EXEC4 
4539" 

3120 PRINT: PRINT" COMMENTS: HELP 

FUL WHEN MAXIMUM" 

3130 PRINT" MEMORY IS 

NEEDED" 

3140 GOSUB3880 

3150 IF A$=" Y"THEN3 160ELSERETURN 

3160 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" 10 PRINT " 

;: PRINT CHR$(34) ; :PRINT"HIT ANY 

KEY.";:PRINT CHR$(34) 

3170 PRINT" 20 EXEC44539" 

3180 PRINT: PRINT" RUN" 

3190 PRINT: PRINT" HIT ANY KEY." 

3200 EXEC44539: RETURN 

3210 » 

3220 'SLOW KEYBOARD RESPONSE 
3230 CLS :PRINT@4, "SLOW KEYBOARD 



RESPONSE" 

3240 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE 2 
83, X" 

3250 PRINT: PRINT" X=5 TO 255, 5 
IS THE FASTEST" 

3260 PRINT: PRINT" RESET CMD FOR 
ABOVE : " 

3270 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE 2 
83,4" 

3280 GOSUB3880 

3290 IF A $ = " Y " THEN 3 3 00 E LS ERETURN 
3300 PRINT: PRINT" ENTER X (5-255 
) RECOMMEND 40 ": PRINT" 4 TO 
RESET" ;: INPUT X 

3310 IF X<4 OR X>255 THEN 3320 E 
LSE 3330 

3320 PLAYMUS$:GOTO3300 
3330 POKE 2 8 3, X: RETURN 
3340 ' 

3 350 'DISK OR CASS PEEK 

33 60 CLS : PRINT@5, "DISK OR CASSET 

TE PEEK" 

3 370 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 IF PE 
EK(188)=14 THEN " 

33 80 PRINT: PRINT" IF LINE 100 RE 
TURNS 14 « DISK" 

3390 PRINT" IF LINE 100 RETURNS 
06 = CASS" 
3400 GOSUB3880 

3410 IF A$= " Y " THEN3 4 2 0ELSERETURN 
3420 IF PEEK(188)=14 THEN GOT034 
30 ELSE GOTO3440 

3430 PRINT: PRINT" 14, YOU ARE USI 
NG A DISK SYSTEM": FOR X=l TO 400 
0 : NEXT : RETURN 

3440 PRINT: PRINT" 6, YOU ARE USI 
NG A CASSETTE": FOR X=1TO4000 :NEX 
T : RETURN 
3450 1 

3460 'DISK/DRIVE LIGHT 

3470 CLS :PRINT@6, "DISK/DRIVE LIG 

HT POKE" 

3480 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE 6 
5344, X 
3490 PRINT 

3500 PRINT" IF X=l THEN IT USES 
DRIVE 0" 

3510 PRINT" IF X=2 THEN IT USES 
DRIVE 1" 

3520 PRINT" IF X=4 THEN IT USES 
DRIVE 2" 

3530 PRINT" IF X=64 THEN IT USES 
DRIVE 3" 

3540 PRINT" IF X=0 RESETS ABOVE 
CMD ' S " 

3550 PRINT: PRINT" TURNS ON LIGHT 
, DOES NOT " 

3560 PRINT" EFFECT DISK/DRIVE MO 
TOR" 



110 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



3570 GOSUB3880 

3580 IF A$="Y M THEN359j3ELSERETURN 
3590 IF PEEK (18 8) =6 THEN 3 610 
3600 GOTO3 630 

3610 PRINT" YOU HAVE A CASSETTE, 
TRY #10" 

3620 PRINT" FROM MAIN MENU.": FOR 

X= 1TO 4 000 : NEXT : RETURN 
3 630 CLS:PLAYMUS$: PRINT: PRINT" W 
ATCH LIGHT ON DRIVE #0":FOR X=1T 
04000: NEXT 

3640 POKE65344,l:FOR X=1TO3000:N 
EXT 

3650 POKE65344,0:FOR X=1TO1000:N 
EXT 

3660 FOR X=1TO10 

3670 POKE65344 / l:FOR Y=1TO150:NE 
XTY 

3680 POKE65344 / 0:FOR Y=1TO100:NE 
XTY: NEXT X 

3690 PLAYMUS$: RETURN 
3700 • 

3710 'DISABLE ALL FUNCTIONS 

3720 CLS: PRINT© 6, "DISABLE ALL FU 

NOTIONS" 

3730 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE 3 

01 / 129:POKE302 / " 

3740 PRINT" 119" 



3750 PRINT: PRINT" USE CMD BELOW 
TO RESET" 

3760 PRINT: PRINT" CMD: 100 POKE 3 

01,129:POKE302,60" 

3770 PLAYMUS$: PRINT: PRINT" warni 

ng SAVE PROGRAM BEFORE " 

3780 PRINT" EXECUTING THIS COMMA 

ND." 

3790 PRINT" OR COPY DOWN THE RES 

ET CMD." 

3800 GOSUB3880 

3810 IF A$="Y"THEN3820ELSERETURN 
3820 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" ALL FUNCTI 
ONS DISABLED" 

3830 POKE301 / 129:POKE302 / 119 
3840 PRINT: PRINT" TRY IT. TYPE 1 
LIST ' , AND VIEW" 

3850 PRINT" THE PROGRAM IN MEMOR 
Y, THEN" 

3860 PRINT" TRY AND 'RUN' IT, OR 

'SAVE' IT" 
3870 END 

3880 A$="": PRINT: PRINT" EXECUTE? 

(Y/N, <ENTER> = N) " ; : 
3890 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 389 
0 ELSE RETURN 

3900 PM0DE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,1 
3910 GOTO310 




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XX V \ \ X X N VV VVV V V'V-N S N N\A N N XX VX N X X X X 



X X N 



April 1986 THE RAINBOW 111 



Get help at tax time by organizing your income, 
expenses and banking accounts 






By Daniel Piersma 



eeping track of your finances is 
very important in this day and 
age, and your Color Computer 
can help. I have seen several programs 
for home budgeting lately, but have not 
seen any that suited my particular 
needs. So, I went ahead and created my 
own. There were four things in partic- 
ular I wanted to accomplish: 

1) keep track of my income and ex- 
penses while staying balanced 
against my checking and savings 
account 

2) calculate my income and expenses 
by account (or category), and 
project a budget from these ac- 
counts 

3) keep an orderly record for filing an 
itemized 1040 income tax return 
(with check numbers or other 
information for proof of deducti- 
bility) 

4) have provision for easy addition, 
deletion or correction of entries 

To accomplish these requirements, I 
wrote two programs. The first program, 
Home Financial Analyst, keeps track of 
my income and expenses for a single 
month. The second program, Yearly 
Report, totals the monthly files together 
and gives a year-end (or part of the year) 
report and projects a monthly budget 
(adjusted for inflation, if you want). It 
also has an option to print out a form 
for planning your next month's budget. 
This is what budgeting is all about — 
being able to see how you have spent 
your money in the past and using this 
information to plan how you are going 
to use your money in the future. 

Running Home Financial A nay 1st 

Upon running Listing 1 , BUDGET, you 
are asked to enter the month and year 
you will be working on (use numbers, 
not letters). After that, you just need to 
select a number off the screen to go to 
the function you want, as the program 
is menu-driven. 

But there is one thing you must do at 
the beginning of each month — enter 



Dan Piersma has an associate's degree 
in electronics and is currently employed 
as an electronic technician at a hospital 
in Evansville, Indiana. His wife, Mi- 
chelle, is a registered nurse. 



your cash balance (total of checking, 
savings, etc.) in Account 100 as your 
first entry. After that, do not use Ac- 
count 100 for the rest of the month. I 
have set up the account numbers so that 
accounts 100 through 140 are income 
accounts, accounts 200 through 283 are 
non-taxable expenses, and accounts 300 




through 340 are tax-deductible ex- 
penses. The list of account numbers can 
be found by using the file maintenance 
option on the screen. 

This program runs like a database 
program, which means each transaction 
you enter is filed in memory with a file 
number attached to it. Each file will 



'v'i. V»fe ^c«« 




BUDGET PLAN FOR ,. ./* ../,.. 
100 CASK BALANCE 

7 :t,.&. . ■»•. .x ■>-...[. * \.- '■>«- ■.'..■*•«. 

110' BARKED INCOME: 
.12/3 ' INTEREST INCOME . . .. . .... 

130 MISC. TAXABLE /INCOME 



* « ♦ ♦ 



■ + + .1 . :»••»• . 



BUDGET PLAN FOR .>./.../„.. 



— — — — 



I I I £ I I 



F L I * 0 • * • » #. 



140 NON-TAXABLE INCOME 



100 CASH 

110 EARNED INCOME 
lap INTEREST INCOME . , , * , , ,u 

13)8 KISC. TAXABLE INCOME 
NON-TAXABLE INCOME 



♦.-»■* .... 



200 FEDERAL WXTHOLDING 
2^1 PICA 

202 STATE WITHOLDING 

203 LOCAL WITHOLDING 
210 GROCERY EXPENSE 
22^ WATER 

230 MORTGAGE 
240 GAS & ELECTRIC 
2S0 TELEPHONE 
260 CAR EXPENSE 
2*0 INSURANCE 

280 HOUSE REPAIRS 

281 ANNUITY 

282 MISC. EXPENSE 

283 LOAN PAYMENTS 
300 MEDICAL EXPENSE 
310 CONTRIBUTIONS 
320 INTEREST PAID 
330 TAXES PAID 

340 MISC. {TAX DED». ) 



+ t + * + t+ +" '4i 



I I I I I L I L Jt I 



¥•.«/.« «.«:■««. *• i 



, , « - - . . . • » 



;• * » * » ». ». 



• V * : *''f • '»•*' * » « 



•;». i * : ♦; » » i 



200 FEDERAL WITHOLDING 
201. FICA 

202 STATE WITHOLDING 
LOCAL WITHOLDING 
GROCERY EXPENSE 
WATER 
MORTGAGE 



GAS ft ELECTRIC 



250 TELEPHONE 
260 CAR EXPENSE 
270 INSURANCE 

280 HOUSE REPAIRS 

281 ANNUITY 

282 MISC. EXPENSE 

283 LOAN PAYMENTS 
300 MEDICAL EXPENSE 
310 CONTRIBUTIONS 
32£ INTEREST PAID 
330 TAXES' PAID 

340 MISC. (TAX DED.) 



I I L L L 



i i i i . . *•*•'»';■» 



t .» Vi'V . . • • jf: 



.......... 



......... 



......... 



..»«*««••• 




• »♦*•» ♦,» ».* 



. . » . . • > 




112 THE RAINBOW April 1 988 



have five pieces of information in it: 
date, account number, amount, check 
number (or savings account) and any 
comments you may want to enter. By 
setting up the information by files, you 
can easily recall it from memory for 
editing or deletion. This also makes it 
possible to have a search function, 
which lets you search for dates, individ- 
ual accounts, amount spent, or a check 
number. 

The monthly program will generate 
three reports, which can be printed 
either to a printer or to the computer 
screen: 

1) a report of each account number 

2) a report of all account total dollar 
amounts, with a grand total 
matched against your checking 
and savings accounts 

3) a report of each data file in numer- 
ical order (to aid in error detection 
and correction) 

The program will save your files to, 
and load them from, disk upon selection 
from the menu. Use care when saving 
a file. The disk file titles are set up by 
the date you are working with; if you 
work on a month that already has a disk 
file created, trying to save new informa- 
tion may erase the old file. Also, if you 
load a file from disk or break the 
program and start over, all the files that 
were in the computer's memory will be 
gone. You will have to start from scratch 
if you haven't saved your information 
to disk. 

One other thing I do is designate my 
checks for separate accounts. For exam- 
ple, I write one check for my mortgage, 
putting the interest in Account 320 and 
the principal in Account 230. This way, 
the interest is under a tax-deductible 
account, but both can still be referenced 
by the proper check. 

Running Yearly Report 

The report program is very simple to 
run and assumes you have your data 
files loaded in Drive 0 when you start. 
Just load and run Listing 2, REPORT. 
Enter the starting and ending dates. The 
program will ask if you want a budget 
planning form, which is a printout to be 
used to plan your budget. You are then 
asked for a cost of living factor, which 
will be used to print out a projected 
budget. 

The budget figures are calculated by 
taking the total value for each account 
and dividing it by the number of 
months. Then it is multiplied by your 
cost of living factor and a report is 



JUL-1987 TO SEP-1987 



ACCOUNT NUMBER 


CREDIT 




DEBIT 


100 


CASH BALANCE 


S 2500,00 






110 


EARNED INCOME 


$ 3336>72 > 






120 

* W Mr 


INTEREST INCOME 


$•■ \9*75 ; 


'■ ?5 ■ * -■ 

;ri ■ A r 


v.. 


130 


MISC. TAXABLE INCOME 




v, , v : 




140 


NON-TAXABLE INCOME 


i :- "• . v - - ■ v."' ^ -■■^y.'i.* 1 - ■ 
. : ;■' --v fy*c& : 
' ■ • $? y $'. ■ '> ■ • • ■ / V.' V V / 






200 


FEDERAL WITHOLDING 




281 » 2 8 


201 


PICA 






183.96 


202 


3TATE WITHOLDING 


■•■ ■ ' ■■■■■■ 


- $ 


20 , 7$ 


203 


LOCAL WITHOLDING 


■ • hq-*'\ i'l , ■ 


$, 


6.24 


210 


GROCERY EXPENSE 


x. '•\.' <l . 


$ 


187 * 65 


220 


WATER 






39*75 


23J3 


MORTGAGE 






165.00 


240 


GAS & ELECTRIC 






167*70 


2 50 


TELEPHONE 




- A 

$ 


74.55 




CAR EXPENSE 




$ 


165. 3^ 


270 


INSURANCE 




s 


27.0^ 


280 


HOUSE REPAIRS 




s 




281 


ANNUITY 




c 




282 


MISC. EXPENSE 




s 


29.85 


283 


LOAN PAYMENTS 






45. 0> 


300 
310 


MEDICAL EXPENSE 


'. ■ ;• .. 


s 


64.50 


CONTRIBUTIONS 




s 


90. 0p 


320 


INTEREST PAID 


*^- ! '.-v.fs' ■ 




340, 10 
; 137.70 


330 


TAXES PAID 




pit 


340 


MISC, (TAX DED . ) 






JJ/.00 



BEGINNING BALANCE & INCOME 

TOTAL EXPENSE 

END OF YEAR BALANCE 

CHECKBOOK BALANCE 
SAVINGS BALANCE 
CASH BALANCE ON HAND 



: ''$v5996.4^^ v ''^/" 
$ 2176.28 ..V >■ 
$ 382^.19 

$ 141JJ.07 
$ 241>, 12 
$ 3820.19 

★★★★STATEMENT BALANCES**** 



generated. The report program will take 
quite a bit of time to load and calculate 
all your transactions. 

Variables and Strings 

The program listings have remark 
statements that will help you follow the 
program operation. Listed below are 
most of the strings and variables and 
what they are used for in the program: 



Expression 

fl$(C) - E$(C) 
BR$ - BF$ 

M$,RD$ 

RN$ 

MM,MM$, 
YY, YY$ 

TITLES 

H 

W 

U,I,D,CB 



CH,SR,BR 



Function 

Data fields 
Data field descrip- 
tions 

Month and account 
descriptions 
Account numbers 
Creates dates 
Used in reports and 
disk files 
Used for naming 
disk data files 
H=0 print to screen/ 
H=l print to printer 
Width of data fields 
Used in calculating 
income, expense and 
balance 

Checkbook and sav- 
ings balances and 
total 



Here are a few program tips you 
might find helpful. Line 14 sets the 
printer speed at 1200 baud, and there 
are several places where a CHR$ ( 12 ) is 



used to form feed reports. You may need 
to modify these to get the program to 
run with your printer. To change ac- 
count descriptions, just change the 
DRTfl statements at the end of the 
program. To add or delete accounts, 
you must change the numbers for RD$ 
and RN$ in Line 10, change all values of 
Y used in the program, and add or delete 
DRTR statements at the end of the 
program. Remember to change both 
program listings when you do this. 

If you want to change the width of 
your data fields, you can change the 
value of W in Line 14 of BUDGET. You 
may need to change the tabs in the 
printer routines if you do this, though. 
If you need to expand the number of 
transactions per month, just change the 
numbers for R$ through E$ in Line 10 
and clear 50 bytes of memory for as 
many files as you increase — and re- 
member to do this to both programs. 

I hope you find this program useful 
in helping save money on taxes and 
managing your money better. I think 
the next project will be to modify this 
program to keep a running balance of 
my checking and savings accounts. 
That's what a computer is for, to do our 
work for us. Right? 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 1414 Thompson Ave., Evans- 
ville, IN 47715. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing for a reply.) □ 

April 1988 THE RAINBOW 113 



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merge, and block select, copy and 
delete. Ledger is a simple spread- 
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Index Cards also allows you to en- 
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and searches. Using Paint, you 
can create colorful charts, graphs 
and designs. Calendar is a simple 
monthly planner that allows you 
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Calculator has four functions for 
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The Color Computer 3 offers 
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The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



iTM 



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58 


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178 






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END . 


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266 


148 







Listing 1: BUDGET 



2 '*HOME FINANCIAL ANALYST* 

4 '* 4/85 BY DAN PIERSMA * 

5 '* 32K-ECB & 1 DISK * 

6 GOT0448 

8 'DIMENSION DATAFILES & DESCRIP 
TIONS 

10 CLEAR5500:DIMA$(100) ,B$(100) , 
C$(100) ,D$(100) ,E$(100) ,M$(12) ,A 
D$(25) ,AN$(25) 

12 'SET BAUD 1200 & DEFINE NONVA 
RIABLE STRINGS 

14 W=8:POKE150,41:V$-" "+STRING$ 
(30,"*") :U$-STRING$(72,"-") :W$=C 
HR$(32) :BA$=" DAY (DD) ":BB$=" A 
CCOUNT# ":BC$=" AMOUNT ":BD$=" 
CHECK # ":BE$=" COMMENTS ":BF$ 
="REC #" 
16 'ENTER DATE 

18 CLS: PRINT §9, "BUDGET MANAGER": 

PRINT "ENTER MONTH AND YEAR THAT 

YOU WILL BE ENTERING DATA ON. 

" : INPUT "MONTH (MM) " ;MM: INPUT "Y 

EAR (YYYY) ";YY$ 

20 I FMM< 1 ORMM> 1 2 THEN 1 8 

22 YY=VAL(YY$) :IFYY<19840RYY>198 

8 THEN 18 

24 'READ DESCRIPTIONS 

26 FORM=lT012:READM$(M) : NEXT: FOR 

AD=1T025 :READAD$ (AD) :NEXT 

28 'CREATE DISK FILE TITLE 

30 MM$=M$(MM) :TITLE$=MM$+"-"+YY$ 

32 L=LEN(TITLE$)/2:Z«207-L 

34 ' CREATE MAIN MENU 

3 6 H=0 : CLS : PRINT@9 , "BUDGET MANAG 
ER": PRINT" SELECT A NUMBER 
1-5" 

38 PRINT@128,V$:PRINT" 1> FILE M 
AINTENANCE": PRINT" 2> SEARCH FIL 
E": PRINT" 3> GENERATE REPORTS" :P 
RINT" 4> SAVE FILE": PRINT" 5> LO 
AD FILE":PRINTV$ 
40 L$=INKEY$ 

42 L=VAL(L$) :IFL<1ORL>5THEN40 
44 ONL GOT048, 212,276,392,420 
46 'FILE MAINTENANCE MENU 
48 CLS3:PRINT@32, " SELECT 
A NUMBER 1-4" : PRINTQ160 , V$ : PRINT 



" 1> ADD AN ENTRY" : PRINT" 2> DEL 
ETE AN ENTRY" : PRINT" 3> EDIT OR 
VIEW A FILE": PRINT" 4> LIST CHAR 
T OF ACCOUNTS" : PRINT" R> RETURN 
TO MAIN MENU":PRINTV$ 
50 L$=INKEY$ : IFL$="R"THENGOT03 6 
52 L=VAL(L$) :IFL<1ORL>4THEN50 
54 ONL GOTO58,112 / 128 / 200 
56 'ADD A FILE 

58 CLS : PRINT© 11 , "ADD A FILE":GOS 
UB452 : PRINT@13 6 , "FILE NUMBER: "C 
+1 : PRINT 

60 PRINTBA$" : " ; : LINEINPUTA$ (C) 
62 IFLEN(A$(C) )<(W)THENA$(C)=A$( 
C)+W$ELSE66 
64 GOT062 

66 PRINTBB$" : " ; : LINEINPUTB$ (C) 
68 IFLEN(B$(C) ) < (W) THENB$ (C) =B$ ( 
C)+W$ELSE72 
70 GOT068 

72 PRINTBC$" : " ; :LINEINPUTC$ (C) 
74 IFLEN(C$(C) )<(W)THENC$(C)=C$( 
C)+W$ELSE78 
76 GOT074 

78 PRINTBD$":"; : LINEINPUTD$ (C) 
80 IFLEN(D$(C))<(W)THEND$(C)=D$( 
C)+W$ELSE84 
82 GOTO80 

84 PRINTBE$" : " ; : LINEINPUTE$ (C) 
86 IFLEN(E$(C) ) < (W*2) THENE$ (C) =E 
$(C)+W$ELSE90 
88 GOT08 6 

90 IFLEN(A$(C) )>(W)THEN58 
92 IFLEN(B$(C) )>(W)THEN58 
94 IFLEN(C$(C) )>(W)THEN58 
96 IFLEN(D$(C))>(W)THEN96 
98 IFLEN(E$(C) ) > (W*2 ) THEN58 
100 X^C:GOSUB446 

102 PRINT" IS THIS CORRECT <Y/N>" 

104 L$=INKEY$:IFL$="Y"THEN108 

106 IFL$="N"THEN58ELSE104 

108 C=C+l:GOT048 

110 'DELETE A FILE 

112 CLS : PRINT© 12 8 ,V$: PRINT" * 

DELETE A FILE *":PRIN 
T" * PRESS <R> TO RETURN TO MENU 
*": PRINT" * OR <C> TO CONTIN 

UE *":PRINTV$ 
114 L$=INKEY$:IFL$="C"THEN118 
116 IFL$="R"THEN36ELSE114 
118 INPUT"RECORD # TO BE DELETED 

: " 7 D 

120 FORX=(D-l)TOC-l 

122 A$(X)=A$(X+1) :B$(X)=B$(X+1) : 

C$(X)=C$(X+1) :D$(X)=D$(X+1) :E$(X 

)=E$(X+1) 

124 NEXTX: CLS :PRINT@232, "FILE DE 
LETED" : FORT=1TO800 : NEXTT : C=C-1 : G 
OT03 6 

126 'EDIT A FILE 

128 CLS :GOSUB4 52: PRINT: INPUT" EN 



16 THE RAINBOW April 19B6 



TER FILE NUMBER : » ;E : X=E-1 : IF (X) 
> ( C) THEN12 8ELSEGOSUB4 4 6 
130 PRINT" EDIT WHICH FIELD 

<l-5>": PRINT" OR PRESS <R> T 

0 RETURN" 

132 L$=INKEY$:IFL$=""THEN132 

134 IFL$="R"THEN3 6 

136 L=VAL(L$) :IFL<10RL>5THENGOTO 

132 

138 ONL G0T014J3,156,166,176,186 
14 0 PRINTBA$" : " ; : LINEINPUTA$ (X) 
142 IFLEN(A$(X) ) < (W) THENA$ (X) =A$ 
(X)+W$ELSE14 6 
144 GOT0142 

146 IFLEN(A$(X) ) > (W) THEN128ELSE1 
48 

148 GOSUB446 

150 PRINT"IS THIS CORRECT <Y/N>" 

152 L$=INKEY$:IFL$="Y"THEN3 6 

154 IFL$="N"THEN13J3ELSE152 

156 PRINTBB$" : " ; : LI NE I NPUTB $ (X) 

158 IFLEN(B$(X) ) < (W) THENB$ (X) =B$ 

(X)+W$ELSE162 

160 GOT0158 

162 IFLEN(B$(X) ) > (W) THEN128ELSE1 
64 

164 GOSUB446: GOTO 150 

166 PRINTBC$" : " ; : LINEINPUTC$ (X) 

168 IFLEN(C$(X) ) < (W) THENC$ (X) =C$ 



(X)+W$ELSE172 
170 GOT0168 

172 IFLEN(C$(X) ) > (W) THEN128ELSE1 
74 

174 GOSUB44 6:GOTO150 

176 PRINTBD$ " : " ; : LINEINPUTD$ (X) 

178 IFLEN(D$(X) ) < (W) THEND$ (X) =D$ 

(X)+W$ELSE182 

180 GOT0178 

182 IFLEN(D$(X) ) > (W) THEN128ELSE1 
84 

184 GOSUB44 6:GOTO150 

186 PRINTBE$" : " ; :LINEINPUTE$ (X) 

188 IFLEN(E$(X) ) < (W*2 ) THENE$ (X) = 

E$(X)+W$ELSE192 

190 GOT0188 

192 IFLEN(E$(X) ) > (W*2) THEN128ELS 
E194 

194 GOSUB44 6:GOTO150 
196 GOT048 

198 'LIST CHART OF ACCOUNTS 

200 CLS0:PRINT@192,"DO YOU WANT 

A HARD COPY <Y/N> ?" 

202 L$=INKEY$:IFL$="Y"THEN206 

204 IFL$="N"THEN208ELSE202 

206 PRINT#-2, "LIST OF ACCOUNTS": 

F0RY=1T025 : PRINT#-2 , AD$ (Y) : NEXTY 

:GOT03 6 

208 CLS : PRINT® 7 , "CHART OF ACCOUN 



$CD CD di CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD & tf* 

$ $ 

$ IF YOU PLAY LOTTO TO WIN $ 

$ THEN YOU NEED $ 

$ LOT— PRO $ 

$ $ 

$ LOT-PRO IS SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED $ 

$ FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER $ 

$ and features: $ 

$ $ 

$ -A handicapping system for any $ 

$ pick-6 lotto $ 

$ $ 

$ -Choice of 6 wheeling systems to $ 

$ increase your winning probabilities $ 

$ $ 

$ -LOT-PRO SYSTEM 60 number selection $ 

$ routine option $ 

$ $ 

$ ONLY $25.95 (specify disk or tape) $ 

$ (Ca. residents add 6% sales tax) $ 

$ $ 

$ CJN Enterprises $ 

$ P.O. Box 40487 $ 

$ _Bakersfield, CA. 93384-0487 $ 

$ /J^^ (805) -836- 1323 $ 

$ RAINBOW $ 

$ -TSf"* Invest in LOT-PRO, $ 

$ It might make YOU RICH! $ 

$ (printer needed) $ 

(I* cb CD CD CD Ct* CD ^ CD ^ CD CD CD CD 




CoCq 3 
ADDRESS FILE 
& 



ENVELOPE & LABEL ADDRESSING 



Automatically addresses all standard envelopes or 
labels using a choice of size options for either!! 

TfCSE FILES NAY SE USED FOR RECORDS OTHER THAN 
ADDRE3SESS! ! 1 IMAGINATION IS ALL THAT'S NEEDED!!! 
There are 15 files that hold IS records per file! This 
TOTALS 278 ADDRESSES , or records that can be stored 
per disk!! They are divided alpabeticaily into the 15 
files where they are alphabetically arranqed! iadi 
record can hold 8 lines of 64 characters per line!! 

WELL DOCUMENTED WHILE RUNNING f INSTRUCTION BOOKLET! 
10 MENU DRIVEN ROUTINES TO FULLY MANIPULATE FILES AND 
RECORDS INCLUDING ^SEARCH? UPDATE AND DELETE! ! 
UNLIMITED STORAGE CAPACITY WITH BACKUP DISKS YOU MAKE! 
REQUIRES ' CoCo 3; Disk Drive? Printer; Monitor OR TV! 

R.J.F. SOFTWARE; R.R. #2; WHITE LAKE, ONTARIO; KOA 3L0 
PHONE (613) 623-7824 

This program has been sealed and certified by RAINBOW 
MAGAZINE! SEE REVIEW IN THE HARCH/88 ISSUE! I 



$14.95 U.S. FUNDS plus $3,00 Shipping and Handling, 
Visa? Money Order or Personalized Check accepted! 
Ontario Residents add 72 Provincial Sales Tax, 

CoCo 3 WORD PROCESSOR for a DMP105 or DMP106 PRINTER 
and DISK DRIVE. Can be used with a iwnitor OR TV! ?! 
Underlining, bold and all font styles + «uch wore!!!!! 
A SUPER WORD PROCESSOR ON A 64 COLUMN SCREEN!!! 
$19.95 U.S. FUNDS plus $3,00 Gripping and Handling. 
Ontario residents add TL Provincial Sales Tax. 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 117 



TS" : F0RY=1T025 : PRINTAD$ (Y) : FORT= 

1TO500 : NEXTT : NEXTY : G0T03 6 

210 1 SEARCH FUNCTION 

212 CLS: PRINT" SEARCH FUN 

CTION" 

214 PRINT "DO YOU WANT A HARD COP 
Y <Y/N>" 

216 H$=INKEY$:IFH$="N"THEN224 
218 IFH$="Y"THEN220ELSE216 
220 H=l 

222 IFH=1THENGOSUB440 

224 LINE INPUT "DATA TO LOOK FOR:" 

;T$ 

22 6 IFLEN(T$)<(W)THENT$=T$+W$ELS 
E230 

228 GOT0226 

230 PRINT: PRINT "SELECT FIELD TO 
SEARCH" 

23 2 PRINT" 1> ";BA$: PRINT" 2> " ; 
BB$: PRINT" 3> ";BC$: PRINT" 4> " ; 
BD$ : PRINT" R> RETURN TO MAIN MEN 
U» 

234 L$=INKEY$:IFL$=""THEN234 
236 IFL$="R"THEN3 6 
238 L=VAL(L$) 

240 IFL<10RL>4THEN234ELSE242 

242 ONL 0010244,254,258,262 

2 44 FORX=0TOC-1:IFA$(X)=T$THENGO 

SUB266ELSE246 

246 NEXTX 

248 CLS : PRINT@232 , "NO MORE FILES 
" : FORT=1TO800 : NEXTT 
250 IFH=1THENPRINT#-2,CHR$(12) 
252 GOT036 

254 FORX*0TOC-l:IFB$(X)»T$THENGO 

SUB266ELSE256 

256 NEXTX:GOT0248 

258 FORX=0TOC-1:IFC$(X)=T$THENGO 

SUB266ELSE2 60 

2 60 NEXTX:GOT02 48 

262 FORX=0TOC-1: IFD$ (X) =T$THENGO 

SUB266ELSE264 

2 64 NEXTX:GOT0248 

266 IFH=1THENGOSUB270ELSE272 

2 68 RETURN 

270 PRINT#-2 , A$ (X) TAB ( 10) B$ (X) TA 

B(20) "$"C$(X)TAB(30)D$(X)TAB(40) 

E $ ( X ) TAB ( 5 9 ) X+ 1 : RETURN 

272 GOSUB44 6:FORT=1TO800:NEXTT:R 

ETURN 

274 'REPORT SETUP & MENU 

276 CLS0 : PRINT 0192 , "DO YOU WANT 

A HARD COPY <Y/N> ?" 

278 L$ = INKEY $:IFL$="Y" THENH= 1 : GO 

T0282 

280 IFL$="N"THEfT282ELSE278 
282 CLS3: PRINT" REPORT GE 

NERATION" : PRINT@160 , V$ : PRINT" 1> 
REPORT FOR EACH ACCOUNT #":PRIN 
T" 2> REPORT OF ACCOUNT TOTALS": 
PRINT" 3> REPORT OF ALL TRANSACT 
IONS (OR LIST ALL FILES BY 



#)": PRINT" R> RETURN TO MAIN MEN 
U":PRINTV$ 

284 F0RY=1T025:AN$(Y)=MID$(AD$(Y 
) ,1,3) : NEXTY 

286 L$=INKEY$:IFL$=»R"THEN3 6 

288 L=VAL(L$) :IFL<10RL>3THEN286 

290 ONL GOT0294,338,386 

292 'REPORT EACH ACCOUNT 

294 IFH=lTHENGOSUB440:PRINT#-2 

29 6 F0RY=1T025 

298 IFH=1ANDY=6THENGOSUB308:GOTO 
310 

300 IFH=1ANDY=10 THENGOSUB30 8 : GO 
TO310 

302 IFH=1ANDY=17THENGOSUB308 :GOT 
0310 

304 IFH=1ANDY=21THENGOSUB308:GOT 
0310 

306 GOTO310 

308 PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) :GOSUB440:P 
RINT# -2 -.RETURN 

310 IFH=lTHENPRINT#-2 , TAB (22) AD$ 
(Y) 

312 FORX=0TOC-1 

314 IFAN$(Y)=MID$(B$(X) ,1,3) THEN 
316ELSE322 

316 IFH=1THENG0SUB2 66 

318 IFH=0THENGOSUB272 

320 U=U+VAL(C$(X)) 

3 22 NEXTX:IFU=0THEN3 24ELSE32 8 

324 I FH= 1 THENPRI NT # - 2 

326 GOT0332 

328 IFH=lTHENPRINT#-2, "TOTAL FOR 
ACCOUNT "TAB ( 20 ) : PRINT#-2 , USING" 
$#####. ##";U:PRINT#-2:U=0 
330 IFH=0THENPRINT "TOTAL FOR ACC 
OUNT ";AN$(Y); M $"U:U=0:FORT=1TO 
1000: NEXTT 

332 NEXTY: IFH=1THENPRINT#-2,CHR$ 
(12) 

334 GOT036 

33 6 'CHART OF ACCOUNTS 

338 IFH=1THENPRINT#-2,TAB(25)TIT 

LE$;'» CHART OF ACCOUNTS" : PRINT #- 

2 : PRINT#-2 ,U$ : PRINT#-2 , "ACCOUNT 

#"TAB(32) "CREDIT"TAB (52) "DEBIT": 

PRINT#-2,U$ 

340 INPUT "ENTER CHECKBOOK BALANC 
E" ; CH : INPUT"ENTER SAVINGS BALANC 
E ";SA:BA=SA+CH 

342 CLS:FORY=1TO5:V=30:GOSUB348 
344 I=U+I:U=0: NEXTY 
346 V=50:GOTO360 
348 FORX=0TOC-1 

350 IFAN$(Y)=MID$(B$(X) ,1,3) THEN 
U=U+VAL(C$(X) ) 
352 NEXTX 

354 IFH=1THENPRINT#-2,AD$(Y)TAB( 
V) :PRINT#-2,USING"$#####.##";U 
356 IFH=0THENPRINTAN$(Y) ;" $";U 
358 RETURN 

360 FORY=6T025:GOSUB348 



118 THE RAINBOW April 1 988 



3 62 D=D+U:U=0:NEXTY 

364 CB=I-D:IFH=0THEN366ELSE374 

3 66 PRINT' 1 TOTAL INCOME $";I 

: PRINT 11 TOTAL EXPENSE $";D:PR 

INT "CASH BALANCE $";CB:PRIN 

T 

368 PRINT" CHECKBOOK BALANCE $";C 
H: PRINT "SAVINGS BALANCE $";SA: 
PRINT"CASH BALANCE $";BA 
370 IFINT (BA) =INT (CB) THENPRINT" 
* * * * * * STATEMENT BALANCES******"E 
LSEPRINT"??DOES NOT BALANCE PLEA 
SE REDO??" 

372 FORT=1TO1000:NEXTT:GOTO382 
374 I FH= 1THENPRINT # - 2 : PRINT#-2 , " 
TOTAL CREDITS "TAB (30) :PRINT#-2,U 
SING" $#####. ##" ;I:PRINT#-2 , "LESS 

TOTAL DEBITS "TAB (30) :PRINT#-2,U 
SING"$#####.##";D:PRINT#-2,"CASH 

BALANCE " TAB (30): PRINT # - 2 , US ING " 
$#####. ##";CB:PRINT#-2 
376 PRINT#-2, "CHECKBOOK BALANCE" 
TAB (30) : PRINT #-2 , USING" $##### . ## 
";CH:PRINT#-2, "PLUS SAVINGS BALA 
NCE " TAB (30): PRINT # - 2 , US ING "$#### 
#.##"; S A : PRINT # - 2 , " CASH BALANCE " 
TAB (30) :PRINT#-2,USING"$#####.## 
";BA:PRINT#-2 

378 IFINT ( CB) =INT (BA) THENPRINT #- 

2,TAB(20) "*****STATEMENT BALANCE 

S*****"ELSEPRINT#-2,TAB(20) "??TO 

TALS DO NOT ADD PLEASE REDO??" 

380 PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) 

382 D=0: 1=0: GOTO 3 6 

384 'LIST OF DATA FILES 

38 6 IFH=1THENGOSUB440:GOTO442 

388 FORX=0TOC-1:GOSUB446:FORT=1T 

09 50 : NEXTT : NEXTX : G0T03 6 

390 1 SAVE TO DISK 

392 CLS3 : PRINTS 19 2 , " INSERT DATA 
DISK IN DRIVE #0 ": PRINT" PRESS 
<C> TO CONTINUE OR <R> TO RE 
TURN TO MAIN MENU. " 
394 L$=INKEY$:IFL$="C"THEN398 
396 IFL$="R"THEN3 6ELSE394 
398 PRINT"SAVE TO DISK-ARE YOU S 
URE <Y/N>" 

400 L$=INKEY$ : IFL$="Y"THENGOTO40 
4 

402 IFL$="N"THENGOTO3 6ELSE400 
404 CLS: PRINTS 140, "SAVING": PRINT 
@Z , TITLE $ : PRINTS 2 67 , " DATA FILE" 
406 OPEN"0", #1, TITLE$ 
408 X=0 

410 IFA$(X)=""THEN416 

412 WRITE#1,A$(X) ,B$(X) ,C$(X) ,D$ 

(X) ,E$(X) 

414 X=X+1:GOTO410 
416 CLOSE#l:GOT036 
418 'LOAD FROM DISK 



420 CLS 3: PRINTS 19 2," INSERT DAT 
DISK IN DRIVE #0":PRINT" PRESS 
<C> TO LOAD DATA OR <R> ™ ™t? 
JRN TO MAIN MENU. " 



<C> TO LOAD DATA OR <R> T 
URN TO MAIN MENU." 
422 L$=INKEY$:IFL$="C"THEN42 6 
424 IFL$="R"THENGOT03 6ELSE422 
426 CLS: PRINTS 140, "LOADING" : PRIN 
T@Z ,TITLE$ : PRINTS2 67 , "DATA FILE" 
428 OPEN "I", #1, TITLE$ 
430 X=0 

432 INPUT #1,A$(X) ,B$(X) ,C$(X) ,D 
$(X) ,E$(X) :X=X+1 
434 IFE0F(1)=-1THEN43 6ELSE432 
CLOSE #l:C=X:N=C:GOT03 6 

NE 

, , _ITLE$ : _ 
-2 , U$ : PRINT#-2 , BA$TAB ( 10 ) BB$T 
20) BC$TAB (30) BD$TAB (40) BE $ TAB 
^) BF$ : PRINT#-2 ,U$ : RETURN 
442 FORX=0TOC-1:PRINT#-2,A$(X)TA 
B(10)B$(X)TAB(20) "$"C$ (X) TAB (30) 
D$ (X) TAB (40) E$ (X) TAB (59) X+l: NEXT 
X:PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) :GOT03 6 
444 1 PRINTER SUBROUTINE 
446 CLS: PRINT" THIS IS FILE 

NUMBER "X+l : PRINT : PRINTA$ (X) : PRI 
NTB$ (X) : PRINTC$ (X) : PRINTD$ (X) : PR 
INTE$(X) : RETURN 
448 PCLEAR1 : GOTO 10 
450 'DATA OVERFLOW SUBROUTINE 
452 PRINT" FIRST 4 ENTRIES ARE 
IMITED TO 8 CHARACTERS EACH, 
D COMMENTS ARE LIMITED TO 16 CHA 
RACTERS . " : RETURN 
454 'DATA DESCRIPTIONS 
456 DATA JAN, FEB, MAR, APR, MAY, JUN 
,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC,100 CAS 
H BALANCE, 110 EARNED INCOME, 120 
INTEREST INCOME, 130 MISC. TAXABL 
E INCOME ,140 NON-TAXABLE INCOME, 
200 FEDERAL WITHOLDING, 201 FICA, 
202 STATE WITHOLDING, 203 LOCAL W 
ITHOLDING 

458 DATA 210 GROCERY EXPENSE, 220 
WATER, 230 MORTGAGE, 240 GAS & EL 
ECTRIC,250 TELEPHONE, 260 CAR EXP 
ENSE,270 INSURANCE 
460 DATA 280 HOUSE REPAIRS, 281 A 
NNUITY,282 MISC. EXPENSE, 283 LOA 
N PAYMENTS, 300 MEDICAL EXPENSE, 3 
10 CONTRIBUTIONS, 3 20 INTEREST PA 
ID, 330 TAXES PAID, 340 MISC. (TAX 
DED. ) 



L 
AN 



April 1 988 THE RAINBOW 119 



We Cannot Tell A Lie 

Lonnie's gone nuts!! He's chopped down prices on 
Rainbow Bookshelf items! 





The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to 
take advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser 
features. An easy-to-read, step-by-step guide packed 
with hints, tips, tutorials and free software in the form 
of program listings. 

Book $12.95, Disk Package $19.95 (2 disks, book not 
included) — a savings of up to 36%! 

SAVE 38%! Book and disks only $29.95 





The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first 
Simulations contest. You are a Civil War Commander, 
an air traffic controller, a civil defense coordinator, or 
a scientist on Mars . . . your wits are on the line. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 — a savings of 65%! 

SAVE 70%! Book and tape only $6 






The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winners from oursecond Simulations contest. 
Fly through dense African jungle, bull your way down 
Wall Street, lead a bomb squad, or try your hand at 
Olympic events. Test your skills and talents. 
Book $4.95, Tape or Disk $4.95 — a 50% savings! 

SAVE 55%! Book and tape only $8.95 
SAVE 57%! Book and disk only $8.95 




SAVE 
UP TO 





The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adven- 
ture contest. Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors, 
Horror House, One Room, Dr, Avaloe and more. Plus 
hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $2, Tape $2 — a 43% savings! 

SAVE 50%! Book and tape only $3.50 






The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure 
games ever compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the 
Blue Meanies, find a hidden fortune, or win the heart 
of a mysterious princess. Ring Quest, Secret Agent 
Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $6.95, Tape $6.95 — a 50% savings! 

SAVE 57%! Book and tape only $11.95 






The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. 
Discover backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, 
attempt a daring space rescue, or defeat evil in the year 
2091 as a genetic android. Evil Crypt, Spymaster, Time 
Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the beginning! 
Book $6.95, Tape $6.95, Two-Disk Set $7.95 — a 
savings of up to 47%! 

SAVE 45%! Book and tape only $11.95 
SAVE 52%! Book and disk only $12.95 




mm 



■ lit--'! 



v . . ....... 

W -MMh" Site "ist& 





The Rainbow 
Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid 
introduction to the realm of statistical processes and 
thinking for both the beginner and the professional. 
(80-column printer required.) 
Book $2.95, Tape or Disk $2.95 — a savings of 54%! 

SAVE 62%! Book and tape or disk only $4.95 





Name _ 
Address 
City _ 
State _ 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number 



ZIP 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book ot Simulations (first) 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape(first) 

□ First Simulations Package 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ Second Simulations Package with Tape 

□ Second Simulations Package with Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Package 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for 

The Complete Rainbow Guide 
to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 

□ First Adventure Package 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

□ Second Adventure Package 

□ The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Third Adventure Package with Tape 

□ Third Adventure Package with Disk 

□ Introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

□ Guide to Statistics Package 
(indicate choice of tape or disk) 

Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4 per book 
Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) 



-$-9SH 3.50 
$-£95-$ 3.50 
$10.00 $11.05 $ 6.00 

$ 9.96 $ 4.95 
-$-9*$ 4.95 
$10.95 $ 4.95 
$19.90 $12.05 $ 8.95 
$20.00 $10.05 $ 8.95 

$19.95 $16. 95 $12.95 

■$8tee- $19.95 

$47.05 S3 6 .0S $29.95 



$19.95 

$ 7.05 $ 3.50 $ 2.00 
$ 7.90 $ 3.G0 $ 2.00 
$15.00 $ 7.00 $ 3.50 
$13.95 $ 6,95 

m&-$ 6.95 

$27.00 $17.05 $11.95. 
-$44-96-$ 6.95 
4-445- $ 6.95 . 
$444fr $ 7.95 . 

$21.00 $15.05 $11.95. 

$20. 9 0 $10.95 $12.95 . 

-$•49$- $ 2.95 . 
■$-535-$ 2.95. 

$12.00 $ 8.05 $ 4.95 



Total 




Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059. To order by phone (credit card orders only) 
call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call 
(502) 228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. That is, 
they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape or disk, you will 
still need the appropriate book for loading and operating instructions. OS-9® is a registered trademark of the 
Microware Systems Corporation. 



v 





188 



J 68 61 

102 183 

130 15 

150 59 

170 22 

END 123 



Listing 2: REPORT 



2 '* YEARLY REPORT PROGRAM * 
4 f * FOR USE WITH * 

6 »* HOME FINANCIAL ANALYST * 
8 '* 4/85 BY DAN PIERSMA * 
10 GOT0184 

12 'DIMENSION DATAFILES & DESCRI 
PTIONS 

14 CLEAR5500:DIMA$(100) ,B$(100) , 
C$(100) ,D$(100) /E$(W) iX$(12) ,A 
D$(25) ,AN$(25) ,AN(25) 
16 'SET BAUD 1200 & DEFINE NONVA 
RIABLE STRINGS 

18 POKE150,41:U$=STRING$(80, "-") 
: BG$=STRING$ ( 10 , " . " ) : BP$=" BUDGET 

PLAN FOR .../•••/•••" 
20 'READ DESCRIPTIONS 
22 F0RM=1T012 : RE ADM $ (M) : NEXT : FOR 
Y=1T025 : READAD$ ( Y) : NEXT 
24 'ENTER DATES 

26 CLS : PRINT@9 , "ANNUAL REPORT" :P 
RINT: PRINT" ENTER BEGINNING MONT 
H AND YEAR AND ENDING MONTH AND 
YEAR" 

28 PRINT: PRINTV$: INPUT" BEGINNIN 
G MONTH (MM) ";BM: INPUT" BEGINNI 
NG YEAR (YYYY) ";BY$: INPUT" ENDIN 
G MONTH (MM) ";EM: INPUT" ENDI 

NG YEAR (YYYY) " ;EY$ 
30 EY=VAL(EY$) :BY=VAL(BY$) 
32 I FBM< 10RBM> 1 2 THEN2 6 
34 I FEM< 1 OREM> 1 2 THEN 2 6 
36 IFBY<19840RBY>1988THEN2 6 
38 'CREATE REPORT TITLE 
40 IFEY<(BY)OREY>1988THEN26 
42 RTITLE$=M$(BM)+"-"+BY$+" TO " 
+M$(EM)+"-"+EY$ 
44 IFEM< (BM) THENEM= (EM) +12 
46 'PRINT BUDGET PLANNING FORM 
48 CLS : PRINT@163 , "WOULD YOU LIKE 
TO PRINT A BUDGET PLANNIN 

G FORM <Y/N>" 

50 L$=INKEY$:IFL$="Y"THEN54 
52 IFL$="N"THEN76ELSE50 
54 CLS : PRINT@201 , "HARDCOPY ONLY" 
: PRINT" IF PRINTER IS READY PRESS 
<P> PRESS <C> TO SKIP TO REPO 
RTS" 

56 L$=INKEY$ : IFL$="C"THEN76 



58 IFL$="P"THEN60ELSE56 

60 CLS : PRINT© 204 , "PRINTING" : PRIN 

T" BUDGET PLANNING FORM" 

62 PRINT#-2,U$:PRINT#-2,TAB(28) " 

BUDGET PLANNING FORM" : PRINT#-2 ,U 

$ : PRINT #-2 : PRINT #-2 , BP $ TAB ( 40 ) BP 

$:PRINT#-2 

64 FORY=1TO5:GOSUB70: NEXTY 

66 PRINT#-2,U$:PRINT#-2 

68 FORY=6TO25:GOSUB70: NEXTY: GOTO 

72 

70 PRINT#-2,AD$(Y)TAB(25)BG$TAB( 
40 ) AD$ ( Y) TAB ( 65 ) BG$ : PRINT#-2 : RET 
URN 

72 PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) 
74 'GENERATE REPORTS 
76 CLS0 : PRINT© 1 60 , " REPORT 
GENERATION": PRINT "PRINT HARD CO 
PY REPORTS <Y/N> ?": PRINT" PRE 
SS <E> TO END PROGRAM" 
78 L$=INKEY$ : IFL$="Y"THENH=1 : GOT 
084 

80 IFL$="N"THEN84 

82 I FL$ = " E " THENENDE LS E 7 8 

84 INPUT "ENTER COST OF LIVING RA 

TE FOR BUDGET PROJECTIONS IN % 

";I:I=(I/100)+1 

86 INPUT "ENTER CHECKBOOK BALANCE 
";CH: INPUT "ENTER SAVINGS BALANCE 

";SA:BA=SA+CH 
88 F0RY=1T025:AN$(Y)=MID$(AD$(Y) 
,1,3) : NEXTY 

90 TITLE$=M$ (BM) +"-"+BY$ : GOSUB17 
2 : FORX=0TOC-1 : IFAN$ ( 1 ) =MID$ (B$ (X 
) / 1 / 3)THEN92ELSE94 
92 AN(1)=VAL(C$(X) ) 
94 NEXTX 

9 6 FORYY= (BM) TO (EM) 

98 IFYY>12THEN100ELSE102 

100 S=(YY) -12:TITLE$=M$(S)+"-"+E 

Y$:GOTO104 

102 TITLE$=M$(YY)+»-"+BY$ 

104 GOSUB172:CLS:PRINT@195 / "CALC 

ULATING ACCOUNT TOTALS" 

106 FORY=2T025 

108 FORX=0TOC-1 

110 IFAN$(Y)=MID$(B$(X) ,1,3) THEN 

AN ( Y) =AN ( Y) +VAL (C$ (X) ) ELSE112 

112 NEXTX: NEXTY: NEXT YY 

114 IFH=0THEN116ELSE118 

116 F0RY=1T025:PRINTAD$(Y) :PRINT 

USING" $#####.##"; AN ( Y ) : F0RT=1T09 

00 : NEXTT : NEXTY : GOT012 4 

118 PRINT#-2,TAB(30)RTITLE$:PRIN 

T#-2 : PRINT#-2 , U$ : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 3 ) 

"ACCOUNT NUMBER"TAB (37) "CREDIT"T 

AB (52 ) "DEBIT" : PRINT#-2 ,U$ : PRINT# 

-2 

120 F0RY=1T05:PRINT#-2,AD$(Y)TAB 
(35) :PRINT#-2 / USING"$#####.##»;A 
N(Y) : NEXTY 



1 22 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



122 FORY=6T025:PRINT#-2,AD$(Y)TA 
B(50) :PRINT#-2,USING»$#####.##"; 
AN (Y) : NEXTY 

124 F0RY=1T05:TI=AN(Y)+TI: NEXTY 
126 FORY=6T025 : TE=AN ( Y) +TE : NEXTY 
128 CB=TI-TE:IFH=,0THEN130ELSE140 
130 CLS : PRINT @160, "TOTAL INCOME 

$" ;TI : PRINT "TOTAL EXPEN 
SE $";TE: PRINT" YEAR END 

CASH BALANCE $";CB 
132 PRINT" CHECKBOOK BALANCE 
$ " ; CH : PRINT" SAVINGS BALANCE 

$";SA:PRINT"TOTAL CASH ON HAND 
S" ; BA 

134 IFINT (BA) =INT (CB) THEN13 6ELSE 
138 

136 PRINT" ****** STATEMENT BALAN 
CES******": FORT= 1TO 1 50 J3 : NEXTT : GO 
TO 15 4 

138 PRINT" STATEMENT OUT OF BALAN 
CE - REDO": END 

140 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , "BEGINNING 
BALANCE & INCOME"TAB (35) : PRINT # 
-2 / USING"$#####.##";TI:PRINT#-2, 
"TOTAL EXPENSE"TAB(35) :PRINT#-2, 
USING"$#####.##";TE 
142 PRINT #-2, "END OF YEAR BALANC 
E"TAB(35) : PRINT#-2 ,USING"$##### . 
##" ;CB 

144 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , "CHECKBOOK 
BALANCE " TAB (35): PRINT # - 2 , US ING " 
$#####•##" 7 CH: PRINT # - 2 , " SAVINGS 
BALANCE "TAB (35): PRINT#-2 , USING" $ 
#####•##" ;SA: PRINT#-2 , "CASH BALA 
NCE ON HAND"TAB(35) : PRINT#-2 ,USI 
NG"$#####.##";BA 

146 IFINT (BA)=INT(CB) THEN148ELSE 
15J3 

148 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(27) "** 
★♦STATEMENT BALANCES****" : PRINT # 
-2 , CHR$ ( 12 ) : GOT0154 



One-Liner Contest Winner „ : , . 

