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THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 








9 





MDMs 
IfeClkfe:. 

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Holiday helpers, , j 
music and graphics, * 
OS-9 programming 
and 11 new product reviews 




L>0 



Holiday 
Issue 









BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 429.00* 
Tandy 1000 SX 1 Drive 384K 629.00* 
Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 51 2K 899.00* 
Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg. Ram1959.00 
Color Computer 2 w/64K Ext. Basic 89.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 169.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130A 120 CPS 229.00" 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230Daisy Wheel339.00 

Star Micronics NP-10 100 CPS 169.00 

Star Micronics NX-10 120 CPS 199.00 

Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 359.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 120 CPS 189.00 

Panasonic P-1091i 160 CPS 210.00 

Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 349.00 

Okidata 182 120 CPS 229.00 

Okidata 192+ 200 CPS 339.00 

Okidata 292 240 CPS 489.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Radio Shack DCM-212 179.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

The Magic of Zanth (CoCo3) 34.95 
Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 
Color Max 3 (CoCo3) 59.95 
COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 
COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTermbyPXEComputing29.95 39.95 
TelePatch III by Spectrum * 29.95 
C III Graphics by Spectrum (CoCo3)1 9.95 
Font Bonanza by Spectrum (CoCo3)29.95 
TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo3 512KRamDiskbyCerComp 19.95 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71.95 
Inside OS-9 Level II Book by FHL 39.95 
VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Interface 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 
CM-8 6' Extension Cable 
Serial to Parallel Conv. 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 99.00 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

Flight 16 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

Nuke the Love Boat (CoCo3) 34.95 



89.00 
14.95 
19.95 
59.95 
26.95 
329.00 



*Sale prices through 12/15/87 

Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 
BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 
KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 
TIMELY DELIVERY 
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



VtSA 




P.O. Box 1094 

480 King Street 
Littleton. MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80isa registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 




28 




FEATURES 







100 




116 




A Christmas Dream/Lonni Wilson 

ADVENTURE Where are the toys? 

A Festival of Lights/ Renard DellaFave 

HOLIDAY GRAPHICS The Hanukkah festival comes to life 

Secret Filenames/6/7/ Bernico 

UTILITY Keep your files secure 

Keep Your Memories in Order/Donald Turowski 

HOME HELP Photo label generator 

Photographing a CRT/ Marty Goodman and Fred Cisin. 

TUTORIAL Get good "hard copies" of your screen 

Making an Address List/G.F. Saunderson 

UTILITY A database for your holiday mailings 

Do You Hear What I Hear?/ John Mosley , 

HOLIDAY SPECIAL It's CoCo singing in four voices 

That's Entertainment/Handy Mayfield 

ORGANIZATION CoCo keeps track of your VCR tapes 

A Christmas Potpourri/ Ruth Golias 

HOLIDAY MUSIC/GRAPHICS A sound and graphics treat 

A Stitch in Time/Larry Anderson 

GRAPHICS Cross-stitching CoCo style 

Customizing Your Keyboard/>4//en Drennan 

TUTORIAL Redefine your keyboard keys 

Pak to Disk Transfer/Dai//d Dawson 

UTILITY Transfer your Pak programs to disk 

Galileo and the CoCo/Debbie and Dennis H. Weide 

HARDWARE PROJECT Prove Aristotle wrong 






NOVICES NICHE/% 



Christmas Star 



70 



Don Shortt and M.G. Duncan 



Holiday Wreath 

Mark Bell 

Rainbow Colors 

Patrick Benway 

Number Conversion 

Dick P urn ell 

I/O Error Free 



72 



74 



74 



75 



Wipeout Prevention 

Mike Speer 

Stitch-Nichery 



George R. Furman 

CoCo Concoctions 

David Allen 

On the Gridiron 

Jeff Remick 



Bohdan Hrycaj 



g^fc The cassette tape/disk symbols 
beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's RAINBOW ON 
TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
RAINBOW ON TAPE. For details, check the 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK 

ad on Page 158. 



20 



28 



38 



46 



58 



66 



86 



92 



100 



108 



116 



152 



160 



76 



76 



77 



78 



NEXT MONTH: Ring in the new year with the rainbow's 
Beginners Issue! If you are new to computing, we'll teach you the ins 
and outs of getting the most from your Color Computer. Discover 
handy hints and tips, and learn to use commands with confidence — 
get a handle on those peeks and pokes. For all of you old-timers, we'll 
have our usual store of features, utilities, Q & A columns and more. 
the rainbow is your source of information for the CoCo 1, 2 or 3, 
whether you're a novice or an experienced user. Start 1988 right! 



4 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/Josep/7 Kolar 

Generating foreign characters 

Building December's Rainbow/Sfaff _ 

Holiday greetings 

CoCo Consultations/Marfy Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 




Command alterations and Hutchison's database report 

Doctor ASCII/ Richard Esposito 

The question fixer 

Education Notes/Sfei/e Blyn 

Experimentation in electricity 

PRINT#-2,/J/>77 Reed 



Executive Editor's notes 

Turn of the Screw/ Tony DiStefano 

Finishing the printer adapter 

^ Wishing Well/Fred Scerbo 

Understanding road safety 

RAINBOWTECH 



Barden's Buffer/ William Barden, Jr. 

Exploring Tandy printer features 
KISSable OS-9/Da/e L. Puckett 



Putting data structures on the drawing board 
OS-9 Programming/Peter Dibble 

Saving and restoring graphic screens 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 



Caladuril Flame of Light/ 'Diecom Products, Inc. 
CBASIC Ill/Cer-Comp 



CoCo Checkbook/Bob's Software 

CoCo Disk Zapper/Microcom Software. 
CoCo Max II Patch/Spectrum Projects . 
Deskmate 3/Tandy Corporation 



Inventory Manager/Forrest Enterprises 
MLBASIC/Wasatchware 



Pyramix/Dr. Preble's Programs 
QuikPro+ll/ICR Futuresoft 



Winnie the Pooh in the Hundred Acre Wood/Sierra On-Line 



DEPARTMENTS 



Advertisers Index 

Back Issue Information 
CoCo Cat 



CoCo Clubs_ 
CoCo Gallery 
Corrections _ 



Letters to Rainbow 
Maxwell Mouse 



192 
177 
150 
148 
_18 
_24 
_6 
_26 



Pipeline 

Racksellers 

Rainbow Info 

Received & Certified 
Scoreboard 



Scoreboard Pointers 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



One-Liner Contest 
Information 



189 



Subscription Info 



144 



16 



82 



121 



124 



98 



12 



156 



52 



172 



180 



168 



135 
.136 
.134 
.131 
.136 
129 
.132 
.138 
.132 
.137 
.133 



120 
190 
_37 
139 
140 
142 

188 

_24 



The 




December 1987 



Vol. VII No. 5 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Faik 



Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Associate Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Consulting Editor Jody Gilbert 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 
Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 
Copy Editor Lauren Willoughby 
Technical Editor Cray Augsburg 
Technical Assistants Ed Ellers, 
Joe Pierce 

Editorial Assistants Sue H. Evans, Wendy Falk, 

Monica Wheat 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 

Richard Esposito, Martin Goodman, M.D., 

Joseph Kolar, Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, 

Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 
Designers Robert Hatfield, Jr., Rita Lawrence, 
Denise Webb 



Typesetter Jody Doyle 



Falsoft, Inc. 



President Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sarah Levin 



Executive Editor James E. Reed 
Editorial Coordinator Jutta Kapfhammer 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jones 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 

Asst. General Manager For Administration 
Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Director of Fulfillment Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Rep. Beverly Beardon 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Director of Production Jim Cleveland 

Dispatch Sharon Smith 

Asst. Dispatch Tony Olive 

Business Assistant Laurie Falk 



Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Belinda Kir by 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 192 



THE rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc.. The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. the rainbow. RAINBOWfest andTHE rainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect, 
KYand additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1987. the rainbow is Intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is' 1 basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered • trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
THE rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S $103. All subscriptions begm 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 5 




Poring Over Reader Responses 



Editor: 

fn your September "Building a Rainbow" 
editorial, you were musing over the future 
direction of the magazine and asked for 
input from readers. As a research scientist 
I use various high-powered micro's profes- 
sionally, so the CoCo at home is mainly for 
entertainment and self-education. 

The main reason for subscribing is the 
ads. I skim through each new issue looking 
for new or unique products. The rainbow 
is the only source of information on pro- 
ducts not produced or sold by Tandy. Since 
acquiring my first Color Computer in 1980, 
I have spent over $13,000 on CoCos and 
peripheral products. This figure is accurate 
because I keep detailed records on a data- 
base program (Homebase) purchased from 
a magazine ad in the now defunct Color 
Computer News. Over 90 percent of these 
purchases were from magazine ads and the 
rest direct from Tandy. 

The second most important service pro- 
vided by rainbow is technical information 
of the problem-solving kind. This comes 
mainly from contributing editor depart- 
ments and occasionally from letters from 
other subscribers. For example, when 1 
recently purchased OS-9 Level II from one 
of your advertisers, 1 was able to patch my 
startup routine to set the dual disk drives to 
6 ms step rates, include a rapid drive turn- 
off sequence, and install several windowing 
functions based on tips and examples from 
"KISSable OS-9." Another recent useful 
item was information on how to patch the 
VIP Writer disk to work with the CoCo 3, 
without which I would not be able to write 
this letter. Using the same technique I was 
also able to patch VIP Database and VIP 
Terminal to work with the CoCo 3. Which 
leads to the suggestion — why not publish 
some of the tech tips uploaded to Delphi 
instead of just reporting on their existence? 

Your third major function for me is the 
publication of utility programs that add to 
the ease of use and general enjoyment of a 
home computer. If the program is short, I 
type directly from the listings; if not, I send 
for a copy of rainbow on disk. With few 
exceptions, programs with listings longer 
than one or two pages are too tedious to 
bother with. The one exception that imme- 



diately comes to mind is the outstanding 
multi-color Christmas card printing pro- 
gram that appeared in the December 1984 
issue that was worth every agonizing hour 
spent typing and debugging. 

Finally, due to the present availability of 
good commercial software for the CoCo, the 
least important function is the publication 
in print of submitted programs unless they 
have some unusual or novel feature not 
otherwise available. This should be left to 
tape or disk with just a description of 
purpose and any special operating instruc- 
tions printed. The "Novices Niche" might be 
the exception to these comments. 

Although my view of rainbow may be 
unique, I doubt it. The Color Computer has 
been on the market for almost eight years 
now and the number of experienced users 
probably far exceeds the number of new- 
comers. Even with the current dearth of 
software for CoCo 3, most of us will rely on 
commercial sources or downloads from 
CoCo SIGs rather than copy printed pro- 
grams. So keep the ads coming, even if you 
have to lower rates and shed staff or increase 
subscription rates to do so. The future of the 
Color Computer depends on it. 

Kenneth R. Hill 
Severna Park, MD 

The two following letters were 
chosen to represent the hundreds of 
people who have written with a differ- 
ent view regarding the publication of 
program listings. 



Keep the Listings! 

Editor: 

I read the "Building a Rainbow" article in 
the September issue, and felt that I should 
express my opinions. Your statement that 
listings might be eliminated in favor of 
rainbow on tape or rainbow on disk. 
greatly worried me that such a thing could 
even be considered. The main reason I 
started reading the rainbow was for the 
listings! I have learned almost everything I 
know about programming from typing in 
those listings and modifying them to see 
what did what and how it did it. Explaining 



something in an article is fine, but it doesn't 
even come close to being able to use the 
information directly and see exactly what's 
going on. 

In relation to your concern for novices, 
you must realize that there are many novices 
who just don't have the money to buy 
rainbow on disk. Indeed, some of them can 
barely scratch up the price of a subscription. 
That's why some people choose the Color 
Computer in the first place . . . it's cheap! 
The fact that it's also a remarkable computer 
is a nice bonus. 

Three-column listings? Well, what would 
they look like? I don't know much about 
magazine format, so all I can say is "try it 
and see." I'm sure if it's not acceptable to 
your subscribers you'll hear about it in a 
hurry! 

The only thing that's missing is more 
technical information on the CoCo 3. 

John Murvine 
Eb ens burg, PA 

Rest assured that we have no inten- 
tion, whatsoever, of eliminating 
printed listings. 

Regarding three column listings: 
Refer to pages 83 and 154 of last 
month 's issue. To determine whether 
or not this format is acceptable to 
readers, we're anxiously awaiting 
feedback. 

11 Out of 12 Ain't Bad 

Editor: 

In response to your request in the Sep- 
tember 1987 "Building a Rainbow": Some 
things I really like are having the full address 
together in "Letters to Rainbow," pictures 
of screens in the reviews, the new design of 
the reviews section and the new typeface for 
programs (they're a lot easier to read now). 

As far as the topics, I find all of them 
helpful except for the Business and Finance 
issue. I expect this to change, however, as 
I get older (I'm 16!^). 

I would whole-heartedly like three- 
column listings if it means more CoCo 3 
articles, as there aren't too many right now. 
Dealing with this, I would not like you 
skipping listings in the rainbow. 



6 THE RAINBOW December 1987 




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EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. 




EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line, 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud, All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42, 51, 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the menially retarded. 
They are sincere, hard working and 
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Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
insert printer control codes, Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add S3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.O. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal, 

PXE Computing 

11 Vtcksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



this, you would require most of us to get 

RAINBOW ON TAPE Or RAINBOW ON DISK, 

which would really add to the cost of the 
magazine. I also feel that this would decrease 
the learning experience of THE rainbow 

mil C Power 
Co t op ax i, CO 

Some CoCo Thoughts 

Editor: 

Being an amateur radio buff, I take an 
active role in its direction in order to keep 
its quality and enjoyment at a maximum. So 
when you asked to hear from your readers 
I jumped at my letter pad and started to 
scratch out my comments, which follow: 

I subscribed to rainbow magazine from 
its beginning to help get it going and for the 
great magazine it was. About I4 months ago 
I let my subscription run out because the 
price of the subscription rose too fast for me 
and because of the dedicated issue format 
i.e., games, education, utilities, etc. At least 
six Issues a year were of no interest to me. 
So I had six rainbows that I never had any 
use for — accounting for half of my sub- 
scription. That means the remaining six 
issues cost me twice as much, theoretically 
$5 per issue. I make this point not in 
bitterness, but in disappointment. 

Like all CoCo nuts, though, I re-enlisted 
and joined the ranks again after I purchased 
one of the new CoCo 3s and received a free 
copy of rainbow magazine and realized 
how much f missed it. 

I applaud Jutta Kapfhammer in her new 
position. Knowing that rainbow is now the 



only magazine left for the Color Computer, 
she still wants feedback to improve rain- 
bow for its subscribers. 

I would like to see three-column listings 
of programs, also a greater variety of 
programs per issue. Some communications 
programs (not telecommunications) so the 
amateur population would start using the 
CoCo for communications instead of the 
very limited C-64. 

I use my computers for several reasons, I 
use my IBM for writing several newsletters 
for local clubs and word processing for local 
legal researchers. My CoCo is used to keep 
track of statistics for a local softball league 
and experimental transmissions on the 
amateur radio bands (not Packet Radio), 

Richard T. Meuse 
Melrose, MA 

Disk Dissertation 

Editor: 

I have a suggestion for an article that 
should be of interest to all computer users. 
The article would be on the care, handling 
and use of computer disks. Somewhere 
along the line most of us have seen and 
digested the knowledge that magnets and cat 
hairs are not good for disks. For most of us, 
the instructions end there. 

For example, what is the best way to send 
disks through the mail? Rainbow uses a thin 
piece of ordinary styrofoam as a backing. 
Some commercial programs come in very 
nice flat vinyl boxes. Is this of value or only 
to impress the buyer? I have a Canadian 
friend who wraps his disk in aluminum foil 



and then a heavy envelope. Two others send 
disks in ZIP-lock sandwich bags with card- 
board as a stiffener. All write "Do not X- 
ray" on the envelope. Is this because of a 
magnetic field around the equipment, or is 
the X-ray itself harmful to disks? Are the 
mail sorting and ZIP code reading equip- 
ment harmful to disks? 

What about general storage of disks? 
Phonograph records aresupposed to be kept 
in a vertical position. Is this true for disks, 
or can they be stored flat without harm? Is 
high humidity harmful? Does low humidity 
and the accompanying static electricity 
botherdisks, orjust computers? And, as part 
of this query, should you ground yourself 
before handling disks? 

Music tapes are supposed to be piayed at 
least once a year to lessen the chance of print 
through. Is there a similar hazard for disks, 
and should we follow a similar procedure for 
all our disks? What about the blank disks 
you buy? Pve bought them for 29 cents each 
in bulk and at $2.50 for a single in a box. 
IVe had no trouble with either. Is one reallv 
better than the other? 

This is just a sampling of questions. 
Someone who has the answers or who can 
do the research could write a very important 
and interesting article. 

Page R. Edmondson 
New Brighton, MN 

An excellent idea, indeed! Your 
questions are presently being re- 
searched and will be answered in a 
detailed article scheduled to appear in 
an early 1988 issue. 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 7 



BACK TALK 

Bar den's Blunder? 

As a programmer with experience on 
computers ranging from the TRS-80 Model 
I to Cray supercomputers plus a variety of 
languages, I was concerned about the atti- 
tudes expressed in William Barden's column 
"Learning the Lingo" (August, 1987, Page 
168). There are three specific assertions of 
his that I take issue with. 

The first is his statement that assembly 
language is "always the language of choice" 
for commercial applications. The facts are 
that this is true only on small microcomput- 
ers such as the CoCo I and 2. The relative 
ease of working in higher level languages 
means that on larger micros, including the 
Macintosh, IBM PCand the Atari ST, most 
appJications are being written in C and 
PASCAL. Assembly language is only impor- 
tant where either code size or speed is a 
priority. With the CoCo 3's enhanced me- 
mory, I would expect to see more and more 
commercial applications written in C, taking 
advantage of Microware's excellent C com- 
piler. 

Second, I take issue with the implication 
that people should learn one computer 
language that "suits" them. There is a lot to 
be learned fromanycomputer language, and 
my personal conviction is that a person 
should learn many computer languages, and 
choose the one best suited for each individ- 
ual application. Even such relatively esoteric 
languages such as LISP and FORTH (both of 
which are available for the Color Computer) 
teach many important programming ideas, 
and can be very appropriate for certain 
tasks. 

Finally, I quickly tired of his constant 
complaining about the lack of systems of the 
same calibre as Turbo Pascal on the Color 
Computer 3. He should take a closer look 
at BASICO*. Except for the lack of a full- 
screen editor, IAS1C0* is such a system as he 
seems to want: it is interactive, has a fast 
compiler, and is a very complete language. 
Admittedly, BASICO* is the only such system 
available for the Color Computer right now, 
but he apparently does not remember just 
how long it was before systems comparable 
to Turbo Pascal were available for BASIC 
and C on the MS-DOS systems. With the 
introduction of the Color Computer 3, we 
now have a first-class computer. It will take 
time before developers can tap the full 
potential of this machine. 

Tim K oo nee 
Berkeley, CA 

Smile When You Say That 

Editor: 

I would like to comment on Jay Thomas' 
letter in Doctor ASCII (July, 1987). I have 
been a proud owner of a CoCo 2 since 1982, 
and a CoCo 3 system for six months, and 
I have been working with different computer 
systems for six years. Well, Jay, I read that 
you loved your Atari system and felt that 
neither the CoCo 2 nor the CoCo 3 are 
comparable with your Atari XL. I have no 



idea about which XL system you have, but 
1 wonder if you ever read about the Atari 
1 200 X L, which was incompatible with itself 
and finally was killed. If those are the kinds 
of products that we can expect from Atari 
Corporation, you aregiving very bad advice. 
Another thing: if you consider the CoCo to 
be less than "your supercomputer," why do 
you have it? I have never heard about any 
"supercomputer" made by Atari, 

You said also that the new CoCo 3 is 
''extremely touchy and is filled with 'bugs'"; 
I think that you must be a pretty good 
technician and programmer to know about 
all of them. You gave a nice list of "bugs" 
that you have with your CoCo 3. Maybe the 
problems with the CoCo 3 aren't a "bunch 
of bugs" but a "bunch of user's mistakes"; 
my CoCo 3 is all I want in an inexpensive 
and flexible programmable machine. Again 
my question: Why do you have your CoCos? 
Yes, it's a really neat idea to sell them — 
maybe they are going to appreciative hands 
and you could then buy your 1040 ST. 

The CoCos have been in the market since 
the late 70's, and you are right to say that 
they don't compete with your Atari XL or 
ST, because the CoCos are better and still 
strong and alive. Better software and hard- 
ware is developed each day (you know that 
because you're reading THE rainbow). 

The last thing I want to share with you is 
this: if you don't like the stuff, don't use it, 
as simple as that. I invite you to contact me 
when you want to sell your CoCo hardware/ 
software. I don't refuse great products. 

Carlos M. Santiago 
Mayagrig, Puerto Rico 



HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

Without a doubt, Tudor Jones' Solitaire 
program (December 1986, Page 76) is out- 
standing among the games published by 
Rainbow, I noted the suggestions published 
in the March issue, but I like the letters 
versus the symbols for easier recognition. 

I made a small change, or rather an 
addition, to the program. It seemed to me 
that just the "you win" was notenough when 
winning. Consequently, I added a short 
musical passage to supplement the "you 
win" notice. The changes and additions are 
as follows: 

Line 300: Delete the :GO5UB20 :GOTO190 
and then insert it at the end of a new Line 

305: 

305 PLflY"LB03T2V 31;4;5;B;10; 
L4;04;l;03;12;10;9;8;9; 
L2T2;10;L4T2;B;9;10;11; 
L2T2; 12;12;L404 ; 1 ;03;12; 
10;9;B;9;L2T2;10;L4T2;8; 
9;10;12;L204T2;1 / ':GO5UB 
20:GOTO 190 



Any other music could be used in place 
of the short passage 1 selected. I chose part 
of A /ley Cat largely because it was different. 

W> Tudor Morris 
Middletown, OH 



Poking the Pork 

Editor: 

I have just received the 1987 disk update 
for the Pigskin Predictions program from 
Federal Hill Software and it runs just fine 
on the new CoCo 3 and CM-8 monitor, 
however here are a few suggestions to make 
it even better. 

First of all, you cannot make any big 
changes to the existing program or it will not 
load and run properly. To get around this 
limitation, type in this short loader program 
and save it to your working disk. It will give 
you your customized printer poke and 
change the graphics to your liking. I call 
mine PIGS, 

10 POKE 150,1 'my system works jus t 

fine at 9600 baud 
20 PALETTES , 0 'changes the light 
blueish color on the main menu 
screen to black 
30 PALETTES , 3B 'changes the main 
work area screen from green to 
BRONCO orange 
40 PALETTEB , 3 'changes the main 
work area text from black to 
BRONCO blue 
50 RL)N"PIGSPRED" 

Using Page 297 in the CoCo 3 manual as 
a guide, you can change palette slots 8 and 
9 to have your text look like your favorite 
team's colors. Good luck. 

Greg Dorsha 
Willis ton. NO 

I/O Fixits 

Editor: 

In the August 1986 issue, Josh Alkire of 
Toledo, Ohio, mentioned his I/O problems 
on long programs. While I still experience 
this problem from time to time, I have 
minimized it through the following: 

1. Replacing the cassette jacks with a 
four-pin terminal lug. Soldering the cassette 
wires to these terminals, then removing the 
plugs on the cable and screwing them 
directly to the corresponding terminal. 

2. Replacing the cassette's drive belt 
whenever the occurrence of the I/O errors 
becomes too frequent. 

3. Connecting a toggle switch to shunt the 
cassette's remote switch wires. With this 
switch, rewinding or fast forwarding of tapes 
can be done without unplugging the DIN 
plug. On tapes which display frequent I/O 
errors, I usually turn this switch to shunt, 
press the play button and keep typingCLOAD 
on the keyboard. 

Most of the time it works. I usually make 
a minimum of four sets per program depend- 
ing on the importance and length of my 
program. 

Ernesto N. Mania 
M a nil a, Philip p ines 

Ask the "Dummies 1 * 

Editor: 

When writing long basic programs that 
use several subroutines, you may lose track 
of where these routines are located if you 
renumber your program. Try this trick to 
find where the routines can be found. Place 



8 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



_Word 

Power 3 



(The Ultimate Word Processor for the CoCo 3) 



Are you still using your CoCo 2 word processor on the CoCo 3 with 
slip- shod patchwork? You don't have to any more. With Word 
Power3, Microcom answers the challenge ofword processors for the 
CoCo 3. It bridges the gap between 41 what is" and "what should be" 
in word- processors. No other word processor offers such a 
wide array of features that are so easy to learn and use. Check 
out the impressive features: 



DISPLAY 

The 80- column display with true lowercase lets you view the full 
width of a standard page. All the prompts are displayed in plain 
English in neat colored windows. The current column number, 
line number, page number and the percentage of memory remaining 
is displayed on the screen at all times. The program even displays the 
bottom margin perforation so you know where one page ends and 
the other begins. You can also change the foreground/background 
color of the screen to suit your needs! 

AVAILABLE MEMORY 

Unlike most other word processors, Word Power3 gives you80K of 
memory with a 128K CoCo 3 and more than 460 K with a 512K 
CoCo 3 to store text. 

TYPING/EDITING 

Word Power3 has one of the most powerful and user* friendly full- 
screen editors with wordwrap. All you do is type; Word Power 3 
takes care of the text arrangement. It even has a built- in Auto* Save 
feature which saves the current text to disk at regular intervals; so 
you know that your latest version is saved on disk. Here are some of 
the editing features of Word Power 3: 

Auto- repeat; Key- Click; Cursor up, down, left, right, beginning of 
line, end of line, next word, previous word, top of text, end of text; 
page forward, backward; 4- way scrolling; block copy, move, delete; 



global search and replace (with wild-card search); line positioning 
(left, right or center) ; insert/ overstrike modes; delete to beginning/ 
end of line, next/ previous word; and tabs. You can also embed 
printer codes in text to take advantage of underlining, sub/ superscript 
and other printer functions. Define left, right, top and bottom 
margins, and page length. 

MAIL MERGE 

Ever try mailing out the same letter to 500 different persons? Could 
be quite a chore. Not with the Mail Merge feature of Word Power3. 
Using this feature, you can type a letter, follow it through with a list of 
addresses and have Word Power 3 print out personalized letters. It's 
that easy! 

LOADING/SAVING FILES TO DISK 

Word Power 3 creates ASCII format files which are compatible with 
almost all terminal, spell- checking, and other word- processing 
programs. It allows you to load, save and kill files and also to create 
and edit Basic, Pascal, C and Assembly files. Supports double-sided 
drives and various drive step rates. 

PRINTING 

Word Power 3 drives almost any printer (DMP series, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc.) . Allows print options such as different 
baud rates, line spacing, page pause, partial print, multi- line headers/ 
footers, page numbers, page number placement, and right justification. 
You can also change the values for these print options within the text 
by using embedded printer option codes. 

INSTRUCTION MANUAL 

Word Power 3 comes with a well- written and easy-to-comprehend 
instruction manual that makes writing with Word Power 3 a breeze. 

Word Power 3 comes on disk for only $69.95, 



MJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654*5244 9 am-9 pmest? d aysa week 

Except NY. Order Status, Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call I-716-223-I477 

All orders (except COD) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charge. Last minute shoppers can benefit. 

VISA, MC, AMEX. Check, MO. Please add$3.00 S&.H (USA & Canada), other countries $5.00 S&H. 

COD (US only) add $2.50 extra. NYS residents please add sales tax. 
Computerized processing & tracking of orders. Immediate shipment. 




"dummy" lines at the very end of your 
program to call these subroutines, placing a 
REM (or ') after the line number for the 
routine, plus a description of what routine 
is being called. No matter how many times 
you renumber your program, these lines will 
always tell you where your subroutines are. 

Another bit of interesting information is 
that 63999 is the highest line number you can 
use in BASIC on a CoCo. 

Gay Crawford 
Olathe, KS 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

I wish to thank the rainbow and your 
free-lance writers for the help they bring us 
by giving hints and tips on programming. 

A special thanks to Joseph Kolar, Fred 
Scerbo, Bill Bernico and all the others who 
contribute to a wonderful magazine. 

About two years ago, I bought a 16K 
CoCo 2, which I thought was only to play 
games with (until I discovered the rain- 
bow). Then I realized I had a powerful 
machine in my possession. 

Long live rainbow. 
work. 

Ernie DiZazzo 
Montreal, Quebec 

Gimme Gimme Gimmesoft 

Editor: 

I would just like to take the time to tell 
you about the excellent service that I re- 
ceived from a company that advertises in 
the rainbow. I ordered a 512K card from 
Gimmesoft via Delphi, and I received it in 
only three days. The documentation with it 
was excellent and the upgrade works per- 
fectly. The software included with the 
upgrade is self-explanatory. I would recom- 
mend this product and company to everyone 
looking to upgrade their CoCo 3. Keep up 
the good work! 

William Dodge 
(WIZARDRY) 
Long Beach, NY 




• I am 12 years old. I have a CoCo 3, FD 
501 diskdrive, DM P-I05 printer and DCM- 
6 modem. I am looking for pen pals from 
the United States and Canada. 

A I Mendel son 
3747 W. Devon 
Chicago, 1L 60659 

• I am a CoCo 3 user with hard drive, CGP- 
220, OS-9 Level II, and I play music with 
MIDI synthesizers. I am looking for an 
American pen pal. I am 27 years old and 
work in a bank. 

Alexandre Maggioni 
Montoie 2 
1007 Lausanne 
Switzerland 

• I am II years old and looking for a pen 
pal that lives in California. He or she must 



like science and be between the ages of 1 1 
and 12. 

I have a CoCo 3, FD 501 disk drive, RGB 
monitor and several other accessories. 

Tim Hennon 
9539 Prairie A ve. #7 
Highland, IN 46322 

• Anyone under 21 anywhere who wants a 
pen pal, please write. I have a CoCo 2 plus 
a CCR-81 recorder and many games and 
joysticks. I also love to do music programs 
on the CoCo. I will answer all letters. 

Norman L. Morris, Jr. 
7632 S. Shore #2 A 
Chicago, 1L 60649 

• For every CoCoist who enjoys playing all 
types of video games: I am planning on 
publishing a disk of assorted games-related 
material which you can be a part of! Write 
to me to talk about our games and maybe 
write a game for the rest of the world to see. 
Let's all become one big CoCo games pen 
pal club! 

Byron Fast 
Box 151 
Kleefeld, Man., 
Canada ROA 0 V0 

• I am 14 years old and have a CoCo 2 and 
3, two disk drives, Multi-Pak, 300-2400 
baud modem, RGB monitor, Speech/ 
Sound Pak, Orchestra-90 and Gemini 10X 
printer. I am looking for a pen pal from 
anywhere, especially Yugoslavia. 

Robert J. Liveoak 
768 S. Dumfries 
Detroit, Ml 48217 

• I am 13 years old and have a 64K ECB 
CoCo 2, disk drive and DMP-I06 printer. 
I'm looking for a 16-year-old or under pen 
pal with a similar system. 

Mike Kohut 
RR 1 

Lynden, Ontario 
Canada LOR 1 TO 

• I am 16 years old and I like Adventure 
games and programming BASIC. 

dual disk drive, a DMP-J05 printer and the 
CGP plotter. I hope to be getting a modem, 
and I will answer all replies. 

Patrick Cormier 
415 Fourth Street 
Petrol ia, Ontario 
Canada 

• I am 28 years old, have a CoCo 2, DMP- 
105 printer, three drives, CCR-81 cassette 
and modem and I would like to have pen 
pals from anywhere in the world. 

Dennis Gray 
3643 S. 6885 W. 
West Valley City, UT 84120 



• I am looking for pen pals all over the 
world. I am 16 years old and I love Adven- 
tures and arcade games. I am also interested 
in basic, 
tronics. 

Tal Pery 
Harakefet 3 Street 
Kiron, Israel 55408 



• I am starting an international computer 
pen pal club. Anyone who is interested in 
joining, please write. 

Heather Kingsley 
603-2770 Aquitaine Ave. 
Mississauga, Ontario 
Canada L5N3K5 

• I am 15 years old, own a CoCo 3, CoCo 
2, Speech/ Sound Pak, cassette recorder and 
a pair of joysticks. I am looking for pen pals 
all over the world and am hoping to hear 
from all you CoCo Canadians. 

Randy J. Pekar 
Group Box 7, Sitel 
Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
Canada S3N 2V6 

• I am 10 years old and would like a pen pal 
within a year's range of my age. I have a 
CoCo 2 (64KJ, two joysticks, FD-500 disk 
drive and Panasonic cassette recorder. I have 
solved Bedlam, Hall of the King, The Maze 
of Moycullen, and Success Mansion. I love 
"Star Trek." If you want a pen pal, please 
write me. I'll answer all letters. 

Spencer Metcalf 

Keep i$ 9 ite"Jb§& reet 
Longview, Ta 75601 

• I would very much like to correspond with 
any and all CoCo owners everywhere. I feel 
I'm all alone with my 64K CoCo 2, one disk 
drive, cassette and DMP-105 printer. I enjoy 
all types of programs — utilities, Adven- 
tures, games, etc. Please write, and dispel 
these lonely feelings. 

Kimberly K. Lindquist 
3250 N W Ridgeview Lane 
Albany, OR 97321 

• I am 13 years old and have a 64 K CoCo 
2, disk drive, DMP-I00 and a joystick. I like 
all games and will reply to all responses. 

Donald G. Hilt 
1046 Meadowbrook 
Corpus Christi, TX 78412 

• I have a 64K CoCo 2 with Extended 

BASIC, 

will try to answer all replies but would prefer 
a pen pal from Africa or Asia. 

David Smith 
Rt. 1 Box 50 
Text co, 1L 62889 



THE RAINBOW welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: 
Letters to Rainbow, The Falsoft Build- 
ing, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
Letters should include the writer's full 
name and address. Letters may be edited 
for purposes of clarity or to conserve 
space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIC 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, type Rfll 
to take you into the Rainbow Magazine 
Services area of the SIG. At the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type LET to reach the 
LETTERS> prompt and then select 
Letters for Publication. Be sure to in- 
clude your complete name and address. 



10 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 



BOOKS & GRAPHICS 

500 



POKES, 
PEEKS, 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own Hl- 
QUALfTY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

* Autostart your basic programs 

* Disable Color Basic/ECB/Disk 
Basic commands Ifke LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TRON, TROff, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, RENUM, PRINT 
USINQ, DIR, KILL. SAVE, LOAD, 
MERQE, RENAME, DSKIMI, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

* Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 

* Generate a Repeat-key. 

* Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (for 
64K only). 

* Speed Up your programs. 

* Reset, MOTOR ON/OFF from 
keyboard. 

* Recover Basic programs lost by 
NEW. 

* Set 23 different 
QRAPHIC/SEMIQRAPHIC modes 

* Merge two Basic programs. 

* AND MUCH MUCH MOREJII 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16 K/32K/64K/ COLOR BASIC/ECB/DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1, 2, at 3. 



ONLY $16.95 



SUPPLEMENT to 

500 POKES, 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 

ONLY $9.95 

L UU additional Pokes, Peeks' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER. 
Includes commands for 

• Rompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm+*> and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Oump (for OMP printers) & Text Screen Oump 

• ANO MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES. PEEKS' N EXECS Is a prerequisite 

^300 POKES 
PEEKS' N EXECS 

FOR THE COCO III : 



Get more POWER for your CoCo III. Includes 
commands for 

• 40/80 Column Screen Text Oump 

• Save TexV Graphics Screens to Disk 

• Command/ Function Disables 

• Enhancements for CoCo 3 Basic 

• 12BK/512K Ram Test Program 

• HPRINT Character Modifier 

• AND MANY MORE COMMANDS ONLY $1 9.95 





M 



MUSF BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERiE These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLEO: $39.95 
OISK BASIC UNRAVELLEO: $19.95 
BOTH UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
SUPER ECB (CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: $24.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $59.95 
COCO 3 SERVICE MANUAL $39.95 
COCO 2 SERVICE MANUAL: $29.95 
INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II $39.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 LEVEL II ON COCO 3: $19.95 

RAINBOW GUIOETO 0S9 II DISK: $19.95 
INSI0E0S9 LEVEL II DISK: $20.00 

COCO 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING*: $16.00 

ADDENDUM FOR COCO 3: $12.00 
UTILITY ROUTINES VOL 1 BOOK: $19.95 



ft 




m n 



HICS DESIGNER 




Greeting Cards 

Signs 

Banners 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions. Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures. Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III ORTDM00 with 
a MINIMUM OF 32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER, compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 AND JD0S. 

Supports the following printers: DMP 

100/105/110/130/430, CGP220, 

EPSON RX/FX GEMIN1 1 0X SG-10, 

NX-10 & OKI DATA 

DISK ONLY $29.95 

PICTURE DISK #1 100 more pictures for 
CGD: $14.95 

FONT DISK #1: 10 extra fonts! $19.95 

$24.95 



COCO MAX III J?!*? 

It's finally here! CoCo Max for the CoCo III. 
Includes all the features of the acclaimed CoCo 
Max II and more: CoCo III hi- res screen display of 
64 colors at a time, 50% larger editing window, 
special effects with animation and much much 
more! Comes with special hi- res interface, 
conversion utilities and a comprehensive manual. 
Disk only $79.95 Min Req: 128K CoCo III with 
a disk drive. 

;oco MAX II 

Disk $77.95: Tape $67.95 

An excellent software patch to run COCO MAX II 
on COCO III. Req RS Hires Joystick Interface No 
chip replacements or soldering Disk only $24.95 
BOTH MAX PATCH & HI-RES INTERFACE: $34.95 






COLOR MAX III DELUXE 

This is the sequel to the popular Color Max III. 
Additional features include multiple screen editing, 
animation, etc Includes printer drivers for EPSON, 
GEMINI, DMP & CGP-220 printers, Disk only 
$69.95. Minimum Requirements: 512 K CoCo3, RS 
Hi- Res Joystick Interface and Tandy Disk Controller. 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 

Fairport, N.Y. 14450 ' ~ 

Phone (71 6) 223-1477 

VISA MQ AMEX, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 S&H(USA& Canada), other 
countries $5.00 S&H. COD (US only) add$2.50 extra NYS residents please 
add sales tax Computerized processing & tracking of orders, Immediate shipment 
Dealer inquiries invited 



vrsA 



MotlwCord 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1*800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pm est 7 days a week 

Except NY. Order Status. Information Technical Information NY Orders call 1-716-223-1477 



PR I NTff - 2 




Got ff one for the book"? 



Lonnie asked me to sit in for him this month and tell you about the 
book I'm working on, a history of the Color Computer. Our feeling 
is that the more people who are aware of this project, the more 
material will be available and the broader-based and better the book can 
be. Yet, while casual mention has been made of the book on Delphi, and 
while I did make several references to it at the CoCo Community Breakfast 
and at some seminars at our very successful October 9, 10 and 1 1 Princeton 
RAINBOWfest, a slice of CoCo history in itself, I believe this is the first 
time we've mentioned it in THE RAINBOW. 

I see the book as very people-oriented, though, of course, the significant 
hardware and software developments, the milestones, naturally must be 
noted. The emphasis, though, should be on the people who are a part of 
the CoCo Community. To bring life to any subject, you relate it through 
the experiences of those whose lives are intertwined in that activity, the 
people "who made it happen." Through our many RAINBOW fests, we 
have had the opportunity to get to know some of the "movers and the 
shakers" of our CoCo Community. Others we know only by telephone, 
or Delphi, or perhaps a letter or two. 

If this book is to have the breadth and scope we have in mind, though, 
we must have your help. You see, the city limits of our CoCo Community 
extend well beyond Prospect, Kentucky, and the various RAINBOWfest 
sites. Yes, though concentrated in the United States and Canada, ours is 
a global community and English is merely our primary language. Did you 
ever see one of the Australian editions of THE RAINBOW? Have you ever 
read a RAINBOW article reprinted in Hungarian? Did you know that there 
is an edition of The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 printed in Japanese? 

No, the CoCo is not taking over the world, but while we like to think 
that Prospect and Fort Worth are focal points of CoCo activity, wouldn't 
it be fun to be able to peek into Tony DiStefano's Canadian workshop, 
Marty Goodman's California parts drawer, the back room at Speech 
Systems in Batavia, Illinois, or the monthly Cajun CoCo Club meeting 
down in Crowley, Louisiana? Club pictures! Wouldn't it be a gas to have 
group shots of all the CoCo clubs? Did you know there's a club in Beverly 
Hills as well as South Sioux City, Nebraska? In Hardburly, Kentucky, and 
Hamburg, West Germany. In Salt Lake City, but also in Hobart, Tasmania. 
In seven provinces of Canada, and even the Netherlands and Mexico. You'd 
figure on one in East Peoria, but how about Netanya, Israel! 

Wouldn't it be terrific if pictures and capsule reports and anecdotal 
material for the CoCo history book poured in from all points of the CoCo 
\ | Community? Can it be that the same avid interest that brings them out 

1 2 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 




COCO 3 UTILITIES GALORE 

(All utilities support 40/80 columns for CoCo3) 
(CoCo2 versions are available for most utilities) 




SUPER TAPE/DISK TRANSFER 

• Disk- to- Disk Copy (1-3 passes) • Tape- to- Disk Copy • Tape- to- Disk Automatic Relocate • Disk- 
to- Tape Copy • Tape- to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ML programs and DATA files. CoCo 1, 2 & 3. 32 K Disk System (Disk to Disk Copy requires 
64 K). Disk Only $24.95 



BEST BBS 

Excellent BBS program lor the CoCo2 & 3. Supports32/40/80 column display and is packed with features 
Supports 64 K 128K or 512K. Disk only $24.95 (CoCo2 version included) 



Hi- RES JOYSTICK SOFTWARE 

Wish you could use thehi-res joystick interface from Basic? You can now. This program will let you access 
640 x640 pixels from your joystick for extra precision CoCo3 Disk $14.95 



512K RAMDISK/SPQOLER 

Turns your51 2K RAM into super- fast in- memory disk drives. Reduces chances of 1 0 errors and disk access 
is lightning fast 51 2 K Spooler keeps your computer free for programming when printing documents to the 
printer. A must for 51 2 K users CoCo3 Disk Only $24.95 



MA1UIST PRO 

The ultimate mailing list program Allows you to add, edit, view, delete, change, sort ( by zipcode or name) and 
print labels Its indispensible! Disk Only $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! Allows elongated, normal and condensed format for text, 
double-strike, border creation and multiple-label printing Its a MUST for any user with a disk drive. Disk 
Only $1 9.95. Supports DMP 105/110/120/130/430, GEMINI, STAR, EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo2 
version included) 



COMPUTERIZED CHECKBOOK 

Why bother with balancing your checkbook? Let the CoCo do it for you! Allows you to add, view, search, edit, 
change, delete and printout (in a table or individual entry format) checkbook entries Updates balance after 
each entry Allows files for checking saving and other accounts. Disk Only $19.95 (CoCo 2 version 
included) 



BOWLING SCORE KEEPER 

An excellent utility to keep track of your bowling scores Allows you to save scores under individuals or 
teams Youcan edit, change, delete and compare scores A must foranyone who wants tokeep track of his or 
her bowling performance. Disk SI 9.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 

Organize your videocassettes with this program! Allows you to index cassettes by title, rating, type, play 
time and comments Also allows you to sort titles alphabetically and view/print selected tapes If you own a 
VCR, this program is a must Disk Only 3SI9.95 (CoCo 2 version included). 



ASTRO FORTUNE TELLER 

Receive answers to30 pre-defined questions on love, success, marriage, etc. This program is over 1 50 K long 
and yet will run on a 32 K- 51 2 K systems due to modular approach Disk Only $24.95 (CoCo 2 version 
included) 



Advanced Disk Operating System for CoCo 3. $34.95 ADOS: $27.95 



COCO UTIL II 

(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible computer, Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo 
$39.95 



SPIT'N IMAGE 



Makes a BACKUP of ANY disk $32.95 



RGB PATCH 

Displays most games in color on RGB monitors For CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE 
WITH C0C01,2&3 

WORD PROCESSORS 

TeleWriter-64: Best Word Processor For 
CoCo 1, 2 & 3. (Cas) $47.95 (Disk) $57.95 
TW-80: 80 Column Displays more features 
for TW-64. CoCo 3 Disk $39.95 
TELEF0RM: Mail Merge& Form Letters for 
TW-64. $19.95 

DATABASE 

Pro Color File * Enhanced* 2.0: Multi-feature 
Database $59.95 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Autoterm: Superb Terminal Program. Works 
with any modem! (Cas) $29.95 (Disk) $38.95 
Wiz: For OS9 II. 300-19200 baud rate, 
windows! Req512K& RS232 Pak 
$79.95 

ASSEMBLERS/COMPILERS 

EOT/ASM 640: Best Disk Based Editor- 
Assembler for CoCo $59.95 (Specify CoCo 
1, 2 or 3) 

THE SOURCE: Best Disassembler for CoCo. 
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IRON FOREST: $28.95 

LIGHT PHASER ^INTERFACE: $34.95 
MISSION! RUSH N ASSAULT: $28.95 
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GANTELET II: $28.95 
GANTELET: $28.95 
MISSION F-16 ASSAULT: $28.95 
MARBLE MAZE: $28.95 
PAPER ROUTE: $28.95 
KNOCK OUT: $28.95 
KARATE: $28.95 
WRESTLE MANIAC: $28.95 
BOUNCING BOULDERS: $28.95 
THE GATES OF DELIRIUM: $28.95 
CALADURIAL FLAME OF LIGHT: $28.95 
LANSFORD MANSION: $28.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
PYRAMIX Cubiir® for CoCo 3: $24.95 
VEGAS SLOTS (CoCo III Only): $34.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE Allonters$50& atoue (axcept CODs] sMppecf by UPS 2 nd Day Airat no extra cbarg& Last minute shoppers 

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Except NY. Order Status, Information Technical Information, NY Orders call 1 -71 6-223-1 477 



for Cincinnati's CINTUG meetings is 
also the driving force for CoCo Club 
activities in the coastal town of Piura, 
Peru, in the shadow of the Andes 
Mountains? I wonder how Dale Puck- 
ett's computer setup in Rockville, Mar- 
yland, compares with David Ardila's in 
Bogota, Colombia. 

Have you helped make CoCo his- 
tory? Want to be in the book? Well, then, 
take pen (or word processor) in hand 
and tell us about it. Have you seen a 
computer setup that just begs to be 
photographed? Do you know where 
Captain 80 is now? Perhaps you know 
a story about Jake Commander. Maybe 
you have pictures of the editorial offices 
of Color Computer Magazine, or a shot 
of the lab at Frank Hogg Laboratory. 
How about the loading dock at Com- 
puter Plus, or the boat dock (?) at 
Computer Island? I took some shots in 
the old Fort Worth CoCo factory; 
maybe you have some pictures of Tan- 
dy's present CoCo plant in Korea. 

I have visited Dr. Preble and his wife, 
Dr. Preble, at Dr. Preble's Programs (I 
think it should be Drs. Preble Pro- 
grams); maybe you've visited Doctor 
ASCII or Dr. Plog or Dr. Goodman. 
Wouldn't it be fun to see photos of the 
authors of such programs as Madam 
Rosa's Massage Parlor, Mega-Bug, 
Black Sanctum, Telewriter, Dungeon 
Quest, or even Star-DOSl And, you 
know there are many stories connected 
with the development of all the CoCo 
Classics. Wonder where Tom Mix hangs 
his ten-gallon hat? You may be the one 
to fill us in on where the HOT CoCo 



people are now. Maybe you can report 
a "first." 

History books are full of firsts. For 
instance, Lee Veal, of Rowlett, Texas, 
has the first CoCo: Serial #000001, a 
4K, nonextended, with a U C" Board. 
Yes, it works fine. In fact, he just got it 
a year ago on an u as-is" table in a Fort 
Worth Radio Shack. Ron Krebs of 
Mark Data lays claim to having created 
and marketed the first Color Computer 
Adventure game, Calixto Island. He 
and his wife wrote it and got the name 
from a street in their neighborhood in 
Mission Viejo, California. Dave Lager- 
quist, who founded Chromasette Mag- 
azine, appears to be the first to use the 
term "CoCo" in a publication. Wayne 
Green was the first to predict the immi- 
nent demise of the CoCo — almost six 
years ago in the January 1982 issue of 
80 Microcomputing! Maybe you know 
of some firsts we haven't heard about. 

Funny stories. Anecdotes. Every- 
body loves those short, entertaining 
accounts of personal experience. Does 
a CoCo club meeting go by without 
someone telling a CoCo "war story" or 
two? I'd like to include some of the best 
anecdotes, with credit lines, in little box 
inserts scattered throughout the book. 
And a history book comes alive with 
pictures of people! Maybe you have a 
lulu and its publication was "just meant 
to be." 

Yes, we have heard our share of tales, 
but I'm sure there are some jewels out 
there just crying to be told. Sometimes 
a simple phone call yields a memorable 
story. Other times, a reader with a sense 



of humor will write in to share a 
"boner." One of my favorite letters to 
the editor was from a reader who re- 
called someone writing in RAINBOW that 
nothing entered through the keyboard 
would ever damage the computer. He 
said he accepted that until he "entered 
a full glass of lemonade through the 
keyboard and it did cause problems." 

Father Bill Fleener, the Old Father 
William of Color Computer News, has 
a funny story about him and his wife 
deciding to sell the family piano in order 
to buy a Color Computer. Peter Stark 
likes to tell about having to change the 
name of his Star-Kits company, "be- 
cause everyone kept asking for Charlie 
the Tuna!" Dan Downard has a new 
story every time he drops by my office. 
A few of his are about me, but I have 
some doozies about him, as well. We 
both have "Lonnie stories" to throw in 
the pot. Our CoCo history book is a 
case in which the more cooks, the better 
the broth. 

If the foregoing has not reminded you 
of some quotable quote or personal 
glimpse into your own CoCo expe- 
rience, maybe you'll just have to waitfor 
the book to come out, but if there's a 
stir in your memory, a recollection of a 
cute story of life and people in our 
CoCo Community, a snapshot stuck 
away in a drawer, a personal perspective 
on significant CoCo turning points such 
as events in the development of new 
products and publications, then I invite 
you to help me write the book! 

— Jim Reed 



<9 
3 



"CoCoPack" 
from Bill Bernico Software 

PROGRAMS! PROGRAMS! PROGRAMS! 
63 programs for only $6.00. 
That's less than 10 cents per 
program. Included are music, 
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styles written in BASIC that you 
can use in your own BASIC programs. 
Available on disk only. Send cash, 
check or money order only to Bill 
Bernico Software 708 Michigan Ave. 
Sheboygan, VI 53081 



0 



3 



14 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Here is a quick and easy method of achieving a 
PCLERR0 on your Color Computer. If you have 
Extended BASIC 1.0 or any problem with the PCLEflRl 
used in the program, you will need to set it up as 

follows: 

10 GOTO G3000 

20 start your program here 



G3000 insert PCLEAR0 routine here followed by 

GOTO 20 

The listing: 

10 POKE182,p:POKE183,PEEK(188) :P 

OKE18 4 , fS : POKE185 , 16 : POKE18 6 , PEEK 

(18 8) : POKE 18 7 , J3 : POKE 18 8 , PEEK (188 

-6) :PCLEAR1: POKE 18 3, PEEK (183+6) : 

POKE188,PEEK( 188+6) T/ Ar . 

' N ' Vernon Nemitz 

Virginia Beach, VA 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



ALL HARDWARE COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 



OISK DRIVES 



Double Sided, Double Density 360 K 40 track disk drives for the Color Computer 1,2 and 3. Buy from 
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DRIVE CARLES: 1 DRIVE CARLE: $19.95 2 DRIVE CADLE: $24.95 4 DRIVE CARLE: $39.95 

(For Drives, add $7.00 S&H in USA/CANADA) 





COMMUNICATIONS 
_ EXTRAVAGANZA 



CABLES/SWITCHERS/ 
ADAPTERS 



EPROM 



1) AVATEX 1200 MODEM: Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 Baud, Auto- Dial/ 
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512K RAMDISK 

Have 2 superfast RAMDISKs & a print spooler. 

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64 K Upgrade for 26-31 34 A/B CoCo II: 
$39.95 

64K Upgrade for CoCo r* CoCo ll's with Cat 
#26-3026/7, 26-3134 & 26-3136: $29.95 



RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 

serial port ONLY $18.95 

Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with 

CoCo Max, DS69, etc. ONLY $24.95 

15' PRINTER/MODEM EXTENOER CABLE: 

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10' JOYSTICK EXTENDER CABLE: S19.95 
CASSETTE 'T CABLE: $19.95 
MODEM CABLE: 4 pin to DB 25: $19.95 
15" MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER 
CABLE: $29.95 

3- POSITION SWITCHER: Select any one of 

three RS232 devices (printers/ modems) 

from the serial port $37.95 

WICO ADAPTER: Use Atari type Joysticks 

with your CoCa $29.95 

RS HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $1 1.99 

MAGNAVOX 8505/851 5/8 CM643 Analog 

RGB Cable: $24.95 

CM-8 RGB Analog Ext. Cable: $19.95 
SONY Monitor Cable: $39.95 



VIDEO 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 
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Lowest Price Anywhera $137.95 
EPROM ERASER (Datarase): Fast erase of 
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EPROMS: 2764 -$8.00, 27128 -$9.00 
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BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER and ERASER: 
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ROMPAK w/Blank PC Board 27xx Series: 
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UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: For 

monochrome or color monitor. $29.95 
VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference. 
$19.95 



KEYBOARDS/ACCESSORIES 

KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: Why 

break your back when typing on the 
CoCo? Our keyboard extender cable 
allows you to move your keyboard 
away from the computer and type with 
ease. You can use your existing 
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second keyboard A MUST for all CoCo 
Users Only $39.95. Cable with CoCo II 
keyboard: $49.95 

COCO 3 KEYBOARD (includes FREE 
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$19.95): $39.95 



CHIPS. ETC, 



^PRINTER INTERFACES^ 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 
switch selectable baud rates(300-9600) 
Comes with all cables $44.95 



Olsk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
III): $14.95 

Mulli- Pak PAL Chip for CoCo 3 (Specify 
Multipak Cat #): $19.95 
PAL Switcher: Now you can switch 
between the CoCo II and CoCo III 
modes when using the Multi-Pak You 
need the OLDER and NEW PAL chip for 
the 26-3024 Multipak. Only $29.95/ 
With NEW PAL Chip S39.95 



/JUT 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box214 
Fairport, N. Y. 14450 
Phone(716) 223-1477 



AH orders$50 and above( except Disk Drives& CODs) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at 
no EXTRA charge We accept VISA/MC/AMEX, Check or MO. CODs (No CODs for 
Disk Drives) add$2.50 extra Please add$3.00 S&H (USA/CANADA; othercountries 
$5.00), except where otherwise mentioned NYS Residents please add sales tax 
Prices are subject to change All products are covered by manufacturer's warranty. 




MotlerCard 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 AM - 9 PM EST 7 days a week 

Except NY Order Status, Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call 1-716-223-1477 



KM 




TANDY COMPUTERS 

1000-EX 256k 1-5 1/4" Drive 410.00 

1000-HX 256K 1-3 1/2" Drive. 505-00 

1000-SX384K 1 5 1/4" Drive 610.00 

1000-TX 640K 1-3 1/2" Drive 840.00 

3000-HL 5 1 2K 1 5 1 /4" Drive 1110.00 

3000 640K 1 5 1/4" Drive 1500.00 

4000 1 Meg 1 3 1/2" Drive 1930.00 

1400LT Portable Computer 1215.00 

102 Portable Computer 24K 375.00 

200 Portable Computer 24K 640.00 

Color Computer 3 1 28K 11 0.00 

MONITORS & BOARDS 

VM-4 Monochrome Green 95.00 

CM-5 Color RGB 200.00 

CM-1 1 Color RGB 295.00 

EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 510.00 

Tandy Dual Display Card 180.00 

Tandy EGA Card 235.00 

Zucker Mono Graphics Card 105 00 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 220.00 

Portable Drive 100/102/200 155.00 

5 1/4" External Drive 1000EX 180.00 

3 1/2" External Drive 1000EX 200.00 

Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 595.00 

Zucker 20 Meg Hardcard 445.00 

Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 265.00 

AT HD/1 .2M Controller 200.00 

EXPANSION BOARDS 

Zucker Serial Board 45.00 

Zucker MFB 256K for 1 000SX 1 70.00 

Zucker MFB 5 1 2K for 1 000 1 69.00 
Zucker 1200 Baud Modem Card 75.00 

PRINTERS 

DMP- 1 06 Dot-Matrix 1 50.00 

DMP-130 Dot-Matrix 210.00 

DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 315.00 

DWP-520 Daisy Wheel 730.00 

DMP-440 Dot-Matrix 595.00 

DMP-2120 Dot-Matrix 1325 00 

LP-1000 Laser Printer 1635.00 

Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 195.00 

Epson FX-86E Dot-Matrix 320.00 

Epson FX-286E Dot-Matrix 475.00 

Epson EX-800 Dot-Matrix 425 00 

Epson EX-1000 Dot-Matrix 585.00 

Epson LQ-800 Dot-Matrix 390 00 

Epson LQ-850 Dot-Matrix 520.00 

Epson LQ-1050 Dot-Matrix 715.00 

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Send for Complete Catolog. 



□□□□□ 
□□□□□ 

ODDDD 
□□□□□ 

124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



p 






in 


I9 


i 




it-i 



^Bu il d i ng D e c e mb e r's Ra i nbow 




%5 



To our Rainbow friends both old and new 
We've made this issue just for you 

Your letters are special and your thoughts are dear 
Please make plans to join us in the coming new year 

People from all over simply rave 
(A year's subscription will let you save) 

Fun and programs, surprises abound 
A better present cant be found 



Novice or veteran, it makes no mind 
Nicer readers we could never find 







So to the Rainbow family far and near ' 
We send our greetings and wish you cheer! <^4$ 

Happy Holidays 
tl From All Of Us Here At The Rainbow! 





16 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 





SUPER MAX III INTERFACE 




Switch between 
Color Max III 
and ??? 

Use EXISTING 
SOFTWARE* 
or write your 
own! Includes 
($24.95) 

utility software 
BONANZA for FflEE ! 



$30.95 



* Compatible with POPULAR CoCo 
graphics software programs that use 

HARDWARE JOYSTICK interfaces ! Bring 
your CoCo III to the MAX ! 




51 2K 
COCO 




$249.95 



* Includes CoColll Software Bonanza 
package - a $150 plus value I ! I 

Offer expires 12/31/87 



ULTIMATE 
HOLIDAY GIFT ! 



51 2K Version 
$69.95 




COLORMAX III & COLORMAX DELUXE ( 

It's herel The CoColll BREAKTHROUGH PRODUCT everyone was waiting fori 320x200 graph ics , pull down menus, icons 
the choice of any 16 colors from the CoCo Ill's 64 color palette plug RGB support 1 Eleven (11) fonts are 
included for hundreds" of lettering styles and painting is a breeze with 16 colors and 32 editable patterns!! I 
Color Max III requires a 128K CoCo III and Hi-Res Joystick interface. ( Spjcify printer 0~ $59 . 95 - Color Max III 
Font Editor - create and rrodify fonts for use with Color Max III $29.95/Font DiskJl (11 more Fonts 1 ) $19.95. 
Hi-Res~Toys t lck interface $14,957 



) 



SPECIAL BONUS - BUY ABOVE 4 for only $99.95 1 1 1 (SAVE $35) 



See pg.138 10/87 
Rainbow review 




TW-80 - 8G COLUMNS FOR TW-S4 ON COCO 

It's finally herel An 80 column version of Telewriter-64 for the CoCo III with TELEPATCH features plus much, 
much morel Includes PRINT SPOOLER & (2) ultra- fast RAM DISKS for 512K users, plus changeable CHARACTER FONTS & 
a setup CONFIG pgm. Req. TW-64 DISK & 128K CoCo III~$39.95 / SPECIAL BONUS COMBO - TW-64 & TW-80 $99795 

SUPER TALK 51 2 DIGITAL VOICE FOR COCO III 

Turn your 512K CoColll into a Digital Voice Recorder ! Not synthesized speech, but 100% reproduction of your 
own voice! Create BIG MESSAGES, up to 32 blocks ot 1.6k each. Reg. 512JK~CoCoIII DISK. From Dr. Preble $39.95 



51 2K UPGRADE ($49.95T°rTce s s 



^ u 






OS9 Lev.ll Ramdisk 
Driver $29.95 

Ea sy installation with a ?.;'.:l<-> rior design for a reliable upgrade. (*$49.95 when purchased with our 512K RSDOS 
RAMDISK for $24.95 and our OS_9 Lev. II RAMDISK for $29.95). Or $79.95 with either RAMDISK program I PTulf, FREE 
512K RAM sticker with purchase 1 5I2K upgrade without RAM chips $29.95. Cheapest prices in Rainbow, period III 

-RES JOYSTICK UTILITY SOFTWARE BONANZA ! 

New useful programs for the Tandy Hi-Res Joystick Interface 1 Get FULL 640X640 mouse & joystick resolution from 
BASIC or run CoCoMaxll on the CoCoIII~ w7q the QoCoMaK cartridge $24.95 w/ Iii-Res Interface $34.95 

RGB PATCH NO MORE BLACK S. WHITE DOTS ... 

Did you buy an expensive RGB monitor ( CM-8 ) just so that you could see your Hi-Res artlf ac ting CoCo 2 games in 
BLACK & WHITE ??? RGB PATCH converts most games to display in COLOR on an RGB monitor. TzBK DISK $29,95 

COCO NEWSROOM — 22 FONTS Gl SO PICTURES ! 

Compose your own " CoCo NEWSPAPER " w/ BANNER HEADLINES & 6 ARTICLES using a SOPHISTICATED graphics editor with 
importing of PICTURES , FONTS & FILL PATTERNS from disk. Over 140K of code & WYSIWYG 1 CoColll DISK $49.95 

Sharper & Brighter 



than Tandy CM-8! 



MAGNAVOX 8515 ($299.95*)^rXcW 

Do NOT be FOOLED t The CM-8 has a dot-pitch of .52mm & will not work with any other computer or VCR I The 'SSIS* 
nas a SHA P .4 2mm dot-pitch, will work with IBM FCs/ TyKFv~I5Q0 and its COLOR COMPOSITE input cfisplays PMODE4 
artifact colors unlike the CM-8 1 * $299. 95 when purchased with a $24.95 CoColll cable ~ Add $14 shipping. 



CoCo III 512K RAM sticker $4.99 
Level II Quick Ref Guide $4.99 
Level II Basic09 binder ..$9.95 



300 CoColll POKES $19.95 

CcCoIII MuTtiPak PAL chip .$19.95 
Guide to CoColll Graphics .$21.95 



Better CoColll Graphics 
CoCo III UnraveTed .... 



CoCo III Service Manual 



PASTOIPB 512 Format & Backup up to 4 single- /double-sided, 35/40 trk disks in 1 PASS1 Even 0S9 Lev. Il l 
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All orders plus $3 S/H (Foreign add $5) - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

PO BOX 264 HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 
See our other ads on pages 25 & 27 




CoCo Gallery 



Mill 



I 







John Murvine 



John, of Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, used a utility he wrote to enrich the gallery with 
this winter scene portraying the Wayside Inn Grist Mill located in South Sudbury, 
Massachusetts. 



Honorable Mention 





Santa 



Claire Beaupre 




Mi* u lift ><>ij h* \ v 





ri j j . ■ ■ . . , . * - ■ * , 





Blue Angels 



John Owens 



Color Designer and CoCo Max were used to 
create this seasonal representation of the 
famous man. Claire is a laboratory technologist 
of clinical chemistry in Montreal, Quebec. 



John was inspired to produce this artwork when he saw the 
famous Blue Angels perform in Rome, New York. He used 
Color Max 3. 



18 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 




Wrestle 



Barry O'Brien 



This detailed illustration of the moments 
before a wrestling match was produced 
with CoCo Max. Barry lives and attends 
school in St. John's, Newfoundland. He 
enjoys drawing on his Color Computer. 



This image of a single engine airplane 
flying in the mountains was generated with 
Color Max 3. Brad is a sophomore in high 
school and lives in Wyomissing, 

Pennsylvania. 




Airplane 



Brad Bansner 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery," Share your creations with the 
CoCo Community! Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you created your picture (what programs you 
used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please include a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV programs or material that's already been submitted 
elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

We will award two first prizes of $25, one for the CoCo 3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize of $15 and one third prize of $10. Honorable Mentions 
may also be given, 

Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo Gallery, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Remember, this is a contest and your 

entry will not be returned. A . „ « * 

1 — Angela Kapfhammer, Curator 



December 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



19 



The Amazing A-BUS 




An A-BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter In foreground 

The A- BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 

About t h e A- B U S sy ste m : 

• All the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC, use INPand OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-1 23) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 

Relay Card re-i 40: $1 29 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LEO's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable. 

Reed Relay Card re 156 $99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card AD-142:$129 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 1 00V by adding a 
resistor. 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

12 Bit A/D Converter aism46:$i39 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%. Input range is -4V to 
+4V. Resolution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 130ms. Ideal for thermocouple, 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-1 56 card) 

Digital Input Card in-i41:$59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-i48:$65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cl-144: $89 

Powerful clock/calendar with: battery backup for Time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built in alarm relay, led and buzzer; timing to 1 /1 00 
second. Easy to use decimal format. Lithium battery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph-i45:$79 

Each tone is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pr-i52:$is 

by 4'/2 in. with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I.C.s 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 




RE-140 





IN-141 



» * * ■» ► • * T » " 



jjplflffiy _ J **** 




AD-142 



Smart Stepper Controller sc-149: $299 

World's finest stepper controller On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously. Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 1 0.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in theon board memory For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half. full. wave), 
scale factor, units, holding power, etc. Many inputs' 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (350mA) for small steppers (MO-1 03). Send for SC-149 flyer. 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-1 22: $19 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board. 

Stepper Motor Driver st-143: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with them Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V, bidirectional. 4 phase. 350mA per phase). 
Special Package: 2 motors (MO-1 03) + ST-143* PA-1 81 : $99 

Stepper Motors MO-103: $15or4for$39 

Pancake type, 2Va" dia. W shaft, 7 57step. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec. 12 V, 36 ohm, bipolar. 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701 -P2. 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter, 4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT, AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot. 
Tandy 1 000, 1 000 EX& SX, 1 200, 3000. Usesoneshort slot. 
Apple II, II+. lie. Uses any siot. 
TRS-80 Model 102, 200 Plugs into 40 pin 'system bus" 
Model 1 00. Uses40 pin socket (Socket is duplicatedon adapter) 
TRS-80 Mod 3,4,4 D. Fits 50 pin bus. (Withharddisk useV-cable) 
TRS-80 Model 4 P. Includes extra cable. (50 pin bus is recessed) 
TRS-80 Model I. Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or E/l 
Color Computers (Tandy).Fus ROM slot Muitipak. or Y-cabie. 

A- BUS Cable (3 ft so cond.) ca-i 63: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i20:$99 

Each Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 
161 : $1 2). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 



AR-133.$69 
AR-133...S69 
AR-134...S49 
AR-136...S69 
AR-135...S69 
AR-132...S49 
AR-137...S62 
AR-131..S39 
AR-138...S49 



Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC, checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT & NY residents add sales tax. 
C.O.D. add S3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is $5 
Overseas add 10% 



ALPHA ® 




a Sigma Industries Company 



242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



Technical info: (203) 656-1806 

ffi^T ly 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




v. 



CHRISTMAS 




SPECIAL 



Good through 
January 31 , 1987 



FREE DEMO DISK 

AND COCOSHOW -J- 
PROGRAM 

When you order CoCo Max 



1 ) Free Font Disk a $24 .95 value 

2) Free CGP-220 Color Driver 

the world's best: 1 25 colors a $1 9.95 value 

3) The complete Font library 

(4 disks) for only $29.95 (a $99 value) 

. Only $79.95 including the deluxe hi-res interface. 



Your 
choice of: 



mi 





must be the most enjoyable, useful, 
and awesome program you've ever 

seen or your money back. 



Instantly, 
no questions asked. 



CALL NOW TOLL FREE 1-800 221 JSfSr and let the fun begin 



A FEW QUOTES : 

a,m ? S l of the Macintosh. 

color, very easy 

to learn and use 
. Family Computing 



Computer J. ever had 



as 



In 



anything » K ® ' l ,". t a single I 
scfeen.There^a ber ■ 

command to rem draW , n g I 
la person who has no 

\ ability KW» myse t ^ n Ne spent 
presentable P>c^e e l nioy 

l hours lust ^" B 8UW to the 
I all the thing. ; 

|e^«S !:SSyll ' y0U 
besorry,__ cg _ 



Note: There is only one CoCo Max III. Do not confuse £cou)*?w4f?E 's CoCo Max with similar sounding imitations. 



I 





ton 



SP 




re 



TIP* 



The best program ever written for the Color Computer" 



Thafs how thousands of enthusiastic users rated 
the CoCo Max II drawing program. With CoCo Max 
III we are ready to amaze them again. Instead of 
"patching" CoCo Max II, we rewrote it from scratch 
to take advantage of the CoCo Max III hardware. 
The results will knock your socks off ! Below is a 
brief list of some of the new features, but some, 
such as animation, color sequencing, orthe slide 
show, havetobeseen.Sendforthe Demo Disk, and 
see for yourself. 

Everybody's favorite drawing package features: 

- A 50% larger editing window. - Zoom area 400% 
larger. - New drawing tools: rays, 3D cubes, arcs,... - 
New editing tools: shadow.text size,... - Rotate by 1.5° 
steps - Select any 16 of the 64 possible colors (all 64 
colors displayed at once!) - Powerful color mix: additive, 
subtractive, overlay,... - Full color editing of patterns 
and color changing patterns. - Incredible special eff- 
ects with color cycling up to 8 colors with variable 
speed. -Animation adds the dimension of motion to 
your image. (Must be seen.) - Sophisticated data com- 
pression saves up to 70% of disk space when saving 
pictures. 

In addition, there are dozens of enhancements to the 
multitude of features that made CoCo Max II a bestseller. 



More about CoCo Max til 

CoCo Max III is not an upgrade of CoCo Max II. It is entirety 

rewritten to take advantage of the new CoCo 3 hardware 

(More memory, resolution, colors, speed,...) 

The new CoCo Max III Hi-Res Interface and the CoCo Max II 

HhRes Pack are not interchangable. 

The new interface plugs into the joystick connector. 

The CoCo Max 111 disk is not copy protected. 

CoCo Max 111 only works with the CoCo 3. 

A Y-Cable or Multi-pak is not necessary. 

Colors are printed in five shades of gray. 

CoCo Max III can read CoCo Max II pictures. 



Note: CoCo Max II (for the CoCo 2) is still available on disk 
($79.95). CoCo Max I is still available on tape ($69.95). For 
details, refer to our double page ad in any Rainbow from 
January '86 to July '87 



Toll Free operators are for orders only, If you need precise answers, call 
the tech line. (Detained CoCo Max specs are Included with the Demo Disk.) 



Add $3.00 per order far ■hipping. 
Vlss, NIC. checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT residents tdd sales tsx. 
C.O.D. tdd $3.00 extri. 
Canada: shipping Is $5 
Overton add 10% 



I Technical info: 
Orders only 



(203) 656-1806 

Except in CT 800 221-0916 

■ Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



File Edit Options Colors Font Size Style 



P Li f) 




Imagine this picture in sixteen colors! 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

UiaCoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with It, 
we will refund every penny. 



System Requirements: 

Any CoCo 3 disk system with a Joystick or a Mouse. 

We apologize to tape users, CoCo Max III needs the flexibility of a disk. 

The CoCo Max III system includes: • The special Hi-Res 
interface (foryour mouse or joystick) • The CoCo Max III disk • Many 
utilities: (To convert Max II pictures, Max colors, etc.) • A detailled User's 

Manual. Complete system; nothing else to buy. CoCo Max III : $79.95* 



I 
I 
I 
I 

1 



M WITH COUPON ONLY 



FREE DEMO DISK 




i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i. 



Name 

Street 

City 
State Zip 

Printer used: 



Please include $2 to help defray Processing and Shipping 
costs. (Check, Money Order, etc. Sorry, no COD or Credit 
Cards). Coupon (or copy) must be mailled to: 



Jfr Beware of inferior imitations that DO NOT include a Hi-Res Interlace 
or charge extra tor each utility. 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries. Inc. 



COLORWARE 

242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 




T * * » * * 



.219 
,170 

,90 



550 . 
END 



. .18 
.143 



The listing: dream 

J3 CLS: PRINT 11 IN THIS ADVENTURE, 
YOU MUST FIND THE STOLEN CHRI 
STMAS TOYS, WHICH ARE HIDDEN IN 
A MAGIC WORLD, AND RETURN TH 

EM TO YOUR HOUSE - 11 
1J3 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 11 THIS ADVE 
NTURE USES TWO WORD COMMANDS SU 
CH AS, get knife OR say help, T 
HE GAME HAS NO SAVE/ LoXd FUNCTI 
ON, BUT IF YOU SHOULDPRESS BREAK 
TYPE CONT TO CONTIN-UE. I HOPE 
YOU ENJOY IT. 11 
2J3 PRINT@448, ff PRESS <SPACEBAR> 
TO CONTINUE 11 ;INKEY$ 
3j3 IFINKEY$=" "THEN4j3ELSE3j3 
4j3 CLS: PRINT 0 THE VERBS ARE : 11 
5j3 PRINT" ASK 

GET 
DROP 
PUT 



6j3 PRINT 11 



USE 
EAT 
SAY" 
LOOK 
PULL" : 

PRINT@44 8," PRESS <SPACEBAR> TO 
CONTINUE" ;INKEY$ 
7j3 IFINKEY$=» "THEN8 j3ELSE7 j3 
8j3 CLS 

9j3 DIM A$(8) ,B$(8) ,C$(8) :L=1 
Ij3j3 DATA IN THE ENTRANCE TO THIS 
ENCHANTING WORLD, MAGIC KNIFE, WE 
ST 

110 DATA IN THE UPSIDE DOWN 

FOREST, UPSIDE DOWN TREES, NORTH 
EAST 

120 DATA IN A COURTYARD, A BEAUTI 
FUL FOUNTAIN, NORTH NORTHEAST 

SOUTH WEST 
130 DATA AT A POND, PINK WATER, SO 
UTHWEST 

140 DATA IN FRONT OF A LARGE 

STONE , STONE , SOUTH 
150 DATA IN A FRUIT ORCHARD, FRUI 
T, NORTH EAST 

160 DATA IN FRONT OF AN ELF, ELF, 
SOUTH 

170 DATA IN A SMALL SHACK, GIFTS, 



Corrections 



"Gift Buyer s Guide" (November 1987, Page 57): The 
price for Spectrum Projects" CoCo Keyboard Ex- 
tender Cable was incorrectly stated as being $19.95. 
The actual price is $39.95. 

"A Desktop Publisher on a Shoestring" (October 
1987, Page 58): Author H. Allen Curtis has written 
to indicate some minor errors in the article. First, in 
the rightmost column on Page 62, the user is told to 
"Change Line 35 to:". This should actually read 
"Insert Line 35" since that line did not already exist. 
Just below that, in the fifth line of Line 35, you should 
change T0 to TO. Finally, in Line 205 of Listing L a 
value of &24 was given. This should read &H24, 
However, this doesn't have any effect on program 
execution. 

"CoCoDraw Update" (October 1987, Page 98): In the 
rightmost column of Page 98, Line 1 1 is missing a 
parenthesis. In that line, just after the value of 50, 
should be two parentheses, so that section should read 

N/50 ) ) instead of N/50 ) . 

For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DRTfl 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIC> 
prompt. 



About Your Subscription 



Your copy of THE RAINBOW is sent second class 
mail. You must notify us of a new address when 
you move. Notification should reach us no later 
than the 15th of the month prior to the month in 
which you change your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending another copy when you 
fail to notify us* 

Your mailing label also shows an account 
number and the subscription expiration date. 
Please indicate this account number when renew- 
ing or corresponding with us* It will help us help 
you better and faster. 

For Canadian and other non-U. S. subscribers, 
there may be a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial office address. Do not 
send any correspondence to that mailing address. 
Send it to our editorial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
This applies to everyone except those whose 
subscriptions are through our distributor in 
Australia. 



24 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



THE SHOPPING LIST $ 



COCO CABLES AND ... 

Printer / Modem 10' Extender Cable $14.95 

TANDY CM-8 RGB Analog 6* Video Ext Cable $19.95 

Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pin) $19.95 

Cassette 1 Y' Cable - Connect a 26-3028 Hi-Res Joy - 
stick interface & Tape Recorder to CoCoIII .$19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

Joystick/Mouse 10 1 Ext Cable $19.95 

No more Deluxe RS-232 paks left to hook up ptr & 
modem ? Buy our RS-^232 "Y" Cable (4 pin) ....$24.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) $24.95 

MAGNA VOX 8505 / 8515 / 8CM643 Analog RGB cable .$24.95 
Other Analog RGB monitor cable ( Specify ! > ..$39.95 
15" Multi-Pak/Disk Pak Extender - Move your Multi- 
Disk Paks further away"T$44?^ Closeout .... $29.95 
40 Pin Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk with a 

Voice Pak f Word Pak f CoCo Max, etc $29.95 

CoCo RS232 Switcher - Now easily switch between a 
printer & modem at the flick of a switch 1 ..$29.95 



5 1/4" Diskettes in any quantity 49 cents 

C-10 tapes - Minimum quantity ( 20 pes ) ... 69 cents 
CoCoII/CoCoIII KEYCAPS - Replace worn keysl .$4.99 

Rompak w/Blank PC Board 27xx series $9.95 

"D" Rev motherboard w/o socketed chips $16.95 

Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV interfer- 
ence created by CoCol $19.95 

Warg Fighter 3-D - A CoCo III Space Fighter game 

with " 3-D GLASSES " ! By Steve Bjork l $39.95 

CoCo III keyboard - upgrade your CoCo II keyboard 1 
" Package ^ deal w/ FKEYS III($24.95) software $39.95 

HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM (SAVE$20) $79.95 

MAGNA VOX TV tuner - Now you can watch TV with your 

Magnayox 8505/8515 RGB Analog monitor 1 $99.95 

Super Controller - Up to 4 DOSs by a POKE ..$99.95 
1200 Baud Modem (Hayes compatible) Auto-dial /answer 
$139.95. Req's Modem cable ( 4pin or DB25 ) ..$19.95 
PBH-64 - A combo Parallel Printer interface & 64K 
Print Buffer 1 COMPUTE while you PRINT ! ....$149.95 
SONY KV-1311CR - ( CHEAPEST PRICE IN THE RAINBCW ) 1 ! 
$439.95/Add $40.00 for cable ($20.00 shipping) 



Breaking your back 
typing on your 
CoCo??? 





i 



Sit back and relax with 
a Spectrum keyboard 
extender cable. $39 t 95 
$ee 11/87 Rainbow review 
page 137 



Now you can extend your present keyboard away from 
your CoCoII/CoCoIII I Easier typing & requires no 
soldering I You also have the option to leave your 
present keyboard intact & hook up a second keybd 
for remote operation 1 Spectrum Keyboard extender 

cable w/ EXTERN&L CoCoII keyboard $49.95 

Design by Marty Goodman / so you know it's quality I 



SUPER CHIP -SALE- 

2764 EPROM $4.95 27128 EPR0M $6.95 

6821 Standard PIA ^r9ST Closeout pricel $6.95 

68764 EPROM Closeout price! $12.95 

6847 VDG Chip Closeout pricel $12.95 

6809E CPU Chip :$%9*SS: Closeout pricel $12.95 

CoCo III Multipak - "NEW" PAL chip (For Gray and 

White 26-3024 nodels ONLY) $19.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) $19.95 

Disk ROM 1.1 - (Needed for CoCoIII ) $29.95 

Original SAM Chip (6883) $29.95 

Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - Closeout pricel $29.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two PIA 1 s f 6809E CPU 
and SAM Chips (BE PREPARED) Closeout pricel $49.95 

NEW1 ' Upgraded ' CoCoIII " GIME " chip $79.95 

EPROM Programmer - uses 2716s up to 27512s ! Super 
fast programming 1 - See April '86 review .$149.95 

COCO LIBRARY ... 

A History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 $6.95 

CoCo Memory Map Reg . Now only $9.95 

New! 200 MORE Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 

Basic Programming Tricks Revealed ^£4f£Sr .... $9.95 

500 Pokes, Peeks *N Execs $16.95 

300 CoCoIII POKES - #1 CoCoIII bestseller! .$19.95 

Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S9 Level II $19.95 

A Guide to CoCo III GRAPHICS (7/87 review) .$21.95 
Better Graphics on CoCo3 (8/87 review pgl43) $24.95 

CoCo II Service Manual (Specify Cat.#) $29.95 

CoCo III Unraveled - A best seller 1 ! 1 $29.95 

Inside 0S-9 Level II $39.95 

CoCo III Service Manual - Current version I .$39.95 
Color / Extended/Disk Basic Unraveled $49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF ... 

WIOQ Adapter- Hookup 2 Atari type joysticks. $19.95 
CoCo Keybd - Low profile, fits all CoCo lis & "F"s 
WAS $39.95 - NOW $19.95. D/E CoCo I adapter $12.95 
WIOQ Trackball - Regularly $69.95 , Now only. $24.95 
QS-9 Level II Solution - A front-end " USER 

FR IENDLY " interface for LEVEL II $29.95 

Universal Video Drvr - All monitors & CoCos .$29.95 
(2) Chip 64K Upgrade - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II .$29.95 

28 pin act Basic - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II $34.95 

PAL SWITCHER - Req. 26~3024 MPI. Switch from CoCoII 

to CoCoIII mode $29.95 w/NEW PAL $39.95 

Real Time Clock - Compatible w/ 0S-9 or RSD0S f easy 
internal mounting , CoCoII / III compatible! ..$59.95 
Top FD-502 Drive 1 (#26-3133) - SAVE $60 ..$139.95 

$229.95 



2400 Baud Modem -(Great for Delphi ): 
CoCo III DISK DRIVE 0 - (Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150 plus value 1 I I ) . . .$239.95 
512K COLOR CDMP17TER III (Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150+ value I ) 3$3*^&3r*$249.95 



HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
See our other 2 ads on pages 17 & 27 ! ! ! 



NOWHERE! use THE force LUKE ! 
180 F0RI=1T08 

190 READ A$(I) ,B$(I) ,C$(I) 
200 NEXT 

210 PRINT" YOU ARE:" ;A$(L) 

220 PRINT" YOU SEE:";B$(L) 

230 PRINT" YOU CAN GO:";C$(L) 

240 INPUT"WHAT DO YOU WISH FOR" ; 

M$ 

250 ON L GOSUB 270,330,400,470,5 
10,550, 610, 650 

2 60 FORX=1TO1500:NEXTX:CLS:GOTO2 
10 

270 IFM$="GET KNIFE "THENPRINT" OK 
AY, YOU HAVE IT . " : KNIFE=1 : B$ ( 1 ) = 
"A RAINBOW ... THE RAINBOW" 
280 IFM$="LOOK KNIFE "THENPRINT "I 
T IS SHAPED WEIRD." 
290 IFM$="GET RAINBOW "THENPRINT " 
YOU HAVE IT. " : B$ (1) ="LOTS OF INT 
ERESTING THINGS." 
300 IFM$="LOOK RAINBOW" THENPRINT 
"IT IS MADE UP OF RAINBOW MAGA- 
ZINES. " 
310 IFM$="W"THENL=2 
320 RETURN 

330 IFM$="LOOK TREES" THENPRINT "T 
HE limbS ARE SHAPED FUNNY.":B$(2 
)="UPSIDE DOWN TREES FUNNY limb 
S" 

340 IFM$="PULL LIMB " THENPRINT "YO 
U HERE A NOISE IN THE DISTANCE": 
LIMB=1 

350 IFM$="LOOK LIMB" THENPRINT "IT 

•S FUNNY, OKAY?" 

360 IFM$="N"THENL=3 

370 IFM$="E"THENL=1 

380 IFKNIFE=2ANDLIMB=1ANDRAIN=1A 

NDM$="SAY GIFT"THENL=8 

390 RETURN 

400 IFM$="LOOK FOUNTAIN"THENPRIN 
T"THE WATER IS A RAINBOW OF COLO 
RS" 

410 IFM$="GET FOUNTAIN" THENPRINT 



Mouse Tales By Logan Ward 




"DON'T TAKE ALL THE BEAUTY AWAY, 
ii 

420 IFM$="N"THENL=5 
430 IFM$="NE"THENL=4 
440 IFM$="W"THENL=6 
450 IFM$="S"THENL=2 
460 RETURN 

470 IFM$="LOOK POND"THENPRINT"A 
RAINBOW WOULD LOOK BEATIFUL HE 
RE!" 

480 IFM$="DROP RAINBOW" THENPRINT 
"YOU HEAR ANOTHER SOUND IN THE 

DISTANCE" :RAIN=1:B$ (4)="RAINBOW 

OVER POND" 
490 IFM$="SW"THENL=3 
500 RETURN 

510 IFM$="LOOK STONE" THENPRINT" T 
HERE IS A SLOT IN IT." 
520 IFM$="PUT KNIFE "ANDKNIFE=1TH 
ENINPUT" WHERE" ; DD$ : IFDD$="STONE" 
THENPRINT" YOU HEAR A THIRD SOUND 
IN THE DISTANCE !":KNIFE=2:B$( 
5)="KNIFE IN STONE" 
530 IFM$="S"THENL=3 
540 RETURN 

550 IFM$="LOOK ORCHARD "THENPRINT 

"IT IS FILLED WITH FRUIT TREES." 
560 IFM$="GET FRUIT"THENPRINT"OK 

AY, YOU HAVE IT.":FRU=1 

570 I F FRU= 1 ANDM $ = " EAT FRUIT"THEN 

PRINT "THEN FRUIT POISONED YOU, B 

ECAUSEYOU WERE NOT USED TO IT." 

580 IFM$="N"THENL=7 

590 IFM$="E"THENL=3 

600 RETURN 

610 IFM$="ASK ELF 11 THENPRINT " I F Y 
E EQUALS THREE AND 
SOUND IS AROUND THEN 
SAY GIFT IN T 

HE UPSIDE DOWN FOREST .": FORX=lTO 
5000 : NEXTX 

620 IFM$="LOOK ELF "THENPRINT "HE 
IS A CRISTMAS ELF." 
630 IFM$="S"THENL=6 
640 RETURN 

650 IFM$="LOOK GIFTS "THENPRINT"T 

HEY ARE THE STOLEN ONES . 11 

660 IFM$="GET GI FTS "THENPRINT 11 YO 

U HAVE THEM." :GF=l:B$(8)="LOTS 0 

F INTERESTING THINGS" 

670 IFGF=1ANDM$="USE FORCE "THEN6 

90 

680 RETURN 

690 CLS: PRINT" YOU DID IT! YOU 

RETURNED THE GIFTS NOT ONLY TO 
YOUR HOUSE BUTTO EVERY HOUSE. Y 
OU MADE CHRISTMAS A REAL C 

HRISTMAS ! " : END /R\ 



26 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 



Software Bonanza Pak 

A SPECTACULAR SOFTWARE BONANZA with the following 
12 programs ; CoCo Checker, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo 
Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, Spectrum Font 
Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, Fastdupe II, 64K 
Disk Utility, Spectrum DOS, Basics, CoCo Calender 
& OS9-Solution (a $300 plus value) for only $99.95 



CoCo III Software Library 

Create an instant library of Spectrum Projects TOP 
CoCo I II software! Get FONT BONANZA, FONT DISK #1, 
FKEYS III, C III GRAPHICS, CoCoIII UTILITIES and 
FASTDUPE II (a $150 plus value) for only $49.95 



CoCo III Utilities 



Terrific utility programs for the Color Computer 
III! Includes a CoCoII to CoCoIII Converter, 32K 
Hi -Res screen saver, 40/80 Column Word Processor, 
RAM tester, DEMO BALL generator, SMOOTH Scrolling 
demos. 128K DISK $24.95 (see 8/87 Rainbow review) 



CoCo III Secrets Revealed 

An introduction to the Color Computer III that 
compares the differences between the CoCol/lI and 
the NEW CoCoIII. Includes: GLME chip specs, CoCoII 
to CoCoIII converter and a 128/512K RAM test. 
"Offers some very g_ood information to pro- 
grammers." - Rainbow review 2/87 $19.95 



CoCo III Screen Dump 



This is the program for HARDCOPY GRAPHICS for 
Radio Shack bit -image, dot-matrix printers ( DMF~ 
105/ DMP-130 , etc.) and Epson compatibles (Star 
Micronics, Panasonic, etc . ) . Will print rtSCREEN 1- 
4 and PMODE 0-4. 16 patterns can be CUSTOMIZED for 
any color onTHe screen! 128K CoCoIII DISK $24.95 



Fkeys 



A productivity enhancement that gives you the 
capability to add twenty (20) predefined functions 
to the CoCoIII by using the CTRL, Fl and F2 keys ! ! 
$24.95 "Get more from your keyboard with FKEYS 
III" - Rainbow review 4/87 



C III Graphics 



A drawing program for the CoCoIII using the new 
ENHANCED graphic features: 320X192 graphics, 16 of 
any 64 colors, plus the ability to SAVE and LOAD 
32K screens. "Paint pretty pictures on the CoCo3." 
- Rainbow review 12/86 $19.95 



OS-9 Solution 



NOW, a program that creates a " USER FRIENDLY " 
environment within OS~9. The 
replaces 20 of the old 



OS-9 SOLUTION 
" USER HOSTILE " commands 
with single; keystroke , menu driven ccmrands. No 
more typing in conplex long pathnames or remember- 
ing complicated syntaxes! $29.95 



Telopatch III 



All the FEATURES of TFLRPATCH plus the classically 
proportioned characters of the WIZARD with TRUE 
lowercase! Now CoCoIII compatible! (Upgrade $15 
w/proof of purcha se ) $ 29 . 95 



Tape/Disk Utility 



Multi-Pak Crak 



Disk Utility 2.1A 



A mu lti - featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk 
handling. Utilize a directory window to 
selectively^ sort, move, rename & kill ~£ile 
entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy 
& backup. Single execution of both Basic & ML 
programs. 64K DISK $29.95. NOW also CoCoIII 
compatible! Upgrade only $15 w/proof of purchase 



Spectrum DOS 



Add 24 NEW Disk commands with 2 Hi-Res screens! 
Supports 40 track & Double -sided drives, 6ms 
st epping , auto disk search , error trapping and 
"EPR0MABLE"7~S4K DISK3^^STNew LOW price! $29.95 



Spectrum Font Generator 

Write files using any CoCo Word Processor (TW-64, 
EliteWord, etc.) and convert them to Highly 
Detailed character sets ! Some of the character 
sets supported are Italics, Old English , 
Futuristic & Block ! Character set editor included 
& supports most dotTTHtrix printers! $29.95 



Schematic 



tocessor 



Save time and design pro looking diagrams using a 
480X540 pixel worksheet w/6 viewing windows. Over 
-30 electronic symbols w /TO definable symbols - 
TEven Logic gates & Multipiii chips 1 ) Print hard 
copy & save to disk. 64K DISK $29,95 



A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and 
disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic copy 
of an entire disk of programs to tape. Ideal for 
Rainbow On Tape to disk. Also copies tape to tape 
& prints tape S disk directories. TAPE?DISK_ $24.95 



Save ROMPAKS on your 64K Disk System using the RS 
Multi-Pak Interface. Eliminate constant plugging 
in of ROMPAKS by keeping all PAK software on disk. 
Includes POXES for " PROBLEM " ROMPAKS & the NEW 16K 
PAKS (Demon Attack, Dragons Lair..) $29.95 NOW 
CoCo3 compatible! Upgrade $15 w/proof of purchase 



CoCo III Font Bonanza 

Replace the ' PLAIN ' CoCoIH text characters from a 
menu of INCREDIBLE fonts or use the hi -res editor 
to modify or create your own ! 1 ! 128K DISK $29.95. 
NEW! FONT DISK #1 with over 25 mor e FONTS ! $19.95. 
Buy them both "Tor only $39.95 - Gets a * * * * 
Rating - Rainbow review 4/87 



CoCo Checker 



Something possibly wrong with your CoCo ? CoCo 
Checker is the answer! Will test your ROMs, RAMs, 
Disk Drives S Controller, Printer, Keyboard, 
Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, PIAs, VDG, Internal 
Clock Speed, Multi-pak Interface and more! $24.95 



Rickoyterm 2.0 



Supports 40/80 column mode, ASCII or XMODE M 
uploads & clownToads, Deluxe RS232 PAK or Serial 
' BITE I ANGER ' port, 300/ 1200 Baud! Plus ' STRINGS ' 
(predefined sequences of text) can be read into 
the BUFFER from DISK S transmitted by NAME! Type 
ahead & auto~repeat are also supported. 128K 
CoCoIII DISK $39.95 (see 9/87 Rainbow review) 



64K Disk Utility Package 

Take advantage of an expanded 64K machine. Make an 
additional oK of RAM available by relocating the 
Ext Basic ROM from $8000 to $D800. Copy ROMPAKs to 
disk (even " protected " 1 PAKs) and create a 32K 
SPOOL buffer for printing. $24.95 



EZ Base 



A truly friendly data base program at an afford - 
able price! Keep inventories, nobby collections, 
recipes, card lists and much more! Hi -Res screen, 
up to 500 records with 15 fields , reoord or field 
search & a MAILING LABELS option. 32K DISK $29.95 



Blackjack Royalo 



A Hi - Res graphics casino blackjack simulation and 
card counting tutor. Fully realistic play 
includes: double clown, splits, surrender, insur- 
ance, 1-8 decks, burnt cards, shuffle frequency 
amd more ! "This fine program is a must for the 
CoCo Blackjack player." - Rainbow review $24.95 



CoCo Calendar 



Get organised for 365 days today with the CoCo 
Calendar ! Designed for recording the entire year's 
occasions and daily appoin timen Ls so you can plan 
ahead _ You can store HUNDREDS of entries and our 
GRAPHIC calendar will show all MEMOS! $19.95 



Spectrum Adventure Generator 

The Spectrum Adventure Generator creates adventure 
g_ames that are 100% ML & very fast ! Up to 99 
rooms, 255 objects, 70 command words & 255 
conditional flags can "be used". 64K DISK $29.95 



THE KITCHEN SINK . . . 

