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00^ I ) 



November 1987 



Canada $4.95 U.S. $3.95 



The U 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 

Our Telecommunications Issue 







g A PP p0>t - 




SEE BACK COVER 
FOR OTHER DIECQM GAMES 



ML 



From Computer Plus to YO 
PLUS after PLUS after PLUS 




Tandy 1400 LT $1239 
Tandy 102 24KS379 
Tandy 200 24K$649 



Color Computer 3 
w/128KExt. Basic $159 




Tandy 1000 HX $539 
Tandy 1000 TX$o89 




DMP-130AS279 



0 



Color Computer Disk Drive 
Drive 0 $249 Drive 1 $149 




BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 479.00 
Tandy 1000 SX 1 Drive 384K 649.00 
Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 512K 1129.00 
Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg. Ram1959.00 
Color Computer 2 w/64K Ext. Basic 89.00 
PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 169.00 
Radio Shack DMP-130A 120 CPS 279.00 
Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel339.00 
Star Micronics NP-10 100 CPS 169.00 
Star Micronics NX-10 120 CPS 199.00 
Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 359.00 
Panasonic P-1080i 120 CPS 189.00 
Panasonic P-1091 i 160 CPS 210.00 
Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 349.00 
Okidata 182 120 CPS 269.00 
Okidata 192+ 200 CPS 339.00 
Okidata 292 240 CPS 489.00 
MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 
Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 
Radio Shack DCM-212 179.00 
Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 

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1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Interface 89.00 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 14.95 
CM-8 6' Extension Cable 19.95 
Serial to Parallel Conv. 59.95 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 329.00 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 99.00 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 
COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 
Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 
Flight 16 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 
Nuke the Love Boat (CoCo3) 34.95 



The Magic of Zanth (CoCo3) 34.95 

Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 

Color Max 3 (CoCo3) 59.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 
COCO Max II by Colorware 
AutoTerm by PXE Computing29.95 
TelePatch III by Spectrum 
C III Graphics by Spectrum (CoCo3)19.95 
Font Bonanza by Spectrum (CoCo3)29.95 

TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 

Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 

CoCo3 512KRamDiskbyCerComp 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 
Inside OS-9 Level II Book by FHL 
VIP Writer (disk only) 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 



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P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 



52 



FEATURES 



113 





144 



Cover illustration copyright 1 
by Fred Crawford 



1987 



jJfc The cassette tape/disk symbols 
beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's RAINBOW ON 
TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
RAINBOW ON TAPE. For details, check the 
RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK 
ad on Page 157. 



26 



32 



36 



46 



52 



57 



64 



70 



0^ The Well- Dressed Diskette/Gay Crawford 

PRINTER UTILITY A disk jacket designer 

CoCoing Abroad/Marfy Goodman and Don Hutchison 

COMMUNICATIONS Traveling with your computer 

Plumbing for Your CoCo/ Ronald Pettus 

HARDWARE PROJECT Build an attractive printer stand 

^ WATTS the Cost?/ Kenneth Burdon 

HOME HELP Figure your monthly electrical usage 

Magic 3 Ball/Logan Ward 

ENTERTAINMENT The future is "in the chips" 

Rainbow Shopping Guide/Staff 

GIFT GUIDE Select that perfect something 

Getting Started With Delphi/Don Hutchison 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS Answers to all your questions 

0^ Let Your CoCo Do the Walking/Devon Copley 

ORGANIZATION A user-friendly phone number database 

Galactic Conflict/Pat;/ Alger. 

BBS GAME Online fun for up to 40 players 

Three Is Not a Crowd/Darry/ l/l/. Hawkins 100 

PROGRAMMING UTILITY Use three screens at the same time 

Short Day's Journey Into Night/Greg Hall 106 

GRAPHICS Day turns into night in City Sun 

Across the Miles/Sean Bossinger 144 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS UTILITY Reach out with this autodialer 

SysOp-Friendly and Hacker-Hostile/M/c/iae/ Jorgenson 152 

DATA COMMUNICATIONS An easy-to-use BBS 

C: The Beginnings/ Nancy Ewart ,168 

OS-9 PROGRAMMING A choice with a future 

NOVICES NICHE ^ 



78 



Password Protector. 

Doug Anderson 

Tunnel Effects 

Ken Ferreira 
One Starry Night 

Jim McDowell 



95 Alphabet Roulette 

Keiran Kenny 

96 The Blue Block Blues. 

J.R. Moon 
96 An Alarming Solution . 

Roderick Clark 



97 



97 



98 



NEXT MONTH: Grab some holiday cheer and follow the 
rainbow to the North Pole! "Do You Hear What I Hear?" If it's not sleigh 
bells, it must be a four-voice rendition of that carol and a medley of 
others. Wake up from "A Christmas Dream," an Adventure where you 
find the presents left on Christmas morning. Use our Christmas filer 
to keep track of your holiday cards. Look for these plus a wide 
selection of games, utilities, Q-and-A columns, hints, tips and lots 
more all for your CoCo 1 , 2 and 3. Happy Holidays! 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/Josep/7 Kolar 

A SCII for it 

Building November's Rain bow/ J/Yn Reed 

Executive Editor's comments 

CoCo Consultations/ Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 
Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg- 



Helpful improvements and Hutchison's database report 
Doctor bSCWI Richard Esposito 

The question fixer 

Education Notes/Steve Blyn 

Upgrading keyboard skills 

Education Overview/ Michael Plog, Ph.D 

Computers in school management 

PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 

Turn ol the Screw/ Tony DiStefano 

New, improved printer adapter 
| Wishing Well/Fred Scerbo 

CoCo Cathead — 20 seconds into the future 

RAINBOWTECH 



Barden's Buffer/ William Bar den, Jr. . 
The mystery of the novice bell ringer 
Downloads/Dan Downard 



Answers to your technical questions 
| KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 

The evolution continues 

PRODUCT REVIEWS 



CoCo Keyboard Extender Cable/Spectrum Projects 
Color File H/Tandy Corp. 



Hall of the King Ill/Prickly-Pear 
Hi-Res Ill/Cer-Comp . 



IRA Analysis/A to Z Unlimited 

The Lansford Mansion/Diecom Products. 

Lotzaluk/William G. Brigance, Sr 

Phonebook/Custom Software 



Printer Muffler 80/ Kensington Microware 

Rescue on Fractalus/Epyx Computer Software 

Third Rainbow Book of Adventures/ Faisoft 

Trig Attack/Sugar Software.. 



Unistand/MicroComputer Accessories 

Utility Routines Volume ll/Microcom Software- 
Vegas Slots/Tom Mix Software 



DEPARTMENTS 

Advertiser Index 



Back Issue Information . 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



Letters to Rainbow. 

Maxwell Mouse 

One-Liner Contest 

Information 

Pipeline 



.192 
.175 
_18 
.116 

_6 



Racksellers 

Rainbow Info 

Received & Certified 
Scoreboard 



.116 

.187 
124 



Scoreboard Pointers. 
Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 

Subscription Info 



.163 



16 



.103 



_62 



.126 



.76 



150 



.12 



.38 



.113 



.174 



.172 



.180 



_137 
_131 
_136 
_133 
_130 
_132 
_135 
_136 
_129 
133 
_137 
_131 
_130 
_135 
_132 



.190 
_20 
.143 
_90 
_92 



.186 
188 



Tne 




November 1987 



Vol. VII No. 4 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Associate Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Consulting Editor Jody Gilbert 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 
Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 
Copy Editor Lauren Willoughby 
Technical Editor Cray Augsburg 
Technical Consultant Dan Downard 
Technical Assistants Ed Ellers, 

Joe Pierce 
Editorial Assistants Wendy Falk, 

Monica Wheat 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 

Richard Esposito, Martin Goodman, M.D., 

Joseph Kolar, Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, 

Fred Scerbo, Richard White 



Art Director Heidi Maxedon 
Designers Tracey Jones, Rita Lawrence, 
Denise Webb 



Lead Typesetter Jody Doyle 



Faisoft, Inc. 
President Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue H. Evans 



Executive Editor James E. Reed 
Editorial Coordinator Jutta Kapfhammer 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jones 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 

Asst. General Manager For Administration 
Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Director of Fulfillment Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Rep. Beverly Beardon 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Director of Production Jim Cleveland 

Dispatch Sharon Smith 

Business Assistant Laurie Falk 



Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 192 



THE rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Faisoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, ProspecL KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. the rainbow, RAINBOWfestand the rainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Secondclass postage paid Prospect, 
KYand additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1987. the rainbow is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
the rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only, Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/1 2ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 5 




mmb® 



Serial Solution 



Editor: 

I recently purchased a program on a 
protected disk. IYn not an expert on disk 
quality, but it appears to be a cheap, flimsy 
disk. This means that if I'm in the middle of 
a project using that program and that disk 
goes bad, I'm out of luck. 

I realize that unauthorized copies are a 
problem for software dealers. However, 
when they sell me a program that will let me 
down some day, they are making their 
problem my problem. When I buy a pro- 
gram ( want a product that is, and will 
continue to be, dependable — more depend- 
able than a cheap, flimsy disk. 

It seems to me that a better solution to the 
unauthorized copies would be to embed a 
serial number in the program on each 
authorized copy. Then, at some point, 
register that serial number with the person 
responsible for the proper and legal use of 
that copy. This, in effect would put the 
purchaser's name on the program and on 
any unauthorized copies. I think that people 
would be more reluctant to give out illegal 
copies if those copies could be traced back 
to them. 

I realize that this would complicate the 
distribution process. There would have to be 
some way to re-register the owner of the 
program as it changed hands in a legal 
mariner. However, I think that this would be 
preferable to selling people programs which 
will eventually let them down. 

Loren Grage 
Phoenix, AZ 

BACK TALK 

Editor: 

[ have had some serious frustration trying 
to get OS-9 to work for me. I have a CoCo 
3 and OS-9 Level II, and for everything 1 try 
to do [ have to fight and wrestle to get this 
beast in line. For my living, I work on a VAX 
under UNIX System 5, so I would like to 
come home and pop OS-9 in the computer 
and lake off from there, but every program 
1 get, every tip I follow, involves several 
hours of work just to get one little nugget 
of useful utility. 

For example, in your May 1987 issue in 
"K ISSable OS-9," Dale Puckett tells how to 
get DeskMate to run the printer at 2400 
baud. After three hours of hair-pulling 
trying to figure out why I kept getting ERROR 
- BOOT FILE FRAGMENTATION I just had to 
quit. Finally, I figured out my problem: Mr. 



Puckett didn't mention that I should boot 
up DeskMate and close down the program 
from the main menu so that my boot file 
would be the one loaded before I attempt the 
patch he offers. 

While something like that may seem 
obvious to some people, it caused me 24 
hours of teeth-gnashing. Don't get me 
wrong, I am grateful for the tips and advice 
Mr. Puckett includes in his column. I never 
have understood why Tandy never thought 
ahead to the fact that users may want to 
print things a little faster than 600 baud. As 
for proof that his advice was helpful, I am 
printing this letter at 2400 baud. Yee-ha! 

Michael D. King 
Powell, OH 

REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I have been a subscriber to your wonder- 
ful magazine for five years now and eagerly 
await each edition. However, I have a 
complaint regarding the direction the for- 
mat of the magazine has been taking the past 
year or so. 

In the earlier days, in practically every 
issue, there would be a program or two that 
was useful, such as home accounting, inven- 
tory, amortization, figuring home construc- 
tion projects, etc. There was even one on 
what kind of fishing lures to use on given 
days (it works, too). Now it seems that every 
issue is devoted almost entirely to games. 
While I realize there is a great demand for 
this kind of programming among the 
younger folks, there's enough of us "old 
goats" around who couldn't care less how to 
shoot down a spaceship loaded with Purple 
People Eaters. 

How about gettingback to putting at least 
one program (doesn't have to be elaborate, 
just practical) in each issue for our interest. 
As Jutta Kapfhammer is taking over as 
managingeditoi , I'm sure she will be looking 
for ways to improve THE rainbow, and I 
respectfully submit this suggestion for her 
consideration. 

Charles E. Pauley 
Orange, TX 

Upgrade Downgrade 

Editor: 

I give up! The whole idea of the new CoCo 
was to get better graphics, more speed, a 
better command set and more memory. But, 



alas, the memory upgrade issue has turned 
into a used car lot atmosphere, complete 
with a whole slew of consumer advocates 
giving us hints here and there. 

I would appreciate a little wheat being 
separated from the chaff! Comprehensive 
articles detailing some basic aspects would 
seem timely. 

As a starting point: Are contacts gold 
plated? Are the chips in the upgrade all 
socketed? Are the new chips on top or 
bottom? What is included in the price? The 
warranty period? The type of warranty? 

I hope you give this idea some serious 
thought. Farming out these upgrades one at 
a time to your reviewers won't give us this 
type of comparison. Keep up the good work. 

Greg Clark 
Syracuse, NY 

3-Column Listings? 

Editor: 

As soon as I read September's "Building 
A Rainbow," I thought I would send in my 
comments. 

When I read . .Would three-column 
listings be OK . . and ". . . should listings 
be eliminated . . ." several responses went 
through my mind. In regard to the three- 
column listings, the obvious objection 
would be the size of print. There are many 
of the older generation who have found a 
wonderful hobby becoming a CoCoist. I 
find it most convenient for debugging, 
having the listings match what's on the 
screen. Would we still be able to read the 
print? I also think you should consider 
"entropy." If you stuff everything into one 
issue (an exaggerated example), what would 
you do for next month's issue, ornextyear's? 
Also, look at the ratio of rainbow on disk/ 
tape users to that of magazine subscribers. 
This should indicate how many people still 
type programs by hand. 

I honestly don't feel that a better, more 
balanced, well-rounded publication could 
be prayed for. It has grown from infancy to 
an adult of high stature worthy of praise. For 
a monthly magazine to remain in print for 
so many years, and to seed such a following 
is noeasy task. To suddenly sever a limb, just 
to try on a new one, may cause an unre- 
bounding shock. Continue to mature, yes! 
But it should be a natural growth, not a 
forceful one. Much could be left behind if 
the leaps are too huge. 

In closing, all I can add is: "Hip-Hip- 



THE RAINBOW 



November 1987 




AUTOTERM 

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YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
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80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
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Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with DC. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42, 51, 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 

They are sincere, hard working and 

appreciative. Thanks! ... 
KK Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
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Insert printer control codes. Specify 
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file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
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Advanced system of keystroke 
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sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



Hoorah" for the RAINBOW; "Hip-Hip- 
Hoorah" tor Falsoft, Inc.; "Hip-Hip- 
Hoorah" for the CoCo Community. 

James K. Knight 
Marysville, WA 

Those of you who do type in the 
programs appearing in THE rainbow 
should refer to the three- column 
format of the listings beginning on 
pages 83 and 154, By printing them 
this way, we have saved approxi- 
mately 15 magazine pages that are 
filled with additional material. 

Two different versions o f the three- 
column formal are shown (one with 
lines between the columns and the 
other without). Please do send us your 
comments regarding this "on trial 
basis" format. 

The Scholastic Challenge 

Editor: 

I think that you have an excellent mag- 
azine and support one of the best computers 
on the market. I have been a reader for two 
and a half years and have never seen a 
magazine that compares with it, for any 
computer! 

Now that the compliments are over, there 
are a few things that 1 think would improve 
THE rainbow. I feel that the programs 
published aren't always the best possible. I 
am a college student, and have only so much 
time for typing in programs. Utilities are 
what 1 like the most. The games make the 



magazine fun, but what 1 think would be 
best are games that have interesting pro- 
gramming aspects (preferably short). But 1 
would like to know more about the CoCo, 
and articles about our favorite computer are 
always read. It's been said that OS-9 is the 
future of the CoCo, and Tandy has ensured 
that with the CoCo 3. It would be nice to 
have more articles and programs and col- 
umns about this operating system. More 
articles and programs forthe CoCo 3 would 
be great, too. 

Ron Nelson 
Beaver Bay, Ml 

Bugs, Fixes V Patches 

Editor: 

First and foremost, you absolutely, pos- 
itively must have a "Bugs, Patches and 
Fixes" column! It's useful to know of a 
problem in both Radio Shack and third- 
party software, as well as possible solutions 
if they exist. Often I only find a bug in a paid- 
for application program after it has done its 
damage, and 1 have no idea how to cure it. 
I often read of fixes posted on Delphi, but 
it might as well be on Mars for me. I, as well 
as others, have no possible way of reaching 
Delphi, due to a number of reasons. 

Furthermore, what is published in rain- 
•ow is randomly scattered in two consulta- 
tion columns and one OS-9 column. A few 
fixes can be hidden in those elusive gray 
boxes filling up corners of pages. I've even 
found hints written in the column you now 
write! Surely this can be pooled into one 



column. That way only one place need be 
searched in each issue. Right now I must go 
through the entire magazine, and when 
looking through three years of back issues 
for help . . . you can imagine the time used 
up. So pleasecojnsider a separate column for 
"Bugs, Fixes and Patches"! 

My second suggestion is for an article on 
hard disks. 1 have noticed increased interest 
in them since OS-9 Level 11 came out. ] have 
also seen an increase in confusion. An 
excellent example of the type of article 
needed is Marty Goodman's article in the 
August 1987 issue of RAINBOW on RGB 
advantages of each, and what to use them 
for. An article geared the same way for hard 
disks is desperately needed. 

Some explanation should accompany the 
article as well — such things as the difference 
between SCSI and SASI interfaces, and how 
one can assemble a hard disk system from 
component boards as an alternative to 
getting a complete system all at once. 

This brings to mind my third suggestion. 
Every May you have an issue devoted 
strictly to printers. Why not expand this to 
peripherals in general? Certainly many fancy 
things can be done with floppy and hard 
disks as well. Then there are those unique 
I/O devices that could have an article 
describing their use and benefit. These 
include music keyboards, voice synthesizers, 
video digitizers, EPROM burners, real-time 
clocks, RS-232C cartridges, programmable 
sound generators, motor controllers, and so 
forth. Printers are great, but many other 



November 19B7 THE RAINBOW 7 



peripherals can do just as fancy footwork. 
So how about a Peripherals Issue? Sounds 
good to me, and probably to many others. 

My fourth and last suggestion is with OS- 
9. For some time Joseph Kolar has helped 
beginners with the Radio Shack/ Microsoft 
BASIC in the Color Computer. Now I'm far 
from being a beginner; I belong on the other 
end of the scale. And yet it would be useful 
for someone, maybe Joseph Kolar, to con- 
centrate on a bit of BASlC09each month. The 
stuff in Level II can swamp a new arrival. 
Even though I've worked with UNIX for 
years, it takes a while to get through that 
1,000-page plus binder from Tandy. There's 
enough to keep someone busy for years 
exploring the possibilities. Now Falsoft has 
taken a step in the right direction with its 
books, but there are books on BASIC, too. 
Yet you very considerately publish a column 
to help beginners. Windows and BAS1C09 is 
where the future is. It needs attention as well. 

Brian D. Armstrong 
Sunspot, N M 

Tyrannosaurible OS-9 

Editor: 

There are lots of things that THE RAINBOW 
could do to help us al 1 out. 1 have a 9-month- 
old CoCo 3 that has 5 1 2K of memory, which 
can't really be used. 

For example, I'd love to use Ankia's FFT 
program and store the data in memory 
rather than on disk, but there's no way to 
store-real numbers in that extra memory. 1 Ve 
used the Radio Shack C Compiler and think 
it produces good programs with graphics. 
But OS-9 is a dinosaur; the disk grinds on 
and on, and the intermediate code very often 
exceeds the disk space available to it. One 
wishes you could simply load the compiler 
and all of the intermediate and final code 
into memory rather than putting it on disk. 

I'm sure you have lots of neat BASIC 
programs in your files. But, lately, when I 
want to produce PASCAL or C code, I do it 
on the IBM in Turbo or even Microsoft. If 
the CoCo is to survive, then it's got to do 
things as easily as the PC. 

Karl J. Casper 
Cleveland, OH 

Suggestion: Puzzles 

Editor: 

I am very happy with THE rainbow, 
which is the best magazine I have ever read. 
I am pleased with your articles, being most 
informative and interesting and also am very 
thankful for the good programs you publish 
each month. 

What happened to Jim Reed's Comic- 
CoCo-Pet, CoCo Cat? Why is CoCo Cat not 
being published any more? I always read the 
CoCo Cat when I received my issues and 
now I miss it! 

I have been thinking these days that THE 
Rainbow should have some pages with 
entertaining puzzles. For example cross- 
words, word search puzzles and maybe also 
short CoCo detective stories for readers to 
find the murderer or thief. I have also 
noticed that you stopped with the Cross- 
word Creator Contest. So, how about 

8 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



printing a couple of pages each month, 
maybe called 'The Entertainment Section." 

Werner Daniel Slreidt 
Cairo, Egypt 

CoCo Cat will return next month. 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I own a 64K CoCo I with Disk BASIC. 
Does anyone know where I can get a host 
program for the CoCo? I use my computer 
for business applications and require that 
my partner be able to access and run my 
business programs via his own computer. If 
anyone has any information that would 
help, please write to me. 

Alex Kouvaras 
203 Moray Street 
New Farm, QLD 4005 
A ustralia 

Remote2, a host program, ap- 
peared on Page 106 of the November 
1985 issue. Because two of the tele- 
communications programs printed 
this month require Remote2 for oper- 
ation, it will also be included on this 
month's RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW ON DISK. 

BBS Start-Up 

Editor: 

I have a 64K CoCo 2, two drives, Multi- 
Pak, DCM3 modem, and a DMP-1 10 print- 
er. I am interested in starting up my own 
BBS. What software is available for me to 
do this? I also have an old Model III, 16K 
TRS-80, which could be upgraded. I would 
like to use it as a BBS; what software is 
available for it? I am looking for an older 
"silver" CoCo 1, upgraded or not. 

Chauncey A. Bailey 
1 107 Clingan Ridge Dr. 
Cleveland, TN 37311 

You might refer to the November 
1985 through February 1986 issues of 
RA/N BO wfor a series of articles detail- 
ing the CoBBS system. Also, see Page 
152 of this issue for an easy-to-use 
BBS program. 

Simple Division 

Editor: 

I have Color Profile, which I've been using 
extensively for the past few years, and I'm 
in need of some assistance/ ad vice. 

Until recently I've had only one disk drive 
and consequently had to keep both my 
control and data files on one disk. Now that 
I have two drives I'd like to separate those 
control and data files to make my control 
files more useful and add storage space to 
my data files. How do I accomplish this? 

Paul Vasko 
820 Ambassador Loop 
Tampa, FL 33613-2 107 

Requisitions Requisitioned 

Editor: 

Is there a machine language program to 
help fill out forms and/or requisitions? I 



have all kinds of invoices and requisitions to 
fill every day, and I need a program that 
would create forms, just like the VIP Data- 
base does, and keep them on a disk file. 

I recently bought the Schematic Drawing 
Processor (SDP). Is there a similar program 
like the Cad Cam on the IBM (electronic 
drafting) for the CoCo 2 and/ or 3? 

Jean Grave He 
713 Main Street ti2 
Gatineau, Quebec 
Canada J8R 1G7 

See " CoCo Cad: The Schematic 
Scoundrel" published in the October 
1985 issue (Page 130). 

OS-9 P-P-P-Problems 

Editor: 

I own a CoCo 3 and have problems 
running OS-9 programs on it. Each time I 
strike a key it repeats itself a number of 
times, as if the machine is stuck in the "key 
auto-repeat mode." 

1 would like to know if others have 
experienced this problem. 

Eugene S. Ceschini 
545 W. 8th Ave.. 
Tarentum, PA 15084 

CoCo 3 Save/Load 

Editor: 

I really enjoyed Stephen Gunn's 64K 
version of 44 Analog-To-Digital and Back 
Again" program (October 1985, Page 87). 1 
even had some of my favorite songs from my 
cassette collection on disk! The problem is 
that the Save/ Load feature doesn't work 
properly on my new CoCo 3. Does anyone 
have any solutions? 

Chris Tripp 
906 Jay Ryan Rd. 
Goldsboro, NC 27530 

CoCo 3 MikeyFix 

Editor: 

My problem is a program written by Mike 
Ward to configure MikeyTerm to run on my 
CoCo 3 that doesn't work up to standards. 
It won't let mesee the full buffer screen, only 
the top eight lines. I can't get to the menu 
from terminal mode unless I'm online. Is 
there some way I can correct this myself, or 
is Mike Ward going to come out with a new 
version of MikeyTerm or a new convertor? 
I'm using the convenor on my version of 
MikeyTerm 4 for the RS-232 pack. 

Michael Ray Todd (MIKE RT) 
10707 IH-I0WH1823 
San Anlonio, TX 78230 

If you are using a CoCo 3, you 
should be using MikeyTerm Version 
4.3. Mike Ward can be contacted 
through Delphi: His username is 
MIKEWA RD. 

At Long Last, . . . Errors 

Editor: 

I have had my CoCo 3 for a year now and 
my first disappointment was to find it had 
no more memory available than the 64K 
machine it replaced. So I waited a year to 



BOOKS & GRAPHICS 



500 

POKES, 

PEEKS, 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
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will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
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QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Basic/ECB/Dlsk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TROn, TROff, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, REMUM, PRINT 
USINQ, DIR. KILL. SAVE, LOAD. 
MERGE, RENAME. DSKINI. 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY. CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 

★ Generate a Repeat-key. 

★ Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (Tor 
64K only). 

★ Speed Up your programs. 

★ Reset. MOTOR ON/OfT from 
keyboard. 

★ Recover Basle programs lost by 
NEW. 

★ Set 23 different 

GRAPHIC /SEMIGRAPHIC modes 

★ Merge two Basic programs. 

★ AND MUCH MUCH MORE1U 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16 K/32 K/64 K/ COLOR BASIC/ ECB/ DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1. 2, fif 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



SUPPLEMENT to 

500 POKES, 
PEEKS N EXECS 

ONLY$9.95 

L U U additional Pokes, Peeks ' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER. 
Includes commands for 

• Rompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®. Edtasm+® and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Qump | lor DMP printers) & Text Screen Dump 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES, PEEKS 'N EXECS is a prerequisite 



^300 POKES 
PEEKS N EXECS 

FOR THE COCO III 

Get more POWER for your CoCo III. Includes 
commands for 



40/BO Column Screen Text Oump 
Save Text/Graphics Screens lo Disk 
Command/ Funclion Oisables 
Enhancements lor CoCo 3 Basic 
12BK/512K Ram Test Program 
HPRINT Character Modifier 
AND MANY MORE COMMANDS ONLY SI 9.95 




MUST" BOOKS ^23 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: SI 9.95 
BOTH UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
SUPER EC8(CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: S24.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $59.95 
COCO 3 SERVICE MANUAL S39.95 
COCO 2 SERVICE MANUAL S29.95 
INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II S39.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO DS9 LEVEL II ON C0C03: S19.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO DS9 II DISK: $19.95 
BASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS S14.95 
COCO 3 SECRETS REVEALED: S19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING*: S1B.DD 

ADDENDUM FOR COCO 3: S12.00 
UTILITY ROUTINES VOL 1 BOOK: $19.95 



JhJF 



AN orders, $50 & above (except CODs) 
shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra 
charge. Last Minute Shoppers can benefit 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 

VISA MC, AM EX, Check MO. Please 
countries $5.00 S&H. COD (US only) 
add sales tax Computerized processing 
Dealer inquiries invited. 




COLOR MAX 3 

Finally, your wait is overt! The ultimate 
graphics program for CoCo 3 has arrived 
Features include: 

• Icons and pull down menus 

• 320 x 200 hhres screen 

• Choice of 64 colors 

• Pencil Eraser, Spray Can. Line. Rectangle. Paint Brush & . 
more functions 

• Electronic Typesetting with 1 1 built-in fonts 

• Zoom-in (Fat Bits) and Undo 

• Variety of brushes and patterns 

• Editing features such as invert flip, copy, cut paste and 
clear 

• Load/ Save/Compress/ Print your work 

• Works with RGB& Composite Monitors 

• Printer Drivers- EPSON. GEMINI. 0MP& CGP-220 

Requires CoCo 3. 1 28 K, Tandy Disk Controller, 
Hi- Res Joystick Interface. QNL y jjjijg gij 

HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 
PIX CONVERTER 1: $29.95 
COLOR MAX 3 FONT EDITOR: $29.95 
COLOR MAX 3 FONTS: $29.95 




Signs 
Banners 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions. Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III ORTDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM OF 32 K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER, compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 AND JDOS. 
Supports the following printers: DMP 
100/105/110/130/430, CGP220, 
EPSON RX/FX, GEMIN1 1 0X, SG-10, 
NX-10& OKI DATA 

DISK ONLY $29.95 

PICTURE DISK #1: 100 more pictures for 

CGD: $14.95 

FONT 0ISK#1: 10 extra fonts! $19.95 
COLORED PAPER PACKS $24.95 



add $3.00 S&H(USA& Canada), other 
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& tracking of orders, Immediate shipment 



VISA 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 g am-9pm est 7 days a week 

Except NY. Order Status. Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call 1-716-223-1477 



finally get OS-9 Level II, thinking it was the 
answer (according to the Tandy clerk). But, 
after two weeks, all I have learned to do is 
format, backup, boot up BASIC09 and type 
in a large number of procedures that will not 
run. 

When I type in a procedure as instructed 
in the manual, I get Error 051 — line with 
compiler error whenever I type RUN. LOAD 
f^ves me Error 216. Occasionally a 043 error 
pops up (unknown procedure) when trying 
to RUN. So here I am locked in a land of error 
with nothing telling me what to do to correct 
the error. 

Beatrice L. Weyrick 
2173 Lynn Dr. 
Akron, OH 44312 

Editor 's Note: We understand your 
frustration, but we have no simple 
answers for you. OS-9 takes time and 
effort to learn. However, here are a 
couple of pointers: 

1) A listed line with an error of any 
type will prevent a program from 
running. 

2) Your other errors (043, 214, 215 
and 216) most likely result from 
improper selection of your cur- 
rent data and execution directo- 
ries. Carefully read pages 4-1 
through 5-10 of the Getting 
Started section of the OS-9 Level 
Two manual. Also, chapters one 
and nine of 'The Complete Rain- 
bow Guide to OS-9 Level II, 
Volume I: A Beginners Guide to 
Windows will help immensely. 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

I ordered the PBBS OS-9 Bulletin Board 
software from S.D. Roberson, 1702 W. Mt. 
View Dr., Mesa, AZ 85201, last year. Not 
beTng an expert at OS-9 but wanting to 
SysOp a BBS, I ordered it. Having trouble 
at first, I called the author for help. He took 
time out to help me with everything I 
needed. Now that I've worked with the 
author, I have learned the OS-9 operating 
system and can SysOp with the best of them. 
Best of all, he provides upgrades to the 
original version for minimal cost. Steve 
Roberson, my hat is off to you. 

Bill Davis 
Weir ton, WV 



Slick Math 

Editor: 

I think that Louis Toscano's equation- 
graphftig and equation-solving programs in 
the September rainbow are the slickest 
progams you've printed in a long time. Not 
that there isn't something of interest to me 
in every issue, but Louis has done a super- 
fantastic job. Now, I know I'm prejudiced 
'cause I'm a math teacher, but that gives me 
the right to be a critic of math programs, too. 
One word to describe Louis' work . . . 
WOW! 

Richard H. Phillips 
RHP 
Snyder, NY 

10 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 



• OVAC Systems BBS has gone 24 hours a 
day! The BBS promotes the Ohio Valley 
Association of Computers. We use the PBBS 
4.8 software with 22 megabytes of online 
storage. New users verified within 24 hours. 
(304)-797-867l. 

SysOp, Bill Davis 
1142 Court land 
Weir ton, WV 26062 

• I would like to announce our BBS. Call 
Hellcat's Army at (516) 997-7914. Calling 
hours are 12 a.m. to 6 a.m. EST. Message 
Bases, BBS list and more. Also call Mission- 
ary Headquarters at (415) 530-2444 (24 hrs. 
a day) with the same f eatures. 

T. Fitzgerald 
164 Lewis Ave. 
Westbury, NY 11590 

• I am the president of our club, the CoCo 
Exchange. It is a pen pal/ public domain 
trading club. We have great games and 
contests and a large download selection. 

Call CoCo Exchange Systems at (813) 
53 1-1038, 24 hours, at 300 baud, 7 bits, even 
parity. 

Dino Sanchez 
2070 62nd St. N HI 503 
Clearwater, FL 33520 

• There is a new BBS at (703) 365-2018. It 
runs Monday through Sunday, 7 p.m. to 7 
a.m. at 300 baud. 7-E-l or 8-N-l. It is run 
on a CoCo 2 under Turbo Colorama 5.0. 

Ricky Sutphin 
Rt. 1 Box 20 
Henry, VA 24102 

• The Midnite Express, formerly The Fast 
Trackin BBS, is online 24 hours. Baud 300/ 
1200. Call (502) 885-4335. Supporting 
online RLE Graphics. Full download access 
to new users. 

Jerry Downey 
620 Sanderson Dr. 
Hopkinsville, KY 42240 

• The following BBSs are all running 
PS BBS Version 1.5 or better: 

The Swamp Land (513) 398-CoCo 
The Pit Stop (513) 821-5170 
The Hideaway (614)676-2505 

All are online 24 hours and run at 300 or 
1200 baud on CoCo 3s. 

Servalin Harlock 
54937 High Ridge Road 
High Ridge, OH 43992 

• Fine Art Treatise (FAT) BBS is running 
on a CoCo I with CoBBS, at 1200 baud, 
online 24 hours. 8-N-l. Text board with 
Novel, Crossbow mag., Literature mag., 
Telecomputing mag., Interactive message 
bases. No fees. First-time caller has near full 
access. Call (5 13) 778-9624. 

Jack Bowman 
1010 Concord Ave. 
Piqua, OH 45356 

• I run a BBS called CoBBS. It has been 
online in Oklahoma City for eight months. 



All computer users are welcome, but up- 
loads and downloads are for the Color 
Computer! There are P/D pictures, music 
and many OS-9 files for Xmodem down- 
loading. The system is run on a 5I2K CoCo 
2, with six drives online. Users may log on 
at 300 or 1200 baud, 8 bit, no parity, 24 
hours, 7 days a week. Call (405) 737-5580. 

Ronn Folk 
1029 Hazelwood 
Midwest City, OK 73110 

• I have recently opened a BBS system, the 
Coco-Connection. It is online 24 hours, 7, 
8 bits, no parity, 300/1200 message base. 
Uploads, downloads. Call (206) 854-3744. 

Cors Bik 
11216 S.E 235th PI. 
Kent, WA 98031 

• I would like to announce the existence of 
The Master BBS. It has the best collection 
offiles in New England available to its users. 
Users must leave their name and phone 
number before being validated. Message 
base includes bulletins, jokes, one-liners and 
an online magazine. The BBS runs 24 hours, 
300 baud, 7-E-No. Call (603) 644-4867. 

George Proulx 
234 Lowell St., Apt. 6 
Manchester, NH 03104 

• The BBS of Belmont Abbey College runs 
300- 1 200 baud , 24 hours, 7 days a week. Call 
(704) 825-6201. The BBS is run on a PC- 
limited 286-8MHz computer with Til Meg 
storage capability. Feature: CoCo SIG, 
extensive files for communications, utilities, 
games, graphics, music, advanced lan- 
guages, OS-9 and BBS software. 

Ron Millar 
Pontefex BBS 
Belmont Abbey College 
Belmont, NC 28012 

• I have two multiuser bulletin boards. Both 
run on an Apple He, I Meg RAM card, with 
two 20 Meg hard drives. 

They both have a real dungeon and 
dragon multiuser game, not just a message 
board type! The download section for the 
CoCo is now up to 15 megs. Public Domain 
only software! Coming soon is a multiuser 
CoCo 3 512K. CoCo Parlor, allowing users 
online at one time! Call (617) 889-0777 and/ 
or (617) 884-9498. 

Robert Bohn, SysOp 
51 Addison St. 
Chelsea, MA 02150 

THE rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type RAI to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBf)W> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 



UTILITIES 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 




• Disk-to- Disk Copy (1-3 passes) 

• Tape-to- Disk Copy 

• Tape-to- Disk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk-to- Tape Copy 

• Tape-to-Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ ML programs and DATA files. 
CoCo 1, 2 & 3 32K Disk System 

(Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY $24.95 

COCO DISKZAPPER 

Are you frustrated with crashed disks? If 
so, this program can save hours of labor by 
restoring complete or part of the information 
from the disk Ifs indespensable 1 

Requires minimum 32K/64K disk system 

only $24.95 

DISK TUTORIAL 

(2- Disk Package) 




An indispensable tutorial for serious disk 
Basic/ ML programmers Gives almost 
everything you MUST know about the disk 
system CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 

only $36.95 
UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best- selected utilities: 

• 40 K Disk Basic • Disk Cataioger 

• Super Tape- to-Disk Copy (with Automatic Relocate] 

• LLisl Enhancer .• X-Ref for Basic Programs 

• Graphics Typesetter (two text sizes!) 

• LARGE D MP Graphics Dump • Basic Stepper 

• Hidden 32 K | Use the ' hidden" 32 K from your 64 K CoCo) 

• RAM Disk (for Cassette & Disk Users) 

• Single Key Printer Text Screen Dump 

• And much, much more !!! 

Most piograms compatible with CoCo 3 

DISK (64K ReoJ ONLY $29.95 

SUPER PACKAGE 

The indespensible utility package 
comprising: SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER, COCO DISK ZAPPER, DISK 
TUTORIAL and UTILITY BONANZA 

REGULAR $1 16.80 

YOU PAY $79.95 (Save $36.85) 



WORD PROCESSORS 

TeleWriter-64: Best Word Processor For 
CoCo 1, 2 & 3. (Cas) $47.95 
(Disk) $57.95 

TW-80:80 Column Displays more features 
for TW-64. CoCo 3 Disk $39.95 
TELEPATCH III: TW-64 Enhancements - 
Overstrike, Spool, Fast I/O, more $29.95 
TELEFORM: Mail Merge& Form Letters for 
TW-64. $19.95 

COLOR SCRIBE3: Best Line Editor for CoCo 
3. $49.95 

DATABASE 

Pro Color File* Enhanced* 2.0: Multi-feature 
Database. $59.95 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Autoterm: Superb Terminal Program Works 
with any modem! (Cas) $29.95 
(Disk) $39.95 

RTerm2.0: CoCo 3 Terminal Prog. Supports 
40/80 columns & more. Disk $39.95 
Wiz: For OS9 II. 300-19200 baud rate, 
windows! Req 512 K & RS232 Pak 
$79.95 

(See our Communications Extravaganza 
on Page 15!) 

ASSEMBLERS/COMPILERS 

EDT/ASM 64 D: Best Disk Based Editor- 
Assembler for CoCo. $59.95 (Specify CoCo 
1, 2 or 3) 

THE SOURCE: Best Disassembler for CoCo. 
$34.95 (Specify CoCo1 : 2 or 3) 
CBASIC: Most powerful Basic Program 
Compiler. $1 49.95 (Specify CoCo 1,2or3) 

TUTORIALS 

MACHINE GENESIS: Excellent Assembly 
Language Tutor. Includes Editor 
Assembler/debugger/ Disassembler and 
other utilities Disk $34.95 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE! 



COCO MAX 

COCO MAX III (Disk Only): $79.95 
COCO MAX II (Disk): $77.95 
COCO MAX (Tape): $67.95 
MAX PATCH: An excellent software patch to 
run COCO MAX II on COCO III. Req. RS 
Hires Joystick Interface. No chip 
replacements or soldering. Disk only $24.95 
BOTH MAX PATCH & HI-RES INTERFACE: 

$34.95 



WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 



OTHER SOFTWARE 

AD0S3: Advanced Disk Operating System 
for CoCo 3. $34.95. ADOS: $27.95 
COCO UTiL II: (Latest Version): Transfer 
CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible 
computer. Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo 
$39.95 

SPIT'N IMAGE: Makes a BACKUP of ANY 
disk $32.95 

GRAFPLOT: Generate graphs from data or 

spreadsheets Fully automatic with print 

function Disk $44.95 

FKEYS III: Function Keys for CoCo 3. 

$24.95 

COCO 3 FONT BONANZA $29.95 
RGB PATCH: Displays most games in color 
on RGB monitors For CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 
DISK ANTI- PIRATE: $59.95 Disk 
HIDE- A-BASIC: $24.95 Tape 



GAMES 

(DISK ONLY) 

IRON FOREST: $28.95 

LIGHT PHASER W/INTERFACE: $34.95 
MISSION! RUSH N ASSAULT: $26.95 
GRANOPRIX CHALLENGE: $28.95 
GANTELET II: $28.95 
GANTELET: $28.95 
MISSION F-16 ASSAULT: $28.95 
MARBLE MAZE: $28.95 
PAPEB BOUTE: $28.95 
KNOCK OUT: $28.95 
KARATE: $28.95 
WRESTLE MANIAC: $28.95 
BOUNCING BOULOERS: $28.95 
THE GATES OF DELIRIUM: $28.95 
CALAOURIAL FLAME OF LIGHT: $28.95 
LANSFORD MANSION: $28.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
PYRAMIX Cubix® for CoCo 3: $24.95 
VEGAS SLOTS (CoCo III Only): $34.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 





MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box214 
Fairport, N. Y. 14450 
Phone(716) 223-1477 



All ordersS5D & above (except COOs) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air al no extra charge Last minute shoppers 
can benefit VISA MC, AM EX, Check MO. Please add$3.00 S&H(USA& Canada), other countries 
$5.00 S&H. COD (US only) add S2.50 extra NYS residents please add sales tax 
Computerized processing & tracking ot orders. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 g am-q pm est7 days a week 

Except NY. Order Status, Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call 1 -71 6-223-1477 



An Exchange of Ideas 



This is our telecommunications issue, right? 
Right. 

So, I'm going to break with tradition and, instead of rambling on about 
something or other, I'm actually going to talk about telecommunications. 
Why? 

Because, frankly and honestly, I think it is really neat. I also happen 
to think it will be telecommunications — not spreadsheets, databases and 
game programs — that will ultimately bring millions and millions of 
additional people into the world of computers. 

My wife was out of town just the other day and some friends were kind 
enough to invite me over for some sustenance. Their daughter, 15-year- 
old Shannon, was in the midst of an argument with her 13-year-old brother 
Brian concerning use of the telephone. 

Brian "needed" the telephone to hook into Delphi to look up something 
in the online encyclopedia. Shannon had numerous friends she "had" to 
call for a number of extremely important reasons. 

The parents settled things, as parents will, by allocating time periods for 
telephone use. Brian got first crack, which caused some muttering from 
Shannon. Brian, however, allowed as how if he could print out the 
information from the encyclopedia, he wouldn't have to spend so much 
time on the telephone. 

I volunteered to try to help out. 

So all five tracked over to the computer and, while I was at it, I showed 
Brian how to get into conference. Suddenly there was interest on Shannon's 
part. 

"Are there boys there?" she asked. 
I told her there probably were. 

By this time, Brian's allocation of phone time had ended. Rather than 
call her friends, Shannon asked for a short lesson on the computer and 
did, indeed, meet a boy in conference. Everyone else was shoo'ed away. 
Shannon ended up spending all her telephone time on the computer — 
and made a "date" for another meeting a couple of days later. 

She's been hanging around Delphi ever since. 



INSTANT SOFTWARE!! 