Run Picoco to see a "modem art generator." 

The listing: 

0 PMODE3:SCREENl,l:PCLS:FOR R=1T 
01)3 :X=RND( 256) :Y=RND(192) : X1=RND 
(256) :Y1=RND(192) :X2=RND(256) :Y2 
=RND(192) :PX=(X+Xl+X2)/3 :PY=(Y+Y 
1+Y2)/3:PC=RND(4) :LINE(X,Y) -(XI, 
Yl) ,PSET:LINE-(X2,Y2) ,PSET:LINE- 
(X,Y) , PSET: PAINT (PX,PY) ,PC,0:NEX 
TR: FORW=1TO500 : NEXTW: GOTO0 

Lonny Guilford 
Lompoc, CA 

(For liiis winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



150 I FH= 1THENPRINT # - 2 , "********S 
TATEMENT DOES NOT BALANCE. PLEAS 
E FIND YOUR ERROR AND REDO****** 
**":END 

152 1 FORMULATE BUDGET PROJECTION 
S 

154 A=(EM)-(BM-1) 

156 FORY=2T025:AN(Y)=AN(Y)/A:AN( 

Y)=AN(Y)*I:NEXTY 

158 IFH=0THEN160ELSE162 

160 CLS: PRINT "MONTHLY BUDGET PRO 

JECTIONS" : FORY=2T025 : PRINT AD $ ( Y) 

:PRINTUSING"$#####. ##";AN(Y) : FOR 

T=1TO900 : NEXTT : NEXTY : GOT0168 

162 PRINT #-2, TAB (28) "MONTHLY BUD 

GET PROJECTIONS " : PRINT#-2 : PRINT* 

-2,U$:PRINT#-2,TAB(3)"ACCOUNT NU 

MBER"TAB (37) » CREDIT" TAB ( 52 ) "DEBI 

T" : PRINT#-2 , U$ : PRINT#-2 

164 FORY=2T05:PRINT#-2,AD$(Y)TAB 

(35) :PRINT#-2, USING"$#####.##"; 
AN (Y) : NEXTY 

166 FORY=6T02 5:PRINT#-2,AD$(Y)TA 
B(50) :PRINT#-2, USING"$##### . ##" 
; AN ( Y) : NEXTY : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , " 
MULTIPLIED BY"I" FOR RISE IN COS 
T OF LIVING" : PRINT # -2, CHR$( 12) 
168 END 

170 'LOAD FILES FROM DISK SUBROU 
TINE 

172 FORX=0TOC-1: A$ (X) ="" :B$ (X) =" 

" : C$ (X) =" " : D$ ( X) «»■ " : E$ (X) =" » : NEX 

TX: CLS : PRINT §140 , "LOADING" : PRINT 

@203 , TITLE $ : PRINT§267 , "DATA FILE 
n 

174 OPEN "I", #1, TITLE $ 
176 X=0 

178 INPUT #1,A$(X) ,B$(X) ,C$(X) ,D 

$(X) ,E$(X) :X=X+1 

180 IFE0F(1)=-1THEN182ELSE178 

182 CLOSE #1:C=X: RETURN 

184 PCLEAR1:G0T014 

186 DATA JAN, FEB, MAR, APR, MAY, JUN 

,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC,100 CAS 

H BALANCE, 110 EARNED INCOME, 120 

INTEREST INCOME, 130 MISC. TAXABL 

E INCOME, 140 NON-TAXABLE INCOME, 

200 FEDERAL WITHOLDING, 201 FICA, 

202 STATE WITHOLDING, 203 LOCAL W 

ITHOLDING 

188 DATA 210 GROCERY EXPENSE, 220 
WATER, 230 MORTGAGE, 240 GAS & EL 
ECTRIC,250 TELEPHONE, 260 CAR EXP 
ENSE,270 INSURANCE 

190 DATA 280 HOUSE REPAIRS, 281 A 
NNUITY,282 MISC. EXPENSE, 283 LOA 
N PAYMENTS, 300 MEDICAL EXPENSE, 3 
10 CONTRIBUTIONS, 320 INTEREST PA 
ID, 330 TAXES PAID, 340 MISC. (TAX 
DED. ) 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 123 



a t u r e 

tility to make color selection easier 



CoCo 3 RGB Monitor 



PALETTEable 

Color Mixing 

By H. Allen Curtis 



Decisions, decisions, decisions, vide a total of 64 color combinations 

The CoCo 3 offers a "palette" of (4*4*4 = 64). 

64 colors from which you can The shades of color vary from dark 

select up to 16 for your graphics mas- to light as they progress from the low 

terpieces, and that's a selection often to the high ends of the color meters, 

difficult to make. To facilitate decision Each color meter controls the amount 

making, I wrote the program Colormix. of intensity of its color red, green or blue 

Colormix is a color editor that aids — to be used in the selected color 

your selection process by mixing colors combination, 
to your prescription. Also, it provides 
a screen or hard copy printout of your 
color selections, saves them to disk or 
tape, and loads them back from disk or 
tape for emendation. The saved selec- 
tions are recorded in BASIC program 
form, ready for merging with a larger 
program. 

Colormix selects its colors via a 
"color mixer," which consists of three 
"color-meters." Each of the colors (red, 

green and blue) has one meter, referred Colormix was written for use with an 

to as the R, G or B meter. There are four RGB monitor. After you have typed the 

values (0, 1, 2 and 3) on each of the listing and saved it, run Colormix to 

scales of the three color meters. Since produce a Mode 2 (320-by-192 resolu- 

each color meter provides four color tion, 16-color) screen. At the top of the 

values, the three meters together pro- screen are 16 slots containing the stand- 

ard colors resulting from the execution 

//. Allen Curtis lives in Williamsburg, of PRLETTE RGB. Below the slots on the 
Virginia. He is interested in 17 th and left is the color mixer and on the right 
18th century history and enjoys biking is a command menu. At the bottom of 
through the colonial capital He balan- the screen is a message board to prompt 
ces past and present with his computer you in the proper operation of Color- 
work, mix. 




THE RAINBOW April 1988 



The initial message on the board is "0- 
9" or "A-J." The color slots are num- 
bered in hexadecimal from 0 to F, with 
A, B, C, D, E and F representing 10, 11, 
12, 13, 14 and 15, respectively. The 
commands on the menu board — Load, 
Save, Lprint and Print — are labelled 
G, H, I and J, respectively. 

The initial message means you can 
press one of the number keys 0 through 
9 or letter keys A through F to send the 
color in the corresponding slot to the 
mixer. The message also means you may 
alternatively select one of the menu 
commands by pressing a key from G to 
J. Pressing any key other than 0 through 
9 or A through J results in the sounding 
of a short blast of a beep alarm. 

Suppose you press a number key, say 
2. Blue, the color in Slot 2, will be sent 
to the mixer. The colors of both the 
menu and message board will also 
change to blue. The message board will 
then read ARROWS or ENTER. The color 
mixer is cursor-controlled by means of 
the arrow keys. ENTER is pressed after 
the color mixing has been accomplished 
to your satisfaction. 

You will see a plus (+) symbol on each 
of the three color meters, which serves 
as the cursor for that meter. A fourth 
plus located immediately to the left of 
the R meter indicates which of the three 
meter cursors is active. 

For the color blue in the mixer, the 
R meter cursor moves to its leftmost 
position corresponding to the lowest R 
meter color intensity value, 0. Pressing 
the right arrow key moves the R meter 
cursor one position and changes the 
color in the mixer. After pressing the 
right arrow key a total of three times, 
you will find the cursor at its rightmost 
position, corresponding to the highest 
R meter color intensity value, 3; it will 
have passed through positions corre- 
sponding to intensity values 1 and 2. 
Likewise, pressing the left arrow key 
moves the cursor left from high to low 
intensity value positions while causing 
associated color changes. 

The up and down arrow keys serve to 
determine which of the color meters has 
an active cursor. Pressing the down 
arrow key transfers cursor active con- 
trol from the R meter to the G meter. 
Pressing the right and left arrow keys 
actuates the G meter cursor in the same 
manner as it did for the R meter. Press- 
ing the up arrow key returns cursor 
control to the R meter, and pressing the 
down arrow key gives the B meter 
cursor control. Again, the right and left 
arrow keys move the active cursor in 
corresponding directions. Pressing the 



right or left arrow key when the cursor 
is in its rightmost or leftmost position, 
respectively, produces no cursor move- 
ment. 

After you have experimented with 
cursor movement and have obtained a 
color in the mixer to your liking, press 
ENTER. Suppose the R, G and B meter 
cursors were in positions corresponding 
to the values 0, 1 and 1, respectively — 
Color 3 would be transferred to Slot 2. 
You will be informed of this fact via an 
auxiliary message board just below the 
mixer. The message on the main board 
will read 0 tnrough 9 or A through J 
once again. 

You will note that the color in Slot D 
has also changed to Color 3. The reason 
for the change is that the color in Slot 
D has been used in Colormix to paint 
the mixer, menu and message boards. 
Colormix also uses the colors in slots E 
and F for all printing and coloring of 
the screen's background, respectively. 

Even though the color in Slot D 
changes with every color change in the 
mixer, Colormix remembers the last 
color selected for Slot D. To verify this, 
press the D key; the color green will be 
sent both to the mixer and to Slot D 
itself. You may select a new color for 
Slot D and press ENTER or press ENTER 
alone to retain green as the color for 
Slot D. 

The auxiliary message board refers to 
Slot D by its decimal designation, 13. 
The hexadecimal designations were 
given to the last six slots for the purpose 
of having single-key selection of each 
slot. 

Changing the colors of slots E and F 
will also change the print and back- 
ground colors, respectively. Selecting 
Slot E turns the mixer, menu and 
message boards black, effectively eras- 
ing all printing on the menu and mes- 
sage boards. Pressing the right arrow 
key will quickly make the printing in the 
menu and message boards visible again. 
Black in Slot E seems to yield the best 
printing clarity. For aesthetic purposes, 
you may want to alter the background 
color of the screen by mixing a new 
color for Slot F. 

When the message board reads 0 
through 9 or A through J, you may, by 
pressing J, obtain a screen printout of 
the present contents of slots 0 through 
F. The printed information appears on 
the auxiliary message board for one slot 
at a time. The main message board tells 
you to press ENTER to receive informa- 
tion for each succeeding slot. When you 
terminate the program by pressing 
BREAK, you automatically get a full text 



slot 


Color 


KGB 


0 


34 


210 


1 


54 


330 


2 


15 


113 


3 


36 


300 


4 


63 


333 


5 


31 


133 


6 


41' 


203 


mum 

7 


42 


212 


8 


0 


000 


9 


18 


030 


10 


6 


110 


11 


27 


033 


12 


o 


000 

W %f w 


13 


18 


030 


14 


0 


000 


15 


38 


310 




Table 1 





4 HSCREEN2 

5 DIMC(15) :FORI=0TO15:REFIDC 
(I):PALETTEI,C(I):NEXT 

6 DflTR 34,54,15,36,63,31,41, 
42, 0,18,6,27,0, IB, 0,3B 

Table 2 



screen printout of all 16 slots. You may 
be greeted with a beep the first time you 
press BREAK, but repeated pressing of 
the key will indeed stop the program. 

For a hard copy printout of the slot 
information, merely press I. Table 1 
shows a sample printout. If your printer 
is not connected, a program hang-up 
will occur; this can be eliminated by 
pressing BREAK. In such a case, you will 
have a screen printout as a consolation. 
If you don't have a printer, change the 
number 660 in Line 480 to 650. Pressing 
I will then produce a beep instead of a 
hang-up. 

Pressing H allows you to save the 
current slot information in BASIC pro- 
gram form (ASCII format). A sample 
listing of such a recording is shown in 
Table 2. The saving process differs 
depending on whether you have a disk 
or cassette system. 

Saving to Disk 

On disk systems, pressing H causes 
the prompt F I LENAME : to be printed on 
the message board. Answer the prompt 
by entering a filename of eight charac- 
ters or less. The information will imme- 
diately be recorded on disk in the 
designated file. Instead of typing a 
filename, you may merely press ENTER. 

If you have not previously loaded any 

April 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 25 



slot information' the current slot infor- 
mation will be recorded on disk in a file 
named SLOTCDLS. On the other hand, 
if in the present session with Colormix 
you have loaded from a previously 
saved file, you will record the current 
information in that file; that is, you will 
overwrite the most recently loaded file. 
All saved files automatically have the 
extension -DAT appended to the file- 
name. 

If an 1/ O Error occurs during record- 
ing, Colormix won't be terminated. 
Instead, I-D ERRDR is printed on the 
message board. Moments later, the 
message will be replaced with 0 through 
9 or A through J. 

Saving to Cassette 

On cassette systems, pressing H also 
causes the prompt FILENAME: to be 
printed on the message board. Position 
the tape in your recorder before you 
answer the prompt, then respond by 
typing a filename of up to eight char- 
acters but do not press enter yet. First, 



press both the Record and Play buttons 
on your recorder, and then press ENTER. 
When the recording is complete, the 
prompt will be replaced with 0 through 
9 or A through J. If you fail to type in 
a filename and instead just press ENTER, 
the prompt will be replaced momentar- 
ily with the message NEED FILENAME. 

Loading from Disk 

To load a previously saved file, press 
G. The prompt FILENAME: is then 
printed on the message board. Answer 
the prompt by entering a filename of up 
to eight characters. If the program 
cannot find that file in the disk direc- 
tory, the prompt is replaced with the 
message ILLEGAL FILENAME. If you 
merely press ENTER without typing a 
filename, the message NEED FILENAME 
appears on the screen for a short time. 

Colormix responds to a correct file- 
name by loading the designated file. 
You will see the slot colors change 
during loading. When loading is com- 
plete, the messages 0 through 9 or A 



through J return to the message board. 
An I/O Error is treated as it was for a 
save. 

Loading from Cassette 

Pressing G brings the prompt FILE- 
NAME: to the message board. You may 
respond by pressing ENTER. Position 
the tape for loading the desired file, then 
press the Play button on the recorder to 
start loading the file. You will see the 
slot colors change during the loading. 
When loading is finished, the messages 
0 through 9 or A through J return to the 
message board. 

You may type a full filename of an 
already saved file and press ENTER 
instead of just pressing ENTER alone. 
However, if you type an incorrect 
filename, a fruitless search for the file 
could ensue. 

After acquainting yourself with the 
operation of Colormix, you should find 
that slot color selection is not only 
"PALETTE"able but also easy and time- 
saving. □ 




100 171 

200 221 

360 32 

450 153 



590 207 

700 36 

840 237 

END 169 



The listing: COLORMIX 
5 CLEAR500 

10 REM **** COLORMIX **** 

20 REM BY H. ALLEN CURTIS 

30 REM COPYRIGHT (C) 198 6 

40 ON ERR GOTO930 

50 ON BRK GOTO970 

60 DIMB(IS) ,R<15) ,G(15) ,B(15) ,Q( 

63) 

70 S(0)=a8:S(l)=54:S(2)=9:S(3)=*3 
6:S(4)=63:S(5)=31:S(6)=45 2S (7) =3 
8:S(8)=0:S(9)=18:S(10)=0:S(11)=6 
3:S(12)=0:S(13)=18:S(14)=0:S(15) 
=38 

80 R(0)=6:G(0)=18:B(0)=6:R(1)=18 

:G(1)=18:B(1)=6:R(2)=6:G(2)=6:B( 

2)=18:R(3)=18:G(3)=6:B(3)=6:R(4) 

=18:G(4)=18:B(4)=18:R(5)=10:G(5) 

=18:B(5)=18:R(6)=18:G(6)=6:B(6)= 

18:R(7)=18:G(7)=10:B(7)=6 

90 R(8)=6:G(8)=6:B(8)=6:R(9)=6:G 

(9)=18:B(9)=6:R(10)=6:G(10)=6:B( 

10)=6:R(11)=18:G(11)=18:B(11)=18 

:R(12)=6 2G(12)=6:B(12)=6:R(13)=6 

:G(13)=1S:B(13)=6:R(14)=6:G(14)= 

6:B(14)=6:R(15)=18:G(15)=10:B(15 



)=6 

100 PALETTERGB : HSCREEN2 : HCLS15 

110 HCOLOR14 : HPRINT (17,1) , "SLOTS 

" : FORI=0TO9 : HPRINT ( 4+2*1 , 3 ) , CHR$ 

( 1+4 8 ) : NEXT : FORI=10TO15 : HPRINT ( 4 

+2*1,3) ,CHR$(I+55) :NEXT 

120 DATA 0,1/8,9,2,3,10,11,16,17 

,24,25, 18, 19,2 6,27,4,5,12,13 ,6,7 

,14,15,20,21,28,29,22,23,30,31,3 

2,33,40,41,34,35,42,43,48,49,56, 

57,50,51,58,59,3 6,37,44,45,38,39 

,46,47,52,53,60,61,54,55,62,63 

130 FORI=0TO3:FORJ=0TO3:FORK=0TO 

3:READC(I, J,K) :NEXTK,J,I 

140 DATA 0,1,10,11,100,101,110,1 

11 , 2 , 3 , 12 , 13 , 102 , 103 , 112 , 113 , 20 , 

21,30,31,120,121,130,131,22,23,3 

2,33,122,123,132,133 

150 DATA 200,201,210,211,300,301 

,310,311,202,203,212,213,302,303 

,312,313,220,221,230,231,320,321 

,330,331,222 ,223,232,233,322,323 

,332,333 

160 FORI=0TO63 :READQ (I) :NEXT 
170 FORI=0TO15:HCOLORI 
180 HLINE(16*I+28,40)-(16*I+44,5 
0) , PSET , BF : NEXT 

190 HCOLOR14:HPRINT(2,10) , "R":HP 

RINT(2,12) , "G": HPRINT (2, 14) , "B": 

HPRINT ( 10 , 8 ) , "MIXER" ; HPRINT (28,8 

) , "MENU 

200 HCOLOR13 

210 FORJ=0TO2 

220 FORI=0TO3 ' 



126 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



23j3 HLINE(36+I*32,79+J*16)-(68+I 
*32,88+J*16) ,PSET,BF 
24J3 NEXTI , J 

25j8 HLINE(192, 78) - (287 , 153 ) ,PSET 

,BF:HCOLOR14:HPRINT(25,ll) , ,f G: L 

OAD" : HPRINT (25,13) , "H: SAVE":HPR 

INT(25,15) LPRINT" : HPRINT (25 

,17), "J: PRINT" 

26)3 GOSUB87j3:GOSUB88j3 

27J3 K$=INKEY$:IFK$= IMf THEN270 

28) 3 D=ASC(K$)-48:IFD>22 AND D<27 
THEN GOSUB48j3:GOT026j3 

29) 3 IFD<j3 OR D>22 THENGOSUB65j3 :G 
OT027j3 

3j3j3 IFD>9 THEND=D-7 : IFD<lj3 THEN2 
7)3 

31J3 RC=R(D) :GC=G(D) :BC=B(D) :GOSU 
B4 7 0 : RR= 1)3 : HPRINT ( RC , 10 ) , » + » : HPR 
INT(GC,12) , H + fl :HPRINT(BC,14) ," + » 
: HCOLOR14 : HPRINT ( 3 , 1)3) , »»+» : HCOLO 
R14 

32) 3 GOSUB87)3:GOSUB89)3 

33) 3 K$=INKEY$ : I FK$ = 11 11 THENGO SUB 4 7 
)3:GOTO3 30 

34) 3 IFASC(K$)=9 AND RR=10 AND RC 
<18 THENGOSUB7 60 : RC=RC+4 : HPRINT ( 
RC,RR) ,"+" 

350 IFASC(K$)*=8 AND RR=10 AND RC 
>6 THENGOSUB760:RC=RC-4: HPRINT (R 



C,RR) , " + » 

36) 3 IFASC(K$)=9 AND GR=12 AND GC 

<18 THENGOSUB7 7)3 :GC=GC+ 4: HPRINT ( 
GC, GR) ,»•+»• 

37) 3 IFASC(K$)=8 AND GR=12 AND GC 
>6 THENGOSUB7 7 )3 : GC=GC-4 : HPRINT (G 
C,GR) , " + " 

38) 3 IFASC(K$)=9 AND BR=14 AND BC 
<18 THENGOSUB78j3:BC=BC+4: HPRINT ( 
BC, BR) ,»+" 

39) 3 IFASC(K$)=8 AND BR=14 AND BC 
>6 THENGOSUB78)3:BC=BC-4: HPRINT (B 
C,BR) ,"+■• 

4j3j3 IFASC(K$)=1)3 AND GR=12 THEN 
GR=j3 : BR=14 : HCOLOR15 : HPRINT ( 3 , 12 ) 
, "+» : HCOLOR14 : HPRINT (3,14),"+" 
41)3 IFASC(K$)=1)3 AND RR=1J3 THEN 
RR=)3 : GR=12 : HCOLOR15 : HPRINT ( 3 , 1)3 ) 
, «+« : HCOLOR14 : HPRINT (3,12), 
420 IFASC(K$)=94 AND GR=12 THEN 
GR=)3 : RR=10 : HCOLOR15 : HPRINT (3,12) 
, "+ M : HCOLOR14 : HPRINT ( 3 , 10 ) ,»+•• 
4 30 IFASC(K$)=94 AND BR=14 THEN 
BR=)3 : GR=12 : HCOLOR15 : HPRINT (3,14) 
, "+" : HCOLOR14 : HPRINT ( 3 , 12 ) , " + " 
440 K=ASC(K$) :IFK<>9 AND K<>8 AN 
D KO10 AND K<>94 AND K<>13 THEN 
GOSUB650 

450 IFASC(K$)=13THENRR=10:HCOLOR 




uinooc wmm 




In Q^st of t^c^5^ r *I^ d 

A new animated graphic adventure for the Color 
Computer 3 from the author of the Hall of the King 
trilogy! Enjoy the mixture of science and fantasy as 
you quest for the Phoenix Crossbow, the only thing 
that can save you in the post-holocaust world. A full 
4 disk sides of adventure! Outstanding 320x200 
graphics will make this your favorite CoCo adven- 
ture! Req. 128K CoCo 3 and disk drive. Only $34.95. 



^itfKp~ru Dude 

An exciting new arcade game. This is the long-awaited response to the huge 
demand for a Kung-Fu program for the CoCo. The graphics, sound effects, 
and animation are spectacular! This is the BEST karate game ever available 
for the Color Computer. Req. 64K, disk drive, and joystick. Only $24.95. 

"The CoCo karate gap has been filled and Kung-Fu Dude does it excellent- 
ly, I highly recommend (it)!" -2/88 Roinbow review 
"A definite 5 stars!" -12/87 Wizard's Castle review 




WHITE FIRE 
OF ETERNITY 

64K Animated Graphic Adven- 
ture. See 12/86 Rainbow review. 
Only $19.95. 

CHAMPION 

64K Superhero Action Adventure. 
See 5/87 Rainbow review. Only 
$19.95. 



All programs CoCo I 2, 3 compatible unless stated otherwise. 




urlpoq 

systems CJ 



Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 

Personal checks, money orders, and CO.D. orders 
accepted. 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^ 

Include $250 for S/H. $2.00 
extra for CO.D. orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax. 
Authorship and dealer inquiries 
welcome. 



>>:■ 



:*:*X:.':¥::*::^^ 

/.^;.:.;.^:.:.^^^^^:.^:.:.^:.^^:.^^:.^:.:%■:o•:•:•:^•:■:^%^^^^^v.■.^%^^^^^:.^:•:.v 



♦••••»< 



. * . . . ... . 

i . . ■ » «... 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 1 27 



13 : HPRINT (RC, 10) , "+" : HPRINT ( GC , 1 
2) ,"+": HPRINT (BC, 14) , »+" :HC0L0R1 
5:HPRINT(3,10) ,"+":HPRINT(3,12) , 
"+" -.HPRINT (3 , 14) , "+" :HC0LOR14 , 15 
: GR=0 : BR=0 : PALETTED , CC : S ( D) =CC E 
LSE330 

460 HCOLOR13:HLINE(36,132)-(157, 
163 ) , PSET, BF : HC0L0R14 : HPRINT (8,1 
7) ,"SLOT H +STR$(D) : HPRINT (8,19) , 
" COLOR" +STR$ ( CC) : R ( D) =RC : G ( D) =GC 
:B(D)=BC:GOTO260 

470 CC=C( (RC-6) *.25, (GC-6)*.25, ( 
BC-6)*.25) : PALETTE 1 3, CC: RETURN 
480 ON D-22 GOTO 490,590,660,700 
490 O=0:GOSUB790 

500 IFPEEK(&HBC)=6THENJ=-1ELSEJ= 
1 

510 F$=A$ 

520 IFA$="" AND J=l THENGOSUB8 7 0 
: GOSUB910 : GOTO 4 90 
530 OPEN"I",#J,F$ 
540 1=0 

550 IF EOF(J)=-1THEN570 

560 LINE INPUT#J,A$:GOTO550 

570 CLOSE#J:A$=RIGHT$(A$,LEN(A$) 

-6) +" , " I FORI =0 TO 15 : D=VAL (LEFT$ (A 

$,INSTR(A$,",")-1) ) :S(I)=D:PALET 

TEI , D : A$=RIGHT$ ( A$ , LEN ( A$ ) -INSTR 

(A$,",") ) :L=INT(Q(D)/100) :R(I)=L 

*4+6:E=Q(D)-100*L 

580 L=INT(E/10) :G(I)=L*4+6:L=E-1 

0*L:B(I)=L*4+6:NEXT:RETURN 

590 IFPEEK(&HBC)=6THENJ=-1:0=1:M 

OTORON ELSEJ=1:O=0 

600 GOSUB790:IFA$="" AND F$= ,MI T 

HENF $= " S LOTCOLS "ELSE I FA$<> " " THE 

NF$=A$ 

610 A$="6 DATA " 

620 FORI=0TO15;A$=A$+RIGHT$(STR$ 
(S(I) ) ,LEN(STR$(S(I) ) )-l)+",":NE 
XT : A$=LEFT$ ( A$ , LEN ( A$ ) -1) 
630 OPEN"0",#J,F$ 

640 PRINT#J,"4 HSCREEN2":PRINT#J 

,"5 DIMC(15) :FORI=0TO15:READC(I) 

: PALETTE I , C ( I) : NEXT" : PRINT # J , A$ : 

CLOSE* J: RETURN 

650 SOUND 60, 3: RETURN 

660 D=2:GOTO680 

670 WIDTH40:D=0 

680 PRINT#-D,TAB(12) "SLOT COLOR 
RGB" : FORI=0TO15 : PRINT#-D , TAB ( 13 ) 
; :PRINT#-D,USING"##";I; :PRINT#-D 
," "; :PRINT#-D,USING"##";S(I) 
; :PRINT#-D, " " ; : PRINT#-D, USING" 
#"; (R(I)-6)/4; :PRINT#-D,USING"#" 
; (G(I)-6)/4; :PRINT#-D,USING"#"; ( 
B(I) -6)/4:NEXT 
690 RETURN 

700 HCOLOR13:HLINE(36,132)-(157, 
1 6 3 ) , PSET , BF : HCOLOR14 : HPRINT (5,1 
7), "SLOT COLOR RGB" : 1=0 : GOSUB870 



: HPRINT (22, 22) , "ENTER" 
710 GOSUB750 

720 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=""THEN720ELSE 
I FAS C ( K$ ) <> 1 3 THENGOSUB 650: GOT07 2 

0 

730 I F 1= 1 5THENRETURNELS EHCOLORl 3 
: GOSUB750 : HCOLOR14 
740 1=1+1 :GOTO710 

750 HPRINT (6, 19) ,STR$(I) '.HPRINT ( 
11,19) ,STR$(S(I) ) : HPRINT ( 15 , 19 ) , 
STR$((R(I)-6)/4) : HPRINT (16, 19) ,S 
TR$((G(I)-6)/4) :HPRINT(17,19) ,ST 
R$ ( (B(I) -6 )/4): RETURN 
760 HCOLOR13:HPRINT(RC,10) ,"+":H 
COLOR1 4: RETURN 

770 HCOLOR13: HPRINT (GC, 12) ,"+":H 
COLOR14: RETURN 

780 HCOLOR13: HPRINT (BC, 14) ,"+":H 
COLOR14 : RETURN 

790 GOT08 00 : A$=" " : HCOLOR13 : HLINE 
(20, 173) -(215, 185) ,PSET,BF:HCOLO 
R14 : HPRINT (6,22), "FILENAME : " : 1=0 
800 A$=" " : GOSUB870 : HPRINT (16,22) 
/'FILENAME: 11 : 1=0 
810 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN810 
820 MOTOROFF 

830 IFK9 AND ASC(K$)>47 AND ASC 
(K$ ) <9 1THENHPRINT ( 2 6+1 , 2 2 ) , K$ : 1= 
I+1:A$=A$+K$ 

840 IFI>0 AND ASC (K$) =8THENI=I-1 
: HCOLOR1 3 : HPRINT ( 2 6+ 1 , 2 2 ) , RI GHT $ 
(A$,l) :HCOLOR14:A$=LEFT$(A$,LEN( 
A$)-l) :GOTO810 

850 IFASC(K$)=13 AND (I>0 OR J=l 

OR 0=0) THENRETURN 
860 IFASC(K$)=13 AND 1=0 AND 0=1 

THENGOSUB870 : GOSUB910 : GOTO590EL 
SE810 

870 HCOLOR14:HPRINT(4,22) , "MESSA 
GES " : HC0L0R13 : HLINE ( 110 , 173 ) - ( 2 8 
7,185) , PSET, BF:HC0L0R14: RETURN 
880 HPRINT (16, 22) ,"0-9 or A-J":R 
ETURN 

890 HPRINT (16, 22 ), "ARROWS or ENT 
ER" : RETURN 

900 HPRINT (16, 22 ) ,"1-0 ERROR" : GO 
SUB6 50 : FORK=0TO9 9 9 : NEXT : RETURN 
910 HPRINT (16, 22 ), "NEED FILENAME 
" : GOSUB650 : FORK=0TO999 : NEXT : RETU 
RN 

920 HPRINT (16, 22) /'ILLEGAL FILEN 
AME" : GOSUB650 : FORK=0TO999 :NEXT:R 
ETURN 

930 IFERNO=26THENGOSUB870:GOSUB9 

2 0 : G0SUB4 9 0 : G0T02 60 

940 IFERN0=3 8THENEND 

950 IFERNO=20THENGOSUB870:GOSUB9 

00:GOTO2 60 

960 END 

970 HSCREEN0:GOSUB670:END 



128 THE RAINBOW April 1988 







IrwwL 


/2\V\/I\/7(^ 













coiorsiFont 





CoCo Max HI — 

Taking CoCo 3 Graphics to the Max 



The Color Computer is an incredible 
machine. It is used by thousands of 
people every day to perform a variety 
of tasks. Telecommunications, business 
applications, games and music are just 
a few of the CoCo's uses. However, for 
many, graphics and the creation of eye- 
pleasing pictures remains the foremost 
function of the CoCo. 

A lot of graphics packages have come 
and gone for the Color Computer, but 
no piece of software has caused such a 
revolution as CoCo Max did in 1985. 
CoCo Max was the first real point-and- 
click system for the CoCo and was truly 
user-friendly. 



In July 1986, the CoCo 3 was intro- 
duced, and with it came an abundance 
of new features, such as new commands, 
more colors, higher resolution, more 
memory, faster speed and new text 
modes. The big question was, "Is there 
going to be a CoCo Max ///?" No one 
really knew what would happen. In the 
meantime, patches and modifications 
were made available to convert CoCo 
Max II to the CoCo 3. However, there 
was no big advantage to this since the 
resolution and colors remained the 
same. There was no patch available to 
take advantage of the Hi-Res screen or 
all the new brilliant colors. Colorware 



mailed out letters to all CoCo Max II 
users stating there were no plans at that 
time to produce a CoCo Max III. 

As time went on, many graphics 
packages for the CoCo 3 emerged. 
Among these were CHI Graphics, Da- 
Vinci3, My Artist and Color Max 3. 
These programs had varying levels of 
success, but at least a serious void was 
being filled for CoCo 3 graphics soft- 
ware. 

Months later, I was reading through 
the September 1987 rainbow and I 
came upon a new advertisement. At first 
glance, it appeared to be a new CoCo 
Max 7/ ad. A closer look revealed it was 
for CoCo Max IIP. I immediately called 
and preordered a copy; about five weeks 
later, it arrived. I couldn't wait to boot 
it up! 

Before I started using CoCo Max HI, 
I made a backup. CoCo Max III is not 
copy-protected, so you can make as 
many backups of the software as you 

April 1988 THE RAINBOW 129 



need. However, in order to use CoCo 
Max III, you must use the Hi-Res 
module, which is included. Colorware 
has taken the standard Radio Shack 
module and modified it to work only 
with Co Co Max III 

The DIN plug of the Hi-Res module 
plugs into the right joystick port of your 
CoCo, and your joystick or mouse 
connector plugs into the DIN port on 
the Hi-Res module. This is a simple 
hookup, and it does not take up any 
space in your Multi-Pak or require a Y- 
cable. 



File F.qi t options Colors Font Size s tyle 

8 




There are two ways to run Co Co Max 
III. The method you choose depends on 
how much memory you have in your 
CoCo 3. If you have ADOS-3, you must 
use the DISRBLE command to use CoCo 
Max HI. If you are using a 128K Color 
Computer 3, you are required to make 
a work disk. This is done by running a 
file called WDMRKER. You must have a 
blank, formatted disk in order to create 
a work disk. On a 128K CoCo 3, the 
work disk is used to store the fonts, the 
clipboard pictures and scrapbook 
buffers. However, you cannot store 
pictures on the work disk. Colorware 
has used the entire disk for all the disk 
I/O and has left no free space on the 
disk. Single-drive systems require that 
you take out the work disk and insert 
a formatted blank disk. Systems with 
two or more drives let you use any drive 
1 through 3 for picture storage and leave 
the work disk in Drive 0. Once the work 
disk has been made, you must remove 
it and reinstall the CoCo Max III 
program disk. Type RUN "CM3" and, 
after CoCo Max ///loads up, install the 
work disk. It is that easy. 

Users with 512K have it even better. 
Unlike a machine with 128K, a 512K 
CoCo 3 can load any font from memory. 
All clipboard and scrapbook functions 
are also accessed through RAM. This 
allows lightning fast control over all of 
the functions. 

Even though CoCo Max III runs as 
is, it is best to customize it to your setup 
by running the configure program. You 

1 30 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



will be asked a series of questions on 
your monitor and printer type, amount 
of RAM, number of drives and printer 
baud rate. If you do not configure your 
CoCo Max III program disk, you can- 
not print. Once the config program is 
finished, you can start CoCo Max III 
by typing RUN"CM3". One nice thing 
about the config software is that it is not 
erased after you run it. As your system 
grows and changes, just run the config 
program again to make the proper 
revisions. 

Upon running CoCo Max III, the 
title screen appears. A click of the 
mouse button causes the opening cred- 
its to disappear, leaving a blank win- 
dow. At this point you are ready to take 
control of the cursor and create. Even 
though Colorware modified the Hi-Res 
module, cursor control is very smooth 
and clean. This is the key to quality 
drawing software for the CoCo. 

There are various tools and patterns 
on the main screen, which is separated 
into seven segments. 

First of all, there is the window. This 
is where you actually draw your picture. 
Just about every function you will use 
relates to the window. Pictures are saved 
from, and loaded into, the window. 

The palette at the bottom of the 
window shows the 16 colors available, 
along with 16 of the 32 patterns. Color- 
ware should be applauded for coming 
up with such a wonderful selection of 
patterns. The alternate set of patterns is 
changed by clicking on the selected 
pattern box. 

The selected pattern box is directly to 
the left of the palette. It is made up of 
an inner and outer box. The inner box 
is the fill/ brush pattern, while the outer 
box is the line/ border pattern. A single 
click on any color or pattern puts that 
pattern into the inner box. A double 
click puts it into the outer box. 



File Edit options colors Font Size Style 



BOH 

ESS 



This is the Coco Mok screen with 
its pull down menus (above); its 
\ioot boyitiefi). jf$ paiette.ibelow) 
you can aram umn: 

THE FEHC K.-THC 44 BfcWHtS-THt SPftAYCMt OA MUM : 






To the left of the selected pattern box 
is the line width box, which is used with 
the drawing tools. Selected lines are of 
set width but can be edited after they are 
drawn into the window. 



Above the line width box are three 
toggle bars. From top to bottom they 
are Fill, Zoom and Undo. Selecting the 
Fill bar will fill a shape with the selected 
color. Zoom is a great feature. It allows 
you to enlarge a section of the window 
to four times its normal size, which is 
perfect for clean-up work. 



file Edit Options colors Font Si2e style » 




The Undo feature is the most power- 
ful of the three. The last action per- 
formed in the window can be voided by 
placing the cursor on the Undo bar. You 
can even undo while zooming. This 
feature is also reversible, so if you 
change your mind, you can toggle the 
Undo bar again to return to the original 
picture. The Undo feature is easy to use, 
too. All it takes is one push of the mouse 
button and you can undo anything. All 
in all, the three toggle bars are an 
important addition to Color Max III 
and help add flexibility to drawing. 

Immediately up from the toggle bars 
is the tool box, which contains 21 icons. 
Many of these icons were available in 
CoCo Max //, including the lasso and 
move window tool; drawing tools, such 
as the pencil and rubber band line; and 
tools for creating boxes, circles, poly- 
gons, etc. CoCo Max //users will also 
recognize such features as the paint 
tool, paint brush, spray can, text icon 
and eraser. There are, however, a 
number of tools that are brand new, and 
which add to the power and flexibility 
of CoCo Max III. One new feature is 
the replace color tool, which is used to 
fill an area in the window with a chosen 
color or pattern. If there is an open 
space on the border, the color will leak, 
so make sure your border is solid. 
Leaving gaps is easy to do when zoom- 
ing. Don't worry — if a mistake is made, 
the Undo bar is always available. 

Another new tool, Arc, takes a little 
getting used to. Arc functions are just 
like the rubber band line, except they 
create a 90-degree arc. This is much like 
using a French curve tool when drawing 
designs on paper. You can use any color, 
and line width can also be changed. 
Also new is the cube icon. You can click 



and hold the mouse button to draw the 
front of the cube just like a square box. 
After drawing the front, a release of the 
button allows you to move around to set 
the angle of the other two sides. Click- 
ing the button again locks the remaining 
sides in place. As usual, line width and 
color selection can be used. This is a 
super tool, although its uses may be 
limited to technical and architectural 
drawings. 

Additional new drawing features 

I include the free hand shape tool, which 
is a cross between the rubber band line 
and the polygon, and the ray tool, which 
can be used to draw wonderful effects. 

Winding up the CoCo Max ///icons 
are the flowbrush and the centered 
circle. The flowbrush is used under the 
animate mode and features the same 
brush shapes as the paintbrush. The 
great thing about flowbrush is that 

j when used in the window, the brush 
shape alternates among the four ani- 
mated colors. These are colors 11, 12, 

I 13 and 14 on the palette. The slower you 

' draw, the closer the four colors are to 
each other. Conversely, the faster you 
move across the window, the larger the 
color separation. The CoCo Max III 
demo gives a beautiful example of how 

I this can be used. This is a fun tool to 
use and its possibilities are endless. 

The centered circle is used to create 
circles from a center point going out- 
ward. It works basically the same as the 
regular circle tool. Drawing bull's-eyes 
and targets is simple, and all line widths 
and colors can be used. 

The final section on the screen is the 
menu bar. This is located above the 
window and is used to pull down the 
seven menus. By clicking on any of the 
seven titles, the menus appear. 

Clicking on the file menu gives you 
the first menu, which includes various 
loading and saving options, as well as 
features to double page size and assign 
drives. The file menu also allows access 
to the scrapbook mode and several 
printer options. The scrapbook mode 
unlinks the window from the rest of the 
picture, allowing you to doodle and try 
new drawing techniques. Toggling out 
of this mode returns the screen back to 
its original form. Objects can also be cut 
or copied out of the scrapbook and 
pasted onto another picture without 
harming the current drawing. Two 
commands are available under the 
scrapbook mode: Save Scrapbook and 
Load Scrapbook. These commands can 
be used to save and load entire windows 
onto disk for later use. They are saved 
with the extension -SBK. The scrap- 



book is another wondrous power of 
CoCo Max III. 

Printer functions include double size, 
which prints out a double screen on a 
full-size sheet of paper or a half sheet 
on a half screen. This allows for excel- 
lent text print for desktop publishing. 

The print option allows printer out- 
put of a drawing. CoCo Max III cur- 
rently Supports several printers. They 
are Epson and compatibles, Gemini, 
DMP-105/106, DMP-130 Serial and 
DMP-130/106 IBM mode. All print 
drivers print out pictures in black and 
white along with five shades of gray 
Each slot prints out a specific shade, 
regardless of what color is assigned to 
it. To print in black and white, Slot 0 
(white) and Slot 15 (black) must be 
used. Use of any other color will result 
in gray shades being printed. The CoCo 
Max III user's manual details shade 
assignments. 

DMP-105 printouts look reasonably 
good. However, due to the quality of the 
printer itself, hard copies may be 
smudged or slightly blurred. Printouts 
from an Epson printer look perfect. The 
double-strike mode works with this unit 
and enhances the printout even more. 

A CGP-220 printer driver is available 
for $19.95. Colorware has developed a 
way to print 125 colors on the CGP. 
There are separated color sets for RGB 
and composite modes. Print quality is 
very good and crisp for the most part, 
and the printout colors match the screen 
colors closely. This really makes CoCo 
Max III shimmer and sparkle. 




Several utilities are also on the CGP- 
220 driver disk to allow custom palettes 
to be created. Other utilities allow 
printing of all available colors, and the 
Printit program allows color hard 
copies of drawings to be printed out 
without using CoCo Max III. The 
CGP-220 driver disk is worth every 
penny and more. 

The second menu can be accessed by 
clicking the edit bar. The functions 
under this menu are used in conjunction 
with the lasso and editing box and all 



are grayed out except for the paste 
command when not using any editing 
tools. The functions include cut, copy, 
paste, clear and fill. 




You can also trace the outer border 
of an object you're editing with the trace 
edges feature, and turn the colors within 
the editing box to their opposites (for 
example, white turns black and black 
turns white). 

Various other functions are available 
from the edit menu that allow you to flip 
an item you're editing (either horizon- 
tally or vertically), turn it sideways, 
shrink it or stretch it, or rotate it in 
small, precise angles. 

Use of the edit menu can be very 
helpful to all CoCo artists. If you plan 
to do serious drawing, you will use this 
menu constantly. 

Clicking on the options menu will 
give you a variety of artistic features 
that complement CoCo Max III very 
well. First is the grid tool. This is 
convenient for positioning text or doing 
technical drawings. 

There are also features for pattern 
modification and brush selection, as 
well as brush mirror options, which 
draw proportional brush strokes either 
horizontally or vertically within the 
window. 

New features include clear RAM 
disk, which clears pictures, scrapbooks 
and clipboards saved in RAM, and load 
font set, which loads optional fonts such 
as Max Fonts. If you create newsletters 
or do desktop publishing, load font set 
is indispensable. 

The color menu really lets CoCo do 
what it is made for — color computing. 
A variety of tools allow for color chang- 
ing and animation. These tools can turn 
an ordinary picture into a remarkable 
and magical picture. 

The set colors tool allows you to 
change any of the 16 palette colors. 
Upon clicking set colors, a window 
showing all 64 available colors and the 
16 palette slots appears. To change 
colors, simply click the palette you want 
to change, then click one of the 64 colors 

April 1988 THE RAINBOW 131 



available. Presto, it is changed. To exit, 
click the OK prompt. This is a great 
feature — no fuss, no guess, just click 
to pick your color. This is a great help 
when drawing shades. You can actually 
compare colors on the screen. The 
Standard CMP and Standard RGB 
option reverts the palettes back to their 
original color sets. 

You can use the cycle colors tool to 
cycle through eight pre-chosen colors. 
To change the cycle colors, click on this 
menu bar and a window will appear, 
again showing all 64 colors and eight 
color palettes. Click on these palettes to 
change, then click the desired color. 
Palette number 1 1 is the color cycle 
palette. This is one of the two powerful 
animation features. 

The cycle speed tool allows the colors 



to be cycled at almost any speed from 
.5 steps per second to 60 steps per 
second. 

You can control animation with the 
animate speed tool, which sets the 
rotation of the four animation colors at 
the same rate as cycle speed. The ani- 
mate feature revolves through four of 
the palettes on the palette bar to create 
a motion type effect. This effect is 
similar to rotating lights on a marquee 
and gives the picture a magical effect 
almost like cartooning. 

Color mixing options include: no 
color mix, to paint over a color by any 
other color; additive mix, which acts as 
a color mixer; and subtractive mix, 
which takes color away from a paint. 

By clicking the font menu, there are 
13 font styles available, with over 90 




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more that can be added. These can be 
loaded through the load font set option. 
If you own Max Fonts, Colorware will 
upgrade your original disks to work 
with all versions of CoCo Max. Send 
the disks along with an S ASE to Color- 
ware for the conversion. These fonts 
maximize the full potential of Co Co 
Max Iirs desktop drawing abilities. 

