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Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

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I 



0 



44254 ll 00001 



03 



1 








SEE BACK COVEW 
FOfl OTHER DlECOM GAMES 





Tandy 4000 HX $539 
Tandy 1000 TX $889 






BIC SAVINGS ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 429.00 
Tandy 1000 SX 1 Drive 384K 649.00 
Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 512K 899.00 
Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg. Ram1959.00 
Color Computer 2 w/64K Ext. Basic 89.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 169.00 
Radio Shack DMP-130A 120 CPS 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel339.00 

Star Micronics NP-10 100 CPS 169.00 

Star Micronics NX-10 120 CPS 199.00 

Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 359.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 120 CPS 199.00 

Panasonic P-1091i 160 CPS 229.00 

Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 349.00 

Okidata 182 120 CPS 229.00 

Okidata 192+ 200 CPS 359.00 

Okidata 292 240 CPS 479.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Radio Shack DCM-212 179.00 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

The Magic of Zanth (CoCo3) 34.95 
Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 
Color Max 3 (CoCo3) 59.95 
COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 
COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTermbyPXEComputing29.95 39.95 
TelePatch ill by Spectrum * 29.95 
C III Graphics bySpectrum(CoCo3)19.95 
Font Bonanza by Spectrum (CoCo3)29.95 
TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo3512KRamDiskbyCerComp 19.95 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71.95 
Inside OS-9 Level II Book by FHL 39.95 
VIP Writer (disk only} 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 



Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 

VSA 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Interface 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 
CM-8 6' Extension Cable 
Serial to Parallel Conv. 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 99.00 
Tandy 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

Flight 16 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

Nuke the Love Boat (CoCo3) 34.95 



89.00 
14.95 
19.95 
59.95 
26.95 
329.00 



Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 



S3 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 





I F e atur es 



20 

Putting It 
on Their Tab 

Shawn Conant 

Generate invoices for parts 

and labor 



25 

RAINBOWfest 
Reporter 

Cray Augsburg 
The scoop on the 
Princeton show 




32 ^ 

Advertising 
Profit Predictor 

Bill Bernico 

A utility to help you decide 
whether or not to market 
your product 

36 

Delivering # 
the Goods 

Dale James Leistico 

A bookkeeping system for 

newspaper carriers 

42 

Helicopter Hero % 

Phil Holsten 

Rescue miners from the 

volcanic caverns 

48 

The Care and 
Handling of Tapes 
and Disks 

Ed Ellers 

Tips on tape and disk 
maintenance 

54 

'Spreading It on % 
a Little Thicker 

Saul Mooallem 
Enhancements to Cheap 
Spread 



Table of Cont e nts 

March 1988 
Vol. VII No. 8 



60 

Taking Stock 4fr 

Charles May 

Getting 'stock' answers to 

your inventory questions 

82 

BASIC for ^ 
Beginners IV 

David W. Ostler 
The final installment of a 
four-part programming 
tutorial 

94 

Stock Analysis ^ 

James E. Franz 
Timing your investment 
decisions 

100 

Rule of 78's % 

Jack W. Eizenga 
Determine whether you save 
or lose by paying off a loan 
ahead of schedule 

104 

The Post Office ^ 

Orman Cyril Beckles II 
A CoCo 3 database that 
holds more than 900 
addresses 




122 

122 

Sub Search ^ 

Steven Sward 

War under the waves 

146 

Co Co 3 

Number Cruncher ^ 

David Archer 
A scrolling spreadsheet, 
plus hints on the CoCo 3's 
GIME chip 



4 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Novic e s Nich e d 



72 

In Good Form 

E.C. Thompson 

73 

Worksheet Printer 

Don Hitko 

74 

Creating Data Files 

Raymond Doss 

74 

Reading Data Files 

Bill Bernico 

75 

A Star Like a Wheel 

Jim Pruyne 

76 

Five in a Row 

John James 




The cassette tape/disk sym- 
bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on Page 99, 




Advertisers Index 192 

Back Issue 

Information 169 

CoCo Gallery 18 

Corrections 40 

Letters to Rainbow 6 



Maxwell Mouse 



.114 



One-Liner Contest 
Information 189 

Racksellers 190 

Rainbow Info 10 

Received & Certified_139 

Scoreboard 90 

Scoreboard 

Pointers 92 

Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 188 

Subscription Info 16 



C o lum n • 



68 

BASIC Training ^ 

Joseph Kolar 
Mission interchangeable — 
there's more than one way to 
get the job done 

16 

Building March's 
Rainbow 

Jutta Kapf hammer 
Managing Editor's notes 

160 

CoCo Consultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

140 

Delphi Bureau 

Cray Augsburg 

Sending Mail messages, and 

Hutchison's database report 



164 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

89 

Education Notes ^ 

Steve Blyn 

Fun with phonics 

12 

PRINT#-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's notes 

158 

Turn of the Screw 

Tony DiStefano 

Bigger and better EPROMs 

78 

Wishing Well % 

Fred Scerbo 
Sentence savvy 




Barden's Buffer f ^W 

William Barden, Jr. 
Font Fascination 



180 ^ 

KISSable OS-9 V 

Dale L. Puckett 
A view of Muiti-Vue 




Address/RJ.F. Software 

Autoterm 6.1 IPXE Computing 

Avatex 2400 Modem/ Cinsoft 

CoCo Base \/JTJ Enterprises 

CoCo Newsroom 

Microcom Software and Spectrum Projects 

Color Computer Artist/ Tandy Corporation 
Printer Lightning/Ow/- Ware 

ShftnghalMcf/Ws/on 



T/S SpeW/Tandy Corporation 



.132 
.132 
.134 
.130 

.129 
.131 
.135 
.138 
.135 



THE RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 
phone (502) 228-4492. THE RAINBOW, RAINBQWfest and THE BAWBOW and 
RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N, 705- 
050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE 
RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding Postage Guaranteed. 
Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada 
Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by FALSOFT, Inc., 
1 988. THE RAINBOW is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers 
and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of 
information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use 
Is expressly prohibited, All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, 
without warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color BASIC, Extended Color 
basic and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • 
Subscriptions to THE rainbow are $31 per year in the United States, Canadian 
rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. 
All subscriptions begin with next available issue. • Limited back issues are 
available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment 
accepted by VISA, MasterCard, American Express, cash, check or money order 
in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/ 
12ths the subscription amount after two issues are mailed. No refund after 
mailing of three or more magazines. 



The Rainbow 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Jody Gilbert 

Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 

Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 

Copy Editor Lauren Willough by 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, 
Ed Eilers 

Editorial Assistants Sue H, Evans, 
Wendy Falk, TOhi Frank, 
Monica Wheat 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr,, 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Robert Hatfield, *Jr. 
Rita Lawrence, Denise Webb 

Typesetter Jody Doyle 



Falsoft, Inc. 



President Lawrence C, Falk 
General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 
AssL General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst to the Publisher 

Sapah Levin 
Executive Editor James E. Reed 
Editorial Coordinator Jutta Kapfhammer 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickois 
Production Coordinator 

Cynthia L. Jones ' 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts JudyQuashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Bonnie FrowenfeldV: 
Director of Fulfillment Sandy, Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Representative 

Beverly Beardon 
Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 
Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 
Director of Production Jim Cleveland 
Dispatch Tony Olive, Sharon Smith 
Business Assistant Laurie Falk 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 2284492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office information, 
see Page 192 

Cover illustration copyright ® 1988 
by Fred Crawford 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 5 



A Thief by Any Other Name . . . 

Editor: 

This is in reference to the growing aware- 
ness in the computer community of the 
illegality of software theft/ piracy. I'm a 
SysOp of a CoCo 20Mb BBS, The Crusader. 
IVe been online \ x h years now. I am not a 
"pirate,' 1 nor do I condone piracy. On my 
BBS for over eight months now we have 
been waging open attack on the subject of 
piracy, more honestly called theft. 

Now, there have been a lot of good 
comments lately in THE rainbow on this 
subject. I myself have been trying to get any 
SysOp or user I talk with to turn in known 
pirates and pirate BBSs they know of or run 
into. I firmly believe that if the SysOps were 
to blacklist and ban from their BBSs known 
pirates, if they refused to allow magazine or 
other pirated programs on their BBSs, if 
they refused to allow access to a user who 
will not leave honest log information (what 
has an honest person to hide?), and if they 
personally verified any user of their systems, 
piracy would stop fast. 

What never ceases to amaze me is the 
number of otherwise honest people who 
would condemn shoplifting and other kinds 
of theft and yet defend or at least condone 
piracy. The worst are the SysOps — either 
from the mistaken idea that users will not 
call unless they have pirated programs for 
downloading or from trying to be one of the 
"don't rock the boat" crowd. Worse, some 
SysOps do not even have the guts to call it 
theft and look the other way — like the 
ostrich, they feel that if they don't see it, it 
won't touch them, and so they allow open 
trading (piracy) messages on their BBSs or 
allow magazine programs to be uploaded. 
' Come on, this may sound harsh, but look 
at the facts. When a SysOp allows, or worse, 
encourages piracy and does not stop it dead 
when he sees it, he is helping it spread even 
when he himself is not doing it. 

This is a subject that badly needs address- 
ing. When a new user comes into the BBS 
world, he sees magazine programs, etc. Well, 
of course he gets the idea it is common and 
OK (he might even feel it's wrong but he's 
new, so says nothing). He in turn passes on 
what he gets, and if someone tells him it is 
not OK, well, it was on such and such's BBS, 
so mind your own business. And the crime 
goes on. 

I also hear the excuse that software costs 
too much. OK, fair enough. But would you 
steal a car or TV that cost more than you 
thought it was worth? I doubt it. You would 
either save up for it or buy a different model 
or brand. Real simple. So much for that 
excuse. Then there is the "Well, I'm only 13, 
and I don't have enough cash" excuse. 
Hmmm, that is more legitimate, at least, but 
jobs are there if you are willing to work and 
look for them. 

Others use the excuse that software com- 

6 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



panies should protect their software better. 
Are you willing to pay extra for it? How 
about, "The software companies should sue 
if they really don't want us to steal." 

Now, what are kids new to BBSing learn- 
ing from all this? 1) Theft is condoned and 
OK if you do not get caught. 2) The com- 
puter community is a good place to learn to 
steal. 3) SysOps are thieves, so piracy is OK. 

I frankly have received more heat from 
these otherwise honest SysOps than from all 
the pirates I've openly been condemning. 

When the piracy scene is looked at fairly 
simply with all the excuses aside, we have 
theft plain and simple (yet people still claim 
it's not a crime). I spent five years in jail, and 
guess what? Not one guy I ever met there was 
guilty of a crime — he was a victim of 
societyl Sound familiar? 

There was a letter in rainbow a while 
back by an ex-pirate saying how sorry he 
was. Well, if he's really sorry he should send 
to the companies he stole from the money 
for their stolen wares plus the names of the 
people he gave copies to if they do not agree 
to do the same. 

How hard is it to stop piracy? Not very. 
We just need honest SysOps who demand 
honest users. My BBS is temporarily offline, 
but the number is (213) 661-3568. 

Jackie W. Farmer 
Hollywood, CA 

Back Talk 

Editor: 

In reference to "Accessing the Back Side" 
in January 1988's "CoCo Consultations" 
(Page 149), I would like to point out that all 
versions of my program, KDSK, can access 
the back side of the disk. KDSK uses a 
unique drive numbering scheme due to the 
many possible ROMs and patches available. 
Just add 4 to the physical drive number: 
Drive 4 is the back side of Drive 0; Drive 
5 is the back side of Drive 1; and Drive 6 
is the back side of Drive 2. 

I also provide patches to registered 
owners of KDSK for unusual system con- 
figurations whenever possible. Finally, 
KDSK avoids ROM calls to ensure compat- 
ibility when new ROMs are released. I 
would not recommend disassembling 
KDSK since I've embedded numerous en- 
cryption routines throughout to discourage 
undocumented user modification. 

Ken Wuelzer 
113 Arrowhead Drive 
Montgomery, AL 36117 

Dragons Not Extinct in UK 

Editor: 

Although the Dragon 32/64 is no longer 
being manufactured in the UK (or in Spain), 
there are many very active Dragon owners. 
These enthusiasts rely on the Dragon User 
and rainbow magazines for support. 



Now that Tandy in the UK is phasing out 
CoCos 1 and 2 and are not importing the 
CoCo 3, that software source will no longer 
be available shortly. However, there is still 
a small band of commercial software pro- 
ducers for the Dragon, in addition to enthu- 
siastic amateur programmers. 

Apart from local user groups up and 
down the country, there are the National 
Dragon Users Group and an OS-9 User 
Group (European), which are both very 
active. 

Because of the reduction in software 
sources, I was very interested in the desktop 
publishing program written by H. Allen 
Curtis and listed in the October '87 issue of 
rainbow ("Desktop Publisher on a Shoe- 
string," Page 58). 

I tapped in the program, changed the file 
handling routine to the Dragon system, and 
quickly produced a Christmas greetings card 
for the office. The only other change made 
was to the I/O memory area to make it 
compatible with my "dump" program. For 
any other Dragon owners interested, here 
are the changed lines for the program: 

Desktop Low 

15 GO5UB440:CLS:PRINT@193, 
"FILENAME: "; : LINE INPUT" TELL 
ME!";SAVE F$+".LR'\&HC00, 
&H2400 , &HR0ER : RETURN 
20 GOSUB440:CLS:PRINT(?193, 
"FILENAME: ";:LINEINPUT 
"WHICH ?";F$:L0ADF$+".LR": 
RETURN 

Genfontl 

900 CREATE "F0NT1" 

1000 F$="F0NT1" 

1010 FOR 1= 1 TO 84 

1020 FWRITE F$;F$(I):NEXT 

1030 FOR 1=1 TO 84 

1040 FWRITE F$;M( I ) :NEXT 

1050 FWRITE F$;D:FWRITE F$;S: 

CLOSE 

Genfontl 

990 CREATE "F0NT2" 

1000 F$="F0NT2" 

1010 FOR 1= 1 TO 84 

1020 FWRITE F$;F$( I ) :NEXT 

1030 FOR 1=1 TO 84 

1040 FWRITE F$;M(I):NEXT 

1050 FWRITE F$;D:FWRITE F$;S: 

CLOSE 

Geoffrey H. Smith 
Cheshire, England 

INFO PLEASE 

Editor: 

I am looking for information about a 
company called BMC International, which 
was based in California and sold computer 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

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SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42 51 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 
They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! ^ ^ 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29,95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



TOTAL AUTOMATION 

Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate £py 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Tinned 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 



PXE Computing ' 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



printers. I am in need of a printer head for 
the model #BX-80 printer. I have called 
several companies with no success. BMC 
must have been bought out by another 
company. I will welcome any information! 

Gary Anderson 
1010 Tullar Road, Apt. B 
Neenah, W 1 54956 

* 

Don't Give this Teacher an Apple! 

Editor: 

Although rainbow is intended for 
CoCos, many subscribers probably have 
other equipment, too. One piece of hard- 
ware I am trying to hook up is a PC Viewer, 
a large LCD display that fits over an over- 
head projector. Whatever is displayed on the 
computer screen is what is displayed on the 
overhead. It is a great idea, if you have a PC. 
What I have is an older Apple He, sending 
out a composite signal. 

Since the Zenith monitor worked with 
both the Apple and the CoCo hooked up to 
a Universal Plus monitor, I thought I could 
just connect the CoCo to the composite 
interface on the PC Viewer. It almost 
worked. Block graphics came out OK, high 
resolution was a blank and text looked like 
it skipped every other line. 

The information that comes with the PC 
Viewer is scanty, but it does list several 
computers that use an RGB interface. Since 
the Universal Video Interface supports RGB 
(doesn't it, for CoCo 2?), why shouldn't this 
work? If, after looking at the signal hook- 
ups, there is absolutely no hope of hooking 



up the CoCo 2, what about the CoCo 3? 
Would it be possible to run the CoCo 2 
software on the CoCo 3, and interface it with 
the PC Viewer? 

My reason for all this foolishness has to 
do with the technology and my desire to use 
the CoCo in the classroom. One computer 
does not go too far with 30 students, but 
using the printer as our output device, we 
have been able to work with some interesting 
simulations. Having direct access to the 
computer via the PC Viewer would be great. 
I prefer to write programs for the CoCo 
rather than use Apple basic. If there is any 
possible way to hook up this new device, I 
want to give it my best shot. The alternative 
is to become proficient in Apple basic and 
translate programs. Please save me from this 
fate. I am a desperate man. 

Also, I am interested in hearing from 
other teachers who use CoCos in the class- 
room. 

Michael Franich 
Lakeridge Jr. High 
5909 Myers Rd. E, 
Sumner M WA 98390 

Derby City RAINBOWfest? 

Editor: 

It occurred to me (and hopefully will also 
to the people at the rainbow) that it would 
be interesting to have a RAINBOWfest in 
Louisville. This would allow CoCo enthusi- 
asts to venture out to Prospect to see where 
the rainbow is published. I feel this would 
be very exciting. In addition, this choice of 



location would allow a different group to 
attend a RAINBOWfest that previously has 
not had the chance because of geographical 
limitations. Possibly the event would not be 
as large as some others, but please give it a 
chance. 

Also, I am very interested in finding more 
information about a special hardware proj- 
ect. I would like to obtain an IBM-type 
computer case for the purpose of installation 
of my disk drives, modem, and tHe insides 
of my CoCo with a separate keyboard. If 
anyone can help or pass on information, I 
would be extremely grateful. Any technical 
information would be of help. 
Thank you for such a fine magazine. 

William hartley 
Box 26 Haggin Hall UK 
Lexington, KY 40526 

Would you travel to Louisville to 
attend a RAINBOWfest? If so, let us 
hear from you. 

The Original Touch 

Editor: I 

I am looking for software to Use with 
Theodore P. Hasenstaub's light pen hard- 
ware project in April 1983's RAlNBbw, Page 
90, for creating original graphics from a 
television image. I have a CoCo 3 and the 
Radio Shack TV/ Monitor. A digitizer is 
fine, but I much prefer the original touch. 

D'Arcy Brownrigg 
P. O. Box 292 
Chelsea, Quebec 
Canada JO X 1 NO 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 7 



PEN PALS 



• I am looking for pen pals seriously inter- 
ested in OS-9 programming (assembler, C, 
BASIC09). I have a CoCo 3 with two disk 
drives, a mouse and a monochrome monitor. 
No beginners, please. 

Alain Smedts 
Joseph Wuytslaan 37 
8700 Deur NE 
Belgium 

• I am a 13-year-old boy and I'm looking 
for a pen pal, preferably a girl from 12 to 
15 years old. I have a CoCo 3 with a free 
access, 24-hour bulletin board on it. Some 
of my interests outside of the computer 
realm include band, comic books, etc. 

Daven Howard 
R.R. #2 Box 23 B 
Gays Mills, WI 54631 

• I am 15 years old, have a CoCo 2 and 3, 
DMP-105 printer, three disk drives, a CCR- 
81 cassette and a modem. 1 would like to 
have pen pals from anywhere in the world. 

Luis Martinez 
LUMA 

2 C-10 Royal Town 
Bayamon, PR 00619 

• A CoCo user over 50 years old would like 
to communicate with other users who share 
an interest in game playing. I have a CoCo 
2, cassette recorder and a DM P- 130 printer. 
1 enjoy Adventure games but need help 
solving most of them. 

Carla E. Sheridan 
P. O. Box 501 
Rodman, NY 13682 

• I would like to have pen pals from any- 
where in the USA, Canada, Australia, New 
Zealand, Europe or Africa. I own a CoCo 
3, 128K with a DMP-1 10 printer, disk drive, 
Multi-Pak Interface, direct connect modem 
pak, and a speech cartridge. Pm 38 years old. 

James W. Andrews 
1732 Orange Lane 
Kissimmee, EL 32741 

• I am 16 years old. I have a CoCo 2, two 
double-sided, double-density drives, a 
Multi-Pak, a 1200 baud modem, a DMP- 
105, a cassette player, a light controller and 
a plotter. I am looking for anyone who 
would like to help me in my quest for 
knowledge of the CoCo. Or anyone who just 
likes to talk. I'll answer as many letters as 
humanly possible. 

Erik Bixby 
3441 E. Dahlia Drive 
Phoenix, A Z 85028 

• I am 15 years old and looking for pen pals 
all over the world, especially in the USA, 
Canada and Australia. I have a 64K CoCo, 
CCR-81 cassette recorder and a new Tandy 
FD-501 disk drive (including Drive 1). 

Daniel Alvarez 
Sucre 2220 4 'B' 
CP. 1428 Capital Federal 
Republica Argentina 



• I'm looking for pen pals from all over the 
world. 1 have a 64K CoCo 1 with a cassette 
player and I like to play games and Adven- 
tures. 

Tal Pery 
Havakefet Str. 3 
Kiron 55408 
Israel 

• 1 have a 64K CoCo and a cassette re- 
corder, and 1 would like a pen pal from 
anywhere, especially in South America. 

Michael A. Lees 
Rua das Valsas, 167 
Jacarepagua 
Rio de Janeiro — RJ 
CEP — 22743 — Brazil 

• I am a collector of public domain CoCo 
2 and 3 pictures and would like to obtain pen 
pals who have good public domain pictures 
they would like to share. I am particularly 
interested in CoCo 3 pictures. 

Chris Steeves 
P. O. Box 255 
Petitcodiac, New Brunswick 
Canada E0A 2 HO 

BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 



• Come on and enter the Dungeon BBS, 
300/ 1200 baud. Offers a great online games 
area, SIGs, forums, downloads, and news 
and information. Currently operating on a 
four-drive system, soon to upgrade to 1 0Mb. 
Hours: 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. Monday through 
Friday, 24 hours Saturdays and Sundays. 
Call (919) 726-9737. 

Chuck Katsekes, SysOp 
410 Scott Drive 
Newport, NC 28570 

• I would like to announce the opening of 
my BBS, The Tomb. It is up 24 hours a day, 
300/1200 baud, 8/N/ 1. It is run on a 512K 
CoCo 3 with four drives. Call (515) 432- 
7853. 

Steve Kratz 
217 West 2nd Street 
Boone, I A 50036 

• I am happy to announce the arrival of a 
new BBS, The Mindmaster's Domain of 
Chicago, running on a Colorama system. It 
is operating at 300/ 1200 baud, 7 bits, even 
parity, 24 hours, seven days a week. Call 
(312) 463-8932. The SysOp is Mindmaster. 

David Lucas 
4451 N. Christiana 
Chicago, IL 60625 

• I am the secretary and treasurer of the 
Enid Chapter of CoCo Inc., The Central 
Oklahoma Computer Organization. We are 
presently expanding our support network 
for CoCo users. We have a new newsletter, 
are building SIGs, and have added a BBS 
(405-237-9282). I would like to hear from 
anyone interested in starting a McAlester, 
OK, chapter. We also support a budding 
Public Domain library and P/D swap disk. 

David Graham 
724 E. Maple 
Enid, OK 73701 



• I would like to announce a new CoCo 3 
BBS in Montreal, serving most of the city. 
It has nice online games and a few boards. 
Give it a call at (514) 351-2130. Open 24 
hours a day, seven days a week. 

Jean Beland 
7720 Pierre-de-Coubertin (est) 

Montreal, P.Q. 
Canada H1L2B2 

• I, would like to announce Tri City BBS, 
sponsored by the Citrus Color Computer 
Club in San Bernardino, California. It runs 
PBBS 5.0 on a CoCo 3, and is online 24 
hours, seven days a week, 7-E-l. Many topic 
areas, all callers welcome. Please fill out 
application on first call to be validated. First 
callers have limited access. Call (714) 885- 
3789. 

James C. Gracey 

101541 

2686 W. Mill St. 
San Bernardino, CA 92410 

• Call Dial-Your-Match #399, a computer- 
ized dating and meeting BBS system. All 
persons over 18 are welcome. Call (201) 261- 
1977 or (201) 265-2481. This is a free service. 
CoCo SIG online. 

David Fischer 
P.O. Box 423 1 898- A Blvd. 
New Milford, NJ 07646 

• Color Galaxy BBS in Santa Ana, Califor- 
nia, is now online 24 hours, 300/1200 baud, 
7-0-1, featuring Xmodem uploads and 
downloads, games, utilities, graphics, music, 
10 message bases and the ability to send 
private uploads to an individual user! Call 
(714) 839-5830 for free access. 

Dave Cragun 
901 S. Toland St. 
Santa Ana, CA 92704 

• The CoCo' Nuts BBS now operates at 
300/1200 baud, 24 hours a day. Call (919) 
425-8242 for BBS; (919) 425-7751 for voice. 
The BBS operates at 7 bits, even parity, 1 
stop bit. We welcome all users to come and 
visit us anytime. I am presently with the 
Army, stationed in Honduras, California. 
But the BBS is still in operation at the North 
Carolina address. 

Tommie Taylor 
6310 Belle Terre 
Fayetteville, NC 28304 

THE RAINBOW welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: 
Letters to Rainbow, The Falsoft Build- 
ing, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
Letters should include the writer's full 
name and address. Letters may be edited 
for purposes of clarity or to conserve 
space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, type RBI 
to take you into the Rainbow Magazine 
Services area of the SIG. At the RAIN- 
BOWS prompt, type LET to reach the 
LETTERS> prompt and then select 
Letters for Publication. Be sure to in- 
clude your complete name and address* 



8 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Word 

Power 3 



(The Ultimate Word Processor for the CoCo 3) 



Are you still using your CoCo 2 word processor on the CoCo 
3 with patchwork? You don't have to any more. With Word 
Power 3, Microcom answers the challenge of word processors 
for the CoCo 3. It bridges the gap between "what is" and "what 
should be" in word processors. No other word processor offers 
such a wide array of features that are so easy to learn and use. 
Check out the impressive features: 

DISPLAY 

The 80-column display with true lowercase lets you view the full 
width of a standard page. All the prompts are displayed in plain 
English in neat colored windows. The current column number, 
line number, page number and the percentage of memory remaining 
is displayed on the screen at all times. The program even displays the 
bottom margin perforation so you know where one page ends and 
the other begins. You can also change the foreground/ background 
color of the screen to suit your needs! 

AVAILABLE MEMORY 

Unlike most other word processors, Word Power 3 gives you80K of 
memory with a 128K CoCo 3 and more than 460 K with a 512K 
CoCo 3 to store text. 

TYPING/EDITING 

Word Power 3 has one of the most powerful and user- friendly full- 
screen editors with wordwrap. All you do is type; Word Power 3 
takes care of the text arrangement. It even has a built- in Auto- Save 
feature which saves the current text to disk at regular intervals; so 
you know that your latest version is saved on disk. Here are some of 
the editing features of Word Power 3: 

Auto- repeat; Key-Click; Cursor up, down, left, right, beginning of 
line, end of line, next word, previous word, top of text, end of text; 
page forward, backward; 4-way scrolling; block copy, move, delete; 



global search and replace (with wild-card search); line positioning 
(left, right or center) ; insert/ overstrike modes; delete to beginning/ 
end of line, next/ previous word; and tabs. You can also embed 
printer codes in text to take advantage of underlining, sub/ superscript 
and other printer functions. Define left, right, top and bottom 
margins, and page length. 

MAIL MERGE 

Ever try mailing out the same letter to 500 different persons? Could 
be quite a chore. Not with the Mail Merge feature of Word Power 3. 
Using this feature, you can type a letter, follow it through with a list of 
addresses and have Word Power 3 print out personalized letters. It's 
that easy! 

LOADING/ SAVING FILES TO DISK 

Word Power 3 creates ASCII format files which are compatible with 
almost all terminal, spell- checking, and other word- processing 
programs. It allows you to load, save and kill files and also to create 
and edit Basic, Pascal, C and Assembly files. Supports double- sided 
drives and various drive step rates. 

PRINTING 

Word Power 3 drives almost any printer (DMP series, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc.). Allows print options such as different 
baud rates, line spacing, page pause, partial print, multi-line headers/ 
footers, page numbers, page number placement, and right justification. 
You can also change the values for these print options within the text 
by using embedded printer option codes. 

INSTRUCTION MANUAL 

Word Power 3 comes with a well- written and easy- to- comprehend 
instruction manual that makes writing with Word Power 3 a breeze. 

Word Power 3 comes on disk for only $69.95. 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1*800*654*5244 9 am- 9 pm est? days a week 

Except NY. Order Status, Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call 1-716-223-1477 



All orders shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge. Last minute shoppers can benefit. 

VISA, MC, AMEX, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 S&.H (USA &. Canada), other countries $5.00 S&H. 

NYS residents please add sales tax. 
Computerized processing & tracking of orders. Immediate shipment. 








How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program listings in 
the rainbow are formatted for a 32-character 
screen — so they show up just as they do on your CoCo 
screen. One easy way to check on the accuracy of your 
typing is to compare what character "goes under" what. 
If the characters match - and your line endings come 
out the same — you have a pretty good way of knowing 
that your typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 

RAINBOW ON DISK or RAINBOW ON TAPE service. 

An order form for these services is on the insert card 
bound in the magazine. 



What's A CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was first given to 
the Tandy Color Computer by its many fans, users and 
owners. 

However, when we use the term CoCo, we refer to 
both the Tandy Color Computer and the TDP System- 
100 Computer. (While many TDP-IOOs are still in 
service, theTDP Electronics division of Tandy no longer 
markets the CoCo look-alike.) It is easier than using 
both of the "given" names throughout the rainbow. 

In most cases, when a specific computer is men- 
tioned, the application is for that specific computer. 
However, since the TDP System-100 and Tandy Color 
are. for all purposes, the same computer in a different 
case, these terms are almost always interchangeable. 



Rainbow Check Plus 




The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command RUN 
and press enter. Once the program has run, type new 



and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program youVe typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to be sure you typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=25G*PEEK(35)+17B 

20 CLEAR 25,X-1 

30 X=25G*PEEI< (35) +178 

40 FOR Z=X TO X+77 

50 READ Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

60 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=79B5THENB0EL5EPRINT 

"DATA ERROR": STOP 
80 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 182, l f 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 183, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 4B, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 3B, 3B 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 15B, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 12B, 171, 128 
150 DATA 230, 132, 3B, 250, 4B, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 1B3, 2, 222, 4B, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 166, 132, 28, 254 
1B0 DATA 189, 173, 19B, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: CMDS and SOURCE. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rs t, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMDS directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the SOURCE directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the source directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 
programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 



doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 

1 ) Type l oad dir list copy and press enter. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd/d0 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
on disk in Drive 1. Then type chd/di and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read . me . f i rs t file to the screen by typing 
list read.me. first and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow ON disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMDS directory, enter dir cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMOS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system: copy /d0/cmds/ filename 'd0/ 
cmds/ filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: copy /dl/cmds///7ename/d0/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Sea! 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. We ascertain 
that their products are, in actuality, what they purport 
to be and, upon such determination, award a Seal. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee of satisfac- 
tion." The certification process is different from the 
review process. You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whether the product is right for your 
needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not. 

We wiil appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



10 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



BOOKS & GRAPHICS 

500 



POKES, 
PEEKS, 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKES, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

* Autostart your basic programs 

* Disable Color Basic /ECB/ Disk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TRON, TROfF, 

PC LEAR, DLOAD, REMUM, PRIMT 
USING, DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD, 
MERGE, RENAME, DSKIMI, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

* Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 

* Generate a Repeat-key. 

* Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

* Speed Up your programs. 

* Reset, MOTOR ON /OFF from 
keyboard. 

* Recover Basic programs lost by 
NEW 

* Set 23 different 

GRAPHIC /SEMIGRAPHIC modes 

* Merge two Basic programs. 

* AND MUCH MUCH MORE1JI 

COM 1*1 AMDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16 K/32 K/64 Kj COLOR BASIC/ ECB/ DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1, 2, fit 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



SUPPLEMENT to 

500 POKES, 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 

ONLY $9.95 
fcUU additional Pokes, Peeks' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER 
Includes commands for 

• Rompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm+® and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (for DMP printers) & Text Screen Dump 

• AND MUCH MUCH MDREI 

• 500 POKES, PEEKS 'N EXECS is a prerequisite 

^300 POKES 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 

FOR THE COCO III 

Get more POWER for your CoCo III. Includes 
commands for 

• 40/80 Column Screen Text Dump 

• Save Text/Graphics Screens to Disk 

• Command/ Function Disables 

• Enhancements for CoCo 3 Basic 

• I28K/512K Ram Test Program 

• HPRINT Character Modifier 

• AND MANY MORE COMMANDS ONLY $1 9.95 






MUST" BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
BOTH UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
SUPER ECB(CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: $24.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $59.95 
COCO 3 SERVICE MANUAL $39.95 
COCO 2 SERVICE MANUAL: $29.95 

INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II $39.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 LEVEL II ON COCO 3: $19.95 

RAINBOW GUIOE TO 0S9 II DISK: $19.95 
INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II DISK: S20.00 

COCO 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING*: $18.00 

ADDENDUM FOR COCO 3: $12.00 
UTILITY ROUTINES VOL 1 BOOK: $19.95 



JILJF 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 




COCO 

GRAPHICS DESIGNER 



Greeting Cards 

Signs 

Banners 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays parties anniversaries and other 
occasions Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III OR TDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM 0F32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 AND JD0S. 

Supports the following printers: DMP 

100/105/110/130/430, CGP220, 

EPSON RX/FX, GEMIN1 1 0X, SG-10, 

NX-10& 0KIDATA 

DISK ONLY $29.95 

PICTURE DISK #1: 100 more pictures for 
CGD: $14.95 

FONT DISK #1: 10 extra fonts! $19.95 
COLORED PAPER PACKS $24.95 

COCO MAX III 

it's finally here! CoCo Max for the CoCo III. 
Includes ail the features of the acclaimed CoCo 
Max II and more: CoCo III hi- res screen, display of 
64 colors at a time; 50% larger editing window, 
special effects with animation and much much 
more! Comes with special hi- res interface^ 
conversion utilities and a comprehensive manual. 
Disk only $79.95 Min Req: 128K CoCo III with 
a disk drive. 

COCO MAX II 

Disk $77.95; Tape $67.95 

MAX PATCH 

An excellent software patch to run COCO MAX II 
on COCO III. Req. RS Hires Joystick Interface No 
chip replacements or soldering Disk only $24.95 
BOTH MAX PATCH & HI-RES INTERFACE: $34.95 




COLOR MAX III DELUXE 

This is the sequel to the popular Color Max in 
Additional features include multiple screen editing, 
animation etc Includes printer drivers for EPSON, 
GEMINI, DMP& CGP-220 printers Disk only 
$69.95. Minimum Requirements: 51 2 K CoCo 3, RS 
Hi- Res Joystick Interface and Tandy Disk Controller. 



VISA MC, AMEX, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 S&H(USA& Canada), other 
countries $5.00 S&K NYS residents please add sales tax. Computerized 
processing & tracking of orders. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited 



VtSA' 



MaitOfCard 



Call Toll Free (For Orders] 1 -800-654-5244 9 am-9 pm estz days a week 

Except NY. Order Status, Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call 1-716-223-1477 



Yes, Alan, There Is a Future 
for the Color Computer 



Dear Mr. Folk: 

I have been a loyal Co Co user since 1982 and a RAINBOW reader 
just as long. We (Co Co Community) have looked to THE RAINBOW 
for honest, unbiased answers to our questions. You have not let us 
down! 

Please answer this letter without regard to the fact that Tandy is 
a major contributor to THE RAINBOW and that members of your staff 
are directly associated with Tandy. 

How much time does the Co Co have? In particular, the Co Co 3. 
There have been drastic price reductions on the CoCo 3 and rumors 
float heavy among members of my user group and others in the 
surrounding area that Tandy thinks the CoCo 3 was a mistake, and 
will suffer the same fate as the Model I, III, 4 and even the almighty 
2000, not to mention the Tandy savior 1000 EX and SX. 

Don't get me wrong, I love my CoCo and still have the old gray 
horse. I wouldn't trade either of them for a trainload of 1000s. I have 
megabucks invested in my CoCo 3, monitor, 512K, two drives, Multi- 
Pak, etc., etc., the list is awesome. Help! 

Alan L. Parker 
Kokomo, IN 

Thanks for writing, Alan, because I think it is time to dispel a few 
rumors myself. Your letter gives me a chance to do so. 

Let me put it to you this way: If you had a product that outsold 
every other product in its classification every year — year in and year 
out — would you discontinue that product? The answer, of course, 
is that you would not. And that is just what is happening with the 
Color Computer. 

Yes, I am pleased to be able to report that, in terms of numbers 
of units sold, for the umpteenth year in a row, the CoCo has outsold 
every other type of Tandy computer during the season just past. 




COCO 3 UTILITIES GALORE 

(All utilities support 40/80 columns for CoCo3) 
(CoCo2 versions are available for most utilities) 




SUPER TAPE/DISK TRANSFER 

• Disk-to-Disk Copy (1-3 passes) • Tape-to- Disk Copy • Tape- to- Disk Automatic Relocate • Disk- 
to- Tape Copy • Tape- to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/Ml programs and DATA files CoCo 1, 2 & 3. 32 K Disk System (Disk to Disk Copy requires 
64 K). Disk Only $24.95 



QS9 LEVEL II RAMDISK 

Lightning Fast Ramdisk with Auto Formatting A must for any 0S9 Level II User. Req. 51 2 K $29.95. (Only 
$14.95 with the purchase of 512 K Upgrade & Ramdisk!!), 



l. 



HI- RES JOYSTICK SOFTWARE 

Wish you could use the hi- res joystick interface from Basic? You can now. This program will let you access 
640 x640 pixels from your joystick for extra precision CoCo3 Disk SI 4.95 



COCO NEWSROOM 

Now available for the CoCo II I! You can design your own newspaper with Banner Headlines/6 articles using 
sophisticated Graphics, Fonts and Fill Patterns Comes with22 fonts&50 pictures! Over 1 40 K of code Disk 
only $49.95 



MAILLIST PRO 

The ultimate mailing list program. Allows you to add, edit view, delete, change, sortfby zipcode or name) and 
print labels Its indispensible! Disk Only $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! Allows elongated, normal and condensed format for text 
double-strike, border creation and multiple- label printing Its a MUST for any user with a disk drive Disk 
Only$19.95. Supports DMP 1 05/1 1 0/1 20/130/430, GEMINI, STAR, EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo2 
version included) 



COMPUTERIZED CHECKBOOK 

Why bother with balancing your checkbook? Let the CoCo do it for you! Allows you to add, view, search, edit 
change, delete and printout (in a table or individual entry format) checkbook entries Updates balance after 
each entry. Allows files for checking saving and other accounts Disk Only $19.95 (CoCo 2 version 
included) 



BOWLING SCORE KEEPER 

An excellent utility to keep track of your bowling scores Allows you to save scores under individuals or 
teams You can edit change, delete and compare scores A must for anyone who wants to keep track of his or 
her bowling performance Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 

Organize your videocassettes with this program! Allows you to index cassettes by title rating, type play 
time and comments Also allows you to sort titles alphabetically and view/print selected tapes If you own a 
VCR, this program is a must Disk Only $1 9.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



512K RAMDISK/SPOOLER 

Turns your5 1 2 K RAM into super- fast in- memory disk drives Reduces chances of IO errors and disk access 
is lightning fast 51 2 K Spooler keeps your computer free for programming when printing documents to the 
printer. A must for 51 2 K users, CoCo 3 Disk Only $24.95 



ADOS3 

Advanced Disk Operating System for CoCo 3. $34.95 ADOS: $27.95 



COCO UTILII 

(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible computer. Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCa 
$39.95 



SPIT 5 N IMAGE 



Makes a BACKUP of ANY disk $32.95 



RGB PATCH 

Displays most games in color on RGB monitors For CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE 
WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 
WORD PROCESSORS 

TeleWriter-64: Best Word Processor For 
CoCo 1 & 2 . (Cas) $47.95 (Disk) $57.95 
TW-80: 80 Column Displays more features 
for TW-64. CoCo 3 Disk $39.95 
TELEFORM: Mail Merge & Form Letters for 
TW-64. $19.95 

DATABASE 

Pro Color File* Enhanced* 2.0: Multi-feature 
Database. $59.95 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Autoterm: Superb Terminal Program Works 
with any modem! (Cas) $29.95(Disk) S39.95 
Wiz: For 0S9 II. 300-19200 baud rate, 
windows! Req 512K & RS232 Pak 
$79.95 

ASSEMBLERS/COMPILERS 

EOT/ ASM 64 D: Best Disk Based Editor- 
Assembler for CoCa $59.95 (Specify CoCo 
1,2 or3) 

THE SOURCE: Best Disassembler for CoCa 
$34.95 (Specify CoCol, 2 or 3) 
CBASIC: Most powerful Basic Program 
Compiler. $149.95 (Specify CoCo 1,2or3) 




GAMES 

(DISK ONLY) 

*IR0N FOREST: $28.95 

LIGHT PHASER W/INTERFACE: $34. 
MISSION! RUSH'N ASSAULT: $28.95 

*GRANDPRIX CHALLENGE: $28.95 

♦GANTELET II: $28.95 
GANTELET: $28.95 
MISSION F-16 ASSAULT: $28.95 
MARBLE MAZE: $28.95 
PAPER ROUTE: $28.95 
KNOCK OUT: $28.95 
KARATE: $28.95 
WRESTLE MANIAC: $28.95 
BOUNCING BOULDERS: $28.95 
THE GATES OF DELIRIUM: $28.95 
CALADURIAL FLAME OF LIGHT: $28.95 
LANSFOflD MANSION: $28.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
PYRAMIX Cubix® for CoCo 3: $24.95 
VEGAS SLOTS (CoCo III Only): $34.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 



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MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone(716) 223-1477 



All orders $50 & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charga Last minute shippers can 
benfit VISA, MC, AMEX, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 S&H(USA& Canada), other countries 
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1 v — 

That ipeans more CoCos than 1000s. 
More Gblor Computers than 3000s. 
More than anything else. Period. 

Would you discontinue a computer 
that sold so well? I wouldn't. And Tandy 
wouldn't, either. 

Since we're talking about the holiday 
season sales in particular, I am tempted 
to paraphrase that famous column from 
the editor of the Baltimore Sun to a little 
girl named Virginia who wrote in to say 
that all her friends were telling her there 
was no Santa Claus. The editor wrote 
back oft; Page One to say, "Your little 
friends are wrong, Virginia." 

Let me say, Alan, that your friends — 
be they little or big — are wrong, too. 

Later in the same reply, the editor 
wrote that Santa "lives and lives for- 
ever. " We all know it won t quite happen 
this way, Alan, but the truth is that the 
CoCo seems to be living forever, too. 

One of the reasons this is so, Alan and 
friends everywhere, is simply because of 
the very thing about which you are 
concerned — the special prices estab- 
lished at holiday time. 

Two; excellent marketing people, 
Bernie Apell — president of Radio 
Shack — and Barry Thompson — 
CoCo's product manager — are the 
ones behind that pricing. Price reduc- 
tions are possible for a number of 
reasons. Among them: 

• Economies in production, which 
are, pf course, going on throughout 
the year, are usually most felt with 
the holiday manufacturing cycle. 

• The largest single "buy" of Color 
Computers is for the holiday pe- 
riod. Everyone understands quan- 
tity discounts. 

• In this year's case, the decision to 
manufacture the CoCo 3 in Korea 
was particularly good for Tandy. 

Fortunately, the company is large 
enough to make on-shore/ off-shore 
decisions and take advantage of them. 
(Incidentally, CoCos will be manufac- 
tured in the United States during 1988, 
another example of this versatility. In 
this case, Tandy will be taking advan- 
tage of the international currency situa- 
tion.) 

A nice thing about Tandy's pricing is 
that if they can make it cheaper, they 
will sell it cheapen That means "passing 
the savings along." And, as they bring 
more and more people into the CoCo 
Community, we all benefit. 

You are, however, wrong about two 
things, Alan. First of all, Tandy is not 



a "major contributor" to THE RAINBOW. 
Their main contribution is for advertis- 
ing space — and they pay the same rates 
as other people. They buy fewer pages 
than a number of other advertisers, as 
well. Other than that, there is no "con- 
tribution" by Tandy to the rainbow. 
We're an independent company and an 
independent magazine. We do, of 
course, like Tandy products. If we 
didnt, we'd be foolish to publish mag- 
azines in support of them. 



"For the umpteenth 
year in a row, the 
CoCo has outsold 
every other type 
of Tandy Computer." 



Also, Alan, there is no member of my 
staff who is "directly associated with 
Tandy." None. Zero. Zilch. As I said 
above, we're an independent company 
and an independent publication. 

Of course, we have good friends at 
Tandy. People in marketing informa- 
tion and computer merchandising. 
People on the "executive floors" and 
people in the manufacturing plants. 
When we're searching for information, 
we try to find out as much as we can. 

And, based on that sort of inquiry, I 
. can find no information whatsoever 
that Tandy plans to discontinue produc- 
tion or sale of the Color Computer now 
or in the foreseeable future. For one 
thing, it is their best-seller. For another, 
they are building a new manufacturing 
plant in Texas just for CoCo. 

Rumors like this, Alan, crop up here 
and there every year. They have, ob- 
viously, never been true and they are not 
true now. 

For instance, if the CoCo were to be 
dropped, why would Tandy be signing 
contracts for new software from several 
major software houses? Why would 
Tandy have developed Multi-Vuel Why 
would Tandy invest in a new version of 
OS-9 for CoCo 3? Why would Tandy 
have contracted with us for still another 
OS-9 book? 

Tandy is more active in the Color 



Computer software field than ever 
before. All the signs point to more 
activity, not less. And if so, they cer- 
tainly want to increase, as much as they 
can, the number of people who would 
be interested in buying these products. 
So they keep on manufacturing and 
selling Color Computers. 
Seems logical to me. 



fft i^C 

As an aside, the third-party market 
seems to be more and more interested 
in the CoCo every month. We've been 
getting more and more inquiries from 
people interested in new and exciting 
things for the CoCo. 

Readers who have been with us for 
more than a little while will remember 
a column in which I compared the 
CoCo 3 with the original Color Com- 
puter in terms of where each machine 
was in its development. At the time, I 
saw the "3" as being far ahead in terms 
of people writing and developing appli- 
cations. 

I re-surveyed that observation just 
before Mr. Parker's letter arrived. The 
case is even more true now than it was. 
More people are starting to do more 
new things for the CoCo 3 than were 
doing anything for the original machine 
at the same time in its development 
stage. ' 

You are already seeing some new 
names to go with some of the more 
familiar ones in the advertising space of 
THE RAINBOW. I encourage you to en- 
courage these advertisers — old and 
new — by closely examining their 
offerings and supporting them (and, 
incidentally, the CoCo Community) by 
buying their products. Many of them 
are excellent. • 

Arid, yes, you will see some familiar 
names disappear from these pages. Our 
advertising department did a recent 
survey and found those firms with new 
products and new ideas were reporting 
sales increases. Those who were riding 
along with the same version of the same 
product and the same business ap- 
proach they had in 1983 were not doing 
so well. Frankly, we have tried to 
counsel with a number of these old 
friends, but — for some — the message 
has never gotten through. 

All of us here are very optimistic 
about the CoCo market. There is no 
reason whatsoever not to be. 

— Lonnie Falk 



14 



THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



ALL HARDWARE COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 



DISK DRIVES 



Double Sided, Double Density 360 K 40 track disk drives for the Color Computer 1,2 and 3. Buy from 
someone else and all you get is a disk drive. Buy from us and not only do you get a quality disk drive, you also 
get $60 worth of disk utility software (Super Tape/Disk Transfer and Disk Tutorial) and our DISKMAX 
utility which allows you to use BOTH sides of our disk drives It's like buying TWO disk drives for the price of 

0NE!! _ DRIVE 1 (Completely Assembled) $149.95 

DRIVE 0 (With J&M Controller & Cable) $229.95 
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DISTO SUPER CONTROLLER: $99.95 
DRIVE CARLES: 1 DRIVE CARLE: $19.95 2 DRIVE CADLE: $24.95 4 DRIVE CARLE: $39.95 

(For Drives, add $7.00 S&H in USA/CANADA) 





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1) AVATEX 1200 MOOEM: Hayes 
compatible 300/1 200 Baud, Auto- Dial/ 
Answer/ Redial (Reg $1 29.95) 

2) MODEM CABLE (Reg $19.95) 

3) AUTOTERM TERMINAL SOFTWARE 

4) FREE COMPUSERVE OFFER and ACCESS 
TIME 

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(With AVATEX 1 200 he instead of 
AVATEX 1200: $174.95) 
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Fast 120 ns chips. Fully tested Easy installation No 
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(With purchase of our 51 2 K RAMDISK program below) 

51 2 K Upgrade without chips $44.95 

512K RAMDISK 

Have 2 superfast RAMDISKs& a print spooler. 

$24.95 

64K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/BCoColl: 
$39.95 

64K Upgrade for CoCo CoCo If s with Cat 
#26-3026/7, 26-3134 & 26-3136: $29.95 



CABLES/SWITCHERS/ 
ADAPTERS _ 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 

serial port ONLY $18.95 

Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with 

CoCo Max, DS69, etc ONLY $24.95 

15' PRINTER/ MOOEM EXTENOER CABLE: 

ONLY$16.95 

MOOEM CABLE: 4 pin to DB 25: $1 9.95 
15" MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER 
CABLE: $29.95 

3- POSITION SWITCHER: Select any one of 
three RS232 devices (printers/ modems) 
from the serial port $37.95 

WICO TRACK BALL $29.95 

WICO ADAPTER: Use Atari type Joysticks 

with your CoCa $29.95 

RS HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $1 1.99 

MAGNAV0X8505/8515/8CM643 Analog 

RGB Cable: $24.95 

CM-8 RGB Analog Ext. Cable: $19.95 

SONY Monitor Cable: $39.95 



EPROM 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 
EPROM Programmer for the CoCa 
Lowest Price Anywhere $137.95 
EPROM ERASER (Oatarase): Fast erase of 
24/28 pin EPROM& $49.95 
EPROMS: 2764 -$8.00, 271 28 -$9.00 
Call for other EPROMs. 

BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER and ERASER: 
$179.95 

ROMPAK w/Blank PC Board 27xx Series. 
$12.95 



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VIDEO 



UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: For 

monochrome or color monitor. $29.95 
VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference. 
$19.95 



KEYBOARDS/ ACCESSORIES 

KEYBOARO EXTENSION CABLE: Why 

break your back when typing on the 
CoCo? Our keyboard extender cable 
allows you to move your keyboard 
away from the computer and type with 
easa You can use your existing 
keyboard with this cable or leave your 
present keyboard intact and use a 
second keyboard A MUST for all CoCo 
Users Only $39.95. Cable with CoCo II 
keyboard: $49.95 
COCO 3 KEYBOARD (includes FREE 
FUNCTION KEYS software value 
$19.95): $39.95 



CHIPS, ETC. 



_ PRINTER INTERFACES _ 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 
switch selectable baud rates (300-9600) 
Comes with all cables, $44.95 



Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
III): $29.95 

Multi-Pak PAL Chip for CoCo 3 (Specify 
Multipak Cat #): $19.95 
PAL Switcher: Now you can switch 
between the CoCo II and CoCo III 
modes when using the Multi-Pak. You 
need the OLDER and NEW PAL chip for 
the 26-3024 Multipak Only $39.95/ 
With NEW PAL Chip $49.95 



MJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE Allorders $ 50 andabove(exceptDiskDrives)shippedbyUPS2ndDayAirat 
P.O. Box 214 n o EXTRA charge We accept VISA/MC/AMEX, Check or MO. Please add 

Fairport, n.y. 14450 $3.00 S&H (USA/CANADA; other countries$5.00), except where otherwise 

Phone (71 6) 223-1477 mentioned NYS Residents please add sales tas. Prices are subject to 

change All products are covered by manufacturer's warranty. 



VISA' 



Call Toll Free (For Orders] 1-800-654-5244 9 am 9 pm est 7 days a week 

Except NY. Order Status, Information Technical Information NY Orders call 1-71 6-223-1 477 



' Bui l ding March's Ra i nbow 



About 
Your 
Subscription 

Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster. 

For Canadian and other non- 
U.S. subscribers, there may be 
a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 




16 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



it's time for our annual Business and Finance issue. Whenever we arrive 
at this time of year, some of us think back to our first Business and 
Finance issue and one of our rare "Now, wait a minute!" discussions 
with cover artist Fred Crawford. Our "problem" concerned his finished art for 
the March 1984 issue of THE RAINBOW. 

If you've been with us for a while, think back to the cover with the distinguished 
guy in a vest, sitting in an easy chair in his den and looking over a printout. We 
had asked Fred to portray an obviously successful-looking man relaxing while he 
reviewed his stock portfolio performance. Fred had taken that concept and brought 
it to life, but with one major unanticipated twist: The computer sitting on the desk 
in the background was a Model III. When we first saw the finished art, we 
exclaimed, "That's not a CoCo!!" To which Fred replied, "Well, you said this was 
the business issue, so I figured you'd want a business computer." Do I have to 
tell you that a short sermon ensued? And the cover art did, quite literally, go back 
to the drawing board. 

No, the CoCo cannot easily handle all business-related computer needs any more 
than a pickup truck can haul a big herd of cattle. But just as you can manage 
to transport a couple of steers in a stake pickup, or haul a few bales of hay, a 
cord of firewood, a load of sand, or a party of duck hunters, when it comes to 
computing, you can do just about everything you need with a CoCo and a little 
time. You may have to load and reload more often than with a bigger machine 
sporting integrated packages, but the CoCo is nothing if not versatile. 

Singer Mickey Newbury does a number about a man whose wife one day grabs 
his pickup truck and runs away, taking with her the kids and his best hound dog. 
The last line of the song is: "I sure miss that truck." Well, a lot of us feel that 
strongly about our CoCo. We'd rather fight than switch. Well, now that we have 
the CoCo 3 with up to 512K and OS-9 Level II, our little machine can "get down 
to business," too. The fact is, our little "pickup truck" computer can handle some 
mighty big jobs. With OS-9, for instance, our CoCo can now have 40- or 80-track, 
double-sided drives, the new 3 l /£-inch drive with 720K of storage space or even 
a hard disk if we want (RAINBOW Technical Editor Cray Augsburg has a 35Mb 
hard disk hooked up to his CoCo 3). 

Along with storage, our CoCo can zip along, as well. Tandy's Ed Juge said 
recently that one of their software engineers ran some unofficial tests comparing 
CoCo 3 and IBM "throughput" (which refers to how fast the microprocessor 
actually handles its instructions, rather than being a strict measure of CPU speed). 
Of course, the IBM PC has a much faster clock speed than does the CoCo 3, but 
the operating system has a considerable influence on how quickly a job gets done. 
The results? The CoCo 3 with OS-9 ran about 35 percent faster than the standard 
IBM PC! 

With as much as 512K available to us, more program data can be memory- 
resident, reducing disk access time and, thus, speeding up things even more. 
Increased memory also allows room for help files or even integrated packages, 
complete with pop-up windows. And, of course, OS-9 gives us the ability to run 
several applications on the same screen, at the same time, each in its own window. 
How many windows? Well, even though he says 14 is practically the upper limit, 
Tandy's Mark Siegel recalls once having almost 30 going simultaneously! Maybe 
we should have a contest! 

The point of all this is that getting down to "serious business" doesn't mean 
you have to trade in that sporty little pickup of a CoCo for some stodgy, cattle- 
truck PC or PC clone. But if you are considering business applications, it does 
mean you may want to investigate the power and performance of OS-9 on the 
CoCo 3. Yes, the learning curve of OS-9 is a bit steep at the beginning, but once 
you've completed the setup, you're past the hardest part. After all, in any business, 
you do have to make an investment to earn the dividends. 

In closing, I'll remind you that it makes good business sense to invest in a 
subscription to THE RAINBOW: You save 35 percent of the newsstand price. 

— Jutta Kapfhaitimer 





COMPUTER AIDED INSTRUCTION 

Educational Programs for Students Grade K-12 arid Adult Self Studies 

NEW PROGRAMS FOR YOUR TANDY 1000 

AND TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 

Compatible with Apple - Atari - Commodore - TRS 80 I, III, 4 - IBM PC Jr. 
16 New Programs now available in Basic Spanish 

• NEW! VIDEO CASSETTES FOR VHS! 



InnerActive Video Tutorials 

Complete with audio narration 

4 cassettes with 8 programs in each of the 
following subject areas: _ 

* Basic Spanish Grammar mf* *m 95 

• Basic Algebra 

• Reading by Phonics %J 

* Basic Fractions 




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* Basic Fractions 

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syllable adject lues 



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O »cy 
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Interactive Tutorial Programs for Home or Classroom Use 

Over 1000 programs for your selection with 32 now available on disk for the Color 

Computer and 500 now available for the Tandy 1000. 




"We're Your Educational 
Software Source" 

Subject No. of Programs 

Reading Development 256 (4 on disk) 
Reading Comprehension 48 (4 on disk) 



Mathematics 

Algebra 

History 

Spelling 

Government 

Physics 



128 

16 (16 on disk) 
32 (4 on disk) 
16 
16 

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First Aid/Safety - Economics - Business 
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Apple 1 1, TRS 80 I, III, & 4, and 
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respective conversion kits (plug-in board 
and stereo cassette player), $99.00 Atari 
400/600/800/1200 computers require the 
Atari cassette recorder and the Dorsett 
4001 Educational Master Cartridge, 
$9.95. For the IBM PC Jr. a cassette 
adapter cable and a good cassette 
recorder are required. The Tandy 1000 
requires the Dorsett M1001 speaker/PC 
board kit, $69.00, and a standard 
cassette recorder. A Radio Shack 
CCR-81 or CCR-82 is recommended. 

CASSETTES: $59.50 for an album con- 
taining a 16-program course (8 cassettes 
with 2 programs each); $9.95 for a 
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Dorsett Educational Software features: 

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Indian 

Wally Mayes 

This intense graphic was 
generated with CoCo 
Max ///. Waily has had 
his CoCo for two years 
and really enjoys its 
graphics capabilities. He 
lives in Hamilton, Ohio. 






Ballooning 

Brad Bansner 

Color Max Deluxe was put to use 
to illustrate this hobby. Brad lives 
in Wyomissing, Pennsylvania, 
and is a sophomore in high 
school. 



**/Neo 



w 



March 



1988 



We are taking "CoCo Gallery" 
to RAINBOWfest Chicago! 
See Page 35 for details. 





HONORABLE MENTION 



School 

John Murvlne, Jr. 

John, of Ebensburg, 
Pennsylvania, used 
Color Max 3 to 
develop this 
panorama of an 
educational 
institution. 




Peterbilt '86 
Darren L Nye and Michael Koflle 

This frontal view of a 1986 Peterbilt tractor 
traitor was produced with Color Max 3. 
Darren and Michael live in SomerviMe, New 
Jersey. 




It 



1 



island 

Christopher Lee Mayeux 

Christopher, a self-employed 
electrician who enjoys 
programming in basic and 
basico9, produced this scene 
with McPaint. He lives in 
Chalmette, Louisiana. 




» w » h ii«ii«« 





l^~Z-Z-Z~Z-Z~Z-Z~Z~~ * " 



"Z'Z'Z z z »*-~z~z~z~z Stifci*>i-»-""*" r *!^r^-* 



March 



A9B8 



tH EBMWBO 



1 F ea ture 




A utility that prints invoices for parts 
and labor 



Putting It on 



By Shawn Conant 

Bill Generator is a handy pro- 
gram for anyone who needs to 
bill for labor plus materials. 1 
use it constantly in my business as a self- 
employed cabinetmaker. 

The program is simple to use. Upon 
running, you are asked for the number 
of hours to be billed, followed by the 
hourly wage. The prompts are gener- 
ated by either INPUT or LINE INPUT 
statements, so you must press ENTER 
after answering each one. 

Next you are asked for the markup 
for net prices and the discount for list 
prices. I always plan to make a small 
profit on the materials purchased for a 
job, but some supply companies bill me 
with a list price, then give a discount 
when the monthly bill is paid. Other 
suppliers give a net price, with no 
further discounts. If I am to make a 
profit, 1 must mark up the net prices for 
what I buy. But I don't want to make 
too much money, so I just take the 
discount from list prices as my profit. 

It is always good to know just how 
much profit 1 have made on materials 
for any job, and this program keeps 
track of that for me. The markup and 
discount are entered as whole numbers 
for percentages, so 15 would be the 
entry for a markup of 15 percent. 

When entering the cost of materials, 
it is necessary to indicate whether each 
amount is a net or list price by pressing 
N or L. When you have finished input- 
ting materials, simply press ENTER 
instead of an amount, and you will be 
presented with your totals onscreen and 



Shawn Conant is a self-employed cabi- 
netmaker living in the remote "North- 
east Kingdom " of Vermont. He and his 
wife and five children use the Co Co to 
combat "cabin fever" during the long 
winters. 



asked if you want a bill printed. I often 
use the program up to this point for 
estimating jobs. 

To print a bill, press Y and follow the 
prompts for the date and the client's 
address information. The Job Descrip- 
tion category is a very simple text entry 
mode, sort of like an electronic type- 
writer. If you stop each line by pressing 
ENTER just before the graphics charac- 
ter on the screen, you will get a neat- 
looking bill. As you did with the mate- 
rials list, press ENTER on an empty line 
when you're finished entering text. The 
final prompt is for any down payment 
received. If a printer is connected, two 
copies of the bill will print out, one for 
your client and another for your rec- 



ords. Added to the bottom of your copy 
will be the total cost of materials and 
your profit. 

You will need to edit a couple of lines 
to customize it for your use. Line 390 
should contain your name and address. 
Line 40 limits your job description to 10 
lines; change that to a larger number if 
you want. The printer codes are for a 
Tandy DMP-130 and are clearly re- 
marked in the program, making it easy 
to change to suit other printers. Line 50 
sets the baud rate of the printer to 1200. 

May your business always prosper. 

(Questions or comments may be 
directed to the author at RFD Box 170, 
Guildhall, VT 05905. Please enclose an 
SASE when writing for a response.) □ 



John Doe 
Main Street 
Hometown, Vt. 05905 
88/02/12 



John D. Customer 
1234 Purchase Avenue 
Lexington, KY, 40502 

Repair toner system on office copier 

Labor= $47.25 

Materials* $195.37 

Total= $242,62 

Received- $50.00 

Balance due= $192.62 

Thank You! 

Materials cost« $179.85 

Profit $15.52 




THE RAINBOW March 1988 



The Amazing A-BUS 




An A- BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter in foreground 

The A' BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

the CoCo 2 and the CoCo 3. 

About the A* BUS system : 

All the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
reader write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC, use INP and OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 
'# They are ait compatible with each other. You can mix and matchup to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 
• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PO-123) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples); 

Relay Card re-i40:$t23 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched 8 UEtTs show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address Is jumper selectable. 

Reed Relay Card re-is6:$99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Nays to switch low ievel signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card AD-142.$129 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to *5V range can he expanded to 1 00V by adding a 
resistor. 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 12Qus. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use 

12 Bit A/D Converter an 1 46: $1 ag 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%. Input range is ~4 Vto 
+4V, fteaoiution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 1 30ms, Ideal for thermocounii 
strain gauge, etc, 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the ?6 card), 

Digital Input Card iN-i4i: $59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/oft" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc, to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (of PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-i48; $65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for: input latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O, Uses the 8255 A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cl-i44: $89 

Powerful ciock/calendar with: battery backup for time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date), built in alarm relay, led and buzzer; timing to 1 /1 00 
mmm& Easy to use decimal format i Ithlum bait^ry included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph 14s: $?9 

Each tone is converted Into a number which i§ stored oh the board. Simply 
read the number with iNP or.PttKt U^f for remote control projecfsy &t& 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pr-i 52:$i s 

by 4W In, with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 i.Cs 



Plug into the future 

With the A- BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-801 into a future of exciting new applications i*1 tftfe fields 
of control, monitoring, aulOmaUam, sensing, robotics, etc, 

|ijpti^^(^ular/-A-ilJS offers a proven method to build your 
"Custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 



Smart Stepper Controller soi49:$299 

World's finest stepper controller On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simuitaneously. Incredibly, it adepts plain Wish commands like 
"Move arm 10.2 inches left": Many complex sequences ca^n be. defined as 

^'rnac^^ 

coordinate (relative br absolute), ramping, speed; $t#rj type {ha!f, Mlwa ve), 
•stile factor, units./ioidine, power, etc. Many inputs; 8 limit 4 "wait until" 
switches, pa^ic button,, etc. On the fly reporting of pqsltipru $pe$& etc, On 
, bnard driyers (3S0mA) for small steppers (M(M 03). Sendlor 49 yer. 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-121 : $49 

.to; control M 4 mafe 4$m$m %&rY^uenc#,$ motions, 
Power Driver Board Option PO-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to- 5 amps per phase.. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option 0B-122: $19 

for easy connection ohmdtors.3 ft. cable ends with screw temilnaTtWd, 

Stepper Motor Driver stm 43: $79 

Stepper motors are tW'UtWte in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with-them. Each card 
driyes two stepper motors (W, ^jrecttoneU phase, 350mA per phase). 
Speotal Package: 8 motoi* {MM 03) i S"M43 PA-1 81 ; $99 

Stepper Motors wio-io3; $1 s or4for$39 

Pancake type, W ola, W* shaft 7.5fysteo. 4 phase bidirectional, 300 
step/sec, 1 2V, 36 ohm, bipolar, 5 oz^in torque, same as Airpax Kfi270t -P2 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter.4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter, Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT f AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot AFM33. $69 

Tandy 1 000, 10G0 EX & SX, 1 200. 3000, Uses one shor) slot. AR-1 33 .$69 

Apple if, lie, Uses any slot. AR-1 34 $49 

TRS.-80 Model 102, 20O plugs into 4Q pin "system bus" AR-1 36 ..$69 

Model 1 00. Uses40 pinsocket (Sotkoi is dupileatedon adapter}. AR*1 35 $69 

TRS-80 Mod 3,4,4 0. Fits 50 pin bus. (WHnhard disk, use Y>caole), AR-1 32 $49 

TR S-M Model 4 P includes extra cable (50 pin bus is recessed) AR-1 37 $62 







LrfllU' 




lpultlS l 


Tnnd 


yJ.Rfe M0 M Hal MiilliRak. or Y caJtfe AR-1 3fl. .S-1 9 


A-BUS Cab 


le (3 ft, 50 cond,) CA-163; $24 



a. a5 



i.OO par ordar fof shipping, 
AQ, chock*, M.O. walcomft. 
CT4 NY rtaldcrttn add »at«s tax. 
C-0.0. add S3.00 axtta, 
Canada: ihipplng rt SB 
Over **«* add Km ' 




Curnu'iMi inp A- BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard 
S ooci Ei I cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-162: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i 20: $99 

; Each Motttefbdard holds five A'B#cird& A sixth connector allows a 
^ second Motberboard to be added to iM first (with connecting cable CA- 
\ W> $i il tip tn five fflothetfeatds tk* fee joined \H& way to a single A- 
BUS adapter, Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 



A0*142 • The A-BUS ft not a Wacemertt for the Mutti-pak 



242- W WB$t Avmue i Darter}, CT 06320 



Techtftoi irjto, (203) 056-1 eoe 

iW 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders; (203) 348*9436 

All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




Max-Wear transfers let 
you easily create your own 
Sweatshirts, T-Shirts, etc. 
Max-Wear transfers are 
8.5 x 1 1 " sheets of a 
special patented material. 
Anything your printer can 
print could be transfered 
to any cotton or cotton 
blend item. 



NEW 



FROM 



COLORWARE I 





You can use your own designs to make custom T-Shirts, 
Sweatshirts, caps, etc. Best of all, it's done in 3 easy steps. 
First use CoCo Max, (or any other graphics program) to create 
your design. Then print it on a Max- Wear transfer sheet with 
your regular printer and ribbon. (You can even print in color with 
the CGP-220, or add color with crayons if you wish.) The 
printed Max-Wear transfer sheet is then ironed onto the 
clothing, ready to wearl Of course, it's washproof. 

SOME IDEAS: Cap insignia, Club T-shirts, Personalized gifts, 
Humorous underwear, Monograms, Pennants, etc. 



TRANSFERS 



Special 
introductory offer: 




Eight 8 1/2x11" Sheets 
Enough for 8 T-Shfrts, etc. 




Disk #1 




Digital medium 

Digital Large 

Futura 

&rid Small 

HB1FB 

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Norm*nde Small 

Normandc Medium 

NORMANDE LG. 

Piano 

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Disk #2 



dtatlow 

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PHI mix KMC. MJ. 



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Uocbo* Cnuj 

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sun 

POIRT OUT 

Prtn1/otj1» Swell 

PRIHTDUT LARGE 



Disk #3 



mmmmm 



Bochhn 

Broadway 

Hot Matrix 



"in 



mm 

Xtrxtl JwW 

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UfAWc 



FONT DISKS FOR COCO MAX I, II AND III: 
Each: $24.95. SPECIAL: all 4 disks for only $49.95 



I 




it 



The best program ever written for the Color Computer 



!9 



That's how thousands of enthusiastic users rated 
theCoCo Max II drawing program. With CoCo Max 
III we are ready to amaze them again. Instead of 
"patching" CoCo Max II, we rewrote it from scratch 
to take advantage of the CoCo Max III hardware. 
The results will knock your socks off ! Below is a 
brief list of some of the new features, but some, 
such as animation, color sequencing, or the slide 
show, have to be seen. Send for the Demo Disk, and 
see for yourself. 

Everybody's favorite drawing package features: 

- A 50% larger editing window. - Zoom area 400% 
larger. - New drawing tools: rays, 3D cubes, arcs,... - 
New editing tools: shadow,text size,... - Rotate by 1 .5° 
steps - Select any 16 of the 64 possible colors (all 64 
colors displayed at once!) - Powerful color mix: additive, 
subtractive, overlay,... - Full color editing of patterns 
and color changing patterns. - Incredible special eff- 
ects with color cycling up to 8 colors with variable 
speed, -Animation adds the dimension of motion to 
your image. (Must be seen.) - Sophisticated diata com- 
pression saves up to 70% of disk space when saving 
pictures. 

In addition, there are dozens of enhancements to the 
multitude of features that made CoCo Max li a best seller. 

More about CoCo Max III 

• CoCo Max 111 is not an upgrade of CoCo Max II. It is entirely 
rewritten to take advantage of the new CoCo 3 hardware 
(More memory, resolution, colors, speed,...) 

• The new CoCo Max III Hi-Res Interface and the CoCo Max I! 
Hi-Res Pack are not interchangable. 

• The new interface plugs into the joystick connector, 

• The CoCo Max III disk is not copy protected, 

• CoCo Max II! only works with the CoCo 3. 

• A Y-Cable or Multi-pak is not necessary. 

• Colors are printed in five shades of gray. 

• CoCo Max ill can read CoCo Max II pictures. 



Note*. CoCo Max li (for the CoCo 2) is still available on disk 
($79.95). CoCo Max I is still available on tape ($69.95), For 
details, refer to our double page ad in any Rainbow from 
January '86 to July '87 



Toll Free operators are for orders only; If you need precise answers, ba|Mf 
the tech line. (Detained CoCo Max specs are included with the Demo Disk.) 



Md $3.00 par oritur for shipping. 
Vttf, NIC. chacks, M.O. WBlcomu. 
CT residents add sates tax. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping Is S5 
Qvvrxeat add 10% 



Technical info: (203)656-1806 

S«n°c n T ,y 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




Imagine this picture In sixteen colors! 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 
Umm CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with it, 
we will refund every penny. 




System Requirements: 

Any CoCo 3 disk system with a Joystick or a Mouse. 

We apologize to tape users, CoCo Max 111 needs the flexibility of a disk. 

The CoCo Max ill system includes: • The special Hi-Res 
interface (foryour mouse orjoystick) • The CoCo Max Hi disk • Many 
utilities: (ToconvertMaxii pictures, Max colors, etc.) • A detained User's 

Manual. Complete system; nothing etse to buy. CoCo Max III : $79.95* 
■awaai aaiaai aaiaaiaai wm4 oouPrjw on: v isjajajaYal aai anaai 

! FREE DEMO DISK 

Name __ 

Street 

City 
State Zip 




i 
i 
i 

i. 



Printer used: 

Please include $2 to help defray Processing and Shipping 
costs. (Check, Money Order, etc. Sorry, no COD or Credit 
Cards). Coupon (or copy) must be maii led to: 



Jfr Beware of inferior imitations that DO NQT include a Hl-Res Interface 
or charge extra for each utility. 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc. 



COLORWARE 

242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 









1-1— 1 


220 


. . .209 




370 ... 


...,58 






510 


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END 


...236 



The listing: BILLGEN 



10 f * BILL GENERATOR * 

20 »* BY SHAWN CONANT * 

30 r * NOVEMBER, 1987 * 

40 DIM J$(10) :CLEAR1000 

50 POKE149,0:POKE150,18: ' 

★ ★PRINTER BAUD RATE-1200** 

60 CLS:W=0:TFM=0:TCM=0 

70 PRINT"HOW MANY HOURS ff ;: INPUTH 

8)3 PRINT "WHAT IS YOUR HOURLY RAT 

E" ; :INPUTR 

90 W=R*H:X=0:Z=0 

100 INPUT"WHAT f S THE MARKUP FOR 
NET PRICES" ;MU 

110 INPUT"AND THE DISCOUNT FOR L 
1ST PRICES" ;D 

120 PRINT" TYPE MATERIALS COST, < 
ENTER>, THEN PRESS <N> TO INDI 
CATE A NET PRICE OR <L> TO INDIC 
ATE A LIST PRICE" 
13 0 X=X4-1 

140 PRINTX; :INPUTM:IF M=0THEN210 

15) 3 C$=INKEY$ 

16) 3 IF C$<>"L"AND C$O"N"THEN150 

17) 3 IFC$="N" THEN GOSUB62)3 

18) 3 IFC$="L"THEN GOSUB630 

19) 3 TPROF=TPROF+PROF : TFM=TFM+FM : 
TCM=TCM+CM 

2) 3)3 GOT013)3 

210 CLS: PRINT "PROFIT=", :PRINTUSI 

NG"$$####.##";TPROF 

22)3 PRINT: PRINT "MATERIALS COST=" 

, : PRINTUS ING "$$####.##"; TCM 

230 PRINT: PRINT "BILL MATERIALS-" 

, : PRINTUSING" $$#### . ##" ;TFM 

24)3 PRINT: PRINT "WAGES=", : PRINTUS 

ING"$$####.##";W 

250 PRINT : FB=TFM+W: PRINT"TOTAL B 
IL]>" , : PRINTUS ING" $$#### . ##" ;FB 
26)3 PRINT: PRINT"DO YOU WANT A BI 
LL PRINTED? <Y/N>" 

270 A$=INKEY$:IF A$<>"Y"AND A$<> 
"N"THEN27)3 

28) 3 IFA$="N"THENEND 

29) 3 POKE282,)3: 1 *UPPER/ LOWER CASE 
DISPLAY* 

3) 3)3 INPUT"DATE-00/00/00";D$ 

31) 3. INPUT "MAKE BILL TO:";N$ 

32) 3* INPUT "STREET ADDRESS :" ;S$: IN 
PUT "CITY : " ; CI$ : INPUT" STATE" ;ST$ : 
INPUT"ZIP";Z$ 



33) 3 CLS:POKE1110,246:Z=Z+1 

34) 3 LINE INPUT" JOB DESCRIPTION: 
<ENTER> TO END " ;J$(Z) 

35) 3 IFJ$ (Z) =""THENGOTO360ELSEGOT 
033)3 

3 6)3 INPUT"HOW MUCH DOWN PAYMENT" 
; DO : BAL=FB-DO 

37) 3 POKE2 82,2 55:FORX=lT02 

38) 3 F0RY=1T06:PRINT#-2:NEXTY 

39) 3 PRINT#-2,TAB(40) , " John Doe": 
PRINT#-2,TAB(4)3) , "Main Street" :P 
RINT#-2 , TAB ( 40 ) , "Hometown, Vt. )3 
59)35" 

4)3)3 PRINT#-2,TAB(4)3) ,D$ 

41) 3 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(10) ,N$ 

42) 3 IFS$=""AND CI$=" "ANDST$=""TH 
ENGOT044)3 

43) 3 PRINT #-2, TAB (1)3) ,S$:PRINT#-2 
,TAB(1)3) ,CI$", "ST$", "Z$ 

44) 3 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 

45) 3 FOR Y=1TOZ:PRINT#-2,TAB(10) , 
J$(Y) : NEXTY 

460 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(30) , "L 
abor=", : PRINT* -2, US ING "$$####.# 
#" ;W 

470 PRINT#-2 :PRINT#-2,TAB(30) , "M 
aterials=", : PRINT#-2 ,USING"$$### 
#.##";TFM 

480 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(30) , "T 
ot a 1 = " , : PRINT #-2 , USING" $$#### • ## 
" ; FB 

490 IF DO=0 THEN GOTO530 

500 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(30) , "R 

eceived=", : PRINT#-2 , USING "$$### 

#.##";do 

510 print#-2:print#-2,tab(30) ,"b 

alance due=", : PRINT#-2 ,USING"$$# 
###.##" ;BAL 

520 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(31) : ! 
* *BOLDFACE * * 

530 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(30) , "T 

hank You! " 

540 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(32) : • 
**END BOLDFACE** 

550 IF X=1THENPRINT#-2,CHR$(12) : 
1 **FORM FEED** 
560 NEXT X 

570 FORY=lT06:PRINT#-2: NEXTY 
580 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,TAB(30) , "M 
aterials cost=", : PRINT#-2 , USING" 

$$####. ##";tcm 

590 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , TAB (30) , "P 

rof it" , : PRINT #-2 , USING" $$#### . ## 
" ;TPROF 

600 PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) : ' 

**FORMFEED** 

610 END 

620 PROF=M* (MU/100) : FM=M+PROF : CM 
=M : RETURN 

630 PRO F=M* ( MD/ 100 ) : FM=M : CM=M- PR 
OF: RETURN 



24 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Prospect, Kentucky 

Vol.2 
No. 5 



Reporter: Cray Augsburg 
Photographer: Ed Ellers 




PRINCETON 



OCT. 9-11 





©Falsoft Inc., All Rights Reserved 



CoCo Past, Present and Future at Princeton RAINBOWfest 



The I4th RAINBOWfest 
opened at 7 p.m., Friday, Oc- 
tober 9, 1987. It was cold out- 
side, but inside, it was all 
warmth and happiness. As some 
people jammed the aisles in an 
attempt to find those long- 
awaited bargains, others took 
the time to relax and meet with 
old and new friends. 

On Saturday morning, many 
early risers attended the tradi- 
tional CoCo Community Break- 
fast. Sharing the head table with 
Lonnie Falk, rainbow's editor 
and publisher, were many CoCo 
notables including rainbow 
contributing editors Marty 



Goodman, Dale Puckett and 
Richard Esposito, Delphi per- 
sonalities Greg Law and Don 
Hutchison, rainbow Managing 
Editor, Jutta Kapfhammer, and 
Executive Editor, Jim Reed. 
Also seated at the head table 
were Tandy dignitaries Barry 
Thompson, Mark Siegel, Fran 
McGehee and Srini Vasan. 

Jim Reed delivered the key- 
note address concerning where 
the CoCo Community has been, 
where it is now and where it is 
going. Jim also offered personal 
accounts of some of the more 
humorous incidents at rainbow 
over the years. 





The CoCo Community Breakfast offers early risers a chance to 
relax and reflect before the exhibit hall opens. 



Over 10,000 people attended the Princeton show. 



In closing, Jim took a few 
minutes to roast his employer, 
Lonnie. Fortunately, for Jim's 
sake, Lonnie was in an excellent 
mood. 

Saturday's seminars, which 
covered everything from hard- 
ware hacking to OS-9, were very 
well attended. 

Sunday's exhibit hall activi- 
ties gave way to many great 
bargains and the showroom 
maintained a "get that good 
deal" atmosphere. 




Attendees got answers to their 
questions at the show. 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 25 



New Hardware on CoCo Horizon 



At the Disto booth, Tony 
DiStefano announced that he 
has designed a new Super Con- 
troller, the SC-2. This high- 
performance disk controller will 
have "no wait" operation under 
OS-9. Tony indicated that inter- 
est in this new product was ex- 
tremely high. 

Also in the works is a new 
mini-bus system that will give 
the CoCo user great flexibility in 
setting up a CoCo system. 

Sardis technology sold out of 
their Dual Mode Controller 
(DMC) at the Princeton show 
and then sold "seconds" for $30 
off the regular price of $149.50 
and good units for $15 off. 

The DMC allows "no halt" 



operation under OS-9. Its sec- 
ond mode gives the user com- 
plete compatibility when using 
Disk basic. 

At Owl-Ware, disk drives 
seemed to be the main target, as 
Drive 0 systems were going for 
$139 and a Drive 1 could be had 
for $85 (bare drives were $45). 
Also, 10Mb hard drive systems 
were priced at $439 and 20Mb 
drives sold for $659. 

Owl- Ware has answered many 
a CoCoist's prayers by introduc- 
ing an IBM keyboard adapter. 
This unit is designed to convert 
the signals from any standard 
IBM-type keyboard for the 
CoCo, and will retail for $119. 

The winner of Owl-Ware's 



"Name the Owl" Contest was 
Robby Allen for his entry of 
"Wholio." For his inspiration, 
Robby received a prize worth 
$250. 

A newcomer to the Princeton 
show was Burke & Burke. They 
were offering the CoCo XT and 
CoCo XT-RTC. 

The CoCo XT is a hard disk 
interface designed to accept 
standard Western Digital hard 
drive controllers and allow con- 
nection of a standard hard drive 
to a CoCo via the Multi-Pak 
Interface. 

The CoCo XT-RTC is similar 
to the CoCo XT except that it 
includes a real-time clock. The 
CoCo XT retails for $69.95 and 




A hardware hacker finds parts 
bargains. 

the RTC version retails for 
$99.95. 

Drives were the story at the 
Southwestern Digital booth. 
Here you could pick up a single- 
sided Drive 0 for $109 or a 
double-sided Drive 0 for $129. 

The HDS disk controller kit 
went for $40, while a fully as- 
sembled unit with ROM sold for 
only $60. 



Radio Shack Offers 
Two 100% Discounts! 



To support the CoCo Com- 
munity and to help rainbow, 
the Mercer County Color Com- 
puter Club attended the Test in 
force. 

They were there selling 
Princeton '87 T-shirts, as well as 
tickets for their own club raffle. 



The club members always had 
time for helping attendees find 
their way around and for offer- 
ing information and answers to 
the many questions that were 
asked. As usual, their presence 
was a big help and it is greatly 
appreciated. 



Radio Shack opened the show 
Friday night selling CoCo 3s for 
$100. Saturday, however, they 
raised the price to $1 15. 

Other bargains included the 
DMP-130 for $239, FD-501 
Drive 0 for $175, DMP-106 
printer for $159.95, CM-8 mon- 
itor for $239.95, and the DWP- 
230 printer for $289.95. 

The single-button mouse was 
selling for just $20. 64K CoCo 2s 
went for $29.95 and 16K ma- 



chines sold for a mere $9.95. 
Needless to say, they went fast! 

In addition to the above bar- 
gains, Radio Shack brought in 
boxes of 64K chips (500 kits, 16 
chips to the kit) and the Plug & 
Power Controllers (4600 units, 
retailing for $99.95) and gave 
them away as freebies! 

Manager John Hutchinson 
said, "The CoCo market is def- 
initely alive and well ... it is 
thriving!" 




The CoCo Cat Educational Sandbox attracted many of the 
younger CoCo experts. 



CoCo Club Supports 'lest 




Tandy executives Mark Siegel, left, and Barry Thomp- 
son, right, get assistance from CoCo Cat. 



26 THE RAINBOW March 1988 




Tandy's Fran McGehee helps at 
the Radio Shack booth. 



Sight and 
Sound from 
Dr. Preble's 

Programs 

The first thing many people 
saw when they entered the ex- 
hibit hall in Princeton was Dr. 
Preble's booth. On a CoCo 
screen was a digitized image of 
Dr. Larry Preble. In the back- 
ground, one could hear his dig- 
itized voice. 

Vocal Freedom, a digital 
voice recorder, caught the atten- 
tion of many. This program 
allows the user to record speech 
using a CoCo 1, 2 or 3 and was 
selling for $29.95. It allows sev- 
eral minutes of speech to be 
recorded on a 512K machine, 
and doesn't use up memory for 
silent sections of the speech. 




rainbow Technical Editor Cray 
Augsburg deals with OS-9. 



"The show is wonderful," Dr. 
Preble said. "It has been a while 
since the last show we attended, 
and the people are still really 
great!" 




Dr. Larry Preble demonstrated 
some of his unique software at 
the "CoCo As a Mind Inter- 
face" seminar. 



Chocolate 

CoCos 
On a Stick! 

In addition to bringing their 
complete line of educational 
software, Computer Island had 
boxes of 10 double-sided, 
double-density disks for only $5. 
One of the items many people 
stocked up on, though, were the 
chocolate computer lollipops! 




Cheryl and Shari Blyn of Com- 
puter Island rest a moment. 




At Diecom, the RAT graph- 
ics design package was selling 
for $59.95. 

RAT includes its own high- 
quality optical mouse and 
mouse pad and is a full-featured 
design package for the CoCo 3. 

Diecom President David Dies 
said, "In the future, we hope to 
provide several games designed 
to work with the Light Phaser 
like Iron Forest does." 

This was the RAINBOWfest 
debut of Colorware's new CoCo 
Max III, a full-featured graphics 
development program. 

CoCo Max III resembles 
CoCo Max II except that it has 
three columns of icons on the 
left side of the screen, allowing 
the selection of the many new 
features. 



Usernames 

and 
User Faces 




Greg Law (above) of the OS- 
9 Online SIG was on hand to 
field the latest questions, as was 
Don Hutchison, the CoCo SIG 
database manager. John Gibney 
and Paul Hodosh were also 
available as representatives of 
the Delphi system. 



Jessie Jackson and Mona Rowe 
of J & R Electronics offered 
complete 512K upgrades, with 
software, for $99.95 



The option of a free Max Font 
disk ($24.95 value) or the pur- 
chase of a complete font library 
(nearly 100 fonts) for $29.95 was 
included in the cost of CoCo 
Max II for $79.95. 

While it wasn't for sale, one of 
the show stoppers in Princeton 
was a homemade robotic arm 
designed by John Monin. The 
arm was driven with the Alpha 
Products A-Bus and controlled 
by a standard CoCo. 




A view of CoCo Max 3 



Graphics Going Strong 



Clearly OS-9 
at Clearbrook 

Paul Kehler of Clearbrook 
Software Group spent a great 
deal of time demonstrating CSG 
IMS, a relational database man- 
ager; Serina, a system mode 
debugger; Erina, a symbolic 
user-mode debugger; and MSF, 
an MS-DOS file manager. 

MSF, which was selling for 
one-third off the regular price of 
$45, allows the direct use of MS- 
DOS disks under OS-9. 

"Qjih&ri than problems with 
customs (at the Canadian 
border), things are really going 
well for us, Mr. Kehler said. 
"And we are happy to be here." 



Graphics has always been the 
name of the game at Computize. 
At RAINBOWfest their big spe- 
cial was a bundled software 
package worth $179 selling for 
$69.95. 

The bundle included Color 
Max 3 Deluxe, Picture Convert- 
en BASIC Tool and Gallery, 
and several utilites. 

Also, since this was the first 
show for Color Max 3 Deluxe, 
upgrades were available for 
those who had purchased the 
original Color Max 3. Over a 
hundred attendees were able to 
take advantage of this $15 offer 
(this offer is still in effect 
through Computize), On hand 
to answer questions were Color 
Max 3 programmers Erik Gav- 
riluk and Greg Miller. 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 27 



CoCo3 

Well 
Supported 



Gimmesoft and J&R Elec- 
tronics put together a package 
including a 5 12K upgrade board 
(OK installed) from J&R Elec- 
tronics, and FKEYS III and 
SIXDRIVE from Gimmesoft. 
The package sold for $69.95. 

Gimmesoft was offering their 
new Multi-Pak Interface Lock- 
ing Plate for $7.95. They also 
offered special deals on FKEYS 
III, SIXDRIVE, Mult i- Label 
and Custom Palette Designer. 

At Microcom, the hottest 
item was Super Tape I Disk 
Transfer. In addition, Micro- 
com sold 10 of the Intronics 
EPROM programmers. 

Said Manohar Santwani, 
owner of Microcom, "What we 
have seen indicates that people 
really want to get into the pro- 
gramming end of the machine. 

Sharing a booth with Micro- 
com was Spectrum Projects. 
According to Bob Rosen, "The 
CoCo 3 has really hit well. WeVe 
sold more products for it than 
anything else at this show." 

The hot item at the Sugar 
Software booth was the Calli- 
grapher combo, a package that 
included CoCo Calligrapher 
and 54 fonts for $69.95. 

Another big seller was Galac- 
tic Hangman, a graphics version 
of the popular word game. 

Bob Hengstebeck was mar- 
keting a new program sure to be 
of interest to serious OS-9 users, 
The Hard Disk Organizer — a 
compiled C program designed to 
allow users to develop menu- 
driven pathlists so that applica- 
tions can easily be accessed from 
the hard drive. The price for The 
Hard Disk Organizer is $24.95. 

Art Flexser, of Spectro Sys- 
tems, was selling ADOS 1 .02 for 
the CoCo 1 and 2, ADOS-3 for 
the CoCo 3 and Peeper, a ma- 
chine language program tracer. 
ADOS really seems to be a hot- 
seller anywhere it goes since it 
allows the user to customize his 
system from a software stand- 
point. 

Steve Bjork, owner of SRB 
Software, was busy demonstrat- 



ing his new product, Warp 
Fighter 3-D. This space simula- 
tion game utilizes features of the 
CoCo 3 along with game en- 
hancements through 3-D tech- 
nology. 



According to Steve, "The 
gameplayers really seem inter- 
ested in this one. I took this 
show as a good opportunity to 
test-market Warp Fighter 3-D. 
So far the results are pleasing. 1 * 




Barry Thompson fields a question at the "Talk to Tandy" seminar. 





Mark Siegel, left, and Dale Puckett. 



A lesson to learn! 




DaVinci3 attracts attention. 




Breakfast speaker Jim Reed, 
left, and Lonnie Falk. 



Goodies Galore 

"Everything seems to be sel- 
ling equally well. The stand-outs 
are the Magnavox monitor and 
the 512K upgrades," said Fran 
Purcell of Computer Plus. 
"These are really hot." 

"As people move into the 
CoCo 3 and begin using OS-9, 
we are seeing an excellent 
market for new hardware and 
software offerings," Fran said. 

While competition in the disk 
drive market was stiff in Prince- 
ton, Howard Medical had little 
difficulty selling their Drive 0 



system for a show special of 
$178.45. 

Of the show, Manager Ross 
Litton said, "We have seen many 
different people here at the 
RAINBOWfest and all of them 
seem to share a common good- 
will." 

Bargains to be found at the 
Micro world booth included the 
DMP-130A for $215 and the 
CM-8 monitor for $239. 

All software went for 20 per- 
cent off the regular price. Also, 
CoCo 3s were available for only 
$115, brand new in the box. You 
could even pick up a pair of 
joysticks for $10. 



Direct from 

Mt. Sivai: 
Saint John 

This was the first RAIN- 
BOWfest exhibit for R. J. Babich 
and family of Mt. Sivai, New 
York. Their company, The St. 
John Gallery Press and Soft- 
ware, offered several utilities, 
including a feature-packed disk 
editor. 

The feature offering was 
Astro Fortune Teller, which 
completely fills a disk, yet, due 
to a modular approach, runs on 
any system having at least 32K. 
Another big seller was The Best 
BBS, which was going for $12. 

T&D 

"Expecting" 
Great Things 

At T & D Subscription Soft- 
ware, a one-year subscription 
was going for $60 for tape and 
$70 for disk. Each of their 64 
issues contains 10 programs and 
was being sold at a show special 
of just $5, 

The story of Tom and Mari- 
anne Dykema, owners of T & D, 
has taken an exciting twist. It 
seems they will be hearing the 
pitter-patter of little feet around 
their home in early May. Best 
wishes and lots of luck to them! 

Public Domain: 
The 
Library's 
Growing 

Public Domain Software 
Copying Company ran a last- 
day special in which the user 
could purchase any 10 disks 
from the 36-disk library for only 
$25. And the complete library 
was going for $75. 

In addition to CoCo software, 
Public Domain also had several 
offerings in their MS-DOS li- 
brary. 

Public Domain's Al Zucker 
said, "By the Chicago show in 
'88 we expect to have a complete 
CoCo 3 library. We think this is 
a big need in the Community 
right now." 



28 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



For over 5 years now, Telewriter has been 
the #1 Color Computer word processor, 
both in popularity and in performance. 
Telewriter's near perfect mix of sophisti- 
cated professional features and a very natu- 
ral user interface, has earned it the highest 
praise in numerous magazines, and an in- 
tensely loyal following among tens of thou- 
sands of Color Computer users all over the 
world. 



HISTORY 



Throughout the history of the Color Com- 
puter, Telewriter has pioneered software 
breakthroughs that set the standards. 

In 1981, it was Telewriter 1.0 that first took 
the Color Computer's inadequate 32X16 all- 
uppercase display, and replaced it with a 
graphics-based 51X24 upper and lowercase 
display. 

A few years later, Telewriter-64 added high 
density 64X24 and 85X24 displays and ac- 
cess to the full 64K of the newer Color 
Computers. 



Tin: NEW AGE 



Today, Telewriter-64 is recognized as the 
standard Color Computer word processor. It 
runs on all Tandy Color Computers — from 
the original Color Computer 1, to the Color 
Computer 2, and 3. 

But the Color Computer 3 brings a whole 
new level of power to low cost computing 
and, so, a new Telewriter is here to put that 
power to work for you. We call it Telewriter- 
128. 



TELEWRITER 128 



You don't mess with a good thing, so 
Telewriter-128 is still Telewriter-64 at heart. 
The commands, and the user interface are 
essentially the same. If you know 
Telewriter-64, then you already know 
Telewriter-128. And, if you don't know 
Telewriter-64, you'll still have an easy time 
learning and using Telewriter-128. 



80 COLUMNS 



But there are major differences as well. First, 
Telewriter-128 uses the Color Computer 3's 
new 80 column screen display. 

This means, simply, that using Telewriter- 
128 on a low cost Color Computer 3 will look 
a lot like using a more expensive word 
processor on a much more expensive IBM 
PC, PS/2, or clone. 



SPJFI) 



Second, Telewriter-128 is lightning fast. 
Telewriter-64 was fast in its own right, but, 
by accessing the Color Computer 3's video 
hardware directly, and by running the 
machine in double speed mode, Telewriter- 
128 is able to provide extremely fast scroll- 
ing and instant paging — functions whose 
speed is crucial to serious word processing, 

In this department, Telewriter-128 doesn't 
simply keep up with IBM-based word proc- 
essors — it generally surpasses them! 



EASE 



Third, Telewriter-128 adds a host of new 
features big and small, that make it even 
easier to use. 

Features like: Quick function key access to 
the editor or the menus — an instant on-line 
help screen summarizing all Telewriter 
commands and special characters — an 
option file where you store your personal set 
of format and screen settings so you only 
have to set them once! 

Then, there's a quick save feature which 
allows you to save all your current work 
without leaving the editor. There's a simple 
way to cursor through the disk directory and 
read in a file by just hitting ENTER. And 
there's more. 