Pay only for what you want! 
Quality Utility Software at Unbelievable Prices! 



o 



40K for Cassette Programs: 1100 
40K for Disk Basic Programs: 1101 
ALPHA-DIR: Alphabetize vour DIRs. #102 
APPOINTMENT CALENDAR: H103 
AUTOMATIC DISK BACKUP: Rea. 2 drives! #104 
AUTOMATIC 5 Min. CASSETTE SAUE:I105 
AUTOMATIC 5 Min. DISK SAUE: 1106 
AUTO DIR BACKUP: No more FS Errors! #107 
BANNER MAKER: T High Letters! #108 
BASIC PROBRAM AUTORUN FROM TAPE: 1109 
BASIC SEARCH: Search for a string. #110 
BORDER MAKER: 255 Border Styles! #111 
BOWLING SCORE KEEPER: 1112 
CALENDAR MAKER: For DMP Printers. #113 
CASSETTE LABEL MAKER: DMP' s Only. 1114 
CLOCK: Keeps tiie as you program. #115 
COMMAND KEYS: Short Hand for Basic. #116 
COMMAND MAKER: Design your own coaniands. #117 
COMMAND SAUER: Saves/Recalls Commands. #118 
CALCULATOR: On-screen calc. when programing. #119 
COMPUTERIZED CHECKBOOK: #120 
CURSOR STYLES: 65535 cursor styles! #121 
DISK CATALOBER: Puts DIRs into Master DIR. #122 
DISK ENCRYPT: PassHord-protect Bas. Progs, #123 
DISK LABEL MAKER: DMP Printers! #124 
DMP CHARACTER SET EDITOR: #125 
DMP SUPERSCRIPTS: Great for Ten-papers! #126 
DOS COMMAND ENHANCER: #127 
ENHANCED KILL: #128 
ENHANCED LL 1ST: Beautiful Listings! #129 
ERROR LOCATOR: CoCo locates your errors. #130 
FAST SORT: 100 strings in 3 seconds!! #131 
FILE SCRAMBLER: Hide your private files! #132 
FULL ERRORS: English error messages! #133 
FUNCTION KEYS: Speeds prog. tiie. #134 
GEMINI/EPSON BRAPHICS DUMP: #135 
GRADEBOOK: Great for teachers! #136 
GRAPHICS SCREEN COMPRESS I ON: #137 
GRAPHICS SCREEN DMP DUMP: #138 
BRAPHICS SCREEN LARBE DMP DUMP: #139 
GRAPHICS LETTER ING: 2 sizes! #140 
BRAPHICS MABNIFY/EDIT: #141 
HOME BILL MANABER: Keep track of bills. #142 
INPUT/OUTPUT DATA MONITOR: #143 
KEY CLICKER: Ensures inout accuracy. #144 

1 PROGRAM - 53 2 PROGRAMS - 
4 PROGRAMS - $24 5 DR M ORE 



KEY SAUER: Save/Recall your keystrokes. #145 
LAST COMMAND REPEATER: #146 
LINE COPY: Copy Basic Lines. #147 
LINE CROSS REFERENCE: #148 
LIST/DIR PAUSE: No «ore flybys! #149 
LOWERCASE COMMANDS: #150 
MAILING LIST: With Zipcode Sort! #151 
MASS INITIALIZATION: #152 
ML/BASIC MERGE: herae ML & Bas. Progs. #153 
MESSAGE ANIMATOR: Great Billboard! #154 
ML TO DATA CONUERTOR: #155 
MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST MAKER: #156 
NUMERIC KEYPAD: Great for nuabers. #157 
ON BREAK GOTO COMMAND: #158 
ON ERROR GOTD COMMAND: #159 
ON RESET GDTD COMMAND: #160 
PHONE DIRECTORY: 1161 
PAUSE CONTRDL: Put programs on hold! #162 
PROGRAM PACKER: For Basic Prograns. #163 
PURCHASE ORDER MAKER: Neat Invoices! #164 
RAM DISK: In-ftenory disk drive. #165 
REPLACE: Find/replace strings. #166 

REUERSE UIDEO C GREEN D : Elininates eyestrain. #167 

REUERSE UIDEO C RED) : Eliiinates eyestrain. #168 

RAM TEST: Checks your RAM. #169 

SIGN MAKER: RUNs on any printer! #170 

SINGLE STEPPER: Great debugger' #171 

SPEEDUP TUTORIAL: #172 

SPOOLER : Speedup printouts! #173 

SUPER INPIJT/LINEINPUT:#174 

SUPER COMMAND KEYS: #175 

SUPER COPY: COPY aultiple files. #176 

SUPER EDITOR: Scroll thru Bas, Progs. #177 

SUPER PAINT: 65535 patterns! #178 

SUPER REPEAT: Repeat Key. #179 

SUPER SCROLLER: Vi ew Scrolled Lines. #180 

TAB/SHIFT LOCK. KEYS: #181 

TAPE ENCRYPT: Password protect Bas. Progs. #182 

TEXT SCREEN DUMP: #183 

TEXT SCREEN SCROLL LOCK: #184 

TITLE SCREEN CREATOR: #185 

UNK ILL: your KILLed disk: programs. #186 

UAR I ABLE CROSS REFERENCE: #187 

UCR TAPE ORGANIZER: #188 

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P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N. Y. 14450 
Phone(716) 223-1477 



Alf ordersS50 & above | except COOs) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra charga Last minute shoppers 
can benelit VISA MC, AMEX Check MO. Please add$3. 00 S&H(USA& Canada), other countries 
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Except NY. Order Status. Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call 1-716-223-1477 



My point here is simply that there is 
a great deal which can be done with 
your computer other than "computing. " 
One of the most vast areas for all of this 
is in the area of telecommunications. 
You can meet people, get information, 
read other people's opinions and do a 
great variety of things. With the infor- 
mation services like Delphi and Com- 
puServe, it's rather inexpensive, too. 

Moreover, telecommunications re- 
presents a use of a computer that steps 
far beyond the bounds of "computing." 
I have always contended that the com- 
puter is merely the tool which allows 
you to build just whatever interests you 
- much like a hammer allows you to 
build physical things. Many of you have 
heard me quote Isaac Asimov that the 
computer is a "mind appliance." I think 
telecommunications allows you to ex- 
pand your mind to touch imany. 

Because of this concept, we will, 
beginning this month, starj experiment- 
ing with a new service on Delphi — a 
Books Special Interest Group. 

This is a new and special concept 
because it goes away from the "tradi- 
tional" in special interest groups, i.e., 
people who have computers and mo- 
dems to begin with. I, frankly, think the 



going will be a little difficult for this 
SIG, because many of those who are to 
participate will not "automatically" 
have the means to do so — the comput- 
er. 

Yet, I think an online book review is 
the kind of thing that should be done 
with an information service such as 
Delphi. The reason is a simple one: We 
plan to offer formal reviews of books, 
but we also plan to provide a means for 
the users of the SIG to make their own 
comments as well. Imagine. A review of 
a book with input from dozens of 
different people! No longer do you have 
to look at just what some fancy reviewer 
has to say, but you'll also have com- 
ments from a lot of different people as 
well. We hope to be able to use the 
conference feature to entice some well- 
known authors to get online and meet 
at various intervals. And, we'll be trying 
to keep an up-to-date best, seller list 
available, too. 

I've always been very interested in 
books and I love to read, so this is a 
natural expression for one of my main 
interests. At the same time, I know we'll 
have a hard row to hoe simply because 
many of those who are interested may 
not have computers — the tool neces- 



sary to be part of the Books SIG. My 
hope is that what we'll provide will not 
only lure many of you who like to read 
and who do have computers, but will 
encourage those whose primary inter- 
ests are books and reading to get a 
computer and use it for these purposes. 

Also, I think it would be really neat 
if those of you with other special inter- 
ests used the CoCo SIG on Delphi as 
a meeting place for anything you want 
it to be. Maybe the teenager in your 
house would like to meet others in other 
parts of the country. We'll be happy to 
try to set something up and post a notice 
of a conference for you. 

Or maybe you're interested in stamps, 
or cars, or needlepoint, or pig farming. 
Whatever. No one says that the SIG and 
its conferences (or forum, for that 
matter) have to concern themselves only 
with computers and computing. As an 
example, there's a pretty lively debate 
on foreign policy which surfaces from 
time to time on our PC/ MS-DOS SIG. 

All this boils down to is exchanging 
ideas. And, after all, isn't that what 
telecommunications is all about? 



— Lonnie Falk 




PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO I, II & III 



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!, II, & III may be played separately for a great challenge and wonderful entertain- 
ment. The Rainbow review of 9/86 called Hall of the King II a "Winner" while 6/86 
Rainbow review called Hall of the King I "one of the best adventure programs I 
have experienced to date" Try one or sll of the Hall of the King series. Each 
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already purchased Hall I & II, send proof of purchase (invoice, cancelled check, 
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of the King series is compatible with all versions of the Color Computer in- 
cluding the COCO III. Requires 64K and 1 disk drive. 




Fall 
Specials 



WARP FACTOR X (Rainbow Review 2/86) $29.95 
DARKMOOR HOLD (Rainbow Review 8/86) $19.95 
DOLLAR WISE Requires 32K 1 ape $19.95 — Disk $24.95 



FONTFILE — (New for the COCO III) $19.95 
DRAGON BLADE (Rainbow Review 11/86) 
Animated Graphics Adventure $24.95 



POLICY ON PROTECTION 

We believe our customers are h«n'esi — an of our soltware con be backed ud us 
ing standard backup procedures., 

Youf Personal check is welcome no de'ay. Include Si 50 shipping (or each 
order TX residents add 6 1M% sales lax. Orders shipped wiihm r.vo days 

Oeale' and author inquiries are al ways welcome. Canadian dna'er.s should con 
tact Kelly Software Distributors. Ltd. 608. STNT, Calvary, Alber'a I5H 2H2. |4' :3i 
236-2165 



For a complete listing of all our programs ca 
write for our free catalog. 
PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

^J5JT| 213 La Mirada • El Paso. Texas 79932 
1 (915) 584-7784 



or 



14 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



ALL HARDWARE COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 



DISK DRIVES 



Double Sided, Double Density 360 K 40 track disk drives for the Color Computer 1,2 and 3. Buy from 
someone else and all you get is a disk drive. Buy from us and not only do you get a quality disk drive, you also 
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0N E!! DRIVE 1 (Completely Assembled) $1 49.95 

DRIVE 0 (With J&M Controllers, Cable) $229.95 
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J&M CONTROLLER (With RSDOS) $79.95 
DISTO SUPER CONTROLLER: $99.95 
DRIVE CABLES: 1 DRIVE CABLE: $19.95 2 DRIVE CABLE: $24.95 4 DRIVE CABLE: $39.95 
(For Drives, add $7.00 S&H in USA/CANADA) 



I 




COMMUNICATIONS 
-EXTRAVAGANZA 



1) AVATEX 1200 MODEM: Hayes 
compatible 300/1 200 Baud, Auto-Dial/ 
Answer/ Redial ( Reg $129.95) 
2| MODEM CABLE (Reg $19.95) 

3| AUTOTERM TERMINAL SOFTWARE 
4] FREE COMPUSERVE OFFER and ACCESS 
TIME 

5) UPS 2nd DAY AIR Shipping. 

only $149.95 

(With AVATEX 1200hc instead of 
AVATEX 1200: $174.95), 




Th B A» ai ex 1 200 



UPGRADES. 



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512K UPGRADE FOR COCO III 

Fast 120ns chips. Fully tested. Easy installation No 
soldering. Comes with complete documentation and 
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HH only $79.95 

(With purchase of our 512 K RAM DISK program below) 
512 K Upgrade without chips S44.95 

512K RAMDISK 

Have 2 superlasl RAMDISKs & a print spooler 

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64K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/R CoColl: 
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64K Upgrade forCoCo l'& CoCo ll's with Cat 
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CABLES/SWITCHERS/ 
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RS232 Y CARLE: Hook 2 devices to the 

serial porl ONLY $18.95 

Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with 

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10' JOYSTICK EXTENDER CABLE: $19.95 
CASSETTE "Y" CABLE: $19.95 
MODEM CABLE: 4 pin to DB 25: $1 9.95 
15" MULTIPAK/ ROMPAK EXTENDER 
CABLE: $29.95 

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from the serial port $37.95 

WICO ADAPTER: Use Atari type Joysticks 

with your CoCo: $29.95 

RS HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $1 1.95 

MAGNAVOX 8505/851 5/8CM643 Analog 

RGB Cable: $24.95 

CM-B RGB Analog Ext. Cable: $19.95 

SEE OUR LINE OF 
DISK DRIVE CABLES! 



EPROM 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 
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Lowest Price Anywhere $137.95 
EPROM ERASER (Datarase): Fast erase of 
24/28 pin EPROMs $49.95 
EPROMS: 2764 -$8.00, 271 28 -$9.00 
Call for other EPROMs. 

BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER and ERASER: 
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ROMPAK w/ Blank PC Board 27xx Series 
$12.95 



VIDEO/DIGITIZER 

UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: For 

monochrome or color monitor. $29.95 
VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference. 
$19.95 

DS-69B DIGISECTOR: Microworks 
Digitizer for CoCo 1, 2 & 3. Includes 
software. ONLY $149.95 



_ PRINTER INTERFACES _ 

SERIALTO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 
switch selectable baud rates (300-9600) 
Comes with all cables $44.95 
PARALLEL PRINTER BUFFER: 64 K Print 
Buffer with Self Test Reset Button, Auto- 
diagnostics & Multiple Copy Functions 
Includes all cables. $129.95. (Please 
allow 1 week for shipment) 



MISCELLANEOUS 



5%" DISKS (DS/DD or SS/DDI Box of 10: 
$4.50 



MJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N. Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 



All orders$50 and above(except Disk Drives& CODs) shipped by UPS2nd Day Air at 
no EXTRA charga We accept VISA/ MC/AM EX, Check or MO. CODs ( No CODs for 
Disk Drives) add$2.50 extra Please add$3. 00 S&H( USA/CANADA; other countries 
$5.00), except where otherwise mentioned. NYS Residents please add sales tax 
Prices are subject to changa Ail products are covered by manufacturer's warranty 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pm est 7 days a week 

Except NY. Order Statua Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call 1 -71 6-223-1 477 




TANDY COMPUTERS 

1000-EX 256k 1-5 1/4" Drive 470.00 

1000-HX 256K 1-3 1/2" Drive. 535.00 

1000-SX 384K 1 5 1/4" Drive 630.00 

1000-TX 640K 1-3 1/2" Drive 875.00 

3000-HL 512K 1 5 1/4" Drive 1 1 10.00 

3000 640K 1 5 1/4" Drive 1500.00 

4000 1 Meg 1 3 1/2" Drive 1930.00 

1 400LT Portable Computer 1 2 1 5.00 

102 Portable Computer 24K 375.00 

200 Portable Computer 24K 640.00 

Color Computer 3 128K 165.00 



VM-4 Monochrome Green 95.00 

CM-5 Color RGB 220.00 

CM-1 1 Color RGB 335.00 

EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 510.00 

Tandy Dual Display Card 180.00 

Tandy EGA Card 235.00 

Zucker Mono Graphics Card 105.00 

Color Computer Drive 6 220.00 

Portable Drive 1 00/ 1 02/200 1 55.00 

5 1/4" External Drive 1C00EX 180.00 

3 1/2" External Drive 1C00EX 200.00 

Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 595.00 

Zucker 20 Meg Hardcard 445.00 

Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 275.00 

AT HD/1.2M Controller 200.00 

EXPANSION BOARDS 

Zucker Serial Board 45.00 

Zucker MFB 256K for 1000SX 170.00 

Zucker MFB 512Kfor 1000 169.00 

Zucker 1200 Baud Modem Card 75.00 

PBJ MFB 512K for 1000 209.00 

PRINTERS 

DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 150.00 

DMP-130 Dot-Matrix 255.00 

DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 31 5.00 

DWP-520 Datsy Wheel 730.00 

DMP-440 Dot- Matrix 595.00 

DMP-2120 Dot-Matrix 1325.00 

LP-1000 Laser Printer 1635.00 

Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 195.00 

Epson FX-86E Dot-Matrix 360.00 

Epson FX-286E Dot-Matrix 520.00 

Epson EX-800 Dot-Matrix 425.00 

Epson EX-1000 Dot-Matrix 585 00 

Epson LQ-800 Dot-Matrix 390 00 

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Epson GQ-3500 Laser 1 430.00 

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Monday thru Friday 9am-6pm EST. 



□□□□□ 
□□□□□ 



□□□□□ 

124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



Building Nov e mb e r's R ai nbow 1 

The sooner you ACK . . . 
. . . the quicker you get the NAK 



T a might strike you as odd for me to be already doing a "guest spot" in what 
I T until recently was my own column, but I still feel right at home. And, though 

A lit was not always the case, I am very comfortable with this month's 

rainbow theme: Telecommunications. 

Yes, I'm "into" telecommunications, a regular online party animal. I'm online, 

on average, about four or five times an evening, totalling about three hours a night. 

That's why new managing editor Jutta Kapfhammer asked me to do this month's 

column. 

What is my fascination with telecommunications? That's easy: it's live! Once 
you've ventured out of your own home base into the network of telecommuni- 
cations, they won't be able to keep you "down on the farm" anymore — not when 
you've transformed your screen into a window on the world. It's always an 
armchair adventure, because you just never know what you'll run into when you 
"go online, live." As often as I reach out, dial up and log on, there's still that feeling 
of anticipation each time I call a BBS or computer information network. When 
Delphi greets me with "Hello JIMREED" my screen seems to brighten a bit and 
the air fairly crackles with the surge of power. It's like you've just swung into the 
fast lane on a busy expressway. Once I'm on, I can hardly wait to see who else 
is on, and then I head for the Mail section with the same eagerness I had as a 
small-town kid waiting for the latest mail-order magic trick to arrive. 

Now, computer to computer communications is by no means new; the 
technology has been around at least a quarter century. And, its terminal emulation 
capability was one of the selling points of the Color Computer right from the very 
start. In fact, Lonnie Falk bought his first computer, a CoCo, back in late 1980, 
only a few months after its introduction, in order to access a DEC computer from 
home. And, his early experiences of sharing Color Computer information with 
others on CompuServe provided the inspiration for him to launch THE RAINBOW. 

My own first, typical, timid, panicky, I'm-going-to-get-stuck-and-can't-get-out 
experience was on CompuServe, too. With practice, though, going online soon 
became old hat. These days, telecommunicating is such an integral and natural 
part of THE RAINBOW and Falsoft operation, the very thought of quitting would 
give several of us fits. It would be as devastating as yanking away our disk drives. 
In fact, I don't think it unfair to compare computing without telecommunications 
to restricting your TV viewing to video cassettes only and never watching broadcast 
TV. Does that sound a bit radical? 

Well, naturally, there are differences. Ed Ellers, another online "regular," points 
out an interesting one. "With television, we began with live programming and 
prerecorded broadcasts and then, fairly recently, VCRs added the ability to 'time 
shift,' and even select your own programming. On the other hand, in computing, 
we usually have the "library" capacity from the start; later we explore the live 
dimension of data communications," permitting us to access the versatility and 
power of host computers and to interact with others. In both cases, the new 
flexibility has a dramatic impact on the way we use our CRTs. Personally, were 
I given the choice of giving up my modem or my VCR, the VCR would have to 
go; I still prefer "live" over Memorex. 

If you have yet to discover the fun of "live" computing, may I remind you that 
we offer a lifetime membership to Delphi and an hour of connect time — a $32. 15 
value as a free bonus — if you subscribe to RAINBOW through our Delphi SIGs 
(see pages 1 14 and 115). When you discover that all the "RAINBOW people" and 
other CoCo Community celebrities are within such easy reach, well, you may 
become an online party animal, too. 

— Jim Reed 



16 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 




Ill 8VCI 



a OS9 Lev.ll Users - 
720K/80 Tracks 




DS 31/2" DRIVES 



Why are you limitng yourself to just 35 track , 16QK single 
sided drives? Nov you can step up to 720K , 80~ " track , double 
sided, 3 1/2" drives! You still can be compatible with" 5 1/ 



software by removing the filler plate & ~a3ding your existing 
5 1/4" drive! (Or buy one f ran us!) Intro price $229,95* 



Drive 1 (5 1/4") - $99.95 
(10) 3 1/2" disks - $24.95 



Disk Controller - $99.95 
QS-5 Controller - $149.95** 



* - Includes PS & Case and hookups for 2nd drive (5 1/4") 
** - Eliminates 0S9 type-ahead problems! 

NOTE the 3 1/2 systara ($229.95) doesn ' t include a conroller . 
Also, the 5 l/4 jr drive must be a half -height drive. 



300 1 
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RAINBOW GUIDE 
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COCO III 
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A COMPLETE DISASSEMBLY of the CoCoIII 's 
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Color Max III requires a 128K CoCo III and Hi -Res Joystick interface. ( Spec ify printer l^S^L^S » "Color Max III 
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PYRAMIX ~ Bost CoCo III action game ever! 

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CoCo III 512K RAM sticker $4.99 
Level" ?! $ulck Ref Guide $4.99 
Level II BasicOg binder . .$9.95 



CoCo III Multipak PAL chip $19.95 
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Better CoCoIII Graphics $24.95 
CoCo IlI~Service Manual $39.95 
CoCo III Computer $299.95 



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Most orders shipped from stock. Allow 1-3 weeks for processing backorders. 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

PO BOX 264 HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 
See our other ads on pages 27 & 29 III 






White House 

David Mills 

This graphic 
representation of the 
White House was created 
with Color Max 3. David 
is working on a machine 
language program which 
he hopes to release next 
year. He lives in 
Huntington, West 
Virginia. 



Illllllllllllim 



fliiililliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilii 




3 and one w } 0 < |W. n ^ e 





The Bubble Zone 

Ke/fh Schuler 

Keith created this 
cosmic scene using 
the CoCo 3 and 
CoCo Canvas. Keith, 
a tenth-grader who 
enjoys racing model 
cars, lives in Merritt 
Island, Florida. 



HONORABLE MENTION 




CoCo Classic 



Logan Ward 



Logan lives in Memphis, Tennessee, and 
designed this detailed graphic with Color Max 
3. He is head technician for the Computer 
Center. 



H 



C®C0 1 ft 2 

San Juan Capistrano Mission 
Floyd Keirnan 

Floyd used Graphicom and a 
pixel editor from CoCo Draw 
to produce this graphic 
creation. He got the idea 
from an oil painting he did 
several years ago. 
Floyd is a retired electronics 
engineer and he lives in 
Orange, California. 




Nov 



ember 



1987 



THE 




How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program listings in 
the rainbow are formatted for a 32-character 
screen — so they show up just as they do on your CoCo 
screen. One easy way to check on the accuracy of your 
typing is to compare what character "goes under" what. 
If the characters match — and your line endings come 
out the same — you have a pretty good way of knowing 
that your typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 

RAI NBOW ON DISK Or RAINBOW ON T APEservice. 

An order form for these services is on the insert card 
bound in the magazine. 



What's A ;CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was first given to 
the Tandy Color Computer by its many fans, users and 
owners. 

However, when we use the term CoCo, we refer to 
both the Tandy Color Computer and the TDP System- 
100 Computer. (While many TDP-100s are still in 
service, the TDP Electronics division o f Tandy n o longer 
markets the CoCo look-alike.) It is easier than using 
bothofthe"given"namesthroughoutTHE rainbow. 

In most cases, when a specific computer is men- 
tioned, the application is for that specific computer. 
However, since the TDP Syst9m-100 and Tandy Color 
are, for all purposes, the same computer in a different 
case, these terms are almost always interchangeable. 



and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different.checkthe listing carefully to besureyou typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, referto H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 RAINBOW. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it'sgiven in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=25G*PEEK(35)+17B 

20 CLERR 25,X-1 

30 X=25G*PEEI< (35)+17B 

40 FOR Z=X TD X+77 

50 READ Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

G0 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=79B5THENB0EL5EPRINT 

"DATA ERR0R":5T0P 
B0 EXEC X: END 

90 DATA 1B2, 1, 106, 1G7, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 1B3, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 4B, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 3B, 3B 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 15B, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 12B, 171, 12B 
150 DATA 230, 132, 3B, 250, 4B, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 1B3, 2, 222, 4B, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 166, 132, 2B , 254 
1B0 DATA 1B9, 173, 19B, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



1) Type load dir list copy and press ENTER. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd'do 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
on disk in Drive 1. Then type chd'dl and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read. me. first file to the screen by typing 
1 is t read . me . f i rs t and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow on disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMD5 directory, enter d i r cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMD5 directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system: copy /dO'cmds/ filename 'd<d' 
cmds/ filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drivesystem: copy 'dl/cmds/ filename /d<d' 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Rainbow Check Plus 



The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check, sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if (he numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PL'JS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command RUN 
and press enter. Once theprogram has run, type NEW 



The OS-9 side of rainbow ON disk contains two 
directories: CMD5 and SOURCE. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rs t, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMD5 directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the SOURCE directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the SOURCE directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 
programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow ON disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 



The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. We ascertain 
that their products are, in actuality, what they purport 
to be and, upon such determination, award a Seal. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee of satisfac- 
tion." The certification process is different from the 
review process. You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whether the product is right for your 
needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



20 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



The Amazing A-BC/S \dg 




An A- BUS system with two Motherboards 
A- BUS adapter In foreground 

The A-BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 

Abo ut the A- B U S syste m : 

• All the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC, uselNPand OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PO-123) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 

Relay Card RE-140:$129 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LED's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable. 

Reed Relay Card re-i56:$99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel sfilector. solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card ad-142: $129 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 1 00V by adding a 
resistor. 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-146: $139 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025%. Input range is -4V to 
+4V. Resolution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion timeis130ms. Ideal for thermocouple, 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-1 56 card). 

Digital Input Card in-i41:$59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-i48.$65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255 A chip. 

Clock with Alarm ci_-i44-. $89 

Powerful clock/calendar with: battery backup for Time. Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built in alarm relay, led and buzzer: timing to 1 /1 00 
second. Easy to use decimal format. Lithium battery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph-145: $79 

Each tone is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 

A-BUS Prototyping Card PR-152:$15 

3Vfe by 4Vfe in. with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I.C.s 




Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 



Smart Stepper Controller sc-149 $299 

Wortd's finest stepper controller On board microorocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously. Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 10.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half. full. wave), 
scale factor, units, holding power, etc. Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
boarddrivers (350mA) for small steppers(MO-103). Sendfor SC-1 49 flyer, 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-1 22: $1 9 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board. 

Stepper Motor Driver st-143: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with them. Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V. bidirectional. 4 phase. 350mA per phase). 
Special Package: 2 motors (MO-103) +ST-1 43 PA-1 81 : $99 

Stepper Motors MO-103: $i5or4for$39 

Pancake type. 2%" dia. W shaft. 7 57step. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec, 12V, 36 ohm, bipolar. 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701 -P2. 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter. 4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer. Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT, AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot AR-1 33 $69 

Tandy 1000, 1000 EX&SX, 1200, 3000. Uses one short slot. AR-1 33 ..$69 

Apple II, II +. He. Uses any slot AR-134 .. $49 

TRS-80 Model 102, 200 Plugs into 40 pin "system bus" AR-136...$69 

Model 1 00. Uses40 pin socket (Socket is duplicated on adapter) AR- 1 35,..$69 

TRS-80 Mod 3,4,4 D. Fits 50 pin bus (With hard disk, use Y-cable) AR-1 32 . $49 

TRS-80 Model4P Includesextra cable. (50 pin bus is recessed). AR-137...S62 

TRS-80 Model I Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or E/l. AR-1 31 . $39 

Color Computers (Tandyi.Fns ROM slot. Muitmak or Y-cabie AR-1 38. ..$49 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft, so cond.) ca-163: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard. 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i2o.$99 

Each Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 
161: $12). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 




Cl-144 





IN- HI 



AD-142 



Add S3.00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC. checks, M O. welcome. 
CT & NY residents add sales tax. 
COD add S3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is $5 
Overseas add 1 0% 



ALPHA mrmSwott. 



a Sigma Industries Company 



242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



Technical info: (203) 656-1 806 

eSM" 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



CoCo Max III 



COMPARISON 



VS. 



Colormax 



by Colorware 



by Computize 



This chart was established to answer the many questions asked about the differences between the two programs. 
All facts mentioned in this chart have been verified by both companies. 



Features 



CoCo Max III 



Colormax 





— ▼ 


▼ 


Size of the picture: 320 by 384 


192 


iMurnDer ot urdwing looio 


Oft 
CO 


18 


basic 1 oois vrencii, brusn, opray, etc.; 


yes 


Yes 


Shrink and Stretch 


Yes 


No 


Dn+o+o 

hotate 


yes 


No 


ui<iK Mernory support 


Van 

Yes 


None 


unao teature always avanaDie 


Yes 


No 


All tools work in zoom mode 


Von 

Yes 


No 


Animation Feature 


Vno 

Yes 


No 


uoior oequencmg 


Yes 


None 


Ohoino rvf n i o for I0+ + or n +0 \yf 

onoice 01 size ior letters, text 


T CO 


No 


nice mciuaes ni-nes JoysticK intenace 


Von 

Yes 


No 


Free CoCo Show: programmable "Slide Show" 


Von 

Yes 


No 


Automatic pattern alignment 


Yes 


No 


nint in smgie ana aouuie size 


Yes 


No 


omart Lasso imove text over DacKgrouno...) 


Vac 

Yes 


No 


Aovanceo toois. Arc, nay, uuoes, etc. 


Yes 


None 


Number of fonts 


. 13 


11 


Extra Fonts available 


90+ 


? 


Supports more than one printer 


Yes 


No 


Undo/Redo (to see before and after changes) 


Yes 


K 1 — 

No 


64 Colors shown when setting palette 


Yes 


Ma 

IN0 


Free CoCo Max II Picture converter 


: Yes 


No 


Free Max Font Conversion 


Yes 


No 


Extensive Pompting 


Yes 


No 


"Glyphic" Clipbook or "Rubber Stamps" 


Yes 


N/A 


Number of paint brush shapes 


40 


16 


Two Color and 3-D lettering 


Yes 


No 


"Double Click" shortcuts 


Yes 


None 


Color mixing (additive/subtractive/none) 


Yes 


No 


Printing colors in shades of gray 


Yes 


No 


Tech Line and Toll free order line 


Yes 


No 


Money back guarantee 


Yes 


No 


File Edit options Colors Font Size Style \ 


r 



Comments 



: :[bd]B 
JKEJH 




more Patuer 
lUura bub 



and twice lis pic lure size I 



CoCo Max III picture is twice as large (2 screens high). 



Irreplaceable when fitting elements of a picture. 

A basic tool that can't be "faked". 

CoCo Max III has fonts plus 4 Clipboards in memory. 

No "Undo" in text, editing and zoom mode. 

The "pencil" is the only tool that works in Zoom mode. 

Only fixed picture. 

Amazing special effects are not possible. 
Font size is fixed. 

Must buy the Radio Shack joystick interface ($10). 

Working with patterns is tedious without this feature. 
Only one size printout. 

Arcs cannot be simulated with other "tools". 

No fonts were available as of this report. 
You must buy one version for each printer. 
The Colormax Undo is not reversible. 
Colors are shown 16 at a time. 
$29.95 option. 
A different $29.95 option. 



However you can edit your own. 

Must always pull menu down. 
Only "paint over" mode available. 
Only full black and white. No "halftone" 



rile Edit Goodies rout Style 




COLOR MAX 3 CO 

DV MILL1LUK TECHNOLOGIES 

DISTRIBUTED BY COHPUTIZE. IHC- 



Conclusion: Colormax is not a serious contender for the real CoCo Max III by Colorware. 
Colorware's money back guarantee speaks for itself. 





in- ,n ^o ve 



"77ie best program ever written for the Color Computer" 



That's how thousands of enthusiastic users rated 
theCoCo Max II drawing program. With CoCo Max 
III we are ready to amaze them again. Instead of 
"patching" CoCo Max II, we rewrote it from scratch 
to take advantage of the CoCo Max III hardware. 
The results will knock your socks off ! Below is a 
brief list of some of the new features, but some, 
such as animation, color sequencing, or the slide 
show, have to be seen. Send forthe Demo Disk, and 
see for yourself. 

Everybody's favorite drawing package features: 

- A 50% larger editing window. - Zoom area 400% 
larger. - New drawing tools: rays, 3D cubes, arcs,... - 
New editing tools: shadow, text size,... - Rotate by 1.5° 
steps - Select any 16 of the 64 possible colors (all 64 
colors displayed at once!) - Powerful color mix: additive, 
subtractive, overlay,... - Full color editing of patterns 
and color changing patterns. - Incredible special eff- 
ects with color cycling up to 8 colors with variable 
speed. -Animation adds the dimension of motion to 
your image. (Must be seen.) - Sophisticated data com- 
pression saves up to 70% of disk space when saving 
pictures. 

In addition, there are dozens of enhancements to the 
multitude of features that made CoCo Max II a bestseller. 

More about CoCo Max 111 

• CoCo Max III is not an upgrade of CoCo Max II. It is entirely 
rewritten to take advantage of the new CoCo 3 hardware 
(More memory, resolution, colors, speed,...) 

• The new CoCo Max III Hi-Res Interface and the CoCo Max II 
Hi-Res Pack are not interchangable. 

• The new interface plugs into the joystick connector. 

• The CoCo Max III disk is not copy protected. 

• CoCo Max III only works with the CoCo 3. 

• A V-Cable or Multi-pak is not necessary. 

• Colors are printed in five shades of gray. 

• CoCo Max III can read CoCo Max II pictures. 



Note: CoCo Max II (forthe CoCo 2) is still available on disk 
($79.95). CoCo Max I is still available on tape ($69.95). For 
details, refer to our double page ad in any Rainbow from 
January '86 to July '87 



Toll Free operators are for orders only. If you need precise answers, call 
the tech line. (Detained CoCo Max specs are included with the Demo Disk.) 



Arid S3. 00 per ardor for shipping. 
Visa. MC. checks. M.O. welcome. 
CT residents add sales tax. 
C.0.0. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping Is $5 
Overseas add 10% 



Technical info: (203)656-1806 

&°c n T ly 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
Ail lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




Imagine this picture in sixteen colors ! 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Umm CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with It, 
we will refund every penny. 



System Requirements: 

Any CoCo 3 disk system with a Joystick or a Mouse. 

We apologize to tape users, CoCo Max III needs the flexibility of a disk. 

The CoCo Max III system includes: • The special Hi-Res 
interface (foryour mouse or joystick) • TheCoCo Max 111 disk • Many 
utilities: (To convert Max ii pictures, Max colors, etc.) • Adetailled User's 

Manual. Complete system; nothing else to buy. CoCo Max III : $79.95* 



WITH COUPON ONLY 




FREE DEMO DISK 

Name 
Street 
City 
State Zip 

Printer used: 

Please include $2 to helpdefray Processing and Shipping 
costs, f Check, Money Order, etc. Sorry, no COD or Credit 
Cards). Coupon (or copy) must be mailled to: 



3f Beware of inferior imitations that DO NOT include a Hi-Res Interface 
or charao extra loreach utility. 



[COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc. 



COLORWARE 

242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 



F t oo odl« « font igfa 
pot LrveL a 





■ i aa 

■■■■ ■ a aa aa 

■ ■■ aaaaa 
■■■ ■ ■ 
■■■■■a aaaaaaa a aaa ■ 
aaaaaaaaaaft aaaaaaa ■ ■ 
■■■■aaaaaaaaaaBaaaiaBai ■ 
■■■aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaira aa a 
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbibbbb aa 



IH!B.Ulrfffl:HfHM: 



ex it etfra 





Hone 


irlALL 


laia » -r t a 


Dontf A 


StOi»* 






.tOD 


tr Mdrno 


- • *t •■ -* 


Systen 


t • r tdu a> 




Truffle 

V«BtV 


Cast 






Colo<t*«l 
:<> 11 in i 


Pir.eccht 




















Parti .. 




□ atoo 






fuubold 








US fflUl 


72 Fonts in Alt 













cold* rnL>: ) (C> 




Hll Pi ghts Rr?*r»ed 




Coaaurn e<a t i on Mode 




Vi •?** the bu r f er 


3. 


3^«.»«? the bu r f er 




Load the burrer 


S. 


Di5k directory 




Set the paraaeteri: 




Cle*r buffer 


8. 


Jtump Wurrer to printer 




Set Jqre#n node 




flco«j s to hi? 1 1* r i 1 e 




Exit to BASIC 



"fun things to do" - with a 

DEAD 
DISK! 

COPYRIGHT 19a? BY EMC UmiTf. MIL RIGHTS RLSFftUfB 




The Best . . . 

"CoCo Product of the Year" 

COLOR MAX 3© 

Unleash the power of your CoCo 3 with 320 x 200 screen resolution, and 
the choice of any 16 colors from the CoCo 3's 64 color palette, and your 
graphic creations almost can't help but come alive with color and detail. 
Icons, pull down menus, and dialog boxes make COLOR MAX 3 very easy 
to use. 11 fonts are supplied, making hundreds of lettering styles possi- 
ble. Text can use any combinations of color, shadow, outline, bold, and 
italics. Painting Is a snap with 16 colors and 32 editable patterns. COLOR 
MAX 3 requires a 128K CoCo 3 with disk drive, High-Resolution Joystick 
interface, and a joystick device (mouse, touch pad, or joystick). Print 
drivers supplied for most popular printers. CGP 220 driver provides 
beautiful 16 color print-outs. 

Cat.#205MD $59.95 



Standard HI Res Joystick Interface 

(Radio Shack H 26-5028) 

Cat. H 221 CH $12.00 

Color Max 3 Font Editor 

Create/ Modify fonts for use with Color 
Max 3. Create Keyboard driven Icons. 
Customize existing fonts. Works in a 
"Fat Bits" type mode. Variable Height 
& Width. Let your imagination "go to 
work"! 

Cat. H 224MD $29.95 

CM3 Basic Tool & Gallery 

Load & Save "MGE" pictures for 
display outside of Color Max 3. Incor- 
porate Into basic programs. Gallery 
lists all MGE files-just Point & Display! 
Cat. # 225MD $19.95 

Color Max 3 FONTS© 

36 Fonts In two sizes 
72 fonts in all! 

Cat. tf 223CD $19.95 



Picture Converter 1 

6 Picture Format Converters: 

• CoCo Max B&W to "MGE" 

• CoCo Max artifact to "MGE" 

• 6K B&W binary file to "MGE" 

• 6K artifact binary to "MGE" 

• Graphlcom B&W to "MGE" 

• Graphlcom artifact to "MGE" 
(MGE is Color Max 3 Pix format) 

Cat. # 220MD $29.95 

Picture Converter 2© 

Converts ATARITM Low Res 320x200 
picture files to "MGE" format used by 
Color Max 3. Works with ATARI pic- 
tures with file extensions .ST, .NEO, 
and TNY. 

NOTE: This utility is designed to allow the 
user to retrieve picture flies from Bulletin 
Boards and Information Services. Files must 
be "Un-Arced". 

Most databases have UN ARC" utilities 
available. 

Cat. # 222MD $29.95 



INTRODUCING. 



COLOR TALK 3© 



IS 



The Complete Terminal/Communications Program you've been waiting for! 

Ideal for accessing Compuserve, Delphi and other Information Services. 
Send your Color Max 3 "MGE" pictures to friends and fellow COCO 
users. THIS IS THE ONLY COMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM AVAILABLE 
FOR YOUR COCO WITH ALL OF THIS POWER! Compare COLOR TALK 3 
with programs for the "PC" market costing 4 to 5 times as much. I'm sure 
you'll agree that COLOR TALK 3 represents real value for your COCO 
Dollars! 

Just look at this partial list of Impressive Features: 

•Supports COCO 3 as well as COCO 1 & 2. •Screen Display options: 
COCO 3: 80x24, 40x24, 32x16 . . . Standard COCO: 32x60, 32x24, 51x24, 
64x24, 85x24. •Supports PBJ Wordpack & Double 80 + . -XMODEM & 
YMODEM. -Upload & Download. »Save to buffer or direct to disk. •Full 
ASCII XON/XOFF support. •ASCII filtering. •ASCII buffering. 
•Customizer-set and store frequently used options/parameters. • 10-64 
character user programmable macros. •Conference/Chat mode. 
•Selectable Baud rates of 110, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 (Radio 
Shack RS232 Ram required for baud rates above 2400). • Parity: Odd, 
Even, Mark, Space, None. • VT-52 Terminal Emulation. •Duplex: Half, Full, 
Echo. •Set Begin Block/ End Block for selected save and print functions 
• Browse/ View through buffer. - Define margins, word-wrap, and justifica- 
tion for print-outs. •Complete support of the COCO'S serial port and the 
RS232 Pack. •Optional prompted ASCII upload •Customize Colors to suit 
your display. Much, Much More! 

Cat. 255MD Disk only Introductory price . . . Just $49.95 



mm 




Just Got Better! 

announcing. , . COLOR MAX DELUXE© 

In addition to the features and quality incorporated in the original Color 
Max 3, take a look at this partial list of impressive enhancements includ- 
ed in the new COLOR MAX DELUXE: 

EDIT MULTIPLE SCREENS - SIMUTANEOUSLY! 
STRETCH & SHRINK - AMY PROPORTION! 
ANIMATION - VARIABLE SPEED! 
ROTATE - ANY DEGREE! 
TILT! 

SHADOW! * " \ ~~\tf 

STAMP! Y MfcVM - . 1 

RAYS Si ARCS! ilVC* 
MORE FONTS! ^ r%Cl UA^" 

MORE STYLES! f XYC^* 

MORE SPEED! 
MORE POWER! 

ALL PRINT DRIVERS INCLUDED! 
COLOR CYCLING - UP TO 16 COLORS) 

COLOR MAX 3 AND DELUXE utilize the STANDARD "MGE" format for 
picture exchange. In addition, COLOR MAX uses the STANDARD RADIO 
SHACK Hi-Res Interface ■ BEWARE OF LESSER QUALITY PROGRAMS 
EMPLOYING NONSTANDARD INTERFACES AS A FORM OF HARD- 
WARE PROTECTION. 

COLOR MAX DELUXE REQUIRES 512K RAM which provides for 

SUPERIOR SPEED & POWER! 

Available for shipment AFTER October 1, 1987 

Cat- tt 260MO Introductory Price . B , $69.95 

Upgrade for Registered Owners Only . . . 

Cat, #261CC (Send Original Disk) f , , $15.00 

MOUSE PADS $10.99 EA BLIP ART BORDER PICTURE DISK 

Super High Quality Mouse Pads 20 border picture fifes for use with 

with Felt Finish. p-v Graphicom II, CoCo Max, Hardcopy, 

10V* x 8 y? IT Specify Color .... Colorscan, or any program that can 

Cat. # 210CH Red ^ Xs* S H=* load sland ard 6K binary files. Helps 

Cat. tf 211CH Bfue\r^^^^^^ create decorative signs, post cards, 

Cat. # 212CH Silver 51^|^V sale P osters - etc - < Ma V alB0 be used 

■V; with "Color Max 3" or "Color Max 

/ ^^Cfck Deluxe" when used with 4 'Picture Con- 

/ ^l^m verier 1 • (CaL 220MD)" 

/ Cat * 227WD ■ - ■ 519 95 

Print In Color! With COLORSCAN, easy to use software for the CGP-220 and 
your 64K CoCo (I, II, III). This program is a must for anyone who owns a Radio 
Shack Ink Jet Printer, and enjoys creating graphics with Graphicom, Graphicom 
Part II, CoCo MAX, or any other program that produces a standard 6K binary pic- 
ture fifes. 

COLORSCAN will print program listings in blazing color, Help create colorful 
banners over four feet in length, produce 1x1/2x2 or poster printout of your 
favorite 6K graphic disk files. 

Order Catalog** 184WD, See RAINBOW REVIEW (1/87 page 136) 129.95 

HARDCOPY is more that just a screen print utility, compare these features with 
any other graphic dump program on the market: Gray Scale or B&W prinlouls, 
1x1, 2x2. 3x3, Lables, posters, and greating cards with your graphics and much' 
much more! HARDCOPY requires a 64K CoCo or III) and disk drive. Please 
specify printer and catalog k when ordering. 

IDS 480/560-G, Gtt 170WD * OKI 82A (Okigraph), Gtt 178 WD ' OK I DATA 92, Ctf 171 WD * 
GEMINI 10X, Ctf 174WD • GEMINI SG 10/15, CM 178WD • DMP-105, Cfl 183WD • DMPH0, CH 
IflOWD • DMP-120, C# 176WD * DMP-130, Ctf 182WO * DMP 2Q0, Ctf 175WD • CGP-22Q, C# 
181WO * EPSON LX80, CH 173WD • EPSON MX-80, C# 172WD • EPSON RX7FX 80, Of 
173WD « RITEMAN PLUS, CH 177WD 

HARDCOPY DISK See RAINBOW REVIEW (10/85) on page 218) $29 95 






color m 



(215) 946 7260 P.O. BOX 207 • LANGHORNE, PA 19047 

Check of M O. * Add S3.00 shipping * PA residents add 6% sales lax 



ALL RICHT1 HIM 



Printer Utility 





, Disk Jacket Designer 
fcr the Well Dressed Diskette 



Cy €ay Crawford 




Sooner or later, it happens to all of 
us. One day we notice that we 
don't have enough jackets for all 
our disks, or we buy those bargain disks 
only to find that they didn't come with 
any jackets. Here is the solution to the 
problem. By using Jacket and a Gemini 
I0X printer, you can print your own 
disk jackets, either plain or with your 
own custom design right on the front. 

This unique program is not only 
useful, but informative as well. It dem- 
onstrates that a printer can be used for 
more than letters and listings, and it 
shows how simple it is to make things 
with a dot matrix printer. 

Running the Program 

All you need to do is load Jacket and 
change the baud rate in Line 30 to 
match your printer. Then run. Press Y 
(Yes) or N (No) when asked if you want 
a picture on the front. If you answer yes, 



Gay Crawford is the president of the 
Kansas City Color Computer Users 
Group. She lives in O lathe, Kansas, 
with her husband, Tom, and divides her 
time between caring for two daughters, 
reviewing products for THE RAINBOW 
and raising venus fly traps. 



then enter the picture's name and watch 
the printer go to work. 

