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THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 





1 




\\v\e". 








SEE BACK COVER 
FOR OTHER DIECOM GAMES 



1 





PI 




after 



after 









BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 429.00* 
Tandy 1000 SX 1 Drive 384K 649.00 
Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 51 2K 899.00* 
Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg. Ram1959.00 
Color Computer 2 w/64K Ext. Basic 89.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 159.00* 

Radio Shack DMP-130A 120 CPS 279.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel339.00 

Star Micronics NP-1Q 100 CPS 169.00 

Star Micronics NX-10 120 CPS 199.00 

Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 359.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 120 CPS 189.00 

Panasonic P-10911 160 CPS 210.00 

Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 349.00 

Okidata 182 120 CPS 229.00 

Okidata 192+ 200 CPS 339.00 

Okidata 292 240 CPS 489.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Radio Shack DCM-212 179.00 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

The Magic of Zanth (CoCo3) 34.95 
Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 
Color Max 3 (CoCo3) 59.95 
COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 
COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTermbyPXEComputing29.95 39.95 
TelePatch III by Spectrum 29.95 
C III Graphics bySpectrum(CoCo3)19.95 
Font Bonanza by Spectrum (CoCo3)29.95 
TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo3 512KRamDiskbyCerComp 19.95 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71.95 
Inside OS-9 Level II Book by FHL 39.95 
VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 



Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149,00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 
BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 
KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 
TIMELY DELIVERY 
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 

PS 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Interface 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 
CM-8 6' Extension Cable 
Serial to Parallel Conv. 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 99.00 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

Flight 16 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

Nuke the Love Boat (CoCo3) 34.95 



89.00 
14.95 
19.95 
59.95 
26.95 
329.00 



*Sale prices through 2/10/88 

Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our relail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 






P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 




Tabl e of Cont e 




20 ^ 

B4S/C for ^ 
Beginners III 

David W. Ostler 

77?e f/?/rd In a four-part series 

of BASIC tutorials 

30 

Compu-Match ^ 

Robert Rogers 
Let CoCo calculate 
friendship compatibility 

36 

The Vote Is In 

Cray Augsburg 
Results of the rainbow's 
Fourth Adventure Contest 

To Overthrow ™ 
the Controllers 

Bruce K. Bell, O.D. 
Grand prize 

Adventure Contest winner 

Castle of Death®* 

Chinarut Ruangchotvit 
16K Best of Show 
Adventure Contest winner 



77 

VCR Tapes Update 

Randy Mayfield 

A patch allowing use on 

a different VCR 

The Color Gallery^ 

Eric White 

Bring the CoCo 3's palette to 
PMODE 3 and 4 graphics 

Wear Your Heart ^ 
on Your Screen 

Brian Catlett 

An electronic Valentine's 

card for the one you love 

108 d> 

Follow the ^ 

Bread Crumbs 

Dennis H. Weide 
A tutorial on finding 
machine language addresses 

114 

Artifact Colors ^ 
on CoCo 3's RGB 

Steven M. Ostrom 

A patch to display CoCo 1 and 

2 colors on the CM-8 monitor 



118 

A Healthy Interface: 
Body Maintenance 
and Computing 

Laurence D. Preble 

The hazards of spending long 
hours at the computer 



February 1988 
Vol. VII No. 7 



122 

Programming for 
the Hi-Res Joystii 
Interface 

Duane M. Perkins 

An ML program to help y 

program the interface 

126 

A Picture Is Wo 
6, 144 Bytes % 

Dennis H. Weide 
Reversing a PMODE 4 
graphics image 

142 

Sounding Out # 
the ABCs 

John M. Linge 

A modification to the AB( 

educational program 

152 

The Impact 
of Multi-Vue 

Cray Augsburg 
A first look at Tandy's use 
friendly interface for OS-i 
Level II 

154 a 

Hackers Haven 

A roundup of five nifty 
programming utilities 




4 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



I Novices N4che^ 
78 

Life in a Fish Bowl 

Sandy Tadman 

79 

A CoCo Pop-Up 
Calculator 

Frank Turner 

80 

The ABCs of 
Organization 

Andre Needham 

80 

Hard Copy Your 
Directory 

Jim Knoppow 

81 

Reading Word 
Processing Files 

Chris Steele 



;Jfib The cassette tape/disk sym- 
bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on Page 28. 



Departments 

Advertisers Index 192 

Back Issue 

Information 177 

CoCo Gallery 18 

Corrections 14 

Letters to Rainbow 6 

Maxwell Mouse 33 



One-Liner Contest 
Information 

Racksellers 



2S 



Rainbow Info. 



.190 
. 10 



Received & Certified 138 

Scoreboard 82 

Scoreboard 

Pointers 84 

Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 74 

Subscription Info 16 



Co l umns 



90 

BASIC Training 

Joseph Kolar 

A tutorial on typing in 

programs 

16 

Building February's 
Rainbow 

Jutta Kapfhammer 
Managing Editor's notes 

146 

Delphi Bureau 

Cray Augsburg 
Delphi's Battled nes and 
Hutchison's database report 

168 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 



76 

Education Notes ^ 

Steve Blyn 

Estimating expenses, Part II 

14 

PRINT#-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's Notes 

150 

Turn of the Screw 

Tony DiStefano 

Build an electronic EPROM 

emulator eraser 

94 

Wishing Well ^ 

Fred Scerbo 

The ultimate testing 

programs 

"CoCo Consultations" 
will return next month 



The Rainbow 



1 Rainbow teefr 



171 

Barden's Buffer 

William Barden, Jr. 
An a f maze'ing Adventure 



182 

KISSable OS-9 4} 

Dale L. Puckett 

Using a fourth-generation 

database language 



1 Product Reviews 



Backup Lightning/Performance Peripherals 
C A IS/4 fter Five Software 



Color Math/ Tandy Corporation 

Color Max 3 Font Editor/ Spectrum Projects 

Currillian Cruiser/G/e/? Calafati 

Disklock/Sr/an J. Rodia 



Kung-Fu Dude/Sundog Systems 
Master Disk/Bob's Software 



Robot Odyssey/777e Learning Company 
Video Cards/Keno/7on? Mix Software _ 



.136 
133 
.136 
-132 
132 
_130 
.129 
.133 
.131 
.135 



the rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 
phone (502) 228-4492, THE RAINBOW, RAlNBOWfest and THE RAINBOW and 
RAlNBOWfest logotypes are registered • trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705- 
050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding Postage Guaranteed. 
Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada 
Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by FALSOFT, Inc., 
1 987. THE rainbow Is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers 
and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of 
information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use 
is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, 
without warranty of any kind whatsoever, o Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color 
BASIC and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp, • 
Subscriptions to THE RAINBOW are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian 
rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $1 03. 
All subscriptions begin with next available issue. • Limited back issues are 
available. Please see notice for Issues that are in print and their costs. Payment 
accepted by VISA, MasterCard, American Express, cash, check or money order 
in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/ 
12ths the subscription amount after two issues are mailed. No refund after 
mailing of three or more magazines. 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Jody Gilbert 

Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 

Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 

Copy Editor Lauren Willoughby 

Technical Editor Cray Augsburg 

Technical Assistants Ed Ellers, 
Joe Pierce 

Editorial Assistants Sue H. Evans, 
Wendy Falk, Toni Frank, 
Monica Wheat 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., 
Steve Bfyn, Ton/ Dr'Stefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Robert Hatfield, Jr., 
Rita Lawrence, Denise Webb 

Typesetter Jody Doyle 

Falsoft, Inc. 



President Lawrence C. Falk 
General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst. to the Publisher 

Sarah Levin 
Executive Editor James E. Reed 
Editorial Coordinator Jutta Kapfhammer 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Production Coordinator 

Cynthia L. Jones 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Bonnie Frowertfeld 
Director of Fulfillment Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Representative 

Beverly Beardon 
Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 
Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 
Director of Production Jim Cleveland 
Dispatch Tony Olive, Sharon Smith 
Business Assistant Laurie Falk 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, 
see Page 192 

Cover illustration copyright ® 1987 
by Fred Crawford 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 5 



OS-9 Happenings 

Editor: 

I have had OS-9 Level II for eight months 
and got nowhere with it until I bought Dale 
and Peter's latest opus — then it happened! 

It is as if someone turned on a switch in 
my head! Having bought the book a week 
ago, I am now going back to the original 
manual and actually understanding it! 

I cannot stress the importance of Level II 
on the CoCo 3 highly enough. I have seen 
a Hi-Res game and a complex database 
running concurrently on my $200 box — I 
can really see what all the excitement is 
about. Although my experience with com- 
puters stretches back to the early days of 
minicomputers, I have always been a bit of 
a computer oaf — strictly an "I don't care 
how it does it" type of person. So, if I can 
figure Level II out, anyone can. 

My brother is a long-time CoCoist (got 
me interested), but lately he's been thinking 
about buying MS-DOS. But on my recom- 
mendation, he now wants to see some of the 
new applications under Level II. 

A friend of mine bought Data Master 
from Computerware. I got to play with it 
briefly. At first glance, the program is a great 
example of the raw speed and power avail- 
able using Level II and the windowing 
environment. One thing I loved was the 
manual — if they can cram everything you 
need to read into 43 pages, including six 
pages of index and introduction, it has to be 
the most user-friendly system I've ever seen. 
(I am currently saving up the $70 to buy it 
myself, but have already spent my December 
computer allowance!) 

Ivan Scanlow- Car ling 
Antioch, TN 



The Year's Best 

» 

Editor: 

Approximately one year ago, I unpacked 
my CoCo 3 and went into business. Since 
then, I have subscribed to rainbow and 
rainbow ON DISK and have had one solid 
year of enjoyment. I would like to start the 
"Program of the Year" contest by selecting 
my three favorites from 1987. 

3rd Runner Up — DU-3 by Mike Jorgen- 
son, February '87. This program has been 
transferred to every one of my disks and is 
a super utility, better than any I could have 
purchased for $50 and up. Thanks, Mike, for 
helping us novices. 

2nd Runner Up — Write III by Bill Cook, 
April '87. I am writing this letter right now 
on this word processor galore. Don't have 
to buy one now, Bill. You could have 
marketed this baby, but you chose to share 
it with your fellow CoCoholics! What a guy! 

Program of the Year — City Sun by Greg 
Hall, November '87. If there's one thing I 

6 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



can't stand, it's a 13-year-old kid who can 
write better programs than I can! All joking 
aside, I still can't believe what this program 
does. Congratulations, Greg! You have a 
tremendous future ahead of you, and thanks 
go to your parents for encouraging your 
talents. 

Bernice M. Shoobs 
Clifton, NJ 

Positive Reaction? 

Editor: 

Although I am totally against software 
piracy, whether it be for profit, trading, or 
just giving, I have my own views on how the 
problem might best be handled. 

Of the many programs I have purchased, 
most are in some way copy-protected. 
However, three of them (including the one 
I am using to write this letter) are not only 
unprotected, but come with manuals that 
encourage the user to make a backup copy 
and save the original. Cognitec (Telewriter- 
64), Sierra On-Line ( Winnie the Pooh in the 
Hundred Acre Wood) and Island Graphics 
(Micro Illustrator) are all to be commended. 
They obviously trust their customers enough 
to make it easy for them to ensure the 
longevity of their purchase. You've got to 
feel good about dealing with people like this. 

I am certain that there are some people 
who take advantage of these companies, but 
they would probably steal from the Salva- 
tion Army. I couldn't violate this trust and 
still sleep at night, and I think the vast 
majority of home computer users feel the 
same way. Many people in the software 
business would think I'm naive, but this is 
not guesswork on my part. It is a considered 
opinion based on experience. 

I work in the car business. Our dealership 
is rather unique in one surprising respect. We 
maintain an inventory of some 300 cars and 
trucks, and they all are kept unlocked with 
keys in the ignitions all day long. And they 
are never locked! All night long, and on 
Sundays (when we are closed) customers can 
get in the cars, lift the hoods and inspect 
them all they want. The keys are removed, 
but no other form of protection is used. 
Foolish? I don't think so. We experience no 
more vandalism and theft than any other 
dealership I have worked in. 

Now granted, Maine is not exactly the 
crime hotbed of the nation. Nevertheless, 
people are people and we are all subject to 
temptation. But a surprising number of us 
react positively when shown that we are 
trusted. 

My message is simple. Assume a little 
integrity in your customers and let them 
know it. You just may find it to be the best 
form of copy protection yet. 

Incidentally, rainbow's product reviews 
motivated me to buy all three of these 
excellent programs, along with several other 



pieces of software and hardware. Even if 
there were nothing else of any consequence 
in your superb magazine, these unbiased, 
informative reports would in themselves be 
more than worth the price of the subscrip- 
tion. You haven't steered me wrong yet. 

Paul Fullerton 
Gardiner, ME 



REVIEWING REVIEWS 



Editor: 

I would like to correct Mr. Augsburg's 
statement in the October issue in which he 
reviews Color Max 3. He states that the 
printer support includes "even a version that 
produces 16-color printouts of the screen on 
a CGP-220." This is untrue. The CGP-220 
Ink Jet Printer has the information con- 
tained in its ROM to print a total of seven 
colors, six of which are produced by the 
subtractive coloring system* as the manual 
states. Any two of the colors (yellow, 
magenta and cyan) can be paired to produce 
three more colors: red, green and violet. 
Black, though technically not a color (the 
absence of all color being black) reflects 
some light, so in practice qualifies as color 
Number 7. 

The Color Max 3 software uses a tech- 
nique called dithering, where colors are 
"meshed" together but not mixed in order 
to produce a simulation of a desired color 
on the CGP-220, not an actual color for 
color representation. This I was told by a 
representative of Computize. 

I would like to add that 1 have seen actual 
CGP-220 color prints made with Color Max 
3 and was very impressed. But will there ever 
come a time when the CGP-220 is permitted 
to "grow up," as it were, to fully implement 
the abilities of this machine? This printer 
could, with the correct software/ hardware, 
faithfully reproduce any of the 64 colors the 
CoCo 3 can show on its screen. When will 
it be realized that this printer can be the 
perfect mate to the CoCo 3? After all, it is 
a "color" computer, so don't you think it 
would be logical to have at its side a "color" 
printer? 

If this issue were left up to Tandy, I would 
have no hope. But what I do have is pride 
in a strong CoCo Community that is ready 
to support its third-party developers. Tandy 
no longer markets this fine printer even 
though Canon USA, Inc., still manufactures 
it as the PJ-1080A Ink Jet Printer. Come on, 
all you programmers and developers, how 
about a real challenge ... or maybe we 
should just be content and not worry about 
such a trivial thing as color, and we'll all 
"upgrade" to a black-and-white CoCo to 
match our black-and-white printers! 

Charles R. Womble 
Wilmington, NC 



* 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. — 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42, 51, 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 
They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/ VISA/CO. D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO'S 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

To make my Genealogy programs [Sep- 
tember and October '87 issues] work with 
a DMP-130 printer, these lines must be 
modified in the PAGE program: 380, 400, 
440, 460, 490, 530, 550, 580, 660, 740, 770, 
850, 870, 900 and 980. 

These lines must be modified in the 
FAMILY program: 3780, 3800, 3840, 3860, 
3890, 3930, 3950, 3980, 4020, 4040, 4070, 
4110,4130,4160 and 4200. 

The lines will have to changed from 
PRINT tt-2 , CHR$ ( 27 ) ; CHR$ ( 90 ) ; 
CHR$(12) to PRINT 8-2 , CHR$ ( 27 ) ; 
CHR$(64);CHR$(24). 

No lines have to be modified in CHART, as 
the PRINT commands do not appear. 

Brian Le Blanc 
Digby County, Nova Scotia 



($10.00) is for newer CoCos (U14 through 
U21 are not "the same size.") Older CoCos 
use the part No. TRS-64K-2 ($8.95). U14 
through U21 are "the same size" to use this 
one. 

My machine had eight 80405 1 7 RAM ICs, 
so I needed the TRS-64K-2 kit. 1 removed 
the eight RAMs, put in the ones from 
Jameco and soldered the Wl jumper into 
place (it's marked "64K"on the board!), and 
nothing could be easier. Do use static 
precautions: Don't stand on a rug while 
handling the computer or ICs. Ground 
yourself on the kitchen faucet before touch- 
ing anything. Don't bend the pins. Touch the 
tip of the soldering iron to ground before 
touching the board. Don't touch any ICs 
unnecessarily. Use a small screwdriver to 
very gently pry an IC out of its socket. 

James English 
Kansas City, KS 



This modification will adapt the 1987 
graphics display to 1988. 

Shawn Robb 
Amarillo, TX 

INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I am looking for people willing to ex- 
change software they have written concern- 
ing quality control or assurance, and statis- 
tics. 

I have written several programs in basic 
and have started to convert them to run 
under BASIC09, using many of the enhance- 
ments available to me on the CoCo 3 and 
OS-9 Level II. 

I am hoping to hear from interested 
readers, especially from those who are 
members of the American Society for Qual- 
ity Control. 

Charles Blair 
5820 Balmoral St. 
Brossard, Quebec 
Canada J4Z 2H4 

CoCo Carrier 

Editor: 

I deliver papers and am very interested in 
being able to put my route on my computer. 
I have to bill my customers once a month, 
so I need a way to do this. Also, I need to 
keep track of names and addresses because 
I need to run this off, and I would like to 
keep track of the payments as they come in. 



Inexpensive Upgrades 

Editor: 

I recently read a letter concerning the 
expense of upgrading a 16K or 32K CoCo 
2 to 64K. I became aware that many of your 
readers are paying large amounts of money 
to make the upgrade. There is a much 
cheaper way. 

Jameco Electronics, 1355 Shoreway 
Road, Belmont, CA 94002 (415-592-8097), 
offers two kits for making the conversion 
easily and cheaply. Part No. TRS CoCo 



A New Year 

Editor: 

Here is a change to the program New Year 
by Carmie A. Thomas [January '87, Page 
29]: 



60 DRfiU"BM24,20;S5L2R2D20L4R8B 
R10U20L5D5R5BR10U5D20R5U11L5U 
10R5D10BR7U10D20R5U11L5U10R5D 
10 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 7 



We also have a list of customers who pay 
directly to the office and their expiration 
dates/ Does anyone know of a program to 
help me? 

Sindy Shields 
RL 6 Box 362 
Rocky Mt., VA 24151 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

1 have wanted to brush up on statistics for 
some time, but could not find the right book. 
At the RAINBOWfest in Princeton, I picked 
up a copy of The Rainbow Introductory 
Guide to Statistics and the disk that goes 
with it. Let me say that brushing up has been 
easy, as the book is well- written, and the 
program is very good. 

Thanks for a job well done. 

Douglas F, Woolley, Jr. 

GIMLET 

Convent Station, NJ 
Brush With Celebrities 

Editor: 

On the few occasions I have gone online 
with Delphi, IVe managed to "bump" into 
a few of the more notable CoCo users. 

While in conference, I have found that 
these individuals are quite tolerant, courte- 
ous and helpful to newcomers — even when 
the first-time user jumps into the middle of 
their conversation. 

Jim Reed, Don Hutchison, Rick Adams 
and a host of other contributors deserve all 
the support and acclaim the CoCo Com- 
munity can give them. 

Charles A. Grossman 

CAG 

Farmington, NM 

PEN PALS 



• I am 15 years old and would like a pen pal. 
1 have a CoCo 2, disk drive, CGP-220 Color 
Ink Jet Printer and joystick, 

Kevin Cain 
12506 NE 142LN #C203 
Kirkland, WA 98034 

• Lakeland Communications, International 
Student Penfriends is the largest student pen 
pal organization in the world for all students 
who are 7 to 18 years of age. We have 
thousands of members who like computers, 
sports and many other interests! We have 
monthly pen pal book listings, newsletters 
and monthly contests. All students 7 to 18 
years of age who would like to join may write 
to us and we will send complete details! 
Please send a #10 business size SASE to: 
Lakeland Communications, International 
Student Penfriends, 7430 Antebellum Blvd., 
Fort Worth, Indiana 46815. 

• I am a 15-year-old looking for a pen pal. 
I own a 64K CoCo 2, with a cassette re- 
corder. 

Sherree Connelly 
79 Edna Ave. 
Mechanicville, NY 12118 



• I am 16 years old and looking for pen pals 
from anywhere. I have a 64K CoCo 2 with 
two joysticks, disk drive (RS-DOS), DMP- 
105 printer and a DMC-3 modem. I have 
solved Black Beard*s Island, as well as 
Dragon Blade and a few others. I am most 
interested in high action arcade games. 

Jesse Sanders 
P.O. Box 84 
Chimney Rock, CO 81127 



• I am 14 years old and have a CoCo 3 and 
two drives, which I use mostly for graphics. 
I enjoy listening to music, especially White- 
snake and Led Zeppelin. I would like to hear 
from girls over 14 or guys with the same 
interests, from anywhere. Will answer all 
letters. 

Greg LeMar 
315 Smimer Blvd. 
Phillipsburg, NJ 08865 



• I am 14 years old and have a CoCo 2 and 
3, DM P- 105 printer, disk drive, cassette 
recorder and Speech/ Sound Pak. I am 
mostly interested in Adventures and games. 
Anyone from anywhere can write. 

Marianne Torraco 
804 Eagle Street 
Utica, NY 13501 

• I am 13 years old and have a 64K ECB 
CoCo 2, disk drive, and a DMP-130 printer. 
If you want a pen pal, please write me. Til 
answer all letters! 

Chris Casson 
3 Channing Lane 
Camillus, NY 13031 



• I am 21 years old and I am looking for pen 
pals who run Color Computer bulletin 
board systems. I have a CoCo 2, modem, 
printer, cassette and a disk drive. 

John Peavy 
1617 Savage Rd. NE 
Salem, OR 97301 

• I'm interested in writing to and hearing 
from CoCo addicts from all over the world. 
I have about 20 pen pals I write to on a 
continual basis, and I'm always looking for 
more. I have a CoCo 2, CoCo 3 (just got it!), 
DMP-130 printer, DCM-5 modem, two disk 
drives and lots more. All letters will be 
answered, so please write. 

Brick Molnar 
P.O. Box 4616 
Sparks, NV 89432 



• I am a 17-year-old male looking for a pen 
pal. I have a CoCo 2, a single-sided and a 
double-sided disk drive, Multi-Pak, tape 
drive and a DMP-130A printer. Everyone 
who reads this qualifies. If we don't talk 
CoCo then we can just talk. I especially 
enjoy Adventure games. 1 guarantee all 
letters will be answered. 

Matt Fumich 
P. O. Box 1346 
Munford, TN 38058 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 

• Call the Grand Rapids BBS Wyoming 
Pubb, 616-538-8229. The BBS operates 
under the OS-9 and UNIX operating sys- 
tems on a CoCo 2 with 512K RAM. 

Robert M. Worth, Jr. 
1726 MillbankS.E. 
Grand Rapids, MI 49508 

• Call the best CoCo Board in Reading, 
Pennsylvania, the Glass Menagerie. We have 
a System 2 for strictly CoCo downloads and 
four drives full of programs. Try the best 
online game section ever! Call 215-376-1819 
24 hours, seven days a week. 8/N/ 1, 300/ 
1200 baud. Run on two CoCo 2s, 10 disk 
drives! SysOp: Glassy. Co-SysOp: Lewis 
Brubaker. 

Allen H. Cravener 
1137 Cotton St. 
Reading, PA 19602 

• The Dungeon BBS of Newport, North 
Carolina, is now online running on Colo- 
rama Version 4.0, featuring games, Hi-Res 
graphics, multiple message bases, uploads 
and downloads. Hours of operation: 6 p.m. 
to 6 a.m. Monday through Friday, 24 hours 
Saturdays and Sundays. 300 baud, protocol 
of 8-N-l. Supports all CoCos. Call 9 19-726- 
9737. 

Chuck Katsekes 
410 Scott Drive 
Newport, NC 28570 

• I would like to inform your readers of two 
new BBSs that run under new software 
called CSBBS. The programs were written 
especially for the CoCo 3! Both have screen 
width settings and multiple message bases, 
provide support for the whole family of 
CoCos, and have helpful SysOps. Both have 
four drives online and operate 24 hours a 
day at 300/1200 baud,7/E/l: 

Fox Communications 602-846-2002 
Dream Weaver 602-848-9902 

Charles Pippin 
6827 W. Luke 
Glendale, A Z 85303 



the rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor* Mail should be addressed to: 
Letters to Rainbow, The Falsoft Build- 
ing, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
Letters should include the writer's full 
name and address. Letters may be edited 
for purposes of clarity or to conserve 
space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, type Rfll 
to take you into the Rainbow Magazine 
Services area of the SIG. At the RAIN- 
BO W> prompt, type LET to reach the 
LETTERS> prompt and then select 
Letters for Publication. Be sure to in- 
clude your complete name and address. 



8 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



4p 



\\ford 

Power 3 



(The Ultimate Word Processor for the CoCo 3) 



Are you still using your CoCo 2 word processor on the CoCo 
3 with patchwork? You don't have to any more. With Word 
Power 3, Microcom answers the challenge of word processors 
for the CoCo 3. It bridges the gap between "what is" and "what 
should be" in word processors. No other word processor offers 
such a wide array of features that are so easy to learn and use. 
Check out the impressive features: 

DISPLAY 

The80-column display with true lowercase lets you view the full 
width of a standard page. AH the prompts are displayed in plain 
English in neat colored windows. The current column number, 
line number, page number and the percentage of memory remaining 
is displayed on the screen at all times. The program even displays the 
bottom margin perforation so you know where one page ends and 
the other begins. You can also change the foreground/background 
color of the screen to suit your needs! 

AVAILABLE MEMORY 

Unlike most other word processors, Word Power 3 gives you 80 K of 
memory with a 128K CoCo 3 and more than 460 K with a 512K 
CoCo 3 to store text. 

TYPING/EDITING 

Word Power 3 has one of the most powerful and user- friendly full- 
screen editors with wordwrap. All you do is type; Word Power 3 
takes care of the text arrangement. It even has a built- in Auto* Save 
feature which saves the current text to disk at regular intervals; so 
you know that your latest version is saved on disk. Here are some of 
the editing features of Word Power 3: 

Auto- repeat; Key-Click; Cursor up, down, left, right, beginning of 
line, end of line, next word, previous word, top of text, end of text; 
page forward, backward; 4-way scrolling; block copy, move, delete; 



global search and replace (with wild- card search); line positioning 
(left, right or center); insert/ overstrike modes; delete to beginning/ 
end of line, next/ previous word; and tabs. You can also embed 
printer codes in text to take advantage of underlining, sub/ superscript 
and other printer functions. Define left, right, top and bottom 
margins, and page length. 

MAIL MERGE 

Ever try mailing put the same letter to 500 different persons? Could 
be quite a chore. Not with the Mail Merge feature of Word Power 3. 
Using this feature, you can type a letter, follow it through with a list of 
addresses and have Word Power 3 print out personalized letters. It's 
that easy! 

LOADING/ SAVING FILES TO DISK 

Word Power 3 creates ASCII format files which are compatible with 
almost all terminal, spell- checking, and other word- processing 
programs. It allows you to load, save and kill files and also to create 
and edit Basic, Pascal, C and Assembly files. Supports double- sided 
drives and various drive step rates. 

PRINTING 

Word Power 3 drives almost any printer (DMP series, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc.). Allows print options such as different 
baud rates, line spacing, page pause, partial print, multi-line headers/ 
footers, page numbers, page number placement, and right justification. 
You can also change the values for these print options within the text 
by using embedded printer option codes. 

INSTRUCTION MANUAL 

Word Power 3 comes with a well- written and easy- to- comprehend 
instruction manual that makes writing with Word Power 3 a breeze. 

Word Power 3 comes on disk for only $69.95. 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 am-9 pm est7 days a week 

Except NY. Order Status, Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call 1-716-223-1477 



All orders shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge. Last minute shoppers can benefit. 

VISA, MC, AMEX, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 S&.H (USA &. Canada), other countries $5.00 S&H. 

NYS residents please add sales tax. 
Computerized processing & tracking of orders. Immediate shipment. 


























How Jo Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program listings in 
the rainbow are formatted lor a 32-character 
screen — so they show up just as they do on your CoCo 
screen. One easy way to check on the accuracy of your 
typing is to compare what character "goes under" what, 
ff the characters match — and your line endings come 
out the same — you have a pretty good way of knowing 
that your typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, cfo read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 

RAINBOW ON DISK Or RAINBOW ON TAPE service. 

An order form for these services is on the insert card 
bound in the magazine. 



What's A CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was first given to 
the Tandy Color Computer by its many fans, users and 
owners. 

However, when we use the term CoCo, we refer to 
both the Tandy Color Computer and the TDP System- 
100 Computer. (While many TDP-100s are still in 
service, the TDP Electronics division of Tandy no longer 
markets the CoCo look-alike.) It is easier than using 
both of the "given" names throughout the rainbow. 

In most cases, when a specific computer is men- 
tioned, the application is for that specific computer. 
However, since the TDP System-100 and Tandy Color 
are, for all purposes, the same computer in a different 
case, these terms are almost always interchangeable. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



1 


V 


r 







The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see If the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 



and save it for later use, then type in the command RUN 
and press enter. Once the program has run, type NEW 
and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to be su re you typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 



10 CLS:X=25G*PEEK(35)+17B 

20 CLEAR 25,X-1 

30 X=256*PEEI< (35J+17B 

40 FOR Z=X TO X+77 

50 READ Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z f Y;W 

60 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=7985THEN80ELSEPRINT 

"DATA ERROR": 5T0P 
80 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 182, 1, 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 1B3, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 48, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 128, 171, 12B 
150 DATA 230, 132, 38, 250, 48, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 166, 132, 28, 254 
180 DATA 1B9, 173, 198, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 

1) Type load dir list copy and press ENTER. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd/d0 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
on disk in Drive 1. Then type chd/di and press 
enter. 

3) List the read . me . f i rs t file to the screen by typing 

list read. me. first and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow on disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMOS directory, enter dir cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMOS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system; copy /d0/cmds///7ename/d0/ 
cmds/ filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: copy /dl'cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



Using Machine Language 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: cmds and source. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f l rs t, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The cmds directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the source directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the SOURCE directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 
programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 



The easiest way to "put" a machine language program 
into memory is to use an editor/assembler, a program 
you can purchase from a number of sources. All you 
have to do, essentially, is copy the relevant instructions 
from the rainbow's listing into CoCo. 

Another method of putting an ML listing into CoCo 
is called "hand assembly" — assembly by hand, which 
sometimes causes problems with OR I G I N or EQUATE 
statements. You ought to know something about 
assembly to try this. 

Use the following program if you want to hand- 
assemble ML listings: 



10 CLEflR200,&H3F00:I=&H3F80 

20 PRINT "ADDRESS:" ;HEX$( I); 

30 INPUT "BYTE";B$ 

40 POKE I, VfiL("&H"+8$) 

50 I = I+l:GOTO 20 



This program assumes you have a 16K CoCo. If you 
have 32K, change the &H3F0G in Line 10 to &H7F00 
and change the value ofito&H7FB8. 



1 0 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



BOOKS & GRAPHICS 

500 
POKES, 
PEEKS, 
'N 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKES, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Baslc/ECB/DIsk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TROM, TROFF, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, REMUM, PRIMT 
USihO, DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD, 
MEROE, RENAME, DSKINI, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKOS. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 
Generate a Repeat-key. 
Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

Speed Up your programs. 

Reset, MOTOR ON /OFF from 
keyboard. 

Recover Basic programs lost by 
NEW 

Set 23 different 
0RAPH1C/SEMI0RAPHIC modes 
Merge two Basic programs. 

AND MUCH MUCH MORE1II 
COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16K/32K/64K/ COLOR BASIC/ ECU/ DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1, 2, & 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



★ 
★ 

★ 



★ 
★ 



SUPPLEMENT to 

500 POKES, 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 

ONLY$9.95 

Lull additional Pokes, Peeks' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER 
Includes commands for 

• Rompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/ double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm+® and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (for OMP printers) & Text Screen Dump 

• ANO MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES, PEEKS N EXECS is a prerequisite 



*taO POKES 
PEEKS N EXECS 

FOR THE COCO III 

Get more POWER for your CoCo III. Includes 
commands for 

• 40/80 Column Screen Text Dump 

• Save Text/Graphics Screens to Oisk 

• Command/Function Disables 

• Enhancements for CoCo 3 Basic 

• 128K/512K Ram Test Program 

• H PR I NT Character Modifier 

• ANO MANY MORE COMMANDS ONLY $1 9.95 






"MUST" BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDEO COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $39.95 

DISK BASIC UNHAVELLEO: $19.95 

BOTH UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 

SUPER ECB (CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: $24.95 

ALL 3 UNRAVELLEO BOOKS: $59.95 

COCO 3 SERVICE MANUAL $39.95 
COCO 2 SERVICE MANUAL: $29.95 

INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II $39.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 LEVEL M ON COCO 3: $19.95 

RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 II OISK: $19.95 
INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II DISK: $20.00 
COCO 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING*: $18.00 

AODENOUM FOR COCO 3: $12.00 
UTILITY ROUTINES VOL 1 BOOK: $19.95 



MJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Falrport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 




COCO 

GRAPHICS DESIGNER 



Greeting Cards 

Signs 

Banners 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III ORTDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM 0F32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 AND JDOS. 

Supports the following printers: DMP 

100/105/110/130/430, CGP220, 

EPSON RX/FX, GEMIN1 10* SG-10, 

NX-1G & OKI DATA 

DISK ONLY $29.95 

PICTURE DISK #1: 100 more pictures for 
CGD: $14.95 

FONT DISK #1 10 extra fonts! $19.95 
COLORED PAPE R PACKS $24 .95 

COCO MAX III 

it's finally here! CoCo Max for the CoCo III. 
Includes all the features of the acclaimed CoCo 
Max II and more: CoCo III hi- res screen display of 
64 colors at a time, 50% larger editing window, 
special effects with animation and much much 
more! Comes with special hi- res interface, 
conversion utilities and a comprehensive manual. 
Disk only $79.95 Min Req: 1 28 K CoCo III with 
a disk drive. 

COCO MAX II 

Disk $77.95; Tape $57.95 

MAX PATCH 

An excellent software patch to run COCO MAX II 
on COCO III. Reo, RS Hires Joystick Interface No 
chip replacements or soldering Disk only $24.95 
BOTH MAX PATCH & HI-RES INTERFACE: $34.95 




COLOR MAX III DELUXE 

This is the sequel to the popular Co\or Max in 
Additional features include multiple screen editing, 
animation, etc Includes printer drivers for EPSON, 
GEMINI, DMP& CGP-220 printers Disk only 
$69.95. Minimum Requirements: 51 2 K CoCo 3, RS 
Hi- Res Joystick Interface and Tandy Disk Controller. 



All orders $50 & above shipped by 2nd 



day Air UPS with no extra charge, 
minute shoppers can benefit. 



Last 



VISA MC, AMEX, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 S&H(USA& Canada), other 
countries $5.00 S&K NYS residents please add sales tax Computerized 
processing & tracking of orders. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited. 



VISA' 



! 



m-7 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 AM - 9 PM EST 7 days a week 

Except NY. Order Status, Information, Technical information NY Orders call 1-716-223-1477 



Some Random Thoughts . . . 



ou, as a member of the CoCo Community;, are far luckier 



than I am. As I write this, the sun is positioned exactly 



M over the Tropic of Capricorn, which means that (except 
for our friends in the Southern Hemisphere) it is the first day 
of winter and the shortest day of the year. Consider that when 
you actually read this it will be six weeks hence and the 
groundhog will be about to pop out of his burrow in Pennsyl- 
vania and, hopefully, forecast an end to winter. 

It certainly is something to think about. Maybe that's why 
I am always behind the times. 

Tandy's new flight simulator for the CoCo 3 is one of the 
all-time best. It is adapted from Microsoft's Flight Simulator,, 
which has been in release in the MS-DOS market for some time. 

As many of you know, I have a private pilot's license and 
fly a Cessna 172. The program is based on a Cessna 182, which 
is a little more powerful than my plane — but the feeling of 
flying is about the same. 

For just about anyone who is learning to fly — or is just 
thinking about it — this flight simulator has all the goodies, 
including VOR receivers so you can practice instrument flying 
and approach techniques. It "behaves" like a real airplane in 
the air and is a great deal of fun to fly. 

If you're looking for a shoot-'em-up in the air, forget it. But 
if you want, instead, to brush up on some techniques, this 
program is a safe, inexpensive and very realistic way to do all 
that and more. 

It is probably as good a time as any to introduce you to Steven 
and Cheryl Walbutton of Broadmeadow, Australia. 

As a number of you are aware, one of the first "overseas" 
locations in which the CoCo and THE RAINBOW thrived was 
the land "down under." A fine chap by the name of Greg Wilson 
called me one evening and asked to be able to reprint most of 
the "Yank" version of the magazine with some special "Aussie" 





COCO 3 UTILITIES GALORE 

(All utilities support 40/80 columns for CoCo 3) 
(CoCo2 versions are available for most utilities) 



SUPER TAPE/DISK TRANSFER 

• Disk-to-Disk Copy (1-3 passes) • Tape-to- Disk Copy • Tape- to- Disk Automatic Relocate • Disk- 
to- Tape Copy • Tape- to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ ML programs and DATA files CoCo 1, 2 & 3. 32 K Disk System (Disk to Disk Copy requires 
64 K). Disk Only $24.95 



0S9 LEVEL II RAMDISK 

Lightning Fast Ramdisk with Auto Formatting A must for any OS9 Level II User. Req. 51 2 K $29.95. (Only 
$14.95 with the purchase of 51 2 K Upgrades Ramdisk!!). 



HI-RES JOYSTICK SOFTWARE 

Wish you could use the hi- res joystick interface from Basic? You can now. This program will let you access 
640 x640 pixels from your joystick for extra precision CoCo 3 Disk $14.95 



COCO NEWSROOM 

Now available for the CoCo III! You can design your own newspaper with Banner Headlines/6 articles using 
sophisticated Graphics, Fonts and Fill Patterns Comes with22 fonts&50 pictures! Over 140 K of code Disk 
only $49.95 



MAI LUST PRO 

The ultimate mailing list program Allows you to add, edit, view, delete, change; sort(byzipcodeorname) and 
print labels Its indispensible! Disk Only $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! Allows elongated, normal and condensed format for text 
double-strike; border creation and multiple- label printing Its a MUST for any user with a disk drive Disk 
Only$19.95. Supports DMP 105/1 10/1 20/130/430, GEMINI, STAR, EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo2 
version included) 



COMPUTERIZED CHECKBOOK 

Why bother with balancing your checkbook? Let the CoCo do it for you! Allows you to add, view, search, edit 
change; delete and printout (in a table or individual entry format) checkbook entries Updates balance after 
each entry. Allows files for checking, saving and other accounts Disk Only $19.95 (CoCo 2 version 
included) 



BOWLING SCORE KEEPER 

An excellent utility to keep track of your bowling scores Allows you to save scores under individuals or 
teams You can edit change; delete and compare scores A must for anyone who wants to keep track of his or 
her bowling performance Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 

Organize your videocassettes with this program! Allows you to index cassettes by title; rating, type; play 
time and comments Also allows you to sort titles alphabetically and view/ print selected tapes If you own a 
VCR, this program is a must Disk Only $1 9.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



512K RAMDISK/SPOOLER 

Turns your51 2 K RAM into super- fast in- memory disk drives Reduces chances of IO errors and disk access 
is lightning fast 51 2 K Spooler keeps your computer free for programming when printing documents to the 
printer. A must for 512 K users CoCo 3 Disk Only $24.95 



AD0S3 

Advanced Disk Operating System for CoCo 3. $34.95 ADOS: $27.95 



COCO UTIL II 

(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible computer. Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo. 
$39.95 



Makes a BACKUP of ANY disk $32.95 



SPIT N IMAGE 



RGB PATCH 

Displays most games in color on RGB monitors For CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE 
WITH COCO 1,2 &3 

WORD PROCESSORS 

TeleWriter-64: Best Word Processor For 

CoCo 1, 2 & 3. (Cas) $47.95 (Disk) $57.95 

TW-80: 80 Column Displays more features 

for TW-64. CoCo 3 Disk $39.95 

TELE FORM: Mail Merges Form Letters for 

TW-64. $19.95 

DATABASE 

Pro Color File * Enhanced* 2.0: Multi-feature 
Database $59.95 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Autoterm: Superb Terminal Program Works 
with any modem! (Cas) $29.95 (Disk) $39.95 
Wiz: For 0S9 II. 300-19200 baud rate, 
windows! Req512K& RS232 Pak 
$79.95 

ASSEMBLERS/COMPILERS 

EDT/ASM 64 D: Best Disk Based Editor- 
Assembler for CoCo. $59.95 (Specify CoCo 
1,2 or 3) 

THE SOURCE: Best Disassembler for CoCa 
$34.95 (Specify CoCol, 2 or 3) 
CBASIC: Most powerful Basic Program 
Compiler. $149.95 (Specify CoCo 1,2or3) 




GAMES 

(DISK ONLY) 

* IRON FOREST: $28.95 

LIGHT PHASER W/INTERFACE: $34. 
MISSION! RUSH'N ASSAULT: $28.95 

*GRANDPRIX CHALLENGE: $28.95 

*GANTELET II: $28.95 
GANTELET: $28.95 
MISSION F-16 ASSAULT: $28.95 
MARRLE MAZE: $28.95 
PAPER ROUTE: $28.95 
KNOCK OUT: $28.95 
KARATE: $28.95 
WRESTLE MANIAC: $28.95 
BOUNCING BOULDERS: $28.95 
THE GATES OF DELIRIUM: $28.95 
CALADURIAL FLAME OF LIGHT: $28.95 
LANSFORD MANSION: $28.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
PYRAMIX Cubix® for CoCo 3: $24.95 
VEGAS SLOTS (CoCo III Only): $34.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 



TK 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



All orders $50 & above shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge Last minute shippers can 
benfit VISA, MC, AMEX, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 S&H(USA& Canada), other countries [ 
$5.00 S&H. NYS residents please add sales tax Computerized processing wmm 
& tracking ot orders. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited 



MBfft0f0QKl 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 AM - 9 PM EST 7 days a week 

Except NY. Order Status, Information Technical Information, NY Orders call 1 -716-223-1 477 



"For just about 
anyone who is 
learning to fly 
— or is just 
thinking about 
it — this flight 
simulator has 
all the goodies. " 



news as well under a royalty agreement. 
I told him to go ahead and a friendship 
was born. 

Greg met an untimely end several 
years ago and others became involved 
with the Aussie edition. Then, just a few 
months ago, we reached an agreement 
with the Walbuttons to continue on in 
the same sort of tradition that Greg 
started. WeVe been quite pleased here 
and, from the way things are going 
"down there," it seems that much more 
than the kangaroos, koala bears and 
wombats are interested, too. We're glad 
that we are now able to provide a 
quality Australian version of THE RAIN- 
BOW again. 

As a matter of fact, Steven and 
Cheryl have gone far beyond the call of 
duty. I'm fascinated with folk songs of 
other lands, and find the folk songs in 
Australia perfectly delightful. I even 
have a favorite singer, Slim Dusty, who 
has done some absolutely incredible 
songs that — at least to my mind — 
capture the feel and heartbeat of Aus- 
tralia. 

I became "acquainted" with Dusty 
through a tape that included two terrific 
songs, "The Man From Snowy River" 



and "The Ballad of Henry Lawson." I 
asked the Walbuttons if there were any 
Slim Dusty tapes and have been happily 
playing them ever since. Seems Fm not 
the only one who likes him: He is 
supposed to be one of the top folk/ 
country singers in Australia. 

Dusty really captures the spirit of the 
land of which he sings through his 
lyrics. Here in the United States it is, of 
course, late December as I write this 
and, so, perhaps, it is fitting to quote a 
short passage from "The Man From 
Snowy River" in which Dusty sings of 
a place . . . 

Where the air is clear as crystal 
And the white stars fairly blaze 
At midnight in the cold and frosty skies 

I can just see Santa headed for my 
chimney through a night like that — an 
occurrence that is due the end of this 
week (provided that I've been good). 

I hope 1988 will be good for all of 
you. 



— Lonnie Falk 



"RAMDisk - Speedy File Handling" (Review, 
January 1988, Page 138): The RAMDisk review 
incorrectly stated that the product is available from 
Spectrum Projects. This product is available from 
Cer-Comp, 5566 Ricochet Avenue, Las Vegas, NV 
891 10, (702) 452-0632, for $19.95. 



which was written by Roger A. Krupski. The last line 
of Patch was inadvertently left out of the listing. Just 
add the following line and Patch should work 
properly: 



610 DATA "END", "END 



"The BASIC Versions" (Doctor ASCII, January 
1988, Page 155): In his answer to Josh Abrams' 
question regarding the use of EDTASM on the CoCo 
3, Richard Esposito presented a program, Patch, 



"Making an Address List" (December 1987, Page 66): 
George F. Saunderson has written to indicate his 
phone number was incorrectly listed at the end of the 
article. The correct phone number is (713) 781-8984. 



For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DATA 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIC> 
prompt. 



1 4 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



ALL HARDWARE COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 1. 2 & 3 



DISK DRIVES 



Double Sided, Double Density 360 K 40 track disk drives for the Color Computer 1, 2 and 3. Buy from 
someone else and all you get is a disk drive Buy from us and not only do you get a quality disk drive, you also 
get $60 worth of disk utility software (Super Tape/Disk Transfer and Disk Tutorial) and our DISKMAX 
utility which allows you to use BOTH sides of our disk drives It' s like buying TWO disk drives for the price of 

0NE!! DRIVE 1 (Completely Assembled) $149.95 M 

DRIVE 0 (With J&M Controller & Cable) $229.95 
(90 day warranty on all drives) 
J&M CONTROLLER (With RSDOS) $79.95 
DISTO SDPER CONTROLLER: $99.95 
DRIVE CARLES: 1 DRIVE CARLE: $19.95 2 DRIVE CARLE: $24.95 4 DRIVE CARLE: $39.95 

(For Drives, add $7.00 S&H in USA/CANADA) 





COMMUNICATIONS 
_ EXTRAVAGANZA 



1) AVATEX 1200 MODEM: Hayes 
compatible 300/1 200 Baud, Auto-Dial/ 
Answer/ Redial (Reg $129.95) 

2) MOOEM CABLE (Reg, $19.95) 

3) AOTOTERM TERMINAL SOFTWARE 

4) FREE COMPUSERVE OFFER and ACCESS 
TIME 

5) UPS 2nd DAY AIR Shipping. 

only $149.95 

(With AVATEX 1200hc instead of 
AVATEX 1200: $174.95) 
AVATEX 2400: Call 




The Avatex 1200 



UPGRADES 



wmemaiiun am 



512K UPGRADE FOR COCO III 

Fast 120ns chips Fully tested Easy installation No 
soldering. Comes with complete documentation and 
RAM test prog ram on disk. 

flHP only $79.95 

(With purchase of our 51 2 K RAMDISK program below) 

51 2 K Upgrade without chips $44.95 

512K RAMDISK 

Have 2 superfast RAMDISKs& a print spooler. 

$24.95 

64 K Upgrade for 26-31 34 A/BCoColl: 
$39.95 

64 K Upgrade for CoCo fs> CoCo II' s with Cat 
#26-3026/7, 26-3134 & 26-3136: $29.95 



CABLES/SWITCHERS/ 
ADAPTERS _ 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 
serial port ONLY $18.95 
Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with 
CoCo Max, DS69, etc ONLY $24.95 
15' PRINTER/MODEM EXTENOER CABLE: 
ONLY $16.95 

MOOEM CABLE: 4 pin to DB 25: $1 9.95 
11" MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER 
CABLE: S29.95 

3- POSITION SWITCHER: Select any one of 
three RS232 devices (printers/ modems) 
from the serial port $37.95 

WICO TRACK BALL: $29.95 

WICO ADAPTER: Use Atari type Joysticks 

with your CoCa $29.95 

RS HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 

MAGNAVOX 8505/851 5/8CM643 Analog 

RGB Cable: $24.95 

CM-8 RGB Analog Ext. Cable: $19.95 
SONY Monitor Cable: $39.95 



EPROM 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 
EPROM Programmer for the CoCa 
Lowest Price Anywhere $137.95 
EPROM ERASER (Oatarase): Fast erase of 
24/28 pin EPROMs $49.95 
EPROMS: 2764 -$8.00, 271 28 -$9.00 
Call for other EPROMs. 

BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER and ERASER: 
$179.95 

ROMPAK w/Blank PC Board 27xx Series: 
$12.95 



r 



VIDEO 



UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: For 

monochrome or color monitor. $29.95 
VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference. 
$19.95 



KEYBOARDS/ ACCESSORIES 

KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: Why 

break your back when typing on the 
CoCo? Our keyboard extender cable 
allows you to move your keyboard 
away from the computer and type with 
easa You can use your existing 
keyboard with this cable or leave your 
present keyboard intact and use a 
second keyboard. A MUST lor all CoCo 
Users Only $39.95. Cable with CoCo II 
keyboard: $49.95 

COCO 3 KEYBOARD (includes FREE 
FUNCTION KEYS software value 
$19.95): $39.95 



r 



CHIPS, ETC. 



_ PRINTER INTERFACES _ 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 

switch selectable baud rates (300 9600) 
Comes with all cables $44.95 



Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
III): $29.95 

Multi-Pak PAL Chip for CoCo 3 (Specify 
Multipak Cat #): $19.95 
PAL Switcher: Now you can switch 
between the CoCo II and CoCo III 
modes when using the Multi-Pak. You 
need the OLDER and NEW PAL chip for 
the 26-3024 Multipak Only $39.95/ 
With NEW PAL Chip $49.95 



MJr 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



All orders$50 and above(except Disk Drives) shipped by UPS2 nd Day Air at 
no EXTRA charge We accept VISA/MC/AMEX, Check or MO. Please add 
$3.00 S&H (USA/CANADA; other countries$5.00), except where otherwise 
mentioned NYS Residents please add sales tas Prices are subject to 
change All products are covered by manufacturer's warranty. 



VfSA 




Call Toll Free (For Orders] 1 -800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pm est? days a week 

Except NY. Order Status, Information Technical Information NY Orders call 1-71 6-223-1 477 




About 
Your 
Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster. 

For Canadian and other non- 
U.S. subscribers, there may be 
a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 





The Ultimate Utility 



Kyou are one of the thousands who've just received a new Color Computer 
for Christmas, congratulations, and welcome to THE RAINBOW. Our 
magazine is devoted to helping you learn all you can about how to get 
the most from your CoCo (short for Color Computer). If you missed our January 
beginners issue, don't worry, because every issue of RAINBOW has lots of material 
for beginners. In fact, in one aspect or another of the CoCo's many uses, all of 
us are beginners. And few of us will ever forget that thrill of discovery and feeling 
of control we experienced when we first powered up our CoCo and played with 
those short sample programs in the manual. 

Today's Color Computer is a very powerful machine despite its very modest 
price. The fact is, thousands of us, when we bought our first Color Computer, 
paid four or five times as much for a machine that had only 4K of memory. Now 
the standard is a 128K machine that can easily be upgraded to as much as 512K. 
There's a lot of computer in that little white box. 

In many ways, we'd love to be right there with you as you get to know your 
CoCo. Do you have your new machine hooked to the TV in the living room? That's 
how most of us started. But we soon found out that CoCoing there was not very 
convenient, so we took over the "spare" TV in the bedroom only to find out it 
really couldn't be spared after all. So, we purchased a TV or monitor just for the 
CoCo. 

Are you using a non-Radio Shack cassette recorder? If so, youH discover that 
while your old tape recorder will probably work, it won't work as well as the 
computer cassette recorder. Whatever the brand or model, do turn up the volume! 
We find that is one of the most common problems encountered by new users — 
yep, they just forgot to turn up the volume (set it on 3) so that the computer could 
"hear" the incoming data. 

Have you bought a multi-plug "power strip" yet? Might as well get two to start 
with; you'll need the other one soon enough as you begin to develop your 
"computer corner," if not an entire room. Is your printer cable too short? You'll 
find a wide variety of cables, extensions and switch boxes of all types in the pages 
of RAINBOW. In fact, since the CoCo is now in its ninth calendar year, just about 
everything you discover you need will be readily available when you want it. Many 
of our advertisers have built their companies on anticipating the needs of CoCo 
users and then developing products to answer those needs. You'll learn a lot just 
by reading the ads! 

One of the needs that is never fully satisfied is the need for utilities, the focus 
of this month's issue. A utility is a program or routine that is used as a tool in 
computing. It seldom has an end use in itself, but is used to help make other 
programs easier to use, faster executing and more efficient. As you "get into" 
computing, youll discover why utilities are so popular. 

For now, though, we want to welcome you to one of the most important 
"utilities" any Color Computer user can have: THE rainbow. Now that youVe 
discovered THE RAINBOW, do consider a subscription to keep the information 
coming all year long. Together, we'll explore to the fullest the potential of our 
Color Computer. 

— Jutta Kapfhammer 



16 THE RAINBOW February 1988 





SUPER MAX Dll INTERFACE 




Switch between 
Color Max III 

and ??? 

Use EXISTING 
SOFTWARE* 
or write your 
own! Includes 
($24.95) 
HI-RES 
JOYSTICK 
utility software 
BONANZA for FREE ! 



$39.95 

* Compatible with POPULAR CoCo III 
graphics software programs that use 

HARDWARE JOYSTICK interfaces ! Bring 
your CoCo III to the MAX ! 





THE 
NEWSPAPER 

Compose your own "CoCo Newspaper" 
with BANNER HEADLINES and six 
articles using a SOPHISTICATED 
graphics editor with importing of 
PICTURES , FONTS & FILL patterns 
from disk. 22 Fonts Si 50 Pictures ! 
Over 140K of^code! CoCo III DISK 



$49.95 



COLORMAX DELUXE - BETTER THAN COCO MAX III 

It's here! The CoCoIII BREAKTHROUGH PRODUCT everyone was waiting fori 320x200 graphics , pull down menus, icons 
the choice of 16 colors from the CoCo Ill's 64 color palette plus RGB sup port 1 11 fonts are included for hun- 
dreds of lettering styles and painting is a breeze with 16 colors and 3"2~ edi table patterns! ! ! Color Max Deluxe 
requires a 512K CoCo III and Hi -Res Joystick interface. ( Speci fy pr inter ! ) $69 .95 , Hi-Res Interface $14.95. 
Color Max Deluxe Font Editor- create and modify fonts for use with Color Max Deluxe $29.95. Font Disk#l $19.95 






SPECIAL BONUS - BUY ABOVE 4 for only $99.95 1 1 1 (SAVE $35) 



SO COLUMNS FOR TW-64 ON COCO III 



NEW LOW 
PRICES!!! 




TW-80 - 

It's finally here! An 80 column version of Telewriter -64 for the CoCo III with TELEPATCH features plus much, 
much more! Includes PRINT SPOOLER & (2) ultra-fast RAM DISKS for 512K users, plus changeable CHARACTER FONTS & 
a setup CONFIG program. Req. TW-64 DISK & 128K CoCo III $24.95 / SPECIAL BONUS COMBO - TW-64 & TW-80 $79.95 

SUPER TALK 51 2 DIGITAL VOICE FOR COCO III 

Turn your 512K CoCoIII into a Digital Voice Recorder! Not synthesized speech, but 100% reproduction of your 
own voice! Create BIG MESSAGES, up to 32 blocks of 16K each. Req. 512K CoCoIII DISK. From Dr. Preble $39.95 



OS9 Lev.ll Ramdisk 
Driver $29.95 




51 2K UPGRADE ($49.9 STSSJS & T 

Easy installation with a superior design for a reliable upgrade. (*$49.95 when purchased with our 512K RSDOS 
RAMDISK for $24.95 and our OS9 Lev. II RAMDISK for $29.95). Or $79.95 with either RAMDISK program! Plus, FREE 
512K RAM sticker with purchase ! 512K upgrade without RAM chips $29.95. Cheapest prices in Rainbow , period ! I ! 

-RES JOYSTICK UTILITY SOFTWARE BONANZA ! 

New useful programs for the Tandy Hi-Res Joystick Interface ! Get FULL 640X640 mouse & joystick resolution from 
BASIC or run CoCoMaxII on the CoCoIII w/o the CoCoMax cartridge $24.95 w/ Hi -Res Interface $34.95 

RGB PATCH NO MORE BLACK & WHITE DOTS ... 

you buy an expensive RGB monitor ( CM-8 ) just so that you could see your Hi-Res artifacting CoCo 2 games in 
K & WHITE ??? RGB PATCH converts most games to display in COLOR on an RGB monitor. 128K DISK $29.95 




Did 
BLACK 




WARP FIGHTER 3-D by sieve bjobk ■ 

The BEST CoCo III game of 1988 has arrived! A CoCo III Space Fighter simulation with " 3-D GLASSES " by the #1 
CoCo programmer of all time - Mr. Steve Bjork !!! CoCo III Disk $39.95 

MAGNAVOX 8515 t$299.95*|S?nXcW «Ln & dy B » 

Do NOT be FOOLED ! The CM-8 has a dot-pitch of .52mm & will not work with any other computer or VCR! The '8515* 
has a SHARP .42mm dot^tch, will work with IBM PCs/TanayT000 and its COLOR COMPOSITE input displays PMODE4 
artifact colors unlike the CM-8! *$299.95 when purchased with a $24.95 CoCoIII cable - Add $14 shipping. 



CoCo III 512K RAM sticker $4.99 
Level II Quick Ref Guide $4.99 
Level II Basic09 binder ..$9.95 



300 CoCoXTT POKES $19.95 

CoCoIII t^ltiPak PAL chip .$19.95 
Guide to CoCoIII Graphics .$21.95 



Better CoCoIII Graphics $24. 9^ 
CoCo ITT Unraveled $29.95 
CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 



F ASmUPE 512 Format & Backup up to 4 single- /double-sided, 35/40 trk disks in 1 PASS! Even OS9 Lev. II ! $19.95 
BIG BUFFER - 437,888 byte spooler for a 512K CoCoIII ! Print up to 200 text pages while using your CoCo! $19.95 

{ OS-9 Level XI Font Editor $29.95 ] | PYRAMTX - Lnwret price! $18. 9b | 

All orders plus $3 S/H (Foreign add $5) - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

PO BOX 264 HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 
See our other ads on pages 25 & 27 





Mysterious Island 



Keith Schuler 



Keith used CoCo G anva& t a. program he wrote, ta design this inscrutable depiction. 
He lives in Merritt Island, Florida. 



Honorable Mention 




^Hf 0 0 










Destroy James Farmer 



James, of N. Charleston, South Carolina, used 
Co/or Max 3 to display this view of planetary 
combat. 




Ship At Sea 



Brad Bansner 



This Image of H shjR sailing into the sunset was originated 
wfth Color Max 3. Brad lives in Wyomisslhg, Pennsylvania. 



18 




THE RAINBOW FfiGruary 




Dragon 



Stu Scott 



to, 



Stu, of Sandyhook, Connecticut, used 
basic to develop this animated scene. 
His hobbies include drawing, playing 
Adventure games and Shotokan karate. 



This unexpected, horrendous-looking 
character was brought into being through 
Color Max 3. Richard lives in Boucherville, 

Quebec, and works for a 
telecommunications firm. 




Space Man 



Richard Perreault 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! Vdij are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in upcoming showings of your creations with the 

CoCo Community! Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you created your picture (what programs you 
used, etq.y and how to display it. Also, please include a few facts about yourself- 

Don't ^nd us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV programs or material that's already been submitted 
elsewhere, A digitized copy of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is not an original work. 
We will award two first prizes of $25, one for the 0oCo 3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize of $15 and one third prize of $10. Honorable Mentions 



may also be given. 

Please send your entry on either tapg or disk to the CoCo Gallery, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Remember, this is a contest and your 
entry will not be returned. — Angela Kapfhammer, Curator 

iruary j9B8 THE RAINBOW 1 9 



1 Feat 



ure 



16K ECB 




BASIC 

4 

* 

for Beginners 

Lesson III 



By David W. Ostler 




far in this series we have 
talked about commands 
that allow you to do some 
fairly impressive programming. But by 
no means can we cover all the com- 
mands utilized by the Color Computer 
BASIC language in only four install- 
ments. 

We have already covered many com- 
mon BASIC commands, giving you a 
solid base of programming skills to 
expand upon. You will eventually need 
to know how to make a program acces- 
sible to disk and tape input/ output, so 
that you can save your results, but we'll 
cover disk and tape input/output in 
detail next month. 

This month we will cover the com- 
mands necessary to determine whether 
a disk drive or cassette recorder is 
present. We will also discuss variable 
memory allocation and how to do 
logical comparisons of variables. In 
addition to a few new commands, we 
are presenting some variations on com- 
mands described in previous install- 
ments. 



DIM 

The DIM command sets up memory 
for use by predefined variable arrays. 

An array is a group of variables with 
attached labels that relate them to a 
particular label. An example is an array 
that has 10 parts, all labeled M. The 
variables have these assignments: M ( 1 ) , 
M(2), M(3), 11(4), M(5), M(6),M(7), 
M(8),M(9),M(10). 

Please note that each variable is 
unique and can be manipulated inde- 
pendently of the others. To display or 
manipulate the variable, you must 
access its label and assignment. The 
proper syntax for the command that lets 
you enter a new amount in a variable 
is DIM* (yyy), where x is the variable 



Dave Ostler is an IC layout designer <u?d. 
the systems manager for a CAD main- 
frame system. He teaches CAD and 
electronics at Guilford Technical Com- 
munity College. Dave is married and 
has three children, Avis, Chuck and 
Erik. 

20 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



The Amazing A-BUS 




Plug into the future 



An A- BUS &yatem with two Motherboard* 
A O US e-dBptar in foreground 

The A-BUS system works w ft h the original CoCo, 
the C0C02 and the C0C0 3, 

About the A-BUS system: 

• All the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC, use tNP and OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers, 

• A-BUS cafds are shipped with power supplies (except PO-1 23) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 



Relay Card RE-140: $1 29 

Includes eight Industrial relays, {& amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LED's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable. 

Reed Relay Card re-i 56: $aa 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card AD-142:$129 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 1 00 V by adding a 
resistor. 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-i4o: $139 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%. Input range is ~4Vto 
■MV. Resolution; 1 millivolt, The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 1 30ms. Ideal for thermocouple 
strain gauge.etc, 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-i 56 card). 

Digital 1 nput Ca rd in-i 41 : $59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats* alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC 1NP (or PEEK), 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-148: $85 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed Input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255 A chip. 

Clock with Alarm ci_-i44: $ss 

Powerful clock/calendar with: battery backup for Time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built in alarm relay, led and buzzer; timing to 1 /1 00 
second. Easy to use decimal format. Lithium battery included. 

Touch Ton*® Decoder p*h45: $?9 

Each tptifl is converted into a number which is stor^ '^^e.b^telra^Sffftf^v , 
read the number with IMP or POKE. Use for remote control projocts, utc 

A- BUS Prototyping Card pr-1 52: $15 

3% by 4Vfe in. with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I.Cs 



With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards, The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 



Smart Stepper Controller sc-i49:$299 

World's finest stepper controller. On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously. Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 10.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory. For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half, full, wave), 
scale factor. units.Jiolding power, etc. Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (350mA) for small steppers (M 0-1 03). Send for SC-1 49 flyer. 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and 'teach" sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-122: $19 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board. 

Stepper Motor Driver st-143: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with them. Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V, bidirectional, 4 phase, 350mA per phase). 
Special Package: 2 motors (MO-103) + ST-143: PA»1 81 : $99 

Stepper MOtOrS MO-103: $15or4for$39 

Pancake type, 2Ya ,r d|a t W shaft. 7.5°/step, 4 , phase bidirectional, 300 
Step/sec, 1 2V, 36 ohm, bipolar, 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701 -P2, 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converters Channel 
Digital to Analog converter Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT, AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot AR-t33...$69 

Tandy 1000,1000 EX&SX k 1 200, 3000, Uses one shortstot AR-1 33...S69 

Apple II, ||+, lie. Uses any slot. AFM34...$49 

TRS-80 Model 102, 200 Plugs into 40 pin "system bus" AFM36...$69 

Model 1 00. Uses 40 pin socket (Socket is duplicated ort adapter). AR-135.,$69 

TRS-80 Mod 3,4,40. Fits 50 pin bus. {With hard disk. use Y-cable) AR-1 32 .$49 

TRS-80 Model 4 P. Includes extra cable. (50 pin bus is recessed) AR-1 37 .$62 

TRS-sn ModeJ I Bm «uio 40 p»n W mm. mpi U AfW 31J&3B 

jColor Computers (Tandy).Fits ROM slot Mu itipak. or Y-cable AR-1 1 38 -$49 

A- BUS Cable (3 ft, so cond.) ca-1 63: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to tirst Motherboard. 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i20:$99 

Each Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
* second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 
161: $12). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
8US adapter Sturdy aluminum trame and card guides included. 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 




IN-141 




Add S3. 00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC, checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT & NY residents add sates tax. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is $5 
Overseas add 10% 




a Sigma industries Company 



ALPHA 

242- w West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 





Technical info: (203)656-1806 

&°c n T ly 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348*9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



S>NEkTSR\RTS 
VMDERWEM* 

^CKETS 
TOTE-BkGS 
PVU.ONN CASES 

MAXWEAR 



£t\qu$\ lot * VSYvvte, 



- Patented new washproof process allows transfer of anything you print 

- Create your own artwork with CoCo Max (or ANY other graphics program). 

- Print it with any Dot Matrix printer. 

- Optionally add colors with crayons or markers. 

Transfer the picture on your item (T- Shirt, etc.) with an iron. 




Optional 

Continuous Feed Attachment 
(Fits most Printers) 

$3991 .26 

While supplies last! 



Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
Visa. MC. check*, M.O. welcome. 
CT residents add sales tax. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping Is $5 
Overseas add 10% 



Technical info: (203) 656-1806 

ffi* 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 346-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc. 



COLORWARE 

242- W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 



I 





pa 






to 



0 \s 



* 



Tlie besf program ever written for the Color Computer 



33 



That's how thousands of enthusiastic users rated 
theCoCoMaxll drawing program. With CoCo Max 
III we are ready to amaze them again. Instead of 
"patching" CoCo Max II, we rewrote it from scratch 
to take advantage of the CoCo Max III hardware. 
The results will knock your socks off ! Below is a 
brief list of some of the new features, but some, 
such asanimation, color sequencing, or the slide 
show, have to be seen. Send for the Demo Disk, and 
see for yourself. 

Everybody's favorite drawing package features: 

- A 50% larger editing window. - Zoom area 400% 
larger. - New drawing tools: rays, 3D cubes, arcs,.,. - 
New editing tools: shadow.text size,... Rotate by 1.5° 
steps - Select any 1 6 of the 64 possible colors (all 64 
colors displayed at once!) .* Powerful color mix: additive, 
subtractive, overlay,... - Full color editing of patterns 
and color changing patterns. - Incredible special eff- 
ects with color cycling up to 8 colors with variable 
speed. -Animation adds the dimension of motion to 
your image. (Must be seen.) - Sophisticated data com- 
pression saves up to 70% of disk space when saving 
pictures. 

In addition, there are dozens of enhancements to the 
multitude of features that made CoCo Max II a best seller. 



More about CoCo Max III 

CoCo Max III is not an upgrade of CoCo Max II. It is entirely 

rewritten to take advantage of the new CoCo 3 hardware 

(More memory, resolution, colors, speed,...) 

The new CoCo Max III Hi-Res Interface and the CoCo Max II 

Hl-Res Pack are not interchangabie. 

The new interface plugs into the joystick connector. 

The CoCo Max III disk is not copy protected. 

CoCo Max III only works with the CoCo 3. 

A Y-Cable or Multi-pak is not necessary. 

Colors are printed in five shades of gray. 

CoCo Max III can read CoCo Max II pictures. 



Note: CoCo Max II (for the CoCo 2) is still available on disk 
($79.95). CoCo Max I is still available on tape ($69.95). For 
details, refer to our double page ad in any Rainbow from 
January '86 to July '87 



Toll Free operators are for orders only, If you need precise answers, call 
the tech line. (Detailled CoCo Max specs are included with the Demo Disk) 



Add *3,00 par arrlar tor shipping. 
Visa. MC. checfct, M.O. welcome 
CT rssldanta tdd ttlts tax. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 aitra. 
Canada: shipping i» $5 
Overseas add 10% 



Technical info: 
Orders only 

Except in CT 



(203) 656-1806 

800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 

Alt lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



File Edit Options Colors Font Size Style 



mmm 




Imagine this picture in sixteen colors ! 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

\Jmm CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with it v 
we will refund every penny. 



System Requirements: 

Any CoCo 3 disk system with a Joystick or a Mouse, 

We apologize to tape users, CoCo Max Hi needs the flexibility of a disk 

The CoCo Max III system includes: • The special Hi-Res 
interface(foryourmouseorjoystick) • The CoCo Max ill disk • Many 
utilities: (Toconvert Max ii pictures, Max colors, etc.) • A detailled User's 

Manual. Complete system; nothing else to buy, CoCo Max III: $79.95* 

p 

I 
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FREE DEMO DISK 




i 

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Name 
Street 

City 
State Zip 



Printer used: 

Please include $2 to help defray Processing and Shipping 
costs. (Check, Money Order, etc. Sorry, no COD or Credit 
Cards). Coupon (or copy) must be mailled to: 



* Beware of inferior imitations that 00 NOT include a Hi-Res Interface 
or charqe extra tor each utility. 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc. 



COLORWARE 

242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 



the array sets up (also called the label) 
and yyy is the number of variables in the 
group to be defined. The DIM command 
must always take place early in the 
program, before use of the CLERR com- 
mand. 

PEEK 

The PEEK command allows you to 
look at memory locations and deter- 
mine various function values in the 
computer such as printer baud rate, disk 
or tape I/O, whether LIST and LLI5T 
are disabled, etc. 

The proper syntax for this command 
is PEEK (xxx), where xxx is the loca- 
tion to be examined or "peeked.'* Also, 
the value returned can be viewed only 
when used in conjunction with a vari- 
able, as in these lines: 

10 A = PEEK(jcjc*) 
20 PRINT A 

Logical Comparisons 

A valuable function of the BASIC 
language, for the Color Computer as 



well as other computers, is the ability to 
compare variables in a logical manner. 
Logical comparison determines wheth- 
er variables are generated by program 
manipulation or entered by an external 
source by comparing the results of two 
variables. The logical comparison oper- 
ators are AND, NOT, OR. Here is an 
example of logical comparison: 



10 IF (A = X 
GOSUB 1000 



AND B = Y) THEN 



This line is basically an IF/THEN 
command, but with something extra — 
the logical comparison operator AND. 
The command line reads: If A equals X 
and B equals Y, then jump to the sub- 
routine at Line 1000. Try this one: 

10 IF NOT (A = X AND B = Y) THEN 
GOSUB 1000 

This line is also basically an IF /THEN 
command, but uses the logical compar- 
ison operator NOT. This command line 
reads: If A does not equal X and B does 



not equal Y, then jump to the subroutine 
at Line 1000. Try another: 

10 IF (A = X OR B = Y) THEN GOSUB 
1000 

Again, the line is basically an IF/ 
THEN command, but it includes the 
logical comparison operator OR. The 
command line reads: If A equals X or B 
equals Y, then jump to the subroutine 
at Line 1000. 

These examples cover some of the 
ways to use the logical operators. The 
commands can be combined to obtain 
very elaborate logical comparisons of 
variables and are invaluable in pro- 
gramming. 

LINEINPUT 

The LINEINPUT command is exactly 
like the INPUT command covered in 
Lesson 1 (September 1987, Page 27), 
but with one exception: Where the 
INPUT command restricted the entry of 
variables to characters without punc- 
tuation, the LINEINPUT command al- 



Line 

0 
10 



20 
30 

40 
50 

60-80 



85 
95 
100 



no 



120 



130 



140-170 



180 
190 



Description 

a remarked line. 

clears 1 ,000 bytes for variable storage, sets T 
equal to 100, sets N equal to 0, and dimensions 
variables B$, C$, D$ and E$ to the size of 10 
variables each, 
a remarked line. 

sets A equal to the value peeked at location 
188. 

a remarked line. 

sets B equal to the value peeked at location 
116. 

test the values of A and B and steer the 
program to the proper location after these 
tests. 

forces a jump to Line 2000. 
a remarked line. 

clears the screen, prints text and the value of 
N, prints a blank line, and allows the entry of 
variable B$ as related to the dimensioned 
variable label, N. 

prints a blank line and allows the entry of 
variable C$ as related to the dimensioned 
variable label, N. 

prints a blank line and allows the entry of 
variable D$ as related to the dimensioned 
variable label, N. 

prints a blank line and allows the entry of 
variable E$ as related to the dimensioned 
variable label, N. 

clear the screen and print the text with the 
variables entered in lines 100, 110, 120 and 
130, respectively. 

prints the text at the desired locations, 
sets 1$ to an INKEY$ function and tests the 
keyboard for the conditions found in this line. 
These conditions are used to correct any 



200 

210 
220 
300-330 



900 



Line Description 

errors found in the variables entered in lines 
140 to 170. 

adds one count to the variable label N and 
checks the value of N — if N is equal to 10, 
it forces the program to Line 6000. 
clears the screen and prints the text at the 
desired locations. 

sets 1$ to an INKEYS function and tests the 
keyboard for the conditions found in this line, 
the error correction lines for the INKEYS 
function called in lines 180 to 190. After the 
corrections are made, the line forces a jump 
to Line 140. 

sets up a FOR/NEXT value for B. Note: When 
displaying variables entered in arrays, you 
must use the variable label used in increment- 
ing the array (at this time we are using N, as 
a label), minus 1 to count down the variable. 
Remember, the computer always counts — in 
this case, from 0 to 10. 

display the text with its associated variables 
that are related to the variable array label 
value, B. 

prints the text at the location, 
sets 1$ to an INKEYS function and, if any key 
is pressed, will continue on with the program, 
subroutines called by previous lines. The 
subroutine starting at Line 1000 identifies the 
type of computer system that the program has 
detected. The subroutine starting at Line 2000 
is the menu for the data entry of the program. 
5000 terminates the program. 
6000 prints the message that the maximum file size 
for the array defined has been reached, and 
then sends the program to Line 900. 



910-940 



950 
960 

1000-2010 



24 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



THE SHOPPING LIST $ 



COCO CABLES AND ... 

Tandy Hi -Res Joystick Interface $14.95 

Printer / Modem 10 • Extender Cable $14.95 

TANDY CM-8 RGB Analog 6*Video Ext Cable ....$19.95 

Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pin) $19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (4pin-DB25) $19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

Joystick/Mouse 10' Ext Cable $19.95 

No more Deluxe RS-232 paks left to hook up ptr & 

modem ? Buy our RS-232 M Y" Cable (4 pin) $24.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) $24.95 

MAGN&VOX 8505 / 8515 / 8O4643 Analog RGB cable .$24.95 
Other Analog RGB monitor cable ( Specify ! ) ..$39.95 
15" Mul t i-Pak/Disk Pak Extender - Move your Multi- 
Disk Paks further away 3AA*9X. Closeout .... $29.95 
i2 ElU Dual "I" Cable - Hook up a Disk with a 

Voice Pak, Word Pak, CoCo Max, etc $29.95 

CoCo RS232 Switcher - Now easily switch between a 
printer & modem at the flick of a switch! ..$29.95 



5 1/4 " Diskettes in any quantity 49 cents 

C-10 tapes - Minimum quantity (20 pes) ...69 cents 

Rompak w/Blank PC Board 27xx series $9.95 

"D" Rev motherboard w/o socketed chips $16.95 

OC-THERM - Measure inside and outside temperatures 

with CoCo! Fahrenheit & Centigrade ! $19.95 

CoCo III keyboard - upgrade your CoCo II keyboard 1 
" Package " deal w/ FKEYS III ($24.95) software $39.95 
Color Schematic Creator III - A computer-aided 
circuit drawing program for the CoCo III! ..$49.95 

HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM (SAVE$20) $79.95 

MAGNAVOX TV tuner - Now you can watch TV with your 

Magnavox 8505/8515 RGB Analog monitor ! $99.95 

Super Controller - Up to 4 DOSs by a POKE ..$99.95 
Super Controller II - DMA "No Halt " disk controll- 
er. No type-ahead OS-9 problems! $129.95 

PBH-64 - A combo Parallel Printer interface & 64K 
Print Buffer! COMPUTE while you PRINT ! ....$149.95 
SONY KV-1311CR - ( CHEAPEST PRICE IN THE RAINBOW ) 1 1 
$439.95 - Add $40.00 for cable (+ $20.00 shipping) 
Tandy LP-1000 Laser Printer (SAVE $200 ) - $1995.00 



Breaking your back 
typing on your 

CoCo??? 





Sit back and relax with 
a Spectrum keyboard 
extender cable. $39,95 
ee 11/87 Rainbow review 
page 137 



Now you can extend your present keyboard away from 
your CoCoII/CoCoIII 1 Easier typing & requires no 
soldering! You also have the option to leave your 
present keyboard intact & hook up a second keybd 
^ or re mote operation I Spectrum Keyboard extender 

cable w/ EXTERNAL CoCo 1 1 keyboard $49.95 

Extender cable w/ EXTERNAL CoCoIII keybd ....$69.95 



SUPER CHIP -SALE- ... 

2764 EPROM $4.95 27128 EPRQM $6.95 

6821 Standard PIA^9?9S: Closeout price! $6.95 

68764 EPROM Closeout price! $12.95 

6847 VDG Chip ^497951 Closeout price! $12.95 

6809E CPU Chip :$*3t3S: Closeout price! $12.95 

CoCo III Multipak - "NEW" PAL chip (For Gray and 

White 26-3024 models ONLY) $19.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) $19.95 

Disk ROM 1.1 - (Needed for CoCoIII ) $29.95 

Original SAM Chip (6883) $29.95 

Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - Closeout price! $29.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two PIA's, 6809E CPU 
and SAM Chips (BE PREPARED) Closeout price! $49.95 

NEW! ' Upgraded 1 CoCoIII " GIME " chip $79.95 

EPROM Programmer - uses 2716s up to 27512 s! Super 
fast programming! - See April *86 review .$149.95 

COCO LIBRARY ... 

A History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 $6.95 

CoCo Memory Map Reg. ^frr^ST Now only $9.95 

New! 200 MORE Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 

Basic Programming Tricks Revealed I$±4t3X ... .$9.95 

500 Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $16.95 

300 CoCoIII POKES - #1 CoCoIII bestseller! .$19.95 

Complete Rainbow Guide to OS9 Level II $19.95 

Rainbow Guide to OS9 Level II Disk $19.95 

A Guide to CoCo III GRAPHICS (7/87 review) .$21.95 
Better Graphics on CoCo3 (8/87 review pgl43) $24.95 

CoCo II Service Manual (Specify Cat.#) $29.95 

CoCo III Unraveled - A best seller! ! I $29.95 

Inside OS-9 Level II (from Frank Hogg!) ....$39.95 
CoCo III Service Manual - Current version! .$39.95 
Cblor/Extended/Disk Basic Unraveled $49.95 



■ ■ ■ 



MORE GOOD STUFF 

CoCo Keybd - Low profile, fits all CoCo lis & "F"s 
WAS $39.95 - NOW $19.95. D/E CoCo I adapter $12.95 
Universal Video Drvr- All monitors & CoCos .$29.95 
(2) Chip 64K Upgrade - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II .$29.95 

28 pin act Basic - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II $34.95 

PAL SWITCHER - Reg. 26-3024 MPI. Switch from CoCoII 

to CoCoIII mode $39.95 w/NEW PAL $49.95 

Real Time Clock - Compatible w /QS-9 or RSDOS , easy 
internal mounting, CoCoII/III compatible! ..$69.95 

1200 BAUD MODEM* $99.95 



* — with purchase of Rickeyterm ($39.95) 
Top FD-502 Drive 1 (#26-3133) - SAVE $60 , 
CoCo III DISK DRIVE 0 - (Includes CoCoIII 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150 plus value ! 11) . 
2400 Baud Modem -(Great for Delphi )$2»r^ 
512K COLOR 0QMPUTER III (Includes CoCoIII 



Bonanza Package — a $ 150+ value ! ) 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 



software 
.$139.95 
Software 
,.$219.95 

C$229.95 
Software 
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HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
See our other 2 ads on pages 17 & 27 ! ! ! 



lows punctuation in the variables en- 
tered. That's the only difference 
between the two commands. 

Programming Exercise: 

Using the methods presented in this 
article and the listing, write a program 
that will allow you to enter items you 
would want to list or find later in the 
program into arrays. 

It is often difficult for new pro- 
grammers (and, sometimes, old pro- 
grammers, too!) to decipher the mean- 
ing of a line of BASIC code. I have 
embedded remark statements in the 
program shown in the listing to help. 
Refer to the chart on Page 24 for a line- 
by-line description. 



In the final installment, Lesson IV, 
we will take this month's program, add 
data I/O, and enhance it further to 
allow easier data entry and correction. 

Hints and Tips 

Nothing puts a damper on a strug- 
gling beginner more quickly than trying 
to edit a program with Basic's built-in 
editor. I find it cumbersome and diffi- 
cult to use. 

To make programming easier, you 
can use word processors such as VIP or 
Telewriter to write your programs. Save 
these programs in ASCII ( 5 fi V E " 
filename" n ft) with the proper exten- 
sions, etc. It may take longer to load and 
save, but the editing capabilities of these 



programs make this a minor inconven- 
ience. 

Those of you who want to know more 
about the commands available for your 
computer can purchase the TRS-80 
Pocket Handbook from Radio Shack 
(Cat. No. 62-2024). It is one of the best 
investments you can make to assist you 
in learning programming. And if you're 
interested in learning more about the 
peeks and pokes available for the Color 
Computer, I recommend you read 500 
POKES, PEEKS W EXECS for the 
TRS-80 CoCo, marketed by Microcom 
Software. 

Remember: Work smarter, not 
harder! □ 



The listing: DRTRBR5E 

0 1 BASIC NAME DATABASE PROGRAM. 
THIS PROGRAM IS TO BE USED WITH 
THE BASIC PROGRAMMING COURSE 
WRITTEN BY DAVID W. OSTLER, COPY 
RIGHT 1987 

1J3 CLEAR100j3:T=100:N=j3:DIMB$(10) 
:DIMC$(lj3) :DIMD$(lj3) :DIME$(10) 






THE RAINBOW'S 

ne-Liner Contest 
as now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines. This 
means a new dimension and new 
opportunity for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sure your line, or lines, aren't packed so tightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 



Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 






4^ 



20 1 CHECK FOR TAPE OR DISK SYSTE 
M 

30 A=PEEK(188) 

40 'CHECK FOR 16K OR 64K SYSTEM 
50 B=PEEK(116) 

60 IF(A=14 AND B=127) THEN GOSUB 
1000 

70 IF(A=6 AND B=127) THEN GOSUB1 
010 

80 IF(A=6 AND B=63) THEN GOSUB 10 
20 

85 GOTO2000 

95 'FILES ENTERED HERE 
100 CLS: PRINT "ADDRESS DATABASE # 
OF FILES" ;N: PRINT: LINEINPUT"ENT 
ER NAME 

";b$(n) 

110 print: line input "enter addres 

S 

";c$(N) 

120 PRINT :LINEINPUT" ENTER CITY, 
ST, &ZIP ";D$(N) 
130 PRINT: LINEINPUT" ENTER TELEPH 
ONE NO. 
";E$(N) 

140 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" 1. NAME- ";B 
$(N) 

150 PRINT: PRINT" 2. STREET-" ;C$ (N 
) 

160 PRINT: PRINT" 3. STATE- ";D$(N 
) 

170 PRINT: PRINT" 4. PHONE- ";E$(N 
) 

180 PRINT@3 57, "PRESS <C> TO CONT 
INUE" : PRINT@399 , "OR" : PRINT@416 , " 

PRESS THE NUMBER TO CORRECT" 
190 I$=INKEY$ : IFI$=" "THEN190ELSE 
IFI$="1"THEN300ELSEIFI$="2"THEN3 
10ELSEIFI$="3"THEN320ELSEIFI$="4 
"THEN330ELSEIFI$="C"THEN200ELSE1 
90 

200 N=N+1:IFN=10GOTO6000 

210 CLS: PRINTS 4 5 6, "ANOTHER ENTRY 



26 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



Software Bonanza Pak 

A SPECTACULAR SOFTWARE BONANZA with the following 
12 programs : CoCo Checker, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo 
Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, Spectrum Font 
Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, Fastdupe II, 64K 
Disk Utility, Spectrum DOS, Basic+, CoCo Calender 
& OS9-Solution (a $300 plus value) for only $99.95 



CoCo III Software Library 

Create an instant library of Spectrum J^rojects TOP 
CoCoIII software! Get FONT BONANZA, FONT DISK #1, 
FKEYS III, C III GRAPHICS , CoCoIII UTILITIES and 
FASTDUPE II (a $150 plus value) for only $49.95 



CoCo III Utilities 



Terrific utility programs for the Color Computer 
III! Includes a CoCoII to CoCoIII Converter, 32K 
Hi -Res screen saver, 40/80 Column Word Processor, 
RAM tester, DEMO BALL generator, SMOOTH Scrolling 
demos. 128K DISK $24.95 (see 8/87 Rainbow review) 



CoCo III Secrets Revealed 

An introduction to the Color Computer III that 
compares the differences between the CoCoI/II and 
the NEW CoCoIII. Includes: GIME chip specs, CoCoII 
to CoCoIII converter and a 128/512K RAM test. 
"Offers some very good information to pro- 



granmers 



Rainbow review 2/87 $19.95 



CoCo III Screen Dump 

This is the program for HARDCOPY GRAPHICS for 
Radio Shack bit -image, dot-matrix printers ( DMP- 
105 , DMP-130 , etc.) and Epson compatibles (Star 
Mi cronies, Panasonic, etc.). Will print HSCREEN 1- 
4 and PM0DE 0-4. 16 patterns can be CUSTOMIZED for 
any color on~EKe screen! 128K CoCoIII DISK $24.95 



Fkeys 



A productivity enhancement that gives you the 
capability to add twenty (20) predefined functions 
to the CoCoIII by using the CTRL , Fl and F2 keys ! ! 
$24.95 "Get more from your keyboard with FKEYS 
III" - Rainbow review 4/87 



C III Graphics 



A drawing program for the CoCoIII using the new 
ENHANCED graphic features: 320X192 graphics, 16 of 
any 64 colors, plus the ability to SAVE and LOAD 
32K screens. "Paint pretty pictures on the CoCo3." 
- Rainbow review 12/86 $19.95 



OS-9 Solution 



NOW, a program that creates a " USER FRIENDLY " 
environment within OS-9. The OS-9 SOLUTION 
replaces 20 of the old " USER HOSTILE " commands 
with single keystroke , menu driven commands. No 
more typing in complex long pathnames or remeaber- 
ing complicated syntaxes! $29.95 



Telepatch III 



All the FEATURES of TELEPATCH plus the classically 
proportioned characters of the WIZARD with TRUE 
lowercase! Now CoCoIII compatible! (Upgrade $15 
w/proof of purchase) $29.95 



Tape/Disk Utility 



A powerful package that transfers tap e to disk and 
disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic copy 
of an entire disk of programs to tape. Ideal for 
Rainbow On Tape to disk. Also copies tape to tape 
& prints tape & disk directories. TAPE/DISK $24.95 



Multi-Pak Crak 



Save ROMPAKS on your 64K Disk System using the RS 
Multi-Pak Interface. "Eliminate constant plugginc 



in of ROMPAKS by keeping all PAK software on an 
Includes POKES for " PROBLEM " ROMPAKS & the NEW 16K 
PAKS (Demon Attack, Dragons Lair..) $29.95 NOW 
CoCo3 compatible! Upgrade $15 w/proof of purchase 



Disk Utility 2.1 A 



A mu lti - featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk 
handling. Utilize a directory window to 
selectively sort, move, rename & kITl "file 
entries. Lightning fast Disk 1/0 for format, copy 
Q backup* Single execution of both Basic & ML 
programs. 64K DISK $29.95. NOW also CoCoIII 
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conditional flags can "be used. 64K DISK $29.95 



CoCo Calendar 



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(Y/N) " 

22J3 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN22j3ELSE 
IFI$="Y"THENlj3j3ELSEIFI$= ,, N"THEN9 
00ELSE220 

30^J CLS: PRINT: PRINT :LINEINPUT"EN 
TER NAME 

";B$ (N) :GOT014j3 
310 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: LINE INPUT "EN 
TER ADDRESS 

" ;C$(N) :GOTO140 
32J3 CLS: PRINT: LINE INPUT "3. STATE 
- ";D$(N) :GOT014j3 

330 CLS: PRINT: PRINT :LINEINPUT"EN 
TER TELEPHONE NO. 

";E$(N) :GOT014j3 
900 FORB=0TO N-l 

910 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" 1. NAME- ";B 
$(B) 

920 PRINT : PRINT " 2 . STREET-" ;C$ (B 
) 

930 PRINT: PRINT" 3. STATE- ";D$(B 
) 

940 PRINT: PRINT "4. PHONE- ";E$(B 
) 

950 PRINT@355, "PRESS ANY KEY TO 
CONTINUE" 

960 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN96j3 
970 NEXTB 



980 GOTO2000 

1000 CLS:PRINT@230,"32/64K DISK 
SYSTEM" :FORX=1TO1000STEP1: NEXTX: 
RETURN 

1010 CLS:PRINT@228, M 32/64K CASSE 
TTE SYSTEM" :FORX=1T01000STEP1:NE 
XTX : RETURN 

1020. CLS:PRINT@229, "16K CASSETTE 
SYSTEM" : FORX=1TO1000STEP1: NEXTX 
: RETURN 

2000 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" WELCOME TO 
THE BASIC DATABASE ": PRINT :PRIN 

T" WOULD YOU LIKE TO:":PRI 

NT: PRINT: PRINT" S) TART A NEW 

DATABAS E " : PRINT : PRINT " E ) 

ND THIS PROGRAM" : PRINT@458 , '* [SEL 

ECT ONE]" 

2010 I$=INKEY$ : IFI$«""THEN2010EL 
SEIFI$="S "THEN9 5ELSEIFI$="E"THEN 
5000ELSE2010 

5000 CLS3:PRINT@224," REBO 
OTING TO BASIC":SOUND200,2:SOUND 
100 , 3 : FORX=1TO1000STEP1 : NEXTX: CL 
S : END 

6000 CLS0:PRINT@224," MAXIMUM 
FILE SIZE REACHED" :SOUND200, 2: SO 
UND100 , 3 : FORX=1TO1000STEP1 : NEXTX 
:GOTO900 



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prompts for easy guided use 


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calculates 1040, 2441, 2106, 6502 


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CHECKS WELCOME m shipping CARDS, CO D. 

T R Y-O-BYTE, 1 008 Alton Circle, Florence, S.C 29501 , (803) 662-9500 



J 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 29 



Let Co Co calculate friendship compatibility 




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30 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 




ompu Match is a program 
designed to match people who 
give similar responses to a ques- 
tionnaire, and is aimed especially at 
clubs and organizations that want an 
interesting project or a way to raise 
money without selling trinkets or candy. 

My high school computer club had 
good results using a similar program 
called Computer Friendship Matching 
Service, which I wrote for the IBM. We 
gave it the long name to convey that the 
program was just for fun, and to avoid 
the problems and negative connotations 
of a dating service. 

Participants fill out questionnaires by 
answering multiple-choice questions 
about their personality, lifestyle and 
interests. Each person's data is entered 
into the computer. Then the program 
prints, for each participant, a list of five 
people of the opposite sex who had the 



Robert Rogers is a self -taught pro- 
grammer who is currently attending 
Florida Atlantic University, majoring 
in computer science. His interests in- 
clude model railroading and playing the 
organ professionally. 



highest percentages of similar re- 
sponses. 

I have included a five-question sam- 
ple questionnaire, which you can use for 
a test run (five males and five females 
are needed in the file to avoid errors 
when matching). More questions are 
needed for the "rear* run. 

Upon running, you are asked what 
filename you are using. You must use 
the same filename when adding addi- 
tional data. In order for the program to 
work on a 16K machine, the CLERR 
10000 and LM=500 statements in Line 
10 require some modification — lower 
values. LM is the number of participants. 
If memory is limited, you could divide 
up the pool of participants by age or 
grade and use separate files. (Note: 
Participants can be matched only with 
others in the same file.) 

A good promotion for your matching 
service is having the faculty participate 
(in a separate file) — this will yield 
hilarious results. 

Next you are asked how many ques- 
tions are on the form (maximum of 25) 
and the largest number of response 
choices for any one question (maximum 
of nine). A menu of six options appears. 

Function 1 allows initial data to be 
entered and new data to be added. Enter 
the person's name, sex (M or F) and 
code number (we used homeroom 
numbers). Then, in sequence, type the 
responses. Use numbers, not letters. 
You won't need to press feNTER after 
each response. You can back up to 
correct a mistake by pressing the up 
arrow; the prompt includes the response 
number, so you will always know which 
one you are entering. No correcting is 
allowed after all the responses art 
entered. 

Function 2 is the actual matching 
process. It prints to the screen or printer 
the top five match-ups and correspond- 
ing percentages for each participant. If 
you use the printer, the printouts can be 
delivered personally. To speed the proc- 
ess, males and females are done sepa- 
rately — you can select which to print 
first. So, to cover everyone, use Func- 
tion 2 twice, selecting "female" first, and 
"male" next. You also have the option 
of starting with a specific "match posi- 
tion." Pressing ENTER begins printing 
the results for the first male or female 
in the file. 

To have printing begin elsewhere in 
the file, enter the desired record number 
obtained with Function 3. The match 
position option enables you to print out 
a partial listing of participants and then 
continue where you left off later (this is 



NAME: BILL WILSON 
CODE NO: 210 
SEX: M 



COMPUTER MATCHING 



RANK 



NAME 



NO. 



EMBRY JOHNSON 
SUSAN AUBREY 
CINDY JEFFERS 
CATHY SPARKS 
THERESA OLSON 



PERCENTAGE 



215 
210 
196 
198 
195 



60 
40 
40 



NAME: GARY SMITH 
CODE NO: 217 
SEX: M 



COMPUTER MATCHING 



RANK 



NAME 



NO. 



CATHY SPARKS 
SUSAN AUBREY 
EMBRY JOHNSON 
THERESA OLSON 
CINDY JEFFERS 



PERCENTAGE 



198 
210 
215 
195 
196 



2? 

2j3 

20 
20 
20 



NAME: JOHN DOE 
CODE NO: 186 
SEX: M 

RANK 



COMPUTER MATCHING 



NAME 



NO. 



SUSAN AUBREY 
THERESA OLSON 
CATHY SPARKS 
EMBRY JOHNSON 
CINDY JEFFERS 



PERCENTAGE 



210 
195 
198 
215 
196 




40 
40 
2J3 

J3 



harder to explain than it is to see in 
operation). The disk containing the 
data file must remain in the disk drive. 

Function 3 lists to the screen or 
printer all the participants 1 data and file 
record numbers. These are not needed 
to use Compu Match unless you use the 
"match position" option previously 
described or need a file dump for debug- 
ging. 

Function 4 allows you to print results 
for the person whose name you input. 
This could be used if a printout is lost 
or if you decide to have people line up 
at the computer to watch the results 
appear on the screen. 

Function 5 is an extra feature that 
will compute for each question the 
percentage of participants that choose 
each response — it can be computed for 
males, females or both combined. These 
statistics can then be announced or 
printed in a newsletter or school news- 
paper for the general interest. This 
function could be used by itself (without 
using the matching process) as a quick 
questionnaire tabulator. 

Function 6 should be used to end 
operation and ensure proper file clos- 
ing. 



(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 10228 Anthony Groves Road, West 
Palm Beach, FL 33414. Please enclose 
an SASE when writing for a reply.) □ 



QUESTION: 


1 






1 \ 


: 2 




20.0 


% 


2 I 


: 3 




30.0 


% 


3 : 


: 2 




20.0 


% 


4 ! 


: 3 




30.0 


% 


QUESTION: 


2 






1 ; 


: 3 




30.0 


% 


2 ! 


: 5 




50.0 


% 


3 ; 


: 1 




10.0 


% 


4 : 


: 1 




10.0 


% 


QUESTION: 


3 






1 ; 


! 1 




10.0 


% 


2 : 


t ft 




0.0 


% 


3 : 


l 5 




50.0 


% 


4 ! 


: 4 




40.0 


% 


QUESTION: 


4 






1 


: 3 




30.0 


% 


2 : 4 




40.0 


% 


3 : 1 




10.0 


% 


4 : 2 




20.0 


% 


QUESTION: 


5 






1 


: 1 




10.0 


% 


2 . 