The size menu is used in conjunction 
with the fonts. Text can be stretched by 
using the tall or wide command. The 
size can be increased or decreased by 
using the X3/4, X2, or X4 options. All 
of these options can be used alone or in 
any combination. Unlimited sizes can 
be created using this menu. 

Last on the menu bar is the style 
menu, which works with the font and 
size menus. Any font can use one or 
more of five styles. Bold, italics, outline, 
shadow and 3-D styles are available. To 
revert back to the regular style, click the 
Plain command at the top of the menu. 
Text can also be justified by using the 
left, centered and right functions in the 
style menu. 

Co Co Max III comes with a multi- 
tude of support programs to round it 
out. Co Co Show comes on the demo 
disk and is used in the creation of slide 
shows and demonstrations with CoCo 
Max ///pictures. This program is easy 
to use and you can use as many pictures 
as you can store on one disk. 

The Coltrans software converts RGB 
colored files to CMP colors or CMP 
colors to RGB colors. This is especially 
useful if you upgrade from a composite 
monitor to an RGB display. Another 
use might be to transfer pictures to a 
friend who has a different kind of 
monitor. 

Translat has the ability to read and 
write compressed files. This program 
loads picture files into memory so they 
can be accessed from BASIC. CoCo Max 
II pictures can also be transferred to 
CoCo Max III, then edited and colored 
using this fine utility. CoCo Max II 
users will find it hard not to use this 
program. 

CoCo Max HI is extremely user- 
friendly. While doing this review, my 15- 
year-old brother, Larry, sat down with 
the mouse and drew an impressive 
picture of an F-4 jet (see photo). He has 
never used CoCo Max III and only 
played with CoCo Max II once. You 
cannot get any friendlier than that. 

CoCo Max III is also error-free. The 
program does not bomb out under any 
conditions. A Quit function on one of 
the menus would have been a big help, 
though, especially if you want to exit to 



132 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



set a printer code, then jump back into 
the program. 

Co Co Max HI is much more than a 
drawing program. School projects, 
Christmas cards, certificates, slide 
shows, newsletters, labels, buttons, 
manuals, brochures, business cards and 
cartoons are just a few of the items that 
can be created. There are no limits to 
what you can do with this fabulous 
program. 

All in all, CoCo Max III is a pro- 
gramming triumph. The CoCo Max III 
user's manual is one of the most com- 
prehensive and easy-to-use guides I 
have ever seen for any CoCo program. 
Colorware and Dave Stampe are to be 
commended for their amazing creation. 
Speed, ease, animation, power and 
color, all in one package. CoCo Max III 
is the ultimate program for the CoCo 3. 



(Colorware, 242-W West Avenue, Darien, 
CT 06820, 800-221-0916; $79.95) 



— Logan Ward 



~ #. CoCo 1 & 2 

1 Software 1 

Banker II — 
Expand and Manage 
CoCo 2 Memory 

Banker His a hardware and software 
package that is manufactured and dis- 
tributed by J & R Electronics of Mary- 
land. The product consists of a memory 
expansion board of either 256 or 512K 
RAM, an associated memory manage- 
ment board (called Banker II because it 
manages the memory banks in the 
CoCo or CoCo 2), and some associated 
software. The product is available in kit 
form or fully assembled. This review is 
for the fully assembled Banker II with 
512K of RAM memory. 

Unfortunately, the product arrived 
damaged. The Banker board had not 
survived the U.S. Postal Service, and 
was too badly damaged to be fixed. I 
contacted Jesse Jackson at J & R Elec- 
tronics, and he promptly shipped me a 
missing installation manual and an 
entirely new unit for review. The unit 
was carefully packaged and arrived in 
only a few days, as promised. It was 
entirely functional after I reinstalled the 



PI jumper cable, which had been in- 
stalled backward. 

The installation is solderless and can 
be done by anybody in less than a half 
hour. It requires only that you be 
capable of removing some IC memory 
chips and the SAM chip and installing 
in its place the Banker II board and a 
memory expansion board that fits 
under the keyboard. In some instances, 
a plastic skating pin that the keyboard 
rests on must be removed for the mem- 
ory board to fit correctly. Otherwise, it 
is a relatively painless operation. I must, 
however, caution that if you have never 
opened a CoCo or other computer and 
have no experience or familiarity, your 
best bet would be to find someone to 
assist you (a local CoCo Club or users 
group might be an excellent resource). 



This is a very sophisticated product 
that can either be very simply imple- 
mented or supercharged to a peak of 
performance, so this memory package 
is useful for both the power user and the 
average user. OS-9 users get the advan- 
tage of OS-9 Level II, and a superfast 
disk drive to really turbocharge opera- 
tions. The RS-DOS users get the bene- 
fits of the memory, one or two instant 
access RAM disks, a sophisticated print 
spooler that will handle multiple copy, 
reset, kill, dump and speed upgrade 
commands by a simple CHR$ statement, 
and more. 

In addition, there is the PCOPYMOR 
program, the Banker Backup program, 
and the pager program, which can be 
used to take advantage of copying 
ROM to RAM memory, backing up a 




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(513) 236-1454 

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April 1988 THE RAINBOW f 33 



RAM disk or an upper bank of mem- 
ory and, more importantly, stepping 
through the memory banks. This is very 
similar to having six 64 K CoCos in one! 

Also included is a bank test program 
that will selectively or automatically test 
and verify all of the memory banks. In 
a 512K CoCo you would now have 125 
graphics pages of memory at your 
command! A PCOPYDEMO program 
shows you how the memory could be 
managed to create animated graphics 
screens. A program designed to work 
with Telewriter-64 called S.XXX is also 
provided. Use this program with great 
care! It is designed to speed up and 
augment disk I/O by allowing the use 
of a RAM disk. You must load the 
RAM disk with the Banker before 
booting Telewriter-64 or any text in the 
buffer will be overwritten and lost! 

Both Jesse Jackson and Raymond 
Rowe have done a thorough and com- 
plete job in designing, engineering and 
assembling Banker II and its software. 
The user can customize the software, 
the source code itself and the Banker II 
memory maps any way he or she 
chooses, and really make it fly. The 
documentation on all counts is thor- 
ough and to the point. The installation 
manuals are thorough, too, with dia- 
grams and careful explanations of how 
to handle the assembly and installation 
of both the assembled Banker Hand the 
one that comes in kit form. Trouble- 
shooting guides are included in both 
manuals and in the user manual for the 
software. A note of caution here, also. 
These are technically oriented manuals 
and are beyond the immediate scope of 
the novice. 

After installing Banker II success- 
fully, I had little trouble operating the 
associated software. I tested the equip- 
ment in several different CoCo 2s, and 
found that it tended to overheat about 
30 to 45 minutes after power-up in some 
cases where the room temperature was 
about 68 degrees Fahrenheit. This was 
not always replicable, however, and 
could be due to a faulty power supply. 
I also found that occasionally, in at- 
tempting to change banks or pages, the 
machine would inexplicably crash. Yet 
I could not get the system to replicate 
the problems. I chalk this up to a faulty 
connection somewhere, and suggest to 
the Banker II user that he or she check 
all connections very carefully! Also, the 
Korean CoCo users will find the 64K 
chips soldered to the motherboard. 
Good luck removing them and instal- 
ling sockets! The CLEARFIX patch and 
OS-9 Boot fix patch, which cure slight 

134 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



incompatibilities with Banker II, 
worked without problems. A note 
again: In switching the controllers and 
computers with Banker II, I discovered 
that DOS 1.0 would cause the disks to 
behave very erratically, while DOS 1.1 
always worked fine. 

In summary, I have tested this prod- 
uct thoroughly and rigorously under 
different circumstances and situations. 
It is a very well-designed and well- 
engineered product that has excellent 
documentation and support. The flaws 
and glitches I found could not be repli- 
cated in every instance and user fault 
cannot be ruled out entirely in these 
cases. What crashes I experienced could 
be recovered from immediately, though 
any data in memory was lost at system 
crash (warm reset was not possible due 
to keyboard lockout). 



1 Hardwar e C ° CQ12&3 I 

Avatex 1200e — 
Economical 1200 
Baud Modem 

The world of personal computing 
continues to move onward and upward 
every day. In the modem industry, the 
300 baud modem was made obsolete by 
the 1200 baud modem — which was 
then superseded by the 2400 baud 
modem. Many high-end business users 
are now running 9600 baud modems, 
and in a few years the new ISDN stand- 
ard will allow communication at speeds 
up to 64,000 baud. 

That's all well and good for those of 
us with deep, well-lined pockets — but 
CoCo users are typically economy- 
minded people who can't, or won't, 
spend such atrocious sums on equip- 
ment. That's why so many CoCo users 
still have 300 baud modems. But 300 
baud can be a false economy when 
you're using a service like Delphi or 
CompuServe, or when you're dialing 
out-of-town bulletin boards and paying 
long distance charges. Also, some heav- 
ily used BBSs are now allowing access 
only at 1200 or 2400 baud, locking out 
the folks with older modems. What has 
been needed for quite some time is a 
1200 baud modem for the price of a 300 
— say, around $100, which is what a 
typical 300 baud modem often sells for. 
The Avatex 1200e, at $99, has finally 
broken the barrier. 



The documentation and support are 
thorough and high quality. I would 
recommend that 512K versions of the 
programs be present on the software 
supplied with the product so that the 
user does not have to customize the 
software if he or she has 512K installed 
in the computer. As the software cur- 
rently exists, the user must customize 
the programs to take advantage of the 
512K RAM. This is an excellent prod- 
uct for people wanting or needing more 
memory, but not wanting to move on 
to the CoCo 3. 

(J & R Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Colum- 
bia, MD 21045, 301-987-9067 or 301-788- 
0861; $39.95, kit form; $169.95, fully as- 
sembled) 

— Jeffrey S. Parker 



Unlike certain other modem bargains 
that have popped up in the past, the 
1200e isn't a stripped model, or 
originate-only, or a "dumb" modem, or 
a reconditioned used unit. It handles 
both answer and originate, dials with 
both tones and pulses, and is a Hayes- 
compatible "smart modem." It has the 
usual status lights and speaker. As best 
I can tell, they haven't left anything out. 
The secret of the 1200e*s small size (6i4- 
by-SVi-by-l 1 /^ inches) and low cost is 
that it uses a new pair of integrated 
circuits — the SCI 1008 and SCI 1014 — 
to provide most of the logic and signal 
processing circuitry. The whole board 
has about as many parts as a transistor- 
ized AM radio. 

The 1200e's AT command set is very 
close to that of a Hayes modem, though 
there are some minor differences that 
shouldn't have an adverse effect on 
compatibility. All 14 of the 'S' registers 
are available for adapting the modem to 
the way you prefer to use it, and all five 
'X' levels are available to allow dial tone 
and busy signal detection. As an exam- 
ple, you might send this string to the 
modem to initialize it: 

RTX4E0L1511=50 

This would set the modem for full 
"call progress" detection (X4), no echo 
of commands (E0) and low speaker 
volume (LI), and would change the 
length of dialing tones and spaces to 50 
milliseconds (SI 1=50) for slightly faster 
tone dialing. 

As for hardware compatibility, the 
J200e can connect with modems using 



either the North American "Bell" 300 or 
1200 baud standards, or the CCITT 
V.21 and V.22 standards used overseas. 
The 1200e is approved by the FCC and 
by the Canadian Department of 
Communications, and there should be 
no problem using it with a normal 
telephone line. 

The 1200e may have problems work- 
ing with some business phone systems 
that use A lead supervision, because it's 
designed for a standard RJ1 1 jack; also, 
if you have a two-line phone, or one that 
has a dial light powered by a separate 
transformer, you'll need to plug it 
directly into a wall jack because the 
1 200e's line cord and phone jack have 
only two wires and won't pass the 
second line or dial light power. 

The 1200e performed well in our 
tests, with very few (if any) data errors, 
both on local and long distance lines. I 
honestly can't find anything really 
negative to say about the product, so I 
can recommend the Avatex 1200e 
highly to anyone who needs a 1200 baud 
modem. 

(Cinsoft, 2235 Losantville, Cincinnati, OH 
45237, 513-396-7638; $99; with CoCo cable, 
$109; with cable and Autoterm software, 
$139) 

— Ed Ellers 



* S oftwa re 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



FlightSim 1 — 
Up, Up and Away 

FlightSim 1 is a flight Simulation 
program for the Color Computer. As a 
user, you fly a large commercial jet from 
one locale to another. To use FlightSim 
/, you need at least 32K of memory plus 
two joysticks (the deluxe models are 
strongly recommended). 

Upon loading FLTSIM into memory, 
you are presented with a screen that 
simulates an aircraft instrument panel 
(lower half of screen) and the front 
window view from the cockpit (upper 
half). The screens are in black and 
white, no color output being supported 
by the program. 

Looking at the instrument panel, you 
will find the Airspeed and Power Indi- 
cator which gives the airspeed in knots 
per hour. The Power Indicator keeps 
you informed as to the throttle position- 
ing. The throttle is controlled with the 
left joystick. 

The Attitude Deviation Indicator is 



located in the central-top portion of the 
panel This gauge shows you the air- 
craft's "deviation" from level flight. By 
watching this, you can tell if the aircraft 
nose is up, down, left or right. 

In addition to these instruments, you 
are provided with a giidescope, altime- 
ter, ROC, HDG and multifunction 
readout. The giidescope, located along 



* Softwar e 



CoCo 3 




the edges of the ADI, keeps you flying 
"true" on the radio beam during landing 
approach. An altimeter gives you alti- 
tude above sea level in thousands of 
feet. ROC stands for Rate of Climb; this 
instrument provides readouts of the rate 
of ascent or descent in thousands of feet 
per minute. The HDG, or heading 
gauge, acts as a compass. Other infor- 
mation available to the pilot includes 
fuel status, heading in degrees, cloud 
ceiling, etc. 

Successfully operating the jet is fairly 
complicated, as might be expected with 
a large aircraft. You will need to spend 
a substantial amount of time mastering 
this one. Flight characteristics are 
realistic but unforgiving, just as the real 
thing. 

The main weakness of this program 
is in the graphics display of the outside 
world, as seen from the cockpit window. 
Whether considered alone or against 
the other flight simulations available, 
these graphics are mediocre at best. It 
should be noted, however, that detailed 
graphics are not necessary for a realistic 
flight simulation. After all, the real 
counterparts take off and land in zero 
visibility conditions, using instruments 
alone. 

Instructions for FlightSim 1 are 
contained in a well-written manual, 
complete with "ground school" orienta- 
tion. Putting all the realistic behavior of 
an aircraft into 32K of memory is quite 
an accomplishment and the authors of 
FlightSim 1 have done this quite well. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Ft. Worth, TX 76102; $24.95. 
Available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide.) 

— Leonard Hyre 



Phantomgraph — 
Professional Graphs 
on the CoCo 3 

One night at a Color Computer Users 
Group meeting, a new CoCo user came 
up to me and inquired if I knew of a 
good graph-making program for the 
CoCo. He wanted one that could take 
his spreadsheet data and turn it into a 
graph for business use. My reply to him 
then was that I knew of no such animal. 
If he'd ask me today, however, I'd have 
just the program he needs. It is a new 
one called Phantomgraph. 

Phantomgraph is one of the latest 
releases from Tandy for the Color 
Computer 3. It requireS^resK memory 7 ; 
and either a mouse or joystick. Like all 
the new Tandy releases for the CoCo 3, 
it comes on an OS-9 Level II disk. 
However, because it has all of the 
necessary OS-9 operating system on the 
disk, the regular OS-9 system disk is not 
needed. 

The manual that comes with the 
program is quite good. It is designed in 
the form of a tutorial and takes you 
through the features of the program 
step by step. You begin by making very 
simple graphs and then move on to 
more advanced ones. 

As I said, the manual is quite good, 
but it does leave out a few things. The 
most important thing concerns the Save 
File procedure. If you follow the proce- 
dure as outlined in the manual, youll 
find yourself staring at the screen won- 
dering if your disk drives have done 
another one of those "silent deaths" — 
when the contacts on the disk-pak get 
corroded and need cleaning, and the 
drive does not come on. Well, the 
problem is not with the disk-pak this 
time, it is with the program documen- 
tation. Simply follow the steps in the 
manual for saving the file to disk and, 
after you have entered the filename, do 
not move the cursor arrow out of the 
dialog box, just move it off the name 
line and press the pointer button. (The 
same goes for loading in a file.) 

Another problem area concerns the 
demo "Camp Cost" graph that you 
make in the tutorial portion of the 
manual. Phantomgraph runs in a 
graphics window. Various window types 
allow for only a certain number of 
colors. In the Type 7 window, the 

April 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 35 



program allows only four colors; in the 
Type 8 window, it allows eight. The 
manual does not tell you what type of 
window the program initially comes up 
in when running the program from the 
"out-of-the-box" disk. Therefore, when 
you do the Camp Cost graph, and it 
draws on the screen, youll notice part 
of your graph is missing. This is because 
the program comes up in a Type 7 
window, and one of the colors you were 
directed to use is not supported by this 
window mode. To get a Type 8 window 
and the full eight colors, you either have 
to go back and modify the start-up file, 
create another window, or boot up with 
a regular OS-9 Level II system disk and 
initialize the W8 window screen. (Or 
you could simply change the color of 
that particular section of the demo 
graph to one that is recognized by the 
Type 7 window.) 

The color limitation is really not all 
that limiting, because the program 
makes use of numerous texture pat- 
terns, as well. Therefore, a number of 
color/ pattern combinations can be used 
to delineate the various items of data in 
your graphs. 

Phantomgraph can make four pri- 
mary types of graphs; line graphs, bar 
charts, pie charts and scatter charts. 
You can also display some of the graph 
types in more than one format. For 
example, you can display bar charts 
that are standard, grouped, columnar, 
and so on. 

The program makes extensive use of 
"Dialog Boxes," i.e., pull-down menus. 
This is another example of the ease of 
programming power that comes with 
OS-9 Level II, as these are really no- 
thing more than small overlay windows. 
In essence, the program uses the pop- 
ular point-and-click method of opera- 
tion. Just move the pointer to one of the 
main menu items listed across the top 
of the screen, click a button, and a 
submenu appears. 

The graphs may be drawn on the 
screen or printed out. The screen draw- 
ing is fast — again another plus with 
using OS-9 Level II. Additionally, a 
series of graphs may be tied together 
into a slide-show for presentation. 
Phantomgraph contains a sequence 
editor to allow for the creation of a 
sequence file (called a Drawing file). 

For hard copy printouts, the program 
contains a unique printer driver. Instead 
of merely supporting the Tandy mode 
of DMP printers, it also supports the 
IBM mode of its printers. 

One of the most time-consuming 
aspects of using Phantomgraph is enter- 

1 36 THE RAINBOW April 1 988 



ing data on which to base a chart. But 
the programmer has even made this a 
little easier. The Utilities section of the 
main menu contains two utility files, 
under Convert. They are DYNR, which 
converts data from DynaCalc spread- 
sheet files into data usable by Phantom- 
graph, and SYLK, a procedure to con- 
vert Symbolic Link (SYLK) files to 
DynaCalc files, which can then be 
converted to Phantomgraph data. 

Aside from the couple of bugs in the 
manual, this program is excellent, and 
the graphs it produces are first-rate. The 
most amazing thing about the graphs is 
that if you don't like the way the data 
looks in a pie chart, for instance, you 
can simply select another graph type 
and have it quickly redrawn. The graphs 
are suitable for business use, for use at 
the PTA, for home use, school use, or 
just about anywhere you want to make 
a good presentation. In short, Phan- 
tomgraph is an excellent program. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Ft. Worth, TX 76102; $39.95. 
Available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide.) ^ I 

32.7U 

— Kerry Armstrong 



C0C0 1, 2 & 3 



I Softwar e — 

Chemistry Tutor — 
An Excellent 
Learning Tool 

Chemistry Tutor is a two-disk set for 
the C0C0 1, 2 or 3, The disks are not 
copy-protected and can be backed up 
for your own protection. The program 
can be booted with the DOS command 
or by typing RUN "BOOT". The user is 
first presented with four options on a 
menu screen: Start Text, Start Test, 
Element Data and End Program. 

The first option, Start Text, provides 
the user with six lessons covering the 
various technical aspects of the ele- 
ments. The information provided is 
based on text found in various books 
such as The New Encyclopedia Britan- 
nica and General Chemistry Principles 
and Structure. The information pro- 
vided consists of various definitions 
such as, "Matter is defined as anything 
that takes up space and has mass. Mass 
is the amount of matter that the sub- 
stance possesses and has a unit of 
weight." 

Obviously, the intent of this program 



is to assist a person in the study of 
chemistry. The information provided 
can be found in text books, but many 
people learn faster and more thor- 
oughly when prompted by a computer. 
At various places throughout the les- 
sons, a high resolution display of the 
element or definition is presented. The 
periodic table is also presented in the 
Hi-Res mode. 



[1 . ELEMENT 



ATOMIC NUMBER • 



ATOMIC SYMBOL- 



0 





ATOMIC HEIGHT 


15 99 


S4 


p 


COMMON VALENCE ■ 


- £ 




lb 


SPECIFIC GRAVITY: 


1.14 






r? 


MELTING POINT I B< 


-216 


8 


EL 


E 0 I L I M 0 POINT <1> 


- i$i 






^JcjolmNUE^- pTeTDTFTJ 





Start Test provides the user with a 
multiple-choice test on each of the six 
available lessons. The user is prompted 
with the correct answer if an incorrect 
one is input. A continuing score is 
provided so that the student can keep 
track of his or her progress. 

The third option, Element Data, 
provides the user with a submenu of 
four additional options: Study Periodic 
Table, Find Element Data, Quiz on 
Periodic Table and End This Program. 
If you choose to study the periodic 
table, you can do it either sequentially 
or randomly from the 106 available 
elements that are loaded into the com- 
puter's memory If you choose to find 
element data, you can look it up by 
name, atomic number or atomic sym- 
bol. 

The last option is a quiz on the 
periodic table, and the student can be 
quizzed by element name, atomic 
number or atomic symbol. The stu- 
dent's score is also monitored during the 
test and presented on the screen. 

I found Chemistry Tutor to be an 
excellent learning tool. The programs 
are well-structured, and the many 
graphics pages are very^ well-done and 
of textbook quality. The programs are 
easy-to-use, user-friendly and self- 
prompting. I believe chemistry students 
and teachers will benefit from this 
software, and I recommend it without 
reservation. 



(A to Z Unlimited, Software Division, 901 
Ferndale Blvd., High Point, NC 27260, 919- 
882-6255; $42 plus $3 S/H) 



— ■ Robert Gray 



1 Software 



CoCo1,2&3 



Graf Find — 
Organize Your 
Picture Files 

Graf Find is a handy graphics utility 
to help you organize your Co Co Max, 
Graphicom II and MacPaint picture 
files. 

It allows you to view, rename, kill and 
transfer pictures from one disk to 
another easily and recognizes all stand- 
ard 6K or 12K graphics picture files, 
regardless of extensions such as -MRX, 
.BIN, etc. 

The program supplied on disk is not 
copy-protected, so making backup cop- 
ies for your own use is not a problem. 
The program is written for all models 
of CoCo with at least 32K of RAM. It 
works fine on the CoCo 3, as well, but 
your pictures will appear in black and 
white if you are using the CM-8 Tandy 
RGB monitor. 

The program works with RS-DOS 
1.0 or 1.1 and the author claims that it 
works with ADOS, too, but I did not 
verify that. I did try it with RS-DOS 1 . 1 
and ADOS 3 on my CoCo 3, and in 
both cases the program booted with the 
DOS command. The documentation is 
good and easy to follow. Although the 
program is not difficult to use, a built- 
in help file is available by typing ? at the 
user prompt. 




The program is loaded in and, after 
a colorful title screen, the user is asked 
questions relating to the number of 
drives in use and to which drive possible 
file transfers will be sent. After the disk 
files are read into memory, they are 
displayed on the Hi-Res screen in two- 
column format with their appropriate 
file extension. The user can either view, 
transfer, kill or rename any file on the 
disk. You can also enter an N for a new 
disk without having to break out of the 



program and restart it. I tried each 
command and did not have any trouble 
manipulating the files contained on 
several of my picture disks. 

The only possible problem I encoun- 
tered was that the author (Steve Rick- 
etts) used the high speed and super high 
speed pokes in the program. While these 
pokes are desirable from an operational 
viewpoint and improve overall program 
operation and flow, they do create a 
problem on some of the older models of 
the Color Computer. Fortunately, the 
pokes are pointed out in the documen- 
tation and can be removed from the 
BASIC listing using CoCo's built-in line 
editor. I doubt that CoCo 2s would have 
any problem with these pokes. The 
program ran fine on my CoCo 3, but I 
had to remove the pokes before it would 
run on my old CoCo 1. If you buy this 
program and your computer locks up, 
be sure to remove these offending pokes 
after loading, and edit the listing before 
running. 

Graf Find is a good utility program 
and is well-written for the CoCo picture 
buff. If you have lots of pictures and 
want a way to move them around easily, 
I suggest you consider this program. 



(RainyDny Software, 10625 SE 362nd Ave., 
SP.B-32, Boring, OR 97009, 503-663-2423; 
$10) 



— Jerry Semones 




CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



CoCo XT - 
Well-Designed Hard 
Drive Interface 

Many CoCo users reach a point 
where they consider the use of a hard 
drive system. Three conditions have 
made this consideration less practical 
than it might have been. First, the cost 
of hard drive systems for the CoCo have 
not been "user-friendly." Secondly, 
there is a lack of general knowledge on 
the part of most users about how to put 
such a system together. Finally, most 
hard drive systems available in the 
CoCo Community have only been usa- 
ble under OS-9. 

The CoCo XT and CoCo XT-RTC, 
from Burke & Burke, address all three 
of these concerns quite well. It is pos- 
sible to set up a 20-Meg hard drive 



system for around $400 using the CoCo 
XT interface. To set up such a system 
requires little technical expertise. If you 
purchase the optional Hyper-ffO soft- 
ware from Burke & Burke, you can use 
the hard drive system without going to 
OS-9. As shipped, the interface includes 
a wide variety of drivers and software 
for building a descriptor specific to your 
hard drive for use under OS-9. 

The CoCo XT is designed to accept 
the common and popular Western Dig- 
ital WD1002-WX1 and WD1002-27X 
(RLL) hard drive controllers used in 
IBM PCs and compatibles. These con- 
trollers are often shipped with bare hard 
drives as a package. It is easy to find 
low-cost 20- and 30-Meg drives in many 
of the "clone" magazines and catalogs. 
It isn't uncommon to find an ad for a 
bare 20-Meg drive with controller for 
around $260. Just make sure the con- 
troller is one of those listed above when 
you order the hard drive. In addition, 
you will need to purchase a case with 
power supply to house your new drive. 
These can be found through advertisers 

in THE RAINBOW. 

Installation of the system is fairly 
straightforward and is well-covered in 
the user's manual accompanying the 
CoCo XT. You install the controller in 
the CoCo XT interface and connect the 
data and control cables between the 
controller and the drive. Mount the 
drive in the case and connect the power 
supply cable. Put the top on the hard 
drive case and enclose the interface/ 
controller combination in its protective 
"sandwich." Plug the interface into Slot 
3 of your Multi-Pak Interface and you 
are ready to begin software installation. 

Simply boot OS-9 (all versions are 
supported) and follow the instructions 
in the CoCo XT user's manual. When 
creating the device descriptor for your 
particular hard drive, you will be asked 
for specific parameters concerning that 
drive. These can be found on the data 
sheet, which' should accompany the 
drive when you purchase it. In addition, 
Burke & Burke has thoughtfully pro- 
vided a table of specifications for the 
more common hard drives. 

Since I had recently pulled a 20-Meg 
Seagate drive with a WD 1002 controller 
out of my compatible and had a spare 
drive case with power supply on hand, 
I was ready to go when I received the 
CoCo XT interface. All told, installa- 
tion was complete in about an hour. Of 
course, then came the somewhat tedious 
task of copying all of my commands and 
software to the hard drive. Proper use 
of the Dsave command lessened the 

April 1988 THE RAINBOW 137 



severity of this chore, however, and I 
was soon under way. 

The interface used for this review was 
the CoCo XT-RTC. This unit is identi- 
cal to the CoCo XT except that it 
includes a hardware real-time clock. In 
addition to the driver and descriptor 
software, Burke & Burke provides 
several utilities for setting and reading 
this clock. Now when I boot my system, 
it tells me what time it is. I found the 
clock to be a handy and very welcome 
addition — well worth the additional 
$30. 

From an OS-9 standpoint, the Burke 
& Burke interface presents a very viable 
option to the serious CoCo user. While 
installation may require some limited 
working knowledge of OS-9, the proce- 
dure is explained thoroughly. The inter- 
face is well-designed, and it is obvious 
that considerable thought went into the 
project during its conception. I com- 
mend Burke & Burke for providing such 
an alternative to the CoCo Community. 



(Burke & Burke, P.O. Box 1283, Palatine, 
IL 60078, 312-397-2898; $69.95; w/real-time 
clock, $99.95) 



— Cray Augshurg 



I Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



Color Venture 
RAMDISK — 
Instant Access for 
the CoCo 3 

ColorVenture has released their ver- 
sion of the popular RAM disk for the 
CoCo 3. The extra memory available in 
the 512K CoCo 3 makes the use of a 
RAM disk not only practical but fun. 
The ColorVenture RAMDISK sets up 
two 35- or 40-track, memory-resident 
disk drives, providing instant access to 
programs or files stored in them. It's 
reset-protected and lets you use up to 
four physical drives in addition to two 
RAM disks. If you have ColorVenture 's 
Printer Lightning spooler program, you 
will have the advantage of the RAM 
disks and printer spooler without losing 
any BASIC memory. All of the present 
disk commands are supported, and you 
can save your default setup so that you 

138 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



won't have to reconfigure it every time 
you boot up the computer. 

A two-page, easy-to-follow instruc- 
tion sheet is provided, making installa- 
tion quick and easy. The program is not 
copy-protected, so make backup copies 
for your own peace of mind. 

After loading, you are required to 
answer whether or not you want to use 
the default settings. New users should 
answer this with an N if this is the first 
use of the program. 

If you answer no to the default ques- 
tion, you are provided with prompts 
asking what physical drives you have 
and by what number to designate them. 
In my case, since I have two drives, I set 
up drives 0 and 1 as my physical drives, 
and drives 2 and 3 as my RAM disks. 
If you goof, you can restart the whole 
process by simply pressing the BREAK 
key. When you are finished you will 
have four drives available. 

To see the RAM disks in action, I put 
a disk chock full of games and utilities 
in Drive 0, typed BACKUP 0 TO 2, and 
pressed ENTER. As usual, the Drive 0 
light came on, the drive churned a bit 
and then stopped. Typing DIR 2 re- 
vealed that the entire contents of the 
disk in Drive 0 had been copied onto the 
RAM disk designated as Drive 2. 1 was 
then ,able to LOAD or LDADM any of the 
programs and RUN or EXEC them with 
instant speed. 

The RAM disk is really fast in this 
regard, but unlike a physical disk that 
remembers its contents when the power 
is turned off, the RAM disk is volatile. 
That is, if you turn off the power with 
important data stored in it, it will be 
lost! So you must remember to fre- 
quently save new programs or data in 
the ^RAM disk to a real honest-to- 
good ness floppy. 

Because RAMDISK is memory- 
resident, some programs will not work. 
One case in point is Telewriter-80 — the 
enhanced, 80-column, CoCo 3 version 
of the popular Telewriter-64 word 
processing program. OS-9 Level II does 
not work, either. There may be prob- 
lems with other programs due to con- 
flicts in memory allocation, but most of 
the software I tried worked fine. 

One other feature I was impressed 
with was a provision to recover your 
data or program stored in a RAM disk 
in case of a computer crash — provided 
you don't turn off the computer in 
frustration, 

I liked ColorVenture RAMDISK. I 
found it easy-to-use and a perfect com- 
panion to my CoCo 3. While no RAM 
disk is ever as safe as a real floppy due 



to its RAM dependency, it does provide 
an excellent method for instant access 
to frequently used programs and data 
that have been saved to a floppy. 

(Dr. Preble's Programs, 6540 Outer Loop, 
Louisville, KY 40228, 502-241-6474; $19.95 
plus $2.50 S/H) 

— David Gerald 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



The Director — 
Create Exciting 
Graphics 
Presentations 

The Director is the sequel to the My 
Artist program produced by SEESOF 
in 1987. (See rainbow Reviews, Oc- 
tober 1987.) The Director is a graphics 
sequencer, but it goes beyond the ordi- 
nary. It allows the user to produce 
graphics displays with sound or music, 
color changes and time delays. 

The Director requires a Tandy Color 
Computer 3 and may be run on a 
cassette or disk-based system. The 
program is written in BASIC, but it is 
fast. It makes use of numerous menus 
to allow the user to produce a short 
program file that will run a graphics/ 
sound sequence. The program's manual 
is well-written and thorough. 

What makes The Director special is 
its ease of use. With all the available 
sub-menus, the user can walk right 
through the program and create an 
exciting graphics presentation. 

The first step in creating a sequence 
is to gather together the picture files you 
will be working on. The Director is not 
a drawing program, so these picture 
files have to be created with other 
programs or taken from other sources. 
Because The Director is essentially a 
sequel to My Artist, the picture format 
the authors decided on was the same 
format used by that program. However, 
the programmers have included a CON- 
VERT utility program on the program 
disk that will capture almost any CoCo 
3 HSCREEN picture and convert it to the 
My Artist format. 

Bear in mind that the CoCo 3 Hi-Res 
mode graphics do take up a lot of disk 
space, so you will not be able to get too 
many different picture files on a disk. 
This is the greatest limitation to the 
sequencer program. Fortunately, the 



actual "sequence" program that The 
Director creates is not very long and 
takes little disk space. 

I suggest the next step you take is to 
make some rough pencil sketches of 
your pictures and note the color codes 
for each major area of the picture. (You 
may recall that one of the exercises in 
the CoCo 3 manual was to make a list 
of each of the 64 color codes and name 
each color. It will be extremely helpful 
to you to find that old list, because you 
are going to need it.) 

The reason for the sketches is quite 
simple. One of the major features of The 
Director is that it allows you to make 
changes in the various colors in your 
pictures. You may change individual 
palette slots or all of them on the fly. 
This makes for some degree of anima- 
tion in the sequence. This feature, 
coupled with the Time Delay feature 
and the Repeat feature, can add a little 
life to your graphics presentations. 

The Time Delay feature allows the 
user to set the amount of time a picture 
will remain on the screen before the next 
event happens. The event could be a 
color change, a picture change, or a bit 
of sound or music. Repeat allows the 
user to set up cycles of events that can 



be done over and over again to make a 
larger presentation. 

Similar to Repeat is the Jump func- 
tion. Jump is used to jump or skip over 
several events to another starting place 
in the sequence. Essentially, a sequence 
is nothing more than a list of events. 

The Music/ Sound features can be 
handled in one of two ways — either by 
utilizing a prerecorded cassette tape, 
which the sequence list will turn off and 
on at the designated time, or by utilizing 
BASIC'S sound functions. Sound effects 
are created by the tone and duration 
functions of the CoCo 3 and, coupled 
with the REPEfiT command, fairly de- 
cent sound effects can be created. Music 
may be created using Basic's PLRY 
commands. Again, the Repeat function 
may be used to make longer musical 
pieces. 

Once the user has gone through all 
the various steps to create a graphics 
sequence, he or she can run the sequence 
list while still in The Director. This 
allows the user to fine-tune or edit the 
sequence and then save the finished 
product to disk or cassette. Likewise, 
the user can always reload the sequence 
file into the program and add to or edit 
it further. 



When the sequence has been saved to 
the disk with the picture files, the editor 
program is no longer needed. The 
authors have provided a short program 
on the program disk called DI5PLRY, 
which they have included as shareware. 
This means the user can feel free to 
provide copies of his or her graphics 
presentations to others. DISPLfiY does 
only one thing. It allows the user to load 
in a sequence file and then displays the 
graphics/ sound sequence for viewing 
and listening. 

You don't have to be limited to your 
CoCo 3 and monitor to show off your 
artistic talents. The CoCo 3 does have 
true video and audio output jacks that 
can be hooked to a VCR, and with the 
graphics and sound capabilities, some 
pretty neat videos could be made. Think 
about it. Like I said before, The Direc- 
tor is not just an ordinary graphics 
sequencer. 



(SEESOF, P.O. Box 574, Beaufort, SC 
29901, 803-524-0116; The Director, $39.95; 
My Artist and The Director, $49.95) 



— Kerry Armstrong 



Still keeping the books the way Granc^p^did? 
Then you need CoCo- Accountant 



Tired. of scrounging through 

old shoeboxes full of receipts, 
canceled checks and bills? 
Looking for an easy way to 
organize your finances when the 
tax man calls? Then you need 
CoCo-Accountant, the best- 
selling home and small business 
accounting program for the 
Color Computer. All you have to 
do is set up a chart of accounts 
and begin entering transactions. 
Checks, credit card expenses, 
income, In any order. Just toss it 
in and CoCo-Accountant sorts it 
out. No fuss, no muss, no mess. 

When you're through, Coco- 
Accounfant will dazzle you with 
an array of reports that will 
answer the three basic questions 
we all ask about our finances: 
Where did it come from? Where 
did it go? And what can I deduct 
from my taxes? 

Here's what it can do for you: 



List and total expenses and in- 
come by month. 
^> List and total expenses and 
income by account, for any 
month or the whole year. 

List and total expenses or 
income by payee or income 
source for any month or the 
whole year. 

o Track, list and summarize tax- 
deductible expenses. 

Track, list and summarize ex- 
penses subject to sales tax. Even 
calculates total sates tax you 
paid! 

& Produce a printed spreadsheet 

showing activity by month and 
account for the whole year! 
^ Balance your checkbook, of 

course! 

<p Sort entries by date and store 
files on tape or disk. • 
^ Up to 900 entries in a single file. 
Requires 64K CoCo or Coco 3. 




mm 



Coco-Accountant is $34.95 
on tape or disk. Be sure to 
specify which you want 
when you order. We accept 
VISA and MasterCard. COD 
orders, add $3.00. Send 
check or money order to the 
address below or call our 
toll-free order line. For infor- 
mation, call 301-521-4886. 



Federal Hill Software 8134 Scotts Level Rd. Baltimore, Md. 21208. Toll-free orders 800-628-2828 Ext. 850 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 139 




The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 




Avatex 1200e, a 1200/300 bps stand- 
alone modem designed for the home, 
school or portable computer. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Cinsoft, 2235 Losan- 
tiville Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45237, 
(513) 396-7638; $99; $109 w/CoCo 
cable; $139 w/ cable and Autoterm. 

Big Pix 3, a 64K graphics editor that 
produces a picture that is 456 pixels 
wide and 565 pixels high. For the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3. Tothian Software, Inc., Box 
663, Rimersburg, PA 16248; $24.95. 

EZWriter, a 32K ECB word processor. 
Features allow you to save, retrieve and 
revise letters on tape or disk; save 
mailing lists; and print labels. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. E.Z. Friendly Soft- 
ware, Button & Orchard Streets, 
Rhinecliff, NY 12574, (914) 876-3935; 
$19.95. 

Graphic Echo II, a 32K graphics screen 
dump available on disk or tape. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Tothian Software, 
Inc., Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 16248; 
$14.95. 

Home Publisher, a 128K desktop pub- 
lishing program. Detailed graphics 
images and different sizes of text allow 
you to produce newsletters, memos, 
certificates, or any other small docu- 
ment using your computer and an 
ordinary printer. For the CoCo 3. 
Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102; $39.95. 
Available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide. 



Iron Forest, a 128K light phaser game. 
Your mission is to protect the sacred 
White Dove. Use your phaser to zap the 
evil creatures that inhabit the forest and 
threaten the dove. For the CoCo 3. 
Diecom Products, Inc., 6715 Fifth Line, 
Milton, Ontario, Canada L9T 2X8, 
(416) 878-8358; $28.95 U.S.; $38.95 
Cdn.; light phaser wj interface, $34.95 
U.S.; $49.95 Cdn.; game and phaser 
together, $59.95 U.S.; $83.95 Cdn. 

Mr. Corey, a 64K graphics Adventure. 
As a member of a secret government 
organization, your mission is to spy on 
the notorious Mr. Corey. Unfortu- 
nately, you are captured and find your- 
self in a room with a nuclear time bomb. 
The fate of the world lies within your 
hands. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Val- 
kyrie Software, P. O. Box 2120, Mon- 
roe, NY 10950, (914) 783-0191; $19.95 
plus $2 S/H. 




The Power Stones of Ard, a 128K 
Adventure game. The object of the 
game is to find the Spirit Stone of Ard. 
Create your own character and begin 
your journey into a land of magic and 
monsters. For the CoCo 3. Three C's 
Projects, P.O. Box 1323, Hamlet, NC 
28345, (919) 582-5121; $18. 

Sub Battle, a World War II Simulation. 
For the CoCo 3. Epyx, 600 Galveston 
Drive, Redwood City, CA 94063; 
$29.95. Available in Radio Shack stores 

^ Ryntomg/n PftK graphics generator 
that features 320-by-192 16-color 
graphics, pull-down and page-down 
point-and-click menus, full screen 
workspace, nine different fonts, and 
more. For the CoCo 3. Elec-Soft, 803d 
W. 47th Street, Norfolk, VA 23508, 
(804) 451-1255; $12. 

<^p> First product received from this company 




The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



140 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



TtfL TOM MIX COMPANIES 



FLIGHT 16*t - This is the very finest flight simulation 
program on the market today. Flight 16 will work with 
all color computers. Flies very much like a Cessna 150. 
Is a full instrument aircraft with sound effects and out- 
the-window graphics. As a REAL bonus feature, you may 
design your own airports and flight areas. 

$34.95 

WORLDS OF FLIGHT *f - A real-time flight simulation 
of a sophisticated ultra-light aircraft which generates 
panoramic 3-D views of ground features as you fly in any 
of nine different "worlds." The manual included explains 
the instrument panel, the basis of flight control, etc. For 
the serious simulation buff! 

$30.95 32K 

P51 MUSTANG ATTACK/FLIGHT SIMULATION *f - The 

ultimate video experience! For the first time ever, two 
CoCo's can be linked together via cable modem. (If play- 
ing via modem, both computers require a copy of the 
program.) Or play alone and sharpen your skills against 
a non-combatant computer drone. 

$30.95 32K 

APPROACH CONTROL SIMULATION* - "Caught in a 
blinding snowstorm, two jet airliners are on a collision 
course. Hundreds of lives are at stake! A high-speed 
disaster is inevitable unless you act fast . . . " This and 
many other scenarios await you as the Air Traffic Con- 
troller. Experience firsthand challenges, frustrations and 
pressures felt by all Air Traffic Controllers! 

$25.95 32K 

THE KING*t • This is a color computer classic! Looks 
and plays like the popular arcade game. Contains the 
same four screens as the original: barrels, pins, jacks, 
and conveyors. Super graphics! 

$25.95 32K 

TRAPFALL*t - The "pitfalls" in this game are many. 
Fight your way through the jungle collecting hidden 
treasures as you go. 

$20.95 16K 

(CATERPILLAR II* t - The CoCo has needed a perfect 
centipede-type game since day one. You will throw all 
imitations aside when you see this. 

$20.95 16K 

BUZZARD BAIT*t - We've done it again. Outstanding 
high resolution graphics and sound make this "joust ' 
type game a must for your software collection. One or 
two players. 

$20.95 32K 



MS. MAZE*f - Ms. Maze combines brilliant color, high 
resolution, detailed graphics and music to make it look 
and play like the arcade version. It is the closest thing 
to the arcade Pac games that we've seen for the CoCo! 
Arcade Aces — this one's for you! 

$20.95 32K 

CUBER*t - The hazards faced by Cuber are many! Help 
him change the colors of the pyramid while avoiding the 
many dangers always present. 

$20.95 32K 

VEGAS GAME PAK*t - Now you can bring Las Vegas 
home with you! This package contains six different 
games: Video Keno, Video Poker, and Video Blackjack, 
plus three slot machine lookalikes, Bar 5, 3 Line, and 
Right/Left. 

$24.95 16K 

GOLD FINDER *t - Here's the quality you have come 
to expect from TOM MIX! While avoiding enemies, pick 
up all the pieces of gold along the way; then ride, the 
elevator to the top to solve each level. Sixty-nine levels. 
PLUS now you can create your own levels. 

$20.95 32K Disk only 

THE SAILOR MAN*f - Avoid the punches of the Bigfat- 
badguy and the flying bottles thrown by the Olduglysea- 
woman to rescue Elsie and win her heart! One or two 
players. More great sound and graphics from the author 
of "The King!" 

$25.95 64K 



SPECIAL OFFER: 

Order two, take $5.00 off total 
Three or more, take $8.00 off total 



MONEYOPOLY*t - Now you can play the popular board 
game on your color computer! Probably the most realistic 
computer board game simulation ever. Contains all the 
features of the original game. Two to four players. 

$20.95 32K 

DRACONIAN*! - Your mission is to destroy all of the 
enemy bases within each sector, rescue as many 
astronauts as possible and dock with the friendly base 
at the top of the sector. Your spaceship can move in eight 
different directions. An exciting program with outstanding 
graphics and sound! 

$20.95 32K 



ARCADE GAME SALE 

NOW! Here's your chance to have your own collection of Arcade 
favorites: 



Package #1 

Donkey Kong 
Centipede 
Pitfall 
Donut Dilemma 
Joust 

$49.95 



Package *2 

Popeye 
Ms. Pacman 
Tron 

Burger Time 
Q*Bert 

$49.95 



Package *3 

Pacman 
Frogger 
Quix 

Bartender 
Loderunner 

$49.95 



OR: 2 packages only $94.95; 3 packages only $139.95 

Each package contained on more than one unprotected diskette (Sorry, 
disk only). This is high quality software that formerly sold for as high 
$34.95 each. 

Pi ease a( jd $4.00 shipping on this special offer only. 



elec*TRON*f - Patterned after the popular arcade game, 
there are four men on your team and four subgames to 
complete. 

$20.95 16K 

THE WILD WEST - CoCo III Only - The notorious 
desperado Black Bart has escaped from jail and is on 
his way to Dry Gulch to recover his hidden fortune. Can 
you capture him? Four voice music and sound effects 
and a vocabulary of over 100 words! 

$20.95 Disk only 

WIZARD'S DEN* - Another of our outstanding graphic 
adventures! You must recover the Gem of Damocfes, 
stolen by the Evil Wizard. His magic is strong and he 
can make you see things that don't exist! 

$20.95 64K Disk only 

LUNCHTIME*t - Your chef, Peter Pepper, is surround- 
ed! Dodge pickles, hot dogs and eggs while building ham- 
burgers. Fast paced action for either one or two players. 

$19.95 32K 

BREWMASTER*t - Move along the end of the bars ser- 
ving beers to your thirsty customers, but watch out for 
falling glasses and rowdy customers! 

$15.95 32K 

MAUI VICE* t - Step into the shoes of Crock and Bubbs 
in this graphic adventure and gather evidence. A new 
story generated each time you play! 

$20.95 64K extended basic, Disk only 

CHAMBERS *t - Loosely based on Cosmic Chasm, in 
each level you must destroy all of the evil creatures. In 
all there are 20 series of chambers with 20-35 intercon- 
nected rooms. 

$15.95 32K 

DRAGON SLAYER* - Save the villagers of Pendor from 
Icarus, the bloodthirsty dragon! He lives in a cave way 
up in the mountains, which is a treasure chest full of gems 
and cashbags. Be on the lookout for enemies and bar- 
riers at all times! Ten levels with sixteen rooms per level; 
over 160 exciting screens. 

$20.95 32K Disk only 

VEGAS SLOTS - CoCo III Only - Seven of the most 
popular slot machine games found in Vegas are yours 
for the price of one: MultiBars, Fruit MultiBars, Right- 
Left/Left-Right, Lucky Dollar, Melons and Bars, Fruit and 
Bar 5. Designed to be as real as being there. One of the 
most outstanding programs we have ever offered. 

$29.95 Disk only 

VIDEO CARDS & KENO - CoCo III Only - Play Video 
Poker, Jokers Wild, Blackjack, and Keno. These games 
are so real you expect to see Wayne Newton walk by! 
Outstanding graphics and movement. Wanna Bet? 

$29.95 Disk only 

TEACHERS DATABASE II* - Allows teachers to keep 
computerized files of students. • Up to 100 students, 24 
items per student • Statistical analysis of scores • Grades 
can be weighed, averaged, percentaged • Test result 
graphs/grade distribution charts 

$59.95 64K TDBII Disk Only 

$42.95 32K TDB 

More educational software available. 

TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 
616/676-8172 

• Specify tape or disk when ordering 

• Add $3.00 postage/handling 

• Ml residents add 4% sales tax 













i i 


f master charge! 




VISA 









* CoCo 1 , 2, 3 compatible 
t Joystick required 

Write for free catalog 



1 CoCo Consu l tatio ns 



Memory Souped Up, Running Hot 

My 512K memory card from Disto 
tends to run very hot. Also, the heat sink 
in the CoCo 3 runs very hot. After some 
hours of use, the computer'crashes, and 
memory check programs reveal errors 
and sometimes crash themselves. Any 
ideas? 