NEW POWER 



Telewriter-64 always had the power to 
handle any kind of serious writing, from 
letters to textbooks. But, here too, 
Telewriter-128 adds major features. 



Like Macros — which let you insert whole 
words or phrases (even sets of control codes 
or format commands) into your text, with a 
single keypress. And every time you power 
up Telewriter-128, the macro definitions are 
automatically loaded*, so they're always 
there. 

Then there's a Print Preview feature that 
shows you, on-screen, the way your printed 
text will look — with margins, headers, 
centering, justification, page numbering, 
and page breaks. This guarantees letter 
perfect documents every time, and makes 
tasks like widow/orphan line elimination, a 
breeze. 



TELEWRITER-64 oh TELEWRITHR-1 28 



We could go on listing features, but the point 
is this: If you own a Color Computer, you al- 
ready have the hardware for the most 
powerful, low cost word processor in town. 
All you need now is to add the heart and 
soul: 

Telewriter-64, for the Color Computer 1 
and 2, costs $59.95 on disk, $49.95 on 
cassette. 

Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 
costs $79.95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

To order by Mastercard or Visa call (619) 
755-1258 anytime, or send check or money 
order plus $2 shipping (Calif ornians add 6% 
sales tax) to: 

COGNITEC 

704 Nob Ave. 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

To upgrade from Telewriter-64 to 
Telewriter-128, return your original disk or 
cassette with $39.95. (Add $10 if you're also 
upgrading from cassette to disk. Deduct $ 10 
with proof of Oct '87 - Feb '88, purchase of 
Teiewriter-64.) 

When I first got Telewriter-64 last year, 
I was in heaven. I couldn't believe the 
program's versatility and ease of use. 

-The RAINBOW, Oct. 1985 



TELEWRITER-64 FEATURES: Compatibility with any printer that works with 
the Color Computer; embedded control codes for underlining, boldface, sub/ 
superscript, variable fonts; format commands for headers, centering, margin and 
spacing changes anywhere in the document; Format menu to set margins, 
spacing, page numbering, BAUD rate, lines per page, justification; Chain 
printing for one shot printing of multi-file documents. Fast, full-screen editor 
with wordwrap, block copy/move/delete, global search and replace, wild card 
search, fast 4-way auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward 
paging, text alignment, tabs, error protection, word and line counter. Insert or 
delete text anywhere on the screen. Simple, easy to remember commands. 
Optional ASCII files for compatibility with spell checkers, terminal programs, 



and BASIC. Load, save, append, partial save files to disk or cassette. Kill, rename 
and list disk files. Cassette verify and auto-retry on error. 
TELEWRITER- 128 - ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Print preview from editor; 
multiple copy print; footers; hanging indents; cursor thru disk directory to load, 
append, rename and kill files; quick file save from editor; keyclick; key repeat; 
true block move; 24, 25, or 28 line screen; 40 or 80 column screen; dual speed 
cursor; on-line help; overstrike mode; word delete; wordwrap at margin; user 
definable macros; nested macros; instant status window for information on 
cursor position, word count, etc.; instant function key access to menus or editor; 
options menu for setting character and screen colors, key repeat and delay rates, 
definable foreign symbols. 



IBM and PS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines Inc. *disk version only 



T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE CONTINUES 




ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 

COVER 1 
RACETRACK 
HANGMAN 
MUSIC ALBUM 
LIFE EXPECTANCY 
WORD TESTS 
KILLER MANSION 
BARTENDER 
CALENDAR 
ROBOT WAR ♦ 

ISSUE #2, AUGUST 1982 

UFO COVER PT, 1 

BIORHYTHM 

BOMBARDMENT 

BLACKJACK 

COST OF LIVING 

FRENZY 

BUSINESS LETTER 
QUICK THINK 
QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 
QUEST FOR LENORE 

ISSUE #3, SEPTEMBER 1982 

UFO COVER PT. 2 
BASKETBALL 
CHUCKLUCK 
SLOT MACHINE 
ALPHABETIZER 
NFL PREDICTIONS 
FLAG CAPTURE 
ROBOT BOMBER 

ISSUE #4, OCTOBER 1982 

UFO RESCUE 

TANK BATTLE 

DRIVEWAY 

SOUNDS 

BALLOON DROP 

MIND BOGGLE 

COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 

CALORIE COUNTER 

JACK-O-LANTERN 

ISSUE #5, NOVEMBER 1982 

CATALOG COVER 
BOWLING 

PROGRAM INVENTORY 

PROMISSORY-LOANS 

CHECKBOOK BALANCER 

TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 

CONVOY 

BAG-IT 

SPECTRA SOUND 
CONVEYOR BELT 

ISSUE #6, DECEMBER 1982 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
RAINDROPS 
STOCK MARKET 
ADVANCED PONG 
DESTROY 
SOUND ANALYZER 
CREATIVITY TEST 
VOICE DATA 
ML TUTORIAL PT 1 
LOONY LANDER 

ISSUE #7, JANUARY 1983 

NEW YEARS COVER 
LIST ENHANCER 
SUPER PRECISION DIV. 
BOMB DIFFUSE 
SPACE STATION 
ML TUTORIAL PT.2 
SHOOTOUT 
FIND UTILITY 
CYRORG INS. 
CYBORG FACES 



ISSUE #8, FEBRUARY 1983 

COVER 8 
DEFEND 

3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 
COCO CONCENTRATION 
AUTO LINE NUMBERING 
ML TUTORIAL PT 3A 
ML TUTORIAL PT.3B 
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 
DUAL BARRIER 
BRICKS 

ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

TIME MACHINE COVER 
TRIG DEMO 
PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 
PROGRAM PACKER 
BUDGET 

ELECTRONIC DATEBOOK 
ML TUTORIAL PT 4 
TAPE DIRECTORY 
BLOCK-STIR 

COCO ADDING MACHINE 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 

TENTH COVER 
PYRAMID OF DANGER 
TYPING TUTOR 
ML TUTORIAL PT 5 
TfNYCALC 

STOCK MARKET COMP 
YAH-HOO 
MISSILE ATTACK 
SCREEN PRINT 
BRIKPONG 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 

ELEVENTH COVER 
ARCHERY 
FROG JUMP 
ML TUTORIAL PT 6 
MLT DICTIONARY 
BASIC SPEED UP TOT 
METRIC CONVERTOR 
GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 
GRAPHICS PROGRAM 
CATERPILLAR CAVE 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 

TWELFTH COVER 
SHOOTING GALLERY 
BOMB STOPPER 
VALLEY BOMBER 
STARFIGHTER 
WHEEL OF FORTUNE 
ML TUTORIAL PT 7 
MERGE UTILITY 
RAM TEST 
LANDER 

ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 

THIRTEENTH COVER 
FLASH CARD 
ICE BLOCK 
COSMIC FORTRESS 
MAIL LIST 
DOLURS & CENTS 
ML TUTORIAL PT 8 
SDSK COPY 
MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 
CRAWLER 

ISSUE #14, AUGUST 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
ROW BOAT 

COMPUTER TUTLPT 1 
INDEX DATABASE 
DISK ZAPPER 
COCO-MONITOR 
COCO- ARTIST 
ROBOT COMMAND 
TEST SCREEN PRINT 
HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 



ISSUE #15, SEPTEMBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER PT 2 
GOLD VALUES 
TREK INSTRUCTIONS 
TREK 

HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 
ASTRO DODGE 
DR. COCO 
PEG JUMP 
MORSE CODE 
PURGE UTILITY 

ISSUE #16, OCTOBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
BOPOTRON 
DIRECTORY RECALL 
VECTOR GRAPHICS INST 
VECTOR GRAPHICS 
SKYDIVER 

SWERVE AND DODGE 
NIMBO BATTLE 
TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 
LIFE GENERATIONS 

ISSUE #17, NOVEMBER 1983 

THANKSGIVING COVER 

3-DTICTAC-TOE 

INDY500 

COLLEGE ADVENTURE 
MEMORY GAME 
DUNGEON MASTER 
WEATHER FORECASTER 
GRID FACTOR INST 
GRID FACTOR 
DRAW 

ISSUE #18, DECEMBER 1983 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
CLIMBER 

GALACTIC CONQUEST 
WARLORDS 
STATES REVIEW 
MATH TUTOR 

MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 
PRINTER UTILITY INST 
PRINTER UTILITY 
MUTANT WAFFLES 

ISSUE #19, JANUARY 1984 

BANNER 
PROBE 

DISK DIRECTORY PROTECTOR 
OPTICAL CONFUSION 
WORD PROCESSOR 
WORD SEARCH 
ASTRONAUT RESCUE 
STAR TRAP 
PIE CHART 
FORCE FIELD 

ISSUE #20, FEBRUARY 1984 

INTRODUCTION: 
HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 
ESCAPE ADVENTURE 
SEEKERS 
MASTER BRAIN 
LIST CONTROLLER 
DISKETTE CERTIFIER 
ROM COPY 
BASIC RAM 
SNAFUS 

ISSUE #21, MARCH 1984 

BASIC CONVERSIONS 
FINANCIAL ADVISE 
CASTLE STORM 
DOS HEAD CLEANER 
COCO TERMINAL 
SNAKE CRAWLER 
WAR CASTLE 
SKY FIRE 
EASY BASIC 
DOTS 3-D 



ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 

HEALTH HINTS 
GLIBLIBS 

CLOTHER SLITHER 
BIBLE 1 & 2 
BIBLE 3 & 4 
CATCHALL 
INVADER 
ALIEN RAID 
MOON ROVER 
10 ERROR IGNORER 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 
STOCKS OR BOMBS 
WALL AROUND 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT 1 
NUCLEAR WAR INST 
THERMONUCLEAR WAR 
CIRCUIT DRAWER 
MOUSE RACES 
SUPER-SQUEEZE 
DATA FALL 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 

DIR PACK & SORT 
BRICK OUT 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT.2 

USA SLIDE PUZZLE 

51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 

51 '24 SCREEN 

CITY INVADERS 

PRINTER SPOOLER 

STEPS 

SNAKE 

ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT 3 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEY MAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDSTOR INST 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLE BUSTER 
RECOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUGUST 1984 

PEEK, POLE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 
OTEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
COCO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

ISSUE #27, SEPTEMBER 198 

COCO TO COM 64 

GALACTIC SMUGGLER 

INDYRACE 

ACCOUNT MANAGER 

CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 

STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 

SPACE DUEL 

BUGS 

TRAP-BALL 

BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCTOBER 1984 

HANGING TREE 
CHECKERS 
FOOTBALL + 
MORE PEEKS, POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RAT ATTACK 



ISSUE #29, NOVEMBER 1984 

DISK ROLL OUT 
ROBOT ON 
MULTIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
QUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 

ISSUE #30, DECEMBER 1984 

MATH HELP 

ZECTOR ADVENTURE 

WORLD CONQUEST 

DRAG RACE 

MINE FIELD 

T-NOTES TUTORIAL 

T & D PROGRAM INDEXER 

SYSTEM STATUS 

ERROR TRAP 

DROLL ATTACK 

ISSUE #31, JANUARY 1985 

TREASURES OF BARSOOM 

BATTLE GROUND 

STRUCTURED COMPILED LANGUAC 

LIBRARY MODULE 

MINIATURE GOLF 

STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEBRUARY 1985 

DR. SIGMUND 
ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 
LOTTERY ANALYST 
BASIC COMPILER 
MUSIC CREATOR 
MEANIE PATROL 
TRI-COLOR CARDS 
SHAPE RECOGNITION 
DISK BACKUP 
SPACE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MARCH 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 
PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
ML DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 
DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEED KEY 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

HOVER TANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSIC GENERATOR 
FYR-DRACA- 
DRIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 

SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 

SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
HAUNTED HOUSE 



VISA 




SUPER SAVINGS 

Single Issue $8.00 

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6-10 Issues $5.00 ea. 

11 or more Issues . $4.50 ea. 
All 67 Issues $185.00 

Purchase 20 or more issues and 
receive a free 6 month subscriDtion 



Every Issue Contains 
10 or More Programs 
Many Machine Language 
Programs 

Available for COCO I, II and 
All Programs Include 
Documentation 



We send 
1 st Class 
No Charge 

Personal 

Checks 

Welcome! 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



BACK ISSUE SALE OF OVER 670 PROGRAMS! 



ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 

SELECT A GAME 2 
VIDEO COMPUTIZER 
SPEECH SYNTHESIS 
SPEECH RECOGNITION 
SPACE LAB 
AUTO COMMAND 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 
KNIGHT AND THE LABYRINTH 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING^uW 

ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 

CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE 5-7 

SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 
FILE TRANSFER 
FOUR IN A ROW 
MARSHY, . 
TAPE CONTROLLER 
CATACOMB 
AUTO TALK • 
SGR8PAK;. 

ISSUE #38, AUGUST 1985 

GOLF PAR 3 \ 
WIZARD ADVENTURE :M 
KITE DESIGN 
ROBOTS 
GOMOKU:; 
AMULET OF POWER - 
LINE COPY UTILITY 
DISK PLUMBER 
SUPER RAM CHECKER 
GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPTEMBER 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
CAR MANAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHINE Y; 
ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 
SUPER VADERS 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR ,; 

ISSUE #40, OCTOBER 1985 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
COCO-WAR 
DISK LA8ELER 
SHIP WAR • : 
ELECTRICCOST 
MULTIKEY BUFFER ;YYY> 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
SAND ROVER .: 

ISSUE #41, NOVEMBER 1985 

GRUMPY- 
DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 
SOLAR CONQUEST- 
GAS COST 

RIME WORLD MISSION 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 1 
GRAPHIC TEST 
GRAPHIC LOOPY 
BOLD PRINT 

ISSUE #42, DECEMBER 1985 

HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAHTZEE 
DISK UtiLflf 
MACH II . 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

-SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
SLOT MACHINE GIVE AWAY 
TEXT BUFFER 
TUNNEL RUN 



ISSUE #43, JANUARY 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 

WATER COST 

ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 

MUSICAL CHORDS 
4- SAFE PASSAGE 

PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
v rGUNFIGHT 
; KEYPAD ENTRY;. . 
: V STYX GAME 

PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEBRUARY 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
. j EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUTS 

COSMIC SWEEPER 

ISSUE #45, MARCH 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT; 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 

MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
■/''■THE FIGHT 
. vCOLO KEENO 

HOCKEY: : 

/LOGICAL PATTERNS 
v ; ;ON SCALE SCREEN 

LIBERTY SHIP 

SINGLE STEP RUN 

ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DISK LOCK 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 
BOMB RUN 
TANKS 
■MPITS 
BASEBALt 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

- ; ROULETTEh-;- 
GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 

v Symbolic diff 

BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
•SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
m TV SCHEDULE:: 
: ^BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTI COPY 
AUTO MATE ; : 
SCROLL PROTECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 

ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 
DISK DISASSEMBLER 
BAKCHEK 
->::;PACHINKO^ 
STOCK CHARTING 
HAUNTED STAIRCASE 
CANYON BOMBERS 
DRAGONS 1 & a 
GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 
AUTO BORDER 



ISSUE #50, AUGUST 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPTEMBER 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET 51 
VAN GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 

ISSUE #52, OCTOBER 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES. 
CALENDAR 
INVASION 

THETRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOTRACE 
FLIPPY THE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS ' 
SUPER ERROR 2; 

ISSUE #53, NOVEMBER 1986 

CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CAVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DECEMBER 1986 

JOB LOG 
PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TYPE 
PANZER TANKS 
MRS PAC 
BIG NUM 

ISSUE #55, JANUARY 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
D!R MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEBRUARY 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRUSH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EDITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 



ISSUE #57, MARCH 1987 

THE BAKERY 
ENCHANTED VALLEY ADV. 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR t 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREADSHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 

ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 
HOME PLANT SELECTION 
CHECK WRITER 
HELIRESCUE 
KABOOM 
NEW PONG 
CROQUET 
FUNCTION KEYS 
ZOOM 

ELECTRONICS 2 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
LABELS 
CATCH A CAKE 
COCO MATCH 
ROBOTS 

STREET RACERS 
BOWLING 3 
ELECTRONICS 3 
GRAFIX 
KRON 

ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 

EZ ORDER 

SUBMISSION WRITER 
KEYS ADVENTURE 
WALLPAPER 
CHOPPER COMMAND 
UNDERSTANDING OPPOSITES 
BIT CODE PLOTTING 
ELECTRONICS IV 
KING PEDE 
RAIDER 

ISSUE #62, AUGUST 1987 

PENSION MANAGEMENT 
HERB GROWING 
CATALOGER UTILITY 
RAIDERS 
ALPHABETIZING 
W.FO. . 
ELECTRONICS V 
RAMBO ADVENTURE 
BLOCKS 

MULTI SCREEN CAVES 

ISSUE #63, SEPTEMBER 1987 

GENEOLOGIST HELPER 
SMART COPY 

MAINTENANCE REPORTING 
COCO 3-COCO 2 HELPER 
DIRECTORY PICTURE 
SUBSTTACK 
SAVE THE MAIDEN 
CAVIATOR 
ELECTRONICS VI 
MONKEY SHINE 



ISSUE #64, OCTOBER 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE IN THE GRASS 
CYCLE JUMP 
GEOMETRY TUTOR 
WIZARD 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS VII 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 

ISSUE #65, NOVEMBER 1987 

TAXMAN 

DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 
SIR EGGBERT 
CROWN QUEST 
GYM KHANA 
COCO 3 DRAWER 
FOOTBALL 
ELECTRONICS 8 
CHOP 

ISSUE #66, DECEMBER 1987 

ONE ROOM ADVENTURE 
OS9 TUTORIAL 
RIVER CAPTAIN 
SOUND EFFECTS 
BETTING POOL 
ADVANCE 
MATH TABLES 
ELECTRONICS 9 
LOWER TO UPPER 
NOIDS 

ISSUE #67, JANUARY 1988 

AUDIO LIBRARY 
SAVE THE EARTH 
WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
LOW RES PICTURES 
WORD COUNTER 
BACARAT 
BATTLE SHIP 
ELECTRONICS 10 
TAPE CONVENIENCE 
PENQUIN 



receiue<f my first 
order ana* U am aery 
pleased! Cnclosed is a 
c/jecA for aff/Ae remain" 
iny 6ac£ issues plus a 
/-ye&r su&s&ripifahiP 

Vary T&zocfes 
7oniana* CjTJ 



"7ls i£e pompui 
instructor for oar 
scAoo/f f? Aaue Seen a 
su6scri6er to U4?p 
softwaref()j*JwQ.y^a^s. j7 
foue ypar programs* "S2fe 
yuaittff-is excjejlepj-Mt 

7? c Jo6/in 



'si an 



MAIL TO: 



T & D Subscription Software 

2490 Miles Standish Drive 
w a Holland, Michigan 49424 

(616) 399-9648 




Name 



Address 



City 



I 

| Credit Card # 
I 



State 



ZIP 



Expires 



TOTAL AMOUNT $ 



CIRCLE ISSUES DESIRED 

1 9 17 25 33 41 49 57 65 

2 10 18 26 34 42 50 56 66 

3 11 19 27 35 43 51 59 67 

4 12 20 28 36 44 52 60 

5 13 21 29 37 45 53 61 

6 14 22 30 38 46 54 62 

7 15 23 31 39 47 55 63 

8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 

PLEASE CIRCLE 
TAPE or DISK 



F e atur e 



16K ECB 



A utility to help you decide whether 
or not to market your product 



Advertising Profit Predictor 



By Bill Bernico 



Most of you RAINBOW readers 
have probably written at least 
one really good program 
you've considered marketing commer- 
cially. Being a first-timer, you're prob- 
ably a little leery about shelling out the 
advertising dollars necessary to get the 
project off the ground. You're not quite 
sure what your chances are for success. 

If some of your questions could be 
answered, would you take a chance? 
Advertising Profit Predictor helps 
answer some of those questions and 
puts things in their proper perspective. 

Run the program and we'll go 
through it together. First, you're asked 
for the number of people who subscribe 
to the publication you're considering 
(total paid circulation). This is impor- 
tant because it gives you an idea of how 
many potential buyers are out there for 
you. You can find circulation figures 
somewhere in the front of most maga- 
zines. If you don't see the figure there, 
write the company and ask. 

Next, input the selling price of the 
product you're marketing. After that, 
enter your cost per unit. In other words, 
take into consideration things like 
blank disks or tapes, envelopes, stamps, 
etc. This is your cost per unit. After 
you've entered this amount, enter the 
cost of the magazine ad. To simplify this 
example, enter the cost of a one-time ad. 
When you've entered this amount, the 
display will show your profit per unit. 



Bill Bernico is the author of over 200 
Color Computer programs and is a 
frequent RAINBOW contributor whose 
hobbies include golf writing music and 
programming. Bill is a drummer in a 
rock band and lives in Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin. 



All right, so now you know how 
much you could make on each transac- 
tion. What does this translate to in 
terms of a mass audience? To find out, 
press any key and you'll be taken to the 
statistics section. 

From here you can break things down 
three different ways. Let's try each way 
and see what happens. I'll give you some 
sample figures to work with; when you 
get familiar with the program's opera- 
tion, simply substitute your own actual 
figures. 

For circulation, let's use 75,000 as a 
round figure. For a selling price, try 
$9.95. Let's assume your cost per unit 
is $4.00. For an ad price, enter $235.00. 
Your profit per unit should be $5.95 less 
the price of the ad. OK, now we're at 
the statistics section. 

First, let's try Option 2. Enter an 
amount that you see as your goal. In 
other words, when all is said and done, 
how much money do you want to make 
on this venture? For this sample, input 
$5000.00 to see the outcome. The dis- 
play will show that in order to make 
$5,000, you'll need to sell 840 units. This 
also means that you have to capture 
only 1.1 percent of the magazine's 
readers. After deducting the cost of the 
ad, you will net a profit of $4,765. Not 
bad! 

Now that you know it takes only a 
small percentage of readers to respond, 
let's try Option 1. It asks you what 
percentage of the readers you think you 
can sell to. Try 3 percent as an example. 
You'll notice that selling to only 3 
percent of those 75,000 readers results 
in a sale of 2,250 units with a profit of 
$1 3,387.50 less the $235 for the ad. Still, 
you're left with a whopping $13,152.50 
for your efforts. Now we're talking big 
business. 



Finally, let's try Option 3. Suppose 
you jumped ahead of yourself and 
anticipated selling a certain number of 
units. Suppose you have already bought 
1,000 blank disks, 1,000 envelopes and 
1,000 stamps. What will it take to move 
all those units out? That's the question 
Option 3 will answer. Input 1000 at the 
prompt. The program then tells you 
that if you do, indeed, sell your 1,000 
units, you have sold to 1 .3 percent of the 
readership. You will also have made 
$5,950 dollars in the attempt (less the 
$235 for the ad). Your net profit is 
$5,715. Still want to debate whether or 
not to spend money to advertise your 
product? 

With this program, you can also do 
a lot of "what if" predictions, For 
example, (/"the price and cost figures 
stay the same but the circulation goes 
up, so does your chance for success. If 
you can lower your cost but the selling 
price stays the same, your profit goes 
up. yon try for that extra percentage 
of readers, what will that mean to you 
in additional profits? See what I mean? 
Advertising Profit Predictor can answer 
lots of marketing questions. 

Don't let your fear of initial costs 
keep you from marketing what you 
consider to be a top-notch program. 
The readers are waiting for your pro- 
gram. Simply have faith in yourself, 
offer a good product at a fair price and 
deliver what you promise. The rest is 
easy. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 708 Michigan Ave., Sheboygan, WI 
53081. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a reply.) □ 

I I 



32 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



The listing: ADPROFIT 

1 'ADVERTISING PROFIT PREDICTOR 

2 'by Bill Bernico 

3 B$=STRING$(32,140) 

4 BB$=STRING$(32,131) 

5 CLS : INPUT "HOW MANY SUBSCRIBERS 
DOES THIS PUBLICATION HAVE";S 

6 PRINTB$; :LINEINPUT"WHAT IS THE 
SELLING PRICE OF YOUR PRODUC 

T $";SF$ 

7 SF=VAL(SF$) 

8 PRINT B$; : LINE INPUT "HOW MUCH D 
OES EACH UNIT COST YOUTO PRODUCE 

$" } CP$ 

9 CP=VAL(CP$) 

10 PRINT B$;:LINE INPUT"WHAT IS 
THE PRICE OF AN AD IN THIS PUB 
LICATION $";AD$ 

11 AD=VAL (AD$) 

12 PRINT B$; : PRINT" YOUR PROFIT P 
ER UNIT IS $";SF-CP 

13 PRINT" (LESS THE PRICE OF THE 
AD) " 

14 PRINT B$; 

15 PRINT@483 , "HIT ANY KEY FOR ST 
ATISTICS" ; 

16 FOR X=1504 TO 1535 

17 POKE X, PEEK (X) -64: NEXT X 

18 IF INKEY$=" "THEN 18 

19 CLS :PRINT@7, "AVAILABLE OPTION 
S 

2)3 FOR X=1024 TO 1055 

21 POKE X,PEEK(X) -64:NEXT X 

22 PRINT BB$ ; : PRINT" 1 . ESTIMATE 
THE PERCENTAGE OF BUYERS 

YOU THINK YOU CAN SELL 

YOUR PRODUCT TO 

23 PRINT B$;:PRINT"2. ESTIMATE P 
OTENTIAL NET PROFIT YOU 

CAN MAKE IF YOU ADVERT 

ISE YOUR PRODUCT. 

24 PRINT B$; :PRINT"3. ESTIMATE N 
UMBER OF POTENTIAL 
BUYERS FOR YOUR PRODU 
CT. 

25 PRINT B$; :PRINT@490, "SELECT ( 
1-3 ) " } 

26 FOR X=15J34 TO 1535 

27 POKE X, PEEK (X) -64: NEXT X 

28 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=" "THEN 28 

29 A=VAL(A$) :ON A GOTO 31,4)3,55 

30 GOTO 28 

31 A=SF-CP:CLS:PRINT"WHAT PER CE 
NTAGE OF THE " S 



32 INPUT "READERS DO YOU THINK YO 
U CAN SELL"; PS 

33 PB=(S*PS)/100 

34 PRINT B$;: PRINT" IN ORDER TO C 
APTURE"PS;"%" 

35 PRINT "OF THE MARKET, YOU'LL H 
AVE TO SELL" ; INT (PB) ; "UNITS. Y 
OUR PROFIT 

36 PRINT"WILL BE $";PB*A 

37 PRINT "MINUS $ "AD" FOR THE AD 

38 PRINT "NETTING YOU $"(PB*A)-AD 

39 PRINT BB$;:GOTO 67 

40 PR$="###.#":CLS 

41 LINE INPUT "WHAT PROFIT FIGURE 
ARE YOU AIMING FOR $";PF$ 

42 PF=VAL(PF$) 

43 A=SF-CP 

44 TP=INT(PF/A) 

45 PR=(TP/S) *100 

46 PRINT B$;:PRINT"IN ORDER TO M 
AKE $";PF 

47 PRINT" YOU'LL NEED TO SELL"TP" 
UNITS 

48 PRINT"OR"; 

49 PRINT USING PR$;PR; 

50 PRINT"% OF THE READERS. 

51 PRINT "DEDUCT $"AD"FOR THE AD 

52 PRINT "AND YOU STILL NET $"PF- 
AD 

53 PRINT BB$; 

54 GOTO 67 

55 PR$="###.#":A=SF-CP:CLS 

56 INPUT"HOW MANY UNITS DO YOU T 
HINK YOU CAN REALISTICALLY SELL" 
;NB 

57 PRINT B$; 

58 PRINT" IF YOU'RE ABLE TO SELL" 
NB 

59 PRINT"UNITS, YOU WILL HAVE SO 
LD TO 

60 PRINT USING PR$ ; (NB/S) *100 ; 

61 PRINT"% OF THE READERS. 

62 PRINT "YOUR PROFIT ON THIS TRA 
NSACTION 

63 PRINT"WILL BE $"NB*A 

64 PRINT"MINUS $"AD"FOR THE AD 

65 PRINT "NET PROFIT IS $"(NB*A)- 
AD 

66 PRINT BB$; 

67 PRINT@481,"nEW FIGURES SAME 
FIGURES eND" ; 

68 F$=INKEY$:IF F$=" "THEN 68 

69 IF F$="N"THEN 5 

70 IF F$="S"THEN 19 

71 IF F$="E"THEN CLS: END 

72 GOTO 68 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 33 




IT"* * - ,L N 




CHICAGO 



MAY 20-22 



AINBOWfest is the only computer show dedicated 
exclusively to yourTandy Color Computer 
Nowhere else will you see as many CoCo-related 
products or be able to attend free seminars conducted 
by the top Color Computer experts. It's like receiving the 
latest issue of the rainbow in your mailbox! 

R AINBOWfest is a great opportunity for commercial 
programmers to show off new and innovative products 
for the first time. Chicago is the show to get information 
on capabilities for the new C0C0 3, along with a terrific 
selection of the latest C0C0 3 software. In exhibit after 
exhibit, there will be demonstrations, opportunities to 
experiment with software and hardware, and special 
RAINBOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace between visiting exhibits and 
attending the valuable, free seminars on all aspects of 
your C0C0 — from improving basic skills to working with 
the sophisticated OS-9 operating system. 

Many people who write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are written about — are there 
to meet you and answer questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people who share your interest 
in the Color Computer. It's a, person-to-person 
event and a tremendous learning experience in 
a fun and relaxed atmosphere. 

A special feature of RAINBOWfest is the 
Educational Sandbox, which features 
child-oriented workshops to give hands- 
on experience to an age group often 
neglected. There are sessions for the 
kindergarten through third-grad- 
ers, and for fourth- through sev- 



enth-graders. And, as an additional treat for C0C0 Kids of 
all ages, we've invited frisky feline C0C0 Cat to join us for 
the show. RAINBOWfest has something for everyone in the 
familyl 

If you missed the fun at our last RAINBOWfest in Prince- 
ton, why don't you make plans now to join us in 
Chicago? For members of the family who don't share 
your affinity for C0C0, there are many other attrac- 
tions in the Chicago area. 

The Hyatt Regency Woodfield offers special rates for 
RAINBOWfest. The show opens Friday evening with a 
session from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's a daytime show 
Saturday — the C0C0 Community Breakfast (separate 
tickets required) is at 8 a.m., then the exhibit hall opens 
promptly at 10 a.m. and runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, 
the exhibit hall opens at 11 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained directly 
from the rainbow. We'll also send you a reserva- 
tion form so you can get a special room rate. 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH 
treatment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at 
(502) 893-331 1 . All POSH services are available at no 
charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 





THHtf 




Mia 3ejj *V 



to 



P 



COCO GALLERY LIVE 
SHOWCASE YOUR BEST AT RAINBOWFEST 

We are taking the popular "CoCo Gallery" on the road to RAINBOWfest Chicago 
— and we'd like you to submit your own graphics creations to be exhibited at the 
show! 




• You can enter color or black-and-white photographs or printouts of your original artwork 
produced on the CoCo 1, 2 or 3. Entries should be framed, mounted or matted, and may 
not be smaller than 5-by-7 inches or larger than 11-by-14 inches. 

• Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized 
images from TV programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized 
copy of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

• Along with your entry, send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, 
detailing how you created your picture (what programs you used, etc.). Please include a 
few facts about yourself, too! 

• Your name, address and phone number, along with the title of your work, must be clearly 
marked on the back of each entry, and a disk copy of each piece must also be included. 

• Entries may be mailed to the rainbow before May 1 , 1 988, or brought to the RAINBOWfest 
registration booth by 10 a.m., Saturday, May 21. 

• Your work will be returned if sent with a postage paid return envelope, or entries can be 
picked up at the close of the show — Sunday, May 22 at 4 p.m. 

There will be two categories: one for graphics produced on the CoCo 1 and 2, and 
one for CoCo 3 graphics. Several awards will be made in each category. Winners 
will be determined by votes from RAINBOWfest attendees. In case of any ties, 
winners will be determined by our chief judge, CoCo Cat. 

Prizes and ribbons will be presented Sunday, May 22, and winning entries will be 
published in the September '88 issue of the rainbow. Send your entry to "CoCo 
Gallery Live,' 1 the rainbow, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, Prospect, KY 40059. 



YES, I'm coming to Chicago! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special advance 
sale price. Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 



Please send me: 



Three-day tickets at $9 each total 

One-day tickets at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 



Saturday CoCo Breakfast 
at $12 each 



total 



RAINBOWfest T-shirts 
at $6 each total 
(Advance sale-priced T-shirts 
must be picked up at the door) 

Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 



(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 
□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the 
Hyatt Regency Woodfield ($64, single or double 
room). 



Name . 

(please print) 

Address ™ 



City 



State 



Telephone 
Company . 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 



Exp. Date 

Signature 



Advance ticket deadline: May 13, 1988. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at 
the door. Tickets will also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. 
Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky 
call (800) 847-0309. 



A bookkeeping system for newspaper carriers 




36 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Delivering 

the Goods 

By Dale James Leistico 

esponsibilities of having a paper 
route include collecting and sub- 
mitting customer checks in addi- 
tion to delivering the paper to custo- 
mers' doorsteps before their morning 
coffee. My son has a paper route, and 
my daughter is soon going to follow in 
his footsteps. In fact, she has had 
substitute carrier jobs that required her 
to do collecting and bill paying. 

To help with all this bookkeeping, I 
looked for a program that would do the 
job of listing out checks and figuring 
balances. I couldn't find what I wanted, 
but I remembered a program called 
Refund- A- File by Donald A. Turowski 
in the April 1986 RAINBOW. This pro- 
gram seemed like a good jumping-off 
point for the program I had in mind, 
what would become Paper Route. 



Dale Leistico lives in Lompoc, Califor- 
nia, and works in the aerospace indus- 
try. He uses his Co Co for help with 
home finances and word processing. 




After examining Refund- A- File, I 
modified it to suit my purposes. I 
changed its sort routine to a partition 
sort. I deleted the "Replace Item" 
routine because I felt the "Add-Delete" 
routine would adequately take its place. 
Also, I changed the search routine to 
make it more versatile and incorporated 
a file check routine. 

I included the ability to save the data 
to either tape or disk, with the data 
defaulting to the tape. This way users 
won't have to change anything when 
they upgrade to disk. 

The program has the ability to check 
printer status and inform the user if the 
printer is not ready. And I added the 
feature of calling the directory from 
within the program. 

Line 830 sets $99.99 as the upper limit 
of each customer check. The total 
amount of checks and bills is limited to 
$9,999.99 by lines 910 through 1010. 

Paper Route's operation needs little 
explanation as the program is menu- 
driven and prompts for information. 

I believe Paper Route provides an 
excellent example of how a program 



CARRIER ROUTE. . . 123 


CARRIER NAME. .. . SARAH MILLS 


1 Allen Briggs 


11.20 


2 Beth Herbert 


15.75 


3 James Aubrey 


11.20 


4 John Doe 


15.75 


5 Mary Wilson 


11.20 


6 Robert Jones 


11 . 20 


CUST CHK TOT $ 


76.30 


COUPON $ 


0.00 


CASH $ 


0.00 


. . . SARAH MILLS $ 


0.00 


TOTAL $ 


76.30 



can be customized to do another job. 
For example, with just a few more 
changes, my program would be useful 
to people who must submit a series of 
checks to pay their bills. 



(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 313 Somerset Place, Lompoc, CA 
93436. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a reply.) □ 




250 92 1430 

440 76 1600 

640 17 1770 

820 91 1970 

1050 13 END 

1220 178 



.50 
206 
119 
.69 
.23 



The listing: PAPERS 
10 GOTO 219J3 

20 'MODIFIED FROM REFUND 

30 'APRIL 1986 RAINBOW, PAGE 95 

40 'BY DALE LEISTICO 

50 '313 SOMERSET PLACE 

60 'LOMPOC, CALIF, 93436 

70 CLEAR 3000:DIMS$(300) ,EX(300) 

80 CLS(RND(8) ) :PRINT@32*6+10,"PA 

PER ROUTE" 

90 FOR Q=1TO1000:NEXT Q:CLS 
100 GOSUB 172j3 
11J3 CLS 

120 PRINT: PRINT' 1 ******select 

choice******" : PRINT 

130 PRINT" (1) input checks to li 



st" 

14J3 PRINT" 
ist" 

150 PRINT" 

list" 
160 PRINT" 
170 PRINT" 
180 PRINT" 
190 PRINT" 



( 2 ) add to the check 1 

( 3 ) delete checks from 

(4) print entire list" 

(5) save check list " 

(6) load check list " 

(7) alphabetize list" 



200 PRINT" (8) search check list" 

210 PRINT" (9) directory" 

220 PRINT" (10) end session" 

230 PRINTTAB (8 ); "SELECTION (1-10 

)"; 

2 40 INPUT M 

2 50 IF M<0 OR M>10 THEN 110 

260 ON M GOSUB 290,410,510,700,1 
070,1230, 1380,1620,1760,1560 
270 GOTO 110 

280 ' ROUTINE TO INPUT/ADD ITEMS 
290 IF Y=0 THEN 400 
300 PRINT" do YOU wish TO erase 
THE " 

310 PRINT: PRINT " records IN THE 
computer ?" 

320 LINEINPUT "<Y>ES OR <N>0.."; 
W$ 

330 IF W$="Y" THEN 370 

3 40 IF W$="N" THEN RETURN 
350 CLS: GOTO 300 

360 FOR Q=l TO 1000: NEXT Q : RETU 
RN 

370 CLS:PRINT@32*3+5,"OLD RECORD 
S ERASED" 

380 PRINT@3 2*6+5, "START NEW RECO 
RD" 

3 90 FOR Q=l TO 1000: NEXT Q 
400 Y-l 

410 CLS: PRINT "input/add items ro 
utine" 

420 GOSUB 2170 

430 PRINT: PRINT "CUSTOMER NAME" 
Y; 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 37 



440 LINEINPUT S$(Y) 
450 IF LEN(S$ (Y) )>15 THEN PRINT" 
PLEASE RE-ENTER A SHORTER NAME": 
GOTO 4 40 

460 IF S$(Y)="" THEN RETURN 

470 PRINT 11 CHECK AMOUNT $";: INPUT 

EX(Y) 
480 Y=Y+1 
490 GOTO 430 

500 REM ROUTINE TO DELETE ITEMS 
510 N=0 

520 CLS:PRINT"delete items routi 
ne" 

530 GOSUB 2170 

540 PRINT "NOTE — >delete from hig 
hest": PRINT" item number 

to ": PRINT" lowest item n 

umber ! " 

550 PRINT: INPUT "CUSTOMER NUMBER 

TO DELETE" ;N 
560 IF N>Y-1 THEN 550 
570 IF N=0 THEN RETURN 
580 PRINT N ; : PRI NT " " ; : PRINTS $ ( 
N) ;:PRINTEX(N) 

590 PRINT "DO YOU WISH TO DELETE" 
600 LINE INPUT "<Y>ES OR <N>0.." 

;w$ 

610 IF W$="Y M THEN 620 ELSE 520 
620 PRINT" ITEM DELETED" : GOSUB 
360 

630 FOR X=N TO Y-2 
640 S$(X)=S$(X+1) 
650 EX(X)=EX(X+1) 
660 NEXT X 
670 Y=Y-1 
680 GOTO 510 

690 REM ROUTINE TO PRINT ITEMS 
700 EB=0:EC=0 

710 CLS:PRINT"LIST ITEMS ON SCRE 
EN(S) OR ON PRINTER (P) ": PRINT" 

-ENTER • S • OR » P ' . . " ; : LINE INP 

UT W$ 

720 IF W$="P" THEN D=-2 :T=10 : GOS 

UB 2070: GOTO 750 

730 IF W$="S" THEN D=0:T=0:GOTO 

750 

740 GOTO 710 

750 CLS: PRINT" ENTER COUPON TOTA 
L ": LINEINPUT CO$ 

760 PRINT" ENTER CASH TURN IN ": 
LINEINPUT CA$ 

770 PRINT "ENTER YOUR BILL": LINE 
INPUT EB$ 

780 CO=VAL(CO$) :CA=VAL(CA$) :EB=V 

AL(EB$) 

790 CLS 

800 FOR X=l TO Y-l STEP 13 

810 FOR Z=X TO X+12 

820 IF D=-2 THEN PRINT@32*8," pr 

inting stand by I !' 1 1 1 1 ! III! " : IF 

S$(Z)="" THEN 860 



830 PRINT#D, TAB (T) :PRINT#D, USING 
"###» ;Z; :PRINT#D,TAB(T+5)S$(Z) ; 
840 PRINT #D, TAB (T+20) :PRINT#D,US 
ING "##.##";EX(Z) 
850 EC=EC+EX(Z) 
8 60 NEXT Z 

870 IF D=0 GOSUB 1750 
880 NEXT X 

890 PRINT#D,TAB(T+17) "========" 

900 PRINT #D, TAB (T) "CUST CHK TOT" 

910 PRINT#D, TAB (T+17 ): PRINT #D,U 

SING"$####.##";EC 

920 PRINT#D, TAB (T) "COUPON"; 

930 PRINT#D, TAB (T+17) :PRINT#D,US 

ING»$####.##";CO 

940 PRINT#D, TAB (T) "CASH"; 

950 PRINT#D, TAB (T+17) :PRINT#D,US 

ING"$####.##";CA 

960 ET=EC+CO+CA 

970 IF D=0 THEN NN$="YOUR CHECK" 

980 PRINT#D , TAB (T) NN$ ; 

990 PRINT #D, TAB (T+17) :PRINT#D,US 

ING"$####.##";EB-ET 

1000 PRINT#D, TAB (T+17) "=======" 

1010 PRINT#D, TAB (T) "TOTAL"; 

1020 PRINT #D / TAB ( T+17) :PRINT#D,U 

SING"$####.##";EB 

1030 IF D=0 THEN GOSUB 1750 

1040 RETURN 

1050 REM ROUTINE TO SAVE ITEMS T 
0 DISK OR TAPE 

1060 IF Y=0 THEN PRINT"NO RECORD 
S IN FILE": FOR Q=l TO 1000: NEXT 
Q : RETURN 
1070 GOSUB 1870 

1080 CLS (8) : PRINT© 13 5, "save item 
s on "GG$; 

1090 SOUND 200, 3: SOUND 200,3 
1100 IF CC$="D" THENPRINT §32*8+8 

, "insert data disk": SOUND 200,3: 

1110 GOSUB 1750 

1120 PRINT@161, "FILE NAME TO SAV 
E . . . " 

1130 LINEINPUT FF$ 

1140 IF CC$="T" THEN PRINT"PRESS 

play AND record" : GOSUB 1750 
1150 CLS (0) : PRINT© 2 2 4, "saving" F 

F$ " on "GG$" stand by!";:SOUN 

D 200,3 

1160 PRINT FF$: PRINT HH 

1170 OPEN "0",#HH,FF$ 

1180 FOR X=l TO Y-l 

1190 IF CC$="T" THEN PRINT#-1,S$ 

(X),EX(X) ELSE WRITE#1, S$(X),EX 

(X) 

1200 NEXT X 

1210 CLOSE #HH: SOUND 200,3:RETUR 
N 

1220 REM ROUTINE TO LOAD FROM DI 
SK OR TAPE 



38 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



1230 GOSUB 187J3 

124J3 CLS(4) :PRINT@134,"load data 

from "GG$;: SOUND 2J3J3,3 
125J3 IF FF$="D" THEN PRINT@32*S+ 
8, "insert data disk!"; 

12 6J3 IF FF$= ,f T ,, THEN PRINT @3 2*5 

+8, "press play on recorder"; 

127)3 GOSUB 175J3 

1280 PRINT© 161, "FILE NAME TO LOA 
D. . . " 

129)3 LINE INPUT FF$ 

13J3J3 CLS(j3) :PRINT@22 4 /'loading " 

FF$" from "GG$ "-stand by";: SOUND 

200,3 

1310 OPEN"I",#HH,FF$ 
1320 Y=l 

1330 IF EOF (HH) THEN 1370 
1340 INPUT #HH, S$(Y),EX(Y) 
1350 Y=Y+1 
1360 GOTO 1330 

1370 CLOSE #HH: SOUND 200,3:RETUR 
N 

1380 REM ALPHABETIZE ROUTINE 
139)3 IF Y=0 THEN PRINT"NO record 
s IN file": FOR Q=l TO 1000: NEXT 
Q : RETURN 

1400 CLS(RND(8) ) : PRINT@32*8 , "sta 

nd by alphabetizing list!" 

1410 L=Y 



1420 L=INT(L/2)+2 

1430 FOR 1=1 TO Y-L 

1440 IF S$(I+L)="" THEN 1500 

1450 IF S$(I)<S$(I+L)THEN 1490 

1460 T$=S$(I) :P-EX(I) 

1470 S$(I)=S$(I+L) :EX(I)=EX(I+L) 

1480 S$(I+L)=T$:EX(I+L)=F 

1490 NEXT I 

1500 IF L=l THEN 1540 

1510 IF L>5 THEN 1420 

1520 L=L-l:GOTO 1430 

1530 GOTO 1420 

1540 CLS(3) :PRINT@32*8, "alphabet 
izing completed! !!!!!! !":SOUND 2 
00 , 3 : FORQ=1TO500 : NEXTQ : RETURN 
1550 1 END WARNING 

1560 CLS:FOR B=l TO 8:CLS(RND(8) 
) :SOUND 200,2 :NEXT B 
1570 PRINT@32*3, "before ending t 
his session, " :PRINT"be sure to s 
ave all changes" :PRINT"on your d 
isk or tape f ile! !!": PRINT: PRINT 
"if you are sure you want to": PR 
INT"end the session, then press 
1 E 1 " : PRINT"otherwise, press and 
<enter> anyother" ; 
1580 PRINT" key to return to the 
main menu" 
159J3 INPUT R$ 




•~ o o r~ c »~ »~ f% o i c cr 

%j i_ || i — c Zf — • KJ I v I d Zf 




DRIVE SYSTEM DSDD DRIVES ACCESSED 
UNDER RS DOS) X-J379.95 

£ DRIVE SYSTEM 3K£ DSDD DRIVES IN ONE CASE) 

*3£9.9& 

DRIVE 1 UPGRADE (1 DSDD UPGRADE FOR YOUR 

£6-3129,3131.. OR 3i3£ - J119.9S PLEASE 

SPECIFY CATALOG NUMBER WHEN ORDERING ! ! 

DRIVE O-SSDD FxH DRIVE S-S199.9S 

DRIYE 1-SSDD F^H DRIVE "CUSE W.'EXISTING DRO) 

S1£5.9S 

X- INCLUDES EITHER R.S. OR DISTO CONTROLLER 



□□□□ 3 

51£K UPGRADE-f 109.95 TECH MANUAL-*£9.9S 
RAM DISK £ DIAGNOSTICS -f 19.95 
MONITOR CONNECTOR FOR CM-S-M.95 

OTHER STUFF 

MONITOR INTERFACE -S£9.95 AD0S-S£9.95 
KEYBOARDS-1S4.9& ADAPTERS-f 9.95 
SERIAL TO PARALLEL CONVERTERS -S4-4.95 
NEW — EPSON LX-SOO PRINTER leOCPS DRAFT/ 
3G CPS NLQ.-— TRACTOR INCLUDED ONLY E139.9& 

FULL LINE OF EPSON PRINTERS IN STOCK ! ! ! 



CALL FOR BEST PRICES ■?■?■? 



C er t i ter 



5512 POPLAR MEMPHIS, TN 38119 901-761-4565 

ADD J4.90 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. Y1SA,MC * MONEY ORDERS ACCEPTED. 
ALLOW 3 WEEKS FOR PERSONAL CHECKS, NO CODS. PRICES MAY CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 39 



16J30 IF R$="E" THEN CLS : END 
161J3 RETURN 

162J3 LINE INPUT "NAME TO SEARCH F 

OR. . .»';NN$ 

163/8 CLS (5) 

164J3 FOR 1=1 TO Y-l 

1650 FT=INSTR(1,S$(I) ,NN$) 

1660 IF FT>0 THEN PRINTS$ (I) ; : PR 

INT" "; :PRINTUSING "###.##" ;EX 

(I) 

1670 IF FT>0 THEN GOSUB 1750 
1680 NEXT I 

1690 PRINT "END OF SEARCH" 
1700 GOSUB 1750 
1710 RETURN 

1720 PRINT"THIS PROGRAM WILL KEE 
P A FILE OFYOUR PAPER ROUTE CHEC 
KS.": PRINT "YOU WILL HAVE ROOM FO 
R ABOUT 150-300 ENTRIES (DEPENDIN 
G ON THEIR LENGTH) ! " 
1730 PRINT" THERE WILL ALSO BE 
A PRINTER OPTION FOR YOUR LIS 
T WHEN YOU WANT A HARD COPY. 



it 



1740 PRINT"note: DO NOT USE COM 

MAS WHEN ENTERING ITEMS 

i ii 

• 

1750 PRINTQ3 2*13+5, "PRESS enter 
TO CONTINUE"; : LINE INPUT R$:CLS: 
RETURN 



Corrections 




"Preparing for Uncle Sam "(January 1988, Page 112): 

Due to a production error, Line 160 of Listing 1, 
TAX.BAS, appears incorrectly in the magazine. The 
line should be entered as it appears below. 



160 DATA97,98,99,101, 102,103, 105 
,109,111,113,117,119,120,121,123 
,124,125,126 



For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DATA 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIO 
prompt. 



1760 IF PEEK(49152) = 68 THEN 18 
00 

1770 CLS: PRINT"THIS FEATURE IS 

DISABLED FOR NON DISK SYSTEMS 
ii 

1780 GOSUB 1750 
1790 RETURN 
1800 CLS:DIR 

1810 PRINT @( (32*12) +25) , "press" 

1820 PRINT§( (32*13) +23) , "<ENTER> 
ii 

1830 PRINT@( (32*14)+28) , "to" 
1840 PRINT@( (3 2*15) +22) ,"CONTINU 
E" 

1850 LINEINPUT R$ : CLS : RETURN 
1860 RETURN 

1870 PRINT" SELECT <D>ISK OR <T>A 
PE" 

1880 LINEINPUT CC$ 

1890 IF PEEK(49152)=68 THEN 1910 

1900 CC$="T" 

1910 IF CC$="D" THEN GG$="disk" : 
HH=1: RETURN 

1920 IF CC$="T" THEN 1940 
1930 GOTO 1880 
1940 GG$="tape":HH=-l 
1950 CLS(RND(8) ) 

19 60 PRINT" SETUP TAPE AND RECORD 
ER" 

1970 PRINT"PRESS <play> ON THE R 
ECORDER" 

1980 PRINT" THE MOTOR WILL GO ON 
WHEN" 

1990 PRINT"enter IS PRESSED" 
2000 PRINT"PRESS enter TO TURN 
IT OFF" 

2010 GO SUB 1750 

2020 MOTOR ON: AUDIO ON 

2030 GO SUB 1750 

2040 MOTOR OFF: AUDIO OFF 

2050 RETURN 

2060 'PRINTER SUBROUTINE 

2070 PS=PEEK(65314) :IF (PS)/2=IN 

T((PS)/2) THEN 2120 

2080 CLS:PRINT@71,"SET up the PR 

INTER" 

2090 SOUND 200,3 
2100 GOSUB 1750 
2110 GOTO 2070 

2120 PRINT" ENTER CARRIER NUMBER 

": INPUT MN 
2130 PRINT" ENTER CARRIER NAME " 
: LINEINPUT NN$ 

2140 PRINT#-2, TAB (10) "CARRIER RO 
UTE. . • "MN 

2150 PRINT#-2, TAB (10) "CARRIER NA 
ME . "NN$ 
2160 RETURN 

2170 PRINT §34, "PRESS enter WHEN 

FINISHED" 
2180 RETURN 
2190 PCLEAR1:GOTO70 




40 THE RAINBOW March 1988 




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Mail Orders to: ICR FutureSoft, P.O. Box 1446-OE 

Orange Park, FL 32073 




Rescue miners from the volcanic caverns 




By Phil 
Holsten 




Equipped with a heli-prop pack 
and a dynamite-shooting crash hel 
met, you hover into the volcanic 
caverns where several lost miners await rescue 
You hear a cry behind a wall. Immediately you toss 
some dynamite, which explodes the wall on impact and 
reveals a lost man beyond the rubble. Your fuel gauge reads 
dangerously low. As you desperately attempt to f ind more fuel, 
you hear your engine sputter to a stop and you go spiraling down. 

You are Helicopter Hero. Your mission is to fly through caverns 
rescuing as many men as possible; while trying to save your own life. 
The walls neutralize your hcli-prop packs on contact, and the rescue 
squad provided you with only three packs. 



Running the Program 

Helicopter Hero will run on all CoCos, requiring only 16K Extended 
Color basic and one joystick. Just load and run the program. 




Phil Holsten is a senior at Modesto Christian High School, has 
programmed for the Co Cos for six years, and is enjoying his CoCo 
3, His other interests include mathematics, bicycling and racquethalL 



42 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



After the title page, the program 
asks if you would like to enact a speed- 
up poke (located in Line 120). Then it 
asks for double or triple speed. Next, 
input the level desired (20 is the easiest 
and 2 is the hardest). A "score" screen 
is displayed while the cavern is con- 
structed and includes the number of 
caverns you have been in, the level, the 
heroes left, shields left, men saved, 
men left behind and the percentage of 
men saved (if lower than 100 percent). 

At the bottom of the game screen is 
a yellow fuel bar, which turns red as 
fuel is used up. When the yellow is 
gone, the game is over. If the yellow 
bar is not disappearing, you have more 
fuel than it can indicate. 

Your hero is red and the miners 
(sitting) are green. The walls of the 
cavern are blue — do not touch them! 
On Level 20, there are no walls except 
for the edges of the screen. Level 20 is 
a wide-open area good for beginners 
to practice their flying. Every time a 
screen is cleared of lost men, the level 
goes down by an increment of two. 

The game ends when you run out of 
fuel or heroes. The scoring screen 
shows you the final results and asks if 
you would like another game. By 
answering "no" (pressing N), a slow- 
down poke is executed and the game 
ends (Line 840). 

Controls 

The keyboard is used to move your 
hero throughout the caverns. The 
right and left arrows move you to the 
sides and the space bar moves you up. 
You will go down if no buttons are 
pressed. You may hold a direction 
button down instead of tapping it over 
and over, thanks to the peeks and 
pokes in lines 430 through 450. 

The @ key fires a bomb from your 
helmet. It will blow up when it hits 
anything blue (the walls). All miners 
are reconstructed after every fourth 
shot (just in case there are some wise 
guys out there who decide to blow up 
the walls directly below one of the 
miners to destroy him). If you have no 
intention of going on a bombing spree, 
you may delete the end of Line 370 
after the G05UB statement and delete 
lines 730 through 750. 

The right joystick (preferably self- 



centering with x-axis "free") controls 
the prop pitch of your rotor blades. 
Moving the stick all the way to the left 
gives you no pitch, and, therefore, 
won't allow you to move in any direc- 
tion; however, you may use the arrow 
keys to turn around in place. 




As you move the stick to the right, 
your hero moves faster in all direc- 
tions. Using a high prop pitch is 
dangerous when moving from side to 
side, but it is ideal for going up or 



down quickly. The lower pitches are 
valuable for the tedious movement 
required in rescuing the miners. 

The right joystick also controls your 
shields. By moving it up all the way (be 
sure to center it after you hear the 
tone), your shield is turned on. A blue 
circle surrounds you for less than 10 
seconds, and this shield will "eat" 
away anything it comes in contact 
with. You are given only one shield at 
the start of the game. 

Shields serve no useful purpose 
except that on Level 2 they are a 
precaution against killing yourself 
trying to get through a horizontal wall 
extending clear across the screen 
(there would be no way to blast 
through it with dynamite). The shield's 
only other use is for getting through 
walls quickly when fuel is low. 

Here is a tip for arranging your 
fingers on the keyboard: Use your 
right hand for the buttons. Place your 
index finger on the @ key and your 





Table 1 




Line 


Description 


Line 


Description 


Initialization 


430-460 


Check buttons, PPOINTs 


20-70 


Title page 




around hero, number of 


80-140 


Ask for speed-up poke 




men rescued 




and get level 






150 


Defines variables and 


Subroutines 




strings 


480-530 


Check PPOINTs around 


160 


GOSUBs scoring screen 




hero when falling 


170-230 


Define variables; con- 


540-560 


Which man was rescued? 




struct game screen 


570-620 


Firing bomb right; check 


240 


Draws "Fuel"; check joy- 




for wall, fuel, or miner 




stick for warning mes- 


630-670 


Firing bomb left; check 




sage 




for wall, fuel, or miner 


250-310 


Place miners; place fuel 


680 


Explosion 




tank (if G5=l) 


690-720 


Get more fuel; check for 


320 


Shows game screen 




extra shield; update fuel 








bar 


Main Loop 


730-750 


Redraw miners in case 


330 


Draws hero 




destroyed 


340-350 


Maintain fuel bar; check 


850-860 


Score screen 




amount left 






360 


Erases variables = draw 


Loss of a Hero 




variables 


760-770 


Kill hero; check number 


370 


Checks for throwing dy- 




killed 




namite 


780-810 


Out of gas, falls, and dies 


380-410 


Check for shield switch 


820-840 


Game Over displayed; 




on 




ask for another game 


420 


Gets prop pitch from 








joystk reading 







March 1988 THE RAINBOW 43 



Table 2 



Variable 


Descriotion 


Variable 


Description 


A 


Horizontal screen loca- 


cv 


Caverns been in 




tion 


GS 


Gas tank on-off switch 


B 


Vertical screen location 


LL 


Level number 


p 


Right/left DRAW string 


PP 


Shot count (resets at 4) 




for hero 


TT 


Shield on-off switch 


C, D, Q 


Erase hero 






A, B,P 




String 


Description 


E 


Horizontal position of 


A$, B$ 


Id* 1 1 / 1* J. I 

Miscellaneous (title 




bomb 




page) 


F 


Vertical position of 


IS 


Speed-up poke? double 




bomb 




or triple? 


G, H 


Erase bomb 


J$ 


Play again? 


E, F 




P$(1), 


Draw hero right or left 


I 


Men left behind 


P${2) 




J 


Total men rescued 


R$ 


Draw miner sitting 


K 


ft A 1 ■ 1 

Men rescued on the 


S$ 


Draw fuel can 




screen 






L 


Lost men on the screen 


Array P(x,y) (Miner Description) 


M 


Horizontal position of 


X 


Column number 




fuel tank 


y 


1 P(x,y) - Horizontal po- 


N 


Vertical position of fuel 




sition (P(x,y)) 




tank 


y 


2 P(x,y) = Vertical posi- 


0 


► i 1 § ' 4* 1 J amm* warn, » » > i 

Prop pitch (JOY5Tl<(0)/ 




tion (P(x,y)) 




4) 


y 


0 P(x,y) = 0 if not there 


R 


Heroes left 




(P(x;y» 


S 


Fuel left 




or = i if not rescued 


T 


Shields left 




(P(x,y)) 


V, w.x 


Miscellaneous (FOR- 






Y.Z 


NEXT) 







thumb on the space bar. Your other two 
"big" fingers should fall nicely on the 
right and left arrow keys. Your left hand 
is free to use the joystick. 

Fueling Up 

Several times during the game, you 
will get low on fuel and will need to find 
some more. Fuel is represented by a 
yellow gas can on a blue background. 
To get at it, simply shoot it and your 
reserves will increase by a random 
amount. Sometimes a new shield is 
awarded when you pick up fuel; this is 
signaled by a siren. 



Rescuing Miners 

To rescue a miner, simply float down 
slowly and touch your toe (toe, not heel) 
to him. This is the only point on your 
heli-suit that checks for green contact. 
When all men on the screen are rescued, 
the score screen is shown while another 
cavern is constructed. If you need fuel 
before going on to the next level, get it 
before you rescue the last man! 

How It's Animated 

Helicopter Hero uses a technique of 
animation that is not very popular, but 
is very effective. The old GET and PUT 



"box" method simply will not do here. 
We need something that doesn't have a 
"cushion" around it. 

The DRAW statement works fine when 
we define a string for the hero. Look at 
Line 330. The symbols within the quotes 
(=C; and =D;) are used in the place of 
numbers. You may put a variable in the 
place of any number within a DRAW 
string or a PLAY string, just so long as 
an equal sign precedes and a semicolon 
follows. However, something like 
=V+2; will not work. Instead, let W=V+2 
and then put the variable W in the string. 

The DRAW statements in Line 330 
contain two sets of variables: A, B, P and 
C, D, Q. The first set draws the man and 
the second set erases the man. As the 
program goes through the main loop, A, 
B and P change, but C, D and 0 still retain 
the values they were assigned in Line 
360. This way, the "old" man is erased, 
and an instant later the "new" one is 
drawn. This prevents the flashing effect 
that would occur if it were done the 
other way around. 

Modifications 

Those of you who own a CoCo 3 and 
would like to be warned when fuel is 
getting low, insert PALETTE3, 7 in lines 
130 and 710, and enter this line: 

355 IF 5>1?0 THEN PALETTE 3, 
RND(63) 

If you would like the game to run a 
little faster and don't mind giving up 
your shields, delete the following: Line 
700, the T=l: in Line 150, and lines 380 
through 410. In Line 850, change the 
196 to 228 and delete PRINT0260, 
"SHIELDS LEFT ";T;:. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 908 Peachwood Court, Modesto, CA 
95350. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a reply,) □ 




90 100 

200 181 

340 161 

450 175 



640 244 

720 181 

END 181 



The listing: HELIHERD 

10 •Helicopter Hero (C) 1985 
Phil Holsten 908 Peachwood Ct 
Modesto, CA 95350 

20 DATA66, 10, 102,2,134,2,138,4,1 



66,2,170,2,198,8,230, 
,4,330,2,362,2,394,4 
30 PLAY H V20O1L255T255 
=1T032 : A$=A$+CHR$ (159 
$(143) :NEXT:PRINT@480 
448 , A$ ; : PRINT@491 , 
;jFORX=1T013:READ Y,Z 
: PLAY"P5C M : PRINT@Y+W, 
NEXTW,X 

40 A$(l)="HELICOPTER 
="BY PHIL HOLSTEN" :A$ 
GHT 1985" :W«I76 



6,262,6,296 

":CLS2:FORX 
) :B$=B$+CHR 
,B$; :PRINT@ 
OUR HERO Afl 
;FORW=lTO 2 

CHR$(191) ; : 

HERO»:A$(2) 
(3)="COPYRI 



44 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



5j3 F0RX=*1T03:F0RY=173T0191:PIAY" 
C":PRINT@Z,CHR$(159) ; :PRINT@Y,CH 
R$ ( 19 1) * 

60 IF Y>176THENPRINT@Z,MID$(A$(X 
) ,Y-176,1) ; 

70 Z=Y:NEXTY:PRINT@191,CHR$(159) 
; : FORV=1TO700 : NEXTV : F0RY=17 3T019 
1 : PLAY "A" : PRINT§Z, CHR$ ( 159 ) ; : PRI 
NT@Y,CHR$(191) ;: Z=Y : NEXTY : PRINT© 
191,CHR$(159) ; :FOKV-1TO400: NEXTV 
,X:FORX=31TO1STEP-2:PLAY"P20;1": 
PRINTS 4 8 0 , A$ ; : PLAY"V=X ; 2 " : NEXT 
80 CLS3 

9j3 PRINT@199, "SPEED UP POKE (Y/N 
) :I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN90 
lj30 IF I$O"Y"THEN130 
110 PRINT@293,"DOUBLE OR TRIPLE 

(2/3) " ; : I$=INKEY$ : IF I$=»""THEN1 
10 

120 IF I$="3 H THENPOKE65497,0ELSE 
POKE65495,0 

130 PRINTQ361, ; : INPUT "LEVEL (2-2 
0)";LL:IF LL>20THEN LL=20 
140 IF LL<2THEN LL=2 

150 S=0 : T=l : CV=1 : R=0 : 1=0 : J=0 : PLA 

Y"O1T255V20L255" : P$ (1) ="R2D3NR2U 
8 NR2 D2NR2 L2 D2 L2 U 6NL2 NR2" :P$ (2)=" 
L2D3NL2U8NL2D2NL2R2D2R2U6NL2NR2" 
: R$="R4U6L2D1BD3D1L4NU1L2D1" : S$= 
"D1L2D7R2U7R2D7R2U7R2ND7U3R1E1R1 
El" 

160 GOSUB850 

170 PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS3 : K=0 : A=14 : B=18 

:P=1:C=A:D=B 

180 COLOR2,3:IF LL=20THEN LINE (4 
,4) -(248, 164) ,PSET,BF:GOTO230ELS 
E FORY=4TO160STEP28:FORX=4TO236S 
TEP28 : LINE (X, Y) - (X+20 , Y+20) , PSET 
, BF : NEXTX , Y : FORY=2 5TO160STEP2 8 : F 
ORX=4T02 3 6STEP2 8 : IFRND (LL) =*1THEN 
200 

190 LINE(X,Y) -(X+20,Y+8) ,PSET,BF 
200 NEXTX, Y:FORX=26T02 36 STEP28:F 
ORY=4TO160STEP28 : IFRND (LL) =1THEN 
220 

210 LINE(X, Y)-(X+8, Y+20) , PSET, BF 
220 NEXTY , X 

230 LINE(38, 178) -(246,182) , PSET, 

BF: IF S>0THEN COLOR4 , 3 : LINE (244- 

S,178)-(248,182) ,PSET,BF 

240 DRAW"C2BM4,182U2NR4U2R4BR4D4 

R4 U 4 BR4 NR4D2NR4D2R4BR4NR4U4":IF 

JOYSTK(0) >5THEN PRINT@227 , "move 

joystick to the left"; 

250 L=9:FORX=14T0238STEP28:Z=( (X 

-14)/28)+l:IFRND(3)=lTHEN P(Z,0) 

=0:L=L-1:GOTO290 

260 Y=(RND(6)*28)-4:DRAW"C1BM=X; 
270 IFPPOINT(X,Y+l)=2THENDRAW"C2 



BM=X ; , =Y ; "+R$ : Y=Y+2 : DRAW"C1BM=X > 

,=Y;"+R$:GOTO270 

280 P(Z,1)=X:P(Z,2)=Y:P(Z,0)=1 

290 NEXTX: IFRND (3 )=1THENGS=0: GOT 

0320 

300 GS=l:M=(RND(7)+l) *28+4:N»(RN 
D ( 4 ) +1) *2 8+4 : IFPPOTNT (M+6 , N+2 0 ) - 
1THEN300 

310 COLOR3,3:LINE(M,N) -(M+20,N+2 
0) , PSET, BF : X=M+6:Y=N+8 : DRAW"C2BM 
=X;,=Y;"+S$ 
320 SCREEN1,0 

330 DRAW"C2BM=C; ,=D;"+P$(Q) : DRAW 

"C4BM=A; ,=B;"+P$(P) 

340 S=S+.2:IF S>0THENLINE (248-S , 

178)-(248-S,182) ,PSET 

350 IF S>209THEN780 

360 C=A:D=B:Q=P:PLAY"V8;1" 

370 I F INKE Y $= " § " THENONP GOSUB570 

,630:PP=PP+l:IF PP=4THEN PP»0:GO 

SUB730 

380 IFJOYSTK(1)=0THEN T=T-1:IF T 

<0THEN T=0:GOTO420ELSESOUND150,4 

:TIMER=0 :TT=1 

390 IF TT=0THEN420 

400 IFB>154ORB<140RA<12ORA>2380R 

TT=1ANDTIMER>500THENTT=0 : GOTO420 

410 PLAY"04V25 ; 12 " : CIRCLE (A, B-3 ) 



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Professional-quality, single-page letters every time! Do one letter 
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Probably the most exciting typing tutor available for your CoCo. 
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March 1988 THE RAINBOW 45 



, Ip , 3 : CIRCLE (A, B-3 ) , 10 , 2 : CIRCLE ( 
A,B-2) ,10,2:PLAY"O1V10" 
420 O=INT(JOYSTK(0)/14) 
43J3 IFPEEK(343)=247THENIFPPOINT( 
A-6 , B+3 ) -30RPP0INT (A-6 , B-5) =30RP 
POINT ( A- 2 , B-7 ) =3THENP=2 : GOTO760E 
LSEPOKE343 , 255 : A=A-0*2 : P=2 :GOT04 
50 

4 40 IFPEEK ( 3 4 4 ) -2 4 7 THENIFPPOINT ( 
A+6 , B+3 ) =30RPPOINT (A+6 , B-5) =30RP 
POINT (A+2 , B-7 ) =3THENP=1 : GOTO760E 
LSEPOKE3 44,255: A=A+0*2 : P=l : GOT04 
50 

450 IFPEEK(345)=247THENIFPPOINT( 
A-4 , B-8 ) =30RPPOINT ( A+4 , B-8 ) =3 THE 
N7 60ELSEPOKE3 4 5,255: B=B-0 : GOT047 

0 

460 ONP GOSUB480,510:B=B+O:IF K= 
L THEN CV=CV+1 : LL=LL-2 : IF LL<2TH 
EN LL=2:GOTO160:ELSE160 
470 GOTO330 

480 IFPPOINT (A+4, B+4 )=30RPPOINT( 
A-2 , B+l) =30RPPOINT (A-4 , B- 6) =3 THE 
N760 

490 IFPPOINT(A+4,B+4)=1THEN540 
500 RETURN 

510 IFPPOINT (A-4 , B+4 ) =30RPPOINT ( 
A+2 , B+l) =30RPPOINT (A+4 , B-6) =3THE 



N760 

520 IFPPOINT (A-4, B+4 )=1THEN5 40 
530 RETURN 

540 F0RX=1T09:IF P(X,0) =0THEN560 
550 IF ABS(P(X,1)-A)<=14AND ABS ( 
P(X,2)-B)<=14THEN P(X,0)=0: J=J+1 
: K=K+1 : SOUND200 , 1 : DRAW"C2BM=P (X, 

1) ;,=P(X,2) ; M +R$:X=9 

560 NEXTX: RETURN 
570 E=A+4:F=B-4 

580 PSET(G,H,2) :PSET(E,F,4) :G=E: 
H=F 

590 E=E+2: IFPPOINT (E+2 , F) <>2THEN 
600ELSE580 

600 IF PP0INT(E+2,F)O30R E>244T 

HEN PSET(G,H,2) :RETURN 

610 IF GS=1AND E<M+26AND E>M-4AN 

D F>N-1AND F<N+21THEN690 

620 GOTO680 

630 E=A-4:F=B-4 

640 PSET(G,H,2) :PSET(E,F,4) :G=E: 
H=F 

650 E=E-2: IFPPOINT (E-2 , F) <>2THEN 
660ELSE640 

660 IF PP0INT(E-2,F)O30R E<16TH 
ENPSET(G,H,2) : RETURN 
670 IF GS=1AND E>M-4AND E<M+26AN 
D F>N-1AND F<N+21THEN690 



Run V 1 Ion y 

CoCo3! 



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Use your right joystick to draw with the "rubber 
band" approach. When you have positioned a line 
where you want it, press the joystick button to set it. 
The next line rotates around the previous line's 
endpoint. Pressing any key will skip to the current 
joystick location without drawing the line. 

The listing: 

fS PMODE1 , 3 : PCLS : PMODE1 , 1 : S GREEN 1 
: H-12 8 : V=9 6 : FORJ=j3TO 1STEPJ3 s X=JOY 
STK(j3) *4 :Y=JOYSTK(l) *3 : LINE (H, V) 
- (X, Y) , PSET : A$s=INKEY$ : IFA$> " "THE 
NPCOPY3T01 ; PCOPY4T02 : H=X : V=Y : NEX 
TELSEIF (PEEK { 6528J3) AND1) THENPCOP 
Y3T01 :PCOPY4T02 : NEXTELSEPCOPY1TO 
3 1PCOPY2TCJ4 : H=X : V=Y : NEXT 



Gary Haussman 
Loveland, CO 



(For this winning Gr%liri$r contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Thitd Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 



46 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1988 



680 F0RX=1T011STEP2 : CIRCLE (E , F) , 
X , 4 : PLAY" V2 5 ; =X ; " : NEXTX : F0RX=1T0 
11STEP2: CIRCLE (E,F) ,X,2:NEXTX:F0 
RX=0 TO 2 S TE P2 : LINE ( X , X/ 2 ) - ( 2 5 j3+X , 
167+X/2) , PRESET, B: NEXT : RETURN 
690 PSET(G,H,2) :GS=0:X=M+10:Y=N+ 
10 : C0L0R4 , 3 : PLAY"V15" : FORZ=0TO10 
STEP2 : LINE (X-Z , Y-Z ) - (X+Z , Y+Z ) , PS 
ET , B : PLAY" V-EEFFFFGGGG" : NEXT : COL 
OR2 , 3 : FORZ=0TO10STEP1 : LINE (X-Z , Y 
-Z)- (X+Z, Y+Z) ,PSET,B:NEXT 
700 IF RND(5)=3THEN T=T+1 : FORX=l 
T05 : PLAY"O5L100 ; 1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 4 ; 5 ; 6 ; 5 ; 4 ; 
3 ; 2 ; " : NEXT : PLAY"01L2 55" 
710 S=S-50-(RND(25) *2) :IF S<0THE 
NLINE (38, 178) -(246,182) ,PSET,BF: 
RETURN 

720 LINE(38,178)-(248-S,182) ,PSE 
T , BF : RETURN 

730 F0RZ=1T09 : IF P (Z ,0 ) =0THEN750 
740 X=P(Z,1) :Y=P(Z,2) :DRAW"C1BM= 
X; ,=Y;"+R$ 
750 NEXTZ: RETURN 

760 DRAW"C2BM=C; ,=D;"+P$(Q) :DRAW 
"C4BM=A; , =B; "+P$ (P) : PLAY"V25" :R= 
R+1:I=I+(L-K) :FORX=llT01STEP-2 
770 PLAY"V-; 9 ; 8 ; 7 ; 6 ; " : CIRCLE (A, B 
-2 ) , X, 2 : PLAY"4 ; 3 ; 2 ; 1 ; " :NEXTX: IF 



R=3THEN820ELSE CV=CV+1 : GOTO 160 

780 PLAY"V31":I=I+(L-K) 

790 DRAW " C 2 BM= A ; , =D ; "+P$ (Q) : DRAW 

"C4BM=A; ,=B;"+P$(P) :Q=P:D=B:B=B+ 

BB:BB=BB+.5:IF RND ( 2 ) =1THEN P=3- 

P 

800 PLAY"V-DC":IF B>170THEN B=B- 

BB:GOTO810ELSE790 

810 PLAY "V3 101" : FORX=1TO40 : PSET ( 

RND (7) *2+A-8,RND(15)+B-10,RND(2) 

) : PLAY"CC" ! NEXT : FORX=1TO500 : NEXT 

820 CLSRND(9)-1:FORX=1TO20:PLAY" 

V3 105L2 55 ; 1 ; 2 ; 4 ; 3 ; 5 " : PRINTQRND ( 4 

00)," GAME OVER ";: NEXTX 

830 GOSUB850:PRINT@484, ; :INPUT"a 

nother mission (Y/N)";J$ 

840 IF J$="Y"THEN CLS3 :GOTO130EL 
SE CLS:IF I$="3"THEN POKE65496,0 
: END ELSE POKE65494,0:END 
850 CLS 4: PRINT© 6 8, "CAVERNS ";CV 
; : PRINT© 10 0 , " LEVEL " ; LL ; : PRINTS 
196, "HEROES LEFT " ;3-R; :PRINT@2 
60, "SHIELDS LEFT " ;T; : PRINT@356 
, "MEN SAVED " ; J; : PRINT@388 , "MEN 
LEFT BEHIND ";I;:IF I>0THENPRI 
NT@420,"SAVE % " ;INT ( ( J/ ( J+I) ) * 
100 ) ; 

860 RETURN 



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March 1 988 THE RAINBOW 47 



I F e ature 



The Care 
and Handling 
of Tapes 
and Disks 



By Ed Ellers 

Rainbow Technical Editor 



"W"' response to Page R. Edmon- 
I W\ son's request for information 
J.Hon the care and handling of 
floppy disks ("Letters to the Rainbow," 
December 1987, Page 7). . . 

Cassettes 

Should I use those special "computer 
cassettes, "or are normal audio cassettes 
OK? What kind of tapes should I use? 

Any standard audio cassette (often 
called "normal bias" or "Type I'O will 
work, although it's best to use one of the 
better quality tapes on the market. 
Since the CoCo writes and reads data 
as an audio signal, the requirements are 
the same as for audio recording. 

The one thing you want to look for 
is a tape that has as few surface imper- 
fections as possible, to avoid losing data 
due to "dropouts." If in doubt, try 
recording some music on the tape you're 
considering, using the best recorder you 
have, and listen for dropouts in one or 
both channels; if you don't hear any, 
and the sound is reasonably clear (not 
muffled or "hissy"), the tape should be 
suitable for computer use. 

The special "computer cassettes" sold 
by Radio Shack and other dealers 
actually use just a high-quality audio 
tape. The major advantage of these 
cassettes is their length — typically five, 
10 or 20 minutes long. Some computer 
cassettes are supplied without leaders at 
the ends so that you can start recording 
on the beginning of the tape without 
having to wind past the leader. (Actu- 
ally, it's a good idea to skip the first few 
seconds of the tape, anyway — that's the 
area most likely to be damaged, whether 
the cassette has a leader or not.) Any 
length up to 60 minutes will do, al- 
though you should avoid the C-90, 
C-120 and C-180 cassettes because they 



Ed Ellers, a RAINBOW and PCM staff 
member, is a self confessed electronics 
fanatic who takes time off to pursue 
other interests, including science fic- 
tion. 



consist of thinner tape that may be less 
reliable. 

There's another type of computer 
cassette you may come across, one that 
has a large notch in the housing between 
the two record-protect tabs. These data 
cassettes are designed for some "stream- 
er" backup systems (as well as some 
older computers and terminals), and are 
not suitable for use with the CoCo. 
Also, avoid the "high bias" or metal- 
particle tapes; these won't be any better 
than a good normal bias tape, and may 
not work properly in your recorder. 

What's the proper way to store 
cassettes? 

Cassettes should be stored at room 
temperature, in their cases (if you have 
them). You might want to buy empty 
cases for the tapes that don't have them, 
but it's not mandatory. Contrary to 
popular belief, audio cassettes won't be 
damaged by being stacked horizontally. 
Also, rewind the tape to the beginning 
(either side will do) before putting it 
away. If you can see that the tape was 
wound unevenly, run it all the way to 
one end and then back to the other; this 
will pack the tape on the reel properly 
and prevent the tape from becoming 
creased. 

What volume setting should I use? 

The correct volume setting will de- 
pend on the recording level of the tape 
you're trying to load. We've found that 
a setting between 2 and 3 works best on 
the Radio Shack CTR-80 and CCR-81. 
On other recorders youH have to find 
it by trial and error; one way to start is 
to type nUDID0N:MDT0R0N, press 
ENTER, and then play a tape through the 
CoCo. Adjust the volume to the highest 
point before the signal starts to become 
distorted, then try a CLOflD at that 
setting; if you still can*t get tapes to 
load, start turning the volume down 
until you get good results. 

What about head alignment? 

It's very common for a recording 
head to be misaligned with respect to 



48 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



i 



the tape, and far too often the head gap 
in your recorder may not match the 
tracks recorded by another machine. 
This causes the playback to be some- 
what muffled, with the high end rolled 
off, resulting in a large number of errors 
when you try to load the file into your 
CoCo. (Head alignment errors are so 
common that some of the better stereo 
cassette decks have a "tracking" control 
to match the alignment of any tape you 
play.) 

If you need to adjust the head in your 
recorder, enter the AUDIOONrMOTORON 
command and play the tape you need 
to match, then insert a small Phillips 
screwdriver through the tiny hole in the 
nameplate until it reaches the alignment 
screw. Turn the screw one way or the 
other to get the clearest signal. 

When you've finished loading a balky 
tape this way, you'll need to reset your 
recorder using a cassette you've re- 
corded on previously. A special align- 
ment cassette would be even better, if 
you're able to find one. 

How do I clean the heads on my 
recorder? 

The best way to clean the heads is 
with a cotton swab dipped in alcohol or 
a special head-cleaning solution. 
Simply soak the swab and gently rub it 
over the heads to remove any oxide or 
other stains. (I don't recommend using 
a head-cleaning cassette; although some 
are OK, others can do more harm than 
good.) 

What about demagnetizing the 

* heads? 

Believe it or not, some authorities say 

* that it's not necessary to demagnetize, 
or degauss, recording heads — they say 
that the "bias" signal fed through the 
head during recording removes any 
residual magnetic field. Other experts 
aren't so sure. In any case, it does no 
harm to demagnetize the recording 
head, using a demagnetizing "wand" 
such as Radio Shack's 44-225 or 44-207. 
If you have a recorder other than one 
of the Radio Shack computer cassette 
recorders, check to make sure that the 
erase head moves back and forth when 
the Play button is pressed. If it only 
moves forward for recording, keep the 
demagnetizer away from it — it's prob- 
ably a permanent-magnet head, and if 
you demagnetize it your recorder won't 
erase properly! 



What about bulk tape erasers? 

Bulk erasers are mainly intended to 
be used when you have to erase an entire 
tape or disk. It's often said that a bulk 
eraser will erase a tape more completely 
than the erase head on the recorder, but 
this isn't necessarily the case. 

If you decide to use a bulk eraser, 
remember to keep it well away from any 
other tapes or disks, possibly in another 
room. 

Can my tapes be damaged by X-rays 
or magnetic fields in transit? 

Recordings can indeed be damaged 
by stray magnetic fields, not only in the 
mail but around your home or office, 
from things like hi-fi speakers or large 
electric motors. If you're mailing tapes 
or disks, it's a good idea to label the 
package, warning postal officials to 
watch out for magnets. 

As for X-rays, I'm told that they do 
not erase tapes or disks, but that many 
X-ray machines generate strong mag- 
netic fields in operation and will there- 
fore erase magnetic recordings that are 
passed through them. 

Disks 

What's the real difference between 
single-sided and double-sided disks? 

It's true that "single-sided" diskettes 
do have a magnetic coating on both 
sides and are actually identical to the 
same maker's "double-sided" disks. The 
difference is that'disks sold as "double- 
sided" are tested for errors on both 
sides, while single-sided disks are tested 
only on the first side. The single-sided 
disks could be disks that passed on Side 
A but had one or more errors on Side 
B. More likely, they are disks that were 
left over after the needed number of 
double-sided disks were selected from a 
batch. In this case, the "other" side will 
not have been tested, and may or may 
not be in good shape. Nobody will 
break down your door to bust you for 
using the second side of a single-sided 
disk — in fact, a lot of people do use 
both sides — but it's at your own risk, 
and you may get more errors than you 
bargained for. 

What type of disks should I buy? 

If anything, this question is even 
more hotly debated in the case of disks 
than it is for cassettes. Some users say 
you should buy the best disks you can 
afford; others say that the cheapest 



disks around are just fine. Actually, 
since disks are one of the few products 
that are either "good" or "bad, "you will 
probably do well with any disks sold by 
a reputable company that is willing to 
replace any disks that are defective — 
which would include any disk that has 
one or more bad tracks when formatted 
for the first time. Warranties do vary, all 
the way from covering just the first use 
of the disk to a full, lifetime warranty. 

Polaroid has a rather unusual war- 
ranty on its Professional disks, which 
have gray jackets. These not only have 
a full, lifetime warranty, but if one of 
these disks is damaged they will copy its 
data to a new disk for you at no charge 
— you just ship the disk to Polaroid and 
they return the new disk the same way 
you sent the old one. The Professional 
disks may be worth considering for your 
most important programs and data 
files. 

How should disks be stored? 

Disks should be stored at room 
temperature and away from dust and 
dirt, preferably in the boxes (if any) they 
came in. As with cassettes, it doesn't 
matter if the disks are stored vertically 
or horizontally. It is important to keep 
them away from heat or magnetic fields, 
and to place them so that they won't be 
bent. Above all, keep the disks out of 
the sun — they warp very quickly. 

How do I clean the disk drive head? 

Disk drive heads are very difficult to 
reach, even if you take the cover off the 
drive, so the best way to clean them is 
with a wet-type head-cleaning disk, 
such as Radio Shack's 26-408. The "dry 
system" cleaning disks can easily dam- 
age a head and are definitely not recom- 
mended. 

Are bulk erasers useful for disks? 

Unlike tape recorders, disk drives do 
not have a separate erase head; instead, 
the read/ write head simply writes over 
the old data. Since the "modified FM" 
system always records at full strength, 
this normally completely replaces the 
previous data. But in some situations 
you may want to erase the whole disk 
before saving an important file. This 
may also be true if you're sending a disk 
to someone to ensure they get only the 
files you want them to have. As with 
cassettes, do your bulk erasing well 
away from any other tapes or disks. 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 49 




COCO'S MOST ADVANCED 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZER. 

IT TALKS, SINGS AND 

MORE, 
only . . . $79.95 



WITH EARS PURCHASE 
only . . . $59.95 





SUPER VOICE is no ordinary speech synthesizer. It uses Silicon 
Systems, Inc. SSI-263, the most advanced speech/sound chip 
available. SUPER VOICE is not only capable of highly intelligible 
speech, sound effects, and singing over a 6 octave range, but now 
we have turned SUPER VOICE into a monophonic Super Music 
Synthesizer with our PIANO KEYBOARD. 

IT TALKS. A free TRANSLATOR text-to-speech program makes 
writing your own talking program as easy as SAYING "HELLO." 

SUPER VOICE works in any 32K or 64K computer. A disk system 
requires a Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 

Here are the facts; 
the decision is yours. 






SUPER VOICE 


REAL TALKER 


RS SPEECH 
CARTRIDGE 


VOICE-PAK 


Synthesizer Oevice 


SSI-263 


SC 01 


SP-256 


SC-01 


Speaking Speeds 


16 


1 


1 


1 


Volume Levels 


16 


1 


1 


1 


Articulation Rates 


8 


1 


1 


1 


Vocal Tract 
Filter Settings 


255 


1 


1 


1 


Basic unit 
of Speech 


64 phonemes 
4 durations each 


64 phonemes 


64 allophones 
5 pause lengths 


64 phonemes 


Pitch Variations 


4096 (32 absolute levels 
with B Inflection speeds) 


4 


1 


4 



SUPER TALKING HEADS 

Paul and Pauline, our talking heads program is normally $24.95. Until 
Dec. 15 we will include them with each SUPER VOICE order. 




FREE 
BLANK DISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 



VtSA* 




Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada . . i , $5.00 

COD charge , $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V«% sales tax 



'//' 



Speech Sy$t 



ems 



38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 




EARS 



TM 



Electronic 
Audio 
Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 

QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 



.^^'•''''^^ligence 



itCQsjuljul 




Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



FREE 
BL4NK DISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 







Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



-//- 



s. 



ydtentd 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada i ....... . $ S.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6%% sales tax 



peecli Si 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



ft o t n ? n 



II R IB HI fsl fcl I 71 fo) 



MIDI Instruments: 



0 
2 
4 
6 
8 
A 
C 
E 



LjJOl Brass 1 

006 Piano 3 

013 E Organ 5 

003 Trunpet 7 

018 Oboe 9 

021 Vibrphn B 

025 Clavier D 

043 Snaredr F 



005 String 

009 Guitar 

014 P Organ 

016 Flute 

019 Clarnet 

026 Harpsch 

032 Timpani 

045 Percusn 



0*' 



Lyra 

COMPATIBLE! 








r5V 



So p$ 



t I.J M ! I l M M 

k * f t -t ».» » t » I 

I » t * I I f i h * 

■ t i ♦ f . i t- 





k O>N 



/ 



SJ9 



Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system. 



Supports 16 Track recording and playback. 

Adjustable tempo. 

Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible). 

^ Record to any track. 

Low Level track editing, 
f LYRA editing, (one voice per track). 
i> Playback from any number of tracks. 
* Quantizing to VvL 1 /$4 intervals. 

Dynamic memory allocation, 



* Filter out MIDI data: 
Key pressure 
Program change 
Pitch wheel 



Control Change 
Channel Pressure 
System Message 



v Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode. 

f Adjustable Key (Transposition) for each 
track, 

Save recording to disk for later playback or 
editing. 

K Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE. 



W LIBRARIAN 



TM 



PUNCH IN and PUNCH OUT editing- 
V Sequencer features. 

* 100% machine code. 

v "Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 

* Metronome 

^ Many songs included. 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manua), and software. Requires 
64K CoCo, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CMJ47 . $149.95 

DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 , $28.95 

TRIPLE Y-CABLE #T-*17? . . v>- . . $34.95 

2 — ^J. 9 ' T *" 



Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 



Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101 , 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, 



memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 . . , $29.95 




FIL E EDIT HID I MISC 



All Voices Dn 




" » » » » w * \_ t uii 

Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 



Block delete 







mi 

c n r t m i 



j Block copy 

" i »'■■ » i p 

* 

- 3 -. IA _-_« 



LEGEND 




LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



in 



i i i *i i 1 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo tor $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MCT58) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not a 
misprint!) 

Super Simple Editing Supports: 
Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 



f Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 

12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 

drum machines. 
^ Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 

channels. 
V Transpose music to any key. 

Modify music to any tempo. 
\* Automatically inserts bar for each measure 

as you compose. 
\* Key signature lets you specify sharps and 

Hats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
\* Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 

(#LC164). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

v 0 Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 



Solo capability 
V Block edits are highlighted. 
v* Tie notes together for musical continuity. 
^ Name of note pointed to is constantly 

displayed. 
^ Jump to any point in the score 

instantaneously. 
^ Memory remaining clearly displayed, 

however you will have plenty of memory 

even for the most demanding piece. 

Help menu makes manual virtually 

unnecessary. 
\* LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 

hardware unless you want more power. 
\* Music easily saved to tape or disk. 

Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 
LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 $54.95 



These LYRA options 

LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA 
files. 

(Disk) #LC164 . .■ $14.95 

VERSION UPDATE 

To receive the latest version of LYRA return your 
original disk. #UP162 $10.00 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 ! $19.95 

We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 
Shipping and handling US and Canada ... ..... , , .,. . $3,00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada .... . , . $5.00 

COD Charge ...» r-.- $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6%% sales tax. 



LYRA OPTIONS — — — 

are not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 

.12. 

(Disk) #LS1 77 $19.95 

LYRA LIBRARY 

A collection of 50 songs ready to play for hours. 
Most have 7 and 8 voices. #LLU7 . $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 




COCO MID Seq/Editor 
A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 ........... $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 900 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 



COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorware. 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark of Radio Shack. 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 




1 F ea ture - 



32K ECB 



the - 




U,- -V 





Enhancements to Cheap Spread 




It on a Little Thicker 



Bill Reed's spreadsheet program, 
Cheap Spread [April 1987, Page 
174], is an outstanding example 
of a practical and useful application for 
a wide range of CoCo users. To make 
it even more convenient and useful, I 
have added four important new capabil- 
ities: 

1) a capacity allowing spreadsheets 
to be saved to or loaded from tape 
(for those of us with lower budgets 
who really need spreadsheets); 

2) optional row and column head- 
ings, which are handy for large or 
complex spreadsheets (this feature 
can be used to "lock in" headings 
on the screen, avoiding the need to 
move the display window back and 
forth); 

3) use of the right and down arrow 
keys for successive data entry into 
multiple cells (you no longer need 
to repeatedly use the DRT com- 
mand — just move to the next 
cell); 

4) alphanumeric cell labels, which 
speed up typing and improve read- 
ability, especially in functions 
(brackets are completely elimi- 
nated; for instance, the function 
[5,3]+[5,4]/[5,5] becomes simply 
E3+E4/E5). 

Due to the modularity of the pro- 
gram, I was able to implement these 
features independently of one another. 



Saul Mooallem is a sales representative 
for a major computer company. He 
holds a master's degree in computer 
science and has extensive experience in 
software development. 

54 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



By Saul Mooallem 

If you prefer to incorporate some but 
not all four enhancements, just make 
the changes shown in the listing corre- 
sponding to the features you want. 

Tape Files 

This enhancement is self-explan- 
atory. Of course you are not asked if you 
want to replace an existing spreadsheet 
or save a new one, as you are asked 
when using disk files. 

Headings 

The first row and the first column are 
considered the headings. A new HDG 
command allows you to turn the display 
of headings on or off. Headings are 
initially off, and the program functions 
exactly as before. However, after you 
turn them on by typing HDG, they appear 
as the first column and top row of the 
portion of the spreadsheet displayed on 
the screen. To turn off headings, just 
type HDG again. 

When headings are displayed, there is 
one less column and row available for 
actual data, but this is often a small 
inconvenience compared to moving the 
window back to check headings. Note 
that when headings are turned on: 

• the first row and column do not have 
labels in the margins. This is how you 
can tell whether you have turned the 
headings on or off. 

• row and column numbers in the J 
(jump) command refer to the upper- 
left cell of the desired display not 
including headings. 

• you are not able to enter or change 
headings without first turning them 
off. 

• the operation of the P (print) com- 
mand is not affected. 



Incidentally, I find it convenient to 
enter a spreadsheet title such as "87 
BUDGET" in Cell [1,1]. 

Multiple Data Entry 

While entering data (using the DRT 
command), you can move between cells 
using the right arrow or down arrow 
keys. This speeds up data entry substan- 
tially by allowing you to fill in an entire 
column of data by entering DRT only 
once. The left arrow key backspaces as 
before. 

Alphanumeric Cell Names 

Rows are now designated by the 
letters A through Z, so the comma 
between row and column are elimi- 
nated. For instance, the command F3 , 2 
is now entered as F C2, and CR2-5 (copy 
row) becomes CR B-E. 

The best improvement is that 
brackets are no longer needed in func- 
tions. However, there are two kinds of 
limitations imposed by this feature: 
Command names may not contain 
spaces, and a space must appear be- 
tween the command name and the cell 
name. Also, you are limited to 26 
rows. 



Correction 

The original Cheap Spread yields 
a BS Error in Line 16550 when the 
user jumps to a nonexistent cell with 
the J command and then tries to 
verify formulas with "VF." To correct 
this, alter Line 16540 as shown: 

1G540 IF (I+DR~1>MR) OR (J+ 
DG-1>MC) THEN 1G580 

□ 



t 



Editor 's Note; The altered program will replace ike four listing* helow on this momh's rainr 
bisk and rainbow on tape. It will be saved under the filename SPREAD 2. 