: 5 




50.0 


% 


3 : 


: 3 




30.0 


% 


4 


! 1 




10.0 


% 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 31 




160 167 

1120 242 

3005 188 



4030 74 

7050 189 

END 233 



The listing: MRTCH 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



**************************** 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



COMPU MATCH 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



COPYRIGHT (C) 1984 BY 

ROBERT ROGERS 

VERSION 1.3 JULY 198 6 

TANDY COLOR COMPUTERS W/ 

16K DISK EXTENDED BASIC 
**************************** 

10 CLEAR10000:VERIFYON:LM=500:DI 
MA$ (LM) ,0(9) : 1 LM=#PARTICIPANTS , 
CHANGE TO FIT MEMORY OF 16K COCO 
20 CLS :PRINT@224, "FILE NAME TO B 
E USED: " ; :LINEINPUTFI$:IFLEN(FI$ 
) >8THENSOUNDl , 5 :RUN 
30 CLS:PRINT§224,"HOW MANY QUEST 
IONS : " ; : INPUTI : IFK10RI>25THENSO 
UND1,5:GOTO30 

40 CLS:PRINT@224,"HOW MANY RESPO 
NSE CHOICES : " ; : INPUTRC : IFRC<10RR 
O9THENS0UND1 , 5 : GOTO40 
100 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(32,191) " 

COMPU MATCH" : PRINTSTRING 
$(32,191) ; 

llj3 PRINT: PRINT" (1) ENTER DATA 
120 PRINT" (2) RUN MATCHING PROC 



LIST DATA 

MATCH ONE PERSON 

COMPILE STATISTIC 



ESS 

130 PRINT" (3) 
140 PRINT" (4) 
150 PRINT" (5) 
S 

160 PRINT" (6) END SESSION 

180 PRINT@3 58, "SELECT OPTION (1 

-6) 

190 PRINT@448,STRING$(32,191)" 

(C)1985 BY ROBERT ROGERS"; 
200 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN200 
210 K=VAL(K$) :IFK<1 OR K>6 THEN 2 
00 

220 ON K GOSUB1000, 2000, 4000, 600 
0,9000,300 
230 GOTO100 
300 CLS : END 

1000 GOSUB7000:X=LOF(1) 

1001 CLS:DD$="" 

1002 IFX+1=LM THENCLOSE#l: PRINTS 
224," NO MORE PARTICIPANTS ALLO 
WED" : SOUND1 , 30 : GOTO100 

1010 LINE INPUT "NAME : " ;NN$ : IFNN$= 
" " THENCLOSE # 1 : GOTO100 
1020 LINE INPUT "CODE NUMBER: ";HH$ 
1030 LINEINPUT"SEX: " ;SS$:SS$=LEF 



T$ (SS$,1) :IFSS$<>"M"ANDSS$o"F"T 

HEN1030 

1040 T=0 

1100 T=T+1:IFT=I+1THEN1140 
1110 PRINT"RESPONSE"T":"; 

1120 F$=INKEY$ : IFF$=" "THEN1120 

1121 IFF$=CHR$.(94)THEN1125 

1122 IF(VAL(F$) )<10R(VAL(F$) ) >RC 
THEN1120 

1125 DD$=DD$+F$ 

1126 IFF$=CHR$(94)THENPRINT:T=T- 
1 : IFT<1THENT=1 : DD$=" " :GOTO1110 : E 
LSEDD$=LEFT$ ( DD$ , LEN ( DD$ ) -2 ) : GOT 
O1110 

1130 PRINTF$ 

1135 GOTO1100 

1140 X=X+1:GOSUB8000 

1150 GOTO1001 

2000 CLS : PRINT@229 , "<P>RINTER OR 
<S>CREEN 

2001 V$=INKEY$ : IFV$="S"THENV=0 : C 
LS : ELSEIFV$="P"THENV=-2 : ELSE2001 

2005 CLS : PRINT@231, "<M>ALE OR <F 
>EMALE 

2006 SS$=INKEY$:IFSS$="M"THENO$=* 

"F":ELSEIFSS$="F"THENO$="M":ELSE 
2006 

2010 GOSUB7000:L=LOF(1) :M=0 
2020 F0RT=1T0L:GET#1,T:IFS$=0$TH 
ENM=M+1:A$(M)=D$+STR$(T) 
2025 NEXTT:IFF=1THENX=0:GOTO3000 
2110 CLS:PRINT@224, ""; :LINEINPUT 
"MATCH POSITION: " ;C$:C=VAL(C$) :I 
FC<1THENC=1:ELSEIFC>L THENC=L 
2120 X=C-1 

3000 X=X+1: PRINT @0,X; :IFX=L+1THE 
NCLOSE#l : GOTO 100 

3001 GET#1,X:IFS$OSS$THEN3000:E 
LSEU$=N$:I$=H$ 

3005 IFF=1THENIFINSTR(1,N$,M$)<1 
THEN3000 

3010 FORQ=1TO5:P(Q)=0:PP(Q)=0:NE 
XTQ 

3015 T=0 

3020 T«T+1:R=0:IFT=M+1THEN3120 
3030 F0RQ=1T0I 

3040 IFMID$(D$,Q,1)=MID$(A$(T) ,Q 

,1)THENR=R+1 

3050 NEXTQ 

3060 P=(R/I) *100:Y=0 

3070 Y=Y+1:IFY=6THEN3110 

3080 IFP<P(Y)THEN3070 

3090 FORZ=5TOY STEP-1 : P (Z+l) =P ( Z 

) :PP(Z+1)=PP(Z) :NEXTZ:P(Y)=P:PP( 

Y)=VAL(RIGHT$(A$(T) , (LEN (A$ (T) ) - 

25))) 

3110 GOTO3020 
3120 GOSUB5000 
3130 GOTO3000 

4000 CLS : PRINT@229 , "<P>RINTER OR 



32 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



<S>CREEN 

4005 V$=INKEY$:IFV$=»S fl THENV=0:C 
LS : ELSEIFV$= M P"THENV=-2 : ELSE4J305 
4j31j3 GOSUB7j3j30 

4030 FORT=1TOLOF(1) :GET#1 # T:PRIN 
T#V / N$:PRINT#V,T M "D$; M »S$;" "; 
H$ 

4035 IFV=0THENIFPEEK(338)O191TH 
ENPOKE 338,255: GOT04 035 
4040 NEXTT: CLOSE #1 

4999 EXEC44539:RETURN 

5000 CLS:IFV=-2THENPRINT#V / TAB(3 
1 ) 1 1 COMPUTER MAT CHING 

5010 PRINT#V 

5020 PRINT* V, "NAME: "U$ 

5030 PRINTS, "CODE NO: "1$ 

5040 PRINT #V, "SEX: "SS$ 

5041 IFV=0THENGOTO5200 

5050 PRINT #V: PRINT#V, " RANK" , "NA 

ME", f "NO. " , " PERCENTAGE" : PRINT #V 

/ STRING$(80 / "-") 

5060 F0RZ=1T05:GET#1,PP(Z) 

5080 PRINT#V,Z,N$,H$,P(Z) 

5090 NEXTZ:PRINT#V:PRINT#V 

5100 RETURN 

5200 F0RZ=1T05:GET#1,PP(Z) 
5210 PRINTZ;LEFT$(N$,25) :PRINT"N 
0. :"H$" PERCENTAGE MATCH: "P(Z) 
5220 NEXTZ 

5230 IFPEEK(3 38)<>191THENPOKE338 
, 255 : GOTO5230ELSEPOKE3 38 , 255 : CLS 
: RETURN 

6000 CLS :PRINT@224, "NAME OF PERS 

ON TO MATCH: ":LINEINPUTM$ 

6010 F=1:GOTO2000 

7000 0PEN ,, D",#1,FI$ / 6J3 

7010 FIELD#1, 30ASN$ / 4ASH$ / 25ASD$ 

,1ASS$ 

7040 L=L0F(1) 
7050 RETURN 

8000 LSETN$=NN$ : LSETH$=HH$ : LSETD 
$=DD$:LSETS$=SS$ 
8010 PUT#1,X 
8015 RETURN 



Mouse Tales By Logan Ward 



on 

ok* 

HOW ALL 1 HAVE 
TO DO IS FIND THE 




9000 CLS:PRINT@229 / "<P>RINTER OR 
<S>CREEN 

9010 V$=INKEY$ : IFV$="S"THENV=0 : C 
LS : ELSEIFV$=" P"THENV=-2 : ELSE9010 
9020 CLS:PRINT@200, "STATISTICS F 
OR :":PRINT@229 / "<M>ALE <F>EMALE 
<B>OTH" 

9030 B$=INKEY$ : IFB$O l, M f, ANDB$<>" 

F"ANDB$<>"B»THEN9030 

9040 CLS:N=0:GOSUB7000 

9050 FORQ=1TOI:FORK=1TORC:O(K)=0 

: NEXTK: F0RT=1T0L 

9060 GET # 1 , T 

9070 IFB$=" F"THENIFS$="F"THENIFQ 
=1THENN=N+ 1 : GOTO90 9 0 : ELSEGOTO90 9 
0ELSE9100 

9080 IFB$= M M n THENIFS$="M M THENIFQ 
=1THENN=N+1 : GOTO9090 : ELSE9090ELS 
E9100 

9085 I FQ= 1THENN=N+ 1 

9090 K=VAL(MID$(D$ / Q / 1) ) :0(K)=0( 

K)+l 

9100 NEXTT :PRINT#V, "QUESTION: "Q: 

F0RK=1T0RC:PRINT#V, » M K" : "O(K) , 

: PRINT # V , US ING "###.# 11 ;(0(K)/N)*1 

00; :PRINT#V, » %" : NEXTK 

9110 IFV=0THENIFPEEK(338)O191TH 

ENPOKE338, 255 :GOTO9110 

9120 NEXTQ : CLOSER 1 : GOTO 100 




$ 
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$ 
$ 
$ 
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$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 



If You Are Serious About Stocks. . ., 
This Program Is A Must! 



Stock Market portfolio for the color computer 
will keep track of all your current stock listings 
and keep a listing of stocks you have sold by the 
year, they were sold with all totals, profit and 
loss, and percentages. More than one person 
can use this program as long as the first three 
letters on both first and last name are not the 
same. The program is menu driven and will 
give you the option for either screen print or 
information to be printed on printer. 



$ 
$ 

s 
s 
$ 

s 
s 

$ 
$ 

5 
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$ 



Rush Check for $22.00 plus $3.00 shipping & handling to: 

Paparis Enterprises 
700 York St. 

Williamsburg, VA 23185 
Please allow 2-3 weeks for delivery 
Sorry no C.O.D.S 
VA residents add 4.5% sales tax. 



S 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 



February 1988 



THE RAINBOW 33 




IPS' 



CHICAGO 



MAY 20-22 



>1 



M*4 





AINBOWfest is the only computer show dedicated 
exclusively to yourTandy Color Computer. 
Nowhere else will you see as many CoCo-related 
products or be able to attend free seminars conducted 
by the top Color Computer experts. It's like receiving the 
latest issue of the rainbow in your mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for commercial 
programmers to show off new and innovative products 
for the first time. Chicago is the show to get information 
on capabilities for the new C0C0 3, along with a terrific 
selection of the latest C0C0 3 software. In exhibit after 
exhibit, there will be demonstrations, opportunities to 
experiment with software and hardware, and special 
RAINBOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace between visiting exhibits and 
attending the valuable, free seminars on all aspects of 
your C0C0 — from improving basic skills to working with 
the sophisticated OS-9 operating system. 

Many people who write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are written about — are there 
to meet you and answer questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people who share your interest 
in the Color Computer. It's a person-to-person 
event and a tremendous learning experience in 
a fun and relaxed atmosphere. 

A special feature of RAINBOWfest is the 
Educational Sandbox, which features 
chitd-oriented workshops to give hands- 
on experience to an age group often 
neglected. There are sessions for the 
kindergarten through third-grad- 
ers, and for fourth- through sev- 



enth-graders. And, as an additional treat for C0C0 Kids of 
all ages, we've invited frisky feline C0C0 Cat to join us for 
the show. RAINBOWfest has something for everyone in the 
family! 

If you missed the fun at our last RAINBOWfest in Prince- 
ton, why don't you make plans now to join us in 
Chicago? For members of the family who don't share 
your affinity for CoCo, there are many other attrac- 
tions in the Chicago area. 

The Hyatt Regency Woodfield offers special rates for 
RAINBOWfest. The show opens Friday evening with a 
session from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's a daytime show 
Saturday — the CoCo Community Breakfast (separate 
tickets required) is at 8 a.m., then the exhibit hall opens 
promptly at 10 a.m. and runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, 
the exhibit hall opens at 11 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained directly 
from the rainbow. We'll also send you a reserva- 
tion form so you can get a special room rate. 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH 
treatment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at 
(502) 893-331 1 . All POSH services are available at no 
charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 





COCO GALLERY LIVE 
SHOWCASE YOUR BEST AT RAINBOWFEST 

We are taking the popular "CoCo Gallery" on the road to RAINBOWfest Chicago 
— and we'd like you to submit your own graphics creations to be exhibited at the 
show! 



RULbS 



• You can enter color or black-and-white photographs or printouts of your original artwork 
produced on the CoCo 1, 2 or 3. Entries should be framed, mounted or matted, and may 
not be smaller than 5-by-7 inches or larger than 11-by-14 inches. 

• Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized 
images from TV programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized 
copy of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

• Along with your entry, send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, 
detailing how you created your picture (what programs you used, etc.). Please include a 
few facts about yourself, too! 

• Your name, address and phone number, along with the title of your work, must be clearly 
marked on the back of each entry, and a disk copy of each piece must also be included. 

• Entries may be mailed to the rainbow before May 1 , 1988, or brought to the RAINBOWfest 
registration booth by 10 a.m., Saturday, May 21, 

• Your work will be returned if sent with a postage paid return envelope, or entries can be 
picked up at the close of the show — Sunday, May 22 at 4 p.m. 

There will be two categories: one for graphics produced on the CoCo 1 and 2, and 
one for CoCo 3 graphics. Several awards will be made in each category. Winners 
will be determined by votes from RAINBOWfest attendees. In case of any ties, 
winners will be determined by our chief judge, CoCo Cat. 

Prizes and ribbons will be presented Sunday, May 22, and winning entries will be 
published in the September '88 issue of the rainbow. Send your entry to "CoCo 
Gallery Live," the rainbow, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, Prospect, KY 40059. 

YES, I'm coming to Chicago! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special advance 
sale price. Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 



Please send me: 



Three-day tickets at $9 each total 

One-day tickets at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 



Name 

(please print) 
Address 



Saturday CoCo Breakfast 
at $12 each 



City 



State 



total 



RAINBOWfest T-shirts 
at $6 each total 
(Advance sale-priced T-shirts 
must be picked up at the door) 

Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 



Telephone 
Company . 



ZtP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express j 

Account Number — . — ~ 



(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 

□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the 
Hyatt Regency Woodfield ($64, single or double 
room). 



Exp. Date 



Signature 



Advance ticket deadline: May 13, 1988. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at 
the door. Tickets will also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. 
Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky 
call (800) 847-0309. 




n tur e Cont e st R e port 



i 



The Vote Is In 




By Cray Augsburg 

Adventure Contest Judge 

Ladies and gentlemen! Your atten- 
tion please! The scores have been 
tallied and the results are in. The 
winner of The Fourth RAINBOW Adven- 
ture Contest is. . . 

Hold on there, not so fast! In the 
tradition of Adventures, there is no 
instant gratification, no easy win. Judg- 
ing this contest was much like playing 
an Adventure — many things to explore 
and no obvious solutions. So why 
should I tell you right off the bat who 
won? We'll get around to it. 

After a considerable amount of time 
and effort, I finally reached my deci- 
sions, which weren't easy to make. Each 
Adventure had its own unique and 
interesting aspects, and it was really 
easy to like them all. So, I had to force 
myself to consider each entry as a 
complete package. 

In judging the contest, I knew the 
winner would be the person who sent in 
the most well-rounded entry. The use of 
graphics was not a requirement. How- 
ever, the winning entry would be com- 
prised of complete documentation, an 
original concept or theme, and logical 
design and organization. It would be a 
testament to the author's programming 
skills, yet be easy for the user to operate. 
I feel the winner of The Fourth RAIN- 
BOW Adventure Contest came through 
with flying colors on all counts. 




Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His user name 
on Delphi is CRAY. 



36 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



What's an Adventure? 

It's simply a game, but not necessarily 
a simple one. Playing an Adventure 
requires a certain level of skill and 
cunning. Since the concept of the game 
is not grounded in reality, you must be 
ready for the unexpected to pop up at 
any time. It all depends on the author's 
understanding of how the average 
human mind works. Just when you 
think you've got it solved, you find 
something else is required of you — 
something that makes the least (or, 
depending on how you look at it, the 
most) sense. Adventures can be quite 
frustrating. 

The goal in writing an Adventure is 
to capture the Adventurer and take him 
right to the frustration threshold — 
where he's just about ready to put his 
foot through the keyboard — and then 
give him a faint glimmer of hope. Let 
him gain a little, then start the process 
again. This is what keeps Adventurers 
coming back for more, and is also a sign 
of a well-written Adventure. 

Obviously, programming an Adven- 
ture takes quite a bit of effort. The 
author must be knowledgeable and 
clever, and must understand program- 
ming concepts and skills; otherwise, you 
might find the solution just by looking 
at the program listing. The good Adven- 
ture writer will invent a story line that 
stretches the imagination. 

I am proud to say the level of quality 
in the entries we received was unbeliev- 
ably high. However, this only made the 
decisions that much harder to make. So 
many people deserved to win, but only 
one could take home the grand prize. In 
the spirit of competition, though, eve- 
ryone was a winner. If you sent in an 
entry, give yourself a pat on the back for 
a job well done — you deserve it. 

The Entries 

What kind of Adventures did we see? 
We saw plenty of graphics! As a matter 
of fact, most of the Adventures submit- 
ted utilized graphics in one way or 
another. Of the many CoCo 3 entries, 
nearly 90 percent were graphics Adven- 
tures — and most were darn good, too! 
Creative use of graphics never fails to 
please people. The CoCo 1 and 2 graph- 
ics Adventures were something to be- 
hold, as well. It never fails to amaze me 
what can be done with a simple PMDDE4 
screen and a few artifacted colors. 

Now, lest we concern those who did 
not use graphics, remember that the 
"original" computer Adventure game 
had text only. The use of graphics has 
never been necessary to an Adventure's 



success. It is true that graphics enhance 
a program, but they are not necessary. 
In many cases, it is better to let the 
Adventurer's imagination create the 
scene. In fact, graphics can sometimes 
distract the player. Often it is best to let 
the readers' impressions of the events 
help them create mental pictures. 

As far as equipment requirements, 
the entries varied. Some Adventures ran 
in 4K without Extended Color BASIC, 
and others squeezed every available 
byte out of a 128K CoCo 3. We did not 
receive any entries written under OS-9, 
which is somewhat surprising consider- 
ing BASlC09's power and flexibility. Oh 
well, that's a story for another day. 

Some entries used music and sound 
effects. Being musically inclined, I had 
hoped to hear some fancy 12-voice 
music. It wasn't to be, (Maybe we can 
have a music programming contest 
someday). For the most part, though, 
the music and sound effects used were 
very appropriate. 

The level of programming found in 
the entries was really amazing. It is 
fascinating to see a skilled pro- 
grammer's work. I can imagine the 
programmer hovering over his key- 
board like a concert pianist. And mas- 
tery of the CoCo ivories has certainly 
been evidenced by the compositions I 
"heard." 

While most of the commands used in 
the entries we received would be famil- 
iar to even the most inexperienced 
Adventurer, some programmers broke 
new ground. Along with the old faith- 
fuls (GO and INVENTORY) were SRY, 
SPEAK, GOBBLE and COMPUTE. In addi- 
tion, some programmers abandoned the 
old "type-it-in" approach for the new 
"point-and-click" powers of the joystick 
and mouse. Our grand prize winning 
entry utilizes icons in a very easy-to- 
understand and realistic way and re- 
quires keyboard entry only when abso- 
lutely necessary. 

From the standard tricks of using 
hundreds of GOSUBs to poking the key 
routines in machine language, no holds 
were barred as the entrants scrambled 
to keep their secrets intact. And what is 
their motivation? While they would 
never admit it, they just want to make 
you work. I think that's fair — they 
worked hard to bring you the best they 
had to offer, and they want to make sure 
you enjoy it! 

In relation to this, I must give ad- 
vance notice: rainbow is not in any 
way, shape or form going to give you 
the solutions! That would just be the 
easy way out. Hints may be offered in 



"Scoreboard Pointers," but the brunt of 
the work remains with you, the Adven- 
turer. That, after all, is the whole point, 
Try to outguess the author in each case. 
He does have the upper hand, but he 
hasn't made the game impossible. I 
guess what I'm really saying is: Enjoyl 
And now for the winners. 

CoCo 3 Graphics Best of Show and 
Grand Prize is presented for the second 
consecutive time to Dr. Bruce Bell, an 
optometrist from Rockmart, Georgia. 
Dr. Bell's work has graced the pages of 
THE rainbow several times in the past. 
And each time he has done himself a 
little better. Dr. Bell did a professional 
job with this year's winning entry, The 
Controllers (see Page 42). His organiza- 
tional and programming skills do not go 
unnoticed. 

The Controllers is set "slightly" into 
the future. Your character is a scavenger 
in a time when technology has been 
banished from the Earth — the planet 
was overtaken by an alien race that uses 
thought control to reduce humans to 
primitivism. Your goal is to free the 
human race from this control. 

Dr. Bell's entry is written for the 
CoCo 3 and will work with color com- 
posite or RGB monitors, as well as tape 
or disk. A mixture of graphics, text and 
sound gave this entry an edge in the 
competition. More importantly, the use 
of a joystick/ mouse user interface gave 
it the final push into the winning posi- 
tion. While the use of such an interface 
is not unique in itself, the appropriate 
manner in which it is implemented here 
must be seen to be appreciated. 

The Controllers is comprised of two 
BASIC programs, one of which "sets up" 
the system. The other program is the 
main body of the Adventure, which 
features games within itself. To achieve 
a fine balance between program fea- 
tures and efficiency, Dr. Bell utilized 
many techniques, including some dab- 
bling into the "deep, dark world" of 
machine language. We commend Dr. 
Bell for his excellent work and hope to 
see more programs from him in the 
future. 

Non-Graphics Best of Show goes to 
Jeff Hillison, of Biacksburg, Virginia, 
for his entry, Intrigue. This Adventure 
casts you as an allied spy stuck in Berlin 
in the midst of WWII. Your mission is 
to find the plans for the impending 
German invasion of Britain. 

Clues in the form of a letter and 
burlesque show guide accompanied this 
entry; these clues are required to solve 



February 1 986 THE RAINBOW 37 



the Adventure, and add a certain sense 
of realism to the game. Jeff also uses 
several interesting commands. Never 
before have 1 seen 5HRKE and FLUSH 
used in an Adventure, but they are here. 

This Adventure is not an easy one to 
solve. (OK! Yes, 1 had to cheat and look 
at the solution.) With 60 rooms, nearly 
90 different objects and over 30 com- 
mands at your disposal, the play can get 
quite complex. 1 thoroughly enjoyed 
this Adventure. 

Jeff is a freshman at Virginia Tech, 
where he is majoring in accounting. He 
has been working with the CoCo since 
1983, and wrote his first Adventure in 
1985. 

CoCo 3 Graphics Runner-Up and 
Second Place go to Charles Farris. His 
entry, Term Paper, had a very interest- 
ing story line: You are a student at CoCo 
State University and someone has 
stolen your term paper. You must search 
the campus and retrieve all 30 pages of 
the paper before it is due. 

1 really empathized with the character 
in this Adventure. I don't know how 
many times "the dog ate my term paper, 
honest!" The play was enjoyable and 
interesting, incorporating levels of 
ability within the character: Fighting 
Factor, Health Points, Personality 
Points and Money Amount. 

The University is shown in the form 
of an onscreen map, but the locations 
of the pages are not given. As you move 
around the campus, you will be struck 
by the realism of the game. 

Charles is a self-taught BASIC pro- 
grammer who has enjoyed program- 
ming his CoCo for the last three years, 
and is currently with the U.S. Air Force, 
stationed overseas in Europe. 

Third Place goes to Dr. Eugene A. 
Carver, from Galena, Ohio, for SDI — 
Countdown to Doom: A criminal mas- 
termind has overtaken NORAD at 
Cheyenne Mountain, and you must 
stop his native country from demolish- 
ing civilization as we know it. You think 

Horw '900DIES* fro* Bill Brmico Software 



you are alone in your mission, but are 
you? The solution requires a great deal 
of thought, and the game never fails to 
twist and turn just when you feel the end 
is near. 

An efficient, yet sometimes evasive, 
programming style combined with a 
great deal of thought earns this entry its 
proper place in the contest. 1 especially 
liked some of the references to real-life 
current events. Everyone who liked 
Wargames will certainly find them- 
selves easily caught up in this one. 

Dr. Carver is an editor at Chemical 
Abstracts Services, where he translates 
chemistry articles from Russian and 
German to English. He received his 
doctorate in physical chemistry from 
the University of Chicago in 1974. 

CoCo 1/2 Graphics Best of Show 

goes to Mike Cooney, of Mansfield, 
Ohio, for his entry, The Eye of the Opal. 
You, Lwither, must find the special opal 
ring in order to make a proper proposal 
to Penelope. This requires what looks 
like an ordinary trip through an average 
sewer system (oh, boy!). 

This Adventure is much more diffi- 
cult than it might seem, but if you catch 
on to what Mike is doing, you will find 
it is really quite straightforward. The 
graphics are appropriate and some 
quite ornamental. 

The Eye of the Opal starts out much 
like most other Adventures, but soon 
takes on its own character as surprise 
after surprise comes your way. And 
many aspects of the game are random, 
which always makes for fun, if frustrat- 
ing, play. 

Mike is a self-taught programmer 
and a junior in high school. In addition 
to his enthusiasm for computers, Mike's 
hobbies include art and music. 

CoCo 1/2 Graphics Runner-Up goes 
to Paul Ruby, Jr., of Beeville, Texas, for 
Foundation of Failure. This 32K Ad- 
venture utilizes colorful PMODE 3 graph- 
ics to illustrate the rather large labyrinth 
in which your character travels. Each of 



the 250 caverns is shown in perspective 
and may or may not contain one of the 
treasures you are seeking or an enemy 
you are trying to avoid. 

The programming and presentation 
style is fairly original and lends itself 
well to this particular game. As you 
travel through the caverns in an attempt 
to save your village on the surface, you 
will learn to accept failure as well as 
triumph. 

Paul is the founder of Ruby Software 
and Consulting, and he works with 
BASIC, dBASEsind assembly language. 
His company consults with businesses 
about the creation and installation of 
accounting systems. 

16K Best of Show goes to Chinarut 
Ruangchotvit, a 14-year-old from Ram- 
sey, New Jersey, whose entry, The 
Castle of Death, can be found on Page 
65. The complexity of this Adventure is 
hidden. Only as the game progresses do 
you begin to realize how lost you can 
get. Those of you who don't believe in 
mapping your travels, be warned. The 
programming style of this Adventure is 
typical of its size, but includes some new 
twists that other programmers can 
appreciate. 

The story involves (as do many other 
Adventures) finding lost jewels. The 
solution is not readily apparent, but is, 
in fact, quite simple. Many traps await 
the Adventurer who becomes too 
greedy or obsessive. 

1 especially liked the addition of a 
descriptive term in some of the com- 
mand lines. For example, since any' 
room may have a door or window in 
several directions, the user can enter 
□PEN LEFT DOOR to open the door 
leading to the left. The Castle of Death 
serves as a useful model for those 
interested in learning how to create their 
own Adventures. 

16K Runner-Up goes to Richard 
John Kottke, of Madison, Wisconsin, 
for his entry, Captain Rodger s. This 
two-part Adventure involves quite a bit 



COCOPflCK, tho original S3 progree disk with 
51 fonts, susic, graphics, utilities and wont, 
FUPflCK, Mhich includes 'COAST TO COAST, 
expanded and additional fonts as well as 
'CoCoSiza 1 , tht exercise prograa for the Color 
Coaputsr. (Sat faril '67 Rainbow page 143 for 

tha CoCoSiza review). 

VflUJPACK, including dozens of additional, 
longer prograw that wouldn't fit on COCOPACK. 
3 PACK, i disfcful of goodies exclusively 
written for the CoCo 3. More gases, graphics 
end useful, inf creative progress all written 

in easy to learn BASIC. 

Each disk is only (6.00. Send cash, check 
I or aoney order today to Bill Bemico Software 
1708 Michigan Ave. Sheboygan, U 33081 



mm 



II 




Hint . . . 



A Sticky Problem 



Are you having problems with disk labels that come 
loose from the disk or don't want to stick at all? I was 
until I started using a thin film of rubber cement. Just 
apply it carefully to the area where you want to affix 
the label. Let the rubber cement dry and, when it has 
done so, put your label on. The rubber cement 
provides a good bonding surface for the "sticky" 
already on the label. Ron Hemermay 

Tacoma, WA 



38 THE RAINBOW February 1988 




mm 




mWt 



_ 









Color Connection 

by BJ Chambless 

m 

This is the most comprehensive modem package for the 
Color Computer! 

Afl are Protocols Supported including CompuServe Pro- 
tocol B, XMODEM protocol, and XON/XOFF. Auto dial fea- 
ture for both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack 
modems. You can use all baud rates when using the Radio 
Shack Deluxe RS232 program pack! Printer baud rates are 
selectable, 

You can print from the buffer and fifes bigger than the 
buffer can be uploaded and downloaded. Download di- 
rect to disk with automatic XON/XOFF protocol! Single key 
macros allow easy entry of often-used passwords and ID's. 

Hi-Res screens with a choice of colors are used. All print- 
able characters available and all control characters are 
supported. 

RSDOS Version includes two sets, one for CoCo I and 
CoCo II, the other for CoCo 3. 
OS-9 Connection 3.Q: 

The package includes all of the features of the RSDOS ver- 
sion plus runs on OS-9! Versions for both level I and Level 
II are deluded. pak is required. 



RSDOS Disk 
OS-9 Disk 



$49.95 
$49.95 



Also available from Radio Shack 
through Express Order Software 




Screen Star 

by Scott Cab it 




Data Master 

by BJ Chambless 

Simplify with pull-down menus 

All options are available from anywhere in the program. 
To make it even simpler, each menu option can be invoked • 
by a single character! 
Dialog boxes 

Pop-up windows display current settings and available 
choices. 

Unique LIST display format 

You view data in easy-to-read rows & columns. From this 
easy-to-read screen you may edit your data, without hav- 
ing to exit. Mass changes are a snap! 

For even more power, use an access key to selectively dis- 
play a subset of records and can change them right on the 
screen i 

Compatibility with OS-9 Profile & Data Bank 

You won't lose any of your valuable data! 
Easy Expansion 

with re-definition of records and transfer of files. 
Elements & Records: 

Each record can contain up to 512 characters used within 
35 elements. Elements are defined as: alphanumeric 
(descriptive data), math (real numbers including dollars & 
cents), date, and derived (formulas calculated from other ele- 
ments in the same record). You can store any type of data 
using these field typesl 



Display & Entry Screens 

Design up to 9 different screen formats for data display 
and data entry for each data base. This is helpful for access- 
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Sorts & Selections: 

Up to 9 different access keys can be defined. These are 
used for displaying data on the screen or selecting data for 
printing. You may use several levels of sorts as well as logi- 
cal operators to select just the right data. A powerful generic 
search is also available. 
Reports: 

See your data any way you want by designing your own 
reports! Data Master offers easy-to-use tools to design pro- 
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Built-in file management capabilities allow easy file 
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Data Master can read and write standard sequential files 
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Full keyboard ease 

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OS-9 accessible 

Even while operating within Data Master 



Requires OS-9 Level ll f 
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Screen Star implements the popular WordStar editing 
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to use Screen Star! 

• Edit flies larger than memory since Screen Star uses the 
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move left or right one character, or one word, or one line; 
scroll forward or back one line, one screen, one block; 
jump to the start or end of the line or the screen, block, 
or file, 

• Find & Find/Replace Commands make mass changes and 
searches a snap. 

• Pop-Up Help Menus are as close as a keystroke. 



Closing Commands let you exit the editor with or with* 
out save, and can import or export files whenever you 
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Smart Speller is included. 

Parameter commands personalize your environment. 
Access the OS-9 Shell. 

Up to 10 functions keys can be defined by CoCo 3 users 

for fast, repetitive functions. 

Use with the Text Formatter for a full word processing 

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Level 1 & Level 2 are supported and both versions are 

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escape and control codes to your printer as well as sophis- 
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macros for often used sequences, relative arguments, up- 
per and lower case modes, nonprintable remarks, and more! 



Requires OS-9 



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of detail and realism. While it requires 
careful, logical thought on the part of 
the Adventurer, the play is very 
straightforward. The game takes you 
from a swamp to a space station if, of 
course, you manage to survive the little 
surprises along the way. 

Richard is a midshipman in the naval 
ROTC unit at the University of Wiscon- 
sin, where his major course of study is 
electrical engineering. He aspires to join 
the Navy's nuclear power program 
upon graduation. 

Non-Graphics Runner-Up goes to 
Stephen Berry, of Lake Jackson, Texas, 
for Life: An Everyday Adventure. The 
amount of work put into this large entry 
is quite obvious. And the goal of the 
Adventure, making your way through 
life, really hit home; it impressed upon 
me the things we take for granted and 
the work we do each day that we don't 
even recognize. 

Life: An Everyday Adventure was 
designed for the CoCo 3 and requires a 
disk drive, but it certainly uses every bit 
of the resources available in such a 
system. The program represents an 
undertaking worthy of praise. 

In real life, Stephen is a 17-year-old 
senior at Brazoswood High School. 

Best in a Continuing Series goes to 
Fred D. Provoncha, of Lynbrook, New 
York, for Aandark II. (His original 
Adventure, Aandark, was a winner in 
The Third rainbow Adventure Con- 
test.) This 32K Disk program details the 
continuing saga of the planet Aandark 
and its attack and occupation by the 
Dorax. You must disable the cannon in 
order for the Terran fleet to get through. 
I liked the first entry in this "series," and 
Aandark II provides the same level of 
enjoyment. It is well-written and well- 
deserving of our attention. 

The Chase in the Park Award goes to 
Mike Anderson, of Tucson, Arizona, 
for The Park of Mystery, a 32K Adven- 
ture. In this Adventure, you have over- 
heard a discussion between shady char- 
acters that "describes" where they have 
hidden their loot. You must find the 
money before they find it ... or you. 
You must keep your "happy face" on 
while playing. Getting too serious just 
might spoil your chances for success. I 
believe The Park of Mystery exempli- 
fies a programming style and efficiency 
we all could strive for. Mike is a return 
winner. His entry, The Adventure of 
Johnny Zero, was a winner in The Third 
RAINBOW Adventure Contest. 

40 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



The Halloween Revisited Award is 

won by David Bartmess, of Fayetteville, 
Pennsylvania, for Ghost House. David 
must have a passion for haunted houses 
and those neat little scares. This 16K 
text Adventure invites you to try to find 
various treasures located in the ghost 
house. A very handy and unique aspect 
of the game is its ability to accept 
multiple commands on one line. I 
thought this ability was interesting — it 
is good to see novel ideas incorporated 
into such software. 

The Sleeper Award goes to Tio Ba- 
bich, of Miller Place, New York. His 
entry, The Parlog Building, is a 32K text 
Adventure in which you are trapped on 
a military base. Your only goal is to 
escape unharmed. It is just a little 
trickier than imagined, though. The 
input routine on this game allows you 
to enter fully descriptive commands or 
shorten them to a simple noun/ verb 
combination. The Parlog Building is a 
good warm-up Adventure for the hardy 
Adventurers and an excellent learning 
tool for novices. 

The Space Wars Awards goes to 
Andre Needham for his work on 
General Panic. Andre, who lives in 
Renton, Washington, has put together 
quite a sophisticated 16K text Adven- 
ture in this entry. Your goal is to retrieve 
some antimatter necessary for the 
Earth's power. This is a "typical" Ad- 
venture with a good story line. It is well- 
written and should be enjoyable to most 
any Adventurer. 

The Architect of the Year Award goes 
to Eric Santanen, of Stanhope, New 
Jersey, for House Adventure. Essen- 
tially, you are stuck in an old, aban- 
doned house and must find a way out. 
But this house is quite a bit more 
complex than it seems. Eric took special 
care in writing this 32K text Adventure 
to make sure the solution could not be 
discovered before the game was played 
(unless you had the solution sheet, like 
me!). This game is rather involved, but 
once you discover the solution, the trials 
and tribulations begin to make sense. 

The Flipper Award goes to Ken Lie, 
from Gates Mills, Ohio. Ken's entry, 
Operation: Ocean Master, involves 
quite a bit of "spook" stuff (I do love 
the underworld and the enchanting 
image of intrigue offered by "special 
operations"). In this 32K text Adven- 
ture, you are a special operations agent 
assigned to uncover the mystery of 



recent underwater volcanic activity and 
how it is related to changes in the songs 
of humpback whales. Sounds simple, 
doesn't it? Try again. This is just the tip 
of the iceberg. I really appreciated the 
sudden twists in the plot of this Adven- 
ture. Also, Ken has done an excellent 
job of hiding the "real" objective be- 
neath a web of mystery. 

Honorable Mention goes to Chris 
Cuthill for his work on Power Search. 
In this Adventure you are leading an 
expedition to find the last remaining 
sources of uranium. It is vital you 
succeed, since the Earth has become 
totally dependent on nuclear energy 
(the year: 3010). 

The realism of this Adventure is such 
that you must enter actual coordinates 
(latitude, longitude and altitude) in 
order to travel during your search. Your 
success is based on your ability to 
calculate locations. Chris included 
several global maps and a scaled ruler 
for this purpose. 

Unfortunately, the requirement of 
the detailed maps makes this excellent 
Adventure unfeasible as a candidate for 
publication. However, it by no means 
lessens the entertainment or educa- 
tional value of the game. 

Chris is 15 years old and is currently 
attending Grimsby Secondary School 
in Ontario, Canada. 

Honorable Mention goes to Jeff 
Johnson, of Orlando, Florida, for 
Superspy. This 32K Adventure is by no 
means easy. The player must infer 
several "normal" daily activities 
throughout the game. Perhaps the most 
frustrating, yet captivating, aspect of 
Superspy is that the objective is un- 
known at the start of the game. This one 
is definitely not for the light-hearted 
Adventurer. 



The winning Adventures represent 
only a small sampling of the entries we 
received in The Fourth RAINBOW Ad- 
venture Contest. They represent what I 
see as the "cream of the crop." The 
winners will be further honored by 
being published in The Fourth Rain- 
bow Book of Adventures, which will be 
available in the near future. 

While I would like to mention each 
and every Adventure, it would not be 
possible. And to list some of the "better" 
entries isn't really fair in my mind. Each 
Adventure had its own special quality 
I was drawn to. No one has "lost" — we 
have all gained. /R\ 



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PRODUCTS 



D'n. of Touchstone Technology Inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624 



By Bruce K. Bell, O.D 



F'rom the crest of the hill you can sec 
the deserted city ahead. It is hard to 
imagine that only lour years ago the 
city teemed with human life. But that was 
before the Controllers came. 

Banning all men to rural life for their 
own good, of course the Controllers 
systematically destroyed, all of Farth's 
cities. This city was one of the last to be 
eliminated. Industrious as you are, you 
want to scavenge for artifacts to sell to 
collectors, an activity tolerated by the. 
ruling race. 

You respect the wisdom of the Con- 
trollers after all, they traveled half- 
way across the galaxy to make all 
mankind understand that the old way of 
life, spent in corrupt pursuit of techno- 
logical advances, threatened I he Plan. 

. j i lj ii ■ .■mil i. r J ili|LD ,, l , |l~trrTI' , "-n , 'T~"r J ~l~ J ""* L ~" *— 

Bruce Hell practices optometry in his 
hometown of Rockmart, Georgia. He 
spends hours using programs he finds in 
////•: KMMtOH' and programming his 
CoCofor use in his office and at home. 




After having put up an initial show of 
resistance, most people understood that 
they were better off under the rule of the 
new masters. 

There has been some talk of a resist 
ance group, but you rather doubt it 
After all, who would want to revert to 
a primitive and heretical way of life? 
Just the same, you are curious to sec for 
one last time the remnants of a civili/.a 
tion you only vaguely remember. 

As you search the ruins, you find an 
odd-looking shuttle barely large enough 
to hold one person. Looking in, you sec 
an old magazine on the seat with the word 
^RAINBOW" printed on the front. 1m 
mediately you recognize this as the 
technological poison of which your 
masters have warned you. But, surely, it 
would not hurt to look after all, you 
would not succumb to primitive heresy. 
You reach for the magazine and flip 
through it. You see that someone or 
something named Falsoft had cstab 
lished a West Coast branch in this city. 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 



Pressed between the pages is a small 
booklet — a manual of some sort. At 
once, you recognize it as an operations 
manual for the shuttle. Curiosity over- 
taking you, you climb in for a closer 
look, and the door accidentally shuts 
behind you. You become dizzy and your 
vision grays. Minutes later your senses 
return . . . 

It is clear to you now that the 
Controllers are able to manipulate the 
human will and that the shuttle some- 
how shields you from their influence. 
You realize you cannot leave the shut- 
tle. And you wonder if there are others 
who know what you do. This you must 
find out and, if any way possible, 
destroy the Controllers! 

As the sun sets over the bent city, 
you pore over the shuttle's manual.*, . . 

Looking the shuttle over, you notice 
all holding tanks are empty. The gun 
is gone! You must do your best in spite 
of all odds. Your mission is clear! 



Setting Up for Game Play 

You need a Color Computer 3 (128K 
minimum) and a joystick or a mouse. 
Type in both listings and save them. If 
you are saving on cassette, save CON- 
TROL first and CNTRL immediately 
following. You will need to enter 
PCLEAR1 before typing in CNTRL* 

To load the game on a disk system, 
just enter RUN "CONTROL". On a tape 
system, enter CLOflD "CONTROL". 
After the program has loaded from 
tape, enter RUN. When prompted to 
press the firebutton, do so and also 
depress the Play button on the tape 
recorder. The tape should already be 
positioned just before the main pro- 
gram, CNTRL, This program will auto- 
matically be loaded for you. When it 
has finished, simply enter RUN a se- 
cond time and the game will start. 

Either the right or left joystick may 
be used, but use the same one through- 
out the game. 



Hints 

Examine every location and identify 
every object. This is an advanced Ad- 
venture requiring wit and skill to com- 
plete. Therefore, save your place often! 
The object of the Adventure is twofold: 
trying to destroy the Controllers, and 
accumulating as much wealth as possi- 
ble. Youll need it in the aftermath of the 
Controller's defeat. As much as 
$2,101,000 in treasure lies hidden in the 
landscape of the Adventure. 

Should you accidentally press BREAK 
during game play, type G05UB 
295:HSCREEN2:C0NT to reset. 

In this battle you have become a 
soldier — a soldier of fate and fortune! 
Good luck — youll need it! 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this Adventure may be directed to the 
author at 137 Samanda Circle, Rock- 
mart, Georgia 30153. Please enclose 
an SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



** 

/ 
/ 
/ 

/ 
/ 
r 

/ 

/ 

\ 



is 



Operations 

The ATS-CC5 All Terrain Shuttle is designed 
for maximum maneuverability over all types of 
earthen terrain, as well as in water. The ATS-CC5 
employs a unique electromagnetic shell that 
eliminates any threat of being overtaken by the 
Controllers via thought control. 

The various background and tracking control 
functions of the ATS-CC5 are maintained by the 
powerful Color Computer 5, which was developed 
just prior to the original Controller invasion. 
Operator control of the ATS-CC5 is also carried 
out through this system. 

The main console of the ATS-CC5 allows the 
single occupant complete control of all shuttle 
operations. The individual controls are described 
starting from the upper-left corner and proceeding 
in a clockwise fashion around the panel. 

Digital View Screen (DVS) 

The large view screen displays a digitized 
video image of the forward surroundings exterior 
to the shuttle. It is important to note that the 
image you see is a digital representation and 
therefore caution must be used in placing objects 
outside the craft. Objects that are similar in color 
to the exterior background may be difficult to see 
later. 

Command Center 

The 10 function buttons (two rows of five) on 
the right side of the control panel are used to 
engage the shuttle's inherent commands. Mov- 
ing the joystick (or mouse) selects the function 
marked by a small blue light in the upper left- 
hand corner of the button. The light glows red 



8 ATS-CC5 Operations Manual 



when the function is engaged by pressing the 
firebutton. These buttons are described below. 

Examine (magnifying glass) gives you a brief 
description of the area immediately outside the 
shuttle. 

Lights On/Off (light with rays) toggles the 
shuttle's lights on and off. A blue light on this 
button indicates when the lights are on. Note that 
one unit of power from the battery is expended 
with each move of the shuttle while the lights are 
on. 

Retrieve/Get (up arrow) transfers joystick 
control to a small blinking cursor in the DVS. 
Move the cursor over an object you desire to 
retrieve and press the firebutton. The object will 
appear in the holding tanks below. To leave this 
mode without getting an object, move the cursor 
to an area of the DVS containing no obtainable 
object and press the firebutton. 

Release/Drop (down arrow) selects the target 
for release from the craft. When you press this 
button, you will see a small blue light appear on 
one of the holding tank monitors in the lower part 
of the control panel. Move the joystick and press 
the firebutton and the object will appear in the 
DVS. 

Use (hand with index finger extended) analyzes 
a target to determine its purpose. Press this button 
and then select the object in the holding tanks you 
want to use (as described under Release). Use is 
a multipurpose function and therefore quite 
powerful. Since the shuttle is controlled by the 
powerful Color Computer 5, analyzing a target is 
simple. Therefore, to USE SANDWICH will result in the 
sandwich being eaten. USE bat is synonymous with 
swinging the bat. USE gas to fill your tanks or use 



ATS-CC5 Operations Manual 9 



44 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



3 




,.19 170 37 

204 195 ......215 

105 ......155 225 70 

125 223 END 224 



Listing 1: CONTROL 



J3 'THE CONTROLLERS 1.0, "CONTROL 
11 - BOOT PROGRAM , (C) 1987 BRUCE 

BELL, This program is avaialabl 
e "as is" and is nonwarranted! 
5 CLEAR5j3j3 : PCLEAR5 ; PMODE3 , 2 :WIDT 
H3 2 : ATTRJ3 , p : MP=PEEK ( 1 8 8 ) * 2 5 6 
lj3 PRINT "THE CONTROLLERS l.jJ'V'C 
OPYRIGHT (C) 1987 BRUCE BELL» > "C 
0CO3 128K", , , ,"MONITOR TYPE",,:I 
NPUT"1, CMP (TV) 2. RGB ";Q$:Q 
=VAL(Q$) : IFQ<10RQ>2THEN5ELSEPOKE 
MP+86,Q-1 

15 PRINT: PRINT"LOADING METHOD" ,, 
: INPUT" 1. DISK 2. TAPE ";Q$:Q= 



BATTERY to restore your power systems. The USE 
function is limited only by your imagination. 

Identify (question mark) describes an object in 
the holding tanks. Since all images in the holding 
tanks are digital images, low relative resolution 
may make an object unidentifiable by sight 
alone. Using the power of the CoCo 5, you can 
select an object in the holding tanks (by pressing 
the ? switch) and it will be described. 

Score (double arrows) displays your current 
score and assets. The score represents the 
number of moves you've made from one location 
to another. Other commands do not add to your 
score. Of course, the lower your score and the 
higher your assets, the better you've played, 

Map (diamond shape) displays a map of your 
travels on the screen. In each position you've 
been, a hexadecimal number from $1 to $F 
appears. Each number represents the exits 
available from that position. A legend below the 
map describes this directional code. Your cur- 
rent position blinks on the map. Using your 
joystick, you may move the line cursor around 
the map. The location and any objects left in that 
position (of only the locations you've been) 
appear below the map. To exit the map, press the 
firebutton. 

Save/Load saves your place. Prepare the tape 
or disk and answer the prompts, pressing S or L 
for Save or Load, respectively and T, D, or A for 
Tape, Disk or Abort, respectively, 

Quit (hexagon) allows you to end your travels 
in the ATS CCS (i.e., quit the game). 

Locomotion 

The ATS-CC5 is moved by pressing the large 



1 0 ATS-CC5 Operations Manual 



VAL(Q$) :IFQ<10RQ>2THEN15ELSEPOKE 

MP+87 ,Q-1: PRINT : PRINT" PRESS YOUR 

FIRE BUTTON" 

2j3 IFBUTTON (J3) THENQ~j3ELSEIFBUTTO 

N ( 2 ) THENQ«2ELSE2j0 

25 POKEMP+88,Q:WIDTH4j3 

3j3 PRINT" While scavenging a w 

est coast city which will be d 

estroyed by your masters, the Con 

trollers, you find an odd lookin 

gshuttle large enough to hold on 

ly one person. Climbing in, th 

e door accident- ally shuts behi 

nd you. You become dizzy" 

35 PRINT" as your vision greys. M 

inutes later yoursenses return., 
ii 

• 

40 PRINT: PRINT" It is clear to 

you now that the Con- trollers 
are able to manipulate the hu- m 
an will. Somehow the shuttle mus 
t shield you from this." 

45 PRINT: PRINT" You cannot lea 



rocker switch below the command center. The 
letters N, S, E and W light up, signifying which 
of the four directions (North, South, East and 
West) you may go. Move the blue indicator to the 
desired direction and press the firebutton. 

Fuel and Battery Indicators 

One unit of fuel is used with each move. The 
ATS-CC5's battery is used to power the exterior 
lights as well as its laser gun and force field. 
Depending on the laser intensity, the gun uses 
one or two units of power with each firing. The 
laser's intensity is automatically set and may not 
be adjusted manually. The force field (engaged 
automatically) uses one unit of power for each 
hit it receives, and one unit of power is expended 
with each move while the shuttle's lights are on. 

Holding Tanks 

There are five holding tanks for objects 
brought into the ATS-CC5. Digital images ap- 
pear on the miniature DVSs below the screen. 
Indicator lights glow blue when selected and red 
when engaged (firebutton is pushed). The 
smaller button to the right of Tank 5 is for exiting 
without selecting one of the monitors. 

There is a separate holding tank for any 
treasures you may find. These are not displayed 
on the control panel. Hence, you may retrieve 
treasure even when your holding tanks are full. 

Laser Gun 

The laser gun may be held in any of the five 
holding tanks. When there is danger, the gun is 
automatically engaged. It may also be engaged 
manually with a USE GUN command. 



ATS-CC5 Operations Manual 1 1 



Si 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 45 



ve the shuttle 1 Are there oth 
ers who know what you do? Theset 
hings you must find out and if a 
ny way possible - destroy..." 
5J3 FORK=MP TO MP+82 : RE ADA $ : POKEK 
,VAL("&H"+A$) :NEXT 
55 DATA1J3 , 8E , DD, DD, 86 , 7J3 , B7 , FF, A 

I, 4C,B7,FF,A2,8E,5F, BF,AF, 8D,0, 1 
B,8E,24,64, 8D, 3 , 16 ,)3 , 2A, 5F, 10, AF 
,81, 5C,C1, 3C, 2D, F8, 3)3, 88, 28 , AC, 8 
D 

60 DATA)3,3,2D,EE,39,)3,0,1)3,8E,22 
,22,86,72,B7,FF,A2,8E,5E,6)3,AF,8 

D, FF, EE, 8E , 46 , A4 , 8D, D6 , 86, 79 ,B7 , 
FF,A1,4C,B7,FF,A2,B7,FF,A2,39 

65 F0RK=MP+91 TO MP+15J3 : READA$ : V 
=VAL ( " &H" +A$ ) : POKEK , V : POKEK+60 , V 
: NEXT 

7)3 DATA86,7J3,B7,FF,A1,4C,B7,FF,A 

2,CE, j3,A, 8E,24,DB, lj3,8E, j3,77,E6, 

84,3)3,1F,A6,84,A7, 1 , 31 , 3F , 26 , F6 , 

E7 # 84,3J3,89, 1,L7,8C,5F,BF,2D,E5. 

33,5F,ll,83,j3,j3,26,DA,86,79,B7,F 

F,A1,4C,B7,FF,A2,39 

75 POKEMP+165,&H64:POKEMP+173,l: 

POKEMP+177 , &H1F : POKEMP+185 , &H88 : 

POKEMP+186 , &H29 : POKEMP+187 , &H12 

80 FORK=MP+211 TO MP+251:READA$: 

POKEK , VAL ( " &H"+A$ ) :NEXT 

85 DATA86,7j3,B7,FF,A2,8E,44,DB,E 

6,84,1)3,8E,0,77,3)3,1F,A6,84,A7,1 

, 31, 3F, 26, F6,E7, 84, 3)3,89,1, 17, 8C 

,52,9B,2D,E5,86,7A,B7,FF,A2,39 

9j3 FORK=MP+252 TO MP+65J3STEP2 :RE 

ADR , A$ : POKEK , R : POKEK+ 1 , VAL ( 11 &H"+ 

A$) :NEXT 

95 DATA29,22,29,23,29,23,29,23,2 
9,27,29,23,29,23, 29, 23 ,29,23,29, 
21,2,6,2,3,2,3,2,3,2,3,2,3,2,3,2 
,3,5,5,6,21,30,20,30,27,30,20,27 
,16,28,3,27,15,1,22,3,27,1,23,1, 
25, 1,2A, 1,23, 1,23, 1,23, 1,23, 1,25 
,2,6,2,3,7,9,8,21 

100 DATA30,2A,30,2B,31,29,27,1A, 

27, 17, 32, IF, 26 ,11,4,2a, 3, 23,1, 2B 
,1,63, 1,23, 1,27, 1,23, 1,23,1, 2D, 2 
,E, 2, 3, 9, 1,10,21, 25, 16, 25, 13, 25, 
13, 25, 13, 32, IB, 32, 19, 26, 16, 20, 17 
,20,17,20,17,20,17,20,15,1,2A,1, 
23, 1, 23, 1,29, 2, E, 2, 7, 2, 7, 2, 5 
105 DATA25,1E,25,13,20,13,23,17, 
24 , 7 , 23 , 15 , 15 , A, 15 , B , 15 , B , 15 , B, 1 
5 , B, 14 , IF , 14 , 17 , 14 , 17 , 12 , 17 , 12 , 1 
7, 11, IF, 11, IF, 11, IF, 11, ID, 25, 1A, 
25 ,13, 20, 13, 23, IB, 2 3, IB, 23, ID, 16 
, 16 , 16 , 17 , 16 , 17 , 16 , 17 , 16 , 15 , 14 , 1 

E, 14, IF, 14, IF, 12, IF, 12, IF, 11, IF, 

II, IF, 11, IF, 11, ID 

110 DATA21,16,21,17,21,17,21,13, 
21, 13, 22, 11, 16, IE ,16, IB, 16, IB, 16 
, IB, 16 , 19 , 14 , IE , 14 , IF , 14 , IF , 12 , 1 



F, 13 ,0, 12 , IF, 12 , IF, 12 , IF, 12 , ID, 2 
6, 1A, 20, IB, 20, IB, 20, 13, 20, 13, 19, 
15 , 17 , 18 , 18 , 23 , 18 , 23 , 18 , 23 , 18 , 25 
, 14 , IE , 14 , IF , 14 , IF , 12 , IF , 12 , IF , 1 
3, 0,12, IF, 12, IF, 12, ID 
115 DATA19,16,19,17,19,17,19,13, 
19 , 13 , 19 , 19 , 18 , 2 6 , 18 , 2 5 , 18 , 2 6 , 18 
, 27 , 18 , 2D , 14 , IE , 14 , IF , 14 , IF , 14 , 1 
F , 14 , IF , 14 , IF , 14 , IF , 14 , IF , 14 , ID , 
19 , 1A, 19 , IB, 19 , IB , 19 , 13 , 19 , 13 , 19 
, 13 , 18 , 2B , 18 , 2B, 18 , 29 , 18 , 2A, 18 , 2 
9, 14, 1A, 14, IB, 14, IB, 14, IB, 14, IB, 
14 , IB, 14 , IB, 33 , IB, 14 , 19 
120 IFPEEK (MP+8 6 ) THENPALETTERGB : 
PALETTE 5 , 56 : PALETTE 7 , 0 : PALETTE 13 
, 56 : PALETTE 14 , 7ELSEPALETTECMP: PA 
LETTE5 ,32: PALETTE7 , 0 : PALETTE 13 , 3 
2:PALETTE14,16 

125 PCLS2:DRAW"BM8,136C1U88R240C 

8D88L240BE8R4U4BHC1L4D4BU68U4R4B 

FC8D4L4BR222R4U4BHC1L4D4BD68U4R4 

BFC8D4L4BM30, 80":A=MP+652 

130 GOSUB250:GOSUB135:GOSUB255:G 

OSUB135:GOT0145 

135 F0RK=1T0197 : POKEA, ASC (MID$ (A 
$,K,1) ) :A=A+1:IFMID$(A$,K,1)="C" 
THENIFMID$ (A$ , K+l , 1) ="1"THENK=K+ 
1: POKEA, 52 :A=A+1 
140 NEXT : DRAW A $ : RETURN , 
145 A$="Lonnie, Marty, and Tony 
left seven days ago to test the 
shuttle you're in. We haven't 
heard from them since. This 
building is shielded as is your 
shuttle and we can't leave. See 
if you can find theml "+CHR$ (13 ) + 

"J. KAPFHAMMER" 

150 A=MP+1046:FORK=1TO219: POKEA, 

ASC(MID$(A$,K,1) ) :A=A+l:NEXT 

155 FORK=MP+1265TOMP+1534 :READA$ 

: POKEK, VAL ("&H"+A$) :NEXT 

160 DATA42,79,20, 64, 69,73, 63,6F, 

6E,6E,65,63,74,69,6E,67,20,74,68 

, 65 , 69 , 72 , 20, 70, 6F, 77, 65, 72 ,20, 7 

3,75,70 > 70,6C,79,20,79 > 6F,75,20, 

68 ,61, 76, 65, 20, 64 ,65, 73 ,74, 72, 6F 

,79,65,64 

165 DATA20,74,68,65,20,43,4F,4E, 
54, 52, 4F, 40,40,45,52,53, 21 ,20, 54 
, 68 , 65 , 20 , 43 , 6F, 6E, 2D, 74 , 72 , 6F, 6 
0,60,65,72,73,20,61,72,65,20,61, 
20,72,61,63, 65,20, 6F, 66,20 , 6D, 61 
,63,68,69 

170 DATA6E,65,73,20,77,68,6F,20 > 
66, 65, 61 ,72, 74, 68, 65, 20, 63, 6F,6D 
,70,75,74, 65, 72, 73, 20, 73,65, 6E, 7 
4, 69, 65, 6E, 74, 20, 62, 65, 69, 6E, 67, 
73, 20, 64, 65, 76, 69, 73, 65, 20, 73, 6F 
,D,74, 68 

175 DATA65, 79,20,65, 6E, 73,60,61, 
76, 65,20,74, 68, 65, 6D, 20, 61, 6E, 64 



46 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



, 20 , 64 , 65,73,74,72, 6F, 79 ,20, 74, 6 
8, 65,69,72,20, 63, 6F,6D, 2D, 70, 75, 
74, 65, 72, 73, 2E, 20,41,73,20,75,73 
,75,61,6C 

180 DATA20,74,68,65,20,43,4F,43, 
4F, 20, 77, 61, 73, 27, 6E, 74, 20, 74, 61 
,6B, 65, 6E,D,73, 65,72 , 69, 6F, 75, 73 
,6C,79,2D,20, 62,75,74, 20,74, 6F, 2 
0,74,68,65, 69,72,20, 64,65, 6D, 69, 
73,65,21 

185 WIDTH32:SCREEN1,1:FORK=30TO0 
STEP-5 : PLAY"L25501 ; V=K; 1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 6 ; 4 
; 8 ; 9 ; 11 ; 3 ; 2 ; 12 ; 3 ; 2 ; 1 ; V30" : NEXT: P 

OKE65497,0 

190 HSCREEN2:HSCREEN0:POKE&HE6,2 
: POKE&HE6C6 , 18 : POKE&HE6C7 , 18 :HCO 
LOR0,0:HCLS14 

195 HDRAW"BM0,108S4C3U108R255D10 
8L255EU106R253D106L253E C8U104R2 
51GL249D102EU100R247 C13D100L247 

GR249U102ED104L251" 

200 FORX=287TO317STEP30:FORY=2TO 

10 6STEP2 3 : HDRAW '» BM=X ; , =Y ; C8 D20L2 
5ER23U18 C13L23D17R22U17 BEC4L24 
D19C13 " : HPAINT (X-4 , Y+4 ) , 13 , 13 : NE 
XTY X 

205'hDRAW"BM271,13C4NG6U8R10 C8D 
8L9G5 BR29BU6C4NF6E6C8BFF2D6NG2B 
R3F2C4BUH2BU3R4BDC8L4BU3E2BUC4G2 



BD20BL9NR10D7L2F7 C8E7L2U7 BL35 
F7L2D7L10- C4U7L2E7 BD3 6BL6H2U4E2 
R9U4ER2 C8FD10G2BU7BL2D2BL4U2BL4 
D2 

210 HDRAW"BR32BD6R2U2BU2NL2U2R8U 
8 C4L12D4 C8R2U2R8 C4D4L8D3BD3ND 
R BD12BRC8F6G6C4H6E6BFBDD8BL2C8U 
8 BL34BU2F6G6BR6E6H6C4D12BL6U12 
BD23BRND12R12BD4L2BL2BGD2L2 C8U2 
R2BR2BEU2R2U2BD4D8L12 BR33BUR4E4 
U3H4C4L4G4D3F3 

215 HDRAW fl BM2 66,160C13U42R48D42L 
48 C4GU44R50 C8D44L50" rHPAINT (27 
2 , 155) , 13 , 13 : HDRAW" BM2 90, 140C4LU 
RBERBFRBD C8LBGLBD8H10E10 C4F10G 
10 " : HPRINT (36,15), "N" : HPRINT (34, 
17) , " W" : HPRINT (38,17) ,"E": HPRINT 
(36,19) ,"S" 

220 HDRAW f, BM234,166C4L14D24EU22R 

12C8D22L12GR14U24BG2C13D20L10U20 

R10" rHPAINT (230, 170) ,13,13 

225 HDRAW"BM245,176C13R8HL6UR6UL 

6UR6UL6U4R6D4R2D2FREU4LFH2 BM245 

, 188R10UL10UR10UL10UR10UL10ERBR6 

RC8 BD3 L2 BL5NUNRNDNL BM317,166C4D 

10L55C8U10R55BGC13D8L53U8R53BD14 

D8L53U8R53BEC4D10L55C8U10R55":HP 

AINT ( 3 10 , 170 ) , 8 , 13 : HPAINT ( 3 10 , 18 

3) ,8,13 



R.A.D. Products 
Hotchkiss Street 
Jamestown 7 NY 14701 
<7JA> ££5-212:4 



R.A.D. Producti Pratant* TQCTFGRM 



Final iy, a varsiUia taxt 
foraattar is available for tha Color 
Coaputar. TQCTFORM it compatible with 
all aodals with at ltut 64K, wan tho 
Color Coaputar III. Thit aachina 
languaga prograa aill foraat ASCII 
taxt filaa into two coluan pagwi 
quickly and aaaily. Taxt aay ba left 
unaodifiad. or i imply insart spacial 
foraattar coaaandt for addad control. 
TEDCTFORH 11 a varsitila anhancaawnt to 
any word procoaiing tyttaa whwthar you 
ara a casual or profaiaional utar. 

Softwara supports: 

- Output to pnntar or ditk 

- Hoat popular printart 

- Adju*tabla foraat paraawtara 

- Columnar data 

- Multipla page titlei 

- Optional paga nuabering 

- Larga filaa (up to » fall di»K> 

TEXTFORH comma wtth coaplata 
dacuaontation at wall aa saaple 
foraat axaapiat. Ontcraen paruiatar 
duplay takas tha guetawork out of 
foraat aattinga. Cuitonixad paruatara 
aay ba aavad to disk and raloadad for 
future usa. thus aliainating aistakas 
and configuration tiaa. Special 
printer codas and baud rate sattinga 
ara softwara salactabla. TEXTPORK is 
prograaaed in a high raaolution 
anvironaant which mcorparatas 
pull-down aanus for sate of usa. Tha 
softwara also supports auxilliary 
peripheral input froa joysticks, 
aousa. touchpad, and high resolution 
input pack for addad prograa control. 



This ia not another word 
processor. There ara aany fine word 
processors on tha aarkat for tha Color 
Computer. TBCTFGRH is a user 
definable two coluan text foraattar. 
If you are looking for a prograa which 
will allow your Color Coaputar to 
create professional looking docuaents 
without hours of tedious work, then 
TEXTFORX it tha answer. 

Ideal for: 

- School newspapers 
* Club newsletters 

- Business reports 

- Bulletins 

- Advert lseaent* 

- Prograa listings 

- And such aoro. . « 



Systea requirements; 

- Color Computer <64K minimum) 

- Oisk drive 

- Printer 



TDCTFORM S34.95 



R.A.O. Products 
194 Hotchkiss St. 
Jamestown. MY 14701 
(716) 66S-2124 

Terms: Check. Money Order, C.O.D. 
NT residents add 7% sales tax 
C.O.D. orders add 13.00 
All orders add 93.00 for shipping 
All ordars shipped within 24-40 hours 
Express shipping available by request 



J&R ELECTRONICS 

Easy, Solderless Installation 

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51 2K COCO 3 Memory Expansion Board. Upgrades stock 128K COCO 3 to full 
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With purchase of a BANKER II or JramR 
you can have a #9008 SIXDRIVE 




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SIXDRIVE is a machine language utility that 
modifies Disk Extended Basic 1.0, 1.1, or FKEYS III 
to allow the use of 3 double sided drives as 6 single 
side drives without AMY hardware modifications. 

FEATURES two different drive select assignments: 

(1) [0,2] [1,3] [4,5] (2) [0,1] [2,3] [4,5] 

Ramdtsk is compatible with GIMMESOFTs SIXDRIVE 



Made in U.S.A. 



• 1010 
#1011 
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Complete Hardware & Software 



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$39.95 JramR bare board plus connectors and software 
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Readily available: User Replaceable Socketed Memory Chips, no hard-to-find SIP memories. 

To place an order, write to J&R ElectroniCB, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MD 21045, OR call (301) 
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Add $4.00 shipping & handling (FOREIGN ORDERS $7.00), COD charge $3.00. Maryland residents add 
5% state tax. Foreign orders must include payment on U.S. bank. 

CHECKS, MONEY ORDERS OR COD's onfy please (personal check— 2 weeks for clearance). IMMEDIATE 
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788-0861. COCO II 26-31 XX owners call (solde ring experience may be required). 

Refer to back issues of RAINBOW for other products. 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 47 



230 FORX=2T0178STEP44:HDRAW"BM=X 
;,164C4D26RU26R34D26LNU26L34BE C 
13R32U24GD22L30 C8U23R32GL30D21 
C8 BR3 4 BU2 3D28L34C4" : FORC=0TO4 : HC 
OLORC , 0 : HLINE (X+5+C*5 , 167) - (X+10 
+C*5,186) , PSET , BF : NEXTC , X 
235 HDRAW"BM2 / 112C1R254D48L254U4 
9R255D50L256U10NR255U40" :HPAINT( 
12 , 150) , 2 , l:HCOLOR13 , 2 :HPRINT (6 , 
19),"/// COLOR COMPUTER 5" 
240 HDRAW" BM3 0 , 40S4 » : GOSUB250 : HD 
RAWA$ : GOSUB255 :HDRAWA$ :HSCREEN2 : 
PMODE0 , 1 : PCLEAR1 

245 POKE65496,0:IFPEEK(PEEK(188) 
*2 56+87 ) THENWIDTH4 0 : PRINT : PRINT" 
Type RUN when you see the OK." :C 



LOAD " CNTRL 11 E LS ERUN " CNTRL " , R 

250 A$="C1U6C8L2C1U4R8C8D4L2D6L4 

BR8R4U4R2C1D4C8R4U10C1L4D4L2C8U4 

C1L4D9BDBR12U10R8C8D2L4D2C1R4C8D 

2L4D2C1R4C8D2L8BG22S8C1U10R8C8D4 

L5 D2 C 1R5 C 8 D4 L8 BR9R8U 10 C1L8D1^BR9 

U10R3C8F2C1U2R3C8D10L3C1H2C8D2L3 

BR10R6U6RU4C1" : RETURN 

255 A$="L8D4C8RC1D6BR8U10R8C8D8L 

2F2L3C1H2C8D2L3BR9R8U10C1L8D10BR 

9U10R6C8D4C1R2C8D6L8BR9R8U6C1L2C 

8U4C1L6D10BR9U10R8C8D2L4DC1R4C8D 

4L4DC1R4C8D2L8BR9R3U2C1F2C8R3H2R 

2U8C1L8D10BR9U2R4UC8L4C1U7R8C8D2 

L4DC1R4C8D7L8" : RETURN 




55 55 540 

125 3 570 

170 243 610 

205 200 650 

270 79 690 

300 206 730 

340 82 760 

365 60 790 

410 196 830 

425 140 850 

475 168 880 

505 73 



141 
209 
234 
.67 
.83 
.38 
253 
186 
139 
.75 
.33 



900 209 

945 55 

965 109 

1005 111 

1025 47 

1060 205 

1080 223 

1140 223 

1200 79 

1230 104 

END ....103 



Listing 2: CNTRL 

0 'THE CONTROLLERS 1.0, "CNTRL" 

- MAIN PROGRAM, (C) 1987 BRUCE B 

ELL, This program is available 11 

as is" and is nonwarrantedl 

5 GOSUB:*95:DIMR$(34) ,0$(29) ,A(20 

0),R(200),D(3),O(35) 

10 POKE65497,0:HSCREEN2:F1=PEEK( 

188) *256:F2=F1+49:M1=F1+91:M2=F1 

+151 : M3=Fl+2 11 : Pl=Fl+2 : P2=Fl+3 : E 

XECF2 : HCOLOR4 , 0 : HPRINT ( 1 , 16 ) , "On 

e moment please" : FORA=0TO4 :GOSUB 

2 30 : NEXT : GOSUB1 60 : GOSUB12 10 

15 V(5)=48:V(6)=48 

20 LO=1:L=1:GOSUB200:GOTO440 

25 D=0:IF(A(R)AND32)=32THENIFL=0 

THEND=1 : GOTO1105ELSEIFL=1ANDV ( 6 ) 

<1THEND=1 ; GOTO 110 5 

30 IFPROR THENONR(R)GOSUB710,72 

0,710,1060,720,805,720,830,720,8 

40,755,770,1050,790,855,865,365, 

885,895,925,975,975,990,955,925, 

925,945,955,1005,1015,1040,330,7 

90,770 

35 IF(A(R)AND128)=128GOSUB150 
40 FORO=0TO35:IFO(O)=R GOSUB175: 
NEXTELSENEXT 



45 FORK=0TO3 : IF (D (K) ANDA (R) ) =D (K 
) THENHCOLOR4 , 0ELSEHCOLOR13 ,0 
50 ONK GOTO55,60,65:HPRINT(3 6,15 
) ,"N":GOTO70 



"S":GOTO70 
"E":GOTO70 

M^ff 



55 HPRINT(36,19) 
60 HPRINT (38, 17) 
65 HPRINT(34,17) 
70 NEXT 
75 R$=R$(R(R) ) 
80 GOSUB215 

85 IF ( A (R) AND16) =16THENM=1ELSEM= 

90 IFLZ=1THENLZ=0:IF(A(R) AND32)= 
3 2 THENL= 1 : LO= 1 : GOTO 440 
95 CD=0 

100 HDRAW" BM=JX ; ,=JY;C2RDLU" 
105 IFM THENEXECM3 : IFR S5 147THENC= 
0:FORK=9TO11:A=( (A+l) AND3) :C=7+A 
: PALETTEK , C : NEXT 

110 IFBUTTON (BU) THEN130ELSEH=JOY 
STK(0) :H=JOYSTK(JH) : V=JOYSTK ( JV) 
:IFH1=H ANDV1=V THEN105ELSEH1=H: 
V1=V 

115 POKE65497,0:GOSUB170 
120 IFCD=0THENIFV<40THENJX=INT(H 
/32) *30+264: JY=INT(V/8) *23+4:GOT 
O100ELSEIFV<48THENJX=285: JY=122 : 
GOTO 10 0 E LS E I F V> 5 5 THEN JX= 2 85: J Y= 1 
5 4 : GOTO 100ELSE JX=INT ( H/ 3 2 ) * 4 1+ 2 6 
9: JY=13 9:GOTO100 

125 JX=INT(H/10.7)*44+33:JY=188: 
I F JX> 2 0 9 THEN JX= 230: JY= 1 8 7 : GOTO 10 
0ELSE100 

130 IFR=147GOSUB160 

135 HDRAW" BM=JX ; , =JY ; C3RDLU" : PLA 

Y"L200O3 ABC" : IFCD=0THENCD=INT (H/ 

32 ) +INT (V/8 ) *2+l : XJ=JX: YJ=JY: ONC 

D GOTO405,440,445,485,490,620,62 

5,630,675,700,300,300,305,310,31 

5,315:GOT095 

140 A=INT (H/10 . 7) : RETURN 

145 GOSUB170 : JX=XJ : JY=YJ : CD=0 : IF 



48 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



W THENW=0:GOTO45ELSE115 

1SJ3 IFR=126THENHCOLOR11,0:HLINE( 

8 3 , 3 8 ) - ( 15 1 , 80 ) , PSET , BF : RETURNEL 

SEIFR (R) =15THENHCOLOR13 , 0 : HLINE ( 

50, 7) -(100, 60) , PSET , BF : RETURNELS 

EHDRAWBM24 , 28C8E10F8E8F10R14G14 

L8G8H8L6H6E4H4 " : HPAINT ( 3 4 , 3 4 ) , 8 , 

8 : RETURN : 1 BREAK WINDOW 

155 HCOLOR10,8:HLINE(110, 14) -(15 

0 , 70 ) , PSET , BF : HDRAW"BM12 7 , 18C4L1 

1D25C8R11U25BR18D25L11C4U25R11BD 

31L11D16C8R11U16BL18D16L11C4U16R 

11BL12BUH2E2C8BM151, 14C8D56L40GR 

42U58C4L42D58EU56R40":RETURN: f DO 

OR 

16)3 IFPEEK(Fl+86) THENPALETTERGB : 
PALETTE 5 , 22 : PALETTE 9 , 32 : PALETTE 1 
0 , 53 Z PALETTE11 , 8 : PALETTE 12 , 25 : PA 
LETTE13 ,56: PALETTE 14 , 7 : PALETTE 15 
, 2 0 E LS EPALETTE CMP : PALETTES , 3 3 : PA 
LETTE9 , 5 : PALETTE10 , 20 : PALETTE11 , 
13 : PALETTE 12 , 45 : PALETTE 13 , 32 : PAL 
ETTE14 , 16 : PALETTE 15 , 1 
165 RETURN 

170 HDRAW"BM=JX; , =JY ; C13RDLU" :RE 
TURN: 'INDICATORS OFF 
175 IFD THENRETURNELSEOG=0:IFO<9 
THENOX=8+0*26 : OY=80ELSEIFO<15THE 
NOX=8+(0-9) *26:OY=100ELSEIFO<23T 



HENOX=164:OY=100:OG=15ELSEIFO<30 
THENOX=190 : OY=100 : OG=16ELSEOX=21 
6:OY=100:OG=17 

180 IFHP THENHPUT (OX, OY)- (0X4-26, 
OY-2 3 ) , OG+2 , PSET : HP=0 : RETURNELSE 
HGET(OX,OY) -(OX+26,OY-23) ,0G+2 
185 HDRAW n BM=OX ; , =0Y ; 11 : 0N0G+1G0S 
UB113 5, 1120, 1160, 1115, 1155, 1195, 
1200, 1145 , 1125, 1175 , 1130, 1180, 11 
40, 1185, 1170, 1165, 1150, 1190 :RETU 
RN:'DROP 

190 FORO=0TO3 5:IFO(O)=PR THENHP= 
l:GOSUB175 

195 NEXT: RETURN: 'PLACE OBJECT 
200 HDRAW"BM266,171C8R48DL48UC6R 
=V(5) ;DL=V(5) ; " : V(5) =V(5) -1: IFV( 

5 ) < 1THENV ( 5 ) =0 : G0SUB2 1 5 : HPRINT ( 1 
, 17 ) , "OUT OF GAS ! '» : RETURNE LS E I FL 
=0THENRETURN 

205 HDRAW"BM2 66,185C8R48DL48UC7R 
=V(6) ;DL=V(6) ; " : V(6 ) =V(6) -1: IFV( 

6 ) < 1THENV ( 6 ) =0 : G0SUB2 15 : HPRINT ( 1 
,17) , "BATTERY DEAD !": LZ=1 : RETURN 

ELSERETURN 

2 10 C=0 : FORX=0TO30STEP5 : C=C+1 : FO 
RY=1T05 : HCIRCLE ( 12 8 , 62 ) , X+Y , C , 1 , 
.5,1: NEXT Y , X : RETURN 
215 EXECF2:HCOLOR4,0: HPRINT (1,15 
) , "LOCATION: "+R$: RETURN: 'CLEAR 




February 1988 THE RAINBOW 49 



Tandy Computers: 
Because there is 
no better value. 1 " 



Tandy Color Computer 3 

Disk System 



Superb graphics and 
uncompromising performance 
at an incredible price. 

Here's a powerful, low-cost sys- 
tem that does it all. The Color 
Computer 3 (26-3334, $199.95) is 
a computer you can put to work 
right away for word processing, 
creating graphs and illustrations, 
spreadsheet analysis, budgeting- 
even writing your own programs! 
And it's expandable, too. 

Disk drive power and flexibility 

Get the most out of your Color 
Computer with the Color 
Computer Disk Drive (26-3133, 



mas usm ums 






















a&- 


























$299.95). With this easy-to- 
connect drive, you can write your 
own sophisticated disk applica- 
tions or utilize ready-to-run 
software on popular 5 x k n disk- 
ettes. We offer a wide selection of 
software — the number of applica- 
tions is almost limitless. 



DeskMate 3™ seven-in-one 
software 

Best of all, we've got a low- 
priced software package that may 
be all you ever need: DeskMate 3 
(26-3262, $99.95). It's easy to use 
because there are no complicated 
commands to memorize, and the 
program itself actually guides you 
along with prompts at each step. 

DeskMate 3 is an integrated pro- 
gram including Text word process- 
ing, a general-purpose text-entry 
and editing program. Text per- 
forms search and replace, file 
merge, and block select, copy and 
delete. Ledger is a simple spread- 
sheet which includes an easy-to- 
use menu and automatic column 
formatting. Index Cards filing 
comes in handy as a personal fil- 
ing system— it actually eliminates 
mounds of paperwork and records. 
Index Cards also allows you to en- 
ter and edit data and perform sorts 
and searches. Using Paint, you 
can create colorful charts, graphs 
and designs. Calendar is a simple 
monthly planner that allows you 
to list "to do's" for any date. 
Calculator has four functions for 
quick and easy calculations. With 
the included Telecom telecommu- 
nications program, you can access 
national information banks or 
send messages to other computers. 



See what you've been missing 

The Color Computer 3 offers 
better graphics than any previous 




Color Computer. Simply connect 
the Color Computer 3 to the 
CM-8 high-resolution monitor 
(26-3215, $299.95), and you can 
create incredibly detailed charts 
and graphs, make engineering 
drawings in vivid colors, or form 
simple sketches. Choose 160 x 192 
or 320 x 192-resolution with 16 
colors, or display 640 X 192 graph- 
ics and 4 colors. Extended BASIC 
language commands let you alter- 
nate screens, colors and back- 
grounds at a higher resolution, 
and you can choose from a palette 
of 64 colors. 

Come in today! 

Stop by your local Radio Shack 
and get the power of a full, disk- 
based system. The Color 
Computer 3 delivers professional 
performance— -for less. 



Radio Jhaek 



Price apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating stores and 
dealers. DeskMate 3 telecommunications require modem. 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



TM 



MESSAGE 

22J3 GOSUB215:HPRINT(l / 17) , "Selec 
t desired object" : RETURN: 'MONITO 
R MESSAGE 

225 GOSUB215:HPRINT(l, 17) , "Abort 
Command" :SOUND5)3,l:RETURN: 'ABOR 
T MESSAGE 

23J3 FORC=)3T04:HCOLORC,)3:B=A*44+7 
+C* 5 : HLINE (B , 1 67 ) - ( B+5 , 18 6 ) , PSET 
, BF : NEXT : RETURN : CLEAR MONITORS 
235 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" Press Fire 

Button to continue..." 
24)3 IFBUTTON (BU) THENHSCREEN2 :RET 
♦ URNELSE24j3 

245 WIDTH 4)3 : ATTR)3 , )3 : CLS : PRINT : PR 
INT: RETURN: 'PREPARE TEXT SCREEN 
250 V(6)=l:GOSUB2)35:HPRINT(l, 18) 
/•NO POWER FOR THE GUN !": RETURN 
255 OX=7+A*44:OY=186:HCOLOR13,)3: 
HLINE (OX, OY) - (OX+25 , 167) , PSET, BF 
: GOSUB18 5 : RETURN : PREPARE FOR CAR 
GO 

26) 3 HPRINT(1,17) , "SCORE="+STR$ (V 
(7))+" ASSETS= $"+MID$(STR$(V(8 
)) ,2)1 RETURN 

265 FORK=lT015:GOSUB16j3:NEXT:GOS 
UB17j3 : RETURN 

27 ) 3 GOSUB285:GOSUB235:HSCREEN2:P 
OKE6549 6 , )3 : FORK=3)3TOj2jSTEP-5 : PLAY 
"L25501 ; V=K; 1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 6 ; 4 ; 8 ; 9 ; 11 ; 3 ; 2 
; 12 ; 3 ; 2 ; 1 ; V15 ; 03 " : NEXT : I F0= 6G0SU 

B21)3:HPRINT(7,2) , "COCO LIVES FOR 
EVER I " 

275 EXECF2:HC0L0R4,)3:HPRINT(1,15 

),"Play again ( Y/N) ? " : G0SUB2 60 

280 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$="N"THENWIDTH4 
)3 : CLS : PRINT" BYE ! BYE ! " : ENDELSEIF 
Q$=»Y"THENlj3 ELSE280 
285 POKE&HE6,2:POKEPl,221:POKEP2 
,221: EXECF1 : HDRAW" BM3 )3 , 4)3 " : A=F1+ 
652 : F0RX=1T02 : A$=" " : F0RK=1T0197 : 
A$=A$+CHR$(PEEK(A) ) : A=A+1:NEXT:H 
DRAW A $ : NEXT : HDRAW" S4 " : RETURN 
29)3 FORK=lT015:GOSUB16j3:NEXT:GOS 
UB245 : F0RK=F1+1265T0F1+1534 : PRIN 
TCHR$ (PEEK (K) ) ; : NEXT : PRINT : PRINT 
"You have been given a lifetime 
subscrip-tion to The RAINBOW and 
even your own column! " :G0T02 7 

295 HBUFF1 , 15 : FORK=2T019 : HBUFFK, 
400 : NEXT : RETURN : ' SET BUFFERS 
3)30 CD=)3:IFV(5)=0ORD=1OR(8ANDA(R 
) ) <> 8 THE N 1 1 5 E LS E PR=R : R=R- 2 )3 : GOTO 
320 

3)35 CD=0:IFV(5)=0ORD=1OR(1ANDA(R 
) ) <>1THEN115ELSEPR=R: R=R-1 : GOTO 3 
25 

310 CD=0:IFV(5)=0ORD=1OR(2ANDA(R 
) ) <>2THEN115ELSEPR=R:R=R+l:GOT03 
20 



52 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



315 CD=0:IFV(5)=0ORD=1OR(4ANDA(R 
) ) <> 4 THE N115ELSE PR=R : R=R+ 2 0 : GOTO 
325 

320 V(7)=V(7)+l:A(R) = (A(R)OR64) : 
GOSUB200 : IFR (PR) =R (R) GOSUB19j3 : EX 
ECM2 : GOSUB170 : IFR (R) =32THEN25ELS 
E40ELSEGOSUB170 : GOT025 
325 V(7)=V(7)+l:A(R) = (A(R)OR64) : 
GOSUB200 : IFR ( PR) =R (R) GOSUB190 : EX 
ECM1 : GOSUB170 : IFR (R) =32THEN25ELS 
E40ELSEGOSUB170 : GOT025 

33) 3 POKEP1,0:POKEP2,0:EXECF1:HDR 
AW" BM8 , 3 9 C14R2 3 9 " : HPAINT ( 10 , 10 ) , 
12 , 14 : S=6 :R$="UNDER ATTACK 1 " :GOS 
UB215:IFO(l) THENA$="NO GUN? ! "EL 
SEA$="Guns Engaged!" 

335 HPRINT(1,17) , A$ : FORY=40TO95S 
TEP6 : HDRAW"XCL$ ; BM8 , =Y ; C9R2 3 9BD2 
C 10 L2 3 9 BD2 CI 1R2 39": NEXT : C=9 : X=20 
:H=RND(218) :HGET(H,39) -(H+22,31) 
, 4 : H=H+8 : HDRAW" BM=H ; , 39XFS$ ; " :H= 
H-8 

34) 3 F0RK=9T011 : PALETTEK, 0 : PALETT 
EC, 18 : C=K : HPUT ( H , 3 9 ) - (H+2 2 , 3 1 ) , 4 
, PSET : HDRAW" BM=X ; , l)32C14RDL fl : IFS 
<1THENK=12 :NEXT: GOSUB160 :RETURNE 
LSEH=RND (16) -8+H: IFH>225THENH=10 
ELSE I FH< 1)3 THENH= 2 2 0 

345 IFV(6)<1GOSUB265:GOSUB160:NE 
XT:GOSUB245:PRINT"Your shields h 
ave failed and your craft destro 
yed. . And so were you! " :GOTO270E 
LSEHGET ( H , 3 9 ) - (H+2 2 , 3 1 ) , 4 : H=H+ 8 : 
HDRAW" BM=H ; , 3 9XFS $ ; ,f : H=H-8 : IFRND 
( 10 ) =1THENA=1 : B=H+12 : G0SUB3 6)3 : GO 
SUB205 

35) 3 IFO (1) THENNEXT: GOTO340ELSEIF 
BUTTON (BU) =0THENY=JOYSTK(0) :X=JO 
YSTK ( JH) * 3 . 5+16 : HDRAW" BM=X ; , 1)3 2 C 
7RDL" : NEXT : G0T03 4)3 

355 V=HPOINT(X,39) : A=3 : B=X: GOSUB 
360:GOSUB205:IFV=13THENS=S-1:HPU 
T (H , 3 9 ) - (H+2 2 , 3 1 ) , 4 , NOT : PLAY" ADG 
FBCEDEFGAGC" :HPUT (H, 39 ) - (H+2 2 , 31 
) ,4,PSET:H=RND(218) : GOT0345ELSEN 
EXT: GOTO 3 4)3 

36) 3 HGET(B,100)-(B+1,39) ,3:HDRAW 
" BM=B ; , 1)3)3 C=A ; U6 1RD 6 1 " : PLAY " L2 5 5 
GEDCB" : HPUT ( B , 1)3)3) - (B+l , 39 ) , 3 , PS 
ET: RETURN 

365 P0KEP1 / 13 6:P0KEP2,13 6:EXECF1 
:HCOLOR9,0:HLINE(64,38)-(192,48) 
, PSET , BF : HCOLOR10 , )3 : HLINE (24,54) 
-(120,64), PSET , BF : HC0L0R1 1 , 0 : HLI 
NE(136,54)-(232,64) ,PSET,BF 

37) 3 HCOLOR4,0:HPRINT(9,5) , "SAUCE 
R ATTACK ! " : HPRINT (4,7) , " ONLY $1. 
00":HPRINT(18, 7) /'ONLY $1.00" :F0 
RX=15T0225STEP38:Y=0C+19:HDRAW"BM 
=X ; , 17XFS$ ; BM=Y ; , 28XFS$ ; " : NEXT : S 
=12: RETURN 



375 G0SUB215:HPRINT(1,16) , "Guns 
Engaged ! 11 : HPRINT (1,17) , "Press an 
y key to disengage." 
380 IFM THENEXECM3 
385 IFBUTTON(BU)=pTHENY=JOYSTK(0 
) : HDRAW"BM=X ; , 102C14RDLCf " : IFS<1 
ORINKEY$<>" M THENRETURNELSEX=JOYS 
TK( JH) *3 . 25+24 :HDRAW"BM=X ; , 1J32C7 
RDL":GOT038j3 

390 V(6)=V(6)-2:IFV(6)<3GOSUB250 
:GOT038j3ELSEGOSUB2j35 
395 V^HPOINT(X,28) :IFV=13THENY=2 
8ELSEV=HPOINT(X,17) :Y=17 
4j3j3 HGET (X, 100) - (X+l , Y) , 3 :HDRAW" 
BM=X; , 100C3M=X; ,=Y;C8" :PLAY"L255 
GEDCBA" : HPUT (X,100)-(X+ 1,Y),3, PS 
ET : IFV=13 ANDR=14 7THENHLINE (X-14 , 
Y) - (X+14 , Y-8 ) , PSET , BF : PLAY" ABEF" 
:S=S-1:GOTO380ELSE3 80 
405 CD=0:GOSUB215:A$="Nothing sp 
ecial" : IFR=lTHENA$="This door is 
locked! "ELSEIFR(R) =29THENA$="Ve 
ry clean! "ELSEIFR(R) =30THENA$="V 
ery noisy! "ELSEIFR(R) =230RR(R) =2 
7THENA$="It , s hot out here"ELSEI 
FR (R) =2 5THENA$= " Flying Saucers ! " 
410 IFR(R)=26THENA$="A lump on t 
he ground"ELSEIFR(R) =19THENA$="W 
ho would bury computers"ELSEIFR( 



R)=18THENA$="Graffiti on the wal 
ls"ELSEIFR=147THENA$="Practice w 
ould help you" ELSEIFR (R) =16THENA 
$="A shooting gallery ahead" 
415 IFR(R)=15THENA$="I hear dogs 

barking ! "ELSEIFR (R) =14THENA$="L 
ooks inviting"ELSEIFR(R)=330RR(R 
)=34THENA$="A lump in the sand"E 
LSEIFR(R) =12THENA$="The fish are 

frightened"ELSEIFR(R)=llTHENA$= 
"Hole"+STR$ (RND ( 18 ) ) ELSEIFR (R) =2 
THENA$=" Looks deserted." 
42-0 IFR=59THENA$="Bullet-proof w 
indows"ELSEIFR=190RR=39THENA$="D 
oor is locked"ELSEIFR(R)=3THENA$ 
="Door is open" ELSE IFR=48THENA$= 
"Something smells good! "ELSEIFR ( 
R)=lTHENA$="Dark and dingy"ELSEI 
FR=12 60RR=85THENA$="Identificati 
on required!" 

425 IFR(R)=13THENA$=="Looks hungr 
y!"ELSEIFR=20TH^NA$="It ! s your k 
ind of place"ELSEI FR= 4 0 THEN A $ = " E 
veryone has moved out"ELSEIFR=60 
THENA$="Lotsa guns!" 
430 IFD THENA$="SPOOKY!" 
435 HPRINT(1, 17) ,A$:G0T0115 
440 CD=0:L=1AND(L+1) :C=13-L:HDRA 
W"BM3 14 , 4 C=C ; RDLU" : G0SUB2 15 : HPRI 



S'UNOOG MfTEM 




S::: 





stacngth riij»j»itijiijii»iijiijiijiijiiji'«iijii»iir * 21 1 ] 



Kun^-ifu Dude 



An exciting new arcade game by Glen Dahlgren. This is the long-awaited response to the 
huge demand for a Kung-Fu program for the Coco. The graphics and sound effects are 
spectacular. The action and animation will please even the most die-hard arcade en- 
thusiast. Destroy your opponents and evade obstacles with over ten different moves as you 
grow ever closer to your ultimate objective. This is the BEST karate game ever available for 
the color computer. Req. 64K, disk drive, and joystick. Introductory price: only $24.95. 




WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY. Enter the age of monsters, 
magic, and adventure. Here you will search for the 
legendary power of White Fire throughout the Forbid- 
den Wood and dark caverns of the Mount. The Rainbow 
review of 12/86 says. "Visually, White Fire is quite an 
achievement. The graphics are excellent!" Discover 
what adventuring on the Coco is all about. Req. 64K and 
disk drive. Only $19.95. 



CHAMPION. Become a superhero in your fight to rid the 
world of the evil forces of Mr. Bigg in this action adven- 
ture. The combat Is hot and heavy and requires a fast 
joystick. The graphics and sound effects are sensational. 
"This Is a fascinating game and a difficult one to master. 
You'll get a blast out of (Champion)!" says the Rainbow 
review of 5/S7. Defend the Innocent and defeat the 
villainous; be a true Champion! Req. 64K, disk drive, and 
joystick. Only $19.95. 




Wr' 5 MUMMIIIIMimillUUUUUMMuV 

End; iiiuwmiiiimtjminiuuuuuuHiui 



All programs Coco ! 2, 3 compatible. 






LinDoa 

systems CJ 



Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 

Personal checks, money orders, and C.O.D. orders 
accepted. 