Franz C. Shattuck 
(GCSCOMP) 
Hillsboro, NH 

First of all, I doubt that the make of 
the memory upgrade board is in any 
way the problem. It certainly is true that 
the power supply of the CoCo 3 runs its 
power transistor and associated heat 
sink quite hot in "normal" operation. A 
cure could involve replacing that tran- 
sistor with a beefier T03 cased unit, and 
whether or not you changed the transis- 
tor, you'd have to mount the regulator 
transistor on a more massive heat sink. 

David Schoepf of Vicksburg, Missis- 
sippi, found this fix to be very effective 
in cutting down on the heat inside his 
CoCo 3, which had become intolerable 
when he added his 5 12K upgrade board. 
He observed that, before, the heat sink 
on the transistor was so hot you could 
not touch it without being burned. 
When he substituted a big, thick alu- 
minum plate for the wimpy little heat 
sink Tandy supplied, the plate ran 
warm, but not too hot to touch. This is 
rather a technical hassle, and many 
folks consider using fans instead. 

I am not a fan of fans, myself ... I 
hate the noise they make, and feel the 
CoCo design should be able to run with 
convective cooling alone. But fans do 
offer the easiest solution to this sort of 
problem. It also seems to be the case 
that different brands and speeds of 
memory chips for the 512K board run 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOWS CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online, His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography, Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 

1 42 THE RAINBOW April 1 988 



Just What 
the Doctor 
Ordered 

By Marty Goodman 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



at varying temperatures. Current wis- 
dom would indicate that the best chips 
for a 512K upgrade board are NEC 
brand 150 or 120 NS chips. You might 
want to consider trying out a different 
set of memory chips in your board. 

Finally, you might want to experi- 
ment with a different timing fix from the 
one recommended by Disto. Disto and 
most other 512K board makers recom- 
mend cutting C65 and C66 off the board 
to fix the timing for their 512K board. 
A different fix, one that some report is 
successful in making their DRAMs run 
a little cooler, is the one recommended 
by Hemphill Electronics for their 
board. They have you leave both C65 
and C66 in place and instead have you 
put a 47-ohm resistor in parallel with 
R22 on the board. R22 is a 120-ohm 
(brown-red-brown-gold) resistor. You 
may want to try this, though you will, 
of course, have to reinstall the caps you 
removed or disconnected originally. 

Testing the Environment 

How can I detect whether my pro- 
gram is running on a CoCo 3 vs. a CoCo 
1 or 2? 

Jim Sparks 

(ESCOMAN) 

Aurora, CO 

There are any number of ways to do 
that. Roger Bouchard (HARBIE) of 



Montreal, Quebec (one of our more 
knowledgeable experts on the intraca- 
cies of CoCo 3 Disk BASIC), suggests 
checking location $E7. If it's 0, 1 or 2, 
you've got a CoCo 3. Those numbers 
will also tell you which text screen mode 
the CoCo 3 is in at the time. 

My own suggestion would be to see 
if you are able to both write to and read 
from the first six bits of the palette 
registers at SFFBO through SFFBF. 
That is, choose a few of those registers, 
read what you find in them, save that, 
then try writing stuff into them and 
seeing if you can recover that same data 
from those registers when you read 
them. Be sure to mask out (AND 
00111111) the high order two bits of 
those registers when you do both the 
reading and writing. And, when done 
with this test, be sure to restore to those 
registers what you found in them orig- 
inally. 

If you find you can write data into 
and then read it out of the registers in 
that range, then you have a CoCo 3. If 
not, you have a CoCo 1 or 2. Note that 
Roger's suggestion is dependent on the 
way the CoCo 3's "superBASlC" ROM 
software works, whereas my suggestion 
is independent of the BASIC ROM and 
relies on a hardware characteristic of 
the GIMEchip. 

Horizontal Overscan 

I'm having trouble with a CM-3 color 
composite video monitor when using it 
with a CoCo 3, In the 32-, 40- and 80- 
column modes, two or three characters 
are cut off on both the right- and left- 
hand sides. Can you help? 

Dave Barnes 

( GLENSIDE) 

Glenside, IL 

This is not surprising. You see, when 
composite video color monitors and 
TVs leave the factory, they tend to be 
adjusted for folks who will be using 
them to show TV and VCR material. 
Now, TV and VCR viewers don't want 
to see even the slightest amount of black 
border around their pictures on the 
screen, so the sets have their horizontal 
width adjusted to be a bit wider than the 
actual width of the screen. In tech 
jargon, one would say that most com- 
mercial composite color monitors are 



CB ASIC- I I I 
The ULTIMATE Color Computer ill Basic Compiler!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient Machine Language Programs and you don't want to spend the next few 
trying to learn how to write them in Assembly language or with a cheap compiler, then C BASIC III is the ai 



CBASIC III is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full 
advantage of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K RAM, 
without having to spend years trying to learn assembly language programming. 
CBASIC III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you 
are already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Res Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). It is 99% 
syntax compatible with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, so most Basic programs can 
be loaded and compiled with little or no changes required. 

The compiler is an optomizing two-pass integer compiler that converts 
programs written in Basic into 100% pure 6809 Machine Language programs 
which are written directly to disk in a LOADM compatible format. The programs 
generated by the compiler are run as complete stand alone programs. A built in 
linker/editor will automatically select one and only one copy of each run-time 
library subroutine that is required and insert them directly in the program. This 
eliminates the need for cumbersome, often wasteful "run-time" packages. 

CBASIC III is for both Beginning & Advanced Users 

CBASIC III is a Powerful tool for the Beginner or Novice programmer as well 
as the Advanced Basic or Machine Language programmer. You can write 
programs without having to worry about Stack Pointers, DP registers, memory 
allocation, and so on, because CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. 
All you have to do is write programs using the standard Basic statements and 
syntax. For the Advanced Basic and Machine Language programmers, CBASIC 
III will let you take command and control every aspect of your program, even 
generating machine code directly in a program for specialized routines. 

CBASIC III adds many features not found in Color Basic, like Interrupt and 
Reset handling, to give you a level of control only available to very advanced 
Machine Language programmers. Plus, we made it exceptionally easy to use, not 
like some other compilers. CBASIC III is the friendliest and easiest compiler 
available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III has Full Command Support & Speed 

CBASIC III features well over 150 Basic Commands and Functions that fully 
support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. It 
also supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play and 
String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/PUT, H/PLAY and H/DRAW, all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable 

Printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
RINT, INPUT, INKEY , GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands. 
CBASIC m is FAST. Not only will CBASIC III compiled programs execute 10 
to several 100 times faster than Basic, but the time it takes to develop a CBASIC 
III program verses writing a machine language program is much, much shorter. A 
machine language program that might take several months to write and debug 
could be created using CBASIC III in a matter of days or hours, even for a well 
experienced machine language programmer. We had a report from one CBASIC 
user that claimed "a Basic program that used to take 3 hours to run, now runs in 7 
to 8 minutes". Another user reported a program that took 1 to 1 & 1/2 hours to 
run in Basic, Now runs in 5 to 6 minutes!!!. 

CBASIC III is more than just a Compiler 

CBASIC III has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor, that can 
be used to create and/or Edit programs for the compiler. It is a full featured 
editor with functions designed specifically for writing and editing Basic programs. 
It has built in block Move and Copy functions with automatic program 
renumbering. Complete, easy to use inserting, deleting, extending and overtyping 
of existing program lines. It is also used for Loading, Saving, Appending 
(merging), Killing disk files and displaying a disk Directory. It also has automatic 
line number generation for use when creating programs or inserting sequential 
lines between existing lines. You can set the printer baud rate and direct normal 
or compiled listings to the printer for hard copy. The built in editor makes 
program corrections and changes as easy as "falling off a log". If CBASIC III 
finds an error when compiling, it points to the place in the program line where the 
error occured. All you have to do is tell the editor what line you want to start 
editing and when it is displayed, move the cursor with the arrow keys to the place 
where the error is and correct it. Just like that, it's simple. 

Selectable 32/40/64/80 Column Displays in 192 or 225 Res. 

CBASIC III is the only Color Basic Compiler that includes it's own 32, 40, 64 
or 80 by 24 line display in 192 or 225 Resolution. All of these display formats are 
part of the standard CBASIC III compiler package. Not only can they be used for 
normal program editing and compiling, but can also be included in your compiled 
programs, with a single command, "HIRES"!! The run-time display package is 
not just a simple "WIDTH 80" display, but a full featured package, far more 
advanced than the "WIDTH 40 or 80" displays. It will let you do things you 
expect like "PRINT @" as well as X,Y positioning. You can select characters per 
line, underline, character highlight, erase to end of line or screen, home cursor, 
home & clear screen, protect screen lines, and much more. 



128K and 512K RAM Support 

CBASIC III makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the 
Color Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and install 2 
Ultra Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 5 12K of memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8K block 
and single or double bytes. CBASIC III also allows your program to use the 
upper 32K of RAM space automatically for variables or even program storage at 
run-time. It will automatically switch the RAMs in and out when needed. ITiere 
are also two other commands that allow you to control the upper 32K of RAM 
manually, under program control. No other Color Basic compiler directly 
supports the use of Extended RAM like CBASIC III. 

All Machine Language 

CBASIC III is completely written in fast efficient Machine Language, not 
Basic, like some other Color Basic compilers. Because of this, CBASIC III can 
edit and compile very large programs, even using the 80 column displays it can 
handle almost 40K of program. Some of the other Basic compilers can only 
work with 16K or about 200 lines. Even working with large programs, CBASIC 
III compiles programs with lightning fast speed. It will compile a 24K program 
to disk in less than 2 minutes! That's without a listing being generated. We've 
heard stories about some other compilers that take almost 10 minutes to 
compile a simple 2-3K program. You might inquire about this when you look at 
some of the other compilers available. 

Compare the Difference 

CBASIC III is not just another Color Basic Compiler. It is the only complete 
Basic Compiler System for the Color Computer. Compare CBASIC Ill's 
features to what other compilers offer and you'll see the difference. When 
comparing CBASIC III to other compilers you might want to keep some of these 
questions in mind. Does it support I/O functions? You can't write much of a 
program without PRINT, INPUT and so on. What about complex string 
statements, or strings statements at all? Can you compile a complex string like: 
MIDS(RIGHT$(DA$(VAL(IN$),LEN(LE$)),3,3)? How large of a programcan 
you write? Can you use two character variable names for string & numeric 
variables, like Basic? Does it support all the Hi-Res graphics statements 
including H/PLAY, H/DRAW, H/GET and H/PUT, using the same syntax as 
Basic? Do you ever have to use a separate Basic program? How long would it 
take to compile a 24K program? Can you take complete Basic programs an 
compile them without extensive changes? Will they work? How do you edit a 
program when it has errors compiling? 

The Finished Product 

Since CBASIC III contains statements to support ALL of the I/O devices 
(Disk, Tape, Screen & Printer), Hi-Res Graphics, Sound, and Enhanced Screen 
displays, it is well suited for a wide range of programming applications. When 
CBASIC III compiles a program, it generates a complete, Ready to Run 
machine language program. The finished product or program does not have to 
be interfaced to a Basic program to perform some of its functions or commands. 
This may seem obvious to you, but some of the other Color Basic compilers 
don't necessarily work this way. Some of their compiler commands need a 
separate Basic program in order for them to work. In some cases, they require 
that a separate Basic program be interfaced to the compiled program to perform 
I/O functions, like INPUT, PRINT and so on. CBASIC III doesn't do this, ALL 
of it's commands are compiled into a single machine language program, that 
does not require any kind of Basic program to make it work. 

Price Verses Performance 

The price of CBASIC III is $149.00, it is the most expensive Color Basic 
Compiler on the market, and well worth the investment. We spent over 3 years 
writing and refining CBASIC III, to make it the Best, most Compatible Color 
Basic compiler available. Most of our CBASIC III users already bought one or 
more of the other compilers on the market and have since discarded them. 
Before you buy a compiler, compare the performance of CBASIC III against any 
Color Basic compiler. Dollar for Dollar CBASIC III gives you more than any 
other Color Basic compiler available. 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

"Over the years, few products have impressed me 
as much as this one." The Rainbow, December 1987 

To order CBASIC III by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 



adjusted to have "horizontal overscan." 
This "overscan," as you noticed, is not 
desirable for text display. 

The fix consists of readjusting the 
horizontal width to make it narrower 
and then, as need be, centering the 
image. On some monitors this is very 
straightforward, for both horizontal 
width and position controls are acces- 
sible from the front or back of the 
monitor. On other monitors, you may 
have to open up the set to find one or 
both of these controls. 

The horizontal width control is typ- 
ically a ferrite slug in a coil. On some 
sets there is so much horizontal over- 
scan designed in that even after you 
maximally adjust the H width control 
for the narrowest width, there is still 
overscan. At that point you must con- 
sider replacing that coil with a different 
one, or altering the value of the capac- 
itor used with that coil to generate the 
horizontal scan. TV repair technicians 
should be able to help you. 

Printer Buffer Fix 

Here's a quick fix to a printer prob- 
lem I had. I have a Panasonic printer 
with a IK buffer on board, driven by my 
CoCo's bit-banger serial port using a 
serial-to-parallel converter. When I 
added a Panasonic brand 4K addition 
to that buffer, the printer ceased to 
work. I returned the 4K buffer and 
ordered a 64K buffer from Polygon 
(made by Performance Peripherals). 
This, too, failed to work. Finally, I 
realized the problem: The placement of 
the buffer between the printer and my 
serial-to-parallel converter interrupted 
the power the converter needed to get 
from the printer. I made up a little 
power supply for that converter, ran it 
off that, and am now able to use what- 
ever buffer I please. 

John C. Burke 
Fremont, CA 

CoCo 3 Battery Backup 

Can the CoCo 3 be fitted with a 
battery backup such as that Harold 
Wolff described on Page 46 of the 
March 1987 issue of RAINBOW? 

Michael Lewis 
Seattle, WA 

Yes! The delightfully simple and 
effective circuit Harold Wolff describes 
will work just fine on a CoCo 3. You 
merely need to hook that source of 9 
volts DC through the diodes to the 
junction of Dl and D2 on the CoCo 3 



motherboard. This junction is the side 
of the diode that is nearest Capacitor 
C62. Or just use an ohmmeter to deter- 
mine which side of Dl is hooked to a 
side of D2. You must, of course, ground 
the battery to the motherboard, as per 
Harold's instructions. To make abso- 
lutely sure youVe got the right spot on 
the right diode, just hook a volt meter 
to that spot and see if the voltage there 
(with respect to ground on the CoCo 3 
board) reads about 10 volts when the 
CoCo is turned on. If it does, youVe got 
the right spot. 

OS-9 Games and Old Controllers 

Why does Koronis Rift not work on 
my CoCo 3? Vm using a J &M controller 
with double-sided Toshiba drives and 
RS-DOS Version 1.0. The game loads 
and runs fine on a friend's system that 
also has a J&M controller. When I use 
his controller on my system, the game 
also works. 

Mark D. McDowell 
Kokomo, IN 

The oldest model of J&M controllers 
often has problems running under OS- 
9 and other programs that run the CoCo 
3 at "double speed." Note that not all 
of them have this problem, but many 
do. I recommend you call J&M about 
fixing the controller for you to make it 
compatible with the CoCo 3. 

Calling the Dog 

/ am interested in using my CoCo 2, 
along with a tape recorder and a 
photocell-based detector, to detect 
when my German shepherd jumps over 
a fence and to activate a recording of my 
voice calling her back. Have you any 
suggestions? 

Robert Schumacher 
Tucson, AZ 

I don't believe that a computer is 
appropriate technology for that project. 
It seems gross overkill for the task at 
hand. One or two 555 timer chips would 
do the job just as well — better, actually, 
for they would be both simpler and 
more reliable. As for detecting the dog 
jumping over the fence, it is hard to do 
that in broad daylight with a "photo- 
cell." Some sort of ultrasonic detector 
might make more sense, although you 
might be able to use a pulsed infrared 
detection system, such as that used by 
Radio Shack's photocell detector (Cat 
No. 49-551 or 49-307 might be exactly 
what you need, although the range is 
limited to 30 feet). Those and similar 



units often have built-in provisions for 
turning on the alarm (the tape recorder 
with the continuous loop tape in your 
case) for several seconds, then turning 
it off. That would be exactly what you 
need. You could then merely hook the 
tape control switch on your tape re- 
corder to the alarm, switch contacts on 
that photocell detector, and your pro- 
ject would be complete. I strongly feel 
that involving a full general-purpose 
microcomputer in the project would be 
a mistake. 

It might interest you to know about 
a "dog trainer" friend of mine who used 
a pressure pad sensor to detect when the 
dog jumped on the bed. The pad acti- 
vated a continuous tape loop for a few 
seconds that said (in the owner's voice), 
"I see you, Hannah! Bad Girll Get down 
off that bed!" This unit used two 555 
timer chips, and worked quite well. 

An Inexpensive Transistor 

A 2N3055 appears to work just fine 
as a replacement transistor for the pass 
power supply regulator transistor in a 
CoCo 2. This is of interest because the 
2N3055 is widely available (Radio 
Shack carries it as Part No. 26-2020) 
and quite inexpensive. 

Roger Krupski 
(HA RD WAREHA CK) 

Buffalo, NY 

Thanks very much for that useful tip. 
Your observation is even more interest- 
ing to me because the CoCo 2's service 
manual (American version) implies that 
not just any old transistor can be sub- 
stituted for that pass transistor. Yet the 
2N3055 is as generic an NPN power 
transistor as one could imagine. 



Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, the rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of genera) interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type ASK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



144 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



*** *** *** ir** COLOR COMPUTER III SOFTWARE *** *** *** *** 



CBASIC III EDITOR/COMPILER 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer HI BASIC COMPILER!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient machine language programs and you don't 
want to spend the next few years trying to learn how to write them in Assembly 
language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!!! 

CBASIC III is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full advantage 
of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K RAM, without 
having to spend years trying to learn assembly language programming. CBASIC 
III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you are 
already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Res Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). We even 
added advanced commands not available in Basic to give you a level of control 
only avialable to very advanced Machine Language Programmers. Plus we made it 
exceptionally easy to use, not like some other compilers. CBASIC III is the 
friendliest and easiest compiler available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced Basic 
or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs without having to 
worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory allocations and so on, because 
CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. For Advanced users, CBASIC HI 
will let you control every aspect of your program, even generating machine code 
directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC III features well over 150 Compiled Basic Commands and Functions 
that fully support Disk Sequential and Direet access files, Tape, Printer and 
Screen I/O. It supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play 
and String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/Put, H/Play and H/DRAW, all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable 
printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
PRINT, INPUT, INKEY, GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands." 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the Color 
Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and install 2 Ultra 
Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation, Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 5 12K of memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8K blocks 
and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor which allows 
you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a full featured editor 
designed specifically for writing Basic programs. It has block move and copy, 
.„ program renumbering, automatic line number generation, screen editing, printer 
control and much more. 

The documentation provided with CBASIC III is an 8 1/2 by 11 Spiral Bound 
book which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. We went to 
great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and understand, but 
complete and comprehensive enough for even the most sophisticated user. 

CBASIC III is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and 
well worth the investment. You can buy a less expensive compiler for your 
CoCo-3, and then find out how difficult it is to use, or how limited its features are. 
Then you'll wish you had bought CBASIC III in the first place. Dollar for dollar, 
CBASIC III gives you more than any other compiler available. If you can find a 
better CoCo-3 Basic Compiler then buy it! ! I 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

DATAPACK III PLUS V1.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 

AUTOPILOT & AUTO-LOG PROCESSORS 
X-MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT-I00 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

• No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port. 

• 8 Display Formats, 32/40/64/80 columns at 192 or 225 Res. 

• 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display & Disk. 

• ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 

• Directly record receive data to a disk file (Data Logging). 

• VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

• VT-100/52 cursor keys, position, insert/delete, PF & Alt. keys. 

• Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates. 

• Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

• 9 Variable length, Programmablc Macro Key buffers. 

• Programmable Printer rates from" 110 to 9600 baud. 

• Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 

• Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

• Freeze Display & Review information On Line with no data loss. 

• Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

• Built in 2 Drive Ramdisk for 512K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R.S. Modem- Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128K & Disk, $59.95 

EDT/ASM III 

128/512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler. It is 
designed to take advantage of the new features available in the CoCo-3 with either 
128K or 512K of memory. It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 
lines in 192 or 225 Resolution, so you use the best display mode whether you are 
using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your display. Plus you can 
select any foreground or background colors or even monochrome display modes. 
It will even support 512K by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fast Ramdisk for 
lightning fast assembly of program source code larger than memory. There is also 
a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug your assembled programs. 
EDT/ASM III has the most powerful, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/Assembler package for the Color Computer. 

• Supports Local and Global string search and/or replace. 
" Full Screen line editing with immediate line update. 

• Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

• Load & Save standard ASCII formatted file formats. 

• Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM III features include: 

• Supports the full 6809 instruction set & cross assembles 6800 code. 

• Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

• Supports Disk Library file (include) up to 9 levels deep. 

• Supports standard Motorola assembler directives. 

• Allows multiple values for FCB & FDB directives (unlike R.S. EDT/ASM) 

• Allows assembly from the Editor Buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 128K & Disk $59.95 



TEXTPRO IV 

The ADVANCED COCO-3 Word Processing System" 

• 9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 

• On Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 

• Up to 8 Proportional Character Sets Supported with Justification. 

• Up to 80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function key sets. 

• Fully Buffered keyboard accepts data even duiring disk access. 

• Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system configuration. 

• 8 Pre-Deiined Printer function commands & 10 Programmable ones. 

• Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

• Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 

" Completely Automatic Justification, Centering. Flush left & right. 

• Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

• Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 
" Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 5 12K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most advanced word processing system available for the 
COCO-3, designed for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is 
not like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
short documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional spacing, 
then most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simpler word processors. 
But, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is what your looking for. It works 
in a totally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
formatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
There are no time comsuming, and often frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
control at all times. You can see what the formatted document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, 
Italic, Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters right on the 
screen. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts. 
take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKIDATA 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All the character sets used on this AD are 
proportional spaced characters, all centering, justification, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO TV. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89.95 

HI -RES III Screen Commander 

The DISPLAY you wanted but didn't get on your CoCo-3 

• 54 Different Character Sizes available from 14 to 212 cpl. 

• Bold, Italic, Underline, Subscript, Superscript and Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad width characters. 

• Scroll Protect form 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

• Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN 3 mode. 

• PRINT @ is available in all character sizes & styles. 

• Programmable Automatic Key repeat for fast editing. 

• Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

• Selectable Character & Background color. 

• Uses only 4K of Extended (2nd 64K) or Basic RAM. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES III will improve the standard display capabilities of the Color 
Computer 3, even the 40 and 80 column displays have several features missing. 
For example, you can't use PRINT @ or have different character sizes on the same 
screen, even when mixing text and graphics with the HPR1NT command, Hi-RES 
III can give you the kind of display you always dreamed about having on your 
CoCo-3, with a wide variety of display options that you can easily use with your 
Basic or ML programs. 

HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color Basic and its operation 
is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the normal screen display with an 
extremely versatile display package. With the full control code keyboard, you can 
control many of HI-RES III extended functions with just a couple of simple 
keystrokes. 

Requires 128K Tape or Disk $34,95 

512K RAMDISK & MEMORY TESTER 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 ULTRA 
High Speed Ram Disks in you CoCo-3. It does not need or require the OS-9 
operating system. It works with R.S. DOS VI0 or Vl.l and it is completely 
compatible with Enhanced Color Disk Basicl Plus it allows your CoCo-3 to run at 
double speed all the time even for floppy disk access!!! It will not disappear when 
you press reset like some other ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
ML program to test the 512K ram. It performs several bit tests as well as an 
address test so you know that your 512K of memory is working perfectly. 

Requires 512K & Disk $19.95 

"The SOURCE IIP' 

DISASSEMBLER & SOURCE CODE GENERATOR 

The SOURCE III will allow you to easily Disassemble Color Computer 
machine language programs Directly from Disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
compatible Source code. 

• Automatic label generation and allows specifying FCB, FDB and FCC areas. 

• Disassemble programs Directly from disk, unlike other disassemblers. 

• Automatically locates Begin, End and Execution address. 

• Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

• Generates Assembler source files directly to disk or printer. 

• Built in Hex/Ascii dump/display to locate FCB, FCC & FDB areas. 

• 8 Selectable Display formats 32/40/64/80 columns in 192 or 225 Res. 

• Selectable Foreground & Background colors & Printer Baud rates. 

• Built in Disk Directory an Kill file commands. 

• Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

Requires 128K & Disk $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 

purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 

(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 



If you have an idea for the "Wishing 
Well/' submit it to Fred cf o THE 
RAINBOW. Remember, keep your 
ideas specific, and don 't forget this is 
BASIC All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use f but 
remain the property of the author. 



Every now and then I get a letter 
from someone who swears up 
and down that I have left a bug 
in one of my "Wishing Well" programs. 
Usually, I load the program to check it 
out and find that no bugs exist. Rest 
assured that all of my programs are 
tested extensively before they are pub- 
lished in these pages. 

However, no one is perfect, and I 
must now admit that several recent 
programs do need correcting, but only 
for those of you who have a CoCo 3. 
Several months ago I finally broke 
down and bought a CoCo 3 system (disk 
drive and all). Granted, the change was 
long overdue. After working with the 
machine for a while, I started to notice 
what more than a few writers have 
pointed out to me: Some basic assump- 
tions from the CoCo 1 and 2 do not 
automatically apply to the CoCo 3. 

Therefore, this month's column is 
dedicated to offering short corrections 
or, more accurately, CoCo 3 modifica- 
tions, to five recent "Wishing Well" 
programs, along with another nice little 
utility that I just threw together. 

What Went Wrong? 

With the exceptions of a few peeks 
and pokes, I have gone under the mis- 
taken assumption that basic programs 
written for CoCos 1 and 2 were perfectly 
upwardly adaptable to the CoCo 3. This 
is true to a large degree — with the 
exception of one very important area 
that missed my attention. 

The ever so popular red and blue 
artifact colors in PM0DE4 graphics are a 
bit more predictable on the CoCo 3 than 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 

146 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



Five programs get 
colorized" on the CoCo 3 



Revising 

the 
Reservoir 

By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



they are on the CoCo 1 or 2. On CoCos 
1 and 2, a color value of 2 or 3 might 
give you either red or blue, depending 
on your power-up. That is why so many 
programs have been written with the old 
"Press Reset Until Screen Is Red" 
command, which allows you to match 
the color set to what the program 
author had in mind. 

For some reason, however, the CoCo 
3 does not change its color set when you 
press the reset button. Therefore, pro- 
grams that use the value 3 in a color set 
for red will never turn red, but will 
always remain blue. (Those of you using 
an RGB monitor have a whole different 
series of problems with artifact colors, 
but I am not even going to address those 
here.) This can cause problems with 
some machine language games, such as 
Tom Mix Software's Donkey King and 
The King, which were written years 
before the CoCo 3 came out. No matter 
how many times you press reset, you 
still get a blue ape! 

Some of my earlier programs allowed 
you to select the color set from the 
keyboard by pressing A or B (e.g., 
Rockfest I and //, Baseball Fever I and 
//, Football Fever, etc.). However, in 
recent programs I have sometimes 
resorted to the reset routine because it 
does save time in programming. Let's 
take each of these programs one at a 
time and check the few short lines that 



must be added to make them work 
correctly in color on the CoCo 3. 

Even if you do not yet have a CoCo 
3, you may want to make these changes 
because they will still work perfectly on 
a CoCo 1 or 2. That way, when you 
upgrade to a CoCo 3, these programs 
will be set to work. 

Revising BLOOD 

One of my favorite sets of Simula- 
tions has to do with the human body 
and how it works. Knowing Your Body: 
How Your Blood Works (May 1987, 
Page 38) is a talking Simulation on the 
human blood system. The graphics and 
animation are nice, but not if the blood 
is blue. The four program lines shown 
in Listing 1 are needed to correct the 
color set for a CoCo 3. 

These four lines can be typed in after 
you have loaded the original program 
back into memory. By retyping these 
lines, you will replace the old lines with 
the same line numbers. Also, the blood 
will be red, not blue. 

Revising HEART 

The same goes for the Simulation 
Knowing Your Body: How Your Heart 
Works (June 1987, Page 106) — the 
sides of the heart would be colored 
incorrectly. The lines shown in Listing 

2 will fix that problem. 

Load in the program HEART first, and 
then type the two lines over, or edit 
them to make the necessary changes. 

Revising Road Skills II 

Recently I published two driver edu- 
cation programs. R0AD5KIL, the first 
one, did not need any changes because 
it was done entirely in the text mode. 
However, the second one, Road Skills 
II (December 1987, Page 52), had 
graphics and used the reset routine to 
set the red and blue colors correctly. 
After loading in ROAD II, edit or type 
the six lines shown in Listing 3. 

Revising CoCo Keys 

CoCo Keys (July 1987, Page 112) is 
a nice keyboard instructor that helps 
students learn the keyboard. Even 
though the CoCo 3 has all its arrow keys 
on the right, I have not redrawn the 
keyboard, as that would require a major 
rewrite of the program. I have changed 
only those lines that impact the color 
set. (See Listing 4.) 



Revising CoCo Keys 2 

CoCo Keys 2 (August 1987, Page 92) 
was the second program in the key- 
board series. Use the lines shown in 
Listing 5 to correct the color set. 

The change in Line 465 will also allow 
you to exit the program by pressing 
SHIFT with the up arrow key. This 
feature was somehow left out of the 
program, so now seemed as good a time 
as any to correct it. 

Save Your Fingers 

The program modifications will be 
included on rainbow on tape and on 
RAINBOW ON DISK as the following: 
BLOOD. FIX, HEART. FIX, DRIVE2. FIX, 
COCOKEYS.FIX and SPELLKEY.FIX. 

Notice that each filename has . F I X as 
an extension. (Tape versions will not 
have the extension. If you are copying 
from tape to disk with a transfer pro- 
gram, you will need to rename the 
programs, e.g., rename "BLOOD. BAS" 
to "BLOOD .FIX". Then you must resave 
them in ASCII format after loading 
them, e.g., SAVE "BLOOD. FIX" 
,A.) 

If you have the modifications on disk 
in ASCII, you will be able to simply 



merge them with the original programs. 
Use these commands: 

LOAD "BLOOD. BAS" (the original) 
MERGE "BLOOD -FIX" 

The old lines will be replaced with the 
new lines without your having to type 
them in. 



"Some BASIC assumptions 
from the CoCo 1 and 2 do 
not automatically 
apply to the CoCo 3. " 



A Nice Little Utility 

I have been a fan of Color Scripsit for 
a long time, largely because it is so 
simple (though somewhat limited in 
power). One real pain I find when using 
it is having to go through the steps of 
making a backup copy. Therefore, I 
have thrown together the short program 
in Listing 6 that will speed up the 
process a little. You will still need to 



swap disks several times, but you won't 
have to use the COPY command with all 
the different filenames and extensions. 
You need only switch the disk. 

You might ask, "Why not just use 
BACKUP0?" Well, sometimes you may 
have additional files on the disk you do 
not want copied. This speeds up the 
process. You can use this copier with 
any other disk files you want to copy — 
just change the data in the last line to 
reflect the files you want copied. 

When using your own filenames, 
make sure to have the last piece of 
information be END, as you see in Line 
100. Maybe this little program will be 
of help to you. I know it saves me some 
needless typing when making a backup 
of a disk. 

Conclusion 

I hope you are able to use these fixes 
if you have a CoCo 3. Even if you don't, 
you may want to make these merges so 
that some software is all set for you to 
use when you finally do upgrade. Those 
of you who are a bit let down by the lack 
of a totally new program this month, 
fear not — very soon I will have a new 
game for you! □ 



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PROGRAMS IS BACK! 



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WARM UPTO OUR WINTER PRICES 
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THERE IS NO BETTER WAYTO EN JOYTHE WINTER THAN TREAT- 
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PLEASE SPECIFY TAPE OR DISK 



T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, 2490 MILES STANDISH DR., HOLLAND, Ml 49424 (616) 399-9648 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 147 



Listing 1: BLOOD. FIX 

275 PCLS2:A=0:B=56:C]>4: JK$=" PR 
ESS RESET AND RUN IF SCREEN IS B 
LUE . " : GOSUB145 : B=B+20 : JK$—" PRES 
S ENTER WHEN THE SCREEN IS RED." 
:GOSUB145 

310 R=2:FORI=4TO250STEP4:PSET(I, 
0,R) : PSET (1+2, 2, R) :NEXTI:GET (0,0 
) - ( 2 56 , 2 ) , Y , G : FORI=4T09 6STEP4 : PU 



Listing 2: HEART. FIX 

320 DRAW"BM52,80C1E10BU8BR56R14" 
: PAINT (4)3,60) ,3,1: PAINT (150, 52) , 
2,1: PAINT (150, 90) ,2,1: PAINT ( 100 , 
52) ,2,1: PAINT (8 6, 52) ,3,1: PAINT (8 
6,90) ,3 ,1: PAINT (62, 26) ,2,1: PAINT 



T (0,1) -(256, 1+2) ,Y,PSET:NEXTI 
350 BL=3:A=(RND(70)*3)+13:B=RND( 
66) +10: CIRCLE (A, B) ,26,BL, . 6 : PAIN 
T (A, B) ,BL,BL: CIRCLE (A, B) ,26,R, .6 
:PAINT(A,B) ,R,R:CIRCLE(A,B) ,12,1 
, • 6 , • 8 , .4 

410 PMODE2,6:PMODEl,6:X=3:GOSUB4 
15:PAINT(60+WM,18) ,X,X:X=l:GOSUB 
415: PAINT (60+WM, 18) ,4,1: RETURN 



(56,2) ,3,1 

330 PCLS2:A=0:B=56:CL=4: JK$=" PR 
ESS RESET AND RUN IF SCREEN IS B 
LUE . ,f : GOSUB150 : B=B+2 0 : JK$=" PRES 
S ENTER WHEN THE SCREEN IS RED." 
:GOSUB150 



Listing 3:DRIVE2.FIX 

265 PCLS2:A=0:B=56:CL=4: JK$=" PR 
ESS RESET AND RUN IF SCREEN IS B 
LUE • " : GOSUB135 : B=B+20 : JK$=" PRES 
S ENTER WHEN THE SCREEN IS RED." 
:GOSUB135 

275 PCLS0:SCREEN0,0:R=3:B]>2:FOR 
I=0TO2 5 6STEP4 : PSET (1,1,2): PSET ( I 
+2,3,2) :NEXT:DIMA(20) :GET(0,0)-( 
256,4) ,A,G:PCLS0 

330 PCLS4:DRAW"S16C2BM128,120R10 



Listing 4: COCOKEYS.FIX 

10 PMODE4,l:PCLSl:SCREENl,l:PMOD 
E3:PCLS3 

295 DRAW"BM2 , 34 " : F0RI=1T014 : GOSU 
B465: PAINT ( (1*18) -6; 28) ,2, 2: NEXT 
300 DRAW"BM4,52":F0RI=1T011:G0SU 
B4 65 : PAINT ( ( 1*18 ) -2 , 42 ) , 2 , 2 : NEXT 
• : DRAW"C4U14R3 2D14NL3 2BR4 " : PAINT ( 
(1*18 ) -2 , 42 ) , 4 , 4 : GOSUB4 65 : PAINT ( 



E10U10H10L20G10D10F10R10" : PAINT ( 

128 ,20) ,2,2: DRAW"C4BM128 , 116R9E9 

U10H9L18G9D10F9R9" 

375 DRAW"S25BM134,126C2M+14,-18H 

L26GM+14,+18" 

3 80 DRAW"BM13 4,86M+7,-9HL12GM+7, 

+9": PAINT (128, 18) ,2,2 

390 JK$="YIELD" : B=42 : A=108 : CL=2 : 

GOSUB13 5: JK$=" YIELD MEANS THAT 

YOU DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT OF WAY 

.":GOSUB30j2> 



242,42) ,2,2:PAINT(242,42) ,4,1 
305 DRAW"BM4 , 70U14R28D14NL28BR4" 
: FORI=1TO10 : GOSUB4 65 : PAINT ( ( 1*18 
) +6 , 60 ) , 2 , 2 : NEXT : DRAW"U14R2 8D14L 
28" : PAINT ( (1*18) +6, 60) ,2,2: PAINT 
(236,60) ,2,2: PAINT (236, 60) ,4,1 
350 PAINT(236,6) ,3,1 
465 DRAW"C2U14R14D14NL14BR4" :RET 
URN 



Listing 5: SPELLKEY.FIX 

10 PMODE4,l:PCLSl:SCREENl,l:PMOD 
E3:PCLS3 

280 DRAW"BM10 , 16" : F0RI=1T013 : GOS 
UB495:PAINT(4+(I*18) ,12) ,2,2:NEX 
T 

285 DRAW"BM2 , 34" : FORI =1T0 14 : GOSU 
B495: PAINT ( (1*18) -6,28) ,2, 2: NEXT 
290 DRAW " BM4 ,52": FORI = 1TO 1 1 : GOSU 
B495 : PAINT ( (1*18) -2 ,42) ,2, 2: NEXT 
: DRAW" C4U14R3 2D14NL3 2BR4 " : PAINT ( 
(1*18) -2,42) ,4,4 :GOSUB495: PAINT ( 



Listing 6: COPIER 

10 REM EASY COPY-BY F.B.SCERBO 

(C) 1988 
20 READ A$ : IFA$="END"THEN60 
30 GOSUB70 
40 COPY A$ 
50 GOTO20 

60 CLS: PRINT" COPY COMPLETED" : END 



242,42) ,2, 2: PAINT (24 2, 42) ,4,1 
295 DRAW" BM4 , 70U14R28D14NL28BR4 " 
: FORI=1TO10 : GOSUB495 : PAINT ( (1*18 
) +6 , 60 ) , 2 , 2 : NEXT : DRAW"U14R28D14L 
28" : PAINT ( (1*18) +6, 60) ,2, 2: PAINT 
(23 6,60) ,2, 2: PAINT (2 36, 60) ,4,1 
340 PAINT(236,6) ,3,1 
4 65 IFX$=G$ ( Z ) THEN4 75ELSEIFX$=" " 
THEN445 

495 DRAW"C2U14R14D14NL14BR4":RET 
URN 



:NEW 

70 CLS: PRINT "INSERT SOURCE DISKE 

TTE AND PRESS 'ENTER'" 

80 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$(13)THEN8 

P 

90 RETURN 

100 DATA "DOS/BAS", "DOS/BIN", "SC 
RIP/BIN" , "COPIER/BAS" , END 



148 THE RAINBOW Apnf 1988 



Doctor ASC II 



Tandy — the Joystick Pick 

The only joysticks that I can find on 
the market for the CoCo are the ones 
from Radio Shack. Are there any 
other brands that will work with the 
CoCo? And where can I get colored 
ribbons for my DMP-105? 

Ron Mills, 
Bonnyville, Alberta 

|D Atari joystick interfaces are avail- 
^jC able for the CoCo, but Atari-type 
joysticks have switches instead of the 
potentiometers that are in the CoCo's 
sticks. With the Atari-type sticks, the 
computer can sense only certain direc- 
tions, making them incompatible with 
much CoCo software. The Tandy de- 
luxe joystick is a bargain. It is made by 
Kraft, one of the leaders in the field. 

The Great Lakes Ribbon Company, 
in Kettering, Ohio, (800) 621-9127, 
claims over 300 styles of ribbons in 
black, red, blue and green. 

Relational Reference 



Where can I get information on how 
to write a relational database system 
for the CoCo? 

Bob Williams 
Baltimore, AID 



15 RISS: A Relational Database 
/L Management System for Mini- 
computers by Meldman, et al, Van 
Nostrand Reinhold, 1978, contains 
BASIC source code for a relational 
database system. 

Random Executions 



Sometimes when I load in a machine 
language program, I type EXECC 
instead o/EXEC. When I do this, the 



D 



Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




* w£ > J 



8 



"Si . i\ 



By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 

with Richard W. Libra 



machine's memory messes up and I get 
garbage on the screen. Would you 
please explain what is happening? 

Chris Romance 
Massapequa Park, NY 

ID When you type EXECC, you are 
/C telling the computer to execute a 
machine language program that has an 
EXEC address at the address in memory 
that is stored in the BASIC variable C. If 
you have not stored a value in C, it 
defaults to zero. So, in effect, you have 
typed EXEC 0, and the computer starts 
executing at Address 0. Since there is no 
rational machine language program at 
Address 0, the computer executes those 
"random" instructions, giving you 
garbage on the screen. When this oc- 
curs, the safest thing to do is to power 
down and start over. 

Multi-Pak Upgrade 



/ purchased a CoCo 3 and a 512K 
RAM upgrade along with a Tandy 
CM-8 monitor. Now with many of 
my machine language games I get beau- 
tiful black-and-white pictures. Is there 
special hardware or software I can use 



to correct this situation? I have heard 
that the Co Co 3 is incompatible with the 
Multi-Pak #26-3124. When I power up 
the CoCo 3 and the Multi-Pak at the 
same time via a power strip, everything 
seems to work OK, but if I first power 
the Multi-Pak and then the computer, 
I get a screen full of garbage. 

Jean Gravelle 
Gatineau, Quebec 

IP Your Multi-Pak can be upgraded 
/L with a satellite board, which re- 
quires soldering. The board is available 
from Radio Shack National Parts 
(#AXX-71 19). The instructions on how 
to perform this upgrade appeared in 
Marly Goodman's "A PAL for Your 
CoCo 3" (January 1987, Page 98). This 
upgrade can also be done by Radio 
Shack for an additional service charge. 
The older Multi-Paks (#3024) are up- 
graded more easily by replacing the 
PAL chip (plug-in replacement #AXX- 
7123 — no soldering necessary). 

Computer Doe 

/ just acquired an Infoton Mod. 
Vistar GT 050001 computer. I re- 
paired it, and now it does work, but 
I'd like to know if it 's compatible with 
anything. I tried contacting the manu- 
facturer, but my letter was returned as 
non-deliverable. 

Dan Griffin 
Avondale, AZ 

If ithasaZ-80or 8080 microproc- 
^ essor, it might be CPM. If it has 
an Intel 8088 or 8086, it might be DOS. 
Otherwise, it's one of the many or- 
phaned computers that did not have the 
staying power of the Color Computer. 
Our beloved CoCo even predates the 
IBM PC and is still a viable machine 
because the 8/ 16 bit 6809E processor it 
uses was right on the leading edge of 
technology at the time of its introduc- 
tion. Tandy has rightly continued the 
line, upgrading it over the years while 
maintaining all-important backward 
compatibility with previous CoCos. 
The CoCo survived industry shakeouts 
that killed off many of its rivals such as 
Texas Instrument's 99/4A, the 
Osborne- 1 , Atari 800, Commodore VIC 
20, etc. 

April 1988 THE RAINBOW 149 



Beefing up BASIC 

Can you use other languages besides 
ML to program the extra keys on the 
CoCo 3 to execute commands such 
as PRINTtt-2,? Tandy's Model 100 has 
a method for programming its 'F'keys, 
and it would be nice to be able to do this 
with the Co Co 3. 

Steven Bosze 
Brooklyn, NY 

I> ADOS-3, sold by SpectroSys- 
terns, adds a number of enhance- 
ments to Disk BASIC, including special 
keys for PRINTtt-2,. 



ML CoCo-PC Transfer 

Is there any way to transfer machine 
language programs from a Co Co to 
an IBM PC compatible? 

Elliot Markus 
Wyncote, PA 

f\j The code can be transferred with 
/£ Co Co Util //, sold by Spectrum 
Projects. But since the IBM PC and 
compatibles can run only machine 
language programs written for the Intel 
8086, the CoCo's Motorola 6809E code 
will be available only for examination 
on those machines (it will not run on an 
8086). 

The Dirt on Downloading 

|j) How can I download programs and 
m. run them? I'm using a CoCo 1 and 
& Colorcom/E Version 2.3. 

Bill Pennington 
Middlesex, NJ 



O Generally speaking, most termi- 
nal programs have a buffer cap- 
ture function to let you capture data 
received from the system you're con- 
nected to. On Delphi or other BBSs, 
you can use this feature to download 
ASCII text or program files. The proce- 
dure on Delphi (similar for other BBSs 
or services) for a simple ASCII buffer 
capture is as follows: 

1 ) Clear your terminal's buffer. 

2) At the ACTI0N> prompt, enter 
DOWN. 

3) After Delphi tells you to "Press 
Return When Ready," open your buffer 
and press ENTER. You will see the file 
on your screen. 

4) When the download is complete, 
you'll see a message like "Download of 
132 Lines Complete." With some termi- 



nal programs you will hear a beep, as 
well. Close your buffer and save the 
contents to tape or disk. If there is more 
than one file to be received, clear your 
buffer and press ENTER to start receiv- 
ing the next file. Note: If the file is a 
BASIC program, you will get a ?DS 
Error message when you load the pro- 
gram back into the CoCo; however, this 
has no ill effect on the program. After 
loading, re-save the program to elimi- 
nate this error. 

The procedure for an Xmodem 
download (not available with all termi- 
nal programs, but needed to download 
non-ASCII files or machine language 
files) is as follows: 

1) At the RCTI0N> prompt, enter 
XDOWN. Delphi will respond after a few 
seconds with OK, RECEIVE ! . 

2) Switch your terminal program 
into Xmodem receive mode. The file 
will be transmitted after a pause. 

3) After the transfer is complete, save 
your buffer contents to tape or disk. 
You may need to specify how the file is 
to be saved (machine language or 
ASCII). 

CoCo 3 Shows Off 



/ would like to really show off my 
CoCo 3. Is there a way to run pro- 
grams such as Koronis Rift, Desk- 
mate and Rogue in windows? Is there 
a way to use my Hi-Res Joystick Inter- 
face with Deskmate 3? How do I fix 
programs to run with a hard disk? 

Tony Mantegna 
Brooklyn, NY 

I? It is possible to create an OS-9 
/L boot that supports both graphics 
windows and VDG screens. First, use 
conf ig to create a customized version 
of OS-9, selecting your favorite parame- 
ters and term_uiin. Then using DS- 
9Gen, create an improved boot using in 
your bootlist the newly created 05- 
98oot with Vdgint-ID from the Mod- 
ules directory. After building a system 
with this boot, you can create VDG 
windows using the normal window 
descriptors by typing xmode /un 
type=l; shell i=/un& where n = 
window number. You can then press 
CLEAR to select a window to run one of 
your VDG programs. 

Note that many VDG programs re- 
quire patching because they are hard- 
coded to run with .TERM. Kevin Dar- 
ling, assistant SysOp on CIS, volun- 
teered the following patch for Desk- 
mate 5, which makes its windows 



compatible and also fixes it so that it 
uses the Hi-Res Joystick Interface: 

LORD /D0/CMD5/DESK 

MODPflTCH -S 

L DESK 

C 03 02 

C 00F1 10 12 

C 00F2 3F 12 

C 00F3 84 12 

C 00F4 10 12 

C 00F5 25 12 

C 00FG 19 12 

C 00F7 CF 12 

C 00FF 00 01 

C 0CAB 2G 12 

C 0CAC 08 12 

C 0CBE 2G 12 

C 0CBF 08 12 

C 1DC7 7D FG 

C 1DCB B2 3R 

C 1DC9 86 45 

V 

To make this change permanent, use 
the Level I Save utility or the Save 
utility that comes with Multi- Vue. 

Koronis Rift can be made VDG 
window-compatible with this patch: 

LOAD /D0/CMDS/KORONIS 

MODPATCH -S 

LOAD KORONIS 

C 2B 03 02 

C 2C 10 12 

C 2D 3F 12 

C 2E 84 12 

V 

Rogue will run in a normal window 
after running Makegu to set up the 
graphics. Note that after saving patched 
routines, you need to use attr to reset 
the permissions. 

Instead of patching programs piece- 
meal for a hard disk, I set up my Burke 
& Burke hard disk with three descrip- 
tors — /D0, /H0 and /D0 — all referring 
to my hard drive so that old floppy 
software (using /D0), old hard disk 
software (using /H0) and new software 
(using /DD) all work without drive 
access modifications. I set up new 
descriptors /F0, /Fl, etc., for my flop- 
pies. 

For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, 
at the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
RSK for "Ask the Experts" to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete 
instructions. 



150 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



Proven Technology 

New CoCo 3 Utilities 

Great for 512K Systems! From Color Venture and OWL-WARE 




PRINTER LIGHTNING 

A great print spooler which gives you 
44K print buffer from a 128K CoCo and 
up to 438K (200 pages!) from a 512K 
CoCo. With this spooler you can run a 
program while you are printing a file. 
The spooler does not slow down the 
computer to any noticeable extent while 
you are running a second program and 
no lost characters arise. Baud rates 
selectable. Printer Lightning can reside 
in memory along with RAMDISKl 

1 |~ ia| mm mum m ■ m same time as tne tnnter ugnmmgi 0 f yoU r most used programs! 

• NEW NCW # Only $1 9.95 each. 3 for $39.95. 
SPECIAL With our 512K Upgrade (Next page) only $2. each Of 3 for $5! 