Everything but the KITCHEN SINK ! i I Receive all 
twenty-three (23) Colorf ul~Uti 1 i ties from top to 
bottom, the Software bonanza ?ak to CqCq Calendar 
(a $500 plus value) for a SPECIAL prici~Tl49.951 ! ! 





D) 
C 

c Q x 

CO lO CO 

Hi 

Q. Off 



GO 



8 a 



■5 co-c 

CO 03 -o 
® CO 

D. to 

2 co 



to 



m in 




CoCo 3 



— *n- — ZZ'&ts-. II 




m I •! I 






By Renard DellaFave 



^^Manukkah brings the brilliance of CoCo 3 graphics 
together with the Hanukkah festival of lights, and 
K m also demonstrates animation techniques for use on 
the CoCo 3. 

Hanukkah draws a menorah, dradle, and a Star of David 
on the screen; the flame on the menorah flickers and the 
dradle spins and moves- For each tap of a key another flame 
is added to the menorah, in the traditional order of right- 
to-left- 

Both the flame and the dradle are literally scanned onto 
the screen from DRTR statements, which makes it very easy 
to modify their shapes. The flame, as it is animated by palette 
switching in Line 1 380, is immediately saved into HGET buffer 
#1. The dradle images are first modified using HLINE 
statements to create the four frames that are used in its HGET/ 
HPUT animation. Each HBUFFER is used before the next one 
is reserved, due to a bug in CoCo 3's basic. 

After the dradle and flame have been drawn and put in 
HBUFFERS with the HGET command, the screen is cleared and 
the stationary objects are created. Both the menorah and the 
Star of David are drawn using HDRAW and HPRINT com- 
mands; the text is put on the screen with HPRINT. The center 
(shamas) and the rightmost flame are then put on the 
menorah with HPUT, and the main loop of the program is 
entered. 

All the action takes place in the main loop. The flames arc 

Renard DellaFave is a student living in Raleigh, North 
Carolina, and is a self-taught programmer, Besides comput- 
ers, he enjoys electronics, books and science, 

28 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



flickered by exchanging the values of two palette slots, and 
the text is made to change color by changing the value of 
a single slot. The dradle is moved by HPUT to a different 
position each time, and spun by cycling through the four 
images created earlier. Line 1400 checks to see if a key has 
been pressed, and adds another flame if one has. 

1 HhF'PV HmHIJ* \ nH 




Hanukkah is heavily remarked, making it is easier to 
understand, but these remarks can safely be left out if you 
want, 

(Questions about this program may be directed to the 
author by calling 919-78 7-8396.) □ 





/ 








V 


220 


137 


1080 


146 




370 ... 


27 


1170 


62 






560 


4 


1320 


169 






700 ... 


. . . .11 


1490 


150 






920 


180 


END 


. . .198 



The listing: HflNUKKflH 

1 POKE &HFFD9 , j3 1 SPEED UP CPU TO 
1.78MHZ 

2 REM PRESS ANY KEY TO UPDATE 

3 REM MENORAH FOR NEXT DAY 

4 REM <(<(<(<(<(!)>)>)>)>)> 

5 REM # RENARD DELLAFAVE # 

6 REM # COPYRIGHT (C) # 

7 REM # 1987 # 

8 REM # VERSION #:2.4 # 

9 REM <(<(<(<(<(!)>)>)>)>)> 

1J3J3 CLS: INPUT 11 ARE YOU USING A RG 
B MONITOR 11 ;MN$ : IF LEFT$ (MN$ , 1) = lf 
Y lf THEN MS=-1 
HJZf MO=MS + l 

120 REM NORMALIZE ON <BREAK> 
130 ON BRK GOTO 150 
140 GOTO 170 

150 IF MS=0 THEN PALETTE CMP ELS 



E PALETTE RGB 

160 CLS: PRINT 11 **** PROGRAM EXIT** 
** lf :POKE 65496,0:END 
170 HSCREEN 2 

180 HBUFF1,15 3 'BUFFER FOR FLAME 

190 REM SET UP PALETTES 

200 DIM B(1),S(1) 'FLAME ANIMATI 

ON COLORS FOR EACH MONITOR 

210 B(0)=32:B(1)=5:S(0)=52:S(1)= 

39 

220 DATA 0,12,28,35,42,44,0,63,5 
,43,39,5,39,0,0,0 

2 30 FOR CA=0 TO 15: READ CS : PALET 
TE CA,CS:NEXT CA 

240 IF MS=-1 THEN PALETTE 3 , 54 : P 
ALETTE 4,42: PALETTE 5,27: PALETTE 

11, 32: PALETTE 12,53 
250 REM DRAW AND GET FLAME IMAGE 
260 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
,0,0,0,0 

270 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
,0,0,0,0 

280 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,6,0,0 
,0,0,0,0 

290 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,6,6,6,0 
,0,0,0,0 

300 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,6,6,2,6,6,0 



Hardware 

Specia 

Communications 




300/1200 baud Fully Hayes 

compatible 
Modem - 2 Year Warranty 

$129. OO 

[Modem & Cable] 

3QQ/12QQ/24QQ baud 
Fully Hayes 
Compatible Modem - CCITT 
2 Year Warranty 

$249. OO 

[Modem & Cable] 



i 



■ ■ 



THE DTHER GUYS CoCo 

55 North Main Street 
Suite 301-D 
PG Box H 

Logan Utah 84321 



'KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. 569.95— Only S39.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k, 
32k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income G. 
expense statement [current & 'YTD'), journal, ledger, 899 accounts ( 2350 entries on 
32k & 64k [710 accounts & entries on 1 6k] [disk only]. Version 1.2 has screen printouts. 

Rainbow Review 1.1- 9/84 ■ 1 .2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. S69.95— ONLY $24.95 

Filing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 16 fields 
with 255 characters per field [40B0 characters/record]. Sort, match S. print any field. 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only]. 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 1 0/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles, elipses. boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on line HELPS at all 
times. Allows text on the graphics screen S. movement of objects on the screen. Can be 
used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. GRAPHICS EDITOR. REG. 
$39.95— ONLY $24.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 

Rainbow Review 7/B5. Hot CoCo 9/B5 "The graphics bargain of the year 1 ' 

C KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & more. User friendly/menu 
driven. Includes manual. $39.95 or $49.95 General Ledger &. Accounts Receivables. 

PskOnly] 'COCO WINDOWS' 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 10 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering. Four function 
calculator, with memory. The above options can be called anytime while running or writing 
in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES. YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. $24.95 [disk 
or tape] includes manual. 




CBQ13 753-7620 
CBOO) 942*9402 



[Add S3.QO far postage & handling] 
CO.O. , Money Order, Check in U.S. Funds [Please specify if J&M 

controller] 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 29 



310 DATA 0,0,0,0,6, 6, 3,3,3,5,5,0 
, 0, 0, 0, 0 

320 DATA 0,0,0,6,6,6,6,3,7,5,6,6 
,0,0,0,0 

330 DATA 0,0,0,6,6,6,3,7,7,5,6,6 
,0,0,0,0 

340 DATA 0,0,0,6,6,6,3,7,7,7,6,6 
,0,0,0,0 

350 DATA 0,0,6,6,6,7,7,7,7,7,6,6 
,0,0,0,0 

360 DATA 0,0,6,6,6,7,7,7,7,7,6,6 
,0,0,0,0 

370 DATA 0,0,6,6,6,7,7,7,7,7,7,6 
,0,0,0,0 

380 DATA 0,0,0,6,6,7,7,4,7,7,7,6 
, )3 , )3 , j3 , )3 

390 DATA 0,0,0,6,7,7,7,4,4,7,6,6 
,0,0,0,0 

400 DATA 0,0,0,6,7,7,7,4,4,7,6,0 

410 DATA 0,0,0,6,6,7,7,4,4,7,6,0 

420 DATA 0,0,0,0,6,6,7,4,7,6,0,0 
,0,0,0,0 

430 REM SCAN FLAME IMAGE FROM DA 
TA 

440 FOR Y=0 TO 32 STEP 2 : FOR X=0 




HBH* 



WITH CLOCK ARITHMETIC AND MONEY 

MATH YOU GET COMPLETE COVERAGE OF 
THE TIME AND MONEY SKILLS YOU TEACH 1 . 



t, ,- CYBERNETICS 

V H 11 R H 6=1 T 

C T BUR H E TICS 



5705 CHESSWOOD DR 
KNOXVILLE, TN 37912 
615-688-4865 



Please send me a FREE CATALOG of all CY-BURNET-ICS software 

Please send Ihe TIME & MONEY DUO (a S59 90 value) lot S39.95 (32k) 

Please send CLOCK ARITHMETIC @ $29 95 (32k) 

Please send MONEY MATH @ S29.9S (32k) 

"We use CASSETTE DISK NETWORK II 

add S3 03 lor DISK or oers/$2.0O postage & handling 



urn ■ 

STREET 
CITY _ 



.STATE 



.ZIP. 



TO 3)3 STEP 2 
45)3 READ V:IF V=)3 THEN HRESET (X, 
Y) :GOTO 48)3 

4 6)3 C=V+5 'COMPUTE CORRECT COLOR 

47) 3 HSET(X/2,Y/2,C) 

48) 3 NEXT X,Y 

49) 3 REM STORE FLAME IN HBUFFER # 
1 

500 HGET (J3,J3)-(16,16) ,1 
510 HCLS)3 

52 J3 REM DRAW AND GET DRADLES 



SI 0 DATA 


0 


0 0 
' P , P i 


0 

' a i 


0 

' X' i 


0 

F X^ i 


0 0 

r P , P 


0 

f A i 


0 

F P 


1 

r x 


1 

f X 


(%(%(% 

,P,P,P 






















RAM DATA 


0 

X* - 


0 0 
r P , P i 


0 
' a i 


0 
' X' i 


0 

' A i 


0 0 
r P , P i 


0 

F X* i 


0 

F X* 




1 

f X 


(%(%(% 

,P,P,P 






















5 50 DATA 


0 

X* i 


0 0 
' P , P i 


0 

r X* i 


0 

' P i 


0 

F X' i 


0 0 
r P , P t 


0 

F X* i 


1 
r -X. 


1 


1 


05 05 05 

iP iP iP 






















560 DATA 


0 

a i 


,0,0, 
f a / a i 


» 0 , 


, 0 , 

F A 7 i 


r 0 , 
F A i 


,0.0 

F A / A i 


r 0 

F A i 


r 1 


f 1 


. 0 

r a 


05 05 05 

tP iP iP 






















570 DATA 


A i 


r0/0i 


r 2 , 


r 2 , 


F0i 
F A i 


r 0/ 0 


, 1 


r 1 


r i 


r A^ 


0 0 0 

1 p 1 p 1 p 












.2,0, 






r0 

F 


r0 

F " 


58 0 DATA 


0, 

A i 


f 0/0, 


F 2 


F 2 


F 2 , 


F li 


r 1 


0 0 0 
1 P 1 P 1 P 






















59 0 DATA 


0 
a 


r 0 , 2 


r 2 

F 


r 2 , 

F 


r 2 , 

F 


r 2 , 2 


f 1 


r 2 

F 


r 2 

F 


. 2 

F 


0 0 0 
1 P 1 P 1 P 






















600 DATA 


0 


r 0 , 2 
F A / 


, 2 

F 


. 2 


r 2 

F 


.2.2 


r 2 

F 


r 2 

F 


r 2 

F 


r 2 

F 


o r?5 (75 
i * i P i P 






















610 DATA 


0 

X 7 


.0.2 

r a / ^ 


. 2 

F ^ 


. 2 

F ^ 


. 2 

F ^ 


.2.2 


. 2 

. XJ 


. 2 

F 


. 2 

F 


. 2 

F 


2 0 0 
t * t P , P 






















62 0 DATA 

w X^ x/ J_/xx J. xx 


0 

X* i 


.0.2 

r P r ^ i 


. 2 


. 2 


. 2 

F ^ 


.2.2 

F ™ / ™ 


. 2 


. 2 

F 


. 2 

F 


. 2 


2 0 0 
i * i p i p 






















610 DATA 


0 
X* 


2 2 


2 

F ^ 


2 

F ^ 


2 

F ^ 


2 2 


2 

F ^ 


2 

F ^ 


2 

F ^ 


2 


2 0 0 
t t P ,P 






















64 0 DATA 


0 
a 


2 2 


2 


2 


2 


2 2 


2 

F ^ i 


2 

F i 


2 


2 

F 


0 0 0 
1 P 1 P 1 P 






















650 DATA 

w — <* Xy xx J. xx 


0 
X' 


2 2 


2 


2 


2 


2 2 


2 


2 


2 


,2 


0 0 0 
1 p 1 p 1 p 






















6 60 DATA 

V-J V-J X/ 1— /XX X. XX 


2 


2 2 

F / 


2 

F ^ 


2 

F ^ 


2 

F ^ 


2 2 


2 

F ^ 


2 

F ^ 


2 

F 


2 


0 0 0 
i P i P i P 






















670 DATA 

V— ' r JL/ x^xx ^ xx 


2 


r 2 . 2 


r 2 


, 2 


. 2 


.2.2 


r 2 


r 2 

F &J 


r 2 

i 


. 2 


0 0 0 
i P i P i P 






















68)3 DATA 


2, 


,2,2, 


f2, 


f2, 


f2, 


-2,2, 


-2, 


-2, 


-2, 


-0 


,)3,)3,)3 






















69)3 DATA 


0, 


-1/2, 




f2, 


r 1; 


-2,2, 


-2 ( 


,2, 


-2, 


-0 


,)3,)3,)3 






















7)3)3 DATA 


0, 


.0,1, 


r 1, 


r 1 


r l 


,1,2, 


-2, 


-2, 


-0, 


-0 


,)3,)3,)3 






















71)3 DATA 


0, 


-0,1, 


rl. 


F li 


rlj 


-1,1, 


- 1, 


-1, 


-0, 


-0 


,)3,)3,)3 




















-0 


72)3 DATA 


0, 


■0,0, 


r li 


fIi 


r li 


-1,1, 


-1, 


-0, 


-0, 


,)3,)3,)3 






















73)3 DATA 


0, 


-0,0, 


f1| 


F 1/ 


' 1/ 


■1,0, 


0, 


-0, 


-0, 


-0 


,0,0,0 






















74)3 DATA 


0- 


-0,0, 




rlj 




■0,0, 


0, 


0, 


■0, 


-0 



,0,0,0 

75) 3 REM SCAN DATA FOR DRADLE TO 
SCREEN 

76) 3 FOR Y=)3 TO 21:FOR X=3 TO 17 
770 READ V 



30 



THE RAINBOW December 1987 



78j3 IF V=J3 THEN GOTO 8 J3j3 ELSE IF 
V=l THEN C=4 ELSE IF V=2 THEN C 

=5 

790 HSET(X,Y,C) :HSET(X+4j3, Y, C) :H 
SET(X+8J3, Y,C) :HSET(X+12j3, Y,C) 
8j30 NEXT X,Y 

81j3 REM SET UP "CORNERS" WITH HL 
INES 

82 jd HCOLOR 4 

83j3 REM FRAME j3 CORNER LINES 
840 HLINE (6, 5) -(4, 15) , PSET 
85J3 HLINE (7, 5) -(4, 15 ), PSET 
860 HLINE(15,7) -(11, 17) , PSET 
87J3 HLINE (15 ,8) -(12,17) , PSET 
880 REM FRAME 1 CORNER LINES 
890 HLINE (8+40, 5) -(5+40, 15) , PSET 
900 HLINE(8+40, 6) -(5+40, 16) , PSET 
910 HLINE(9+40, 6) -(6+40, 16) , PSET 
920 HLINE(10+40, 6) -(7+40, 16) , PSE 
T 

930 REM FRAME 2 CORNER LINES 

940 HLINE(10+80,7)-(8+80, 16) ,PSE 

T 

950 HLINE (11+80, 7) -(9+80, 16) , PSE 
T 

960 HLINE(12+80, 6) -(9+80, 16) ,PSE 
T 

970 REM FRAME 3 CORNER LINES 



980 HLINE (13+120, 6) - ( 10+120 , 16) , 
PSET 

990 HLINE (14 + 120, 6) -(10+120,17) , 

PSET 

1000 HLINE(14+120,7)-(11+120, 17) 
,PSET 

1010 REM *"GET" DRADLE FRAMES IN 
TO 

1020 REM APPROPRIATE HBUFFER AR 
EAS 

1030 HBUFF 2,242 

1040 HGET (0,0) - (20, 21) , 2 1 FR 

AME 0 

1050 HBUFF 3,24 2 

1060 HGET (40,0) -(60,21) , 3 1 FR 
AME 1 

1070 HBUFF 4,242 

1080 HGET (80,0) -(100 ,21) , 4 ' FR 
AME 2 

1090 HBUFF 5,242 

1100 HGET (120,0)-(140,21) ,5 ' FR 
AME 3 
1120 HCLS 

1130 REM DRAW MENORAH 
1140 HDRAW "C1;BM55, 36;M62, 36;M6 
2,48;M69,48;M69,96;M76, 96;M76,10 
2 ;M90,102 ;M90, 108 ;M132, 108 ?M132, 
96;M90, 9 6 ;M90, 90 ;M8 3 , 90 ;M83 , 36 ;M 



Run 



n y 1 on your 

9H|p iljflK M 

UO vOo ! 



T7TTI TT A. A _J T * !.„ „_ 

YIF Integrated Library 

'11^ W i i %,rija 1 1 at* 
kK VV lllCI / optJlIt:! 

VIP Calc 
VIP Database 

AJT JL d lllllf€ll 

viir opener 
VIP Disk-Zap 
All products are RSDOS Disk versions only. 

* Available at Radio Shack stores through express order. 

■■■■■■■■ 1 1 t i t i t r 1 rnrriiiiiiiiiririnr iMiiiMiiWiM^ ■■■■■■■■■■■ 



*$149.95 
*$69.95 
*$69.95 
*$59.95 
*$49.95 
$34.95 
$24.95 



THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

HY FRIEND, BILL, PRODUCES A SUPER DISK WHICH WE 
OFFER WITH A DOUBLE WARRANTY. IF YOU RECEIVE A 
DEFECTIVE DISK FROM US, WE WILL REPLACE IT WITH 
TWO (2) NEW DISKS. INTRODUCTORY SALE PRICE ON 
50 I m LOTS IS m BELOW OUR REGULAR PRICE!! 




Upgrade your VIP Writer, Speller, Calc, Database or Term- 
inal to run on your CoCol, 2 or 3 for only $30.00 each! 
Send diskette only and check or money order for $30. 

Upgrade ANY Product to VIP Library 

which includes VIP Writer, Speller, Calc, Database, Term- 
inal and Disk-Zap, for only $1 05.95.You save $451 Send 

original product and check or money order for $1 05.95. 



PER 
1 00 



DATAMATCH 
D I SKS 

i m for *• 

t£f FOR mm 00 

CERTIFIED ERROR FREE. M/SLEEVES, LABELS, i.P. 
5 YEAR WARRANTY 
OFFER EXPIRES IN It DAYS 
PRINTER RIBBONS 
EPSON HX/RX/FX 70/80 (5.00 EA. 
GEMINI 10/10X/SS $2.00 EA. 

COLORS R-SR-BL-6R-PUR $3.00 EA. 
R.S. DHP 130 BLACK $6.95 EA. 



&/$28.00 
1 2/122. m 
4/$10.00 



ALL ITEMS 100% GUARANTEED 






imit® irpirJs 




R 0, Box 1064 Sandy OR 97055 Ph. (503) 668-7213 
Include $3 shipping. Checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. 



Add $2.50 S/Hin U.S.A. - Canada Add $3.50 + $ 1.00/LB 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 
Send Check/Money Order Payable to: 

THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

9020 Hemingway, Bedford, Ml 48239 
(313) 937-1313 

Send Card Number & Exp. Date Min. Charge Order $20,00 





December 1987 THE RAINBOW 31 



9J3,3 6;M9J3,78;M97,78;M97,84 ;M13 2, 
84;M132 ,78;M111,78 ; Mill, 7 2 ;Mlj34, 
72 ;Mlj34 , 3 6 ; Mil 1, 3 6 ; Mill , 6(3 ;M118 , 
6J3;M118, 66 ff 

115j3 HDRAW "M132, 66;M132,54;M125 
, 54;M125, 36 ;M13 2 , 36 ;M13 2 , 48 ;M139 
,48 ;M13 9, 54 ;M14 6,54 ;M14 6 , 3j3 ;M16j3 
, 3j3;M16j3 , 54 ;M167 , 54 ;M167, 48 ;M174 
, 48;M174, 3 6;M181,3 6;M181, 54 ;M174 
,54;M174, 66;M188, 66;M188 , 6j3;M195 
, 6j3;M19 5, 36 ;M2j32 , 36 ;M2j32 , 72 ;M195 
,72;M195,78 ff 

116J3 HDRAW "M174,78 ;M174 , 84 ;M2J39 
,84 ;M2j39, 78 ;M216,78 ;M216 , 36 ;M2 2 3 
, 36;M2 2 3, 9j3;M216, 9j3 ;M216 , 96 ;M174 
, 96;M174, 1J38 ;M216, 1J38 ;M216, 1(32 ;M 
2 3J3,1J32;M2 3J8,96;M23 7,9 6;M23 7,48 ; 
M244,48;M244 ,36;M251, 3 6;M2 51, 6j3 ; 
M244 , 6j3;M244 ,1J38;M23 7, 1J38 ;M2 3 7, 1 
14;M223, 114 !f 

117(5 HDRAW ff M223 , 12j3 ;M174 , 12j3 ;M1 
74,138;M167, 13 8;M167, 144 ;M16j3,14 
4 ;M16j3, 15 6;M167, 15 6;M167, 168;M17 
4,168;M174, 174;M188, 174 ;M188 , 18j3 
;M2j39, 18j3;M2j39, 186;M216, 18 6;M216 
,192 ;M9j3, 192 ;M9j3 , 18 6 ;M97 , 18 6 'M97 
,18j3;M118, 18j3;M118, 174;M13 2, 17 4 ; 
M132, 168;M139, 168" 
118j3 HDRAW !f M139, 156 ;M146, 156 ;M1 
4 6,144;M139, 144 ;M13 9 , 138 ;M132 , 13 
8;M13 2,12j3;M83 , 12j3 ;M8 3 , 114 ;M69 , 1 
14;M69,lj38;M62, lj38;M62, 6j3;M5 5,6j3 
;M55, 36" 

119J3 HPAINT (153, 31), 1,1 

1195 REM "HAPPY HANUKKAH" MESSAG 

E 

12PP HCOLOR 7, y 0lHPRINT(13 /> 0) , "HA 
PPY HANUKKAH" 

121j3 REM DRAW STAR OF DAVID 

122j3 HDRAW "C6 ;BM62 , 132 ;F42 ;L84 ; 

E42;BM62, 18 6;E42 ;L8 4 ;F42" 

123j3 REM CENTER 

124j3 HPAINT (62, 162) , 3 ,6 

125j3 REM CORNERS 

126j3 HPAINT(62 , 138) , 2 , 6 

127j3 HPAINT (85, 15j3) ,2,6 

128j3 HPAINT(85, 168) ,2,6 

129j3 HPAINT(35 , 168) , 2 , 6 

13PP HPAINT(35, 147) , 2 , 6 

131J3 HPAINT(62,18J3) ,2,6 

13 2j3 REM PLACE SHAMAS AND 1ST FL 

AME 

133j3 HPUT(147, 14)-(163 , 3 / 0) ,1,PSE 
T 

134j3 HPUT(24 / 0,2j3)-(256, 36) , 1,PSE 
T 

13 5j3 REM MAIN. LOOP OF PROGRAM 
137j3 Xl=287:X2 = 3j37:DX=-2:DM=6:DB 



=1 

13 8j3 IF F=(3 THEN F=l : PALETTE 1(3, 
B(MO) : PALETTE 8,S(MO) ELSE IF F= 
1 THEN F=j3 : PALETTE 1(5 , S (MO) : PALE 
TTE 8,B(MO) 'FLICKER THE FLAMES 
139j3 PALETTE 7,RND(63) 'FLASH TE 
XT 

14PP IF INKEY$<> " 11 THEN GOSUB 15 

6(3 'ADD DAY IF KEY PRESSED 

14 1(5 CC=CC+1 'UPDATE CYCLE COUNT 

FOR DRADLE 
142j3 DB=DB+l:IF DB=6 THEN DB=2 ' 
CALCULATE NEXT DRADLE FRAME BUFF 
ER # 

143j3 X2=X2+DX:X1=X1+DX 'UPDATE D 
RADLE POSITION 

144j3 REM CHECK FOR DRADLE OUT-OF 
-BOUNDS 

145j3 IF X2>3j37 THEN X2 = 3j37 : Xl=2 8 
7 

146j3 IF XK219 THEN X1=219:X2=23 
9 

14 7j3 REM DRAW DRADLE IN NEW POSI 
TION, OLD IMAGE OVERWRITTEN 
148j3 HPUT (X1,170)-(X2, 191) ,DB,P 
SET 

149j3 IF CC<=DM THEN 138j3 'IF STI 
LL MOVING DRADLE, JUMP BACK TO B 
EGINNING NOW 

15(3(3 DX=3-RND (RND ( 3 ) ) : IF RND(2)= 
1 THEN DX=-DX 'NEW DRADLE SPEED 
151J3 IF DX=j3 THEN IF RND(3)<>2 G 
OTO 15(3(3 'KILL ZEROS, ADD DELAY 
152j3 DM=RND(8)+2 'HOW FOR TO GO 
AT THAT SPEED 

153j3 CC=(3 'CLEAR CYCLE COUNT 

154j3 GOTO 138j3 

155j3 REM ADD A FLAME 

156j3 HD=HD+1 

157j3 ON HD GOSUB 16(3(3 , 161(3 , 162(3 , 
163(3 ,164(3 , 165(3 , 166(3 
158(3 RETURN 

159j3 REM HPUT STATEMENTS FOR EAC 
H FLAME 

16(3(3 HPUT(212 , 2(3) 
T: RETURN 'DAY 2 



T: RETURN 'DAY 3 
162j3 HPUT(17j3,2, 
T: RETURN 'DAY 4 
163j3 HPUT(122,2 
T: RETURN 'DAY 5 



T: RETURN 'DAY 6 
165j3 HPUT(8J3,2J3)-(96, 36) , 1,PSET: 
RETURN 'DAY 7 

166j3 HPUT(52,2J3)-(68, 36) , 1,PSET: 
RETURN 'DAY 8 /Ss 



(228, 


36) 


,1, 


PSE 


(2j39, 


36) 


,1, 


PSE 


(186, 


36) 


,1, 


PSE 


(138, 


36) 


,1, 


PSE 


(117, 


36) 


,1, 


PSE 



32 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



OVER 

1 /a OFF 



i|OW Your Computer Writes 

PROGRAMS for YOU with 

QUIKPRO+II 

In minutes even if you know nothing about programming! 
For COCO, IBM, Tandy, Apple, Commodore, and others. 




To Computer Users. 

Now you can tell your computer what you want and your computer 
can write your programs for you in minutes to your custom design — easily and without 
requiring any programming background from you., .with QUIKPRO + II. 

A Breakthrough In Micro Computer Technology 

You know your computer is fantastically fast... once it knows what to do. Programs 
and software are what makes it happen. Every task your computer performs for you 
requires some kind of program. Until now, you could only get programs in just one 
of two ways: buy a canned package that many times doesn't meet your needs 
or hand over hundreds or thousands of dollars for a custom programming job. 
Now, you have a better choice... 

Programs Without Programming 

Automatic programming is what it's all about. And, with QUIKPRO + II the 
Automatic Program Writer, your computer can actually write programs 
for you. You can quickly generate a new individual application 
program when you want it with QUIKPRO + II. Each program you 
create is a completely stand alone program that will run in the 
standard BASIC language you already have on your own 
computer. QUIKPRO + II creates filing, data retrieval, and report 
programs. Best of all, you do not have to become a 
programmer to use QUIKPRO + II. The QUIKPRO + II software 
becomes your personal progrcmmer, waiting to do your 
work for you any time of the day or night you choose to use it. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Proven and Widely Used 

Businesses, Schools, Hobbyists and Government are among our thousands of users... 



John Hopkins 

U.S. Department of 

Agriculture 
Proctor & Gamble 
Federal Express 
American Express 
Monsanto 

Ford Motor Company 
Duracell International 



NASA 

Westinghouse 

U.S. Navy 

NCR 

DuPont 

RCA 

Exxon 

AT&T 

Texas Tech 



General Electric 
Random House 



Tandy Corporation 
Satellite Broadcasting 



r 




APPLICATION CHECKLIST 

Here are a few of the thousands of possible applications 
you can do with QUIKPRO-fll. ..And most can be created in 
a few minutes. 



BUSINESS USES 

Customer Filing 
Master Files for 
General Ledgers 
Accts. Receiv. 
Accts. Payable 
Telephone Logs 
Telephone Lists 

Hotel/Travel Data 

Reservations 
Properly Control 

Library Catalogues 
Inventories 



EDUCATIONAL USES 

Student Records 
Grade Records 
Teacher Lists 
School Lists 
Program Design 
Course Design 

HOME & HOBBY USES 

Personal Records 
Check Lists 
Club Rosters 
Telephone Directories 
Recipe Files 



ORDER NOW - OVER V2 OFF 

CALL TOLL FREE 24 HOURS 

1-800-872-8787, Operator 627 

(From Georgia Call 1-800-874-5112, Operator 627) 

YES, send me QUIKPRO + II for $29.50 plus 
$4.50 shipping 8c handling $34.00 total. 
SAVE OVER % OFF the reg. $149 price. 

Check your computer type & payment 



[ ] Color Computer 
2 or 3 with Disk 
] TANDY 1000, 1200. 3000 
] IBM/Compatible 
] Commodore 64 
] Apple 2, 2C, 2E 
] TRS-80 Mod 3 
] TRS-80 Mod 4 
] TRS-80 Mod 2 



[ ] Payment enclosed 
[ ] MasterCard [ 
Card ' __ 



] VISA 



Expiration Date 



Name 



Address 



Ctly/Sfate/Zip 



Mail Orders to: ICR FutureSoft, P.O. Box 1446AD 

Orange Park, FL 32073 



Save $200 on Magnavox Monitors 
Magnavox 8CM643 RGB Analog only $385!! 



MONITORS 

rggm 




1230A 12" 

This 12" green screen high resolution 
monitor offers 80column capability. Zenith 
quality and a 90-day warranty valid at any 
of Zenith's 1200 locations. 



$125 



122A Zenith 12" Amber Screen offers 
the same 640 dots x 200 lines reso- 
lution at 15MHz and a 90-day war- 
ranty valid at 1200 locations. 



$88 



( s 7 shipping) 

MAGNAVOX 
8 CM 515 has 

analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB 
for Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and 
composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. 
Built-in speaker. 14" screen with 
640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 
2 years parts and labor warranty. 

reg. list S499 

SAVE 
$200 



Retail $199 
Our price 
(S7 shipping) BRAND NEW 

All monitors require an amplifier cir- 
cuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer. 
They attach with spring connectors 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one for audio and one for 
video. CoCo 3 does not require an 
amplifier circuit. 

VA-1 for monochrome monitors only, 
fits all color computers 



$24. 4 5 



($2 shipping) 

VC-4 for monochrome or color, fits all 
color computers 

($2 shipping) 



$39. 4 * 




$298 

+ S14 Shipping 
CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable. 

only $19.95 with 

Magnavox Monitor order. 
S29.95 w/o monitor. 



MAGNAVOX 

CM 8505 has analog RGB 

and TTL RGB and composite 
color input. Built in speaker. 13" 
screen with 390 dots x 240 reso- 
lution in RGB mode. Plus 1 year 
parts & labor warranty. 

reg. list «299 

SAVE 

$79 



$220 

+ S14 Shipping 




DRIVE 0 +. Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, aCA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 

for only- Double sided double density 360K 



$178 45 

( s 5 shipping) 
Add $34 for a Disto DC-3. 



Double sided 
Double density 
360K 




GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty- 
of dealing with a company through the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for any 
reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) 

Shipping charges are for 48 states. 

APO, Canada and Puerto Rico orders are higher. 



DISK CONTROLLER 




Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 



ROM Chip. 

$98 



DISTO 



DC-3 /^ 



$2 shipping on all DISTO products 



ADD-ON BOARDS 



DC-38 includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and all 
software $138 

DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM $QQ 

DC512 512K RAM Board with 
software $125 



DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port Q $40 



DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer in- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips Q 



2764 8K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 

27128 16K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 
1 FREE Eprom w/DC-3P order 
effective thru 12/15/87 

C-DOS 3 28 pin Eprom makes Disto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

$20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 



Payrol/BAS™ . 

( s 2 shipping) 

• Nonprotected basic is modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
federal calculation 

• Custom code for each state ( s 25 option) 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 

• Print payroll and nonpayroll 
checks 



TM 



Payrol / BAS 
30 Day Trial 

$29.95 



VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package in- 
cludes VIP Writer Terminal Data 
Base, Calc and Disk Zap which 
can fix a diskette that is giving I/ 
O errors 



$125 



reg. M49 ( s 2 shipping) 



MEMORY 

Memory for CoCo 3 PC memory 
board plugs into the spare slots 
inside the computer and is pop- 
ulated with 256K ram chips. 
Completely solderless with com- 
plete easy to install instructions. 

$79.95 

PC Memory board without RAM 

$49.50 

Software spooler and RAM disk 
for lightning quick response or no 
disk swapping drive backup for 1 
drive system and printer spooler to 
free computer during long listings. 
For CoCo 3 with $1Q >1C 

512K RAM * 
($2 shipping on Memory 

products) 



WE REPAIR 

DISK DRIVES 

MONITORS 

CONTROLLERS 



Send them UPS prepaid 
to Howard Medical with 
your daytime telephone 
number and we will call 
with a cost to repair. 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

COD. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO.'S 



COCO 1 , 



L" 

2, and 3 Accessories 




i 



DISK 
DRIVES 





2 DRIVE SYSTEM 

$00095 




2 DSDD Drives in one case with 
choice of RS or Disto Controller, 
drives are 40 track, 6 rfts. 



DRIVE 1 

$ 





95 



Add a second drive to your 1/2 height 
system. Please specify catalog # 26-3129, 
26-3131, or 26-3135 when ordering. 





EPSON 
LX-800 

$209 Q 5 



Hardware 

4 Drive System (2 DSDD Drives 
in one case that can be accessed 
under RS DOS 

195 _ 



Drive O-SSDD Full Height 

Drive 1-SSDD Full Height 

COCO 3 51 2K Upgrade 

(New Low Price). . . . , 

COCO 3 Keyboard 



m w .$ 1-99*05 
. . .$125.95 

. * 99 r Q5 
, ,$ 34.95 



M 



EPSON 

FX-86e $384.95 

FX-286e. . .$559.95 

EX-800 $454.95 

EX-1000. . .$629.95 



Software & Misc 

ADOS .$29,95 ADOS 3 

COCO Graphics Designer ..... 
Art Deli (440 Pix on 10 disks) . . . 

Monitor Interface 

Serial to Parallel Converters. . . . 

FKEYS It! $19.95 Sixdrive. 

Telewriter 64 . .$59.95 COCO-Util . 

Gauntlet $28.95 Pyramlx . . . 

Disto Super Controller 

COCO in Stitch (X-Stiteh Patterns). . 



.$39.95 

.$99.05 
.$29.95 
.$54.95 
.$19.95 
.$39.95 
.$24.95 

.$99.95 
.$ 3.95 




5512 Poplar Ave., Memphis, TN 38119 901-761-4565 

Add $4.90 for shipping and handling. VISA, MasterCard, and Money Orders accepted 
Allow 3 weeks for personal checks. No CODs. Prices may change without notice. 

All drives carry a 90 day warranty. 




NOW DO YOU GIVE A RAINBOW? 



It's simple — Give a rainbow gift certificate . 



Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
source fortheTandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow— more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 

safe at home. 
Give a rainbow gift certificate 

and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by De- 
cember 25 and we'll begin your 
friends' subscriptions with the 
February issue of rainbow. 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 



Name 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



From: 

I 



I 



Name 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



□ My payment is enclosed. 

Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Acct. # Exp. date 



i Signature 



Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subscriptions to THE rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada, The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program listings in 
the rainbow are formatted for a 32-character 
screen — so they show up just as they do on your CoCo 
screen. One easy way to check on the accuracy of your 
typing is to compare what character"goes under" what. 
If the characters match — and your line endings come 
out the same — you have a pretty good way of knowing 
that your typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 

RAINBOWON DISKOrRAINBOWONTAPESefVice. 

An order form for these services is on the insert card 
bound in the magazine. 



What's A CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was first given to 
the Tandy Color Computer by its many fans, users and 
owners. 

However, when we use the term CoCo, we refer to 
both the Tandy Color Computer and the TDP System- 
100 Computer. (While many TDP-100s are still in 
service, the TDP Electronics division of Tandy no longer 
markets the CoCo look-alike,) It is easier than using 
both of the "given" namesthroughoutTHE rai nbow. 

In most cases, when a specific computer is men- 
tioned, the application is for that specific computer. 
However, since the TDP System-100 and Tandy Color 
are, for all purposes, the same computer in a different 
case, these terms are almost always interchangeable. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



f 


V 


f 







The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command RUN 
and press enter. Once theprogram has run, typeNEW 



and press enter to remove it from the areawhere the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to besureyou typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rain bow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CL5:X=25G*PEEK(35)+17B 

20 CLEAR 25,X~1 

30 X=256*PEEI< (35) +178 

40 FOR Z^X TO X+77 

50 READ Y:W=U+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

G0 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW-79B5THENB0EL5EPRINT 

"DATA ERRDR":STOP 
60 EXEC X : END 

90 DATA 1B2, 1, 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 1B3, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 46, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 36, 36 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 156, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 128, 171, 128 
150 DATA 230, 132, 36, 250, 48, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 166, 132, 28, 254 
180 DATA 169, 173, 198, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: CMDS and SOURCE. It also contains a file, 
read .me. f i rst, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMDS directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the SOURCE directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the SOURCE directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 
programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't 'learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 



1) Type load dir list capy and press ENTER. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd/d0 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
ON disk in Drive 1. Then type chd/di and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read .me. first fileto the screen by typing 

list read .me . first and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow on disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMDS directory, enter di r cmds, Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMDS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system: copy /d0/cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds/ filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: capy /dl /cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 




RAINBOW 

CEHTfFfCATJOW 
SEAL 



The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. We ascertain 
that their products are, in actuality, what they purport 
to be and, upon such determination, award a Seal. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee of satisfac- 
tion." The certification process is different from the 
review process. You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whether the product is right for your 
needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not, 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



utmty 



16K Disk 



Keep those files secure 



Sec ret 
Filenames 



By Bill Bernico 



Every now and then I run across a 
file on a disk with a strange "name" 
— if you could call it a "name." It 
looks more like a string of graphics 
characters from the Lo-Res CHR$ set. 

Not knowing what it was called, I 
didn't know how to load, run, or even 
kill it. I know a little more about them 
now, and Td like to share what I've 
found so you can save your own disk 
files with these strange "names." That 
way, other folks won't be tampering 
with files you don't want them looking 
into. Or you and your friends can keep 
your files extra secure on your BBS. 

There are two methods of saving: 
with or without a graphics extension. If 
you opt not to include the colorful 
extension, BA5 will be used. Write down 
the correct combination of CHR$ codes 
that went into making up your filename 
or you may not get that file off the disk 
later. 

Creating the File 

Let's create a file with one of these 
filenames. Type in Listing I. To save it 



Bill Bernico is a self-taught computerist 
who enjoys golf, music and program- 
ming. He is a drummer with a rock band 
and lives in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, 



with the character string name, type in 
the following directly (no line number): 



SAVE CHR$ ( 120 ) +CHR$ ( 145 ) +CHR$ 
(162)+CHR$( 1?9)+CHR$ ( 196)+ 
CHR$ (213) +CHR$ ( 230 ) +CHRS (24?) 
+ 'V''+CHR$(159)+CHR$(1?5) + CHR$ 
(191) 

Next, type DIR and look at what 
you've saved. Looks a little strange, 
doesn't it? Even the extension has 
graphics characters. Later on, if you 
want to access that file, you'll have to 
know how to load it. Did you write 
down the combination of character 
strings that made up that name? It's easy 
to lose a file if you're not careful. 

Loading the File 

Now that the file is on disk, let's 
retrieve it. Type in Listing 2 and save it 
to disk. Notice that Line 20 contains the 
combination of character strings that 
you used to save Listing I. To see how 
this all falls together, run this program 
and it will automatically load and run 
the first file, the one with the colorful 
name. Pretty slick, eh? 

The third and fourth listings have the 
same results as the first two except these 
were done without graphics extensions, 
in which case BA5 was assumed. 

Character String File Syntax 

Certain rules have to be followed in 



order to save, load and kill files with 
these types of "names." The most im- 
portant rule is to know what you called 
that particular file. Without knowing 
what combination of character strings 
made up that filename, the rest of these 
rules won't help you at all. 

First, to save a file with a CHR$ name, 
type in or load the file you want to save 
(the old file with the regular name). 
Next, in the immediate mode, type in 
the following: 

SAVE CHR$(X1)+CHR$(X2)+CHR$ 
(X3)+CHR$(X4)+CHR$(X5)+CHR$ 
(X6)+CHR$(X7)+CHR$(XB) 

This will save the file with a BA5 
extension. To save a file with a CHR$ 
extension, add this to the end of the 
SAVE line: +"/ "+CHR$ ( Yl ) +CHRS ( Y2 ) + 
CHR$( Y3). 

Now your filename has eight colorful 
characters, a space and three more color 
blocks. To load this file, simply substi- 
tute the word LORD for the word SAVE 
in the example above. 

Killing a file like this is a little differ- 
ent. If it has a regular BAS extension, 
you have to substitute the word KILL 
for the word LOAD in the example above 
and add +"/BAS" to the end of the line. 
If it has a "color block" extension, add 
+"/"+CHR$(Yl)+CHR$(Y2)+CHR$ 
( Y3) to the end of the line. 

Ineachof these examples, XI through 
XB represents the number of the char- 



38 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



acter string color block you want to use. 
The examples Yl through Y3 represent 
the color blocks used in the extension. 
They can be the same as the ones used 
in the name. I just used these examples 
for clarity. 

I think the benefit of this system is 
thatsomeoneelsecan't easily break into 



and modify my file. They can if they 
read this article, but they didn't count 
on one thing — the fact that you can 
also use character strings that can't be 
seen: CHR$(13), CHR${32) and 
CHR$(143), for example. These are 
ENTER, space bar and a green block, 
which is invisible on a green back- 



ground. Someone could try different 
combinations until the cows come home 
and still not hit upon your combination. 
The possibilities are endless. 

( Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at 708 Mich- 
igan Ave., Sheboygan, Wl 53081. 
Please enclose an SASE for a reply.) □ 



Listing 1: 
1ft CLS 

20 PRINT M THIS IS A TEST FOR THE 
DISK CHARACTER STRING FILE S 

AVING ROUTINE . 

30 PRINT :PRINT M TEST 1 COMPLETED. 
SEE. IT WORKS! 



Listing 2: 
10 CLS 

20 LOAD CHR$(12 8)+CHR$(14 5)+CHR$ 
( 162 ) +CHR$ ( 179 ) + CHR$ (19 6) + CHR$ ( 2 
13)+CHR$ (230)+CHR$ (247) +"/"+CHR$ 
(15 9)+CHR$ (175)+CHR$ (191) ,R 



Listing 3: 
10 CLS 

20 PRINT 11 THIS IS A TEST FOR THE 
DISK FILE CHARACTER STRING S 

AVE ROUTINE WITHOUT THE GRA 

PHIC EXTENTION. 
30 PRINT :PRINT"THIS PROCEDURE DI 
FFERS SLIGHTLY FROM TEST 1 IN TH 
E WAY FILES ARE LOADED, SAVED 

AND KILLED. 
40 PRINT: PRINT M TEST 2 COMPLETED. 

SEE. IT WORKS! 

Listing 4: 
10 CLS 

20 LOAD CHR$ (203)+CHR$ (195)+CHR$ 
(19 8)+CHR$ (204)+CHR$(201)+CHR$ (1 
99) +CHR$ (200) +CHR$ (19 3) ,R 



Clearbrook Software Group 



(604)853-9118 




Information 

Management 

System 



RAINBOW 

C£Hfl(tC/ktlON 

S£A1 



CSG IMS is THE full featured relational database 
manager for the Color Computer and OS9. The com- 
prehensive structured application language makes 
CSG IMS the ideal developement tool for sophisti- 
cated file-intensive applications. 



• Interactive access to data- 
bases and quick queries. 

• CSG IMS includes a recur- 
sive compiled language sup- 
porting program modules 
with full parameter passing. 



• User defined screen and 
report formats. 

• Record, index and file size al- 
most unlimited. 

• Text, BCD floating point (14 
digits), short and long in- 
teger and date types. 



CSG IMS for CoCo2/3 OS9 L1/2 (single user)$169.95 
CSG IMS for OS9 L2 or 68000(multi user) $495.00 
CSG IMS demo with manual $30 



ERINA - Symbolic User Mode Debugger for OS9 
ERINA is a must for all serious assembler and C 
software developers. It lets you find bugs quickly by 
displaying the machine state and instuctions being ex- 
ecuted. You can set address and register break 
points, dump, search and change memory, assemble 
and disassemble code and many other things to 
numerous to mention. This program will pay for itself 
over and over by the time you save solving your bugs. 

Requires 80 column display, OS9 L1/2 $69.00 



SERINA - System Mode Debugger for OS9 L2 

SERINA is a debugger for OS9 system modules 
(device drivers, file managers, etc.). It allows you to 
trace execution of any system module, set break 
points, assemble and disassemble code and examine 
and change memory. There are special provisions for 
executing code with critical timing loops and for ac- 
cessing I/O registers. A must for system programmers. 

Requires CoCo3, OS9 L2, $139.00 
80 col. terminal connected to /T1 or /T2 




Shipping: N. America - $5, Overseas - $10 

Clearbrook Software Group 

P.O. Box 8000-499 
Sumas, WA 98295 



OS9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corp., MSDos is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. 



MSF - MSDos File Manager for C0C0 3/OS9 Level 2 
MSF is a file manager which allows you to use MSDos 
disks directly under OS9. You don't have to change 
the format of the data before using it! 

Requires C0C0 3, OS9 L2, SDISK3 driver $45.00 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 39 



GJ*^ from Ait of Us At 

A M ^ Speech Systems \^ ' 





< IhanJ^O r ou for your Support 





Season s (greetings And 
Ait 'The (Best In the 9{ezv year 





r V\ ^ 





yo c,>> \~> "' Q 

For Your COCO 1, 2, or 3 

ChristniCLS fantasia l^oL 1 (Pictures & Music for the Christmas Season) ... 3£*§5 $19.95 

Christmas fantasia Vol. 2 (More beautiful pictures and music) $2*95 $19.95 

S'Upezi Voice (COCO's Premier Speech Synthesizer) $59.95 

EA!KS ( Now y° u 0311 realJ y ^ 10 y° ur computer) $£^5 $79.95 

SyM<29<09& r 12 (A real 12 voice music synthesizer) , $0^5 $59.95 

Uy t S^- (The musical COCO MAX) $^5 $47.95 

UJJ\A. jyJ\lJ\L (Print your music) $&$5 ,...$24.95 

songs of 7 & 8 voice music) $p$5 $29.95 

LyEJl LTfB%2\$£f Supplement 1 (More LYRA music) $£^5 $19.95 

LyRA LyB%A^Cf Supplement 2 (Still more) $$$5 $19.95 

COCO MW 1 2 (Complete hardware & software for MIDI) $l>gC95 $129.95 

(A professional 61 note keyboard) $1&35 $139.95 

PROTO (BOJVRP & CASE (For the experimenter) $14.95 

^KJTLE y-CabCe (Connect 3 hardware paks together) $>t35 $29.95 

(DOWBLE y- Cable (Connect 2 hardware paks together) $8^5 $23.95 

MUSICA 2 (Complete 4 voice music composition & printing program) $p$5 $24.95 

MUSIC LI<B%A$£f (900 songs, 1 00 per volume) $2>^5 $24.95 

EXCLUSIVELY FOR YOUR COCO 3 

(Complete memory upgrade with extras) ... $1^95 $99.95 

512*KWR!P0 W/O Chips $fa$5 $44.95 

MAQIC Of ZAD^T0<{k High Resolution Graphics Adventure) $3^5 $29.95 

(High Res. Arcade game).. $3^5 $29.95 




Christmas fantasia 

We got so many compliments last year for Christmas Fantasia Volume 1, we added 
a second all new version. 

Christmas Fantasia is a collection of traditional Christmas music combined with 
beautiful high resolution Christmas scenes. Christmas Fantasia picks one of more 
than a dozen Christmas scenes and music selections from tape or disk, displays 
the picture and plays the music. Upon completion, another scene and piece of 
music is loaded and played. The Christmas scenes are beautiful. One shows a 
chapel nestled in a valley with snow actually falling. The low price is our way of 
saying "SEASONS GREETINGS" from Speech Systems. 64K required. 

Volume 1 (Tape or Disk) #CF125 $24.95 

Volume 2 (Tape or Disk) #CF126 $24.95 



FILE EDIT MIDI MISC 



LEGEND 



oaiiBdStz)© 



A 1 : — ( 



Z 



Symphony 12 

CoCo's Premier Music Synthesizer 



I 



J J J J J J J,. 



12 Voices 
4 Noise Generators 
Lyra Compatible 
Musica 2 Compatible 
Stereo & Mono 



Sound Effects 





It you want to compose music, experiment or 
just listen 10 music, LYRA is the toof you need. 
LYRA re presents the new slate-oMhe-ari super 
user friendly software. Pull down menus and 
icons make composing music as easy as pointing 
with a joystick or mouse and clicking. LYRA is 
capable of ft individually controlled voices. You 
may take advantage of the R voice power of 
LYRA using external MIDI synthesizers or SYM- 
PHONY 12. We believe that LYRA and SYM- 
PHONY 12 was a match made in heaven. For a 
limited time, when you purchase both, we will 
include tree (he LYRA SYMPHONY 12 CONNEC- 
TION, a $19.95 value. 



■ 

STEREO AND MONO. By connecting SYM- 
PHONY 12 lo your home stereo system, music is 
produced in stereo, h voices from each channel. 
However, you don't need lo have a slereo syslem, 
all I 2 voices also come out of your TV or monitor 

SOUND EFFECTS. SYMPHONY 12 is a sophisti- 
cated sound generator. 12 voices and -1 noise 
generators give vou incredible sound effect capa- 
bility. We have included gun shot, explosion, rac- 
ing car and more. 

SYMPHONY 12. You gel over a dozen music and 
sound effect seleciions and complele documenta- 
tion. Software is shipped on Tape or Disk. 



PIANO KEYBOARD. For those wishing to turn 
SYMPHONY 12 into a real polyphonic synthe- 
sizer we offer a full size 61 note piano 
keyboard. 



Tape users using both SYMPHONY 
PIANO KEYBOARD will require a 
Disk systems require a Triple Y- 
MULTI-PAK. 

SYMPHONY 12 (T or D) #SYI-1} 
LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

#LSI77 , 

PIANO KEYBOARD #PKIB5 . 
DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DYI8I . . 
TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY 1 7J 



I 2 and the 
Y-CABLE. 
CABLE or 

. $69.95 

. , $19.95 
. $169.95 
. $28.95 
$34.95 



GUITAR CHORD BOOK 



This program, written by a guitar instructor of 17 years, displays in high 
resolution graphics the exact fingering for over 1 00, 000 chord combina- 
tions. You may even tune your guitar to the computer and play altng. 



Whether you are a beginning guitar student or an advanced player, you 
will find this quick reference to guitar chords invaluable. 
J2K Disk only #CC 1 5 1 . . $29.95 



MUSIC THEORY 



COURSE 1 



COURSE 2 



This course covers all the basics from music notation <N. duration, key 
signatures, tempo, to an introduction of the keyboard. This is an entry 
level course recommended as a prerequisite for Course 2. 
32K Disk only. #MTlOI $49.95 



A more advanced course that deals with: Major and Harmonic Minor 
scales, interval spelling, Triad (Chord) theory, Inversions, Dominant 7th 
chords, and ear training of the intervals. 

MK Disk only #MTI02 $49.95 



COCO'S MOST ADVANCED 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZER. 

IT TALKS, SINGS AND 

MORE, 
only . . . $79.95 



WITH EARS PURCHASE 
only . . . $59.95 



SUPER VOICE is no ordinary speech synthesizer. It uses Silicon 
Systems, Inc. SSI-263, the most advanced speech/sound chip 
available. SUPER VOICE is not only capable of highly intelligible 
speech, sound effects, and singing over a 6 octave range, but now 
we have turned SUPER VOICE into a monophonic Super Music 
Synthesizer with our PIANO KEYBOARD. 



IT TALKS. A free TRANSLATOR text-to-speech program make 
writing your own talking program as easy as SAYfNG HELLO." 




SUPER VOICE works in arty 32K or 64K computer. A disk system 
requires a Y-Cable or Multi-PakM^L V 

Here are the facts; ^'a|V 
the decision is yours. ^> 





nakes 







SUPER VOICE 


HEAL TALKER 


RS SPEECH 
CARTRIDGE 


VOICE-PAK 


Synthesizer Device 


SSI-263 


SC 01 


SP-256 


SC-01 


Speaking Speeds 


16 


1 


1 


1 


Volume Levels 


16 


1 


1 


1 


Articulation Rates 


I 


1 


1 


1 


Vocal Trad 
Fitter Settings 


2SS 


1 


r 


1 


Basic unit 
ol Speech 


64 phonemes 
4 durations each 


64 phonemes ' 


64 allophones 
5 pause lengths 


64 phonemes 


Pitch Variations 


4096 (32 absolute levels 
wilh 6 inflection speeds) 


4 


\ 


4 



SUPER TALKING HEADS 



Paul and Pauline, our talking heads program is normally $24.95. Until 
Dec. 15 we will include them with each SUPER VOICE order. 





l EE V- 




FR 

BUNK DISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 

ORDER ^V v 



V 




Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada . . P . T , 53.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada , 55.00 

COD charge 52.00 

Illinois residents add bV*% sales tax 



SpeeckS^t 



38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



1 MEGABYTE 
COLORAMA 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 




EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 

Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



^7 a_3 



•4 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

•HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 

QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 



Two Years In t he Malting. Speech Systems 
was formed |o develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses- 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In factyoudo 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 




you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 





Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
ATGH and other commands have been 
dded to BASIC so that programming 
ARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
fine: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. Wemean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headsetstylenoise 



ncelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 




FREE 
BLANK OISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 






Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



'//' 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada . , 

COD charge 

Winois residents add 6'/4% sales tax 



$3.00 
$5.00 
$2.00 



Speech SifAtemd 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MA/L 



FILE EDIT MIDI MISC 



" ' n t n 



1^1 '<-» ™ R 



MIDI Instrunents: 



0 
2 
4 

6 

A 

C 
E 



[U01 Brass 1 

006 Piano 3 

013 E Organ 5 

003 Trumpet 7 

018 Oboe 9 

021 Vibrphn B 

025 Clavier D 

043 Snaredr F 



005 String 

009 Guitar 

014 P Organ 

016 Flute 

019 Clarnet 

026 Harpsch 

032 Tinpani 

045 Percusn 





Lyra 

COMPATIBLE! 



3 



1, 



J 




^ $3-9$ 
So ^ 




I M ).H I I | 1 I 
< i t I l t t ♦ » t v 
»»»»»*'»! ■ t 
" I ♦ * « * « t t 




$29 ^ 5 



Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 




Supports 16 Track recording an* playback. 
Adjustable tempo. 



t> Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible) 

Record to any Irack. 

t> Low Level track editing. 

i> LYRA ed:iing. (one voice per Irack), 



X V + t 

Filter out MIDI data: 
Key pressure 
Program change 
Pitch wheel 



entry level MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system. 

T2 



Control Change 
Channel Pressure 
System Message 



v Graphic Piano Keyboard Display i 
record and playback mode 





both 




is* Playback from any num 



ber of 



track 



V Quantizing jto Vi* r Vfc>, Vga intervals 



f Dynamic memory allocation.. 





f Adjustable Key (Transposition) lor each 

if* Save recording to disk for laier playback ot 
editing. 

Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE. 



DX LIBRARIAN 



PUNCH IN and PUNCH OUT editing. 
Sequencer feaiures. 
100% machine code 
\* "Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 

t> Metronome 

Many songs included. 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64K CoCo, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 {disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 

DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 

TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173 



TM 



$34.95 



Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 

Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, 



memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 
MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 $29.95 





4,1^ 



lLf FDIT rtlDI PtISC 



All Voices On 
Tin* Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 



■ ■■■■ 



you 




) > 



2, 
















LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean' any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 

mouse and click. 
v Compose with up to 8 completely 

independent voices. 
w Room for over 18.000 notes. (This is not a 

misprint!) 
^ Super Simple Editing Supports 

Note insert 



Block insert 



Note delete 
Note change 
Output music 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 





Block delete 
Block copy 


to: 





Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 





^ Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 




Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 
12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 
drum machines. 

Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 
channels. 

Transpose music to any key. 
Modify music to any tempo. 
Automatically inserts bar for each measure 
as you compose. 

Key signature lets you specify sharps and 
flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
& Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 
(#LC164). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 



LYRA OPTIONS 




Solo capability 
^ Block edits are highlighted. 
V Tie notes together for musical continuity. 
Name of note pointed to is constantly 
displayed. 
w Jump to any point in the score 
instantaneously. 

Memory remaining clearly displayed, 

however you will have plenty of memory 

even for the most demanding piece. 

Help menu makes manual virtually 

unnecessary. 
U* LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 

hardware unless you want more power. 

Music easily saved to tape or disk. 

Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 
LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 $54.95 



These LYRA options are not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 

LYRA CONVERT LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER \ 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 

files. 12. 

(Disk) #LC164 $14.95 (Disk) #LS177 $19.95 

VERSION UPDATE f J LYRA LIBRARY 

To receive the latest version of LYRA return your A collection of 50 songs ready to play for hours, 

original disk. #UP162 $10.00 Most have 7 and 8 voices. #LL137 . $39.95 

LYRA MIDI CABLE SYMPHONY 12 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

synthesizer. play all 8 voices in stereo. 

#MC158 $19.95 (T or D) #SY149 $69.95 

We accepl CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CA^D orders. T ' jj " ~ 

Shipping and handling US and Can.ida f $3.00 ^ — > /J ^ — > 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada , . . , $5.00 V / / V / 

CODCh ^ - H cr cr nh s^Si Jtr '? YY1 4 

Illinois residents add 6»/«% soles; t.ix. r ' I^CsCsLU L> < ' W ^L^Csl I L-L 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 
A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 , . $149.95 



MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 900 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX . . $29.95 



COCO MAX is .1 trademark of Colorwarc. 
ORCHKSTRA 90 is «i trademark of Radio Shack. 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

r1>(312) 879-6880 



16K ECB 




1 Hom o H el p 





dSd. Sd 



ave you ever looked through 
your photos months or years 
after they were taken and asked 
yourself, "Who's standing next to Uncle 
George?" or perhaps the most asked 
question about Halloween photos — 
"Who was that masked man?" 

Well, Photo Tagger is here! It's a 
handy utility that prints photo informa- 
tion on mailing labels, which you stick 
on the back of your photos for future 
reference. No more wondering about 
when and where the picture was taken, 
who is in it and other easily forgotten 
information. 

Photo Tagger works with any 16K or 
larger Color Computer with Extended 
Color BASIC. It is compatible with both 
cassette and disk systems and works 
with Radio Shack DOS, JDOS and 
ADOS. And, of course, it does require 
a printer to produce the labels. Radio 
Shack one-wide fanfold labels (Cat. No. 
26-1328, or similar labels) are also 
required. 

To use Photo Tagger, load the pro- 
gram, type RUN and press enter. On a 
16K CoCo, you will need to enter 
PCLEflRl prior to loading the program. 

Donald Turowski has a bachelor's 
degree in education and teaches algebra 
and computer literacy in the Burr ells 
School District in Natrona Heights, 
Pennsylvania. He is married and has 
two children. 



46 



THE RAINBOW December 1987 




C 



A title screen appears and then you will 
be asked if you want instructions. Of 
course, you can bypass them. 

Next, a message appears on the 
screen, prompting you to turn on the 
printer, and the program internally 
checks to see if it is on. If it is not, a 
message appears alerting you that the 
printer is not online. Once it is turned 
on, the message disappears and the 
program continues. The next message 
prompts you to line up the labels with 
the print head. 

Now you are ready to begin the data 
entry routine. Place one of your snap- 
shots in front of you and begin entering 
the information that is asked for by 
Photo Tagger. The first question is 
iS Date of Picture?" This can be entered 
in any manner, such as 1 1/ 12/86 or 
November 12, 1986, or simply Summer 
1986. (Since LINE INPUT statements are 
used in the program, commas may be 
used with no difficulty. If INPUT state- 
ments had been used, this would not be 
possible.) 

The next question is "Location of 
Picture? 1 * You have 29 characters to 
work with for each of these prompts. An 
entry such as "Disney World, Orlando" 
would be fine, but "Disney World, 



Orlando, Florida 1 * would be too long, 
unless you eliminated the spaces. If your 
entry is too long. Photo Tagger alerts 
you, asking you to reenter the informa- 
tion in a shorter version. 

The third question is "People, Places, 
Things in Picture?" Be creative in 
entering this information, keeping in 
mind the 29 character-length maxi- 
mum. Also, if you feel you need more 
than one line for this type of informa- 
tion, you can continue it in Question 4. 

Question 4 is "Fu rther Information?" 
If you need to continue with informa- 
tion on people, places and things (from 
Question 3), then by all means do so. 
And, if you do not want to add any 
further information, simply press 
ENTER, which prints a blank line on the 
label. 

After you enter all this information, 
you will be asked to approve of your 
entries by answering the prompt, "Is 
This Correct?" If the information is 
acceptable, press Y, and printing be- 
gins. But if you see a mistake, press N 
and you will be given an opportunity to 
reenter your information. 

When prompted for the Date of 
Picture, you do not have to reenter the 
information if it is already correct; 



Photo Tagger has a built-in feature that 
allows you to type a slash mark (/) to 
keep the current data. This means that 
if your only mistake was on Location of 
Picture, and everything else is correct, 
then you could enter a / for Date of 
Picture, enter the corrected information 
for the Location, and then simply enter 
/ for each of the remaining two ques- 
tions. This makes Photo Tagger very 
easy to use and edit. 

This feature is also very helpful when 
all of your pictures have the same date, 
location or subject. Simply enter / for 
each question and you can produce 
your labels quickly and easily. 

Once you use Photo Tagger, you will 
see how helpful the CoCo can be in 
keeping track of information that is 
routinely forgotten. No more wonder- 
ing and guessing "Is that really Aunt 
Mary next to Uncle Bill?" or "Was this 
taken on Johnny's 14th or 15th birth- 
day?" Now then, let me see, was that 
masked man in the spandex tights and 
red cape really Cousin Frank or Uncle 
Bob or . . . 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at 1236 Ninth 
A venue, Natrona Heights, PA 15§65. 
Please enclose an SASE for a reply. )U 




ARTIST 




aw COC03 pictures in all 4 high reso- 
lution Basic screen modes . 640 and 320 by 
192 with 2, 4 or 1 6 colors and 64 hues. 

Simple keyboard and joystick controls in 

eluding 1 xes , ovals , painting, 

reproduction , 2 speeds , fast ML save/load 
and a complete user manual . Requires 1 28K 
COC03 , joystick , TV or monitor. . . . .$14.95 
s a Specify cassette or disk. t h'C 

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Prepare and show professional COC03 pic 
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Completely menu driven with i ntegrated 
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time delays, Basic and prerecorded cas- 
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to convert pictures , and to freely share 
your displays , and a complete user man- 
ual . Unlimited educational and entertain- 
ment uses including VCR recordings!!! Re- 
quires I2 8K COCQ3, TV or mon i tor , . .-$e^r95- 
Specif y cassette or disk . 

HOLIDAY SPECIAL. . .$29.95 
with MY ARTIST. . .$39,95 

Gift wrapped with card & message. . . .$4.00 

Prices include $3 shipping and a 30 day 
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December 198? THE RAINBOW 47 




A » « 4 * * 



.28 1160 
..50 END 
.146 



,233 

.202 



The listing; PHOTOTflG 

t_ p 1 ************** 

2 0 ! * PHOTO TAG * 

3j3 ■* UTILITY * 

4)3 '* BY * 

5j3 '*D.A.TUROWSKI* 

60 '* AUGUST '86 * 

70 *************** 

75 CLEAR5j3j3j3 

8j3 CLS (0) : FOR X=3 TO 61 : SET (X, 5, 
8 ) : SET (X , 2 5 , 8 ) : NEXT X : FOR Y=5 TO 
2 5 : SET ( 3 , Y , 8 ) : SET ( 6 1 , Y , 8 ) : NEXT 

Y 

90 FOR Y=2 TO 4 : SET ( 54 , Y , 4 ) : SET ( 
58,Y,4):NEXT Y : FOR X=54 TO 58:SE 
T(X,2,4) : NEXT X 

100 FOR X=lj3 TO 5J3:SET(X,7,2) :SE 
T(X,20,2) : NEXT X 

lip FOR Y=7 TO 2j3:SET(l > 0 ,Y,2) :SE 
T(5j8, Y,2) : NEXT Y 

12j3 FOR X=7 TO 9 : SET (X, 8 , 6) :NEXT 
X 

13j3 GOTO 1000 
200 REM 

21j3 CLS (RND ( 8 ) ) : GOSUB 2000: PRINT 
@32*8,"DO YOU NEED INSTRUCTIONS 
ABOUT <photo-tagger>" ; : INPUT R$ 
: IF LEFT$ (R$, 1)="Y" THEN 3000 EL 
SE 22j3 

22j3 CLS:GOSUB 200$ I PRINT@32*3 , " 1 
) TURN ON PRINTER": SOUND 20j3,3:FO 
RXX=lTOlj3 > 0 > 0:NEXT XX: IF PEEK (6531 
4)/2<>INT(PEEK(65314)/2) THEN PR 

INT@32*ll+6 , "printer is not on 1 
ine! ! ! 11 : PRINT@32*12 , "turn printe 
r on at this time! ! ! 11 :F0RXX=1T01 
ppjZhNEXT XX: GOTO2 20 
23j3 CLS:GOSUB 2000 : PRINT@32*5 , "2 
) LINE UP LABELS IN PRINTER WITH 
PRINT HEAD AT THIS TIME": SOUND 
23j3,2 

240 PRINT@32*1J25, » PRESS ANY KE 
Y TO CONTINUE" :EXEC44 53 9 
25j3 PLAY'^^l/Llp ; A ;V16 ; A; V8 ; A 
,*V3;A?Vl;L2j3;A" 
255 CLS (RND(8) ): GOSUB 2000 
257 PRINT§32*14," [press / to kee 
p last entry! !!!]"; 
26J3 PRINT@32*7, "date of picture" 
LINE INPUT A$:IF LEN(A$) >29 T 



/ * 



HEN PRINT "LINE TOO LONG, PLEASE 

RE-ENTER": GOTO 2 6J3 
261 IF A$="/" THEN A$=E$:GOTO 27 

9> 

2 62 E$— A$ 

27J3 PRINT"location of picture" : L 
INE INPUT B$:IF LEN(B$)>29 THEN 
PRINT "LINE TOO LONG, PLEASE RE- 
ENTER": GOTO 2 7j3 

271 IF B$="/" THEN B$=F$:GOTO 28 
0 

272 F$=B$ 

28j3 PRINT" people , places , things i 
n picture" : LINE INPUT C$: IF LEN 
(C$)>29 THEN PRINT" LINE TOO LONG 
, PLEASE RE-ENTER" : GOTO 2 8jZ) 

281 IF C$="/" THEN C$=G$:GOTO 29 

0 

282 G$=C$ 

29j3 PRINT "further information" : L 
INE INPUT D$: IF LEN ( D$ ) >29 THEN 
PRINT" LINE TOO LONG, PLEASE RE- 
ENTER" : GOTO 290 

291 IF D$ = "/" THEN D$=H$:GOTO 30 
0 

292 H$=D$ 

300 CLS (RND (8) ): GOSUB 2000 : PRINT 
@32*4 , "is this correct?" : PRINTST 
RING $(32,"-");: PRINT® 3 2 * 6 , A$ : PRI 
NTB$ : PRINTC$ : PRINTD$ : PRINT STRIN 
G$(32, "-") ;: SCREEN 0,1 
310 R$=INKEY$;IF R$= ?l " THEN 3 10 

315 IF R$="Y" OR R$="y" THEN 32j3 

316 IF R$=»N" OR R$="n" THEN 255 

317 GOTO 310 

3 20 REM ROUTINE TO PRINT ON THE 

LABELS 

325 PRINT@32*14+8, "stand by-prin 

ting! I " / 

33J3 PRINT#-2,A$ 

340 PRINT#-2,B$ 

35j3 PRINT#-2,C$ 

360 PRINT#-2,D$ 

370 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 

380 PRINT@32*14, "press <C> TO CO 

NTINUE,<E> TO END" ; : LINE INPUT R 

$:IF R$="C" THEN 255 ELSE IF R$= 

"E" THEN END ELSE 38j3 

1000 REM ROUTINE FOR TITLE SCREE 

N 

1010 A$-CHR$ (34) +»photo»+CHR$ ( 12 
8)+"tagger"+CHR$ (34) : L=5 : GOSUB1J3 
60 

1020 A$="by":GOSUBlj37J3 

1030 A$="d . a . turowski" : GOSUB107j3 

1040 A$="august 1986" :GOSUBlj37j3 



48 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 



Tandy Computers: 
Because there is 
no better value ™ 



Tandy Color Computer 3 



TM 




Save $ 70 on our 
popular, ready-tcrun 
Color Computer, 

Just $129,95, Have a colorful Christmas 
with the advanced Color Computer 3. 
This powerful computer is perfect for all 
kinds of applications: word processing, 
education, entertainment, programming, 
graphics and much more. It's a gift the 
whole family will love. 

Start computing Christmas day. Just at- 
tach the Color Computer 3 to your color 
TV, and you can begin programming in 
BASIC. Or plug in a Program Pak™ for 
instant fun and games, personal finance 
and many other applications. The Color 
Computer 3 is compatible with software 
and accessories designed for our popular 
Color Computer 2. 

Add a monitor for advanced graphics. 

For razor-sharp color graphics, add our 
CM-8 high-resolution monitor. With the 
CM-8, you can achieve up to 160 X 192 
or 320 X 192 resolution graphics using 16 
colors, or 640 X 192 with 4 colors. 

Save on a disk drive. To make the Color 
Computer 3 even more powerful, add a 
disk drive, now on sale for just $219.95. 
You can store over 156,000 characters of 
programs and data on 5 [ U ff diskettes. 

Come in today! The Color Computer 3 
offers uncompromising performance at an 
incredible low price. See it at your local 
Radio Shack. (26-3334) 

Radio /hack 



Sale ends 12/24/87. Reg. $199.95. FD-502 Color Disk #0 reg. $299.95. 
Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating stores and 
dealers. Television, Program Pak and disk drive sold separately. 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



1050 GOTO 1180 
1060 REM CLS (0) 
1070 M=LEN (A$) 
1080 FOR X=1T0M 

1090 PRINT@32*L+15-M/2+X,MID$ (A$ 
,X,1) ; 

1100 SOUND100,1 

1110 NEXT X 

1120 L=L+1 

1130 SOUND 200,1 

1140 FOR S=1TO80:NEXTS 

1150 RETURN 

1160 'ROUTINE BY JOHN D. BOYLE 

FROM RAINBOW MAGAZINE 2/85 
1170 'PROGRAM LISTING 2 
1180 SCREEN 0,1: FOR XX=1 TO 500: 
: NEXT XX: FOR YY=1T03 : PLAY M 03 ; V3 1 
;L10 ;A;V16 ;A;V8 ;A;V3 ;A;V1;L20 ;A lf 
: NEXT YY 
1190 GOTO 200 

2000 PRINT@10 , "photo"+CHR$ ( 128 ) + 
"tagger 11 ; : PRINT@32*2 + 8 , "by"+CHR$ 
(12 8)+"d.a.turowski" ; : RETURN 
3000 CLS : PRINT : PRINT" photo-tagge 
r IS A UTILITY TO HELP YOU KE 
EP TRACK OF YOUR PHOTOS. IT 

WILL PRODUCE ON A MAILING LAB 



EL THE INFORMATION THAT YOU US 
UALLY FORGET TO WRITEON THE BACK 
OF THE PHOTO SUCH ASTHE DATE, P 
EOPLE OR PLACES IN" 
3010 PRINT 11 THE PHOTO, AND ALSO A 
NY OTHER GENERAL INFORMATION Y 
OU MAY WANTTO REMEMBER ! 11 
3015 PRINT@ 3 2*15+5 , "HIT ANY KEY 
TO CONTINUE" ; :EXEC44539 
3020 CLS : PRINT: PRINT"photo-tagge 
r IS SELF-PROMPTING AND BY USIN 
G IT AFTER YOU GET A NEW B 

ATCH OF PICTURES, YOUAND YOUR CO 
MPUTER CAN QUICKLY PRODUCE LAB 
ELS TO PLACE ON THE BACK OF EAC 
H PICTURE." 

3025 PRINT"ALSO, IF YOU ARE TYPI 
NG THE S AME INF ORM AT ION REPEATEDL 
Y FOR A SETOF PICTURES, FOR EXAM 
PLE, THE SAME DATE, BY PRESSIN 
G THE '/' KEY , photo- tagger WIL 
L DEFAULT TO THE LAST USED ENTR 
Y . ENJOY ! ! " 

3030 PRINT@32*15 , "press <enter> 
to begin photo-tag" ;: EXEC 44539: 
GOTO 2 20 




50 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 



# * 





Tandy Computer 
Accessories: 
Because there is 
no better value™ 



Sale ! Color Disk Drive 



1 




Save $ 80 when 
you expand your 
Color Computer. 

Just $219.95! Turn any Color Computer 
with Extended BASIC into a complete 
disk system and store over 156,000 char- 
acters of data. The sale-priced FD-502 
Color Disk #0 is simple to connect— just 
plug directly into your Program Pak™ port 
or Multi-Pak Interface. A disk drive makes 
loading and saving data and programs a 
snap. Plus, the FD-502 opens your Color 
Computer to a whole new world of com- 
puting power — the speed and sophistica- 
tion of disk-based programs. 

The FD-502 includes a 5 ] k" disk drive, a 
Program Pak containing the disk operat- 
ing system, cable, a blank diskette, a man- 
ual and operator's instructions. You get it 
all at one terrific price! 

Open new doors with OS/9. Add the 

OS/9 Level Two Operating System 
($79.95) to your Color Computer 3 for 
dramatic new flexibility both in program- 
ming and software selection. OS/9 Level 
Two lets you tap the full potential of OS/9 
based software, for greater speed, and utili- 
zation of up to 5 12K of memory. 

Upgrade today! Now's the time to step up 
to a new plateau in Color Computing. 
Get the sale-priced FD-502 disk drive and 
the OS/9 operating system today! 

Radio Jhaelt 



Sale ends December 24. 1 987. FD-502 rcj». $299.95. Prices apply at 
Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating srnres and dealers. 
OS/9/TM Microware and Mororola. 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



TM 




hing Well 



Taking it to the streets 



32K ECB 



TP 



On the Road Again 

By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor 's Note: If you have an idea for 
the " Wishing Well, "submit it to Fred 
c/o THE RAINBOW, Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don't forget 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use, 
but remain the property of the au- 

Several months ago I presented 
Road Skills /, the first drivers' 
education software for the Color 
Computer. The program worked in 1 6K 
CoJor BASIC and provided a quick 
overview of driving rules common in all 
50 states. I have used the program with 
my students and find it to be quite useful 
in preparing them for their learner's 
permit test. 

The ink had barely dried on the issue 
containing Road Skills (September 
J 987, Page 90) when RAINBOW manag- 
ing editor Jutta Kapfhammer suggested 
I follow up with a possibility I hinted 
at in the article — that I could come up 
with a "Part II" involving the various 
road, highway and traffic signs. Since 
readers are always asking me to write 
more graphic programs that would 
work on the CoCo 1 and 2, as well as 
3, Road Skills II seemed like a logical 
progression. Also, many people have 
written asking for more software for the 
Speech/Sound Pak. 

Therefore, readers, here you are: the 
first fully graphic drivers' education 
program f or the Color Computer. 

Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



The Goal 

Road Skills I simply gave users a 
chance to review standard driving infor- 
mation on an inverse video screen. The 
program allowed you to review the 
material as much as you wanted, later 
allowing you to quiz yourself on the 
information. Its only graphics were Lo- 
Res illustrations showing the right-of- 
way laws at intersections. 

In order to create the graphics re- 
quired to display various traffic signs, 
1 wrote Road Skills II in Color Ex- 
tended BASIC. However, to save mem- 
ory, I did use PMDDE2/1 for both illus- 
trations and graphic text displays. The 
results are very attractive. However, 



there is one difference between the two 
programs. 

Where Road Skills I might have 
seemed very academic, Road Skills II 
could strike some of you as a bit more 
elementary. I mean, how much intelli- 
gence does it take to realize a stop sign 
means stopl 

However, there is some value to this 
kind of program. It can be used with 
younger students who are years from 
their driving permits. It's never too early 
to learn the meaning of warning signs. 
Add to that the use of the Speech/ 
Sound Pak (optional, of course) and 
you have a program that is suitable for 
both younger and older students. 



A 




5 T □ P 



V 



V □ U MUST ftLWA V 5 
□ BE V fi STOP 5IGN 



WHEN 



□U 5EE IT. 



52 



THE RAINBOW December 1987 



Using the Program 

As with all my programs, take great 
care to be very precise in typing it in, 
especially the DATA statements. One 
mistake in the data and the program will 
not run properly. Also, since the pro- 
gram contains poke commands, be sure 
to save it to tape or disk before trying 
to run it. A misplaced POKE could cause 
you to lose all of your typing by locking 
up your machine. 

As with some of my other recent 
graphic educational programs, I have 
redrawn a graphic text character set to 
display our writing in a number of 
colorful ways. All of the text will be 
drawn out of view on graphic pages 3 
and 4, later being copied (by PCDPY) to 
pages I and 2, which we are viewing. 
The same goes for all of our graphic 
signs. This way, they just pop into view, 
like a fancy machine language program. 

On running the program, you will be 
asked if you want (T)alking or (N)ot. If 
you press T with the Speech Pak in 
place, the program will advance itself. 
Pressing N for no talking will allow the 
user to pace himself or herself by press- 
ing ENTER to advance to each new 
screen. Thus, if you have a small child 
who cannot read, you can advance the 



screens along while you read the mate- 
rial to him or her. 

Next, either a red or blue screen 
appears. Press ENTER if thescreen is red. 
If the screen is blue, press the reset 
button and run until the screen is red. 
This sets the correct color pattern for 
our signs. (You wouldn't want a blue 
stop sign, now, would you?) 

^This way is better 
for this program. 99 

You may wonder why I'm not using 
my old technique of setting a variable 
from the color on the screen. Believe it 
or not, in some graphics, that is not 
suitable. It has more to do with pixel 
location than anything else. Take my 
word for it — this way is better for this 
program. 

There is no quiz in this program. It 
would be too difficult to fit questions 
and the graphics on the screen all at 
once. Therefore, this program is strictly 
educational and not diagnostic, like 
Road Skills I 



You will notice that I have not cov- 
ered a lot of different signs, but have 
instead concentrated on categories with 
examples. On running the program, you 
will see what I mean. Of course, that 
leaves the door open for parts III and 
IV, if necessary. One such program 
could even deal with pedestrian signals 
for youngsters. Let me know if you 
would find such a program valuable. (I 
know some of my more limited special 
needs students would definitely benefit 
from such a program.) 

At the conclusion of the last frame, 
the program will rerun itself for another 
person to sit and watch. When you use 
the program, you will find that it actu- 
ally does take some time to listen to. 
Even done without speech, the program 
is lengthy and contains quite a bit of 
information. Only you can decide how 
valuable it can be for your family or 
students. 

If you can suggest some additional 
areas that this drivers' education series 
can cover, drop me a line. 1 am always 
looking for new ideas. 

Until next month, thank you for all 
yourkind letters of support. They mean 
a great deal to me when my typing 
fingers get sore. □ 



Model 101 
Interface $39.95 




• Serial to parallel interlace 

• Works with any COCO 

• Compatible with "Centron- 
ics" parallel input printers 

• 6 switch selectable baud 
rates 300-600-1200-2400- 
4800-9600 

• Small size 

4.5" x 2,5" x 1.25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables lo connect to your 
computer and printer 



Other Quality 
Items 

High quality 5 screw shell C- 
10 cassette tapes. $7.50/ 
dozen 

Hard plastic storage boxesfor 
cassette tapes. $2.50/dozen 

Pin-Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00/100 
Colors $3.60/100 (specify 
red. blue, yellow, tan) 



Model 104 Deluxe 
Interface $51 .95 




Same features as 101 plus 

• Built in serial port for your 
modem or other serial device 

• Switch between parallel 
output and serial output 

• Size is 4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25' 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 



NEW! Cables for 
your COCO 

• U.L. listed foil-shielded cable 

• 2 Types: male/femaleexten- 
sion cables (used between 
a serial device and existing 
cable) male/male cables 
(used between two serial 
devices such as a modem 
and one of our switchers). 

• 3 ft./$3.95, 6 M./S4.49, 

10 ft./$5,59 Specify M/M 
or M/F and length. 



Model 102 
Switcher $35.95 




• Connect to your COCO 
serial porl and have 3 switch 
selectable serial ports 

• Color coded indicator lights 
show switch position 

• Lights also serve as a 
power on indicator for your 
COCO 

• Heavy guage blue anodized 
aluminumcabinetv/ith non- 
slip rubber feet 



The 101 and 104 require 
power tooperate. Most print- 
ers can supply power to your 
interface. (Star. Radio Shack 
and Okidata are just a few that 
do - Epson and Seikosha do 
not). The interfaces can also 
be powered by an AC adap- 
tor; Radio Shack model 273- 
1 431 plugs into all models. If 
you require a power supply, 
add a "P" to the model number 
and add $5.00 to the price. 
(Model 101 P $44.95. Model 
104P $56.95). 



Model 105 
Switcher $14.95 




• Connects to your COCO 
to give you 2 switch select- 
able serial ports 

• 3 foot cable to connect to 
your COCO's serial port 

• The perfect item to use to 
connect a printer and a 
modem to your COCO 

• Small in size, only 4.5 x 2.5 
x 1.25 



TheModel 101 , 102. 104 and 
1 05 work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory 
size. These products are co- 
vered by a 1 year warranty. 

TheModel 101 and 104 work 
with any standard parallel 
input printer including Gemini. 
Epson. Radio Shack, 
Okidata, C. loth, Seikosha, 
Panasonic and many others 
They support BASIC print 
commands, word processors 
and graphic commands. 

We manufacture these 
products - dealer inquiries 
are invited. 



Cassette Label 
Program $6.95 

• New Version - tape trans- 
ferable to disk - save and 
loadlabelsfromtapeto disk 

• Prints5 linesof information 
on pin-feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven, easy to use 

• Standard, expanded and 
condensed characters 

• Each line of text auto- 
matically centered. 

• Label display on CRT. en- 
abling editing before printing 

• Program comes on tape 
and is supplied with 24 
labels to get you starled 

• 16K ECB required 

Ordering 
Information 

Free shipping m the United 
States (except Alaska and 
Hawaii) on all orders over 
$50.00. Please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling on or- 
ders under S50.00. 
Ohio residents add 6% 
sales tax. 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use 
yourVlSAor MASTERCARD 
or request CO D. (Please 
add S2.00 for C.O.D. orders). 
If you prefer, send check or 
money order; payable in U.S. 
Funds to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 53 



Coco Graphics Designer 

Only $29.95 



The Coco Graphics Designer pro- 
duces beautiful Greeting Cards, 
Banners, and Signs for holidays, 
birthdays and other occasions. 

The program features picture, 
border, and character font editors, 
so that you can modify or expand 
the already built in libraries. Plus 
a special "grabber" utility is in- 
cluded to capture areas of high 
resolution screens for your picture 
library. 

Requirements: a Coco I, II or III 
with at least 32K, one disk drive, 
BASIC 1.0/1.1 ,ADOS 1.0/1.1 or 
JDOS. Printers supported in- 
clude: Epson RX/FX, Gemini 10X, 
SG10, NX10, C-ltoh 8510, DMP 



100/105/110/130/430 CGP220, 
many Okidata (check with Ze- 
bra), Seikosha GP1 00/250, Goril- 
la Banana, Legend 808. 
#C323 Coco Graphics Designer 



Picture Disk #1 

This supplementary picture li- 
brary diskette contains over one 
hundred additional pictures. 
#C333 Picture Disk #1 $14.95 



Colored Paper Packs 

150 sheets (50 each red, yellow, 
blue) with 60 matching enve- 
lopes. Perfect for making your 
productions outstanding. 
#C274 Paper Pack $1 9.95 





It's fun making your own Greeting Cards, Signs, and Banners with Ze- 
bra's Coco Graphics Designer. 



WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Only $29.95 

Order Cat#TBRS01 
(Originally $69.95) 

WICO designed these trackballs 
specifically for the Radio Shack 
Color Computer joystick port. 

WICO is the largest designer 
and manufacturer of control de- 
vices for commercial arcade vid- 
eo games. If you've ever played 
an arcade video game, chances 
are you've used a WICO joystick 
or trackball and experienced its 
superior control, pinpoint firing 
accuracy, and exceptional dura- 
bility. 

Includes one-year limited 



warranty. Phoenolic ball offers 
360-degree movement. Two opti- 
cal encoders provide split-second 
response. Quick-action fire but- 
ton for smooth, two handed ar- 
cade response and feel. Long 5" 
computer connection. Heavy duty 
plastic case for long hard use. 
Compatible with all color comput- 
er models. 

We also have trackballs for 
Atari, Atari ST, Commodore 64, 
Amiga, Macintosh, Apple ll/IIC, 
and TI99/4A computers. 



Ordering Instructions: All or- 
ders add $3.00 Shipping & Han- 
dling. UPS COD add $3.00. VI- 
SA/MC Accepted. NY residents 
add sales tax. 



Zebra Systems, Inc. 

78-06 Jamaica Avenue 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 















'so 


75 


435 


128 


V 


140 


153 


470 


192 










m 








290 


57 


570 


251 






325 


4 


END . 


84 






365 


64 







The listing: ROAD 1 1 



REM* ************************* 



2 REM* 

3 REM* 

4 REM* 

5 REM* 

6 REM* 

7 REM* 



DRIVING INSTRUCTOR 2 
KNOWING ROAD SIGNS 
BY FRED B.SCERBO 
6j3 HARDING AVE 
NORTH ADAMS, MA 012 4 7 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 
8 REM************************** 
10 CLS0:CLEAR1000:FORI=1TO32:PRI 
NTCHR$ (188) ; :NEXT:F0RI=1T0192:RE 
ADA: IFA=0THENA=16 
15 PRINTCHR$ (A+112) ; :NEXT 
20 DATA126, 124, 122, 126, 124, 122,1 
2 6,124,12 2,125,12 4,125, , ,30,2 8,2 
6 , 2 9 , , , 30 , 20 , 30 , 20 , 30 , 16 , 20 , 30 , , 
21,28,29 

25 DATA122, ,122,122, ,122,122,96, 
122,117, ,117, ,,26,, 24, 21, 16, 22,1 
6, ,26, ,26, ,16,26, ,21, ,20 
30 DATA123, 115, 122, 122, ,122,123, 
115,12 2,117,96, 117, , , 27 , 19 , 18 , 21 
,22, 16,,, 26,, 26,, 16, 26,, 21, 19, 19 
35 DATA122, 117, ,122, ,122,122,112 
,12 2,117,112,117,^ ,26,21,20,18 
, ,,26, ,26, ,16,26, , , ,21 
40 DATA122, 117, 96, 122, ,122,122, , 
122,117, ,117, ,16, 26,, 26, 21,, 20,1 
8,, 26,, 26, 21, 16, 26, 21, 21,, 21 
45 DATA122, 117, 114, 123, 115, 122,1 
2 2,112,12 2,119,115,119, , ,27,19,2 
6,2 3,18, ,27,17,27,17,27,23,17,27 
,23,21, 19,23 

50 F0RI=1T032:PRINTCHR$(179) ;:NE 
XT 

55 PRINT© 2 9 3," DRIVING INSTRUCTO 
R 2 11 ; 

60 PRINT§3 25," KNOWING ROAD SIG 
NS 11 ; :PRINT@3 89 , 11 BY FRED B.S 
CERBO 11 ; 

65 PRINT@421," COPYRIGHT (C) 19 
87 " ; 

70 PRINT@485," (T)ALKING OR (N)O 
T ? "; 

75 X$=INKEY$: IFX$="T"THEN95 
80 IFX$="N"THEN90 
85 GOT075 
90 NT=1 
95 CLS0 



54 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



SUPER PRODUCTS 



100 XX=&HFF00: YY=&HFF7E 

105 POKEXX+1, 52 :P0KEXX+3 , 63 

110 POKEXX+3 5 , 60 

115 PM0DE4, 1: PCLS1 

120 DIMR(23) ,L$ (26) ,Y(4p) :C$(1)= 

"CI" :C$(2)="C2":C$(3)="C3":C$ (4) 

= "C4 " 

125 F0RI=1T02 6 : READL$ ( I ) : NEXT 
130 GOTO2 60 
135 AA$=JK$ 

140 A$=STR$(A) :B$=STR$(B) 

145 DRAW"S4BM"+A$+" , "+B$+C$ (CL) 

15^1 IF LEN(JK$) <=21THEN17 / 0 

155 FOR T=21TO / 0STEP-1 : IF MID$ ( JK 

$,T,1)=" "THEN 165 

160 NEXT T:GOTO170 

165 L$=LEFT$ (JK$,T) : W$=L$ : GOSUB1 
75:JK$=" "+RIGHT$(JK$, (LEN(JK$) ) 
-T) :GOTO140 

170 W$=JK$:B=B+14:GOSUB175:RETUR 
N 

175 SL=LEN(W$) :FORI=lTOSL:BB$=MI 

D$(W$,I,1) :C=ASC(BB$)-64:IF C=-3 

2 THEN DRAW"BR12":GOT019 5 

180 IF C=-18THENDRAW"BR2RBR9" : GO 

T0195 

185 IFC=-2,0THENDRAW"BR2R2D2G2E4B 

R7" :GOT0195 

190 DRAWL$(C) 

195 NEXTI:B=B+14: RETURN 

200 IFNT=1THEN24,0 

205 FORII=lTOLEN(AA$) 

210 IF PEEK (YY) AND 128=0 THEN 2 10 

215 POKEYY / ASC(MID$(AA$,II / l) ) 

220 NEXTII 

225 IFPEEK(YY) AND12 8=,0THEN2 25 
230 POKE YY, 13 

235 F0RHH=1T016^J:NEXTHH: RETURN 
240 FORHH=1TO3000 

245 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=CHR$ (13)THEN2 
55 

250 NEXTHH 
255 RETURN 

260 PMODE2,l:PCLSl:SCREENl,l:PMO 
DEI: SCREEN1, 1 : PCLS0 : POKE65314 ,24 
8 

265 PCLS3 :A=0 : B=56 : CL=4 : JK$=" PR 
ESS RESET AND RUN IF SCREEN IS B 
LUE . " : GOSUB135 : B=B+20 : JK$=" PRES 
S ENTER WHEN THE SCREEN IS RED." 
:GOSUB135 

210 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$OCHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 
270 

275 PCLS,0 : SCREEN^ , 0 : R=3 : BL=2 : FOR 
I=0TO256STEP4 :PSET(I,1,3) :PSET(I 
+2,3,3) :NEXT:DIMA(20) : GET (0,0) -( 
256,4) ,A,G:PCLS0 

280 DATA U6E2R2F2D2NL4D4BR6,U8R4 





A superb controller. Along with 
Ihe included C-DOS. plug-in 
three more software selectable 
2764or271 28 EPROMs burned 
to your liking. 