Include $2.50 for S/H. $2.00 
extra for C.O.D. orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax. 
Authorship and dealer inquiries 
welcome. 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 53 



NT (1,17) /'Lights "+MID$("ON OFF" 
, (C-12)*3+l,3) :IF(A(R)AND32)=0AN 
DLO=0THEN115ELSEIO=0:GOTO25 
445 CD=0:X==10:Y=X:IFBUTTON(BU)TH 
EN4 4 5ELSEGOSUB2 15 : HPRINT (1,17)," 
Receive Cargo" 

450 IFM THENEXECM3 
455 IFBUTTON (BU)=0THENHGET(X, Y) - 
(X+4,Y+4) , l:HPUT(X,Y)-(X+4,Y+4) , 
l,PRESET:HPUT(X,Y)-(X+4,Y+4) ,1,P 
SET:X=JOYSTK(£) : X=JOYSTK (JH) *3 . 7 
+8 : Y=JOYSTK (JV) *1 . 4+10 : G0T04 50 
460 A=5:FORK=0TO4:IFV(K)=-1THENA 
=K: NEXTELSENEXT 

465 0=INT((X-8)/26)+INT(Y/81)*9: 
0G=0: IFO=15THENFORK=15T022 : IFO (K 
)=R THENO=K: NEXTELSENEXT ELSE IFO 
=16THENFORK=2 3T029:IFO(K)=R THEN 
0=K: NEXTELSENEXT ELSEIFO=17THENF 
ORK=30TO35:IFO(K)=R THENO=K : NEXT 
ELSENEXT 

470 IFY<560RO(0)OR GOSUB225:GOT 
0115 ELSEIF0<3 0ANDA=5THENA$="Hol 

ding Tanks Full" :GOTO480 

475 HP=1:GOSUB175:IFO=6GOTO290EL 

SEA$=" Cargo Secured" : IFO<30THENO 
X=7+A*4 4 : 0 Y=l 8 6 : HC0L0R13 , 0 : HLINE 
( OX , 0 Y ) - ( 0X+ 2 5 , 1 6 7 ) , PSET , BF : HP=0 
:GOSUB185:V(A)=O:O(O)=0 ELSEO(O) 
=0:V(8)=V(8) +350000 :GOT025 
480 GOSUB215 : HPRINT (1, 17) ,A$: GOT 
0115 

485 IFBUTTON (BU) THEN485ELSEGOSUB 
220: G0SUB12 5 : IFA=5GOSUB2 2 5 : G0T01 
4 5ELSEIFV (A) =-lTHEN4 8 5ELSEGOSUB2 
30:O=V(A) :V(A)«-1:0(0)=R:G0SUB17 
5 : G0SUB2 15 : HPRINT ( 1 , 17 ) , 0$ (O) +" 
Released" :GOT0145 

490 IFBUTTON (BU) THEN490ELSEGOSUB 
220: G0SUB12 5 : IFA=5GOSUB2 2 5 : G0T01 
45ELSEIFV(A)=-1THEN490ELSEGOSUB2 
15 

495 A$=" ":CD=0:ONV(A)+lGOTO500 f 
505,510,510,525,525,0,530,540,55 
5,570,575,585, 600, 605: GOTO610 
500 GOSUB265:GOSUB245:PRINT"The 
food was spoiled and Botulism ha 
s ended your adventure • " : GOTO 2 
70 

505 IFR=147THENA$="NO PAY - NO P 
LAY I " : G0T06 15ELSES=1 : G0SUB3 75 : S= 
0 : IFR (R) =13GOSUB2 65 : GOSUB245 : PRI 

NT"While your aim was true, ther 
e were too many' of them. Your ad 
venture is over . " :GOTO270ELSEA$= 
"That was fun! 11 :GOT0615 
510 IFR=190RR=390RR=490RR=280RR= 
850RR=25THENA(R) = (A(R)OR128) :W=1 
:GOSUB150ELSEIFV(A)=3THENA$="You 
"+MID$ ( "SlicedHooked" , RND ( 2 ) *6- 
5,6) :GOT0615ELSEA$="Whew, what a 



swing! ":G0T06 15 
515 IFR=190RR=39THENA(R)=(A(R)OR 
2) :GOT0615ELSEIFR=2 5THENA(R)=(A( 
R)0R11) :GOT0615 

520 IFR=85GOSUB265:GOSUB245:PRIN 
T"The building was shielded from 

the Con- trollers influence. Yo 
u have compromisedthe shield and 

for you this adventure isover!" 
:GOTO270 

525 0(V(A) )=0:GOSUB245:PRINT"Tha 

t was delicious... But there is 

some- thing hard in it i " : PRINT" It 

•s a gold nugget worth $500!":GO 

SUB2 3 5 : G0SUB2 30 : 0 ( V ( A) ) =0 : V ( A) =- 

1:V(8)=V(8)+500:GOTO615 

530 IFR(R)=13THENR(R)=34:A(R)=(A 

(R)0R31) :GOSUB245:PRINT"You inju 

red the shark causing him to 

bleed, which attracted other sha 

rks who devoured the attacking s 

hark while you escaped! " :G0SUB2 

35 : GOSUB770 : W=l : G0T0145 

53 5 A$="A dentist is needed": GOT 

0615 

540 IFR(R)<>15THENA$="Where , s th 
e wire?!":GOT0615 

545 HPRINT(36,19) , "S" :GOSUB150 : I 
FO(0)=R OR V(9)=1THENO(0)=0:V(9) 
=l:A(R)=(A(R)OR132) :A(R+20)=(A(R 
+20)OR8) :G0SUB245:PRINT"Guard do 
gs went for the food, letting 
you pass . " : G0SUB2 3 5 : HP=1 : 0=0 : GOS 
UB175:G0T0615 

550 GOSUB265 : GOSUB245 : PRINT"Pit 
Bull guard dogs attacked and hav 
e ended your adventure! " :G0T02 

70 

555 IFR(R)=34THENR(R)=12ELSEIFR( 
R) =3 3THENR (R) =14ELSEIFR (R) =2 6 THE 
NR (R) =2 0ELSEIFR (R) =19 THENA $= " HER 
E? ! Are you nuts? ! " :GOT0615ELSEA 
$="Don l t break your shovel J ": GOT 
0615 

560 FORK=28TO33:IFO(K)=0THENO=K: 
NEXTELSENEXT 

565 0(0)=R:GOSUB175:A$="Buried t 
reasure = $350,0001 ":GOT0615 
570 I FRO 5 9 THENA $=" It doesn't wo 
rk" : G0T06 15ELSEA (R) = ( A (R) 0R2 ) : A$ 
="It worked! You may pass.":HPRI 
NT(38,17) ,"E":GOT0615 
575 IFR=126THENA(R)=(A(R)OR13 6) : 
HPRINT ( 3 6 , 15 ) , "N" : HC0L0R11 , 0 : HLI 
NE( 83, 38) -(151,80) , PSET, BF: A$="T 
he gate opens" :GOT0615ELSEIFR=8 5 
GOSUB245:PRINT"A MESSAGE APPEARS 
ON THE WALL MONITOR. ..": F0RK=F1 
+1046TOF1+1264:PRINTCHR$(PEEK(K) 
) ; :NEXT:GOSUB235:GOT0615 
580 A$="Nobody wants to see it": 



0 

54 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



GOTO 6 15 

585 IFR<>147THENA$="I , d hang on 
to that dollar" :GOT0615ELSEIFO(l 
) THENA$="NO GUN- NO PLAY ! 11 : GOTO 
615 

590 GOSUB230:O(12)=126+RND(5) :V( 
A)=-l:GOSUB375 

595 GOSUB160 : IFS<lTHENA$= s "Anothe 
r passage is revealed! " :A(R)=(A( 
R)OR2) :HPRINT(38,17) , : GOT0615 
ELSEG0SUB2 2 5 : GOTO 14 5 
60J3 IFR<>lTHENA$« M It has no effe 
ct":GOT0615ELSEA$="It works! The 

door is open!" : A(R) =(A(R) OR4) :H 
PRINT (36, 19) , "S":GOT0615 
6j35 GOSUB245:PRINT"THE LETTER IS 

SMUDGED ! IT SAYS . . . " : PRINT : PRIN 
T" I have be n captur d by t e 

Control- lers. I have learn d t 
hat they are only m c n s. Disc 
o ec the p w r to defe tthem!" 
TAB (60) "M. Goodman. . . ":GOSUB235: 
GOTO 6 15 

610 IFV(A)<23THENA$="Fuel tank r 
e-f illed" : V ( A) =-1 : V ( 5 ) =4 8 : GOSUB2 
30 :GOSUB200ELSEA$=" Battery re-ch 
arged" : V ( A) =-1 : V ( 6 ) =4 8 : GOSUB2 3 0 : 

GOSUB205 

615 GOSUB215:HPRINT(l, 17) ,A$:GOT 



0145 

620 IFBUTTON(BU)THEN620ELSE:GOSU 
B220 : GOSUB125 : IFA=5GOSUB225 : GOTO 
145ELSEIFV (A) =-lTHEN620ELSEGOSUB 
215 :HPRINT (1, 17) , "Tank"+STR$ (A+l 
) + « : "+0$ (V (A) ) : IFV (A) =11THEN109 
0ELSE145 

625 CD=0 : GOSUB2 15 : HPRINT (1,17)," 
SC0RE="+STR$(V(7) )+" ASSETS= $" 
+MID$ ( STR$ ( V ( 8 ) ) , 2 ) : G0T0115 
630 WIDTH40:CLS5:ATTR0,4:PRINTTA 
B(13)"* TRAVEL MAP *": PRINT : ATTR 
0,0:FORK=1TO200:IFK=R THENATTR0, 
0,B ELSEATTR0 ,0 

635 IF (A (K) AND64 ) =64THENPRINTHEX 
$ ( (A(K) AND15) ) " ";ELSEPRINT" »; 
640 NEXT : ATTR0 , 4 : PRINT : F0RK=1T01 
5 : A=K*5 : PRINTHEX$ (K) "=" ; : FORC=0T 
03:IF(K ANDD(C) ) =D (C) THENPRINTMI 
D$ ("NSEW" , C+l , 1) ; ELSE PRINT" • " ; 
645 NEXT : PRINT " " ; : NEXT 
650 IFBUTTON(BU)THEN670ELSEX=JOY 
STK (0 ) : X= ( JOYSTK ( JH ) / 1 • 6 ) AND2 5 4 : 
Y=INT(JOYSTK(JV)/6.4) :MR=X/2+Y*2 
0+1 : LOCATEX, Y+2 : IFMR=R THENATTR0 
,0,B ELSEATTR0 , 0 

655 IFXJ=X ANDYJ=Y THEN 6 50 ELS EX J 
=X : YJ=Y : LOCATE0 , 17 : ATTR0 , 4 : PRINT 
STRING $ ( 200 , 3 2 ) : LOCATE0 , 17 : IF ( A ( 



l 



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EJ>l< p-ATTLE TA 
?AV£ THEFA&TH 
££Jt hi &AL-AX I E?/ 

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MAkTH-P'A-kT , NY 

1/76% 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 55 



MR) AND64 ) =64 THENPRINTR$ (R (MR) ) EL 
SE650 

660 FORK=0TO35:IFO(K)=MR THENPRI 
NTO$ (K) ■» , " ; : NEXTELSENEXT 
665 GOTO650 

670 CD=0 : ATTR0 , 0 : HSCREEN2 : GOTO 11 
5 

675 CD=0:POKE65496,0:GOSUB245:IN 
PUT 11 SAVE / 1 0 AD 11 ; A$ : INPUT "dISK/tAP 
E/aBORT" ;Q$ : IFQ$="D"THENDN=1ELSE 
IFQ$="T"THENDN=-1ELSEHSCREEN2:G0 
T0115 

680 PRINT: INPUT" Prepare device & 
press ENTER" ;Q$ : PRINT: IFA$="S"T 
HENPRINT" SAVING" :OPEN"0" ,DN, "C" : 
PRINT #DN,R: FORK=0TO9 : PRINT#DN,V( 
K) ; : NEXT : FORK=0TO3 5 : PRINT #DN , 0 (K 
) ; :NEXT:FORK=1TO200:PRINT#DN,R(K 
) ;A(K) ;: NEXT: CLOSE :HSCREEN2: GOTO 
115 

685 IFA$="L"THENPRINT"LOADING" :0 
PEN "I" , DN, "C" : INPUT # DN , R : FORK=0T 
09:INPUT#DN,V(K) :NEXT:FORK=0TO35 
: INPUT #DN, 0 (K) : NEXT : FORK=1TO200 : 
INPUT#DN,R(K) ,A(K) : NEXT : CLOSE : HS 
CREEN2 ELSE675 

69)3 FORA=0TO4:IFV(A)=-1GOSUB230E 

LSEOG=V (A) : IFOG>2 2THENOG=16 : GOSU 

B255ELSEIF0G>14THEN0G=15:G0SUB25 

5ELSEGOSUB255 

695 NEXT:PR=0:GOTO20 

700 CD=0:EXECF2:HCOLOR4,0:HPRINT 

(1,15) /'Cease Operations" rHPRINT 

(1,17), "Are you sure (Y/N)?" 

705 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$=" "THEN705ELSE 
IFQ$O"Y"THENG0SUB225:G0T0115ELS 
E275 

710 POKEP1,0:POKEP2,0:EXECF1:FOR 
X=8TO240STEP24:FORY=7TO67STEP11: 
HCOLOR9 , 8 : HLINE (X, Y) - (X+22 , Y+9 ) , 
PSET , BF : HDRAW" BM=X ; , =Y ; C13R2 2D10 
C8L2 2U10 " : NEXTY , X : HDRAW" BF10BR13 
C2L239BD4R239BD6L239BD8R239" 
715 IFR(R)=3THEN725ELSEF0RK=1T01 
00 :HSET (RND (238) +8, RND (82) +8, RND 
(8) ) : NEXT : RETURN 

72) 3 P0KEP1,221:P0KEP2,13 6:EXECF1 
725 HCOLOR14,8:HLINE(18,14)-(78, 
56) , PSET, BF: HLINE (23 8 ,14) -(178,5 
6 ) , PSET , BF : GOSUB155 : IFR=3 9THENA$ 
="LOCK" :B$="SMITHS"ELSEIFR=59THE 
NA$=" GUNS " : B$=" &AMMO "ELSE735 

73) 3 HDRAW"BM24,40C3R48BR112R48C4 
" : HCOLOR4 , 0 : FORK=0TO2 0STEP2 0 : HPR 
INT(4+K,3) ,A$:HPRINT(3+K,4) ,B$:N 
EXT:GOT0745 

735 FORK=38TO198STEP160:FORX=K T 
OK+40STEP20:FORY=14TO42STEP14:HD 
RAW"BM=X ; , =Y ; C9L19D13 C12R19U13 " : 
NEXTY, X, K: IFR=19THENFORY=35T0195 
STEP160 : FORX=0TO2 6STEP26 : FORK=0T 



56 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



02:HCIRCLE(Y+K+X,54) ,15,1,2.5, .5 
,1:NEXTK,X,Y 

740 IFR(R)=3THENFORX=20TO180STEP 
160:HDRAW"BM=X; , 46C3R56H10U10L36 
D10G10 " : HPAINT ( X+9 , 4 4 ) , 3 , 3 : NEXT : 
RETURN 

745 FORX=78TO238STEP160:HDRAW"BM 
=X; , 14C8D42L63C4U42R63" :NEXT 
75^ HCOLOR13,8:HLINE(8,72)-(247, 
90) , PSET, BF: HDRAW" BM8 , 9 1C8E20R3 0 
G20R30E20R30G20R30E20R30G20R30E2 
0R3 0G2 0 " : HCOLOR14 , 8 : HLINE ( 8 , 90 ) - 
(247,94) , PSET, BF: HPAINT (9, 98) ,8, 
14 : RETURN 

755 POKEPl,85:POKEP2,85:EXECFl:H 
DRAW"BM8 , 44C14E10F10E13F13E8F8E1 
0F10E9F9E15F15E5F5E15F15E15F15E1 
4F14E5F8D12H10G10H13G13H8G8H10G1 
0H9G9H15G15H5G5H15G15H15G15H14G1 
4H5G10D5R79FR79E2R81" : HPAINT ( 10 , 
10) ,12,14:HPAINT(10,54) ,15,14:HP 
AINT(10,62) ,0,14 

760 HCIRCLE(51, 90) ,30,15, .3:HPAI 
NT (50, 90) ,15,15:HCIRCLE(50,90) ,3 
,9, .5:HDRAW"BM50,90C8U40M+10,+5M 
-9,+5D31C14M+22,-6R4M+20,-5D6M-8 
, - 3 " : HPAINT (53, 55), 3, 8: HPAINT ( 9 4 
, 82 ) , 14 , 14 : C=14 : FORX=42TO50 :HCIR 
CLE (X, 90) ,30,C, .3, .4, .7:IFX=45TH 
ENC=4 : NEXTELSENEXT 
765 HDRAWCL$ : FORK=1TO50 : HSET (RND 
(239)+8,RND(30)+70,15) : NEXT : RETU 
RN 

770 POKEP1, 34:P0KEP2,34:EXECF1:H 
DRAW"BM8 , 60C14R80ER80FR78" :HPAIN 
T ( 10 , 64 ) , 10 , 14 : FORK=1TO100 : HSET ( 
RND(235)+10,RND(40)+60,RND(2) *4) 
:NEXT 

775 FORK=1TO8:X=RND(20)*10+20:Y= 
RND ( 4 ) *4+8 : C=RND ( 5 ) +2 : F0RA=1T09 : 
HCIRCLE(X,Y) ,A,C, . 4 : NEXT : X=X-8 : H 
DRAW" BM=X ; , =Y ; C=C ; H4D8E4LH3 D6E3L 
H2D4E2LBR16BUC8R" :NEXT 
780 IFR(R)=34THENFORK=0TO8:HCIRC 
LE(228,90) ,K,9, .4:NEXT ' 
785 RETURN 

790 POKEPl,68:POKEP2,68:EXECFl:H 
DRAW"BM8 , 60C14R20M+30 ,+4R50M+20 , 
-2R80M+40 , -2U10L240" : HPAINT (10 , 1 
0) ,12,14:HPAINT(10,55) ,2,14:HDRA 
W"BM20 , 35C4R4F2E2R2BR20BUR4F2E2R 
4BR30BD2R4F2E4R4 XCL$ ; " 
795 IFR(R)=3 3THENFORK=0TO8:HCIRC 
LE(228,90) ,K,13, .4:NEXT 
800 RETURN 

805 POKEPl,13 6:POKEP2,136:EXECFl 
: HDRAW" BM8 , 60C14R240D18L240DR240 
DL2 40 " : HPAINT (10, 70), 13, 14: FORX= 
9T02 47STEP4 ': HDRAW" BM=X ; , 8 1C3D20 " 
: NEXT : HDRAW "BM7 2, 12C2R113D20L113 
U20HR115D22L115U22BH3BL2C4R125D2 



9L125U29":HPAINT(78,20) ,4,2 

81) 3 FORX=80TO82:HDRAW"BM=X; ,26C1 
U5E4F4ND5E4F4D5" : NEXT : HDRAW"BM76 
,14C3R26D16L26U16BR34BD2C8R40BD4 
L40BD4R40BD4L40BR50R20BU4L20BU4R 
20BU4L20" :Y=46:FORC=15TO0STEP-15 
: FORY=Y TOY+6STEP2 : HDRAW"BM8 , =Y ; 
C=C;R239":NEXTY / C 

815 HDRAW"BM8,52C14R20NU44E6U38L 
26BR46D44R160NU44E6U38L28D30L127 
U30L10BM8 , 20R16D20L16C12BER14BU2 
L14BU4R14BU2L14BU4R14BU2L14BM60 , 
20C14NR4D20NE4R14 6U4NL14U16L14 

82) 3 HPAINT(10,9) ,13,14 :HPAINT(10 
0,50) ,13, 14: HPAINT (30, 10) ,14,14: 
HPAINT(218,1)3) , 14 , 14 : HPAINT (200 , 
38) , 12 , 14 :HDRAW"BM9 , 44C4R12BD2L1 
2BD2R12BUC8L12BU2R12BU2L12BM8 , 10 

• C4R18C8D2L18BR48R8BU2C4L8NDBR138 
R18C8D2L18" 

825 FORX=72T0156STEP42:HDRAW"BM= 
X; ,44C4R36BD2L36BD2R36BUC8L38BU2 
R3 6BU2L3 6 11 : NEXT : RETURN 

83) 3 P0KEP1,221:P0KEP2,221:EXECF1 
: FORY=17T043STEP2 : HDRAW" BM8 , =Y ; C 
15R2 39 " : NEXT : FORY=45TO101STEP2 : H 
DRAW" BM8 , =Y ; C0R2 39": NEXT : HDRAW" B 
M247 , 37C14M-10 , -20U9LD9L228D24R1 
00E8R20G20L109D15R109NU15E20U15D 
4R112D4L112D4R112D4L112" 

835 HPAINT (10, 10) ,3, 14: HPAINT (10 
,42) ,4,14:HPAINT(1)3,62) ,12,14:HP 
AINT (119,60) ,2,14:HPAINT(200,39) 
, 8 , 14 : HPAINT (200, 47), 8, 14: FORX=0 
TO40: HCIRCLE (200, 70) ,X,RND(8) , .3 
: NEXT : RETURN 

840 P0KEP1,221:P0KEP2,221:EXECF1 

: FORY=50TO60STEP2 : HDRAW "BM8 , =Y ; C 

2R2 39 " : NEXT : FORY=62TO100STEP2 : HD 

RAW" BM8 , =Y ; C12R2 39": NEXT : HDRAW" B 

M48,7C14D53R148NU53E10U44L20D49L 

56NU49BM+10,-6NR46U43L26D49L56NU 

49BM+10,-6NR46U43" 

845 FORX=64TO204STEP70: HPAINT (X, 

20) ,14, 14: NEXT: HPAINT (54, 20) ,10, 

14 :HDRAW"BM59 , 55C8M+10 , -6BR72M-1 

0,+6" 

850 G$="C8U3LD3LU3LD3LU6ED4RU6ED 
7RU16G2F2U8RD14EU22ED20EU30LD10" 
: FORK=74TO106STEP8 : X=K+72 : HDRAW" 
BM=K ; , 5 2XG$ ; BM=X ; , 5 2XG$ ; " : NEXT : F 
0RX=8T04 6STEP4 : HDRAW" BM=X ; , 7C6D4 
3 BR2 0 0U4 3 " : NEXT : RETURN 
855 P0KEP1,221:P0KEP2,221:EXECF1 
: FORY=60TO100STEP2 : HDRAW" BM8 , =Y ; 
C9R2 3 9 C14 " : NEXT : C=8 : B-2 4 8 : FORK=8 
TO300STEP8 : Y=K: X=K: H=256-K: IFY>6 
0THENY=60 : IFX>248THENX=248 : H=8 : C 
=C+8 : B=B-8 

860 HLINE(X,C)-(X-Y+C,Y) ,PSET:HL 
INE (H , C ) - ( B-X+Y , Y ) , PSET : NEXT : FOR 



X=18T02 4 7STEP80 : HDRAW" BM=X ; , 7C8D 
55L3BUC4U54RD54 " : NEXT : RETURN 
865 POKEP1,0:POKEP2,0:EXECF1:HDR 
AW" BM8 , 80 C 1 4 R2 40U30 L2 40 " : HPAINT ( 
10,10) ,12, 14: HPAINT (10, 70) ,13,14 
:HDRAW"BM108, 66C3U20R60D20L5H4L7 
G4L20H4L7G4L5BU7BR10R40U10L40D10 
BR5BUC8U8 BR8 D8 BR8U8 BR8D8 BR8U8 " : H 
PAINT (110 , 64) , 3 , 3 : FORY=3T05 : HCIR 
CLE(120,68) ,Y,8 

870 NEXT:HCOLOR13,0:HLINE(138,10 
0) -(238,80) ,PSET,BF:FORX=138T023 
8STEP4 : HDRAW" BM=X; ,100 C6U20C0" :N 
EXT:HLINE ( 173 , 100) - (203 , 97) , PSET 
, BF : HDRAW"XCL$ ; BM13 8 , 100C8U20E50 
M-30 , +52NM-20 , -2M+3 0 , +2NU54M+35 , 
-2NM-35 , -52M+15 , -2NH50D20L35U3NL 
27U9L30D12NE3L35" 

875 C=0 : FORX=145TO240STEP30 : C=C+ 
1:HPAINT(X,78) , C, 8 : NEXT: HDRAW" BM 
60 , 63C8M-15 , +38R30M-15 , -38" :HPAI 
NT (60, 65) ,8,8: HPAINT (178, 95) ,8,8 
: C=0 : FORY=0TO8 : C=C+1 : HCIRCLE ( 60 , 
63) ,27+Y,C: HCIRCLE (60, 63) ,Y,C:NE 
XT:HDRAW"BM60,63C4U32RD64LU32L32 
DR64UL32E22FG44HE22F22GH44EF" 
880 RETURN 

885 POKEP1,238:POKEP2,238:EXECF1 
: FORK=1TO50 : X=RND ( 200 ) +8 : Y=RND ( 5 
2)+7:H=RND(30) :V=RND(20) :C=RND(7 
) : HDRAW" BM=X ; , =Y ; C=C ; M+=H ; , +=V ; " 
:NEXT:GOSUB210 

890 C=0:FORX=224TO236STEP2:C=C+1 

: FORY=10TO70STEP10: HDRAW" BM=X; ,= 

Y ; C=C ; F5G5 " : NEXTY , X : F0RC=1T07 : HC 

OLORC , 0 : HPRINT ( 1+C , C) , MID$ ( "RAIN 

BOW" , C , 1 ) : NEXT : HDRAW" BM8 , 8 0 C8R2 3 

9D21L239U21BUC13R78U72RC8D72C13R 

79U72RC8D72C13R79U72RC8D72 " : HPAI 

NT(10,90) ,8,8:RETURN 

895 POKEPl,238:POKEP2,238:EXECFl 

: FORY=40TO100STEP2 : HDRAW" BM8 , =Y ; 

C15R2 39 " : NEXT : HDRAW "XCL$ ; BM8 , 32C 

8R239BD4L239" : FORX=8TO247STEP10 : 

HDRAW"BM=X; , 29D11" :NEXT 

900 HDRAW"BM30,65C13R10U15R10U10 

L10U10L10D10L10D10R10D15BM77 , 79U 

40E6R20F6D40L32BM150,71U5R10NM+4 

,+2U33E4ND39F4D33R10D5L28BM204,5 

9U30R25D30L25" 

905 HPAINT (32, 63) , 13 , 13 : HPAINT (7 
9,77) 7 13,13:HPAINT(152,69) ,13,13 
: HPAINT ( 162 , 62 ) , 4 , 13 : HPAINT (206 , 
58) ,13,13 

910 HDRAW"BM30,65C8R10U15R10U10B 

L10U10BG10BD10L10BM109 , 79U40H6BM 

178 , 71U5BL10NM-4 , +2BU33M-4 , +2C13 

M-4,-2C8BM230,59U30" 

915 Y=65:X=35:GOSUB920:Y=79:X=93 

: GOSUB9 2 0 : Y=7 5 : X=l 64 : GOSUB9 20 : Y= 

59 : X=217 : GOSUB920 : HPRINT (10, 6) ," 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 57 



We Cannot Tell A Lie 

Lonnie's gone nuts! ! He's chopped down prices on 
Rainbow Bookshelf items! 






The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to 
take advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser 
features. An easy-to-read, step-by-step guide packed 
with hints, tips, tutorials and free software in the form 
of program listings. 

Book $12.95, Disk Package $19.95 (2 disks, book not 
included) — a savings of up to 36%! 

SAVE 38%! Book and disks only $29.95 




- \\\ 



/ 



The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first 
Simulations contest. You are a Civil War Commander, 
an air traffic controller, a civil defense coordinator, or 
a scientist on Mars . . . your wits are on the line. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 — a savings of 65%! 

SAVE 70%! Book and tape only $6 





v 



1 



\mmmm 



•■:<■§= '.iV'. rMv\* 



The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winners from our second Simulations contest. 
Fly through dense African jungle, bull your way down 
Wall Street, lead a bomb squad, or try your hand at 
Olympic events. Test your skills and talents. 
Book $4.95, Tape or Disk $4.95 — a 50% savings! 



SAVE 55%! Book and tape only $8.95 
SAVE 57%! Book and disk only $8.95 



' *' . ™ » ... 




SAVE 
UP 10 






The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adven- 
ture contest. Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors, 
Horror House, One Room, Dr. Avaloe and more. Plus 
hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $2, Tape $2 — a 43% savings! 

SAVE 50%! Book and tape only $3.50 




The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure 
games ever compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the 
Blue Meanies, find a hidden fortune, or win the heart 
of a mysterious princess. Ring Quest, Secret Agent 
Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $6.95, Tape $6.95 — a 50% savings! 

SAVE 57%! Book and tape only $11.95 




• -i,;; 1 '■ , *;.Vi,0, ' ' ' •.' • • ' '•• ' > 



i 



■i f. \. 





The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. 
Discover backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, 
attempt a daring space rescue, or defeat evil in the year 
2091 as a genetic android. Evil Crypt, Spy master, Time 
Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the beginning! 
Book $6.95, Tape $6.95, Two-Disk Set $7.95 — a 
savings of up to 47%! 

SAVE 45%! Book and tape only $11.95 
SAVE 52%! Book and disk only $12.95 




The Rainbow 
Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid 
introduction to the realm of statistical processes and 
thinking for both the beginner and the professional. 
(80-column printer required.) 
Book $2.95, Tape or Disk $2.95 — a savings of 54%! 

SAVE 62%! Book and tape or disk only $4.95 





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j Please send me: 
j □ The Rainbow Book ot Simulations (first) 

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□ Second Simulations Package with Tape 

□ Second Simulations Package with Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Set (2 disks) 

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□ The Windows & Applications Disk lor 

The Complete Rainbow Guide 
to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I 

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■$-&95-$ 3.50 
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-$-9* $ 4.95 
$ 4.95 

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$12.00 $ 8.05 $ 4.95 



Total 



wmm 



Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059. To order by phone (credit card orders only) 
call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call 
(502) 228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. That is, 
they are intended to be an adjunct ana complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape or disk, you wM 
still need the appropriate book for loading and operating instructions. OS-9« is a registered trademark of the 
Microware Systems Corporation. 




IBM" : HDRAW"BM220 , 44C3L6HR8EL10UR 
10UL10ER8HL6R2FC8E3" : RETURN 
920 C=14:F0RY=Y TOY+20 :HCIRCLE (X 
,Y) ,25,C, .2, . 5, 1:C=15: NEXT: HDRAW 
" BM=X ; , =Y ; C 1 4 NL2 5R25BH2L46" : RETU 
RN 

925 POKEP1,204:POKEP2,204:EXECF1 
:HDRAW"BM8,32C13R239BD4L239BD2C1 
4R2 3 9C13 11 : HPAINT ( 10 , 9 8 ) , 0 , 14 : FOR 
X=8TO247STEP10:HDRAW"BM=X; ,29011 
" : NEXT : FORK= 1T0 1 0 0 : HS ET ( RND ( 2 3 8 ) 
+8,RND(61)+37,14) :NEXT 
930 H=0:FORK==1TO7:X=RND(10) *20+l 
0:Y=RND(10)+50:H=1AND(H+1) :C=H+8 
: : HDRAW" BM=X; , =Y;C=C;U8NF4HL13DR 
14DL14DR14DL2ND4L12D4BR2BDU9L6UR 
10HL8ER5BL2HL7HBR18GL10" :NEXT 
935 IFR(R)=25THENFORK=15T0225STE 
P3 5 : X=K+RND ( 4 ) : Y=RND ( 13 ) +13 : HDRA 
W"BM=X ; , =Y ; XFS$ ; " : NEXTELS EHDRAWC 
L$ : IFR (R) =2 6 THENFORK= 0 TO 8 : HCIRCL 
E (228,90) ,K,15, .4:NEXT 
940 RETURN 

945 POKEP1,204:POKEP2,204:EXECF1 
: : HDRAW 11 XCL$ ; BM8 , 7 8 C5R2 3 9 BDL2 3 9 B 
DC14R100U40R30U10R20NF4D10R4NU6R 

2 6F4D3 6L4NU4 0L8 0R1 39": HPAINT ( 12 0 
, 70) ,4, 14: HPAINT (10 ,100) ,13,14 
950 HPAINT ( 160 , 35) ,14 ,14: HPAINT ( 
190 , 45) , 14 , 14 : F0RX=114T0178STEP8 
: FORY=44TO70STEP4 : HLINE (X, Y) - (X+ 
4 , Y+2 ) , PSET , BF : NEXTY , X : HLINE (138 
,74) -(154,80) , PSET, BF: HDRAW" BM1 3 
8, 80C13U6R8ND6R8D6C0R34GL31BL20L 
27HR30C2BM143 , 3 9U7RD7RU7 D3R4 DNL4 
D3U7RD7RU7C14 " : RETURN 

955 POKEP1,0:POKEP2,0:EXECF1:HDR 
AW"BM8 , 102C14U2E10U10R120D10F12R 
98U22L110U66L120D66NL10D4":HPAIN 
T(10,10) ,4,14:HPAINT(30,50) ,14,1 
4 : HPAINT ( 20 , 100 ) , 13 , 14 : HDRAW" BM1 
9 , 80C13U66R59ND66R59C8D66L120C13 
U67R122C8D68L122" 

960 HDRAW"BM68,45C13D10RU10RD10R 
U10RD10RU10BR10D10RU10RD10RU10RD 
10RU10" : FORX=154TO240STEP8 : FORY= 
84T096STEP6:C=RND(7) : HDRAW" BM=X; 
9 =Y ; C=C 7 EFGHC2 " : NEXTY , X 
965 IFR=25THENHPRINT (19 , 4) , "WEST 
POINT" : HPRINT (20,5), "HOSPITAL" E 
LSEHPRINT (21,4), "FALSOFT" : HPRINT 
(22,5), "-WEST" : HDRAW" BM19 8 , 54C8D 
10L10U10R10C13EL12D12GU14R14C14D 
14L14ER12U12 " : HPAINT ( 190 , 58 ) , 2 , 8 
970 RETURN 

975 P0KEP1,187:P0KEP2,187:EXECF1 

:HDRAW"XCL$;BM8,80C14R239U16C4L2 

3 9BU16R2 39" : HPAINT ( 10 , 100) ,13,14 
: FORX=8T02 4 7 STEP2 4 : HDRAW" BM=X ; , 8 
0C4U40EC8FD40C11" : NEXT 

980 IFR=126THENGOSUB150:IF(A(R)A 



60 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



ND128) <>128THENHDRAW"BM83,79C4U3 
2R68D16L68DR68M-68,+15R68NU16M-6 
8 , -15 " : HPRINT (11,7)," FALSOFT" 
985 RETURN 

990 P0KEP1,187:P0KEP2,187:EXECF1 
: HDRAW" XCL$ ; BM8 , 7 8 C5R2 3 9 BDL2 3 9 BD 
C14R80U40NR132L2E10R114NM+18,+12 
F10L2D40L60U10L20D10L60R148NU38R 
22" 

995 HPAINT (10, 100) ,13, 14: HPAINT ( 
100,70) ,4,14:HPAINT(100,35) ,9,14 
: HPAINT (220, 70), 14, 14: HP AI NT ( 15 5 
, 78 ) , 14 , 14 : FORX=9 3T02 13STEP16 : FO 
RY=44T066STEP6 : HLINE (X , Y) - (X+8 , Y 
+3 ) , PSET , BF : NEXTY , X : HDRAW " BM13 8 , 
80C13U10R10ND10R10D10L20C0L50FR4 
6BR26R56EL60C2BU5BR2R4GL" 
1000 RETURN 

1005 POKEP1,68:POKEP2 / 204:EXECF1 
: HDRAW" BM8 , 7 1C14R2 3 9UL2 3 9UR2 3 9UL 
239UR239UL239": HPAINT (10, 100) ,4, 
14 

10 10 FORX= 8TO247STEP30: HDRAW " BM= 
X; , 101C14E30" : NEXT: HDRAW" BM8 , 91R 
239 BU10L2 39": FORX=3 6T02 4 7STEP60 : 
F0RY=7 6T09 6STEP20 : HPAINT ( X , Y ) , 12 
, 14 : NEXTY , X : FORX=8T0247STEP58 : HP 
AINT (X, 86), 12, 14: NEXT : GOSUB155 : R 
ETURN 

1015 POKEP1,204:POKEP2,204:EXECF 
1 : Oil : FORX=0TO20STEP2 0 : FORY=X+6 
0TOX+8 1STEP2 : HDRAW" BM8 , =Y ; C=C ; R2 
3 9 C8 " : NEXT : C=2 : NEXT : HLINE ( 8 , 7 ) - ( 
247,59) ,PSET,BF: : HDRAW" BM8 , 78C14 
R40NU74E18U54R40D72R100NU72E18U5 
4" 

1020 HPAINT(10,10) , 13 , 14 : HPAINT ( 
120,10) ,13,14:HPAINT(60,10) ,14,1 
4 : HPAINT ( 2 10 , 10 ) , 14 , 14 : FORY=12TO 
54STEP14:HLINE(12,Y)-(42,Y+10) ,P 
SET , BF : HDRAW" BM12 , =Y ; C8NR30D10C4 
R30U10C14":NEXT 

1025 HDRAW"BM112,12C14R38D45L38N 
U45EC8U43R36C4D43L3 6BR4 6R3 8U43C8 
L38D43BGC14R40U45L40D45BE6R28U15 
BU3U15L28D15R28BD3L28D15BEC4U13R 
26C8D13L26BU18R26U13C4L26D13C0": 
HLINE(167,38) -C190,49) ,PSET,BF:H 
LINE (167, 31) -(190,20) ,PSET,BF 
1030 HC0L0R14, 0: HLINE (117, 15) -(1 
45,54), PSET , BF : FORY=25T044STEP19 
: FORX=2T09 : HCIRCLE ( 13 1 , Y) , X , 4 : NE 
XTX,Y:HDRAW"BM140,25C4D19LU19":F 
ORY=20TO38STEP18 : FORX=1TO10 : HSET 
(RND(21)+167,RND(10)+Y,RND(7) ) :N 
EXTX,Y:HDRAW"BM114,65C8R84BD4L84 
BD4R84BUC4L84BU4R84BU4L84 
1035 RETURN 

1040 P0KEP1,68:P0KEP2,68:EXECF1: 
FORY=8 0TO10 0STEP2 : HDRAW" BM8 , =Y ; C 
12R239":NEXT:HDRAW"BM8,101C14E21 



« 



NM247 , 101" : HPAINT ( IjS , 1J3 ) , 14 , 14 x H 
DRAW»C8U73RD73BM162,78U2PM+16,+1 
D20M-16 , -1" : HPAINT ( 164 , 76) , 13 , 8 
1J845 HDRAW"BU17BR7R4FD5GL5HU5EBD 
2BRD3BR3U3BD8D3BL3U3BLBU2GD5FR5E 
U5HL5" : RETURN 

105j8 P0KEP1,34:P0KEP2,34:EXECF1: 
HCIRCLE( 120,70) ,70,14, .3:HCIRCLE 
(120,70) ,72,14, .4,0, .5:HCIRCLE(1 
20, 70) ,72,14, .9, .5,1: HPAINT ( 120 , 
96) ,13, 14: HPAINT (120, 1/8) ,13,14:H 
PAINT ( 120 , 70 ) , 3 , 14 : HCIRCLE ( 120 , 5 
0),20,14,.5,.6,.9 

1055 HDRAW"BM68,28C14D10L2H2G2L3 
R8BR105R2E2F2R3L9U10BM52 , 72E4F6E 
12F6E8F6E8F6E6F6E6F6E6F8E6F8E6F1 
2BM184 , 70G4H6G12H6G8H6G8H6G6H6G6 
H6G6H8G6H8G6H12G6" : HPAINT (66,32) 
,4,14: HPAINT ( 17 4 , 3 2 ) , 4 , 14 : HPAINT 
(12)8,54) ,4,14:RETURN 
1060 P0KEP1,68:P0KEP2,68:EXECF1: 
F0RY=6 1TO10 1 STEP 4 : HDRAW" BM8 , =Y ; C 
3R2 39": NEXT : Y=0 : FORX=0TO5 6STEP8 : 
HLINE ( 12 8+X , 6 1 ) - ( 12 8 +X+Y ,1)81) ,PS 
ET:HLINE(128-X,61)-(128-X-Y,101) 
,PSET: Y=Y+8:NEXT: 

1065 FORX=74T0176STEP16: HPAINT (X 
, 62 ) , 3 , 3 :NEXT: FORX=66TO188STEP20 
: HPAINT (X , 7 2 ) , 3 , 3 : NEXT : FORX=52TO 
202STEP24 : HPAINT (X, 80) , 3 , 3 :NEXT: 
FORX=35TO203STEP28 : HPAINT (X, 88) , 
3,3: NEXT : F0RX=2 4 TO 2 16 STEP 3 2 : HPAI 
NT(X,96) ,3,3:NEXT 

1070 FORX=80TO188STEP18 : HPAINT (X 

, 68) , 3 , 3 : NEXT : FORX=7 2 TO20 4 STEP2 2 

: HPAINT (X , 7 6 ) , 3 , 3 : NEXT : FORX=58TO 

2 14 STEP2 6 : HPAINT ( X , 8 4 ) , 3 , 3 : NEXT : 

FORX=4 5T02 2 5STEP30 : HPAINT ( X , 9 2 ) , 

3,3: NEXT : FORX=3 5T02 2 7STEP3 2 : HPAI 

NT(X,100) , 3,3:NEXT 

1075 HDRAW" BM8 , 60C14R23 9" :HCIRCL 

E (128, 101) ,100,14, .4, .5,l:HPAINT 

(10,70) ,15, 14: HPAINT (1)8, 10) ,8,14 

: FORX=8T02 4 6 STEP 4 : HDRAW" BM=X ; , 7C 

1D4 5 " : NEXT : HDRAW " BM2 47,60C0L239U 

2R2 3 9U2 L2 3 9U2R2 3 9U2NL2 3 9 C14U20L1 
0G8R18D20L18NU203L50E8U20NG8T.17Q 

D8NR171D20R171U20" 

1080 HPAINT (10, 50) ,10, 14: HPAINT ( 

240,50) ,10, 14: HPAINT (182, 50) ,9,1 

4 : HPAINT ( 10 , 35) 0 , 14 : HPAINT (240 , 

35) ,0,14:HDRAW"BM78,36C13U29R40D 

2 5G4NL3 6U10NL3 6U4NL3 6U15 " : HPAINT 

(80,32) ,13, 13: HPAINT (116, 32) ,14, 

13 : HPAINT (80, 10), 3, 13: HDRAW"BM84 

, 14C4F4R4E8R4F4DH4L4G8L4H 

1085 C=0:FORX=84TO104STEP10:HCOL 

ORC , 0 : HLINE ( X , 2 3 ) - ( X+ 6 , 2 5 ) , PS ET , 

BF : C=C+l : NEXT : RETURN 

1090 POKEP1,0:POKEP2,0:EXECF1:HD 

RAW"BM58 , 80C14F6R128E6U58H6L128G 



The Coco Graphics Designer pro- 
duces beautiful Greeting Cards, 
Banners, and Signs for holidays, 
birthdays and other occasions. 

The program features picture, 
border, and character font editors, 
so that you can modify or expand 
the already built in libraries. Plus 
a special "grabber" utility is in- 
cluded to capture areas of high 
esolution screens for your picture 
ibrary. 

Requirements: a Coco I, II or 111 
with at least 32K, one disk drive, 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 or 
JDOS. Printers supported in- 
clude: Epson RX/FX, Gemini 10X, 
SG10, NX10, C-ltoh 8510, DMP 



Coco Graphics Designer 

Only $29.95 



100/105/110/130/430 CGP220, 
many Okidata (check with Ze- 
bra), Seikosha GP1 00/250, Goril- 
la Banana, Legend 808. 
#C323 Coco Graphics Designer 



Picture Disk #1 

This supplementary picture li- 
brary diskette contains over one 
hundred additional pictures. 
#C333 Picture Disk #1 $1 4.95 



Colored Paper Packs 

150 sheets (50 each red, yellow, 
blue) with 60 matching enve- 
lopes. Perfect for making your 
productions outstanding. 
#C274 Paper Pack $1 9.95 




It's fun making your own Greeting Cards, Signs, and Banners with Ze- 
bra's Coco Graphics Designer. 



WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Only $29.95 

Order Cat#TBRS01 
(Originally $6955) 

WICO designed these trackballs 
specifically for the Radio Shack 
Color Computer joystick port. 

WICO is the largest designer 
and manufacturer of control de- 
vices for commercial arcade vid- 
eo games. If you've ever played 
an arcade video game, chances 
are youVe used a WICO joystick 
or trackball and experienced its 
superior control, pinpoint firing 
accuracy, and exceptional dura- 
bility. 

Includes one-year limited 




warranty. Phoenolic ball offers 
360-degree movement. Two opti- 
cal encoders provide spfft-second 
response. Quick-action fire but- 
ton for smooth, two handed ar- 
cade response and feel. Long 5" 
computer connection. Heavy duty 
plastic case for long hard use. 
Compatible with all color comput 
er models. 

We also have trackballs for 
Atari, Atari ST, Commodore 64, 
Amiga, Macintosh, Apple 1 1/1 10, 
and TI99/4A computers. 



Ordering Instructions: All or- 
ders add $3.00 Shipping & Han- 
dling. UPS COD add $3.00. VI- 
SA/MC Accepted. NY residents 
add sales tax. 



Zebra Systems, Inc. 

78-06 Jamaica Avenue 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 61 



NEW 

DISK 
DRIVES 



95 



Starting at 



89 



with case & 
Power Supply 
129.95 




TANDON MPI TEAC 

Speed 6ms tk to tk and up 
Capacity 250k unformatted 
Tracks 40 

Warranty now 1 Year 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!! 

ALL DRIVES FULLY TESTED AND WARRANTEED 

We carry only the finest quality disk drives 
no seconds • no surplus 



New Low Price! 




/ 40Tks6Ms 
Double Sided 
Double Density 



40 or 80 Tracks 
1 /2 Hght. Teac/ Panasonic 




Free Software for Drive 0 Systems 

CoCo Checker...Test roms, rams, disk drives and & controller printer, keyboard cassette & more. 
Tape/Disk Utility...Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



169 



95 



Drive 0 



• Full Ht Drive 

• Single Case 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & manuals 



189 



95 



Drive 0 



• Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



289 



95 



Drive 0 & 1 



• 2 Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



Other Drive Specials 



119 



95 



2nd Drive 

for new Radio Shack 
includes: 

• Slim Line DS/DD Drive 

• Cabling & Instructions 

• Mounting Hardware 



Drives cleaned, aligned & tested, 29 



95 



Full Ht Drive 89 95 

Full Ht Drive Ps/Case.. 129 95 

Slim Line Drive 99 95 

Slim Line Drive Ps/Case... 139 95 
2 Slim Drives Ps/Case . 239 95 
Disk Controller 59 95 



Single Ps & Case 

Dual 1 /2ht Ps & Case 

Dual Full Ht. Ps & Case 
Disk Controller 



10 Diskettes 

with free library case 



4495 
5495 

79 95 
59 95 

9 95 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 
617-278-6555 




V 



TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 



We welcome 

• Visa/ Mastercard 

• Checks (allow 2 weeks for clearing) 
•C.O.D. Add $2. 



9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 

Hours: Mon.-Sat., 9-6 (EST) 



Call us today I 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



Software Included 

• Pc-Write word processor 

• Pc-Calc Spreadsheet 

• Pc-File Database 

• Print Spooler 

• Ram Disk 

• Runs all popular software 




IBM XT 
COMPATIBLE 



Complete 
system 



only 



699 



95 



Hardware Included 

4.77 mhz and 8mhz Turbo 
360k Floppy Disk Drive 
Monochrome or Color Card 
At style Case w/pwr light & key 
Game, Printer and Serial Port 
Real Time Clock 
150 watt power supply 
640k memory 

At keyboard optional expanded 
Monochrome Monitor 
Optional Hard Disk Drive 




PRINTER CABLES AND 
INTERFACES AVAILABLE 
Call for current pricing 



PRINTERS 




NX10 (New 120CPS NLQ 80 col.) 

19995 

t 

NX15 (New 120CPS NLQ 132 col.) 349^ 

PANASONIC PRINTER H -7 OQ c 

10801 (New 120CPS NLQ 80 col.) I lif 3 

Complete Packages 



10801 



229 95 



NX10 



25995 



includes: includes: 

• Panasonic 10801 Printer • Star NX10 Printer 

• Interface • Interface 

• Screen Dump Program • Screen Dump Program 





Serial to Parallel Interface 
for Color Computer I, II, III 



• 300- 1 9,200 BAUD rates only 

• External to printer — No AC plugs 

• Built in modem/printer switch — 
No need for Y-cables or plugging/ 
unplugging cables Power SU PP'V + 500 



54 



95 



64K Upgrades 
Video Driver 



1995 



29 



95 



Enables your CoCo to operate with a video monitor 
instead of a television! 



w 



TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 

9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 




Screen Dump Program 19 95 

The best screen dump program for the Epson & 
Star printers ever!! Have the option of standard 
images reverse w/regular or double sized pictures. 

Dealer Inquiries invited 
617-278-6555 

Call us today! 617-278-6555 
Order Toll Free 1 -800-635-0300 



6D58" : HPAINT (62 , 8)3) , 13 , 14 :G0SUB2 

I) 3 

1J895 HC0L0R8,)3:HPRINT(1#, 3) , "RAI 
NBOW CARD" :HPRINT (9 , 9) , "Member: 
L. Falk" :HPRINT (4 , 11) , "Press But 
ton to Continue" :GOSUB17)3:JX=XJ: 
JY=YJ:CD=)3 

II) 3)3 IFBUTT0N(BU)THEN25ELSE11J3)3 

II) 35 P0KEP1,136:P0KEP2,136:EXECF 
l:R$="TOTAL DARKNESS" :GOT08j3 

III) 3 HSCREEN2:HCLS13 

1115 HDRAW"C8BRlj3BU2L6C3HR8ELlj3C 

8HR12E12LG12": RETURN: 'CLUB 

1120 HDRAW"C8BR15BU2R8UL8ER6UL6E 

R4UL4M-3 , -lRlpUC3Ll)3C8UL12UR22DL 

1)3U2R4 " : RETURN : 1 GUN 

1125 HDRAW"C8NE16RE16D4L1)3U4F16U 

H15 " : RETURN : 1 WIRE CUTTER 

113)3 HDRAW"C8BU8BR2E4F4G4H4RE3F3 

G3H3R2J3D3LU2L4D2LU2L4D2LU2L2":RE 

TURN : 1 KEY 

1135 HDRAW"BU6BR6C1)3R12EL14HR16B 

EC3L18BHC8R2)3UL2£BEC1R18BHC1)3L16 

ER14HL12 " : RETURN : 1 BURGER 

1140 F0RK=1T06:HCIRCLE(0X+12,0Y- 

1)3) ,K,14: NEXT: RETURN: 'SILVER DOL 

LAR 

1145 HDRAW"C4BE10R6HL4ER2H" :RETU 
RN: 'TOOTH 

115) 3 HDRAW"C4BR7BU6C4R1)3UL1)3UR1)3 
UL1J3UR1)3UL1)3ERBR6RC8BD3L2BL5NUNR 
NDNL" : RETURN : ' BATTERY 

1155 HDRAW"BE4C1R14UL14UR14UL14U 
R14UL14UR14UL14UC9R16UNL12UNL8D1 
)3LU4NL14U5" : RETURN: 1 CAKE 

116) 3 HDRAW" C4 BU8 BR4R2 EL4 ER18 FL4F 
R2BU2BHL16HR18EL4ER2BL16L2GR4" :R 
ETURN : 1 BONE 

1165 HDRAW" C3BR3U15RD15RU15RD15R 
U15RD15RU15RD15RU15RD15RU15ND15B 
LC8U2E2LG2D2BD7HLGLUR": RETURN: 'G 
AS 

117) 3 HDRAW"C4BE4R16UL16UR16UL16U 
Rl 6UL1 6UR1 6UL1 6UR1 6UL1 6UR1 6UL1 6 C 
8F8E8L16D12R16U12" :RETURN: 'LETTE 

R 

1175 HDRAW"C8BR13U6L2D6RU6L6U6ED 
7RU8ED9RU1J3ED11RU12FD11RU1)3FD9RU 
8FD7RU6" : RETURN: 'SHOVEL 

118) 3 HDRAW"C4BR8BU6R10EL12UR12UL 
12UR12HL1J3D2 C14 DEFREBR2 DERF " : RET 
URN: 'CARD 

1185 HDRAW"C8BR3BU6F2G2U4D2R5EF2 
E2F2E2F2ER2": RETURN: 'DRILL 

119) 3 IFOY=18 6THENRETURNELSEHDRAW 
"BM216 , l)3)3CHBR2UlpRl)3BD2D8NLl)3M 
+13 , -8U8NM-13 , + 6L1J3NM-13 , +6U8M-1 



3 , + 6 D8HU6GD4 " : HPAINT (221, 98), 9,1 
1 : HPAINT (225, 88), 1,11: HPAINT (225 
,82) ,3,11:RETURN: ' TREASURE 
1195 HDRAW" C2BE4BR4U8RD8RU8RD8RU 
8RD8RU8D3E2RFD4L4": RETURN: 'CUP 
12)3)3 HDRAW " C 8 BU9 BR3 R7 DL7 DR7 DL7 DR 
7L4U2G5D13G9RE8U13E5RG5D13G9":RE 
TURN 

12)35 FORY=8)3T01)3)3STEP2)3:FORX=8TO 
233STEP25 : HDRAW" BM=X ; , =Y ; C8R25U2 
)3L25D2)3":NEXTX,Y 

121) 3 RESTORE :BU= PEEK (Fl+88 ) :JH=B 
U: JV=JH+1:PR=)3 

1215 CL$="BM2)3,l)3C4R4j3BDBL8L4j3BD 
BR4R4)3BDBL3C13L3)3BR3)5BD4R3)3C4BEL 
AjS BUBR2 )3R3)3 BEL3 5 BR7)3 BUR4 )3 BDBL1)3 L 
4)3BDBR5C13R14BR4)3BD2R14BUBRlpC4L 
4)3BUBRl)3R4j3BUBR4L4)3":FS$="C13R8B 
EC4RL12HLR16BEC3RL2)3RBEC4R16LHL1 
2RBEC13R8 

122) 3 F0RK=1T034:READR$(K) :NEXT:D 
ATASubway,City Street, Pizza Hut 

Entrance, Pizza Hut, McDonald's 
Entrance, McDonalds, Locksmith Ent 
ranee , Locksmith Shop,Gunshop Ent 
ranee , Gunshop , Gol f Course , Ocean , 
Sharks! , Beach, Chain Fence, Carniv 
al, Shooting Gallery 
1225 DATATunnel , Graveyard , Pastur 
e,Iron Fence, Iron Gate,Falsoft P 
arking Lot,Falsoft West Bldg,,Pa 
sture, Pasture, Hospital Parking L 
ot, Hospital Entrance, Hall, Comput 
er Room, Corner, Battle Ground, Bea 
ch, Ocean 

123) 3 X=l:FORK=Fl+252TOFl+65)3STEP 
2:R(X)=PEEK(K) : A(X) =PEEK(K+1) :X= 
X+l:NEXT 

1235 D()3)=8:D(1)=4:D(2)=2:D(3)=1 
: FORK=)3T04 : V (K) =-1 : NEXT 

124) 3 FORK=)3T029:READO$(K) ,0(K) :N 
EXT 

1245 DATAQuarter Pounder, 2)3, Lase 
r Gun , 6)3 , Femur Bone, 161, Golf Clu 
b, 12)3, Chocolate Cake, 4 8, Cup of C 
of fee, 48, PLUG, 43, Shark's Tooth, 1 
58, Wire Cutters, 173 

125) 3 DATAShovel,132,Key,4)3,Plast 

ic Card, 190, Silver Dollar, 1)38 , Dr 
ill , 10 , Letter, 24 , Gas , 27 , Gas , 80 , G 
as, 2)3)3, Gas, 192 , Gas, 171, Gas, 181, G 
as , 6 1 , Gas , 8 8 , Battery ,76, Battery , 
159, Battery, 148 , Battery, 1)31, Batt 
ery, 86, Battery, 111, Battery, 47 
1255 F0RK=3)3T035:0(K)=)3:NEXT 

126) 3 R=51:X=314:Y=4: JX=X: JY=Y:RE 
TURN 



L_ _____ 

64 THE RAINBOW February 1988 
























' ' % 9 • T ^ f 1 M 


LBilLlililJ 







ou've heard stories throughout the village that there are jewels hidden in a nearby 
castle. Supposedly, the jewels are the famous South American Crown jewels that 
were lost years ago. According to legend, a lost king found the castle in the forest 
just beyond the village and decided to take shelter there. He never left and 
eventually died peacefully with his precious stones. 

You quickly decide you must find the castle and the jewels. As the stories go, many others 
have gone before you, yet not one of them has ever returned. The jewels might already have 
been found. Also, some danger obviously exists, but it is a chance you feel you must take. 
After all, you are strong and wise. You have every confidence you can find the treasure. 

After weeks of searching the forest, you finally stumble across a large fortress of a 
castle. All that remains is to find the jewels hidden inside. Or is it? 

Loading and Playing 

The Castle of Death is a text Adventure that will run on any CoCo with Extend- 
ed Color BASIC. Due to memory limitations, in order to play the game on a 
16K machine you must use a cassette-based system and enter POKE 2S, 
6: NEW before loading. This will clear enough memory for the program. 
If you have 32K of memory or more, you don't need to enter this 
command. 

The Castle of Death involves a maze of rooms. Because of the nature of 
this Adventure, it would be very wise to map your progress through the castle. 
To move from room to room through the passageways, use the commands 

Chinarut Ruangchotvit is 14 years old and lives in Ramsey, New Jersey, 
He has been programming on the Color Computer for the past three 
years. 





FebFLia ry 1 9SB THE. MBO W 65 



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All monitors require an amplifier cir- 
cuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer. 
They attach with spring connectors 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one for audio and one for 
video. CoCo 3 does not require an 
amplifier circuit. 

VA-1 for monochrome monitors only, 
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$220 

+ $14 Shipping 




drive o + ■ Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only Double sided double density 360| 

$178 45 ™3i _ 

(s 5 shipping) ^ W 

Add $34 for a Dlsto DC-3. 



ju-4 uisk controller 

I K 

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GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee Is meant to eliminate the uncertainty- 
of dealing with a company through the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for any 
reason, return It in 30 days and we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) 

Shipping charges are for 48 states. 

APO, Canada and Puerto Rico orders are higher. 



DISK CONTROLLER 




Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 



ROM Chip. 

$98 



DISTO 



DC-3 



c 

ADD-ON 

DC-38 includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and all 
software $1 38 

DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM $QQ 

DC512 512K RAM Board with 
software $125 

DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port Q $40 



$2 shipping on all DISTO products 



BOARDS 



DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer in- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips Q 



2764 8K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 

27128 16K Eprom 28 pin 

«8 S0 each 
1 FREE Eprom W/DC-3P order 
effective thru 12/15/87 

C-DOS 3 28 pin Eprom makes Disto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

•20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 



Payrol/BAS™ /So M 

* (*2 shipping) 

• Nonprotected basic is modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
federal calculation 

• Custom code for each state (*25 option) 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 

• Print payroll and nonpayroll 
checks 



TM 



Payrol/BAS 
30 Day Trial 

$29.95 



VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package in- 
cludes VIP Writer Terminal Data 
Base, Calc and Disk Zap which 
can fix a diskette that is giving I/ 
O errors 



$125 



reg. *149 (* 2 shipping 



MEMORY 

Memory for CoCo 3 PC memory 
board plugs into the spare slots 
inside the computer and is pop- 
ulated with 256K ram chips. 
Completely solderless with com- 
plete easy to install instructions. 

$89.95 

PC Memory board without RAM 

•49.50 

Software spooler and RAM disk 

for lightning quick response or no 
disk swapping drive backup for 1 
drive system and printer spooler to 
free computer during long listings. 
For CoCo 3 with $19 45 

on Memory 



WE REPAIR 

DISK DRIVES 

MONITORS 

CONTROLLERS 



512K RAM 
($2 shipping 

products) 



Send them UPS prepaid 
to Howard Medical with 
your daytime telephone 
number and we will call 
with a cost to repair. 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 

ORDERS INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(800) 443-1444 = (312) 278-1440 




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The Bigge st 
The Best 
The \ndispensab\e 




THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
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Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
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Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
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Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
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CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 




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& Rainbow On Disk! 



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Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
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Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
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RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
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To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
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Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 



Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
THE RAINBOW today! 

YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 
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VIP Writer III 

WORD PROCESSOR • SPELLING CHECKER • PRINT SPOOLER 

"..Nearly every feature and option possible to implement on the Color Computer. The design of the program 
is excellent; the programming is flawless." -The RAINBOW OCTOBER 1983 
That's what they said about VIP Writer. Wait until they review VIP Writer III! We've added even 
more features and options to make the VIP Writer III the BEST word processor for the CoCo 3! 



SCREEN DISPLAY OPTIONS 

VIP Writer III has a screen of 32, 40, 64 or 80 characters wide by 24 lines 
using the CoCo 3's hardware display with actual lower case letters. You 
can choose foreground and background colors from up to 64 different hues. 
Color can be turned ON or OFF for the best possible display using a color 
or monochrome monitor or TV set. VIP Writer III has a built in on-line 
context sensitive help facility which displays command usage in easy to 
read colored windows. VIP Writer III also runs at double clock speedl 

TEXT FILE STORAGE 

There is a 48K text buffer and disk or cassette file linking allowing virtually 
unlimited text space. In addition, there is a 48K print spooler to allow you 
to print one document while editing another. 

EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer III has a full featured screen editor which can be used to edit 
text with lines up to 240 characters long with or without automatic word 
wrap around. You can select type-over mode or insert mode. There is 
even an OOPS command to recall a cleared text buffer. Other editing 
features include: Type-ahead, typamatic key repeat and key beep for 
flawless text entry, end of line bell, full four way cursor control with 
scrolling, top of textfile, bottom of textfile, page up, page down, top of 
screen, bottom of screen, beginning of line, end of line, left one word, right 
one word, DELETE character, to beginning or end of line, word to the left 
or right, or entire line, INSERT character or line, LOCATE and/or 
CHANGE or DELETE single or multiple occurrence using wildcards t 
BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to TEN simultaneous block 
manipulations, TAB key and programmable tab stops, three 
PROGRAMMABLE FUNCTIONS to perform tasks such as auto column 
creation and disk file linking for continuous printing. 

TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you to 
format your text in any way you wish. You can change the top, bottom, 
left or right margin and page length. You can set your text flush left, 
center or flush right. You can turn right hand justification on or off. You 
can have headers, footers page numbers and TWO auxiliary lines which 
can appear on odd, even or all pages. You can also select the line on which 
they appear! You can even change the line spacing! All of these format 
parameters can be altered ANYWHERE within your text file. 

TEXT FILE COMPATIBILITY 

VIP Writer III creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all other 
VIP Programs as well as other programs which use ASCII file format. You 
can use VIP Writer III to create BASIC, assembly, PASCAL or C files. 
VIP Writer III also allows you to save and load files using DISK or 
CASSETTE in the case of an emergency. You can even read disk 
directories, display free space on a disk and kill disk files. 

© IEintl<sir]pirils<&s 

P.O Box 1233. Gresham, OR. 97030 
Ph. (503) 663-2865 



PREVIEW PRINT WINDOW 

The VIP Writer III features an EXCLUSIVE format window which allows 
you to preview your document BEFORE SENDING IT TO YOUR 
PRINTER! You are able to see margins, page breaks, orphan lines etc. 
This feature makes hyphenation a snap! 

PRINTING 

VIP Writer III supports most any printer serial or parallel using the parallel 
interface described in Nov-Dec. '87 RAINBOW magazine, or an external 
serial to parallel interlace, and gives you the ability to select baud rates 
from 1 10 to 9600. You are able to imbed printer control codes anywhere in 
your text file EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT! VIP Writer III also has 
twenty PROGRAMMABLE PRINTER SEQUENCES which allow you to 
easily control all of your printers capabilities such as underline, bold, italics, 
superscript and subscript using simple keystrokes. Additional printer 
features include: single sheet pause, print pause, word length and line feed 
selection. 

PRINT SPOOLING 

VIP Writer ill incorporates a built in print spooler which allows you to print 
one document WHILE you are editing another. You no longer have to wait 
until your printer is done printing before starting another job! 

DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer ill is supplied with a 125 page instruction manual which includes a 
tutorial, glossary of terms and a complete index. The manual is well 
written and includes many examples to aid in understanding and application. 

SPELLING CHECKER 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller for NO ADDITIONAL COST! VIP 
Speller automatically checks text files for words to be corrected, marked 
for special attention or even added to the dictionary. You can even view 
the misspelled word in context! VIP Speller comes with a specially edited 
50,000 word dictionary, and words can be added to or deleted from the 
dictionary or you can create one of your own. 

THE ORIGINAL VIP WRITER 

VIP Writer is also available for CoCo 1 and 2 owners and has ail the 
features found in the VIP Writer HI including VIP Speller except for the 
following: The screen display is 32, 51 , 64 or 85 columns by 21 or 24 rows. 
Colors other than green, black or white are not supported. Help is not 
presented in colored windows. Double clock speed is not supported. Parallel 
printer interface is not supported. Printer spooler is not available. Even so, 
the VIP Writer is a CoCo 1 or 2 owners best choice in word processors. 




VIP Writer III 
VIP Writer 
VIP Speller 



Disk $79.95 
Disk $69.95 
Disk $34.95 



Please add $3.00 for shipping and handling. COD orders add an 
additional $2.00. Personal checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. All 
orders shipped the same day. 



UP, DOWN, LEFT and RIGHT. Obviously, 
there is more than one floor to this 
castle. When referring to a door or 
window, you must specify its location. 
For example, to open a door on your 
left enter OPEN LEFT DOOR. Any time 
you open a door or window, you auto- 
matically go through it to the next 
room. 

When the Adventure starts, you will 
have 40 strength points. If, during the 
course of your travels, your strength 
should drop to zero, you will lose one 
of your two "lives." (You are given a 
second chance.) 

Many dangers lurk within the walls 
of the castle. You will have to fight many 
foes. Upon entering a room that con- 



tains an enemy, you will be forced to 
fight at least one round (a round con- 
sists of each combatant having one turn 
to hit the other). After each round, you 
will be given the option of continuing 
the fight or trying to escape. Make your 
decision carefully as some foes carry 
objects of great importance to your 
success. If you don't try to escape, the 
fight will continue until one of the 
combatants dies. 

As you travel through the castle, be 
sure to use the SERRCH command to find 
any objects hidden in a particular room. 
Of course, many rooms will not contain 
any such items. 

The STRTUS command is used to 
determine your general condition and 



keep track of your current possessions. 
Enter SCORE to get a report on the 
number of moves you have made. 

To save a game in progress, enter 
SfiVE, then follow the prompts. When 
prompted for a filename, make sure 
your tape or disk is ready before press- 
ing ENTER. The LORD command works 
in the same manner. 

One final word: The Castle of Death 
can be solved many different ways. The 
object is to complete the Adventure in 
as few moves as possible. Good Luck! 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 242 Davidson A venue, Ram- 
sey, NJ 07446. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing for a response.) □ 




90 109 

210 10 

370 239 

470 73 

495 25 

506 128 

530 179 

548 213 



745 57 

880 137 

1080 54 

2040 175 

5300 233 

5640 92 

7000 99 

END 207 



The listing: CASTLE 

0 GOTO20 

1 FORX=1TO3000: NEXT: RETURN 

2 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN 2 

3 PLAY " T2 01L8B 11 : RETURN 

4 PRINT" IT HITS YOU FOR"X"UNITS 
OF DAMAGE" : HP=HP-X : PLAYD$ : 
RETURN 

5 GOSUB1:GOTO200 

6 PRINT "BUT LUCKILY IT MISSES" :G 
OTO3000 

7 PLAY"T2L4P203CP96CL3FL4P24CFAP 
6 4 C FAP 6 4 C F AF AO 4 CO 3 AF C P6 4 C P9 6 CL3 F 
" : RETURN 

8 PRINT"EXCUSE ME BUT I DON'T HA 
VE THAT "A$" IN MY VOCABULARY" : G 
OTO410 

9 PRINT "THAT IS NOT POSSIBLE" :GO 
TO410 

I 0 FORX= 1TO 1 2 00 : NEXT : RETURN 

II PRINT" PLEASE INDICATE WHICH " 
A$:GOTO410 

20 CLEAR300:CLS3:PRINTl§72, "C A S 
T L E O F" ; : PRINTO140 , "D EAT 
H"; :PRINT@226, "BY: " ; :PRINT@295, 

"CHINARUT" ; : PRINT@3 63 , "RUANGCHOT 

VIT"; 

50 HP=40:DIM DL(67) , DR(67) ,B(67) 
,R(67) ,LU(67) ,LD(67) ,E(67) ,M(67) 
,P(67) ,WR(67) ,WL(67) ,A(67) ,0(69) 



90 FORX=8T055:READDL(X) : NEXT: FOR 
X=7T054 : READDR (X) : NEXT : FORX=2T06 
3 : RE ADB ( X ) : NEXT : FORX= 2 TO 9 : READR ( 
X) : NEXT : R ( 20 ) =1 : FORX=2 8T03 3 : READ 
R(X) :NEXT:R(43)=1:R(55)=1:R(59)= 
1 

150 FORX=3T055:READLU(X) :NEXT:FO 
RX= 14 TO 6 6 : RE ADLD ( X ) : NEXT : FORX=5 7 
T066:READWR(X) : NEXT : FORX=57T064 : 
READWL(X) :NEXT 

175 E(5)=1:E(24)=1:E(26)=1:E(35) 
=1:A(2)=1:A(9)«1:A(19)=1:A(28)=1 
:P(2)»1:P(13)=1:P(15)-1:P(17)=1: 
P(21)«1:P(31)-1:P(26)-1:P(38)»1: 
P ( 4 4 ) =1 : P ( 50 ) =1 : FORX=5T057 : READM 
(X) :NEXT 

181 VL$="DROGETLOOOPEPULPUSUP DO 
WGO LEFRIGSAVLOADRISCORAI" : NL$=" 
TRALE FRI GROPBUTS I DE LE DOOWINGA 
TPASLADSKESPEBROPOTKEYJEWMED 
185 F$="YOU FIND ":M$="A MEDALLI 
ON":T$="A BROADSWORD" :X$=" A MAGI 
CAL SPEAR" :W$="A GOLDEN KEY":Z$= 
"WHEN YOU RAISE THE KEY, A ":Y$=" 
MAGICALLY ":L$=" ON THE LEFT" :R 
$=" ON THE RIGHT" :G$="A LADDER G 
OING ":S$=STRING$(3 2,175) :R=2:ML 
=2:D$="T2L401DDD 
2)3)3 IFR=1THEN52£0 

210 IFR=120RR=2?ORR=340RR=450RR= 
56THEN5300 

211 IFHP<=J3THENQ=1:G0T0932 

215 IFR-llORR=47ORR=53THEN400j3 

22p IFG=1THEN240 

230 IFM(R)=lTHEN60j3 

240 G=0:SI=0:PL=0:PR=j3 

250 CLS:PRINT"I SEE:",,S$ 

260 IF(R0=1ANDR=2)0RR=3THENPRINT 

"A TRAP DOOR 

265 IFR*67THENPRINT H JEWELS" , , "A 
SKELETON 

270 IFDL(R) =1THENPRINT"A DOOR"L$ 



68 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



NEW FROM ARK ROYAL! 



N eW Pro Football: Strategy Gridiron game (CC3128KHRB) $20 

N eW Okinawa: The Big Invasion (CC64K D HR ML) $27 

N eW Blitzkrieg West: A Bigger Bulge (CC64KDHR ML) $27 

n eW Bataan: Historical & Hypothetical games in one (CC64K D HR ML) $29 

N EW Desert Fox: Rommel (CC64KDHR MLS) : $27 

N eW Task Force: Modern Naval War in the Med (CC64KDHR MLS) $27 

^dED D DAY: The 6th of June (CC64K HR ML) $25 

UP G RAD eD Battle H y mn: Battle of Gettysburg (CC64K D HR ML) , 

uP ^pED Company Commander: Squad level Wargame (CC32K SG MLIS) ^Q^V 
uP (House to House Module included in Company Commander) 



Additional Models for Company Commander 3.0 

River Crossing mfJf *. . 

i^E^ Gemini « V] » . ^ , . .•*_« * . ....... r . »*» ^ . » 

HEW Cauldron 





$25 



■ • * l * : : « .*■■•■ h * * » • 



.... 



• • • • . • 




. ■ . ■ . S^* iy* 1 * ■ ■* * * • * 

ueW Beach Head . . ft . . . . 

Fire One! Submarine Simulation (CC3 D HR B) 
Luftflotte: Battle of Britain (CC32K SG MLS) . 
Stalingrad: The turning point. (CC64K HR ML) 
Final Frontier: War in Space (GC32K D HR MLS) . 
Fire & Steel: Waterloo Campaign (CC64K D HR MLS) 
Barbarossa: The War in Russia (CC64K HR ML) 




■ a * * 




• ■ • » » 



« < « * « » 



4- ■ * . ■ .* ' i* • « » »■ »■ 



m m f 



• . . . 



* • * • . .. » ■ • « • . ■ a 

• '* .,•'» ♦ # k. * . 1 • i 



•i- 4 h r 



4 ■ « " • ' • ft • 



1 • 



RedStar: Nato viWarsaw Pact (CC32K D HR ML) 
DarkHorse: RedStar Sequel (CC64K D HR ML) . 
Midway: The Turning Point in the Pacific (CC32K HR MLS) v . 
Escape From Denna; Dungeons! (CC32K SG MLS) 
Tunis: War in the Desert (CC32K SG B) 
Battle of the Bulge 1 or 2 player (CC32K SG B) 
Phalanx: Alexander the Great (CC32K HR ML) 
Rubicon II: Invasion game (CC32K SG B) 
Guadalcanal: America Strikes Back (CC32K SG MLS) 

Waterloo: Napoleon (CC32K SG MLS) . . < \ . P iJv 

Bomber Command: Strategic Bombing Mission (CC32K SG MLS) . 
Kamikaze: Naval War in the Pacific (CC32K HR B) ^SW^V 
Starblazer: Strategy Star Trek (CC32K SG MLS) . 
Mission Empire: Build an Empire in Space (CC32K SG B) 
Galactic Taipan: Economics in Space (CC32K SG B) 
Keyboard General: Bi-monthly newsletter yearly sub 
Barbarossa, Luftflotte, Battle Hymn (256K) available Tandy 1000 
New for the Tandy 1000: * jggj 

Gray Storm Rising: War in the North Atlantic ..... w ..:?yf $25 

Codes CC — Color Computer, all versions CC3 CoCo 3 pnl/ 
D — Disk only (no D means program available tape or disk) 
HR — High Resolution SG — Semigraphics ML 
MLS — Machine Language Subroutines B — Basic 




■ n ■ r r 



$17. 
$17 
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$25 
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$15 £ 
$15 
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ARK ROYAL GAMES 

P.O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 
(904) 786-8603 



275 I FR= 2 THENPRI NT 11 THE GATE 

276 IFR=54ANDKD=0THEN300 

277 IFWD=1ANDR=54THEN300 

280 IFDR(R) =1THENPRINT"A DOOR"R$ 
29 0 IFR=41ORR=50THENPRINT"A SIDE 
DOOR 

300 IFR(R)-1THENPRINT"A ROPE FRO 
M THE CEILING 

310 IFB(R)=1THENPRINT"A BUTTON 0 
N THE WALL 

320 IFWL(R)=1THENPRINT"A WINDOW" 
L$ 

325 I FWW= 1ANDR= 6 3 THEN 3 4 0 

330 IFWR(R) =1THENPRINT"A WINDOW" 

R$ 

340 I FR= 3 ORR= 6 ORR= 10 OR ( W 1= 1ANDR= 
19) 0RR=160RR=180RR=270RR=51THENP 
RINT"A SIDE WINDOW" :SI=1 
345 IFR=44ANDKL=0THEN360 
350 IFLU(R)=1THENPRINTG$"UP 
360 I FLD ( R ) = 1THE NPRI NTG $ " DOWN 
370 IFE (R) =1THENPRINT"AN ELEVATO 
R 

380 IFR=2 0RR=6 10RR= 6 2 ORR= 65THENP 

RINT"A PASSAGE"L$:PL=1 

385 IFR=60ORR=61ORR=64THENPRINT" 

A PASSAGE "R$:PR=1 

390 IFO(l)=R THENPRINTT$ 

392 IFO(2)=R THENPRINTX$ 

394 IFO(3)=R THENPRINTW$ 

395 IFO(R+2)=R THENPRINT"A POTIO 
N 

396 IFO(0)=R THENPRINTM$ 

410 PRINTS$; : LINE INPUT "NOW WHAT 
->" ;A$ 

415 IFLEN (A$) <2THEN410 

416 MO=MO+l: J$=LEFT$ (A$,3) 

417 IFJ$="STA"THEN990 

418 IFJ$="SEA"THEN543 

420 V$=LEFT$(A$, 3) :N$="" 

421 IFLEN (A$)<6THEN455 

43)3 N=INSTR(A$," ") :N$=MID$ (A$, N 
+1.3) 

455 D=INSTR(A$," DO") :W=INSTR(A$ 
, w WI") 

460 V=<ENSTR(VL$,V$) :IFV=0THENA$= 
"VERB":GOT08 

470 N=INSTR(NL$,N$) :IFN=0THENA$= 
"NOUN":GOT08 

48)3 V=(V+2)/3:ON V GOT0527 , 516 , 4 
85,502,509,51)3,511,512,513,514,5 
15,5400,5500,537,538,539 

485 I FN=2 50RD> 9 THENPRINT "IF YOU 
ASK ME, THEY ARE JUST NORMAL 
WOODEN DOORS" :GOTO410ELSEIFN=2 80 
RW> 9 THENPRI NT " HMMM • . .IT APPEARS 
TO BE VERY DARK OUTSIDE" : GOTO 
410 

486 I FN= 1 3 ANDR ( R ) ^lTHENPRINT " IT 
LOOKS LIKE A NATURAL FIBER ROP 
E, SISAL I THINK" :G0T04 10 



487 IFN=16ANDB (R) =1THENPRINT"THE 
BUTTON LOOKS VERY WORN DOWN": GO 

TO410 

488 IFN=22ANDE (R) =1THENPRINT"IT 1 
S A ROTTEN, WOODEN ELEVATOR WIT 
H A RUSTED PULLEY ON IT":GOTO410 

489 IFN=43ANDSP=1THENPRINT"IT I S 
A FINELY CRAFTED SPEAR INDEE 
D":GOTO410 

490 IFN=46ANDSW=1THENPRINT"IT I S 
APPEARS TO BE VERY NEW AND HAS A 
N EYE OF THE TIGER NEAR THEHANDL 
E":GOTO410 

491 IFN=4 9 ANDP>0THENPRINT " THE PO 
TION IS A VERY DARK BLUE AND HA 
S A FOUL SMELL" :G0T04 10 

492 IFN=52ANDK=1THENPRINT"THE KE 

Y APPEARS TO BE MADE OUT OF PUR 
E GOLD":GOTO410 

493 IFN=1THENGOTO200 

494 IFN=31ANDR=2THENPRINT"IT IS 
A DOUBLE HINGED IRON GATE" : GOTO 4 
10 

495 IFN=34AND(PL=10RPR=1) THENPRI 
NT "MAYBE THE PASSAGE LEADS NOWHE 
RE, WHO KNOWS?" :G0T04 10 

496 IFN=37AND(LU(R)=10RLD(R)=:1)T 
HENPRINT"THEY 1 RE CARVED WOODEN L 
ADDERS" :G0T04 10 

497 IFN=40ANDR=67THENPRINT"IT , S 
AN UGLY HUMAN SKELETON" :G0T04 10 

498 IFN=5 5 ANDR=6 7 THENPRINT " I COU 
LD SWEAR IT'S THOSE JEWELS YOU'R 
E AFTER! ! " :GOTO410 

499 IFN=58ANDME=1THENPRINT"IT IS 
A VERY BEAUTIFUL SOLID GOLD 

MEDALLION" :G0T04 10 

500 IFN>42THENPRINT"YOU DO NOT H 
AVE IT " E LS E PRI NT " THE PRESENCE OF 

THAT IS ABSENT 

501 GOTO410 

502 IFN=31THENPRINT"IT IS ALREAD 

Y OPEN SIR":GOTO410 

503 IFW>9ORD>9THEN504ELSEIFN=25T 
HENA $= " DOOR" : GOTO 11ELSEI FN=2 8 THE 
NA$^"WINDOW" : G0T011ELSE9 

504 IFN-4AND(RO=10RR=3)THENGOT05 
550 

505 IFN=7AND(DL(R)=10RWL(R)=1)TH 
ENR=R-1:GOTO200 

506 IFN=10AND(DR(R)=1ORWR(R)=1)T 
HENR=R+1 : IFR=67THENGOSUB6000 : GOT 
O200ELSE200 

507 IFN=19ANDD>9AND(R=41ORR=50)T 
HENPRINT" YOU SMASH YOUR FACE INT 
0 A BRICKWALL AND TAKE A HI 
T POINT OF DAMAGE" :HP=HP-1: GOTO 
410 

508 IFN=19ANDW>9ANDSI=1THENG0T05 
750 

509 IFN=13ANDR(R)=1THEN1060ELSEP 



70 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



RINT"YOU ARE UNABLE TO DO THAT F 
EAT f, :GOTO410 

510 IFN=16ANDB(R)=1THEND=0:GOTO1 
# 4 9 E LS E PRI NT " THAT DIDN'T DO A TH 
ING":GOTO410 

511 IFLU(R)=1THENR=R+11:GOTO20J3E 
LSEPRINT"WHAT?? lf :GOTO410 

512 IFLD (R) =1THENR=R-11 z GOT02 j30E 
LSEPRINT "WHAT? ? " : GOT04 10 

513 IFN=22THENlj3£0ELSE9 

514 IFPL=1THENR=R-1:GOTO200ELSE9 

515 IFPR=1THENR=R+1:GOTO200ELSE9 

516 IFN=43ANDO(2)=R THENSP=1:0(2 
)=0:GOTO526 

517 IFN=46ANDO(l)=R THENSW=SW+1: 
O(1)=0:GOTO52 6 

518 IFN=49ANDO(R+2)=R THENP=P+1: 
O(R+2)=0:GOTO52 6 

519 IFN=52ANDO(3)=R THENK=1 : 0 (3 ) 
-0:GOTO526 

520 IFN=58ANDO (0) =R THENME=1 : PM= 
0:O(0)=0:GOTO526 

521 IFNO550RRO67THEN525 

522 IFPM=1THEN7000 

523 I FPM=0THENPRINT " THE SKELETON 
SUDDENLY RISES AND SAYS, DON'T 

YOU DARE TOUCH MY JEWELS ! ! HE 

THEN STRANGLES YOU TO DEATH SO 
YOU CAN ALSO LIE PEACEFULLY N 



EXT TO HIM WITH HIS JEWELS :HP= 
0:Q=1:R=2:GOTO932 

525 PRINT" I AM UNCAP ABLE OF TAKI 
NG THAT": GOTO 4 10 

52 6 PRINT" IT IS NOW TAKEN" : GOT04 
10 

527 IFN=43ANDSP=1THENSP=0:O(2)=R 
:GOT053 6 

528 IFN=46ANDSW>0THENSW=SW-1:O(1 
)=R:GOT0536 

529 IFN=49ANDP>0THENP=P-l:O(R+2) 
=R:GOT053 6 

530 IFN=52ANDK=1THENK=0:O(3)=R:G 
OT0536 

531 IFN=58ANDME=1THENME=0:O(0)=R 
: PRINT "FAINTLY, YOU HEAR A VOICE 

SAY THANK YOU," : PM=1 : GOTO410 

535 PRINT" I DON'T THINK YOU CAN 
DROP THAT" :GOTO410 

536 PRINT "YOU HAVE NOW DROPPED I 
T" :GOTO410 

537 IFN=49ANDP>0THENA=40-HP:PRIN 

T"AHHH THAT WAS REFRESHING, I 

T GIVES YOU"A"UNITS OF STRENGTH" 
: HP=40 : P=P-1 : G=l : GOT04 10ELSEIFP< 
=0ANDN=49THENPRINT"YOU DON'T HAV 
E ANY! ! !":GOTO410ELSEPRINT"I WOU 
LDN'T ADVISE THAT" : GOTO410 

538 MO=MO-l:PRINT"YOUR SCORE IS" 



CoCo 3 

ADDRESS FILE 

& 

ENVELOPE & LABEL ADDRESSING 

Automatically addresses ail standard envelopes or 
labels using a choice of size options for either!! 

THESE FILES HAY BE USED FOR RECORDS OTFCR THAN 
ADDRESSES!!! IMAGINATION IS ALL THAT'S NEEDED!!! 
There are 15 files that hold IS records per file! This 
TOTALS 270 APPOSES , or records that can be stored 
per disk!!They are divided alphabetically into the 15 
files where they are alphabetically arranqed!Each 
record can hold 8 lines of 64 characters per line!! 

WELL DOCUMENTED WHILE RUNNING + TYPED INSTRUCTIONS! 
10 MENU DRIVEN ROUTINES TO FULLY MANIPULATE FILES AND 
RECORDS INCLUDING? SEARCH; UPDATE AND DELETE!! 
UNLIMITED STORAGE CAPACITY WITH BACKUP DISKS YOU MAKE ! 
REQUIRES ; CoCo 3;Disk Drive?Printer5Monitor or TV! 

IM.Fi S0F1 WARE; R.R. #2; White Lake, Ontario; KOA 3L0 
PHONE (613) 623-7B24 

$14.95 U.S. FUNDS plus $3.00 Shipping and Handling. • 
Visa;Money Order or Personalized Check accepted! 
Ontario residents add 7/i Provincial Sales Tax. 




69 





To* »r* At lh» •nlranc* of « 
toj a br«l gonq, ami 

Pa«!?Ef» direct mn» W 




Tomb of Tien 

Legend and history. It is often 
hard to distinguish the two 
Until recently, you thought the tale of the 
great Emporer T'len was a myth, but ever 
since the sacred shrine of your village was 
stolen by a winged dragon, you have 
decided that there might be some truth to 
the old stories. Armed with a dull knife 
(probably good for nothing), you were 
chosen to retrieve the shrine and discover 
the secrets of the Tomb of T'len. 
100%ML Graphics Adventure . . . .$19.95 



Mr. Corey 

Place: Island In the Pacific. 
Time: 10 minutes Into the future. 
As a member of Athena, a top secret 
organization for the preservation of human 
kind, you were sent to spy on the most 
villanous man alive, Mr. Corey. Unfor- 
tunately, you were discovered during a rou- 
tine transmission and Dlaced in a room 
with a nuclear time bomb. If you die, 
, hu manity dies with you 

100% ML Graphics 
Adventure 





?*!"'• ••>>*• hi tin: . ...m 



«..« Ira. •« ..!••»,... 





February 1988 THE RAINBOW 71 



MO "MOVES" : GOTO410 

539 IF (N=52 ANDK=0 ) THENPRINT"YOU 
DON'T HAVE A KEY! " : GOTO410 

540 IFN=52ANDR=44THENGOSUB5620:G 

OTO200 

541 IFN=52ANDR=54THENKD=l:GOSUB5 

610:goto200 

542 PRINT"A NICE ATTEMPT" : GOTO 41 
0 

543 I FR= 2 THENPRINTF $ " A TRAP DOOR 
":RO=a:GOT05 

544 IFR=520RR=48THENPRINTF$G$"UP 
":LU(R)=l:GOT05 

546 I FR= 19 THENPRINTF $ "A SIDE WIN 
DOW":Wl=l:GOT05 

547 IFR=58THENPRINTF$ " A WINDOW'L 
$:WL(R)=l:GOT05 

548 IFR=3THENPRINTF$"AN ELEVATOR 
":E(3)=l:GOT05 

549 IFR=2 10RR=3 6THENPRINTF$ " A BU 
TTON" : B (R) =1 : GOT05 

550 IFR= 3 9 THENPRINTF $ "A DOOR"L$: 
DL(R)=l:GOT05 

560 PRINT"YOU FIND NOTHING" :GOTO 
410 

600 IFR=5THENK$="LICH":MP=20 
610 IFR=8THENK$="QUASSIT" :MP=21 
620 IFR=18THENK$="MIND FLARE" :MP 
=15 

630 IFR=2 2THENK$="BUG BEAR":MP=1 
5 

640 IFR=24THENK$="YETI" :MP=15 
650 IFR=29THENK$="VERANOPS":MP=l 
4 

660 IFR=30THENK$="NIGHT HAG":MP= 
15 

670 IFR=3 2THENK$="BIAMAT":MP=28 
680 IFR=39THENK$="GHAST" :MP=15 
690 IFR=41THENK$=" SPHINX" :MP=20 
700 IFR=48THENK$="PSEUDO DRAGON" 
:MP=28 

710 IFR=52THENK$="DRAGONNE" :MP=2 
8 Jff 
720 IFR=57THENK$-"TIAMAT" :MP=30 
730 IFR=49THENK$="IMP" :MP=15 
740 IFR=17THENK$=" YELLOW MOLD" :M 
P=10 

745 N$=RIGHT$(K$„2) : GOSUB5700 : CL 
S:IFN$="AT"THENPRINTK$" IS IN TH 
E ROOM 1 " : GOT07 60 

750 PRINT " THERE IS A "K$:PRINT"I 

N THE ROOM I 

760 MP-MP+RND(5) :F=1 

765 IFF=0THEN200ELSE770 

770 PRINT"YOU ATTACK" :E=RND (7 ) -1 

780 IFE=0THENM=1:GOTO8 60 

790 IFSW>0THENA=RND(6) :E=E+A 

792 IFSP=1THENA=RND(3) :E=E+A 

800 PRINT"YOU HIT "H$K$ : PRINT"FO 

R" E "UNITS " : MP=MP-E : PLAY " T2 L4 03 AA 

A" : IFMP=<0THEN920 



805 PRINTH$K$" ATTACKS 

810 X=RND(7)-1:IFX=0THENM=2:GOTO 

860 

820 PRINTH$K$" HITS YOU" : PRINT"F 
OR"X"UNITS" :HP=HP-X: PLAYD$ : IFHP= 
<0THEN932 

830 PRINT"YOU HAVE "HP "POINTS OF 

STRENGTH" : PRINTH$K$ " HAS "MP : PRIN 

T"POINTS OF STRENGTH 

840 PRINT "TRY TO ESCAPE (Y/N) 

845 G0SUB2 

850 IFA$="N"THEN940 

852 IFA$="Y"THEN5630ELSE845 

858 PRINTH$K$" STOPS YOU":GOT094 

0 

860 I FM= 1THENPRI NT " YOU MISSED" :G 
OTO810 

880 I FM= 2 THENPRINT 11 THE "K$" MISS 

ES":GOTO830 

920 G0SUB7 

930 IFMP=<0THENPRINT"YOU HAVE KI 

LLED "H$ : PRINTK$ : M (R) =0 : G0SUB1 : F 

=0:IFR=57THEN6500ELSE200 

932 IFHP=<0THENML=ML-1 

935 IFML=0THENPRINT"YOU ARE DEAD 

":GOTO980 

93 6 PRINT "YOU HAVE NO MORE HP'S" 
, "LIVES LEFT:";ML-1:HP=40:IFQ TH 
ENGOSUB1ELSE840 
937 GOTO200 
940 GOT0765 

980 PRINT : PRINT "PLAY AGAIN (Y/N) 
985 G0SUB2 : IFA$="Y"THENRUNELSEIF 
A$="N"THENCLS : ENDELSE985 

990 PRINT" YOU HAVE : " : PRINTHP"UNI 
TS OF STRENGTH" :PRINTP" POTIONS " : 
PRINTML-1 ; : IFML=2THENPRINT"LIFE" 
;ELSEPRINT"LIVES" ; 

991 PRINT" LEFT" : IFSW>0THENPRINT 
ii n«p$ 

992 IFSP=1THENPRINT" "X$ 

993 I FK= 1 THENPRINT " "W$ 

994 IFME=1THENPRINT" "M$ 

995 GOTO410 

1000 I FR= 3 THENR= 2 4 E LS E I FR~ 2 4 THE N 
R=3 

1010 IFR=5THENR==2 6ELSEIFR=2 6THEN 
R=5 

1020 IFR=35THEN5000 
1025 IFE (R) = 5 1THEN200ELSEPRINT"AR 
E YOU CRAZY, I DON'T SEE AN EL 
EVATOR AROUND HERE" : G0T04 10 
1049 IFR=20RR=55THEND=1 

1060 IFA(R)=1ANDD=0THENX=RND(3) : 
A=RND (4 )-l:PRINTX; "ARROWS SHOOT 
OUT AND ";:IFA=0THEN1065ELSEPRIN 
T"HIT YOU FOR"A"UNITS OF DAMAGE 
" : HP=HP-A: PLAYD$ : GOTO3000 

1061 GOTO1070 

1065 PRINT "LUCKILY, THEY MISS YO 
U":GOTO3000 



72 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



'1 



1070 IFP (R) =1THENPRINT" A POTION 
DROPS ONTO THE FLOOR" : 0 (R+2 ) «R: P 
(R)=0:GOSUB5720:GOTO300J3 

1075 IFB37=1ANDR=37THEN2900 

1076 IFR3=1ANDR=3THEN2900 

1080 IFR=30RR=37THENPRINTT$" LIE 
S ON THE FLOOR" :0(1)=R:IFR=3THEN 
R3=l : GOSUB57 2 0 : GOT03 000 

1081 IFR=37THENB37=1:GOSUB5720:G 
OTO3000 

1084 IFB7=1ANDR=7THEN2900 

1085 IFR=7THENPRINTX$ " LIES IN F 
RONT OF YOU" : 0 ( 2 ) =R: B7-1 : GOSUB572 
0:GOTO3000 

1090 I FR= 1 4 ORR= 4 3 THENPRINT " A AXE 
SWINGS OUT AT YOU! " : A=RND (2) -1 : 
X=RND ( 2 ) : IFA=0THEN6ELSEGOSUB4 : GO 
TO200 

1095 IFB59=1ANDR=59THEN2900 

2000 I FR= 5 9 THENPRINT "THERE IS NO 

W "W$" ON THEFLOOR":0(3)=R:B59=l 

: GOSUB5720 : GOTO3000 

2005 IFR=4THENPRINT"YOU FALL DOW 

N A TRAP DOOR":R=7:GOTO3000 

2010 IFR=20THENPRINT" SUDDENLY YO 

U ARE HYPERSPACED INTO ANOTH 

ER ROOM!":R=46:GOTO3000 

2012 IFR=40THEN2025 

2015 IFR=2 50RR=3 6THENPRINT" A SL 



EEPING GAS SEEPS INTO THE ROO 
M AND WHEN YOU WAKE UP, YOU ARE 
IN ANOTHER ROOM! 

2020 IFR=2 5THENR=4 8ELSEIFR=3 6THE 
NR=40 

2021 IFR=40ORR=4 8THENGOSUB1:GOTO 
3000 

2025 I FR= 3 3 THENPRINT "AN KNIFE SH 
OOTS OUT AT YOU ! " : X=RND ( 2 ) : A=RND 
( 2 ) -1 : IFA=0THEN6ELSEGOSUB4 : GOT02 
00 

2035 I FR=4 2THENPRINT "A FLAME SHO 
OTS OUT!":A=RND(2)-1:X=2:IFA=0TH 
EN6ELSEGOSUB4 : GOTO200 

2037 IFWW=1ANDR=63THEN2900 

2038 IFWD=1ANDR=54THEN2900 

2040 IFR=40ORR=54ORR=63THENPRINT 
"A WALL SLAMS RIGHT IN FRONT OF 

YOUR FACE ! " : GOSUB60 10 
2045 I FR=4 jSTHENPRINT " YOU ARE TRA 
PPED! IT COSTS YOU A LIFE TO GET 

OUT" : HP=0 : Q=l : GOT09 3 2 
2050 IFR=54THENWD=1:GOTO3000 
2055 IFR=63THENWW=1:GOTO3000 
2800 IFR=55ANDD=1THENPRINT" A CH 
ANDELIER DROPS ON YOUR HEAD 
! YOU BLEED TO DEATH ! " : HP=0 : Q=l : 
GOT093 2 

2900 PRINT "NOTHING HAPPENS 



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RAINBOW 




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Write for Free Catalog 

_ -_ _- CYBURNETICS - 



5 CYBURNETICS 



<3> 



8 



$4 



5705 CHESSWOOD DR. 
KNOXVILLE, TN 37912 
615-688-4865 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 73 



3000 GOSUB10:D=0:GOTO200 

4000 PRINT" AS YOU GO DOWN THE L 

ADDER , YOU GET YOURSELF INTO A 

TRAP! 

4005 IFR=11THENA=RND(2) 

4010 IFR=47THENA=RND ( 3 ) 

4020 IFR=53THENA=RND(4) 

4035 PRINT "YOU TAKE "A" UN ITS OF D 

AMAGE", "TRYING TO ESCAPE" : HP=HP- 

A:PLAYD$ 

4050 IFR=11THENR=22 
4)360 IFR=47THENR=58 
4070 IFR=53THENR=64 
4080 GOTO3000 

5000 PRINT" YOU ARE STUCK IN THE 

ELEVATOR ! " : A=RND ( 3 ) 
5010 PRINT"YOU TAKE"A"UNITS OF D 
AMAGE" , "TRYING TO ESCAPE" : HP=HP- 
A:PLAYD$ 
5110 GOTO3000 

5200 PRINT" YOU ARE BACK OUTSIDE! 
,BUT YOU SAY TO YOURSELF, I MU 
ST GET THOSE PRECIOUS JEWELS 

" : R=2 : GOSUB1 : GOTO200 
5300 GOSUB6000: PRINT" YOU FALL I 
NTO THE MOAT, AND GET EATEN ALIV 
E BY CROCODILES !":HP=0:Q=1:R=2:G 
OT0932 

5400 GOSUB5600:IFN=-1THEN5410ELS 
E5420 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



■ 



Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that 
are useful/helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and 
it is best to make several saves, at least one of them 
in ASCII format. We're sorry, but we do not have time 
to key in programs. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary explaining how the 
program works. Generally, we're much more inter- 
ested in how your submission works and runs than 
how you developed it. Programs should be learning 
experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Tnose wishing remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed 
information on making submissions, please send a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submis- 
sions Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some 
more comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



5410 OPEN"0", #N,A$:FORX=5T057:PR 
INT #N ,M(X) : NEXT : FORX=2TO50 : PRINT 
#N , P ( X) : NEXT : FORX=0TO6 9 ; PRINT #N , 
O(X) :NEXT:PRINT#N,R,HP,ML,SW,SP, 
G, P , F , K, WD, WW, B37 , R3 , B7 , B59 ,MO : C 
LOSE #N: END 

5420 OPEN n O" , #N,A$:FORX=5T057:WR 
ITE#N,M(X) : NEXT :FORX=2TO50: WRITE 
#N,P(X) :NEXT:FORX=0TO69:WRITE#N, 
O(X) :NEXT:WRITE#N,R,HP,ML,SW,SP, 
G,P,F,K,WD,WW,B37,R3 ,B7,B59,MO:C 
LOSE#N:END 
5500 GOSUB5600 

5510 OPEN" 1 11 , #N, A$ : FORX=5T057 : IN 
PUT#N , M ( X) : NEXT : FORX=2TO50 : INPUT 
#N , P (X) : NEXT : FORX=0TO69 : INPUT #N, 
O(X) :NEXT:INPUT#N,R,HP,ML,SW,SP, 
G, P, F , K, WD, WW, B3 7 , R3 , B7 , B59 ,MO : C 
LOSE #N : A=l : GOT02 10 

5550 I FR= 2 THENR= 3 E LS E I F R= 3 THENR= 
2 

5560 GOTO200 

5600 CLS:PRINT M tAPE,dISK,OR rETU 
RN TO GAME - 

5601 GOSUB2 : IFA$="R"THEN200ELSEI 
FA$="T ,f THENN=-lELSEIFA$= ,l D ,f THENN 
=1ELSE5601 

5602 INPUT" MAY I ASK THE NAME OF 
YOUR GAME" ;A$ 

5605 RETURN 

5 6 10 PRINTZ $ » DOOR " R$ Y $ "OPENS " : IF 
WD=1THENPRINT" BUT A WALL IS BLO 
CKING IT 

5615 GOSUB1 : RETURN 

5620 IFWD=0THEN538 

5621 PRINTZ $" LADDER" Y$ "APPEARS" : 
KL=1 : GOSUB1 : RETURN 

5630 IFHP<41THENA=RND (7) 
563 5 IFHP<3 1THENA=RND ( 5 ) 



One- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Pretend you are playing golf and putt the ball into 
the cup. Enter numbers from -2 to 5 to take aim. 

The listing: 

10 S=30:Y=RND(188)+2:PMODE3:PCLS 
:SCREEN1,0: CIRCLE (170, 66) ,6,3, .5 
: PAINT ( 170 , 6 6 ) , 3 : FORI=lTOS : CIRCL 
E (2 , Y) ,3,2: NEXT : INPUTS : SCREEN1 , 0 
: FORX=2T0173STEP7 : CIRCLE (X, Y) , 3 , 
2 : CIRCLE ( X , Y) , 3 , 1 : Y=Y-S : NEXT : I FY 
< 7 0 ANDY> 6 3 THENPLAY "02 ; L24 ; 12 ; 12 ; 
03 ; 1 ; 3 ; 9 ; 7 ; 5" : END : ELSERUN 

Brad Lowe 
Lafayette, CA 

(For ihis winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The 
Second Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



74 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



5640 IFHP<21THENA=RND(3) 
564 5 IFHP<11THENA=RND (2) 
5650 IFHP<5THENA=1 
5655 IFA=1THENG=1:GOTO200 
566j3 GOT0858 

5700 IFN$= ,I AT I, THENH$=" fl ELSEH$="T 
HE 11 

5710 RETURN 

5720 PLAY"T403L4CCCL3GL4CL2G" :RE 
TURN 

5750 I FR= 3 THENR= 6 ELS E I FR= 6 THENR= 
3 

5755 IFR=10THENR=19ELSEIFR=19THE 
NR=10 

5760 IFR=16THENR=18ELSEIFR=18THE 
NR=16 

5765 I FR= 2 7 THENR= 5 IE LS E I FR= 5 1THE 
NR=27 

5770 PRINT" YOU CLIMB OUT OF THE 
WINDOW AND GO INTO ANOTHER WIND 
OW" : GOSUB1 : GOTO200 
6000 A$="BAGFEDC ,, :PLAY"T9L405XA$ 
?04XA$;03XA$; 

60 10 PLAY " L4 P2 T5 3 01 V3 0 « : F0RX=1T0 
30 : PLAY ,f V-D lf : NEXT : PLAY"V15 " : RETU 
RN 

6500 PRINT "AFTER A FEW SECONDS, 
YOU WATCH AS THE CORPSE OF TIAM 
AT TURNS INTO "M$ : 0 (0 ) =57 : GOSU 
B1:GOTO200 

7000 PRINT" YOU DID IT! YOU TAKE 
THE JEWELS AND GO HOME RICH FOR 
LIFE! YOU FINISHED THE ADV 



ENTURE 



IN 



8100 
8101 
8102 
8103 
8104 



MO "MOVES" :GOTO980 



8000 


DATA1 , 


1,,, 




/1/1//1///,,! 