Using 512K CoCo 3 you have access to 
2 additional disk drives in RAM. All 
disk commands are supported, and the 
data are Reset button protected. You 
can now have up to 5 disk drive capa- 
cities on line at once and can assign the 
ram disks to any drive number. By 
making the ramdisk Drive 0, all pro- 
grams which require a lot of drive 
access will run much faster. You can 
have the RAMDISK in memory at the 
same time as the Printer Lightningl 



BACKUP LIGHTNING 

This program is the fastest way to make 
backup copies of your files using a 512K 
CoCo. You can backup 35, 40, or 80 
track disks single or double sided. Both 
RS and OS-9 disks may be backed up. 
The original disk is saved to memory 
and a copy can be made on an 
unformatted disk every 45 seconds! The 
lightning read, write, format, and verify 
routines that were developed make this 
program much quicker that RSDOS or 
OS-9 for backups. This will become one 



Announcing: 




The finest graphics/drawing program for the COCO 3! 




Da Vinci 3 



16 colors on screen at one time 

Modify each color from 64 available colors 

Use composite or RGB monitor 

Draw with custom paintbrushes 

Full resolution 320 X 192 

Picture converter for conversion of 

COCO 2 pictures to COCO 3 
Multiple \cxt fonts 
Accepts input from joystick, X-pad, 

mouse, or touch-pad 
Boxes, circles, line, paint generation 
Screen dump for Tandy mono and color ink-jet 

printers, (NX- 10 and others pending) 
Sensible price 

No additional hardware required because of 

course/fine joystick movement modes 
Zoom mode for individual pixel editing 
Great on screen menu which is removable at 
the touch of a key to allow full screen edit 









Super I/O Board for OS-9 

Each Board Provides 2 Serial Ports and Centronics Parallel Port 

First Board has Real Time Clock and Beeper... With Second Board up to 5 Users 

2 Serial Ports 



More 
Adt... 



The serial ports are usable up to 19,200 Baud, and 
the parallel port is a true Centronics standard. 
Plug into your multi-pak. On CoCo 3, multi^pak 
must be upgraded. You will have a multi-user 
system with additional computers or terminals 
plugged into the serial ports. An OWL hard drive 
and 512K upgrade are strongly recommended for 
multi-user systems. 

Intro Price... 

BOARD 2. ..$145. 



(up to 19,200 BAUD) 



$169. 



Plugs 
Into 
MULTI PACK 






CENTRONICS 
PARALLEL 
PORT 



P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 
- ORDER LINES (only) — 
(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 



Proven Techno/ogy 

I On l he Razor's Ldge ol the C olor Computer Frontier 



OS-9 Hard Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or Business Use 
Drive Access is at Least 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives 
Control up to 2 Drives per Controller each as Continuous Storage 



Every hard drive system is complete with software, 
hard drive, controller, heavy-duty power supply, and 
LR Tech Interface. When a complete drive system is 
ordered, the drive is fully assembled, tested, and 
burned in for 3 full days. This ensures dependability 
and optimum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo hard drive 
systems and parts for systems for more than 2 years. 
This is the longest history in the Co Co market of any 
available drive system. About Va of all hard drive 
systems currently in use in the CoCo market use the 
LR Tech/OWL-WARE system. We have reached 
this position in the CoCo hard drive market by 
providing our customers with a quality product that 
they (am! wc) can be proud to own and use. 

System Prices: New ? 



A number of drive systems were in the market place 
when the LR Tech Interface was introduced and 2 
have been introduced since. Most of these are no 
longer available. We provide the only system which 
provides a combination of standard interface (SAS1), 
rugged unit construction (not hacked to a floppy 
drive controller), high speed, and reasonable price. 
These systems are even several times faster than 
the standard XT hard drive system. Ideal for 
multi-user system because processor does not stop 
for hard drive access. 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and 2 




Dealers 



$469. $619. $739. $1,069. 

10 Meg. 20 Meg. 40 Meg. 80 Meg. (2x40 Meg.) Inquiries Invited! 



Hard Drive Interface 

(Includes Software) 

For those who want to put together their own 
system, we have an exclusive arrangement to 
distribute the LR Tech Interface. Please note 
that an interface is not a controller. A Xebec, 
WD, or Adaptec SASI controller are required 
for a drive system. 

To assemble a hard drive system yourself re- 
quires some reasonable knowledge of OS-9 and 
electronic construction and a hard drive that 
works. CoCo 3 users will have to upgrade their 
Multi-pak. 

Only $119. 

Xebec Controller $ 135. 



CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 

The LR Tech 512K upgrade uses all gold con- 
tacts and 120 nanosecond 256K chips. Provides 
large system memory from OS-9 Level 2. 



Without A 
Mem Chips $49. 



With (CALL: Sorry, 
Chips the price of 
RAM CHIPS is 
going up) 

Special! See software offer on previous page, 



Hard Drive Basic 

New For the CoCo 3! 

In Answer for the Many Reqests to Run BASIC from a Hard Drive 



With the development of the CoCo 3, OWL Ware has been able to 
provide a truly professional Hard Drive System using OS-9. There has 
not, however, been a method of running your programs from the 
standard BASIC. With this latest development of the CoCo software 
aces, it is now possible to partition your hard drive into RSDOS and 
OS-9 sections. The OS-9 partition runs your OS-9 normally. The RSDOS 
section is further divided into a number of floppy sized units to run 
RSDOS programs. The familiar RS disk commands work normally. 



There is little more that must be learned. 

All of these RS drive sections are available at all times. It is not necessary 
to use assign commands and get access to only a few of these sections. 
Programs that use RS-BASIC should work as will all programs which do 
not force their own disk drivers. 

Call about prices. This should be availabile by the time you read this ad! 





OWL-WARE PHONES 

ORDERS 

(800) 245-6228 
PA (215) 682-6855 

TECHNICAL HELP 
(21 5) 433-8695 
Call for advice 



t, quietest drive av 

$219. 



Ask for the WHISPER DRIVE for the finest, quietest drive available! 

Drive 0 Systems (Fun Hgt) $169 ■ (Half Hgt -DS) 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, cable, case & power supply, and manual. 

Drive 1 Systems (FuiiHgt) $95. (HalfHgt-DS) $129. 

New! New! (3,5" 720K Drive for OS-9) $189. 

Drive 1 has drive, case & power supply, and instructions for use with your drive. 
(Call for Special Prices on Drive 0, 1> 2> 3 Combos.) 



HALF HEIGHT DRIVE 
UPGRADE KIT FOR 
RS HORIZONTAL CASES 

Why only double the capacity of your 
system when you can triple in the same 
case? Kit includes: double sided drive to fit 
your case, chip to run both sides of new 
drive, hardware, and detailed instructions. 
Takes only 5 minutes. 

Model $119. Model $129. 
500 501 or 502 



Our prices do not include shipping costs, but do 
include a discount for cash. 

OWL- WARE has a liberal warranty policy. During 
the warranty period, all defective items will be 
repaired or replaced at our option and at no cost to 
the buyer except for shipping costs. 

Call our technical help line for return authorization 
numbers. Return of non-defective items or unauthor- 
ized returns are subject to a service charge. 



All drives are new and fully assembled. We 
ship only FULLY TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at these low prices. Full height 
drives are unused surplus and not always 
available. 

We use Fuji, Teac and Other Fine brands. We 
have 5 years experience in the CoCo disk drive 
market! We are able to provide support when 
you have a problem. 

NOW FOR CoCo l y 2,3U\ 
WARRANTIES 

Full Hgt 90 days Half Hgt 1 Year 

ORDER LINES (only) 

(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 



Bonus! 
Special 
Bundled 
Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 




TECH HELP LINE 

(21 5) 433-8695 

Call for Latest Prices! 







P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 



OWL-WARE 

Software Bundle 



Disk Tutorial - 3 Utilities - 2 Games 

DISK TUTOR Ver. 1 .1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language pro- 
gram. This tutor takes you through your 
lessons and corrects your mistakes for a 
quick, painless disk drive intoduction. 
(This professionally written tutor is easily 
worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster disk 
access and allows the use of double-sided 
drives. Corrects a floating point number 
error on early CoCo systems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs between 
disks. A wild card option selects groups of 
programs for copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad sec- 
tors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These have sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is over 
$125 worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with cheap, 
non-professional "Public Domain" soft- 
ware which is being offered by others. All 
of this software is copyrighted and pro- 
fessional in quality. The tutor is unique 
with us and has helped hundreds of new 
users learn their disk drive. 

only $27.95 

(or even better) 

only $6.95 with 

any Disk Drive Purchase!! 



* 



Turn of th e Screw 



Last month we talked about high- 
capacity EPROMs from 8K (the 
2764) all the way to 64K (the 
newest member of the family, the 
. 27512). We also talked about hooking 
up these chips to your CoCo. 

The 2764 and the 27128 (16K) can be 
hooked up directly to the CoCo. The 
2764 is easy to hook up, as it has only 
8K of memory. In any ROM chip, only 
the first 8K of memory is valid — the 
rest of it is memory mirrored. 

As we get into more memory per chip, 
we are faced with more options. For 
example, do we use the 27128 as one 
complete 16K package, or do we split 
it up into two packages of 8K and select 
between the two? Do we make it selec- 
table in software or in hardware, or 
both? Look at the Radio Shack Multi- 
Pak, which does all of this. 

All these possibilities can be over- 
whelming to a novice hardware hacker. 
For that matter, the ramifications of 
EPROMs aren't all that clear to the 
pros, either. What I am attempting to 
do is take a close look at large capacity 
EPROMs and describe how to hook 
them up to the CoCo and have a big 
enough EPROM package to make a 
ROM disk. 

The CTS pin can access up to 16K on 
CoCos 1 and 2, and can access up to 
32K on the CoCo 3. But because only 
the CoCo 3 can access 32K, I am lim- 
iting my possibilities to 16K — other- 
wise, we'd have to throw in another 
variable, which would only add to the 
confusion. Besides, the 32K mode of the 
CoCo 3 is rarely used, if at all. 

Let's start with something we are 
already a little familiar with, DOS. 
Now, the DOS ROM that Tandy offers 
is called Disk Extended BASIC. While 
we are on the subject of DOS, let me 
clear up a little misconception. There 
are only two versions of this DOS — the 
older 1.0 and the newer 1.1. When you 
power up a CoCo 3 with a Tandy DOS 
in the controller, you see one of two 
messages: If you have Tandy DOS 1.0, 
you get the message "2.0"; if you have 
Tandy DOS 1 . 1 , you get "2. 1 ." You see, 
the '2' part of the version belongs to the 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Quest, Quebec. 



A DOS expansion project 
for experienced hackers 



Build a 

Half-Megabyte 
ROM Disk 

By Tony DiStefano 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



version of Hi-Res BASIC you have, not 
to DOS — the ".0" or ". 1 " part of the 
version belongs to DOS. I just thought 
I would clear this up because I hear too 
many times that someone has DOS 
Version 2.1. 

Well, back to work. Whatever the 
version, Tandy DOS is contained in an 
8K ROM. ROMs are masked at the 
factory and cannot be changed, but 
EPROMs are user-programmable. You 
can change them any time you want, as 
they are erasable. I think I have said 
enough about the structure of 
EPROMs. Read last month's article for 
more details. 

There are a lot of people who are 
familiar with DOS and would like to 
expand it — add in their favorite utility, 
for example. To expand DOS, you need 
more memory space, so the only thing 
to do is change to a 16K EPROM. That 
gives you about 8K of extra space to 
work with. To have more than that 
requires more space. 

This is where you have to start with 
bank switching. Bank switching means 
that you have more than one memory 
chip mapped in the same area, but only 
one of them is active at a time. Last 
month we looked at a technique that 
required a hardware switch to physi- 
cally change the access to the EPROMs. 
That is a simple technique, but there are 
some limitations, the biggest one being 
that the software will most likely get lost 



and cause the computer to crash when 
you switch it. It is OK when you want 
to completely change and power down 
anyway, but not too practical when you 
have a lot of software already loaded 
and need just a little utility. 

Preventing a crash that may occur 
when you turn the switch is not too 
difficult if you know how. Have the 
CPU turn the switch for you — this is 
called a "Softswitch," and requires a 
latch, some decoding and a circuit. With 
this latch we can switch between quite 
a few things. What I want to show you 
is a way to access eight EPROMs of 
varying sizes. Figure 1 shows the circuit 
required to wire up eight 27512 
EPROMs. That gives you a total of half 
a megabyte of EPROMs, or, in other 
words, one big ROM disk. 

Before you run out and buy all the 
parts and try building the ROM disk, 
keep in mind that this is one heck of a 
big project. A project that should not be 
tried by everyone. First of all, you must 
have a lot of patience — to solder eight 
28-pin EPROM sockets takes many 
hours. Second, you must have lots of 
money to buy eight 275 1 2 EPROMs. In 
addition to a disk drive, you must also 
have a Multi-Pak. And lastly, you must 
have a lot of knowledge about machine 
language drivers for disk drives. So, you 
see, this is a big one. If you have all the 
prerequisites, let's start. 

The first thing to do is get acquainted 
with the circuit. Ul simply gates the 
SCS with the Read/ Write line. All this 
does is prevent you from switching the 
data in the latch just by reading that 
memory area. So, this becomes a "Write 
Only" byte. Since it uses the SCS pin, 
this byte is mapped at $FF40. In fact, 
it is mirrored from SFF40 to $FF47. U2 
is a six-bit latch. The diagram says that 
the inputs are from Dl to D6, but they 
are in fact connected from DO to D5, 
respectively. The latch is connected to 
the output of Ul and is cleared to all 0s 
when the reset button is pressed. 

The output of U2 is six bits that are 
controlled by writing to it. Let's look at 
the last three bits first, Q4, 5 and 6. They 
go to the inputs of a 3-to-8 decoder. 
These three pins select one of eight 
outputs. The other inputs to U3 are the 
CTS pin and the E clock. The E clock 
is needed to make sure the data is in sync 
with the CPU. 



154 THE RAINBOW April 1988 




tt^ Get Smart, Have Fun and Save $50! 

Order the new Educational Combo package by April 31, 1988 at the introductory price of $48.50. 
The Combo includes these educational (and entertaining) games: Silly Syntax (with 2 stones) 
Galactic Hangman (700 word vocabulary), The Presidents of the USA (includes well over 35 
presidents), The Great USA (even little-known states are covered) and Trig Attack (Zap those 
Trigs). For children ages 5-10 through adult. Disk only; $48.50; S&H $1.50. 



CALLI GRAPH ER 

CoCo Cn 111 graph er - (Hybrid basic/ml) 
Turn your CoCo and dotrmatrix printer 
into a calligrapher's quill. Make beautiful 
invitations, flyers, certificates, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are % 
inch high and variably spaced. Works 
with many printers including Epson, 
Gemini, Radio Shack, Okidata 92A, Ba- 
nana and Prowriter. Additional fonts are 
available (see below). Tape /Disk; $24.05. 

OS9 Calllgrapher - (c) Although a 
different program from the CoCo Calli- 
grapher, the OS9 Calligrapher prints all 
the same fonts. It reads a standard text 
file which contains text and formatting 
directives. You may specify the font to 
use, change fonts at any time, centering, 
left, right or full justification, line fill, 
margin, line width, page size, page break 
and indentation. Similar to troff on 
UNIXtm systems. Includes Gay Nineties, 
Old English and Cartoon fonts. Addition- 
al fonts are available (see below). Disk 
only; OS9 Level I or II; $24.95. 

Calllgrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $14.95 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - (8 fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
way; Set #3 - (8 fonts) Antique and 
Business; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West 
and Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, 
Hebrew and Victorian; Set #6 - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; specify 
RSDOS or OS9; 29.95: Font Package #1 
- Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 fonts) 
on one disk. Font Package #2 - Above 
font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on one 
disk. Both Packages #1 and #2 (51 
fonts) on one disk; 49.95. 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Every- 
thing!; specify RSDOS or OS9; Includes 
the Calligrapher and both Font Pack- 
ages on two disks; $69.05. 



UTILITIES 

Plratector- (ioo%ml) Utility to allow your 
own disk-based BASIC or ML programs 
to display a graphics title screen and then 
self-start after loading. Adds copy protec- 
tion to your programs but still allows 
users to create, non- executable backups! In- 
cludes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo 1, 2, 3 
(except Semigraf); $39.95. 

Super Screen Machine - (ioo% ML) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. 
Smooth scroll, key click, lower case with 
colored characters. Tape /Disk; 32K CB; 
CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except 64K mode); $19.95. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Color Disk Manager - (ioo%ml) Disk util- 
ity with these features: Disk repair, selec- 
tive track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except for 64K 
mode); $24.95. 

Color Tape Manager - (ioo% ml) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert ML programs into DATA state- 
ments, append ML to BASIC, much 
more! Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 
3 (except for 64K mode); $19.95. 

OS9 Patcher- (c) Display and modify the 
contents of a file or memory module. 
Hexidecimal, decimal and ASCII modes. 
Search feature. Calculates module CRCs; 
Generates patch command files. Disk 
only; OS9 Level I or II; $19.95. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape or disk, 
fast and simple general data base pro- 
gram. Create files of records that can be 
quickly sorted, searched, deleted and up- 
dated. Powerful printer formatting. Up 
to 8 user fields, sort on up to 3 fields. 
Tape /Disk; $19.95 (see combo pkg 
below). 

TIMS Mail - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape or 
Disk based mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 
1, 2 or 3 across, 2% to 4 inches wide. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95 (see combo pkg 
below). 

HMS Utility - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Utility 
companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail to 
allow multi-term search (AND and OR 
logic), global change and delete, split 
large files and more! Tape/Disk; $14.95 
(see combo pkg below). 



TIMS Combo Package - All three of 
the above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail 
and TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.95. 



SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer. Disk only; $19.95 each. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Trig Attack - (iooSSml) Ages 9 and up. In 
this educational arcade game, enemy trigs 
travel along math, curves. Players learn 
important mathematical concepts as they 
play. Sound effects, colorful graphics. 
Excellent manual includes an introduc- 
tion to trigonometry. Tape 16K CB/Disk 
32K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3; $19.95. 



Silly Syntax - (Hybrid basic/ml) Ages 5 
and up. Story creation game; output to 
screen or printer; includes 2 stories or 
create your own. Tape /Disk; $19.95 or 
disk with 62 stories for $29.95. Sets of 10 
stories on tape/disk for $4.95: Fairy 
Tales, Current Events, X-Rated, Sing- 
Along, Adventure, Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
basic/ml) Ages 4 & up. A graphics ad- 
venture game for young children & their 
families. Old testament. Tape /Disk; 
$19.95. 

Hie Presidents of the USA - (ioo%ml) 
Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, user 
modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape /Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

Hie Great USA - Ages 9 and up. Trivia 
game of the 50 states. Capitals, nick- 
names, abbreviations, flowers, trees and 
birds. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

Galactic H angman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist to the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word 
vocabulary. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

Pre Reader - (Hybrid basic/ml) Ages 3-5 
(level I); Ages 5-7 (level 2); Great graph- 
ics and music. Level 1: match colors, 
shapes, letters and numbers; Level 2: 
match letters and consonant blends with 
their sounds. Tape /Disk; Joystick; 
$19.95. 

Statgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
rint graph with screen print program 
not supplied); Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
pense categories. This program may be tax 
deductible. Disk only; $29.95. 

Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations com- 
monly used in design or evaluation of 
land mobile radio systems, satellite TV, 
etc. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set>in Sleeve; 3 
weights or yarn; 8 sizes from baby to 
man. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

Flying Tigers - (100% ML) Fast Defenders 
style arcade game. 5 levels of difficulty; 
Outstanding graphics and sound effects. 
Tape /Disk; Joystick; $19.95. 



r 



TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and 8, S2K 
Extended Baric, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.50 per tape or disk for shipping and han- 
dling. Florida residents add 6% sales tax. COD 
orders add $5. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders 
generally shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds 
or exchanges without prior authorization. 



3r 



v L L 



1Q BZK> 

6,g >. 



5 EST>- 



JJ1 

A 
B 

C 



G1 

G2A 

G2B 



YO 
Y1 
Y2 
Y3 
Y4 
YS 
YB 
Y7 



It 



74LS1 3B 




1 



5 



U2 



D1 
□ 2 
□3 
04 
□5 
06 



□ 1 

□ 2 
Q3 
OA 
□5 
Q6 



->CLK 
C CLR 



74LS174 



6 

3 



U3_ 



A 
B 

C 



G1 

G2A 

G2B 



YD 

Y1 

Y2 

Y3 

Y4 

Y5 

YG 

Y7 




74LS13B - 



05- 



it 



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SW1 



A1 3 



5W SPDT 



1 0 



U4 



8 



I 



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21 



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AD 

A1 

A2 

A3 

A4 

AS 

AS 

A7 

AB 

AS 

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A1 2 

A13 

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A15 

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Figure 1 



The CTS pin is the main select for the 
external ROM area. The output YO is 
connected to the Chip Enable and 
Output Enable of U4. Only one 
EPROM is shown. The other seven 
EPROMs are all wired in parallel ex- 
cept for these two pins. Yl to Y7 of U3 
connect to pins 20 and 22 of chips U5 
to Ull, respectively. Wow! What a 
mouthful! Depending on what the 
binary number is at the A, B and C 
inputs of U3, one of the eight EPROMs 
will be selected when the CTS pin goes 
low. 

Now let's look at the next two bits, 
Q2 and Q3 of U2. They connect to A 14 
and A15 of all the EPROMs. If you put 
on your binary thinking hat, you'll 
realize AO to A13 comprise 14 address 
lines. Two to the power of 14 gives us 
the amount of data 14 address lines can 
access — 16K. These two bits that are 
connected to the EPROMs select four 
banks of 16K. A 27512 has 64K of 
memory. These two bits connected to 
A14 and A15 will divide the 64K 
EPROM into four banks of 16K. OK, 
here comes the tricky part. A13 of the 
EPROMs can be connected to one of 
two sources via SW1. The way it is 
connected in Figure 1 is the way it is 
required to switch 16K banks. Each of 
the eight EPROMs has four 16K banks; 
that gives you 32 16K banks of memory. 

There is another way to wire things 
up. When the switch is turned the other 



way, it no longer gives you 16K banks. 
With one less address line to work with, 
the CPU will see two 8K banks mirrored 
with the same data. By putting this 
address line to another bit (Ql of U2), 
we now have three bits of bank switch- 
ing. In binary, three bits give you eight 
banks to choose from. You now have 
eight EPROMs with eight banks each, 
which gives you 64 banks of 8K of 
memory. That's a total of 512K of 
memory. 

Well, that about does it for the theory 
part. The construction of the ROM 
disk, like I said before, is a big task. You 
will need eight 28-pin sockets for the 
EPROMs and three 16-pin sockets for 
the other support chips. The best way 
to go with this one is to get the proto- 
board from CRC Inc. That is the one 
I used, and it has plenty of room for all 
the chips. Also needed for this project 
are eleven .1 uf capacitors, one for each 
chip; connect them between +5V and 
ground as close to each chip as possible. 
Not shown on the diagram are the +5V 
and ground pins for these chips. It is 
simple. For the three TTL chips, the 
+5V pin is 16 and the ground pin is 8. 
For the EPROMs, the +5 V pin is 28 and 
the ground pin is 14. That is all you need 
to know to construct this board. 

Now that I've shown you the hard- 
ware part of this project, it's time for the 
software. You all know how much I hate 
that. But, without software, hardware 



would not be much good. Though I will 
not be writing any software, you will 
need to know something about the 
hardware to write it yourself. The 
control byte, as I call it, for which bank 
is active in this circuit is at $FF40. 

There are two different ways the 
control byte works, depending on which 
way the switch SW1 is set. The two 
options are this — 32 16K banks and 64 
8K banks. For the option of 64 8K 
banks, DO, Dl and D2 of the control 
byte select eight banks per EPROM. 
D3, D4 and D5 select one of eight 
EPROMs. So, U4 has bank numbers 0 
to 7, U5 has 8 to 15, U6 has 16 to 23, 
and so on. Each bank will appear from 
$C000 to $DFFF. The 16K banks are a 
little different. DO is not used; Dl and 
D2 select four 16K banks; and D3, D4 
and D5 again select one of eight 
EPROMs. This time U4 has bank 
numbers 0 to 3, U5 has 4 to 7, U6 has 
8 to 11, and so on. 

The choice to use 8K or 16K banks 
is yours, of course, but think of this: If 
you use 16K banks, you lose 256 bytes 
per bank in CoCos 1 and 2 and 512 bytes 
per bank in CoCo 3 because of the 
addressing of the CoCo. Those bytes are 
reserved for I/O, 

I hope that I have given you enough 
information to think about and act on. 
It is a big project, but for the right 
people, it can be quite rewarding. 



156 THE RAINBOW ApriM988 



DefphMtoreati 



Briefly, last month, we covered use 
of the Mail and Forum areas in 
the CoCo SIG for the benefit of 
newcomers. We find that, with the 
continual influx of new users, we must 
periodically revisit topics of greater 
interest. 

Most people join Delphi mainly for 
the purpose of downloading the many 
fine programs found in the CoCo SIG. 
It is only after they have used the system 
that they begin to realize its benefits 
extend far beyond the databases. They 
also learn that downloading for the first 
time can be very frustrating. Many also 
find that the communications software 
they have purchased won't allow them 
to download from online services such 
as Delphi. 

The thrust of this month's column is 
to help those who have limited expe- 
rience in downloading from informa- 
tion services. First, we will discuss the 
software aspects and system require- 
ments. We will then discuss how the 
database area is organized on Delphi. 
Next month we will continue our dis- 
cussion with the procedures involved in 
downloading files from the CoCo SIG. 

What Software Should I Use? 

Before you can begin telecomputing 
in the first place, you must have a 
computer, a modem and the software 
that allows your computer to act as a 
terminal. This "terminal software" 
comes in many shapes and sizes with 
various flavors to suit just about any 
taste. 

While Color Compac and the built- 
in software in the Deluxe RS-232 Pak 
(both from Radio Shack) allow you to 
communicate with online services, 
neither program is designed to allow 
you to download programs from such 
services. 

For the purposes of downloading, 
you will want to purchase a terminal 
program that supports the Xmodem or 
Kermit protocols. These protocols use 
error-checking techniques to ensure 
error-free downloads. This, of course, 
will save you time and money. 



Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering, He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is CRAY, 



Database 
Downloading 

By Cray Augsburg 

Rainbow Technical Editor 



A host of commercial terminal pro- 
grams that support Xmodem are avail- 
able. Autoterm from PXE Computing, 
Color Connection from Computerware 
and the Datapack series from Cer- 
Comp come to mind. Another feature- 
packed terminal program, intended for 
the CoCo 3, is Color Talk 3 from 
Computize. All of these companies are 
rainbow advertisers. The programs 
each offer various features that can be 
very useful to the telecommunicator. 

Many people choose to avoid the 
commercial route until they have gained 
experience in the telecommunications 
field. In this way, they can be sure of 
which features they need before invest- 
ing a great deal of money in such 
software. For these people, the "share- 



Database Report 

By Don Hutchison 

Rainbow CoCo SIG Database Manager 

Interest in graphics remains exception- nally written by Kevin Darling and was 

ally high on the CoCo SIG. The graphics uploaded with his consent.) 

topics are already the largest in the data- Kevin Darling (kdarling) uploaded an 

base, and user interest never seems to flR'ed file of a Shell* module and docu- 

wane. For the second month in a row, the mentation. Shell+mii replace your current 

CoCo 3 Graphics topic of the database was shell on L-II CoCo 3. It features bug fixes, 

the fastest growing area by far. a programmable prompt, shell scripts in 

your execution directory, allows command 
OS-9 Online line inclusion of parameters for packed 
In the Utilities topic area, Ronald Cli- BAS1C09 programs, and a few other neat 
borne (cocoron) uploaded a multiple- things. Michael Washburn (compzap) 
directory file utility that can handle direc- posted Scan, a utility for searching disk 
tories of more than 250 files and allows files for text, codes, etc. Input can be a 
several of the most often used commands, mixture of Hexadecimal or text strings. 
Greg Law (gregl) uploaded I Patch* a r, Robert Scott (robertscott) uploaded 
which contains two programs written by clockon, an executable command for 
Bob Santy. IPatch can perform a complex setting the system clock from the Disto 
patch to a module that includes additions, RTime hardware clock adapter. George 
deletions and simple changes to byte Janssen posted Version 2.02 of his popular 
sequences in a file. It is similar to Mod- Pak archiving utility. 
Patch, but can be used to make a file larger In the Patches topic area, Dave Phi- 
or smaller. Its companion program, Mal<~ lipsen (dphilipsen) uploaded a file called 
Patch, can be used to compare the original ClDckpatch.ar, which contains a patch 
file with a new file and create an IPatch file to be used with the IPatch utility. It 
script. creates a new clock module that will keep 
Colin McKay (counmckay) uploaded system time under OS-9 Level II using the 
ModemTime, a program to read in the Speech Systems Real Time Clock car- 
time from a Capetronic QT1200 modem tridge. Kevin Darling uploaded a patch file 
and convert it to 24-hour time. George from Kent Meyers to fix the two known 
Janssen (gbjanssen) posted ScrCpy, a major bugs in GShe 11 from the Multi-Yue 
program that can be used to copy a Type package. 

2 (24-by~80) window to another window, In the Telecommunications topic area, 

file or the printer. Richard Esposito (DOC- Bill Brady (OS9UGED) posted the docurnen- 

torascii) posted Saue9 • BRS, a disk basic tation file for BlgT and for Version 5 of 

program that will create the SAVE program W i zac l a. 

Tandy/ Micro Ware did not include with In the Graphics & Music topic area, 

Level II. (The SAVE command was origi- Christopher Burke (COCOXT) uploaded an 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 157 



ware" market is the way to go. While 
there are many entries in this arena, 
three currently stand out in my mind: 
MikeyTerm by Mike Ward, Greg-E- 
Term by Greg Miller and Rickey term 
by Rick Adams. These three programs 
are available from the authors simply by 
sending $10 and a blank disk to the 
appropriate address: 

Mike Ward 
1807 Cortez 

Coral Gables, FL 33134 



Greg Miller 
9575 Roston Road 
Grandledge, MI 48837 

Rick Adams 
Color Central Software 
712 Brett Avenue 
Rohnert Park, CA 94928 



Also, MikeyTerm supports tape- 
based systems — simply include a tape 
with your $10 instead of a disk. 

OS-9 users will be interested in 




XCOM9, a public domain terminal 
program being distributed by the OS-9 
Users Group. Also, The Wiz is gaining 
a lot of attention in the Level II market. 
This program, from Frank Hogg Lab- 
oratory, is very easy to use and takes 
advantage of the added power offered 
by Level II. 



The CoCo SIG Databases 

To enter the database area of the 
CoCo SIG, first get to the CoCo Sig> 
prompt. Then enter DRT. The next 
prompt to appear on your screen will be 
TDPIO?. You see, the overall database 
is divided into several smaller data- 
bases. This organizational approach 
helps make finding a specific file that 
much easier. It can also help to reduce 
your online time. Just enter the first 
three characters of one of the following 
user-accessible topics: 

General Information 

CoCo 3 Graphics 

Source for 6809 Assemblers 



Utilities & Applications 
Hardware Hacking 
Games 

Classic Graphics 
Music & Sound 
Info on Rainbow 
Archives 
HELP 

Product Reviews & Announcement 
Rainbow On Tape 
Data Communications 

You may also get a list while online 
by entering a question mark (?) at the 
TOPIO prompt. 

When you have entered the topic of 
your choice, Delphi will whisk you into 
that particular database. You will see 
DBflSES:jcjcjc> on your screen (the xxx 
represents the first three characters of 
the particular topic area of the database 
you have chosen). At this point, you can 
enter DIR or simply press ENTER to get 
a directory of the chosen database. Each 
directory entry contains up to 32 char- 
acters. Keep in mind you are not neces- 
sarily looking at actual filenames. You 



article that provides instructions for instal- 
ling MultU Vue on a hard disk and also 
included a brief review of Multi-Vue. 
George Janssen uploaded an icon editor 
for creating, modifying or viewing a 24-by- 
24 pixel, four-color bit m^p icon of the 
type used by GShsl 1 when running Multi- 
Vue. 

CoCo SIG 

In the General topic of the database, 
Kevin Nichols (nickols) posted the Tandy 
Newsletter for January. Marty Goodman 
( M ARTYGOODM an) posted a very interest- 
ing article about the bar code system used 
by the U.S. Postal Service. With informa- 
tion from this article, readers can decipher 
the codes and even generate their own 
codes using 'a dot matrix printer. Rick 
Adams (rickadams) posted a collection 
of humorous quips denoting what Rick 
terms "diminished mental capacity." For 
example, one such quip was, "His drive- 
way doesn't run all the way to the street.* 1 
All jokesters will have to have this file. 

In the CoCo 3 Graphics topic area, Steve 
Ricketts (stevepdx) uploaded a CM3 
viewer, some CoCo Max III pictures and 
several digitized images. Mike Andrews 
(M ANDREWS) posted a printer dump for 
the DMP-105 that will print DS-69 digit- 
ized images. Richard Trasborg (tras) 
uploaded 13 complete sets of adult pictures 
by Mike Trammell. Mike's drawings are 
always popular. Richard also sent us 
several digitized shots from the Star Wars 
movies, as well as some of his own adult 
drawings. James MacKenzie (zimbo) 
posted a Color Max 3 font display utility 
Orman Beckles (orman) uploaded a video 



display utility. John Nichols (JKNICHOLS) 
uploaded a double screen viewer utility for 
CoCo Max ///pictures. Gene Clifto (CEC) 
provided us with his MacPaint dump for 
the CGP-220. Cray Augsburg (cray) 
posted a digitized picture of user Shannon 
Yoffe (SHANNONY), thereby fulfilling a 
deep-seated fantasy. Glenn Accardo 
(6883SAM) uploaded some fine 16-level 
digitized Star Wars pictures. 

Gregory Clark (GNOME) uploaded his 
Dumpl6 utility program, which will print 
an HSCREIEN2 image to a DMP-1 10 printer. 
Then Jason Forbes (COC03K1D) uploaded 
an Epson version of Clark's Dumpl6 
program and a program to display Hilbert 
curves. Colin McKay provided us with a 
second modified version of DumpI6, 
Roger Bouchard (harbie) uploaded a text 
file that describes the file format used by 
CoCo Max /// pictures. David Mills 
(davidmills) provided a drawing of Miss 
CoCo done with Color Max 3, Bob Whar- 
ton (bobwharton) uploaded some CM3 
calendar head pictures. 

In the Utilities & Applications topic 
area, David Mills posted an outstanding 
basic program called Diplomat that gives 
information about other countries, their 
monetary systems, their capitals, etc. Ken 
Wuelzer (wuelzerken) posted Version 
2.6 of his very popular shareware disk 
utility, KDSK. Hadiey Hazen (HAZE) up- 
loaded a disk label maker, and then up- 
dated it a few days later with Version 2. 
Brian Wright (POLTERGEIST) uploaded an 
"AutoCopy" utility. 

In the Hardware Hacking topic area, 
Roger Bouchard uploaded text files de- 
scribing gray scale composite video and 



another providing valuable information 
about dynamic RAMs. 

In the Games topic area, Mike Ward 
(mikeward) uploaded "immortality" 
pokes for the popular game Thexder, as 
well as a text file describing how to transfer 
your Thexder ROM pack to disk. 

In the Classic Graphics topic area, 
George Hoffman ( ho ffberger) uploaded 
a basic program that creates the album 
cover from Pink Floyd's The WalL Jason 
Forbes uploaded his program to display 
Hilbert curves, and Brian Wright posted 
some digitized ladies. 

In the Music & Sound topic area, 
George Hoffman uploaded his rendition of 
"Pop Goes the World." 

In the Product Reviews & Announce- 
ments topic area, Jim Goettig (JGMG) 
uploaded his impressions of Word Power 
3. Laurence Tepolt (TEPCO) provided 
product announcements of his assembly 
language programming books for the 
CoCo 1 and 2 and the CoCo 3, 

In the Data Communications topic area, 
Marty Goodman uploaded the revised 
rtty programs as written by N6LQV. These 
programs enable the CoCo to send and 
receive Baudot codes, and are always very 
popular with amateur radio operators. 
Dave Stinson (UG) uploaded a set of 
message generator programs for use with 
the RTTY package. Joe Carney (JOECAR- 
NEY) uploaded a text file describing his 
testing of uploading and downloading 
times using both the Ymodem and the 
Xmodem protocols with Delphi. Mike 
Andrews uploaded the specifications for 
the Ymodem protocol. 

See you online on Delphi! 



158 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



are really looking at the descriptive 
name of a group of files. Each directory 
entry indicates one group that may 
contain one or more files. 

When you have entered the topic of 
your choice, Delphi will whisk you into 
that particular database. You will see 
DBRSES:jcjcjc> on your screen (the xxx 
represents the first three characters of 
the particular topic area of the database 
you have chosen). At this point, you can 
enter DIR or simply press ENTER to get 
a directory of the chosen database. Each 
directory entry contains up to 32 char- 
acters. Keep in mind you are not neces- 
sarily looking at actual filenames. You 
are really looking at the descriptive 
name of a group of files. Each directory 
entry indicates one group that may 
contain one or more files. 

After you have found an entry that 
interests you, find your way back to the 
□BASES : xxx> prompt. If your cursor is 
not there, usually a simple CONTROL-Z 
will take you there. If, instead, you wind 
up at the flCTIDN> prompt, press 
CONTROL-z a second time. 

Now that you are back at the prompt, 
you can get a description of the entry 
by entering READ yyyy 9 where yyyy is the 
name of the entry from the directory. 



You will be presented with a brief 
(usually) description of the chosen 
group of files. At the bottom will be the 
ACTI0N> prompt indicating you can 
download at this point. Just above that 
will be the actual filenames. While we 
don't have enough room this month to 
get into the actual downloading proce- 
dures, I would like to leave you with 
some idea of what the extensions to 
those filenames mean. 

When Marty Goodman (MARTY- 
GOODMAN) started working in the data- 
bases a year or so ago, he proposed a 
standardization of filename extensions. 
The result has been a set of meaningful 
extensions that have changed only to 
allow room for new developments, 
Color Max 3 and Co Co Max III files 
being notable examples. The standard 
list of allowable extensions and a brief 
explanation of each is as follows: 

BBS — a BASIC program stored in 
ASCII format. 

BIN — binary data or machine lan- 
guage files. 

CM3 — a binary picture file for CoCo 
Max III. 

DOC — indicates file is an ASCII 
documentation file for a program. 



MGE — a binary Color Max 3 picture 
file. 

MUS — a binary Musica file that can 
be played with the Player utility to 
be found in the Music database. 
Music files that can be 
(C)LOADMed and EXECed will 
have the .BIN extension. 

□RC — an Orchestra-90/CC file in 
ASCII format. 

PIX — indicates a picture file that has 
been converted to an ASCII BASIC 
program via the MAXCMP com- 
pressor program. It will create a 
PM0DE4 picture when it is run. 

SRC — assembly language source file 
in ASCII format. 

TXT — general text file that doesn't 
fall under the BAS, DOC, PIX or 
SRC conventions above. 

TOK — a BASIC file that has been 
stored in tokenized form, also 
referred to as compressed BASIC. 
In any event, the file is in binary 
format and can be downloaded 
only with an error-checking pro- 
tocol such as Xmodem. 

The importance of the extensions 
given above will become apparent when 
we continue with our discussion of the 
databases next month. /£\ 



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April 1988 THE RAINBOW 159 




What 's new in the OS-9 sector 

* 

New Tools, New Toys 



The telephone rang one evening 
just before Christmas. Tony Di- 
Stefano was calling from Canada 
to tell me his new Super Controller II 
was ready for release. My copy had been 
mailed and Tony hoped I would get it 
before Christmas. 

We had talked about this direct mem- 
ory access disk controller several times 
in the past year and I couldn't wait to 
get my hands on it. Tony has also 
designed many other hardware add-ons 
for the Color Computer during the past 
several years, and they all have per- 
formed flawlessly. And most impor- 
tantly, they've been affordable. 

The pricing of the Super Controller 
II is "very competitive," although Di- 
Stefano wasn't exactly sure what the 
final selling price would be. He said the 
suggested retail price will be $149.95, 
but he expected the selling price to be 
much lower. My sources tell me it 
should come in at a price just below the 
Sardis controller — the only no-halt 
controller for the Color Computer 
presently on the market. 

DiStefano's new controller mounts in 



Dale L. Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale is a 
U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and lives 
in Rockville, Maryland. 



By Dale L. Puckett 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Slot 4 of your Multi-Pak Interface — 
just like a Radio Shack controller. In 
fact, if you don't install Kevin Darling's 
special device driver, Tony's new con- 
troller acts just like a Radio Shack 
controller. It is completely compatible 
with the Tandy controller and will run 
all RS-DOS software right out of the 
box. It has one ROM socket that can 
hold either a regular 24-pin chip like 
that found in the Radio Shack con- 
trollers or a 28-pin jumper-selectable 
EPROM like the 2764 or 217128. You 
can also plug your Disto parallel print- 
er/real-time clock, hard disk adapter, 
or RAM disk expansion boards into it 

Tony held the current drain of the 
controller well below the 300 milliamps 
recommended by Radio Shack. In fact, 
it still comes in below Tandy's recom- 
mendation even after you add one of the 
Disto add-on cards. 

However, the beauty of this new 
CoCo hardware cartridge surfaces 
when you install Darling's CC3 
Disk.irq device driver in your OS-9 
Level II boot file and reboot. DiStcfano 
worked closely with the author of Inside 
OS-9 Level II while he was developing 
the driver for this controller. It is 
completely interrupt-driven. 

Here's how it works. When the con- 
troller issues a read or write command, 
the data is placed in a memory buffer 
on the controller card. Then, the con- 
troller fires the irq and the computer 
services it to get the data. While the 
transfer from the disk to the controller 
is taking place, the computer continues 
to process other data. Even when the 



drive needs to step back and forth on 
the floppy, the computer works away. 
With this controller, you'll no longer 
need to stop and wait for a disk oper- 
ation to be completed before you can go 
about your business. 

The full type-ahead feature that 
veteran OS-9 users have loved since day 
one has finally arrived. No longer will 
you lose a keystroke or two when you 
type a command line while your disk 
drives are running. This is a fantastic 
feature. Once again, Tony DiStefano is 
to be congratulated. 

What's next from Disto? No one 
knows — not even Tony. However, he 
does have a lot of things on his CoCo 
wish list. At the top of that list is a color 
digitizer that takes the output from a 
video cassette recorder, processes it and 
then feeds it into your CoCo. Sounds 
interesting . . . and useful. 

Games, Too! 

Several days after we talked with 
Tony, we received Sub Battle, a new 
CoCo 3 game from Epyx — the same 
submarine simulator that runs on the 
IBM PC, Apple II and Commodore 64/ 
128 computers. Designed by Digital 
Illusions and sold by Tandy, it makes 
OS-9 shine. 

Your goal is to command a World 
War II submarine, complete a mission 
and survive. As a beginner you can start 
with some target practice against an 
enemy convoy and then move on to a 
single mission game in a real combat 
setting. When you get brave, you can 
assume command of the sub and replay 



160 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



i 



* Kent D. Heyers 1 Modpatch script that corrects 

* two known G She 11 bugs. 

* Old CRC« 9E2FB9, new CRC should be= 8E7E71. 

* Fixes both the three- letter file extension hang bug, 

* and lets GShell handle directories with more than 255 files. 



1 gshell 



c 


117D 


42 


2C 


c 


1838 


32 


16 


c 


1839 


64 


ID 


c 


18.3A 


0C 


CC 


c 


18EF 


32 


16 


c 


18F0 


62 


ID 


c 


18F1 


0A 


21 


c 


3607 


EC 


DC 


c 


36(218 


62 


3(3 


c 


36)2(9 


E3 


C3 


c 


360A 


A9 


(3(3 


c 


360B 


05 


(31 


c 


360C 


8D 


DD 


c 


360D 


25 


3(3 


c 


36J2(E 


21 


32 


c 


360F 


19 


64 


c 


3610 


A3 


16 


c 


3611 


A9 


E2 


c 


3612 


(35 


29 


c 


3613 


8F 


DC 


c 


3614 


24 


3(3 


c 


3615 


1A 


83 


c 


3616 


34 


n 


c 


3617 


(96 


(31 


c 


3618 


AE 


DD 


c 


3619 


A9. 


3(3 


c 


361A 


(35 


32 


c 


361B 


8D 


62 


c 


361C 


4F 


16 


c 


361D 


AC 


E2 


c 


361E 


E4 


D4 



v Figure 1: FixGS 



actual incidents that took place during 
World War II. Sixty different missions 
— 24 American and 36 German — are 
included in this Simulation. 

Sub Battle is an excellent graphics 
game. You navigate your sub by keeping 
an eye on view, heading and speed 
gauges. You also have map displays to 
keep you on track. If the lunch whistle 
blows, you can save your mission to a 
file on a floppy disk and reload it later. 
This game is a lot of fun to play. I 
particularly like the response you get if 
you try to raise the periscope while you 
are submerged: "But you'll drown, Sir!" 
Try it! It's not just a game; it's an 
adventure! 

Multi-Vue Fix 

Last month we urged you to be care- 
ful when you name files on a disk that 
you plan to use with Multi- Vue. Quite 
often, GShell, the new graphics shell, 
will hang up if it encounters a file with 
a name that ends with a period followed 
by exactly three characters — unless the 
three characters used are in a Multi- Vue 
AIF filename. 

Kevin Darling jumped on the prob- 
lem immediately and wrote a program 
to clear the data memory area used by 
GShel 1 before starting Multi- Vue. That 
improved things a bit, but didn't really 
solve that problem. Darling continued 
to pursue the problem with Kent Mey- 
ers, hacker extraordinaire, who offered 
the ModPatch script shown in Figure 1. 
If you're running Multi- Vue, it's abso- 
lutely essential that you run this script. 
Store it in a file named FixGS in your 
current data directory. Then type the 
following command line: 

059: ModPatch <FixG5 <ENTER> 

Getting Organized 

I'm betting that once you start run- 



ning Multi- Vue, you are going to want 
to get organized. In the low resolution 
mode, GShell displays only 12 docu- 
ments or folders on your screen. The 
situation improves somewhat when you 
use the high resolution mode and can 



see 24 icons displayed eight columns 
wide by three rows deep. 

We've talked about OS-9's hierarchi- 
cal directory system and discussed the 
advantages of keeping a small number 
of files in each directory. You can save 



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April 1988 THE RAINBOW 161 



Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCI I format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
fisting. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria Those wishing 
renumeration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 



a lot of time if you do that. It takes just 
under five seconds to redraw the screen 
each time you scroll from one screen- 
full of document icons to another while 
browsing through a directory folder. 
You will find it easier to get to your 
documents and application programs if 
you store just one screen-full in each 
directory. 

There's no question about it - run- 
ning an application program or utility 
by double-clicking the mouse button 
while pointing to an icon is much more 
enjoyable than remembering a long 
pathlist to the file that holds your 
program. Before you can do this, how- 
ever, you'll need to prepare application 
information files — AIFs — and icons 
for the utilities you use most often. 

Here's the quick and dirty way to get 
started. For now, ignore the fact that 
you don't have an icon editor. You do 
have an icon you can use — it's stored 
in a file named I con . demo in the I CONS 
directory of your original system disk 
from Tandy. 

Since the icon attached to any partic- 
ular application program or document 
is defined in the application informa- 
tion file, it really doesn't matter that you 
have only one icon. You can. write an 
AIF file that points all of your programs 
and utilities to the same icon. You'll still 
be able to tell your programs apart, 
however, because the name of the pro- 
gram in each AIF file will appear below 
each icon. 

Later you'll want to download a copy 
of a public domain icon editor for 
Multi- Vue, You'll find one in the data- 
base section of rainbow's OS-9 Online 
SIG on Delphi and on CompuServe's 
OS-9 SIG. The icon editor will let you 
make your own icons for your applica- 
tions. By the way, you'll want to store 
all of your icons in the same place. A 
directory named ICONS in your current 
execution directory, CMDS, is the most 
appropriate place for this directory. 

Many people have already started to 
work on a set of icons for their favorite 
OS-9 applications, and you'll find 
several files full on the commercial 
databases mentioned above. Once you 
have downioaded these files, you can 
modify them with the icon editor to suit 
your own taste or simply use them with 
your own applications and documents. 

For example, after I downloaded an 
icon named i con . tsuio rd from the OS- 
9 SIG last week, I noticed that it pic- 
tured an old-fashioned quill and a bottle 
of ink. I immediately thought it would 
make an excellent icon for DynaStar , so 
I quickly set up an application informa- 



tion file named Rif .dsa to put it to 
work. Here is a listing of that file: 

ds 

icons'icon. tsuiord 

96 

2 

B0 
24 
3 
2 

The next time I double-clicked on the 
directory where I had stored Rif .dsa, 
an icon with a quill and ink bottle 
appeared with the letters ds below it. 
Multi-Vue had automatically read the 
file Ri f . dsa and learned that the name 
of the application I wanted to run was 
named ds. 

Later when I double-clicked that 
icon, Multi-Vue read the file Rif .dsa 
again and told OS-9 that I wanted to 
run a program named ds. It assumed 
that I had stored ds in my current 
execution directory. Further, it tells OS- 
9 that I do not want to pass any addi- 
tional parameters when ds is started. 