The internal Mini Expansion Bus 
lets you add some incredible 
features to the controller Disto 
Super Add-Ons were designed 
to fit neatly inside the controller 
case. 



DISTO 
SUPER 
RAM 




Zero K $ 29.95 



Full512K $ 79.95 




Now is the time to upgrade your 
COCO 3 to 512K of memory. 
Available with or without mem 
ory chips, the Super Ram 3 
board is easily installed inside 
the COCO. It is fully compatible 
with OS-9 Level 2 and is deliv- 
ered with a software package (in 
BASIC) that includes: a printer 
spooler, a ramdisk, a memory 
test and an install/configure 
program for your system 



DISTO SUPER ADD-ONS 



REAL TIME CLOCK AND PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE 

Have the Real Time, date and year displayed on your screen at a simple 
command using the included software drivers. $29.95 

MINI EPROM PROGRAMMER 

A low cost EPROM programmer that attaches directly to your Disto 
Super Controller to program those often used utilities. $54.95 

HARD DISK INTERFACE 

A hard disk interface fully compatible with S.A.S.I. that fits inside the 
Super Controller or Ramdisk. OS-9 Drivers are included. $49.95 



$169.95 



SUPER RAMDISK 5 12K 

Imagine having access to 51 2K of virtual disk 
memory in close to no time. 

The OS-9 operating system is rapidly becoming a best-seller. All Disto 
products are supported by OS-9 Level 1 and Level 2 software. We 
have drivers for: Parallel Printer Interface, Real Time Clock Adapter, 
Super Ramdisk, Hard Disk Adapter and Disto's Super Controller 2 



SEND FOR FREE 87/88 WINTER CATALOG 9 


©X c 

10802 Lajeuness 

MASTER CARD 
AND VISA 
ACCEPTED 


RC COMPUTERS inc. 

>e, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. H3L 2E8 

1-514-383-5293 

We accept phone orders. 
C.O.D. in Canada onfy. 
Shipping & Handling not included in prices. 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 55 



F2G2NL4F2G2NL4BR8 , U8R4BD8NL4BR6 , 
U8R4F2D4G2NL4BR8 ,U8NR4D4NR4D4R4B 
R6,U8NR4D4NR4D4BR1J3,U8R6BD4NL2D4 
NL4 BR6 , U4NU4R6U4 D8BR6 
285 DATA R2U8L2R4L2D8R2BR6 , NU4R4 
U8L4R6BD8BR6 , U8D4R2NE4F4BR6 ,NU8R 
4BR6 ,U8F4E4D8BR6 , U8F6NU6D2BR6 ,U8 
R6D8NL6BR6 / U8R6D4L6D4BR12 ,U8R6D8 
NL6NH4NF2BR6 

29j3 DATA U8R6D4L4F4BR6 , R6U4L6U4R 
6BD8BR6 , BR4U8L4R8BD8BR6 , NU8R6NU8 
BR6,BU8D4F4E4U4BD8BR6 ,NU8R4NU6R4 
NU8BR6 , E8G4H4F8BR6 , BU8D2F4ND2E4U 

2BD8BR6 , NR8E8NL8BD8BR6 

295 PM0DE2,1:PCLS1:SCREEN1,1:PM0 

DEI : SCREEN1 , 1 : PCLSJ3 : POKE653 14 ,24 

8 : PM0DE2 , 3 : PM0DE1 , 3 : COLOR2 , 3 : GOT 

032J3 

3j3j3 COLOR2,3:LINE(j3, 138)-(256, 19 
2) , PSET , BF : B=152 : A=j3 : CL=1 : GOSUB1 
35 : PCOPY3T01 : PCOPY4T02 : GOSUB2j3j3 : 
RETURN 

3J35 COLOR3,2:LINE(j3,138)-(256, 19 
2 ) , PSET , BF : B=152 : A=J3 : CL=1 : GOSUB1 
35 : PCOPY3T01 : PCOPY4T02 : GOSUB2j3j3 : 
RETURN 

31J3 COLORl,l:LINE(j3, 138)-(256, 19 
2) ,PSET,BF:B=152 : A=j3 : CL=3 : GOSUB1 
35 : PCOPY3T01 : PCOPY4T02 : GOSUB2j3j3 : 
RETURN 

315 COLOR2,4:LINE(p,138)-(256,19 
2) , PRESET ,BF: LINE (0, 138) - (256, 19 
2) ,PSET,B:B=152 : A=j3 : CL=3 : GOSUB13 
5: PCOPY3T01: PCOPY4T02 : GOSUB2j3j3 :R 
ETURN 

32J3 PCLS4:COLOR2,3:LINE(p,p)-(25 
6,92) , PSET , BF : B=16 : A=J3 : CL=1 : JK$= 

11 THIS PROGRAM WILL INTRODUCE YO 
U TO SOME OF THE MOST COMMON ROA 
D SIGNS USED IN THE UNITED STATE 
S TODAY . 11 : GOSUB13 5 : PCOPY3T01 : PCO 
PY4T02 :GOSUB2j3j3 

325 COLOR3,2:LINE(j3, 98) -(256,192 
) ,PSET,BF:A=j3:CL=l: JK$=" WHILE N 
OT ALL SIGNS USED HAVE BEEN INCL 
UDED, THE SIGNS PRESENTED ARE A 
GOOD CROSS SECTION OF THOSE IN U 
SE . 11 : GOSUB13 5 : PCOPY3T01 : PCOPY4TO 
2 :GOSUB2j3j3 

33J3 PCLS4 : DRAW 11 S16C3BM128 , 12j3Rlj3 
Elj3Ulj3Hlj3L2j3Glj3Dlj3Flj3Rlj3 lf : PAINT ( 

12 8 , 20) ,3,3: DRAW lf C4BM128 , 116R9E9 
U1J3H9L18G9D1J3F9R9 11 

335 JK$= lf THIS IMPORTANT ROAD SI 
GN HAS EIGHT SIDES AND IS RED. 11 : 

GOSUB3fdf3 

34J3 JK$ = lf THIS ROAD SIGN IS THE 
ONLY ONE WHICH IS THIS SHAPE . 11 : G 



OSUB3J35 

34 5 JK$ = lf IT IS ALWAYS RED AND I 
S PRINTED WITH LARGE WHITE LETTE 
RS. lf :GOSUB31j3 

35J3 DRAW lf S12BM62 ,72C4 lf +L$ (19)+L$ 

(2j3)+L$(15)+L$(16) :JK$ = M YOU MUS 

T ALWAYS OBEY A STOP SIGN WHEN Y 

OU SEE IT. 11 :GOSUB315 

355 JK$= lf YOU MUST COME TO A COM 

PLETE STOP WHEN YOU SEE IT. lf :GOS 

UB3J3J3 

3 6J3 JK$ = lf YOU MAY THEN PROCEED W 
HEN IT IS SAFE TO DO SO. lf :GOSUB3 

IP 

365 PCLS4 

3 7J3 DRAW lf S24BM128 , 13 2C1R2M+16 , -2 

PH2L3J3G2M+16,+2J3R2 I! 

375 DRAW lf S25BM134 , 126C3M+14 , -18H 

L2 6GM+14 , + 18 11 

38J3 DRAW lf BM134 , 86M+7 , -9HL12GM+7 , 
+9 M :PAINT(128,18) ,3,3 
385 JK$ = lf THIS TRIANGULAR SHAPED 
SIGN IS USED FOR JUST ONE SIGN. 
11 :GOSUB3j35 

39J3 JK$= lf YIELD 11 : B=42 : A=lj38 : CL=3 : 
GOSUB13 5: JK$= lf YIELD MEANS THAT 
YOU DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT OF WAY 
. 11 :GOSUB3j3j3 

395 JK$ = lf YIELD MEANS YOU MUST L 
ET THE OTHER CAR GO BEFORE YOU. 11 
:GOSUB315 

4j3j3 JK$= M YOU MAY EVEN HAVE TO S 

TOP BEFORE THE WAY TO GO IS CLEA 

R. 11 :GOSUB3pp 

4J35 GOSUB41j3:GOT04 3j3 

41J3 PCLS4 : DRAW M S8C1BM128 , 6R2M+38 

,+3j3DM-3 8,+3j3L4M-38 ,-3j3UM+3 8, - 3J3 

R2 11 

415 PAINT (128 , 1(5) ,1,1 

42J3 FORI=j3T0128STEP4:PUT(j3,I)-(2 

56,1+3) ,A,OR:NEXT 

425 DRAW lf S8ClBM13'j3, lj3M+3 6 , +2 8M-3 
6 , +2 8M-3 6 , -2 8M+3 6,-28": RETURN 
43J3 JK$= lf WARNING SIGNS ARE DIAM 
OND SHAPED AND ARE YELLOW AND BL 
ACK lf :GOSUB3pp 

43 5 JK$= lf SOME WARNING SIGNS HAV 
E WORDS WHILE SOME OTHERS DO NOT 
. ":GOSUB305 

44 j3 JK$ = lf THEY ARE USED TO SHOW 
THAT SOME KIND OF DANGER IS AHEA 
D. 11 :GOSUB315 

445 DRAW lf S12BM12 8 , 3J3C1R4D1J3R12D4 
L12D1J3L6U1J3L12U4R12U1J3R2 11 : PAINT ( 
128, 34) , 1, 1: JK$= lf THIS SIGN IS S 
EEN BEFORE COMING TO AN INTERSEC 
TION. 11 :GOSUB31j3 

45J3 GOSUB41J3 : DRAW 11 S8BM8 6 , 74Cl lf +L 



56 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



$(19)+L$(12)+L$(15)+L$ (23) : JK$=" 
THIS SIGN MEANS THAT YOU SHOULD 
SLOW DOWN . 11 : GOSUB300 

455 JK$«" IT MEANS THAT ROAD CON 

DITIONS ARE NOT SAFE FOR HIGH SP 

EEDS" :GOSUB315 

460 GOSUB410: DRAW 11 S 8 BM1 10,94C1U1 
4EUEUERERER6M-4 , -8M+18 , + 6G12U6L4 
GLGLGDGD12 L6 11 : PAINT ( 114 f 90) , 1,1: 
JK$=" THIS SIGN MEANS THAT THE R 
OAD AHEAD CURVES TO THE RIGHT . 11 : 
GOSUB300 

4 65 JK$ = " YOU SHOULD REDUCE YOUR 
SPEED BEFORE REACHING THE CURVE 
. 11 :GOSUB305 

470 GOSUB410: DRAW"S8BM146, 94C1U1 
4 HUHUHLHLH L 6 M+ 4 , -8M-18 , +6F12U6R4 

FRFRFDFD12R6 11 : PAINT (14 2, 90), 1,1: 
JK$=" THIS SIGN MEANS THAT THE R 
OAD AHEAD CURVES TO THE LEFT . 11 : G 

OSUB300 

475 JK$= lf AGAIN YOU SHOULD REDUC 
E YOUR SPEED BEFORE THE CURVE . 11 : 

GOSUB305 

480 GOSUB410:DRAW"BM108, 98C1NU32 
RNU 3 2 RNU 3 2 BR 4 U 4 BU 4 U4 RD 4 B D 4 D 4 BR4 N 
U12RU12NH4LH4BU4U4BU4U4LD4BD4D4B 
U12BR6D12F12D8LU8H12U12LD12F12D8 
BL4U4BU4U2LD2BD4D4 11 
485 JK$=" THIS SYMBOL MEANS THAT 
A RIGHT LANE DROP LIES AHEAD. 11 : 
GOSUB315 

490 JK$= I! TRAFFIC TO THE RIGHT M 
UST MERGE WITH THE LEFT LANE . 11 : G 
OSUB300 

495 GOSUB4 1 0 : DRAW 11 BM 15 2, 98C1NU32 
LNU3 2LNU3 2BL4U4BU4U4LD4BD4D4BL4N 
U12LU12NE4RE4BU4U4BU4U4RD4BD4D4B 
U12BL6D12G12D8RU8E12U12RD12G12D8 
BR4U4BU4U2RD2BD4D4 ff 
500 JK$= M THIS SYMBOL MEANS THAT 
A LEFT LANE DROP LIES AHEAD . 11 : G 
OSUB310 

505 JK$=» TRAFFIC TO THE LEFT MU 
ST MERGE WITH THE RIGHT LANE . 11 : G 
OSUB315 
510 PCLS4 

515 CIRCLE (128 ,58) , 68 , 1, .9: PAINT 
(128,10) ,1,1 

520 FORI=0TO128STEP4:PUT(0,I)-(2 
56,1+3) ,A, OR: NEXT 

525 CIRCLE (128 ,58) , 62 , 1, . 9 : CIRCL 
E (130, 58) , 62,1, . 9 

530 DRAW !f S4BM128 , 52C1NE36NH36BD1 
6NF3 6NG3 6BU8BR8NE3 6NF3 6BL16NH3 6N 
G3 6 11 : PAINT ( 12 8 , 58 ) , 1 , 1 
535 DRAW !! S12BM80,70U8R4D4L4F4RNH 
4BR23U8R4D4L4F4RNH4 11 



540 JK$ = " THIS SIGN MEANS A RAIL 
ROAD CROSSING IS JUST AHEAD . 11 : GO 

SUB305 

545 JK$=" YOU MUST STOP AND LOOK 
BOTH WAYS BEFORE CROSSING . 11 : GOS 
UB310 

550 JK$=" YOU MUST NEVER CROSS T 
HE TRACKS IF THE GATES ARE DOWN. 

":GOSUB300 

555 GOSUB560:GOTO565 

560 PCLS4 : DRAW 11 S8C1BM128 , 0R30F2D 

64G2L60H2U64E2R30BD2R2 8F2D60G2L5 

6H2U60E2R28 11 : RETURN 

565 JK$ = ff REGULATORY SIGNS ALWAY 

S HAVE FOUR SIDES AND ARE WHITE. 

11 :GOSUB300 

570 DRAW 11 BM7 8 , 100S8C1 "+L$ ( 19 ) +L$ 
(16) +L$ (5 ) +L$ (5 ) +L$ (4 ) : DRAW H BM7 8 
, 12 6»+L$(12)+L$(9)+L$(13)+L$(9)+ 

L$ (20) :FORI=78T0132STEP54 : DRAW'S 
4BM"+STR$ (I) + " , 70R40E4U20H4L36U2 
0R3 6U4L40D28R3 6F4D12G4L3 6D4 11 : NEX 
T 

575 PAINT(80,68) , 1, 1: PAINT (134, 6 
8) , 1, 1: JK$=" SPEED LIMIT SIGNS A 
RE EXAMPLES OF REGULATORY SIGNS. 
SI :G0SUB315 

580 JK$ = " THEY SHOW THE FASTEST 
SPEED WHICH YOU MAY TRAVEL. 11 : GOS 

585 GOSUB560 : DRAW 11 BM106 , 40S8C1 !I + 
L$ ( 14 ) + L$ ( 15 ) : DRAW 11 BM8 8 , 7 4 11 +L$ ( 1 
2 ) +L$ ( 5 ) +L$ ( 6 ) +L$ ( 20 ) : DRAW 11 BM7 8 , 
110»+L$(20)+L$ (21) +L$(18)+L$ (14) 
590 JK$= lf OTHER TIMES THEY MAY H 
AVE WRITTEN DIRECTIONS . 11 : GOSUB31 
5 

595 PCLS4:COLOR2,3:LINE(0,0)-(2 5 
6 , 92 ) , PSET , BF : B=16 : A=0 : CL=1 : JK$= 
11 BY KNOWING THE SHAPES OF TRAFF 
IC SIGNS, YOU CAN SAVE TIME IN K 
NOWING THE ROAD RULES IN JUST A 
SPLIT SECOND. 11 : GOSUB135 : PCOPY3TO 
1 : PCOPY4T02 : GOSUB200 
600 COLOR3,2:LINE(0,98)-(256,192 
) ,PSET,BF:A=0:CL=1: JK$=» INFORMA 
TION SUCH AS THIS COULD SAVE YOU 
R LIFE, OR THE LIFE OF A LOVED 0 
NE. KNOWLEDGE IS SAFETY WHEN DRI 
VING . 11 : GOSUB135 : PCOPY3T01 : PCOPY4 
T02 :GOSUB200 

605 IFINKEY$OCHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 60 5 
610 RUN 



December 1 987 THE RAINBOW 



Tutor ia l 




gaCRT 




By Marty Goodman and Fred Cisin 



I A is relatively easy to get nice hard 
copies (printouts) of one's black- 
Ljand-white drawings done on a 
computer. Screen dumps to dot matrix 
printers produce quite excellent copy in 
most cases, but getting hard copies of 
color images is considerably more 
difficult. 

Black-and-white dot matrix printers 
are very common and can be had for 
relatively low cost. And if one buys a 
printer that is Epson compatible, one 
can be assured that all common graphic 
screen dumps will work reasonably well 
with it. 

Color printers are expensive, availa- 
ble in only a few models, and extremely 
slow. Worse yet, no color printer avail- 
able for under $1,000 can be made to 
display the full 64-color palette of the 
CoCo 3 (or even all of the nuances of 
artifact color patterns of the CoCo 2) 
even with the best of screen dump 
programs. For the present, the only 

Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinker er and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the S/Gop of rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS -9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 

Fred Cisin is formally trained in 
Computer Sciences and photography. 
He created the company Xenosoft, 
which produces Xenocopy (a file con- 
version program for alien file formats) 
and Xenofont (a screen capture and 
print package) for the IBM PC. Fred is 
also on the faculty of Merit College, 
where he teaches Computer Sciences. 





Photo 1:This desert scene photo shows a proper exposure. 1s 
f8,100mm. Photo 2: This photo was taken with a shutter speed of V 12 sth 
second (f2.0). In addition to showing the normal effects of too high a 
shutter speed, the photo shows the artifact of the focal-plane shutter 
mechanism (diagonal shadow). 



58 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 



Photo 3 Photo 4 Photo 5 

Photo 3: A proper exposure taken at 1 s, f5.6 with a 1 00mm lens. Photo 4: This image has been marred by the glare and reflection 
of a desk lamp. The glare, however, is not always so obvious. Sometimes it appears as uneven shadowing which makes the 
picture look as though you are viewing it through shallow water. 1s @ f 5.6, 100mm. Photo 5: This photo, taken with a 28mm 
lens, shows the effects of fish-eye distortion. Vis @ f5.6. Tight cropping, however, almost eliminates this distortion. 



means of getting accurate hard copy of 
color art is photographing the color 
monitor displaying the picture. 

This article is addressed primarily to 
owners of 35mm single-lens reflex 
cameras. A camera that allows some 
degree of manual control is required. 
You will not be able to use the "pro- 
gram" mode of the newest, highly 
automatic 35mm SLR cameras. In- 
stead, you will be using either a shutter 
speed or aperture-preferred mode of 
automatic operation, or a fully manual 
mode. Where focal lengths of lenses are 
given, remember that they are for 35mm 
film systems. Owners of other systems 
will have to make appropriate adjust- 
ments. Those with Polaroid cameras 
allowing through-the-lens focusing will 
be able to make use of much of the 
advice here, but will need some means 
of exposure control — possibly via 
filters that cut down light entering the 
camera. We will also briefly discuss the 
techniques used for ultra-high resolu- 
tion transfer of computer images to 
film, such as those used in movie pro- 
duction studios. 

How To Do It 

There are several elements of success- 
fully photographing a monitor: expo- 
sure, focus, focal length and anti-stray 
light measures used. The exposure itself 
can be broken down into contributing 
factors of shutter speed, film speed and 
aperture. 

Shutter Speed 

In photographing a monitor you 
must use a relatively long shutter speed. 
We recommend using a speed of be- 
tween a quarter of a second and two 
seconds. Why? 

Pictures are drawn a line at a time on 
the screen of a monitor. As an electron 
beam traces across the screen, the 
beam's intensity is varied. Accordingly, 



the brightness with which the phosphor 
lights up on the screen where the beam 
hits varies. On most monitors a picture 
is traced in '/ ]6 th of a second. 

The instant after a bit of phosphor is 
excited by the beam it begins to fade. 
On some monitors this fading occurs 
rapidly and on others it is a bit slower. 
This is referred to as short vs. long 
persistance phosphor. You may have 
noticed on some green monochrome 
monitors that when the screen is 
cleared, the ghost of the previously 
displayed image remains for a moment. 
On most monochrome amber screen 
monitors this does not happen, because 
the most commonly used green phos- 
phor tends to be a bit longer in its 
persistance than the most commonly 
used amber phosphor. Very short per- 
sistance phosphors fade so rapidly that 
the image may appear to flicker, causing 
eyestrain. Very long persistance phos- 
phors cause annoying ghosting when 
their display is changing rapidly. 

Let's see what happens if we try to use 
a '/250th of a second shutter speed to 
photograph a monitor. In that time only 
a quarter of a full image can be traced 
on the monitor. Thus, what the camera 
will see is a quarter of the image appear- 
ing very bright, for it was just traced, 
and the remainder of the picture look- 
ing quite dim, for all that the camera is 
seeing is the fading phosphorescence of 
the screen from the previous trace. 

What happens if you use a shutter 
speed of '/30th of a second? This is 
roughly enough time for two pictures to 
be traced on the screen. The key word 
here is roughly. Only exceedingly ex- 
pensive camera shutter speed settings 
are likely to be exact to more than + or 
- 20 percent. Thus, the camera will see 
between l 4 / 5 and 2 ] / 5 frames traced. The 
result is that a narrow band on the 
picture will be either especially bright or 
especially dim, depending on which 



direction the camera's shutter speed is 
in slight error. 

The solution is to use a/n especially 
long shutter speed. If you shoot at one 
second exposure you will be photo- 
graphing 60 full frames. Although the 
last of those frames will be cut off at 
some random point, the inequality in 
exposure for that part of the film will 
be only l U§ih of the total exposure, so 
no bright or dark bands will be seen in 
the picture. 

The use of so long an exposure also 
eliminates the distortions caused by the 
operation of focal plane shutters. Note 
that in order to take a proper picture at 
this long a shutter speed, you must use 
a tripod or other solid means of anchor- 
ing the camera, and a means of tripping 
the shutter that will not jostle the 
camera. This means either using a cable 
release or using the self timer on the 
camera. 

Film Speed 

In order to allow use of a relatively 
slow shutter speed we need to use a 
relatively slow film speed. We recom- 
mend ASA 100 orslower. You may want 
to experiment with your camera's inter- 
nal meter to see what sort of speed film 
it wants in orderto take a proper picture 
of your monitor at the recommended 
slow shutter speed. 

Professional photographers will be 
aware that shooting at shutter speeds as 
slow as one second slightly alters the 
color balance of the resulting picture. 
However, such "reciprocity failure," as 
the pros call this effect, will not be very 
significant, and, in any case, will afreet 
the colors far less than variations of 
color display caused by the particular 
monitor used and by the settings of the 
controls on a given monitor. 

Aperture 

One wants to have a Jot of depth oT 

December 1987 THE RAINBOW 59 



A Great Holiday Gift Idea! 



RAINBOW Binders 




Distinctive, Durable RAINBOW Binders 

the rainbow is a vital resource to be referred to 
again and again. Keep your copies of the rainbow safe 
in our quality, distinctive binders that provide com- 
plete protection. 

These attractive red vinyl binders showcase your 
collection and ensure your rainbows are in mint 
condition for future use. Each binder is richly em- 
bossed with the magazine's name in gold on the front 
and spine. They make a handsome addition to any 
room. 

Put an End to Clutter 

Organize your workspace with these tasteful bind- 
ers. Spend more time with your CoCo and eliminate 
those frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two binders, which holds a full 12 issues of 
the rainbow, is only $13.50 (plus $2.50 shipping and 
handling). 

Special Discounts on Past Issues 

To help you complete your collection of the rain- 
bow, we're offering a special discount on past issues 

of the magazine. 

When you place an orderfor six or more back issues 
of the rainbow at the same time you order binders, 
you are entitled to $1 off the regular back issue price. 
To order, please see the "Back Issue Information" 
page in this issue. 

Know Where to Look 

You may purchase the "Official And Compleat I ndex 
To THE RAINBOW" for $1 when you purchase a set 
of binders. This comprehensive index of rainbow's 
first three years (July 1981 through July 1984) is 
usually priced at $2.50. 



YES Please send me 



set(s) of RAINBOW binders 




Take advantage of these special offers with your binder purchase: 

Save $1 off the single issue cover price for back issues. Minimum order of 6 magazines. Please 
enclose a back issue order form from a recent issue indicating magazines wanted. 

Purchase the "Official and Compleat Index to THE RAINBOW" for $1 . (Regular price $2.50.) 



State 



ZIP 



(These offers good only with the purchase of a rainbow binder set) 

Name 

Address 

City 

□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number Expiration Date 

Signature 

Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Binders are $13.50 per two-binder set plus $2.50 shipping and handling. If your order is to be sent via U.S. mail to 
a post office box or foreign country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, please. 
In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



field. In order to get this one must use 
a small aperture (high f number). We 
recommend f5.6 or greater. You may 
end up choosing the precise value based 
on what will be said next about focusing 
and depth of field. 

Examine the diagram (Figure 1). You 
will see that the distance from the center 
of a monitor to the camera is less than 
the distance from the edge of a monitor 
to the camera. Because of this, if you 
focus on the center of your monitor, the 
edges of the monitor may be out of 
focus, or vice versa. This effect is 
compounded by the fact that many 
monitors have edges that curve away 
from the center. 

There are two simple solutions to this 
problem. One is to choose a sufficiently 
high f value (small aperture) so that the 
camera has great enough depth of field 
to get both the edge and center of the 
monitor in focus. Most 35mm SLR 
cameras have a depth of field preview 
option that allows viewing the image as 
it will be seen by the film, at the f stop 
that will be used to take the picture. This 
option is useful in confirming you have 
selected a sufficiently high f number 
opening to provide for adequate depth 
of field. 

Note that the closer you are to the 



monitor, the greater the discrepancy 
between camera to monitor center vs. 
camera to monitor edge distances. 
Another approach is choosing a longer 
focal length lens that allows shooting 
further from the monitor. 



s 



s 



Camera 



& 



B 



Distance AB is 
greater than 
distance AC. 



Figure 1 



Focal Length 

We recommend using a medium tele- 



photo lens (75 to 120 mm) to photo- 
graph a monitor. While a 50mm lens 
will do, the problem is that in order to 
focus close enough to the monitor so 
that its screen fills the camera, you will 
often end up so close to it that the 
resulting image will show fish-eye dis- 
tortion. Actually, all things when 
viewed close up necessarily show fish- 
eye distortion. In the human image 
processing system, however, complex 
pre-processing in the brain filters that 
fish-eye effect out, so we usually do not 
perceive images viewed close up by our 
eyes as having fish-eye distortion. Such 
image "correction" is not done within a 
camera. If you use a medium teJephoto 
lens, you can get further from the 
monitor, and the resulting image on 
film will beflatter. If youuse much more 
than a 120mm lens, you will find it 
difficult getting adequate depth of field 
and stabilizing the camera properly for 
the exposure. Sharpness will also suffer. 

Many ordinary lenses will not be able 
to focus closely enough to the monitor 
to let the image fill the screen. The 
solution is to use a macro or close 
focusing lens. These lenses are opti- 
mized for focusing close to objects, and 
allow you to get within inches of your 
subject. Note that the newer "do every- 




'.W.-.'.V-". 
ViV.W.V. 
"■'-■■'.VJ-V 



4 I 

■\ J _~ 





An exciting new arcade game by Glen Dahlgren. This is the long-awaited response to the 
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thusiast. Destroy your opponents and evade obstacles with over ten different moves as you 
grow ever closer to your ultimate objective. This is the BEST karate game ever available for 
the color computer. Req. 64K, disk drive, and joystick. Introductory price: only $24.95. 




WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY. Enter the age of monsters, 
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den Wood and dark caverns of the Mount. The Rainbow 
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what adventuring an fhe Coco is all about. Req. 64K ond 
disk drive. Only S19.95 



CHAMPION. Become a superhero in your fight to rid the 
world of the evil forces of Mr Bigg in this action adven- 
ture The combat is hot and heavy and requires a fast 
joystick The graphics and sound effects are sensational 
"This is a fascmoting game and a difficult one to moster 
you'll get a blast out of (Champion) 1 " says the Rainbow 
review of 5/87. Defend the innocent and defeat fhe 
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is 1 1 





All programs Coco I 2. 3 compatible. 





'mm. 




Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 

Personal checks, money orders, and CO D. orders 
accepted 



Include $2.50 for S/H. $2.00 
extra for COD, orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax, 
Authorship and dealer inquiries 
welcome. 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 61 



thing" lenses (wide angle, telephoto, 
and close focusing all in one lens) may 
cause problems due to internal reflec- 
tions in their numerous internal glass 
elements. A simple, dedicated 100mm 
macro lens would likely be better, for it 
tends to have only three to five pieces 
of glass in it, compared to the 13 or 
more in modern, multiple purpose 
lenses. 

Two far less expensive (and nearly 
equally effective) alternatives to using a 
macro lens are to use a lens extender or 
a "portra" (add-on close-up lens). If 
using extension tubes on your 35mm 
camera, try to get tubes that preserve 
the light meter operation of the camera. 
Get the smallest available size extension 
tube. You do not want to use a long tube 
or, worse yet, an extension bellows. 
They are for postage stamps and insects. 
The #2 portra lens is likely to be the 
right one for you. 

You may want to experiment in the 
store before deciding on what portra 
lens or extension tube to buy. Take 
along a piece of cardboard the size of 
your monitor screen to facilitate such 
experimentation. Select a portra lens or 
extension tube that permits you to focus 
sharply on the "target" cardboard at a 
point where it just completely fills the 
camera's viewfinder. Portra add-on 
lenses cost about S10 to S20 and the 
extension tube costs about $20 to $30 
at discount photo stores. 

A third alternative, which we partic- 
ularly recommend, is a tele-extender. 
This device is placed between your 
camera and your lens, and effectively 
doubles the focal length of the lens. 

Vivitar makes the excellent 2X 
Macro Flat Field Tele-extender. It 
doubles the focal length of a lens, makes 
the lens field flat (valuable for photo- 
graphing screens), and considerably 
extends how close it can focus. Tokina 
also makes an especially good tele- 
extender for most popular SLR cam- 
eras. When used with a 50mm ("nor- 
mal") lens, the result is a 100mm focal 
length, ideal for screen photography. If 
your 50mm lens normally can focus to 
within 3 feet (one meter) of its subject 
(as is usually the case), then you will be 
able to focus close enough when using 
the tele-extender to allow a 14-inch 
diagonal monitor screen to fill the 
viewfinder. 

Tele-extenders are also handy for use 
with telephoto lenses if you need to use 
tin extreme telephoto lens. The draw- 
back associated with them is that the 
added glass can cause internal reflec- 
tions, and they do to some extent 



degrade image quality. But modern, 
high quality tele-extenders like the 
Tokina five-element model offer quite 
good optical performance. 

Note that using a tele-extender will 
cause the actual f stop you use to be one 
stop higher than the one indicated by 
the ring on your camera's lens, but the 
light meter in the camera usually still 
works fine. Tele-extenders represent an 
attractive low-budget choice because 
they allow both close focusing and 
converting normal lenses to the more 
desirable J 00mm focal length. The 
Tokina five-element tele-extender sells 
for $35 to $45 in New York photo 
discount stores. 

The Ultimate 

There are very special and exceed- 
ingly expensive lenses that are specifi- 
cally designed to correct fish-eye distor- 
tion. The enthusiastic photo hobbyist 
might consider a very inexpensive alter- 
native to these lenses: enlarger lenses. 
The lens used in an enlarger is specially 
ground for a flat focus on a board at 
close range. This is exactly the sort of 
lens we would like for photographing a 
monitor in a distortion-free fashion. If 
you are competentto mount such a lens 
on your camera, you will have an inex- 
pensive ideal lens for photographing 
monitors. Of course, you will have to 
give up all aspects of automatic opera- 



tion of your camera if you try this 
approach. 

Stray Light Prevention 

When you look at a monitor, you 
usually don't notice the mild to moder- 
ate amount of glare and reflections 
present from the monitor's surface. The 
camera will see all of this, though, and 
your first attempts at photographing a 
monitor might be quite disastrous, for 
the image could be virtually lost in a sea 
of reflected images from around the 
room. 

To prevent stray light, you must 
photograph the monitor in a darkened 
room. Preferably, you should put the 
camera and monitor under a black cloth 
or conical black cardboard hood to 
completely eliminate stray light and 
reflected room images. Even so, you still 
can have problems with reflection of the 
lens of the camera. We recommend, if 
you are quite serious about this, that 
you black out with a felt tip pen or paint 
the white lettering that surrounds your 
camera's lens. The lettering has been 
known to cause visible reflections in 
screen photos. 

Color Balance and Phosphor Dots 

Most color monitors have images 
that are somewhat bluish overall. We 
tend not to notice this when viewing the 
monitor, for we automatically correct 



Hi-Res Color and Animation 

When folks want extremely high resolu- it can resolve over 16 million colors, 

tion color images on film, it turns out that Registration of the three color images must 

color monitors are often not used. This is be perfect, of course. But this is a practical 

because ultra Hi-Res color monitors are technique that is very commonly used for 

exceedingly difficult to make, costing tens ultra high resolution color imaging, 

of thousands of dollars. Their resolution is Equipment designed for frequent and 

limited by the fineness of the phosphor professional creation of film images from 

dots on them and by the precision of the computer images incorporates a number of 

positioning of the shadow mask grid. niceties. The shutter on the camera can be 

A far simpler technique is to use a high electronically synchronized to the video 

resolution black-and-white monitor, display, so that there no longer is a need 

Today, black-and-white monitors with for a very long shutter speed, 

resolutions in the 1 ,000-by-I,000 pixel For computer graphics used in animated 

range and better can be had off the shelf movies, each frame is made one at a time, 

for under $1 ,000. These are combined with Indeed, in some cases it takes minutes to 

a driver program and driver hardware hours of time on immense Cray computers 

capable of displaying a large number of to calculate the changes needed for each 

gray levels for each pixel. A given image frame. Thus, those animated sequences are 

is created using three monochrome pic- no more produced in "real time" on the 

tures, each showing the red, green and blue computer than were their predecessors that 

information in that image. These three were exclusively drawn by human hand, 

components are then photographed using After each new frame is ready, it is 

color film and red, green and blue filters, converted to a film image. Recall, too, that 

In effect, you get the immense resolution monitors typically display 60 frames a 

of monochrome with the beauty of color, second, but movie film is set up to run at 

If each pixel can be shown at one of 64 gray 24 frames per second. Thus, if one merely 

levels, 64 cubed (over a quarter of a points a movie camera at a monitor, trying 

million) different colors can be resolved. If to record a real-time moving image on it, 

the system can display 256 gray levels, then the results will be disappointing. □ 



62 



THE RAINBOW December 1987 



for it. But photos of color monitors may 
appear bluish. Ektachrome film is most 
likely to have this problem, for it tends 
to yield slightly bluish pictures to begin 
with. We suggest using Kodacolor 
(print) or Kodachrome (slide) film. If 
you still find your pictures appearing 
unacceptably bluish in areas that should 
be white, you might want to experiment 
with using filters on your camera to 
correct this. Slight bluishness might be 
corrected by a skylight ( I A) filter. FLD 
filters, used to correct for fluorescent 
lighting, might be of help with more 
severe bluish cast problems. 

Of course, it is quite possible to make 
needed color corrections when the 
negative is developed and printed, in the 
darkroom. One merely experiments 
with various filters until a part of the 
image that is supposed to be white is 
indeed properly rendered as white. But 
if you want this done for you by a 
professional printing service, you will 
find such custom corrections cost a 
great deal. Unless you do your own 
color printing, you will find it far less 
expensive to attempt to make any 
needed corrections by using a filter on 
the camera at the time you take the 
picture. 



If you focus sharply on the monitor, 
you might find that your photos show 
the individual phosphor dots that com- 
pose the face of a color monitor, This 
effect can be either pleasing or annoy- 
ing, depending on the image in ques- 
tion. To eliminate this effect, you may 
wish to deliberately make the image just 
slightly out of focus. This can be done 
at the time you take the picture, or at 
the time the picture is printed. Profes- 
sionally, it is best to take a sharp picture 
and then, if need be, put it out of focus 
at the time of printing. But as with the 
filters, unless you do your own printing, 
you may find it economical to make the 
camera out of focus at the time the 
picture is taken. We recommend that 
you also take a similar picture in sharp 
focus at the same time. 

In the case of screen photos that are 
published in magazines, a very sharp 
image showing the phosphor dots on 
the monitor can cause Moire patterns 
when the pattern of dots on the monitor 
photo interacts with the pattern of dots 
used to render the color picture in the 
magazine printing process. It is for this 
reason that photos for publication in 
RAINBOW are often deliberately put very 
slightly out of focus, toeliminate the dot 



pattern of the monitor screen from the 
photo image. 

Summary 

For proper screen photography, we 
recommend; 

1) shutter speed of Vi to 2 seconds 

2) small aperture (fS.6 or higher) 

3) a close focusing, moderate tele- 
photo lens 

4) a hood to keep out stray light 

If you follow this advice, you should 
be able to take quite excellent, nearly 
professional, color or black-and-white 
pictures of your monitors. If you find 
there is undesirable fish-eye distortion, 
and if you are a photo hobbyist, do 
consider adapting an enlarger lens to 
your camera. Using one will likely give 
you truly professional quality screen 
photos, 

In the examples we show photos of 
a monitor where all of the important 
details are taken care of. We also show 
photos where the shutter speed is too 
short for a proper image, where the 
image is marred by glare, and where 
annoying fish-eye distortion (due to 
deliberate use of a wide angle Jens) is 
present. /S\ 



. VVVVVS 



MLBASIC 2.0 - BASIC Compiler 

The wait is over. WASATCHWARE announces the latest version 
of MLBASIC designed to allow more compatibility with existing BASIC 
programs than ever available before for the Color Computer. This 
version also allows fall use of the capabilities and memory of the 
CoCo 3. Written in machine language, MLBASIC can compile programs as 
large as 84K bytes. Standard floating point (9 digit precision), 
INTEGER, and String type variables and arrays supported. 

COMMANDS SUPPORTED: 

1. I/O commands 
CtOSE CLOADM CSAVEM DtR 
FILES GET INPUT KILL 
RSET USING LIN El N PUT 

2. Program control commands 
CALL DEFUSR END EXEC 
IF THEN ELSE ERROR 

3. Functions 
ABS ASC ATN COS 
HPOINT INSTR INT LEN 
PEEK POINT PPOINT RND 
TIMER VAL VARPTR 

4. String functions 
CHR$ INKEY$ LEFTS MlD$ 

5. Graphic/Screen commands 
ATTR COLOR CLS CIRCLE 
HLiNE HPAINT HPRINT HRESET 
LINE LOCATE PALETTE PAINT 
PRESET PSET RESET SCREEN 

6. Other commands 
DATA DIM MOTOR POKE 
TRON TROFF TAB VERIFY 

Plus many more commands not available with re< 
interfacing with hardware registers and machine 

COCO 3 WITH DISK REQUIRED -Add $4.00 Postage. 
CHECK or MONEY ORDERS only. No C.O.D, or Bank cards 
Foreign orders use U.S. MONEY ORDERS only. 



DRIVE 
ISET 


DSKI$ 

OPEN 


DSKOi 
PRINT 


FIELD 
PUT 


FOR 
ON 


NEXT 
RETURN 


GOSUB 
STOP 


GOTO 
USR 


CVN 
LOG 
SGN 


EOF 

LPEEK 

SIN 


EXP 

LOC 

SQR 


FIX 

LOF 

TAN 


MKN3 


RIGHTS 


STR$ 


STRINGS 


DRAW 
HCIRCLE 
PCLEAR 
SET 


HCOLOR 
HCLS 
PCLS 
SOUND 


HSCREEN 
HSET 
PLAY 
WIDTH 


HDRAW 
JOYSTK 
PMODE 


LPOKE 


RESTORE 


READ 


REM 



or BASIC which allow 
guage programs. 



WASATCHWARE 

7350 Nutree Drive 
Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 
Phone (801) 943-1546 




(Reviewed in Oct. 87 RAINBOW) The graphic pro- 
grammer's dream! Makes programming sensational- 
looking graphics as easy as moving a joystick! Con- 
verts precision drawings into "DRAW" commands 
which can bestand-alone BASIC programs or merged 
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Transform your computer into an ultra-secret code 
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December 198? THE RAINBOW 63 



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72 Font* in Ail 



COLOR ThLK j C 

hI I Rijh'v-s Reser-M*iJ 

1. Coppun io-3i l i t»r> Mode 

2. Vi^M the buffer 

3. t he buffer 
L.i.id th* burrer 

5 . I* i s It di rectory 

6. Set the p-*r aaeters 

7. Cl^ar buffer 

8. Hump Wul'fer to i nt«r 
9 . Set scrfn-n to o >d e 

8. Access to help fi le 
*. Exit to FflSIC 



"fun things to do" - with a 



DEAD 
DISK! 




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Unleash the power o^^jj^^Co 3 320 x 
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Icons, pull down menus, and diak> r 
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italic^ Painting is »^nap m# 1 

inl 



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oDreemresoJution, and 
oU0*r*T64 color pltette, and your 

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drive. High-Resolution^bystick 
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$29.95 



CM3 Basic Tool & GBllery© 
Load & Save "MGE" pictures for 
display outside of Color Max 3. Incor- 
porate into basic programs. Gallery 
lists all MGE files-just Point & Display! 
Cat. # 225MD $19.95 

Color Max 3 FONTS© 

36 Fonts in two sizes 
72 fonts in all! 

Cat. # 223CD $19.95 



£Sri?erter 1 ^f^^ 

CoCo M^fmftP'MGE" 
CoCo Mm©Ym&*<> to ; 

B&#S^tffileJ^TOQE" 

"MGE" 

GraphicgjpHEW to "MGE" 
Gr,^gBm artifact to "MGE n 
is Color Max 3 Pix format) 
Cat. # 220MD $29.95 

Picture Converter 2© 

Converts ATARI™ Low Res 320x200 
picture files to "MGE" format used by 
Color Max 3. Works with ATARI pic- 
tures with file extensions .ST, .NEO, 
and J NY. 

NOTE: This utility is designed to allow the 
user to retrieve picture files from Bulletin 
Boards and Information Services. Flies must 
be "Un-Arced". 

Most databases have "UN-ARC" utilitfes 
available. 

Cat. # 222MD $29.95 



INTRODUCING. 



COLOR TALK 3© 



The Complete Terminal/ Communications Program you've been waiting for! 

Ideal for accessing Compuserve, Delphi and other Information Services. 
Send your Color Max 3 "MGE" pictures to friends and fellow COCO 
users. THIS IS THE ONLY COMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM AVAILABLE 
FOR YOUR COCO WITH ALL OF THIS POWER! Compare COLOR TALK 3 
with programs for the "PC" market costing 4 to 5 times as much, I'm sure 
you'll agree that COLOR TALK 3 represents real value for your COCO 
Dollars! 

Just look at this partial list of Impressive Features: 

•Supports COCO 3 as well as COCO 1 & 2. -Screen Display options: 
COCO 3: 80x24, 40x24, 32x16 . . . Standard COCO: 32x60, 32x24, 51x24, 
64x24, 85x24. -Supports PBJ Wordpack & Double 80 + . -XMODEM & 
YMODEM. -Upload & Download. -Save to buffer or direct to disk. - Full 
ASCII XON/XOFF support. -ASCII filtering. -ASCII buffering. 
•Customlzer-set and store frequently used options/ parameters. -10-64 
character user programmable macros. -Conference/Chat mode. 
•Selectable Baud rates of 110, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 (Radio 
Shack RS232 Ram required for baud rates above 2400). • Parity: Odd, 
Even, Mark, Space, None. »VT-52 Terminal Emulation. - Duplex: Half, Full, 
Echo. -Set Begin Block/End Block for selected save and print functions 
•Browse/View through buffer. - Define margins, word-wrap, and justifica- 
tion for print-outs. -Complete support of the COCO'S serial port and the 
RS232 Pack. -Optional prompted ASCII upload -Customize Colors to suit 
your display. Much, Much More! 

Cat. # 255MD Disk only Introductory price . . . Just $49.95 



Just Got Better! 

announcing COLOR MAX DELUXE© 

In addition to the features and quality incorporated in the original Color 
Max 3, take a look at this partial list of impressive enhancements includ- 
ed in the new COLOR MAX DELUXE 

EDIT MULTIPLE SCREENS - S1MUTANE4 
STRETCH & SHRINK ANY PROPORT'" 
ANIMATION VARIABLE SPEED' 

ROTATE - ANY DEGREE! 

COI_\t MA* ylwiXD^^^t^ "MGE'-JOllnat foi 

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EMPLOmNG WOH%TA*§|0IRD INTERFACE^|^^TORiyL*rt 
WARE PBDTECTiqfi ^ #\G 0 ° Y * ^ 

COLOR flLx DELUXE fftCftrf^FSl 2 K^BAIirShich provides tor 
SUPERIOR WEE^flfl*OTVER! 

Available foiViiprT^^FTE^^Iinef 1, 1987 

Cat. # 260MD% ^^^^^T Introductory Price . . . $69.95 

Upgrade for Regh**™dOwners Only . . . 

Cat. # 261 CC (Send Original Disk) . . . $15.00 

MOUSE PADS $10.99 EA BLIP ART© BORDER PICTURE DISKS 

Super High Quality Mouse Pads 

with Felt Finish. r\ Three disk set containing 20 border 

10% x QW Specify Color . ... ^^V^ P icture files for use with Co,or Max 3 > 
Cat. # 210CH Red - Co,or Max 3 Deluxe » Graphicom II, 

Cat. # 211CH Blue \ C^$$ff sS® CoCo Max, Hardcopy, Colorscan, or 
Cat. # 212CH Silver ft^fe^/ any program that can load standard 

6K binary files. Helps create decora- 
tive signs, post cards, sale posters, 
etc. 

W\ Cat. #227WD $19.95 





Print in Color! With COLORSCAN, easy to use software for the CGP-220 and 
your 64K CoCo (I, II, III). This program is a must for anyone who owns a Radio 
Shack Ink Jet Printer, and enjoys creating graphics with Graphicom, Graphicom 
Part II, CoCo MAX, or any other program that produces a standard 6K binary pic- 
ture files. 

COLORSCAN will print program listings In blazing color, Help create colorful 
banners over four feet in length, produce 1x1/2x2 or poster printout of your 
favorite 6K graphic disk files. 

Order Catalog^ 184WD, See RAINBOW REVIEW (1/87 page 136) $29.95 

HARDCOPY is more that just a screen print utility, compare these features with 
any other graphic dump program on the market: Gray Scale or B&W printouts, 
1x1, 2x2,3x3, Lables, posters, and greating cards with your graphics and much' 
much more! HARDCOPY requires a 64K CoCo (I, If, or III) and disk drive. Please 
specify printer and catalog # when ordering. 

IDS 480/560-G, C# 170WD • OKI 82A (Okigraph), C# 179WD • OKI DATA 92, C# 171WD • 
GEMINI 10X, C# 174WD • GEMINI SG 10/15, C# 178WD • DMP-105, C# 183WD • DMP-110, C# 
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HARDCOPY DISK See RAINBOW REVIEW (10/85) on page 218) $29,95 




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THE ULTIH^TF PR I IfT ER UTILITY 



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©1984 W M I TES III I T H U^l.O 

ALL RIGHTS RE5EHVEO 



« 4j ll> * **** **** * 
* + {. + ¥<<? *•*»*-* •* 

mm w* mm *V m* mm mm m-m ** mm mm 
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u ** mm ** ***+» ** •* ** •* »• *• 
rimmwmm mmmmmrm mi at ** 

4*4 4 *ti*i mm mmmmmm mvm-m 

COLORSCAN HI -RES PRINT UTILITY 



mn 




©1986 W HI T FL S m I T M U:J 

ALl WIGHTS neSERVRO 



COLOR QZ 

THC UlTlHflTC OflflPHtCS HAGHINI 



1 f 



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At L. H I OriTS ItPVJ D, 



Utility 



32K ECB 




File away important information 



Making a Christmas Address List 



Christmas List is a BASIC program 
that will keep a file of names and 
addresses for any purpose, but it 
is intended for Christmas cards. 

Type in and save XMA5LI5T. If you're 
using a tape system, wind the tape to a 
clear spot, note and record the counter 
reading, and do another save. This will 
be your working copy of the program. 
You should repeat this step two or three 
times for backup copies of the program 
whether you have a tape or disk system. 

To run Christmas List for the first 
time from tape, set up your tape re- 
corder by winding the tape until the 
counter is reading a few digits before 
your working copy of the program. 
Then load the program with the CLOflD 
"XMA5LIST" command. When the tape 
has finished loading, run the program 
and the menu will be shown: 

E - EDIT (CHECK'CHflNGE/'flDD OR 

DELETE) NAME5ET5 
G - GENERATE LIST OF NAME5ET5 
P - PRINT LIST 
0 - QUIT PROGRAM 

Since this is the first use of the pro- 
gram, you must select G. When you type 

George F. Saunderson is a retired 
professional engineer and project man- 
ager who lives in Houston, Texas. He 
is the president of TASC and co-author 
of two plane geometry programs dis- 
tributed by TASC. His other interests 
include ham radio and photography. 



By G.F. Saunderson 

in G you will be asked for an eight-letter 
name for the list. Type in something like 
MYLIST87 and press ENTER. You will be 
asked to enter the first name of your list. 
When prompted, enter the street ad- 
dress, the city, the state and the ZIP 
code. You will then be asked if you want 



to enter another name and address. If 
you answer yes, the input process is 
repeated. If you answer no, the program 
proceeds to save the list. Be sure you 
have a data tape or disk ready before 
typing No. 



A 



tittl 



0 




66 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



o 



o 



o 



o 



o 



o 



JOHN DOE 
1234 ANY STREET 
DOWNTOWN , IN 
56789 



JIMMY VALENTINE 
67 BELLVIEW 
NEW HAMMER, ONTARIO 
CANADA 3 74 9X3 



RAINBOW MAG. 
P.O.BOX 385 
PROSPECT, KY 
40J359 



- EDITOR 



J 



J 



o 



o 



o 



o 



o 



o 



When entering data, keep each line to 
35 characters or less, and do not use 
commas in any line. If you must use a 
delimiting mark, use a hyphen. 

If your address uses "c/o" it must be 
worked into the name line or into the 
street address line, or both. 



The ZIP code line may be expanded 
for foreign countries if necessary, e.g., 
Canada H2A 3C4. 

Once a list has been filed on tape or 
disk, it may be edited. If you select E 
from the menu, you are asked for the 
name of the file you want to edit, and 



instructions are given on loading the list 
from your data tape. When loading is 
complete, the first nameset will be 
displayed with the notation: 

<□> THIS 15 OK 

<C> THIS NEEDS CHRNGING 

<D> DELETE THIS NRMESET 

If you type □ the next nameset will be 
shown. If you type C you will be asked 
to input new data. After the new data 
has been entered, the next nameset will 
be shown. 

If you type D the current nameset will 
be deleted. The numbers of all succeed- 
ing namesets will be decreased by 1. If 
you delete the first nameset of a long 
list, this renumbering step can take an 
appreciable amount of time. 

When you reach the end of the list, 
you will be asked if you want to add a 
new nameset. If Y is selected you will be 
asked to input the data. If N is selected, 
prepare your data tape or disk for the 
corrected list to be saved. 

If you want to make a backup copy 
of your list, you may do so by editing 
the list — typing in E and answering all 
namesets with □ (and then allowing the 
backup to be saved at a new location on 



ALL SOFTWARE OOMPATABLE WITH GOC03 
MO PATCHES REQUIRED 

COLOR BANKBOOK +3 * $19.95 



# BUSINESS BANKBOOK 

SPECIFY i OR £ DISK DRIVES 

# TU BLACKOUT BINGO * 

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0 SUPERDISK UTILITY 

SEE REVIEW IN MAY '86 
RAINBOW PAGE 1*1 

RODIOLOG 

SEE REVIEW IN MAY '*& 
RAINBOW PAGE £09 

CODE PRACTICE 

SEE REVIEW IN NOV '86 
RAINBOW PAGE 134 



ORDERS OR INFORMATION 

CALL 1-800 628-2828 
EXTENSION 552 

ALL PROGRAMS INCLUDE MANUALS 
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1 008 ALTON CIRCLE DEPT. P 
FLORENCE, SC 29501 
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TRY-O-TAX Federal tax can help you afford ten of the most used forms 
and schedules. Printer required. $49.99.* 



TRY-O-MENU Select and RUN programs with one keystroke. Great 
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TRY-O-PLAN Help with financial decisions. Amortization schedule, annuity, 
loan payments, future value, return on investment, and more. Printer optional. 

$19.99/ 

TRY-0 PRINT Get the most from your printer, batch of 
labels, cassette labels, disk labels read from the disk, invoice, 
purchase order, and statement on menu driven program. Printer 
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MATH-ZAP Drill and practice plus tutorial on math skills at 
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Assesment Program.$29.99.* 



'$3.00 shipping and handling on all orders. 

No COD or credit card, please. Your good personal check welcome. 



it 



Try Our Byte" 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 67 



the data tape, if you're using a tape 
system). 

The list may be printed by selecting 
P from the menu. You will be asked for 
the name of the file and given instruc- 
tions on loading the list. After you load 
it, the printer will print the first nameset 
and show the message PRINT I NG- 
xxxxxxxx, where xxxxxxxx is the 
nameset name. The screen prompts you 
for the next nameset. Pressing ENTER 
causes the next nameset to be displayed 
on the screen and printed. This con- 
tinues until the entire list has been 
printed. 

The printing function was designed to 

print tractor feed labels, single width, 

l-by-3 [ /2 inches. The printing process 




was designed not to be continuous — 
envelopes can be fed through a friction 
feed printer one at atime. The list, when 
printed on plain paper, is a good record . 

The program may be changed for use 
with disk storage by changing the fol- 
lowing lines: 

2j3j3 OPEN"0" ,1,L$:PRINT#1 / N 

210 FOR A=l TO N: PRINT#1 , N$ (A) ; " 
,";A$(A) ;",'»;C$(A) ; " , '» ;S$ ( A) 
;Z$(A):NEXT A:GOTO 6j3 

230 CLS:OPEN M I",l,L$:INPUT#l,N 

320 PRINT: PRINT"NAME OF FILE TO 
EDIT" : INPUT L$ : OPEN" I" , 1, L$ 

330 INPUT#1,N 

340 FOR A=l TO N:IF EOF(l) THEN 



GOTO 420 ELSE INPUT #1, N$ (A) , A 
$(A) , C$ (A) , S$(A) , Z$(A) 

450 OPEN"0" , 1 , L$ : PRINT# 1 , N : FOR A 
=1 TO N:PRINT#1,N$(A) ;", M ;A$(A) ; 
" / ";C$(A) ;",";S$(A) ;",";Z$(A) 

The disk version of the program skips 
all of the loading instructions. It is 
assumed the disk containing the pro- 
gram will have room for data files. 

The data files will hold a list of 100 
namesets. It is better not to use this 
capacity. Four data files of 25 namesets 
each are easier to edit. 

(Questions may be directed to the 
author by calling 413-781-8984 or writ- 
ing 10619 Bayou Glen, Houston, TX 
77042. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a reply.) □ 



140 136 460 103 

230 240 END 176 

350 121 



The listing: XMR5LI5T 

lp REM ***XMAS CARD LABEL PRINT 

ING PROGRAM - TAPE VERSION *** 

2p REM ***TITLE "XMASLIST/TAP" * 
** 

2p REM *** (C) BY GEORGE SAUNDER 
SON - HOUSTON, TX 1987 *** 
4J3 CLEAR IppppiDIVL N$(lj3j3), A$(l 
J8J8) , C$(1J8J8) , S$(1J8J8) , Z$(1J8J8) 
6p CLS: CLOSE: PRINT" 

MENU" : PRINT" — = 

lp PRINT" E - EDIT (CHECK/CHANGE 
/ADD OR DELETE) NAMESETS": 

PRINT" G - GENERATE LIST OF NAME 
SETS": PRINT" P - PRINT LIST":PRI 
NT" Q - QUIT PROGRAM" : PRINT : PRIN 
T" PRESS KEY OF YOUR CHOICE" 
Bp X$=INKEY$:IF X$="E" THEN GOTO 
32J3 

9p IF X$ = "G" THEN X$ = " " : L$=" " : N= 
j3:GOTO 13 p 

Ipp IF X$="P" THEN X$ = "":GOTO 22 
P 

lip IF X$="Q" THEN X$="":GOTO 31 
P 

12 p IF X$<>"G" OR X$<>"P" OR X$< 
>"Q" THEN GOTO 8p 

13 p PRINT :PRINT"8-LETTER NAME OF 

THIS LIST ": INPUT L$ 
14J3 CLS :N=N+1: PRINT "NAME" : INPUT 
N$(N) :PRINT"STREET ADDRESS" : INPU 
T A$ (N) :PRINT"CITY" : INPUT C$ (N) : 
PRINT"STATE": INPUT S$(N) :PRINT"Z 
IP CODE": INPUT Z$(N) 



15 p PRINT: PRINT "ANOTHER NAME & A 
DDRESS? <Y> OR <N> PRESS 

KEY" 
16J3 X$=INKEY$ 

lip IF X$="Y" THEN X$="":GOTO 14 
P 

18 p IF X$="N" THEN X$=" " : GOTO 2p 
P 

19 p IF X$<>"Y" OR X$<>"N" THEN G 
OTO 16p 

2pp CLS: PRINT" WIND DATA TAPE TO 
FRESH TAPE- NOTE COUNTER READI 
NG" : PRINT"SET RECORDER TO RECORD 
" : GOSUB 54 p : CLS : PRINT "RECORDING 
";L$:OPEN"0" , #-1 , L$ : PRINT#-1 ,N 
21p FOR A=l TO N: PRINT#-1,N$ (A) ; 
A$(A) ;C$(A) ;S$(A) ;Z$(A) :NEXT A:G 
OTO 6p 

22p PRINT: PRINT "FILENAME OF CARD 
LIST TO BE PRINTED" : INPUT L 

$ 

23J3 CLS : PRINT "SET DATA TAPE TO B 
EG INNING OF ": PRINT L$ : PRINT" SET 
RECORDER TO PLAY": GOSUB 54j3:CLS 
:PRINT"PRINTING " ; L$ : OPEN"I " , #-1 
,L$: INPUT#-1,N 
24J3 FOR A=l TO N 

25j3 INPUT#-1, N$(A) ,A$(A) ,C$(A) , 
S$(A) f Z$(A) 

26p PRINT :PRINT"PRINTING ";N$(A) 
27j3 PRINT#-2 : PRINT# -2 , N$ ( A) : PRIN 
T#-2 f A$ (A) : PRINT#-2 f C$ (A) ; : PRINT 
#-2 , " , " ; : PRINT#-2 , S$ (A) : PRINT#- 
2,Z$(A) :PRINT#-2 

28J3 PRINT :PRINT"PRESS <ENTER> FO 
R NEXT LABEL" ; : INPUT Z 
29J3 NEXT A 

2pp PRINT :PRINT"END OF FILE - <E 
NTER> FOR MENU";: INPUT Z : GOTO 6J3 
21p PRINT: PRINT"THAT'S ALL FOLKS 

i I I " ; END 
22p PRINT :PRINT"NAME OF FILE TO 



68 



EDIT": INPUT L$ : CLS : PRINT" SET DAT 
A TAPE TO BEGINNING OF " : PRINT L 
$:PRINT"SET RECORDER TO PLAY": GO 
SUB 54j3:OPEN"I", #-l,L$ 
33J3 INPUT#-1,N 

3 4J3 FOR A=l TO N:IF EOF(-l) THEN 
GOTO 42j3 ELSE INPUT #-1, N$ (A) , 
A$(A) , C$(A) , S$(A) , Z$(A) 
3 5j3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT L$ ; " N 
AMESET NO."; A: PRINT 
36j3 PRINT N$(A):PRINT A$(A):PRIN 
T C$(A);", "; S$(A):PRINT Z$(A) 
37j3 PRINT: PRINT" <0> THIS IS OK" 
: PRINT" <C> THIS NEEDS CHANGING" 
: PRINT" <D> DELETE THIS NAMESET" 
38j3 X$=INKEY$:IF X$="0" THEN X$= 
"" :GOTO 41J8 

39)3 IF X$="C" THEN X$ = "": GOTO 4 
3j3 

395 IF X$="D" THEN GOTO 53j3 

4j3j3 IF X$o"0"OR X$o"C" OR X$<> 

"D" THEN GOTO 3 8J3 

41J8 IF A=N THEN GOTO 47J3 ELSE NE 
XT A 

42j3 GOSUB 54 j3 : CLOSE : GOTO 45J2J 
43j3 PRINT : PRINT" NAME ": INPUT N$ (A 
): PRINT "STREET ADDRESS ": INPUT A$ 
(A) : PRINT"CITY" : INPUT C$ (A) : PRIN 
T " STATE M : INPUT S$ (A) :PRINT"ZIP C 



ODE" : INPUT Z$ (A) 
44j3 NEXT A 

45j3 CLS:PRINT"WIND DATA TAPE TO 

FRESH TAPE- NOTE COUNTER READI 

NG" :PRINT"SET RECORDER TO RECORD 

11 : GOSUB 5 4 j3 : CLS : PR I NT "RECORDING 

" ; L$ : OPEN " 0 " , # - 1 , L$ : PRINT# -1 , N : F 

OR A=l TO N:PRINT#-1,N$ (A) ;A$ (A) 

;C$(A) ?S$(A) ;Z$(A) 

46j3 NEXT A: CLS: GOTO 6j3 

47j3 PRINT: PRINT "ADD A NEW NAMESE 

T? <Y> OR <N>" 

48j3 X$=INKEY$:IF X$ = "N"THEN CLS: 
GOTO 4 2j3 

49,0 IF X$ = "Y"THEN GOTO 51,0 

5pp IF X$O"Y"0R X$<>"N" THEN GO 

TO 48j3 

51J8 N=N+1 : CLS : PRINT"NAME" : INPUT 
N$(N) :PRINT"STREET ADDRESS ": INPU 
T A$(N) :PRINT"CITY" : INPUT C$ (N) : 
PRINT"STATE" : INPUT S$ (N) :PRINT"Z 
IP CODE" : INPUT Z$ (N) 
52j3 CLS:GOTO 47j3 

53j3 FOR B=A TO N : N$ ( B) =N$ ( A+l) : A 
$(B)=A$(A+1) :C$(B)=C$(A+1) :S$(B) 
=S$ (A+l) : Z$ (B) -Z$ (B+l) :NEXT B:A= 
A-1:N=N-1:NEXT A 

54j3 PRINT@452 , "PRESS <ENTER> TO 
CONTINUE" ; : LINEINPUT Z $ : RETURN 



"I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now, it's time to 
give BASIC a shot in the arm, with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your 
choice, with your own custom storlup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3. our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of fhe acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you con have it burned into an EPROM that plugs 
into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S15-20; we provide information concerning how you can 
hove this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35. 40, or 80 trocks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts. RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC programs, aulo-edll o\ error line, and 
many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/B7 

Disk $34.95 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 $27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 

Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitosks with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid for the expert 
CoCo 1. 2. or 3 compatible 

Disk S23.95 Assembler source listing Add S3. 00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

fvtagnavox 8CM51 5/8CM505/8CM643 



$19.95 



SonyKV1311CR 



S29 95 




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The above disks manufactured by BASF — but 
have no manufacturers labels. 

All 5 1 A In. disks complete with T/vek Sleeves, ID 
Labels, Write Prot. Tabs, and Reinforced Hub 
Rings 

Many other Items available 

3 1 /2 in. disks SS/DD & DS/DD, 
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Ribbons for most popular printers, printer stands, 
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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 69 





the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 




The Christmas Star 

By Don Short! and M.G, Duncan 




We don't know whether the Christmas Star was a super- 
nova explosion or an alignment of planets or something else 
entirely. But you can enjoy this transformation of a tiny star 
making its way to a point in the sky over a certain stable in 
Bethlehem. 



The listing: XMflSSTflR 



1)8 
2J3 



3j3 



' -k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 

' A CHRISTMAS CARD 

FROM M.G.DUNCAN AND 
DON SHORTT 1986 

* -k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 




4/3 DIMA(12) ,B(12) 
5/2 PMODE4,l 
6/3 SCREEN 1,1 
7/3 PCLS/3 

8/3 LINE (/3, 164) - (256 , 164) , PSET 
9/3 DRAW"BM124, 164U5E15D19U2/3R3/3 



D21L13U7L4D7" 

W 
ET, B 

11/3 

12/3 

13)3 



LINE ( 18/3, 164) -(2/3/3, 158) , PS 

PAINT (15/3, 163) , 1 
CIRCLE (5/3 , 154) , 3/3 , , 1 , . 5 ,/3 
LINE (20, 164) -(8j0, 154) , PSET 



70 



THE RAINBOW December 1987 




IRON CROSS 

War in Russia 

by John & Michael Galus 



The German invasion of Russia 
began at 0300 on 22 June 194! 
Two massive armies faced each 
other in a titanic struggle which 
would decide World War II. The 
object of IRON CROSS is to 
defeat the Russian forces con- 
trolled by the computer & to 
take control of the Russian cities. 



64K, Ext. Basic, Disk. $24.95 



CoCo Max ill 



Take advantage of your 

CoCo III with everbody's favorite draw- 
ing package. It includes spectacular features like zoom, color mix- 
ing, animation, color sequencing, slide show, special effects, and 
more. Plus everything is included — the hires interface for your 
mouse or joystick, printer drivers, utilities (including conversion 
from CoCo Max II), and a detailed manual. (Requires CoCo III, 
disk, & joystick or mouse.) 

CoCo Max III S79.95 
Combo w/Kraft joystick S 99.00 



Color Connection 

modem communication software 
by BJ Chambless 

ColorConnecnon forRSDOSand OS-9 Connection are the best in 
communication software All standard protocols are supported 
mcluaing CompuServe Protocol B. XMODEM, and XOfM/XOFF The 
auto dial feature fa Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems 
is supported Macros allow easy entry of often-used passwords and 
ID s 300. 1200. and higher baud rates supported Communicate with 
confidence with rhis super modem software' 



OS-9 version requires R232 Pak 
RSDOS versions (CoCo 2 & CoCo 3 incl) 



coming soon . . . 



S49.95 
$49.95 




OS-9 Word Processing 



Screen Star 



by Scott Cablt 



This excellent screen editor implements the popular WordStar edit- 
ing capabilities on OS-9 & includes a unique Speller. Move, copy, 
or delete blocks of text with one keystroke. Powerful cursor com- 
mands allow fast, easy movement throughoutthe file. The findy 
replace command makes mass changes & searches a snap. Set tabs, 
toggle the video, access the OS-9 shell & define up to 10 function 
keys for fast repetitive functions. And it will edit files larger than 
memory tool Easy interface with Computerware's Text Format- 
ter makes an exquisite word processing package! 

Requires OS-9 S49.95 
With Text Formatter S 74.95 



Text Formatter 

The OS-9 Text Formatter turns text files into beautifully printed 
documents. It supports right & left justification, automatic pagi- 
nation, headers & footers, macros, tabs, page numbering, auto 
date insert, ESC & CTL codes for printer directives & more. It inter- 
faces with any editor that produces standard ASCII text files like 
Computerware's Screen Star & Radio Shack's TS Edit. Whyjust print 
it when you can format it?! 



Requires OS-9 



S34.95 



Computerware's new fall catalog! 
Call or write for your copy today! 



m 

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Box 668 • Encinitas, CA • 92024 



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6% Calif Sales Tax 
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Sftrpprng* 
TOTAL 



J 



,B 

140 PAINT(22, 170) , 1 

150 LINE(225, 164) -(250,150) , PS 

ET, B 

160 F0RX=1T012: READA (X) , B (X) 
170 NEXT 
180 REM 

19 0 T=RND ( 2 ) : P=RND (12) : I FT=2 THEN 

PSET(A(P) ,B(P) ) 
200 IFT=1 THEN PRESET (A(P) , B (P) ) 
: F0RX=1T0222: NEXT: PSET(A(P),B 

(P) ) 

21)3 R=R+1: PSET (R, 25) : PRESET (R-l 
,25) 

220 IFR=155 THENR=154 : GOSUB250 : P 
RESET(155,25) 



230 GOTO190 

240 DATA20,20,25,50,50,10,150,50 

,200,150,100,120,80, 100,225,110, 

200,55,128,96,75,50,245,25 

250 DRAW"BM155,20D10U5L3R6L3E3G6 

E3F3H6" 

260 L=L+1:IFL=2 THEN L=0 : COLOR0 
: DRAWBM155 , 20D10U5L3R6L3E3G6E3F 



3H6" 


■ 








270 


C0L0R1 








280 
T 


LINE(155, 


35) 


-(155,140) 


, PSE 


290 


LINE (155 , 


15) 


-(155,05) , 


PSET 


300 


LINE (137, 


25) 


-(147,25) , 


PSET 


310 


LINE (164, 


25) 


"(174,25) , 


PSET 


320 


RETURN 










This Wreath Hangs Indoors 

By Mark Bell 

Christmas wouldn't seem like Christmas without a wreath. 
However, we do not suggest that you hang your monitor on 
your front door. Keep your CoCo close to the fireplace 
and think cozy holiday thoughts. 



The listing: WREATH 

5 REM**A WREATH WITH MUSIC** 

10 PMODE3,l:PCLS:SCREENl,l 

20 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,96 

30 CIRCLE(128,96) ,58 

50 CIRCLE (200,66) ,10 

60 CIRCLE (180, 36) ,10 

70 CIRCLE (130, 21) ,23 

80 CIRCLE (76, 36) ,10 

90 CIRCLE (60, 66) ,10 

100 CIRCLE (50, 96) ,10 

110 CIRCLE (205, 96) ,10 

120 LINE(60, 150) - (200, 150) , PSET 

130 LINE(60, 150)-(60, 200) , PSET 

140 LINE(60, 200) - (130, 150) , PSET 

150 LINE(130, 150)-(200, 200) , PSET 

160 LINE(200, 200) - (200, 150) , PSET 

170 PAINT(105,17) ,2,4 

180 PAINT (110, 21) ,8,8 

190 PAINT (7 6, 36) ,8,8 

200 PAINT (60, 66) ,8,8 

210 PAINT(205, 96) ,8,8 




220 PAINT (50, 
230 PAINT (200 
250 PAINT (180 
260 PAINT (175 
400 CIRCLE (13 
410 PAINT (12 5 
420 PAINT (125 
430 PAINT (145 
440 PAINT (105 
450 PAINT (80, 
460 PAINT (70, 
470 PAINT (180 
490 PAINT (19 6 
500 GOTO500 



96) ,8,8 
,66) ,8,8 
,36) ,8,8 
,50) ,2,4 
0,150) ,15 
,145) ,8,8 
,155) 
,155) 
,175) 
175) , 
180) , 
,150) 
,180) 



,8,8 
,8,8 
,2,4 



8,8 
8 . 8 



,8,8 
.8,8 



72 THE RAINBOW December 1987 




from the same people who brought you Data Bank & OS-9 Profile . 
a new level of sophistication and ease of use in data base systems! 




by BJ Chambless 



14.95 




Simplify steps with pull-down menus 

Throw down the shackles of rigid menu hierarchies and see how simple our 
pull-down menu system is to use. AH options are available from anywhere in 
the program. So what if you're designing a report, if you want to change 
your access key you can do it right then and there without exiting back and 
forth through several levels of menus and options. To make it even simpler, 
each menu option can be invoked by a single character! 



Dialog boxes 

Pop-up windows display current settir 
able choices for fast changes of any c 



[display, access, print] and 



Unique LIST (spreadsheet] display format 

A unique LIST display format lets you view data in easy-to-read rows 
& columns. Simply choose which elements from the record you want to 
see and Data Master displays them in a simple, one record per fine, 
spreadsheet-like format. 

From this easy-to-read screen you may edit your data right there, without 
having to exit the display menu, enter an edit menu, and edit each individual 
record. Mass changes are a snap! 



Elements & Records: 

Each record can contain up to 512 characters used within 35 elements. Ele- 
ments are defined as: alphanumeric [descriptive data], math [real numbers 
induding dollars & cents), date, and derived [formulas calculated from other 
elements in the same record]. You can store any type of data using these 
field types! 

Display & Entry Screens 

Design up to 9 different screen formats for data display and data entry for 
each data base. This is helpful for accessing your data for different purposes 
as well as in easy data entry of specific elements, 

Sorts & Selections: 

Up to 9 different access keys can be defined. These are used for displaying 
data on the screen or selecting data for printing, You may use several levels 
of sorts as well as logical operators to select just the right data. A powerful 
generic search is also available. 



3y to selectively display a subset of 
m only the chosen elements, in the 
sen format - and can change them 



For even more power, use an access to 
records from your data base. Now you s 
chosen records, in a very simplified sen 
riqhtonthe screen! 



Upload/Download with other software 

Data Master can read and write standard sequential files which aids in 
data transfer between DynaCalc and many other programs. 

OS-9 Profile & Data Bank Compatibility 

Your OS-9 Profile and Data Bank files are compatible with the new power 
of Data Master. You wont lose any of your valuable data when you step 
up to Data Master! 



See your data any way you want by designing your own reports! Data 
Master offers easy-to-use tools to design professional reports including 
report headings, titles, column headings, automatic page numbers, column 
totals, and more. Store up to 9 report formats for each data base. At print 
time use the powerful access keys to select the data printed on any report 



File Management 

Built-in file management capabilities allow easy file manipulation for trans- 
ferring data files, renaming data files, expanding data files, and more. This 
integrated function is easy to use and available from the simplified puil-down 



Easy Expansion 

Re-definition of records and transfer of fil 
bility when designing a new data base or w. 



is made e* 
nusinq ant 



/, allowing you flexi- 
! one for new tasks, 



Full keyboard ease 

Data Master takes full advantage of the CoCo 3's cursor and function keys. 
OS-9 accessible 

Even while operating within Data Master, you can invoke OS-9 commands, 
Requires: OS-9 Level II, CoCo 3, 512K 




COMPUTERWARE 



P.O. Box 688 
Encinitas, CA 92024 
[619] 436-3512 



$20 OFF Offer 

Send in your original 

OS-9 Profile or Data Ba 
disk and take $20 off the 
regular retail price of 
Data Master! 





All the Colors of the Rainbow 

By Patrick Benway 

When you run Color f est, you will discover that there is not 
one color in nature that is not eventually generated. You may 
be puzzled to note that only three color statements (PCLS, 
SCREEN and P5ET) are used to generate every color, shade, 
hint or hue possible. The longer you let this program run, 
the better it gets. Enjoy, and see how many different colors 
you can spot. The colors can be seen only on a TV or color 
composite monitor, however. 



The listing: COLRFEST 

lj3 REM* ************************* 
2p REM* COLOR MY RAINBOW * 



3J3 REM* 1986 * 

40 REM* PATRICK J BENWAY * 
5j3 REM* R.R.2, BOX 116 * 

60 REM* MANSFIELD, MO. 657j34 * 
7j3 REM************************** 
8j3 LET JJ=1 

9j3 PCLS:PMODE4: SCREEN 1,1 

1J3J3 CLS:PLAY ,I J31;L255;V31 

lip A=165 :B=RND( 15,0) :C=RND( 255) 

12)3 D=RND(6j3) : IFB<8pTHENB=B+8 1 

13j3 IFC<8j3THENC=C+17j3 

14j3 IFD<9j3THEND=D+61:FORJ=lT03j3 

15J3 V=RND(3) :A=A+V:B=B-V:C=C-V 

16J3 D=D+V:IFC<2THENGOT09j3 

17J3 LINE(A,B)-(C,D) , PSET , B : NEXTJ 

18 j3 A$= l! A;B;C;D;E;F;G; lf 

190 FORX=1TO10:PLAYA$:NEXTX 

2P? F0RK=1T05W:NEXTK 

21j3 LET JJ=JJ+1:CLS 

22p PRINT @ 263, "COLOR GRAPHIC # 

11 JJ : FORJ=lTOlj30 j 0 : NEXTJ : GOT09P 




They Do it with Numbers 




By Dick Purnell 



Number Conversion saves programmers time at the scratch 
pad by quickly converting numbers from one number system 
to another. Four number systems are offered: decimal 
(ordinary numbers, base 10), hexadecimal (base 16) ? octal 
(base 8) and binary (base 2). 

When you run the program, you are asked for "input." You 
choose the option number (from 1 to 4) of the number system 
you want to convert. Then you are asked for "output" — the 
number system you are converting to. Again, select an option 
number. 

Next you are presented with your input and output choices 



and a blinking cursor awaiting an input number. For 
example, if you had selected decimal (Option 1) for your 
inputand hexadecimal (Option 2) for your output, you would 
type a number from zero to 65,535. (The range of numbers 
you are allowed to enter always appears under "input.") 
Typing a value of 500 would give you a value of 01 F4. 

To repeat the process for another input number, just type 
it and its output will appear. When entering a hexadecimal 
number, you must enter all four digits; use leading zeros, if 
necessary. 



The listing: CONVERT 



1/8 
4j3 



PROGRAM "NUMBER" 
WRITTEN BY 
RICHARD F. PURNELL 
COPYRIGHT (C) 



74 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



5j3 ' 5/5/87 
6p CLS:0$="j3j3j3j3j3p" 

7j3 A$ ( 1 ) = ,f DECIMAL" : A$ ( 2 ) = ff HEXADE 
C !f 

8j3 A$ (3) = ,f OCTAL" :A$ (4)="BINARY" 
9J3 PRINTA$ ( 1 ) ; " ( 1 ) " : PRINTA$ ( 2 ) ; " 
(2) " :PRINTA$ (3) ;" (3) " : PRINTA$ ( 
4) ;" (4) " 

lpj3 INPUT"INPUT ";A 
11J3 INPUT "OUTPUT" ;B 
120 IFA= 1ANDB=4THENC$ = 
13j3 IFA=1ANDB=2THENC$= 



it 



14j3 IFA=1ANDB=3THENC$ = 
15)3 IFA=2ANDB=1THENC$= 

16j3 IFA=2ANDB=3THENC$ = 

17J3 IFA=2ANDB=4THENC$ = 

18j3 IFA=3ANDB=1THENC$ = 
77" 

19)3 IFA=3ANDB=2THENC$ = 
77" 

20p IFA=3ANDB=4THENC$= 
77" 

21J3 CLS : PRINT" " ; A$ (A) , A$ (B) : P 
RINTC$ 

220 PRINT@97 , "" ; : LINEINPUT" ";Y$ 
:N=VAL(Y$) 



0-255" 
0-65535 



0-4095" 
0000-FF 

0000-0F 

0000-00 

0000-77 

0000-77 

0000-37 



230 ON A GOTO240,390,400,470 
240 ON B GOTO250,270,290,350 
250 PRINT@97," " ; : PRINT@1 

12 , N$ ; : IFB=1THENPRINTN 
260 GOTO220 

270 N$=RIGHT$ ("000"+HEX$ (N) ,4) 

280 GOTO250 

290 N$="" :FORX=0TO3 

300 S=INT (2 A (9-3*X) ) 

310 D=INT(N/S) 

320 N=N-D*S 

330 N$=N$+CHR$ (D+48) 

340 NEXT:GOTO250 

350 N$="" :FORX=0TO7 :N$ (X) = "0" 

3 60 IFN=>INT(2 A (7-X) ) THENN$ (X) =" 

1" :N=N-INT(2 A (7-X) ) 

370 N$=N$+N$ (X) 

380 NEXT:GOTO250 

390 T=12 :U=4 :GOTO410 

400 T=9:U=3 

410 N=0:FORX=0TO3 

420 Z=ASC(RIGHT$ (Y$,4-X) ) 

430 D=Z-48 

440 IFZ>60THEND=Z-55 

450 N=N+D*2 A (T-U*X) 

460 NEXT:GOTO240 

470 N=0: Y$=O$+Y$:FORX=0TO7 

480 IFLEFT$ (RIGHT$ (Y$, 8-X) , 1) ="1 

"THENN=N+2 A (7-X) 

490 NEXT:GOTO240 



I/O Error Free 

By Bohdan Hrycaj 




Call lets you do searches for a program on tape without 
getting frustrating I/O errors. With Call, you won't have to 
start at the beginning of a tape or program, and you won't 
have to type CLDflD constantly after repeated I/O errors. 

Key in the listing and make several copies. Run the 
program, and you should see "CALL=" on the screen. Reset 
the computer. Now, whenever you want to load in a BASIC 
program, type EXEC. When the "CALL=" prompt appears, 
type in the program name (you won't need to use quotes) and 
press ENTER. Fast forward or reverse your cassette to the 
approximate location of the program, press play, and the 
program will automatically load when found. 

The only time you'll get an I/O Error is when the program 
is not loading properly. Trying to load a machine language 
program causes an FM Error. 



16282+97 



The listing: CALL 

1 'CALL PROGRAM 

2 CLEAR100, 16282 

3 FOR X=16282 TO 

4 READ A$ 

5 B=VAL("&H"+A$) 

6 POKE X,B 

7 NEXTX 

8 EXEC 16282 

9 DATA 8E,1,D1,6F,80,86,20,A7,80 
,8C, 1,DA,2 6,F9 ,8E, 1,D2,C6,7 ,10 

10 DATA 8E, 3F,F4, A6,A0,5A,C1,0,2 
7,6,AD,9F,A0,2,20,F3,5F,AD,9F,A0 

11 DATA 0,27,FA,AD,9F,A0,2,81,D, 
27,9,81,8,27,1B,A7,80,5C,20,E9,F 
7 

12 DATA 1,D1,BD,A5,86,BD,A6,81,8 
1,0,26,F9,86,2,27,A,F,78,7E 

13 DATA A4,A6,5A,30,1F,20,CE,7E, 
A4,CD,43,41,4C,4C,3D,20,0,0 



December 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



75 




Preventing Program Wipeout 

By Mike Speer 



Have you ever saved a program under the wrong name and 
wiped out a day's work on another program — just before 
making your daily backup? To prevent these catastrophes you 
must never make a mistake when doing the same thing every 
day (nobody's perfect). Or you can include the short routine 
in your programs that Safesave generates. 

The program generates four lines that allow you to safely 
save your program: 

1 GOTO 10 

2 VERIFYDN:SnVE'7/fe«flAW^":STOP 

3 VER I FYDN : SAVE ''filename : 1 " : STOP 
10 ' 



At the end of your program, add the statement GOTO 2 or 
GOTO 3 (depending on which drive you want to save to — 
you can change the drive number in Line 3 to another drive 
if you want). For instance, typing 40000 GOTO 2 would ensure 
that the program is saved. Run the program when you are 
ready to quit and it updates itself. 

Running Safesave creates those first four lines at the 
beginning of a new program. If you want to use Safesave in 
another program, make sure there is room for lines 1 through 
10, or put them elsewhere in the program. 

The listing: SAFESAVE 

1 CLS:Q$=CHR$ (34) : OPEN" O lf , 1 , "NEW 
.DAT" : PRINT#1, 11 lGOT01j3 lf : LINEINPU 
T"ENTER PROGRAM NAME: lf ;N$:PRINT 
# 1 , 11 2 VERIFYON : SAVE " ; Q$ ; N$ ; Q$ ; " : S 
TOP 11 : PRINT# 1 , 11 3 VERIFYON : SAVE 11 ; Q$ 
;N$; lf :1" ;Q$; lf :STOP" : 

2 PRINT#1, "lj3 1 " : CLOSE :MERGE"NEW. 
DAT 11 



Stitch Niche-ery 

By George R. Furman 




Embroidery generates symmetric patterns on your screen 
that can be dumped to the printer to serve as a basis for 
embroidery and other decorative patterns. 

When the constants K, L and M on lines 130 to 150 are 
all equal, a circle is formed. Variations are controlled by 
changing the magnitudes of the radius (constant K on Line 
450) and the horizontal (x) and vertical (y) coordinates 
influenced by L and M in lines 460 and 470. K, L and M 
can be increased to almost any limit beyond six; however, 
the resulting patterns take a long time to draw on the monitor 
and are too complex. Furthermore, exact multiples can 
become repetitious: 111, 222, 333, etc., all create a simple 
circle. 

The multiplier constant 94 in Line 450 controls the overall 
size of the patterns. Reducing this makes the pattern smaller, 
but anything much larger won't fit on the screen. For tighter 
patterns (points closer together), the STEP value of .05 in Line 
440 can be reduced to as small as .002. 

The screen shows the values of K, L and M along with the 
specific image, making it easy to study the relationships of 
those factors. If you should want to return to a particular 
pattern, KLM=341, for example, reenter lines 130 to 150 as 
130 l<=3, 140 L=4, 150 M=l and add 505 GOTO 505. In some 
instances a half-developed pattern can be of interest — such 
as patterns 136 and 165. These can be gotten by changing 
the limit in Line 440 to one pi (3. 1416) instead of two pi. 

The listing: EMBRDID 




10 
2J3 



*********** 

* EMBROIDERY * 



3J3 
40 

50 
60 
70 
80 
90 
100 

110 
120 
130 
14j3 
150 
160 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



BY 

GEORGE R FURMAN 

P.O.BOX 506 
GLENHAM,N.Y. 12527 

'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k-k 



* 



1 TAPE TITLE: "EMBROID" 
I 

PMODE 4, 1:PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 
FOR K= 1 TO 6 
FOR L= 1 TO 6 
FOR M= 1 TO 6 

K$= lf BM2 / 22; M 'LOCATES FIRST 



NUMBER 



76 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



170 L$="BM14,22;" 1 LOCATES SECON 


340 


IF 


L=4 


THEN 


DRAW L$+N$(4) 


D NUMBER 


350 


IF 


L=5 


THEN 


DRAW L$+N$(5) 


180 M$="BM2 6, 22 ;" ' LOCATES THIRD 


360 


IF 


L=6 


THEN 


DRAW L$+N$(6) 


NUMBER 


370 


IF 


M=l 


THEN 


DRAW M$+N$(l) 


190 N$(1)="BU8BR3R1D8BL2R4" 


380 


IF 


M=2 


THEN 


DRAW M$+N$(2) 


'1 


390 


IF 


M=3 


THEN 


DRAW M$+N$(3) 


200 N$ ( 2 )="BU7E1R6F1D2G1L6G1D3R8 


400 


IF 


M=4 


THEN 


DRAW M$+N$ (4) 


Ul" '2 


410 


IF 


M=5 


THEN 


DRAW M$+N$(5) 


210 N$ (3)="BU6U2R8G3L1BR1F2D2G1L 


420 


IF 


M=6 


THEN 


DRAW M$+N$ (6) 


6H1U1" '3 


430 


DRAW"BM2 , 10;U8BR8G4L4BR4F4BR 



220 


N$(4) 




,! BR6U8G6R8" 


4U8BD8R8BR4U8F4E4D8 11 'DRAWS K f L 




1 4 






AMD 


M 


230 


N$ (5) 


— 


,f BU2F2R4E2U2H2L6U2R8 lf 


44j3 


FOR Q= 0 TO 6 .28318 STEP.j35 




•5 






f USE STEP .002 FOR CLOSE LINE 


240 


N$ (6) 




"BU4R6F1D2G1L4H2U4E2R4 


450 


R=94*COS (K*Q) 


Fl" 


• 6 






460 


X=1.35*R*SIN(L*Q) 


250 


IF K= 


1 


THEN DRAW K$+N$(l) 


410 


Y=R*COS (M*Q) 


260 


IF K= 


2 


THEN DRAW K$+N$(2) 


48j3 


IF X>126 OR X<-128 GOTO 500 


270 


IF K= 


3 


THEN DRAW K$+N$(3) 


4 9j0 


PSET(128+X,96+Y) 


280 


IF K= 


4 


THEN DRAW K$+N$(4) 


500 


NEXT Q 


290 


IF K= 


5 


THEN DRAW K$+N$(5) 


510 


FOR T= 1 TO 2 y 0j3 > 0:NEXT T 


300 


IF K= 


6 


THEN DRAW K$+N$(6) 


520 


PCLS 


310 


IF L= 


1 


THEN DRAW L$+N$(l) 


530 


NEXT M : NEXT L: NEXT K 


320 


IF L= 


2 


THEN DRAW L$+N$(2) 


54J3 


GOTO 120 


330 


IF L= 


3 


THEN DRAW L$+N$(3)' 


55j3 


END 



CoCo Concoctions 



By David Allen 

Type in and run Apple Pie while your printer is online, and 
you'll have a recipe printing out that will make your mouth 
water. This program is designed for an Epson compatible 
printer. You will have to alter the control codes in lines 450 
through 480 for your particular printer. 

The listing: RPPLEPIE 

10 1 APPLEPIE 04/02/85 

20 REM: ONE-CRUST APPLE PIE 

30 Ll$ = "DOROTHY ALLEN" 

40 L2$ = "P.O. BOX 531" 

50 L3$ = "BREWSTER, WA. 98812" 

60 L4$ = "PHONE: 689-2831" 

70 GOSUB 440 

80 PRINT #-2, TAB (1 6 ); "APPLE PIE 
ii 

90 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 
100 PRINT #-2, TAB ( 14 );" ONE CRUST 
PIE" 

110 PRINT #-2 : PRINT#-2 

120 PRINT#-2," PASTRY FI 

LLING TOPPING « 

130 GOSUB 480 

140 PRINT#-2 :PRINT#-2 

150 PRINT#-2,TAB(9) ; "MIX AND ADD 

";TAB(32) ;"MIX TOGETHER"; 

160 PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 5 5 ) /"BAKE AT 37 

5" 



170 PRINT*-2,TAB(9) ; "TOGETHER " ; 
TAB(32);"AND TOSS WITH"; 
180 PRINT#-2,TAB(55) ;"1 HOUR" 
190 PRINT#-2, TAB(3 6) ; "APPLES" 
200 PRINT#-2 :PRINT#-2 
•210 PRINT#-2,TAB(9) ;"1 CUP FLOUR 
" ; TAB ( 3 2 ) ; " 1/2 CUP SUGAR " ; 
220 PRINTf-2 ,TAB(55) ;"l/2 CUP SU 
GAR" 

230 PRINT#-2,TAB(9) ;"1 CUBE MARG 
ARINE " ; TAB (32) ; " 2 TBSP FLOUR"; 
240 PRINT#-2,TAB(55) ;"l/2 CUP FL 
OUR" 

250 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(9) ;"l/4 CUP MIL 
K" ;TAB(32) ; "1/2 TSP CINNAMON"; 
.260 PRINT#-2,TAB(55) ;"l/3 CUP MA 
RGARINE" 

270 PRINT#-2,TAB(3 2) ;"l/8 TSP NU 
TMEG" 

280 PRINT#-2,TAB(32) ;" DASH 0 
F SALT" 

290 PRINT#-2,TAB(3 2) ;"4 LARGE GO 

LDEN APPLES" 

300 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 

310 PRINT! -2, TAB ( 17 ); "PREPARE PA 

STRY AND TURN INTO 9 INCH PIE PL 

ATF" 

■Jot n« Mob 

320 PRINT#-2,TAB(25) ;"POUR IN TH 

E APPLE PIE FILLING" 

330 PRINT#-2 , TAB (27) ; "SPRINKLE W 

ITH THE TOPPING" 

340 PRINT#-2 :PRINT#-2 

350 PRINT #-2, TAB (30) ;"FROM THE K 

December 1987 THE RAINBOW 77 



ITCHEN OF" 

36) 3 GOSUB 44)3 

37) 3 PRINT#-2,TAB(13) ;L1$ 

38) 3 PRINT#-2,TAB(13) ;L2$ 

39) 3 PRINT#-2,TAB(13) ;L3$ 

4)3)3 PRINT#-2,TAB(13) ;L4$ 

41) 3 GOSUB 48)3 

42) 3 END 

43) 3 REM: DEFINE MACRO FOR EMPHAS 



IZED AND EXPANDED TEXT 

44) 3 PRINT#-2 :ESC$=CHR$ (27) 

45) 3 PRINT#-2 ,ESC$ ;CHR$ (43 ) ;ESC$; 
"E" ;ESC$ ; "W" ;CHR$ (1) ;CHR$ (3)3) 

46) 3 PRINT#-2,ESC$;CHR$ (33) : RETUR 
N 

47) 3 REM: REINITIALIZES PRINTER T 
0 NORMAL PRINTING 

48) 3 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ; 11 @ 11 : RETURN 





Who'll Win on the Gridiron? 