/ / / 


1,1, , 


/I, /I, 


1,1, 




,i, ,i,,,,i,,i 


/ / / 


1 9 1 / / 


/1///1 










8001 


DATAl, 


1,,, 




,1,1,, i, ,,,,i 


/ / / 


1,1m 


/1//1/ 


1,1; 




,1, ,1,1, , ,1, , 


i,, 


/ / / 1 / 

8002 


/ / 1 / / / 


i 








DATAl, 


,i,, 




i,,,,, ,1,1,1, 


,i, 


/ 1 / / i 


///l/l 


9 9 9 9 


, 


,,,,,, 1/1, ,1, 


,i, 




/ / / 1 / / 


,,1, 


1 


,,,,,,,,1 




8003 


DATA1, 


1,,, 


, 


,,i,i,,,i,,i 




8004 


DATAl, 


1,1, 


1 


,1,1, 1,1,1, ,i 


,,i 


,1/1/ 


/ / / / 1 / 


,,,1 


, 


,,i,i,,,i,,i, 


,,i 


/ / / / / 


1,1/// 


1, ,, 


1 


,,,i,,i 




8005 


DATAl, 


1,1, 


1 


,1,1,1,1,1, ,i 


,,i 


/l/l/ 


/ / / / 1 / 


,,,1 


/ 


,,i,i,,,i,,i, 


,,i 


9 9 9 ft 


1,1,,, 


1,1, 


/ 


i,,i,i,,i 




8006 


DATAl , 


1,1, 


/ 


,1,1, ,,i 




8007 


DATA1 , 


,1,1 


/ 


, ,1,1 




8008 


DATAl , 


,,1, 


/ 


,,,,,,,1,1,,, 


,i, 


/ 1 / / / 


,,1,1, 


,1,, 


/ 


1,,,// 


,,i 


/ 1 / / / 


1 / / / / / 


1 









CASTLE OF DEATH 
BY CHINARUT RUANGCHOTVIT 
242 DAVIDSON AVENUE 
RAMSEY, NEW JERSEY 0744 6 
JUNE -AUGUST 1987 




Jhe Saint g.ohr\ £alle*^ 

THE ASTRO 

FGRTUnE TELLER 

*SEf\ I WBt c oh^ cur, 

you Hrcnvc Txrs=\H>ucR 7£>rt<vy I 

OP 30 PfiCGCHNFO QUCSTiOMg 
SUCCESS - tt(\f\S\\f\<sV + FOHTUOJE- 

toosr orrssshiTD Br mvm£ uiofm 

this Ptio&Fv\n /s ovfft /Sftq vrr j>u^ 

TOriODOLf>+\ APPROACH fOILL h{iXJ CXV S^SiZ^ 5fSTCf*iS 

rofi thc ssfiiQus i&QU/neft oh CrtiCKT FOH m^ries If 
<JKe tftbtfco (f octane cJettet Z DISK $ZV& 




THE IDIEST EES ^ 



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J- JT E — - 




PL3 I T 



DOZENS OF FULL COLOUR 5C000TWLV ANfrO^TfD 
Ab^ASS\NS ^fVWJ/^S^ MJ-RrS SCREEN 
SATFiX SOLO OR ACv>07Tjrq PIAV£T^ $ 21^ 




9 SCREECVS - 9 SCEYS)AR(05> * w 



THttOUhID MACHWt . 

Hwrrouti coco p> bmzs m>p save roufj sfienw 



[pDfficra<M7 iiosttraiiaiie O 

(^> \Koq PlAV6AfO£S WILE VOUPRltJT- FAST-DISK i>\0$* 




J 512K 

/TfOfO C0LOAUfAJTOR£ *FPST£ ST &SK DifiJCATOPi OUT 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 75 



E du cation Notes 



Last month we visited a fast-food 
restaurant and worked on esti- 
mating expenses. This month, we 
ask the children to actually calculate the 
same expenses. 

The program sends us back to our 
fast-food restaurant. Again, we see only 
part of the menu on our screen, where 
four food items are visible: a chicken 
sandwich, a salad, a soda and coffee. 
The computer chooses two of these 
items for each example, and the prices 
are randomly selected within a reasona- 
ble range of values. 

Last month, the students were asked 
whether or not a certain random sum of 
money was enough for these two pur- 
chases. This month, they are asked for 
the correct amount of money they will 
need to make the combined purchase. 

There are several alternatives in 
computing the amount. Using pencil 
and paper is the way that first comes to 
mind. If this program is used in a 
classroom, one or more students could 
work simultaneously at the blackboard 
on the same example. Alternatively, 
since there are only two values to be 
added, more advanced students could 
be taught to do the addition mentally. 
Lastly, a combination of two of the 
preceding might be a possibility. For 
instance, try the example first mentally 
and then check it on paper or the 
blackboard before entering the answer 
on the computer. 

This program is very similar to last 
month's program. Lines 40 through 1 10 
draw the menu and then select food 
prices for each example. The variables 
CH, Sfl, SD and CO determine the prices 
for each item. Line 130 sends the pro- 
gram temporarily to lines 250 through 
300, where the two items highlighted in 
this example are chosen. 

Line 150 asks the student to enter the 
total amount of the bill he or she must 
pay for the two items. Lines 160 through 
190 calculate whether the response is 
correct. If it's incorrect, the correct 
answer will be displayed. The variable 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 

76 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



Expense estimating, 
Part II 



Restaurant 
Reckonings 

By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



FZ becomes the child's answer. The 
computer determines the correct answer 
by adding the variables fifi and BB; Rfi 
represents the price of the food item 
selected and BB represents the price of 
the drink. 

After studying the answer, the stu-. 
dent presses the ENTER key to call up 
two more randomly selected food items 
and their prices. 

After the student has gone through 10 
trials, a scorecard is presented. Ten 
points are counted for each correct trial. 
Then the student is asked if he or she 
wants to try the program again. The 
program may now be ended by pressing 
the N key or started again by pressing 
the Y key. 

We hope this program, in combina- 
tion with last month's program, helps 
your students to become more adept at 
calculating purchases. □ 



The listing: SHOPPING 

10 REM 11 FAST FOOD SHOPPING" 

20 REM" STEVE BLYN, COMPUTER ISLAN 

D, STATEN ISLAND, NY ,1988" 

30 CLS5 :D==RND( -TIMER) : IF CT=10 T 

HEN 310 

40 PRINT $ 3 , "YOUR MENU" ; : PRINT@25 

" # " ; CT+1 ; 
50 FOR T=1056TO1087:POKET,243:NE 
XT:SOUND100, 3 

60 CH=120+RND(40) : PRINT@98 , "CHIC 
KEN-$" ; : PRINTUSING"# . ##" ;CH/100 ; 
70 SA=70+RND(20) : PRINT? 162 , "SALA 
D -$"; : PRINTUSING"*. ##" ;SA/100; 
80 SD=32+RND (20) : PRINT@114 , "SODA 

-$" ; : PRINTUSING" #.##"; SD/100 ; 
90 CO=40+RND(20) :PRINT@178, "COFF 
EE-$" ; : PRINTUSING" #.##"; CO/100 ; 
100 FOR T=1248 TO 1279 
110 POKET,252 : NEXTT : SOUND200 , 2 
120 1 PLAY"04 ;L80 ; ABDBDBDBGG" 
130 PRINT@256, "YOU ARE GOING TO 
BUY A " 

140 GOSUB 250:PRINT@288,N1$;" AN 
D A ";N2$ 

150 PRINT@352, "" ; : LINE INPUT"<EN 

TER> YOUR TOTAL BILL- $";FZ$ 

160 CT=CT+1:FF=VAL(FZ$) 

170 FZ=INT( (FF*100)+.9) 

180 IF FZ-AA+BB THEN 200 

190 IF FZOAA+BB THEN 220 

200 RI^RI+l : PRINT@428 , "CORRECT" ; 



210 FOR T=2j3j3T0255STEPll:SOUNDT, 
1 : NEXTT : GOTO 230 

220 PRINTS 4 16, "SORRY, THE ANSWER 
IS $ !, ;:PRINTUSING" #.##»; (AA+BB) / 
100: SOUND 10,3 

230 PRINTS 4 8 4, "PRESS <ENTER> TO 
GO ON "; 

240 EN$=INKEY$ : IF EN$=CHR$(13) T 

HEN 30 ELSE 240 

250 RN=RND(2) :RR=RND(2) 

260 IF RN=1THENN1$="CHICKEN":AA= 

CH 

270 IF RN=2 THEN Nl$=" SALAD" :AA= 

SA 

280 IF RR=1 THEN N2$="SODA" : BB=S 
D 

290 IF RR=2 THEN N2$ : =" COFFEE" : BB 
=CO 

300 RETURN 

310 CLS8:FOR T=1024TO1055 : POKET, 

214 : PLAY"L100 ;G" :NEXT : PRINT© 3 7 , " 

HERE IS YOUR S CORE CARD " ; 

320 FOR T=1119TO1088STEP-1: POKET 

, 214 : PLAY"L100 ; A" : NEXTT 

330 PRINT? 20 2 , "SCORE = ";10*RI;" 

%" " 

340 FOR T=1344T01375: POKET, 214 :P 
LAY"L100;A":NEXT T 

350 PRINT@416," " : PRINT@448 , " ": 
PRINTS 4 18, "DO YOU WANT TO PLAY A 
GAIN? "; 
360 EN$=INKEY$ 

370 IF EN$="Y" THEN RUN ELSE IF 
EN$="N" THEN END ELSE 3 60 



Two-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Many of us have felt frustration when our computer 
"makes an error." Here is one way to relieve those 
feelings. 
The listing: 

10 PMODE2 , 1 : PCLS5 : A'$» fl BM8j8 , 130S6 

C0D15R10U15L10D20R20U3M95, 152BM8 

0 , 132G5D3F5BM70 , 160R30D5L30U5D30 

R5U16R20D30R5U20BM150 , 130R5D40L1 

5U4E3R3U10H5U10E8H3U4E3R4F3D4G3" 

: DRAW U XA$ ; BM153 , 14j3M125 , 160M120 , 

155M148,13 5M153 ,140" 

20 DRAW»BM125,160H13G5F3E3F10E4" 

: PMODE2 , 3 : PCLS5 : DRAW"XA$ ; BM148 , 1 

40M127 , 118M130 , 115M153 , 135M148 , 1 

40BM127 , 118E13H5G3F3G10F4" : FORI= 

0TOlSTEP0sA=P*2+l:PMODE2,A:SCREE 

Nl , A: FORO=1TO500 : NEXTO : P=-SGN (P) 

+1:NEXTI A D 

Arron Becwar 

Ml Sterling, WI 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



VCR Tapes Update 

By Randy Mayfield 

After my program, VCR Tapes (December 1987, 
Page 92), was submitted for publication, I purchased 
a new video cassette recorder. The digital counter 
display on the new model did not increment at the 
same rate as the old model. This made all counter 
records on the printouts and labels meaningless when 
using the new recorder. Since I did not envision this 
problem when I wrote the program, there was no 
provision in VCR Tapes to change an entry. I have 
a patch, however, 'and would like to share it with any 
readers who are experiencing the same problem. 

The following changes and insertions will allow the 
user to change a title, tape number or counter number 
individually. The Change function is added as part of 
the Work in a File option and allows scrolling through 
an existing file to find the entry to change. Press the 
C key and you will be given four choices: 1) Change 
title; 2) Change tape number; 3) Change counter 
number; and 4) Return to work menu. Just enter the 
appropriate new data when prompted. 

Make these changes to existing lines: 

Line 110: after the word DELETE insert , CHPNGE 
Line 340: after the number 3 insert CHANGE ": PRINT "4 
Line 360: change the number 3 to 4 
Line 370: change the first number 3 to 4 
Line 460: remove the apostrophe and insert 

L$=N IDS ( T$ ( X ) ; 1 , L ) : Q$=MID$ ( T$ ( X ) , 
L+1,3): T$(X)=L$+Q$+R$: GOTO 340 
Line 920: before the ELSE 110 at the end of the line, 
insert ELSE IF R$="C" FIND W=3 THEN 452 

And add the following new lines: 

375 IF W=3 THEN 451 

451 CLS:X=X+1:PRINT"FIND ENTRY T 
O change" : PRINT: PRINT" UP-AR 
ROW = SCROLL FORWARD": PRINT" 

DOWN-ARROW = SCROLL BACK": PRINT 
» C = CHANGE" : PRINT "A 

NY OTHER KEY = MAIN MENU":SOUND2 
W, l:G0TO94j3 

452 CLS: PRINT" change: ";MID$(T$( 
X) , 1 , L) : PRINT : PRINT" 1 . CHANGE TI 
TLE":PRINT"2. CHANGE TAPE NUMBER 
": PRINT" 3. CHANGE COUNTER NUMBER 
":PRINT"4. WORK MENU" : PRINT : PRIN 
T" SELECT ONE":SOUND2£0,1 

453 R$=INKEY$:IF R$="" THEN453 

454 Q=VAL(R$):IF Q<1 OR Q>4 THEN 
GOSUB13 6j3 : GOT04 52 

455 CLS:PRINT MID$(T$(X) ,1,L) :PR 
INT" TAPE NUMBER: ";MID$(T$(X) 
,1*1,3) S PRINT "COUNTER NUMBER : " ; 
RIGHT$(T$(X) ,4) :ON Q GOTO 456,45 
7,459,34^ 

456 PRINT : PRINT" ENTER NEW TITLE: 
M :SOUND200,l: INPUT R$ : L$«RIGHT$ ( 
T$(X) ,7) :T$(X)=R$+L$:GOTO340 

457 PRINT: PRINT "ENTER NEW TAPE N 
UMBER (###) :": SOUNDS #p , 1 : INPUT R 
$:IF LEN (R$)<>3 THENGQSUB13 60:G 
0T0455 

458 L$=MID$(T$(X) ,1,L) :Q$=RIGHT$ 
(T$(X) ,4) :T$(X)~L$+R$+Q$:G0T034j3 

459 PRINT: PRINT "ENTER NEW COUNTE 
R NUMBER (####) :":SOUND2j30,l:INP 
UT R$:IF LEN(R$)<>4 THENGOSUB13 6 
0:GOTO455 ^ 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 77 



the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 



Life in a Fish Bowl 

By Sandy Tadman 




Are you looking for a maintenance-free pet? Here's one for 
you — a blinking, bubble-burping fish. Not only do you not 
have to feed it, you can send it back to tape or disk whenever 
you're tired of it. 

Electronic Aquarium is an exercise in simple animation 
using PM0DE4 and nested loops to achieve the appearance of 
motion. If, after typing in and running the program you find 
you aren't satisfied with your pet, you can customize him (or 
her) — after all, you have to live with it. 

Try altering some of these variables. For example, the step 
rate of variable M (Line 15) controls the distance the fish 
moves; R determines where on the screen the fish, bubbles 
and eye are drawn; X controls the movement of the bubbles; 
and E controls the blinking of the eye. Alter the value Z in 
Line 22 to change how often the filter bubbles. Add color, 
if you own a CoCo 3. You can even change the shape of the 
fish as set in F$ (Line 14). 



The listing: RQURRIUM 

4 ***************************** 

ELECTRONIC AQUARIUM 

by 

Sandy Tadman 



5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



i * 

• * 

• * 



* 
* 
* 



■* (C) JULY 1987 * 

***************************** 

10 PMODE 4: SCREEN 1,1:PCLS 

11 R=i60:E=R+24:El==R+27 

12 FORGR=1TO254:A=RND(50) :LINE(G 
R,190)-(GR, (140+A) ) , PSETrNEXTGR: 
'weed 

13 LINE(1,155)-(20,190) ,PSET,BF: 

78 THE RAINBOW February 1988 




LINE (3 ,157) -(17,187) , PRESET, B 

14 F $= " S 7H1U2 E1R2 E 8RERER9 F2RFRFR 
F2DFE3UERE2RRER2FD3GDGDG3LG2F5RF 
5 D2 GL5HLH5 DG3 LGLGL2 GL9HLHL3HLH3 L 
H3G1L2H1U1E1BR14F3R2EUR2EUH2L": 1 
fish 

15 FOR M=168 TO 0 STEP-3 

16 S$=STR$(M) + ",96" 

17 DRAW t, BM !l +S$+ ,, Cl;XF$;" :GOSUB 2 

18 DRAW ,, BM"+S$+ fl C0 ;XF$ ; " :NEXT M 

19 GOTO 16 

20 PLAY"T255L4B" : FOR X=96 TO 0 S 
TEP-2 0 : CIRCLE (R , X) , 4 : CIRCLE ( E , 8 5 
) ,4, , .01: CIRCLE (E, 85) ,4,0: 



21 FORY=X+40TO 0STEP-20 : CIRCLE (R 
,Y) , 4,0: CIRCLE (E, 85) ,4:NEXTY: f ey 
e 

22 Z=RND(30):IF Z>28 GOSUB26 

23 NEXT X:R=R-3:E=E-3:E1=E1-3:IF 
R<=10 THEN END 

24 CIRCLE (El, 85) ,4,0: CIRCLE (El, 8 
5) ,4,0, .01 



25 RETURN 

2 6 FOR B=151 TO 0 STEP- 10 : CIRCLE 

(5,B),5:NEXT B: 'filter 

27 PLAY " 0 1T2 5 0 CDEFGABO 2 CDEFGABO 3 

CDEFG" 

2 8 FORB=151 TO 0STEP-10 : CIRCLE (5 
,B) ,5,0:NEXT B 
29 RETURN 



\0» 




A CoCo Pop-Up Calculator 

By Frank Turner 

A friend of mine is always extolling the virtues of his new 
Macintosh. I enjoy demonstrating that almost anything his 
high-priced computer can do, my CoCo can do, also. So, 
when I saw what a neat graphic calculator he had, I thought 
I would write a CoCo version for myself. 

Calc draws a calculator on the screen and allows you to 
perform ordinary four-function mathematical operations 
(addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.) Just 
enter a number, an "operator" ( + ,-,*,/), another number 
and the "equals" sign ( = ), and your answer will be displayed 
on the calculator screen. 

Press C to clear the display for another operation. If you 
are finished, press the space bar, and the calculator will erase 
itself from the screen. As programmed, pressing the space bar 
also ends the program. But you can easily adapt Calc to 
become a subroutine of one of your larger programs with an 
INPUT or INKEY loop. In fact, the numbering of the program 
starts at Line 5000 to aid you in its transferal to a subroutine. 

Just imagine — you're in the middle of a database program 
and need to do some calculations on your raw data. You won't 
have to waste time away from the keyboard hunting for your 
pocket calculator; you can quickly call up Calc, get your 
answer and return to the database where you left off! 

Note: If you are using Calc as a subroutine, make sure that 
its variable names are not duplicated in the main program. 
Also, the DIM statement ought to go at the beginning of the 
main program. 

The values required for the calculator display, or, in fact, 
any other display you may desire to construct, can be looked 
up in tables. In practice, it is easier to let the computer do 
the work. Just type in and run this one-line program: 

1000 F0RX=1T0128 : PRINT0170 , X : "= ; " : POKE1200 , X 
: FORY=1TO200 : NEXTY : NEXTX 

This mini-program lets you pick out the correct values to 
use to generate the character. 

The listing: CALC 

5000 REM************************ 
* 

5001 REM* CALCULATOR SUBROUTINE 

5002 REM************************ 
* 

5003 DIMP(90) :CF$=»######.#" 



50)34 DATA129, 131, 131,131,131,131 
,131,131,131,13)3,133,96,96,96,96 
,96,96,96,96,138,132,14)3,140,14)3 
,140, 14)3,14)3, 14)3,14)3,136,32,49,1 
28,50,32,32,51,32,52,32 

5005 DATA32, 53, 32,54,32,32,55,32 
,56,32,32,57,32 ,48,32,32,32,32,6 
1,32 

5006 DATA32,43,32,45,32,32,47,32 
,42,32 

5007 DATA32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32 
,32,32,3,1,12,3,21,12,1,20,15,18 

5008 Y=992 :A=0 

5009 FORX=Y+208 TO Y+217 :P(A)=PE 
EK(X) :READXX:POKEX,XX 

5010 A=A+1: NEXTX 

5011 Y=Y+3 2:IFY>1279 GOTO 5012 E 
LSE GOTO5009 

50 12 Y=0 : B$=" 11 : D$=" » : 0$=" " : C$=" " 

5013 C$=INKEY$:IF C$=" "THEN5013 

5014 PRINT@209+Y,C$; :B$=B$+C$:Y= 
Y+l 

5015 IF C$= ,f *" OR C$="/" OR C$=" 
+" OR C$="-" THEN PRINT@209," 

"C$; :0$=C$:GOTO 5017 

5016 GOTO5013 

5017 Y=0 

5018 C$=INKEY$:IFC$ = ,M, THEN5018 

5019 PRINT@209+Y,C$; :D$=D$+C$:Y= 
Y+l 

5020 IF C$= tf =" AND 0$="*" THEN A 
=(VAL(B$) ) *(VAL(D$) ) :GOTO5025 

5021 IF C$=" = " AND 0$="/" THEN A 
= (VAL(B$) )/(VAL(D$) ) :GOTO5025 

5022 IF C$=" = lf AND 0$="+" THEN A 
=(VAL(B$) )+(VAL(D$) ) :GOTO5025 

5023 IF C$="= ,f AND 0$="-" THEN A 
=(VAL(B$) ) - (VAL(D$) ) :GOTO5025 

5024 GOTO5018 

5025 PRINT@209,USINGCF$;A; 

5026 C$=INKEY$:IFC$= H "THEN5026 

5027 IFC$="C ff THEN PRINT@209," 

";:GOTO 5012 

5028 IFC$=CHR$ (32) GOTO5030 

5029 GOTO 5026 

5030 Y=992 :A=0 

5031 FORX=Y+208 TO Y+217 : POKEX, P 
(A) 

5j332 A=A+l: NEXTX 

5033 Y=Y+32:IFY>1279 THEN END EL 
SE GOTO 5031 

February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 



79 



The ABCs of Organization 

By Andre Needham 




This short program alphabetizes the directory entries on 
your disks, which makes keeping track of programs much 
easier. 

To use DIR Alpha, just put the disk to be alphabetized 
in Drive 0 and run the program. That's all there is to it! 

The listing: DIRfiLPHR 

1J3 GLEAR1I0J3 :DIMD$( 68 ) :CLS: PRINT 
"DIRECTORY ALPHABETIZER" : PRINT 
20 INPUT"PRESS ENTER TO START" ; A 

$ 

30 PRINT "ONE MOMENT . . . " : Z=0 : FORT 
=3 TO ll:A$="":B$="":DSKI$D,17,T 
,A$,B$ 

40 FORQ=l TO 97 STEP32 : C$=MID$ (A 
$,0,16) :IFASC(LEFT$(C$ / 1) )=255 T 
HEN130 

50 IFASC(LEFT$(C$ / 1) ) =0 THEN70 
60 D$(Z)=C$:Z=Z+1 
70 NEXT 

80 FORQ=l TO 97 STEP32 : C$=MID$ (B 
$,0,16) :IFASC(LEFT$(C$,1) )=255TH 
EN130 



90 IFASC(LEFT$(C$,1) ) =0 THEN110 
100 D$(Z)=C$:Z=Z+1 
110 NEXT 
120 NEXT 

130 Z=Z-1:IFZ=0THENPRINT"ONLY ON 
E FILE ON DISK-NO NEED TO ALPH 
ABETIZE" : END 

140 FORT=0TOZ-1:FORS=T+1 TOZ 
150 IFD$(S)<D$(T) THEN C$=D$(S): 
D$(S)=D$(T) :D$(T)=C$ 
160 NEXTS ,T 

170 N$=STRING$(16,0) :FORT=0 TO Z 

+3 STEP8 : A$=" " : B$=" " 

180 FORU=0 TO 3:IFT+U<=Z THEN A$ 

=A$+D$(T+U)+N$ ELSE 230 

190 NEXT:FORU=4 TO 7:IFT+U<=Z TH 

EN B$=B$+D$ (T+U)+N$ ELSE240 

200 NEXT 

210 DSKO$0, 17,T/8+3,A$,B$:IFT+U< 
=Z THENNEXT 

220 IFT/8+4 <18 THENA$=STRING$ ( 1 
28,255): B$=A$ : DSKO$0 , 17 , T/8+4 , A$ 
,B$ 

225 END 

230 A$=A$+STRING$(12 8-LEN(A$) ,25 
5) 

240 B$=B$+STRING$(128-LEN(B$) ,25 
5) :GOTO210 



Hard Copy Your Directory 




By Jim Knoppow 

If you're as tired as I am of rooting through a pile of disks 
in order to find a particular file, here comes some rapid relief. 

Pop a roll of 3!^-by- l5 /i6 inch labels into your Epson- 
compatible printer, run DIR Print, and — voilal — out 
comes a neatly printed label showing every entry in the 
directory. Each label will hold up to 36 names and extensions. 

In my filing system, I place my disks into categories (e.g., 
graphics, games, utilities, word processing text files, etc.). 
When a disk is reasonably full, it goes into a permanent filing 
system, a backup is made, and two DIR Print labels are 
printed — one for the main disks and one for the backup. 

I also like to run DIR Print using ordinary computer paper 
(instead of labels) so that I can have an index of all my 
programs on one page. 

All the printer codes are commented in the listing; so, if 
your printer is not Epson-compatible, you should be able to 
substitute the correct codes. Incidentally, until you reset the 
CoCo, directories will be printed to the screen in two columns 
for easier reading. 

On some printers, the code in Line 40 that selects 
condensed type may be canceled by the code in Line 50, which 
selects elite type. You may need to put a REM marker at the 
beginning of Line 50. On my Epson LX 86 printer, the four 
columns of directory information fit on the label with plenty 
of room. On other printers, such as the Epson FX, however, 
the condensed mode is larger, and fitting the columns on a 
standard label is a tight squeeze, requiring a few trial runs. 
If you have problems, please feel free to contact me at 15355 
SE 307 St., Kent, WA 98042. 



ACCOUNT 

BEEZAP 

COCOKEYS 

ENVELOPE 

FORMATTR 

LE LUT1N 

PAYROLL 

SCRNDMP 

VACATION 



BA8 
BA9 
BA9 
BAB 
BA8 
BAS 
BA8 
BAB 
BA8 



ANIMATE 

BIOCHART 

DE9KTOPL 

F 1 3EAGLE 

BRAPH 

HAPSCALE 

RESCUE 

SPELDOMN 

VARIABLE 



BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
BAB 
BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
BAB 



AUTODIAL 

BLASTER 

O I RALPHA 

FIFTHDIM 

HANGMAN 

flETRNOflE 

ROADSKIL 

TAX I NFD 

MDSEARCH 



BAS 
BAB 
BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
BA9 



BARREL 

COCODRAtf 

DIRPRINT 

FOOTBALL 

JETPLANE 

HONEY JAR 

R080FLIP 

USETOUN 

YARDSALE 



BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
BAS 
8AS 
BAS 
BAB 
BA8 



Editor's Note: For best results, use DIR Print and DIR 
Alpha, the preceding program, in tandem — you will be able 
to locate any file in a matter of seconds. 

The listing: DIRPRINT 

10 POKE150,1 1 SETS BAUD RATE TO 
9 600 -TO CHANGE THIS COCO TO 
PRINTER COMMUNICATION SPEED SEE 
YOUR COCO MANUAL. 

20 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(51) ;CH 

R$(18) , LINE SPACING (1/12") 

30 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(83) ;CH 

R$ (0) 1 SELECT SUPERSCRIPT 

40 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) f SE 

LECT CONDENSED 

50 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(77) f SE 
LECT ELITE 

6 0 FORX= 3072TO3134: RE ADA $ : POKEX , 

VAL( lf &H"+A$) :NEXT 

70 DATA 1A, 50, 8E, 80,00 

80 DATA A6, 84,B7,FF,DF 

90 DATA A7,80,8C,E0,00 

100 DATA 27,05,B7,FF,DE 

110 DATA 20,EF,1C,AF,86 

120 DATA 12,B7,CC,EC,B7 

130 DATA CC,ED,B7,CC,EE 



80 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



14) 3 DATA B7,CD,)3)3,B7, CD 

15) 3 DATA )31,B7,CD,)32,B7 

16) 3 DATA CD,J83,B7,CD,)34 

17) 3 DATA B7,CD,j35,B7,CD 

18) 3 DATA 18,B7,CD,19,B7 

19) 3 DATA CD,1A,39 
2,0)3 EXEC3)372 

21) 3 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(81) ;C 
HR$ (64) 'SELECT 64 CHAR/LINE 

22) 3 CLS 

23) 3 POKE 111,J3 

2 4)3 PRINT" INSERT DISK WHOSE DIRE 

CTORY YOU WISH TO PRINT" 

25)3 PRINT: PRINT" POSITION LABEL I 



N PRINTER" 

2 6)3 PRINT :INPUT"HIT <ENTER> TO P 
RINT";Z 

27) 3 CLS 

28) 3 P0KE111,254:DIR 

29) 3 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (13) 'CARRIAGE R 
ETURN 

3)3)3 INPUT" DO YOU WANT TO PRINT 
ANOTHER, <YES OR NO>";A$ 

31) 3 B$=LEFT$(A$,1) 

32) 3 IF B$="N"THENEND 

33) 3 IF B$="Y"THEN22)3 

34) 3 GOT03)3)3 



Reading Word Processing Files I 1 

By Chris Steele 

t, 

This program allows you to read a text file without having 
to load a word processor. After running, enter the filename 
with its proper extension. ASCII Read asks if you want the 
file output to the screen or to the printer, giving you a 
selection of printer baud rates to choose from. Note: If the 
file contains embedded control codes, the program might not 
work. 

The listing: A5CIRERD 

5 ■* THE ASCII SCREEN MACHINE * 

6 '* ASCIREAD BY CHRIS STEELE * 
1)3 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(3 2,14)3) ;:PRI 
NT" The Ascii Print Utility (c)8 
7" :PRINTSTRING$ (32,14)3) ; :PRINT"P 
rog Created by: Chris Steele" 

15 PRINT :LINEINPUT" [ENTER] textn 
ame/EXT: " ;FILE$ : IFFILE$=""THEN15 
ELSEPRINT:PRINT"Would you like t 
o output file:": PRINT" [1] SCREEN 

[ 2 ] PRINTER" : LINEINPUT" Enter 
Choice : " ; CH$ : IFCH$=" 1 "THEN2 J8 ELS 
• E IFCH$="2"THEN45 
2j3 0PEN"I",#1 / FILE$ 

21 CLS: PRINT" [Press <S> to stop 
scrolling] 11 : F0RX=1T05)3)3 : NEXTX 
25 ST=p 

3J3 ST=ST+1:IFST>6)3THEN4J3 
3 5 I FINKE Y $= " S " ORINKE Y $ = " s " THEN4 
)3ELSEIFN0TE0F (1) THENLINEINPUT#1 , 
TEXT$:PRINTTEXT$:GOT03 5 ELSE CLO 
SE: F0RX=1T05)3)3 : NEXTX: PRINT" [End 
of file]":G0T01)3 

4JJ PRINT : LINEINPUT" [<S>top or <C 
>ontinue] : " ;C$ : IFC$="S"ORC$="s"T 
HENCL0SE#1: PRINT"* aborted *":G0 
TO10ELSE25 



45 PRINT: PRINT"Following Baud Ra 
te to choose:":PRINT"[l] 3)3)3 BAU 
D [2] 6)3)3 BAUD": PRINT" [3] 12)3)3 

BAUD [4] 24)3)3 BAUD" : PRINT" [5 ] 
48)3)3 BAUD [6] 96)3)3 BAUD" : PRINT: 
INPUT"Enter Baud#" ;BD$ : IFBD$=""T 
HEN45 

5) 3 IFBD$=" 1"THENP0KE15)3 , 18)9 : GOTO 
9)3 

55 IFBD$="2 "THENPOKE15)3 ,87: G0T09 
ft 

6) 3 IFBD$=" 3 "THENPOKE15)3 ,41: G0T09 
)3 

65 IFBD$=" 4 "THENPOKE15)3 , 18 : G0T09 
f 

7) 3 IFBD$="5"THENP0KE15)3, 7:GOT09)3 
75 IFBD$="6"THENP0KE15)3, l:GOT09J3 

8) 3 GOT045 

9) 3 IFPEEK ( &HFF2 2 ) 04THENPRINT : PR 

INT"Printer is not ready, turn it 
on" : PRINT: LINEINPUT" Press [ENTE 
R] when ready: " ;ZZ$:IFZZ$=" "THEN 
94ELSE9)3 

94 0PEN"I",#1,FILE$ 

95 IFNOTEOF ( 1) THENLINEINPUT#1 , TE 
XT$:PRINT#-2,TEXT$:GOT095 ELSE C 
L0SE#1: PRINT: PRINT" [Printing is 
complete] " :F0RX=1T05)3)3: NEXTX: GOT 
05 



Submissions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. 
We like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in 
at one sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, 
although the short programs are limited in scope, many novice 
programmers find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve 
the software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We*re sorry, 
but we cannot key in program listings. All programs should be 
supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how the 
program works. If your submission is accepted for publication, 
the payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior to 
publication. 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 81 






Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE RAINBOW's 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed — 
legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high score. 
Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE RAINBOW. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type 5END and address to: EDITORS. 



* Current Record Holder 



Shutout 



ADVANCED STAR*TRENCH (THE RAINBOW. 7/86) 
4,300 ^Jeffrey Warren, Waynesville, NC 
3,975 David Schalier, Clarkston, WA 
3,960 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
3,960 Robbi Smith, Helena, HI 
3.800 Shaw Muniz, Los Angeles, CA 
2,600 John Fredericks, Kalkaska, Ml 
2,450 Blatn Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 

BEE ZAPPER (THE RAINBOW, 9/87) 

9,650 ★Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

BOUNCING BOULDERS (Diecom) 

9,318 *Skip Taday, East Lyme, CT 
8,859 Darrell Gilpin, Norwslk, CA 
7,448 Philip Manwarren, Harrington, ME 
3,994 Louis Bouchard, Gatineau, Quebec 
1,561 Lise Nantel, L'Acadie, Quebec 
BREWMASTER (NOVASOFT) 

133,575 *Melody Webb, Lakeport. CA 
126,925 Matthew Leitman, Beaconsfield, 
Quebec 

BUBBLE WARS (THE RAINBOW, 2/86) 

52,100 ★Daniel Cecil, Bardstown, KY 
42,800 Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
41,400 Becky Rumpel, Arcadia, Wt 
26,350 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
BUZZARD BAIT (Tom Mix) 
22,931,850 *Skip Taday, East Lyme, CT 

763,550 Geran Stalker, Rivordalo. GA 
CALIXTO ISLAND (Ma/* Data) 



196 


★Augusto Voysest, Lima, Peru 


98,985 


CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 


97,740 


1,627,500 


★Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 


69,490 


178,200 


Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 


77,254 


169,000 


Gregory Speer, Emporia, KS 


73.346 


159,200 


Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 




150,200 


Brian Lewis. Baltimore. MD 


70.142 


141,400 


Michael Petry, Kansas, AL 


68,142 


135,600 


Eric Rose, Grand Coulee, WA 




128,000 


Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 


67,721 


125,600 


Tim Lang, Downieville, CA 


62,442 


125,000 


Tony Fortino, Tacoma, WA 




CASTLE (THE 


RAINBOW, 6/86) 


55,300 


326.352 


★Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 




228,622 


John Broussard Jr., Alexandria, LA 


49.500 


202,659 


Brendan Powell, La Grande, OR 


43,502 


116,606 


Darryn Bearisto, New Carlisle, 


41,896 




Quebec 




93,672 


Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 


40,360 




British Columbia 


34,424 


CLOWNS & BALLOONS (Radio Shack) 


25,147 


688,960 


★Faye Keefer, Augusta, GA 


21,527 


70.160 


Charles Andrews, Delta Jet, AK 


19,835 


36,650 


Melody Webb, Lakeport, CA 


18,251 


COLOR POKER (The Rainbow, 4/83) 


18,103 


4,128,600 


★Earl Foster, Lynchburg, VA 


17,120 



CRYSTLE CASTLES (ThunderVision) 

554,979 ★Patrick Mattel, Laval, Quebec 
60,107 Alphonse Brown, Houston, TX 
DALLAS QUEST (.Radio Shack) 

81 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
85 David and Shirley Johnson, Leicester, 
NC 



86 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
86 Melanie Moor, Florence, AL 

86 Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 

87 Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 
89 Chris Piche, White Rock, 

British Columbia 
89 Milan Parekh, Fullerton, CA 
89 Andrew Urquhart, Metairie, LA 
89 Steve Zemaitis, Howell, Ml 
91 John Semonin, Akron, OH 
DECATHALON (Spectral Associates) 

7,216 ★Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
DEF MOV (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

30,253 ★Benoit Landry. Drummondville, 
Quebec 

DEMON ATTACK (Imagic) 

72,410 ★Glenn Hodgson, Aberdeenshire, 
Scotland 

40,435 Upton Thomas, Arnold. MD 
28,780 Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
4,960 Laundre Clemon, Sacramento, CA 
DESERT RIDER (Radio Shack) 

50,797 ★Patrick Devitt, Lombard, IL 
26,125 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Torn Mix) 
1 ,866. 1 00 ★Stephana Martel, Laval, Quebec 
623,550 Dale Krueger, Maple Ridge, 
British Columbia 
75,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

99,980 ★Danny Wimett, Rome, NY 

Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
Stephane Deshaies, Beloeil, Quebec 
Neil Edge. Williston, FL 
Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 
Jean-Francois Morin, Loretteville, 
Quebec 

Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
Keith Yampanis, Jaffrey, NH 
Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
Patrico Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 
Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge, VA 
Mike Ells, Charlotte, Mt 
Antonio Hidalgo, San Jose, 

Costa Rica 
Jesse Binns, Phoenix, AZ 
Andrea Mayfield, Melbourne, FL 
Timothy O'Neal, Commerce, TX 
Scott Godfrey, Nashua, NH 
Christopher Heston, Louisville, KY 
Sam DiCerce, Wiiiowich, OH 
Sarah Van Oteghem, Taylor Ridge, IL 
Kay McCluskey, Remsen, NY 
DRAGON BLADE (Prickiy-Pear) 

69 ★ Jason Damron, Folsom, CA 
DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

146,325 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
5,561 Chris Lorenz, Kiester, MN 
ESCAPE 2012 (Computerwara) 

202 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 



FIRE COPTER (Adventure International) 

126,420 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
64,710 Phillip Gregory, Moultrie, GA 

FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/86) 
22,505 *Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 

8,910 Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
5,680 Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wt 
3,760 Rick Beevers, Bioomfield, MN 
3,505 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

26,370 ★Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
9,930 Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 

328,820 ★Bernard Burke, Lee's Summit, MO 
255,080 Jason Clough, Houston, TX 
249,960 Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
169,410 Danny Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
149,520 Vernon Johnson III, Parkville, MD 
116,280 Scott Jamison, Billerica, MA 
1 16,000 Micah Clough, Houston, TX 
GALAX ATTACK (Spectral Associates) 
236.350 *Coray Leopold. Nada, TX 
28,300 Augusto Voysest, Lima, Peru 
GALLOPING GAMBLERS (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 

3,427,660 *Sean Lair, Ewing, MO 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
23,643,720 ★Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
20,921,490 Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
10.222,940 Clinton Morell, Sacramento, CA 
10,020,500 Ken Hubbard, Madison, Wt 
7,493,340 Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
2,626,950 Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
2,512,620 Jason Steele, Pensacola, FL 
2.312,640 Rory Kostman, Hershey, NE 
2,1 1 5,790 Jerry Honigman, Waggoner, IL 
2,01 1 ,200 Jerry Colbert, Bakersfield, CA 
1,224,190 Jonathan Wanagel, Freevitle, NY 
1,108,750 Robert Fox, Dover, OH 
1,094,280 Donnie Pearson, Arvada, CO 
1,081,530 Michael Wallace, Bronx, NY 
1,025,900 John Hotaling, Duanesburg, NY 
1.016,050 Edward Swatek, Chicago. IL 
933,740 Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
932,660 Brian Hunter, South Berwick, ME 
787,780 Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
685,840 Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
667,390 Robbie Smith, Helena, HI 
456,220 Scott Jamison, Billerica. MA 
410,868 Billy Helmick, Independence, KY 
79,570 David Gordon, Pierre, SD 
GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 

523,080 ★Joseph Delaney, Augusta. GA 
457,520 Georgina Haynes, Nice, CA 
252,840 Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
GRABBER (Tom Mix) 

432,650 ★Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
HALL OF THE KING (Prickly-Pear) 

107 ★Joshua Wanagel, Freeville, NY 
HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY (fntocom) 

400/510 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
HOME ROW BOMBER (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 
6,364 ★Timothy Hennon, Highland, IN 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^^ 




3,372 Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 
INFIDEL (Infocom) 

400/326 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
JOKER POKER (THE RAINBOW, 3787) 
2,793,285 ★Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
13,377 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
1 1,000 Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computerware) 
2,503,000 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
257,600 Keith Cohen, Rocky Mount, NC 
THE JUNGLE (THE RAINBOW, 8/84) 

432,223 ★Michael Nystrom, West Bridgewater, 
MA 

JUNKFOOD (THE RAINBOW, 11/84) 

18,650 ★Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
KARATE (Diecom Products) 

1 1 ,600 *Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
6,300 David Darling, Longiac, Ontario 
THE KING ( Tom Mix) 
3,824,280 ★Andre Grenier, Quebec, Canada 
22,400 Spencer Metcalf, Longview, TX 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 



54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
51 
49 
9 



186,710 
184.180 
184,120 
133,990 
84,830 
84,070 
33,900 
13,210 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 

* 

t 

* 

* 
* 



★Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 
Russell Johnson, Sarnia, Ontario 
John Farrar, Lebanon, TN 
Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 
Thomas Beruheimer, Yoru, PA 
David Spalding, Galena Park, TX 
Steven Moreno, Stockton, CA 
David Ewing, Deatsville, AL 
LUNAR RESCUE (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 
1 13,579 ★Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
LUNCHTIME (Novasoft) 



444,325 
136,925 
103,350 
55,550 
42,025 



★Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 
Alphonse Brown, Houston, TX 
George Ramos, Lakeport, CA 
Richard Deane, Chicago, IL 
Steve Place, Webster, NY 
THE MARTIAN CRYPT (NOVASOFT) 

32 ★Matthew Fumich, Munlord, TN 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

5,172 ★Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 



1,404,000 
1,003,104 
326,192 
205,335 
104,034 



468,750 
355,570 
318,160 
137,920 
127,550 
120,670 
58,530 



★Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
Jeremy Pruski, Sandwich, IL 
Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
Michael Heitz, Chicago, IL 
Vernon Johnson III, Parkville, MD 
Chris Wright, New Albany, IN 
MOON HOPPER (Computerware) 

103,840 ★Alphonse Brown, Houston, TX 
100,990 George Ramos, Lakeport, CA 
51,870 Martin Kertz, Forrest City, AR 
MUNCHKIN BLASTER (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
9,000 ★Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

7,240 Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 



1,276-0 

1,210-0 

1,204-0 

1,160-0 

1,132-23 

1.122-4 



★•Jonathan Dorris. Indianapolis, IN 
•Gregg Thompson, Chesterfield, VA 
•Chad Johnson, Benton, AR 
•Mark Lang, Downieville, CA 
Dan Liffmann, Andover, MA 
Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 



PAPER ROUTE (Diecom Products) 



★ Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 
David Kauffman, South Haven, MI 
Christopher Darden, Woodson 

Terrace, MO 
Konnie Siewierski. Schaumburg, IL 
Larry Sheiton, Marion, IL 
Patrick Devitt, Lombard, IL 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM RIDERS (Radio Shack) 
303,100 ★Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
244,100 Martinez Domingo, Miami, FL 
67,100 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 



1,120,350 
1,059,350 
830,950 

720.560 
531,600 
25,700 



PI NO ALL (Radio Shack) 

399,350 *Troy Stoll, Washington, IN 
213,300 Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
142,400 Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
PITFALL II (Act/vision) 

199,000 ★Sean Noonan, Green Bay, Wl 
1 21 ,680 Robert Wells, Topeka, KS 
PITSTOP II (Epyx) 

54 ★Rusty Breitbach, Rickardsville, IA 
★Jeff Coburn, Easton, PA 
★Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
★Jeff Szczerba, Sturtevant, Wl 
★Sean Noonan, Green Bay, Wl 
★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
Christian Grenier. Valley field, Quebec 
Randy Venable, Coal City, WV 
Laundre Clemon. Sacramento, CA 
PLANETFALL (Infocom) 

400/21 0 *Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
POPCORN ( Radio Shack) 

94,470 ★Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
25,850 Matthew Leitman. Beaconsfieid, 
Quebec 
PYRAMID (Radio Shack) 

220 *Jason Ebbeling. Berkshire, MA 
PYRAMID 2000 (Radio Shack) 

100 ★Peter Antonacopoulos, Toa Baja, 
Puerto Rico ': 

QUIXfTom Mix) 
8,407,772 ★John Haldane, Tempe, AZ 

Curtis Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
Elisa Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
Martin Parade, Arcadia, CA 
John Hotaling, Duanesburg, NY 
Christopher Conley, 
North Attleboro, MA 
RESCUE ON FRACTALUS (Epyx) 

270,000 ★Russell Johnson, Sarnia, Ontario 
99,967 Gary Sebastian. Hazel Park, Ml 
88,445 James Andrews, Kisslmmee. FL 
48,445 Steven Moreno, Stockton, CA 
RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Colorware) 
1,792,800 ★Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 
RETURN OF THE JET-I (ThunderVision) 

309,250 ★Melody Webb. Lakeport, CA 
ROGUE (Epyx) 

27,542 ★Melanle Lapoint, Fitchburg, MA 
Paul Blessing, Spring, TX 
Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
Allen Houk, San Diego, CA 
Kirk Marshall, Westport, MA 
Scot Drew, Ottawa, OH 
David Spalding, Galena Park, TX 
John Moore, Ottawa, OH 
Reland Brumfieid, LaJoila, CA 
Mary Calcott, LaJoila, CA 
SAILOR MAN (Tom Mix) 

332,600 ★Jeremy Carter, Spring Lake Park, MN 
287,200 Patrick Devitt, Lombard, IL 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

82 *Edward Rocha, Cobleskill. NY 

86 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 

87 Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 
SAUCER DEFENSE (THE RAINBOW, 4/87) 

30,900 ★Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
SHOOT'N RANGE (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 

5,433 *Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

SHORT-TERM MEMORY TEST (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 
20 * Brian and Harold Matherne. 
Gretna, LA 
SPEEDSTER (THE RAINBOW 8/87) , 

4,710 ★Andrea Reelitz, Greenville, IL 
3,350 Jamie Stoner, Mt, Union, PA 
STELLAR LIFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 

629,000 ★Steven Smith, Matthews, NC 
114,620 Martinez Domingo, Miami. FL 



21,682 
17,851 
8,812 
6,576 
6,204 
5,679 
5,369 
5,274 
4.719 



SUCCESS MANSION (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

13/13 ★Dave Allessi, Iselin, NJ 
SUPER ROOTER (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

15,180 ★Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 
1 1 ,090 Frederick Lajoie. Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

3,910 Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

303,600 ★Tim Hennon, Highland. IN 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

132 ★Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
123 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
TUTS TUMB ( Mark Data) 

1 18,720 *Reina Roy, Carleton. Quebec 
Mack Haynes, Nice, CA 
Chad Presley, Luseland, 

Saskatchewan 
Don Siler, Muncie, IN 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) 

2,032 ★Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 

★Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
Philip Puffinburger, Winchester, VA 
Denise Rowan, Minneapolis, MN 
Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, CA 
Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
Bernard Florence, Croydon, Australia 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
1 8,81 3 ★Taiib Khan, Bronx, NY 

Martha James, Swarthmore, PA 
Karl Gulllford, Summerville, SC 
Pat O'Neill, Nepean, Ontario 
Martha James, Swarthmore, PA 
Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 
THE VORTEX FACTOR ( Mark Data) 

100/276 *Tommy Crouser, Dunbar, WV 
Rick & Brenda Stump, 

Laureldale, PA 
Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 
British Columbia 
WARP FACTOR X (Prickiy-Pear) 

5,829,559 ★Doug Lute, Clymer, PA 
WISHBRINGER (Infocom) 

400/201 *Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
WRESTLE MANIAC (Diecom) 

956,971 *Marc Reiter, Cincinnati, OH 

Louis Bouchard, Gatineau, Quebec 
Tony Bacon, Mt, Vernon, IN 
Billy Helmick, Independence, KY 
Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City. MD 
ZAKSUND (E/rre Software; 

357,550 ★Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
39,950 Walter Hearne, Pensacola, FL 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
2,061,000 *Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
Dan Brown, Pittsford, NY 
Andrew Urquhart, Metairie, LA 
Bob Dewitt, Blue island, IL 
Matthew Yarrows, East Hampton, MA 
Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
Upton Thomas, Arnold. MD 
Jeff Miller, Bronson, Ml 
Tim Lang, Downieville, CA 
David Darling, Longiac, Ontario 
David Anderson, Midlothian, VA 
ZONX (THE RAINBOW, 10/85) 

6,500 ★Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
ZORK I (infocom) 

400/720 *Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
ZUES (Aardvark) 

3.380 ★Martin Kertz, Forrest City, Aft 



74,780 
72,000 

60.020 
45,000 



2,032 
2,008 
1,995 
1,991 
1,988 
1,975 



11,902 
10,489 
6,294 
4,643 
3,285 



100/483 
210 



546,315 
45,483 
39,086 
26,599 



1.950,000 
1,300,500 
1,100,600 
253.400 
170,600 
163.700 
119,600 
118,100 
111,400 
87.200 
83.700 
81,000 



Jody Doyle 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 





In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column 
of pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, 
we encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



Feedback 



In response to questions from: 

• Tim Collett: In Raaku-Tu, when you 
get to the south end of a great hallway, 
go north and you will be at the north end 
of the hallway. Once you get there you 
will need to go east to find the lamp. 
Next, you will need to go west back to 
the north end of the hallway, and go west 
again to find the candle. Then you will 
need to go to the petite chamber and light 
the candle with the lamp, and attack the 
gargoyle with the candle and then put it 
out. 

A word of warning: If you get to the 
room with the vault and pull the lever, 
you will be killed. 

Bryan Tucker 
Pine Bluff. AR 

• Jared Brookes: Don't use any rings 
until you have accomplished killing all 
the creatures on levels 1 through 3 in 
Dungeons of Daggorath, 

• John Barsh: I shall make you a deal. 
I will tell you where the torch is if you 
tell me where" the grapes and the scepter 
are in Sands of Egypt. The torch is two 
steps south of the cliff, then dig, 

• Steven Kaschimer: Get away from all 
Abye flasks in Dungeons of Daggorath. 
They will kill you if you use them. Save 
all your Hale and Thews flasks. 

• Jason Jasmin: In Sands of Egypt, I 
don't know where the dates are, but the 
pool I do know. When you are at the cliff, 
go down, then go west three times, then 
south and then east. 

Eric Reitz 
Mendham, NJ 

• Richard Deane: To get past the tunnel 
in Dragon 's Blade, go into the east room 
and get a boulder, then come back out. 
Type THROW BOULDER and when it asks 
where, type N. Now you can go safely 
through the tunnel (only if you have the 
sword from the mine!). 



• Robert Taylor: To get the flashlight in 
Dallas Quest, try pulling the curtain. 

• Fallon Yager: As far as I know, you do 
not go across the rug in Raaku- Tu. You 
can solve the game without going to that 
door. 

To kill the wizard's image in Dungeons 
of Daggorath, make sure you have a Hale 
flask in one hand and either of the two 
rings in the other. Hit once with the Fire 
ring, drink a Hale flask, hit with the Ice 
ring, Hale flask, etc. It takes four shots 
to kill him. 

• Rick Kelton: To find the amulet in 
Trekhoer, look around where you found 
the Roman numerals . . . especially up. 

• Chris Casey: To get out of the dark in 
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, wait 
until it does not list one of the five senses, 
then use that sense. This works for all the 
darks. 

In Hitchhiker s Guide to the Galaxy, 
how do you get the real tea or common 
sense? 

How do you stop the boat from leaking 
in Blackheard's Island? 

Tom Lawrence 
Middlesex, NJ 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, what is the 
incantation for the Supreme ring? 

David Wurmstein 
Del Rio, TX 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, to reveal 
a ring you may want to look the word up 
in a dictionary and the definition will give 
you a clue. 

D.J. Massa 
Linton, IN 

Scoreboard: 

I've finally become almost invincible 
on the first level of Dungeons of Daggo- 
rath, but when I climb to the next level, 
the ogre fellow of the giant knight's kills 
me. On Level 1, I get a lot of things 
hoarded around the ladder, such as a 



shield, wooden sword and a bundle of 
torches. Once, I got a ring and an iron 
sword, but I can't get them anymore. 
What do I do now? 

Mike Snyder 
Allen, OK 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, to get the shovel, first 
drop the owl. Before you go down the 
ladder, put everything you have (except 
the flashlight) into the knapsack. Drop 
the knapsack, turn and go down the 
ladder with only your flashlight, then 
drop the flashlight and return to the 
trading post. Now get the knapsack and 
go down the ladder. 

In Sands of Egypt, the torch is buried 
in the sand. To ride the camel you must 
first go to the tree and get the dates. Feed 
the camel the dates and ride the camel 
The scepter is hidden in the carving and 
the ax is on top of the pyramid. You 
cannot get the rope; you must make your 
own by getting the palm fronds from the 
tree and braiding them. 

When you are in the treasure room, 
type GO CRACK. Get back on your boat 
and float back until you are under the 
hole. Drop and climb the ladder. 

Warning: Never drink the water that is 
underground. 

Philip Manwarren 
Harrington, ME 

To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We will immediately forward your 
letter to the original respondent and, just 
as importantly, well share your reply 
with all "Scoreboard" readers in an 
upcoming issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo SIG. From 
the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, 
then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 
Be sure to include your complete name 
and address. _ Jody Doy|e 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



84 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



1 F e ature 



Bring the Co Co 3's palette 
to PM0DE3 and 4 graphics 



CoCo 3 




The Color Gallery 



By Eric White 



Just as the autumn leaves were 
beginning to introduce new colors 
to nature's palette, Tandy was 
introducing the CoCo 3 to the world of 
computer enthusiasts. With its new 
color abilities, the CoCo is now a real 
color computer. We now have the crea- 
tive power of choice. 

When we select the palette for our 
graphics, we can actually use color 
theory techniques such as analogous, 
monochromatic, secondary and tertiary 
color schemes. Imagine, purple moun- 
tains surrounded above by light, airy 
blue sky, a valley of golden flowers, and 
maybe a blackbird flying above. 

All this and more! The CoCo 3 is a 
new beginning, but what happens to the 
old pictures we created on the previous 
CoCos? Are they stuck with the old 
palette of colors? No, Color Change will 
help you fix them. 

Color Change allows you to load old 
Graphicom or CoCo Max pictures and 
change their color palettes. The pro- 
gram's menu is controlled with the four 
arrow keys and the space bar. You'll 
need a backup disk of Hi-Res (Oh, 
• excuse me, they now call it "Lo-Res") 
PMODE 3 or PMODE 4 pictures. The 
pictures will not be harmed, and they 
will be saved as a standard 6K binary 



Eric White is a self-taught programmer 
with a graphic arts background, who 
has been writing software for five years. 
He lives in Altamonte Springs, Florida, 
and has coauthored many programs in 
association with WHITESMITH. 



file, to remain compatible with most 
commercial software. 

Load a picture by selecting the Load 
option. Once the picture is loaded, 
select either the upper or lower screen, 
which will be the picture screen saved 
back to the disk as a 6K binary file 
(addresses &H0E00, &H25FF and 
&H0006). 

Make changes to the palette by mov- 
ing the "change" bar over the colored 
square you want to modify and press the 
space bar. The picture will appear; to 
change the color, press the up or down 
arrow keys. When finished, press the 
space bar to accept the color change or 
press the BREAK key to abort the 
change. To see the picture at any time, 
press the Fl key. 

When finished with your palette 
changes, select the Save option to save 
the currently selected picture area 
(upper/ lower), and the new palette will 
be coded and stored in the last part of 
the file's directory entry (bytes 16 
through 31). Once you have colorized 
all your pictures, you will be ready to 
run the Color Gallery program, which 
displays the "colorized" standard Lo- 
Res PMODE 3/ PMODE 4 pictures on the 
CoCo 3 in a "gallery." 

To use Color Gallery, type in the 
program and save it to a picture disk 
(disk containing Lo-Res pictures colo- 
rized with Color Changer), and then 
run. 

The program loads and searches the 
disk directory for any file with the 
extension that matches the variable FES 
in Line 100. Next, it will load and 
display each picture in the palette that 



is stored on the file's directory entry. If 
the picture file has no palette or if the 
computer being used is not a CoCo 3, 
the default palette of "black/ red /blue/ 
white" will be used. 

Each picture remains on the screen 
for a few seconds; the time is controlled 
by variable TM in Line 1 10. To go to the 
next picture without waiting, just press 
the space bar and the program will 
continue. 

Color Gallery can be put on almost 
any disk of pictures, since it loads the 
disk directory each time it is loaded and 
run. Just be sure the extensions of the 
pictures match the gallery extension 
variable. 

Pal Print is a utility program used to 
decode and print the palettes of Lo-Res 
pictures. The output can be directed to 
the screen or printer. Enter the filename 
of the picture you want to decode, or 
press ENTER to decode all the pictures 
on the disk. 

* Sitting in front of the CoCo screen is 
a far cry from walking down the marble 
hallway of a New York art gallery, yet 
we can capture some of that awe and 
appreciation as we view the colorful 
pictures created by family and friends. 
Our computer galleries house the artis- 
tic creativity enhanced by this electronic 
age. Color, shape and texture are all 
there for the artist to control and mold 
into his own world of expression. 

(Questions or comments about these 
programs may be directed to the author 
at P.O. Box 609, Altamonte Springs, 
FL 32715. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing for a reply.) □ 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 85 



310 


42 


1400 


106 


2900 


44 


4060 


126 


5600 


7 


7500 , . 


,163 


8500 


42 


9400 


11 


END 


...224 



Listing 1: CHANGER 

i **************************** 

20 f * LOW-RES PICTURE * 

30 f * PALETTE COLOR CHANGER * 

40 f * VERSION: 1.0 8610.31 * 

50 ***************************** 

60 1 * (C) 1986 BY ERIC WHITE * 
70 ***************************** 

100 CLEAR2000, 31231: PMODE3 :PCLEA 
R8:DIM CP(15) ,P$(72) ,A$(1) ,SP(24 
) :P=3:SC=0:OP=7 

150 G$="/,5>?%* ?=:/-*OLEJOANMBO 

LKENLHOL/ 5:?%* ?5 :/-"+CHR$ (34) + 

"0@ENOEKGJO@OEJMJOL, ,4«$, («8,$ 

(LLDHLDHDHL@LDLLHLL" 

160 F0RX=1T096:MID$(G$,X,1)=CHR$ 

(ASC(MID$ (G$,X,1) )+112) :NEXT 

200 FORZ=0TO15:READ CP(Z),A$:PAL 

ETTE Z,CP(Z) :NEXTZ 

250 ON BRK GOTO 1100 

270 1 CMP DEFAULT PALETTE COLORS 



300 


DATA 




, PMODE COLOR 1 


301 


DATA 


12 


, PMODE COLOR 2 


302 


DATA 


7 


, PMODE COLOR 3 


303 


DATA 


63 


, PMODE COLOR 4 


304 


DATA 




, LO-RES COLOR 1 


305 


DATA 


12 


, LO-RES COLOR 2 


306 


DATA 


7 


, LO-RES COLOR 3 


307 


DATA 


63 


, LO-RES COLOR 4 


308 


DATA 


P 


,BG COLOR 128-255 


309 


DATA 


18 




310 


DATA 


16 




311 


DATA 


63 




312 


DATA 


16 


, FG COLOR 0-127 


313 


DATA 


32 


, BG COLOR 0-127 


314 


DATA 


0 




315 


DATA 


38 





400 SL$ (0) =" change" : SL$ (1) ="sele 
ct" 

500 P(0)=161:P(1)=169:P(2)=177:P 
(3)=185:P(4)=353:P(5)«361:P(6)=3 
69:P(7)=377 

600 GB$=CHR$(12 8)+CHR$(128) :N$=" 
UNTITLED" 

700 G1$=CHR$(143) :G1$=G1$+G1$+G1 
$+Gl$+Gl$+Gl$ 



800 G2$=CHR$(159) :G2$=G2$+G2$+G2 
$+G2$+G2$+G2$ 

900 G3$=CHR$(175) :G3$=G3$+G3$+G3 
$+G3$+G3$+G3$ 

1000 G4 $=CHR$ ( 19 1 ) : G4 $=G4 $+G4 $+G 
4$+G4$+G4$+G4$ 

1100 CLS0:A$=INKEY$:PRINTG$; 

1200 C$=" BNOXQHFGSjpxwu_AX_DQH 

B_VGHSD " : FORX=lT016 : P0KE1119+X 

/ ASC(MID$ CG$,X,1) ) -63 :POKE1152-X 
, ASC(MID$ {C$,22-yL,±) ) -63: NEXT 
1300 PRINT@193,G1$GB$G2$GB$G3$GB 
$G4$; 

1400 PRINT@225/G1$GB$G2$GB$G3$GB 
$G4$; 

1500 PRINT§257 / G1$GB$G2$GB$G3$GB 

$G4$; 

1600 PRINT@289,G1$GB$G2$GB$G3$GB 

$G4$; 

1700 PRINT@385, "MODIFY"GB$"MODIF 
Y"GB$" SAVE "GB$" LOAD "GB$" LOW 
"GB$" HIGH " GB $ " GRAPHS " GB$ " GRA 
PHS " GB $ " S CREEN " GB $ " S CREEN " GB$ " 
TO "GB$" FROM "GB$"&H0E00"GB$"& 
H2 600"GB$" DISK »GB$" DISK "; 
1800 U$=" "+CHR$(207)+"=## "+CH 
R$(223)+"=## "+CHR$(2 39)+"=## 
"+CHR$ (255) +"=## " : SC$ (0) ="HI-S 
CRN" : SC$ ( 1 ) ="LO-SCRN" : B$=CHR$ ( 14 

3) 

1900 1 

2000 PD=0' PICTURE DISK DRIVE NO. 
2100 FE$="PIC" 'DISK FILE EXTENSI 
ON 

2200 DE$="/"+FE$+" : "+RIGHT$ (STR$ 
(PD) ,1) :PP=OP:KB=0:LD=0:GOTO 310 

2300 MN=l:GOSUB 10000 :MN=0 : ON KB 

GOTO 2400,2500,2600,2700,2800 
2400 PP=PP+4:GOTO 2900 
2500 PP=PP-4:GOTO 2900 
2600 PP=PP-l:GOTO 2900 
2700 PP=PP+l:GOTO 2900 
2800 LD=l:OP=PP 

2900 IF LD THEN ON PP+1 GOTO 404 
0,4040,4040, 4040,9950, 9950,3200, 
3300 

3000 IF PP<0 THEN PP=PP+8 ELSE I 
F PP>7 THEN PP=PP-8 
3100 PRINT@P(OP) , GB$GB$GB$ ; : OP— P 
P:PRINT@P(OP) ,SL$(INT(OP/4) ) ;:GO 
TO 2300 

3 200 Y$="SAVE PICTURE TO DISK":G 
OTO3400 

3300 Y$="LOAD PICTURE FROM DISK" 
:GOTO3400 

3400 CLS:GOSUB9700:PRINTSTRING$( 
32, 140) TAB ( (32-LEN(Y$) )/2) Y$:PRI 
NTSTRING$(32,131) -.PRINT 
3500 ON PP-5 GOTO 8600,4100 



86 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=" n THEN 360 

3700 S0UND2 j3j3 , 1 : RETURN 
3800 PRINT© 12 8 , 11 11 : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) "EN 
TER NAME OF PICTURE" : PRINT: PRINT 
: PRINT@233 , " 11 / : INPUT Y$ : RETURN 
3900 CLS 

4)3)9/3 A$=INKEY$:GOTO1100 

4)34)3 PMODE P, SC*4+1 : SCREEN1 , 1 :NC 

=CP(PP) 

4050 PALETTE PP+4,NC:PLAY lf P10" 
4060 GOSUB10000:IF KB=5 THEN CP ( 
PP) =NC : CP (PP+4 ) =NC : FORZ=*0TO7 : PAL 
ETTE Z , CP ( Z ) : N?XT : GOTO1100 
4070 IF KB=1 THEN NC=NC+1:IF NO 
63 THEN NC=0 : S0UND1 , 1 
4)38)3 IF KB=2 THEN NC=NC-1:IF NC< 
0 THEN NC=63:S0UND1,1 

4) 39)3 GOTO 4)35)3 

41) 3)3 VERIFY ON 

42) 3)3 IF DT THEN4 6)3)3 

43) 3)3 F0RX=1T012:SP(X) = (X-1)*32+1 
: SP (X+12 ) =SP (X) +16 : NEXT : Z$="LOAD 
>":EX$="exitdisk fl 

4400 NN=0 : F0RX=1T072 : P$ (X) =" 11 : NE 
XT 

45)3)3 DSKI$ PD,17, 18,A$(0) ,A$(1) : 
DN$=MID$(A$(1) ,113,8) :DT$=MID$(A 
$(1) ,121,8) :FR=FREE(PD) 
4600 GOSUB9500 

47) 3)3 IF DT THEN5000 

48) 3)3 IF VAL(DT$)=0 THEN 8200 

49) 3)3 PRINT© 66, "WHEN DIR. IS PRIN 
TED, USE THE ARROW KEYS TO SCROL 
L THROUGH THE LIST OF PROGRAMS 
ON THE DISK. ": GOSUB7 40)3 :S=1 

5) 3)30 S=1:GOSUB7200 

51) 3)3 FORT=0TO11:Y$=INKEY$:PRINTT 
AB(7) ;LEFT$(P$(S+T) ,8) ;TAB(23) ;L 
EFT$(P$(S+T+12) ,8) :NEXTT:PP=1:LD 
=J3 

52) 3)3 PRINT@SP(PP) ,Z$; :P1=PP 

53) 3)3 GOSUB10000:ON KB GOTO 54)3)3, 
56)3)3,58)3)3, 6)3)3)3, 62)3)3 

54) 30 PP=PP+1:IF PP>NN THEN PP=NN 
5500 GOTO6300 

5600 PP=PP-l:IF PP<1 THENPP=1 
5700 GOTO 6300 

5800 PP=PP-12:IF PP<1 THENPP=1 
5900 GOTO 6300 

6000 PP=PP+12:IF PP>NN THENPP=NN 

6100 GOTO 6300 

6200 LD=1:P1=0 

6300 IF PP=P1 THEN5200 

6400 PRINT@SP(P1) ," ";:IF LD 

=0 THEN5200ELSEGOTO8000 

6500 IF PP<1THENPP=1 

6600 NV=INT( (S-l)/24) :IFPP>(NN-2 

4*NV) THENPP= (NN-24*NV) 

6700 IFPP>24THENPP=24 

6800 , IFIN=9THEN7100ELSE IFIN<>8 



THEN6400 ELSEIFS-24<1THEN6400 

6900 'IFINO8THEN6400 

7000 'PP=1:S=S-24:GOTO5000 

7100 GOTO 6400'IF S+24>49 OR S+2 

4>NN THEN6400ELSEPP=l:S=S+24:GOT 

05000 

7200 PRINT@480, USING" ## PICTURE 

";NN-1;:IF NN>2 THENPRINTCHRS ( 8 ) 
it g ii • 

7300 PRINT@0, 11 ";: RETURN 

7400 PRINT@232, "READING DIRECTOR 

Y" 

7500 NN=0:FORZ=?TO11 

7600 DSKI$ PD,17,Z,A$(0) ,A$(1) :F 
ORQ=0TO1 : FORW=0TO3 : P$=MID$ (A$ (Q) 
,W*32+1,32) :P1$=LEFT$(P$,1) :P1=A 
SC(P1$) :IFP1=0THEN7700ELSEIF Pl= 
255THENGOTO7800ELSE IF MID$(P$,9 
,3)=FE$ THEN NN=NN+1 : P$ (NN) =P$ 
7700 NEXTW,Q,Z 

7800 POKE&HFF40,0:NN=NN+1:P$(NN) 
=EX$ 

7900 RETURN 

8000 IF P$(PP)=EX$ THENDT=0 : GOTO 
3900ELSEDT=1 : LD=0 : PRINT@492 , "LOA 
DING:"LEFT$(P$(PP) ,8) ; :PCLS1:SCR 
EEN1, 1:L0ADM LEFT$(P$(PP) , 8)+DE$ 
:N$=LEFT$(P$(PP) ,8) 
8010 IF MID$(P$(PP) ,17,16) =STRIN 
G$(16,0) THEN 8100 ELSE FORX=0 T 
0 15:CP(X)=ASC(MID$(P$(PP) ,17+X, 
1) ) : NEXT : FORX=0TO7 : PALETTE X, CP ( 
X) :NEXT 

8100 PLAY "P50": GOTO 1100 

8200 CLS:PRINT@66,"HEYl THIS DI 

SK HAS NO NAME 1 " 

8300 PRINT@96," WHAT DO YOU WAN 

T TO NAME IT?":PRINT@2 69, " 

. ":PRINT@266,""; :INPUTDN$:IF DN$ 
=""0R LEN(DN$)>8GOTO8300 
8400 PRINT @ 3 2 1 , " ENTER TODAY'S DA 
TE FOLLOWED BY" : PRINT@355 , " YOUR 
IDENTIFICATION LETTER" : PRINTQ395 
, " YYMM . DDI " : PRINT© 3 92,"";: INPUTD 
T$:IF DT$="" OR LEN (DT$) O8THEN8 



Hint . . . 

High-Speed Hijinx 

If you want to include the high-speed poke in a 
program that performs printer output, keep in mind 
you don't have to turn off the high-speed poke. Just 
issue a baud rate poke at the beginning of your 
program that uses a baud value half that which you 
would normally use. For example, instead of using 
POKE 150,1 to set your computer for 9600 baud 
printing, use POKE 150,7 to set it to 4800 baud. 

James M, Stewart 

(WHEEUIMMER) 

Highland Falls, NY 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 87 



400 

8500 DSKI$ PD,17,18,A$(j3) ,A$(1) : 
MID$ ( A$ ( 1) , 113 , 16 ) =STRING$ (16,32 
) :MID$(A$(1) ,113,8)=DN$:MID$(A$( 
1) ,121,8) =DT$:DSKO$ PD, 17 , 18 ,A$ ( 
p) ,A$(1) :DT=0:GOTO1100 
8600 PRINT@128,"";:A$=INKEY$ 
8700 IF N$="" THEN INPUT 11 NAME OF 
PICTURE TO BE SAVED" ;N$ ELSE Y$ 
=N$:GOTO8800 

8800 PRINT: PRINT: IF Y$="" THENPR 
INTTAB(5) "ABORT ILLEGAL FILE NAM 
El": SOUNDS , 10 : GOTO1100 
8900 IF SC THEN GOSUB 10700 
9000 Y$=LEFT$(Y$,8) :SAVEM Y$+DE$ 
, &HEj3j3 / &H25FF / &HW6:IF SC THEN 
GOSUB 10700 

9 100 CP$=" " : FORZ=j3T015 : CP$-CP$+C 
HR$(CP(Z) ) :NEXTZ 

9200 FORZ=3 TO 11:DSKI$ PD / 17 / Z / 
h$(0) ,A$(1) :FORQ=j3 TO l:FORW=j3 T 
03:IF Y$+FE$=MID$(A$(Q) ,W*32+1,1 
1) THEN MID$(A$(Q) ,W*32+1+16,16) 
=CP$:DSKO$ PD,17,Z,A$(0) ,A$(1) :Z 
=11:Q=1:W=3 

9300 'PRINT MID$(A$(Q) ,W*32+1,32 
) :EXEC44539 

9400 NEXT W,Q, Z:GOTOllj30 

9500 CLS:PRINT@384,STRING$(32,14 

3 ) DN$ " "RIGHT$ (DE$, 2) TAB (11) B$DT 

$B$; :PRINTUSING"## GRANULE" ; FR; : 

IF FR>1 THEN PRINT"S" 



9600 PRINT§395,B$; : PRINT§404 ,B$ ; 
:PRINT@391,CHR$(143) ;:GOTO9800 
9700 PRINT@384,STRING$(32,143) :P 
RINT@416 , "PALETTE : " ; : PRINTUSINGU 
$;CP(J3) ,CP(1) ,CP(2) ,CP(3) 
9800 PRINT@448,STRING$(32,143) "S 

CN: ";SC$(SC) ;B$"PICNAME: "N$;LEFT 
$(DE$,3) ; :POKE1535,ASC(RIGHT$(FE 
$,1) ) :PRINT@459,B$; 
9900 PRINT@0,"";:RETURN 
9950 SC=PP-4 

996^0 PMODE P, SC*4+1: SCREEN1, 1 
9970 EXEC44539:GOTO1100 
10000 KB=j3» READ KEYBOARD 
10100 IF PEEK (34 2) =2 47 THEN POKE 

342,255:KB=1 
10200 IF PEEK(341)=247 THEN POKE 

341,255:KB-2 
10300 IF PEEK(343)=247 THEN POKE 

343,255:KB=3 
10400 IF PEEK(344)=247 THEN POKE 

344,255:KB=4 
10500 IF PEEK(345)=247 OR PEEK(3 
38)=191 THEN POKE 345,255:KB=5 
10550 IF PEEK(343)=191 THEN SCRE 
EN1,1 ELSE IF MN=1 THEN SCREENJ3, 

10600 IF KB=j3 THEN 10100 ELSE PL 
AY"P2 55": RETURN 

10700 F0RX=1T04 : PCOPY X TO 19 : PC 
OPY X+4 TO X: PCOPY 19 TO X+4:NEX 
T : RETURN 



Listing 2: GALLERY 



20 f * LOW-RES PICTURE GALLERY * 

30 »* WITH PALETTE CONTROL * 

40 l * VERSION: 1.0 8611. 02 * 

50 ***************************** 

60 »* (C) 1986 BY ERIC WHITE * 
7jj ***************************** 

80 A$=INKEY$:F=FREE(PEEK(&HEB) ) 

90 CLS0:PCLEAR8:CLEAR20j30:IF PEE 

K(33j321)=5j3 THEN PMODE 3 , 5 : PCLSj3 

ELSE PMODE 4,5:PCLS1 

100 FE$="PIC" 1 DISKFILE EXTENSION 

110 TM=3500 1 TIMEOUT BETWEEN PICS 

12j3 DIMNF$(71) :X=J3:FORS=3T011 

130 DSKI$ PEEK ( &HEB) , 17 , S , A$ , B$ 

14j3 C$=A$-f LEFTS (B$, 127) 

150 FORN= i 0TO7 

160 NF$=MID$(C$,N*32+1,32) 

170 IFLEFT$(NF$,l)=CHR$(j3)THEN21 

0 

180 IFLEFT$(NF$,1)=CHR$ (255) THEN 
N=7:S=ll:GOT021j3 

190 IFMID$(C$,N*32+9,3)<>FE$ THE 



N 210 

200 NF$(X)=NF$:X=X+1 
210 NEXTN , S 
220 SCREEN1,1 

230 F0RI=J3T0 X-1:IF NF$(I)="" TH 
EN CLS: PRINT "THERE IS NO PICTURE 
S ON THIS DISK WITH THE EXTEN 
SION - 1 "FE$" 1 " : END 
240 F$=LEFT$(NF$(I) / 8)+"/"+FE$ 
250 LOADM F$ 

2 6j3 IF PEEK(33021)=5j3 THEN FORT= 
4 TO 7 : PALETTE T , 6 3 : PLAY " P5 0 " : NE XT 
T 

270 F0RT=1T04: PCOPY T TO T+4:NEX 
TT 

280 IF PEEK(33j321)=5j3 THEN GOSUB 
310 

290 FORT=lTO TM: A$=INKEY$ : IF A$= 
"" THEN NEXTT ELSE T=TM:NEXTT 
300 SCREENl,l:NEXTI:GOTO 23j3 
310 IF MID$(NF$(I) , 21, 4) ^STRING $ 
(4,0) THEN PALETTE 4,01 PALETTE 5 
,12: PALETTE 6, 21: PALETTE 7 , 63: RE 
TURN 

32J3 FORT=4T07: PALETTE T,ASC(MID$ 
(NF$(I) ,17+T,1) ) : PLAY "P5j3": NEXTT 
: RETURN 



88 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



Listing 3: PflLPRINT 



1/3 
2J3 

5J3 
6j3 
70 



1 **************************** 

f * DECODE AND PRINTS COLORS * 

f * LOW-RES PALETTES * 

■* VERSION: 1.J8 8611.02 * 

i **************************** 

1 * (C) 1986 BY ERIC WHITE * 
f **************************** 

8j3 A$=INKEY$ : F=FREE (PEEK( &HEB) ) 
9j3 CLS:PCLEAR8:CLEAR2j3j3j3 
10j3 FE$="PIC" 1 DISKFILE EXTENSION 
llj3 PRINT"OUTPUT TO (S)CREEN OR 
(P) RINTER" 

12 j3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$= I,H THEN 120 
13j3 IF A$="S" THEN DV=0:GOTO 150 
140 IF A$="P" THEN DV=-2 ELSE 90 
150 CLS: PRINT" ENTER THE NAME OF 

PICTURE FOR DECODING OF PAL 

ETTE COLORS OR PRESS [ENTER 

] TO DECODE ALL PICTURES 

ON DISK" 
160 PRINT@20j3, "" ; :INPUTN$ 
170 IF N$>"" THEN N$=N$+STRING$ ( 
8-LEN(N$) ,32) 

180 DIMNF$ (71) :X=0:FORS=3TO11 



190 DSKI$ PEEK(&HEB) , 17,S,A$ (0) , 
A$(l) 

200 FOR C=0TO1:FOR N=0TO7 
210 NF$=MID$(A$(C) ,N*32+1, 32) 
220 IFLEFT$(NF$,1)=CHR$(0)THEN27 

P 

23 0 IFLEFT$(NF$,1)=CHR$(255)THEN 
N=7:S=11:GOTO270 

240 IFMID$(A$(C) , N*32+9 , 3 ) <>FE$ 
THEN 270 

250 IF N$>"" AND LEFT$ (NF$ , 8 ) ON 
$ THEN 270 

260 NF$(X)=NF$:X=X+1 
270 NEXTN,C,S 

280 FORI=0TO X-1:IF NF$(I)="» TH 
EN 340 

290 PRINT#DV,CHR$(27)CHR$(20) ; f C 
ONDENSED PRINT FOR DMP-200 
300 CLS : PRINT #DV, "PICTURE NAME: 
"LEFT$ (NF$ (I) ,8) "/"FE$ : PRINT#DV 
310 FORT=0 TO 15 

320 PRINT#DV," SLOT ";:PRINT#DV 
,USING"##" ;T; :PRINT#DV,"=»ASC(MI 
D$(NF$(I) ,17+T,1)) , 
330 NEXT T:IF DV=0 THEN PRINT@45 
1, "PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE.";: 
EXEC44539 ELSE PRINT #DV: PRINT #DV 
340 CLS :NEXTI: GOTO 100 



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PROGRAMS 
for PEOPLE 



CoCo CHECKBOOK 



More than a checkbook maintenance program. Handles budgeting, 

cash and teller machine transactions and automatic bank payments. 

Customizable with up to 64 expense accounts of your own choosing. 

Reconciles your checkbook with your bank statements; summarizes transactions 
by account, month or YTD, and permits searches on every field. 

Up to 1,500 transactions on a single disk system. 

An easy to use menu driven program $25.00 plus $2.50 shipping and handling. 
See review in December 1987, Rainbow Magazine. 

CoCo ADDRESS BOOK 



A mailing list manager, a personal phone book and an address book 

all 1n one program. 
The address book will store, sort, retrieve or print mall labels, either 

the whole file or one at a time, for friends, family or acquaintances, 
A year round help but especially helpful during holiday seasons. 
You can search the file on the last name, city, state/province, zip code, 

telephone area code or remarks. 
Up to 100 name/file and 78 f11es/d1sk. An easy to use menu driven program. 
A printer 1s recommended but not required. 
$20.00 plus $2.50 shipping and handling. 

_____ MASTER DISK VERSION 2.1 



A computerized catalog of program names and disk names. 
Each entry in the catalog has the program name, extension and a 9 character 
disk name. 

To find that special program look it up in the alphabetized listing on the 

screen or a printout or have your Co Co search for it by name. 
Program names can be loaded by the disk full or entered 1 at a time. 
Up to 250 program names per file and up to 18 files per disk. 
An easy to use menu driven program A printer 1s optional. 
$15.00 plus $2.50 shipping and handling 
See review 1n January 1988 Rainbow Magazine 

ALL PROGRAMS REQUIRE 32KCoCo 1,2 or 3 and 1 DISK DRIVE 



SEND CHECK OR MONEYORDER TO: 

BOB'S SOFTWARE 

RO. BOX 391 CLEVELAND, OHIO 44107 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 89 



1 B ASIC Tr a ining 



* 



16K ECB 



I was thumbing through the Sep- 
tember issue of THE rainbow and 
idling away the time in my hotel 
room, waiting to compete in the 1987 
Florida Star Ball, a dance competition. 
I plopped down on the bed and flipped 
to the contents page to see the latest 
offerings. 

The article "Not Just Child's Play" by 
Ann B. Mayeux caught my eye. Work- 
ing as a volunteer with learning disabled 
children at the Lakeview School in 
Hernando, Florida, I was tempted by 
the program. I wondered if it might be 
of value to "my kids." 

Upon reading the text and noting that 
a 32K, ECB CoCo was required for 
either tape or disk, I turned to the 
listing. 

It was a daunting listing, running for 
about seven or eight tightly formatted 
pages. It was the kind of graphics 
program, loaded with oodles of DRAW, 
CIRCLE, PAINT and LINE statements, 
that is near and dear to my heart. The 
illustrations for the A, B and C panels 
were intriguing. How would they look 
on my CoCo? Dare I copy the listing? 
Would the ultimate users — the students 
— find it to be fun and entertaining? 

My gaze turned dreamily to the ceil- 
ing and I speculated — if I usurped a 
few panels and put them on tape, I could 
bring them to Ms. Hudson's class at 
Lakeview. If they liked the panels, I'd 
break down and copy the entire pro- 
gram! 

Upon returning home with my tro- 
phies, I unpacked and wandered into 
my computer nest. 

One tutorial.coming up! 

Please open your personal copy of the 
September '87 issue of THE rainbow to 
pages 60 and 61. (Refer to this month's 
listing if your copy is lost, has strayed 
or was stolen). The first question is 
where the first panel, A, is located. The 
clue is in the routine from Line 130 to 
Line 400. Line 140, letter A, sent me 
searching for Line 410. Line 150, letter 
B, referred me to Line 510. Ergo, be- 
tween lines 410 and 510 lay nestled the 
A panel. 

Checking out the lines in question 
revealed a lot of closely packed, multi- 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 

90 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



A tutorial on typing 
in programs 



Previewing 
a Program 

By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



line statements. I drooled in anticipa- 
tion because closely packed, multi-line 
statements are a good indication of lots 
of goodies waiting to be revealed. 

Suggestions at the Starting Gate 

Instead of mindlessly typing away to 
reproduce this lengthy program, get out 
the old ECB manual and reacquaint 
yourself with DRAW, PAINT, CIRCLE and 
LINE statements. Get their formats 
straight in your mind. As you key in a 
, statement, try to visualize what you are 
asking CoCo to do. 

After you complete a program line (if 
you are a conscientious copier), check 
the characters at the right end of each 
row with the listing. If they are not the 
same,you might have left out a charac- 
ter, added unnecessary, though harm- 
less, spaces, or inadvertently slipped in 
an extra, uncalled-for character. We all 
do it, so join the club! 

Also, check to see under which char- 
acter the final character in the line falls. 

Don't be "smart" and anticipate what 
you think the author intended or correct 
what seems to you to be an error in the 
listing. You will be sorry! 

The first thing you know, you become 
engrossed in seeing each new unit of the 
program emerge, and you happily 
clack, clack away far into the night. 

After tap, tap, tapping for a few hours 



at the keyboard, you may get an SN, FC 
or other error message. Checking and 
rechecking the listing and the program 
line does not divulge the error. If it is 
a multiple-statement program line, 
perform a little surgery and edit out the 
last statement and run. Keep it up! Lop 
off the last statement and run until 
CoCo doesn't produce the message. 
Then retype the balance of the line that 
must have contained the elusive error. 

A second way to combat an obstinate 
gremlin is to rekey the entire line. 

If you are still perplexed and unable 
to discover the boo-boo, ask a disinter- 
ested spectator in your household to 
compare your work with the listing. 

A final ploy is to make a few copies 
of your work in progress and shut down 
for the day — or night — and sweep out 
the cobwebs in your mind to get a fresh 
perspective on the morrow. 

Targeting the Listing 

My object was to yank out the A 
panel and display it on the screen. 

Beginning at Line 410, I copied and 
ran the listing up to Line 500. I got the 
black screen and the sound. Now, 
PCLS2 calls for a yellow screen. A 
PMDDE was needed. I noticed a 
PMDDE3,1 in Line 130 and copied this 
line. Then I copied Line 140, as it directs 
CoCo to Line 410, the target area. 

I ran this three-liner and it became 
evident that a stop-the-action line 
would be useful. I settled on 510 GOTO 
510. 

Line 510 is the start of the B panel in 
Ann Mayeux's program. If and when I 
get to it, I can key in the true program 
line (which deletes my false Line 510) 
and continue keying in lines through 
580 for the B panel. I can then use Line 
590, the beginning of the C panel, as my 
temporary perpetual loop. 

What did I accomplish? I found the 
first part of the panel. Evidently, an 4 A' 
was printed on a blue background. By 
running my working program, I found 
I had no error message to warn me of 
impending doom. Whew! What a relief! 
Now, if I had an SN, FC, TM or BS 
Error, etc., I could search out and 
correct it as I went along. 

I added Line 430 and ran the pro- 
gram. Naturally, I got an FC Error. A 
quick check proved that I had mis-typed 
a S for a ) . I edited out the boo-boo and 
was pleased to see the airplane pop up 
on the screen. 



When typing in Line 440, 1 got an SN 
Error message. No big deal! I found I 
spelled FIR for FDR (note tongue- 
twister), one of my common garden 
variety boo-boos. Note: You could go 
right into the EDIT mode. Upon isolat- 
ing the SN Error, correct it and move 
on. I prefer to be more relaxed about 
it and enjoy weeding out my inevitable 
errors. I begin by entering LIST 440. 
After I pinpoint the error, I get into the 
EDIT mode. 

I have found that after many hours 
at the keyboard, there is a tendency to 
become weary, and, when in the EDIT 
mode, I usually compound the boo-boo 
instead of eradicating it. So, like they 
say, "Slow, but sure." 

After all this work, CoCo added what 
proved to be an alligator's tail to the 
display. 

Adding LINE 450 drew in the foot. 
The line was too long; something was 
missing. A close check revealed that the 
X motion command was missing. Spell- 
ing out the XflL$; variables extracted 
RL-I-R-P-L-flL-N-E. flL must be the 
designation for the character A. 

Since the alphabet variables must be 
made known to CoCo before they can 
be called, a program line with RL$ must 
have been created someplace in front of 
Line 130. 

Line 80 started with fiL$, and a quick 
review of RL$= "U6E3F3D3NL6D4 
BR5" proved that it was a 9-by-6 unit 
sized A. 

Since the lack of variables for the 
substrings, XRL$;, etc., didn't hurt the 
flowering program displayed, it was 
onward and upward! 

Line 460 produced more of the alli- 
gator without any further error mishaps 
on my part. 

Remember, after each additional line, 
the extant program is run — first, to see 
what is what, and second, to correct as 



many mistakes as possible that crop up. 
The alligator was fleshed out and col- 
ored green. 

Line 480 was a "word" line, so I didn't 
expect to see anything new. What I did 
find out was that, so far, there were no 
FC and SN Errors — which, being a 
careless typist, I am an expert at invok- 
ing. 

Soon I got the drift of Ann Mayeux's 
programming style. I paid more atten- 
tion to each line and what it signified. 
Line 490 was a couple of painted, partial 
circles. I ran it to verify what I had 
mentally conjured. I repeated the error 
where I keyed in a 3 for a ) in the 
CIRCLE statement. Being aware of the 
kinds of errors I am prone to make 
causes me to focus automatically on 
likely problem areas. 

Line 500 looks like it made the apple 
stem, spelled out the word "apple" and 
returned to the panel choice routine at 
Line 130. 

When I ran this, CoCo raced through 
the program, and I hardly saw what 
happened. An easy solution would have 
been to temporarily edit out GOTO130 
from Line 500 to hold the display. 

Better still, adding the line 400 GOTO 
130, which closed out the I NKE Y$ letter- 
panel choice routine (lines 130 through 
400), gave me the excruciating task of 
tapping the A key to get the A panel. 
1 could delete Line 510 as being redun- 
dant. 

At this point, I could take a breather 
and double-check to see if my numerical 
values were keyed in correctly. CoCo is 
not likely to complain if you use an 
incorrect value. It will show up on the 
screen by distorting the display in some 
manner. Thus, if you check each line as 
you add it to your copied program and 
correct errors you are alerted to (such 
as SN or FC errors), you can inspect the 
display for an incorrectly located, 



drawn or painted item. 

If you do these things, you will be 
correcting a major portion of your 
errors and have a relatively error-free 
expanding program. 

Suppose Line 500 ended in 
GOSUB1000 instead of GOTO130. If you 
ran it, you would get a UL Error. . 

What happened was that CoCo was 
directed to a program line that started 
a subroutine you hadn't yet reached. A 
temporary solution would be to key in 
1000 RETURN. But this would result in 
an RG Error. The solution to hold the 
display is to put something in LINE1000 
that will take it out of its RG Error 
condition. 

Entering 10(30 GOTO130 : RETURN 
works. We used the INKEY$ routine to 
exit the GOSUB routine. 

This should hold everything until you 
rekey Line 1000 when you finally gel to 
it. But this is only one ploy you can use. 

As it stands now, we have the panel 
complete except for the lettering. In 
order to present a properly finished 
display panel to the children, it is a 
prerequisite to key in lines 80 through 
110. 

After keying in Line 80, I ran the 
program and saw that the A's and E's 
were OK. After keying in and running 
the next line, Line 90, the G's and L's 
appeared. Upon keying in Line 100, 1 
was delighted to see "airplane" and 
"apple" come out perfectly. The V was 
missing in "alligator," but in a few 
minutes that would be taken care of. 
After completing Line 1 10 and running 
the program, I got the 't' inserted in its 
rightful place. 

I ended up with a complete, and I 
might add, impressive, panel that I plan 
to use to amuse and educate the chil- 
dren. 

At this time, we might as well verify 
that all the letters we used and didn't use 




s 



P° J> 



n n & *v <jF 



S3 




money order 



James 
Portsmouth 



02871 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 91 



long, complex, mind-boggling pro- 
grams. You can alter it to work with 
other programs. 

Review 

First, take a sampling of the program. 
Who wants to key in a program that 
takes days of effort and debugging, only 
to find out it is disappointing? 

Second, we debug as we go along, 
ensuring accurate, error-free work. 

Third, as we become familiar with the 
author's techniques, we can study, 
absorb, anticipate and appreciate the 
program lines and the plot as it unfolds. 

How would you like to type in the 
entire program and then drive yourself 
nuts trying to debug all the errors you 
keyed in? For instance, take the listing, 
which is the dollop usurped from Ann 
Mayeux's original program. Key it in 
entirely before running it. Then run it 
and see how difficult it is to track down 
the errors, even in a straightforward 
program like this one. 

A helpful hint to aid you in your 
debugging efforts is to become aware of 
the typing errors you customarily make. 
If you make a mental list of the kinds 
of errors you tend to make in DRRW 



statements, for example, you know 
what to look out for. In my case, I have 
a tendency to leave out the opening 
quote mark, omit the comma between 
the h , v (horizontal, vertical) values and 
type a 4 instead of a $. In the LINE 
statement, I often omit the - or type in 
= by mistake. Also, I must watch the 
parentheses, which I am apt to make 
into an 8 or 9. 

Everybody has his or her own set of 
idiosyncratic mistakes. Become aware 
of yours and you will be able to make 
rapid corrections. 

On your own, add only the necessary 
lines to compose the B panel. Delete 
lines 120 through 129 and add 590 GOTO 
590. 

Correct as you go along. By now you 
must be eager to undertake keying in the 
rest of this delightful program. 

Moral of this tutorial: Read, enjoy 
and, above all, utilize the programs 
presented for your pleasure in THE 
rainbow. They are a fine learning 
experience. 

Editor's Note: To utilize a Speech / 
Sound Pak with Ann Mayeux's ABC 
program, refer to John Linge s "Sound- 
ing Out the ABCs"on Page 142. □ 



were created without mishap. Tempo- 
rarily insert these lines: 

120 PMDDE3,1:PCL52:5CREEN1,0 
:DRflW''C4BM10,20''+fiL$+B$+C$ 
+D$+E$+F$:DRfiWG$+H$+I$+J$+l<$ 
+L$:DRflWM$+N$+D$+P$+Q$:DRRWR$ 
+S$+T$+U$+V$ 

121 DRfiW' / BM10,40 // +W$+X$+Y$ 
+Z$ 

129 GDTD130 

Running this verifies that all letters 
are OK and the spacing between letters 
is adequate. Now, pressing the A key 
gives the A panel. 

Let us give credit where credit is due 
. . . to Ann Mayeux. Key in lines 10 
through 30. 

The following are the lines we left out. 
Line 40 looks like the "break key 
disable" routine. Lines 50 through 70 
throw up the title with some musical 
accompaniment. Line 120 gives a few 
instructions, and lines 150 through 390 
direct CoCo to the B through Z panels. 
Later, we will add them to our complete 
program. 

All we need is the time and patience 
to forge onward. This method I have 
shown you is helpful when keying in 

The listing: 

0 '<LISTING1> EXCERPT FROM 

10 1 A*B*C 

20 1 BY ANN B. MAYEUX 
30 1 KEY WEST, FL. 

80 AL$= M U6E3F3D2NL6D4BR5":B$="U9 
R3F2G2L3R4F2G3L3BR11":C$= !I U9R6BD 
9L6BR11" :D$="U9R4F2D5G2L4BR11" :E 
$="U9R6BD4L6D5R6BR5" :F$="U9R6BD5 
L6D4BR11" 

90 G$= M U9R6BD4NL2D5L6BR11" :H$="U 
9D4R6U4D9BR5" : I$="NU9BR6" : J$="NU 
2R6NU9BR5" : K$="U9BR6G6E3F3D3BR5" 
:L$= ,f NU9R6BR5 !l :M$=' , U9F4E3D9BR5" 
100 N$= n U9D2F6DNU9BR5":0$="U9R6D 
9L6BR11" : P$="U9R6D5L6D4BR11" : Q$= 
"U9R6D9NF3L6BR11" :R$="U9R6D4L6R3 
F3D2BR5" :S$=»'R6U5L5U4R5BD9BR5" 
110 T$= M BR3U9L3R6BD9BR5 !I :U$="NU9 
R6NU9BR5" : V$="BU9D6F3E3U6BD9BR5" 
: W$="NU9E4F4NU9BR5" : X$="M+6 , -9BL 
6M+6, 9BR5" : Y$="BR3U4H3U2BR6D2G3D 
4BR8 " :Z$="BU9R6D2G6DR6BR5" 

120 PMODE3,1:PCLS2:SCREEN1,0:DRA 
WC4BM10 , 20"+AL$+B$+C$-HD$+E$+F$ : 
DRAWG$+H$+I$+J$+K$+L$:DRAWM$+N$+ 
0$+P$+Q$ : DRAWR$+S$+T$+U$+V$ ' 

121 DRAW ! 'BM10,40"+W$-fX$+Y$+Z$ 
129 GOT013j3 

13)3 PMODE3,l:A$=INKEY$ 
140 IFA$= f, A" THEN410 
400 GOTO130 



92 THE RAINBOW February 1986 



410 PCLS2:SCREEN1,0:PLAY"L6C" 
420 DRAW"C3BM0 , 70R255C2" : PAINT (1 
00, 30) ,3 , 3:DRAW M BM10,50M30,20M50 
,50BM20, 35R20C4" 

430 CIRCLE(150 / 30) ,50,2, .25, .3, . 
05:DRAW M C2BM150, 30L20F20R20H20F1 
0R30H8R10F10L10H10BU8E12R4D15C4" 
440 FORH=120TO170STEP10:PSET(H,2 
7,2) :NEXTH:CIRCLE(60,145) ,45, , .8 
5, .25, .72: CIRCLE (7 2, 157) ,3 5, , .8, 
• 3 , • 65 

450 DRAW"C2BM120, 65XAL$ ;XI$ ;XR$ ; 
XP$ ; XL$ ; XAL$ ; XN$ ; XE $ ; C4 11 : CIRCLE ( 
65,138) ,13, ,1.3, .2, .05 : DRAW lf BM75 
,141R5G4F6L5D6H6" 

460 DRAW M BM78,138R45E10G10F15G5R 
5F5E5R5H20E5G5R65E3U9H3G3L7H3G3L 
14H3G3U5E6R3U3E6R3U3E6R3U3E6R3U5 
H10L3D5G25" 

470 CIRCLE (150, 105) ,10, ,1.2, .3,0 

: CIRCLE (150 , 105 ) , 5 , 4 : LINE ( 140 , 10 

5) -(53,110) , PSET: PAINT (100, 115) , 

1,4:PAINT(65,138) ,1,4 

480 DRAW" BM7 0 , 180XAL$ ; XL$ ; XL$ ; XI 

$ ; XG$ ; XAL$ ; XT$ ; XO$ ; XR$ ; " 

490 CIRCLE (215, 110) ,10, ,1.7: PAIN 

T (215, 110) ,4,4: CIRCLE (228, 110) ,1 

0, ,1.7: PAINT (232, 110) ,4,4 

500 DRAW"BM210,85F15U15E10D10G10 

M : PAINT (230, 87), 1,4: DRAW" BM200 , 1 

50XAL$ ; XP$ ; XP$ ; XL$ ; XE$ ; 11 : GOTO 130 /s\ 







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1 Wishing Well 



CoCo 3 32KECB 




For over a year now I have been 
putting off the inevitable. I knew 
when the CoCo 3 came out I 
would eventually have to buy one, but 
I just kept putting it off. Well, I finally 
succumbed. 

Some readers have asked when I 
would start writing programs for the 
CoCo 3, but I feel I have some legiti- 
mate reasons for putting it off. First, 
although many people have been buy- 
ing this dandy, improved model, the 
overwhelming majority of RAINBOW 
readers still have CoCo 1 s or 2s. The last 
thing I want to do is write programs that 
would be useless to the majority of my 
readers. Second, I was a little too cheap 
to put up the money for a whole new 
system. However, when the price of the 
full system finally dropped below $300, 
the time seemed right to make the move. 
It also gave me an extra system (my old 
one) to bring to school and use with my 
students. (More on that later!!) 