Listing 1: TfiPE 



7020 REM delete line 7020 

7^3^ OPEN"I" ,#-1,?$ 

7040 INPUT#-1,MR,MC 

7080 INPUT#-1,C$ (1/ J) 

7120 INPUT#-1,FC$(I,J) 

7140 CL0SE#-1 

7510 REM delete line 7510 

7520 PRINT@32,STRING$ (30,32) ;:PR 



INT@ 3 2 , " " ; : INPUT 11 FILENAME : 

7530 REM delete line 7530 

7540 REM delete line 7540 

7550 OPEN"©", #-l,F$ 

7560 PRINT#-1,MR,MC 

7590 PRINT#-1,C$(I, J) 

7630 PRINT #-1 , FC$ (I ,J) 

7650 CLOSE#-l 



" ; F$ 



Listing 2: HERDING 

160 IF CN^l THEN GOSUB 4000 V IF E 
R$<>»» THEN GOSUB 9500:GOTO 60: 1 
ENTER DATA 
802 IM$="S" 

153 2 IF C8=9 OR C8=10 THEN IM$=C 
8$:PRINT@PS," 11 ; : C9=VAL(C9$) :RET 
URN 

2562 IF MID$(IP$,I,l)<>"- n AND M 
ID$(IP$ / I / lj<>» / " THEN ER$="DELI 
MITER MUST BE 1 - 1 OR ■ , 1 " 



2590 REM delete line 2590 

4002 IM$="M fl 

4022 IF IM$= lf M" THEN 4029 

4024 IF ASC(C8$)=10 THEN 01=01+1 
: GOSUB 2570 

4025 IF ASC(C8$)=9 THEN 02=02+1: 
GOSUB 3070 

402 6 IF ER$<> ,,, » THEN 4029 
4027 GOSUB 3500: IF ER$<>"" THEN 
GOSUB 9500 ELSE 4002 
4029 IM$="S" 



Listing 3: DATA 

§mm changes for headings 

302 IF CN=18 THEN HD=1-HD : PRINT @ 
32 / STRING$(30 / 32) ; : PRINTQ32 , "HEA 
DINGS "+MID$("OFFON " , 3*HD+1, 3) ; 
:GOSUB 12000 
532 HD=0 

600 NC=18:DIM VC$(NC) ,V$(20) 

640 DATA DAT, F, I, D, SPREAD, V, J, CR 

, CC , P , S , H , ERASE , CLRD , U , VF , Q / HDG 

3510 IF CN<9 AND (01>DR+13-1 OR 

OK (DR+HD) ) THEN 3550 

3520 IF CN=9 AND (01>DC+3-l OR 0 

1< (DC+HD) ) THEN 3550 

3530 IF CN<6 AND (02>DC+3-l OR O 

2< (DC+HD)) THEN 3550 



8150 PRINT@14*32+2,"P - PRINT 

HDG- HEADINGS"; 
10052 IF HDG=0 OR (I<>1 AND J<>1 
) THEN II=I+DR-1: JJ=J+DC-1:G0T0 
10060 

10054 IF 1=1 AND J<>1 THEN 11=1: 

JJ=J+DC-1 : GOTO 10060 

10056 IF J=l AND I<>1 THEN 11=1+ 

DR-l: JJ=1:G0T0 10060 

10058 GOTO 10070 

10060 PRINT@96+(I-1) *30+I*2+(J-l 

)*10,C$(II,JJ) ; 

10520 FOR I=HD+1 TO 3 

10580 FOR I=HD+1 TO 13 

11010 DR=01-HD:DC=02-HD: RETURN 



Listing 4: CELL 

0 REM changes for alphanumeric c 

92 IF CN>7 THEN 98 

94 GOSUB 17000: IF ER$<>"" THEN G 

OSUB 9500: GOTO 60 

96 GOSUB 3000: IF ER$<> ,MI THEN GO 

SUB 9500: GOTO 60 

98 IF CN<>9 THEN 132 

132 IF CN<>8 THEN 140 

134 GOSUB 17000: IF ER$<> ,f " THEN 

GOSUB 9500: GOTO 60 



136 GOSUB 17500: IF ER$<>»» THEN 

GOSUB 9500: GOTO 60 

534 AL$="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVW 

XYZ" 

780 PRINT@13*32+4, H # OF ROWS(DEF 
. &MAX.=2 6) : INPUT MR: IF MR=0 TH 
EN MR=26 

782 IF MR>26 THEN 780 

2020 1 GET COMMAND NAME 

2040 IF INSTR (NM$+ M 11 ,MID$ (IP$ , I 

,1) )>0 THEN 2070 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 55 



Protect and highlight 
your important 

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with sturdy 

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Distinctive, Durable RAINBOW Binders 

the rainbow is a vital resource to be referred to 
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These attractive red vinyl binders showcase your 
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and spine. They make a handsome addition to any 
room. 

: 



I 




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Put an End to Clutter 

Organize your workspace Mth these tasteful bind- 
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A set of two binders, which holds a full 12 issues of 
THE rainbow, is only $13.50 (plus $2.50 shipping and 
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Special Discounts on Past Issues 

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When you place an order for six or more back issues 
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To order, please see the "Back Issue Information" 
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Know Where to Look 

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To THE RAINBOW" for $1 whin you purchase a set 
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Please send me 



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In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



2j350 CM$=CM$+MID$(IP$,I,1) 
2530 IF INSTR(NM$+" " ,MID$ (IP$ , I 
,1))>P THEN 01$=01$+MID$(IP$,I,1 
) ELSE 255j3 

654)3 PRINT© 3 2 , "ENTER START, END R 

OW" ; : INPUT Rl$ , R2 $ : R1=INSTR ( AL$ , 

Rl$) :R2=INSTR(AL$ 7 R2$) 

6542 IF Rl=j3 OR R2<R1 OR LEN (Rl$ 

)<>1 OR LEN(R2$)<>1 THEN ER$="IN 

VALID ROW":GOSUB 95J2JJ3 : GOTO 6530 

8540 PRINT® 3 2 , "ENTER START ROW T 

0 CLEAR" ;: INPUT S2$ 

8542 S2=INSTR(AL$,S2$) : IP S2=j3 T 

HEN PRINT@32,STRING$(30,32) ; :GOT 

0 8540 

95J2J2 PRINT@32,STRING$(3j3,32) ; 
1J359J3 PRINT@64+(I*32) ,MID$(AL$,I 
+DR-1,1) ; 

13520 11=2: IF LEFT$(IP$,1)="R" T 
HEN GOSUB 17000 ELSE GOSUB 2 500 
13550 IF LEFT$(IP$,1)="R" THEN G 
OSUB 17500 ELSE GOSUB 3000 
14040 IF INSTR(AL$,I9$)>0 THEN G 
OSUB 14500: GOTO 14070 
14510 04$="" 

14520 REM delete line 14520 
14530 REM delete line 14530 
14540 REM delete line 14540 



14550 REM delete line 14550 

14560 03=INSTR(AL$,I9$) 

14580 IF I>LEN(IP$) THEN 14620 

14610 REM delete line 14610 

14620 04=VAL(04$) : 1=1-1 

17000 »*** VALID ROW? *** 

17010 FOR 1=11 TO LEN(IP$) 

17020 IF MID$(IP$, I,l)<>" " THEN 

17050 
17030 NEXT 

17040 ER$="ROW INVALID OR MISSIN 
G":GOTO 17070 

17050 01=INSTR(AL$,MID$(IP$,I,1) 
): 11=1+1: IF 01=0 THEN 17040 
17060 IF CN<9 AND 01>MR THEN ER$ 
="MAX. NO. OF ROWS IS"+STR$(MR) 
17070 RETURN 

17500 ' *** VALID DELIMITER & SEC 
OND ROW? *** 

17510 IF MID$(IP$,II,l)<>"-» AND 
MID$(IP$,II,1)<>", " THEN ER$="D 
ELIMITER MUST BE ' - 1 OR 1 , ' " : GOT 
O 17530 

17520 II=II+1:02=INSTR(AL$,MID$( 
IP$,II,1) ) :IF 02=0 THEN ER$="ROW 

INVALID OR MISSING" 
17530 RETURN 



Model 101 
Interface $39.95 



Model 1 04 Deluxe Model 1 02 
Interface $51.95 Switcher $35.95 



Model 105 
Switcher $14.95 




• Serial to parallel interface 

• Works with any COCO 

• Compatible with "Centron- 
ics" parallel input printers 

• 6 switch selectable baud 
rates 300-600-1200-2400- 
4800-9600 

• Small size 

4.5" x 2.5" x 1 .25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 



Other Quality 
Items 

High quality 5 screw shell C- 
10 cassette tapes. $7.50/ 
dozen 

Hard plastic storage boxes for 
cassette tapes. $2.50/dozen 

PwvF eed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00/100 
Colors $3.60/100 (specify 
red, blue, yellow, tan) 




Same features as 101 plus 

• Built in serial port for your 
modem or other serial device 

• Switch between parallel 
output and serial output 

• Size is 4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 

NEW! Cables for 
your COCO 

• U.L listed foil-shielded cable 

• 2 Types: male/female exten- 
sion cables (used between 
a serial device and existing 
cable) male/male cables 
(used between two serial 
devices such as a modem 
and one of our switchers). 

• 3ft./$3.95, 6 ft./$4.49, 

10 ft./$5.59 Specify M/M 
or M/F and length. 




• Connect to your COCO 
serial port and have 3 switch 
selectable serial ports 

• Color coded indicator lights 
show switch position 

• Lights also serve as a 
power on indicator for your 
COCO 

• Heavy guage blue anodized 
aluminum cabinet with non- 
slip rubber feet 

The 101 and 104 require 
power to operate. Most print- 
ers can supply power to your 
interface. (Star, Radio Shack 
and Okidata are just a few that 
do - Epson and Seikosha do 
not). The interfaces can also 
be powered by an AC adap- 
tor; Radio Shack model 273- 
1 431 plugs into all models. If 
you require a power supply, 
add a "P" to the model number 
and add $5.00 to the price. 
(Model 101P $44.95, Model 
104P $56.95). 





ML"! m!: thOIHil HH > 



• Connects to your COCO 
to give you 2 switch select- 
able serial ports 

• 3 foot cable to connect to 
your COCO's serial port 

• The perfect item to use to 
connect a printer and a 
modem to your COCO 

• Small insize, only4.5x2.5 
x 1.25 



The Model 101 ,102, 104 and 
1 05 work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory 
size. These products are co- 
vered by a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101 and 1 04 work 
with any standard parallel 
input printer including Gemini, 
Epson, Radio Shack, 
Okidata, C. loth, Seikosha, 
Panasonic and many others. 
They support BASIC print 
commands, word processors 
and graphic commands. 

We manufacture these 
products - dealer inquiries 
are invited. 



Cassette Label 
Program $6.95 

• New Version - tape trans- 
ferable to disk - save and 
load labels from tape to disk 

• Prints 5 lines of information 
on pin-feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven, easy to use 

• Standard, expanded and 
condensed characters 

• Each line of text auto- 
matically centered. 

• Label display on CRT, en- 
abling editing before printing 

• Program comes on tape 
and is supplied with 24 
labels to get you started 

• 16K ECB required 

Ordering 
information 

Free shipping in the United 
States (except Alaska and 
Hawaii) on all orders over 
$50.00. Please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling on or- 
ders under $50.00. 
Ohio residents add 6% 
sales tax. 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use 
your VISA or MASTERCARD 
or request C.O.D. (Please 
add $2.00 for C.O.D. orders). 
If you prefer, send check or 
money order; payable in U.S. 
Funds to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 57 



Come to Radio Shack for the Very 



We've got the selection! 

At Radio Shack, we're dedicated to 
making sure that you never run out 
of ways to use and enjoy your Color 
Computer. We've got a terrific line of 
software— here's just a sample! 

Games for the whole family 

Let your Color Computer open the 
door to a world of fun and adventure. 
Choose from a dazzling selection of 
popular and challenging games. 

Explore a secret cave in Downland. 
Challenge the evil wizard in Dun- 
geons of Daggorath. Avoid the Great 
White Bat of Cave Walker, Take part 
in a daring raid in Koronis Rift, Or 
enter the changing worlds of Rogue or 
The Interbank Incident. 



You'll think your feet have left the 
ground as you take off into the real' 
ism of the wild blue yonder of Flight 
Simulator II. Battle the enemy for 
your survival as you challenge the 
depth and the intricacies of an under' 
ground fortress in Thexder or over- 
come the danger of the depths of the 
ocean as well as the treacherous en- 
emy of Sub Battle Simulator. 

Or go even further as you transport 
supplies between two galaxies of Zone 
Runner. Marvel at the 3-D color 
graphics of Rescue on Fractalus and 
Springster. Get down to earth and 
play Color Baseball Or introduce 
yourself to the 3 ,000-year-old game 
of Mahjong in the smokey backrooms 
of Shanghai 



Make learning fun 

One of the most valuable potentials 
of your Color Computer is in provid- 
ing your children a head start in their 
education. We've got learning pro- 
grams for children of all ages that will 
provide hours of productive fun! 

Children in grades 1 through 8 en- 
joy the challenging fun of Color 
Math. With testing options at all lev- 
els, Color Math assures progress. 
Older kids enjoy learning facts from 
the World Almanac as they venture 
through the great capitals of the 
world while in search of the stolen 
Statue of Liberty's torch in Where in 
the World is Carmen Sandiegol Chil- 
dren embark upon a journey of an- 
other type as they venture through 




Koronis Rift and Rescue on Fractalus/TM LucasFilm Games. Rogue and'Sub Battle Simulator/TM Epyx. Flight Simulator IL^M subLOGIC Corp. ThexderfTM Game Arts. 



Best in Color Computer Software 



the human body of Microscopic Mis- 
sion. Imagine your child's excitement 
and anticipation while journeying 
through the blood vessels from the leg 
through the kidneys, liver, heart, 
lungs and finally, to the brain itself. 
The Color Computer Artist helps 
children realize creative skills at an 
early age. With this selection you'll 
find programs that help develop hun- 
dreds of useful skills. 

Boost your productivity 

No matter what your personal 
needs, we've got programs that'll put 
your Color Computer to work where 
you need it most. Personal Finance II 
and Color File II organize paperwork 
and filing. Get Color SCRIPSIT®II 
and TSSPELL for perfect letters and 



reports. Or run complex spreadsheets 
using SpectaculatoL 

For the programmer's delight we 
have OS-9 Level Two and the devel- 
opment system. And for the solution 
of many of your software needs, con- 
sider the enhanced DeskMate® 3. 
With Text word processing, Ledger 
spreadsheet, Paint, Index Cards 
filing, Telcom telecommunications, 
Calendar and Calculator programs, 
DeskMate 3 is seven of the most pop- 
ular applications in one simple-to-use 
program. 

Need more suggestions? Send in the 
coupon for a free copy of our 1988 
Computer Catalog & Software Refer- 
ence Guide. Radio Shack is your one- 
stop software center. 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



r, 
■ 

i 
■ 
■ 

■ 

■ 



Send me a 1988 computer catalog. 

Mail to: Radio Shack, Dept. 88-A-705 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 78102 



Name 



.1 



Address 
City 



State 
ZIP_ 



Phone 





tW* MACROSCOPIC IWSMQN 



EH SSP^ZL ■ MICROSCOPIC 

MISSIO 




Shanghai and Microscopic Mission/TM Activision. Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?/TM Broderbund. 0S-9/TM Microware and Motorola 



Getting 'stock' answers to 
your in ventory questions 





KING STOCK 



Stock, a direct access inventory 
program, allows you to take stock 
of your goods, permitting up to 
99,999 units per record. 

The program has provisions for an 
11-digit stock number, unit descrip- 
tions, purchases, returns, wholesale and 
retail costs, and more. Along with 
figuring gross profit, it also calculates 
final inventory balance, total purchases, 
gross receipts, returns and allowances, 
and inventory given to personal use. 

All this information can be printed in 
an inventory report, using your printer's 
condensed mode to fit 133 characters on 
a line. The program is currently config- 
ured for a DMP-105, but it can easily 
be modified to accommodate other 

Charles May owns his own carpet and 
upholstery cleaning business and pre- 
pares taxes in season. He used his Co Co 
for all business transactions for three 
years, and now lets his IBM PC share 
some of the load. 

60 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



printers. (Line 890 puts the 
printer in condensed mode, and 
Line 1105 returns it to standard 
print. Just substitute your ap- 
propriate printer code.) 

The program listing is 
"blocked off in modular style, 
making it very easy to under- 
stand. 

Running the Program 

Stock is menu-driven, 
prompting you along. On run- 
ning the program you will see the 
main menu and its five options: 

1) Enter New Stock Numbers 

2) Inventory Activity 

3) Print Report 

4) Review Status 

5) Exit 

The first step is to enter all stock 
numbers correctly and in proper se- 
quence — select Option 1 from the main 
menu. Stock numbers can be up to 11 
characters of any combination of letters 
and numbers — but the final three 
characters must be numbers] These 
three numbers will become the record 
number the disk uses to store and access 
records. They must begin in this se- 
quence: 001, 002, 003 . . . 099, 100, 101, 
etc. For example, your first number 
might be A 137690-001; the 001 is the 
disk record number. 

Should you begin with any other 
sequence, the disk will skip space, 
leaving blank all unassigned records. 
For example, if you begin with 100 
instead of 001, the disk leaves the first 
99 records blank. When you printed 
your report, you would get nothing but 
garbage. It is extremely important that 
you assign stock and record numbers 
correctly. 

Thirty-two spaces are assigned to the 



By Charles May 

Unit Description field; five spaces are 
assigned to all "count" fields, and eight 
spaces are assigned to all "money" fields 
in each record. This means that the files 
can contain up to 99,999 units per 
record and dollar amounts of 
$99,999.99. For amounts over these 
limits you must alter the code. 

Only the stock number, description, 
quantity purchased, cost and retail are 
entered during the initial entry routine. 
New purchases, sales, returns and per- 
sonal use entries can be entered only as 
"Inventory Activities." 

Inventory Activities are coded in such 
a way that they adhere to standard 
accounting principles. For instance. 
Total Receipts will contain receipts that 
are to be deducted on the returns and 
allowances adjustments of your income 
statement — and on the IRS' Schedule 
C of Form 1040. Other entries, such as 
dollar amounts of items withdrawn for 
personal use, are income statement 
adjustments, also. 

Should you purchase goods that have 
changed in cost, you will need to make 
a separate record of each item as though 
it were a brand new entry. The stock 
number can be identical to the original 
except for the final three digits, the 
record number. For example, suppose 
stock number 3001 A-019 originally cost 
$8.65 but now costs $9.15. Your new 
number might become 3001A-139. 
3001 A is not stored in records 019 and 
139. This is the only way to keep your 
sales and income figures correct. 

You will be asked for the actual 
selling price. If your selling price differs 
from retail, enter it so. 

Refunds will be the total dollar 
amount of the refund — not the unit 
refund amount. For example, suppose 
a customer returns three items that you 
sold for $10 each; you refund $30 — 



enter $30.00 at the prompt. 

Your report gives a final inventory 
balance of your stock on hand. This 
figure may be different from physical 
inventory count, but this final inventory 
balance must be used on your income 



statement and on Schedule C to show 
your true net income. 

To begin a new year with accurate 
data, save the program on a new disk 
and reenter all stock data as though it 
were for the first time. 



(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at Rt. 1, Box 234 P, Desoto, TX 75115. 
Please enclose an SASE when writing 
for a response.) □ 



I INVENTORY REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING FEBRUARY 13,1988 



■■ iv» ■■. : v. C$ ■. ' ' ; U 
f.. .*«.' "!; \ * "■■ >" ^ Iv-'^Ji 










OTY 






AMOUNT F 


IECEIPTS 


PROFIT 


UNITS 


"■ ." V 


OTY 


UNIT 


OTY 


OTY 


PRSON 


UNIT 


AMOUNT 


PERSONAL 

f k 1 IU . III I 


THIS 


THIS 


ON 


STOCK NO, UNIT DESCRIPTION 


PURCH 


COST 


SOLD 


RETRN 


USE 


RETAIL 


REFUNDED 


USE 


ITEM 


ITEM 


HAND 


26-3334-001 128K COLOR COMPUTER 3 


13 


87.20 


4 


0 


. 2 


129.95 


0.00 


174,40 


519.80 


mum 


7 


26-3215-0132 CH~8 RGB COLOR MONITOR 


10 


191.23 


3 


0 


4 


299.95 


0.00 


556.86 


899.85 


326.16 


5 


26-3131-003 FD-501 COLOR TH INLINE DRIVE 0 




139,7* 


% 




6 


299.95 


0.00 


836.34 


1199.70 


361.26 


2 


26-3132-004 FD-501 DRIVE 1 


f 


m, 19 


0 




8 


179.95 


0.00 


1004.72 


0.00 


0.00 


4 


26-3124-005 : MULT I -PAK INTERFACE 


B 


53.71; 


I 


B 


0 


99,95 


0.00 


0.00 


299.85 


138.72 


5 


26-3025-006 COLOR MOUSE ; 


ft 


19.32 


3 


D 


9 


49.95 


0.00 


1024.04 


149,85 


91.89 


4 


26-2226-007 RS-232 PROGRAM PAK 


10 


32.65 


5 


0 


0 


79.95 


0.00 


0.00 


399.75 


236.50 


5 


26-1280-003 DMP-13B PRINTER 


\ 


248,53 




0 


10 


349.95 


0.00 


1272.57 


599.90 


1132. B4 


1 


26-1385-009 DCM 212 INTELLIGENT MODEM 

^^p-^^ — — — — — — — — — — 


3 

— • — - — — • — — — — 


127.96 


1 


0 


11 


199.95 


0.00 


1400.53 


199.95 


71.99 


1 



FINAL 

INVENTORY TOTAL GROSS RETURNS & PERSONAL 

BALANCE PURCHASES RECEIPTS ALLOWANCES USE 

10305.54 14474.36 4268.65 0.00 6269.46 



GRAND TOT A L S 

GROSS 

PROFIT 

1500.36 








4340 


.....108 


610 


...141 


4520 


. . . r » 1 87 


2060 . . 


>235 


4690 


. , i .» . 231 


3100 


...180 


6150 


• » r --t * '• « : ; . 57 


3245 . . 


...159 


7030 


i ».»'.• 53 


4150 . .. 


...123 


END 


22 



The listing: STOCK 



100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
1/95 
110 
5pp 
510 
520 
54)3 



i ****** ******************** 

1 *** CHARLES MAY *** 
i*** rt. 1 BOX 234P *** 
«*** DESOTO, TX. ,75115 *** 
«*** (214) 223-3767 *** 
• ************************* 



1 ************************* 

i** INITIALIZE VARIABLES ** 
i ************************* 

CLEAR 1000 

55) 3 F1$="QTY 

AMOUNT RECEIPTS PROFIT UNI 
TS ii 

56) 3 F2$="QTY UNIT QTY QT 
Y PRSON UNIT AMOUNT PERSO 
NAL THIS THIS ON" 

57) 3 F3$=" STOCK NO. UNIT DE 
SCRIPTION PURCH CO 
ST SOLD RETRN USE RETAIL 
REFUNDED USE ITEM ITE 
M HAND" 



TOTAL 
PERSONAL 

PURCHASES 
USE 

#####.## 
#####.## 



R 



# 



58) 3 F4$="% % % 

% ##### #### 
#.## ##### ##### ##### #####.## 
#####.## #####.## #####.## ##### 
.## #####" 

59) 3 F5$=STRING$(133,"=") 
6)30 F6$=" FINAL" 

61) 3 F7$=" INVENTORY 
GROSS RETURNS & 

GROSS" 

62) 3 F8$=" BALANCE 
ECEIPTS ALLOWANCES 

PROFIT" 

63) 3 F9$=" #####.## 

####.## #####.## 

####"# * ## H 
89)3 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27)CHR$(20) 
9)3)3 GOSUB5000 

1)3)3)3 '************************ 

1)31)3 ' *** ROUTINE SELECTIONS*** 
1)3 2)3 '************************ 

1)34)3 GOSUB 2)3)3)3 

1)36)3 IF Z$="5" THEN 11)35 

107)3 ON VAL(Z$) GOSUB 3)3)3)3,4)3)3)3, 

60) 3)3, 70)30 

1080 GOSUB 2000 

1100 GOTO 1060 

1105 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27)CHR$(19) 

1110 CLS:CLOSE#l 

1140 PRINT @ 200 , "END OF PROGRAM" 

1150 END 

2000 ************************* 

2010 f *** MENU *** 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 61 



2020 ************************** 
2040 CLS 

2050 PRINT TAB(10)"M E N U" 
2060 PRINT « 11 

2070 PRINT "CODE SELECTION" 
2080 PRINT 11 " 

2090 PRINT "1. -ENTER NEW STOCK NU 
MBERS" 

2100 PRINT "2. -INVENTORY ACTIVITY 



it 



2110 PRINT" 3. -PRINT REPORT" 
2115 PRINT "4 • -REVIEW STATUS" 
2120 PRINT"5.-EXIT " 
2130 PRINT " " 

2140 PRINT "ENTER CODE 1-5 :"; 
2150 Z$=INKEY$: IF Z$=""THEN2150 
2160 IF Z$>="1"ANDZ$<="5"THEN 21 
70 ELSE 2000 
2170 RETURN 

3000 '************************* 

3005 »*** DATA ENTRY *** 

3010 *************************** 

3020 K=LOF(l) : CLS: PRINT "THE LAST 

RECORD NUMBER WAS ";K 
3025 PRINT" " 

3030 PRINT "STRIKE ANY KEY TO CO 
NTINUE" 

3040 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=:""THEN3040 
3050 CLS: PRINT "ENTER NEW STOCK N 



THE POWER STONES 

OFARD 



THE QUEST FOR 



THE SPIRIT STONE 




~ : t:~X 



You're tired, you're hungry, not to mention you're badly injured. 
No one in town seems to want to talk to you. Your magic sword has 
stopped glowing, the room is dark, you're out of spells, you can't 
get your wand to work, you wont swear to it but you may be lost, 
you have no idea what that last puzzlement, and you hear something 
large moving just beyond the only door. The old sage warned you 
there would be days like this! 

"QUEST FOR THE SPIRIT STONE" is an Adventure that will 
keep you playing for hours. It features single keystroke commands, 
16 color graphics, 100% Hi-Res graphics screens, full game save, 
extensive playing area, level advancement, and the disk is not copy- 
protected. You choose your character's name, race, sex, and ability 
scores. The use of arrow keys simplify movement. This one is easy 
to play but a challenge to complete! 

ONLY $18.00 AND WE PAY SHIPPING! 

North Carolina residents add 5% sales tax 

COLOR COMPUTER 3 AND ONE DISK DRIVE REQUIRED 



Send check or money order to: 



HRE 

RO J" I 



C s 
CTS 



P.O. Box 1323 
Hamlet, NC 28345 



UMBER" 

3060 LINE INPUT" 11 CHARACTERS MA 
X 11 ; A$ 

3070 RN=VAL(RIGHT$(A$, 3) ) 

3080 PRINT "ENTER STOCK DESCRIPTI 

ON" 

3090 LINE INPUT B$ 

3100 INPUT "NUMBER OF UNITS BOUGH 
T" t C 

3110 L=C 

3130 INPUT "ENTER UNIT COST";D 
3140 INPUT" ENTER UNIT RETAIL PRI 
CE" ;E 

3150 PRINT "ARE ALL ENTRIES CORRE 
CT? Y/N" 

3155 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN 3155 
3160 IF Z$="N" THEN CLS: GOTO 308 

0 

3170 IF Z$="Y"THEN 3200 ELSE 315 
0 

3200 LSET AA$=A$ : 1 STOCK NO. 
3205 LSET BB$=B$ :' DESCRIPTION 
3210 LSET CC$=MKN$(C 
S 

3215 LSET DD$=MKN$(D 

T ' 

3220 LSET EE$=MKN$ (E 
AIL 

3225 LSET GG$=MKN$ (0 
USE 

3230 LSET HH$=MKN$(0 
3235 LSET JJ$=MKN$ (0 
3240 LSET KK$=MKN$ (0 
RSONAL 

3245 LSET LL$=MKN$(L 
HAND 

3250 LSET PP$=MKN$(P 
FIT 

3255 LSET RR$=MKN$ (0 
RN 

3260 LSET SS$=MKN$(0 
3280 PUT #1, RN 
3290 PRINT" DO YOU HAVE ANOTHER E 
NTRY Y/N?" 

3300 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN3300 

3320 IF Z$="Y" THEN 3050 

3330 IF Z$="N" THEN 3370 ELSE 32 

90 

3370 RETURN 

4000 * ************************* 

4010 '*** ACTIVITY *** 

4020 '************************* 

4030 CLS: PRINT "ENTER STOCK NUMBE 

R" 

4040 INPUT A$ 

4050 RN=VAL(RIGHT$(A$,3) ) 

4060 GET #1,RN 

4070 A$-AA${B$=BB$:C=CVN(CC$) :D= 
CVN(DD$) :E=CVN(EE$) :H=CVN(HH$) :J 
=CVN(JJ$) :L=CVN(LL$) :S=CVN(SS$) : 
P=CVN(PP$) 



QTY UNIT 

UNIT COS 

UNIT RET 

PERSONAL 

RECEIPTS 
REFUNDED 
$ AMT PE 

UNITS ON 

UNIT PRO 

QTY RETU 

QTY SOLD 



62 THE RAINBOW March 1988 




FRANK HOGG LABORATORY 
BUYS OUT INVENTORY OF 

Sculptor! 

SELLS FOR LESS THAN DISTRIBUTOR COST!!! 



Frank Hogg Laboratory purchased the remaining inventory of another 
Sculptor distributor! Because we got them so low we can offer them to 
you at tremendous savings. 

Scu/ptorforthe CoCo III with OS9 Level II* is 

1 ON LY $149 I 

$149 is below distributor cost! The list price is $450!! Once they are 
gone the prices will go back to normal. This is a great opportunity to 
buy the most powerful Database/4th Generation Language available 
today!! 

They won't last long. 
Hurry and get yours today!!! ! 



Also on SALE Sculptor MS/DOS $149 -Sculptor OS9/68K $499 

See Dale Puckett's February 1988 Rainbow 
column for information on this great package. 

ORDERING INFORMATION VISA, M/C and AMEX. NY residents add 7% sales tax. US shipping add $3.50. Please call for Air Express 
shipping. Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. * Requires OS9 LII and 512K.. 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 
Telex 646740 - FAX 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856! 



4080 CLS: PRINTTAB ( 10 )A$ 
4)390 PRINTB$ 

4120 PRINTTAB (5) "1. -PURCHASES" 
4130 PRINTTAB ( 5 )" 2 . -SALES " 
4140 PRINTTAB ( 5 ) " 3 . -RETURNS/ALLO- 
WANCES" 

4150 PRINTTAB (5) "4. -PERSONAL USE 
it 

4160 PRINTTAB (5) "5. -REVIEW ONLY" 
4170 PRINTTAB ( 5 )" 6 . -EXIT TO MAIN 

MENU" 
4180 PRINT" " 
4190 PRINT " S E LE CT 1 - 6" 
4200 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$=""THEN4200 
4210 IF Z$>="1"ANDZ$<="6"THEN421 
5 ELSE 4080 

4215 IF Z$="6"THEN 4690 
4220 CLS: PRINTTAB (10) A$ 
4230 PRINT B$ 

4240 PRINT @64, "QUANTITY UNITS 0 
N HAND ";L 

4250 PRINT" TOTAL UNITS BOUGHT "; 
C 

4260 PRINT"UNIT COST ";D 

4270 PRINT "UNIT RETAIL "?E 

4275 PRINT "NUMBER UNITS SOLD";S 

4290 PRINT" ": PRINT" " 

4300 ON VAL(Z$) GOTO 4310,4380,4 

470,4560,4660,4690 

4310 INPUT "ENTER NUMBER UNITS BO 

UGHT ";N 

4320 PRINT"ARE YOU SURE? Y/N" 

4330 Y$=INKEY$:IFY$=*""THEN4330 

4340 IF Y$«"N"THEN4310ELSEIFY$=" 

Y"THEN4350ELSE4320 

4350 C=C+N : L=L+N : N=0 

4360 LSET CC$=MKN$ (C) : LSET LL$=M 

KN$(L) 

4370 GOTO 4650 

4380 INPUT "ENTER NUMBER UNITS SO 
LD ";N1 

4390 PRINT "ENTER ACTUAL SALES PR 
ICE PER " 

4400 INPUT "UNIT ";N2 

4410 PRINT "ARE YOU SURE? Y/N" 

4420 Y$=INKEY$:IFY$=""THEN4420 

4430 IF Y$="N"THEN4380ELSEIFY$=" 

Y"THEN4435ELSE4410 

4435 H=H+(N1*N2): LSET HH$=MKN$ ( 

H) 

4440 L=L-N1:S=S+N1:P1=(N1*N2)-(D 
*N1) : P=P+P1 : P1=0 : N1=0 : N2=0 
4450 LSET LL$=MKN$ (L) :LSETPP$=MK 
N$(P):LSET SS$=MKN$(S) 
4460 GOTO 4650 

4470 INPUT" ENTER NUMBER UNITS RE 

TURNED FOR REFUND" ;N3 

4475 INPUT"HOW MANY CAN BE RESOL 

D?";N4 

4480 PRINT"ENTER AMOUNT YOU REFU 
NDED" 

4485 INPUT N5 



4490 PRINT "ARE YOU SURE? Y/N" 
4500 Y$=INKEY$:IFY$=""THEN4500 
4510 IFY$="N"THEN4470ELSEIFY$=»Y 
"THEN4520ELSE4490 
4520 L=L+N4 : R=R+N4 : J=J+N5 : 
S=S-N4 : N4=0: N5=0 
4525 LSET LL$=MKN$(L): LSET RR$= 
MKN$(R) : LSET JJ$=MKN$ (J) : LSE 
T SS$=MKN$(S) 
4530 GOTO 4650 
• 4560 PRINT "ENTER NUMBER UNITS YO 
U/YOUR FAMILY USED OR YOU GA 

VE AWAY" 
4570 INPUT N6 

4580 PRINT "ARE YOU SURE? Y/N" 

4590 Y$=INKEY$:IFY$=""THEN4590 

4600 IF Y$-"N"THEN4560ELSEIFY$=" 

Y"THEN4620ELSE4580 

4620 L=L-N6:K=K+(N6*D) :G=G+N6:N6 

=0 

4630 LSET LL$=MKN$ (L) : LSETKK$=MK 
N$(K):LSET GG$=MKN$(G) 
4640 GOTO 4650 
4650 PUT #1,RN 

4655 t N=0 : N1=0 : N2=0 : N3=0 : N4=0 : N5= 
0 : N6=0 

4660 PRINT @ 448, "DO YOU HAVE AN 

OTHER ACTIVITY?" 

4670 Y$=INKEY$ : IFY$=" "THEN4 670 

4680 IF Y$="Y"THEN4030ELSEIFY$=" 

N»THEN4690ELSE4660 

4690 RETURN 

5000 ' ************************* 
5010 '***** OPEN FILES ******** 
5020 ************************** 
5030 OPEN "D",#1,"INV",116 
5040 FIELD 1, 11 AS AA$,32 AS BB 
$,5 AS CC$,8 AS DD$,5 AS SS$,5 A 
S RR$,5 AS GG$,8 AS EE$,8 AS JJ$ 
,8 AS KK$,8 AS HH$,8 AS PP$,5 AS 

LL$ 
5050 RETURN 

6000 ************************** 
6010 '*** PRINT REPORT *** 
6020 ' ************************* 

6030 CLS : PRINT "ENTER TODAY'S DAT 
E" 

6040 PRINT "EXAMPLE: JANUARY 10, 

1988" 
6050 LINE INPUT W$ 

6055 W$="INVENTORY REPORT FOR PE 
RIOD ENDING "+W$ 

6060 W=LEN(W$) :Wl=INT((133-W)/2) 
6070 CLS:PRINT"I'M WORKING ON YO 
UR REPORT" 

6080 PRINT#-2,TAB(W1)W$ 

6090 PRINT#-2," * 

6100 PRINT#-2,TAB(73)F1$ 

6105 BI=BI+(L*D) 

6110 PRINT#-2,TAB(46)F2$ 

6120 PRINT#-2,F3$ 

6130 PRINT#-2," " 



64 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



The Bigges* 
The Best 
Th e indispensable 




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most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
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VIP Writer III 

WORD PROCESSOR • SPELLING CHECKER • PRINT SPOOLER 

"..Nearly every feature and option possible to implement on the Color Computer. The design of the program 
is excellent; the programming is flawless." --The RAINBOW OCTOBER 1983 

That's what they said about VIP Writer. Wait until they review VIP Writer III! We've added even 
more features and options to make the VIP Writer III the BEST word processor for the CoCo 3! 



SCREEN DISPLAY OPTIONS 

VIP Writer 111 has a screen of 32, 40, 64 or 80 characters wide by 24 lines 
using the CoCo 3's hardware display with actual lower case letters. You 
can choose foreground and background colors from up to 64 different hues. 
Color can be turned ON or OFF for the best possible display using a color 
or monochrome monitor or TV set. VIP Writer 111 has a built in on-line 
context sensitive help facility which displays command usage in easy to 
read colored windows. VIP Writer III also runs at double clock speed! 

TEXT FILE STORAGE 

There is a 48K text buffer and disk or cassette file linking allowing virtually 
unlimited text space. In addition, there is a 48K print spooler to allow you 
to print one document while editing another. 

EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer III has a full featured screen editor which can be used to edit 
text with lines up to 240 characters long with or without automatic word 
wrap around. You can select type-over mode or insert mode. There is 
even an OOPS command to recall a cleared text buffer. Other editing 
features include: Type-ahead, typamatic key repeat and key beep for 
flawless text entry, end of line bell, full four way cursor control with 
scrolling, top of textfile, bottom of textfile, page up, page down, top of 
screen, bottom of screen, beginning of line, end of line, left one word, right 
one word, DELETE character, to beginning or end of line, word to the left 
or right, or entire line, INSERT character or line, LOCATE and/or 
CHANGE or DELETE single or multiple occurrence using wildcards, 
BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to TEN simultaneous block 
manipulations, TAB key and programmable tab stops, three 
PROGRAMMABLE FUNCTIONS to perform tasks such as auto column 
creation and disk file linking for continuous printing. 

TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you to 
format your text in any way you wish. You can change the top, bottom, 
left or right margin and page length. You can set your text flush left, 
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can have headers, footers page numbers and TWO auxiliary lines which 
can appear on odd, even or all pages. You can also select the line on which 
they appear! You can even change the line spacing! All of these format 
parameters can be altered ANYWHERE within your text file. 

TEXT FILE COMPATIBILITY 

VIP Writer ill creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all other 
VIP Programs as well as other programs which use ASCII file format. You 
can use VIP Writer III to create BASIC, assembly, PASCAL or C files. 
VIP Writer HI also allows you to save and load files using DISK or 
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directories, display free space on a disk and kill disk files. 

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VIP Writer ill supports most any printer serial or parallel using the parallel 
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from 1 10 to 9600. You are able to imbed printer control codes anywhere in 
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DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer III is supplied with a 125 page instruction manual which includes a 
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SPELLING CHECKER 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller for NO ADDITIONAL COST! VIP 
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THE ORIGINAL VIP WRITER 

VIP Writer is also available for CoCo 1 and 2 owners and has all the 
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VIP Speller 



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Every time you flip through the 
pages of THE rainbow and are 
inspired to park yourself in front 
of the beloved CoCo, you should expect 
to discover something new. New in the 
sense that, after tossing aside THE 
RAINBOW and turning off panting CoCo 
for the night, you have added some new 
insights to your ever-expanding core of 
CoCo lore. 

As a newcomer to BASIC, you may be 
awed and overwhelmed by its vast 
complexity. It can be intimidating! 
CoCo is so powerful that when you 
discover a routine or technique you are 
comfortable with, you have a tendency 
to use it exclusively and rest on your 
laurels. 

One of the features of the DRAW (as 
well as the PLAY) statement I have never 
mentioned is the X option, which exe- 
cutes sub-strings and returns. I was so 
enamored with concatenation that I saw 
no need for this feature. It appeared as 
an alternate method to perform a par- 
ticular task. Everyone knows that CoCo 
has more than one way to accomplish 

a mission. 

In last month's tutorial, we studied 
Ann B. Mayeux's delightful children's 
program, ABC (September 1987, Page 
58). 

Instead of using my sacred concate- 
nation technique of displaying lettering 
on the Hi-Res screen (on CoCos 1 and 
2 — Lo-Res in CoCo 3), she used the 
DRAW X option. 

In the process of copying her listing, 
I noted three facts. It's easier to type 
XB$; than +B$. Why? In the all-caps 
mode, the SHIFT key is used only once 
in the four keystrokes. In the compar- 
able concatenation sequence, SHIFT is 
used twice in three keystrokes. This 
constant shifting bodes evil for the 
average, non-expert typist. Personally, 
in long, concatenated lines, I am apt to 
strike a '4' for a T, or a ';' for a '+', in 
my "shift-no-shift-shift" sequence. 

In Line 480 of Ann Mayeux's listing, 
I noticed that she had managed to get 
the entire word into one DRAW statement 
line. I suspect that I would have reached 
CoCo's limit had I used concatenation 
— somewhere in the middle of the word 
ALLIGATOR I would probably have 

Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 

68 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Mission 
Interchangeable 



By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



gotten an LS Error message, signifying 
that the string was too long (more than 
255 characters) . . . not to mention the 
OS Error message, even earlier on, 
warning that CoCo was sulking because 
not enough string space was cleared. 

These observations made me recall 
that I hadn't seen or used a CLEAR 
statement in the program. 

Noticing things is OK. If you fail to 
study and learn from your observations, 
you may be missing an opportunity to 
add to your growing storehouse of 
CoCo facts. 

The best way for a beginner to pro- 
ceed is to experiment. How? By making 
a small program to compare the two 
techniques. Refer to listing COMPARE. 

Stoke up CoCo and key in Lines 10 
and 100. We want a PMDDE 4 panel and 
a perpetual loop to hold our creation on 
the screen. 

We need some string variable mate- 
rial to put into our DRAW lines. Lines 20 
and 30 create the letters A and B, respec- 
tively 

Key them in. Key in Line 50. Within 
quote marks, we size and locate the first 
letter, A, hidden in variable AS. Con- 
sider the data inside the quote mark as 
a choo-choo locomotive. Each concat- 
enated (+) string variable can be likened 
to a freight car, and each freight car is 
connected to the one before it. Our 
sequence is one *A' car and one 'B' car, 
repeated until CoCo squirms in protest. 

Run our mini-program of lines 10 
through 100 (Listing 1). Three sets of 
ABs appear on the screen. Press BREAK. 
Enter EDIT50, press X to jump to the 
end of the line, type +A$, press enter 
again and run. Oops! OS Error! 



Press BREAK, enter 5 CLEAR500 and 
run. CoCo breathes a sigh of relief. Add 
as many freight cars as CoCo can stand. 
Run again. Nine more freight cars can 
be added to the freight train before 
CoCo throws up its hands in despair 
and hollers, "LS Error!" 

Count the letters within the quote 
marks in lines 20 and 30 (14 and 19, 
respectively). Count the number of 
freight cars in Line 50 — first the A$ and 
then B$ (8 and 7, respectively). 

Perform these calculations with the 
PRINT command, pressing ENTER after 
each (and make sure your answer 
matches mine): 



Enter 

PRINT14*8 
PRINT19*7 
PRINT112+133 
PRINT245+9 



Answer 
112 

133 
245 
254 



Edit Line 50 to Size 12, adding one 
space to Line 50. Run. 255 is OK. Ignore 
the runaway lettering that is slipping off 
the screen. Now, press BREAK, enter 
EDIT50 and press the space bar until the 
cursor is over the 0 in 10. Press I to go 
into the Insert mode. Type 0 to turn the 
10 into 100. Press ENTER and run. No 
good. To get rid of the extra 0 and 
return Line 50 to its earlier state, enter 
ED IT 50 and press the space bar until the 
cursor is over either 0 in 100. Press D 
(for delete), then press ENTER and run. 

Observe that we used CoCo as a 
calculator to do necessary arithmetic. 
There is no need to resort to pencil and 
paper. This calculator feature is often 
overlooked by the novice, but it is very 
useful. For instance, if we did a series 
of PRINT0 relocations, we could wind 
up with a line like this: 

110 CLS:PRINT@ 190+64+16," 
etc. 

Execute by entering RUN110. But by 
doing the necessary calculations on 
CoCo in the command mode, we get the 
same result: Entering PRINT190+64+16 
yields the result of 270. With a one, two, 
three, we have a more meaningful, 
compact line. 

Edit Line 110 by entering EDIT110. 
Press the space bar until the cursor is 
over the 1 of 190, type 3C and then 270 
(to change 190 to 270 — you change 
three characters). Then type 6D to delete 
six characters, press ENTER, and enter 
RUN110. By entering RUN110 we get 
around the graphics mode into the text 



mode without disturbing either pro- 
gram. Line 100 keeps the graphics page 
from spilling over into the text page. 

Back to work! Change the value in 
Line 50 to S8. Key in Line 60. Note that 
every sub-string is a part of the DRAW 
statement. Thus, unlike concatenation, 
which adds, executing sub-strings stuffs 
the string variables within the quote 
marks of DRAW statements. The closing 
quote is optional. Run. Note that CoCo 
happily romped off the screen. 

Do we need CLEAR? Not to execute 
sub-strings. 

Press BREAK and enter EDIT50. Press 
X to jump to the end of Line 50. Use 
the left arrow key to eliminate the 
fourth +A$, press ENTER, and run. Press 
BREAK, enter 5 CLEAR0 and run. No 
good. Mask Line 50 with REM. Run 
again. No, we do not require CLEAR. 
Change the value in Line 50 to SX4 and 
run again. 

Find out how many As and Bs you can 
display in Line 60 before CoCo drops 
over the edge. 

Remember to remove the final quote, 
stuff away and add the closing quote. 
You will find that CoCo is getting so 
bloated that he drunkenly staggers off 
the right side of the screen. 

Now, we know for sure concatena- 
tion is fine, but executing sub-strings 
with the X option gives us a bigger bang 
for our typing efforts; it's simpler to use, 
and the keystrokes are more manage- 
able. We need not clear string space and, 
as a bonus, we save memory. 

Enter 5 CLEAR 500 and unmask Line 
50. To see the minimum amount of 
memory you must reserve for the scoop 
in Line 50, enter 5 CLEAR and find the 
lowest value required. Do it the trial- 
and-error way. Try other values. When 
you get the lowest value that will allow 
CoCo to operate Line 50 — congratu- 
lations! 

Now enter 5 CLEAR 200 and EDIT50. 
Type 84, press the space bar, then press 
H and ENTER. Enter DEL5 and run. 

You may want to save your work as 
COMPARE at this time. Enter NEW. 

Our second project for today's con- 
sideration is a routine to label PMODE 4 
graphics pages 1 want to save to disk. 
I wanted to create a graphics page 
filename that I could use as the title 
when 1 saved the display. A single-code 
character would identify the particular 
graphics routine utilized. A three- 
numeral value would be assigned to the 
first variable, and a two-numeral value 
would identify the second variable. 

This identifying label would read 
T000-00 through T999-39 and appear 



in the upper left-hand corner. On the 
input of a single digit, it is necessary that 
the blank tens and hundreds columns 
house zeros (so that 003 or 3 give the 
same result). These completed codes 
become the title of the graphic. 

What does this have to do with you? 
This tutorial explains one way to ac- 
complish the mission. Between lines 1 10 
and 700 you can put some sort of 
graphics routine that has one or two 
inputted numbers. You can adjust this 
program by deleting unnecessary lines 
or unwanted multiple-line statements to 
suit your requirements. 

There are two parallel constructions 
between lines 10 and 100. Key in the 
INDEX listing. Line 10 calls for a vari- 
able consisting of from one to three 
digits — or none, if you choose N. The 
first statement in Line 30 creates a string 
variable by converting N into X$. 

Each of the three digits will be 
plucked out of X$ and assigned a sepa- 
rate string variable in lines 40 through 
60. Line 60 contains A$, the hundreds 
column digit. Line 40 fingers B$, the 
tens column digit, and Line 50 picks out 
C$, the units column digit. MID$ and 
RIGHTS were used to pinpoint the 
desired digit. 

CoCo has to be told what to do in the 
event of a single-digit number being 
called. The hundreds column contains 
a zero rather than the contents of 
MID$ ( X$ , 2, 1 ) . It also has to check the 
same status of the other variable, Z, in 
the tens column. 

If N is between 0 and 99, Line 80 
determines that the hundreds column 
digit is zero and the tens column digit 
is whatever a M I D$ ( X$ , 2 , 1 ) turns up. 

If you add the command :GOTD100 
to the end of Line 60 and input various 
values, you will see that lines 70 through 
90 are needed. Can you figure out why? 
What if you changed the value of 
B$=MID$(X$,2,1) to 0? Why would 
this maneuver present problems? 

Chew on this: If the hundreds column 
is null or empty, then surely A$ equals 
0 in all instances. The digit in the tens 
column might, or might not, be a zero. 
B$=MID$(X$,2,1) or B$=LEFT$ 
(X$,2) will pull out whatever is in the 
tens column. 

Why doesn't LEFTS (X$,l) work? 
Put on your thinking cap and try some 
variables — you can use your direct 
mode to see what number was selected. 
Press BREAK and enter PRINT 
LEFTS ( X$ , 2 ) . Lop off : GOTD100 from 
Line 60. 

A parallel construction was used for 
the second variable, Z. See the second 



statement in lines 30 through 50 and 
Line 90. 

The next step (GOSUB1000) involves 
a jump to the routine in Lines 1000 
through 1140 to allow CoCo to mem- 
orize the variables that create the nu- 
merals 0 through 9 and the letters A, B 
and T and a dash ( — ). It returns and 
sets up the PMODE 4 screen. 

Line 110 is what it is all about. We 
draw Size 8 at location 3,15 (horizontal, 
vertical) using concatenation; T$ desig- 
nates the series. Then we draw whatever 
values were in the three-digit input, a 
dash, and whatever values were in the 
two-digit input. To save our work, enter 
CSAVE"INDEX". 

A two-line graphics routine illus- 
trates an imperfect use of this program. 
Insert these lines: 

200 DRAW"BM=N; ,=Z;R5F7R5" 
210 CIRCLE(N+17,Z+B) ,6,1 

Try various combinations of N and Z 
inputs ranging from N=0 to 221 and 
Z=16to 99. 

For the intrepid CoConaut: If you 
want to refine this program, change 
lines 10 and 20 to read allowed input 
values. Include a couple of IF lines to 
reject out-of-bounds entries. 

Better yet, revise Z values to allow for 
a three-digit number, so you can hop all 
over the entire screen vertically, from 16 
to the highest allowable value without 
drifting down off the screen. This 
should be an exciting, fun challenge for 
you. 

Listing SRVELDRD may now be keyed 
into your working program. It was 
condensed and revised from "Demon- 
stration in Art'* by Ricky Sutphin (Page 
80, October '87). His program, C0CD- 
ART, allows you to save, load, view and 
draw PMODE 4 graphics screens with a 
disk system. 

We're now finished with the file 
number creating program, the short 
demo graphic and the utility to save, 
load, view and draw more graphics into 
a larger program. You might want to 
save the whole thing as "TOTAL " to have 
it handy. You never know when you 
might need it. 

This listing can be used with any 
suitable graphics program. Merely 
change Line 780 to an appropriate line 
number to link up with your revised 
TOTAL. 

TOTAL is a combination of INDEX, the 
two-line graphic demo and SAVELOAD. 
TOTAL contains Line 1, not found in 
INDEX, and deletes Line 999 as redun- 
dant. 

If you want to save SAVELOAD as a 

March 1988 THE RAINBOW 69 



separate program, enter DEL-218. Then 
enter DEL999- . You will be able to save, 
load and view any existing graphics you 
have squirreled away. You will not be 
able to draw a new graphic but that is 
life . . . and why we saved TOTAL. 

If you want to use SAVELOAD or 
TOTAL with a cassette-based system, 
revise lines 820 and 880 to the following: 

820 CSAVEM N$, 1536, 7679, 1536 
880 CLOADfl N$ 



Position your tape and you are in 

business. 

There is no better way to get the 
maximum utility from your CoCo than 
to read THE RAINBOW, get intrigued by 
something and experiment. If you find 
something useful or potentially valua- 
ble in the distant future, save the listing 
and write it up, in words that have 
significance to you, in your personal 
reference notebook. 

You have two stand-alone programs 



you can adjust to use in any manner 
your creative urge beckons. These 
routines may suggest other areas to 
investigate and projects to attempt. You 
are encouraged to explore and find uses 
for these utility programs. It always 
generates satisfaction when you learn 
something new or are dimly reminded 
of facts once learned but tucked into the 
dark reaches of your unconscious. 
Bring them out into the open and let 
them flower. □ 



Listing 1: COMPARE 

0 '<COMPARE> CONCATENATION WITH 

SUB-STRING EXECUTION 

10 PMODE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 

20 A$=»U6R4D3NL4D3BR3" 

30 B$= "U6R3 FDGNL3 FDGNL3 BR4 " 

50 DRAW"S8BM10 , 20"+A$+B$+A$+B$+A 



$+B$ 

60 DRAW"BM10,50XA$;XB$;XA$;XB$;X 
A$ ; XB$ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; X 
A$ ; XB$ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; " 
100 GOTO100 



Listing 2: INDEX 

0 »<INDEX> IDENTIFYING NUMBERS 
FOR SAVED GRAPHIC SCREENS 
10 CLS:F0RX=1T04: PRINT: NEXT : INPU 
T" ENTER NUMBER OF DESIGN 

000 THRU 999" ;N 
20 PRINT: INPUT" TIM 
ER 00 THRU 

99" ;Z 

30 X$=STR$ (N) :Y$=STR$(Z) 
40 

1) 



B$=MID$(X$,3,1) : J$=MID$(Y$,2, 
C$-RIGHT$ (X$ , 1) : K$=RIGHT$ ( Y$ , 



50 
1) 

60 A$=MID$(X$,2,1) 

70 IF N<10 THEN A$="0" :GOTO90 

80 IF N<100 AND N>9 THEN A$="0": 

B$=MID$(X$,2,1) 

90 IF Z<10 THEN J$*="0" 

100 GOSUB1000 : PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCRE 

EN1,0 



110 DRAW"S8BM3 , 15"+T$+N$ (VAL(A$) 
)+N$(VAL(B$) )+N$(VAL(C$) ) : DRAWQ $ 
+N$(VAL(J$) )+N$(VAL(K$) ) 

999 GOT0999 

1000 N$(1)="BR4NU4BR" 

1010 N$(2)="BR2U2R3U2NL3BD4NL3" 
1020 N$(3)="BR2R3U2NL2U2NL3BD4" 
1030 N$ (4)="BE2NU2R3U2D4" 
1040 N$(5)="BR2R3U2L3U2R3BD4" 
1050 N$(6)="BR2U4NR3D2R3D2NL3" 
1060 N$(7)="BR2BU3UR3D4" 
1070 N$(8)="BR2U4R3D2NL3D2NL3» 
1080 N$ (9)="BE2NR3U2R3D4" 
1090 N$(0)="BR2U4R3D4NL3" 
1100 D$="BR2U4R3D2NL3D2» 'A 
1110 E$="BR2U4R2FGNL2FGNL2BR" •B 
1120 Q$="BE2R3BD2" 'DASH 
1130 T$=*"BR4U4NL2R2BD4" f T 
1140 RETURN 



Listing 3: SAVELDAD 

2 60 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" COCO 
GRAPHICS DEMO"," ME 
NU" 

270 PRINT,,,, 11 [1] SAVE IT"," 
[2] LOAD IT", , ," [3] VI 

EW IT" ,,,,,,," ENTER OPTION 

NUMBER" 

280 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN2 80 
290 IF A$="1"THENGOSUB380 
300 IF A$="2"THENGOSUB450 
310 IF A$="3"THENGOSUB490 
370 GOTO260 

3 80 CLS :F0RX=1T05: PRINT: NEXT : INP 
UT" GIVE IT A NAME" ;N$ 

390 IF N$=""THEN380 

400 IF LEN (N$ ) >12THENPRINT" THA 



T'S TOO LONG" :FORX=1TO500: NEXT: G 
OTO380 

410 SAVEM N$, 3584,9727,3584 

4 20 PRINT" ITS DISK FILE NAM 

E IS: ";N$ 

430 FOR X=1TO4000:NEXT 

440 GOTO2 60 

4 50 cls : forx^ 1t05 : print : next : inp 
ut" name and extent ion. .. . 
";ni$ 

460 IF N1$=""THEN450 
470 LOADM Nl$ 
480 GOTO260 

490 PMODE4,l:SCREENl,l 

500 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN500ELSE 

260 



70 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1988 



Listing 4: TOTAL 

0 ' <TOTAL> (<INDEX>, TWO LINE 
GRAPHIC ROUTINE, <SAVELOAD> COM- 
BINED) 

1 'OMIT LINES 2J3J3-930 

1J3 CLS : F0RX=1T04 : PRINT : NEXT : INPU 
T" ENTER NUMBER OF DESIGN 

jSjSfS THRU 999" ;N 
20 PRINT: INPUT" TIM 
ER j3j3 THRU 

99" ;Z 

3j3 X$=STR$(N) :Y$=STR$(Z) 

4j3 B$=MID$(X$,3, 1) :J$=MID$(Y$,2, 

1) 

50 C$=RIGHT$ (X$ , 1) : K$=RIGHT$ ( Y$ , 
1) 

6J3 A$=MID$(X$,2,1) 

7j3 IF N<lj3 THEN A$="j3" : GOT09j3 

8j3 IF N<lj3j3 AND N>9 THEN A$="j3": 

B$=MID$(X$,2,1) 

9j3 IF Z<lj3 THEN J$="j3" 

10j3 GOSUBlj3j3j3:PMODE4,l:PCLS:SCRE 

ENl,j3 

110 DRAW"S8BM3,15"+T$+N$(VAL(A$) 
)+N$(VAL(B$))+N$(VAL(C$)) : DRAWQ$ 
+N$(VAL(J$) )+N$(VAL(K$) ) 
2j3j3 DRAW"BM=N; / =Z;R5F7R5" 
21j3 CIRCLE (N+17,Z+8) ,6,1 
7j3j3 "<SAVELOAD> VIEW 
71j3 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN71j3 
720 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" COCO 
GRAPHICS DEMO"," M 
ENU" 

73J3 PRINT,,,," [1] SAVE IT"," [2 
] LOAD IT",,," [3] VIEW IT", "[4 
] DRAW IT" , , , , , " ENTER OPTI 

ON NUMBER" 

740 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN74J3 
75j3 IF A$="l" THEN GOSUB8j3j3 



THEN GOSUB86j3 
THEN GOSUB9J3J3 
THEN GOTO10 



76J3 IF A$="2" 
770 IF A$="3" 
780 IF A$="4" 
790 GOTO720 
800 GOSUB920 
810 IF N$=""THEN800 
820 SAVEM N$, 3584, 9727, 3584 
830 PRINT" ITS DISK FILE NAM 

E IS: ";N$ 
840 FOR X=1T0 4000: NEXT 
850 GOTO720 
860 GOSUB920 
870 IF N$=""THEN860 
880 LOADM N$ 
890 GOTO720 

900 PMODE4,l:SCREENl,l 

910 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=""THEN910ELS 

E720 

920 cls : print© 2 02,"": input" 

name / extension 

. .";n$ 

930 RETURN 

1000 N$(1)="BR4NU4BR" 
1010 N$ ( 2 ) ="BR2U2R3U2NL3BD4NL3 " 
1020 N$(3) ="BR2R3U2NL2U2NL3BD4" 
1030 N$(4)="BE2NU2R3U2D4" 
1040 N$(5)="BR2R3U2L3U2R3BD4" 
1050 N$(6)="BR2U4NR3D2R3D2NL3" 
1060 N$ (7)="BR2BU3UR3D4" 
1070 N$(8)="BR2U4R3D2NL3D2NL3" 
1080 N$(9)="BE2NR3U2R3D4" 
1090 N$(0)="BR2U4R3D4NL3" 
1100 D$="BR2U4R3D2NL3D2" 'A 
1110 E $= " BR2U4R2 FGNL2 FGNL2 BR" 1 B 
1120 Q$="BE2R3BD2" 'DASH 
1130 T$="BR4U4NL2R2BD4"'T 
1140 RETURN 



PRINTERS! 

N EWl Okidata 1 92+ (Par. or Ser.) s 370 

N EWl Okidata 193 (Parallel) $ 540 

N EWl Okidata 193+ (Serial) $ 6I0 

Okimate 20 Color Printer $ I35 

Fujitsu 2100 (80 col.) $ 4I0 

Fujitsu 2200 (1 32 col.) *520 

Toshiba 321 (Par. or Ser.) $ 5I0 

Qume Letterpro 20 (Letter Qual.) $ 445 

Silver Reed 420 (Daisy Wheel) $ 240 

Silver Reed 600 (Daisy Wheel) $ 575 

(Add $ I0 Shipping for Printers) 



ACCESSORIES! 

Taxan 12" Green Monitor $ l 25 

Taxan 1 2" Amber Monitor $ l 35 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot (80 col.) $ 30 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot'(l32 col.) $ 45 

Stand w/ Diskette Storage (80 col.) $ 47 

Stand w/Diskette Storage ( 1 32 col.) $ 57 

Other Printers, Monitors, and Accessories for CoCo 
and IBM upon request. 

$ 15 off interface with purchase of printer. 

Find your cheapest published price and we'll beat it!!! 



DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS! 

ALL Vi HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives!) , '235 

Drive 0, 1 (addressed as 4 drives!) $ 350 

All above complete with HDS controller, 
cable, & drive in case with power supply 

Bare Double Sided Drives *I09 

Dual Vi Height Case w/ Power Supply *49 

Double Sided Adapter *25 

HDS Controller, RS ROM & Instructions $ 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes J 32 & f 3 s/h 

We use the HDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROM's. 
Shipping Costs: *5/ drive or power supply, *I0 max. 
Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft — M0. Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft.-*20. 
Other cables on request. (Add J 3°° shipping) 



CLOSEOUT* $ 29.9S 



SP-2 INTERFACE for 
EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Rugs 

■ Optional external switch (*5°° extra) frees parallel port 
for use with other computers 

'While Supplies Last 



SP-3 INTERFACE for 
MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem /printer switch— no need for Y-cables 
or plugging/unplugging cables 



c 




R 



P.O. Box 293 
Raritan, NJ 08869 
(201)722-1055 

ENGINEERING 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 71 



the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 



In Good Form 

By E.C. Thompson 




With Receipt you can print out personalized receipts, four 
to a page. What are the advantages of using your computer 
and printer for this? Well, there are three big ones: durability 

— when you use quality paper; convenience — with your 
hardware and this program, you'll never run out of receipts; 
and economy — personalized forms at less than one-fourth 
the cost of commercial equivalents. 

On running the program, you are prompted for your 
printer's baud rate. Then you are asked if you would like 
normal printing or double strike (bold type). Finally, you are 
prompted for how many pages of receipts you want (re- 
member — four to a page). After you answer these three 
questions, your forms will begin printing out. 

The printed form has two parts, the receipt itself and a stub 
for your records. On both the stub and the receipt, there is 
room for an identifying number. 

After cutting out the receipts, you may want to punch holes 
in the left margin and store the forms in a loose-leaf binder. 
To facilitate detaching the receipt from the stub, you can 
make perforations along the border with a sewing machine. 

To personalize your receipt, edit Line 200 by typing in your 
street address. Count the number of spaces it takes up and 
delete that number of spaces immediately after the address 

— this keeps the right margin properly aligned. Edit Line 210, 
adding your city and state, counting spaces and deleting as 
before. Similarly, your name can be added in Line 310 to fit 
below the "signed" space. 

In addition, the baud rate selector can be detached from 
the program and added to any other program you want to 
work with the printer. 



**** 

* 
* 
* 



******* 

wen*, ; 0 . 

STUB 



**** 



*** 

* 
* 

* 



******** 
NO. ** 



******* 

* R 

* B 

* C 

* E 

SKIVED 



*** 



*** 



**** 



**** 



**** 



**** 



*** 



*** 



******* 



*** 



*** 



* * » T j 

* » . p OR: 

** i : * — ' .~.7~" vl " fdoii «-.j 

* .... — ;;; : 

** : 



The listing: RECEIPT 

5 CLS3:PRINT@4,"**BAUD RATE SELE 
CT0R**"; 

10 PRINT@72 , "1) . BAUD 600"; 
15 PRINT@136,"2) . BAUD 1200"; 
20 PRINT@196+4, "3) . BAUD 2400"; 
25 PRINT@200+95 , "ENTER 1, 2, OR 
3 " ; : INPUT D 

30 ON D GOTO 35, 40, 45 
35 D=87:GOTO50 
40 D=41:GOTO50 
45 D=18:GOTO 50 
50 POKE150, (D) 

80 CLS ( 3 ) : PRINT @ 1 9 6 , " DOUBLE STRI 

KE (Y OR N)";:INPUT F$ 

90 IF F$="Y"THEN GOTO110 

100 IF F$="N" THEN GOTO 120 

110 0=31:GOTO 130 

120 0=19: GOTO 130 

130 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$(0) 

140 CLS 3 

150 PRINTS 19 4 , "HOW MANY PAGES WI 
LL I PRINT"; : INPUT C 
160 FOR P=l TO C 

170 CLS6:PRINT@168, "P R I N T I 
N G"; 

180 FOR X=l TO 4 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



190 PRINT#-2,STRING$ (77,42) 
200 PRINT#-2,"* RECEIPT NO. 

* R NO. 

*«■ 

210 PRINT#-2,"* STUB 

* E 

220 PRINT#-2,"* 

* C 

230 PRINT#-2,"* 

* E 

240 PRINT#-2,"* 

* I RECEIVED FROM 

*n 

250 PRINT#-2,"* 

* p 

*»» 

260 PRINT#-2,"* 

* rp 

/100 (dollars) *" 

270 PRINT#-2,"* 



280 PRINT#-2,"* 
* FOR: 



290 PRINT#-2,"* 
* 

300 PRINT#-2,"* 

* $ 

310 PRINT#-2,"* 
* 



(signed) - 



320 PRINT#-2,STRING$ (77,42) 
330 PRINT#-2,STRING$(77,46) 
340 NEXT X 

3 50 PRINT#-2,STRING$(4 / 13) 
3 60 NEXT P 

370 PRINTQ325,"* * * FINISHED * 

* * " ; 

380 PRINT@3 88+2,"CONTINUE?<any k 

ey>" ; 

390 EXEC44539:GOTO100 



Worksheet Printer 

By Don Hitko 




Have you ever wanted to make a quickie spreadsheet, but 
you didn't feel like fooling with the "cells" of a computerized 
'sheet? And even with a straightedge your handmade charts 
come out crooked? Well, Worksheet Printer is here! Whether 
you're filling in a seating chart or roughing out assignments 
for your sales crew, this program provides a quick means to 
see what goes where and how much. 

Worksheet Printer uses printer graphics characters to draw 
a sheet (to be used horizontally) with 19 rows and 10 columns. 
It is configured for a DMP-200, but should work as is on 
the entire line of DMP printers. For those with other printers, 
these are the codes that should be changed: 

Line Number Printer Code Description 



320 
440 
440 
480 



27 28 
241 
250 
245 



Half forward linefeed 
Horizontal Bar (-) 
Cross (+) . 
Vertical Bar (|) 



For those with 132-column printers, the number of 
repetitions of the loops starting in lines 430 and 470 can be 
increased to allow for more rows. If you are using fanfold 
paper and want a sheet with more columns, increase the 
number of repetitions in the loop beginning in Line 330. 

Now you can sit in front of your spreadsheet program, 
brimming with confidence, knowing exactly what you're 
going to do before you start! 

The listing: SHEET 
10 CLS 

20 PRINT" SPREAD-SHEET WORKSHEET 
PRINTER 11 



30 PRINTTAB(10) ;"BY DON HITKO" 
40 PRINT: PRINT 
50 PRINTTAB(12) ;"<1> 
60 PRINTTAB(12) ;"<2> 
70 PRINTTAB(12) ;"<3> 
80 PRINTTAB(12) 



600" 
1200" 
2400" 
4800" 
9600" 



"<4> 

90 PRINTTAB ( 12 ) ; "<5> 
100 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 6) ; "PLEASE SE 
LECT PRINTER" 

110 PRINTTAB ( 12 ); "BAUD RATE" 
120 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 120 
130 IF I$<"1" OR I$>"5" THEN 120 
140 ON VAL(IS) GOTO 150,160,170, 
180,190 

150 POKE &H9 6,&H57:GOTO 200 
160 POKE &H96,&H29:GOTO 200 
170 POKE &H9 6,&H12:GOTO 200 
180 POKE &H9 6,&H07:GOTO 200 
190 POKE &H96,&H01 
200 CLS 

210 PRINT" SPREAD-SHEET WORKS HE E 
T PRINTER" 

220 PRINTTAB ( 10 ); "BY DON HITKO" 
230 PRINTS 3 20, "HOW MANY COPIES W 
OULD YOU LIKE PRINTED?" 
240 PRINT" ->" ; : LINE INPUT C$ 
250 CLS 

2 60 PRINT" SPREAD-SHEET WORKSHEE 
T PRINTER" 

270 PRINTTAB ( 10 );" BY DON HITKO" 
280 PRINT© 3 2 9, "PRINTING COPY z " 
290 IF VAL(C$)<1 THEN 200 
300 FOR C=l TO VAL(C$) 
310 PRINT@366,C 

320 PRINT #-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(28) 
330 FOR A=l TO 11 
340 GOSUB 430 

March 1988 THE RAINBOW 



350 FOR B*l TO 10 
360 GOSUB 470 
370 NEXT B, A 
380 FOR D=l TO 11 
39J3 PRINT#-2 
4)8)8 NEXT D 
41)3 NEXT C 
42j3 END 

43)3 FOR X=l TO 2)3 



44) 3 PRINT #-2,STRING$(3,241) ;CHR 
$(25)3) ; 

45) 3 NEXT X 

46) 3 RETURN 

47) 3 FOR Y=l TO 2)3 

48) 3 PRINT #-2,STRING$(3,32) ;CHR$ 
(245); 

49) 3 NEXT Y 
5)3)3 RETURN 



\0» 



Creating Data Files 

By Raymond Doss 




Filedata can be used to produce a single-dimensioned 
alphanumeric string file. What good is that? Programming 
economy! If a file is produced in this fashion, the program's 
DATA statements do not have to be in the program. DATA 
statements use memory; if there are no DATA statements, 
there's more memory for the program. 

Filedata allows the user to set two internal dimensions 
from the first input. The first structures the input strings and 
the second loads the file and displays it back onscreen. The 
routine is designed for disk use, but modifications could be 
made for use on tape systems. 

Type in the program and run it. At the first prompt (for 
strings), type in the number of strings to be entered. This sets 
both internal dimensions. Don't be shocked at the string 
input stage — the absence of a question mark is a feature 
of the LINE INPUT command. The up arrow key can be used 
at any time to exit, produce and display the file onscreen. 
More string space can be cleared in Line 10 if needed. 

What are the rules for input? Simple! If you see it on the 
keyboard and it can be displayed on the screen, it'll work. 

The listing: FILEDATA 

1 ***************************** 

1 DATA-FILES: BY RAYMOND DOSS 
'CONSTRUCT SINGLE DIMENSIONED 
•ALPHA-NUMERIC FILES -RGD*87- 
f (PS: COMMAS WORK TOO!) 



2 
3 
4 
5 



6 ***************************** 

10 CLS:CLEAR2000:GOSUB90 

20 INPUT "HOW MANY STRINGS" ;NS : DI 

M AN$(NS) ,BN$(NS) :G0SUB9J3 

30 FORN=l TO NS : PRINT" STRING#"N, 

"BYTES="BY 

40 PRINT :PRINT"ENTER STRINGS BEL 

OW. COMMAS CAN BE USED. USE ,A ' 

FOR FAST FILE." 

50 PRINT: LINEINPUT"" ;AN$ (N) 

60 B=LEN (AN$ (N) ) : BY=BY+B 

70 IF AN$(N)=CHR$(94)THEN100 

80 GOSUB90:NEXTN:N=N-1:GOTO100 

90 CLS:PRINTSTRING$ (32,42) ; : PRIN 

T h *********** DATA-FILES ******** * 

* * " ; : PRINTSTRING $(32,42) ; : RETURN 

100 NN=N : CLS : GOSUB9 0 : INPUT "FILEN 

AME/EXT" ;F$:OPEN"0" , #1,F$ 

lip FOR N=l TO NN:PRINT#1,AN$(N) 

120 NEXTN:CLOSE#l 

130 CLS: PRINT"** LOADING FILE**: 

";F$ 

140 OPEN" 1 11 , #1,F$:N=1 
150 LINEINPUT#1,BN$(N) 
160 IF EOF(1)=-1THEN180 
170 N=N+1:GOTO150 
180 CLOSE#l:M«N 

190 FORN=l TO M:PRINTBN$(N) :NEXT 
N 

200 END 



Reading Data Files j« 

By Bill Bernico 

A pen pal recently sent me a disk with a bunch of data 
files containing the solutions to several games. Well, not 
knowing too much about the structure of data files or how 
to see what's inside them, 1 sat down with my CoCo manual 
and figured out how to get at the contents and display them. 
This easy-to-use program, File Reader, resulted. 

File Reader asks you only three questions — the first is 
the name and extension of the file to be displayed. The second 
asks whether you want the contents of the file output to the 
screen or to the printer. If you choose output to the printer, 

74 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



the contents are immediately printed out. If you choose to 
have the file output, to the screen, you must press the space 
bar to advance every line of data in that file — this is to 
prevent the contents from scrolling by too fast. (You don't 
have to sit with your fingers poised to press the SHlFT-@ 
combination in order to pause the scroll.) The third and final 
prompt merely asks if you want to read another file. 

The listing: FILEREflD 

10 'FILE READER 

20 'FROM KROMICO SOFTWARE 

30 'BY BILL BERNICO 

40 1 

50 CLS: CLEAR 5000 

60 INPUT " F I LENAME/ EXT " ;A$ 



70 PRINT "OUTPUT TO SCREEN OR pRI 
NTER? 

80 B$=INKEY$:IF B$=""THEN 8J3 

90 IF B$="S"THEN Q=0:GOTO 120 

100 IF B$="P"THEN Q=-2:GOTO 120 

110 GOTO 80 

120 CLS:OPEN"I" / #l / A$ 

130 IF B$="S"THEN GOSUB 320 

140 IF B$="P"THEN GOSUB 3 30 

150 FORX=1024 TO 1055 

160 POKE X, PEEK (X) -64 

170 NEXT X 

180 PRINT@42,A$ 

190 IF EOF(l)=-l THEN CLOSE: GOTO 
250 

200 INPUT#1,A$ 



210 PRINT #Q,A$ 

220 IF B$="P"THEN 240 

230 IF B$="S"THEN GOSUB 300 

240 GOTO 190 

250 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ANOTHER RU 
N (Y/N) 

260 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN 260 
270 IF I$="Y"THEN RUN 
280 IF I$="N"THEN CLS : END 
290 GOTO 260 

300 IF INKEY$OCHR$ (32) THEN 300 
310 RETURN 

320 PRINT@0," HIT SPACEBAR TO S 
EE MORE OF . . " : RETURN 
330 PRINT§0," PRINTING OUT CON 
TENTS OF ..." : RETURN 



CoCo * 



CoCo 3 



A Star Like a Wheel . 

By Jim Pruyne 

Stars uses CoCo 3's advanced capabilities to animate a 
spinning star. The program starts by prompting for input of 
the number of points the star will have. It asks if you want 
the star outlined, how fast the animation should be, whether 
you want an inner star inscribed, and how accurate the 
animation should be. The higher the number you select (up 
to 15), the smoother the animation. 

The animation is accomplished by drawing a number of 
images of the star in various degrees of rotation, as 
determined by the accuracy level input. Each image is drawn 
in a different color, using the PALETTE command set to the 
background color in order to be invisible. After all images 
are drawn, the program uses the PALETTE command to 
display each image in sequence by changing it from the 
neutral background color to a visible color. 

The listing: STARS 

10 'ROTATING STAR. BY JIM PRUY 
NE JR. 

20 f 201 W. SUMMIT, NORMAL IL. 

30 1 WITH ENCOURAGEMENT FROM. MELI 

SSA RODRIGO & RICHARD NEWTON 

40 POKE 65497 ,0 

50 ON ERR GOTO 410 

60 ON BRK GOTO 410 

70 PALETTE RGB 

80 HSCREEN 0 

90 INPUT » POINTS ";X 

100 INPUT"OUTLINE (Y/N) " ?0$ :0$=L 

EFT$(0$ / 1) 

110 INPUT 11 ROTATE <F>AST OR <S>LO 
W H ;D$:D$=LEFT$(D$,1) : IF D$= lt S l, T 
HEN D$="P16 n ELSE D$="" 
120 INPUT" INNER STAR (Y/N) » ;C$:C 
$=LEFT$(C$,1) :IF C$= ,, Y" THEN CS = 



64 ELSE CS=70 

130 INPUT "ACCUARACY (1-15)";AC 

140 DIMA(2,X) 

150 PI=3. 14159265 

160 S=2*PI/X 

170 F=0 

180 PALETTE 0,0 
190 HSCREEN 2 
200 CD=2/X/AC*PI 
210 FOR Fl=l TO AC 
220 HCOLOR Fl 
2 30 F=F+CD 

240 FOR BB=80 TO 15 STEP -CS 
250 FOR R=0 TO 2*PI STEP S 
260 A(1,R/S)=COS(R+F)*BB+160 
270 A(2 ,R/S)=SIN(R+F) *BB+96 

2 80 NEXT 

290 FOR R=0 TO X-l 

300 W=R+INT(X/2)+l 

310 IF W>X-1 THEN W=W-X 

320 HLINE (A(1,R) ,A(2,R) ) - (A (1 , W) 

,A(2,W) ) ,PSET 

3 30 NEXT 

340 IF 0$<>"Y fl THEN 380 ELSE FOR 

R=0 TO X-2 
350 HLINE ( A ( 1 , R) , A ( 2 , R) ) - ( A ( 1 , R+ 
1) ,A(2,R+1) ) ,PSET 
3 60 NEXT 

370 HLINE(A(1,0) ,A(2,0) )-(A(l,X- 

1) ,A(2 ,X-1) ) ,PSET 

3 80 NEXT: PALETTE Fl, 63: NEXT 

3 90 FOR F=l TO AC: PALETTE F,63:P 

LAY D$: PALETTE F,0:IF INKEY$O lftl 

THEN 400 ELSE NEXT: GOTO 3 90 
400 PALETTE F , 2 3 : A$=INKEY$ : IF A$ 
= ,! » THEN 390 ELSE IF A$= M " THEN 

400 ELSE CLEAR: RUN 
410 POKE 6 54 9 6,0: PALETTE RGB: STO 
P 

March 1988 THE RAINBOW 75 




Five in a Row 

By John James 




In ConFive, two players take turns dropping letters down 
one of 10 columns, attempting to get five in a row horizon- 
tally, vertically or diagonally. Play continues until a player 
succeeds in doing so, or until there are no possible moves left. 



The listing: CONNECTS 




2 CLS 

3 PRINT"THIS IS CONNECT 5 IN A R 
OW FOR TWO PLAYERS. TRY TO BE T 
HE FIRSTTO GET 5 IN A ROW TO WIN 

THE GAME" 
30 FOR X=l TO1000:NEXT X 
40 CLS 3 

50 DIM A$(10,10) 

60 PRINT"JOYSTICK OR KEYBOARD (J 

OR K)";:INPUT K$ 
70 C=5 

80 INPUT "NAMES OF PLAYERS " ; NA$ 
(1) ,NA$(2) 
90 CLS 3 

100 FOR Y=l TO 10:PRINT§Y*2-1,Y; 
: NEXTY 

110 FOR X=l TO 10 

120 FOR Y=l TO 10 

130 A$(X,Y)="0" 

140 NEXT Y 

150 NEXT X 

160 FOR X=l TO 10 

170 FOR Y«l TO 10 

180 PRINT @X*32+Y*2,A$(X,Y) ; 

190 NEXT Y 

210 NEXT X 



220 PRINT@Y*32," 



ii 



:PRINT@Y 



*32,"" ; 

230 IF C=5 THEN PRINTNA$(1) ELSE 

PRINTNA$ ( 2 ) 

240 IF C=5 THEN C=l ELSE C=5 

250 IF C=5 THEN B$="i" ELSE B$=" 

b" 

260 IF K$="K" THEN 350 

270 H=JOYSTK(0) :V=JOYSTK(2) 

280 IF H<7 OR V<7 THEN 270 

290 IF C=l THEN PRINT@2*INT (H/6 . 

3) ,B$; 




300 IF C=5 THEN PRINT@2*INT (V/6 . 

3) ,B$; 

310 TS=PEEK(65280) 

320 IF C=5 THEN PRINT@2*INT (V/6 . 

3) -1, INT (V/6. 3) 

330 IF C=l THEN PRINT@2*INT (H/6 . 
3)-l,INT(H/6.3) ; 

340 IF TS=127 OR TS=255 THEN 270 
ELSE IF C=l THEN X=H/6.3 ELSE X 
=V/6.3 

3 50 IF K$="K" THEN INPUT X 

3 60 IF X>10 OR X<1 THEN PRINT: GO 

TO 220 

370 FOR G=10 TO 1 STEP -1 

380 IF A$(G,X)<>"0" THEN NEXT G 

390 IF A$(G,X)="0" THEN A$(G,X)= 

B$ 

400 GOTO 160 





SuhnHssions (o "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone 
We like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in 
at one sitting and are useful, educational and fun* Keep in mind, 
although the short programs are limited in scope, many novice 
programmers find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve 
the software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, 
but we cannot key in program listings* All programs should be 
supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how the 
program works. If your submission is accepted for publication, 
the payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior to 
publication. 




76 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



TTjrsr-t" — 



by BJ Chambless 




This is the most comprehensive modem package for the 
Color Computer! ■ 

All arc Protocols Supported including CompuServe Pro- 
tocol B, XMODEM protocol, and XOWXOFF. Auto dial fea- 
ture for both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack 
modems. You can use all baud rates when using the Radio 
Shack Deluxe RS232 program pack! Printer baud rates are 
■ .selectable, .. 

You can print from the buffer and files bigger than the 
buffer can be uploaded and downloaded. Download di- 
rect to disk with automatic XON/XOFF protocol! Single key 
macros allow easy entry of often-used passwords and ID'S. 

Hl-Res screens with a choice of colors are used. All print- 
able characters available and all control characters are 
supported. 

RSDOS Version includes two sets, one for CoCo I and 
CoCo 11/ the other for CdCB 3> 
OS-9 Connection 3.0: 

? The package includes all of the features of the RSDOS ver- 
sion plus runs on OS-91 Versions for both Level I and level 
II are included. RS232 pak is required. 



RSDOS Disk 
OS-9 Disk 



$49,95 
$4995 



Also available from Radio Shack 
through Express Order Software 



*3 




Screen Star 

by Scott Cabit 



\ 



Data Master 

by BJ Chambless 

Simplify with pull-down menus 

All options are available from anywhere in the program. 
To make it even simpler, each menu option can be invoked 
by a single character! 
Dialog boxes 

Pop-up windows display current settings and available 
choices. 

Unique LIST display format 

You view data in easy-to-read rows & columns. From this 
easy-to-read screen you may edit your data, without hav- 
ing to exit. Mass changes are a snap! 

For even more power, use an access key to selectively dis- 
play a subset of records and can change them right on the 
screen! 

Compatibility with OS-9 Profile & Data Bank 

You won't lose any of your valuable data! 
Easy Expansion 

with re-definition of records and transfer of files. 
Elements & Records: 

Each record can contain up to 512 characters used within 
35 elements. Elements are defined as: alphanumeric 
(descriptive data), math (real numbers including dollars & 
cents), date, and derived (formulas calculated from other ele- 
ments in the same record). You can store any type of data 
using these field types! 



Also available from Radio Shack 
through Express Order Software 



Screen Star implements the popular WordStar editing 
capabilities. If you know WordStar you already know how 
to use Screen Starl 

• Edit files larger than memory since Screen Star uses the 
disk as an extension of memory. 

• Block Commands - with a keystroke you can mark the 
start and end of a block, then move, copy, or delete the 
block. 

• Cursor Movement is easy with an array of commands to 
move left or right one character, or one word, or one line; 
scroll forward or back one line, one screen, one block; 
jump to the start or end of the line or the screen, block, 
or file. 

• Find & Find/Replace Commands make mass changes and 
searches a snap. 

• Pop-Up Help Menus are as close as a keystroke. 



call or write today for 



• Closing Commands let you exit the editor with or with- 
out save, and can import or export files whenever you 
need them. 

• Smart Speller is included. 

Parameter commands personalize your environment. 

• Access the OS-9 Shell. 

• Up to 10 functions keys can be defined by CoCo 3 users 
for fast, repetitive functions. 

• Use with the Text Formatter for a full word processing 
team. Simply imbed the Text Formatter commands in your 
Screen Star file and it will be printed in style! 

• Level t & Level 2 are supported and both versions are 
included. 



. » •■>.?• 



Requires OS-9 Disk 
With Text Formatter 



$49.95 
$74.95 



Calf or Write tot 

" 



Display & Entry Screens 

Design up to 9 different screen formats for data display 
and data entry for each data base. This is helpful for access- 
ing your data for different purposes. 
Sorts & Selections: 

Up to 9 different access keys can be defined. These are 
used for displaying data on the screen or selecting data for 
printing. You may use several levels of sorts as well as logi- 
cal operators to select just the right data. A powerful generic 
search is also available. 
Reports: 

See your data any way you want by designing your own 
reports! Data Master offers easy-to-use tools to design pro- 
fessional reports including report headings, titles, column 
headings, automatic page numbers, column totals, and 
more. Store up to 9 report formats for each data base. 
File Management 

Built-in file management capabilities allow easy file 
manipulation for transferring data files, renaming data files, 
expanding data files, and more. 
Upload/Download 

Data Master can read and write standard sequential files 
which aids in data transfer between DynaCalc and .many 
others. 

Full keyboard ease 

taking full advantage of the CoCo 3's cursor and function 
keys. 

OS-9 accessible 

Even while operating within Data Master. 



Requires OS-9 Level II, 
CoCo 3, 512K 



Also available from Radio Shack 
through Express Order Software 

An easy way to get beautiful documents and letters with 
OS-9, Text Formatter interfaces with any editor that pro- 
duces standard ASCII text files. 

Features indude left and rightjustlflcation, page breaks, 
special spacing, automatic pagination, automatic page 
numbering, centering, indenting, tabs, and sending 
escape and control codes to your printer as well as sophis- 
ticated headers and footers. Special functions include 
macros for often used sequences, relative arguments, up- 
per and lower case modes, nonpr/ntaWe remarks, and morel 



Requires OS-9 




Box 668 • Enclnltas, CA * 



— 



FREE Catalog 



512K COMBO Package 

We've put together a combination package of everything you need to expand to 
5I2K and priced it special to make it impossible to resist! The package includes: 

• 512K Memory Board with prime, 120 ns memory chips and easy instructions. 

• 512K Ramdlsk & Diagnostics Software package for RSDOS. 

• Specifications on the important GIME chip (plus a number of additional pages 
of CoCo 3 technical details that we think you'll find interesting.) 



5I2K Combo Package 
OK Combo Package 
(no chips In board) 



$114.95 
S 54.95 



Name 

Address _ 

City 'fry gfff?j , :^¥7^^f^^^y vr : . , St^t|p 

Veil Send me your f^Hlsf? CAtaMogf CoCo □ 

VISA MasterCard 
Card 




$34.95 



'■'■'■';s?l 

|619| 436-3512 



1. ■•.«».. ■' : 





Signature 

\ *"« ^v."'i}'V* , 'Vp'**' ; ,? 







Format 



& , 



-■■■■-'<■'■■■ 



6 l 



. ^ f „ . „■ ., ■ y r 



Surface — $2 minimum. 

2% for orders over $! 00 
Air or Canada — $5 minimum 

i|§^fbr orders over $100 - v - V :■ S^^^^^P^ 5 ^^? '$10* 
Checks are delayed for bank clearance . ; #ll£ * JS& ..J.-fe- 



if. Sales 

^<Jrj SB 
Shipping * 




mm 





16K ECB 




I Wi s hing W e5 



If you have an idea for the "Wishing 
Well" submit it to Fred c/o THE 
RAINBOW. Remember, keep your 
ideas specific, and don 't forget this is 
BASIC. All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 

Hello, readers. Welcome back to 
another month's effort in meet- 
ing your needs and wishes. As 
usual, you, the reader, serve as the 
inspiration for these pages by writing in 
with your ideas. If there is one common 
thread that runs through nearly all of 
my mail, it is this one request: "Keep 
writing more software for the Speech/ 
Sound Pak!" 

This is perfectly understandable. 
When you invest in something like the 
Speech/ Sound Pak, you want it to be 
more than just a novelty. Therefore, this 
month's program will be another valu- 
able educational program that uses 
speech as an option. The program does 
not need the Speech Pak to be effective, 
however. Speech is just an extra option, 
especially nice for use with younger 
students. 

Some of you have written and asked 
why I do not make these programs work 
with other speech packs for other 
dealers. There are two reasons for this. 
First, I believe that Tandy products for 
the CoCo have the widest distribution 
simply by being sold side-by-side with 
the CoCo. Second, I cannot afford to 
go out and buy every other dealer's 
product. If other dealers were to supply 
me with the hardware, I would gladly 
make some of my programs compatible 
with other voice packs. Unless that 
happens, however, these programs will 
be designed to work specifically with the 
Tandy version. 

The Program 

This month's program is Sentence 
Structure: Recognizing Simple Subjects 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North A dams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



Sentence 



By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



and Predicates. The purpose of the 
program is very simple: to familiarize 
students with simple subjects and pred- 
icates while introducing them to sen- 
tence diagramming. The program has 
some features found in other educa- 
tional programs I have written for 
"Wishing Well." Other parts are totally 
new 

One of the nice features of the pro- 
gram is that you can easily add up to 
50 of your own sentences (in DATA 
statements). You might even want to 
save different versions of the program 
with sentences of varying difficulty, 
building up a small software library. 

Most of my other programs have 
used multiple-choice selection for user 
responses. This is one of the few pro- 
grams that has the user actually input 
the correct answer. The sentence is 
directly in front of the student, so he or 
she should be able to input an answer 
without making a mistake in spelling, in 
which case the response would be wrong 
even on a written test. 

Sentence Structure shares features 
found in other "Wishing Well" pro- 
grams. You can go to the score card any 
time by pressing the @ key, and you still 
have the option of continuing once you 
check the score. You also have the 
familiar title screen that graces my 
programs. 

Running the Program 

On running the program you will see 
the title screen. Press T or N for the 
options of Talking or Not Talking. 
(Make sure your CoCo is turned off 



before you try to insert the Speech/ 
Sound Pak.) 

One nice feature of Sentence Struc- 
ture is that it requires you to read each 
screen. The program presents a sentence 
and asks you to type in the simple 
subject or simple predicate. Sometimes 
it asks for the sentence's subject first; 
other times it asks for the predicate first; 
this helps keep the program from be- 
coming too routine. 

After both simple subject and simple 
predicate have been entered, the pro- 
gram diagrams the sentence onscreen 
for you. You advance to the next screen 
by pressing ENTER. 

No other instructions are needed for 
the program to run. 

Adding Your Own Information 

If you want to delete my DATA state- 
ments, enter DEL 1000-4999. You 
could also choose to add to my data 
rather than dump it, placing your new 
DATA statements between lines 1080 and 
5000. Line 5000 reads 5000 DATA 
END , END , END; you must include this 
line or the program will not work. If you 
want to add your own data, follow this 
format: 

1000 DATA sentence, simple 
subject , simple predicate 

Here's an example; 

1000 DATA JOHN LEFT THE 
HOUSE, JOHN, LEFT 

Be sure to place commas between each 
piece of information. If you need to use 
a comma as part of the punctuation, 
surround each piece of information 
with quotes: 

1000 DATA "JOHN, MARY AND BILL 
ALL LOVE APPLES.", "JOHN, MARY 
AND BILL", "LOVE" 

An OD Error means you left out a 
comma somewhere. Be sure not to 
delete Line 5000. 

After you enter your data, run the 
program to test it and then save your 
new program under a different file- 
name, such as SENT2. 

CoCo 3 Problems 

A few of you have written to say that 
some of my graphics programs do not 
work properly with the CoCo 3. Now 



78 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



that I have a CoCo 3, 1 know what you 
mean. Some of my programs that re- 
quire a press of the reset button to 
change the screen color do not work as 



they should. It seems that the CoCo 3 
has a standard color set that does not 
change with reset. I'll publish some fixes 
to these problems shortly (please do not 



ask me for copies in advance by mail). 
Just be patient — the fix is coming! And 
keep your cards and letters coming, 
too! □ 



The listing: SENTENCE 











40 


. . .137 




125 ... 


186 






260 , 


72 






335 


. .103 






430 


188 






530 . . . 


,214 






END . 


190 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 



REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 



************************ 

* RECOGNIZING SIMPLE * 

SUBJECTS & PREDICATES* 

BY FRED B.SCERBO * 

60 HARDING AVE. * 

NORTH ADAMS , MA 01247 * 

COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 * 
************************ 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



9 CLEAR3000 

10 CLS0:FORI=1TO64:PRINTCHR$ (156 
) ; : NEXT 

15 F0RI=1T0192:READA:PRINTCHR$(A 
+128) ; :NEXT 

20 DATA126 / 124 / 124 / 120 / 53 / 60 / 60 / 
53 , 60,56,59,48,58,60, 61, 60,56,62 
,60,53,50,53,53,60,60,53,60,56,1 
12,126,124,124 

25 DATA122 , , , ,52, 60, 61, 53, 56, ,58 

,57,58, ,53, ,48,62,48,53,52,55,53 

, , ,53,56, , 112 ,12 2, , 

30 DATA123,115, 115,114,52, 60,60, 

52,60,56,56, ,56, ,52, ,48,60,60,52 

,48,52,52,60,60,52,60,56,112,123 

,115,115 

35 DATA80, ,80,122,124,125,124,12 
0 , 12 6 ,. 12 4 , 12 2 , 12 2 , 80 , 117 , 117 ,124, 
,124,124,116,12 4,12 6,124,117,80, 
80,122,126,124,122,122,112,112 
40 DATA80,80,80,122,80,117,80,80 
, 12 6 , 12 6 , 120 , 12 2 , 80 , 117 , 117 , 80 , 8 
0,80,80,80,122,80,117,80, ,122,12 
6,126,120,122, ,80 

45 DATA123, 115, 115, 122,80,117,11 
2 , , 122 , 116 , 114 , 123 , 115 , 119 , 117 , 1 
15,115,115,112,80, 122, ,117,115,1 
15,122,122,116,114,123 ,115,115 
50 F0RI=1T064 : PRINTCHRS ( 147 ) ; : NE 
XT 

55 PRINT@3 57," RECOGNIZING SIMP 
LE »;:PRINT(33 89," SUBJECTS & P 
REDICATES M ; : PRINT@421 , 11 (T)ALKI 
NG OR (N)OT ? " ; 

60 PRINT @4 53," BY FRED B.SCERB 
O 



ii . 

r 



65 PRINT@485," COPYRIGHT (C) 19 
87 "; 

70 X$=INKEY$ :XX=RND (-TIMER) :IFX$ 

="T"THEN90 

75 IFX$="N"THEN85 

80 GOTO70 

85 NT=1:GOTO150 

90 CLS0 

95 XX=&HFF00 : YY=&HFF7E 

100 POKEXX+l,52:POKEXX+3,63 

105 POKEXX+35,60:GOTO150 

110 I FNT= 1THENRETURN 

115 FORII=lTOLEN(AA$) 

120 IF PEEK (YY) AND 12 8=0 THEN120 

125 POKEYY,ASC(MID$(AA$,II,l) ) 

130 NEXTII 

135 IFPEEK(YY) AND128=0THEN135 
140 POKEYY,13 

145 FORI=1TO1000: NEXT: RETURN 
150 SW=31 
155 CLS0 

160 DIMAO(50) ,A$(50) ,SS$(50) ,SP$ 

(50) ,NP(50) 

165 CLS0:GOTO205 

170 AA$=JK$:GOSUB110 

175 IF LEN(JK$)<=SW THEN195 

180 FOR T=SW TO 0STEP-1:IF MID$ ( 

JK$,T,1)=" "THEN190 

185 NEXT T:GOT0195 

190 L$=LEFT$ (JK$,T) : W$=L$ : GOSUB2 

00:JK$= ,f "+RIGHT$ (JK$, (LEN ( JK$ 

) ) -T) JGOT0175 

195 W$=JK$:PRINTW$: RETURN 

200 PRINTW$: RETURN 

205 FORJ=1TO50:READ A$(J),SS$(J) 

,SP$(J):IF A$(J)="END" THEN 2 15 

210 NEXT J 

215 REM START QUIZ 

220 J=J-l:FORI=l TO J 

225 AO(I)=RND(J) 

230 IF NP(AO(I))=l THEN 225 

235 NP(AO(I) )=1:NEXTI 

240 FOR Y=1TO1000:NEXTY 

245 GOT0395 

250 CLS 

255 PRINT© 3 5, "HERE IS EXAMPLE NU 

MBER" ; P 

2 60 RETURN 

265 AA$=" WHAT IS THE SIMPLE S 

UBJECT OF THIS SENTENCE ?" : 

:GOSUB110:PRINT@96,AA$ 

270 PRINT@192,"";:JK$=" "+A$ (A 

O(P) ) :GOSUB170 

275 PRINT : PRINT" => ";:LINEINP 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 79 



UTA$ 

280 IFA$="@"THENGOSUB480 

285 IF FX=1 THEN RETURN 

29)3 IF A$<>SS$ (AO (P) ) THEN305 

295 PRINT :JK$=" YOU ARE CORREC 

Tl THE SIMPLE SUBJECT IS: "+SS$ (. 