By Jeli Remick 



Football Winner helps you try to pick the winning team 
in any football game. When you run the program, you will 
be asked for the names of the two teams playing (remember 
to put the home team first). The computer then asks you 
questions about the teams — you may need to refer to the 
sports page of your newspaper for help. When all the 
questions have been answered, the computer will predict a 
winner. 

The listing: FOOTBALL 

■ -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k 

2 ' ** ** 

3 ' ** FOOTBALL WINNERS ** 

4 ' ** BY ** 

5 ' ** JEFF REMICK ** 

6 » ** -k-k 

7 ' -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k -k 

1) 3 POKE65495, )3 : CLS : PRINT@ 1)34 , "Fo 
otball Winners" 

2) 3 PRINT@175, "by" :PRINT@234 , "Jef 
f Remick" : PRINT@355 , "press any k 
ey to continue" : POKE65 314 , 8)3 : EXE 
C 44539 

3) 3 CLS 

4) 3 PRINT"TEAM NAMES. HOME TEAM FI 
RST": INPUT A$,B$ 

5) 3 CLS:W=j3:L=^:T=j3:WH=j3:LH=j3 :PA= 
)3:PF=)3:WA=)3:LA=)3 

6) 3 PRINT@1)3,A$ 

7j3 PRINT: INPUT "WINS";W 
8j3 INPUT "LOSSES" ;L 
9)3 INPUT "TIES";T 
1J3J8 INPUT "WINS AT HOME";WH 
11J3 INPUT "LOSSES AT HOME" ; LH 
12J3 INPUT "POINTS FOR";PF 
130 INPUT"POINTS AGAINST"; PA 
14^0 GOSUB3 6j3 : GOSUB4 y 0 y 0 



15)8 A=A+W*2-L-(T/2) + (WH/2) -(LH/2 
)+FP-AP+. 5 

16 j3 CLS:W=j3:L=j3:T=j3:WH=j3:LH=j3 : PF 
=j3 : PA=j3 

17)8 PRINT@lj3,B$ 

PRINT: INPUT"WINS" ;W 
INPUT" LOSSES" ;L 



18) 8 

19) 8 
2)3 j3 

21) 8 

22) 3 

23) 3 

24) 3 



INPUT 
INPUT 
INPUT 
INPUT 
INPUT 



"TIES" ;T 
"WINS AWAY";WA 
"LOSES AWAY"; LA 
"POINTS FOR";PF 
"POINTS AGAINST"; PA 

25) 3 GOSUB3 6)3:GOSUB4)3)3 

26) 3 B=B+W*2-L-(T/2) + (WA/2)-(LA/2 

)+FP-AP 

27) 3 CLS 

28) 3 PRINT@8 , "FOOTBALL WINNERS" 

29) 3 PRINT STRING $ (32,"-") 

3) 3)3 PRINT : PRINT@72 , "MOST POINTS 
WINS" : PRINT : PRINT 

31) 3 PRINT "HOME ";A$"-";A 

32) 3 PRINT"VISITORS-" ; B$ ; "-" ;B 

33) 3 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 

34) 3 POKE6 5494 ,)3: PRINT@ 3 3)3, "AGAIN 
(Y/N) " ; : INPUT A$ 

35) 3 IF A$ = "Y" THEN 3)3 ELSE END 

36) 3 FOR Q=)8 TO 3)3)3)3 STEP 1)3)3 

37) 3 IF PF>Q THEN NEXT Q 

38) 3 FP=Q/l)8)8/2-.5 
3 9)3 RETURN 

4) 3^ FOR Q=)8 TO 3)3)3)3 STEP 1)3)3 

41) 3 IF PA>Q THEN NEXT Q 

42) 3 AP=Q/ 1)3)3/ 2 - . 5 

43) 3 RETURN 

Contributions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in at one 
sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, although 
the short programs are limited in scope, many novice programmers 
find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve the software 
written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but 
we cannot key in program listings. AH programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary, explaining how the program works. 
If your submission is accepted for publication, the payment rate will 
be established and agreed upon prior to publication. 



7& 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 



Proven Technology 

New CoCo 3 Utilities 

Great for 512K Systems! From Color Venture and OWL-WARE 



PRINTER LIGHTNING 

A great print spooler which gives you 
44K print buffer from a 128K CoCo and 
up to 438K (200 pages!) from a 512K 
CoCo. With this spooler you can run a 
program while you are printing a file. 
The spooler does not slow down the 
computer to any noticeable extent while 
you are running a second program and 
no lost characters arise. Baud rates 
selectable. Printer Lightning can reside 
in memory along with RAMDISKl 




NEW NEW 



Using 512K CoCo 3 you have access to 
2 additional disk drives in RAM. All 
disk commands are supported, and the 
data are Reset button protected. You 
can now have up to 5 disk drive capa- 
cities on line at once and can assign the 
ram disks to any drive number. By 
making the ramdisk Drive 0, all pro- 
grams which require a lot of drive 
access will run much faster. You can 
have the RAMDISK in memory at the 
same time as the Printer Lightning\ 



BACKUP LIGHTNING 

This program is the fastest way to make 
backup copies of your files using a 51 2K 
CoCo. You can backup 35, 45, or 80 
track disks single or double sided. Both 
RS and OS-9 disks may be backed up. 
The original disk is saved to memory 
and a copy can be made on an 
unformatted disk every 45 seconds! The 
lightning read, write, format, and verify 
routines that were developed make this 
program much quicker that RSDOS or 
OS-9 for backups. This will become one 



of your most used programs! 

Only $1 9.95 each. 3 for $49.95. 
SPECIAL With our 512K Upgrade (Next page) only $2. each Or 3 f Or $5! 



Announcing: 

The finest graphics/drawing program for the COCO 3 



Da Vinci 3 




16 colors on screen a( one time 

Modify each color from 64 available colors 

Use composite or RGB monitor 

Drawwith custom paintbrushes 

Full resolution 320 X 192 

Picture convener for conversion of 

COCO 2 pictures to COCO 3 
Multiple text fonts 
Accepis input from joystick. X-pad. 

mouse, or touch-pad 
Boxes, circles, line, paint generation 
Screen dump for Tandy mono and color ink-jet 

printers. (NX-10 and others pending) 
Sensible price 

No additional hardware required because of 

course/line joystick movement modes 
Zoom mode for individual pixel editing 
Great on screen menu which is removable at 
the (ouch of a key (o allow full screen edit 



Last Minute Specials! 

Master Artist 2 or 3 $25.95 

(One of the best CoCo2 graphics programs) 
Pyramix (Qubert) List $25 $19.95 
Blackjack Royale (Black Jack) $12.95 
Crystal Revenge (Space Shoot-out) $12.95 



OS-9 

SUPER BOARD I/O 



3 or 5 Users 
on Your 
CoCo 



2 Serial Ports 
(up to 19,200 BAUD) 



Toll Free 
Order Line 

(800) 
245-6228 




M.C. & VISA Accepted 

OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA. 
19539 

PA R«s lnclud«6%Tax 
PA (215) 682-6855 



PkJQ& 
Into 
MULT I PACK 





FULL 

DETAILS 
NEXT 
PAGE 



CENTRONICS 
PARALLEL 
PORT 




Proven Technology 

^^^^^M i hi l In Razor's Ldge of the C olor C omputer Frontier ^^^^^1 



OS-9 Hard Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or Business Use 
Drive Access is at Least 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives 
Control up to 2 Drives per Controller each as Continuous Storage 



Every hard drive system is complete with software, 
hard drive, controller, heavy-duty power supply, and 
LR Tech Interface. When a complete drive system is 
ordered, the drive is fully assembled, tested, and 
burned in for 3 full days. This ensures dependability 
and optimum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo hard drive 
systems and parts for systems for more than 2 years. 
This is the longest history in the CoCo market of any 
available drive system. About V.\ of all hard drive 
systems currently in use in the CoCo market use the 
LR Tech/OWL-WARE system. We have reached 
this position in the CoCo hard drive market by 
providing our customers with a quality product that 
they (and we) can be proud to own and use. 



A number of drive systems were in the market place 
when the LR Tech Interface was introduced and 2 
have been introduced since. Most of these are no 
longer available. We provide the only system which 
provides a combination of standard interface (SAS1), 
rugged unit construction (not hacked to a floppy 
drive controller), high speed, and reasonable price. 
These systems are even several times faster than 
the standard XT hard drive system. Ideal for 
multi-user system because processor does not stop 
for hard drive access. 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and 2 



Sale 

$459 

10 Meg 



System Prices: 

$649. 

20 Meg 




New RLL System! 

$789. 

30 Meg 



■mm 


Wm ;: : 


■. . . jj 








■ ■ ■ - i 






« s -m : S': : ;'- ;V; : 







Call for larger or smaller drives 

Dealer's Inquires Invited! 



Super I/O Board for OS-9 

Each Board Provides 2 Serial Ports and Centronics Parallel Port 

First Board has Real Time Clock and Beeper... With Second Board up to 5 Users 



The serial ports are usable up to 19,200 Baud, and 
the parallel port is a true Centronics standard. 
Plug into your multi-pak. On CoCo 3, multi-pak 
must be upgraded. You will have a multi-user 
system with additional computers or terminals 
plugged into the serial ports. An OWL hard drive 
and 512K upgrade are strongly recommended for 
multi-user systems. 



Intro Price.. 



$165. 



Board 2 $139. 



Hard Drive 
Interface 

(Includes Software) 



For those who want to put together 
their own system, we have an 
exclusive arrangement to distribute 
the LR Tech Interface. Please 
note that an interface is not a 
controller. A Xebec, WD, or 
Adaptec SASI controller are 
required for a drive system. 

To assemble a hard drive system 
yourself requires some reasonable 
knowledge of OS-9 and electronic 
construction and a hard drive that 
works. CoCo 3 users will have to 
upgrade their Multi-pak 

Only $119. 

Xebec Controller $139. 
Adaptec RLL Controller $199. 

CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 

The LR Tech 512K upgrade uses 
all gold contacts and 120 nanosec- 
ond 256K chips. Provides large 
system memory from OS-9 Level 2. 

Without With 

Mem Chips $59. Chips $1 05. 

Special! See software offer on 
previous page with memory board! 




OWL-WARE PHONES 

ORDERS 

(800) 245-6228 

PA (21 5) 682-6855 

TECHNICAL HELP 
(21 5) 433-8695 

Call for advice 



Ask for the WHISPER DRUE for the finest, quietest drive available! 

1 \J ^ -(Half Hgt -DS) 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, cable, case & power supply, and manual. 




rive 1 Systems (Fun Hgt) ^)%7Ji 



(Half Hgt - DS) 

(3.5" 720K Drive for OS-9) $195. 

Drive 1 has drive, case & power supply, and instructions for use with your drive. 

(Call for Special Prices on Drive 0, 1, 2, 3 Combos.) 




HwwB L . jHIP "Waft 



HALF HEIGHT DRIVE 
UPGRADE KIT FOR 
RS VERTICAL CASES 

Why only double the capacity of your 
system when you can triple in the same 
case? Kit includes: double sided drive to fit 
your case* chip to run both sides of new 
drive* hardware^ and detailed instructions. 
Takes only 5 minutes. 

Model $119. Model $129. 
500 



All drives are new and fully assembled. We 
ship only FULLY TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at these low prices. Full height 
drives are unused surplus and not always 
available. 

We use Fuji, Teac and Other Fine brands. We 
have 5 years experience in the CoCo disk drive 
market! We are able to provide support when 
you have a problem. 



Bonus! 
Special 
Bundled 
Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
urchase! 



NOW FOR CoCo 1,2, 3!! } 



Our prices do not include shipping costs, but do 
include a discount for cash. 

OWL-WARE has a liberal warranty policy. During 
the warranty period, all defective items will be 
repaired or replaced at our option and at no cost to 
the buyer except for shipping costs. 

Call our technical help line for return authorization 
numbers. Return of non-defective items or unauthor- 
ized returns are subject to a service charge. 



WARRANTIES 

Full Hgt 90 days Half Hgt 1 Year 

- ORDER LINES (only) — 

(800) 245-6228 

(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 

— TECH HELP LINE 

(21 5) 433-8695 

Call for Latest Prices! 




P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 



OWL-WARE 

Software Bundle 



Disk Tutorial ~ 3 Utilities - 2 Games 

DISKTUTOR Ver. 1.1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi -lesson^ machine language pro- 
gram. This tutor takes you through your 
lessons and corrects your mistakes for a 
quick, painless disk drive intoduction. 
(This professionally written tutor is easily 
worth the bundle's total price,) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster disk 
access and allows the use of double-sided 
drives, Corrects a floating point number 
error on early CoCo systems, 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs between 
disks. A wild card option selects groups of 
programs for copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector, Bad sec- 
tors are listed on the screen. 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These have sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is over 
$125 worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with cheapo 
non-professional "Public Domain" soft- 
ware which is being offered by others. All 
of this software is copyrighted and pro- 
fessional in quality. The tutor is unique 
with us and has helped hundreds of new 
users learn their disk drive. 

only $27.95 

(or even better) 

only $6.95 with 
any Disk Drive Purchase!! 



Lo Consultations 



I riii I i jpfe o i ri #111 o 1% d^^T w% ifii o i^inl 
A IIC/ LrCulIl 111 d IIlCj JJUai tJt 



By Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



/ left my Co Co I on for 24 hours, and 
when J came back to it only the 
CONTROL-C ( CLE A R-C) key sequence 
was working, I turned the Co Co off 
then turned it on again, but the key- 
board seemed completely dead. How 
can I fix it? 

John W. Wooster 

(JW47) 

Jackson, MI 

The most common cause of a sud- 
denly, completely dead keyboard is a 
joystick button being somehow de- 
pressed. So, first unplug your joysticks 
and see if the problem goes away. Then 
make sure that the contacts for the 
joystick buttons on the joystick connec- 
tor are not somehow shorted to ground. 

If this is not the case, then you must 
determine whether the CoCo mother- 
board is at fault, or whether the fault lies 
in the keyboard. This can be done by 
swapping a keyboard with another 
CoCo 1 and trying out your keyboard 
in the other CoCo 1. If you don't have 
access to another CoCo 1, you can 
accomplish the same thing (albeit a bit 
more tediously) by using a VOM as a 
continuity checker along with the sche- 
matic diagram of the keyboard matrix 
to make sure that all the keys cause the 
appropriate shorts between row and 

Martin H, Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOWs CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager ofOS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography, Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 

82 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



column contacts on the keyboard cable 
(this tests the keyboard), and then by 
shorting with a jumper wire appropriate 
pins on the CoCo motherboard connec- 
tor (referring to the keyboard matrix 
schematic again) and seeing if the right 
characters are generated on the screen. 

In your case, if the problem is not a 
joystick problem, and if you confirm the 
keyboard is still visibly plugged into the 
CoCo motherboard, it sounds like you 
may have a dead keyboard PIA chip 
inside the CoCo. On the older CoCo Is, 
this is a 682 1 chip, and on the late model 
(For NC boar d CoCo Is) this would be 
a 6822 chip. Either chip is readily and 
inexpensively available from Tandy 
National Parts. You may be able to 
check this first by swapping the 6821 or 
6822 chip with another CoCo 1. Be sure 
you get the right chip by referring to the 
schematic diagram of your particular 
model CoCo or merely by tracing the 
connections from the CoCo mother- 
board keyboard connector to the PIA 
chip they go to. 

CoCo-IBM Joystick Swap 

Can a CoCo 3 two-button joystick be 
used on the IBM PC XT or clones? How 
about using an IBM PC XT type joy- 
stick on a CoCo 3? 

John Bennett 

(JOHNGB) 
Shelby Township, MI 

The joysticks used by the CoCo 3 and 
by the IBM PC XT are pretty much 
electrically identical. The difference 
between them is merely in the connector 
used. So, yes, both conversions are 
possible, provided you are dealing with 
a two-button joystick. The CoCo 3 
manual gives you the pinout of the 



joystick port. All you need to know is 
the pinout of the IBM PC's joystick 
port, and then you (or any competent 
hacker) can make the needed conver- 
sion given the proper connectors, which 
are available at Radio Shack stores. 

The pinout of the IBM PC type 
joystick is as follows: 



PIN 


Function 


1 


+5 VDC 


2 


button 4 


3 


position 0 (wiper of the po- 




tentiometer) 


4 


ground 


5 


NC 


6 


position 1 


7 


button 3 


8 


+5 VDC 


9 


+5 VDC 


10 


button 6 


1 1 


position 2 


12 


ground 


13 


position 3 


14 


button 7 


15 


ground 



Using this inf ormation, and some 
checks made using a VOM ? you should 
easily be able to make the needed 
conversions. 

Zapped Multi-Pak 

My old gray Multi-Pak Interface just 
ain't what it used to be, I may have 
zapped it. When I plug it into any model 
of CoCo, it causes the machine to fail 
to boot up (although I get some video 
output when it is used with a CoCo I). 
The disk controller that was in this 
Multi-Pak at the time it died works fine, 
as does the CoCo that it had been used 
with, I may have plugged or unplugged 



NEW FROM ARK ROYAL! 

N EW Pro Football: Strategy Gridiron game (CC3 128K HR B) $20 

N eW Okinawa: The Big Invasion (CC64K D HR ML) $27 

N EW Blitzkrieg West: A Bigger Bulge (CC64KDHR ML) $27 

n eW Bataan: Historical & Hypothetical games in one (CC64K D HR ML) $29 

n eW Desert Fox: Rommel (CC64K D HR MLS) $27 

HEW Task Force: Modern Naval War in the Med (CC64KDHR MLS) $27 

gPA dED DDAY:The6thof June (CC64K HR ML) $25 

uP rAD ed Battle Hymn: Battle of Gettysburg (CC64KDHR ML) $25 

upG R ^ D ED Company Commander: Squad level Wargame (CC32K SG MLS) 

uP (House to House Module included in Company Commander) 

Additional Models for Company Commander 3,0 

River Crossing $17 

N eW Gemini $17 

N eW Cauldron !(»....... $17 

HEW Beach Head $17 

Fire One! Submarine Simulation (CC3 D HR B) .^Hik: $25 

Luftflotte: Battle of Britain (CC32K SG MLS) $25 

Stalingrad: the turning point. (CC64K HR ML) , .^^^E^. $25 

Final Frontier: War in Space (CC32KDHR MLS) $25 

Fire & Steel: Waterloo Campaign (CC64K D HR MLS) ||| $22 

Barbarossa: The War in Russia (CC64KHR ML) $22 

RedStar: Nato vs Warsaw Pact (CC32K D HR ML) $22 

DarkHorse: RedStar Sequel (CC64KDHR ML) |T > , i $22 

Midway: The Turning Point in the Pacific (CC32KHR MLS) $20 

Escape From Denna: Dungeons! (CC32K SG MLS) $15 

Tunis: War in the Desert (CC32K SG B) $15 

Battle of the Bulge 1 or 2 player (CC32KSG B) $15 

Phalanx: Alexander the Great (CC32K HR ML) $15 

Rubicon II: Invasion' game (CC32K SG B) $10 

Guadalcanal: America Strikes Back (CC32KSG MLS) $10 

Waterloo: Napoleon (CC32K SG MLS) $10 

Bomber Command: Strategic Bombing Mission (CC32K SG MLS) $10 

Kamikaze: Naval War in the Pacific (CC32KHRB) $10 

Starblazer: Strategy Star Trek (CC32K SG MLS) $10 

Mission Empire: Build an Empire in Space (CC32KSG B) $10 

Galactic Taipan: Economics in Space (CC32KSG B) $10 

Keyboard General: Bi-monthly newsletter yearly sub $15 

Barbarossa, Luftflotte, Battle Hymn (256K) available Tandy 1000 
New for the Tandy 1000: 'v 

Gray Storm Rising: War in the North Atlantic $25 

Codes CC — Color Computer, all versions CC3 CoCo 3 only 
D — Disk only (no D means program available tape or disk) 

HR — High Resolution SG Semigraphics ML — Machine Language 

MLS — Machine Language Subroutines B — Basic 

Write for free catalog! ^P^>^^ 

(Upgrades may be acquired for $5. Original tape or disk must be returned M-C^^^T^^ 

Prices on all programs include shipping costs to USA and Canada. Others ARK ROYAL GAMES W^^^^Nf !■ 

add $3.00. COD's available in USA only, add $3.50. Personal Checks ac- pQ gQX 14806 ftlARK F 

cepted with no delays in USA. Others send M.O. or Bank Draft in US funds. " ooooo M ■ r> Vd 

Programs shipped within 24 hours except on weekends. Color Computer J SCKSOnVI I lG, FL 32238 ROYAL \J 

and Tandy 1000, TM Tandy Corp. Florida residents add 5% sales tax. (904) 786 8603 ^Cl GAME ^ VTk 

Canadians may order direct from: M & M Software, #203 818 Watson Cres., S\l 
Dawson Creek, B.C. VIG 1 N8. Write M & M Software for information. ^^^^ 



the pack into or out of the CoCo with 
the power on. Can you tell me how to 

fix it? 

Mike Andrews 

( MAN DREWS) 
Gary, IN 

It sure sounds like your Multi-Pak 
Interface has gotten "zapped." One of 
the common causes of this is a blown 
74LS367 chip. The MPI uses several of 
these to buffer the CoCo's address and 
other lines. Try checking continuity 
between every input on all the LS367 
chips and ground using a VOM. If you 
find any that are nearly zero ohms from 
ground, then you have located a blown 
chip, and must remove and replace it. 
A better approach might be to hook up 
an oscilloscope to all of the address 
lines, one at a time, while the MPI is in 
use. You may be able to identify one that 
is tied low or high. If so, this is con- 
nected to a bad LS367 chip. I have fixed 
two blown MPIs in this fashion. The 
74LS245 that buffers the data lines 
could also be the culprit. Note that all 
models of MPI use these chips, so this 
advice is good for any blown MPI. 
Check also for shorts between the NMI 
orthe HALT line and ground inside the 
MPI. It is rare (though always possible) 
for the PAL chip in the MPI to be the 
cause of the problem here. 

Why You Avoid Y 

I find I am unable to boot OS-9 using 
a Korean CoCo and a Y cable between 
the CoCo and the disk controller. Yet 
I can boot using the same setup and an 
older model CoCo. Why is this? 

Mark E. Schweder 

( MSCH WEDER ) 

Gainesville, FL 

You should not use a Y cable at all. 
Period. Instead, it is essential, if you 
want to use more than one card in the 
CoCo system bus, that you buy a Multi- 
Pak Interface. The reason is that the Y 
cable causes the very fragile, unbuffered 
CoCo system bus to be stressed to the 
limit by its added capacitance and other 
properties. In some cases this causes a 
marginal system that works most of the 
time, and in others it causes a system 
that is unable to do Disk I/O. How bad 
an effect the Y cable has is probably 
determined by what batch of chips was 
used in the CoCo, and other very minor 
details of differences in design between 
various models of the CoCo. Note, also, 
that OS-9 puts a particular strain on the 
disk I/O hardware, and if a problem is 
to occur, it is most likely to show up 
under OS-9. 

84 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



For those who insist on ignoring the 
advice, yoursystem may appeario work 
correctly, but you have removed all 
margin of safety from the disk I/O 
hardware, and risk a massive crash at 
any moment. The longer the Y cable, 
the more likely it is to cause trouble. I 
must confess that in some experiments 
I have found that Y cables that have no 
more than a total of an inch of ribbon 
cable seem to be the most reliable. But 

1 do not recommend even these. 

Lowercase on CoCo 2 

How can I take advantage of the 
lowercase display capability built into 
the late-model Korean CoCo 2s? Can I 
replace the character set in the CoCo 32- 
column display with characters of my 
own design? 

Alexander L. Schultz 

(EX LAX) 

Marysville, KS 

I've consulted with my friend Art 
Flexser of SpectroSystems, for he is the 
master of CoCo 2 lowercase in these 
parts. The easiest way to make use of 
the 32-column lowercase capabilities 
present in the 4 ET model Korean CoCos 
would be to buy ADOS Version 1 .02. (If 
you own a previous version of ADOS, 
you can upgrade to Version 1.02 for 
SJO.) Look for the SpectroSystems ad 
in this issue of RAINBOW. 

If you can put your CoCo into 64K 
mode, the following pokes will make the 
needed lowercase mods under BASIC: 

POKE &H95C9,&H57:PDKE &HFF22, 
&H50 will produce a green border; POKE 
&H95C9,&H17:PDKE &HFF22,&H10 will 
produce a black border; POKE &H95C9, 
&H37:PDKE &HFF22,&H30 will give you 
an inverse screen. All will give you true 
lowercase. 

Note that you'll have to re-poke 
&HFF22 whenever you use PNODE 3 or 
1. If you get ADOS 1.02, you will not 
need to re-poke &HFF22 in such cases. 

Some folks have published the sug- 
gestion that one try POKE 359 , 57 : POKE 
&HFF22 , &H50, which can be done with- 
out using the 64K mode. That approach 
is to be avoided! It disables the return 
to the text screen upon breaking out of 
a program that was in graphics mode. 
Much worse, the POKE 359,57 disables 
ASCII saves to tape or to disk, with no 
indication that any failureever occurred 
until you try to read your saved file, 
which will be totally blank. 

Note that a 4 ET model Korean CoCo 

2 is required for all this. These are the 
CoCo 2s that have a 'B' suffix after their 
catalog number on the machine (e.g., 
26-2027B, 26-3 134B and 26-3 136B). 



As for modifying the character set 
used by the CoCo 2, it is possible but 
cannot be done without significant 
hardware hacking. In the early days of 
the CoCo, several manufacturers pro- 
duced "lowerkits"that would do exactly 
what you wanted, provided you could 
burn your own 2716 EPROM. You see, 
the VDG chip does have provisions for 
getting its character set from an external 
character generator ROM. But the 
CoCo did not implement this option, 
and a special board with extra circuitry 
had to be added. With the advent of the 
CoCo 2B with built-in lowercase and 
later the CoCo 3 with full 80-column 
lowercase, the market for lowerkits 
ended, and none have been offered for 
sale for quite a while. 

Booting Micro Illustrator 

My copy o/Micro Illustrator will not 
boot properly on my CoCo 3. How can 
this be fixed? 

Greg Kazian 
Greer, SC 

The problem is caused by the fact that 
Micro Illustrator contains its own mini 
OS-9 Level 1 Version 1.0 or 1.01. 
Neither of these early versions of OS- 
9 can boot properly on the CoCo 3 
because they overwrite the interrupt 
vectors of the CoCo 3 that live at SFEEO 
through SFEFF. You can get around 
this problem by first booting up OS-9 
Level 1 Version 2.00, then putting the 
Micro Illustrator disk in Drive 0 and 
pressing reset. This will cause a reboot 
under OS-9 Level I Version 2.0, and 
Micro Illustrator will start working. 
This same trick will fix the same prob- 
lem that you will encounter on the 
CoCo 3 with DL LOGO, Trivia Fever, 
and one or two other older CoCo OS- 
9 products. 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type FI5K (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



V 



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OS -9 Cotnmunica lions program, 

• Menu oriented • Definable macro keys 

• Upload/download. Ascii ■ Works with standard serial port, RS232 

or XMODEM protocol PAK, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers 

• Execute OS-9 commands • Works with standard screen. XSCREEN, 
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• True character oriented full screen editing 
» Full block commands 

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» Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
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Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
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1906 Jerrold Avenue 
.St Paul, MN 55112 

DtaUt Inquiries Ikviitd 
Author S*bmh*ioti* atctpitd ... 
OS'Q if a troilfmnrk of Mkni^sli 




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32K ECB 




o You Hear What I Hear? 





m 






H«— 






1 r~i= 




[ j ' 0 








wr * f 

£J 




4 • 4 4 



By John Mosley 





































(\) # 4 - # # 






J 


1 




m $ 4 








Your ears do 



not deceive 



it's C0C0 



singing in four 



voices 



T 



86 



he holiday season is a time for singing, so let your C0C0 join 
thechorusof carolers with Do You Hear What I Hear, a four- 
voice music and graphics program. 
Do You Hear What I Hear is actually two programs — a BASIC 
driver (to create graphics, play and load music) and a machine 
language editor. 

Each memory location in the C0C0 from 0 to 65,535 holds one 
value between 0 and 255 or between &H00 and &HFE The values 
in ML SONG, Listing 3, are in hexadecimal, I chose this format because 
it involves less typing. 

Start off by typing in Listing 1; save it on the cassette you are 
using. Then type in Listing 2 and save it on another tape, or on the 
reverse side of your tape, leaving about a 30 second gap between 
listings 1 and 2. Run Listing 2, You will not load an old file if you 
are just starting to enter Listing 3. When prompted for the start 
address, enter a value of 16128. 

Enter Listing 3 one hexadecimal value at a time. All of the 
hexadecimal values are separated by two spaces. When you are 
through entering Listing 3, or when you have to stop entering, type 
5 and press ENTER. If you are just stopping temporarily and plan 
to resume entering later, write down the number to the left of the 
; S 5 you typed before you press ENTER, The number should be five 
digits long. 

When you are ready to resume entering, use that number as your 
start address. You will have to load the old file you saved before 
you can resume entering Listing 3. 

When you have finished and everything is saved properly, all you 
have to do is load and run XMA55DNG, leave the play button down, 
and follow the prompts. 

As listed, XMASSONG will work with a disk drive. MLEDITOR, 
however, is set up for tape users, To use MLEDITOR on a disk system, 
change CLDRDM to LDRDM in Line 4. Also, chan ge CSfiVEM to SfiVEM 

John Mosley is a freshman at Port/and High School, in Portland, 
Conn. He enjoys working with the Color Computer, and especially 
likes sound and graphics. 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 



in Line 10 and change "cassette" to "disk" in Line 1 1. Now, 
when you enter Listing 3 into the editor, the resulting 
machine language file will be saved to disk instead of tape. 

For those who get RAINBOW ON TAPE and want to transfer 
ML SONG to disk, the start, end and transfer addresses are 
S3F00, S4F24 and S3F00, respectively. Simply CLORD the file 



Editor's Note: The song file, ML SONG, will replace 
WfAsting- 3 on l|i^mo«//?Pi?/i^ 

RAINBOW ON DISK. 

• . w u,v*;,v!T,f/;V.;l!,ri;.. '• • . . ■ .!E;= : .viv:m 



130 3 300 ,224 

180 164 END 67 

2^0 •«**»■ 



Listing 1: XMfiSSONG 

10 DIMC$ (80 ) : CLEAR 12 0 , &H3EFF : CLE 
AR1000 

20 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS0 : SCREEN1 , 1 : FORT 
=0TO60STEP2 : LINE (T,0) - (T, 60) , PSE 
T :NEXTT 

30 FORT=1TG1000 : NEXTT : CLS : PRINT 11 
IF BOX IS BLUE THEN PRESS <C> 
TO CONTINUE, ELSE RESET AND RUN" 
:GOSUB 3 70:PCLS0 

40 CLS 4:PRINT@131,"DO YOU HEAR 

WHAT I HEAR" ; : PRINT @ 3 30 , "BY: JOH 

N H . MO S LEY" ; : FORT=1TO2000 : NEXTT 

50 '***DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR** 
* 

60 PRINT@449, "PREPARE (C) ASSETTE 

OR (D) ISK: " ; 
70 A$=INKEY$;IFA$=""THEN70 
80 IF A$="C"THEN100 ELSE IF A$ = " 
D"THEN90 

90 LOADM"ML SONG" : GOTO110 

100 CLOADM"ML SONG" 

lip LINE(5,4)-(251, 187) ,PSET,B:P 

OKE178,2:PAINT(0,0) , ,1 

120 CLEAR1000:C$="C1URUE2RERER5F 

RF3DFD3 6L4U38D3HU2L5GLG3LH2F2U3F 

R2EU4ERD4R2U4R2FRD2R2D2GE2DFD2G4 

E2D5GE3 D5G3ED5GE2RD4G3ED5GE3D5G3 

R" 

13)3 F0RD=1T068:READA / B:PSET(A / B / 
1) : NEXTD 

140 DATA 88,8,88 , 14,94,8,94 , 14,1 

61, 10 , 162, 11 , 16 6, 11, 167 , 10 , 161, 1 

6,162, 15, 16 6, 15, 167,16 , 163 ,41,16 

3,4 7, 16 9,41,169,47,18,8 3,18,87,2 

2,83,22,87,89,77,94,74 

15$ DATA 215,12,215,14,213,15,21 

7,15,215,16,213,17,217,17,211,18 

,215,18,219,18,213 , 19,217 ,19,211 

,20,215,20, 219,20,209,21, 213,21, 

217,21,221,21, 211, 22, 215,22,219, 

22 



from tape and type SAVEM"ML SONG",&H3F00,&H4F24, 
&H3F00 followed by ENTER. 



(Questions about this program may be directed to the 
author at 420 Main Street, Portland, CT 06480. Please 
enclose an SASE when writing for a reply.) □ 



160 DATA 209,23,213,23,217,23,22 
1,23, 211, 24, 215, 24, 2 19, 24, 209, 25 
,2 13, 25, 2 17, 25, 221, 25, 211, 26, 215 
,26, 2 19, 26, 209, 27, 2 13, 27, 2 17, 27, 
221, 27, 211, 28, 2 15, 28, 219, 28,213, 
29,217,29,215,30 

170 FOR A=19 TO 219 STEP 40: DRAW 
"BM=A; , 130; "+C$ : PAINT (A+4 , 129) , 1 
, 1 : PAINT ( A+12 ,12 6) ,1,1: PAINT (A+l 
6,13 2) , 1,1: PAINT (A+ 16, 14 2) ,1,1: P 
AINT (A+ 16 , 152 ) , 1 , 1 : PAINT (A+16 , 16 
2) ,1,1: NEXT A 

180 DRAWC1BM42 , 18 ;NU3NR3ND3NL3N 
E2NF2NG2NH2" : DRAW" BM91 , 1 1 ; NU3NR3 
ND3NL3" :DRAW"BM164 , 13 ,*NU4NR4NL4N 
D4" :DRAW"BM166 , 44 ; NU4NR4ND4NL4NE 
NFNGNH" : DRAW"BM194 , 95 ; NU4ND4NR3N 
L3 NENFNGNH " : DRAW" BM 8 9 f 7 4 ; F 2 D2 BR3 
BU1H2U2BU2RFRF2 D3 G2LGL3HLH2U3E2R 
ER3" 

185 DRAW" BM2 0 , 85NU3NR3ND3L3 " 

190 DRAW"C1BM6 , 49 ; ERE5UEUEUEU3EU 

8EU2D2FD3FD2FD2FDFDFDFEUEUEU2EUE 

U2EU4RU2D2RD8FD4FDFDFDFDF4RDRL5H 

3 UHUHUHUHUHU 3 D 3 LDG2 DGDGL2HUHUH2U 

LU3D3GDGDGDGDGDG2LGL4" : PAINT ( 18 , 

30) ,1,1 

200 DRAW"C1BM233, 44 ; DG2LH2U2E 3R2 
F2D4G3L30H2F2R9U17FRD16U16R2D16U 
16R2D16U16E2D18U4REU2H" : DRAW"BM2 
10,35;GD2R" 

210 C$="C1R3FR2FR7FR2F3D6GDG2D3F 
D3FD2F3RL5H2U2HU3HU2H2L5DGD4GD4G 
DL4EUEU4EU4EU5HU4HU3H2F2BR3BD2FR 
6FR3FD5GL9U5HU2 " : DRAW"BM77 ,21; "+ 
C$ : DRAW" BM105 ,21; "+C$ : PAINT (90,2 
5) ,1,1: PAINT (120, 25) ,1,1 
220 DRAW"C1BM4 9 , 4 9EUEU3EU4EU4HU3 
HUHUHERE2R2ER3FR2FRFER3FRLGL2GL3 
HL2HL3GLGFDFD2FER2FR2FR2L2G2LHL2 
GD3GD4GDR2FR3 FR2FRFER3FRLGL2GL3H 
L3HL3HL3GLG" : PAINT (53, 24), 1,1: PS 
ET(51,47 , 1) 

230 DRAW"C1BM13 0,21 ;R4F6DFDFDFD2 
RU2EUEUEUE6R4G3LG3 DGDGDGDGD2GD10 
F 2 RL 9 RE 2 U 9 HU 2 HUHUHUHUH 3 LH 3 " : PAIN 
T ( 140 , 30) ,1,1 

240 C$-"C1FD2L2U2D2GLG3DGD2FDF3R 
FR2 ERE 3 U EU 2 HUH 3 LH L2 D 1 3 U 1 3 G LD 1 1U 1 
1G2D7U7E2RER2D13U13FRD11U11F2D7U 
2LU3L2U2D2RD3LD2" : FORA=3 3T02 3 3 ST 
EP40 : DRAW" BM— A ; ,16 8; "+C$:NEXTA 
250 DRAW"C1BM31,76 ; U3H3 LHL2HL10G 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 87 



LG2DGDGD30FDF3R12ER2ERE3U3G4L3GL 
11H2U29EU2E2R11FR2F4" : PAINT (20 , 7 

0) .1.1 

2 60 DRAW"C1BM3 5 , 68 ;R4FD5FD3 FD8FE 

2R8FRF3DFD2FD10FDF3L3H3UHU10HU2H 

2LHL5G3DGD7GD4GD2GL5RE2U3EU6EU8H 

U9HU3HU4H2": PAINT ( 40, 80) ,1,1 

27,0 DRAWBM64 , 86 ;R4F2ERE2R6FRF3G 

2H2LHL4G3DGD5FD7GD3L4EU4EU4HU6HU 

3H3 11 : PAINT ( 70 , 90 ) , 1 , 1 

280 DRAW" BM8 8 , 85 ;R7G2D21F2L7E2U2 

1H2": PAINT (91, 91) , 1,1 

290 C$="G2H3L8G2D3FRFR6FRFRF3 DFD 

4GDG3LGLGL5HLH3E2F3R5ERE3U3HUH2L 

HL5HL2HLH2U4EUE2RER8FRF3" : DRAWB 

M116 , 8 6 ; "+C$ : DRAWBM22 6,86; "+C$ : 

PAINT (110, 94) ,1, 1: PAINT (2 20 ,94) , 

1,1 

300 DRAW"BM125 , 68 ;R7G2D13R6E2D7H 
2L6D21F2L7E2U21L6G2U7F2R6U13H2" : 
PAINT(128,80) ,1,1 

310 DRAW"C1BM141, 8 4 ; R4FDFRE2RER3 
FRF2D17FEU17E2RER3FRF4DFD11FD3F4 



L3HLH2U4HU11H4L2GLGD16G3H3U16HLH 

L2G4D5FD6GD2GDG2L3E3U4EU5HU7HUH3 

":PAINT(145,85) ,1,1 

3 20 DRAW"BM204, 110 ; L3U2GLGL8HLH2 

UH2UHU12EUEUE3R12F3DFD22" : DRAW" B 

M189, 86 ;R9F3D15GLG2L6H4UHU10EU2E 

2": PAINT (190, 85) ,1,1 

3 30 F0RT=1T029 :READA,B: PRESET (A, 

B) : NEXTT : DATA 130,69 , 128 , 70 , 129 , 7 

2,128,74,129,76,12 8,78,12 9,80,12 

8, 82, 12 8, 86, 12 9, 88, 12 8, 90, 129, 92 

, 128,9 4, 129, 96 , 12 8 , 98 , 129 , 100 , 12 

8 , 102 , 12 9, 104, 12 8, 106, 129 , 108, 12 

8 , 84 , 12 6 , 85 , 124 , 84 , 12 2 , 85 , 120 , 84 

, 130, 85 , 132 , 84 

335 DATA134,85,136,84 

340 PMODE4,1:SCREEN1,1:GOSUB390 

350 EXEC&H3F00 

3 60 FORT=1TO3000 : NEXTT : G0T03 50 
3 70 I FI NKEY $ = " " THEN 370 
3 80 RETURN 

390 FORT=1TO600: NEXTT 
400 RETURN 



Listing 2: MLEDITOR 

0 CLS : CLEAR1000 : CLEAR200 , &H3EFF 

1 PRINT" *** EDITOR **'*» 

2 FORT=1TO1000: NEXTT 

3 INPUT"LOAD OLD FILE ( Y/N) : " ; C$ 

4 IFC$="Y" THEN GOSUB11 : CLOADM"M 
L SONG" : GOSUB14 : ELSE 5 

5 CLS: INPUT "START ADDRESS:", 'A 

6 FORX=A TO &H4F 24 :PRINTX; : INPUT 

7 IF A$="S" THEN 10 

8 POKEX,VAL(HEX$(A$) ) 



9 NEXTX 

10 GOSUBll:CSAVEM"ML SONG" , &H3F0 
0,&H4F24,l:END 

11 PRINT"READY CASSETTE (PRESS AN 
Y KEY) " 

12 IF INKEY$=" "THEN12 

13 RETURN 

14 INPUT"MAKE PRINTOUT "; C$ : IFC$= 
"Y" THEN 15 ELSE RETURN 

15 FORT=&H3F00 TO &H4F24 STEP12 I 
FOR TT=0 TO ll:PRINT#-2,HEX$(PEE 
K(T+TT) ) ;" "; :NEXTTT:PRINT#-2:N 
EXTT 



Listing 3: ML SONG 




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88 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



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BY FAZER ELECTRONICS 

PRINT * - 2 . "HELLO . " 

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Manage your checking account(s) with Cfl 15 . Keep track of deposits, checks, ATM 

withdrawals and other account transactions. Define up to 36 categories to monitor 

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Requires 1 disk drive 
Pr i nt er is opt i onal 
CoCo 3 compatible 



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90 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



0 8 10 42 C 2D 2 B6 9 AB 8 0 
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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 91 



That's 

Entertain 



By Randy Mayfield 



Hyou own a video cassette record- 
er and have ever experienced the 
frustration of searching through 
a shelf full of video cassettes for a 
particular recording, you need VCR 
Tapes. This program maintains (on disk 
or tape) a file of up to 500 movie titles 
detailing which video cassettes they are 
on and the starting VCR digital counter 
value of each title. 

The first step in setting up your VCR 
Tapes system is numbering your video 
cassettes. I use the pre-printed stick-on 
numbers included with each new 
cassette. Then type in and save 
VCRTAPE5 and run it. The program is 
menu-driven, with the main menu offer- 
ing seven options: 

Create new file allows you to enter 
a title, tape number (###) and VCR 
digital counter reading for each 

Randy Mayfield is a radar electronics 
technician living in Melbourne. Flor- 
ida, with his wife and two children. His 
hobbies include target shooting, wood- 
working and programming for the 
Co Co. 



V. 

r 



u 

L 

r 



r 



r 



r 



nizat io n — 

MUPPETS TAKE MANHATTEN 1095 

TAG 0000 

NO TIME FOR SERGEANTS 0200 

RED DAWN 1249 

RETURN TO MAYBERRY 2079 

. - ■ ■ - - ii r -■ - - - -- - ■ -- * 

BABY THE LOST LEGEND.. ■ XXX X 

MATTER OF LIFE & DEATH 0000 

VIEW TO A KILL XXXX 

■ ..- . ■ — • . : i.. : 

ELECTRIC DREAMS 2144 

ROMANCING THE STONE 0000 

TARZAN-6REY3T0KE 1194 

MY SCIENCE PROJECT.. 0000 

PROTOCOL 1852 

RAMBO 1104 

— — ■ *• » ' ■■ «■ < i ■ —!■■»■ « » Mini l n m i 

RETURN OF THE .JED 1 0000 

STRIPES 1415 

■ ■ . t- - ~ ^: - . ^ 

JAWS 1092 

MAN WITH ONE RED SHOE 0000 

TEEN WOLF 2072 

COMMANDO 1282 

PALE RIDER 0000 

SILVERADO 1925 

■ " — ■ — — - -■ ■ ■ »■ ■ ■ ■ - — * 1 * * * - " * m i 

INVASION OF BODY SNATCHERS 1983 

UNFAITHFULLY YOURS 0030 

YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE 1114 

• ■ ■ '7 ■ ■ '— ^ .. *'" . — - 

ABSENT MINDED PROFESSOR XXXX 

EVIL THAT MEN DO 0000 

ROBIN HOOD-DISNEY XXXX 

DUMBO 1089 



"i 



J 



J 
1 



J 



1 



30 {/ cr f^- o 



G 




ment 






recording You must enter the tape titles, the printer will skip to the next want to sort alter an 'add' or 'delete' 
numbers and counter numbers in the label and continue printing. D MP- 1 05 operation d only a lew titles are in- 
formal* shown in parentheses, as all the printer control codes for baud rale, volvcd. 

information is compressed into a single condensed characters enable and Quit use to exit the program. 11 a 

siring for conserving siring space and condensed characters disable are to- file is in RAM, you will be given the 

for ease of storage cated within lines 490. 610 and 690, opportunity to rclum to the Save lunc- 

Work in a file - use to update the respectively. Change these codes as lion, just in case you forgot to save the 

file as your video cassette library grows required for other printers. tile, 

and changes. The 'add' option has the Save file use to save your file to 

same format as the Create function. The disk or tape. When a lite is saved, you It any ot the Work, Printout, Scroll 



the Scroll function, allowing you to in RAM or erasing it. This allows the lile.s in RAM, program execution takes 
scroll through Ihe file and find the title f lexibility of creating a file or working you to the load file' subroutine and you 
to be deleted on another one without having to re- will be prompted to load an existing tile 
Printout file - the 'paper' option start the program (after 'erase') or to from disk or tape. The program uses 
prints a hard copy listing of all recorded return to work on the file jusl saved high-pitched beeps to prompt lor key- 
titles with tape numbers and counter (after 'retain'). board response and a low-pitched tone 
numbers. The routine uses fanfoid Scroll file allows scrolling forward to indicate erroneous entries, 
printer paper, skips perforations and and backward through a file on the VCR Tapes could also be used to 
prints 18 titles per page. The labels' CoCo video screen lo find a title and its catalog your computer cassettes or 
option will print titles and their cones- corresponding tape and counter disks, although the pr.nler labels option 
ponding counter numbers for any video numbers. This function is especially would require adjustments d dillerent 
cassette" you choose. The routine is for useful to those who do not have a size labels are used, 
standard 3'/-by->V. 6 inch fanfoid labels, printer lo produce hard copy. ( Questions or comments may he 
using a condensed printer character set Sort file uses a Shell-Met/ner directed to the author at 188 I layer 
( 1 6,7 cpi) to allow lengthy titles to fit on sorting algorithm to sort titles in alpha- C trele North, Melbourne, r /- AO. 
the labels, and prints up to four titles per betical order. This is included as a menu Please enclose an SA Sr. when request- 
lube]. If a tape contains more than four selection, because you may not always mg a reply.) 

December 1987 THE RAINBOW 93 



printer paper, skips perforations and 
prints 18 titles per page. The 'labels' 
















V 


J 

/ 


/ 
170 


95 


770 


203 






270 . . . 


247 


930 


203 








A(\(\ 


QC 




917 








520 


72 


1220 


224 








630 


175 


END 


162 



The listing: VCRTflPES 

]_p **************************** 

2p 1 VCR TAPE CATALOG 

3j3 1 BY RANDY MAYFIELD 

4J3 1 COPYRIGHT 1987 

5j3 **************************** 

60 1 

70 CLEAR10000:PCLEAR1:Z=500:B=0: 
W=0:P$=" . " :DIMT$ (Z) 
80 1 

90 1 MAIN MENU 
100 1 

110 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(32,12 8) ; : PR 
INT§5 , "vcr" ; : PRINT@9 , "tape" ; : PRI 
NT@14 , "catalog" ; : PRINT@2 2 , "menu" 
; : PRINT§2 6 , STRING$ (6,128) ; : PRINT 
: PRINT" 1. CREATE NEW FILE": PRINT 
"2. WORK IN A FILE": PRINT" (A 
DD, DELETE)" 

120 PRINT"3. PRINTOUT A FILE": PR 
INT" (PAPER, LABELS) ": PRINT" 4 

. SAVE FILE" : PRINT" 5. SCROLL FIL 
E": PRINT" 6. SORT FILE" : PRINT"7 . 
QUIT" :SOUND200, 1: PRINT :PRINT"SEL 
ECT ONE " 

130 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=""THEN130 

140 X=VAL(R$) :IFX<10RX>7THENGOSU 

B1360:GOTO110 

150 ON X GOTO190,330,490,740,890 

,1070,1000 

160 1 

170 ' CREATE NEW FILE 
180 1 

190 IFB=0THEN 210 ELSECLS : SOUND 1 
,3:PRINT"A FILE ALREADY EXISTS I 
N RAM! ! YOU MUST 'SAVE' IT OR A 
BANDON IT ('QUIT') TO ENABLE CREA 
TION OF ANEW FILE ! ! » : PRINT : PRINT 
"PRESS ANY KEY FOR MAIN MENU." 
200 IF INKEY$=""THEN200ELSE110 
210 B=1:CLS:SOUND200, 1:INPUT"NAM 
E NEW FILE: " ; F$ : IFLEN (F$) >8THEN 
GOSUB 1360: GOTO 2 10 

220 CLS:PRINT"new FILE: ";F$:GOT 
0240 

2 30 CLS: PRINT" add TO FILE: "F$ 
240 PRINT §3 2, "ENTER TITLES (NO C 
OMMAS) , " : PRINT" TAPE NUMBER 

S,": PRINT" AND VCR COUNTER 



NUMBERS. ": PRINT "HIT <ENTER> WHEN 
FINISHED. " : PRINT" ENTRY # : " ; B : SO 
UND200 , 1 : PRINT@192 , " " ; : INPUT"TIT 
LE: ";T$(B) : IFT$ (B) =" "THEN B=B-1 
:GOTO110 

250 SOUND200 , 1 : PRINT@256 , " " ; : INP 

UT " TAPE NUMBER (###): ";A$:IF LE 

N(A$) <>3THENGOSUB13 60:PRINT@25 6, 

" ":GOTO2 50 

260 T$(B)=T$ (B)+A$ 

270 SOUND200 , 1 : PRINT§3 2 0 , " " ; : INP 

UT" COUNTER NUMBER (####): ";A$:I 

FLEN (A$) O4THENGOSUB1360 : PRINT§3 

20," ":GOTO270 

280 T$(B)=T$(B)+A$:B=B+1: IFB>Z T 
HENSOUND1 , 3 : PRINT : PRINT" YOU HAVE 
MADE THE MAXIMUM NUMBEROF ENTRI 
ES. . . ":FORT=1TO2000:NEXTT:B=B-1: 
GOTO 110 

290 IFW=1 THEN230ELSE220 
300 1 

310 • WORK EXISTING FILE 
320 1 

330 IFB=Z THENSOUND150 , 1 : GOTO110 

ELSEIFB=0 THENGOSUB12 80 
340 CLS: PRINT "work EXISTING FILE 
: ";F$:PRINT@32, "1. ADD":PRINT"2 
. DELETE" :PRINT"3. MAIN MENU": PR 
INT:SOUND200, 1 : PRINT"SELECT ONE" 
350 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=""THEN350 
360 W=VAL(R$) :IFW<10RW>3THENGOSU 
B1360 :GOTO340 

370 IFW=3 THEN110ELSEIFW=1 THENC 

LS:B=B+1:GOTO2 30 ELSEX=0 

380 CLS:X=X+1:PRINT"FIND TITLE T 

O delete": PRINT: PRINT" UP-AR 

ROW = SCROLL FORWARD" : PRINT" D 
OWN-ARROW = SCROLL BACK": PRINT" 

D = DELETE" : PRINT "ANY 
OTHER KEY = MAIN MENU": SOUND 20 
0,1:GOTO940 

390 CLS:PRINT"delete: ";MID$(T$( 

X) , 1 , L) : PRINT "ARE YOU SURE (Y/N) 
?" :SOUND200, 1 

400 R$=INKEY$: IFR$=""THEN400 

410 IFR$="N"THEN380ELSEIFR$="Y"T 

HEN420ELSEGOSUB1360:GOTO390 

420 A$=MID$ (T$(X) ,L+1,3) :D$=MID$ 

(T$ (X) , 1,L) :FOR Y=X TO B-1:T$(Y) 

=T$ ( Y+l) : NEXT Y:B=B-1 

430 CLS:PRINT@3 2,D$:PRINT"HAS BE 

EN DELETED" :PRINT"FROM TAPE NUMB 

ER " ; A$ : PRINT : PRINT : SOUND2 00 , 1 : P 

RINT"WANT TO DELETE ANOTHER (Y/N 

) ? " 

440 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=""THEN440 
450 IFR$="N"THEN3 40ELSEIFR$="Y"T 



94 



THE RAINBOW December 1987 



HENX=X-I: GOTO3 80ELSEGOSUB13 60 : GO 
TO430 

4 60 1 

470 1 PRINT-OUT FILE 

480 ' 

490 POKE150,18 1 THIS POKE FOR 

DMP-105 PRINTER 2400 BAUD 

500 IFB=0THENGOSUB1280 

510 CLS:PRINT"print FILE: ";F$:P 

RINT"1. PRINT ON PAPER" : PRINT" 2 . 

PRINT ON LABELS" : PRINT "3 . MAIN 
MENU" : PRINT : SOUND200 , 1 : PRINT" SEL 
ECT ONE" 

520 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=""THEN520 

530 X=VAL(R$) :IFX<10RX>3THENGOSU 

B1360:GOTO510 

540 IFX=3THEN110ELSEPRINT§192 , " I 

5 PRINTER ON & READY?" : SOUND200 , 
1:PRINT"HIT ANY KEY WHEN READY." 
550 IF INKEY$=""THEN550 

560 I.FX=2THEN610 

570 CLS:PRINT§2 60, "PRINTING: "; 
F$ : PRINT#-2 , TAB (32) "VCR TAPE CAT 
ALOG":PRINT#-2,TAB(3 2) "FILE NAME 
: ";F$:PRINT#-2: Y=l 
580 FORX=lTOB:L=LEN(T$(X) ) -7:PRI 
NT#-2,TAB(15)MID$ (T$ (X) , 1,L) : PRI 
NT#-2,TAB(15) "TAPE# : " ;MID$ (T$ (X 
) , L+l , 3 ) ; : PRINT#-2 , " " ; : PRINT 
#-2, "COUNTER*: " ;RIGHT$ (T$ (X) ,4) 
: PRINT#-2 : Y=Y+1 : IFY=18THEN600 
590 NEXTX:GOTO510 

600 F0RT=1T016: PRINT#-2 : NEXTT: Y= 

jl • T O 5 5 j3 

610 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27)CHR$ (20) 1 
CONTROL CODES FOR DMP-105 PRINT 
ER CONDENSED CHAR. ENABLE 
620 Y=1:CLS: PRINT" labels FOR: 11 ; 
F$: PRINT: PRINT" ENTER TAPE NUMBER 
, AND THE LABEL (S) FOR THAT 

TAPE WILL BE PRINTED. " :PRINT"H 
IT <ENTER> WHEN FINISHED. ": PRINT 
: PRINT : SOUND200 , 1 : INPUT "TAPE NUM 
BER (###): 11 ;R$ 

630 IFR$=""THEN690ELSEIFLEN (R$) < 
>3 THENGOSUB1360:GOTO620 
640 FORX=lTOB:L=LEN(T$ (X) ) -6 : IFM 
ID$ (T$ (X) , L, 3 ) =R$THENA$=MID$ (T$ ( 
X) , 1, L-l) :GOTO660 

650 NEXTX:F0RT=1T07-Y:PRINT#-2:N 
EXTT:GOTO620 

660 A$=A$+P$:IFLEN(A$) >45THENA$= 
LEFT$ (A$, 45) : GOTO670ELSE660 
670 IFY<5THENPRINT#-2 , A$ ; : PRINT# 
-2,RIGHT$(T$(X) ,4) : Y=Y+1 : GOT06 50 
680 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:Y=l:GOT067 

0 



690 PRINT#-2,CHR$(2 7)CHR$(19) ' 
CONTROL CODES FOR DMP-105 PRINT 
ER CONDENSED CHAR. DISABLE 
700 GOTO 5 10 
710 • 

720 ' SAVE FILE 
730 ' 

740 IFB>0THEN760ELSECLS : SOUND1, 3 
:PRINT"NO FILE IN RAM TO SAVE!!" 
: PRINT: PRINT"PRESS ANY KEY FOR M 
AIN MENU" : SOUND200 , 1 
750 IF INKEY$=""THEN750 ELSE110 
760 CLS: PRINT "save FILE: " ;F$ : PR 
INT "WANT TO RENAME ( Y/N) ?": SOUND 
200,1 

770 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=""THEN770 

780 IFRS="Y"THEN7 90ELSEIFR$="N"T 
HEN810ELSEGOSU31360:GOTO760 
790 PRINT : SOUND200 , 1 : INPUT "ENTER 
NEW NAME: " ;M$ : IFLEN (M$) >8THENG 
OSUB1360:GOTO760 

800 F$=M$: CLS : PRINT" SAVE FILE: " 

HI G OS UB117 , : OP EN "0.., #D , F5 

820 FORX=lTOB: PRINT#D,T$ (X) :NEXT 

X : CLOSE#D : CLS : PRINTF$" SAVED" : PR 







If you're stift -plugging printed 
circuit cards into your 

c 






without a card guide . 



« * 



CUT IT OUT 

Write or call for a free brochure describing 
printed circuit cards and guides designed 
for the CoCo expanstion port. Bare cards 
or with connector for disk controller. 

206 782-6809 




ROBOTIC 





MICRO SYSTEMS 



BOX 30807 SEATfLE, WA 98103 





December 1987 THE RAINBOW 



INT : PRINT "1. RETAIN FILE IN RAM" 
:PRINT"2. ERASE FILE IN RAM":PRI 
NT : PRINT"SELECT ONE" : SOUND200 , 1 
830 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=""THEN830 
840 X=VAL(R$) :IFX<1 OR X>2 THENG 
OSUB13 60 

850 IFX=1THEN110ELSE FOR T=1T0B: 
T$ (T) =" " : NEXTT : B=0 : W=0 : GOTO110 
860 1 

870 ' SCROLL FILE 
880 ' 

890 X=1:IFB=0THENGOSUB1280 

900 CLS: PRINT "scroll FILE: ";F$: 

PRINT: PRINT" UP-ARROW = SCRO 

LL FORWARD" : PRINT" DOWN-ARROW 

= SCROLL BACK" : PRINT"ANY OTHER K 

EY = MAIN MENU" : SOUND200 , 1 : W=0 : G 

OTO940 

910 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=""THEN910 
920 IFR$=CHR$ (94) THENX=X+1 : GOT09 
30ELSEIFR$=CHR$ ( 10) THENX=X-1 : GOT 
O930ELSEIFR$="D" AND W=2 THEN390 
ELS El 10 

930 IF X>B THEN X=l ELSE IF X<1 
THEN X=B 

94j3 IFT$ (X)=""THEN950ELSEPRINT@2 
56 , " " : L=LEN (T$ (X) ) -7 : PRINT@224 , 
"TITLE: ";MID$ (T$ (X) , 1,L) :PRINT@ 
288,"TAPE#: " ;MID$(T$ (X) ,L+1,3) : 
PRINT@352 , "CNTR# : " ;RIGHT$ (T$ (X) 
,4) :GOTO910 

950 CLS:SOUNDl, 3 : PRINT" YOU HAVE 
DELETED ALL TITLES IN" : PRINTF$ ; " 
M":PRINT"IT HAS BEEN ABANDONED 
IN RAM.": PRINT :PRINT"HIT ANY KE 
Y FOR MAIN MENU.":B=0:W=0:F$="" 
960 IF INKEY$=" "THEN960ELSE110 
970 • 

980 ' QUIT 
990 1 

1000 CLS: PRINT "THANK YOU.":IFB>0 
THENPRINT : PRINT " P . S . DID YOU SA 
VE ";F$;" ?": PRINT" PRESS 'S 1 TO 
RETURN AND SAVE IT, ANY OTHER KEY 

TO QUIT.":SOUND200,1 
1010 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=""THEN1010 
1020 IFR$="S"THEN760ELSECLS : PRIN 
T" THANK YOU": END 
1030 ' 

1040 1 SHELL-METZNER SORT 
1050 ' 

1060 IFB=0 THENGOSUB1280 

1010 CLS : PRINT@70 , "SORTING TITLE 

S IN" : PRINT§102 , "ALPHABETICAL OR 

DER. ":PRINT@201, "PLEASE WAIT. . ." 

:S1=B 

1080 Sl=INT(Sl/2) :IF S1=0THEN113 



96 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 



0 ELSE S4=1:S3=B-S1 
1090 S5=S4 

1100 S2=S5+S1:IF MID$ (T$(S5) ,1) 
< MID$ (T$ (S2) , 1) THEN1120ELSE111 

1110 M$=T$(S5) :T$(S5)=T$(S2) :T$( 1 
S2)=M$:S5=S5-S1:IF S5<1 THEN1120 
ELSE1100 

1120 S4=S4+1:IF S4>S3 THEN1080EL 
SE1090 

113 0 CLS :PRINT@70, "SORT COMPLETE 
D" : SOUND150 , 1 : FOR T=1TO2000 : NEXT 
T: GOTO 11)3 
1140 1 

1150 1 DISKTAPE SELECT SUBROUTINE 
1160 1 

1170 PRINT@32,"1. DISK" : PRINT"2 . 

TAPE" : PRINT :SOUND200, l:PRINT"SE i 
LECT ONE" 

1180 R$=INKEY$:IFR$=""THEN1180 

1190 D=VAL(R$) : IFD<10RD>2THENGOS 

UB1360:GOTO1170 

1200 PRINT: IFD=2THEN1220 

1210 PRINT "DISKETTE LATCHED IN P 

LACE?" : GOTO 12 30 

1220 D=-l:PRINT"POSITION TAPE": I 
FB=0THENPRINT" PRESS PLAY BUTTON" 
ELSEPRINT" PRESS RECORD & PLAY BU 
TTONS" 

1230 SOUND200, 1:PRINT"HIT ANY KE 
Y WHEN READY" 

1240 IF INKEY$=" "THEN1240ELSERET 
URN 

12 50 1 

1260 • LOAD FILE SUBROUTINE 
1270 ' 

1280 CLS: PRINT" load EXISTING FIL 
E" : SOUND200 , 1 : INPUT"ENTER FILENA 
ME: " ;F$:IFLEN(F$) >8THENGOSUB13 6 
0:GOTO1280 

1290 CLS:PRINT"LOAD EXISTING FIL 
E: " ; F$ : GOSUB1170 : OPEN"I " , #D , F$ : 
B=l 

1300 IF EOF(D)=-l THEN1320 

1310 INPUT#D,T$ (B) : B=B+1 : GOTO130 

% 

13 20 CLOSE#D:B=B-l: RETURN 
1330 1 

13 40 'INCORRECT ENTRY SUBROUTINE 
1350 1 

13 60 SOUNDl,3:PRINT@416 / "INCORRE 
CT ENTRY" :PRINT@448, "PRESS ANY K 
EY TO TRY AGAIN. . . ":SOUNDl,3 
1370 IF INKEY$=""THEN1370 
13 80 PRINT@416," " : PRINT@448 , " 11 
: RETURN 



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Six menu driven games for young 
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These programs contain short stories. 
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Education Notes 




Electricity and Circuit 
Experimentation 



Computers are completely de- 
pendent on circuits. A circuit is 
a path or line of electric current. 
A complete or closed circuit is a path 
that makes an entire "circular" path 
returning back to its origin. 

This month's program introduces 
youngsters to the world of electricity 
and circuits. Students are asked to draw 
a complete circuit using a dry cell and 
two light bulbs. When their circuit is 
complete, the bulbs light up. 

A dry cell is illustrated in this pro- 
gram since it is the familiar source of 
electricity used in classrooms and by 
hobbyists. The first wire emanates from 
the negative pole of the dry cell, because 
electricity flows from negative to posi- 
tive. Electricity maybe thought of as the 
flow of negative ions. 

The student uses the arrow keys to 
draw dotted lines, which represent real 
wires. Each time a wire is connected to 
a terminal, the computer beeps: The 
beeps act as clues that the student is on 
the right path. 

Upon returning to the positive termi- 
nal of the dry cell, the student finds out 
whether he or she completed the circuit 
in an acceptable manner. If the circuit 
is complete, the light bulbs will light up. 
The student may then either press the 
'E' key to end the program or the ENTER 
key to begin again. 

Bear in mind that this program is 



Sieve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 

merely intended to act as an introduc- 
tion. It is not an attempt to present an 
overview of the topic of electricity. The 
student may therefore connect the wires 
in any order as long as all of the terminal 
points are included. The shortest or 
easiest path to completing the circuit is 
left for you to discuss with the student. 



"It often helps to 
involve the students 
in the programming 
to ensure their 
interest in the 
program itself." 



Similarly, no attempt is made to 
distinguish between series and parallel 
circuits. Again, you may bring this topic 
up with the student at your own discre- 
tion. It is always interesting for the 
student to observe that there are several 
ways to successfully complete this 
circuit on the screen as well as in reality. 
Experimentation should always be 
encouraged. In short, you can use this 
program at any level of sophistication 
you feel is appropriate. 

The program is quite straightforward 
and uncomplicated. Lines 40 through 
210 draw the dry cell and the two light 
bulbs. Lines 30 and 220 set the initial 
wire at screen location 1,158. This is at 
the negative terminal. The dotted line I 
chose to represent the wiring is 
CHR$(130). You may experiment with 



other CHR$s if you feel like being crea- 
tive. It often helps to involve the stu- 
dents in the programming to ensure 
their interest in the program itself. 

The wiring is moved by lines 230 to 
270. The CHR$s numbered 8, 9, 10 and 
94 represent the four d irectional arrows. 
The computer checks at this point to see 
if any of the arrows are pressed and 
moves the wiring one space in that 
direction. 

Lines 280 to 300 check to see if the 
student has left the boundaries of the 
screen. If so, his or her turn has ended 
(this was done to prevent aimless press- 
ing of the arrow keys). Lines 330 to 400 
check to see whether any of the terminal 
points have been met. A pleasant sound 
accompanies each terminal meeting. 

The positive terminal point of the dry 
cell is located at screen location 1,186. 
When this point is met, the program 
checks to see if all of the other terminals 
were encountered (connected). If they 
were connected, the student is assumed 
to be correct. We say "assumed "because 
the student could have purposely taken 
an absurd but nevertheless technically 
correct path. If, on the other hand, all 
of the terminals have not been con- 
nected, then the student could not 
possibly be correct. Line 410 checks to 
see if all of the terminals are connected 
and reports whether the student is 
correct. 

We hope that you and your children 
find this program a pleasant way to help 
introduce the topic of circuits, and we 
suggest that you help them with it at 
first. Hopefully, you can help them to 
build an electrical vocabulary, gain a 
little knowledge about circuitry and 
have some fun all at the same time. □ 



98 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



The listing: CIRCUIT 

Ijd REM COMPLETE THE CIRCUIT 

2p REM STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 

D, STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1987 

3p N=1158:REM INITIAL DOT 

4J3 CLSj3 : PRINT@p , 11 COMPLETE T 

HE CIRCUIT" 

5j3 FOR T=1J356 TO 1)387 : POKET , 255 : 
NEXT T : REM TOP 

6jd FOR T=1472 TO 15)33: POKE T,255 
: NEXT T:REM BOTTOM 

7) 3 FOR X=4 TO 14: FOR Y=12 TO 25: 
SET(X,Y,3) : NEXT Y,X 

8) 3 PRINT@2 91, "dry" ; 
90 PRINT@355, "cell" ; 

1)3)3 SET(5,11,7) :SET(11,11,7) :SET 

(5,1)3,7) :SET(11, 1)3,7) 

lip POKE 1187,43:POKE 119)3,45 

12) 3 FOR T=3)3 TO 4)3 : SET (T , 14 , 3 ) : N 
EXT T:REM DRAW THE LIGHTBULBS 

13) 3 FOR X=3 3 TO 37: FOR Y=8 TO 12 
:SET(X, Y,5) : NEXT Y,X 

14) 3 RESET (33,8) : RESET (37,8) : RESE 
T(33,12) :RESET(37 , 12) :RESET(33,1 

1) :RESET(37 , 11) 

15) 3 FOR T=32 TO 38 : SET (T , 13 , 2 ) : N 
EXT T 

16) 3 FOR T=44 TO 54 : SET (T, 24 , 3 ) : N 
EXT T 

17) 3 FOR X=47 TO 51: FOR Y = 18 TO 2 
2: SET (X, Y,5) : NEXT Y,X 

18) 3 RESET(47,18) : RESET ( 5 1 , 18) :RE 
SET(47,22) :RESET (51, 22) :RESET(47 
,21) :RESET(51,21) 

19) 3 FOR T=46 TO 52 : SET (T, 23 , 2 ) : N 
EXT T 

2) 3)3 POKE 1264 , 43: POKE 1267,45 

21) 3 POKE 1431,43 : POKE1434 , 45 

22) 3 POKE N,13J3 

23) 3 EN$=INKEY$ 

24) 3 IF EN$=CHR$(9) 

25) 3 IF EN$=CHR$ (8) 

26) 3 IF EN$=CHR$ (1)3) 

27) 3 IF EN$=CHR$(94) 

28) 3 REM PROTECT BOUNDARIES 

29) 3 IF N<1)388 THEN SOUND 1)3)3, 5:G 
OTO 5)3)3 

3) 3)3 IF N>1472 THEN SOUND 1)3)3, 5:G 
OTO 5)3)3 

31) 3 POKE N,13)3 

32) 3 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 42)3 

3 3)3 REM CHECK TERMINAL POINTS 

34) 3 A=PEEK(1264) : B=PEEK ( 12 6 7 ) : C= 
PEEK(1431) : D=PEEK(1434) :E=PEEK(1 
186) 

35) 3 IF A=13)3 THEN POKE1264 , 88 : SO 
UND 2)3)3,3 



THEN N=N+1 
THEN N=N-1 
THEN N=N+3 2 
THEN N=N-3 2 



THEN POKE1267, 88: SO 
THEN POKE1431,88:SO 
THEN POKE1434,88:SO 



36) 3 IF B=13)3 
UND 2)3)3,3 

37) 3 IF C=13)3 
UND 2)3)3,3 

38) 3 IF D=13)3 
UND 2)3)3,3 

39) 3 IF E = 13)3 THEN POKE 1186,88 

4) 3)3 IF E = 88 THEN 41)3 ELSE 23)3 

41) 3 IF E=88 AND A=88 AND B=88 AN 
D C=88 AND D=8 8 THEN 42)3 ELSE 4 3 

42) 3 PRINT@j3," CORRECT ! 11 
:GOTO 4 4)3 

43) 3 PRINT@)3," 
Y AGAIN" :GOTO 

44) 3 EN$=INKEY$ 

45) 3 IF EN$ = "E" THEN 52)3 ELSE 
EN$=CHR$(13) THEN RUN 

46) 3 SET(36 , 9 , 1) :SET(35 , 11 , 1) :SET 
(5)3,19,1) :SET(49, 2)3,1) 

47) 3 FOR T=l TO 35: NEXT T 

48) 3 SET(36,9,8) :SET(35, 11,8) :SET 
(5)3,19,8) :SET(49,2)3,8) 

49) 3 GOTO 44)3 

5) 3)3 EN$=INKEY$ 

51) 3 IF EN$ = "E" THEN 52)3 ELSE IF 
EN$=CHR$(13) THEN RUN ELSE 5)3)3 

52) 3 END 



SORRY, PLEASE TR 

5)3)3 



IF 



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December 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



99 



Holid a y Mus i c/Graphic s 



CoCo3 



IJlU 



X 







By Ruth E. Golias 




I 



Take a holiday tour of the CoCo's sound and 
graphics capabilities with A Christmas Pot- 
pourri. The program presents four familiar 
holiday carols and accompanying graphics. 
After a title screen, it's "Up on the Housetop" as CoCo 
3 invites you to sing along by providing lyrics that follow 
the music. Next, five Hi-Res toy soldiers command your 
attention in a lush graphics treat, drawn with extensive 
use of the HPAINT and PALETTE commands. 

Then hark as the angels sing "It Came Upon a 
Midnight Clear," and add your voice to theirs as CoCo 
again furnishes the lyrics. 

The final screen leaves you with a holiday message and 
plays "We Wish You a Merry Christmas." 

( Questions or comments may be directed to the author 
at 2826 Pacific Coast Hwy., Torrance, CA 90505. Please 
enclose an SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 

Ruth Golias has retired from the Torrance Police 
Department where she did micro filming. She is learning 
to program her CoCo and it has become her hobby. 













V 


200 


94 


1870 


17 




390 .. . 


119 


2100 


20 






670 


157 


2270 


34 






770 


156 


2490 . 


4 






1100 


190 


2730 , 


121 






1370 


. 55 


END 


240 






1680 


168 







The listi 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



ng: XMASPORI 



***************************** 



* 
* 



A CHRISTMAS POTPOURRI * 

BY * 
RUTH E. GOLIAS * 
282 6 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY* 
TORRANCE, CALIFORNIA 9J35J35* 



***************************** 



100 



THE RAINBOW December 1 987 



_ 



_ 



8 ' 

9 ****** MERRY CHRISTMAS ******* 
1)3 ON BRK GO TO 2 9 6j3 

2j3 GOSUB256j3 

3j3 HSCREEN2 : PALETTE CMP 

4j3 PALETTE 0,4j3 

5j3 FOR X=l TO 6 

6j3 HCOLOR 4 

7j3 HDRAW !f S8;BM151,6j3;XAA$; ,f 
8j3 HDRAW' 1 BM101 , 8j3 ; XX2 $ ; 11 
9j3 HDRAW"BM93 , 130 ;XX3$ ; 11 

1) 8 J3 HCOLOR 3 

11) 3 HDRAW ,f BM152 , 61 ; XAA$ ; 11 

12) 3 HDRAW n BMl)32,81;XX2$; !f 

13) 3 HDRAW n BM94 , 13 1 ;XX3 $ ; 11 

14) 3 NEXT X 

15) 3 FOR D=l TO 5)3)3 :NEXT D 

16) 3 1 

17) 3 ■*** UP ON THE HOUSE-TOP *** 

18) 3 GOSUB2 56)3 

19) 3 HSCREEN2 : PALETTE j3 , 5 6 : PALETT 
E 8,8 

2) 3)3 HCOLOR 8 

21) 3 HPRINT (8, 12) , 11 'UP ON THE HO 
USE-TOP 1 11 

22) 3 FOR D=l TO 1)3)3)3: NEXT D 

23) 3 HCLS)3: HCOLOR 8 

24) 3 FOR X=l TO 2 

25) 3 HPRINT ( 3, 1) , "UP ON THE HOUSE 
-TOP REINDEER PAUSE , 11 

26) 3 PLAY !f T3V3)3;02L4GL8GAL4GECEL2 
G" 

27) 3 HPRINT (3 , 3) , "OUT JUMPS GOOD 
OLD SANTA CLAUS ; " 

28) 3 PLAY " L4 AAGE DGL2 G " 

29) 3 HPRINT (3, 5) , "DOWN THRO 1 THE 
CHIMNEY" 

3) 3)3 PLAY"L4GL8GAL4GL8E" 



31)3 HPRINT (3 , 7) , "WITH LOTS OF TO 
YS " 

3 2)2 PLAY"DL4CEL2G" 

3 3)3 HPRINT (3 , 9) , "ALL FOR THE LIT 
TLE ONES , " 

34) 3 PLAY" L4AL8AAGGL4E" 

35) 3 HPRINT (3 , 11) , "CHRISTMAS JOYS 



it 



3 6)3 PLAY"DGL2C" 

37) 3 HPRINT (3,13) , "HO , HO , HO I WHO 
WOULDN 1 T GO ! " 

38) 3 PLAY " L4 F FL2 AL4 GL8 GGL2 E " 

39) 3 HPRINT(3 , 15) , "HO,HO,HO! WHO 
WOULDN 1 T GO . " 

4) 3)3 PLAY"L4DFL2FL4EL8GGL4CE" 

41) 3 HPRINT (3 , 17) , "UP ON THE HOUS 
E-TOP, " 

42) 3 PLAY"GL8GAL4GE" 

43) 3 HPRINT (3 , 19) , "CLICK, CLICK, CL 
ICK, " 

44) 3 PLAY"FGL2A" 

45) 3 HPRINT(3 , 21) , "DOWN THRO 1 THE 
CHIMNEY" 

46) 3 PLAY"L4GL8GAGGL4" 

47) 3 HPRINT (3 , 24) , "WITH GOOD SAIN 
T NICK. " 

48) 3 PLAY " L4 E DGL2 C " 

49) 3 FOR D=l TO 5)3)3 : NEXT D 

5) 3)3 HCOLOR )3 

51) 3 NEXT X 

52) 3 HCLS2 

53) 3 HCOLOR 4 

54) 3 HPRINT (5, 1)3) , " HAPPY 
OLIDAYS " 

55) 3 HPRINT ()3, 2) , STRING$ ( 4)3 , "V") 

56) 3 HPRINT ()3, 21) , STRING$ (4)3 , "V" ) 

57) 3 FOR D=l TO 5)3)3: NEXT D 

58) 3 1 



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disk controller, JDOS with Memory Minder 
in ROM and one or two half-height floppy 
drive(s) with case and power supply. 



i//A 

JAM SYSTEMS, LTD. 

15100-A CENTRAL SE 
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO B7123 
505/292-4182 




JFD-CP DISK CONTROLLER 

Our new JFD-CP, compatible with the original COCO. COCO 2 and 

the new COCO 3, features 
a parallel port to support a 
Centronics compatible 
I printer or our hard drive, 
and an external ROM 
switch, which allows you to 
select JDOS or an optional 
RS DOS-type ROM. It 
comes in a ca.se and in- 
cludes JDOS 1.2 and man- 
ual. JDOS implements all RS DOS commands, plus many more, in- 
cluding auto line numbering, error trapping, baud rate selection, 
OS/9 boot from floppy or hard drive, and Memory Minder, our disk 
drive analysis program. (Precision Alignment Disk not included.) 

JFD-CPDiskControllerwithJDOS $ 99.00 
OPTIONS 

Precision Alignment Disk<& Memory MinderManual D/S $ 40.00 

Precision Alignment Disk & Memory Minder Manual S/S S 26.00 

JFD-CP Disk ControlIerwithRS DOS 1.1 $ 99.00 

JFD-CP Disk Controller with JDOS and RS DOS 1.1 $ 1 1 9.00 

JPD-CPDrive O System with one double sided drive $265.00 

JFD-CP irivc U,l System with two double sided drives $379.00 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 101 



59)3 '****** TOY SOLDIERS ******* 
600 GOSUB256J3 

610 PALETTE 0,5: PALETTE 8,0 
620 HSCREEN2 : HCLSJ3 
630 HCOLOR 1 

64)3 FOR B=0 TO 320 STEP3 

650 HLINE (B, 14)3) -(B, 191) ,PSET 

660 NEXT B 

670 A1$="C8;R5F2D3G2L17H2U3E2R5D 
1F1FR3 E1EU1 ; U4RU4RU4RU4RU4RU4 ; LI 
7 D4RD4 RD4 RD4RD4 RD4 ; BU2 4L5G2LH2UR 
5DU2)3L3G2D17 ; BR5U3R2U3RU3RU3LU3L 
U2L2U2 ; E 2 RDRDRDRDRDRDRURURURURUR 
URF2D2L2D2L1D3L1D3R1D3R1D3R2D4" 
680 A2$="U3 6R2D33DFD3L1H2BU4BL6L 
5U1E1UEBU3URDLBD3R1 ; FDF1D1BU7BL2 
BD13BR11R1E1U2NL2U18HL2BU1)3BL6F1 
D5GNF1LG1L5H1L1NG1HU5E1 ; F1RF1R3E 
1RE1L11;U4EU2EU1ER1E1R1NURNUR1F1 
R1FD1FD2 FD4 LI ; BD3 BL3 DBL5UBD3 BRIE 
RF" 

690 HDRAW" BM7)3 , 1 6 ; S6 ; XTT$ ; BR3 ; BD 
9 ; XO$ ; BR8 ; BU2 ; XYY $ ; BR18 ; BU6 ; S 4 ; X 
SS$ ; BD12 ; BR6 ; S6 ;XO$ ; BR8 ; BD2 ; XL$ ; 
BR11 ; BD9 ; S 7 ; XDD$ ; BD2 ; BR3 ; XI I $ ; BR 
9 ; BD6 ; S 6 ; XE$ ; BR9 ; BD2 ; XR$ ; BR4 ; BD4 

;S8;XS$;" 

700 HDRAW 11 S 8 ; BM1 1 6 , 1 6 1 ; XA 1 $ ; XA2 $ 



710 


HPAINT ( 


116, 164) 


,8,8 


7 20 


HPAINT ( 


112,166) 


,3,8 


730 


HPAINT ( 


112,1)32) 


,3,8 


74)3 


HPAINT ( 


94 , 102) , 


3 , 8 


750 


HPAINT ( 


87,1)32) , 


3,8 


760 


HPAINT ( 


124,98) , 


3 , 8 


770 


HPAINT ( 


128,98) , 


8,8 


780 


HPAINT ( 


132,98) , 


3 , 8 


790 


HPAINT ( 


112,7)3) , 


3 , 8 


800 


HPAINT ( 


112,5)3) , 


3 , 8 


810 


HPAINT ( 


112,55) , 


3 , 8 


820 


HPAINT ( 


112,1)38) 


,1,8 


830 


PALETTE 


1 4,54 




84)3 


HPAINT ( 


110,60) , 


4,8 


850 


HPAINT ( 


86,114) , 


4,8 


860 


HPAINT ( 


133,114) 


,4,8 


870 


i 




;XAl$;XA2$; 


880 


HDRAW"BM174,174 


890 


HPAINT ( 


174,178) 


,8,8 


900 


HPAINT ( 


17)3,179) 


,3,8 


910 


HPAINT ( 


168, 114) 


,3,8 


920 


HPAINT ( 


154,11)3) 


,3,8 


930 


HPAINT ( 


148, 110) 


,3,8 


94)3 


HPAINT ( 


182,11)3) 


,3,8 


950 


HPAINT ( 


186,11)3) 


,8,8 


960 


HPAINT ( 


19)3, 11)3) 


,3,8 


970 


HPAINT ( 


17)3,86) , 


3,8 


980 


HPAINT ( 


160,60) , 


3 , 8 



,3,8 
3 , 8 
3,8 
3 , 8 
3 , 8 
8,8 
3 , 8 
3 , 8 
3 , 8 
3 , 8 
1,8 



990 HPAINT(166, 68) ,3,8 
1000 HPAINT (166, 108) ,1,8 
1010 PALETTE 4,54 
1020 HPAINT (174, 76) ,4,8 
1030 HPAINT (146, 126) ,4,8 
1)34)3 HPAINT (192, 126) ,4,8 
1050 1 
1060 HDRAW" 
1070 HPAINT 
1080 HPAINT 
1090 HPAINT 
1100 HPAINT 
1110 HPAINT 
1120 HPAINT 
1130 HPAINT 
114)3 HPAINT 
1150 HPAINT 
1160 HPAINT 
1170 HPAINT 
1180 HPAINT 
1190 PALETTE 
1200 HPAINT 
1210 HPAINT 
1220 HPAINT 
1230 1 

12 4)3 HDRAW" BM5 6 , 1 5 2 ; XA 1$ ; XA2 $ ; 
1250 HPAINT 
1260 HPAINT 
1270 HPAINT 
1280 HPAINT 
1290 HPAINT 
1300 HPAINT 
1310 HPAINT 
1320 HPAINT 
1330 HPAINT 
134)3 HPAINT 
1350 HPAINT 
1360 HPAINT 

13 70 PALETTE 
1380 HPAINT 
1390 HPAINT 
14)3)3 HPAINT 

141) 3 • 

142) 3 HDRAW" BM2 9)3 , 148 ; XA1$ ;XA2$ ; 
. 29)3,156) ,8,8 

284,153) ,3,8 



BM2 3 2 , 15 6 ; XA1$ ; XA2 $ ; 
228,164) ,8,8 
228, 161) 
224 ,95 
2)34 ,91 
2 10 , 9 1 
236,86 
244,86 
248,86 
232,65 

228.4) 3 

228.5) 3 
228,9)3 

4,54 
228,57) , 
2)36, 1)37) 
251,1)37) 



14 3)3 HPAINT 
14 4)3 HPAINT 

145) 3 HPAINT 

146) 3 HPAINT 

147) 3 HPAINT 

148) 3 HPAINT 

149) 3 HPAINT 
1500 HPAINT 
1510 HPAINT 
1520 HPAINT 
1530 HPAINT 
154)3 HPAINT 
1550 PALETTE 



4,8 

,4,8 

,4,8 



50, 


,160} 


,8,8 


46, 


,157} 


1 ,3,8 


48, 


-92) , 


,3,8 


3)3, 


-89) , 


,3,8 


34, 


-89) , 


,3,8 


65, 


.84) , 


,3,8 


67, 


,84) , 


8,8 


72, 


,84) , 


,3,8 


46, 


, 64) , 


,3,8 


46, 


■ 4)3) , 


,3,8 


46, 


,46) , 


,3,8 


46, 


,80 ) , 


1,8 


4, 


54 




46, 


5)3) , 


,4,8 


25, 


,105) 


,4,8 


74 , 


, 105) 


,4,8 



282, 9J3 
262, 9J3 
268,86 
296, 8J3 
3J32,8J3 
3J35,8J3 
284, 6J3 
284, 3J3 
28J3,42 
2 8J3,8 2 
4,54 



3 , 8 
3,8 
3,8 
3,8 
8,8 
3,8 
3 , 8 
3,8 
3,8 
1,8 



102 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



156j3 HPAINT(290, 50) , 4, 8 
157j3 HPAINT (2 6j3 , Ij3j3 ) , 4 , 8 
158j3 HPAINT(3j3 8, Ij3j3) , 4 , 8 
159p FOR D=l TO 5j3j3:NEXT D 

PLAY fl T2V3J302 ; L8BBBBAAL4 A; L8 
GGGGL2B" 

161J3 PALETTE 0,21 

162j3 PLAY 11 L8 EEEEDDL4 G ; L8 F # GABL2 A 



ii 



163,0 PALETTE 0,37 

164J3 PLAY ff L8BBBBAAL4A ; L8GGGGL2B 11 
1650 PALETTE 0,53 

1660 PLAY" L8EEEEDDL4G ; L8AGABL2G" 
1670 PALETTE 0 , 5 
1680 FOR D=l TO 500: NEXT D 
1690 1 

1700 ****** ANGELS SING ******** 
1710 GOSUB2560 

17 20 HSCREEN2: PALETTE 0,29:HCLS0 
: PALETTE 8,63 

1730 HPRINT(12,12) , "HARK THE HER 
ALD" 

1740 FOR D=l TO 500: NEXT D 
1750 B$= ff XAA$ ; BR 4 ; XN$ ; BUI ; BR 9 ; XG 
$ ;BU4 ; BR14 ; XE$ ; BR8 ; BD3 ; XL$ ; BR 6 ; B 
D7;XS$; M 

1760 C$ = fl S6;XSS$;BR4;BD10;S8 ;XI$ 
; BR 7 ; BD8 ; XN$ ; BR 9 ; BUI ; XG$ ; 11 
1770 HCOLOR 8 

1780 HDRAW"S8;BM70,40; f, +B$ 

1790 HDRAW"BM190 , 36; lf +C$ 

1800 FOR D=l TO 500:NEXT D 

1810 HPAINT (0,96) ,0,4 

1820 FOR X=2 TO 320 STEP 10 

1830 HCIRCLE(X,8) ,4,8 

1840 HCIRCLE (X, 184) , 4 , 8 

1850 NEXT X 

1860 HPAINT(0,96) ,0, 4 

1870 AN$= I! R3E2R3E2R3E2R4 ;E2R4U4H 

3U1H3U1H3U1H3U1H3 ; E2U1R2E2U1R2U2 

;H2L2 ; E2U1R2E2U1R2U2 ; H2 L2 ; E2U1R2 

E2U1R2U2 ; H2L2 ;E2U1R2U2 ; H2L2 ; D1L2 

D1L2D1L2D1L2D1L2D1L2D1L2D1L2H2 ; E 

2U1E2U1L2E2U1H3U1L2H1L1 ; 11 

1880 AG$= f, L3H2L3H2L3H2L4 ;H2L4U4E 

3U1E3U1E3U1E3U1E3 ;H2U1L2H2U1L2U2 

;E2R2;H2U1L2H2U1L2U2 ;E2R2 ;H2U1L2 

H2U1L2U2;E2R2;H2U1L2U2 ;E2R2 ;D1R2 

D1R2D1R2D1R2D1R2D1R2D1R2D1R2E2 ;H 

2U1H2U1R2H2U1E3U1R2E1R2 ; 11 

1890 PALETTE 8,63: HCOLOR 8 

1900 HDRAW lf BM160, 140 ;S4 ;XAN$ ; ft 

1910 HDRAW" BM160 , 140 ; XAG$ ; 11 

1920 HPAINT(158,120) ,8,8 

1930 HDRAW lf BM94 , 140 ;XAN$ ; 11 

19 40 HDRAW" BM94 , 140 ;XAG$ ; 11 

1950 HPAINT(94, 120) ,8,8 



1960 HDRAW lf BM2 2 6,140;XAN$;» 
1970 HDRAW ff BM2 2 6 , 140 ; XAG$ ; !f 
1980 HPAINT(226,120) ,8,8 
1990 FOR D=l TO 500 : NEXT D 
2000 PALETTE 0,29 
2010 PALETTE 8,63 
2020 HCOLOR 8 

2030 HPRINT(4,20) , "IT CAME UPON 

THE MIDNIGHT CLEAR, 

2040 PLAY"T2 ; V2 5 ; 02L8G03L4EL8DDC 

02AL4GL8AL4G" 

2050 HPAINT(0, 160) ,0,4 

2060 HPRINT (7 , 20) , "THAT GLORIOUS 

SONG OF OLD, " 
2070 PLAY"L8GAB03CCDEL3D" 
2080 HPAINT(0, 160) ,0,4 
2090 HPRINT (3, 20) ,"FROM ANGELS B 
ENDING NEAR THE EARTH," 
2100 PLAY"02L8G03L4E02L8B03L8DCO 
2AL4GL8AL4G" 
2110 HPAINT(0, 160) ,0,4 
2120 HPRINT (6,20) , "TO TOUCH THEI 
R HARPS OF GOLD," 
2130 PLAY 11 L8 GL4 AL8 AB AGO 3 L 3 C " 
2140 HPAINT (0,160) ,0,4 
2150 HPRINT (3 , 20) , "PEACE ON THE 
EARTH, GOODWILL TO MEN" 



flaaa jntiflffiftL I M BBBB Wto . ^^^^H ffifi ^^^^b jUfflBBBft i , ffftffftftffflftfflffig I M BBBB wii l _rftffBBBBRrtn_- SSSSk 455S jsSSSSSlh. d&ES& bt 

kbsb «HP gPHnF ^^^^ ftflflfli ^m^^^ WSk vmt WW roff " W fl u sEL JSs «BPflBB| Wtt b& **** ~jt*'Kb 

^mraF Mimtf ' Mih nm wk vhmi bbhrbb vmmi **8g&r wr wb wbe sw 'gbb sws ^Qf&xF 



Easy, Solderless installation 

"JramR" 

512K COCO 3 Memory Expansion Board, Upgrades stock 128K COCO 3 to full 
612K (or 0S9 Level II. Similar to RS upgrade. 

Now pardner... reach for your 

■ rltfHKllwhftfffr fi 1 ££S3& JKPKUUJLto . ASSfiffiSeV BSSfifl UUUUUUUUUUUUB JMBf 

fill ™ 8 BV OTMWMBT jBBBBB " ^BBBBK afifi? «SS? Bm SSSffi J&Br JB» flBBBF 

WMMMWfft i BW SS2S2SP JWw iBBBBe HumW mm JSSr aathumi BBr 

'twwwA JSSSb& am fflSST jZsSSc SSS& Bs ™* JaHT XtttttttttO fm 

fflft..ffflff Aw #m lUr M m JflV mm w 

* i> i- .ABBS' Jflflf gdUUy VUflBh j MeMMMM ff" EBB JHB8B flflf WBHP SSI' 

With purchase «f a BANKER I tr JramR 
you can have a #9008 SIXDRIVE 



for only 



*<m, jw* —™ 



SIXDRNE is a machine language utiiiW that 
modifies Disk Extended Basic 1.0, 1.1, or FKEVS 
to allow the use of 3 double sided drives as 6 single 
side drives without AMY hardware modifications. 

fB&WKS two different drive setect assignments: 

(1) [0,2] [1,31 [4,53 (2) [0,1)12,3] [4,5] 

RmxSbk is compatm with GIMMESOFTs SIXDRIVE 



Made in U.S.A. 



11Q10 

mem 

81012 
#1013 

11014 




Compete Hardware & Software 



COCO 3 ONLY 

$39.95 JramR bare board pfus c-onnoctors and software 
$79.95 JramR kit includes all parts plus memory chips and software 
$99 95 JramR assamblod and tasiod plus memory Chips and software 
$19.95 JramR SW doli^ca cuslomlzablo ramdisk & spooler, mamory tost, and 

ramdlsk utility programs. Compatible with afl CoCo 3 51?K. 
$48.95 JramR 0K byi@s (11012 less memory chips) 



Readily available: User Replaceable Socketed Memory Chips, no hard-to-find SIP memories. 