New Worlds to Conquer 

Needless. to say, it didn't take me long 
to fall in love with the CoCo 3, which 
is everything the original CoCo wasn't. 
My first reaction was, naturally, to 
come up with a program to celebrate my 
new purchase. However, I made a 
pledge to myself and to all my readers: 
Unless I am using CoCo 3 graphics 
(which will be some time to come, at 
least in this column), any program I 
write for the CoCo 3 will include 
changes that allow it to work on a CoCo 
1 and 2. 

Once Upon a Time 

Many moons ago, when I first started 
writing the "Wishing Well," I presented 
a program called Multiple Choice Quiz- 
maker. There were two versions of that 
program, a Hi-Res version that used 
real upper- and lowercase letters and a 
Lo-Res version that used the CoCo's 
text characters. I later listed a hard copy 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 

94 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



The 

Ultimate 
Testing 
Programs 

By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



version that would create paper tests 
with a line printer. 

For several years, I have been tempt- 
ed to combine the two programs into 
one so they could use the same DATA 
statements. Normally, I would just 
merge the data from one program to the 
other; however, that is not the best way 
to have new readers accomplish the 
task. Owning the new CoCo 3 provided 
a perfect excuse to make a new version 
and to throw in speech from the Speech 
Pak, as well. Besides, many readers still 
ask me for copies of old programs or 
reprints of old articles, which I have 
neither the time nor resources to pro- 
vide! Making a whole second genera- 



tion of these programs would solve this 
problem very easily. 

The Program 

Super Test will take a set of phrases 
you generate in BASIC DATA statements 
and turn them into a random quiz on 
the screen or on paper. Every time the 
program is run, the results are different. 
In fact, it's a different test each time you 
run it. 

In order to create any quiz or test, you 
need to match two pieces of informa- 
tion, such as a question and an answer, 
or a sentence with a blank and informa- 
tion to fill it, synonyms (two words that 
mean the same thing) and so on. You 
would need at least five groups in order 
to make a quiz on SuperTest. 

All information is stored in DATA 
statements at the end of the program. 
SuperTest can easily be rewritten to use 
disk files; however, when I write an 
educational program for my students, I 
like to have the program free-standing 
so that no information needs to be 
loaded into it. Besides, it is so much 
easier to edit a line in the program using 
BASIC'S EDIT command than it is to try 
to edit a file. 

There are great advantages in using 
this type of program, whether with 
students in school or with your own 
youngsters at home. Reviewing material 
with a computer makes it easier to 
strengthen many skills, including for- 
eign language translations (bon jour: 
good day). 

In order to put your own DATA into 
my program, you must first type 
DEL1000-5000 and press ENTER. This 
dumps the sample data I have put in. 
Let's say you want to do synonyms; 
your data would start in Line 1000 and 



NAME DATE 

TEST ON: EXPLORING OUR SOLAR SYSTEM 

1- GALILEO 

(1) VEHICLES SENT TO JOVIAN PLANETS 
(a) DISTANCE FROM THE EARTH TO THE SUN 

(3) NUMBER .OF EARTHS THAT WOULD FIT INSIDE JUPITER 

(4) WHAT THE SURFACE OF MARS IS COVERED WITH 

(5) NOT GIVEN 

a. PIONEER 

(1) DISTANCE FROM THE EARTH TO THE SUN 

<a> FIRST VEHICLE SENT TO JUPITER AND SATURN 

(3) WHAT THE SURFACE OF MARS IS COVERED WITH 

(4) VEHICLES SENT TO JOVIAN PLANETS 

(5) NOT GIVEN 



look like this: 

1000 DATA HAPPY, GLAD 
1010 DATA LOUD, NOISY 

Your last data line should be Line 5000 
and have END as a flag and the title of 
your program separated by a comma. 

5000 DATA END, SYNONYMS 1 

The comma must be placed between 
each of the two pieces of data you want 
matched. If your statement needs to 
include a comma, wrap each segment in 
quotation marks, like this: 

1000 DATA "ABRAHAM, MARTIN AND 
JOHN", "BY DION" 

Without the quotation marks, BASIC 
would assume that the comma after 
ABRAHAM was the end of our first state- 
ment. When in doubt, wrap in quotes 
or put each statement into a separate 
line: 

1000 DATA "ABRAHAM, MARTIN AND 
JOHN" 

1005 DATA "BY DION" 

In this case, no comma is needed be- 
tween statements, and all information is 
wrapped in quotes. 

The program is designed to hold 50 
DATA statements. You may increase the 
number, if you wish, by changing the 
value of NM in Line 180, which presently 
reads 180 NM=50. This would change all 
other values such as the DIM statements 
for our arrays. 

Changes for CoCo 1 and 2 

This program will work very easily on 
a CoCo 1 or 2 but will not have some 
extra screens the CoCo 3 version uses. 
If you use the program on a CoCo 1 or 
2, you must delete the following lines: 



9, 315, 320, 325, 330, 335, 340, 410 and 
535. You should add the following lines: 

315 SU=31 
410 REM 
535 REM 

Rather than delete the above lines, you 
could insert REM at the beginning of 
each line except the new Line 315. This 
way, if you upgrade to a CoCo 3, you 
won't have to add these lines back in 
later. Either way, the program will run 
much like the original. The only differ- 
ence is the lack of real upper- and 
lowercase letters. This is not that serious 
a drawback; however, if you have small 
pieces of information, such as single 
words, the regular 32-character screen 
of the CoCo is much better — you won't 
have much blank screen area. 

A New Feature 

Besides speech, I have added one new 
feature to both the paper and screen 
quiz parts of the program. The original 
programs allowed for four choices plus 
5 ) NOT GIVEN. I put this option into the 
original program because some of the 
standardized tests that our students 
take include "not given" as a choice. 
However, in the past few years I have 
found that many of my students have a 
rough time with the u not given" cate- 
gory. (Also, my special needs students 
are usually exempt from taking group 
tests.) Therefore, the screen will allow 
you to choose whether or not you want 
the "not given" category included. 

Running the Program 

There is really not too much more to 
say about the program, since it is self- 
prompting. Pressing the @ key during 
a question allows you to check your 
score. Pressing C continues the program 
where you left off. 

If you use the HARDCOPY section, you 



may use either standard or double- 
width characters, selectable from the 
keyboard. As the test is printed, the 
printing will stop as you approach the 
bottom of the page. You may print the 
next line of text by pressing N. This 
helps prevent the choices of a question 
from being printed on different pages. 
You may then advance the paper to the 
next page and press ENTER to continue 
printing. 

The listing printed here has no bugs. 
If you get an OD Error, you probably 
made a mistake in the DATA statements 
at the beginning of the listing. You may 
even get an FC Error as a result of 
having made a mistake in the data as 
you typed it in. Make sure to correctly 
type in every comma and number as 
they appear in these opening lines, or 
the program will crash. 

Try this program with your own data. 
I think you will find it very useful when 
working with your children or students. 
Super Test can be useful even to college 
students. It gives you a real hand with 
controlled learning via computer. 

Be sure to let me know if you have 
other ideas for CoCo 3 programs that 
won't cast our CoCo 1 and 2 owners 
adrift. 

Help Me, Please! 

At this point I would like to make a 
personal pitch to you, my reading 
audience, who have been so supportive. 
This year I received some of the tough- 
est special needs students I have ever 
had to work with. While, in recent 
years, only a few of my students in a 
given class period have worked on the 
CoCo, this year I have groups as large 
as eight students needing computer 
time. 

Fortunately, I have been able to 
expand the number of CoCo stations in 



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RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
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February 1988 THE RAINBOW 95 



my room to five. Some friends donated 
old silver case CoCos they no longer use 
since upgrading to a CoCo 2 or 3. That's 
when this idea hit me. 

I am sure there are many of you out 
there who have old 16K or 32K silver 
body CoCos that are now collecting 
dust. If you do, and would be willing to 
donate them, the students in our pro- 
gram would benefit greatly. 

Any such donation to a school can be 
claimed as a tax deduction, but you 
would have to consult your tax preparer 
to determine how to go about it. I can 
easily supply you with a receipt for tax 
purposes should you make such a do- 
nation. 



So, how about it? If you have any 
CoCos you can spare, you can contact 
me at (413) 663-9648 most evenings 
between 9 and 1 1 p.m. I can't promise 
to reimburse you for shipping; however, 
I will promise that any machines, drives, 
tape players or other CoCo accessories 
you donate will be put to use helping 
either my special needs students or 
special needs students in the middle and 
elementary school levels. (We can even 
use old ROM-Pak versions of Color 
Scripsit.) 

CoCos may be sent either to Fred B. 
Scerbo, 60 Harding Ave., North 
Adams, MA 01247 or to Drury High 
School, Special Needs Department, 



South Church St., North Adams, MA 
01247, Attn: Fred B. Scerbo. 

Any help will be greatly appreciated, 
and all donations will be put to ex- 
tremely good use. Thank you. 



If you have an idea for the "Wishing 
Well," submit it to Fred c/o THE 
RAINBOW. Remember, keep your 
ideas specific, and don't forget this is 
BASIC. All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 




45 100 

145 40 

260 29 

350 172 

470 192 



570 8 

685 4 

760 231 

1040 113 

END 182 



The listing: SUPRTEST 



1 REM************************** 



2 REM* 

3 REM* 

4 REM* 

5 REM* 

6 REM* 

7 REM* 



SUPERTEST 
A TEACHER'S HELPER 

BY FRED B. SCERBO 
60 HARDING AVENUE 
NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 



* 

* 
* 
* 



8 REM************************** 

9 WIDTH 3 2 

10 CLEAR3000:CLS0:PRINTSTRING$(3 
2j,172)STRING$(32, 204) ; 

15 F0RI=1T0192:READA:PRINTCHR$(A 
+128) ; : NEXT 

20 PRINTSTRING$(32 / 195)STRING$(3 
2,163) ; 

25 DATA30 / 28 / 29 / 21 / ,21,21,28,28, 
26,30,28,29,21,28,28, 29,53, 60,61 
,60,61,53,60,61,53, 60,60,58,62,6 
2,61 

30 DATA26, ,20,21, ,21,21, , ,26,26, 
, 2 0 ,21, , ,21,52, ,53, ,52,53, ,52,53 
, , ,56,56,58,52 

35 DATA27,19, 19, 21, ,21,21,19,19, 
26,27,19,18,21,19,19,23, , ,53, , ,5 
3,51,51,53,51,51,50, ,58, 
40 DATA, ,21,21, ,21,21, ,, ,26, ,16, 
21,16,25,16, , ,53, , ,53, ,,,, ,58, ,5 

8, 

45 DATA18, ,21,21, ,21,21, ,, ,26, ,1 
7,21, , ,25, , ,53, , ,53, ,49,49, , ,58, 
,58, 

50 DATA27, 19,23,21,19,23,21, ,, ,2 
7,19,23,21,, ;21, , ,55, 50,, 53, 51, 5 



5,53,51,51,58,49,59, 
55 PRINT @ 3 57, 11 A TEACHER'S HELP 
ER " ; :PRINT@389, " (P)APER OR (S 
) CREEN " ; 

60 PRINT0421," BY FRED B.SCERB 

0 "; 

65 PRINT@453," COPYRIGHT (C) 19 
87 " ; 

70 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="S"THEN HC=0:G 
OT085 

75 IFX$="P"THEN HC=1:GOTO180 
80 GOTO70 

85 PRINTQ389, " (T)ALKING OR (N) O 

T ? ,f ; 

90 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="T fl THEN110 
95 IFX$="N"THEN105 
100 GOTO90 
105 NT=1 

110 REM TALKING , 

115 XX=StHFF00 : YY=&HFF7E 

120 POKEXX+l,52:POKEXX+3,63 

125 POKEXX+35,60 

130 GOTO180 

135 I FNT= 1THENRETURN 

140 FORII«lTOLEN(W$) 

145 IF PEEK (YY) AND 128=0 THEN145 

150 POKEYY, ASC(MID$(W$, II, 1) ) 
155 NEXTII 

160 IFPEEK(YY) AND12 8=0THEN160 
165 POKEYY, 13 

170 FORHH=1TO900 : NEXTHH : RETURN 
175 RETURN 
180 NM=50 

185 DIMAO(NM) ,A$(NM) ,B$(NM) ,NP(N 
M) 

190 GOT022 5 

195 IF LEN(JK$)<=SW THEN215 

200 FOR T=SW TO 0STEP-1:IF MID$ ( 

JK$,T,1)=" "THEN210 

205 NEXT T:GOT0215 

210 L$=LEFT$ (JK$,T) : W$=L$ : GOSUB2 

20:JK$=" "+RIGHT$ (JK$, (LEN (JK$ 

) ) -T) :GOT0195 



96 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



215 W$=JK$:PRINTW$:GOSUB13 5:RETU 
RN 

22j3 PRINTW$ : : G0SUB13 5 : RETURN 
225 F0RJ=1T0 NM:READ A$(J),B$(J) 
:IF A$(J)="END" THEN2 3 5 
23j3 NEXT J 

235 REM TITLE CARD 

24j3 PRINT@357, " DO YOU WANT TH 
E " ; :PRINT@3 89 , 11 DATA REVERSED 

( Y/N) ? »; 
245 T$=INKEY$:UH=RND(6666) :IF T$ 
="N"THEN 265 
25j3 IF T$="Y" THEN2 6j3 
255 GOT0245 

26j3 FOR Q=l TO J-l : TEM$=A$ (Q) :A$ 
(Q)-B$(Q) :B$(Q)=TEM$:NEXT Q 

2 65 J=J-1 

270 FORI=l TO J 

275 AO(I)=RND(J) 

28j3 IF NP(AO(I))=l THEN 275 

285 NP(AO(I) )=1:NEXTI 

29)3 CLS : PRINT@2j32 , "DO YOU WANT": 

PRINTQ2 34, " 'NOT GIVEN 1 " : PRINT@ 2 6 

6,"AS A CHOICE" : PRINTQ297 , " (Y) ES 

OR (N)O?" 
295 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THEN FS=J3 : 
GOTO310 

300 IFX$="N"THEN FS=1 : GOT03 10 
305 G0T0295 

31) 3 IF HC=1THEN605 

315 CLS : PRINTS 16 9 / "SELECT WIDTH" 
:PRINT@23 3 , " (A) WIDTH 32": PRINTS 
265,." (B) WIDTH 4)3" : PRINT(3297 , " (C 
) WIDTH 8)3" 

32) 3 X$=INKEY$:IFX$= lfll THEN3 20 
325 IFX$="A"THEN WIDTH 32:SW=31: 
GOT035)3 

330 IFX$="B"THEN WIDTH 40:SW=3 9: 
GOTO 3 50 

335 IFX$="C"THEN WIDTH 8)3:SW=79: 
GOTO3 50 
340 GOT032)3 

35)3 FOR P=1T0J:G0SUB3 55:G0T0415 

3 55 CLS 

3 60 FORQ=1TO5:C(Q)=0:NEXT 
3 65 FOR Q=1T04-FS 

37) 3 C(Q)=RND(J) : IF C(Q)=AO(P) TH 
EN370 

375 FOR K=Q-1 TO 0STEP-1:IF C(K) 
=C(Q) THEN3 70 

38) 3 NEXTK 

385 NEXTQ:C(5-FS)=A0(P) 

39) 3 FOR E=1T05-FS 
395 F(E)=RND(5-FS) 

4)3)3 FOR K=E-1 TO 0 STEP-1:IF F(K 

)=F(E) THEN395 

405 NEXTK, E: RETURN 

410 WIDTH SW+1 

415 CLS : PRINT :JK$=" "+A$(AO(P) 
) :GOSUB195 
420 PRINT 



IFSW<>3 1THENPRINT 

JK$=" 4-"+B$(C(F(4) ) ) :G0SUB1 



425 JK$=" l-"+B$(C(P(l))) :G0SUB1 
95 

430 IFSW<>3 1THENPRINT 

435 JK$=" 2-"+B$(C(F(2) ) ) :G0SUB1 

95 

440 IFSW<>3 1THENPRINT 
445 JK$=" 3-"+B$(C(F(3) ) ) :G0SUB1 
95 
450 
455 
95 

460 IF FS=1 THEN 475 

4 65 IFSW<>3 1THENPRINT 

470 JK$=" 5-NOT GIVEN" : GOSUB195 

475 G$=INKEY$:IFG$="@"THEN535 

480 IF G$=""THEN475 

485 G=VAL(G$) 

490 IF G<1 THEN 475 

495 IF G>5-FS THEN 475 

500 IF C(F(G) )<>AO(P) THEN515 

505 PRINT: JK$=" YOU ARE CORREC 

T! THE ANSWER IS: "+B$ (AO (P) ) : GO 

SUB195 

510 CR=CR+l:GOT0525 

515 PRINT :JK$=" WRONG! THE COR 

RECT ANSWER IS: "+B$ (AO (P) ) : GOSU 

B195 

520 IR=IR+1 

525 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$<>CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 



r 





<TH> 



•Softvare for hom* since 1983 



'A 






Req. 64K 1 Drive 
CoCo 1 2 3 Compatible 
Using Hi-res* 51 col 
NEW CoCo 3 version ! 
♦ Hailer i Jacket P6M 



or 



3d $ZS >«0 shipped? 



*1 hive seen cowtless 'checkbook' progrus for the CoCo. 
I HU MUR seen a progn* for this purpose is good is 
ffOȣ-MC* Rush T. Caley Owner Eierson Coiputer Services 

Fast Check/Card is designed to take the "work - out of 
bookMork with lightning fast entries personaly configured 
to you systei and account, Constant balance displays and 
sorts for both checking and creditcard. w t7i9iQS «^ 
Try it, if you don't like it Til give your loney back! 
Specify 51 or 80 col (CC3 w/RBB or lonochroie ion.) 



CoCo3 8CM515 



l vox <. 

RGB Monitor 
Only 4310 W/cable shipped 

Computer Villa, 1328 48th, DM, I A 50311 
Terry Simons 



515-279-2576 to 10 PM 



February 1988 



THE RAINBOW 97 



525 

53J3 NEXT P 
535 WIDTH 32 

540 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 
545 L=CR+IR:IF L=0 THEN L=l 
550 PRINT" NUMBER CORRECT = " 
CR 

555 PRINT 

560 PRINT" NUMBER WRONG = " 
IR 

565 PRINT: PRINT" STUDENT SCOR 

E = ";INT(CR*100/L) ;"%" 

570 PRINT: PRINT" ANOTHER TRY- 

(Y/N/C)"; 

575 W$=INKEY$:IFW$=""THEN575 
580 IF W$="Y" THEN RUN 
585 IF W$="N" THEN END 
590 IF W$="C" THEN 410 
595 GOT0575 

600 REM ***** START HARDCOPY *** 
605 CLS0 

610 CLS0:GOTO645 

615 IF LEN(JK$)<=SW THEN63 5 

620 FOR T=SW TO 0STEP-1:IF MID$ ( 

JK$,T,1)=" "THEN630 

625 NEXT T:GOT063 5 

630 L$=LEFT$ (JK$,T) : W$=L$ : GOSUB6 

40:JK$=" . "+RIGHT$(JK$, (LEN (J 

K$) )-T) :GOT0615 

635 PRINT#-2 , JK$ : CR=CR+1 : RETURN 
640 PRINT#-2,W$:CR=CR+1:GOSUB770 
: RETURN 

645 REM START PRINTING 
650 CLS:PRINT@128,STRING$(32, "*" 
) ; : PRINT" SELECT (L)ARGE OR (S)MA 
LL PRINT" :PRINTSTRING$ (32,"*") ; 
655 P$=INKEY$:IF P$=""THEN655 
660 IF P$="L"THEN 675 
665 IF P$="S"THEN 680 
670 GOT0655 

675 SW=38:PL=46:TL=8:LL=21:PS=31 
:GOT0685 

680 SW=76:PL=4 6:TL=14:LL=53:PS=3 
0 

685 PRINT : PRINTSTRING$ (32,"*") ; : 
PRINT" PRESS <ENTER> TO BEGIN PRI 
NTING" : PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "*") ; 
690 P$=INKEY$:IF P$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 
700 

695 GOTO690 

700 PRINT#-2,CHR$(PS) ;" NAME" ;ST 
RING$ (LL, &H5F) ; "DATE" ; STRING $ (TL 
, &H5F) 

705 PRINT#-2," TEST ON: ";B$(J+1 
) :PRINT#-2," ":CR=4 
710 FOR P=l TO J 
715 GOSUB355 

720 JK$=ID$+STR$(P)+". "+A$(AO(P 
))+" "+STRING$(6,&H5F)+" " : GOSU 
B615 

725 PRINT 



730 JK$=" (1) »+B$(C(P(l)) ) :GO 
SUB615:GOSUB770 

735 JK$=" (2) "+B$(C(F(2) ) ) : GO 
SUB615:GOSUB770 

740 JK$=" (3) "+B$(C(F(3) ) ) :GO 
SUB615:GOSUB770 

745 JK$=" (4) "+B$(C(F(4) ) ) :GO 

SUB615:GOSUB770 

750 IF FS=1 THEN760 

755 JK$=" (5) NOT GIVEN" :GOSUB 

615:GOSUB770 

760 GOSUB770 

765 PRINT#-2," " : GOSUB770 : NEXTP: 
RUN 

770 IF CR<=PL THEN RETURN 
775 CLS : PRINT: PRINTSTRING$ (32 , "* 
" ) ; : PRINTTAB ( 2 ) "ADVANCE PAPER TO 
NEXT SHEET" : PRINTTAB (3) "PRESS < 
ENTER> TO CONTINUE" 
780 PRINT" PRESS (N) FOR NEXT L 
INE ONLY":PRINTSTRING$(3 2,"*") ; 
785 P$=INKEY$:IF P$=CHR$(13) THE 
N CR=0: RETURN 
790 IF P$="N" THEN RETURN 
795 GOT0785 

990' REM ENTER DATA AT LINE 1000 
1000 DATA RED, COLOR OF THE SURF A 
CE OF MARTIAN SOIL 
1010 DATA VOLCANOES AND CRATERS, 
WHAT THE SURFACE OF MARS IS COVE 
RED WITH 

1020 DATA THREE HUNDRED MILES WI 
DE , THE WIDTH OF MARS LARGEST VOL 
CANO 

1030 DATA GALILEO, DISCOVERED TH 
E MOONS OF JUPITER 
1040 DATA ELEVEN, THE NUMBER OF E 
ARTHS THAT WOULD FIT ACROSS THE 
WIDTH OF JUPITER 

1050 DATA THIRTEEN HUNDRED, NUMBE 
R OF EARTHS THAT WOULD FIT INS ID 
E JUPITER 

1060 DATA RED SPOT, A LARGE STOR 
M ON THE SURFACE OF JUPITER 
1070 DATA TEN HOURS, THE TIME IT 
TAKES JUPITER TO ROTATE ONCE 
1080 DATA 1 A.U. (ASTRONOMICAL U 
NIT) , DISTANCE FROM THE EARTH TO 
THE SUN 

1090 DATA VIKING, THE FIRST VEHIC 

LE TO SOFT LAND ON MARS 

1100 DATA ANY SIGNS OF LIFE. ,WHA 

T SCIENTISTS DIDN'T FIND ON MARS 

1110 DATA PIONEER, FIRST VEHICLE 

SENT TO JUPITER AND SATURN 

1120 DATA VOYAGER 1 & 2, VEHICLES 

SENT TO JOVIAN PLANETS 
1130 DATA END , EXPLORING OUR SOLA 
R SYSTEM 

5000 DATA END , EXPLORING OUR SOLA 

R SYSTEM /s\ 



98 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 

12 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Help I 

DISCOUNT PRICE LIST 



SOFTWARE 

CoCo DOS 

eFORTH CLOSE OUT 

CoCo OS9 Level II W/512K * 



List Cost 

$79.95 30.00 



TheWiz $79.95 

Communications software for CoCo 3 

Sculptor $450.00 

Database - 4th generation language 

DynaStar $150.00 

The easiest to use word processor for 

the CoCo 3 with OS9! 
DynaSpell spelling checker 

by Dale Puckett 

Font Editor $29.95 

Super Sleuth disassembler $50.00 

Utllix utilities set $49.95 

UniCharger Unix like utilities $ 1 50.00 

Level I OS9 (Limited quan.) $69.95 

Baslc09 (Limited quan.) $100.00 

DYNACALC Spreadsheet $99.95 

FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up $150.00 

Ramdisk $29.95 



69.95 
295.00 
100.00 

$94.50 45.00 

25.00 
40.00 
40.00 
75.00 
40.00 
50.00 
85.00 
75.00 
27.00 



BOOKS 



Inside OS9 Level II 
Bask09 Tour Guide (Limited) 
Starting Forth (Limited) 



$39.95 
$18.95 
$18.95 



29.95 
15.00 
15.00 



HARDWARE 

HARD DRIVES (5.25- half height) 

MinlScrlbe High Quality Drives - 1 Year Warr. 

M3425+ 21.4MB 53MS $395.00 281.00 

M3438 32.7MB RLL 55MS $415.00 291.00 

M3650 41.9MB 61MS $455.00 376.00 

M3053 44.6MB 25MS — 711.00 

M6085 71.3MB 28MS Full Height — 975.00 
(COMPLETE SYSTEM PRICES START AT $799) 

Hard Drive Controllers 

Western Digital WD 1002-05 $289.00 210.00 

(For FHL High Speed Hard Disk Interface) 

Adaptec 4000 SCSI/SASI — 162.00 

Adaptec 4070 SCSI/SASI RLL — 162.00 

(For Owl and Disto interfaces) 

CoCo Hard Drive Interfaces 

FHL HCA/WD High Speed Interface $160.00 119.00 
(Uses WD 1002-05 above, with software) 

L&R Interface for SASI — 1 19.00 

(Uses Adaptec 4000 or 4070 above, with software) 

Disto (Uses Adaptec 4000 above, with software) 199.00 



DISK DRIVES (5.25 H and 3.5 M FLOPPY DISKS) 
TEAC High Quality Drives - 1 Year Warr. 
FD55B 360K 40 Track DS 5.25" 
FD55F 720K 80 Track DS 5.25: 
FD35F 720K 80 Track DS 3.5" 

DISK DRIVE CASES 

Dual Half Height Floppy Case w/PS 
XT with AT aspect with 150 Watt PS 
Hard Drive case with PS and Fan 

CABLES 

ST506 Hard disk to controller, set 2 
SASI 3' Inline to Inline 
FHL HCA/WD 40 Pin Card edge 4' 
FHL HCA/WD 34 Pin Card edge 4' 



PRINTERS 

Star micronics 

ND10 10" carriage 180CPS Draft 
NX15 15" carriage 120CPS Draft 
NB15 15" carriage 300CPS Draft 
Panasonic 

P1080i 144CPS Draft 
P1092i 240CPS Draft 
Canon Laser Beam 

MODEMS 

Packard Bell 
PB1200+ 300/1200 
PB2400EM 2400 baud 
US Robotics 

Courier 2400 auto error correction 

TERMINALS 

QUME 
QVT 101G 
QVT 101 Plus 
QVT 119 Plus 
Wyse 
WY-30 
WY-50 

WY-350 Color 

WY-60 with keyboard 



118.00 
151.00 
147.00 



100.00 to 



75.00 
125.00 
170.00 



28,00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 



$499.00 
$499.00 
$1399.00 

$269.00 
$499.00 



332.00 
374.00 
945.00 

198.00 
392,00 



$2750.001943.00 



$199.00 129.00 
$595.00 256.00 

$699.00 544.00 



384.00 
396.00 
540.00 

390.00 
482.00 
968.00 
529.00 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA, M/C and AMEX. NY residents add 
7% sales tax. US shipping add $3.50. Please call for Air Express 
shipping. Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. 

* Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 



Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 
Telex 646740 - FAX 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856 



16K ECB 



the 



RAINBO W 



1 F e atur e 



/!« electronic Valentine 's card 
for the one you love 



Wear Your Heart 
on Your Screen 



By Brian Catlett 




T J E i -HK - ^ 









Valentine's Day is fast approach- 
ing — it's time to throw off your 
shyness and let that special per- 
son know how you really feel. But if the 
words get in your way, let Valentine and 
the CoCo speak for you. 

In order to use a fancy script type for 
the words, for visual appeal, I had to 
resort to writing a long series of DATA 
statements to print the words to the 
screen. In fact, the DATA statements take 
up more than one-third of the program 
and were laborious to write, let me tell 
you! 

But love's labor is not lost! If, for 
some reason (extremely unlikely), your 
beloved is not bowled over by the 
expression of your sentiment, merely 
show him or her a listing of the pro- 
gram, pointing out that you had to 
exercise Herculean precision to ensure 
that every number in those DATA state- 
ments was copied accurately. That 
should do it. 

After you have typed in and saved the 
program, run it. The screen should be 
red; if it is not, press the reset button and 
run again. And if anyone out there 
knows a way to make love's labor less 
tedious (how to get around all those 
DATA statements) without losing the 
effect, please write and let me know. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 6801 Mountain Rd., NE, Albu- 
querque, NM 87110. Please enclose an 
SASE when writing for a response.) □ 

- - 

Brian Catlett holds a degree in comput- 
er science from Widener University in 
Chester, Pennsylvania. He enjoys work- 
ing with computer graphics and anima- 
tion and is presently working for a 
drafting company. 



100 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



t 













V 


350 , 


, 60 


2060 


131 




550 .. . 


.145 


2110 


222 






830 


147 


2160 . . 


....25 






2010 , . 


. 125 


END . 


133 



The listing: VRLNTINE 



IjS 
2jd 

3J3 
4)3 

50 
6J3 
7J3 

80 
90 
100 

110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
160 

200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 



**************************** 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



HAPPY 
VALENTINE 1 S 
DAY 

BY BRIAN CATLETT 1985 
BOX 297 

WIDENER UNIVERSITY 

CHESTER, PA. 19013 
**************************** 

PCLEAR8 : DIM H ( 5 , 3 1 ) : RESTORE 

PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS1 : SCREEN1 , 1 

PMODE3 : PCLS3 

IF INKEY$=" " THEN 130 

PM0DE4,1:PCLS1 

W=2 • 

FOR C=1TO400:NEXT 
'* WRITE "HAPPY" * 
FOR D=1T0191 
READ X,Y 

PSET (W*X+73,Y+2,0) 
NEXT 

'* WRITE "VALENTINES" * 
FOR D=1T0228 
READ X,Y 

PSET ( W*X+4 1 , Y+3 0,0) 



290 NEXT 

300 '* WRITE "DAY" * 

310 FOR D=1TO110 

320 READ X,Y 

330 PSET(W*X+89,Y+58,0) 

340 NEXT 

350 »* CHANGE SCREENS * 
3 60 •* TO DRAW HEARTS * 
370 PMODE4,5 

380 PCOPYlT05:PCOPY2T06:PCOPY3TO 
7:PCOPY4T08 

390 '* DRAW SMALL HEART * 

400 CIRCLE (12 4, 120) ,10,0,1, .4, .9 

410 CIRCLE(140, 120) ,10,0,1, .6, .1 

420 CIRCLE(132, 99) ,22,0,1.8, .13, 

.38 

430 POKE178,2 

440 PAINT (128, 120) , ,0 

450 CIRCLE (124, 120) ,10, ,1, .4, .9 

460 CIRCLE (140, 120) ,10, ,1, .6, .1 

470 CIRCLE (132, 99) ,22, ,1.8, .13, . 

38 

480 GET(113,109)-(153,140) ,H,G 
490 POKE178,3 

500 LINE(113, 109)-(151, 140) , PSET 
,BF 

510 •* DRAW LARGE HEART * 

520 CIRCLE(104, 120) ,30,0,1, .45, . 

92 

530 CIRCLE (112, 124) ,18,0,1, .45, . 
94 

540 CIRCLE(152, 120) ,30,0,1, .595, 
.07 

550 CIRCLE (14 4-, 124) , 18 ,0 , 1 , . 59 , . 
07 

560 CIRCLE(128, 72) ,64,0,1.6, .1, . 
42 

570 CIRCLE(128, 38) ,51,0,2.4, .15, 
.36 



PRINTERS! 

M EW! Okidata 192+ (Par. or Ser.) $ 370 

M EW! Okidata 193 (Parallel) s 540 

ME W! Okidata 193+ (Serial) S 6I0 

Okimate 20 Color Printer 5 1 35 

Fujitsu 2100 (80 col.) S 4I0 

Fujitsu 2200(132 col.) J 520 

Toshiba 321 (Par. or Ser.) S 5I0 

Qume Letterpro 20 (Letter Qual.) $ 445 

Silver Reed 420 (Daisy Wheel) s 240 

Silver Reed 600 (Daisy Wheel) $ 575 

(Add 5 10 Shipping for Printers) 



ACCESSORIES! 

Taxan 12" Green Monitor $ I25 

Taxan 12" Amber Monitor s l 35 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot (80 col.) . . . $ 30 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot(l32 col.) $ 45 

Stand w/ Diskette Storage (80 col.) $ 47 

Stand w/ Diskette Storage (132 col.) $ 57 

Other Printers, Monitors, and Accessories for CoCo 
and IBM upon request 

* 15 off interface with purchase of printer. 

Find your cheapest published price and we'll beat it!!! 



DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS! 

ALL Vi HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives!) .'. . . s 235 

Drive 0,1 (addressed as 4 drives!) J 350 

All above complete with HDS controller, 
cable, & drive in case with power supply 

Bare Double Sided Drives $ I09 

Dual Vi Height Case w/ Power Supply s 49 

Double Sided Adapter s 25 

HDS Controller, RS ROM & Instructions J 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes 5 32 & s 3 s/h 

We use the HDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROM's. 
Shipping Costs: 5 5 /drive or power supply, MO max. 

Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft.-*IO. Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft.— *20. 
Other cables on request. (Add *3°° shipping) 



SP-2 INTERFACE for 
EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Optional external switch (*5°° extra) frees parallel port 
for use with other computers 

*While Supplies Last 



CLOSEOUT* $ 29.9S 

SP-3 INTERFACE for 



MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem /printer switch— no need for Y-cables 
or plugging/unplugging cables 



c 




R 



P.O. Box 293 
Raritan, NJ 08869 
(201)722-1055 

ENGINEERING 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 101 



mm A md 

58j3 


mm. VW*^^ — 1 mmm mm mm. 

POKE178, 2 

PAINT (128 , 105) , ,0 


mm mm* mm m* mm ax mm mmm mm a mm am mm — - mm a. mm — mm - _ 

, 15 , 16 , 15 , 17 , 14 , 18 , 13 , 18 , 12 , 18 , 1 
1 , 18 , 10 , 19 , 9 , 18 , 14 , 19 , 15 , 20 , 15 , 2 


590 


600 


■* SWITCH SCREENS TO * 


1,15,22, 14,23, 13,23, 12,24,11,24, 


610 


• * DISPLAY HEART * 


10,24,9,23, 14,23,15,23,16,22,17, 


620 


PM0DE4 , 5 : SCREEN1 , 1 


22,18,21,19,21,20,21,21,2)3,22,19 


.aa a»* mm* 

630 


Am «■ 4B*aaBh aaa> Masai a ■ ^ mm ^^^«a ^a as 

* * WRITE "WITH" * 


.aa. mm mm mmm mWm. *m mm mmm mm mmt. n ^mt mm — 

, 21 , 19 , 20 , 19 , 19 , 20 , 18 

^m. m^m. ^mm mmm*. mm mmmm mm .^k. mm ^^^m — ^_ — — — __ ^_ 

2030 DATA 20,17,21,16,22,15,25,1 


640 


FOR D=1TO80 


^ MM a^ 

650 


READ X,Y 

PSET(X+112, Y+122,0) 


^mt mm. ^mm ^m± ^mm mmm ^m±. ^m~ ^m± mm ^^m* — 

0,26, 9, 27, 9, 28, 10, 29, 11, 29, 12, 29 


660 


,13,28, 14,27,15,26,15, 25,15,24,1 


670 


NEXT 


4,28,15,29,15,30,15,31,15,32,14, 


680 


'* WRITE "LOVE" * 


33,13,33,12,34,11,34,10,34,9,33, 


690 


FOR D=1T046 


14,33,15,33,16,32,17,3 2,18,31,19 

mm. mm mmm, mm* mm, mm mmm, mm mm. mmw mm. mm, mm mm. mm. mm mm. mm mm. mm mm 

,31, 20, 31, 21, 30, 22, 29, 21, 29, 20, 2 


700 


READ X,Y 


710 


PSET(X+116, Y+13 6, 0) 


^fe. mm mm. mm*, mml mm mm mm^ mmt mm mmm 

9,19,30,18,30,17 ! 


i 720 


NEXT 


2040 DATA 31,16,32,15,35,10,36,9 


730 


'* PUT HEARTS ON SIDES * 


,37,9,38,10,39,11,39,12,39,13,38 1 


•an m mmm 

740 


PUT(1, 1) -(41,32) ,H, AND 


,14,37,15,3 6,15,35,15,34,14,38,1 . 

mmm .^mm mm mmm m ^mt mm mmm M mm ^mm m. mm * — ^_ — 

5,39,15,40,15,41,15,42,14,43,13, 


75J3 


* .mmm. mm mmm mm ft m .mmm. mmmm — — m ■ _. _ 

PUT(215,1) -(255,32) ,H, AND 


760 


aaa^aa aaaaaai aa « .^af ft A* m an an an ft » am m. a » <^&. 

PUT(1,70)-(41,101) ,H, AND 


43,12,44,11,44,10,45,9,46,9,47,1 


aam a*aj jh 

770 


aaa* «a> a> aam a -mm aa aa* aaaa ^af ft a ^Sk aaa aaa a* _aat ai ft aaaa aa a a aaa. 

PUT(215,70)-(255,101) ,H, AND 


0,47,11,47,12,46,13,46,14,47,15, 

m ^mm. mm mmm m ^mm. mm m mmm ^m mm ^m*. ^mm ^m mm mm mm mm ._. 

48, 15,49, 14,50,13,50,12,51, 11,51 
,10,51,9,51,12,51,13 | 


A W 

780 


aB\a>%aam A —mm. mm mm mm. ft a -da mm mm an mmm*} ft am aa aa ak aa aaa*. 

PUT(21, 139) -(61,170) ,H, AND 


790 


PUT(195,139)-(235,170) ,H,AND 


800 


'* SWITCH SCREENS TO * 


2050 DATA 51,14,50,15,50,16,49,1 


810 


'* DRAW EXSPANDED HEART * 


7,49,18,49,19,48,20,48,21,47,22, 
46,21,46,20,46,19,47, 18,47,17,48 


820 


PC0PY5T01 : PC0PY6T02 : PC0PY7T0 


3 : PCOPY8T04 


91 ^m m mmm mm mmm mt mmm mmt mm a mmm ^mm. mm — ^aa — mm mm ^mm mm 

, 16 , 49 , 15 , 50 , 14 , 52 , 12 , 53 , 11, 54 , 1 


830 


PM0DE4 , 1 


0,55,10 


840 


P0KE178,2 

CIRCLE (104, 120) , 30, , 1, . 45, . 9 


ala* mmf mmt # aaa. mm mmmm mm mmmm mm* aak ■ ■ mm mm mm mmt aaa m mm m^ma 4mmm *m mm mmmm ■ ^mm ■ A% 

2060 'DATA FOR "VALENTINE'S" 


850 


2070 DATA 0,1,1,0,2,0,3,1,2,2,1, 


2 




•1 4**a ft" A *i A a**4 fmrn mm mmm m mm mmm mm> m* m+ 

1,3, 0,4, 1,4, 2, 5, 3, 5, 4, 6, 5, 6, 6, 6, 

mmm m* mm, m* mmm, mmm mm *mt mmm mm mm mmm mm mm. mmm mm — m 

7,6,8,6,9,5,10,5,11,5,12,5,13,4, ! 


860 


CIRCLE (152, 120) ,30, ,1, .595, . 


07 




mm m m mm mmm mmm mm mm, mm mm mmm mmm mm mmm mm mm j mmm. mm -mm, 

14 , 4 , 15 , 5 , 15 , 6 , 15 , 7 , 15 , 8 , 14 , 9 , 13 


870 


CIRCLE (12 8, 72) , 64 , , 1 . 6 , . 1, . 4 


^mm. mum ^mm mm *mmJ mm mm mm mmum} mm ^mmm mmm ^mmt _ mUml * mmml amml mmmmm , 

,9,12,10,11,10,10,10,9,10,8,11,7 


2 




•a m** mm mm mmm mm —m m mm +mm mm. mm mm* mmm —t mm mm mm 

, 11, 6, 11, 5, 11, 4 , 12, 3 , 12 , 2 , 13 , 1, 1 


880 


CIRCLE (103, 120) ,40,0,1, .45, . 


A mm* aa mmm mmt 

4,0,15,0 


86 




mm mmt mm mg mmm. mm mmmm mm, mm m\ mm m\t mm mmm mmm mm m> mm. mm mmm mm mmt 

2080 DATA 18,10,17,9,16,9,15,10, 


89)3 


CIRCLE (153, 120) , 40 ,0 , 1 , . 65 , . 


14 , 11 , 14 , 12 , 14 , 13 , 14 , 14 , 15 , 15 , 16 


07 




+1 mmm mm mmm mm mmm mm mm mm j mm mmm mm mW . mm A mm mmm. mm -mm mm 

, 15 , 17 , 15 , 18 , 14 , 19 , 13 , 19 , 12 , 19 , 1 


900 


CIRCLE (128, 69) , 74 ,0 , 1 . 6 , . 1, . 


1,19,10,20,9,19,14,20,15,21,15,2 


42 


* 


2,15,23,14,24,13,25,12,25,11,26, 


910 


PAINT (128, 95) , ,0 


10, 26,9,26,8,2 6,7,27, 6,27,5,27,4 
,27,3,27,2,26,1,26,0,25,0,24, 1,2 


920 


'* FLIP BETWEEN BOTH * 


930 


' * SCREENS TO MAKE * 


4,2,24,3 

2090 DATA 23,4,23,5,23,6,23,7,23 


94)3 


»* HEART PULSE * 


950 


PM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 


,8,23,9,23,10,23,11,23,12,25,14, 


960 


FORD= 1T0 500 : NEXT 


26,15,27, 15,28, 15,29, 14, 30, 13,31 
,12,32, 11,3 2,10,31,9,30,9,30, 10, 


970 


PM0DE4 , 5 : SCREEN1 , 1 


98)3 


FORD=1TO500 : NEXT 


29,11,29,12,31, 14,32,15,3 3,15,34 


99)3 


GOTO950 


mm mmm mm. mmm mm m mtm mm mm mm. mm. mm mm mm\. mm. mm mm mm mm mmm mm 

,15,35,14,3 6, 13 ,36,12,36,11,37,1 


1)3)3)3 GOTO1000 


0,38,9,39,9,40,10,40,11,40,12,39 


2)3)3)3 1 DATA FOR "HAPPY" 


,13,39,14,39,15 

2100 DATA 41,10,42,9,43,9,44,10, 


2^1)3 DATA 0,1,1,0, 2, 0,3,1, 2, 2,1, 


1,3,0,4,1,4,2,4,3,4,4,4,5,3,6,3, 


44,11,43, 12,43,13,43,14,44,15,45 


7,3 


, 8 , 3 , 9 , 2 , 10 , 2 , 11 , 2 , 12 , 2 , 13 , 1, 
1,15,12,0,12,1,11,2,11,3,10,4 


aa mmm A m mm mmm m mmm mm a m mm mm -mm m mm mm -mm. a mm, mm 

, 15 , 4 6 , 15 , 47 , 14 , 48,13,48,12,48,1 


14, 


1,49,10,49,9,49,8,49,7,49,6,49,5 


,10,5,10,6,10,7,9,8,9,9,9,10,9,1 


,50,4,50,3,49,14,50,15,51,15,52, 
15 , 53 , 14 , 54 , 13 , 54 , 12 , 55 , 11 , 55 , 10 


1,8 


,12,8,13,8,14,8,15,8,7,7,6,6, 
,6,4,7,4,8,5,9,6,9,7,9,8,9,10 


6,5 


, 55 , 9 , 55 , 14 , 56 , 15 , 57 , 15 , 58 , 15 , 59 


,9,11,9,12,8 

2020 DATA 17,10,16,9,15,9,14,10, 


,14,60,13 

2110 DATA 60,12,60,11,61,10,62,9 


13, 


11 , 13 , 12 , 13 , 13 , 13 , 14 , 14 , 15 , 15 


. 63 . 9 . 64 . 10 . 64 . 11 . 64 . 12 . 63 . 13 . 63 

§ Saf mm? § mm* W Naf * ¥ mmm mmf f Naf * M mmm mmm 9 mm* m W mmm mmm § mmf mm* A mmm mmf f \mf mm? 



1 02 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



, 14 , 63 , 15 , 65 , 10 , 66 , 9 , 67 , 9 , 68 , 10 , 
68 , 11 , 67 , 12 , 67 , 13 , 67 , 14 , 68 , 15, 69 
,15,70,15,71,14,72,13,73,12,74,1 

I, 74,10,73,9,72,9,72,10,71,11,71 
,12,73,14,74,15,75, 15,76,14,77,6 
,77,7,78,8,78,9 

2120 DATA 79,15,80,14,81,13,82,1 
2,82,11,83, 10,83,9,84,9,85,10,86 
,11,86,12,85,13,84,14,83,15,82,1 
5,81,14,84,15,85,15,86,15,87,14, 
46,8,47,7,48,7,49,7,50,7,51,7,52 
,6,55,7 

2130 'DATA FOR "DAY" 

2140 DATA 10,0,9,0,8,1,7,2,7,3,6 

,4,6,5,6,6,5,7,5,8,5,9,5,10,4,11 

,4,12,4,13,3,14,2,15,1,15,0,14,1 

,13, 2, 13, 4, 15, 5, 15, 6, 15, 7, 15, 8,1 

5 , 9 , 15 , 10 , 14 , 11 , 13 , 12 , 12 , 12 , 11 , 1 

3 , 10 , 13 , 9 , 14 , 8 , 14 , 7 , 14 , 6 , 14 , 5 , 14 

,4,13,3,13,2,12,1,11,0,9,2,10,2, 

II, 2,13,0 

2150 DATA 21,10,20,9,19,9,18,10, 
17 , 11 , 17 , 12 , 17 , 13 , 17 , 14 , 18 , 15 , 19 
, 15 , 20 , 15 , 2 1 , 14 , 22 , 13 , 22 , 12 , 22 , 1 
1,22,10,23,9,22,14,23,15,24,15,2 
5, 15, 26, 14, 27, 13., 27, 12, 28, 11, 28, 
10,29,9,30,9,31,10,31,11,31,12,3 
0,13,30,14,31,15 



2160 DATA 32,15,33,14,34,13,34,1 

2,35,11,35,10,35,9,3 5,12,35,13,3 

5,14,34,15,34,16,33,17,33,18,33, 

19,32,20,32,21,31,22,30,21,30,20 

,30,19,31,18,31,17,32,16,33,15,3 

4,14,36,12,37,11,38,10,39,10 

2170 'DATA FOR "WITH" 

2180 DATA 0,1,1,0,2,0,2,1,1,1,3, 

1,3,2,3,3,3,4,2,5,2,6,2,7,1,8,0, 

9,1,9,2,9,3,8,4,7,5,6,5,5,6,4,6, 

3,6,5,6,6,6,7,6,8,7,8,8,7,9,6,9, 

5,10,4,10,3,11,2,12,7,13,6,14,5, 

14,4,14,3,15,6 

2190 DATA 16,6,17,5,18,4,18,3,18 
, 2 , 19 , 1 , 19 , 0 , 19 , -1 , 19 , -2 , 19 , 5 , 20 
,5,21,4,22,3,23,2,24,1,24,0,25,- 
1,25,-2,25,-3,24,-4,23,-3,23,-2, 
23,-1,23,0,23,1,23,2,23,3,23,4,2 
4,1,25,1,26,2,26,3,27,4,28,4,29, 

3 , 14 , 1 , 17 , 1 , 18 , 0 , 19 , 0 , 20 , 0 , 2 1 , -1 
2200 'DATA FOR "LOVE" 

2210 DATA 0,0,1,1,1,2,1,3,1,4,1, 
5,1,6,0,7,2,6,3,6,4,7,5,7,6,6,10 
,2,9,2,8,3,8,4,8,5,9,6,10,6,11,5 
,11,4,11,3,12/2,13,1,14,2,14,3,1 

4 , 4 , 15 , 5 , 16 , 5 , 17 , 4 , 17 , 3 , 17 , 2 , 17 , 
1,18,1,19,2,20,2,21,2,22,1,21,0, 
20,1,20,3,21,4,22,4,23,4,24,3 




f~ fi t~ fi O CT *Z *~* O 1 CT 

i i »_ >~ Zf Zf Ix I *Z — * 




DfcStt DWUES 

NEW-4 DRIVE SYSTEM <S DSDD DRIVES ACCESSED 
UNDER RS DOS) X -1373.35 

£ DRIVE SYSTEM XCS DSDD DRIVES IN ONE CASE) 

*3£9.35 

DRIVE 1 UPGRADE (1 DSDD UPGRADE FOR YOUR 

SG-31£3,3131, OR 313£ -Jll 3.35 PLEASE 

SPECIFY CATALOG NUMBER WHEN ORDERING ! ! 

DRIVE 0 - SSDD F^H DRIVE X -*133.35 

DRIVE 1-SSDD F^H DRIVE <USE WxEXISTING DRO) 

fl£5.35 

*- INCLUDES EITHER R.S. OR DISTO CONTROLLER 



□□EG 3 

SiSK UPGRAOE-J103.3S TECH MANUAL-f 23.35 
RAM DISK £ DIAGNOSTICS -S19.35 
MONITOR CONNECTOR FOR CM-S-J4.35 

OTHER STUFF 

MONITOR INTERFACE -J23.95 A00S-S&3.35 
KEYB0ARDS~*£4.35 ADAPTERS-*3.35 
SERIAL TO PARALLEL CONVERTERS -J44.35 
NEW — EPSON LX-dOO PRINTER 160 CPS DRAFT/ 
3GCPS NLa— TRACTOR INCLUDED ONLY S133.3S 

FULL LINE OF EPSON PRINTERS IN STOCK ! ! ! 
CALL FOR BEST PRICES 



5512 POPLAR MEMPHIS, TN 38119 901-761-4565 

ADD J4.30 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. VISA^MC £ MONEY ORDERS ACCEPTED. 
ALLOW 3 WEEKS FOR PERSONAL CHECKS, NO CODS. PRICES MAY CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 03 



COCO'S MOST ADVANCED 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZER. 

IT TALKS, SINGS AND 

MORE, 
only . . . $79.95 



WITH EARS PURCHASE 
only . . . $59.95 




■ - I 




SUPER VOICE is no ordinary speech synthesizer. It uses Silicon 
Systems, Inc. SSI-263, the most advanced speech/sound chip 
available. SUPER VOICE is not only capable of highly intelligible 
speech, sound effects, and singing over a 6 octave range, but now 
we have turned SUPER VOICE into a monophonic Super Music 
Synthesizer with our PIANO KEYBOARD. 

IT TALKS. A free TRANSLATOR text-to-speech program makes 
writing your own talking program as easy as SAYING "HELLO." 

SUPER VOICE works in any 32K or 64K computer. A disk system 
requires a Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 

Here are the facts; 
the decision is yours. 






SUPER VOICE 


REAL TALKER 


RS SPEECH 
CARTRIDGE 


VOICE-PAK 


Synthesizer Device 


SSI-263 


SC 01 


SP-256 


SC 01 


Speaking Speeds 


16 


1 


1 


1 


Volume Levels 


16 


1 


1 


1 


Articulation Rates 


8 


1 


1 


1 


Vocal Tract 
Filter Settings 


255 


1 


1 


1 


Basic unit 
ol Speech 


64 phonemes 
4 durations each 


64 phonemes 


64 allophones 
5 pause lengths 


64 phonemes 


Pitch Variations 

_ — — 


4096 {32 absolute levels 
with 8 inflection speeds) 


4 


1 


4 



SUPER TALKING HEADS 

Paul and Pauline, our talking heads program is normally $24.95. Until 
Dec. 15 we will include them with each SUPER VOICE order. 




FREE 
BLANK DISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 



VISA* 




Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



*//' 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V«% sales tax 



Speech Suit 



38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 



EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 
Recognition 
System 



$99.95 




• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 

QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 



Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
En any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separatefy) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 





FREE 
BLANK DISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 





Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



'//' 



ems 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V4% sales tax 



Speech Sifsti 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 



FILE EDIT MIDI MISC 



b T,n,;rn 



m m a \t\ r?i 



tf/JIJ Jus trunentsi 

0: UJO 1 Brass l: 005 
2: 006 Piano 3: 009 
4: 013 E Organ 5: 014 
6: 003 Trunpet ?i 016 
8) 018 Oboe 9: 019 
At 021 Vibrphn B<* 026 
C: 025 Clavier D: 032 
Et 043 Snaredr F: 045 



String 
Gui tar 
P Drgan 
Flute 
Clarnet 
Harpsch 
Tinpani 
Percusn 





Lyra 

COMPATIBLE! 





3 



n Q cP h iifrt 

6 



So ptf* 



$3-0 



J I * II J 1 I 4 i > 

« ( ♦ ♦ » «. 1 » t I » 4 




± 



* i t t t * i < 



,l, Tl 



r i-L 



d on** 



****** ft* MM' •# at 
4W ****** ^^^tS^^it4»f^>rfV*%W,^ » M Wl lA 



/////fifiiiiiiiumvww 




Now your CCCO xanllattoLyoLir 
Whether you hjrw^^ 



doesn't matters longǤl it's MIDI equippe 

- ■ • « - *** a— -^.^"M 




c^ynthesfzet. ^I&nli^ 



V Supports 16-Track recording and playback. 
Adjustable ternpo~ 

✓ Over 45 Kbytes available 
(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible). 

Record to any track. 

Low Level track editing. 
^ LYRA editing, (one voice per track). 

Playback irpm any number of tracks. 

Quantizing to 1 Aft vL interval. 
t> Dynamic memory allocation^ 



a. Or Moog, it 
oose from our 



Filter out MIDI data: 

Key pressure ; 

Program change 
Pitch wheel 



p rafessiorjal €OC< 




IDl *2 



tern. 



Conlrol Change 
""Srwnet Pressure 
System Message 



J__.. <■<£--— ■•■■—•<•'*— . "%' t j fr 




OUT editing 




✓ Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode. 

Adjustable Key (Transposition) for each 
track. 

p* -Save recording to-disk for later playback or 

TfiBaT 



s MASTE^of* 




i^-Sync&lo drum 

,SLAV§1. 




A** LIBRARIAN 



^Sequencer "features: 
100% machine code. 
"Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 
Metronome 

Many songs included. 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 _MIDI ca- . 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires- 
64K CoCo, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. ^h^t 
COCO MIDI 2. (disk only) #CM147 , $149.95 
DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 
TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173ZZ??_^ , $34.95 

_ 




Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface, 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 



Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101^ 
CZ-10Q0, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, 



memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hard$a/e interface. : 
CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk on\y)-#CUW^^,, ~.V . . . . . $39^5 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



I 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



I j < 

If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with* our full size 5 octave keyboard 




MIDI KEMBOARb 

gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to cpnnept 
the COCO to your MIDI synth: ~rr" 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) fgw! , $29.95 



ZTZ 




TM 



Aj<J0 



t 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



All Voices Dn 
Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 



Block delete 



J Block copy 





pose 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



#— 3--IA 




1, 



2, 



3 



LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not a 
misprint!) 

Super Simpte Editing Supports: 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 



f Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 

12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 

drum machines. 
v 0 Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 

channels. 
uf Transpose music to any key. 

Modify music to any tempo. 
& Automatically inserts bar for each measure 

as you compose, 
f Key signature lets you specify sharps and 

flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
* Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 

(#LC164). 

^ Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

*^ Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 



* Solo capability 

Block edits are highlighted. 
v 0 Tie notes together for musical continuity. 

Name of note pointed to is constantly 

displayed. 
& Jump to any point in the score 

instantaneously. 
v 0 Memory remaining clearly displayed, 

however you will have plenty of memory 

even for the most demanding piece. 
^ Help menu makes manual virtually 

unnecessary. 
*^ LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 

hardware unless you want more power. 
^ Music easily saved to tape or disk. 

Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 
LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 $54.95 



LYRA OPTIONS — — 

These LYRA options are not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA G0N VERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA 
files. 

(Disk) #LC164 $14.95 

VERSION UPDATE 

To receive the latest version of LYRA return your 
original disk. #UP162 $10.00 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 $19.95 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada . . $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada . . SS.00 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(Disk) #LS1 77 $19.95 

« 

LYRA LIBRARY 

A collection of 50 songs ready to play for hours. 
Most have 7 and 8 voices. #LL137 . $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 
play all 8 voices in stereo. 
(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 

A professional quality MJDJ interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 $149.95 



iVn 



COD Charge 



$2.00 



Illinois residents add b ] A% sales tax. 




















MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 900 songs. WhVn used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible L^RA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 

COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorware. 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark of Radio Shack. 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
Ud££y?2d (312) 879-6880 



Follow the Bread Crumbs 



By Dennis H. Weide 






ince the publi- 
cation of my 
article "The 
CoCo Writes A Program" 
(July 1987, Page 84), many 
people have written to me with 
questions. Some say they have ma- 
chine language programs on disk, 
but don't have the addresses of the 
programs. Well, believe it or not, Tandy 
left you some bread crumbs on disk 
Wk (just like in the fairy tale) that will 
lead you to the addresses you 
want. 

On cassette-based systems, the 
m addresses are stored in RAM. 
Load the ML program into 
memory and use the following 
m PEEK commands to find the re- 
quired addresses; 

Start Address 

PEEK ( 4B7 ) *256+PEEI< ( 488 ) 
End Address 

PEEK ( 12G ) *256+PEEK ( 127 ) 
Exec Address 

PEEK ( 157 ) *25G+PEEK ( 158 ) 

Disk Extended BASIC doesn't store 
all the addresses in memory after 
loading the program. They're stored in 
the file on disk as shown in Figure 1 . 
The top part of the figure shows a 
machine language program file in its 



Dennis Weide is a communications 
technician for A T&Tin Albuquerque, 
New Mexico, where he programs 
A T& Tand IBM PCs. He enjoys mak- 
ing toys and teaching computer pro- 
gramming. 



binary format, as it is stored on disk. 
The bottom part shows a BASIC pro- 
gram file in its tokenized format. We'll 
be using the top part of the figure for 
this discussion. The bottom portion is 
included for reference. Note that 
Figure 1 represents the program file on 
disk, and byte numbers are deter- 
mined by the length of the file. 

The first byte (Byte 1) of an ML 
program file is always zero — this is 
how Disk BASIC determines whether 
the file specified in the LORDM com- 
mand is a machine language program 
file. For a BASIC program, Byte 1 is 
always 255. 

The second and third bytes (bytes 2 
and 3) of the ML program file are the 
most significant byte (MSB) and least 
significant byte (LSB) of the file size. 
These two bytes tell Disk BASIC how 
many bytes of program code are actu- 
ally stored in the file. 

The fourth and fifth bytes (bytes 4 




and 5) are the MSB 
and LSB of the start 
address pointer. These two 
bytes point to the start ad- 
dress of the ML program, where 
Disk BASIC will load the first byte 
of program code. 

The sixth byte (Byte 6) is the first 
byte of the program code that will be 
loaded into the start address, in- 
dicated by the start address pointer. 

Disk BASIC continues to load 
each successive byte into mem- 
ory until it reaches the end of 
the program file. In Figure 1, 
the last byte of program code 
is Byte 11. The last five bytes 
(bytes 12 through 16) of an ML 
program file contain the end-of- 
program marker and the execute 
address. The fifth, fourth and third 
bytes (bytes 12, 13 and 14) from the 
end of the file always contain 255-0- 
0, indicating the end of the binary file. 



Machine Language Program Disk Storage 



1 


2 | 3 


4 | 5 


6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | II 


12 | 13 ] !4 


15 | f6 


PGM 

type 


PGM CODE 
SIZE 


START 
AODRESS 


VARIABLE LENGTH PROGRAM CODE 


END OF PRGM i 


EXECUTE 
ADDRESS 


ML»0 


MSB 


LSB 


MSB 


LSB 


VAR 


VAR 


VAR 


VAR 


VAR 


VAR 


255 


0 


0 


MSB 


LSB 






BASIC Program Disk Storage 


1 


2 1 3 


4 J 5 


6 1 7 


8 | 9 j 10 | II | 12 | 13 


14 


15 | 16 


PGM 
TYPE 


NUMBER OF 
CODE BYTES 


NEXT LINE 
POINTER 


LINE 
NUMBER 


VARIABLE LENGTH PROGRAM CODE 


EOLN 


EOF 


B=255 


MSB 


LSB 


MSB 


LSB 


MSB 


LSB 


VAR 


VAR 


VAR 


VAR 


VAR 


VAR 


0 


0 


0 



B BASIC 

EOF END DF FILE MARKER 
EOLN END OF LINE MARKER 
LSB LEAST SIGNIFICANT BYTE 



ML MACHINE LANGUAGE 

MSB MOST SIGNIFICANT BYTE 

VAR VARIABLE BYTE VALUES 

1-16 BYTE NUMBER 



Figure 1: Disk Hie storage 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



The last two bytes (bytes 15 and 16) are 
the MSB and LSB of the execute ad- 
dress pointer. This is the address the 
processor jumps to when the program 
is executed from BASIC using the EXEC 
command or USR function. The pro- 
grams in listings 1 and 2 follow the 
bread crumbs for you. 

The program in Listing 1 is a BASIC 
program that prompts you for a file- 
name and then reads the first byte of the 
file to determine if it's an ML program 
file. If it's not, the program jumps to 
Line 7000 and prints "Not a binary file." 
If it is an ML file, the program reads the 
file length in bytes 2 and 3 and the start 
address in bytes 4 and 5. Then it per- 
forms the following calculations to 
determine program size and the start, 
end, and execute addresses: 

Program Size 

BYTE2 * 256 + BYTE3 
Start Address 

BYTE4 * 256 + BYTE5 
End Address 

START ADDR + PGM SIZE -1 
Exec Address 

(PGM SIZE + 9) * 25G + (PGM 

SIZE + 10) 

When all these calculations are com- 
plete, the results are printed on the 
screen in decimal and hexadecimal 
format. The last line, "Total bytes," is 
the program size — not the file size. The 
program size is always smaller than the 
file size, because the pointers and end- 
of-file (EOF) markers are not loaded 
into memory. 

The program in Listing 2 is the PAS- 



Listing 1: ADRESBAS 



10JS 1 FINDADDR PROGRAM 14j3j3 1 

2J30 1 BY DENNIS H. WE IDE 1 OPEN FILE TO READ 

3j3j3 ' 1 A BYTE AT A TIME 

40j3 1 THIS PROGRAM WILL READ 17j3j3 1 

5J30 1 THE START, END AND EXE 18j8j3 OPEN "D" , #1, F$ , 1 

C 19 M FIELD #1,1 AS A$ 

60)3 » ADDRESSES OF AN ML PRO 20j3j3 1 

GRAM € 2100 1 READ FIRST BYTE TO 

7pp ' FROM DISK AND PRINT TH 2200 1 SEE IF FILE IS AN 

E 2300 1 ML BINARY FILE 

800 1 RESULTS ON THE SCREEN 2400 1 

900 1 2500 GET #1,1 

1000 • 2600 IF ASC(A$)>0 THEN 7000 

1100 CLS 2700 1 

1200 LINEINPUT M ENTER FILENAME > 2800- 1 READ BYTES 4 AND 5 

»;F$ 2900 1 AND CALCULATE THE 

1300 CLS 3000 1 START ADDRESS 



CAL source code for the same program. 
It was written using Deft PASCAL and 
compiled into a machine language 
program. The addresses of the version 
provided for RAINBOW ON TAPE/ DISK 
are as follows: 



Function 

Start Address 
End Address 
Exec Address 



Dec 

20000 
24980 
20000 



Hex 

4E20 
6194 
4E20 



The ML code produced by the Deft 
compiler is fully relocatable, so you can 
load it into memory anywhere you 
want. It's always a good idea to protect 
memory where an ML program is 
loaded by using the CLERR command. 

Each version has its own advantages 
and disadvantages. The BASIC version 
will be erased from memory each time 
another basic program is loaded. But 
it can be appended to other BASIC disk 
utilities. The PASCAL version can be 
loaded into protected memory and 
executed whenever it's needed, but it 
executes slower than the BASIC version 
because PASCAL doesn't allow direct 
reading of disk tracks and sectors as 
BASIC does. 

Both programs contain remarks to 
help you understand how they function, 
but it's not necessary to type in these 
remarks in either listing. After you've 
chosen the version you will use and have 
saved it to disk, you can test the pro- 
gram by entering the filename of an ML 
program stored on disk for which ad- 
dresses are known. Be sure to include 
the drive name in the filename if you 
have more than one drive. You can 



create a dummy test file by entering the 
following: 

SflVEM"J(JNI</BIN:0'\ 5000,6000, 
5500 . 

This is not a working program but a 
dummy file to verify that your program 
works properly, so be sure to kill it after 
youVe completed the test. When you 
enter JUNK/BIN :0 at the filename' 
prompt, the following screen message 
should be displayed: 

JUNI</BIN:0 



FUNCTION 


DEC 


HEX 


STRRT ADDRESS 


5000 


13BB 


END ADDRESS 


G000 


1770 


EXEC ADDRESS 


5500 


157C 


TOTAL BYTES 


1001 


03E9 



If other addresses are displayed, 
check the program for typing errors. 

The information I've provided here 
should come in handy for those who 
want to expand their programming 
knowledge or better understand how 
files are stored on disk. This informa- 
tion applies to Radio Shack Disk Ex- 
tended Color BASIC versions 1.0 and 
1.1, and any RS-DOS compatible op- 
erating system. It will not work on OS- 
9 operating systems. 

It's always a pleasure to hear from 
people who find my articles interesting. 
So, if you have any questions or sugges- 
tions, please feel free to write me. 

(You may write to Dennis Weide at 
14201 Marquette N.K, Albuquerque, 
NM 87123. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 1 09 



3100 


i 


5500 GET #1,PS+10 




3200 


GET #1,4 
SA=ASC(A$) *256 


5600 EX=EX+ASC(A$) 




3300 


5700 CLOSE#l 




3400 


GET #1,5 


5800 1 




3500 


SA=SA+ASC(A$) 


5900 • PRINT RESULTS TO 


SCREEN 


3600 


1 


6000 1 




3700 


1 READ BYTES 2 AND 3 AND 


6100 PRINT F$ 




3800 


1 CALCULATE PROGRAM SIZE 


6200 PRINT 




3900 


i 

• * 


6300 PRINT "FUNCTION 


DEC • • 


4000 


GET #1,2 
PS=ASC(A$) *256 


HEX" 




4100 


6400 PRINT " 




4200 


GET #1,3 






4300 


PS=PS+ASC(A$) 


6500 PRINT "START ADDRESS 


" ; SA 


4400 


1 


;" ";HEX$(SA) 




4500 


1 CALCULATE END ADDRESS 


6600 PRINT "END ADDRESS 


; EA 


4600 


i 


;" ";HEX$(EA) 




4700 


EA=SA+PS-1 


6700 PRINT "EXEC" ADDRESS* 


" ; ex ' 


4800 


i 


;" ";HEX$(EX) 




4900 


' LOCATE LAST TWO BYTES 


6800 PRINT "TOTAL BYTES 


" ; EA 


5000 


1 OF FILE AND CALCULATE 


-SA+1;" ";HEX$ (EA-SA+1) 




5100 


1 EXECUTE ADDRESS 


6900 END 




5200 


i 


7000 PRINT F$ : PRINT : PRINT 


"NOT A 


5300 


GET #l,PS+9 
EX=ASC(A$) *256 


BINARY FILE" 




5400 







Listing 2: flDRESPAS 

PROGRAM FINDADDR (INPUT, OUTPUT) ; 

(* WRITTEN BY DENNIS H. WEIDE *) 

(* PROGRAM TO FIND START, END, & EXEC ADDRESS *) 
(* OF MACHINE LANGUAGE PROGRAM. TRS-80 COCO *) 

(* DECLARE ALL VARIABLES *) 

VAR FILENAME , ADDRESS 1 , ADDRESS 2 , ADDRESS 3 , ADDRESS 4 : STRING ; 

FILE! : TEXT; 

BITE1 , BITE2 , BITE3 : CHAR; 

PGMSIZE, START, FINISH, EXEC, COUNT: INTEGER; 

(* START OF MAIN PROGRAM *) 

BEGIN 
PAGE ; 

WRITE ( 1 ENTER FILENAME > •); 
READLN ( FILENAME ) ; 
PAGE ; 

(* OPEN FILE TO BE READ *) 
(* ONE BYTE AT A TIME *) 

RESET (FILE1, FILENAME) ; 

(* READ BYTES 1,2,3 TO SEE *) 
(* IF THIS IS AN ML BINARY *) 



110 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



(* FILE . 



*) 



READ ( FILE 1, BITE 1 , BITE2 , BITE3 ) ; 

(* IF THIS IS AN ML BINARY *) 
(* FILE, START HERE TO *) 
(* CALCULATE PROGRAM SIZE *) 

IF BITEl=CHR(j3) THEN BEGIN 

PGMSIZE : =ORD (BITE2 ) *256+ORD (BITE3 ) ; 

(* READ BYTES 3 AND 4 AND *) 
(* CALCULATE START ADDRESS *) 

READ ( FILE 1, BITE 1 / BITE2) ; 

START : =ORD ( BITE 1 ) * 2 5 6+ORD ( BITE2 ) ; 

(* CALCULATE END ADDRESS *) 

FINISH : =START+PGMSIZE-1 ; 



(* READ ALL BYTES UNTIL THE *) 
(* LAST TWO FILE BYTES ARE *) 
(* FOUND. *) 

FOR COUNT:=l TO PGMSIZE+3 DO READ (FILE 1 , BITE 1) ; 

(* READ LAST TWO FILE BYTES *) 
(* AND CALCULATE EXECUTE *) 
(* ADDRESS. *) 



READ(FILE1,BITE2 , BITE3) ; 
WRITELN; 

EXEC:=ORD(BITE2) *256+ORD (BITE3 ) ; 



(* COMPUTE ALL HEX I DE C IMAL *) 
(* ADDRESSES. *) 

WORD [1024] :=START; 
HEX(lj324,2,ADDRESSl) ; 
WORD [102 4] :=FINISH; 
HEX(lj324,2,ADDRESS2) ; 
WORD [1024] :=EXEC; 
HEX(lj324,2,ADDRESS3) ; 
WORD[1024] :=PGMSIZE; 
HEX(lj324,2,ADDRESS4) ; 



(* PRINT RESULTS TO SCREEN *) 



PAGE ; 

WRITELN ( FILENAME ) 
WRITELN; 



WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 
WRITELN ( 



FUNCTION 



DEC 



HEX') 



t 



START ADDRESS 
END ADDRESS 
EXEC ADDRESS 
TOTAL BYTES 



1 , START , ■ 
1 FINISH, 1 
1 ,EXEC, 1 
1 , PGMSIZE, 1 



) 



1 , ADDRESS 1) ; 
■ / ADDRESS2) 



, ADDRESS 3) 
1 , ADDRESS4) 



END 

ELSE WRITELN ( f NOT A BINARY FILE 1 ); 
END. 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 111 



T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE CONTINUES IT 



ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 

COVER 1 
RACETRACK 
HANGMAN 
MUSIC ALBUM 
LIFE EXPECTANCY 
WORD TESTS 
KILLER MANSION 
BARTENDER 
CALENDAR 
ROBOT WAR 

ISSUE #2, AUGUST 1982 

UFO COVER PT 1 

BIORHYTHM 

BOMBARDMENT 

BLACKJACK 

COST OF LIVING 

FREHZX 

BUSINESS LETTER 
QUICK THINK 
QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 
QUEST FOR LENORE 

ISSUE #3, SEPTEMBER 1982 

UFO COVER PT.2 
BASKETBALL 
CHUCKLUCK 
SLOT MACHINE 
ALPHABETIZER 
NFL PREDICTIONS 
FLAG CAPTURE 
ROBOT BOMBER 

ISSUE #4, OCTOBER 1982 

UFO RESCUE 

TANK BATTLE 

DRIVEWAY 

SOUNDS 

BALLOON DROP 

MIND BOGGLE 

COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 

CALORIE COUNTER 

JACK-O-LANTERN 

ISSUE #5, NOVEMBER 1982 

CATALOG COVER 
BOWLING 

PROGRAM INVENTORY 

PROMISSORY-LOANS 

CHECKBOOK BALANCER 

TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 

CONVOY 

BAG-IT 

SPECTRA SOUND 
CONVEYOR BELT 

ISSUE #6, DECEMBER 1982 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
RAINDROPS 
STOCK MARKET 
ADVANCED PONG 
DESTROY . 
SOUND ANALYZER 
CREATIVITY TEST 
VOICE DATA 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 1 
LOONY LANDER 

ISSUE #7, JANUARY 1983 

NEW YEARS COVER 
LIST ENHANCER 
SUPER PRECISION DIV. 
BOMB DIFFUSE 
SPACE STATION 
ML TUTORIAL PT.2 
SHOOTOUT 
FIND UTILITY 
CYRORG INS. 
CYBORG FACES 



ISSUE #8, FEBRUARY 1983 

COVER 8 
DEFEND 

3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 
CXO CONCENTRATION 
AUTO LINE NUMBERING 
ML TUTORIAL PT 3A 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 3B 
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 
DUAL BARRIER 
BRICKS 

ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

TIME MACHINE COVER 
TRIG DEMO 
PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 
PROGRAM PACKER 
BUDGET 

ELECTRONIC DATEBOOK 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 4 
TAPE DIRECTORY 
BLOCK-STIR 

CXO ADDING MACHINE 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 

TENTH COVER 
PYRAMID OF DANGER 
TYPING TUTOR 
ML TUTORIAL PT.5 
TINYCALC 

STOCK MARKET COMP 
YAH-HOO 
MISSILE ATTACK 
SCREEN PRINT 
BRIKPONG 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 

ELEVENTH COVER 
ARCHERY 
FROG JUMP 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 6 
MLT DICTIONARY 
BASIC SPEED UP TOT. 
METRIC CONVERTOR 
GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 
GRAPHICS PROGRAM 
CATERPILLAR CAVE 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 

TWELFTH COVER 
SHOOTING GALLERY 
BOMB STOPPER 
VALLEY BOMBER 
STARFIGHTER 
WHEEL OF FORTUNE 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 7 
MERGE UTILITY 
RAM TEST 
LANDER 

ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 

THIRTEENTH COVER 
FLASH CARD 
ICE BLOCK 
COSMIC FORTRESS 
MAIL LIST 
DOLLARS & CENTS 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 8 
SDSK COPY 
MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 
CRAWLER 

ISSUE #14, AUGUST 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
ROW BOAT 

COMPUTER TUTLPT. 1 
INDEX DATABASE 
DISK ZAPPER 
COCO-MONITOR 
COCO-ARTIST 
ROBOT COMMAND 
TEST SCREEN PRINT 
HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 



ISSUE #15, SEPTEMBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER PT. 2 
GOLD VALUES 
TREK INSTRUCTIONS 
TREK 

HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 
ASTRO DODGE 
DR. COCO 
PEG JUMP 
MORSE CODE 
PURGE UTILITY 

ISSUE #16, OCTOBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
BOPOTRON 
DIRECTORY RECALL 
VECTOR GRAPHICS INST, 
VECTOR GRAPHICS 
SKYDIVER 

SWERVE AND DODGE 
NIMBO BATTLE 
TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 
LIFE GENERATIONS 

ISSUE #17, NOVEMBER 1983 

THANKSGIVING COVER 

3-DTIC-TAC-TOE 

INDY500 

COLLEGE ADVENTURE 
MEMORY GAME 
DUNGEON MASTER 
WEATHER FORECASTER 
GRID FACTOR INST. 
GRID FACTOR 
DRAW 

ISSUE #18, DECEMBER 1983 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
CLIMBER 

GALACTIC CONQUEST 
WARLORDS 
STATES REVIEW 
MATH TUTOR 

MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 
PRINTER UTIUTY INST. 
PRINTER UTILITY 
MUTANT WAFFLES 

ISSUE #19, JANUARY 1984 

BANNER 
PROBE 

DISK DIRECTORY PROTECTOR 
OPTICAL CONFUSION 
WORD PROCESSOR 
WORD SEARCH 
ASTRONAUT RESCUE 
STAR TRAP 
PIE CHART 
FORCE FIELD 

ISSUE #20, FEBRUARY 1984 

INTRODUCTION: 
HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 
ESCAPE ADVENTURE 
SEEKERS 
MASTER BRAIN 
LIST CONTROLLER 
DISKETTE CERTIFIER 
ROM COPY 
BASIC RAM 
SNAFUS 

ISSUE #21, MARCH 1984 

BASIC CONVERSIONS 
FINANCIAL ADVISE 
CASTLE STORM 
DOS HEAD CLEANER 
COCO TERMINAL 
SNAKE CRAWLER 
WAR CASTLE 
SKY FIRE 
EASY BASIC 
DOTS 3-D 



ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 

HEALTH HINTS 
GUBLIBS 

CLOTHER SLITHER 
BIBLE 1 & 2 
BIBLE 3 & 4 
CATCHALL 
INVADER 
ALIEN RAID 
MOON ROVER 
10 ERROR IGNORER 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 
STOCKS OR BOMBS 
WALL AROUND 

CXO TECHNICAL LOOK PT.1 
NUCLEAR WAR INST. 
THERMONUCLEAR WAR 
CIRCUIT DRAWER 
MOUSE RACES 
SUPER-SQUEEZE 
DATA FALL 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 

DIR PACK & SORT 
BRICK OUT 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT.2 

USA SLIDE PUZZLE 

51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 

51 *24 SCREEN 

CITY INVADERS 

PRINTER SPOOLER 

STEPS 

SNAKE 

ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 3 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEYMAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDITOR INST. 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLE BUSTER 
RECOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUGUST 1984 

PEEK, POLE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 
O-TEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
CXO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

ISSUE #27, SEPTEMBER 198 

COCO TO COM 64 

GALACTIC SMUGGLER 

INDY RACE 

ACCOUNT MANAGER 

CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 

STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 

SPACE DUEL 

BUGS 

TRAP-BALL 

BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCTOBER 1984 

HANGING TREE 
CHECKERS 
FOOTBALL + 
MORE PEEKS, POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RAT ATTACK 



ISSUE #29, NOVEMBER 1984 

DISK ROLL OUT 
ROBOT ON 
MULTIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
QUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 

ISSUE #30, DECEMBER 1984 

MATH HELP 
ZECTOR ADVENTURE 
WORLD CONQUEST 
DRAG RACE 
MINE FIELD 
T-NOTES TUTORIAL 
T&D PROGRAM INDEXER 
SYSTEM STATUS 
ERROR TRAP 
DROLL ATTACK 

ISSUE #31, JANUARY 1985 

TREASURES OF BARSOOM 
BATTLE GROUND 
STRUCTURED COMPILED LAMkUftS 
LIBRARY MODULE 
MINIATURE GOLF 
STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEBRUARY 1985 

DR. SIGMUND 
ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 
LOTTERY ANALYST 
BASIC COMPILER 
MUSIC CREATOR 
MEANIE PATROL 
TRI-COLOR CARDS 
SHAPE RECOGNITION 
DISK BACKUP 
SPACE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MARCH 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 
PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
ML DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 
DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEED KEY 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

HOVER TANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSIC GENERATOR 
FYR-DRACA 
DRIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 

SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 
SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
HAUNTED HOUSE 



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RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
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ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 

SELECT A GAME 2 
VIDEO COMPUTIZER 
SPEECH SYNTHESIS 
SPEECH RECOGNITION 
SPACE LAB 
AUTO COMMAND 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 
KNIGHT AND THE LABYRINTH 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 

ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 

CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE 5-7 

SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 
FILE TRANSFER 
FOUR IN A ROW 
MARSHY 

TAPE CONTROLLER 
CATACOMB 
AUTO TALK 
SGR8PAK 

ISSUE #38, AUGUST 1985 

golf™ 3 
wizard adventure 
kite design 

GOMOKU 

AMULET OF POWER 
LINE COPY UTILITY 
DISK PLUMBER 
SUPER RAM CHECKER 
GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPTEMBER 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
CAR MANAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHINE 
ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 
SUPER VADERS 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

ISSUE #40, OCTOBER 1985 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
COCO-WAR 
DISK LABELER 
SHIP WAR 
ELECTRIC COST 
MULTIKEY BUFFER 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
SAND ROVER 

ISSUE #41, NOVEMBER 1985 

GRUMPS 

DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 
SOLAR CONQUEST 
GAS COST 

RIME WORLD MISSION 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 
GRAPHIC TEST 
GRAPHIC LOOPY 
BOLD PRINT 

ISSUE #42, DECEMBER 1985 

HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAHTZEE 
DISK UTILITY 
MACH II 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
SLOT MACHINE GIVE AWAY 
TEXT BUFFER 
TUNNEL RUN 



ISSUE #43, JANUARY 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER COST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 
KEYPAD ENTRY 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEBRUARY 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 

ISSUE #45, MARCH 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COLO KEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
LIBERTY SHIP 
SINGLE STEP RUN 

ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DISK LOCK 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 

BOMB RUN 

TANKS 

TAR PITS 

BASEBALL 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

ROULETTE 

GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFF. 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
TV SCHEDULE 
BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTI COPY 
AUTO MATE 
SCROLL PROTECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 

ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER LO U. 

DISK DISASSEMBLER 

BAKCHEK 

PACHINKO 

STOCK CHARTING 

HAUNTED STAIRCASE 

CANYON BOMBERS 

DRAGONS 1 & 2 

GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 

AUTO BORDER 



ISSUE #50, AUGUST 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPTEMBER 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET 51 
VAN GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 

ISSUE #52, OCTOBER 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 
INVASION 

THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOTRACE 
FLIPPY THE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS 
SUPER ERROR 2 

ISSUE #53, NOVEMBER 1986 

CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CAVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DECEMBER 1986 

JOB LOG 
PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TYPE 
PANZER TANKS 
MRS PAC 
BIG NUM 

ISSUE #55, JANUARY 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
DIR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEBRUARY 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRUSH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EDITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 



ISSUE #57, MARCH 1987 

THE BAKERY 
ENCHANTED VALLEY ADV 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR 1 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 

ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 
HOME PLANT SELECTION 
CHECK WRITER 
HELIRESCUE 
KABOOM 
NEW PONG 
CROQUET 
FUNCTION KEYS 
ZOOM 

ELECTRONICS 2 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
LABELS 
CATCH A CAKE 
COCO MATCH 
ROBOTS 

STREET RACERS 
BOWLING 3 
ELECTRONICS 3 
GRAFIX 
KRON 

ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 

EZ ORDER 

SUBMISSION WRITER 
KEYS ADVENTURE 
WALLPAPER 
CHOPPER COMMAND 
UNDERSTANDING OPPOSITES 
BIT CODE PLOTTING 
ELECTRONICS IV 
KING PEDE 
RAIDER 

ISSUE #62, AUGUST 1987 

PENSION MANAGEMENT 
HERB GROWING 
CATALOGER UTILITY 
RAIDERS 
ALPHABETIZING 
W.F.O. 

ELECTRONICS V 
RAMBO ADVENTURE 
BLOCKS 

MULTI SCREEN CAVES 

ISSUE #63, SEPTEMBER 1987 

GENEOLOGIST HELPER 
SMART COPY 

MAINTENANCE REPORTING 
COCO 3-COCO 2 HELPER 
DIRECTORY PICTURE 
SUB SHACK 
SAVE THE MAIDEN 
CAVIATOR 
ELECTRONICS VI 
MONKEY SHINE 



ISSUE #64, OCTOBER 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE IN THE GRASS 
CYCLE JUMP 
GEOMETRY TUTOR 
WIZARD 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS VII 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 

ISSUE #65, NOVEMBER 1987 

TAXMAN 

DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 
SIR EGGBERT 
CROWN QUEST 
GYM KHANA 
COCO 3 DRAWER 
FOOTBALL 
ELECTRONICS 8 
CHOP 

ISSUE #66, DECEMBER 1987 

ONE ROOM ADVENTURE 
OS9 TUTORIAL 
RIVER CAPTAIN 
SOUND EFFECTS 
BETTING POOL 
ADVANCE 
MATH TABLES 
ELECTRONICS 9 
LOWER TO UPPER 
NOIDS 

ISSUE #67, JANUARY 1988 

AUDIO LIBRARY 
SAVE THE EARTH 
WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
LOW RES P/CTURES 
WORD COUNTEFI 
BACARAT 
BATTLE SHIP 
ELECTRONICS 10 
TAPE CONVENIENCE 
PENGUIN 



^Jen/feme/}) 

1 1 7 /a s/ reeeiuecf my first 
order anef 7 am very 
pleased! l^ncfosed is a 
cAecAfr a// (Ae remain" 
iny 6acA issues plus a 
I ^year subscription. " 

^Jary TZAodes 
y*j/?/a/}a, C>7t 

Dear 7t( l O t 

"sis iAe (Computer 
7nsirucior for our 
scAdo/, 7 Aaue 6een a 
su6scri6er /o Jd 1 /) 
software for two years. 7 
looe your proyrams. 
auality is excellent /" 

/Sarry H *Jo6lin 
S/aten 7sfan<f XXf 



MAIL TO: 



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2490 Miles Standish Drive 
Holland, Michigan 49424 
(616) 399-9648 




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PLEASE CIRCLE 
TAPE or DISK 



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1 1 , |l i if 1 i'ii 'i -'A.; »f 



Because of all the concern over 
artifact colors not being dis- 
played on the CM-8 monitor 
when the CoCo 3 runs older machine 
language programs, I decided to create 
Patch. This BASIC program, along with 

Sieve Ostrom is a 38-year-old father of 
two girls who love the Co Co, He has 
written numerous programs, including 
tM Adventure SHIPWREK, the ML 
game STYX, and a variety of basic , 
games and utilities, both commercial 
and in the public domain. 

114 TTHE RAIN BOW February ifi&B 



its three machine language subroutines, 
helps display color on the CM-8 mon- 
itor. 

Patch modifies the existing machine 
language program that uses artifact 
colors, searching the program for ill 
occurrences of the sequence FF22. It 
then checks to see if the STR or STB 
commands precede this reference to the 
PI A register If so> Patch then inserts a 
call to a small routine placed in upper 
memory , that checks to see if the PMODE 
being attempted is either 2 or 4. 

What this routine does is change the 



PMODE to either 1 or 3, which will let you 
see the game in full color. The graphics 
may appear slightly coarser, though. 
The program is not foolproof. It works 
in most cases, but sometimes the patch 
just won't work. In a few instances, 
however^ when it appeared to fail, a 
press of the reset button started every- 
thing up and the program ran fine with 



( ■■;*!;:■ MOST, 



fwch h self^xplari&tory. Just load it 
f^-pmffi . fbr$t MtmUzes the proper 
color slots for the RGB monitor and 
sets up the machine language routines. 



You are then told to load your artifact- 
ing machine language program (do not 
type EXEC), and to type GOTO 298. You 
will be prompted to press the ENTER 
key, and you might notice three values 
displayed briefly in the upper left-hand 
corner of the screen. These are the 
number of occurrences found in the ML 
program of a possible PMODE change. 

The value next to the question marks 
represents the occurrences of references 
to $FF22, without either STfl or STB just 
prior. These may need to be examined 
further using the Look program. Patch 
modifies all occurrences of STR and STB 
whenever PMDDEs 2 and 4 are called. 
You must do this every time you want 
to load an ML program. 

Patch will not work if the pro- 
grammer did some unusual things while 
setting up the PMODE screens. Also, it 
won't work on BASIC programs, copy- 
protected programs or ROM packs. It 



works only on machine language pro- 
grams that load between &H1900 and 
&H7FE0. This is a range large enough 
that it should include most programs. 

My second program to help in arti- 
facting colors for RGB monitors is 
Look. It's a basic program that scans 
machine language programs and prints 
out the locations of all possible writes 
to Register SFF22. You can examine 
these locations in more detail with an 
editor/ assembler/ debugger utility. 

If you are proficient in using a debug- 
ging utility such as ZBUG 9 you can also 
make permanent changes to many ma- 
chine language programs that work 
with Patch. When you find the areas 
that store a number into $FF22, just 
replace this number with the same 
number ANDed with &HEF. This sets Bit 
4 of Register SFF22 to zero, and 
changes the PMODE from 4 to 3 or from 
2 to 1. All you need to do then is save 



this copy. It will now always run with 
color on your CM-8 without needing to 
run Patch each time. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 12612 Cedar Lake Road, 
Minnetonka, MN 55343. Please enclose 
an SASE when requesting a reply.) 



Editors Note: The following machine 
language programs from T & D Sub- 
scription Software have been tested 
with Patch to display colors when run 
on a Co Co 3 and CM-8 monitor: 
Panzer, Mrs. Pac, Foot Racer, Raider, 
Fire Runner, Flippy and Able. If you 
find other ML programs to work prop- 
erly with Patch, please send us a list of 
the program names, along with the 
companies presently selling the pro- 
gram. We will print updated lists for our 
readers in upcoming issues. □ 



Listing Is PATCH 



PATCH 

COPYRIGHT 1987 

STEVE OSTROM 

12612 CEDAR LAKE ROAD 

MINNETONKA, MN 55343 

612-546-7608 



1* 
20 

30 
40 
50 
60 
70 

80 PCLEAR1 

90 CLEAR14 / &H1900 

100 RGB 

110 PALETTE 4,0 

120 PALETTE 5,9 

130 PALETTE 6,36 

140 PALETTE 7,63 

150 FORX=&H7FE0 TO &H7FE9 

160 READA$ 

170 POKEX,VAL("&H"+A$) 
180 NEXTX 

190 FORX=&H7FF0 TO &H7FF9 
200 RE AD A $ 

210 POKEX,VAL( f, &H lf +A$) 
220 NEXTX 

230 FORX=&H7F70 TO &H7FDB 
240 RE ADA 
250 POKEX,A 
260 NEXTX 

270 CLS: PRINT" NOW LOADM ' YOUR ML 
PROGRAM • " : PRINT : PRINT "WHEN DONE, 

TYPE: GOTO 290" 

280 END 

290 A=PEEK(&H9D) *256+PEEK ( &H9E) 
300 CLS: PRINT "LDA=" :PRINT@32 , "LD 
B=" : PRINTQ64 , "???=»' 
310 PRINT: INPUT "PRESS <ENTER>" ;A 

$ 

320 EXEC&H7F70 



330 PRINT: INPUT "PRESS <ENTER> TO 

START PROGRAM" ?A$ 
340 EXECA 

350 DATA 81,C0,25,05,84,EF,B7,FF 
,•22,39 

360 DATA CI, C0, 25,05, C4,EF,F7,FF 
,22,39 

370 DATA 134,48,167,141,0,43,167 
,141,0,40,167,141,0,37,142,25,0, 
141,33,16,174,128,140,127,112,39 
,46,16,140,255,34,3 8,240, 166,30, 





Roget Bouchard 

■^m(HARBlE) 

Montreal, Quebec 



Hint . . > 

Taking Care of CoCo 3 Bugs 

In theory, when you specify a value greater than 23 and less than 256 to 
the vertical coordinate of the HPR I NT command, the CoCo 3 BASIC should 
draw the characters on Line 23 on the screen (the bottom line). In practice, 
however, a value greater than 23 but less than 127 causes basic to draw 
the characters on the first (top) line. Further, when the value is greater than 
151 (which, by the way, is equal to 128+23), the characters are drawn right 
off the displayed screen, causing BASIC to crash randomly, 

What is happening is that basic is taking the entered eight-bit value and 
performing a signed comparison on it to determine whether or not it is lower 
than the maximum allowable value. As a result, any integer greater than 127 
is considered negative and, therefore, passes the range test. When the value 
goes over 151, BASIC starts to draw the characters into the RAM space 
reserved for BASIC code, which causes the system to crash, 

The solution to this problem is simple: Convert the signed comparison to 
an unsigned comparison. To do this, just issue P0KE&HEF92 , &H24 from 

BASIC 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 115 




• « • 

« • I » • * • • ■ « " 



HOW DO YOU GIVE A RAINBOW? 



Name 



Address 
City 



j From: 



I 



Name 



Address 
City 



It's simple — Give a rainbow gift certificate . . . 

Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
source for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
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Give a rainbow gift certificate 

and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by Febru- 
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Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 



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Subscriptions to THE rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency on/y, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



129,183,39,35,129 

380 DATA 247,39,48,1J38,141,J3,4,3 
2,224,255,255,255,166,141,255,24 
9,183,4,4,166,141,255,243,183,4, 
36,166,141,255,237,183,4,68,57,1 



34,189,167,30,16,142 

39J3 DATA 127,224,16,175,31,108,1 

41,255,216,3 2,182,13 4,189,167,30 

,16,142,127,240,16,175,31,108,14 

1,255,200,32,165,999 



Listing 2: LDOK 


210 


PRINT@0,HEX$(X) 




10 1 LOOK 


220 


A=PEEK(X) 




2J3 1 COPYRIGHT 1987 


230 


IFAO&HFF THEN3 80 




30 1 STEVE OSTROM 


240 


A=PEEK(X+1) 




4J3 '12612 CEDAR LAKE ROAD 


250 


IFAO&H22 THEN 3 80 




50 1 MINNETONKA, MN 55343 


260 


A=PEEK(X-1) 




6J3 1 612-546-7608 

* * 


270 


IFA=&HB7 THEN320 




70 ' 


280 


IFA=&HF7 THEN 3 50 




80 PC LEAR 1 


290 


DC=DC+1 




90 CLEAR14,&H19j3j3 


300 


PRINT#-2,HEX$(X) ; " 


• • • 


100 RGB 


310 


GOTO380 




110 PALETTE 4,0 


320 


DA=DA+1 




120 PALETTE 5,9 


330 


PRINT#-2,HEX$(X) ; » 


LDA" 


130 PALETTE 6,3 6 


340 


GOTO 3 80 




140 PALETTE 7,63 


350 


DB=DB+1 




±Dp v~1jO • r x\ J. IN ± Jb^xlUrl J.riili xrJXwLiKArl 


360 


PRINT#-2,HEX$(X) ;» 


LDB" 


TO TEST" : PRINT : PRINT"THEN TYPE: 


380 


NEXTX 




GOTO 160" : STOP 


390 


CLS : PRINT "LDA= 11 ; DA: PRINT#-2 , 


160 CLS 


"LDA=" ; DA 




170 DA=0 


400 


PRINT 11 LDB= H ; DB : PRINT#-2 , "LDB 


180 DB=0 


~" r 


DB 




190 DC=0 


410 


PRINT "???= H ; DC : PRINT # - 2 , f 1 ? ? ? 


200 FORX=&H36AD TO &H3E0A 


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1 F e ature 



The hazards of spending long hours 
at the computer 



A 

Healthy Interface 

Body Maintenance and Computing 

By Laurence D. Preble 



hat began as a trickle in the 
late 70s has now become a 
flood. I'm talking about the 
increasing flow of patients who come to 
me with complaints directly attributa- 
ble to long hours spent in front of a 
computer. 

At first, "computer casualties" came 
mainly from the work place. But more 
and more often now I see problems 
stemming from long hours of comput- 
ing in the home. 

I admit it. There have been occasions 
when I actually spent more time at 
home in front of the computer than I did 
at work. (Thanks, Peg, you're a sweet- 
heart to put up with it all.) Some of my 
most creative work comes at 2 o'clock 
in the morning. Those "simple" pro- 
gramming problems always take at least 
five times longer than expected to 
debug. But I am not the only guilty one 
— home computing has become a se- 
rious business. 



Laurence D. Preble, D. G> a graduate of 
Vanderbilt University and Logan Col- 
lege of Chiropractic, has been a practic- 
ing chiropractor since 1978 and an avid 
computer programmer since 1969. He 
built his first computer in 1976. The 
Radio Shack Color Computers have 
been his favorite home computers since 
1982. 

118 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



The consequences of long hours at 
the computer are also serious business. 
Essentially, computing stresses three 
systems: the eyes, the spine and the 
nervous system. 

The Eyes 

Perhaps the best-known consequence 
of long computing sessions is eye strain. 
Some display devices are notoriously 
hard to read. Many LCD Screens (Liq- 
uid Crystal Displays) fit this category. 
Computers that use a TV as a display 
device can also strain the eyes if the 
characters displayed are too small. 

Several popular programs for the 
CoCo try to squeeze up to 85 columns 
of characters across and 24 lines down 
a TV screen! The problem is that TV 
sets and even composite video monitors 
have very limited resolution capacities. 
If more than 40 columns of characters 
are displayed across the screen, the 
letters and numbers begin to blur. CoCo 
3 circumvents this problem by allowing 
the use of a high resolution RGB mon- 
itor. Good quality RGB monitors easily 
handle 80 columns across and 24 or 
more lines down the face of the tube, 
even displayed in color. 

If it is necessary to use composite 
video, a high resolution monochrome 
monitor will give the best results for 
text-oriented applications. 



If the only display device available is 
the venerable television set, here are a 
few actions you can take to reduce the 
chance of eye strain: Limit the display 
to 40 characters across and no more 
than 16 lines down. If you want to push 
this limit a bit, turn the color control on 
the TV all the way down so that the 
display is black and white. By removing 
the color (or by using a black-and-white 
TV), you will notice that the text display 
appears sharper. With a very good TV 
set, you may be able to display up to 51- 
by-24 characters with relative viewing 
ease. 

Inadequate lighting can also play a 
role. Computing usually involves read- 
ing, from both a VDT and hard copy, 
or paper printouts. The lighting in the 
work area should be bright enough to 
provide good contrast when reading 
paper printouts. If the display device is 
an LCD screen, the lighting is vitally 
important as the screen emits no light 
of its own. More commonly, a CRT 
(Cathode Ray Tube) is used as a display 
device. It is important to shield this kind 
of display from too much light. Light 
reflected from the CRT can decrease 
contrast or wash out the 1 display and 
also produce a distracting glare. Glare 
shields and proper arrangement of the 
lighting can help. 