Multi- Vue found the icon it displayed 
in a file named icon . tsuord. That file 
had its execute and public execute bits 
set and was stored in a directory named 
ICONS, which I had created in CMDS, my 
current execution directory. 

When Multi- Vue read the fourth line 
of the file Rif. dsa, it learned that 1 
wanted OS-9 to start DynaStar with 96 
pages — 24K — of memory. In the next 
three lines it learned that I wanted OS- 
9 to start DynaStar in an 80-by-24, Type 
2 window. The last two lines tell OS-9 
to display black letters on a green 
background. A Type 2 window is con- 
figured to display text only and runs 
much faster than a graphics window. 

To get to this point, GShei i — your 
visual interface to OS-9 — followed a 
precise sequence of events. 

When it first reads the name of a file, 
it checks to see if it is a directory. If so, 
it displays a folder on your screen. If the 
file is not a directory, it checks its 
attributes to see if it contains executable 
code. If it does, it displays an object icon 
that visually tells you the file contains 
an application program or utility you 
can run on your Color Computer. To 
run a program with an object icon, you 
must first select the icon by pointing to 
it with the mouse and clicking once. 
Then, you click on "open" under Multi- 
Vue's file Menu. 

If the file checked is not a directory 
and not executable, it can only contain 
data. However, that data can take any 



162 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



form. For example, it may simply be a 
text file you created with DynaStar . . . 
or a program source file you created 
with BASIC09. However, it may also 
contain information that can help 
Multi-Vue automate your Color Com- 
puter. 

If, for example, a file's name is aif . 
followed by any three characters that 
form a legal OS-9 filename, GShell 
knows that it contains an application 
information file. Likewise, if the name 
of a file ends with a period followed by 
three letters that have been previously 
used in an application information file, 
then GShell knows that it is a data file 
created by the application program 
named in that AIF file. Let's take a 
closer look at this last condition. 

Earlier we mentioned that we had 
described an application information 
file named fiif .dsa. If we later save a 
DynaStar file with a filename that ends 
in -dsa, then GShell will know that it 
was created by DynaStar. If we double- 
click the mouse button while pointing 
to this file's icon, it will start DynaStar 
and automatically open our document 
for editing. Give it a try! 

To keep from getting confused, 
there's an important thing you should 



note here. If you create a new file with 
DynaStar named MVTester.dsa, it 
will not appear on the screen that 
displays your current data directory 
until GShel 1 reads that directory again. 
To check this out, I created a file named 
MVTester.dsa and saved it in my 
current data directory. Then I closed 
DynaStar to return to Multi-Vue. I did 
not see my new file. 

Suspecting this would be the case, I 
clicked on another drive and displayed 
the documents in its root directory. 
When I moved back to my original data 
directory — presto, the new file was in 
place and was marked by the quill and 
ink bottle icon. Just to make sure 
everything was working, I double- 
clicked on it. A second later, DynaStar 
was running and the file MVTester.dsa 
was ready for editing. It passed the test. 

If you have applications like Dyna- 
Star and BASIC09 that you run often, 
you'll probably want to load them into 
memory in your "start-up" file so they'll 
be there instantly when you double- 
click. 

When GShel 1 checks a data file and 
does not find an AIF-file or a data file 
created by an AIF-driven application, it 
displays that file as a simple document. 



You can find out what's in that docu- 
ment by selecting it with your mouse 
and acting on it with any of the active 
verbs under the Multi- Vue file menu. 

About the Clipboard 

Those of us who use other computer 
systems at work that provide a clip- 
board for cutting and pasting within 
and between application programs have 
looked forward to Multi-Vue's release 
for a long time. We were surprised to see 
that Multi-Vue's GShell did not make 
use of the clipboard capability that had 
been designed into the heart of the 
system. It is, however, the job of the 
application programmer to provide the 
clipboard capability within his or her 
program. 

Before we get to the point where we 
can cut data from one application and 
paste it in another, we must develop a 
set of standards that every application 
programmer should follow. To this end, 
Tandy has come up with a set of sug- 
gestions they hope all application 
vendors will follow. If the vendors don't 
follow this lead, we will all suffer. 
Incompatibility problems will then 
prevent our Color Computers from 
reaching the performance goals we seek. 



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SDISK - Standard disk driver module replacement allows full use of 40 or 80 
track double sided drives with OS-9 Level I. Full compatibility with CoCo 35 track 
format and access all other OS-9 non-CoCo formats. Easy installation. $29.95 

SDISK+BOOTFIX - As above plus boot directly from a double sided diskette. 
$35.95 

SDISK3 - Level II version of SDISK driver. Same features as level I (except 
bootfix not required to boot from double sided). $29.95 

PC-XFER UTILITIES - Programs to format and transfer files to/from MS- 

DOS tm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. (Requires either SDISK or SDISK3 to run 
depending on which level of OS-9 you are using) $45.00 

MSF - MS-DOS disk format file manager. More complete file transfer capabil- 
ities for level II only. (Requires SDISK3 to operate). $45.00 

CCRD 51 2K byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE - Operates faster than similar 
device sold by others. Requires RS Multipak interface, two units may be used to- 
gether for 1 MB. OS-9 Level I & II drivers and test software included. $169.00 

All diskettes are in CoCo OS-9 format; other OS-9 formats can be supplied for 
$2.00 additional charge. All orders must be prepaid or COD, VISA/MC accepted, 
add $1 .50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD, additional charge for COD. 

D. P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St., 
Portland, OR 97223 

(503) 244-8152 (For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time, Mon.-Fri.) 
OS-9 is a trademark ot Microware and Motorola Inc., MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, 
Inc. 



DISKMASTER HARD DISK SYSTEM 

The DISKMASTER system has features no other system has: 

- 20 MB SCSI hard disk 

- High Density floppy drive with over 1 MB storage per disk 
(The ONLY HD floppy system available for the COCO, 

at least twice the speed of normal floppies.) 

- Battery backed up Clock/Calender 

- 3 Serial ports 

- Bi-directional parallel (printer) port 

- Expansion port for additional Floppy drives 

- Single cable interface to COCO 3 

- All interface software for OS-9 level II included 

$1295.00 

- Optional RAMDISK up to 1 .5 MB (Call for price) 

A dual HD floppy model is available with ail the features listed above 
except the hard disk is replaced by a second floppy. $795.00 

You can get a cheaper system elsewhere but not with all the features 
and performance of the DISKMASTER. 

PLUS-100 512K MEMORY EXPANSION 

$109.00 (+$2.50 S&H) 
The most reliable 51 2K memory expansion board for the COCO 3. Our 
products are designed to be the most reliable, not the cheapest. 

Send for a COLOR BROCHURE fully describing the DISKMASTER and 
PLUS-1 00 Memory Expansion. 

Visa and Mastercard accepted, call for Diskmaster shipping charges. 
HEMPHILL ELECTRONICS INC. 

334 Paseo Tesoro 
Walnut, CA 91789 

(714) 598-7799 (Phone hrs. 10 AM-2 PM Mon.-Thurs. Pacific Time) 

You may also contact D. P. Johnson (see left) to answer your techni- 
cal questions about the DISKMASTER system. 



April 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 63 




About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . . 

the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
oneortwo line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




164 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



The first thing your application pro- 
gram must do is highlight the clipboard 
option under the hourglass on the menu 
ban When you do this you are telling 
the user that he may select a portion — 
or all — of his data using the mouse and 
then click on the clipboard option under 
the hourglass where he can act on his 
data with the active verb of his choice. 
When he clicks on the word clipboard 
he will see the dialogue box below. 



«« CLIPBOARD »» 



COPY 
CUT 
MERGE 
PASTE 



VIEW 
QUIT 



The View option above lets the user 
see the data code and its extension so 
he can determine if he wants to replace 
an existing clip file with new data. 

Copy and Cut will delete an existing 
clipboard file and write a new file. 
Merge adds more data to the clipboard 
file. It is up to the application pro- 
grammer to ensure that it is the same 
type of data. 

Paste inserts the data in the clipboard 
file into the application's data space at 
the position pointed to by the cursor. 
Quit exits the clipboard function with- 
out changing anything. After you paste 
some data into an application, the 
clipboard function returns control to 
the application program. If no clip file 
exists, your program must be smart 
enough to know it and warn the user. 

When the user selects Cut or Copy, 
your program should take the selected 
data and write it to a file named 'DD/ 
ClipJ. The pound sign (8) represents 
the user ID of your application pro- 
gram's process. The file should contain 
a two-character Hex representation of 
the data type you are putting in the 
clipboard, a period and three-letter 
code that tells the origin of the data, 
plus one space and a carriage return 
without a line feed. The data you are 
saving to the clipboard follows this 
standard prefix. A typical clipboard file 
that uses this format is listed below: 

(03) (VEF) (80D) . . . DATA . . . 
[EOF] 

Tandy has proposed the following 
code definitions, which I propose we all 



start using now so we'll have a standard 
right from the start: 

00=ASCII 

01=Binary 

02=Windous Draw file 
03=VEF file 
04=GIF file 
05=RLE file 

■ • ■ 

06 - $FF = undefined 

If your application program generates 
a unique data type, you can assign any 
code above 06 to it. If you do this, you 
will want to publish that code in your 
documentation and post it on the OS- 
9 forums on CompuServe, Delphi and 
GEnie so everyone else can avoid using 
the same number. 

They Call It Shell+ 

There's really good news for dedi- 
cated Color Computer 3, OS-9 Level II 
hackers in the CompuServe and Delphi 
OS-9 SIGs these days. Kent Meyers, 
Kevin Darling and Ron Lammardo 
have joined forces to create Shell* — a 
replacement for the original Tandy/ 
Microware OS-9 Shell. 

This program includes fixes to bugs 
in the original Shell and many new 
features. It is super. These guys are to 
be congratulated. 

Shell* will now unlink the proper 
name. If the module name a program 
was trying to unlink did not match the 
command filename you typed when 
using the original Shell, it would stick 
in memory until you manually unlinked 
it. Shell* fixes this by reading in the 
actual module name instead of the name 
on the command line. 

The new Shell also prevents you from 
attempting to execute a write-only 
device as a procedure file and helps you 
start up Level II windows by writing a 
null to the standard output path when 
you run it. You can now also redirect the 
standard and error output paths to a 
write-only device. The old Shell tried to 
open the path in the UPDATE mode. The 
"quote" bug has been fixed also, so if 
you leave off the second quote mark in 
a command line, Shell* will not crash. 

The exciting news about Shell* is 
substantiated when you look at the 
additions. For example, when you work 
in a windowing environment like OS-9 
Level II, it is very easy to forget which 
window you are working in. To solve 
the problem, type this line: p=0S9 [ @ ] : . 

After you type it, Shell* will append 
the name of the window you are using, 
and your new OS-9 command prompt 



will look like this: DS9[W7]:. If you 
would rather know the process number, 
you can type p=DS9 [ 8 ] : , and then you 
will see DS9[06] 

Of course, the 06 will change as the 
number of your process changes. With 
Shelly your prompt can be up to 21 
characters long. 

Global procedure files — Shell scripts 
— can be placed in your execution 
directory when you are using Shell*. To 
use this feature, take a procedure file 
you use all the time and copy it to CMDS. 
Then set the execute and public execute 
bit with the RTTR utility. This feature 
makes it easy for you to add some 
commands that you use often. 

The shell search path for Shell* is 
memory, execution directory modules/ 
scripts, data directory scripts. Here's a 
sample Shell* script that Kevin Darling 
uses to start Flight Simulator: 

xmode /w6 type-l ; display c >/ 
w6 

chd /dd/games/fs 

( f s 0»/u6 ; xmode /w6 

type =80 )& 



This procedure file opens a VDG- 
type screen on Window /W6 and starts 
Flight Simulator. When you exit Flight 
Simulator, it resets / W6 to a graphics 
window. All of this is done in the 
background. 

A new feature that lets you append or 
overwrite a file moves our Color Com- 
puter OS-9 Level II closer to OSK and 
Unix. Now you can append the output 
of a program to a file by typing DS9: 
merge this that theother >+ Old- 
File. 

If you type >- instead of >+, you 
cause Shell* to overwrite the contents 
of the original file. The + and - oper- 
ators also work with the standard error 
output path ... or both. This means 
you can also use »+ and »>+. 

Al) of these new features are great, 
but we've saved the best for last: Shell* 
lets you execute RunB programs from 
the OS-9 command line without typing 
the parentheses and quotation marks. 
For example, here's the old and new 
command lines I use to start Wiz: 

059: Wiz ("Delphi") 
0S9: Wiz Delphi 



Take your pick. Download this pro- 
gram and use it! But don't forget to tell 
these guys how great it is so they will 
keep adding new features. They're 



already talking about Shell variables, 
Go scripts, Command structures, in- 
memory Shell scripts and an environ- 
ment. Fantastic! 

More Good News 

If you need a fourth-generation data- 
base application like Sculptor but are 
on a budget, we have good news. MPD 
USA was sued by MPD in London and 
Frank Hogg at FHL was able to pick 
up hundreds of copies of Sculptor at an 
outstanding price. Until he runs out, 
you can buy Sculptor for the Color 
Computer for $149.95 — that's half the 
standard FHL price and far below the 
program's $450 list. However, when this 
shipment is sold, this price is history. If 
you need this application, act now. 

WordPak RS Drivers for CoCo 3 

We can't thank Dennis Skala of 
Fairview, Pennsylvania, enough for his 
help during our OS-9 seminar at RAIN- 
BOWfest Princeton. He ran the 
computer and performed a live demon- 
stration of OS-9 Level II windows while 
we told how to create them. It added a 
lot to the presentation. 

We often get requests for device 
drivers and, once again, Dennis has 
answered the call. Last year we pub- 
lished his RAM disk drivers for the 
"Banker." If you have graduated to the 
Color Computer 3 but still have a 
WordPak RS lying around, you'll 
thank Skala for these drivers that will 
bring your 80-column monochrome 
display back to life. If you're trying to 
learn how to write a device driver for 
OS-9, study Skala's excellent code. 

Skala wanted to use the existing co80 
subroutine module, so he wrote a small 
driver that emulates the functions of the 
Level I CCIO driver. His WordPak RS 
works fine at the 2 MHz clock rate used 
by the Color Computer 3. However, he 
did need to add a software delay at one 
point in the co80 subroutine. He sup- 
plies a procedure file that you can use 
with Debug to make the changes. You 
will need to load coB0 into memory by 
itself so there will be room for the extra 
16 bytes added by his patch. 

Skala thinks that you may also be 
able to get your old WordPak I or 
WordPak II to work with these drivers 
if you make a hardware modification to 
clear up an addressing conflict with the 
Color Computer 3. His drivers support 
all of the CoCo 3 display commands 
except "underline," "blinking," "insert a 
line" and "delete a line." All relevant 
"set status" and "get status" codes are 
supported. The driver assumes coB0 is 



WHOM 



I 

5523 



TANDY COMPUTERS 

1000-HX 256K 1-3 1/2" Drive. 
1000-TX 640K 1-3 1/2" Drive 
3000-HL512K 1 5 1/4" Drive 
3000 640K 1 5 1/4" Drive 
4000 1 Meg 1 3 1/2" Drive 
1400LT Portable Computer 
102 Portable Computer 24K 
Color Computer 3 128K 

MONITORS & BOARDS 

VM-4 Monochrome Green 

CM-5 Color RGB 

CM-11 Color RGB 

EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 

Tandy Dual Display Card 

Tandy EGA Card 

Zucker Mono Graphics Card 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 
Portable Drive 100/102/200 
5 1/4"' External Drive 1000EX 
3 1/2" External Drive 1000EX 
Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 
Zucker 30 Meg Hardcard 
Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 
AT HD/1.2M Controller 

EXPANSION BOARDS 

Zucker Serial Board 
Zucker MFB 512Kfor 1000SX 
Zucker MFB OK for 1000 



535.00 
875.00 
1110.00 
1500.00 
1930.00 
1215.00 
375.00 
155.00 



95.00 
220.00 
335.00 
510.00 
145.00 
160.00 

75.00 



250.00 
155.00 
180.00 
200.00 
509.00 
450.00 
265.00 
200.00 



45.00 
135.00 
103.00 

Zucker 1200 Baud Modem Card 72.00 
PRINTERS 

DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 165.00 
DMP-1 30 Dot-Matrix 255.00 
DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 335.00 
DWP-520 Daisy Wheel 730.00 
DMP-440 Dot-Matrix 595.00 
DMP-2120 Dot-Matrix 1325.00 
LP-1000 Laser Printer 1635.00 
Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 195.00 
Epson FX-86E Dot-Matrix 320.00 
Epson FX-286E Dot-Matrix 475.00 
Epson EX-800 Dot-Matrix 425.00 
Epson EX-1000 Dot-Matrix 585.00 
Epson LQ-500 Dot-Matrix 375.00 
Epson LQ-850 Dot-Matrix 520.00 
Epson LQ-1050 Dot-Matrix 695.00 
Epson LQ-2500 Dot-Matrix 905.00 
Epson GQ-3500 Laser 1580.00 

Price's Subject To Change. 
Please Call for Current Prices. 
Send For Price List. 



All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Adver- 
tised prices are cash prices. CO D. accepted add 2% (minimum charge 
$10.00). M.C, Visa add 2%. All non defective items require return 
merchandise authorization. Call for RMA Number before returning. 
Delivery is subject to product availability. Add V/j% for shipping and 
handling, $5 00 minimum charge 

TM • Registered Trademark of Tandy, Epson, and IBM 
Monday thru Friday 9am-6pm EST. 



□□□□□ 
□ □□□O 

□□□□□ 

oaoon 

124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



1 


■ 




n 


ma 


i 




TJjDJQJuQ. 


ffcrl 



April 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 65 



already in memory and will not auto- 
load it like CCIO. 

The listing of wp.dd is the device 
descriptor. Wecho is a device descriptor 
that lets you use the WordPak as a 
window device. You use it with the 
following code sequence: 

iniz wecho wp 

wcreate /wecho -s=2 0 0 B0 24 1 
0 0 

shell </WBcho»>/wp& 

The only "gotcha" is the fact that the 
terminal pause and CTRL-W functions 
will not work with this configuration. 
Otherwise, you are home free. After you 
have assembled Dennis' driver, descrip- 
tors, and subroutine module, you can 
experiment with them by typing the 
following: 



up.dd co60 



chd /dl 

merge wpdrv.dr 
wecho. dd >wptest 
attr wptest e pe 
load /dl/wptest 
1 ink wp 
link coB0 
link wecho 
iniz wp wecho 



If everything performs the way you 
want it to, you can use DS9Gen or 
Con fig to move these modules into 
your 0S9Boot file. If you have any 
questions, Skala invites you to send 
them to him along with an SASE at 
5423 W. Sebago Drive, Fairview, PA 
16415. 

Packet Radio 

Add another sin to the list. Several 
years ago, George Dorner, the treasurer 
of the OS-9 Users Group kept telling me 
about packet radio on the amateur 
radio bands. He's right — it's fascinat- 
ing. It's like being on CompuServe or 
Delphi without paying an hourly fee. 
Besides that, it's fun. There's a wealth 
of information waiting for you on 
amateur radio bulletin boards. Get your 
license and go for it. 

If you're looking for OS-9 software 
for packet radio, I understand that 
Dwayne Bruce, VE3FXI, at 29 Vanson 
Avenue, Nepean, Ontario, Canada K2E 
6A9, will send you the C source code for 
his WORLI compatible bulletin board 
program if you send him a 5 ^-inch disk. 
Check it out. His code could even help 
you set up a regular telephone-driven 
BBS system. Tell him to send any 
comments to me, KOHYD, @ K4QQ. If 
you're a ham and active on packet 



Listing 1: COB0. patch 

* This is a script file to use debug to patch the co80 subroutine for the 

* Wordpak RS. This is written to patch edition #2, length - $0295, 
CRC - $C4F197. Load this version of co80 into memory before using. 
If using level II, make sure there is room in back of the module for 
the additional length. Use debug which has been patched for correct 
operation under level it; or patch using level I OS-9. 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



tmode .1 -pause 
-p -x -t 
debug 
1 co80 
. .+03 

$* This lengthens the module by $10 bytes, 
ex 

- A5 

1 co80 
. .+08 

$* This corrects the header parity for the new length, 
ex 

- 5C 

1 co80 
. .+1D 

$* This changes the cursor to a blinking underline. The second character 

* is the starting line of the cursor - e.g. a value of $60 would 

* result in a blinking block cursor; a value of $65 in a blinking half 

* block cursor, etc. Using a zero for the first digit will result in 

* a non- blinking cursor. N.B. - changing this in this file will make 

* the given CRC value incorrect, 
ex 

- 69 

1 co80 
. .+21F 

$* This is the branch to the new code . 
ex 



\ m 



- 74 

1 co80 
. .+278 

$* This corrects an apparent typo in the original ( IDA -> LDB ) 
ex 

- C6 

1 co80 
. .+281 

$* This patches the existing code to restore the proper cursor 

* on receipt of a $5, $21 sequence 
ex 

- 0A 

- 81 

- 2A 

- 2E 

- 0D 
« E6 

- 8D 

- FD 

- 93 

- 20 

- 02 

- C6 

- 20 

- 86 

- 0A 

- ED 

- D8 

- 01 

- 5F 

- 39 ' 

$* The following is additional code to introduce a hardware -controlled 

* delay after a clear-to-end-of -screen, 
ex I 

17 
FE 

- 6E 

- C6 

- 20 

- E5 

- D8 

- 01 



166 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



- 27 

- FB 

- 16 

- FE 

- 3F 

$* This is the new CRC value 
ex 

- 8E 

- 1C 

- IE 

Q 

tmode .1 pause 



radio, I'll be looking for your traffic 
there also. 

Another good contact for you may be 
John Alan Lind, KD7XG, the Orange 
Section technical coordinator of the 
American Radio Relay League. He told 
me last February that he was porting the 
WA7MBL packet BBS system into OS- 
9 C for the CoCo. Give him a try, also. 
If you contact him, tell him to let me 
know the status of his BBS. 

Till May, 73's & CUL! □ 



Listing 2: updrv.dr 



* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



Device driver for Wordpak RS 

For use with Level II OS- 9 

Copyright 1987 by Dennis Skala 
all rights reserved 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



* A A * k k i cir kifA. A A A A k kkk A A ii A"A , A"& ,, A , i A WHc * 'iWlt & 1 *^ 

NAM WpDrv 

TTL Level II device driver for Wordpak RS 
IFP1 

USE /D0/DEFS/OS9DEFS 
USE /DJ7/DEFS/SCFDEFS 
ENDC 

* Note - USE /D0/DEFS/OS9DEFS AND 

* USE /D0/DEFS/SCFDEFS STATEMENTS ARE 

* INCLUDED BETWEEN IFP1 & ENDC 

* 

MOD WPSIZ, WPNAM , TYPE , REVS , START , S IZE 
TYPE SET DRIVR+OBJCT 
REVS SET REENT+1 

FOB UPDAT . mode byte - read will be error 
WPNAM FCS /WpDrv/ 
EDITION FCB 1 

**** EQUATES **** 

CO80FLG EQU $J?4 offset for jump address 
CC3BELL EQU $1)717 address of cc3io bell routine 

**** THE FOLLOWING ARE OFFSETS INTO THE MEMORY AREA **** 

* These are chosen to conform to the co80 subroutine 

COUNT EQU $25 character count for multi -character sequences 

MULTIADR EQU $26 jump address for multi -write 

MULCHAR2 EQU $28 third character in multi-character sequence 

MULCHAR1 EQU $29 second " " " H 

ROWCOL EQU $2D columns, rows 

CHAR EQU $52 single character or status code here 
JMPADR EQU $72 entry to co80 subroutine 

**** DIRECT PAGE VARIABLES **** 

SYSPROC EQU $4A system process descriptor 
CURPROC EQU $5)7 current process descriptor 

**** DRIVER MEMORY AREA **** 



SIZE 



RMB $7C 
EQU . 



CONAME FCC "co80" co-module name 
FCB $J7D cr 

START LBRA INIT 



LBRA READ 
LBRA WRITE 
LBRA GETSTA 
LBRA SETSTA 
LBRA TERM 

* INIT ENTRY: U - ADR. OF DEVICE MEM. AREA 

* Y- ADR. OF DEVICE DESCRIPTOR 

* EXIT: NO CONDITIONS 
irkitiekirkirirki<itirki<i<i<i<ickirk^ 

INIT CLRA 

LEAX $1D,U clear memory from $1D 

LDB #$5D to $7A 
INIT.l STA ,X+ 

DECB 

BNE INIT.l 

IDA #CO80fFLG to test if already linked 
LDX #$5)718 columns, rows 
PSHS A,X,Y,U 
BSR COSETUP 
PULS A,X,Y,U 
BCS INIT. 2 if error 
STX ROWCOL ,U 
INIT. 2 RTS exit 

COSETUP BITA $7)7, U do setup, A - parity 
BEQ C0SET.1 not already set up 
CLRB no error 
RTS 

C0SET.1 LEAX CONAME, PC pointer to comodule name 
PSHS A,X,Y 

LDD <CURPROC save current process pointer 
PSHS D 

LDD <SYSPROC make system process current 
STD <CURPROC 

BSR LINKIT link the comodule 
PULS D 

STD <CURPROC restore current process 
BCC COSET. 2 if linked successfully 
LEAS 5,S clean stack 
LBRA NF. ERR report error 
COSET, 2 LEAX JMPADR, U 
LDA ,S should be 4 here 
STY A,X comodule entry point address 
PULS A,X,Y clean stack 
CLRB flag init jump 

BRA COJMP jump to comodule initialization 

LINKIT PSHS U link the comodule 
LDA #SYSTM+OBJCT subroutine comodule 
0S9 F$LINK 
PULS U.PC 

* READ IS ILLEGAL OPERATION 

irkirA ^^ kic^^^ieicki^ 

READ COMB set carry 
LDB #$CB illegal mode 
RTS 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 167 





* Y - ADR OF PATH DESCRIPTOR 


* WRITE ENTRY: U - ADR. OF DEVICE MEM. AREA 


* A - STATUS CODE 


* Y - ADR. OF PATH DESCRIPTOR 


* EXIT: CONDITIONS DEPEND ON STATUS CODE 


* A s* CHARACTER TO WRITE 


A A A A fejfc&jriHlnlH^friN^ 


* EXIT: NO CONDITIONS 




★ft**'** A'A**-An^ 


*** Only screen size call supported here 


WRITE LDB COUNT, tJ 


GETSTA STA CHAR,U stash status code 


BNE WR.MULTI if mult i- character sequence 


LDX PD.RGS.Y caller's stack 


STA CHAR,U single character 


CMPA #SS.SCSIZ is it get screen size? 


CMPA #' is it control character? 


BEQ SCRSIZ yes, do it 


BHS WR. CHAR no 


CMPA #$92 monitor type call? 


CMPA #$1E $1E or $1F? 


BNE GS.JMP no, jump to comodule 


BHS WR.ESC yes 


CLR R$X,X return monochrome code in X 


CMPA #$0F $0F - $1D? 


CLR R$X+1,X 


BHS READ no graphics codes permitted 


RTS 


CMPA #C$BELL 




BNE WR. CHAR not bell 


SCRSIZ CLRA 


JMP [CC3BELL] will RTS from there 


LDB ROWCOL,U 




STD R$X,X no. columns in X reg. 


WR. CHAR LDD #$100*CO80FLG+3 write single character 


LDB R0WC0L+1.U 


CO JMP LEAX JMPADR,U 


STD R$Y,X no. rows in Y reg. 


LDX A,X get comodule execution address 


CLRB no error 


BEQ NF.ERR if not there 


RTS 


LDA CHAR,U single character 




JMP B,X jump to comodule write 


GS.JMP LDD #$100*CO80FLG+6 flag comodule getstatus jump 




BRA COJMP do it 


WR.ESC BEQ TERM ignore $1E 




LEAX WR. CHAR, PC jump address 


•kirkirfrirkit k'kirk'k-kk k irk A-A-A-AA- k A A A-A■A-A^^A^^^ Mrk kkrk^rk^rkick^kicirlrk'k 


LDB #1 prepare for escape code 


* SETSTA ENTRY: U - ADR. OF DEVICE MEMORY 




* V » ADR OF PATH DESCRIPTOR 


STB COUNT, U 


* A - STATUS CODE 




* EXIT: CONDITIONS DEPEND ON STATUS CODE 








kirfrkirkk A A' AnfrVfrA'ATfc'A^A'^rA^ 


* TERM ENTRY: U - ADR. OF DEVICE MEMORY AREA 




* EXIT: NO CONDITIONS 


SETSTA STA CHAR,U stash status code 




CMPA #SS.COMST set baud, etc.? 




BEQ TERM yes , ignore it 


TERM CLRB no error 


CMPA #$29 undocumented status code - window stuff 


RTS 


BEO TERM icnore it 




LDD #$100*CO80FLG+9 flag comodule setstatus jump 


kk*k*k1rkicie1ckickick^ 


BRA COJMP do it - will be $D0 error 


WR.MULTI CMPB #2 need another? 


irkkkkkkkirkirkirk^rkk'kick-k'kk A -ft A fck+titk A A -A A ^^ftTAft^V^T^ftTV^AT^-A^ 


BEQ WR.M1 yes 




STA MULCHAR1,U stash character 


NF.ERR COMB set carry 


CLR COUNT, U no more needed 


LDB #$DD module not found 


JMP [MULTIADR.U] do multi character sequence 


RTS 


WR.M1 STA MULCHAR2,.U stash character 




DEC COUNT U one more needed 


EMOD 


CLRB 


WPSIZ EQU * module size 


RTS 


END 


*Sr* Vr;HWrft->Wr -ft-* * JrA-ttMrfcfcbririrk A A A"A"A- AVffrfrAA^frA-A^VVrA-A^ 




* GETSTA ENTRY: U - ADR. OF DEVICE MEMORY 




Listing 3: up.dd 


MOD WPSIZ , WPNAM , TYPE , REVS , FMAN , DEVDRV j 


TYPE SET DEVIC+OBJCT 


kirf<^rkirkic^^frki€-kkieirk^irk'ki< A A* A-A-*VrA A A A A A A A A frk-irkirk-k 


REVS SET REENT+1 


* * 


FCB UPDAT. mode byte - read will be error 


* Device descriptor for Wordpak * 


FCB $07 hi address byte 


* For use with Level II OS -9 * 


FDB $FF76 device address 


* * 


FCB WPNAM-*-l initializtion table size 


* Copyright 1987 by Dennis Skala * 




* all rights reserved * 


* Initialization table 


* * 

irkick^irkicMrkirki^ 


mmm — ^ Jh jmt mm 4 jm\ *m 

FCB $00 device class - SCF 




FCB $00 upper & lower case 


NAM Wp 


FCB $01 erase on backspace 


TTL Level II device descriptor for Wordpak 


mmm mm* " JM jh m mi m 

FCB $00 backspace over line 


IFP1 


FCB $01 echo on 


USE /D0/DEFS/OS9DEFS 


FCB $01 auto line feed on 


USE /D0/DEFS/SCFDEFS 


FCB $00 end of line null count 


ENDC 


FCB $01 pause enabled 




FCB $18 lines per page 


* Note - USE /D0/DEFS/OS9DEFS AND 


FCB $08 backspace character 


* USE /D^/DEFS/SCFDEFS STATEMENTS ARE 


FCB $18 delete line character 


* INCLUDED BETWEEN IFP1 & ENDC 


FCB $0D end-of- record character 



1 68 THE RAINBOW April 1 988 



FCB $1B end-of -f ile character 

FCB $J?4 reprint line character 

FCB $J71 duplicate last line character 

FCB $17 pause character 

FCB $03 interrupt character 

FCB $J?5 quit character 

FCB $08 backspace echo character 

FCB $07 line overflow (bell) character 

FCB $02 initialization value (parity, type) 

FCB $00 baud rate (unused) 

FDB WPNAM attached device name offset 

FCB $00 xon unused 

FCB $00 xoff unused 

FCB $50 no. columns for display 

FCB $18 no. rows for display 



FCB $00 window number unused 
FCB $00 rest is invalid 

FDB $00 6 empty bytes for 
FDB $00 window parameters 
FDB $00 

WPNAM FCS /Wp/ device name 
EDITION FCB 1 

FMAN FCS /SCF/ file manager 
DEVDRV FCS /WFDRV/ device driver 

SHOD 

WPSIZ EQU * module size 
END 



Listing 4: uecho.dd 



"iVlVVfiVlY "A' 'it ififtcfcfctcfric/ti 



•ir k toik'ictolctrJ c fcfFtck 



* 

* 
* 
* 
★ 
* 
* 
* 



Device descriptor for Wecho 
a term device which echos to /wp 

> 

For use with Level II OS -9 

Copyright 1987 by Dennis Skala 
ail rights reserved 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



NAM Wecho 

TTL Level II device descriptor for window device which echos to /wp 
IFP1 

USE /D0/DEFS/OS9DEFS 
USE /D0/DEFS/SCFDEFS 
ENDC 



FCB $0D window number =- $0D 

FCB $01 rest is valid - use as defaults 

FCB $02 window type 2-80 col text 

FCB $00 X start 

FCB $00 Y start 

FCB $01 foreground palette 

FCB $00 background palette 

FCB $00 border palette 

TERMNAM FCS /Wecho/ this device's name 
EDITION FCB 1 

FMAN FCS /SCF/ file manager 
DEVDRV FCS /cc3io/ device driver 
WPNAM FCS /Wp/ echo device is wordpak 



EMOD 

TERMS I Z EQU * module size 
END 



* Note - USE /D0/DEFS/OS9DEFS AND 

* USE /D0/DEFS/SCFDEFS STATEMENTS ARE 

* INCLUDED BETWEEN IFPl & ENDC 

MOD TERMS IZ , TERMNAM , TYPE , REVS , FMAN t DEVDRV 
TYPE SET DEVIC+OBJCT 
REVS SET REENT+1 

FCB UPDAT. mode byte - read + write access 

FCB $07 hi address byte 

FDB $FFAD device address matches window number 
FCB TERMNAM-*- 1 initialization table size 

* Initialization table 

FCB $00 device class - SCF 

FCB $00 upper & lower case 

FCB $01 erase on backspace 

FCB $00 backspace over line 

FCB $01 echo on 

FCB $01 auto line feed on 

FCB $00 end of line null count 

FCB $01 pause enabled 

FCB $10 lines per page 

FCB $08 backspace character 

FCB $18 delete line character 

FCB $0D end-of -record character 

FCB $1B end-of-file character 

FCB $04 reprint line character 

FCB $01 duplicate last line character 

FCB $17 pause character 

FCB $03 interrupt character 

FCB $05 quit character 

FCB $08 backspace echo character 

FCB $07 line overflow (bell) character 

FCB $80 initialization value (parity, type) 

FCB $00 baud rate (unused) 

FDB WPNAM attached device name offset 

FCB $00 xon unused 

FCB $00 xoff unused 

FCB $50 no. columns for display 

FCB $18 no. rows for display 




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April 1988 THE RAINBOW 169 



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Hands-On Hershey 

By William Barden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Besides this column in RAINBOW, I write a regular 
column for rainbow's sister publication, PCM, The 
Personal Computer Magazine for Tandy Computer 

Users. Believe it or not, Tandy MS-DOS system owners are 
not bad people. Thanks to their efforts, you're about to 
receive a gift — as a matter of fact, 1377 gifts. . . . 

Let me explain. Back in the December 1987 and January 
1988 PCM columns, I described a font utility and font driver 
program that worked in conjunction with a public domain 
font set called the Hershey font. 

A font is just a collection of character definitions, such as 
the ones displayed on the CoCo screen for the alphabet, digits 
and special characters. As you probably know, there's quite 
-a variation in fonts, ranging from characters that are drawn 
with straight line segments to very ornate characters, drawn 
with serifs and gingerbread. 

The Hershey Project 

The Hershey font is a digitization of all kinds of characters 
in several different fonts — plain vanilla, fancy, Old English, 
German, Russian and Greek. Hershey also takes in special 
symbols such as music, mathematical and cartographic (map) 
symbols. Typical characters in the Hershey set are shown in 
figures 1 and 2, actual photographs of a CoCo 3 screen in 
high resolution (640-by-192) mode. 

The Hershey characters were created by Dr. Allen V. 
Hershey, of the U.S. Naval Weapons Laboratory, in the late 
1960s. Unlike typical computer characters, which are bit- 
mapped, the Hershey characters were designed for vector 
devices such as COM (Computer Output on Microfilm) and 
plotters. Figure 3 shows the difference between a bit-mapped 
character used on the CoCo 3 and the corresponding Hershey 
character. 

The beauty of the Hershey characters is that they can be 
drawn on the CoCo and PC-compatible systems by using the 
BASIC DRAW command (which draws a line segment between 
any two points on the screen) rather than by setting a matrix 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 




Figure 2 



of bits on and off. Since DRAW involves a line between two 
points, scaling can easily be done — characters can be made 
larger or smaller without the "blockiness" that results from 
expanding a bit-mapped character (see Figure 4). 

Although it's possible to buy a mainframe magnetic tape 
in ASCII or BCD format that provides the characters, I 
suggested to the readers of PCM that they might like to help 



170 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



Bit-Mapped 



Hershey 



8 Pixels 



8 Pixels 



-x 




+x 



Figure 3: Bit Mapped vs. Hershey Characters 



Enlarged Bit-Mapped 'A' 



Enlarged Hershey Character 





Figure 4: Enlarged Bit-Mapped vs. Hershey Characters 



me create a database of characters from the printed character 
definitions I had. It was no easy task — there were approx- 
imately 100,000 bytes worth of data to be entered, all precisely 
so. The response was overwhelming. I had 58 volunteers the 
first month, offering from several hours to unlimited amounts 
of time. 



Because of the number of volunteers, I was able to allocate 
a few hours' worth of work to several dozen readers. The 
result was a database of more than 100,000 bytes defining 
all 1,377 Hershey characters. The database can be used on 
MS-DOS systems, on the CoCo 1 , 2 and 3, and on any system 
with a vector DRRW capability. 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 171 




Thanks to the PCM readers, this database exists now in 
CoCo-friendly form. I had to modify the original programs 
for the CoCo, which took some additional work on my part. 
But this resulted in two programs that are better than the MS- 
DOS versions. I'm presenting them here, and I'll also tell you 
how to obtain your copy of the Hershey database. 

With the Hershey database and programs, you can include 
alphabetic characters, digits and special characters in any size 
on your graphics screens. Proportional spacing, where 
narrower characters are allocated less width, is also provided. 
About the only negative aspect of the character set is that 
the characters do take some time to be drawn on the screen 

— typically seconds per character in low-speed mode. (For 
CoCo 3 users, this time can be halved in high-speed mode. 
Perhaps I can provide a fast assembly language or BASIC09 
driver in the future, if there's enough interest.) 

The Hershey Utility Program 

Hershey Utility, shown in Listing 1, allows you to enter 
Hershey characters or to define your own vector characters. 
Once defined, the characters can be dumped to one or many 
files for use with the driver program, described further on. 
The utility program is designed for a CoCo 1, 2 or 3 disk 
system with Extended BASIC. As the program runs in 32- 
character mode, a full-width screen is not necessary. 

The menu for Hershey Utility is as follows: 

Hershey Font Utility 

1. Read Characters from Disk 

2. Display Character 

3. Define New Character 

4. Store Characters on Disk 

5. List Characters in Memory 

6. Initialize Hershey File! 
Selection (1-6):? 

Let's suppose that the Hershey font database didn't exist 

— you could use Hershey Utility to create it! 

Defining Characters 

For you aspiring font engineers, entering a 3 for "Define 
New Character" takes you into the character definition mode. 
The first prompt is: 

INPUT 8:? 

Hershey characters are assigned numbers from 1 through 
3,926. The program, however, accepts values from 1 through 
32,639. Suppose we want to enter a Hershey straight-line * A', 
Character Number 1 — we enter a 1 for the Hershey number 
and are greeted by the next prompt: 

INPUT X,V VALUES:? 

Hershey values are based on a matrix of square points 128 
units wide by 128 units high. Some characters use fewer 
points than others, however, A Hershey 'A', a small-format, 
straight-line character, is defined in the Hershey book of 
values as follows: 

1 : -5, 5: 0, -5: -4, 4:-64, 0: 0, -5: 4, 4:-64, 0: -2, 1: 2, 1: 
-64, -64 

The first digit is the number of the character. The next two 
digits are the width of the character in the x position. The 

1 72 THE RAINBOW April 1 988 



-5 is five units to the left of the center line, and the 5 is five 
units to the right of the center line. The remaining pairs of 
numbers are the (x,y) coordinates of the points defining the 
character. Figure 5 shows the definition of the 'A' on the 
matrix of points. 

The (-64, 0) pair is a special case. It says, "Move to the 
next (x,y) coordinate without drawing a line." This is 
necessary to draw character segments that are not connected 
to a previous segment. The (-64, -64) pair is a terminator, 
which marks the end of the data for the character. A 
terminator is needed because all the characters are of different 
lengths — simple characters may take only 10 points, but 
complex, elaborate characters take as many as 250 points! 

The entire dialog for entering the 'A' is shown below: 

Input X, Y Values:? -5,5 
Input X, Y Values:? 0,-5 
Input X, Y Values:? -4,4 
Input X, Y Values:? -64,0 
Input X, Y Values:? 0,-5 
Input X, Y Values:? 4,4 
Input X, Y Values:? -64,0 
Input X, Y Values:? -2,1 
Input X, Y Values:? 2,1 
Input X, Y Values:? -64,-64 

When the terminating value is entered, the program 
switches to a 256-by-192 graphics mode screen and draws the 
character. Pressing any key brings you back to the menu. 

This same process is repeated for other characters in the 
Hershey (or your own) set. If an error is made and the 
character isn't drawn properly, you can re-enter the character. 
The program will always take the most recently entered 
character as the definition of the character. Characters do not 
have to be entered in any sequential order. 



Listing Characters in Memory 

You can list the currently entered characters in memory by 
selecting Menu Item 5. The program lists all characters in 
the order they were entered. Here is a typical listing: 

551 552 553 554 555 55G 
557 55B 559 5G0 561 5G2 
1 2 3 3 5G1 

Note that there are two repeats (3 and 561) and that the 
characters are not completely in order. 

Displaying Any Character 

You can display any character in memory by selecting 
Menu Item 2. 

When prompted, input the Hershey number, and you'll see 
the character displayed on a graphics screen. Press any key 
to get back to the menu. 



with a /DfiT extension). The character numbers (Start, End) 
in the file are 551 through 576 inclusive (551 and 576 are 
included). The numbers from 551 through 576 do not have 
to exist — this is only a range of character numbers that will 
be included in the file. Other character numbers will be 
ignored and not sent to the output file. 

You can create one huge file called HERSHEY/ if you want, 
but it's probably better to create a variety of smaller files 
designated by the types of characters in the fiJe. The SCRIPT/ 
file here includes uppercase script characters, for example. 
You can create one or many files from the same set of 
characters in memory. 

As the file is created, all characters in memory are sorted 
by Hershey number and then output to the file. Duplicate 
characters are deleted, with the program sending the most 
recent character definition to the file. If you do a "list" after 
creating the file, you'll see an ordered listing of the numbers 
with duplicates deleted — for example: 



Creating a New File 

Once you have characters defined, you can create a 
Hershey file containing the characters. Selecting Menu Item 
6 initializes a file, and you'll be met with these prompts: 

File Name:? SCRIPT/ 

Y to Continue, N to Restart: 

Input Start, Endtt:? 551, 57G 

The filename above is SCRIPT/ (the ✓ character avoids the 
extension /DfiT, which BASIC automatically tacks on if the 
/ is not included — forget the / if you want to create a file 



1 2 3 551 552 553 
554 555 55G 557 55B 559 
5G0 5G1 5G2 

Reading Additional Characters From Disk 

Once one or more files have been created, you can reload 
the file at any time. After creating SCRIPT/, for example, you 
could reload the characters at another session by selecting 
Menu Item 1. The "read characters" function reads in all or 
a portion of characters from a named disk file. The read 
merges the data from the disk file with any characters already 
in memory. Suppose you had defined the characters 651, 652, 




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653 and 654. Reading in SCRIPT/ might result in this 
dialogue: 

File Name:? SCRIPT/ 

Input Start, Endtt:? 1,10000 

The resulting list of characters after reading in SCRIPT/ 
would then be as follows: 

651 652 653 654 551 
552 553 554 555 . . . 

The range of 1 to 10,000, by the way, was just a convenient 
way of saying "give me all the characters in the file," assuming 
that no character number is greater than 10,000. 

Merging Characters in Memory With Existing Data on Disk 

Menu Option 4 lets you merge the current characters in 
memory with characters in an existing file. It operates much 
like Menu Item 6, Initialize File, except that the specified 
range of characters in memory is merged in sequence in the 
characters of an existing file. If the character already exists 
in the disk file and it also is present in memory, it replaces 
the character in the disk file. This menu option can be used 
to modify a character on disk or simply to merge in new 
characters. 

If You Never Want to Define Characters 

Maybe you don't want to define any characters. In that 
case, simply use the existing Hershey characters, which you 
can get from me. Hershey Utility, though, still comes in handy 
for breaking up the huge Hershey database into smaller files, 
which can then be loaded in by the program Hershey Font 
Driver, described below. Bear in mind, however, that with 
a little bit of plotting, you can define your own characters 
and conveniently save them in a file. 

Bells and Whistles 

Hershey Utility was designed primarily for entering 
Hershey character definitions. There are some embellish- 
ments that could make it a more usable program. Some 
Hershey volunteers complained that the program had no 
editing capability — if you enter an invalid 240th data pair, 
you're going to have to repeat the entire entry. That is a 
drawback, but perhaps it can be corrected. 

Another problem is that the entire Hershey database 
cannot be loaded into memory. As a matter of fact, not very 
many characters can be loaded into the CoCo before it runs 
out of memory; this is more of a handicap imposed by 
Extended BASIC. An average Hershey character is 70 bytes 
long — 100 characters require 7,000 bytes of memory, a large 
chunk in a system with only about 23K of free memory to 
start with. However, working with smaller file sizes over- 
comes this handicap. With the merge capability (Store 
Characters), the disk file can be up to the limits of the disk 
— characters can be merged into a master file in small 
increments. Accessing the Hershey database is no problem, 
as you'll see in the next description. 

The Hershey Font Driver 

Hershey Font Driver is an Extended BASIC program that 
will work with a CoCo 1 , 2 or 3. Once a database of characters 
is established, Hershey Font Driver can access them and 
display them on the screen. Assuming that you have created 
a dozen files or so with the Hershey Utility program, any of 

174 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



the 1,377 characters can be accessed within seconds and 
loaded into memory, at which time the current character set 
is available for screen display. 

Any groups of characters can be mixed together in 
memory. Hershey characters (or your own characters or 
symbols) can be equated to ASCII characters for easy 
reference. For example, printing "ABCDEF" can cause 
ABCDEF to appear as script, Old English or Greek 
characters, depending on how youVe set up the correspond- 
ence between the Hershey and ASCII codes. 

Characters can be programmed in different sizes, from 
pinpoint size to a character that fills the screen. Hershey 
characters, however, work best when they are larger than 
standard screen characters — small characters lose resolu- 
tion. 

Hershey Font Driver, shown in Listing 2, is set up as a 
subroutine with line numbering from 10000 on up. The 
comment lines at the beginning of the program can be deteted 
to save memory. Hershey Font Driver is called from your own 
BASIC program with string Zfi$ set equal to characters you 
want displayed and with Font Driver subcommands; Font 
Driver subcommands are preceded by %% — two percent signs 
— and ended by a semicolon. There are eight subcommands: 



fcfcFname; 



OyO, 



Initializes driver 

Sets the Hershey font filename to "name 
Sets scale factor for the characters 
Moves an imaginary graphics cursor to the 
(x,y) position corresponding to the graphics 
mode in force 

Sets the character width or proportional 
spacing 

Reads Hershey characters from file "name" 
Equates the next m Hershey characters to the 
next m ASCII codes 
Toggles the control code flag 



To illustrate a typical sequence of commands, look at the 
"call" to the Hershey Font Driver below: 

100 CLEAR 4000 

110 DIM E(200), C$(100), PIX(255) 
120 PMODE 4,1 
130 SCREEN 1,0 
140 PCLS 

150 (your graphics routines here) 

160 Zfl$= 

170 GOSUB 10000 

1B0 . . . 

Initialization 

Before a call can be made to Hershey Font Driver, some 
action must be taken in the calling program. CLEfiR allocates 
additional string space. The amount required depends on the 
size of your program, the amount of string processing your 
program does, and the amount of free memory. Some 
experimentation is called for here. 

Three arrays are used by Font Driver. Array E holds two 
entries for each Hershey character. If youll be using 100 
characters, for example, use DIM E ( 200 ) . The C$ array is the 
string array that holds each Hershey character definition. Use 
C$(100) to hold up to 100 Hershey characters in memory. 
The RX array equates 256 ASCII codes to a Hershey character 
number and is fixed by DIM fiX( 255). 

Of course, the screen must be set to the proper graphics 



mode with a SCREEN and PMODE. (If you're using a CoCo 2 
and want to do SCREEN displays, use that setup, but see the 
note farther on — all HDRflWs must be changed to DRfiWs. 