Remove the newly printed disk 
jacket, cut along the solid lines, fold 
along the dotted lines and tape or glue 
the ends together. It's that easy. 

How Jacket Works 

Lines 10 through 20 set up the array, 
storing the code for the seven top pins 
on the print head. Only seven are used 
with dot-matrix graphics. 

Line 30 sets the baud rate and Line 
40 initializes the printer. Line 50 sets the 
line feed for 7/72 and Line 60 sets the 
left-hand margin in five spaces, which 
allows the jacket to be printed closer to 
the center of the page. 

Lines 70 through 130 allow for a 
picture to be loaded to the screen and 
then dumped to the front of the jacket. 
Line 150jumps to a subroutine that tells 
the printer how many dots to print 
across the page. This information must 
be sent after each carriage return. 

Lines 160 through 280 send the codes 
to the printer, telling it which pins to 
"fire" and print the top edge of the 
jacket. For example, sending a 
CHR$(64) will fire the top pin, and 
doing this several times in a row will 
make a line across the page. 



' 1 ' ■■ A 






26 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Software Bonanza Pak 

A SPECTACULAR SOFTWARE BONANZA with the following 
12 pr ograms : CoCo Checker, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo 
Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, Spectrum Font 
Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, Fastdupe II, 64K 
Disk Utility, Spectrum DOS, Basics, CoCo Calender 
& 0S9-Solution (a $300 plus value) for only $99.95 



CoCo III Software Library 

Create an instant library of Spectrum Projects TOP 
CoCo III software! Get FOtTT BONANZA, FONT DISK #1, 
FKEYS III, C III GRAPHICS, CoCoIII UTILITIES and 
FASTDUPE £1 (a $150 plus value) for only $49.95 



CoCo III Utilities 

Terrific utility programs for the Color Computer 
III! Includes a CoCo II to CoCoIII Converter, 32K 
Hi-Res screen saver, 40/80 Column Word Processor, 
RAM tester, DEMO BALL generator, SMOOTH Scrolling 
demos. 128K DISK $24.95 (see 8/87 Rainbow review) 



CoCo III Secrets Revealed 

An introduction to the Color Computer III that 
compares the differences between the CoCol/lI and 
the NEW CoCoIII. Includes: GIME chip specs, CoCoII 
to CoCoIII converter and a 128/512K RAM test. 
"Offers some very g_oqd information to pro- 
grammers." _ Rainbow review 2/87 $19.95 



CoCo III Screen Dump 

This is the program for HARDCOPY GRAPHICS for 
Radio Shack bi t-image, dot-ma trLx printers (DMP- 
105 , DMP-130 , etc.) and Epson compatibles (Star 
Micronics, Panasonic, etc.). Will print H SCREEN 1^ 
4 and PMODE 0-4. 16 patterns can be CUSTOMIZED for 
any color on~tKe screen! 128K CoCoIII DISK $24.95 



Fkeys III 

A productivity enhancement that gives you the 
capability to add twenty (20) predefined functions 
to the CoCoIII by using the CTRL , Fl and F2 keys ! ! 
$24.95 "Get more from your keyboard with FKEYS 
III" - Rainbow review 4/87 



C III Graphics 

A drawing program for the CoCoIII using the new 
ENHANCED graphic features: 320X192 graphics, 16 of 
any 64 colors, plus the ability to SAVE and LOAD 
32K screens . "Paint pretty pictures on the CoCo3 . " 
- Rainbow review 12/96 $19.95 



Tolopatch III 

All the FEATURES of TELEPATCH plus the classically 
proportioned characters of the WIZARD with TRUE 
lowercase! Now CoCoIII compatible! (Upgrade $15 
w/prcof of purchase) $29.95 



Tape/Disk Utility 

A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and 
disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic copy 
of an entire disk of programs to tape. Ideal for 
Rainbow On Tape to disk. Also copies tape to tape 
& prints tape & disk directories. TAPE/ DISK $24.95 



Multi-Pak Crak 

Save ROMPAKS on your 64K Disk System using the RS 
Multi-Pak Interface. Eliminate constant plugging 
in of ROMPAKS by keeping all PAK software on disk. 
Includes POKES for " PROBLEM " ROMPAKS & the NEW 16K 
PAKS (Demon Attack, Dragons Lair..) $29.95 NOW 
CoCo3 compatible! Upgrade $15 w/proof of purchase 



Disk Utility 2.1 A 

A mu lti - featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk 
handling. Utilize a directory window to 
selectively sort, move, rename & kiTl "f ile 
entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy 
& backup. Single execution of both Basic & ML 
programs. 64~K DISK $29.95. NOW al so CoCoIII 
compatible! Upgrade only $15 w/prcof of purchase 



Spectrum DOS 

Add 24 NEW Disk commands with 2 Hi-Res screens! 
Supports 40 track & Doubl e-sided drives, 6ms 
stepping, auto disk search - , error trapping and 
"EPROMABLE"7~6~4K DISK $49.95 New LOW price! $29.95 



Mikey Dial 

When used with any H ayes compatible modem and 
Deluxe Program Pak , adds to Mikeyterm 4.0 the 
ability to Autodial 22 numbers fran a menu and 
load a set of 3 M ACROS for each directory choice. 
Also EASY redial & changing of MODEM settings by 
command menu. $19.95 (see 12/86 Rainbow review) 



Spectrum Font Generator 

Write files using any CoCo Word Processor- (TW-64, 
EliteWord, etc.) and convert them to Highly 
Detailed character sets ! Some of the character 
sets supported are Italics, Old English, 
Futuristic & Block ! Character set editor included 
& supports most dot-matrix printers! $29.95 



Schematic Drafting Processor 

Save time and design pro looking diagrams using a 
480x540 pixel worksheet w/6 viewing windows . Over 
30 electronic symbols w/ TO definable symbols . 
(Even L ogic gates & Multipin chips!) Print hard 
copy & save to disk. 64X DISK $29.95 



OS-9 Solution 

NOW, a program that creates a " USER FRIENDLY " 
environment within OS-9. The OS-9 SOLUTION 
replaces 20 of the old " USER HOSTILE " oomnands 
with single keystroke ^ menu driven. canTiands. No 
more typing in ccmplex long pathnames or remember- 
ing complicated syntaxes! $29.95 



CoCo Checker 



Something possibly wrong with your CoCo ? CoCo 
Checker is the answer ! Will test your ROMs, RAMs, 
Disk Drives & Controller, Printer, Keyboard, 
Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, PIAs, VDG, Internal 
Clock Speed, Multi-pak Interface and more! $24.95 



Rickeyterm 2.0 



Supports 40/80 column mode, ASCII or XMODEM 
uploads & downloads. Deluxe RS232 PAK or Serial 
' BITBANGER ' port, 30071200 "Baud! Plus 1 STRINGS' 
(predefined sequences of text) can be read into 
the BUFFER from DISK & transmitted by NAME! Type 
ahead & auto-repeat are also supported. 128K 
CoCoIII DISK $39.95 (see 9/87 Rainbow review) 



64K Disk Utility Package 

Take advantage of an expanded 64K machine. Make an 
additional 8K of RAM available^by relocating the 
Ext Basic ROM from "$8000 to $D800. Copy ROMPAKs to 
disk (even '' protected " PAKs) and create a 32K 
SPOOL buffer for printing, $24.95 



EZ Base 



A truly friendly data base program at an afford - 
able price! Keep inventories, hobby collections, 
recipes, card lists and much more! Hi-Res screen, 
up to 500 records with 15 fields , record or field 
search & a MAILING LABELS option. 32K DISK $29.95 



Blackjack Royale 



A Hi- Res graphics casino blackjack simulation and 
card counting tutor . Fully realistic play 
includes: STouble c!cwn, splits, surrender, insur- 
ance, 1-8 decks, burnt cards, shuffle frequency 
amd more! "This fine program is a must for the 
CoCo Blackjack player . hl - Rainbow review $24.95 



Spectrum Adventure Generator 

The Spectrum Adventure Generator creates adventure 
games that are 100% ML & very fast ! Up to 21 
rooms , 255 objects , 70 command words & 255 
conditional flags can~be used. 64K DISK $29.95 



CoCo Calendar 



Get organized for 365 dayg today with the CoCo 
Calendar ! Designed for recording the entire year's 
occasions and daily appointments so you can plan 
ahead* You can store HUNDREDS of entries and o r 
GRAPHIC calendar will show all MEMOS! $19.95 



THE KITCHEN SINK ... 

Everything but the KITCHEN SINK ! M Receive all 
twenty-three (23) Colorlullfti 1 i ties from top to 
bottom, the Software Bmanza Pak to " CoCo Calendar 
(a $500 plus value) for a SPECIAL price $149.9511! 





Line 300 jumps to a subroutine to 
print side flaps if no picture is to be 
printed. Lines 320 through 680 jump to 
the subroutine for the side flaps and do 
a screen dump on the front. 

Lines 700 through 810 print the 
bottom fold. Lines 830 through 1010 
print the back of the jacket. 

Line 1020 sends a form-feed code to 
the printer. Line 1 040 tells the printer to 
print 426 dots across and Line 1050 tells 
the printer to print 379 dots across. 

Lines 1070 through 1160 are a sub- 
routine that prints the side flaps for the 
front of the jacket. This is used for both 
a plain jacket as well as one with a 
picture on it. 

Line 1 170 contains the data for the 
individual print pins — 64 for the top 
pin and one for the bottom. 

Since this is a BASIC program, it is 
rather slow. However, it would be easy 
to convert the program to work on 
other printers. After printing your 
customized jacket, you may want to 
make photocopies of the page. This will 
save wear and tear on your printer. 

(Questions about this program may 
be addressed to the author at 1001 
Fredrickson, Olathe, KS 66061. Please 
enclose an SASE for a reply.) □ 

28 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Editor's Note: Two sample picture files, LDNNIE .BIN 
and TUXEDO .BIN will be included on this month's 
RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. Since this 
program requires disk, however, the pictures will be 
saved on RAINBOW ON TAPE with Disk BASIC ad- 
dresses. To transfer each file to disk, just CLOfiDM the 
file and type SfiVEM" filename" , & H 0 E 0 0 t 
&H25FF,&HR027 



\/ 20C 



200 
380 
640 



.105 810 207 

. .86 1000 105 

. .53 END 51 



The listing: JfiCKET 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



•disk jacket designer 
'copyright (c) 1986 
'GAY CRAWFORD 
■10)31 FREDRICKSON 
'OLATHE, KS 66061 



Kg* SHOPPING LIST *%2j 



COCO CABLES AND ... 

Printer / Modem 10" Extender Cable $14.95 

TANDY CM-8 RGB Analog 6 'Video Ext Cable ....$19.95 

Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pin) $19.95 

Cassette 'Y' Cable - Connect a 26-3028 Hi -Res Joy- 
stick interface & Tape Recorder to CoCoIII .$19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

Joystick / Mouse 10 1 Ext Cable $19.95 

No more Deluxe RS-232 paks left to hook up ptr & 
raxlein ? Buy our RS-232 "Y" Cable (4 pin) ....$24.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) $24.95 

MAGNAVOX 8505/8515/8CM643 Analog RGB cable .$24.95 
Other Analog RGB monitor cable ( Specify ! > ..$39.95 
15" Mul ti-Pak/Disk Pak Extender - Move your Multi- 
Disk Paks further away ^$24^35: Closeout .... $29.95 
40 Pin Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk with a 

Voice Pak, Word Pak, CoCo Max, etc $29.95 

CoCo RS232 Switcher - Now easil y switch between a 
printer & modem at the flick of a switch! ..$29.95 

OTHER GOOD STUFF ... 

5 1/4 " Diskettes in any quantity 49 cents 

C-10 tapes ~ Minimum quantity (20 pes) ...69 cents 
CoCoII/CoCoIII KEYCAPS - Replace worn keys! .$4.99 

Rompak w/Blank PC Board 27xx series $9.95 

"D" Rev motherboard w/o socketed chips $16.95 

Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV interfer- 
ence created by CoCo! $19.95 

CoCo Util II - Transfer CoCo files to your MS-DOS 

machine ( Tandy 1000 & IBM PC! ) $39.95 

CoCo III keyboard - upgrade your CoCo II keyboard! 
" Package " deal w/ FKEYS III($24.95) software $39.95 

HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM (SAVE$20) $79.95 

MAGNAVOX TV tuner - Now you can watch TV with your 

M agnavox 8505/8515 RGB Analog monitor ! $99.95 

Super Controller - Up to 4 DOSs by a POKE ..$99.95 
1200 Baud Mod em ( Hayes compatible) Auto-dial/answer 
$139.95. Req's Modem cable ( 4pin or DB25 ) ..$19.95 
PBH-64 - A combo Parallel Printer interface & 64K 

..$149.95 
,.$219.95 



Print Buffer! COMPUTE while you PRINT! .. 
MAGNAVOX 8505 RGB Analog monitor $299.95 
SONY KV-1311 RGB Analog monitor/ TV w /cable $499.95 



Breaking your back 
typing on your 
CoCo??? 





Sit back and relax with 
a Spectrtm keyboard 
extender cable? $39.96 
See 11/87 Rainbow review 



Now you can extend your present keyboard away from 
your CoCoII / CoCoIII ! Easier typing & requires no 
soldering! You also have the option to leave your 
present keyboard intact & hook up a second keybd 
for remote operation 1 Spectrum Keyboard extender 

cable w/EXTKRNAL CoCoII keyboar d $49.95 

Design by Marty Goodman, so you know it's quality! 



SUPER CHIP -SALE- ... 

» 2764 EPROM $4.95 27128 EPROM $6.95 

6821 Standard PIA *SS*&ZZ Closeout price! $6.95 

Basic ROM 1.1 Chip ^t^S: Closeout price! . . .$9.95 

6847 VDG Chip :$£»?3S: Closeout price! $12.95 

6809E CPU ChipT$^9^5: Closeout price! $12.95 

-CoCo III Multipak - "NEW" PAL chip (For Gray and 

White 26-3024 models ONLY) $19.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) $19.95 

►Disk ROM 1.1 - (Needed for C oCoIII ) $29.95 

Original SAM Chip (6883) $29.95 

- Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - Closeout price! $29.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two PIA's, 6809E CPU 
and SAM Chips (BE PREPARE!) Closeout price! $49.95 

- EPROM Frograimter - uses 2716s up to 27512 s I Super 
fast programming! - See April f 86 review .$149.95 
New! " Upgraded " CoCoIII 'GIME' chip .WRITE 

COCO LIBRARY ... 

► A History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 $6.95 

CoCo Manory Map Reg. 5*&*a5r Now only $9.95 

New! 200 MORE Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 

Basic Programming Tricks Revealed .... $9.95 

* 500 Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $16.95 

300 CoCoIII POKES - #1 CoCoIII bestseller! .$19.95 

Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S9 Level II $19.95 

A Guide to CoCo III GRAPHICS (7/87 review) .$21.95 

► Better Graphics on CoCo3 (8/87 review pgl43)$24.95 

CoCo IT Service Manual (Specify Cat.#) $29.95 

CoCo III Unraveled - A best seller! ! ! $29.95 

Inside 0S-9 Level II $39.95 

- CoCo III Service Manual - Current version! .$39.95 
Color/Extended/Disk Basic Unraveled $49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF ... 

WICO Adapter- Hookup 2 Atari type joysticks. $19. 95 
" CoCo Keybd - Low profile, fits all CoCo lis & "F"s 
WAS $39.95 - NOW $19.95. D/E CoCo I adapter $12.95 
WICO Trackball - Regularly $69.95 , Now only. $24. 95 
-OS -9 Level II Solution - A front-end " USER 

FRIENDLY " interface for LEVEL II $29.95 

All monitors & CoCos .$29.95 



Universal Video Drvr- 



(2) Chip 64K Upgrade - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II .$29.95 

28 piii act Basic - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II $34.95 

PAL SWITCHER - Reg. 26-3024 MPI. Switch from CoCoII 

to CoCoIII mode $29.95 w/NEW PAL $39.95 

Real Time Clock - Compatible w/ OS-9 or RSDQS , easy 
internal mounting, CoCoII / lII compatible! ..$59.95 
Top FD-501 Drive 1 (#26-3133) - SAVE $60 ..$139.95 
2400 Baud Modem -(Great for Delphi )]£23£r35r $229.95 
CoCo III DISK DRIVE 0 - ( Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150 plus value! ! ! ) . . .$239.95 
512K COLOR COMPUTER III ( Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150+ value! ) ^2^t^Z .$249.95 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 
PO BOX SG4 
HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
See our other 2 ads on pages 17 & 27!!! 



10 DIM A(7) 

20 FORL-1 TO 7: READ A(L) :NEXTL 
30 POKE15j3,18' BAUD RATE 2400 
40 PRINT#-2, CHR$(27) ; " @ " ; CHR$ ( 2 7 
) : 11 1" : 

50 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;"1"; 

60 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (27) ?CHR$(77) ; CH 

R$(5) ? 

70 CLS : PRINT" DO YOU WANT TO PRIN 

T A PICTURE ON THE SLEEVE? 11 

80 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=«" , THEN8p 

90 IFI$="N"THEN14p 

100 IFI$o"Y"THEN8j3 

110 CLS : LINEINPUT*'ENTER NAME OF 

PICTURE TO PRINT " ; P$ 

120 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 

120 LOADMP$ 

140 'begin 

150 GOSUBlj34j3 

160 PRINT#-2,CHR$(j3) ;CHR$(1) ; 

17 0 PRINT #-2 , CHR$ ( 2 ) ? CHR$ ( 4 ) ; CHR 

$(4) ; 

180 F0RL=1T013:PRINT#-2,CHR$ (8) ; 
: NEXTL 

190 F0RL=1T013 :PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (16) 
; : NEXTL 

2 00 FORL= 1TO 1 3 : PRINT # - 2 , CHR$ (32) 
; : NEXTL 

210 PRINT#-2,CHR$(113) ; 




BTEJ Analysis 



ANALYZES WAT LOSS L GAIN 

<v«> ou_i 3 1 « : i u proper 

HEATIN6 AM) COOLING UNIT 

sue. 

or i s i nall v dev*ujped fur 
professional use. 

0X9100*8 -WORSE CAGE" 
0RB26N («TH00OLO6Y. 



COOLING SPECIFIED IN 
BTU'a OR TONS 
CJW*i>*>ttjIV£ ANALYSIS 
ELVERS TTX Of U.S.A. 
USE ON ROOT) ASD I T IONS 
OR WHOLE KWSE 
INSTRUCTIONS IW3-UDED 
IN 6CFTWAR£ 
HARDCOPY OPTIC** 

BE USE ON HOST 
WVAC SYSTEM Otel&NS 
EASY TO USE, FOR DO IT 
vm »rrn--| r ADDICTS. 
CT«reJICIAL USES 



Disk Only. 
$39.95 + S&H 



IRA Analysis 



I.R.A.'S AM) SET 
MORE ON YOUR INVESTTtXT. 

PRCFESSIONALa MY OWtt 
FOR FOR SUCH AN ANALYSIS. 
SAVE ♦»♦, 

PROFESSIONAL RESULTS AT 
YOUR FINGER TIPS. 

USES BY PRO'ESSIOIALO FOR 



J BUILT-IN DEPOSIT LIMITS 
1 PER5T»V»LIZED PRDF'EB- 

6I0NAL WILIS 
< EACH ANALYSIS IB UNIQUE 
WITH A YEAR BY YEAR 
BREAK COM OF RESULTS. 

* EACH ANALYSIS WILL 
INFORM AT THE END OF 
TVC mjH THE TOTAL 
pro* IT INVESTED AND 
TVE TOTAL AMOUNT 
GAINED, 

■ HARDCOPY OPTION 

• EASY TO USE 

■ HYftJCIN. USES 

■ UPGRADES AVAILABLE AT A 
NOMINAL CHAREf »€N TAX 
LAWS CHANGE. 

Disk Only: 
$29.95 + S &. 




Shipping & Handling Charge $3 



22j3 F0RL=1T03 36 : PRlNT#-2 , CHR$ ( 64 
) ; : NEXTL 

23j3 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (113) ; 

2 4 0 FORL- 1T0 1 3 : PRINT # - 2 , CHR$ (32) 

; : NEXTL 

250 F0RL=1T013:PRINT#-2,CHR$(16) 
; : NEXTL 

2 6J3 F0RL=1T013:PRINT#-2,CHR$(8) ; 
: NEXTL 

27j3 PRTNT#-2,CHR$ (4) ;CHR$(4) ?CHR 
$(2) ; 

28j3 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (1) ;CHR$ (0) 
290 'print front 

300 IF I$o"Y" THEN F=39:GOSUB10 

60: GOTO! 00 

310 'read screen 

32j3 F=3 :GOSUBlj3 6j3 

33j3 F0RY=j3 TO 188 STEP7 

34j3 GOSUB1040 

350 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (127) ; 

360 FORL=lT04 3:PRINT#-2,CHR$(p) ; 

: NEXTL 

37j3 PRINT#-2,CHR$(113) ; 

38j3 FORL=lT04j3:PRINT#"2,CHR$(j3) ; 

: NEXTL 

390 FORX=jZI TO 255 
400 N=j3 

41j3 F0RD=j3 TO 7 

42j3 IFPP0INT(X,Y+D)=j3 THEN N=N+A 
(D) 

43j3 NEXTD 

440 PRINT #-2 ,CHR$ (N) ; 
45j3 NEXTX 

460 FORL=lT04p:PRINT#-2,CHR$ (0) ; 
: NEXTL 

47j3 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (113) ; 

48j3 FORL=1TO43:PRINT#-2,CHR$(0) ; 

: NEXTL 

490 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (127) 

500 NEXTY 

51j3 GOSUB1040 

520 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (12 7) ; 

530 FORL=1TO43:PRINT#-2,CHR$(0) ; 

: NEXTL 

54j3 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (113) ; 

55 0 FORL=lT04j3 : PRINT #-2 , CHR$ (0) ; 

: NEXTL 

56j3 Y=189 

57 0 F0RX=j3 TO 255 

58j3 N=j3 

590 FORD=p TO 2 

600 IFPPOINT(X,Y+D)=p THEN N=N+A 
(D) 

61j3 NEXTD 

620 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (N) ; 
63j3 NEXTX 

64 0 FORL=lT04j3:PRINT#-2,CHR$(jZI) ; 
: NEXTL 

65j3 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (113) ; 



30 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



66p F0RL=1T04 3:PRINT#-2,CHR$ (0) ; 
: NEXTL 

6lp PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (12 7) 
68 fS F=5:GOSUBlj36j3 
690 'bottom fold 
7j3j3 GOSUBlj34j3 

710 PRINT#-2,CHR$(64) ;CHR$(32) ; C 
HR$ (16) ;CHR$ (16) ; 

72j3 F0RL=1T019 :PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (8) ; 
:NEXT 

73j3 F0RL=1T018:PRINT#-2,CHR$ (4) ; 
:N£XT 

740 PRINT#-2,CHR$(2) ;CHR$(2) ;CHR 
$(2) ; 

750 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (113) ; 

760 F0RL=1T0168:PRINT#-2,CHR$(1) 

;CHR$ (0) ; : NEXT 

770 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (113) ; 

780 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (2) ; CHR$ ( 2 ) ; CHR 

$(2) ; 

790 F0RL=1T018:PRINT#-2,CHR$(4) \ 
: NEXT 

800 F0RL=1T019:PRINT#-2,CHR$(8) ; 
: NEXT 

810 PRINT#-2,CHR$(16) ;CHR$(16) ; C 
HR$(32) ;CHR$ (64) 
820 'print back 
830 GOSUB1040 

840 FORL=lT045:PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (0) } 
:NEXT 

850 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (112) ;CHR$(15) ; 
8 60 F0RL=1T03 32 :PRINT#-2,CHR$ (0) 
; : NEXT 

870 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (15) ;CHR$ (112) ; 
880 FORL=1TO44:PRINT#-2,CHR$(0) ; 
: NEXT 

890 PRINT#-2,CHR$(0) 
900 'back sides 



910 F0RC=1T047 : GOSUB1050 

920 FORL=1TO47:PRINT#-2,CHR$(0) ; 

: NEXTL 

930 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (127) ; 

940 FORL=1TO330 : PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (0) 

; : NEXTL 

950 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (12 7) 
960 NEXTC 
970 GOSUB1050 

980 FORL=1TO47:PRINT#-2,CHR$(0) ; 
: NEXT 

990 PRINT#-2,CHR$(64) ;CHR$(32) ; C 
HR$ (16) ;CHR$(8) ;CHR$ (4) ;CHR$ (2) ; 
1000 FORL=lTO320:PRINT#-2, CHR$ (1 
) ; : NEXT 

1010 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (2) ;CHR$(4) ; CH 
R$(8) ;CHR$(16) ;CHR$(32) ;CHR$(64) 
1020 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (12) 
1030 STOP 

1040 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27) "K"CHR$ (17 
0 ) CHR$ ( 1 ) ; : RETURN 

1050 PRINT#-2, CHR$ (27) "K"CHR$ (12 

3 ) CHR$ ( 1 ) ; : RETURN 

1060 'front subroutine 

1070 F0RC=1T0F 

1080 GOSUB1040 

1090 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (127) ; 

1100 FORL=1TO43:PRINT#-2,CHR$(0) 

; : NEXT 

1110 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (113) ; 

1120 FORL=lT033 6:PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (0 

) ; : NEXT 

1130 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (113) ; 

1140 F0RL=1T043 :PRINT#-2,CHR$ (0) 

; : NEXT 

1150 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (12 7) : NEXTC 
1160 RETURN 

1170 DATA 64,32,16,8,4,2,1 ^ 



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select JDOS or an optional 
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J FD-CP Disk Controllerwith RS DOS 1 . 1 
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J FD-CP Drive 0,1 System with t wodouble sided drives 



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November 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



31 



^otTHTttH i i cat io ns 



CoCoing Abroad 



By Marty Goodman 
with Don Hutchison 



\ 



WALES . 



VENEZUELA 



Australia 



Periodically on Delphi, we find 
folks asking us about taking a 
CoCo abroad. Their questions 
usually concern one or more of three 
general types of problems that people 
face when they take their computer 
systems to other countries. Note that 
the problems and their solutions may 
well be relevant to owners of any com- 
puter. 

Q. Will foreign televisions work with 
my Co Co when I take it abroad? How 
about foreign monitors? 

A. Sometimes yes, sometimes no. 
The answer depends on whether or not 
the country you're visiting uses the U.S. 

Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 

Don Hutchison is an electrical engineer 
and lives in Atlanta, Georgia. He works 
as a senior project engineer involved in 
the design of industrial control systems. 
On Delphi, Don is the Database Man- 
ager of the RAINBOW CoCo SIG. His 
Delphi username is DON HUTCHISON. 



32 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



NTSC system. Canada, Mexico and 
most countries in Latin America use 
NTSC (as does Japan, on different 
VHF channel frequencies), but most 
other nations do not, preferring instead 
to use either the PAL or SECAM sys- 
tem. Their TVs cannot be connected to 
a CoCo built for use in North America. 

Indeed, Tandy makes a separate 
model CoCo for use with PAL-type 
televisions. The difference between the 
NTSC and PAL models involves the 
different ways color information is 
added to a black-and-white TV signal. 
Monochrome composite monitors may 
be available abroad, for there are a 
number of computers using them, but 
color composite monitors may be 
harder to come by. 

Q. What sort of problems will I have 
operating my CoCo from foreign power 
sources? 

A. The problems are many and varied 
and depend on where abroad you go. 
However, there are three major sorts of 
power supply problems: voltage, fre- 
quency, and "cleanliness" of the power. 

In the United States, our equipment 
operates on standard, stable voltages 
between 1 10 to 125 volts (usually 1 17 to 
120) AC at a frequency of 60 cycles per 
second. Most foreign power sources 
supply 220 volts only, so some form of 



Monitor Updates 

By Marty Goodman 



T the August '87 rainbow I 
I wrote an article describing how 
A K m>io make a cable to hook a Mag- 
navox RGB monitor to CoCo 3's RGB 
port (see "A Guide to RGB Analog 
Monitors," Page 68). Since then I have 
learned a bit more about the matter, 
received information from others, and 
noted one or two minor errors in the 
article as printed. The following is in- 
tended to correct those errors and pro- 
vide the additional information I have 
learned. 

The Sony KV1311CR Cable 

In my article I said you could find a 
source of +5 volts on Pin 14 of the 14- 
pin IC or Pin 16 of the 16-pin 1C near 
the 34-pin RGB analog connector. It 
would have been more correct forme to 
have written that those two ICs are 
actually located nearer to the 8-pin RGB 
digital connector than they are to the 34- 



converter will be necessary to run your 
equipment abroad. 

Another voltage-related problem is 
that the line voltage in some countries 
is not as closely regulated as it is in the 
U.S. Thus, u 220 volts" could mean 
voltages varying constantly between 
150 and 250 volts. 

Grounding standards abroad differ 
considerably from U.S. standards. In 
many states, it is required by law that 
metal piping be used for 10 feet before 
the water pipe enters the home, and for 
at least one foot after it enters the 
foundation. This is purely for ground- 
ing purposes, since a buried copper pipe 
provides a very good ground. 

Different countries also have differ- 
ent standards regarding the connection 
of a "neutral" supplied from the utility 
feed. Most U.S. utility companies con- 
nect the neutral side of the line to the 
ground connection inside the breaker 
panel. Many foreign standards do not 
require the connection of a neutral at 
all, and this may result in hazardous 
conditions for the computer operator 
and/or damage to the computer equip- 
ment. 

Power in some countries is supplied 
at 50 cycles per second instead of 60. 
Unlike converters that turn 220 volts 
into 1 10 volts, and are widely available 
and relatively inexpensive, converters 



pin RGB analog connector on the Sony 
KV131 ICR vertical circuit board. 

Also in that article I suggested "steal- 
ing" a source of +5 volts for running the 
Sony cable from the joystick connector. 
This will properly power the needed chip, 
but stealing power from that joystick 
connector will result in the joysticks 
ceasing to work correctly — they no 
longer produce a full range of values 
when you move them. This problem can 
be fixed by shorting out R13 inside the 
CoCo 3. R 13 is a 1 00-ohm (brown-black- 
brown), Vi watt (slightly fatter than the 
other resistors) resistor located to the 
right of t he rearmost of the four socketed 
4464 memory chips on the CoCo 3's 
motherboard. 

But once you have the computer open, 
it would be better to steal 5 volts directly 
from somewhere inside the computer and 
leave the joystick ports alone. The +5 
volts can be obtained from hundreds of 



for turning 50 cycles to 60 are extremely 
unusual and quite expensive. 

The frequency of the AC power is not 
important to the CoCo's clock fre- 
quency because that frequency is de- 
rived from an internal, crystal- 
controlled oscillator. However, the 
transformer in the CoCo that converts 
the incoming 117 volts AC to about 8 
volts AC becomes less efficient as the 
frequency of the incoming current 
decreases. The difference between 60 
and 50 cycles could, in some cases, cause 
the transformer to run abnormally hot, 
and result in ultimate overheating and 
malfunctioning. Whether or not a given 
CoCo is sensitve to 50-cycle AC at 1 10 
volts can be difficult to predict. We've 
heard reports of some CoCos working 
fine on 50-cycle AC, and of others 
overheating. The issue is very likely one 
of subtle variations in the power supply 
and current drain of different model 
CoCos. 

Finally, power in other countries is 
generally "dirtier" than power in the 
United States. That is, there may be 
more spikes, surges, and brown- or 
blackouts, especially behind the Iron 
Curtain, where voltage fluctuations are 
frequent. It is not at all uncommon to 
see voltage spikes of 150 volts or more! 
This is certainly not conducive to long 
equipment life. Monitors, in particular, 



points on the CoCo motherboard, in- 
cluding one spot just in front of the 
MC68B09EP chip near the 40-pin con- 
nector. This spot is actually labeled +5 
volts, and the pad you need to solder to 
is indicated with a white, silk-screen 
circle. 

Still onthesubject of Sony cables, note 
that I neglected to mention in my article 
that Spectro Systems is also a vendor of 
Sony KV131 ICR to CoCo RGB cables, 
along with Spectrum Projects. Note, too, 
that not only is Howard Medical selling 
Sony K V 1 3 1 1 CR monitors with CoCo 3 
cables, but the monitors they are selling 
are specially modified so that they can 
work with a particularly simple RGB 
cable that requires nojoystick connector. 
This cable has been custom-built for 
them. 

The Amiga 1080 Monitor 

In my article I speculated that the 
Amiga 1080 monitor could be made to 
work with a CoCo 3 if the sync signals 
were combined and inverted. I have since 
successfully constructed a working CoCo 
3 to Amiga 1080 cable, and the image is 
reported to be quite nice. Note, also, that 
the Sony K V 1 3 1 1 CR monitor works fine 
with Amiga computers and is a popular 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 33 




Star NX-10 Printer Only $238 
NOW WITH FREE SP-C ($68.45 value) 

EPSON 



disk NEW FROM J&M 

CONTROLLER 

The DC-4 is a scaled-down version of the popular DC-2 
without a parallel port. It includes a switch with 2 ROM 
sockets, JDOS, manual and such features as gold connec- 
tors and metal box. It accesses double sided drives and ac- 
cepts RSDOS 1.1 for Radio Shack compatability. 



cepts HbUUb 

$65 



DC-4 with memory minder 
($2 shipping) 




RS DOS ROM CHIP 



ROM chip fits inside disk controller. 24 pin fits both J&M 
and RS controller Release 1.1. For CoCo 3 Compatability. 



$20 



each 



Reg. $40 
{$2 shipping) 



DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 



DRIVE 0 + Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-'I cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only. Add $34 for a Disto DC-3 replacement. ($s shipping) 

DOUBLE SIDED 

DOUBLE DENSITY *fgt I „ M 
360K IB ^ A * 



$178 45 



Separate Disk Drive Components 

DD-3 An MPI 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



(*5 shipping) 



DD-2 A TEAC 55B Vi height, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a Vt height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



$188 



( s 2 shipping) 



TEAC 55B bare drive, V£ height, double-sided, double density with 
all mounting hardware, needs CA-2 below to fit R.S. 501. 



an iiiuui i in iy i lai \ 

$118 



LX-800 $239 

Friction and tractor feed included 
1 60 CPS 
3K Buffer 

NLQ on front buttons 
Package includes free SP-C serial to 
parallel converter and Epson tutorial 
on disk. W M 



Star NX-10 Only 



white supplies laai 



JJ^hlgrjJrig) 



WORD PACK RS 

This ROM pack is the hardware answer for an 80 column 
display, It includes a built-in video controller to drive a 
monochrome monitor like our 123A. To get started, you need 
OS-9 2.0, a Y-cable or multipack fnterface drive 0 T and a 
monochrome monitor. & Jgg\ 

$ 39 ($2 shipping) 



(*2 shipping) 

While supplies 



s 



New basic driver runs word pack without 
need for an OS-9, 



$10 




SP-C 

Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial output to run 
a parallel printer like Star or Epson. Includes all cables. Add $10 for 



modem attachment. 



($2 shipping) 



$68. 45 



CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to the drive. 

$2495 CA2 $2995 

One Drive Two Drive 



GUARANTEE — Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try 
it out, test it for compatibility. Jf you're not happy with it for 
any reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your 
money back (less shipping). 



MONITORS 

Sony KV-1311CR $449 

• Vivid Color ($15Bhlpplng> 

• Vertically flat 13" screen 

• Monitor/Trinitron TV with remote control 

• 640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot 
pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and composite 
inputs 

• VCR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 . 

Zenith 1220A $125 

• 12" Amber screen (*7 shipping) 




640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ 



COLOR $CQ 45 
MAX 3 I 3 ?" 

YCABLE $25. 00 

MAX 6^1) 
FONTS *03 



Lets the graphic capabilities 
of your CoCo 3 EXPLODE 

Needed to connect CoCo 
Max and disk drive at same 
time. r A 



Three sets include 72 different 
fonts for typesetting 

QQLQPINQ 3 ■! Twenty-two pictures of clip-art 

Boor 

(S2 shipping for each product) 



by Glenside Color Computer Club 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



:(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 

8:00 - vw M m - Fri. 
10:00 t:(H)MI 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 



Shipping charges are for 48 slates. 
3 0 and Canada order slightly hkjri 



The Biggest 
The Best 
The indispensable 




THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 




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Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
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Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
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RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
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Togetyour first heaping helping, just fill out and 
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Use our 800 number! 

For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

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Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
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YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

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the rainbow magazine is a separate purchase. 



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are very sensitive to power line voltage 
fluctuations. 

Simple spike filters ($40 to $100) 
often will take care of the spikes. But for 
substantial surges or brownouts, power 
conditioners ($200 to $400) are needed, 
and for blackouts, uninterruptable 
power supplies ($300 to $1,000 and up) 
are often required. 

Q. What about telecommunication 
abroad? 

A. In the United States, when we com- 
municate at 300 or 1 200 bits per second 
over telephone lines, we use the Bell 103 
or Bell 212A standard for encoding the 
data. This standard is not used in 
Europe. Instead, they use a completely 
different type of encoding for both 300 
and 1200 bps, established by the CCITT 
(International Telegraph and Telephone 
Consultative Committee). 

In most European countries, use of 
modems is heavily regulated. Attempts 
to use a Bell 103 or 212A type modem 
may be quite illegal. Indeed, I've been 
told that using an American Bell- 
standard modem in some countries 
causes odd effects on the telephone 
system because the modem tones and 
some telephone system control tones 



are on the same frequency. 

Some of the more modern modems 
sold in America today do have provi- 
sions for operating in the CCITT stand- 
ard at 300 and 1200 bps. This must be 
explicitly stated in the instructions for 
the modem. 2400 bps modems used 
both here and in Europe operate on the 
same 2400 bps CCITT standard. 

Apart from problems of protocol, 
other problems can arise. These include 
line noise, periodic interruptions of 
service and the like. There may also be 
problems relating to physically hooking 
into the telephone lines to attach a 
direct-connect modem. I've heard of 
problems caused by odd-shaped and 
odd-sized telephone apparatus that 
plagued users of acoustic cup modems 
abroad. It's best to take small screw- 
drivers and a patch cord that hooks to 
your modem at one end and has alliga- 
tor clips at the other end in order to 
make sure you can connect to the 
telephone you encounter. 

Before you travel with your comput- 
er, you'll need to do a thorough study 
of what special conditions you may 
face. Hopefully, this article will give you 
an idea of what questions to ask. fits 



choice among Amiga owners. The RGB 
video used by the Amiga is similar to that 
of the CoCo. 

The Magnavox 8CM562 

Ken Piccoli of Rochester, New York, 
wrote to point out that the Magnavox 
8CM562 can display an image without 
using any special adapter circuitry. 
Merely wire the analog RGB of the CoCo 
3 to the digital RGB port it offers. Using 
an 8-pin DIN connector to make the 
cable, he wired R to R, G to G, B to B, 
Hsync to Hsync, Vsync to Vsync, and 
ground to ground, and was able to get an 
image. (He ignored the Intensity pin on 
the Magnavox and left it unconnected.) 
Mr. Piccoli is probably incorrect, how- 
ever, when he alleged that this allowed 
the Magnavox monitor to "work great." 
With this arrangement, the best you can 
do is display up to six colors plus black- 
and-white, because its RGB I port was 
not designed to accept an analog RGB 
signal. Thus„ the arrangement is virtually 
worthless for display of CoCo 3 graphic 
art in full color, although it is quite 
acceptable for bringing up an 80-column 
text screen. If you are going out to buy 
a Magnavox monitor, do not buy the 
Magnavox 8CM562! But, if you have 
access to one, you may be able to use it 
for text display with the CoCo 3. 




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November 1987 THE RAINBOW 35 



L Hardwar e-Rrojee* 



J 



Plumbing 
For Your CoCo 



By Ronald Pettus 



Shopping for computer equipment 
in a hardware store may seem 
ridiculous, but if you need a mon- 
itor or printer stand, the idea is not as 
outrageous as it first sounds. Using 
about $4 worth of materials, one tool 
and a scrap of sandpaper, you can build 
an attractive, functional stand. 

Plastic pipe is the secret to this 20- 
minute hardware project, and it offers 
many advantages. The pipe, or PVC 
pipe, to be specific, is available at 
hardware stores and can be cut with a 
handsaw or hacksaw. 

A few feet of pipe, a handful of pipe 
fittings and four furniture-leg end caps 
are all you need. The fittings provide 
such a tight fit that glue is not required, 
but you get a more permanent and 
sturdy result if PVC adhesive is applied 
to each connection. 

A pleasant extra benefit is the pipe's 
beige color, which matches the CoCo 2 
and many popular monitors and print- 
ers. In addition, the stand provides 
access to the back of the computer and 
the ROM port, while giving plenty of 
ventilation to your CoCo. 

Figure 1 illustrates the general layout 
of a simple stand f or monitors or print- 
ers. PVC l /2-inch pipe adequately sup- 
Ron Pettus works in the field of oper- 
ations analysis and holds a degree in 
physics. His hobbies include astronomy 
and volunteer work at a science mu- 
seum. Ron's last RAINBOW contribution 
was a program to locate H alley's 
Comet. 




ports 12-inch moni- 
tors, most printers and 
even 13-inch color tel- 
evision sets. If you 
want a stronger struc- 
ture, the pipe also 
comes in a %-inch size. 

The biggest decision is the size of the 
stand. The typical measurements for a 
12-inch monitor stand are listed, but it 
is a simple matter to modify these 
dimensions if you want to customize 
your project. 

A tilted printer stand with a catch 
tray for printouts can be built for about 
$8. The tray is a standard 8 l /2-by- 1 2- 
inch letter tray available in assorted 
colors from discount department stores. 
The design details for the printer stand 
are shown in Figure 2 which provides 



measurements for an Epson FX-80 
printer; other dimensions may be re- 
quired for different printers. 

Here are a few construction hints that 
may prove useful. Cutting the pipe with 
a handsaw or hacksaw leaves a burr, 
which should be removed with sand- 
paper or a file. The pipe also has red 
markings stamped down its \ength. 
These markings can be eliminated with 
light sanding. Completely assemble the 
stand before using glue. 

To assemble the monitor stand, at- 



36 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



tach the cross bars (D) to the tees, one 
tee at each end. Next, make a square by 
connecting the cross bars with the side 
bars (C). Finally, add piece B, a 90- 
degree elbow and piece A at each corner 
to make legs. A %-inch vinyl furniture 
tip fits over the bottom end of each leg. 



The tilted printer stand is assembled 
similarly with the tray resting on four 
short pieces (J). If the monitor or print- 
er slides on the stand, add self-sticking 
foam strips to the tee fittings. 

Press the fixtures tight and square the 
components. Do not glue the joints 



until you make sure everything is as you 
want it. Then glue one joint at a time. 

(Questions or comments about this 
project may be addressed to the author 
at 1228 Fordyce Lane, St. Charles, MO 
63303. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 



Monitor/Printer Stand 




List of Material — 1 /2-inch PVC Pipe 



90-degree Elbow (4) 

Tee Fitting (4) 

rm Vinyl Furniture Tips — 
mj %" size (4) 



3 Beige PVC Pipe 
(approx. 5 feet) 



Figure 1 



Pipe 


Length (inches) 


Qty 


A 


3V6 


4 


B 


2 


4 


C 


9 


2 


D 


7 


2 



FX-80 Printer Stand 
with Catch Tray 




Figure 2 



List of Material — 1 /2-inch PVC Pipe 

£3 90-degree Elbow (6) 

[^~p Tee Fitting (8) 

Vinyl Furniture Tips — 
DI 5 / 8 "size(4) 

I I Beige PVC Pipe 

(approx. 8 feet) 
J Letter Tray — 

^ 8V2" x 12" (1) 



Pipe 


Length (inches) 


Qty 


A 


2V6 


2 


B 


3 


1 


C 


10 


1 


D 


8 


1 


E 


3 1 / 2 


2 


F 


9 


2 


G 


2 


2 


H 


6 


2 


J 


4 


4 


not shown 


1 


5 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 37 



Turn Of The Scr e w 



] 



A New, Improved Printer 

Adapter 

By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



I have watched our computer grow 
from a 4K CoCo 1 to a 5 12K CoCo 
3. BASIC has improved from ho- 
hum simple Color BASIC to Extended 
Color BASIC, to Disk Extended Color 
BASIC. That is some improvement. The 
hardware has gotten faster and the 
software has gotten better. There is, and 
always will be, a close relationship 
between software and hardware. It's a 
closed loop. The hardware cannot work 
without the software and the software 
cannot work without the hardware. 
This is where I sometimes have a di- 
lemma. I have many ideas for hardware, 
yet do not have the time or the skill to 
implement the proper software. 

DOS (Disk Operating System) or, for 
that matter, any software in ROM 
(Read Only Memory) is a lot harder to 
deal with than software in RAM (Ran- 
dom Access Memory). This is because 
ROM cannot be changed, but RAM 
can be. So, if there's a little piece of 
hardware you want to add on, it must 
be supported by software. To add on 
some hardware, you can plug it into the 
cartridge slot or you can plug it into a 
multipack. If you are like me, you can 
also solder it right in. All you need is 
the hardware. 