Some recent visual research has sug- 




gested another potential problem. It 
appears that hour upon hour of reading 
provides inadequate stimulation to the 
peripheral vision (side vision). The 
fovea centralis (center area of vision on 
the retina) is, however, highly stimu- 
lated by reading. The consequences of 
this limited stimulation actually affects 
the growth of the eye! The eye lengthens 
and causes light to be focused in front 
of the retina rather than precisely on its 
surface, resulting in myopia or near- 
sightedness. Have you ever noticed that 
people who are avid readers seem to 
wear glasses more often than not? There 
is a developing body of evidence to lend 
credence to this observation. 

Unfortunately, the studies I read 
merely reported their findings without 
recommending any solutions to the 
problem. Until more research is com- 
pleted, we are left with "common sense" 
suggestions. So take frequent breaks 
from reading and computing. A walk 
outdoors provides excellent peripheral 
.vision stimulation and is a wonderful 
stress reducer, as well. 

It is best to act quickly if you discover 
any visual problems. Consult a vision 
specialist on a regular basis. Your 
optometrist or ophthalmologist may 
have specific suggestions for reducing 
eye strain during your long hours at the 
keyboard. 







The seat of this kneeling chair tips the pelvis 
forward to help maintain good sitting 
posture. 




Photo 1 



Photo 2 



Photo 1 shows the natural curve of the cervical spine. Photo 2 shows degeneration 
of cervical discs and vertebrae (spondylosis) due to poor posture. 



The Spine 

Computing normally requires a sit- 
ting posture, a position that can have 
serious consequences for your back and 
neck. The quality of your sitting posture 
can affect your computing endurance 
and, ultimately, your health. Often, 40 
hours of sitting puts more strain on the 
spine than 40 hours of standing. 

Good sitting posture supports the 
three natural curves of the spine (cervi- 
cal, thoracic and lumbar) in their nor- 
mal, balanced alignment. When you 
slouch, the induced strain can lead to 
stiffness, backache, muscle fatigue, 
headache and even degenerative 
changes. The lumbar curve (lower back) 
bears most of the strain of sitting and 
requires the most support. 

Vertebrae are the bones of the spine 
that provide a framework and protec- 
tion for the spinal nerves. Discs are the 
pads of cartilage between vertebrae and 
act primarily as cushions for the verte- 
brae. Ligaments act like very strong 
rubber bands, connecting and stabiliz- 
ing the vertebrae. The muscles of the 
back and abdomen help maintain the 
natural curves of the spine. 

Slouching greatly alters the natural 
alignment of the spine. With postural 
muscles no longer doing their work, 
ligaments take up the load, becoming 
overstretched. This leads to stiffness, 
fatigue and backache. 

Even more serious is the compression 
of discs resulting from poor sitting 
posture. When the spine curves for- 
ward, pressure within the discs soars. 
Years of poor posture often lead to a 



gradual deterioration of the lower 
cervical (neck) discs and of the lower 
lumbar (lower back) discs. 

A common result of cervical disc 
degeneration is a mixture of pain, 
numbness and tingling in the neck, 
shoulder, arms and hands, due to com- 
pression of the network of nerves 
(brachial plexus) leading from the neck 




The "Nada-Chair Back Sling" cradles the 
lowerback in a "sling" that is anchored at the 
knees by padded loops of webbing. 

February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 119 



and upper back into the arms and 
hands. Common symptoms of lumbar 
disc degeneration are lower back pain, 
muscle spasms and sciatica (leg pain due 
to compressed and inflamed nerve 
roots). Again, the injured disc com- 
presses delicate nerve structures to 
produce the symptoms. 

Spinal degeneration due to poor 
sitting posture is entirely preventable. 
There are four simple things you can do 
to save your back and neck from the 
rigors of computing: maintaining good 
sitting posture, shifting position fre- 
quently, moving safely in your chair and 
performing simple back exercises. 

Rx for a Healthy Spine 

Support your lumbar: It can be help- 
ful to use a cushion to support the lower 
back — a towel rolled to about 6 inches 
in width or a premade support can fit 
the bill. Alternately, a seat wedge that 
tips the pelvis forward can help to 
restore the lumbar curve; you may 
either sit on a folded towel a few inches 
thick or use a premade seat wedge. 

Sit close to your work: Keep your 
chair close to the desk so that you won't 
strain to reach your work materials. 
Also, a detachable keyboard can go a 
long way towards alleviating back 
strain while computing. When the key- 
board is movable, you can select the 
ideal position for typing. Check the ads 
in THE RAINBOW — keyboard extender 
cables are available. 

"Prop" your materials: Try propping 
the work materials up vertically to 
prevent slumping over the desk. Profes- 
sional typists often use "copy stands" to 
hold their papers upright. You might 
find one at an office supply store. 

Use special support helpers: I use two 
special devices to help maintain good 
posture for the long haul: a special 
kneeling chair and a "back sling." The 
chair is available from office furniture 
stores. The seat tips your pelvis forward 
with the legs placed below and the knees 
are given padded support. The config- 
uration appears rather unusual, but it is 
really quite comfortable. 

The other support device, called the 
"Nada-Chair Back-Sling" cradles the 
lower back in a "sling" that is anchored 
at the knees by padded loops of web- 
bing. The Mayo Clinic has used the 
Nada-Chair to train their back patients 
in good sitting posture. A nice feature 
of the Nada-Chair is its total portability. 
It can be taken camping, even canoeing. 

Shift position frequently: You can 
diminish the strain and fatigue of sitting 
by finding a few alternate sitting posi- 

1 20 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



tions and switching among them during 
the day. 

Move safely in your chair: Staying 
active in your chair can help prevent 
fatigue. Sudden motion should be 
avoided, however. When turning the 
body, avoid sudden twisting motions; 
instead, turn the body as a unit. When 
bending to pick up something from the 
floor, support your upper body with 
one hand on the desk and one foot in 
front of you. 

Simple Back Exercises 

Head Press: Place the palms of your 
hands on your forehead and press 
firmly for several seconds, then release. 
Repeat five to 10 times. Likewise, press 
the back and sides of the head. 

Neck Roll: Gently and slowly roll the 
neck in circles, pausing at places where 
you feel tension. Breathe deeply to help 
release the tension. Roll to the left and 
right alternately. Go slowly! Repeat five 
to 10 times. 

Shoulder Shrug: Bring the shoulders 
to the ears and press tightly. Release 
gradually. Next, press shoulders down 
firmly. Release. Work the shoulders 
forward and backward in a circular 
motion. Repeat five to 10 times. 

Mid-back Press: With your arms at 
your side, clasp your hands behind you. 
Push backward while inhaling deeply to 
expand the chest. You should feel as if 
you are pressing your shoulder blades 
together behind you. Repeat five to 10 
times. 

Mid-back Stretch: Press one arm 
above your head, one arm down behind 
your back. Keep both elbows bent. Try 
to touch your ear with the upper arm. 
Stretch and then release. Repeat five to 
10 times. 

Lower Back Stretch: Stand upright. 
Place the palms of your hands on your 
lower back for support. Gently and 
slowly bend backward. Stretch for a 
moment and then release. Repeat five to 
10 times. 

Abdominal Strengthener: Sit straight 
with your posterior firmly against the 
back of the chair. Exhale and tighten 
your abdominal muscles for a count of 
10. Release and repeat five to 10 times. 

Years of personal experience have 
shown that it is far easier to prevent 
back problems than it is to treat them 
once an injury has occured. Take the 
time to develop good habits of spinal 
hygiene. 

The Nervous System 

Computing is, of course, a thought- 
intensive activity. And, while complet- 



ing a successful computing project is 
rewarding and satisfying, the process of 
programming and debugging can be 
extremely stressful and frustrating. 

There is a growing body of knowl- 
edge indicating the harmful effects of 
too much stress. Jdst recently I heard 
about some research concerning the 
immune system. It was determined that 
high levels of stress produce a hormone 
called A.C.T.H. (Adrenocorticotropic 
Hormone, also known as Cortico- 
tropin). This hormone, in turn, de- 
presses the functioning of the immune 
system. In other words, too much stress 
can get you an infection for your trou- 
ble. I can believe it. I used to catch the 
"flu" with great regularity around final 
exam time in college. (It helps to do 
your studying in advance rather than try 
to cram the night before the exam.) I 
survived the "flu bugs" during eight 
years of college — now I have to watch 
out for "Compu-Crud"! 

I have found it useful to take occa- 
sional breaks to practice what some 
researchers call the "Relaxation Re- 
sponse." A simple method of focusing 
the attention can result in reduced stress 
and enhanced function. To use the 
"response," sit in an upright posture 
with the eyes closed and turned gently 
upward. But do not force them upward. 
Select a word of your choice to act as 
a point of focus. It could be the word 
"One," or the word "Relax," or any 
other word of your choice. Imagine the 
sound of that word being spoken, just 
as you would imagine the sound of a 
symphony being played. This is a bit 
more subtle than just mentally repeat- 
ing the word. 

As you sit, the body becomes more 
relaxed, the thoughts more subtle. This 
process is not an attempt at fantasy, 
escape or self-hypnosis — there should 
be no attempt to "blank" the mind. By 
listening to the inner sound you have 
selected, you offer the mind a simple 
point of focus. Random thoughts will 
continue for a time, but become less 
intrusive. If the mind wanders, gently 
return to your point of focus. 

If you sit like this for several minutes, 
your brainwaves will become smooth 
and regular. If an EEG were connected 
to you, it would indicate brainwaves of 
8 to 13 cycles per second, a state called 
the Alpha Rhythm, associated with 
relaxed awareness. 

Allow this restful state to continue for 
15 to 20 minutes. There is no need to 
time the session — your body clock will 
let you know when enough time has 
elapsed. 




Slouching changes the 
alignment of the spine, 
causing ligaments to 
become stretched, 
leading to stiffness, 
fatigue and backache. 




Compression of cervi- 
cal nerves can cause 
pain and numbness in 
the neck, shoulder, 
arms and hands. 



Cervical Curve — 



Thoracic Curve — 



Lumbar Curve — 



Vertebra 
Nerve 




Ligament 




Good sitting posture supports the 
three natural curves of the spine 
{cervical, thoracic and lumbar) in 
their balanced alignment. 



The lumbar curve 
needs support to 
prevent disc 
degeneration and 
compression of 
delicate nerves. 



A biofeedback instrument can be 
useful in early training for achieving the 
Relaxation Response. Radio Shack 
sells a simple device for measuring the 
Galvanic Skin Response, which oper- 
ates on the relationship of the electrical 
resistance of the skin to the amount of 
stress in the system. The Radio Shack 
Biofeedback Monitor (Cat. No. 63-675) 
takes readings of skin resistance and 
converts them into a variable pitch tone. 
The more relaxed you become, the 
lower the pitch of the tone. (The same 
principles are used in a polygraph or "lie 
detector" test.) 



Reams of information have been 
written on relaxation. It is certainly not 
new, and the benefits are many. People 
who practice in this way on a regular 
basis are found to have much lower 
levels of stress in their bodies. Their 
ability to concentrate is improved. Even 
high blood pressure can be reduced 
through relaxation techniques. 

Over the years I have come to think 
of the computer as an extension of me, 
a sort of "mind amplifier." With the 
advent of room temperature supercon- 
ductors, it is quite possible that our 



future will bring computers so small, yet 
so capable, that they can be worn as 
jewelry and controlled by voice or even 

by brainwave interpretation. Until that 
time arrives, we must put up with an 
imperfect human-to-computer inter- 
face. Also, like any mechanical device, 
our bodies, too, must be carefully 
maintained. 



(Questions or comments regarding 
this article may be directed to the author 
at 6540 Outer Loop, Louisville, KY 
40228. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) *55\ 

February 1988 THE RAINBOW 121 



1 F e atur e 



CoCo3 




A machine language subroutine to 
help you program the Interface 



ith the advent of Tandy's Hi- 
Res Joystick Interface, CoCo 
\J VJ 3 owners now have the means 
to access all of the 640 by 192 pixels that 
comprise a Hi- Res graphics screen, and 
at a cost of only $9.95. 

For this price, however, no software 
is provided — not even a hint on how 
to program it. My solution to the 
problem is a simple machine language 
subroutine, shown in Listing 1. 

The interface accomplishes with 
hardware what is otherwise done with 
software. The joystick input is com- 
pared against a rising ramp. When the 
ramp voltage reaches the input voltage, 
the output goes high. The ramp is 
started by making the cassette output 
low. 

The ramp is a smooth, continuous 
sawtooth rather than the staircase 
normally generated by the digital-to- 
analog converter in the CoCo, which 
permits a resolution more than 10 times 
greater than the 64 steps possible with 
the DAC. 

Use of the subroutine is illustrated by 
the BASIC program in Listing 2. This 
program draws circles but can easily be 
enhanced to draw any figures. The ML 
program is poked into memory, then a 
Hi-Res screen appears with cross hairs 
pointing to the pixel selected by the 
right joystick or mouse. Select the 
center of the circle and press the firebut- 
ton. As long as the button is held, a spot 
appears at the selected location. Release 
the button and select any point on the 
circumference. Press the button again 
and the circle will be drawn. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at P.O. Box 255, Ml Gretna, PA 17064, 
Please enclose an SASE when writing 
for a reply.) □ 



Duane M. Perkins retired as director of 
management information systems at the 
Panama Canal and lives in Mt. Gretna, 
Pennsylvania, He has had a number of 
articles published in Modern Electron- 
ics and operates an OS-9 BBS at 717- 
964-3 16 L 




Listing 1 












7Fj3j3 






J3j31j3j3 


ORG 


$7FJ30 


7Fpp 


B7 


FFD9 


ppilf5 ENTER 


STA 


$FFD9 


7FJ33 


BD 


B3ED 


00 120 


JSR 


$B3ED 


7FJ36 


4F 




ft Jil3.fi 


CLRA 




7FJ37 


5D 




J3J314J3 


i. O X £? 




7Fj38 


27 


n 


j30150 


BEQ 


SKIP1 


7FJ3A 


86 


J38 


J30160 


LDA 


#8 


7FJ3C 


B7 


7F74 


&017J3 SRTP1 


STA 


PARAM 


7FpF 


B6 


FF01 




LDA 


$FFj31 


7F12 


84 


F7 




ANDA 


#$F7 


7F14 


BA 


7F74 




ORA 


PARAM 



122 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



1 



7F17 


B7 


FF01 


00210 




STA 


$FF01 


7F1A 


B6 


FF03 


00220 




LDA 


$FF03 


7F1D 


84 


F7 


00230 




ANDA 


#$F7 


7F1F 


B7 


FF03 


(30240 




STA 


$FF03 


7F22 

¥ « MBS 


8D 


2E 


00250 


L00P1 


BSR 


SUBR 


7F24 


BF 


7F75 


00260 




STX 


SAVE 


7F27 

r fli Mai * 


8D 


29 


00270 




BSR 


SUBR 


7F29 


BC 


7F75 


00280 




CMPX 


SAVE 


7F2C 


26 


F4 


00290 

A* A* " "'A 




BNE 


L00P1 


7F2E 


IF 




00300 




TFR 


X,D 


1730 


83 


0001 


00310 




SUBD 


#1 


7F33 


7D 


7F74 


00320 




TST 


PARAM 


7F36 


27 


0D 


00330 




BEQ 

njr am 


SKIP2 


7F38 


44 




00340 




LSRA 




7F39 


56 




00350 




RORB 




7F3A 


1083 


00BF 


00360 

A A A 




CMPD 


#191 


7F3E 


2F 


0E 


00310 

A A A 




BLE 


SKIP3 

¥~mr A % <fc hp* 


7F40 


CC 


00BF 


00380 




LDD 


#191 


7F43 


20 


09 


00390 




BRA 


SKIP3 


7F45 


1083 

ii> Jfc/ \mf *S 


027F 


00400 


SKIP2 


CMPD 


#639 


7F49 


2F 


03 


00410 

A A 




BLE 


SKIP3 


7F4B 


CC 


027F ' 


00420 

AAA 




LDD 


#639 

II 


7F4E 


BD 


B4F4 


00430 

A^ * ~ 


SKIP3 


JSR 


$B4F4 


7F51 


39 




00440 




RTS 




7F52 


B6 


FF20 


00460 


SUBR 


LDA 


$FF2j3 


7F55 


84 


03 


00462 




ANDA 


#3 



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February 198B THE RAINBOW 123 



7F57 


8A 


FC 


00464 




ORA 


#252 


7F59 


B7 


FF20 


00466 




STA 


$FF20 


7F5C 


5F 




00468 




CLRB 




7F5D 


5A 




00470 


L00P2 


DECB 




7F5E 


26 


FD 


00472 




BNE 


L00P2 


7F60 


8E 


)3j394 


00474 




LDX 


#148 


7F63 


84 


23 


00480 




AN DA 


11 * — 

#$23 


7F65 


B7 


MM 

FF2j3 






STA 


$FF20 


7F68 


30 


M| MM 

IF 


W W — W w 


LOOP 3 


•M MM <M M M 

LEAX 


<M MM 

-1/X 


7F6A 


26 


FC 


f5f651p 




BNE 


LOOP 3 


7F6C 


30 


pi 


0j352j3 


L00P4 


LEAX 


1/X 
$FF00 


7F6E 


B6 


FF00 






LDA 


7F71 


2A 


F9 






BPL 


LOOP 4 


7F73 


39 


• 






RTS 




7F74 






00590 


PARAM 


RMB 


1 


7F75 






00600 


SAVE 


RMB 


2 




* 


7Fj3j3 


00610 




END 


ENTER 



00)300 TOTAL ERRORS 



Listing 2: HI RES JOY 

10 'MAKE CIRCLES USING MOUSE OR 

20 ' JOYSTICK AND TANDY HI-RES 

30 ' INTERFACE ON C0C03 . MACHINE 

40 'LANGUAGE SUBROUTINE RESOLVES 

50 '640X192 PIXELS. 

60 CLEAR 200,&H7EFF 

70 FOR A=&H7F00 TO &H7F73 

80 READ H$:POKE A , VAL ( " &H " +H$ ) 

90 NEXT A 

100 DEF USR0=&H7F00 

110 PALETTE 0,63: PALETTE 1,0 

120 HBUFF 1,189 

130 HSCREEN 4 

140 HGET(0,0)-(21,17) ,1 

150 GOSUB 360 

160 IF(PEEK(&HFF00)AND1)>0 THEN 
150 

170 PX=X:PY=Y 

180 HPUT(LX,LY) -(X+10,Y+4) ,1 

190 C=HPOINT(PX,PY) 

200 HSET(PX,PY) 

210 HGET (LX, LY) - (X+10 , Y+4) ,1 

220 IF(PEEK(&HFF00) AND1)=0 THEN 

220 

230 GOSUB 360 

240 IF (PEEK(&HFF00) AND1) >0 THEN 
230 

250. HPUT(LX,LY)- (X+10, Y+4) ,1 
260 AX=ABS(X-PX) :AY=2*ABS (Y-PY) 
270 R=SQR (AX*AX+AY*AY) 
280 R=INT(R+.5) 



290 HCIRCLE(PX,PY) ,R 

300 IF C=0 THEN HRESET (PX, PY) 

310 LX=X-10:IF LX<0 THEN LX=0 

320 LY=*Y-4:IF LY<0 THEN LY=0 

330 HGET(LX,LY) - (X+10, Y+4) ,1 

340 IF(PEEK(&HFF00) AND1)=0 THEN 

340 

350 GOTO 150 

360 H=X:V=Y:X=USR0(0) :Y=USR0(1) 
370 LH=H-10:IF LH<0 THEN LH=0 
380 LV=V-4:IF LV<0 THEN LV=0 
390 LX=X-10:IF LX<0 THEN LX=ji 



124 THE RAINBOW February 1988 




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Reversing a PMODE 4 graphic 



A Picture Is Worth 

6,144 Bytes 

By Dennis H. Weide 



Last week a friend called and in- 
vited me over to watch her 
transfer a CoCo graphics printout 
from paper to a T-shirt by ironing it on. 

She had tfbught a special printer 
ribbon for heat transfers from Diver- 
sions, Inc., 1550 Winding Way, Bel- 
mont, CA 94002. The ribbon is guaran- 
teed for at least 20 transfers. Ours came 
out quite well on the second try, and has 
been washed twice without any appar- 
ent fading. 

A Backwards Picture 

The only problem we had was that the 
image on paper had to be reversed from 
the image on the screen in order to print 
correctly on the T-shirt. Otherwise, all 
printing would have been backwards. 

What seemed easy at first turned out 
to be more complicated as we attempted 
to reverse the screen image for printing. 
Fortunately, I still have my old CoCo 
manuals, which explain how graphics 
modes work in the computer. So, with 
the help of the manuals and Bill 
Barden's book, Color Computer 
Graphics, we went to work. 



Dennis Weide is a communications 
technician for AT&T communications 
in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he 
programs AT&T and IBM PCs. He 
enjoys making toys and teaching com- 
puter programming. 

126 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



Understanding Graphics 

The picture we wanted to transfer was 
saved on disk from a PMODE 4 graphics 
screen, so we set out to write a program 
that would reverse a PMODE 4 graphics 
image. 

In this mode, there are 192 rows of 
picture elements, called pixels, which 
are numbered from 0 through 191. Each 
row contains 256 pixels numbered from 
0 through 255. Each pixel is represented 
by one bit of one byte of video RAM 
(graphics memory). Each row of graph- 
ics on the screen is made up of 32 bytes 
of video RAM (256 bits/ 8 bits per byte 
= 32 bytes). Since there are 192 rows 
displayed on the screen and each row 
consists of 32 bytes, a full screen of 




PMODE 4 graphics requires 6,144 bytes 
of video RAM (32 bytes X 192 rows = 
6144 bytes). 

To reverse the video image (but not 
the colors) on the screen, it is necessary 
to reverse the bit pattern of each byte 
as well as the bytes themselves. To help 
you better understand, look at Figure 1. 

Note in Figure 1 that the bit images 
and byte addresses are actually turned 
end over end. While this may seem a 
little complicated at first, once you view 
the graphics page as a binary picture, 
you can readily see how to reverse it. 

The program Listing 1 is a short 
BASIC program that lets you see the bits 
as they are set and reset. To use the 
program, key it in and run it. The 




The screen dump shown on the left is of a normal graphics image. The reversed image is 
shown on the right. While color is not indicated here, the program switches red and blue 
artifact colors as the image is reversed. This should not affect black-and-white printing. 



graphics screen for PMODE 4 will be 
displayed. 

Type in any number between 0 and 
255 (you won't see the text screen until 
you press the reset button) and watch 
the bits as they are set on the screen. You 
can actually see the binary image for 
each number. The small line you see on 
the screen is for reference. That byte, 
Address 4010, has been loaded with 255 
to set all 8 of its bits. The address you 
will be loading, 4042, is directly below 
that one. 

Reversing the Image 

To help us reverse the image, we'll use 
BASIC'S powerful RND statement. PND 
allows you to determine which bits in a 
byte are set and which are reset. The RND 
statement takes two binary values and 
produces a result whose binary value 
represents only those bits that are set in 
the first and second binary number. 

Look at Figure 2. Notice that only the 
leftmost bit of the results is set (equal 
to 1), because this is the only bit set in 
both R and B. 

To see how the BASIC RND statement 
works, run the program in Listing 2. 
Enter a number from 0 to 255 to see 
which bits are set and which are reset. 
In each pass through the loop, a logical 
RND is performed on the value of R and 
the bit position determined by the 



BYTE # #1 #2 . . #31 #32 

NORMAL IMAGE 11000000 11111111 10011100 00000000 

REVERSE IMAGE 00000000 00111001 11111111 00000011 

NOTE: The above binary values are arbitrary figures chosen at random for this 
example. The actual values will depend on the graphics image displayed. 

Figure 1 



DECIMAL 


192 = 


: BINARY 


11000000 


BINARY VALUE A 


DECIMAL 


129 = 


= BINARY 


10000001 


BINARY VALUE B 


DECIMAL 


128 = 


■ BINARY 


10000000 


RESULT OF LOGICAL AND 








Figure 2 





formula 2 /N C. The results are then 
printed on the screen. This short pro- 
gram is the foundation for reversing bit 
images on the graphics screen. 

The complete BASIC program for 
reversing the graphics image is shown in 
Listing 3. In order to accomplish the 
task, each of the 32 bytes in Line 1 of 
the screen is read, its bit image reversed 
and the results stored in an array. When 
all 32 bytes have been read and stored, 
the array is read backwards and placed 
back in the row. This procedure con- 
tinues until all of the 192 rows displayed 
on the screen have been reversed. 

The BASIC program takes about 31 
minutes to reverse a PMODE 4 picture, 
which is quite a long time. So, I wrote 
a PASCAL version (Listing 4) to accom- 



plish the same task in about one minute. 

After you've loaded your picture file, 
run the BASIC version (by entering RUN) 
or the PASCAL version (by entering 
EXEC) to reverse the image. When the 
image has been reversed, load your 
screen print program and install the 
special printer ribbon. Once printed, 
your picture is ready for heat transfer. 

The next time you have a family 
gathering, you can pass out T-shirts 
decorated with your family crest. Or, 
your club can design their own logos for 
hats and shirts. 

(Questions or comments may be 
directed to the author at 14201 Mar- 
quette N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87123. 
Please enclose an SASE when writing 
for a reply.) □ 



Editor's note: The PASCAL source presented here will work on a Co Co 3 if it is entered and compiled on 
a CoCo 3. You could use the version of Deft PASCAL for this. However, the binary file which will appear 
on RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK this month was compiled on a CoCo 2 and will not run on 
a CoCo 3. 



Listing 1: REVERSEl 



1J3J3 ■ 

2j3j3 1 

3j3j3 1 

4j3j3 CLS 

5j3j3 PCLEAR 4 



LISTING 1 



6j3j3 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1,1:PCLS 
7J3J3 POKE 359,57 

POKE 4j31j3,255 
9j3j3 INPUT A 
1J3J3J3 POKE 4)342, A 
11)3)3 GOTO 9)3)3 



Listing 2: REVER5E2 
ljZfj8 1 LISTING 2 

2) 3)3 1 

3) 3)3 1 

4) 3)3 CLS 

5) 3)3 INPUT A 



6) 3)3 FOR C=j3 TO 7 

7) 3)3 IF A AND 2 A C THEN PRINT "BIT 
"C"IS SET TO 1" ELSE PRINT "BIT" 
CIS SET TO )3" 

8) 3)3 NEXT C 

9) 3)3 GOTO 500 



Listing 3: REVER5E3 

1) 3)3 * LISTING 3 

2) 3)3 1 

3) 3)8 1 BACKWARDS GRAPHICS 

4) 3)3 1 BY DENNIS H. WE IDE 

5) 3)3 1 (C) 1987 

6) 8)3 1 

7) 8)8 1 

8) 3)3 PMODE4,l:SCREENl,l 



9)3)3 FOR X=l TO 1)3)3)3: NEXT X 

I) 3)3)3 DIMA(31) 

II) 3)3 FOR X=3584 TO 9727 STEP 32 

12) 3)3 FOR T=)3 TO 31 : A (T) =)3 : NEXT T 

13) 3)3 FOR Y=)3 TO 31 

14) 3)3 W=1:Z=7 

15) 3)3 Q=Q+1 

16) 3)3 C=PEEK(X+Y) AND W 

17) 3)3 IF C=W THEN A (Y) — A ( Y) +2 A Z 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 27 





18j3j3 W=W*2 


:Z=Z-1 




, 

22j3j3 POKEX+Y,A(Z) 




19j3j3 IF W<256 THEN 


16J30 


23j3j3 Z=Z-1 




2j3j3j3 NEXT ' 


£:Z=31 




24j30 NEXT Y,X 




21j3j3 FOR Y=J3 TO 31 




25)3)3 FOR X=l TO Ij3j3j3j3 :NEXT X 




Listing 4: REVER5E4 






BYTE [65475] :=1; 




(** LISTING 4 


**) 


BYTE [ 65472 ] :=J3; 








**) 


ADDRESS: =3 58 4 ; 




(** BACKWARDS 


GRAPHICS 


**) 


REPEAT | 




(** BY DENNIS 


H. WE IDE 


**) 


FOR X:=J3 TO 31 DO A[X]:=J3; 




(** (C) 1987 


**) 


FOR Y:=J3 TO 31 DO BEGIN 








W:=l; 




PROGRAM BACKWARD; 




Z:=128; 










WHILE W<256 DO BEGIN 




VAR A : ARRAY 


.31] 


OF INTEGER; 


C : =BYTE [ ADDRES S+Y ] AND W; 




ADDRESS, B, 




Z : INTEGER; 


IF C=W THEN A[Y] :=A[Y]+Z; 
W:=W*2 ; 




BEGIN 






Z:=Z DIV 2; 




PAGE ; 






END; 




BYTE[65479] ! 


:=J3; 




END; 




BYTE[65481] ! 


:=j3; 




Z:=31; 




BYTE [65483] : 


:=j3; 




FOR Y:=j3 TO 31 DO BEGIN 




BYTE [65484]: 






BYTE [ADDRESS+Y] :=A[Z] ; 




BYTE[65486] : 






Z:=PRED(Z) ; 




BYTE [65488] : 






END; 




BYTE[6549J3] ! 


:=0; 




ADDRESS :=ADDRESS+32 ; 




C:=BYTE[65314] ; 




• UNTIL ADDRESS=9728 ; 




BYTE [653 14] : 


:=(C AND 


7)+250; 


WHILE Z<lj3j3j3j3 DO Z:=Z+1; 




BYTE[65477] : 




• 


END. ^ ' 



"I cannot -magine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now. it's time to 
give BASIC a shot in the arm, with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your 
choice, with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs 
into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility, (EPROM 
■h burning will cost $15-20; we provide Information concerning how you can 
have this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35, 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC programs, auto-edit of error line, and 
many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk . . . $34.95 Original ADOS lor CoCo 1 or 2 . . . $27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 

Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 ; $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the larget program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid for the expert. 
CoCo 1, 2, or 3 compatible. 

Disk . . . S23.95 Assembfer source listing , . , Add $3.00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

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THE RAINBOW February 1 988 




STfi£N<STH 



itiiiiiiiiiiitiiiifi 



y&jMM&M^m** ■ \ CoCoV2&3 



Kung-Fu Dude — 

Combat Evil With Karate Action 



I hate to mention this fact, but we in 
the CoCo Community have been living 
with a serious software void for the past 
several years. Every other type of com- 
puter has had this particular type of 
software, but we, the Co Co users of 
America, have had to hide our faces in 
shame because of this great deficiency. 
But no longer! 

What we have been missing is a great 
Kung Fu-type arcade game. But Glen 
Dahlgren of Sundog Systems has come 
to every CoCo owner's rescue. He has 
given us Kung-Fu Dude. We now have 
our own great karate arcade game. 



With a 64K CoCo, one disk drive and 
a joystick, you learn that you were born 
to the royal house of Kilachi and that 
as a child you were foreordained . to 
destroy the dark temple of evil that 
ruled the land of your birth. To carry 
out this life mission, your parents sent 
you far away to the Orient to learn the 
ancient mysteries of Kung Fu. Later, 
you learned that the evil rulers of the 
dark temple had your parents killed 
because they refused to reveal your 
location. 

After 19 years of study, you learn that 
the dark temple has kidnapped your 



prearranged mate, Princess Trinsim. 
You decide that now the time has come 
to seek the destruction of the dreaded 
dark temple. When you return to your 
land of birth, you discover that the 
temple has been moved to a secret 
location in New York! 

Boarding a flight to New York, you 
soon arrive and begin your search for 
the evil rulers of the dark temple. Your 
starting point is the dock area of New 
York. Almost as soon as you begin your 
search, you are besieged by hordes of 
evil henchmen from the dreaded temple. 
You must call on every skill you have 
learned of the ancient art of Kung Fu. 
It is at the New York dock area that the 
hunt begins. 

I had only two problems with Kung- 
Fu Dude. The first stems from the fact 
that my 9-year-old son, the "Hi-Tech 
Kid, "got the game and the CoCo before 
I did. After several hours of threats, 
promises and bribery, I was finally able 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 129 



to regain control of my CoCo (bear in 
mind that he does have a CoCo of his 
own, but for some reason would prefer 
to pound away at Dad's). The net effect 
of this problem was that he had run up 
the high scores and it took me days to 
even make the high score list, let alone 
beat him. I'm not saying the game is 
easy by any means, just that he is tough. 

The second problem I had with the 
program (one I have with all programs) 
was that it is copy-protected. I realize 
there are many who feel this is a neces- 
sary evil in order to prevent software 
piracy. However, I feel that it does work 
a decided disadvantage to the legitimate 
user, as there is no provision for making 
a working backup copy. I have been 
using personal computers for over 10 
years now and I have seen more than my 
share of crashed disks, so the first thing 
I always do, after making sure a pro- 
gram works, is to make a working 
backup copy for everyday use and store 
the original away for safekeeping. You 
cannot do this with Kung-Fu Dude. 

In all fairness, I must state that 
Sundog Systems does offer a limited 
one-year warranty on the program, 
guaranteeing that the disk will load or 
they will replace it free. This is certainly 
much fairer than those companies offer- 
ing only a 30-, 60- or 90-day warranty. 

Kung-Fu Dude is well-written in 100 
percent machine language and is a 
challenge. After several weeks of use, I 
still haven't made it to the dark temple. 

The graphics in the program are done 
in artifacted colors. And while the 
program does run on a CoCo 3, you 
must use a color composite monitor or 
color TV set. (On an RGB monitor, all 
you get are black and white stripes.) The 
program takes advantage of the high 
speed mode of the CoCo 3. In fact, once 
the program boots up, you are asked if 
you want to play in the CoCo 3 high 
speed mode. Don't try this with a CoCo 
1 or 2 or, as the Kung-Fu Dude author 
puts it, "The video will attempt to fry 
itself." 

If you are playing on a CoCo 3, I 
suggest you follow the author's further 
recommendation of playing the game at 
the slower speed the first few times to 
get the feel of the game. The high speed 
mode makes this mode look like slow 
motion. And you are going to need 
every advantage you can get to survive 
in Kung-Fu Dude. 

You control the Dude with your 
joystick. There is a set of moves that 
occurs with the firebutton on, and 
another set of moves that occurs with 
the firebutton off. Sometimes it is hard 



to keep track of which is which. To 
assist you in helping to remember which 
move goes with which direction and 
firebutton position in Kung-Fu Dude 
and other games like it that use compli- 
cated joystick movement, I would like 
to pass on a little tip that has helped out 
quite a bit in the Armstrong household. 

We use a small 3-by-3-inch square 
notepad of paper that you can tear off 
and stick to an# surface, and draw a 
small circle on it to represent the control 
radius of the joystick. Then we mark the 
positions of the joystick as they relate 
to the various movements in the game, 
noting what movement each joystick 
position causes. In the case of Kung-Fu 
Dude, we made two such diagrams — 
one for firebutton-on movements and 
one for firebutton-off movements. 
Because these stick-on notes can be 
removed and replaced many times, we 
store them with the instructions to the 
particular game. Then when we decide 



to play that particular game, we simply 
take them out and stick them near the 
face of the computer screen for quick 
reference. It is a real help. 

Notwithstanding the fact that the 
program is copy-protected and the Hi- 
Tech Kid makes it tough for his old Dad 
to catch up with him, I highly recom- 
mend Kung-Fu Dude. It is not a game 
that you will master easily, so it is one 
that you'll be playing for a long time to 
come. And if complexity and challenge 
are a criteria of worth, you'll certainly 
get your money's worth on this one. 

Now the CoCo karate game gap has 
been filled, and Kung-Fu Dude does it 
excellently. CoCo users of America, 
hold your heads up high! 

(Sundog Systems, 21 Edinburg Drive, Pitts- 
burg, PA 15235, 412-372-5674; $24.95: First 
product review for this company appearing 

in THE RAINBOW.) 

— Kerry Armstrong 



1 Software CoC ° 1 2&3 

Disklock — 
Put a Padlock 
on Your Data 

Having just read a novel about a 
criminal who kept a journal of his 
misdeeds on a disk (alas, not a CoCo) 
and was caught because of it, I looked 
forward to reviewing Disklock by Brian 
Rodia. Computer security has become 
a very important issue in the last few 
years, and even though the criminal 
aspect is not what RAINBOW readers are 
interested in, most computer users have 
some files they would like to keep 
private. 

Disklock and its manual come on an 
unprotected disk. That means you must 
have a printer and a word processor to 
print out the instructions. The manual 
was written with VIP Writer but doesn't 
cause any problems, even with Scripsit. 
If you don't have a printer but have 
ADOS, the manual can be read on the 
screen using the SCAN command. 

The purpose of the program is to 
deny anyone but yourself information 
from your disk files. It does this very 
well. The author states he has had 
Disklock tested for some time and no 
one has been able to break the protec- 
tion. I made a nominal effort to disable 



it using a disk zapper and wasn't suc- 
cessful, even though it was obvious the 
program writes code to the first two 
sectors of Track 17. 

The program is very simple to oper- 
ate. Put the disk in Drive 0, type LORDM 
DISKLOCK and at the OK prompt type 
EXEC. Then remove Disklock and place 
any disk in Drive 0 and press ENTER. 
You are given the status of the disk, 
locked or unlocked, and prompted for 
a password. When you are returned to 
the title screen, pressing BREAK returns 
you to BASIC. 

When you type in a password to 
unlock a disk, the characters are 
masked on the screen so as not to make 
it apparent to kibitzers. If you lock a 
disk and then issue a DIR command 
from BASIC, all you get is LOCKED! If you 
try to unlock a disk without the pass- 
word, you get three tries and, if unsuc- 
cessful, are thrown back to BASIC. A 
password can be up to 14 characters 
long, allowing the user a lot of latitude 
for exotic combinations. 

As it is, I think Disklock is a valuable 
utility if you need the security it pro- 
vides. Brian Rodia is issuing it as a 
shareware program, so payment is 
whatever you feel it's worth. It is adver- 
tised to work on all three Color Com- 
puters. I tested it on both the CoCo 2 
and 3 and the performance was identi- 
cal. 

The only criticism that could be made 
is that there are no screen prompts and 
no provision is made for multiple drive 



130 



THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



operation. Considering the simplicity 
and price of this program, that may be 
the ultimate in nitpicking. The last 
caveat, which the author stresses, is 
don't accidentally lock your Disklock 
disk unless you have a backup! 

(Brian J. Rodia, 6593 Rcdcoach Ln., Rey- 
noldsburg, OH 43065, 614-868-0216; Share- 
ware: First product review for this company 
appearing in the rainbow.) 

— Frank Mardon 



1 Software CoCo1 ' 2&3 QS " 9 



Robot Odyssey — 
Adventures in 
Robotropolis 

You have fallen into Robotropolis, an 
underground city populated by robots. 
Your mission is to escape back to civ- 
ilization, with a little help from the 
robots. Robot Odyssey combines a five- 
level Adventure game with a set of 
problem-solving tutorials designed to 
help you complete the journey. This is 
not your typical Adventure game. Plan 
on spending weeks (if not months) 
completing this one. Fortunately, 
games can and should be saved as you 
go along. 

Section One involves a robot anat- 
omy course, which takes about 20 to 30 
minutes to complete. The player gets a 
detailed look at how robots behave and 
what equipment they have. This knowl- 
edge helps get you through Level 1. 
Before moving on to the next level, it's 
necessary to learn about wiring and 
robot circuits. In the higher levels of the 
game, learning chip design and doing 
some experimentation is essential for 
success. 



The Learning Company has gained a 
reputation for developing excellent 
educational software, and this program 
is no exception. Contained within the 
program is a mini-course in electronic 
engineering, design and problem- 
solving skills. In a way, it's a logical 
sequel to Rocky's Boots, an earlier 
program they developed. If you aren't 
acquainted with Rocky's Boots, I'd 
suggest that you start with it first. Not 
only will the experience be fun and 
educational, it will help you with Robot 
Odyssey. 

This program is a natural for teachers 
who want to teach problem-solving or 
the Scientific Method. The Learning 
Company has additional classroom 
materials available to accompany the 
program. Vocational, electronics and 
electrical engineering instructors should 
also look closely at its possibilities. It 
would make an excellent introductory 
project. 

Recommended age for this Adven- 
ture is 13 and up. I agree. The tutorials 
are deceptively easy, but looking at the 
program as a whole can be a mind- 
boggling experience that would be 
better handled by teens and adults. The 
tasks become increasingly more com- 
plex at the higher levels of the game. To 
make things more interesting, obstacles 
such as power-sucking 'Ampire bots 
and invisible mine fields appear. There 
are so many variations in Robot Odys- 
sey that it can be used over and over 
again, which is a definite plus for both 
home and school use. 

The graphics are excellent, the edu- 
cational goals sound, but some aspects 
of the 70-page manual bugged me. It has 
directions for the IBM PC and Apple, 
along with the CoCo. When reading for 
information, you have to wade through 
three different sets of commands to 
figure out how to perform a particular 
operation. I would gladly pay extra to 



have a separate Color Computer ver- 
sion. Also, it is interesting to note that 
certain "extra" sections, such as a 
Robotropolis Preview and Robot 
Teamwork were conspicuously absent 
from the CoCo version of the program. 




? BUMPER 



flHTEHNA f Um 

EYE . 



THRUSTER "<f 




SWITCH J 
UTTER V * Tj 



Robot Odyssey is designed primarily 
for the CoCo 1 or 2, and uses artifact 
colors that don't show up on the CoCo 
3 when used with an RGB monitor. 
CoCo 3 users need a composite monitor 
or TV to take advantage of the color 
capabilities. I hope The Learning Com- 
pany will consider adding an RGB/ 
composite option on start-up like some 
of the newer OS-9 software that is 
currently available. 

Robot Odyssey deserves an 4 A' for 
both its novel approach and educa- 
tional value. Although the manual is a 
bit awkward in some respects, it is 
obvious that the authors put a lot of 
care and planning into the program 
itself. I'm glad that excellent software 
such as this, once only available for the 
Apple and PC Compatibles, is now 
available for the Color Computer. 

(The Learning Company, 6493 Kaiser 
Drive, Fremont, CA 94555, $49.95. Avail- 
able in Radio Shack stores nationwide) 

— Mark Haverstock 



CM 



un -fc I n 



Manage your checking account(s) with C A 1 5 ■ Keep track of deposits, checks, ATM 

withdrawals and other account transactions. Define up to 36 categories to monitor 

expenses. Set up automatic transactions for such items as direct deposits or 

pre-authori zed deductions. Balance your account(s) in minutes! Other features 

include multi-drive capability, display and print options, history purge and more. 



Requires 1 disk drive 
Printer is optional 
CoCo 3 compati ble 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



After Five Software 
P.O. Box 210975 
Columbia, SC 29221-0975 
(803) 7BB-5995 



Send check or M.0. for 
$34.95 plus $3.00 S/H. 
COD orders: add $1.00. 
(SC res. add 57. sales tax) 



Sm review in this month's issue 



February 1988 THE RAfNBOW 131 




fe 



CoCo 3 



Color Max 3 Font 
Editor — Add 
Characters to Your 
Creations 

Color Max 3 Font Editor is a useful 
addition to your Color Max 3 package. 
With this program, you can load var- 
ious print fonts into your Color Max 3 
creations, then edit them or create 
custom ones to suit your own tastes. 

Color Max 3 Font Editor was written 
by Eric A. Wolf. It requires a 128K 
CoCo 3, a disk drive, and a joystick or 
mouse. The program is loaded in with 
a simple BASIC loader that calls the main 
machine language program. The disk is 
not copy-protected, so backup copies 
for your own use are not a problem. 

After loading the program and an- 
swering prompts concerning RGB or 
composite monitors and type of joystick 
in use, you are presented with the main 
operating screen. This screen consists of 
a grid and a point-and-shoot menu that 
allows you to examine each character in 
detail or to modify it. 

At the bottom of the menu is a 
number that ranges from 032 to 127 
representing the ASCII value of the 
character. This number is toggled with 
the joystick or mouse firebutton to 
select the character you want to exam- 
ine or modify. The view font option 
allows you to see all the characters of 
a particular font at the same time. The 
disk contains the following fonts: Crys- 
tal, Downhill, Film, Glyphic, Old Eng- 
lish and Stripe. 

Glyphic is a neat collection of 70 
small pictures and symbols that can be 
added for some nice effects with Color 
Max 3 pictures. Downhill has a slanted 
effect, and Crystal looks like the LCD 
characters on your wrist watch. The 
Film font looks like the standard block 
letters, except they are in negative form 
and have little sprocket holes at the top 
and bottom of each character font 
frame. The others speak for themselves 
and are equally well done. 

The fonts can be edited or new ones 
created by simply clicking the fire- 
button at the cursor position pointed to 
by the movable arrow. The grid is done 
in typical "fat bit" style, providing the 
opportunity to easily modify or create 
special characters and symbols. 

A second disk containing 11 other 



fonts is available for $19.95. The fonts 
contained on this disk include Lined, 
USA, Cameo, Potted, July 4, Bells, 
Roadsign, ASCII-SM, Tech-Lg, 
Banner and Large. 

Color Max 3 Font Editor is a good 
program and is sure to enhance Color 
Max 3. I found it both easy and fun to 
use. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc., P.O. Box 264, 
Howard Beach, NY 11414, 718-835-1344; 
$29.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



CoCo1,2&3 



1 S o ftware — 

Currillian Cruiser — 
The World's 
Last Hope 

"The year was 2584. Four hundred 
seventy-two years after the unification 
of the Earth-born galaxies. The largest 
and most terrible war was just begin- 
ning to dawn, a war with little warning 
and relentless fighting. Many people 
lost their lives, whole planets were 
shredded without the Earth-men ever 
having a hint what had or could have 
done something of this magnitude. This 
is the tale of the Skirum War and the 
Currillian Cruiser" 

You are the sole pilot of the ship and 
the last hope for Earth. In your journey 
to complete the defense systems of the 
Currillian Cruiser^ you will travel to 
distant planets and encounter many 
enemies. While traveling to the planets 
Elleval, Ita-Falac, Scmea, Denrael and 
Alpha Centuri you fly head-on into a 
hazardous meteor shower, face merci- 
less unmanned Skirum interceptor 
attack vehicles, and enter the hulls of 
military and scientific research vessels 
to obtain a missing weapon system, a 
fission laser system, warheads and a 
guidance system. 



Currillian Cruiser is an arcade-type 
Adventure game that has good game 
play and a brilliantly written scenario. 

The copy-protected disk comes with 
a four-page manual featuring a detailed 
drawing of the Currillian Cruiser on the 
front. The second page of the manual 
contains information on loading, play- 
ing (a note to remove the disk during 
game play since the computer accesses 
the disk many times) and saving the 
game. The last two pages give the story 
of Currillian Cruiser. 




The game can be used on a Color 
Computer 1, 2 or 3 and requires a 
joystick. I recommend a self-centering 
joystick since you must make fast and 
difficult maneuvers during most of the 
game. 

Currillian Cruiser has some nice 
features. The main menu has options to 
start the game, go to the title screen, see 
the high scores and quit the game, which 
requires you to shut off the computer. 

After choosing the start game option, 
you are prompted to type in your name 
for a new game or to choose a number 
from one of the maximum nine game 
saves. The high score screen lists up to 
12 scores. In this game, scoring goes by 
the number of the board you survived 
through. Between boards, you are 
prompted with options to continue to 
the next board, save the game or quit 
the current game. 

The PMDDE graphics come out in 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Use this program to look at the contents of your disk and check 
for errors. It's helpful for Adventure disks, too! 

The listing: 

1 CLEARlj3p^:FORX=^T034:FORY=lTO 
18 : DSKI$p ,X / Y,A$,B$: PRINTA$ ; B$ ; : 
IFINKE Y $= » " THEN NEXT Y : PLAY 11 L2 5 5 ; 
1 ; 1 2 " : NEXT : ELSE PLAY " P2 " : NEXT Y : P 
LAY " 1 ; 1 2 " : NEXT Brad Lowe 

Lafayette, CA 

(For this winning one~liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of both The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures and Us companion The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



132 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



black-and-white on the Color Comput- 
er 3 when using an RGB monitor. The 
screens are nicely done and give the 
effect of a futuristic setting. 

Altogether, this game is pretty good. 
It requires a lot of hand-eye coordina- 
tion and is challenging. 

(Glenn Calafati, 54 Oak Street, Northport, 
NY 11768, 516-261-4105; $25: First product 
review for this company appearing in the 

RAINBOW.) 

— Glen Baisley 



* Softwar e 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



Master Disk — 
Catalogs Your Disks 

Master Disk is a disk cataloging 
program that works on any version of 
the CoCo having at least 32K. The 
program is written in BASIC and is not 
copy-protected. Master Disk works 
with a single disk drive and, therefore, 
may be of interest to beginners. 

Master Disk is very colorful and, I 
might add, somewhat noisy. I mention 
this only because while the program is 
well-structured, the continued call to 
the sound subroutines does slow down 
overall program execution speed. 

Master Disk is menu-driven and very 
easy to use. A single page of instructions 
comes with the disk, but the program 
contains onscreen help. You can create, 
sort, print and save to disk up to 18 disk 
directories with up to 250 program 
names in each directory. This provides 
a sufficient number of disk categories 
for most users, and with 250 program 
names in each category, the program 
will handle most CoCo user applica- 
tions. 



Master Disk lets you look at all 
entries by a specific searched-for name, 
or an entire disk directory. In addition 
to saving and displaying program 
names and extensions, the name of the 
disk containing the program is saved 
and displayed. This name is assigned by 
the user and is limited to nine charac- 
ters. 

This offering from Bob's Software is 
worthy of your consideration. The price 
won't make a big dent in your wallet and 
you can put Master Disk to practical 
use organizing your disks. 

(Bob's Software, P.O. Box 391, Cleveland, 
OH 44107, 216-871-8858; $15 plus $2 S/H) 

— David Gerald 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



CAIS - 
Check Account 
Information System 

I used to have a pathological hatred 
of the simple act of balancing my check- 
book. It's not that I was afraid of the 
work, I just didn't like to spend the time 
doing it. Now the hard part is done for 
me, thanks to CAIS. 

CAIS stands for Check Account 
Information System. And before you let 
fly that groan of, "Oh no, another 
checkbook program!" let me tell you 
that CAIS is not run-of-the-mill. It is a 
fast, simple, accurate and yet very 
detailed way of handling up to eight 
different accounts. 

CAIS was written for the disk-based 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3 using RS-DOS 1.1. I 
used ADOS-3 and had no problems 
with any functions. 



The only command to remember is 
the one that starts the program (RUN 
"CfllS.BfiS"). After that, there are 
extensive onscreen prompts, as well as 
full menus wherever possible. On start- 
up, all you need to do is enter the 
current date, and the main menu ap- 
pears. 

The first time you use this program, 
you will need to define the account 
information. This is where you enter the 
name of the bank, account type (regular 
or interest-bearing), what drive you 
want the information stored on, and the 
account number and balance. And for 
once, here is a program that stores your 
number exactly as you enter it — re- 
gardless of how many digits it contains. 
This has been a problem with every 
other checking program I have seen. 

You may continue to enter informa- 
tion about other accounts you want to 
track. I have three checking accounts 
(one account for my wife, one for me 
and one for business). As I wanted to 
use the program as much as possible, 1 
also added my two savings accounts to 
the batch. 

After you have entered this informa- 
tion (along with the account balance — 
the program tracks each account indi- 
vidually), you may either edit the infor- 
mation or return to the main menu to 
begin the processing. 

When you select an item from the 
main menu other than the account 
control (the setup option), you are 
presented with another menu to help 
you select which account you want to 
access. Your other main menu choices 
are Post Account, Reconcile (balance) 
Account, Display Account, Print Ac- 
count, Purge Account History and Exit. 

Post Account means just what the 
name implies. This option allows you to 
make deposits, debit the account, and 
otherwise manipulate the figures. And 



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February 1988 THE RAINBOW 



133 



for each expense or credit, an option is 
given to apply the amount to an expense 
category you previously defined (up to 
36 definitions per account). I said before 
how easy it was to use this program to 
track savings, as well — all I did was 
define a category as "Withdrawal" and 
one as "Deposit." I used the "Payable 
to" field to explain the transaction. 

Flexibility is the key in posting trans- 
actions. You may enter codes for de- 
posit, checks (it keeps track of the 
numbers, unless you override it), ATM 
withdrawals and any automatic depos- 
its/withdrawals you care to define. The 
autos use the date you enter both at the 
beginning of the program and in the 
definition of the automatic transaction 
to make the change at the appropriate 



time. And it notifies you of that change. 
This is a real "set and forget" feature. 

Reconcile Account provides a de- 
tailed balance report with a minimum 
of work on your part. Pick a starting 
check number, and the program steps 
through each transaction with you to 
see if the statement covers it. If not, the 
information is added to the stack and 
the selection process continues. 

When presented with the balance, all 
you need to do is compare it with the 
bank's statement. If it is not correct, 
press BREAK and research the problem. 
If it is correct, you may then print the 
statement. The cleared transactions are 
moved to a history file, and you may 
then print the updated check register or 
return to the main menu. 




MUL TI-FONT PRINTER 

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Will transfer a Pmode 0, 1, 2, 3, or Transfers color screens to Colour 
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Software Trio w/Colour Super Gemprint 

Price, availably and speciFtcaiions subject to change without notice. 



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Visa & MasterCard 
within the continental U.S. 



Display Account and Print Account 
are essentially the same. One shows the 
information onscreen only, and the 
other prints both to the screen and the 
printer (the baud rate you want is poked 
in for you, since you set this option way 
back at the beginning). At this point, 
you can literally see any combination of 
information needed either between two 
dates, or from all the information on 
file. 

The final option is Purge Account 
History. Here is where you can delete 
older information by date. All you do 
is enter the beginning and ending dates, 
and all information between those dates 
is purged. The rest remains intact. If you 
print a copy of the file before you purge, 
you can save disk space and still have 

the information handy. 

The manual that comes with the 
program is very detailed and ex- 
tremely easy to follow. It is laid out 
in the same order as the main menu. 
Each option is explained in depth, 
and the information necessary to use 
each option is readily available on 
that page. The only other thing I 
would like to have seen is one page 
devoted to the one-letter codes used 
throughout the program (D = 
Deposit, C=Check, etc.). Then I 
could set this page next to my CoCo 
and get into high gear. 

The nice thing about CAIS is that 
one version fits all. It doesn't matter 
whether you have a CoCo I or 3, one 
disk drive or two, or even whether 
you have a printer. The program is 
flexible enough to handle whatever 
system you have. The manual (70 
pages) tells you how to configure to 
your system, all within the program 
(no editing required). 

Overall, CAIS performs well 
beyond the advertised limits. I found 
it both easy to use and flexible 
enough to handle whatever my finan- 
cial situation required. The manual 
is detailed without being dry. And the 
price is low enough to put it within 
reach of virtually anyone. In short, 
if you have a checking or savings 
account, CAIS should be in your 
Library. 



(After Five Software, P.O. Box 210975, 
Columbia, SC 29221, 803-788-5995; 
$34.95 plus $3 S/H) 



— D.A. Ferreira 



134 



THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



* Softwa re 



CoCo3 



Video Cards/ Keno 
— Play the Odds 

Video poker machines are found in a 
lot of places outside of Nevada where 
gambling on them is legal. In some areas 
they are regular fixtures in local bars 
and lounges. For some, they are a kind 
of adult video game. For others, they 
are another opportunity to gamble. If 
you play them or if you have always 
wanted to, Video Cards! Keno from 
Tom Mix Software may be for you. 

Video Cards j Keno is designed for the 
Color Computer 3 with disk drive. 
The instructions are simple and the 
disk loads easily. After a title page the 
screen presents a menu. Your choices 
are Poker, Joker's Wild, Blackjack, 
Keno and Quit. After you make a 
choice, the screen asks if you are 
using a composite or RGB monitor. 
The next screen asks the number of 
credits you want to start with, and 
then your game begins with a prompt 
asking you how much you want to 
bet. You bet and the cards are dealt. 
(Or, in Keno, the numbers are 
chosen.) If you win, your credits are 
increased. Unless your credits are 
down to zero, you again return to the 
bet prompt. You can play as long as 
you have credits to bet. (If you do run 
out of credits, you can always get 
more.) 

Poker and joker poker are fun to 
play. (The difference between the two 
games, for those unfamiliar with 
poker machines, is that the deck used 
in joker poker contains a joker that 
can be used as a wild card. Because 
it is easier to draw a winning hand, 
the payoffs are reduced.) As with the 
real machines, the deck is stacked 
against you. Payoffs do not reflect 
the true odds — the longer you play, 
the more likely you will lose. Trying 
to overcome the laws of probability 
can be enjoyable and maybe even 
educational. 

I found blackjack to be even more 
fun. (I find that competing against 
someone, even if it's the computer as 
dealer, makes a game more interest- 
ing.) The game is not much different 
from the game played in a casino. 
Thus, learning the right blackjack 
moves can significantly reduce the 
computer's advantage. The black- 
jack game was fast and entertaining. 



Keno allows you to pick numbers 
from 1 to 80 and then the computer 
chooses the winning numbers. Payoffs 
are based upon how many numbers 
match. (State lotto-type games work in 
a similar fashion.) Keno/ lotto games 
have never fascinated me. Predictably, 
I found this game to be the least inter- 
esting of the games. 

This package has two strong points to 
recommend it. The first is its outstand- 
ing graphics. Each program makes use 
of the Color Computer 3's added graph- 
ics capabilities. I own other programs 
that use playing cards in the program. 
In terms of resolution, Video Cards/ 
Keno is the best. 

Secondly, I liked the speed of the 
programs — cards are dealt and results 



are computed very quickly. Addition- 
ally, each game allows for a maximum 
bet key that saves the time of pressing 
the C (for coin) key over and over again. 
If I could have asked for more from 




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DAYTON ASSOCIATES 13&, INC. 

7201 CLA1RCREST, BLDG. D 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX • C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



PERSONAL SERVICE 

(513) 236-1454 

Visa & MasterCard 
within the continental U.S. 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 35 



Tom Mix Software, it would have been 
the ability to make slight changes in 
either the payoffs or the way the games 
are played. (I like more of a chance in 
poker games.) Overall, if you enjoy 
gambling machines, you will probably 
enjoy Video Cards/ Keno. 

(Tom Mix Software, P.O. Box 201, Ada, MI 
49301, 616-676-8172; $29.95) ' 

— John Matviko 



^ CoCo1,2&3 

' Software 1 

Color Math — 
Reinforces Math 
Skills 

Color Math is an educational pro- 
gram that lets your child practice the 
four basic math skills (addition, sub- 
traction, multiplication, division) he or 
she is learning at school. It requires at 
least 16K and a cassette recorder. 

The option screen allows you to 
choose one of the two options in that 
part of the program (each part has 
either addition and subtraction, or 
multiplication and division). You then 
choose the maximum number of pro- 
grams the child will practice, and then 
select one of the four options: Place- 
ment, Lessons, Tests or Change maxi- 
mum problems. 

The first option allows you to find the 
most appropriate skill lesson for your 
child to start his or her lessons. The 
second option uses skill building to 
increase math skills and has automatic 
promotion as each lesson is mastered. 
The third option tests your child on any 
lesson in the program to evaluate pro- 
ficiency at that level. The fourth option 
allows you to change the number of 
problems that your child will do. 

After you choose the option you 
want, the child starts working the 
problems. The addition/ subtraction 
lessons have 70 different mastery levels, 
the multiplication has 50 mastery levels, 
and the division has 37 mastery levels. 

In the early mastery levels, the child 
is shown when to carry or borrow 
numbers, and in the higher levels the 
child can use the letters 'C or 6 B' to 
perform these functions. In addition 
and subtraction, the child has two 
chances to answer a question correctly. 

1 36 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



After the second try, the correct answer 
appears, and the problem is repeated 
until it is solved correctly. In multipli- 
cation and division, the computer 
checks each digit as it is typed. The child 
gets two opportunities to enter each 
number correctly. If both tries are 
wrong, the correct digit appears and the 
cursor moves to the next digit. After 
each lesson is completed, you see the 
report screen, which shows if the child 
is promoted to the next level or demoted 
to the previous level. 

Color Math is a good program. It not 
only helps the child to improve his/her 
math skills, but provides the needed 
reinforcement of those skills. This is 
also a good program if you want to 
monitor your child's progress as he or 
she goes through each lesson. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Ft. Worth, TX 76102; $19.95. 
Available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide.) 

— - John H. Appel 

1 Software c - s£21 - 

Backup Lightning — 
Faster Than A 
Speeding MS-DOS 

Backup Lightning is a handy utility 
for the 512K equipped Color Computer 
3. As the program name implies, this 
software is used to duplicate disks. 

In developing Backup Lightning, 
Color Venture has made full use of the 
capabilities of the 512K CoCo 3. It will 
copy 35-, 40- or 80-track disks. The 
entire disk is copied into memory as a 



first step, then duplicates are written as 
requested. Both RS-DOS and OS-9 
format disks are copied with ease. The 
speed at which the duplication is done 
is remarkable. 

Using Backup Lightning is as simple 
as typing LORDM "BACKUP" and answer- 
ing a few prompts. The user can then 
load a previously saved configuration 
or may choose to input the few pieces 
of data needed for a new configuration. 
One- or two-sided drives may be se- 
lected. Drive speed may be maximized 
up to 6 ms and up to four drives (0, I, 
2, 3) are supported. 

The display screen keeps the user 
informed of what the parameters se- 
lected are, and what is currently going 
on. The program name and copyright 
information appear at the top. Just 
below that, a configuration screen 
displays the parameters (number of 
sides and drive designations for read 
and write, setup rate, etc.) currently 
being used. A menu/ status area occu- 
pies the major portion of the screen, 
telling the user what actions are taking 
place. Along the bottom of the screen 
is a help message area. 

I had no difficulty at all in duplicating 
either RS-DOS or OS-9 disks, with 
either formatted or non-formatted 
target disks. As a believer in the precau- 
tion of backing up all of my software, 
I found the program invaluable. Copy- 
protected software, however, cannot be 
duplicated with Backup Lightning. 

If you have a 512K CoCo 3 and want 
to protect yourself from disk crashes, 
Backup Lightning is a very handy tool 
and an excellent value. 

(Performance Peripherals, 11432 Pena Way, 
Mira Loma, CA 91752, 714-681-7222; 
$19.95) 

— Leonard Hyre 



Hint . . . 

Disk or Cassette 
I/O Errors? 

Make sure the disk drive(s) and cassette recorder are not on 
the left side of the TV set (or if they are, that they're at least 
six inches or more away). This is because a TV set's flyback 
transformer, almost always on the left side of the set, puts out 
a strong magnetic field which can interfere with cassette or disk 
operation. 



Education 
Breakthrough 

New interactive CoCo software 
makes learning easy, 
fun. Kids love it! 



THE MAGIC OF SPELLING 

Grades 4 to 8 



NEW LOW PRICE - 16 lessons for the price 
of 8! Educational Software for kids froiu* 
6 to 18. * 



Parents are depending more and more on 
supplemental education for their children. Edu- 
cators know that the most effective teaching is 
done one-to-one. Through individual attention 
and self-paced progress, students learn more 
and retain more. 

BETTER THAN A PRIVATE TUTOR 

The Compass Education Software LOOK/ 
LISTEN/LEARN approach is the next best 
thing to a private tutor. Unlike other educational 
software the Compass Library also talks to the 
student — not in synthesized speech, but in a 
real human voice. With on-screen textual infor- 
mation and attention-getting graphics, stu- 
dents of all ages actually enjoy learning! 

SELF-PACED FOR BETTER RETENTION 

The lessons advance only after the stu- 
dent has correctly answered the questions 
throughout the programs assuring that the 
material has been thoroughly absorbed. 

SIMPLE EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 

All you need is the TRS-80* Color Com- 
puter (any model), computer cassette recorder 
and TV set. Once the cassette is loaded you 
need only entertwo simple commands . . . and 
then press any key to start the lesson. 

Of course you can stop the lesson at any 
point to study information on the screen. Just 
push the pause button on the cassette player. 
Push it again and lesson resumes. 

To answer questions throughout the les- 
son simply press the appropriate number on 
the computer keyboard, type in the correct 
answer, or follow other easy instructions. And 
to go back and review, just rewind the cassette. 
It s that simple. 

CHOOSE FROM 9 SUBJECTS 

There is not sufficient space in this adver- 
tisement to list all lesson titles, but here is a 
sample: 

MATHEMATICS 

In today's advanced, HiTech world, under- 
standing and working with numbers is essen- 
tial. Compass has developed three compre- 
hensive series of math programs. From basic 
numerals for the very young, to algebra and 
higher mathematics for the older child. In 
between, there are programs for everything 
from addition and subtraction to practical 
everyday percentage problems. 

*TRS-80 is a registered trademark of The Tandy Corporation. 




MS 1 — Plurals: branches, rodeos, valleys 
MS 2 — Plurals: houses, brushes, candies 
MS 3 — Plurals: babies, pianos, leaves 
.MS 4 — Suffixes: boxed, referred, writing 
^MS 5 — Suffixes: paid, quickly, extremely 
MS 6 — Suffixes: said, confusion, school's 
MS 7 — Homonyms: two, too, to; their, there 
MS 8 — Homonyms: our, are, hour; ate, eight 
MS 9 — Homonyms: weight, wait; who's, whose 
MS 10- Homonyms: scent, cent; sell, cell 
MS 11 -Homonyms: dew, due; course, coarse 
MS 12-Homonyms: cite, site, sight; by, buy 
MS 13— Homonyms: blue, blew, creek, creak 
MS 14 -Homonyms: sale, sail; steel, steal 
MS 15- Spelling by Syllables: letter, color 
MS 16 -Doubling Consonant Letters: hollow 




MATH/FRACTIONS 

Grades 4 to 8 

MF 1 — Numerator, denominator, bar 
MF 2 — Multiplication of fractions 
MF 3 — Factors and prime numbers 
MF 4 — Reducing fractions, reciprocals 
MF 5 — Reducing fractions, lowest terms 
MF 6 — Proper fractions, mixed numbers 
MF 7 — Multiplication-division of fractions 
MF 8 — Addition-subtraction of fractions 
MF 9 — Addition of mixed numbers 
MF 10 — Changing fractions to decimals 
MF 11 — Converting decimal numbers 
MF 12 — Word problems using percents 
MF 13 — Additional problems using percents 
MF 14 — Word problems using percents 
MF 15 — Finding circle area using pi 
MF 16 — Using a ruler to measure fractions 



MATH/BASIC ALGEBRA 

For all grades 
Sixteen lessons: MBA-1 to 16 



e 



MATH/NUMBERS 

For grades 1 to 6 
Sixteen lessons: MN-1 to 16 

SELF DEVELOPMENT 

Writing effectively means communica- 
tiong effectively. Through the writing series of 
lesson students of all ages will develop basic 
skills needed to turn thoughts and ideas into 
expressive words and phrases. 



o 



RULES OF WRITING 

For all grades 

Sixteen lessons: RW-1 to 16 



LANGUAGE ARTS 

A practical education begins with good 
reading skills and is continued with increased 
vocabulary comprehension and, of course, 
spelling. Your child will learn that reading is fun 
while they are also learning when to use "to," 
"too," and "two," and how to spell when build- 
ing a vocabulary. 



o 



VOCABULARY COMPREHENSION 

Grades 3 to 5 
Sixteen lessons: VC-1 to 16 



o 



READING COMPREHENSION 

For all grades 

Sixteen lessons: DRC-1 to 16 



o 



SCIENCE 
SCIENCE/PHYSICS 

For all grades 
Sixteen lessons: SP-1 to 16 



o 



HISTORY 
AMERICAN HISTORY 

For grades 4 to 12 
Sixteen lessons: AH-1 to 16 



So there it is . . . no-nonsense subject 
matter presented in a way that maximizes 
understanding and retention. 

SPECIAL PRICING 

YORK 10 is now offering, for a limited time, 
a complete set in any subject, 1 6 cassettes, 
one lesson on each cassette, for only 
$49.95. We originally offered only 8 cassettes 
for the same amount so now it's twice the 
value. The same 16 cassettes are sold else- 
where for over $1 50. 

To order, send your check or money order 
for $49.95 (CA residents add sales tax) for 
each subject you wish, plus $3.50 shipping and 
handling (any quantity). For immediate ship- 
ment, call collect the number below and 
charge your VISA or MASTERCARD. 



9525 VASSAR AVENUE 
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311 

1- 818/700-0330 — 




The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 




■^CCRAM, a software-only implemen- 
tation of a RAM disk. The program 
requires OS-9 Level I Version 2, 512K and 
single disk drive. For the CoCo 3. Dime- 
A-Byte, 116 Webster Avenue, Bangor, 
ME 04401, (207) 942-0739; $28 plus $2 S/ 
H. 

Chemistry Tutor, an educational learning 
aid for high school or college level chem- 
istry principles. Text lessons are combined 
with high resolution graphics. For the 
CoCo 1 and 2. A to Z Unlimited, 901 
Ferndale Boulevard, High Point, NC 
27260, (919) 882-6255; $42 plus $3 S/H. 

CoCo Max III, a graphics drawing system 
with animation and color sequencing. 
Includes Hi-Res interface for your mouse 
or joystick, CoCo Max III disk and 
several utilities. For the CoCo 3. Color- 
ware, 242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 
06820, (800) 221-0916; $79.95. 

Grand Prix Challenge, a high-speed 
racing game that lets you compete against 
the computer or a friend. Includes de- 
tailed 320-by-200 graph-ics, realistic 
driving conditions and different race 
tracks. For the CoCo 3. Diecom Products, 
Inc., 6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, 
Canada L9T2X8, (416) 878-8358; $28.95 
U.S.; $38.95 Cdn. 

Lightning RAM Disk, a utility for your 
512K CoCo 3 that allows the simultane- 
ous use of up to four mechanical drives 
and two RAM drives. Dr. Preble's Pro- 
grams, 6540 Outer Loop, Louisville, KY 
40228, 502-969-1818; $19.95. 

MPI-CoCo Locking Plate, an accessory 
that protects your CoCo 3 and multipack 
interface. Installs on the bottom of both 
units and prevents bumping of the mul- 
tipack interface from the ROM slot of 



your CoCo. For the CoCo 3. Gimmesoft, 
P.O. Box 421, Perry Hall, MD 21128, 
(301) 256-7558; $9.95. 

Printer Lightning, a ColorVenture print 
spooler which gives a 44K print buffer 
from a 128K CoCo and up to 438 K from 
a512K CoCo. Owl-Ware, P.O. Box 116- 
A, Mertztown, PA 19539, 800-245-6228; 
in Penn., 215-682-6855; $19.95. 



Super-Graphics 16, a graphics program 
that lets you create art using every color 
of the rainbow. Draw and paint lines, 
boxes, circles, etc., and make a printed 
copy with a Radio Shack DMP-105 or 
similar dot matrix printer. For the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3. E.Z. Friendly Software, Hut- 
ton and Orchard Streets, Rhinecliff, NY 
12574, (914) 876-3935; $16 plus $1.50 S/ 
H. 



The Rat Graphic Design Package, a 

graphics program that supports 320-by- 
200 Hi-Res graphics made with a 16-color, 
user-definable palette. The package is 
complete with screen print routines, a 
mouse and mouse pad. For the CoCo 3. 
Diecom Products, Inc., 6715 Fifth Line, 
Milton, Ontario, Canada L9T 2X8, (416) 
878-8358; $69.95 U.S.; $99.95 Cdn. 

Sixdrive, Version 1.0 A, a machine lan- 
guage utility that modifies Disk Extended 
BASIC 1.0 or 1.1, FKEYS III, or ADOS 
to allow the use of three double-sided 
drives as six single-sided drives. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Gimmesoft, P.O. Box 
421, Perry Hall, MD 21128, (301) 256- 
7558; $16.95. 



TX-80, a printer page editor with 5,280 
print positions. The program allows 
global editing and uses a WYSIWYG 
format. For the CoCo 3. Kolesar B/S, 7 
Ladd Road, Westfield, PA 16950, (814) 
367-5384; $39.95 plus $2 S/H 




TEXTFORM, a menu-driven pro- 
gram designed to format ASCII text files 
into two-column format. Output may be 
directed to either a printer or disk file. For 
the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. R.A.D. Products, 
194 Hotchkiss Street, Jamestown, NY 
14701, (716) 665-2124; $34.95. 



^p* First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction, As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



1 38 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 




Proven Technology 

New CoCo 3 Utilities 

Great for 512K Systems! From Color Venture and OWI^WARE 



PRINTER LIGHTNING 

A great print spooler which gives you 
44K print buffer from a 128K Co Co and 
up to 438K (200 pages!) from a 512K 
Co Co. With this spooler you can run a 
program while you are printing a file. 
The spooler does not slow down the 
computer to any noticeable extent while 
you are running a second program and 
no lost characters arise. Baud rates 
selectable. Printer Lightning can reside 
in memory along with RAMDISK1 




NEW NEW 



Using 512K CoCo 3 you have access to 
2 additional disk drives in RAM. All 
disk commands are supported, and the 
data are Reset button protected. You 
can now have up to 5 disk drive capa- 
cities on line at once and can assign the 
ram disks to any drive number. By 
making the ramdisk Drive 0, all pro- 
grams which require a lot of drive 
access will run much faster. You can 
have the RAMDISK in memory at the 
same time as the Printer Lightningl 



BACKUP LIGHTNING 

This program is the fastest way to make 
backup copies of your files using a 5 12K 
CoCo. You can backup 35, 40, or 80 
track disks single or double sided. Both 
RS and OS-9 disks may be backed up. 
The original disk is saved to memory 
and a copy can be made on an 
unformatted disk every 45 seconds! The 
lightning read, write, format, and verify 
routines that were developed make this 
program much quicker that RSDOS or 
OS-9 for backups. This will become one 



of your most used programs! 

Only $1 9.95 each. 3 for $49.95. 
SPECIAL With our 512K Upgrade (Next page) only $2. each Or 3 for $5! 



Announcing: 



The finest graphics/drawing program for the COCO 3! 



Da Vinci 3 




16 colors on screen at one time 

Modify each color from 64 available colors 

Use composite or RGB monitor 

Draw with custom paintbrushes 

Full resolution 320 X 192 

Picture converter for conversion of 

COCO 2 pictures to COCO 3 
Multiple text fonts 
Accepts input from joystick, X-pad, 

mouse, or touch-pad 
Boxes, circles, line, paint generation 
Screen dump for Tandy mono and color ink-jet 

printers, (NX- 10 and others pending) 
Sensible price 

No additional hardware required because of 

course/fine joystick movement modes 
Zoom mode for individual pixel editing 
Great on screen menu which is removable at 
the touch of a key to allow full screen edit 



Super I/O Board for OS-9 

Each Board Provides 2 Serial Ports and Centronics Parallel Port 

First Board has Real Time Clock and Beeper... With Second Board up to 5 Users 

2 Serial Ports 



The serial ports are usable up to 19,200 Baud, and 
the parallel port is a true Centronics standard. 
Plug into your mulli-pak. On CoCo 3, multi-pak 
must be upgraded. You will have a multi-user 
system with additional computers or terminals 
plugged into the serial ports. An OWL hard drive 
and 512K upgrade are stronglv recommended for 
multi-user systems. gm± mm 

Intro Price... $ 1 DOi 

BOARD 2. ..$139. 



(up to 19,200 BAUD) 



Plugs 
into 
MULT I PACK 





CENTRONICS 
PARALLEL 
PORT 



P.O. Box 11 6-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 
- ORDER LINES (only) - 

(BOO) 245-6228 
(215) 682-6855 (PA) 




Proven Techno/ogy 

On the Razor's KiJge of the Color* ompukT frontier W^^^^M 



OS-9 Hard Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or Business Use 
Drive Access is at Least 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives 
Control up to 2 Drives per Controller each as Continuous Storage 



Every hard drive system is complete wilh software, 
hard drive, controller, heavy-duty power supply, and 
LR Tech Interface. When a complete drive system is 
ordered, the drive is fully assembled, tested, and 
burned in for 3 full days. This ensures dependability 
and optimum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo hard drive 
systems and parts for systems for more than 2 years. 
This is the longest history in the CoCo market of any 
available drive system. About V* of all hard drive 
systems currently in use in the CoCo market use the 
LR Tcch/OWL-WARE system. We have reached 
this position in the CoCo hard drive market by 
providing our customers with a quality product that 
they (and we) can be proud to own and use. 



A number of drive systems were in the market place 
when the LR Tech Interface was introduced and 2 
have been introduced since. Most of these are no 
longer available. We provide the only system which 
provides a combination of standard interface (SAS1), 
rugged unit construction (not hacked to a floppy 
drive controller), high speed, and reasonable price. 
These systems are even several times faster than 
the standard XT hard drive system. Ideal for 
multi-user system because processor does not stop 
for hard drive access. 

For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and 2 



System Prices: 

$469. $629. 



New! 




10 Meg 



20 Meg 



$759. 

40 Meg Dealer's Inquires Invited! 



Hard Drive Interface 

(Includes Software) 

For those who want to put together their own 
system, we have an exclusive arrangement to 
distribute the LR Tech Interface. Please note 
that an interface is not a controller. A Xebec, 
WD, or Adaptec SASI controller are required 
for a drive system. 

To assemble a hard drive system yourself re- 
quires some reasonable knowledge of OS-9 and 
electronic construction and a hard drive that 
works. CoCo 3 users will have to upgrade their 
Multi-pak. 

Only $119. 

Xebec Controller $139. 

CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 

The LR Tech 512K upgrade uses all gold con- 
tacts and 120 nanosecond 256K chips. Provides 
large system memory from OS-9 Level 2. 

Without . A With . ^ 

Mem Chips $59. Chips $1 1 2. 

Special! See software offer on previous page. 



Hard Drive Basic 



New For the CoCo 

In Answer for the Many Reqests to Run BASIC from a Hard Drive 



With the development of the CoCo 3, OWL Ware has been able to 
provide a truly professional Hard Drive System using OS-9. There has 
not, however, been a method of running your programs from the 
standard BASIC. With this latest development of the CoCo software 
aces, it is now possible to partition your hard drive into RSDOS and 
OS-9 sections. The OS-9 partition runs your OS-9 normally. The RSDOS 
section is further divided into a number of floppy sized units to run 
RSDOS programs. The familiar RS disk commands work normally. 



There is little more that must be learned. 

All of these RS drive sections are available at all times. It is not necessary 
to use assign commands and get access to only a few of these sections. 
Programs that use RS-BASIC should work as will all programs which do 
not force their own disk drivers. 

Call about prices. This should be availabile by the time you read this ad! 




OWL-WARE PHONES 

ORDERS 

(800) 245-6228 
PA (21 5) 682-6855 

TECHNICAL HELP 
(21 5) 433-8695 

Call for advice 



Ask for the WHISPER DRIVE for the finest, quietest drive available! 

Drive 0 Systems (Fuii Hgt) $169 ■ (HalfHgt-DS) $229. 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, cable, case & power supply, and manual. 

Drive 1 Systems (Fun Hgt) $95. (HalfHgt-DS) $135. 

New! New! (3.5" 720K Drive for OS-9) $195. 

Drive 1 has drive, case & power supply, and instructions for use with your drive. 
(Call for Special Prices on Drive 0> 1> 2 y 3 Combos.) 



HALF HEIGHT DRIVE 
UPGRADE KIT FOR 
R8 HORIZONTAL CASES 

Why only double the capacity of your 
system when you can triple in the same 
case? Kit includes: double sided drive to fit 
your case, chip to run both sides of new 
drive, hardware, and detailed instructions. 
Takes only 5 minutes. 

Model $119. Model $129. 

500 501 



All drives are new and fully assembled. We 
ship only FULLY TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at these low prices. Full height 
drives are unused surplus and not always 
available. 

We use Fuji, Teac and Other Fine brands. We 
have 5 years experience in the CoCo disk drive 
market! We are able to provide support when 
you have a problem. 



Bonus! 
Special 
Bundled 
Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 



NOW FOR CoCo 1, 2, 3!! \ 



Our prices do not include shipping costs, but do 
include a discount for cash. 

OWL-WARE has a liberal warranty policy. During 
the warranty period, all defective items will be 
repaired or replaced at our option and at no cost to 
the buyer except for shipping costs. 

Call our technical help line for return authorization 
numbers. Return of non-defective items or unauthor- 
ized returns are subject to a service charge. 



WARRANTIES 

Full Hgt 90 days Half Hgt 1 Year 
ORDER LINES (only) — 

(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 

- TECH HELP LINE 

(21 5) 433-8695 

Call for Latest Prices! 








P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 



OWL-WARE 

Software Bundle 

Disk Tutorial - 3 Utilities - 2 Games 

DISK TUTOR Ver. 1 .1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language pro- 
gram. This tutor takes you through your 
lessons and corrects your mistakes for a 
quick, painless disk drive intoduction. 
(This professionally written tutor is easily 
worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster disk 
access and allows the use of double-sided 
drives. Corrects a floating point number 
error on early CoCo systems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs between 
disks. A wild card option selects groups of 
programs for copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad sec- 
tors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These have sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is over 
$125 worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with cheap, 
non-professional "Public Domain" soft- 
ware which is being offered by others. All 
of this software is copyrighted and pro- 
fessional in quality. The tutor is unique 
with us and has helped hundreds of new 
users learn their disk drive. 

only $27.95 

(or even better) 

only $6.95 with 

any Disk Drive Purchase!! 



1 F e atur e 

A modification to the ABC educational program 



Sounding Out 
the ABCs 

By John ML Linge 




1 42 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



September 1987's issue of rain- 
bow featured the program ABC 
by Ann B. Mayeux, which helps 
small children learn the alphabet. My 3- 
year-old, Regina, loved being able to 
"type" on the keyboard and get a color- 
ful response with ABC. 

However, it seemed to me that the 
program could be enhanced greatly by 
having the computer speak to her as she 
pressed the keys. When I scanned the 
listing, I saw that Mrs. Mayeux had 
written the program in such a way that 
I could readily patch it to take advan- 
tage of the Tandy Speech/Sound Pak to 
provide music and speech. 

After a bit of trial and error, the 
program RBCMRG resulted. To use it, 
type in the listing, being careful to use 
the line numbers shown. The lines fit 
between the lines of the original pro- 
gram, except the ones I had to rewrite 
because of a conflict with Pak opera- 
tion. Also, the apparent misspellings in 
the program are there purposely — the 



As a systems engineer at a major aero- 
space company, John Linge has worked 
with a variety of operating systems and 
languages. At home, he enjoys using his 
Co Co for personal and family-oriented 
purposes. 



Speech/ Sound Pak does some odd 
things with the pronunciation of some 
properly spelled English words, so they 
must be misspelled in order to be pro- 
nounced correctly. 

Save the program in ASCII form by 
entering SAVE "RBCMRG/BRS", A. Re- 
name the original ABC program as 
"RBCOLD/BRS" in order to retain it in 
its original form as a backup, then load 
it and merge the two programs by 
entering MERGE "RBCMRG/BR5". Save 
the merged program as RBC. 

To run the new ABC program, you 
must have a Speech/ Sound Pak in- 
stalled in Slot 2 or Slot 3 of a Multi-Pak 
Interface, with the disk controller in 
Slot 4, as usual. The subroutine that 
starts at Line 3140 redirects the CoCo 
sound port to the Pak, and the subrou- 
tine starting at Line 3000 resets it. The 
data starting at Line 3230 is for the 
notes of the ABC song in the Pak's third 
octave. Each item to be said by the Pak 
is placed in the variable LG$, whose 
letters are poked into the Pak one at a 
time by the subroutine at Line 3060. 

For each key pressed, the child is told 
"You pressed," followed by the letter he 
or she pressed. This helps a small child 
associate the letter shape with its name. 
For each graphic, the child is told that 



the letter he or she pressed "is for" the 
graphic shown on the screen. For exam- 
ple, when the child presses A, the 
computer says, "You pressed A. A is for 
airplane. A is for alligator. A is for 
apple." I attempted to have the program 
identify the object as closely as possible 



to the drawing of the object without 
rewriting the drawing routines, which 
were programmed very well by Mrs. 
Mayeux. 

When Regina asks to type on "Dad- 
dy's computer," we load the modified 
program. She still enjoys the color and 



immediate feedback of her actions, and 
she also hears the "robot" speak to her. 

(Questions or comments about this 
modification may be directed to the 
author at 27 Apple Lane, Commack, 
NY 11725. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing for a reply.) □ 



Editor's Note: The modified BBC program will be 
placed on this month's RAINBOW ON TAPE and 
RAINBOW ON DISK instead of RBCMRG. 




163 2405 173 

.70 3160 84 

185 END 121 



The listing: RBCMRG 

49 1 PATCHES TO ABC/BAS TO USE S 

/sc 

5j8 W=&HFF7D: X=&HFFj3j3: Y=&HFF7E 

51 GOSUB 3j8j8j8 

52 POKE Y, &HAF: GOSUB 317J3 

53 FOR 1=1 TO 2 

54 READ XI: POKE Y,X1: GOSUB 317 

55 NEXT I 

61 PRINT@384, "MODIFIED FOR S/SC 
BY JOHN LINGE"; 

62 FOR 1=1 TO 43 

63 POKE Y,8: GOSUB 317j8: POKE Y, 
J3: GOSUB 3170 

64 READ X1,X2,X3 

65 FOR J=l TO X3 

66 GOSUB 314j8 



71 NEXT I 

72 POKE Y,8: GOSUB 317J3: POKE Y, 
0: GOSUB 317J3 

73 POKE Y, &HFF: GOSUB 317j3 

74 CLS 

135 IF A$>="A" AND A$<="Z" THEN 
LG$= M Y0U PRESSED "+A$: GOSUB 3j37 
J3 

41J3 PCLS2 : SCREEN1,J8 

435 I^^'AIRPLAYN" : GOSUB 3j340 

485 LG$="AELLIGAYTOR" : GOSUB 3)34 

J3 

495 LG$=" APPLE": GOSUB 3j34j3 
51)3 PCLS: SCREENl,Jfr 



525 LG$="BOWT" : GOSUB 3j34j3 
" ^BIRD": GOSUB 3)34)3 
LG$=" BALLOONS " : GOSUB 3)34)3 



545 LG$=" 
555 



67 


POKE Y,J3: GOSUB 


317J3: 


POKE 


Y, 


875 


LG$= 


" FLOUERS 


'»: GOSUB 3)34)3 


X2: 


GOSUB 311 ft 








90J3 


PCLS 


: SCREEN 1 


,1 


68 


POKE Y,l: GOSUB 


3170: 


POKE 


Y, 


9J35 


LG$= 


"GAYT" : 


GOSUB 3)340 


XI: 


GOSUB 317J3 








955 


LG$= 


"GRAPES" 


: GOSUB 3)34)3 


69 


POKE Y,8: GOSUB 


3170: 


POKE 


Y, 


985 


LG$= 


"JIHRAFF 

4 


": GOSUB 304)3 



59)3 PCLS:SCREEN1,1 
605 LG$="CLOUD": GOSUB 3040 
655 
665 
680 
695 
725 
735 

750 „. w « 

755 LG$="EXIT 

_ — _ mm — M 



LG$= ■ uijvjuu" ; buouo oja- 
LG$="CAR": GOSUB 3)34)3 
LG$="CAT": GOSUB 3)34)3 
PCLS:SCREEN1,1 
LG$="DOOR": GOSUB 3040 
LG$="DAWGG": GOSUB 3040 
LG$="DISH": GOSUB 3040 



PCLS:SCREEN1,1 

GOSUB 3040 



755 LG$="EXIT": GOSUB 3040 
775 LG$=" ELEPHANT": GOSUB 3040 
820 PCLS 2 : SCREEN1,0 

O *"1 C T — II Tt"n -K T.T/T* II . OAPTTO ft A ft 



10: GOSUB 3170 
70 NEXT J 



1020 PCLS: SCREEN1,1 

1035 LG$="HELICOPTER": GOSUB 30. 



DMC "No Halt" Disk Controller 




Unleash your CoCo's potential! 

Our new Dual Mode Controller (DMC) implements a new 
"no halt" mode of operation so it can read from or write 
to disk all by itself. The 6809 is freed to process other 
tasks and respond to interrupts. This is how OS-9 was 
meant to run! But the Radio Shack "halt" mode of 
operation is also retained to maintain full compatibility 
with existing non-OS-9 software. 

Fr««l Disk caching software included can speed up 
OS-9 disk accesses. 



Did you know? 

. . .\\\a\ all the older floppy disk controllers for the 
CoCo completely tie up (and even halt) the 6809 pro- 
cessor during disk reads and writes? No wonder 
your keyboard is constantly "losing" characters! Or 
that your serial port often gives you garbage. 



2261 East 11th Ave., Vancouver, B.C., Canada V5N 1Z7 



Other DMC features: 

• works with original CoCo, CoCo 2, or CoCo 3 
(Multl-Pak required) ^ 

• no adjustments — all-digital data separator and write 
precompensation 

• gold plated card-edge connectors for reliability 

• ROM socket takes 24 pin or 28 pin chip; dual DOS capability 

• Radio Shack DOS 1.1 ROM installed 

• 8K bytes cache memory on board (32K optional) 

• D.R Johnson's SDISK package (specially modified for DMC) is 
included at no charge ($30 value) 

• aluminum case 

• fully assembled and tested; 120 day limited warranty 

To ord«r: DMC controller with RSDOS 1.1 and SDISK (specify 
OS-9 Level I or II) $149.50 plus $5 S/H ($12 overseas). Add $16 
for 32K RAM option. Terms (prices in $US); check, money 
order, VISA. U.S.A. orders shipped via UPS from WA state. 




(Also ask about our ST-2900 
6809 based expandable 
single board computer) 

(604) 255-4485 (Pacific Time) 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 143 



1055 LG$="HOUSE": GOSUB 3040 
1100 PCLS6: SCREEN1,1 
1102 DRAW"BM175,40R25D15L5D81R5D 
15L25U15R5U81L5U15" : PAINT (185, 50 
) #8,8 

1115 LG$="ICE CREAM": GOSUB 3040 
113)8 PCLS3:SCREEN1,0 
1135 LG$="JAK IN THE BOX": GOSUB 
3040 

1220 PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 

1235 LG$="KAEET": GOSUB 3040 

1255 LG$="KEY": GOSUB 3040 

1325 LG$="KANGUHROO" : GOSUB 3040 

1340 PCLS3: SCREEN1,0 

1345 LG$=" LEAVES" : GOSUB 3040 

1375 LG$="LAYDEYBUG": GOSUB 3040 

1410 PCLS: SCREEN1,1 

1415 LG$="MOUNTENS": GOSUB 3040 

1425 LG$="MAILBOX" : GOSUB 3040 

1435 LG$="MOON": GOSUB 3040 

1490 PCLS: SCREEN1,1 

1495 LG$="NEST": GOSUB 3040 

1525 LG$="NIGHT": GOSUB 3^4j3 

1560 PCLS: SCREEN1,1 

1565 LG$="AOUL": GOSUB 3040 

1615 LG$="OTION": GOSUB 3040 

1635 LG$="OCTOWPUS": GOSUB 3040 

1680 PCLS: SCREEN1,1 

1685 LG$="PICTURE": GOSUB 3040 

1695 LG$=" PUMPKIN": GOSUB 3040 

1715 LG$="PAPER": GOSUB 3j34j3 

1725 LG$="PENCIL": GOSUB 3j34j3 

1780 PCLS: SCREEN1 , 1 

1785 LG$="QUILT": GOSUB 304j8 

1825 LG$="QUEEN": GOSUB 3j34j3 

189j3 PCLS 3 : SCREENl,j3 

1905 LG$="ROCKET" : GOSUB 3040 

1955 LG$="RAINBOW": GOSUB 3040 

1975 LG$="RABBIT": GOSUB 3040 

2020 PCLS 3: SCREEN1,0 

2025 LG$="SUN": GOSUB 3040 

2045 LG$= I !SIGN": GOSUB 3040 

2055 LG$=" SNAKE" : GOSUB 3040 

2085 LG$="STREET": GOSUB 3040 

2100 PCLS: SCREEN1,0 

2115 LG$="TRUCK": GOSUB 3040 

2145 LG$= S "TREE" : GOSUB 3040 

2190 PCLS 3: SCREEN1,0 

2205 LG$="UMBERELLA" : GOSUB 3040 

2250 PCLS: SCREEN1,1 

2255 LG$="VYIOWLIN" : GOSUB 3040 

2315 LG$="VAZE": GOSUB 3040 

2335 LG$="VYOWLETS": GOSUB 3040 

2360 PCLS 2 : SCREEN 1,0 

2365 LG$="WIHNDOW" : GOSUB 3040 

2405 LG$= "WATERMELON" : GOSUB 304 

$ 

2440 PCLS 2: SCREEN1,0 

2445 LG$="XYLOWPHONE": GOSUB 304 



144 THE RAINBOW February 1968 



2490 PCLS 2 : SCREEN1,0 

2535 LG$=" YELLOW YARN": GOSUB 30 

40 

2550 PCLS: SCREEN1,1 

2585 LG$="ZEEBRA": GOSUB 3040 

2605 LG$="ZOO": GOSUB 3040 

3000 1 INITIALIZE S/SC 

3010 GOSUB 3140 

3020 POKE W, 1:GOSUB3170: POKE W, 

0:GOSUB3170 

3030 RETURN ■ 

3040 1 SET UP LEGEND FOR KEYPRES 
S 

3050 LG$=A$+" IS FOR "+LG$ 
3060 1 SAY LEGEND 

3070 POKE X+1,52: POKE X+3,63: P 
OKE X+3 5,60 

3080 FOR 1=1 TO LEN (LG$) 

3090 POKE Y,ASC(MID$(LG$,I,1) ) :G 

OSUB 3170 

3100 NEXT I 

3110 POKE Y,13:GOSUB3170 

3120 FOR DL=1 TO 1000: NEXT DL 

3130 RETURN 

3140 1 SET UP S/SC 

3150 POKE X+1,52: POKE X+3,63: P 

OKE X+3 5,60 

3160 RETURN 

3170 1 CHECK FOR S/SC READY 
3180 IF PEEK(Y) AND 128 = 0 THEN 

3180 
3190 RETURN 
3200 1 ABC SOUND DATA 
3210 ' ENABLE CHANNEL A ON MIXER 
3220 DATA 7,254 
3230 1 ABC SONG DATA 
3240- 1 CC GG AA G 

3250 DATA 1,172,2, 1,172,2, 1,29 
,2, 1,29,2, 0,254,2, 0,254,2, 1, 
29,4 

3260 1 FF EE DDDD C 

3270 DATA 1,64,2, 1,64,2, 1,83,2 

, 1,83,2, 1,125,1, 1,125,1, 1,12 

5,1, 1,125,1, 1,172,4 

3280 1 GG F EE D 

3290 DATA 1,29,2, 1,29,2, 1,64,4 
, 1,83,2, 1,83,2, 1,125,4 
3300 1 GGG F EE D 

3310 DATA 1,29,1, 1,29,1, 1,29,1 
, 1,64,4, 1,83,2, 1,83,2, 1,125, 
4 

3320 1 CC GG AA G 

3330 DATA 1,172,2, 1,172,2, 1,29 
,2, 1,29,2, 0,254,2, 0,254,2, 1, 
29,4 

3340 1 FF EE DD C 

3350 DATA 1,64,2, 1,64,2, 1,83,2 
, 1,83,2, 1,125,2, 1,125,2, 1,17 
2,6 

3360 ' TURN OFF CHANNEL A SOUND 
3370 DATA 0,0,0 



TEXTPRO-IV 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer III Word Processing System" 



9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 
Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 
9 Proportional Character Sets Supported with full Justification. 
80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function key sets. 
Three Programmable Headers and One Programmable Footer. 
Automatic Footnote System places lines at the bottom of a page. 

7 Tab Commands, with: Center, Left, Right and Decimal align. 
Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system setup. 

8 Pre-Defmed & 10 Programmable printer function commands. 
Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 
Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 
Complete Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left & right. 
Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 
Create and Edit Hies larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

1 Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 
1 Compatible with all printers including Laser printers. 
1 Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 512K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most Powerful Word Processing System available for the 
X)CO-3, designed for speed, (taxability and extensive document processing. It is 
tot like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
hort documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional printing, 
hen most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simple word processors. 
Jut, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
eatures to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
iroblems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is the answer. It works in a 
otally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
haracter abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
nformation that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
brmatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
Qiere are no time comsuming and frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
:ontrol at all times. You can display the formatted document on the screen before 
i single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, footers, 
>age numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, Italic, 
Jnderline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts, 
ake a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKIDATA 
^ASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All of the character sets used on this AD are 
proportional, all centering, justification, font selection, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

What you see is what you get! 

TEXTPRO IV has 9 Hi-Resolution screen fonts to choose from, with 58 to 212 
characters per line in 225 Resolution, for the best display possible. You can easily 
natch the width of your printed page to the screen and you can have it 
lutomatically change display widths as you change printer fonts so you can even 
lisplay the "fine print". All of the screen fonts can display, Bold, Italic, Underline, 
Superscript, Subscript and Double Width characters. When you you want to see 
vhat your printed document will look like, TEXTPRO IV will let you see it on the 
«reen in all its glory, so that, "What you see is what you get". 

Standard Commands 

TEXTPRO IV has all the document formatting commands you expect in a 
word processor and then some. The setup commands include: line length, top 
nargin, bottom margin, page length, page numbering on/off, page format on/off, 
mtomatic word fill on/off and justification left, center, right or full. Some of the 
Vertical control features include: Test for a number of lines left on a page, skip to 
lext page, set page number, page pause, single and multiple line spacing. 

TEXTPRO IV features 3 programmable Header lines that can be centered, left 
>r right justified and one programmable Footer line. There are 3 commands for 
:ontinious, single and paragraph indenting, Center Text, Center Line and Right 
histify text with character fill. 

Printer & Special Commands 

TEXTPRO IV has 8 pre-defined printer & screen commands for Bold, Italic, 
Double Width, Underline, Subscript, Superscript, Condensed and Double Strike 
print. It also has 10 programmable functions that you can use to access intelligent 
printer features like: Graphics, variable line spacing, half line feed, horizontal & 
vertical positioning. There are also 3 other printer commands that allow you to 
imbed control code sequences anywhere in the text. 

There is a Footnote command that will automatically place footnotes at the 
bottom of the page. Another command allows you to display a message on the 
screen and input text from the keyboard, to be included in your printed document. 
There is also a repeat command that allows you to repeat an entire document or 
part of one, up to 255 times. 