You can call Hershey Font Driver at any time — before, 
during or after your own graphics displays. Each call is made 
with Zfl$ set to a string of Hershey subcommands intermixed 
with characters. 

Subcommands to Call the Driver 

The first subcommand in the string should be a %%l to 
initialize the arrays and do general setup within Font Driver, 
%%l can be used at any time, however, to "wipe the slate 
clean" and provide additional room in memory. Here is an 
example of the subcommand used in a program line: 

1G0 ZR$ = ; . . . 

The next typical subcommand is a %%Y NAME command. 
This simply sets the current filename to the name youVe 
specified. No read is done at this point. The filename can be 
changed whenever you like, to read in characters from 
different font files. You might have Greek letters in a file 
called GREEK/, for example, and German in a file called 
GERMRN/ Don't forget to add the slash after the name if the 
file does not have the extension 'DPT. This subcommand 
must be done before an actual read; otherwise, the default 
filename of " " (null string) will cause an error. It would be 
used in a program as follows: 

1G0 Zfl$= "**I;**FSCRIPT'; . . . 



The next subcommand might be a read command. The %%& 
command reads in characters n through m from the current 
file. Any range of values can be read in from the current file. 
Generally, just read in whatever characters you will be using 
to save space. Characters read in are appended to any 
previous characters — the more reads that are done, the 
larger the list of characters will grow. Purge the list by issuing 
subcommand at any time. 

One important caution: When using more than one read 
command with a single file (a typical situation), order the read 
subcommands by character number. If you do this, the reads 
will be sequential — the file is kept open and the characters 
will be read in one pass. If the reads are not in sequence by 
character number, the program will search from the 
beginning of the file for each read. In our ever-growing 
sample program line, the %%& subcommand would be used 
like this: 

1G0 ZR$= ''a*I;**FSCRIPT/;^551,57G;**RG51, 
G7G; . . . 

The above subcommand reads in characters 551 through 576 
(uppercase script), followed by characters 651 through 676 
(lowercase script) from the Hershey database. 

The next subcommand, &&Nh,a,m, typically is an equate 
command. The N subcommand equates a set of Hershey 
numbers to ASCII codes. ASCII codes run from 0 to 31 
(control characters), from 32 to 127 (digits, uppercase and 
lowercase letters, and special characters), and from 128 
through 255 (non-standard characters not in the original 



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April 1988 



THE RAINBOW 175 



ASCII set). Suppose you want to equate the Hershey 
uppercase script characters at 551 through 576 to ASCII 
characters A through Z. The ASCII characters A through 
Z are codes 65 through 96. This subcommand would do the 
trick: 

160 Zfl$ = ~m;FSCRIPT';**R551,576;**N551 f 
G5 , 26 5 • - ■ 

The N subcommand can be used at any time to change the 
equivalences for ASCII codes. The advantage of equating 
other fonts to ASCII A through Z is that standard characters 
can be used in (and printed from) Zfl$. Otherwise, Zfi$ might 
have to be made up of CHR$ functions — CHR$(3) 
+CHR$ ( 17 ) +CHRS ( 5 ) . - . ". Note that the N subcommand 
works with a block of m characters. Sometimes a single 
character at a time must be equated, for example: 

* 

1000 ZA$=". . . **N699,32 f l; ..." 

The above line equates a Hershey blank 699 to an ASCII 
space, Code 32. Also note that no characters can be displayed 
with Font Driver unless they are defined by the N subcom- 
mand. The Font Driver does not display normal screen 
characters (use the HPRINT command for this in CoCo 3 
Extended BASIC). 

The %%Z subcommand "toggles" the control code flag in 
Fom Driver. If the flag is set, a carriage return and line feed 
(ASCII characters 13 and 10) will cause the proper action 
on the screen. If the flag is not set, ASCII carriage return 
and line feed codes will be used in finding an equated Hershey 
character, just like the other ASCII codes. Alternate fcfcC 
subcommands turn the flag on and off. Use this command 
for automatic line spacing, if desired. 

The size of the characters displayed is determined by two 
things, the size of the character on digitization (Hershey 
worked with three basic sizes) and the scale factor. The 
%%Sr\ , m ; subcommand sets the horizontal (n) and vertical (m) 
scale factors. A scale factor of 1 produces characters from 
nine to 21 pixels high in 256-by-192 mode, depending on the 
font. Setting n-m will provide a character that looks like the 
original digitization in 256-by-192 mode. (In HSCREEN mode, 
n must be 2.4 times greater than m for a 1:1 character.) 
Increasing n produces a taller character. Increasing m 
produces a more squat character. Fractions can be used here. 
Use the $$5 subcommand as follows: 

160 ZR$ = *»XI;X«FS0RrPT/;*»RS5i f 57G;**N5S1, 
65 j 26 1 S>S>S2 - 4 j 2 ? ... 

This string sets the x scale factor to 2.4 and the y scale factor 
to 2. 

The %%Wn; subcommand has two width modes for Font 
Driver. If %% W999 ; is specified, Font Driver will use the width 
of the character from the width bytes. This produces 
proportional spacing, where each character is allocated a 
different width. Using another width value spaces over a fixed 
amount of width for every character — the value is the width 
in pixels. Here is an example of the subcommand that sets 
proportional spacing used within a program line: 

160 Zfl$ = *!lfXI;**FSCRIPT/;»»RSSl*57G}aWN5Sl f 
G5,2G;**S2.4,2;**W999; . . . 

The fc&Mx,y; subcommand positions an invisible cursor 

176 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



to an x,y position. This subcommand is used to find the 
starting position prior to displaying a new group of 
characters. The cursor is referenced to the center point of each 
character, so enough space must be provided on both its left 
and right sides. A BASIC error may result if the DRRU 
command draws off the screen. The M subcommand can be 
used at any time, and may appear like this: 

160 Zfl$ = ~**I;**FSCRIPT';**R551,57G;**N551 f 
65,26;**S2.4,2;**W999;**M32,16; . . . 

The above string moves the cursor to x=32, y=16. 

"Normal" Characters 

Screen printing is done by either CHR$ codes or normal 
ASCII characters that have been equated to corresponding 
Hershey numbers. To print in uppercase script, for example, 
the string could be: 

160 Zfi$ = ~**I;**FSCRIPT';**R551,576;**R699, 
699 ; *XN551 , 65 , 26 ; **N699 ,32,1; **S2 .4,2; %%U3 
99;**M32,1G;"THIS IS UC SCRIPT WITH BLANKS" 

The sequence above will be printed starting at (32,32), the 
center point of T, with proportional spacing and in script. 

Once all the definitions have been made, display of 
characters becomes much easier. Just use normal text and 
change the scaling, spacing or position when necessary. Don't 
hesitate to include your own strings as "macro" subcom- 
mands, either. If uppercase script will always be scaled at 2.4 
and 2 with proportional spacing and contained in a file called 
SCRIPT/, you can do something like this: 

100 UC$ = ''**FSCRIPT/;a*R551,576;**N551, 
65 , 26 ; **S2 .4,2; **W999 " 
600 ZR$ = UC$: GOSUB 10000 

As a further example of the use of subcommands, see the 
code in Listing 3 that prints the characters in Figure 1. 

HSCREEN Hershey Font Driver Program 

The Hershey Font Driver program for CoCo 2 users is 
identical to the program in Listing 2 except that all HDRflWs 
must be changed to DRFlWs, and the SCREEN must be set by 
the calling program. 

How to Get the Hershey Font 

Because the Hershey font is in the public domain, and 
because the efforts of our MS-DOS comrades created the 
large database, the Hershey font database is available free 
to certifiable CoCo freaks. To get your copy, send a statement 
by your spouse or significant other indicating that you spend 
more time with the CoCo than with them. Also send me a 
formatted 35-track, single-sided disk and include a self- 
addressed envelope large enough to hold the disk. Stamp the 
envelope with at least $1.07 worth of stamps (or more, if you 
include heavy disk protection such as cardboard or steel). 

In keeping with the spirit of this project, you may not resell 
the programs, but may distribute them free as often as you 
wish, providing my copyright is maintained. Ill also try to 
get the database and programs on Delphi. Write to William 
Barden, Jr., Post Office Box 3568, Mission Viejo, CA 92692. 

The Hershey Font Project has been an exciting one for me 
because of the enthusiastic response from readers. This 
started off as a CoCo project, and I'm glad to see that it finally 



wound up as one. I'm certain that if it had been CoCo readers 
solicited for the volunteer work, the response would have 
been just as great. This project shows what can be accom- 



plished by a group of unselfish computer users. Perhaps the 
next project of this type could be a CoCo project. Any 
volunteers? □ 




1420 .21 

1610 220 

1790 24 

1950 48 

2120 86 

END 171 



Listing 1: FDNTUTIL 



110 1 

12)3 1 HERSHEY FONT UTILITY. ALLO 
WS HERSHEY CHARACTERS TO BE READ 
FROM 

130 1 DISK FILE, DISPLAYED, DEFI 
NED, AND MERGED WITH DISK FILE D 
ATA. 
140 1 

150 1 VI. 0 12-31-87 COCO 1, 2, 3 

VERSION 
160 1 

17 p i 

180 ■ INITIALIZE C$ AND E TABLE 
POINTERS AND ALLOCATE ARRAYS 
190 CLS 

200 CLEAR 5000 
210 1=0: J = 0 

220 DIM HV( 300 ), C$ ( 300 ), E( 

600 ) 
2 30 PRINT MEM 
240 SCREEN 0,1 
250 1 

260 ' 

2 70 1 DISPLAY MENU 
280 CLS 

2 90 PRINT "HERSHEY FONT UTILITY" 
300 PRINT "1. READ CHARACTERS FR 



OM DISK" 

310 PRINT "2. DISPLAY CHARACTER" 
3 20 PRINT "3. DEFINE NEW CHARACT 
ER" 

3 30 PRINT "4. STORE CHARACTERS O 
N DISK" 

340 PRINT "5. LIST CHARACTERS IN 
MEMORY " 

3 50 PRINT "6. INITIALIZE HERSHEY 
FILE! " 

360 1 

370 t 

380 1 MAIN LOOP. INPUT SELECTION 

AND BRANCH OUT. 
390 PRINT "SELECTION (1-6):"; 
400 INPUT RE 

410 IF RE = 5 THEN GOTO 2190 
420 IF RE < 1 OR RE > 6 THEN GOT 
O 390 

430 ON RE GOSUB 460, 710, 1190, 
1660, 2190, 1680 
440 GOTO 280 
450 1 

4 60 i =========================== 

470 1 

4 80 1 READ CHARACTERS FROM DISK 
4 90 ' MERGES C$ AND E ARRAYS WIT 
H HERSHEY CHARACTERS FROM DISK F 
ILE. 
500 1 

51 p i 

520 1 INPUT FILENAME, START, AND 
END RANGE OF HERSHEY CHARACTERS 
AND OPEN 

530 INPUT "FILE NAME:"; F$ 

540 INPUT "INPUT START#, END# : 11 ; 
SN, EN 

550 OPEN "I", #1, F$ 



DMC "No Halt" 



Controller 




Unleash your CoCo's potential! 

Our new Dual Mode Controller (DMC) implements a new 
"no halt" mode of operation so it can read from or write 
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meant to run! But the Radio Shack "halt" mode of 
operation is also retained to maintain full compatibility 
with existing non-OS-9 software. 

Fr««! Disk caching software included can speed up 
OS-9 disk accesses. 



Did you know? 

. . .that all the older floppy disk controllers for the 
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precompensation 

• gold plated card-edge connectors for reliability 

• ROM socket takes 24 pin or 28 pin chip; dual DOS capability 

• Radio Shack DOS 1.1 ROM installed 

• 8K bytes cache memory on board (32K optional) 

• D.R Johnson's SDISK package (specially modified for DMC) is 
included at no charge ($30 value) 

• aluminum case 

• fully assembled and tested; 120 day limited warranty 

To ord«r: DMC controller with RSDOS 1.1 and SDISK (specify 
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(604)255-4485 (Pacific Time) 



April 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 77 



T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE CONTINUES ITS 



ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 

COVER 
RACETRACK 
HANGMAN 
MUSIC ALBUM 
LIFE EXPECTANCY 
WORD TESTS 
KILLER MANSION 
BARTENDER 
CALENDAR 
ROBOT WAR 

ISSUE #2, AUGUST 1982 

UFO COVER P1 1 
BIORHYTHM 
BOMBARDMENT 
BLACK JACK 
COST OF LIVING 
FRENZY 

BUSINESS LETTER 
QUICK THINK 
QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 
QUEST FOR LENORE 

ISSUE #3, SEPTEMBER 1982 

UFO COVER PI 2 
BASKETBALL 
CHUCKLUCK 
SLOT MACHINE 
ALPHABETIZER 
NFL PREDICTIONS 
FLAG CAPTURE 
ROBOT BOMBER 

ISSUE #4, OCTOBER 1982 

UFO RESCUE 

TANK BATTLE 

DRIVEWAY 

SOUNDS 

BALLOON DROP 

MIND BOGGLE 

COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 

CALORIE COUNTER 

JACK-O'LANTERN 

ISSUE #5, NOVEMBER 1982 

CATALOG COVER 
BOWLING 

PROGRAM INVENTORY 
PROMISSORY-LOANS 
CHECKBOOK BALANCER 
TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 
CONVOY 
BAG IT 

SPECTRA SOUND 
CONVEYOR BELT 

ISSUE #6, DECEMBER 1982 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
RAINDROPS 
STOCK MARKET 
ADVANCED PONG 
DESTROY 
SOUND ANALYZER 
CREATIVITY TEST 
VOICE DATA 
ML TUTORIAL P1 1 
LOONY LANDER 

ISSUE #7, JANUARY 1983 

NEW YEARS COVER 
LIST ENHANCER 
SUPER PRECISION DIV. 
BOMB DIFFUSE 
SPACE STATION 
ML TUTORIAL PT 2 
SHOOTOUT 
FIND UTILITY 
CYRORG INS, 
CYBORG FACES 



ISSUE #8, FEBRUARY 1983 

COVER 8 
DEFEND 

3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 
COCO CONCENTRATION 
AUTO LINE NUMBERING 
ML TUTORIAL PT.3A 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 3B 
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 
DUAL BARRIER 
BRICKS 

ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

TIME MACHINE COVER 
TRIG DEMO 
PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 
PROGRAM PACKER 
BUDGET 

ELECTRONIC DATEBOOK 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 4 
TAPE DIRECTORY 
BLOCK-STIR 

COCO ADDING MACHINE 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 

TENTH COVER 
PYRAMID OF DANGER 
TYPING TUTOR 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 5 
TINYCALC 

STOCK MARKET COMP 
YAH-HOO 
MISSILE ATTACK 
SCREEN PRINT 
BRIKPONG 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 

ELEVENTH COVER 
ARCHERY 
FROG JUMP 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 6 
MLT DICTIONARY 
BASIC SPEED UP TOT 
METRIC CONVERTOR 
GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 
GRAPHICS PROGRAM 
CATERPILLAR CAVE 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 

TWELFTH COVER 
SHOOTING GALLERY 
BOMB STOPPER 
VALLEY BOMBER 
STARFIGHTER 
WHEEL OF FORTUNE 
ML TUTORIAL PT, 
MERGE UTILITY 
RAM TEST 
LANDER 

ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 

THIRTEENTH COVER 
FLASH CARD 
ICE BLOCK 
COSMIC FORTRESS 
MAIL LIST 
DOLLARS & CENTS 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 8 
SDSK COPY 
MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 
CRAWLER 

ISSUE #14, AUGUST 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
ROW BOAT 

COMPUTER TUTL PT 1 
INDEX DATABASE 
DISK ZAPPER 
COCO MONITOR 
COCO-ARTIST 
ROBOT COMMAND 
TEST SCREEN PRINT 
HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 



ISSUE #15, SEPTEMBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER PT, 2 
GOLD VALUES 
TREK INSTRUCTIONS 
TREK 

HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 
ASTRO DODGE 
DR COCO 
PEG JUMP 
MORSE CODE 
PURGE UTILITY 

ISSUE #16, OCTOBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
BOPOTRON 
DIRECTORY RECALL 
VECTOR GRAPHICS INST 
VECTOR GRAPHICS 
SKYDIVER 

SWERVE AND DODGE 
NIMBO BATTLE 
TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 
LIFE GENERATIONS 

ISSUE #17, NOVEMBER 1983 

THANKSGIVING COVER 

3-DTlC-TAC-TOE 

INDY500 

COLLEGE ADVENTURE 
MEMORY GAME 
DUNGEON MASTER 
WEATHER FORECASTER 
GRID FACTOR INST 
GRID FACTOR 
DRAW 

ISSUE #18, DECEMBER 1983 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
CLIMBER 

GALACTIC CONQUEST 
WARLORDS 
STATES REVIEW 
MATH TUTOR 

MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 
PRINTER UTILITY INST 
PRINTER UTILITY 
MUTANT WAFFLES 

ISSUE #19, JANUARY 1984 

BANNER 
PROBE 

DISK DIRECTORY PROTECTOR 
OPTICAL CONFUSION 
WORD PROCESSOR 
WORD SEARCH 
ASTRONAUT RESCUE 
STAR TRAP 
PIE CHART 
FORCE FIELD 

ISSUE #20, FEBRUARY 1984 

INTRODUCTION 
HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 
ESCAPE ADVENTURE 
SEEKERS 
MASTER BRAIN 
LIST CONTROLLER 
DISKETTE CERTIFIER 
ROM COPY 
BASIC RAM 
SNAFUS 

ISSUE #21, MARCH 1984 

BASIC CONVERSIONS 
FINANCIAL ADVISE 
CASTLE STORM 
DOS HEAD CLEANER 
COCO TERMINAL 
SNAKE CRAWLER 
WAR CASTLE 
SKY FIRE 
EASY BASIC 
DOTS 3-D 



ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 

HEALTH HINTS 
GLIBLIBS 

CLOTHER SLITHER 
BIBLE 1 & 2 
BIBLE 3 & 4 
CATCH ALL 
INVADER 
ALIEN RAID 
MOON ROVER 
10 ERROR IGNORER 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 
STOCKS OR BOMBS 
WALL AROUND 
COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 1 
NUCLEAR WAR INST 
THERMONUCLEAR WAR 
CIRCUIT DRAWER 
MOUSE RACES 
SUPER SOUEEZE 
DATA FALL 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 

DIR PACK & SORT 
BRICK OUT 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT 2 

USA SLIDE PUZZLE 

51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 

51 '24 SCREEN 

CITY INVADERS 

PRINTER SPOOLER 

STEPS 

SNAKE 

ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT, 3 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEY MAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDITOR INST. 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLE BUSTER 
RECOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUGUST 1984 

PEEK, POLE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 
OTEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
COCO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

ISSUE #27, SEPTEMBER 19fl 

COCO TO COM 64 

GALACTIC SMUGGLER 

INDYRACE 

ACCOUNT MANAGER 

CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 

STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 

SPACE DUEL 

BUGS 

TRAP-BALL 

BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCTOBER 1984 

HANGING TREE 

CHECKERS 

FOOTBALL 

MORE PEEKS. POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RAT ATTACK 



ISSUE #29, NOVEMBER 1984 

DISK ROLL OUT 
ROBOT ON 
MULTIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
QUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 

ISSUE #30, DECEMBER 1984 

MATH HELP 
ZECTCR ADVENTURE 
WORLD CONQUEST 
DRAG RACE 
MINE FIELD 
T-NOTES TUTORIAL 
T&D PROGRAM INDEXER 
SYSTEM STATUS 
ERROR TRAP 
DROLL ATTACK 

ISSUE #31, JANUARY 1985 

TREASURES OF BARSOOM 
BATTLE GROUND 
STRUCTURED COMPILED LANGUAGE 
LIBRARY MODULE 
MINIATURE GOLF 
STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEBRUARY 1985 

DR SIGMUND 
ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 
LOTTERY ANALYST 
BASIC COMPILER 
MUSIC CREATOR 
MEANIE PATROL 
TRICOLOR CARDS 
SHAPE RECOGNITION 
DISK BACKUP 
SPACE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MARCH 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 
PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
ML DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 
DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEED KEY 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

HOVER TANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSIC GENERATOR 
FYR-DRACA 
DRIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 

SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 
SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
HAUNTED HOUSE 



VISA 




SUPER SAVINGS 
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6-10 Issues $5.00 ea. 

11 or more Issues . $4.50 ea. 

All 67 Issues $185.00 

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ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 

SELECT A GAME 2 
VIDEO COMPUTIZER 
SPEECH SYNTHESIS 
SPEECH RECOGNITION 
SPACE LAB 
AUTO COMMAND 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 
KNIGHT AND THE LABYRINTH 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 

ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 

CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE i 

SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 
FILE TRANSFER 
FOUR IN A ROW 
MARSHY 

TAPE CONTROLLER 
CATACOMB 
AUTO TALK 
SGRBPAK 

ISSUE #38, AUGUST 1985 

GOLF PAR 3 
WIZARD ADVENTURE 
KITE DESIGN 
ROBOTS 
GOMOKU 

AMULET OF POWER 
LINE COPY UTILITY 
DISK PLUMBER 
SUPER RAM CHECKER 
GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPTEMBER 1985 

DRUNK DRtVING 
CAR MANAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHINE 
ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 
SUPER VADERS 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

ISSUE #40, OCTOBER 1985 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
COCO-WAR 
DISK LABELER 
SHIP WAR 
ELECTRIC COST 
MULTIKEY BUFFER 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
SAND ROVER 

ISSUE #41, NOVEMBER 1985 

GRUMPS 

DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 
SOLAR CONQUEST 
GAS COST 

RIME WORLD MISSION 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 
GRAPHIC TEST 
GRAPHIC LOOPY 
BOLD PRINT 

ISSUE #42, DECEMBER 1985 

HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAHTZEE 
DISK UTILITY 
MACH II 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
SLOT MACHINE GIVEAWAY 
TEXT BUFFER 
TUNNEL RUN 



ISSUE #43, JANUARY 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER CQST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 
KEYPAD ENTRY 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEBRUARY 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 

ISSUE #45, MARCH 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD Z 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COLO KEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
LIBERTY SHIP 
SINGLE STEP RUN 

ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

special events reminder 
disk lock 

small business manager 

BOMB RUN 
TANKS 
TAR PITS 
BASEBALL 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

ROULETTE 

GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGE^ 
SYMBOLIC DIFE 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
TV SCHEDULE 
BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTI COPY 
AUTO MATE 
SCROLL PROTECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 

ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 

DISK DISASSEMBLER 

BAKCHEK 

PACHINKO 

STOCK CHARTING 

HAUNTED STAIRCASE 

CANYON BOMBERS 

DRAGONS 1 & 2 

GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 

AUTO BORDER 



ISSUE #50, AUGUST 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPTEMBER 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET 51 
VAN GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 

ISSUE #52. OCTOBER 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 
INVASION 

THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOT RACE 
FLIPPY THE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS 
SUPER ERROR 2 

ISSUE #53, NOVEMBER 1986 

CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CAVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DECEMBER 1986 

JOB LOG 
PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TYPE 
PANZER TANKS 
MRS PAC 
BIG NUM 

ISSUE #55, JANUARY 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
DIR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEBRUARY 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRUSH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EDITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 



ISSUE #57, MARCH 1987 

THE BAKERY 
ENCHANTED VALLEY ADV 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR 1 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS ! 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 

ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 
HOME PLANT SELECTION 
CHECK WRITER 
HELIRESCUE 
KABOOM 
NEW PONG 
CROQUET 
FUNCTION KEYS 
ZOOM 

ELECTRONICS 2 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
LABELS 
CATCH A CAKE 
COCO MATCH 
ROBOTS 

STREET RACERS 
BOWLING 3 
ELECTRONICS 3 
GRAFIX 
KRON 

ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 

EZ ORDER 

SUBMISSION WRITER 
KEYS ADVENTURE 
WALLPAPER 
CHOPPER COMMAND 
UNDERSTANDING OPPOSITES 
BIT CODE PLOTTING 
ELECTRONICS IV 
KING PEDE 
RAIDER 

ISSUE #62, AUGUST 1987 

PENSION MANAGEMENT 
HERB GROWING 
CATALOGER UTILITY 
RAIDERS 
ALPHABETIZING 
W.F.O. 

ELECTRONICS V 
RAMBO ADVENTURE 
BLOCKS 

MULTI SCREEN CAVES 

ISSUE #63, SEPTEMBER 1987 

GENEOLOGIST HELPER 
SMART COPY 

MAINTENANCE REPORTING 
COC03-COCO 2 HELPER 
DIRECTORY PICTURE 
SUB SHACK 
SAVE THE MAIDEN 
CAVIATOR 
ELECTRONICS VI 
MONKEY SHINE 



ISSUE #64, OCTOBER 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE IN THE GRASS 
CYCLE JUMP 
GEOMETRY TUTOR 
WIZARD 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS VII 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 

ISSUE #65, NOVEMBER 1987 

TAXMAN 

DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 
SIR EGGBERT 
CROWN QUEST 
GYM KHANA 
COCO 3 DRAWER 
FOOTBALL 
ELECTRONICS 8 
CHOP 

ISSUE #66, DECEMBER 1987 

ONE ROOM ADVENTURE 
OS9 TUTORIAL 
RIVER CAPTAIN 
SOUND EFFECTS 
BETTING POOL 
ADVANCE 
MATH TABLES 
ELECTRONICS 9 
LOWER TO UPPER 
NOIDS 

ISSUE #67, JANUARY 1988 

AUDIO LIBRARY 
SAVE THE EARTH 
WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
LOW RES PICTURES 
WORD COUNTER 
BACARAT 
BATTLE SHIP 
ELECTRONICS 10 
TAPE CONVENIENCE 
PENQUIN 



4 fjwti received my//r\ 
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I -year $u6&ur/p/mn 

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MAIL TO: 



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a Holland, Michigan 49424 
Sk (616) 399-9648 




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33 


41 


49 


57 


65 


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10 


18 


26 


34 


42 


50 


58 


66 


3 


11 


19 


27 


35 


43 


51 


59 


67 


4 


12 


20 


28 


36 


44 


52 


60 




5 


13 


21 


29 


37 


45 


53 


61 




6 


14 


22 


30 


38 


46 


54 


62 




7 


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23 


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39 


47 


55 


63 




8 


16 


24 


32 


40 


48 


56 


64 





PLEASE CIRCLE 
TAPE or DISK 



560 • 

570 • 

580 • READ AND STORE CHARACTER L 

INES IF WITHIN INPUT RANGE 

590 IF EOF( 1 ) GOTO 680 

600 INPUT#1, C$( I ) 

610 NO = ( ASC( LEFT$( C$ ( I ), 

1 ) ) - 128 ) * 128 + 

ASC( MID$( C 
$( I ), 2, 1 ) ) - 128 
620 IF NOT( ( NO >= SN AND NO <= 

EN ) ) THEN 670 
630 E( J ) = NO 
640 E ( J + 1 ) =1 
650 J = J + 2 
660 1=1+1 

670 IF NO < EN THEN GOTO 590 
680 CLOSE 
690 RETURN 
700 • 

7 i 0 i =========================== 



720 ' 

730 ' DISPLAY CHARACTER FROM MEM 
ORY 

740 • DISPLAYS A GIVEN HERSHEY C 
HARACTER # IN MEMORY. THE LAST C 
HARACTER 

750 ' FOUND IS DISPLAYED IF THER 
E ARE DUPLICATES. CALLED BY DEFI 
NE CHARACTER. 
760 ' 

770 i 

780 ' INPUT VALID #. IF NOT FOUN 
D, ANOTHER PROMPT GIVEN. ENTERIN 
G 0 TERMINATES. 

790 INPUT "INPUT HERSHEY #:"; NO 
800 IF NO = 0 THEN GOTO 1170 
810 FOR K = J - 2 TO 0 STEP -2 
820 IF E( K ) = NO THEN 880 
830 NEXT K 
840 GOTO 790 
850 1 

860 1 

870 ■ • INITIALIZATION AND MOVE TO 

SCREEN CENTER. 
880 SCREEN 1,0: PMODE 4,1: PCLS 
890 K = E ( K + 1 ) 
900 SX = 1.5: SY = 1.5 
910 DRAW "BM128, 96" 
920 X = 128: Y =96 
930 L = 5 
940 ' 

950 i 

960 1 START AT FIRST X/Y COORDIN 
ATE, BYPASS WIDTH 
970 IF LEN ( C$ ( K ) ) <= 6 THEN 
GOTO 1170 

980 A = ASC( MID$( C$ ( K ), L, 1 
) ) - 128 



990 B = ASC( MID$( C$ ( K ), L + 
1, 1 ) ) - 128 
1000 L = L + 2 

1010 A = A * CSX: B = B * SY: A 
= INT ( X + A ) : B = INT ( Y + B ) 
1020 DRAW "BM" + STR$ ( A ) + " , " 

+ STR$( B ) 
1030 ' 

!04j3 i 

1050 1 GET REMAINING X/Y COORDIN 
ATES AND DRAW LINE SEGMENTS 
1060 A = ASC( MID$( C$ ( K ), L, 
1 ) ) - 128 

1070 B = ASC( MID$( C$ ( K ), L + 

1, 1 ) ) - 128 
1080 L = L + 2 

1090 IF ( A = -64 ) AND ( B = -6 

4 ) THEN GOTO 1170 

1100 IF NOT( ( A = -64 AND B = 0 

) ) THEN GOTO 1150 
1110 A = ASC( MID$( C$( K ), L, 
1 ) ) - 128 

1120 B = ASC( MID$( C$( K ), L + 

1, 1 ) ) - 128 
1130 L = L + 2 

1140 A=A*SX:B=B*SY:A= 
INT( X + A ) : B = INT( Y + B) : 

DRAW "BM" + STR$( A ) + 

"," + STR$( B ) : GOTO 1160 

1150 A = A * SX: B = B * SY: A = 
INT ( X + A ) : B = INT ( Y + B ) : 
DRAW "M" + STR$( A ) + 

"," + STR$( B ) 

1160 GOTO 1060 

1170 A$ =-INKEY$: IF A$="" THEN 
GOTO 1170 ELSE RETURN 
1180 1 



1200 1 

1210 ' DEFINE NEW CHARACTER. 
1220 1 MAKES C$ ENTRY IN MEMORY, 
STORING HERSHEY CHARACTER AS A 
STRING. FIRST 

12 30 1 TWO CHARACTERS OF STRING 
ARE NUMBER, MS/LS; NEXT TWO CHAR 
ACTERS 

1240 ' ARE STANDARD HERSHEY WIDT 
H FROM HERSHEY DEFINITIONS; REMA 
INING 

1250 ' CHARACTERS ARE X/Y PAIRS 
FROM HERSHEY DEFINITIONS. TERMIN 
ATOR IS 

12 60 1 -64,-64. WIDTH AND X/Y PA 
IRS ARE STORED IN EXCESS 128 COD 
E. 

1270 1 

1280 • 

1290 ' Input Hershey # and initi 
alization 



180 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



1300 INPUT "INPUT #:'•; NO 
1310 A$ n •'" 
1320 K = 0 
133)3 1 

134 0 i 

1350 1 Input width, X/Y pairs, 

nd -64/-64 terminator 

13 6)3 INPUT "INPUT X,Y VALUES:"; 



+ 1 ) 
) : Y = HV( 



K + 1 



= -64 AND Y = -64 



HV ( K ) , HV ( K 
1370 X = HV( K 

) 

1380 K = K + 2 
1390 IF NOT( X 

) THEN GOTO 13 60 
1400 1 

1410 * 

1420 • CONSTRUCT STRING AND MAKE 
C$ ENTRY 

1430 C$( I ) = CHR$( INT( NO / 1 
28 ) + 128 ) + CHR$( NO - ( INT ( 
NO / 128 ) ) * 128 + 128 ) 

1440 FOR L = 0 TO K - 1 
1450 C$( I ) = C$( I ) + CHR$( H 
V( L ) + 128 ) 
1460 NEXT L 
1470 1 

1480 ■ 

1490 » MAKE E TABLE ENTRY, BUMP 
POINTERS, AND GO TO DISPLAY CHAR 



ACTER 

1500 E ( J ) = NO 
1510 E( J + 1 ) = I 
1520 J = J + 2 
1530 1=1+1 
1540 K = J - 2 
1550 GOTO 880 
1560 1 

1570 »========================== 

1580 ■ 

1590 1 STORE CHARACTERS ON DISK 
1600 1 SORTS C$ ENTRIES BY HERSH 
EY #, ELIMINATING DUPLICATE ENTR 
IES IN 

1610 1 MEMORY BY KILLING ALL BUT 
THE LAST. MERGES MEMORY C$ ENTR 
IES OVER 

1620 1 GIVEN RANGE WITH NAMED FI 
LE, CREATING NEW NAMED FILE. REP 
LACES 

1630 1 EXISTING FILE ENTRIES WIT 
H NEW DEFINITION FROM MEMORY. 
1640 » 

165 j3 i 

1660 INPUT "FILE NAME:"; F$ 
1670 NF - 0: OPEN "I", #1, F$: G 
OTO 1730 













EVEN IF YOU DON'T HAVE A 

HARD DISK 

YOU CAN STILL SUPERCHARGE YOUR COCO 1,2, OR 3 WITH 

RGB-DOS(HD) 

HERE ARE JUST SOME OF THE FEATURES OF RGB-DOS(HD): 

* FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH RS-DOS 

* WILL RUN TWO HARD DISK DRIVES 

* WILL AUTO-EXECUTE ANY PROGRAM 

* FULL SCREEN DIRECTORY DISPLAY 

* ELECTRONIC DISK LABELING 

* IMPROVED "COPY" COMMAND 

* "RUNM" COMMAND FOR M/L PROGRAMS 

* ...AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

RGB-DOS(HD) COMBINES ALL THESE FEATURES WITH THE 
ABILITY TO RUN ANY SIZE HARD DISK DRIVE IN BASIC! 

DO YOUR COCO A FAVOR- SUPERCHARGE IT WITH RGB-DOS! 

28 PIN ROM WITH USERS MANUAL... $74.95 

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AND OUR FULLY SCSI COMPATIBLE HARD DISK INTERFACE 



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SYSTEMS 

1716) 876-7538 







294 STILLWELL AVE 
KENMORE, N Y 14217 







April 1988 THE RAINBOW 181 



1680 INPUT "FILE NAME:"; F$: NF 
= 1 

1690 PRINT "THIS DESTROYS "; F$ ; 
» FILE!" 

1700 PRINT "Y TO CONTINUE, N TO 
RESTART : " 

1710 A$ = INKEY$: IF A$ = "" THE 
N GOTO 1710 

1720 IF A$ = "Y" THEN GOTO 1730 
ELSE GOTO 280 

1730 OPEN "0", #2, "HERSHEYN/" 
1740 INPUT "INPUT START, END*:"; 

SN, EN 
1750 1 

1760 P 

1770 1 BUBBLE SORT E TABLE AND D 
ELETE FIRST DUPLICATE ENTRIES 
1780 PRINT "SORTING,.." 
1790 IF J * 2 THEN GOTO 1930 
1800 SWAPF = 0 

1810 FOR L = J3 TO J - 4 STEP 2 
1820 IF E( L + 2 ) < E( L ) THEN 

Tl = E(L+2):T2 = E(L+3 
) : E ( L + 2 ) = E(L):E( 
L + 3)=E(L+1):E(L)=T 
1: E ( L + 1 ) =T2: SWAPF = 1 
1830 IF ( E( L + 2 ) m E( L ) ) 
AND ( E ( L ) <> 65535 ) THEN E( 
L )=65535: Tl = E( L + 2 ) : 

T2=E(L+3):E(L+2)= 
E( L ) : E( L + 3 ) = E( L + 1 ) : 
E ( L ) = Tl: E( L + 1 ) = T 
2: SWAPF = 1 
1840 NEXT L 

1850 IF SWAPF = 1 THEN 1800 
1860 FOR K = 0 TO J - 2 STEP 2 
1870 IF E( K ) = 65535 THEN J = 
K: GOTO 1890 
1880 NEXT K 

1900 1 

1910 1 MERGE C$ ENTRIES IN MEMOR 
Y WITH NAMED FILE, REPLACING FIL 
E 

1920 1 ENTRIES IF SAME HERSHEY # 

IN MEMORY. 
1930 K = 0 

1940 IF NF = 1 THEN GOTO 2050 
1950 IF EOF( 1 ) THEN GOTO 2050 
ELSE IF K = J THEN GOTO 2090 ELS 
E C . INPUT#1, A 

$ 

1960 NO = ( ASC( LEFT$( A$ , 1 ) 
) - 128 ) * 128 + ASC( MID$( A$, 

2, 1 ) ) - 128 
1970 IF K = J THEN PRINT* 2 , A$ : 
GOTO 2090 

1980 IF E ( K ) >= NO THEN GOTO 2 
000 

1990 IF E( K )< SN THEN K = K + 
2: GOTO 1980 ELSE IF E ( K ) > E 
N THEN PRINT#2, A$: GOTO 20 

90 ELSE PRINT#2, C$( E( K + 1 ) 



) : K = K + 2: GOTO 1970 

2000 IF E( K ) <> NO THEN GOTO 2 

030 

2010 IF E( K ) < SN THEN PRINT#2 
, A$: K = K + 2: GOTO 1950 ELSE 
IF E( K ) > EN THEN PRINT* 

2, A$: GOTO 2090 ELSE PRINT#2, C 
$( E( K + 1 ) ) : K = K + 2: 

GOTO 1950 
2020 1 E ( K ) > NO 
2030 IF E( K ) < SN THEN PRINT#2 
, A$: GOTO 1950 ELSE IF E ( K ) > 
EN THEN PRINT* 2, A$ 

: GOTO 2090 ELSE PRINT#2, A$: GO 
TO 1950 

2040 1 

2050 IF ( K = J ) OR ( E( K ) > 
EN ) THEN GOTO 2140 
2060 IF E( K ) >= SN THEN PRINT* 
2, C$( E( K + 1 ) ):K=K+2: 
GOTO 2050 

2070 K = K + 2: GOTO 2050 

2080 1 

2090 IF EOF( 1 ) THEN GOTO 2140 
2100 INPUT#1, A$: PRINT#2, A$ : G 
OTO 2090 
2110 1 

2120 1 

2130 1 FINAL LEANUP. DELETE OLD 
MASTER, RENAME NEW MASTER TO "HE 
RSHEY" . 
2140 CLOSE 

2150 IF NF <> 1 THEN KILL F$ 
2160 RENAME "HERSHEYN/" TO F$ 
2170 RETURN 
2180 ■ 

2190 1 ========================== 



2200 1 

2210 » LIST CHARACTERS IN MEMORY 
2220 1 LIST CURRENT HERSHEY CHAR 
ACTERS IN MEMORY, INCLUDING DUPL 
ICATES . 

2230 1 

2240 1 
2250 CLS 

2260 FOR K = 0 TO J - 2 STEP 2 
2270 IF POS( 0 ) > 20 THEN PRINT 

E ( K ) ELSE PRINT E ( K ) ; 
2280 NEXT K 

22 90 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY 

TO CONTINUE" 
2300 A$ - INKEY$: IF A$ = "" THE 
N GOTO 2 300 
2310 CLS 
2320 GOTO 270 
2330 ' 

2340 1 ========================== 



182 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



Comput^Tsland 



BULLETIN BOARD 




MATH ON DISK 

Add Fractions $19.95 

Subtract Fractions 19.95 

Multiply Fractions 19.95 

Trigonometry Tutor 19.95 

Linear Equations 19.95 

Quadratic Equations 19.95 

Number Sequences 19.95 

Signed Numbers 19.95 

Binary Dice Game .19.95 

Money pack 1 9 . 95 

Distance Problems 19.95 

Comparison Shopping 19.95 

Sales & Bargains 19.95 

Bank Account 19.95 



LANGUAGE ARTS ON DISK 

Beyond Words 1 ,...$19.95 

Beyond Words 2 19.95 

Beyond Words 3 19.95 

Vocabulary Builders 1 19.95 

Vocabulary Builders 2 19.95 

Vocabulary Builders 3 19.95 

Cloze Exercises 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7.19.95 

Punctuation Practice 19.95 

Story Details 2-3 or 4-5 19.95 

Drawing Conclusions 3-4 19.95 

Drawing Conclusions 5-6 19.95 

Context Clues Gr. 2-3 19.95 

Context Clues Gr. 4, 5, 6, or 7.19.95 





OTHER SUBJECTS ON DISK 

Explorers & Settlers $19,95 

Famous American Women 19.95 

Street Map Game 19.95 

States & Capitals 19.95 

Know Your States 19.95 

History Game 19.95 

Chemistry Tutor 24.95 

Science Game 24.95 

Color Computer Literacy 19.95 

French Baseball 19.95 

Spanish Baseball 19.95 



GAMES ON DISK 



The Pond $29.95 

The Factory 29.95 

Teasers By Tobbs 29.95 

Wheel of Fortune 19.95 

Wheel (Coco3/RGB) 19.95 

Pegs (Coco3/RGB) 19.95 

Name Flag (Coco3/RGB) 19.95 

First Games 24.95 

Arrow Games 21.95 

Mr. Cocohead 19.95 

Preschool 1,2, & 3 24.95 



TAKE ADVANTAGE OF MOST DISKS AT TAPE PRICES. 
LIMITED TIME ONLY. GOOD UNTIL APRIL 15,1988 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



ComputenrTsland 




(71 8) 948-2748 Evenings after 7:00 PM EST r 

Dept. R,227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 



Please add $1 .00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 




10140 . 


29 


11190 . 


90 


10260 . 


...250 


11440 


....39 


10420 . 


...247 


11600 


. . .51 


10580 


, , , .31 


11740 . 


..215 


10810 . 


...119 


12000 . 


..108 


10980 . 


...166 


END , . 


..226 



Listing 2: HFDRIVER 
10000 « 



10020 1 HERSHEY FONT DISPLAY. LO 
ADS HERSHEY CHARACTERS FROM A DI 
SK FILE. 

10030 1 DISPLAYS CHARACTERS AT G 
IVEN LOCATION. SIZE OF CHARACTER 
MAY BE 

10040 1 MODIFIED AS REQUIRED. 
10050 1 VI. 0 1-1-88 COLOR COMPUT 
ER 1, 2, 3 VERSION 
10060 » 

10070 1 

10080 1 INPUT: ZA$ = CHARACTER S 

TRING TO BE INTERPRETED. 

10090 ' SUBCOMMANDS: %%I; 

INITIALIZE DRIVER - ZERO CHARAC 
TER TABLE 

10100 1 %%FN 
AME; SET DISK FILE NAME 
10110 1 %%SN 
,M; SET SCALE FACTORS TO N HOR, 
M VERTICAL 

10120 1 %%MX 
,Y; POSITION TO GRAPHICS COORDIN 
ATE X,Y 

10130 1 %%WN 
; SET WIDTH TO N PIXELS OR 999 F 
OR PROPORTIONAL 

10140 1 %%RN 
,M; READ HERSHEY CHARACTERS FROM 

DISK FILE IN 
10150 ■ R 
ANGE N TO M 

10160 • %%NH 
,A,M; EQUATE NEXT M HERSHEY CHAR 
ACTERS TO 

10170 f N 

EXT M ASCII CHARACTERS 

10180 1 %%C; 

TOGGLE CONTROL CODE FLAG 
10190 1 (STR 
ING) DISPLAY ALL OTHER CHARACTER 
S IN HERSHEY 

10200 1 F 
ORMAT 

10210 1 OUTPUT: PARAMETERS CHANG 
ED OR CHARACTERS DISPLAYED ON SC 
REEN UNLESS 



10220 1 ERROR, IN WHICH 

CASE ZE = CHARACTER POSITION OF 
LAST ERROR 
10230 ' 

10240 ■ 

10250 1 DATA DICTIONARY 
10260 1 AX() = ASCII ARRAY; -1 I 
F NO CHARACTER DEFINED ELSE POIN 
TS TO E() 

10270 1 C$() = ARRAY OF HERSHEY 
CHARACTERS; UP TO 255 CHARACTERS 
/ENTRY 

10280 1 E() « ARRAY OF HERSHEY # 
POINTERS; HERSHEY # AND INDEX T 
0 C$ 

10290 1 Zl = NUMERIC VALUE OF SU 
BCOMMAND ARG 1 

10300 1 Zl$ = STRING VALUE OF SU 
BCOMMAND ARG 1 

10310 1 Z2 = NUMERIC VALUE OF SU 
BCOMMAND ARG 2 

103 20 1 Z3 = NUMERIC VALUE OF SU 
BCOMMAND ARG 3 

103 30 1 ZA = INPUT TO DISPLAY CH 
ARACTER SUBROUTINE - ASC VALUE O 
F CHARACTER 

10340 1 ZA$ = STRING TO BE DISPL 
AYED 

10350 ' ZB = BEGINNING OF DISK C 

HARACTERS (WORKING) 

10360 1 ZB$ = CURRENT CHARACTER 

(WORKING) 

10370 1 ZC = ENDING OF DISK CHAR 
ACTERS (WORKING) 

103 80 1 ZC$ = WORKING 

10390 » ZE = ERROR FLAG FOR RETU 
RN; 0 IF NO ERROR OR CP IF ERROR 
10400 1 ZF = WORKING 
10410 1 ZF$ = DISK FILE NAME, DE 
FAULT = 

10420 1 ZG = WORKING 

104 30 ■ ZI = POINTS TO NEXT (UNU 
SED) ENTRY IN C$ 

10440 1 ZJ = POINTS TO NEXT (UNU 

SED) ENTRY IN E 

10450 1 ZK = WORKING 

104 60 1 ZL = WORKING 

10470 1 ZM = INDEX TO CURRENT CH 

ARACTER IN INPUT STRING 

10480 ' ZN = # OF ARGUMENTS FROM 

PARSE SUBROUTINE 
10490 1 ZO - HERSHEY # (WORKING) 
10500 ' ZQ = WORKING 
10510 1 ZS = FUNCTION # FROM PAR 
SE SUBROUTINE 

10520 ■ ZU= CURRENT HORIZONTAL 
SCALE FACTOR 

10530 1 ZV = CURRENT VERTICAL SC 
ALE FACTOR 

10540 1 ZW = CURRENT WIDTH IN PI 
XELS OR 999 FOR PROPORTIONAL 



1 84 THE RAINBOW April 1 988 



DISTO 



SUPER PRODUCTS 



INTRODUCES 

THE FANTASTIC _ 

SUPER CONTROLLER IE 

power' beyond belief 

m Radio Shack/Tandy controller compatible. 

m Works on all COCOs! 1, 2 or 3, with or without Multi-pak interface. 
m One 24/28 pin socket, for 8K ROM, 2764, 27128 or 27256. 
0 Internal Mini-Expansion-Bus Connector for one DISTO 

Super Adapter board. 
m Low Power draw; Within COCO's power requirements. 
M Gold Plated edge connectors. 
0 Under OS-9: 

• Buffered Read/Write sector achieved without halting the CPU. 

• Continual use of keyboard even while Reading or Writing to disk. 

• System's Clock no longer looses time during Read & Write. 

• NMI is blocked and transferred to IRQ in software for low CPU overhead. 

• Completely Interrupt driven for fast and smooth Multi-Tasking operations. 

• Drivers (written by Keven Darling) for Level 1 and 2. 




Suggested Retail Price 



$150 



Introductory Price $130 




DGTD 



SUPER ADD-ONS 




TEH 





A superb controller. Along with 
the included C-DOS, plug-in 
three more software selectable 
2764 or 271 28 EPROMs burned 
to your liking. 

The internal Mini Expansion Bus 
lets you add some incredible 
features to the controller. Disto 
Super Add-Ons were designed 
to fit neatly inside the Super 
Controller case. 



□is~ra 

SUPER RAM 




ZeroK $29.96 



Full 5 12K 89.95 




Now is the time to upgrade your 
COCO 3 to 51 2K of memory. 
Available with or without mem- 
ory chips, the Super Ram 3 
board is easily installed inside 
the COCO. It is fully compatible 
with OS-9 Level 2 and is deliv- 
ered with a software package 
(for BASIC) that includes: a 
printer spooler, a ramdisk, a 
memory test and an install/con- 
figure program for your system. 



REAL TIME CLOCK AND PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE 
Have the Real Time, date and year displayed on your screen at a simple 
command. $39.95 

MINI EPROM PROGRAMMER 

A low cost EPROM programmer that attaches directly to your Disto 
Super Controller to program those often used utilities. $54.95 

HARD DISK INTERFACE 

A hard disk interface fully compatible with S.A.S.l.controller. Fits inside 
the Super Controllers, Ramdisk or MEB adapter. OS-9 Drivers are 

included. $49.95 
SUPER RAMDISK 512K 

Imagine having access to 51 2K of virtual disk memory in close to no time. 
Upgradable to One Megabyte $1 1 9.95 

MEB ADAPTER 

A Stand-Alone Mini-Expansion-Bus in which you can plug any other 
DISTO Adapter directly in a Multi-pak without the need for a Super Controller 

or Ramdisk $24.95 



SEND FOR I 


=REE 1986 WINTER CATALOG 5 


©X C 

10802 Lajeunes; 

MASTER CARD 
AND VISA 
ACCEPTED 


RC COMPUTERS inc. 

se, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3L 2E8 

1-514-383-5293 

We accept phone orders. 
Call for Canadian prices. 
Include S&H of $4 or $8 if order exceeds $75. 