The software, on the other hand, can 
be loaded from cassette or disk, or typed 
in from the keyboard (if it is not too 
long). But, whatever the method, soft- 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Quest, Quebec. 



ware may cause you problems. If it 
resides in memory, no matter where it 
is, it will be erased by something else. 
In the CoCo 1 , 2 and 3, there is only 32K 
of memory available for BASIC pro- 
grams. The other 32K is reserved for 
BASIC itself. In the case of the CoCo 1 
and 2, this 32K of memory space is 
taken up by ROMs. 

If, for example, you want to make 
changes to BASIC, you need to have 64K 
of memory. Then you need a routine to 
transfer ROM into RAM. Only then 
can you make changes to BASIC. For 
instance, if you don't like the word 
PRINT you can change it to SPLAT. If 
you want to change a routine, it can be 
done. Of course, you will need some 
knowledge of how BASIC works. But the 
fact is you can do it. 

When the CoCo 3 came out, good ol' 
Radio Shack made it a little easier for 
us. First, the CoCo 3 comes with lots of 
memory — a whole 128K of it. But 
BASIC can still use only 32K. The main 
difference is that BASIC itself is in RAM, 
which makes it a lot easier to modify. 
There is one less step to do in the CoCo 
3. Also, since it comes with all CoCo 3s, 
there is no problem with, "Will it work 
with mine?" And it doesn't use up 
memory for BASIC programs. 

Now it comes down to, "What am I 
going to do with this?" Well, a while 
back, I made a parallel printer port that 
plugs into the cartridge port. It was a 
PIA (Peripheral Interface Adapter). 
There were a couple of things wrong 
with this adapter. First, if you had a disk 



drive attached to your computer, it 
didn't work. Second, it had to be re- 
initialized every time you pressed the 
reset button. And the CoCo 3 was not 
available then, so you needed driver 
software, which was always in the 
wrong place. 

This time I am making a new parallel 
printer adapter — a better one, in many 
ways. First, it will be inside the CoCo. 
Second, since I am not using a PIA, it 
will not be necessary to re-initialize after 
a reset. And, if you are installing it in 
the CoCo 3, which always works in the 
all-RAM mode, the driver will not be 
erased by other software. The rest of 
this month's article will be taken up by 
the construction of the adapter board 
itself, and next month we'll finish by 
hooking it up to a printer and a sof tware 
driver. 

As you can see in Figure 1, this is not 
a big project. It only requires three 
chips. I did it this way because I did not 
want to use a 40-pin PIA chip, for a 
couple of reasons. I've already discussed 
one reason; the other is size (the smaller 
the better). I think it is a little cheaper, 
too, and those are magic words. Any- 
way, the first chip is an eight-bit latch. 
It is used to latch the data that is to be 
printed. Without a latch, the data would 
not be held long enough for the printer 
to receive it. The chip I used in this case 
is the same chip Radio Shack's newest 
controller uses to set the active drive. It 
is the 74LS273. 

The second chip in the circuit is a tri- 
state buffer. Before data can be sent to 



38 THE RAINBOW November 19B7 



a printer, it is up to the software driver 
to determine that the printer is not busy. 
This is done with sof tware that reads the 
busy line on the printer. The second chip 
in the circuit is connected to the busy 
line of the printer. The output of this 
buffer is connected to Bit 7 of the data 
bus. When a READ to that memory 
location is done, the status of the printer 
is easily known. The chip in question is 
a 74LS125. 

The third chip in the circuit is very 
important. It is used to memory map the 
printer data latch and the busy indicator 
into the picture. The chip I used for this 
is a74LS139. It is a dual 2-to-4 decoder. 
Memory mappingextra devices into the 
CoCo's memory area is a very delicate 
operation. There are not very many 
locations available that don't violate 
someone's real estate. 

But, I have a trick up my sleeve. The 
I/O area used for the disk drive hard- 
ware is mapped from SFF40 (65344) to 
SFF5F (65375). That area takes up 32 
bytes. You need only five of those 32 
bytes to operate the disk drive. The 
other bytes are wasted because they are 
mirrored. "Mirrored" means you access 
more than one byte but get the same 
hardware being activated. In the case of 
the CoCo's map, the five bytes are all 
located between SFF40 and SFF4F 
(65359). The first thing this chip does is 
separate the upper half of the I/O area 
from the lower half. This is done using 
half of the 74LS139. It separates the 
SCS line into two sections. The first 
section, SFF40 to SFF4F, will go to the 
disk controller. That is needed if you are 
to use a disk drive. We will use the 
second section for the printer I/O. 

The second half of this chip is used 
to further decode the section into two 
more sections. The first of the two 
sections is used for data. This signal is 
also used to strobe the data into the 
printer. This is done by running a line 
from this output to the Strobe input of 
the printer. The second section is used 
for the busy line. It is used to activate 
one of the tri-state buffers of the 
74LS125. The other buffers of this chip 
are not used. 

To recap, the new memory map looks 
like this: The untouched area is from 
SFF40 to SFF4K This area has to go to 
the disk drive. The next area is SFF50, 
which is used for the data latch. Finally, 
the third area is SFF58, and it is used 
to monitor the busy signal. 

Constructing this board is not a big 
deal. You will need the three chips 
mentioned above. It is recommended 
that you use sockets for the chips (a 





SEE TEXT 




7 -t-,.. 5 



Figure 1 



20-, a 16- and a 14-pin socket). You will 
also need a small board to mount the 
chips on. The way I decided to put it in, 
the PCB will not need an EDGE con- 
nector. A 2-inch by 3-inch board is more 
than enough to fit all the parts on. 
Radio Shack has such a board. 

As usual, there is more than one way 
to skin a cat. Some may like to solder 
directly, and some may prefer to use 
connectors. This time I'll use a connec- 
tor for the output and direct wiring for 
the input. As a connector f or the output, 
I used a dual in-line header. This is a 
connector that has two rows of pins that 
are spaced at one-tenth inches between 
the rows and at one-tenth inches be- 
tween the pins. You will need a 26-pin 
connector. 

The connector should mount on the 
same side as the components. It is 
numbered as follows. Look at the pins 
lengthwise. Pin 1 is the bottom left- 
hand pin. Continue counting counter- 
clockwise till you get them all. See 
Figure 2 for its position. All pins not 
mentioned are N/C. The construction 
of the board is simple and requires only 
the standard project kit. In Figure 1 the 
5 volts and ground pins are not indi- 
cated. The following is a list of the 5 
volts and ground connections: 



IC 


+5 Volts 


GND 


74LS273 


20 


10 


74LS125 


14 


7 


74LSI39 


16 


8 



Also not shown on the schematic are 
three decoupling capacitors. The value 
of the caps is one-tenth uf at 25 volts. 
They go between +5 volts and ground, 



CONNECTOR 
PIN f/26 

V»S 



-A 



Figure 2 



and as close to the chips as possible. 
These caps are used to decouple the 
supply to the chips. T here i s one more 
thing to do. Since the SCS line has to 
be decoded to a different state, it has to 
be cut. The best place to cut the line is 
right at the connector. In fact, that is the 
best place to get all of the signals — 
right at the connector. Use the connec- 
tor numbers, but solder the wires di- 
rectly to the connector on the inside. 

Cut the connector and pry the two 
ends apart so they do not touch. The 
encMhat goes to the connector is the 
SCSOUT and the side that goes to the 
PCB is the SCS. Build the circuit first, 
then connect the wires to the connector. 
Make the wires as short as possible so 
that they won't be in the way of any- 
thing. Use four plastic screws and some 
rubber cement to fix the board to the 
computer. 

Next month I'll finish up by making 
and installing the printer cable and 
getting the different drivers for CoCos 
1, 2 and 3. fTZs 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 39 








from All of Us At 
^ Speech Systems \^ j o^l 
Thankjyou for your Support 

Season 's (greetings And 
Ait The. (Best In the 9{ew year 

For Your COCO 1, 2, or 3 

Christmas fantasia Vol. 1 (Pictures & Music for the Christmas Season) $)#§5 $19 

Christmas fantasia Vol. 2 (More beautiful pictures and music) $>^5 $19.95 

S ( U r B ( L%^ VOICE (COCO's Premier Speech Synthesizer) $j&$7 $59.95 

EAiRS ( Now y° u 0311 rea]] y 10 y° ur computer) $^9^5 $79 .95 

SyMrprtObQr 12 (A real 12 voice music synthesizer) $0^5 $59.95 

LJtRA CThe musical COCO MAX) $J&<?5 $ 47.95 

X9^^/fA£T(Print your music) $&$5 $24.95 

Ly?%A L ( y t B < SS^y '(» songs of 7 & 8 voice music) $^5 $29.95 

L/y%& UfBHARy Supplement 1 (More lyra music) $^5 $19.95 

Ly%A LyBfijMty Supplement 2 (Still more) $2*^5 $19.95 

COCO Ml(D 1 2 (Complete hardware & software for MIDI) $l>^95 $129.95 

(A professional 6 1 note keyboard) $1&35 $139.95 

( 2 { RPT0 <BOA$!l) & CASE (For the experimenter) $14.95 

TIPPLE y. Cable (Connect 3 hardware pales together) $j&^5 $29.95 

r DO ( U ( BLE y Cable (Connect 2 hardware paks together) $^8^5 $23.95 

OVlUSICA 2 (Complete 4 voice music composition & printing program) $p$5 $24.95 

MUSIC LIB^A^y (900 songs, 100 per volume) $2>^5 $24.95 

EXCLUSIVELY FOR YOUR COCO 3 

5l2?t r B(<U'BO %AM (Complete memory upgrade wiLh extras) , $1^(95 $99.95 

5l2HCTllfl(®0 %AfM<W/0 Chips $<&$5 $44.95 

MAQIC Of ZA^T9-hx High Resolution Graphics Adventure) $3^5 $29.95 

<RffTU%?tOf SWilOlCs %%VE<XQE (High Res. Arcade game) .. $3^5 $29.95 




Christmas fantasia 

We got so many compliments last year for Christmas Fantasia Volume 1, we added 
a second all new version. 

Christmas Fantasia is a collection of traditional Christmas music combined with 
beauliful high resolution Christmas scenes. Christmas Fantasia picks one of more 
than a dozen Christmas scenes and music selections from tape or disk, displays 
the picture and plays the music. Upon completion, another scene and piece of 
music is loaded and played. The Christmas scenes are beautiful. One shows a 
chapel nestled in a valley with snow actually falling. The low price is our way of 
saying "SEASONS GREETINGS" from Speech Systems. 64K required. 

Volume 1 (Tape or Disk) #CF125 $24.95 

Volume 2 (Tape or Disk) #CF126 . . $24.95 



FILE EDIT MIDI MISC 



LEGEND 



0 S i m Q L*' Il 



Symphony 12 

CoCo's Premier Music Synthesizer 



I 



12 Voices 
4 Noise Generators 
Lyra Compatible 
Musica 2 Compatible 
Stereo & Mono 
Sound Effects 



If you want to compose musk, experiment, or 
jusi li&ieo io music, LYRA is ihe tool you need. 
LYRA represents the new state-ot-lhe-ajl super 
user friend fy software. Pull clown menus one! 
icons make composing music as easy as pointing 
with a joystick or mouse and clicking. LYRA is 
capable of 8 individually controlled voice*. You 
may take advantage oi ihe 0 voice power of 
LYRA using external MIDI synthesizers or SYM- 
PHONY 12. We believe th.it LYRA and SYM- 
PHONY 12 was a match made in heaven. For a 
limited time, when you purchase both, we will 
include tree the LYRA SYMPHONY 12 CONNEC- 
TION, a $19.95 value. 




STEREO AND MONO. By connecting SYM- 
PHONY 12 to your home stereo system, music is 
produced in stereo, (•> voices trom each channel. 
However, you don't need to have a stereo system, 
all 12 voices also come out of your TV or monitor. 

SOUND EFFECTS. SYMPHONY 12 is a sophisti- 
cated sound generator 12 voices and A noise 
generators give you incredible sound ettect capa- 
bility. We have included gun shot, explosion, rac- 
ing car and more. 

SYMPHONY 12. You get over a dozen music and 
sound ettect selections and complete documenta- 
tion. Software is shipped on Tape or Disk 



PIANO KEYBOARD. For those wishing to turn 
SYMPHONY 12 into a real polyphonic synthe- 
sizer we otter a kill size 61 note piano 
keyboard 

Tape users using both SYMPHONY 12 and tine 
PIANO KEYBOARD will require a Y-CABLE. 
Disk systems require a Triple Y-CABLE or 
MULT1-PAK. 

SYMPHONY 12 <T or D) #SYM9 $69.95 
LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 
#LS177 . S19.95 

PIANO KEYBOARD #PK 185 I $169.95 
DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DYI8I J— $28.95 
TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TYI7 \ $34.95 



GUITAR CHORD BOOK- 



This program, written by a guitar instructor ot 17 years, displays in high 
resolution graphics the exact fingering for over IOC). 000 chord combina- 
tions. You may even tune your guitar to the computer and play along 



Whether you are a beginning guitai student or an advanced player, you 

will lind this quick reference to guitar chords invaluable 

J2K Disk only #CCI5 3 $29.95 



MUSIC THEORY 



COURSE 1 



COURSE 2 



This course covers all the basics trom music notation duration, kev 
signatures, tempo, to an introduction of the keyboard. This is an entry 
level course recommended as a prerequisite tor Course 2 
32K Disk only. #MTI0I $49.95 



A more advanced course thai deals with' Major and Harmonic Minor 
scales, interval spelling. Triad (Chord) theory, Inversions, Dominant 7th 
chords, and ear training of the intervals 

52K Disk only #MTI02 $49.95 



'SUPER VOICEZ 



COCO'S MOST ADVANCED 
SPEECH SYNTHESIZER. 

IT TALKS, SINGS AND 
MORE, 
only . . . $79.95 

WITH EARS PURCHASE 
only . . . $59.95 

SUPER VOICE is no ordinary speech synthesizer. It uses Silicon 
Systems, Inc. SSI-263, the most advanced speech/sound chip 
available. SUPER VOICE is not only capable of highly intelligible 
speech, sound effects, and singing over a 6 octave range, but now 
we have turned SUPER VOICE into a monophonic Super Music 
Synthesizer with our PIANO KEYBOARD. 

IT TALKS. A free TRANSLATOR text-to-speech program makes 
writing your own talking program as easy as SAYING " HELLO. M 

SUPER VOICE works in any 32K or 64K computer. A disk system 
requires a Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 

Here are the facts; 
the decision is yours. 






SUPER VOICE 


REAL TALKER 


RS SPEECH VOICE-PAK 
CARTRIOGE VUILt ™* 


Synlhesf2er Device 


SSI-263 


SC-01 


SP-256 


SC-01 


Speaking Speeds 


16 


1 


1 


1 


Volume Levels 


16 


1 


1 


1 


Articulation Rates 


8 


1 




1 


Vocal Tract 
Filler Settings 


255 


1 


1 


f 


Basic unit 
oi Speech 


64 phonemes 
4 durations each 


64 phonemes 


64 allophones 
5 pause lengths 


64 phonemes 


Pitch Variations 


4096 (32 absolute levels 
with B Inflection speeds) 


4 


1 


4 



SUPER TALKING HEADS 



Paul and Pauline, our talking heads program is normally $24.95. Until 
Dec. 15 we will include them with each SUPER VOICE order. 






Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada J 5.00 

COD charge . J2.00 

Illinois residents add 6'/i% sales tax 



Speech Syst 



ems 



38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 

1 MEGABYTE 
COLOHAMA 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OR BBS. 




EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 

Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

• HIGH 
QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 




Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truety sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is t rained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally Infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS i s re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In factyou do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 



Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase- 

II Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you theSUPERVOICE f or$59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or ''TV OFF". . $24.95 





Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V«% sales tax 



Speech Sy5 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CAU ANY DAYTO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



Q t n Ml 



a m a n i ci in f=i m 



MIDI Instruments: 

0:[J01 Brass 1: 005 String 

2:006 Piano 3:009 Guitar 

4: 013 E Organ 5: 014 P Organ 

6:003 Trunpet 7:016 Flute 

£» 8:018 Oboe 9:019 Clarnet 

A: 021 Vibrphn B: 026 Harpsch 

C: 025 Clavier D: 032 Tinpani 

E: 043 Snaredr F: 045 Percusn 



So ptf* 




Lyra 

COMPATIBLE! 



, 3 




NJO 



,0 



Now your COCO can talk lo your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a K«rg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system, 



at plays MUS 



*** Supports 16 Track recording and playback. 

■^r~ I 1 ■ — m | | — Hi 

Adjustable tempo 

\* Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI evenls possible) 

Record to any track 

Low Level track editing 

LYRA editing (one voice per track) 



Filter out MIDI data: 
Key pressure 
Program change 
Pilch wheeJ 



?ssion t il COCO MIDI 2 syste 

- 



Conlrol Change 
Channel Pressure 
System Message 



Playback from any number of (racks. 



Guanti'zrng,EO Y^, %\ % 
u Dynarnrc memory, allocation 



snlervals 




Save and load voi^^arameters lor the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode 

Adjustable Key (Transposition) for each 
track ^^^^^F 

Save recording to disk lor later playback or 
editing 

i^* Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE. 

TM 



t> PUNCH IN and PUNCH OUT editing. 

Sequencer leatures 

100% machine code. 

"Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 

4> Metronome 

Many songs included 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64K CoCo, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 

DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 

TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY1 73 $34.95 



LIBRARIAN" 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 



Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, 
CZ-1001, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, 

G 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $19.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini key-sand the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



9 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 $29.95 




TM 



doco 




LEGE 



FILE EDIT IUDI WISC 



All Voices On 
Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Teitpo 

Reset block 



m 



■ ill! 



FILE EDIT niDl HISC 



Block deiPte 



W -) Block copy B2 

-J. — 4 4_^ :M ^ — 4 



m. 



JJJJJJJ.. 



LEGEND 



1 P 



asiia i 

ami 



* 1 1 



i 1 



4*° fit 

use* 8 



3 




LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
• any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not a 
misprint!) 

Super Simple Editing Supports: 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 



Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 



Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 
12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 
drum machines. 

Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 
channels. 

Transpose music to any key. 
Modify music to any tempo. 
Automatically inserts bar for each measure 
as you compose. 

Key signature lets you specify sharps and 
flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 
(#LC164). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading 



f Solo capability 

Block edits are highlighted. 
f Tie notes together for musical continuity. 
v Name of note pointed to is constantly 

displayed. 

Jump to any point in the score 
instantaneously 
^ Memory remaining clearly displayed, 
however you will have plenty of memory 
even for the most demanding piece. 
Help menu makes manual virtually 
unnecessary. 

V LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 
hardware unless you want more power. 

V Music easily saved to tape or disk. 

V Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 
LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 ,.«,,.., $54.95 



LYRA OPTIONS 



These LYRA options are not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility 
LYRA CONVERT 



5c 



A program to convert MUSICA 2 files lo LYRA 
files. 

(Disk) #LC164 $14.95 

VERSION UPDATE 

To receive the latest version of LYRA return your 
original disk. #UP162 $10.00 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 $19.95 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(Disk) #LS177 $19.95 

LYRA LIBRARY 

A collection of 50 songs ready to play for hours. 
Most have 7 and 8 voices. #LL137 . $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 
A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 900 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 



COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorware, 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark of Radio Sh.ick. 



Weaccept CASH. CHECK. COD, VISA andM/> 


STERC 


IARD orders. 
S3.00 

.... $5.00 V / 






38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 


Shipping and handling US and Canada u 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada 

COD Charge 

Illinois residents add 6'/i% sales tnx. 



















Hom e H elp 




WATTS the 
Electrical 
Cost of 
Appliances 

By Kenneth Burdon 



flecform was developed as an aid 
in calculating various electrical 
values and utility costs. From the 
main menu, you can choose to calculate 
volts, amperes, resistance and watts, as 
long as you know any of the two factors 
involved. 

After the introduction, press ENTER, 
and the main menu will appear. Select 
a formula from the menu by pressing 
the appropriate number. A second 
menu showing the formula on top of the 
screen will appear, and you will be 
asked to enter the known values in 
succession. The computer then calcu- 
lates the formula and prints the answer 
on the screen. After any calculation you 
may either return to the main menu or 
end the program. 

At the bottom of the screen for watt 
calculation you are given the option of 
calculating the cost of heating water 



Ken Burdon is semi-retired, and is 
currently running his own consulting 
business in Industrial Lubrication. He 
has been writing programs for his Co Co 
for several years, in connection with his 
work. 



electrically, or the cost of any appliance. 

For calculating the cost of heating 
water, you will need to know your local 
rate per kilowatt-hour. If you don't 
know the rate, estimate by dividing the 
total of your electric bill by the number 
of kilowatts consumed, as shown on the 
bill. You will also need to know the 
temperature of the incoming water — 
determine at any cold water f aucet using 
a thermometer. For outgoing water 
temperature, use something like 150 
degrees Fahrenheit for dishwashers and 
about 105 degrees Fahrenheit for baths, 
etc. You have to estimate the amount of 
water used; most clothes and dish- 
washers use about 50 gallons for a 
complete cycle, but all the water they 
use is not necessarily hot. 

You are also given a chance to calcu- 
late the cost of any electrical appliance 
such as a hair dryer, can opener, toaster, 
etc. Don't forget that air conditioner. 
All approved appliances will have a tag 
that lists the amperes they draw. A 
voltage of 120 is pretty much standard 
in this country, although it may vary 
from time to time depending on the 
overall load and efficiency of your 
power company. □ 



The listing: ELECFDRM 



75 199 475 165 

175 210 590 190 

295 217 675 18 

380 107 END 96 



1 CLS 

2 PRINT© 7 3 , "KEN BURDON" 

3 PRINT@lj32,"2j31 OAKRIDGE ROAD" 

4 PRINT@134 , "PLAISTOW, NH-03865" 

5 PRINT@ 16 6, "COPYRIGHT 1987" 

6 PRINT@2 2 8,"PRESS<ENTER> TO PRO 
CEED" 



46 THE RAINBOW 



S culptor 



40 times faster than other 

4th. generation languages 




Easy to learn. 
80% Reduction in development time. 
Reliable proven software - in use by over 
30,000 programmers in 34 countries worldwide. 
Works with MS-DOS, Unix, Xenix, VMS, OS9, QNX and more. 

100% Portable to over 90 machines - Micros to Mainframes. 



OS9 LEVEL II SPECIAL $295 

FHL 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 
770 James St. - Syracuse, NY 13203 - 315/474-7856 TELEX 646740 - Since 1976 



8 AN$=INKEY$: IF AN$= IMI THEN 8 

9 IF AN$=CHR$(13) THEN 10 

1)3 DIM E(100) ,1(100) ,R(100) ,P(30 
)3) ,0(3)3)3) 
15 CLS 

20 PRINT @ 1)31, "ELECTRICAL FORMULA 
S" 

25 PRINT§167, "VALUES NEEDED" 

3)3 PRINT§196, "2 OF 3 MUST BE KNO 

WN" 

35 PRINT@3 2 2, "TO FIND VOLTS (E) PR 
ESS (1)" 

40 PRINT§354, "TO FIND AMPS (I) PRE 
SS (2) 



FIND OHMS (R) PRE 
FIND WATTS (P) PR 



45 PRINT@386, "TO 
SS ( 3 ) " 

50 PRINT§418, "TO 
ESS (4) 

5 5 PRINT§48 2, "TO SELECT THE VALU 
E NEEDED PRESS (1-4)" 

60 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 6)3 
65 IF K$="l" THEN 9)3 
70 IF K$="2" THEN 155 
75 IF K$="3" THEN 2 20 
IF K$="4" THEN 290 
IF K$>"4" THEN 15 



110 
115 
120 
125 
130 



80 
85 

90 CLS : PRINT§4 0 , "TO FIND THE VOL 
TS " 

95 PRINT@101, "THE FORMULA IS E=I 
*R" 

100 PRINT§165, "INPUT THE FOLLOWI 
NG DATA" 
105 PRINT 

INPUT "AMPS=";I 
PRINT: INPUT "OHMS";R 
I=INT(I*100+.5)/100 
E=I*R 

PRINT§3 2 2, "THE ANSWER IS"E"V 
OLTS" 

135 PRINT@418 , "DO YOU WANT MORE 
DATA ( Y , N ) " 

140 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=""THEN 140 

145 IF K$="Y" GOTO 15 

150 IF K$="N" GOTO 720 

155 CLS : PRINT@4 0 , "TO FIND THE AM 

PS" 

160 PRINT@101, "THE FORMULA IS 1= 
E/R 

165 PRINT§165, "INPUT THE FOLLOWI 
NG DATA" 
170 PRINT 

175 INPUT "VOLTS=";E 

176 INPUT"OHMS= ";R 
185 I=E/R 

190 I=INT(I*100+.5)/100 

195 PRINT§3 2 2, "THE NUMBER OF AMP 

S IS" ;I 



200 PRINT@4 18 , "DO YOU WANT MORE 
DATA ( Y , N ) 11 

205 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 205 

210 IF K$="Y" GOTO 15 

215 IF K$="N" GOTO 720 

220 CLS : PRINT§40 , "TO FIND OHMS" 

225 PRINT§101, "THE FORMULA IS R= 

E/I 

230 PRINT@165, "INPUT THE FOLLOWI 
NG DATA" 

235 PRINT: INPUT "VOLTS=";E 
240 PRINT 

245 INPUT "AMPS=";I 
250 PRINT 
255 R=E/I 

260 R=INT(R*100+. 5)/100 

265 PRINT@322,"THE ANSWER IS"R"0 

HMS 

270 PRINT@4 18 , "DO YOU WANT MORE 
DATA ( Y , N ) 

275 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 275 

280 IF K$="Y" GOTO 15 

285 IF K$="N" GOTO 720 

290 CLS:PRINT§38,"TO FIND POWER 

IN WATTS" 

295 PRINT §9 6, "FORMULAS ARE P=E*I 

OR P=(I*I)*R OR P=(E*E)*R 

300 PRINT §160, "INPUT THE FOLLOWI 
NG DATA" 

305 PRINT@2 2 4, "VOLTS &AMPS KNOWN 
<5>" 

310 PRINT§256, "AMPS & OHMS KNOWN 
<6>" 

315 PRINT@288, "VOLTS & OHMS KNOW 
N <7>" 

320 PRINT :PRINT"WHICH SELECTION 
DO YOU WISH?" 

325 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 325 

330 IF K$="5" GOTO 345 

335 IF K$="6" GOTO 450 

340 IF K$="7" GOTO 510 

345 CLS: PRINT §3 8, "FOR POWER IN W 

ATTS" 

350 PRINT§101, "THE FORMULA IS P= 
E*I" 

355 PRINT@165, "INPUT THE FOLLOWI 
NG DATA" 

3 60 PRINT: INPUT" VOLTS ";E 
3 65 INPUT"AMPS";I 
370 P=E*I 

375 PRINT@322, "POWER IS EQUAL TO 
"P"WATTS" 

380 PRINT§386, "TYPE (C) FOR HOT 
WATER COSTS" 

381 PRINT§418, "TYPE (X) FOR OTHE 
R COSTS" 

382 PRINT§450, "TYPE (M) FOR MENU 



48 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Tandy Computers: 
Because there is 
no better valued 



Tandy Color Computer 3 



Folder Disk 



? • • © 



mm 



Calendar 



Ledser 



■ In roldiM | 


El 


PUsr Telecom 


p| 




HE 


Text Paint 






n 



Truh 





We cut $ 20 off our most 
powerful Color Computer- 
nowjust $ 199. 

Now Radio Shack's most advanced version of 
the famous Color Computer is more affordable 
than ever! The Color Computer 3 is great for 
small business and home applications such as 
education, programming, word processing, 
graphics, entertainment and more. 

It's easy to expand with disk drives, 
printer, telephone modem and more. 
Plus, the Color Computer 3 comes 
with 128K RAM (expandable to 
512K), giving you greater programming 
and data-processing power. And for 
added versatility, the Color Computer 
3 is compatible with software and ac- 
cessories designed for the popular 
Color Computer 2. 

Create razor-sharp graphics with our 
CM-8 high-resolution monitor (sold sepa- 
rately). You can achieve up to 
160 X 192 or 320 X 192 resolution 
graphics using 16 colors, or 640 X 192 
with 4 colors. 

The Color Computer 3 offers uncom- 
promising performance at a terrific price. 
Visit Radio Shack today for a demonstration! 



r 



Send me a new 1988 
computer catalog. 



Mail To: Radio Shack 
Dept. 88-A-701A 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 



Address _ 
City 



ZIP_ 



Phone . 



=1 

El 

mi 



Radio /hack 



Was $219.95 in Cat. RSC-17B. Price applies at Radio Shack 
Computer Centers and participating stores and dealers. Moni- 
tor, stand, Program Pak and disk drive sold separarely. 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



385 K$=INKEY$:IF K$= M " THEN 385 

390 IF K$="C" GOTO 640 

395 IF K$="X" GOSUB 585 

398 IF K$="M" GOTO 15 

400 GOTO 405 

405 CLS: PRINT 

410 PRINT© 6 6, "POWER CONSUMED IS" 
P" WATTS" 

415 PRINT© 9 8, "RATE PER KWH IS $" 

;R 

420 PRINT© 130, "RUN TIME IN HRS I 
S" ;H 

425 PRINT: PRINT" POWER COST IS $" 
TC'IF RUN FOR "H" HOURS AT $"R"P 
ER KWH" 
430 GOTO 380 

435 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 435 

44 0 IF K$="M" GOTO 15 

445 IF K$="E" GOTO 720 

450 CLS: PRINT ©3 8, "FOR POWER IN W 

ATTS" 

455 PRINT@101, "THE FORMULA IS P= 
(1*1) *R" 

460 PRINT§165, "INPUT THE FOLLOWI 
NG DATA" 

465 PRINT: INPUT "AMPS" ; I 
470 INPUT "OHMS" ;R 
475 P=(I*I)*R 

48,0 PRINTS 3 2 2," POWER IS EQUAL TO 

"P"WATTS" 

485 GOTO 380 

490 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 490 
495 IF K$="C" GOTO 640 
500 IF K$="X" GOSUB 585 
505 GOTO 405 

510 CLS : PRINT@38 , "FOR POWER IN W 
ATTS " 

515 PRINTS 6 8, "THE FORMULA IS P= ( 
E*E)/R 

52,0 PRINT@100, "INPUT THE FOLLOWI 
NG DATA" 

525 PRINT: INPUT" VOLTS" ;E 

530 INPUT " OHMS ";R 

535 P=(E*E)/R 

540 P=INT(P*100+.5)/100 

545 PRINT@2 60,"POWER IS EQUAL TO 

"P" WATTS" 

550 GOTO 380 

555 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 555 

560 IF K$="C" GOTO 640 

565 PRINT: PRINT@418 , "DO YOU WANT 

MORE DATA ( Y , N ) 
570 IF K$="X" GOSUB 585 
575 GOTO 405 
580 IF K$="Y" THEN 290 
585 CLS : PRINT§64 , "******* COST C 



ALCULATI ONS ******* 

590 PRINT: PRINT "WATTS CONSUMED A 

RE" ;P 

595 PRINT: INPUT "RATE PER KWH ($. 
000) =";R 

600 INPUT"HOURS RUN" ;H 

605 C=(P/lj3j3j3) *R 

61j3 C=INT(C*lj3j3+. 5)/lj3j3 

615 TC=H*C 

62J3 RETURN 

625 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 625 

63J3 IF K$="E" GOTO 72j3 

635 IF K$="Y" THEN RETURN 

64J3 CLS:PRINT§2 , "FOR COST OF HOT 

WATER INPUT:" 
645 PRINT: INPUT "INCOMING WATER T 
EMP (F) IS ";I 

65J3 INPUT"OUTGOING WATER TEMP IS 

(F) IS ";0 
655 INPUT" GALLONS USED ARE " ; G 
66J3 INPUT "RATE/KWH ($.j3j3j3) IS";R 
663 REM DEGREES WATER TO BE RAIS 
ED 

665 D=0-I 

666 REM CONVERT WATTS TO KILOWAT 
TS 

67J3 B=G*8.35*D 

675 REM FORMULAE TO DETERMINE 

676 PRINT@258 , "BTU REQUIRED ARE 
";B 

677 REM FORMULAE RO DTERMINE 

678 REM COST TO RAISE WATER THE 

679 REM DESIRED TEMP. AT COST 
68J3 REM PER KILOWATT HOUR 

682 K=P/lj3j3j3 

683 KH=B/(K*5 6.92*6J3) 

684 KH=INT(KH*lj3j3+.5)/lj3j3 

685 C=KH*R 

686 C=INT(C*lj30+.5)/10j3 

69,0 PRINT§322 , "COST TO HEAT"G"GA 
LS OF WATER BY " D " DEGREES AT $"R 
"PER KWH IS $" ;C 

695 PRINT@45J3," FOR MAIN MENU PR 
ESS(M) " 

7j3j3 PRINT@483 , "IF ALL DONE PRESS 
(E) 

705 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 7J35 

71j3 IF K$="M" GOTO 15 

715 IF K$="E" GOTO 720 

720 CLS: PRINTS 2 30 /'PROGRAM IS FI 

NISHED" 

725 PRINT© 4 19, "PRESS (M) FOR MAI 
N MENU" 

730 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 730 
735 IF K$="M" GOTO 15 



50 THE RAINBOW November 1987 




Tandy Computer 
Accessories: 
Because there is; 
no better value, " 



Radio Shack has the 
best of everything* 




Accessories make the difference between a 
computer and a hard-working, fully configured 
computer system. That's why Radio Shack offers 
a complete line of accessories to make the most of 
your Color Computer. 

Add the flexibility of the Multi-Pale Interface 
(A; #26-3124, $99.95) for connecting up to four 
Program Pak™ cartridges (or disk drive and other 
accessories) to your Color Computer at the same 
time. Send and receive data and access informa- 
tion services by phone with the DC Modem Pro- 
gram Pak (B; #26-2228, $89.95). Even add a hard 
disk drive for added storage, using the Hard Disk 
Interface (C; #26-3145, $129.95). 

We've got the cursor controllers you need to 
make your computing easier. The Deluxe Color 
Mouse (D; #26-3125, $49.95) simply glides across 
a tabletop to accurately position the cursor. Or 
use the Deluxe Joystick (E; #26-3012, $29.95) for 
"spring-centering" or "free-floating" operation. 
Two players can enjoy the fun with standard Joy- 
sticks pair (F; #26-3008, $19.95 pair). 

Come in today and see our complete line of 
computers and accessories. 



I 
I 

L. 



Send me a new 
1988 computer 
catalog. 



Mail To: Radio Shack 
Dept. 88-A-701 
300 One Tandy Center, 
fort Worth, TX 76102 



City. 



1 

=1 
=1 
-J 



Radio /hack 



Prices apply at participating Radi« Sliack stores and dealers. Multi-Pak Inter- 
face shown with computer and software, n»t included, 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



MAGIC 
3 BALL 



The future is "in the chips " 




CoCo Has All the Answers 

By Logan Ward 



Remember the Magic 8 Ball? It was the black 
spherical object that knew all and could tell all. 
When you asked the ball a question and shook 
it, it predicted the f uture (or a reasonable f acsimile). Does 
this bring back memories? Longing for that old 8 ball? 
Look no further. Magic 3 Ball is here! 

Magic 3 Ball works exactly the same as the old 8 Ball. 
Once the program is loaded and run, ask a question — 
any question: Will I become a millionaire? Will there be 
a CoCo 4? Press any key and an answer will appear. Af ter 

Logan Ward lives in Memphis, Tennessee, and is 
studying electronics technology and computer engineer- 
ing at the State Technical Institute. He is head technician 
and service manager at The Computer Center, and his 
hobbies include custom programming and creating 
pictures with CoCo Max. 



a few seconds, the answer box will clear, and Magic 3 
Ball will be ready for another question. This makes the 
program great for parties, get-togethers and psychic 
convocations. 

Magic 3 Ball has 16 different answers — six positive, 
six negative and four indifferent. These answers can be 
customized to fit any need and are found as data in lines 
750 and 760. Magic 3 Ball also supports the Radio Shack 
Speech/ Sound Pak, allowing all answers to be spoken. 
This makes asking questions even more exciting. 

Q: Will M agic 3 Ball give hours of fun and laughs? 
A: All signs point to yes. 

( Questions about this program may be addressed to 
the author at 2774 Lakeside Dr., Memphis, TN 38134. 
Please enclose an SASE for a reply.) □ 



52 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



\/ 200 



The listing: MRGIC3 



200 


243 


300 


12 


500 


169 


690 


. 151 


END 


. . . .44 



\0 ***************************** 
* 

20 ' MAGIC 3 BALL 

30 1 (C) 1987 LOGAN R. WARD 

40 1 2774 LAKESIDE DR. 

50 ' MEMPHIS , TN 3 813 4 

* 

10 'THIS PROGRAM SIMULATES THE 0 
LD MAGIC EIGHT BALL FROM YEARS P 
AST. TO GET AN ANSWER, PRESS ANY 
KEY 

80 P0KE65497,J3:DIM P ( 15 ) , Q ( 14 ) ,S 
(14) ,A$(19) ,B$(19) 
90 A=16j3:B=96:F=j3:G=.5 
100 WIDTH4J3 : HSCREEN2 
'READ DATA 

FOR V=0 TO 15 : READ P(P):PALE 
P,P(P) :NEXTP 

FOR Q=l TO 14 : READ Q (Q) : READ 



lip 
\20 
TTE 
130 

S(Q) : NEXTQ 

14j3 FOR 1=1 

150 FOR 1=1 



TO 7: READ R(I):NEXTI 
TO 19: READ A$(I):REA 
D B$(I) :NEXTI 

160 CLS1:HCOLOR6,J3:GOSUB470 

17 0 'DRAW CHARACTERS 

180 HDRAWBM21 , 8 ; C4 ; "+A$ : HDRAW'B 

M2 1 , 8 ; "+B$ : HDRAW" BM3 0 , 8 ; "+A$ : HDR 

AW"BM39,8;"+C$ 

190 HDRAW" BM2 1 , 45 ; C5 ; "+A$ : HDRAW" 
BM2 1,45; "+B$ : HDRAW "BM 3 9,45; "+C$ : 
HDRAW "BM2 1,59; "+B$ 

200 HDRAWBM2 1 , 82 ; C7 ; "+A$ : HDRAW" 
BM21, 82 ; "+B$:HDRAW"BM21, 111;"+B$ 
:HDRAW"BM3 9 , 97 ; "+D$ : HDRAWBM35 , 9 
7 ; "+E$ 

21,0 HDRAW "BM29,119;C11;"+A$: HDR A 

W"BM2 1 , 156 ; C12 ; "+A$ : HDRAW "BM2 1 , 1 

56 ; "+B$ : HDRAW "BM21, 185 ; "+B$ 

220 HDRAWBM29 5, 8 ; C13 ;" + F$: HDRAW 

"BM276,8;"+B$:HDRAW"BM276,23 ; "+B 

$:HDRAW"BM276,37 ;"+B$ 

2 3 0 HDRAW" BM2 76, 45 ; C14 ; "+A$ : HDRA 

W"BM276 , 45 ; "+B$ :HDRAW"BM27 6 , 59 ; " 

+B$ :HDRAW"BM278 , 74 ; "+B$ : HDRAW "BM 

293,45 ; "+D$: HDRAW" BM2 95, 59 ; "+D$ 

240 HDRAW " BM2 76,82 ;C4 ; "+A$: HDRAW 

"BM276,82;"+B$:HDRAW"BM295,82;"+ 

C$:HDRAW"BM276,96;"+B$ 

250 HDRAWBM2 7 6, 119 ; C5 ; "+A$ : HDRA 

W"BM276, 148;"+B$:HDRAW"BM276, 156 



Now Create Your Own Signs, 
Banners, and Greeting Cards. 



Introducing The 
Coco Graphics Designer 

Last Christmas we introduced our 
COCO Greeting Card Designer program 
(see review April 86 Rainbow). It hai 
been so popular that we've now 
expanded It Into a new program called 
the COCO Graphici Designer. The 
Coco Graphici Designer produce! 
greeting cards plui banners and signi, 
This program will further increase the 
ute fullness and enjoyment of your dot 
matrix printer. 

The Coco Graphics 

Designer allows you to mix text and 
pictures in all your creations. The 
program features picture, border, and 
character font editor*, so that you can 
modify or expand the already built in 
libraries. Plus a special "grabber" utility 
is included to capture area* of high 
resolution screens for your picture 
library. 



Requirements: a Coco or Coco II 
with a minimum of 32K, One Disk Drive 
(Disk Ext. BASIC 1.0/1. l.ADOS, or 
JDOS). Printer* supported include: 
Epson RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX-10, C-Itoh 8610, DMP-100/ 130/ 
400/ 430, Seikosha GP-100/260, Legend 
808 and Gorilla Bannana. Send a SASE 
for complete list of compatible printers. 
#C332 Coco Graphics Designer $29.95 

Over 100 More Pictures 

An optional supplementary library 

diskette containing over one hundred 
additional pictures is available. 

#C333 Picture Disk #1 *H.96. 

Colored Paper Packs 

Now available are packs containing 120 
sheets of tractor-feed paper and 42 
matching envelopes in assorted bright 
RED, GREEN, and BLUE. Perfect for 
making your productions unforgettable. 
#C274 Paper Pack $19.96 




With Zebra's Coco Graphics Designer It's easy and enjoyable 
making your own greeting cards, signs, and banners. 



NEWS FLASH! 
CGP-220 and DMP-105 
NOW SUPPORTED 



As o-f June 



1987 



we are 

shipping version 2-3 o-f the 
CoCo Graphics Designer- This 
version includes drivers for 
the CGP-220 and DMP-105 
printers, and improved menu 
dialogs -for single disk drive 
users- By the time this issue 
appears in print we will 
probably also have added 
Qkidata printer drivers — check 
with us i-F you have an Okidata. 



Ordering Instructions: All orders 

add 13.00 Shipping it Handling. UPS 
COD add 13.00. V1SA/MC Accepted. 
NY residents add sales tax. 



Zebra Systems, Inc. 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 53 



NEW FROM ARK ROYAL! 

N gW Pro Football: Strategy Gridiron game (CC3128KHRB) $20 

N gW Okinawa: The Big Invasion (CC64K D HR ML) $27 

N gW Blitzkrieg West: A Bigger Bulge (CC64KDHR ML) $27 

N gW Bataan: Historical & Hypothetical games in one (CC64K D HR ML) $29 

N gW Desert Fox: Rommel (CC64K D HR MLS) $27 

N EW Task Force: Modern Naval War in the Med (CC64KDHR MLS) $27 

graded D DAY: The 6th of June (CC64K HR ML) $25 

UP aD ED Battle Hymn: Battle of Gettysburg (CC64K D HR ML) $25 

UP pAD ED Company Commander: Squad level Wargame (CC32K SG MLS) 

uP (House to House Module included in Company Commander) 

Additional Models for Company Commander 3.0 

River Crossing $17 

MgW Gemini ... . . $17 

NEW Cauldron >" $17 

NEW Beach Head , . ^^KT^JBK)^ ■.. . Xj¥ $17 

Fire One! Submarine Simulation (CC3 D ^^EM^yl^jf^vC^; - $ 25 

Luftfl.otte: Battle of Britain (CC32K SG MLS) . ^g^^^^^^^S^ ^ $25 

Stalingrad: The turning point. (CC64K HR ML) . $25 

Final Frontier: War in Space (CC32K D HR MLS) ^> , $25 

Fire & Steel: Waterloo Campaign (CC64KD HR MLS) .., $22 

Barbarossa: The War in Russia (CC64K HR ML) ..„-".:. - - . - > $22 

RedStar: Natovs Warsaw Pact (GC32K D HR ML) $22 

DarkHorse:RedStarSequel(CC64KDHRML) $22 

Midway: The Turning Point in the Pacific (CC32K HR MLS) .' $20 

Escape From Denna: Dungeons! (CC32K SG MLS) , ... , ; $15 

Tunis: War in the Desert (CC32K SG B) ■ . , . . . .7. > . $15 

Battle of the Bulge 1 or 2 player (CC32K SG B) ..." $15 

Phalanx: Alexander the Great (CC32K HR ML) . .jS^ ■ ^ tiffing JL^JB^^ 

Rubicon II: Invasion game (CC32K SG B) V. Wm^ x. - - - -^^^j^j Hfi^ 

Guadalcanal: AmericaStrikes Back (CC32KSG MLS) V* . : . . . .V- $10 

Waterloo: Napoleon (CC32K SG MLS) . . . _ , - $10 

Bomber Command: Strategic Bombing Mission (CC32K SG MLS) . : . .... . $10 

Kamikaze: Naval War in the Pacific (GC32K HR B) f . , $10 

Starblazer: Strategy Star Trek (CC32K SG MLS) .1 , $10 

Mission Empire: Build an Empire in Space (CC32K SG B) $10 

GalaeticTaipan: Economics in Space (CC32KSG B) . . . . . . .... . . • ■ ■ ■ ■ -ijj^. .^^$10 

Keyboard General: Bi-monthly newsletter yearly sub f , . . , P \ \\ . I $15 

Barbarossa, Luftflotte, Battle Hymn (256K) available Tandy 1000 
New for the Tandy 1000: 

Gray Storm Rising: War in the North Atlantic \ . Vt . $25 

Codes CC — Color Computer, all versions CC3 CoCo 3 only 
D — Disk only (no D means program available tape or disk) 

HR — High Resolution SG — Semigraphics ML — Machine Language 

MLS — Machine Language Subroutines B — Basic 

Write for free catalog! ^P^>flk 

(Upgrades may be acquired for $5. Original tape or disk must be returned SBr^^^t^ 
with order.) y W 

Prices on all programs include shipping costs to USA and Canada. Others ARK ROYAL GAMES H^^s^|B 

add $3.00. COD's available in USA only, add $3.50, Personal Checks ac- pQ QqX 14806 WL ARK IW 

cepted with no delays in USA. Others send M.O. or Bank Draft in US funds. " " 00000 m 1 n x 



Canadians may order direct from: M & M Software, #203 818 Watson Cres,, 
Dawson Creek, B,C. VIG 1N8. Write M & M Software for information. 