To place an order, write lo J&fl Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MD 21045. OR call (30t) 
987-9067— Jesse or (301 J is^mm— Ray. 

HOURS: Weekdays 7 p.m.-9 p.m.: Sat. fsloon-5 p.m. EASTERN TIME, usually, if no answer Iry laier. 

Add $4 00 shipping & handling (FOREIGN ORDERS $7.00), COD charge $3.00. Maryland rosidenls add 
5% siatg tax. Foreign orders musl include pay mam on U.S. bank. 

CHECKS, MONEY ORDERS OR COO's only please (personal chock— 2 weeks for clearance). IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY. Give COCO Radio Shock modal »{i.e. 20-3136). Disk or Tape when ordering. 

QUANTITY DISCOUNT AVAILABLE. For Information on shipping or previously placed ordars call (30 1) 
788-0861, COCO H 26-31 XX own ens call (soidsrlng experience mav be r&quired), 

Refer to back issues of RAINBOW for other products. 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 103 



216,0 PLAY lf L8EL4E02L8EEF#G#L4AL8B 
03L4C 11 

2170 HPAINT(0,160) , 0, 4 

2180 HPRINT (5,20) , " FROM HEAV 1 N 1 S 

ALL GRACIOUS KING. 11 
2190 PLAY 11 L8 E DCO 2 B AB AL3 G 11 
2200 HPAINT (4 , 160) , 0, 4 
2210 HPRINT(4,20) , "THE WORLD IN 
SOLEMN STILLNESS LAY" 
22 20 PLAY lf L8G03L4E02L8B03DC02AL4 
GL8AL4G 11 

2230 HPAINT(0, 16/3) ,0, 4 

2240 HPRINT (8, 20 ) r "TO HEAR THE A 

NGELS SING." 

2250 PLAY"L8GL4AL8ABAG03L3C" 
2260 HPAINT (0,160) ,0,4 
2270 PALETTE 0,27: FOR D=1TO500:N 
EXT D 

2280 PALETTE 0 , 2 6 : FOR D=l TO 500 
:NEXT D 

22 90 PALETTE 0,25: FOR D=l TO 500 
: NEXT D 

2300 PALETTE 0 , 7 : FOR D=l TO 500: 
NEXT D 
2310 1 

2 3 20 1 MERRY CHRISTMAS 

AND HAPPY NEW YEAR 
2330 GOSUB2550 

2340 HSCREEN2 :PALETTE0, 7: PALETTE 
8,63 

2 3 50 HCOLOR 8 

2360 HDRAW"BM46,42;S8;XX1$;" 
2370 GOSUB2940 
2380 HDRAW"BM150,28;XX2$;" 
2390 GOSUB2940 

2400 HDRAW"BM13 2 , 8 6 ;XA$ ; BR3 ;BD1; 

XN$;BR7;XD$;" 

2410 GOSUB2940 

2420 HDRAW"BM4 6, 150 ;XHH$ ; BR3 ; BU5 
;XA$ ; BR3 ; BD4 ; XP$ ; BR 7 ; BD4 ; XP$ ; BR7 
;BU5;XYY$;" 
2430 GOSUB2940 

2440 HDRAW"BR16;BU2 ;XNN$ ; BR8 ;BU1 
; XE$ ; BR8 ; BD3 ; XW$ ; " 
2450 GOSUB2940 

2 460 HDRAW"BR10 ; BU2 ; XZY$ ; BR8 ; BD6 
; BD1 ; XE$ ; BR9 ; BU2 ; XA$ ; BR3 ; XR$ ; " 
2470 PLAY"T3 ; V30 ; 02L4FB-L8B-03CO 
2B-AL4GGG03CL8CDC02B-02L4AFF03DL 
8DE-DCO 2 L4 B-GL8 FFL4 GO 3 CO 2 AL2 B- " 
2480 GOSUB2940 

2490 PALETTE 0 , 18 : PALETTE 8,63:H 
COLOR 8 

2500 HDRAW " BM2 7 8 , 1 8 2 ; S 4 ; XRR$ ; BR1 

0 ; XEE$ ; BR16 ; BU3 ; XGG$ ; " 

2510 PLAY"02L4FB-B-B-L2AL4AB-AGL 

2F03L4CDL8CC02B-B-03L4F02L4FL8FF 

L4G03C02AL2B-" 



2520 PALETTE 0,23: FOR D=l TO 500 
: NEXT D 

2530 PALETTE 0,7 
2540 GOTO2540 

2550 1 *******ALPHABET*********** 
2560 AA$="U6E3R1F3D3NL6D3" 
2570 A$="E1R2F1D5L3H1U1E1R3BD3R1 
El" 

2580 B$="U8D4R5F1D2G1L5" 

2590 CC$="H1L4G1D6F1R4E1" 

2600 D$="U6D4H1L2G1D1F1R4E1" 

2610 DD$="U6D4H1L2G1D2F1R4E1" 

2620 EE$="L5H1U6E1R5BD4BL1L4" 

2630 E$="G1L3H1U4E1R3F1D2L5" 

2640 GG$="H1L4G1D6F1R4E1U2L3" 

2 650 G$="G1L3H1U4E1R3F1D8G1L3H1" 

2660 HH$="U8D4E1F1R2E1F1U4D8" 

2670 H$="U8D4E1R3F1D4" 

2680 I$="R4L2U6L2R4BL2BU3D" 

2690 II$="R2L1U5L2R3BL2BU2U" 

2700 L$="R3L1U8L2" 

2710 MM$="U8F2R1D1U1R1E2D8" 

2720 M$="D5U6R2F1D5U5E1R1F1D5" 

2730 NN$="U8D1F5E1U5D8" 

2740 N$="U6F1E1R2F1D5" 

2750 00$="U4E1R3F1D4G1L3H1" 

2760 0$="U4R4D4L4" 

2770 PP$="U8E1R4F1D3G1L4" 

2780 P$="U9D1E1R2F1D3G1L3" 

2790 RR$="U7E1R4F1D2G1L4R1F4" 

2800 R$="U6D1F1E1R1F1" 

2 810 SS$="F2R3E2U2H2L3H2U2E2R3F2 
ii 

2820 S$ = "F1R2E1U1H1L2H1U1E1R2F1" 

2830 TT$="U8NL3R3" 

2840 T$="G1L1U8D2L3R6" 

2850 U$="U5;BD5;F1;R3;E1;U5" 

2860 W$="BU6D5F1R1E1U5D5F1R1E1U5 
ii 

2870 YY$="D4F1R3E1U4D8G1L3H1" 
2880 ZY$="D2F2R2D4U4R2E2U2" 
2890 Y$="D2F1R4U3D5G1L3H1" 
2900 X1$="XMM$ ;BR8 ;BU1;XE$;BR8 ;B 
D3 ; XR$ ; BD4 ; BR2 ; XR$ ; BD4 ; BR2 ; BU6 ; X 
Y$;" 1 MERRY 

2 910 X2$="XCC$;BR3 ;BD1;XH$ ;BR3 ;X 
R$;BD4 ;BR2 ;XI$;BR2 ;BD7 ;BR3 ;XS$;B 
R7 ; BD4 ; XT$ ; BR3 ; BD1 ; XM$ ; BR4 ; BU5 ; X 
A$ ; BR 3 ; XS$ ; " 1 CHRISTMAS 
2920 X3$="XPP$;BD2;BR8 ;XOO$ ;BR12 
;XT$;BD9 ;BR3 ;XP$;BR7 ;XOO$ ;BR4 ; BR 
4 ; XU$ ; BD6 ; BR 3 ; XR$ ; BD4 ; BR 3 ; XR$ ; BD 
4 ; BR 2 ; XI $ ; " 1 POTPOURRI 
2 930 RETURN 

2940 FOR D=l TO 200: NEXT D 
2950 RETURN 

29 60 PALETTE CMP: HSCREEN 0: WIDTH 
32:CLS /R\ 



104 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



o 



ip1£I DM 



■ i- i'' 




V MO 






SSHSasaaar. 

MODELS oTthe Cr?| Ce ^ fin ,s ^ AL °' 



"" ed Into its ovnt\i^ am Perfect). 

" on tie side 0& 3 she,f °' hano 
pomes 6 .K *«I(. Procase 57 

wl,nno soldering. 

The HJL-sr 

^VboardKlt.ssB.95/69 95 

K,, «^CoCo 2a d 9 'coCoT VerS ' 0f} - 

oou ° 3 are $69.95, 



wneciors 'orsoider| ss i ,7, ! ao,e a "d 

Monitor id.nl- 

™ CG Pf some CoPn 4 * 0,der "fl 

mon?, Ch ' pS) ' crl 8 W D '? )( S °' de ^-in 
monitor output with . ! p ' '"^er-free 

m HJL p ^ducts. 



T he Numberjeek if,.., 
As «'f-conta,n ed yPM * W9 ' 95 

"•"•»' ""SffiT^ygw f or 

1 " m 0* Q es/des the 

ofa* or C a;™ S,C P">B«mm.r. 



The M °n»°r-J99.95 

0tJr hiflh-resolui[ O n= t 

<ne d/Bp/ay S""*" monitor gives 
computer pros K d ^ mos, U 08 

0«'c kB a sic p (lJ8 . $18a6 

2?n'f SSB a r ,nfl a ' p "orks 
26 one-touch Basic «, J funct '°n keys 

sets of macros a fl Jn m 8 (aave as man* 
Bering, InstanS^^^ 0 
Pinter, and glooal sea f T dt ' m P >° 

Sonify d| Sk or cassette ' C p ™0«"nm., 



Conne°" SW " Ch ' M9 - 96 

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The Complete 



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* * ■ _«_»_ 



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of program listings. 

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-,-„-. v,v. 



Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adven- 
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Simulations 



20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first 
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□ The Complete Rainbow Guide lo OS-9 

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Graph i cs 



L**mo 



CoCo 3 



~1Z 



I 





By Larry 
Anderson 



Id you like to cross*;, space bar. This makes the characteristic 
tch, even if you can't % xX-shaped stitch in the default color, 



thread a needle? With 
Counted Cross-Stitch, 
you can simulate cross-stitchery in your 
choice of 15 different colors. It's your 
creative doodler with a flair. 

For the dedicated craftsperson, new 
ideas for cross-stitch designs can be 
tried, altered, assigned different colors, 
and, if desired, photographed on the 
monitor screen. (I am leaving it to a 
more ambitious programmer to create 
a 16-colorgraphics dump to capture the 
graphics on paper.) 

Here's how it works. The CoCo 3 is 
put into the 16-color graphics mode, 
and a help screen is displayed. Pressing 
any key advances you to the work area, 
with its grid of reference dots and 
overhead color chart. Your cursor is the 
small dot in the middle of the screen 
(you can see it better by moving it with 
the arrow keys). Position it where you 
will begin to "stitch," and press the 

Larry Anderson is an auto mechanic 
and electronics instructor who lives in 
Benton, Louisiana, with his wife, Linda, 
and their 13-year-old daughter, Kacy. 
He holds a degree in English, and his 
interests include photography and 
cooking. 



black. Other colors are also available at 
any time. Simply type C fallowed by a 
number between 0 and 14, and you will 
see the cursor change to the color of 
your choice. Move around the screen 
and try a few stitches. 

Want to move in larger jumps? Just 
hold down the alt key when you use 
the arrow keys. Your moves will be 10 
times greater, allowing you to get 
around the screen in a hurry. Do you 
want to erase the stitch you just made? 
Type D and it will be gone. Any other 
stitch can be removed by moving the 
cursor over it, pressing the space bar 
and typing D. 

Whenyou tire of one design and want 
to move on to another one, pressing the 
ESC/BREAK key gives you the choice of 
erasing or quitting. Erasing lets you 
start fresh, while quitting lets you exit 

to BASIC. 

Here's the program's structure. Line 
30 sets the 16-color Hi-Res graphic 
mode, and lines 40 through 80 establish 
the help screen. Line 90 sets initial 
foreground and background colors and 
cursor position. Then the palette is re- 
loaded with different color assignments 
(you are welcome to change these codes, 
which are in Line 390 as data). Line 130 



sets the workspace to color code 63 for 
a neutral background. Then lines 140 
through 170 print the color chart and a 
grid of dots for reference. 

Foreground and background colors 
are initialized to 0 and 15 (remember 
Line 90?) and the cursor is placed on the 
screen in lines 180 and 190. Line 200 
looks for a keystroke and blanks out the 
cursor dot when it sees a key pressed. 
The cursor will move a standard dis- 
placement unless the ALT key is also 
pressed, in which case the displacement 
increases tenfold — see lines 210 



- 

■ r 

4 ¥ P • 



through 250. If the C is typed, lines 340 
and 380 assign the foreground color by 
your next (numeric) keystrokes. If D is 
selected, lines 320 and 330 cause the 
stitch to be redrawn in the background 
color, making it invisible, and effec- 
tively erasing it. 



108 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



V 

1 * A 4 

DISKMASTER . . . THE ULTIMATE DISK DRIVE 

SYSTEMS FOR THE OS-9 BASED COCO 3 BAR NONE ! ! 




COCO 3 + OS-9 + DISKMASTER 
THE HIGHEST PERFORMANCE 
PERSONAL COMPUTER 
AVAILABLE TODAY! 



THE DISKMASTER SYSTEM . . . A Completely Integrated System with HARDWARE AND 

SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY GUARANTEED from a Single Source. In addition to Single Source Confidence and Convenience, 
you will get a Disk System that has NO EQUAL in the COCO World! The Floppy Drives are the High Density (IBM-AT) Types with 
over 1 MB of Storage and TWICE THE DATA TRANSFER RATE of Single or Double Density Drives. Using these High Speed 
Drives is almost like using a Hard Disk. PLUS ... A FIRST FOR COCO COMPUTERS! DMA transfer of Data from the 
Floppy Disk to a SEPARATE HARDWARE DISK CACHE frees up the CPU during Disk Accesses. The Keyboard, Printer etc. 
KEEP ON WORKING DURING DISK ACCESSES! 

The Hard Disk Drives are 3 1/2" Drives with the SCSI INTERFACE. These are the Next Generation of Hard Drives where the 
Industry has Concentrated the Latest Inovations in Hard Drive Technology. The SCSI INTERFACE is THE High Performance 
Industry Standard for these type of Drives. No Non-Standard Interfaces used here! The Software is by D. P. JOHNSON. His 
SDISK Software set the Standard for 40 & 80 track Disk Drive Software for the COCO 2. This Unique Software allows 
DISKMASTER Systems to read 35, 40, or 80 Track, Single or Double Sided, Single, Double or High Density Drives in Radio 
Shack, Standard OS-9, Fujitsu or Mizar Formats! 



For Maximum Performance: add the plus 100 — 

The PREMIER 512K Memory Expansion for the COCO 3. 




Save $20.00 off the regular price of $1 09.00 when purchased 
with a DISKMASTER System. 



PLUS!!! 

Each DISKMASTER System 
includes the following additiona 
features . . . 

• 3 Software Selectable Hardware Serial Ports with 
XMODE and special SETBAUD Commands 

• Centronics Compatible Bi-Directional Parallel Port 

• Super Accurate Hardware Clock (+/- 6 seconds/month) 
with Battery Backup 

• Hard Disk Boot Capability 

• Expansion Connector for additional Floppy Drives 

• Optional 0.5 MB, 1 MB or 1.5 MB RAMDISK 



THINK ABOUT IT . . . The Unsightly, 
Cumbersome and Unreliable Expansion Interface is 
Eliminated. NOW compare cost. Purchasing an Expansion 
Interface and numerious cards from various suppliers 
results in a system that costs about the same as a 
DISKMASTER SYSTEM but doesn't even begin to compare 
to it in performance! 



TMM/HEMPHILL ELECTRONICS, INC 

4480 Shopping Lane 
Simi Valley, CA 93063 
(805) 581-0885 
(Mon. thru Thurs., 1:30 to 5:30 PM Pacific Time) 



CC3-1 2 1 MB Floppy Drives 

CC3-20H 1 MB Floppy + 20MB Hard Drive 

RAMDISK Options Call Factory 



$ 795.00 
$1,295.00 



Line 270 relocates the cursor accord- 
ing to the f oregoing (note that it is off set 
by one dot to avoid changing an X that 
you may move it through). If you press 



the space bar, an X-shaped character is 
drawn by lines 280 through 300 in the 
specified foreground color. 

Now let's get busy cross-stitching! 



(Questions may be directed to the 
author at 202 Jackson St,, Benton, LA 
71006. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply,) □ 




80 212 

180 233 

300 139 

END 232 



The listing: X5TITCH 



*****COUNTED CROSS-STITCH**** 
*****GRAPHICS PROGRAM FOR**** 
******** *THE COCO 3 ********* 
******BY LARRY ANDERSON****** 
********PO BOX 180 ********** 
******BENTON, LA 7 100 6* ****** 
*******COPYRIGHT 1987******** 



1 
* 

2 
* 

3 
* 

4 
* 

5 
* 

6 
* 

7 
* 

9 

10 1 

20 ONBRK GOTO 400 
30 HSCREEN2 
40 HCLS5 

50 HPRINT ( 11 , 10) , "COUNTED CROSS- 
STITCH" 

60 HPRINT (4 , 12) , "Space bar marks 
the stitch" : HPRINT (4,13), "Arrow 
keys move the cursor dot":HPRIN 

T (4 , 14) , "ALT-arrow multiplies cu 

rsor movement" 

70 HPRINT (4, 15) ,"C and 2 digits 
sets stitch color" : HPRINT (4,16) , 
"D deletes the current stitch" :H 
PRINT (4, 18 )," (delete any stitch 
by moving to it, 11 : HPRINT (4,19) , 11 

press SPACEBAR and then D) " 
80 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="" THEN80 
90 FG=0:BG=15:X=162:Y=90 
100 FOR SL=0TO15:READ CL: PALETTE 

SL,CL 
11)3 NEXT SL 
120 RESTORE 
130 HCLS15 

140 HCOLOR 0,15:HPRINT(3,0) ,"0": 
HCOLOR 1,15: HPRINT (5,0) , " 1 " : HCOL 
OR 2,15: HPRINT (7,0) , " 2 " : HCOLOR3 , 
15: HPRINT (9,0) , " 3 " : HCOLOR4 , 15 : HP 
RINT(11,0) , "4" 

150 HCOLOR5 , 15: HPRINT (13 ,0) , "5" : 
HCOLOR6 , 15 : HPRINT (15,0) , " 6 " : HCOL 



OR7 ,15: HPRINT (17,0) , " 7 " : HCOLOR8 , 
15 : HPRINT ( 19 ,0) , " 8 " : HCOLOR9 , 15 : H 
PRINT(21,0) , "9" 

160 HCOLOR10, 15: HPRINT (23 ,0) , "10 
" :HCOLORll, 15 : HPRINT ( 2 6 , 0 ) , "11" : 
HCOLOR12,15:HPRINT(2 9,0) , "12":HC 
OLOR13, 15: HPRINT (3 2,0) , "13": HCOL 
OR14,15:HPRINT(35,0) ,"14" 
170 FOR L=1TO320STEP54:FOR M=30T 
O190STEP40:HSET(L,M,0) :HSET(319 , 
M,0) : NEXT M,L 
180 HCOLOR FG,BG 
190 HSET(X+1,Y,FG) 

200 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN200 ELS 
E HRESET (X+l , Y) 
210 D=6:E=5 

220 IFPEEK(341) =191 OR PEEK(341) 
=183 THEN E=40:D=54 
2 30 IF ASC(A$)=8 THEN X=X-D ELSE 
IF ASC(A$)=9 THEN X=X+D ELSEIF A 
SC(A$)=10 THEN Y=Y+E ELSEIF ASC( 
A$)=94 THEN Y=Y-E 

240 IFX<0THEN X=0 ELSE IF X>318 
THEN X=318 

250 IFY<0THEN Y=0 ELSE IF Y>190T 
HEN Y=190 

260 IFA$="C"THEN GOSUB340 : ELSEIF 
A$="D" THENGOSUB3 2 0 
270 HSET(X+1,Y,FG)ELSEGOTO200 
280 IFA$=CHR$(3 2)THEN 290ELSE 20 

0 

290 X$="BM"+STR$ (X) +" , "+STR$ (Y) + 



ii • it 



300 HDRAW X$+";C"+STR$(FG)+";E3; 

B;L3;F3" 

310 GOTO200 

320 HDRAW X$+" ;C"+STR$ (BG) +" ;E3 ; 
B;L3;F3" 
330 RETURN 
340 B$="" 

350 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN3 50 

3 60 B$=B$+A$:IF LEN(B$)=2 THEN F 
G=VAL(B$) ELSE GOTO350 

370 IF FG>15 THEN FG=0 
380 RETURN 

390 DATA0, 32, 39, 60, 47, 52, 55, 50,1 

6,20,48,27,29,10,57,63 

400 HPRINT (13, 24 ), "Erase or Quit 

911 
• 

410 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN410 

4 20 IFA$="Q"THEN PALETTE RGB: NEW 
:ELSEGOTO90 

430 A$=INKEY$: IFA$=""THEN430ELSE 
PRINTASC ( A$ ) ; : PRINTPEEK (341) : : GO 
TO4 30 f2\ 



110 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



TOM MIX'S MINI-CATALOG 




'Flight 16 ^ 

Our very newest flight simulator. A full 
instrument aircraft that features the 
following: 

• Works with all COCO's 

• Realistic flight controls 

• Flight editor included to change flight 
parameters 

• Design your own airports and flight 
areas 

• Flies like Cessna 150 

• Full graphics & sound 

Joysticks Required $34.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 




P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator lets you fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations 
against another player, OR a non com- 
batant computer drone. 

32K Machine Language 

Joysticks R e quired $34 95 

Spe cify Tape or Disk 

Educational 

* Teachers Database II -Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64KTDBH $59.95 Disk Only 
32KTDB $42.95 




'Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 
32K Machine Language 
Joysticks Required $34.95 

Specify Tape or Disk 

'Goldfinder 

Here's the quality you've come to expect from 
TOM MIX. Endless possibilities await you in 
this exciting new creation. Move over 
Goldrunner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLDFINDER. . 
32K & Joysticks Required Disk $22.95 

* Dragon Slayer- Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
160 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 



COCO 3 Compatible 




TON NIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 



NOVflSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 




'Wizard's Den 

Another of our outstanding graphic 
adventures! You must recover the Gem 
of Damocles stolen by the Evil Wizard 
and hidden in his den. Dare to fight your 
way through eight levels of mazes and 
dangers. But beware the Wizard's 
magic. He can make you see things that 
don't exist! Don't stray from the path or 
it's certain death! 
64 K Joystick or Keyboard $22.95 

Disk only 



i'OKCH 



* Sailor Man-Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 


win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 


64K 


$27.95 


• The King- 




32K 


$27.95 


* Draconian— 




32K 


$22.95 


* Ms. Maze— 




32K 


$22.95 


' Kater Pillar II- 




16K 


$22.95 


* Warehouse Mutants- 




16K 


$21.95 


* Buzzard Bait- 




32K 


$22.95 


All Above Specify Tape or Disk 




* Video Cards & Keno 

(Color III Only) 

Four outstanding games on one disk: 
Poker, Jokers Wild, Blackjack and Keno! 
So real you expect Wayne Newton to 
walk by! Never before have you seen 
such excellent graphics and realistic 
movement as that created in this 
package. Wanna Bet? 

$29.95, Disk only 

Also available — Vegas Slots* (Color III 
only) — Same outstanding graphics! 
Seven of the most popular slot machine 
games found in Vegas. 

Keyboard or joystick $34.95 

Disk only 

• Many more titles-write for free catalog! 

Ordering Information 

•Call us at 616/676-8172 
for Charge Card orders 

• Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

• Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

• Authors— We pay top 
royalties! 




I 

T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE CONTINUES ITS 



ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 

COVER 1 
RACETRACK 
HANGMAN 
MUSIC ALBUM 
LIFE EXPECTANCY 
WORD TESTS 
KILLER MANSION 
BARTENDER 
CALENDAR 
ROBOT WAR 

ISSUE #2, AUGUST 1982 

UFO COVER PT. \ 

BIORHYTHM 

BOMBARDMENT 

BLACKJACK 

COST OF LIVING 

FRENZY 

BUSINESS LETTER 
OUICK THINK 
QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 
OUEST FOR LENORE 

ISSUE #3, SEPTEMBER 1982 

UFO COVER PT. 2 
BASKETBALL 
CHUCKLUCK 
SLOT MACHINE 
ALPHABETIZER 
NFL PREDICTIONS 
FLAG CAPTURE 
ROBOT BOMBER 

ISSUE #4, OCTOBER 1982 

UFO RESCUE 

TANK BATTLE 

DRIVEWAY 

SOUNDS 

BALLOON DROP 

MIND BOGGLE 

COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 

CALORIE COUNTER 

JACK-O-LANTERN 

ISSUE #5, NOVEMBER 1982 

CATALOG COVER 
BOWLING 

PROGRAM INVENTORY 

PROMISSORY-LOANS 

CHECKBOOK BALANCER 

TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 

CONVOY 

BAG-IT 

SPECTRA SOUND 
CONVEYOR BELT 

ISSUE #6, DECEMBER 1982 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
RAINDROPS 
STOCK MARKET 
ADVANCED PONG 
DESTROY 
SOUND ANALYZER 
CREATIVITY TEST 
VOICE DATA 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 1 
LOONY LANDER 




ISSUE #7, JANUARY 1983 

NEW YEARS COVER 
LIST ENHANCER 
SUPER PRECISION DIV. 
BOMB DIFFUSE 
SPACE STATION 
ML TUTORIAL PI 2 
SHOOT OUT 
FIND UTILITY 
CYBORG INS. 
CYBORG FACES 

ISSUE #8, FEBRUARY 1983 

COVER 8 
DEFEND 

3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 
COCO CONCENTRATION 
AUTO LINE NUMBERING 
ML TUTORIAL PT.3A 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 3B 
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 
DUAL BARRIER 
BRICKS 

ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

TIME MACHINE COVER 
TRIG DEMO 
PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 
PROGRAM PACKER 
BUDGET 

ELECTRONIC DATEBOOK 
ML TUTORIAL PT! 4 
TAPE DIRECTORY 
BLOCK-STIR 

COCO ADDING MACHINE 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 

TENTH COVER 
PYRAMID OF DANGER 
TYPING TUTOR 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 5 
TINYCALC 

STOCK MARKET COMP 
YAH-HOO 
MISSILE ATTACK 
SCREEN PRINT 
BRIKPONG 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 

ELEVENTH COVER 
ARCHERY 
FROG JUMP 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 6 
MLT DICTIONARY 
BASIC SPEED UP TOT. 
METRIC CONVERTOR 
GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 
GRAPHICS PROGRAM 
CATERPILLAR CAVE 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 

TWELFTH COVER 
SHOOTING GALLERY 
BOMB STOPPER 
VALLEY BOMBER 
STARFIGHTER 
WHEEL OF FORTUNE 
MLTUTORIALPT. 7 
MERGE UTILITY 
RAM TEST 
LANDER 



ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 

THIRTEENTH COVER 
FLASH CARD 
ICE BLOCK 
COSMIC FORTRESS 
MAIL LIST 
DOLLARS & CENTS 
MLTUTORIALPT. 8 
SDSKCOPY 
MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 
CRAWLER 

ISSUE #14, AUGUST 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
ROW BOAT 

COMPUTER TUTLPT. 1 
INDEX DATABASE 
DISK ZAPPER 
COCO-MONITOR 
COCO-ARTIST 
ROBOT COMMAND 
TEST SCREEN PRINT 
HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 

ISSUE #15, SEPTEMBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER PT. 2 
GOLD VALUES 
TREK INSTRUCTIONS 
TREK 

HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 
ASTRO DODGE 
DR. COCO 
PEG JUMP 
MORSE CODE 
PURGE UTILITY 

ISSUE #16, OCTOBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
BOPOTRON 
DIRECTORY RECALL 
VECTOR GRAPHICS INST 
VECTOR GRAPHICS 
SKYDIVER 

SWERVE AND DODGE 
NIMBO BATTLE 
TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 
LIFE GENERATIONS 

ISSUE #17, NOVEMBER 1983 

THANKSGIVING COVER 
3-DTIC-TAC-TOE 
INDY 500 

COLLEGE ADVENTURE 
MEMORY GAME 
DUNGEON MASTER 
WEATHER FORECASTER 
GRID FACTOR INST. 
GRID FACTOR 
DRAW 

ISSUE #18, DECEMBER 1983 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
CLIMBER 

GALACTIC CONQUEST 
WARLORDS 
STATES REVIEW 
MATH TUTOR 

MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 
PRINTER UTILITY INST. 
PRINTER UTILITY 
MUTANT WAFFLES 



ISSUE #19, JANUARY 1984 

BANNER 
PROBE 

DISK DIRECTORY PROTECTOR 
OPTICAL CONFUSION 
WORD PROCESSOR 
WORD SEARCH 
ASTRONAUT RESCUE 
STAR TRAP 
PIE CHART 
FORCE FIELD 

ISSUE #20, FEBRUARY 1984 

INTRODUCTION: 
HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 
ESCAPE ADVENTURE 
SEEKERS 
MASTER BRAIN 
LIST CONTROLLER 
DISKETTE CERTIFIER 
ROM COPY 
BASIC RAM 
SNAFUS 

ISSUE #21, MARCH 1984 

BASIC CONVERSIONS 
FINANCIAL ADVISE 
CASTLE STORM 
DOS HEAD CLEANER 
COCO TERMINAL 
SNAKE CRAWLER 
WAR CASTLE 
SKY FIRE 
EASY BASIC 
DOTS 3-D 

ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 

HEALTH HINTS 
GLIBLIBS 

CLOTHER SLITHER 
BIBLE 1 & 2 
BIBLE 3 & 4 
CATCH ALL 
INVADER 
ALIEN RAID 
MOON ROVER 
10 ERROR IGNORER 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 
STOCKS OR BOMBS 
WALL AROUND 
COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT 1 
NUCLEAR WAR INST. 
THERMONUCLEAR WAR 
CIRCUIT DRAWER 
MOUSE RACES 
SUPER-SQUEEZE 
DATA FALL 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 

DIR PACK & SORT 
BRICK OUT 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 2 

USA SLIDE PUZZLE 

51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 

51 '24 SCREEN 

CITY INVADERS 

PRINTER SPOOLER 

STEPS 

SNAKE 



ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 3 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEY MAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDITOR INST. 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLE BUSTER 
RECOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUGUST 1984 

PEEK, POLE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 
O-TEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
COCO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

ISSUE #27, SEPTEMBER 1984 

COCO TO COM 64 

GALACTIC SMUGGLER 

INDY RACE 

ACCOUNT MANAGER 

CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 

STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 

SPACE DUEL 

BUGS 

TRAP-BALL 

BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCTOBER 1984 

HANGING TREE 
CHECKERS 
FOOTBALL - 
MORE PEEKS, POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RAT ATTACK 

ISSUE #29, NOVEMBER 1984 

DISK ROLL OUT 
ROBOT ON 
MULTIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
OUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 

ISSUE #30, DECEMBER 1984 

MATH HELP 
ZECTOR ADVENTURE 
WORLD CONQUEST 
DRAG RACE 
MINE FIELD 
T-NOTES TUTORIAL 
T&D PROGRAM INDEXER 
SYSTEM STATUS 
ERROR TRAP 
DROLL ATTACK 



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ISSUE #31, JANUARY 1985 

TREASURES OF BARSOOM 
BATTLE GROUND 

STRUCTURED COMPILED LANGUAGE 
LIBRARY MODULE 
MINIATURE GOLF 
STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEBRUARY 1985 

DR. SIGMUND 
ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 
LOTTERY ANALYST 
BASIC COMPILER 
MUSiC CREATOR 
MEANIE PATROL 
TRI-COLOR CARDS 
SHAPE RECOGNITION 
DISK BACKUP 
SPACE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MARCH 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 
PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
ML DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 
DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEEDKEY 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

HOVERTANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSiC GENERATOR 
FYR-DRACA 
DRIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 

SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 
SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
HAUNTED HOUSE 

ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 

SELECT A GAME 2 
VIDEO COMPUTIZER 
SPEECH SYNTHESIS 
SPEECH RECOGNITION 
SPACE LAB 
AUTO COMMAND 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 
KNIGHT AND THE LABYRINTH 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 

ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 

CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE 5-7 

SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 
FILE TRANSFER 
FOUR IN A ROW 
MARSHY 

TAPE CONTROLLER 
CATACOMB 
AUTO TALK 
SGR8PAK 



ISSUE #38, AUGUST 1985 

GOLF PAR 3 
WIZARD ADVENTURE 
KITE DESIGN 
ROBOTS 
GOMOKU 

AMULET OF POWER 
LINE COPY UTILITY 
DISK PLUMBER 
SUPER RAM CHECKER 
GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPTEMBER 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
CAR MANAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHINE 
ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 
SUPER VADERS 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

ISSUE #40, OCTOBER 1985 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
COCO-WAR 
DISK LABELER 
SHIP WAR 
ELECTRIC COST 
MULTIKEY BUFFER 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
SAND ROVER 

ISSUE #41, NOVEMBER 1985 

GRUMPS 

DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 
SOLAR CONOUEST 
GAS COST 

RIME WORLD MISSION 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 
GRAPHIC TEST 
GRAPHIC LOOPY 
BOLD PRINT 

ISSUE #42, DECEMBER 1985 

HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAHTZEE 
DISK UTILITY 
MACH II 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
SLOT MACHINE GIVE AWAY 
TEXT BUFFER 
TUNNEL RUN 

ISSUE #43, JANUARY 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER COST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 
KEYPAD ENTRY 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEBRUARY 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 



ISSUE #45, MARCH 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT. 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COLO KEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
LIBERTY SHIP 
SINGLE STEP RUN 

ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DISK LOCK 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 

BOMB RUN 

TANKS 

TAR PITS 

BASEBALL 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

ROULETTE 

GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFF. 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
TV SCHEDULE 
BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTI COPY 
AUTO MATE 
SCROLL PROTECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 

ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 
DISK DISASSEMBLER 
BAKCHEK 
PACHINKO 
STOCK CHARTING 
HAUNTED STAIRCASE 
CANYON BOMBERS 
DRAGONS 1 & 2 
GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 
AUTO BORDER 

ISSUE #50, AUGUST 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPTEMBER 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET 51 
VAN GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 



ISSUE #52, OCTOBER 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 
INVASION 

THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOT RACE 
FLIPPY THE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS 
SUPER ERROR 2 

ISSUE #53, NOVEMBER 1986 

CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CAVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DECEMBER 1986 

JOB LOG 
PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TYPE 
PANZER TANKS 
MRS RAC 
BIG NUM 

ISSUE #55, JANUARY 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
DIR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEBRUARY 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRUSH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EDITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 

ISSUE #57, MARCH 1987 

THE BAKERY 
ENCHANTED VALLEY ADV. 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR 1 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 



ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 

HOME PLANT SELECTION 

CHECK WRITER 

HELIRESCUE 

KABOOM 

NEW PONG 

CROQUET 

FUNCTION KEYS 

ZOOM 

ELECTRONICS 2 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
LABELS 
CATCH A CAKE 
COCO MATCH 
ROBOTS 

STREET RACERS 
BOWLING 3 
ELECTRONICS 3 
GRAFIX 
KRON 

ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 

EZ ORDER 

SUBMISSION WRITER 
KEYS ADVENTURE 
WALLFWPER 
CHOPPER COMMAND 
UNDERSTANDING OPPOSlTES 
BIT CODE PLOTTING 
ELECTRONICS IV 
KING PEDE 
RAIDER 

ISSUE #62, AUGUST 1987 

PENSION MANAGEMENT 
HERB GROWING 
CATALOGER UTILITY 
RAIDERS 
ALPHABETIZING 
W.F.O. 

ELECTRONICS V 
RAMBO ADVENTURE 
BLOCKS 

MULTI SCREEN CAVES 

ISSUE #63, SEPTEMBER 1987 

GENEQLOGIST HELPER 
SMART COPY 

MAINTENANCE REPORTING 
COCO 3-COCO 2 HELPER 
DIRECTORY PICTURE 
SUB STOCK 
SAVE THE MAIDEN 
CAVIATOR 
ELECTRONICS VI 
MONKEY SHINE 

ISSUE #64, OCTOBER 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE IN THE GRASS 
CYCLE JUMP 
GEOMETRY TUTOR 
SLOT RACERS 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS VII 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 



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RAINBOW'S 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from Thu 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $25 to give 
your account a positive balance. 
This will be refunded after your first 
free hour if you choose to no longer 
use the system or it will be applied 
to future connect charges. If you do 
not maintain a positive balance, you 
will be charged $3.50 each month 
for direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — on 
a regular basis. Conference sched- 
ules will appear in the rainbow 
each month. Be sure to check online 
announcements for changes and 
additions. 

THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $24.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to the rainbow entitles 
you to this $32.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

If you're not a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hour of connect time. 

SAVE EVEN MORE 

Want to save even more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29.95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21.95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21.60). 

Delphi provides us all with 
Immediate CoCo Community. 

Check it out today. After all, you can 
sample it for free! 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



DELPH I 



TYPE: 

GROUP COCO 



COMMUNITY TOGETHER 



How to reach RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and the 
rainbow's CoCo SIG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Telenet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and one stop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge f or Telenet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $10.80 (U.S.) per 
hour. 

On Telenet: Uninet network has merged with Telenet. 
To get the Telenet number for your area, call (800) 336- 
0437. After you call the local access number and make 
connection, press enter twice. When the "TERMINAL^" 
prom pt appears, press enter again. When the "(£>" prompt 
appears, type C DELPHI and press ENTER. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage" or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier." At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press 'A'. 
When "please log in:" appears, type DELPHI and press 

ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (.) and 
ENTER (use two periods if you're using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1, 3:126 and press ENTER. Now type p 1 3106, 
DELPHI; and press ENTER. Delphi's new rates indicate an 
additional $10.80 hourly surcharge for evening use of 
Datapac, which means a total of $18 (U.S.) for connect 
time. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Telenet or 
Tymnet. Check with the telephone authorities in your 
country f or details on how to sign up f or this service. When 
you have an account set up, you can reach Delphi with 
a "host code" of 31 10 6170 3088 through Telenet, or 3106 
90 6015 through Tymnet. (You'll have to pay the toll 
charges for this connection.) 
Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to the rainbow, at the 



"USERNAME:" prompt, type JOINDELPHI and press 
enter. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type RRINBOW. 
Then, at the "NUMBER:" prompt, type your individual 
subscription number from the mailing label of your latest 
issue of THE rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros at 
the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you don't already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type JOINDELPHI and press ENTER. At 
the "PASSWORD:"prompt, type 5ENDRRINB0W and press 
enter. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because you'll be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your rainbow and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill f or subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just use Control-X and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BVE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter the CoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. We'll 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP COCO 

Af ter you sign in, you'll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "user name" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and you'll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. You'll also 
be assigned a temporary password. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next day. Once an account is verified and opened, each 
RAINBOW subscriber will be credited with an hour of free 
time! 

When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into your 
own personal password. This is the password you will use 
for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 

After Max bids you goodbye, you'll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 



I 



Tutori a l 



64K ECB 



Customizing Your Keyboard 




One of the Color Computer's 
best but least known features is 
its ability to customize the 
keyboard keys. Problems that arise in 
everyday life f ortheCoCo user now can 
be solved with a simple poke. How 
many times have you accidentally 
pressed the CLEAR key instead of the 
ENTER key, or pressed the BREAK key 
in the middle of a program? You can 
save yourself some grief and prevent 
these accidents f rom ruining your life by 
using the CoCo's special character 
table. 

The CoCo's special character table is 
situated between locations 41582 and 
41601 in memory. This character table 
defines the ASCII value generated when 
certain keys are pressed. For instance, 
the CLEAR key, when pressed, produces 
the ASCII value 12, which is sent to the 

Allen Drennan has been programming 
in BASIC, PASCAL and assembly lan- 
guage for nine years. At 17, he holds a 
degree in PASCAL programming, and is 
currently enrolled as a senior at Sonora 
High School, living in Sonora, CA. 



By Allen Drennan 

computer. The computer recognizes 12 
to be the ASCII value to clear the 
screen; therefore, the screen is cleared 
by pressing the CLEAR key. The same is 
true for the ENTER key. The ASCII 
value of the ENTER key is 13, and it 
sends a 13 to the computer when 
pressed. Twenty different keys and their 
corresponding values are held in the 
keyboard special character table. 

If we were to type PRINT PEEK 
(41594), the computer would respond 
with the value 13. This is true only 
because location 41594 holds the ASCII 
value of the ENTER key. If we attempted 
to poke location 41594 with anything 
else, it would not work, because we 
cannot change the values of ROM 
(Read Only Memory). If we could 
convert this ROM to RAM (Random 
Access Memory), we could change the 
value of location 41594. 

The exception to the above is the 
CoCo 3. Since ROM is copied into 
RAM when the machine is first turned 
on, you won't need to be concerned with 
doing it later. The changes outlined in 
this article can be made as soon as the 



machine is powered up. 

Listing I is a short program that will 
copy ROM to RAM so it can be 
changed. After the program is run, the 
contents of location 41594 and all 
others in the keyboard special character 
table can be altered. Listing I will work 
only if your Color Computer is running 
at 64K. 

The special character chart lists all of 
the keys in the CoCo's special keyboard 
character table. If we were to type 
PRINT PEEI<( 41590) (one of the values 
in the first column), the computer 
would respond with the value 32 (the 
number corresponding to 41590 in the 
second column). If we were to run 
Listing 1 and type POKE 41590,12, 
pressing the space bar from that point 
onward would clear the screen. We 
redefined location 4 1590, which was the 
space bar, to the same value held by the 
CLEAR key. So now every time the space 
bar is pressed, the screen clears. Ob- 
viously, this example serves no useful 
purpose, but changing other values in 
the table can make life extremely easy 
for the CoCo user. 



116 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 



PROGRAMS • PERIPHERALS • SUPPLIES • SERVICE 



from our central location 



fn/&iMtf Sendee, 

from our courteous staff 



\ File EOJt options CuJOf^ Foot Size Si<ji*» 



3H 



a 



(in 



1 o a m 
undo i 



mm 



r 



J or lha Coco 3 

Features . . 

• Animation • More resolution 

• Colorcycling "Morespeed 

• Color mix • More tools 

• Hi-Res interface and picture conversion 
utilities INCLUDED! 




B5 

Colorware 

Computize 

Diecom 

Dorsett 

Dynacalc 

Elite 

HJL 



J&M 

Mark Data 
Metric 
Microcom 
Micro Works 
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PBJ 

Sundog 



PXE 

Spectrum 
Speech Systems 
Sugar 
TCE 

Telewriter 
Zebra 
and morel 



Coco Max III s 79 95 

Coco Max III plus Deluxe Joystick . 99 95 

Coco Max 1 1 79 95 

Coco Max \\, Y-cable, Joystick ... 1 1 9 95 



for Coco 3 




RAINBOW 




• Easy installation 

• Ideal forOS9 Level II 



512K Upgrade with chips installed 
with RAMdisk and spooler 



s 7 goo 
59500 



DYNACALC 



**NEW LOW PRICES** 

Avatex 2400 s 229 00 

with Coco cable (Coco 3 only) . 239 00 
with RS-232 cable* 245 00 

Avatex 1200 89 00 

with Coco Cable 99 00 



'Phil s s . 

AUTOTERM 

THE WORLD'S 
SMARTEST TERMINAL 




CoCo's Best & Fastest Spreadsheet System 



! — / \ , 

/ with 
y GRAPHICS! 



79 



95 



T V I 



51 x24 display with lower case 

Super-fast screen refresh 

Auto-repeat Keyboard driver 

Sum, mean, standard deviation 

Logical functions 

Sort by columns or rows 

Line, bar, circle graphs 

Joystick/mouse driver 

Up to 256 columns or 256 rows 

On-screen help messages 



I 



VERSION 6.0 features 



• 2400 baud from the serial port 
(Coco 3 only) 

• 2400 baud from the RS-232 
Pak (all Cocos) 

• 128K, 512K support (Coco 3) 

• 80-Column mode (Coco 3) 

• Smooth scrolling (Coco 3) 

• Split-screen for packet radio 

• and much more . . . 



Avatex 1200, cable Avatex 2400, cable 

plus AUTOTERM plus AUTOTERM 

$ 129 00 $ 269 00 

'Coco i, 2 requires Deluxe RS-232 Pak 



20% oU 

A2D DELUXE JOYSTICK 



RAINBOW 



• Open gimbal design 

• Self-centering or free-floating 

• Mechanical trim on both axes 

• Eight foot cable 

For Coco 3 . . . . s 23 95 
For Coco 1, 2 ... 22 00 
(one button only) 




5 44 00 /pair 
39 95 /pair 





DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME 
SALE ENDS 12/31/87 



DIECOM PRODUCTS 



E3> 

Iron Forest* 

with light phaser .... s 59 9& 

Grandpnx Challenge* 26 0CH 

Gantelet II* 26 00 

Mission: Rush'n Assault 26 00 

Caladuril Flame of Light 26 00 

Lansford Mansion 26 00 

Gates of Delirium 26 00 

and others! 

*For Coco 3 only 

NOTE: We carry only disk versions of Diecom Products. 




NX-10 

S21 9 00 

printer only 



With Metric Industries 
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Run Listing I to prepare for your 
special customizing entries. If you 
cannot regain control of your system 
because you poked certain values in the 
table, you can regain control by press- 
ing the reset button and running Listing 
1 again. Therefore, any of the following 
changes will stay in effect until you press 
the reset button or turn the computer 
off. 

Easier Pausing 

If you ever tried to stop in the middle 
of listing a program, you know how 
hard it sometimes is to get the CoCo to 
pause. Part of the problem is that nasty 
combination keystroke of SHIFT and @, 
which is slow and cumbersome and 
hardly worth the effort. To remedy this 
problem we must redefine another key 
to the pause key. I chose the down arrow 
key to become the pause key simply 
because it is rarely used and rather 
convenient. 

To change the down arrow key to a 
pause key, look for the location of the 
down arrow in the keyboard special 
character chart. The location is 41584, 
which contains the value 10. Then we 
look up the value contained in the 
shifted-@ location. That value is 19, 
which is at location 41601. Typing POKE 
415B4,19 will change the down arrow 
to a pause key, leaving all other key- 
strokes intact, including the shifted-@ 
combination. In simple terms, we took 
the value of the shif ted-@ key and gave 
it to the down arrow key. 

Disabling the BREAK Key 

I have seen many methods for dis- 
abling the BREAK key, but none prove 
to be as simple and reliable as this one. 
Other methods work only part of the 
time (sometimes they quit working 
during input), but this method will 
disable the BREAK key permanently. 

Locations 41598 and 41599 hold the 
values of the BREAK key and the BREAK 
and shifted-BREAK respectively. Those 
who are tired of accidentally pressing 
the BREAK key while running a program 
might consider just altering location 
41598, leaving location 41599 intact — 
pressing shifted-BREAK will stop the 
computer, and BREAK by itself won't 
function. 

Those who want copyprotection and 
total control over the BREAK key might 
consider altering both locations. Since 
the ASCII table ranges from values 0 to 
255, and since only values smaller than 
128 can be accessed through the key- 
board, any value above 128 can be used 
as a garbage value. Theref ore, if we type 



The Keyboard Special Character Table 



Location 


Value 


Key Press 


A -4 C O O 

41582 


C\A 
94 


Up ArrOW 


A -4 C O O 

41583 


9o 


oniTl Up ArrOW 


A -4 C O A 

41584 


1U 


uown Arrow 


A -4 C O C 

41585 


91 


oniTt uown Arrow 


41 586 


Q 
O 


Len Arrow 


41587 


1-1 


on in LGTt Arrow 


A -4 C O O 

41588 


y 


Hignt Arrow 


41589 


no 
93 


oniTt Hignt Arrow 


41590 


32 


bpacG bar 


a •< c" r\ -4 

41 591 


32. 


bpacG bar 


41 592 


A O 

48 


Zero 


41 593 


1 8 


onitt zero 


A -4 C f\ A 

41 594 


•4 O 

1 3 


Lnter 


41 595 


13 


bnift Enter 


41596 


12 


olear 


41597 


92 


Shift Clear 


41598 


3 


Break 


41599 


3 


Shift Break 


41600 


64 


@ 


41601 


19 


Shift (5) 



The listing: 



lj3 REM ROM TO RAM TRANSFER 

2p FOR I=32j3pj3 TO 32j325:READ A:P 

OKE I,A:NEXT I : EXEC 320j3j3 



30 
4J3 

5J3 
7 



DATA 26,8)3,142, 120,0,236, 132 
DATA 183,255,223,237,129,183 
DATA 255,222,140,254,255,37 
DATA 241,183,255,223,28,175,5 



POKE 41598,255 and POKE 41599, 
255, or just one of those two pokes 
(depending on which we prefer), we can 
redefine the BREAK key from ASCII 
value 3 to ASCII value 255 and render 
the break key useless to anyone access- 
ing the keyboard. 

That Nasty CLEAR Key 

The clear key is so close to the 
ENTER key that you sometimes might 
accidentally press it instead of the 
ENTER key. The following poke will 
solve that problem. Location 41596 
holds the value 12 and the CLEAR key. 
If we type POKE 41596,13, the same 
value as the ENTER key, we redefine the 
CLEAR key so that it acts as the ENTER 
key. 

A Caps-Lock Key 

Last, and one of my favorites, is the 



ability to create a Caps-Lock key. Once 
again I decided to use the down arrow 
key as my victim. Shifted-0, in effect, is 
a Caps-Lock combination. If we put the 
value of the shifted-0 combination in 
the down arrow location, we turn the 
down arrow into a Caps-Lock. This is 
accomplished by typing POKE 415B4, 
18. This is a handy little feature that 
everyone will enjoy. 

Experiment on your own with the 
different keys in the table and decide 
what you like best. The four examples 
above are just a few of the many differ- 
ent possibilities you can explore. For 
further information, look up the ASCII 
table in your Color BASIC or Extended 
Color BASIC manual. 

(Questions may be directed to the 
author at 15485 Paseo de Los Robles, 
Sonora, CA 95370, Please enclose an 
SASE when writing for a reply.) /«\ 



118 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



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DISK UTILITY Sunrise Software has 
announced the release of Superdisk +3, 
a multiuse utility program for your 
CoCo. It contains software for the 
CoCo 1 and 2, plus a special edition for 
the CoCo 3. 

Superdisk +3 may be added to any 
disk. It lists disk directories in pages, 
runs any program with two keystrokes, 
creates a spare directory, restores 
crashed directories and performs many 
other tasks. Superdisk +3 costs $19.95 
plus$2S/H. Contact Sunrise Software, 
8901 NW26 Street, Sunrise , FL 33322, 
(800)628-2828. 

DEVELOPMENTS Radio Shack has 
released the OS-9 Development System 
for the Color Computer 3. This system 
is a complete editor/assembler with 
full-screen editing and specialty I/O 
drivers. The development system gives 
serious, as well as novice, Color Com- 
puter programmers tools to develop 
software programs for their own cus- 
tomized applications. In addition, the 
package includes several new com- 
mands that are useful for creating a 
multiuser environment as well as drivers 
for external devices such as hard drives. 

The OS-9 Level II operating system 
is required to take advantage of pro- 
gramming tools provided by the devel- 
opment system. The package (Cat. No. 
26-3032) retails for $99.95 and is avail- 
able at Radio Shack stores nationwide. 

STOP THE FLOW Kalglo Electronics 
has introduced a new model telephone- 
line/modem voltage surge protector. 

120 THE RAINBOW December 1987 




The Model TLP-2 from Kalglo Electronics. 



Designated the Model TLP-2, it plugs 
into any standard three-prong AC wall 
outlet and providesconvenient modular 
phone jacks and interface modular 
phone cables to connect and protect 
your computer's modem from voltage 
surges and lightning spikes on the 
telephone line. Capable of dissipating 
up to 6,000 v at 14,000 amps, the device 
discharges high energy surges safely to 
the ground wire of your electrical sys- 
tem. The TLP-2 utilizes both MOV and 
gas discharge technologies and is ca- 
pable of reacting within 1 nanosecond 
to clamp off spikes harmlessly. The 
TLP-2 unit costs $39.95. Contact Kal- 
glo Electronics Co. Inc., 6584 Ruch 
Road — East Allen Township, Bethle- 
hem, PA 18017-9359, (800)524-0400. 

ACQUISITIONS Kensington Micro- 
ware Ltd. has announced that they have 
acquired the Networx line of surge 
suppression products. The Networx 



family of products includes a variety of 
surge suppressors f rom the Power Tree, 
an outlet strip with a suggested retail of 
$29.95, to the Wire Tree Plus, a more 
advanced surge suppressor with EMI/ 
RFI noise filtering and telephone line 
surge suppression, with a suggested 
retail price of $99.95. Other Networx 
family products include Wire Tree, 
Wire Cube, Wire Cube Plus and 
Modem Protector. Kensington prod- 
ucts are available through computer 
stores nationwide. For the name of the 
dealer nearest you, contact Kensington 
at (800) 535-4242. In New York, call 
(212) 475-5200. 

CONGRATULATIONS Anchor Au- 
tomation, a manufacturer of modems 
for PCs, recently announced the ship- 
ment of the company's millionth 
modem. George Eisler, president and 
founder, said, "This marks a significant 
milestone for Anchor Automation, and 
for the whole industry. Back in 1980 
when the company was founded, no one 
could accurately foresee the demand for 
computer communications that has 
materialized. We are grateful to have 
played a major role in the industry's 
growth." 

Anchor Automation, a privately held 
California corporation, manufactures 
the Signalman and Volksmodem prod- 
uct lines. Their modems, available from 
300 to 2400 baud, are distributed by 
more than 1500 dealers. For further 
information, contact Anchor Automa- 
tion, 20675 Bahama Street, Chats- 
worth, CA 91311, (818)998-6100. 



D e lphi Bur e au 



The Times Are A-Changin' 



Delphi is a continually changing 
information system. This is 
why most users find the system 
gets easier and easier to use. Rather 
than set the system up a certain way and 
never allow any room for change, Del- 
phi listens to its users and makes 
changes the users would like to see. 

Call it a self-honing process, if you 
will. The point is, the end users of the 
system give the SIG staff feedback 
regarding certain aspects of the SIG 
operation. While most of the changes 
required cannot be perf ormed by us, but 
must be performed by Delphi service, 
we do use that information to show 
Delphi what changes are needed. They 
usually follow through. 

In addition, the people who work for 
Delphi and the SIG staff are continually 
searching for other ways to improve the 
system. For example, as Don Hutchison 
(DONHUTCHISON) explains in the Data- 
base Report, he recently took a long, 
hard look at how the graphics area of 
the database was arranged. All graphics 
files were put under one topic regardless 
of the machine and/ or software for 
which they were intended. Don sug- 
gested some changes to the rest of the 
SIG staff, everybody put in their "two 
bits," and now the graphics database 
has been split in two. This makes find- 
ing graphics images for your specific 
machine much easier. 
"What am I getting at?" you might 

Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associates degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His user name 
on Delphi is CRA Y. 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Editor 

ask. I am suggesting that you make 
rainbow's Delphi CoCo SIG your very 
own. If you see something you feel 
should be altered, let us know] Some- 
times we might have a good reason for 
not wanting to change something, but 
no suggestion is too small f or us to take 
a little time to consider. To make your 
suggestions known to the SIG staff, just 



use the Feedback to SIG Staff selection 
in the Rainbow Magazine Services 
menu. Again, we welcome any informa- 
tion that would make Delphi use more 
convenient. 

Database Alterations 

Speaking of making changes to the 
system, Delphi has recently made some 



Database Report 

order to provide greater conven- 
ience for our users in the CoCo 
-M-iiSIG, we have split the former 
Graphics topic of the database into two 
topics, namely "CoCo 3 Graphics" and 
"Classic Graphics," The Classic Graphics 
topic will contain graphics utilities and 
PMODE 3 and 4 graphic images that may be 
displayed on a CoCo 1, 2 or 3; the CoCo 
3 Graphics topic will contain graphics and 
utilities that are specific to the CoCo 3. 

We will also be creating an Archives 
topic in the database that will contain 
archived Forum threads and other infor- 
mation that should be retained in a data- 
base topic. Look for this topic in the next 
few weeks. 



OS-9 Online 

In the General Information topic area, 
Steve Clark (steveclark) uploaded his 

Don Hutchison is an electrical engi- 
neer and lives in Atlanta, Georgia. He 
works as a senior project engineer 
involved in the design of industrial 
control systems. On Delphi, Don is the 
Database Manager of the RAINBOW 
CoCo SIG. His Delphi user name is 

DONHUTCHISON. 



program that puts "OS-9" in giant letters 
on an 80-column text screen. 

In the Users Group topic area, SIGop 
Greg Law (GREGL) posted a description of 
the User Group files in a text file that's 
already formatted and printer-ready; Sled, 
a full-screen text editor for CoCo 3 OS-9 
Level II that also supports windows; 
NROFF, a Unix-style print formatter; 
dateub, a Julian date conversion utility; 
Dates, to keep track of dates, appoint- 
ments, birthdays, etc., and warn if they are 
coming up; and D, a directory utility 
similar to LS that lists one file per line with 
wildcards. 

In the Utilities topic area, Greg Law 
posted Alarm, which allows one to set, 
display, or clear an alarm using the new 
F$filarm call (the program is courtesy of 
Dan Robins). Greg also uploaded sys- 
info, a BAS1C09 procedure that can be used 
in other programs or as a stand-alone 
assembly version to display the window 
number, screen type, window size, current 
foreground, background, and border 
palette register numbers, and a list of all 
16 current palettes and the colors con- 
tained therein, {sysinfo is also courtesy of 
Dan Robins.) Rick Adams (rickadams) 
uploaded CC2 for those with Level II, 512K 
and the C compiler. This implementation 



December 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



121 



which should make downloading spe- 
cific fiJes much easier. When looking for 
certain types of files in the different 
database topic areas, most people find 
it convenient to use the SEARCH com- 
mand. In the past, entering this com- 
mand took you to a "mini" menu from 
which you could start the search for 
specific keywords. Delphi has altered 
this so you no longer go to the other 
menu. Rather, entering SEARCH at the 
DBASES prompt automatically clears 
any previous search keywords and 
begins a new search. 

To supplement the search process, the 
NARROW and WIDEN commands, which 
used to reside in the Search menu, have 
also been placed on the DBASES menu. 
The NARROW command allows you to 
"fine tune" the search. Obviously, then, 
WIDEN allows you to make a broader 
search than you had originally intended 
when you issued the SEARCH command. 

In addition, you can get a list of 
keywords used to helpyou in narrowing 
a search by typing a question mark at 
the keyword prompt. Actually, you will 



have to enter two question marks since 
the first one you enter will call the help 
screen for the NARROW command. The 
only keywords that will be in the list will 
be those that match at least one of the 
keywords used to describe at least one 
of the files already selected by the 
SEARCH command. 

This may seem a little confusing, but 
it is really quite easy to understand. 
Let's assume you are at the DBASES 
prompt for the Utilities and Applica- 
tions topic. You have a CoCo 3 and all 
you are interested in are programs 
intended for that machine. So, you type 
SEARCH and press ENTER. When 
prompted for the keyword to search on, 
you enter C0C03. Now, the search 
routine will go through all the groups 
of files in the database, looking f or any 
which have C0CD3 as a keyword. All 
such files will then be considered "se- 
lected." From that point on, only those 
groups will be "active" whenever you 
enter DIR or READ. 

Now, if you are looking for filing 
programs, you might want to narrow 



the search a bit. Simply enter NARROW. 
When prompted for the keyword to 
narrow the search, enter a question 
mark. After the help screen explains the 
NARROW command, enter a second ques- 
tion mark. You will see a complete list 
of the keywords used in the groups you 
selected. You might see one that is 
related to filing programs. Simply enter 
the appropriate keyword and the search 
will be narrowed. Any selected files that 
do not contain that keyword will be de- 
selected. 

When you have found the file you are 
looking for, you can then download it. 
Once the program is downloaded, you 
might want to search f or something else. 
Simply enter SEARCH again and the 
present search keywords will be cleared. 
At this point, you can enter another 
keyword or, if you just want to look at 
the directory of all groups in the topic 
area, simply press CONTROL-Z. If you 
should use SET to choose a different 
topic area of the database, all SEARCH 
parameters are also reset. To repeat, the 
SEARCH parameters you choose one 



of cci combines the C.PREP, C.PASS1, 
C.PASS2 and COPT steps via pipes, and 
has many options. Most of these are 
identical in function to the CC2 command 
that is described in the C compiler manual 
but non-existent on the C compiler disks. 

In the Applications topic area, Mark 
Sunderlin (megabyte) uploaded his 
phone "words" generator program that 
generates easy-to-remember mnemonic 
names from phone numbers. This program 
prints out all possible "words" that a given 
phone number creates. (Example: 667- 
5263 is 667-MALE.) 

In the Patches topic area, Greg Law 
furnished a text file that describes a bug 
and the fix for rma Version I . I as supplied 
with the OS-9 Level II Developers System. 
It corrects a minor bug in the listing f ormat 
when using the option. 

In the Telecommunications topic area, 
Bill Brady (WBRADY) uploaded WIZUP 
.TXT, a report of problems that people 
have had with his terminal program, The 
Wiz. 

In ihe Graphics and Music topic area, 
Ray McCopin (raymccopppin) uploaded 
ICE.AR, an icon editor for OS-9 Level II 
with 512K. It features full-screen editing of 
icons and patterns for use in other pro- 
grams. 

CoCo SIG 

In the CoCo 3 Graphics topic area, 
Michael Schneider (mschneider) up- 
loaded three more adult conversions from 
Atari ST pictures as well as MGE pictures 
of Marilyn Monroe. I posted several more 



MGE pictures, including a revised picture 
of Little Red Riding Hood, a nude shot of 
Elvira, a version of the three Microware 
programmers, a sample of the works of 
Ron Kiyomura converted to MGE format, 
and a few other conversions from Ana 
Landa's PMODE 4 graphics. Richard Tras- 
borg (tras) posted an adult picture called 
"Charla" and a grouping of three MGE 
nudes drawn by Mike Trammell. Victor 
Ricker (JACKRIPPER) provided an out- 
standing utility for viewing ST pictures in 
"Tiny" format on a CoCo 3. (This utility 
is written in machine language and is very 
fast.) Bob Wharton (bobwharton) up- 
loaded a picture from the movie Top Gun, 
and Michael Fischer (MIKE88) uploaded a 
picture of the logo for Carnegie Mellon 
University. Noel Fallon (fallon) gra- 
ciously furnished four of his original 
drawings in an Oriental grouping. 

In the Classic: Graphics topic area, 
Victor Ricker sent us a fine utility for 
viewing Koala pictures on a CoCo PMODE 
4 screen. Earl Knutson (bjornknutson) 
provided the program called Graffiti that 
adds legends to CoCo I graphics screens. 
Since the program required Dick White's 
copyrighted character generator, Dick 
White (dickwhite) then provided the 
character set f rom his program to complete 
the program. Ana Landa (ana) posted a 
second gallery collection of her PMODE A 
artwork, drawn using Graphicom. Jason 
Forbes (COC03KID) sent us some more 
digitized Max pictures. I posted a text file 
describing the format for RLE-encoded 
picture files. 



In the Source for 6809 Assemblers topic 
area, I provided the source code for a fast 
disk initializer for the CoCo I and 2. Roger 
Krupski (hardwarehack) provided the 
source code to his Copy command en- 
hancement program and the source code 
f or the CoCo 3 character set. Doug Masten 
(dmasten) uploaded a popular fast disk 
duplicating utility for the 5I2K CoCo 3. 

In the Utilities and Applications topic 
area, Richard Trasborg uploaded a fine 
VCR cataloger program for the DMP-105 
Tandy printers. Richard's program will 
catalog over 2,000 tapes, and will work on 
all CoCos. John Malon (JOHNLM) up- 
loaded a disk directory utility that will 
print an organized directory listing, op- 
tionally sorting the directory in alphabet- 
ical order. Roger Krupski supplied his 
CoCo 3 Super Patch, a complete CoCo 3 
enhancement program that fixes all the 
known bugs in Super Extended Color 
basic and adds several new commands and 
functions. It is written for the CoCo 3 
under Disk Extended Color basic Version 
2.1 only. Michael Fischer sent us a basic 
program for comparing the lengths of 
individual files versus their archived 
length. Craig Shelton (JAYBACK) provided 
us with LCSCREEN to set newer CoCo 2s to 
true lowercase when in the 32-column 
mode. Michael Schneider uploaded TC3, 
the CoCo 3 version of the very popular The 
Compressor program by John Lauro for 
RRCing and un-RRCing files. 

In the Hardware Hacking topic area, I 
posted a description of a bug in disk basic 
and a fix for it. This bug pertains to the 



122 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



time are erased if you leave the database 
or log off the system. They are not 
permanent. 

Keep in mind that the SEARCH com- 
mand is on the DBASES menu, which 
means you can no longer type 5E GRfl 
to change to the graphics database 
topic. In fact, the way Delphi has 
arranged the priority of the two com- 
mands, entering 5E will cause the sys- 
tem to default to SEARCH. To change 
topic areas, you must enter SET. 

In addition to the SEARCH changes 
above, Delphi has done quite a bit 
toward making downloading easier. 
Until now, the DOWNLOAD command 
(abbreviated DO) has been used only for 
buffer capture downloads. You would 
use the commands XMODEM, KERMIT or 
YMODEM instead for an error-checking 
download. Now that Delphi supports so 
many file transfer protocol variations, 
however, they have consolidated these 
commands into a new DONNLOAD com- 
mand. The first time you use DOWNLOAD 
after logging in, you will get a menu of 
the different transfer techniques avail- 
able. Pick the one you normally use. If 
the transfer is successful, your choice 
will be remembered for the rest of the 
session. For most CoCo users, the 
chosen protocol will be Xmodem. But 
first, make sure your terminal software 
supports this protocol. 

It is also possible to bypass the 
Download menu. You just need to enter 
the chosen method on the same com- 
mand line with DOWNLOAD command 
(e.g., DO XM). If you want to download 
only the third file in a group, you would 
enter DO 3 XM. 

If you consistently use a particular 
file transfer protocol (often the case 
with the CoCo), you can make that your 
default selection by using profile com- 



mands. Entering the following two lines 
will cause the DOWNLOAD command to 
default to the Xmodem protocol: 

/FX_METHOD XMODEM 
/SAVE 

Note: To enter the underscore character 
with the CoCo, press and hold the 
SHIFT key and then tap the up arrow 
key. 

You can also find out what your 
currently selected download protocol is 
by typing /FX_METHOD and pressing 
ENTER. Once you have selected a pre- 
ferred file transfer method, the way to 
override it temporarily is to type DOWN 
MENU to get the download menu. Or, 
you can enter /FX.J1ETH0D NONE fol- 
lowed by /SAVE to clear out your 
preference. 

Another addition to the database 
software on Delphi is the SHOW com- 
mand. This command, available from 
the ACTION prompt in all database 
topic areas, redisplays the file entries f or 
the current group (the one you just 
read). You can redisplay just one file 
entry by typing SHOW, following it with 
the number of the entry in question and 
pressing ENTER. For example, to see the 
specifics about the fourth file in the 
current group, simply enter SHOW 4. If 
you want to see all the files for the 
group, enter SHOW by itself or SHOW *. 

We feel each of these alterations will 
make life a little easier for Delphi and 
CoCo SIG users. One of the more 
confusing aspects of telecommunica- 
tions to any new user is downloading. 
By making the databases a little easier 
to understand, as well as work with, 
users will be able to spend their online 
time more productively. □ 



use of the DOS command after an oper- 
ation with a drive other than Drive 0. 

In the Games topic area, Fred McDon- 
ald (FRUDMCD) uploaded his excellent 
Monopoly game, and Stephen Macri 
(dracman) sent us his fine Tiahna pro- 
gram, an experiment with artificial intel- 
ligence programming. 

Vd like to add a note of clarification 
about a previous database report. The 
game crescue, which is online in the 
games topic of the database, was originally 
written by Greg Clark (gnome) and re- 
leased to the public domain. It was up- 
loaded to us by James McDaniel (newk id) 
during July. cRescue'is an excellent game, 
featuring several well-drawn Hi-Res 
screens and very interesting action. 
Thanks, Greg and James, for sending us uti 
outstanding game! 

In the Product Reviews and Announce- 
ment topic area, Mike Banks (kzin) posted 
an announcement concerning the new 
Delphi manual which will be available in 
bookstores soon. This manual will be 
adopted by Delphi as the official hand- 
book for its users. 

In the Data Communications topic area, 
Marc Genois (marcgenois) uploaded 
Version 2.5 of the popular Uiiimaterm 
terminal program for the CoCo 3. Before 
starting an Xmodem download with Ulti- 
ma term t make sure you have it configured 



for an eight-bit word length and no parity. 
You may want to sign onto Delphi using 
these settings to avoid having to change 
them back and forth between seven- and 
eight-bit settings for each download. This 
is due to the fact that Ultimaterm doesn't 
adjust its terminal settings automatically 
for an Xmodem transfer, so the user has 
to handle the changeover manually. 
See all of you online on Delphi! 



— Don Hutchison 
Rainbow CoCo SIG Database Manager 



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$79.95 $29.95 



RAM BOARD OPTIONS 

All 3 for only $19.95 




□ RAM Disk for RSDOS* 

□ Print Spooler* 

□ Sophisticated Memory Test Program 



$10 OFF with purchase of OK or 512K Board 

PAL UPGRADE — ONLY $7.95 
for your gray or white MULTI-PACK (26-3024) 



COCO 3 UTILITES 
$14.95 eacn 

□ Disk Duplicator* 

□ 640x640 Joystick Driver* 

□ Coco Max 2 to Coco 3 Patch Routines* 

All 3 for only $39.95! 

PYRAMIX Arcade Game*— $19.95 

* Products developed b y ColorVenture 



□ Fast 120 nsec RAM Chips 

□ Easy-to-Follow 
Instructions 

□ No Soldering 



Shipping & Handling: 

Within the U.S. & Canada: add 53.00 

Outside the U.S. & Canada: add S5.0t 

COD Orders: add S2.00 

(Calif. Residents: add 6% sales tax) 

Calif, check requires 1 week hold 

Out-of-siaie check requires 2 week hold 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Send Check or Money Order to: 

Performance Peripherals 

11432 Pena Way 
Mira Loma, CA 91752 
Or Call (71 4) 681-3007 
(VISA or MC orders accepted) 



(^-30 DAY MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE PLUS FULL 1 YEAR WARRANTY! 



New! $99.95 

No-Halt DMC Floppy Disk 
Controller for your Cocol, 2, or 3 
{not currently certified) 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 123 



Doctor ASC I I 



□ 



Automatic PCLEAR 



By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 



Jj Is there any way to have my pro- 
_ grams automatically do a PCLERR0 
B with Disk BASIC? 

Mary Willingham 
Omaha, NE 

Xy Place the following routine at the 
/C beginning of your program. This 
causes the program to relocate itself to 
&H0EO1. 

10 GOTO 5000 

20 DRTfl BD,B3,ED,1F,02, 

7E,96,fl7 
30 RESTORE : FOR X=0 TO 7: 

REflDES : NEXT 
40 Place your program here 
5000 CLEflR200:FOR 1=0 TO 7 : READ 

E$ 

5010 POKE&HE01 + I,Vfll_("&H"+ 

ES) : NEXT 
5020 DEFUSR0=&HE01:X=USR0 

(&HE09) 
5030 GOTO 30 



Label Jam 

) I have a DM P- 100 printer that I use 
with my CoCo2. When J use mailing 
labels in the machine, I have to 
advance the platen by hand. Jt seems 



Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




that the paper is too thick for the 
machine to advance automatically. 1 
have adjusted the print head, but this 
does not help. Are there any other 
adjustments I can make to the machine 
that will advance the paper automati- 
cally? 

Bob Kemether 
Bricktown, NJ 

I? There are thinner labels available 
/C that will feed properly. Check with 
a local business forms supplier or one 
of the many mail order firms. 



Getting Online 

How do you link up Radio Shack's 
Deluxe RS-232 Program Pak with a 
BBS? Specifically, what should my 



terminal settings be (I know the baud 
rate should be set to 300). Should my 
Modemphone be set to answer or orig- 
inate? How do I "ask" a question or 
request to copy a program? Do I have 
to buy a terminal program or can I get 
an acceptable program from the BBS 
without any great programming skill? 

Luis Modesto 
Miami Beach, FL 

Ty Set the phone to originate. Get a 
^Lterminal program with Xmo- 
dem protocol, which will allow you to 
upload and download programs virtu- 
ally error-free. The settings for most 
BBSs, including Delphi, would be 300 
baud, 7 bits word length, even parity, 1 
stop bit. 

In Search of a Canadian Pak 

I To be able to use the terminal pro- 
gram within Desk Mate 3, / need an 
RS-232 Pak. In Canada, I'm told 
that this hardware was discontinued 
two years ago. Is there some kind of fix 
I could use short of sending to the states 
for the equivalent of the elusive RS-232 
Pak? Radio Shack software support 
personnel didn't seem to be aware the 
RS-232 Pak was gone from the shelves 
and could not give any advice other 
than to buy the Direct Connect Modem 
ROM Pak. I have no need for a second 
modem! Can you help? 

Walter Medak 
Edmonton, Alberta 

X> Although it is officially S.O.W.G. 
1 X (Tandy slang for "Sold Out When 
Gone"), many are still in warehouses 
and on store shelves around the United 



124 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 



*** *** *** *** COLOR COMPUTER III SOFTWARE *** *** *** *** 



CBASIC III EDITOR/COMPILER 

The ULTIMATE Color Compute r Hi BASIC COMPILER!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient machine language programs and you don't 
want to spend the next few years trying to learn how to write them in Assembly 
language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!'.! 

CBASIC III is ihc only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full advantage 
of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K RAM, without 
having to spend years trying to learn assembly language programming. CBASIC 
III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you arc 
already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Rcs Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). We even 
added advanced commands not available in Basic to give you a level of control 
only avialablc to very advanced Machine Language Programmers. Plus we made it 
exceptionally easy to use, not like some other compiler. CBASIC III is the 
friendliest and easiest compiler available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III is a powerful too! for the Beginner as well as the Advanced Basic 
or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs without having to 
worry about the Stack. DP Register, memory allocations and so on, because 
CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. For Advanced users, CBASIC III 
will let you control every aspect of your program, even generating machine code 
directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC III features well over 150 Compiled Basic Commands and Functions 
that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, Tape, Printer and 
Screen I/O. It supports ALL the High and LowRcsolution Graphics, Sound, Play 
and String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/Put, H/Play and I I/DRAW, all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable 
printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
PRINT. INPUT, INKEY, GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands. 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the Color 
Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and install 2 Ultra 
Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation, Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 5i2K of memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8K blocks 
and single or double b)ics. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor winch allows 
you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a full featured editor 
designed specifically for writing Basic programs. It has block move and copy, 
program renumbering, automatic line number generation, screen editing, printer 
control and much more. 

The documentation provided with CBASIC HI is an 8 I/2 by 1 1 Spiral Bound 
book which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. We went to 
great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and understand, but 
complete and comprehensive enough for even the most sophisticated user. 

CBASIC III is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and 
well worth the investment. You can buy a less expensive compiler for your 
CoCo-3, and then find out how difficult it is to use, or how limited its features are. 
Then you'll wish you had bought CBASIC III in the first place. Dollar for dollar, 
CBASIC III gives you more than any other compiler available. If you can find a 
better CoCo-3 Basic Compiler then buy it ill 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

DATAPACK III PLUS V1.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 

AUTOPILOT & AUTO-LOG PROCESSORS 
X- MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT-100 &. VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

" N# lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port. 

• 8 Display Formats, 32/40/64/80 columns at 192 or 225 Res. 

• 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Rcs Text Display & Disk. 

• ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 
' Directly record receive data to a disk file (Data Logging). 

' VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

• VT- 1 00/52 cursor keys, position, insert /delete, PF & Alt. keys. 

• Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates. 

" Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

• 9 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers. 

• Programmable Printer rates from 1 1 0 to 9600 baud. 

• Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 
" Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

• Freeze Display & Review information On Line with no data loss. 
" Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

• Built in 2 Drive Ramdisk for 512K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R.S. Modem-Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak. even with Disk. 

Requires 128K & Disk, $59.95 

EDT/ASM III 

128 /512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler. It is 
designed to take advantage of the new features available in the CoCo-3 with cither 
128K or 512K of memory It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 
lines in 192 or 225 Resolution, so you use the best display mode whether you arc 
using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your display. Plus you can 
select any foreground or background colors or even monochrome display modes. 
It will even support 512K by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fast Ramdisk for 
lightning fast assembly of program source code larger than memory. There is also 
a freestanding ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug your assembled programs. 
EDT/ASM III has the most powerful, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/Assembler package for the Color Computer. 

• Supports Local and Global string search and/or replace. 
" Full Screen line editing with immediate line update. 

• Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

• Load & Save standard ASCII formatted file formats. 

• Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM III features include: 

• Supports the full 6809 instruction set & cross assembles 6800 code. 

• Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

• Supports Disk Library file (include) up to 9 levels deep, 
' Supports standard Motorola assembler directives. 

' Aliows multiple values for FCB & FDB directives (unlike R.S. EDT/ASM) 
•Allows assembly from the Editor Buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 128K & Disk $59.95 



TEXTPRO IV 

"The ADVANCED COCO-3 Word Processing System: 

* 9 Hi-Rcs Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 

* On Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 

* Up to 8 Proportional Character Sets Supported wi!h Justif icaiio/). 

* Up to 80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function key sets. 

* Fully Buffered keyboard accepts data even duiring disk access. 

* Autocxccutc Startup files for easy printer & system configuration. 
*8 Prc-Dcfincd Printer function commands & 10 Programmable ones. 

* Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

* Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 

* Completely Automatic Justification, Centering. Flush left & right. 

* Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 

* Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

* Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 

* Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 512K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most advanced word processing system available for the 
COCO-3, designed for speed, flcxability and extensive document processing. It is 
n»t like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you arc looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
short documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional spacing, 
then most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simpler word processors. 
But, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex format ting 
problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is what your looking for. If works 
in a totally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text, There arc over 70 different 
formatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
There arc no time comsuming, and often frustrating menu chases, you arc in total 
control at all times. You can sec what the formatted document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, 
Italic, Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters right on the 
screen. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts. 
take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKIDATA 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All the character sets used on this AD arc 
proportional spaced characters, all centering, justification, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89.95 

HI- RES III Screen Commander 

The DISPLAY you wanted but didn't get on your CoCo-3 

* 51 Different Character Sizes available from 14 to 212 cpl. 

* Bold, Italic, Underline, Subscript, Superscript and Plain character styles. 

* Double Width, Double Height and Quad width characters. 

* Scroll Protect form 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

* Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN 3 mode. 

" PRINT @ is available in all character sizes & styles. 

* Programmable Automatic Key repeat for fast editing. 
" Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

* Selectable Character & Background color. 

* Uses only 4K of Extended (2nd 64K) or Basic RAM. 

* Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES III will improve the standard display capabilities of the Color 
Computer 3, even the 40 and 80 column displays have several features missing. 
For example, you can't use PRINT @ or have different character sizes on the same 
screen, even when mixing text and graphics with the H PRINT command. Hi-RES 
III can give you the kind of display you always dreamed about having on your 
CoCo-3, with a wide variety of display options that you can easily use with your 
Basic or ML programs. 

HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color Basic and its operation 
is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the normal screen display with an 
extremely versatile display package. With the full control code keyboard, you can 
control many of HI-RES III extended functions with just a couple of simple 
keystrokes. 

Requires 128K Tape or Disk $34.95 

51 2K RAMDISK & MEMORY TESTER 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will g/ve you 2 ULTRA 
High Speed Ram Disks in you CoCo-3. It does not need or require the OS-9 
operating system. It works with R.S. DOS VI . 0 or Vl.l and it is completely 
compatible with Enhanced Color Disk Basic! Plus it allows your CoCo-3 to run at 
double speed all the lime even for floppy disk access!!! It will not disappear when 
you press reset like some other ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
ML program to test the 5I2K ram. It performs several bit tests as well as an 
address test so you know that your 512K of memory is working perfectly. 

Req uires 512K & Disk $19.95 

The SOURCE NT 

DISASSEMBLER & SOURCE CODE GENERATOR 

'Die SOURCE III will allow you to easily Disassemble Color Computer 
machine language programs Directly from Disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
compatible Source code. 

* Automatic label generation and allows specifying FCB, FDB and FCC areas. 
" Disassemble programs Directly from disk, unlike other disassemblers. 

* Automatically locates Begin, End and Execution address. 

* Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

* Generates Assembler source files directly to disk or printer. 

* Built in Hcx/Ascii du.:jp/display to locate FCB, FCC & FDB areas. 

* 8 Selectable Display formats 32/40/64/80 columns in 192 or 225 Res. 

* Selectable Foreground & Background colors & Printer Baud rates. 
' Built in Disk Directory an Kill file commands. 

* Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

* Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

Requires 128K & Disk $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for (he amount of 

purchase, plus S3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, Sam to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 



States. Contact mail order suppliers 
advertised in THE RAINBOW. P.B.J, also 
offers a compatible RS-232 Pak. 

Old Drives and OS-9 

I have a Co Co 1 with 64K, a DM P- 
200E and two disk drives and re- 
cently purchased a CoCo 3. color 
monitor, the new disk drive unit and 
Desk Mate 3. When I used my old drives 
with the Co Co 3 disk controller and 
tried to load DeskMate 3, all commands 
would work except the DOS command. 
I do not get an SN Error, but nothing 
happens. Are the old disk drives com- 
patible with the new disk drive units 
when hooked to the other disk con- 
trollers? If so, then why don 7 mine 
work? 

Dennis Restorff 
Ft. Lewis, WA 



D The old drives are compatible, but 
jL the old 12-volt controllers, even 
with 12 volts supplied by a Multi-Pak, 
cannot handle the 2 MHz clock speed 
of OS-9 Level 11 under which DeskMate 
3 runs. You need a newer 5-volt con- 
troller. 

Tapefix Fix 



/ was looking through back issues of 
80 Micro when I came across a 
program called Tapefix that ap- 
peared in your July 1986 column. It was 
described as being written for Disk 
Color BASIC 10. What, if any, changes 
need to be made for TapeFix to run on 
Disk Color BASIC LI? 

Bill White 
Live Oak, FL 



D Tapefix is fully compatible with 
Disk BASIC 1.1. At the time the 
article was written, Disk BASIC 1.0 was 
the only version available and I was 
playing it safe so that when 1.1 came 
out, I would not get a flurry of mail if 
it was not compatible. 



CoCo Goes Hollywood 

J read in Newsweek (August 10, 1987 
issue) that several software compa- 
nies have written software for per- 
sonal computers that would enable a 
user to put special effects, color titles 
and other goodies on videotape either 
in real time or during edit sessions. 
These programs allow the home user to 
make "home movies" of the kids that 
have extra pizazz. Have you heard of 



anybody selling or planning to sell this 
type of program for the CoCo? 

Bob King 
New Bern, NC 

Xy Simply hook your CoCo to your 
/C VCR via the antenna terminals, or 
if you have a CoCo 3, via the composite 
video jacks. Then CoCo Max, Color 
Max, Deskmate J, etc., can be used to 
design f ancy title screens for your home 
movies. 



Data Line Dilemma 

Can you tell me why the following 
~~| program won't work with any 
j number except 123? Any other num- 
ber in Line 120 gives a y$. 

10 CLS 
20 RERD R 

30 X$ = " IT IS R MRTCH 
40 Y$=" IT IS NOT R MRTCH 
50 Z$=" RNDTHER NUMBER?" 
60 INPUT"TYPE R NUMBER; "N 
70 IF NOR THEN PRINT Y$ 
80 IP N-R THEN PRINT X$ 
90 PRINT:PRINTZ$:PRINT 
100 RESTORE 
110 GDTD20 

120 DRTR 123,132,213,231, 
312,321 

Joseph A. Champagne 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 

O The RESTORE statement in Line 
100 makes the first number in the 
list of DRTR statements available to the 
next RERD, which occurs at Line 20. 
Perhaps this is what you really wanted: 

10 CLS 

30 X$=" IT IS R MRTCH 
40 Y$=" IT IS NOT R MRTCH 
50 Z$=" RNOTHER NUMBER?" 
60 INPUT"TYPE R NUMBER; "N 

62 FOR 1 = 1 TO 6 

63 RERD R 

B0 IF N-R THEN PRINT X$: GOTO 90 
B5 NEXT I 
8? PRINT Y$ 

90 PRINT:PRINTZ$:PRINT 
100 RESTORE 
110 GOTO60 

120 DRTR 123,132,213,231, 
312,321 

Pirate Protection 



/ have a CoCo 3 and am creating a 
BASIC program that I don't want 
people to be able to break into and 



put their own names on. What I have 
done is disable the BREAK key and reset 
button, so that part is taken care of after 
the program is running. But I can V stop 
someone from just loading and then 
listing it. I was wondering if there is a 
way to create an autostart (disk ) for my 
program. If there isn't, could you please 
tell me if there is some software that will 
do this? 

Erik Yoder 
Evanston, IL 

D Microcom Software, P.O. Box 
A X 214, Fairport, NY 14450, (716) 
223-1477 markets Disk Anti- Pirate, 
$59.95, which would seem to meet your 
needs. 

Typewriters as Printers 



/ have a Brother Pro-7800 Correct- 
0-Ball typewriter, and I heard from 
a friend that you can hook a Brother 
typewriter to a Color Computer. Can I 
do this with my typewriter? How would 
I go about doing it? 

Tim Sternburg 
Thousand Oaks, CA 



If the typewriter has an RS-232 
serial or a Centronics parallel 
interface, it can be done quite easily. If 
it has a serial interface, you need a 
custom cable. If it has a Centronics 
parallel interface, you need a serial-to- 
parallel interface. 

Random Request 



How can I get a listing for the RRN- 
DOM routine? I started learning ML 
13 and need a complete listing to create 
my program. I am editing the program 
on EDTASM+ (disk or ROM). 

Jean Gravelle 
St. Rose De Lima, Canada 



Disassemble the code starting at 
/C SBF1F, which is the entry point to 
the RND() routine; or better yet, get 
copies of the "CoCo Unravelled" series, 
which is sold by Spectrum Projects, 
P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
11414. 



TEC Drives Zap Directories 

/ now have a CoCo 3 and two FD- 
500 drives. I also use the disk utility 
$ DU-3 (February '87) to load my 
programs from disk. After loading a 
program with DU-3, 1 list it and find out 



126 THE RAINBOW December 1987 




ECTOR 

S-69B 



s 



VIDEO 
uiulTIZER 

FOR THE 
COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 

!'.'■ 




COCO 3 SCREEN 



USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS™ 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



I TM 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 




Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



/ have half of one program and half of 
a second program. I can't do a DEL to 
separate the second program. Even 
typing the line number and ENTER will 
not delete any lines. I must load the two 
half-programs intoVlP Writer and then 
edit the mess. This never happened to 
me with my CoCo 2. 

Edward Russell 
Key West, EL 

Since you have the early, full- 
/C height TEC drives, which were 
notorious for going out of alignment 
and zapping directories and granule 
allocation tables, my guess is they are 
the problem. I suggest that you get rid 
of the TEC drives and replace them with 



new hajf-height, double-sided ones. I 
also suggest that you replace your 12- 
volt controller, because the newer 5 
volt-only ones will handle the 2 MHz 
speed of OS-9 Level II where the older 
12-volt ones will not. 

Disk Errors With DeskMate 3 

I recently upgraded from a CoCo 2 
to a CoCo 3 because I needed more 
memory, but I was dismayed to find 
out that I did not have any more mem- 
ory to access via BASIC. Everybody says 
J have to use OS-9 to access all of the 
memory. I tried DeskMate 3, but there 
was no disk space to store even a small 
file. So then I bought drives 2 and 3. 




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Reviewed in 
'87 March 
Rainbow 

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When I try to use drives 2 and 3 for data 
storage, I get disk errors. Can you help? 

J. O. 
Deland, EL 

Ty DeskMate 3 comes configured for 
/C two drives. Using OS-9 Level II, 
you need to create a new Deskmate disk 
using CONFIG. When selecting system 
options, be sure to select TERM_VDG, 
since DeskMate uses that mode. You 
also need to select D2.dd and D3.dd to 
access drives 2 and 3. 

All-RAM and EPROM Defined 



In many issues of THE RAINBOW I 
have seen uses for the Co Cos "all- 
RA M mode " and have seen the term 
"EPROM" used many times. Unfor- 
tunately, I haven't seen a definition 
of either and am compelled to ask 
what is probably a dopey question 
. . . What do the terms mean? 

Tom McLarnan 
San Francisco, CA 

When the CoCo is first turned 
A /L on, the memory is configured 
so that the lower 32K of the 64K 
address space is occupied by RAM 
and the upper 32K with ROM. The 
6809 microprocessor looks at ad- 
dresses SFFFE to SFFFF to find 
where in this memory to start execut- 
ing code. The code in the CoCo 3 that 
is executed eventually switches the 
CoCo into a mode where the ROMs 
are switched out of the 64K address 
space, and this is called the "all- 
RAM" mode. A ROM is a memory 
chip pre-programmed at the factory 
and retains its programming even 
when the power is off. An EPROM 
is similar to a ROM, but it can be 
programmed at home with a special 
hardware device called an EPROM 
programmer. To the computer, 
ROMs and EPROMs are essentially 
equivalent. 



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For a quicker response, your 
questions may also be submitted 
through rainbow's CoCo SIG on 
Delphi. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick Rainbow Magazine 
Services, then, at the RAlN- 
BO W> prompt, type ASK for "Ask 
the Experts" to arrive at the EX- 
PERTS> prompt, where you can 
select the "Doctor ASCII" online 
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tions. 



1 28 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



1 fi nftwi r** CoCo3 

DeskMate 3 — 

Some Important Extras for CoCo 3 



In the fall of 1985, Tandy introduced 
DeskMate, its new sof tware package f or 
the CoCo. The program was based in 
the powerful Unix-like operating sys- 
tem for the Color Computer, OS-9. It 
had windows, online help, mouse con- 
trol, colors, and was a thorough, inte- 
grated package with all the features 
anyone could want. DeskMate for the 
CoCo was designed to rely heavily on 
pop-up screens, menus, mouse control 
and its integrated features. 

This sounded terrific, and for those of 
us who eagerly tore open the package, 
we were not disappointed. But we soon 
discovered that we needed a modem and 
had to have a multipack interface and 



an RS-232 Pak to use Telecom. We were 
in a 40-column upper- and lowercase 
screen environment. One disk drive was 
not enough. Any non-Tandy printer 
needed some fiddling with to get graph- 
ics printed, and we couldn't send any- 
thing faster than 1200 baud to that 
printer, due to OS-9's limitations. 

The manual was masterful. It had 
beautiful color screen examples scat- 
tered liberally throughout, lots of ap- 
pendices, and an index. It even had a 
thorough tutorial to help with all these 
wonderful new programs. Many of us 
noted with quickening pulse the many 
references to an ALT key and a CTRL key. 
We found out that Telecom had only 



Xon/Xoff file transfer protocol. But 
mostly, we were all happy and made 
good use of the software. 

I already mentioned a few of the 
hardware and software limitations, 
which are critical when dealing with 
integrated software packages. By and 
large, no one can cram all the features 
of a dedicated word processing package 
into a module of an integrated software 
system. Remember, the main objective 
for DeskMate was integration, or hav- 
ing all programs and functions available 
from one central disk, without having 
to constantly swap programs and disks. 

Inherent in all integrated packages is 
the compromise of features versus 
complexity. Users quickly discovered 
with the text editor that it was very, very 
straightforward. For instance, there was 
no quick or easy way to set double- 
spacing. Something as basic as that was 
either very difficult or couldn't be done. 
You could possibly figure out a way, by 
issuing printer escape codes before 

December 1987 THE RAINBOW 129 



booting DeskMate, but the average user 
wouldn't know how 

Chances are good that if you were a 
hard-core Dynacalc, Telewriter 64 or 
Profile user, this program was not for 
you. If you were a newcomer to com- 
puting, and especially to the CoCo, then 
DeskMate might just have filled the bill. 
It was, however, very doubtful that 
DeskMate was all the software you 
would ever need or want. 

On July 31, 1936, Tandy introduced 
the CoCo 3 at the Wald orf Hotel in New 
York City. Along with Tandy's other 
introductions, the new CoCo made a 
real hit. The use of a proprietary chip, 
the GIME, made it possible for the new 
CoCo to utilize more banked memory. 
It had a graphics display system with 
built-in high resolution text drivers and 
an analog RGB port, along with many 
other exciting features. It even had ALT 
and CTRL keys. Moreover, it would run 
most of the software written for the 
CoCo 1 and 2, and that meant that 
DeskMate 1.0 would run on the CoCo 
3. It also meant that, because DeskMate 
makes use of high resolution artifacted 
colors, users with the CM-8 Analog 
RGB monitor would be unable to get 
color without running a special color 
patch program to bring out the Desk- 
Mate 1.0 colors on an RGB monitor. 