AO(P) ) :GOSUB170 

300 CR=CR+l:GOT0315 

305 PRINT :JK$= M WRONG! THE COR 

RECT SIMPLE SUBJECT IS: "+SS$(AO 

(P) ) :GOSUB170 

310 IR=IR+1 

315 GOSUB475 

320 X$=INKEY$:IFX$<>CHR$(13)THEN 
320 

325 RETURN 

330 AA$=" WHAT IS THE SIMPLE 

PREDICATE OF THIS SE 
NTENCE ?" :GOSUB110:PRINT@96,AA$ 
335 PRINT@192,""; :JK$=" "+A$ (A 
O(P) ) :GOSUB170 

340 PRINT : PRINT" => " ;:LINEINP 
UTA$ 

345 IFA$="@"THENGOSUB4 80 

350 IF FX=1 THEN RETURN 

355 IF A$<>SP$(AO(P) )THEN370 

3 60 PRINT :JK$=" YOU ARE CORREC 

Tl THE SIMPLE PREDICATE IS: "+SP 

$(AO(P) ) :GOSUB170 

3 65 CR=CR+1:GOTO380 

370 PRINT :JK$=" SORRY! THE COR 

RECT SIMPLE PREDICATE IS: "+SP$( 

AO(P) ) :GOSUB170 

375 IR=IR+1 

38J3 GOSUB475 

385 X$=INKEY$:IFX$<>CHR$(13)THEN 
385 

390 RETURN 
395 FORP=lTOJ 

400 WW=RND(2) :IFWW=1THEN410 

405 FX=0:GOSUB2 50:GOSUB2 65:GOSUB 

250 : GOSUB330 : GOT0415 

410 FX=0:GOSUB2 50:GOSUB3 30:GOSUB 

250:GOSUB265 

415 CLS:JK$=" HERE IS HOW WE W 
OULD DIAGRAM THE SIMPLE SUBJECT 
AND THE SIMPLE PREDICATE .": PRINT 



Hint . , . 

Revving Up Your Tape System 

Are you running a tape-based CoCo 3 system? 
Would you like to speed things up? I thought so. It 
is possible to use the high-speed poke with a tape- 
based CoCo 3, Just enter POKE 65437 , 0 before saving 
your program to, and loading from, tape. If you do 
this, make sure you are using the highest quality tape 
you can find. The increased speed during I/O can 
cause problems if you don't. 

George Ellenburg 
Edgewood, FL 



@32,"" ; :GOSUB170 

420 PRINT: JJ=LEN (SS$ (AO (P) ) ) :PRI 

NTSTRING$ ( JJ+6 ,32); CHR$ (133) 

425 PRINT" "SS$(AO(P) ) ;" "CH 

R$(133)" n ;SP$(AO(P)) 

430 PRINT" "STRING$(26,131) 

435 PRINT@2 30+JJ,CHR$(129) ; 

440 PRINT@262+JJ,CHR$(133) 

445 PRINT@320," SIMPLE SI 

MPLE" 

450 PRINT" SUBJECT PREDICA 
TE" 

455 GOSUB475 

460 X$=INKEY$:IFX$<>CHR$(13)THEN 
46J3 

. 4 65 NEXT P 
470 GOSUB480:RUN 

475 PRINT@483," PRESS <ENTER> TO 

CONTINUE" ; : RETURN 
480 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 
485 PQ=CR+IR:IF PQ=0THEN PQ=1 
490 PRINT" NUMBER CORRECT = " 
CR 

495 PRINT 

500 PRINT" NUMBER WRONG = " 
IR 

505 PRINT: PRINT" STUDENT SCOR 

E = " ;INT(CR*100/PQ) ;"%" 

510 PRINT: PRINT" ANOTHER TRY 

(Y/N/C)"; 

515 W$=INKEY$:IF W$=""THEN515 
520 IF W$= M C" THEN FX=1: RETURN 
525 IF W$«"Y" THEN RUN 
530 IF W$="N" THEN CLS: END 

535 GOT0515 

990 REM ENTER DATA AT LINE 1000 
1000 DATA AROUND HER HEAD SHE WO 
RE A YELLOW RIBBON, , SHE, WORE 
1010 DATA IT LOOKS LIKE IT IS GO 
ING TO RAIN. , IT, LOOKS 
1020 DATA I WILL BE LEAVING WHEN 
THE SUN COMES OUT., I, WILL BE LE 
AVING 

1030 DATA GET ME A PLATE OF THAT 

PASTA WITH MEATBALLS . , YOU , GET 
1040 FIVE TIRED MEN PLODDED ACRO 
SS THE MUDDY FIELD ., MEN, PLODDED 
1050 DATA THE SIGHT OF THE TOWN 
IN THE DISTANCE GAVE THEM HOPE., 
SIGHT, GAVE 

1060 DATA HE WAS WEARING A PINK 

SHIRT . , HE , WAS WEARING 

1070 DATA WE SAW HER DANCING ALL 

NIGHT LONG . , WE , SAW 
1080 DATA MUCH FRUIT GROWS RAPID 
LY IN THE SUNNY VALLEY DOWN SOUT 
H. , FRUIT, GROWS 

1090 DATA THOSE EXPENSIVE JEWELS 
IN THE WINDOW ARE NOT FOR YOU., 
JEWELS, ARE 

5000 DATA END, END, END 



80 THE RAINBOW March 1988 







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The final installment of a four-part 
programming tutorial 



BASIC 

for Beginners 

4 

Lesson IV 



By David W. Ostler 



"BASIC for Beginners: Les- 
son Iir[February 1988, Page 
_ I I 20], I left you with a pro- 
gramming exercise. There are many 
solutions. Those of you who want to see 
what one possible solution looks like, 
just examine the listing of DRTRBRSE, 
which accompanied "Lesson III." 

Well, this is the final installment in the 
series. I hope I've helped you to develop 
your programming skills, or have 
helped you to better understand how 
commands work. Again I stress that we 
have not covered all the commands the 
Color Computer uses, but we have 
touched on many of the more common 
commands. To learn more about pro- 
gramming, keep reading the rainbow 
and studying the manuals that accom- 
pany your computer. 

This month we put the finishing 
touches on our database program, 
adding disk and tape I/O and enhanc- 
ing some of the program's features. 

Because the program has become 
rather intricate, I've included a line-by- 
line breakdown of this month's addi- 
tions. (For a line-by-line description of 
the rest of the program, see Page 24 of 
February's "Lesson III.") 

The best way to understand and plan 
a complicated program is to break it 
into blocks, identifying them by REM 
statements. Or you can mark the blocks' 
functions on a hard copy of the pro- 
gram. Use these methods to write your 
programs and keep the program func- 
tions straight in your mind, 

open a fcfasSE 

The DPEN command opens up a file 
on disk, tape or RAM memory for 
input/ output (I/O) operations. This 
command can also name the file, estab- 
lish length and define the device to be 
used. 

Proper syntax for this command is 
0PEN"X$",Y,R$, where X$ is either I 

"A 1 — -r ■ — ! i " . — ~- ■ '. ' 1 

Dave Ostler is an IC layout designer and 
the systems manager for a CAD main- 
frame system. He teaches CAD and 
electronics at Guilford Technical Com- 
munity College. Dave is married and 
has three children, Avis, Chuck and 
Erik. 



82 THE RAINBOW March 1988 




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or 0, for input or output, respectively. 
Y is the device to be opened, and fl$ is 
the filename of the file to be accessed. 
An example of the use of the OPEN 
command is OPEN "I " , 1 ,DRTfVPRG, 
which opens a file named DRTfVPRG for 
loading of data into the computer. The 
device used for "input from" is the disk 
drive. Note that I represents input from 
and □ represents output to. 

The following are device specifiers, 
which should be used in place of the Y 



for determining the device for I/O "to" 
or "from": 



Device 

Disk 
Tape 
Printer 
Keyboard 



Specifier 
1 

-1 

-2 
0 



EOF 

The EOF command detects when an 
"End Of File" has been reached, and is 



always used in an IF/ THEN format. 

The proper syntax for this command 
is IF EOF [x) THEN xxxx, or IF EOF (x) 
THEN CLOSE, where x is the End Of File 
indicator and xxxx is the line number 
in the program where the program 
should go if an End Of File has been 
detected. Note that the command line 
reads, "If End Of File is x then go to 
xxxx, or if End Of File is x then close 
file. 1 * The End Of File indicators are 
listed as follows. These numbers indi- 



Line 

500 



502 



505-520 

540 
545 



550 



552 



553 



554 
555 

560 
565 
567 

568 



572 



573 
579 



Description 

sets N equal to zero, clears the screen and 
allows the input of string variable A$, 
which is the name of the file to be used for 
data I/O, 

tests to see if there has been an entry for 
string variable A$; if there has been no 
entry then the program will return to Line 
2000. 

test the value of variable fl to see whether 
the system is tape or disk, 
a remarked line. 

opens an input file to the cassette with the 
name found in A$, which was entered in 
Line 500. 

checks to see if the End Of File has been 
reached. If it detects an EOF condition, it 
will jump to Line 560. If no EOF condition 
has been detected, the program will then 
go to the next line, which is Line 552. 
inputs data from the cassette drive. Please 
note that this data has dimensioned vari- 
able labels, each variable related to the 
dimension variable label N. 
adds one count to the dimension variable 
label N. The computer does not care 
whether the data comes from the key- 
board, tape drive or disk drive — it treats 
all the data the same way. 
forces a jump to Line 550 to test for an 
EOF condition. 

properly closes the file that was opened in 
Line 545. 

forces a jump to Line 900. 
a remarked line. 

opens an input file to the disk drive with 
the name found in fl$. 
checks to see if the End Of File has been 
reached Mf it detects an EOF condition, it 
will jump to Line 580. If no EOF condition 
has been detected, the program will then 
go to the next line, which is Line 572. 
inputs data from the disk drive. This data 
has dimensioned variable labels, each 
variable related to the dimension variable 
label N. 

adds one count to the dimension variable 
label N. 

forces a jump to Line 568 to test for an 
EOF condition. 



Line 

580 

590 
600 

602 



605-620 

650 
655 

660 



661 



675 
680 

682 
684 



Description 

properly closes the file that was opened in 
Line 567. 

forces a jump to Line 900. 

clears the screen and allows the entry of 

string variable fl$. 

sets a new value for PIS equal to the old 
value of fl$ entered in Line 600. This is 
done to avoid any file errors that may 
occur due to too many characters being 
used in the filename. Remember that your 
computer recognizes only filenames of a 
maximum eight characters long with a 
three-character extension. The extension is 
a label placed on the program name that 
tells the computer what type of program 
is being loaded or saved. See your manuals 
for more information on filenames and 
extensions. 

test the value of variable R to see whether 
the system is tape or disk, 
a remarked line. 

opens an output file to the cassette drive 
with the name found in 
sets a FOR/NEXT command with the value 
of variable Z to be set from zero to the 
value of N-l. (The reason for this is that 
if we left the value for zero to N, we would 
have a blank file left at the end of the data 
file when we saved the data file to disk or 
tape. This would use up data space and not 
allow us to make the most of our data 
space available. 

prints data to the cassette drive. These 
variables are printed as they relate to the 
variable label Z. The program then adds 1 
to the value of Z and causes the program 
to go back to Line 660 to start the next 
count of the FOR/NEXT loop set up in Line 
660. When the count conditions are satis- 
fied for the FOR/NEXT loop, the line will 
then properly close the file opened in Line 
655 and force a jump to Line 2000, which 
is the menu selection area, 
a remarked line. 

opens an output file to the disk drive with 
the name found in fi$. 
sets a FOR/NEXT command with the value 
of Z to be set from 0 to the value of N-l. 
prints data to the disk drive. 



84 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



cate that an End Of File condition has 
been detected: 



Device 

Disk 
Tape 



Indicator 

1 

-1 



CLOSE 

The CLOSE command properly termi- 
nates any file that was previously 



opened. Failure to properly terminate 
open files will result in an FD Error 
(bad file data). These files may or may 
not be recoverable; usually they are lost 
and all data contained in them is lost, 
as well. Sometimes you can recover it 
by repairing the files or by using a disk 
repair utility to look at the data and 
print it out. 

If for any reason you interrupt a 
program that has previously opened a 
file, or you suspect a file has been left 



open, type CLOSE and press ENTER. This 
command will then properly terminate 
any file that might have been left open. 
This can be done after a break or error; 
be sure to enter the command before a 
reset, cold poke or warm start has 
occurred. 

Proper syntax for this command is 
CLOSE, CLOSE*, where x is the proper 
device specifier or any other form that 
adds the proper device specifier on the 
end of the command. 



Line 



686 
687 

700-770 



Description 

adds 1 to the value of Z and causes the 
program to go back to Line 682 to start the 
next count of the FOR/NEXT loop set up in 
Line 682. When the count conditions are 
satisfied for the FDR/NEXT loop, it goes on 
to Line 686. 

properly closes the file opened in Line 680, 
forces a jump to Line 2000. 
print out the string variables B$, C$, Di and 
E$, and allow you to select which one to 

Sorrect ih ■■y:i 

clears the screen and allows the entry of B$ 
as it is related to 2; h will be used for £ 
new value for B$ as related to N, 
sets B$(N) equal to the same character 
ykluesas B$( Z ); forces a jump to Line 700. 



810-831 



900 



910-$l0 

950 
960 



';V<;^ Description 

perform the same operations for entering 
and changing variables C$, DS and E$, and 
then force a jump to Line 700, 
sets up a FOR/NEXT value for EL (As 
explained for lines 660 and 682, when 
displaying or printing variables entered in 
arrays, you must use the variable used in 
counting the array, which, in this case, is 
N minus 1 /This counts down the variable. 
To fail to do so will cause a blank file to 
be displayed ^- •• 
display text with associated variables as 
they relate to B . : 
prints text at the specified location, 
sets 1$ to an >^ftHS^^pin^l|^''-^d mil 
continue to Line 970 if any key is pressed. 



Still keeping the books the way 
Then you need CoCo- Accountant 



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List and total expenses and in- 
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March 1988 THE RAtNBOW 85 



Block 


Lines 


Label 


1 


0-85 


Setup 


3 


95-220 


Data Input 


3A 


300-330 


Entry Error Correction 


5 


500-520 


Output Device Setup 


5A 


540-560 


Cassette Input 


5B 


565-590 


Disk Input 


6 


600-620 


Input Device Setup 


6A 


650-661 


Cassette Output 


6B 


675-687 


Disk Output 


4A 


700-831 


Editor 


4 


900-980 


Text Display 


1A 


1000-1200 


Svstem Tvne Disnlav 


2 


2000-2010 


Main Menu 


7 


5000 


Program End Routine 


3B 


6000 


Maximum File Size Routine 



Figure 1 



PRINT# 

The PRINTttx command prints the 
characters following this command to 
the device specified. The device specifi- 
ers used for the PRINTttx command are 
the same ones used for the OPEN com- 
mand. 

Proper syntax for this command is 
PRINTtt-1 for the cassette drive, 
PRINTtt-2 for the printer, PRINT81 for 
the disk drive, or PRINTA$, where A$ is 
the proper device specifier as deter- 
mined in the program. 

LEFTS 

This command allows you to select 
the left string of characters within a 
specified string of characters. It is useful 
in various text data manipulations. 

The proper syntax for this command 
is B$ = LEFTS (AS,*,), where B$ is the 
new character string to be defined, A$ 
is the text string to be manipulated and 
x equals the number of characters to use 
in the length of the string manipulation 
(a number from 1 to 255). A common 
practice is to use the same string vari- 
able for the manipulation. This can be 
accomplished by the command fi$ = 
LEFTS (A$,B), which reads, "String 
variable A$ has a new value of the old 
value of A$, but only the first eight 
characters on the left of the old value 
of as." 



We will not go into the other string 
manipulation commands. 

The Program 

I mentioned earlier the method of 
"blocking off" your program, in which 
you take a hard copy of it and physically 
draw lines between distinct routines. 
You then label each routine, explaining 
its function. This makes the program 
much more understandable to you and 
to anyone else who looks at the listing. 
I blocked off the final version of DATA- 
BASE as shown in Figure I. 
Well, I guess this is it. We have cov- 



ered many of BASIC'S commands and 
have developed a small database pro- 
gram. The database is rather crude; I 
left it that way so you could practice the 
skills you have learned in this series. 
You can use what you have learned to 
enhance the database program, perhaps 
adding a feature that allows adding 
more data to an existing database, 
increasing the array sizes, etc. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this tutorial may be directed to the 
author at 901 Ferndale Blvd., High 
Point, NC 27260, Please enclose an 
SA SE when writing for a reply.) □ 




140 ,. . 


116 


310 


18 


600 


147 


740 . . 


118 


920 


, 38 


2000 


66 


END 


..;.12 



The listing: DATABASE 

0 'BASIC NAME DATABASE PROGRAM . 
THIS PROGRAM IS TO BE USED WITH 
THE BASIC PROGRAMMING COURSE 
WRITTEN BY DAVID W. OSTLER, COPY 
RIGHT 1987 

10 CLEAR1000:T=100:N=0:DIMB$(10) 
:DIMC$(10) :DIMD$(10) :DIME$(10) 
20 1 CHECK FOR TAPE OR DISK SYSTE 
M 

30 A=PEEK(188) 

40 'CHECK FOR 16K OR 64K SYSTEM 
50 B=PEEK(116) 

60 IF(A=14 AND B=127) THEN GOSUB 



1000 

70 IF(A=6 AND B=127) THEN GOSUB1 
010 

80 IF(A=6 AND B=63) THEN GOSUB10 
20 

85 GOTO2000 

95 'FILES ENTERED HERE 
100 CLS : PRINT "ADDRESS DATABASE # 
OF F I LE S " ; N : PRI NT : LI NE INPUT " ENT 
ER NAME 

";b$(n) 

110 print : lineinput"enter addres 

S 

";c$(N) 

120 PRINT :LINEINPUT"ENTER CITY, 
ST, &ZIP * H ;D$(N) 
130 PRINT: LINE INPUT 11 ENTER TELEPH 
ONE NO. 
";E$(N) 

140 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" 1. NAME- " ;B 
$(N) 

150 PRINT : PRINT" 2 . STREET-" ;C$ (N 
) 

160 PRINT: PRINT" 3. STATE- ";D$(N 
) 



86 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1988 



17 p PRINT : PRINT 11 4 . PHONE- ";E$(N 

) 

180 PRINT? 3 57 , "PRESS <C> TO CONT 
INUE" : PRINT@3 99 , "OR" : PRINT@416 , " 
1 PRESS THE NUMBER TO CORRECT" 
190 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN19j3ELSE 
IFI$="l»THEN3ppELSEIFI$="2"THEN3 
1£ELSEIFI$="3"THEN32J3ELSEIFI$="4 
M THEN3 30ELSEIFI$="C"THEN2ppELSEl 
90 

20j3 N=N+1:IFN=11GOTO6000 
210 CLS:PRINT@456, "ANOTHER ENTRY 
(Y/N) » 

220 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN220ELSE 
IFI$="Y"THEN100ELSEIFI$="N"THEN9 
00ELSE220 

300 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : LINEINPUT "EN 

TER NAME 

";B$(N) :GOTO140 

3 10 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : LINEINPUT"EN 

TER ADDRESS 

" ;C$ (N) :GOTO140 

320 CLS: PRINT: LINEINPUT" 3. STATE 

- " ;D$ (N) :GOTO140 

330 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : LINEINPUT "EN 
TER TELEPHONE NO. 

";E$(N) :GOTO140 
500 N=0: CLS: INPUT "ENTER NAME OF 
FILE TO BE LOADED" ;A$ 
502 IFA$=""THEN2000 
505 'CHECK FOR DISK OR TAPE 
510 IFA=6THEN545 
520 IFA=14THEN565 
540 1 CASSETTE TAPE READ IN 
545 OPEN"I",-l,A$ 
550 IF EOF (-1) THEN 560 

552 INPUT#-1,B$(N) ,C$(N) ,D$(N) ,E 

• (H) 

553 N=N+1 

554 GOTO550 

555 CLOSE 
560 GOTO900 

565 'DISK SYSTEM READ IN 

567 OPEN"I",l,A$ 

568 IF EOF (1) THEN 580 

572 INPUT#1,B$(N) ,C$(N) ,D$(N) ,E$ 
(N) 

573 N=N+1 

579 GOT0568 

580 CLOSE 
590 GOTO900 * 

600 CLS: INPUT "ENTER NAME OF FILE 

TO BE SAVED" ;A$ 
602 A$=LEFT$(A$,8) 
605 'CHECK FOR DISK OR TAPE 
610 IFA=6THEN650 
620 IFA=14THEN675 
650 'CASSETTE TAPE 
655 OPEN"0",-l,A$ 

660 FORZ=0 TO N-l 

661 PRINT#-1,B$(Z) ;" / ";C$(Z) ;", 

;D$(Z) ;",";E$(Z) ;», 

662 NEXTZ 



SAVE 



ii ♦ 



Coco Graphics Designer 

Only $29.95 



The Coco Graphics Designer pro- 
duces beautiful Greeting Cards, 
Banners, and Signs for holidays, 
birthdays and other occasions. 

The program features picture, 
border, and character font editors, 
so that you can modify or expand 
the already built in libraries. Plus 
a special "grabber" utility is in- 
cluded to capture areas of high 
resolution screens for your picture 
library. 

Requirements: a Coco !, II or III 
with at least 32K, one disk drive, 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 or 
JDOS. Printers supported in- 
clude: Epson RX/FX, Gemini 10X, 
SG10, NX10, C-ltoh 8510, DMP 



100/105/110/130/430 CGP220, 
many Okidata (check with Ze- 
bra), Seikosha GP100/250, Goril- 
la Banana, Legend 808. 
#C323 Coco Graphics Designer 



Picture Disk #1 

This supplementary picture li- 
brary diskette contains over one 
hundred additional pictures. 
#C333 Picture Disk #1 $14.95 



Colored Paper Packs 

1 50 sheets (50 each red, yellow, 
blue) with 60 matching enve- 
lopes. Perfect for making your 
productions outstanding. 
#0274 Paper Pack $19.95 




It's fun making your own Greeting Cards, Signs, and Banners with Ze- 
bra's Coco Graphics Designer. 



WICO 

TRACKBALL 
Only $29.95 

Order Cat#TBCC 





WICO designed these trackballs 
specifically for the Radio Shack 
Color Computer joystick port. Fea- 
tures 360-degree movement and 
quick-action fire button for smooth, 
arcade response and feel. Works 
great with Coco joystick and 
mouse software. 



The Car Sign Designer program en- 
ables you to easily create distinc- 
tive bright yeilow diamond shaped 
car signs. Everything you need is 
provided including two reusable clear 
plastic sign holders with suction 
cups, 50 sheets of bright yellow 
fanfold paper, and the Car Sign De- 
signer program disk and instruc- 
tions. ••■ Hardware, DOS, and 
printer requirements are the same 
as for our CoCo Graphics Designer 
above. Order Cat#CSCC, $29.95. 
For six additional sign holders, order 
Cat#CS6PK $9.95. 



Ordering Instructions: All or- 
ders add $3.00 Shipping & Han- 
dling. UPS COD add $3.00, VI- 
SA/MC Accepted. NY residents 
add sales tax. 



Zebra Systems, Inc. 

78-06 Jamaica Avenue 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 



87 



$ 
$ 

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II 



663 CLOSE 

664 GOT02j3j3j3 
675 'DISK SYSTEM SAVE 
68j3 OPEN"0" ,1,A$ 
682 FORZ=j3 TO N-l 

684 PRINT#1 / B$(Z) ;" / ";C$(Z) , 

D$(Z) ;",";E$(Z) ;»,»; 

685 NEXTZ 

686 CLOSE 

687 GOTO2J300 

70j3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT 11 1. NAME- ";B 
$(Z) 

710 PRINT: PRINT" 2. STREET- 11 ;C$ (Z 
) 

720 PRINT: PRINT" 3 • STATE- 
) 

740 PRINT: PRINT" 4. PHONE - 
) 

750 PRINT© 3 57 , "PRESS <C> TO CONT 
INUE" : PRINT@399 , "OR" : PRINT@416 , " 

PRESS THE NUMBER TO CORRECT" 
770 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN770ELSE 
IFI$="1"THEN800ELSEIFI$="2"THEN8 
10ELSEIFI$="3"THEN820ELSEIFI$= ,I 4 
"THEN830ELSEIFI$="C"THEN970ELSE7 
70 

800 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : LINE INPUT "EN 
TER NAME 

";B$(Z) 



";D$(Z 
";E$(Z 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

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LOT-PRO is specifically 
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-Unique LOT-PRO SYSTEM 60 
number selection routine 

ONLY $25 . 95 (disk or tape) 
CJN ENTERPRISES 
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Invest in LOT-PRO! 



It could make YOU rainbow 
RICH ! 



CEHTIFlCAIiON 

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88 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

THE RAINBOW March 1988 



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801 B$(N)=B$(Z) :GOTO700 

8 1/3 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : LINE INPUT" EN 

TER ADDRESS 

K «c$ (Z) 

811 C$(N)=C$(Z) :GOTO700 

820 CLS:PRINT:LINEINPUT"3. STATE 

- M ;D$(Z) 

821 D$(N)=D$(Z) :GOTO700 

830 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : LINEINPUT"EN 
TER TELEPHONE NO. 

";E$(Z) 

831 E$(N)=E$(Z) :GOTO700 
900 FORZ=0TO N-l 

910 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" 1. NAME- ";B 
$(Z) 

920 PRINT: PRINT" 2. 



) 

930 PRINT: PRINT" 3. 
) 

940 PRINT: PRINT" 4. 



STREET-" ;C$(Z 
STATE- ";D$(Z 
PHONE- ";E$(Z 



) 

950 PRINT@320," PRESS [C] TO 

CONTINUE, [R] TO RETURN T 

0 MAIN MENU,":PRINT@399,"OR":PRI 

NT@422,"[E] TO EDIT ENTRY" 

960 I$=INKEY$ : IFI$=""THEN960ELSE 

IFI$="C"THEN970ELSEIFI$="R"THEN2 

000ELSEIFI$="E"THEN700ELSE960 

970 NEXTZ 

980 GOTO2000 

1000 CLS0:PRINT@230, "32/64K DISK 
SYSTEM" ; : FORX«1TO1000STEP1:NEXT 
X : RETURN 

1010 CLS0:PRINT@228, "32/64K CASS 
ETTE SYSTEM" ; : FORX=1T01000STEP1 : 
NEXTX : RETURN 

1020 CLS0:PRINT@229, "16K CASSETT 
E SYSTEM" ; : FORX=1TO1000STEP1:NEX 
TX : RETURN 

2000 CLS0:PRINT@32," WELCOME TO 
THE BASIC DATABASE " ; : PRINT@71 , " 
WOULD YOU LIKE TO : " ; : PRINTS 13 3 , " 
B) EGIN A NEW DATABASE" ;: PRINT@19 
7,"A)BORT THIS PROGRAM"; 
2005 PRINT0261, "L)OAD A NEW DATA 
BASE" ; 
ABASE" 
ABASE" 



PRINT© 32 5, "S) AVE THIS DAT 
:PRINT@389,"V)IEW THE DAT 
: PRINT@458 , " [ SELECT ONE]" 



2010 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN2010EL 
SEIFI$="B"THEN95ELSEIFI$="A"THEN 
5000ELSEIFI$="L"THEN500ELSEIFI$= 
"S"THEN600ELSEIFI$="V"THEN900ELS 
E2010 

5000 CLS3:PRINT@224," RE BO 

OTING TO BASIC" :SOUND200, 2: SOUND 
100,3:FORX=1TO1000STEP1:NEXTX:CL 
S : END 

6000 CLS0:PRINT@224," MAXIMUM 
FILE SIZE REACHED" :SOUND200, 2: SO 
UND100 , 3 : FORX=1TO1000STEP1 : NEXTX 
:GOTO900 



Education Not e s 



16K ECB 




This month's program is for the 
younger set, specifically for 
children who are just beginning 
to read words. To them we present 
Phonics, our version of a phonics wheel. 

When a child begins to read, initial 
consonant sounds that represent famil- 
iar objects are learned first — "B is for 
boy" and "C is for Cat," for example. 
Next, final consonants are taught. For 
example, the word bed ends in D and 
car ends in R. 

The short vowel sounds are taught 
next, and with them, children can 
practice and learn a great variety of 
three-letter words. Our program gener- 
ates an endless variety of three-letter 
words for children to practice reading. 

Supervision by an adult is needed 
with Phonics to first help and later 
reinforce a child's reading of the words. 
A child should not be left alone with this 
program until he or she becomes quite 
familiar with the material. 

Words are chosen randomly and 
without any regard as to whether they 
are indeed real words, which is in 
keeping with our philosophy of teach- 
ing reading. We feel it is important to 
learn to read nonsensical three-letter 
words because they often form the 
beginning, middle or end of larger real 
words. For example, although til is not 
a real word, it is the beginning of tilt, 
the middle of still and the end of until, 
which are all common words that will 
be learned in the near future. 

Adults may also ask the child whether 
a three-letter word is a real word, part 
of a longer word or just nonsense. At 
this age, children are often very happy 
with a little nonsense. It adds some fun 
to the hard work of learning to read. 

We felt that the program should go 
one step further in the reading process, 
and so included as an option the "Magic 
E." The Magic E is a final E, which 
makes the preceding vowel sound long 
instead of short: Four-letter words 
ending in E are the next step in the 
reading process. Words such as bit and 
mat become bite and mate when the E 
is added. The rule taught here is that the 
long sound of the vowel is said but the 
E at the end is silent. 

Each time a child presses 3 on the 

Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master f s 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



Fun With 
Phonics 



By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

keyboard, the letter wheels "spin" and 
the child will be shown a three-letter 
word. Pressing 4 instead produces a 
four-letter word with a silent E at the 
end. No other regular key will operate 
except the 9 key, which ends the pro- 
gram. 

The program is very short and 
straightforward. Lines 40 through 70 
dimension and read the letters. You may 
choose to leave these as they are or 
adjust the letter choice for your child. 



For example, you may choose to stress 
certain beginning consonant sounds 
only or the family of words ending in 
at or et. The choice of letters used can 
easily be altered as the child progresses. 

Lines 90 through 120 draw a box to 
surround the word. Lines 180 through 
2 1 0 print a random word inside the box. 
After each word is printed, the child 
may press either the ENTER key for 
another word or the 9 key to end the 
program. 

Our youngest child, Shari, is 6 years 
old. We recently bought her a plastic 
phonics wheel to reinforce her word- 
reading skills. She enjoys it but often 
finds it hard to manipulate the wheels. 
My wife, Cheryl, challenged me to 
create a similar wheel on the comput- 
er. The result is the program presented 
this month. Shari loves to think of the 
larger words the nonsense words are 
part of (she is very smart), and she 
enjoys the computer wheels more than 
she does the plastic ones. We hope your 
youngsters enjoy the program, too. □ 



FOR Y-l TO 5 : READ B$(Y):NEXT 
FOR Z= 1 TO 17 :READ C$(Z):NEX 



The listing: PHONICS 

10 REM"PHONICS WHEELS " 

20 REM" STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 

D, STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1988" 

30 CLS5:R~17:R1=5:R2=17 

40 DIM A$(R) ,B$(R1) , C$ (R2 ) 

50 FOR X=l TO 17 : READ A$(X):NEXT 

X 
60 
Y 

70 
T 2 

80 CLS RND(5)+1 

90 FOR T=1160 TO 1175: POKE T,255 
: NEXT T 

100 POKE 1207,255:POKE1239,255:P 
OKE 1271,255 

110 FOR T=1288 TO 1303:POKE T,25 
5: NEXT T 

120 POKE 1256,255:POKE 1224,255: 
POKE 1192,255 
130 EN$=INKEY$ 

140 IF EN$= ,f 3 !l THEN 150 ELSE IF 

EN$= ,, 4 n THEN 150 ELSE 130 

150 FOR T= 1 TO 10 

160 A=RND(R) :B=RND(R1) :C=RND(R2) 

170 PLAY M O3L50;C" 

180 PRINT§204 ,A$ (A) ; 

190 PRINT@206,B$(B) ; 

200 PRINTS 20 8 , C$ (C) ; : NEXT T 

210 IF EN$= H 4" THEN PRINT §2 10 , "E 
?i ■ 

220 EN$=INKEY$ 

230 IF EN$= lf 9 tf THEN END ELSE IF 

EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 80 ELSE 220 

240 DATA B,D,F,G,H,J,K,L,M,N,P,R 

,S,T,V,W,Z,A,E,I,0,U 

250 DATA B,D,F,G,H,J,K,L,M,N,P,R 

,S,T,V,W,Z 



/5\ 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 89 



¥ 
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¥ 

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¥ 




Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE RAINBOW's 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed — 
legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high score. 
Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE RAINBOW. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



* Current Record Holder 



Shutout 



ADVANCED STAR'TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
4,750 *Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
4,300 Jeffrey Warren, Waynesville, NC 
3,975 David Schaller. Ctarkston, WA 
3,960 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
3,960 Robbi Smith. Helena, HI 

ALPINE SLOPES (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 

13,140 *Ron Silvestro, Lindenwold, NJ 
9,680 Walter Schilling, Lindenwold, NJ 
7,340 Gary Demerest, Lindenwold, NJ 
6,110 Rick McElroy, Lindenwold, NJ 

BEE ZAPPER {THE RAINBOW, 9/87) 

9,650 *Benoit Landry, Drummondvilfe, 
Quebec 

9,450 Phillip Hotsten, Modesto, CA 
BUZZARD BAIT (Tom Mix) 
22,931,850 ★Skip Taday, East Lyme, CT 
783,550 Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
187,750 Keith Janas, Kitwanga, British 
Columbia 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 
1,627,500 ★Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 

David Brown, New Watertord, Nova 
Scotia 

Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
Gregory Speer, Emporia, KS 
Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
Brian Lewis, Baltimore, MD 
Michael Petry, Kansas, AL 
Eric Rose, Grand Coulee, WA 
Joanna Wanagel, Freeville, NY 
CLOWNS & BALLOONS ( Radio Shack) 
688,960 ★Faye Keefer, Augusta, GA 

Charles Andrews, Delta Jet, AK 
Melody Webb, Lakeport, CA 
Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 

COLOR POKER (THE RAINBOW, 4/83) 
21,504,600 ★Earl Foster, Lynchburg, VA 
CRYSTLE CASTLES ( Thundar Vision) 

554.979 *Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
60,107 Alphonse Brown, Houston, TX 
DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 

81 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs; GA 

85 David and Shirley Johnson, Leicester, 

NC 

86 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 

86 Melanie Moor, Florence, AL 

86 Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 

87 Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 
89 Chris Piche, White Rock, 

»)'•;*■ v British Columbia 
489 Milan Parekh, Fullerton, CA 
89 Andrew Urquhart, Metairle, LA 
89 Steve Zemaitis, Howell, Ml 
91 John Semonjn, Akron, OH 
DECATHALON (Spectral Associates) 

10,400 ★Tom DiVlttorio. Glassboro, NJ 
7,440 Wayne Hufford, Kincardine, Ontario 
7,3216 Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
DEFENSE (Spectral Associates) 

16,305 ★Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 



40.435 
28,780 
16,995 
4,960 



202.000 

178,200 
169.000 
165,500 
159,200 
150,200 
141.400 
135.600 
130,400 



70,180 
36,650 
15,950 



623,550 

75,000 
40.800 



DEF MOV (THE RAINBOW. 1/87) 

30,253 ★Benoii Landry. Drummondville, 
Quebec 

25,739 John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 
DEMOLITION DERBY (Radio Shack) 

100.100 ★Gary Budzak, Westerville, OH . 
32,000 Darren Lowe, White Rock, British 
Columbia 
DEMON ATTACK magic) 

72,410 *Glenn Hodgson, Aberdeenshire, 
Scotland 
Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
Todd VanNatta, Isle of Palms, SC 
Laundre Clemon, Sacramento, CA 
DESERT PATROL (Arcade Animation) 

377,050 ★Jason Lakes, Franklin, OH 
DESERT RIDER (Radio Shack) 

50,797 ★Patrick Devitt, Lombard, IL 
26,125 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
24,355 Roby Janssen, Clear Lake, I A 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Tom Mix) 
1,866,100 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Dale Krueger, Maple Ridge, 

British Columbia 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
Benbit Landry. Drummondville, 
Quebec 

DISCRIMINATION (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

15 ★ Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
DONPAN (Radio Shack} 

52,600 ★Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 

172,320 ★Richard Winkeibsuer, Bronx, NY 
Don Mullis, Delavan, Wl 
Betty Mullis, Delavan, Wl 
Tristan Terkuc, Richmond, Ontario 
Darren Lowe, White Rock, British 
Columbia 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

99,980 *Danny Wimett. Rome, NY 

Karl Gulliford, Summorville, SC 
Stephane Deshaies. Beloeil, Quebec 
Neil Edge, Wiltiston, FL 
Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 
Jean-Francois Morin, Lorettevilie, 
Quebec 

Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
Keith Yampanls, Jaffrey, NH 
Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
Patrico Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 
Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge, VA 
Kevin Pater, Port Alberni, British , 

Columbia 
David Brown, New Watertord, N6ya' : 

Scotia 
Mike Ells, Charlotte, Ml 
Antonio Hidalgo, San Jose, 

Costa Rica 
Jesse Binns, Phoenix, AZ 



136,510 
51,470 
50,700 
34,990 



97,740 
89,490 
77,254 
73,346 

70,142 
68,142 

87,721 
62,442 

55,300 

49,500 
49,441 

49,254 

43,502 
41,896 



40,360 



34,424 Andrea Mayfield, Melbourne, FL 
25,147 Timothy O'Neal, Commerce. TX 
21,527 Scott Godfrey, Nashua, NH 
19,835 Christopher Heston, Louisville, KY 
18,251 Sam DiCerce, Willowich, OH 
18,103 Sarah Van Oteghem. Taylor Ridge, IL 
17,120 Kay McCluskey, Remsen, NY 
DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

160,835 ★Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
146,325 Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
5.561 Chris Lorenz. Kiester, MN 
DRAC ( Tom Mix) 

1 04.850 *Don Muttis, Delavan, Wl 
ESCAPE 2012 fCompuferware; 

202 #Roy Grant, Toledo. OH 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/86) 

22,505 ★Chad Presley, Luseiand, 

Saskatchewan 
11,250 Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
5,680 Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
3,760 Rick Beevers, Bloomfield, MN 
3,505 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
FRACTION FEVER (Spinnaker) 

10,480 ★Shawn Riggins, Orangevale, CA 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

26,370 ★Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
10,600 Brian Crabtree, College Park. WA 
9,930 Daniel Streidt, Cairo. Egypt 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 

357,690 ★Jason Clough, Houston, TX 
328,820 Bernard Burke, Lee T s Summit, MO 
249,960 Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
169,410 Danny Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
149,520 Vernon Johnson III, Parkviiie, MD 
138,500 Darren Brown, New Waterford, Nova 
Scotia 

1 1 6,280 Scott Jamison, Billerica, MA 
116,Q00 Micah Clough, Houston, TX 
105,000 David Brown, New Waterford, Nova 
Scotia 

GALAX ATTACK (Spectral Associates) 
236,350 ★Corey Leopold, Nada, TX 
28,300 Augusto Voysest, Lima, Peru 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
23,643,720 #Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
20,921,490 Randall Edwards, Dunlap* KS 
10,222,940 Clinton Morell, Sacramento, CA 
10,020,500 Ken Hubbard, Madison, Wl 
7,493,340 Stirling Dell. Dundalk, Ontario 
2,626,950 Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
2.512,620 Jason Steele, Pensacola, FL 
2,312,640 Rory Kostman, Hershey, NE 
2,1 15,790 Jerry Honigman, Waggoner. IL. 
2,01 1 ,200 Jerry Colbert, Bakersfield, CA 
1,224,190 Jonathan Wanagel, Freeville, NY 
1,108,750 Robert Fox. Dover, OH 
1,094,280 Donnie Pearson, Arvada, CO 
1 ,081 ,530 Michael Wallace. Bronx, NY 
1,025,900 John Hotaling, Duanosburg, NY 
1,016,050 Edward Swatek, Chicago, IL 
933,740 Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
932,660 Brian Hunter, South Berwick, ME 
787,780 Brad Wilson, Llthia Springs, GA 
685,840 Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 




667,390 Robbie Smith, Helena, HI 
555,230 Larry Shelton, Marion, IL 
456,220 Scott Jamison, Billerica, MA 
410,868 Billy Helmick, Independence, KY 
132,800 Lance Orner. Chico, CA 
HALLOWEEN (THE RAINBOW, 10/86) 

625 ★Clara Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 

HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY (Infocom) 
400/422 ★Jeff Holtham, Waterloo, Ontario 
400/510 Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
JOKER POKER (THE RAINBOW, 3/87) 
2,793,285 ★Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
205,239 Paul Dykes, Baton Rouge, LA 
13,377 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
1 1,000 Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computer ware) 
2,503,000 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
257,600 Keith Cohen, Rocky Mount, NC 
JUNKFOOD (THE RAINBOW, 11/84) 

25,670 *John Guptill, Columbia, MO 
18,650 Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
KARATE (Dtecom Products) 

31,000 ★Wayne Hufford, Kincardine, Ontario 
1 1,600 Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
6,300 David Darling, Longlac, Ontario 
THE KING (Tom Mix) 
3,824,280 *Andre Grenier, Quebec, Canada 
49,400 Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

22,400 Spencer Metcalf , Longview, "FX 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 

186,710 *Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 
184,180 Russell Johnson. Sarnia, Ontario 
184,120 John Farrar, Lebanon, TN 
133,990 Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 
96,540 Doug Lute, Clymer, PA 
KUNG-FU DUDE (Sundog Systems) 

32,000 *Tony Geitgey, University Park,: 
LUNAR RESCUE (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 
260,427 *Tom Beeker, Gracey, KY 
246,668 Phillip Holsten, Modesto, CA 
113,579 Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

9,016 ★Heather Richwalski, Medford, Wl 
5,172 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
468.750 ★Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
355,570 Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
318,160 Jeremy Pruski, Sandwich, IL 
137.920 Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
127,550 Michael Heitz, Chicago, !L 
120,670 Vernon Johnson III, Parkville, Mb 
58,530 Chris Wright, New Albany, IN 
MUNGHKIN BLASTER (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
10,420 ★Gabe Emerson, Baraboo, Wl 
9,760 Tom Beeker, Gracey, KY 
9,080 John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 
9,000 Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

7,240 Jeff Remick, Warren, ML 
ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1.276-0 *»Jonathan Dorris, Indianapolis, IN 
1,210-0 "Gregg Thompson, Chesterfield, VA 
1,204-0 «Chad Johnson, Benton, AR 
1,160-0 »Mark Lang, Downieville, CA 
1.132-23 Dan Liffmann, And over, MA 
PANIC BUTTON (Radio Shack) 

2,192 ★Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
190 Roby Janssen, Clear Lake, IA 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM RIDERS (Radio Shack) 
303,100 ★Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
244,100 Martinez Domingo, Miami, FL 
67.100 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
PINBALL (Radio Shack) 

399,350 ★Troy Stoll, Washington, IN 
213,300 Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
142.400 Thomas Payton. Anderson, SC 
PITSTOP If (Epyx) 

64 *Rusty Breitbach, Rickardsville, IA 
54 *Jeff Coburn. Easton, PA 
54 *Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
54 ★Jeff Szczerba, Sturtevant, Wl 
54 *Sean Noonan, Green Bay, Wl 
54 *Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 



51 Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
49 Randy Venable, Coal City, WV 
9 Laundre Clemon, Sacramento, GA; 
PLANETFALL (Infocom) 

400/210 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 

4,855 ★Darren Lowe : White Rock, British 
Columbia 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

94,470 ★Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
44.010 Kevin Pater, Port Alberni, British 
Columbia 

25.850 Matthew Leitman, Beaconsfield, 

Quebec 
PYRAMID (Radio Shack) 

220 ★Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA> 
PYRAMID 2000 (Radio Shack) 

220 ★Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
100 Peter Antonacopoulos, Toa Ba|a, 
Puerto Rico 
PYRAMIX ( Co/or Venture) 

17,170 ★Janet Kim, Pinckheyville, IL 
Q\J\X(Tom Mix) 
8,407,772 ★John Haldane, Tempe, AZ 
1,404,000 Curtis Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
1,003,104 Efisa Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
326,192 Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
205,335 John Hotallng, Duanesburg, NY 
104,034 Christopher Conley, 
North Attleboro, MA 
RESCUE ON FRACTALUS (Epyx) 

270,000 ★Russell Johnson, Sarnia, Ontario 
190,915 Leon Beggs, Bellingham. WA 
167,947 Roger Smith, High Prairie, Alberta 
133,661 James Andrews, Kissimmee, FL 
99,967 Gary Sebastian, Hazel Park, Ml 
RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Coiorware) 
1,792,800 ★Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 
RETURN OF THE JET-I (ThunderVision) 

309,250 ★Melody Webb, Lakeport, CA 
ROGUE (Epyx) 

27,542 ★Melanie Lapoint. Fitchburg, MA 
21,682 Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 

17.851 Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
8,812 Allen Houk, San Diego, CA 
6,576 Kirk Marshall, Westport, MA 
6,204 Scot Drew, Ottawa, OH 

5,679 David Spalding, Galena Park, TX 
5,369 John Moore, Ottawa, OH 
5,274 Reland Brumfield, LaJolla, CA 
4,719 Mary Calcott, LaJolla, CA 
SAILOR MAN (Tom Mix) 

1,019,200 ★Gabriel Assal, Cameron, MO 
341,800 Jason Clough, Houston, TX 
332,600 Jeremy Carter, Spring Lake Park, MN 
287,200 Patrick Devitt, Lombard, IL 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

67 ★Tristan Terkuc, Richmond, Ontario 
82 Edward Rocha, Cobleskflf, NY 

86 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 

87 Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 
117 John Lente, Austin, TX 

SANDWORM (THE RAINBOW, 8/86) 

995 ★Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 

23,100 ★Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
SHOOTN RANGE (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
13,794 ★Phillip Holsten, Modesto, CA 
5,998 Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
5,433 Benoit Landry, Drummondville. 
Quebec 

SHORT-TERM MEMORY TEST (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 
20 *Brian and Harold Matherne, 
Gretna LA 
SPACE ASSAULT (Radio Shack) 

6,200 ★John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

81,020 *Wayne Hufford, Kincardine, Ontario 
SPEEDSTER (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 

22,750 ★Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

10,500 Sara Mittetstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
4,710 Andrea Reelitz, Greenville, IL 



3,380 Kevin Hilton, Gurdon, AR 
3 350 Jamie Stoner, Mt Union, PA 
STELLAR LIFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 

629,000 ★Steven Smith. Matthews, NC 
114,620 Martinez Domingo, Miami, FL 
SUCCESS MANSION (THE RAINBOW. 1/87) 

13/13 ★Dave Allessi, Iselin, NJ 
SUPER ROOTER (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

15,180 ★Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 
1 1 ,090 Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

3,910 Daniel Bradford. Birmingham, AL 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

303,600 ★Tim Hennon, Highland, IN 
138,400 Gary Budzak, Westerville, OH 
TREASURE QUEST (THE RAINBOW, 11/86) 

29,340 ★Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

132 ★Matthew Fumich, Muntord, TN 
123 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
TUT'S TUMB (Mark Data) 

1 18,720 ★Reina Roy, Carleton, Quebec 
74,780 Mack HayneS, Nice, CA 
72,000 Chad Presley, Luseland , 

Saskatchewan 
60,020 Don Siler, Muncie, IN 
45,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) 

2,032 *Tony Harbin, CuHman, AL 
2,032 *Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
2,008 Philip Puffmburger, Winchester, VA 
1,995 Denise Rowan, Minneapolis, MN 
1,991 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
1 ,988 Randall Edwards, Dun lap, KS 
1 ,975 Bernard Florence, Croydon, Australia ^ 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
18,813 ★Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 
1 1,902 Martha Janes, Swarthmore.PA <4( 
10,489 Karl Gulliford, Summervjtle, SC 
6,294 Pat O'Neill, Nepean, Ontario 
4,643 Martha James, Swarthmore, PA 
3,285 Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ ±f 
THE VORTEX FACTOR (Mark Data) ^ 
100/276 ★Tommy Crouser, Dunbar, WV 
100/483 Rick & Brenda Stump, 

Laureldale, PA ^ 
210 Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 
British Columbia 
WARP FACTOR X(Prickly~Pear) 
10,577,051 ★Doug Lute, Clymer, PA 
WISHBRINGER (Infocom) 

400/201 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA ^ 
WRESTLE MANIAC (Diecom) 

956,971 *Marc Reiter, Cincinnati, OH 
546,315 Louis Bouchard, Gatineau, Quebec ^ 
45,483 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 'yK 
42,105 David Brown. New Waterford. Novel ^ 
Scotia *m 
39,086 Billy Helmick, Independence, KY 
ZAKSUND (Elite Software) 

357,550 ★Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
39,950 Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
ZAXXON (Datascft) 
2,061,000 ★Byron Aiford, Raytown, MO 
1,950,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
1,300,500 Dan Brown, Pittsford, NY ^ 
1,100,600 Andrew Urquhart, Metairie, LA- 
253,400 Bob Dewitt, Blue island, IL ' " 
170,600 Matthew Yarrows, East Hampton, MA 
163,700 Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
127,600 Larry Shelton, Marion, IL 
1 19,600 Daniel Straidt, Cairo, Egypt 
118,100 Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
111,400 Jeff Milter. Bronson, Ml 
87,200 Tim Lang, Downieville, CA 
83,700 David Darling, Longlac, Ontario 
81,000 David Anderson, Midlothian, VA ^ 
50,500 Andrew Rhodes, Atlanta, GA *^ 
ZONX (THE RAINBOW, 10/85) 

6,500 *Danie! Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
ZORK I (Infocom) 

400/720 *Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
ZUES (Aardvark) 

3.380 *Martin Kertz, Forrest City, AR ^£ 



— Jody Doyle 



March 1 988 THE RAINBOW 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 


















In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column 
of pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, 
we encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



Feedback 

In response to questions; 

• William Grace: In Halls of Dungeon 
Death, you need a mace to attack any 
golems — it's good to enchant the mace 
before the sword, 

• Marc Prudhommeaux; You do need 
the 3-D glasses to escape the fuzzy room 
in Wishbringer. They're under the theater 
seat. Give the coin to Miss Voss to enter 
the theater. 

In Wishbringer, move the joystick in 
the direction you walk. Press the button 
when you Ye done. 

In The Witness , Phong can be pres- 
sured into revealing the truth through 
shown evidence, but the real evidence is 
found by hiding behind the office lounge 
and waiting until both Monica and 
Phong are in the room together, 

John Hotaling 
Duanesburg, NY 

• Matt Swift: In Pyramid 2000, use the 
pillow to drop the delicate vase on. 

• Eddie Baker: In Sands of Egypt t oil the 
scepter and go back to the pool. Then 
hook the scepter to the drain cover and 
drain the pool. 

• Duane Fair: The container is east from 
the snake in Sands of Egypt. Be sure to 
get the oil. You will need it. 

Lisa LaRiviere 
Bellingham, WA 



Scoreboard: 

How do you kill the Dungeon Death 
in Halls of Dungeon Death'} I have been 
to the dungeon seven times, amassed a 
maximum of 564 hit points and a com- 
bination of 1 1 potions and still get blown 
away. Is there any way to save the game 
up to a level? 

Has anyone ever made it past Level 30 
in Gold Runnerl I have scored over 
594,000 points but cannot get past that 
level. 

Michael Mealey 
Bushell Park, Saskatchewan 




Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, I can kill 
the wizard's image, and when I do, he lays 
down a scroll. Why can't the scroll be 
picked up? Is there a third ring? If so, who 
has it and what level is it on? 

James Green 
Virginia Beach, VA 

Scoreboard: 

You can get water in your canteen from 
a pool in the desert in Sands of Egypt. 
To get there from the base of the cliff, go 
west then south and east. If you ride the 
camel any odd number of consecutive 
times, you will go from your origin to 
your destination. An even number of 
consecutive rides keeps you at your point 
of origin. After you go into the treasure 
room, take the ladder and get back to 
civilization to complete the game. 

When you get to the spider the first 
time in Trekboer, save the game. After 
you give him the capsule, it takes three 
turns for him to pass out and become 
harmless. The second place you see the 
spider, just before you leave, type DROP 
RLL and GET FILL or you may be eaten 
by him. 

Roy Grant 
Toledo, OH 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, I can get to the dinghy 
in Africa, bribe the monkey to stop the 
water from coming in, but I can't do 
anything after that. 

Jason Ebbeling 
Berkshire, MA 

Scoreboard: 

In Sea Quest, I have the anchor, pearl, 
silver and the statue. I need 20 more 
points to win. What else do I need and 
where is it? 

In Trekboer, I cannot move the ship 
and I cannot operate anything. Please 
help. 

Sean Noonan 
Green Bay, Wl 

Scoreboard: 

In Sea Search, how do I get the mer- 
maid, the shark repellent and the object 



I keep stumbling over in the hold behind 
the fails? How do I get the key to open 
the trap door in the bungalow? 

In Shenanigans, how do I stop falling 
off the rainbow? Does the pole help? 
How do I get it through the hole? 

Jimmy Munroe 
Sussex, New Brunswick 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid, how do you get past the 
snake in the pharaoh's chamber? How do 
you pick up the bird statue? 

In Raaka-Tu, how do you get past the 
gargoyle? 

Kurt Heiss 
Glens Falls, NY 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid 2000, once you climb the 
plant and get the key and the egg, what 
do you do then? How do you get to the 
snake? 

Kevin Pereira 
Corsicana, TX 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid 2000, in order to kill the 
fierce green serpent, you must have the 
bird statue. But in order to get that, you 
must drop the scepter. 

How do I get the flashlight so I can go 
down the ladder at Chugalug's trading 
post? 

Robert Sherman 
Fords, NJ 

Scoreboard: 

I just seem to be spinning my wheels 
in The Andrea Co Co. I can get into the 
Volks but I just wind up driving around 
in circles. Help! 

Erick Molnar 
Reno, NV 

Scoreboard: 

In One- On- One, smashing the back- 
board and making three-point shots are 
just luck. There's no sure way to do it. 

In Raaka-Tu, you can't cross the rug. 

In Zaxxon, in order to kill Zaxxon, 
you must destroy the missile before it is 
launched. 

In Black Sanctum, when you open the 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



92 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



casket, type LISTEN. The corpse will tell 
you what you need to make the altar^u : 

In Sands of Egypt, you can't get 
scepter if you can't oil it first. 

In Forest Adventure, how do you kill 
the troll? 

In Syzygy, what do you do? 

In Fighter Pilot, when you shoot down 
a big plane, shoot the parachutes, too. 
You will get two escort planes or you will 
start shooting five shots instead of two. 

Matthew Fumich 
Munford, TN 



Scoreboard: 

In Caladuril Flame of Light, how do 
J get by the sharp blades in the cavern? 

John Peavy 
Salejn t QR 

Scoreboard; 

How do I open the sonic Ipf^in thg 
skyways in Robot Odyssey Tf% 

In Bedlam, how do I get Napoleon tp 
open the secret door? 

Joseph Mangretta 
Oklawaha, FL 

Scoreboard: 

In Zork I, typing VERBOS makes the 
computer give a room description each 
time you enter. To exorcise the entrance 
to Hades, you require the bell, candles, 
a source of flame and the black book. The 
problem is, when I get killed, I can\ 
figure out how to- become a physical 
being again. How dp you get the plati- 
num bar? What is the way through the 
maze? I can't map it because the thief 
keeps moving things around. Where is 
the pump to inflate the raft? 

Patrick Cormier; 
peirx>Hap Ontario 



Scoreboard: ; 

In Hitchhiker's Guide -fa ^^cuW^ 
how do you get past the Bugblatter Beast 
6f Traal? Where is the fluff and the key 
on Damogran? 

In Robot Odyssey, how do you push 
the nine buttons on the 5th level? When 
a robot pushes the third button it starts 
all over again. 

In Bedlam, how do you get the red key? 
How do you get to the blue doors? Hqw 
do you stop the doctor from giving you 
shots? 

In Sands of Egy pi, where is the scep- 
ter? "" 

Duncan Cameron 
Chippewa Falls, Wl 

Scoreboard: 

I am stuck on the last screen of Ghana 
Bwana. I have read the instructions on 
how to get the bow and continue to the 



altar to get the other bow, but after that 
I dp not know how to kill the guardians 
on the altar; "' 

David Kauffman 
South Haven, MI 

Scoreboard: 

What is the Adventurer needed for in 
Enchanter! What do you do in the trans- 
lucent rooms? Also, what do you do in 
the library with the rat hole? What do you 
do with the Kulcad scroll? 

Use the turtle to get the Kulcad scroll. 
Use the sacrificial dagger from the altar 
to open the jeweled box. Also, use the 
Krebf spell to fix the scroll in the jeweled 

Adam Swiderskti 
Lexington, KY 

Sctireboafd: 

In Wishbringer, I have everything 
except the glasses and the broomstick. F 
made it in the tower, but when I tried M 
go up the steps; I got trapped in "fuzz*^ 
mess. 

Matt Smith 



sylvanWi 



Scoreboard: 

There is a useful object in the Crevice; 
of Nickelpedes in The Magic of Zanth, 
but it is hidden. You must examine things 
to find it When you open the bottle, 
make sure you're in the cabin. When ypu^j 
come to the lake, keep your , fri^rid^| 
safety in mind. 

Lawrence 



Scoreboard: 

To get through all the levels in Dragon 
Slayer with only three men is very frus- 
trating due to the way the game save 
feature works. One way around this is to i 
duplicate the original disk using 
Image by Computize. 

Mark the copied disk 4 A' and put thjfes 
original away. Play the game on lMsk'M| 
After Level 1 is completed, press S as 
indicated in the instructions. Turn off the 
computer and copy Disk A using Spit-N- 
Image and label the second copy *B\ 
When you want to resume playing, rein- 
sert Disk A and you will then be on Level 
2. After your men get killed, turn off the 
computer and copy Disk B onto Disk A. 
When you play again, you will start at the 
beginning of Level 2, whereas if you hajl 
not done all this copying, you would have 
started once again at the beginning of 
Level 1. 

Edward Smith 
New Castle, :D& 



Scoreboard: 

Do not kill ^y will receive 

50,00Q points after the pattern is coin- 

plete4 : fii Cofpr Car Action* 

' : Louis-Serge Bouchard 
Gaiineau, Quebec 

Scoreboard: 

What do I have to do when I see the 
diamond appear in Mr. Dig! It happens 
often and I do not know what to do. 

Also, where can I get the explanations 
for the game? 

Gisete Duval 
Sainte-A nne Des Plaines, Quebec 

Scoreboard: 

In Strange Odyssey, try pulling the 
rod, pushing it, then touching the plastic. * 

In Trekboer, the amulet is found on the 
ice planet. Remember riot to enter the 
room where the plant is if ygu have 
pressed the butt oh; 

In Shenanigans, how do I get but of the 
town? • ; i^:r . 

Btiviit Brown 
New fefe^fe Nova Scotia 

Scoreboard: 

In fyinsford Mansion, to make the 
guard leave; type Y EL Li F I ft£w I have 
gotten up to the part where the piranhas 
are. I can't get the box out of the fish tank 
or pick up the piranha to feed to the dying 
man; Please ihelp, 

Walsh 

West W$wBgm 

Scoreboard: m --''" 
>cln/0r' Randolf of the Moors, how do 
ybu ^ OutJ^f the pit? 

John Anderson 



To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 




March 19B8 THE RAINBOW 93 



1 F e atur e 




The question investors most often 
ask is, "When is the right time to 
buy or sell a particular stock?" In 
times of market stability, efficient 
market timing techniques are often used 
to estimate when it's best to buy stocks 
(when they are at their lowest market 
value) and when to sell stocks (when at 
their peak value). 

One market timing technique makes 
use of moving averages. In this tech- 
nique, the average market value of a 
stock is computed over a time interval 
sufficiently long to minimize the effect 
of unusual fluctuations (weekly values 
are generally for a 30- or 39-week 
period). If the current market value of 
the stock is higher than its average 
value, this method signals for you to 
buy; conversely, values that are lower 
signal you to sell. Of course, prudent 
investors consider many additional 
factors before actually deciding whether 
to buy, sell or hold. 

Investment Trends is written for a 
64K ECB CoCo, single disk drive or 
cassette, and a DMP-100 printer. It will 
track general market indicators (e.g., 
Dow Jones Industrial Average, S&P 
500 index, etc.), present investments 
and potential investments. 

The program develops a 30-week 
moving average and computes the most 
recent six-week performance. It handles 
a maximum of 60 entities and has 
deletion, addition and correction capa- 
bilities for each entity. Also, there is a 
special correction feature for mutual 
funds. 

The program asks you if the fund has 
a cash/capital gain distribution and 
then adjusts the NRV for the total distri- 
bution for all entries in the database. If 
a disk drive is plugged in, enter PCLERR1 
before loading the program or you will 
get an OM Error. 

Input data can be obtained from the 
financial section of local newspapers. A 
fair amount of time is required initially 
to put historical data into the database. 
Once the database is established, how- 
ever, less than 30 minutes a week is 
required for updating 60 entities. 

Since retiring from Bell of Pennsylva- 
nia, Jim Franz has completed courses of 
study in electronics, microprocessor 
technology and fundamentals of invest- 
ing. He enjoys electronics, the Co Co 
and his 12 grandchildren. 



Timing your investment decisions 



Stock 
Analysis 



By James Franz 



Table 1 

Trend Analyses of Market Indicators and Present/Potential Investments 

MARKET INDICATOR 
S&P500 INDEX 

11/30- 209.6 12/7- 209.6 12/14- 209.6 12/21- 209.6 12/28- 209.61 1/4- 210.88 1/1 
1- 205.96 1/18- 208.43 1/25- 206.43 2/1- 211.78 2/8- 214,56 2/15- 219.76 2/22- 2 
24.62 3/1- 225 3/8- 225.57 3/15- 236.55 3/22- 233.34 3/29- 238.97 4/5- 228.69 4/ 
12- 235.97 4/19- 242.38 4/26- 242.29 5/3- 234.79 5/10- 237.85 5/17- 232.76 5/24- 
241.35 5/31- 247.35 6/7- 245.67 6/14- 245.73 6/21- 247.58 



6-WEEK TREND 

30-WEEK AVG 
DEV FROM AVG 
% DEVIATION 



5/17 

220.42 
12.34 
5.60 



5/24 

221.48 
19.87 
8.97 



5/31 

222.74 
24.61 
11.05 



6/7 

223.94 
21.73 
9.70 



6/14 

225.14 
20.59 
9.14 



6/21 

226.41 
21.17 
9.35 



PRESENT INVESTMENT 
MUTUAL FUND 

11/30- 19.7 12/7- 19.7 12/14- 19.7 12/21- 19.7 12/28- 19.67 1/4- 19.81 1/11- 21. 
29 1/18- 21.55 1/25- 21.33 2/1- 21.93 2/8- 22.28 2/15- 22.87 2/22- 23.41 3/1- 23 
.47 3/8- 23.54 3/15- 24.75 3/22- 24.59 3/29- 25.04 4/5- 23.94 4/12- 24.73 4/19- 
25.43 4/26- 25.42 5/3- 25.6 5/10- 25.98 5/17- 25.45 5/24- 26.4 5/31- 27.07 6/7- 
26.91 6/14- 26.93 6/21- 27.13 



6-WEEK TREND 

30-WEEK AVG 
DEV FROM AVG 
% DEVIATION 



5/17 

22.31 
3.14 
14.06 



5/24 

22.54 
3 .86 
17.15 



5/31 

22.78 
4.29 
18.82 



6/7 

23.02 
3.89 
16. 89 



6/14 

23.26 
3.67 
15.76 



6/21 

23.51 
3.62 
15.39 



POTENTIAL INVESTMENT 



STOCK 



11/30- 42 12/7- 42 12/14- 42 12/21- 42 12/28- 42.125 1/4- 43.125 1/11- 43.25 1/1 
8- 43.375 1/25- 42.375 2/1- 42.375 2/8- 43.125 2/15- 44.375 2/22- 44.25 3/1- 44. 
5 3/8- 44.875 3/15- 47 3/22- 45.25 3/29- 45 4/5- 43.625 4/12- 44.125 4/19- 44.25 
4/26- 43.875 5/3- 41.125 5/10- 41.375 5/17- 40.75 5/24- 40.5 5/31- 42.5 6/7- 41 



6/14- 43.25 6/21- 44.25 



6-WEEK TREND 

30-WEEK AVG 
DEV FROM AVG 
% DEVIATION 



5/17 

43.07 
-2.32 
-5.39 



5/24 

43.02 
-2.52 
-5.86 



5/31 

43.04 
-0.54 
-1.25 



6/7 

43.00 
-2.00 
-4.66 



6/14 

43.05 

0.2P 
0.47 



6/21 

43.12 
1.13 
2.62 



94 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



The output report provides the actual 
30-week values and the most recent six- 
week comparisons. By examining the 
trends, you can see whether this market 
timing technique is signaling to buy, sell 
or hold and whether the trend is favor- 
able or unfavorable. In addition, you 
can compare percentage deviation to 
general market deviations to see how 



well your investment is doing in com- 
parison to the market. 

To see how the program works, load 
and run INVTREND. Use the sample data 
in Table 1 for your input data. The 
program will create a data file 
(TRNDDRTR/DRT for disk, TRNDDRTR for 
tape). 

If you input data from the table, your 



report will show only the most recent 
week in the six-week trend. This system 
has to be online for six weeks to develop 
trends in the database. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 136 Country Lane, Pittsburgh, PA 
15229. Please include an SASE when 
writing for a reply.) □ 




605 119 

677 ......247 

830 183 

1100 54 

END 5 



The listing: INVTREND 

1 CLS : PRINT© 13 8 , "INVTREND" : PRINT 
@138+30,"BY JIM FRANZ" :F0RX=1T02 
00J3:NEXT 

2 CLS :PRINT@96, "THIS PROGRAM PRO 
VIDES ONLY ONE OF MANY AIDS THA 
T INVESTORS SHOULD USE FOR T 
IMING INVESTMENTDECISIONS • THE A 
UTHOR IS NOT RE-SPONSIBLE FOR AN 
Y DECISIONS MADETHROUGH USE OF T 
HIS TIMING METHOD OR USE OF 

THIS PROGRAM;"; 



3 PRINT" FURTHER , THE AUTHOR IS 
NOT RE- SPONSIBLE FOR ANY ERRO 

NEOUS CAL-CULATIONS IN THE PROGR 
AM ITSELF." 

4 FORX=lT015j3j3j3:NEXT 

5 CLEAR15J3J3 

10 DIMA(6J3,3J3) ,AV(6j3,6) ,PC(6J3,6) 
,DF(6j3,6) ,T(60) 

15 DIMA$ (6J3) ,D$ (30) 

16 CLS: PRINT "PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 
ft 

17 PRINT"THIS PROGRAM COMPUTES A 
VERAGE VALUES FOR A 3)3 WEEK PE 
RIOD." 

18 PRINT"IT ALSO COMPUTES % CURR 
ENT VALUEOF AVG VAL " ; 

19 PRINT"AND SHOWS 6 WEEK TR 
ENDS.":PRINT"IT CAN TRACK 6J3 ENT 
ITIES . " : FORK=lT09j3j3j3 : NEXTK 



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CELEBRATING OUR 4TH YEAR WITH RAINBOW! 



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5/112.00 



PRINTER RIBBONS 

EPSON HX/RX/FX 70/80 $5.00 EA. 
6EHINI 10/10K/S6 $2.00 EA. 

COLORS R-BR-BL-6R-PUR $3.00 EA. 
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OTHER RIBBONS IN STOCK-CALL OR WRITE FOR QUOTE 

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Add $2.50 S/H In U.SA. • Canada Add $3.50 + $ 1.00/LB 
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Send Check/Money Order Payable to: 

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9020 Hemingway, Redford, Ml 48239 

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Mm. Charge Ofder $2aQ0 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 95 



20 CLS: PRINT" INVESTMENT TREND AN 


260 IFN$=A$(I)THENK=1 


ALYSIS" 


265 IFK=0THEN290 


30 PRINT" DO YOU WANT TO:" 


270 IFK=1THENT(I)=T(I+1) :F0RJ=1T 


31 PRINT" (l)SET UP A NEW FILE" 


030 : A (I , J) =A(I+1, J) :NEXTJ 

280 IFK=1THENA$(I)=A$(I+1) :FORJ= 


32 PRINT" (2) ADD INV/IND" 


33 PRINT" (3) DELETE INV/IND" 


1T06 : AV(I, J) =AV (1+1, J) :DF(I,J)=D 


34 PRINT" (4) CORRECT PAST DATA" 


F(I+1,J) :PC(I, J)=PC(I+1, J) :NEXTJ 


35 PRINT" (5) UPDATE DATA" 


284 CLS: PRINT "PLEASE WAIT" 


3 6 PRINT" (6) GET A PRINTOUT" 


290 NEXTI 


37 PRINT" (7) QUIT" 


291 IFK=0THEN PRINTN$"IS NOT IN 


38 INPUTC 


FILE" 


39 IFP=1THENG0T045 


292 IF K=0 GOTO200 


40 IFC>1ANDC<7THENGOSUB910:P=1 


293 Y=Y-1:PRINTN$" HAS BEEN DELE 


1 45 Y=I 


TED":GOTO200 


50 ON C GOTO70,80,200,300,430,59 


300 K=0:D1=0:D=0 


0/60 


310 CLS: INPUT "NAME TO CORRECT (I 


60 END 


F DONE TYPE 'D f ) ";N$ 


70 1=0 


320 I FN $ = " D " THENPRINT " DO YOU WAN 


80 1=1+1 


T TO SAVE THIS DATA NOW(Y/N)?" 


90 CLS: INPUT "NAME OF INDICATOR/I 


: INPUTR$ 


NVESTMENT" ;A$ (I) 


321 IFN$="D " ANDR $="Y" THENGOSUB 7 5 


100 PRINT"IS THIS A:" 


0 


101 PRINT" (1) MARKET INDICATOR" 


322 IFN$="D"THEN20 


102 PRINT" (2) PRESENT INVESTMEN 


323 PRINT: PRINT: INPUT" IS THIS AN 




NAV ADJUSTMENT CAUSEDBY MUTUAL * 


103 PRINT" (3) POTENTIAL INVESTM 


FUND DISTRIBUTION (Y/N) " ;R$ 


ENT" 


324 IFR$= f, Y"THENDl=l: PRINT 


104 INPUTT(I) 


325 IFD1=1THEN INPUT "AMT OF DIST 


110 AV=0 


RIBUTION/ SHARE" ;D 


120 FOR J=1TO30 


326 PRINT 5 PRINT " PLEASE WAIT" 


125 IFC=50RC=4THEN145 


327 F0RI=1T0Y 


127 IFC=2THENPRINT" VALUE WEEK EN 


330 IFK=1THEND1=0 


j DING "D$(J) :INPUTA(I,J) :GOT0145 


331 K=0 


1 130 INPUT "DATE (WEEK ENDING-MM/DD 


340 IFN$=A$ (I)THENK=1:M=1:CLS:PR 


)";d$(J) 


INTA$(I) 


140 INPUT" VALUE"; A (I, J) 


341 IF Dl=l AND K=l THEN 3 80 | 


145 AV=AV+A(I,J) 


345 IFK=0THEN420 


150 NEXT J 


350 INPUT " CHANGE NAME Y/N";R$ 


160 AV(I,1)=AV/30:DF(I,1)=A(I,1) 
-AV(I,1) :PC(I,1)=DF(I,1)/AV(I,1) 


3 60 IFR$="Y"THEN PRINT "ENTER COR 


RECT NAME":INPUTA$(I) 


*100 


370 PRINT"IS"T (I) "THE CORRECT TY 


165 IFC=40RC=5THENRETURN 


PE INV/IND (Y/N)?":INPUTR$ 


170 CLS: INPUT" TYPE' N f FOR NEXT IN 


371 I FR$= S " N " THENINPUT " TYPE CORRE 


VESTMENT/ INDICATOR OR 'D'FO 


CTION";T(I) 


R DONE";B$ 


380 FOR J=1TO30 


175 Y=I 


381 IFD1=1THENA (I ; J) =A(I, J) -D 


180 IFB$="N"THENGOTO80 


382 IFD1=1THEN CLS : PRINT "NOW COR 


185 INPUT" DO YOU WANT TO SAVE TH 


RECTING THE DATA" : GOTO410 


IS DATA NOW(Y/N)";R$ 


390 PRINT "WANT TO CHANGE THIS VA 


186 IFR$="Y"THENGOSUB750 


LUE?" 


190 GOTO20 


391 PRINTD$ (J) "-"A (I, J) 


200 INPUT "TYPE NAME YOU WANT TO 


392 INPUTR$ 


DROP-IF DONE TYPE 1 D 1 " ;N$ 


400 I FR$= " Y " THENINPUT " TYPE NEW V 


210 IFN$="D"THENPRINT"DO YOU WAN 


ALUE" ;A(I f J) 


T TO SAVE THIS DATA NOW(Y/N)":IN 


410 NEXT J 


PUTR$ 


415 GOSUB110 


211 I FN$ = " D "ANDR$=" Y " THENGOSUB7 5 


420 NEXTI 


0.-GOTO20 


421 I FM= 0 THE NPRINT " INV/ I ND NOT I 


212 IFN$="D"THEN20 


N FILE " ELSEPRINT " CORRECTION COMP 


220 K=0 


LETED" 


230 FORI=lTOY 


422 FORK=1TO5000:NEXT:GOTO300 



96 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



43j3 F0RJ=3J3T02STEP-1:D$(J)=D$(J- 

1) : NEXT J 

440 F0RI=1T0Y 

450 CLS : PRINT" PLEASE WAIT" 

460 A(I,30)==0:AV(I,6)==0:DF(I,6) = 

0:FC<X,6)-0 

470 FORJ=30TO2STEP-1 

480 A(I, J)=A(I, J-l) 

490 NEXT J 

500 FORJ=6T02STEP-l:AV(I, J)=AV(I 
,J-1) :DF(I,J)=DF(I,J-1) :PC(I,J)= 
PC(I,J-1) 
510 NEXT J 
520 NEXT I 

522 INPUT" CURRENT DATE (WEEK ENDI 
NG MM/DD) " ;D$ (1) 

523 F0RI=1T0Y 

540 PRINTA$(I) 

541 IFA$(I)=""THEN570 

560 INPUT"PRES VALUE" ;A (I , 1) : GOS 

UB110 

570 NEXT I 

575 GOSUB750:GOTO30 

590 CLS:INPUT"WHEN PRINTER IS TU 
RNED ON AND PAPER IS SET, PRES 
S <ENTER>" ;R$ 

591 PRINT # - 2 , " " : PRINT # - 2 , " " : PRIN 
T#-2, "TREND ANALYSIS OF MARKET I 
NDICATORS AND PRESENT/ POTENTIAL 



INVESTMENTS" 

592 INPUT" DO YOU WANT TO INCLUDE 

DETAILED 30 WEEK DATA ( Y/N) " ; F$ 
600 G=0:PRINT"DO YOU WANT A PRIN 
TOUT OF: " 

(1) MARKET INDICATORS 



601 PRINT" 
ONLY" 

602 PRINT" 
TS ONLY" 

603 PRINT" 
ENTS ONLY" 

604 PRINT" 

605 PRINT" 



(2) PRESENT INVESTMEN 

(3) POTENTIAL INVESTM 

(4) ALL OF THE ABOVE" 

(5) RETURN TO MAIN ME 
NU":INPUTC1 

606 F0RK=1T04 : PRINT #-2 , " " : NEXTK : 
IFCl=lTHENPRINT#-2, "MARKET INDIC 
ATOR" 

607 IFCl=2THENPRINT#-2 , "PRESENT 
INVESTMENT" 

608 IFCl=3THENPRINT#-2 , "POTENTIA 
L INVESTMENT" 

609 IFC1=4THENC1=1:G=1:GOSUB606: 
Cl=2 : GOSUB606 : Cl=3 : GOSUB606 : GOTO 
20 

610 IFC1=5THEN20 

611 FORI=lTOY 

620 IFC1=1ANDT(I)=1THENGOSUB670 
630 IFC1=2ANDT(I)=2THENGOSUB670 
640 IFC1=3ANDT(I)=3THENGOSUB670 








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The wait is over. WASATCHWAKE announces the latest version 
of MLBASIC designed to allow more compatibility with existing BASIC 
programs than ever available before for the Color Computer. This 
version also allows full use of the capabilities and memory of the 
CoCo 3. Written in machine language, MLBASIC can compile programs as 
large as 64K bytes. Standard floating point (9 digit precision), 
INTEGEB, and String type variables and arrays supported. 

COMMANDS SUPPORTED: 



1. I/O commands 

CLOSE CLOADM CSAVEM DIR 
FILES GET INPUT KILL 
RSET USING LINEINPUT 

2. Program control commands 



CALL" DEFUSR END 

IF > THEN ELSE 

3. Functions 

ABS ASC ATN 

HPOINT INSTR INT 

PEEK POINT PPOINT 

TIMER VAL VARPTR 

4. String functions 
CHR$ INKEYS LEFTS 



EXEC 
ERROR 

COS 

LEN 

RND 



DRIVE 
LSET 



FOR 
ON 

CVN 
LOG 
SGN 



DSKIS 
OPEN 



NEXT 
RETURN 

EOF 

LPEEK 

SIN 



DSKOS 
PRINT 



GOSUB 
STOP 

EXP 

LOC 

SQR 



FIELD 
PUT 



GOTO 
USR 

FIX 

LOF 

TAN 



5. Graphic/Screen commands 
ATTR COLOR CLS CIRCLE 
HLINE HPAINT HPRINT HRESET 
LINE LOCATE PALETTE PAINT 
PRESET PSET RESET SCREEN 

6. Other commands 

DATA DIM MOTOR POKE 

TRON TROFF TAB VERIFY 



MID$ MKN$ RIGHTS STR$ STRINGS 



DRAW 
HCIRCLE 
PCLEAR 
SET 



HCOLOR 
HCLS 
PCLS 
SOUND 



HSCREEN 
HSET 
PLAY 
WIDTH 



HDRAW 
JOYSTK 
PMODE 



LPOKE RESTORE READ REM 



Plus many more commands not available with regular BASIC which allow 
interfacing with hardware registers and machine language programs. 

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CHECK or MONEY ORDERS only. No C.O.D. or Bank cards. 
Foreign orders use U.S. MONEY ORDERS only. 



WASATCHWARE 

7350 Nutree Drive 
Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 
Phone (801) 943-1546 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 97 



660 NEXTI 

661 IFG=1THENRETURNELSEGOTO600 

670 PRINT#-2 , " " : PRINT#-2 , " " : PRIN 
T#-2," ":PRINT#-2,A$(I) 

671 IFF$<>"Y"THEN67 3 

672 FORJ=30TO1STEP-1:PRINT#-2,D$ 

( J ) " - » A ( I , J ) ; : PRINT # - 2 , " " ; : NEXTJ 

673 PRINT # -2 , " " : PRINT # - 2 , 11 " : PRIN 
T#-2," 6-WEEK TREND " ;D$(6 

);" "D$(5);" ";D$(4) 

;" ";D$(3);» ";D$(2 

)/" "D$(l) 

675 PRINT#-2 , " " : PRINT#-2 , "30-WEE 
K AVG " ; :GOSUB700 

676 PRINT#-2,"":PRINT#-2,"DEV FR 
OM AVG " ; :GOSUB710 

677 PRINT#-2,"":PRINT#-2,"% DEVI 
ATION 11 ; :GOSUB720:PRINT#-2, ,M, :R 
ETURN 

700 FORJ=6T01STEP-l:PRINT#-2,USI 
NG" ####.##»;AV(I,J) ;:NEXTJ:R 
ETURN 

710 FORJ=6T01STEP-l:PRINT#-2,USI 
NG" ####.##";DF(I,J) ;:NEXTJ:R 
ETURN 

720 FORJ=6T01STEP-l:PRINT#-2,USI 
NG" ####.##";PC(I,J) ; :NEXTJ:R 
ETURN 

750 PRINT"NOW WE'LL SAVE THIS DA 
TA. " 

751 INPUT" DATAFILE : (D) DISK OR (T 
) TAPE " ;S$ 

752 IF S$="T"THEN1100 

753 IFS$<>"T" AND S$O"D"THEN750 
755 CLS: PRINT "NOW WE'LL SAVE THI 
S DATA ON DISK. WHEN READY PRESS 
<ENTER>":INPUTR$ 

782 OPEN"0",#2,"TRNDDATA/NEW" 

790 FORI=lTOY 

800 WRITE#2,A$(I) 

805 WRITE#2,T(I) 

810 FOR J=1TO30 

820 WRITE#2,A(I,J) 

825 IFI=1THENWRITE#2 ,D$ (J) 

830 NEXTJ 

840 F0RJ=1T06 

850 WRITE#2,AV(I,J) ,DF(I,J) ,PC(I 
,J) 

860 NEXTJ 
880 NEXTI 

889 CLOSE#2 

890 IFC=1THEN892 

891 KILL"TRNDDATA/DAT" 

892 RENAME " TRNDDAT A/NEW " TO " TRNDD 
ATA/ DAT" 

900 RETURN 

910 INPUT"IS YOUR DATAFILE (D)DI 
SK OR (T)TAPE";S$ 

911 IFS$="T"THEN1200 

912 IFS$<>"T" AND S$<>"D" THEN 91 



915 CLS:PRINT"NOW WE'LL LOAD PAS 
T DATA. WHEN THE DISK IS READY 
PRESS <ENTER>":INPUTR$ 
920 1=0 

930 OPEN" I " , # 1 , "TRNDDATA/DAT" 
940 IFEOF(1)=-1THEN1040 
950 1=1+1 

960 INPUT#1,A$(I) ,T(I) 

970 FORJ=1TO30 

980 INPUT#1,A(I, J) 

985 IFI=1THENINPUT#1,D$(J) 

990 NEXTJ 

1000 F0RJ=1T06 

1010 INPUT#1 , AV (I , J) ,DF(I, J) ,PC( 
I, J) 

1020 NEXTJ 
1030 GOTO940 
1040 CLOSE#l 
1050 RETURN 

' 1100 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 
:PRINT"TO SAVE THIS DATA": PRINT" 
PLACE A CLEAN TAPE IN THE": PRINT 
"CASSETTE AND PRESS PLAY" : PRINT" 
AND RECORD" 

1110 INPUT"WHEN READY PRESS <ENT 
ER>";R$ 

1120 OPEN"0",#-l,"TRNDDATA" 

1130 FORI=lTOY 

1140 PRINT#-1,A$(I) ,T(I) 

1150 FORJ=1TO30 

1160 PRINT#-1, A (I , J) 

1165 IFI=1THENPRINT#-1,D$(J) 

1170 NEXTJ 

1175 F0RJ=1T06 

1180 PRINT#-1,AV(I, J) ,DF(I,J) , PC 
(I, J) 

1185 NEXTJ 

1190 NEXTI 

1191 CLOSE#-l 

1192 RETURN 

1200 CLS: PRINT "INSERT <TRNDDATA> 
TAPE IN" : PRINT "THE CASSETTE AND 
PRESS PLAY" 

1201 INPUT" WHEN READY PRESS <ENT 
ER>";R$ 

1205 1=0 

1210 OPEN"I",#-l,"TRNDDATA" 
1215 IFE0F(-1)=-1THEN1297 
1220 1=1+1 

1230 INPUT#-1,A$(I) ,T(I) 

1240 FORJ=1TO30 

1250 INPUT#-1,A(I, J) 

1260 IFI=1THENINPUT#-1,D$(J) 

1270 NEXTJ 

1280 F0RJ=1T06 

1285 INPUT#-1,AV(I,J) ,DF(I,J) , PC 
(I / J) 

1290 NEXTJ 
1295 GOT01215 
1297 CLOSE#-l 
1299 RETURN 



98 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Still pounding away at that keyboard? 




SAVE up to 1 9%" 

when you buy a joint sub- 
scription to the magazine and 
either rainbow on tape or 
rainbow ON disk! A one-year 
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and rainbow ON tape is only 
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RAINBOW ON DISK 

Offers OS-9 Programs 

In addition to all the programs 
offered on tape, part of one side of 
rainbow on disk is formatted for the 
OS-9 operating system. That means 
you can now get all the OS-9 pro- 
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Unauthorized copying of any copyright product is strictly illegal. The copyright (right to make copies) is in no way conveyed in the purchase transaction. 



Determine whether you save or lose by 
paying off a loan early 




Jack 




■P'very month, as you mail the checks 
^ to pay off your loans, it may cross 
Maiyour mind that you could save 
money by paying off the loans ahead of 
time. Don't go digging into your savings 
account right away, however — some- 
times you are penalized by early 
payoffs. 

Check your loan documents care- 
fully. If you find that a payoff is subject 
to the Rule of 78's, you could pay more 
than the balance due if you pay it off 
early. 

The program, Rule of 78's, compares 
simple interest against the loan repay- 
ment Rule of 78*s and shows the penalty 
for paying off a loan early. Bankers and 
finance companies aren't out to do you 
any favors, and the IRS will not allow 
the excess interest. This program com- 
pares those costs month-for-month 
prior to the end of the loan term. 

Interest and the Rule of 78's 

Bankers and finance companies don't 
want to recalculate loans that are paid 
off early. In fact, they will do as little 
calculating as absolutely necessary. 
They would rather use charts prepared 
at the main office by one of the newer 
(read "low paid") employees. When a 
loan is paid off early, they have to 

l - ~ J 

Jack Eizenga holds a degree in account- 
ing and is a retired IRS agent, In 
addition to being an enrolled agent and 
tax consultant, he also is currently disk 
librarian and treasurer of the Color 
America Users Group in California. 



recalculate the entire loan using the 
shorter period — and this doesn't work 
too well because the tables are usually 
set up for six-month to one-year peri- 
ods. 

Some genius found that simple inter- 
est could be approximated by applying 
interest equally to each month of the 
loan term. As you pay interest for 12 
months in a year, you add the months 
together, i.e., 12+11 + 10+. . .2+1=78. 
Each payment due is a numerator of 
that fraction in a decreasing sequence. 

The first month you pay l2 /n of the 
interest, the next month n ly% 9 and so 
forth. If the loan is paid off two months 
early, the rebate of interest is 1+2=3/ 
78ths of the total finance charge for the 
year. Thus, the rule of 78's. Expressed 
as a mathematical equation, it would 
look like this: 

I=(m)(m+l)/2 

Because one of the terms (m) or (m+ 1) 
is always an even number, this can be 
done mentally. For a 12-month loan, 
(m) is 12 and (m+1) is 13; dividing 12 
by 2 equals 6, and 6 times 13 equals 78 
(78=12*13/2). Suppose you pay off a 
loan in six months; the result is 21: 

6*7/2 = 3*7 = 21 

Therefore, your rebate is 21/78 of the 
total for the year. 

Now, take your four-year car loan: 
The dealer writes x dollars finance 
charge on the loan application and tells 
you that you hit the lottery and will be 



able to pay it off in 15 months. Here's 
the calculation: 48*49/2=24*49=2,352 
parts of our Rule of 78's. Your rebate 
would be 5.1 percent (15*16/2=15 
*8=120/2,352=5.1%) of the total inter- 
est. That's not nice, you say. You're 
right, it's not. CoCo to the rescue. 

The Program 

Rule of 78's can be used on any 
CoCo. For use on CoCos 1 and 2, delete 
Line 100. However, for full effect, an 80- 
column display is best. I kept the CoCo 
3 commands limited to a single line 
(Line 100) for this versatility. If you are 
limited to a 32-column screen, you will 
especially want a hard copy printout. A 
printer is not required, but it is highly 
recommended. 

The real comparison necessary is the 
difference between the simple interest 
per month and the Rule of 78's per 
month. The printouts do that for you. 
When you run Rule of 78 's you are given 
the choice of printer, screen, or both. 
Then you are asked the amount of the 
loan, the term of the loan in months and 
the interest rate entered as a percentage 
(8.9% = 8.9). Rule calculates the 
monthly interest, principal and balance 
by both simple interest and the Rule of 
78's. 

The sample printout shows the actual 
output for an automobile loan of 
$7,231.30 for 48 months at an annual 

percentage rate of 10.3 percent. You are 
able to readily observe the differences jn 
the payoff calculations. As you ap- 
proach the end of the term, the interest 
calculations tend to equalize. However, 



100 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



the finance company is always ahead for 
the first year and a half. That's why the 
Rule of 78's is used. Experience has 
shown that the first year is when most 
defaults and/ or payoffs occur. 

The totals at the bottom of the page 
show that the total interest and princi- 
pal are the same under either method if 
you pay according to the contract. The 
balance remaining is due to rounding 
errors and can and will be ignored. 

Monthly payments are calculated in 
Line 240. The sum of principal and 
interest is equal to the monthly payment 
under either method. The loop in lines 
300 through 410 calculates the principal 
and interest for each month. The for- 
mula in Line 120 rounds all payments 
to the nearest cent. 

The interest according to the simple 
interest formula (I) is the principal 
balance remaining (B) times the 
monthly interest rate (R). According to 
the Rule of 78's, the interest (17) is the 
finance charge (F) times the units as- 
signed to the month in question (T- 
N+l) divided by the total number of 
units for the loan (U=T*(T+l)/2). The 
finance charge is the total of payments 
minus the loan amount (F=M*T-B) in 
Line 250. 







Comparison of Simple Interest and Rule of 78's 










LOAN 


- 7231.3 














TERM 


=48 MONTHS 












INTEREST m 10,3 


PERCENT 


PER YEAR 










MONTHLY PAYMENT 


» $ 184. 


45 






SIMPLE INTEREST 


RULE OF 78 


1 o 

P. 


78 'S 
































EXCESS 




MONTHS 


MONTHS 


BALANCE 


MONTHS 


MONTHS 


is A LAN Cb 


INTEREST 




INTEREST 


PRINCIPAL 


REMAINING 


INTEREST 


PRINCIPAL 


£\£ji v lAJ.lM lUtf 


TO -DATE 


1 


62 .07 


122 .38 


7108 . 92 


66.21 


118.24 


/ ±±4 ./Jo 


4.14 


2 


61.02 


123 .43 


6985. 49 


64.83 


119 * 62 


by y j . a 4 


7.95 


3 


59. 96 


124.49 


6861.00 


63 . 45 


121.00 


DO / /. . 4 4 


11.44 


4 


58 • 89 


125.56 


6735 . 44 


62 .07 


122 .38 


O / « jflO 


14.62 


5 


57 .81 


126.64 


6608 .80 


60. 69 


123 .76 


D O Z D • J ]P 


17.50 


6 


56.73 


127.72 


6481.08 


59.32 


125.13 


OOJfll . 1 / 


20.09 


7 


55 . 63 


128 .82 


6352 • 26 


57 . 94 


126. 51 


0 J / 4 . 0 0 


22.40 


8 


54.52 


129.93 


6222.33 


56.56 


127.89 


©24 0 .77 


24.44 


9 


53.41 


131.04 


6091.29 


55.18 


129.27 


Oil / . DjO 


26.21 


10 


52.28 


132.17 


5959.12 


53.80 


130.65 


oy 86 .83 


27.73 


11 


51.15 


133*30 


5825.82 


52.42 


132.03 


COCA QO 


29.00 


12 


50.00 


134. 45< 


5691.37 


51.04 


13 3.41 


5721 .41 


30.04 


13 


48.85 


135.60 


5555.77 


49.66 


134.79 


5586.62 


30.85 


14 


47.69 


136.76 


5419.01 


48.28 


136.17 




31.44 


15 


46.51 


137.94 


5281.07 


46.90 


137.55 


5312.90 


31.33 


16 


45.33 


139.12 


5141.95 


45.52 


138.93 


5173.97 


32.02 


17 


44.14 


140.31 


5001.64 


44.14 


140.31 


5033.66 


32.02 


18 


42.93 


141.52 


4860.12 


42.76 


141.69 


4891.97 


31. 85 


19 


41.72 


142.73 


4717.39 


41.38 


143.07 


4748.90 


31.51 



Calculating the Rule of 78's won't 
keep you from having the penalty as- 
sessed, but it can help you avoid the 
crushing feeling that comes when you 
pay off a loan and find you owe more 
money than you thought you did. 



(Questions or comments may be 
directed to the author at 3811 N. Foster 
Ave., Baldwin Park, CA 91706. Please 
enclose an SASE when writing for a 
response.) □ 




270 


, .171 


390 . . , 


...196 


530 


• . . * . 35 


740 


26 


END . 