Tab Functions 

TEXTPRO IV features an elaborate system of tab commands for complete 
:ontrol over column formatting. There are 10 programmable tab stops that can be 
defined and re-defmed at any time. They can be used to: Center over Tab 
column, Right Justify to Tab column, Decimal Align over Tab column, Left 
Justify to Tab column (Normal Tab) and Horizontal Tab. They can also be used 
with a numeric column position for maximum flexibility. 



Proportional Fonts & Printing 

TEXTPRO IV is the only Color Computer III Word Processing system that 
gives you Justified Proportion Printing, which can give your documents and letters 
that professional touch that just isn't obtainable with fixed or mono spaced 
printing. And just about all printers today support proportional fonts, and with 
Laser Printers you can get typesetting quality output for just pennies a page. 
TEXTPRO IV supports up to 9 proportional fonts, with full justification. And, 
you can even mix mono spaced and proportional fonts for maximum flexability. 
Even if you don't use proportional printing, you can select between Pica, Elite and 
Condensed fixed width fonts to get fully justified printing. 

Mail Merge and Text Processing Disk Functions 

TEXTPRO IV supports several commands that allow you to import data or 
text from other disk files. They allow you to include information like names and 
addresses for Mail Merge capability, Import standard paragraphs or other 
information for Boiler Plate type functions and more. Some of the commands 
include: Open a file, Field a Record, Read a Record into fielded variables, Read 
single or multiple lines and Trim spaces from the trailing end of fielded variables. 

Another powerful disk function not to be overlooked is the "LIBRARY" 
command that allows you to include the entire contents of a file in your text. This 
can be very useful for a great many applications. You can use a Library command 
to automatically include a standard or optional printer setup command file, or to 
include standard paragraphs, headers or information created from a spread sheet 
or any other program. And, for printing very large documents that consist of 
several files linked together. 

Autoexec Startup Files 

TEXTPRO IV will automatically load and execute a command text file when it 
first executes. This allows you to customize the program configuration for your 
system and printer whenever you startup TEXTPRO IV. You can setup the 
screen display format, colors, adjust automatic key repeat, printer baud rate, load 
a set of function keys, load your printers control codes and more. 

80 Programmable Function Keys 

TEXTPRO IV allows you to have up to 80 function keys with just about any 
kind of information or command sequences you can imagine. Once programmed, 
you can have a command sequence execute using a single function key. You can 
also Save and Load function key sets at any time. So, you can have several sets for 
different writing tasks or projects, the possibilities are endless. Just think, with a 
single function key you could, load a disk file, search for and replace all the 
occurences of a phrase, save the file back to disk, nave it processed and printed! 

Text Editing 

TEXTPRO IV has a powerful, full featured, line oriented screen editor that is 
faster and more efficient then most editors youVe ever worked with. It supports 
single or multiple line copy and move, global or local search and replace, word and 
character insert/delete, block delete and much more. It features adjustable 
automatic key repeat, selectable display foreground and background colors, screen 
line width and more. 

TEXTPRO IV uses fully compatible ASCII formatted files. You can even 
direct formatted output files to a standard ASCII disk file. It will Load, Save, 
Append, Kill, Text Process files from disk, Roll part of a file to disk, Get next 
portion of a file, display a Directory and Backup Ramdisk to & from Floppy disks. 

TEXTPRO IV's files are also compatible with spelling checker programs like 
Spell 'n Fix from Star Kits, a shareware program, available with TEXTPRO IV for 
your evaluation, just for the asking. 

Fully Buffered Keyboard 

While many word processing programs are slow and often lose keystrokes. 
TEXTPRO IV has a fully buffered keyboard that is virtually impossible to out 
type. Even when it's busy, it will still remember the keystrokes entered. You can 
enter in commands or whatever, even during insert mode you'll never lose a key. 

Professional Word Processing Power 

TEXTPRO IV is a powerful tool for both the Casual and Professional Word 
Processing user. It offers a wide range of features and functions that can satisfy 
even the most demanding writer. Even though you may not need all of 
TEXTPRO IV's power and flexability right now, its not a program that you can 
easily outgrow. As your needs and skills improve, you'll discover that you won't 
need to go out and buy another word processing program, TEXTPRO IV will 
already be ready and waiting. No Text Processing program available for the Color 
Computer III gives you more Text Processing Power than TEXTPRO IV. It can 
make your writing appear more professional than you ever thought possible. 
Check around, see what other word processing programs have to offer in terms of 
power, speed and flexability. When your finished comparing them against 
TEXTPRO IV, you'll see that it's the only real choice for the Color Computer III. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89.95 

To order TEXTPRO IV by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 
Coining Soon: CoCo 1 & 2 versions of TEXTPRO IV 



D el ph i Bure au 



BattleLine Topic No. 1 was an- 
nounced in mid-October by Greg 
Miller (GREGM1LLER) with this 
question: Does the high cost of software 
make piracy just? Several people took 
the opportunity to put in their two bits, 
and it is interesting to note that few 
users took the position that high soft- 
ware prices justify piracy. 

For those new to the game, "Battle- 
Line" refers to the discussion of contro- 
versial topics on Delphi. These topics 
are chosen and announced about once 
a month, and all users are invited to join 
in and let their opinions be known. To 
participate, send your messages in 
Forum. Also, stick around for the open 
conference that's held toward the end of 
the BattleLine period. 

If you missed anything, don't worry 
— all Forum messages and a complete 
log of the resulting conference will be 
placed in the Archives area of the 
database for later perusal by any SIG 
member. The archive of the piracy 
BattleLine is there now. Be forewarned, 
however, that the information is over 
100K in size. The main archive file has 
been broken into several smaller files, 
which should help those whose terminal 
programs don't support direct-to-disk 
file transfers. 

As the size of the archive file implies, 
the first BattleLine seemed to go quite 
well. Several users responded to the 
chosen topic and aired their thoughts 
and feelings. All in all, not too many low 
blows were thrown (although it might 
help to see more of these!). 

If the topic interests you, download 
the appropriate files. You can still 
respond to the issue — kick it around 
some more and see what you come up 
with. Nothing says we can't pick the 
same (or a closely related) topic twice. 

We expect the number of users to 
increase as BattleLine continues. It is 
part of human nature to want to join in. 
And the best part of the "battle" is that 
if you disagree with someone else, you 
can't get punched in the nose! Battle- 
Line won't leave any casualties; rather, 



Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associate s degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is cra V. 



Delphi's Online 
Debate Team 

By Cray Augsburg 

Rainbow Technical Editor 



it can help us all to understand the 
impact of certain topics. 

By the way, BattleLine topics are not 
limited to computer-related discussion 
only. If you have ideas for BattleLine, 
any "hot" thoughts in your heart or 
mind, let them be known. Send a Forum 



Database Report 

By Don Hutchison 

Rainbow's Delphi Database Manager 

Both OS-9 Online and the CoCo SIG 
have been very busy since the Oc- 
tober Princeton RAINBOWfest. 
Many users purchased software at the *fest 
and are now using it to produce utilities, 
pictures and other programs that they wish 
to share with the CoCo population. Our 
uploading activity following the 'fest was 
extremely lively! We even uploaded one 
very popular file, CoCo3FIX.BflS, from 
the 'fest! 

OS-9 Online 

In the General Information topic area, 
Jim Johnson (reindeer) uploaded a 
"typewriter graphic" file that describes 



Don Hutchison is an electrical engi- 
neer and lives in Atlanta, Georgia. He 
works as a senior project engineer 
involved in the design of industrial 
control systems. On Delphi, Don is the 
Database Manager of the RAINBOW 
CoCo SIG. His Delphi username is 

DONHUTCHISON. 



message to Greg Miller, who will spread 
the word among the staff, which will 
then choose a topic. You should keep in 
mind that in these infant stages of 
BattleLine we are learning to better 
serve you as members of the SIG. We 
need your feedback to make this work. 

Resource to Delphi 

We just received our copy of the new 
book DELPHI: The Official Guide. 
This book, written by Michael A. Banks 
(KZIN) of the Science Fiction SIG, is 487 
pages long and literally jammed with 
information about Delphi. The infor- 
mation contained in the book is broken 
into four parts: 

Getting Started covers the basics of 
telecommunications. It also details the 
basics of the Delphi menu and com- 
mand systems, ending with a presenta- 
tion and discussion of the Delphi Main 
Menu selections. 

The DELPHI Member Handbook 
explains in its 16 chapters major aspects 
of how to utilize Delphi to the fullest. 
Topics covered include Business & 
Finance, Conference, DELPHI Mail, 



how to convert S^-inch disk drive connec- 
tors to the type used by S^-inch drives. 
This file is of importance to OS-9 users 
because his modifications will allow 314- 
inch drives of the 720K double-sided, 80- 
track variety to be used with the existing 
CoCo disk controller circuitry. Jim Man- 
ning (jimbm) uploaded a program that 
enables booting with 80 columns and using 
the VDG screen in another window. Greg 
Law (GREGL) sent us a shell script file to 
merge BAS1C09 and RUNB with SYSCALL, 
INKEY^and GFX2 to alleviate the popular 
Error #043. Rix Seacord (Rix) gave us a 
review of the new "no halt" DMC con- 
troller from Sardis Technology. 

In the Programmers Den topic area, 
Greg Law uploaded a total of eight rou- 
tines. Included are a CRC checksum calcu- 
lation routine for Xmodem/ Ymodem, a 
day of the week calculator, a reverse string 
routine, a Julian date calculator, integer to 
ASCII (and vice versa) routines, an ASCII 
to double precision routine, and a C 
program for executing any OS-9 system 
call directly from the command line. The 



1 46 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



*** *** *** *** COLOR COMPUTER III SOFTWARE *** *** *** *** 



CBASIC III EDITOR/COMPILER 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer III BASIC COMPILER?!! 

If you want to write fast efficient machine language programs and you don't 
want to spend the next few years trying to learn how to write them in Assembly 
language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!!! 

CBASIC III is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full advantage 
of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K RAM, without 
having to spend years trying to learn assembly language programming. CBASIC 
III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you are 
already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Res Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). We even 
added advanced commands not available in Basic to give you a level of control 
only avialablc to very advanced Machine Language Programmers. Plus we made it 
exceptionally easy to use, not like some other compilers. CBASIC III is the 
friendliest and easiest compiler available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced Basic 
or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs without having to 
worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory allocations and so on, because 
CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. For Advanced users, CBASIC III 
will let you control every aspect of your program, even generating machine code 
directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC III features well over 150 Compiled Basic Commands and Functions 
that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, Tape, Printer and 
Screen I/O. It supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play 
and String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/Put, H/Play and I I/DRAW, all with 99.99& syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable 
printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
PRINT, INPUT, INKEY, GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands. 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the Color 
Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and install 2 Ultra 
Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation, Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 51 2K of memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8K blocks 
and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor which allows 
you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a full featured editor 
designed specifically for writing Basic programs. It has block move and copy, 
program renumbering, automatic line number generation, screen editing, printer 
control and much more. 

The documentation provided with CBASIC III is an 8 1/2 by 11 Spiral Bound 
book which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. We went to 
great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and understand, but 
complete and comprehensive enough for even the most sophisticated user. 

CBASIC III is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and 
well worth the investment. You can buy a less expensive compiler for your 
CoCo-3, and then find out how difficult it is to use, or how limited its features are. 
Then you^ll wish you had bought CBASIC III in the first place. Doltar for dollar, 
CBASIC III gives you more than any other compiler available. If you can find a 
better CoCo-3 Basic Compiler then buy it!!! 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

DATAPACK III PLUS V1.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 

AUTOPILOT & AUTO-LOG PROCESSORS 
X-MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT-I00 <fe VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

• No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port. 

• 8 Display Formats, 32/40/64/80 columns at 192 or 225 Res. 

" 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display & Disk. 

• ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 
" Directly record receive data to a disk file (Data Logging). 

' VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

• VT-100/52 cursor keys, position, insert/delete, PF & Alt. keys. 
" Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates. 

■ Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

• 9 Variable length, Programmable^ Macro Key buffers. 
" Programmable Printer rates from 110 to 9600 baud. 

• Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 

• Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

• Freeze Display & Review information On Line with no data loss. 

• Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

• Built in 2 Drive Ramdisk for 512K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R.S. Modem- Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128K & Disk, $59.95 

EDT/ASM III 

128/512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler. It is 
designed to take advantage of the new features available in the CoCo-3 with either 
128K or 5I2K of memory. It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 
lines in 192 or 225 Resolution, so you use the best display mode whether you are 
using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your display. Plus you can 
select any foreground or background colors or even monochrome display modes. 
It will even support 512K by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fast Ramdisk for 
lightning fast assembly of program source code larger than memory. There is also 
a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug your assembled programs. 
EDT/ASM III has the most powerful, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/Assembler package for the Color Computer. 

• Supports Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

• Full Screen line editing with immediate line update. 

■ Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

• Load & Save standard ASCII formatted file formats. 

• Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM III features include: 

• Supports the full 6809 instruction set & cross assembles 6800 code. 

• Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

• Supports Disk Library file (include) up to 9 levels deep. 

• Supports standard Motorola assembler directives. 

■ Allows multiple values for FCB & FDB directives (unlike R.S. EDT/ASM) 

• Allows assembly from the Editor Buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 128K & Disk $59.95 



TEXTPRO IV 

The ADVANCED COCO-3 Word Processing System" 

• 9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 

• On Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 

• Up to 8 Proportional Character Sets Supported with Justification. 

• Up to 80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function keysets. 

• Fully Buffered keyboard accepts data even duiring disk access. 

• Auioexecute Startup files for easy printer & system configuration. 

• 8 Pre-Defined Printer function commands & 10 Programmable ones. 
" Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

• Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 

' Completely Automatic Justification, Centering. Flush left & right. 
' Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

• Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 

• Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 512K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most advanced word processing system available for the 
COCO-3, designed for speed, fiexability and extensive document processing. It is 
not like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
short documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional spacing, 
then most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simpler word processors. 
But, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is what your looking fcr. It works 
in a totally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
formatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
There are no time comsuming, and often frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
control at all times. You can see what the formatted document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, 
Italic, Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters right on the 
screen. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts. 
take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKIDA'l. A 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! AH the character sets used on this AD are 
proportional spaced characters, all centering, justification, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89,95 

HI -RES III Screen Commander 

The DISPLAY you wanted but didn't get on your CoCo-3 

• 54 Different Character Sizes available from 14 to 212 cpl. 

• Bold, Italic, Underline, Subscript, Superscript and Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad width characters. 

• Scroll Protect form 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

• Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN 3 mode. 

• PRINT @ is available in all character sizes & styles. 

• Programmable Automatic Key repeat for fast editing, 

• Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

• Selectable Character & Background color. 

• Uses only 4K of Extended (2nd 64K) or Basic RAM. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES III will improve the standard display capabilities of the Color 
Computer 3, even the 40 and 80 column displays have several features missing. 
For example, you can't use PRINT @ or have different character sizes on the same 
screen, even when mixing text and graphics with the HPRINT command. Hi-RES 
III can give you the kind of display you always dreamed about having on your 
CoCo-3, with a wide variety of "display options that you can easily use with your 
Basic or ML programs. 

HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color Basic and its operation 
is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the normal screen display with an 
extremely versatile display package. With the full control code keyboard, you can 
control many of HI-RES III extended functions with just a couple ol simple 
keystrokes. 

Requires 128K Tape or Disk $34.95 

512K RAMDISK & MEMORY TESTER 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 ULTRA 
High Speed Ram Disks in you CoCb-3. It does not need or require the OS-9 
operating system. It works with R.S. DOS VI.O or VI. 1 and it is completely 
compatible with Enhanced Cblor Disk Basic! Plus it allows your CoCo-3 to run at 
double speed all the time even for floppy disk access!!! It will not disappear when 
you press reset like some other ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
ML program to test the 512K ram. It performs several bit tests as well as an 
address test so you know that your 512K of memory is working perfectly. 

Requires 512K & Disk $19.95 

"The SOURCE 111" 

DISASSEMBLER & SOURCE CODE GENERATOR 

The SOURCE III will allow you to easily Disassemble Color Computer 
machine language programs Directly from Disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
compatible Source code. 

" Automatic label generation and allows specifying FCB, FDB and FCC areas. 

• Disassemble programs Directly from disk, unlike other disassemblers. 

• Automatically locates Begin, End and Execution address. 

• Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 
■ Generates Assembler source Tiles directly to disk or printer. 

• Built in Hex/Ascii dump/display to locate FCB, FCC & FDB areas. 

• 8 Selectable Display formats 32/40/64/80 columns in 192 or 225 Res, 

• Selectable Foreground & Background colors & Printer Baud rates. 

• Built in Disk Directory an Kill file commands. 

• Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

Requires 128K & Disk $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 

purchase, plus S3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 



Electronic Mail, Entertainment, 
Groups and Clubs, People on DELPHI, 
Workspace, Using DELPHI, HELP 
and Using the OnlineText Editors. 

DELPHI Users Guide describes var- 
ious shortcuts you can use to maximize 
the benefits of using Delphi. Applica- 
tions of Delphi to your personal and 
business life are covered, as well. 

Reference contains four appendices: 
Index to DELPHI Services, DELPHI 
Membership Agreement, Trouble- 
shooting and Dial-Up Guide (access 
numbers for Tymnet, Telenet and Data- 
pac). 

DELPHI: The Official Guide is well- 
written and well-organized. The infor- 
mation is presented in a logical manner 
and is, therefore, very useful for the 
beginning, intermediate or advanced 
user. The book, which can be ordered 
online, costs $19.95. To order online, 
first go to the Delphi Main Menu. 
Select Using-DELPHI and then Man- 
uals. Finally, choose Order DELPHI 
Guide and answer the questions ap- 
propriately. We think you will appre- 
ciate the value of the book as well as the 
effort Mr. Banks has put forth to ensure 
the clarity, accuracy and completeness 
of the information it contains. □ 



program will perform the system call 
requested, give a dump of all the registers, 
and then exit with the status code indicated 
from the system call itself. 

In the Users Group topic area, Dennis 
Weldy (OS9ER) provided DL.flSM, a delet- 
ing utility that accepts names from a pipe; 
DISK ID, which allows the user to rewrite 
the disk name and date on a disk after 
BACKUP has overwritten it; DISKCflT -B0S, 
a BASIC09 utility to print a hierarchical 
directory of a disk to the printer; DIRW.C, 
for providing directories with wild cards; 
and DIR. ASM, a directory utility for 64- 
column screens. 

In the Utilities topic area, Greg Law 
provided ECH, a slightly different version 
of ECHO that accepts control characters on 
the command line. Rick Adams (RlCK- 
adams) provided an updated CC2 com- 
mand for use with the C compiler package 
that combines the £; PREP, C.PA5S1, 
C.PRSS2 and C.DPT steps via pipes. 

In the Telcom topic area, Bob Mon- 
towski (GRAPHICSPUB) uploaded the 
BAS1C09 BBS package that he used for- 
merly. Bill Brady (wbrady) sent us BT, a 
simple terminal program written in basic 
for those who have an Atari ST and only 
the personal pak. 

In the Graphics & Music topic area, Pat 
Abramovitch (HUBBS) uploaded a pro- 
gram that draws a "512K on board 1 ' sign 



on a 40-column graphics screen. (He says 
he was inspired by Rick Adams' Rickey- 
term macros.) Toni Ryan (tntrhodan) 
sent us a new 512K version of his popular 
BDraw program, written in BASIC09. Steve 
Clark (STEVECLARK) provided us with his 
MacPaint picture display and print utility 
for Level II. He included documentation 
as well as the C source code. Rick Adams 
gave us a UiLfiBEL command that will put 
a Macintosh-style window label at the top 
of all your windows. Rick also uploaded 
a COLOR command for Level II, including 
C source code. 

CoCo SIG 

In the General Information topic area, 
Kevin Nickols (nickols) posted the Tandy 
newsletters for September and October. 
Marty Goodman (martygoodman) 
posted his report on RAlNBOWfest. I 
provided a patch for the CoCo 3 demo 
program from Spectral Associates that 
provides enhanced disk performance for 
those with high-performance drives. 

In the CoCo 3 Graphics topic area, 
David Mills (DAViDMlLLS) uploaded his 
picture of the White House, which won 
first prize in November's CoCo Gallery. 
Mark OTella (MDODELPHl) sent us his 
KRLISC0P.BA5 program. David Tilman 
(davidtilman) provided us with some 
nifty palette animation and preset motion 



Model 101 
Interface $39.95 



Model 1 04 Deluxe Model 1 02 
Interface $51 .95 Switcher $35.95 



Model 105 
Switcher $14.95 



Pi 






• Serial to parallel interface 

• Works with any COCO 

• Compatible with "Centron- 
ics" parallel input printers 

• 6 switch selectable baud 
rates 300-600-1200-2400- 
4800-9600 

• Small size 

4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25" 

• Comes compfete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 



Other Quality 
Items 

High quality 5 screw shell C- 
10 cassette tapes. $7.50/ 
dozen 

Hard plastic storage boxes for 
cassette tapes. $2.50/dozen 

Pin-Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00/100 
Colors $3.60/100 (specify 
red, blue, yellow, tan) 






Same features as 101 plus 

• Built in serial port for your 
modem or other serial device 

• Switch between parallel 
output and serial output 

• Size is 4.5" x 2.5" x 1 .25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 

NEW! Cables for 
your COCO 

• U.L listed foil-shielded cable 

• 2 Types: male/female exten- 
sion cables (used between 
a serial device and existing 
cable) male/male cables 
(used between two serial 
devices such as a modem 
and one of our switchers). 

• 3 ft./$3.95, 6 ft./$4.49, 
10ft./$5.59 Specify M/M 
or M/F and length. 



• Connect to your COCO 
serial port and have 3 switch 
selectable serial ports 

• Color coded indicator lights 
show switch position 

• Lights also serve as a 
power on indicator for your 
COCO 

• Heavy guage blue anodized 
aluminum cabinet with non- 
slip rubber feet 

The 101 and 104 require 
power to operate. Most print- 
ers can supply power to your 
interface. (Star, Radio Shack 
and Okidata are just a few that 
do • Epson and Seikosha do 
not). The interfaces can also 
be powered by an AC adap- 
tor; Radio Shack model 273- 
1 431 plugs into all models. If 
you require a power supply, 
add a "P" to the model number 
and add $5.00 to the price. 
(Model 1 01 P $44.95, Model 
104P $56.95). 



• Connects to your COCO 
to give you 2 switch select- 
able serial ports 

• 3 foot cable to connect to 
your COCO'S serial port 

• The perfect item to use to 
connect a printer and a 
modem to your COCO 

• Small in size, only 4.5 x 2.5 
x 1.25 



The Model 1 01 , 1 02, 1 04 and 
1 05 work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory 
size. These products are co- 
vered by a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101 and 1 04 work 
with any standard parallel 
input printer including Gemini, 
Epson, Radio Shack, 
Okidata, C. loth, Seikosha, 
Panasonic and many others. 
They support BASIC print 
commands, word processors 
and graphic commands. 

We manufacture these 
products - dealer inquiries 
are invited. 



Cassette Label 
Program $6.95 

• New Version - tape trans- 
ferable to disk - save and 
load labels from tape to disk 

• Prints 5 lines of information 
on pin-feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven, easy to use 

• Standard, expanded and 
condensed characters 

• Each line of text auto- 
matically centered. 

• Label display on CRT, en- 
abling editing before printing 

• Program comes on tape 
and is supplied with 24 
labels to get you started 

• 16 K ECB required 

Ordering 
Information 

Free shipping in the United 
States (except Alaska and 
Hawaii) on all orders over 
$50.00. Please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling on or- 
ders under $50.00. 
Ohio residents add 6% 
sales tax. 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use 
your VISA or MASTERCARD 

or request C.O.D. (Please 
add $2.00 for C.O.D. orders). 
If you prefer, send check or 
money order; payable in U.S. 
Funds to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



1 48 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



0 



utility programs. I uploaded MGE pictures 
of two lovely ladies, and a picture of 
Lonnie Falk for contrast. Jason Forbes 
(COC03K1D) gave us some more converted 
Atari ST pictures and a program to display 
two-dimensional fractal designs. Jeff 
Butler (JEFFBUTLER) sent us his MGE-to- 
CM3 converter utility. Bruce Farrington of 
Computize (BF<poMPUTlZE) kindly pro- 
vided the Color Max Deluxe cycling 
demos that he used at RAlNBOWfest 
(these were uploaded at the request of 
several *fest-goers). Bob Montowski 
(GRAPH1CSPUB) became very popular with 
the male SIG members this month by 
providing 24 digitized Playmate pictures. 
Ana Landa (ANA) provided several Hallo- 
ween pictures that were converted from her 
original PMODE 4 drawings. Craig Luecke 
(luecke) uploaded two pictures in the new 
GIF format, since Color Max is now 
capable of reading this format. Craig also 
sent us his clip set of vegetables and fruits 
and a 21 Jump Street calendar. Richard 
Trasborg (tras) uploaded a Playmate 
picture, the entire CoCo Max III demo 
disk, his first cycling picture (called 
"Snake") drawn under Co Co Max III, and 
the second in his series of "Coloring Book" 
pictures. Richard also uploaded an erotic 
picture called "Marabel," which was 
originally drawn by Mike Trammel!. 
Michael Schneider (MSCHNEIDER) pro- 



vided MAX . MGE, a few adult MGE pictures, 
and a picture of Albert Einstein. 

In the Classic Graphics topic area, Jason 
Forbes uploaded a program that displays 
two-dimensional fractal designs. 

In the Source for 6809 Assemblers topic 
.area, Roger Krupski (hardwarehack) 
uploaded a CoCo reader for the Speech 
and Sound Pak, and a "remote host" 
utility. I provided a high-speed utility for 
comparing two machine language disk 
files, 

In the Utilities & Applications topic 
area, Michael Schneider uploaded the 
Spell 'n Fix programs. Kurt Stecco (high- 
RA1LER) uploaded a program for the CoCo 
3 that will print gift certificates on a DMP 
printer. I uploaded a program of patches 
for the CoCo 3 DOS that was given to me 
at RAlNBOWfest by its author, Vernon 
Nemitz. 

In the Hardware Hacking topic area, 
Randy Poppe (RPOPPE) provided us with 
the schematic diagram for the Hi-Res 
joystick input module used by CoCo Max 
III. The file is in the form of a CoCo Max 
III picture file. Paul Schmidt (PAULK9PS) 
sent us instructions concerning converting 
the Deluxe RS-232 pack to modem pack 
addressing. Jim Johnson provided two 
informative hardware articles. The first 
one described how to convert the data and 
power connectors for 3 1 /4-inch disk drives 



to the type of connectors used by the older 
5!4-inch drive systems. This information is 
of particular value because once the matter 
of the different connectors is fixed, VA- 
inch drives of the 720K double-sided, 80- 
track variety will work with the existing 
CoCo disk controller circuitry. Jim's 
second article provided information con- 
cerning the new model No. 26-3124 multi- 
pack in the form of a "typewriter graphic" 
schematic. I provided a file that describes 
some cautions and advice for those who 
may be considering installing a second 
phone line for exclusive use with their 
computer. 

In the Music & Sound topic area, Mark 
Raphael (markraphael) sent us two 
more Musica files, Sunny Side and Rainy 
Day 

In the Games topic area, David Tilman 
sent us two games, HAVfil and HflVfl2. 

In the Data Communications topic area, 
Mike Andrews (mandrews) uploaded a 
patch for Version 2.0 of Rickey term that 
provides Ymodem downloading capabili- 
ties. Delphi supports the efficient Ymodem 
protocol, so this patch is sure to be popular 
among Rickeyterm users. Gerry Thomas 
(INET191) uploaded the documentation file 
for Ultimaterm. 

As you can see, we have a lot of new and 
very good material online for our CoCo 
users. See all of you online on Delphi! 



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Hardware 



i 




Communications 




300/1S00 baud Fully Hayes 

compatible 
Modem - 2 Year Warranty 

$129. OO 

[Modem & Cable] 

300/1SD0/3400 baud 
Fully Hayes 
Compatible Modem - CCITT 
2 Yean Warranty 

&249.00 

[Modem & Cable] 



THE OTHER GUYS CoCo 

55 North Mam Street 
Suite 301-D 
PO Box H 

Logan Utah B4321 




'KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. $69.95— Only $39.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k, 
32k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement [current & 'YTD'], journal, ledger, 899 accounts [ 2350 entries on 
32k & 64k [710 accounts & entries on 1 6k] [disk only]. Version 1 .2 has screen printouts. 

Rainbow Review 1.1- 9/84 : 1 .2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95 — ONLY $24.95 

Rling data base. File any information with Omega Re. Records can have up to 1 6 fields 
with 255 characters per field [4080 characters/record]. Sort, match & print any field. 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only]. 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 10/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles, elipses, boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on line HELPS at all 
times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects on the screen. Can be 
used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. GRAPHICS EDITOR. REG. 
539.95 — ONLY S24.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 

Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/B5 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking &more. User friendfy/menu 
driven. Includes manual. 639.95 or S49.95 General Ledger & Accounts Recaivables. 

[Disk Only] 'COCO WINDOWS' 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 10 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering. Four function 
calculator, with memory. The above options can be called anytime while running or writing 
in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES. YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. 824.95 [disk 
or tape] includes manual. 




CSD13 753-7620 
CBOOD 94S-94QS 



C.O.D. 



(Add S3.00 for postags & handling] 
Money Order, Check in U.8. Funds [Please spaoffy if JSM 

controller! 



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February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 49 



W the September 1987 issue of 
I *W\ rainbow (Page 150), I wrote 
XUan article on how to build an 
EPROM emulator using a RAM chip 
backed up with a battery. That was all 
well and good, and I thought that was 
the end of that. But it wasn't. A reader 
called me up and told me about his 
problem with the emulator — he had a 
problem erasing it. 

A regular EPROM has a specific 
method of erasing — you need an 
EPROM eraser. All EPROMs have a 
window on top that allows you access 
to the chip's memory cells. Exposing 
that window to ultraviolet light erases 
all data in the EPROM. 

When an EPROM is new, and every 
time you erase it, the EPROM memory 
cells contain "logical 1"; or, in the case 
of an eight-bit EPROM, a Hex value of 
$FF (that is, eight logical high levels). 
When you program an EPROM, the 
logical 1 changes to a logical 0. And 
there is only one way the programmer 
can change that cell back to a logical 1 
— use an eraser. 

Since the chip I used was a RAM 
instead of an EPROM, my EPROM 
emulator had no window. You could not 
erase it with an EPROM eraser, but that 
did not seem to be a problem. Unlike 
an EPROM, a RAM chip cell can be 
changed to a logical 1 just by writing to 
it. In most cases, all you had to do was 
plug the RAM-based EPROM emula- 
tor and run the programmer software. 
No problem, the emulator was pro- 
grammed. 

There are always exceptions to the 
rule. In sync with today's world of 
"faster is better," the people who wrote 
EPROM programmer software were 
looking for faster ways to program an 
EPROM, each cell of which has to be 
programmed separately. Each EPROM 
cell takes a small fraction of a second 
to program, which does not seem like 
a very long time; but with EPROMs 
getting bigger and bigger, those "frac- 
tions" add up, and it takes longer and 
longer to program them. 

The software experts thought of one 
way to shorten the programming time: 
Since an EPROM contains all $FFs 
when it is new and just after it is erased, 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Quest, Quebec. 

150 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



Build an . . . . 

Electronic 
EPROM 

Emulator 
Eraser 

By Tony DiStefano 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



why not use that fact when program- 
ming? So, when the software is pro- 
gramming an EPROM, it first checks to 
see if the present data byte to be pro- 
grammed is $FF. If it is, the software 
doesn't bother to program that byte, as 
it is already an $FF on the EPROM. 
Instead, it goes on to the next byte. The 
more $FFs there are in the data to be 
programmed, the faster it goes. Makes 
sense, doesn't it? Right! To further 
aggravate the problem, some EPROM 
programmers check for $FFs and won't 
even start if your EPROM isn't right. 

Now, that is a problem. You can't 
erase the EPROM emulator with an 
eraser, and you can't program $FFs into 
it. You can't even unplug the battery to 
let the memory "forget"; that would 
make the EPROM emulator all zeros. 
What are you to do? Well, here is the 
answer. Build an Electronic EPROM 
Emulator Eraser. Wow, what a mouth- 
ful! But it will solve your problem. 

Building It 

To start with, you will need the 
standard tools you usually use on a 
project: soldering iron, solder, cutters, 
screwdrivers and the like. The parts list 
shows you what you will need. Some of 
these parts are not available at your 
local Radio Shack store, but they 



should all be available at a good elec- 
tronics store. 

Note that this project does not have 
to be plugged into a CoCo to work, and 
is completely self-contained. However, 
it does need a 5-volt supply. If you build 
it on a CoCo-compatible proto-board, 
you can get 5 volts from the CoCo's 
power supply. The 5-volt supply is 
available on Pin 9, and ground is on Pin 
33. 

First, let's start off with some theory 
The EPROM emulator is mainly a 
RAM chip, so let's review our knowl- 
edge of RAM chips. Basically, this 
RAM chip has 13 address lines (AO to 
A 12), eight data lines (DO to D7), one 
read /write line and some Chip Enable 
lines. Since this chip is emulating an 
EPROM, all lines are about the same 
except for the read/ write line. It 
changes to the program (PGM) line. 
What we have to do is program the chip 
for $FFs, so all DRTR lines are tied to 
Vcc, which is 5 volts and logical 1 , using 
the PGM pin (See Figure 1) to strobe 
this data (always $FF) to the chip. 

Every memory location has to be 
programmed this way. The easiest way 
to access every location is to do them 
in sequence, one at a time. For that you 
need some binary counters. Two of 
them will have enough bits to cover all 
addresses. In fact, if you study Figure 
1, you will see the counters I am using 
are 74LS393. Each of these packages 
have two 4-bit counters. I am using two 
chips to give us a total of 16 bits. That 
is more than enough for us to use. 

Setting up these counters is quite 
easy. The last bit of the first counter, QD 
(most significant bit), connects to the 
clock of the next, and this is repeated 
two more times to include all counters. 
The clock to the counter comes from a 
free-running clock. The LM555 is a 
versatile timer that can be used as a "one 
shot" or resettable timer, but I am using 
it as a free-running timer. That means 
that the output clocks high and low 
continuously, which is necessary in our 
case. 

So, the output of the 555 is connected 
to the clock of the first counter. The 
clear (CLR) of the counters and the 
reset (R) of the 555 are connected 
together to an RC constant, which is 
just a capacitor that charges through a 
resistor. When you first turn the power 
on, the cap is discharged. Therefore, the 



R3 
10K 



~ C3 
I ,1uf 



C1 

O. 1 uf 



TR 



cv 



Q 

□ IS 
THR 



VCC 



R2 

2. 2K 



R1 

2 . 2K 



U3 
LM555 



U1 A 



OA 



QA 
QB 
QC 

CLR □□ 



74L.S393 



1 3, 



iyiB. 

t>A 



CLR 



QA 
QB 
QC 
QD 



U 1 - 



74LS393 



8 



U2A 



OA 



CLR 




74LS393 



1 3, 



OA 



1 2 



U2B 



CLR 



QA 
□ B 
QC 
QD 



74LS393 



1 

Ci 



VCC 
0 



G 



1 o 



e 



25 



24 



20 



22 



27 



VCC 

o 



Socket 


AO 


00 


■ A1 


01 


■ A2 


02 


■ A3 


03 


■ A4 


04 


■ AS 


OS 


AS 


OB 


- A7 


07 


■ AB 




• A3 




■ A1 0 




■ A1 1 




■ A12 




CE 




OE 




PGM 




VPP 




2764 



i 2 



13 

j S_ 
J B_ 
1 7 



a 

3 



R4 
1 K 



01 
LEO 



Figure 1 



555 and the counter are held inactive. 
When the cap charges to 5 volts, it 
activates the 555 and counters. This is 
done in order to give the power supply 
time to stabilize and to make sure that 
all the chips are properly powered 
before starting. It also clears all the 
counters to zeros. 

Once the power is stabilized and the 
reset releases, the 555 starts to clock. 
That starts the counters. If you notice, 
the first bit is connected to the PGM pin 
of our 2764 socket. That programs (or 
pulses) the data ($FF) into each chip. 
The next 13 bits of the counter are 
connected to address lines. It should be 
clear to you by now that all address lines 
have to be used. 

The next bit on our counters is con- 
nected to an LED and a resistor. Last 
month I covered the theory on LEDs, 
so everyone should be up on it. This 
LED is used as an indicator to tell you 
that the process is finished. If you let the 
process continue, the LED will go off 
again and then on again. This will not 
hurt the chip, but it is not necessary to 
do it twice — once is enough. 

Constructing the project is not too 
hard. It is recommended that you use 
sockets for all the chips. Use a 28-pin, 
ZIF socket for the 2764. If your budget 
does not allow for one, use a good 
quality socket, at least. Some of the 
cheap sockets are good only for one or 
two insertions. Figure 1 shows all 
connections except power and ground. 



The following is a power and ground 
connection list for this project: 



Chip Number 
Ul 
U2 
U3 
2764 



Power (5v) 
14 
14 

8 
28 



Ground 
7 
7 
1 

14 



turned off, insert the EPROM emula- 
tor. Turn the power on until you see the 
LED go on. Then turn the power off 
and remove the EPROM emulator. 
And that's that. □ 



It would be a good idea to run a few 
tests before you plug the EPROM 
emulator into the eraser. Turn the 
power on and check with a digital probe 
or meter to see if the 555 is working and 
if all the address lines are clocking. You 
should also see if the LED lights up after 
a while. Check for the proper 5 volts and 
ground on the 2764 socket. That should 
be all there is to it. 

Erasing an EPROM emulator is 
simple. With the power to the eraser 



Part 


Description 


U1 


74 LS 293 


U2 


74LS 293 


U3 


LM 555 


C1 


.1uf 25 V 


C2 


.1uf 25 V 


C3 


.1uf 25 V 


R1 


2.2K 1 /4 W 


R2 


2.2K 1 /4 W 


R3 


10K Va W 


R4 


1 K Vi W 


D1 


Red LED 



Parts List 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

If there is not a mouse in your house, do not despair! "Micki the 
Quicki Mouse" is here to fill the void. 

The listing: 70 PM0DE4 : PCLS: SCREEN 1 ,1 : FORX^IT 

03 0 : CIRCLE (128,70) ,3 *X/4 : CIRCLE ( 
107,41) , 3*X/6:CIRCLE(14 8,40) , 3*X 
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(For tlits winning .'brie-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of both The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 51 



I F e atur e 



A first look at Tandy's user-friendly interface 

for OS-9 Level II 

The Impact of Multi-Vue 



Over the years we have seen quite 
a few changes in the Color 
Computer. Some changes have 
been superficial, while others were 
somewhat drastic design changes made 
in line with Tandy's commitment to 
provide a truly powerful machine at the 
lowest price possible. 

The changes made in the software 
area have been obvious, as well. How 
many can remember not having Ex- 
tended BASIC? What about Disk BASIC? 
Then, to top things off, Tandy licensed 
OS-9 Level I from Microware. Now, 
with the advent of the CoCo 3, we have 
OS-9 Level II. This operating system, 
complete with windows, has brought a 
power to the CoCo that few of us could 
have foreseen. 

The problem with such power is that 
it often involves a great deal of com- 
plexity. Let's face it, OS-9 is no breeze 
to learn and understand! For some time 
now, we have needed a way to organize 
all of that power in order to utilize it to 
its fullest. The latest entry in the pro- 
gression toward a powerful but easy-to- 
use system, Multi-Vue, provides us with 
that organizational ability. 

Multi-Vue is an environment within 
an environment. Most people refer to 
programs of its nature as a "user inter- 
face," which is simply the method we 
use to interact with the computer. We 
have gone from toggle switches to 
keyboards, from joysticks to mice. But 
the computer presents information to us 
in much the same way it has throughout 
the personal computing era — via a 
video display. However, the format in 
which the data is displayed has changed. 
With pull-down menus and a "point- 



Cray Augsburg is RAINBOW'S technical 
editor and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is CRA Y. 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Editor 

and-click" interface, the machine be- 
comes easier to understand and control. 
This is what Multi-Vue is all about. 

Multi-Vue as a System 

Multi-Vue utilizes the general struc- 
ture of OS-9 along with the windows 
from Level II to provide an easy method 
of user interaction with the Color 
Computer. It is a system that keeps 
track of where you are and allows for 
a sensible organization of the data you 
want to use. And, by its design, it allows 
the user to alter or customize the system 
to suit his or her particular needs. Mark 
Siegel, Tandy product manager for 
Software Engineering, says, "Multi- 
Vue will let the user build his own 
custom DeskMate out of stand-alone 
applications." 

Multi-Vue doesn't include a word 
processor or a spreadsheet, or anything 
else we consider an application. Rather, 
it provides an environment for us to 
easily set up and operate the applica- 
tions we choose to purchase. 

It accomplishes its chores through a 
series of system files. As you probably 
have surmised, each application is 
associated with its own icon on the 
screen. When you select a particular 
icon, Multi- Vue doesn't directly run the 
application. Instead, it checks what is 
called an Application Information File 
(AIF). This system file contains infor- 
mation about which program it is to 
run, what parameters to use, which 
palettes to use, what minimum size 
window the application will run in and 
some other control information. Multi- 
Vue then executes the requested appli- 
cation based on this AIF file. Each 
application is associated with its own 
icon and AIF file. 

The user simply creates an AIF file 
and icon for any application he or she 
wants to introduce into the system. 
Also, the AIF file for any application 
can easily be edited. Simply double- 
click the mouse button on the appro- 
priate icon. 



Multi-Vue also utilizes an Environ- 
ment File. This user-created file con- 
tains information about your particular 
system. It knows how many drives you 
have and what their capacities are, and 
contains information about the printer 
you are using. All of this system-specific 
information can be used by application 
programs. Assuming a given applica- 
tion is written for the Multi-Vue envi- 
ronment, it can query the Environment 
File all by itself and configure itself for 
your particular system. 

Many new users have a hard time 
moving through OS-9's directory struc- 
ture and understanding just how, why 
and when to use the chx and chd 
commands. Multi-Vue eliminates this 
by offering a point-and-click alterna- 
tive. When you boot the system, you'll 
notice that the screen contains icons for 
the various files and directories within 
the root directory. 

To move into a given directory, just 
click on its associated icon. Then the 
screen will show the icons for all files 
and subdirectories within your current 
directory. In this manner, you can move 
down the "tree" as far as you need to 
go. Simply click on a small box in the 
upper left-hand corner of the screen and 
you will move one "place" backward. 

When I say, "you will move one place 
backward," I mean you will return to 
the point from which you entered your 
current position. If you are within an 
application, it closes and you will find 
yourself back on the graphics screen 
pointing to the icon for that application. 
If you are not within an application or 
command, clicking the box takes you 
one level higher in the directory struc- 
ture. This makes movement through the 
system much easier for newcomers. 

Originally, it was rumored that 
Multi- Vue would not be able to run on 
a 128K system. This is not the case. 
However, since Multi-Vue runs in a 
graphics shell (a shell running in a 
graphics window), the memory restric- 
tions of a 128K system do impose on the 



1 52 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



performance of the environment. For 
instance, whenever the user chooses to 
do anything, the function he or she 
selects replaces the graphics shell in 
memory. The user cannot press the 
CLEAR key to return to the graphics 
shell; the graphics window and shell 
"come back to life" as soon as the user 
closes the application. 

Performance on a 512K system is 
much more appreciable. The user 
simply clicks on the appropriate icon 
and a box appears in the current win- 
dow. This box will be the same size as 
the minimum window size dictated by 
the AIF file. To set the box at a partic- 
ular location, simply click the button 
again. The user can move the mouse (or 
joystick) to enlarge the box if desired. 
When the user clicks the button again, 
the system builds the application in this 
box (window) and starts it according to 
the information contained in the AIF 
file. This allows for a very smooth- 
running, user-friendly environment. 

In its standard configuration, Multi- 
Vue seemed fairly fast. It is easy to 
imagine the power of this system run- 
ning at 6ms on 80-track drives. Or, 
better yet, how about running it on a 
hard drive? The power of the environ- 
ment would be enhanced that much 
more due to the storage capacity and 
speed allowed by such setups. 

Additional Features 

Across the top of the Multi-Vue 
"home screen" are several pull-down 
menus. These menus offer selections 
that allow you to control the system 
setup. One selection allows you to 
switch between the 40- and 80-column 
modes (512K system only). Another lets 
you add temporary devices to the envi- 
ronment. Let's say you have a RAM 
disk partitioned in memory and want to 
be able to access it. All you have to do 
is tell Multi-Vue that it exists. When 
you do, another device image appears 
on the left side of the screen with all the 
preconfigured device images. 

One of the more esoteric, but very 
useful, features of the Multi-Vue envi- 
ronment is the Tandy icon. In the upper- 
left portion of the screen you will see a 
Tandy icon (an object shaped like an 
hourglass). This icon controls a menu 
that offers several goodies, including a 
pop-up calculator, a clock complete 
with alarm, system utilities and a clip- 
board function. The clipboard function 
can be used with properly written appli- 
cations to "import" and "export" text — 
you can transfer sections of text be- 
tween documents. 



The utilities include a port option and 
printer configuration section. The 
printer section is fairly self-explanatory. 
The port option "replaces" the Xmode 
and Tmode commands used in OS-9. 
This selection allows you to change the 
various settings used for the serial port 
and the terminal. 

A final option from the Tandy menu 
is the shell selection. After making this 
selection, you find yourself in a new 
bordered window from which you may 
execute various OS-9 system com- 
mands. Simply press the CTRL-BREAK 
combination to exit the shell and return 
to Multi-Vue. 

What does all this mean? Tandy has 
made a "standard" out of OS-9 in the 
CoCo Community by moving to full 
support of it. Now they have introduced 
a standard-setting environment for OS- 
9 Level II on the CoCo 3. In other 
words, we should see Multi-Vue be- 
come a common point between applica- 
tions written by the users, Tandy and 
third-party software houses. These 
applications would be written first to 
take advantage of the flexibility of the 
environment. They would be allowed to 
"interrogate" the system by reading the 
Environment File and then know how 
to configure themselves. Some pro- 
grammers may include AIF files for 
their applications, eliminating the need 
for the end user to create such a file. 

We will also see third-party applica- 
tions taking advantage of the pop-up 
features such as the calendar and calcu- 
lator. Also, the ability to import and 
export text will be utilized. Finally, we 
may see commercial software that in- 
cludes "install" programs. The pro- 
grams will automatically build the AIF 
file, read the Environment File, config- 
ure the application accordingly and 
install it on the system disk. 

The most important aspect of the 
introduction of Multi-Vue is that OS- 
9 now has a very user-friendly interface. 
OS-9 novices will be able to run OS-9 
without having to face the system itself. 
This may lead to a better understanding 
of the system in the long run because 
they will have a better feel for the 
environment before having to delve into 
the "how." Also, those who are already 
comfortable with OS-9 will find Multi- 
Vue makes their work that much easier 
and more enjoyable. 

We are certainly excited about Multi- 
Vue and feel you will be, too. It opens 
up possibilities many people never 
thought of and will fill a strong need 
within the CoCo OS-9 Community. ^ 




v&oo- 

TANDY COMPUTERS 

1000-HX 256K 1-3 1/2" Drive. 
1000-TX 640K1-3 1/2" Drive 
3000-HL512K 1 5 1/4" Drive 
3000 640K 1 5 1/4" Drive 
4000 1 Meg 1 3 1/2" Drive 
1400LT Portable Computer 
102 Portable Computer 24K 
Color Computer 3 128K 

MONITORS & BOARDS 

VM-4 Monochrome Green 
CM-5 Color RGB 
CM-11 Color RGB 
EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 
Tandy Dual Display Card 
Tandy EGA Card 
Zucker Mono Graphics Card 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 
Portable Drive 100/102/200 
5 1/4" External Drive 1000EX 
3 1/2" External Drive 1000EX 
Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 
Zucker 30 Meg Hardcard 
Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 
AT HD/1.2M Controller 

EXPANSION BOARDS 

Zucker Serial Board 
Zucker MFB OK for 1000SX 
Zucker MFB OK for 1000 



535.00 
875.00 
1110.00 
1500.00 
1930.00 
1215.00 
375.00 
165.00 



95.00 
220.00 
335.00 
510.00 
1 45.00 
235.00 
110.00 



220.00 
155.00 
1 80.00 
200.00 
595.00 
495.00 
265.00 
200.00 



55.00 
130.00 
98.00 



Zucker 1200 Baud Modem Card 83.00 
PRINTERS 



DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 
DMP-130 Dot-Matrix 
DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 
DWP-520 Daisy Wheel 
DMP-440 Dot-Matrix 
DMP-2120 Dot-Matrix 
LP-1000 Laser Printer 
Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 
Epson FX-86E Dot-Matrix 
Epson FX-286E Dot-Matrix 
Epson EX-800 Dot-Matrix 
Epson EX-1000 Dot-Matrix 
Epson LQ-500 Dot-Matrix 
Epson LQ-850 Dot-Matrix 
Epson LQ-1050 Dot-Matrix 
Epson LQ-2500 Dot-Matrix 
Epson GQ-3500 Laser 



150.00 
255.00 
335.00 
730.00 
595.00 
1325.00 
1635.00 
195.00 
355.00 
520.00 
425.00 
585.00 
NEW CALL 
520.00 
715.00 
940.00 
1580.00 



Price's Subject To Chanae 
Please Call For Current Price's 

Send for Complete Catolog. 

AH prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Adver- 
tised prices are cash prices. CO D. accepted odd 2% {minimum charge 
S10.0O) M.C., Visa add 2%. All non defective items require return 
merchandise authorization Cafl (or RMA Number before returning. 
Delivery is subject to product availability. Add 1Vj% for shipping and 
handling, $5.00 minimum charge. 

TM - Registered Trademark of Tandy, Epson, and IBM 
Monday thru Friday 9am-6pm EST. 



□□□□□ 

□ □□□□ 

□ □□□□ 
□□□□□ 

124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



F 


E 


n 


in 


IB 


I 




DUDQEJLi 





February 1988 THE RAINBOW 153 



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60 



If 



By Donald Sapello 

Have you ever tried to translate a 
program from one C0C0 to another? 
If you have, you know how tedious it 
is to track down all occurrences of 
specific pokes and commands that 
would prevent the program's opera- 
tion on the other machine. The pro- 
gram shown in Listing 7 can help. 

Word Find is a machine language 
program that searches for any word or 
string of characters that is printed to 
the screen. To use the program, enter 
L0FIDM"W0RDFIND" and then EXEC. 
Next, enter the word or string you 
want to find, then run or list a BASIC 
program; your program or listing will 
stop when the word is printed. Press 
any other key to continue, except 

BREAK or ENTER. 




tie* t x>& 



6 tVJ 



N6 



co 



de 



ess 



ate « utv *v 



etvv 



*d* 6 



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atft s 
e e« 



Ocvo 



to 



L det 



use 



At* 



\Jcv* 



tfve 



set 



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to 



6^ ^V 0 . 



vtve 




oV-e 



sM 



Listing 1: AUTOEXEC 



lj3 1 **AUTOEXEC** 


29/3 


RESTORE 


20 'ADDS BOOT LOADER TO 


3/3/3 


P=/3 


3j3 'END OF ML FILE • 


31/3 


READ C 


4j3 1 


32/3 


LSET C$ = CHR$(C) 


5J3 'BY DOUG MASTEN 


33/3 


PUT#1,R+P 


6j3 1 ROUTE' 4, BOX 3 


34/3 


P=P+1 


7j3 ' MACON, MO 63552 


35j3 


IF P<>6 THEN31J3 


8j3 DATA J3,J3,3,1,&H82,&H7E 
9J3 INPUT "FILENAME" ;F$ 


36/3 


R=R+P 


37/3 


LSET C$=E1$ 


1/8/8 OPEN"D",#l,F$,l 


38/3 


PUT#1,R 


11/3 FIELD #1,1 AS C$ 


39/3 


LSET C$=E2$ 


12J3 R=l 


4/3/3 


PUT#1,R+1 


13/3 GET#1,R 


41/3 


LSET C$=CHR$(&HFF) 


14/3 'TEST FOR EOF 


42/3 


PUT#l,R+2 

LSET C$=CHR$(j3) 


15/3 IF ASC(C$)=&HFF THEN24/3 


43/3 


16/3 'GET LENGTH OF DATA BLOCK 


44/3 


PUT#l,R+3 


17/3 GET#1,R+1 


45/3 


LSET C$=CHR$(j3) 


18/3 L=256*ASC(C$) 


46/3 


PUT#l,R+4 
LSET C$=E1$ 


19/3 GET#l,R+2 


47/3 


2p/3 L=L+ASC(C$) 


48/3 


PUT#l,R+5 
LSET C$=E2$ 


21J3 R=R+L+5 


49/8 


22/3 GOT013/3 


5/3/3 


PUT#l,R+6 
CLOSE#l 


23/3 'GET EXEC ADDRESS 


51/3 


24/3 GET#l,R+3 


52/3 


PRINT 


25J3 E1$=C$ 


53/3 


PRINT "BOOT PROGRAM INSTALLED 


26/3 GET#l,R+4 
27J3 E2$=C$ 


ii 




54/3 


END 


28/3 'ADD BOOT LOADER TO ML FILE 







Still keeping the books the way Grandpa did? 



Then you need CoCo- Accountant 



Tired of scrounging through 

old shoeboxes full of receipts, 
canceled checks and bills? 
Looking for an easy way to 
organize your finances when the 
tax man calls? Then you need 
CoCo-Accountant, the best- 
selling home and small business 
accounting program for the 
Color Computer. All you have to 
do is set up a chart of accounts 
and begin entering transactions. 
Checks, credit card expenses, 
income. In any order. Just toss it 
in and CoCo-Accountant sorts it 
out. No fuss, no muss, no mess. 

When you're through, Coco- 
Accounfant will dazzle you with 
an array of reports that will 
answer the three basic questions 
we all ask about our finances: 
Where did it come from? Where 
did it go? And what can I deduct 
from my faxes? 

Here's what it can do for you: 



& List and total expenses and in- 
come by month. 
& List and total expenses and 
income by account, for any 
month or the whole year. 
^> List and total expenses or 
income by payee or income 
source for any month or the 
whole year. 

Track, list and summarize tax- 
deductible expenses. 
^ Track, list and summarize ex- 
penses subject to sales tax. Even 
calculates total sales tax you 
paid! 

& Produce a printed spreadsheet 

showing activity by month and 
account for the whole year! 
& Balance your checkbook, of 

course! 

Sort entries by date and store 
files on tape or disk. 

Up to 900 entries in a single file. 
^ Requires 64K CoCo or Coco 3. 




Coco-Accountant is $34.95 
on tape or disk. Be sure to 
specify which you want 
when you order. We accept 
VISA and MasterCard. COD 
orders, add $3.00. Send 
check or money order to the 
address below or call our 
toll-free order line. For infor- 
mation, call 301-521-4886. 



Federal Hill Software 8134 Scotts Level Rd. Baltimore, Md. 21208. Toll-free orders 800-628-2828 Ext. 850 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 



157 



Listing 2: PEELPCLS 


















00100 


************************ 








00110 


* 




* 








00120 


* 


PEELPCLS 


* 








00130 


* 


BY 


* 








00140 


* DONALD SAPELLO * 








00150 


* 




* 








00160 


************************ 


7D00 






00170 




ORG 


$7D00 


7D00 


DC 


BC 


00180 


START 


LDD 


$BC 


7D02 


C3 


3000 


00190 




ADDD 


i$3W 


7D05 


1093 


19 


00200 




CMPD 


$19 


7D08 


22 


34 


00210 




BHI 


RTS 


7D0A 


9E 


BC 


00220 


COPY 


LDX 


$BC 


7D0C 


31 


89 1800 


00230 




LEAY 


$180 0,X 


7D10 


10BF 


7D3A 


00240 




STY 


CMPX+1 


7D14 


EC 


81 


00250 


LOOP0 


LDD 


,X++ 


7D16 


ED 


89 17FE 


00260 




STD 


$17FE,X 


7D1A 


BC 


7D3A 


00210 




CMPX 


CMPX+1 


7D1D 


25 


F5 


00280 




BLO 


LOOP0 


7D1F 


9E 


BC 


00290 




LDX 


$BC 


7D21 


BF 


7CFD 


00300 




STX 


$7CFD 


7D24 


BE 


7CFD 


00310 


LINCLR 


LDX 


$7CFD 


7D27 


86 


10 


00320 




LDA 


II ^ _ - ' 

#$1J3 


7D29 


B7 


7CFF 


00330 




STA 


$7CFF 


7D2C 


CC 


0000 


00340 




LDD 


*$0 


7D2F 


ED 


81 


00350 


LLOOP0 


STD 


,X++ 


7D31 


7A 


7CFF 


00360 




DEC 


$7CFF 


7D34 


26 


F9 


00310 




BNE 


LLOOPj3 


7D36 


BF 


7CFD 


00380 




STX 


$7CFD 


7D39 


8C 


FFFF 


00390 


CMPX 


CMPX 


#$FFFF 


7D3C 


25 


01 


00400 




BLO 


LSKIPJ3 


7D3E 


39 




00410 


RTS 


RTS 




7D3F 


31 


89 17E0 


00420 


LSKIP0 


LEAY 


$17E0,X 


7D43 


86 


10 


00430 


GETPUT 


LDA 


#$10 


7D45 


B7 


7CFF 


00440 




STA 


$7CFF 


7D48 


EC 


Al 


00450 


GLOOP0 


LDD 


, Y++ 


7D4A 


AA 


89 1800 


00460 




ORA 


$1800, X 


7D4E 


EA 


89 1801 


00410 




ORB 


$1801, X 


7D52 


ED 


81 


00480 




STD 


,X++ 


7D54 


BC 


7D3A 


00490 




CMPX 


CMPX+1 


7D57 


24 


CB 


00500 




BHS 


LINCLR 


7D59 


7A 


7CFF 


00510 




DEC 


$7CFF 


7D5C 


26 


EA 


00520 




BNE 


GLOOP0 


7D5E 


31 


A8 C0 


00530 




LEAY 


-$40, Y 


7D61 


10BC 


7D3A 


00540 




CMPY 


CMPX+1 


7D65 


24 


DC 


00550 




BHS 


GETPUT 


7D67 


20 


BB 


00560 




BRA 


LINCLR 






7D00 


00510 




END 


START 


00000 TOTAL ERRORS 













Listing 3: SAMPLE 


50 SCREEN1,1 

60 FOR X = 1 TO 25 


10 ' SAMPLE PROGRAM FOR "PEELPCLS 


70 CIRCLE (RND (255) ,RND(191) ) ,RND ! 


ii 


(40) 


20 PCLEAR 8 


80 NEXT X 


30 PMODE 4,1 


90 EXEC 


40 PCLS 


100 GOTO 60 



158 



THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



Listing 4: SflVE&RUN 

0 F$="SAVE&RUN.BAS !I 'Copyright 1 
986 by Richard Steinbrueck, All 
Rights Reserved 

1 CLS : DIR : PRINTFREE ( j3 ) ; " FREE GRA 
NS":A=PEEK(25) *256+PEEK(26) : B=PE 
EK(A+17) :C=PEEK(A+18) :D=PEEK(A+1 
9) : PRINT "<O0NTINUE OR SAVE <S>A 
ME , <N>EXTOR <V>ERSION ###?" 

2 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$= M "THEN2 

3 E=INSTR( I, CSN II / A$) :ON E GOTO10, 
8,5: IFA$o"V"THEN2ELSEINPUT u WHAT 

VERSION (3 CHAR) " ; A$ : IFLEN (A$) < 
>3THEN1 

4 B=ASC(LEFT$(A$,1) ) :C=ASC(MID$( 



A$,2,l) ) :D=ASC(RIGHT$(A$ / 1) ) :GOT 
07 

5 D=D+1:IF D=57 THEN OC+l:D=48 

6 IF C=57 THEN B=B+1:C=48 

7 IF B=57 THEN B=48 

8 POKE A+17,B:POKEA+18,C:POKEA+l 
9/D 

9 F$^LEFT$(F$,9)+CHR$(B)+CHR$(C) 
+CHR$ (D) : SAVE F$:CLS 

10 'there is a GOTO 10 in line 3 
of the program. Make sure you 
have a line 1J8 in your program 
to avoid getting an error 
message of ?UL ERROR IN 10 



Listing 5: CRUSH 



01DA 



J3J3J31J3 
J3J3J32J3 
j3j3j33j3 

j3j3j36j3 
J3j3j37j3 

j3j312j3 
J30130 



************************* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



CRUSH i 
VERSION 2.1 



WRITTEN BY 

JYRI J. VIRKKI 

ESTACION EXPERIMENTAL 

RIO PIEDRAS, PR 00928 
************************* 

ORG .$1DA 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



^-"p.O. Box 1283 Palatine, IL 60078-1283 (312) 397-2898 



1988 - The Year of the Hard Disk! 

The CoCo XT hard disk interface from Burke & Burke lets you 
connect up to 2 low cost, PC compatible 5-120 Meg hard drives 
to your CoCo. You buy the Western Digital WD1002-WX1 or 
WD1002-27X (RLL) controller, a case and a drive from the PC 
dealer of your choice. Just plug them into the CoCo XT, and you 
have a 20 Meg OS9 hard disk system for under $450! 



RAINBOW 



CEHTIFICATIOH 
SEAL 



CoCo XT (with anodized housing, 50 page user manual, hard disk back-up utility 
and drivers for both OS9 & HYPER-I/O) - $69.95. CoCo XT-RTC (includes 
real-time clock / calendar with battery backup) - $99.95 

NEWllI XT-ROM - installs in the ROM socket of your CoCo XT hard disk controller. 
Boots OS9 from your hard or floppy disk - $19.95. 

64K COCO OR COCO 3 & MULTI-PAK REQUIRED FOR ALL VERSIONS. 
HYPER-I/O REQUIRED FOR USE WITH RS-DOS. 

Make Tracks . . . 

Got the 35-track floppy disk blues? Burke & Burke's HYPER-I/O program modifies 
the RS-DOS BASIC in your CoCo 1, 2, or 3 to provide a "Dynamic Disk Interface" that 
works with the CoCo XT hard disk. It also lets you use any mix of single-sided and 
double-sided floppy disk drives in your system - even those 720K floppies* 



HYPER-I/O 
HYPER-IM 



(64K, includes 50 page user manual and utilities) - $24.95. 
(RAM Disk and Print Spooler for CoCo 3 HYPER-l/O) -$19.95 



Directory Assistants 

Here are two real time savers for OS9 users. WILD lets you use wild cards with OS9*s 
commands. MV rapidly moves files, and even entire directories, from place to place 
on your hard or floppy disks. WILD & MV - one disk, two great utilities, only $19,951 



r - 

|MastrrC."irrtl 



0S9: wild asm /dO/src/* . arc o-/dl/abs/reieasa/*.abs 
OS9; mv /dl/abs/release /dl/release 

ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 7.0% SALES TAX. COD'S 
add $2.00. Shipping (within the USA) $2.00 per CoCo XT; $1.50 per 
disk or ROM. Please allow 2 weeks for delivery (overnight delivery 
also available for in-stock items). Telephone orders accepted. 




WIN YOUR 
STATE LOTTO 

WITH YOUR COMPUTER! 

"The home computer Is the most power- 
ful tool ever held by man" (or woman 
for that matter)! 

Are you still wasting money with ran- 
dom guesswork? 

This amazing program will analyze the 
past winning lotto numbers and pro- 
duce a powerful probability study on 
easy to read charts in just seconds. With 
single key presses from a menu you'll 
see trends, patterns, odd/even, sum 
totals, number frequency and more on 
either your screen or printer. Includes 
automatic number wheeling, instant 
updating and a built-in tutorial to get 
you started fast and easy! 

CHECKS & CHARGE CARDS ACCEPTED 
WITH NO SURCHARGE. 
Al! orders shipped same day 
(except personal checks). 

APPLE & IBM Compatibles $24.95 

Macintosh (requires M/S Basic) $29.95 

Commodore, Atari & Radio Shack $21 .95 

Back-Up Copies - $3.00 
Please add $2.00 for shipping and handling. 
Phone credit given with orders. 

(513) 233-2200 SOFT-BYTE 

P.O. Box 5701, Forest Park 













VISA' 



Dayton, Ohio 45405 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 59 



01 DA 








01DC 








01DE 








01E0 








01E1 


86 


01 




01E3 


A7 


8C 


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00150 
00160 
00170 
00180 
00190 
00200 
00210 
00220 
00230 
00240 
00250 
00260 
00270 
00280 
00290 
00300 
00310 
00320 
00330 
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00350 
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00380 
00390 
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00410 
00420 
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00440 
00450 
00460 
00470 
00480 
00490 
00500 
00510 
00520 
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00540 
00550 
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00570 
00580 
00590 
00600 
00610 
00620 
00630 
00640 
00650 
00660 
00670 
00680 
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00700 
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************************* 

COUNT RMB 2 

LINE RMB 2 

NEXT RMB 2 

STATUS RMB 1 
************************* 

START 



AGAIN 



LDA 


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STATUS 


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CLR 


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RTS 

************************* 

BEGIN LDX 25 

STX LINE, PCR 

************************* 



SEARCH 



LOOPY 



LDX 

CMPX 

BEQ 

STX 

LDX 

LEAX 

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CMPA 

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SKIP 

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************************* 

* NO MORE SPACES LEFT * 
************************* 

ITSOVR CLR STATUS , PC 

RTS 

************************* 

* GO TO NEXT LINE * 
************************* 

NOTHR LDX NEXT , PCR 

STX LINE, PCR 

BRA SEARCH 
************************* 

* DON'T REMOVE SPACES * 

* BETWEEN QUOTATION MARKS* 
************************* 

SKIP LDA ,X+ 

CMPA # 1 " 



160 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



(AO o,n 


0 7 




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************************* 








(A (Ann (A 
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* MOVE PROGRAM 


DOWN BY * 








pploy) 


* ONE BYTE. 


* 








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************************* 








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*MOVE NEXT LINE POINTERS* 








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Cllarbrodk Software Groiifj 



(604)853-9111 




Information 

Management 

System 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



CSG IMS is THE full featured relational database 
manager for the Color Computer and OS9. The com- 
prehensive structured application language makes 
CSG IMS the ideal developement tool for sophisti- 
cated file-intensive applications. 



• Interactive access to data- 
bases and quick queries. 

• CSG IMS includes a recur- 
sive compiled language sup- 
porting program modules 
with full parameter passing. 



• User defined screen and 
report formats. 

• Record, index and file size al- 
most unlimited. 

• Text, BCD floating point (14 
digits), short and long in- 
teger and date types. 



CSG IMS for CoCo2/3 OS9 L1/2 (single user)$169.95 
CSG IMS for OS9 L2 or 68000 (multi user) $495.00 
CSG IMS demo with manual $30 



ERINA - Symbolic User Mode Debugger for OS9 
ERINA is a must for all serious assembler and C 
software developers. It lets you find bugs quickly by 
displaying the machine state and instuctions being ex- 
ecuted. You can set address and register break 
points, dump, search and change memory, assemble 
and disassemble code and many other things to 
numerous to mention. This program will pay for itself 
over and over by the time you save solving your bugs. 

Requires 80 column display, OS9 L1/2 $69.00 



SERINA - System Mode Debugger for OS9 L2 

SERINA is a debugger for OS9 system modules 
(device drivers, file managers, etc.). It allows you to 
trace execution of any system module, set break 
points, assemble and disassemble code and examine 
and change memory. There are special provisions for 
executing code with critical timing loops and for ac- 
cessing I/O registers. A must for system programmers. 

Requires CoCo3, OS9 L2, $139.00 
80 col. terminal connected to /T1 or /T2 




Shipping: N. America - $5, Overseas - $10 

Clearbrook Software Group 

P.O. Box 8000-499 
Sumas, WA 98295 



(l+cntTCartft 



OS9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corp., MSDos is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. 



MSF - MSDos File Manager for C0C0 3/OS9 Level 2 
MSF is a file manager which allows you to use MSDos 
disks directly under OS9. You don't have to change 
the format of the data before using it! 

Requires C0C0 3, OS9 L2, SDISK3 driver $45.00 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 161 



0269 


AF 


9D FF6F 


00990 


STX 


[LINE, PCR] 


026D 


AF 


8D FF6B 


01000 


STX 


LINE , PCR 


0271 


20 


EB 


010 10 


BRA 


MORE 


0273 


9E 


IB 


01020 


NOMORE LDX 


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0275 


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IF 


01030 


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0277 


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027D 


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1,X 


027F 


AF 


8D FF57 


01010 


STX 


COUNT , PCR 


0283 


39 




01080 


RTS 








01090 


************************* 






01E1 


01100 


END 


START 



00000 TOTAL ERRORS 



Listing 6: LOADER 



0 DATA0, 0,0,0,0,0,0, 134, 1,167, 14 

0,250,111,140,241,141,20,109,140 

,242,38,249,220,31,163,140,229,2 

21,31,220,29,163,140,222,221,29, 

57,158,25,175,140,216,174,156,21 

3,140,0,0,39,32,175,140,207,174 

10 DATA140,202,48,4,166,128,129, 

32,39,42,129,34,39,2 6,129,131,39 

,14,129,130,39,10,129,0,39,6,32, 

232,111,140,177,57,174,140,171,1 

75,140,166,32,204,166,12 8,129,34 

,39,214, 129,0,39,238,32,244,31,1 

8 

20 DATA49,63,166,128,167,160,156 

,27,37,248,174,140,137,236,2 

30 DATA189, 189,204 

48 DATA134,32,173,159,160,2,174, 

157,255,122,140,0,0,39,12,48,31, 

175,157,255,111,175,141,255,107, 

32,235,158,27,48,31,159,27,174,1 

41,255 



50 DATA93,48,1,175,141,255,87,57 
,0 

52 CLS: PRINT" BASIC LOADER F 

OR CRUSH" 

54 PRINT: PRINT :INPUT"STARTING AD 
DRESS" ;SA:IFSA=0THENSA=474 
56 EA=SA+170 

58 FORR=SATOEA : READA : POKER , A : C=C 
+A : NEXT 

60 IFC019378THENPRINT" *** DAT 

A ERROR ***":STOP 

62 SA=SA+7:POKE157,INT(SA/256) :P 

OKE158,SA-INT(SA/256) *256 

64 PRINT : I FS A> 3072 THENPRINT " REME 

MBER TO CLEAR500 , "SA-8 : PRINT "BEF 

ORE LOADING CRUSH." 

66 INPUT "SAVE TO <T>APE OR <D>IS 

K" ; A$ : IFA$o"T"ANDA$<>"D"THEN66 

68 IFA$="T"THENCSAVEM"CRUSH" , SA- 

7 , EA, SA: END 

70 SAVEM" CRUSH" ,SA-7,EA,SA 



Listing 7: WORDFIND 



7E00 
7E00 CC 
7E03 DD 
7E05 DD 



7FFF 

7E00 

74 

27 



00100 
00110 
00120 
00130 
00140 
00150 
00160 
00170 
00180 
00190 
00200 
00210 
00220 
00230 
00240 
00250 



************************* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



WORDFIND 
BY 

DONALD SAPELLO 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



************************* 

* 32K VERSION * 

* FOR 16K VERSION * 

* MEMTOP EQU $3FFF * 
************************* 

MEMTOP EQU $7FFF 

ORG MEMTOP- $ IFF 

START LDD #MEMT0P-$1FF 

STD $74 

STD $27 



162 THE RAINBOW February 1988 




«< GIWWESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 

MULTI-LABEL III FKEYS 




III 



(CoCo III only) 

An easy to use, versatile label creating program including 
many new Co Co III features. Even if you already own a 
label program, this one's a must for the 3! 
(See Jury '87 review) Disk $16.95 

Custom Palette Designer 

(CoCo III only) 

Easily alter the contents of any palette without having to 
remember numbers or colors! Once configured, all sixteen 
palettes can be saved to disk as a single subroutine which 
may then be used in a basic program. 
(See Aug. '87 review) Disk $14.95 

CoCo Max III 

(CoCo III only) 

INTRODUCING the next generation: 
More resolution! / More power! / More color! 
Built in animation! / More speed! / More tools! 
More type styles! / Amazing color sequencing!!! 

Complete package 



(CoCo l/ll/lll) 

A user friendly, user programmable function key utility 
that creates up to 20 function keys. Other features 
include an EDITOR, DOS mods, and DISABLE. Comes 
with an enhanced CoCo III version and it's EPROMable. 
(See April '87 review) Disk (latest version) $19.95 



SIXDRIVE 



.. $79.95 

MPI-CoCo Locking Plate 

(CoCo III only) 

Protects your CoCo ill and Murti Pak Interface from 
destroying each other! Installs in seconds. MPI 26-3124 & 
CoCo III 2d%3334 only. Just $9.95 

AUTO DIM m NEW MAXSOUND 



(CoCo l/ll/lll) 

This machine language utility modifies DECB 1.0, 1.1, 
FKEYS III, or ADOS to allow the use of 3 double-sided 
drives (or 2 D/S drives and J&R's RAMD1SKS) as 6 

single-sided drives without ANY hardware mods. Includes 
2 selectable drive assignments and it's EPROMable. 

Disk. $16.95 

With purchase of FKEYS (I! $12.95 

With purchase of any JramR $ 9.95 

JramR 512K Upgrade 

(CoCo 111 only) 

#1010 JramR bare board, connectors, and 

software $39.95 

#1014 JramR assembled and tested with software, 

without memory chips. $49-95 

#1012 JramR assembled and tested with software, 

51 2K memory.. $99.95 

(See June '87 review) 

Call for 
Demo 



(CoCo 111 only) 

This hardware device protects your RGB or composite 
monitor, or your TV from IMAGE BURN after a few 
minutes of inactivity from your keyboard. Illustrated 

instructions and easy to install. Just $29.95 

(See January '88 review) 



(128k or 512k CoCo III only) 

Turn your CoCo 111 into a REAL digital audio sampler 
with HIGH quality audio reproduction. Exotic effects, 
stuttering, speed shifting, sequencing, reverse audio, plus 
free digital oscilloscope program! You have got to hear 
MAXSOUND to believe it!!! Disk & Hdwe $79.95 



NEW 



V-Term Terminal Emulator 

(128k or 512k CoCo III only) 



444 NEW 



V-Term is one of the most advanced terminal programs for the CoCo 111 ever!!! 

FEATURES: VT-100, VT-52, and standard CRT emulations. Full use of 512K, 80X25 text or graphics characters, 
Windows & Multi-tasking (Disk Basic!), RAMDISK like buffer, Xmodem, Xon/Xoff, Monochrome monitor support, Capture 
buffer, Snapshot, Conference mode, and much much more! Complete with documentation. Disk...... $39.95 



PYRAMIX 



(CoCo III only) 

This 100% machine language arcade game was written 
exclusively to take advantage of your CoCo 3. The colors 
are brilliant, the graphics are sharp, and the action is hot! 
(See Dec. '87 review) Disk $19.95 



CHAMPION 



(CoCo l/ll/lll) 

Become a superhero in your fight to rid the world of the 
evil forces of Mr. Bigg in this action adventure. The 
combat is hot and heavy and requires a fast joystick! 
(See May '87 review) Disk $19.95 



Kung-Fu Dude 

ICoCo l/ll/lll) 

This is the long-awaited response to the huge demand for 
a Kung-Fu program for the CoCo. Destroy opponents and 
evade obstacles as you grow even closer to your ultimate 
objective! (See Feb. '88 review) Disk $24.95 

White Fire of Eternity 

(CoCo l/II/lll) 

Enter the age of monsters, magic, and adventure. Here 
you will search for the legendary power of White Fire 
throughout the Forbidden Wood and dark caverns. 
(See Dec. '86 review) Disk. $19.95 





:FKEYS::III| ; MULTI-LABEL : III,:. Custom 





vtii-.-.the 

Rainbow xfo^ Please 
iiate: lhar.M apply . 



mm 



mm 



Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
information: Delphi's CoCo Sig 



GIMMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301-256-7558 or 301-256-2953 



Add $2.50 for shipping and handling 
Add $2.00 for COD's 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VISA/MC/Check/Money Order/COD 



7E07 


CC 


00C8 


00260 


LDD 


i200 


7EJ3A 


35 


10 


00270 


PULS 


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7EJ3C 


BF 


7E13 


00280 


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$AE46 


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7E15 


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7E1A 


7F 


7FFE 


00330 


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7EA9 


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7E2j3 


7C 


7FFE 


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7E23 


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J3167 


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$167 


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#$39 


7E28 


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$168 


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00400 


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1E30 


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7E46 


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7E47 


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7E49 


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6F 


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$6F 


7E4B 


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7FFF 


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7E4E 


35 


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7E52 


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7FFE 


00550 


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7E55 


27 


2B 


00560 


BEQ 


RETURN 


7E57 


34 


36 


00510 


PSHS 


A,B,X,Y 


7E59 


7D 


7FFD 


00580 


TST 


MEMTOP- 2 


7E5C 


26 


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00590 


BNE 


MLOOP1 


7E5E 


8E 


1F01 


00600 


LDX 


#DATA 


7E61 


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7E63 


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BEO 


MRETRN 


7E65 


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7FFD 


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7E85 


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7E6E 


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84 


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7E70 


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MSKIP1 


7E72 


7F 


7FFD 


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7E75 


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09 


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7E77 


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00100 MSKIP1 


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7E79 


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7E83 






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7F 


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7F 


7FFE 


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[ $A0j32 ] 


7E8F 


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7E96 


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t $W00 ] 



1 64 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 




Educational Software 



ARROW GAMES $mZ LOCATING STORY DETAILS 

- $21 .95 tape/$26,95 disk 32K Ext. - disk only f $24.95 

menu driven games for young These programs contain short stories, 
children (ages 3-6) to teach direc- Each has an accompanying ptctur^; 
tions, All games involve using the Questions about story details refer to 
arrow keys ONLY. Games include: either the text or pictures. The disk 
LADYBUG, BUTTERFLY, ARROW generated graphics are an integral 
MATCH, KALEIDOSCOPE, RABBIT, part of these attractive programs, 
and DOODLE. Colorful graphics. Available for grades 2-3 OR 4-5. 

Please specify. I :fi|i v ;. 



programs to delight and teach your ' : -:\> 
early learners (ages 3-6). These 
games enrich the teaming of colors, 
numbers, lowercase letters, shapes, 
memory, visual discrimination 
counting. 





FOREIGN LANGUAGE GAMES 

32K£xt- $19;95tape/$24.95 disk 

(500 words) 

¥^m^ French or Spanish Bas|^il f; 
icore base hits ol home rdhs 5 for 



correct answers. You're out if wrong. 

32K Ext - $19 m 

32K txt. $19.95 rape/ $24.95 Disk to learn and practice vocabulary. 
These programs give students prac- fj^LEASE SPECIFY LANGUAGE, 
tice using the popular CLOZE read- 
ing technique. Each program contains 
grade appropriate short stories witti 
key missing words to be deduced by 
the student. Available for grades 3, 4, 
5, 6, 



•■V-'.. , •'v. : - '.y> . -TVi'* , 





99 



m" iii'iji0l)fli 




DRAWING CONCLUSIONS 

32K Ext. - tape $1 9,95/disk $24.95 V - 

These programs contain short stories. PUNCTUATION PRACTICE 

Each story has two accompanying 32K Ext. - tape $19.95/disk $24.95 

questions that ask the student to draw On screen practice in proper usage 

conclusions from the text. Available of the familiar punctuation marks, 

for grades 3-4 OR 5-6. Please specify. Grades 3-7. 




MATH TUTOR SERIES 

16K Ext. 

Ihese tutorials take tifehild through 
each step of the example. All pro- 
grams include HELP tables, cursor 
and graphic aids. Ail allow user to 
create the example, or let the com- 
puter choose. M^|fevel. <3reat 
teaching: programs. %BZ • -Z^C 

LONG DIVISION TUTOR 
; : " $ 14.95 tape/$19.95 disk 

MULTIPLICATION TUTOR 

#|@a$:14.95- tape/ $19.95 disk ^2 

$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 4 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (addition) 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (subtraction) 

$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 



i 



FRACTIONS TUTOR (mult.) 

Iff 19.95 tape/S24.95 disk 



. ■ y ■*■• "5 



4MB 



POM PUTER iilRAC VS 

32K Ext. ~ $19.95 tape/$29.95 disk 
A computer literacy quiz exclusively 
for the Color Computer. Tests and 
scores from over 60 questions on a 
Hi-res upper and lower case screen. 
Reviews computer literacy and 
beginning programming knowledge. 
Ages 10 and up. 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Computefyrlsland 



VISA 



(71 8) 948-2748 Evenings after 7:00 PM EST 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 



Please add $1.00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds 



7E9A 


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000j3j3 TOTAL ERRORS 



1 66 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 




Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 




For over 5 years now, Telewriter has been 
the #1 Color Computer word processor, 
both in popularity and in performance. 
Telewriter's near perfect mix of sophisti- 
cated professional features and a very natu- 
ral user interface, has earned it the highest 
praise in numerous magazines, and an in- 
tensely loyal following among tens of thou- 
sands of Color Computer users all over the 
world. 



HISTORY 



Throughout the history of the Color Com- 
puter, Telewriter has pioneered software 
breakthroughs that set the standards. 

In 1981, it was Telewriter 1.0 that first took 
the Color Computer's inadequate 32X16 all- 
uppercase display, and replaced it with a 
graphics-based 51X24 upper and lowercase 
display. 

A few years later, Telewriter-64 added high 
density 64X24 and 85X24 displays and ac- 
cess to the full 64K of the newer Color 
Computers. 



THE NEW AGE 



Today, Telewriter-64 is recognized as the 
standard Color Computer word processor. It 
runs on all Tandy Color Computers — from 
the original Color Computer 1, to the Color 
Computer 2, and 3. 

But the Color Computer 3 brings a whole 
new level of power to low cost computing 
and, so, a new Telewriter is here to put that 
power to work for you. We call it Telewriter- 
128. 



TEIJ'WK ITER- 128 



You don't mess with a good thing, so 
Telewriter-128 is still Telewriter-64 at heart. 
The commands, and the user interface are 
essentially the same. If you know 
Telewriter-64, then you already know 
Telewriter-128. And, if you don't know 
Telewriter-64, you'll still have an easy time 
learning and using Telewriter-128. 




Hi) COLUMNS 



But there are major differences as well. First, 
Telewriter-128 uses the Color Computer 3's 
new 80 column screen display. 

This means, simply, that using Telewriter- 
128 on a low cost ColorComputer 3 will look 
a lot like using a more expensive word 
processor on a much more expensive IBM 
PC, PS/2, or clone. 



SPEED 



Second, Telewriter-128 is lightning fast. 
Telewriter-64 was fast in its own right, but, 
by accessing the Color Computer 3's video 
hardware directly, and by running the 
machine in double speed mode, Telewriter- 
128 is able to provide extremely fast scroll- 
ing and instant paging — functions whose 
speed is crucial to serious word processing. 

In this department, Telewriter-128 doesn't 
simply keep up with IBM-based word proc- 
essors — it generally surpasses them! 



EASE 




Third, Telewriter-128 adds a host of new 
features big and small, that make it even 
easier to use. 

Features like: Quick function key access to 
the editor or the menus — an instant on-line 
help screen summarizing all Telewriter 
commands and special characters — an 
option file where you store your personal set 
of format and screen settings so you only 
have to set them once! 

Then, there's a quick save feature which 
allows you to save all your current work 
without leaving the editor. There's a simple 
way to cursor through the disk directory and 
read in a file by just hitting ENTER. And 
there's more. 



NEW POWER 



Telewriter-64 always had the power to 
handle any kind of serious writing, from 
letters to textbooks. But, here too, 
Telewriter-128 adds major features. 



Like Macros — which let you insert whole 
words or phrases (even sets of control codes 
or format commands) into your text, with a 
single keypress. And every time you power 
up Telewriter-128, the macro definitions are 
automatically loaded*, so they're always 
there, 

Then there's a Print Preview feature that 
shows you, on-screen, the way your printed 
text will look — with margins, headers, 
centering, justification, page numbering, 
and page breaks. This guarantees letter 
perfect documents every time, and makes 
tasks like widow/orphan line elimination, a 
breeze. 



TELEWRITER-64 or TELEWRITER-128 



We couldgo on listing features, but the point 
is this: If you own a Color Computer, you al- 
ready have the hardware for the most 
powerful, low cost word processor in town. 
All you need now is to add the heart and 
soul: 

Telewriter-64, for the Color Computer 1 
and 2, costs $59.95 on disk, $49.95 on 
cassette. 

Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 
costs $79.95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

To order by Mastercard or Visa call (619) 
755-1258 anytime, or send check or money 
order plus $2 shipping (Californians add 6% 
sales tax) to: 

COGNITEC 

704 Nob Ave. 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

To upgrade from Telewriter-64 to 
Telewriter-128, return your original disk or 
cassette with $39.95. (Add $10 if you're also 
upgrading from cassette to disk. Deduct $10 
with proof of Oct '87 - Feb '88, purchase of 
Telewriter-64.) 

When I first got Telewriter-64 last year, 
I was in heaven. I couldn't believe the 
program 's versatility and ease of use. 

-The RAINBOW, Oct. 1985 



TELEWRITER-64 FEATURES: Compatibility with any. printer that works with 
the Color Computer; embedded control codes for underlining, boldface, sub/ 
superscript, variable fonts; format commands for headers, centering, margin and 
spacing changes anywhere in the document; Format menu to set margins, 
spacing, page numbering, BAUD rate, lines per page, justification; Chain 
printing for one shot printing of multi-file documents. Fast, full-screen editor 
with wordwrap, block copy/move/delete, global search and replace, wild card 
search, fast 4-way auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward 
paging, text alignment, tabs, error protection, word and line counter. Insert or 
delete text anywhere on the screen. Simple, easy to remember commands. 
Optional ASCII files for compatibility with spell checkers, terminal programs, 



and BASIC. Load, save, append, partial save files to disk or cassette. Kill, rename 
and list disk files. Cassette verify and auto-retry on error. 
TELEWRITER- 128 - ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Print preview from editor; 
multiple copy print; footers; hanging indents; cursor thru disk directory to load, 
append, rename and kill files; quick file save from editor; keyclick; key repeat; 
true block move; 24, 25, or 28 line screen; 40 or 80 column screen; dual speed 
cursor; on-line help; overstrike mode; word delete; wordwrap at margin; user 
definable macros; nested macros; instant status window for information on 
cursor position, word count, etc.; instant function key access to menus or editor; 
options menu for setting character and screen colors, key repeat and delay rates, 
definable foreign symbols. 



IBM and PS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines Inc. 'disk version only 



Doctor ASC II 



Disk Transfer 

/ would like to run Radio Shack's 
Ernie's Magic Shapes, Cookie 
Monster's Letter Crunch and 
Grover's Number Rover from disk. 
However, these programs were written 
to run from cassette only, and conflict 
with address assignments for the DOS. 
They were also written in absolute 
reference code and are not readily 
relocatable. Is there a way to transfer 
the code? 

John W. Hefler 
Sausalito, CA 

O I wrote a program called TAPE- 
/L FIX that automatically modi- 
fies tape programs by appending a 
machine language loader. The program 
was published in the September 1983 
issue of HOT Co Co in the article "Disk 
Utilities." For reprints, write CW Com- 
munications, 80 Pine St., Peterbor- 
ough, NH. 

Controlling Plug 'N Power 



I seem to remember reading in RAIN- 
BOW some instructions for control- 
ling Radio Shack's Plug 'N Power 
Remote Control modules directly from 
BASIC. Could you tell me what issue this 
was in or where else I can find this 
information? 

Fred Kaplan 
Topeka, KS 

A.B. Trevor wrote four articles on 
A X the original Plug *N Power (X10) 
system for the CoCo: "Let CoCo Con- 
trol Your Home Power Units," Febru- 
ary 1983; "CoCo Clock, An Accurate 
Timepiece," April 1983; "X10 Protocol 
Theory, Home Power Control," June 
1983; and "Keep Your Home On Sched- 
ule," August 1983. 



Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 

with Richard W. Libra 



Mitsubishi Drives on CoCo 2B 

/ have a CoCo 2B with HDS con- 
troller and one MPI 51 drive, run- 
ning BDOS. I recently got a great 
deal on two Mitsubishi 80-track drives 
(double-sided). They won't work at 
present. Will my controller handle these 
drives and, if so, is there a DOS avail- 
able to run them? I have a friend who 
says that patched ADOS will work. Is 
this true, and how is the patch done? 

James L. Pogue 
Marietta, GA 



15 ADOS comes with a configura- 
ble tion program, and 80-track drives 
is one of the options. 

Altering BASIC 

ml have heard about the "all- RAM 
1| mode, "which puts BASIC into RAM. 
& How do you edit BASIC with the all- 
RAM program, to change BASIC com- 
mands, for example. 

Daniel L. Miller 
Oregon, OH 

13 On boot-up with the CoCo 3, or 
/C after running a ROM-to-RAM 
program on a 64K CoCo, you can either 
poke or use a machine language pro- 
gram to modify BASIC (addresses $A000 



through SBFFF), Extended BASIC 
($8000 through S9FFF) or Disk BASIC 
($C000 through $DFFF). 

CoCo and Commie Compatibility 

Q / was wondering if there is a way that 
Withe CoCo can run Commodore 64 
H software. 

Alvin Malone 
Diaz, AZ 

y) Only if the program is in BASIC 
/L and you transfer the ASCII code. 
It will also most likely require some 
modification since the two BASICS are 
not totally compatible. 

Color Blind Software 

(H Is there a way to cause the correct 
□ color to come up in high resolution 
\B screens with software instead of by 
constantly pressing the reset button? 

Richard Schultz 
Carmichael, CA 

T) The four-plus color, 256-by-192 
/L mode on the CoCo 1 and 2 ma- 
chines is not officially supported in the 
6847 SAM chip's documentation. The 
red/ blue interchange on these machines 
cannot be controlled by software to 
automatically start the same way all the 
time. 

OS-9 BBS Software 

|| I'm looking for information on 
where to get BBS software that runs 
under OS-9 for our CoCo club in 
York, Pennsylvania. Can you help? 

Christian B. Lutz 
York Haven, PA 



T) An OS-9 BBS program called 
A ji PBBS5.0 is available for $50 from 
Steve Roberson, (602) 884-7840. He 
recommends that the user have double- 
sided, 40-track drives at a minimum to 
use it. The source code is also available 
for an additional $50. 



Botched Communications 

/ have tried and tried to communi- 
cate with my friend's OS-9 system 
using my modem, but each time I 
attempt to send underlines, boldface 



168 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



£7/5 TO 



SUPER PRODUCTS 



INTRODUCES 

THE FANTASTIC _ 
SUPER CONTROLLER IE 

power' beyond belief 




Radio Shack/Tandy controller compatible. 

Works on all COCOs! 1, 2 or 3, with or without Multi-pak interface. 
One 24/28 pin socket, for 8K ROM, 2764, 27128 or 27256. 
Internal Mini-Expansion-Bus Connector for one DISTO 
Super Adapter board. 

Low Power draw; Within COCO'S power requirements. 
Gold Plated edge connectors. 
Under OS-9: 

• Buffered Read/Write sector achieved without halting the CPU. 

• Continual use of keyboard even while Reading or Writing to disk. 

• System's Clock no longer looses time during Read & Write. 

• NMI is blocked and transferred to IRQ in software for low CPU overhead.. 

• Completely Interrupt driven for fast and smooth Multi-Tasking operations.. 

• Drivers (written by Keven Darling) for Level 1 and 2. 



Suggested Retail Price 



$150 



Introductory Price $130 



DISTD SUPER CONTROLLER I $99. 95 



A superb controller. Along with 
the included C-DOS, plug-in 
three more software selectable 
2764 or 271 28 EPROMs burned 
to your liking. 

The internal Mini Expansion Bus 
lets you add some incredible 
features to the controller. Disto 
Super Add-Ons were designed 
to fit neatly inside the Super 
Controller case. 



□HTrj 



SUPER ADD-ONS 




□ISTO 

SUPER RAM 




ZeroK $29.95 



Full512K $79.95 




Now is the time to upgrade your 
COCO 3 to 51 2K of memory. 
Available with or without mem- 
ory chips, the Super Ram 3 
board is easily installed inside 
the COCO. It is fully compatible 
with OS-9 Level 2 and is deliv- 
ered with a software package 
(for BASIC) that includes: a 
printer spooler, a ramdisk, a 
memory test and an install/con- 
figure program for your system. 



REAL TIME CLOCK AND PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE 
Have the Real Time, date and year displayed on your screen at a simple 
command. $39.95 

MINI EPROM PROGRAMMER 

A low cost EPROM programmer that attaches directly to your Disto 
Super Controller to program those often used utilities. $54.95 

HARD DISK INTERFACE 

A hard disk interface fuEly compatible with S.A.S.I.controlter. Fits inside 
the Super Controllers, Ramdisk or MEB adapter. OS-9 Drivers are 

included. $49.95 
SUPER RAMDISK 512K 

Imagine having access to 51 2K of virtual disk memory in close to no time. 
Upgradable to One Megabyte $1 1 9.95 

MEB ADAPTER 

A Stand-Alone Mini-Expansion-Bus in which you can plug any other 
DISTO Adapter directly in a Multi-pak without the need for a Super Controller 

or Ramdisk $24.95 



SEND FOR I 


FREE 1988 WINTER CATALOG B 


€TC C 

10802 Lajeunesi 

MASTER CARD 
AND VISA 
ACCEPTED 


RC COMPUTERS inc. 

se, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3L 2E8 

1-514-383-5293 1 

We accept phone orders. 
Call for Canadian prices. 
Include S&H of $4 or $8 if order exceeds $75. 



characters, blinking characters, etc., all 
he gets is a homed cursor, and the rest 
of the special codes are ignored. Is this 
a bug or am I doing something wrong? 

Tom Sanders 
Parma, MI 

13 Thanks to Kevin Darling for com- 
ing up with a patch. Using Mod- 
patch -s, patch CC3IO: 

c778 a7 12 
c 779 c8 12 
c 77a If 12 
c 79f 4b 4e 
c9ef c8 12 
c 9f0 If 12 
c a2d bd cO 
v 

Then use Save to make a new module 
or Cobbler a new patched disk. 

CoCo 3 Keys 

/ just would like information on the 
Co Co 3 keyboard, specifically the Fl, 
F2, CTRL and ALT keys. The Co Co 
manual doesn't cover them at all. 

Kenneth Allen Leap 
Norfolk, VA 

T) The ALT, CTRL, Fl and F2 keys 
A /Coccupy addresses 341, 342, 
343 and 344 of the keyboard rollover 
table. When any one of these keys is 
pressed, the value at its corresponding 
address in the keyboard rollover table 
changes from 255 to 191. You can use 
this information in writing your own 
programs to detect when one of these 
keys are pressed. 

Old Controller, New CoCo 

/ have an old silver-case CoCo (F 
board — 1982) and a silver-case 
upright disk drive, which connects to 
the CoCo by means of a black con- 
troller. I would like to upgrade to a 
CoCo 3, but don't want the expense of 
a new disk drive and controller. Can I 
use my old disk drive and controller on 
a CoCo 3? Would a Multi-Pak interface 
solve my problem? 

Charles Waldron 
Fairfield, CT 

Xy Your current controller, if it re- 
A Q u ' res * ^ volts, will not work with 
a CoCo 3 unless it somehow gets the 
required 12 volts (the use of a Multi-Pak 
is one way to supply the necessary 12 
volts). OS-9 Level II runs at 2 MHz, 
which cannot be handled by most of the 
12-volt controllers. If you plan to use 
OS-9 Level II, I'd suggest getting a new 

1 70 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



controller. But, before you purchase 
either a Multi-Pak or a controller, check 
to see if you already have a 5-volt 
controller, for some of the earlier ones 
came with black housings. 

Of Modem Paks and DeskMate 3 

^ Do you know of a way to use Radio 
Shack's Direct Connect Modem Pak 
(Cat. No. 26-2228) through the "Tele- 
com" section of DeskMate 3 for the 
CoCo 3? 

A.M. Fransen 
Calgary, Alberta 

After you swap disks and select 
/C telecommunications, specify /Ml 
as your serial port. 

64K Programs on 512K 

I'm thinking about selling my 64K 
CoCo and buying the CoCo 3 with 
the 512 K upgrade kit. If I do, will I 
be able to run my 64 K programs on it 
with no problems? 

Michael Duvall 
Zanesville, OH 



15 Yes and no. Many of your 64K 
/C programs will work without mod- 
ification, some will work with minor 
fixes, and some may not be worth the 
time or trouble to fix. The two major 
areas of problems are those programs 
that interfere with the GIME chip and 
Super Extended BASIC. The former 
problem is usually with a 64K boot 
routine messing up the GIME (e.g., the 
VIP series programs have this prob- 
lem); it is relatively easy to fix. The 
latter problem can be more difficult 
since code may have to be extensively 
modified. 

The Power of the Pins 



The disk controller shipped with the 
original CoCo drives required a -5- 
volt supply from the CoCo to oper- 
ate. The CoCo 2 does not have this 
source available on its cartridge connec- 
tor. It is not possible to solve this 
problem using a Multi-Pak interface, 
since they are no longer available in 
Europe. Using some elementary elec- 
tronic components, one can generate a 
-5-volt output coming from a 10-volt (or 
more) source. The only problem is the 
pin number on the cartridge connector. 
Would it be possible for you to inform 
me on this subject? 

Dirk Vandekerckhove 
B-8600 Menen, Belgium 



ID The power supplied at the ROM- 
/C pack port on the original CoCos 
was at 1) -12V(100MA), 2) +12V(300 
MA), and 9) +5V(300MA). There was 
no external -5-volt supply. 

Mac Hard Drives 

Can you make use of all the keys on 
the CoCo 3 keyboard on a CoCo I 
(F board)? If so, how complicated 
would it be? Could I hook up a Corvus 
5 Mb hard drive, last used on a Macin- 
tosh, on my CoCo I? 

Rod Reinemer 
Leaburg, OR 

TD The CoCo 3 keyboard is available 
/C from Radio Shack National Parts 
(Part No. AXX-0245). It should plug 
right in. With the proper interfacing 
hardware and software, you could use 
the drive. For starters, contact Owl- 
Ware and Burke & Burke, both adver- 
tisers in this magazine. 