=.S:G=1 



NEXT I 
FOR W=17 



TO 19:GOSUB400:NEXT 



;C7; "+A$ :HDRAW"BM276, 185 ; "+B$ 
260 1 DRAW BALL 

270 FOR 1=1 TO 14STEP2 : HCIRCLE (A 
,B) ,B,Q(I) ,S(I) ,F,G 
280 IF I+l>7 THEN F 
290 HCIRCLE (A,B) ,B,Q(I + 1) ,S(I+1) 
F G 

300 HPAINT(A,R((I+l)/2) ) ,Q(I) ,Q( 

I) 
310 
320 
W 

33j3 I$=INKEY$:IF I$<>"" THEN GOS 
UB390 

34j3 FOR 1=13 TO 1 STEP- 1 : X=RND ( 6 
3 ) : PALETTEQ (I) ,X: NEXTI 
35 0 ON BRK GOTO 700 

360 IF SS=1 THEN S=RND (200) :SOUN 
DS,1 

370 GOTO330 

380 'PRINT ANSWER 

39j3 W=RND(16) 

400 HCOLOR9,0:HLINE(110,85)-(210 
,105) ,PSET,BF 

410 A2=LEN(A$ (W) ) :B2=LEN(B$ (W) ) : 

Al=(4j3-A2)/2:Bl=(4j3-B2)/2 

420 HCOLOR15,0:HPRINT(A1,11) ,A$ ( 

W) :HPRINT(B1, 12) , B$(W) 

430 IF W<18 THEN GOSUB550 ELSE F 

OR N=l TO 3000:UEXTH 

440 IF W=19 THEN GOSUB670 

450 HCOLORll,j3:HLINE(llj3,85) -(21 

0,105) ,PSET,BF 

460 RETURN 

470 A$="D3p;R3 ;U15 ; LI ; D14 ; LI ;U29 
ii 

480 B$="R18;D1;L18" 
490 C$="D3J3;R1;U3J3" 
500 D$="D15;R1;U15" 
510 E$="R4;D1;L4 

520 F$="D3j3;L3;U15;Rl;D14;Rl;U29 



530 
540 
550 



RETURN 

•SPEECH ROUTINE 
POKE65496,0:S$=A$(W)+CHR$ (32 
)+CHR$ (32)+B$ (W) :K=&HFFj3j3:L=&HFF 
7E 

560 POKEK+l,52:POKEK+3,63:POKEK+ 
35,60 

570 GOSUB590 
RETURN 

FOR 1=1 TO LEN(S$) 
IF PEEK (L) AND 128=0 THEN 60 



580 
590 
600 
P 

610 
620 
630 

& 

640 



POKEL,ASC(MID$(S$,I,l) ) 
NEXT I 

IF PEEK (L) AND 128=0 THEN 
POKEL, 13 



63 



650 FOR SD=1 TO 1300:NEXTSD 
660 POKE 65497,0: RETURN 
670 Z$=INKEY$ 

680 IF Z$="Y" THEN SS=1: RETURN 
690 IF Z$="N" THEN SS=0: RETURN E 
LSE GOTO670 
700 POKE65496 , 0 : END 
710 DATA 3,25,0,34,36,38,56,2,0,8 
,1,20,63,8,40,60,63 
720 'DATA 4,20,5,30,7,60,11,96,1 
2,132,13,152,14,172 
730 DATA 4,1,4, .75,5, .75,5, .5,7, 
.5,7,. 25,11,. 25, 11,. 25, 12 ,.25, 12 
, .5,13, .5, 13, .75,14, .75,14,1 
740 DATA 172,152,132,96,60,30,20 
750 DATA THINK HARDER, TRY AGAIN, 
SEEK ANSWER, LATER, DO NOT BET, ON 
IT, OUTLOOK, GREAT, MORE THAN, LI 
KELY , YOU CAN, COUNT ON IT,OUTLO 
OK NOT, VERY GOOD , SOURCES , SAY N 
0, ALL SIGNS, POINT TO YES , FORECA 
ST, AWFUL, LOOKS LIKE, THUMBS DOWN, 
BETTER NOT, SAY NOW 
760 DATA REPLY CLOUDY, TRY AGAIN 
, VERY , UNCERTAIN, WITHOUT , QUESTION 
, LOOKS LIKE, A YES, MAGIC ,3 BALL, 
(C) 1987, LOGAN WARD , SOUND , <Y> OR 
<N> 





If you're stiii plugging printed 
circuit cards into your 

CoCo 1 

CoCo2 

CoCo3 

vAthout a card guide . . . 

CUT IT OUT. 

Write or call for a free brochure describing 
printed circuit cards and guides designed 
for the CoCo expanstion port. Bare cards 
or with connector for disk controller. 



206 782-6809 



ROBOTIC 





MICROSYSTEMS 



BOX 30807 SEATTLE, WA 98103 



November 1987 



THE RAINBOW 




XTEAM 
OS -9 



P 



» Menu oriented 
» Upload/download. Ascii 

or XMODEM protocol 
• Execute OS-9 commands 

from within XTERM 



XTERM 

OS-9 Commiiriic aborts program, 

• Definable macro keys 
■ Works with standard serial port, RS232 

PAK, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers. 

• Works with standard screen. XS CREEN, 
WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board. 

$49,95 with source $89.95 



XDIR & 


XCAL 


Hierarchial directory 


OS-9 calculator 


• Full sorting 


■ Decimal, Hex, Binary 


• Complete pattern matching 


■ +, -, • 1, AND.OR, XOR, NOT 


$24.95 


with source $49.95 





XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 with source $54.95 



HARDWARE 




512k memory upgrade 


$80.00 


Printers 




Citizen 120D 


CALL 


Star NP10 


CALL 



BOTH 
WINNERS! 



5 Ail of our OS-9 producli^ 
\ work wllh: $* 
OS-* version 1 & 
OS 9 *enlou t V 
Uvti Z K 

_\ y^X^>>v>.>^>*> ^ ^» * !W ■>». I S: : 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

• Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

• Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
overstrike, underline, super/sub-seripts 

• 10 header/footers 

• Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

• Margins and headers ean be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $1 24.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with sourcc$ 4 9. 9 5 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$1 1 4.95 with XWORD/XMERGEsourc*1 99.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 



AND FOR RS 



SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING 

This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
also contains the flexibility for the accounting ori- 
ented user to set up a double entry journal with an 
almost unlimited chart of accounts. Includes Sales 
Entry, transaciion driven Accounts Receivable and 
Accounts Payable, Journal Entry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
oulpuis include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check Reg- 
ister, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and a 
Journal Posting list. $79 95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory control, 
with user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis of the business' sales and the sales force. One 
may enter/update inventory data, enter sales, run five 
sales analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter /update salesman records, and 
update theS BAP inventory. $59.95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up to 200 hourly and salaried employees 
with 8 deductions each. Calculates payroll and tax 
amounts, prints checks and maintains year-lo-date 
totals which can be automatically transferred to the 
SBA package. Computes each pay period's totals 
for straight lime, overtime and bonus pay and det- 
ennines taxes to be withheld. Additional outputs 
include mailing list, listing of employees, ycar-lo- 
date federal and/or state tax listing, and a listing of 
current misc. deductions. Suited for use in all stales 
except Oklahoma and Delaware. $59.95 



PERSONAL BOOKEEPING 2000 

Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense categories. 
Menu driven and user friendly. $39.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history reports 
for each customer, prepares invoices and monthly 
statements, mailing labels, aging lists, and an alpha- 
betized customer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance charges 
for revolving accounts. This package functions as a 
standalone A/R system or integrates with the Small 
Business Accounting package. $ 5 9 95 



ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance o f vendor and A/P 
invoice files. The system prints checks, voids 
checks, cancels checks, deletes cancelled checks, 
and deletes paid A/P invoices. The user can run a 
Vendor List, Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged 
report, and an A>P Check Register. This package 
can be used cither as a standalone A/P system or 
can be integrated with the Small Business 
Accounting Package. $ 5 9 95 



MICROTECH 
CONSULTANTS 

IK 1 1906 Jerrold Avenue 

I vi V* ■!*! Paul > MN 55112 

DtaUtr Inquiries Inviltd 
Author Submissions ttcctptid 




Ordering information 

Add S3 00 shipping & handling, MN residents add S% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $2.50), personal checks. 



(612) 633-6161 



Gift Buyer's Guide 

Looking for just the right gift for that special 
Co Co someone? Look no further — our Gift 
Buyer's Guide has a full selection of prized delights 
in price categories sure to please even old Scrooge! 

(For ordering information on these gift buyer's 
selections, see Page 61.) 



Add a personal touch to seasonal 
letters and announcements with dec- 
orative printer paper. From Computer 
Creations, $10 per package of 100 
sheets. 




t'DUOH THFDK5 5 
&1 H^F DD135D 



FIODR 2 LIVES H 
BONUS T I HER i±3 




Hi: 885089 
SCORE: 883680 



Art Deli is a smorgasbord of graph- 
ic treats for all occasions. From 
Specialty Projects, $1 2.95; set of 1 0 
disks, $99.95. 



LEVEL: 1 



Don your baker's hat for a fun-filled time with 
Donut Dilemma. From Tom Mix Software, $24.95. 



A little CoCo mouse 
can sleep tight in this 
handy MousePouch. 
From H&H Enter- 
prises, $5.95. Put a 
CoCo 2 or 3 key- 
board at your finger 
tips with the CoCo 
keyboard Extender 
Cable. From Spec- 
trum Projects Inc., 
$19.95. 



ROUND: t 




Pyramix offers animation, graphics and sound in a challenging game of 
arcade fun. From Dr. Preble's Programs for the CoCo 3, $24.95. 




November 1987 THE RAINBOW 57 





Koronis Rift, a shoot-'em-up space Adventure, takes full advantage of the 
CoCo 3 and OS-9 Level II. From Epyx, $29.95. Available in Radio Shack 
stores nationwide. 




Screen Star and OS-9 Text Formatter provide 
all the capabilities of word processing for the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. From Computerware, Screen 
Star, $49.95; OS-9 Text Formatter, $34.95; both 
for $74.95. 



Donald Duck's Playground turns 
learning into child's play on the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. From Sierra On- 
Line, $34.95. Available in Radio 
Shack stores nationwide. 




A gift subscription to THE RAIN- 
BOW, complete with magazine 
binders, will be remembered long 
after the holiday season ends. Or 
take advantage of the Rainbow 
Bookshelf specials for that 
"something extra." 




The adventu res of Winnie the Pooh 
in the Hundred Acres Wood will 
delight your favorite youngster. 
From Sierra On-Line, $34.95. Avail- 
able in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide for the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 







rr i 


Uisible Objects 








Inventory 




lew 

Bucket and tope 




Spray bus 

The bus wrinkles up its cnitinous nos* 
and leaves. 
Look creeper 

It looks like it wouJd only just take 
«y weight. 
Look gap 

It's a doddle! 
Look bridge 
I don t have that . 



Caladuril Flame of Light is a unique graphics 
Adventure game sure to please any CoCoist. 
From Diecom Products, Inc., $28.95 U.S.; $38.95 
CND. 



58 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 





f 
1 













y 


Enjoy the sounds of silence with the 
Printer Muffler 80 from Kensington 
Microware Ltd, $59.95. 



Explore the full potential of the Color Computer with Tandy's OS-9 Level Two 
Development System ($99.95), OS-9 Level Two ($79.95), and Deskmate 3 ($99.95). 
Available in Radio Shack stores nationwide. 




Color Max 3 brings CoCo 3 graphics creations to life with color and 
detail. From Computize, Inc., $59.95. 



The Color Computer3unveils the mystery of graphics and 
animation, spreadsheets and databases, education and 
Adventure. A great gift for any age. From Tandy Corpo- 
ration, $199.95; CM-8 monitor, $299.95. Available in Radio 
Shack stores nationwide. 

November 1987 THE RAINBOW 59 






The Citizen 1 20D Printer Package is the perfect complement to 
any CoCo system. From Dayton Associates of W.R. Hall, Inc., 
$229.95. This versatile Unistand dresses up any printer. From 
Microcomputer Accessories, Inc., $19.95. 



The Avatex 2400 Modem opens the door to com- 
munications. From Cinsoft, $229; with RS-232 cable 
and Autoterm 6.0, $269. 





CoCo Midi 2 and the Color Computer add 
music to all the holiday festivities. From Speech 
Systems, $149.95. 



This Magnavox RGB Monitor 80 (Model 
8CM515) from Howard Medical Computers 
provides plenty of resolution and an excellent 
display, $298; CoCo 3 cable, $19.95 with mon- 
itor purchase. 




Desktop publishing gets better with the new Tandy LP-1000 Laser Printer, 
$2,199. Available in Radio Shack stores nationwide. 



60 



THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



Products listed in the Gift Buyer's Guide are available from 
the following companies: 



Cinsolt 


Diecom Products, Inc. 


Microcomputer Accessories, Inc 


2335 Losantiville 


6715 Fifth Line 


5405 Jandy Place 


Cincinnati, OH 45237 


Milton, Ontario 


P.O. Box 66911 


(513) 396-SOFT 


Canada L9T 2X8 


Los Angeles, CA 90066 


(416) 878-8358 


(213) 301-9400 


Computer Creations 


P.O. Box 3744 


Dr. Preble's Programs 


Tom Mix Software 


Long Beach, CA 90803 


6540 Outer Loop 


4285 Bradford NE 


(213) 434-2655 


Louisville, KY 40228 


Grand Rapids, Ml 49506 


Computerware 


(502) 241-6474 


(616) 957-0444 


4403 Manchester Avenue 


H&H Enterprises 


Specialty Projects 


Encinitas, CA 92024 


Box 2672 


4810 McCrory 


(619) 436-3512 


Corona, PA 91718 


Memphis, TN 38122 


Computize, Inc. 


(714) 737-1375 


(901) 682-8737 


r .U. oOX ZU / 


riowdru ivieuiCcU computers 


opcLiruiii r rojcuis, inu. 


Langhorne, PA 19047 


1690 North Elston 


P.O. Box 264 


(215) 946-7260 


Chicago, IL 60622 


Howard Beach, NY 1 1414 


Dayton Associates of 


(800) 443-1444 


(718) 835-1344 


W.R. Hall, Inc. 


Kensington Microware Ltd. 


Speech Systems 


7201 Claircrest Bldg. C 


25 1 Park Avenue S 


38 W. 255 Deerpath Road 


Dayton, OH 45424 


New York, NY 10010 


Batavia, I L 60510 


(513) 236-1454 


(212) 475-5200 


(312) 879-6880 



Hardware 

Special 

Communications 
Package 

300/1200 baud Fully Hayes 

compatible 
Modem - 2 Yean Warranty 

$129.00 

[Modem & Cable] 

3DO/1 2DD/24DD baud 
Fully Hayes 
Compatible Modem - CCITT 
2 Year Warranty 

$249.00 

[Modem & Cable] 



Software 



■■ THE OTHER GUYS CoCo 

I 55 North Main Street 
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32k & 64k [71 □ accounts & entries on 1 6k) (disk only). Version 1 .2 has screen printouts. 
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Filing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 16 fields 
with 255 characters per field [4080 characters/record). Sort, match & print any field. 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only]. 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 1 0/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles, elipses, boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on line HELPS at all 
times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects on the screen. Can be 
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Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements. 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & more. User friendly/menu 
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t° sk0nW 'COCO WINDOWS' 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 10 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering. Four function 
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controller] 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 61 



D el phi Bur e au 



Some Helpful Improvements 



Marc Genois (MARCGENOIS) of 
Beauport, Quebec, has found 
that Greg-E-Term works 
quite well through the CoCo 3's rear 
serial port at 2400 baud. For those who 
want to go this route, Marc suggests the 
following steps: 

1) Type LDfiDM"GTERM" and press 
ENTER. 

2) Type P0KE&H15RF , 1 : POKE&H15B0 , 
&H74 :P0KE&H15B7,&Hlfi and 
press ENTER. 

3) Enter SfiVEM"GTERM",&HE00, 
&H652C,&HE00 

After these changes, the 110 baud 
option of Greg-E-Term will cause the 
program to run at 2400 baud through 
the serial port. Marc reports that he has 
no problem with lost characters or 
garbage when using Greg-E-Term in 
this manner. 

A New Report Form 

For the convenience of CoCo SIG 
users, Jim Reed (JIMREED), manager of 
the CoCo SIG, has created a new online 
form. This new form is designed to 
allow users to report problems with 
their RAINBOW magazine subscriptions. 
This form will also allow Falsoft per- 
sonnel to more efficiently handle your 
problem, thereby reducing the time 
required to achieve a proper solution. 

To get to the form, you must first 
enter the Rainbow Magazine Services 



Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associate 's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is CRA Y. 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Editor 

section of the SIG. This is accomplished 
by entering RRIN at the main CoCo SIG 
prompt. Once there, simply enter RE- 
PORT (for Report Subscription Prob- 
lem) and you will be taken into the 



proper form. Once you have selected 
this form, you only need to answer a few 
simple questions. 

You will first be asked to confirm that 
you are reporting a problem or making 



Database Report 



SIGop Greg Law (gregl) has set 
aside two new topics in his database: 
the Programmers Den topic and a 
Tutorials and Education topic. Greg hopes 
to have development programs placed in 
the Programmers Den area where pro- 
grammers can help each other debug and 
beta test them. The Tutorials and Educa- 
tion topic is for the wealth of tutorials that 
are being written by avid OS-9 users to help 
each other. 

In me Users Group topic area, Greg Law 
posted disasm, an OS-9 disassembler, with 
documentation and source code; several 
CoCo configuration modules for Dynacalc, 
DynaStar and RMS', a smart terminal 
program called comm, written in BASIC09; 
a clock driver for the Computerware 6800 
CL4 CalClock/ Timer board, including 
source code; chvolnam, a BAS1C09 pro- 
gram that changes the name of a volume; 
a file check utility that determines file status 
of the specified input file; CAL t a simple 
little program that demonstrates two useful 
properties of Julian dates; gotoxy mod- 
ules for Level II standard DynaStar, a 
utility to allow a user to change his or her 
password, and a BAS1C09 utility to interac- 
tively change the terminal configuration. 

In the Utilities topic area, Peter Durham 
(pedxing) posted sortdjr.ar, a C pro- 
gram to sort directories. Complete C source 
is included. Peter also uploaded OS9P3, a 
kernel extension module for Level II CoCo 



OS-9 that adds f ull-text "printer" style error 
messages. Source code is also included. 
George Janssen (gbjanssen) sent an up- 
dated version of his fine PAK, F I LEX _ PAK 
and FILES. PAK utilities. Greg Law posted 
rs—copy, which allows trscopy to work 
correctly under Level II. Michael Wash- 
burn (COMPZAP) sent us PAUSE. B09 — a 
BASIC09 source file to set pause for the 
current window, and PRINT. B09, a win- 
dow print command for Gemini and Star 
printers. 

In the Tutorials and Education topic 
area, Brian Wright (POLTERGEIST) up- 
loaded an article that explains some of the 
basic OS-9 concepts. Andrew Ellinor 
(cropper) sent us an article he wrote 
explaining the concepts of operating sys- 
tems. It also explains many of the great 
features of Level II to CoCo 3 owners who 
have not yet purchased it. 

In the Patches topic area, Greg Law 
provided PASCAL. FIX, a modpatch script 
file for patching pascal to work properly 
under Level II, and LOGIN. FIX, a mod- 
patch script file for patching the Level I 
Login command to work with Level II. 

In the Graphics topic area, Dale Puckett 
(dalep) uploaded the KissDraw program 
from his column in rainbow. Dale hopes 
to see the continuing evolution of KlSSDraw 
become a CoCo community project. Dave 
Archer (davearcher) sent us his fonted 
program, which is a simple font editor for 



62 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



an inquiry about your subscription. 
Simply press Y for yes or N for no and 
then press ENTER. After this, you will be 
asked f or your subscription number and 
expiration date. This information can 
be found on the label of your copy of 
the RAINBOW. 

Next, you will need to enter your full 
name and address. Most importantly, 
we must have your full name and ad- 
dress to properly handle a situation. All 
too often we receive messages from such 
users as IXZI966 saying, "My subscrip- 
tion just ran out . . . please extend it." 
The user has included neither his real 
name nor his address. There is very little 
we can do with such a request. Even if 
IXZI966 has filled out a user profile in the 
Member Directory section of the SIG 
(something all users should do), we still 
don't have any idea what his subscrip- 
tion number and expiration date are. 
Indeed, since we publish several maga- 
zines, we don't even know to which 
magazine IXZI966 is referring. And his 
complete address may not be given in 



his user profile. 

Finally, you will be given plenty of 
space to leave your report/ inquiry. Just 
enter up to 20 lines of text and press 
CONTROL-Z when you are done. You will 
then be allowed to make suggestions to 
the rainbow staff. 

It really is a simple matter to use this 
form. We do encourage its use as well 
as use of the many other forms in the 
Rainbow Magazine Services section of 
the SIG. From here you can order 
RAINBOWfest tickets as well as sub- 
scriptions to rainbow. You can also 
report address changes and even ask 
questions of our technical experts. The 
main thing is to explore the CoCo SIG 
and learn to use it to its fullest. 

Where It's @ 

Some of you might have noticed a 
peculiar thing while accessing Delphi 
through Telenet. If you should happen 
to press the c @' key as the firstcharacter 
on a line and then immediately follow 
it with a carriage return (ENTER), you 



will quickly find yourself at the Telenet 
prompt. However, short of typing CQNT 
or HfiNG and pressing ENTER, there is 
nothing you can do. CDNT will return 
you to where you were on Delphi and 
HANG will disconnect Telenet. Typing 
HELP, INFO, C DELPHI or any other text 
besides CDNT will result in Telenet 
echoing a question mark to your screen. 

Now, on most computers, this really 
isn't that big a deal. On the CoCo, 
however, the 4 @' key is located just 
above the ENTER key. I don't know 
about you, but at least once during any 
given computing session 1 will go for the 
ENTER and accidentally press the 4 @' 
key, my finger sliding off that one right 
into the ENTER key. Needless to say, if 
I am on Delphi, I find myself in a funny 
predicament. So, be forewarned! It can 
happen to the best of us. Just remember 
that a simple CDNT followed by an 
ENTER will take you right back where 
you left off. Just press ENTER once more 
and the current Delphi prompt will be 
redisplayed. □ 



Level II written in BASIC09. Steve Clark 
(steveclark) uploaded a utility to display 
PMODE 4 graphics under OS-9 Level II 
windows. 



CoCo SIG 

In the General topic area, Kevin Nickols 
(nickols) presented us with the August 
issue of the Tandy Newsletter. Jim Reed 
(jimreed) provided more information on 
the pending FCC rate hike action, while 
Brian Wright sent us another outline of the 
FCC proposal. 

In the Source Code topic area, Doug 
Masten (dmasten) provided us with a fast 
disk duplicating utility for 512K CoCo 3s. 

In the Utilities topic area, Roger Krupski 
(hardwarehack) sent us his patches for 
Disk edtasm to allow it to run correctly 
on the CoCo 3. Brandon Knight (KNiGHTi) 
sent us two basic programs, one to disable 
a disk controller under software control, 
and a second program that "locks out" 
unused granules, making a disk appear f ull. 
Gerry Thomas (INETI9I) sent us a useful 
editing utility for removing linefeed and 
nulls from downloaded text files. The 
program makes use of the special graphics 
available on the CoCo 3, Ira Goldwyn 
(i rag) sent us TC12, the latest version of an 
archiving and de-archiving utility. The 
original basic program was written by 
John Lauro, and he has completely redone 
this version in fast machine language. Marc 
Genois (marcgenois) uploaded his ver- 
sion of a similar program, called Archives, 
for Disk basic Version 1.1 only. Marc's 
version is also written in efficient machine 
language. Marlin Simmons (linlee) 
posted a set of patches called RRCMOD to the 
BASIC version of ARC to make it usable 



with Disk basic 1.0 systems. Eric Robi- 
chaud (egrobichaud) sent us his short 
but useful matrix manipulation programs. 
Jim Sparks (escoman) sent us his program 
makebas that will read an ASCII data file 
from disk and make a basic program from 
that data. It's great f or those who don't have 
a 5CRN command. Dave Ferreira (SKEEVE) 
uploaded his very latest version of the 
popular Omega file utilities. Glen Hatha- 
way (Hathaway) also favored us with a 
revised edition of his popular Snap disk 
editor. 

In the Hardware Hacking topic area, 
Marty Goodman (martygoodman) pro- 
vided another inf ormative hard ware article, 
this one detailing the problems faced by 
owners of the Radio Shack Direct Connect 
Modem Pack. It suggests various sorts of 
fixes for these problems, and includes a 
description of how to modify the pack so 
that it occupies the same addresses as those 
used by the RS-232 pack, allowing it to 
work with software that formerly would 
support only the RS-232 pack. 

In the Games topic area, John Brennan 
(firefly) sent us the great Battle at Vulcan 
game, and Michael Schneider 
(mschneider) provided aset of patches to 
selected games to allow the use of an RGB 
monitor with them. 

In the Graphics topic area, Jason Forbes 
(COC03K1D) sent us some of his favorite 
digitized pictures, including a picture of 
"Ron Headroom." Michael Schneider sent 
us MGE pictures of two lovely female faces 
and one of the cartoon character Spider- 
man. Richard Trasborg (tras) sent us a 
picture of Erik Gavriluk and Greg Miller 
that was digitized from the pages of rain- 
bow. James Farmer (modemm aster) 
uploaded an original drawing that he called 



"Spacewar." Craig Luecke (luecke) sent 
us an MGE picture promoting rainbow 
magazine. Ira Goldwyn uploaded three 
RRCed files that contained a total of 17 
digitized photos. Erik Gavriluk (erikgav) 
uploaded an outstanding pair of machine 
language utilities to allow CoCo 3 owners 
to view DS-69B digitized pictures. Eric 
Robichaud sent us three outstanding Mac- 
intosh pictures that can be viewed by Erik 
Gavriluk's utilities. He also sent us three 
more MGE pictures, including an interest- 
ing picture of Alfred E. Neuman. I up- 
loaded some MGE scenes from across the 
U.S. — a picture of a youth skateboarding 
in space, and another colorful picture of 
Donald Duck. 

In the Music topic area, John Brennan 
uploaded his "Tuner Helper" for guitars. 
(Honest, that's what he called it!) Pete 
Ellison (ucfer) sent us 10 of his great 
musical favorites, including the Toyota 
theme song and music from the Burger 
King and McDonald's commercials. All 
MUSlCA users will want these. Randy 
Cassel (bbtroll) sent us his rendition of 
"Music Box Dancer," and some more four- 
part harmony. 

In the Data Communications topic area, 
Mike Ward (mikeward) provided rle- 
term, an interesting graphics terminal 
program. rleterm \s a "no frills" terminal 
program that will convert an RLE picture 
into a screen image as it's being sent to your 
computer. You may see the picture being 
built while you're online. (This grouping 
also included three RLE pictures drawn by 
Ana Landa for your use in demonstrating 

RLETERM.) 

— Don Hutchison 
Database Manager 
Rainbow CoCo SIG 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 63 



T ele commun i cat i ons 



Getting 
Started 
with 
Delphi 

By Don Hutchison 

Rainbow's Delphi Database Manager 

Many new CoCo users have 
heard about Delphi and also 
about RAINBOW'S efforts to 
bring the CoCo community together 
online. The concept of a nationwide 
network and a national information 
service is quite new and intriguing to 
most, but a little mystifying to new 
users. What I'd like to do here is answer 
some of the questions that potential 
Delphi users may have. 

What is Delphi? 

It's an information service. It oper- 
ates on large computers that are located 
near Boston, Mass. Computer hobby- 
ists can hook up to these computers via 
phone lines from almost anywhere in 



Don Hutchison is an electrical engineer 
and lives in A tlanta, Georgia. He works 
as a senior project engineer involved in 
the design of industrial control systems. 
On Delphi, Don is the Database Man- 
ager of the RAINBOW CoCo SIG. His 
Delphi username is DONHUTCHISON. 



the world. Once connected to Delphi, 
you have instant access to a vast amount 
of information and services, such as 
airline schedules, financial news, elec- 
tronic mail, magazines, books, shop- 
ping services, news, weather, sports and 
groups dedicated to CoCo users. 

What does RAINBOW have to do with 
Delphi? 

THE RAINBOW operates "The CoCo 
SIG" and "OS-9 Online," two of the 
Special Interest Groups (SIGs) on 
Delphi. THE RAINBOW doesn't own 
Delphi, nor does Delphi own THE RAIN- 
BOW. THE RAINBOW simply uses the 
equipment and services that Delphi 
furnishes in order to provide a place for 
CoCo enthusiasts to meet and share 
ideas. Your connect charges pay for 
your access to this service. 

Do I need anything special to use 
Delphi? 

You can access Delphi using your 
CoCo, a telephone, a special device 
called a modem, and a suitable terminal 
program. This will make it possible for 
you to use your CoCo to access all of 
the services available on Delphi. 

What on earth is a modem? 

A modem is simply a small box that 
sits on your desk and furnishes the 
important connection between your 
CoCo's serial port and the phone lines. 
A modem is needed on each end of the 
phone line, and Delphi provides a 
modem at their end. 

A modem (an abbreviation for 
modulator-demodulator) simply con- 
verts the ones and zeroes that your 
CoCo supplies to it into different tones. 
These tones can be sent over ordinary 
phone lines to a remote modem such as 
the ones Delphi uses. The remote 
modem converts the tones back into 
ones and zeroes and supplies them to 
Delphi's computers. It's really just an 
efficient way to connect two widely 



separated computers with a minimum 
of hardware. 

Modems for computer hobbyists are 
available at reasonable cost, from about 
$60 up to a few hundred dollars, de- 
pending on features. Three different 
baud rates (speeds) are commonly 
available: 300, 1200 and 2400 bits per 
second. (Sometimes the term baud is 
used interchangeably with the term bits 
per second) This is roughly the same as 
saying that a modem may send and 
receive 30, 120 or 240 characters per 
second. 

Naturally, the higher speed modems 
cost a bit more, but they are usually 
capable of operation at the lower 
speed(s) also. For example, a 1200 bits- 
per-second modem is usually capable of 
operating at 300 bits per second, while 
a 2400 bits-per-second modem is usu- 
ally capable of 300 and 1200 bits-per- 
second operation, as well. 

A 300 bits-per-second modem is all 
that is really necessary for casually 
reading messages and electronic mail, 
but many users prefer the faster 
throughput of the higher speed mo- 
dems. Since the price of the higherspeed 
modems is declining almost daily, it will 
be to your advantage generally to shop 
for the modem that best suits your 
anticipated needs. An auto-dialing 1200 
bits-per-second modem is probably the 
most popular at present, although 2400 
bits-per-second modems are rapidly 
becoming an international standard. 
Popular modems include the Avatex 
1200 HC, the Mitsuba, and the Hayes 
Smartmodem series. Any modem that 
you consider purchasing should be 
"Hayes-compatible." 

If you plan to operate the modem 
from the standard CoCo serial port, a 
special cable is required, one with a 
four-pin DIN connector on one end and 
a standard DB-25 connector on the 
other end. Operation with the Radio 
Shack Deluxe RS-232 Program Pak is 
possible with a "straight through" cable 



64 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



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that has a DB-25 connector on each 
end. 

Whafs a terminal program? 

When you use your CoCo with a 
word processing program such as Tele- 
writer or VIP Writer, you are using your 
computer as a sort of electronic type- 
writer, You type your text on the key- 
board and see the result on the screen. 
When you Ye finished, you can print 
your document on a printer. 

A terminal program is similar be- 
cause it allows you to use your CoCo 
as a terminal. This means that you can 
type on your keyboard, and your typing 
will be sent to the remote computers at 
Delphi. When Delphi sends informa- 
tion to you, the terminal program will 
accept that information from the 
modem and display it on your screen. 

Make sure that your terminal pro- 
gram is compatible with your chosen 
modem and optional hardware. Any 
modern terminal program will operate 
at 300 bits per second, but some termi- 
nal programs may require an RS-232 
pack for operation at the higher speeds 
such as 1200 and 2400 bits per second. 

Also, be sure that your chosen termi- 
nal program supports a protocol such 
as Xrnodetn or Kermit. These features 
provide error-free file transfers from 
Delphi to your computer. They do this 
by sending the data to your computer 
in small chunks. Following each 128- 
byte chunk of data is a checksum, which 
is simply the sum of all the data bytes 
that Delphi sent to your computer. Your 
computer then adds up all thedata bytes 
again and compares its result with the 
one Delphi calculated. If they agree, 
your terminal program says, "Great! 
Send me more!"; if they don't agree, 
your terminal program says, "Uh-oh, 
please send that again," to the Delphi 
computer, and it does. In this manner, 
both computers areconstantly checking 
for errors for you! 

All modern terminal programs sup- 
port Xmodem. Popular commercially 
available terminal programs include 
Auto term, Color Connection and Col- 
orCOMj E y which are priced from $40 
to $50 and are available through several 
RAINBOW advertisers. 

OS-9 users generally choose Xterm or 
the Wiz. Xterm will operate under OS- 
9 Level I using the standard serial port 
(a driver for the RS-232 pack is fur- 
nished), while the Wiz requires a CoCo 
3, OS-9 Level II, the Deluxe RS-232 
Program Pak and Multipack, and a 
512K memory expansion. 

Recently, several programmers have 



written terminal programs to share with 
others. These terminal programs are 
called Rickey term, Greg-E-Term and 
MikeyTerm in honor of their respective 
authors Rick Adams, Greg Miller and 
Mike Ward. The authors have kindly 
allowed their terminal programs to be 
distributed and copied freely by all 
CoCo users. However, the programs 
remain the copyrighted works of their 
authors. 

For a minimal $10 charge, these 
programs may be obtained directly 
from the author of the individual pro- 
gram. All of the programs are compat- 
ible with the CoCo 3, and all feature 
Xmodem file transfer capability. All are 
disk-based terminal programs except 
MikeyTerm, which also has provisions 
to support tape I/O. All three offer 
reliable communications and dependa- 
ble operation at a minimum cost. 

For the OS-9 user, the most popular 
terminal program is XCOM9, distrib- 
uted as a public domain terminal pro- 
gram by the national OS-9 Users 
Group. Several OS-9 terminal pro- 
grams that support the Kermit protocol 
are also available through the Users 
Group. 

Do I have to pay long-distance charges 
since Delphi is in Massachusetts? 

No, Delphi uses several services 
called networks to lower the cost of 
telecomputing, The two most-used 
networks are named Telenet and 
Tymnet. These networks buy enormous 
amounts of telephone time, and may 
even purchase some of their own tele- 
phone equipment. By doing so, they are 
able to provide users with access to 
Delphi at rates much lower than long- 
distance charges. 

You may usually connect your com- 
puter to one of these networks by 
d ialing a local phone number. To obtain 
the telephone number for Telenet in 
your area, call (800) 336-0437. The 
corresponding telephone number for 
Tymnet is (800) 336-0149. These are the 
"customer service" numbers for each 
network. 

How much does it cost? 

The connect charges are always pub- 
lished online on Delphi, and they are 
currently $7.20 per hour duringthe non- 
prime time hours of 6 p.m. until 7 a.m. 
local time on weekdays and all day 
Saturdays and Sundays. (Access at 
other times is available at a higher rate.) 
This rate is the same whether you access 
Delphi at 300, 1200 or 2400 bits per 
second. You may also use the service 



offered by Delphi on the following 
holidays at the non-prime time rate: 
New Year's Day, Fourth of July, Labor 
Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. 
Once you learn your way around on 
Delphi, you'll find that you can ac- 
complish a great deal in a fairly short 
period of time. 

What's available on Delphi? 

For one thing, all of the programs 
that are published every month in THE 
rainbow are available on Delphi! You 
can download any or all of the pro- 
grams for just the cost of connect time 
plus a small surcharge. 

All BASIC programs in the rainbow 
ON TAPE topic of the database are stored 
in compressed or tokenized format, and 
all binary or machine language pro- 
grams are stored in disk binary format. 
This is the same format that would be 
created if one entered SRVE ( M ] 
"filename" from the keyboard. In other 
words, the files are created and saved on 
a disk-based CoCo system. 

Cassette users should be aware of 
this, because special processing is neces- 
sary after downloading the RAINBOW 
ON TAPE files, A special utility called 
TAPCNV has been written by Mike Ward 
to convert the machine language files 
into a format that's compatible with 
tape systems. Mike has written another 
specialized utility called BASFIX that 
will convert the BASIC programs into a 
format that may be used by tape sys- 
tems. Cassette-system users should have 
both of these utilities available if they 
plan to download programs from the 
rainbow on TAPE topic of the data- 
base. The programs are available online 
from the RAINBOW SIG on Delphi, and 
are found in the utilities topic of the 
database. (These special steps are not 
required by owners of disk-based CoCo 
systems,) 

" The RAINBOW CoCo SiG on Delphi 
contains a large library of graphics 
pictures, especially the high-resolution 
pictures for the CoCo 3. These pictures 
are listed with an extension of MGE and 
are meant for use with Color Max 3, 
Hundreds of PMDDE A graphics are 
available online, and these are compat- 
ible with the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 

Additionally, many fine utilities, 
games, music files, assembler source 
code files, hardware articles, and even 
specialized educational programs for 
the home are available from the data- 
base. If you have a special need for a 
certain type of program, you'll mmsi 
likely be able to find it in the SIG's 
database. 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 67 



You also have access to the special 
areas such as travel information, elec- 
tronic mail services, financial news and 
information, and specialized informa- 
tion that is furnished on the specialized 
areas of Delphi like the CoCo SIG and 
OS-9 Online. 

Also, many vendors maintain online 
shopping areas on Delphi in the CoCo 
SIG and OS-9 Online. Here you may 
order books and other Color Computer 
products, as well as back issues of 
RAINBOW and other items. 

The RAINBOW CoCo SIG also has a 
vast number of the CoCo "experts" who 
frequent the SIG, just waiting for an 
opportunity to help the novice member. 
If a user has a nagging question or needs 
help in a specialized field, personalities 
such as Rick Adams, Steve Bjork, 
Kevin Darling, Art Flexser, Erik Gav- 
riluk, Greg Law, Dale Lear, Greg 
Miller, Mike Ward and myself may be 
able to help out. Also, many RAINBOW 
writers are online: such notables as Cray 
Augsburg, Bill Barden, Dan Downard, 
Ed Ellers, Richard Esposito, Lonnie 
Falk, Marty Goodman, Dale Puckett, 
Jim Reed and Dick White. 



What's downloading? 

Downloading is a way of transferring 
a program from Delphi's computer to 
your CoCo. Once the transfer is com- 
plete, you may save the program or file 
to disk or tape. There isn*t any need to 
download a program every time you 
want to use it. 

Downloading is a standard service 
provided by almost all terminal pro- 
grams. The better ones also provide 
methods for monitoring the transfer 
using special procedures or protocols 
for error detection. This is how Bel phi 
tries to make sure that you get an error- 
free copy of the program or file. Xmo- 
dem is the most popular protocol on 
Delphi, but terminal programs that 
support the Kermit protocol may be 
used also. 

Downloading is very easy, and most 
users find themselves downloading files 
without difficulty after experiencing 
their first downloading session. The 
actual process is initiated by telling 
Delphi what you want to download by 
entering a filename, or sometimes by 
simply entering DOWNLOAD, Then a 
special combination of keystrokes in- 
forms your terminal program that you 
want to download the file. The transfer 
is then automatic until completion of 
the download, when the terminal pro- 
gram will ask you a question or two 



about how to save the information. It's 
really easy! 

Where can I learn more? 

A great source of information about 
using Delphi is published in THE RAIN- 
BOW. Cray Augsburg, rainbow's tech- 
nical editor, writes a monthly column 
titled "Delphi Bureau." Each month his 
column covers another topic related to 
Delphi. Be sure to read the "Delphi 
Bureau" every month in RAINBOW. 

Also, many Help files are available 
online. Just type HELP at the main 
prompt of the CoCo SIG or OS-9 
Online and you'll be able to access more 
than 60 special Help modules written 
for CoCo users. 

Online help is provided by the Delphi 
system itself. S imply entering a T at any 
of the prompts will result in the initia- 
tion of a dialogue sequence that's de- 
signed to quickly give the user concise, 
accurate information. 

The March '87 issue of RAINBOW 
featured a copy of the Delphi command 
card in the u Delphi Bureau" column. 
This is an extremely useful reference 
card, and most users will do well to keep 
it beside their computers forquick help. 

Another great reference is the Delphi 
Handbook, which is available directly 
from Delphi for $29.95, and can be 
ordered online. The handbook is a very 
complete source of information about 
all of the services and features available 
on Delphi. Another book, Using Del- 
phi, will be available for Delphi users 
later this yean 

What is the Forum for? 

The Forum is for the exchange of 
information, ideas, hints and tips, and 
just about anything else that you care 
to talk about. Here you can ask ques- 
tions and receive help and information 
from other CoCo enthusiasts across the 
nation and around the world. The 
Forum is like a nationwide electronic 
bulletin board. 

Tve heard a lot about the Conference 
area. What's that? 

The Conference area is a special 
feature of Delphi that lets users "talk" 
to each other in real time. Users can type 
single-line messages on their computers 
and the messages will be broadcast to 
other users in the Conference area. All 
users are able to reply in the same 
manner. It is not uncommon for several 
users from across the country to be seen 
in Conference. 

Conferencing is a great way to hold 
informal meetings with friends inexpen- 



sively, since connect charges are much 
less than long-distance charges. It is also 
highly contagious. Once a person is 
accustomed to the Conference area, he 
or she prefers to talk frequently with 
friends from across the country. Some 
say the nickname "party animal" orig- 
inally described Delphi Conference- 
goers. 

What is the database and how is it used? 

The database is where all of the 
programs and files are stored. It is 
divided into topic areas, such as Games, 
Utilities, Graphics, etc. Programs and 
information are available in the data- 
bases, and you may download them for 
only the cost of connect time to Delphi. 
We have many, many great programs 
and text files in the database of the 
CoCo SIG and OS-9 Online. 

If I download a program from the CoCo 
SIG or OS-9 Online, may I give my 
friends a copy? 

No, because almost all of the pro- 
grams and files in the databases are 
copyrighted, just as commercial soft- 
ware is copyrighted. You may use any- 
thing that you download for your own 
personal use, and you may make back- 
ups of such files for your own use, but 
you are not allowed to give or sell them 
to others. 

Isn't it sorta scary? 

No, it's exciting! Just imagine being 
able to "talk" to people from all across 
the United States at one time! Imagine 
having almost 24-hour access to people 
and information through use of Mail, 
Conference, and the Forum! It's mod- 
ern and as fast as the speed of light. 

Even if you become totally disori- 
ented your first time online, you may 
simply disconnect from Delphi and 
connect again when youVe ready. It 
won't hurt your computer a bit! 

How do I sign up? 

See the Delphi ad in THE RAINBOW 
for information on how to sign up for 
your lifetime membership on Delphi via 
modem. It's fast and easy, and your first 
hour online is free! Additional sign-up 
offers are available at reduced rates. 
Y#u may use your VISA, Mastercard or 
American Express card, or you may 
choose direct-billing with a small dep- 
osit. 

Be sure to take the "guided tour** 
when you first sign up, as it will ac- 
quaint you with Delphi's major areas 
quickly, It's well worth the small 
amount of time for the "tour." 