97 

t .... if 1 



The listing: RULEDF78 

100 PALETTEJ3 , 0 : WIDTH80 : CLS1 : ATTR 
3,J3:POKE150,1 

110 1 SIMPLE INTEREST VS RULE OF 
78'S 

120 DEF FNR(X)=INT(100*X+.5)/100 
: 'ROUND TO NEAREST WHOLE CENT 
13j3 F$=»#######.##»:l$-»###»:I1= 
0:10=0 

140 PRINT TAB ( 6) : INPUT "OUTPUT TO 
SCREEN <1>, PRINTER <2> OR BOTH 
<3>";Z 

150 PRINT TAB ( 6) ; "PRESS THE SPAC 
EBAR TO HOLD SCREEN PRINTING" 
160 PRINT TAB (6) ; "AND PRESS <ENT 
ER> T0 CONTINUE" 

200 PRINT TAB (6) : INPUT" ENTER THE 

LOAN AMOUNT" ;B:B7=B 
210 PRINT TAB ( 6) : INPUT "ENTER THE 

TERM OF THE LOAN IN MONTHS" ;T 



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OS9 is the trademark of Microware 
Systems Inc and Motorola Inc. 
Multi-pak is the trademark of 
Tandy Corp. 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 101 



220 PRINT TAB ( 6) : INPUT "ENTER THE 
ANNUAL INTEREST RATE AS A PERCE 
NT" ;R 

230 R=R/ 1200: 'MONTHLY INTEREST A 
S A DECIMAL 

24j3 M=B*R/(1-(1+R) A (-T) ) : 'MONTHL 
Y PAYMENT 

250 F=M*T-B : ' FINANCE CHARGE 

2 60 M=FNR(M) : 'WHOLE CENT PAYMENT 

270 U=T* (T+l)/2: 'UNITS FOR THIS 

TERM 

275 IF Z=2THEN 290 

280 GOSUB500: 'PRINT HEADER ON SC 
REEN 

285 IFZ=1THEN300 

290 GOSUB700: 'PRINT HEADER ON PR 
INTER 

300 FORN=lTOT: ' «<<LOOP<<<««« 
«««««« 

310 I=FNR(B*R) : 'MONTH'S INTEREST 
PAYMENT 

320 P=M-I: 'MONTH'S PRINCIPAL PAY 
MENT 

330 B=B-P: 'BALANCE REMAINING AFT 
ER PAYMENT 

340 I7=FNR(F*(T-N+1)/U) : f 78'S MO 
NTHLY INTEREST 

350 P7=M-I7: '78 'S MONTHLY PRINCI 
PAL 

360 B7=B7-P7: '78'S BALANCE RE MAI 
NING 

370 11=11+1:18=18+17: 'RUNNING TO 
TALS OF INT. PMNTS • 
380 P1=P1+P:P8=P8+P7: • RUNNING TO 
TALS OF PRINC. PMNTS. 

385 IFZ=2THEN400: ' 

386 Z$=INKEY$ : IFZ$<>CHR$ (32) THEN 
390ELSE387 

387 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=CHR$(13)THEN 
390ELSE387 

390 PRINT TAB (6) : PRINTUSINGI$ ;N ; 
: PRINTUSINGF$ ; I ; P ; B ; 17 ; P7 ; B7 ; 18- 
II: ' 

395 IFZ=1THEN410 

400 PRINT#-2, USING 1$ ;N; :PRINT#- 

2 ,USING F$ ; I ; P ; B ; 17 ; P7 ; B7 ; 18-11 : 
i 

410 NEXTN: ' »»»»>>»»>>»»> 

»»»»>>>> 

415 IFZ=2 THEN 450 

420 GOSUB600: 'PRINT UNDERLINES 0 

N SCREEN 

430 PRINT TAB ( 6) ; "SUM"; : PRINT US 
ING F$;I1;P1;B;I8;P8;B7;I8-I1 

435 IF Z=l THEN 460 

44,0 GOSUB 800: 'PRINT UNDERLINE 0 

N PRINTER 

450 PRINT#-2, "SUM"; : PRINT#-2 ,USI 



NG F$;I1;P1;B;I8;P8;B7;I8-I1 
455 IF Z=2 THEN 820 
460 END 

500 CLS: PRINT TAB (25) ; "COMPARIS 
ON OF SIMPLE INTEREST" 
510 PRINT TAB(30);"AND RULE OF 7 
8 ' S" : PRINT 

520 PRINT TAB(30) ;"LOAN =";B 
530 PRINT TAB (30) ; "TERM =";T;"MO 
NTHS " 

540 PRINT TAB ( 30 ); "INTEREST =";1 

200 *R; "PERCENT PER YEAR" 

550 PRINT TAB ( 30 ); "MONTHLY PAYME 

NT = $";M: PRINT: PRINT 

560 PRINT TAB ( 19 ); "SIMPLE INTERE 

ST" ; TAB (15) ; "RULE OF 78'S";TAB(1 

2) ;"78 'S" 

570 L$=STRING$ (28 ,"-"): PRINT TAB 
( 6 ) ; » " ; L$ ; " " ; L$ " EXCESS 



ii 



580 PRINT TAB (6);" MONTHS 

MONTHS BALANCE MONTHS 

MONTHS BALANCE INTEREST" 
590 PRINT TAB (6);" INTEREST 

PRINCIPAL REMAINING INTEREST P 
RINCIPAL REMAINING TO-DATE" 
600 PRINT TAB ( 6 ) ; " " ; : FORI=lTO 

7 : PRINT" " ; : NEXT I : PRIN 

T 

610 RETURN 

700 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , T 
AB ( 20 ); "COMPARISON OF SIMPLE INT 
EREST AND RULE OF 78'S" 
710 PRINT#-2 

720 PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;"LOAN =";B 
730 PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;"TERM =";T; 
"MONTHS" 

740 PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;"INTEREST = 
";1200*R; "PERCENT PER YEAR" .. 
750 PRINT #-2, TAB ( 30 ); "MONTHLY PA 
YMENT = $" ;M:PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 
760 PRINT#-2, TAB ( 13 ); "SIMPLE IN 
TEREST" ; TAB (44) ; "RULE OF 78'S";T 
AB(68) ; "78 'S" 

770 L$=STRING$(28,"-") :PRINT#-2, 

" ";L$;" ";L$;" EXCESS" 

780 PRINT#-2," MONTHS MO 

NTHS BALANCE MONTHS MONT 

HS BALANCE INTEREST" 

790 PRINT#-2," INTEREST PRI 

NCIPAL REMAINING INTEREST PRINC 

IPAL REMAINING TO-DATE" 

800 PRINT#~2," ";:FOR 1=1 TO 7 

:PRINT#-2," ";:NEXT I:P 

RINT#-2 
810 RETURN 
820 END 



102 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



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Joysticks (pair) 


$ 13 


Mouse 


$40 


MultiPak 


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Disk storage box (50) 


$12.50 


CCR-81 Cass. Rec. 


$42 



Disks (SS) $7.50/box 
Disks (DS) $8.00/box 
*lncludes free library case 



DMP-106 $159 
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Featu re 



A mailing list program that holds 
more than 900 addresses 










IdkgOste© DO 




3 he Post Office just may be the 
best mailing list program ever for 
the CoCo 3. How can I claim 
this? Because after looking at all the 
rest, I designed one with more features. 
This program was over five months in 
the making and one month in the test- 
ing. It is easy to use because it's totally 
menu-driven and user-prompting. Here 
are a few things The Post Office can do: 

• hold more than 900 addresses 

• look up ZIP codes automatically 

• double-check with you before 
printing and deleting 

• work in 40 or 80 columns, as you 
choose 

• print form letters 

• allow advanced cursor editing in 
the Add and Edit modes 

• operate in a very user-friendly 
fashion 

• work with most RAM disk pro- 
grams 

Orman Beckles works for an engineer- 
ing firm outside Boston. He writes 
programs for the IBM as well as for the 
Color Computer. 



Running the Program 

. After typing in and saving the pro- 
gram, enter RUN "POST". The main 
menu will appear, and look like this: 

<A> Add Addresses 

<D> Delete Addresses 

<E> Edit Addresses 

<F> Form Letters H 

<P> Print Routines 

<X> Exit From Program 

The main menu screen also displays 
the present number of records and an 
estimated number of free records. To 
return to the main menu from within 
any option, press BREAK. 

Adding and Deleting Addresses 

Select menu Option A. There is no 
need to press enter. You will see nine 
fields awaiting your entry of data. Code, 
the first field, is a non-printable field 
used for categorizing records. Some 
examples might be the following: Xmas, 
Regular, Pen Pal, Mother's, Father's, 
Active, Inactive and Overdue. 

For the second field, Name, type in 
the person's name just as you want it to 



appear on the label. You may use the left 
arrow key to erase the last printed 
character. When you have finished with 
Name, press either ENTER or the down 
arrow key. Do the same for the Address, 
City and State fields. 

When you get to the ZIP code field, 
the disk drive will activate for a second. 
If you are using a new disk, there will 
be no ZIP codes on file. Enter the ZIP 
code. Since PO will not allow you to 
alter a ZIP code once it has been placed 
in the ZIP codes file, be sure that it is 
correct before going to the next record. 
The ZIP codes file is updated each time 
a new ZIP code is introduced. 

PO will use the ZIP code you entered 
whenever both the city and state match 
a record in the ZIP code file. It will 
allow you to interchange the abbrevia- 
tion and full name of a state. However, 
the city must be exact. For example: 

Mass — Ma = Match 

Bedford — New Bedford = No Match 

Enter the person's phone number in 
the Telephone # field. In the F, L Name 
field, type in the person's first name 









104 



THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



followed by a comma, and then type ibe 
last name, e.g., Orman* Beckles. 

Form Letter module; the comma is used 
i|8gthat\ the program can distinguish 
between the first and last names. The 
names can be typed in uppercase if you 
like, since PO will convert them to the 
proper mixture of upper-/ lowercase. 

When you reach the Country field, 
look at the record — if you want to 
change any field, use the up arrow key 
to move up to it. Make the change, and 
use either the down arrow key or ENTER 
to get back to the Country field. Change 
the country or simply press ENTER. The 
drive will activate and the record will be 
saved/ln additio n to saving the record , 
PO will save the ZIP code you entered. 

The next record then appears. It will 
look like the last record. You may 
change any field you want by using the 
up and down arrow keys to move to that 
field and then typing in the new infor- 
mation. To exit, simply press BREAK. 
The record on the screen will not be 
saved, and the main menu will appear. 

Select D for Delete. The screen will 
display all the fields you saw in the Add 
Address option numbered 1 through 9, 
plus an option to default to any of the 
nine. You are prompted to select the 
field (press the appropriate number) 
"where deletion can be found." Pressing 
ENTER is the same as pressing 0. 

You are then prompted to "Enter 
string to delete." Enter the string you 



are searching for, but type only what 
you need: 



Bost 



ft 



Match - Boston 

Match = Boston, Boulton 

Match * Boston, Boulton 

Bedford 



As you can see, the more of the string 
you type, the more selective the records 
pulled. Entering an empty carriage 
return will result in all the records being 
selected. The first record will be dis- 
played. Press Y (yes) to delete the 
record, and N (no) to not delete the 
record. Press A to automatically select 
all the records that meet the match you 
specified. When the whole file has been 
checked. PO will give you a quick 
double-check by displaying key infor- 
mation about each record. In the 40- 
column mode, the field will always be 
the:;£!&dfc and Name fields. In the 80- 
column mode, the field being searched 
and a randomly chosen field will be 
displayed. You are shown the number of 
fields marked for deletions and asked, 
"Do you really want to erase these?" 
Pressing N will abort the process. Press- 
ing Y will delete the records forever. 
When PO is finished, the main menu 
will appear. 

Editing Addresses 

Select E for Edit. The screen will 
display the familiar nine fields (num- 
bered) and the default ("any of the 
above"). You are prompted to select 



field "where edit string can be found." 

Specify the field you want to search 
by pressing the appropriate number. 
(Pressing ENTER is the same as pressing 
0.) The screen will ask you to enter the 
string to edit. Entering an empty Jine 
will select all the records; each record 
will be displayed and changes may be 
made. As in the Add option, after the 
Country field the record will be put 
back in the file. 



Form Letters 

Select F for Form. Again, the screen 
displays the nine fields and the default. 
Specify the field you want to search by 
pressing the appropriate number. You 
are asked to enter the string to print and 
to enter the name of the letter file. 

Again, the more of a string you type, 
the more selective the records pulled. 
Merely pressing ENTER will result in all 
the records being selected. The "Letter 
File" is the ASCII-saved letter where 
the variable .FN. is used wherever you 
want the first name to be printed, and 
.LN. wherever the last name is to be 
printed, For example: 

Dear .FN 



I see by rny own records that you are 
eligible for a special discount. If I can 
be of any service to > you Mr. .LN-, 
please let me know. 

Your friend, 
John Q. Public 



^ > . . . 




WE'RE BRINGING THE COCO 



RAINBOW'S 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from Thu 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $25 to give 
your account a positive balance. 
This will be refunded after your first 
free hour if you choose to no longer 
use the system or it will be applied 
to future connect charges. If you do 
not maintain a positive balance, you 
will be charged $3.50 each month 
for direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — on 
a regular basis. Conference sched- 
ules will appear in the rainbow 
each month. Be sure to check online 
announcements for changes and 
additions. 

THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $24.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to the rainbow entitles 
you to this $32.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

If you're not a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hour of connect time. 

SAVE even more 

Want to save even more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29.95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21 .95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21.60). 

Delphi provides us all with 
Immediate CoCo Community. 

Check it out today. After all, you can 
sample it for freel 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



DELPHI 



TYPE: 

GROUP COCO 




How to reach RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and THE 
RAINBOW'S CoCo SIG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Telenet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and one stop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge for Telenet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $10.80 (U.S.) per 
hour. 

On Telenet: Uninet network has merged with Telenet. 
To get the Telenet number for your area, call (800) 336- 
0437. After you call the local access number and make 
connection, press enter twice. When the "TERMINAL=" 
prompt appears, press ENTER again. When the "@" prompt 
appears, type C DELPHI and press ENTER. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage" or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier," At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press 'A'. 
When "please log in:" appears, type DELPHI and press 

ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (.) and 
enter (use two periods if you're using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1, 3:126 and press ENTER. Now type p 1 310G, 
DELPHI; and press ENTER. Delphi's new rates indicate an 
additional $10.80 hourly surcharge for evening use of 
Datapac, which means a total of $18 (U.S.) for connect 
time. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Telenet or 
Tymnet. Check with the telephone authorities in your 
country for details on how to sign up for this service. When 
you have an account set up, you can reach Delphi with 
a"host code" of 3110 6170 3088 through Telenet, or 3106 
90 6015 through Tymnet. (YouH have to pay the toll 
charges for this connection.) 
Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to THE rainbow, at the 



"USERNAME:" prompt, type JOINDELPHI and press 
ENTER. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type RAINBOW. 
Then, at the "NUMBER:" prompt, type your individual 
subscription number from the mailing label of your latest 
issue of THE rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros at 
the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you dont already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type JOINDELPHI and press ENTER. At 
the "PASSWORD: "prompt, type 5ENDRAINB0W and press 
ENTER. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because you'll be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your rainbow and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill for subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just use Control-X and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BYE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter the CoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. Well 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP COCO 

After you sign in, youll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "user name" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and you'll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. You'll also 
be assigned a temporary password. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next day. Once an account is verified and opened, each 
rainbow subscriber will be credited with an hour of free 
time! 

When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into your 
own personal password. This is the password you will use 
for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 

After Max bids you goodbye, you'll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 



The first record will be displayed. 
Pressing Y prints the record; N does not 
print the record. Pressing A automati- 
cally selects all of the records that meet 
the match you specified. When the 
whole file has been checked, PO will 
give you a quick double-check by dis- 
playing key information about each 
record. 

In the 40-column mode, the field will 
always be the Code and Name fields. In 
the 80-column mode, the field being 
searched and a randomly chosen field 
will be displayed. The screen asks, "Are 
you sure you wish to print these?" 

Pressing N aborts the process. Press 
Y, and PO will write the letters to the 
printer substituting the proper names 
for .FN. and .LN.. For example: 

Dear Orman, 

I see by my own records that you are 
eligible for a special discount. If I can 
be of any service to you Mr. Beckles, 
please let me know. 

After the last letter is printed, the 
main menu will appear. 



Printing Routines 

Select P for Print. The screen displays 
our familiar nine fields and the default. 
Specify the field you want to search by 
pressing its number. 

Enter the string you are searching for 



when prompted. The more you type, the 
more selective the records pulled. Press- 
ing ENTER causes all the records to be 
selected. The first record will be dis- 
played. Pressing Y prints the record; 
pressing N does not print the record. 
Press A to automatically select all the 
records that meet the match you spec- 
ified. 

When the whole file has been 
checked', the program will give you a 
quick double-check by displaying key 
information about each record. Again, 
in the 40-column mode, the field will 
always be the Code and Name fields. In 
the 80-column mode, the field being 
searched and a randomly chosen field 
will be displayed. The screen then shows 
you the number of fields marked for 
printing and asks if you are sure you 
want to print them. 

Pressing N aborts the process. Press- 
ing Y causes PO to print out mailing 
labels. When PO is finished, the main 
menu will appear. 

Error Trapping 

PO can cope with almost any error 
and will display a message to help solve 
the problem. 

RAM Disk 

I use PO on my RAM disks. I wrote 
a little program that copies the informa- 
tion onto the RAM disk, starts the 
program and copies it back onto a 
floppy when I'm done. 



Parameters 

Line 12 contains the speed-up poke. 
Change this line to 4 0' if you do not want 
the high speed mode. PO automatically 
slows down the machine whenever disk 
I/O Errors occur. 

Line 13 sets the default screen width. 
You may select either the 40- or 80- 
column mode. 

Line 14 sets the default tab width. If 
you are using the 80-column mode, set 
this to 20. If you are using the 40- 
column mode, set this to 0. If you are 
using a TV, which cuts off the first two 
columns, set this to 2. 

Line 15 sets the printer baud rate. 
Enter POKE 150,1 for 9600 baud, POKE 
150,87 for 600 baud, etc. 

Line 16 sets the number of lines 
between labels. For most labels, this 
should be set to 2. Increase the number 
for larger labels. 

Line 17 prints the country. Select 
whether you want the Country field to 
print (0=no, l=yes). 

Line 18 sets the default column start, 
and this should never be changed. 

The Post Office has applications for 
both personal and business uses. Its 
ability to hold more than 900 addresses 
should make it more than adequate for 
most small business owners. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 45 Meridian St., Maiden, MA 
02148. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a response.) □ 




17 57 

50 68 

110 192 

2060 186 

2160 142 

2250 236 

2325 154 

2425 153 

3105 145 

4055 159 



4160 46 

4245 6 

4330 160 

4425 156 

5045 237 

5150 128 

5235 90 

5325 157 

6025 77 

6235 221 



6410 132 

6480 29 

6565 97 

6645 106 

7000 161 

7090 215 

7205 10 

END 58 



The listing: POST 



1 1 ***************************** 


******* 




2 1 ** 


The Post Office 


** 




3 » ** 


By Orman Cyril Beckles 


II ** 




4 i ** 




** 




5 1 ** 


(C) Copyright 1987 


★ * 





6 1 ** 

** 

7 i ***************************** 
******* 

8 ■ 

9 ' 

lp GOTO 673J3: • 

< — DOES A PCLEAR 1 

11 RGB: CLEAR 2J3J30 : FILES 2,332:DI 
M S(949) :TZ=5:ON ERR GOTO 7210 

12 HI=65497: 1 

< — HI SPEED POKE 

13 W=8j3 : ■ 

< — DEFAULT WIDTH 

14 TB=2J3 : 1 

< — DEFAULT TAB 

15 POKE 150,1: ' 

<-- BAUD RATE 

16 EL=2 : » 

< — # OF LINES BETWEEN 

LABELS 

17 PC=J3 : • 

< — PRINT COUNTRY 0=NO 



108 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



1=YES 

18 DC=TB+13 : 1 

< — DEFAULT COLUMN STAR 

T 

19 KK=l: ■ 

< — KEY CLICK 
2)3 WIDTH W: PALETTE J3,J3:0N BRK GO 
TO 2j3:CLSl:ATTR l,j3:CLS:GOSUB 61* 
J3j3 

25 LOCATE TB+6 , 6 : PRINT"Nuitiber Of 
Free Records =" ; INT (FREE (J3) *13) 
3j3 GOSUB 6j3j3j3:NF=LOF(l) : LOCATE J3 
,2)3: PRINT: CLOSE #l:LOCATE J3,7:PR 
INTTAB (TB+6) "Number Of Used Reco 
rds =";NF 
35 LOCATE )3,12 

4) 3 PRINTTAB(TB+9) ; : ATTR 3,J3:P 
RINT"A ff ; : ATTR 1 ,)3 : PRINT" >" ; : ATTR 

3, )3: PRINT" ADD Address (s) "; : 
ATTR 1,0: PRINT 

45 PRINTTAB(TB+9 )"<";: ATTR 3,J3:P 
RINT"D" ; : ATTR 1,)3: PRINT "> " ; : ATT 
R 3,0: PRINT "DELETE Address (s) "; : 
ATTR 1,J3: PRINT 

5) 3 PRINTTAB(TB+9) "<"; :ATTR 3,0:P 
RINT"E"; : ATTR 1 , )3 : PRINT" >" ; : ATTR 

3, 0: PRINT" EDIT Address (s) "; : 
ATTR 1,0: PRINT 

55 PRINTTAB(TB+9 )"<";: ATTR 3,0:P 



RINT"F"; : ATTR 1 , )3: PRINT" >" ; : ATTR 
3, )3: PRINT" FORM Letter (s)";: 
ATTR 1,)3: PRINT 

6) 3 PRINTTAB(TB+9) "<"7 :ATTR 3,0:P 
RINT"P"; : ATTR 1 ,p : PRINT">" ; : ATTR 

3, )3: PRINT" PRINT Routine (s) "; : 
ATTR 1,)3: PRINT 

65 PRINTTAB (TB+9 ) "<"; :ATTR 3,)3:P 
RINT"X" ; : ATTR 1, j3: PRINT ">" ; : ATTR 
3, )3: PRINT" EXIT FROM PROGRAM" ; : 
ATTR 1,)3: PRINT 

7) 3 LOCATE j3, 22: ATTR 3,2:PRINTTAB 
(TB+3)"By Orman Cyril Beckles II 

(C) 1987": ATTR 1,0: PRINTCHR$ (8 

) 

75 GOSUB 719)3 

8) 3 IF IK$="A" THEN 1)3)3)3: 1 "A 
DD" MODULE 

85 IF IK$="D lf THEN 2)3)3)3:' <-- "D 
EL" MODULE 

9) 3 IF IK$="E" THEN 3)3)3)3:' <— "E 
DT" MODULE 

95 IF IK$="F" THEN 4)3)3)3 :• <— "F 
OM" MODULE 

1)3)3 IF IK$="P" THEN 5)3)30:' <~ " 
PRT" MODULE * 

105 IF IK$="X" THEN 6725:' <-- " 
XIT" 

110 GOTO 75 



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"I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine, Now, it's time to 
give BASIC a shot in the arm, with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors ot your 
choice, with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible witfci ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs 
into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S \ 5-20; we provide information concerning how you can 
have this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35. 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC programs, auto-edit of error line, and 
many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk . , . S3495 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 . . . S27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 

Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid for the expert. 
CoCo 1 , 2, or 3 compatible. 

Disk . . . S23.95 Assembler source listing . . . Add S3. 00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

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No delay on personal checks • Please add $2.00 shipping • Sorry no credit cards or COD"s 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 109 



1000 ON BRK GOTO 12 : 1 

< — START OF ADD MODULE 
1005 GOSUB 6100 
1010 GOSUB 6500 
1015 GOSUB 6000: GOSUB 6015 
1020 IF AD(1)-1 AND LEN(V$(4))>1 
AND LEN(V$(5))>1 THEN AD(1)=0: 
FL(3)=l:GOSUB 7150:GOSUB 7110 
1025 GOTO 1000 

2000 ON BRK GOTO 12:FL(1)=1: ! 

< — START OF DELETE MODULE 
2005 GOSUB 6100: GOSUB 6200 
2010 LOCATE 0,21 

2015 PRINTTAB(TB+11) "PLEASE SELE 
CT FIELD" 

2020 PRINTTAB (TB+2) "-> Where del 
etetion can be found <-" 
2025 GOSUB 7190 
2030 A=VAL(IK$) 
2035 GOSUB 6100 

2040 PRINTTAB (TB+8) "ENTER STRING 

TO DELETE" 
2045 PRINT 

2050 PRINTTAB (TB+10) "->" ; : LINEIN 

PUT SD$: GOSUB 6100 

2055 GOSUB 6000 

2060 FOR T=l TO LOF(l) 

2065 POKE (HI-1) ,0:GET #l,T:POKE 

HI,0 
2070 S(T)=0 
2075 GOSUB 6400 

2080 IF FL(2)=1 THEN FL(2)=0:GOS 
UB 2 100: GOTO 2085 
2085 NEXT T 

2090 POKE (HI-1) ,0:CLOSE #l:POKE 
HI,0 



2095 


GOTO 2190 






2100 


LOCATE 0,9 






2105 


PRINTTAB (TB) " 


CODE: 


it 


DC$ 








2110 


PRINTTAB (TB) " 


NAME: 


it 


DN$ 


/ 






2115 


PRINTTAB (TB) " 


ADDRESS : 


ii 


DA$ 






ii2p 


PRINTTAB (TB) " 


CITY: 


ii 


DY$ 








2125 


PRINTTAB (TB) " 


STATE : 


ii 


DS$ 








2130 


PRINTTAB (TB) " 


ZIP: 


ii 


DZ$ 








2135 


PRINTTAB (TB) "TELEPHONE # : 


ii 


DT$ 








2140 


PRINTTAB (TB) 11 


F,L NAME: 


ii 


DF$ 








2145 


PRINTTAB (TB) " 


COUNTRY : 


ii 


DO$ 








2150 


IF FL(1)=1 THEN GOTO 2165 


2155 


S(T)=1 






2160 


RETURN 






2165 


GOSUB 7190 






2170 


IF IK$="Y" OR 


IK$="y" THEN 



2155 

2175 IF IK$="N" OR IK$="n" THEN 
2160 

2180 IF IK$="A" OR IK$="a" THEN 
FL(1)=0:GOTO 2150 
2185 GOTO 2165 

2190 1 DOUBLE CHECK OF DELETES 
2195 GOSUB 6100 

2200 LOCATE 0 , 6 : PRINTTAB (TB+ 14 ) " 

DELETIONS" 
2205 CV=9:C=1 
2210 GOSUB 6000 
2215 FOR T=l TO LOF(l) 
2220 IF S(T)=1 THEN 2225 ELSE 22 
90 

2225 POKE (HI-1),0:GET #l,T:POKE 

HI,0 
2230 CV=CV+1 
2235 IF CV>21 THEN CV=9 
2240 LOCATE 0 , 7 : PRINTTAB (TB+8) "M 
ARKED FOR DELETIONS^" ;C:C=C+l:LO 
CATE 1,CV 

2245 IF A=l OR A=0 THEN PRINT T 
AB(TB+5)A$;" ";B$ 

2250 IF A=2 THEN PRINT TAB (TB+5) 

DN$ ; " ";DC$ 

2255 IF A=3 AND W=80 THEN PRINTT 
AB(18) DA$ ; " ";DN$ ELSE IF A=3 T 
HEN PRINTTAB (2 ) C$;" "; DC$ 
2260 IF A=4 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DY$ ; " "; DN$ ELSE IF A=4 THEN PR 
INT D Y $ ; " ";DC$ 

2265 IF A=5 THEN PRINT DS$;" ";D 
N$ 

2270 IF A=6 THEN PRINT DZ$;" ";D 
N$ 

2275 IF A=7 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DT$ ; " "; DN$ ELSE IF A=7 THEN P 
RINT DT$ ; " "; DC$ 
2280 IF A=8 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DF$ ; " "; DN$ ELSE IF A=8 THEN PR 
INT DF$ ; " "; DC$ 

2285 IF A=9 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DO$;" "; DN$ ELSE IF A=9 THEN PR 
INT DO$;" "; DC$ 
2290 NEXT T 

2295 POKE (HI-1) ,0:CLOSE#1: POKE H 
1,0 

2300 T=21-CV:FOR Y=l TO T: LOCATE 
1 i CV+T : PRINT : NEXT Y: PRINTTAB (TB 
+4) "DO YOU REALY WANT TO ERASE T 
HESE" ; 

2305 GOSUB 7190 
2310 IF IK$="Y" THEN 2325 
2315 IF IK$="N" THEN STOP 
2320 GOTO 23-05 

2325 GOSUB 6100 : PRINTTAB (TB+8 ) "* 

Busy Deleting Records *": GOSUB 
6000 

2330 POKE (HI-1) ,0: OPEN "D",#2," 
TEMP. FIL", 166: POKE HI f l 



110 THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



2335 FIELD #2, 10 AS J$,25 AS K$ 
,25 AS L$,25 AS M$,10 AS N$,7 AS 

0$,14 AS P$,25 AS Q$,25 AS R$ 
2340 FOR T=l TO LOF(l) 
2345 IF S(T)=1 THEN 24j35 
2350 F-F+l:POKE (HI-1) ,0:GET #1, 
T:POKE HI,0 
2355 LSET J$=DC$ 
2360 LSET K$=DN$ 
23 65 LSET L$=DA$ 
2370 LSET M$=DY$ 
2375 LSET N$=DS$ 
2380 LSET 0$=DZ$ 
2385 LSET P$=DT$ 
2390 LSET Q$=DF$ 
2395 LSET R$=DO$ 

2400 POKE (HI-1) ; 0:PUT #2,F:POKE 
HI,0 

2405 S(T)=0:NEXT T 
2410 CLOSE #1 
2415 CLOSE #2 

2420 POKE (HI-1) ,0 : KILL H MAILER. F 
IL M :POKE HI,0 

2425 POKE (HI-1) ,0: RENAME "TEMP. 
FIL" TO "MAILER. FIL": POKE HI,0 
2430 GOTO 12 

3000 ON BRK GOTO 12:FL(2)=0:' ED 
IT MODULE 

3005 GOSUB 6100:GOSUB 6200 
3010 LOCATE 0,21 

3015 PRINTTAB(TB+11) "PLEASE SELE 
CT FIELD" 

3020 PRINTTAB (TB+2 ) "-> Where edi 
t string can be found <-" 

3025 GOSUB 7190 
3030 A=VAL(IK$) 
3035 GOSUB 6100 

3040 PRINTTAB (TB+10) "ENTER STRIN 
G TO EDIT" 
3045 PRINT 

3050 PRINTTAB (TB+1 2) "->" ; : LINEIN 

PUT SD$:IF SD$="" THEN SD$=" " 

3055 GOSUB 6000: 'OUTPUT ROUTINE 

3060 FOR NR=1 TO LOF(l) 

3065 POKE (HI-1),0:GET #l,NR:POK 

E HI,jJ 

3070 S(T)=0 

3075 GOSUB 6400 

3080 IF FL(2)=1 THEN FL(2)=0:GOT 
0 3105 

3085 GOTO 3125 

3090 POKE (HI-1) ,0: CLOSE #l:POKE 

HI,0 
3095 GOTO 12 
3100 GOTO 5280 
3105 GOSUB 6100 

3110 V$(1)=DC$:V$(2)=DN$:V$(3)=D 
A$:V$(4)=DY$:V$(5)=DS$:V$(6)=DZ$ 
: V$ ( 7 ) =DT$ : V$ ( 8 ) =DF$ : V$ ( 9 ) =DO$ 
3115 GOSUB 6500 

3120 LSET DC$=V$(1) :LSET DN$=V$( 




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March 1 988 THE RAINBOW 111 



2):LSET DA$=V$ ( 3 ) : LSET DY$=V$(4) 
:LSET DS$=V$(5) :LSET DZ$=V$(6):L 
SET DT$=V$(7) :LSET DF$=V$ (8) :LSE 
T D0$=V$(9) :PUT #1,NR 
3125 NEXT NR 
3130 GOTO 3090 

4000 ON BRK GOTO 12 :FL(1)=1: ' <- 
- START OF FORM MODULE 
4005 GOSUB 6100:GOSUB 6200 
4010 LOCATE 0,19 

4015 PRINTTAB(TB+11) "PLEASE SELE 
CT FIELD" 

4020 PRINTTAB (TB+2 ) " Where print 

-out string can be found " 

4025 GOSUB 7190 

4030 A=VAL(IK$) 

4035 GOSUB 6100: LOCATE 0,7 

4040 PRINTTAB (TB+ 10) "ENTER STRIN 

G TO PRINT" 

4045 PRINT 

4050 PRINTTAB (TB+12 ) "->" ; : LINEIN 

PUT SD$:IF SD$="" THEN SD$=" " 

4055 LOCATE 0 , 11 : PRINTTAB (TB+8 ) " 

ENTER NAME OF LETTER FILE" 

4060 PRINT : PRINTTAB (TB+12 ) "->" ; : 

LINEINPUT LF$ 

4065 IF LF$="" THEN 4055 

4070 GOSUB 6000:' < — OUTPUT RO 

UTINE 

4075 FOR T=l TO LOF(l) 

4080 POKE (HI-1),0:GET #l,T:POKE 

HI,0 
4085 S(T)=0 
4090 GOSUB 6400 

4095 IF FL(2)=1 THEN FL(2)=0:GOS 
UB 4115: GOTO 4100 
4100 NEXT T 

4105 POKE (HI-1) ,0: CLOSE #l:POKE 

HI,0 
4110 GOTO 4160 
4115 LOCATE 0,7: GOSUB 6255 
4120 IF FL(1)=1 THEN GOTO 4135 
4125 S(T)=1 
4130 RETURN 
4135 GOSUB 7190 

4140 IF IK$="Y" OR IK$="y" THEN 
4125 

4145 IF IK$="A" OR IK$="a" THEN 

FL(1)=0:GOTO 4120 

4150 IF IK$="N" OR IK$="n" THEN 

4130 

4155 GOTO 4135 

4160 1 <-- DOUBLE CHECK OF DELE 
TES 

4165 GOSUB 6100 

4170 LOCATE 0, 6: PRINTTAB (TB+13) " 

PRINT-OUT" 
4175 CV=9 : C=l 
4180 GOSUB 6000 
4185 FOR T=l TO LOF(l) 
4190 IF S(T)=1 THEN 4195 ELSE 42 



60 

4195 POKE (HI-1),0:GET #l,T:POKE 

HI,0 
4200 CV=CV+1 
4205 IF CV>21 THEN CV=9 
4210 LOCATE 0 , 7 : PRINTTAB (TB+8) "M 
ARKED FOR PRINTING 3 " ; C : C=C+1 : LOC 
ATE 1,CV 

4215 IF A=l OR A=0 THEN PRINT T 

AB(TB+5) DC$;" ";DN$ 

4220 IF A=2 THEN PRINT TAB(TB+5) 

DN$ ; " ";DC$ 

4225 IF A=3 AND W=80 THEN PRINTT 
AB(18) DA$ ; " "; DN$ ELSE IF A=3 
THEN PRINTTAB ( 2 ) DA$ ; " ";DC$ ' 
4230 IF A=4 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DY$ ; " "; DN$ ELSE IF A=4 THEN PR 
INT DY$ ; " "; DC$ 

4235 IF A=5 THEN PRINT DS$;" " ;D 
N$ 

4240 IF A=6 THEN PRINT DZ$;" ";D 
N$ 

4245 IF A=7 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DT$ ; " "; DN$ ELSE IF A=7 THEN P 
RINT DT$ ; " "; DC$ 
4250 IF A=8 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DF$ ; " "; DN$ ELSE IF A=8 THEN PR 
INT DF$ ; " "; DC$ 

4255 IF A=9 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DO$;" "; DN$ ELSE IF A=9 THEN PR 
INT DO$;" "; DC$ 
4260 NEXT T 

4265 POKE (HI-1) ,0:CLOSE#1: POKE 
HI,0 

4270 T=21-CV:FOR Y=l TO T: LOCATE 
1 , CV+T : PRINT : NEXT Y : PRINTTAB ( TB 
+0)"ARE YOU SURE YOU WISH TO PRI 
NT THESE"; 
4275 GOSUB 7190 
4280 IF IK$="Y" THEN 4295 
4285 IF IK$="N" THEN 4000 
4290 GOTO 4275 
4295 CLS 

4300 GOSUB 6100 : PRINTTAB (TB+10) " 

Working. . . " 

4305 GOSUB 6000 

4310 FOR T=l TO LOF(l) 

4315 IF S(T)=1 THEN 4320 ELSE 44 

80 

4320 POKE (HI-1),0:GET #l,T:POKE 

HI,0 
4325 GOSUB 4345 

4330 POKE HI-1,0:PRINT#-2,CHR$(1 
2): POKE HI,0:'< — EJECTS A PAGE 
4335 NEXT T 

4340 CLOSE #l:GOTO 12 • 
4345 P=INSTR(DF$,",") :RF$=LEFT$( 
DF$,P-l):FOR TF=P TO 25: IF MID$ ( 
DF$,TF,l)OCHR$ (32) THEN FC=FC+1 
:NEXT TF 

4350 RL$=MID$(DF$,P+1,FC-1) 



112 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



4355 L= S LEN(RF$) :R1$=RF$ : GOSUB 44 

30:RF$=R1$:L=LEN(RL$) :Rl$=RL$:GO 

SUB 4430:RL$=R1$ 

4360 OPEN f, I",#2,LF$ 

4365 IF EOF(2)=-l THEN CLOSE #2: 

RETURN 

4370 LINE INPUT #2,IL$ 

4375 P=INSTR(IL$ / ".FN. ff ) : IP P>0 

THEN 4395 

4380 P=*INSTR(IL$," .LN.») :I? P>0 
THEN 4425 

4385 POKE HI-1,0: PRINT #-2, IL$: 

POKE HI,j3 

4390 GOTO 4365 

4395 1 FOUND .FN. 

4400 MID$(IL$,P,4)=" » 

4405 P1$=MID$(IL$,1,P-1) 

4410 P2$==MID$(IL$,P+4,LEN(IL$) ) 

4415 IL$=P1$+RF$+P2$ 

4420 GOTO 4375 

4425 MID$(IL$,P,4)=" ":P1$=MI 
D$ (IL$ , 1 , P-l) : P2$=MID$ (IL$ , P+4 , L 
EN(IL$) ) :IL$=Pl$+RL$+P2$:GOTO 43 
80 

4430 FOR U«l TO LEN (Rl$) 

4435 C$=MID$(R1$,U,1) 

4440 IF U«l THEN 4465 

4445 IF ASC(C$)<91 AND ASC(C$)>6 

4 THEN C=ASC(C$)+32:C$=CHR$(C) 



4450 MID$(R1$,U,1)=C$ 

4455 NEXT U 

4460 RETURN 

4465 "FIRST LETTER 

4470 IF ASC(C$)>96 THEN C=ASC(C$ 

)-32:C$=CHR$(C) 

4475 GOTO 4450 

4480 NEXT T 

4485 POKE (HI-1) ,0:CLOSE #l:POKE 

HI,0 
4490 GOTO 12 

5000 ON BRK GOTO 12:FL(1)=1:' <- 
- START OF PRINT MODULE 
5005 GOSUB 6100:GOSUB 6200 
5010 LOCATE 0,19 

5015 PRINTTAB(TB+11) "PLEASE SELE 
CT FIELD" 

5020 PRINTTAB (TB+2 ) " Where print 
-out string can be found " 

5025 GOSUB 7190 

5030 A=VAL(IK$) 

5035 GOSUB 6100: LOCATE 0,7 

5040 PRINTTAB (TB+ 10) "ENTER STRIN 

G TO PRINT" 

5045 PRINT 

5050 PRINTTAB (TB+12 ) "->" ; : LINEIN 
PUT SD$:IF SD$="" THEN SD$=" " 
5055 GOSUB 6000 
5060 FOR T=l TO LOF(l) 



CoCo 3 
ADDRESS FILE 
& 

ENVELOPE & LABEL ADDRESSING 

Automatically addresses all standard envelopes or 
labels using a choice of size options for either!! 

THESE FILES HAY BE USED FOR RECORDS OTHER THAN 
ADDRESSESS! H IMAGINATION IS ALL TIM'S NEEDED!!! 

There are 15 files that hold 18 records per file! This 
TOTALS 270 ADDRESSES! or records that can be stored 
per disk!! They are divided alpabetically into the 15 
files where they are alphabetically arranged! Each 
record can hold 8 lines of 64 characters per line!! 

WELL DOCUMENTED WHILE RUNNING + INSTRUCTION BOOKLET! 
IB MENU DRIVEN ROUTINES TO FULLY MANIPULATE FILES AND 
RECORDS INCLUDING? SEARCH; UPDATE AND DELETE!! 
UNLIMITED STORAGE CAPACITY WITH BACKUP DISKS YOU MAKE! 
REQUIRES ; CoCo 3? Disk Drive? Printer! Monitor OR TV! 

R.J.F. SOFTWARE? R.R. #2; WHITE LAKE, ONTARIO? KOA 3L0 
PHONE (613) 623-7824 

This program has been sealed and certified by RAINBOW 
MAGAZIt€! SEE PRODUCT REVIEW IN THIS ISSUE ! ! 

$14.95 U.S. FUNDS plus *J.W Shipping and Handling. 
Visa; Money Order or Personalized Check accepted! 
Ontario Residents add 72 Provincial bales lax. 

CoCo 3 WORD PROCESSOR for a DMPI85 or DMP186 PRINTER 
and DISK DRIVE. Can be used with a janitor Ok TV!!! 
Underlining, bold and all font styles *■ mch store!!!!! 
A SUPER WORD PROCESSOR ON A 64 COLUMN SCREEN! ! ! 
$19.95 U.S. FUNDS plus $3,00 Shipping and Handling 
Ontario, residents add 72 Provincial Sales fa?.. 




is/fwe yea* 

THE LARGtST AND MOST 
JERRI 8 lk WAR WAS 7UST 

ts we 7$l£ op T//e 

TH£ 




To ORDBRZ 
SEMI7 CflECK Of? finoMBy 
ORD£R> FOR $ZS TO: 
GLENN CflLAF/m 
S*/ OAK ST. 

f/CgTHPofCT, N.y. //76S 

'RAINBOW CJZtiVFlBPf 

FOR TtiS Coco* CoftlfKrtBR 
A/.y. RBS ftDP ?.$?. Stil&S 779X\ 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 113 



5/365 POKE (HI-1) ,0:GET #l,T:POKE 
HI,fS 
5070 S(T)=0 
5/375 GOSUB 6400 

5080 IF FL(2)=1 THEN FL ( 2 ) =0 : GOS 
UB 5100: GOTO 5/385 
5085 NEXT T 

5/390 POKE (HI-1) ,/3: CLOSE #l:POKE 

HI,0 
5095 GOTO 5145 
510/3 LOCATE 0,7: GOSUB 6255 
5105 IF FL(1)=1 THEN GOTO 5120 
5110 S(T)=1 
5115 RETURN 
5120 GOSUB 7190 

5125 IF IK$="Y" OR IK$="y" THEN 
5110 

5130 IF IK$="A" OR IK$="a" THEN 

FL(1)=0:GOTO 5105 

5135 IF IK$="N" OR IK$="n" THEN 

5115 

5140 GOTO 5120 

5145 'DOUBLE CHECK OF DELETES 
5150 GOSUB 6100 

5155 LOCATE 0,6: PRINTTAB ( TB+ 1 3 ) " 

PRINT -OUT" 
5160 CV=9:C=1 
5165 GOSUB 6000 
5170 FOR T=l TO LOF(l) 
5175 IF S(T)=1 THEN 5180 ELSE 52 
45 

5180 POKE (HI-1),0:GET #l,T:POKE 

HI,0 
5185 CV=CV+1 
5190 IF CV>21 THEN CV=9 



Mouse Tales 

By Logan Ward 




114 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



5195 LOCATE 0, 7: PRINTTAB ( TB+8 ) "M 
ARKED FOR PRINTING=" ; C : C=C+1 : LOC 
ATE 1,CV 

5200 IF A=l OR A=0 THEN PRINT T 

AB(TB+5) DC$;" Vf DN$ 

5205 IF A=2 THEN PRINT TAB(TB+5) 

DN$ ; " ";DC$ 

5210 IF k-3 AND W=80 THEN PRINTT 
AB(18) DA$; W »/DN$ ELSE IF A=3 T 
HEN PRINTTAB (2) DA$ ; " •»; DC$ 
5215 IF A=4 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DY$;" ";DN$ ELSE IF A=4 THEN PRI 
NT DY$ ; " M ;DC$ 

5220 IF A=5 THEN PRINT DS$;" M ;D 
N$ 

5225 IF A=6 THEN PRINT DZ$; H ";D 
N$ 

5230 IF A=7 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DT$ ; " " ;DN$ELSE IF A=7 THEN PRIN 
T DT$ ; " ";DC$ 

5235 IF A=8 AND W=80 THEN PRINT 
DF$ ; " ";DN$ ELSE IF A=8 THEN PRI 
NT DF$; W ";DC$ 

5240 IF A=9 AND W=80 THEN PRINT . 
DO$ DN$ ELSE IF A=9 THEN PRI 

NT DO$; M ";DC$ 
5245 NEXT T 

5250 POKE (HI-1) ,0 : CLOSE#l : POKE 
HI,0 

5255 T=21-CV:FOR Y=l TO T: LOCATE 
1 , CV+T : PRINT : NEXT Y : PRINTTAB (TB 
+0)"ARE YOU SURE YOU WISH TO PRI 
NT THESE" 
5260 GOSUB 7190 
5265 IF IK$="Y" THEN 5280 
5270 IF IK$="N" THEN GOTO 5000 
5275 GOTO 5260 
5280 CLS 

5285 PRINT "WORKING ."; 

5290 GOSUB 6000 

5295 FOR T=l TO LOF(l) 

5300 IF S(T)=1 THEN 5305 ELSE 53 

65 

5305 POKE (HI-1),0:GET #1,T 
5310 F=0 : TF=0 : POKE (HI-1) ,0 
5315 TF=TF+l:CC$=MID$(DY$ / TF,l) : 
IF CC$=CHR$(32) THEN F=F+1 
5320 IF TF=25 OR F=2 THEN 5330 
5325 GOTO 5315 

5330 IF TF=25 THEN T$=DY$ :GOTO 

5335 ELSE T$=LEFT$ (DY$, TF) 

533 5 PRINT#-2,DN$ 

5340 PRINT#-2,DA$ 

5345 PRINT#-2,T$;" / ";DS$ 

5350 PRINT#-2,DZ$ 

5355 IF PC=1 THEN EL=EL-1 : PRINT# 
-2,DO$ 

5360 FOR TT=1 TO EL: PRINT#-2 , " " 
:NEXT TT 
5365 NEXT T 

5370 POKE (HI-1) ,0: CLOSE #l:POKE 



HI,* 

5375 GOTO 12 
538J3 • 
5385 ' 

5390 ' — END OF PRINT ROUTINE — 
6000 • — START OUTPUT ROUTINE — 
6005 CLOSE#l:POKE (HI-1) ,J3:L0CAT 
E 0 ,20: ATTR 3, J3,B: PRINTTAB (TB+6) 
"PLEASE WAIT - ACCESSING DISK";: 
ATTR 1,J3:0PEN "D" , #1, "MAILER. FIL 
:J3",166 

6010 FIELD #1, 10 AS DC$,25 AS D 
N$,25 AS DA$,25 AS DY$,1J3 AS DS$ 
,7 AS DZ$,14 AS DT$,25 AS DF$,25 
AS DO$: LOCATE 0, 20 : PRINT: RETURN 
6fS15 LSET DC$=V$(1) :LSET DN$=V$( 
2):LSET DA$=V$ ( 3 ) : LSET DY$=V$(4) 
:LSET DS$=V$'(5) 

6020 LSET DZ$=V$(6) :LSET DT$=V$ ( 
7):LSET DF$=V$(8) :LSET DO$=V$(9) 
6025 NR=LOF(l)+l 

6030 POKE (HI-1) ,J3:PUT #l,NR:POK 
E E1,0 

6035 POKE (HI-1) ,0: CLOSE #l:POKE 
HI,* 

6040 LOCATE 0, 20% PRINT 
6045 RETURN 

6100 • — HEADER SUBROUTINE — 
6105 CLS : ATTR 1 , 0 : PRINTSTRING$ (4 
0+TB+TB, "*") : PRINTTAB (TB+12) ; : AT 



TR 3, 3: PRINT" The Post Office "; 

: ATTR 1,0: PRINT : PRINT : PRINTSTRIN 
G$ ( 4 J3+TB+TB, "*"): LOCATE *,9:RETU 
RN 

62 00 ' — HEADERS SUB-ROUTINE — 
62*5 LOCATE 0,1 

621* PRINTTAB (TB+1* ) "<1>. Code 

ONLY" 

6215 PRINTTAB (TB+1*) "<2>. Name 

ONLY" 

622* PRINTTAB (TB+1*) "<3>. Addres 
S ONLY" 
6225 PRINTTAB (TB+1*) "<4>. City 

ONLY" 

623* PRINTTAB (TB+1* ) "<5>. State 

ONLY" 

6235 PRINTTAB (TB+1* ) "<6>. Zip 

ONLY" 

6240 PRINTTAB (TB+1* ) "<7>. Teleph 
one ONLY" 

6245 PRINTTAB (TB+1*) "<8>. First/ 
Last ONLY" 

625* PRINTTAB (TB+1*) "<9>. Countr 

y ONLY " : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 

TB) "Def ault-> <0> . ANY OF THE AB 

OVE": RETURN 

6255 'SUB ROUTINE 2 

626* PRINTTAB (TB+TZ ) " CODE 

:";DC$ 

62 65 PRINTTAB (TB+TZ ) " NAME 



R«A„E>„ Products 
1^4- Hptchkiss Street 
Ja!r!B5to'.!in 5 NY 14-701 
<7).A> 665-2124 




Finally. a ver utile text 
formatter is available for the Color 
Computer. TEXTFORM is compatible with 
all models with at least 64K, even ths 
Color Computer ill. This machine 
language program will foraat ASCII 
text ft lit into two column pages 
quickly and sasily. Text nay be Left 
unmodified, or timply insert special 
formatter commands for addad control. 
TEXTFORH is a versitile enhancement to 
any word procsssmg syitam whathar you 
ara a casual or profassional user. 

Software supports; 

- Output to printer or disk 

- Most papular printers 

- AdjusUble format parameters 

- Columnar data 

- Multiple page titles 

- Optional page numbering 

- Large files (up to a full disk) 

TCCXFQfW comes with complete 
documentation as well as sample 
format sxamplea. Onscreen parameter 
display takes the guesswork out of 
format settings. Customized parametars 
may be laved to disk and reloaded for 
future use. thus eliminating mistakes 
and configuration time. Special 
printer codes and baud rate settings 
are software selectable. TEXTFORH it 
programmed in a high resolution 
environment which incorporates 
pull -down menus for esse of use. Ths 
software also supports auxilliary 
peripheral input from joysticks, 
mouse, touchpad, and high resolution 
input pack for added program control. 



This is not another word 
processor. There are many fine word 
processors on the market for the Color 
Computer. TEXTFORM is t user 
deflneable two column text formatter. 
If you are Looking for a program which 
will allow your Color Computer to 
create professional looking documents 
without hours of tedious work, then 
TEXTFORM is the answer. 

Ideal for: 

- School newspapers 

- Club newsletters 

- Business reports 

- Bulletins 

- Advertisements 

- Program listings 

- And much mora . . , 



System requirements: 

Color Computer <64K minimum) 

Disk drive 

Printer 



TEXTFORM 134.95 



R.A.D. Products 
194 Hotchkiss St. 
Jamestown. NY 14701 
<716> 665-2124 



RAINBOW 

cfftrncAiKM 

•ML 



Terms: Check. Money Order, C.O.D, 
MY residents add 7% sales tax 
C.O.D. orders add S3. 00 
All orders add S3. 00 for shipping 
All orders shipped within 24-48 hours 
Express shipping available by request 




PAOGAAMS • PC RtPHERALS • SUPPLIES • SCPVICC 



Fast Delivery... 
Friendly Service 

Now in our 6th year! 





Avatex 1200e 
with Coco Cable 109 



• FULLY Hayes compatible 

• Internal speaker 

• New compact size 

• 2-year Warranty 

Avatex 1200e, cable 
AUTOTERM $ 139 



»Call» • Shop by Modem • 

513-396-SOFT 513-396 SHO P 

1 1 QteliflSS \/yymrr^\ 



2235 Losantiville. Cincinnati, OH 45237 

SHIPPING will be charged at our ACTUAL COST 
Ohio re5tdvnis add S 5"o Sales Ta« C W jdHi i up 



J. 



March 1 988 THE RAINBOW 115 




HOW DO YOU GIVE A RAINBOW? 

It's simple — Give a rainbow gift certificate . . . 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 

Name 

Address : 

City State ZIP 

From: 

Name 

Address 

City State ' ZIP 

□ My payment is enclosed. 

Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Acct. # Exp. date 

Signature 

Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Let a gift subscription to the I 

rainbow carry the premier Color j 
Computer magazine right to 

your friends 1 doorsteps, the | 

rainbow is the information I 

source for the Tandy Color Com- I 

puter. j 

Each month, your friends will | 

enjoy the intelligent programs, I 

reviews and articles written ex- I 

clusively for their CoCo. j 

First, your gift will be an- | 
nounced in a handsome card, i 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- I 
member you and your thought- j 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — more than j 
200 pages loaded with as many i 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- I 
umns and lots of helpful hints j 
and tips. j 

Generosity benefits the giver, | 

too. There'll be no more tracking I 

down borrowed copies of the ' 

rainbow. Your collection will be j 

safe at home. [ 

Give a rainbow gift certificate | 

and let your friends in on the fun. I 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 

partfon for the Color Computer! \ 

Get your order to us by March j 

25 and well begin your friends' j 

subscriptions with the May issue i 

Of RAINBOW. I 

I 
I 



I 



DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 




> VIDEO 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS™ 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



I TM 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



; /ft* V; 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



■ 



t 



COCO 3 SCREEN 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. ^KF® S 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619)942-2400 



I 

I 

\ 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



TELEPHONE # 
F,L NAME 



COUNTRY 



: " ; DN$ 

627,0 PRINTTAB (TB+TZ ) 
: " 7 DA$ 

6275 PRINTTAB (TB+TZ) 
• it • DY$ 

6280 PRINTTAB (TB+TZ) 
: »»;DS$ 

6285 PRINTTAB (TB+TZ) 

;DZ$ 

62 90 PRINTTAB (TB+TZ) 

: " ; DT$ 

6295 PRINTTAB (TB+TZ) 
: " ; DF$ 

6300 PRINTTAB (TB+TZ) 

: " ; DO$ 

6305 RETURN 

6400 ' — SEARCH SUB-ROUTINE — 
6405 IF A=l AND INSTR (DC$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL( 2 )=l: RETURN 
6410 IF A=2 AND INSTR ( DN$ , SD$ ) >0 

THEN FL(2)=1: RETURN 
6415 IF A=3 AND INSTR ( DA$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL (2 )=l: RETURN 
6420 IF A=4 AND INSTR (DY$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL(2)=1: RETURN 
6425 IF A=5 AND INSTR ( DS $, SD$ ) >0 

THEN FL (2 )=1: RETURN 
6430 IF A=6 AND INSTR (DZ$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL(2)=l: RETURN 
6435 IF A=7 AND INSTR (DT$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL ( 2 ) -1 : RETURN • 
6440 IF A=8 AND INSTR ( DF$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL(2)=l: RETURN 
6445 IF A=9 AND INSTR (DO$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL( 2 RETURN 
6450 IF A=0 AND INSTR (DC$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL(2)=1: RETURN 
6455 IF A=0 AND INSTR ( DN$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL(2)=1: RETURN 
6460 IF A=0 AND INSTR (DA$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL(2)=1:RETURN 
6465 IF A=0 AND INSTR (DY$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL ( 2 ) =1 : RETURN 
6470 IF A=0 AND INSTR (DS$ , SD$) >0 

THEN FL (2 )=l: RETURN 
6475 IF A=0 AND INSTR ( DZ $, SD$) >0 

THEN FL (2 )=l: RETURN 
6480 IF A=0 AND INSTR ( DT$ , SD$) >0 
S$=MID$(S$,1,LEN(S$)-1) :GOT0 663 

0 

665J8 IF IK$=CHR$(13) OR IK$=CHR$ 
(10) THEN GOTO 6680 
6655 IF P=M-1 THEN 6630 
6660 P=P+1 

6665 S$=S$+IK$: LOCATE P , R : ATTR 3 
, 0 : PRINT IK$ ; : ATTR 1 , 0 
6670 IF P=M-1 THEN LOCATE P+1,R: 
PRINT" ";: SOUND 1,1: GOTO 6630 
6675 GOTO 6630 

6680 IF S$<>"" THEN P=P+1: LOCATE 
P,R: PRINT 



6685 RETURN 
6690 GOSUB 7190 
6695 GOSUB 6000 

6700 DC$=CO$:LSET B$=NA$ : LSET C$ 
=AD$ : LSET D$=CI$:LSET E$=ST$:LSE 
T F$=ZI$:LSET G$=TE$ : LSET H$=FL$ 
: LSET I$=CN$ 
6705 NR=LOF(l)+l 

6710 POKE (HI-1),0:PUT #l,NR:POK 
E HI,0 

6715 POKE (HI-1) ,0: CLOSE #l:POKE 

HI,0 
6720 RETURN 

6725 POKE (HI-1) ,0:POKE 113,0:EX 
EC 40999 :•< — BREAK OUT FROM MAI 
N MENU 

6730 PCLEAR-1:RUN 11 

7000 » — BEGINNING OF INPUT LOOP 

7005 LOCATE C,R: PRINTV$ (VN) :LOCA 
TE C+L,R: PRINT: GOSUB 6605 
7010 IF S$<>"" THEN V$(VN)=S$ 
7015 IF UA=1 THEN 7025 
7020 RETURN 
7025 UA=0 

7030 IF S$<>"" THEN V$(VN)=S$ 
7035 GU-1: RETURN 

7040 IF FL(3)=2 THEN FL(3)=0:RET 
URN:'< — ZIP CODE LOOKUP MODULE 
7050 POKE (HI-1) ,0: OPEN ,, D' , / #2 / " 
ZIPCODES.FIL",42 

7055 FIELD #2, 25 AS ZC$,10 AS Z 
S$,7 AS ZZ$:IF LOF(2)=0 THEN CLO 
SE #2: LOCATE 0 , 20 : PRINT : GOTO 709 
5 

7060 FOR T=l TO LOF(2) 
7065 POKE (HI-1),0:GET #2,T:POKE 
HI,0 

7070 BS=25-LEN(T1$) :T$=STRING$ (B 
S,» •') 

7075 T1$=T1$+T$ 

7080 IF ZC$=T1$ AND INSTR(ZS$,T2 
$)>0 THEN V$(6)=ZZ$:POKE (HI-1), 
0: LOCATE 0 , 20 : PRINT : CLOSE #2:POK 
E HI, 0: RETURN 
7085 NEXT T 
7090 CLOSE #2 
7095 V$(6)= ,,H 
7100 AD(1)=1 
7105 RETURN 

7110 1 — ADD ZIP CODE TO FILE — 
7115 POKE HI-1,0:OPEN "D",#2,"ZI 
PCODES.FIL" ,42 

7120 FIELD #2,25 AS ZC$,10 AS ZS 

$,7 AS ZZ$ 

7125 NR=LOF(2)+l 

7130 LSET ZC$=T1$:LSET ZS$=T2$:L 
SET ZZ$=V$(6) 
7135 PUT #2,NR 
7140 CLOSE #2: POKE HI,0 
'7145 RETURN 



118 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1988 



4 



* 



715J3 ' 

7155 IF FL(3)=1 AND LEN (V$ ( 4 ) ) =0 
OR LEN(V$(5) )=0 THEN FL(3)=2:RE 
TURN 

7160 IF FL(3)=1 THEN CV$=V$(4):G 
OSUB 7165:T1$=CV$:CV$=V$(5) :GOSU 
B 7165:T2$=CV$:FL(3)=j3:RETURN 
7165 FOR L=l TO LEN(CV$) 
717J3 LX$=MID$ (CV$,L, 1) :LX=ASC(LX 

$) 

7175 IF LX>90 AND LX<123 THEN LX 
=LX-3 2:MID$(CV$,L,1)=CHR$(LX) . 
7180 NEXT L 
7185 RETURN 

7190 •-- INKEY STRING SUB-ROUTIN 
E — 

7195 IK$=INKEY$ : IF IK$= ,MI THEN 7 
195 

7200 IF KK=1 THEN SOUND 200,1 
7205 RETURN 

7210 IF ERNO=26 AND ERLIN=4340 T 
HEN CLS:GOSUB 6100: LOCATE 0,12:P 
RINTTAB(TB) "** LETTER FILE REQUE 
STED NOT PRESENT **" : LOCATE 0,2 
0 : PRINTTAB ( TB+ 5 ) 11 * * PRESS ANY KE 
Y TO CONTINUE **":GOSUB 7 190: GOT 
0 12 

7215 IF ERNO=20 AND ERLIN=6005 T 
HEN GOSUB 6100: LOCATE 0,12: PRINT 



TAB (TB+0) "** FILE: MAILER. FIL H 
AS AN I/O ERROR **": LOCATE 0,20: 
PRINTTAB (TB+ 5 ) "** PRESS ANY KEY 
TO CONTINUE **" ;:GOSUB 7190:GOTO 
12 

7220 IF ERNO=20 AND ERLIN=12 THE 
N GOSUB 6100: LOCATE 0,12 : PRINTT 
AB (TB+0) 11 ** 10 ERROR ON DATA DIS 
K PLEASE CHECK **": LOCATE 0,.20:P 
RINTTAB (TB+5 ) "** PRESS ANY KEY T 
0 CONTINUE **";:GOSUB 7190:GOTO 
12 

7225 IF ERNO=20 AND ERLIN=9545 T 
HEN GOSUB 6100: LOCATE 0,12 ."PRINT 
TAB (TB) "** 10 ERROR IN FILE ZI 
PCODES PLZ CHK **": LOCATE 0,20: 
PRINTTAB (TB+5) "** PRESS ANY KEY 
TO CONTINUE **";:GOSUB 7190:GOTO 
12 

7230 IF ERNO=26 AND ERLIN=4355 T 
HEN GOSUB 6100: LOCATE 0,12: PRINT 
TAB(TB+2) "* NO LETTER FILE PRESE 
NT ON DISK * ";: GOSUB 7190: GOTO 
12 

7231 IF ERN0=2 6 AND ERLIN=43 60 T 
HEN 20 

7235 STOP 

7240 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 724 
0 



Clearbrook Software Group 

ERINA - Symbolic User-mode Debugger for 0S9 is 

a must for serious assembler and C programers. 
ERINA helps to find bugs quickly by displaying the 
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MSF - MS-DOS File Manager for CoCo3/OS9L2 al- 
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ERINA (requires 80 col. display, 0S9 L1/2 . . .$69.00 

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Full-featured database manager for CoCo/OS9 $169.95 

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U.S.: P.O. Box 8000-499, Sumas, WA 98295 
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Phone: (604)853-9118 

OS9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corp., 
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March 1988 THE RAINBOW 119 




We CannoT Tell A Lie 

Lonnie's gone nuts!! He's chopped down prices on 
Rainbow Bookshelf items! 





The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to 
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The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

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(80-column printer required.) 
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Name _ 
Address 

City 

State 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number 



ZIP 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book ot Simulations (first) 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape(first) 

□ First Simulations Package 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ Second Simulations Package with Tape 

□ Second Simulations Package with Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Package 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for 

The Complete Rainbow Guide 
to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 

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□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

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□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

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□ introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

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(indicate choice of tape or disk) 

Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4 per book 
Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) 



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I 

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'ft'. 1 ; ■ S&%& >»F 




Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059. To order by phone (credit card orders only) 
call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other Inquiries call 
(502) 228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. That is, 
they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape or disk, you will 
still need the appropriate book for loading and operating instructions. OS-9® is a registered trademark of the 
Microware Systems Corporation. 

¥^^t : i-f^^ : :^^^^fM&^ : : lllfev ^iilfe 




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16K ECB 



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—4 

A 



122 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Sample Situation After Three Moves 



Player 1 



(Heading 135 degrees at 30 KTS) 



Player 2 
(225 degrees at 30 KTS) 




Distance f rom sub; 



r tirst move 
after second move 
after third move 



Range from sub is decreasing by 
20 NM each turn. Sub must be 
moving away from you — you are 
moving 30 NM each turn, but sub 
is also moving 10 NM; net 
difference is 20 NM. 





Range from sub is decreasing by 
40 NM each turn. Sub must be 
heading your way — you are 
moving 30 NM and sub is moving 
10 NM; net difference is 40 NM. 



Note: Repair station has a radius 
of 10 NM. Use this as a guide to 
judge whether you are within 10 
NM of the sub to attack. 



Range from sub is decreasing by 
30 NM each turn. Sub's path must 
be perpendicular to yours — you 
are moving 30 NM each turn. 




Player 3 
(315 degrees at 30 KTS) 



If your ship is within 10 NM of the 
sub, and the sub is either 25 feet above 
or below the depth setting of your 
ASROC — you win! However, if you 
attack the sub within 10 NM but miss 
with the depth setting, the sub will 
reattack with a torpedo. To repair 
damage caused by torpedoes or to re- 
stock your supply of ASROCs, head for 
the red repair station in the center. 
Should you attack the sub farther than 
10 NM away, nothing will happen; the 
sub will not retaliate — you will simply 
have wasted one or two missiles. 

There are two difficulty options. The 
first option displays the sub's path, 
which is useful in becoming familiar 
with the game. The second option is the 
same except that the sub's path is 
concealed. When the sub is finally 
destroyed under Option 2, its path will 




March 1988 THE RAINBOW 123 



r 



Up and Running 

1) Run program 

2) Title page/instructions- 

3) Input number of players (1 to 4) 

4) Select game difficulty (1=easy; 2=hard) 

5) Copy your secret distance code number 

6) Copy sub "depth range" 

7) Status of your destroyer 

8) Playing screen (repair station in center) 

9) Press ENTER when ready to enter ship's course and speed 

10) Enter course (001 to 360 degrees) 

1 1) Enter speed (0 to 30 KTS) 

12) Your new position is now >»f I i ckeri n g«< 

13) Decide whether to attack sub (Y or N). (Must be within 10 NM to 
succeed) 

14) If you didn't attack, write down your distance report 

1£) if you attacked, choose number of rockets and set depth — ASROC 
' has kill zone of plus or minus 25 feet (50 feet total) 

16) If you attacked and your distance codes appear, you missed! (You 
were not within 10 NM of the sub.) 

17) If the sub fires a torpedo, you were close enough (10 NM) but your 
depth setting was off. (Remember, sub does not change depth, so 
don't duplicate that depth setting again!) 



be displayed for the curious. For the 
frustrated, there is an "I Give Up" 
feature, which will also display the sub's 
depth and path. 

Remember, the only information you 
get is distance from the sub. As you 
don't want other players to know how 
close you're getting to the sub, each 
player receives a distance code number 
at the beginning of the game. Copy 
down your code number ( 1 to 10) on 
your pad of paper, and don't let anyone 
else see it! 

After each player's turn, a list of 10 
distances will appear. When your turn 
is over, use your code number to deter- 
mine your distance from the sub. Your 
code number works only after your 
turn. Do not try to use the information 
from another player's list of 10 codes 
(these numbers will be meaningless .to 
you). 

It is helpful to keep track of your 
moves on a pad of paper. Analysis of the 
distance reports will provide valuable 
clues to the sub's position and heading/ 
track. 

See the "Up and Running" reference 
chart to quickly step you through the 
motions of becoming captain of your 
destroyer. □ 



Program Line Comments 


10-30 


Title page 


40-110 


Instructions 


120-170 


Game setup/Initialize variables 


180 


Begin new turn 


190 


"I GIVE UP" option 


200-220 


Control sub path 


240 


Next player's turn begins 


250-310 


Display ship position and input 




new course and speed 


320-800 


Determine ship position given 




course and speed 


750-760 


End of turn 


840-900 


Check to see if you hit reef or 




repair station 


910-960 


Display ship status 


980-1010 


Figure distance between attacking 




ship and sub 


1020-1040 


Sound of missile launching 


1050-1100 


Ask if you want to attack sub 


1110*1210 


Attack sequence 


1220-1300 


Torpedo attack 


1320-1350 


Assign each player a "code 




number" 


1430-1440 


Win sequence 


1450-1480 


Draw sub path 


1520 


End of game loop 


1530 


Designs screen 



Variable Descriptions 


A3 


= Game difficulty level 


D 


= Max depth for sub 


DD 


= Actual sub depth 


DR 


= Course in degrees 


DS 


= Direction of sub (degrees) 


KE(4) 


- "Code number" for each player 


MD(2) 


= ASROC depth setting 


ML(4) 


= Missile launchers operational (2 max) 


MS(4) 


= Missiles left (4 max) 


MR 


= Moves before sub changes course (7 to 9) 


MV 


= Counts sub moves 


P 


= Current player number 


P4 


- Number of players in game 


PR (4) 


- Speed available (30 KTS max) 


SD 


= Distance between sub and ship 


SP 


= Speed 


T 


= Turn 


TT 


= Total turns (100 max) 


X(4,5) 




Y(4,5) 


= Stores ship's last 4 moves 


XS(102) 




YS(102) 


= Stores sub's entire route 

■ • . ■ <r \7-,- ■■■■ .. . ■ 



124 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 

12 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Help! 

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QVT 119 Plus 
Wyse 
WY-30 
WY-50 

WY-350 Color 
WY-60 with keyboard 



$199.00 129.00 
$595.00 256.00 

$699.00 544.00 



384.00 
396.00 
540.00 

390.00 
482.00 
968.00 
529.00 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA, M/C and AMEX. NY resi- 
dents add 7% sales tax. US shipping add $3.50. Please call for Air 
Express shipping. Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. 
* Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 



Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 
Telex 646740 - FAX 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856 




110 23 

160 63 

310 230 

580 170 

850 6 



980 200 

1180 11 

1300 237 

1420 239 

END 226 



The listing: SUBSERCH 

10 R=RND( -TIMER) : CLEAR100 : DIMX(4 
,5) ,Y(4,5) ,118(4) ,ML(4) ,PR(4) ,XS( 
102) ,YS(102) :CL$=CHR$(128)+CHR$( 
128)+CHR$(128) 

20 CLS(0) :PRINT©74," 'SUB SEARCH 
' " ; : PRINT@112 , "BY" ; : PRINT@138 , " 
STEVE SWARD " ; : PLAY"T1P1" : PRINT 
@76,CL$; 

30 FORW=1TO20 :R=RND (500) : PRINTER 
, "sub"; :PLAY"T170V15O1;A;A#;A-;O 
5 ; A ; A # ; A- ; T2 P6 " : PRINT @R , CL$ ; : NEX 
T 

40 CLS(3) :PRINT"MISSION: DESTROY 
ENEMY SUBMARINE" ; : PRINT@40, "*SP 
EED: 10KTS "; :PRINT@72,"*DEPTH: 

UNKNOWN" ; 
50 PRINT© 128," FORCE : 1 SPRUANCE C 
LASS DESTROYER" ;: PRINT" *EQUIP : 
SONAR (DISTANCE ONLY) ": PRINT" *S 
PEED : 0 TO 30 KTS" : PRINT "*HE AD 
ING: 001 TO 3 60 DEGREES" 
60 PRINT "*WEAPONS: 4 ASROCS":PRI 
NT@296 , "* RANGE : 10NM" : PRINTQ328 , 

11 * DEPTH SETTING: MUST BE": PRINT© 
3 60," WITHIN 25 FT OF SUB" 

70 PRINT@480,". . .HIT <ENTER>" ; :L 
INEINPUTA$ 

100 CLS(4) : PRINT" SUB STARTS IN C 
ENTER ... COURSE CHANGES EVERY 7 
-9 TURNS.": PRINT :PRINT"EACH PLAY 
ER STARTS IN A CORNER .": PRINT : PR 
INT" TO REPAIR AND REARM SHIP, HE 
AD FOR RED REPAIR DOCK IN CENTE 
R. " ; 

110 PRINT@256,"TO ENTER SHIP'S C 
OURSE AND SPEED... HIT <ENTER>. 

NEW SHIP TRACK"; : PRINT "WILL THE 
N »FLICKER«" : PRINT : PRINT"YOU 
THEN HAVE THE OPTION OF ATTA 
CKING... HIT <Y> OR <N>";: PRINT© 
480, ". . .HIT <ENTER>" ; : L1NEINPUTN 

120 CLS (3) :PRINT@64, H INPUT NUMB 
ER OF PLAYERS"; : INPUTP4 : GOSUB8 10 
: IFP4>2THENMR=7ELSEMR=RND ( 3 ) +7 
130 PRINT@160," SELECT DIFFICULT 
Y . . . " : PRINT : PRINT" 1 . LANDLUBBER- 
DISPLAYS SUB PATH 2. OLD SALT" : I 
NPUTA3 :GOSUB1320 

140 FORP=lTOP4 : PR ( P ) =30 : MS ( P) =4 : 
ML(P)=2:NEXTP 

150 PMODE3, 1:PCLS (6) :COLOR8,6:TT 



=l:T=l:D=P4*300:DD=RND(D) :GOSUBl 
530 

160 CLS(0) :PRINT@64,"SUB DEPTH I 
S 1 TO"D"FEET"; :PLAY"T1P1P1" 
170 DS=RND(36) *10:GOTO200 
180 F0RB=1T0P4:F0RC=1T04:X(B,C)= 
X(B,C+1) :Y(B,C)=Y(B,C+1) :NEXTC,B 
190 CLS(0) :IFTT=101THEN1490ELSEP 
RINT@64," YOU ARE ON TURN #"TT". 
.GIVE UP??" ; : PRINT@416 , "TO CONTI 
NUE GAME, HIT <ENTER>" : PRINTQ96, 
tf ":LINE INPUT" ENTER <I GIVE UP>. 
. . ";G$:IFG$="I GIVE UP"THEN1490 
200 MV=MV+1:IFMV=MR THENMV=0 : GOT 
0170 

210 T=T+1:TH=T:T=2:X(0,1)=XS(TH- 
1) :Y(0,1)=YS (TH-1) :DR=DS:SP=10:P 
=0:GOTO320 

220 XS(T)=X(0,2) :YS(T)=Y(0,2) :IF 

A3=1THEN1450 

230 P=l 

240 GOSUB910:SCREEN1,1 

250 FORN=lT03:LINE(X(P,N) ,Y(P,N) 

)-(X(P,N+l) ,Y(P,N+1) ) , PSET:NEXTN 

260 FORN=1TO100:A$=INKEY$:IFA$<> 

" "THEN2 80ELSENEXTN 

270 FORN=lT03:LINE(X(P,N) ,Y(P,N) 

)~(X(P,N+1) ,Y(P,N+1) ), PRESET: NEX 

TN:GOTO2 50 

280 LINE(X(P,1) ,Y(P,1))-(X(P,2) , 
Y(P,2) ) , PRESET: CLS (4) :PRINT@64," 
SKIPPER. .WHAT COURSE (001-360)"; 
: INPUTDR: IFDR>3 60ORDR=0THEN280 
290 PRINT ©160 ,".";: INPUT" . .WHAT 
SPEED" ;SP 

300 IFSP>PR(P)THENPRINT@228, "HEY 
! WE CAN'T GO THAT FAST i":PRINT 
:PRINT"TOP SPEED IS"PR(P) "KTS" :G 
OTO290 

310 TH=T : T=5 : SCREEN1 f 1 

320 'DIRECTIONS 

330 IF DR=360THEN340ELSE370 

340 X(P,T)=X(P, (T-l) ) 

350 Y(P,T)=Y(P, (T-l) )-SP 

360 GOTO710 

370 IF DRO090THEN410 

380 X(P,T)=X(P, (T-l) )+SP 

390 Y(P,T)=Y(P, (T-l) ) 

400 GOTO710 

410 IF DRO180THEN450 

420 X(P,T)=X(P, (T-l) ) 

430 Y(P,T)=Y(P, (T-l) )+SP 

440 GOTO710 

450 IF DRO270THEN490 

460 X(P,T)=X(P, (T-l) )-SP 

470 Y(P,T)=Y(P, (T-l) ) 

480 GOTO710 

490 IF DR>90THEN550 

500 AA=9 0 -DR : AB-DR 

510 GOSUB770 

520 X(P,T)=X(P, (T-l) )+INT(SB) 



126 



THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



530 Y(P,T)=Y(P, (T-l) )-INT(SA) 

540 GOTO710 

55j3 IF DR>180THEN610 

560 AA=DR-90 : AB=90-AA 

570 GOSUB770 

580 X(P,T)=X(P, (T-l) )+INT(SB) 

590 Y(P,T)=Y(P, (T-l) )+INT(SA) 

600 GOTO710 

610 IF DR>270THEN670 

620 AA=DR-180:AB=90-AA 

630 GOSUB770 

640 X(P,T)=X(P, (T-l) )-SA 
650 Y(P,T)=Y(P, (T-l) )+SB 
660 GOTO710 

670 AA=DR-270:AB=90-AA 
680 GOSUB770 

690 X(P,T)=X(P, (T-l) )-SB 

700 Y(P,T)=Y(P, (T-l) )-SA 

710 GOSUB840 

720 T=TH:IFP=0THEN220 

730 GOSUB980: GOTO 1050 

740 GOSUB1360 

750 P=P+1:IFP<=P4 THEN 2 40 

760 TT=TT+1: GOTO 180 

770 R5=57. 29577951 :AC=90 

780 AA=AA/R5 : AB=AB/R5 : AC=AC/R5 

790 SA=(SIN(AA)/SIN(AC) ) *SP 

800 SB=(SIN(AB)/SIN(AC) ) *SP:RETU 

RN 



810 DATA 0,0,5,5,255,0,250,5,255 

,191,250,186,0,191,5,186 

820 FORP=lTOP4:READX,Y,Xl,Yl:FOR 

N=1T04 : 1 FN= 3 THENX ( P , N ) =X1 : Y (P, N) 

=Y1 ELSEX(P,N)=X:Y(P,N)=Y 

830 NEXTN,P:XS(1)=128:YS(1)=96:R 

ETURN 

840 IFX(P,T)<0ORX(P,T)>255ORY(P, 

T) <0ORY (P,T) >191THEN880 

850 IFP=0THEN RETURN 

860 IFX(P,T)<1180RX(P,T)>1380RY( 

P,T)<860RY(P,T) > 10 6 THENRETURN 

870 CLS(2) : PRINT@64 , "YOU HAVE RE 

ACHED THE REPAIR DOCK" :PR(P) =30 : 

MS ( P) =4 : ML (P) =2 : PLAY"T1P1P2 " : GOS 

UB9 80 : T=TH : GOT07 50 

880 IFP=0THENT=TH-1:MV=0:GOTO170 

890 CLS(8) :PRINT@96, "SKIPPERl W 

E HIT THE REEF ! !i " : PR(P) =PR(P) - 

10 : PLAY "T2P1":IFPR(P)<20 THENPR ( P 

)=15 

900 PRINT :PRINT"WE HAVE PROP DAM 
AGE ! " : PRINT : PLAY"P1" : PRINT"TOP 
SPEED IS NOW"PR(P) "KTS . 11 : PRINT: P 
RINT"TRY AGAIN. . . " : GOSUB1420 :T=T 
H:GOTO240 
910 CLS(3) 

920 PRINT@32," STATUS OF DESTROY 
ER #"P 



Hardware 

Specia 

Communications 




300/1200 baud Fully Hayes 

compatible 
Modem - 2 Yean Warranty 

$129. OO 

[Modem S. Cable] 

300/1200/240Q baud 
Fully Hayes 
Compatible Modem - CCITT 
2 Yean Warranty 

SS49.00 

[Modem & Cable] 



■ 

II 



THE OTHER GUYS CoCo 

55 North Main Street 
Suite 3Q1-D 
PD Box H 

Logan Utah 8-4321 



'KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. $69.95— Only S39.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k, 
32k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement [current & 'YTD'], journal, ledger, 899 accounts [ 2350 entries on 
32k & 64k [71 0 accounts & entries on 1 6k] [disk only]. Version 1 .2 has screen printouts. 

Rainbow Review 1.1- 9/84 : 1 .2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95 — ONLY $24.95 

Filing data base. File any information with Dmega File. Records can have up to 1 6 fields 
with 255 characters per field [4080 characters/record]. Sort, match & print any field. 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only]. 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles, elipses, boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on line HELPS at all 
times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects on the screen. Can be 
used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. GRAPHICS EDITOR. REG. 
539.95 — ONLY S24.95 for disk or tape. 64k EC8. 

Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/65 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK 1 Accounts Receivable. 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in. account number checking, credit limit checking & more. User friendly /menu 
driven. Includes manual. $39,95 or S49.95 General Ledger & Accounts Receivables. 

Pskomy] 'COCO WINDOWS' 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 10 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering. Four function 
calculator, with memory. The above options can be called anytime while running or writing 
in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES. YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. 824.95 [disk 
or tape] includes manual. 





(BOD 753-7620 
(BOO) 94S-94Q2 



[Add S3.00 for postage & handling] 
C.O.D., Money Order, Check in U.S. Funds [Please specify if J&M 

controller] 



March 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 27 



930 PRINT@128," TOP SPEED ="PR(P 
) "KTS » 

940 PRINT: PRINT" ASROCS ="MS(P) 
950 PRINT: PRINT" LAUNCHERS ="ML( 

P) 

960 PRINT@480, ". . .HIT <ENTER>" ; : 
LINEINPUTF$ : RETURN 

980 SX=ABS(XS(T)-X(P,5) ) 
990 SY=ABS(YS(T)-Y(P,5) ) 
1000 SD=INT(SQR(SX*SX+SY*SY) ) 
1010 RETURN 
1020 FOR H=1T0 MS 

1030 PLAY"T15V10O3CC#DD#EFF#GG#A 
A#B ; P1T40O1V3 1ECBP2ECBP2ECBP2ECB 
P2ECBP2ECBP1P1P1" 
1040 NEXT H: RETURN 
1050 A$=INKEY$ 

1060 LINE(X(P,5) ,Y(P,5) )-(X(P,4) 

, Y(P,4) ) , PRESET 

1070 PLAY"L20O4V5T15CE" 

1080 LINE(X(P f 5) ,Y(P,5) )-(X(P,4) 

,Y(P,4) ) ,PSET 

1090 IFA$="Y"THEN1110 

1100 IFA$="N"THEN740ELSE1050 

1110 FOR W=1T05 

1120 FOR WT=0TO8:CLS (WT) :PRINT@1 
e p f ha a a a BATTLE STATIONS A A 

A A II 

1130 PLAY"T170V31O1;A;A#;A-;O5;A 
;A# ;A-P2" : NEXTWT, W 

1140 IFMS(P)=0ORML(P)=0THENPRINT 
@64," HEY SKIPPER. . .HOW ABOUT HE 
ADING FOR THE REPAIR DOCK ? ? ?" 
: PLAY" T1P1P1 11 : GOT07 4 0 
1150 PRINT@64 f " HOW MANY ROCKETS 
" ; : INPUTMS : IFMS<1THEN1150 
1160 IFMS>MS(P)ORMS>ML(P)THENPRI 
NT@256," SKIPPER... WE CAN'T DO T 
HAT ! !":PLAY"P1P1" :GOTO1140 
1170 MS(P)=MS(P)-MS:FORWT=lTOMS 
1180 PRINT§(128*WT+128) , "WHAT DE 
PTH FOR ROCKET #"WT;: INPUT MD(WT 

) 

1190 NEXTWT : SCREEN1 , 1 : GOSUB1020 : 
PLAY"T1P1P1" 

1200 IF SD>10THENPLAY"P1":GOTO74 

1210 FORWT^ITO MS : IFABS (MD (WT) -D 

D) <2 6THEN1 4 30ELSENEXTWT 

1220 PLAY"L4V104T1" 

1230 FORE=1TO30:FORF=1TO7:PLAY"C 

P4T+" : NEXTF : PLAY"V+" : NEXTE 

1240 PLAY"T38P1V31O1ECDP20ECDP20 

ECDP20ECDP20ECD" * 

1250 CLS(8) :ONRND(2)GOTO1260,129 

1260 PRINT096," SKIPPER! WE TOOK 
A HIT IN THE ENGINE ROOM !":P 
RINT:PLAY"T1P1" 
1270 IFPR(P)<21THENPR(P)=25 
1280 PR(P)=PR(P)-10:PRINT@192, " 



TOP SPEED IS NOW"PR(P) "KTS.":GOS 
UB1420:GOTO740 

1290 PRINT@96," SKIPPER 1 I WE TO 
OK A HIT AFT! !":PLAY"T1P1" 
1300 ML(P)=ML(P) -l:PRINT@160, " W 
E LOST A ROCKET LAUNCHER ! ! ! " : PL 
AY"Pl":PRINT@320 f " LAUNCHERS NOW 
OPERATIONAL="ML(P) : GOSUB1420 :GO 
TO740 

1320 CLS(0) :PRINT@96 / "GET READY 

TO COPY DISTANCE CODE .": PRINT "DO 

N'T LET ANYONE SEE YOUR CODE!!"; 

:PLAY"T1P1P1" 

1330 FORN=lTOP4 : CLS (0) 

1340 PRINT@64 f " PLAYER #"N"YOUR 

NUMBER IS " :KE(N)=RND( 10) : PR 

INT : LINEINPUT" . . . READY? . . . HIT <E 
NTER>" ;W$ 

1350 PRINT@192," ."KE(N):P 

LAY"T5P1L50O5C10" :NEXTN: RETURN 
1360 CLS(2) :PRINT" SKIPPER #"P". 
..USE YOUR CODE # TO DETERMINE 
SUB'S DISTANCE. ": PRINT: FORWT=lTO 
10 

1370 IFWT=KE (P) THENPRINTWT" • "SD 
:GOTO1390 

1380 RN=RKD(2) : ONRND (2) GOSUB1400 
,1410 

1390 NEXTWT :PRINT@4 80 , ".. .HIT <E 
NTER>" ; :LINEINPUTF$: RETURN 
1400 PRINTWT". " (ABS (SD+RND(RN*1 
5) ) ) : RETURN 

1410 PRINTWT". " (ABS (SD-RND(RN*1 
5) ) ) : RETURN 

1420 FORWT=1TO4000: NEXTWT: RETURN 
1430 FORC=1TO250 : PLAY n T40O5C" : CI 
RCLE(XS(T) ,YS(T) ) , C, 8 :NEXTC: PLAY 
"T1P1" 

1440 CLS(8) :PRINT@37 ; " MISSION 

COMPLETE " ; : PRINT§99 , "SUB DES 

TROYED AT "DD" FEET. " ; :PLAY"P1P1" : 
GOTO 1500 

1450 DRAW"BM128 / 96" 

1460 FORD=2TO(TT+l) 

1470 LINE- (XS (D) f YS (D) ) , PSET 

1480 IFCN=1THEN1510ELSENEXTD: GOT 

0230 

1490 TT=TT-1:CLS(8) : PRINTQ64 , "BE 

TTER LUCK NEXT TIME ": 

PLAY"T1P1":PRINT"SUB WAS AT"DD"F 
EET.":PLAY"P1P1" 

1500 CN=1:PCLS(6) : SCREEN1 , 1 : GOSU 
B1530:GOTO1450 

1510 FORWY=1TO2:PLAY"T170V31O1;A 
; A # ; A- ; 0 5 ; A ; A # ; A- " : NE XTWY : PLAY 1 ' T 
2P1P3":NEXTD 
1520 GOTO1520 

1530 CIRCLE(128 f 96) # 10 f 7, .95:PAI 
NT (128 ,96) f 7,7: LINE (0,0) -(255 ,19 
1) , PSET, B: LINE (1,1) -(254 ,190) ,PS 
ET , B : RETURN 



128 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



- 


"S) /7H /R\ V\ f7\ /7 fc^ 









t 




' Softwar e 

CoCo Newsroom — 

Desktop Publishing for the CoCo 3 



CoCo Newsroom is a full-featured 
desktop publishing package for the 
CoCo 3. The program is supplied on 
three disks and comes with 16 pages of 
typewritten instructions. The disks are 
not copy-protected, and making back- 
ups for your own protection is encour- 
aged. 

CoCo Newsroom provides the CoCo 
3 user with a valuable tool previously 
reserved for the more expensive PC 
machines. This program is very easy-to- 
use, and excellent step-by-step menu 
selections help you turn out an impres- 
sive small newspaper. All you have to 



do is select one of four options at the 
main menu: Type Up, Layout, Print- 
View the page, and Picture and Font 
utilities. 

To construct your publication, select 
Type Up first to compose the various 
articles or subject matter. Then use 
Layout to arrange the articles in blocks 
that fit on the page in two-column 
format. Next, add appropriate pictures 
from the picture disk, and select the 
various fonts from the font disk to 
complete your publication. 

In the Type Up mode, the screen 
displays a large work area with icons, 



or pictures, representing the various 
commands available. The arrow keys 
control the cursor, and selection is made 
with the space bar. 

The commands available in Type Up 
are: PICTURE STAMP, for stamping a 
picture loaded from memory onto the 
work sheet; TRASH, for throwing away 
the screen if you are not satisfied or 
want to start over; UNDO, for undoing 
mistakes; and PENCIL, a submenu that 
allows you to select Line, Box, Circle, 
Fill, Erase, Text, Dot or Invert. 

Actual composition is done in the 
Text mode. Other options are available 
to enhance the overall appearance and 
layout of the article or story: GRAB 
PICTURE allows you to grab a picture 
from the screen and store it in memory 
for later recall using the stamp picture 
icon; DISK MENU provides a submenu 
for use with the other two disks; and 
LOAD A FONT SET loads a font (type) set 
from the font disk. There are over 20 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 129 



Co Co Newsroom fonts to choose from, 
or you can use Color Max 3 fonts. 

To load a fill pattern set as generated 
by the fill pattern editor, select LORD 
FILL PRTTERN SET. Three fill patterns 
are available on the font disk. These are 
handy graphics patterns of lines, dots, 
crosshatches, diamonds, etc. Once 
selected, type the drive number to load 
the fill set from, then select the filename. 

LOflD/SGVE fl GRRPHIC PfiNE^L loads 
or saves a complete article or graphics 
panel from disk for later editing or 
printout; LORD/SAVE NEWS RRT selects 
the picture of your choice from the 
assortment of 50 on the picture disk or 
from one of your own creations. You 
won't see the pictures until you stamp 
them onto the worksheet. This is the 
same for the font disk and is a minor 
inconvenience, since you are shown a 
word list of available fonts and pictures. 

The package also comes with a Pic- 
ture Grabber program that is designed 
to allow the user to grab pictures from 
any standard PMDDE 4 picture or Color 
Max file. This is a very handy utility and 
can be used effectively to produce some 
outstanding pictures. 

A Configure program is also pro- 
vided that lets you set up CoCo News- 
room to fit your individual needs with 
monitor and printer type, number of 
disk drives, etc. 



1MSN 
UNDO 

o« 

L -.--.J 

IT] 



3% c<jCo msk 

pesktops for CoCo 

the nor Id of Desktop Publishing 
Is oon ing \a the CoCo Co*«un ityf 
Iff has beery seen on many other 
listens for so»e time now. the 
JtoCo desktop publishing systems 
pre also feature-packed." 



I found CoCo Newsroom to be an 
excellent program. It was easy to use 
and required minimal reading of the 
instructions to acquire a working 
knowledge. I was able to create some 
pretty neat pages in short order. 

I believe CoCo Newsroom will be a 
smash for the CoCo 3. It provides the 
average CoCo 3 user with some very 
sophisticated features and options. 
CoCo users with club or social respon- 
sibilities can use it to publish their own 
newsletters; schools and CoCo Users 
Groups will love it, too. They will be 
able to publish monthly newsletters and 
bulletins made with the very machine 
that is the object of their affection. 

130 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Eric Wolf is to be congratulated for 
this CoCo 3 programming achievement. 



(Microcom Software, P.O. Box 214, Fair- 
port, NY 14450, 716-223-1477; or Spectrum 
Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard 
Beach, NY 11414: $49.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



I Softwar e 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



CoCo Base I — 
Refined and 
Improved 

Over the past year and a half, I have 
had the opportunity to review two 
products from JTJ Enterprises. The 
first was CoCo Solver; the second, 
CoCo Base I. Both products are pow- 
erful and interesting, especially for 
those who are able to do a little BASIC 
programming. 

Since my last review of CoCo Base /, 
it has undergone a major revision. 
CoCo Base I is a relational database 
management system that consists of 13 
BASIC programs and one machine lan- 
guage program for data entry editing. 
All programs except Util 9 a directory 
saving utility, are accessed from the 
main program menu. Several of the 
programs perform normal database 
management functions. Fields are 
named, titled and assigned a data type 
and length using Create. Eight fields are 
included on each page of field descrip- 
tions. Several pages can be used for field 
assignments, allowing for a great deal of 
flexibility. Put is used to add data to the 
database. Records can be edited after 
entry and all records are available for 
viewing and editing. Records can also 
be edited using the Edit option from the 
main menu. Using Edit, you can edit 
one field while viewing another. Files 
are indexed using Index, which allows 
you to save named index files. This type 
of flexibility is evident throughout the 
use of CoCo Base /. A single structure 
file made with Create can be used for 
many database files, each of which can 
have many index files. 

At first, it is annoying having to 
specify the name and extension of each 
structure and data file for menu op- 
tions, but the effort is necessary for the 
extra options to work as they do. 



Up to this point, CoCo Base / looks 
like a normal, but slightly awkward, 
database manager. However, there are 
other options. CoCo Base I allows the 
user to operate on data files using lines 
of BASIC code without having to keep 
track of file manipulation commands. 
This is a real boon to novices and 
experts alike. Novices need only master 
a few BASIC instructions to perform 
fancy feats of data manipulation and 
presentation. Experts can concentrate 
on manipulating data in a file without 
the distraction of file handling routines. 
This helps produce working procedures 
in a minimum of time with a minimum 
of effort. 

Using CoCo Base / terminology, 
templates are created to operate on 
data. Each template is built and tested 
using the Action program. Templates 
can then be combined into a schedule 
of operation using Schedule. Schedule 
produces job files that are executed 
using the Jobs option. Since templates 
and jobs can be saved, many types of 
operations on data files can be available 
at one time as different jobs, each of 
which can be built of many templates. 
Again, nearly complete freedom is 
possible. Jobs can be as simple or as 
complex as the user desires. And nearly 
any data operation is possible with the 
right templates. The more you know 
about programming in BASIC, the more 
you can do with templates and jobs. 

CoCo Base / claims to be a relational 
database management system. This 
generally means that data files can be 
linked together by a common data field, 
allowing multiple files to be manipu- 
lated together. In the strictest sense, 
CoCo Base I lives up to the claim. It 
does this in an unusual way, however. 
Multiple files are not accessed at once. 
Instead, files are accessed one at a time 
as a new file is built. The end result is 
the same as that achieved by other 
relational database managers, but the 
method is somewhat slower. The result- 
ing file remains after the operation, 
though. This means that multiple oper- 
ations could be used on many files to 
produce many new files that could be 
manipulated by CoCo Base /. The 
possibilities seem endless, limited only 
by imagination, computer memory and 
disk space. 

Since I am comfortable program- 
ming in BASIC, I found CoCo Base I 
interesting, powerful and reasonably 
simple to learn. Beginners should ex- 
pect to spend some time experimenting 
with templates to get the full power of 
CoCo Base /. This is a very powerful 



tool capable of performing amazing 
feats if it is given a chance. 

I did find a few annoyances with 
CoCo Base I. The first complaint is with 
the screen displays. Maybe I'm too 
sensitive, but I found the flashing 
options on the main menu annoying. 
Also, some of the programs scroll the 
screen display as they display file access 
information. I found it disconcerting to 
see a screen disappearing as I was 
watching the status report at the bottom 
of the screen. Finally, I don't like 
programs that make noises. Luckily, the 
sound prompts are not necessary for 
proper program operation, so I could 
turn the volume down. None of these 
are really problems, just my own pref- 
erences. 

I did have a couple of minor problems 
using CoCo Base Ion sl CoCo 3. There 
seems to be some problem with memory 
allocation. Since it wasn't written for 
the CoCo 3, I guess that a few minor 
problems are to be expected. This leads 
to the first part of my CoCo Base / wish 
list. I've gotten addicted to the 80-by-24 
text screen available on the CoCo 3. I 
sure wish that a version of CoCo Base 
I were available that could take advan- 
tage of it. I also wish there were some 
way for the programs to trap and report 
errors. When there is a program error, 
CoCo Base I bombs. Instructions are 
given for recovery, but if Tandy had 
been kind enough to include error 
trapping commands in BASIC, CoCo 
Base / would be a smoother operator. 