CoCo's British Brothers 



lam likely to move to England soon 
and would like to know if my CoCo 
would work there using a locally 
bought TV. I know that they use a 220- 
volt, 50Hz electrical system and a TV 
system called PAL instead of our 
NTSC. Is there a British computer 
similar to the CoCo? Would it run all 
the CoCo's programs? 

Zafer Deeb 
Toledo, OH 



13 There is a PAL version of the 
/L CoCo sold in Europe that is 
software-compatible with the NTSC 
versions sold here. Also, there is a CoCo 
clone called the Dragon sold there that 
will run some of the CoCo's software. 
See the recent article "CoCoing 
Abroad," in the November 1987 RAIN- 
BOW, Page 32, by Marty Goodman and 
Don Hutchison. 

For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, 
at the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
RSK for "Ask the Experts" to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete 
instructions. 




Barden s Buffer 



An A^maze'ing Adventure 

By William Barden, Jr. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The Winchester Mystery House, found in Silicon Valley, 
California, started as a basic three-story Victorian 
home. Lucy Winchester, widow of the arms manufac- 
turer, kept adding to it — as long as she kept building, she 
believed, she would never die. 

There are stairways in the house that go nowhere, doors 
that open to sheer three-story drops, and doors that don't 
open at all. I was reminded of the house when writing this 
column — the maze game presented here is similar, and some 
of the problems I ran into while writing the program are 
analogous to those fake doors and empty rooms. 

In this column I'll describe the maze game and its 
development and suggest ways you can add to it for your own 
version. You won't have to add much, though; by itself it's 
an interesting game, relying heavily on three-dimensional 
arrays and string processing, among other things. 

The Scenario 

It's like this: Lucy Winchester has kidnapped you. 
Groggily, you awake (with a nasty headache) to find yourself 
in an interior room of the house. In order to find your way 
out, you'll have to negotiate the various rooms, floors and 
dead ends. (If you don't like that one, another scenario 
involves an abduction by aliens that look like clones of CoCo 
Cat — I'll leave it to you to establish your own fantasy.) In 
any event, you're in the middle of a three-dimensional box, 
as shown in Figure 1, and must find your way out to one 
of the four sides, the top or bottom. 

Within the maze is a series of rooms. Each room can have 
a door on the left, a door on the right, a door in front of 
you, a door behind you, an opening in the ceiling to the floor 
above (no staircases here) or an opening in the floor to the 
floor below. Rooms may have any combination of these doors 
and openings — one room may have no doors, but another 
may have two doors and a ceiling opening. A room with every 
door and opening is presented in Figure 2. 

Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years 'experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 



Game Play 

By pressing keys you can move to adjacent rooms and go 
up or down one floor. When you go through a door, you may 
change directions. If you select the door to the right, for 




Figure 1: Three-Dimensional Box or Maze 
(Cut-Away View) 



Upper Opening 




Lower (Down) Opening 



Figure 2: Room in Maze 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 71 



example, youll be facing the new room at a right angle to 
the old direction. Pressing these keys takes you from room 
to ropm: 

§ through the door straight ahead 

£| through the door behind you 

L through the door on your left 

R through the door on your right 

U through ceiling opening to floor above 

D through floor opening to floor below 

Designing the Maze Game 

L^t's start off by assuming that the maze is a box, consisting 
of height, width and depth. We'll assume that the height must 
be greater than one story and the width and depth greater 
than two. 

We could number each of the rooms, as shown in Figure 
3, starting at the upper-left corner of the box and working 
down toward the lower-right corner. Numbering might work 
like the numbering of hotel rooms, which use the floor 
number as their first number — rooms 401 through 412 for 
rooms on Floor 4, for example. 

This is a cumbersome way of identifying the rooms, 
however. Is Room 412 toward the front or back of the 
building? Is Room 401 on the left or right side? Another way 
to define the rooms is to use a three-dimensional array. An 
array is defined by the dimension statement (DIM) in 
Extended Color BASIC. 



100 DIM R(2, 3, 4) 



'height, width, depth 



The DIM statement above defines a box that is two stories 
high, three rooms wide, and four rooms deep, numbered as 
shown in Figure 4. The box is called R. Actually, there's 
another floor, the "zero" floor, as well. The DIM statement 
allocates an array starting with 0 for all dimensions, so the 
height is 0 to 2, the width is 0 to 3, and the depth is 0 to 4, 
making the total number of rooms 3-by-4-by-5, or 60 rooms. 
However, in a lot of programs, the "zero" index is not used, 
because numbering often starts from 1 and not from 0. We'll 
do that here. 

Variables can be used in place of numeric constants in the 
DIM statement, as in this example: 



100 INPUT H 
110 INPUT W 
120 INPUT DP 
130 DIM R(H,W,DP) 



'get height 
'get width 
'get depth 
'al locate array 



Once the array has been defined, you can refer to any room 
in the array with its coordinates, or indices: 

140 C=R(2,1,3) 

The statement sets variable C equal to the room on the 
second story, the first row, and the third column. What is 
"in" R(2,l,3) is another problem, which we'll discuss shortly. 

Instead of using stories, rows and columns, however, let's 
use the X/Y/Z scheme, shown in Figure 5. Here the height 
is equivalent to the Z dimension, the width is equivalent to 
the X dimension, and the depth is equivalent to the Y 
dimension. A room is defined by R(height,width, depth) or 
R(Z,X,Y). 




401 


402 


403 


404 


301 


302 


303 


304 


201 

■■ 


202 


203 


204 


101 


102 


103 


104 




Figure 3: Hotel Room Numbering Scheme 



This 0 Level Not Used For Height 



<D 1 




/ 
This 0 Section 

Not Used For 

Width 



R(0,0,3) 


R(0,1,3) 


R{0,2,3) 


R(0,3,3) 


R(1,0,3) 


fid, 1,3) 


R<U3) 


R(U3) 


R(2,0,3) 


R(2,1,3) 


R(2,2,3) 


R(2,3,3) 



v 0. 




R(0,3,0) 



ThisO 
.Section 



Width 



Figure 4: DIM Numbering 



x 

Width 




2 

Height 



t 



Figure 5: X/Y/Z Scheme 



1 72 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



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Write for free catalog 



Table 1: Decimal, Hexadecimal and Binary Values 



0 


&H00 000000 


16 


&H10 


010000 


32 


&H20 


100000 


4B 


&H30 


110000 


1 


&H01 000001 


1? 


&H11 


010001 


33 


&H21 


100001 


49 


&H31 


110001 


2 


&H02 000010 


18 


&H12 


010010 


34 


&H22 


100010 


50 


&H32 


110010 


3 


&H03 000011 


19 


&H13 


010011 


35 


&H23 


100011 


51 


&H33 


110011 


4 


&H04 000100 


20 


&H14 


010100 


36 


&H24 


100100 


52 


&H34 


110100 


5 


&H05 000101 


21 


&H15 


010101 


37 


&H25 


100101 


53 


&H35 


110101 


6 


&H0G 000110 


22 


&H16 


010110 


3B 


&H26 


100110 


54 


&H36 


110110 


? 


&H07 000111 


23 


&H1? 


010111 


39 


&H27 


100111 


55 


&H37 


110111 


e 


&H0B 001000 


24 


&H1B 


011000 


40 


S.H2B 


101001 


56 


&H3B 


111000 


3 


&H09 001001 


25 


&H19 


011001 


41 


&H29 


101001 


57 


&H39 


111001 


lid 


&H0R 001010 


26 


&H1R 


011010 


42 


&H2R 


101010 


5B 


&H3R 


111010 


11 


&H0B 001011 


27 


&H1B 


011011 


43 


&H2B 


101011 


59 


&H38 


111011 


12 


&H0C 001100 


28 


&H1C 


011100 


44 


&H2C 


101100 


60 


&H3C 


111100 


13 


&H0D 001101 


23 


&H1D 


011101 


45 


&H2D 


101101 


61 


&H3D 


111101 


14 


&H0E 001110 


30 


&H1E 


011110 


46 


&H2E 


101110 


62 


&H3E 


111110 


15 


&H0F 001111 


31 


&H1F 


011111 


47 


&H2F 


101111 


63 


&H3F 


111111 



What's in a Room 

What is in a room? We know that the array R is a numeric 
array and each room or element contains a numeric value. 
How does that numeric value represent the doors and 
openings of the room? One way is to use a string array and 
then form a string of words to define what the room looks 
like. The string could be "left door, right door, ceiling 
opening", for example. To be more concise, we could say 
"LRU" for "Left door, Right door, and Upper opening". 

Another way of representing the room, though, is with bits 
— binary digits. We know that there are only six possible 
doors and openings in a room (right door, left door, the door 
in front, the door behind, the ceiling opening, and the floor 
opening). These six doors and openings can be represented 
in six bits, as shown in Figure 6. A bit with a value of 1 
indicates that the door or opening is present, while a 0 bit 
indicates that the door or opening is not there. 

The six bits always have the same meaning as shown in 
the figure. They occupy the same position in the value. A 
value of 100J0I, for example, means U (upper), L(left), and 
R(right). 

To calculate the decimal value for each bit, just add 32, 
16, 8, 4, 2, or 1 together, depending on which bit is present. 
In the example of 100101, you'd have 32+4+1=37 decimal. 
For this room, then, the value that represents an upper 
opening, left door and right door could be set by this line: 

200 R(2,l,2) = 3? 

The 2,1,2 indices for Z, X and Y (height, width and depth) 
are just three arbitrary values we happened to choose.) 

The value used for a room could range from 0 (no doors 
or openings) to 63 (all doors and ceiling and floor openings). 
Another way of specifying this value is in hexadecimal or 
Hex, which is a shorthand way of representing binary. In this 
case, decimal values of 0 through 63 are represented by Hex 
values of 0 through &H3F, as shown in Table 1. 

The numbers in the first column of the table are the decimal 
numbers; the numbers in the second column, with the &H 
prefix, are the hexadecimal equivalents; and the numbers in 
the tast are the binary equivalents. 

1 74 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



Drawing the Rooms 

At this point we have a three-dimensional box or array, 
with each element of the array containing a value from 0 to 
63 that indicates the doors and openings. To draw any room 
from the room value, we first check each bit of the value and 
then draw the appropriate door or opening. But before that, 
we have to draw the outline of the room, since that stays 
constant for any room. The BASIC code for drawing a room 
is found in lines 220 through 470 of Listing 1, but here is a 
condensed presentation of those lines to provide a clearer 
understanding: 



100 SCREEN 1,0 
110 PMOOE A 
120 COLOR 2,3 
130 PCL5 

140 LINE (0,0) - (255,191 ) ,PSET,B 
150 C=R(Z,X,Y) 
160 GOSUB 710 

170 IF (C AND 32) 0 THEN GOSUB 1110 
1B0 IF (C AND 16) 0 THEN GOSUB 1030 
190 IF (C AND A ) 0 THEN GOSUB 790 
210 IF (C RNO 2) 0 THEN GOSUB 950 
220 IF (C FIND 1) 0 THEN GOSUB 870 



'graphics screen 
'256 x 192 
'black on green 
'clear screen 
' border 

'value, 0 to 63 
'outl ine 
' upper 
' lower 
'left door . 
' front door 
' right door 



128 


64 


32 


16 


8 


4 


2 


1 


Power of Two 


7 


6 


5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


0 


Bit Position 






U 


D 


B 


r ■ - ■ 

L 


S 


R 

, .- 





Right Door 
Straight Ahead Door 
Left Door 

Door Behind Observer 
Down Opening 
Up Opening 



Figure 6: Bit Codes for Doors and Openings 




PC2PR 



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Calllgraph 
New Fonts 

Sugar Software's popular 
CoCo Calligrapher program 
now has a new set of 5 
fonts* The text of this ad 
was printed with the 0S9 
Calligrapher and the 
condensed ROMAN font. 

Like all of the current 54 
fonts, these are variable 
width for a more pleasing 
appearance. The new fonts 
are the smallest of all (less 
than «2 inches tall) and are 
more useful for Desktop 
Publishing: 

R o ini a o 



Dieiti 
Hi® Hi 111 i 



These fire new fonts are 
available in either RSDOS or 
0S9 format. The intro- 
ductory price for the set 
on disk or tape (RSDOS) is 
$18.50, good through March 
31st. The font set requires 
that jou hare the CoCo or 
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TIMS 

The Information Management 
Sgstem, TIMS, is a rerj 
easg-to-use database 
program. TIMS is used to 
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decide what gou want to 
file; it could be articles, 
collections (coins, stamps, 
video tapes, etc*), anything 
gou might put into an index 
card file. The advantage to 
computerizing gour files is 
that gou can quicklg search 
the entire file in a fraction 
of a second; sort the file 
on ang of the fields (up to 
3) in a few seconds; easilg 
update gour fields or 
records; and print gour file, 
or a portion of it is a 
format gou design. 

TIMS MAIL 

TIMS Mail is a special 
version of TIMS that is 
tailored to maintaining a 
file of names and addresses 
and printing mailing labels 
instead of reports. Mang of 
the standard label sizes are 
supported including 2 or 3 
across. TIMS Mail address 
files mag be used with TIMS. 



TIMS 
UTILITY 

The TIMS Utility program 
enhances the other 
programs. It allows 
multi-term searches of gour 
fil es, global modification 
and deletion of records and 
file splitting. 

TIMS 
COMBO 

Your best value is to 

J purchase the entire TIMS 
ibrarg on a single disk. All 
three programs are included 
along with a sample TIMS 
bibliographg file of all 
articles written about the 
CoCo in 1981 and 1982! 

All the TIMS programs run 
on either tape or disk. The 
tape TIMS programs mag be 
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TIMS and TIMS Mail are 
$19.95 each. TIMS Utilitg is 
$14.95. The TIMS Combo 
Package is $34.95, saving 
gou about $20! At Sugar 
Software 9 tape and disk 
prices are the same. 



The Calligrapher Programs - Both the 
OS9 and CoCo Calligrapher come with 
three %-inch fonts: Old English, Gay 
Nineties and Cartoon. Both come with 
support for Epson, Gemini, Radio Shack, 
Okidata 92A, Banana and Prowriter 
printers. Both print the same fonts. 

CoCo Calligrapher - Tape or Disk; 
$24.05. OSO Calligrapher - Requires 
OS9 Level I or II; Disk only; $24.95. 



TIMS - Tape or disk, fast and simple 
general data base program. Create files of 
records that can be quickly sorted, 
searched, deleted and updated. 
Tape /Disk; $19.95. 

TIMS Mail - Tape or Disk based mailing 
list management program. Files are com- 
patible with TIMS. Fast and simple to 
use. Tape /Disk; $10.95. 



TIMS Utility - Utility companion for 
TIMS and TIMS Mail to allow multi-term 
search (AND and OR logic), global 
change and delete, split large files and 
more! Tape /Disk; $14.95. 

TIMS Combo Package - All three of the 
above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail and 
TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.05. 



This ad was composed using te-inch Reversed Old English for the headline, %-inch Block for headers and .2-inch Roman for the 
body. A 2%-inch column was printed and cut to three columns. Specify OS9 or CoCo (RSDOS) when ordering Calligrapher or fonts. 



RAINBOW 

CE.TIFICATIOM 
SEAL 













m&t 









*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All program* run on the CoCo 1, 2 and S, S2K 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.60 per tape or disk for postage and handling. 
Florida residents add b% sales tax. COD orders 
add $4. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders generally 
shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds or exchanges 
without prior authorization. 



V 



The subroutine at Line 710 of Listing 1 draws the room 
outline as if you were looking into the room from the 
doorway you've just passed through. The other subroutines 
draw individual doors or the ceiling and floor openings. The 
room outline is always drawn, but the other subroutines are 
called only if the proper bit is set in the value. The bit for 
each is tested by RNDing the room value with the value of 32, 
16, 4, 2, or 1. The FIND returns a non-zero result if the bit 
is set and a zero result if the bit is not set. The door "behind" 
the observer is not drawn, because it is not visible in the view 
of the room. It's still always there, however, because it's one 
of the ways to get into the room. 

The code for drawing the doors and openings uses a series 
of LINE statements. A CIRCLE statement in the door 
subroutines draws a doorknob, and PRINT colors the 
doorknob black. Ceiling and floor openings are painted 
black, as well. The code for drawing the shapes is shown in 
lines 700 through 1 700 of Listing 1 . 

Moving From Room to Room 

The code in lines 700 through 1700 draws a single room, 
but what about moving through the maze? One way to move 
through the maze is to use a single key press to go either up, 
down, back, left, straight ahead or right; keys U, D, B, L, 
S and R are used to move in those directions. An INKEY$ 
command allows you to read in a key, as shown in lines 480 
through 500 of Listing 1 : 

480 fl$=INKEY$: IF fl$="" THEN GOTO 480 
490 FFINSTR ( "UDBL5RH" t fl$) 
500 IF fl=0 THEN GOTO 480 

The code loops at Line 480 until a key is pressed. The 
INSTR statement then looks at the string UDBL5RH to find the 
key letter in fl$. If the letter is found, variable fi is set to the 
position in the UDBLSRH string of 1 through 7. If the letter 
is not found, A is set to 0 and the key press is ignored. 

There's a big problem, though, in moving from room to 
room. The values in the elements of each array are based on 
an observer facing "north" — right really means east, left is 
west, and so forth. However, when you're moving through 
the rooms, you're turning right or left to go through the right 
or left doors, or turning completely around to return through 
the door you just entered. (In going through the door in front 
of you, you keep the same direction, as you do when going 
up or down.) When you turn and walk through the door, you 
may be facing another direction. If the room were drawn from 
the original data, the view would always be the one you see 
facing north and not the one you see walking through the 
door (see Figure 7). 

The answer to this problem is a conversion of the original 
room doors and openings to those corresponding to the 
observer's view. To do this, a direction variable has to be 
maintained. Let's use variable D to represent the direction. 
Again, we could have used N, E, S and W in a string variable, 
but our choice was: 



0 
1 

2 

3 



North 
East 
South 
West 



The conversion is common sense. If an observer enters a 
room and faces north, the right and left sense of the original 
room values apply. However, if an observer enters a room 

176 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



facing east, the door straight ahead is actually the "right" 
door of the original value; the door to the right is actually 
the "back" door of the original value, and so forth. Facing 
south and west requires the same type of conversion. Here's 
a conversion table: 

C$="20154130540235431254" 

This "table" requires some explanation. It's divided into four 
parts for north, east, south and west: 

20154 13054 02354 31254 
N E S W 

The single digit represents the bit that should be tested for 
the door or opening — Bit 5 (most significant) through Bit 

0 (least significant). The order of the string is LRSUD, for left, 
right, straight, up or down. Facing north, for example, Bit 
2 should be tested for the left door. Facing south, however, 
Bit 0 should be tested for the left door, as the original right 
door is now viewed as the left door. Confused? It is confusing 
and there's probably no way to simplify it unless you sit down 
and draw some sample cases yourself. 

Using the C$ "table," the direction variable D and the code 
for the movement key (U, D, B, L, S, or R), it's easy to go 
through the conversion to draw the room as it appears to an 
observer in the doorway. Lines 360 through 390 of Listing 

1 do this: 

360 C=R(Z,X,Y) 
370 GDSUB 710 

380 M=INT(2 /N VRL(MID$,C$, (D*5)+l,l) ) ) 
390 IF (C FIND M) O 0 THEN GDSUB 790 

This code accomplishes the same thing as the previous code 
— it draws the left door of the room, but it first converts 
what the observer sees as the left door to the original door. 
The MID$ portion of the statement gets the bit position; the 



North 
k 



1. Originally Facing 
North 

2. Turn to Right 



It H 

Room A 


2 

Room B 









t 



View of Room B 
Facing East 



View of Room B 
Facing North 



Figure 7: Changing Directions 



# 

VflL portion converts the single character to a numeric value; 
the 2^ portion changes this numeric value to a power of 2 
(32, 16, 8, 4, 2, or 1); and the INT portion makes certain that 
the power of 2 is an integer value. The result is put into 
variable M, a "mask" variable with a value of 32, 16, 8, 4, 2, 
or 1. The modified code for drawing the room is found in 
lines 310 through 500 of Listing 1. 

Once the room is drawn, the player can input a key to 
determine which direction he wants to go — U, D, B, L, S 
or R. One problem with this, however, is that the player can 
input a direction that isn't allowed. He may try to go through 
a left door where there isn't a door (on the left), for example. 
This cannot be allowed. To prevent it, a check must be made 
of allowable directions based on the current direction, the 
intended direction and the openings that are present. The 
code in lines 480 through 590 accomplishes the conversion. 

The value C in Line 590 is the value of the current room 
in the array. Variable A is a mask value of 32, 16, 8, 4, 2 or 
1 derived from the "543 ... 321" string by the current 
direction D (1, 1, 2 or 3) and the ft code. If the ftND of X and 
ft is zero, there is no corresponding bit in the array value and 
the key is ignored. If the AND is non-zero, then the direction 
the player wants to move is valid. 

If the player has entered a valid direction, the next step 
is to change the current direction in the variable D. This is 
done by adding 1 for a move to the right, adding 2 for a move 
backward, or subtracting 1 for a move to the left. Moving 
up or down does not alter the direction. The second thing 
done is adjusting Z, X or Y to reflect the move. Moving up 
subtracts 1 from the current Z value, and moving down adds 
1 to it. If the direction is north (D=0), 1 is subtracted from 
Y. If the direction is east (D=l), 1 is added toX. If the direction 
is south (D=2), 1 is added to Y. If the direction is west (D=3), 
1 is subtracted from X. 

A check is then made of the current Z , X , Y. If any of the 
three variables is equal to 0, the placer has moved out of the 
"box" and the game is over. If any of the three variables is 
equal to a value one greater than the dimension limit height, 
width or depth, the player has moved out of the box, as well. 
If the player is still within the box, the process repeats. The 
code for these actions is shown in Listing 1, along with the 
code described above. 

How to Generate a Maze 

The above discussion assumes that a maze exists. But who 
created it? Not me — youll have to create your own. 

One way to create a maze is to sit down with paper and 
pencil and draw one out, adding a random number of doors 
and openings in each room. A better way, and the way I opted 
for, was to have the CoCo generate a three-dimensional 
maze! 

The resulting FINDMAZE program shown in Listing 2 uses 
the same structure we've been discussing above, an array of 
three dimensions with a height (Z) greater than 1, a width 
(X) greater than 2, and a depth (Y) greater than 2. The first 
portion of code defines an array R of dimensions height, width 
and depth. 

The next portion of code fills all of the "rooms" of the array 
with a random arrangement of doors and openings. Since this 
value is from 0 to 63, an RND ( 64 ) -1 expression produces the 
proper random value. 

The rooms are now filled with random doors and openings. 
However, there's a slight problem. Because adjacent rooms 
— rooms next to each other — are created randomly, there 
may be a door that leads into an adjoining room, but no door 



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going back into the original room. Imagine this scenario: The 
player presses R for right to go through a door. Upon entering 
the room he sees no doors or openings (a random value of 
0). Thinking he'll go back the way he came, he presses B, 
which should return him to the previous room, but facing 
the opposite direction. Instead, he can't get back because 
there is no door! 

To solve this problem, a scan is made of all rooms. If there 
is a door to the right but no door to the left in the adjoining 
room, one is added. Conversely, if there is a door to the left 
but no door to the right in the preceding room, one is added. 
The same actions are taken for "up" and "down" openings 
and for doors that are straight ahead and behind. 

Next, the center room is found by setting Z, X and Y equal 
to the integer value of the dimension divided by 2. Variable 
N is then set to 0, for north. 

The coding at the heart of F I NDMAZE does a "random walk" 
through the maze. Starting at the center, a direction N is 
chosen at random, including an up/ down direction. How- 
ever, if the direction represents a return back to a room it 
was in previously, the direction is discarded and a new 
direction found (travel through the maze doesn't reverse 
itself). 

Variables TZ, TX and TY are set equal to Z, X and Y. These 
variables represent a "trial room." Based on the current 
direction of travel (N), Z, X or Y is adjusted for the direction. 
The adjustment defines a new room. A check is made of all 
the old rooms (stored in Array 5) to make certain that the 
path does not come back to a previous room. If it does, a 
new direction is taken and the trial room discarded. 

If the trial room represents a room that is out of the maze 
(Z, X or Y = 0, or Z, X or Y = dimension+1), the trial room 
is also discarded, providing that less than 30 percent of the 
rooms have been used in the path of travel. 

If the trial room is OK, then a doorway or opening is 
"blasted through." Of course, one might exist without having 
to set a new one, but an OR of the proper bit sets one, 
regardless. 

There's a problem with blasting a new doorway similar to 
that of the generation of random rooms, however. If no 
doorway or opening exists on the other side, the player will 
not be able to reverse himself in going through the maze path. 
The corresponding door or opening on the new room is 
therefore blasted through as well by a second OR. 

If the outside of the maze is not reached, the process is 
repeated — the program wends through the maze in erratic 
fashion, blasting a path through random rooms until the 
outside is reached. Each time a new room is computed, it is 
added to the "previous rooms" Array 5, so that a check may 
be made of trial rooms. Also, a record of the direction taken 
is recorded in string fl$. At the end of the random walk, fl$ 
holds the sequence to follow to get out of the maze, such as 
"DLL5SULSRULDDSS 

At the end of thef INDMRZE program the complete room 
array is saved to a disk file, along with the array dimensions 
and path sequence. This disk file is read into the NEWMAZE 
program to "initialize" the maze. 

Using FINDMAZE and NEWMAZE 

To play a game, first run FINDMAZE to define a maze. A 
good height, width and depth to try is 5-by-5-by-5 — about 
38 rooms will be present in the maze path. You'll see the room 
coordinates displayed on the screen as they are calculated. 
The program will then ask you for a disk filename for the 
maze data, after which the maze data will be written out. Any 
filename will do. 



1 78 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



Next, run NEWMAZE and reply with the filename just 
created. The program loads the maze file and displays the 
center room. Use the U, D, B, L, S and R keys to move 
through the maze. Any direction that is not possible will be 
ignored. If you're stuck, use the H key to list the directions 
to travel — it displays the fi$ string from FINDMAZE. 

There are about 3,800,000,000,000 combinations for a 5- 
by-5-by-5 maze, so the game is not easy. You might try making 
a map as you travel through the maze! 

FINDMRZE and NEWMAZE are "core" programs that do the 
job, but there is room for embellishments. How about a way 



of marking a wall with a paint that remains visible, but only 
for 10 moves? What about a monster pursuing you through 
the maze, with a heartbeep sound that gets more frequent, 
louder and higher-pitched as it approaches? 

Another thing that could be added is a "vanish button "that 
transports you to another room if the monster appears to be 
too close — maybe a "button" with a battery that takes 20 
moves to recharge? How about adding some of those "trap" 
rooms that have no way out? Some rooms might open out 
onto sheer drops, just like the Winchester House. The 
possibilities are endless. □ 




390 111 970 111 

550 20 END 122 

710 111 



Listing 1: NEWMAZE 

100 1 EXECUTE A MAZE GAME 
110 ■ 

120 'READ MAZE FILE 

130 INPUT "MAZE FILE NAME: " ;MF$ 

140 OPEN "I",#1,MF$ 

150 INPUT#1,H,W,DP 

160 DIM R(H,W,DP) 

170 FOR Z=l TO H: FOR X=l TO W:FO 

R Y=l TO DP 

180 INPUT#1,R(Z,X,Y) 

190 NEXT : NEXT : NEXT 

200 INPUT#1,B$ 

210 1 

220 'INITIALIZE 
230 SCREEN 1,0 
240 PMODE 4 
250 COLOR 2,3 
2 60 PCLS 
270 Y=INT(DP/2) 
280 X=INT(W/2) 
290 Z=INT(H/2) 
300 D=0 

310 C$="20154130540235431254" 
320 1 

330 'MAIN LOOP - DO UNTIL OUT 
340 PCLS 

350 LINE(0,0)-(255,191) ,PSET,B 
360 C=R(Z,X,Y) 
370 GOSUB 710 

380 M=INT(2 A VAL(MID$ (C$, (D*5)+l, 
1))) 

390 IF (C AND M ) <> 0 THEN GOSU 
B 790 

400 M=INT(2 A VAL(MID$ (C$, (D*5)+2, 
1))) 

410 IF (C AND M ) <> 0 THEN GOSU 
B 870 

420 M=INT(2 A VAL(MID$(C$, (D*5)+3, 
1))) 

430 IF (C AND M ) <> 0 THEN GOSU 
B 950 

440 M=INT(2 A VAL(MID$ (C$, (D*5)+4, 



1))) 

450 IF (C AND M ) <> 0 THEN GOSU 
B 1110 

460 M=INT(2 A VAL(MID$(C$, (D*5)+5, 
1))) 

470 IF (C AND M ) <> 0 THEN GOSU 
B 1030 

480 A$=INKEY$: IF A$='»" THEN GOT 
O 480 

490 A=INSTR("UDBLSRH",A$) 
500 IF A=0 THEN GOTO 480 
510 IF A$<> ,I H , ' THEN GOTO 580 
520 SCREEN 0,0 

530 PRINT "THE SEQUENCE IS:"; B$ 
540 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO CONT 
INUE" 

550 A$=INKEY$: IF A$="" THEN GOT 

0 550 

560 SCREEN 1,0 
570 GOTO 480 

580 A=INT(2 A (VAL(MID$ ("543210542 
103541032540321", (D*6)+A,l) ) ) ) 
590 IF (C AND A ) = 0 THEN GOTO 
480 

600 IF A$="U" THEN Z=Z-1 ELSE IF 

A$="D" THEN Z=Z+1 
610 IF A$="R" THEN D=D+1: IF D=4 

THEN D=0 

620 IF A$="B" THEN D=D+2: IF D>3 

THEN D=D-4 
630 IF A$="L" THEN D=D-1: IF D=- 

1 THEN D=3 

640 IF (A$= ,, U") OR (A$="D") THEN 
GOTO 660 

650 IF D=0 THEN Y=Y-1 ELSE IF D= 
1 THEN X=X+1 ELSE IF D=2 THEN Y= 
Y+l ELSE X=X-1 

660 IF NOT((X=0) OR (X=W+1) OR ( 

Y=0) OR (Y=DP+1) OR (Z=0) OR (Z= 

H+l) ) THEN GOTO 690 

670 PRINT "YOU'RE OUT! HIT ANY K 

EY TO PLAY ANOTHER" 

680 A$=INKEY$: IF A$="" THEN GOT 

O 680 ELSE GOTO 230 

690 GOTO 340 

700 I 

710 * DRAW ROOM OUTLINE 

720 LINE (80,60)-(176,132) ,PSET, 

B 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 179 



730 


LINE (0,0) -(80,60) ,PSET 


m mmm M 

970 


^^B B> ^B BB BBBB M BB B a BB ^BB ^B % S BB B B ^B^ A % B^^k ^^^m ^^^^k 

LINE (144,132) -(144,84) ,PSET 


740 


LINE (0, 191)-(80,132) ,PSET 


980 


LINE (112 , 84) -(144,84) ,PSET 


750 


LINE (255,0) -(176, 60) ,PSET 


990 


— mmm im v. 0 m\ .mmt mm. m M m M mmf \. .mm. 

CIRCLE (138, 110) .3 


760 


LINE (255, 191) - (176, 132) ,PSE 


_ mmt b mm* 

1000 


PAINT (13 8 , 110) ,0 


T 




B b mmt 

1010 


RETURN 


770 


RETURN 


1020 


1 


780 


i 


1030 


■ BB. B«B Bt BB at BW .BW V VMM MB. ^B. BB- BBB BV BB BB BV B 

1 DRAW LOWER OPENING 


1 790 


m - — ^a a^B B^BBi a^aw a^BB 4fl^B ^rt^k mmm. 

1 DRAW LEFT DOOR 


1040 


mmm mmm b bb bb« > bb _b- b« bb mmm mm. \ f mt mmB m** m m W m^m \ 4*4 mmmm 

LINE(100,172)-(156,172) ,PSE 


800 


LINE (26,172)-(26,70) ,PSET 


T 




810 


LINE (52, 152) -(52,78) , PSET 
LINE (26 , 70) - (52 , 78) , PSET 


1050 


bb mmm b bb bbbb * BB mmt mm. BB bb b V # B _ bb mmm mmm. \ *mm 

LINE (109,152)-(147,152) , PS 


820 


ET 




830 


B^B BBW ^Bb BB BBB * dBB. A *B BB % 

CIRCLE (34 , 121) , 3 


1060 


BB BBB Bb BBBB * B> B# mmt B BB -B \ # ™~ \ ™ 

LINE (100,172)-(109,152) , PS 


_ b* 

840 


, - _ ^ _ — ^ bb m mm mm. mm \ 

PAINT (34 , 121) ,0 


ET 




850 


RETURN 


BB B, BB B# 

1070 


LINE (156, 172) - (147 , 152 ) , PS 


860 


i 


ET 




870 


A BB. BB BB aB BBB. MB B> BBBBB ^B. BjBb 

1 DRAW RIGHT DOOR 


B mmt — b* 

1080 


«B«_ MB b. « aM J BB ^b ^B ^B _B1 _i_ \ mmt 

PAINT (128, 162) ,0 


— — - ■* 

880 


mmm mmm m mm i ■ j" ~b b bb ^B, \ » mmm. b* ^b M \ ^"1 fft 

LINE (203 ,152) -(203,78) ,PSET 


1090 


RETURN 


890 


am* mmm m. bbbb > bb. —v bb «■ BBB «av % — -pv A Amm mmt \ mmM \ A 9 ** "P" M« 

LINE (229, 172)- (229 , 70) ,PSET 


1100 


t 


900 


b» bb «k b bb* •> — mmt m*m mmm Am± V > B*a BB. "™ b* \ v*b M mmmm mmm* 

LINE (203 ,78) -(229,70) ,PSET 


1110 


a ^bw bbb. mm mm mm mm mm mbb> b» bib bb^ ^bv bb mmmm m mm mmW* m. V ^mm 

'DRAW UPPER OPENING 


910 


,, — am* ^ _ _ bv mm mm* mm \ 

CIRCLE (222,121) ,3 


1120 


BB BB B mm BBS # BB B# M B B % J» M B* ^t> J% J «. «h BB «M BBB 

LINE(100, 24) -(156,24) , PSET 


— — _b* 

920 


•maw. am abbs Bt bibbs M ^b, ^b ^b BB ^bw bb \ ^b, 

PAINT (222,121) ,0 


1130 


mmm mmm* b b bb» m mm mmt mm. A M \ / b m mmM A m \ mmmm mmmm bbb 

LINE (109 f 44)-(147,44) , PSET 


930 


RETURN 


1140 


mm* mmm b mmmmmm » mm mmt mmt mmm. A \ m* mm A A \ B bbb BBB 

LINE (100, 24) - (109, 44) , PSET 


940 


i 


1150 


LINE(147,44)-(156,24) ,PSET 


950 


' DRAW DOOR STRAIGHT AHEAD 


1160 


PAINT (128,34) ,0 


960 


LINE (112, 132) -(112, 84) ,PSET 


1170 


RETURN 




330 12 

460 157 

670 234 

END 105 



Listing 2: FINDMAZE 

100 'CONSTRUCT A 3-D MAZE 
110 1 

120 D$="SRBLDULSRBDUBLSRDURBLSDU 
it 

130 DIM S(200) 
140 1 

150 'INPUT DIMENSIONS, GET ARRAY 

160 INPUT "HEIGHT; ";H 

170 IF H<2 THEN GOTO 160 

180 INPUT "WIDTH: ";W 

190 IF W<3 THEN GOTO 180 

200 INPUT "DEPTH: ";DP 

210 IF DP<3 THEN GOTO 200 

220 DIM R(H,W,DP) 

230 ' 

240 'FILL ROOMS WITH RANDOM DOOR 
S 

250 FOR Z=l TO H: FOR X=l TO W:F0 

R Y=l TO DP 

260 R(Z,X,Y)=RND(64)-1 

270 IF Y=l THEN R (Z , X, Y) =R (Z , X, Y 

) AND &H3D 

280 IF Y=DP THEN R (Z , X, Y) =R(Z , X, 
Y) AND &H37 

290 IF X=l THEN R(Z ,X, Y) =R(Z ,X, Y 
) AND &H3B 

300 IF X=W THEN R (Z , X, Y) =R ( Z , X, Y 
) AND &H3E 



310 IF Z=l THEN R(Z ,X, Y) =R(Z ,X, Y 
) AND &H1F 

320 IF Z=H THEN R (Z , X, Y) =R ( Z , X, Y 

) AND &H2F 

330 NEXT : NEXT : NEXT 

340 FOR Z=l TO H: FOR X=l TO W: 

FOR Y=l TO DP 

350 IF Z=l THEN GOTO 360 ELSE IF 

(R(Z-1,X,Y) AND 16) <> 0 THEN R 
(Z,X,Y) = R(Z,X,Y) OR 32 
360 IF X=l THEN GOTO 370 ELSE IF 

(R(Z,X-1,Y) AND 1) <> 0 THEN R( 
Z,X,Y) ¥ R(Z,X,Y) OR 4 
370 IF Y=l THEN GOTO 380 ELSE IF 

(R(Z,X,Y-1) AND 8) <> 0 THEN R( 
Z,X,Y) = R(Z,X,Y) OR 2 
380 IF Z=H THEN GOTO 390 ELSE IF 

(R(Z+1,X,Y) AND 32) <> 0 THEN R 
(Z,X,Y) = R(Z,X,Y) OR 16 
3 90 IF X=W THEN GOTO 400 ELSE IF 

(R(Z,X+1,Y) AND 4) <> 0 THEN R( 
Z,X,Y) = R(Z,X,Y) OR 1 
400 IF Y=DP THEN GOTO 410 ELSE I 
F (R(Z,X,Y+1) AND 2) <> 0 THEN R 
(Z,X,Y) = R(Z,X,Y) OR 8 
410 NEXT : NEXT : NEXT 
420 1 

430 'FIND CENTER ROOM 
440 F=0 
450 D=0 

460 Y=INT(DP/2) 
470 X=INT(W/2) 
480 Z=INT(H/2) 

490 S(1)=Z: S(2)=X: S(3)=Y: JE=3 
500 PRINT Z;X;Y 



180 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



51j3 A$=»" 
52j3 1 

53 j3 'MAIN LOOP 

540 'DO A RANDOM WALK 

55) 3 N=RND ( 6) -1 

56) 3 IF F=j3 THEN F=l : GOTO 64)3 

57) 3 IF (N=2 AND D=J3) OR (N=j3 AND 
D=2) OR (N=l AND D=3) OR (N=3 A 

ND D=l) THEN GOTO 55,0 

58) 3 T2=Z: TX=X: TY=Y 

59) 3 IF N=5 THEN TZ=TZ-1 ELSE IF 
N=4 THEN TZ=TZ+1 ELSE IF N=3 THE 
N TX=TX-1 ELSE IF N=2 THEN TY=TY 
+1 ELSE IF N=l THEN TX=TX+1 ELSE 

TY=TY-1 
6)3)3 FOR J=l TO JE STEP 3 

61) 3 IF (TZ=S(J)) AND (TX=S ( J+l) ) 
AND (TY=S(J+2)) THEN GOTO 55)3 

62) 3 NEXT J 

63) 3 IF (TX=)3) OR (TX=W+1) OR (TY 
=j3) OR (TY=DP+1) OR (TZ=J3) OR (T 
Z=H+1) THEN IF JE<(H*W*DP)/3 THE 
N GOTO 55)3 

64) 3 IF N=)3 THEN M=2 ELSE IF N=l 
THEN M=l ELSE IF N=2 THEN M=8 EL 
SE IF N=3 THEN M=4 ELSE M=2 A N 

65) 3 R ( Z , X , Y ) =R ( Z , X , Y ) OR M 

660 IF M=32 THEN M=16 ELSE IF M= 
16 THEN M=32 ELSE IF M=8 THEN M= 



2 ELSE IF M=2 THEN M=8 ELSE IF M 
=4 THEN M=l ELSE IF M=l THEN M=4 

67) 3 A$=A$+MID$(D$,D*6+(N+1) ,1) 

68) 3 IF N=5 THEN Z=Z-1 ELSE IF N= 
4 THEN Z=Z+1 

69) 3 IF N=3 THEN X=X-1 ELSE IF N= 
2 THEN Y=Y+1 ELSE IF N=l THEN X= 
X+l ELSE IF N=)3 THEN Y=Y-1 

7) 3)3 S(JE+1)=Z: S(JE+2)=X: S(JE+3 
)=Y: JE=JE+3 

71) 3 IF NOT((Z=H+l) OR (Y=DP+1) 0 
R (X=W+1)) THEN R(Z,X,Y)=R(Z,X,Y 
) OR M 

72) 3 IF N<4 THEN D=N 

73) 3 PRINT Z;X;Y 

740 IF (Z=J3) OR (Z=H+1) OR (Y=)3) 
OR (Y=DP+1) OR (X=)3) OR (X=W+1) 
THEN GOTO 77)3 ELSE GOTO 55)3 

75) 3 1 

76) 3 1 STORE MAZE IN MAZE FILE 

77) 3 INPUT M MAZE FILE NAME : 11 ;MF$ 

78) 3 OPEN "0" / #l,MF$ 

79) 3 PRINT#1,H,W,DP 

8) 3)3 FOR Z=l TO H: FOR X=l TO W: 
FOR Y=l TO DP 

81) 3 PRINT # 1 , R ( Z , X , Y ) 

82) 3 NEXT : NEXT : NEXT 

83) 3 PRINT#1,A$ 

84) 3 CLOSE 



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February 1988 THE RAINBOW 181 




Using a Fourth- Generation 
Database Language 



I saw the future at RAINBOWfest 
Princeton. Unfortunately, I still 
haven't had a chance to attack 
Multi-Vue with my own mouse and 
keyboard — but it looked very nice 
under the command of Mark Siegel, 
Tandy's software product manager. It 
may be just what we need to get more 
people on the OS-9 team. 

This month we'll take a look at Sculp- 
tor, a fourth-generation database appli- 
cation. We will also spotlight the first 
user contribution to KISS Draw, our 
CoCo community OS-9 programming 
project. But first we'll share a few tips 
from readers and look at the new en- 
hanced CoCoBin standard proposed by 
Wiz author Bill Brady. 

We received a helpful hint from Jay 
Truesdale on rainbow's Delphi OS-9 
Online SIG, who writes: 

"I ran across this gem in the OS-9/ 
68000 manual at work, so I ran home 
and tried it with OS-9/ 6809. It worked 
beautifully. There is a reference to this 
technique on Page 3-9 of the OS-9 Level 
II manual, but it is vague and obscure. 
If you are pretty far down in a directory 
tree and want to change to another 
working directory temporarily, try this. 



Dale L. Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale is a 
U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and lives 
in Rockville, Maryland. 

1 82 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



By Dale L. Puckett 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

Instead of typing two long paths to 
change your working data directory 
with chd, try this line: 

OS9: (chd /newworkingdirpath) 

« 

"This OS-9 command line creates a 
new shell, which uses newworkingdir- 
path as its current data directory. 

"To return to your previous direc- 
tory, press ctrl-esc on the Color 
Computer 3. This action will kill the 
new shell and return you to the shell 
using your original working directory." 
/ Good research! Neat trick! Thanks, 
Jay! Another helpful hint for beginners 
was contributed by Brian Wright — 
POLTERGEIST on Delphi. "If you know 
someone who wants to get started with 
OS-9 Level I or Level II, list the file 
named Helpmsg in the SYS directory to 
your printer and give the person the 
hard copy. This file pretty much de- 
scribes the command syntax for all OS- 
9 utility commands. Also, if your 
friends want to know more about device 
descriptors and drivers and other things 
OS-9, have them take a look at the files 
in the HELP directory on their Level II 
Config disk." Another good tip! 
Thanks, Brian! 

New CoCoBin Standard 

Bill Brady, author of the OS-9 termi- 
nal program Wiz, has upgraded his 
proposed CoCoBin standard to handle 
ICONs and AIFs — application infor- 
mation files — supported by Multi-Vue 
and the new Windlnt manager. We print 
it here with the hope that its automatic 
operation will make it easier for every- 
one to receive and enjoy the many 



public domain OS-9 fonts, picture files, 
etc., bound to follow. Brady proposed 
that a binary protocol be created and 
that it be defined as follows: 

One or more blocks would be sent as 
a preface to binary — Xmodem — 
transfers. These blocks shall contain 
information for the purpose of transfer- 
ring the FD information, the ICON and 
the AIF, and for removing the fill at the 
end of the file transmission. On upload- 
ing, the operator will be given a choice 
of Upload or CoCoBin upload. If Co- 
CoBin is selected, the sending software 
will preface the actual file data with 
block(s) that contain the information 
shown in Figure 1. 

All undefined bytes in the block 
should be set to $C9. All sizes are equal 
to the number of bytes in the data item. 
ICON= 144 bytes. 

It is the intent of this standard to 
apply, and be usable with, transfer 
methodologies other than Xmodem — 
hence the use of offsets. Offsets are 
relative to the first data byte, not 
(Xmodem) blocks. It is also the intent 
of this standard not to preclude 
compression-decompression "on the 
fly." 

After this block is sent, data transfer 
will continue in the customary fashion, 
with the next block labeled as Block 2. 
If ICON data is present, ICON data 
may or may not start at Block 2. AIF 
data can start at any point after the 
ICON, so the ICON will usually be 
transferred first, AIF next, starting at 
the beginning of Block 2. 

After all ICON and AIF data is sent, 
it is recommended that data begin on 
the next block boundary for Xmodem. 
However, it may begin at any point. 



0 Xmodem byte 4 (attr) must not be 0 

8 Xmodem bytes 12,13,14,15 must not sum to 0 

12 Xmodem byte 16 must be ?FF or $FE (revision byte) FE-this edition 

127 Xmodem byte 131 must be MOD (256) of Xmodem byte 16 

Figure 2 



XMODEM 132 byte Block #1 CoCoBin 0S9 FD Def initi 



j~ jT 

Ottset 












-3 


Xmodem 


byte 


1 


SOH (01) 




-2 


Xmodem 


byte 


2 


Block # (01) 




-1 


Xmodem 


byte 


3 


Block MOD(256) 




0 


Xmodem 


byte 


4 


ATTR byte (usually (07)) 


FD. ATT 


1 


Xmodem 


byte 


5 


OWNER msb (usually (00)) 


FD. OWN 


2 


Xmodem 


byte 


6 


OWNER lsb (usually (00)) 




3 


Xmodem 


byte 


7 


YEAR (87) ($57) Date 


FD . DAT 


4 


Xmodem 


byte 


8 


MONTH (03) Last Modified 




5 


Xmodem 


byte 


9 


DAY 




6 


Xmodem 


byte 


10 


Hours 




7 


Xmodem 


byte 


11 


Minutes 




8 


Xmodem 


byte 


12 


FILE SIZE mmsb 


FD.SIZ 


9 


Xmodem 


byte 


13 


FILE SIZE msb 




10 


Xmodem 


byte 


14 


FILE SIZE lsb 




11 


Xmodem 


byte 


15 


FILE SIZE llsb 




12 


Xmodem 


byte 


16 


CoCoBin Revision Xmodem byte MUST be $FE 


13 


Xmodem 


byte 


17 


Size of filename 




14 


Xmodem 


byte 


18- 


■49 File Name (ASCII) Not Pathname 


or $C9 


46 


Xmodem 


byte 


50 


Offset to ICON data (Normally 129 


in xmodem. . . 2nd block) 


47 


Xmodem 


byte 


51 


ICON size 


48 


Xmodem 


byte 


52- 


53 Offset to AIF data 




50 


Xmodem 


byte 


54 


-55 AIF size 




52 


Xmodem 


byte 


56- 


57 Offset to Start of file data. 




54 


Xmodem 


byte 


58- 


62 reserved for compression flags 


$0000C-not a compressed 


file 












59 


Xmodem 


byte 


63- 


130 NOT YET DEFINED (SC9), reserved for expansion of 


CoCoBin. 










127 


Xmodem 


byte 


131 CoCoBin Revision byte M0D(256) 




128 


Xmodem 


byte 


132 


. Checksum 





Figure 1 



This method, although requiring 
previous knowledge on the operator's 
part for uploading, is transparent to the 
host computer. 

On downloading, the receiver may 
know in advance that the file is in the 
CoCoBin format, or the software may 
detect the transfer as CoCoBin as 
shown in Figure 2. 

The receiving Xmodem will then 
decode the file size (which is the most 
useful piece of information) and use it 
in the following ways: 

a) display to the operator the number 
of blocks forthcoming in the transmis- 
sion 

b) use the total blocks /received 
blocks to drive a % complete indicator 

c) discontinue writing data to the 
incoming file when bytes received 
equals the filesize (FD.SIZ), effectively 
"stripping the fill" 

The software will place the ICON and 
AIF data in the appropriate directory 
on the appropriate volume. At this time 
the author is unsure as to the exact use 
of ICON and AIF data. If the execute 
bit is set, the data portion of the file may 
be placed in .the current execution 
directory. 

After this use, the receiving Xmodem 
shall discard the CoCoBin block — 
Block #1 — the ICON and AIF data, 
and save all subsequent blocks/data to 
the file. 

The opportunity exists for other 
information to be included in the not yet 
defined bytes of this block. Responses 
to this proposed enhancement of the 
Xmodem transfer methodology should 
be addressed to William L. Brady, 1503- 
I Flanders Lane, Harwood MD 29776, 
CIS 70126,267, Delphi WBRADY, GEnie 
W.BRADY, or 301-952-1761. 

This CoCoBin revision will be used in 
future releases of Wiz — gWiz — and 
various public domain packages re- 
leased by the author. 

Wood Adds Color to KISSDraw 

Tom Wood at 1973 Fairgrounds 
Road, Burton, SC 29902, is the first one 
out of the gate with an addition to 
KISSDraw, our OS-9 shareware pro- 
gramming project. The BASIC09 proce- 
dure KISSColor listed this month does 
the work. Wood modified several other 
KISSDraw4 procedures to add color. 
We'll outline his changes here. 

Wood beat us to a project we have 
wanted to do for a long time. He has 
definitely inspired me to add code that 
determines if you are running KISS- 



Draw in a four- or 16-color window and 
reacts accordingly. You could really 
draw some nice pictures with Wood's 
addition installed in a copy of KISS- 
Draw running in a 16-color window. I'll 
try to make that my next project. 

You change KISSDraw's current 
drawing color by clicking on the color 
you. want in a bar of 16 equally spaced 
boxes along the bottom of the screen. 
When you are running in a four-color 
window — as in all versions of KISS- 
Draw to date — only four of the boxes 
will be colored. A larger box on the left 
end of the bar always displays the 
current drawing color. 

You can change the current drawing 
color to any of the 64 hues available on 
the Color Computer by pointing to the 
large box, holding down the mouse 
button and dragging the mouse from 
left to right. When you release the 
button, the color value remains at the 
currently displayed hue. 

To use the KISSColor procedure, 
you must modify several of the KISS- 
Draw procedures and add a color var- 
iable to the type stats in all KISSDraw 



procedures. Changes (Figure 9) re- 
quired are summarized here: 

KISSdMenu — add routine to draw 
colored boxes 

GetKISSMouse — add check to see if 
ButtonEvent. Mouse. RcY>180 and 
set InToolBox to TRUE if so 

WhichTool — add check to see if 
mouse . flcY>lB0 and set sta- 
tus, col or to TRUE if so 

DoEvent — add RUN KlSSColor- 
(ButtonEvent) 

KISSDraw4 — add code to set But- 
tonEvent .Pointer. Coulor to 1 and 
the statement Run GFX2 ( "color" , 
1) so the program always starts with 
color Number I 

KISSColor simply checks flcX se- 
quentially from left to right and either 
changes the current palette value or the 
current foreground color. ButtonE- 
vent . Pointer .Coulor always con- 
tains the current drawing color. 

"It really looks like KISSDraw is 
headed directly for animation crea- 
tion," Wood said. "With multitasking 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 183 



Title: REMOTE From: SEATON, WM. GLENN 
Ver: 1 Lang: ASM. 6809 Fmt: SOURCE 

Function: "LINKS" USER TO A SPECIFIED REMOTE TERMINAL PATH FOR 

COMMUNICATION . 

Program Type: COMMUNICATION 

Planned for volume # 0 Already used? Y 

Figure 3 



REMOTE 

SEATON, WM. GLENN 
1 

ASM. 6809 
SOURCE 

"LINKS" USER TO A SPECIFIED REMOTE TERMINAL PATH FOR COMMUNICATION 
-done- 

COMMUNICATION 

0 

Y 

-end- 

» 

Figure 4 



For each field enter: 

name , heading , type&size , format ; validat ion 
Type h for help. 

Field name must be unique using A-2 a-z 0-9 — only. 
Valid field types are: 

a - alphanumeric (maximum 255 bytes) 

1 * integer (size 1, 2 or 4 bytes) 

r - real(size 8 bytes) 

m - money (size 4 or 8 bytes) 

d - date (size 4 bytes) 

Single byte integers are always positive. Data fields may be dimensioned. 
Both format and validation list are optional. The validation list may 
contain both single values and ranges of values. Examples: 

Item, Item Code,al2 

Unit , ,a5 ; each, gross, doz , box [Heading defaults to name] 
description, ,a20(No heading] 
stklev, Stock Level , 14 , ###### 
price, Sale Price ,m4(3) ,####.## 
cat , Category, 11 ,##; 1-10 , 50 , 90-99 

Figure 5 



and a little sound thrown in, we should 
be able to beat the other computers to 
it at this rate — with your object or- 
iented art and some timed sequences 
and SS.Tone — it's all there." 

Thanks for the KISSColor proce- 
dure, Tom! Who's next? 

FHL and Sculptor team help OS-9 
Users Group 

Color Computer OS-9 users stand to 
benefit greatly from a change in proce- 
1 dures made by Dave Kafeita, the new 
president of the OS-9 Users Group. 
Frank Hogg at FHL is now distributing 
the 56 disks in the group's software 
library directly. 

You no longer need to be a member 
of the group to buy a disk of programs. 
And you should now get your disks in 
a few days, instead of the few months 
it once took, because your order no 
longer needs to be sent through the 
group's notoriously slow mail relay 
system. The group benefits, too, be- 
cause FHL pays a royalty fee for each 
disk mailed. 

When a massive undertaking like the 
OS-9 Users Group Software Library 
moves from a volunteer effort to a 
commercial enterprise, many potential 
problems surface. For example, pro- 
spective buyers expect to be told which 
programs they can find on a disk — and 
they want an answer now! 

On the surface, this doesn't sound like 
much of a problem. But when you 
consider the OS-9 Users Group soft- 
ware library features more than 340 
programs squeezed onto 56 disks, you 
begin to get a clear picture of the 
problem. Even though the group's 
librarian has divided the programs into 
categories, it is difficult to keep track of 
340+ programs — in both source and 
binary versions — and all the files that 
hold the documentation. 

In the Users Group's early years, 
Dave Kaleita kept the information in an 
RMS database. He then used OS-9's 
redirection capability to send the output 
of his RMS report program to a text 
file. After that, the file was updated 
using DynaStar — an OS-9 word proc- 
essor. 

The information was all available, 
but it was stored in a format that was 
almost impossible to search quickly. To 
solve the problem, Hogg converted the 
DynaStar text file to a Sculptor data- 
base that could easily be manipulated 
and maintained. He also added key- 
word searching so his telephone oper- 
ators could quickly find the programs 
his customers wanted. 

184 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



Since we have long wanted to intro- 
duce you to the power of today's new 
fourth-generation databases like Sculp- 
tor,, we asked Hogg to show us how easy 
it would be to accomplish a rather 
complex task — managing the OS-9 
Users Group software library, for ex- 
ample. 

Converting a Database 

An example of a record in the original 
DynaStar file is given in Figure 3. 
Further study of the file reveals that the 
records contain from r one to three lines 
under Function. It also shows the 
maximum length of each field in a 
record. 

Hogg's first step was to use the Umacs 
text editor — available from the Users 
Group Library — to delete words like 
"Title:" and "From:" from each field. 
This editor's extensive macro capabili- 
ties made the job easy. 

Hogg put each field on an individual 
line and added the line "-done-" before 
the "Program Type:" field. He also 
added the line "-end-" between records 



and added a last line, "-fin-", so he could 
test for the end of the file. He named the 
new file convRecord. A record in 
convRecord looks like that shown in 
Figure 4. 

After Hogg finished processing the 
raw DynaStar text file with Umacs, he 
had to describe his new data file for 
Sculptor. He used the Sculptor de- 
scribe utility to do this job. He named 
the file containing the description, 
disk. Figure 5 is a snapshot of the help 
screen displayed by describe. To see 
this screen while running describe, 
you must press H. 

Here is how Hogg described the OS- 
9 Users Group software library file: 

KEY FIELDS 

1 '.untitle , Title , a20 ,u 
DATA FIELDS 

2:u_size,# Sectors, a4, ;0-9999 

3 : u_f rom , From , a30 , u 

4 : u_ver , Vers ion , a 12 , u 

5 : u_language , Language , al6 , 1 

6 :u_format .Format ,al 6,1 

7 : u_f unc t ion , Func t ion , a7 3 ( 3 ) , 1 

8 :u_type , Program Type,a24,l 

9 :u_volurae, Volume #,a2, 

0: u_used, Already Used? ,al ,u;Y,N 



Line 1 is the key field. You can define 
more than one key, but there is no need 
to do so here. Hogg used the name of 
the program described in each record 
for the key. Since he decided that none 
of the other information in the record 
was useful as a key, he described the rest 
of the fields as data. 

It's a Sculptor convention to use a 
prefix like u_ to name the file in which 
a variable is found. The word Title 
here is the default text string Sculptor 
will use if you don't override it. The a20 
describes a text field containing 20 
characters. Hogg's analysis of the data 
had shown this was the longest field 
needed. The u means to force uppercase 
on input. Experienced Sculptor users 
suggest it is wise to force either upper- 
or lowercase on key fields to prevent 
confusion during a search. 

Line 2 is a field Hogg reserved for 
future use. The data for this field will 
need to be added manually, because it 
does not exist in the original database. 
However, he knew he needed this infor- 
mation later to determine how many 
programs will fit on a disk, 

Notice the end of Line 2. Hogg used 
a text field instead of an integer here so 
he would be able to upload his data files 
after running them through the OS-9 
public domain archiving program ar. 
He had learned earlier that ar works 
only with text files, and he hoped to 
upload the Users Group Software Li- 
brary file to many computer bulletin 
board systems. The ; 0-9999 at the end 
of the line means that Sculptor will 
allow only numbers from 0 to 9999, This 
demonstrates how Sculptor does input 
validation. 

Line 5 is unique because it converts 
uppercase letters to lowercase automat- 
ically when it reads a data file. This 
makes the text easier to read. Line 7 
holds the one- to three-line description 
of the function of each UG program. 
Line 9, the volume number, must be 
defined as a text field, because an 
integer field here would default to zero 
when the field is blank. The field con- 
taining the volume number is blank 
until the program that the record de- 
scribes has been assigned to a disk in the 
library. 

On describing the data in his new file, 
Hogg created a program to read the text 
file he'd prepared with Umacs and 
inserted it into the database. The code 
in Figure 6 took care of the job. 

Here's what happens when you run 
this program. First, Hogg has told 
Sculptor to reference a filename disk 
with the word ug. He then defined some 



"UGDISKS" FILE CONVERSION TO SCULPTOR FORHAT 
(file ug disk 

I temp scrllne, ,12 
(temp done, -done-, a32 
(scroll 13,3 

+u_title, ,4,14 
+u_from, ,6,32 
+u_ver , ,7 ,32 
+u_language ,,8,32 
+u_format, ,9,32 
+u_type, ,10,32 
+u_volume ,,11,32 
■moused, ,12,32 
+u_ function ,,13,6 
+done , , 18 , 32 

start scroll 2 : u_function - " " 
scroll : u_function - " H 
Input u_title-u_format 
scroll 1 

start 1 Input u_f unction 

if u_f unction bw "-done-" then u_function-"" : goto start2 
if scrline < 3 then scroll : goto startl 
input done 

st art 2 input u_type-u_used 
insert ug 
input untitle 

if untitle ct "-END-" then goto start 
if untitle ct "-FIN-" then exit 
exit"" 

Figure 6 



UG DISK FILE HaINT, 



Today's date [ 



Title [ 



# Sectors 
From 
Version 
Language 
Format 
Program Type 

Volume # 
Already Used? 



Function 



C ][ 

1 

[ ][ 
] 

[ ][ 



] 



i- insert f-find n-next p-prev m-match a-amend d-delete e-exit 

Which option do you require? 

Figure 7 



temporary variables and a scroll win- 
dow. That done, he set up the screen 
form and told Sculptor where to put 
each field on the screen. 

The heart of the program follows the 
screen form definition. The first two 
lines clear the last two lines of the 
function array. Then, data is input into 
all of the fields. When a line begins with 
(bw) the string -done-, Sculptor moves 
on to the next field. If all three lines are 
input, a fourth line containing the string 
-done- is ignored. The rest of the fields 
are then read and inserted into the 
database. 

Since untitle forces uppercase, 
Hogg had to do the end and fin tests 
in uppercase. The ct means contains. 



You can read the program line like this. 
If u_title contains the string -END- 
then go to the beginning and start again. 

You use OS-9's redirection operators 
when you run this program. 

0S9: sage convUGdisk <convReport 

A few minutes after typing this line, 
Hogg had 339 records inserted into a 
new database — ready for manipula- 
tion. He then let Sculptor write a pro- 
gram to manipulate the new database, 
by typing two lines: 

OS9:sg disk 
0S9 sage disk 

Sculptor came alive with a screen that 
looked like the one shown in Figure 7. 



February 1 988 THE RAINBOW 1 85 



OS 9 USERS GROUP DISKS 
If lie disk disk 
.new code 

!file dkey diskkey 
new code end 

! temp date, ,d4 

Jtemp t_u_f unction, ,tl 

! temp BS , , il 

Itemp scrline,,12 

Itemp serf lag,, il 

! scroll 14,3 

+date, Today's date, 2, 70 

.new code 
+k_keyword, ,5,33 
.new code end 

+u_title, ,4,34 
+u_size , , 6 , 33 
+u_from, ,7,33 
+u_ver, ,8 ,33 
+u_language , ,9,33 
+u_f ormat , , 10 , 33 
+u_type, ,11,33 
+u_volume ,,12,33 
+u_used, ,13,33 
+t_u_f unct ion, ,14,2 ;# 
+u f unct Ion , , 14 , 5 



END\ 



display date 
end 



*i- insert 

clear 



display date 



message "Use BACKSPACE to finish inserting" 

input u_title bs - 14 

read disk nsr - 12 

scrflag - 0 

gosub DISPLAY 

error "Already recorded" 

end 12\ 

gosub GET_DATA 

if BS then goto il 

insert disk 

clear : display date 

goto il 



clear : display date 



.new code 

14 goto ik 

.new code end 

end 

.new code 

*ik-K insert 

ik check disk 

ikl message "Use BACKSPACE tq finish inserting" 
input k_keyword bs - END 
k_title - untitle 
insert dkey re - ik2 
goto ikl 

ik2 error "That key already exists ..." 
end 

.new code end 
*f-find 

clear ; display date 

input u_title bs - END 

find disk 

scrflag - 1 

gosub DISPLAY 

end 

.new code 
*fk-K find 

clear 

input k_keyword bs - END 
find dkey nsr - fk2 

find disk key - k_title fkl gosub DISPLAY 



Figure 8 

prompt "Next match" no - END 
match disk nsr «fk2 

goto fkl fk2 message "No matching records" 
end 

.new code end 



*n-next 



next disk 
scrflag - 1 
gosub DISPLAY 
clear k_keyword 
end 



*p-prev 



prev disk 
scrflag - 1 
gosub DISPLAY 
clear kjkeyword 
end 



*m~match 



ml\ 



match disk nsr - ml 
scrflag - 1 
gosub DISPLAY 
clear kjkeyword 
end 

error "No further matching records" 
end 



*a-amend 

a0\ 
al\ 



check disk 
goto al 

input untitle bs 



END 



*d-del 



*e-exit 



gosub GET_DATA 

if BS then goto aO 

prompt "All correct" no > 

write disk 

clear : display date 

message "Record amended" 

end 



check disk 

prompt "Are you sure" no 

delete disk 

clear : display date 

end 



exit 



al 



END 



DISPLAY\ 

display u_title-u_used 

scroll 1 
Dl_u_function\ 

t_u_function * scrllne 

display t_u_f unct ion, u_f unct ion 

if scrline 3 then goto D3_u_function 

scroll , 

goto Dl_u_f unct ion 
D3_u_f unct ion\ 

return 

GET_DATA\ 

BS - 0 

input u slze-u_used bs - GDI eoi - GDO 

GD0\ 

scroll 1 
GD_u_funct ion\ 

t_u_function - scrline 

display t_u_f unct ion, u_f unct ion 

input u_function bs - GDl_u_function eoi - GD2_u_function 
scroll 

if scrline <- 3 then goto GD_u__function 
goto GD2_u_funetion 
GDl_u_function\ 

if scrline - 1 then goto GET_DATA 
scroll -1 

goto GD_u_function 
GD2_u_f unct ion\ 
return 

GD1\ 

BS - 1 

return 



186 THE RAINBOW February 1988 



The program Sculptor wrote looked 
like that shown in Figure 8 — almost. 
Frank added the code between each 
new .code and new code end later to 
give the program the ability to search on 
a key field. 

Hogg's additions work by letting 
Sculptor know about the file QlskKsy 
with the command 'file dkey disk- 
key. The program will know it as Dkey, 
and it will store keys in 12-character 
ASCII fields. The keys are followed by 
20-character titles. A match in DiskKey 
returns the title for the main database 
so that any number of keys may be 
inserted for any title. 

"One person using 
Sculptor can perform 
a task that required a 
systems analyst and a 
gang of programmers 
several years ago. n 



The +k_key word, ,5,33 adds the 
keyword field to the screen format at 
Line 5, Column 33. ik inserts a key into 
the DiskKey file after making sure that 
a record has been selected. Keys are 
inserted until you type a backspace. 

To find a title record, you type a 
keyword. If a key is found, a search is 
made in Disk using the key k_title 
from the key file. The record is dis- 
played, and the entire process takes less 
than a second. 

That's all it takes to add a sophisti- 
cated keyword search to a Sculptor 
program. There are some problems, 
however. The program above works 
fine until somebody changes the title in 
the main file or deletes a record. There 
are no provisions in the program to 
change or delete keys when this 



(* Add to KISSdMenu procedure 
(* Now, for the colors! 

RUN gfx2("fill»,45,181) 
RUN gfx2 ("fill" ,'116,181) 
RUN gfx2("color",2) 
RUN gfx2("fill",151,181) 
RUN gfx2("cblor",3) 

(* That's all you need 

(* add this check in the procedure WhichTool 
(* following all of the other checks 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse .Ac Y>1 80 THEN 
ButtonEvent . status . color : =TRUE 
END 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent . status . color : =FALSE 

End if 

END 

(* add this code to DoEvent 

IF ButtonEvent. status. color THEN 
RUN KISScolor(ButtonEvent) 
ButtonEvent . status . color :»FALSE 
END IF 

(* add this code to initialization at start 
(* of procedure KlSSDraw4 

ButtonEvent . pointer . Coulor : =1 
RUN gfx2("color",l) 

(* add the second half of the IF statement 
(* to the code in GetKISSMouse 

IF But tonEvent. mouse. AcX<40 OR ButtonEvent * mouse .Ac Y>1 8 ft THEN 

ButtonEvent 4 status . InToolBox : =*TRUE 

ELSE 

ButtonEvent . status . InToolBox : -FALSE 
END IF 

Figure 9: These additions should be made to the existing programs 



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February 1988 THE RAINBOW 187 



happens. Hogg fixed that problem by 
rewriting the amend code: 

*a-amend 

check disk 

goto al a0\ 

title - untitle 

input utitle bs - END 

if untitle o title then flag-2 

al\ 

gosub GETJ>ATA 

if BS then goto aO 

prompt "All correct" no - al 

write disk 

if flag - 2 then gosub CHANGEJCEYS 
clear : display date 
message "Record amended" 
end 

CHANG E_KEYS\ 

rewind dkey 
chl next dkey nsr - cb_return 

if k__title O- title then goto chl 

k_title - title 

write dkey 

goto chl 
ch_retum\ 

flag - 0 

return 

CHANGE_KEYS\ 

k_keyword - 

k_title-title 
chl readkey dkey nsr-ch_retum 

read dkey 

delete dkey 

goto chl 

Hogg then wrote the following code 
to delete all keys referring to a main 
record after that record has been de- 
leted. It is almost the same as the amend 
code, but this time he wrote it in-line 
rather than as a subroutine: 

★d-del 

check disk 

prompt "Are you sure" no - END 

title - u_title 

delete disk 

rewind dkey 

next dkey nsr - dl2 

if title O- k_title then goto dll 

delete dkey 

goto dll dl2 clear : display date 
end 

If Hogg had been working with a 
larger database — or had thought about 
it sooner — he would have written the 
Users Group Software Library data- 
base program differently. The sequen- 
tial method used here would be too slow 
to manipulate huge databases. How- 
ever, this month we have only set out 
to show you how one person using 
Sculptor can perform a task that re- 
quired a systems analyst and a gang of 
programmers several years ago. 

Planning how the data in your var- 
ious databases interacts is probably the 
most important step when you start to 
program with a database language like 
Sculptor — even when you're writing a 
small program. Well look at this and a 
few other database programming con- 
siderations next month when we con- 
tinue to explore the OS-9 Users Group 
Software Library with this fourth- 
generation language. Until then, Happy 
Groundhog's Day! □ 

1 88 THE RAINBOW February 1 988 



The listing: KISSColor 


PROCEDURE 


KISSColor 


3030 


(* Program to select and change colors 


3326 


TYPE rodent-Vld , Act , ToTm: BYTE ; XI: INTEGER; TTTo: BYTE; TSSt: 




INTEGER ; CBSA , CBSB , CCtA , CCtB , TTSA , TTSB , TLSA , TLSB : BYTE 




; X2 , BDX , BDY : INTEGER ; Stat , Res : BYTE ; AcX,AcY,WRX,WRY: 




INTEGER 


3397 


TYPE stats-event , InWindow, InToolBox , InMenuBar , line , box , circle 




, ellipse , bar , arc , fill , text , freehand , patterns ,horzlines 




, vertlines , slantright , slantlef t , dots , color : BOOLEAN 


33EE 


TYPE cur sor-NoCur,arrov, pencil, cross, hourglass, No Ic on, TextBar 




, Scross , Icon , IconBuf f , Coulor : BYTE 


3121 


TYPE packet-mouse : rodent ; status : stats ; pointer : cursor 


013E 


TYPE registers-cc,a,b,dp:BYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 


3163 


DIM RegisterSet : registers 


316C 


DIM callcode: BYTE 


0173 


PARAM ButtonEvent: packet 


017C 

> 


DIM Currcolor , Covalue : INTEGER 


3187 


RegisterSet . a : -0 


0192 


RegisterSet . b : -$89 


019E 

r 


Reg is t er S e t . x : -ADDR ( ButtonEvent . mous e ) 


31AF 


RegisterSet .y:-l 


31BA 


callcode :-$8D 


01C2 


Currcolor : -ButtonEvent .pointer . Coulor 


31D3 


IF ButtonEvent. mouse. AcX<76 THEN 


01E2 


REPEAT 


01E4 


RUN syscall(callcode .RegisterSet) 

wf x ■ W * 


01F3 


Covalue : -INT (ButtonEvent . mouse . AcX/10) 


0206 


RUN gf x2 ("palette" , Currcolor , Covalue) 


321F 


UNTIL ButtonEvent. mouse. CBSA-0 


0230 


END 


0232 


END IF 


0234 




0235 


IF ButtonEvent .mouse ,AcX<115 THEN 


0247 

r 


ButtonEvent . pointer . Coulor : -0 


0255 


RUN gfx2("color",0) 


3265 


RUN gfx2("bar", 0,183, 76, 191) 

» W 9 www * W 


027C 


END 


027E 


END IF 


0280 

r r 


IF But tonE vent. mous e.AcX<l 50 THEN 


0292 


ButtonEvent . pointer . Coulor : -1 


02A3 


RUN gfx2(" color",!) 


32B3 


RUN gfx2("bar", 0,183,76, 191) 


02C7 


END 


02C9 


ENDIF 


02CB 


IF ButtonEvent. mouse .AcX<185 THEN 


32DD 


ButtonEvent . pointer . Coulor : —2 


32EB 


RUN gfx2("color",2) i 


02FB 


RUN gfx2( "bar ",0,180, 76, 191) 


0312 


END 


0314 


ENDIF 


0316 


IF ButtonEvent. mouse ,AcX<220 THEN 


0328 


ButtonEvent . pointer . Coulor : -3 


0336 


RUN gfx2("color",3) 


0346 


RUN efx2( "bar" ,0,180,76 ,191) 


035D 


END 


035F 


ENDIF 


« 


END 







:'.S> : ''v:>:" ; " 



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Henderson 

Hopkinsville 

Louisville 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 
New Orleans 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Oxford 

Sanford 

MARYLAND 

College Park 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 
Brockton 



Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Matfs News & Gifts 
Hobby Shop 

Hawtey-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 
Radio Shack 

City Newsstand 

Sidney's News Stand Uptown 

The Book Rack 



Magazines, Inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Books-N-Thlngs 
Radio Shack 

University Bookstore 

Eastern Newsstand 
Voyager Bookstore 



Cambridge 

Ipswich 

Littleton 

Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Harrison 

Hillsdale 

Holland 

Howell 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Perry 

Rlvervlew 

Roseville 

MINNESOTA 

Burnsvllle 
Crystal 
Duluth 
Edina 

Minneapolis 
Mlnnetonka 
Roseville 
St. Paul 



Wlllmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmlngton 
Flat River 
Florissant 
Jefferson City 
Klrksveile 
Moberly 
St. Louis 
St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Whiteflsh 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omcha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 

Cedar Knolls 

Clinton 

Marmora 

Pennsvllle 

Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 

Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonla 
Hudson Falls 
Huntington 
Johnson City 
New York 



Out Of Town News 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co, 
Newsbreak, inc. 

Book Nook, inc. 
Border's Book Shop 
Robbins Electronics 
Merit Book Center 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Electronics Express/Radio Shack 
Frts News Company 
Howell Auto Parts 

Curt's Sound & Home Arcade Center 
The Eight Bit Corner 
Perry Computers 
Rlvervlew Book Store 
New Horizons Book Shop 

Shlnder's Burnsvllle 
Shlnder's Crystal Gallery 
C orison Books 
Shlnder's Leisure Lane 
Shlnder's (2 Locations) 
Shlnder's Ridge Square 
Shlnder's Roseville 
Shlnder's Annex 
Shlnder's Maplewood 
Shlnder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Ra/s TV &. Radio Shack 
Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Bailey's TV & Radio 

Consumer Electronics of Whiteffsh 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Bookceflar 

Hurley Electronics 

Steve's Books & Magazines 

Bookwrlghts 
Verham News Corp. 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 
Outpost Radio Shack 
Dave's Elect, Radio Shack 
Software Station 



New Horizons Computer Systems 
Front Page Newsstand 
Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 



Village Green-Buffalo Books 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Cromland. Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

G A West & Co. 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicom Electronics 

Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station, Track 37 

200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1) 

65 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonil Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Walden Books 
World Wide Media Services 



THE RAINBOW February 1988 



NEW YORK (cont'd) 

Pawling Universal Computer Service 

Rochester village Green 

World Wide News 
Woodhaven Spectrum Projects 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Cary 

Chapel Hill 
Charlotte 



Havlock 

Hickory 

Jacksonville 

Kemersville 

Marlon 

WinstorvSaiem 

OHIO 

Akron 

Blanchester 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbiana 

Columbus 



Dayton 



Dublin 
Fairbom 

Findley 
Kent 

Lakewood 
Lima 

Miamisburg 

Parma 

Toledo 

Warren 

Xenia 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 
Altoona 
Bryn Mawr 
Feastervllle 
King of Prussia 
Maivern 
Phoenixville 
Reading 
Temple 
West Chester 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Newport 
Warwick 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Clemson 
Florence 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 
Union 

TENNESSEE 

Brentwood 
Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxvlile 

Memphis 
Nashville 



News Center In Cary Village 
University News & Sundry 
Newsstand Int'l 
Papers & Paperback 
Computer Pius 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Mlchele's, Inc. 
K & S Newsstand 
Boomers Rhythm Center 
K 8c S Newsstand (3 Locations) 
Rainbow News Ltd. 

Churchill News & Tobacco 

JR Computer Control 

Little Professor Book Center 

Thrasher Radio & IV 

Clnsoft 

Erieview News 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

B5 Software 

Micro Center 

The Newsstand 

Books & Co. 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wilke News 

Wright News & Books 

Book Bam 

News-Readers 

Wilke's University Shoppe 

Open Book 

The News Shop 

Lakewood International News 

Edu-Caterers 

Wilke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

•Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Plaza Book fit Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, Inc. dba Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store, Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owl Services 
Newborn Enterprises 
Bryn Mawr News 
Global Books 
Gene's Books 
Personol Software 
Stevens Radio Shack 
Smith's News & Card Center 
Software Corner 
Chester County Book Co. 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Tollgate Bookstore 

Bellevue News 
Software Connection 

Software Haus, Inc. 
Clemson Newsstand 
Ray's #1 

Palmetto News Co. 
Software City 
Fleming's Electronics 

Bookworid #5 
Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicols 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Davis-Kidd Bookseller 
Computer Center 
Davis-Kidd Booksellers 
Mosko's Place 
R.M. Mills Bookstore 



TENNESSEE (cont'd) 


Smyrna 


Delker Electronics 


TbaAS 




Big bpung 


Poncho's News 


Brenham 


Mnorft's FlAPtmnlfs 


Desoto 


Maxwell Books 


Elgin 


The Homing Pigeon 


Harllngton 


Book Mark 


UTAH 




Provo 


Valley Book Center 


VIRGINIA 




Danville 


K&S Newsstand 


Hampton 


Benders 


k u j k ii 

Norfolk 


l-O Computers 




Tum The Page 


Richmond 


Volume 1 Bookstore 


WASHINGTON 

■ II www 1 III 1 | • m 




Port Anaeles 


Port Book & News 


Seattle 


Adams News Co Inc 




Bulldog News 


lacoma 


o oc I Magazines <x books 




Nybbles 'N Bytes 


WEST VIRGINIA 




Huntington 


Nick's News 


Logan 


Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 


ft a —i t ^ 

Madison 


Communications, LTD 


ruiKSiSL>urg 


\ fr*t\\i-\\ i K|d\.jr Cor. A/~t~\ 

VGIIQy IN6W5 Q©iV1C© 


South 




Charleston 


Spring Hill News 


WISCONSIN 




Appleton 


Badger Periodicals 


Cudahy 


m*\ I ._. i_ . ft I All ■ 1 

Cudohy News & Hobby 


Kenosho 


R.K. News, Inc. 


Madison 


Pic A Book 




University Bookstore 


ft ml 1_ .| . ^. 

Milwaukee 


Juneau village Reader 


Racine 


1 • a 1 J m* m™k 1 

Little Professor Book Center 


Waukesha 


Holt Variety 


ARGENTINA 




Cordoba 


Information Telecommunications 


AUSTRALIA 




Blaxland 


Blaxland Computers 


Kingsford 


Paris Radio Electronics 


CANADA- 




ALBERTA 

¥ mm? mm WW ■ » > 




Banff 


Banff Radio Shack 


Blair more 


L & K SDorts & Music 

V" ■* ML/UN*) iVl\J\Jl\tS 


Bonnwille 


Paul Tercler 


Brooks 


Double "D" AS C Radio Shack 


Calaarv 


Billy's News 


C* Inm^hol m 

>w(V_4IOOI ' Wl 1 | 1 


Rntiin Shriek A«isncintpH 9torA$ 


L/rayTon VQI!©y 


Langaro tiecrronics 


tamonion 


^fvil' Micro 


Edson 


Kaaio onacit, asa 


Fairview 


u.N.n. humiTure a IV 


Fox Creek 


Fox City Color & Sound 




A S C Rnrilo Shark 


Ft. Saskatche- 




wan 


Ft. Mall Radio Shack, ASC 


Grande 




Cache 


The Stereo Hut 


Grande 




Centre 


The Book Nook 


Hlnton 


Jim Cooper 


Innisfail 


L&S Stereo 


Lecombe 


Brian's Electronics 


Leduc 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


Lethbridge 


Datatron 


Uoydmlnster 


Lloyd Radio Shack 


Okotoks 


Okotoks Radio Shock 


Peace River 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 




Tavener Software 


St. Paul 


Waiter's Electronics 


Stettler 


Stettler Radio Shack 


Strathmore 


Wheatland Electronics 



MBERTA (cont'd) 




Taber 


Pynewood Sight & Sound 


Westlock 


Westlock Stereo 


Wetasklwln 


Radio Shack 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


fiurnnbv 


Pnmnuiit 


Burnt 1 akA 


VT Video Works 






River 


TPS Flectronics 


Chllllwack 


Charles Parker 


Coortenay 


Rick's Music & Stereo 


Dawson Creek 


Bell Radio & TV 


Golden 


Taks Home Furnishings 


Keiowna 


reiesoTT Markering 


Lanalev 


Lanalev Radio Shack 


N. Vancouver 


Mlcrowest Distributors 


Nelson 


Oliver's Books 


Parksville 


Parksville TV 


Pentlcton 


DJ.'s 




rout isomer lorocery 


Sldnev 


Sldnev Electronics 


Smlthers 


Wall's Home Furniture 


Squamlsh 


Kotyk Electronics 


100 Mile 




House 


Tip Top Radio fit TV 


m\ M\ A m i ■ mm mmm* mm m\ 

MANITOBA 




Aitona 


I A | i II i lift 

LA Wlebr Ltd. 


Lundar 


Goranson Elec. 


Morden 


Central Sound 


The Pas 


j . . i *t _ |>t— »ft_A A — 

Jodi s Sight & Sound 


Selkirk 


G.L Enns Elec. 


virtieu 


rMCllUI CMIoiLJHaWo 


Winnipeg 


J & J Electronics Ltd. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 




Moncton 


Jeffries Enterprises 






NEWFOUNDLAND 




Botwood 


Seaport Elec. 


Carbonear 


Siade Realties 


NOVA SCOTIA 




Halifax 


Atlantic News 


awm. ft IV A m W 

ONTARIO 




Angus 


Micro Computer Services 


Aurora 


Compu vision 


Concord 


Ingram Software 






Hanover 


Modern Appliance Centre 


Hunlsvllle 


Huntsvilie Elec. 






Kingston 


T.M. Computers 


Ustowel 


Modem Appliance Centre 


South Rrver 


Max TV 




Dennis TV 

U/«JI M IU I ▼ 


QUEBEC 




LaSalle 


Messageries de Presse Benjamin Enr. 


Pont. Rouge 


Boutique Bruno Laroche 


vllle St. Gabriel 


Gilles Comeau Enr/Radio Shack 


SASKATCHEWAN 




Asslniboia 


Telstar News 


Estevan 


Kotyk Electronics 


Moose Jaw 


D&S Computer Ploce 


Nipiwan 


Cornerstone Sound 


Regina 


Regina CoCo Club 


Software Supermarket 


Saskatoon 


Everybody's Software Library 


Shellbrooke 


Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 


Tlsdale 


Paul's Service 


Unity 


Granf s House of Sound 


YUKON 




Whitehorse 


H&O Holdings 


JAPAN 




Tokyo 


America Adojnc. 


PUERTO RICO 




San Juan 


Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles — in Canada, Waldenbooks, Pickwick 
Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & 
Brentano's, and Community Newscenters. 



February 1988 THE RAINBOW 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



After Five Software ■ ■ ...... 1 31 



Alpha Products , . » 

Ark Royal .«...».. y-* , »...»•».... 69 

Bill Bernico Software ^. , .... 38 

Bob's Software y ; . 89 

Burke & Burke . . .->■*>■.,. 159 

Canyon County Devices ...... > .29 

Cer-Comp ....... . . . . ... .1 45, 1 47 

C/ in soft « . . ..v.'.. ........lj. ...... . .11. 7 

CJN Enterprises . . .128 

Clearbrook Software 

Group........ ..... . , .161 

CNR Engineering . r , 101 

CoCo Cat Anti-drug ... ..... . . . .49 

Cognitec . . , . ... .167 

Colorware. . ., .22, 23 

Computer Center . .103 

Computer Island 1 65 

Computer Plus . . > + + * ; , . ... r . .3 

Computer Villa. , . , .97 

Computerware . . . 39 

CY-BU RNET-ICS .73 

D.P. Johnson . 187 

Dayto n Associates of 

W R. Hall, Inc 134, 135 

Diecom — . ...... . ► + IFC, IBC 

Disto/CRC , ,169 

Federal Hill Software . . 1 57 

Frank Hogg Laboratory . ; . . 99 

Gimmesoft . .... ... ......... . . .163 

Glenn Calafati . . . . . ... , . . ..... .55 

Hard Drive Specialists . .189 

Hawkes Research 

$ervices . . «■-..:.«*•• . .73 

H J L- . .. -. • >: » * » . . « *■■■■■ r.....L. . . 41 

Howard Medical . J., m 66, 194 

j & R Electronics . . . .:47 ;: 

K-SOFT.... .. 123 

Metric Industries . .148 

Micro Works* The ,.. . . 193 

Microcom Software ... .9, 11, 13, 15 
M i crotec h Consultants 



MicroWorld .............125 

Other Guys Software, The ... ..149 

Owl-Ware 139, 140, 141 

Paparis Enterprises . . . .. . . . 33 

Performance Peripherals .... . . .95 

Perry Computers 1 53 

Preble's Programs, Dr. BG 

PXE Computing .7 

R.A.D. Products, . ..... m 47 

R.J : F. Software ..... . •. ...... r r .71 

Rainbow Bookshelf .... .58, 59 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 116 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk .. ...28 
RAINBOWfest ...... ..... . . .34, 35 

RGB Computer . 1 17 

Saint Johns Gallery ... .75 

Sardis Technologies , . .143 

SD Enterprises 66, 1 23 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



Softbyte..,. ...... ...... 159 

Software House, The , .♦ + ♦ + :^;^.^55 : 

SpectroSystems . . . v .. . .128 

Spectrum Projects Inc. . > ,17, 25, 27 
Speech Systems 104, 1 05* 1 06, 1 07 

Sugar Software . . ^.^ , . . . . . 175 

Sundog Systems ..... ....... ^53 

T & D Software . ^ .112, 113, 181 

Tandy/Radio Shack 50, 51 

T"epco . .• . . » . • . . . v . . « * . ■* . »• . . . . 91 

Tom Mix Software . . . . .... 173 

True Data Products ... 62, 63 

Try-O-Byte . I , .29 

Valkyrie . . . . * . « . . . . .. « . . . . . . « . .71 

Vidicom Corporation . . . . . . . . . . 1 33 

Woodstown Electronics 89 

\*ork 1 0-» » • ♦ • #; » ■■■■ • * 1 37 
Zebra Systems 61 



□ 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 




DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 



> VIDEO 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 

COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects, 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software * _* #i 

will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS™ 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR™ 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



I 



COCO 3 SCREEN 



THE, 



Purveyor of Fine Video Dlgisizars Since 1977. 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 




Star NX-10 Printer Only $238 

NOW WITH FREE SP-C <*68.45 value) 



disk NEW FROM J&M 

CONTROLLER 




The DC-4 is a scaled-down version of the popular DC-2 
without a parallel port. It includes a switch with 2 ROM 
sockets, JDOS, manual and such features as gold connec- 
tors and metal box. It accesses double sided drives and ac- 
cepts RSDOS 1.1 for Radio Shack compatability. 



DC-4 with memory minder 
($2 shipping) 



$65 

RS DOS ROM CHIP 




ROM Chip fits inside disk controller. 24 pin fits both J&M 
and RS controller Release 1.1, For CoCo 3 Compatability. 



and RS cont 

$25 



each 



Reg. $40 
($2 shipping) 





DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 

0 + Howards Drive 0 gives you a 
DD-3 MPi drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only. Add $34 for a Disto DC-3 replacement. ($5 shipping) 

DOUBLE SIDED 
DOUBLE DENSITY 
360K i 





Separate Disk Drive Components 

DD-3 An MPI 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



$98 



■ 

(*2 shipping) DRIVE ONE 



TEACT-3 Va Height, double sided, double density, 720K 
bare drive, includes all mounting hardware. 



(*2 shipping) 





TEAC 55B bare drive, 1 / 2 height, double-sided, double density with 
all mounting hardware, needs CA-2 below to fit R.S. 501 , 




18 



(*2 shipping) BARE 



SP-C k^^^^^ P^ 

Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial output to run 
a parallel printer Ilka Star or Epson, includes all cables. Add $10 for 
modem attachment ($2 shipping) $£Q 45 



CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to the drive. 

$24§5 ^ CA2 $2995 



One Drive 



Two Drive 



-r Howard Medical s 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try 
it put, test it for Cfompatibility. If you're not happy with it for 
any reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your 
money back (less shipping). 



LX-800*239 

Friction and tractor feed included 
160 CPS 
3K Buffer 

NLQ on front buttons 
Package Includes free SP-C serial to 
parallel converter and Epson tutorial 
on disk. 




Stair NX-10 Only $238 

t^ai^lleUonverte^hite^ppfi last (*5 shipping 

WORD PACK RS 
BASIC SCREEN EDITOR 

• Full documentation 

• Works on CoCo 1, 2 & 3 V-;4k : »r^ 

• Add lines without renumbering 

MYDOS by Chris Hawks 

• Simplify your directory 

• Accesses double sided drives 1 

• Use J&M on CoCo 3 

CoCo MAX by Colorware 

• Specify II or III 

• Includes high res interface 

• Animation 

• Printers supported include, R.S. 105, 106, 130; Star: & Epson ( ' 2 ih 'PP in 8 on 




MONITORS 

$449 



Sony KV-1311CR 



Regular *626 
($15 shipping) 



• Vivid Color 

• Vertically flat 13" screen 

• Monitor/Trinitron TV with remote control 

• 640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot 

'pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and composite 
inputs 

• VGR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36h: 

MAGNA VOX 7622 $88 

12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 350 lines/ 
resolution at 20 MHz on a dark glass anti-glare GAT 
with built-in audio and 1 year warranty. Jl 

7652 Green Screen • Same Specs • Same Price 








20,000,000 Bytes 

equivalent to 125 R.S. 501 'son line 
micro stepping heads have 15 position per track 

automatic temperature compensation realigns head every five minutes for 
trouble free reads and writes 
will also work with IBM & clones 

complete package includes 20 meg drive, case & power supply, controller, 
and Interface that plugs into slot #3 of multipack interface. £ £Qr\ 00 
1 year warranty 5p05Jif« 

Pk * (5 ship) 

BASIC driver lets you access this hard drive without need for OS-9 $49.95. 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elsfon Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



mi lunies and order status 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

C.QD. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL PO'S Shipping charges are for 48 states. 

I ww. « ApQ find CanadB order 8 |,g hny hlsfher. 



SEE FRONT COVER 

FOR OTHER DIECOM GAMES 





m 




I . I/'." I . • 



f*f m *';J ;.:■^. , •J , :■■• , 




DR .PREBL E7S 
PROGRAMS 



Introducing PYRAMIX 

for tpur Color Computer 5 ! 

PYRAMII is a 100% machine language game written exclusively to take advantage of all the power in your 12BK 
CoCo 3. The colors are brilliant, the graphics sharp, the action hot. 

pvDiuTT features the finest in animation, graphics, sound effects and game play available today. It has all 
Sutras you want, too, such as a pause option, RGB and CMP modes, keyboard or joystick play, help screen, 
multiple skill level, and the ability to backup your disk. 
Best of all is the low pricel Available today, for only $24.95 on disk + s/h! 



Product. Of 
CoiorVenture 



HI £ 0 I BBfttt 



LEVEL t 1 



And Liqhtninq Strikes! 



LIGBTHDiG RAM DISK ia the most versatile RAM disk for your 5121 Color Computer 3! LIGHTNING RAM 
DISK will allow you to use up to 4 mechanical drivea and 2 RAM drives simultaneously for a total of 
6 Drives! This RAM DISK will also work simultaneously with our amazing LIGHTNING PRINTER SPOOLER! 
$19.95 on 'link + s/h. 

■LIGHTHIHG PRINTER SPOOLER for the 128K or 5121 Color Computer 3. Multitask your computer! Dump 
more than 400K of text to the spooler "instantly." Then, continue your keyboard work while it all 
prints outl Alao compatible with our LIGHTNING RAM DISK above. $14.95 on disk + s/h. 

LIGHTWING BACKUP utility for your 512K Color Computer 3 reads your master disk once and then makes 
superfast multiple disk backups on all your drives! No need to format blank disks. Supports 35, 40 
or 60 t racks^ double or single sided disks and adjustable step rate. $14.95 on disk + s/h. 

Order ail 5 for ontu $4455 ♦ s-'h 




IE IMC) cup 



tVMiV. EHL :■ 




BASIC FREEDOM! No one wants to be chained down. And 
yet, if you type in BASIC programs, you have been 




subject to involuntary servitude! The culprit? 
BASIC'S limited EDIT command. 

Demand Your BASIC FREEDOM! Programmed by Chris BabCock for CoiorVenture, this software gives you a 
full screen editor for typing in and editing BASIC programs! Move the cursor anywhere on the screen. 
Insert, delete or add text. It's the same concept as in a word processor, except you never have to 
leave BASIC! BASIC FREEDOM is an invisible machine language program which you can turn on and ott at 
will. Even pressing RESET will not hurt your BASIC FREED DOM! Simple, yet powerful with an easy to 
read mSual! Many extra "nice touches" included, like KEY REPEAT and LOWERCASE INTERPRETER which 
lets you type BASIC commands in upper or lower case for ease of programming. Translation .to 
uppercase ia automatic for commands. Text in quotes is not affected. y Qr ^ 0 j ^ qt 51 

SPECIAL COCO 3 VERSION lets you work in 32, 40, or 80 column display modes. A separate version is 
available for the CoCo 1 and 2. Available on disk for $24.95 + s/h. 

MENTAL FREEDOM by Dr. Preble! IMAGINE! Some day, a computer so advanced that it responds to your 
very thoughts and emotions. Imagine, some day, tho UR ht^:oatroUed graphics: levitation and 
materialization! PLUG IN YOUR MIND and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS — that dsy is now! The Radio Shack 
Color Computer has many advanced capabilities, just waiting to be tapped. Dr. Preble s Programs 
combines the advanced technology of the CoCo with the amazing Radio Shack Biofeedback Monitor to 
bring you "Mental Freedom." f 0J £o£o 2 or 5 * J 

THOUGHT-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any video game you have ever played, our ^hous^ware 
tests your ability to handle stress, to remain calm under adverse circumstances. LIGHTHIHG FAST 
reflexes will do you no good here, unleas you first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. Are you the 
secretely nervous type? Many people can keep a "Poker Face" even when they are worried so that 
others may not notice; but can you really stop the worry itself? Find out with Mental Freedom! 

AND IT TALKS! Did you know that the CoCo can produce incredibly realistic digital speech without a 
special speech synthesizer? The voice quality is so good, it sounds human! Honest. Best of all, no 
extra hardware is needed for speech, just Borne clever programming by Dr. Preble. 

MENTAL FREEDOM - Next time your friends ask what your computer can do, show 
them Dr Preble's Thoughtwarel Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback Monitor 
Catalogue #63-675. Mental Freedom - DISK only $24.95 + a/h 




512JC bifiiat Voice 
Recorder for your 
CoCo }, 2, or 31 



^aastf frwim tens you . . . 



* Record voice or any sound into RAM 

* Record and playback at 2 speeds 

* Save and Load voice to disk 

* Select normal or high fidelity 

* Record more than 2 minutes of speech if 
you have a 512K CoCo 3 

* Fully compatible with CoCo 1 and 2 

* Features Sound Activated Playback. 
Messages will playback automatically for 
your family when any noise is made. 
Could also scare off prowlers. 

Vocal Freedom includes special cable. 
Requires only a low cost amplifier (RS 
cat. #277-1008) and any microphone. 

On Disk, only $39.95 + s/h 

Incorporate digitally recorded 
sound into your own programs. 
Vocal Freedom, above. 



voices or 
Requires 



VDOS, the UnDISK: Save multiple programs in memory. Or save multiple graphic pictures in memory. Works with 
or without a disk. Let's you SAVE, LOAD and KILL stored programs or graphics. DIRECTORY function lists 
files, gives the start, end and execution addresses of machine language programs and number of free bytes 
remaining. Own a RAM disk without buying a diak drive! Requirea 64K CoCo 1 or 2. Available on tape or disk 
for $24.95 + shipping/handling. +m^mm f Qt" CoCO 1 Ot" 2 

VDUMP, for the UnDISK: Backup all your UnDISK files to a single tape file for easy reloading A must for VDOS 
users! On tape for $14.95 + Bhipping/handling. 



VPRIHT, for the UnDISK: Papsr printout for UnDISK Directory. On tape, $9.95 + •hipping/handling. 



Check, money order. Mastercard 
Visa or CO A for Shipping 
in (J.S A or Canada add $2.50, 
to otber Countries, add tS.00, 




Vheck. Moticy Order or 
COD 





DkufiftK.1 only $14.95 + s/h 




Order From 
Dr. Preble's Programs 
6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville^M 
(502) %9-im 

24 HOUR ORDER LINE 



for CoCo 
\. A or V 



a 2 2 & S T 

Dress up your Disk. Birec torn 
unth cotxnjut messages emit 

botcfers. Create useful fwXp 
moannqe* Add tfiax pro- 
jessionoi- touch to your cre- 
ations! Mtj $995 



for kMeckol Nimldm 



CoCoBraille 



• * 
• » » 



Emboss Grade 1 or Grade 2 
Braille using your CoCo 1, 2 
or 3 and a Brother Daisy Wheel 
printer! Fast Print to 
Braille conversion algorithm 
converts word processor files, 
program listings and data 
Eilsn Into couch readable 
Braille. For use by the blind 
or the sighted. No knowledge 
of the Braille code is 
necessary. Just send print to 
the program and out comes 
Braille! Note: The complex 
Grade 2 conversion is very 
good and though not always 
perfect, quite readable. 
Requires 64K or wire. Brother 
HR series printer or the IF-50 
interface series required. 
Low Cost! Similar software 
costs 3 times as much. Only