See you online on Delphi! /^\ 



68 THE RAINBOW November 1987 




*» 8 



***** 



IRON CROSS 

War in Russia 

by John & Michael Gafus 



The German invasion of Russia 
began at 0300 on 22 June 194L 
Two massive armies faced each 
other in a titanic struggle which 
would decide World War II. The 
object of IRON CROSS is to 
defeat the Russian forces con- 
trolled by the computer & to 
take control of the Russian cities. 



Requires 64K, Ext. Basic, Disk. $24.95 



■ Color Max 3 



i — OS-9 Tools 



Now 320 x 200 screen resolution & a choice of _^ 
16 of the 64 colors are available on your CoCo 5> . uv^j^$ 
3. Painting is a snap with its easy to use icons. ^/^ l \/rv^^ 
pull down menus, & dialog boxes. Color Max 3 has 1 1 fonts mak- 
ing hundreds of lettering styles possible. Please specify printer type 
when ordering. 

Req. 128K, disk, hl-res joystick Interface S 57.50 



Mltsuba 1200 Modem 



Great Hayes compatible 1200 baud modem 
Mitsuba 1200 SI 49 



CoCo cable 



S 25 



Color Connection 

modem communication software 
by BJ Chambless 

Color Connection for RSDOS and OS-9 Connection are the best in 
communication software. All standard protocols are supported. 
including CompuServe Protocol R XMODEM, and XON/XOFF. The 
auto dial feature for Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems 
is supported. Macros allow easy entry of often-used passwords and 
ID s. 300. 1200, and higher baud rates supported. Communicate with 
confidence with this super modem softwar el 



OS-9 version requires R232 Pak 
RSDOS versions (CoCo 2 & CoCo 3 Incl) 



coming soon 



S49.95 
S 49.95 




Screen Star 

by Scott Cablt 



This excellent screen editor implements the popular WordStar edit- 
ing capabilities on OS-9 & includes a unique Speller. Move, copy, 
or delete blocks of text with one keystroke. Powerful cursor com- 
mands allow fast, easy movement throughout the file. The find/ 
replace command makes mass changes & searches a snap. Set tabs, 
toggle the video, access the OS-9 shell & define up to 10 function 
keys for fast repetitive functions. And it will edit files larger than 
memory tool Easy interface with Computerware's Text Format- 
ter makes an exquisite word processing package! 



Requires OS-9 
With Text Formatter 



S49.95 
S74.95 



OS-9 Text Formatter 

The OS-9 Text Formatter turns text files into beautifully printed 
documents. It supports right & left justification, automatic pagi- 
nation, headers & footers, macros, tabs, page numbering, auto 
date insert, ESC & CTLcodes for printer directives & more. It inter- 
faces with any editor that produces standard ASCII text files like 
Computerware's Screen Star & Radio Shack's TS Edit. Whyjust print 
it when you can format it?l 



Requires OS-9 



S 34.95 



Computerware's new fall catalog! 
Call or write for your copy today! 



| Call or Write to: 



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~ 3^ Box 668 • Encinitas, CA • 92024 



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Air or Canada — S 5 minimum . TOTAL . 

5% for orders over S100 
Checks are delayed for bank clearance 



I Organ i z ation 



32K. Disk 




Let Your CoCo 
Do the Walking 

By Devon Copley 



A user-friendly 
database for 
storing telephone 
numbers 



Phone Numbers is an extensive 
database for the CoCo that 
includes many useful and time- 
saving features and is as user-friendly as 
possible. 

The program is currently configured 
for disk, but by changing all disk com- 
mands to cassette commands, it can 
easily be adapted to cassette. 

Phone Numbers uses almost all avail- 
able memory for the program and data 
storage. However, more can be accessed 
by a PCLEflR 1 command. I have found 
the memory available at PCLEflR A more 
than adequate for all applications. 

Input Numbers and Names 

This option allows you to enter the 
data the program will use. When you 
enter this routine, you will be asked for 
the default area code. This code will be 
used if you do not specify an area code 
when entering a number. If you enter a 
number with an area code different 
from the default, you must use the 
format (XXX) XXX-XXXX. Other- 
wise, simply use the format XXX- 
XXXX. 

After you enter the numbers, the 



Devon Copley has been using his CoCo 
for over six years and lives in Amherst, 
New York. This is his first full-length 
program for THE RAINBOW. 



computer will give you five prompts. 
The Name, Number and Comment 
prompts are self-explanatory. If you 
simply press ENTER at the comment 
prompt, the computer will display the 
word "none" automatically. 

List All Numbers 

This command sends the computer 
through all the numbers in the current 
file, one by one. You are then asked for 




MIIIIIIW 



70 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



Data Master 

from the same people who brought you Data Bank fi OS-9 Profile. . . 
a new level of sophistication and ease of use in data base systems! 




by B J Chambless 



y 



Simplify steps with pull-down menus 

Throw down the shackles of rigid menu hierarchies and see how simple our 
pull-down menu system is to use. All options are available from anywhere in 
the program. So what if you're designing a report, if you want to change 
your access key you can do it right then and there without exiting back and 
forth through several levels of menus and options. To make it even simpler, 
each menu option can be invoked by a single character! 

Dialog boxes 

Pop-up windows display current settings (display, access, print] and avail- 
able choices for fast changes of any option. 

Unique LIST (spreadsheet) display format 

A unique LIST display format lets you view data in easy-to-read rows 
& columns. Simply choose which elements from the record you want to 
see and Data Master displays them in a simple, one record per line, 
spreadsheet-like format. 



From this easy-to-read screen you may edit your data right there, without 
having to exit the djsplay menu, enter an edit menu, and edit each individual 
record. Mass changes are a snap! 



For even more power, use an access key to selectively display a subset of 
records from your data base. Now you see only the chosen elements, in the 
chosen records, in a very simplified screen format - and can change them 
right on the screen! 

Upload/Download with other software 

Data Master can read and writestandand sequential files which aids in 

data transfer between DynaCalc and many other programs. 

OS-9 Profile & Data Bank Compatibility 

Your OS-9 Profile and Data 8ank files are compatible with the new power 
of Data Master. You won't lose any of your valuable data when you step 
up to Data Master! 

Easy Expansion 

Re-definition of records and transfer of files is made easy, allowing you flexi- 
bility when designing a new data base or when using an old one for new tasks. 



S64.95 



Elements & Records; 

Each record can contain up to 512 characters used within 35 elements. Ele- 
ments are defined as: alphanumeric (descriptive data], math [real numbers 
including dollars & cents], date, and derived (formulas calculated from other 
elements in the same record). You can store any type of data using these 
field types! 

Display & Entry Screens 

Design up to 9 different screen formats for data display and data entry for 
each data base. This is helpful for accessing your data for different purposes 
as well as in easy data entry of specific elements. 

Sorts & Selections: 

Up to 9 different access keys can be defined. These are used for displaying 
data on the screen on selecting data for printing. You may use several levels 
of sorts as well as logical operators to select just the right data. A powerful 
generic search is also available. 

Reports: 

See your data any way you want by designing your own reports! Data 
Master offers easy-to-use tools to design professional reports including 
report headings, titles, column headings, automatic page numbers, column 
totals, and more. Store up to 9 report formats for each data base. At print 
time use the powerful access keys to select the data printed on any report 
format. 

File Management 

Built-in file management capabilities allow easy file manipulation for trans- 
ferring data files, renaming data files, expanding data files, and more. This 
integrated function is easy to use and available from the simplified puil-down 
menu system. 

Full keyboard ease 

Data Master takes full advantage of the CoCo 3's cursor and function keys. 
OS-9 accessible 

Even while operating within Data Master, you can invoke OS-9 commands. 
Requires: OS-9 Level II, CoCo 3, 512K 



COMPUTERWARE ® 



P.O. Box 668 
Encinitas, CA 92024 
(619) 436-3512 



a time delay between numbers; I find a 
value of 50 comfortable. 

Searchfor Name 

When you enter this subroutine, the 
program simply asks you for a name. It 
then searches through all of the files; if 
there is a file under that name, the 
computer shows it to you. Then the 
program returns you to the main menu. 

Search for Number 

This routine is very powerful. One of 
the things it does is find a file from just 
the number you entered. However, if 
you used X's instead of numbers for 
some of the digits, the computer allows 
any digit to fit into that place. For 
example, if you enter (555) XXX- 
XXXX, the computer finds any and all 
numbers with the area code 555. You 
can use this routine to find all the 
numbers in one exchange. For instance, 
entering (555) 000-XXXX retrieves all 
numbers with the area code 555 and the 
exchange 000. 

Dump All Numbers to Printer 

This option allows you to print out 



the entire numbers file. It adjusts itself 
to your printer's line length and allows 
you to decide whether you want single- 
spaced or double-spaced copy. It also 
lets you decide whether to print com- 
ments or not. 

Change Name, Number or Comment 

This subroutine is simply a time- 
saving feature. If, for instance, one of 
the people on file had his or her tele- 
phone number changed, you could use 
this option to change the number on file 
without altering any of the other infor- 
mation. The program also allows you to 
change the name or the comment. 

Delete Name and Number 

This subroutine asks you for both the 
name and the number of the file you 
want to delete. For instance, if you had 
two people named "John Smith" in 
your file, you could easily choose the 
correct one to delete. 

Save Numbers File 

This option allows you to save the 



entire numbers file to disk under any 
filename you want. 

Load Numbers File 

This option allows you to load in a 
numbers file, under any desired file- 
name, from disk. 

Exit Program 

This ends the program with a STOP 
statement. However, if choosing this 
option was a mistake, you can return to 
the program without losing any data by 
typing CDNT and pressing ENTER. 

Clear Memory 

After you select this option, the 
computer will give you a warning mes- 
sage asking if you really want to erase 
all of your data. Anything but the entire 
word "yes" returns you to the main 
menu. 



(Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at 88 Ruskin 
Road, Amherst, NY 14226. Please 
enclose an SASE when writing for a 
reply,) □ 



250 140 1060 191 

330 ......160 1250 .....189 

510 244 1410 .25 

730 61 END 59 

900 .,..,.188 



The listing: NUMFILE 

10 REM ******PHONE NUMBERS ****** 
20 REM *****BY DEVON COPLEY***** 
30 REM STARTED 1/24/85 
40 REM FINISHED 1/26/85 
50 REM REVISED 4/13/85 
60 CLEAR 12000 

70 TN=0:DIM NA$ (255) , NU$ (255) , NO 
$(255) 

80 REM MAIN LOOP 
90 CLS 

100 PRINT" ********** PHONE NUMBER 

110 PRINT 11 1) INPUT NUMBERS AND NA 
MES I? 

120 PRINT" 2 ) LIST ALL NUMBERS" 
130 PRINT" 3 ) SEARCH FOR NAME" 
140 PRINT" 4) SEARCH FOR NUMBER" 
150 PRINT" 5) DUMP ALL NUMBERS TO 
PRINTER" 

160 PRINT" 6) CHANGE NAME , NUMBER , O 
R COMMENT" 



170 PRINT"7) DELETE NAME AND NUMB 

ER" 

180 PRINT"8)SAVE NUMBERS FILE" 

190 PRINT" 9) LOAD NUMBERS FILE" 

200 PRINT"10)EXIT PROGRAM" 

210 PRINT" 11) CLEAR MEMORY" 

220 PRINT: IF A$ = "" THEN A$="IN M 

EMORY ONLY" 

230 PRINT" CURRENT FILE:"A$ 
240 INPUT"SELECT ONE"; I 
250 IF 1=11 THEN CLS : PRINT"you a 
re about to clear memory* this 
will erase all files in memor 
y.":PRINT"IF YOU WISH TO DO THIS 
, TYPE THEENTIRE WORD 'YES' NOW. 
ANYTHING ELSE WILL TAKE YOU BAC 
K TO THE MENU." 

260 IF 1=11 THEN LINEINPUT Z$:IF 

Z$="YES" THEN RUN 
270 IF 1=10 THEN CLS : PRINT"TYPE 
'CONT 1 TO GO BACK INTO THE PROGR 
AM WITHOUT LOSING YOUR DATA. 
":STOP 

280 IF I<0 OR I>9 THEN 90 

290 IF ((I>1 AND K>9)AND TN<2) 

THEN CLS:PRINT"MORE THAN ONE REC 

ORD IS REQUIREDTO USE THIS OPTIO 

N.":GOSUB 1640:GOTO 90 

300 ON I GOSUB 320,500,610,730,8 

70,1050,12 20,13 90,1530 



72 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



310 GOTO 90 

320 CLS: PRINT" INPUT NUMBERS 

AND NAMES" : PRINT : PRINT 

330 PRINT "BE SURE TO USE THE COR 

RECT FOR- MAT WHEN TYPING IN PHO 

NE NUM- BERS. HERE IS AN EXAMP 

LE: (555) -555-5555 

it 

34j3 PRINT" IF NO AREA CODE IS SPE 
CIFIED, THE DEFAULT AREA CODE 
WILL BE USED. " 

35j3 PRINT: INPUT" WHAT IS THE DEFA 

ULT AREA CODE" ;AC$:IF LEN 

(AC$)<>3 THEN 350 

360 AC$=" ("+AC$+")-" 

370 GOSUB 1640: CLS 

380 X=TN:IF TN=0 THEN X=l 

390 PRINT: PRINT: INPUT"NAME" ;NA$ 

400 INPUT" NUMBER" ;NU$ 

410 IF LEN(NU$)<8 THEN 400 

420 IF LEN(NU$)=8 THEN NU$=AC$+N 

U$ 

430 IF MID$(NU$,10,1)=" 11 THEN M 
ID$(NU$,10,l)="-» 

440 IF MID$(NU$,6,1)=" " THEN MI 
D$(NU$,6,1)="-" 

450 INPUT" COMMENT"; NO $: IF NO$="" 
THEN NO$="NONE " : PRINT @ 1 3 7 , NO$ : E 
LSE PRINT 

460 PRINT: INPUT"CORRECT" ;C$ : IF L 

EFT$(C$,1)="N" THEN 390 

470 NU$(X)=NU$:NA$(X)=NA$:NO$(X) 

=NO$ 

4 80 TN=TN+1 

490 INPUT"MORE FILES" ; C$ : IF LEFT 
$(C$,1)="N" THEN RETURN ELSE X=X 
+l:CLS:GOTO 390 

500 CLS: PRINT" LIST ALL N 

UMBERS " 

510 PRINT: INPUT"SPEED DELAY (0-10 

0)";D:IF (D<0 OR D>100) THEN 510 

520 D=D*10 

530 PRINT: PRINT 

540 FOR X=l TO TN 

550 CLS 

560 PRINT: PRINT" NAME: ";NA$(X) : PR 
INT: PRINT" NUMBER: ";NU$(X) : PRINT: 
PRINT" COMMENT:" ;NO$(X) 
570 PRINT 

580 FOR TD=1 TO D : NEXT TD 
590 NEXT X 

600 GOSUB 1640: RETURN 
610 CLS: PRINT" SEARCH FOR 

NAME" 

620 PRINT: INPUT" ENTER NAME" ;NA$ 
630 FOR X=l TO TN 
640 IF NA$(X)=NA$ THEN 680 
650 NEXT X 



660 PRINT "SORRY, THAT NAME IS NO 
T IN THE FILE.": GOSUB 1640 
670 RETURN 

680 PRINT"NAME: ";NA$ (X) 
690 PRINT "NUMBER: " ;NU$ (X) 
700 PRINT "COMMENT: " ;NO$(X) 
710 GOSUB 1640 
720 RETURN 

730 CLS: PRINT" SEARCH FOR 

NUMBER" 

740 PRINT: PRINT "ENTER NUMBER TO 
SEARCH FOR. BE SURE TO INCLUDE 
ALL DASHES." 

750 PRINT "ENTERING 'X' INSTEAD 0 
F A DIGIT WILL ALLOW ANY DIGIT I 
N THAT PLACE. " :LINEINPUT NU$ 

7 60 NP=0 

770 FOR X=l TO TN 

780 NN$=NU$(X) 

790 FL=0:IF LEN (NU$) <>LEN (NN$) T 
HEN NEXT X 

800 FOR Y=l TO LEN(NU$):IF MID$( 
NU$,Y,1)=MID$ (NN$,Y, 1) THEN FL=F 
L+1:ELSE IF MID$(NU$,Y,1)="X" TH 
EN FL=FL+1 
810 NEXT Y 

820 IF FL=LEN (NU$) THEN CLS : PRIN 

T : PRINT" NAME : "NA$(X) : PRINT .'PRINT 

"NUMBER : "NU$ ( X ) : PRINT : PRINT" COMM 

ENT:"NO$(X) :NP=NP+1 

830 IF FL=LEN(NU$) THEN GOSUB 16 

40 

840 IF X<TN THEN NEXT X 

850 IF NPO0 THEN RETURN 

860 PRINT" SORRY, THAT NUMBER IS 

NOT IN THEFILE. ": GOSUB 1640: RETU 

RN 

870 CLS: PRINT" DUMP ALL NUMBER 
S TO PRINTER" 

880 PRINT: PRINT"PRINT COMMENTS (Y 
/N) 11 ; : INPUT 1$ 

890 IF LEFT$(I$,1)="Y" THEN CO=l 

ELSE CO=0 
900 PRINT: INPUT" DOUBLE SPACED(Y/ 
N)";I$:IF LEFT$(I$,1)="Y" THEN D 
S=l ELSE DS=0 

910 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS 'P' TO PRI 
NT NOW, OR ANY OTHER KEY TO RET 
URN TO THE MENU." 

920 X$=INKEY$:IF X$="" THEN 920 
930 IF X$<>"P" THEN RETURN 
940 PRINT: INPUT"HOW MANY CHARACT 
ERS ACROSS DOES YOUR PRINTER HAV 
E" ;CA 

950 PRINT " PRINTING. " 

9 60 FOR X=l TO TN 

970 PRINT#-2,NA$(X) ; 

980 FOR GG=1 TO CA- ( LEN (NA$ (X) ) + 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 73 



LEN(NU$(X) ) ) :PRINT#-2 , 11 . 11 ; :NEXT 
GG 

99j3 PRINT#-2,NU$(X) 

Ij3j3j3 IF C0=1 THEN PRINT 11 COMMENT : 

"NO$ (X) 

1/31/3 IF DS=1 THEN PRINT#-2,"" 
1/32/3 NEXT X 

1/33/3 PRINT " DONE ! ":GOSUB 164/3 
1/34/3 RETURN 

1/35/3 CLS: PRINT" CHANGE NAME 

OR NUMBER" 

1/36/3 PRINT: INPUT "ENTER NAME OR N 
UMBER TO SEARCH FOR";NN$ 
1/37/3 FOR X=l TO TN 

1/38/3 IF (NN$=NA$(X) OR NN$=NU$ (X 
) ) THEN 11/3/3 ELSE NEXT X 
1/39/3 PRINT" SORRY , THAT NAME/NUMB 
ER IS NOT IN THE FILE . 11 : GOSUB 1 
64/3: RETURN 

11/3/3 PRINT" NAME: "NA$ (X) 
111/3 PRINT"NUMBER: "NU$ (X) 
112/3 PRINT 11 COMMENT : "NO$ (X) 
113/3 PRINT: INPUT "DO YOU WANT: 

1) 

OR THE FILE 2) 
FOR THE FILE 3) 
T FOR THE FILE 4) 



A NEW NAME F 
A NEW NUMBER 
A NEW COMMEN 
RETURN TO TH 



E MAIN MENU PICK ONE" ; IN : IF 

(IN>4 OR IN<1) THEN 113/3 
114/3 IF IN=4 THEN RETURN 

ON IN GOTO 116/3,118/3,12/3/3 
PRINT :INPUT"NEW NAME" ;NA$ (X 



115/3 
116/3 
) 

117/3 
118/3 
119/3 
12/3/3 
121/3 
122/3 
AND 



GOSUB 164/3: RETURN 
INPUT "NEW NUMBER" ;NU (X) 
GOSUB 164/3: RETURN 
INPUT"NEW COMMENT" ;NO$ (X) 
GOSUB 164/3: RETURN 
CLS: PRINT" DELETE NAME 

NUMBER" 



123/3 PRINT: PRINT" ENTER NAME" ; : IN 
PUT NA$ 

124/3 INPUT"ENTER NUMBER" ;NU$ 
125/3 PRINT" SEARCHING. . . " 
12 6/3 FOR X=l TO TN 

127/3 IF(NA$(X)=NA$ AND NU$=NU$ (X 
) ) THEN 129/3 ELSE NEXT X 
128/3 PRINT"THERE IS NO FILE UNDE 
R THAT NAMEAND NUMBER. ": GOSUB 16 
4/3: RETURN 

129/3 PRINT"NAME : "NA$ (X) 

13/3/3 PRINT "NUMBER: "NU$ (X) 

131/3 PRINT" COMMENT: 11 NO$ (X) 

132/3 PRINT: PRINT"STILL WANT TO D 



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T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, 2490 MILES STANDISH DR., HOLLAND, Ml 49424 (616) 399-9648 



74 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



ELETE(Y/N) ";: INPUT IN$:IF LEFT$ ( 

IN$,1)<>»Y» THEN RETURN 

1330 PRINT "DELETING. . . " 

1340 FOR Y=(X+1) TO TN 

135j3 NA$(Y-1)=NA$(Y) :NU$(Y-1)=NU 

$(Y) :NO$(Y-l)=NO$(Y) 

13 60 NEXT Y 

1370 TN=TN-1 

1380 GOSUB 1640: RETURN 

1390 CLS: PRINT" SAVE NUMB 

ERS FILE" 

1400 PRINT: PRINT "THIS OPTION WIL 
L SAVE TWO FILES. THE FILENAME YO 
U ENTER, AND A BACKUP." 
1410 PRINT: LINEINPUT"HIT <ENTER> 
TO START SAVING, OR <R> AND <EN 
TER> TO RETURN TO THEMENU . " ; IN$ 
1420 IF IN$="R" THEN RETURN 
1430 INPUT " FI LENAME " ;A$ 
1440 FOR GG=1 TO 2 
1450 IF GG=1 THEN OPEN"0" , #1 , A$ : 
ELSE A$=A$+" . BAK" : OPEN"0" , # 1 , A$ 
1460 WRITE#1,TN 
1470 FOR X=l TO TN 

1480 WRITE#1,NA$(X) ,NU$(X) ,NO$(X 
) 



1490 NEXT X 

1500 CLOSE 

1510 NEXT GG 

1520 GOSUB 1640: RETURN 

1530 CLS: PRINT" LOAD NUMBE 

RS FILE" 

1540 PRINT :LINEINPUT"HIT <ENTER> 

TO LOAD OR <R> AND <ENTER> TO 
RETURN TO THE MAIN MENU.";IN$ 
1550 IF IN$="R" THEN RETURN 
1560 INPUT "FI LENAME ";A$ 
1570 OPEN"I", #1,A$ 
1580 INPUT#1,TN 
1590 FOR X=l TO TN 

1600 INPUT#1,NA$(X) ,NU$(X) ,NO$(X 
) 

1610 IF EOF(l)=-l THEN 1620 ELSE 
NEXT X 

1620 CLOSE:GOSUB 1640:RETURN 
1630 END: REM END OF PROGRAM AND 
MAJOR SUBROUTINES 

1640 PRINT@480," PRESS ANY KE 
Y TO CONTINUE" ; 

1650 X$=INKEY$:IF X$="" THEN 165 
0 

1660 RETURN 



SSSSSS$SSSSSSSSSS$SSSS$SiSSSSS:Vf .CS^:iS$$SSSSS$S$$$$$$SS$SSSS$$ 




RAINBOW 
cmrwvcATim 



If You Are Serious About Stocks. 
This Program Is A Must! 



Stock Market portfolio for the color computer 
will keep track of all your current stock listings 
and keep a listing of stocks you have sold by the 
year, they were sold with all totals, profit and 
loss, and percentages. More than one person 
can use this program as long as the first three 
letters on both first and last name are not the 
same. The program is menu driven and will 
give you the option for either screen print or 
information to be printed on printer. 



Rush Check for $22.00 plus $3.00 shipping & handling to: 
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700Y«rkSt. 

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Please allow 2-3 weeks for delivery 
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The above disks manufactured by BASF — but 

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All 5 1 /4 In. disks complete with Tyvek Sleeves, ID 

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Many other Items available 
3V 2 in. disks SS/DD & DS/DD, 
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Add 5% shipping & handling. Illinois residents 
add 7% tax, 

We accept, VISA, MC, DISCOVER, Personal & 
Company Checks, Money Orders, & C.O.D. 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 



75 



-Eclueatten-Netes- 



Upgrading Keyboard Skills 

By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



r ■ ihis month's article features a 
f| program for kids of all ages and 
JL grade levels. Even many of our 
readers who are long past their school 
years may benefit from it. The program, 
Quickie Typing Tutor, will help stu- 
dents sharpen their keyboard skills. 

We have found that too many stu- 
dents and even adult computer users 
still have very poor keyboard skills, It 
is often such an effort to type in short 
programs or class assignments and 
compositions that the computer re- 
mains unused. It sometimes becomes a 
monumental chore merely to type a few 
paragraphs. This problem should be 
addressed and corrected as early as 
possible. 

To add a little controversy to this 
issue, there is some debate as to whether 
the correct use of typewriter fingering 
should always be insisted upon. My 
feeling is that typing courses are ex- 
tremely useful to computer usage. Un- 
fortunately, they are not always offered 
to students, or not always at a time 
concurrent with computer keyboard 
use. Therefore, I am not convinced that 
correct fingering should always be 
required. 

Lately, I have seen a number of 
students who have independently devel- 
oped their own keyboard fingering 
systems because they had no formal 
typing course available. Their methods 
are all individual. They involve two or 
four or almost any number of the 10 
fingers. Some of these students can use 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master 's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



the keyboard quite swiftly and accu- 
rately. I feel that they should be com- 
mended and not deterred, unless a 
formal typing program can be offered. 
Not everybody agrees on this issue, 
however. 

Our program presents sentences to be 
typed by the user. The program then 
checks to see if the sentence was copied 
correctly, with the results immediately 
shown at the bottom of the screen. After 
each sentence is typed, the student may 
press ENTER to get a new sentence or the 
E key to end the program. Quickie 
Typing Tutor may be played endlessly 
until the student either masters the 
sentences or tires of practicing. The 
current score is always displayed, 

Lines 80 through 1 10 draw a picture 
of the computer keys used. Line 140 
randomly selects a sentence from the 
DRTR statements. The sentence selected 
is R$[R). The student's typed sentence 
is obtained from the LINEINPUT in Line 
160; this becomes B$. Lines 180 and 190 
compare the two and tell if the typed 
sentence matches the computer-selected 
sentence. Line 200 updates the score. 



Included are 20 sample sentences for 
practice. These samples are only a 
starting point. After these 20 are suffi- 
ciently mastered or memorized, replace 
them with 20 of your own. 

You may want to include more than 
20 DRTR statements. I recommend you 
put in 50 to 100 sentences to make the 
program more challenging. People are 
creatures of habit and like to win. 
Therefore, you may expect that with 
only 20 sentences to learn, many users 
will begin to memorize them. This puts 
those who d on't memorize the sentences 
easily at a disadvantage. 

A further step in the process of attain- 
ing better keyboard skills simply in- 
volves applying masking tape over all or 
some of the keys. You are forced to learn 
the placement of the keys if you cannot 
see them. I have mixed emotions on this 
technique and, therefore, leave it to you 
to decide if you would like to try it. 

As always, we at Computer Island 
enjoy hearing your thoughts on the 
ideas and programs presented in this 
column, □ 



The listing; TYPING 

IP REM" QUICKIE TYPING TUTOR" 

2j3 REM" STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER IS LAN 

D, STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1987" 

3j3 N=2j3 :K=RND( -TIMER) : DIM A$(2j3) 

40 FOR T=l TO N: READ A$ (T) : NEXT 

T 

5j3 CLS : R=RND (N) 
6j3 PRINT@j3," R=";C" 
W=" ;W 

7j3 PRINT@3 6,"* QUICKIE TYPING TU 
TOR *"; 



76 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



8j3 Al$="l 234567890:- 
ii 

9j3 A2$=" QWERTYUIOP@ 
Ipp A3$=" AS DFGHJKL ; 11 



llj3 A4$=" Z X C V B N M 



/ 



12j3 PRINT@99,A1$:PRINT@131,A2$:P 
RINT@163 , A3$ : PRINT@195 , A4$ 
130 PRINT@64,STRING$(32,2 39) ; : PR 
INT@224,STRING$ (32 ,239) ; 
14j3 PRINT@2 5 6 , A$ (R) 
15j3 PRINT@32j3, 11 " ; 
16j3 LINEINPUT B$ 
170 PRINT@38 4,STRING$ (32, 224) ; 
18J3 IF B$=A$(R) THEN PRINT@42 6," 
CORRECT" : PLAY" L15 j3 CDEGGGG " : C=C+1 
190 IF B$OA$(R) THEN PRINT@427, 
"SORRY" : PLAY" L8G-" :W=W+1 
200 PRINT@0," R=";C" 
w=" ;w; 

210 PRINT@488 , "PRESS ENTER"; 
220 EN$=INKEY$ 

230 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 50 ELSE 

IF EN$="E" THEN END ELSE 220 
240 REM" HERE ARE 20 REPLACEABLE 
DATA STATEMENTS TO GET HELP GET 
YOU STARTED" 

250 DATA THE RAINBOW IS A MAGAZI 



NE . , LONNIE FALK IS THE OWNER OF 
THE RAINBOW. 

260 DATA THIS IS A TEST TO SEE H 
OW WELL YOU CAN TYPE SENTENCES. 
270 DATA CAN YOU TYPE WELL?, MY F 
INGERS DON'T HURT MUCH. 
280 DATA HOW ARE YOU FEELING ON 
THIS FINEAUTUMN DAY? , I FEEL FINE 
TODAY. 

290 DATA THIS SENTENCE WILL GO 
PAST THE FIRST LINE. 
300 DATA THEY ARE COMING HERE FO 
R LUNCH., CAN YOU WASH THE DISHES 

310 DATA WHEN ARE YOU GOING HOME 
?,WILL YOU BE BACK TOMORROW? 
320 DATA I LIKE TO WATCH JOHNNY 
CARSON., BUGS BUNNY IS MY FAVORIT 
E CARTOON. 

330 DATA SPIDERMAN HAS SPECIAL P 
OWERS ., MADONNA IS MY FAVORITE SI 
NGER. 

3 40 DATA MY CLASS HAS 8 COLOR CO 
MPUTERS.,I CAN'T WAIT FOR THANKS 
GIVING. 

350 DATA I AM GOING TO THE MOVIE 
S LATER., I WILL SEE A GOOD PICTU 
RE SHOW. /R\ 



«< GIWIESOFT >» 



MULTI-LABEL III 

(CoCo III only) 

An easy to use, versatile label creating program Including 
many new CoCo III features. Even if you already own a 
label program, this one's a must for the 31 
(See July '87 review) Disk $16.95 

Custom Palette Designer 

(CoCo III only) 
Easily alter the contents of any palette without having 
to remember numbers or colors! Once configured, all 
sixteen palettes can be saved to disk as a single 
subroutine which may then be used in a basic program. 
(See Aug. '87 review) Disk.. $19.95 

CoCo Max III 

(CoCo III only) 

INTRODUCING the next generation: 
More Resolution! / More power! / More color! 
Built in animationl / More speed! / More tools! 
More type stylesl / Amazing color sequencinglll 

Complele package $79.95 

PYRAMIX 

(CoCo iii only) 

Experience brilliant colors, sharp graphics, and hot action 
in this super machine language arcade game! 

Disk , , $24.95 



FKEYS III 



(CoCo 

A user friendly, user programmable function key utility 
that creates up to 20 function keys. Other features 
include an EDITOR, DOS mods, and DISABLE. Comes 
with an enhanced CoCo ill version and It's EPROMable. 
(See April '87 review) Disk (latest version) $19.95 



SIXDRIVE 



(CoCo l/ll/IH) 

This machine language utility modifies DECB 1.0, 1.1, 
FKEYS III, or ADOS to allow the use of 3 double-sided 
drives (or 2 double-sided drives and J&R's RAMDISKS) 
as 6 single-sided drives without ANY hardware mods. 
Includes 2 selectable drive assignments and It's 
EPROMabie. 

Disk $16.95 

With purchase of FKEYS III............ $12.95 

With purchase of any JramR $ 9.95 

JramR 512K Upgrade 

(CoCo III only) 
#1010 JramR bare board, connectors, and 

software $39.95 

#1014 JramR assembled and tested with software, 

without memory chips..... $49.95 

#1012 JramR assembled and tested with software, 

512K memory $99.95 

(See June '87 review) 



Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
Information: Delphi's CoCo Sig 



GSMMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301-256-7558 or 301-256-2953 



Add $2.50 for shipping and handling 
Add $2.00 for COD's 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VISA/MC/Check/Money Order/COD 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 77 



I B BS Game 



32K Disk 



*<wr TT ou are the skipper of a fleet of 
vessels in deep space. Your mis- 

JL sion: To colonize uncharted 
planets, establish bases, transport 
cargo, and let no onestand in your way. 
You check the ship's long-range scanner 
to find enemy fleets converging on your 
position. You deploy a squadron of 
fighters to intercept the enemy. A red 
alert is sounded. Flagship defenses go 
automatic. The battle begins. . . . 

Galactic Conflict is a multi-player 
BBS game for up to 40 players. It will 
work as a stand-alone BBS using Re- 
motel, or it can be easily modified to 
work with most CoCo-based 32K BBS 
systems. To date, the game has topped 
500 calls and has proven to be quite 
popular, serving as an alternative to the 
normal BBS functions of reading and 
writing posts. 

The game is played on several levels, 
each level a grid of predetermined size. 
The SysOp sets the size of the grid and 
the number of levels at the start of the 
game. This way, the SysOp can allocate 
as much disk space as he has available, 
or make each game different for the 
users, 

When the galaxy is small, its resour- 
ces run out quickly, and the users are 
forced to war with each other. If the 
galaxy is large, there are plenty of 
resources to go around, and the game 
is usually won quickly. A typical galaxy 
size is a 20-by-20 grid with four levels. 
This gives the players 1,600 sectors to 
explore. 

Getting Started 

Galactic Conflict requires a min- 
imum of 15 granules of disk space: nine 
for the program, four for the user data 
file, at least one for the galaxy, and one 
for the rules. You should allow at least 
one granule for each level in the game. 
For example, a 20-by-20 grid with four 
levels would use a total of 18 granules. 



Paul Alger holds a bachelor's degree in 
audio engineering and is currently 
working as a professional musician. He 
also runs The Time Machine BBS at 
(509)586-2559 which in online 24 hours 
a day at 300 baud. 



Caught 

Up 

in a 
Galactic 
Conflict 

By Paul Alger 

Type in Listing 1, NEWGRME, and run 
it. This program creates all of the data 
files needed for the game. You will be 
prompted to select the size of the grid 
and number of levels. When the data 
files are made, you have the option of 
setting up the number of planets, robo- 
droids, etc., that is held in each level. 
Remember that a 20-by-20 grid contains 
400 sectors and the total items in each 
level cannot exceed that number. Here 
is a typical setup for Level 1: 



Prompt 


Typical 




response 


Enter number of 


250 


planets with cargo 




Enter number of 


40 


Robodroids 




Enter number of 


40 


Stargates 




Enter number of? 


40 


In the above example, 370 out of 400 



sectors will have items of value, while 



the remaining 30 sectors will be neutral 
planets with no cargo. 

These steps are repeated for each 
level In this way, the SysOp can make 
each level different, I usually set up one 
level as nothing but Robodroids and T. 
Use your imagination. 

Playing the Game 

Once the data files and the galaxy are 
in place, type in Listing 2, GALRCTIC. 
Then save the program to disk and enter 

the following: 

LO ADM "REMOTE 2 ~ 

EXEC 

PCLEAR1 

RUN"GALACTIC" 

Press ENTER again and log on the 
game as new When the logon process 
is complete, use any of the following 
commands to play the game. 

NAV, The Navigation command allows 
your fleet to move from sector to sector 
within the current level. When the Nav 
option is selected, you will be prompted 
to enter a direction (I to 8). The direc- 
tion of travel is as follows: 

1 ) up, or north 

2) up and right, or northeast 

3) right, or east 

4) down and right, or southeast 

5) down, or south 

6) down and left, or southwest 

7) left, or west 

8) up and left, or northwest 

Any other value will abort the Nav 
command. When a direction of travel is 
selected, you will be prompted to enter 
a Warp factor (1 to 8). Warp 1 will move 
you one sector while Warp 8 will move 
you eight sectors. 

5R5. The Short-Range Scan will list 
what is contained in the sector you are 
currently in. 

LR5. If you have purchased a scanner, 
the Long-Range Scan will allow you to 
look beyond the sector you are in. The 
more scanners you have, the farther you 



78 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Proven Technology 

New CoCo 3 Utilities 

Great for 512K Systems! From Color Venture and OWL WARE 

BACKUP LIGHTNING 

This program is the fastest way to make 
backup copies of your files using a 512K 
CoCo. You can backup 35, 40, or 80 
track disks single or double sided. Both 
RS and OS-9 disks may be backed up. 
The original disk is saved to memory 
and a copy can be made on an 
unformatted disk every 45 seconds! The 
lightning read, write, format, and verify 
routines that were developed make this 
program much quicker that RSDOS or 
OS-9 for backups. This will become one 
of your most used programs! 

Only $1 9.95 each. 3 for $49.95. 
SPECIAL With our 51 2K Upgrade (Next page) only $2. each Or 3 for $5! 



PRINTER LIGHTNING 

A great print spooler which gives you 
44K print buffer from a 128K CoCo and 
up to 438K (200 pages!) from a 512K 
CoCo. With this spooler you can run a 
program while you are printing a file. 
The spooler does not slow down the 
computer to any noticeable extent while 
you are running a second program and 
no lost characters arise. Baud rates 
selectable. Printer Lightning can reside 
in memory along with RAM-DISK 

NEW NEW 



Using 512K CoCo 3 you have access to 
2 additional disk drives in RAM. All 
disk commands are supported, and the 
data are Reset button protected. You 
can now have up to 5 disk drive capa- 
cities on line at once and can assign the 
ram disks to any drive number. By 
making the ramdisk Drive 0, all pro- 
grams which require a lot of drive 
access will run much faster. You can 
have the RAMDISK in memory at the 
same time as the Printer Lightning 1 . 



Announcing: 



The finest graphics/drawing program for ihe COCO 3! 



Da Vinci 3 



I 16 colors on screen ai one time 

I Modify each color from 64 available colors 

I Use composite or RGB monitor 

I Draw with custom paintbrushes 

I Full resolution 320 X 192 

I Picture converter for conversion of 

COCO 2 pictures to COCO 3 
I Multiple text fonts 
I Accepts input from joystick, X-pad, 

mouse, or touch-pad 
I Boxes, circles, line, paint generation 
I Screen dump for Tandy mono and color ink- jet 

printers, (NX-10 and others pending) 
I Sensible price 

I No additional hardware required because of 
course/fine joystick movement modes 
Zoom mode for individual pixel editing 

I Great on screen menu which is removable at 
the touch of a key to allow full screen edit 



128Kor512K COCO 3 



$37-95 



Last Minute Specials! 

Master Artist 2 or 3 $25.95 

(One of the best CoCo2 graphics programs) 
Pyramix (Qubert) List $25 $19.95 
Blackjack Royale (Black Jack) $12.95 
Crystal Revenge (Space Shoot-out) $12.95 




OS-9 

SUPER BOARD I/O 



3 or 5 Users 
on Your 
CoCo 



2 Serial Ports 
(up to 19,200 BAUD) 



Toll Free 
Order Line 

(800) 
245-6228 




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OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA. 
19539 

PA R«s. Include 6\T«x 

"PA (2 15) 682-6855 



Plugs 
kilo 
MULTI RACK 




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PARALLEL 
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BBIBfJ^ tJEJMi 



2 



On the Razor's Edge of the Color Computer From 



OS-9 Hard Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or Business Use 
Drive Access is at Least 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives 
Control up to 2 Drives per Controller each as Continuous Storage 



Every hard drive system is complete with software, 
hard drive, controller, heavy-duty power supply, and 
LR Tech Interface. When a complete drive system is 
ordered, the drive is fully assembled, tested, and 
burned in for 3 full days. This ensures dependability 
and optimum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo hard drive 
systems and parts for systems for more than 2 years. 
This is the longest history in the Co Co market of any 
available drive system. About ¥\ of all hard drive 
systems currently in use in the Co Co market use the 
LR Tech/OWL-WARE system. We have reached 
this position in the CoCo hard drive market by 
providing our customers with a quality product that 
they (and we) can be proud to own and use. 



A number of drive systems were in the market place 
when the LR Tech Interface was introduced and 2 
have been introduced since. Most of these are no 
longer available. We provide the only system which 
provides a combination of standard interface (SASI), 
rugged unit construction (not hacked to a floppy 
drive controller), high speed, and reasonable price. 
These systems are even several times faster than 
the standard XT hard drive system. Ideal for 
multi-user system because processor does not stop 
for hard drive access. 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and 2 



Sale! 



System Prices: 

$489. $699. 



New RLL System! 

$829. 




10 Meg 



20 Meg 30 Meg Dealer's Inquires Invited! 



Super I/O Board for OS-9 

Each Board Provides 2 Serial Ports and Centronics Parallel Port 

First Board has Real Time Clock and Beeper... With Second Board up to 5 Users 



The serial ports are unable up to 19,200 Baud, and 
the parallel port is a true Centronics standard, 
Plug into your multi-pat On CoCo 3, moiii-pak 
must be upgraded. You will have a multi-user 
system with additional computers or terminals 
plugged into the serial ports. An OWL hard drive 
arid 5i2K upgrade are strongly recommended for 
mulii-user systems. 



Intro Price.,, 



$165. 



Board 2 $139. 



Hard Driwe 
Interface 

(Includes Software) 



For those who want to put together 
their own system, we have an 
exclusive arrangement to distribute 
the LR Tech Interface. Please 
note that an interface is not a 
controller. A Xebec, WD, or 
Adaptec SASI controller are 
required for a drive system. 

To assemble a hard drive system 
yourself requires some reasonable 
knowledge of OS-9 and electronic 
construction and a hard drive that 
works. CoCo 3 users will have to 
upgrade their Multi-pak 

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Disk Tutorial - 3 Utilities - 2 Games 

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Verifies reading of each sector. Bad sec- 
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can scan. These symbols are used to 
identify objects in other sectors: 



Symbol Object 

Up arrow Your Current position 
E Enemy Planet 

# Enemy Fleet 
R Robodroid 

(computer- 
controlled enemy) 

? Chance (could be 

good or bad) 

S Stargate 

$ Your base 

T Trading Base 

1-7 Neutral Planet with 

cargo 

0 Neutral Planet with 

no cargo 

* Outside galactic limits 

GET. The Get command will extract all 
cargo from a neutral planet and place 
the cargo on your flagship. You may 
hold 10 cargo bays of material for every 
flagship you own. 

BUI. If you have purchased base kits, 
the Build command will build bases on 
a neutral planet. Once built, the bases 
will provide you with money at the start 
of each turn. 

TRfl. If there is a trading base located 
at your current position, the Trade 
command will allow you to buy and sell 
goods. There is a bank located at each 
trading base. 

WAR. Jf you run across any enemy bases 
or an enemy fleet, you may declare War 
on that planet or fleet. Once war is 
declared, you must deploy fighters to 
fight the battle for you. 

TLP. If there is a stargate located at your 
current position, the TLP command 
will teleport your fleet to any position 
in the current level. 

LST. The LST command will list all 
players in the game. 

LVL. This command allows you to 
switch from one level to the next. The 
higher the level, the more bases you can 
build on a single planet. Robodroids get 
tougher on higher levels, as well. 

STfl. The Status command will show 
your current status. 

TOP. This command will show you the 
top five players. 

CflL. This will list out the last nine 
callers who have played the game. 



RUL. This will list out a text file called 
RULES. You should write up a 
condensed list of rules and save it to the 
BBS disk as RULES . TXT. 

END. This command ends your turn. 

Rules of Play 

You may extract cargo from any 
neutral planet or your own planet, but 
not from an enemy planet. If cargo is 
found on an enemy planet, you must 
take over the base(s) first, then extract 
the cargo. 

If you end your turn in any sector but 
your own base, your fleet will be tele- 
ported to a neutral sector and a base will 
be built there. The bank builds the base 
for you and charges you double the 
price to build it. The price of the base 
is added on to your loan amount. 

There are several more rules to the 
game, but I will let you find them out 
as you play. 

If you do not want to allow back-to- 
back calls, remove the REM in Line 162. 