My last problem is with the pro- 
gram's manual. While it is well-written, 
the manual could use some improve- 
ment. I had to try everything a couple 
of times before I understood the printed 
instructions. A tutorial with lots and 
lots of examples would help more than 
anything else. Detailed, step-by-step 
directions for building a common appli- 



cation would have been warmly re- 
ceived and would go a long way toward 
making CoCo Basel a general-purpose 
tool easily understood by all levels of 
users. 

Complaints aside, this is really an 
amazing package. It has a good feel 
about it. I am also amazed at its flexible 
power. I am often frustrated by pro- 
grams that won't let me do some odd 
thing that I want to do. I never ran into 
a problem with CoCo Base I that I 
couldn't solve one way or another. I find 
it encouraging to have this much free- 
dom when using a program. I recom- 
mend CoCo Base I to anyone willing to 
give it a chance, forgive its quirks, and 
enjoy its power. 

(JTJ Enterprises, P.O. Box 110841, Nash- 
ville, TN 37211, 615-793-0450; $34.95) 

— Don McGarry 



"Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



Color Computer 
Artist — 
OS-9 Level II 
Graphics 

Tandy's recent entry into the world of 
graphics for the CoCo 3 is Color Com- 
puter Artist, This unprotected software 
is supplied on disk and is in OS-9 Level 
II format. It's booted up by simply 
typing DOS on a CoCo 3 with at least 
128K of RAM. After booting up, the 
program prompts the user for the spe- 
cific kind of monitor and joystick being 
used (the two-button deluxe version is 
recommended) and asks whether or not 



Select 




TEXT 



you are using the Tandy Hi-Res Joy- 
stick Interface. 

Color Computer Artist was written 
by Steve Bjork for Tandy and comes 
with a colorful 14-page instruction 
booklet. 

After the program loads, you are 
presented with a plus sign (+) cursor on 
a blank screen. Getting to the main 
menu requires either pressing the sec- 
ond button on the deluxe joystick or 
ALT-3 on the keyboard. 

The main menu displays, in icon 
style, various words and symbols rep-" 
presenting the functions available at that 
level. You can delete, undelete, add text, 
move, copy or fill (paint) from this 
menu. If you choose Select, a blinking 
circular cursor is displayed and you can 
move, copy or delete any object on the 
drawing screen. Another option, 
Group, allows you to select more than 
one object to move, copy or delete. The 
program features the customary rubber 
band line, box, circle and polygon, but 
also offers something that is a little 
different, called Free Hand. In this 
mode, you control the movement of the 
cursor totally as it moves around on the 
screen. In this way, you can draw to 
your heart's content without having to 
move a cursor from one point to 
another point or worry about having to 
match up connecting lines. What you 
get in this mode is very much like the 



un *t In 



Manage your checking accounts) with CAI5 . Keep track of deposits, checks, ATM 

withdrawals and other account transactions. Define up to 36 categories to monitor 

expenses. Set up automatic transactions for such items as direct deposits or 

pre-authorized deductions. Balance your account(s) in minutes! Other features 

include multi-drive capability, display and print options, history purge and more. 



Requires 1 disk drive 
Printer is optional 
CoCa 3 compatible 



RAINBOW 

CfftTltlCATlO* 



After Five Software 
P.O. Box 210975 
Columbia, SC 29221-0975 
(B03) 7B8-5995 



Send check or M.0. for 
$34.95 plus $3.00 S/H. 
COD orders: add $1.00. 
(SC res. add 57. sales tax) 



Sit review in February '88 issue of RAINBOW! 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 131 



old Etch- A-S ketch toy except you can 
fill the design with the color of your 
choice when you are finished. 

A submenu is available from the main 
menu that lets you do housekeeping 
chores like saving, loading, printing, 
setting colors, etc. There is also a Color/ 
Pattern Menu, which displays the colors 
and pattern designs you can use when 
creating your drawings. Sixteen squares 
are displayed and you can select the 
color and pattern you want by moving 
the square cursor with your joystick. A 
similar Text/ Color Menu provides a 
way to add text of various sizes and 
colors to your pictures. 

While Color Computer Artist is a 
smoothly operating program, I 
wouldn't compare it with the heavy- 
weights like Color Max 3 and Co Co 
Max 3, which offer added features like 
fat-bits, zooming, line erase, animation 
and other popular commands. Color 
Computer Artist is, however, written in 
OS-9 Level II and is capable of provid- 
ing some interesting ideas with the 
windows command in OS-9. This is a 
good program and will provide most 
CoCo users with the necessary tools to 
make neat drawings. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102; $29.95. 
Available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide.) 

— David Gerald 

1 Softwar e CoCo ^ 2&3 l 

Address — 
Computer Address 
Book 

At least once a year I get fed up with 
all the pieces of note paper, parts of 
envelopes and such, falling out of my 
address book — all of those temporary 
changes that never get posted. Then it's 
cross-out-and-hope-there's-room-on- 
the-page time. Eventually the page gets 
filled and you have to buy a new address 
book. 

Address, by R.J.F. Software, makes 
those infernal postings ridiculously 
simple. Not only that, but this disk- 
based program also prints out the 
envelopes for you. Its base is a set of 15 
files, some of which are devoted to only 
one letter, others to several letters. The 
authors supposedly did a study of last- 

1 32 THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



name beginning letters and assigned the 
files accordingly. 

Not to worry, though. If you have a 
lot of friends and relatives whose last 
names begin with 'Z\ the program 
allows you to stash them in another 
letter's files if need be. 

The five-page instruction booklet is 
clear and helpful, although the primary 
menu and prompts would probably be 
enough: 

The "search" capability is rather 
amazing to me: Not only can you search 
for records by last name, you can search 
by ZIP code, area code, state, city, and 
so on. This leads me to surmise that, 
even though it is primarily designed to 
hold up to 270 different name/ address 
sets, you can set up your own database 
that depends partially on sorting by 
letters: business accounts, small house- 
hold inventories, etc. 

You can set the program to print 
anything from ,5 /i6-inch mailing labels 
to 9',4-inch envelopes. The only catch is 
you have to store your own name and 
address in the file to answer the Return 
Address prompt. 

As mentioned, the prompts for each 



of eight possible functions (e.g., Add a 
file, Change a file, Search, Delete, Print, 
etc.) are easy to follow. It took me about 
10 minutes to start transposing our 
paper-cluttered address book into the 
disk as I tested its capabilities. You can 
store two separate telephone numbers, 
enter the country (if applicable), and 
make a tricky job easy. Record review 
can be done on the full-sized screen, sent 
to the printer, or both. 

The only minor omission, in my 
opinion, is an option to set printer baud 
rates. You can, of course, do that with 
a poke before loading, but my recom- 
mendation to R.J.F. is to add that as a 
future enhancement. 

All in all, I found Address to be an 
excellent program which, with a little 
imagination, could be used to establish 
a small database for any number of 
categories. 



(R.J.F. Software, R.R. 2, White Lake, 
Ontario, Canada K0A 3L0, (613) 623-7824; 
$14.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— John M. Hebert 



1 Software CqCq1 - 2&3 I 

Autoterm 6.1 — 
Vast CoCo 3 
Improvements 

Today, the CoCo community is faced 
with a bewildering array of terminal 
programs. This is largely a function of 
the simple fact that there is no perfect 
terminal package — one which will 
meet every need or suit every personal- 
ity. The choice of a terminal package is 
simply a matter of preference. Polish 
and sophistication are totally unrelated 
to basic functionality. Fine attention to 
detail and the development of a truly 
user-friendly interface require an im- 
mense investment in time and effort. 
The product must spend time in public 
view, allowing for substantial feedback 
to develop, for wish lists to be submitted 
to the author, and for the author to 
respond to these inputs. Autoterm 6.1 
is a striking example of just how pro- 
ductive this type of development can be. 

Autoterm 6 A is, in many respects, a 
totally new product and is still supplied 
as a collection of programs. Versions are 
included to support the CoCo 1 and 2 
in either 32 or 64K configurations. New 



to Ver. 6.1 are programs to fully support 
either a 128 or 51 2K CoCo 3. 

The heart of Autoterm is formed by 
the interaction of three basic functions: 
intelligent terminal operation, text 
processing and the use of keyboard 
macros. By interweaving these capabil- 
ities, the author has largely succeeded in 
his attempt to build an automated 
terminal that blends extraordinary 
power into a truly user-friendly inter- 
face. 

As an intelligent terminal, Autoterm 
supports standard buffer capture via 
Xon/ Xoff (DC1 / DC3), as well as Xmo- 
dem, an error checking protocol that 
allows for the error-free transmission 
and reception of data, an absolute must 
where binary program downloads are 
involved. While Autoterm downloads 
may not be written directly to disk, all 
other disk I/O operations are smoothly 
implemented. Directories may be read, 
and files saved, loaded, transmitted or 
erased while online. Autoterm suspends 
the reception of incoming data during 
disk access, so disk operations must be 
timed for execution when data is not 
being received. Information that has 
been captured may be scanned, saved, 
edited, or printed while online, with the 
capture buffer still receiving new infor- 
mation. 

A display at theitop of the terminal 



screen indicates the available memory, 
whether the buffer is in the capture or 
scan (open or closed) mode, and 
whether lowercase has been toggled on 
or off. A total of 27 individual parame- 
ters such as communications baud rate, 
parity, screen width, and printer config- 
uration commands (page length, etc.) 
are user-definable via a. terminal status 
screen. As is the case with most CoCo 
3 terminal packages, communications 
at 2400 baud is smoothly implemented 
through the serial (bit-banger) port The 
addition of a Radio Shack RS-232 
pack, while not required, provides the 
additional flexibility of printing the 
buffer contents while online. 

As receiving or transmitting data is 
only a part of the process involved in 
information exchange, immediate ac- 
cess to a text processor can become 
habit-forming. Without loading 
another program, new or received text 
may be viewed, edited, searched, and 
printed, all from within Autoterm. 
While the text processor does not pos- 
sess the broad capabilities of a dedi- 
cated word processor, it is quite pow- 
erful in its own right. Word wrap, block 
operations, search and find commands, 
and printer control are all fully imple- 
mented. As the text processor and the 
terminal share the same buffer, the user 
is greeted with a screen that is identical 
to the one in the terminal mode. This 
"seamless" transition has a very comfor- 
table feel about it, and adds to the 
overall ease of use, especially for those 
new to the telecommunications envi- 
ronment. 

As most online time accrues some 
sort of cost, either in long distance 
charges, connect charges, or both, the 
ability to fully automate a computer to 
computer dialogue can result in sub- 
stantial savings. Autoterm uses a "lan- 
guage" which allows the user to build 



keystroke multipliers (KSMs) that can 
recognize and respond to the prompts 
of a host system. While there are many 
names for this sort of dialogue capabil- 
ity, the KSM scheme in Autoterm 
provides for every conceivable key- 
stroke sequence, and in that sense may 
be the most powerful automated dia- 
logue language (often called "autolog") 
currently available for the CoCo. The 
author uses "wedge notation" to desig- 
nate multiple key-press operations, i.e., 
<SCL> represents a shift/ clear se- 
quence, while <DAR> stands for 
down/ arrow. The full integration of 
virtually all system commands into the 
KSM scheme allows the user to pro- 
gram conditional operations into an 
automated scheme, allowing for the 
total automation of many computer 
dialogue sessions. Indeed, Autoterm 
may be programmed to log on at a given 
time (a clock program is included), dial 
an information service, read (and save) 
your waiting mail, and then log off — 
all faster than you could type the neces- 
sary commands to a host system. The 
result is less "connect time" on pay 
services and, thus, lower cost. 

With the release of Version 5.0, sup- 
port of the RS-232 pack, Radio Shack 
Direct Connect Modem Pak, and the 
J&M parallel printer port were added. 
Also, printer baud rate was imple- 
mented as a user-definable parameter 
and printing while online was enabled. 
The core program was also modified to 
automatically load a KSM file as part 
of the start-up procedure, effectively 
allowing for automatic self- 
configuration of the program. Version 
6.1 has added a split-screen "chat" or 
packet radio mode. This feature allows 
the user to view (and edit) several lines 
of text prior to transmitting them to a 
host system, while still viewing the "live 
action" on the upper part of a split 



screen, vastly improving user control 
(and comfort) during "real time" online 
conferences. 

The features mentioned to this point 
are common to all the programs re- 
leased on Version 6. 1 , but Autoterm has 
been vastly improved for the CoCo 3. 

For all its apparent power, previous 
versions of Autoterm failed to support 
any form of 80-column display. With 
the advent of the CoCo 3, Autoterm has 
come of age. The 80-column display of 
the CoCo 3 is a true joy to view on a 
Magnavox 8CM515 monitor. The au- 
thor has added a downright sensuous 
scroll routine to the CoCo 3 screen, and 
complemented this with full paging 
ability — both of which may be accel- 
erated to almost any rate. These en- 
hancements are topped off with a 
"jump" command that instantly relo- 
cates your position within the capture 
buffer. Screen colors are controlled by 
the contents of four palette registers, 
and are configured via BASIC. 

The available buffer is approximately 
90K for a standard CoCo 3, and 475K 
for machines with a 512K upgrade. 
Autoterm takes advantage of the entire 
RAM, overwriting BASIC, creating a 
buffer that appears continuous to the 
user. Because of this structure, the 
return to BASIC may be faulty when the 
user exits Autoterm, To ensure proper 
operation, a cold reboot must be per- 
formed after using Autoterm in the 
CoCo 3 mode. While the error-trapping 
within Autoterm is superb, the ability to 
return the CoCo 3 versions to BASIC via 
a software command creates the poten- 
tial for the faulty operation of subse- 
quent programs. But disabling of the 
software Exit command (shift/ break) 
from the main menu, creating an abso- 
lute requirement for a cold reboot, 
would certainly remove any potential 
for error. 




March 1988 THE RAINBOW 133 



During the time in which this review 
was prepared, talk of a 512K bug in 
Autoterm began to appear on the Del- 
phi CoCo SIG. 

As Autoterm 6.1 ran perfectly with all 
Radio Shack 512K installations, suspi- 
cion was directed to the construction of 
the third party boards and the installa- 
tion procedure for those boards. As the 
512K board is straightforward in its 
design, it seemed that the installation 
procedure might be the culprit. Indeed, 
when Phil Zwart (Autoterm author) 
called the folks at the Fort Worth 
Service Center, he was informed that 
Tandy varies its 512K installation 
procedure depending on the revision 
level of the CoCo 3 motherboard. It 
appears that the "crashes" reported on 
Delphi may well be a function of some 
previously undocumented variability in 
the construction of the CoCo 3. 

Within a week, Phil Zwart had iden- 
tified this "bug" and modified Autoterm 
to accommodate these production dif- 
ferences. For the record, the third party 
512K boards appear to be sensitive to 
how the screen address can be posi- 
tioned in memory on some CoCo 3s. 
Technically, the fix involved changing 
any screen address at an eight-byte 
boundary to a 64-byte boundary. New 
disks containing the fix (Ver. 6.2), were 
prepared and shipped to his 512K users 
within a week, demonstrating PXE 
Computing's dedication to customers in 
providing a level of support and con- 
cern seldom seen. 

The documentation for Autoterm is 
supplied as a bound manual, consisting 
of 85 thorough and well-written pages. 
Sample KSMs and automated comput- 
er dialogues are provided, all with 
excellent annotation. As the program is 
copy-protected, two complete diskettes 
are furnished to guard against media 
failure. As some version of Autoterm 
will run on virtually every CoCo system 
with at least 32K, there are no practical 
minimum system requirements. How- 
ever, the use of a CoCo 3 and at least 
one disk drive are necessary for the 
enhanced A 128 and A512 revisions. An 
80-column RGB or monochrome mon- 
itor and an RS-232 pack are also very 
desirable complements to this terminal 
package. 

Perhaps PXE's Phil Zwart will con- 
tinue his tradition of support by consid- 
ering part of this wish list for his next 
revision: a character trap/ filter, the 
ability to download directly to disk, 
and, perhaps, support lor Ymodem, 
Kermit, and CompuServe B transfer 
protocols. But, Autoterm 6.1 certainly 

134 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



represents one of the very best values in 
CoCo software. 

(PXE Computing, 11 Vicksburg Lane, 
Richardson, TX, 75080, 214-699-7273; disk, 
$39.95; tape, $29.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Henry Holzgrcfc 

I H ardwar e CoCo1 2&3 1 

Avatex 2400 
Modem — 
Inexpensive 
Hayes-Compatibility 

The Avatex 2400 modem has recently 
been introduced as a high speed, 
bargain-priced modem offering full 
Hayes compatibility. While the current 
thinking seems to indicate that all 
modems offering full Hayes compatibil- 
ity will function in an equivalent fash- 
ion, such is not the case. An old ca- 
veat,"You get what you pay for," still 
applies. 

Compared to several other low-end 
2400 baud modems, the Avatex 2400 
acquits itself quite well. It does, in fact, 
support the entire, extended Hayes 
command set. The modem is housed in 
a beige plastic case and comes with an 
external power supply and a null 
modem cable (supplied by the vendor) 
to facilitate connection to the serial port 
of the CoCo. The front panel contains 
a bank of eight LEDs, which report line 
status, terminal operation and call 
progress. Three push/ push switches 
toggle the data/ voice, originate/ 
answer, and synchronous/ asynchro- 
nous modes. A power switch, RS-232C 
port (female, D-type, 25-pin), and two 
modular phone jacks (female, RJ11-C) 
are located on the rear panel. The dual 
phone jacks allow for the simultaneous 
connection of the modem and telephone 
with immediate user access to either 
one. Gone, however, are the DIP 
switches present on some earlier Avatex 
modems. 

The documentation is extremely well- 
done. Indeed, the 98-page manual is a 
virtual short course in telecommunica- 
tions via the Hayes command set. And, 
the entire package has a two-year war- 
ranty. Given all of these adequate to 
occasionally excellent characteristics, 
why did I open this review with a 
cautionary statement? 



The gold standard by which all mo- 
dems are compared is their ability to 
resist line noise, expressed as a signal- 
to-noise ratio (in decibels). Unlike most 
electronic devices, where high S/N 
ratios are deemed "good," the modem 
that can operate with the least separa- 
tion between signal and noise wins the 
race. In the world of telecommunica- 
tions, two types of noise prevail: garden 
variety white line noise, and perturba- 
tions due to phase shift when the signal 
makes a transition from one medium, 
such as wire, to another, such as a fiber 
optic cable. Phase shift, in particular, 
affects 2400 baud transmission due to 
the protocol used for high speed oper- 
ations (CCITT V.22bis). In a side-by- 
side comparison, the Avatex 2400 was 
outperformed by its more expensive 
competition. In particular, at 2400 
baud, the Avatex 2400 dropped charac- 
ters, inserted "garbage," or (worst case) 
failed to connect, while a more expen- 
sive 2400 baud modem continued to 
function smoothly. These observations, 
while subjective, highlight the problems 
of line noise and intrinsic differences in 
the modems' construction. Hayes- 
compatible does not mean Hayes- 
equivalent. But neither does it mean 
that you should buy the most expensive 
modem you can find. 




1 called -the folks at Elec & Eltek 
(USA) Corporation (importers of the 
Avatex modems) and asked their tech- 
nical representative for any benchmark 
signal-to-noise values that he might 
have, or be willing to share, pertaining 
to the Avatex 2400. While these values 
were not available, the representative 
remarked that the Avatex 2400 was 
"about average." He did, however, 
confirm a suspicion that many people 
have mentioned: a 2400 baud modem 
operating at 1200 baud will outperform 
a 1200 baud modem of similar manu- 
facture. Indeed, at 1200 baud, the 
Avatex 2400 ran circles around my 
Avatex 1200. When queried as to why 
this might be, the representative replied 
that the chip set necessary to support 
the 2400 baud protocol was necessarily 



of higher quality than that found in a 
dedicated 1200 baud machine. 

The implications of this situation are 
very important. The best buy for rou- 
tine 1200 baud communication may 
well be an inexpensive 2400 baud 
modem, operating at 1200 baud. For 
those who demand excellence in 2400 
baud performance, modem quality and 
line noise become primary considera- 
tions. For local- links over quiet lines, 
the Avatex 2400 is indistinguishable 
from a Hayes 2400. If, however, you live 
at "trails end," and your telephone 
service is one step above a string and tin 
can, the Avatex 2400 operating at 1200 
baud may be the best value. 

(Cinsoft, 2235 Losantiville, Cincinnati, OH 
45237, 513-396-7638; $239) 

— Henry Holzgrefe 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo3 



Printer Lightning — 
Easy, Reliable 
Print Spooler 

Printer Lightning is a memory- 
resident print spooler for the CoCo 3. 
The program stores information going 
to your printer, then prints it out in the 
background while you go on using your 
CoCo 3 for work (or play!). Owl- Ware 
is the distributor of this handy little 
utility from ColorVenture, the creators 
of Pyramix. 

The program is loaded into memory 
and executed. The disk can then be 
removed from the drive. Printer Light- 
ning then prompts the user for several 



pieces of information. First, a Hi-Res 
memory option for a bigger buffer is 
offered. Pressing ( Y' (yes) gives you 
more storage space but prevents use of 
the graphics screens. Baud rate is then 
optionally selected, a query is made as 
to whether your printer requires line 
feeds after carriage returns, and the 
program is ready to use. 

Once installed in memory, the pro- 
gram remains active until the machine 
is turned off or reset. There are a few 
programs that conflict with memory 
used by Printer Lightning, but they are 
the exception rather than the rule. 

Use of the program is automatic, in 
that anything that would normally be 
handled by the standard print vector 
(PRINTtt-2 command, LL 1ST com- 
mand, or machine language equiva- 
lents) is automatically sent to Printer 
Lightning. 

I tried Printer Lightning with a 
number of programs, including Tele- 
writer, and found it very practical. It 
also works perfectly well with LLI5T 
from BASIC, allowing you to continue 
working on a program while the long 
code is printed out. The buffer space is 
determined by the amount of memory 
your CoCo 3 has and the elections you 
have taken at program installation. A 
CoCo 3 with 128K gives you a 44K 
buffer, while 512K machines can have 
up to 437K available for print spooling. 

Utility programs that work effort- 
lessly and correctly, and that also add 
to the usefulness of your CoCo 3, are 
always nice to have. Printer Lightning 
certainly meets those criteria and must 
be considered a real software bargain. 
ColorVenture has a winner in this one! 



(Owl-Ware, P.O. Box 116-D, Mertztown, 
PA 19539, 800-245-6228; $19.95) 



I Softwar e 



CoCo1,2&3 OS-9 



— Leonard Hyre 



T/S Spell - 
A Dictionary 
and More 

I recently remarked to some fellow 
computer users that if I had a dollar for 
every sort of spell checker around, I 
would be a rich man. There must be 
literally hundreds of spell checking 
programs for all the many types of 
computers in existence. But with the 
release of Tj S Spell for the Tandy Color 
Computer line, I am firmly convinced 
CoCo users now have the best. 

Now that may seem to be a pretty tall 
boast, so let me lay out the evidence. 

In an overview of T/S Spell, Tandy 
seems to have taken the best features 
from all the various spell checkers 
around and put them into one program. 

In publishing T/S Spell, Tandy has 
done two things. First, they have ful- 
filled their implied promise in providing 
a menu selection of the existence of a 
spell checker; and secondly, they have 
upheld their commitment to continue to 
present high-quality software for the 
Color Computer 3, while still support- 
ing the CoCo 1 and 2. T/S Spell con- 
tains versions to work on all CoCos. 

When spell checking programs were 
first introduced, a 10,000-word diction- 
ary was considered fantastic. When the 
20-, 30- and 40-thousand word diction- 
aries were released, it became unbeliev- 
able that one's personal computer could 
be capable of checking that many words 
for spelling. Well, hold on to your hats. 
T/S Spell has a master dictionary of 
over 100,000 words! 

In confirming this with the guys in the 
Tandy Towers here in Fort Worth, I was 



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March 1988 THE RAINBOW 135 



told that these are real words, too, not 
just root words. Furthermore, T/S 
Spell uses the most advanced compres- 
sion techniques around to place all of 
this on a 35-track floppy disk. 

Not only is there a 100,000+ word 
Master Dictionary on the disk, there is 
also a 6,271 -byte Quick Dictionary file 
on the same disk which contains the 
most common misspelled words. And 
that's not all, folks — there is still room 
for a user-created Personal Dictionary 
on the same disk. Here you can store 
words that do not appear in the Master 
Dictionary. The size of the Personal 
Dictionary is limited only by the 
amount of storage space. What this 
means to the user is that with the 
100,000+ word Master Dictionary and 



the unlimited Personal Dictionary, 
dictionary size is no longer limited by 
number of words, but simply by storage 
capabilities. The instruction manual 
tells the user how to put all of this on 
a hard disk. Think about that for dic- 
tionary size! 

T/S Spell comes on a "flippy" disk, 
with one side containing the programs 
and a minimal OS-9 Level I Version 2.0 
operating system, and the other an OS- 
9 data disk with the dictionary files on 
it. It is presented on an OS-9 Level I disk 
so that CoCo 1 and 2 users can use it, 
but it does contain a version that can be 
used under Level II with windows. 

The two versions in the CMD5 direc- 
tory are TSSPELL, for use under Level 
I and with T/S Word, and TSSPELLW, 



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for use under Level II with windows. 

T/S Word, the Tandy file format 
program, and its companion, 775 Edit, 
the Tandy file editor program, which 
together make a primitive word proces- 
sor, were written to operate under OS- 
9 Level I, which does not support 
windows. And while they can both be 
run on the CoCo 3 under OS-9 Level II, 
they will still not support windows. So 
no matter what model CoCo or oper- 
ating version of OS-9, if you want to 
access 775 Spell through the menu 
icons in 77 S Word, you must use the 
T55PELL version of the program. 

I ran T/S Spell T/S Word and T/ 
S Edit on my CoCo 3 under OS-9 Level 
II. Now, there is a trick to this. It must 
be done on a non-graphics, non- 
window screen. It must be done in 
the 32-column screen mode available 
under VDG/INIT. In other words, the 
system configuration you get from 
OS-9 Level II — right out of the box. 
I merely copied all the T/S Spell, 
T/S Word and T/S Edit programs 
over to my system disk. The only 
drawback with using these on the 
CoCo 3 is that they do not and 
cannot take advantage of the better 
looking 80-column mode available 
under Level II. Instead, you are 
limited to using the awkward 80- 
column graphic screen that the OS- 
9 Level I system provides for the 
CoCos 1 and 2. 

But there is some partial relief. As 
mentioned before, T/S Spell comes 
with two main programs, TS5PELL 
and TSSPELLW. The latter is the OS- 
9 Level II version (you guessed it, 'W 
stands for windows). Now, while you 
can't use TSSPELLW in the T/S Word 
program, either TSSPELL or TS- 
SPELLW can be used as a stand-alone 
program to spell check any ASCII 
file. Therefore, you can, on the CoCo 
3 under OS-9 Level II, get the benefit 
of the better 80-column text screens 
by spell checking the file created with 
T/S Word outside of T/S Word. 

The font characters are much 
easier to read and better looking, 
too. 

T/S Spell has a number of unique 
features in its operation. When in the 
default CHECK/CORRECT mode, if it 
does not find your word in one of its 
dictionaries, it highlights that word 
and then provides you with several 
options. At this time you can choose 
to go one of four routes with the 
suspect word. You can OK the word 
and the program will proceed to the 
next suspect word. You can tell 775 



136 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Spell to LOOKUP a suggested list of 
possible replacements for the suspect 
word, in which case it will scan its 
Master Dictionary for a list of the six 
most similar words to your spelling, 
displaying them for your consideration 
and selection or rejection. You may 
choose one of the suggested words and 
have it substituted into your text by 
merely highlighting it and pressing 

ENTER. 

You can RETYPE the suspect word. 
Or, you can approve the spelling of the 
word as it exists and ADD it to your 
Personal Dictionary. If you ADD the 
word, all further occurrences of the 
word will be considered valid. 

After having run through all the 
suspect words in the text file, the 
program asks you if you want to save 
the corrections or ignore them. If you 
choose to save them, the program 
creates a new corrected text file 
under your original name and re- 
names the old un-corrected text file 
by adding the extension . BU to it. 

Next, if you did any adding, the 
program asks if you really want to 
add the new words to your Personal 
Dictionary. If you do and you have 
not already created a Personal Dic- 
tionary, the program creates one for 
you under the filename TSPersonal. 

I'd like to pause here to say a few 
things about Personal Dictionaries, 
Notice, I said dictionaries because 
you can have more than one. You can 
create any number of special func- 
tion Personal Dictionaries. The 
trade-off with using many Personal 
Dictionaries lies between all- 
inclusiveness versus search time, but 
only one Personal Dictionary may be 
utilized at a time in a command line. 

Aside from having a Personal 
Dictionary created automatically 
with the use of the ADD function, you 
can also use a text editor to create 
one following the rules set down in 
the user's manual for the Quick 
Dictionary. If you would like 
T55PELL or TSSPELLW to check your 
Personal Dictionary for words and 
it's also on Drive /Dl, you must 
indicate its location by adding, P / 
Dl /PERSONAL -DICTIONARY . NAME, 
to the command line. 

Additionally, you may modify 
WORD. ICONS, as illustrated above, to 
have T/S Spell through T/S Word 
check your Personal Dictionary for 
words in your text file. However, 
there seems to be a little quirk in 
WORD . ICONS that you should be 
aware of when making the aforemen- 



tioned modifications to include your 
Personal Dictionary. It seems that 
UORD . I CONS wants every command line 
to fit on one line, and if you stick with 
the name TSPersonal as the name of 
your Personal Dictionary, it is too long 
of a name to place on one line with all 
the other modifiers. What I suggest is 
that you adopt the same scheme of 
dictionary naming that T/S Spell uses 
and rename your Personal Dictionary 
TSP. That way the command modifica- 
tion for WORD. ICONS would read: 

TSSPELL % M /Dl/TSM Q /Dl'TSQ P 
/Dl/TSP ttlGK. 

T/S Spell also provides command 
options to change the screen colors. For 



TSSPELL you are limited to either a 
black-on-green screen (the default), or 
black-ori-white. On the other hand, 
TSSPELLW provides for a number of 
color combinations for both its primary 
window and its secondary windows. 

But wait! That's not the end of T/S 
Spell's many features. We have dis- 
cussed only the default CHECK/COR- 
RECT mode. There are still two more 
modes of operation. If the program had 
stopped here with only the ability to 
check and correct spelling, it would still 
have been well worth its price, but there 
are two other modes: DIRECT MODE and 
the FILTER MODE. 

Suppose you just want to look up 
how to spell a word as you would with 
any dictionary. T/S Spell can do that, 



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March 1988 THE RAINBOW 137 



too. Simply enter T5SPELL D or 
TSSPELLW D (if you relocated the dic- 
tionaries to Drive /Dl, don't forget to 
tell the program in the command line, 
or simpler yet, just CHD /Dl). The 
program then displays the message 
ENTER WORD TO LOOKUP :. Merely type 
in your word as you think it is spelled 
and the program goes to work. If the 
word is located in the dictionary, it 
displays the message OK. If it is not, it 
displays NOT FOUND, CLOSEST 
MRTCHES, and then lists six words that 
come the closest to your spelling. You 
exit the DIRECT MODE by simply press- 
ing ENTER without entering a word to 
lookup. 

Since TSSPELLW works with win- 
dows, you can type out a text file in one 
window and, when you need to look up 
the spelling of a word, jump to another 
window and run TSSPELLW in the DI- 
RECT MODE. Neat, huh? 

The last mode is the FILTER MODE. 
The basic premise of this mode is to scan 
a text file and then list out all the words 
that do not appear in the dictionary. The 
list can be redirected from the normal 
screen output to a printer or disk file. 
To send the list to the printer, merely 
enter T55PELL (or TSSPELLW) F MY- 
FILENAME >/P. 

If you don't include a filename, the 
program takes its input from the key- 



board until an EOF (CTRL-BREAK) is 
entered as the first character on a line. 

This brings another scenario to mind. 
Suppose you have one of those "high- 
tech" kids, who needs to practice his 
spelling words. Let him type them on 
the keyboard in the FILTER MODE. The 
misspelled words could then be output 
to the screen or listed out to the printer. 
Pounding a CoCo keyboard is so much 
more fun than the old-fashioned paper 
and pencil method. 

I have saved one surprise about T/S 
Spell for last. With all the many features 
Tandy has included in T/S Spell, they 
could have charged big bucks for the 
program and no one would have looked 
twice. A plain vanilla spell checker for 
some of their other computers, offering 
about a tenth of the features that T/S 
Spell has, goes for $100 or more (and 
they don't have the dictionary size, 
either). But Tandy kept the price down, 
along the same lines of its other excel- 
lent programs for the CoCos. T/S Spell 
is well worth every penny and should be 
on everyone's must-have list. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102; $39.95. 
Available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide.) 

— Kerry M. Armstrong 



1 Software CoCo3 1 

Shanghai — 
Fast-Paced Fun 

Shanghai is based on an ancient 
Chinese game called Mah-Jongg. The 
origins of Mah-Jongg are as mysterious 
as the game itself, but it is believed to 
have started about 500 B.C. and is still 
played today in many parts of the 
world. It is similar to many card games 
but is played with small rectangular tiles 
engraved with Chinese drawings and 
symbols. There are 144 Shanghai tiles 
used on the CoCo 3 version of this 
ancient game. Of these, 108 are divided 
into suits much like playing cards. But 
in Shanghai, there are also 12 Dragon 
tiles, 16 Winds, four Seasons and four 
Flowers. 

The object of Shanghai is to disman- 
tle the pile of tiles shown on the screen. 
The pile is randomly generated for each 

138 THE RAINBOW March 1988 




game and is five layers deep. The dis- 
mantling process is done with the joy- 
stick by selecting matching tiles with an 
arrow. Tiles can only be moved in a left 
or right direction. Tiles between other 
tiles cannot be moved — only the top 
tiles that are free on the left or right side. 
If you are successful in removing all the 
tiles, you uncover the colorful fire- 
breathing dragon and win the game. 

Shanghai is supplied on a ROM Pak 
and runs on a 128K or higher Color 
Computer 3. It can plug directly into the 
side of the CoCo 3 or, if you have a 



Multi-Pak Interface, just plug it into 
any unused slot. 

The graphics on Shanghai are excep- 
tional and have to be seen to be be- 
lieved. The program, written by Rick 
Adams and designed by Brodie Lock- 
ard, is an Activision product that is 
simply outstanding on the CoCo 3. 
Since the stack of tiles is viewed from 
above, you can well imagine the diffi- 
culty in trying to show depth percep- 
tion. The authors have taken care of this 
by using gray shading and black borders 
at strategic edges of the tiles. The result, 
is an amazing 3-D effect that displays 
all five layers of the tiles with ease. As 
tiles are removed, the shading continues 
so that you still see distinct layers 
throughout the game. 

After the game auto-starts on your 
computer, you are given the opportu- 
nity to select either RGB or Color 
Composite monitors. A main menu 
then appears with these options: Play 
Solitaire, Begin Again, Select a Dragon, 
Tournament Play, Challenge Match 
and Return to Game. 

When playing, you always have the 
opportunity to cancel a move or to peek 
ahead. If you select a tile that cannot be 
moved, the computer beeps and dis- 
plays a message that tells you the tile 
cannot be moved. If the tile is movable, 
it flashes when you tap the joystick 
button. After matching tiles have been 
selected, a final tap removes them from 
the screen and a countdown score is 
displayed in the lower-left corner of the 
screen. A nice touch is the use of a 
Chinese-style font for the text on each 
screen. 

Tournament Shanghai can be played 
with multiple players and provides 
scores for each player. A five- or 10- 
minute time limit can be set and a 
countdown clock is displayed. 

Challenge Shanghai is a no-holds- 
barred competition between two play- 
ers, each using his own joystick. A pre- 
determined time limit of up to 60 sec- 
onds can be selected and each successful 
move of two tiles nets 1 point. 

I really liked Shanghai. It provides 
hours of quiet challenge or fast-paced 
fun if played with a friend. It is well- 
done, has outstanding graphics and 
makes your CoCo 3 really shine. 

(Activision, Inc., 2350 Bayshore Frontage 
Road, Mountain View, CA 94043; $34.95. 
Available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide.) 

— David Gerald 





MM 



77ze following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 




ass* 1 



^Cartoonamator, a 64K disk- 
based animation program that dis- 
plays up to one minute of animation 
with 20 characters and four settings 
that you design. For the CoCo 2 and 
3. Cocotronics Software, 29 South- 
brook, Irvine, CA 92714, (714)651- 
0283; $17.95 plus $2 S/H. 

CoCo Address Book, a 32K pro- 
gram designed to assist in maintain- 
ing a mailing list, telephone list and 
address file. For the CoCo 1 , 2 and 
3. Bob's Software, P.O. Box 391, 
.Cleveland, OH 44107, (216) 871- 
8858; $20 plus $2.50 S/H. 

Domination, a 128K board game 
for two to six players. The computer 
generates the game board (a map) 
and keeps track of all playing pieces. 
The object is to take control of the 
planet YCNAB by using your ar- 
mies to conquer all provinces con- 
trolled by other players. For the 
CoCo 3. HA WKSoft, 307 Sexauer 
Avenue, Elgin, IL 60123, (312) 742- 
3084; $18. 

SuperDisk +3, a utility that makes 
a spare copy of the disk directory. 
For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Sunrise 
Software, 8901 NW 26 Street, Sun- 
rise, FL 33322, (800) 628-2828; 
$19.95. 



Thexder, a 128K arcade game. Pilot 
a robot through multiple attack 
scenarios. The battlefields include 
caves, cargo holds and spaceship 
interiors. For the CoCo 3. Tandy 
Corporation, 1700 One Tandy Cen- 
ter, Ft. Worth, TX 76102; $24.95. 
Available in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide. 



^Tomb of T'ien, a 64K animated 
graphics Adventure. Your village 
has been burned and its sacred 
shrine stolen by the mythical 
dragon. You have been chosen to 
conquer the dragon and retrieve the 
shrine so that the village may live in 
peace. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 
Valkyrie, 37 Peter Bush Drive, 
Monroe, NY 10950, (914)783-0191; 
$19.95. 



Try-O-Tax, a program to assist with 
federal income tax returns. This 
fifth edition includes tax changes for 
1987. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Try- 
O-Byte, 1008 Alton Circle, Flor- 
ence, SC 29501, (803) 662-9500; 
$44.99 plus $3 S/H. 



<^Zandar, a space game that lets 
you maneuver through three levels 
of play. The object is to leave your 
home planet and land safely on the 
farthest planet. Drone ships are 
between you and every planet, and 
it takes practice to aim your laser. 
For the CoCo 3. K-Soft, 300 13th 
NE, East Wenatchee, WA 98801, 
(509) 662-9365; $24.95. 



^ First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE rainbow reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 139 



Delphi Bur e a u 



T i has been some time since we 
I | have discussed the "simple" 
A Ithings that can be done on our 
CoCo SIG. Those of us wjio have used 
the system for a while have no problem 
performing tasks such as sending mail 
or posting a Forum message, and we 
take these things in stride and go about 
them without even thinking. 

The new user, however, doesn't have 
the experience necessary to use Delphi's 
features "without thinking." Even dis- 
counting all the fancy things that can be 
done in Mail, it can be very frustrating 
to send that first electronic letter. And 
when you don't know how to do that, 
it becomes difficult to ask for online 
assistance. 

Sending Your First Letter 

After becoming familiar with the 
CoCo SIG, you might decide it is time 
to reach out and interact with other 
users. A useful way to do this is with 
electronic mail. You can send "letters" 
to other people on the system. But how 
do you do this? 

At the CoCo SIG prompt, you can 
enter the Mail section of Delphi by 
typing MAIL (or Mfl, for short) and 
pressing ENTER. After a short wait, the 
MflIL> prompt will appear on your 
screen. At this point, you can do many 
things. The easiest, of course, is sending 
a simple letter. 

To begin your letter, first enter SEND. 
Delphi will prompt you with TO:, 
asking for the username of the person 
to whom you are sending your letter. 
Simply enter the appropriate username. 
If you want your letter to go to more 
than one person, type in the usernames 
of all the people you want to write to, 
separating each with a comma. When 
you are finished entering the usernames, 
press ENTER. (Delphi takes care of the 
hard part for you.) 

At this point, Delphi will respond 
with SUBJECT : . You are given the 
opportunity to enter a brief description 
of the contents of the letter (this tag 
helps mail recipients when the time 
comes to file letters away in their Mail 



Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is CRA Y. 

140 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Reach Out 
and Touch 
Someone 



By Cray Augsburg 

Rainbow Technical Editor 



files). Just enter your description (up to 
about 40 or 50 characters) and press 

ENTER. 

Now, Delphi will tell you to enter 
your letter. It also tells you that to 
finalize ("transmit") your letter you 
must press CONTROL-z. You can abort 



the letter at any point by pressing 

CONTROL-C. 

The system has one quirk that can be 
very maddening at times. If you put 
enough text on one line so that the 
computer must go down to the next line, 
the system inserts a blank line between 
the two lines. Or it might put a few 
words on each of many different lines 
and shift these words increasingly 
farther to the right. 

The moral of this story is simple: As 
you enter your text in a letter (or 
anywhere on the SIG, for that matter) 
and get near the right-hand side of the 
screen, go ahead and press ENTER to 
send that line. If you don't have room 
for the next word on the same line, press 
ENTER and use another line. This is 
quite easy to do and becomes second 
nature after a short while. 

When you have finished the body of 
your letter, please "sign" it (we prefer 
that you sign all correspondence with 
your real name) and press CONTROL-Z. 
It will then be sent to the people you 
have indicated. 

That's all there is to sending a letter! 
If you don't believe me, try it. Send one 
to yourself. To do this, all you need to 
do is answer the TO: prompt with your 



Database Report 

Activity on both OS-9 Online and OS-9 Online 
the CoCo SIG has been lively in In the General topic area, Rix Seacord 
spite of the recent holiday season. (Rix) uploaded his review of the Burke & 
Many users received new CoCos or soft- Burke interface. Chris Burke (COCOXT) 
ware as Christmas presents and are now uploaded a very informative description of 
using them to produce utilities, pictures the hard drive system available from Burke 
and other programs they want to share & Burke detailing what is included, what 
with the CoCo population. is needed, and where to obtain all the 
Joe Carney (joecarney) helped us to hardware. Chris also furnished the Burke 
do some testing in early November to & Burke application notes #1 and #2. 
determine the speed of downloading from Kevin Darling (kdarling) uploaded a text 
Delphi using Xmodem versus Ymodem at file that gives a brief description of Multi- 
300, 1200 and 2400 bits per second. As it Vue. Paul Kacprowicz (PAK) uploaded an 
turns out, Ymodem is roughly 10 percent article that gives his impressions of the 
faster than Xmodem at 300 bps, 20 percent Flight Simulator // program from Sub- 
faster at 1200 bps, and 30 percent faster at Logic. Jonathan Guthrie (sciguy) up- 
2400 bps. loaded a documentation file for the Ymo- 
Few CoCo terminal programs support dem protocol. Greg Law (GREGL) provided 
Ymodem at present, although we expect a documentation file for the calling syntax 
that to change shortly. If you have a for all of the functions in the CGFX.L 
terminal program that supports Ymodem, library in the Developer's System. Bill 
you may want to use it online for faster Brady (wbrady) uploaded several text 
downloads. (A Ymodem patch for Version articles dealing with starting up OS-9/68K 
2.0 of Rickey term and the CoCo 3 is on an Atari system, 
available in the Data Communications In the Patches topic area, Ken Scales 
topic of the CoCo SIG's database.) (kscales) uploaded CC3PAK, which will 



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* 80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function key sets. 

* Three Programmable Headers and One Programmable Footer. 

* Automatic Footnote System places lines at the bottom of a page. 

* 7 Tab Commands, with: Center, Left, Right and Decimal align. 

* Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system setup. 

* 8 Pre-Defined & 10 Programmable printer function commands. 

* Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

* Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 

* Complete Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left & right. 

* Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text* 

* Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

* Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 

* Compatible with all printers including Laser printers. 

* Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 512K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most Powerful Word Processing System available for the 
COCO-3, designed for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is 
not like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
short documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional printing, 
then most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simple word processors. 
But, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is the answer. It works in a 
totally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
formatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
There are no time comsuming and frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
control at all times. You can display the formatted document on the screen before 
a single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, footers, 
page numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, Italic, 
Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts, 
take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKIDATA 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All of the character sets used on this AD are 
proportional, all centering, justification, font selection, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

What you see is what you get! 

TEXTPRO IV has 9 Hi-Resolution screen fonts to choose from, with 58 to 212 
characters per line in 225 Resolution, for the best display possible. You can easily 
match the width of your printed page to the screen and you can have it 
automatically change display widths as you change printer fonts so you can even 
display the "fine print". All of the screen fonts can display, Bold, Italic, Underline, 
Superscript, Subscript and Double Width characters. When you you want to see 
what your printed document will look like, TEXTPRO IV will let you see it on the 
screen in all its glory, so that, "What you see is what you get". 

Standard Commands 

TEXTPRO IV has all the document formatting commands you expect in a 
word processor and then some. The setup commands include: line length, top 
margin, bottom margin, page length, page numbering on/off, page format on/off, 
automatic word fill on/off and justification left, center, right or full. Some of the 
Vertical control features include: Test for a number of lines left on a page, skip to 
next page, set page number, page pause, single and multiple line spacing. 

TEXTPRO IV features 3 programmable Header lines that can be centered, left 
or right justified and one programmable Footer line. There are 3 commands for 
continious, single and paragraph indenting, Center Text, Center Line and Right 
Justify text with character fill. 

Printer & Special Commands 

TEXTPRO IV has 8 pre-defined printer & screen commands for Bold, Italic, 
Double Width, Underline, Subscript, Superscript, Condensed and Double Strike 
print. It also has 10 programmable functions that you can use to access intelligent 
printer features like: Graphics, variable line spacing, half line feed, horizontal & 
vertical positioning. There are also 3 other printer commands that allow you to 
imbed control code sequences anywhere in the text. 

There is a Footnote command that will automatically place footnotes at the 
bottom of the page. Another command allows you to display a message on the 
screen and input text from the keyboard, to be included in your printed document. 
There is also a repeat command that allows you to repeat an entire document or 
part of one, up to 255 times. 

Tab Functions 

TEXTPRO IV features an elaborate system of tab commands for complete 
control over column formatting. There are 10 programmable tab stops that can be 
defined and re-defined at any time. They can be used to: Center over Tab 
column, Right Justify to Tab column, Decimal Align over Tab column, Left 
Justify to Tab column (Normal Tab) and Horizontal Tab. They can also be used 
with a numeric column position for maximum flexibility. 



Proportional Fonts & Printing 

TEXTPRO IV is the only Color Computer III Word Processing system that 
gives you Justified Proportion Printing, which can give your documents and letters 
that professional touch that just isn't obtainable with fixed or mono spaced 
printing. And just about all printers today support proportional fonts, and with 
Laser Printers you can get typesetting quality output for just pennies a page. 
TEXTPRO IV supports up to 9 proportional fonts, with full justification. And, 
you can even mix mono spaced and proportional fonts for maximum flexability. 
Even if you don't use proportional printing, you can select between Pica, Elite and 
Condensed fixed width fonts to get fully justified printing. 

Mail Merge and Text Processing Disk Functions 

TEXTPRO IV supports several commands that allow you to import data or 
text from other disk files. They allow you to include information like names and 
addresses for Mail Merge capability, Import standard paragraphs or other 
information for Boiler Plate type functions and more. Some of the commands 
include: Open a file, Field a Record, Read a Record into fielded variables, Read 
single or multiple lines and Trim spaces from the trailing end of fielded variables. 

Another powerful disk function not to be overlooked is the "LIBRARY" 
command that allows you to include the entire contents of a file in your text. This 
can be very useful for a great many applications. You can use a Library command 
to automatically include a standard or optional printer setup command file, or to 
include standard paragraphs, headers or information created from a spread sheet 
or any other program. And, for printing very large documents that consist of 
several files linked together. 

Autoexec Startup Files 

TEXTPRO IV will automatically load and execute a command text file when it 
first executes. This allows you to customize the program configuration for your 
system and printer whenever you startup TEXTPRO IV. You can setup the 
screen display format, colors, adjust automatic key repeat, printer baud rate, load 
a set of function keys, load your printers control codes and more. 

80 Programmable Function Keys 

TEXTPRO IV allows you to have up to 80 function keys with just about any 
kind of information or command sequences you can imagine. Once programmed, 
you can have a command sequence execute using a single function key. You can 
also Save and Load function key sets at any time. So, you can have several sets for 
different writing tasks or projects, the possibilities are endless. Just think, with a 
single function key you could, load a disk file, search for and replace all the 
occurances of a phrase, save the file back to disk, have it processed and printed! 

Text Editing 

TEXTPRO IV has a powerful, full featured, line oriented screen editor that is 
faster and more efficient then most editors you've ever worked with. It supports 
single or multiple line copy and move, global or local search and replace, word and 
character insert/delete, block delete and much more. It features adjustable 
automatic key repeat, selectable display foreground and background colors, screen 
line width and more. 

TEXTPRO IV uses fully compatible ASCII formatted files. You can even 
direct formatted output files to a standard ASCII disk file. It will Load, Save, 
Append, Kill, Text Process files from disk, Roll part of a file to disk. Get next 
portion of a file, display a Directory and Backup Ramdisk to & from Floppy disks. 

TE5CTPRO IV*s files are also compatible with spelling checker programs like 
Spell *n Fix from Star Kits, a shareware program, available with TEXTPRO IV for 
your evaluation, just for the asking. 

Fully Buffered Keyboard 

While many word processing programs are slow and often lose keystrokes. 
TEXTPRO IV has a fully buffered keyboard that is virtually impossible to out 
type. Even when it's busy, it will still remember the keystrokes entered. You can 
enter in commands or whatever, even during insert mode you'll never lose a key. 

Professional Word Processing Power 

TEXTPRO IV is a powerful tool for both the Casual and Professional Word 
Processing user. It offers a wide range of features and functions that can satisfy 
even the most demanding writer. Even though you may not need all of 
TEXTPRO IV's power and flexability right now, its not a program that you can 
easily outgrow. As your needs and skills improve, you'll discover that you won't 
need to go out and buy another word processing program, TEXTPRO IV will 
already be ready and waiting. No Text Processing program available for the Color 
Computer III gives you more Text Processing Power than TEXTPRO IV. It can 
make your writing appear more professional than you ever thought possible. 
Check around, see what other word processing programs have to offer in terms of 
power, speed and flexability. When your finished comparing them against 
TEXTPRO IV, you'll see that it's the only real choice for the Color Computer III. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89.95 

To order TEXTPRO IV by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 
Coming Soon: CoCo 1 & 2 versions of TEXTPRO IV 



own username, respond to the SUB- 
JECT: prompt, type a message, and 
press CONTROL-Z. 

Now, to see the message you have just 
sent, type READ/NEW at the MflIL> 
prompt and it will be displayed. (Each 
time you enter Mail, the system will 
default to RERD/NEW in order for you to 
see any messages entered.) When you 
are satisfied that electronic mail works, 
send a few letters to other people. You 
might want to learn more about Mail 
while you are there, too. Just enter HELP 
at the MfiIL> prompt and let Delphi 
teach you. To leave the Mail area and 
return to the CoCo SIG prompt, just 
press CONTROL-Z. 

On to Forum 

Posting a Forum message is almost as 
simple as sending electronic mail. And, 
if privacy isn't necessary, using the 
Forum for asking questions and posting 
ideas is preferred. By keeping such 
communication in public view, others 
can follow our thoughts. They might be 
able to back up our suggestions. And we 
also stand a much better chance of 



having our questions answered quickly. 
It isn't uncommon to ask a question in 
Forum on a Saturday night, log off for 
an hour and come back to find two or 
three responses. 

To get to the Forum area from the 
CoCo SIG prompt, simply type FORUM, 
or use the abbreviation FD, and press 
ENTER. Once there, you might want to 
scroll through some existing messages 
to get a feel for the layout. To do this, 
just press ENTER. Every time you press 
ENTER, you will continue forward. If 
you come across a MORE? prompt, press 

ENTER. 

If you come across a message you 
would like to respond to, enter REPLY. 
Delphi prompts you with TO:. Now 
look up at the top of the message to 
which you are replying, get the user- 
name and type it in. Or you can simply 
press ENTER. If you choose the latter 
method, you will be taken immediately 
to the text entry mode. This mode 
works just as it did in Mail. Do re- 
member to cut your lines short on the 
right side of the screen. 

If you type in the username (after all, 



Topics 

General Information 
Info on Rainbow 
CoCo 3 Graphics 
Archives 

Source for 6809 Assemblers 
HELP 

Utilities & Applications 

Product Reviews & Announcements 

Hardware Hacking 

Rainbow On Tape 

Games 

Data Communications 
Classic Graphics 
Music & Sound 

Figure 1 



you might also want to "reply" to 
someone else), you are prompted with 
SUBJECT : . Again, just like in Mail, 
enter a short description here. The last 
prompt before getting to text entry is 
TOPIC?. You can pick one of the Delphi 
topics presented in Figure 1 for entry at 



patch CC310 to allow the Level I version of 
DynaStar to work with Level II. He also 
uploaded KEVTflB01,flR, which patches 
CC3IO (Level II) to provide the capability 
of selecting an alternate mapping for up to 
"23 of the non-alpha key codes. The two key 
maps may be toggled independently on a 
window basis. The alternate key map 
included allows the arrow and function 
keys to be used under DynaStar, Chris 
Burke uploaded a short text file that 
describes a fix to Version 1.3 of the Burke 
& Burke drivers, which have a problem 
with masking the interrupts. Bruce lsted 
(BRUCEISTED) uploaded SSCLK.flR, a 
Level II clock module patch for Speech 
Systems* RTC, PCPflK.flR, a file describing 
the hardware modification to allow the 
PBJ P-C Pak to work with a CoCo 3 
funning OS-9 Level II; PC PAK. A R Update, 
a revision that includes CoCo 3 clock 
patches and printer drivers for the PBJ 
P-C Pak; and SSPflK.flR, a file that de- 
scribes the hardware modification for the 
Speech & Sound Pak to enable it to run 
on a CoCo 3 at 1.78 MHz. Denny Skala 
(dennyskala) uploaded a one-byte acia- 
PAK module patch that extends the char- 
acter "cushion" between its sending an 
XOFF signal to the host and the end of its 
input buffer. 

In the Graphics and Music topic area, 
Steve Clark (steveclark) uploaded a 
program to display McPaint graphics 
pictures from the Macintosh into the 
CoCo 3 screens under OS-9. Gene Loefer 
(gloefer) gave us a very nice program 
that generates graphics images based on 
the Mandelbrot functions. Several RLE 



pictures have been posted by Steve Clark. 
Steve also uploaded the source and binary 
versions for the VDG and window screens 
and a printer dump for the Tandy DMP 
series printers, Steve H. Fravel (OS9FA- 
natic) uploaded the humorous 1988 Andy 
Capp Calendar, which features Andy 
doing his favorite thing. 

In the Device-Drivers topic area, Craig 
Aarseth (CRA1GAA) uploaded a file that 
describes the changes to the hardware and 
software to allow the PC-Pak to function 
under OS-9 Level II. Brian Stretch (BRIAN- 
STRETCH) uploaded the source and object 
code for a driver for the JFD-CP Parallel 
Port under Level II. Tim Sirianni (TDS) 
uploaded a device driver and descriptor for 
a RAM disk driver for the Disto RAM 
disk card. Dennis Weldy (OS9ER) uploaded 
WIND0W5.AR, which contains binary cop- 
ies of window descriptors w8-wl5. 

In the Programmers Den topic area, Jim 
Johnson (reindeer) uploaded a PIA 
definitions file that defines the PIA regis- 
ters and bits for the two PI As in the CoCo 
3. Jim also uploaded a "Floppy Disk Defs 
File" to the Programmers Den database 
topic area. This is a complete breakdown 
of the registers and commands of the 
WD1773/MB8877A floppy disk con- 
troller chip used by the Tandy Disk Con- 
troller. SIGop Greg Law updated his 
stand-alone program that allows a user to 
execute system calls from the command 
line. This version allows system calls 
returning packets of data to be executed 
and dumps the packets to disk files, which 
can then be examined with the dump 
utility. Ray McCoppin (raymccoppin) 



sent us three C programs called Frame, Pi 
and Cmouse. 

In the Users Group topic area, over 40 
files were added as we continue to bring 
more and more of these valuable files 
online. 

In the Applications topic area, Joel 
Sherman (JSHERMAN) uploaded an ad- 
dress database program written in BASIC09. 
Pat Abramovitch (HUBBS) uploaded 
Check09 to the Applications database 
topic area. This is a mouse-driven check- 
book program that works on graphics 
screens. Dennis Weldy uploaded DS . I NIT, 
which redefines (among other things) the 
cursor movement commands available 
through the arrow keysf 

In the Utilities topic area, Michael 
Washburn (COMPZAP) uploaded pset, a 
printer setup and menu program, and 
DOWN> a utility for Gemini and Star 
printers with character download capabil- 
ity, to allow the user to design his or her 
own printer fonts or use the Level II screen 
fonts. Greg Law published Code, a pro- 
gram that translates an input character 
into an output string of the form: charac- 
ter, hexadecimal, decimal and octal values. 
Greg also provided Merror, which is a self- 
contained program similar to Error, which 
keeps the err msg file in memory along 
with some descriptive text of the error 
(helpful for those who make lots of errors). 
Warren Moore (wjmoore) uploaded SE~ 
LECT16, which displays 16 colors of the 
user's choice on the 320-by-I92 screen, and 
split, which will split an ASCII file into 
several smaller files as specified by the 
number of records or the number of bytes. 



142 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



*** *** *** *** COLOR COMPUTER II! SOFTWARE *** *** *** *** 



CBASIC III EDITOR/COMPILER 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer 111 BASIC COMPILER!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient machine language programs and you don't 
want to spend the next few years trying to learn how to write them in Assembly 
language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!!! 

CBASIC III is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full advantage 
of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K RAM, without 
having to spend years trying to learn assembly language programming. CBASIC 
III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you are 
already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Res Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). We even 
added advanced commands not available in Basic to give you a level of control 
only avialable to very advanced Machine Language Programmers. Plus we made it 
exceptionally easy to use, not like some other compilers. CBASIC III is the 
friendliest and easiest compiler available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced Basic 
or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs without having to 
worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory allocations and so on, because 
CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. For Advanced users, CBASIC 111 
will let you control every aspect of your program, even generating machine code 
directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC III features well over 150 Compiled Basic Commands and Functions 
that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, Tape, Printer and 
Screen I/O. It supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play 
and String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/Put, H/PIay and H/DRAW, all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable 
printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
PRINT, INPUT, INKEY, GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands." 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the Color 
Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and install 2 Ultra 
Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation, Editing and 
Compilation. YoucaneasilyaccessalI512Kof memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8IC blocks 
and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor which allows 
you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a full featured editor 
designed specifically for writing Basic programs. It has block move and copy, 
program renumbering, automatic line number generation, screen editing, printer 
control and much more. 

The documentation provided with CBASIC III is an 8 1/2 by 11 Spiral Bound 
book which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. We went to 
great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and understand, but 
complete and comprehensive enough for even the most sophisticated user. 

CBASIC III is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and 
well worth the investment. You can buy a less expensive compiler for your 
CoCo-3, and then find out how difficult it is to use, or how limited its features are. 
Then youMl wish you had bought CBASIC 111 in the first place. Dollar for dollar, 
CBASIC III gives you more than any other compiler available. If you can find a 
better CoCo-3 Basic Compiler then buy it!!! 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

DATAPACK III PLUS V1.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 

AUTOPILOT & AUTO-LOG PROCESSORS 
X-MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT-100 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

• No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port. 
" 8 Display Formats, 32/40/64/80 columns at 192 or 225 Res. 

• 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display & Disk. 

• ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 

• Directly record receive data to a disk file (Data Logging). 

• VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

• VT-100/52 cursor keys, position, insert/delete, PF & Alt. keys. 

• Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates. 

• Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

• 9 Variable length, Program mableMacro Key buffers. 
' Programmable Printer rates from" 110 to 9600 baud. 

" Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 

' Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

" Freeze Display & Review information On Line with no data loss. 

• Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

• Built in 2 Drive Ramdisk for 512K RAM support and much more, 
Supports: R.S. Modem-Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128K & Disk, $59.95 

EDT/ASM III 

128/5X2K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler. It is 
designed to take advantage of the new features available in the CoCo-3 with either 
128K or 512K of memory. It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 
lines in 192 or 225 Resolution, so you use the best display mode whether you are 
using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your display. Plus you can 
select any foreground or background colors or even monochrome display modes. 
It will even support 512K by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fast Ramdisk for 
lightning fast assembly of program source code larger than memory. There is also 
a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug your assembled programs. 
EDT/ASM III has the most powerful, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/Assembler package for the Color Computer. 

• Supports Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

• Full Screen line editing with immediate line update. 
■ Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

• Load & Save standard ASCII formatted file formats. 
' Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM III features include: 

• Supports the full 6809 instruction set & cross assembles 6800 code. 

• Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

• Supports Disk Library file (include) up to 9 levels deep. 

• Supports standard Motorola assembler directives. 

• Allows multiple values for FCB & FDB directives (unlike R.S. EDT/ASM) 

• Allows assembly from the Editor Buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 128K & Disk $59.95 



TEXTPRO IV 

The ADVANCED COCO-3 Word Processing System" 

• 9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 

• On Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 
' Up to 8 Proportional Character Sets Supported with Justification. 

• Up to 80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function keysets. 

• Fully Buffered keyboard accepts data even duiring disk access. 

• Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system configuration. 

• 8 Pre-Defined Printer function commands & 10 Programmable ones. 
" Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

• Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing, 

• Completely Automatic Justification, Centering. Flush left & right. 

• Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

• Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 

• Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 5 12K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most advanced word processing system available for the 
COCO-3, designed for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is 
not like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
short documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional spacing, 
then most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simpler word processors. 
But, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is what your looking for. It works 
in a totally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
formatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
There are no time comsuming, and often frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
control at all times. You can see what the formatted document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, 
Italic, Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters right on the 
screen. 

TEXTPRO TV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts. 
take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO J V on an OKIDATA 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All the character sets used on this AD are 
proportional spaced characters, all centering, justification, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89.95 

HI -RES III Screen Commander 

The DISPLAY you wanted but didn't pet on your CoCo-3 

• 54 Different Character Sizes available from 14 to 212 cpl. 

• Bold, Italic, Underline, Subscript, Superscript and Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad width characters. 

• Scroll Protect form 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

• Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN 3 mode. 

9 PRINT @ is available in all character sizes & styles. 

• Programmable Automatic Key repeat for fast editing. 

• Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

• Selectable Character & Background color. 

• Uses only 4K of Extended (2nd 64K) or Basic RAM. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES III will improve the standard display capabilities of the Color 
Computer 3, even the 40 and 80 column displays have several features missing. 
For example, you can't use PRINT @ or have different character sizes on the same 
screen, even when mixing text and graphics with the H PRINT command. Hi-RES 
III can give you the kind of display you always dreamed about having on your 
CoCo-3, with a wide variety of display options that you can easily use with your 
Basic or ML programs. 

Hl-RES HI is totally compatible with Enhanced Color Basic and its operation 
is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the normal screen display with an 
extremely versatile display package. With the full control code keyboard, you can 
control many of HI-RES III extended functions with just a couple of simple 
keystrokes. 

Requires 128K Tape or Disk $34.95 

512K RAMDISK & MEMORY TESTER 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 ULTRA 
High Speed Ram Disks in you CoCo-3. It does not need or require the OS-9 
operating system. It works with R.S. DOS VI.O or VI. 1 and it is completely 
compatible with Enhanced Color Disk Basic! Plus it allows your CoCo-3 to run at 
double speed all the time even for floppy disk access!!! It will no disappear when 
you press reset like some other ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
ML program to test the 512K ram. It performs several bit tests as well as an 
address test so you know that your 512K of memory is working perfectly. 

Requires S12K & Disk $19.95 

"The SOURCE III" 

DISASSEMBLER & SOURCE CODE GENERATOR 

The SOURCE III will allow you to easily Disassemble Color Computer 
machine language programs Directly from Disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
compatible Source code. 

• Automatic label generation and allows specifying FCB, FDB and FCC areas. 

■ Disassemble programs Directly from disk, unlike other disassemblers. 
" Automatically locates Begin, End and Execution address. 

• Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

• Generates Assembler source files directly to disk or printer. 

• Built in Hcx/Ascii dump/display to locate FCB, FCC & FDB areas. 

• 8 Selectable Display formats 32/40/64/80 columns in 192 or 225 Res. 

• Selectable Foreground & Background colors & Printer Baud rates. 

• Built in Disk Directory an Kill file commands. 

■ Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

Requires 128K & Disk $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 

purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 



this prompt. Most people enter GEN 
(General Information) whether or not 
their message is general in nature. 

When you are finished typing your 
message (be sure to sign it), use 
CONTROL-Z to "post" the message for 
others to see. If you want to abort the 



message at any point, use CONTROL-C 
just as you did in Mail. 

If there isn't a specific message to 
which you want to reply, but you do 
want to leave a message for others to 
see, enter the ADD command at the 
rORUM>prompt. You will be asked for 



the same information as in REPLY. 

Many times, we don't want to ask a 
question of just a single user. Instead, 
we want to leave the message for all SIG 
members to see. If this is the case, when 
Delphi sends the TO : prompt, enter ALL 
instead of a single username. □ 



Jason Forbes (COC03KID) provided C 
source code for Modbuster, a program to 
split merged executable files and BASIC09 
procedure files into their individual files. 
Dennis Weldy uploaded the C source code 
for FfLESTA T, which reads the file descrip- 
tor sector for a given list of files and then 
prints its contents (except for the cluster 
list). Files may be given on the command 
line or accepted from standard input. Bert 
Challenor (bertac) updated his OS-9 
spooler program. 

In the 68K-OS9 topic area, Bill Brady 
uploaded bigt-st, a basico9 terminal 
program similar to BigT for the CoCo. 

In the Telecommunications topic area, 
Greg Law published an autobaud version 
of TsGo] Tsmon. Simmule Turner 
(simmy) uploaded ctalk, a demonstra- 
tion version of a terminal program that 
features VT52 emulation, and its asso- 
ciated documentation. Ernest Fielder 
(DOUG AL) uploaded Remote, a program to 
link two devices for communication. 

CoCo SIG 

In the General Information topic area, 
Kevin Nickols (nickols) posted the Tandy 
newsletters for November and December. 
Michael Fischer (M1KE88) posted two very 
humorous files, one called "Unix Wars" 
and the other being a "jived" version of the 
Gettysburg address. Brian Wright (POL- 
TERGEIST) posted some insicte news about 
Tandy's sales practices in a file called 
'Tandy Secrets Revealed." 

In the CoCo 3 Graphics topic area, 
Gregory Clark (gnome) uploaded 
DUMPC16, a screen dump program for a 
CoCo 3 and a D MP- 1 20 printer. It uses 
Greg Miller's gallery program to view 
the pictures. Bob Wharton (BOBWH ARTON) 



posted many more of his very popular 
renditions of the logos for various rock 
groups. Bob also posted an MGE picture 

of Sun Bowl '87. I (DONHUTCH1SON) 

posted a Macintosh picture of the lovely 
Samantha Fox. Greg Miller (GREG- 
M1LLER) posted HOLT DRY. MGE, a holiday 
scene that he drew with Color Max De- 
luxe. Greg also provided us with new 
versions of his very popular bsctool and 
GALLERY utilities. Richard Trasborg 
(TRAS) was this month's most prolific 
uploader, providing us with memorable 
pictures of the new year '88, several female 
movie stars, Linda Ronstadt and Hyapatia 
Lee, a humorous cartoon involving the 
Fuller brush man, and GIRLNUD2/CM3. 
Richard also posted several popular nude 
CoCo Max III drawings by Mike Tram- 
mell, including those called Tahiti, Gei- 
sha2, Windyday, Joselene, Sally Field and 
other assorted nudes. In addition, Richard 
uploaded a Madonna collage drawn by his 
friend Stephen Knell using CoCo Max III 
David Mills (davidmills) posted a nicely 
colored map of the USA in MGE format. 
Brian McElroy (RFITZHUGH) sent us sev 7 
eral pictures and zodiac signs drawn with 
The Rat, a new CoCo 3 drawing program. 
Michael Talcott (miketalcott) sent us his 
picture color editor, which allows one to 
redefine the palette used in an MGE 
picture while viewing it, and Mike An- 
drews (mandrews) uploaded an MGE 
picture displaying a CoCo 3. Jason Forbes 
sent us a "Money For Nothing" picture and 
a digitized picture of Michael J. Fox. Bob 
Tarburton (BOBTAR BURTON) furnished us 
with his color separation programs, and 
Chris W. Brown (CRlSPWiLLlAM) sent us 
several pictures that he drew with CoCo 
Max III I posted the "CoCo Gallery" files 



from RAINBOW for the months of Febru- 
ary, April, June, July, August and Sep- 
tember. Jim Shoop (bazar) sent us his 
utility program for converting CoCo Max 
//fonts into a format usable by CoCo Max 
III, Brian Stretch sent us a CoCo Max III 
viewer utility and a picture of his Falcon's 
Lair BBS. Ken Schunk (kenschunk) sent 
us a QuickBASIC program that will let 
IBM PC owners display all of our great 
MGE pictures on an IBM PC or clone 
equipped with an Enhanced Graphics 
Adapter. Christian Erickson (CE) sent us a 
picture from the game Tron. 

In the Source for 6809 Assemblers topic 
area, Roger Krupski (hardwarehack) 
posted the source code for a 512K RAM 
disk for the CoCo 3. 

In the Utilities & Applications topic 
area, Bob Wharton published a disk direc- 
tory label maker and some utilities for 
making calendars using CoCo Max III. 
Laurence Tepolt (tepco) uploaded a 
binary tree tutorial that includes a sample 
program. Jim Sanford (WB4GCS) sent us his 
fine RTTY utility, Smarty, for the CoCo 
3., Ray Dutton (GEM1NI06) sent us his 
EDTASM+ source code conversion pro- 
gram, and Ezra Story (ezy) uploaded 
cciWRlTE, a first-run word processor for 
the CoCo 3. Brian Stretch sent us a line 
editor called CoCo Word, and Roy Cosby 
(UNCLE) gave us a bowling game and his 
NewBoot program. David Mills (DAVID- 
MILLS) sent us DOSTfiMER.BIN, a program 
that will automatically load and run a 
program when a user enters the DOS 
command. Jason Forbes sent us a real-time 
clock program, and Brian Wright sent us 
The DiskPlumber repair utility. Roger 
Krupski provided his Disk edtasm 
patches for operation on the CoCo 3. 



Hint ♦ . ♦ 



Nailing It Down 



If you're into some minor hardware hacking and 
want to offer your CoCo and Multi-Pak a little more 
protection, consider the following option. The 
particular approach is up to you, but many have found 
it advantageous to bolt the CoCo and MPI together 
to one piece of plywood. This will keep those "minor" 
bumps from destroying the valuable electronics inside. 
If you are a little queasy about opening the units (this 
will void the warranty), ask your local hardware 
hacker for a little help. 



Hint . . * 

Locked Out 

Have you ever been typing in a program listing, 
gone to get a cup of coffee and come back only to find 
that your CoCo is locked up arid won't accept any 
characters from the keyboard? Of course! It must have 
been the kids! But is the CoCo really "locked up"? Any 
time your CoCo decides it doesn't want any charac- 
ters, check the joysticks. If a firebutton is pushed in, 
the keyboard becomes inactive. And it is easy to 
accidentally bump a joystick so that the firebutton 
presses against something. 

Ned M, Taggart 
tf^awe> OH 



144 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



In the Hardware Hacking topic of the 
database, Marty Goodman (marTYGOOD- 
MAN) published his EPROM and Static 
RAM Pinout charts. This group contains 
three files, each file being a table of pinouts 
for EPROM and/ or static RAM chips. 
Marty has donated these charts to the 
Public Domain. Marty also provided us 
with the driver fix for the hard d rive system 
from Burke & Burke. (This file will be 
made available to all registered owners, 
but was published online so that users 
could receive it faster.) John Malon 
(JOHNLM) published a File describing a 
modification to the Avatex 1200 modem to 
provide external carrier detection. Logan 
Ward (logan ward) sent us a CM3 picture 
describing how to add a switch to a Radio 
Shack Hi-Res adapter so that a single 
adapter may be used with both Color Max 
3, Color Max Deluxe and Co Co Max III. 
Stan Stephenson (minstrel) sent us his 
humorous interpretations of the specifica- 
tions for both the RS-422 standard and the 
electronic specifications for the RS-232 
standard. 

In the Games topic of the database, 
Colin McKay (colinmckay) posted a 
description of how to put The Interbank 
Incident onto a 512K Disto RAM disk. 
Kyle Petree (KYLE) uploaded a "Dungeon 
Master Helper" and a "Dungeons & Drag- 



ons" character sheet generator. Fred 
McDonald (fredmcd) sent us his fine 
PROPERTY. BAS program, a BASIC utility 
for use with the game of Monopoly. Mi- 
chael Schneider (MSCHNEIDER) sent us two 
archived (compressed) files with two 
shareware games from Ark Royal. 

In the Classic Graphics topic area, Tom 
Bedwell (REBECCA) uploaded a two-disk 
set that tells "The Christmas Story" using 
graphics, music and text. Emery Mandel 
(EM AN DEL) uploaded Mike Ward's popu- 
lar RLE-to-binary convertor program 
with Mike's permission. I posted the 
"CoCo Gallery" winners for the months of 
February, April, June, August and Sep- 
tember. 

In the Music & Sound topic of the 
database, James Predinger (jjmbopredig) 
uploaded his renditions of several of Willie 
Nelson's greatest hits. 

In the Archives topic of the database, 
Greg Miller posted the Forum messages 
and the Conference from the first Battle- 
Line. Dick White (DICKWHITE), the SIG's 
polls manager, posted 108 archived polls 
from the Polls section of the SIG. 

In the Product Reviews & Announce- 
ments topic of the database, Roger 
Krupski posted a description of his hard 
drive system at the request of several SIG 
members. This 25 K file is actually most of 



the documentation for the product, and 
should be interesting reading for those 
considering upgrading to a hard disk 
system. Marty Goodman posted his review 
of the Disto "No Halt" floppy disk con- 
troller and another review of the No Halt 
disk controller and the 512K RAM up- 
grade board from Performance Peripher- 
als. Christopher Burke posted Burke & 
Burke Application Note #1, and Michael 
Schneider posted his review of Flight 
Simulator II, 

In the Data Communications topic area, 
Steve Lamb (stringfellow) posted the 
11/16/87 version of the popular Ultima- 
term terminal program. Billy Douglas 
(BiLLYDOUGLAS) posted the documenta- 
tion for the CoBBS systems. Mike Ward 
(mikeward) uploaded Version 4.7 of his 
always-popular MikeyTerm terminal pro? 
gram. Fred McDonald posted a collection 
of several letters from Ken Johnston (the 
author of Ultimaterm) to the Delphi users, 
and Uliimaterm 3.0 with supporting util- 
ities. 

As you can see, we have a lot of new and 
Very good material online for our CoCo 
users. See all of you online on Delphi! 

— Don Hutchison 
Rainbow CoCo SIG 
Database Manager 



TOTHIAN 
SOFTHARE 



DID YOU HEAR ABOUT THE 
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THAT CAN HAKE PICTURES 
UP TO 456 PIXELS HIDE 
AND 565 PIXELS HIGH ?? 

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HISSING QUITE A FEU 
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SOLUTION : WRITE US AND 
HftUE YOUR HAHE ADDED 
TO OUR FREE NAILING 
LIST ! ! NO OBLIGATION 



TOTHIAN SOFTUARE, INC. 

BOX 663 
RltlERSBURG, PA. 16248 



(SINCE 1985) 




—Dual Program Specials— 

TIME/MONEY $39.95 

ADDITION/SUBTRACTION $39.95 

MULTIPLICATION/ 

BEAT THE COMPUTER $21 .95 

supports CoCo 1 , 2. & 3 
specify cass/disk/Network II 

school P.O.s welcome 
add *2.00 shipping and handling 
Network orders add '10.00 per disk 
Write for Free Catalog 

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5705 CHESSWOOD DR. 
KNOXV1LLE, TN 37912 
615-688-4865 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 145 



1 F e atur e 



CoCo 3 




A scrolling spreadsheet for the Co Co 3, 
plus hints on the GIME chip 



CoCo 3 Number 

Cruncher 




Suml28 is a simple spreadsheet 
that demonstrates some relatively 
unknown text screen modes on 
the CoCo 3. 

The program uses a 128-column (80 
at one time) by 28-row screen to display 
a 12-month by 20-category spreadsheet 
that adds the columns and rows and 
displays the results along the bottom 
and right sides, respectively; Keep in 
mind that only 80 columns are dis- 
played at one time in the "window." 

Some monitors and most TV sets will 
not be able to display this program 
properly. Suml28 uses an expanded 
screen display, some of which may not 
fit onto your screen. But if you're using 
Tandy's CM-8 monitor or something 
similar, you won't have any problems. 

If your monitor or TV will display the 
normal 80-by-24 screen, you won't have 
any trouble with the horizontal display 
from Sum 128 — but you may have 
problems with the increased vertical 
display, 28 rows compared |p the nor- 
mal 24 rows. 

On my TV set, the top and bottom 
rows, as well as the right side, are for 
the most part cut off The set just wasn't 
designed for displaying that much. My 



Dave Archer is a grain farmer and 
CoCo programmer. He and his wife, 
Jodi, a registered nurse, live on a farm 
near Finley, North Dakota. 

1 46 THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



By David Archer 




BMC monochrome monitor does much 
better but is still barely able to contain 
the entire screen. My CM-8 monitor 
handles it quite easily, as 40 similar 
RGB analog monitors. 



I Ve included a short program (MON- 
TEST) that outlines an 80-column by 28- 
row text screen. With it you can judge 
for yourself whether your monitor is 
suited for use with Suml28. That may 



Getting Text In 128x28 



Enabling the 128-column by 28-row text 
screen is simply a matter of setting the 
proper registers within the CoCo 3 GIME 
chip. This can be accomplished by poking 
the GIME register's memory address with 
the proper value (see lines 420 and 430 of 
Sum 128). Refer to Table 1 for a more 
detailed look at the three GIME registers 
used in this program. These are not all the 
GIME registers, just the ones used in 
Sum 1 28.' 

What follows is perhaps a bit technical, 
but I feel it's necessary to explain exactly 
how this unusual screen mode works. If 
you Ye not interested in this part, skip on 

to another. 

Exploring the GIME 

Numbers with the prefix &H are hex- 
adecimal numbers. Numbers with no 
prefix are decimal. And numbers like 
00000011 are eight-bit binary representa- 
tions. Eight-bit binary numbers are for- 
matted with Bit 7 as the leftmost bit and 
Bit 0 as the rightmost bit. 

The first GIME register set is at 
&HFF98. You'll see that by storing &H03, 
we set bits 1 and 0 (&H03 = 0000001 1). If 



you look at Table 1, you'll see that means 
we've set the register for text mode with 
eight lines per character row. (This is also 
accomplished by the BASIC command 
WIDTH 80.) 

Next is the video resolution register at 
&HFF99. By storing &H75 there we set 
bits 6,5,4,2 and 0 (&H75 = 01 1 10101). 
Again, if you refer to Table 1, you'll note 
that by setting bits 6 and 5 we set the lines 
per field to 225 lines (225 lines of screen). 
That means that if we have 225 lines and 
eight lines per row, we can display 28 rows 
on the text screen! Actually, 28 * 8 = 224 

lines, so we have one extra line displayed 
at the very bottom of the screen. More 
about that extra line later. 

Bits 4 and 2 set the horizontal resolution 
bits, and Bit 0 sets CRES0. That allows the 
use of attribute bytes with the text (under- 
line, blinking and color), basic normally 
stores &H15 in this register when the 
command WIDTH 80 is executed (&H15 = 
00010101). So, you can see that the only 
thing we did differently from BASIC was to 
increase the lines per field from 192 to 225. 

The most extensively used register in this 
program is the horizontal offset register, 



Item 



Jan 



Feb 



Mar 



Apr 



May 



Jun 



Jul 



Aug 



Sep 



Oct 



Nov 



Dec 



Total 



Store No. 120 

Store No. 121 

Store No. 122 

Store No. 123 

Store No. 124 

Store No. 125 



6354.21 
6545.23 
3648.27 
8532.43 
6432.76 
2965.56 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



7234.32 
8764.43 
3734.23 
7354.78 
5463.83 
2465.62 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



4325.23 
8764.23 
4958.18 
6475.98 
5498.23 
3956.21 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0-00 
0.00 
0.00 



3214.43 
5345.87 
2958.64 
5897.23 
7002.94 
3194.34 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



5436.54 
6545.87 
3874.54 
6235.54 
6572.79 
3216.45 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



4325.34 
5436.34 
3986.37 
6453.12 
6453.76 
2349.05 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



6545.42 
9874.20 
2748.75 
7984.65 
6250.56 
4325.66 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0-00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



5784.87 
7234.92 
4348.30 
4765.98 
6395.87 
4487.23 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



6547.56 
7384.82 
3396.79 
7129.54 
7409.54 
3997.70 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



7654.34 
7365.47 
5007.87 
8653.41 
6547.23 
3566.08 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0-00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



8765.34 
8293.93 
5298.19 
8954.96 
7231.40 
2777.45 
0.00 
0.00 
0-00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0-00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



9875.91 
9912.61 
7350.34 
9346.54 
7389.04 
3665.92 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



76063.51 
91467.92 
5T310.47 
87784.16 
78647.95 
40967.27 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



Total 



34478.5 35017.2 33978.1 27613.5 31881.7 29004.0 37729.2 33017.2 35866.0 38794.4 41321.3 47540.4 



426241.28 



save the agony of typing in all the code 
only to be unable to display the results 
properly. Also, you can use M0NTE5T as 
a basis for developing your own appli- 
cations using the expanded screen area. 
IVe added quite a few comment lines to 
both MDNTE5T and SUM12B for just that 
purpose as well as for additional expla- 
nation. 



Running Suml28 

When you first nin Suml28 youll be 
asked whether you are using a tape or 
disk system. Simply press the T or D 
key. Then you will see the entire screen 
with a blank worksheet (all values are 
zero). You are now at the main menu. 
On the fourth row is the command line, 
which always has the available com- 



mands on it. You'll note that by pressing 
the left or right arrows you're able to 
scroll the entire worksheet across the 



screen. 



Pressing the Fl key brings you to the 
command mode, where most of the 
commands are used. Again, the fourth 
row is the command line showing the 
available commands. 



which is located at &HFF9F. This is the 
register that enables the 128-column wide 
screen. It also controls where the 80- 
column "window" is located within the 
128-column virtual screen. Use this for- 
mula: 

POKE &HFF9F,128 = X 

X is the column number ( 0 through 1 27) 
you want to be displayed leftmost within 
the 80-column window. 

The reason we must add 128 to the 
column number is that the value 128 
decimal, &H80 in hex (10000000 in bi- 
nary), sets Bit 7 of the register, which is the 
128-column enable bit. Bits 6 through 0 
specify the offset column number. Refer to 
Table 1. Some examples are shown below. 
* These examples show how to display the 
right columns of the 1 28-column screen as 
the left portion of the window and show 
the left columns of the 128-column screen 
as the right portion of the window. 



I hope you now have an idea of how we 
can use this register to scroll or switch the 
80-column window to anywhere within the 
128-column screen. 

Fixing BASIC 

The problem with using this screen 
mode is that it's not supported by BASIC. 
Luckily, the CoCo 3 basic interpreter is in 
RAM, so with a few careful pokes we can 
fix that, too. These are done in lines 450 
through 520 of Suml28. 

BASIC Vectors 

basic vectors are used by basic when 
writing the text screen. &HFE00 and 
&HFE01 is the cursor address. Set to 
&H2000 (top of screen memory). &HFE04 
is the number of characters per row on the 
text screen; set to 128. &HFE05 is the 
number of rows on the text screen; set to 
28. &HFE06 and &HFE07 is the end 
address of text screen memory; set to 
&H3E00. 



Command 



POKE &HFF9F,128 (10000000) 
POKE! &HFF3F,168 (10101000) 
POKE &HFF9F , 192 (11000000) 
POKE &HFF9F,255 (11111111) 



Columns displayed in 
80-column window 

0 th rough 79 (like normal 80-column) 
40 through 119 

64 through 127 and 0 through 15 * 
127 and 0 through 78* 



Each row of text is 128 characters long 
and each character needs two bytes — one 
for the actual character and the other for 
attributes. The attribute byte contains the 
color, blinking or underline information. 
That means we need 256 bytes of memory 
for each row of text displayed. So, with 28 
rows of 256 bytes (28 * 256 = 7,168), we 
need 7,168 (1C00 in Hex) bytes of screen 
memory. 

The beginning of Hi-Res text screen 
memory for basic is at &H2000. Adding 
&H1C00 to &H2000, we come up with 
&H3C00. So why did I set the end address 
to &H3E00? Well, by adding the extra 
memory we can print over that one line 
(not row) of screen at the very bottom, as 
I mentioned earlier. Also, this keeps basic 
from trying to scroll when we do print over 
that line. Basic's scroll routine will destroy 
the 128-column format. 

Fixing BASIC'S LOCATE command was a 
little more tricky. This involved patching 
the machine code instructions that execute 
the LQCRTE command, and is accom- 
plished in lines 500 through 520. 

Note that not every basic command was 
patched for use with this screen mode. If 
you develop your own applications, some 
commands may not behave as they nor- 
mally do. One such example is trying to 
print more than 29 rows on the screen. 
Basic's scroll routine still thinks that each 
line is only 80 columns wide, so when the 
scroll executes, the result is a mess. □ 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 147 



(F)ile I/O 



(M)ain menu 
(P)rint 
Arrow keys 



(ALT) 



allows saving or load- 
ing of worksheet files, 
which can also be 
edited with an ASCII 
word processor, 
jumps back to the 
main menu, 
allows printing of en- 
tire worksheet, 
allow you to move to 
any cell (except the 
totals and category 
areas) within the 
worksheet for entry of 
new value. 

moves cursor back to 
upper-left cell of 
worksheet. Pressing 
the @ key gives the 
same result. 



When you have the cursor (high- 
lighted area) over the cell you want to 
edit, simply type the number you want 
to store there and press ENTER (do not 
use commas in your entries — 5000, not 
5,000, for example). The number must 
be lower than 10,000 or you'll hear a 
beep and the old value will be restored 
in the cell. 

Please note that the first number key 
you press will be the first number of the 
cell. That is, when a number key is 
pressed, the program jumps to a LINE - 
INPUT routine. The input string is 
tacked on to the string containing the 
number key first pressed. The entire 
string is then evaluated as one number 
and stored in the current cell (see lines 
1640 through 1710). The columns and 
rows are totaled after each cell is 
changed. 

The best way to learn how to use 
Sum 128 is to run it. Try out the various 
features until you feel comfortable with 
the program. 

Hard Copying Your Spreadsheet 

The printer routine (lines 2240 
through 2430) is set up to print in a 
condensed format of 17 characters per 
inch. The default is for Gemini 10X 
printers, but the code for most Radio 
Shack printers is included in a REM 
statement. Consult your printer manual 
for the specific codes for your printer. 

If your printer doesn't support a 
condensed print mode, you might want 
to modify the routine to divide the sheet 
into two pages for printing. If your 
printer has a wide mode (132 columns), 
then you should not need condensed 
print — you can remove Line 2300. 

Line 160 sets the printer speed to 9600 
baud. If your printer requires a slower 
baud rate, you can change it there. Lines 

1 48 THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



GIME Register Table (Courtesy of Kevin Darling) 

This is by no means a complete table of GIME registers . Only the 
registers used are shown. For more information you may wish to 
purchase the Color Computer 3 Technical Manual. 



Address 



Contents 



FF98 Text/graphics video mode, and lines per row. 



Bit 
Bit 
Bit 
Bit 
Bit 
Bit 
Bit 



7 
6 
5 
4 
3 
2 
1 



Bit 0 



vidmode 
na 

DESCEN 

MOCH 

H50 

LPR2 

LPR1 

LPR0 



0 is text, 1 is graphics 

1 - extra DESCender ENable 

MOnochrome bit (1-monocrome) (composite only) 
50hz vs 60hz bit 
Lines per character row 
(Bits 2-1-0 below) 



000 - 1 line/char row 100 

001 - 2 101 

010 - 3 110 

011 - 8 111 



9 lines/char row 

11 (??) 

12 (??) 



FF99 Video Resolution Register 
Bit 7 - na 

Bit 6 - LPF1 Lines Per Field bits 

Bit 5 - LPF0 " 

Bit 4 - HR2 Horizontal Resoloution bits 







00 - 


192 lines 


10 - 


210 lines 






01 - 


200 lines 


11 - 


225 lines 


TEXT MODES 
















HR2 


HR1 


HR0 


(HR1 


don't care for text) 


80 


Char/line 


1 


X 


1 






64 


ti 


1 


X 


9 


CRES0 


- 1 for attribute 


40 


H 


9 


X 


1 




bytes used 


32 


n 


9 


X 


9 






GRAPHICS MODES 


( Horizontal 


Resoulution ) 




X 


Colors 


HR2 


HR1 


HR0 


CRES1 


CRES0 Bytes/line 


640 


4 


1 


1 


1 


9 


1 160 


640 


2 


1 


9 


1 


9 


9 


512 


4 


1 


1 


9 


9 


0 128 


512 


2 


1 


9 


9 


9 


0 64 


320 


16 


1 


1 


X 


1 


9 160 


320 


4 


1 


9 


1 


9 


1 80 


320 


• 2 


9 


1 


1 


9 


0 40 


256 


16 


1 


1 


9 


1 


0 128 


256 


4 


1 


9 


9 


9 


1 64 


256 


2 


9 


l 


9 


9 


0 32 


160 


16 


1 


9 


1 


1 


0 40 


Note the correspondence of HR2 & HR0 


to the text mode's bytes/line. 


FF9F 


Horizontal Offset Register 








Bit 7 - Horizontal 


offset enable bit 


( 128 char width always ) 




Bit 6 - - 


1 












Bit 5 - 


I 












Bit 4 - 


i 












Bit 3 - 


--> 


Bits 


6-0 specify the column offset (0 - 127) 




Bit 2 - 


I 












Bit 1 - 


I 












Bit 0 - --« 


1 










If Bit 


7 is set & 


in text 


mode 


, then 


there are 128 chars (only 80 seen)/li 


This allows an offset to 


be specified 


into a 


virtual 128 char/line screen. 



Useful for horizontal hardware srolling on wide text or spreadsheets. 

* Note that not all bits of each register are applicable to the program. 
They are included only for continuity and reference. 

Table 1 



It/L TOM MIX COMPANIES 



FLIGHT 16* t • This is the very finest flight simulation 
program on the market today. Flight 16 will work with 
all color computers. Flies very much like a Cessna 150. 
Is a full instrument aircraft with sound effects and out- 
the-window graphics. As a REAL bonus feature, you may 
design your own airports and flight areas. 

$34.95 

WORLDS OF FLIGHTS - A real-time flight simulation 
of a sophisticated ultra-light aircraft which generates 
panoramic 3-D views of ground features as you fly in any 
of nine different "worlds." The manual included explains 
the instrument panel, the basis of flight control, etc. For 
the serious simulation buff! 

$30.95 32K 

P51 MUSTANG ATTACK/FLIGHT SIMULATIONS - The 

ultimate video experience! For the first time ever, two 
CoCo's can be linked together via cable modem. (If play- 
ing via modem, both computers require a copy of the 
program.) Or play alone and sharpen your skills against 
a non-combatant computer drone. 

$30.95 32K 

APPROACH CONTROL SIMULATION* - "Caught in a 
blinding snowstorm, two jet airliners are on a collision 
course. Hundreds of lives are at stake! A high-speed 
disaster is inevitable unless you act fast. . . " This and 
many other scenarios await you as the Air Traffic Con- 
troller. Experience firsthand challenges, frustrations and 
pressures felt by all Air Traffic Controllers! 

$25.95 32K 

THE KING* t • This is a color computer classic! Looks 
and plays like the popular arcade game. Contains the 
same four screens as the original: barrels, pins, jacks, 
and conveyors. Super graphics! 

$25.95 32K 

TRAPFALL*t - The "pitfalls" in this game are many. 
Fight your way through the jungle collecting hidden 
treasures as you go. 

$20.95 16K 

KATERPILLAR ll*t - The CoCo has needed a perfect 
centipede-type game since day one. You will throw all 
imitations aside when you see this. 

$20.95 16K 

BUZZARD BAIT*t - We've done it again. Outstanding 
high resolution graphics and sound make this "joust" 
type game a must for your software collection. One or 
two players. 

$20.95 32K 



MS. MAZE*t - Ms. Maze combines brilliant color, high 
resolution, detailed graphics and music to make it look 
and play like the arcade version. It is the closest thing 
to the arcade Pac games that we've seen for the CoCo! 
Arcade Aces — this one's for you! 

$20.95 32K 

CUBER*t - The hazards faced by Cuber are many! Help 
him change the colors of the pyramid while avoiding the 
many dangers always present. 

$20.95 32K 

VEGAS GAME PAK*t - Now you can bring Las Vegas 
home with you! This package contains six different 
games: Video Keno, Video Poker, and Video Blackjack, 
plus three slot machine lookalikes, Bar 5, 3 Line, and 
Right/Left. 

$24.95 16K 

GOLD FINDER *t - Here's the quality you have come 
to expect from TOM MIX! While avoiding enemies, pick 
up all the pieces of gold along the way; then ride, the 
elevator to the top to solve each level. Sixty-nine levels. 
PLUS now you can create your own levels. 

$20.95 32K Disk only 

THE SAILOR MAN*t - Avoid the punches of the Bigfat- 
badguy and the flying bottles thrown by the Olduglysea- 
woman to rescue Elsie and win her heart! One or two 
players. More great sound and graphics from the author 
of "The King!" 

$25.95 64K 



SPECIAL OFFER: 

Order two, take $5.00 off total 
Three or more, take $8.00 off total 



elec*TRON*t - Patterned after the popular arcade game, 
there are four men on your team and four subgames to 
complete. 

$20.95 16K 

THE WILD WEST - CoCo III Only - The notorious 
desperado Black Bart has escaped from jail and is on 
his way to Dry Gulch to recover his hidden fortune. Can 
you capture him? Four voice music and sound effects 
and a vocabulary of over 100 words! 

$20.95 Disk only 

WIZARD'S DEN* - Another of our outstanding graphic 
adventures! You must recover the Gem of Damocles, 
stolen by the Evil Wizard. His magic is strong and he 
can make you see things that don't exist! 

$20.95 64K Disk only 

LUNCHTIME*t - Your chef, Peter Pepper, is surround- 
ed! Dodge pickles, hot dogs and eggs while building ham- 
burgers. Fast paced action for either one or two players. 

$19.95 32K 

BREWMASTER*f - Move along the end of the bars ser- 
ving beers to your thirsty customers, but watch out for 
falling glasses and rowdy customers! 