10550 1 ZX = CURRENT X POSITION 
10560 1 ZY = CURRENT Y POSITION 
10570 ' ZZ = TOGGLE FOR CONTROL 
CHARACTER ACTION 

10580 1 **WORKING** INDICATES A 
VARIABLE USED FOR TEMPORARY STOR 
AGE 

10590 1 

10600 1 

10610 ■ START OF CODE 

10620 ZM = 1: ZE = 0 

10630 IF ZM > LEN ( ZA$ ) THEN RE 

TURN 

10640 ZB$ - MID$( ZA$, ZM, 1 ) 
10650 IF ZB$ <> ff % fl THEN GOTO 11 
400 ELSE IF MID$( ZA$, ZM + 1 , 1 
) <> »%" THEN GOTO 

11400 
10660 

10670 1 "%% M SUBCOMMAND HERE 

10680 1 

10690 GOSUB 11530 

10700 ON ZS GOSUB 10750,10820,10 
860,10910,10960,11010,11190,1134 

10710 GOTO 10630 
10720 1 

10730 1 

10740 1 "%%I;" SUBCOMMAND - INIT 
IALIZE 

10750 IF ZN <> 0 THEN ZE = ZM: G 
OTO 10780 ELSE ZI - 0 : Z J = 0 : Z 
F$ = ZO = 0 

10760 FOR ZL = 0 TO 255: AX( ZL 
) = - 1: NEXT 

10770 ZU « 1: ZV = .5: ZW = 10: 
ZE = 0: ZZ « 0 
10780 RETURN 
10790 1 

10800 » 

10810 • 11 %%F, NAME ; " SUBCOMMAND - 

SET FILE NAME 
10820 IF ZN <> 1 THEN ZE = ZM: G 
OTO 10830 ELSE ZF$ = Zl$: CLOSE 
2 

108 30 RETURN 

10840 1 

10850 1 "%%SN,M; fl SUBCOMMAND - S 
ET SCALE FACTORS 

10860 IF ZN <> 2 THEN ZE = ZM: G 
OTO 10870 ELSE ZU = Zl: ZV = Z2 
10870 RETURN 
10880 1 

10890 ' 

10900 1 H %%MX,Y; fl SUBCOMMAND - S 

ET GRAPHICS POSITION 

10910 IF ZN <> 2 THEN ZE = ZM: G 

OTO 10920 ELSE ZX = Zl: ZY = Z2 

10920 RETURN 

10930 1 



1)394)3 ' 

10950 1 n %%WN; ,f SUBCOMMAND - SET 

WIDTH TO N PIXELS 
10960 IF ZN <> 1 THEN ZE = ZM: G 
OTO 10970 ELSE ZW = Zl 
10970 RETURN 
10980 1 

10990 1 

11000 1 U %RN,M; ,! SUBCOMMAND - RE 
AD CHARACTERS FROM DISK 
•11010 IF ZN <> 2 THEN ZE = ZM: G 
OTO 11140 ELSE ZB = 'Z1: ZC = Z2 
11020 IF ZO <> 0 THEN IF ZO < ZB 

THEN GOTO 11040 ELSE CLOSE 2 
11030 OPEN "I", #2, ZF$ 
11040 IF EOF( 2 ) GOTO 11130 
11050 INPUT#2, C$( ZI ) 
11060 ZO = ( ASC( LEFT$( C$ ( ZI 
) , 1 ) ) - 128 ) * 128 + 

ASC( MID$( 

C$( ZI ) , 2, 1 ) ) - 128 
11070 IF NOT( ( ZO >= ZB AND ZO 
<= ZC ) ) THEN GOTO 11120 
11080 E( ZJ ) = ZO 
11090 E( ZJ + 1 ) = ZI 
11100 ZJ = ZJ + 2 
11110 ZI = ZI + 1 

11120 IF ZO < ZC THEN GOTO 11040 

ELSE GOTO 11140 
11130 CLOSE 2 
11140 RETURN 
11150 1 

11160 1 

11170 1 "%%NH,A,M; M SUBCOMMAND - 

EQUATE HERSHEY TO ASCII 
11180 1 EQUATES AS ENTRIES TO E 
ENTRIES 

11190 IF ( ZN <> 3 ) THEN ZE = Z 

( M: GOTO 11300 

11200 FOR ZL = 1 TO Z3 

11210 FOR ZQ = 0 TO ZJ - 2 STEP 

2 

11220 IF E( ZQ ) = Zl THEN GOTO 
11260 

11230 NEXT 
11240 ZE = ZM 
11250 GOTO 11270 
11260 AX( Z2 ) - ZQ 
11270 Zl = Zl + 1 
11280 Z2 = Z2 + 1 
11290 NEXT ZL 
11300 RETURN 
11310 1 

11320 1 

11330 1 H %%C;" SUBCOMMAND - TOGG 
LES CONTROL CODE FLAG 
11340 IF ZN <> 0 THEN ZE = ZM: G 
OTO 113 60 

11350 ZZ = ZZ XOR 1 
113 60 RETURN 



186 THE RAINBOW April 1988 



t 



1137) 8 1 

1138) 3 1 

1139) 3 1 NORMAL CHARACTER - MAY B 
E ASCII )3 THROUGH 255 

114)3)3 ZA = ASC( ZB$ ) 

1141) 3 IF ( ZA >= 32 ) THEN GOTO 
1144)3 ELSE IF ZZ <> )3 THEN GOTO 
1144)3 

1142) 3 IF ZA = 1)3 THEN ZY - INT( 
ZY + 32 * ZV ) : GOTO 1145)3 

1143) 3 IF ZA <> 13 THEN GOTO 1145 
J3 ELSE ZX = INT( 16 * ZU ) : GOTO 

1145)3 

1144) 8 GOSUB 1186)3 

1145) 3 ZM = ZM + 1 

1146) 3 GOTO 1)363)3 

1147) 8 1 



1149)3 1 

115) 3)3 1 PARSE SUBCOMMAND LINE SU 
BROUTINE 

1151) 3 1 RETURNS ZN = # ARGS ; Zl 
= ARG1; Z2 = ARG2; Z3 = ARG3 ; ZE 

= CP OF ERROR; Z 

S = SUBCOMMAND FUNCTION 

1152) 3 1 

1153) 3 ZN = )3 

1154) 3 ZC$ - MID$( ZA$, ZM + 2 , 1 
) 

1155) 3 ZS = INSTR( "IFSMWRNC" , ZC 
$ ) 

1156) 3 IF ZS = ^ THEN ZS = INSTR( 

"ifsmwrnc", ZC$ ) 

1157) 3 IF ZS = J3 THEN ZE - 

1158) 3 ZM = ZM + 3 

1159) 3 FOR ZF = ZM TO LEN ( 

116) 3)3 IF MID$( ZA$, ZF, 1 
" OR MID$( ZA$, ZF, 1 ) = 
EN GOTO 1163)3 

1161) 3 NEXT ZF 

1162) 3 ZE = ZF - 1: ZM = ZE: GOTO 



ZM 

ZA$ 

) - 
if it 
/ 



) 

ii • 

/ 

TH 



TH 



) = 

ZA$ 
) = 

II II 
/ 



II 



) 
ii 



TH 



1179)3 

1163) 8 Zl = VAL(. MID$( ZA$, ZM, 
F - ZM ) ) 

1164) 3 Zl$ = MID$( ZA$, ZM, ZF 
ZM ) 

1165) 3 ZM = ZF + 1: IF ZF <> 4 
EN ZN = ZN + 1 

1166) 3 IF MID$( ZA$, ZF, 1 
" THEN GOTO 1179)3 

1167) 3 FOR ZF = ZM TO LEN ( 

1168) 3 IF MID$( ZA$, ZF, 1 
" OR MID$( ZA$, ZF, 1 ) = 
EN GOTO 1171)3 

1169) 3 NEXT ZF 

117) 3)3 ZE = ZF - 1: ZM = ZE: GOTO 
1179)3 

1171) 3 Z2 = VAL( MID$( ZA$, ZM, Z 
F - ZM ) ) 

1172) 3 ZM = ZF + 1: ZN 
IF MID$( ZA$, ZF, 1 ) 

GOTO 1179)3 

1173) 3 FOR ZF = ZM TO LEN ( 

1174) 3 IF MID$( ZA$, ZF, 1 
11 THEN GOTO 1177)3 

1175) 3 NEXT ZF 

1176) 3 ZE = ZF - 1: ZM = ZE: GOTO 
1179)3 

1177) 3 Z3 = VAL( MID$ ( ZA$, ZM, Z 
F - ZM ) ) 

1178) 3 ZM = ZF + 1: ZN = ZN + 1 

1179) 3 RETURN 

118) 3)3 ' 



= ZN + 1: 
= THEN 



ZA$ 
) = 



) 



tl • 



DISPLAY CHARACTER SUBROU 



1182) 3 1 

1183) 3 1 
TINE 

1184) 3 • DISPLAYS A GIVEN HERSHEY 
CHARACTER # REFERENCED BY ASCII 
CODE 

1185) 3 1 

1186) 3 IF AX( ZA ) = -1 THEN ZE = 



1988 » The Year of the Hard Disk! 

The CoCo XT hard disk interface from Burke & Burke lets you connect up to 2 low 
cost, PC compatible 5-120 Megabyte capacity hard drives to your CoCo. You buy the 
drive, Western Digital WD10O2-WX1 or WD1002-27X (RLL) controller, and a case from 
the PC dealer of your choice. Just plug them into the CoCo XT, plug the CoCo XT into 
your Multi-PAK, and you have a 20 Meg OS9 hard disk system for under $4501 

Great for multi-user systems! The CoCo XT interface uses advanced "NO HALT" 
hard disk controllers, which do not halt your CoCo and do not disable or use interrupts 
during hard disk access. You get full type-ahead, and the system clock does not lose 
time during hard disk access. Fully compatible with most RS-232 expansion portsl 

CoCo XT (with anodlzed housing, 50 page user manual, hard disk back-up utility and 
new, Version 2.0 drivers for use with both OS9 & HYPER-i/O) - $69.95. Or choose the 
CoCo XT-RTC (includes real-time clock / calendar with battery backup) - $99.95 

THE PROFESSIONAL TOUCH: XT-ROM -Automatically boots OS9 from your 
hard disk. Installs in the BIOS ROM socket of your hard disk controller — $19.95. 



Announcing the Dynamic Disk Interface! 

Got the 35-track floppy disk blues? Burke & Burke proudly presents HYPER-I/O 
Version 2.0 - the program that modifies the RS-DOS Disk BASIC in your CoCo 1, 2, 
or 3 to provide a "Dynamic Disk Interface". This program lets you use your existing 
BASIC and RS-DOS software with hard disk interfaces (such as the CoCo XT), RAM 
Disks, and any mix of floppy drives from 160K to 720K each. HYPER-I/O can even read 
standard disks in those quad-density, 160 track floppy drives. Fully RESET protected, 
user-configurable, expandable, OS9 compatible, EPROM-able HYPER-I/O may soon 
be TH E RS-DOS enhancement of choice for the CoCo \, CoCo 2, and CoCo 31 

HYPER-I/O (64K, includes 50 page user manual , BASIC & OS9 utilities) - $29.95. 
HYPER-III (RAM Disk and Print Spooler for CoCo 3 HYPER-I/O) -$19.95 

OS9 Direc lory A SSIStantS WILD lets you use wild cards with OS9*s 
commands. MV rapidly moves files, and even entire directories, from place to place 
on your hard or floppy disks. WILD & MV - one disk, two great utilities, only $19,951 

OS9; wild asm /d0/ arc/* . arc c=/dl/abs/rele&8&/ * .aba 
OS9: mv /dl/abs /release /dl/release 




: ; 




P.O. Box 1263 Palatine, IL 60078-1283 (312) 397-2898 



|Mnr.t*iCni 'J| 




ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 7% SALES TAX. 
COD's add $2.20. Shipping (within the USA) $2.00 per 
CoCo XT; $1 .50 per disk or ROM. Please allow 2 weeks 
for delivery (overnight delivery also available for in- stock 
items). Telephone orders accepted (312)397-2898. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 

St AJ , 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 187 



Protect and highlight 
your important 
magazine collection 

with sturdy 
RAINBOW binders 



Distinctive, Durable RAIN BOW Binders 

the rainbow is a vital resource >to,'|i^ii^rlbe*;ta 
again and again. Keep your copies of the rainbow safe 
in our quality, distinctive binders "'.frt^t^prov@!^l5®tft* 
.•• :•■ plete p rotection I fellfe f •; ■ : ' 

These attractive red vinyl binders £Ho$cise ydur 
collection and ensure your rainbows are in mint 
condition for future use, Each binder is richly em- 
bossed with the magazine's name in gold on the front 
and spine. They make a handsome addition to any 
room. 




Put an End to Clutter 

Organize your workspace with these tastef til bind- 
ers. Spend more time with your CoCo and eliminate 
those frustrating searches for misplaced mag 

A set of two binders, which holds a full l^issues of 
the rainbow, is only $13.50 (plus $2.50 shipping and 
handling). - ''^'0%' 

Special Discounts on Past Issues 

To help you complete your collection of the rain- 
bow, we're offering a special discount on past issues 
of the magazine. 

When you place an order for six or more back issues 
of the rainbow at the same time you order binders, 
you are entitled to $1 off the regular back issue price. 
To order, please see the "Back Issue Information" 
page in this issue. 

Know Where to Look 

You may purchase the "Official And Compleat I ndex 
To THE RAINBOW" for $1 when you purchase a set 
of binders. This comprehensive index of rainbow's 
first three years (July 1981 through July 1984) is 
usually priced at $2.50. 



YES. Please send me 



set(s) of rainbow binders 




Take advantage of these special offers with your binder purchase: 

Save $1 off the single issue cover price for back issues. Minimum order of 6 magazines. Please 

enclose a back issue order form from a recent issue indicating magazines wanted. 

Purchase the "Official and Compleat Index to THE RAINBOW" for $1. (Regular price $2.50.) 

(These offers good only with the purchase of a rainbow binder set) 

Name , 

Address 

City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number Expiration Date 

Signature 

Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Binders are $13.50 per two-binder set plus $2.50 shipping and handling. If your order is to be sent via U.S. mail to 
a post office box or foreign country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, please. 
In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



ZM: GOTO 1218/9 

1187) 8 ZK = E( AX( ZA ) + 1 ) 

1188) 3 IF ZW <> 999 THEN GOTO 119 
20 

1189) 3 ZF - -( ASC( MID$(C$( ZK ) 
, 3, 1 )) - 128 ) + ASC( MID$(C$ 
( ZK ), 4, 1 )) - 128 
119)3)3 ZF = ( ZF / 2 ) * ZU 

1191) 3 ZX - INT(ZX + ZF) 

1192) 3 HDRAW ,! BM" + STR$ ( ZX ) + 
"," + STR$( ZY ) 

1193) 3 ZL = 5 

1194) 3 1 START AT FIRST X/Y COORD 
INATE, BYPASS WIDTH 

1195) 3 IF LEN ( C$ ( ZK ) ) <= 6 TH 
EN GOTO 1213)3 

1196) 3 ZF m ASC( MID$( C$ ( ZK ), 
ZL, 1 ) ) - 128 

1197) 3 ZG = ASC( MID$( C$ ( ZK ) , 
ZL + 1, 1 ) ) - 128 

1198) 3 ZL = ZL + 2 

1199) 3 ZF=ZF*ZU:ZG=ZG*ZV:ZF=INT(Z 
X+ZF) :ZG=INT(ZY+ZG) 

12)3)3)3 HDRAW "BM" + STR$ ( ZF ) + 
"," + STR$( ZG ) 

12)31)3 ■ GET REMAINING X/Y COORDI 
NATES AND DRAW LINE SEGMENTS 
12)32)3 ZF = ASC( MID$ ( C$ ( ZK ) , 
ZL ; 1 ) ) - 128 

12)33)3 ZG = ASC( MID$ ( C$ ( ZK ) , 
ZL + 1, 1 ) ) - 128 



( ZG = 



12040 ZL = ZL + 2 
12050 IF ( ZF « -64 ) AND 

-64 ) THEN GOTO 12130 
12)36)3 IF NOT ( ( ZF » -64 AND ZG 
= )3) ) THEN 1211)3 
12)37)3 ZF = ASC( MID$ ( C$ ( ZK ), 
ZL, 1 ) ) - 128 

12)38)3 ZG = ASC( MID$ ( C$( ZK ), 
ZL + 1, 1 ) ) - 128 
12)39)3 ZL = ZL + 2 

121)3)3 ZF = ZF * ZU: ZG = ZG * ZV 
: ZF = INT(ZX + ZF) : ZG = INT(ZY 
+ ZG) : HDRAW "BM" 

+ STR$( ZF ) + "," + STR$( ZG ) 
: GOTO 1212)3 

12110 ZF = ZF * ZU: ZG = ZG * ZV 
: ZF = INT(ZX + ZF) : ZG = INT(ZY 

+ ZG) : HDRAW "M" 

+ STR$( ZF ) + + STR$( ZG ) 

1212) 3 GOTO 12)32)3 

1213) 3 IF ZW <> 999 THEN ZX = ZX 
+ ZW: GOTO 1218)3 

1214) 3 ZF = -( ASC( MID$(C$( ZK ) 
, 3, 1 )) - 128 ) + ASC( MID$(C$ 
( ZK ) , 4,1)) - 128 

1215) 3 ZF = ( ZF / 2 ) * ZU 

1216) 3 ZX =» ZX + ZF 

1218) 3 RETURN 

1219) 3 1 ========================= 



Listing 3: EXAMPLE 

5) 3 1 DEMONS TAT ION 1 FOR HERSHEY 
SCREEN - FONTS 

52 CLEAR 7)3j3)3 

54 DIM E(3)3j3), C$(15)3), AX(255) 
56 HSCREEN 4 
58 PCLS 

6) 3 ZA$= f, %%I ; % % FHERSHMAS / f %%R5)31, 
52 6;%%R6)31,62 6;%%R699, 699;%%N699 
,32,1;%%N5)31 / 65,26;%%N6)31,97,26; 
M :GOSUB 1)3)3)3)3 

62 ZA$="%%S1 .)3 , 0.4; %%W2)3 ; %%M32 , 1 
6;This is Simple Text 11 : GOSUB 10 
000 

64 ZA$= M %%W999;%%M32 / 36;This is 
Proportional Text" : GOSUB 10000 
66 ZA$= ff %%I;%%FHERSHMAS/;%%R699, 
699;%%R3001 / 302 6;%%R3101,3126;%% 
N3001, 65,26 ;%%N3101, 97,26 ;%%N699 
,32,1;%%S1.0,0. 4;%%W999;%%M3 2,56 

;This is Complex Text": GOSUB 10 
000 



68 ZA$="%%I;%%FHERSHMAS/;%%R699, 
699 ; %%R2051 , 207 6 ; %%R2 151 , 2176 ; ; % 
%N2051,65,26;%%N2151,97,26;%%N69 
9,32,1;%%S1.0,0.4;%%W999;%%M32,7 
6;This is Italics": GOSUB 10000 
70 ZA$="%%S2 .0 , 1.5; %%M32 , 103 ;Lar 
ge and Tall": GOSUB 10000 
72 ZA$="%%I ; %% FHERSHMAS/ ; %%R699 , 
699;%%R3 301, 33 25 ;%%N3301, 65,26;% 
%N699,32,1;%%S1.5,0.6;%%W999;%%M 
32,140;DEUTSCHLAND": GOSUB 10000 
74 ZA$="%%R3001,3003;%%N3001,65, 
3;": GOSUB 10000 

7 6 ZA$="%%S0 . 3 ,0 . 15 ; %%M3 2 , 170 ; AB 
C%%S0.5,0.2;%%M62,170;ABC%%S0.75 
,0.3 ;%%M112, 170;ABC%%S1.0,0.4;%% 
M177,170;ABC%%S1.5,0.6;%%M270,17 
0;ABC%%S2.0,0.8 ; %%M400 , 170 ; ABC%% 
S3.0,1.6;%%M560,170;A": GOSUB 10 
000 

78 GOTO 78 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 189 



Racksellers 

The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis and 
may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We 
suggest you patronize those in your area. 



Ai ARAMA 




DirrntnynuiTi 


jenerson inqws ^o. 


Brewton 


McDowell Electronics 


Florence 


Anderson News Co. 


Greenville 


M & B Electronics 


Madison 


Madison Books 


Montgomery 


Trade W Books 


Tuscaloosa 


Injun John's, Inc. 


ALASKA 


■ - s '■ ■■ ■ 




C\£ir-irr\r\\r* \Ktrxr\ri 
CloCTlOniC YVOllQ 


ARIZONA 




Cottonwood 


A& W Graphics Co. 


Lake Havasu 




City 


Book Nook 


Phoenix 


TRI-TEK Computers 


Sierra vista 


Livingston's Books 


Tempe 


Books, Etc, 


Computer Library 


Tucson 


Anderson News Co. 


ARKANSAS 




FayettevHIe 


Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 


Ft Smith 


Hot Off the Press Newssland 


Little Rock 


Anderson News Co. 


CALIFORNIA 




Berkeley 


Lyon Enterprises 


Citrus Heights 


Software Plus 


Grass Valley 


Advance Radio, inc. 


Half Moon Bay 


Strawflower Electronics 


Hollywood 


Levity Distributors 




Stef-Jen. Inc. 


La Jolia 


Butler & Mayes Booksellers 


Los Angeles 


Circus of Books (2 Locations) 


Marysville 


Bookland 


Napa 


Bookends Bookstore 


Oakland 


DeLouer's News Agency 


Sacramento 


Deibert's Readerama 




Tower Magazine 


San Francisco 


Booksmlth 




Bookworks 




Castro Kiosk 



FLORIDA (cont'd) 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvale 
Torrance 



Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Camino College Bookstore 



COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Glenwood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 

DELAWARE 

Middletown 
Mtlford 
Newark 
Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COL 

Washington, 
DC 



Aurora Newsstand 

Hatha way's 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Readmore Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 

Delmar Co. 
Milford News Stand 
Newark Newsstand 
Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Clearwater 
Cocoo 
Danla 
Davie 

Ft. LauderciaiQ 



Gainesville 
Jacksonville 



North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Park 



Chronichles 
News Room 
World News. Inc. 



Great American Book Co. 
Software, Software. Inc. 
The Avid Reader 
The Open Door 
Dania News & Books 
Software Pius More 
Bob's News & Book-Store 
Clarks Out of Town News 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 
The Book Nook 

White's of Downtown Bookstore 

Almar Bookstore 
Boyd-Ebert Corp. 
Anderson News Co, 
Wolfs Newsstand 



"South 




PncnHonfl 


Pr^linn Pfnrt* Ronk«;tnra 




l\t7\_»L/I V-i JUI IL-'IIVJI 1, |l It-i, 




KUCJUJ OII<JL.K L/OUIWI 


11 11 i'^ 


Sunnv/s nt Sunset 

uUi pi ly 9 \J1 Jul i^cft 


IUIIUI lUJJuw 


AnHoixnn Mpua C^r\ 




Ph iRow'c Ma\i/t r^ontesr 
UVJutSy a INt>WJ> wtJI IIOE 


Tlttisv/IUfi 

1 HUOVIHW 




GEORGIA 




Atlanta 


Border's 


Bremen 


Bremen Electronics/Radio Shack 


Forest Park 


Ellers News Center 


Jesup 


Radio Shack 


Marietta 


Act One Video 


Thomasville 


Smokehouse Newsstand 


Toccoa 


Martin Music Radio Shack 


IDAHO 












ILLINOIS 




Beiieville 


Software or Systems 


\_numpaign 


tjooKmarx 




D. UAJIIUI) DV-HJKStSllolo 


UcCU 1 U 1 


DtxjK ciiifjuiturn 




Ix-JVKJIT rlUcvJ 




inui 1 1 lyuiu rviuii 


ftiet Mrilinn 


DUUH LI 1 IwAJI iUI ■ ■ 


CVUI IMUII 


INUIIIS \-»tjllIOt DUUKalUIW 




lxxjk crnponuiTi 








CITipilQ roIlLAJIUUla 


IVaWIUi t 


Dill 9 IV l\UUIvJ Ol IULK 


runs 


LaJvJK Ll I lLJLH IUI E 1 


reona 


lxxjk cn lpofium 




onBiiuun viiiuytj 




wtjsiiuKW onufjpiiiy v««nTQr ■ 




1 M if luia lytjvvs Owl viv^tJ 


apnngutjiu 


dook crnponurn 




Sangamon Center North 




Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 


Sunnyland 


Book Emporium 


West Frankfort 


Paper Race 


Wheeling 


North Shore Distributors 


INDIANA 




Angola 


D & D Electronics 




Radio Shack 


Berne 


White Cottage Electronics 


Bloomington 


Book Corner 


Columbus 


Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 


Crawfordsville 


Koch's Books 


Dyer 


Miles Books 


Franklin 


Gallery Book Shop 


Garrett 


Finn News Agency, Inc. 


indianapotis 


Bookland, Inc. 




Borders Bookshop 




Delmar News 




Indiana News 




Southside News 


Lebanon 


Gallery Book Shop 


Martinsvlile 


Radio Shack 


Wabash 


Mittlng's Electronics 


IOWA 




Davenport 


Interstate Book Store 


Des Moines 


Trickery's Books, Inc 


Fairfield 


Kramers Books 8c Gifts 


Ottumwa 


Southside Drug 


KANSAS 




Hutchinson 


Crossroads, Inc. 


Topeka 


Palmer News, Inc. 




Town Crier of Topeka. Inc. 


Wellinglon 


Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 


Wichita 


Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 




Lloyd's Radio 



KENTUCKY 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Hopkinsville 

Louisville 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 
New Orleans 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 



Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Mart's News* Gifts 
Hobby Shop 

Hawley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 
Radio Shack 

City News Stand 

Sidney's News Stand Uptown 

The Book Rack 

Magazines, inc. 



MAINE (cont'd) 

Brockton 
Caribou 
Oxford 
Sanford 

MARYLAND 

College Park 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Ipswich 

Littleton 

Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Harrison 

Hilisdafe 

Holland 

Howell 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Miles 

Perry 

Rlverview 

Roseville 

MINNESOTA 

Bumsviile 
Crystal 
Duluth 
Edina 

Minneapolis 
Mlnnetonka 
Roseville 
St. Paul 



Wlllmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmington 
Flat River 
Florissant 
Jefferson City 
Kirksville 
Moberly 
St. Louis 
St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Butte 
Whitefish 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Keene 
Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 

Cedar Knoiis 

Clinton 

Marmora 

Pennsville 

Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alarnogordo 
Albuquerque 

Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockport 
Brookiyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Falls 



Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Books-N-Things 
Radio Shack 

University Bookstore 

Eastern Newsstand 
Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak, Incx 

Book Nook, inc. 
Border's Book Shop 
Robbins Electronics 
Merit Book Center 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Electronics Express/Radio Shack 
Fris News Company 
Howell Auto Parts 

Curt's Sound & Home Arcade Center 

The Eight Bit Corner 

Michiana News Service 

Perry Computers 

Rlverview Book Store 

New Horizons Book Shop 

Shinder's Bumsviile 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Carlson Books 
Shinder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shinder's Ridge Square 
Shinder's Roseville 
Shinder's Annex 
Shinder's Maplewood 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Ray's TV 8c Radio Shack 
Ray's TV St Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Bailey's TV & Radio 

Plaza Books 

Consumer Electronics of Whitefish 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Bookcellar 

Hurley Electronics 

Steve's Books & Magazines 

Radio Shack Associate Store 

Bookwrights 

Verham News Corp. 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World 11 
Outpost Radio Shack 
Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 
Software Statjon 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Front Page Newsstand 
Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 

Village Green-Buffalo Books 

Lift Bridge Book Shop. Inc. 

Cromiand, Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

GA West & Co. 



190 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 



NEW YORK (cont'd) 

Huntington Oscar's Bookshop 



Johnson City 
New York 



Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhaven 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Cary 

Chapel Hill 
Charlotte 

Havlock 
Hickory 
Jacksonville 
Kernersvilie 
Marion 

Winston-Salem 

OHIO 

Akron 

Blanchester 
Canton 
Chardon 
Cincinnati 
Cleveland 
Columbiana 
Columbus 



Dayton 



Dublin 
Falrbom 

Rndley 
Kent 

Lakewood 
Lima 

Mtamisburg 

Parma 

Toledo 

Warren 

Xenia 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allen town 
Altoona 
Bryn Mawr 
Feastervllle 
King of Prussia 
Malvern 
Phoenixville 
Reading 
Temple 
West Chester 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Newport 
Warwick 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Clemson 
Ftorence 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 
Union 



Unicom Electronics 
Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 
Coliseum Books 
Eastern Newsstand 
Grand Central Station, Track 37 
200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1) 
55 Water Street 
World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
Idie Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonil Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Walden Books 
Worldwide Media Services 
Universal Computer Service 
Village Green 
World Wide News 
Spectrum Projects 

News Center In Cary Village 
University News & Sundry 
Newsstand Infl 
Papers & Paperback 
Computer Plus 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Michele's, Inc. 
K&S Newsstand 
Boomers Rhythm Center 
K&S Newsstand (3 Locations) 
Rainbow News Ltd. 

Churchill News & Tobacco 
JR Computer Control 
Uttle Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radb & TV 
Cinsoft 

Erieview News 
Fidelity Sound & Electronics 
B5 Software 
Micro Center 
The Newsstand 
Books & Co. 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wiike News 

Wright News & Bccte 

Book Barn 

News-Readers 

Wilke's University Shoppe 

Open Book 

The News Shop 

Lakewood International News 

Edu-Caterers 

Wllke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Plaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, Inc. dbq Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store, Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owl Services 
Newborn Enterprises 
Bryn Mawr News 
Global Books 
Gene's Books 
Personal Software 
Stevens Radio Shack 
Smith's News & Card Center 
Software Comer 
Chester County Book Ca 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Toitgate Bookstore 

Bellevue News 
Software Connection 



TENNESSEE 

Brentwood 
Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxvllie 

Memphis 
Nashville 



Smyrna 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Brenham 
Desoto 
Elgin 

Harlington 

UTAH 

Prova 

VIRGINIA 

Danville 

Hampton 

Norfolk 

Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Port Angeles 
Seattle 

Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkeraburg 
South 
Charleston 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Kenosha 
Madison 

Milwaukee 

Racine 

Waukesha 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Kingsford 

CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Blairmore 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Colgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Fairview 

Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hjntan 
Innisfail 
Lecombe 
Leduc 
Lethbridge 
Lloydminster 
Okotoks 



Bookworld #5 
Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Ca 
Davis-KIdd Bookseller 
Computer Center 
Davis-Kidd Booksellers 
Mosko's Place 
RM Mills Bookstore 
Delker Electronics 

Poncho's News 
Moore's Electronics 
Maxwell Books 
The Homing Pigeon 
Book Mark 

Valley Book Center 

K&S Newsstand 

Benders 

l-O Computers 

Turn The Page 

Volume I Bookstore 

Port Book & News 
Adams News Co.. Inc. 
Bulldog News 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Spring Hill News 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
R.K. News, Inc. 
Pic A Book 
University Bookstore 
Juneau Village Reader 
Little Professor Book Center 
Holt Variety 



Information Telecommunicatlones 

Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
L & K Sports & Music 
Paul Tercier 

Double "D" A.S.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shack, asd 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
AS.C. Radio Shack 

Ft; Mail Rodlo Shack, ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 

Jim Cooper 

L & S Stereo 

Brian's Electronics 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 

Datatron 

Lioyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 



ALBERTA (cont'd) 

Peace River 

St, Paul 

Stettler 

Strathmore 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetasklwin 



Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's Electronics 
Startler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radb Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Burnaby 
Burns Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chiiliwack 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Lang ley 
N, Vancouver 
Nelson 
Parksviile 
Penticton 

Sidney 
Smrthers 
Squamlsh 
100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altona 

Lundar 

Morden 

The Pas 

Selkirk 

Vfrden 

Winnipeg 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood 
Carbonear 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsville 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

QUEBEC 

LaSaile 
Pont. Rouge 
Ville St. Gabriel 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assiniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Ttsdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



Compuiit 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 
Rick's Musfc & Stereo 
Bell Radb & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesoft Marketing 
Langley Radio Shack 
Microwest Distributors 
Oliver's Books 
Parksviile TV 
DJ.'s 

Four Corner Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wail's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 

Tip Top Radio & TV 

LA Wiebr Ltd. 
Goran son Elec. 
Central Sound 
Jodl's Sight & Sound 
G.L Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Ltd. 



Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewltt Elec. 



Seaport Elec. 
Slade Realties 

Atlantic News 

Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J, Macleane & Sons 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Huntsville Elec. 

Donny"B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Messagerles de Presse Benjamin Enr, 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 
GillesComeau Enr/Radio Shack 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Granf s House of Sound 

H & O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 



Software City 



Software Haus, Inc. 
Clemson Newsstand 
Ray's #1 

Palmetto News Co. 
Software City 
Fleming's Electronics 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles — in Canada, Waldenbooks, Pickwick 
Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & 
Brentano's, and Community Newscenters. 



April 1988 THE RAINBOW 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — ail of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning THE rainbow when you contact these firms. 



A to Z Unlimited 175 

After Five Software . K 81 

Alpha Products 21 

Ark Royal Games 93 

Burke & Burke * . m ........ 1 87 

Cer-Comp , , 143, 145 

Cinsoft .57 

CJN Enterprises , . 117 

Clearbrook Software 

Group , ....,89 

CoCo Gallery Live . 49 

Cognitec 29 

Colorware 22, 23 

Computer Center . . . . . . .... .173 

Computer Island . . , . . . . , 183 

Computer Plus 3 

Computerware . . . . , 97 

CY-BURNET-ICS ...... . . . .169 







Dayton Associates of 




W. R. Hall, Inc 


.132, 133 


[Delphi • T. v ..... i v ■ ■ >■ » . .* < 


.106, 107 




.IFC, IBC 


Disto/CRC 


185 


E.Z. Friendly Software . . . 


111 




, ,.. 139 


Frank Hogg Laboratory . 


....54, 55 




.......45 




95 


Glen Calafati 


14 




193 


Hawkes Research 




Services ; 


. . . *v« .57 


HJL Products 


1 05 


Howard Medical ..*.....« 


...66, 194 


J & R Electronics. , 


. . . 45 


^5 f^t ................. 


...... 1 


KLC Software 


...... 1 59 


Metric Industries 


•'.] .' • ... 83 


Micro Works, The . . . . , * . 


. V ■: . . ■ 85 


Microcom Software ...9, 


11, 13, 15 


Microtech Consultants 





Inc. ..•«.. -i -i ■ ......... '»-.<»'•;.• ^ . .79 

MicroWorld ..+m. .31 

Other Guys CoCo, The 71 



Owl-Ware .... . . .151, 152, 153 

Performance Peripherals 161 

Perry Computers 1 65 

Preble's Programs, Dr BC 

PXE Computing .7 

R.A.D. Products ..181 

R.G.B. Computer Systems ..... 1 81 

R.J.F. Software , . ..117 

Rainbow Binder.* 188 

Rainbow Bookshelf 120, 121 

Rainbow Gift Subscription .vt-.. . .17 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk 41 

RAINBOWfest ..50, 51 

Saint Johns Gallery .37 

Sardis Technologies , , , ; . 177 

SD Enterprises 27, 67, 109 

SEESOF ...,33 



Call: 

Belinda Kirfoy 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



Soft - * BYTE . » • ■ -i «•■•*!■>■■ .;<?>.> .159 

Software House, The 39 

SpectroSystems . . 53 

Speech Systems . .46, 47 

Sugar Software ... ..... , ■ , ..... 1 55 

Sundog Systems 1 27 

T & D Software .... . .147, 178, 179 

Tandy/Radio Shack ... 1 14, 1 15 

Tepco .43 

Three C's Projects 175 

Tom Mix Software . . . ... *. 141 

True Data Products 100, 101 

Vidicom Corporation * 25 

Wasatchware ...... .81 

Woodstown Electronics .61 
Zebra Systems 65 




□ Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 




192 



THE RAINBOW April 1988 




he Best Money Can Buy . . . 
HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 





•Hit " >l> D**fM 

0*4 *,m 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 
colob coMPUTtn conr*outn 





Dual Sai&ctubi* row Soctate 
- Camprtf ble with COCO I & li 
* 120 D*y Warranty 
1 Double and Single Density '^=% 







i ■■}, 




i ■ ' 


, if 




Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drive Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Color Computer. Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers mate It the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shack ROM give? you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM 
(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 
Completed and Tested Board without ROM 
(Includes Case) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM 
Radio Shack ROM {current version) 



e 




^ b 1 1 j ^ i t m > y j ■ | *. m + f 



* ■» 



i i j i ■ 



$99. 
$79. 

.$30. 
$30- 
$20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1,G < > > $40„ 



LIB* ciur WAT'S lira to ilaca yaur wciis M'iaa, MfliLarCard, or Wftra tr^narer Or 
mirt your ptfymwil dfrgcbV fa- us. Arty pjan ■ tefvliad lurid? wvl tnj tieitf unW prapir 
ctatrBrtcft i& (TMidfir. COP CuClans yfc BozuatfiO wi Wflll aa piirchMBi artftrs Ir^ftt 
^jv^rnnt^rV: igtniLi«?. Wcigi itnrtis &m £l«ipp*d alt ih& tfwlf win 11™ dtfcspiibft ci I hard 
tltiM* pioSiicis t1i#i lira cuwam butf UPS ^noura* a E*jr sansivd. <rw?.na jji-iipp*rig 
ytii&B* amartf^n i^cil'rti] Shipping toiii om avaii^bm upm r&qi,ipsit 



Drive 0 Complete . . - $199. 

Drive 1 Complete . _ . , $129„ 

Drive 0 & 1 Dual Drive $319™ 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 



1-713-4BO-6OO0 
Order Line 1-A00-231 -6671 
16206 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, Texas 77059 



Corporate/School: 




■ CONTROLLERS 
The DC-4 1$ a scaled-down version of the popular DO 
2 without a parallel port. It includes a switch with 2 ROM 
sockets, JDOS, manual and such features as gold 

(connectors and metal box. It accesses double sided 
drives and accepts RSDOS1.1 for Radio Shack compat- 
ibility 

^03 ($2 Shipping) 

RS 1.1 R.S. ROM Chip $25 



DC-2 

1m# mm J&M Disk Contr 

$98 




J&M Disk Controller with parallel 
port/Hard Drive expansion bus 
; makes a revival with the CoCo 3. 

($2 Shipping) 



DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 

DRIVE 0 + Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only. Add $34 for a Disto DC-3 replacement. ($s snipping) 

J DOUBLE SIDED 

9 4 DOUBLE DENSITY 




Separate Disk Drive Components 



DD-3 An MPI 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



$98 



<*2 shipping) DRIVE ONE 



J 



NEW FROM DiSTO $|29 



DC6 

($2 Shipping) 

Super Controller II works with CoCo 1, 2 & 3. It buffers keyboard Input so 
that no keystrokes are lost when disk is reading or writing. Especially useful 
with 03-9, but also works with BASIC. 



TEAC 55B bare drive, Vs height, double-sided, double density with 
all mounting hardware, needs CA-2 below to fit R.S. 501. 



$118 



(*2 shipping) BARE 



SP-C ^ m ^ m ^ m mk^ 

Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial output to run 
a parallel printer like Star or Epson. Includes all cables. Add $10 for 
modem attachment. ($2shlpplng) SgQ^S 




CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to the drive. 

CA2 $29 95 



$0495 

One Drive 



Two Drive 



GUARANTEE ~ Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try 
It out, test it for compatibility, if you're not happy with it for 
any reason, return it in 30 days and well give you your 
money back (less shipping). 



FAX Order Number 

(312) 278-9513 

EPS" 




LX-800 $239 

Friction and tractor feed included 
160 CPS 
3K Buffer 

NLQ on front buttons 
Package includes free SP-C serial to 
parallel converter and Epson tutorial 
bn disk. 




Star NX-10 Only $238 

ieriaUopara jlet converter^hile supplies last (*5 shippln 

WORD PACK RS 
BASIC SCREEN EDITOR 

• Looks like Atari screen editor 

• Works on CoColv 2 & 3 

• Now with 80 column support 

MYDOS by Chris Hawks 

• Simplify your directory 

• Accesses double sided drives 

• Use J&M Printer Port on CoCo 3 

CoCo MAX by Colorware 




• Specify II or III 

• Includes high res interface 

• Animation 

• Printers supported include, R.S. 105, 106, 130: Star: & Epson 




(*2 shipping on software) 




MONITORS 



Sony KV-1 311 CR $449 



• Vivid Color 

• Vertically flat 13" screen 

• Monitor/Trinitron TV with remote control 

• 640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot 
pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and composite 
inputs 

• VCR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 



Regular *625 
('15 shipping) 







MAGNAVOX 7622 

12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 350 lines 
resolution at 20 MHz on a dark glass anti-glare CRT 5m PP ,n 9) 
with built-in audio and 1 year warranty. 

7652 Green Screen • Same Specs • Same Price 



■ 



20 MEG HARD DRIVE 

$499 

($9 Shipping) 



• pre-lnstalled, formatted and ready to run 

• equivalent to 125 R.S. 501 's on line 

• includes Western Digital WD1002-WK1 Controller 

• and Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 

• will aiso work with IBM & clones 




• complete package includes 20 meg drive, case & power supply, controller and Interface 
that plugs into slot #3 of multfpack interface. 

• 1 year warranty 



BASIC driver lets you access this hard drive without need for OS-9 $49.95 




Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



I 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri, 
10:00 - 3:00 Sal. 



WE ACCEPT. VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

C O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO/S Shipping charges are for 48 states 

APO and Canada order slightly higher 




I 






SEE FRONT COVER 

FOR OTHER DIECOM GAMES 





DR. PREBLE'S 
' PROGRAMS 



Introducing PYRAMIX 

for ijout Cofot Computet 5 ! 



Product of 
ColorVenture 



FYRaMIX is a 100% machine language game written exclusively to take advantage of all the power in your 128K 
CoCo 3. The colors are brilliant, the graphics sharp, the action hot. 

PYRAMII features the finest in animation, graphics, sound effects and game play available today. It has all 
Extras you want, too, such as a pause Option, RGB and CMP .odes, keyboard or joystick play, help screen, 
multiple skill level, and the ability to backup your disk. 

Best of all is the low price! Available today, for only $24.95 on disk + s/h! 



HI i 



r. D K F = HI 



LEVEL; i 

1 03GB RDIJHO: * 

rr tt 



rr. And Lightning Strides! ~~ 

LIGHTNING RAM DISK is the most versatile RAM disk for your 512K Color Computer 31 LIGHTNING RAM 
DISK will allow you to use up to 4 mechanical drives and 2 RAM drives simultaneously for a total of 
6 Drives! This RAM DISK will also work simultaneously with our amazing LIGHTNING PRINTER SPOOLER! 
$19.95 ou disk + s/h. 

LIGHTNING PRINTER SPOOLER for the 128K or 5121 Color Computer 3. Multitask your computer J Dump 
more than 400K of text to the spooler "instantly." Then, continue your keyboard work while it all 
prints out! Also compatible with our LIGHTNING RAM DISK above. $14.95 on disk + s/h. 

LIGHTNING BACKUP utility for your 512K Color Computer 3 resds your master disk once and then makes 
superfast multiple disk backups on all your drives! No need to format blank disks. Supports 35, 40 
or 60 tracks, double or single sided disks and adjustable step rate. $14.95 on disk + s/h. 

Order ail 5 for ontt| $4455 * s'h 




JUMP 



<pmfs mo 



BASIC FREEDOM t No one wants to be chained down. And 
yet, if you type in BASIC programs, you have been 
subject to Involuntary servitude! The culprit? 
BASIC'S limited EDIT command. 




J 




Demand Your BASIC FREEDOM! Programmed by Chris BabCock for ColorVenture, this software gives you a 
full screen editor for typing in and editing BASIC programs! Move the cursor anywhere on the screen 
Insert, delete or add text. It's the aame concept as in a word proceasor, except you never have to 
leave BASIC! BASIC FREEDOM ia sn invisible machine language program which you can turn on ana orr at 
T7«,„ ^roaoHno RFSFT will not hurt vour BASIC FHEEDDOM! Simple, yet powerful with an easy to 
t * mlnual! Man "exSa^nice tonnes" Included, like KEY REPEAT and LOWERCASE INTERPRETER which 
lets you type BASIC commands' in upper or lower caae for ease of programming. Translation to 
uppercase is automatic for commands. Text in quotes is not affected. y w p ofo j 2, Of 31 

SPECIAL COCO 3 VERSION lets you work in 32, 40, or 80 column diaplay modes. A separate version is 
available for the CoCo 1 and 2. Available on disk for $24.95 + s/h. 

MENTAL FREEDOM by Dr. Preble! IMAGINE! Some day, a computer so advanced that it responds to your 
■^eTT^houghts end emotions. Imagine, some day, thought-controlled graphics: lev! tstion and 
materialization' PLUG IN YOUR MIND and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS — that day is now! The Radio Shack 
Color Computer has many advanced capabilities, just waiting to be tapped. Dr. p reble s Programs 
combines the advanced technology of the CoCo with the amazing Radio Shack Biofeedback Monitor to 
bring you "Mental Freedoo." jr 0f foCo 2 Of 5 

THOlXnTT-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any video game you have ever played, our J^^^re 
teats your ability to handle stress, to remain calm under adverse circumstsnces. LIGHTNING FAST 
reflexes will do you no good here, unless you first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. Are ypu the 
aecretely nervous type? Many people can keep a "Poker Face" even when ^ a ^. w ^^° that 
others may not notice; but can you really stop the worry itself? Find out with Mental Freedom! 

AND IT TALKS! Did you know that the CoCo can produce incredibly realistic digital speech without a 
special speech synthesizer? The voice quality is so good, it sounds human! Honest. Best of all, no 
extra hardware is needed for speech, just some clever programming by Dr. Preble. 

MENTAL FREEDOM - Next time your friendB ask what your computer can do, show 
' them Dr Preble's fhoughtware! Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback Monitor 
Catalogue #63-675. Mental Freedom - DISK only $24.95 + s/h 



1 I • i « il|W"" lnMk* 

,|".^W''mIF!«»i' 

Mm ii 'i if,-afc 

"1 •>* 

It J l« ■¥ .'H.:.»." - 



p'l jlij.ljjlLLH i 





fffiatityWoijze WiffoWf 



Motor 

5J2f Digital Voice 
Recorder for your 
CoCo K 2, or 31 



* Record voice or any sound into RAM 

* Record and playback at 2 speeds 

* Save and Load voice to disk 

* Select normal or high fidelity 

* Record more than 2 minutes of speech if 
you have a 512K CoCo 3 

* Fully compatible with CoCo 1 and 2 

* Features Sound Activated Playback. 
Messages will playback automatically for 
your family when any noise is made. 
Could also scare off prowlers. 

Vocal Freedom includes special cable. 
Requires only a low cost amplifier (RS 
cat. 0277-1008) and any microphone. 




On Disk, only $39.95 + s/h 

Incorporate digitally recorded voices or 
sound into your own programs. Requires 
Vocal Freedom, above. 



.disk, only $14.95 + a/h 



VDOS the UnDlSK: Save multiple programs in memory. Or save multiple graphic pictures in memory. Works with 
or without a disk. Let's you SAVE, LOAD and KILL stored programs or graphics. DIRECTORY function lists 
files, givea the start, end and execution addreases of machine language programs and number of free hytes 
remaining. Own a RAM disk without buying a disk drive! Requires 64K CoCo 1 or 2. Available on tape or disk 
for $24.95 + shipping/handling. iFOF CoCO 1 Ot" 2 

VDUMP, for the UnDISK: Backup all your UnDISK files to a single tape file for easy reloading A must for VDOS 
users! On tape for $14.95 + shipping/handling. 

VPRINT, for the UnDISK: Paper printout for UnDISK Directory. 

Check, money order, Mastercard fof CoCo 

Visa or COD. for Sbjppijtg J , ft OrWor trnm & 

in (J.S J. or Canada add tZ.SO, 
1o other Countries, add $5.00. 



On tape, $9.95 + shipping/handling. 



VISA 




CFiccfc. .^loney Order or 
COD 




Order from 

Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 

Louisville, KY 40228 

(502) 969-/8/8 
24 HOUR ORDER LINE 



a % % & ® if 

Dress up ifour lush Dim tot u 
tvtth coforfut messages and- 

boidcr s. Create useful help 
me-ssnqes. Add that pro- 
fessiorKjL touch to uot+r cre- 
ations! rmfi) $995 




for Mzlkdwl SiimMm 

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CoCoBrailie 



4 » • 



Emboss Grade 1 or Grade 2 
Braille using your CoCo 1, 2 
or 3 and a Brother Daisy Wheel 
printer! Faat Print to 
Braille conversion algorithm 
converts word processor files, 
program listings and data 
files into touch readable 
Braille. For use by the blind 
or the sighted. No knowledge 
of the Braille code 1s 
necessary. Just send print to 
the program and out comes 
Braille! Note: The complex 
Grade 2 conversion is very 
good and though not always 
perfect, quite readable. 
Requires 64K or more. Brother 
HR series printer or the IF-50 
interface series required. 
Low Cost! Similar software 
costs 3 times aa much. Only