Notes for Multi-Drive Users 

If you have more than one disk drive 
and want to move the data files to 
another drive, use the following steps: 

1) LOAD "NEWGflME" 

2) Insert the data disk into Drive 0 

3) Run the program and set up the 
galaxy 

4) LOAD "GALACTIC" 

5) Edit the following lines, inserting 



the proper drive number: 280, 
2010, 21 10, 4900, 7020 and 7050 
6) SAVE "GALACTIC. BAS" 

Hints 

To prevent BBS crashers from break- 
ing into BASIC, I have the power to my 
modem going through the cassette relay. 
If, for some reason, the program pro- 
duces an error and the game breaks into 
BASIC, the modem shuts off and will not 
allow further calls until the problem is 
fixed. This protection is crude, but very 
effective. To use this option, you must 
have a modem that uses a transformer 
which changes 110VAC to some small 
voltage between 6 and 12 volts. Do not 
attempt to run 11 0V through the 
cassette relay! (See Figure 1.) 

Use with Another BBS Program 

If your BBS program runs under RS 
DOS and uses Remote2 as a terminal 
driver, enter LOAD "GALACTIC. BAS" 
and delete lines 1 through 6. Edit Line 
9999 and change it to RUN" your BBS 
program filename". 

If your BBS uses a different terminal 
driver program, you must convert the 
pokes used to change the bells on 
Remote! to work with your new termi- 
nal driver. These pokes are located in 
lines 2, 140, 160 and 5010. 

(Questions about this program may 
be addressed to the author at 1811 D W. 
21st St., Kennewick, WA 99337. Please 
enclose an SASE when writing for a 
reply.) □ 



82 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Editor's Note: REMDTE2 appeared on 
Page 106 of the November 1985 issue 
of THE RAINBOW. For information 
about the program, or if you wish to 
assemble REM0TE2, refer to that 
issue. REMDTE2 will also be included 
on this month's RAINBOW ON TAPE 
and RAINBOW ON DISK under the 
filename REMDTE2/5Y5. To copy it 
from tape to disk, CLOADM the file 
from tape. Then type 5 AVE M "RE - 
MDTE2",&H7D00,&H7EFG,&H7D32 
and ENTER. 



2135 ...211 

4050 183 

END 132 



Listing 1: NEWGflME 

5 CLEAR2000 
10 DIMA(16) 

12 CLS:PRINT"THIS PROGRAM WILL S 
TART A NEW GAME OF GALACTIC CO 
NFLICT" : PRINT"BE SURE THE PROPER 

DISKETTE IS INSERTED IN DRIVE 
0 . " : PRINT 

15 INPUT"HOW MANY LEVELS " ; LV : INP 
UT" ENTER GALAXY SIZE (13-25)" ;SZ 



:IFSZ<13 OR SZ>25 THENPRINT"TRY 
AGAIN! " :GOT015 

16 PRINT"HOLD ON A SEC..." 

17 DIMG(SZ,SZ) 

20 FORZ=1TO16:A(Z)=0:NEXT:FORZ=0 
T09 :B(Z) =0 : NEXT 
2100 1 PUT RECORD 

2102 Dl$="":Cl$="":FOR Z=1T016:C 
1$=C1$+MKN$(A(Z) ) :NEXT:FORZ=0 TO 
9:D1$=D1$+MKN$(B(Z) ) :NEXT:AT$=" 
/" :D1$ = D1$+AT'$ 

2105 IFL=0 THENA1$="\":B1$="\" 

2106 IF R=42 THEND1$="" : FORF=lTO 
5 : Dl$=Dl$+"NONAME "+MKN$ (0) +M 
KN$ (0) : NEXTF 

2110 OPEN"D" , #1, "GALAXUSR/DAT" ,2 
00 

2120 FIELD#1,10 AS A$,10 AS B$ , 8 
0 AS C$, 100 AS D$ 

2130 LSET A$=A1$:LSET B$=B1$:LSE 

T C$=C1$:LSET D$=D1$ 

2135 IF L=0 THENF0RR=1T04 2 

2140 PUT#1,R 

2145 IF L=0 THENNEXT 

2150 CLOSEI1 

3000 IF L=0 THEN L=l : R=42 : A1$="N 
oname" : Bl$="Cadet " : A ( 1 ) =0 : A ( 2 ) =0 
: A ( 3 ) =SZ : A ( 4 ) =LV : GOT02 100 
3010 CLOSEfll 

4000 FOR LL=1 TO LV: PRINT "LEVEL" 
;LL 

4010 INPUT"# OF ROBOTOIDS" ;RO: IN 
PUT"# OF STARTGATES" ; ST: INPUT "t 
OF CARGO" ; CA : INPUT" # OF ??" ; Q 

4020 Z=SZ*SZ:Zl=RO+Q+ST+CA:IFZ<= 
Zl THENPRINT" START OVER ..": PRINT 
"YOU CAN ONLY HAVE" ; Z ; "ITEMS TOT 
AL" : GOTO4010 

4021 PRINT"HOLD ON WHILE I CREAT 



E THE LEVEL" 

4022 FOR Z=l TO Q 

4024 X=RND(SZ) :Y=RND(SZ) :IFG(X,Y 
)=0 THEN G(X, Y)=90+RND(8) ELSE40 
24 

4026 NEXTZ 

4030 FOR Z=lTORO 

4040 X=RND(SZ) :Y=RND(SZ) : IF G(X, 
Y)=0 THEN G(X, Y) =40+RND(9) ELSE 
4040 

4050 NEXTZ 

4060 FOR Z=l TO ST 

4070 X=RND(SZ) :Y=RND(SZ) : IF G(X, 
Y)=0 THEN G(X / Y)=50 ELSE4070 
4080 NEXTZ 
4090 FOR Z=l TO CA 

4100 X=RND(SZ) :Y=RND(SZ) : IF G(X, 
Y)=0 THEN G(X, Y)=RND(7) *1000 ELS 
E 4100 
4110 NEXT 

4120 Z$="LEVEL"+STR$ (LL) 

4130 GOSUB4140 : NEXTLL : GOT04 9 9 9 

4140 G(1,1)=99:G(SZ,SZ)=99:G(1,S 

Z)=99:G(SZ, 1)=99 

4150 PRINT "MAKING Vr ';Z$ 

4160 OPEN"0",#l,Z$ 

4170 FOR X=1T0SZ:FQR Y=l TOSZ 

4180 WRITE #1,G(X,Y) 

4190 NEXTY , X 

4200 CLOSE|l:FO§ TR=1 TO SZ:FOR 
TQ=1 TO SZ:G(TR J ,T§)=0:NEXT TQ,TR 
: RETURN 

49 9 9 OPEN"0" Jl, "RULES/TXT" : PRIN 
Tn,"The rules go here ! " : CLOSEtfl 
5000 PRINT " NEWGAME COMPLETE" : PRI 
NT"NOW ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS : " : P 
RINT"LOADM REMOTE2 " : PRINT"EXEC" : 
PRINT "PCLEAR1 " : PRINT"RUN GALACTI 
C" 




310 . 
440 . 
540 . 
1510 
2100 
3020 
3205 
3320 



Listing 2: GALACTIC 



2 CLS (0) : CLEAR2000 , &H7D00 : POKE&H 
7D04,1 

5 Z$=INKEY$:IFZ$=""THEN5 

6 Z$=INKEY$: IFZ$=" "THEN6 

20 PRINT"Welcome to Galactic Con 

f lief "PUT ANY MESSAGE HERE 

40 R=42 :DIMY(16) ,A(16) :GOSUB2000 

:SZ=A(3) :DIMG(SZ,SZ) :Y(14)=32 

50 FORZ=l TO 8 : READD$ ( Z ) : NEXT : FO 

RZ=0 TO 7: READ RK$ ( Z ): NEXT : FOR Z 

=0 TO 6 : READTW ( Z ) : NEXT 

70 PRINTCHR$(12) 

100 PRINT : B$=STRING$ (23,"*") : A$= 
B$:GOSUB1000: A$="* Galactic Con 
flict *":GOSUB1000:A$="* by 



3460 223 4530 221 

3480 4 4725 164 

167 3520 228 4804 28 

.32 3670 249 5005 144 

.95 3775 23 5065 27 

.43 4050 248 5120 129 

140 4190 45 7000 165 

.91 4240 9 8030 170 

237 4315 77 9000 63 

.18 4340 206 END 130 



Paul Alger * " : GOSUB1000 : A$=B$ 
:GOSUB1000 : PRINT: PRINT 

105 PRINT:R=42:GOSUB2000:LD$=A1$ 
:RK$=B1$:CR=A(1) : NR=A ( 2 ) :SZ=A(3) 
:LV=A(4) :NC=A(5) :WG=A(6) :A$="Gal 
axy size : "+STR$ (SZ)+" x"+STR$(SZ 
) :GOSUB1000: A$="No. of levels: "+ 
STR$(LV) :GOSUB1000:PRINT 

106 IF WG=1 THENPRINT" The game h 
as been won by " ;TP$ ( 1 ) : PRINT"Do 

you want to play anyway? (Y/N) : 
" ; :GOSUB1500:IFZ$="N"ORZ$="n"TH 
EN9999 

110 IF TR<3 THENPRINT: PRINT"NEW 
for new user 1 " : PRINT"Enter Accou 



nt #: (1 to" ;NR;") ";:GOSUB1500 
ELSE9999 

120 IF Z$="NEW" OR Z$="new" THEN 
5000 

130 IF Z<1 OR Z>NR THEN PRINT: PR 
INT"The Galactic Police are watc 
hing! " : TR-TR+1 : GOTO 110 
140 R=Z:Y(0)=Z:GOSUB2000:ZL$=A1$ 
: PRINT: PRINTA1$;'\ enter your pa 
ssword. " ; :POKE&H7D03, 36:GOSUB15 
00 : POKE&H7D03 ,0 

150 IF Z$=B1$ THEN 160 ELSE PRIN 

T : PRINT n The Galactic Police eye 

you suspisiously ! " : GOTO110 

160 NC=NC+1 : POKE&H7D04 ,0: Y$ ( 1 ) -A 

1$: Y$ (2)=B1$:F0RZ=1T016: Y(Z)=A(Z 

) :NEXT:R=41:GOSUB2000 

162 LP$=Y$(1) ' :IFY$(1)-LEFT$(LP$ 

(9) ,LEN(Y$(1) ) ) THENPRINT "No bac 

k to back calls ! ": GOT09 999 

165 A1$=LP$ :GOSUB2100 

170 Y(11)=Y(11)+1:PRINT:PRINT:A$ 

="Welcome back "+Y$ ( 1 ) + " 1 ! " : GOSU 

B1000 : A$="This is turn number"+S 

TR$ ( Y ( 11) ) +" . " : GOSUB100P 

180 PRINT: PRINT: A$=RK$+" "+LD$+" 

is leading with" +STR$ (CR) +" ere 
dits . " :GOSUB1000 : A$="There are"+ 
STR$(NR)+" players playing .": GOS 
UB1000 : PRINT :GOSUB4000 : PRINT"Top 

Five: " : PRINT : GOSUB8 100 
190 GOSUB1100 

192 PRINT :R=Y(0) : GOSUB2000 : GOSUB 
6000 

194 Z=Y(5) * (900+RND(200) ) :Y(6)=Y 
(6) +Z : PRINT"Your base(s) TOade";Z 
; "credits I " 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 83 



195 Z=0:Z1=0:IF Y(8)>0 THEN Z=FI 
X(Y(8)*.l) :Y(8)=Y(8)+Z 

196 IF Y(7)>0 THEN Z1=FIX (Y (7 ) * . 
07) : Y(7)=Y(7)+Z1 

197 PRINT: PRINT" Interest on savi 
ngs:" ; Z 1 : PRINT"Interest on loan: 

" ;Z: PRINT 

198 GOSUB1100: PRINT : 

199 X=Y(9) : Y=Y(10) :MV=25 

280 Z1$="LEVEL"+STR$(Y(15) )+"/DA 
T" : PRINT : PRINT"Loading galaxy" : P 
RINT"Start" ;STRING$ (SZ-13 , " ") ; 11 
Finished" : OPEN" I" , # 1 # Z 1$ : FORXl=l 
TOSZ:FORYl=lTOSZ: INPUTHl f G(X1,Y1 
) :NEXTY1: PRINT" . " ; 

281 NEXTX1: CLOSER 1: PRINT: PRINT 
284 PRINT: IFY (11) =lTHENPRINT"You 

start the game off in sectorial 
"ELSEPRINT" You left off last tim 
e in sector";X;", " ; Y: G (X, Y) =G(X, 
Y)-50 

29? PRINT: GOTO3100 

2PP 1 COMMAND LEVEL START 

310 GOSUB4000 

320 IF MV<1 THEN 4802 

34 0 PRINT : PRINT"Sector " ; X ; " , " ; Y ; 

"Level" ;Y (15) :PRINTMV; "move(s) 1 

eft. " 

350 PRINT: PRINT"Cmd» " ;:G0SUB15 
00: PRINT 

360 IF LEFT$(Z$,1)="?" THEN 500 
365 IF Z$="LST" OR Z$="lst" THEN 
9000 

370 IF Z$="STA" OR Z$="sta" THEN 

GOSUB 3000 : GOTO 300 
380 IF Z$="SRS" OR Z$="srs" THEN 
3100 



390 IF Z$="TRA" OR Z$="tra" THEN 
3300 

400 IF Z$="NAV" OR Z$="nav"THEN 
4100 

410 IF Z$="WAR" OR Z$="war" THEN 
4200 

415 IF Z$="CAL" OR Z$="cal" THEN 

GOSUB8 200:GOTO300 
417 IF Z$="RUL"ORZ$="rul"THENGOS 
UB9100:GOTO300 

420 IF Z$="TLP" OR Z$="tlp" THEN 
4400 

430 IF Z$="GET" OR Z$="get" THEN 
4500 

440 IF Z$="BUI" OR Z$="bui" THEN 
4600 

450 IF Z$="END" OR Z$="end" THEN 
4800 

460 IF Z$="LRS" OR Z$="lrs" THEN 
4700 

470 IF Z$="LVL" OR Z$="lvl" THEN 
7000 

480 IF Z$="TOP" OR Z$="top"THEN 
GOSUB8100 :GOTO300 

490 PRINT: PRINT"No comprendo i " : G 
OTO300 

500 1 COMMAND LIST 

510 PRINT: PRINT: A$="Available Co 
ramands" : GOSUB1000 : PRINT : A$="Comm 
and Description" :GOSUB 

1000:A$=STRING$(29, "-") :GOSUB100 
0:A$="NAV Navigation comm. 

and" :GOSUB1000 

520 A$="STA Your current 

Status" :GOSUB1000:A$="TRA 

Trade at Outpost ":GOSUB1000: 
A$="WAR Declare War on us 



er" : GOSUB1000 : A$= n LRS Lon 
g range scan " : GOSUB1000 : A$=" 
SRS Short range scan " : 

GOSUB1000 

530 A$="BUI Build your ba 

se " :GOSUB1000 : A$="TLP 
Teleport your fleet" :GOSUB1000:A 
$="GET Get cargo 

" :GOSUB1000 
540 A$ = r, LVL Change levels ! 

" :GOSUB1000 : A$="LST 
List players ":GOSUB1000 
545 A$="CAL Last nine cal 

lers " :GOSUB1000: A$="RUL 
Display rules ":GOSUB1000 ! 

550 A$="TOP List top 5 pi I 

ayers" : GOSUB1000 : A$="END 
End your turn " : GOSUB1000 :GO 

TO 300 

1000 'Print centered 

1020 IF LEN(A$) <Y (14) THEN PRINT 

TAB ( ( Y ( 14) -LEN (A$ ) ) / 2 ) ; A$ ELSE P 

RINTA$ 

1099 RETURN 

1100 'Print Continue Prompt with 
MCI trick 

1102 A$="Hit /RETURN/ to continu 
e: " 

1110 PRINTA$; 
1120 Z$=INKEY$ 

1130 IF Z$=CHR$(13) THEN 1150 EL 
SE 1120 

1150 FOR Z=l TO LEN (A$ ) 

1160 PRINTCHR$ (8) ; 

1170 NEXTZ : PRINT"Thank you!" 

1180 RETURN 

1500 'INPUT ROUTINE 



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84 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



1510 LINEINPUTZ$ :Z=VAL(Z$) : RETUR 
N 

2000 'GET RECORD 

2010 OPEN"D" ,11, "GALAXUSR/DAT" , 2 

00 

2020 FIELD #1,10 AS A$, 10 AS B$ , 
80 AS C$,100 AS D$ 
2035 GET#1,R: A1$=A$:B1$=B$:C1$=C 
$:D1$=D$: CLOSE* 1 

2050 Zl=l : FOR Z=1TO80 STEP 5 : Z$= 
MID$(C1$,Z,5) :A(Z1)=CVN(Z$) :Z1=Z 
1+1: NEXT 

2055 IFR<41 THENZ1=0:FOR Z=l TO 5 
0 STEP5:Z$=MID$(D1$,Z,5) :B(Z1)=C 
VN(Z$) :Z1=Z1+1: NEXT : AT$=RIGHT$ ( D 
1$,50) 

2056 IF R-41 THEN Z1=0 : F0RZ=1T01 
00 STEP 10lLP$(Zl)=MID$ (D1$,Z,10 
) :Z 1=21+1; NEXT 

2057 IF R=42 THEN Zl=l:FOR Z=l T 
0 100 STEP 20 : TP$ ( Z 1 ) =MID$ ( Dl $ , Z 
,10) :TP(Z1)=CVN (MID$(D1$,Z+10,5) 
) :TU(21)=CVN(MID$(D1$,Z+15 ,5) ) :Z 
1=Z 1+1: NEXT 

2058 FOR Z-l TO LEN ( Bl$) : IF RIGH 
T$(B1$, 1)=" » THEN B1$-LEFT$(B1$ 
,LEN(B1$)-1) :GOTO2058 

2059 IF RIGHT$(A1$,1)=" " THEN A 
1$=LEFT$(A1$,LEN<A1$)-1) :GOTO205 
9 

2060 RETURN 
2100 r PUT RECORD 

2102 Dl$=««;Cl$^»»;FOR Z=1T016:C 
1$-C1$+MKN$(A(Z) ) :NEXT:IFR<41 TH 
ENFORZ=0 TO 9;D1$^D1$+MKN$(B(Z) ) 
:NEXT:D1$=D1$+AT$ 

2103 IF R»41 THEN FORZ=l TO 9 : LP 
$(Z-1)=LP$(Z) :D1$=D1$+LP$<Z) :NEX 
T:D1$-D1$+LP$ 

2104 IF R-=42 THEN F0RZ=1T05 : Dl $ = 
Dl $+TP$ ( Z ) +MKN$ ( TP ( Z ) ) +MKN$ ( TU ( Z 
) } : NEXT 

2110 OPEN" D " , # 1, "GALAXUSR/DAT" , 2 
00 

2120 FIELD#1,10 AS A$,10 AS B$,8 
0 AS C$,100 AS D$ 

2130 LSET A$— Al$ : LSET B$=*B1$:LSE 

T C$=C1$:LSET D$=D1$ 

2140 PUT#1,R 

2150 CLOSE#l: RETURN 

3000 'STATUS REPORT 

3010 PRINT? PRINT" You currently h 

ave : " : PRINT : FORZ=l TO 8:PRINTU'SI 

NG"##,###,###»;Y(Z) ;:PRINT" »• ; D 

$(Z) : NEXT 

3020 PRINTUSING" ##,###,###"* Y (13 
) ;: PRINT" Power scanner" : TW= (Y ( 
1)*100000)+(Y (2) *5000)+(Y(3) *250 
0)+(Y(4)*2500)+(Y(5) * 10000) +Y (6) 
+Y(7)-Y(8)+(Y(13) *20000) ; PRINT" - 

ii ;prin 

TUSING"## , ## # # # # # " ;TW ; : PRINT" T 
otal worth" 

3030 PRINT: PRINT: GOSUB1100: RETUR 

N 

3100 * SHORT RANGE SCAN 

3110 PRINT"Sensors indicate : '* :WR 

==0:CG=0:NU=0: YB=0 

3115 IF X<1 OR X>SZ OR Y<1 OR Y> 
SZ THEN PRINT"Nothingi (You left 

the Universe) " :GOTO300 
3120 IF G(X, Y)=99 THEN PRINT" A T 

rading Outpost. " :GOTO300 

3130 IF G(X,Y)=S0 THEN PRINT"A S 

targate! I " :GOTO300 

3150 IF G(X, Y)>40 AND G(X f Y)<50 

THEN Z=G(X, Y) -40:PRINT"A class" ; 

Z;"Robodroidl I " : WR=3 : GOT04 200 

3160 IF G(X,Y)=0 THEN PRINT" A ne 

utrai planet with no cargo . " :NU= 

1:GOTO300 

3170 IF G(X,Y)>90 AND G (X , Y) <99 



THEN 8000 

3180 Z$=STR$ (G(X, Y) ) : Z1$=RIGHT$( 
Z$,2) :UN=VAL(Z1$) 

3190 IF LEN(Z$) >4 THEN Z2$^LEFT$ 

(Z$, 2) :C=VAL(Z2$) : Z3$=MID$ (Z$ , 3 , 

1) :B=VAL(Z3$) ELSE Z2$=" " : C=0 : Z3 

$=LEFT$(Z$,2) :B=VAL(Z3$) 

3200 IF UN^0 THEN PRINT" A neutra 

1 planet with" ;C; "cargo bays!" :C 

G=C:NU=l:GOTO300 

3205 IFO0 THEN PRINTC ; "cargo ba 
y(s) and " ; 

3210 IF UN=Y(0) THEN PRINT"Your 
planet with" rB;"base(s) . ":CG=C:Y 
B=l:GOTO300 

3220 IF UN>50 THEN WR=2 : PRINT"An 
enemy fleet I 1 " : UN=UN-50 : IF UN>0 
AND UN<=NR THEN R=UN : GOSUB2000 : 
PRINT n The fleet belongs to:":PRI 
NT M -=< " ;RK$(A(12) ) ;" ";A1$;" >= 
-" :PRINT"There are";A(2) ;"£ ighte 
rs deployed! " :GOTO300 
3230 IF UN>0 AND UN<41 THEN WR=1 
: PRINT "An enemy planet with";B;" 
base(s) I " : IF UN>0 AND UN<=NR THE 
N R=UN : GOSUB2000 : PRINT" This plan 
et belongs to: " : PRINT" -=< n ;RK$( 
A(12));'» ";A1$;» >— ":GOTO300 
3240 WR=0 : PRINT n This object is n 
ot recognized i " : PRINT" 1 1 m going 
to neutralize this sector !": G (X, 
Y) ~0:GOTO300 
3 300 'TRADING BASE 

3310 IF G(X,Y)<>99 THEN PRINT" Th 
ere is no Trading Outpost here!" 
: GOTO 300 

3320 PRINT : PRINT"Welcome to our 
Outmost* PRINT: PRINT" [B] Buy go 
ods" : PRINT" [S] Sell goods" : PRINT 
»[C] Credit Union" : PRINT" [Q] Qui 
t" 

3330 PRINT: PRINT" Outpost>> » ; : GO 
SUB1500 

3340 IF Z$="B" OR Z$="b" THEN 34 
00 

3350 IF Z$="S" OR Z$="s" THEN350 

3360 IF Z$="C" OR Z$="c" THEN3 60 
0 

3370 IF Z$="Q" OR Z$="q" THEN 30 
0 

3380 IF Z$='»?" THEN 3320 

3 38 5 PRINT"No comprendo ! " : GOT03 3 

30 

3400 1 BUY 

3405 P1-100000+RND(25000) :P2-180 
00+RND(3000) :P3=4000+RND(2000) :P 
4=-2000+RND(1000) :P5-100+RND(100) 
3410 PRINT : PRINT" Items available 
": PRINT: PRINT"No . Description 

Price" :PRINTSTRING$ (27 , "-») : 
PRINT" 1. Flagship ";P1:P 
RINT" 2, Scanner " ?P2 

3420 PRINT" 3* Fighter 
";P3: PRINT" 4. Base kit 
";P4: PRINT" 5. Quit 
" ;P5 

3430 PRINT: PRINT fI You have";Y(6); 

"credits. Your choice (1-5) or 

?: ": PRINT" Buy » ";:GOSUB1500 

3440 IF 2$-"?" THEN 3410 

34 50 IF Z<1 OR Z>5 THEN 3 4 30 

3460 ON Z GOTO 3 4 70,3475,3480,34 

85,3490 

3470 Z=FIX(Y(6)/P1) : IF Z=0 THENP 
RINT"You can r t afford a Flagship 
!":GOTO34 30 ELSE PRINT"You can b 
uy";Z;"Flagship(s) ." 
3472 PRINT"How many do you want? 
" ; :GOSUB1500: Z1-VAL(Z$) :IF Z1>0 
AND ZK=Z THEN PRINT" Done , . " : Y ( 
6 ) =Y ( 6 ) - ( PI *Z 1 ) :Y(1)=Y(1)+Z1: GOT 



03430 ELSE PRINT "No sale! ! ":GOT 
03430 

3475 Z-FIX(Y(6)/P2) :IF Z=0 THENP 

RINT"You can't afford a Scanner! 

" :GOTO3430 ELSE PRINT" You can bu 

y" ?Z;"Scanner(s) . n 

3477 PRINT"How many do you want? 
" ; :GOSUB1500:Z1=VAL(Z$) :IF Z1>0 
AND ZK = Z THEN PRINT" Done Y ( 

13) =Y(13)+Z1: Y(6)=Y(6) -(P2*Z1) :G 

OTO3430 ELSEPRINT"No sale!i":G0T 

03430 

3480 Z=FIX(Y(6)/P3) : IF Z-0 THENP 
RINT"You can't afford a Fighter! 
" :GOTO3430 ELSEPRINT " You can buy 
" ;Z; "Fighter (s) . " 

3482 PRINT"Kow many do you want? 
" ; :GOSUB1500: Z1=VAL(Z$) : IF Z1>0 
AND ZK=Z THENPRINT" Done „ . " : Y ( 6 

)=Y(6)-(P3*Z1) :Y(2)=Y(2)+Z1:GOTO 

3430 ELSEPRINT"No sale i ! •» : GOT034 

30 

3485 Z=FIX(Y(6)/P4) : IF Z=0 THENP 
RINT"You can't afford a Base kit 
I":GOTO3430 ELSEPRINT" You can bu 
y" ;Z; "Base kit(s) . " : 
3487 PRINT"How many do you want? 
";:GOSUB1500:Z1^VAL(Z$) :IF Z1>0 
AND ZK=Z THENPRINT" Done . . " : Y(6 
)=Y(6) -(P4*Z1) :Y(4)=Y(4)+Zl:GOTO 
3430 ELSEPRINT" No sale ! ! " : GOT034 
30 

3490 Y(6)=Y(6) -P5:GOTO3300 

3500 'SELL 

3505 PRINT: PRINT 

3507 IF Y(3)<1 AMD Y(l)<2 THEN P 
RINT"You have nothing I wantl":G 
OTO3300 

3510 IF Y (3) >0 THEN PRINT"I see 
you have"; Y(3) ; "Cargo bays . " : Pl= 
Y(3) *(2000+RND(1000) 5 : PRINT "I'll 

give you" ; PI ; " for it . " : PRINT"Wa 
nt to sell? (Y/N) : " ; : GOSUB1500 : 
IF Z$="Y" OR Z$^"y" THENPRINT" Do 
ne. . 14 : Y ( 6 ) =Y ( 6 ) +P1 : Y (3 )=0 ELSEPR 
INT"No cargo sold. " 
3520 IF Y(l) >1 THEN PRINT" I see 
you have" ; Y ( 1) -1 ? "Flagships . " : PI 
-90000+RND(1000) : PRINT"I 1 11 give 

you" ; PI; "for one . " : PRINT"Want t 
o sell? (Y/N) :GOSUB1500: IF Z$ 
=»Y" OR Z$="y" THENPRINT M Done. ." 
:Y(1)=Y(1)-1:Y(6)=Y(6)+P1 ELSEPR 
INT"No Flagships sold." 
3530 PRINT: PRINT"I see nothing e 
lse that I want. ": GOTO 3 3 00 
3 600 'BANK 

3610 PRINT: A$="Welcome to Galact 
ic Federal . " : GOSUB1000 : PRINT 
3620 A$=" [ D] Deposit ":GOSUB10 
00:A$="[W] Withdraw " :GOSUB1000 
:A$~"[S] Statement " : GOSUB1000 : A 
$="[L] Loan " : GOSUB1000 : A$= 

" [Q] Quit bank ": GOSUB1000 : PRINT 
3630 PRINT: PRINT" Bank" ; PRINT" You 
r choice or ?: "; : GOSUB1500 : PRIN 
T 

3640 IF Z$="?" THEN 3610 

3650 IF Z$-"D" OR Z$="d" THEN375 

0 

3660 IF Z$="W" OR Z$="w" THEN380 
* 

3670 IF Z$="S" OR Z$="s" THEN PR 
INT" Credits on hand: " ; Y (6) : PRIN 
T"Credits on loan: " ;Y (8) : PRINT" 
Credits in Bank: " ; Y ( 7 ) : PRINT : GO 
TO3630 

3680 IF Z$="Q" OR Z$="q" THEN 3 3 
00 

3690 IF Z$="L" OR Z$ = "l" THEN 37 

10 

3 700 GOTO363 0 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 85 



3710 IF TW<500000 THEN PRINT"The 
loan officer throws you out!!": 
GOTO3630 

37 2j3 PRINT" I see you are worth" ; 

TW: PRINT" 1 1 11 loan you up to" ; ; Z 

=FIX(TW/2) : PRINTZ : PRINT"The term 

s are 10% per turn.": PRINT 

3730 PRINT"Enter amount. Max is" 

;Z ; :GOSUB1500: Z1=VAL(Z$) 

3740 IF ZK0 OR Z1>Z THEN 3730 E 

LSE Y(6)=Y(6)+Z1:Y(8)=Y(8)+Z1:G0 

TO3630 

3750 f SAVINGS 

3752 IF Y(6)<0 THEN Y(6)=0 
3755 IF Y(8)>0 THENPRINT" You hav 
e an outstanding loan. " : PRINT" An 
y deposits made will go against 

it," 

3760 PRINT: PRINT"Enter amount of 
deposit . " : PRINT"Max is";Y(6) ;": 
»; :GOSUB1500:Z=VAL(Z$) : IF Z<0 O 

R Z>Y(6) THEN37 60 

3770 IF Y(8)>0 THEN Y(8)=Y(8)-Z: 
Y(6)-Y(6)-Z:IF Y(8}=<0 THEN Y(7) 
-=Y(7)+ABS(Y(8) ) ;Y(8)=0: PRINT" You 
have paid off your loan I " : G0T03 
780 

3775 IF Y ( 8 ) -0 THENY ( 7 ) =Y ( 7 ) +Z : Y 
(6)«Y(6>-2 

3780 PRINT" Done . . 11 : G0T03 630 
3800 ' WITHDRAW 

3810 PRINT: PRINT"Enter amount of 
withdrawal. ": PRINT "Max is" ;Y(7) 
M ; :GGSUB1500 : Z— VAL(Z$) : IF Z< 
0 OR Z>Y(7) THEN3810 ELSE Y ( 6 ) = Y 
(6)+Z:Y(7)=Y(7)-Z: PRINT" Done . .": 
GOTO3 630 
4 000 f TW CALC 

4010 TW=(Y(1)*100000)+(Y(2)*5000 
) + (Y(3)*2500) + (Y(4) *2500) + (Y(5) * 
1000.0 } +Y ( 6 ) + Y ( 7 ) - Y ( 8 ) + ( Y ( 13 ) *200 
00) 

4020 IF TW>TW(Y(12)) AND Y(12)<7 
THEN Y ( 12 )=Y( 12) +1: PRINT: PRINT" 

Congratulations!" :PRINT"You have 
been promoted to " ;RK$(Y(12) ) : I 

FY (12) =7 THENPRINT "You just won 

the game! I ":WG=1 

4030 IF Y(12)>0 THEN IF TW<TW(Y( 
12)-1) THEN Y(12)=Y(12)-1:PRINT: 
PRINT"Sorry . . " : PRINT"You have be 
en demoted to " ;RK$ (Y( 12} ) 

4050 TP$=Y$(1> :TU(6)=0:TP$(6)=*"N 
ONAME " : TP ( 6 ) ~0 : L=0 : FORZ- 1T05 
:IFTU(Z) =Y (0) THEN J>Z:Z=6 

4051 NEXT 

4052 IF LEN(TP$)<10 THEN TP$=TP$ 
+ " ":GOTO4052 

4055 IFL=0THEN4065 

4060 FOR Z=L TO 5 :TP$ (Z) =TP$ ( Z+l 

) :TP(Z)=TP(Z+1) :TU(Z)=TU(Z+1) : NE 

XT 

4065 L=0:FORZ=1TO5:IFTW>TP(Z)THE 
NL=Z : Z=6 

4070 NEXT: IF L>0 THEN 4075 ELSER 
ETURN 

4075 F0RZ=5 TO L+l STEP-l : TP$ ( Z ) 
=TP$(Z-1) :TP(Z)=TP(Z-1) :TU(Z)=TU 

(2-1) 

4080 NEXT:TP$(L)=TP$:TP(L) =TW : TU 
(L)=Y (0) : RETURN 
4 100 'NAV 

4110 PRINT: PRINT"Enter course. ( 
1-8) : " ; : GOSUB1500 : Z 2=FIX ( VAL ( Z $ 
) ) :IF Z2<1 OR Z2>8 THENPRINT" Nav 

aborted! ":GOTO300 
4120 PRINT: PRINT"Enter warp fact 
or. (1-8): "; :GOSUB1500: Z1=FIX(V 
AL(Z$) ) : IF ZK1 OR Zl>8 THENPRIN 
T"Nav aborted! " :GOTO300 
4 130 IF Z2=l THEN Y=Y-Z1 
4140 IF Z 2 = 2 THEN Y=Y- Zl : X=X+Z 1 



4150 IF Z2=3 THEN X=X+Z1 

4160 IF Z2=4 THEN X=X+Z 1 : Y=Y+Z 1 

4165 IF Z2=5 THEN Y=Y+Z1 

4170 IF Z2=6 THEN X=X-Z 1 : Y=Y+ Z 1 

4180 IF Z2=7 THENX=X-Z1 

4190 IF Z2=8 THENX-X-Z1: Y=Y-Z1 

4199 MV=MV-l:GOTO290 

4200 'WAR 

4210 IF WR=0 THENPRINT "There is 
nobody here to attack i ": GOTO300 
4212 : IFWR=2 A.ND B (9 ) <>0 THENPRI 
HT"That player has been attacked 

! " : GOTO 3 00 

4215 FORZ=0 TO 8 : IF 8 ( Z } <1THENAK 
=Z:Z=10:NEXTELSE AK=8 : NEXT 

4216 O$="0":PN$=STR$(Y(0) ) :IF LE 
N(PN$)>2 THEN PN$^RIGHT$ ( PN$ , 2 ) 
ELSE PN$= 5 '0"+RIGHT$ (PN$, 1) 

4217 X$-STR$(X) :IF LEN(X$)>2 THE 
N X$=RIGHT$ (X$ , 2)ELSEX$="0"+RIGH 
T$ (X$ , 1) 

4218 LE$=STR$(Y(15) ) : LE$-RIGHT$ ( 
LE$,1) : Y$=STR$(Y) :IF LEN(Y$)>2 T 
HEN Y$^RIGHT$ < Y$ , 2 ) ELSEY$="0"+RI 
GHT$(Y$ ,1) 

4220 IF WR=1 THENPRINTAl$;" f s pi 
anet has" ;B;"base(s) , ":ST=B*3 
4230 IF WR=2 THENPRINTA1$ ; " 1 s f 1 
eet has " ; A ( 2 ) ; M f ighters deployed 
!":ST=A(2) 

4240 IF WR=3THENST=(G(X,Y)-40) *Y 
( 15) : PRINT"The Robodroid is atta 
eking ! " : Z=RND ( 3 ) : IFZ=3 THENPRINT 
"The Robodroid surprized you ! " : Z 
1=FIX( (RND(10) * .01) *Y(2 ) ) : IF Zl> 
0 THENPRINT" He captured" ;Zl;"of 
your fighter (s) i " : Y ( 2 ) =Y (2 ) -Z 1 : S 
T=ST+Z1 

4245 IF WR=3THENPRINT"He has";ST 
-n fighters deployed ! " 
4 250 PRINT :PRINT"How many fighte 
rs will you deploy? ": PRINT"Max i 
s " ; Y ( 2 ) ; " : " ; : GOSUB1500 : Z=VAL ( Z $ 
) : IF Z<0 OR Z>Y(2) THEN 4250 
4260 IF WR<>3 AND Z=0 THENPRINT" 
Attack Aborted! ":GOTO300 
4 270 PRINT: YS=Z: F0RQ=1T03 : PRINT" 
CONDITION RED! ! " ; : F0RQ1=1 TO 15: 
PRINTCHR$(8) ; : NEXTQ 1 , Q : PRINT"CON 
DITION RED! ! " 

4 280 PRINT"You Enemy" :PRI 

NTSTRING$(15," ") ? 

4290 PRINTSTRING$(15, 8) ; : Z1$=STR 
$(YS) :Z2$=STR$(ST) : Z1=LEN ( Zl $ ) +L 
EN(Z2$) : Z3$=STRING$ (15-Z1, " ") :Z 
4$=Z1$+Z3$+Z2$ : PRINTZ4$ ; 
4295 IFYS<1 OR ST<1 THEN 4310 
4300 Z1=RND( 100) : IF Zl>60 THEN Y 
S=YS-1 ELSEST=ST-1 
4 305 GOTO4 290 

4 310 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: IF YS>0 T 
HENST=0: PRINT" You won! I " ELSE IF 
ST>0 THENYS=0: PRINT"You lost!! 
" : ELSEPRINT" It was a draw. "YS=0: 
ST=0 

4315 PRINT"You lost";Z-YS; "fight 
ers.":Y(2)=Y(2)-(Z-YS):IF YS<1 A 
ND Y(2)>0 THENPRINT "Do you want 

to deploy more fighters? ( Y/N) : 
" ; :GOSUB1500:IF Z$="Y" OR Z$="y" 
THEN4250 

4320 IF WR=1 AND ST<1 THEN A(5)« 
A(5) -B:G(X, Y)=G(X, Y)-UN+Y(0) :Y(5 
) =Y (5) +B: PRINT"You have conquers 
d this planeti"sCD$= i, l":B(AK)=VA 
L(CD$+LE$+X$+Y$+PN$) :G0SUB2 100 : G 
OTO290 

4325 IF WR=1 THENPRINTA 1 $ ; " 1 s pi 
anet survived your attack! ": CD$= 
"2" : B(AK)=VAL(CD$+LE$+X$+Y$+PN$) 

: G0SUB2 100 : GOT03 00 

4 3 30 IF WR=2 AND ST<1 THENPRINT" 



You beat ";Al$;" 5 s f leet ! ": PRINT 
"You get: " : PRINTA (6) ; "credits.": 
Y(6)=Y(6)+A(6) : A ( 6 ) =0 : PRINTA(3) ; 
"cargo bays . " : Y (3 ) =Y (3 ) +A ( 3 ) : A (3 
) =0:Zl=FIX(A(2)/4) : PRINTZ 1? "figh 
ters. ":Y(2)=Y(2)+Z1:A(2)=1: GOSUB 
4360:GOSUB2100: GOTO300 
4335 IF WR=2 THENPRINTA1$ ; " ' s f 1 
eet won ! " : PRINT"Troups board you 
r Flagship and" : PRINT "take all c 
argo and credits ! " : A ( 2 ) =A ( 2) +FIX 
(Z/4) :A(3)=A(3)+Y(3) : Y(3)=0:A(6) 
=A(6)+Y(6) : Y ( 6 ) =0 : CD$=" 3 " : B ( AK) = 
VAL(CD$+LE$+X$+Y$+PN$) :GOSUB2100 
:GOTO300 

4340 IF WR=3 AND ST<1 THENPRINT " 
You beat the Robodroid Zl= (G (X 
, Y) -40+Y(15) )* (5000+RND(2000) ) :P 
RINT"He had" ;Z1 ? "credits 1": Y(6)= 
Y(6)+Z1:G(X, Y)=0: GOT02 90 
4 350 IF WR=3 THENPRINT"The Robod 
roid takes all your money! " : PRIN 
T"He tows your fleet away . . . M : Y ( 
6 ) =0 : X=RND (SZ-2 ) + 1 : Y=RND (SZ-2) +1 
: GOTO 2 90 

4 3 60 'GET WINNERS COMMENT 
4 3 70 B(9)=Y(0) % PRINT : PRINT"Enter 
comment to " ;A1$ ; " (50 chrs max 
) ":AT$="Gotchai ! !": PRINT" <CR>=" ; 
AT$ : GOSUB1500 : IF LEN(Z$)>1 THENA 
T$ = Z$ 

4 3 80 RETURN 
4 400 1 TLP 

4410 IF G(X,Y)<>50 THEN PRINT"Th 
ere is no Stargate here \ " :GOTO30 

4420 PRINT"Enter X coordinate: " 
7 : GOSUB1500 : X=VAL (Z$) : PRINT"Ente 
r Y coordinate: " ; : GOSUB 1500 : Y=V 
AL(Z$) :GOTO290 
4 500 f GET 

4510 IF CG=0THENPRINT"No cargo h 
ere! " :GOTO300 

4520 Z=Y(1)*10:IF Y(3)+CG>Z THEN 

PRINT" It all won't f it 1 » : C1=Z-Y ( 

3) :CG-CG-C1:Y(3)«Z:G(X, Y)«G(X,Y> 

~(C1*1000) :GOTO290 

4530 Y(3):=Y(3)+CG:G(X, Y)=G(X,Y) - 

(CG*1000) :GOTO2 90 

4599 f BUI 

4 600 IF NU=0 THENPRINT "You can't 

build a base here i " : GOTO290 
4605 IF Y ( 4 ) >Y ( 1 5 ) THENZ 1=Y (15) E 
LSEZ1=Y(4) 

4610 PRINT"Build how many bases? 
" : PRINT"Max is" ;Z 1 ; " : " ; : GOSUB150 
0: Z=VAL(Z$) :IF Z<0 OR Z>Z1 THEN4 
610 

4620 IF Z=0THEN300 

4630 G(X, Y)=G(X,Y)+(Z*100)+Y(0) : 
Y(4)=Y(4)-Z:Y(5)-*Y(5)+Z:GOTO290 
4700 1 LRS 

4705 IF Y(13) <1 THENPRINT" You do 
n't have a scanner I " :GOTO300 
4710 PRINT"Scan how far? Max is" 
;Y(13) ; :GOSUB1500: Z=VAL(Z$) :IF Z 
<0 OR Z>Y (13) THEN4710 
4715 Y3=Y-Z:Y4=Y+Z :X3=X-Z:X4=X+Z 
4720 FOR Y2=Y3 TO Y4 : FOR X2=X3 T 
O X4 

4725 IF X2 = X AND Y2 = Y THENPR$— ff * 

"1GOTO4 780 

4730 IF X2>0 AND X2<21 AND Y2>0 
AND Y2<21 THENLC$=STR$(G(X2 f Y2) ) 
ELSEPR$="*" : G0T04 780 
4735 Z=VAL(RIGHT$ (LC$, 2) ) : IF Z=0 
AND G(X2 ? Y2)>0 THEN PR$=STR$(FI 
X(G(X2, Y2)/1000) ) :PR$=RIGHT$(PR$ 
, 1) :GOTO4780 

4740 IF Z=50 THENPR$="S" :GOT047 8 
0 

4745 IF Z>40 AND Z<50 THENPR$="R 



86 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Telewriter-64 

the Color Computer Word Processor 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 

columns x 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full-screen 

editor 

Right justification 
Easy hyphenation 
Drives any printer 
Embedded format and 
control codes 
Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 
Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply slated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer, The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 
The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters, So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
Tl, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fan. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power, 
Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one of she best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seeth., 

— Color Computer News, jan, 1982 



lLLbWKllhK-64 



Bui now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K S 32K S or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to lake optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly, In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 X 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows'* that show you only fragments at a 
lime and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that ^what you see is what 
you gel." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVII/VHI, DMP-IGO/2§0> Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh> Smith-Corona, 
Terminer, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
Intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable jusiification. 
Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line he?ders and automatic 
centering. Prim or save all or any section of the lexi 
buffer. Chain prim any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for su-e saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command tnly once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 
Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fait, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete err»r protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes/' This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR, 



...truly a state §f t he art word processor., 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $5$ .95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Californians add 6% state tax.) 