$15.95 32K 

MAUI VICE*t - Step into the shoes of Crock and Bubbs 
in this graphic adventure and gather evidence. A new 
story generated each time you play! 

$20.95 64K extended basic, Disk only 

CHAMBERS *t - Loosely based on Cosmic Chasm, in 
each level you must destroy all of the evil creatures. In 
all there are 20 series of chambers with 20-35 intercon- 
nected rooms. 



$15.95 



32K 



MONEYOPOLY*f - Now you can play the popular board 
game on your color computer! Probably the most realistic 
computer board game simulation ever. Contains all the 
features of the original game. Two to four players. 

$20.95 32K 

DRACONIAN *t - Your mission is to destroy all of the 
enemy bases within each sector, rescue as many 
astronauts as possible and dock with the friendly base 
at the top of the sector. Your spaceship can move in eight 
different directions. An exciting program with outstanding 
graphics and sound! 

$20.95 32K 



ARCADE GAME SALE 

NOW! Here's your chance to have your own collection of Arcade 
favorites: 



Package #1 

Donkey Kong 
Centipede 
Pitfall 
Donut Dilemma 
Joust 

$49.95 




Package *3 

Pacman 
Frogger 
Quix 

Bartender 
Loderunner 

$49.95 



OR: 2 packages only $94.95; 3 packages only $139.95 

Each package contained on more than one unprotected diskette (Sorry, 
disk only). This is high quality software that formerly sold for as high 
$34.95 each. 

Please add $4.00 shipping on this special offer only. 



DRAGON SLAYER* - Save the villagers of Pendor from 
Icarus, the bloodthirsty dragon! He lives in a cave way 
up in the mountains, which is a treasure chest full of gems 
and cash bags. Be on the lookout for enemies and bar- 
riers at all times! Ten levels with sixteen rooms per level; 
over 160 exciting screens. 

$20.95 32K Disk only 

VEGAS SLOTS - CoCo III Only - Seven of the most 
popular slot machine games found in Vegas are yours 
for the price of one: MultiBars, Fruit MultiBars, Right- 
Left/Left-Right, Lucky Dollar, Melons and Bars, Fruit and 
Bar 5. Designed to be as real as being there. One of the 
most outstanding programs we have ever offered. 

$29.95 Disk only 

VIDEO CARDS & KENO - CoCo III Only - Play Video 
Poker, Jokers Wild, Blackjack, and Keno. These games 
are so real you expect to see Wayne Newton walk by! 
Outstanding graphics and movement. Wanna Bet? 

$29.95 Disk only 

TEACHERS DATABASE II* - Allows teachers to keep 
computerized files of students. • Up to 100 students, 24 
items per student • Statistical analysis of scores • Grades 
can be weighed, averaged, percentaged • Test result 
graphs/grade distribution charts 

$59.95 64K TDBII Disk Only 

$42.95 32K TDB 

More educational software available. 

TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 
616/676-8172 

• Specify tape or disk when ordering 

• Add $3.00 postage/handling 

• Ml residents add 4% sales tax 




VISA 



* CoCo 1 , 2, 3 compatible 
t Joystick required 

Write for free catalog 



163 through 167 have some alternate 
values. If you're unsure, check your 
printer manual for the proper baud rate 
setting. 

File Input/Output 

The files you save or load are auto- 
matically given the extension .SUM — 
so don't add an extension when asked 
for the filename. Also, filenames are 
restricted to eight characters or less. 
(That is, eight characters plus the exten- 
sion.) If you enter more than eight, 
you'll hear a beep and you'll be asked 
to reenter the filename. If you're using 
a tape system, you'll be prompted with 
"Prepare tape and press <ENTER>" 
before any load or save operation. 

You can edit the worksheet files 
you've saved to tape or disk by use of 
an ASCII word processor, or you can 
use the files in other programs. 



The file format is this: Category 
string, 12 values (one for each month), 
and dummy separation string. For 
example: 



Category 1 

0000 

0000 



0000 



category 
January value 
February value 
March through No- 
vember values 
December value 
dummy string inserted 
for category separa- 
tion 



Category 2 



Category 20. 

Final Notes 

There are quite a few comments 
within the program listing, so if I've 
forgotten to explain something here, I 



hope you can figure it out from looking 
at the listing. If not, write to me and I'll 
try to figure it out. 

Feel free to modify this program or 
develop your own applications using 
some of the things shown here. Custom- 
izing can be done by changing strings in 
the DRTR statements in lines 2590 
through 2780 to whatever best suits 
your needs. Remember that these 
strings cannot be more or less than 15 
characters. Pad with spaces if less than 
15 characters. This will allow you to 
rename the categories to something 
more meaningful than "Category." 



(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at Box 504, Finley, ND 58230. Please 
enclose an SASE when writing for a 
reply.) □ 




180 


, , ,209 


1570 . . 


255 


360 


.41 


1770 . . 


90 


540 


, ,138 


1930 . . 


3 


770 


128 


2190 . . 


. , .16 


1030 


28 


2380 . . 


150 


1200 , 


.178 


2580 . . 


, , ,217 


1400 


236 


END 


...160 



Listing 1: SUM12B 

10 ' Sum 128 

20 ' By Dave Archer 

30 1 

40 1 Special thanks to Roger Bou 
chard for the fix to BASIC'S LOC 
ATE command 

50 f and to Dick White for his v 

aluable suggestions . 

60 1 Also to Kevin Darling for p 

roviding GIME specs. 

70 ' 

80 1 Palette colors set for RGB 
analog monitor 
90 1 

100 RGB : 'Change to CMP for com 
posite color monitor 

110 PALETTE 0,8 : PALETTE 1,18 

120 PALETTE 2 ,63: PALETTE 3,0 

130 PALETTE 4,0 

140 PALETTE 8,63 

150 X=l : 1 9 600 baud 

160 POKE 150, X :'set printer bau 

d rate 



161 
162 
163 
164 
165 



Baud 

9600 
4800 
2400 



X = 

1 
7 
18 



166 '1200 41 

167 5 600 87 

168 ' 

170 GOTO 240: ' if using monochr 
ome then delete this line 
180 1 

190 ' * For monochrome * 

200 FORX=0 TO 7 STEP 2 : PALETTE X 
,0: PALETTE X+1,63:NEXT 
210 PALETTE 4, 63 '.PALETTE 3,0: PAL 
ETTE 2,63 

220 'Change all "ATTR (1,3)" to 
"ATTR (0,0)" for monochrome 
230 ' 

240 CLEAR 2000 

250 DIM MO(13,21) ,A$(21) ,B$(12) , 
M$(4) 

260 ON BRK GOTO 1180 

270 ON ERR GOTO 1280 

280 CLS:POKE 65497, 0:POKE 282,25 

5: ' fast speed & upper case 

290 WIDTH80:CLS1: PRINT: PRINT 
300 PRINT TAB(7),"-< Sum 128 >-" 
310 PRINT: PRINT 

320 PRINT TAB (21)" By Dave Arch 
er" 

330 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 

340 PRINT TAB(16) " (T)ape or 

(D)isk ?" 
350 I$=INKEY$ 

3 60 IF I$= M T" THEN DEV=-l:GOTO 4 
00: ' TAPE 

370 IF I$="D" THEN DEV=l:GOTO 40 
0: ' DISK 
380 GOTO 350 

390 ' Set 128 by 28 screen 
400 ONBRK GOTO 1170 
410 CLS 

420 POKE&HFF98,&H03:POKE&HFF99,& 



150 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Proven Technology 

New CoCo 3 Utilities 

Great for 512K Systems! From Color Venture and OWL-WARE 



PRINTER LIGHTNING 

A great print spooler which gives you 
44K print buffer from a 128K CoCo and 
up to 438K (200 pages!) from a 512K 
CoCo. With this spooler you can run a 
program while you are printing a file. 
The spooler does not slow down the 
computer to any noticeable extent while 
you are running a second program and 
no lost characters arise. Baud rates 
selectable. Printer Lightning can reside 
in memory along with RAMDISKl 

NEW NEW 




Using 512K CoCo 3 you have access to 
2 additional disk drives in RAM. All 
disk commands are supported, and the 
data are Reset button protected. You 
can now have up to 5 disk drive capa- 
cities on line at once and can assign the 
ram disks to any drive number. By 
making the ramdisk Drive 0, all pro- 
grams which require a lot of drive 
access will run much faster. You can 
have the RAMDISK in memory at the 
same time as the Printer Lightningl 



BACKUP LIGHTNING 

This program is the fastest way to make 
backup copies of your files using a 512K 
CoCo. You can backup 35, 40, or 80 
track disks single or double sided. Both 
RS and OS-9 disks may be backed up. 
The original disk is saved to memory 
and a copy can be made on an 
unformatted disk every 45 seconds! The 
lightning read, write, format, and verify 
routines that were developed make this 
program much quicker that RSDOS or 
OS-9 for backups. This will become one 



of your most used programs! 

Only $1 9.95 each. 3 for $49.95. 
SPECIAL With our 51 2K Upgrade (Next page) only $2. each Or 3 for $5! 



Announcing: 

The finest graphics/drawing program for the COCO 3! 



Da Vinci 3 



16 colors on screen at one time 

Modify each color from 64 available colors 

Use composite or RGB monitor 

Draw with custom paintbrushes 

Full resolution 320 X 192 

Picture converter for conversion of 

COCO 2 pictures to COCO 3 
Multiple text fonts 
Accepts input from joystick, X-pad, 

mouse, or touch-pad 
Boxes, circles, line, paint generation 
Screen dump for Tandy mono and color ink-jet 

printers, (NX* 10 and others pending) 
Sensible price 

No additional hardware required because of 

course/fine joystick movement modes 
Zoom mode for individual pixel editing 
Great on screen menu which is removable at 
the touch of a key to allow full screen edit 



128Kor512K COCO 3 



$37.95 




Super I/O Board for OS-9 

Each Board Provides 2 Serial Ports and Centronics Parallel Port 

First Board has Real Time Clock and Beeper.*. With Second Board up to 5 Users 

2 Serial Ports 



The serial ports are usable up to 19,200 Baud, and 
the parallel port is a true Centronics standard. 
Plug into your multi-pak. On CoCo 3, multi-pak 
must be upgraded. You will have a multi-user 
system with additional computers or terminals 
plugged into the serial ports. An OWL hard drive 
and 512K upgrade are stronelv recommended for 
ttvaUvuser systems. mm 

Intro Price... $ I DOi 

BOARD 2. ..$139. 



(up to 19,200 BAUD) 



Ptogs 
Into 
MULTI PACK 







CENTRONICS 
PARALLEL 
PORT 



P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 
ORDER LINES (only) — 
(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 



Proven Techno/ogy 

On the Razor's Kdge of the Color Coin outer Frontier 



OS-9 Hard Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or Business Use 
Drive Access is at Least 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives 
Control up to 2 Drives per Controller each as Continuous Storage 



Every hard drive system is complete with software, 
hard drive, controller, heavy-duty power supply, and 
LR Tech Interface. When a complete drive system is 
ordered, the drive is fully assembled, tested, and 
burned in for 3 full days. This ensures dependability 
and optimum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo hard drive 
systems and parts for systems for more than 2 years. 
This is the longest history in the Q)Co market of any 
available drive system. About V* of all hard drive 
systems currently in use in the CoCo market use the 
LR Tcch/OWL-WARE system. We have reached 
this position in the CoCo hard drive market by 
providing our customers with a quality product that 
they (and we) can be proud to own and use. 

System Prices: New ? 

$469. $629. $759 

10 Meg 20 Meg 40 Meg 



A number of drive systems were in the market place 
when the LR Tech Interface was introduced and 2 
have been introduced since. Most of these are no 
longer available. We provide the only system which 
provides a combination of standard interface (SASI), 
rugged unit construction (not hacked to a floppy 
drive controller), high speed, and reasonable price. 
These systems are even several times faster than 
the standard XT hard drive system. Ideal for 
multi-user system because processor does not stop 
for hard drive access. 

For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and 2 




Dealer's Inquires Invited! 



Hard Drive Interface 

(Includes Software) 

For those who want to put together their own 
system, we have an exclusive arrangement to 
distribute the LR Tech Interface. Please note 
that an interface is not a controller. A Xebec, 
WD, or Adaptec SASI controller are required 
for a drive system. 

To assemble a hard drive system yourself re- 
quires some reasonable knowledge of OS-9 and 
electronic construction and a hard drive that 
works. CoCo 3 users will have to upgrade their 
Multi-pak. 

Only $119. 

Xebec Controller $139. 

CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 

The LR Tech S12K upgrade uses all gold con- 
tacts and 120 nanosecond 256K chips. Provides 
large system memory from OS-9 Level 2. 

Without _ ^ With 

Mem Chips $59. Chips $1 1 2. 

Special! See software offer on previous page. 



Hard Drive Basic 

New For the CoCo 3! 

In Answer for the Many Reqests to Run BASIC from a Hard Drive 



With the development of the CoCo 3, OWL Ware has been able to 
provide a truly professional Hard Drive System using OS-9. There has 
not, however, been a method of running your programs from the 
standard BASIC With this latest development of the CoCo software 
aces, it is now possible to partition your hard drive into RSDOS and 
OS-9 sections. The OS-9 partition runs your OS-9 normally. The RSDOS 
section is further divided into a number of floppy sized units to run 
RSDOS programs. The familiar RS disk commands work normally. 



There is little more that must be learned. 

All of these RS drive sections are available at all times. It is not necessary 
to use assign commands and get access to only a few of these sections. 
Programs that use RS-BASIC should work as will all programs which do 
not force their own disk drivers. 

Call about prices. This should be availabile by the time you read this ad! 




OWL-WARE PHONES 

ORDERS 

(800) 245-6228 
PA (21 5) 682-6855 

TECHNICAL HELP 
J (21 5) 433-8695 

Call for advice 




t, quietest drive ava 

$229. 



Ask for the WHISPER DRIVE for the finest, quietest drive available! 

Drive 0 Systems (Fun Hgt) $169 ■ (Half Hgt -DS) 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, cable, case & power supply, and manual. 

Drive 1 Systems (Fun H g t) $95. (HalfHgt-DS) $135. 

New! New! (3.5* 720K Drive for OS-9) $195. 

Drive 1 has drive, case & power supply, and instructions for use with your drive. 

( Call for Special Prices on Drive 0, 1, 2, 3 Combos.) 



HALF HEIGHT DRIVE 
UPGRADE KIT FOR 
RS HORIZONTAL CASES 

Why only double the capacity of your 
system when you can triple in the same 
case? Kit includes: double sided drive to fit 
your case, chip to run both sides of new 
drive, hardware, and detailed instructions* 
Takes only 5 minutes. 

Model $119. Model $129. 
500 501 



L 



All drives are new and fully assembled. We 
ship only FULLY TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at these low prices. Full height 
drives are unused surplus and not always 
available. 

We use Fuji, Teac and Other Fine brands. We 
have 5 years experience in the CoCo disk drive 
market! We are able to provide support when 
you have a problem. 



Bonus! 

Special 

Bundled 

Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 



NOW FOR CoCo h 2, 3!! \ 



Our prices do not include shipping costs, but do 
include a discount for cash. 

OWL-WARE has a liberal warranty policy. During 
the warranty period, all defective items will be 
repaired or replaced at our option and at no cost to 
the buyer except for shipping costs. 

Call our technical help line for return authorization 
numbers. Return of non-defective items or unauthor- 
ized returns are subject to a service charge. 



WARRANTIES 

Full Hgt 90 days Half Hgt 1 Year 



ORDER LINES (only) — 

(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 

- TECH HELP LINE 

(21 5) 433-8695 

Call for Latest Prices! 








P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 



OWL-WARE 

Software Bundle 

Dlak Tutorial - 3 Utilities - 2 Games 

DISK TUTOR Ver. 1 .1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language pro- 
gram. This tutor takes you through your 
lessons and corrects your mistakes for a 
quick, painless disk drive intoduction. 
(This professionally written tutor is easily 
worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster disk 
access and allows the use of double-sided 
drives. Corrects a floating point number 
error on early CoCo systems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs between 
disks. A wild card option selects groups of 
programs for copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad sec- 
tors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These have sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is over 
$125 worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with cheap, 
non-professional "Public Domain" soft- 
ware which is being offered by others. All 
of this software is copyrighted and pro- 
fessional in quality. The tutor is unique 
with us and has helped hundreds of new 
users learn their disk drive. 

only $27.95 

(or even better) 

only $6.95 with 

any Disk Drive Purchase!! 



H75: 1 Set for 28 rows of text 
430 POKE&HFF9F,128: • Set for 12 

8 columns with column 0 as left 
most column 

435 ' BASIC vectors and patch pr 

ovided by Roger Bouchard. 

440 ' Tell BASIC new screen size 

450 POKE&HFE00, &H20 : POKE &HFE0 1,0 

: 1 beginning cursor address 
460 POKESrHFE04,128: 1 # columns 
on text screen 

470 POKE&HFE05,28: 1 # rows on t 
ext screen 

480 POKE&HFE06,&H3E:POKE&HFE07,& 

H00: 1 End of text screen 

490 i *** Patch BASIC'S LOCATE 

command *** 

500 POKE &HF90A,&H58: 'enable ne 

w LOCATE positions 

510 POKE &HF8EC,128:' Allows LOC 

ATE from column 0 - 127 

520 POKE &HF8F4,28: ' Allows LOC 

ATE from row 0-27 

530 CLS 

540 ' Read DATA strings 
550 F0RX=1T04:READ M$(X):NEXT 
560 FORX=0 TO 2 1 : READ A$(X):NEXT 
570 F0RX=1T012:READB$(X) tNEXT 

580 ' Main program begin 

590 ATTR 0,0: CLS 

600 POKE 65497,0 

610 POKE &HFF9F,128 

620 F$=»#####.##":T$=" ###### 

# • # # " 

630 FORY=0TO13:MO(Y,21)=0:NEXT 
640 ATTR 1,3 
650 FORX=l TO 4 
660 PRINT M$(X) 
670 NEXT X 

680 ATTR 2,1: PRINTA$ (0 ) : ATTR 2 , 3 

690 PRINT 

700 T=0:C=0 

710 F0RX=1 TO 20 

720 A$(X)=LEFT$(A$(X)+STRING$(15 

, " " ) , 15 ) : 1 Make sure string le 

ngth is 15 chrs. 

730 ATTR 2, 3: PRINT" " ; : ATTR 1,3 

740 PRINT A$(X) ; 

750 FORY=l TO 12 

760 T=T+MO(Y,X) 

770 ATTR 0,3 

780 PRINTUSING F$;MO(Y,X); 
790 MO(Y,21)=MO(Y,21)+MO(Y,X) 
800 NEXT Y 
810 ATTR 1,3 
820 MO(13,X)=T 

830 MO(13,21)=MO(13,21)+T:PRINTU 

S INGT$ ; T ; : ATTR 2, 3: PRINT" ";:T=0 

840 NEXT X 
850 ATTR 1,3 



860 PRINT " ";STR 
ING$(110,"-") 
870 PRINT" "; 
880 ATTR 2,1 

890 PRINTA$ ( 2 1 ) ; : ATTR 1,3 
900 F0RX=1T012 
910 GOSUB 990 

920 PRINTUSINGF$;MO(X,21) ; 
930 NEXT 

940 F$="#####.##" 
950 ATTR 1,3 

960 PRINTUSING T$ ;MO (13 , 21) ; : ATT 
R 6, 4: PRINT" "; 

970 ATTR 2 , 3 : PRINT : ATTR l,3:GOTO 
1080 

980 ' Check number and change US 
ING string accordingly 

990 IF MO(X,21)>9999 THEN F$="## 

####.#" ELSE F$="#####.##" 

1000 IF MO(X,21)>99999 THEN F$~" 

########" 
1010 RETURN 

1020 ' Main Menu 
1030 1 scroll routine and check 
for <F1> key or left & right arr 
ow keys 

1040 ATTR 1,3: LOCATE 0,0:FORX=1T 
04 : PRINTM$ (X) : NEXT 
1050 ATTR 2,1 

1060 LOCATE 0,4: PRINTA$ (0 ) ; 
1070 ATTR 1,3 
1080 X«128 

1090 L=PEEK(343) : » Check left ar 
row 

1100 R=PEEK(344) : 1 Check right a 
rrow 

1110 I$=>INKEY$ 

1120 IF I$="g" THEN 1320: 'Check 
for <F1> key 

1130 IF R=247 THEN X=X-1:IF X<=1 
28 THEN X=128 

1140 IF L=247 THEN X=X+1:IF X>-1 

76 THEN X=176 

1150 POKE &HFF9F,X 

1160 GOTO 1090 

1170 POKE &HFF9F,128 

1180 ATTR 0 , 0 : CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PR 

INT " * BREAK key pressed *":PRI 

NT 

1190 IF DEV=0 THEN RUN 

1200 PRINT: PRINT " Press <M> fo 

r Main" 

1210 PRINT " Press <Q> to quit" 

1220 I$=INKEY$ 

1230 IF I$="M" THEN 1820 

1240 IF I$="Q" THEN 1260 

1250 GOTO1220 

12 60 ATTR 0,0:CLS:WIDTH80:POKE65 
496,0 

1270 END : ' ****. END **** 

1280 POKE &HFF9F,128:CLS:PRINT:P 



154 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



RINT: PRINT" An ERROR has occurr 
ed ! » 

1290 PRINT : PRINT" Error number"; 
ERNO ; " in line number "; ERLIN 

13) 3)3 PRINT: GOTO 119)3 

131) 3 • *** Command mode *** 

132) 3 POKE &HFF9F,128:X=1:Y=1 

133) 3 ATTR 1,3 

134J3 T$=" #######.##» 

135J3 IF X>=8 THEN LOCATE 47,3 EL 
SE LOCATE 0,3 

136) 3 PRINT " (F)ile i/o (M 

)ain menu (P)rint a 

rrow keys (ALT) "; 

137) 3 A=MO(X,Y) 

138) 3 IF X=»>8 THEN LOCATE J3,0:ATT 
R 1,3: PRINT: PRINT: LOCATE 64,j3:GO 
TO 14J3)3 

139J3 ATTR l,3:LOCATE 64, j3: PRINT: 
LOCATE jS,jB 

14) 3j3 PRINT "Column/Row = ( ";B$( 



X) ;CHR$(44) ;A$(Y) ;") 



Value = 



it 



1410 PRINT USING F$;A; 

142) 3 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 

143) 3 ' locate on current cell 

144) 3 LOCATE 8+(X*8),Y+5 

145) 3 ATTR 4 , 2 ,U: PRINTUSINGF$ ;A; : 



ATTR 2,3: » Hi-lite current cell 
1460 I$=INKEY$ 

147) 3 IF 1$="" THEN 1460 

148) 3 ATTR 1,3 

149) 3 IF VAL(I$) > )3 THEN 164)3 

15) 3)3 IF I$=")3" THEN 164)3 

151) 3 XX=X:YY=Y: • save current c 
ell location to allow erase of h 
i-lite 

152) 3 IF I$=CHR$ (8) THEN X=X-1:IF 
X<1 THEN X=l: • left arrow 

153) 3 IF I$=CHR$(9) THEN X=X+1:IF 
X>12 THEN X=12: • right arrow 

154) 3 IF X<8 THEN POKE &HFF9F, 128 
ELSE POKE &HFF9F,192: • shift wi 
ndow 

155) 3 IF I$=CHR$(10) THEN Y=Y+1:I 
F Y>2)3 THEN Y=20: » down arrow 
1560 IF I$=CHR$(94) THEN Y=Y-1:I 
F Y<1 THEN Y-l: • up arrow 

157) 3 ATTR )3,3:LOCATE 8+(XX*8) ,YY 
+5 : PRINTUSINGF$ ; A; : ATTR 2,3: ' e 
rase hi-lite on previous cell 

158) 3 IF I$="F" THEN 1830: • File 
save or load 

159) 3 IF I$="P" THEN 224J3: 

ter out 

16) 3)3 IF I$=»"M" THEN 1)34)3: 



Prin 



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March 1988 THE RAINBOW 155 



menu 


1980 FOR Y=1TO20 


1610 IF I$="@" THEN 1320:' <ALT> 


1990 PRINT#DEV,A$(Y) 


or <@> key returns to upper lef 


2000 F0RX=1T012 


t cell 


2010 PRINT#DEV,MO(X,Y) 


1620 SOUND 180,1:' key click... 


2020 NEXT X 


delete if annoying 


2030 PRINT#DEV, ••*******": • dummy 

f g W 


1630 GOTO 1330 


string 


1640 IF X=>8 THEN LOCATE 6 4,1: PR 


2040 NEXT Y 


INT: LOCATE 64,1: GOTO 1660 


2050 CLOSE 


1650 LOCATE 0,1: PRINT : LOCATE 0,1 


2060 GOTO 1820 


1660 ATTR 1,3 


2070 ****** LOAD 


1670 T=MO(X,Y) 


2080 LINEINPUT " Filename to lo 


1680 PRINT" New value : ";I$; 


ad : ";F$ 


1690 LINEINPUT RM$ 


2090 IF LEN(F$)>8 THEN SOUND 100 


1700 I$=I$+RM$:MO(X,Y)=VAL(I$) 


,2:G0T0 1830 ! 


1710 IF MO(X,Y)>=10000 THEN MO(X 


2100 F$=F$+VSUM" 


,Y)=T: SOUND 100, 2: GOTO 1330 


2110 POKE 65496,0 


1720 ATTR 1,3 

1730 MO(X,21)=0:MO(13,Y)=0:MO(13 


2120 IF DEV=-1 THEN LINEINPUT ■ 


Prepare tape and press <ENTER> 11 

■M* 


,21)=0 

1740 FORV=1TO20:MO(X,21)=MO(X,21 


;i$ 


2130 OPEN "I",DEV,F$ 


)+MO(X,V) :NEXT 


2140 FORY=1TO20 


1750 GOSUB 990 


2150 INPUT#DEV,A$(Y) 


1760 LOCATE 8+ (X*8) , 27 : PRINTUSIN 


2160 F0RX=1T012 


GF$;M0(X,21) ; 


2170 INPUT#DEV,MO(X,Y) 


1770 FORV=lT012:MO(13,Y)=MO(13,Y 


2180 NEXT X 


)+MO(V,Y) :MO(13,21)=MO(13,21)+MO 


2190 INPUT #DEV,I$:' ignore dumm 


(V,21) :NEXT 


y string 


1780 LOCATE 112 , Y+5 : PRINTUSINGT$ 


2200 NEXT Y 


;MO(13,Y); 


2210 CLOSE 


1790 LOCATE 112 , 27 : PRINTUSINGT$ ; 


2220 GOTO 1820 


1 110(13/21); 

1800 F$=»#####.##" 


2230 • PRINTER OUT 


2240 POKE &HFF9F, 128: LOCATE 0,0: i 
PRINT: LOCATE 0,0: ATTR 1,3 


1810 GOTO 1330 


1820 GOTO 590 


2250 LINEINPUT " Prepare printer 


1830 POKE &HFF9F, 128 : LOCATE 0,0: 


and press <ENTER> or <BREAK> to 


ATTR 1,3 


quit ";I$ 


1840 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT :LOC 


2260 POKE 65496,0 


ATE 0,0 


2270 1 Q$=CHR$(27)+CHR$(20) : 1 F | 


1850 PRINT » < FILE I/O > 


OR RADIO SHACK PRINTER 


(S)ave (L)oad or (Q)uit " 


2280 Q$=CHR$ ( 27 ) +CHR$ ( 66) +CHR$ (3 


18 60 I$=INKEY$ 


) : ' FOR GEMINI 10X 


1870 IF I$="S" THEN LOCATE 0,0 :P 


2290 1 SET TO 17 CPI 


RINT : GOTO 1920 


2300 PRINT#-2,Q$ 


1880 IF I$- M L" THEN LOCATE 0,0 :P 


2310 PRINT#-2,RIGHT$(A$(0) ,124) 


RINT: GOTO 2080 


2320 PRINT#-2,STRING$(128,95) 


1890 IF I$= lf Q" THEN 1320: f Retur 


2 3 30 F0RX=1T021 


n to command mode 


2340 IF X=21 THEN PRINT#-2 , STRIN 


1900 GOTO 18 60 


G$(128,95) 

2350 PRINT#-2,A$ (X) ; 


1910 '***** SAVE 


1920 LINEINPUT " Filename to sa 


2 360 F0RY=1T012 


ve : " ;F$ 


2370 IF MO(Y,X)>9999.99 THEN F$= 


1930 IF LEN(F$)>8 THEN SOUND 100 


"######.#" ELSE F$=»#####.##» 


,2:G0T0 1830 


2380 IF MO(Y,X) >99999 THEN F$=" 


1940 F$=F$+"/SUM" 


###### " 


1950 POKE 65496,0 


2390 PRINT #-2, USING F$;MO(Y,X); 

g 9 ■ • \ 9 w w 


1960 IF DEV=-1 THEN LINEINPUT " 


2400 NEXT Y 


Prepare tape and press <ENTER> " 


2410 PRINT#-2, USING T$;M0(13,X) 


;i$ 


2420 NEXT X 


1970 OPEN "0" . DEV.FS 


2430 GOTO 1820 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



244p ' 


2610 


DATA 


"Category 


3 


II 




245p ' TEXT STRINGS 


2620 


DATA 


"Category 


4 


II 




2460 ' 


2630 


DATA 


"Category 


5 


II 




2470 • M$(l) - M$(4) 


2640 


DATA 


"Category 

mW m\ 


6 


II 




2480 DATA 


2650 


DATA 


"Category 


7 


II 




2490 DATA " 


2660 


DATA 


"Category 

mw A 


8 


II 




-< Sum 128 >- M 


2670 


DATA 


"Category 


9 


11 




2500 DATA 11,1 


2680 


DATA 


"Category 


10 


II 




251)3 DATA 11 Press left or right 


2690 


DATA 


"Category 


11 


II 




arrow keys to scroll Pres 

■mm 


2700 


DATA 


"Category 

mW m% 


12 


It 




s Fl key for command mode " 


2710 


DATA 


"Category 


13 


II 




252)3 ' A$ (J3) 


2720 


DATA 


"Category 

mw mm 


14 


II 




253)3 DATA " Item J 


2730 


DATA 


"Category 

* mm 


15 


II 




an Feb Mar Apr M 

mm 


2740 


DATA 


"Category 


16 


II 




ay Jun Jul Aug S 

m» mw 


2750 


DATA 


"Category 


17 


II 




ep Oct Nov Dec 


2760 


DATA 


"Category 


18 


II 




Total" 


2770 


DATA 


"Category 


19 


II 




254)3 ! 


2780 


DATA 


"Category 


20 


II 




255)3 1 


2790 












256)3 • Edit -> Category 1 - C 


28)3)3 


1 A$ 


(21) 








ategory 2)3 to suit needs 1 


281)3 


DATA 


11 Total 




II 




2570 1 The length of the string 


282)3 












must remain the same 1 15 chrs 


283)3 


• B$(l) - B$(12) 






• min/max ! 


284J3 


DATA 


Jan , Feb , Mar , Apr , May , Ju 




258)3 1 A$(l) - A$(2J3) 


n , Jul , Aug , Sep , Oct , Nov , Dec 






2 590 DATA "Catacrorv 1 M 


285)3 












2600 DATA "Category 2 " 















Listing 2: MDNTEST 

1) 3 ' Montest 

2) 3 ' By Dave Archer 

3) 3 1 test monitor support for 12 
8 (8)3 window) by 28 text screen 

4) 3 PALETTE 8 ,63 : PALETTE 0,J3 ■ wh 
ite text on black background 

5) 3 WIDTH8j3:CLSl 

6) 3 ON BRK GOTO 34)3 

7) 3 POKE&HFF98 / &H)33:POKE&HFF99 / &H 
75: 1 Set for 28 rows of text 

8) 3 POKE &HFF9F, 128: 1 Set for 128 
columns with column )3 as left m 

ost column 

9) 3 ' Tell BASIC new screen size 

I) 3)3 POKE&HFEj3)3, &H2)3:POKE&HFE)31,)3 
: ' beginning cursor address 

II) 3 POKE&HFE)34 , 128: 1 # columns 
on text screen 

12) 3 POKE&HFE)35, 28: 1 # rows on t 
ext screen 

13) 3 POKE&HFE)36,&H3E:POKE&HFE)37,& 
H)3)3: 1 End address of text scree 
n 

14) 3 1 *** Patch BASIC'S LOCATE 

command *** 

15) 3 POKE &HF9)3A,&H58: 'enable ne 
w LOCATE positions 

16) 3 POKE &HF8EC,128:' Allows LOC 
ATE from column JS - 127 

17) 3 POKE &HF8F4,28: • Allows LOC 



ATE from row )3 - 27 

18) 3 CLS 

19) 3 A$="< this is colum 

ns 8)3 - 127 >x" 

2) 3)3 F0RX=)3 TO 27: LOCATE 79,X:PRI 
NT"X" ; : LOCATE 127 , X: PRINT"x" 7 

21) 3 LOCATE )3,X: PRINT " Line num 
ber ";X; 

22) 3 NEXT 

23) 3 LOCATE 2)3 , )3 : PRINTSTRING$ (1)38 

,"*") ; 

240 LOCATE 2)3 , 27 : PRINT STRING$ ( 1)3 

8, "*") ; 

25) 3 LOCATE 8)3 , 13 : PRINTA$ ; 

26) 3 LOCATE 2)3, 23: PRINT "Press an 
y key"; 

27) 3 LOCATE 2)3 , 1)3 : PRINT "This sho 
ws columns )3 - 79 ";:LOCATE 0,27 
2 8)3 ON BRK GOTO 31)3 

29)3 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 29)3 

3) 3)3 ' scrolls columns 8)3-127 int 
o display window 

31) 3 FORX=128 TO 17 6: POKE &HFF9F, 
X : F0RD=1T0 1)3 : NEXTD : NEXTX 

32) 3 ON BRK GOTO 34)3 

33) 3 F0RX=1T02 9)3)3: NEXT: 'delay to 
view 

34) 3 WIDTH8)3: 'restore to normal 8 
)3 col. by 2 4 line screen 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 157 



Turn of th e Scr e w 



Along time ago, when computers 
for the consumer were just start- 
ing to come on the market, large 
amounts of memory were unheard of. 
My first computer was a Sinclair ZX- 
80. It had only IK of Random Access 
Memory, or RAM. 

RAM is a temporary storage place 
for data — as long as the computer is 
on, RAM will remember what is put 
into it. When you first power up a 
computer, RAM has no set pattern. The 
data in it is not valid data. When you 
turn the computer off, all RAM data is 
lost. 

Anyway, imagine only 1,024 bytes of 
memory, and half of that used for video 
display — a far cry from our present 
CoCos. BASIC was in Read-Only Mem- 
ory, or ROM, and that was a whopping 
4K ROM at that. Later, they came out 
with 8K of ROM, which was a big 
improvement. 

ROM is memory that has been per- 
manently etched into the chip at the 
factory. It cannot be changed or lost. 
When you power up with ROM, instant 
data (or a program) appears. Every 
computer needs a bit of ROM (no pun 
intended). How much is a "bit"? Well, 
that all depends on what that ROM has 
to do. 

When a computer is first powered up, 
a hardware reset line delays the start of 
the CPU until the power supply is 
stable. Then, when the reset line lets go, 
the first thing the CPU does is load a 
starting address from a predetermined 
area of memory. It loads this address 
into its program counter and then starts 
to execute the code pointed to by this 
program counter. Now, what is wrong 
with this picture? if this area of memory 
is RAM, we're in trouble. On power-up, 
RAM has no definite pattern; the CPU 
would certainly get confused and hang 
up. But if ROM were there in place of 
RAM, then the CPU would see valid 
code and run merrily on its way. Hurray 
for ROM! 

ROM is great — instant software, 
and no way to lose it. But for hackers 
like you and me, ROM is a downer. 
Why? For the same reason that makes 
ROM great — it locks us in. It cannot 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Ouest, Quebec. 

1 58 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Bigger 

and 
Better 
Eproms 

By Tony DiStefano 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



be changed. The code that is in a ROM 
is for keeps. 

The manufacturer of ROMs saw a 
need for the user to be able to program 
his or her own ROM. From that need 
came the PROM. The PROM is a 
Programmable ROM. In other words, 
a PROM is a blank ROM. A special 
device lets you program your own data 
code into the PROM. That was great, 
but if you made an error in your code, 
you had to throw that chip away and 
start with a new one. The chip was fine 
for small runs of a proven code: It had 
all the advantages of ROM and none of 
the high costs of mask programming a 
ROM. 

But there remained a need for a 
reusable chip that was easy to program. 
The EPROM was introduced — an 
erasable PROM. Just what the doctor 
ordered. Easy to use, inexpensive and 
able to be used over and over again. 
When I first started learning about 
computers, I wanted to customize mine. 
When I turned it on, I wanted it to say 
"HI TONY." It was that desire that 
made me want to learn more about 
EPROMs. 

Back then, the most capacious 
EPROM I could find was only a 2K by 
8-bit EPROM. Its part number was 
27 1 6. The " 1 6" represents the number of 
bits in that chip. There are 16K (16 
thousand) bits. Most microprocessors 
then were only eight bits wide, so 



EPROMs were also eight bits wide. 
Dividing 16,000 bits into 8-bit-wide 
bytes gave us 2K (2,000) bytes of mem- 
ory. But that was then, and this is now. 
As technology improved, so did 
EPROM capacities. After the 2716 
came the 2732. Yes, you guessed it, the 
2732 has 32K bits or 4 K by 8 bits — 
twice the capacity of the 2716. 

Still improving, technology then 
allowed for a reasonably priced 2764. 
To me that was the breakthrough, a 64K 
bit EPROM and 8K to play with. This 
was great because it was the same size 
as the BASIC, Extended BASIC and the 
Disk BASIC ROMs to EPROMs. I was 
able to customize these ROMs with 
EPROMs. 

Things didn't stop there. The prices 
for these EPROMs started very high, 
but soon dropped very fast. Again, the 
industry came out with another 
EPROM — another doubling of capac- 
ity. Yes, a 27128, a whole 16K of data 
in one chip. Impressive as it was, it did 
not stop there. Next came the 27256 and 
then the 27512. The 27256 is a 32K 
EPROM and the 27512 is a 64K 
EPROM. Just think of it. The 6809 
CPU inside the CoCo can access 64K of 
memory — that is the whole 6809's 
memory address in one chip! If you 
think back to the 2716, it would take 32 
of these memory chips to make up the 
capacity of one 27512. I know that 
manufacturers are making 231024s, 
which are 128K by 8-bit ROMs (but I 
don't think they have them in EPROMs 
— just yet, anyway). 

The Project 

What can you do with these bigger 
and better EPROMs? Well, I have a few 
ideas. The easiest place to put EPROMs 









1 o 


AO OO 
A1 01 
A2 02 
A3 03 
A4 04 
A5 05 
A6 06 
A7 07 
A8 
A9 
A10 
A1 1 
A1 2 


1 1 


9 


1 2 


8 


13 


7 


1 5 


6 


1 6 


5 


1 7 


4 


18 


3 


19 


25 




24 




21 




23 




2 


• 






20 


CE 
OE 
PGM 
VPP 




22 




27 




1 










2764 






Figure 1 











1 Q 


AO 00 

A1 01 

A2 02 

A3 03 

A4 04 

A5 05 

A6 06 

A7 07 

A8 

A9 

A10 

A1 1 

A1 2 

A13 


1 1 


9 


i 2 


8 


1 3 


7 


1 5 


S 


1 6 


5 


1 7 


4 


1 8 


3 


1 9 


25 




24 




21 








2 




26 








2Q 


CE* 
OE 
PGM 
VPP 




22 




27 




1 










€k / I 






Figure 2 





is in the Multi-Pak. And the easiest 
place to map them is in the Disk BASIC 
area, located from SCOOO to SFEFF in 
the memory map of the CoCo 1 and 
CoCo 2. With the CoCo 3, you are a 
little bit more limited. The mapping is 
from SCOOO to SFDFF, just one page 
less only 256 bytes at the top of the 
memory map. That is to accommodate 
the extra functions of the GIME chip. 
Anyway, for all intents and purposes, 
this area is 1 6K long. Just remember the 
top two pages are not usable. 

Look at Figure 1, a pinout of a 2764. 
I started there because I figure it is the 
smallest memory chip (8K long) that is 
worthwhile hooking up. Accessing this 
amount of memory requires 13 address 
lines, AO to A12. The CTS pin on the 
CoCo's bus accesses a total of 16K, 
requiring 14 address lines to properly 
decode. This leaves us with one address 
line left over. In this case, we can't use 
it. Leave it unconnected. This will cause 
a memory mirror. If the CPU accesses 
the first half of the 16K memory area, 
it gets the data. When it accesses the 
second half of the memory, it gets the 
same data. The only difference is that 
the last address line, A 13, does not 
control anything. Such is the case of the 
Disk BASIC ROM in the Radio Shack 
Controller; it is only 8K long and is 
mirrored to the second half of the 16K 
area. 

Now look at Figure 2, the pinout of 
a 27128. It has 14 address lines, making 
it 16K long. It is a perfect match for the 
CTS area of the CoCo. There are no 
leftover address lines. The CPU can 
access a full 16K of memory with no 
memory mirroring. 

Figure 3 shows the pinout for a 
27256. This one has one more address 
line than we can handle. That is the 
number of address lines it requires to 
access 32K. This presents a problem. 
The CTS cannot handle 32K, and we 
have one address line left over, with 
nowhere to connect. Figure 4 is the 









1 o 


AO OO 

A1 01 

A2 02 

A3 03 

A4 04 

A5 05 

A6 06 

A7 07 

AS 

A9 

A10 

A1 1 

A12 

A1 3 

A1 4 


1 1 


9 


1 2 


8 


1 3 


7 


1 5 


6 


1 6 


5 


1 7 


4 


1 Q 


3 


1 9 


25 




24 




21 




23 








26 




27 








\ 2D 


CE 

VPP 




22 




1 










27256 






Figure 3 





pinout of a 27512. It has double the 
problem, with yet another address line 
we don't know what to do with. 



The 27256 represents 32K of data, but 
that is just one way of looking at it. 
Another way of looking at it is as two 
banks of 16K. For example, let's say you 
have two pieces of software that are 
each 16K long. You can put both of 
them on one 27256 and select which you 
want to use when you turn on the 
computer. This can be done quite 
simply 

Figure 5 shows a small (I mean 
smalll) circuit that can select between 
the two banks of a 27256. It consists of 
a single pole, single throw switch and a 
resistor. The resistor acts as a "Pull Up." 
When the switch is in the off position, 
current is fed from the 5-volt supply to 
the address line via this resistor. The XX 
means whichever address line is con- 
nected to it, making the address line a 
logic level of 1, or HI. When the switch 
is on, the current is shorted to ground, 
making the address line in question a 
logic level of 0, or LO. The switch and 
resistor become your manual bank 
selector. When this circuit is connected 
to A 14 on a 27256 and the switch is on, 
you get the first half of the EPROM. 
When the switch is off you get the 
second half. So, when you turn the 
computer on, it will see one or the other. 
If you happen to turn the switch when 
the computer is on, chances are the 
computer will get confused and hang 
up. However, this does not hurt the 
computer. 

If you are thinking of using a 27512, 
you can have four banks of software, 
each bank 16K long. In that case, you 
have to build another circuit like the one 
in Figure 5. Connect the second switch 
to A 15. When both switches are on, you 
get the first 16K bank of software. 
When the A 1 4 switch is off and the A 1 5 
switch is on, you get the second. When 
the A 14 switch is on and the A15 switch 
is off, you get the third bank. When 



1 0 


AO OO 

A1 01 

A2 02 

A3 03 

A4 04 

A5 05 

A6 06 

A7 07 

A8 

A9 

A10 

A1 1 

A1 2 

A1 3 

A1 4 

A1 5 


1 1 


9 


1 2 

1 * — 


e 


1 3 


7 


1 5 


6 


1 6 


5 


1 7 


4 


1 Q 


3 


1 9 


25 




24 




21 




23 




2 








27 




1 








2D 


re 

OE 




22 










2751 2 






Figure 4 





both switches are off, you get the last 
bank of software. 



So far, the switches have been switch- 
ing 16K banks of data. If most of your 
software is in 8K blocks or less, you 
might want to switch these E PRO Ms in 
8K banks instead of 16K banks. You 
will need yet another circuit like the one 
in Figure 5. 



vec 

7 R1 

> 1K 1/4W 

n . A-XX 

\ SW1 
\ SW SPST 



Figure 5 



In either the 27128, 27256 or the 
27512, disconnect A13 from the 
computer side. Connect A 1 3 to the third 
switch. This switch now controls 8K 
banks. When the switch is off, you are 
seeing the first, or lower, 8K bank of 
data at SCOOO to SDFFF. When this 
switch is on, you see the second, or 
upper, bank also mapped at SCOOO to 
SDFFF. When you use a 27 128, you get 
two 8K banks. A 27256 gets you four 
banks, and a 27512 gives you a whop- 
ping eight 8K banks of software. Re- 
member, though, that each one of these 
banks starts at memory location SCOOO 
and that for this software to work 
properly, they must be written for this 
area or be in complete relocatable code. 
Also remember that to autostart soft- 
ware that begins at SCOOO you must 
short out Pin 7 and Pin 8 on the CoCo 
bus. Software that looks like a DOS 
must have the first two bytes the same 
as RS-DOS in order to function prop- 
erly and be recognized by BASIC. DOS- 
like software must not have pins 7 and 
8 shorted. ^ 

March 1988 THE RAINBOW 159 



CoCo Consu l tat i on s 



'W' this and in future "CoCo Con- 

I W"Bsultations," I will be trying 
JL MAsomething new. In addition to 
the familiar Q & A column, I will also 
include tidbits of information contrib- 
uted by various folks and, in some cases, 
comment on the information. Thus, 
even if you don't have a question, I 
invite you to send in any little hints or 
descriptions of experiences you have 
had with the CoCo that you think might 
be of interest to the CoCo-owning 
public in general. 



Old Printers Should Retire 

How can I hook up a Line Printer V 
(currently used on a TRS 80 Model 2) 
to a CoCo 2? 

Jeff Causley 
Bay City, MI 

I believe the ancient Line Printer V 
has inputs for parallel data only. That 
means you would have to buy a serial- 
to-parallel converter ($50 to $110, 
advertised in RAINBOW) to get it work- 
ing. The Line Printer V is so old, and 
so lacking in features accessible to the 
CoCo, that I would recommend not 
even bothering to try this (unless you 
can get such a converter for free). 
Instead, spend the $1 10, plus $70 more, 
on a more modern printer. 

No Power to Spare 

/ need about an extra amp of power 
to run a Cir-pak 68008 board on my 
CoCo 3. How can I modify the CoCo 
3 power supply to provide this? I've 
already replaced some of the TTL chips 
on the 68008 board with HCT-type 
chips, but I still need at least .6 amp 
more power than the CoCo 3 can pro- 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOWs CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 

1 60 THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



Having 
Technical 
Difficulties? 

By Marty Goodman 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



vide. Also, I note that TS Edit does not 
work with OS-9 Level II. Can you help 
with that? 

Doublas Streidt 
Stillwater, OK 

Do not under any circumstances 
attempt to power such a board from the 
CoCo 3! Instead, run it off a separate 
power supply. The CoCo 3 has no power 
to spare for such jobs. There are patches 
on the Delphi OS-9 Online SIG to allow 
using TS Edit under OS-9 Level II. 

Parallel Port Communications 

Can I use the Disto Parallel Port to talk 
to my modem? 

Brandon Knight 
(KNIGHTl) 
Sulphur, OK 

No. Essentially, all external modems 
communicate with the computer via an 
RS-232 serial protocol, not a parallel 
protocol. The differences between RS- 
232 serial and parallel port protocols 
are considerable. RS-232 serial lines use 
two wires plus ground to send data both 
to and from the computer, plus one or 
more handshake lines. The voltages on 
the serial lines vary between +12 and 
-12 volts. Parallel lines consist of at 
least eight data lines plus a strobe and 
one or more handshake lines. Parallel 



lines often support data transfer in only 
one direction (apart from busy signals). 
The voltage levels on them are TTL 
levels of 0 to 5 volts. 

Versatile EPROM 

Is there an easy way to use a 28-pin 
2764 EPROM in a Radio Shack disk 
controller that takes a 24-pin ROM? 

Mike Tolbert 
(MIKEGT) 

A long time ago, Dennis Kitsz, of 
Green Mountain Micro, designed an 
adapter to do just that. For a while, it 
was sold by Spectrum Projects. When 
Dennis disappeared from the CoCo 
world, his adapter disappeared also. 
Recently, however, a friend of Art 
Flexser developed an even better, 
cleaner, more clever adapter to do 
exactly what you ask. This item is 
currently available from SpectroSys- 
tems. It allows you to use either a 2764 
or a 27128 EPROM in your Radio 
Shack controller. 

64K Upgrades 

Can I upgrade my cassette tape-based 
CoCo 2 to 64 K, 128K or higher without 
getting a disk drive system? 

Rob Casebolt 
Aurora, MO 

If you have a 16K CoCo 2, it is easy 
to upgrade to 64K. Kits for doing this 
are available from many folks who 
advertise in RAINBOW. If your CoCo 
already has more than 16K of memory 
in it, you already have a 64K CoCo. 
There are kits for adding extra memory 
to the CoCo 2 (J&R makes one such, 
called the Banker, and Disto makes 
another, called the Super Ram Disk) 
but, unless you have a particular appli- 
cation for them, they are not of much 
value because the only programs that 
can make good use of them are those 
that use disk I/O frequently. For nearly 
all practical purposes, 64K is the mem- 
ory limit of the CoCo 2. If you need 
more power and flexibility, the next 
thing to spend money on would, with- 
out question, not be more memory, but 
rather a disk drive system. After that, 
if you still need more power, it might be 
wise to get a CoCo 3 before experiment- 
ing with add-on RAM disk cards. 



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Foiled Again 

Marty, you once mentioned to me 
that there are problems of one monitor 
interfering with another when the two 
are placed side by side. I had the same 
problem, and was successful in elimi- 
nating it by placing a piece of aluminum 
foil between the two monitors. 

Dennis Skala 

(DENNYSKALA) 

Fairview, PA 

Thanks very much, Dennis, for that 
tip. I am delighted that such an easy 
solution is available. I do note that as 
the amount of shielding in different 
brands of monitors varies greatly, your 
suggestion might not work with all 
combinations of monitors, but still 
should be tried first by anyone with such 
a problem. 

Getting the Part 

I've been trying to build that surge 
protector you described in the October 
1986 issue of RAINBOW (Page 158), but 
am having problems getting a dual or 
single Zener diode rated at 220 volts. 
Where might I order them? 

Tim Wright 
Minerva, OH 

I must confess that I received several 
notes asking where to get those Zener 
diodes. Frankly, I used parts I got at a 
local surplus store, and had little idea 
where one ordinarily gets them. But it 
turns out that a single direction 200-volt 
10-watt Zener is available as a Sylvania 
ECG series replacement component: 
Sylvania Part No. ECG 5232A. You'll 
need to put two of them together, cath- 
ode to cathode, to make the dual Zener 
arrangement I described. The part is 
relatively expensive (as are all ECG 
series parts), but should be available at 
most stores that sell TV repair parts. 

RS-232 Pack Failure Under OS-9 

I notice that the 6551 chip in the RS- 
232 pack is rated at 1 MHz operation. 
Is it possible that this could cause 
problems when one attempts to use the 
RS-232 pack under OS-9 Level II, 
which runs the Co Co at 2 MHz cycle 
speed? 

James McDaniel 

(NEW KID) 

Brooklyn, NY 

I myself have not heard of any prob- 
lems due to "slow" 655 1 chips, but Greg 



Law (GREGL), SysOp of our OS-9 On- 
line SIG, tells me he has heard occa- 
sional reports of RS-232 packs not 
working under OS-9 Level II, and of the 
problem being cured by replacing the 
6551 chip with a 6551 A chip (rated for 
2 MHz operation). Such chips can be 
purchased from Jameco, of Belmont, 
California, for about $6 each. 

There are a number of other things 
that can go wrong with the RS-232 
pack, so if yours does not work, that 
does not necessarily prove the problem 
is a slow 6551 chip. But if your pack 
works perfectly under Disk Extended 
BASIC programs at 1 MHz and fails only 
when used with OS-9 Level II, you 
might well consider replacing the 655 1 
with a 6551 A chip. There are other 
possible causes for failure at higher 
speeds, such as a defective 74LS133 or 
74LS04 chip. 

Bad Contacts 

/ have been having increasing prob- 
lems that appear to be caused by poor 
contacts between my Multi-Pak and my 
disk controller. These problems were 
cured when I switched my controller to 
Slot 4 (the recommended slot for it, 
anyway). I'm curious, though: Why is 
Slot 4 recommended, and could the 
problems be related to my failure to buy 
a new PAL chip for use with my Multi- 
Pak and Co Co 3? 

Richard Phillips 
(RHP) 
Snyder, NY 

Sometimes the problems of bad con- 
tacts between CoCo and Multi-Pak, 
and Multi-Pak and the disk controller 
are cured merely by cleaning the edge 
card connector with a pencil eraser. 
These problems can occur even with 
disk controllers that have gold-plated 
contacts, though the gold does help 
considerably. 

Sometimes the fix is considerably 
more difficult, for it will involve replac- 
ing the female edge card connector on 
the CoCo or the Multi-Pak. This can be 
quite tedious. Slot 4 is allocated for the 
disk controller by convention. For most 
Disk Extended BASIC programs, it does 
not matter where you put the controller 
in the Multi-Pak. But when you start to 
use OS-9 and programs that utilize the 
CART interrupt line, it will be impor- 
tant to observe the conventions about 
where things go in the Multi-Pak. 

By convention, the RS-232 pack 
usually goes in Slot 1 of the Multi-Pak. 



MikeyTerm, Greg-E-Term and Ricky- 
term do not care where you put the disk 
controller or RS-232 pack, but OS-9 
terminal software will most likely care 
a lot. I doubt the PAL chip was the 
source of your problem, but it is true 
that one symptom of a bad PAL chip 
can be that Disk BASIC boots up only 
when the disk controller is in one 
particular slot of the Multi-Pak. 

The One and Only Terminator 

I have heard that a terminator resis- 
tor needs to be in the drive at the end 
of a disk drive cable. Is this so? Does 
it matter if that drive is set up as some 
drive number other than the highest 
number in the system? 

Jon Ruhnow 
(RUHNOW) 
Duncanville, TX 

Each disk drive system should have 
one, and only one, terminator resistor 
in one of its drives. In theory, that 
terminator resistor should be in the 
drive that physically is farthest from the 
controller along the cable, regardless of 
what logical drive number that drive is 
defined as. In practice, as long as you 
are sure there is only one terminator 
resistor in the system, it should not 
matter which drive you put the termi- 
nator into. The terminator resistor can 
take many forms: On some drives it 
looks like a 14- or 16-pin integrated 
circuit, and on others it is a blob of 
epoxy with a single row of pins. On a 
few more recent drives (such as the Teac 
54 A), the terminator resistor is perman- 
ently soldered into the drive. But the 
manufacturers use a 1,000-ohm termi- 
nator in such drives (instead of the 150- 
ohm removable terminators), so with 
these you can have another drive in the 
system with a terminator of the same 
value. 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, THE rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BO W> prompt, type ASK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



162 THE RAINBOW March 1988 




ar 



ftware 



O" Get Smart, Have Fun and Save $50! HO 

Order the new Educational Combo package by April 31, 1988 at the introductory price of $48.50. 
The Combo includes these educational (and entertaining) games: Silly Syntax (with 2 stories), 
Galactic Hangman (700 word vocabulary), Hie Presidents of the USA (includes well over 35 
presidents), The Great USA (even little-known states are covered) and TVig Attack (Zap those 
Trigs). For children ages 5-10 through adult. Disk only; $48.50; S&H $1.50. 



CALLI GRAPH ER 

CoCo Calligrapher - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) 
Turn your CoCo and dot-matrix printer 
into a calligrapher's quill. Make beautiful 
invitations, flyers, certificates, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are % 
inch high and variably spaced. Works 
with many printers including Epson, 
Gemini, Radio Shack, Okidata 92A, Ba- 
nana and Prowriter. Additional fonts are 
available (see below). Tape /Disk; $24.95. 

OS9 Calligrapher - (CD Although a 
different program from the CoCo Calli- 
grapher, the OS9 Calligrapher prints all 
the same fonts. It reads a standard text 
file which contains text and formatting 
directives. You may specify the font to 
use, change fonts at any time, centering, 
left, right or full justification, line fill, 
margin, line width, page size, page break 
and indentation. Similar to troff on 
UNIXtm systems. Includes Gay Nineties, 
Old English and Cartoon fonts. Addition- 
al fonts are available (see below). Disk 
only; OS9 Level I or II; $24.95. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $14.05 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - (8 fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
way; Set #3 - (8 fonts) Antique and 
Business; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West 
and Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, 
Hebrew and Victorian; Set #6 - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; specify 
RSDOS or OS9; 20.95: Font Package #1 
- Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 fonts) 
on one disk. Font Package #2 - Above 
font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on one 
disk. Both Packages #1 and #2 (51 
fonts) on one disk; 49.95. 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Every- 
thing!; specify RSDOS or OS9; Includes 
the Calligrapher and both Font Pack- 
ages on two disks; $09.05. 



UTILITIES 

Piratector - (ioo%ml) Utility to allow your 
own disk -based BASIC or ML programs 
to display a graphics title screen and then 
self-start after loading. Adds copy protec- 
tion to your programs but still allows 
users to create non- executable backups! In- 
cludes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo 1, 2, 3 
(except Semigraf); $30.95. 

Super Screen Machine - (100"% ML) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. 
Smooth scroll, key click, lower case with 
colored characters. Tape /Disk; 32K CB; 
CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except 64K mode); $10.05. 



Color Disk Manager - (ioo%ml) Disk util- 
ity with these features: Disk repair, selec- 
tive track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except for 64K 
mode); $24.95. 

Color Tape Manager - (ioo% ml) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert ML programs into DATA state- 
ments, append ML to BASIC, much 
morel Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 
3 (except for 64K mode); $19.95. 

OS9 Patcher- (c) Display and modify the 
contents of a file or memory module. 
Hexidecimal, decimal and ASCII modes. 
Search feature. Calculates module CRCs; 
Generates patch command files. Disk 
only; OS9 Level I or II; $19.95. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape or disk, 
fast and simple general data base pro- 
gram. Create files of records that can be 
quickly sorted, searched, deleted and up- 
dated. Powerful printer formatting. Up 
to 8 user fields, sort on up to 3 fields. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95 (see combo pkg 
below). 

HMS Mall - (Hybrid BASIC/ml) Tape or 
Disk based mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 
1, 2 or 3 across, Vk to 4 inches wide. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95 (see combo pkg 
below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Utility 
companion Tor TIMS and TIMS Mail to 
allow multi-term search {AND and OR 
logic), global change and delete, split 
large files and more! Tape /Disk; $14.95 
(see combo pkg below). 



TIMS Combo Package - All three of 
the above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail 
and TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.95. 



SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer. Disk only; $19.95 each. 

EDUCATIONAL 

TWg Attack - (ioo%ML) Ages 9 and up. In 
this educational arcade game, enemy trigs 
travel along math curves. Players learn 
important mathematical concepts as they 
play. Sound effects, colorful graphics. 
Excellent manual includes an introduc- 
tion to trigonometry. Tape 16K CB/Disk 
32K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3; $19.95. 



Silly Syntax - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 5 
and up. Story creation game; output to 
screen or printer; includes 2 stories or 
create your own. Tape /Disk; $19.95 or 
disk with 62 stories for $29.95. Sets of 10 
stories on tape /disk for $4.95: Fairy 
Tales, Current Events, X-Rated, Sing- 
Along, Adventure, Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
basic/Ml) Ages 4 & up. A graphics ad- 
venture game for young children & their 
families. Old testament. Tape /Disk; 
$19.95, 

The Presidents of the USA - (ioo%ML) 
Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, user 
modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape /Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 and up. Trivia 
game of the 50 states. Capitals, nick- 
names, abbreviations, flowers, trees and 
birds. Tape /Disk; 16K ECB; $10.95. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist to the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word 
vocabulary. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $10.95. 

PreReader - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 3-5 
(level I); Ages 5-7 (level 2); Great graph- 
ics and music. Level 1: match colors, 
shapes, letters and numbers; Level 2: 
match letters and consonant blends with 
their sounds. Tape /Disk; Joystick; 
$19.95. 

Statgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
rint graph with screen print program 
not supplied); Tape/Disk; $10.95. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
pense categories. This program may be tax 
deductible. Disk only; $29.95. 

Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations com- 
monly used in design or evaluation of 
land mobile radio systems, satellite TV, 
etc. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set-in Sleeve; 3 
weights or yarn; 8 sizes from baby to 
man. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

Flying Tigers - (ioo% ML) Fast Defenders 
style arcade game. 5 levels of difficulty; 
Outstanding graphics and sound effects. 
Tape /Disk; Joystick; $19.95. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 arid S, S2K 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.50 per tape or disk for shipping and han- 
dling. Florida residents add 6% sales tax. COD 
orders add $6. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders 
generally shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds 
or exchanges without prior authorization. 



I Doctor ASCII 



VIP CoCo 3 Fix 

How can I fix VIP software, such as 
VIP Writer, to run on the Co Co 3? 

Steve C Munsell 
Hermiston, OR 

ft. To fix VIP software to run on the 
J* CoCo 3, you generally change the 
sequence of bytes $8C $FF $00 to $8C 
$FE $00. 

80- Track or Hard Drive Dilemma 

I have a CoCo 3 with 5 12 K and OS- 
9 Level II, and I want to upgrade my 
disk drives to DSDD. Should I get 
40- or 80-track drives, and who makes 
good ones? I also want a clock I calendar 
and a good type-ahead controller that 
I could attach a hard drive to. Also, I 
just bought the Avatex 2400 baud 
modem. At 2400 or 1200 baud, I can't 
get my printer to print right. Can I print 
while online at any speed? 

Lawrence Myers 
Silver Spring, MD 

J? A while ago, I would have said to 
/L go with 80-track floppies for OS- 
9, but with hard disk systems under 
$450 now, it makes little sense to up- 
grade your floppies. For example, I 
recently purchased an older white 
Multi-Pak for $20, a Burke & Burke 
(312-397-2898) CoCoXT-RTC hard 
disk interface for $99, a Hard Times 
(408-280-1969) Case and 65-watt Power 
Supply for $72, and a 20Mb Seagate 
ST225 Kit (includes cables and IBM 
PC/XT compatible Western Digital 
controller) for $269. The 10Mb drives 
are even cheaper 

If you still want floppies, consider the 
Teac 55 F, an 80-track drive. On the 
newer drives, you can add a switch to 
toggle reading both 80- and 35/40-track 
drives under RS BASIC. The only prob- 
lem with this setup is that normal 40- 



Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 



C 




By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 

with Richard W. Libra 



track drives may not reliably read a 40- 
track disk prepared in this fashion. For 
floppies, the Sardis (604-255-4485) "No 
Halt" controller for $150 has been 
lauded on Delphi. The latest CoCo 
drive, FD-502, is really a 40-track 
DSDD drive. 

For your printing problem, you need 
to match the printer's baud rate and 
number of bits with the baud rate and 
number of bits coming from your tele- 
communications program. 

A One-to-One Ratio 



Is there a way to switch one disk 
drive between two computers when 
both of them are powered up? I have 
a CoCo 1 and 2 and only one drive. 

Lowell James Welchman 
Mountain View, WY 



Because of the expense of the 
/C multiple-gang switch required, it 
really wouldn't be practical. 

BBSs: Disk Drives Required 



I have a 64 K CoCo 2 with Extended 
BASIC and a tape player. I'm trying 
to put up a BBS, but I can't find any 



programs to let my computer talk to my 
modem in BASIC. How do I do this? 
CoTerm won't load! 

Christian J. Miller 
Macedon, NY 



ID There was an excellent BBS by 
/C Michael Jorgenson in the No- 
vember '87 issue of RAINBOW, but it, like 
all BBS programs, requires a disk drive. 
The reason for this is to provide for 
upload /download capability. The prob- 
lem with a tape-based system is that you 
would have to manually switch between 
Record and Play and rewind the tape, 
which defeats the purpose of an auto- 
matic, unattended BBS. 



Tape-Based Communications 

MAre there any tape-based commu- 
T nications programs for the CoCo 
Busing the RS-232 Deluxe Program 
Pak? 

Luis A. Modesto 
Miami, FL 



ID MikeyTerm is available for $10 
1 \ from Michael D. Ward, 1807 Cor- 
tez, Coral Gables, FL 33134. Specify 
that you want the tape version. 



Pak-to-Disk Transfers 
for New Cartridges 

I've been a faithful reader of your 
column since its early days in HOT 
CoCo. I've been using your RomFix 
program to put my old cartridges on 
disk, and in your September 1984 col- 
umn you published patches for packs 
that did not work properly in the all- 
RA M mode. I was just wondering if you 
know the patches for the newer packs, 
particularly Stellar Lifeline, Downland, 
Demon Attack and Dragon Fire. The 
older patches came in quite handy and 
I'm hoping you can bring the list up-to- 
date. 

Paul Riddle 
Linthicum, MD 



X) The original RomFix program 
^/C was updated by David Dawson in 
the December '87 RAINBOW, Page 152. 
Add the appropriate line below to the 
PRKXFER program. The patches I have 



164 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1988 



Education 
Breakthrough 

New interactive CoCo software 
makes learning easy, 
fun. Kids love it! 




0 



THE MAGIC OF SPELLING 

Grades 4 to 8 



NEW LOW PRICE - 76 lessons for the price 
of 8! Educational Software for kids from 
6 to 18. 

Parents are depending more and more on 
supplemental education for their children. Edu- 
cators know that the most effective teaching is 
done one-to-one. Through individual attention 
and self-paced progress, students learn more 
and retain more. 

BETTER THAN A PRIVATE TUTOR 

The Compass Education Software LOOK/ 
LISTEN/LEARN approach is the next best 
thing to a private tutor. Unlike other educational 
software the Compass Library also talks to the 
student — not in synthesized speech, but in a 
real human voice. With on-screen textual infor- 
mation and attention-getting graphics, stu- 
dents of all ages actually enjoy learning! 

SELF-PACED FOR BETTER RETENTION 

The lessons advance only after the stu- 
dent has correctly answered the questions 
throughout the programs assuring that the 
material has been thoroughly absorbed. 

SIMPLE EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 

All you need is the TRS-80* Color Com- 
puter (any model), computer cassette recorder 
and TV set. Once the cassette is loaded you 
need only enter two simple commands . . . and 
then press any key to start the lesson. 

Of course you can stop the lesson at any 
point to study information on the screen. Just 
push the pause button on the cassette player. 
Push it again and lesson resumes. 

To answer questions throughout the les- 
son simply press the appropriate number on 
the computer keyboard, type in the correct 
answer, or follow other easy instructions. And 
to go back and review, just rewind the cassette. 
It's that simple. 

CHOOSE FROM 9 SUBJECTS 

There is not sufficient space in this adver- 
tisement to list ail lesson titles, but here is a 
sample: 

MATHEMATICS 

In today's advanced, HiTech world, under- 
standing and working with numbers is essen- 
tial. Compass has developed three compre- 
hensive series of math programs. From basic 
numerals for the very young, to algebra and 
higher mathematics for the older child. In 
between, there are programs for everything 
from addition and subtraction to practical 
everyday percentage problems. 

•TRS-80 is a registered trademark of The Tandy Corporation. 




MS 1 — Plurals: branches, rodeos, valleys 
MS 2 — Plurals: houses, brushes, candies 
MS 3 — Plurals: babies, pianos, leaves 
.MS 4 — Suffixes: boxed, referred, writing 
^MS 5 — Suffixes: paid, quickly, extremely 
MS 6 — Suffixes: said, confusion, school's 
MS 7 — Homonyms: two, too, to; their, there 
MS 8 — Homonyms: our, are, hour; ate, eight 
MS 9 — Homonyms: weight, wait; who's, whose 
MS 10- Homonyms: scent, cent; sell, cell 
MS 1 1 — Homonyms: dew, due; course, coarse 
MS 12 -Homonyms: cite, site, sight; by, buy 
MS 13- Homonyms: blue, blew, creek, creak 
MS 14 -Homonyms: sale, sail; steel, steal 
MS 15- Spelling by Syllables: letter, color 
MS 16 -Doubling Consonant Letters: hollow 




MATH/FRACTIONS 

Grades 4 to 8 

MF 1 — Numerator, denominator, bar 
MF 2 — Multiplication of fractions 
MF 3 — Factors and prime numbers 
MF 4 — Reducing fractions, reciprocals 
MF5 — Reducing fractions, lowest terms 
MF 6 — Proper fractions, mixed numbers 
MF 7 — Multiplication-division of fractions 
MF 8 — Addition-subtraction of fractions 
MF 9 — Addition of mixed numbers 
MF 10 — Changing fractions to decimals 
MF 1 1 — Converting decimal numbers 
MF 12 — Word problems using percents 
MF 13 — Additional problems using percents 
MF 14 — Word problems using percents 
MF 15 — Finding circle area using pi 
MF 16 — Using a ruler to measure fractions 



e 



MATH/BASIC ALGEBRA 

For all grades 
Sixteen lessons: MBA-1 to 16 



e 



MATH/NUMBERS 

For grades 1 to 6 
Sixteen lessons: MN-1 to 16 

SELF DEVELOPMENT 

Writing effectively means communica- 
tiong effectively. Through the writing series of 
lesson students of all ages will develop basic 
skills needed to turn thoughts and ideas into 
expressive words and phrases. 



o 



RULES OF WRITING 

For all grades 

Sixteen lessons: RW-1 to 16 



LANGUAGE ARTS 

A practical education begins with good 
reading skills and is continued with increased 
vocabulary comprehension and, of course, 
spelling. Your child will learn that reading is fun 
while they are also learning when to use "to," 
"too," and "two," and how to spell when build- 
ing a vocabulary. 



o 



VOCABULARY COMPREHENSION 

Grades 3 to 5 
Sixteen lessons: VC-1 to 16 



o 



READING COMPREHENSION 

For all grades 

Sixteen lessons: DRC-1 to 16 



© 



SCIENCE 
SCIENCE/PHYSICS 

For ail grades 
Sixteen lessons: SP-1 to 16 



o 



HISTORY 
AMERICAN HISTORY 

For grades 4 to 12 

Sixteen lessons: AH-1 to 16 



So there it is . . . no-nonsense subject 
matter presented in a way that maximizes 
understanding and retention. 

SPECIAL PRICING 
YORK 10 is now offering, for a limited time, 
a complete set In any subject, 16 cassettes, 
one lesson on each cassette, for only 
$49.95. We originally offered only 8 cassettes 
for the same amount so now it's twice the 
value. The same 16 cassettes are sold else- 
where for over $150. 

To order, send your check or money order 
for $49.95 (CA residents add sales tax) for 
each subject you wish, plus $3.50 shipping and 
handling (any quantity). For immediate ship- 
ment, call collect the number below and 
charge your VISA or MASTERCARD. 




9525 VASSAR AVENUE 
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311 

1- 818/700-0330 — 



for problem RomPaks are the follow- 
ing: 

Canyon Climber 

235 POKE &H4424,&H12: POKE 
&H4425,&H12 

Colorterm 

235 POKE &H404R,&H12: POKE 
&H404B,&H12: POKE &H404C, 
&H12: POKE &H4139,&H11 

Cyrus 

235 FOR I=&H4B4E TO &H4B51: 
POKE I.&H12: NEXT I 



eluded with The Rainbow Introductory 
Guide to Statistics? 

Roger Page 
Elida, OH 

Check your local library for a 
copy of The Funstat Package In 
FORTRAN IV by John T. Roscoe, 
published by Holt, Rinehart, & Win- 
ston, 1973. It contains FORTRAN pro- 
gram listings for the statistical tech- 
niques you desire, which, with minimal 
effort, can be modified to run on a 
CoCo in BASIC or BASIC09. The Rain- 
bow Introductory Guide to Statistics 
describes some of the tests you mention. 



real meat and potatoes part of this patch 
is the CWAI instruction. It tells the 6809 
to stop executing instructions until an 
interrupt occurs. On the CoCo, this will 
be ! /6oth of a second at most, as the clock 
signal always interrupts BASIC 60 times 
each second. The net result is that BASIC 
will wait that long between each char- 
acter, resulting in an effective baud rate 
of 600, or 60 characters per second. 

You could add additional CWAIs to 
slow it down even more. The first 
glaring problem with this quick and 
dirty poke is that it doesn't preserve the 
vector's contents and do the jump after 
the interrupt. The second is that it 
depends on the contents of addresses 
360 through 367 to have been initialized 
by Extended BASIC 1.1, not Disk BASIC. 

The BASIC program shown below will 
enter a similar patch for any version of 
Extended or Disk basic. It has a further 
enhancement — it provides for four 
different speeds. In response to the 
Enter Speed prompt, you enter a 
number from 1 to 4. This is the number 
of interrupts the patch will wait between 
each character, resulting in speeds of 60, 
30, 15 and 7.5 characters per second, 
respectively. 

10 S = &HF3 

20 INPUT "ENTER SPEED (1, 2, 3, 

OR 4) ";I 

30 FOR K = 1 TO I 

40 POKE S, &H3C 

50 POKE 5+1, &HFF 

60 5 = S + 2 

70 NEXT K 

B0 POKE S, PEEK (359) 
90 POKE S+l, PEEK (360) 
100 POKE 5+2, PEEK (361) 
110 POKE 360, &H00 
120 POKE 361, &HF3 
130 FOR X = 1 TO 10 
• i40 PRINT "SEE IT WORKS" 
150 NEXT X 
160 NEW 

Warning: Do not run this program 
more than once without either powering 
down the machine or restoring the 
original values for addresses 360 and 
361. 

For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, 
at the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
RSK for "Ask the Experts" to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete 
instructions. 



Demon Attack 

235 FDR I=&H4027 TO &H402F: 
POKE I , &H12 : NEXT I 

Dragon Fire 

235 FOR I=&H401R TO &H4021: 
POKE I,&H12: NEXT I: POKE 
&H41B0,&H70 

Megabug 

235 POKE &H567D,&H12: POKE 
&H567E,&H12: POKE &H567F, 
&H12:P0KE &H56B0,&H12 

Micropainter 

235 POKE &H4067,&H3E: POKE 
&H40G8,&H80 

Microbes 

235 POKE &H45B8,&H12: POKE 
&H45BC&H12 

Reactoids 

235 POKE &H4C09,&H39 

Slay the Nerius 

235 POKE &H5124,&H12: POKE 
&H5125,&H12 

Spectaculator (original release) 

235 POKE &H519F,&HBE: POKE 
&H51R0,&H9F: POKE &H51G1, 
&HFE :P0KE &H51A2,&HBF: POKE 
&H51A3,&H00: POKE &H51G4, 
&H60 : P0KE&H51G9 , &H39 



Stats, Analysis Programs 
Under FORTRAN 

|| / have been looking for a reasonably 
priced statistical package for my 
CoCo 3 that will do a few ANOVAs, 
Pearson correlations, rank difference 
correlations, t-tests, etc. I am aware of 
Lig-Pack, but seven disks and about 
$150 are a bit much. What about the 
analyses performed by CoCo-Stat in- 



Vector Vexation 

When I plug in the disk controller, 
some of the pokes that work fine 
without it stop working. Why? Does 
Disk BASIC rearrange the memory map? 
Iam specifically interested in the u slow 
speed scroll" poke, POKE 359,60. 

Paul R. Rondeau 
Lowell, MA 



ID The slow speed poke that you 
/£ identified is an ingenious little 
shortcut into the Extended BASIC code. 
BASIC uses the lower area of RAM for 
a series of jump vectors (more com- 
monly called "hooks"). These hooks 
allow a machine language program to 
alter the function of a ROM routine or 
even totally bypass the ROM routine. 
Two of these vectors are located at 
addresses 359 and 362 (each is three 
bytes long). The first of these vectors is 
used every time a character is to be 
displayed on the screen or sent to the 
printer. The second calls the keyboard 
scanning routine. Here are the hexadec- 
imal and assembler values for these 
vectors: 



7E 82 73 

7E 8C Fl 

39 

39 

39 



JMP $8273 
JMP $8CF1 
RT5 
RTS 
RTS 



Notice that both of these jump ad- 
dresses are in the Extended BASIC ROM 
address space ($8000 to $9FFF). After 
POKE 359 , G0 is executed, the disassem- 
bly looks like this: 



3C 82 
73 7E 8C 
Fl 39 39 
39 



CWfil tt$82 
COM $7E8C 
CMPB $3939 
RTS 



As you can see, this new code is quite 
different from the original code. The 




1 66 THE RAINBOW March 1 988 




CoCo3 
Disk 



Barden's Buffer 




Font Fascination 



By William Harden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



I am fascinated by fonts! In case you don't know this 
buzzword, a font is a typeface or character set, always 
containing the uppercase letters A through Z, the 
lowercase letters a through z, the digits 0 through 9, and 
special characters such as @ and #. 

There are literally thousands of fonts in existence. Your 
typewriter probably uses a Courier font. Typewriters space 
in uniform increments, typically Vio-inch horizontally, rather 
than making the width of each character dependent on the 
size of the character, as does typesetting equipment. 

Courier fonts tend to use characters that are padded out 
to fill up the Vio-ir»ch space for narrow letters. Other fonts 
are proportional fonts — they allocate varying widths for 
each character based on the actual size of the letter. Take a 
look at the pages of rainbow and you'll see what I mean. 
The Times Roman type found here looks much better than 
type produced by a typical dot matrix printer. Times Roman 
type is often used for books and magazines, to increase 
readability. Bodoni, Century Schoolbook, Avant-Garde and 
thousands of other fonts are available to create type that is 
bold, sad, timid or heroic. 

I don't know where I'd put CoCo type. It's not timid, but 
not heroic, either. It's just one of those typefaces that are used 
for equally spaced video characters. Want to play some games 
with the built-in font on your CoCo 3? It's easy to create your 
own characters and even steal other compatible fonts. The 
only catch is that you must have a CoCo 3 for these programs. 
The CoCo 3 has a high resolution graphics mode that allows 
text to be interspersed with graphics, and has a built-in 
character set for this purpose. The following programs will 
work on any CoCo 3. They use Extended BASIC rather than 

OS-9 BASIC09. 

Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 



CoCo 3 Hi-Res Text 

Let's start first with the CoCo 3 high resolution mode. The 
CoCo 3 has capacity for these modes: * 

HSCREEN 1 (320-by-192, four colors) 
HSCREEN 2 (320-by-192, 16 colors) 
HSCREEN 3 (640-by-192, two colors) 
HSCREEN 4 (640-by-192, four colors) 

The numbers 320 and 640 refer to the number of dots across 
the screen in each row. The 192 refers to the number of rows 
up and down the screen. In 640-by-192 mode, there are a total 
of 122,880 dots on the screen, each of which can be 
programmed by high resolution graphics commands. 

In high resolution graphics mode, you must use the 4 H' 
commands. These are the high resolution modes that 
supplement the primary BASIC graphics commands. The 
format is very similar to the old graphics commands, 
however. Here's a recap of the commands available: 



HCIRCLE 

HCLS 

HCOLDR 

HDRRW 

HLINE 

HPRINT 

HRESET 

HSET 

HPOINT 



draws a circle like the Lo-Res CIRCLE 
clears the screen like the Lo-Res CLS 
sets graphics colors like Lo-Res COLOR 
draws line segments like Lo-Res DRfiW 
draws lines like Lo-Res LINE 
fills an area with PRINT like Lo-Res PRINT 
resets a point like Lo-Res PRESET 
sets a point like Lo-Res PSET 
examines a point like Lo-Res POINT 



CoCos 1 and 2 do not allow text to be displayed with 
graphics. If you set graphics mode, you have to construct 
your own character set and then display the characters at the 
proper point on the screen by pokes or DRRW statements, or 
some other method. This makes for a lot of tedious 
programming. 

The CoCo 3, though, allows you to use a special command 
called HPRINT, which lets you print text anywhere on a high 

March 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 67 



resolution graphics screen. The format of HPRINT is the 
following: 

HPRINT (cp n row), "text"; 

The cp value is a text character position of 0 through 39 
or 0 through 79, depending on the screen mode. The row 
value is a text row value of 0 through 23. The data following 
the cp and row is a text string, variable name or other 
information, just as in a Lo-Res PRINT statement. To print, 
"This is the middle of the screen," superimposed over a circle 
for Hi-Res 640-by-194 four-color mode, for example, you'd 
have: 

100 H5CREEN 4 

110 HCIRCLE (320, 96), 20 

120 HPRINT (24, 12) , "This is the middle of the 

screen" 

130 GOTO 130 

Actually, the text will be a little offset toward the bottom 
of the screen, because there are an even number of text rows 
on the screen. However, lowercase characters will be 
displayed in addition to uppercase characters and the text will 
be superimposed over the circle. 

You can intermix text and graphics in this manner for any 
screens you want to draw. The text becomes an integral part 
of the graphics data and will be erased or overwritten by 
graphics and new text. 

The H5CREEN command is a little picky, however. It will 
print a string such as "This is a string" + CHR$(32) + 
"and so is this" without problems. You can also use 
commands such as HPRINT (10,10), fl$. However, items 
separated by commas or semicolons will give syntax errors. 
HPRINT (10,12), "This is "; "a s t ring" is not handled 
by HPRINT, for example. Use a plus sign (+) to concatenate 
strings or CHR$ values. 

Another thing to keep in mind with HPRINT is that 
characters HPRINTed in 640-by-192 resolution mode are one- 
half the width of the characters HPRINTed in 320-by-192 
resolution mode. In 320-by-192 mode, 40 characters are 
allowed across the screen, while in 640-by-192 mode, 80 
characters are allowed. 

Where's That Character Set? 

I knew the character set was in RAM somewhere. I was 
saved from having to search for it by Spectrum Projects' 
CoCo 3 Secrets Revealed, a handy 36-page document about 
CoCo 3 memory mapping and modes. It listed the character 
set at locations &HF09D through &HF39C, and that's where 
it was. The HPRINT character set looks like Figure 1. There 
are 96 characters, each represented by eight bytes, for a total 
of 96 * 8 = 768 bytes. 

To see how the characters are generated, try the following 
program. It first prints all available HPRINT characters at the 
top of the screen. Next, it enlarges a character by printing 
an uppercase 'O' for each bit of the character. Since a 
character takes up 8-by-8 bits on a 640-by-192 screen, the 
character is enlarged 64 times. The proportions are off — the 
character appears elongated, but you can see the individual 
dots making up the character. 

To use this short program, enter a character value from 
32 through 127 and the character data from the character 
table will be displayed at screen center. The value corresponds 
to the ASCII code for the character. You won't be able to 



&HF09D 
&HF09E 



&HF0A4 
&HF0A5 



&HF39B 
&HF39C 



Chaffer 0 
J (ASCII 32)4 
Bytes 



Character 95 
► (ASC(f127)-a 
Bytes 



Figure 1: HPRINT Character Table 



see the values you input, however. INPUT values are displayed 
only on a text screen. Just enter a two-digit value and watch 
the screen change for the corresponding character. To view 
a new character, enter another value. 

100 HSCREEN 4 
110 HCLS 

120 FOR 1=32 TO 127 

130 IF K80 THEN HPRINT (1-16,0) 

,CHR$(I) ELSE HPRINT (I-64,1),CH 

R$(I) 

140 NEXT I 
150 INPUT CH 

160 HLINE ( 280, 60 ) - ( 360, 1 

40 ) , PRESET, BF 

170 CH = (CH - 32) *8 + &HF09D 

180 FOR 1= 0 TO 7 

190 CV - PEEK ( CH + I ) 

200 FOR J=7 TO 0 STEP -1 

210 IF (CV AND (INT(2 A J))) <> 0 

THEN HPRINT ( 44 - J, 8 + I ) , 11 

0" 

220 NEXT J 
230 NEXT I 
240 GOTO 150 

■ 

How the Program Works 

The program has two parts. The first part is a loop from 
1=32 to 1=127. The values of I are the ASCII codes for the 
characters from a space to an escape. Two lines of characters 
are printed. If I is less then 80, the character is printed at 
1-16 and Line 0, which spreads the characters over character 
position 32-16=16 to 79-16=63. If I is greater than 79, the 
character is printed at 1-64 and Row 1, which spreads the 
character over character position 80-64=16 to 127-64=63. 

The second part of the program uses Hl_ INE to draw a filled- 
in box, clearing any previous character in the center of the 
screen. (Remember that graphics will overwrite the HPRINT 
characters,) But, prior to that, a character value is input — 
a value of 32 to 127, which represents the ASCII code of the 
character. A value of 32 is then subtracted from this code to 



1 68 THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



find the position in the character table at &HF09D, starting 
from 0. The result is multiplied by eight because each 
character in the table is made up of eight bytes. The 34th 
character (ASCII code 65, an A) would start at &HF09D + 
34*8. 

Because each character is made up of eight bytes, control 
variable I sets up a loop of eight iterations. Each time through 
the loop, a new byte from the character table is read into CV. 
This byte is made up of eight bits, each bit defining a single 
dot for the character. The byte is scanned from left to right 
by means of a second control variable, J. Using J as an 
exponent for a power of 2 results in "mask values" of 128, 
64, 32, 16, 8, 4, 2 and 1. 

These values are RNDed with the byte value read from the 
table. If the FIND is not 0, the bit representing a pixel is set 
in the value, and an 'O' is written to the screen center. The 
HPRINT statement prints the 'O' in one of the 64 positions 
(row, column) depending on the current I and J. This process 
is repeated 64 times to construct the entire character in 
enlarged format. 

Defining Your Own Characters 

Since the character table for HPRINT is in RAM (random 
access, or read-write memory) and not ROM (read-only 
memory), the character data can be changed. Memory 
locations in RAM can be changed by a poke function. Of 
course, you have to be careful to poke the right places, 
otherwise chaos can result. As long as we stick to changing 
the characters in the HPRINT character table, though, 
everything should be fine. 
Try this code to see what I mean: 

100 HSCREEN 4 

110 HCLS 

120 FDR I = &HFD9D + 33*8 TO &HF09D + (33*8) + 7 
130 POKE 1,244 
140 NEXT I 

150 HPRINT (0,0),"RRflRflfiRfiflflfiRftfiPT 
160 GOTO 1G0 

If you entered this code correctly, you will see a stripe 
pattern in the upper-left corner of the screen. This pattern 
replaces the 'A' character definition in the HPRINT character 
table. The decimal value 244 is 1 1001 100 in binary. The bits 
in a byte represent horizontal pixels in 640-by-192 mode. 
Looking at the binary value, you can see how the ones and 
zeros alternate, producing a stripe. 

Instead of a simple stripe pattern, though, we'd like to enter 
a series of dots that define a character. There are several ways 
to do this. First, you can simply load "over" the table with 
data defining a new character set. Where to get the character 
set? Any character set that uses an 8-by-8 pixel character can 
be used. Although it's probably heresy to suggest it in these 
pages, one of these is the Tandy 1000 character set. 

The Tandy 1000 Character Set 

The 1000's character set uses an 8-by-8 pixel character with 
a format different from that of the CoCo 3 HPRINT charac- 
ters. There are 256 different characters defined for the Tandy 
1000 set — 128 "standard" ASCII characters in codes 0 
through 127, and 128 "extended" characters in codes 128 
through 255. 

The standard characters include upper- and lowercase 
alphabetic characters, digits and special characters. They also 
include the displayable control characters found on PC 
compatibles, codes in the 0 to 31 range that display happy 
faces, card suits, musical notes and others. 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Back Issue 
Availability 




BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
pages of material, it's ail just for CoCo users 
— a great way to expand your library! 

A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents for 
each additional issue for postage and han- 
dling if sent by United Parcel Service. There 
is a $5 charge for the first issue, plus a $1 
charge for each additional issue on orders 
sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not deliver to a 
post office box or to another country. 

MOST ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

■ 

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March 1988 THE RAINBOW 169 



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RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1981 through June 
1984, is printed In the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes including rainbow on tape are in the July 
1985 and July 1986 issues, respectively. The Sixth Year Index is In the July 1987 
issue. 



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The extended character set includes foreign characters such 
as an umlaut, texture characters (like newspaper halftones), 
block graphics, mathematical symbols and line segments. The 
line segments are especially nice, as they allow you to 
construct forms or simple diagrams without using graphics 
commands. 

Listing 1, lines 10000 through 10255, shows a complete 
listing of the Tandy 1000 character set from codes 0 to 255. 
These codes were acquired by peeking into the Tandy 1000 
character tables. There are two such tables, one for codes 0 
through 127 and one for codes 128 through 255. 

Each peek resulted in one byte of the eight bytes required 
for the character. An entire character is represented by eight 
bytes. The eight bytes for each character were converted to 
eight DfiTfi values. For each of the 256 codes, a DRTR line was 
generated consisting of a line number from 10000 through 
10255, the word "DRTR" and the eight code values with 
interspersed commas. These ASCII (text) lines were output 
to a sequential file on the Tandy 1000 MS-DOS disk. This 
file was copied onto a CoCo 3 disk using CoCo Util //(Mark 
Data Products). On the CoCo 3 side, the file was read in as 
a straight BASIC program. The character code, by the way, 
is contained in the line number. Line number 10044 holds the 
character definition for ASCII character 44, for example. 

How do you make use of the Tandy 1000 characters? Only 
96 characters can be displayed at one time in the HPRINT 
mode of the CoCo 3. However, once the characters have been 
read into the CoCo, it's a simple matter to switch back and 
forth among the 256 characters by reloading the character 
table. The remainder of the program in Listing 1 does this. 

A Character Load/Switch Program 

The middle part of the program, from Line 8000 on, is the 
Character Load/ Switch code. It switches back and forth 
between selected character sets, either the original CoCo set 
or three segments of the Tandy 1000 set. 

To save memory, the 352 characters of the original set and 
Tandy 1000 set (256 plus 96) are saved in a string array called 



CS$(0) 
GS$(1) 



8 Character/String 



CS$(255) 
CS$(256) 



CS$(351) 



Tandy 1000 
Character 
Codes (256) 



Original CoCo 3 
Codes (96) 



Figure 2: CS$ Character Array 



170 



THE RAINBOW 



March 1988 



CSS. It may seem a little strange to save character codes in 
a string array, but numeric variables take up six bytes each. 
With numeric variables, 6*8*352 = 16,896 bytes would be 
used to store the complete character set. With a string array, 
though, each byte can be put into a single character by using 
a CHR$ function. The result is about 8*352 = 2,816 bytes of 
storage. (I say "about" here because additional bytes are 
required to define the array and strings.) 

CSS is made up of 352 entries, with each entry holding the 
codes for one character, as shown in Figure 2. The first 256 
entries hold the Tandy 1000 character set. The last 96 entries 
hold the character codes for the original CoCo characters. 
Once the character table is overwritten, the original codes are 
destroyed, and it's necessary to save the codes if you want 
to use them instead of the Tandy 1000 codes. 

The code at 8000 first peeks at the 96 characters of the 
original set. An eight-byte string is built for each character, 
in A$. This string is stored in C5$ ( 256 ) through C5$ ( 351 ) , 
depending on the code. 

The code then reads the Tandy 1000 DflTn values, eight at 
a time. For each eight, another string fi$ is constructed, which 
is stored in C5$(0) through CS$(255), depending on the 
ASCII code. Once this task is done, arrays C5$(0) through 
CSS ( 351 ) contain 352 strings, each string of length eight and 
representing one character in CHR$ ( ) format. 

The code starting at 9000 is used to switch between 
character sets. There are four subroutine calls, which bring 
in one of four character sets: 



GD5UB 9100 — loads character codes 32 through 127 
of the Tandy 1000 character set. These codes start with 
a space (32) and contain the upper- and lowercase 
alphabet, digits and special characters. They are 
displayed by simply using the text to be written in an 
HPRINT statement. Doing an HPRINT (10,16), "This 
is text 0123", for example, displays that text in Line 
16, character position 16, but in Tandy 1000 format. 

GDSUB 9200 — loads character codes 128 through 223 
of the Tandy 1000 character set. These codes start with 
foreign characters such as umlaut and the yen sign. 
Fractions and "texture" characters follow. Line 
segments are next, followed by five block graphics 
characters. Doing an HPRINT (10,16), "RBCDEFG" 
displays Tandy 1000 character codes for 129 through 
135 in place of the ABCDEFG. 

GDSUB 9300 — loads character codes 0 through 31 and 
224 through 255 of the Tandy 1000 into the first 64 
characters of the character table. The codes from 0 
through 31 are control codes that display as happy 
faces, card suits, musical notes, etc. The codes from 224 
through 255 are the Greek alphabet, mathematical 
symbols, and others. Doing an HPRINT (10,16), 
"ABCDEFG" displays Tandy 1000 codes 1 through 7 — 
happy faces and others. Doing an HPRINT (10,16) , 
"abcde f g " displays Tandy 1 000 codes 225 through 23 1 , 
seven Greek letters, 

GDSUB 9400 — loads the original character codes back 
into the HSCREEN character table. The characters now 
display with HPRINT as before. 




Character Set Display 

Figure 3 shows an actual display of the character sets. The 
character set in the top two lines and the bottom two lines 
are the original CoCo characters. The bottom two lines were 
restored by a GOSUB 9400. Lines 3 and 4 are the 96 Tandy 
1000 characters from space (32) to escape (127). Notice how 
bold they are in comparison to the CoCo character set. Most 
of the characters use a double-line thickness for vertical lines. 
These characters were written after a GDSUB 9100. Lines 5 
and 6 are the 96 Tandy 1000 characters from a Serbo- 
Croatian 'C (128) to the last block graphics character (223). 
Line segment characters are included here. Lines 7 and 8 are 
the 64 Tandy 1000 characters from a null (0) and cursor down 
(31) and from a Greek alpha (224) through blank FF (255). 

The "driver" for this display is shown in the first part of 
the code of the listing, CHAR1000. This code gives you an 
example of how the Load / Switch program is called. The first 
part of the code constructs two 48-character strings, fl$ and 
B$. fi$ contains character codes from 32 to 79, while B$ 
contains character codes from 80 to 127. A$ and B$ are used 
in the HPRINT statements following to print the character set 
in force. There are four GOSUBs to select character sets 1, 2, 
3 and a return to the original. 

Designing Your Own Characters 

The same method used in dumping the Tandy 1000 
character set and in loading selected portions of it can be used 
in your own character definitions. Just substitute your own 
characters for any of the 256 characters in the Tandy 
character set defined by lines 1 0000 through 1 0255 in the code 
above. 

A Bullet Example 

Suppose you wanted to define a "bullet," which is a small 
filled-in circle used to highlight text. To design a bullet, you'd 
start with an 8-by-8 matrix, as shown in Figure 4. Each box 
in the matrix is 2 units wide by 1 unit high to compensate 
for the screen proportions of 640-by-192. (192 vertical pixels 
are held in 6 inches while 640 horizontal pixels are held in 
10 inches. If the screen were square, 320 vertical pixels could 
be held in' 10 inches. The ratio is therefore 2:1.) However, 
if you'll be using 320-by-192 mode, use a matrix with square 
boxes. We'll use the square (320-by-192) matrix here. 