In December of 1986, DeskMate 3 {or 
the Color Computer 3 became availa- 
ble. Like its older version, DeskMate 3 
is an all-inclusive integrated application 
with six main features. These features 
and subfunctions are very similar to 
those of the original DeskMate, but 
include some important extras and 
enhancements that take advantage of 
the greater memory and graphics capa- 
bilities of the CoCo 3. Perhaps the most 
important feature is 128K memory 
expandable to 5 1 2K. It allows the CoCo 
3 to run OS-9 Level II, which can 
function only on machines with a min- 
imum of 128K RAM. OS-9 Level II is 
important for several reasons. First, it 
takes advantage of more than 64K 
RAM, so there is much more user- 
available memory storage. Secondly, it 
has excellent file handling capabilities. 
And, it has windowing and greater 
graphics facility, making DeskMate 3 
more easy to use in some ways, and 
giving it features that cannot be imple- 
mented on standard DeskMate 1.0. 

A very good feature of DeskMate 3 
is that it runs by simply typing DOS into 
the computer. OS-9 is transparent to the 
user; therefore, you do not have to 
worry about trying to master it. There 
are two exceptions: You must type a 

130 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



pathname at certain places in Desk- 
Mate, and you must swap disks at 
certain other places. This is still handled 
straightforwardly in the manual and 
should create no confusion, even for the 
novice user. 



UMHl Nil rtuiU- '.rloi I I>„iI«-Mt< 




A note here to OS-9 users: Should 
you want to use either the package as 
a whole or separate modules of Desk- 
Mate, it can be started from within OS- 
9 as the files are all in standard OS-9 
Level II format. Because seven windows 
are available under Level Ii, and be- 
cause OS-9 is a multiuser environment, 
this creates some exciting and creative 
ways to implement DeskMate 3 for the 
more sophisticated user. Imagine seven 
windows all running at the same time 
with a different DeskMate feature in 
each, all available from the CLEAR key. 
Or, imagine two terminals hooked to a 
CoCo running DeskMate. 

There are many similarities and many 
identical features between DeskMate 
and DeskMate 3, as with any upgrade 
release. The overall command structure 
is identical. The only exceptions are in 
implementing new features, which fol- 
lows consistently with other command 
formats; the @ key is replaced by the 
ALT key on the CoCo 3, and the CLEAR 
key is replaced by the CTRL key on the 
CoCo 3. 

There are several important changes 
in the Deskmate 3 main menu. The first 
is noticeable right away, a little trash 
can icon in the lower-right corner 
labeled "trash." This trash can is used 
to delete files when using the mouse or 
joystick cursor control option. You drag 
the file to the trash can and "throw it 
out." 

The second change is that Deskmate 
3 is a two-disk set, with Ledger con- 
tained on a separate disk. The program 
boots by looking at the programs in 
Program Folder 3. If you are using one 
disk drive, you have to swap between 
the two disks for saving files and chang- 
ing applications, in addition, you are 
required to set the pathlist, which is a 
way to tell DeskMate what "path" to 
follow to find programs and save data. 
This is more important to multiple disk 



drive users, as DeskMate 3 defaults to 
only one disk drive. The remaining 
programs are in Program Folder 4, 
which is on the other disk. Instructions 
for setting the path list to find files or 
swapping for single drive users are in the 
manual. Using Deskmate j on a one- 
drive system means frequent disk swaps 
and a lot of aggravation. I recommend 
and strongly suggestyou use at least two 
disk drives. 

The Menu Icon Bar feature lets the 
user access the subfunctions of Desk- 
Mate: files, printer, calculator, date and 
time set, display type, cursor control, 
help, and a "hot key" to get you back 
to the program you were in last, with 
whatever file that was open at the time 
still open. That means you can stop 
editing a letter in the 40-coJumn mode 
by exiting to the Icon Bar, switch to 80- 
column mode, and return directly into 
your edit file, as OS-9 keeps track of 
open files for you. 

There are several new features here. 
First, under the printer configuration 
function you can now set the printer for 
between 300 and 9600 baud (with Desk- 
Mate i.O you could only choose 600 or 
1200 baud). This is actually a feature of 
OS-9 Level II. 

The next new feature is Display 
Display for DeskMate 1.0 was a choice 
of black on green or inverse, or white 
on black with colors (red and blue) or 
inverse. With Deskmate 3, you have a 
choice of a 40- or 80-coJumn display in 
Ledger, Text and Telecom. This en- 
hancement gives a WYSIWYG (What 
You See Is What You Get) display in 
these three programs. This is an excel- 
lent enhancement that takes advantage 
of the CoCo 3 display capabil ilies. The 
CM-8 Analog RGB monitor provides 
crisp and clear 80-column display. With 
a medium resolution color composite 
monitor, the 80-column display is dif- 
ficult to use, and you may have to use 
only the 40-column display. With a 
monochrome monitor, the display can 
be used in an 80-column format. Results 
vary substantially with the quality and 
type of monitor you use. 

The best display by far is the RGB. 
With DeskMate 3 the user has 16 color 
choice combinations at any one time. 
The color is set using a special program 
with a palette and color scales to select 
colors for the background, foreground, 
window borders and command bar. The 
program is difficult to get used to at 
first, but after a little familiarity it is 
easy to set the resolution between 40- 
and 80-column and to set the colors any 
way you want. 



Neither Calendar nor Filer have been 
altered significantly from DeskMate 
1 .0. The greatest difference is that Index 
Cards from DeskMate 1.0 has been 
named Filer in DeskMate 3. All files are 
compatible with the older DeskMate, 
however, and Filer automatically con- 
verts Index Card files to the new Filer 
format. 

Text and Ledger have been upgraded 
to include a choice of either 40- or 80- 
column screens in each of the programs. 
You can switch between the screen 
formats at any time. This enhancement 
makes a big difference in both Text and 
Ledger; with Ledger you can see a lot 
more rows and columns of data and 
how changes impact the spreadsheet 
twice again as much as was possible 
with DeskMate 1 .0. With Text you have 
a similar advantage, you get a full 80 
columns of text, giving a more realistic 
idea of what the formatted page will 
look like when completed. For users 
with televisions or composite monitors, 
the 40-column choice is still there. Files 
are also directly compatible with Desk- 
Mate 1.0. 

Telecom has been improved in several 
key areas. The first is a choice of either 
a full 80-column or a40-column display. 
This really makes a big difference in 
communicating with machines that are 
used to sending 80-column screens. It 
also means that you don't have to 
reconfigure for 40 columns every time 
you call a new computer. It also pro- 
vides more of a viewing window with 
the view option to see what information 
has been received. 

A second major enhancement that 
makes life much easier with Telecom is 
the Xmodem option. Now users have 
the choice of using either Xon/Xoff file 
transfer protocol or Xmodem file 
transfer. Xmodem makes file transfers 
much easier, and is more accurate, 
saving time and money. 

The third enhancement is an increase 
of about I0K in the storage buffer. This 
is now 23K from 13K in the original 
DeskMate 1 .0. Also, the terminal screen 
has been enhanced and simplified for 
transmitting and receiving files under a 
separate option, which makes them 
easier to utilize while online. Yet 
another change is that User Keys 8 and 
9 have been left undefined, so you can 
install your own macros instead of 
being forced to use them for User LD. 
and Password. 

The Serial Port option must be set at 
/T2 if you are using the Tandy Multi- 
Pak interface and an RS-232 program 
pack; otherwise, you will be unable to 



access terminal mode. 

Paint is another area of DeskMate 3 
that has been greatly enhanced. In 
combination with the CoCo 3's display 
capabilities and some program changes, 
Paint now gives you a 16 color 160-by- 
200 pixel resolution screen to work 
with. DeskMate 1 .0 had four colors and 
a resolution of only 1 28-by- 1 92 in four- 
color mode. With the new Paint, there 
is only one high resolution mode, and 
no longer an option for "colors" under 
the edit menu. There are also less initial 
patterns. The edit pattern screen, how- 
ever, has been substantially enhanced to 
incorporate all 16 colors available to 
create and edit your own patterns in an 
8-by-8 pixel matrix. This screen is 
operated very similarly to the Display 
option screen on the Icon Bar. 

In addition, several new tools have 
been added to Paint to assist in the 
drawing process. Theseare solid rectan- 
gle, solid circle, and rays, which draw 
lines extending in any direction from a 
common hub or matrix. I thought the 
manual could have been a little bit 
better in introducing the user to Paint 
in the "Getting Started" section. 

This, then, is the new DeskMate 3 for 
the Color Computer 3. We have taken 
a look at the new features, some advan- 
tages and some drawbacks to the new 
software. As an integrated package, this 
is a full-featured program. As a group 
of stand-alone products, these pro- 
grams are limited. As a writer, for 
example, I need a more full-featured 
text editing program than Text. For my 
work at home, however, this product 
provides the basic functions that 1 need 
with the added convenience of all being 
interconnected by one program. 

As many readers might agree, there 
are other factors besides productivity 
that influence the view of a product. For 
a child to learn on, this is an excellent 
package. For an adult new to comput- 
ers, this is an excellent product to get 
the sense of how programs work. For a 
household, this product is more than 
adequate to generate notes, draw pic- 
tures, keep an inventory or phone list, 
call the computer at the office, etc. It 
can best be described as simple, yet 
sophisticated. 

Still another feature is what has been 
called "user-friendliness." Is the pro- 
gram friendly to you? With Deskmate 
3, the answer is yes, very friendly and 
fun to use. It comes with an Intro Pak 
to Compuserve and a quick reference 
card to all the commands and features, 
which make it very easy for the user to 
get up and running. 



The documentation that accompa- 
nies DeskMate 3 is complete and easy 
to read, and organized better and more 
thoughtfully than the original Desk- 
Mate 1.0. Of great value are the many 
screens and examples, and the "Getting 
Started" section gets the user up and 
running in short order. 

Anyone in need of an integrated set 
of programs for the Color Computer 3 
should consider DeskMate 3. This is a 
quality software package, and very 
useful with all its self-contained features 
and functions. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102; $99.95: 
Available in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide.) 

— Jeffrey Parker 



1 Software 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 | 



CoCo Disk 

Zapper — 

A Handy Utility 

CoCo Disk Zapper is a handy utility 
that you can use if you ever have the 
unhappy experience of crashing a disk, 
or want to modify a disk file. The 
program is menu-driven and works on 
all models of the Color Computer. 

The menu options available include: 

A) Alphabetize Directory 

D) Drive = 0 

L) Look at track/ sector 

Q) Quit 

S) Search Disk for string 

T) Translate = ON 

V) Verify Disk 

Z) Zap current track/sector 

Most of these options are obvious, but 
a few bear further explanation. 

The Search Disk string option is 
handy because it finds every track and 
sector on the disk where a specific string 
of characters is located, and it displays 
that information on the screen or to 
your printer. 

The Translate option is provided so 
that you can view the disk contents in 
ASCII form. Unfortunately, you can't 
toggle on and off without first going 
back to the menu and reselecting the 
track and sector. If ASCII is on, you can 
type directly onto the sector. If ASCII 
is off, you must type on the sector in 
hexadecimal. 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 131 



Verify Disk lists all bad tracks and 
sectors right on the screen, along with 
the appropriate error message. The 
arrow keys are used to move the cursor 
through the tracks and sectors. 

Co Co Disk Zapper is a copy- 
protected program and is sold as is with 
no warranty, although a program is 
provided to allow you to make a non- 
executable backup. I believe Microcom 
should offer some kind of replacement 
policy if backup opportunities are to be 
prevented. 

(Microcom Software, P.O. Box 214, Fair- 
port, NY 14450, 716-223-1477; $24.95 plus 
$3 S/H) 

— David Gerald 



Ls oftwar e CoCo3 1 

Pyramix — 
Keeps You 
Hopping 

Pyramix is similar to the old favorite 
"Q-bert" arcade game. It's a 100 percent 
machine language program requiring a 
minimum of 1 28K RAM. The colors are 
brilliant, the graphics are razor sharp, 
and the action is fast and furious. 
Excellent sound effects are used 
throughout the program to enhance the 
animation. 

The object of Pyramix is simple, and 
you catch on very quickly as to how to 
play All you have to do is hop a short, 
fat little guy with a long snout, Kubix, 
on top of the blocks that make up a 
pyramid on the screen. When Kubix 
hops on a block it changes color, and 
the idea is to get all the blocks the same 
color. When all the blocks match the 
master cube shown in the upper-left 
corner of the screen, you advance to the 
next level. 

While this all sounds pretty easy — 
believe me, it's not. There are many 
falling boulders to thwart your prog- 
ress, and contact with a deadly snake 
costs you a Kubix. As you try to avoid 
these obstacles and change block colors, 
you will also notice a little guy the 
authors call a "punk" with sunglasses. 
His sole purpose in life is to undo all 
your hard-earned color changes. 

There are six ievels of difficulty in 



Pyramix. I was only good enough to get 
to the second level, but then again, as 
I get older my coordination seems to 
diminish. My 10-year-old daughter, 
however, got to Level 4 with little 
difficulty. The game can be played with 
a joystick or with the arrow keys. I 
really recommend a joystick if you want 
to accumulate a large score. 




J UUP <p AU SI MC> GGB 



I was impressed with the opening title 
screen and game board that drops down 
from the top of the screen and "boun- 
ces" several times before play begins. 
The bouncing is very life-like and really 
shows off CoCo 3's advanced graphics 
capabilities. The game can be played 
with either a composite or RGB mon- 
itor. I tried it on both but, as you would 
expect, the colors are more vivid and 
brilliant on an RGB monitor. A nice 
feature is the use of a built-in Help 
screen. A brief encounter with this 
screen is all you need to be able to play 
the game, although excellent documen- 
tation is provided. 

For those who score well, pressing S 
displays the game high scorers. If you 
don't press any keys, the game automat- 
ically goes into the Demo mode. Watch- 
ing the demo gives you a few good hints 
on avoiding many of the obstacles that 
you will encounter. 

A number of objects and characters 
make up the Pyramix game including 
the likes of Smack, Smuck, Time 
Stopper, Red Ball, Purple Ball/Kaderf, 
Elevator Discs, Death Square and 
Diamond. All of these critters play a big 
part in your ability to maneuver your 
Kubix over the pyramid. If you're not 
careful about which direction Kubix is 
facing, you will watch helplessly as he 
falls into oblivion. Scoring is based on 
your ability to catch Smack or Smuck, 
the Green Time Stopper Ball, or chang- 
ing the colors of the blocks as you hop. 
You also get extra points f or completing 
the various levels of difficulty. 

Pyramix is copy-protected and writ- 
ten only for disk systems. Information 



is provided on how to make a backup 
copy that can be used to restore the 
original in case of trouble. The game is 
provided on both sides of the disk and 
can be used as a flippy, so you start off 
with two copies of the program. 

I loved Pyramix. I believe this pro- 
gram shows off the graphics potential of 
the CoCo 3 at its best. ColorVenture 
should be congratulated for an excellent 
product, and I anxiously await other 
CoCo 3 developments from them. 

(Dr. Preble's Programs, 6540 Outer Loop, 
Louisville, KY 40228, 502-241-6474; $24.95) 

— Jerry Semones 



~~T ~ CoCo 1 , 2 r.H 

Software ■ 

Inventory 
Manager — 
Keeps Stock Records 
Up-To-Date 

The one day businesses dread most is 
the day inventory must be taken. The 
tedious time spent in counting each item 
and noting the quantity can be enough 
to drive anyone crazy. Inventory Man- 
ager does not take inventory for you, 
but it makes the experience less painful. 

Inventory Manager is an inventory 
database that revolves around manu- 
facturer part numbers, a copy of the 
same program that uses f our-character/ 
digit stock numbers you assign, and a 
converter that changes a file created by 
one into the other. It also has the ability 
to create purchase orders. 

When starting the program, the user 
is greeted with a simple graphics screen. 
Press any key and the program starts. 
Each time the program is run you are 
asked for the following information: 
Have you entered your business ad- 
dress? How many drives are you using? 
What is your printer baud rate? White 
I realize that your hardware may change 
(you buy a better printer or add a 
second drive), an option on the main 
menu to configure the program would 
be far less repetitious. 

When you reach the main menu, you 
can actually begin work. Here you may 
either create, print or edit the files 
containing your stock information by 
selecting the appropriate option. When 



132 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



creating files, it should be noted that 
each of your suppliers should have his 
own file, as there is an auto-order 
routine in effect. 

Regardless of the version you use 
(part numbers or your stock ID), the 
beginning of each item file contains the 
supplier name and address. A word of 
caution: When entering the name and 
address, do not press the ENTER key 
until all the information has been en- 
tered, i.e., the name and address must 
be entered as a single line of informa- 
tion. At this point, you begin to define 
the items by entering the part number 
or the stock number, the quantity on 
hand, the auto-order number (when 
your stock reaches or falls below this 
number it reminds you to order more), 
how many you want in stock after the 
order (the program subtracts the actual 
from this number to determine how 
many to order), your cost and the retail 
cost. 

When all the items are defined (you 
may have a maximum of 200 items in 
any one file, and up to 22 files per disk), 
you may edit the file. With this option, 
you can change any field in a given file, 
add to or delete from the file, and save 
the results. Using another menu option, 



you can add or subtract items sold or 
received. When your in-stock number 
falls below the auto-order number, the 
Purchase Order option prints an invoice 
to send to your supplier. 

The program is really very simple to 
use. There are a couple of problems, 
though. The first is with the manual. 
While I had the luxury of time to figure 
out how everything works, you might 
not. The manual is poorly written and 
has no table of contents to direct the 
user to specific information. At best, it 
is difficult reading. The fairly straight- 
forward aspects of the package are 
explained, but the detailed features are 
skimmed over. 

The second problem seems to be in 
the support area. The program (in 
versions for either RS-DOS or JDOS) 
is copy-protected. There is extensive use 
of the high-speed poke. If your system 
does not handle the poke well, the 
manual instructs you to return the 
program with a note, and it will be 
modified for you. I wrote to Forrest 
Enterprises and after three weeks had 
not received a response. This does not 
bode well for customer support. 

Overall, the program performs as 
advertised. But with the apparent lack 



of support, an ordinarily fine program 
is left to suffer. 

(Forrest Enterprises, 1521 Lancelot, Borger, 
TX 79007, 806-274-3083; $25: First product 
review for this company appearing in THE 

RAINBOW.) 

— D.A. Ferreira 



I Softwa re 



CoCo 1 . 2 & 3 



Winnie the Pooh and 
the Hundred A ere 
Wood — 
And Tigger, Too! 

Winnie the Pooh and the Hundred 
Acre Wood is an Adventure game 
designed for children ages 7 and up. It 
requires a Tandy Color Computer, one 
disk drive and at least 64K RAM. 
Although the game runs under the OS- 
9 operating system, OS-9 is not required 
to load or run it. You can use the DDS 
command in Disk BASIC Version l . 1 , or 
type in a special loader program pro- 
vided in the manual if you do not have 





Tomb of T'ien 



Legend and histoiy, it Is often 
heard to distinguish the two 
Until recently, you thoughf the tale of the 
great Emporer T'ien was o myth, but ever 
since the sacred shrine of your village wos 
stolen by a winged dragon, you hove 
decided that there might be some truth to 
the old stories. Armed with a dull knife 
(probably good for nothing), you were 
chosen to retrieve the shrine and discover 
the secrets of the Tomb of T'ien. 
100%ML Graphics Adventure . . . . S1 9.95 



Mr. Corey 



Place: Island in the Pacific. 
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Version 1.1. I have Disk BASIC 1.0 and 
I also have OS-9 Level I Version 1 . 1 . I 
fried the special loader program, the 
OS-9 boot program included with the 
OS-9 system, and running from within 
the OS-9 shell itself. 




Vou JTP in Christopher Robin' 
May roo*. He 1 outbid p. pUvthM 
if* ni ( , tr»»f"hou^p in ihv Htjruir 
A< re HnnO . 



The special BASIC loader program 
worked perfectly. It is a short program 
and very easy to type in, but it must be 
saved on a disk other than the Pooh disk 
since the Pooh disk is in a special OS- 
9 compatible format. The OS-9 boot 
program also worked without a hitch. 

Pooh comes on a single disk written 
on both sides in "flippy" fashion. This 
means you simply turn the disk over to 
gain access to side two on a single-sided 
drive. The game boots from side one 
and then requests that you insert side 
two to complete the loading process. 
The instructions call for using a backup 
copy of the disk. Even though Pooh 
runs under OS-9, you can use the stand- 
ard BACKUP command to create your 
backup copy. Unless you have access to 
a flippy disk, the backup requires two 
disks. 

The manual begins with a short story 
about Pooh and his walk through the 
Hundred Acre Wood. Pooh finds that 
many of his friends have lost some 
object. It is up to him to find these 
objects and return them to their proper 
owners. 

There are a total of I0 objects scat- 
tered throughout the woods. Pooh 
begins his search from Christopher 
Robin's playroom and proceeds into the 
woods looking for the missing objects. 
Once an object is found, Pooh must 
return it to its proper owner or location 
in the woods. For instance, a lost picnic 
basket belongs under an empty picnic 
table. 

Excellent graphics are used through- 
out the game showing scenes in the 
woods. Stories are given describing 
each scene along with a list of things 
Pooh can do. There are usually several 
choices that describe something Pooh 
may do, or he may select North, South, 
East or West. Using these choices Pooh 



can search the woods for all the missing 
objects and their owners. 

When an object is found, a "take" 
choice is provided. When already car- 
rying an object, a "drop" choice is 
displayed. Pooh can carry only one 
object at a time and when he drops an 
object, he is informed whether or not he 
has found the correct owner. 

Every now and then Tigger bounces 
in and causes Pooh to lose what he is 
carrying. A wind may also blow in and 
mix everything up in the woods again, 
confusing poor Pooh. If Pooh is not 
careful, he may get lost in the mist and 
cannot see anything. When this happens 
all he can do is keep walking until he 
is out of the mist, but no telling where 
he will be by then. 

If Pooh needs help finding out where 
the object belongs, he may take it to 
wise Mr. Owl and receive a clue as to 
the proper owner. However, Pooh must 
still locate the owner's whereabouts 
himself. 

All in all, Winnie ihe Pooh in the 
Hundred Acre Wood is a very exciting 
game for young and old alike. The 
graphics are excellent and children 
learn how to create and read maps and 
charts to assist them in locating the 
objects and their owners. Walt Disney 
Software and Sierra On-Line have a 
real winner in Winnie. 

(Sierra On-Line, Coarsegold, CA 93614; 
$34.95. Available in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide.) 

— Larry Birkenfeld 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



Software 



Co Co Checkbook - 
Keeps You 
in Balance 

CoCo Checkbook is a colorful, 
menu-driven program that provides 
you with an easy way to balance your 
checkbook and track expenditures by 
category. While the author is wise to 
point out that the program is not in- 
tended to replace the user's ojwn check 
register, it aids in reconciling your 
checkbook with your monthly bank 
statement. 

The program is written in BASIC for 
a minimum of 16K and works on the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3, It is supplied on disk, 
and is not copy-protected. Documenta- 



tion consists of a detailed 49-page 
notebook that includes seven sample 
sessions used to acquaint the user with 
loading, operation and file manipula- 
tion. 

The maximum number of transac- 
tions allowable is 1,500 using a single 
disk drive or 2,200 with two drives. The 
user can establish 64 different account 
names, making it easy to keep track of 
expenses by categories such as food, 
clothing, gasoline, house payments, 
entertainment, etc. The program ac- 
cepts check numbers from 0 to 9999. 
The maximum value for a single trans- 
action is $9,999.99, or an accumulated 
total of $99,999.99. 

CoCo Checkbook is designed to 
allow input of automatic bank deposits, 
teller machine transactions, and cash 
transactions. Budgeting is accom- 
plished by setting aside funds to meet 
periodic payments. These funds, while 
not appearing in your checkbook reg- 
ister balance, are included when your 
statement balance is computed. Since 
each budgeted account is maintained 
separately, the balance in each category 
can be established at any time. 

A printer is optional; however, I 
recommend one to get the most flexibil- 
ity out of the program. Provisions are 
made to delete or change categories and 
entry transactions. You can search the 
disk files for transactions made on a 
specified date, check number, payee, 
account name, or amount paid. This is 
a powerful feature if you write a lot of 
checks or spend a lot of money. 

I liked CoCo Checkbook. User sup- 
plied disk file extensions make it easy 
to spot data files for a specific period, 
such as CAR-BZ Besides the various 
submenus which walk the user through 
each transaction, lots of prompts are 
used to alert the user as to what kind 
of input the computer is expecting. 

I did notice that when setting up some 
sample files, the computer wanted the 
date as MM/DD/YY. However, when 
I wanted to see all the transactions I 
made in August, I was forced to enter 
8 instead of the expected 08 in spite of 
the fact that the prompt clearly asked 
for "MM." 

Co Co Checkbook is a good program 
that can make your life a little easier. It's 
a perfect companion for the CoCo in the 
home environment and is adequate for 
many small business applications. 

(Bob's Software, P.O. Box 391, Cleveland, 
OH 44701, 216-871-8858; $25) 

— Jerry Semones 



134 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



1 Softwar e CoCo1l2&3 ' 

Caladuril Flame of 
Light — 
A Different 
Kind of Adventure 

Caladuril Flame of Light is different 
from any Adventure game I have played 
in the past. Instead of using the stand- 
ard North, South, or N, S, or go N, go 
E, etc., you use the arrow keys to move. 
While this may not be unique by itself, 
this and the graphics that go along with 
it make it different. 

The screen is split into sections. The 
top-left quarter, called the Play Field, 
is used for the graphics and lets you see 
where your character, Jame, is and the 
adjoining terrain. The bottom half is 
like the standard Adventure game area. 
This is where you see the text from the 
Adventure and where you type in the 
commands to manipulate objects. 

The top-right quarter of the screen is 
split into two parts. The top part, titled 
Visible Objects, is used when you move 
up close to an object. The object name 



is listed. If your monitor does not make 
it clear what the object is, this makes 
identification much easier. 

The bottom is titled Inventory and is 
just that. This is very nice since, at a 
glance, you always know what you are 
currently carrying. If your screen is so 
bad that even the writing in these two 
areas is illegible, you can type VIEW or 
INVENT to have that area printed on the 
lower half of the screen. 

As in all Adventure games, a map is 
helpful, and it is always advisable to 
save your game often. Caladuril allows 
you the option of saving only one game. 
But all good Adventurers can over- 
come. To play Caladuril, you use the 
Boot disk to start, and insert a Player 
d isk to play. While the boot disk is copy- 
protected, it is recommended to make 
a backup of the player disk. So, make 
a couple of backups of the player disk 
and save the game in multiple stages. 

You must have a player disk in the 
drive as you play the game since it 
occasionally goes to the disk to load 
pictures and data about the new areas, 
but any player disk will do this. You can 
put in a new player disk anytime you 
want to save the game at the new loca- 
tion. 



Caladuril has a Restart command 
that protects you. Typing RESTART after 
you load a game puts it back to the 
nearest non-critical point. At this point 
the game can be won. You may use 
Restart at any time during the game, so 
you could use it to try different solu- 
tions to the same problem. 







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The documentation states that the 
program requires a Color Computer 
with 64K and a disk drive and that it 
also runs on a CoCo 3. It did run on my 
CoCo 3 just like my CoCo I, almost. 
While the play and look of the game was 
the same on both machines, Caladuril 
was compatible with ADOS on my 
CoCo I, but it was not compatible with 
ADOS 3. I had to throw my trusty little 




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December 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 35 



switch to go to Radio Shack DOS. The 
Fast command puts the CoCo 3 in the 

double-speed mode and Slow returns it. 

These commands are ignored by the 

CoCo 1 and 2. 
I really enjoyed Caladuril Flame of 

Light, but I have to admit, I did not 

solve it. 

(Diecom Products Inc., 6715 Fifth Lane, 
Milton, Ontario, Canada L9T 2X8, 416-878- 
8358; $28.95 US; $38.95 CDN plus $2 S/H) 

— Dale Shell 



L Settware- CoCo3 1 

CBASIC III — 
Power for 
Programmers 

c BASIC III is a complete editor/ com- 
piler programming system for the 
Tandy Color Computer 3. By imple- 
menting all standard BASIC statements, 
including the new Hi-Res commands, 
complemented with an excellent text 
editor, and topping it all with an effi- 
cient compiler, Cer-Comp has given 
CoCo 3 BASIC programmers a powerful 
tool. 

Just what is a compiler, anyway? A 
compiler converts BASIC code into 
machine language, creating programs " 
which are accessed by LDRDM and EXEC. 
The main advantage to this format is 
extra speed of execution. The Color 
BASIC which comes built into the CoCo 
3 is in the f orm of an interpreter. As each 
BASIC line of code is encountered, it is 
"interpreted," then converted to binary 
code which implements the instructions 
on a line-by-line basis. A compiler, on 
the other hand, pre-converts the BASIC 
code into pure machine language, thus 
allowing the resulting binary code to 
skip the repeated need to interpret each 
line. This results in much faster instruc- 
tion execution. 

CBASIC III has gone this one better by 
adding many additional BASIC com- 
mands to the programmer's repertoire, 
and has added a more powerful text 
editor to assist in writing and debugging 
BASIC code. 

The program comes on a single copy- _ 
protected disk, along with a well- 
written manual. Users can back up the 
original disk, but the copy is not exec- 

136 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



utable. It is kept aside to be available 
for restoration of the original, should it 
ever become unusable. The manual is 
neatly done, featuring a spiral binder, a 
handy feature for keeping your place 
when working. 

When CBASIC ///is loaded, the editor 
is automatically active. It has not only 
the standard basic editing commands, 
but some added features as well. Some 
of these are quite powerful. For exam- 
ple, 5ERRCH, as suggested by the name, 
searches through the program for a 
given string. RPLRCE replaces a given 
string with another. Key repeat is imple- 
mented and the repeat speed controlled 
with RDELRY. Characters per line can be 
altered with SW (Set Width). Many more 
editing commands, such as LEDIT, 
RED IT, PRINTER, SIZE, BRRTE, LF, 
CCDLDR, etc., have also been added. 
Programming commands have not been 
overlooked and quite a few interesting 
ones are added. Some, like 5WRPS (a 
handy one) and GEN (allows ML in- 
structions to be directly inserted) are so 
powerful you will wonder why they 
weren't there in the first place. Others 
include HIRES, UNLINK, CBLINK, SIGN, 
□N INTERUPT, IRQ, LPOKE, DLPOKE, 
RRM, CHRIN, etc. Access is afforded to 
a full 512K of memory. There is no need 
to go into detail as to particular func- 
tions in this review. Suffice it to say that 
they are of value, and are fully docu- 
mented in the accompanying manual. 
Once edited, programs are saved in an 
ASCII format, with the extension /CBR 
automatically appended. 

After the code is saved, compiling can 
safely take place. Starting the compile 
process is as simple as typing CBRSIC 
program name. As the program com- 
piles each line, errors are highlighted for 
ease of further editing. Output of the 
line-by-line error checking can be di- 
rected to a printer for maximum con- 
venience in further editing. The result- 
ing code is automatically saved with the 
/BIN extension. Assuming all errors 
have been corrected, this code can be 
loaded with the LORDM command, just 
as any other /BIN program. 

There are some differences between 
Color BASIC and CBASIC III. For one, the 
dimensioning of strings (DIM) is handled 
differently by CBASIC III. Variable in- 
itialization to particular values is also 
needed. Don't worry about that, the 
author shows you a shortcut. Most 
command syntax remains identical to 
the Color BASIC version. 

Like most of us with a new program, 
I couldn't wait to get started with this 
review. I quickly saved a couple of my 



own BASIC programs in ASCII format 
and tried compiling them. Much to my 
amazement, I had them compiled and 
working just fine in only a few minutes. 
Don't get me wrong — this does not 
happen every time. To fully utilize a 
program with this power, you have to 
read and maybe reread the manual. 
Most of the problems I did encounter 
turned out to be just a matter of my not 
following instructions. 

In summation, I would say that Cer- 
Comp has created a real winner with 
CBASIC III. As a CoCo user since the 
days of 4K and a tape drive, I am always 
anxious to try out the latest in CoCo 
hardware and software. Over the years, 
few products have impressed me as 
much as this one. Simply put, CBASIC 
III is an all-around excellent package. 

(Cer-Comp, 5566 Ricochet Avenue, Las 
Vegas, NV 89110, 702-452-0632; $149) 

— Leonard Hyre 



-Settwaro J 

CoCo Max II 
Patch — 
CoCo 3 Helper 

CoCo Max II Patch is a set of pow- 
erful new programs from ColorVenture 
that allow owners of CoCo Max II to 
use this popular program on their CoCo 
3. This is done with the use of Tandy's 
Hi-Res Joystick Interface (Cat. No. 26- 
3028) that sells for $9.95 at Radio Shack 
stores nationwide. 

Not only can you use CoCo Max II 
on your old Color Computer with the 
Colorware Hi-Res Joystick Interface 
Pack, you can use it on your CoCo 3 
with the simple addition of the Tandy 
Hi-Res Interface. With this approach, 
you don't even need the Multi-Pak 
Interface or a Y-cable, and you can 
access 256-by-l 92 pixels using a joy- 
stick, mouse or X-pad. One word of 
caution: You have to use either an RGB 
monitor capable of color composite 
video, a color composite monitor or a 
color TV, since the Tandy CM-8 does 
not display artifact colors. If you use 
these patches for CoCo Max II with 
your CoCo 3 and CM-8 monitor, you 
will get pictures in black and white. 

The disk contains patches for CoCo 



Max II, Max Edit and a program called 
HJOYSTK. The patches are very simple 
to install. A new file, NENMflX, results 
and is used to run the patched Co Co 
Max II program on your CoCo 3. A 
direct patch is provided for Max Edit 
if you have it and is run just like before 
with RUN "MAXEDIT". In both cases, you 
are instructed to make a backup copy 
of your original disks before you at- 
tempt either of the patches. The CoCo 
Max //patch program disk is not copy- 
protected, so backup copies for your 
protection are recommended. 

The third program on the disk, 
HJOYSTK, is a Hi- Res Joystick Interface 
driver that provides a way to access all 
640-by-640 pixels available on the 
CoCo 3 from your own BASIC or ma- 
chine language programs. This is a 
handy utility program that can be used 
to support the Tandy Hi-Res Joystick 
Interface used with not only your joy- 
stick, but with a mouse or X-pad as well. 
A demo program is supplied that dem- 
onstrates the use of HJOYSTK. 

I liked CoCo Max II Patch. It was 
simple to install the two patches and 
CoCo Max //worked fine on my CoCo 
3. 1 was able to load, view and edit many 



of my old CoCo Max II pictures with 
no problem. 

(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 264, 
Howard Beach, NY 11414, 718-835-1344; 
$24.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Michael Beckman 

' Softwar e CoCo12&3 

QuikPro+II - 
Writes 

Databases for You 

I have often heard the old cliche, 
"Seeing is believing, " and sometimes 
you really do have to see to believe. This 
is a case in point. 

Several months ago, 1 received in the 
mail an advertisement from ICR Fu- 
tureSoft offering to sell me a $149 
program called QuikPro+II for the 
small sum of $29.50. With such a price 



drop a few "flags of doubt" arose in my 
mind. But what really raised those flags 
to a level of rejection was the advertise- 
ment's claim that this was a piece of 
software that would write programs for 
you, and you didn't even have to know 
how to program the computer. 1 figured 
that this was just too good to be true and 
threw the advertisement away. 

A few months later, lo and behold, 
here comes a review package from 
rainbow with that very piece of software 
in it. So, OK, we now have a way to 
really test the advertising claims. 

The packaging of QuikPro+II was 
really impressive. It came in a nice vinyl 
case and contained an 80-page instruc- 
tion manual. I really didn't see how they 
could even put out this sort of package 
for such a small sum. So the "catch" 
must be that there's something wrong 
with the software — right? Wrong! 

I scanned the manual for enough 
information to get the program up and 
running. The purpose of QuikPro+II is 
to write programs that will set up and 
allow input and maintenance of data- 
bases. Following the instructions in the 
manual and the onscreen prompts, I set 
up a screen of data input fields for a 



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Finally, a veraitile text 
formatter is available for the Color 
Computer. lfcJU rURH is compatible with 
all models with at. least 64K. even the 
Color Comouter [II. This fcichme 
language program will format ASCII 
text fi los into two column pages 
quickly and oasily. Toxt nay be left 
unmodified, or simply insert spocial 
forma ttor commands Tor added control. 
TEXTFORH is a versitile enhancement to 
any word processing system whether you 
aro a casual or professional user. 

Software supports: 

- Output to printer or disk 

- Most popular printers 

- Adjustable format parameters 

- Columnar data 

- Hultiplo page titles 

- Optional pago numbering 

- Large files (up to a full disk) 

TEDCTF0RK comes with compute 
documentation as well as sample 
format examples. Onscreen parameter 
display takes the guesswork out of 
format settings. Customized parameters 
may be saved to disk and reloaded for 
future use. thus eliminating Bistakoc 
and configuration time. Special 
printer codas and baud rata settings 
are software seLectablo. TOCTFORM is 
programmed in a high resolution 
envi ronment which incorporates 
pull -down monus for oase of use. The 
loftwaro also supports auxilliary 
peripheral input from joysticks, 
mouse, touchpad . and high resolution 
input pack for added program control. 



This is not anothor word 
processor. Thore aro many fine vord 
processors on the market for the Color 
Computer. TEXTFORM is a user 
definoable two column toxt formatter. 
If you are Looking for a program which 
will allow your Color Computer to 
create profeisional looking documents 
vi thout hours of tedious work, then 
TCXTFORH is the Answer. 

Ideal for: 

- School newspapers 

- Club nevs letters 

- Business reports 

- Bu 1 1 o 1 1 n s 

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- Color Computer (64K minimum) 

- Disk drive 

- Printer 



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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 137 



program to maintain employee records 
of a mythical company. Even with my 
constant referral to the manual, it only 
took a few minutes. Then I pressed a key 
and a message came on the screen to tell 
me that my program was being written 
for me. I had not entered a single line 
of programming. After a few more 
minutes, a message came on the screen 
to tell me that my program was reading 
and asked if I wanted a hard copy 
printout. 

Qui k Pro +11 had done exactly what it 
said it would — write a five-page, 
tightJy-packed BASIC program that I 
could run like any other BASIC program 
to create a database for maintaining 
employee records. It was unbelievable! 
But the software doesn't stop there. 
There was more, a lot more. 

QuikPro+II also asked if I wanted a 
user's manual to go along with my new 
program. Not only did it write the 
program, it wrote the documents to go 
along with it. 

Further study of the Quik Pro+II 
manual indicated that the program will 
sort the records for you, if desired, and 
that you could even make some of the 
data input fields "calculation" fields. 
That is, fields that can be mathemati- 
cally manipulated, I am absolutely 
amazed at what this program can do, 
and I had thrown the original advertise- 
ment offer away. 

Needless to say, I was extremely 
curious as to how this piece of software 
could do what it does, so I immediately 
dove into it. The disk contains 1 1 files. 
All are ASCII BASIC or text files. The 
version I was working with was de- 
signed for the CoCo 1 or 2, one disk 
drive, and a 32~by-16 screen. However, 
it does run on the CoCo 3; it just won't 
take advantage of the CoCo 3's ex- 
panded potential, i.e., 80-by-24 column 
screen. What the programmers of Quik- 



Happy 
Holidays! 




Pro+II have done is to very cleverly take 
advantage of the file merge functions of 
ASCII files. (This, of course, does cost 
a little in time for the slower ASCII 
program loads, but once your program 
has been written, it can be saved back 
to disk in the faster loading compressed 
or binary BASIC format). 

By using this merge function, most of 
the final program can already be writ- 
ten, and it is only a matter of taking 
what is needed to complete the user's 
created program. This goes for the 
newly-written program's user manual as 
well. 

One of the promises QuikPro+II 
makes, and it carries it out very well, is 
that your new program will be highly 
commented with remark statements. 
They, likewise, follow this same practice 
with their own programs. Now ordinar- 
ily, a program written in BASIC, partic- 
ularly in ASCII BASIC, with a lot of 
remark statements, is extremely slow, a 
big disadvantage. In the case of Quik- 
Pro+II, while it is slow to load, it does 
not seem to suffer any from a lack of 
speed in operation. And for the (ffoCo 
3 user, the disadvantages of this highly 
commented ASCII BASIC program turn 
out to be a real big advantage. 

Because of the consistency in pro- 
gram design and the use of fairly stand- 
ard BASIC, QuikPro+II can easily be 
modified to take advantage of the 80- 
by-24 screen size of the CoCo 3. There 
are even places in the program already 
set up for u error traps," (a function not 
supported on the CoCo 1 or 2). Most 
of the modifications only have to do 
with increasing the size of set variables 
having to do with screen size and the 
like. 

In fact, the only disadvantage of the 
Quik Pro+II system is the hardware 
limitation of the CoCo 1 and 2 32-by- 
16 screen. Part of this screen must be 
used by the program for prompts and 
line guides, so this limits the number 
and size of the data fields that can be 
designed and utilized. Other than that 
one small disadvantage, I must say that 
this is one of the best programmed 
pieces of BASIC software that I have 
seen. 

After working with QuikPro+II for 
this review, I am now sorry that I did 
not respond to the original advertise- 
ment mailer. Seeing what the program 
can do made a believer out of me. 

(ICR FutureSoft, P.O.Box 1446-FC, 
Orange Park, FI 32073, 800-872-8787; 
$29.50 plus $4.50 S/H) 

— Kerry Armstrong 



CoCo 



- Software 

MLBASIC — 
Create Machine 
Language Programs 

MLBASIC is an enhanced BASIC com- 
piler written for the 128K CoCo 3 with 
Radio Shack DOS. It is a full compiler 
that features most of the commands 
available with Extended Disk BASIC, 
but added commands in MLBASiCmakz 
it easy to interface programs with 
assembly language and other BASIC 
programs. Best of all, MLBASIC allows 
CoCo 3 users who are not familiar with 
machine language programs to create 
them from their BASIC listings with ease. 
Default options are provided at the 
menu level and make first-time users 
feel at ease. 

MLBASicls provided on disk only and 
comes with a comprehensive 172-page, 
spiral-bound user's manual. The disk is 
not copy-protected, so you can make a 
backup copy for safekeeping. The pro- 
gram is very easy to use and, as already 
mentioned, menu-driven. Since it's for 
the CoCo 3, the menu is done in 80- 
column format with red and white 
letters on a black background. The user 
simply steps through the menu prompts 
and selects such items as whether or not 
the program to be compiled is in mem- 
ory or on disk, filenames to be used, etc. 
Since the compiler actually translates 
your BASIC or source program into a 
new object file, it can be relocated and 
executed where it is, as opposed to the 
file being interpreted one line at a time 
as in BASIC. MLBASIC also optimizes the 
program, thus increasing operating 
speed. 

I tried MLBASIC on several of my 
BASIC programs and was impressed 
with the obvious increased speed. The 
authors claim typical increases of 10 to 
20 percent but it looked more like 50 
percent to me. 

The user's manual contains step-by- 
step instructions and lots of examples. 
It supports virtually all RS-DOS com- 
mands and has added some of its own. 
Numerical error codes are used (and 
explained in the user's manual) to flag 
programming faults. 

MLBASIC is a fine program for any 
serious programmer. 

(WasatchWare, 7350 Nutree Drive, Salt 
Lake City, UT 84121, 801-943-6263; $59.95 
plus $4 S/H) 

— David Gerald 



138 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 





The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 



ADDRESS, a program that automat- 
ically addresses envelopes using any two 
addresses in the proper formatted posi- 
tion. Fifteen files hold 18 records per file 
for a total of 270 addresses. For the CoCo 
3. RJF Software, RR ti2, While Lake, 
Ontario, Canada KOA 3L0, (613) 623- 
7824; $14.95 plus $3 S/H. 

BTU Analysis 3.0, an upgrade version 
that includes disk I/O and automatic 
lowercase switching within the program. 
It also fixes bugs found in Version 1.0.0 
and 2.0.0. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. A to 
Z Unlimited, 901 Ferndale Boulevard, 
High Point, NC 27260, (919) 882-6255; 
$39. 95 plus $3 S/ H. 

CAIS Version 2.0, a checking account 
information system that is menu-driven. 
This disk-based application is designed to 
make the task of managing checking 
accounts easier and faster. For the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3. After Five Software, P. O. Box 
21095, Columbia, SC, (803) 788-5995; 
$34.95 plus $2.50 S/H 

CoCo 3 OS-9 Ramdisk Package, a pack- 
age that includes the device driver and 
descriptor necessary to implement a 
RAM disk under OS-9 Level I or II on 
a CoCo 3. Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. 
Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 11414; 
$29.95 plus $3 SJH 

Color Max III Font Editor, a program 
that allows you to design and edit your 
own character sets. For the CoCo 3. 
Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 264, 
Howard Beach, NY 11414; $29.95; Font 
Disk til, $19.95; both $39.95 plus $3 
S/H. 



< ^ > Home-Pac, a home financial package 
that lets you fill 51 to 80 characters per 
line with current credit card expenses and 
totals added to categories. For the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3. Computer Villa, 1328 48 th St., 
Des Moines, lA 50311, (515) 279-2576; 
$39.95 plus $3 S/H. 

^How to Build Your Own Video Ar- 
cade Game, an instruction booklet on 
how to rebuild a video arcade game using 
your CoCo I or 2. Also included is a disk 
that contains four games. R.A.M. Elec- 
tronics, 814 Josephine Street, Mon- 
mouth, OR 97361, (503) 838-4 144; $29.9 5. 



Corporation, 1700 One Tandy Center, 
Fort Worth, TX 76012; $99.95. Available 
in Radio Shack stores nationwide, 

< ^ > Superbrush, a tool for home or office 
that contains one Superbrush with a 
coarse grade FybRglass refill installed, 
and two extra refills made of stainless steel 
wire and fine grade FybRglass. May be 
used for removing rust spots, cleaning 
electrical contacts, and roughing surfaces 
before using epoxy or glue, etc. The 
Eraser Company, Inc., Oliva Drive, Syr- 
acuse, NY 13221, (315)454-3237; $6.98. 



OS-9 Level Two Development System, a 

system that includes an interactive de- 
bugger; a screen-oriented text editor; a 
relocating macro assembler; three utili- 
ties: Make — to help maintain current 
version software, Touch — to update files, 
and VDD — a Virtual Disk Driver/ RAM 
Disk Driver to create high-speed storage 
in your system's RAM; twelve additional 
OS-9 commands to expand your system's 
capabilities. For the CoCo 3. Tandy 



^SYNTRAX 2.00, a 64K sequencer 
that becomes the control center of your 
Musical Instrument Digital Interface 
studio, with the ability to control multiple 
music synthesizers, rhythm machines or 
other MIDI devices. Included is a demo 
disk with four pre-programmed scores. 
For the CoCo 2 and 3. Intercomp Sound, 
129 Loyalist Avenue, Rochester, NY 
14624, (716) 247-8056; $95 plus $3 S/H 

First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 
THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



i 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 39 





Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE RAINBOW'S 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed — 
legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high score. 
Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE RAINBOW. 
The ''Rainbow Scoreboard" is now a bimonthly feature. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
^CoCoSl^^romtheCoC 



* Current Record Holder 



Shutout 



ADVANCED STAR'TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 



3,975 
3,960 



★David Schaller, Clarkston, WA 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
Robbi Smith, Helena, HI 
Shaw Muniz, Los Angeles. CA 
John Fredericks, Kalkaska. Ml 
Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
BEE ZAPPER (THE RAINBOW, 9/87) 

9,650 *Benoit Landry. Drummondville. 
Quebec 

BIOSPHERE (Radio Shack) 



3.960 
3,800 
2.600 
2.450 



25.345 
21,372 
14,186 
10,056 
3.822 



★Robert St. Pierre, Coventry. Rl 
Randall Edwards. Dunlap. KS 
David Spalding. Galena Park. TX 
Carlos Gameros. El Paso. TX 
Kevin Hilton, Gurdon. AR 



86 
86 
87 
87 

89 

89 
89 
89 
91 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★i 



BOUNCING BOULDERS (Diecom) 



9,318 
8,859 
7,448 
3.994 
1.561 



★SkipTaday, EastLyme, CT 
Darrell Gilpin, Norwalk, CA 
Philip Manwarren, Harrington, ME 
Louis Bouchard. Gatineau, Quebec 
LiseNantel, L'Acadie, Quebec 
BOXING (THE RAINBOW. 8/86) 

560 ★Jason Ebbellng, Berkshire, MA 
BUBBLE WARS (THE RAINBOW, 2/86) 

52.100 ★Daniet Cecil, Bardstown, KY 
42,800 Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
41.400 Becky Rumpel, Arcadia. Wl 
26.350 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
BUZZARD BAIT ( Tom Mix) 
22.931.850 *Skip Taday, East Lyme. CT 

763,550 Geran Stalker, Rivordalo. GA 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 



1 78.200 
169.000 
159,200 
150,200 
141.400 
135.600 
128,000 
125.600 
125,000 



★Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
Gregory Speer, Emporia, KS 
Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
Brian Lewis, Baltimore. MD 
Michael Petry, Kansas, AL 
Eric Rose, Grand Coulee, WA 
Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
Tim Lang. Downieville, CA 
Tony Fortino, Tacoma, WA 



CASTLE (THE RAINBOW, 6/86) 



326,352 
228.622 
202,659 
116.606 



★Richard Donnell, Penns Grove. NJ 
John Broussard Jr.. Alexandria, LA 
Brendan Powell, La Grande, OR 
Darry.n Bearisto, New Carlisle, 
Quebec 

Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek. 
British Columbia 
COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

999-0 ★•Erik Munson, Tucson. AZ 
★•Danny Wimett, Rome. NY 
•Eugene Paoli. Wilminglon. DE 
•Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
Ghislain Chillis, Trois-Rivieres, 

Quebec 
•John Licata, Richlon Park, IL 
Frank D'Amato, Brooklyn, NY 
COLOR CAR (Novaso(t) 

209,381 *Roger Rosebrock. Leipsic. OH 
10,097 Justin Mai, Rapid City. SD 
CRYSTLE CASTLES ( ThunderViston) 

554,979 *Palrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
60,107 Alphonse Brown, Houston. TX 



93,672 



999-0 
998-0 
982-0 
866-1 

814-0 
814-1 



DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 

86 *Roy Grant, Toledo. OH 

★Melanie Moor, Florence, AL 
★Paul Summers, Orange Park. FL 
Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 
David and Shirley Johnson, 
Leicester, NC 
Chris Piche, White Rock, 

British Columbia 
Milan Parekh. Fullerton, CA 
Andrew Urquhart. Metairie, LA 
Steve Zemaitis, Howell, Ml 
John Semonln, Akron, OH 
DEF MOV (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

30.253 ★Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

DEMOLITION DERBY (Radio Shack) 
210.700 *Duke Davis, Sandwich, IL 
124,000 Judy Haviland. Caldwell. ID 
16.100 Christopher Heston, Louisville, KY 
DEMON ATTACK (Imagic) 

40.435 *Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
28,780 Daniel Streidt. Cairo. Egypt 
4,960 Laundre Clemon, Sacramento, CA 
DEVIL ASSAULT ( Tom Mix) 
1,866,100 ★Stephane Martel, Laval. Quebec 
Dale Krueger, Maple Ridge, 

British Columbia 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

99.980 *Danny Wimett, Rome, NY 

Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
Stephane Deshaies, Beloeil, Quebec 
Nell Edge, Williston, FL 
Tom Audas. Fremont, CA 
Jean-Francois Morin, Loretteville, 
Quebec 

Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
Cooper Valentin. Vavenby. 

British Columbia 
Keith Yampanis. Jaffrey, NH 
Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
Patrico Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 
Danny Perkins, Clilton Forge, VA 
Mike Ells, Charlotte, Ml 
Antonio Hidalgo, San Jose. 

Costa Rica 
Jesse Binns, Phoenix. AZ 
Andrea Maylield. Melbourne, FL 
Timothy O'Neal, Commerce, TX 
Scott Godfrey. Nashua. NH 
Christopher Heston. Louisville. KY 
Sam DiCerce, Willowich, OH 
Sarah Van Oteghem, Taylor Ridge. IL 
Kay McCluskey. Remsen. NY 
DRAGON BLADE (Prickly-Paar) 

69 *Jason Damron. Folsom, CA 
DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

146.325 ★Stephane Martel. Laval, Quebec 
5,561 Chris Lorenz, Kiester. MN 
ENCHANTER (Infocom) 

400/212 *Charly Rushing, Santa Rosa, CA 
400/621 Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 



8,910 
5.680 
3.760 
3.505 



623.550 

75.000 
59.200 



98,985 
97,740 
89,490 
77.254 
73.346 

70.142 
68.142 

67.721 
62.442 

55.300 

49.500 
43.502 
41.896 

40.360 
34,424 
25,147 
21,527 
19,835 
18,251 
18,103 
17,120 



400/431 Truman Bryerton. Jr.. B.Ville. NY 
224/358 Joseph Delaney. Augusta. GA 
185/186 David Tarleton. Williamsburg, VA 
ESCAPE 2012 (Computerware) 

202 *Roy Grant, Toledo. OH 
EVICTOR (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 

12,915 *Spencer Metcalf. Longview, TX 
10,560 Patricio Gonzalez. Buenos Aires, 
Argentina 

7.125 Jason Ebbeling. Berkshire. MA 
FALCON'S LAIR (THE RAINBOW. 8/85) 
45.425 *Talib Khan. Bronx, NY 
FIRE COPTER (Adventure International) 

64,710 ★Phillip Gregory, Moultrie, GA 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/86) 
22.505 *Chad Presley. Luseland. 
Saskatchewan 
Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
Rick Beevers. Bloomfield. MN 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

26.370 *Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
9,930 Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
GAL AGON (Spectral Associates) 

328,820 ★Bernard Burke, Lee's Summit. MO 
Jason Clough, Houston. TX 
Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
Danny Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
Vernon Johnson III, Parkville, MD 
Scoll Jamison. Billerica, MA 
Micah Ctough, Houston, TX 
GALAX ATTACK (Spectral Associates) 

236,350 ★Corey Leopold, Nada. TX 
GALLOPING GAMBLERS (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 

3.427,660 *Sean Lair. Ewing, MO 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
23.643.720 *Geran Stalker. Rivordalo. GA 
Randall Edwards. Dunlap, KS 
Clinton Morell, Sacramento, CA 
Ken Hubbard, Madison. Wl 
Stirling Dell, Dundalk. Ontario 
Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
Jason Steele. Pensacola, FL 
Rory Kostman, Hershey, NE 
Jerry Honigman. Waggoner. IL 
Jerry Colbert, Bakerslield, CA 
Robert Fox, Dover, OH 
Donnie Pearson, Arvada, CO 
Michael Wallace. Bronx. NY 
John Hotaling, Duanesburg, NY 
Edward Swatek, Chicago, IL 
Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
Brian Hunter, South Berwick, ME 
Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
Karen Jessen, Cleveland. OH 
Robbie Smith. Helena. HI 
Scott Jamison. Billerica, MA 
Billy Helmick, Independence, KY 
David Gordon, Pierre, SD 



255,080 
249,960 
169.410 
149,520 
116.280 
116,000 



20,921,490 
10,222.940 
10,020,500 
7,493,340 
2,626,950 
2,512,620 
2,312,640 
2,115,790 
2,011,200 
1,108,750 
1.094,280 
1.081 ,530 
1,025,900 
1,016.050 
933.740 
932,660 
787,780 
685.840 
667,390 
456.220 
410.868 
79,570 



GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 

523.080 ★Joseph Delaney. Augusta. GA 
252,840 Edward Rocha. Cobleskill. NY 

GIN CHAMPION (Radio Shack) 

2.272 ★Michael Petry, Kansas, AL 





GRABBER (Tom Mix) 

432,650 *Matthew Fumich, Munlord, TN 
HALL OF THE KING (Prickly-Pear) 

107 *Joshua Wanagel, Freeville. NY 
HOME ROW BOMBER (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 
6,384 *Timothy Hennon, Highland, IN 
3,372 Benoit Landry. Drummondville, 
Quebec 

2,420 Stephane and Patrick Martel, 
L.3V3I Quebec 
JOKER POKER (THE RAINBOW, 3/87) 
2,793,285 *Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
13,377 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
THE JUNGLE (THE RAINBOW, 8/84) 

432,223 *Michael Nystrom, West Bridgewater, 
MA 

JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computerwere) 
2,503,000 ★Slephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
257,600 Keith Cohen. Rocky Mount. NC 
JUNKFOOD (THE RAINBOW, 1 1/84) 

18,650 *Daniel Streidt. Cairo. Egypt 
KARATE (Diecom Products) 

11,600 *Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
6,300 David Darling. Longlac, Ont ario 
THE KING (Tom Mix) 
3,824,280 *Andre Grenier, Quebec, Canada 
22,400 Spencer Metcalf. Longview. TX 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 

186,710 *Tohy Harbin, Cullman, AL 
184,120 John Farrar, Lebanon, TN 
84,830 Thomas Beruheimer, Yoru, PA 
84,070 David Spalding. Galena Park, TX 
33,900 Steven Moreno, Stockton, CA 
13,210 David Ewing, Deatsville, AL 
LANCER (Spectral Associates) 

567,200 *Luke Birinyi. Pefferlaw, Ontario 
227,800 Andre Grenier. Valleyfield, Quebec 
178,800 Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
99i700 David Kauffman, South Haven, Ml 
LUNAR RESUCE (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 
113.579 *Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
LUNCHTIME (Novasoft) 

444,325 * Richard Donnell, Penns Grove. NJ 
136,925 Alphonse Brown, Houston, TX 
55,550 Richard Deane, Chicago, IL 
42,025 Steve Place. Webster, NY 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

5,172 *Jason Ebbeling. Berkshire, MA 
MINIGOLF (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

29 *Jason Ebbeling. Berkshire, MA 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
468,750 *Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
355,570 Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
318,160 Jeremy Pruski. Sandwich. IL 
137,920 Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
127,550 Michael Heitz. Chicago, IL 
120,670 Vernon Johnson Ml, Parkville. MD 
58,530 Chris Wright. New Albany, IN 
MOON HOPPER (Computerwere) 

103,840 ★ Alphonse Brown, Houston, TX 
51,870 Martin Kertz, Forrest City, AR 
M\JDP\ES (MichTron) 

486,500 ★Stephane Martel. Laval, Quebec 
MUNCHKIN BLASTER (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
9,000 *Benoit Landry, Drummondville, 
Quebec 

7,240 Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
NUKE AVENGER (T&D Soflwere) 

60,250 *Doug Lute, Clymer, PA 
OMN1VERSE (Computerwere) 

1 12 *Roy Grant, Toledo. OH 
ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1,276-0 **Jonathan Dorris. Indianapolis. IN 
1,210-0 «Gregg Thompson, Chesterfield. VA 
1,204-0 *Chad Johnson. Benton, AR 
1,160-0 *Mark Lang. Downieville, CA 
1,132-23 Dan Liffmann, Andover, MA 
1,122-4 Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
PAPER ROUTE (Diecom Products) 
1,120,350 *Neil Haupt. Elyria. OH 
1,059,350 David Kauffman, South Haven, Ml 
830.950 Christopher Darden, Woodson 

Terrace, MO 
720,560 Konnie Siewierski, Schaumburg, IL 
531,600 Larry Shelton, Marion. I L 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM RIDERS (Radio Shack) 
303.100 *Mike Grant, Fresno. CA 
244,100 Martinez Domingo. Miami, FL 



PINBALL (Radio Shack) 

213,300 * Patrick Martel. Laval, Quebec 
142,400 Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
PITFALL II (Aclivision) 

199,000 *Sean Noonan, Green Bay. Wl 
PITSTOP II (Epyx) 

54 *Rusty Breltbach, Rickardsville. LA 
54 *Jeff Coburn, Easton, PA 
54 *Walter Hearne. Pensacola, FL 
54 *Sean Noonan, Green Bay, Wl 
51 Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
49 Randy Venable, Coal City. WV 
9 Laundre Clemon, Sac ramento, CA 
POLARIS (Radio Shack) 

1 61 , 1 98 ★ Danny Remick, Warren. M I 
POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 

4,855 *Darcy Gifford. Portland. OR 
4,080 Alphonse Brown, Houston, TX 
POOYAN (Dataso(t) 

99,500,300 *Danny Wimett. Rome, NY 
97,500,000 Rich Fiore, Clemson, SC 
54,500,000 Carlos Gameros. El Paso, TX 
3,785,000 Ben Collins. Clemson. SC 
1 ,987,000 Jon Sowle. Sanford. FL 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

94.470 ^Patrick Martel. Laval, Quebec 
PYRAMID (Radio Shack) 

220 *Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
PYRAMID 2000 (Radio Shack) [ 

100 *Peter Antonacopoulos, Toa Baja, 
Puerto Rico 

QUIX(7om Mix) 

8,407,772 *John Haldane, Tempe, AZ 
1,404,000 Curtis Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
1,003,104 Ellsa Goodson, Sao Paulo. Brazil 
205,335 John Hotaling. Duanesburg. NY 
104,034 Christopher Conley, 
North Attleboro, MA 
RADIO BALL (Radio Shack) 
6,330,350 *Myriam Ferland. Trois-Rivieres. 
Quebec 

4,510,740 Les Dorn. Eau Claire, Wl 
1,945,110 Dominic Deguire. St. Basile. Quebec 
1,768.940 Brian Buss, Whitehall, PA 
1,631,750 David Del Purgatorio, Antioch, CA 
RAIDE.RS (THE RAINBOW, 11/86) 

2,100 ★Dave Allessi, Iselin, N J 
RESCUE ON FRACTALUS (Epyx) 

99,967 *Gary Sebastian, Hazel Park. Ml 
48,445 Steven Moreno, Stockton, CA 
RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Colorware) 
1,792,800 *Chad Presley. Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 

ROGUE (Epyx) 

27,542 *Melanie Lapoint, Fitchburg, MA 
17,851 Yvan Langlois, Laval. Quebec 
8,812 Allen Houk. San Diego. CA 
6.576 Kirk Marshall, Westport, MA 
5,679 David Spalding. Galena Park. TX 
5,369 John Moore, Ottawa. OH 
5.274 Reland Brumfield, LaJolla. CA 
4,719 Mary Calcott. LaJolla, CA 
SAILOR MAN (Tom Mix) 

332,600 *Jeremy Carter, Spring Lake Park, MN 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

82 *Edward Rocha. Cobleskill, NY 

86 Roy Grant. Toledo, OH 

87 Nell Haupt. Elyria, OH 
SAUCER DEFENSE (THE RAINBOW, 4/87) 

30,900 ★Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire. MA 
SHOOT'N RANGE (THE RAINBOW. 8/87) 

5,433 *Benoit Landry. Drummondville. 
Quebec 

SHORT-TERM MEMORY TEST (THE RAINBOW. 12/85) 
20 *Brian and Harold Matherne, 
Gretna, LA 
SLAY THE NERIUS (Radio Shack) 

73,091 *Jeff Remick, Warren. Ml 
SPACE AMBUSH (Computerware) 

250.000 *Roger Spackman, Gaspe. Quebec 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

148,050 *Alan Martin, Cornwall, Ontario 
130,720 Patricio Gonzalez. Buenos Aires, 
Argentina 
SPEEDSTER (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 

3,350 *Jamie Stoner. Mt. Union, PA 
SPIDERCIDE (Radio Shack) 

6,170 *Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 



3,820 



3,540 
2,550 
2,000 
1,740 
1,160 



NJ 



Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
James Church, Pointe Claire. Quebec 
Charles Marlow, Briarwood, NY 
Mike Watson. Northville. NY 
Joel DeYoung, Manson, Manitoba 
Jason Ebbeling, Berkshire, MA 
STARLORD (THE RAINBOW, 8/86) 
10,489,710 ^Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

STELLAR LIFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 

629,000 *Steven Smith, Matthews, NC 
114,620 Martinez Domingo, Miami, FL 
SUCCESS MANSION (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

1 3/13 *Dave Allessi, Iselin, NJ 
SUPER ROOTER (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

15,180 *Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, 
1 1,090 Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia. 
Canada 

3,910 Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

303,600 *T'tm Hennon, Highland. IN 
TIME BANDIT (MichTron) 

89,650 *Sarah Rollin, San Bruno. CA 
48,990 Andrew Rollin, San Bruno. CA 
TREASURE QUEST (THE RAINBOW 11/86) 

645,360 ★Stephane Martel. Laval, Quebec 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

132 *Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
123 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
TUT'S TUMB (Mark Data) 

118,720 *Reina Roy. Carleton. Quebec 
72,000 Chad Presley, Luseland. 

Saskatchewan 
60,020 Don Siler, Muncie. IN 
45,000 Blake Cadmus. Reading, PA 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) 

2,032 *Tony Harbin. Cullman, AL 
2,032 *Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
2,008 Philip Puffinburger, Winchester, VA 
1,995 Denise Rowan, Minneapolis, MN 
1,988 Randall Edwards. Dunlap, KS 
1 ,975 Bernard Florence, Croydon, Australia 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAiNBOW, 7/86) 
18,813 *Talib Khan, Bronx. NY 
10,489 Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
6,294 Pal O'Neill. Nepean, Ontario 
4,643 Martha James. Swarthmore, PA 
3,285 Richard Donnell. Penns Grove, NJ 
THE VORTEX FACTOR (Mark Data) 

100/276 *Tommy Crouser, Dunbar, WV 
100/483 Rick & Brenda Stump. 

Laureldale, PA 
210 Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 
British Columbia 
WARP FACTOR X (Prickly-Pear) 

5,829,559 *Doug Lute. Clymer, PA 
WILD WEST (Tom Mix) 

38 *Neil Haupt, Elyria. OH 
WRESTLE MANIAC (Diecom) 

956,971 *Mar.c Reiter, Cincinnati, OH 
546,315 Louis Bouchard. Gatineau, Quebec 
45,483 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
39,086 Billy Helmick, Independence. KY 
26,599 Jonathon Ross. Pocomoke City. MD 
ZAKSUND (Elite Software) 

39,950 ★ Walter Hearne. Pensacola, FL 
ZAXXON (Oatasoft) 



★Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
Blake Cadmus, Reading. PA 
Dan Brown, Pittsford, NY 
Andrew Urquhart, Metairie, LA 
Bob Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 
Matthew Yarrows, East Hampton, MA 
Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
Upton Thomas, Arnold. MD 
Jeff Miller, Bronson, Ml 
Tim Lang, Downieville. CA 
David Darling, Longlac. Ontario 
David Anderson, Midlothian, VA 
ZONX (THE RAINBOW. 10/85) 

6,500 *Daniel Streidt, Cairo. Egypt 
ZUES (Aardvark) 

3,380 *Martin Kertz, Forrest City, AR 



2,061,000 
1 .950.000 
1,300,500 
1.100,600 
253,400 
170,600 
163.700 
119,600 
118,100 
111,400 
87,200 
83,700 
81,000 



— Jody Doyle 



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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 141 





^^^r^onjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, which appears 
bimonthly, we offer this column of pointers for our game-playing 
readers' benefit. If you have some interesting hints, tips or responses 
to questions, or want help yourself, we encourage you to write to the 
i \ Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. y 



FEEDBACK 

In response to questions from: 

• Jaan Laansoo: In Sands of Egypt, the 
torch can be found by going to the snake, 
then going west twice, south once, east 
once and then digging. 

• Brien Louque: In Sands of Egypt, you 
can get the water after oiling the scepter 
and getting and emptying the canteen. To 
do this, ride back to the oasis, fill and get 
the canteen. Then type DRINK. 

• Anne Fiehler: I hope you tied the boat 
to the pole in Sands of Egypt] If you did, 
don't try to get the treasures. Go to the 
crack and get your supplies. Go to the 
archway, untie the rope and look up. 
Drift until you see a hole in the roof, then 
drop and climb the ladder. Then feed, 
mount, ride and dismount the camel. 

David Rothgery 
Sheffield Lake, OH 

• David Gordon: On Level 8 in Gantelet, 
the transporters have "sensitive corners." 
You must first find them, then you may 
go one of two ways. Going up and to the 
right puts you into a chamber where the 
bones surround a pair of keys. Or you can 
go to the right, then up, but you'll have 
to avoid Death in the process. You will 
end up in front of three corridors: the left 
leads to a dead end; the right leads to a 
plate of food; and the center leads to a 
great hall. Keep going right and you'll 
find the exit, but beware of Death. 

Make sure your character is exactly on 
the teleporter or it has no effect. 

The exit to Level 14 is in the lower 
right-hand corner of Level 13. Once on 
Level 14, you can explore or just exit to 
Level 15. After Level 15, you start to 
repeat levels. The exit on Level 15 is in 
one of the corners but it's not easy to get 
to. 

David Schulze 
S*n Antonio, TX 

• Jason Bell: You cannot carry the treas- 
ure in Sands of Egypt, so type GET 
LADDER , GO CRACK, GO ARCHWAY , 
UNTIE ROPE, UNTIE ROPE again (once 
for the pole and once for the boat). Ride 



the current to the place where the hole is 
by pressing enter over and over. Then 
type DROP LADDER and CLIMB. 

In Pyramid 2000, to get the statue you 
have to drop the scepter first. To open the 
sarcophagus you need the jewel encrested 
key. Does the nest of golden eggs belong 
to the statue? 

In the Interbank Incident, what do you 
put in the slot on the yacht? 

Patrick Slagle 
Thibodaux, LA 

• Rusty Merritt: To open the painted 
door in Bedlam, you have to get Napo- 
leon in the room with the painted door 
and ask him to open the door. 

Edward Rocha 
Cobleskilh NY 

• Steve Moore: After you find the secret 
passage in Raaku-Tu, type GO IN PAS- 
SAGE, but make sure you have everything 
you want because you cannot return to 
the temple. 

Also in Raaku-Tu, I know how to get 
out of the temple but what do I do after 
I am out? How do I get over the rug or 
do I even need to get over it? 

Tony Bacon 
Mt. Vernon, IN 

• Scott Melton: In Sands of Egypt, to 
avoid dying, start by going north three 
times and then west twice. 

Marshall Miller 
Oneonta, NY 



• Damon McGaughey: In Hall of the 
King, you have to type POUR ACID and 
when itsays"where?"type STEEL BANDS. 
Then get the one key piece and go to the 
room with the gate. Bend the crowbar 
and the rest is up to you. 

Spencer Metcalf 
Longview, TX 



Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, when you 
get a ring revealed, look the word up in 
the dictionary; it gives you a better clue. 

Darren King 
York ton, Saskatchewan 



Scoreboard: 

Kill as many creatures and get as many 
items as you can before you venture into 
the second level in Dungeons of Daggo- 
rath. The stone giants and the knights are 
the toughest and the most dangerous. 
Place everything in front of you before 
you fight anything. Do not use pine 
torches on the third level. 

In Sands of Egypt, the only items 1 can 
find are the magnifier, shovel, torch and 
canteen. Where are the scepter and the 
dates? 

Eric Reitz 
Mend ham, NJ 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, how do 
you kill the wizard's image? 

In Dallas Quest, how can I pass the bay 
with the monkey without sinking? 

Marc Paul in 
La me que, New Brunswick 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, during a 
fight, find a good safe spot and drop most 
or all of your inventory. Most creatures 
will not attack you until they pick up 
everything on the floor. While they are 
picking up the objects, attack them. This 
works on all creatures except the scor- 
pions, wizard's image and, of course, the 
wizard. 

Stephen Dodgen 
Pascagoula, MS 

Scoreboard: 

In Rogue, how do you kill a griffin? I 
try to polymorph them, but by that time 
I'm too weak. Is the Amulet of Yendor 
always on Level 26? I made it to that level 
but never found the amulet. 

Kirk Marshall 
West port, MA 

Scoreboard: 

In Rogue, when you get to Level 6, or 
where there are sleeping leprechauns, 
don't try and hit them. Shoot them with 
a crossbow or bow from the farthest 
distance possible but still be in the same 
room and shoot at them until they are 
dead. Sometimes you can get 500 gold 
pieces. 



142 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 



In Blackbeard's Island, where do you 
fish f or the anchor? 

Cory Harris 
Janesville, W1 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid, after you have the eggs 
and the key, use the key to open the 
sarcophagus. To cross the pit, wave the 
scepter. You do not have to worry about 
the batteries; they will be replaced auto- 
matically after your lamp goes out. 

Keep in mind buying the batteries 
prevents you from winning the game. 

In Sands of Egypt, try looking at the 
carving and have your snake oil ready. 

In Bedlam, certain things cannot be 
accomplished unless they are part of the 
solution. To open the painted door, you 
must first meet Picasso, then get a lobot- 
oiny. If the painted door is in your cell 
after this, you can open it. 

To kill the dog, put the pill in the meat 
and feed the meat to the dog. 

To get the torch in Sands of Egypt, go 
south twice from the cliff and dig. Also, 
the rope is a hint; it will come in handy 
below the pool. The dates are at the top 
of the tree. 

In Madness and the Minotaur, you 
score points by getting spells, or return- 
ing treasures to the forest. The Power 
ring, Light ring, Truth ring and Spell- 
book are also treasures. 

To escape the maze: In the area with 
up and down exits in every room, go 
south as far as you can go and then go 
east as far as you can go. This should put 
you in the non-random part of the maze. 
Find the dead-end room with the small 
pit in the corner and jump it. 

To get the first spell, find the food and 
the mushroom, and go to the first floor 
room where the air is crackling with 
enchantment. 

After you get all the points in Pyramid 
and Raaka-Tu, how do you win? I can 
get all the points but the game does 
nothing. 

Paul Riddle 
Sykesville, MD 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid 2000, don't waste time or 
your coins. The pots are delicate and 
need sof t ground. Af ter you can locate all 
the treasures, start over and try to go 
through it in less moves before your light 
dies. 

In the Interbank Incident, how do you 
find the crooks? 

Adam B rower 
Bossier City. LA 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, how do you use the 



dinghy? In Gates of Delirium, how do 
you use the OTHER command to get allies? 

Paul King 
Nashville, TN 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, I can't get past the 
giant rat to get the small shovel. In Sands 
of Egypt, I can only get to the part where 
I see the shovel and then I die of thirst. 

In Bag-It- Man, I get all the money into 
my hide-out; then I get stumped because 
the money is in the hide-out and I am 
getting chased all over by guards. In 
Blackbeard's Island, I get the coconut, 
but there is no way of opening it. 

In Preserve Quandic, I can't find the 
right password. 

Thomas Crowe 
Villa-vicencio, Meta, Colombia, 

Scoreboard: 

How do you get the flashlight in Dallas 
Quest? 

Ric Yates 
Corpus Chrisli, TX 

Scoreboard: 

I can't seem to find the dates used to 
feed the camel in Sands of Egypt, and I 
don't know what to do with the snake oil 
once I get to the pool. Also, where is the 
scepter? 

Mait Hoyer 
Chatsworlh, CA 

Scoreboard: 

I have the dates and have arrived at the 
pyramid in Sands of Egypt, but I f ound 
out I needed the snake oil. Before I found 
this out, I typed HELP and it said, "Did 
you have any good dates lately?" Does 
that mean I have to eat them? 

Curtis Schaaf 
Moro, IL 



Scoreboard: 

In Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, 
you must block the bulldozer until Ford 
Prefect arrives. How do you get past the 
Bugblatter Beast to the opening to the 
west from his inner lair? How can you 
steal the heart of gold after the guards 
drop their rifles, and how can you get 
past the screening door on the ship? 

In Sands of Egypt, you can't take the 
treasure. You must return to civilization 
and tell about it. To leave the under- 
ground river, you must get the ladder 
from the treasure room and climb out the 
drain f rom the boat. 

In Zork /, what do you do in the shaft 
room, and what purpose does the scepter 
serve? Can you get rid of the granite wall? 

John Austin 
Clifton, TX 



Scoreboard: 

In Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, 
how do you get the vector plotter and 
keyboard, and how do you get past the 
screening door? 

Stevie Nakahara 
Garden Grove, CA 

Scoreboard: 

In Trekboer, I can get by the first 
spider, but I can't get by the second one. 

Robert Johnston 
Toledo, OH 

Scoreboard: 

In the Interbank Incident, what's the 
IBC gold card's code number? In Sands 
of Egypt, how do you get the treasure? 

In Dr. A valoe from the First Rainbow 
Book of Adventures, to get out of the first 
room, type LOOK HOLE then DOWN HOLE. 
In Planetfall, how do you get the key in 
the crevice? 

How do you get the bird statue in 
Pyramid! 

Phil Derksen 
Hendersonville, NC 

Scoreboard: 

How do you open the safe in Vortex 
Factorl 

David Why bur d 
Peace River, Alberta 

Scoreboard: 

In Blackbeard's Island, what do I do 
with the anchor? How does it become a 
grappling hook? 

Stu Scott 
Sandyhook, CT 

Scoreboard: 

In Sea Quest, I can only find the 
anchor, pearl, diamond ring and silver. Is 
there anything else to be found? 

In Shenanigans, how do I find the 
clover field? 

Ted Scarbrough 
Clarkston, GA 

To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 

— Jody Doyle 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 143 



Farlez-V ous LoLo t rancaisf 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



ducational programs intrigue 
me, and foreign languages have 
always sustained my interest. 
Naturally, I inspected the CoCo 3 to see 
if it could be utilized in these areas. 

Having constructed various language 
programs in German, French, Italian, 
Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, not to 
mention Japanese and Russian, I 
discovered that a great disadvantage of 
older CoCos is their inability to quickly 
and effortlessly create unique letters 
formed of various diacritical marks and 
shapes inherent to specific languages. 

You are all familiar with the double- 
dot (umlaut) that graces some German 
vowels. You are also probably aware of 
the slant accents overvowels in French, 
Italian or Spanish. These marks indi- 
cate a specific phonetic value for a 
vowel or consonant, 

CoCo 3 makes most of these special 
diacritical marks available in the Hi-Res 
mode. 

Back up a minute. We previously 
learned about the fiSC function. Briefly, 
it converts a character or string variable 
to its corresponding ASCII decimal 
number. CHR$ works like a mirror image 
of fiSC and retrieves a single character 
that is represented by the ASCII dec- 
imal number code. 

All CoCo owners, pay attention! Key 

in; 

1 CL5 

10 PRINT£140, ; : INPUTX 
20 Y$=CHR$(X) 
30 PRINT12142," "Y$;X 
40 GOTD10 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 

144 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 



Run, and enter a value of 75, which 
will be our ASCII value. CoCo, using 
the CHR$ function, obligingly spits out 
the character representing the ASCII 
decimal number. 

In order to get CoCo to place the 
input question mark in the upper- 
middle of the display, I specified a 
particular 32-by-!6 screen PRINTS 
address: Line 10 does this. To make this 
stratagem plainer, quotes should have 
been inserted in front of the semicolon, 
but they are optional. To obliterate the 
prompted value, Line 30 uses another 
PRINTS with two spaces enclosed within 
quote marks. The blanks overprint the 
fiSC value input, and both the CHR$ and 
RSC values are displayed side by side. 

Try various numbers from 33 to 255 
and see what is what. 

A note of caution: If you have a Hi- 
Res program in CoCo 3 and then enter 
NEW instead of OFF and ON to load a Lo- 
Res program that doesn't have a 
WIDTH32 statement in it, you are apt to 
be astounded with an HP Error. Merely 
type in and enter WIDTH32 to get into 
sync with domineering CoCo 3. 

Type and enter 5 WIDTH32. Run and 
enter a value of 75. So far, so good. 
Now enter 5 UIIDTH40 and run. Indig- 
nant CoCo 3 gives us an anticipated HP 
Error message. 

We suspect that PRI NT@ is a no-no in 
Hi-Res CoCo 3. We convert to LO- 
CATES, b and search for equivalent a,b 
values. A guess of 15,4 comes close, but 
1 6,4 is a good replacement. Try entering 
L0CflTE16,4: ? and run. Oops! CoCo 3 
protests the other PRINTS location, and 
a conversion to LOCfiTE 19,4: is suit- 
able. Run. 

In UIIDTH40 we uncoversome strange 
characters residing in ASCII 1 28 
through 1 59. You will find the entire set 



in your manual. For a dynamic look- 
see, key in: 

7 FOR X = 12B TO 159 

35 FOR V = l TO 1000: NEXT V,X 

Rekey lines 10, 30 and 40: 

10 L0CATE1S,^:INPUTX 

30 L0CflTE19,4:PRINT V$;X 

40 GOTO? 

Run, and look at the new immigrants 
on the block. Save our work as "LOUT, 
if you desire. 

To compare the newcomers with the 
"old residents" in ASCII 128 through 
159, key in the following lines: 

40 WIDTH32 

45 FOR X=12B TO 159 

50 PRINT (5139, X 

60 V$=CHR$(X) 

70 PRINT140," "Y$;X 

(Note three spaces within quotes!) 

B0 FOR Y=l TO 1000:NEXT V,X 
90 G0T05 

Run, and save our work as "HlfiND™ 
LOW". 

In WIDTH32, flSC(9G) will print a 
reversed @. In WIDTH40, CoCo 3 will 
print a carat. You might want to change 
the number 12B to 123 in both lines 7 
and 45 to see a few more aliens. Run. 

Incidentally, if you want to check out 
the Lo-Res CHR$ characters first, press 
the BREAK key and enter RUN40-. This 
program has two separate routines that 
follow each other in a loop. The second 
one is linked with the first by Line 90. 

Now that you have had it up to here 
with PSC and CHR$, we shall give our 




undivided attention to using some of 
these "foreigners" in a language pro- 
gram. 

If you have the itch, you can make 
either authentic German or French 
language text on CoCo 3. For our 
foreign text we shall select French as the 
guinea pig. Clear your computer by 
typing and entering NEW. 

Key in listing FRENCHTX on your 
CoCo 3. If you are not into languages, 
do not worry if you misspell some 
words. Just make sure you have the 
same number of letters. (This is a demo 
— not a typing test.) 

This program is in Hi-Res text mode 
to enable CoCo 3 to show off the proper 
accented characters. 

Note that I maintain an interval of 
nine between program line numbers. 
Usually, Line 0 is reserved for a title. I 
begin with Line 10. 

□N BRK GDTD2060 tells CoCo 3 to 
change over to a 32-by- 16 screen and list 
the program up to Line 1000. This is 
done in order to position myself at the 
end of my French text block (50 through 
1999) so 1 could conveniently add more 
lines in a logical sequence. 

I like to use low numbers for GD5UB 
routine lines because they are short, 
easy to remember, easy to type and 
readily found for inspection or consul- 
tation at the beginning of a program. 

Eight useful characters are found, 
lines 1 through 8). Look in the manual 
or inspect HI flNDLDW to see which CHR$ 
is in each of the GD5UB routines. 

After 1 keyed in lines 1 through 8, 1 
was annoyed to find that 1 had to go 
around them to begin the program at 



Line 10. That's why I violated my own 
rule about reserving Line 0 for a title 
and squeezed in instructions to bypass 
the GD5UB routines. They are my rules 
and who ever heard of a rule that didn't 
have exceptions? 

Lines 20 through 40 gave me a Hi-Res 
text screen, indented my first paragraph 
and chose both the foreground and 
background colors. 

The text began on Line 50 and con- 
tinued to Line 250 on the first display 
page. CoCo 3 was then directed to a 
GG5UB routine that flashed a blinking 
prompt message asking CoCo 3 to wait 
for Fi key to be pressed. If CoCo 3 
detected PEEK ( 343) =191, it knew the 
Fi key was being pressed and would 
graciously clear the screen and locate 
the start of the second page. Otherwise, 
the CoCo would sit there all night long, 
waiting for Fl or, as you will see, F2, to 
be pressed. 

The second page was running from 
Line 265 to 390 when I stopped and 
called it a day. Line 400 calls the F2 
routine at Line 3000, where CoCo 3 
inquires if you want to return to the 
beginning of the program by pressing F2 
(if you don't respond, it will take a nap). 

Line 45 is dormant. Unmasked, it 
tells CoCo 3 to go directly to the second 
working page. This is great when you 
are working on this page and don't want 
to be bothered with the first display 
page distracting you. Lines 1240 and 
1999 are fossils from an earlier version 
of this program. 

For the record, the 'e 1 in CHR$(130) 
is called e accent aigu\ the l e' in 
CHR$ ( 138 ) is an e accent grave\ the c o' 



in CHR$(143) is o circonJJexe; and the 
'c' in CHR$ ( 135 ) is the cedilla. I had no 
occasion to use A5C(139) or (14B). 
Cest la vie\ (That's life!) 

Run our program and save it as 
"FRENCHTX". 

Look over the listing and focus in on 
Line 50. Note that every line of text will 
begin and end with a blank space. The 
reason for this will become apparent 
later. The paragraph is indented to 
begin at Column 5, and each succeeding 
line begins at Column 2. 

Consider Line 50 to be a bunch of 
statements tacked together to make up 
a strip of text on a single row. We have: 

1) PRINT" En France, un ^ 

2) GD5UB1 : 

3) PRINT" 1"; : 

4) GD5UB2 : 

5) PRINT"ve doit r"; : 

6) G05UB1 : 

7) PRI NT"ubs i r " ; 

These seven segments are glued to- 
gether with semicolons that tell CoCo 
3 to butt each succeeding statement to 
that of the preceding one. Provisions for 
butting-up are made in the GD5UB 
routines, lines 1 through 8, that house 
the special characters (look for the 
semicolon): 

1) It has both a leading and a trailing 
blank space. 

2) The accented 'e\ CHR$[130), be- 
gins a word and tacks onto the 
space allowed for in 1. 



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R 



P.O. Box 293 
Raritan, NJ 08869 
(201) 722-1055 

ENGINEERING 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 145 



3) One lonely letter is added to the 
accented 'e\ 

4) Another type of accented 'e' is 
called by BDSUB2 and attached to 
the T in 3. 

5) It adds the rest of the word and 
continues the text until the next 
special letter is due. It happens to 
occur in the middle of a word. 

6) Another accented 'e* is called up to 
join the parade of letters. 

7) Finally, the rest of the word is 
printed. Note that a blank ending 
space will be provided. For now, 
you can't see it, but rest assured 
that it is there. 

This completes the line. How do you 
Jcnow when to begin a new line of text? 
When you near the end of the line you 
must become alert. There is no hard and 
fast rule; it depends on the length of the 
words involved. 

Edit Line 50 by entering EDIT50. 
Type X to jump to the end of the line. 
Backspace two spaces. Press the space 
bar and type ";. This adds the space 
after the last word. Enter :G05UB5, 
enter, and run. This works, but you can 
see it leaves that strange vowel hanging 
in the corner. 

For argument's sake, let us add the 
next word to Line 50. Enter EDIT50, 
and type X to jump to the end of the 
line. Press I to insert, then press shifted 
0, and enter PRINT"! ' examen" ; , Press 
shifted 0 again, and press ENTER. Run. 
The word wends its way onto the inter- 
vening blank row. 

To restore the original Line 50, type 
and enter EDIT50, pressing X to jump 
to the end of the line. Backspace 28 
spaces, enter ";, and run. 



Listing 1: 



The second text line ends in a long 
word. There are two options: first, move 
the entire word to the next available text 
line; second, break the word up into 
syllables. 

How the text is ultimately formatted 
is your business. You are the typesetter. 
You may strive to keep a few blank 
spaces at the right margin. I tried but 
violated my own rule, as the last two 
lines on the first display page will attest. 
It seems to flesh out the text and appeals 
to me. 

Press Fi. The second page is merely 
a continuation of text presentation and 
could go on and on and on. I pooped 
out in the middle of the second display 
page and called it a day. You might 
consider relocating the flashing legend, 
Line 3000, to the 15th row. 

Enter EDIT3000 and press the space 
bar until the cursor is under the 2. Type 
2C, then type 15, and press ENTER. Run. 
Now it looks bad and conflicts with the 
text. Back to the drawing board! Return 
Line 3000 to its original state. 

Follow Line 70 and every succeeding 
text line, and you will find that your 
prime concerns are dual: first, to pro- 
vide spaces where required; and second, 
to end each line of text in a neat manner 
allowing for a right margin. 

Suppose we change the color to make 
neat, colorful strips of text? Enter 
EDIT40 and press X. Backspace one 
space, type 7, press ENTER, and run. 
Look at the three orange squares at the 
left edge. The last space of each of the 
offending lines ran over to the next row, 
spoiling the effect we labored so hard to 
achieve. 

It would be a lot of unproductive 
work to clear this up. "Depend" would 



Listing 2: 



have to be hyphenated, requiring an 
extra ribbon of text because, as luck 
would have it, it is the very last word 
of the paragraph. It also says something 
about lousy planning. 

The last two text lines should also be 
pushed to the following text strips, and 
this will inevitably run over and disturb 
the second display page, 

Enter EDIT265, press X and type and 
enter : RTTR4 , 7. Run, and press the Fi 
key. See how nice the second page is? 
Press F2. In conclusion, it is easier to 
hide the orange squares. 

Type and enter 235 LOCfiTE0,20 
: RTTR0 , 5. Enter EDIT240, press X, 
type : RTTR4 , 7, and press ENTER. Enter 
255 LOCATE0,22:ATTR0,5, and run. 

We did not need to restore the orange 
strip color further because we already 
edited Line 265. Save our work now, if 
you want. 

It's too bad the people at Microsoft 
didn't create the nasalized V (as in 
canyon) so that Spanish language pro- 
grams could be developed. 

German programs can be created 
with the three double-dot vowels and 
with CHR$(141) to simulate the "dou- 
ble s" consonant. 

It is safe to say that you now know 
how to utilize some of the odd-ball 
characters in Hi-Res text. This includes 
CHR$(9G) and from (123) to (159}. 
You never know when you might call on 
CoCo 3 to produce these unusual char- 
acters. 

I hope you enjoyed the editing prac- 
tice provided and received encourage- 
ment to continue to study all these little 
nitty-gritty features of CoCo 3. □ 



0 1 <HIANDLOW> 

1 CLS 

5 WIDTH40 

7 FOR X=128 TO 159 

10 LOCATE 16 , 4 : 1 INPUTX 

20 Y$=CHR$(X) 

30 LOCATE19,4:PRINTY$;X 

3 5 FOR Y=l TO 1000 : NEXTY , X 

40 WIDTH3 2 

45 FOR X=128 TO 159 

50 PRINT@139,X 

60 Y$=CHR$(X) 

70 PRINT@140, 11 ff Y$;X 

80 FOR Y=l TO 1000 : NEXTY , X 

90 GOT05 



0 GOTO10 1 <FRENCHTX> 

1 PRINTCHR$ (130) ; : RETURN 

2 PRINTCHR$ (13 8) ; : RETURN 

3 PRINTCHR$(13 5) ; I RETURN 

4 PRINTCHR$ (14 7) ; : RETURN 

5 PRINTCHR$ (13 3);: RETURN 

6 PRINTCHR$ (13 6) ; : RETURN 

7 PRINTCHR$ (131) ; : RETURN 

8 PRINTCHR$ ( 1 5 1 ) ; : RETURN 
10 ON BRK GOTO2060 

20 WIDTH40 
30 LOCATES ,1 
40 ATTR4 , 5 
45 'GOT0265 

50 PRINT" En France, un ";:GOSUB 
1 : PRINT" 1 11 ; : GOSUB2 : PRINT" ve doit 



146 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



r lf ; : G0SUB1 : PRINT "ussir 11 ; 
6j3 LOCATE2,3 

7j3 PRINT" 11 ; : GOSUB5 : PRINT 11 1 1 exa 
men qui s'appelle le bacca-"; 

8j3 LOCATE 2, 5 

9j3 PRINT" laur"; : G0SUB1 : PRINT"ea 
t (famili" ; : GOSUB2 : PRINT" rement, 

le <bac> ou" ; 
Ij3j3 LOCATE 2, 7 

llj3 PRINT" le <bachot>} avant de 
pouvier entrer" ; 

12 j3 LOCATE 2, 9 

13j3 PRINT" " ; : GOSUB5 : PRINT" l'un 
iversit" ; : GOSUB1 : PRINT" . Est-ce 
important?" ; 

14j3 LOCATE2,ll 

15j3 PRINT" C'est plus qu 1 importa 
nt; c'est un"; 

16 j3 LOCATE2,13 

170 PRINT" drame dans la vie de 
chaque jeune"; 

18 j3 LOCATE2,15 

19j3 PRINT" Fran"; : G0SUB3 : PRINT"a 
is. Tout son avenir en d";:GOSU 
Bl:PRINT"pend. "; 
2j3j3 LOCATE5,17 

210 PRINT" On passe 1 1 examen dan 
s toute la" ; 

22 j3 LOCATE2 / 19 

23j3 PRINT" France au m";:G0SUB6: 
PRINT"me moment; les copies des" 

r 

24 0 LOCATE2,21 

25$ PRINT" 11 ; : G0SUB1 : PRINT"1" ; : G 
0SUB2 : PRINT "ves sont ensuite cor 
rig"; :GOSUBl:PRINT"es non pas"; 

260 GOSUB2^j3 
265 LOCATE2,l 

27,0 PRINT" par leurs professeurs 



" ; :G0SUB5: PRINT" eux, mais"; 
280 LOCATE2,3 

290 PRINT" par des <correcteurs> 
qu'ils ne"; 

300 L0CATE2,5 

310 PRINT" connaissent pas — et 

qui ne les" ; 
320 LOCATE2,7 

330 PRINT" connaissent pas. Le 
bac " ; :G0SUB1: PRINT"tant un"; 
340 LOCATE2,9 

350 PRINT" examen difficile, il 
y a tour jours" ; 
360 L0CATE2,11 

370 PRINT" une proportion consid 
" ; : GOSUB1 : PRINT"rable d 1 " ; : GOSUB 
1:PRINT"1"; : G0SUB2 : PRINT"ves" ; 
380 LOCATE2,13 

390 PRINT" qui " ; : GOSUB1 : PRINT"c 
houent . " ; 

400 GOSUB3j3## 
1240 "GOSUB3j3j3j3 

1999 GOT01999 

2000 L0CATE8 ,23: ATTR3 / 5 , B 

2010 PRINT" PRESS <F1> TO CONTI 
NUE . " ; 

2020 ATTR5 , 5 : LOCATE^ , 0 

2030 IF PEEK(343)=191 THEN 2040 

ELSE2j33j3 

2040 CLS:L0CATE5,1:ATTR4,5 
2050 RETURN 

2060 WIDTH3 2 '.'L1ST-1000 

3000 LOCATE5,23:ATTR3,5,B 

3010 PRINT" PRESS <F2> TO RETUR 

N TO START . " ; 

3015 ATTR5 , 5 : LOCATE 0 , 0 

3020 IF PEEK(344)=191 THEN 0 ELS 

E 3020 



DMC "No Halt" Disk Controller 



to* 




Did you know? 