March 1988 THE RAINBOW 171 



Draw the figure in the matrix. Some rough edges are 
necessary. Now convert to eight code values. The column 
'weights" of the matrix from left to right are 128, 64, 32, 16, 





co 

04 CVJ <0 , f ..o... 
t— CO CO t— CO ■*&■ CM t- 




RowO 

i 

i 

2 
3 

4 

s 

6 
7 
















16+8=24 

QC.T tyTQT«f«>Qy 

64+32+16+8+4+2=126 

128+64+32+16+8+4+2+1=255 

128+64+32+16+8+4+2+1=255 

64+32+16+8+4+2=126 

32+16+8+4=60 

16+8=24 




















L 








































■ .: 
1 . 
































1 
























Figure 4: Designing a "Bullet" 



co 



CHR$(200) 



OJ -cf CVJ CO CVI T^" OJ CO 

t— cocot— co^rcxjT— t— cocot— 



oo cvj »- 



CHR$(202) 



































































— 






























































































































































































































































































—h- 




































— 























































































































CHR$(201) 



CHR$(203) 



Figure 5: A Multiple-Character Symbol 



8, 4, 2 and 1 . For each filled-in box, add the weight to the 
total weight. The first row is 16+8=24. The next row is 
32+16+8+4=60, You'll have eight code values after you're 
done. These go into the DATA statement for the appropriate 
ASCII code. To replace an escape code with a bullet, for 
example, your DATA statement would look like this: 

10127 DATA 24, G0, 126, 255, 255,126, 60, 24 

Thereafter, any time an escape code (127) is used, you'd 
display a bullet. For example: 

1000 HPRINT (10,16), CHR$(127)+" Preceding 
Bullet" 

Multiple Character Symbols 

Another trick you might want to try is to define multi-part 
symbols. By dividing a symbol into quadrants, you can split 
up a symbol into four characters or more. The complete 
symbol can then be displayed by HPRINTing four or more 
characters. Suppose you had the symbol shown in Figure 5, 
split into four segments. The four sets of DATA values would 
be: 

10200 DATA 0,0,0,126,60,60,24,24 

10201 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,31,146,210 

10202 DATA 63,127,63,63,94,140,0,0 

10203 DATA 126, 126, 126, 126, 120, 4B, 0,0 

The symbol would be displayed by: 

2000 HPRINT (10,11) ,CHR$( 200) +CHR$( 201) 
2010 HPRINT (10,12) ,CHR$(202)+CHR$(203) 

There are a lot more tricks and techniques that can be 
applied to the HPRINT character table — things like enlarging 
characters from table definitions and providing a font 
generator for easy character construction. We'll look at some 
of them in a future column. In the meantime, I hope you'll 
try the Tandy 1000 character set on your CoCo. It will save 
you a lot of work defining some interesting characters that 
you can use with your graphics. If you have your own fonts 
defined, pass them along and I'll include them in a future 
column. □ 




330 

8140 ,.,..243 
10003,... 238 
10018 ....203 
10038 ....158 
10054 ....189 

10074 88 

10088.... 129 
10108 .....15 



10123 ....177 

10141 86 

10155 ....173 
10173 ....236 

10187 89 

10216 20 

10232 96 

END 135 



The listing: CHAR 1000 

lj30 1 Sample Driver for Characte 
r toad/ Switch Program 



120 



130 


CLEAR 5000 




140 


GOSUB 8010 




150 


HSCREEN 4 




160 


HCOLOR 0,3 




170 


HCLS 




180 


A$ = B$ = »•'• 




190 


FOR I = 32 TO 79 




200 


A$ m A$ + CHR$( I 


) 


210 


NEXT I 




220 


FOR I m 80 TO 127 




230 


B$ = B$ + CHR$( X 


W 


240 


NEXT I 




250 


HPRINT ( 16, 5 ) , 


A$ 


260 


HPRINT ( 16, 6 ) , 


B$ 


270 


GOSUB 9000 






• CS 1 




280 


HPRINT ( 16, 8 ) , 


A$ 


290 


HPRINT (16, 9 ), 


B$ 



172 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



3J3J3 GOSUB 

•CS 2 
31j3 HPRINT ( 16, 
320 HPRINT ( 
330 GOSUB 9 

•CS 3 
34j3 HPRINT ( 16, 
35J3 HPRINT ( 16, 
/ 16 ) 

36J3 GOSUB 940J3 

• original 

370 HPRINT ( 16, 17 ) , 
380 HPRINT ( 16, 18 ) , 
390 GOTO 390 
400 ' : 



11 )/ 

12 J, 



14 ), 

15 ), 



A$ 
B$ 



A$ 

LEFT$( 



8090 CSS( 256 

8100 PRINT 

8110 NEXT I 

8120 FOR I = 0 

8130 A$ = 



+ I) M AS 



n • 
i 



llll 



B$ 



B$ 



8140 
8150 
8160 
8170 
8180 
8190 



+ CHR$( A ) 



A$ 



II II • 



8210 



ft:?.'* 



8010 1 Character Load/Switch Pro 
gram f^^go.ij|3orate; in your own c 
ode 

8020 ' r^'--"- ' ''■'^^•'' :; *>' •■• 

8030 DIM CS$( 351 ) 
8040 FOR I - 0 TO 95 
8050 A$ = 

8060 FOR J = 0 TO 7 

8070 A$ « A$ + CHR$( PEEK( &HF09 

D + 1*8 + J ) ) 

8080 NEXT J 



FOR J m 0 TO 

READ A: A$ « 

NEXT J 

CS$( I ) 

PRINT 

NEXT I 

RETURN 
i 

• LOAD CSX 

ST = 32: EN » 127: OF = 0 
FOR ZI=ST TO EN: ZA$=CS$(ZI 
) : FOR Z J=0 TO 7: POKE &HF09D + ( 
OF+ZJ) ,ASC(MID$(ZA$,ZJ+1,1) ) : NE 
XT ZJ: OF=OF + 8: NEXT ZI 
9120 RETURN 

9200 ST - 128: EN 223: 

GOTO 9110 
9300 ST - 0: EN - 31: OF 
SUB 9110: ST - 224: EN - 

= 32*8: GOTO 9110 
9400 ST « 256: EN - 351: 
GOTO 911)3 

9996 1 

9997 • 



- 0: 



* 0 : 
255: 



GO 
OF 



OF = 0: 



P.O. Box 1283 Palatine, IL 60078-1283 (312) 397-2808 




1988 - The Year of the Hard Disk! 

The CoCo XT hard disk interface from Burke & Burke lets you 
connect up to 2 low cost, PC compatible 5 - 1 20 Meg hard drives 
to your CoCo. You buy the Western Digital WD1002-WX1 or 
WD1002-27X (RLL) controller, a case and a drive from the PC 
dealer of your choice. Just plug them into the CoCo XT, and you 
have a 20 Meg OS9 hard disk system for under $4501 



RAINBOW 



CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Great for multi-user systems! The CoCo XT interface uses advanced "NO HALT" 
hard disk controllers, which do not halt your CoCo and do not disable or use interrupts 
during hard disk access. You get full type-ahead, and the system clock does not lose 
time during hard di6k access. Fully compatible with most RS-232 expansion portsl 

CoCo XT (with anodized housing, 50 page user manual, hard disk back-up utility 
and new, Version 2.0 drivers for use with both OS9 & HYPER-l/O) - $69.95. 
CoCo XT-RTC (includes real-time clock / calendar with battery backup) — $99.95 

THE PROFESSIONAL TOUCH: XT-ROM -Automatically boots OS9 from your 
hard disk. Installs in the BIOS ROM socket of your hard disk controller - $1 9.95. 

64K COCO OR COCO 3 & MULTI-PA K REQUIRED FOR ALL VERSIONS. 
HYPER-1/O REQUIRED FOR USE WITH RS-DOS. 

Make Tracks 

Got the 35-track floppy disk blues? Burke & Burke's Verelon 2.0 HYPER-l/O 
program modifies the RS-DOS Disk BASIC in your CoCo 1, 2, or 3 to provide a 
"Dynamic Disk Interface'* that works with the CoCo XT hard disk and any mix of 
single-sided and double-sided floppy disk drives — even those 720K floppiest 



HYPER-l/O 
HYPFR-III 



(64K, includes 50 page user manual and utilities) -- $29.95. 
(RAM Disk and Print Spooler for CoCo 3 HYPER-l/O) ™$1 9.95 



Directory Assistants 

Here are two real time savors for OS9 users. WILD lets you use wild cards with OS9's 
commands. MV rapidly moves files, and even entire directories, from place to place 
on your hard or floppy disks. WILD & MV - one disk, two great utilities, only $1 Q.Hfil 



OS9: wild aam /d0/src/*.arc o-/dl/aba/roloaao/* .abs 
OS9: wv /dl/abs/relcaa« /dj/rtilaaae 

ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 7% SALES TAX. CCD's add 
$2.00. Shipping (within the USA) $2.00 per CoCo XT; $1 50 per 
disk or ROM. Ptoase allow 2 weeks for delivery (overnight delivery 
also available for in-stock hems). Telephone orders accepted. 



TANDY COMPUTER 
DISCOUNTS 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-3127 64k color comp 

26-3334 CoCo 3 

26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 



89.95 
170.00 
259.95 



PRINTERS 



26-2802 DMP 106 
26-1277 DMP-430 
26-1280 DMP-130 

Complete line of Tandy (Daisy Wheel) print wheels 



179.95 
580.00 
279.00 



MODEL 4 and MSDOS COMPUTERS 



25-1050 Tandy 1000 EX 
25-1052 Tandy 1000 SX 
25-1053 TANDY 1000 HX 
25-1600 TANDY 1000 TX 
25-1023 CM-5 color monitor 
25-1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 



530.00 
750.00 
599.00 
999.95 
249.95 
110.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N J. 08098 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 173 



9998 1 Table of T1000 Characters 

9999 • 

1^^ DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

10001 DATA 126,129,165,129,189,1 
53,129,126 

10002 DATA 126,255,219,255,195,2 
31,255,126 

10003 DATA 54,127,127,127,62,28, 
8,0 

10004 DATA 8,28,62,127,62,28,8,0 

10005 DATA 28,62,28,127,127,62,2 
8,62 

10006 DATA 8,8,28,62,127,62,28,6 
2 

10007 DATA 0,0,24,60,60,24,0,0 

10008 DATA 255,255,231,195,195,2 
31,255,255 

10009 DATA 0,60,102,66,66,102,60 
,0 

10010 DATA 255,195,153,189,189,1 
53,195,255 

• 10011 DATA 15,7,15,125,204,204,2 
04,120 

10012 DATA 60,102,102,102,60,24, 
126,24 

10013 DATA 48,60,51,49,49,112,11 
2,0 

10014 DATA 96,120,102,115,111,22 
7,231,7 

10015 DATA 153,90,60,231,231,60, 
90,153 

10016 DATA 64,112,124,127,124,11 
2,64,0 

10017 DATA 1,7,31,127,31,7,1,0 

10018 DATA 24,60,126,24,24,126,6 
0,24 

10019 DATA 102,102,102,102,102,0 
,102,0 

10020 DATA 127,219,219,123,27,27 
,27,0 

10021 DATA 63,96,62,99,62,3,126, 
0 

10022 DATA 0,0,0,0,126,126,126,0 

10023 DATA 24,60,126,24,126,60,2 
4,255 

10024 DATA 24,60,126,24,24,24,24 
,0 

10025 DATA 24,24,24,24,126,60,24 

10026 DATA 0,12,6,127,6,12,0,0 

10027 DATA 0,24,48,127,48,24,0,0 

10028 DATA 0,0,96,96,96,127,0,0 

10029 DATA 0,36,102,255,102,36,0 

,0 

10030 DATA 0,24,60,126,255,255,0 
,0 

10031 DATA 0,255,255,126,60,24,0 
,0 

10032 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 



10033 DATA 24,60,60,24,24,0,24,0 

10034 DATA 54,54,54,0,0,0,0,0 

10035 DATA 54,54,127,54,127,54,5 

4,0 

10036 DATA 24,62,96,60,6,124,24, 
0 

10037 DATA 0,99,102,12,24,51,99, 
0 

10038 DATA 28,54,28,59,110,102,5 
9,0 

10039 DATA 24,24,48,0,0,0,0,0 

10040 DATA 12,24,48,48,48,24,12, 

0 

10041 DATA 48,24,12,12,12,24,48, 
0 

10042 DATA 0,102,60,255,60,102,0 

10043 DATA 0,24,24,126,24,24,0,0 

10044 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,24,24,48 

10045 DATA 0,0,0,126,0,0,0,0 

10046 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,24,24,0 

10047 DATA 3,6,12,24,48,96,192,0 

10048 DATA 62,99,103,111,123,115 
,62,0 

10049 DATA 24,56,24,24,24,24,126 
,0 

10050 DATA 60,102,6,28,48,102,12 
6,0 

100.51 DATA 60,102,6,28,6,102,60, 
0 

10052 DATA 14,30,54,102,127,6,15 
,0 

10053 DATA 126,96,124,6,6,102,60 
,0 

10054 DATA 28,48,96,124,102,102, 
60,0 

10055 DATA 126,102,6,12,24,24,24 
,0 

10056 DATA 60,102,102,60,102,102 
,60,0 

10057 DATA 60,102,102,62,6,12,56 
,0 

10058 DATA 0,24,24,0,0,24,24,0 

10059 DATA 0,24,24,0,0,24,24,48 

10060 DATA 6,12,24,48,24,12,6,0 

10061 DATA 0,0,126,0,126,0,0,0 

10062 DATA 48,24,12,6,12,24,48,0 

10063 DATA 60,102,6,12,24,0,24,0 

10064 DATA 62,99,111,111,111,96, 
60,0 

10065 DATA 28,54,99,99,127,99,99 
,0 

10066 DATA 126,51,51,62,51,51,12 
6,0 

10067 DATA 30,51,96,96,96,51,30, 
0 

10068 DATA 124,54,51,51,51,54,12 
4,0 

10069 DATA 127,49,52,60,52,49,12 
7,0 

10070 DATA 127,49,52,60,52,48,12 



174 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



0,0 

10071 DATA 30,51,96,96,103,51,31 

10072 DATA 102,102,102,126,102,1 
02,102,0 

10073 DATA 60,24,24,24,24,24,60, 
0 

10074 DATA 15,6,6,6,102,102,60,0 

10075 DATA 115,51,54,60,54,51,11 
5,0 

10076 DATA 120,48,48,48,49,51,12 
7,0 

10077 DATA 99,119,127,127,107,99 
,99,0 

10078 DATA 99,115,123,111,103,99 
,99,0 

10079 DATA 62,99,99,99,99,99,62, 
0 

10080 DATA 126,51,51,62,48,48,12 
0/0 

10081 DATA 62,99,99,99,99,111,62 
,3 

10082 DATA 126,51,51,62,54,51,11 
5,0 

10083 DATA 60,102,112,56,14,102, 
60,0 

10084 DATA 126,90,24,24,24,24,60 
,0 

10085 DATA 99,99,99,99,99,99,62, 
0 

10086 DATA 102,102,102,102,102,6 
0, 24 ,0 

10087 DATA 99,99,99,107,127,119, 
99,0 

10088 DATA 99,99,54,28,28,54,99, 
0 

10089 DATA 102,102,102,60,24,24, 
60,0 

10090 DATA 127,99,70,12,25,51,12 
7,0 

10091 DATA 60,48,48,48,48,48,60, 
0 

10092 DATA 96,48,24,12,6,3,1,0 

10093 DATA 60,12,12,12,12,12,60, 
0 



10094 
10095 
10096 
10097 
10098 

0/0 
10099 

0 

10100 

9,0 
10101 

0 

10102 

0/0 
10103 

24 

10104 

5,0 

10105 

10106 

10107 

5,0 

10108 

0 

10109 

9,0 

10110 

10111 

/0 

10112 
20 

10113 
5 

10114 
0 

10115 
10116 

/0 

10117 

9,0 

10118 

/0 

10119 
/0 

10120 



DATA 8,28,54,0,0,0,0,0 
DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,255 
DATA 24,24,12,0,0,0,0,0 
DATA 0,0,60,6,62,102,59,0' 
DATA 112,48,62,51,51,51,11 

DATA 0,0,60,102,96,102,60, 

DATA 14,6,62,102,102,102,5 

DATA 0,0,60,102,126,96,60, 

DATA 28,54,48,120,48,48,12 

DATA 0,0,59,102,102,62,6,1 

DATA 112,48,54,59,51,51,11 

DATA 24,0,56,24,24,24,60,0 
DATA 6,0,14,6,6,102,102,60 
DATA 112,48,51,54,60,54,11 

DATA 56,24,24,24,24,24,60, 

DATA 0,0,230,127,127,107,9 

DATA 0,0,110,51,51,51,51,0 
DATA 0,0,60,102,102,102,60 

DATA 0,0,110,51,51,62,48,1 

DATA 0,0,59,102,102,62,6,1 

DATA 0,0,110,59,51,48,120, 

DATA 0,0,62,96,60,6,124,0 
DATA 16,48,124,48,48,54,28 

DATA 0,0,102,102,102,102,5 

DATA 0,0,102,102,102,60,24 

DATA 0,0,99,107,127,127,54 

DATA 0,0,99,54,28,54,99,0 



DMC "No Halt" 



Controller 




Other DMC features: 

• works with original CoCo, CoCo 2, or CoCo 3 
(Multi-Pak required) ^ 

• no adjustments — all-digital data separator and write 
precompensation 



Unleash your CoCo's potential! 

Our new Dual Mode Controller (DMC) implements a new • gold plated card-edge connectors for reliability 
"no halt" mode of operation so it can read from or write • ROM socket takes 24 pin or 28 pin chip; dual DOS capability 
to disk all by itself. The 6809 is freed to process other • Radio Shack DOS 1,1 ROM installed 
tasks and respond to interrupts. This is how OS-9 was • 8Kbytes cache memory on board (32K optional) 
meant to run! But the Radio Shack "halt" mode of 
operation is also retained to maintain full compatibility 
with existing non-OS-9 software. 



Pr««I Disk caching software included can speed up 
OS-9 disk accesses. 



D.R Johnson's SDISK package (specially modified for DMC) is 
included at no charge ($30 value) 

• aluminum case 

• fully assembled and tested; 120 day limited warranty 



Did you know? 

. . .that all the older floppy disk controllers for the 
CoCo completely tie up (and even halt) the 6809 pro- 
cessor during disk reads and writes? No wonder 
your keyboard is constantly "losing" characters! Or 
that your serial port often gives you garbage. 



X«HNOLOOIC< 

2261 East 11th Ave., Vancouver, B.C., Canada V5N 1Z7 



To ord«r: DMC controller with RSDOS 1.1 and SDISK (specify 
OS-9 Level I or II) $149.50 plus $5 S/H ($12 overseas). Add $16 
for 32K RAM option. Terms (prices in $US); check, money 
order, VISA. U.S.A. orders shipped via UPS from WA state. 




(Also ask about our ST-2900 
6809 based expandable 
single board computer) 

(604) 255-4485 (Pacific Time) 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 175 



10121 DATA 0,0,102,102,1)32,62,6, 
124 

10122 DATA 0,0,126,76,24,50,126, 
0 

10123 DATA 14,24,24,112,24,24,14 
,0 

10124 DATA 24,24,24,0,24,24,24,0 

10125 DATA 112,24,24,14,24,24,11 
2,0 

10126 DATA 59,110,0,0,0,0,0,0 

10127 DATA 0,8,28,54,99,99,127,0 

10128 DATA 30,51,96,96,96,51,30, 
12 

10129 DATA 102,0,102,102,102,102 
,59,0 

10130 DATA 12,24,60,102,126,96,6 
0,0 

10131 DATA 60,195,60,6,62,102,63 
,0 

10132 DATA 102,0,60,6,62,102,63, 
0 

10133 DATA 48,24,60,6,62,102,63, 
0 

10134 DATA 24,0,60,6,62,102,63,0 

10135 DATA 0,0,60,102,96,102,60, 
24 

10136 DATA 60,195,60,102,126,96, 
60,0 

10137 DATA 102,0,60,102,126,96,6 
0,0 

10138 DATA 48,24,60,102,126,96,6 
0,0 

10139 DATA 102,0,56,24,24,24,60, 
0 

10140 DATA 56,198,56,24,24,24,60 
,0 

10141 DATA 48,24,56,24,24,24,60, 
0 

10142 DATA 99,28,54,99,127,99,99 
,0 

10143 DATA 28,28,62,99,127,99,99 
,0 

10144 DATA 6,12,127,49,60,49,127 
,0 

10145 DATA 0, 0,126,27 ,126,216,12 
6,0 

10146 DATA 63,108,204,255,204,20 
4 , 207 ,0 

10147 DATA 60,195,60,102,102,102 
,60,0 

10148 DATA 102,0,60,102,102,102, 
60,0 

10149 DATA 48,24,60,102,102,102, 
60,0 

10150 DATA 60,195,102,102,102,10 
2 , 59 ,0 

10151 DATA 48,24,102,102,102,102 
59 .0 

10152 DATA 102,0,102,102,102,62, 
6,124 

10153 DATA 99,62,99,99,99,99,62, 



0 

10154 DATA 54,99,99,99,99,99,62, 
0 

10155 DATA 12,12,63,96,96,63,12, 
12 

10156 DATA 28,54,50,120,48,115,1 
26,0 

10157 DATA 102,102,60,126,24,126 
,24,24 

10158 DATA 248,204,204,250,198,2 
07,198,199 

10159 DATA 14,24,24,60,24,24,24, 
112 

10160 DATA 12,24,60,6,62,102,63, 
0 

10161 DATA 24,48,56,24,24,24,60, 
0 

10162 DATA 12,24,60,102,102,102, 
60,0 

10163 DATA 12,24,102,102,102,102 
,59,0 

10164 DATA 59,111,0,110,51,51,51 
,0 

10165 DATA 118,222,115,123,111,1 
03 ,99,0 

10166 DATA 60,6,62,102,59,0,255, 
0 

10167 DATA 60,102,102,102,60,0,2 
55 , 0 

10168 DATA 0,24,0,24,48,96,102,6 
0 

10169 DATA 0,0,0,126,96,96,0,0 

10170 DATA 0,0,0,126,6,6,0,0 

10171 DATA 195,198,204,222,51,10 
2,204,15 

10172 DATA 195,198,204,216,55,11 
1,207,3 

10173 DATA 0,24,0,24,24,60,60,24 

10174 DATA 0,51,102,204,102,51,0 

,0 

10175 DATA 0,204,102,51,102,204, 
0,0 

10176 DATA 34,136,34,136,34,136, 
34,136 

10177 DATA 85,170,85,170,85,170, 
85,170 

10178 DATA 219,119,219,238,219,1 
19,219,238 

10179 DATA 24,24,24,24,24,24,24, 
24 

10180 DATA 24,24,24,24,248,24,24 
,24 

10181 DATA 24,24,248,24,248,24,2 
4,24 

10182 DATA 54,54,54,54,246,54,54 
,54 

10183 DATA 0,0,0,0,254,54,54,54 

10184 DATA 0,0,248,24,248,24,24, 
24 

10185 DATA 54,54,246,6,246,54,54 
,54 



176 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



1)3186 DATA 
54 

10187 DATA 
4 

1J3188 DATA 

10189 DATA 

1J3190 DATA 

J3 

10191 DATA 

10192 DATA 

10193 DATA 

10194 DATA 

10195 DATA 
24 

10196 DATA 

10197 DATA 
,24 

10198 DATA 
24 

10199 DATA 
54 

10200 DATA 

10201 DATA 

10202 DATA 

10203 DATA 
4 

10204 DATA 
54 

10205 DATA 

10206 DATA 
54 

10207 DATA 

10208 DATA 

10209 DATA 
4 

10210 DATA 

10211 DATA 

10212 DATA 

10213 DATA 

10214 DATA 

10215 DATA 
54 

10216 DATA 
4,24 

10217 DATA 

10218 DATA 

10219 DATA 
55,255,255 

10220 DATA 
55 

10221 DATA 
40,240,240 

10222 DATA 
15 

10223 DATA 

10224 DATA 
,P 

10225 DATA 
110,96 

10226 DATA 



54,54,54,54,54,54,54, 

0,0,254,6,246,54,54,5 

54,54,246,6,254,0,0,0 
54,54,54,54,254,0,0,0 
24,24,248,24,248,0,0, 

0,0,0,0,248,24,24,24 

24,24,24,24,31,0,0,0 

24,24,24,24,255,0,0,0 

0,0,0,0,255,24,24,24 

24,24,24,24,31,24,24, 

0,0,0,0,255,0,0,0 
24,24,24,24,255,24,24 

24,24,31,24,31,24,24, 

54,54,54,54,55,54,54, 

54,54,55,48,63,0,0,0 
0 ,0 , 63 , 4 8 , 55 , 54 , 54 , 54 
54,54,247,0,255,0,0,0 
0,0,255,0,247,54,54,5 

54,54,55,48,55,54,54, 

0,0,255,0,255,0,0,0 
54,54,247,0,247,54,54 

24,24,255,0,255,0,0,0 
54,54,54,54,255,0,0,0 
0,0,255,0,255,24,24,2 

0,0,0,0,255,54,54,54 

54,54,54,54,63,0,0,0 

24,24,31,24,31,0,0,0 

0,0,31,24,31,24,24,24 

0,0,0,0,63,54,54,54 

54,54,54,54,255,54,54 

24,24,255,24,255,24,2 

24,24,24,24,248,0,0,0 

0,0,0,0,31,24,24,24 

255,255,255,255,255,2 

0/0f 0,0,255,255,255,2 

240,240,240,240,240,2 

15,15,15,15,15,15,15, 

255,255,255,255,0,0,0 

0,0,59,110,100,110,59 

60 , 102 , 102 , 124 , 99 , 99 , 

127,51,49,48,48,48,12 



0,0 

10227 DATA 

10228 DATA 
126,0 

10229 DATA 
,0 

10230 DATA 

10231 DATA 

0 

10232 DATA 
24,126 

10233 DATA 

10234 DATA 
2,231,0 

10235 DATA 

J3f0 

10236 DATA 

10237 DATA 
,96 

10238 DATA 

10239 DATA 
2,102,0 

10240 DATA 

10241 DATA 

10242 DATA 

0 

10243 DATA 
0 

10244 DATA 
2 

10245 DATA 
8,56 

10246 DATA 

10247 DATA 

10248 DATA 

10249 DATA 

10250 DATA 

10251 DATA 
0,28 

10252 DATA 

10253 DATA 

10254 DATA 

10255 DATA 

10256 • 



0,0,127,54,54,54,51,0 
126,102,48,24,48,102, 

0 , 0 , 63 , 102 , 102 , 102 , 60 

0,0,51,51,51,51,62,9 6 
0,0,126,152,24,24,24, 

126,24,60,102,102,60, 

28,54,99,127,99,54,28 

60,102,195,195,195,10 

14,24,12,62,102,102,6 

0,0,126,219,219,126,0 

0,3, 62,103,lj!>- 7 , 115, 62 

28,48,96,124,96,48,28 

60 , 102 , 102 , 102 , 102 , 10 

0,126,0,126,0,126,0,0 
0,24,126,24,0,126,0,0 
48,24,12,24,48,126,0, 

12,24,48,24,12,126,0, 

7,12,12,12,12,12,12,1 

12,12,12,12,12,108,10 

24,24,0,126,0,24,24,0 

0,59,110,0,59,110,0,0 

28,54,54,28,0,0,0,0 

0,28,28,0,0,0,0,0 

0,0,0,24,24,0,0,0 

15 , 12 , 12 , 12 , 236 , 108 , 6 

60,54,54,54,54,0,0,0 
56, 12,24,48,60,0,0,0 
0,0,60,60,60,60,0,0 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 



GET IT ALL!!! 

Ex cellent 38 Disk C oCo Software Library $135.00 
includes Word Processor, Modems, Utilities, 124 Games, 
Graphics/Pics, Business, Languages, Music and More. 
Public Domain and Shareware. Over 350 Programs. 

15% Discount to User Groups and Students, Major Credit 
Cards Welcomed, Call Lisa or Joe at 1-800-221-7372; in 
New York call 212-732-2565. 

Public Domain Software Copying Company 

33 Gold Street-Suite L3 
New York, N.Y. 10038 



j 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 177 



NEW 

DISK 
DRIVES 



95 



Starting at 



89 



with case & 
Power Supply 
1 29.95 




TANDON MPI TEAC 

Speed 6ms tk to ik and up 
Capacity 250k unformatted 
Tracks 40 

Warranty HOW 1 Year 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!! 

ALL DRIVES FULLY TESTED AND WARRANTEED 

We carry only the finest quality disk drives 
no seconds • no surplus 



New Low Price! 




Double Sided 
Double Density 



40 or 80 Tracks 
Vi Hght. Teac/ Panasonic 




Free Software for Drive 0 Systems 

CoCo Checker.Test roms, rams, disk drives and & controller printer, keyboard cassette & more. 
Tape/Disk Utility.. .Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



169 



95 



Drive 0 



• Full Ht Drive 
•Single Case 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & manuals 



189 



95 



Drive 0 



• Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



289 



95 



Drive 0 & 1 



• 2 Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



Other Drive Specials 



Drives cleaned, aligned & tested, 29 



95 



119* 

2nd Drive 

for new Radio Shack 
includes: 

• Slim Line DS/DD Drive 

• Cabling & Instructions 

• Mounting Hardware 



Full Ht Drive 


89 95 


Full Ht Drive Ps/Case 


129 95 




9995 


Slim Line Drive Ps/Case. 


139 95 


2 Slim Drives Ps/Case.... 


239 95 




59 95 



Single Ps & Case 

Dual Yaht Ps & Case 

Dual Full Ht. Ps & Case 
Disk Controller 



10 Diskettes 

with free library case 



44 95 
54 95 
79 95 
59 95 

9» 5 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 
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We welcome 
• Visa/ Mastercard Us-llsb? 




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Checks (allow 2 weeks for clearing) 
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Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 

Hours: Mon,-Sat, 9-6 (EST) 



Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Onier Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



Software Included 

• Pc-Write word processor 

• Pc-Calc Spreadsheet 

• Pc-File Database 

• Print Spooler 

• Ram Disk 

• Runs all popular software 



El 



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only 



699 



95 



Hardware Included 

4.77 mhz and 8mhz Turbo 
360k Floppy Disk Drive 
Monochrome or Color Card 
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Game, Printer and Serial Port 
Real Time Clock 
150 watt power supply 
640k memory 

At keyboard optional expanded 
Monochrome Monitor 
Optional Hard Disk Drive 




PRINTER CABLES AND 
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PRINTERS 




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OS-9 




KISSable OS-9 



A View of Multi- Vue 



By Dale L. Puckett 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Last month we reported that we 
had seen the future during a 
quick demonstration of Multi- 
Vue at RAIN BOWf est Princeton. We 
were impressed then. Now, after a few 
hours of hands-on exercise, we are 
ready to pronounce the future has 
arrived. Indeed, it would not be an 
exaggeration to proclaim that if Multi- 
Vue had been around when OS-9 ar- 
rived in 1983, this column probably 
wouldn't have been needed. 

Multi- Vue uses a visual metaphor to 
reduce the complexity of OS-9. Long 
OS-9 pathlists are often hard to re- 
member — especially for a beginner. 
Multi-Vue replaces those pathlists with 
pictures. Instead of remembering a 
pathlist to a file on a disk drive or other 
hardware device must begin with a slash 
(/), you need only remember a disk 
drive is a rectangular box with an 
opening in the front. 

Finding Files 

If you want to find a file on a floppy 
or hard disk with Multi-Vue, you 
simply point to the icon or graphic 

Dale L. Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association, Dale is a 
U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and lives 
in Rockville, Maryland. 



symbol that represents that disk and 
click the button on your mouse. If you 
don't have a mouse, you can simulate 
it with the arrow and function keys on 
the Color Computer 3 keyboard. 

After you click the mouse button, the 
name of the device selected is displayed 
in a title bar just below Multi-Vue** 
main menu bar. In a few seconds, a 
number of icons that look like file 
folders appear in the window. The name 
of each folder — or OS-9 directory — 
appears below each folder. To find out 
what is stored in one of these folders, 
you must move the mouse pointer to the 
folder and click twice. After you click, 
icons that represent any additional 
folders, documents or application pro- 
grams appear in the window. The com- 
plete OS-9 pathlist to that directory 
appears in the title bar at the top of the 
window. 

Essentially, when you run your Color 
Computer 3 with Multi- Vue, you select 
an object by pointing to it and clicking 
the mouse button. Then, you act on the 
object you selected by picking a verb 
from one of the pull-down menus at the 
top of your screen. 

For example, to list a text file to your 
screen, you point to its icon — a small 
picture that looks like a piece of paper 
with the top right-hand corner folded 
over. You then move the mouse until the 
pointer rests above the word Files and 
click the button. A shadowed box with 
a menu suddenly pops down from the 
menu bar and remains in place. You can 
then move the mouse until the pointer 



rests over the word List and click the 
button. 

After you push the button, an overlay 
window will pop out of the bottom third 
of your screen and OS-9 will list your 
file. It will pause and wait for you to 
press a key every time it fills the window. 

If you want to know more about the 
file you selected earlier, you can move 
the pointer and click over the word Stat 
in the file menu. Stat is similar to the 
Get Info command on the Macintosh. 
It shows you the name of the file and 
the number of the owner, and tells you 
when the file was first created and last 
modified. It also displays several addi- 
tional file attributes. For example, it 
will tell you if you can read from or 
write to the file. It tells you if it contains 
executable code and also how many 
bytes are stored in the file. 

After you select a document or file, 
you can use any of the commands in the 
menu that Multi-Vue has enabled. For 
example, if you have selected a text file, 
you will be able to list it, copy it, delete 
it, get information about it, print it or 
rename it. You will not be able to open 
it. On the other hand, if you have 
selected a file or document that contains 
executable object code, you will only be 
able to copy, delete, get information 
about or rename it. You will not be able 
to list or print it. 

Multi- Vue knows what it can do with 
the file or document you select because 
it reads the OS-9 attributes set on the 
file when it was created. It tells you what 
it can do by highlighting the commands 



180 



THE RAINBOW March 1988 



you can select. For example, when you 
select a file that contains executable 
code, the list and print choices on the 
menu appear dim. 

A Nice Shortcut 

There are two ways to run an appli- 
cation program using Multi- Vue. First, 
if you see an icon that looks like an open 
window, the file contains executable 
program code. To run that program you 
must first select the document and then 
move the mouse to the files menu and 
click on the word Open, 

If the application you want to run has 
its own icon, you will be able to take a 
nice shortcut. In this case, you, simply 
point to the icon and click twice. Multi- 
Vue will run the program for you au- 
tomatically. You will not have to go to 
the file menu and click Open. Unfortu- 
nately, it does not have command key 
shortcuts for common menu commands 
like Open, Print, etc. 

This shortcut can also be used with 
a document that was created by an 
application program with its own icon. 
For example, after you have created an 
application information file and an icon 
for your word processor, any document 
you save with the same three-letter 
extension as the AIF file will also be 
displayed with the word processor's 
icon. If you "double click" on one of the 
documents with that icon, Multi- Vue 
automatically loads your word proces- 
sor and then opens your document. 

Other Choices 

The file menu is only one of four 
Multi-Vue menus you may use while 
running your Color Computer 3. With 
the Disk menu, you can find out the 
amount of free space available on a 
floppy or hard disk, create a new folder 



— or OS-9 directory, format a new disk, 
back up an old disk, set your current 
execution directory or add new devices 
to your Multi- Vue desktop. 



"While Multi-Vue makes 
OS-9 power available to 
the masses, hackers won't 
need to worry about their 
elite status. There's 
plenty there for them, 
also. 93 



With the View menu, you can choose 
between an 80-column text display and 
eight folders displayed per row in the 
Hi-Res mode or 40-column text and 
four folders displayed in a row in the 
Lo-Res mode. With either choice you 
get three rows of documents or folders. 

The 'X' Must Mean Multitasking 

If you click over the 'X* on Multi- 
Vue's menu bar, you open another 
window of opportunity. Remember 
what a hassle it used to be to set the 
attributes on your serial or printer port? 
Or even worse, how many times have 
you found yourself writing a BASIC09 
program with GetStat or SetStat 
system calls to set the key-repeat delay 
or speed? These hassles are gone when 
you use Multi- Vue*s 'X' menu. Actually, 
the Multi- Vue manual calls this icon the 
"Tandy" menu and if you look closely 
you'll notice the top and bottom of the 
'X' are closed. 

From the Tandy menu you can also 
start a clock, use a decimal/ hexadec- 
imal calculator or work with a built-in 
calendar to keep track of your schedule. 
Later, OS-9 application programs will 



be released that make use of the clip- 
board standard built into Multi-Vue. 
This means that in the future you will 
be able to cut a selection of text or a 
drawing out of one document and paste 
it in another. With a little luck and 
additional standards, we may someday 
be able to paste drawings in our word 
processing documents and vice versa. 

I strongly encourage the OS-9 Users 
Group to establish a standards commit- 
tee and create a Multi-Vue clipboard 
standard immediately. If the Users 
Group doesn't act, I certainly hope that 
several major Color Computer OS-9 
software developers will join forces long 
enough to publish a standard. Without 
a workable Multi-Vue clipboard stand- 
ard, CoCo OS-9 users will never have 
the ability to cut and paste text data and 
graphics images between applications. 
We need this ability if OS-9 is to realize 
its potential in today's market. May the 
users force the issue! 

Multi-Vue Manual Is Hacker's Heaven 

While Multi-Vue makes OS-9 power 
available to the masses, hackers won't 
need to worry about their elite status. 
There's plenty there for them, also. In 
fact, the information in the back of the 
Multi- Vue manual is a gold mine. With 
it, we can all learn what makes a win- 
dowing system like Windlnt. ID tick. 

We'll learn about window types and 
learn how to create framed windows 
with scroll bars, plain framed windows, 
windows with shadowed boxes, win- 
dows with a double box and windows 
with a plain box. We'll learn about 
"regions" and what to do with the 
information revealed by them. And 
we'll learn how to design our own menu 
bars and add pull-down menu support 
to our programs. 



OS-9 tm SOFTWARE/HARDWARE 



L1 UTILITY PAK - Contains 40 uselul utilities that run under both level I and II OS- 
9. Included are a complete set ol "wild card" file handling utilities, a disassembler, a 
disk sector editor, and the MacGen command language compiler. MacGen will allow 
you to generate many useful command macros in minutes, much more useful than 
procedure files. Macro source Is included for a macro to implement an archival 
backup type function $49.95 

L2 UTILITY PAK - Contains a Level II "printerr" function that also shows the 
pathname being searched for when "not found" or permission type errors occur. 
Also contains level II software ram disk driver. Ten other utiiites included, some useful 
for level I also $39.95 

L1+L2 COMBINATION PAK both of above together for $75.00 

SDISK • Standard disk driver module replacement allows full use of 40 or 80 track 
double sided drives with OS-9 Level I. Full compatibility with CoCo 35 track format 
and access all other OS-9 non-CoCo formats. Easy installation. $29.95 
SDISK+BOOTFIX - As above plus boot directly from a double sided diskette. 
$35.95 

SDISK3 - Level II version of SDISK driver. Same features as level I (except boottlx 
not required to boot from double sided). $29.95 



PC-XFER UTILITIES - Programs to format and transfer files torttom MS-DOS"" 
diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. (Requires either SDISK or SDISK3 to run depending 
on which level of OS-9 you are using) $45.00 

MSF • MS-DOS disk format file manager. More complete file transfer capabiltites for 
level- 1 1 only. (Requires SDISK3 to operate). $45.00 

CCRD 51 2K byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE - Operates faster than similar device 
sold by others. Requires RS Multipak interface, two units may be used together for 
1MB. OS-9 Level I & II drivers and test software included. $169.00 

DISKM ASTER HARD-DISK/JO INFORMATION: Free color brochure describing 
the Diskmaster Hard-disk, HD floppy, multi-l/O system and the Plus-1 00 CoCo-3 
memory expansion is available when you send an S.A.S.E.. Nothing else for the 
CoCo can compare in quality or capability. 

All diskettes are in CoCo OS-9 format; other OS-9 formats can be supplied for $2.00 
additional charge. All orders must be prepaid or COD, VISA/MC accepted, add $1 .50 
S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD, additional charge for COD. 

D. P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St., Portland, OR 97223 

(503) 244-81 52 (For best service call between 9-1 1 AM Pacific Time, Mon.-Fri.) 

OS-9 is a trademark of Mlcrowara and Motorola Inc., MS-DOS Is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 181 



Hint u .■ 



M/L Autostart 

You can quickly make a ma- 
chine language program autostart 
(and restart) by including the 
following statements at the ap- 
propriate place in your program: 

ORG $0182 
JMP execad 

The execad is the execution 
address of the program* After this, 
the program will start itself after 
loading. It will also restart when 
the reset button is pressed. 

David Mills 
Huntington* WV 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . , 

Does your dungeon need clean- 
ing? Make things a little more 
organized in your D&D games 
with this one-liner, which gener- 
ates a printed chart to help you 
keep track of your character's 
qualities. 



The listing: 

6 Z$-STRING$(8j3,"-«) :A$-CHR$(138 
) +CHR$ (138): INPUT "NAME » ; N$ : PRINT 
#-2 , CHR$ ( &HE) N$A$Z$ : PRINT#-2 , "ST 
R: "A$"INT: ,, A$ ,, WIS : "A$"DEX: H A$»CO 
N: «A$ M CHA: "A$A$"HIT PTS: "A$"ARM 
CLASS: "A$ "MONEY : H A$Z$ "EQUIPMENT 
CARRIED" : FORT-1T05 : PRINT* -2 r A$:N 
EXT:PRINT#-2,Z$"0THER NOTES 



Keith Schuler 
Merritt Island, FL 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the 
author ha« been sent copies of both The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



182 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



Also in the back of the Multi-Vue 
manual, C programmers will find the 
long-awaited documentation to the 
CGFX library that comes with the 
Program Development Package. In it, 
they'll find the definitions for the high- 
level windowing environment and the 
structure definitions needed to access it. 

One note of caution is in order with 
Multi-Vue. As you build your first 
working disks, make sure you do not 
name any files with a period followed 
by a three-letter extension, e.g., . TXT or 
.BIN. GShell, the graphics shell in 
Multi-Vue, seems to suffer from a 
conflict between these files and Multi- 
Vue^ Application Information Files 
(AIF) and tends to hang up if it encoun- 
ters them in a directory. Be careful. 

When you install Multi-Vue, follow 
the directions in the manual carefully 
and you shouldn't have any trouble. Be 
sure you use the original OS-9 system 
disk and not one you have modified 
with non-standard modules when you 
generate your new Multi-Vue system. 
Multi-Vue will work with hard disks, 
RAM disks or just about any other 
RBF device that has the proper device 
descriptor and device driver installed. 
However, the script file provided on the 
Multi-Vue release disk expects to find 
the standard set of Tandy OS-9 mod- 
ules. 

If you are an OS-9 veteran, feel free 
to generate a Multi- Vue system start-up 
disk that works with your hardware. 
Just use the 0S9Gen utility with your 
own bootlist file. That's the method I 
used to generate my system disk and it 
worked like a charm from the start. 



PhantomGraph Appears Promising 

Tandy released one of the most useful 
business tools available on the Color 
Computer last month. PhantomGraph 
is Fort Worth's answer to the old axiom, 
"One picture is worth a thousand 
words." With it, you can convert nu- 
merical data from your DynaCalc 
spreadsheet into a pictorial form that is 
easy to understand. If you don't have 
DynaCalc, you can still plot your data 
with PhantomGraph. 

The type of chart you need depends 
on the data you want to explain. Phan- 
tomGraph lets you present line graphs, 
bar charts, pie charts and scatter charts. 
The program is easy to install — you 
simply copy it into your current execu- 
tion directory, /D0/CMD5. Once it is in 
place, you run it by typing pg. 

PhantomGraph uses pull-down 



menus to make your plotting easy. Its 
four menus include Files, Drawing, 
Graph and Utilities. Graph lets you pick 
the color of your charts, enter your 
data, draw the charts and add titles to 
your work. To enter data into Phantom- 
Graph, you use the Data item under the 
Graph menu. You simply move an 
arrow into a blank area of the screen 
and type in the numbers. This method 
works quite well for simple charts but 
would be very tedious if you had a lot 
of data to handle. When large charts 
and graphs are required, the DynaCalc/ 
PhantomGraph link is in order. 

To link the data from DynaCalc into 
a PhantomGraph chart, you use a 
special utility program supplied with 
PhantomGraph. The program, called 
Dyna, converts the spreadsheet files 
into PhantomGraph files. 

To make a chart this way, enter your 
data into a DynaCalc spreadsheet and 
save it using the DynaCalc S#S option. 
After this is done, call Dyna from the 
PhantomGraph Utility menu and let it 
make the conversion. When the data 
window appears, the conversion is 
complete. 

Next, click the mouse button with the 
pointer off the data window to get back 
to PhantomGraph proper. At this 
point, you can call up the Graph menu, 
set your chart type and add your titles. 
This done, you open the converted file 
from the file menu, select Draw from 
the Graph menu and youll soon be 
looking at your new chart. 

If you have a few spreadsheets that 
were saved in the Sylk format on your 
MS-DOS machine at the office, you can 
also use PhantomGraph to display 
charts made from them. A special utility 
program supplied with PhantomGraph 
will convert your Sylk files to DynaCalc 
files. Once you have them in this famil- 
iar format you can make as many charts 
as you need. 



OS-9 Users Group Active Again 

Dave Kaleita, a long-time veteran of 
the OS-9 Users Group, has become the 
group's president following Bill 
Turner's resignation from that office. 
Turner must be thanked for his long 
hours and yeoman efforts to get the 
group back on its feet after administra- 
tive details had been neglected far too 
long by his predecessor. 

Kaleita, who is noted for his manage- 
rial ability, seems to be getting the ball 
rolling again. As I was finishing this 
column, Bill Brady (Wiz author and 



new MOTD editor) had just sent a new 
issue of the group's newsletter to the 
printer. He hopes to repeat that task 
every two months. The issue contains a 
ballot, and, for the first time, the OS- 
9 Users Group will elect its officers by 
mail. Those ballots must be returned to 
the Users Group's post office box in 
Tampa, Florida, by March 1. The 
names of the new officers will be an- 
nounced in the May/June issue of 
MOTD. 

The slate includes Kaleita for presi- 
dent, Pete Lyall for vice president, 
George Dorner for treasurer and Kevin 
Darling for secretary. I cannot praise 
Kaleita highly enough for the outstand- 
ing work he did when he served as the 
group's software librarian while I was 
president several years ago. The same 
goes for George Dorner, who is prob- 
ably responsible for keeping me sane. 
Without his extremely hard work and 
outstanding help I never would have 
made it through the two terms. Kevin 
Darling and Pete Lyall are both ex- 
tremely well-known — Pete for his hard 
work as an assistant SysOp on Compu- 
Serve's OS-9 SIG, and Kevin for his 
continuous and outstanding help to 
newcomers on rainbow's OS-9 Online 
SIG on Delphi. They will both serve the 
group well. 

Again, let me go to bat for this new 
round of volunteers and encourage you 
to help them keep the group alive. Four 
officers alone do not a Users Group 
make. The group is yours. These guys 
are just trying to manage the group so 
it will be there to serve you. They cannot 
do the job alone — even though they 
will certainly try. 

They need your articles for MOTD, 
your programs for the software ex- 
change library and your support when 
they hold an event near you. If you buy 
only one or two disks from the software 
library in a year, you will have recouped 
the money you paid in dues. 

The library archive now contains 1 1 
80-track, double-sided disks, and you 
can buy the entire set from the group for 
$100. The software is also distributed on 
56 individual disks and includes more 
than 300 programs. You can order 
individual disks in the Color Computer 
format for $6 each directly from the OS- 
9 Users Group at their Tampa address. 

If you are in a hurry, you can get 
immediate service by ordering them by 
telephone from FHL in Syracuse, New 
York. FHL charges $10 for this service 
and pays a royalty to the Users Group 
for each disk sold. Consult the latest 



edition of MOTD for a listing of the 
group's library. 

Kaleita also announced the names of 
several of the group's committees. He is 
asking George Dorner, Bill Turner, 
Steve Odneal and Bill Brady to join him 
on the finance committee. The member- 
ship committee will include Kevin 
Darling, Dave Kaleita, Pete Lyall, 
George Dorner and Bill Turner. Pete 
Lyall, Dave Kaleita, George Dorner, 
Kevin Darling and I will serve on the 
public relations committee. The news- 
letter committee will include Bill Brady, 
Kevin Darling, Pete Lyall, Greg Morse 
and Bert Schneider. The software ex- 
change committee will include Carl 
Kreider, Dave Kaleita and Bert 
Schneider. And, finally, the communi- 
cations committee will include George 
Dorner, Bill Brady, Pete Lyall and Greg 
Law. 

The address for disk orders, renewals, 
or volunteers is OS-9 Users Group, 
Suite R-237, 1715 East Fowler Avenue, 
Tampa, FL 33612. 

The UG Software Library, Part II 

Last month we showed you how easy 
it is to use a fourth-generation database 
program like Sculptor to tackle a large 
database like the OS-9 Users Group's 
Software Exchange Library. These new 
database languages actually write their 
own programs after you tell them what 
the data looks like. However, large 
projects with dozens of databases can 
easily get out of hand. That's the topic 
of this month's discussion. 

After years of working with Sculptor, 
Frank Hogg finds it takes him only a 
few minutes to write most programs. 
Yet, he sometimes spends weeks plan- 
ning his databases. He told us if he had 
to write equivalent programs in C or 
BASIC, it would probably take him 
several months. The example programs 
we showed you last month took him less 
than 20 minutes. 

The question, then, is how to go 
about planning a large database. The 
first step is a thorough examination of 
the problem and the data. When we left 
Hogg pondering the solution last 
month, he had a database that was 
already defined. 

He started his enhancement by add- 
ing a new field where he could store the 
number of sectors required to hold each 
program. This additional field will 
make it easier to rearrange disks in the 
future. Then he asked another question. 
Is there anything else that might be 
needed in the database? If so, he wanted 




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PRINTERS 



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Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 
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All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Adver- 
tised prices are cash prices. CO D. accepted add 2% (minimum charge 
$10.00). M.C.. Visa add 2%. All non defective items require return 
merchandise authorization. Call tor RMA Number before returning. 
Delivery is subject to product availability. Add »VHb for shipping and 
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124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1 -800-248-3823 



March 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 83 



to add the new fields immediately 
before writing a number of additional 
programs to manipulate the data. 

Hogg wanted to include a way to find 
things in the database with a keyword 
search. For example, a communications 
program might have keywords like 
XModem, Kermit, Comm, etc. He 
added that ability quickly. But editing 
or deleting a record made maintaining 
the keyword database messy. He needed 
a cleaner method to maintain the key- 
words. 

At first he thought he could limit the 
keywords to some fixed number — 
maybe five — and then add the key- 
words to the main database. If he did 
this, the keyword database could be 
made up of just the index without the 
data, which would make the program 
quicker. The only negative aspect about 
this approach was the predetermined 
limit. The file would get a little larger, 
but it's a small file, anyway. 

Next, Hogg thought about a double 
keyword file — one with the keyword 
first and one with the title first. He could 
then find the keywords quickly by 
looking at the titles. It sounded like a 
kludge, but the idea wasn't that bad. 
The inserting, deleting and amending 
process would take twice as long, but if 
there were five keywords it would still 
take only one or two seconds. That 
wouldn't be a problem. 

The size wouldn't be a problem either. 
In fact, the total disk space would be less 
because space would only be assigned to 
keyword records he needed. His first 
approach had required the keywords be 
assigned a space in the main database 
where the space would be reserved 
whether it was actually used or not. 

These alternative solutions all pose 
interesting questions. Hopefully, they 
will give you some idea about what you 
should look at when you plan your next 
database. Remember, you must look at 
more than one aspect of the problem. 
You must consider speed, disk usage, 
database maintenance and the com- 



plexity of the programs — as well as the 
needs of the database application itself. 

As it turned out, the way Hogg wrote 
the program originally was the best way 
for this application — although it was 
a very crude way to accomplish the goal. 
It was also more than fast enough. It 
squarely met two of the most important 
criteria. 

The only slow area in the application 
was the part used to delete and amend 
the records. Since these actions are 
rarely used in this application, the 
slower speed of these functions does not 
present a problem. Additionally, the 
program is easy to understand and 
allows any number of keywords in each 
main database record. The only thing it 
lacks is a way to delete individual 
keywords that may have been entered 
accidentally. The code in Figure 1 takes 
care of the job. 

Other Database Considerations 

In 1983, Hogg created a Sculptor 
invoicing program for FHL that uses 
six different databases to create each in- 
voice. The main file is the customer 
database. One handy field in Hogg's 
customer database is the most recent 
invoice number. When the program 
finds a customer, it can then find the 
most recent invoice and display it. At 
the same time, the description of each 
item on the invoice is retrieved from 
another database. 

Hogg added a field in each invoice 
that holds the next most recent invoice. 
This lets him step back through invoices 
that refer to a customer and see what he 
has purchased over the years. His fore- 
thought came in handy recently when he 
offered an upgrade to DynaStar, the 
firm's popular word processing pro- 
gram. His customers did not have to 
send in their original disks to upgrade. 
He was able to verify the fact that they 
were eligible for an upgrade by looking 
at their records when they called. 

Everything worked fine with Hogg's 
database until last year when, after four 



years of 24-hour, seven-days-a-week 
service, the disk drive failed on his 6809- 
based Gimix III. And, as luck would 
have it, he did not have the system fully 
backed up. He recovered most of the 
data, but some of the old invoices got 
lost in the process. 

Many of Hogg's invoices were in the 
middle of a chain and his database 
design did not have a provision for this 
occurrence. He lived with the situation 
for several months while trying to figure 
out an easy way to find the missing links 
to thousands of invoices. He decided he 
needed a forward link in the invoices 
and an additional field in the customer 
file that pointed to the beginning of the 
chain. With these additions, he could 
get to an invoice from either direction. 

He began to make the changes during 
a four-day Thanksgiving weekend. At 
the same time, he moved the data over 
to one of his QT 68000 systems. He used 
Sculptor's Reformat utility to copy the 
data over to another file with extra 
blank fields. Then he wrote a Sculptor 
program that went down each linked 
list, created a backward link and set up 
the customer files to point to the begin- 
ning of the chain. It took the better part 
of a day to run this program, but when 
it was through, he had solved most of 
his problems. 

Hogg then wrote a simple program to 
update the invoice database and search 
for any invoices that weren't flagged by 
the previous program. He relinked these 
missing links and the job was done. It 
didn't take as long as he thought it r 
would, but, as he remarked recently, "It 
wouldn't have had to be done if I had 
planned the database correctly in the 
first place." 

Group Library Database Revisited 

Sculptor is a nice database program, 
but not everyone owns it. Hogg needed 
to find a way to allow anyone to use his 
new Users Group Software database. 
Hogg solved the problem with a pro- 
gram named Grep, which can be found J 
on UG Disk #13. ' 

Grep is a text string search utility. It j 
looks through a text file and prints any * 
line that contains the search string. He 
decided to format a straight text file 
with data from the UG database that 
non-Sculptor users could search with 
Grep, | 

First. Hogg studied Grep, He found ] 
it prints each line that matches the * 
search string. He also realized most ) 
terminals, including the CoCo 3, have 
an 80-column display. 



dk=delete keyword 
check disk 

message "Use BACKSPACE to finish inserting" 
input kjceyword bs - END 
k_title = u_title 
find dkey 

prompt "Are you sure" no « END 

delete dkey 

end 

Figure 1 



184 THE RAINBOW March 1988 



SUPER PRODUCTS 



INTRODUCES 

THE FANTASTIC „ 
SUPER CONTROLLER IE 

POWER BEYOND BELIEF 




Radio Shack/Tandy controller compatible. 

Works on ail COCOs! 1, 2 or 3, with or without Multi-pale interface. 
One 24/28 pin socket, for 8K ROM, 2764, 27128 or 27256. 
Internal Mini-Expansion-Bus Connector for one DISTO 
Super Adapter board. 

Low Power draw; Within COCO's power requirements. 
Gold Plated edge connectors. 
Under OS-9: 

• Buffered Read/Write sector achieved without halting the CPU. 

• Continual use of keyboard even while Reading or Writing to disk. 

• System's Clock no longer looses time during Read & Write. 

• NMI is blocked and transferred to IRQ in software for low CPU overhead.. 

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• Drivers (written by Keven Darling) for Level 1 and 2. 



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Introductory Price $130 



] ISTD SUPER CONTROLLER I $99. 95 



A superb controller. Along with 
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ZeroK $29.95 



Full 5 12K 89.95 




Now is the time to upgrade your 
COCO 3 to 51 2K of memory. 
Available with or without mem- 
ory chips, the Super Ram 3 
board is easily installed inside 
the COCO. It is fully compatible 
with OS-9 Level 2 and is deliv- 
ered with a software package 
(for BASIC) that includes; a 
printer spooler, a ramdisk, a 
memory test and an install/con- 
figure program for your system. 



REAL TIME CLOCK AND PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE 
Have the Real Time, date and year displayed on your screen at a simple 
command. $39.95 

MINI EPROM PROGRAMMER 

A low cost EPROM programmer that attaches directly to your Disto 
Super Controller to program those often used utilities. $54.95 

HARD DISK INTERFACE 

A hard disk interface fully compatible with S.A.S.I.controller. Fits inside 
the Super Controllers, Ramdisk or MEB adapter. OS-9 Drivers are 

included. $49.95 
SUPER RAMDISK 5 12K 

Imagine having access to 51 2K of virtual disk memory in close to no time. 
Upgradable to One Megabyte $1 1 9.95 

MEB ADAPTER 

A Stand-Atone Mini-Expansion-Bus in which you can plug any other 
DISTO Adapter directly in a Multi-pak without the need for a Super Controller 

or Ramdisk $24.95 



SEND FOR I 


FREE 1988 WINTER CATALOG 3 


o~c C 

10802 Lajeunes; 

MASTER CARD 
AND VISA 
ACCEPTED 


RC COMPUTERS inc. 

se, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3L 2E8 

1-514-383-5293 

We accept phone orders. 
Call for Canadian prices. 
Include S&H of $4 or $8 if order exceeds $75. 



He decided to let Sculptor create a 
text file in which each line contained all 
the data from a record. The line could 
be many screen lines long, but it would 
look good on the screen if he padded it 
with the proper number of spaces. 
Figure 2 shows the Sculptor program 
that created the Grep file. 

The variable tab it is an integer 
number used to calculate the tab offset 
when printing from one to three lines of 
text. Remember that the disk file can 
have some blank lines in it. The index 
used in loops in Sculptor is scrl ine. In 
BASIC, the code would look like this: 

FOR 1=1 TO 3 

PRINT U_FUNCTION(I) 
NEXT I 

The scroll function is different be- 
cause it does not require the paren- 
theses. The Sculptor code takes some 
getting used to, but it saves a lot of 
typing. The scroll function makes more 



sense in screen programs, but it is also 
used in report programs for continuity. 

Seeing the end statement probably 
suggests to you that the program will 
stop after printing just one record, but 
in Sculptor , exit is used to stop a 
program and end is used to tell Sculptor 
to get the next record. Here is how we 
make the file for use by Grep: 

0S9: sagerep disk pvdu > 
diskgrep 

Sagerep is the Sculptor report pro- 
gram, disk is the program above and 
pvdu is the printer driver for the termi- 
nal — Hogg didn't want any printer 
control codes in the file. He used the 
>diskgrep in the command line to 
redirect the output of sagerep to adisk 
file named diskgrep. Here's how you 
use the file diskgrep: 0S9: grep grep 
diskgrep or 059: grep GREP disk- 
grep. 

Another nice addition would be a 



report that shows the disks in volume 
number order. Hogg used a simple 
utility called reformat to rearrange the 
database. 

Here are the descriptors for vol disk: 

KEY FIELDS 
l:u_volume, ,a2, 
2:u_ti tie, ,a20, 

Notice he used the same field names 
but only two of them. A new index file 
is created by the command line 0S9: 
reformat disk voldisk. Hogg then 
changed the u_ to v_ with the Sculptor 
describe utility. 

The program below lists a file in the 
new order. The driving file is vol- 
disk. Each time a record is retrieved in 
voldisk, Sculptor automatically looks 
up a record in disk with the key from 
voldisk. . 

!file 1 voldisk !xfile 2 
disk key = v_title 

print u_volume,u_ti tle,u_ 
from 

Here are the first few lines of output: 

0 RTTRJCHG WAGGONER, ROLAND T. 
0 B00TSPLIT KREIDER, CARL R. 
0 DDIR SEATON, UM. GLENN 
0 DLIST KREIDER, CARL R. 
0 DDCGEN3 KALEITA, DAVID L. 

Sculptor works with up to 16 data- 
bases per program. Six can be open at 
a time. Relationships can be set up 
between all of the different databases in 
any way you choose! 

Goldberg's Dsort 

This month we feature some more of 
Stephen Goldberg's fine assembly lan- 
guage code. Dsort will sort your direc- 
tories in alphabetical order. It is a short 
program that will quickly sort and 
consolidate up to 250 filenames in a 
directory. 

Since Dsort is an ASCII sort, if you 
maintain the OS-9 convention of using 
uppercase for subdirectories and lower- 
case for filenames, the sorted directory 
will list all the subdirectories at the top. 
To use this program, type Dsort fol- 
lowed by the name or pathlist of the 
directory you want to sort. If you omit 
the directory name, the program will 
sort your current working directory. 

That's it for March. Enjoy Multi- Vue 
and we'll see you next month with more 
tips and cods. □ 



!file disk 

! temp tabit , , 12 

print ******* Title: ";u_title;' f From: " ;u_f rom; tab(80) ; 
print "Size: ";u_size;" Ver: ";u_ver;" Lang: " ;u_JLanguage ; 
print " Format: " ;uJE ormat ; tab(160) ; 
scroll 1 LOOP\ 

if ufunction - then goto END_LOOP 

tabit=160+(scrline*80) 

print u_funct ion; tab (tabit ) ; 

scroll 

if scrl ine < 4 then goto LOOP END_LOOP\ 

print "Program Type : " ;u_type ; " Vol : " ;u_volume ; 

print " Used? ";u_used 

end 

Figure 2 



The listing: Dsort 

****VoV*WoW<-***************** 
* 

* DSORT - COPYRIGHT (c) 1987 by S.B.GOLDBERG 
* 

* Use: dsort [directory] 

* Omit directory name for current directory 

* 

* Produces sorted disk directories of up to 250 

* filenames . 
* 

ifpl 

use /dp/def s/os9def s 
endc 

* 

mod len , name , prgrm+ob j ct , reent +1 , entry , ds iz 

* 



186 



THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



NRIHands-On Training With an IBM PC Compatible Plus 20 Meg Hard Disk 

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You start with the step-by-step 
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You build and test the "intelligent" 
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the high-resolution monitor. But that's 
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technical staff, ready to help you when 
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Free 100-Page 
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training, which gives you 
all the facts about NRI 
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... below 

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3939 Wisconsin Avenue, 
Washington, D.C. 20016. 



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SCHOOLS 



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3939 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016 

w' :heck one free catalog only 

□ Computer Electronics 

□ TV/Video/Audlo Servicing 

□ Robotics 

□ Electronic Music Technology 

□ Satellite Electron Ics 

□ Digital Electronic Servicing 



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For Career courses 
approved under Gt Bill 

□ check for details. 



□ Electronic Design Technology 

□ Industrial Electronics 

□ Communications Electronics 

□ Basic Electronics 

□ Bookkeeping and Accounting 

□ Building Construction 

□ Automotive Servicing 



□ Air Conditioning, Heating 8. Refrigeration 

□ Small Engine Repair 

□ Electrician 

□ Locksmlthing & Electronic Security 

□ Travel Careers 

□ Telephone Servicing 

□ Paralegal 



Name (Pease print) 



Age 



Street 



Clty/State/Zlp 



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Accredited by the National Home Study Council 



000-000 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety. of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
renumeration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 



path rmb 
pointer rmb 
pointer2 rmb 



buffer 



dsiz 

* 

name 



rmb 
rmb 
rmb 
equ 



1 I/O path number 

2 filename pointer 

2 comparison pointer 
8000 directory buffer 
200 stack 
200 parameter 



current 



fcs /dsort/ 

fcb 1 edition number 

fee /(c)1987 S.B.Goldberg/ 

fcs /./ current directory 

* OPEN DIRECTORY 

entry decb parameter? 

bne open yes, open directory 

leax <current,pcr no, current directory 

open Ida #updat.+dir. update directory mode 

os9 i$open open directory 

bes pass exit with error 

sta path save path number 

bsr skipdots omit directory and parent 

* GET DIRECTORY ENTRIES 

leax buffer,u directory buffer 

clr ,x end of buffer marker 

ldy #32 length of entry 

os9 i$read get entry 

bes error branch on error 

tst ,x deleted file? 

beq reread yes, get next entry 

tfr x,y buffer pointer 

ldb ,y+ end of name? 

bpl endloop no, look some more 

andb #%01111111 clear ms bit 

stb -l>y return to filename 

clr ,y end of name marker 

leax 32, x bump pointer 

bra getentry get next entry 



getentry 



reread 



endloop 



skipdots pshs 
ldx 
ldu 
os9 

pass bes 
puis 
rts 



error 



cmpb 

bne 

bsr 



u save 'U 1 register 

#0 

#64 

i$seek skip first 2 entries 

out exit with error 

u retrieve f U f register 

return 

#e$eof end of file? 

out exit with other error 

skipdots reset directory pointer 



>v 

* SORT DIRECTORY ENTRIES 



1 88 THE RAINBOW March 1 988 





1 pay 


sorti 


S LX 




1 AAV 




Ida 




n A /"I 




tvnl 
Dpi. 


sort J 






bra 




C l- 




V\ A /"> 








bhi 




bio 

L> J- \J 




s tv 




Ida 




bed 

Ly \-» vj 












DJ.U 




1QX 




Vita 


1 nuPT 

J- vJ W Ci. 


ldx 

J- UA 




lay 


lower2 


leay 




bra 



buffer,u buffer address 
pointer save filename pointer 
32, x comparison filename 
,x first filename character 
setend end of sort 
sort4 not sorted, continue 
y,x already sorted 
sortl try again 
,y end of buffer? 
output yes, put in directory 
,y compare 

sort3 no match, continue sort 
lower2 no match, continue sort 
pointer2 save comparison pointer 
,x+ filename character 
lower end of filename 
,y+ compare 
compare same look again 
lower no match, continue sort 
point er2 new filename pointer 
sortl continue sort 
pointer retrieve pointers 
pointer2 

32, y new comparison 
sort2 try again 

* 

*. OUTPUT SORTED ENTRIES 

x,y filename pointer 
,y+ filename characters 
end of name? 
fixloop no, look some more 
#%100PP000 set ms bit 
-l,y return to filename 
path path number 
#32 length of entry 
i$write entry to directory 
out exit with error 
,x set sorted indicator 
com do again if not set 
sort continue sort 

* 

* TERMINATE DIRECTORY 
* 

path path number 
#ss.pos file pointer function 
i$getstt get pointer position 
out exit with error 
#ss.size file size function 
i$setstt set eof at pointer 
out exit with error 

clear error 
f$exit quit 



output 
fixloop 



com 



tfr 

ldd 

tstb 

bne 

ora 

sta 

Ida 

ldy 

os9 

bcs 

com 

bpl 

bra 



setend 



out 
len 



Ida 

ldb 

os9 

bcs 

ldb 

os 9 

bcs 

clrb 

os9 



emod 

equ 

end 




About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . 



the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
one or two line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




March 1988 THE RAINBOW 189 



I Racksellers 



The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis and 
may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We 
suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

Tuscaloosa 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Cottonwood 
Lake Havasu 

Crty 
Phoenix 
Siena Vista 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayettevilie 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Berkeley 
Citrus Heights 
Grass Valley 
Half Moon Bay 
Hollywood 

La Joila 

Los Angeles 

Marysville 

Napa 

Oakland 

Sacramento 

San Francisco 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvale 
Torrance 

COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Glenwood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 

DELAWARE 

Mlddletown 
Mllford 
Newark 
Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington, 
DC 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 
Injun John's, Inc. 

Electronic World 

A & W Graphics Co, 

Book Nook 
TRI-TEK Computers 
Livingston's Books 
Books, Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Eiecrronics/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Ca. 

Lyon Enterprises 
Software Plus 
Advance Radio. Inc. 
Strawflower Electronics 
Levity Distributors 
Stef-Jea Inc. 

Butler & Mayes Booksellers 
Circus of Books (2 Locations) 
Bookland 

Bookends Bookstore 
DeLauer's News Agency 
Deibert's Readerama 
Tower Magazine 
Booksmith 
Bookworks 
Castro Kiosk 

Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Camino College Bookstore 

Aurora Newsstand 

Hathaway's 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Readmore Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 

Delmar Co. 
Mllford NewsStand 
Newark Newsstand 
Normar, Inc. —The Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA (cont'd) 

Tallahassee Anderson News Co. 

DuBe/s News Center 
Computrac 



MASSACHUSETTS (cont'd) 



FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Clearwater 
Cocoa 
Danid 
Davte 

Ft Lauderdale 



Gainesville 
Jacksonville 



North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensacoia 
Pinellas Park 
South 

Pasadena 
Starke 

Sunrise 



Chronichles 
News Room 
World News. Inc. 

Great American Book Co. 
Software. Software. Inc. 
The Avid Reader 
The Open Door 
Dania News & Books 
Software Plus More 
Bob's News & Book-Store 
Ciarks Out of Town News 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 
The Book Nook 

White's of Downtown Bookstore 

Almar Bookstore 
Royd-Fbert Corp. 
Anderson News Co. 
Wolfs Newsstand 

Poling Place Bookstore 
Record Junction, Inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Sunn/5 at Sunset 



Titusville 

GEORGIA 

Atlanta 

Bremen 

Forest Park 

Jesup 

Marietta 

Thomasville 

Toccoa 

IDAHO 

Boise 
Moscow 

ILLINOIS 

Belleville 
Champaign 
Chicago 
Decatur 



East Mollne 

Evanston 

Kewanee 

Lisle 

Lombard 
Newton 
Paris 
Peoria 



Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

Crawfordsville 

Dyer 

Franklin 

Garrett 

Indianapolis 



Lebanon 

Martinsville 

Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Des Moines 
Fairfield 
Ottumwa 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson 
Topeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Hopklnsvllle 

Louisville 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 
New Orleans 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Oxford 

Sanford 

MARYLAND 

College Park 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 



Border's 

Bremen Electronlcs/Radlo Shack 
Ellers News Center 
Radio Shack 
Act One Video 
Smokehouse Newsstand 
Martin Music Radio Shack 

Book Shelf, inc. 
Johnson News Agency 

Software or Systems 
Bookmark 

B. Dalton Booksellers 
Book Emporium 

K-Mart Plaza 

Northgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Norris Center Bookstore 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Empire Periodicals 
Bill's TV Radio Shack 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 

Sheridan Village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Illinois News Service 
Book Emporium 

Sangamon Center North 

Town & Country Shopping Crr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Place 
North Shore Distributors 

D 8c D Electronics 
Radio Shack 

White Cottage Electronics 
Book Corner 

Micra Computer Systems, Inc. 

Koch's Books 

Miles Books 

Gallery Book Shop 

Finn News Agency, Inc. 

Bookland, inc. 

Borders Bookshop 

Delmar News 

Indiana News 

Southside News 

Gallery Book Shop 

Radio Shack 

Mitting's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 
ThackerVs Books, Inc. 
Kramers Books & Gifts 
Southside Drug 

Crossroods, Inc. 

Palmer News, Inc. 

Town Crier of Topeka, Inc. 

Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 

Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 

Lloyd's Radio 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Matf$ News & Gifts 
Hobby Shop 

Hawley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 
Radio Shack 



City NewsStand 

Sidney's News Stand Uptown 

The Book Rack 



Brockton 

Cambridge 

Ipswich 

Littleton 

Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Harrison 

Hillsdale 

Holland 

Howell 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Perry 

Riverview 

Roseville 

MINNESOTA 

Bumsvlile 
Crystal 
Duluth 
Edina 

Minneapolis 
Minnetonka 
Roseviiie 
St. Paul 



Wllimar 

MISSOURI 

Farmlngton 
Flat River 
Florissant 
Jefferson City 
Kirksvllie 
Moberly 
St. Louis 
St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Butte 
Whltefish 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Keene 
Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 

Cedar Knoiis 

Ciinton 

Marmora 

Pennsviile 

Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 

Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Falls 
Huntington 
Johnson City 
Now York 



Magazines, Inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Books-N-Things 
Radio Shack 

University Bookstore 

Eastern Newsstand 



Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak, Inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 
Border's Book Shop 
Robbins Electronics 
Merit Book Center 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Electronics Express/Radio Shack 
Fris News Company 
Howell Auto Parts 

Curfs Sound & Home Arcade Center 
The Eight Bit Corner 
Perry Computers 
Riverview Book Store 
New Horizons Book Shop 

Shinder's Bumsvlile 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Carlson Books 
Shinder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shinder's Ridge Square 
Shinder's Roseville 
Shinder's Annex 
Shinder's Maplewood 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Ray's TV & Radla Shack 
Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Bailey's TV & Radio 

Plaza Books 

Consumer Electronics of Whltefish 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Bookcellar 
Hurley Electronics 
Steve's Books & Magazines 

Radio Shack Associate Store 

Bookwrights 

Verham News Corp. 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World ti 
Outpost Radio Shack 
Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 
Software Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Front Page Newsstand 
Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 

village Green-Buffalo Books 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Cromland. Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., inc. 

On Une: Computer Access Center 

GA West & Co. 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicom Electronics 

Barnes fit Noble— Soles Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station. Track 37 

200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1 ) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonll Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 



190 



THE RAINBOW March 1 988 



NEW YORK (cont'd) 



Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhaven 
NORTH CAROLINA 



State News 
Walden Books 
World Wide Media Services 
Universal Computer Service 
Village Green 
World Wide News 
Spectrum Projects 



TENNESSEE (cont'd) 

Nashville Davis-Kidd Booksellers 

Mosko's Place 
R.M, Mills Bookstore 
Delker Electronics 



Cary 

Chapel Hill 
Charlotte 

Havlock 

Hickory 

Jacksonville 

KernersvfJle 

Marion 

Winston-Salem 

OHIO 

Akron 

Blanchester 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbiano 

Columbus 



Dayton 



Dublin 
Fairbom 

Findley 
Kent 

Lakewood 
Lima 

Miamisburg 

Parma 

Toledo 

Warren 

Xenia 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa . 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Aiientown 
Altoona 
Bryn Mawr 
Feastervilie 
King of Prussia 
Malvern 
Phoenixville 
Reading 
Temple 
West Chester 
Wind Gap 
York 



RHODE ISLAND 

Newport 
Warwick 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Clemson 
Rorence 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 
Union 

TENNESSEE 

Brentwood 
Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxville 

Memphis 



News Center in Cary Village 

University News & Sundry 

Newsstand Infl 

Papers & Paperback 

Computer Plus 

C 2 Books 8c Comics 

Michele's, Inc 

K&S Newsstand 

Boomers Rhythm Center 

K & S Newsstand (3 Locations) 

Rainbow News Ltd. 

Churchill News & Tobacco 
JR Computer Control 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Clnsoft 

Erieview News 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

B6 Software 

Micro Center 

The Newsstand 

Books & Co. 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wilke News 

Wright News & Books 

Book Bam 

News-Readers 

Wllke's University Shoppe 

Open Book 

The News Shop 

Lakewood Intemationol News 

Edu-Caterers 

Wilke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Plaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, Inc. dba Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store, Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owl Services 
Newborn Enterprises 
Bryn Mawr News 
Global Books 
Gene's Books 
Personal Software 
Stevens Radio Shack 
Smith's News & Card Center 
Software Comer 
Chester County Book Co. 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Tollgate Bookstore 

Bellevue News 
Software Connection 

Software Haus, Inc. 
Clemson Newsstand 
Ray's #1 

Palmetto News Co 
Software City 
Fleming's Electronics 

Bookworld #5 
Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Davis-Kidd Bookseller 
Computer Center 



Smyrna 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Brenham 
Desoto 
Elgin 

Harltngton 

UTAH 

Provo 

VIRGINIA 

Danville 

Hampton 

Norfolk 

Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Port Angeles 
Seattle 

Tacoma 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 
South 
Charleston 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Kenosha 
Madison 

Milwaukee 

Racine 

Waukesha 



ALBERTA (cont'd) 

Strathmore 
Taper 
Westlock 
Wetaskiwln 



Wheatland Electronics 
Fynewood Sight {k Sound 
Westiock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Kingsford 

CANADA- 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Blairmore 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Fairvfew 

Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

CentTe 
Hinton 
Innisfail 
Lecombe 
Leduc 
Lethbridge 
Uoydminster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 
Stettler 



Poncho's News 
Moore's Electronics 
Maxwell Books 
The Homing Pigeon 
Book Mark 

Valley Book Center 

K&S Newsstand 

Benders 

f-O Computers 

Turn The Page 

Volume I Bookstore 

Port Book 8t News 
Adams News Co., Inc. 
Bulldog News 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Spring Hill News 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
R.K. News, Inc. 
Pic A Book 
University Bookstore 
Juneau village Reader 
Little Professor Book Center 
Holt Variety 



Information Telecommunlcatjones 

Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
L & K Sports & Music 
Paul Tercier 

Double "D" A.S.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shack, asd 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
AS,C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack, ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 

Jim Cooper 

L & S Stereo 

Brian's Electronics 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 

Datatron 

Lioyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shock Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Waiter's Electronics 
Stettler Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Burnaby 
Burns Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chilliwack 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Langley 
N. Vancouver 
Nelson 
Parksville 
Pentlcton 

Sidney 
Smithers 
Squamish 
100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altona 

Lundar 

Morden 

the Pas 

Selkirk 

Vlrden 

Winnipeg 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood 
Carbonear 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Haltfax 

ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsville 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

QUEBEC 

LaSaile 
Pont. Rouge 
Vllle St Gabriel 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assiniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Sheilbrcoke 
Tisdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whltehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



Compullt 

VT, Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesoft Marketing 
Langley Radio Shack 
Microwest Distributors 
Oliver's Books 
Parksville TV 
DJ.'s 

Four Corner Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 

Tip Top Radio & TV 

LAWIebrLtd. 
Goranson Elec. 
Central Sound 
Jodi's Sight 6c Sound 
G.L Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Ltd. 



Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewitt Elec. 

Seaport Elec. 
Stade Realties 

Atlantic News 

Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Huntsville Elec. 

Donny "B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Messagerles de Presse Benjamin Enr. 

Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Gilles Comeau Enr/Radio Shack 

Teistar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H & O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 



Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles — in Canada, Waldenbooks, Pickwick 
Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & 
Brentano's, and Community Newscenters. 



March 1988 THE RAINBOW 191 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



After Five Software 131 

Alpha Products . . .21 
Burke & Burke > . .173 

Cer-Comp ,141, 143 

(3 1 ri soft »'•. • • * * » ♦ ♦, ♦ *■ » * * * * .• ~* t*. * • • 1 1 5 

CJN Enterprises #.* P .8& 

Clearbrook Software 

Group 119 

CNR Engineering 71 
CoCo Cat Anti-drug . . . i. . ? T . . 65 

Cognitec , ... 29 

Coiorware . , .22, 23 

Computer Center , :f> , ,. + * : * .39 

Computer Island ...... . .. , . . .193 

Computer Plus . . 3 

Computerware . , ..... + + . ., . . ,77 
CY-BURNET-ICS . ... > , . ,,. .145 

D. P. Johnson 181 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc. ,..,...136, 137 
Delphi ......... . * * * . . ... 106, 107 

Diecom . .IPC, IBC 

Disto/CRC ..185; 

E3orsett « . « . « l >. . . . ...... ^ ■. ■ ■ « « .. ."17 

E. Z. Friendly Software .45 

Federal Hill Software 85 

Frank Hogg Laboratory + + , .63, 125 
Gimmesoft . .. . i. .... . , , ^ . 

Glenn Calafati 113 

Hard Drive Specialists . ..... .161 

Hawkes Research 

Services 119 

Howard Medical 66, 194 

ICR Futuresoft .. — * .. .41 

K SCjFT **.«...■ • . . . ■ ■ i»: * . . 1 09 

Metric Industries 57 

Micro Works, The 1 17 

Microcom Software , < .9, 11, 13, 15 
Microtech Consultants 

Inc 81 

MieroWorld . , . ,. ;? : . ..... .... ,103 

NRI. i . * »' ♦ •».:• , *' . .. ... .; ..• * ... . . . r . ^"l 87 

Other Guys CoCo, The ........ 1 27 



Owl-Ware 151, 152, 153 

Performance Peripherals . . , , . .135 

Perry Computers. , .183 

Preble's Programs, Dr BC 

Public Domain . . — 177 

PXE Computing . . ..... .... 7 

R.A.D. Products. « . ... 115 

R.G.B. Computer Systems 97 

R.J.F. Software > .... .113 

Rainbow Binder. . .> .56 

Rainbow Bookshelf .120, 121 

Rainbow Gift Subscription , . . . .116 
Rainbow on Tape and Disk .99 

RAINBOWfest . ..J ..34, 35 

Saint Johns Gallery 1 1 1 

Sardis Technologies . . . .175 
SD Enterprises . , .46, 67 
Soft-Byte ...95 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



Software House, The 95 

SpectroSystems * . . 1 09 

Speech Systems .... .50, 51, 52, 53 

Sugar Software 163 

Sundog Systems . < 155 

T & D Software . . , , 30, 31 , 47 

Tandy/Radio Shack . .58, 59 

Tepco... . .,...133 

Three C's Projects ............ .62 

Tom Mix Software 149 

Tothian Software, Inc 145 

True Data Products 178, 179 

Vidicom Corporation . . .101 

Wasatchware 97 

Woodstown Electronics 173 

YoFk 1.0. ...... ..: , »•••♦' ■* ........ . . . . 1 65 

Zebra Systems ^ .......... 87 



□ Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative * 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 




1 92 THE RAINBOW March 1988 




BULLETIN BOARD 




MATH ON DISK ' 

Add Fractions $19.95 

Subtract Fractions 19.95 

Multiply Fractions 19.95 

Trigonometry Tutor 19.95 

Linear Equations 19.95 

Quadratic Equations 19.95 

Number Sequences 19.95 

Signed Numbers 19.95 

Binary Dice Game 19.95 

Moneypack 19.95 

Distance Problems 19.95 

Comparison Shopping 19.95 

Sales & Bargains 19.95 

Bank Account 19.95 



LANGUAGE ARTS ON DISK 

Beyond Words 1 ,...$1*9.95 

Beyond Words 2 19.95 

Beyond Words 3 19.95 

Vocabulary Builders 1 19.95 

Vocabulary Builders 2 19.95 

Vocabulary Builders 3 19.95 

Cloze Exercises 3,4,5,6, or 7.19.95 

Punctuation Practice 19.95 

Story Details 2-3 or 4-5 19.95 

Drawing Conclusions 3-4 19.95 

Drawing Conclusions 5-6 . 19.95 

Context Clues Gr. 2-3 19.95 

Context Clues Gr. 4, 5, 6, or 7.19.95 




OTHER SUBJECTS ON DISK 

Explorers & Settlers $19.95 

Famous American Women 19.95 

Street Map Game 19.95 

States & Capitals 19.95 

Know Your States 19.95 

History Game 19.95 

Chemistry Tutor 24.95 

Science Game 24.95 

Color Computer Literacy 19.95 

French Baseball 19.95 

Spanish Baseball 19.95 



GAMES ON DISK 

The Pond $29.95 

The Factory 29.95 

Teasers By Tobbs 29.95 

Wheel of Fortune 19.95 

Wheel (Coco3/RGB) 19.95 

Pegs (Coco3/RGB) 19.95 

Name Flag (Coco3/RGB) 19.95 

First Games 24.95 

Arrow Games 21.95 

Mr. Cocohead 19.95 

Preschool 1,2, & 3 24.95 



TAKE ADVANTAGE OF MOST DISKS AT TAPE PRICES. 
LIMITED TIME ONLY. GOOD UNTIL APRIL 15,1988 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 



Computewrlsland 



SEAL 



(71 8) 948-2748 Evenings after 7:00 PM EST g 

Dept. R,227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send tor catalog with complete description::,. 
Please add $1 .00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 





Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 




Corporate/School: 




disk NEW FROM J&M 

CONTROLLER 

The DC-4 is a scaled-down version of the popuiar DC-2 
without a parallel port. It includes a switch with 2 ROM 
sockets, JDOS, manual and such features as gold connec- 
tors and metal box. It accesses double sided drives and ac- 
cepts RSDOS 1.1 for Radio Shack compatability. 



DC-4 with memory minder 
($2 shipping) 



$65 

RS DOS ROM CHIP 





ROM chip fits inside disk controller. 24 pin fits both J&M 
and RS controller Release 1.1* For CoCo 3 Compatability. 



$25 



each 



Reg. $40 
($2 shipping) 




DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 
DRIVE 0 



$17845 



Separate Disk Drive Components 

DD-3 An MPI 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



$98 



(*2 shipping) DRIVE ONE 



TEAC T-3 1 /2 height, double sided, double density, 720K 
bare drive, includes all mounting hardware. 

NEW 



$159 



(*2 shipping) 




TEAC 55B bare drive, Va height, double-sided, double density with 
all mounting hardware, needs CA-2 below to fit R.S. 501, 



$118 



(*2 shipping) BARE 



SP-C ^^v^ 

Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial output to run 
a parallel printer like Star or Epson. Includes all cables. Add $10 for 
modem attachment. ($2 shipping) $gg 45 



CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to the drive. 

$0495 CA2 $2995 

One Drive Two Drive 



g, 



GUARANTEE — Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try 
it out, test it for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for 
any reason, return it in 30 days and well give you your 
money back (less shipping). 



Howards Drive 0 gives you a 
DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only. Add $34 for a Disto DC-3 replacement ($5 shipping) 

DOUBLE SIDED ■■Pll 

sr LE DEN8,Tv ail^ 



FAX Order Numb 

278-9513 




LX-800 $239 

Friction and tractor feed included 

160 CPS 
3K Buffer 

NLQ on front buttons 
Package includes free SP-C serial to 
parallel converter and Epson tutorial 
on disk. 




Star NX-10 



$238 



WORD PACK RS 
BASIC SCREEN EDITOR 

• Full documentation 

• Works on CoCo1,2&3 

• Add lines without renumbering 

MYDOS by Chris Hawks 

• Simplify your directory, 

• Accesses double sided drives 

• Use J&M on CoCo 3 



CoCo MAX by Cotorware 



• Specify II or II 

• Includes high res interface 

• Animation 

• Printers supported include, R.S. 1Q5, 106, 130: Star: & Epson 




(*2 shipping on software) 




MONITORS 



Sony KV-1 311 CR $449 



Regular *625 

(MS shipping) 




• Vivid Color 

• Vertically flat 13" screen 

• Monitor/Trinitron TV with remote control 

• 640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot 
pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and composite 
inputs 

• VCR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 

MAGNAVOX 7622 $88 

12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 350 lines 
resolution at 20 MHz on a dark glass anti-glare CRT 
with built-in audio and 1 year warranty. 

7652 Green Screen • Same Specs • Same Price 







HARD DRIVE 

20,000,000 Bytes 

equivalent to 125 RS, 50Tsdn line 
mtcroatepping heads have 15 position per track 

automatic temperature compensation realigns head every five minutes for 
trouble tree reads and writes 
will also work with IBM & clones 

complete package includes 20 meg drive, case & power supply, controller 
and interface that plugs into slot #3 of multfpack interface. ^fiQQ 00 
1 year warranty ^05?5f» 

(5 ship) 

BASIC driver lets you access this hard drive without need for OS-9 $48.95. 




g 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, 



0622 




ORDl 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 5:00 Moo Fri. 
10:00 3:00 Sal. 



WE ACCEPT VISA i MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 



C.QD. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO.'S 



Shipping charges are for 48 states 
APO and Canada order slightly higher. 




1 




pea' 







SEE FRONT COVER 



FOR OTHER DIECOM GAMES 



J 






« PREBL EI'S 
PROGRAMS 



Introducing PYRAMIX 

for your Color Computer 3 ! 

PYRAHIX is a 100% machine language game written exclusively to take advantage of all the power in your 128K 
CoCo 3. The colore are brilliant, the graphica sharp, the action hot. 

nvniin-* foAM.rP* the finest in animation, graphics, sound effects and game play available today. It has all 
Extras you want! too' such as a pause option, RGB and CMP modes, keyboard or joystick play, help screen, 
multiple skill level, and the ability to backup your disk. 

Beat of all is the low price! Available today, for only $24.95 on disk + s/tal 

: — : And Llqfitning Strikes! 1 



Product of 
ColorVenture 



Hit 018600 
SCUHL : 010358 



LIEVEM 1 
ROUMDJ 1 

5* W 



LIGHTNING KAH DISK is the moat versatile RAM disk for your 5121 Color Computer 3! LIGHTNING RAM 
DISK will allow you to use up to 4 mechanical drives and 2 RAM drives simultaneously for a total of 
6 Driveal This RAM DISK will also work simultaneously with our amazing LIGHTNING PRINTER SPOOLER! 
$19.95 on disk + a/h. 

LIGHTNING PRINTER SPOOLER for the 128K or 5121 Color Computer 3. Multitask your computer! Dump 
more than 400K of text to the spooler "instantly." Then, continue your keyboard work while it sll 
prints out! Also compatible with our LIGHTNING RAM DISK above. $14.95 on disk + a/ta. 

LIGHTNING BACKUP utility for your 5121 Color Computer 3 reads your master disk once and then makes 
superfast multiple disk backups on all your driveal No need to format blank disks. Supports 35, 40 
or 80 track^ double or single sided disks and adjuatable step rate. $14.95 on disk + a/ta. 

Order oil 5 for ontu $4435 • s'h 






iUpj 










1 


□ 


1 * 







1 0 0 



pi * 



BASIC FRJ1H D0H! No one wants to be chained down. And 
yet, if you type in BASIC programs, you have been 
subject to involuntary servitude! The culprit? 
BASIC'S limited EDIT command. 




Demand Tour BASIC FREEDOM! Programmed by Chris BabCock for ColorVenture, this software gives you a 
full screen editor for typing in and editing BASIC programs! Move the cursor anywhere on the screen. 
Insert, delete or add text. It's the same concept as in a word processor, except you never have to 
leave BASIC! BASIC FREEDOM is an invisible machine language program which you can turn on ana o££ at 
will Even nressina RESET will not hurt your BASIC FREEDDOM! Simple, yet powerful with an easy to 
rtaa' manual? San? extra "nice touches" included, like KEY REPEAT and LOWERCASE INTERPRETER which 
leta you type BASIC commands in upper or lower case for ease of programming. Translation to 
uppercase is automstie for commands. Text in quotes ia not affected. y or ^ 0 j 2, or 3 I 

SPECIAL COCO 3 VERSION lets you work in 32, 40, or 80 column display modes. A separate version is 
available for the CoCo 1 and 2. Available on disk for $24.95 + s/h. 

MENTAL FR EEDOM by Dr. Preble! IMAGINE! Some day, a computer so advanced that it responds to your 
very "" t houghts and emotions. Imagine, some day, thought-controlled graphica: levitation and 
materialization! PLUG IN TOOR MDfD and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS— that day is now! The Radio Shack 
Color Computer has many advanced capabilities, juat waiting to be tapped. Dr. Preble s Programs 
combinea the advanced technology of the CoCo with the amazing Radio Shack Biofeedback Monitor to 
bring you "Mental Freedom." f or fcto 2 Of 5 

TBOWOT-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any video game you have ever played, our Thoughtware 
testa your ability to handle stress, to remain calm under adverse circumstancea. LIGHTNING FAST 
reflexes will do you no good here, unless you first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. Are ypu the 
^ , 1 - S u i,««n « "Poker Face" even when they are worried 90 that 




secretely nervoua type? Many people can keep a 
others may not notice; but can you really stop the worry itself? Find 



ou 



t with Mental Freedom! 



AND IT TALKS! Did you know that the CoCo can produce incredibly realtatic digital speech without a 
special speech synthesizer? The voice quality ia so good, it sounds human! Honest, Beat of all, no 
tra hardware is needed for speech, just some clever programming by Dr. Preble. 



ex 



QlffifityWoice w rfHSui 



vi m ti> atr> »wi t 
^BttfrtWIBTftfHauii'gtor 1 ^ 

$\2K Diytal Voice 
Recorder for your 
), 2, or 3 1 



MENTAL FREEDOM - Next time your friends ssk what your computer can do, show 
them Dr Preble^ Thoughtware! Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback Monitor 
Catalogue #63-675. Mental Freedom - DISK only $24.95 + s/h 



VDOS, the UnDISK: Save multiple programs in memory. Or save multiple graphic pictures in memory. Works with 
or without a disk. Let's you SAVE, LOAD and KILL atored programs or graphics. DIRECTORY function lists 
files, gives the Btart, end and execution addresses of machine language programs and number of free bytes 
remaining. Own a RAM disk without buying s disk drive! Requires 64K CoCo 1 or 2. Available on tape or disk 
for $24.95 + shipping/handling. +m^^m j~OX CoCO 1 Ot" 2 

VDUMP, for the UnDISK: Backup all your UnDISK files to a single tspe fils for eaay reloading A rauat for VDOS 
users! On tape for $14.95 + shipping/handling. 



VPSINT, for the UnDISK: Paper printout for UnDISK Directory 

Check, money order, Mastercard 

Visa or CO A for Shipping 
in U.S.A or Canada add $2.50, 
1o other Countries, add $5.00. 



On tape, $9.95 + shipping/handling. 



Vt$A 




Chock. Money Order or 
TOD 





* Record voice or any sound into RAM 
'* Record and playback at 2 speeds 

* Save and Load voice to disk 

* Select normal or high fidelity 

* Record more than 2 minutes of speech if 
you have a 512K CoCo 3 

* Fully compatible with CoCo 1 and 2 

* Featurea Sound Activated Playback. 
Messages will playback automatically for 
your family when any noiae is made. 
Could also scare off prowlers. 

Vocal Freedom includes special cable. 
Requires only a low cost amplifier (RS 
cat. 1277-1008) and any microphone. 

On Disk, only $39.95 + s/h 

Incorporate digitally recorded voices or 
sound into your own programs. Requirea 
Vocal Freedom, above. 



Oiv-disk, only $14.95 + s/h 



Order from 
Dr. Preble's Programs 
6540 Outer Loop. . 
Louisville, KY 40226 

(502) 969-/8/8 
24 HOUR ORDER LINE 



for CoCo 
i, ? or 3* 



1 a £ 2 H © T 

Dress up youi Bisk Di tec tout 
uttfi colorful messages ant£ 

bolder s Create useful help 
irjessnaes Add that- pro- 
fessional touch to uour cre- 
ations! Outti $995 




CoCo Pro$rm f Ilk 



CoCoBraille 



« » 

4 



Emboss Grade 1 or Grade 2 
Braille using your CoCo 1, 2 
or 3 and a Brother Daisy Wheel 
printer! Fast Print to 
Braille conversion algorithm 
converts word processor files, 
program listings and data 
files into touch readable 
Braille. For use by the blind 
or the sighted. No knowledge 
of the Braille code Is 
necessary. Just send print to 
the program and out comes 
Braille! Note: The complex 
Grade 2 conversion is very 
good and though not always 
perfect, quite readable. 
Requires 64K or more. Brother 
HR series printer or the IF-50 
interface series required. 
Low Cost! Similar software 
costs 3 times as much. Only