. . . that all the older floppy disk controllers for the 
CoCo completely tie up (and even halt) the 6809 pro- 
cessor during disk reads and writes? No wonder 
your keyboard is constantly "losing" characters! Or 
that your serial port often gives you garbage. 



Unleash your CoCo's potential! 

Our new Dual Mode Controller (DMC) implements a new 
"no halt" mcde of operation so it can read from or write to 
disk all by itself. The 6809 is freed to process other tasks 
and respond to interrupts. This is howOS-9was meant to 
run! But the Radio Shack "halt" mode of operation is also 
retained to maintain full compatibility with existing non- 
OS-9 software. 



^<hnolooi«:^ 

2261 East 11th Ave., Vancouver, B.C., Canada V5N 1Z7 




Other DMC features: 

• works with original CoCo, CoCo 2, or CoCo 3 
(Mult i-Pak required) 

• no adjustments — all-digital data separator and write 
precompensation 

• aold plated card-edge connectors for reliability 

• ROM socket takes 24 pin or 28 pin chips; dual DOS 
capability 

• Radio Shack DOS 1.1 ROM installed 

• 8K bytes cache memory on board (32K optional) 

» includes DP. Johnson's SDISK packagespecially modified 
for DMC 

• aluminum case 

• fully assembled and tested; 120 day limited warranty 

To order: DMC controller with RSDOS 1.1 and SDISK 
(specify Level I or II) $149.50 plus $5 S/H ($12 overseas). 
Terms (prices in $US): check, money order, VISA 



(Also ask about our ST-2900 
6809 based expandable 
single board computer) 



(604) 255-4485 (Pacific Time) 



December 1 987 THE RAINBOW 147 



Clubs, Clubs, Clubs 




e compile a list quar- 
terly of Color Computer 
Clubs because of the 



many requests we receive. CoCo 
Clubs may wish to exchange 
newsletters, share ideas for top- 
ics of discussion at monthly 
meetings, etc. 

Please let us know if we have 
omitted any clubs and send us 
complete u p-to-date addresses. 
Only those clubs that have 
signed our anti-piracy agree- 
ment form will appear in this 
listing of CoCo Clubs. Also, 
please notify us if you wish toadd 
or delete any names on this list. 
Send your information to: 

CoCo Clubs 
THE RAINBOW 
The Falsoft Building 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

— Monica Wheat 



ARIZONA 

Tucson Color Computer Club, Bill Nunn, 9631 E. 
Stella, Tucson, 85730, (602} 721-1085 

CALIFORNIA 

Color America Users Group, Mark Randall, 2227 
Canyon Road, Arcadia, 91006, (818) 355-61 1 1 

CoCo-3 World, Fred K. Wright, 101 12 Melody Park 
Dr., Garden Grove, 92640, (714) 534-5174 

Los Angeles-Wilshire Color Computer Users' 
Group, Norm Wolfe, P.O. Box 1 1151, Beverly 
Hills, 90213, (213) 838-4293 

United Computer Federation, (San Fernando Valley 
Chapter and Headquarters), Pete EHison, 366 
West Providencia Ave., Burbank, 91506, (818) 
840-8902 

United Computer Federation, (San Francisco 
Chapter), Art Murray, P.O. Box 7007, Redwood 
City, 94063, (41 5) 366-4560, BBS (415) 364-2658 

United Computer Federation, (Los Angeles Chap- 
ter), Gary James, 4147 Faculty Avenue, Long 
Beach, 90808 

United Computer Federation, (Orange County 
Chapter), Fred Wright, 10112 Melody Park 
Drive, Garden Grove, 92640 

The Davis CoCoNuts, Shneor Sherman, 1818 
Haussler Dr., Davis, 95616, (916) 758-3195 

South Bay Users Group (S-Bug), Patricia Scheffer, 
P.O. Box 653, Hawthorne, 90251, (213) 532-8071 

Ventura County Color Computer Club (VC4), Doug 
McLaughlin, Oxnard Public Library, 214 South 
"C" Street, Oxnard, 93030, (805) 984-4636 or 
BBS (805) 484-5491 

CitrusColorComputer Club, Jack Brinker, P.O. Box 
6991, San Bernadino, 92412, (714) 824-1866 

South Bay Color Computer Users Group, John G. 
Say, 3117 Balmoral Drive, San Jose, 95132, 
(408) 923-2967 

COLORADO 

Colorado CoJor Computer Club, Lloyd Carroll, 6651 
Bellaire Street, Commerce City, 80022, (303) 
288-6369 



The ESCO Computer Ciub, David E. Schulz, 1299 
Harrison Street, Denver, 80206, (303) 388-6988 

CONNECTICUT 

The Southeast Connecticut Color Computer Users 
Group, Bill Gross, 30 Sycamore Lane, Groton, 

06340, (203) 448-1388 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club. Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Rd., Dale City, Virginia 22193, (703) 
690-2453 

FLORIDA 

Color Computer Club of Brandon, Richard Stein- 
brueck, 2913 John Moore Road, Brandon, 
33511, (813)681-1526 

Northwest Florida CoCo Nuts, Lee Gottcher, P.O. 
Box 1 032, Fort Walton Beach, 32549, (904) 678- 
8894 

Aiachua County Color Computer Club, Robert J. 
Lake, 2929 N.E. 1 2th Street, Gainesville, 32609, 
(904) 378-1993 

Jacksonville Color Computer Club, William K 
Brown 111,2411 Hirsch Ave., Jacksonville, 3221 6, 
(904) 721-0282 

Broward County Color Computer Club, George 
Aloia, 2263 N.W. 65 Avenue, Margate, 33063, 
(305) 972-0975 

South Brevard Color Computer Club, Benjamin S. 
Jerome, 496 Hillside Court, Melbourne, 32935, 
(305) 259-4609 

Color-6809 Users Group, Emery Mandel, 4301 1 1th 
Avenue North, St. Petersburg, 33713-5207, (813) 
323-3570, BBS (813) 321-0397 

C.C. Club of Sarasota, Ernie Bontrager, 4047 Bee 
Ridge Rd., Sarasota, 33583, (813) 921-7510 

GEORGIA 

The Northeast Atlanta Color Computer Club, Joe 

Novosel, P.O. Box 450915, Atlanta, 30345, (404) 
921-7418 

The CoCo Cartel, Dennis M. Weldy, 4059 Acacia 
Drive, Columbus, 31904, (404) 576-5479 

Atlanta Color Computer Users Group, Terry E. 
Love, 5155 Maroney Mill Rd., Douglasville, 
30134, (404) 949-5356 

ILLINOIS 

Illinois Color Computer Club of Elgin, Tony Po- 
d raza. 1 1 9 Adobe Circle, Carpentersville, 60110, 
(312) 428-3576 

Northern Illinois Color Computer Club, Kenneth 
Trenchard, Sr.. 6145 N. Sheridan Road 30, 
Chicago, 60660, (312) 973-5208 

Willow-Works Club, Kevin L. Adair, 5753 S. Laflin, 
Chicago, 60636, (312) 737-5716 

Glenside Color Computer Club, Ed Hathaway, 8 W. 
StevensonDrive.Glendale Heights, 60139, (312) 
462-0694 

Kitchen Table Color Computer Group, Robert Mills, 
P.O. Box 464, Hanover, 61041, (815) 591-3377 

Motorola Microcomputer Club, Steve Adler, 1301 
Algonquin Rd., Schaumburg, 60196, (312) 576- 
3044 

Chicago OS-9 Users Group, John Chasteen, 480 
Gilbert Drive, Wood Dale, 601 91 , (31 2) 860-2580 

INDIANA 

Three Rivers Color Computer Club, Eddie Nast, 
R.R. 3, Box 269, Angola, 46703 

CoCo Program Exchange. Erik Merz, 3307 Arrow 
Wood Dr., Fort Wayne, 46815, (219) 749-0294 

frsdy Color Computer Club, Kevin S, Jessup, Sr., 
P.O. Box 26521, Indianapolis, 46236, (317) 873- 
5808 

Southern Indiana Computer Club, Route 1 , Box 459, 
Mitchell, 47446 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

IOWA 

CoCo Questers, Scott Bellman, 2420 Salem Court, 
Bettendorf, 52722, (319) 359-7702 



Metro Area Color Computer Club (MACCC), David 
E. Hansen, 3147 Avenue J, Council Bluffs, 
51501, (712) 323-7867 

Mid Iowa CoCo, Terry G. Simons, 1328 48th Street, 
Des Moines, 50311, (515) 279-2576 

Dubuque Tandy Users Group, Wesley Kullhem, 
1 995 Lombard, Dubuque, 52001 , (319) 556-4137 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson Color Computer Club, James M.Jones, 
612 Idlewtld. Hutchinson, 67502, (316) 662-0718 

KC CoCo Club, Gay Crawford, P.O. Box 11192, 
KansasCity, 66111, (913) 764-9413 

Micro 80 Users Group, Kevin Cronister, 2224 Hope, 
Topeka, 66614, (913) 272-1353 

Color Computer Club of Wichita, David Brimmer, 
527 N. Pershing Ave., Wichita, 67208, (316) 685- 
9587 

KENTUCKY 

Perry County CoCo Users Group, Keith W. Smith, 
Generai Delivery, Hardburly, 41747, (606) 439- 

4209 

LOCO-COCO, Jim Spillman, 2405 Woodmont Dr., 
Louisville, 40220, (502) 454-5331 

The Basic Byte, Don Henderson, 1 52 Patty Lane, 
Florence, 41042, (606) 371-9368 

Hardin County Color Computer Club, Paul W. 
Urbahns, 2887 Republic Ave, Radcliff, 40160, 

(502) 351-4757 

LOUISIANA 

Cajun CoCo Club, Rick Herbert, P.O. Box 671, 
Crowley, 70526, (318) 788-3148 

The CoCo Sig, Christopher Mayeux, 20 G ibbs Drive, 
Chafmette, 70043, (504) 277-6880 

MAINE 

Western Maine Color Computer Club, Michael 
Newell, Box 780, Bethel, 04217 

Tandy Computer Club, Delmer Cargill, P.O. Box 
428, Westbrook, 04092, (207) 854-2862 

MARYLAND 

Arkade, John M. Beck, 3513 Terrace Drive #D, 
Suitland, 20746, (301) 423-8418 

MASSACHUSETTS 

The Computer Connection, Ken Ferreira, 21 George 
St., Oxford, 01540. (617) 987-0197 

Greater Boston Super Color Users Group, Robert 
Biamonte, 6 Boulder Drive, Burlington, 01803 

CLUB 6809, Jean Salvas. 204 East Street, Spring- 
field, 01104, (413) 734-5163 

The Computer Connection, Ken Ferreira, 21 George 
Street, Oxford, 01540, (617)987-0197 

MICHIGAN 

Color C.H.I.P.S., Jack Pieron, 3175 Oakhill Place, 
Clarkston, 48016, (313) 627-4358 

Tandy Users Group of Grand Rapids, Robert M. 
Worth, Jr., 1726 Millbank S.E., Grand Rapids, 
49508 (616) 245-9324 

Greater Kalamazoo Color Computer Club, Jim Rix, 
1835 Chevy Chase Blvd., Kalamazoo, 49008, 
(616) 344-7631 

Greater Lansing Color Computer Users Group, P.O. 
Box 14114, Lansing, 48901 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S, Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091. (616) 651-4248 

Color Computer Owners Group, Charles Van Ark, 
c/o DSL Computer Products, Inc., 4950 Shaefer, 
Dearborn, 48126, (313) 582-8930 

MINNESOTA 

Gallifrean Recall Circuit, Dr. Who Fan Club/News- 
letter, Robert Hermanek, 216 Cardinal Ct., 
Chaska, 55318, (612) 448-7911 

Northern Minnesota CoCo Community, David B. 
Smith. 4112 Trinity Road, Duluth, 55811, (218) 

726-0511 

MISSISSIPPI 

Singing River C.C. Club, Mark Welch. 3605 Van- 
cleave Rd., # 1 1 8, Gautier, 39553, BBS (601 ) 875- 
8688 



148 



THE RAINBOW December 1 987 




3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns X 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full -screen 
editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 
control codes 

Runs in 16K f 32K 5 or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



64K COMPATIBLE 



The original 



Simply stated. Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lowercase characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fan. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power, 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means thai 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one of she best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen,.. 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1*82 



1*E»f K'1I/DI 1 TE*D HA 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons, 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, #r 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately, 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 5} column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don*t even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get," This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple, 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 

(LPVII/VIII, DMP-100/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. horn Smith-Corona, 
Terminer etc). 

Embedded controi codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent primer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; sine length, lines per page. 
Sine spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/doable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line headers and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell *n Fix}. 

Casselte verify command for sire saves, Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, biock move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto -re peal cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front »f you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 




RAINBOW 

S££L 



...truly a stale of the art word processor, 
outstanding in ever* respect. 

-The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Calif or mans add 6% stale tax.) 

Available at 

Radio /haek stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple It is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.; Atari is a trademark 
of Alari. Inc.; TRS-80 is & trademark of Tandy Corp; is & 

trademark of Epson America, Inc. 



Gulf Coast Color Computer Assoc., Ed Keels, 22 
Christy Cove. Gulfport, 39503, (601) 832-1210 

Jackson Color Computer Club, Dorothy N. Welch, 
424 Church Street, Madison, 39110, (601) 856- 
7255 

CoCo Art Club, Joel Bunyard, Rt. 16, Box 11, 
Meridian, 39301, (601) 483-0424 

MISSOURI 

North County 80 Group, Tom Vogel, 12 Ville Donna 
Ct., Hazelwood, 63042, (314) 739-4078 

Mid-America Color Computer User's Group, Jerry 
Morgon, 807 Ponca Drive, Independence, 
64056, (816) 796-5813 

Coconuts, Steve Knittel 1610N. Marian, Springfield, 
65803, (417) 485-3419 

MakoTRS-80& Tandy UsersGroup, David Morgan, 
622 Porter, Joplin, 64801, (417) 781-6546 

NEBRASKA 

Siouxland Color Computer Club, Alan Pedersen, 
61 1 D Street, South Sioux City, 68776, (402) 494- 
2284 

NEVADA 

CAT. F.U.N., Paul A. Osborne. 201 Miners Road, 
Fallon. 89406, (702) 423-5789 

NEW JERSEY 

West Orange CoCo Club, Gregg Favalora, 12 
Blackburne Terrace, W. Orange, 07052. (201) 
736-1748 (let ring 12 times) 

Mercer County Color Computer Users Group, 
Richard C. Kelly, 1904 Country Lane, W. Tren- 
ton. 08628, (609) 883-9270 

NEW MEXICO 

Chaves County Color Computer Club, Harry Ma- 
chen, 18 Forest Drive, Roswell, 88201, 

CoCo Users Group, David M, Hutchison, 732 
Landman PI. NE, Albuquerque. 87123, (505) 
294-4732 

The Curry County CoCo Club, Ron Bull, 100 
Conestoga Trail. Clovis. 88101, (505) 763-4713 

NEW YORK 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Albany Chapter), Ron Fish, 
Box 4125, Albany, 12204, (518) 465-9793 

Adirondack CoCo Club, (Greene County Chapter), 
Pete Chast, P.O. Box 61, Athens, 12015, (518) 
945-1636 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Glens Falls Chapter). 
Richard Mitchell, 39 Center St., Fort Edwards, 
12828 

The Island CoCo Club, D.K. Lee, P.O. Box 426, 
Massapequa Park, 11762, BBS (516) 227-1285 

Kings Byte CoCo Club, Morty Libowitz, 1063 East 
84th St., Brooklyn, 11236, (718) 763-4233, BBS 
(718) 837-2881 

C.C. Club of Central N.Y., Joseph Short, 248 S. 
Fourth Ave., Ilion, 13357, (315) 895-7730 

Rockland County Color Computer Users Group, 
Harold L. Laroff, P.O. Box 131, Monsey, 10952- 
0131, (914) 425-2274 

Metropolitan Color Computer Users Group, Danny 
lacovou. 21-36 42 St., Astoria, 11105, (718) 204- 
4770 

Olean Area CoCo Users Group, Herman L. Smith, 
P.O. Box 216, Olean, 14760, (716) 933-7488, 
BBS (716) 933-7489 

Twin Tiers CoCo Club, William Cecchini, 319 Irvine 
Place. Elmira, 14901, (607) 734-0065 

The Rochester S-80 Computer Club, Inc., Gary 
Panepinto, P.O. Box 15476. Rochester, 14615, 
(716) 392-6133 



New York Color Computer Group, Bill Bergadano, 
Box 140626, Staten Island, 10314, (718) 761- 
0268 

Broome CoCo Club, Lloyd Shotwell, 18 Adaline 
Street, Owego, 13827, (607) 687-3231 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Bull City CoCo Users Group, Todd Wall, 5319 
Durand Drive, Durham, 27703, (919) 598-1348 

Raleigh Color Computer Club, Pete Katz, 505 
Berkshire, Garner, 27529 

OHIO 

Central Ohio Color Computer Club, Jim Upperman, 
5201 Wilcox Road, Amlin, 43002, (614) 876-1767 

Color Computer Club, Inc., William Wills, P.O. Box 
468, Canfield, 44406 

Dayton Color Computer Users Group, Steven E. 
Lewis, 4230 Cordell Dr., Dayton, 45439, (513) 
299-3060 

Dayton Area Color Computer Users Group, David 
R. Barr. 2278 Yorkshire PL, Kettering, 45419, 
(513) 293-2228 

Greater Toledo Color Computer Club, Robin Jack- 
son. 2053 Eileen Road, Toledo, 43615, (419) 531 - 
4549 

Tri-County Computer Users Group, William J. 
Loeffler, 261 2 Dale Avenue, Rocky River, 441 16, 
(216) 356-0779 

Miami Valley CoCo Club, Tim Ellis, 1805 W. Park- 
way Dr., Piqua, 45356, (513) 773-2244 

OKLAHOMA 

Central Oklahoma Computer Organization, Inc., 
Martin Schiel, 5313 Spitz Drive, Oklahoma City, 
73135, (405) 670-6891 

Green Country Computer Association, Michael 
Keller, P.O. Box 2431, Tulsa, 74101, (918) 245- 
3456 (data) 

Central Oklahoma Computer Organization Inc., 
Enid Chapter, Jim Sands, 706 South Grand, 
Enid. 73701, (405) 237-5949 

PENNSYLVANIA 

SNUG-Phila., William K. Serody, 1181 Cumberland 
Road, Abington, 19001, (215) 887-0513 

HUG-A-CoCo. George Lurie, 2012 Mill Plain Court, 
Harrisburg, 17110, (717) 657-2789 

Penn-Jersey Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 2742, 
Lehigh Valley, 18001 

Williamsport Area Color Computer Club, John M. 
Rymell, R.D, 3, Box 182, Muney, 17756, (717) 
546-2721 

The CoCo Exchange Club, Daniel Moore, 617 
Prescott Avenue. Scranton, 18510, (717) 961- 
0535 

Skyline Color Computer Club of Berks County, 
Lewis F. Brubaker, 4874 Eighth Ave., Temple, 
19560, (215) 921-3616 

Pittsburgh Color Group, Ralph Marting, 309 Frazier 
Dr., Pittsburgh, PA, 15235 

The Hollidaysburg Area Color Computer Club, Bill 
Smith, P.O. Box 101, Roaring Spring, 16673, 
(814) 224-5280 

The Monthly CoCo Newsletter, Dino DiEnno, 715 
So. Hutchinson, Philadelphia, 19147, (215) 923- 
2454 

Philadelphia Area Computer Society (PACS) Color 
Computer Special Interest Group (SIG), Robert 
Toscani, LaSalle University, 19th & Olney Sts., 
Box 312, Philadelphia, 19141, (215) 567-4276 
(Arnie Weiss) 



RHODE ISLAND 

New England COCONUTS, P.O. Box 28106, North 
Station, Providence, 02908 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

LoCo CoCo Club, Larry Coyle, 4334 Flynn Dr., 
Charleston, 29405, (803) 747-0802 

Midlands 80 Computer Club, Frank Eargle, P.O. Box 
7594, Columbia, 29202, TBBS (803) 791-7389 

Spartanburg County CoCo Club, Jesse W. Parris, 
152 Bon Air Ave., Spartanburg, 29303, (803) 573- 
9881 

TENNESSEE 

Tri-Cities Computer Club, Gary Collins, P.O. Box 
4506 CRS, Johnson City, 37602-4506, (615) 929- 
1862 

Foothills Micro-Computer Club, Aaron Sentell, P.O. 
Box 1541, Maryville, 37801, (615) 982-4629 

Memphis Color Computer Users Group, Logan R. 
Ward, 5512 Poplar, Memphis, 381 19. (901) 685- 
0009 

TEXAS 

Alamo Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 690256, San 
Antonio, 78269, (512) 699-6027 

The Codis CoCo Symphony, William C. Garretson, 
828 Gregory Avenue, Bedford, 76022, (817) 283- 
8571 

UTAH 

Salt City CoCo Club, Dennis Mott, 720 E. Browning 
Ave , Salt Lake City, 84105, (801 ) 487-6032, BBS 
(801) 487-6787 

VIRGINIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Rd., Dale City, 22193, (703) 670-4962 

Central Virginia Color Computer Club, Roger Lee, 
Rt. 2 Box 175, Madison Heights, 24572 * 

Color Company, Rick Blouin, 12007-C3 Greywing 
Sq., Reston, 22091, (703) 860-9297 

Richmond Area Color Computer Organization, 
William Mays, 6003 Westbourne Drive, Rich- 
mond, 23230, (804) 282-7778 

WASHINGTON 

Northwest Computer Club, Lin Shapel, East 1812 
Rockwell, Spokane, 99207, (509) 487-8365 

Mount Rainier Color Computer Club, Ron Amos, 
2450 Lenore Drive N., Tacoma, 98406, (206) 752- 
8735 

Tri-Cities Color Computer Users' Group/OS-9 SIG, 
Jim Vestal, P.O. Box 1213, Richland, 99352, 
(509) 943-4832 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Ohio Valley Association ol Computers, Bill Davis, 
1142 Courtland, Weirton, 26062, voice (304) 
797-8321, data (304) 797-8671 

Mil-O-Bar Computer Club. Jim LeMaster, P.O. Box 
130, Ona, 25545, (304) 743-4752 after 4 p.m. 

Blennerhassett CoCo Club, David Greathouse, 
1306 Wells Circle, Parkersburg, 26101, (304) 
424-7108 

WISCONSIN 

Southern Wisconsin CoCo Club, David C. Buehn, 
24607 67th Street, Salem, 53168, (414) 843-3830 

CANADA 

ALBERTA 

Bonnyville User Group (BUG's), Doug MacDonald, 
Box 2071, Bonnyville, Alberta, T0A 0L0, (403) 
826-4790 

The Calgary Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 22, 
Station M, Calgary. Alberta, T2P 2G5 



CoCo Cat 




get out of the 
Educational 



150 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



Edmonton CoCo Users Group, Dexter Dombro, 
P.O. Box 4507 Stn. South, Edmonton, Alberta, 
T6E 4T7, (403) 439-5245 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Vancouver Colour Computer Club, Box 76734, Stn 
S, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5R 5S7 

Salmon Arm CoCo, David Coidwell, RR #4, Site 26 
Comp. 13, Salmon Arm, British Columbia, V1E 
4M4 

MANITOBA 

Winnipeg Micro-80 Users Group, Robert Black, 
1755 King Edward St,. Winnipeg. Manitoba, R2R 
0M3, (204) 633-7196 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Campbellt#n 6809E UsersGroup, Blaine Arsenault, 
80 Deny Street, Atholville, New Brunswick, EOK 
1A0, (506) 753-4769 

Moncton Color Computer Users Group, Robert E. 
McLaughlin. 73 Lewis Street, Monclon, New 
Brunswick, E1C 4S5. (506) 855-3860 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Color Trading Post, Lee A. Sutton. P.O. Box 565, 
Bridgetown, Nova Scotia, BOS 1C0 

Halifax Dartmouth CoCo Users Group, Eugene 
Naugler, P.O. Box572, Dartmouth. Nova Scotia, 
B2Y3Y9 

Colour Computer Halifax User Group (CoCo Hug), 
Paul A. Power, 6354 London St., Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, B3L 1X3, (902) 455-6341 

ONTARIO 

ESSA Color Computer Club, David Morrow. 10 
Berwick Cres., Angus, Ontario, L0M 1B0, (705) 
424-6985 

Kingston CoCo Club. Kenneth Bracey, 316 West- 
dale Ave.. Apt. 4-C, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 4S7, 
(613) 544-2806 

K-W CoCo Club, P.O. Box 1291, Station C, Kitch- 
ener, Ontario, N2G 4G8 

London CoCo Nuts Computer Club, Harry K. 
Boyce, 180 Concord Road, London, Ontario, 
N8G3H8, (519) 472-7706 

Niagara Regional CoCo Club, Gerry Chamberland, 
6843 Cumberland Crt., Niagara Fails, Ontario 
L2H2J9, (416) 357-3462 

Ottawa 6809 Users Group, Norm Shoihet, 1497 
Meadcwbrook Road, Ottawa. Ontario, K1B 5J9 f 
(613) 741-1763 

Sarnia Computer Users Group, J. Verdon, P.O. Box 
1082, Sarnia, Ontario, NTT 7K5, (519) 344-6985 

Burlington Color Computer Users Group, Lawrence 
TJ. Coffey, 33 Drakes Drive, Stoney Creek, 
Ontario, L8E 4G4, (416) 573-6889 

Durham 80-C Computer Club, Tony Kernohan, P.O. 
Bex 95, Whitby. Ontario, LIN 5B7. (416) 728- 
6416 

Trenton Colour Cats, Perry Skipton, 21 Janlyn Cres 
Appt. 5, Belleville, Ontario, K8N 1L1. (613) 966- 

OOQ1 



Gateway Colour Computer Club, Jim Ross, P.O. 
Box 492, North Bay, Ontario. P1 B 8J1, (705) 472- 
4931 

QUEBEC 

Club d'Ordinateur Couieur du Quebec, Inc., Centre 
de Loisirs St-Maihieu, 7110- 8e Ave., St-Michel, 
Montreal, Quebec, H2A3C4, (514) 729-8467 

Club Micro Ordinateur de Montreal»Nord, Christian 
Champagne, 12365 Blv. Langeller #7, Montreal- 
Nord. Quebec, H1G 5X6, {514) 323-5958 

Les CoCophiles, Robert Chartrand, 17 Bord-de- 
I'eau, Repenlieny, Quebec, J6A 3K2, (514) 581- 
1385 

Club ORCO-RS, Jacques Bedard, 33 Lisiere, St- 
Constant, Quebec, J0L 1X0, (514) 632-431 1 

LeClub Couieur du Nord, Gabriel Pigeon, CP. 315. 
Barraute, Quebec, JOY 1A0, (819) 734-6640. 
BBS (819) 825-2283 

Club CoCo APPE, Andre Patenau*e, 10870 Boisde 
Boulogne, Montreal, Quebec. H3M 2X1, (514) 
331-8418 

Advanced Montreal CoCo Club, Richmond Skrzzy- 
pinski. 329 boul. Richelieu, St-Basile-le-Grand, 
Quebec, J0L 1S0, (514) 653-5182 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Saskatoon Color Computer Club, L. Curtis Boyle, 
35 Bence Crescent, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 
S7L 4H9, (306) 382-1459, BBS (306) 384-8040 



FOREIGN 



ARGENTINA 

Freecoco Club f Novoa, Miguel Angel-lng. Duarte, 
Omar, Mendez de Andes 799, Buenos Aires, 
Capital Federal 1405, Argentina, phone 431- 
2501 

AUSTRALIA 

Blacktown City TRS-80 Colour Computer Users 
Group, Keith Gallagher, P.O. Box 264, River- 
stone, New South Wales, 2765, Australia, (02) 
627-4624 

COCOPUG, Harry Murphy, 8 Lois Court. Regents- 
ville, New South Wales, Australia. 2750 

CoCoHUG (Color Computer Hobarl Users Group), 
Robert Delbourgo, 15 Willowdene Avenue, 
Sandy Bay, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia 7005 

Sunshine Color Computer Club, Stephen Jones, 
P.O. Box 111, Sunshine, Victoria, Australia, 3020 

Pine Rivers/Peninsula User Group, B, Clarke, C/-31 
Brooks Rd., Bray Park, Queensland. Australia, 
4500, (07) 205-4879 

Australian Christian Users Group, Lieutenant 
Raymond L. Isaac, 57 Wittenoom Street, Collie, 
Western Australia 6225, phone (097) 34-1578 

COLOMBIA 

CoCo-Byte, Fabian A. Rodriguez, Avenida 4A #49N~ 
60 or A. A. 5976, Cali, Colombia. 640705-649165 



ISRAEL 

The Mid-East CoCo Club, J. Yosef Krinsky, 526/11 
Kiryat Kaminitz — Neve Yaacov, Jerusalem, 
Israel 

MEXiCO 

Mexcoco Users Group, Sergio Waisser. Paseo de la 
Soledad H120, MexicoCity, D.F., 53920, Mexico, 
phone 294-36-63 

First Color Computer Users Group of Hermosillo, 
Arturo Fernandez Diaz-Gonzalez, Javier de 
Leon No. 708, Colonia Pitic, Hermosillo, Sonora, 
Mexico, phone 4-75-78 

the NETHERLANDS 

Color Computer Club Benelux, Jorgen te Giffei, 
Eikenfaan 1, 4641 GB Ossendrecht, the Nether- 
lands 

CoCoCE, J. Slaats, Chopinlaan 11, 5653 ET Eind- 
hoven, the Netherlands, (040) 512-222 

PERU 

Piura Color Computer Club, Carlos Alvarez. Box 
142, AV. Guillermo Irazola. J-6 URB, Miraflores 
Castilla, Piura, Peru, phone (074) 327-182 

PUERTO RICO 

Puerto Rico Color Computer Users Club, P A. 
Torres, Cuernavaca 1699, Venus Gardens, Rio 
Piedras, Puerlo Rico 00926, Phone (137) 755- 
7598 

WEST GERMANY 

First CoCo Club Hamburg. Theis Klauberg, Kriet- 
kamp 27A. Hamburg 65, Wesl Germany. 2000, 
(040) 536-3676 

The Greatest German CoCoCooks, Michael 
Herbes, Dorfstr 23, 4320 Hatttnger, West Ger- 
many 



meikk as m m jtem ^ 9 w m Bill 

mm m^%MM 111 O 

m Wt -*aoP' W W ^m&r fli WWX tamer 



• [ want to start a CoCo Users group in 
Rapid City, South Dakota. 1 am 18 years old 
and am in the Air Force. Anyone interested 
should reply by writing. My system consists 
of I28K CoCo 3 } FD-500 disk drive, CM- 
8 monitor, CCR-81 cassette recorder, touch 
pad, joysticks and DM P- 105 printer. 

Andrew Urquhart 
PSC Box 988 
Ellsworth A FB> SD 57706 

• Since I've never seen a listing for a Min- 
nesota CoCo Users Group — I guess V\\ 
have to start one! Let's hear from you! 

David B. Smith 
4112 Trinity Rood 
Duluth, MN 558 1 1 




U.S. check 
or money order 
Rl residents 



< x N o\ ^ <P \& ^JX vC/ ^e? ^ ^ ^ Q v* O V 



6>* V <>V «srP Zi ' K> 

<$> ^ ^° <? w 



V* p Lease add 6% sales tax 



TEPCO 

30 Water Street 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 151 



f^#fef 

CoCo 3 Disk I t&BU i 7 






By David Dawson 



III fter two days of working with 
J3l my new CoCo 3, only a dozen 
M H, programs refused to work. Con- 
sidering I have collected nearly 2,000 
programs over the years, this is quite 
good. A few did require patches, 
though, and the program appearing 
here is one of the most significant. 

Although almost everything worked 
without problem, many ROM packs I 
acquired long ago that were transferred 
to disk would no longer work. 

The patch program I had been using 
up to the purchase of the CoCo 3 is one 
that appeared in HOT CoCo in Sep- 
tember 1983, written by Doctor ASCII, 
Richard Esposito. I obviously needed a 
new patch and, after trying several 
strategies, I was stumped since the only 
CoCo 3 manual I have is the one Radio 
Shack sells with the computer. 

I found the solution by studying 
Esposito's column in the January RAIN- 
BOW (Page 167) and by understanding 
the CoCo's new GIME chip. 1 realized 
the memory locations beginning with 
hexadecimal SFFAO control memory 
that appears in a memory map area. For 
example, the value in SFFAO deter- 
mines the actual memory seen by the 
Color Computer in the locations 0000 
to 2000 (Hex) or 70000 to 72000 in the 
new memory map notation. 

So, if you wanted (though you would 
have to write your own operating sys- 
tem), you could have a single 8K block 

David Dawson is currently completing 
his doctorate in human factors psychol- 
ogy. David, his wife, Leigh Anne, and 
his son, Adam, all enjoy their CoCo 3. 



of memory appear many times in the 
memory map, which is exactly how the 
short assembly language program in 
Listing 1 works. The program pack 
code is loaded into normal program 
memory where any BASIC program 
might reside; then my patch tells the 
GIME that this is the program pack 
memory and replaces this newly moved 
memory with a block from the upper 
64K. 

Using the Program 

There is no need to get out your 
assembler or to type in Listing 1; the 
BASIC program in Listing 2 contains a 
loader for the machine code. I have also 
included part of the code that appeared 
in HOT CoCo. Including this allows my 
program to test and do the old CoCo 



patch if you are not using a CoCo 3. 
This makes this patch downwardly 
compatible. 

To use the program, you must either 
have some patched ROM packs on disk 
or save the contents of a ROM pack to 
tape before running this program. 

To save a program pack to tape, 
merely expose the ROM pack's connec- 
tions and tape the far-left one (if you 
orient the ROM pack label side down 
with the connections facing away from 
you), Then insert the program pack 
with the power off. Power up the com- 
puter and you should get the normal 
sign-on message ■ — if you do not, re- 
check the lead you taped and make sure 
the program pack is securely inserted, 

Next, prepare the tape recorder, type 
PDKE&HFFDE ,0: CSfiVEM'y//entfm£" , 



152 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



&HC000,&HFEFF,&HC000 and press 
ENTER. When the tape stops, turn the 
computer off again, reinsert the disk 
controller and run the program shown 
in Listing 2. 

The program is straightforward as 
long as you have either a tape dump of 
the ROM pack code or a disk program 
that was patched with Esposito's orig- 
inal program. If you attempt to repatch 
a disk program modified in some other 
way, you will get an error message. 

Also, due to the nature of the original 
programming, some ROM Paks cannot 
be transferred with my program as it 
stands. 

(Questions about this program may 
be addressed to the author at 434 N. 
Pine St, #31, Vermillion, SD 57069. 
Please enclose an SASE when writing 
for a reply.) □ 



Listing 1: 









00010 










00020 


* COCO 3 ROMFIX PATCH * 








00030 


*BY DAVID LIONELL DAWSON* 










Wrirtr*i)rW*irttt ft ft iWoWfVo*- 


3F48 






00100 


ORG 16200 


3F48 


B6 


80FD 


00101 


LDA 33021 ROM VERSION NUMBER 


3F4B 


81 


32 


00102 


CMPA #50 IS IT A COCO 3? 


3F4D 


27 


03 


00103 


BEQ C0C03 


3F4F 


7E 


3F9A 


00104 


JMP 16282 IF NOT DO COCO 1&2 FIX 


3F52 


1A 


50 


00110 


C0C03 ORCC #$50 KILL INTERRUPTS 


3F54 


86 


7A 


00120 


LDA #$7A SELECT 3ANK AT PRESENT MEM 16384 


3F56 


B7 


FFA6 


00130 


STA $FFA6 AND BANK IT TO CARTRIDGE MEMORY 


3F59 


86 


7B 


00131 


LDA #$7B ALSO BANK NEXT 8K. . 


3F5B 


B7 


FFA7 


00132 


STA $FFA7 . . TO CARTRIDGE MEMORY 


3F5E 


86 


70 


00133 


LDA #$70 THEN BANK 8K FROM. . 


3F60 


B7 


FFA2 


00134 


STA $FFA2 ..EXTENDED MEMORY TO REPLACE 


3F63 


86 


71 


00135 


LDA #$71 . .AND ANOTHER 8K 


3F65 


B7 


FFA3 


00136 


STA $FFA3 


3F68 


7E 


C000 


00140 


JMP $C000 AND JUMP THERE 






0000 


00150 


END 



00000 TOTAL ERRORS 



Listing 2: PRKXFER 
10 WIDTH 32 

20 PMODE 0 : PCLEAR1 : CLEAR 200,160 
00 

30 CLS 

40 PRINT STRING$ (32 , lf * lf ) ; 
50 PRINT "COCO 3 ROM FIX AND ROM 
PATCH 11 

60 PRINT "BY DAVID LIONELL DAWSO 
N" 

70 PRINT "COCO 1/2 CODE BY R. ES 
POSITO" 

80 PRINT STRING$ (32 , "*") 
90 PRINT: PRINT 
100 PRINT "MODE:" 

lip PRINT " A: PATCH 'ROMFIXED' 
DISK FILE" 

120 PRINT " B: PATCH ROM CODE ON 
TAPE" 

130 INPUT "*****WHICH" ;A$ 

140 IF A$o"A" AND A$o"B" THEN 
100 

150 IF A$="B" THEN 220 

160 INPUT "DISK FILE NAME" ; FA$ 

170 LOADM FA$ 

180 IF PEEK ( &H3F9A) O&H0F THEN C 
LS: PRINT "SORRY NOT CORRECT FORMA 
T" : END 

190 GOSUB 300 :■ ADD PATCH 
200 INPUT "SAVE <A>8K OR <B>16K 
ON DISK";A$:IF A$="A" THEN SAVEM 
FA$, 16200, 24577, 16200 ELSE SAVE 
M FA$, 16200, 32751, 16200 
210 PRINT: PRINT" PATCHED VERSION 
ON DISK": END 

220 INPUT "TAPE FILE NAME" ; FA$ 
2 30 CLOADM FA$,&H8000 
240 GOSUB 300:'COCO3 PATCH 
250 GOSUB 410:'COCO1&2 PATCH 



260 INPUT"DISK FILE NAME" ; FA$ : FA 
$=LEFT$ ( FA$ , 8 ) 

270 INPUT "SAVE <A> 8K OR <B> 16 
K";A$:IF A$="A" THEN SAVEM FA$ , 1 
6200,24577,16200 ELSE SAVEM FA$ , 
16200,32751, 16200 
280 END 

290 'COC03 PATCH 

300 FOR I=&H3F48 TO &H3F6A 

310 READ A$ 

320 POKE I,VAL("&H"+A$) 
3 30 NEXT I 

340 DATA B6,80,FD,81,32,27,03 ,7E 
350 DATA 3F,9A,1A,50,86,7A,B7,FF 
360 DATA A6,86,7B,B7,FF,A7,86,70 
370 DATA B7,FF,A2,86,71,B7,FF,A3 
380 DATA 7E,C0,00 

3 90 RETURN 

400 f COC01/2 PATCH 

410 FOR I=&H3F9A TO &H3FFE 

420 READ A$ 

430 POKE I,VAL("&H"+A$) 

4 40 NEXT I 

450 DATA 0F,71, 1A , 50 , 8E , 80 , 0 , A6 , 
84,B7,FF,DF,A7,80 

4 60 DATA B7,FF,DE,8C,C0,0,2 6,F1, 
B7,FF,DF,8 6,7E,B7 

470 DATA A0,51,CC,A0,72,FD,A0,52 
,CC, 8E, 9F,FD, A0 , 84 

480 DATA CC,FE,7E,FD,A0,8 6,CC, A0 
,93,FD,A0,88,7F,80 

490 DATA 00,0F,71,86,7E,B7,A0,CB 
,CC, 3F,E3 , FD, A0 , CC 

500 DATA 7E,A0,27,CC,C0,00,97,45 
,CC, DF,FF,DD, 41, CC 

510 DATA 40,00,DD,47,CC,5F,FF,DD 
,43 , BD, AC, 20, 1C, AF 
520 DATA 7E,C0,00 

530 RETURN ^ 



December 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



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Finishing the Printer Adapter 

By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



ast month I started something I 
now have to finish, a parallel 
printer adapter for your CoCo — 
something internal to your CoCo that 
will give you a parallel printer port 
without using a Multi-Pak or special 
controller, 

Last month was the hardware side of 
this two-part project, which Til review 
quickly. A small PCB that goes inside 
your computer has three ICs on it and 
connects to the inside of the cartridge 
connector. It also has a 36-pin connec- 
tor. This connector can be connected to 
any Centronics type parallel printer. 
The hardware uses two bytes to talk to 
the printer. The first, at SFF50, is the 
latch to which the character to be 
printed is located. The second, located 
at SFF58, is a readable bit that shows 
the state of the printer, busy or not busy. 
The data at the latch is auto-strobing, 
which means the second the data is 
latched, the printer is told about it. You 
don't have to strobe the printer sepa- 
rately. 

This month I will do two things: first, 
I'll describe how to build (or buy) a 
printer cable; second, Til describe the 
software required to drive this parallel 

port. 

You can get the cable in one of two 
ways. The simple way is to run to your 
local Radio Shack and buy a cable. Just 
ask for a cable to connect a Model 100 
computer to any Radio Shack parallel 
printer (Catalog Number 26-1409). 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Quest, Quebec. 



The second way is a bit harder but 
also less expensive. You need three 
parts: a 36-pin ribbon printer connector 



(Radio Shack carries it, but at a stiff 
price), a length of 26-conductor ribbon 
wire (if you cannot get a 26-conductor, 



END 

Figure 1: Driver routine f or any CoCo 



NAM POUT 



START 



ORG 

LDX $168 

STX PT2+1,PCR 

LEAX POUTl,PCR 

STX $168 

LDA #$39 

STA START, PCR 

RTS 



RTS 



POUT1 



PT2 
POUT2 



POUT3 
POUT4 



PSHS B 
LDB $6F 
CMPB #$FE 
PULS B 
BEQ POUT2 
JMP $CB4A 

TST $FF58 
BMI POUT2 
STA $FF5J3 
LEAS 2 , S 
PSHS B 
CMPA #$j3D 
BEQ POUT3 
INC $9C 
LDB $9C 
CMPB $9B 
BLO POUT4 
CLR $9C 
PULS B,PC 



FOR PRINTER 



IS IT CR? 
YES 

INC CHR COUNT 

CHECK END OF PRINT LINE 

END? 

NO 

RESET CHR COUNT 




156 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



get a higher number and split the dif- 
ference. A common ribbon wire avail- 
able is a 25-wire, This will do just fine 
since the 26th wire is not used. Just 
make sure that the missing wire is not 
on the pin number I side), and a female 
26-pin dual inline header. To assemble 
the cable, start by locating pin number 
I on both connectors. Usually, the 
ribbon wire will come with a red stripe 
on the side. Line up Pin I of one con- 
nector to the red stripe. Push the wire 
into the connector and crimp the con- 
nector. Be careful that the wires align up 
with the connector teeth. Next, do the 
same thing with the other connector. 
That's it, your cable is done. Now it's 
time to get into that "Do J really have 
to?" part of the project, yes, the soft- 
ware. 

Deep in the ROMs of the CoCo lies 
software. This software is called BASIC, 
Extended BASIC and Disk BASIC. Also 
in these ROMs are drivers that control 
the computer. Reading the keyboard, 
displaying a character on the video 
screen, getting a file from disk and 
printing a character on a printer are all 
software functions built into these 
ROMs. These functions are sometimes 



called Basic Input Output Subroutines, 
or BIOS, for short. 

In the case of the CoCo's printer 
routine, it is in the BASIC ROM. With- 
out going into too many details, the 
printer routine has what is called a 
RAM HOOK. If you look in the "Ma- 
chine Language Subroutines"section of 



ff With the proper 
driver, the parallel 
printer adapter 
would work with all 
S-9 software J 3 



your BASIC manual, you will find one 
routine that is called CHROUT. This 
routine will output a character to the 
device specified by the contents of a byte 
in memory. The value of that byte will 
determine which device the character 
will be sent to. If that value is -2 or $FE 
as a signed eight-bit integer, that char- 



acter is destined for the printer. But 
before this character is sent to the 
printer routine, it goes through the 
RAM HOOK. This is a few bytes in 
RAM that, if changed, can re-route the 
character to your own driven This is 
where my routine comes in. 

Look at Figure 1, the driver routine 
for my parallel printer port. It will work 
with any CoCo. I wrote it using the 
Micro-Works editor/assembler. You 
may have to change some things around 
if you use another package. The first 
part, called Start, initializes the soft- 
ware by changing the RAM HOOK to 
POUT!. It then puts an RTS at the 
beginning of the routine so it cannot be 
done again. The new printer routine 
starts at POUT I and checks the device 
number to see if the character in ques- 
tion is for the printer. If it is not, the 
routine continues to where it would 
normally go had we not changed the 
RAM HOOK. If the character is for the 
printer, the routine then moves to 
POUT2, where the printer is tested to 
see if it is busy. If it is busy, the software 
waits in a loop until the printer is free. 
If the printer is not connected, the 
software will wait forever. 



Hard" Disk? § 



r 




Connecting a han 
won't take a 



disk to your Co Co Is easy, and It 
b out of your pockethook! 



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VERSIONS. HYPER-IO REQUIRED FOR USE WITH RS-DOS. 



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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 157 



Still fimndwy away 

m t(uU old &e<f&omd? 



Give it, and yourself, a break! Subscribe to rainbow on tape 
or rainbow ON disk today! Every month, these convenient 
services bring as many as two dozen ready-to-run programs 
right to you. Using the current issue of the rainbow as 
documentation, all you have to do is load and run them. Just 
a one-year subscription gives you more than 230 new programs! 



0 





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For No-Fuss Fun 

The typing time you save is time that you can spend enjoying your 
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and U.S. $105 for all other countries. U.S. currency only, please. 
In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.* 

RAINBOW ON DISK 

Offers OS-9 Programs 



In addition to all the programs offered on tape, part 
of one side of the disk is formatted for the OS-9 
operating system program. That means you can now 
get all the OS-9 programs from the magazine — 
programsthat cannot be put on tape. And, with the 
introduction of the CoCo 3, OS-9 programs will 
become more and more prevalent. Back issues 
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Please note: While group purchases of rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk arepermitted (andmultiplesubscriplions areeven discounted, if purchased in one order from a club), no license 
to make copies is conveyed or implied. Yes, your group may even purchase a subscription to our disk/tape services, but such purchase in no way authorizes that any copies be made of that original disk/lape. 
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For your convenience, these products can also be ordered via the Delphi Information Network in our Shopping Service area 
of THE RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG (Special Interest Group). 

Programs from our past issues are also available for immediate download in the RAINBOW ON TAPE database area in THE 
RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG on Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



ORG 


$A2F7 




FCB 


$21 


CODE FOR BRN 


UKG 


C* 1 7\ O 0 

pA2 C3 




TST 


5FF58 


PRINTER BUSY 


BMI 


POUT 


YES 


STA 


$FF5p 


PRINTER DATA 


JMP 


$A2.DF 


CONTINUE 



Figure 2: Driver routine for CoCo 3 only 



After it is established that the printer 
is no longer busy, the software proceeds 
by sending the character to the printer. 
By now you would think that your job 
is finished. No way, there's a little more 
to go. First, we get rid of the return 
address, because the character has been 
processed and must return to whatever 
software called the printer routine to 
begin with, avoiding the serial printer 
routine. 

To stay compatible with the regular 
printer routine, this software must do 
one more thing — deal with carriage 
returns. There are two variables used 
with the regular printer routine: charac- 
ter count and printer line length. Every 
time a character is output to the printer, 
the character count is incremented and 
checked with the printer line length. If 
it is equal, it is then cleared. When a 
carriage return is issued, the character 
count is again cleared. You may ask 
yourself what use this routine might 
have. Well, the printer routine itself 
does not use it, but other routines like 
TAB use these variables. After all this is 
taken care of, the routine is finished and 
returns to its caller. 

A few notes to this program are 
necessary at this time. If you noticed, at 
the beginning of the routine there is an 
ORG statement. This tells the assembler 
where the software is to be loaded in 
memory. The value after the ORG state- 
ment is 0 to make things a little easier 
for the user. While the program will not 
function properly when it is assembled, 
calculation of the offset is made easier. 

The loading address of a machine 
language consists of adding its regular 
address to the offset. If the regular 
address is 0, then the offset address 
becomes the loading address. It is up to 
the user to determine where this routine 
must end. Usually, machine language 
routines are loaded in the top portion 



of memory, protected by the CLERR 
command. An offset address must be 
used, in any case. Another point to this 
driver is that while all BASIC programs 
should work fine, machine language 
programs that choose to ignore RAM 
HOOKS will not work. The reason is 
simple — the program does not use the 
hook; therefore, there is no way that the 
program will know you have added the 
extra hardware. 

If you use a higher level of software 
such as OS-9, with the proper driver, the 
parallel printer adapter would work 
with all OS-9 software. But, unfortu- 
nately, I know little about OS~9 drivers. 
If there is someone out there who knows 
enough about it and can write such a 
driver, send it to me, via THE rainbow, 
I'll check it out, and if it works fine, I'll 
print it in a future issue. 

Figure 2 is another printer driver with 
a twist. It works only with the CoCo 3, 
You see, the CoCo 3 always works in the 
all-RAM mode. When you turn the 
computer on, it transfers all the ROM 
data into RAM. While it is impossible 
to write to ROM, it is possible to write 
to RAM. This routine is in two parts. 
The first part is one byte long and 



checks to see if the serial printer is ready. 
We don't need this with the parallel 
port; this byte defeats that routine. The 
second part is the printer driver itself. 
It is not very long — it does not need 
to be. First of all, it is loaded directly 
on top of the old serial driver. It does 
not need to be relocated in memory, nor 
does it need to be hooked into the RAM 
HOOK. Next, it does not need to check 
to see if the character is for the printer; 
if the software gets this far, it has 
already determined that it is for the 
printer. And finally, it does not have to 
deal with carriage returns, because the 
rest of the routine does that for you. 
Another advantage to this is that more 
machine language programs will work, 
because it is at the address normally 
taken up by the serial driver. 

Again, some notes for this driver are 
necessary. The assembler I used for this 
routine allows for more than one ORG 
value. Many assemblers allow this, but 
the area in between must not be filled 
with zeros if your assembler does not 
allow it. You can poke the value into 
memory. Enjoy your parallel print- 
ing! 



LOTZATiUK 

fS HER bl ? 

UW/Aim , machine language program for COCO i , 2,& 3. Studies history of LOTTO 
game as a hand! capper studies horses. Arizona 6/39, California 6/49, Iowa 6/36, 
Missouri 6/39, New York 6/40, New York 6/48, Oregon 6/42, Tri -State (Maine, 
New Hampshire, &. Vermont) 6/36, & Washington State 6/44 available. Others to 
follow. Requires 64K. Specify gaiDe desired with order . 




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California residents add 6% sales tax 

December 1987 THE RAINBOW 159 



d f VI ¥V CI I CJ ■ I w j v# * 



64K Disk Deft Pascal 




Prove Aristotle wrong in less than an hour 



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y JJebbie and 
ennis li. Weide 




aving taken science classes in 
school every year since elemen- 
tary school, I always do a 
science project for the school science 
fair. Projects are due toward the end of 
the school year, usually in April or May, 
In the past, IVe always waited until the 
last minute to get started and end up 
rushing to finish it. This year, however, 
I decided to start my project right after 
school let out last summer. Now, with 
a new school year in full swing, my 
project is finished. 

This past summer, I was invited to 
attend a special summer science class 
taught by scientists from Sandia 
Laboratories. This class covered many 
aspects of science including computers 
and physics. I learned so much that I 
decided to base my science fair project 
on these two subjects. With a little bit 
of research, rny CoCo and some hard- 
ware I built, I duplicated one of the 
world's greatest scientist's experiments. 

The project works on any version 
CoCo I and 2 with or without disk 
drives. If you use disk drives, you must 
use a multipack interface. A 4 Y' cable 
will not work, The PASCAL program 
automatically switches between disk 

Debbie Weide is a junior at Manzano 
High School and lives in Albuquerque, 
New Mexico. She is a member of the 
Honor, Spanish Honor and Thespian 
societies. Her interests include drama, 
photography and window shopping. 
Her father, Dennis Weide, has contrib- 
uted many articles to THERA IN BOW, but 
this is her first. 

1 60 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



and the timer circuit. Place the timer 
circuit in Slot I and the disk controller 
in Slot 4. Although the PASCAL timer 
program may not work on the CoCo 3, 
the BASIC program and timercircuit will 
work in the CoCo 2 mode. Those using 
a CoCo 3 can write their own assembly 
language timer program. 

How Galileo Could Have Saved Time 
One of the first things most students 
learn in a physical science course is that, 
air resistance aside, objects of different 
weights and sizes dropped from the 
same height will strike the ground at the 
same time. Pm sure you've heard of 
Galileo's experiments on free-falling 
objects at the Leaning Tower of Pisa, In 
an attempt to disprove Aristotle's the- 
ory that heavy objects fall faster than 
lighter objects, Galileo took two un- 
equal weights to the top of the tower 
and dropped them. Much to everyone's 
amazement, the weights appeared to hit 
the earth at approximately the same 
time. 

But Galileo believed that lighter 
objects fell faster, because they struck 
the ground slightly earlier than the 
heavier objects. Years after Galileo's 
death, a scientific explanation of this 
phenomenon was discovered. When a 
person releases two unequal weights 
from his hands, he cannot release them 
simultaneously no matter how hard he 
tries. Photographic evidence shows that 
he involuntarily releases the lighter 
object first, due to differential muscular 
fatigue. When holding two unequal 
weights, his hand tends to grip the 



Top View 





1 






—4— 









Hoie Center 



to, staft 
3- Block 



Ltght 8eam 
Mounting 
1/4" Holes 



Front View 
Starting 8i»ck 




Tower 
s Bracing 



Figure 1: Tower Construction 



heavier weight more tightly. Therefore, 
he will release the lighter object before 
the heavier one no matter how hard he 
tries to do otherwise. 

Now, if Galileo had owned a CoCo, 
he could have proved Aristotle wrong 
in about an hour and saved himself 
years of research and experimentation. 
Hecould have dropped unequal weights 
from a smaller tower and clocked the 
time it took for each weight to fall. 
Although he could not have dropped 



them at the same time, the experiment 
would be accurate because the weights 
would be dropped from exactly the 
same height and would fall the same 
distance each time. 

Tower Construction 

In order to duplicate Galileo's exper- 
iments (on a smaller scale), I built the 
tower shown in Figure 1. The crosses 
shown on the sides of the tower are the 
light beam mounting holes. They are % 
inch in diameter, and on our tower, 
were spaced 6 inches apart. 

If the tower is not plumb (level ver- 
tically), the object may not fall through 
both light beams. I solved this problem 
by bracing the towerand adding a small 
plumb bob for tower alignment. The 
starting block can be placed above any 
one of the light beams in order to test 
objects falling from different distances. 
The cross indicates the center of the hole 
where the marbles were placed. The 
card slot holds a piece of paper or a 
business card and is used to release the 
marble or ball. My tower was 3 feet tall, 
but you can make one to your own 
specifications. 

The Hardware 

Let's take a look at the event timer 



circuit. The circuit was built on a small 
PC board that plugs into the CoCo 
ROM port. Power is supplied by the 
computer. The complete circuit, shown 
in Figure 2, is laid out in five circuit 
blocks. I'll describe each block sepa- 
rately, and then explain how it relates 
to and works with the others. 

Clock Circuit 

The clock circuit uses a crystal- 
controlled TTL squarewave oscillator 
(IC1) to generate a 1 MHz signal. The 
output is fed to the three 74LS90 
decade counters, IC2 through IC4. 
Each counter divides the input fre- 
quency by 10 so that output from IC4 
is a 1 KHz squarewave. To count by 
hundredths and tenths of seconds, 
additional 74LS90s can be added. 
Capacitors CI through C4 are used to 
keep switching transients out of the 
power supply and are optional. 

Trigger generator 

The trigger generator uses two in- 
frared emitting diodes (IRED's CR1 
and CR2) and two phototransistors (Q 1 
and Q2) to generate the triggers re- 
quired to start (CR1,Q1) and stop 
(CR2,Q2) the computer program. Be- 



cause CR 1 is biased to conduct, infrared 
light is emitted as long as power is 
applied to the circuit. The [R beam 
striking the base of Ql causes the 
transistor to conduct placing a logic low 
signal on Pin 1 of 1C5. When the light 
beam is broken, Ql stops conducting 
and the output to Pin 1 of 1C5 goes high. 
When the beam strikes the base of Ql 
again, the transistor will conduct and its 
output will go low. The circuit of CR2- 
Q2 is identical to CR1-Q1. 

Trigger Shaper 

The trigger shaper circuit includes 
one 74LS04 (IC5) and two 555 timers 
(IC6 and IC7). IC5 inverts the pulses 
from the trigger generator, while 1C6 
and IC7 shape and lengthen the start 
and stop triggers. Pin 2 is the input to 
the 555 timer circuit. While this input 
is high, the output at Pin 3 remains low. 
When the input goes low, a trigger 
whose pulse width is determined by R5 
and C7 is present at the output. This 
trigger has a fixed duration independent 
of the input trigger duration. 

Gate Generator 

The gate generator uses a 74LS00 
Quad NAND gate (IC8) to generate a 



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December 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



161 



+ 5V 




CI I 



rGATED 



BUS 

£0 



ICS 74L3244 




61 



13 



(5 



!7 



16 



(4 



IE 



10 



I 1 I 



19 



rt/w 



to 



[3 



14 



15 



IS 



J7 



DO 
01 
D2 
OS 
D4 

D9 
Dfi 
07 



IS 



scs 



36 



o 



O 

cr 
o 

o 
o 



ci-cn- o.j 

RI,R3 • ZZ0 
R2,R4.4.7K 

J J00K 



GATE GENERATOR 



£ 

SCS 

• vex 



S3 



8N0 



gate from the R/W, E and SCS leads. 
The computer uses these leads to access 
address SFF40 for reads and writes. IC8 
decodes the state of these leads and 
generates a low on Pin 1 1 whenever the 
computer attempts to read address 
SFF40. Figure 3 shows a truth table for 
IC8. 



R/W 


E 


SCS 


OUT 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


L 


L 


H 


L 


H 


H 


H 


L 


L 


H 


L 


H 


H 


H 


L 


H 


L 


H 


L 


L 


H 


H 


L 


L 


L 


H 



Figure 3: Gate Generator 
Truth Table 



Gated Bus Buffer 

The gated bus buffer (IC9) is a tri- 
state octal buffer used to isolate the 



Figure 2: Event Timer Circuit 



clock and trigger outputs from the 
computer until the computer is ready to 
read them. While the gate from IC8 is 
high, the buffer is in the high impedance 
state and the event timer circuit is 
isolated from the computer data bus. 
When the gate goes low, IC9 is switched 
on and information from the timer 
circuit is passed to the computer data 
bus where it will be read by the comput- 
er. The clock, start and stop bits are sent 
to the data bus on bits 0 through 2. Bits 
3 through 7 are held low (grounded) for 
this circuit but, if desired, can be used 
for other inputs. When the gate lead 
again goes high, the timer circuit returns 
to its high impedance state isolating it 
from the computer data bus. 

Circuit Construction 

Circuit construction can be point-to- 
point or wire-wrapped. I prefer wire 
wrapping because it makes the circuit 
easier to modify. Remember to keep the 
leads as short as possible. I used a small 
board with a card edge connector (see 
Parts List, Figure 4) to plug into the 
ROM port. Any double-sided card edge 
connector with at least 40 tabs spaced 
. 1 inch apart can be cut to fit. Figure 4 
is a parts list with possible sources. 



Checking around your area for surplus 
or discount parts houses may save you 
lots of money. 

The Software 

The software for the experiment 
consists of two programs (listings 1 and 
2). Listing 1 is the PASCAL source code 
for the event timer program. Since 
BASIC is an interpreted computer lan- 
guage, it executes too slowly to allow 
fast timing speeds. To ensure accuracy 
of time measurement, the computer 
must be able to recognize each half- 
cycle of the clock squarewave. 

We are using a 1 KHz clock signal, so 
the computer must read the clock pulse 
at least 2,000 times per second to main- 
tain accuracy, This isn't really that hard, 
but we are executing additional instruc- 
tions between each clock read so the 
number of times we can read the clock 
each second is reduced. The more often 
the clock is read, the more accurate our 
timer circuit will be. I wrote the timer 
portion of the program using Deft 
PASCAL, a compiled language that pro- 
duces relocatable machine code. 

Listing 2 is the BASIC program that 
allows you to time 10 events. It stores 
the results in memory for final compu- 



162 



THE RAINBOW December 1987 



tation. A screen or printer output is 
provided. I used BASIC for this portion 
of the project so that I can easily modify 
the program to perform different exper- 
iments. 



Using the Programs 

First, load the BASIC program by 
typing RUN "TIMER". The BASIC pro- 
gram then loads the machine language 
program. The program will ask whether 
you want the results of the 10 trials to 
be displayed on the screen or printed on 
the printer. After you've made your 
selection, youVe ready to drop the first 
object. When it passes through the first 
light beam, a small cross will appear in 
the upper left corner of the screen to 
indicate that the computer has begun 
timing. When the object passes through 
the last light beam, the computer stops 
counting and displays the time. It asks 
if the event was valid . I f so, type a V and 
the computer will save the event; if it 
isn't, type N so that the computer will 
discard the event. When 10 valid events 
have been completed, the computer will 
throw out the highest and lowest read- 
ings and print the average of the eight 
remaining values. 



uesig. 


Hart # 


Quan. 


Price 


Source 


U l-U 1 1 


Zi z-\ uby 


1 1 


2/. 79 


Radio Shack 




27b- 1 4o 


2 


1.49 


Radio Shack 


IU 1 


UoU 1 .(JUL) 


1 


OHO 

3.1 9 


Jameco 


i on i a 


"7 a i cnn 
/4Loy(J 


3 


a r\ 

.49 


Jameco 


i c 


"7/ii on A 


1 


.35 


Jameco 




NE555V 


2 


.29 


Jameco 


i r^o 
lUo 


~7/ii o r\r\ 


1 


.29 


Jameco 


icy 


74LS244 


I 


.79 


Jameco 


Q1-Q2 


276-145 


2 


.89 


Radio Shack 


R1.R3 


271-015 


2 


2/. 19 


Radio Shack 


R2,R4 


271-030 


2 


2/. 19 


Radio Shack 


R5.R6 


271-045 


2 


2/. 19 


Radio Shack 



Circuit Board with connector Part # JE413 modified to fit ROM Port 
available from Jameco Electronics, 1355 Shoreway Blvd., Belmont, 
CA 94002 for $7.95 

Figure 4: Parts List 



The Whole Circuit and Program 

Now let's discuss the entire circuit 
and program. The clock circuit contin- 
uously generates a l KHz squarewave 
signal and feeds it to the gated bus 
buffer. The program instructs the com- 
puter to read address SFF40 (the timer 
circuit) at least 2,000 times per second 
by setting the R/ W and E leads high and 



the SCS lead low each time (refer to 
Figure 3 again). The gate generator 
enables the gated bus buffer for each 
read cycle, allowing the timer circuit 
information to pass to the computer 
data bus. As long as the start bit remains 
low, the program disregards the clock 
and stop leads. 

When an object breaks the light beam 



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December 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



163 



from CR1, IC6 generates a 1 millisec- 
ond high pulse and sends it to Pin 4 of 
IC9. The computer reads this start pulse 
and counts the number of times the 
clock pulse changes state from low to 
high. When the object breaks the light 
beam emitted by CR2, IC7 sends a stop 
pulse to IC9. The computer then stops 
counting clock pulses, passes the results 
to BASIC and gets ready for the next 
event. After 10 valid events, the pro- 
gram exits to the BASIC program where 
all mathematical calculations and out- 
put take place. 

My Experiment 

My experiment consisted of dropping 
a steel ball and two marbles (see Figure 
5 for dimensions) from the homemade 
tower. I used a business card in the card 
slot to support the marble. First, I 
dropped the marbles and the steel ball 
from the tower 10 times each. The 
results are shown in Figure 6. Even 
though the steel ball is almost four times 
heavier than either of the marbles, their 
average times were extremely close. So, 
it can be assumed that if the human 
hand could release both weights simul- 
taneously, they would hit the ground at 
the same time. 

Prove Your ResuJts With Equations 

After running a few tests, I was 
curious to know if my readings were 
accurate. That is, I wanted to make sure 
I wasn't breaking any laws of nature or 
gravity. The easiest way to verify the 
results is to plug the values from my 
tests into the formulas below and check 
the results. 

d=.5at 2 To find distance traveled 

t= V 2d /a To find time of travel 
a= 2d/t 2 To find acceleration 

You can find these equations in any 
physics book under the section on 
acceleration. 

For my results, I used the values from 
Figure 6 and plugged them into the 
formula for time. The results are shown 
below. 

t= V 2 x 2.5 ft / 32 

t=V5 / 32 

t= 3952847 seconds 

As you can see f rom Figure 6, my results 
(.399 seconds) do not match theformula 
results (.3952847 seconds). I used the 
formula below as a cross check. 

d=.5at 2 

d= 5 x 32 x .399 2 
d=l6 x .159201 
d=2.547216 feet 



Close, but no cigar. 

164 THE RAINBOW 



Weight (oz.) 
Diameter (in.) 
Avg. Time (sec.) 



Blue 
Marble 

.1383 

.54 

.399 



Multicolor 
Marble 

.1380 

.52 

.401 



Steel 
Ball 

.44224 

.55 

.399 



Figure 5: Size and Weight Statistics 



RESULTS OF EXPERIMENTS WITH BLUE MARBLE 
THE TEN VALUES ARE AS FOLLOWS: 



EVENT # 1 
EVENT # 2 
EVENT # 3 
EVENT # 4 
EVENT # 5 
EVENT # 6 
EVENT # 7 
EVENT # 8 
EVENT # 9 
EVENT # 10 



0.398 SECONDS 
0.400 SECONDS 
0.399 SECONDS 
0.398 SECONDS 
0.399 SECONDS 
0.398 SECONDS 
0.399 SECONDS 
0.398 SECONDS 
0.399 SECONDS 
0.398 SECONDS 



THE LOW VALUE = 0.398 
THE HIGH VALUE = 0.400 
8 EVENT AVERAGE = 0.399 

RESULTS OF EXPERIMENTS WITH MULTICOLOR MARBLE 

THE TEN VALUES ARE AS FOLLOWS: 
EVENT # 



EVENT # 



EVENT # 



1 


0. 


404 


SECONDS 


2 


0. 


403 


SECONDS 


3 


0. 


400 


SECONDS 


4 


0. 


400 


SECONDS 


5 


0. 


404 


SECONDS 


6 


0. 


400 


SECONDS 


7 


0. 


399 


SECONDS 


8 


0. 


400 


SECONDS 


9 


0. 


401 


SECONDS 


10 


0. 


402 


SECONDS 



THE LOW VALUE = 0.399 
THE HIGH VALUE = 0.404 
8 EVENT AVERAGE = 0.401 

RESULTS OF EXPERIMENTS WITH STEEL BALL 
THE TEN VALUES ARE AS FOLLOWS: 



EVENT 


# 


1 


0. 


399 


SECONDS 


EVENT 


# 


2 


0. 


399 


SECONDS 


EVENT 


# 


3 


0. 


399 


SECONDS 


EVENT 


# 


4 


0. 


398 


SECONDS 


EVENT 


# 


5 


0. 


398 


SECONDS 


EVENT 


# 


6 


0. 


398 


SECONDS 


EVENT 


# 


7 


0. 


399 


SECONDS 


EVENT 


# 


8 


0. 


398 


SECONDS 


EVENT 


# 


9 


0. 


399 


SECONDS 


EVENT 


# 


10 


0. 


398 


SECONDS 


THE LOW 


VALUE = 




0.398 


THE HIGH 


[ VALUE 




0. 


399 


8 EVENT 


AVERAGE 




■■ 0 


.399 



Figure 6: Results of Experiments 



December 1987 



Rware 



Just For the Fun of It 

Order any item by December 31, 1987 and you may have your choice of 
either the Silly Syntax story creation game (including two stories) or the 
Flying Tigers arcade game for only $1.95! 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Calligraphcr - (Hybrid basic/ml) 
Turn your CoCo and dot-matrix printer 
into a calligrapher's quill. Make beautiful 
invitations, flyers, certificates, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are y k 
inch high and variably spaced. Works with 
many printers including Epson, Gemini, 
Radio Shack, Okidata 92A, Banana and 
Prowriter. Additional fonts are available 
(see below). Tape/Disk; $24.95. 

OSO Calligrapher - (C) Although a 
different program from the CoCo Calligra- 
pher, the OS9 Calligrapher prints all the 
same fonts. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and formatting direc- 
tives. You may specify the font to use, 
change fonts at any time, centering, left, 
right or full justification, line fill, margin, 
line width, page size, page break and in- 
dentation. Similar to trojf on UNIX'IM sys- 
tems. Includes Gay Nineties, Old English 
and Cartoon fonts. Additional fonts are 
available (see below). Disk only; OS9 Level 
I or II; $24.05. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $14.95 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - (8 fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
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Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, He- 
brew and Victorian; Set #6 - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; speci- 
fy RSDOS or OS9; 29.95: Font Pack- 
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fonts) on one disk. Font Package #2 - 
Above font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on 
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fonts) on one disk; 49.95. 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Every- 
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UTILITIES 

Piratector - (ioo% ML) Utility to allow 
your own disk- based BASIC or ML pro- 
grams to display a graphics title screen 
and then selT-start after loading. Adds 
copy protection to your programs but still 
allows users to ereate non-executable back- 
ups! Includes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo 

1, 2, 3 (except Semigraf); $39.95. 

Super Screen Machine - (ioo% ML) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. Smooth 
scroll, key click, lower case with colored 
characters. Tape/Disk; 32K CB; CoCo 1, 

2, 3 (exeept 64K mode); $19.95. 



Color Disk Manager - (ioo% ml) Disk 
utility with these features: Disk repair, 
selective track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except for 64K 
mode); $24.95. 

Color Tape Manager - (ioo% ML) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert IVIL programs into DATA state- 
ments, append ML to BASIC, much more! 
Tape/Disk; 1BK ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except 
for 64K mode); $10.95. 

OS9 Patcher - (C) Display and modify 
the contents of a file or memory module. 
Hexidecimal, decimal and ASCII modes. 
Search feature. Calculates module CRCs; 
Generates patch command files. Disk only; 
OS9 Level I or II; $19.95. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (Hybrid basic/ml) Tape or disk, 
fast and simple general data base program. 
Create files of records that can be quickly 
sorted, searched, deleted and updated. 
Powerful printer formatting. Up to 8 user 
fields, sort on up to 3 fields. Tape/Disk; 
$19.95 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Mail - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape or 
Disk based mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 1, 
2 or 3 across, 2% to 4 inches wide. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid basic/ml) Utility 
companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail to al- 
low multi-term search (AND and OR log- 
ic), global cha-nge and delete, split large 
files and more! Tape/Disk; $14.95 (see 
combo pkg below). 



TIMS Combo Package - All three or 
the above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail 
and TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.95. 



SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer. Disk only; $19.95 each. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Trig Attack - (ioo9#ml) Ages 9 and up. In 
this educational arcade game, enemy trigs 
travel along math curves. Players learn im- 
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play. Sound effects, colorful graphics. Ex- 
cellent manual includes an introduction to 
trigonometry. Tape 16K CB/Disk 32K 
ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3; $19.95. 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Silly Syntax - (Hybrid basic/ml) Ages 5 and 
up. Story creation game; output to screen 
or printer; includes 2 stories or create your 
own. Tape/Disk; $19.95 or disk with 62 
stories for $29.95. Sets of 10 stories on 
tape/disk for $4.95: Fairy Tales, Current 
Events, X-Rated ; Sing-Along, Adventure, 
Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
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lies. Old testament. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

The Presidents of the USA - (ioo% ML) 
Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, user 
modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 and up. Trivia 
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birds. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
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PreReader - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 3-5 
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Tape/Disk; Joystick; $19.95. 

Statgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
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SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
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Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations common- 
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mobile radio systems, satellite TV, etc. 
Tape/Disk; $10.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
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sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set-in Sleeve; 3 weights 
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Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

Flying Tigers - {i00% ml) Fast Defenders 
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Outstanding graphics and sound effects. 
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RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 




WW 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-L241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and 8, 82 K 
Extended Basic, unless otkervriee noted. Add 
$1.50 per tape or disk for postage and handling. 
Florida residents add b% sales tax. COD orders 
add $4. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders generally 
shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds or exchanges 
without prior authorization. 



Errors and Inconsistencies 

The computer is accurate to .00 I 
seconds, so I had to find my error. I 
started by remeasuring the dimensions 
of my tower. After measuring from the 
center of the top IRED beam to the 
center of the bottom one, I found that 

1 was almost /2-inch over the planned 

2 feet 6 inches that was supposed to 
separate the light beams. That ac- 
counted for most of my error. In the 
final analysis, my results were within 
.001 seconds of what the formula said 
they should be. 

Here are some other things to con- 
sider when verifying your results. The 
starting block must be placed about Va- 
inch above the light beam so the beam 
will break only after the object is re- 
leased. This means that the object will 
have already fallen '/J-inch before it 
breaks the light beam. Because an 
object gains speed as it falls, it has 
already picked up speed before the 
timer started counting. 

The weather and environment can 
also affect the results. Some of my 
experiments were conducted in dry 
weather (humidity=6%) and some in 
humid weather (humidity=60%). The 
readings, much to my amazement, were 
different. In humid weather the times 
were slower than in the drier weather. 
I have no scientific explanation for this, 
but it would make an interesting science 
project! 

Lastly, you should know that the rate 
of acceleration of a falling object d ue to 



Location 


Degrees 


elevation 


Acceleration 




Normal 


(Meters) 




Canal Zone 


9 


0 


32.0944 


Jamaica 


18 


0 


32.1059 


Bermuda 


32 


0 


32.1548 


Denver 


40 


1638 


32.1393 


Cambridge 


42 


0 


32.1652 


Greenland 


70 


0 


32.2353 


Figure 7: 


Rate of Acceleration for Given Latitudes 



gravity is not always exactly 32 feet per 
second. At different latitudes it can 
equal 32.1 or even 32.2 feet per second. 
For instance, an object falling at the 
equator does not fall as fast as the same 
object falling at the North Pole. Figure 
7 shows the rate of acceleration for 
various latitudes. 

Other Practical Uses 

This project can be used to time 
events other than falling objects. If built 
in the horizontal position, it can be used 
to time objects traveling horizontally. 
For example, it could time how fast a 
model race car or train is going. If the 
timer and the car are built to scale, scale 
distances and speeds can be calculated 
using the formula S=D/T where S is the 
scale speed, D is the scale distance 
traveled and T is the time required to 
travel the distance. Note that since 
PASCAL stores the results of each event 
in a 16-bit word when passing it to 



BASIC, the program can read only 
65,535 clock cycles. Because we're 
measuring .001 second increments, the 
maximum amount of time we can clock 
accurately is 65.535 seconds (65,535/ 
1,000) or just over one minute. By 
adding another 74LS90 to the timer 
circuit, we can count .01 second incre- 
ments and increase the maximum clock 
time to 655.35 seconds (65,535/ 100). 

This project is not intended to pro- 
vide step-by-step instructions, but was 
written to give you ideas for using your 
C0C0 for your next science fair project. 
Build the circuit and elaborate on it. 
Experiment using different materials, 
different distances and different condi- 
tions. Most of all, have fun with it! 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to the authors at 14201 
Marquette Dr. NE, Albuquerque, NM 
87123. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a reply.) □ 



Editor s Note: The Deft PASCAL source codes for the 
Timer program will be included on this month's 
RAINBOW ON DISK under the filename TIMER . PflS, 

Listing 1: TIMER-BIN 

PROGRAM TIMER ( INPUT , OUTPUT ) ; 



(* CHECK BIT 2 (START BIT) *) 
(* FOR HIGH. DISCOUNT CLK BIT HIGH *) 

WHILE (BYTE[$FF40]<2) OR (BYTE [ $FF4 0 ] >3 ) DO 

■ 

r 

X : = 0 ; 

BYTE[$0400] :=$2A; 
WHILE X=0 DO BEGIN 

CURRENTCLOCK: =BYTE[$FF4 0] ; 

CASE CURRENTCLOCK OF 



(* 
(* 
(* 
(* 
(* 
(* 
(* 



EVENT TIMER PROGRAM 
WRITTEN BY D. WEIDE 
COPYRIGHT 1987 

START ADDRESS $4E20 
END ADDRESS $642F 
EXEC ADDRESS $4E20 



*) 
*) 
*) 
*) 
*) 
*) 



(* 
(* 



CONST ADDRESS=65407 ; 

VAR X , TIME , CURRENTCLOCK , LASTCLOCK : INTEGER ; 
RESULT: REAL; 

BEGIN 

X:=BYTE[1024 ] ) 
PAGE ; 

CURSOR (38); 

WRITELN ( 1 EVENT TIMER PROGRAM 1 ) ; 
CURSOR (72); 

WRITELN ( 1 EVENT NUMBER 1 , X : 2 ) ; 
BYTE [ADDRESS] :=0; 
LASTCLOCK : =0 ; 
TIME:=0; 



(* 
(* 
(* 



(* 

(* 
(* 



IF CLOCK LOW, RESET 
LASTCLOCK FLAG 

0,2: LASTCLOCK :=0; 

CHECK CLOCK BIT HIGH 
INCREMENT CURRENTCLOCK 
IF HIGH 

1,3: BEGIN 

IF LASTCLOCK=0 THEN BEGIN 
TIME : =TIME+ 1 ; 
LASTCLOCK: = 1; 
END; 
END; 

CHECK IF STOP BIT SET 

IF SET, EXIT CLOCK READ 
DISREGARD START BIT 

4,5:X:=l; 



*) 
*) 



*) 
*) 
*) 



*) 
*) 



166 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



(* CHECK CLOCK AND STOP BIT 


*) 


BYTE [ADDRESS ] :=51; 


1 


(* SET. IF BOTH ARE SET, INCREMENT 


*) 




(* CLOCK AND EXIT CLOCK READ 


*) 


(* PRINT RESULTS AND STORE 


AT *) 






(* ADDRESS 30208 AND 30209 


*) 


5,7 : BEGIN 




IF LASTCLOCK=0 THEN BEGIN 




WORD [$7 6 00] :=TIME; 




TIME:=TIME+1 ; 




RESULT :=TIME; 




X:=l 




RESULT : =RESULT/ 1000; 




END; 




CURSOR (355) ; 




END 




WRITELN (RESULT : 7 : 3 , ' SECONDS 


ELAPSED' ) 






17 XT Pi 




END; 









Listing 2: TIMER. BflS 

lf& ft " EVENT TIMER PROGRAM 

200 1 BY DENNIS H. WE IDE 

300 1 & DEBBIE E. WE IDE 

k00 1 COPYRIGHT 1987 

45j3 POKE 150,1:' BAUD RATE 

500 CLEAR 200, 19999 

6j3j3 CLS : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 10 ) 11 EVENT 

TIMER" :PRINTTAB(6) "BY DENNIS H. 

WEIDE" 
7j3j3 PCLEAR1 
8j3jd HI=J8 

9j3j3 DIM EV(lj3) :CT=1 
1000 PRINT: PRINT "YOU WILL TIME 
10 EVENTS, THROWOUT THE HIGH AN 
D LOW VALUES ANDAVERAGE THE REM 
AINING EIGHT." 

1100 PRINT: INPUT "RESULTS TO sCRE 

EN OR pRINTER>" ; DEVICES 

1200 IF DEVICE$="P" THEN DEVICE= 

-2 ELSE DEVICE=j3 

1300 LOADM"TIMER" 

1400 PRINT: PRINTTAB (5) "PRESS <EN 

TER> TO BEGIN" ; 

1500 SOUND 100,1 

1600 LINE INPUT Z$ 

1700 POKE 1024, CT: EXEC 20000 

1800 PRINT: PRINTTAB(3) "WAS THIS 

A VALID EVENT?"; 

1900 E$=INKEY$:IF E$="" THEN 190 

2000 IF E$="Y" THEN CT=CT+1:EV(C 
T)=PEEK(&H7 600) *256+PEEK ( &H7 601) 
2100 IF CT=10 THEN 2200 ELSE 170 

0 

2200 CLS:PRINT#DEVICE,TAB(1) "THE 

TEN VALUES ARE AS FOLLOWS:" 
2300 FOR X=l TO 10 : PRINT#DEVICE , 
TAB ( 1 ) "EVENT # " ; X ; TAB ( 15 ) ; 11 " ' 
2400 PRINT#DEVICE, USING "##.### 
SECONDS" ;EV(X)/1000 : NEXT X 
2500 FOR X=l TO 10: IF EV(X)>HI T 
HEN HI=EV(X) 
2600 NEXT X 
2700 LO=HI 
2800 FOR X=l TO 10 



2900 IF EV(X)<LO THEN LO=EV(X) 
3000 NEXT X 

3100 PRINT #DE VICE, USING " THE LO 
W VALUE = ##.###" ;LO/1000:PRINT# 
DEVICE, USING " THE HIGH VALUE = 
##.###" ;HI/1000 

3 200 FOR X=l TO 10: IF EV(X)=LO T 
HEN LO=X 

3 300 IF EV(X)=HI THEN HI=X 
3400 NEXT X 
3500 TL=0 

3 600 FOR X=l TO 10: IF X=LO OR X= 

HI THEN 3 800 

3 700 TL=TL+EV(X) 

3800 NEXT X 

3900 PRINT#DEVICE, USING " 8 EVEN 
T AVERAGE = ##.###"; (TL/1000) /8 ^ 



WIN YOUR 
STATE LOTTO 

WITH YOUR COMPUTER! 

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for that matter)! 

Are you still wasting money with ran- 
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This amazing program will analyze the 
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easy to read charts in just seconds. With 
single key presses from a menu you'll 
see trends, patterns, odd/even, sum 
totals, number frequency and more on 
either your screen or printer. Includes 
automatic number wheeling, instant 
updating and a built-in tutorial to get 
you started fast and easy! 

CHECKS & CHARGE CARDS ACCEPTED 
WITH NO SURCHARGE. 
All orders shipped same day 
(except personal checks). 
APPLE & IBM Compatibles . . $24.95 

Macintosh (requires M/S Basic) . $29.95 

Commodore, Atari & Radio Shack $21.95 
Back-Up Copies - $3.00 
Please add S2.00 for shipping and handling. 
Phone credit given with orders. 

(513) 233-2200 SOFT-BYTE 

^^^g P.O. Box 5701. Forest Park 
I Dayton, Ohio 45405 



,v_x7 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 167 



Compression Filters in 
Saving and Restoring 
Graphic! Screens 



Twasn't at all happy with the speed 
I of the programs I wrote to save and 
JLrestore graphics screens. About 
four and a half minutes to save a screen 
to disk is dreadful. Three and three 
quarters minutes to restore the screen is 
even worse. Both programs need help, 
but since I wrote the program to dump 
the screen to disk first, HI fix it first. 

I tried fiddling with the screen dump 
program in its BASIC09 code and got 
some improvement out of it, maybe 20 
or 30 seconds. Since I was looking for 
a four-fold improvement, I needed to 
try something else. 

Receding the program in C might 
have done the trick. C programs are 
always faster than similar BASlCOf code. 
However, those of you with C compilers 
have probably already done the trans- 
lation, and the people without C 
wouldn't want to type in the executable 
file for the resulting program. (C pro- 
grams usually generate big modules.) 



Peter Dibble has a bachelor s degree in 
chemistry and is currently a graduate 
student in computer science. He has 
worked as an applications programmer, 
systems programmer and as the user 
services assistant director for the Uni- 
versity of Rochester Computing Center. 
With Dale Puckett, he is co-author of 
The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS- 
9 and the first volume q/The Complete 
Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II. 



By Peter Dibble 

Once a BASlCOf or C program is as 
fast as possible, we usually turn to 
assembly language. Recoding our entire 
program in assembly language would be 



the leave-no-stone-unturned way to 
speed up the program, but it would be 
wasteful. Most of the screen dump 
program makes only a tiny contribution 



Listing 1: RLSqsh .CDump 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



87CD 00C8 000D 

1408 D152 4C53 

0F01 5F0F 0230 

074F DD05 3049 

9 701 8D25 250F 

C10F 2403 5C20 

ED8D 058D 6E10 

5858 DA01 8D49 

390D 0226 118D 



10: 0044 4444 4484 0F03 



11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 



FE39 9600 20F5 
9G03 2618 3404 
0400 3049 103F 
2031 8B10 9F03 
8039 C1D3 26D8 
129E 0710 9E05 
2602 8D0E E780 
109F 0535 9210 
0409 8601 103F 
8E00 0010 9F05 



1181 E000 
7173 E801 
C904 099F 
9F03 8D29 
9101 2607 
F18D 0920 
3F06 5858 
C600 9701 
1725 0C97 
F03 021C 
4310 3F06 
8 600 108E 
8925 0D1F 
3504 4FA6 
4335 8434 
108C 0400 
9F07 3121 
9E05 30G9 
8 A 2 5 AD 10 
39A5 3B21 



Listing 2i Save I mage 



PROCEDURE Save Image 
0000 DIM File Name : SIRING[99] 

000C INPUT "Image file name: 

002 5 RUN compress (FiieName) 
P02F END 



135708. 

49877 . 

23689, 

56727 . 

100655 . 

113454. 

171672. 

103119. 

38507. 

34916. 

169516. 

90014. 

15685 . 

53644. 

124072. 

57416. 

49783. 

59437. 

24702, 

80163. 

.0 



FiieName 



168 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



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to the program's run time. Even if the 
translation to assembly language re- 
duced the time of the unimportant parts 
of the program to zero, it would make 
practically no difference in the pro- 
gram's speed. The most efficient way to 
use assembly language is to choose the 
parts of the program that use the most 
time and recode only them. 

The most expensive part of the screen 
dump program is the section where it 
compresses the buffer and writes it to 
disk. The program seems to spend more 
than 75 percent of its time here. I 
decided that replacing it with assembly 
language should make a big difference 
to the program's speed — maybe close 
to the factor of four that I wanted. 

It turns out that the part of the 
program 1 chose to improve does run 
length encoding. The nyble encoding 
method I use is specialized, but not so 
specialized that this program is the only 
one you would ever want to use it for. 
In fact, it looks like it would be a good 
program to have around. Unfortu- 
nately, subroutines for BASIC09 pro- 
grams are of no use without other 
programs to call them. 

Compression Filter 

The easiest way to write a run-length 
encoding program is as a filter, a pro- 
gram that reads from standard input 
and writes transformed data to stand- 
ard output. Since all OS-9 programs 
start with standard input and standard 
output open, you don't need to worry 
about filters having filenames and 
opening files. Filters got their name 
because they are often inserted in pipes 
where they "filter" data. 

BASIC09 programs can call filters. It 
takes a little work and costs a little time, 
but it lets us use a run-length encoder 
filter instead of a subroutine. It also 
moves the filter into an address space 
separate from the rest of the program. 
If we were tight for memory, the second 
address space might be an advantage. 

My first filter was simple, but slow. 
It read and wrote one byte at a time, and 
the OS-9 overhead was killing the 
program. My second attempt read and 
wrote 100-byte buffers. It was much 
faster. 

The best size for the buffer is hard to 
choose. Every increase in buffer size 
makes the program run faster, but after 
the buffers reach about 100 bytes, 
further increases don't make much 
difference. On the other hand, the CoCo 
hands out memory in 8K chunks; so a 
program that uses only a few hundred 
bytes is wasting the rest of the 8K. I 



PROCEDURE Compress 



0000 PARAM OutFileN: STRING [99] 

000C DIM OutPath: BYTE 

0013 DIM OutPipe:BYTE 

001A DIM buffer (7680) : BYTE 

0026 DIM section: INTEGER 

002D DIM position : INTEGER 

0034 DIM WinType , horiz , vert : INTEGER 

0043 

0044 CREATE #OutPath .OutFileN : WRITE 

0050 RUN GetWinAttr( 1 , WinType , horiz , vert) 

0067 

0068 REM Write the window attributes into the image file 

009A PUT #0utPath, WinType 

00A4 PUT #0utPath , horiz 

00AE PUT #0utPath, vert 

00B8 

00B9 RUN MakPipe("RLSqsh" , OutPipe , OutPath) 
00D1 

00D2 FOR section:=l TO 4 

00E2 REM get part of the screen image 

0101 RUN getbuffer(l, buffer, section) 

0113 REM write the image data to the compression program 

0145 PUT #0utPipe .buffer 

014F NEXT section 
015A 

015B CLOSE #0utPath ,#0utPIpe 

0166 END 



PROCEDURE GetWinAttr 



0000 


PARAM Window: BYTE 




0007 


PAR .AM typecode: INTEGER 




000E 


PARAM horiz , vert: INTEGER 




0019 


TYPE registers=cc , a , b , dp : 


BYTE; x.y.u: INTEGER 


003E 


DIM regs :r egisters 




0047 


regs . a : =Window 




0053 


regs . b : =$93 




005F 


RUN syscall($8D, regs) 




006D 


IF LAND (regs . cc , !)=■! THEN 


007F 


ERROR regs .b 




0087 


ENDIF 




0089 


typecode :»regs . a 




0094 


IF typecode<5 THEN \REM 


not a graphics window 


00B8 


ERROR 183 \REM Illegal 


window type 


00D2 


ENDIF 




00D4 


FOR I: =5 TO typecode 




00E7 


READ horiz , vert 




00F0 


NEXT i 




00FB 


END 




00FD 


DATA 640,192 




0108 


DATA 320,192 




0113 


DATA 640,192 




011E 


DATA 320,192 





PROCEDURE MakPIpe 



0000 


REM For a process with its standard output directed 


to 


0035 


REM a given path and Its standard Input coming from 


a pipe 


006F 


PARAM Pgm: STRING 




0076 


PARAM InPath: BYTE \(* Input for the new program 




0099 


PARAM OutPath: BYTE \REM Output for the new program 




00BD 


TYPE registers»cc , a , b , dp : BYTE ; x , y,u : INTEGER 




00E2 


DIM regs : registers 




00EB 


DIM tmp , Oldln , OldOut : BYTE 




00FA 






00FB 


REM Fix standard output 




0111 


regs . a-=l 




011C 


RUN syscall($82,regs) \REM dup standard output 




0140 


OldOut :=regs . a 




014B 


CLOSE #1 




0150 


regs .a:=0utPath 




015C 


RUN syscall($82 , regs) \REM dup the output path into 


std out 


018D 






018E 


REM Fix standard input 




01A3 


regs . a«0 




01AE 


RUN syscall($82 ,regs) 




01BC 


Oldln :«regs . a 




01C7 


CLOSE #0 




01CC 


OPEN #tmp, "/pipe" : UPDATE 




01DC 






01DD 


REM Now standard input and output are redirected as 


they 


0214 


REM should be. Fork the program 





170 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



0233 
023E 
0249 
0257 
0262 
026D 
0282 
0283 
02A1 
02B5 
02C0 
02E2 
02FD 
0302 
030E 
0344 
034A 
034B 
0371 
03 76 
0382 
03 96 
039C 



PROCEDURE 

0000 
0007 

0013 
001A 
003F 
0048 
0053 
005A 
0061 
006 3 
0064 
0083 

008E 
009C 
00C3 
00C4 
00CF 
00DB 
00EE 
00F9 
011D 
013B 
0143 
0145 
0146 
0163 
0180 
0191 
019C 
019D 
01B0 
01BB 
01E2 
01FA 



regs . a :=0 

regs . b : =0 

regs .x: =ADDR(Pgm) 

regs .y :=0 

regs .u:=»0 

RUN syscall($03,regs) \REM fork 

REM now Che process is running. 
REM clean up afcer ic 
regs . a : «0 

RUN syscall($82 , regs) \REM dup Che new scdin 
InPach:*regs . a \REM save Che pipe 
CLOSE #0 
regs . a : =01dln 

RUN syscall($82 , regs) \REM dup Co res Core Che old scandard inpuc 
CLOSE #01dln 

REM now res Core Che old scandard oucpuc 

CLOSE #1 

regs . a : =01d0uC 

RUN syscall($82,regs) \REM dup 

CLOSE #01d0uC 

END 



GeCBuf f er 
PARAM Window; INTEGER 
PARAM buffer(7680) : BYTE 
PARAM seccion: INTEGER 

TYPE regisCers=cc,a,b,dp:BYTE; x , y , u : INTEGER 

DIM regs : regiscers 

DIM i, group: INTEGER 

DIM posic ion: INTEGER 

DIM pointer : INTEGER 

BASE 0 

RUN syscall($0C ,regs) \REM gee process id 

group : «regs . a 

pos icion : -48*( sect ion -1) 

RUN gfx2 (Window, "gee group , 1 , 0 , pos icion , 639 , 48 ) 

regs . a-1 

regs . b-$84 

regs . x-group*256+l 

regs . y-1 

RUN syscall($8E,regs) \REM map in "get" buffer 
IF LAND(regs . cc , 1)O>0 THEN \REM an error 

ERROR regs.b 
ENDIF 

poinCer :=regs . x \REM an optimization 
FOR i:=regs.y-l TO 0 STEP -1 
buffer(i) :-PEEK(poinCer+i) 
NEXT i 

regs . x=group*256+l 
regs .y=0 

RUN syscall($8E»regs) \REM unmap Che "get" buffer 

RUN gfx2("killbuff", group, 1) 

END 



settled on IK buffers, but that still 
leaves plenty of wasted space. I proba- 
bly should have used even more mem- 
ory for the buffers. 

When I stitched the filter to the screen 
dump program, the result ran in about 
a minute and a quarter (on my test 
screen. It gives a different performance 
on different data). I wish it were faster, 
but I'm not offended by the perform- 
ance any more. 

Pipes 

Unless you are comfortable with 
pipes, the MakPipe procedure may be 
the strangest part of the Savelmage 
program. The goal of the procedure is 
to save the current standard input and 
output paths and replace them with the 
patch we want the filter to have. When 
the paths are right, we fork the filter. 
The last part of the procedure gives the 
calling procedure a path number for the 
pipe and puts the standard paths back 
the way they were when MakPipe was 
called. 

The I SDup system call gets a lot of use 
in MakPipe. You won't see it much 
except when a program is fooling with 
the standard paths. Dup gives a path a 
new path number, but it doesn't change 
the path in any way or touch the old 
path number. MakPipe uses it to save a 
path when it needs to borrow its path 
number. 

MakPipe is mostly several repetitions 
of code like: 

dup pa th 0 into x 
close pa th 0 
□pen /pipe 

This saves the current path 0 (stand- 
ard input) in x and replaces it with a 
pipe. The pipe file goes in path zero 
because OS-9 always uses the lowest 
free path number for a new path. /R\ 



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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 171 




Barden's Buffer 



Taking Your Printer to the Limit 



By William Barden, Jr. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 




ack in the good old days of the Radio Shack Model 
I, a printer didn't have many bells and whistles. As a 
matter of fact, you were lucky if the printer did 
anything more than print listings in uppercase. Today, we 
have a different situation. 

The DMP-130 I use with my CoCo is just loaded with all 
kinds of options — proportionally spaced characters, 
superscripting, boldface printing, and compressed printing, 
to name a few. As a matter of fact, the darn thing can even 
emulate an Epson/IBM printer! But using a printer to full 
advantage is tedious — there's a whole new printer language 
to learn and no tools to help. In this column we'll take a look 
at some of the things you can and can't do with your printer 
and how to learn that mysterious language. 

Radio Shack Printers 

First, a brief note about why Radio Shack printers are the 
way they are. They are very prolific creatures, spawning at 
a rate of about five per year. Unfortunately for the little 
critters, they die out after a brief life — usually only three 
years or so (although some have been known to live for 10 
years or more). Their short life spans are due to the 
appearance of newer printers with more and more capabilities 
at lower and lower prices. 

Early in the game, before IBM knew microcomputers were 
hot, Radio Shack established their own printer language, 
called a "control code sequence." A current name for this is 
"Tandy character set." At about the same time, Epson, an 
aggressive printer manufacturer, established its own standard 
set of characters and control codes. 

Things went along smoothly until the IBM PC became a 
dominant force in the microcomputer market. IBM used an 
Epson printer as a standard IBM graphics printer, sticking 
their own label on the unit, and changing a few minor 
features. 

When Tandy started stamping out IBM PC clones, they 

Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects or computers ranging 
from mainframes to micros. 



had a problem. Their older printers used the Tandy character 
set and control codes, but not the IBM/ Epson codes. Since 
most printer features are implemented in firmware in the 
printer, however, the solution was easy — simply make the 
two character sets/control code sequences switch-selectable. 
And that's what they did. Current Tandy printers will run 
either in IBM/ Epson mode or in Tandy character mode by 
setting DIP switch settings on the printer, or even under 
program control. 

In addition, many Tandy printers allow for either serial or 
parallel I/O. Serial I/O is used on the CoCos, as you know, 
while parallel I/O is used on Tandy MS-DOS (IBM- 
compatible) systems. 

IBM's vs. Tandy's Character Set 

The two character sets, IBM and Tandy, are mutually 
exclusive, having very few similarities in the control codes. 
Certainly, there's no problem in printing plain text in either 
set, but we'd like to do more than that. The biggest difference 
between the two sets is in graphics mode. Tandy has 
historically used seven dots per graphics column, while IBM/ 
Epson uses eight dots per graphics column. Both accomplish 
the same thing, but it's a little harder to work with numbers 
that are not powers of two in graphics. For example, if you 
wanted to write a screen dump program for the Hi-Res 640- 
by-192 mode on the CoCo 3, you'd have 24 graphics columns 
vertically in IBM/ Epson mode, but m / 1 = 27 3 / 7 columns in 
Tandy mode. CoCo software, however, is geared more to the 
Tandy character set. Also, the Tandy character set/ control 
code sequence affords a few more niceties. For that reason, 
we'll stick with the Tandy character set in this column. 

The printer we'll use for examples will be the Tandy DMP- 
130. This is an efficient, inexpensive dot matrix printer that 
I'm sure many of you have. If you don't have a DMP-130, 
you're still in luck, because most of the control code 
sequences used for illustration here will be the same for your 
printer — there's a great deal of similarity between the 
capabilities of the printers and their use of the Tandy control 
codes. 

Fonts 

Current Tandy printers have three basic fonts, which are 



172 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



the designs of the printable characters: standard, correspond- 
ence and proportionally spaced. Figure 1 shows these three 
basic fonts as printed with a DMP-130. 



This is a sample of standard characters 

This is a sample of correspondence characters 

This is a sample of proportional characters 

Figure I 

As you can see, the quality of the fonts d iffers — the lowest 
quality is the standard font, better is the correspondence font, 
and the highest quality font is the proportional font. The 
correspondence and proportional fonts approach what 
would be printed on a daisy wheel printer, as a matter of fact. 

On most Tandy printers, the higher-quality fonts take 
longer to print. For informal printing, then, it makes sense 
to use the standard font. For letter writing, the correspond- 
ence font is nice. For the best quality, say, manuscripts for 
THE RAINBOW, the proportional font is good. 

There is one problem with using the proportional font, 
however: It is sometimes difficult to get a clean right margin. 
The term proportional simply means that each letter is 
allocated a different width. Notice in Figure 1 that the first 
two fonts are spaced at 10 characters per inch (the "of" ends 
at the same place), while the proportional font compresses 
the text more. This text compression occurs because letters 
such as V are less than '/loth-inch wide. The overall 
appearance of the type is very pleasing, however. 

How do you get a justified right margin? Some word 
processing programs will provide a justified text mode that 
supports your printer. Often, however, you're left to write a 
program that counts the widths of individual characters and 
then inserts thin slivers of space in between words and 
characters to provide a clean right edge. More on that later. 

The Basic Font Control Code Sequence 

The corresponding listing to producethe printout in Figure 
1 is shown here: 

100 PRINT«-2, CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ; 

110 PRINTtt~2, "This is a sample of standard 
cha rac ters" 

120 PRINTS-2, CHR$(27) ;CHR$(18) ; 

130 PRINT8-2, "This is a sample of correspond- 
ence characters" 

140 PRINTH-2, CHR$(27) ;CHR$(17) ; 

150 PRINTS-2, "This is a sample of proportional 
charac ters " 



The PRINT8-2 portion is the standard way in Extended 
Color BASIC to address the system printer. A normal text line 
is printed by enclosing the text in quotes. The CHR$ sequences 
need some explanation. Each CHR$ function creates one 
character; two CHR$ functions create two characters. The 
character function ctuld be used to print any text character: 

100 PRINT8-2, CHR$(65) ;CHR$(66) 

This line prints AB, for example. In most cases, though, 
CHR$ is used to print only those characters that are less than 
32 decimal, which are called "control codes" and are usually 
not entered from the keyboard. The control code decimal 27 
is called an "escape" control code and was used on old 
teletypewriting equipment to signal an interrupt. An escape 
code often precedes a special control code action, and control 
code sequences are also called "escape sequences." In this 
case, the escape sequences are the following: 

27, 19 Set standard characters 

27, 18 Set correspondence characters 

27, 17 Set proportional characters 

Once the font is set, it remains in force until a new control 
code sequence sets another font. You could set a new font 
at any time, however, just by inserting the control code 
characters at the proper point in the PRINTB-2 statement. 

100 PRINTtt-2, "Standard here, but CHR$(27); 
CHR$(1B); "correspondence here" 

Another way to do this is with concatenated strings: 

100 PRINTtt-2, "Standard here, but " + CHR$(27) + 
CHR$(1B) + "correspondence here" 

Spacing 

For historical reasons, standard spacing is 10 characters 
per inch horizontally for non-proportional fonts. This makes 
each character ! / !0 th-inch wide, the same width as typewriter 
characters (remember typewriters?). Radio Shack printers, 
however, allow several variations on this standard width, as 
shown in Figure 2. 



This is a sarnple of 1G— p±~tch. spacing 
This is a sample of 12-pitch spacing 

This is a sample of condensed (17 epi ) 
This is elongated text- 

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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 173 



This is a sample of 1 0~pi tch spacing 
This is a sample of 12-pi tch spacing 

This is a sample of condensed (17 cpi ) 
This is & 1 onga t&d text 

Figure 3 



This, is an #samp 2 # of micro font »oJ(? . 
Note? that t.he 1 ins spacing is I /2 norma J 



Figure 4 



The top line prints at JO characters per inch, the standard 
spacing. The next line is set by the control code sequence 
PRINTtt -2, CHR$(27) ; CHR$(29) and prints at 12 charac- 
ters per inch. The next line is "condensed," a Radio Shack 
term for 17 characters per inch. This spacing is about the 
smallest possible for characters on most printers. It allows 
136 columns to be put in eight inches horizontally, a boon 
for printing spreadsheets and other listings. Essentially, it 
reduces the large computer listing format down to a 
manageable 8^-by-ll inch paper size. The condensed text 
is set by PRINT8-2, CHR$(27); CHR$ ( 20 ). The final text 
is "elongated." In this mode, two horizontal dots are printed 
for every single dot, making the characters twice as wide as 
they would normally be. Elongated characters can be printed 
in 10-pitch, 12-pitch and 17-pitch mode. Elongation is set by 
PRINTtt-2, CHR$(27); CHR$(14) and reset by PRINTtt - 2 , 
CHR5(27) ;CHR$(15). 

The bottom line, therefore, is that you can have 10, 12, 17, 
5, 6 or 8.5 characters per inch, depending upon the font and 
spacing set. 

Italics and Microfont 

Earlier Radio Shack printers do not have an italics or 
microfont capability. For example, my DMP-2100, a 5-year- 
old printer, has many options, but not as many as the DMP- 
130. The D MP- 130 and several others have the ability to 
italicize text for most type styles, as shown in Figure 3. The 
italics mode is set by PRINT8-2, CHR$(27); CHR$(66); 
CHR$(1) and reset by PRINT8-2, CHR$(27); CHR$(66); 
CHR$(0). 

The microfont mode produces text that is half the height 
of regular text; it is printed on the top half of the line, as 
shown in Figure 4. Microfont mode is set by CHR$(27); 
CHR$(77). Microfont mode is ended by selecting another 
mode. 



Other Character-Related Actions 

In addition to italics and microfont, most newer printers 
have the ability to superscript and subscript. Again, this is 
usually a control code sequence (in the DMP-130, it is 27, 
83, 0 to start superscripting; 27, 83, I to start subscripting; 
and 27, 88 to end either superscripting or subscripting). 

Almost all Radio Shack printers have the ability to 
perform bold printing, using a 27, 31 (start) and 27, 32 (end) 
control code sequence. Many printers print boldface by 
overprinting the characters a second time, resulting in the 
print speed being halved. 

Underlining is also a feature found on all printers except 
for the most ancient. This mode is set by the control code 
15 and canceled by the control code 14. 

In addition to standard ASCII characters, most newer 
printers have an extended character set. In IBM /Epson 
mode, this extended character set more or less matches what 
you see in the extended graphics mode on the screen — 
foreign characters, shading characters and line segments. In 
Tandy mode, the same types of characters are present, but 
the codes are different. 

On a typical modern dot matrix printer, therefore, you 
have about five different type fonts, six types of character 
spacing, superscripting and subscripting, bold printing, and 
underlining. All of this for about S250 or less! 

Line Spacing 

Printers historically have printed at six lines per inch, about 
the vertical spacing of typewriters. However, all newer 
printers have the ability to print at six lines per inch, eight 
lines per inch, and incremental amounts in between. This is 
a useful feature that allows you to create a variety of line 
spacing, or "leading," as it is called in the typesetting trade. 

The DMP-130, for example, has control code sequences 
that allow you to space vertically in increments of 7 12 -inch 
reverse, ] / 6 -inch reverse, '/^-inch forward, i / i44 -inch forward, 
! /72-inch forward, ! /| 2 -inch forward, ! /g-inch forward and 76- 
inch forward, allowing you to get practically anywhere on 
the page vertically, with a precision of 0.0046 inch! Figure 
5 shows the effect of different spacings on text. 

Line spacings of six, eight, and 12 lines per inch are used 
in the figure. Reverse line spacing also could have been used, 
or a new line of a smaller increment could have been used, 
but that doesn't make too much sense for text. 

Forms Control 

The standard "page" for printing is 8^-by-l 1 inches. The 



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characters 



r inch optional 



174 



THE RAINBOW December 1987 



Figure 6 



1 1-inch length translates to 66 lines per page when a standard 
line spacing of six lines per inch is used. However, newer 
Radio Shack printers allow you to specify any page length 
from inch (a rather short page) to about 44 inches by using 
the control code sequence 27, 52, /?, where n is the length in 
'/6-inch units. Although most word processing packages also 
allow you to keep track of the page length and automatically 
do a new page by a series of line feeds, the built-in page length 
is something you get for free and can be useful in programs 
in which the special "form feed" control character (decimal) 
12 is used. 

Column Positioning 

Depending on the font and pitch selected, the firmware of 
the printer keeps track of the current "dot column" as it is 
printing. The DMP-130, for example, prints a 9-by-9 matrix 
of dots in the standard font in 10 pitch with each character 
occupying 1 2-dot columns (there's some blank space between 
characters). Since 80 characters can be printed per page, the 
total number of dot columns in this mode is 80 times 12, or 
960 dot columns. In 12 pitch, the number of dot columns is 
increased by l2 /io and becomes 1.2 * 960 = 1,152. For 
condensed and correspondence modes, the number of dot 
columns is increased still further. 

On most newer Radio Shack printers, the print head can 
be positioned to any dot column or at least every other dot 



column by two methods: moving the print head incrementally 
by a small number of dot positions or moving the print head 
to a specific dot column on the current print line. 

You could, for example, move the printhead to dot column 
400 out of 0 through 479 on the DMP-130 by using the 
control code sequence PRINTH-2, CHR$[27); CHR$(16); 
CHR$[1) ; CHR$[144) 

The first two characters here specify that this is a print head 
positioning action. The 1 and 144 are the two bytes that define 
the dot column. The first byte must be multiplied by 256 
the final dot column is defined by 1 * 256 + 144 = 400. 

To see how this works, consider the following code, which 
prints an 'X' at dot columns 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 
144, 233 and 377 (this is a Fibonacci series, in which the next 
position is determined by adding the previous two numbers 
— 8 and 13 produce 21, for example): 



100 Nl = 1 
110 N2 = 0 
120 N3 = Nl + N2 
130 PRINTH-2, CHR$(27) 
(N3'256)); CHRS(N3 



CHR$(1G) ; CHRi (INT 
INT(N3/25G] * 25G) ; 



140 Nl = N2 
150 N2 = N3 

1G0 IF N2 O 377 THEN GOTO 120 
170 PRINTH-2 



The printing for this code is shown in Figure 6. 



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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 175 



in the good old days of the Radio Shack Model I, a printer didn't have many bells 
and whistles. As a matter of fact, you were lucky if the printer did anything more 
than print listings in upper case. Today, we have a different situation. The 
DMP-130 I use on my CoCo is just loaded with all kinds of options - 
proportional-spaced characters, superscripting, bold-face printing, and compressed 
printing, to name a few. As a matter of fact, the darn thing can even emulate an 
Epson/IBM printer! Using a printer to full advantage is tedious - there's a whole 

in the good old days of the Radio Shack Model I, a printer 
didn't have manv hells and whistles. As a matter of fact, 
you were lucky if the printer did anything more than print 
listings in upper case. Today, we have a different 
situation. The DMP-130 1 use on m v CoCo is just loaded 
with all kinds of options - proportional -spaced characters^ 
superscripting, bold-face printing, and compressed printing* 
to name a few* As a matter of fact, the darn thing can even 
emulate an Epson/IBM printer! I, s i n g a printer to full 
advantage is tedious - there's a whole new printer language 

Figure 7 



Although the DMP-130 does not have incremental dot 
positioning, other printers have a "proportional spacing" 
control sequence, in which you can move the print head tiny 
amounts, usually 0 to 9 dot columns (CHR$(27); CHR$ 
(«), where n is 0 to 9). This allows you to move relative to 
the current print head position. This sequence is handy for 
doingjustification of text in proportional spacing mode, The 
proportional font prints characters in varying widths. To get 
a clean right edge (a justified edge), these steps must be 
followed: 

• Find the word break 

• Put everything after the word break on the next line 

• Look up the widths of every character on the current text 
line and arrive at a grand total 

• Find the difference between this grand total and the dot 
column width of the line 

• Insert slivers of space using the proportional spacing 
control codes between random words to make up the 
difference 



A sample of justification is shown in Figure 1, on a printout 

from a DMP-2100. The same justification is possible on 

printers such as the DMP-130, but the computations must 

be in absolute dot column values from the left margin. The 

DMP-130 also has a control code sequence of CHR$(8) ; 

CHR$( n ) , where n is a number from 0 to 255, and backspaces 

from 0 to 255 dot columns. 

You might ask yourself why all software packages don't 

provide automatic justification on printing. The answer lies 

in those five printers per year and the huge number of other 

printers available. There are so many printers in use and so 

little standardization that it's hard to provide printer 

"drivers" (software subroutines) for every printer on a system, 

even the average CoCo system. As a result, many of the 

capabilities of the printers in use are not implemented. It's 

a shame, too, because the quality of the printing could be 

much better, 

Graphics Modes 

As printers became controlled by microprocessors and 

176 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



print actions by firmware or by software inside the printers, 
it became easy to add graphics printing. After all, what's the 
difference in printing a dot matrix representing an alphabetic 
character and printing those same dots to represent graphics? 
High resolution graphics printing actually preceded high 
resolution screens in microcomputers, and current printers 
can more than match the CoCo 3's 640-by-l92 Hi-Res screen. 

In graphics printing, the same action is taken to print either 
seven dots (Tandy) or eight dots (IBM/ Epson) per vertical 
column. Newer printers also print with nine-pin heads and 
24-pin heads, but in Tandy mode, most graphics printing is 
done in seven-dot columns. 

In normal text printing, "white space" is inserted between 
columns, as shown in Figure 8. However, in graphics mode, 
no white space is required, because the graphics dots must 
be contiguous — the next dot column must start one d ot away 
vertically from the last dot column. Because of this, a smaller 
line spacing is used in graphics mode, 7 / 7 2-mch in the DMP- 
130 or similar spacing in other printers. 

The number of dot columns per inch horizontally is usually 



9 Rows 
Of Dots < 



Vii' 



'-/72 - Vs 



3 Rows Of 
"White Space" 



Next 
Character 



V*o" Typical 



1 



! /?2" Typical 



t 

Firsl 

Graphics 
Column 



Second 

Graphics 

Column 



Figure 8: Graphics Spacing 



on the order of 60, although some Radio Shack printers allow 
even greater resolution — up to hundreds of dots per inch. 
The DMP-130, for example, prints graphics dot columns at 
60 per inch, making the total number of dot columns across 
the page 480. In a 10-inch vertical print area, there are 104 
dot columns or 728 dots. This makes the total "resolution" 
of a printed page about 480 by 728 dots, a total of 349,000. 

The aspect ratio of 480 to 728, however, doesn't really 
match the CoCo 3 screen aspect ratio of 4 to 3. Therefore, 
it's difficult to "print the screen" in screen dumps in graphics 
mode unless some compensation is made. One way to do a 
screen dump is to rotate the dump 90 degrees to print the 
horizontal portion of the screen vertically on the paper. The 
aspect ratio now becomes ,92 /6o = 3.2 to 640 / 72 = 8.8 inches, 
or 8.8 to 3.2. Expanding the vertical screen dimension 
(printed horizontally) by printing two dots for every screen 
dot makes the aspect ratio 8.8 to 6.4 inches very close to the 
screen's 4:3 aspect ratio. CoCo screen dumps have been 
described in this column in the past and are easy to do. 

What is more difficult to accomplish is doing anything 
significant with printer graphics without a great deal of 
trouble. CoCo Extended Color BASIC and OS-9 BASIC09 have 
quite good graphics commands that allow you to draw and 
color lines, boxes, circles, windows and complex shapes. 
Printer "language," however, has no such capability — the 
best you can do is draw a vertical column of dots. This means 
that unless screen dumps are done, graphics on printers must 
be done by laboriously translating figures into a series of 
vertical dot columns. This is a tedious operation, to say the 
least. Here's a sample: 

Suppose we have the shapes and initials shown in Figure 
9 and want to print them on our system printer as a logo. 
First, an overlay representing the printer resolution must be 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

! 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



1 

16 8 16 2 2 2 

32 16 32 4 4 8 4 
32 64 64 64 32 8 16 8 4 
128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 



128 128 128 160 240 216 240 166 142 155 142 132 128 



Dot 

Column 1 



Dot 

Column 2 




4 4 4 

8 8 8 

16 16 16 4 

32 4 32 32 16 4 

64 16 64 64 6 4 6 4 6 4 64 
128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 

128 128 252 148 252 128 192 128 252 212 196 128 192 



Figure 9: Typical Graphics Translation 



i 

! 
I 

I 



The 




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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 77 



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1984, is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

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superimposed on the shape. Next, the lines across the shape 
must be converted into dot columns. Each dot column is then 
encoded into a numeric value. In Tandy graphics mode, the 
seven dots in a dot column represent values of 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 
32, 64, and 128, moving from top to bottom. The final value 
for each dot column is calculated by adding the individual 
dot values together and then adding 128. (The 128 value sets 
the most significant bit of the byte, marking it as a graphics 
value when sent to the printer.) 

To print the graphics shape, graphics mode is set by a 
PRINTtt-2, CHR$(1B). Each line of dot columns is then 
printed by sending the individual dot column values. At the 
end of each line, a PRINTtt-2 moves to the next line, spacing 
the 7 /72-inch graphics line spacing. The complete program is 
shown below. 



set graphics mode 
print first row 



100 DRTR 128, 128, 128, 160, 240, 216, 240, 166 
110 DRTR 142, 155, 142, 132, 128 
120 DRTR 128, 12B, 252, 148, 252, 128, 192, 128 
130 DRTR 252, 212, 196, 128, 192 
140 PRINTtt-2, CHR$[1B) 
150 FDR 1=1 TO 13 
160 RERD R 

170 PRINTtt-2, CHR$[R) ; 
180 NEXT I 
190 PRINTtt-2 
200 FDR I = 1 TO 13 
210 RERD R 

220 PRINTtt-2, CHR$[R) ; 
230 NEXT I 

240 PRINTtt-2 ' line feed 



1 ine feed 
print second row 



In spite of complex graphics commands, current printers 
such as the DMP-130 are real bargains. There's a lot of 
capability to be found if you're willing to learn and use a few 
control code sequences. I'm looking forward to the next set 
of Tandy printers — they're bound to be less expensive with 
even more features. Perhaps they will even include a page 
description language as packaged with laser printers to make 
drawing graphics and defining fonts more palatable. 

Want to buy a used DMP-130? /K\ 



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1A) Title of publication: The Rainbow, The Color Computer Monthly Magazine B) 
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178 



THE RAINBOW 



December 1987 



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KISSable OS-9 



Putting Data Structures on 
the Drawing Board 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 




ISSDraw takes a great leap 
forward this month as weshow 
you how to save your artwork 
and load it back into memory. We also 
increase the speed of the program 
dramatically by taking a different ap- 
proach to output and finish the KISS- 
DrauArc routine. We tinkered with the 
design of the HandleMenu procedure, 
and the file menu now works like the 
menus on a Macintosh. KISSDraw's 
overall structure remains basically the 
same, so you won't be starting over 
from scratch. 

From Easy to Easy 

The first goal we wanted to accom- 
plish when we started KISSDraw was 
to show you how easy it is to do really 
amazing graphics programming with 
the primitives built into OS-9 — espe- 
cially when you access them through 
BASIC09. Our next objective was to 
introduce the general concept of event- 
and object-oriented programming. Last 
month, we introduced the main event 
loop. This month we hope to concen- 
trate on objects. 

Down the road we hope to experi- 
ment with OS-9's SS.MsSig GetStat 



Dale L. Puckett, who is author of The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director~at~large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale is a 
U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and lives 
in Rockville, Maryland. 



call to see if we can come up with a way 
for the Ge tKISSMouse routine to run in 
the background continuously, sending a 
signal to KISSDraw — or any other 
program you install it in — each time 
there is a mouse event. If we do that, the 
main program will be able to go about 
its business until it is summoned by the 
mouse. But that's another column. 

We hadn't even finished last month's 
column when we ran into a brick wall. 
We were in a hurry and wanted to 
publish a routine that would let you 
save your drawings in a disk file. From 
the beginning, we had planned to redi- 
rect the output of KISSDraw's Do- 
Event procedure to a tee filter. The 
output of the tee would go to a disk file 
and the screen at the same time. It was 
a great idea! But, you can't redirect the 
run statements in a BASIC09 program. 

On several occasions I wrote BASIC09 
programs as filters and ran them using 
RunB from the OS-9 command line, so 
I thought I could attack the problem by 
using BASlC09's Shell statement to run 
an OS-9 command that was actually a 
module of BASIC09 I-code. It wasn't 
meant to happen. It would take an act 
of Congress and quite a programming 
feat to put together the string required 
to pass the complex data structure 
KISSDraw uses to RunB. Once again we 
had proven the old programmers adage: 
prior planning could have prevented 
poor performance. 

Managing Your Development 

As your programs grow larger, you'll 
quickly discover that you need to get 
organized. During the past month we 
reached that point with KISSDraw. The 



length of the source code has now 
reached the point where KISSDraw will 
no longer fit when BASIC09 is running 
with 32K of workspace. However, be- 
cause of BASlC09's modular design and 
its ability to pack procedures into 
intermediate code modules, we can 
continue our project. 

The solution is to pick the modules 
you feel are stable at this point in your 
program's development cycle and pack 
them into BASIC09 I-code modules that 
can reside anywhere in the 5J2K bytes 
available in your Color Computer 3 — 
but outside your BASIC09 workspace. 

When you do this, you'll free plenty 
of memory For example, KISSdMenu 
presently needs 3,885 bytes in BASlC09's 
workspace. When it's packed, it only 
needs 761 bytes of memory. The source 
for WhichTool is 1,914 bytes long. Its 
packed binary code is only 864 bytes 
long. And KISSDrauflrc took 3,192 
bytes of source code. It packs down to 
1,585 bytes. 

Next month, we will merge packed 
modules of SetUpMouse, WhichTool, 
DoEven t, KISSdmenu, KISSf reehand 
and the individual proced ures that draw 
bars, boxes, circles, ellipses and lines. 
They all fit in a file less than 8K long. 
It's important to notice we planned it 
that way. Why? 

A Typical Problem 

Let's study a typical troubling scenar- 
io that many people are running into 
these days, if the questions on RAIN- 
BOW'S Delphi OS-9 On-Line Forum are 
an indicator. The symptoms are "Error 
32 — Memory Full" and "Error 43 — 
Unknown Procedure" messages. The 



1 80 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 



reason they are receiving these messages 
is complex, but it's easy to understand 
when you analyze the problem. 

Even though you have 512K bytes of 



memory available on your Color Com- 
puter 3, each process you run can use 
only 64K of memory for its program 
code and its data. When BASIC09 is 
running, it is a process. Its program 
code uses 23,244 bytes. However, be- 
cause of the way OS-9 Level II memory 
management works, it takes a full three 
blocks or 24,576 bytes. If you run 
B AS I CO 9 with 32K bytes of data memory, 
you have used a total of 56,0 12 bytes or 
seven blocks of memory. Of the 65,536 
bytes or eight blocks available, you have 
8, 1 92 bytes or one block left in BASlC09's 
64K process block. 

Let's assume you are a beginning 
BASIC09 programmer and have not yet 
mastered OS-9. In that case you prob- 
ably haven't gotten around to merging 
the InKey and SysCall modules into 
your gfx2 file. Planning to write a large 
program, you ask for 32K of memory 
when you start BASIC09. You decide to 
start with a simple routine, but that 
routine just happens to use InKey and 
gfx2. You look at the listing time and 
time again. It has to be right. In fact, 
it is right. But after listing your proce- 
dure again, you type RUN for the 16th 
time and get the same error messages 
again. What happened? 

When your BASIC09 procedure en- 
countered the line RUN InKey [ Char ] , it 
did not find a procedure by that name 
in your BASIC09 workspace since InKey 
is an I-code module. OS-9 then looked 
in its module directory to see if a module 
named InKey existed. It didn't, so it 
looked for a file by that name in your 
current execution directory, loaded it 
and then linked to the module InKey, 
When OS-9 loaded the 94-byte InKey 
module it stored it in an 8K block. 
When your BASIC09 program ran 
InKey, OS-9 switched the entire 8K 



block of memory into your 64K BASIC09 
workspace. 

You're OK so far. You have used 
exactly 65,536 bytes or eight blocks of 



memory — all that is allotted to a 
process. But the next line of your 
program uses the gfx2 procedure to 
clear your Color Computer's screen. 
BASIC09 retraces its steps and attempts 
to switch the 8K block of memory that 
contains the 2, 250-byte gfx2 module. It 
quickly discovers that there's not 



another 8K block of memory left in 
BASlC09's process area, and you receive 
the error message. 

The answer is to merge gfx2, Sys- 
Call and InKey into one file. Since 
gfx2 is only 2,250 bytes long, you have 
plenty of space left in its 8K block. In 
fact, we'll probably merge several of 
KISSDraw's general modules into this 
file once they are finalized. Since almost 
any BASIC09 graphics program we write 
uses gfx2, we will have access to quite 
a few of the KISS Draw primitives at no 
extra memory cost. 

This all means if you aregoing to run 
a file containing up to 8K of packed I- 
code modules from within your BASIC09 
programs, you must not ask for more 
than 24 K of memory. An 8K block for 
any module in your own file, plus an 8K 
block for gfx2 and any modules con- 
tained in its file and the 24K BASIC09 
workspace add up to 40K. That leaves 
24K for BASlC09's program code and 
that's exactly what it uses. 

If your file of packed modules con- 
tains between 8,193 and 16,383 bytes, 
you will use 16K of memory when you 



Listing 1: KISSDrauPut 

PROCEDURE KISSDravPut 
9999 (* Drawing program For the Color Computer III 

Insert type statements from Figure 1 

01CE TYPE Drawing=Loc : orgin ; tool: object 

01E3 

01E4 DIM Event:packet 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 181 



TYPE rodent =Vld , Ac t , ToTm : BYTE ; XI: INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 
INTEGER; CBSA , CBSB , CCtA , CCtB , TTSA , TTS B , TLSA ,TLS B : BYTE 
; X2 ,BDX,BDY: INTEGER; S tat , Res : BYTE ; AcX , AcY , WRX , WRY : 
INTEGER 

TYPE stats=IsEvent , InWindow, InToolBox , InMenuBar , line , box , c ircle 
.ellipse , bar , arc , fill, text .freehand , RecordOn : BOOLEAN 

TYPE cursor=OutPut , ScaLe , ScreenType , NoCur , arrow, pencil .cross 
.hourglass , Nolcon , Text Bar , Scross, Icon , IconBuf f, pattern 
, hor zline , vert line , slant right .slantleft.dots: BYTE 

TYPE codes=DArc .DBar , DBox , DCircle , DEllipse , DLine .DPoint , DFill 
, DSe tPtr , DPutCur , DSetCur , DLogic, DPattern : INTEGER 

TYPE ob ject=DCode , HorP , VerP : INTEGER 

TYPE orgin=DPSCode .HanX.HanY : INTEGER 

TYPE packet=mouse : rodent ; s ta tus : s tats ; pointer : cursor ; Code 
:codes; Pen:object; Handle :orgin 

Figure 1: Type Statements 



"Even though you have 512K 
bytes of memory available on 
your Color Computer 3, each 
process you run can use only 
64K of memory for its 
program code and its data." 



load it. You will then only be able to ask 
for I6K of BAS1C09 workspace. Let's add 
it up again: 

I6K + 8K+I6K+24K=64K. 

Ponder what would have happened if 
we had stored the KISS Draw modules 
listed above in individual files in our 
CflDS directory. They would have used 
88K of memory when they were loaded. 
That's not a problem. But each time we 
called a new one from our BASIC09 
program we would have switched 
another 8K block of memory into our 
64K workspace. After the first two or 
three, we would be out of memory 
within BASlC09's workspace. 

**We revamped the 
HandleMenu 
procedure, 
attempting to 
emulate the way a 
Macintosh menu 
works. The patient 
lived. 99 

To merge gf x2, InKey and SysCa 1 1 , 
you can run the following lines from the 
OS-9 prompt. 

chd /dd/cmds 

rename gfx2 gfx2 . original 
merge gfx2 . or i ginai InKey 

SysCal i > gf x2 
at tr gf x2 e pe 

If you are going to be running a lot 
of packed BASIC09 programs from the 
OS-9 command line rather than from 
within BASIC09 itself, you may also want 
to merge InKey and SysCall into your 
RunB file. This will cover you when you 
run a packed program from the OS-9 
command line that does not use the 
gfx2 module but does use InKey and 
SysCall. Just change gfx2 to RunB in 
the command lines above. 

The bottom line: Remember that the 
OS-9 memory management scheme 
switches 8K of memory at a time into 
the workspace used by a process, no 
matter how short the module in that 8K 
block, and always account for that 8K 
of memory. 

Type Changes This Month 

If you look closely at the TYPE state- 
ments in our new version of KISSDraw, 
you'll notice several changes. After we 



01ED DIM MaxObjects , ObjNum: INTEGER 

01F8 DIM PixFile : BYTE 

01FF DIM Picture (20) : Drawing 

020D DIM char : STRING [1] 

0219 

021A MaxObjects :=20 

0221 FOR ObjNum: =1 TO MaxObjects 

0232 Picture(ObjNum) . Loc . DPSCode : =0 

0243 Picture(ObjNum) .Loc .HanX:=0 

0254 Picture(ObjNum) .Loc.HanY:=0 

0265 Picture(ObjNum) . tool .DGode :=0 

0276 Picture(ObjNum) . tool .HorP : =0 

0287 Picture(ObjNum) , tool . VerP : =0 

0298 NEXT ObjNum 

02A3 ObjNum:=l 

02AA 

02AB char:="" 

02B2 Event . status . RecordOn : =FALSE 

02BF Event .Code. DSe tCur : =$1B39 

02CE Event .Code. DPutCur :=$ 1B4E 

02DD Event .Code. DSetPt r : =$1B40 

02EC Event .Handle .DPSCode :=Event .Code .DSetPtr 

0301 Event . Code .DBox :=$1B48 

0310 Event. Code. DBar:=$lB4A 

031F Event. Code. DCircle : =$ 1B50 

032E Event .Code. DEllips e : =$1B51 

033D Event .Code. DFill:=$lB4F 

034C Event .Code. DLine:=$lB44 

035B Event .Code. DArc :=$1B52 

036A Event . pointer . Out Put : =1 

0378 Event .status . IsEvent :=FALSE 

0385 Event .status . line :=FALSE 

0392 Event .status . box: =FALSE 

039F Event . status . circle : =FALSE 

03AC Event . status . ellipse : =FALSE 

03B9 Event . status . bar:=FALSE 

03C6 Event . status . arc : =FALSE 

03D3 Event . status .fill :=FALSE 

03E0 Event . status . text :=FALSE 

03ED Event . status . freehand : =FALSE 

03FA 

03FB Event . pointer . NoCur=0 

0409 Event . pointer . arrow=l 

0417 Event . point er . pencil=2 

0425 Event . pointer . cross=3 

0433 Even t. pointer . hourglass=*4 

0441 Even t. point er . NoIcon=5 

044F Event . pointer . TextBar=6 

045D Event . pointer . Scross=7 

046B Event .pointer . IconBuff =202 
0479 

047A (* First we need to start with a clear screen 

04A7 (* and draw the menu 

04BB 

04BC RUN gfx2 ("clear") 

04C9 RUN KISSdMenu(Event) 
04D3 

04D4 w e must bring the high resolution mouse on line 

0506 (* and find out where it is pointing 

052A 

052B RUN setupmouse 

052F Event. Pen. DGode : =Event . Code . DSe t Cur 

0544 Event . Pen . HorP : =INT(256*Event .pointer . IconBuff )+Event . pointer . arrow 

056A Event. Pen. VerP:=0 

0578 PUT #1, Event. Pen 
0585 

0586 LOOP \REM Main Event Loop 
059A 

059B EXITIF charo"" THEN 

05A7 ENDEXIT 

05AB 

05AC RUN inkey(char) 

05B6 RUN getKISSmouse(Event) 

05C0 

05C1 (* Has there been an event 

05DC (* is Button Down 

05ED 

05EE IF Event , status . IsEvent THEN 

05FD IF Event . status . InToolBox THEN 

060C RUN WhichTool (Event) 

0616 Event . Pen . DCode : =Event . Code . DSe t Cur 



182 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



062B 

P65C 
0669 

5?673 

06AE 

06BD 

06CA 

06DC 

P6EE 

06F9 

P6FB 

P6FD 

06FE 

0713 

0736 

0744 

0751 

0753 

0754 

0763 

0772 

0774 

0776 

077A 

077B 

07AD 

07C2 

07D7 

07EC 

07F9 

07FB 



Event . Pen . HorP : =256*Event . pointer . IconBuf f+Event . pointer . pencil 
Event . Pen . VerP :=0 
PUT #1 , Svent . Pen 
RUN DoEvent( Event) 

REM Record Data Structure Picture here is Record Flag is ON. 
IF Event .status .RecordOn THEN 
IF ObjNum<=MaxObjects THEN 

Picture (ObjNum) . Loc :=Event .Handle 
Picture (ObjNum) . tool : =Event . Pen 
ObjNum: =ObjNum+l 
ENDIF 
ENDIF 

Event . Pen . DCode : =Event . Code . DSetCur 

Event . Pen .HorP :=256*Event . pointer . IconBuf f+Event . pointer .arrow 
Event . Pen .VerP :=0 
PUT #1 .Event . Pen 
ENDIF 

IF Event. status . InMenuBar THEN 
RUN HandleMenu(Event .Picture) 
ENDIF 

ENDIF 
ENDLOOP 

(* Turn Graphics Cursor off before leaving program 

Event . Pen . DCode : =Event . Code . DSetCur 

Event . Pen . HorP : =Event . pointer . NoCur 

Event . Pen . VerP : =Event .pointer . NoCur 

PUT #1, Event. Pen 

END 



Listing 2: GetKISSMouse 



PROCEDURE GetKISSMouse 
0000 (*" Reads the present location of the mouse and 

002E (* returns the status of the button. 



Insert type statements from Figure 1 



01F3 

01FC 

01FD 

0222 

0223 

022C 

0233 

0234 

023F 

024B 

025C 

0267 

026F 

0270 

027F 

0280 

0292 

029F 

02A3 

02B0 



PARAM Event: packet 

TYPE registers=cc,a,b,dp:BYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 

DIM RegisterSet :registers 
DIM callcode : BYTE 



RegisterSet . a : =0 

RegisterSet .b: =$89 

RegisterSet . x: =ADDR(Event . mouse) 

RegisterSet . y : =1 

callcode :=$8D 

RUN syscall( callcode .RegisterSet) 

IF Event .mouse. CBSAO0 THEN 

Event . status . Is Event :=TRUE 
ELSE 

Event . status . IsEvent :=FALSE 
ENDIF 



made them in the main procedure, we 
copied them into all of the other proce- 
dures using DynaSiar, the screen editor 
from FHL. This saved us several hours 
of typing with the BAS1C09 editor. 

We'll point out some of the major 
features here. The data type rodent, 
which holds a packet of information 
from the mouse, wasn't changed. In the 
data type stats, we changed the name 
of the Event to IsEvent. This lets us 
change the name of our packet from 
ButtonEvent to Event, saving many 
keystrokes and making more sense. We 
also added a field named RecordOn 
here and removed all of the fields that 
define fill patterns. 

The data type cursor grew. We 
added a field that can be used to hold 
an OutPut path if we need it later. We 
also added a field named Scale and 
anothernamed ScreenType. We'll need 
this when we get around to adding a 
Gets tat call to determine the screen 
type. An 80-column screen type will be 
assigned a scale of one while a 40- 
column screen will have a scale value of 
two. After we add these routines, we will 
edit the GetKISSMouse procedure so 
the horizontal pixel position is always 
the position returned by the mouse 
divided by the scale. This means if we 
run KISS Draw in a 40-column window, 
it will handle it automatically. Presently, 
you must only run it in an 80-column 
window. 

We moved the pattern fields into the 
data type cursor, which is made up of 
BYTE fields. This lets us store the numer- 
ical value for each type of pattern in a 
variable named pointer. Instead of 
typing a group number — which doesn't 
mean much to human beings — to set 
a pattern, we can now type a field name. 
It takes a few more keystrokes, but it 
makes your code almost intuitively 
obvious to anyone who reads it. 

Additional data types added this 



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December 1987 THE RAINBOW 183 



month include object, orgin (which 
we discussed earlier) and codes. Data 
of the TYPE codes is used to store the 
actual numerical codes that define the 
various objects we want to draw. We can 
then use symbolic names when we 
define our objects instead of hexadec- 
imal numbers that don't mean anything 
to anyone. 

An example would help here. First, 
we'll go ahead and show you the DIM 
statement for the new data packet and 
then we'll initialize one of the tools: 

TYPE packet-mouse : rodent ; 

s ta tus : stats ; 

pointer : cursor; 

codeicodes; Pen: 

object; Handle: 

orgin 
DIM Event:packet 
Event . Pen . DCode : -Even t . Code . 

.DBar 

In addition to the data types there are 
a few other things worth spotlighting in 
this month's listing. Immediately after 
the DIM statements, you'll find a FOR- 
NEXT loop that initializes the entire 
array picture to a value of 0 and sets the 
□bjNum to 1. 

In the next section we initialize many 
of the variables used by KISS Draw, It's 
here that we set the value in each of the 
drawing code fields. The next major 
change to KISSDraw's main procedure 
occurs in the main event loop. After we 
run the procedure DoEvent (next 
month) to put an object on the screen, 
we check to see if the flag, Event. 
Sta tus . RecordOn, is true. I f it is, we 
check to make sure the array Picture 
is not full. If there is still room in 
Picture, we store the object that we 
just put on the screen in DoEvent in the 
array. Notice that Event. Handle and 
Even t . Pen together put one drawing in 
the array. After we put them there, we 
increment the counter Ob j Num. 

In the SavePix routine we did not 
worry about the handling of filenames. 
We simply opened a file named Test- 
Save for Update. To make sure it was 
there, we created a dummy file with that 
name that contained one character. 
Eventually, we will have to deal with 
files that already exist and add a routine 
that prompts you for a filename in an 
overlay window. 

We added thePreviewPix procedure 
to the menu items to give you a way to 
look at the images you have stored in 
a picture before you send them to a file. 
We used an overlay window and re- 
versed the screen colors in this routine, 



02B2 

02B3 IF Event .mouse. AcY<10 THEN 

02C5 Event .status . InMenuBar :=TRUE 

02D2 ELSE 

02D6 Event .status . InMenuBar : "FALSE 

02E3 ENDIF 

02E5 

02E6 IF Event .mouse. AcX<40 THEN 

02F8 Event .status . InToolBox : =>TRUE 

0305 ELSE 

0309 Event. status . InToolBox :=-FALSE 

0316 ENDIF 

0318 

0319 IF NOT(Event . status . InMenuBar) AND NOT(Event . status . InToolBox 
) THEN 

0334 Event . status . InWindow : =TRUE 

0341 ELSE 

0345 Event . status . InWindow :=FALSE 

0352 ENDIF 

0354 

0355 REM Put out the Cursor 

036A Event . Pen . DCode : =Event . Code . DPutCur 

037F Event. Pen . HorP :=Event . mouse . AcX \Event . Pen . VerP : =Event . mouse . AcY 

03A9 PUT #1, Event. Pen 

03B6 END 



Listing 3: SavePix 

PROCEDURE SavePix 

0000 (*«• This procedure will record the data structure containing 

003B (* your picture. 

Insert type statements from Figure 1 

01EB 

01EC TYPE drawing=loc : orgin; tool: object 

0201 PARAM Event : packet ; Picture(20) : drawing 

0217 

0218 DIM PixFile: BYTE 

021F 

0220 OPEN #PixFIle, "TestSave": UPDATE 

0233 PUT #PixFile, Picture 

023D CLOSE #PIxFIle 

0243 END 

0245 



Listing 4: LoadPix 

PROCEDURE LoadPix 



0000 (* This procedure will put a picture you have recorded earlier 

003E (* on your Color Computer III screen. Eventually, it will also 

007D (* load the picture into your data structure so you can change it. 

Insert type statements from Figure 1 

0260 TYPE drawing^loc : orgin ; tool: object 

0275 PARAM Event : packet ; Pic tur e ( 20) : drawing 
028B 

028C DIM PixFile : BYTE 

0293 DIM NumDrawing: INTEGER 

029A 

029B OPEN #PIxFIle , "TestSave" : READ 

02AE GET #PIxFIle .Picture 

02B8 PUT #l,PIcture 

02C1 CLOSE #PixFile 

02C7 END 



Listing 5: PrevieuPix 

PROCEDURE PreviewPIx 



0000 (* This procedure will open an overlay window over KISSDraw and 

003F (* display the work you have recorded into the data structure 

007D (* picture. KISSDraw' s screen will be saved underneath it. 

Insert type statements from Figure 1 

0259 TYPE Drawing=Loc : orgin; Tool: object 

026E PARAM Event : packet ; Picture(20) : Drawing 

0284 DIM GoBack: STRING [ 1 ] 
0290 

0291 GoBack:="" 



1 84 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 



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just for the fun of it. Another handy 
addition is the procedure ErasePix, 
which you access from the file menu. It 
merely erases the screen at this time. It 
does not null the array picture to zero 
yet. We will probably rewrite it to work 
that way soon. 

We revamped the Hand 1 eMenu proce- 
dure this month because I didn't like the 
feel of the "user interface" in last 
month's code. This time we attempted 
to emulate the way a Macintosh menu 
works. The patient lived. We also give 
you the option to set Event. Status. 
RecordOn to true or false from the 
menu. Using this switch, you can turn 
the recording on and off at will, saving 
only the mouse moves you want to the 
final picture. 

After reading the descriptions of the 
Rrc routines in the windows section of 
the OS-9 Level II manual and the 
BAS1C09 manual another dozen times 
and running scores of experiments, the 
light bulb finally came on. The secret, 
for us, was found by emulating the 
algorithm described in the OS-9 manual 
Rrc section manually. We physically 
drew a line in each quadrant and then 
drew an arc from that line in a clockwise 
direction from the ending point of the 
line to the beginning point. Once we did 
this, the order we had to use to send the 
line information to the screen became 
obvious. It's hard to admit it took 
several days to figure this one out. 

That's KISSDrawPut in a nutshell. 
Study the listings and experiment. 
Hopefully before too long we'll add a 
routine that lets you print a hard copy 
of your picture. We're anxious to add 
the procedure to determine the 
screentype and set the scale field. 
And we can't wait to add a color menu 
bar along the top of the screen. And, 
when we were working on the line 
command, we figured out how to do 
polygons. And we have to design that 
data type to save irregular objects. Now, 
if someone would just lell us how to 
handle layering! 

Well, that is about all we have room 
for this month. We'll have to pick up the 
subject again in January. You should 
have plenty of work to do with what is 
here. The remaining listings will appear 
next month. After you finish entering 
those, you will have a near-complete 
version of KISSDrau. At that point, we 
can begin to make some refinements. 

Enjoy your holiday season, drive 
carefully and join us next month for the 
1988 edition of rainbow's Beginners 
Issue. TiJl then, keep on drawing! □ 



J3298 RUN gfx2("0WSet" ,1,0,0,80,24,0,2) 

J32BA PUT #1, Picture 

02C3 WHILE GoBack= ,,H DO 

02CF RUN InKey(GoBack) 

02D9 ENDWHILE 

02DD RUN gfx2 ("OWEnd") 

02EA END 



Listing 6: ErasePix 

PROCEDURE ErasePix 

J3000 (* This procedure gives you a way to erase your 

P030 (* CoCo III screen when your artwork goes down hill and 

0067 (* you want to start again. 

Insert type statements from Figure 1 

0221 PARAM Event :packet 
022A 

022B RUN gfx2 ("clear") 

0238 RUN KISSdMenu (Event) 

0242 END 



Listing 7: HandleMenu 

PROCEDURE HandleMenu 
0000 

Insert type statements from Figure 1 



01A0 

01A1 TYPE drawing=-loc :orgin; tool:object 

01B6 PARAM Event : packet ; P icture(20) : drawing 
01CC 

01CD DIM Menu(6) :STRING [14] 

01DE DIM FileAction: STRING [25] 

01EA DIM MenuCur, Item: INTEGER 
01F5 

01F6 DATA "ErasePix" , "LoadPix" , "PreviewPix" , "SavePix" , "RecordOn" 
, "RecordOf f " 

023D 

023E FOR Item: = l TO 6 

024E READ Menu(Item) 

0257 NEXT Item 
0262 

0263 RUN gfx2 ("OWSet" ,1,10,0,16,8,0,2) 

0285 RUN gfx2("boldsw" , "on") 

0298 RUN gfx2("CurXY" ,0,0) 

02AB PRINT "FILE 

02BB RUN gfx2("boldsw" , "off ") 

02CF FOR Item:=l TO 6 

02DF PRINT Menu(Item) 

02E7 NEXT Item 

02F2 

02F3 REM while the mouse button is down 

0314 REM and in the overlay menu window 

0335 REM flash the menu item the mouse is on 

035B WHILE Event . mous e . CBSAO0 AND Event .mouse . Stat=>0 DO 

037A RUN getKISSMouse(Event) 

0384 MenuCur :=INT(Event .mouse .AcY/8) 

0397 Item:=MenuCur 

039F IF MenuCur>0 AND MenuCur<7 THEN 

03B2 RUN gfx2("revon") 

03BF RUN gf x 2 ( " CurXY" , 0 , MenuCur) 

03D4 PRINT Menu(Item) 

03DC RUN gfx2("Rev0ff") 

03EA RUN gf x2( "CurXY" ,0, MenuCur) 

03FF PRINT Menu(Item) 

0407 ENDIF 

0409 ENDWHILE 

040D RUN gf x2 ("OWEnd") 

041A 

041B REM Drop out of loop when mouse button is opened 

044A REM If mouse was on menu item then 

046C REM run the procedure the button was over 

0494 IF MenuCur>0 AND MenuCur<7 AND Event .mouse . AcX>80 AND Event . mous e . AcX 
<128 THEN 

04C1 FileAction : =TRIM$ (Menu(Item)) 

04CD IF FileAction="RecordOn" THEN 

04E1 Event . status . RecordOn: -TRUE 

04EE ELSE 



186 THE RAINBOW December 1987 





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Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHATTO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We havea continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We re sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter, Afso, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
renumeration should so state 
when making submissions, 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication, 




188 THE RAINBOW December 1987 



04F2 IF FileAction-"RecordOff" THEN 

0507 Event, status .RecordOn: -FALSE 

0514 ELSE 

0518 RUN FileAction(Event ,Picture) 

0527 ENDIF 
0529 ENDIF 

0528 ENDIF 
052D END 
052F 

Listing 8: KISSDrawArc 

PROCEDURE KISSDrawArc 

0000 (* Program to Draw Arc with Mouse 

Insert type statements from Figure 1 

01C2 P ARAM Even t:packet 

01CB DIM StartX.StartY, CurrX, CurrY : INTEGER 

0LDE DIM XPos,YPos : BOOLEAN 

01E9 

01EA (* Enable XOR logic, then 

0203 (* let cursor follow mouse until button is pushed 
0234 

0235 RUN gfx2("logic" , "xor") 
0248 

0249 REPEAT 

024B RUN getKISSmouse(Event) 

0255 UNTIL Event .mouse . CBSAO0 AND Event . mouse .AcX>40 
0273 

0274 StartX:=Event .mouse. BDX 

0282 S tartY:~Event .mouse. BDY 

0290 CurrX;=Event, mouse. AcX 

029E CurrY: =Event . mouse . AcY 
02AC 

02AD WHILE Event .mouse . CBSAO0 DO 

02BF RUN getRISSmouse(Event) 

02C9 

02CA Event . Pen , DCode; -Event .Code . DSetPtr 

02DF Event . Pen, HorP ;=StartX 

02EE Event . Pen. VerP: "Star tY+(CurrY- Start Y) 

0305 PUT #1 , Event. Pen 

0312 

0313 IF CurrXOEvent . mouse .AcX OR CurrYOEvent . mouse . AcY THEN 
0334 

0335 REM Print over old arc to delete it 

035? Event . Pen, DCode ; =ABS(CurrX-StartX) \Event . Pen .HorP : =ABS 

(CurrY-StartY) 

037F 

0380 XPos :-CurrX-StartX>0 \YPos :»CurrY-StartY>0 

039E IF YPos AND NOT(XPos) THEN 100 

03AF IF YPos OR NOT(YFos) AND NOT(XPos) THEN 

03C2 Event . Pen, VerP:=0 

03D0 Event. Handle . DPSCode : **S tartY-CurrY 

03E3 Event . Handle. HanX:»CurrX-StartX 

03F6 Event . Handle . HanY : -0 

0404 ELSE 

0408 100 Event . Pen. VerP : -CurrX-StartX 

041E Event . Handle . DPSCode : -0 

042C Event , Handle . HanX:*0 

043A Event . Handle . HanY :«StartY~CurrY 

044D ENDIF 

044F 

0450 PUT #1, Event. Code. DArc 

0460 PUT #1, Event. Pen 

04 6 D PUT #1 .Event .Handle 

047A 

047B REM Now update Current pos ition of mouse and redraw 

04AD GurrX :=Event .mouse, AcX 

04BB CurrY :=Event .mouse, AcY 
?4C9 

04CA REM Must UpDate Draw Pointer Here 

04EA Event . Pen. DCode : -Event . Code .DSetPtr 

04FF Event .Pen. HorP :-StartX 

050E Event. Pen .VerP :=*StartY+(CurrY-StartY) 

0525 PUT #1 .Event .Pen 

0532 

0533 Event . Pen. DCode ; =ABS (CurrX-StartX) \Event . Pen . HorP : =ABS 

(CurrY-StartY) 

055B 

055C XPo s : -CurrX- Star tX>0 \YPos :-CurrY-StartY>0 

057A IF YPos AND NOT(XPos) THEN 200 



058B 
059E 
05AC 
j?5BF 
JJ5D2 

£5FA 
06£8 
?616 
£629 
J362B 
J?62C 
P63C 
0649 
|I656 
0658 

P65D 
0670 

0698 
0619 
0637 
06C8 
06DB 
06E9 
06FC 
070F 
071_D 

0721 300 

0737 

0745 

0753 

P766 

0768 

07 69 

0779 

0786 

0793 

07A8 



IF YPos 
Event . 
Event, 
Event 
Event , 

ELSE 
Event , 
Event , 
Event . 
Even t 

ENDIF 



OR NOT(YPos) AND NOT(XPos) THEN 
Pen. VerP:=0 

Handle . DPSCode : =S tar tY - CurrY 
Handle , HanX : =CurrX-S tartX 
Handle .HanY:=0 

Pen. VerP :=CurrX- Star tX 
Handle. DPSCode :=0 
Handle ,HanX:-0 
Handle . HanY : -Star tY-CurrY 



PUT #1 , Event . Code , DArc 
PUT #1, Event. Pen 
PUT #1, Event .Handle 
ENDIF 
ENDWHILE 

RUN gfx2("logic'V i off") 

Event . Pen . DCode : =ABS (CurrX- StartX) \Event , Pen .HorP: 
-StartY) 

XPos :=CurrX-StartX>0 \YPos : =>Curr Y-S tartY>0 
17 YPos AND NOT(XPos) THEN 300 
IF YPos OR MOT(YPos) AND NOT(XPos) THEN 
Event . Pen . VerP:«=0 

Event . Handle , DPSCode : =>S tart Y- CurrY 
Event . Handle .HanX; =CurrX~ StartX 
Event . Handle . HanY : =»0 
ELSE 

Event . Pen. VerP :=CurrX -StartX 
Event . Handle , DPSCode : =0 
Event . Handle , HanX; =0 
Event . Handle . HanY :=»StartY- CurrY 
ENDIF 

PUT #1, Event. Code. DArc 
PUT #1, Event. Pen 
PUT #1, Event .Handle 

Event. Handle . DPSCode ;=Event. Code . DSetPtr 
END 



»ABS (CurrY 



Listing 9: KISSHandleText 

PROCEDURE KISSHandleText 
0000 (* Procedure to type text at position 

0025 (* selected with graphics cursor 

Insert type statements from Figure 1 

PARAM Event: packet 



31E6 
01EF 
01F0 
01FB 
0202 
0203 
0229 
024F 
0250 
0263 
0264 
0266 
0270 
02 8E 
028F 
02 BA 
02DD 
02DE 
02 EF 
0303 
0304 
9 325 
0326 
033D 
033E 
0356 
0365 
0383 
038C 
0395 
0399 
03A7 
03A9 
03AA 
03AB 



DIM CharPosX, CharPos Y: INTEGER 
DIM char: BYTE 

(* We'll use the verltlcal bar cursor 
(* that represents a text insert point 

RUN gfx2( ,, gcset",202,6) 

REPEAT 

RUN getKISSmouse(Event) 
UNTIL Event. mouse. CBSAO0 AND Even t . mouse . Ac»40 

(* Now we must translate the pixel position 
(* returned to a character position 

CharPosX: =Event. mouse . AcX/8 
CharPos Y:=»< Event , mouse .AcY+5)/8 

(* Now we can position the cursor 

RUN gfx2("CurXY" , CharPosX .CharPosY) 

(* Hake sure Echo is off 
SHELL " tmode -echo" 

WHILE charoL3 DO \REM Carriage Return 

GET #0,char 

PUT #l,char 
ENDWHILE 

SHELL ,f tmode echo" 
END 




About 

Ti s ■ 

he One-Liner 

Contest . . . 



the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
oneortwolinenumbersand 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code, The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




December 1987 THE RAINBOW 189 



Racksellers 

... . i 

The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis 
and may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer 
users. We suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

Tuscaloosa 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Cottonwood 
Lake Havasu 

City 
Phoenix 
Sierra Vista 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayetteville 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Berkeley 
Citrus Heights 
Grass Valley 
Half Moon Bay 
Hollywood 

La Jolla 

Los Angeles 

Marysvilie 

Napa 

Oakland 

Sacramento 

San Francisco 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvale 
Torrance 

COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Qenwood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 

DELAWARE 

Middletown 
Mllford 
Newark 
Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington, 
DC Chronichles 
News Room 
World News. Inc. 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 
Injun John's, Inc. 

Electronic World 

A & W Graphics Co. 

Book Nook 
TRI-TEK Computers 
Livingston's Books 
Books, Etc. 
Computer Libraty 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/Ttadlo Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Lyon Enterprises 
Software Plus 
Advance Radio, Inc. 
Strawflower Electronics 
Levily Distributors 
Stef-Jen, Inc. 

Butler & Mayes Booksellers 
Circus of Books (2 Locations) 
Bookland 

Bookends Bookstore 
DeLauer's News Agency 
Delbert's Readerama 
Tower Magazine 
Booksmith 
Bookworks 
Castro Kiosk 

Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Camino College Bookstore 

Aurora Newsstand 

Hathaway's 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Readmore Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 

Delmar Co. 
Milford News Stand 
Newark Newsstand 
Normar. Inc. —The Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA (cont'd) 



FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Clearwater 
Cocoa 
Danla 
Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 



Gainesville 
Jacksonville 



North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Paik 
South 

Pasadena 



Great American Book Co. 
Software. Software, Inc. 
The Avid Reader 
The Open Door 
Dania News & Books 
Software Plus More 
Bob's News& Book-Store 
Clarks Out of Town News 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 
The Book Nook 

White's of Downtown Bookstore 

Almar Bookstore 
Boyd-F-bert Corp. 
Anderson News Co. 
Wolf's Newsstand 



Starke 


Record Junction. Inc. 




Radio Shack Dealer 


Sunrise 


Sunny's at Sunset 


Tallahassee 


Anderson News Co. 




DuBey's News Center 


Titus ville 


Computrac 


GEORGIA 


- 


Atlanta 


Borders 


Bremen 


Bremen Electronics/Radio Shack 


Forest Park 


Ellers News Center 


Jesup 


Radio Shack 


Marietta 


Act One Video 


Thomasville 


Smokehouse Newsstand 


Toccoa 


Martin Music Radio Shack 


IDAHO 




Boise 


Book Shelf. Inc. 


Moscow 


Johnson News Agency 


ILLINOIS 




Belleville 


Soflware or Systems 


Champaign 


Bookmark 


Chicago 


B. Dalton Booksellers 


Decatur 


Book Emporium 




K-Mart Piaza 




Northgote Mall 


East Moline 


Book Emporium 


Evanston 


Norris Center Bookstore 


Kewanee 


Book Emporium 


Lisle 


Book Nook 


Lombard 


Empire Periodicals 


Newtan 


Bill's TV Radio Shack 


Paris 


Book Emporium 


Peoria 


Book Emporium 




Sheridan Village 




Westlake Shopping Center 




Illinois News Service 



Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

Crawfordsvllle 

Dyer 

Franklin 

Garrett 

Indianapolis 



Poling Ploce Bookstore 
190 THE RAINBOW 



Lebanon 

Martinsville 

Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Des Moines 
Fairfield 
Ottumwa 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson 
Topeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Hopkinsville 

Louisville 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 
New Orleans 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Oxford 

Sanford 



Book Emporium 
Sangamon Center North 
Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 

Book Emporium 

Paper Place 

North Shore Distributors 

D & D Electronics 
Radio Shock 

White Cottage Electronics 
Book Corner 

Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 

Koch's Books 

Miles Books 

Gallery Book Shop 

Finn News Agency, Inc. 

Bookland. Inc. 

Borders Bookshop 

Delmar News 

Indiana News 

Southside News 

Gallery Book Shop 

Radio Shack 

Mitting's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 
Thackeiy's Books, Inc. 
Kromers Books & Gifts 
Soulhside Drug 

Crossroads, Inc. 

Palmer News, Inc. 

Town Crier of Topeka, Inc. 

Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 

Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 

Lloyd's Radio 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Matrs News & Gifts 
Hobby Shop 

Hawley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 
Radio Shack 



City News Stand 

Sidney's News Stand Uptown 

The Book Rack 



MARYLAND 

College Park 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Fitchburg 

Ipswich 

Littleton 

Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Harrison 

Holland 

Howell 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Perry 

Riveiview 

Roseville 

MINNESOTA 

Burnsville 
Crystal 
Duluth 
Edlna 

Minneapolis 
Minnetonka 
Roseville 
St. Paul 



Willmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmington 
Florissant 
Jefferson City 
Kirksville 
Moberly 
St. Louis 
St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Whiteflsh 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic Cily 

Cedar Knolls 

Clinton 

Marmora 

Pennsville 

Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 

Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonia 
Hud son Falls 
Huntington 
Johnson Cily 
New York 



Magazines. Inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Books-N-Thlngs 
Radio Shack 



University Bookstore 

Eastern Newsstand 
Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Corners Book Shop 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak, Inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 
Border's Book Shop 
Robbins Electronics 
Merit Book Center 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Fris News Company 
Howell Auto Parts 

Curl's Sound & Home Arcade Center 
The Eight Bit Corner 
Perry Computers 
Rlverview Book Store 
New Horizons Book Shop 

Shinder's Burnsville 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Carlson Books 
Shinder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shinder's Ridge Square 
Shinder's Roseville 
Shin der's Annex 
Shinder's Maplewood 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The PhotoShop 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Bailey's IV & Radio 

Consumer Electronics of Whitef ish 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Bookcellar 

Hurley Electronics 

Steve's Books & Magazines 

Bookwrights 
Verham News Corp. 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micra World li 
Outpost Rodla Shack 
Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 
Software Station 



New Horizons Computer Systems 
Front Page Newsstand 
Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 



Village Green-Buffalo Books 

Lift Bridge Book Shop. Inc. 

Cromland. Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

GA West & Co. 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicorn Electronics 

Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station, Track 37 

200 Park Ave. (Pan Am # 1 ) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 



December 1987 



NEW YORK (cont'd) 



Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhaven 



International Smoke Shop 

Jonll Smoke 

Penn Book 

Software City 

State News 

Walden Books 

World Wide Media Services 

Universal Computer Service 

Village Green 

World Wide News 

Spectrum Projects 



TENNESSEE (cont'd) 

Nashville Davis-Kidd Booksellers 

Mosko's Place 
R.M, Mills Bookstore 
Smyrna Delker Electronics 

Union City Cox Electronics Radio Shack 



ALBERTA (cont'd) 

Sterller 
Strathmare 
Taber 
West lock 
Wetaskiwin 



Stettter Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Cary 

Chapel Hill 
Charlotte 

Havlock 
Hickory 
Jacksonville 
Kernersville 
Marion 

Winston-Salem 

OHIO 

Akron 

Blanchester 
Canton 
Chardon 
Cincinnati 
Cleveland 
Columbiana 
Columbus 



Dayton 



Dublin 
Fairborn 

Rndley 
Kent 

Lakewood 
Lima 

Miamlsburg 

Parma 

Toledo 

Warren 

Xenla 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

Clly 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 
Altoona 
Bryn Mawr 
Feasterville 
King of Prussia 
Malvern 
Phoenlxvllle 
Reading 
Temple 
West Chester 
Wind Gap 
York 



News Center in Cary Village 
University News & Sundry 
Newsstand Inf I 
Papers & Paperback 
Computer Plus 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Mlchele's, Inc. 
K & S Newsstand 
Boomers Rhythm Center 
K & S Newsstand (3 Locations) 
Rainbow News Ltd. 



RHODE ISLAND 

Newport 
Warwick 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Clemson 
Florence 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 
Union 

TENNESSEE 

Brentwood 
Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxville 

Memphis 



Churchill News & Tobacco 
JR Computer Control 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Cinsoft 

Erleview News 
Fidelity Sound & Electronics 
B5 Software 
Micro Center 
The Newsstand 
Books & Co. 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wilke News 

Wright News & Books 

Book Bam 

News-Readers 

Wilke's University Shoppe 

Open Book 

The News Shop 

Lakewood International News 

Edu-Caterers 

Wilke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Plaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Meri t Micro Software 

Thomas Sales. Inc. dba Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store Inc. 
Sixth & Woshington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owl Services 
Newborn Enterprises 
Bryn Mawr News 
Global Books 
Gene's Books 
Personal Software 
Stevens Radio Shack 
Smith's News & Card Center 
Software Corner 
Chester County Book Co. 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Tollgate- Bookstore 

Bellevue News 
Software Connection 

Software Haus, Inc. 
Clemson Newsstand 
Ray's #1 

Palmetto News Ca. 
Software City 
Fleming's Electronics 

Bookworld #5 
Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Davis-KIdd Bookseller 
Computer Center 



TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Brenham 
Desoto 
Elgin 

Harlington 

UTAH 

Provo 

VIRGINIA 

Danville 

Hampton 

Norfolk 

Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Port Angeles 
Seattle 

Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 
South 
Charleston 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Kenosha 
Madison 

Milwaukee 

Racine 

Waukesha 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Klngsford 

CANADA- 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Blalrmore 

Bonnyviile 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Falivlew 

Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hinton 
Innisfail 
Leduc 
Lethbrldge 
Lloyd minster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 



Poncho's News 
Moore's Electronics 
Maxwell Books 
The Homing Pigeon 
Book Mark 

Valley Book Center 

K & S Newsstand 

Benders 

l-O Computers 

Turn The Page 

Volume I Bookstore 

Port Book & News 
Adams News Co, Inc. 
Bulldog News 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications. LTD 
Valley News Service 

Spring Hill News 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
R.K. News. Inc. 
Pic A Book 
University Bookstore 
Juneau Village Reader 
Little Professor Book Center 
Holt Variety 



Information Telecommunicationes 



Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
L & K Sports & Music 
Paul Tercler 

Double "D" A.S.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shack 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fax Cily Color & Sound 
A.S.C Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack, ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 
Jim Cooper 
L & S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Datatron 

Lloyd Radb Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's Electronics 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Burnoby 
Bums Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chilliwack 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Langiey 
N. Vancouver 
Nelson 
Parksville 
Penticton 

Sidney 
Smithers 
Squamish 
100 Mile 
House 



Compulit 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesofl Marketing 
Langiey Radio Shack 
Microwest Distributors 
Oliver's Books 
Parksville TV 
DJ.'s 

Four Corner Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 

Tip Top Radio & TV 



MANITOBA 




Altona 


LAWiebr Ltd. 


Lundar 


Gcranson Elec. 


Morden 


Central Sound 


The Pas 


Jodi's Sight & Sound 


Selkirk 


G.L, Enns Elec. 


Vlrden 


Archer Enterprises 


Winnipeg 


J & J Electronics Ltd. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 




Mancton 


Jeffries Enterprises 


Sussex 


Dewltt Elec. 


NEWFOUNDLAND 




Botwood 


Seaport Elec. 


Carbonear 


Slade Realties 


NOVA SCOTIA 




Halifax 


Atlantic News 


ONTARIO 




Angus 


Micro Computer Services 


Aurora 


Compu Vision 


Concord 


Ingram Software 


Exceter 


J. Macleane & Sons 


Hanover 


Modern Appliance Centre 


Huntsvllle 


Huntsvllle Elec. 


Kenora 


Donny "B" 


Kingston 


T.M. Computers 


Listowel 


Modem Appliance Centre 


South River 


Max TV 




Dennis TV 



QUEBEC 




LaSaile 


Messageries de Presse Benjamin Enr. 


Pont. Rouge 


Boutique Bruno Laroche 


SASKATCHEWAN 




Asslniboia 


Telsfar News 


Estevan 


Kotyk Electronics 


Moose Jaw 


D&S Computer Ploce 


Nipiwan 


Cornerstone Sound 


Regina ' 


Regina CoCo Club 


Software Supermarket 


Saskatoon 


Eveiy body's Software Library 


Shellbtooke 


Gee Laberge Radio Shack 


Tlsdale 


Paul's Seivice 


Unity 


Grant's House of Sound 


YUKON 




Whitehorse 


H & O Holdings 


JAPAN 




Tokyo 


America Ado Inc. 


PUERTO RICO 




San Juan 


Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, 
and selected Coles — in Canada, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore 
Books, Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, 
Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & 
Brentano's, and Community Newscenters. 



December 1987 THE RAINBOW 191 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



A to Z Unlimited 133 

After Five Software 90 

Alpha Products 21 

Ark Royal Games 83 

Bernico Software 14 

Burke & Burke 157 

Cer-Comp 125 

Cinsoft 117 

Clearbrook Software 

Group 39 

CNR Engineering 145 

CoCo Cat Anti-Drug Ad 50 

Cognitec 149 

Colorware 22, 23 

Computer Center 35 

Computer Island 97 

Computer Plus 3 

Computer Villa 161 

Computerware 71,73 

Computize 64, 65 

CY-BURNET-ICS 14 

D. P. Johnson 183 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

Delphi 114, 115 

Diecom IFC, IBC 

DISKMASTER, INC 69 

Disto 55 

E. Z. Friendly Software 63 

Fazer Electronics 89 

Frank Hogg Laboratory 99, 185, 187 

Gimmesoft 169 

Hard Drive Specialists 119 

Hawkes Research 

Services 47 

f I i-i L« ■ «fc •-*••• • * ■ ■ 1 ^3^3 

Howard Medical 34, 194 

ICR Futuresoft 33 

J & M Systems 101 

J & R Electronics 103 

Kelly Software 

Distributors 137 

Logasoft Software 163 

Metric Industries 53 

Micro Works, The 127 

Microcom Software ...9, 11, 13, 15 

1 92 THE RAINBOW December 1 987 



Microtech Consultants 

Inc 85 

MicroWorld 179 

Other Guys Software, The 29 

Owl-Ware 79, 80, 81 

Paparis Enterprises 161 

Performance Peripherals 123 

Perry Computers 16 

Preble's Programs, Dr BC 

Prickly-Pear Software 135 

PXE Computing 7 

R.A.D. Products 137 

Rainbow Binder 60 

Rainbow Bookshelf 106, 107 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 36 

Rainbow Introductory Guide 

to Statistics Book 24 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk 158 

Robotic Microsystems 95 

RTR Development Systems .... 1 73 

Saint John's Gallery 89 

Sardis Technologies 147 

SD Enterprises 31 

SEESOF, Inc 47 



Tm 

'ill 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



Seibyte Software 171 

Softbyte 167 

Software House, The 31 

SpectroSystems 69 

Spectrum Projects Inc 17, 25, 27 

Speech Systems 40, 41, 42, 

43, 44, 45 

Sugar Software 165 

Sundog Systems 61 

Sunrise Software 67 

T & D Software 112, 113, 175 

Tandy/Radio Shack 49, 51 

Tepco , 151 

TMM/Hemphill Electronics ....104 

Tom Mix Software 111 

True Data Products 154, 155 

Try-O-Byte 67 

Valkyrie 133 

Vidicom Corporation 91 

Wasatch ware 63 

William Brigance 159 

Woodstown Electronics 157 

York 10 193 

Zebra Systems 54 



□ 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 




Education 
Breakthrough 

New interactive CoCo software^ 

\ 




0 



THE MAGIC OF SPELLING 

Grades 4 to 8 



makes learning easy, 
fun. Kids love it! 



NEW LOW PRICE - 16 lessons for the price 
of 81 Educational Software for kids fror%+ 
6 to 18. 

Parents are depending more and more on 
supplemental education for their children. Edu- 
cators know that the most effective teaching is 
done one-to-one. Through individual attention 
and self-paced progress, students learn more 
and retain more. 

BETTER THAN A PRIVATE TUTOR 

The Compass Education Software LOOK/ 
LISTEN/LEARN approach is the next best 
thing to a private tutor. Unlike other educational 
software the Compass Library also talks to the 
student — not in synthesized speech, but in a 
real human voice. With on-screen textual infor- 
mation and attention-getting graphics, stu- 
dents of all ages actually enjoy learning! 

SELF-PACED FOR BETTER RETENTION 

The lessons advance only after the stu- 
dent has correctly answered the questions 
throughout the programs assuring that the 
material has been thoroughly absorbed. 

SIMPLE EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 

All you need is the TRS-80* Color Com- 
puter (any model), computer cassette recorder 
and TV set. Once the cassette is loaded you 
need only enter two simple commands . . . and 
then press any key to start the lesson. 

Of course you can stop the lesson at any 
point to study information on the screen. Just 
push the pause button on the cassette player. 
Push it again and lesson resumes. 

To answer questions throughout the les- 
son simply press the appropriate number on 
the computer keyboard, type in the correct 
answer, or follow other easy instructions. And 
to go back and review, just rewind the cassette. 
It's that simple. 

CHOOSE FROM 9 SUBJECTS 

There is not sufficient space in this adver- 
tisement to list all lesson titles, but here is a 
sample: 

MATHEMATICS 

In today's advanced, HiTech world, under- 
standing and working with numbers is essen- 
tial. Compass has developed three compre- 
hensive series of math programs. From basic 
numerals for the very young, to algebra and 
higher mathematics for the older child. In 
between, there are programs for everything 
from addition and subtraction to practical 
everyday percentage problems. 

•TRS-80 is a registered trademark of The Tandy Corporation. 




MS 1 — Plurals: branches, rodeos, valleys 
MS 2 — Plurals: houses, brushes, candies 
MS 3 — Plurals: babies, pianos, leaves 
MS 4 — Suffixes: boxed, referred, writing 
AviS 5 — Suffixes: paid, quickly, extremely 
MS 6 — Suffixes: said, confusion, school s 
MS 7 — Homonyms: two, too, to; their, there 
MS 8 — Homonyms: our, are, hour; ate, ePght 
MS 9 — Homonyms: weight, wait; who's, whose 
MS 10- Homonyms: scent, cent; sell, cell 
MS 11— Homonyms: dew, due; course, coarse 
MS 12 -Homonyms: cite, site, sight; by, buy 
MS 13- Homonyms: blue, blew, creek, creak 
MS 14- Homonyms: sale, sail; steel, steal 
MS 15 -Spelling by Syllables: letter, color 
MS 16 -Doubling Consonant Letters: hollow 




MATH/FRACTIONS 

Grades 4 to 8 

MF 1 — Numerator, denominator, bar 
MF 2 — Multiplication of fractions 
MF 3 — Factors and prime numbers 
MF 4 — Reducing fractions, reciprocals 
MF 5 — Reducing fractions, lowest terms 
MF 6 — Proper fractions, mixed numbers 
MF 7 — Multiplication-division of fraclions 
MF 8 — Addition-subtraction of fractions 
MF 9 — Addition of mixed numbers 
MF 10 — Changing fractions to decimals 
MF 11 — Converting decimal numbers 
MF 12 — Word problems using percents 
MF 13 — Additional problems using percents 
MF 14 — Word problems using percents 
MF 15 — Finding circle area using pi 
MF 16 — Using a ruler to measure fractions 



MATH/BASIC ALGEBRA 

For all grades 
Sixteen lessons: MBA-1 to 16 




o 



MATH/NUMBERS 

For grades 1 to 6 
Sixteen lessons: MN-1 to 16 

SELF DEVELOPMENT 

Writing effectively means communica- 
tiong effectively. Through the writing series of 
lesson students of all ages will develop basic 
skills needed to turn thoughts and ideas into 
expressive words and phrases. 



o 



RULES OF WRITING 

For all grades 

Sixteen lessons: RW-1 to 16 



LANGUAGE ARTS 

A practical education begins with good 
reading skills and is continued with increased 
vocabulary comprehension and, of course, 
spelling. Your child will learn that reading is fun 
while they are also learning when to use "to," 
"too," and "two," and how to spell when build- 
ing a vocabulary. 



VOCABULARY COMPREHENSION 

Grades 3 to 5 
Sixteen lessons: VC-1 to 16 



o 



READING COMPREHENSION 

For all grades 

Sixteen lessons: DRC-1 to 16 



© 



SCIENCE 
SCIENCE/PHYSICS 

For all grades 
Sixteen lessons: SP-1 to 16 



■ HISTORY 
AMERICAN HISTORY 

For grades 4 to 12 
Sixteen lessons: AH-1 to 16 



So there it is . . . no-nonsense subject 
matter presented in a way that maximizes 
understanding and retention. 

SPECIAL PRICING 
YORK 10 is now offering, for a limited time, 
a complete set in any subject, 16 cassettes, 
one lesson on each cassette, for only 
$49.95. We originally offered only 8 cassettes 
for the same amount so now it's twice the 
value. The same 16 cassettes are sold else- 
where for over $1 50. 

To order, send your check or money order 
for $49.95 (CA residents add sales tax) for 
each subject you wish, plus $3.50 shipping and 
handling (any quantity). For immediate ship- 
ment, call collect the number below and 
charge your VISA or MASTERCARD. 



9525 VASSAR AVENUE 
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311 

1 - 81 8/700-0330 — 



Star NX-10 Printer Only $238 

NOW WITH FREE SP-C ($68.45 value) 

EPSON 



disk NEW FROM J&M 

CONTROLLER 

The DC-4 is a scaled-down version of the popular DC-2 
without a parallel port. It includes a switch with 2 ROM 
sockets, JDOS, manual and such features as gold connec- 
tors and metal box. It accesses double sided drives and ac- 
cepts RSDOS 1.1 for Radio Shack compatability. 




DC-4 with memory minder 
($2 shipping) ^ 



RS DOS ROM CHIP 



ROM chip fits inside disk controller. 24 pin fits both J&M 
and RS controller Release 1.1. For CoCo 3 Compatability. 



$20 



each 



Reg. $40 
($2 shipping) 



DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 



DRIVE 0 + Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only. Add $34 for a Disto DC-3 replacement. ($5 shipping) 

DOUBLE SIDED 

DOUBLE DENSITY ( ^ V^fr 



$17845 



360K 



Separate Disk Drive Components 

DD-3 An MPI 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 

$98 ^shipping) DRIVE ONE 



DD-2 A TEAC 55B 1 / 2 height, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a V2 height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



$188 



(*2 shipping) DRIVE ONE 



TEAC 55B bare drive, Vfe height, double-sided, double density with 
all mounting hardware, needs CA-2 below to fit R.S. 501. 



$118 



(*2 shipping) 



BARE 



SP-C 

Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial output t o run 
a parallel printer like Star or Epson. Includes all cables. Add $10 for 
modem attachment. ($2 shipping) $gQ 45 



CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to the drive. 

CA-2 



$0495 

One Drive 



$2995 

Two Drive 



GUARANTEE — Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try 
it out, test it for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for 
any reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your 
money back (less shipping). 



LX-800 $239 

Friction and tractor feed included 
1 60 CPS 
3K Buffer 

NLQ on front buttons 
Package includes free SP-C serial to 
parallel converter and Epson tutorial 
on disk. 




Star NX-10 Only $238 



WORD PACK RS 

This ROM pack is the hardware answer for an 80 column 
display. It includes a built-in video controller to drive a 
monochrome monitor like our 123A. To get started, you need 
OS-9 2.0, a Y-cable or multipack interface drive 0, and a 
monochrome monitor. & A f\ 

Sftdl ($2 shipping) (*2 shipping) 

JO W While supplies last 

New basic driver runs word pack without 
need for an OS-9. 



$10 



MONITORS 

Sony KV-1311CR $449 

.v/- -j , Regular $625 

• Vivid Color 

• Vertically flat 1 3" screen < $15 shi PP In s> 

• Monitor/Trinitron TV with remote control 

• 640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot 
pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and composite 
inputs 

• VCR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 

SONYCPD-1310 $375 

Regular *550 

• Monitors versions of KV-1311CR, above without 

XV < $15 shipping) 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 



HARD DRIVE 

20,000,000 Bytes 

equivalent to 125 R.S. 501's on line 

micro stepping heads have 15 position per track 

automatic temperature compensation realigns head every five minutes for 
trouble free reads and writes 
will also work with IBM & clones 

complete package includes 20 meg drive, case & power supply, controller, 
and interface that plugs into slot «3 of multipack interface. A/%aq qq 

1 year warranty ^05/%/« 

(5 ship) 

BASIC driver lets you access this hard drive without need for OS-9 $49.95. 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sat. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 



C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL P.O.'S 



Shipping charges are for 48 states. 
APO and Canada order slightly higher. 




-J 1 .' *ii flS 






1 



DR 





PROG 




AMS 



as? 



Introducing 



PY 




For your Volor Computer 5 ! 



Product of 
Color Ven lure 



PYRAKIX is a 100% machine language game wi itteii exclusively to take ndviintdfje of all the power in your 128K 
CoCo 3. 'Hie colors ure brilliant, die graphics sharp, the action hot. 

PYRAMIX fe.nu-'^s the finest in unlmaLLon, graphics, sound c££ect a and gome alay fiv.iilahle toiluy. It has all 
Che extras you vane , too, such as a |k~iuse option, RGB and CMP modes, keyboard or' Joystick play, hclji screen, 
multiple skill level, and the ability to backup your disk. 

Bcsl of all is the low price! Available today, for only $24.95 on diflk + a/h! 



hi i ai#&ee 

SCORE ' G1B3SB 



KQUMQ! H 



And C-Lqhtn-inq Strikes! 



LIGITFNING HAH 

DISK will allow 



DISK is die ino.sr versatile RAM tlisk for your 512K Color CorapuL^r 3! LIGHTNING RAM 
you Co use up co 4 laecbanicai drives und 1 RAM drives siraul tntnmuslj" for a total of 



6 Drives' This RAM DISK -ill also vork simultaneously with our amazing LIGHTNING PRI.VTHR SPOOLER! 
$19.95 on disk + s/h. 



LIGHTNING PRINTER SP001.ER for the 128K or 512K Color Computer 3. Multitask your computer! 
more than 40O5C of Lexr Co the spooler "instantly." llierj , continue your keyboard work while 
prints out! Also compatible with our LICIN'NING RAM DISK ibove. $14,95 on disk + a/h. 

IJCiriKINC BACKUP utility for your 512K Color Compucer 3 rendu your rooster disk once and then 
superfasi multiple disk backups on all your drives! N'o need to foroat blank rlisks. Supports 



Dump 
it all 



makes 

35> 40 



double or single sided 
Old CI 




'Itsks ,ind adjustable step rate. 

rill 5 1 1» nnlu v-i W s U 



$14.95 on dlak + s/h. 



juhf 



<PflUSIHC> 



one wants to be chained down , Anrl 
yell, if you type Ln BASIC programs, you have been 
subject co Involuntary servitude! Oie culprit? 
BASIC'S limited EDIT command. 




Demand Your BASIC FREEDOM! Programmed by Chris EabCock for ColorVenture, this Software giv^s you a 
full screen editor for Cyping in and editing BASIC programs! Move the cursor anywhere on Che screen. 
Insert, dclece or ddd text. It's the sajne concept as in a word processor, e.<ccpL you never have to 
leave BASIC! BASIC FREEDOM is an invisible machine language program which you e?tn turn on and off at 
will. Even pres.sing RESET will not hurt your BASIC FREEDDQM! Simple, yet powerful with an easy to 
rwad manual. Many extra "u ice touches" included, like KEY REPEAT ami LOWERCASE INTERPRETER which 
l«ts you type BASIC commands in upper or lovt.-r case for case of programming. Translar.ion to 




is automatic for commands. Text in quotes is not affected. 



3 VERSION lets 
the CoCo 1 and 2. 



you work in 
Avai lable 



32. 40, 
on disk 



or 80 column 
for $24.95 > 



display 
s/h. 



t'oi CoCo l I or 3 ! 

mode*. A separate version 



Is 



FREEDOM 



by Dr. Preble! IMAGINIil Some day, a computer so advance;*! that it responds to your 
very choup.hcs and emotion.-s. Imagine. some day, thought-controlled graphics: Invitation and 
tauter ia Liza c ion! PLUG IN YOUR MIND and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS — chat day is nou! The Radio Shack 
Color Computer has many advanced capabilities, Just uniting to be Lapped. Dr. Preble's Programs 
coBiines the advanced technology of Lhe CoCo with Lhe amazing Radio Shuck Biofeedback Monitor Co 
bring you "Mental Ereedoa." idp / f: $ 

TMOOGfrr-CONTROU-ED VIDEO CHA.LLENGE7 Unlike. my videogame you have over ployed, our Thoughcware 
Cescs . your ability Co handle stress, to remain calm under adverse ci. r curasttinces, LTGnYNTNG FAST 
reflexes will do you no good here, unless you first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. Are ypu the 
aecretely nervous type? Many people can keep a "Poker Fact*" even when they are worried so chat 
others may noL notice; but t-rtu you really stop the worry itself Find out with Mental Freedom! 



AMI) IT TALKS1 Did you know that the CoCo can produce Incredibly realistic digital speech 
spocilal speech synthesizer? The voice qua l icy is so good, It sounds human 1 Honest. Best 
extr^i hardware Is needed for speech, just sumo clever programing by Dr. PreLilc. 

MENTAL FREEDOM - Next time your friends nsk white your computer can do, show 
them Dr Preble's Thoughtware! Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback MonLtor 
CacategMtl £63-675. Hencnl Freedom - DISK only $24.95 + s/h 



wl ch*ut 
of all, 



a 
no 



fry: at Vo:cc 
Recorder for your 
CoCo L 2. or j r 

* Record voice or any sounii inCo RAM 
'■' Record and playback jL 2 speeds 

* Save .aid Load voice \u disk 

% Select normal or high fidelity 

* KcconJ more than 2 minutes of speech if 
yon h.ive a 512K CoCo 1 

* Fully compatible with CoCo 1 anrl 2 

0 Features Sound Activated Playback. 
Mcssanes will ))layb;jck auuoniat ica U y lor 
y»ur I;imil> hlicn <iny noise is nmde. 

Could also scare off prowlers. 

Vocal Freedom int hides special cable. 
Requires only a low cost aniplilier (RS 
cm. p"277-1003) and any microphone. 



On Disk, only $39.95 + .s/h 

Incorporate digitalis recorded 
sound into your own programs. 
Vocnl Freedom, above. 



voices »r 
Reipn res 



VD0S r the UnDISK: 

or without u disk, 
f i l(-s. gives the 
remaining. 0\^n a RAM disk 



Save multiple programs in memory. Or save tiultiplc gr.jphic pictures in men or y . Works with 
Let's you SAVE. LOAD and KILL .iLored projjraras or graphics. DIRECTORY function lists 
sLurt, end and execution addresses of »EU v hint language prn^rams and niiiSbOf of free bytes 
without biiyinfj a disk drive! Rcc|uires 6'iK CoCo 1 or 2. Available o:i tape or disk 



fur S2A.95 + shipping/handling. 

VDUHP, for tlic UnDISK: Backup all your UnDISK 
users' On cai.K' for $h't.95 -t shipping/hanid I ing. 

VPRINT, for the UnDISK: Paper pnntouL for UnDISK 

Chock, money ot der, Mastercard 
Visa or C O.b. For Shipping 
m US, A or Canada add $2.50, 
ta olber Countries, add 15 00 



ii.es to a 



For CoCo 1 or 

ungle tape file for easy 



■*1 

reloddiiig i'\ must 



for "DOS 



Directory. On tape:. $9.95 f shipping/handling. 




Hicr-fv s iotir»i 0i i in 

L OB 




■a Fran 
Dr. Pr eble's Programs 
tWQ Oarer Loon 

40228 



tor 
I. 2 



Of Co 




il) $14.95 4 s/h 



1M< Vli-Sdlwy 

a 2 g il © g- 

1'tcss i i o uoui Disk Du ft i cm i| 
lri.th ruici ji'.l tnc^ seines oml 

L«?nki«. L.'rcntr usi. fuf fvrtp 
>>icssfi-K''- rir!"rf mm pro- 
kcoinnni rourfi ro ;joui rrr 



Louisville, 



cr v 
i % i 



) 06Q ■ m 



r 

i 

L 



% 



for lah'ktiml SiimlQim 
Mo ProfQitiS, LI!). 



CoCoBraille 



Eaboss Grade 1 or Grade 2 
Braille using your CoCo 1, 2 
or 3 and a Brother Daisy Wheel 
printer! FasL Print to 

irallle conversion algorithm 
converts word processor files, 
program listings ond data 
flies into touch readable 
Braille. For use by the blind 
or the sighted. No knowledge 
of the Braille code ia 
noccaaory. Just send print to 
the program and out comes 
Braille! Nocc: The complex 
Grade 2 conversion 1^ very 
good ond though not always 
perfect, quite readable. 
Requires 64K or 'nore. Brother 
HK series printer or the IF-50 
interfuco scries required. 
Low Cost! Similar- software 
cost.s' 3 t imf;s as much. Only