Available at 
Radio /haek stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple 11 is a trade murk of Apple Computer, Inc.. Alan is a trademark 
of Atari. Inc.; TRS-80 is n trademark of Tandy Corp. MX-80 is a 
trademark of Epson America. Inc. 



n 



B 



ft 



( 



ft 

I 



n 



Computer Island Educational Software 



ARROW GAMES 

32K Ext. - $21.95 tape/$26.95 disk 
Six menu driven games for young 
children (ages 3-6) to teach direc- 
tions. All games involve using the 
arrow keys ONLY. Games include: 
LADYBUG, BUTTERFLY, ARROW 
MATCH, KALEIDOSCOPE, RABBIT, 
and DOODLE. Colorful graphics. 

FIRST GAMES 

32K Ext. - $24.95 tape/$29.95 disk 
First Games contains 6 menu driven 
programs to delight and teach your 
early learners (ages 3-6). These 
games enrich the learning of colors, 
numbers, lower case letters, shapes, 
memory, visual discrimination and 
counting. 




CLOZE STORIES 

32K Ext. - $19.95 Tape/$24.95 Disk 
These programs give students prac- 
tice using the popular CLOZE read- 
ing technique. Each program contains 
grade appropriate short stories with 
key missing words to be deduced by 
the student Available for grades 3, 4, 
5, 6, OR 7. Please specify. 

DRAWING CONCLUSIONS 

32K Ext. - tape $19.95/disk $24.95 
These programs contain short stories. 
Each story has two accompanying 
questions that ask the student to draw 
conclusions from the text Available 
for grades 3-4 OR 5-6. Please specify. 



LOCATING STORY DETAILS 

32K Ext. - disk only - $24.95 
These programs contain short stories. 
Each has an accompanying picture. 
Questions about story details refer to 
either the text or pictures. The disk 
generated graphics are an integral 
part of these attractive programs. 
Available for grades 2-3 OR 4-5. 
Please specify. 




FOREIGN LANGUAGE GAMES 

32K Ext. - $1 9.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
(500 words) 
French or Spanish Baseball 
Score base hits or home runs for 
correct answers. You're out if wrong. 
Correct answers supplied. Fun way 
to learn and practice vocabulary. 
PLEASE SPECIFY LANGUAGE. 




PUNCTUATION PRACTICE 

32K Ext. - tape $19.95/disk $24.95 
On screen practice in proper usage 
of the familiar punctuation marks. 
Grades 3-7. 




MATH TUTOR SERIES 

16K Ext. 

These tutorials take the child through 
each step of the example. All pro- 
grams include HELP tables, cursor 
and graphic aids. All allow user to 
create the example, or let the com- 
puter choose. Multi-level. Great 
teaching programs. 

LONG DIVISION TUTOR 
$14.95 tape/$19.95 disk 
MULTIPLICATION TUTOR 
$14.95 tape/$19.95disk 

FACTORS TUTOR 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (addition) 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (subtraction) 
$19.95tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (mult.) 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 

COMPUTER LITERACY 

32K Ext. - $1 9.95 tape/$29.95 disk 
A computer literacy quiz exclusively 
for the Color Computer, Tests and 
scores from over 60 questions on a 
Hi-res upper and lower case screen. 
Reviews computer literacy and 
beginning programming knowledge. 
Ages 10 and up. 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 

(718) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 
Please add S1 .00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 



" ;GOTO4780 

4750 IF Z>90 AND Z<99 THEN PR$=" 
?":GOTO4730 

4755 IF Z=99 THEN PR$ = "T TI : GOT047 
80 

4760 IF Z=Y(0) THEN PR$=" $ " : GOTO 
4780 

4765 IF Z>50 THEN PR$=" # " : GOT047 

80 

477)3 IF Z>0 AND Z<41 THENPR$ = ! 'E" 
: GOTG4 7 8 0 

4775 IF 2-0 THEN PR$= M 0" 

4780 PRINTPR$; : NEXTX2 : PRINTCHRS ( 

13} ; :NEXTY2:GOTO300 

4800 1 END 

4801 PRINT"End your turn? (Y/N) 

" ; : GOSUB1500 : IF Z$="Y" OR Z$«"y" 
THEN4 802 ELSE 300 

4802 IF YB=1 OR NU=1 THEM4804 EL 
SEPRINT"You can't stay here!" : X= 
RND ( SZ-2 ) + 1 : Y=RND(SZ-2 ) + l: PRINT" 
Your fleet was taken to" ;X; Y:MV^ 
0 :GOTO3100 

4804 IF NU=1 THENPRINT"I 'm charg 

ing you double to build this bas 

e for you!":G(X,Y)-1504.Y(0) : Y(5) 

=Y(5}+1: Y(8)=Y(8)+5000 

4806 IF YB = 1 THEN G ( X , Y) =G ( X , Y ) + 

50 

4810 GOSUB3000 

4820 LD$=TP$(1) :CR=TP(1) :IFTU(1) 
=Y (0) THENPRINT" You are leading! 1 
":RK$=RK$(Y(12) ) 
4825 R=4 2:GOSUB2100 
4830 R=Y(0) : GOSUB2000 : F0RZ=1T016 
: A (Z) -Y (Z ) : NEXTZ : FORZ=0TO9 : B ( Z ) = 
0 : NEXTZ : AT$="/" * A ( 9 ) -X: A ( 10 ) =Y: G 
OSUB2100 

4900 Z1$="LEVEL"+STR$ ( Y ( 15 ) ) + "/D 
AT" : PRINT: PRINT"Saving galaxy" : P 
RINT"Start" ;STRING$ (SZ-13 , " ") ;» 
Finished" : OPEN"0" , # 1 , Zl$ : FORX1-1 
TOSZ : FORY 1=1T0S Z : WR ITE# 1 , G (X 1 , Yl 
) : NEXTY1 : PRINT" . " ; 
4910 NEXTX1:CL0SE#1 
4930 GOT09999 
5000 * NEW USER 

5005 IF NR>39 THEN PRINT"Sorry. . 
game is closed to new users . " : R 

UN "BBS 

5010 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"Welcome t 
o Galactic Conflict .": PRINT"S inc 
e you have not played before, " : P 
RINT"I need some information abo 
ut you . " 

5020 POKE&H7D0 4,1: PRINT : PRINT : PR 
INT"What name will you be using? 
" : PRINT" ( 10 characters max. ) ";: 
GOSUB1500:IF LEN(Z$)>10 THEN Z$= 
LEFT$ ( Z $ , 10) ELSEIF LEN(Z$)=0 THE 
N5020 

5025 GOSUB5100 ; Y$ (1)=Z$ 
5030 PRINT"Fine "; Y$ ( 1 );".": PRIN 
T: PRINT"Enter a password. (10 ch 
ar, max) " ; : GOSUB1500 : IF LEN(Z$) 
>10 THEN Z$=LEFT$ ( Z $ , 10) : Y$ ( 2 ) =Z 
$ ELSE Y$ ( 2 ) =Z$ 

5040 PRINT"Thank you . " : PRINT : PRI 
NT "How wide is your terminal scr 
een? " ; ; GOSUB1500 r Z=VAL( ZS) : IF Z 
<20 THEN Z=20 ELSE IF Z>80 THEN 
2=80 

5050 Y (14) =Z : PRINT: PRINT:A$="I h 
ave it as: " :GOSUB1000 : A$="Name: 
"+Y$ (1) :GOSUB1000 :A$="Password: 
"+Y$ (2) : GOSUB1000 : A$="Terminal w 
idth: "+STR$(Y(14) ) : GOSUB1000 : PR 
INT: PRINT 

5060 PRINT" Is this correct? (Y/N 
) " ; :GOSUB1500:IF Z$="Y" OR Z$=" 
y" THEN 5065 ELSE 5020 
5065 PRINT: PRINT" Hold on while I 



create your account . " : R=42 : GOSU 
B2000:A(2)=A(2)+1:AN=A(2) :G0SUB2 
100 

5070 R=AN:Y(15)=1: Y(l)=l: Y(2)-10 
: Y (4)^3: Y (6) =10000: Y (8) =167 500: Y 
(9)«1:Y(1JS)-1:A1$=Y$(1) :B1$=Y$(2 
) 

5080 FORZ- 1T0 1 6 : A ( Z ) = Y ( Z ) : NEXT : F 
ORZ=0TO9 : B( Z } -0 : NEXT : GOSUB2 100 
5090 PRINT: PRINT :AS=" Your accoun 
t tf is n +STR$(AN)+".":GOSUB1000:A 
$""Your password is "+Y$ (2)+" . " : 
GOSUB1000 : PRINT : AS=" Write these 
down! " : GOSUB1000 : A$=" You ' 11 need 
them later : GOSUB10 00 : PRINT : GO 
SUB1100 

5095 PRINT: PRINT"I ' 11 spot you e 
nough credits to ge started" : PRI 
NT"but you'll have to pay me bac 
k. " : PRINT"I charge 10% interest. 
": PRINT 

5099 PRINT : PRINT"Now you must lo 
g in using your" : PRINT"account # 

and. password. " :GOTO70 

5100 ' Upper-lower case convertio 
n 

5120 Z3$=LEFT$ (Z$, 1) : FOR Z=2 TO 

LEN(Z$) : Z1$=MID$ (Z$, Z , 1) 

5130 IF ASC(Z1$)<48 THEN Z3$=Z3$ 

+Z1$:Z5=1:GOTO5160 

5140 IF Z5=0 AND ASC(Z1$)>64 AND 
ASC(Z$)<91 THEN Z2=ASC ( Z 1$) +32 : 
Z2$=CHR$(Z2) ELSE Z5=0:Z2$=Z1$ 
5150 Z3$=Z3$+Z2$ 
5160 NEXT 

5170 Z$=Z3$:RETURN 

6000 1 ATTAC REPORT 

6010 FORZ=0TO3 : IFB (Z) =0THEN6040 

6020 AT$=STR$(B(Z)) : CD$~LEFT$ (AT 

$,2) :X$=MID$(AT$,4,2) :Y$=MID$(AT 

$,6,2) :PN$=RIGHT$(AT$,2) : LES=MID 

$( ATS, 3,1) 

6025 IFCD$=" 1" THENPRINT"Player 
#";PN$;" took over your base at 
";XS ,*","; Y$;" Level ";LE$: PRINT 

6028 IF CD$= n 2" THENPRINT "Pla ye 

r 3" ;PN$;" attacked your base at 
" ;X$ ; " , " ;Y$; " Level " ; LE$ : PRINT 

" but failed to take it overi":P 

RINT 

6030 IF CD$=" 3" THENPRINT" PI aye 
r #";PN$;" attacked your fleet b 
ut lost i " : PRINT 
6040 B(Z)=0:NEXT 

6050 AT$=RIGHT$(D1$,50) :IF B(9) = 
0 THEN RETURN 

6060 PRINT"Player #" ; B (9) ,* "overr 

an your fleet .": PRINT"That playe 

r left you this comment : " : PRINTA 

TS:B(9)=0:AT$="\" : PRINT : RETURN 

7000 'SWITCH LEVELS 

7002 PRINT"Enter level. (1 to" ;L 

V;") " ; :GOSUB1500: Z=VAL(Z$) :IF Z 

<1 OR Z>LV THENPRINT" LVL Aborted 

I » :GOTO300ELSE LL=Z 

7010 Z1S="LEVEL"+STR$ ( Y ( 15) ) +"/D 

AT" 

7015 PRINT" Saving this level": PR 
INT"Start" ;STRING$ (SZ-13 , " " ) ; " F 
inished" 

7020 OPEN "0" , #1,Z1$ :F0RX1=1T0SZ 
: F0RY1=1T0SZ : WRITE#1 f G(X1, Yl) :NE 
XTY1: PRINT" . " ; : NEXTX1: CLOSE! 1 
7040 PRINT : 21S="LEVEL"+STR$ ( LL) + 
"/DAT" 

7045 PRINT"Loading level" ; LL: PRI 
NT"Start" ;STRING$ (SZ-13 , " ") ; "Fi 
nished" 

7050 0PEN"I if , #1, Z1$:F0RX1=1T0SZ: 
F0RY1=1T0SZ : INPUT tf 1 , G (XI , Yl) : NEX 
TY1 : PRINT" . " ; : NEXTX1 : CLOSER 1: Y ( 1 
5}=LL:GOTO290 



3^500 1 ??? 

3010 Z=G(X,Y}-90 

8020 IF z-1 THENPRINT" An abandon 
ed Flagship! ! " : Y ( 1) =Y ( 1 ) +1 
8030 IF Z=2 THEN PRI NT" A Space m 
inel I " :Z1=RND(80000) : PRINT"It ex 
poded causing"; zi ; "credits damag 
e to your Flagship ! ": PRINT"I f m 1 
oaning you the money to get it r 
epaired. " : Y (8 ) =Y (8 ) +Z1 
8040 IF Z-3 THENZ1=RKD(5)+5:PRIN 
TZ1 ; "fighters who join your flee 
t! ": Y(2)=Y(2)+Z1 

8050 IF Z=4 THEN PRI NT "A Fairy Go 
d Mother! " : 1 1=JRND ( 20000) -f 2 0000 : P 
RINT"She gives you" ?Z1; "credits 
cause you've been good i " : Y ( 6 ) =Y ( 
6)+Zl 

3060 IF Z=5 THEN PRINT "An Atomic 
explosion! !" :PRINT"Your fleet s 
uffered no damage but your turn 
is over! " : G (X r Y) =100+50+ Y (0) : GOT 
04820 

8070 IFZ>5 THENPRINT"A treasure 
chest! i":Zl=RND (20000) : PRINT"It 
has" ;Z1; "credits inside" : Y ( 6 ) =Y ( 
6)+Zl 

8080 G (X , Y ) =0 : GOTO290 

8100 ' TOP COMMAND 

8105 PRINT" # Name"," Credits": 

PRINT 

8110 FOR Z=1T05: PRINTUSING H # # " rT 
U-(Z) ;: PRINT" "+TP$ (Z) ,TP(Z) : NEXT 
: PRINT: RETURN 
8200 ' CAL COMMAND 

3205 PRINT" The last 9 callers we 
re: " : PRINT 

8 210 FOR Z=0 T08: PRINTLP$ ( Z ) : NEX 
T : RETURN 

9000 ' LST COMMAND 

9010 PRINT"Start at what player? 

(CR=1) » ; :GOSUB1500: Z2=VAL(Z$) : 
IFZ2=0 THEN Z2=l ELSE IF Z2>NR 0 
R Z2<0 THENPRINT "There are only" 
; NR ; "players! " :GOTO9010 
9020 PRINT"End at what player? ( 
CR= " ; NR ; " ) " ; : GOSUB 1500:Z 1-VAL ( Z 
$) : IF Z1=0 THEN Z1=NR ELSE IF Zl 
<0 OR Z1>NR THEN PRINT"Try again 
i „ . GOTO9020 

9030 0PEN"D" , r 1 , "GALAXUSR/DAT" , 2 
00 

9040 FIELD#1,10AS A$ , 10 AS B$,60 

AS C$,100 AS D$ 
9050 FOR R-Z2 TO Z1:GET#1,R 
9055 Z3=CVN(MID$(C$,56,5) ) 
9060 PRINTR; A$ ;RK$ (Z3) :NEXT:CL0S 
E#1:GOTO290 

9100 OPEN "I", #1, "RULES/TXT" 
9105 PRINT"Hit 'A' to abort": 
9110 IF E0F(1)— 1 THEN 9140 
9115 Z$-INKEY$: I FZ$=" A "ORZ $^"a "T 
HEN9140 

9120 LINE INPUT # 1 , AS : PRINTA$ 

9130 GOTO 9110 

9140 CLOSE | 1 : RETURN 

9999 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"See ya la 
ter! !": PRINT" Please hang up now. 
":R=42 :A1S=LD$ : B1$**RK$ : A ( 1 ) =CR : A 
(2)-NR: A(3)-SZ:A(4)=LV: A(5)==NC:A 
( 5 ) =WG : GOSUB 2 100 : RUN 

10000 DATA Flagship(s) , Fighter (s 
) , Cargo bay (s) , Base kit (s), Base ( 
s) , Credits on hand, Credits in ba 
nk, Credits on loan 

10001 DATA Cadet, Ensign, Leftenan 
t , Commander, Captain, Admiral , Flee 
t Admiral , Supream Admiral 

10002 DATA 500000,1000000,200000 
0,3000000,4000000, 6000000,800000 

fits 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 89 



RAINBOW 



Give us your best: join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE RAINBOW's 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed — 
legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high score. 
Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE RAINBOW. 
The "Rainbow Scoreboard" is now a bimonthly feature. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIC From the CoCo SIO prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



* Current Record Holder 



Shutout 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 

¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



ADVANCED STAR'TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
3,975 *David Schaller. Clarkston, WA 
3,960 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek. 

British Columbia 
3.960 Robbi Smith. Helena, H! 
3,800 Shaw Muniz, Los Angeles, CA 
2,600 John Fredericks, Kalkaska. Ml 
2,450 Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
AN DRONE (Radio Shack) 

107,901 ★Steve Nealon. St. Louis, MO 
85.240 Judy Haviland, Caldwell, ID 
81.375 Corey Jackson, Monongahela, PA 
71.035 Ouinn Grantor, Bismark. ND 
63,600 Maurice MacGarvey. Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
58.200 Scott Bellman. Bettendort, IA 
BEAM RIDER (Spectral Associates) 

7,144,040 *Paul Bivens, Washington. PA 
BIOSPHERE (Radio Shack) 

25,345 ★Robert St. Pierre, Coventry, Rl 
21,372 Randall Edwards. Dunlap, KS 
14.186 David Spalding, Galena Park, TX 
10.056 Carlos Gameros. El Paso, TX 
3,822 Kevin Hilton, Gurdon. AR 
3.101 Vincent Knight. Harvey. IL 
2.491 Robert de Lambert, Everett, WA 
BOUNCING BOULDERS (Dlecom) 

9,318 *Skip Taday, East Lyme, CT 
7.448 Philip Manwarren, Harrington, ME 
3.994 Louis Bouchard, Gatineau. Quebec 
1.561 Lise Nanlel. L'Acadie. Quebec 
36 Andre Grenier, Quebec. Canada 
BREWMASTER (Novasoft) 

120.375 ★Thomas Crowe, Colombia. 
South America 
BUBBLE WARS (THE RAINBOW. 2/86) 

52.100 *Daniel Cecil. Bardstown. KY 
42,800 Blain Jamieson. Kingston, Ontario 
41 ,400 Becky Rumpel. Arcadia. Wl 
BUSTOUT (Radio Shack) 

35.518 ★Brian Matherne. Gretna. LA 
BUZZARD BAIT (Tom Mix) 
22.931,850 *Skip Taday, East Lyme. CT 

763,550 Geran Stalker. Rivordalo. GA 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 

150,200 ★Brian Lewis. Baltimore. MD 

145.800 Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 

135,600 Eric Rose, Grand Coulee. WA 

128,000 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon. IN 

125.000 Tony Fortino. Tacoma, WA 

112,700 Jesse Binns, Phoenix, A2 

1 10.400 Alexander Chapman. Vancouver, 

British Columbia 
100.400 Michelle Schiessl. Menasha, Wl 
CASTLE (THE RAINBOW. 6/86) 

326,352 ★Richard Donnell. Penns Grove, NJ 
228,622 John Broussard Jr., Alexandria, LA 
202.659 Brendan Powell. La Grande, OR 
1 16,606 Darryn Bearisto, New Carlisle, 
Quebec 

93,672 Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 
British Columbia 
CLOWNS and BALLOONS (Radio Shack) 

63.750 ★Steve Fraser, Pickering. Ontario 
18,470 James Leistico, Lompoc, CA 
15.350 Christopher Heston. Louisville, KY 
11,650 Cliff Armoogan. Las Vegas, NV 



COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

999-0 ★•Erik Munson. Tucson, AZ 
999-0 ★•Danny Wimetl, Rome. NY 
998-0 «Eugene Paoli, Wilmington, DE 
982-0 «Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
866-1 Ghislain Chillis, Trois-Rivieres, 
Quebec 

814-0 »John Licata, Richton Park, IL 
814-1 Frank D'Amato. Brooklyn, NY 
800-0 •Curtis Schaaf, Moro, IL 
COLOR CAR (Novasolt) 

209,381 ★Roger Rosebrock. Leipsic, OH 
CRYSTLE CASTLES (ThunderVision) 

554,979 ★Patrick Martel. Laval, Quebec 
DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 

86 ★Melanie Moor. Florence, AL 

87 Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 
87 David and Shirley Johnson. 

Leicesier. NC 
87 Paul Summers. Orange Park. FL 
89 Chris Piche. White Rock, 

British Columbia 
89 Milan Parekh, Fullerton, CA 
89 Andrew Urquhart, Metairie. LA 

89 Steve Zemaitis, Howell, Ml 

90 Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 

91 John Semonin, Akron, OH 
DECATHALON (Spectral Associates) 

10,368 ★Sylvain Duguay, St. Bruno. Quebec 
DEFENSE (Spectral Associates) 

16.305 ★Patrick Martel. Laval. Quebec 
DEMOLITION DERBY (Radio Shack) 
210,700 *Duke Davis, Sandwich, IL 
124.000 Judy Haviland. Caldwell, ID 
16,100 Christopher Heston. Louisville. KY 
DEMON ATTACK (Imagic) 

28.780 ★Daniel Streidt, Cairo, Egypt 
4.960 Laundre Clemon, Sacramento, CA 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Tom Mix) 
1.866.100 ★Stephane Martel. Laval, Quebec 
623,550 Dale Krueger. Maple Ridge. 
British Columbia 
75.000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
59.200 Stephane Martel. Laval. Quebec 
DISCRIMINATION (THE RAINBOW. 1/87) 

15 ★Patrick Martel. Laval, Quebec 
DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 

34.560 *Laundre Clemon, Sacramento, CA 



DOWNLAND 

99,980 
98.985 
97.740 
89.490 
77.254 
73,346 

70,142 
68,142 

67.721 
62.442 

55.300 



49.500 
43,502 



(Radio Shack) 
★Danny Wimett, Rome. NY 
Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
Stephane Deshaies, Beloeil, Quebec 
Neil Edge. Williston, FL 
Tom Audas. Fremont. CA 
Jean-Francois Morin, Loretteville, 
Quebec 

Chris Goodman. Baltimore, MD 
Cooper Valentin. Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
Keith Yampanis, Jaffrey, NH 
Eddie Lawrence. Pasadena. 

Newfoundland 
Patrico Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 
Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge. VA 
Mike Ells. Charlotte, Ml 



41 ,896 Antonio Hidalgo, San Jose. 

Costa Rica 
40.360 Jesse Binns. Phoenix. AZ 

34.424 Andrea Mayfield. Melbourne. FL 
25,147 Timothy O'Neal. Commerce, TX 
21.527 Scott Godfrey, Nashua, NH 
19,835 Christopher Heston, Louisville, KY 
18,251 Sam DiCerce, Willowich, OH 
17,120 Kay McCluskey, Remsen. NY 

DRAGON BLADE (Prickly- Pear) 

69 ★Jason Damron. Folsom, CA 
DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

146,325 ★Stephane Martel, Laval. Quebec 
5.561 Chris Lorenz. Kiester, MN 
ENCHANTER (Inlocom) 

400/212 ★Charly Rushing. Santa Rosa. CA 
400/621 Brad Wilson. Lithia Springs. GA 
400/431 Truman Bryerton. Jr., B.Ville, NY 
224/358 Joseph Delaney. Augusta, GA 
185/186 David Tarleton. Williamsburg, VA 
ESCAPE 2012 (Computerware) 

202 *Roy Grant. Toledo, OH 
EVICTOR (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 

12,915 ★Spencer Metcalf, Longview, TX 
10,560 Patricio Gonzalez. Buenos Aires, 
Argentina 

FALCON'S LAIR (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 

45.425 ★ Talib Khan. Bronx. NY 
FIRE COPTER (Adventure International) 

64.710 ★Phillip Gregory, Moultrie. GA 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW. 1/86) 

8,910 ★Stephane Martel. Laval, Quebec 
5,680 Kathy Rumpel. Arcadia, Wl 
3,760 Rick Beevers, Bloomfield, MN 
3,505 Blake Cadmus, Reading. PA 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

26,370 *Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
9,930 Daniel Streidt, Cairo. Egypt 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 

328,820 ★Bernard Burke, Lee's Summit. MO 
249.960 Matthew Fumich. Munlord, TN 
169.410 Danny Dunne, Pittsfield. NH 
149,520 Vernon Johnson III, Parkville, MD 
116,280 Scott Jamison, Billerica, MA 
107,570 Kyle Madruga. Hanford, CA 
104,870 Chris Dunne. Pittsfield. NH 
99.100 Mark Kingsley, Mississauga, Ontario 
98.770 Etienne Duguay, St. Bruno, Quebec 
73.520 Neil Edge. Williston. FL 
GALAX ATTACK (Spectral Associates) 

236.350 ★Corey Leopold. Nada. TX 
GALLOPING GAMBLERS (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 

3,427,660 ★Sean Lair. Ewing, MO 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
23,643,720 *Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
20,921.490 Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
10,222,940 Clinton Morell, Sacramento, CA 
10,020.500 Ken Hubbard, Madison, Wl 
7,493,340 Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
2,626,950 Jonathon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
2,512,620 Jason Steele. Pensacola. FL 
2.312,640 Rory Kostman, Hershey. NE 
2,1 1 5.790 Jerry Honigman, Waggoner, IL 
2,011.200 Jerry Colbert, Bakersfield, CA 
1,108,750 Robert Fox, Dover, QH 
1,094,280 Donnie Pearson, Arvada, CO 
1.081.530 Michael Wallace, Bronx, NY 



0 



THE RAINBOW 



November 1987 




1,025,900 
1,016,050 
933,740 
932,660 
787,780 
685.840 
667.390 
456,220 
410,868 
79,570 



1,059,350 
830.950 

720,560 
531 ,600 
160,450 



3.820 

3,540 
2.550 
2.000 
1,740 



* 



John Holaling, Duanesburg, NY 
Edward Swatek, Chicago, IL 
Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
Brian Hunler, South Berwick, ME 
Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs. GA 
Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
Robbie Smilh, Helena. HI 
Scott Jamison, Billerica. MA 
Billy Helmick. Independence, KY 
David Gordon, Pierre, SD 
GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 

523.080 ★Joseph Delaney, Augusta, GA 
252.840 EdwardRocha, Cobleskill, NY 
GRABBER (Tom Mix) 

432,650 ★Matthew Fumich, Munford. TN 
HALL OF THE KING (Prickly-Pear) 

107 ★Joshua Wanagel. Freeville, NY 
HOME ROW BOMBER (THE RAINBOW. 1/87) 
6.384 ★Timolhy Hennon. Highland, IN 
2,420 Slephane and Patrick Martel. 
Laval, Quebec 
JOKER POKER (THE RAINBOW, 3/87) 

2,793.285 ★Blain Jamieson, Kingslon, Ontario 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Compute rware) 
2,503.000 ★Slephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
257.600 Keith Cohen. Rocky Mount, NC 
JUNKFOOD (THE RAINBOW, 11/84) 

18.650 ★Daniel Streidl, Cairo. Egypt 
KARATE (Diecom Products) 

11,600 ★Jonalhon Ross, Pocomoke City, MD 
6,300 David Darling, Longlac, Onlario 
THE KING (Tom Mix) 
3,824.280 *Andre Grenier, Quebec, Canada 
22,400 Spencer Metcalf, Longview, TX 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 

84,830 ★Thomas Beruheimer. Yoru. PA 
David Spalding. Galena Park, TX 
Steven Moreno, Stockton, CA 
Timothy Hennon. Highland, IN 
Tony Rapson, Tulsa, OK 
LANCER (Spectral Associates) 

567,200 *Luke Birinyi, Pefferlaw, Ontario 
227,800 Andre Grenier. Valleyfield, Quebec 
178.800 Christian Grenier. Valleyfield, Quebec 
99,700 David Kauffman, South Haven, Ml 
LUNAR RESUCE (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 
113.579 *Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
LUNCHTIME (Novasolt) 

55,550 ★Richard Deane. Chicago, IL 
42,025 Steve Place, Webster, NY 
26.425 Joshua Conley, Springfield, OH 
18,225 Charles Julian, Chicago, IL 
MICROBES (Radio Shack) 

337,880 *Judy Haviland, Caldwell. ID 
151.420 James Leistico. Lompoc. CA 
121.330 Minesh Patel, Benlon, AR 
77,700 Brian Abeling, Monticello, IA 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
468,750 *Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
Stirling Dell. Dundalk, Ontario 
Jeremy Pruski, Sandwich. IL 
Mike Grant. Fresno, CA 
Michael Heitz. Chicago. IL 
Vernon Johnson III, Parkville, MD 
Edward Swatek. Chicago, IL 
Chuck Morey, Bakersfield, CA 
Chris Wright, New Albany, IN 
MUDPIESfM/crJ fron) 

486,500 ★Stephane Martel. Laval. Quebec 
MUNCHKIN BLASTER (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 

7,240 ★Jeff Remick. Warren. Ml 
NUKE AVENGER (T&D Software) 

60.250 *Doug Lute. Clymer. PA 
OMNIVERSE (Computerware) 

112 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 



84,070 
33,900 
11,430 
2,785 



355,570 
318,160 
137.920 
127,550 
120,670 
49,630 
45.500 
45,375 



ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1,276-0 ★•Jonathan Dorris. Indianapolis, IN 
•Gregg Thompson, Chesterfield, VA 
•Chad Johnson, Benton, AR 
•Mark Lang, Downieville, CA 
Dan Liffmann. Andover, MA 
Rick Beevers. Bloomfield, NM 
David Blankenship. Princeton, WV 
Toby Jacobs, Bellefontaine, OH 
Tim DeJong. Rock Valley, IA 



1,210-0 

1 ,204-0 

1.160-0 

1,132-23 

1,106-15 

1.086-17 

1,078-2 

1,064-16 



1,028-60 Jamie Keels, Gulfport. MS 
54-0 •Walter Hearne. Pensacola. FL 
PAPER ROUTE (Diecom Products) 
1,120,350 ★Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 

David Kauffman. South Haven, Ml 
Chrislopher Darden. Woodson 

Terrace. MO 
Konnie Siewierski, Schaumburg. IL 
Larry Shelton. Marion. IL 
Holly Forsberg. Wheaton, IL 
PEGASUS AND THE PHANTOM Rl DERS ( Radio Shack) 
303,100 *Mike Grant, Fresno, CA 
244,100 Martinez Domingo, Miami. FL 
PINBALL (Radio Shack) 

213,300 * Patrick Martel. Laval. Quebec 
142,400 Thomas Paylon, Anderson. SC 
PITSTOP II (Epyx) 

54 ★Rusty Breitbach. Rickardsville. IA 
54 ★Walter Hearne. Pensacola, FL 
51 Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
9 Laundre Clemon, Sacramento. CA 
POLARIS (Radio Shack) 

161.198 *Danny Remick, Warren, Ml 
POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 

4,855 ★Darcy Gilford, Portland, OR 
4,080 Alphonse Brown, Houston, TX 
POOYAN fDarasoft; 

99,500.300 *Danny Wimett, Rome. NY 
97.500,000 Rich Fiore. Clemson, SC 

Carlos Gameros. El Paso, TX 
Ben Collins, Clemson, SC 
Jon Sowle. Sanford. FL 
Jason Maxwell, Manchester, TN 
Shawn Bonning. Sayre. PA 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

94.470 ★Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
PYRAMID 2000 (Radio Shack) 

100 ★Peter Antonacopoulos, Toa Baja, 
Puerto Rico 

QUIX (Tom Mix) 
8,407,772 ★John Haldane. Tempe, AZ 

Curtis Goodson, Sao Paulo. Brazil 
Elisa Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
John Hotaling, Duanesburg. NY 
Christopher Conley, 

North Attleboro, MA 
Patrick Martel. Laval, Quebec 
Thomas Crowe, Colombia, 
South America 
RADIO BALL (Radio Shack) 

6,330,350 ★Myriam Ferland, Trois-Rivieres. 
Quebec 
Les Dorn, Eau Claire, Wl 
Dominic Deguire, St.Basile. Quebec 
Brian Buss. Whitehall. PA 
David Del Purgatorio, Antioch, CA 
RAIDERS (THE RAINBOW, 11/86) 

2,100 ★Dave Allessi, Iselin, NJ 
RESCUE ON FRACTALUS (Epyx) 

48,445 ★Steven Moreno, Stockton, CA 
ROGUE (Epyx) 

1 7.851 *Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
8,812 Allen Houk. San Diego, CA 
Kirk Marshall, Westport. MA 
David Spalding, Galena Park. TX 
John Moore, Ottawa, OH 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

82 *Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
87 Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 
SANDWORM (THE RAINBOW, 8/86) 

737 ★Becky Rumpel. Arcadia, Wl 
355 Mallhew Smith. Denman Island, 
British Columbia 
SHAMUS (Radio Shack) 

120.480 *Lynn Shrewsberry. Sunnyside. WA 
47.260 Jamie Keefs. Gulfporl, MS 
38,075 Kay Shrewsberry, Sunnyside. WA 
SHORT-TERM MEMORY TEST (THE RAINBOW 12/85) 
20 ★Brian and Harold Matherne, 
Gretna, LA 
SLAY THE NERIUS (Radio Shack) 

73,091 ★Jeff Remick. Warren, Ml 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

148,050 *Alan Martin, Cornwall, Ontario 
1 30,720 Patricio Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 
Argentina 



54,500.000 
3,785,000 
1.987.000 
1 .546,000 
709.750 



1,404.000 
1,003,104 
205.335 
104,034 

38,957 
19.410 



4.510.740 
1.945.1 10 
1,768.940 
1,631 ,750 



6,576 
5,679 
5,369 



SPEEDSTER (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 

3,350 ★Jamie Stoner, Ml. Union, PA 
SPI DERCI DE (Radio Shack) 

6,170 ★Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 

Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
James Church, Pomte Claire. Quebec 
Charles Marlow, Briarwood, NY 
Mike Watson, Norlhville, NY 
Joel DeYoung. Manson, Manitoba 
STARLORD (THE RAINBOW. 8/86) 
10,489,710 ★Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia. 
Canada 

STELLAR LIFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 

629.000 ★Steven Smith. Matthews, NC 
114.620 Martinez Domingo, Miami. FL 
SUCCESS MANSION (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

13/13 ★Dave Allessi. iselin, NJ 
SUPER ROOTER (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

1 1,090 ★Frederick Lajoie, Nova Scotia, 
Canada 

3,910 Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

303,600 ★Tim Hennon. Highland. IN 
TREASURE QUEST (THE RAINBOW 11/86) 

645,360 ★Slephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

132 ★Malfhew Fumich. Munlord, TN 
TUT S TUMB (Mark Data) 

118,720 *Reina Roy. Carleton, Quebec 
60,020 Don Siler, Muncie. IN 
45.000 Blake Cadmus. Reading, PA 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) 

2,032 *Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 

★ Edward Rocha. Cobleskill, NY 
Philip Puffinburger, Winchester, VA 
Denise Rowan, Minneapolis, MN 
Randall Edwards. Dunlap. KS 
Bernard Florence, Croydon. Australia 
Donnie Pearson, Arvada. CO 
Lynn Shrewsberry, Sunnyside, WA 
Domenick Doran, Coram. NY 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
18.813 ★Talib Khan. Bronx. NY 

Karl Gufliford, Summerville. SC 
Pat O'Neill. Nepean, Ontario 
Martha James. Swarthmore, PA 
Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 
THE VORTEX FACTOR (Mark Data) 

100/276 ★Tommy Crouser, Dunbar. WV 
100/483 Rick & Brenda Stump. 

Laureldale, PA 
210 Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 
British Columbia 
WARP FACTOR X (Prickly-Pear) 

5,829.559 *Doug Lute. Clymer, PA 
WILDWESTfTo/Tj Mix) 

38 ★Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 
WRESTLE MANIAC (Diecom) 

956,971 *Marc Reiter, Cincinnati. OH 
546,315 Louis Bouchard. Gatineau, Quebec 
Tony Bacon. Mt Vernon, IN 
Billy Helmick, Independence, KY 
Jonathon Ross. Pocomoke City. MD 
ZAKSUN D (Elite Software) 

39,950 ★Walter Hearne. Pensacola, FL 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
2,061 ,000 ★Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
Blake Cadmus. Reading, PA 
Dan Brown, Pittsford. NY 
Andrew Urquhart, Melairie, LA 
Bob Dewitt. Blue Island, IL 
Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
Daniel Sireidt. Cairo, Egypt 
Jeff Miller. Bronson, Ml 
David Darling, Longlac. Ontario 
Tom Maccarone, Swampscott, MA 
Carlos Gameros, El Paso. TX 
Garrett Stangel. Milwaukee, Wl 
Jamie Stoner. Mt. Union, PA 
ZONX (THE RAINBOW, 10/85) 

6,500 ★Daniel Streidt. Cairo, Egypt 



2.032 
2,008 
1,995 
1.988 
1.975 
1.968 
1.952 
1.908 



10,489 
6,294 
4.643 
3,285 



45,483 
39,086 
26.599 



1,950.000 
1.300,500 
1,100,600 
253.400 
163.700 
119.600 
111,400 
83,700 
72.800 
67.400 
59.800 
22.500 



— Jody Doyle 



November 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



91 




REBOARD PillTii 



In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, which appears 
bimonthly, we offer this column of pointers for our game-playing 
readers' benefit. If you have some interesting hints, tips or responses 
to questions, or want help yourself, we encourage you to write to the 
Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. a 



FEEDBACK 

In response to questions from: 

• David Davidson: In Sands of Egypt, 
the scepter is at the pyramid. The rope 
that crumbles to dust is of no use. You 
need to get the palm fronds and make a 
good rope. 

In Shenanigans, to get the pole inside 
the cave, leave it in the cabin and go back 
inside the cave and open the trapdoor. 
Then go up and get the pole and go back 
through the trapdoor. 

• Bo Van Cleave: In Pyramid 2000, after 
you get the key, go and open the sarcoph- 
agas and go down and get the pearl. The 
scepter makes a bridge fall. 

• Sean McDonough: In Infidel, to find 
the pyramid you must dig. After you find 
it, put the stone cube in the empty hole. 

• David Hill: In Vortex Factor, feed the 
sandwich to the mutant. He will give you 
the cartridge to get to Cairo Moon. You 
don't need to read the hieroglyphics on 
the ring. 

• Dale Kaczmarek: In Hitchhiker's 
Guide to the Galaxy, the plotter is in the 
Klingon hold. When you get the babble 
fish, wait until you get taken to the 
captain. Wait until he reads poetry and 
type ENJOY POETRY. Keep typing this 
until he gets to the second verse, then 
read it carefully. 

• Harry Keener: In Dragon Blade, you 
need the sword. The sword is in the 
abandoned mine. 

Don Grey 
Austell, GA 

Scoreboard: 

In Arcon, I can wander through the 
bedroom, garden, roof, garbage compac- 
tor, field, mousehole, tool shed and the 
meat shed, but I can't go any farther. 

Julie Finn 
Ft. Smith. A R 

Scoreboard: 

In the third chapter of War of the 
Worlds, I can't find the bunker. 1 know 



that I need to get into the bunker so I can 
exchange my gold disk for a silver one 
from Xad. 

Darcy Gi fjord 
Portland, OR 

Scoreboard: 

In War of the Worlds, to get the 
farmer's children, go east from the plane 
and look. 

How doyougettotheplaneand cross 
the river? 

Doug Elmer 
Lancaster, PA 

Scoreboard: 

In Wishbringer, 1 can't get out of the 
fuzzy room in the tower and the library/ 
museum. I think it has something to do 
with the 3D glasses, but I can't find them. 

Marc Prud'hommeaux 
Winter Harbor, ME 

Scoreboard: 

How do you shatter the backboard and 
get three points on One-On-One} 

Mark Fernandes 
N. Dartmouth, MA 

Scoreboard: 

In Dr. Avaloe, to get out of the first 
room, type OPEN HOLE. Af ter you get out, 
you'll be in a room that you have to get 
out of right away by falling into a secret 
trapdoor that will be randomly selected 
somewhere in the room. You will have to 
avoid the invisible monsters. 

How do you get over the rug in Raaka- 
Tu and how do you kill Zaxxon itself in 
Zaxxonl 

Shawn Pitman 
San Diego, CA 

Scoreboard: 

In Paramission, try to jump out of the 
plane and go most of the way to the 
platform without your parachute. On the 
low levels, it helps to avoid the bomb. 

On Gantelet, try to save the potions to 
kill Death or when your health is low. 

Clinton M or ell 
Sacramento, CA 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, I can only 



kill all the monsters on the first level and 
then go down a level and only kill vipers; 
all the rest kill me before I can get enough 
shots in. Help! 

Darren King 
Yorkton, Saskatchewan 



Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, don't use 
a flask unless you know what type it is. 
The Hale and Thews flask will aid you. 
The Abyes will not. Hale means to render 
immune to disease. An Aby is a penalty. 
Thews are sinews and tendons. 

Tim Hennon 
Highland, IN 

Scoreboard: 

In Rogue, the Aquadors can't take 
points off the plain leather armor. Start 
shooting the leprechauns and nymphs at 
a distance. If you kill them before they 
can steal from you, the leprechauns will 
leave gold and the nymphs will usually 
leave a magical item. Don't vaporize a 
weapon twice because this will make your 
weapon disappear in a puff of smoke. 

For the scare monster scroll, you have 
to drop it. Do not try to pick it back up 
though, or it will turn to dust. To use it 
again in the same level, go back to the 
scroll and press G and move on top of 
the scroll. 

I've had the amulet before, but what 
can you do with it? I found that there are 
more than 26 levels, but is it possible to 
kill the dungeon lord? Is there a way to 
stop the Medusa's gaze from confusing 
you? What comes after the ranks of 
warlord and hero? 

Quinn Granfor 
Bismarck, ND 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid, to get around the serpent, 
find the bird and type THROW BIRD. You 
shouldn't do anything to the mummy 
because, if you do, you will be unable to 
get to the treasurechest. Go into the maze 
and you will find the treasure chest. 

How do you get the coins out of the 
machine after you get the batteries? How 
do you feed the sarcophagus? 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



92 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



In Bedlam, how doyoutowakeupthe 
unconscious doctor? If the doctor stings 
you with his hypo, type PLUGH or you 
aimlessly move around. 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, to go to 
Level 4, there is no hole to climb. You 
have to kill the wizard's image first with 
the fire ring. 

Watch out, you have no objects to stall 
the creatures on Level 4, so use the spider 
as your guide. 

Where is the ring in Level 3 and where 
is the elvish sword? 

In Madness and the Minotaur, if you 
drop everything and still cannot open the 
crypt, you must get your strength to over 
250. To light the tower room, get the 
treasure and go to the packrat in the 
forest. The powerful force in the second 
level will be conquered if you have the 
scepter. 

If you havethejewelbox, open it in the 
rninotaur's lair. If you look at the tablet, 
it disappears. Something else happened 
when I looked at the tablet in the 
chamber with the carvings. I used AKHI - 
ROM on the scarab and it glowed. What 
do I do with the glowingscarab? How do 
I get through the magic spells that push 
me out of the room? 

John Howell 
Montreal, Quebec 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid 2000, what do I do with the 
pillow and the magazine? What do I do 
to the plant? I can find the vending 
machine in the maze, but I can't find 
where the mummy puts the treasure. 

Matt Swift 
Longview, TX 

Scoreboard: 

In Raaka-Tu, drop the ring and then 
pick it up again. You will be back in the 
room where you found the ring. The food 
is useless. Once you find the secret 
passage, make sure you have all the 
treasure. Go through the passage to the 
outside. 

What do you do after that? 

In Sands of Egypt, you must get the 
canteen and go to the pool. #nce you are 
there, type TILL CRNTEEN, GET CANTEEN 
and DRINK. Only take the torch into the 
treasure room and when you leave, take 
the torch and the ladder only. The ax is 
on top of the pyramid. The dates are in 
the tree. 

In Pyramid 2000, drop the scepter 
before you get the statue. 

In Sc>:- Quest y there is no key to the 
beach house. You must break the window 
with the shovel. The shovel is the thing 
thatyou trip over behind the falls. 

Matthew Fumich 
Munford, 77V 



Scoreboard: 

In Black Sanctum, I have the boards, 
nails, saw and hammer, but I cannot 
convince the game to make an altar. 
What have I missed? 

Deborah MicWef 
Kap usk a sing, On tario 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas §uest, when you meet the 
anaconda, type TICKLE CHIN. To make 
Roger cooperate and get past the canni- 
bals to get into the cave, type WRVE RING. 

In Madness and the Minotaur, I have 
the basket and the mushroom and took 
them to the Air of Enchantment, but I 
didn't get the spell. 

Mark Bollinger 
Baltimore, MD 

Scoreboard: 

I have the oil and I am by the pyramid 
in Sands of Egypt, then I find the scepter. 
What do I do next? 

Eddie Baker 
Lincoln Park, NJ 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, I can't find the 
oasis, pool, dates, pyramid or the con- 
tainer. 

Duane Fair 
Joshua, TX 

Scoreboard: 

In Treasures of the Enrakian Empire. 
I can't find any treasures except for the 
rose and the magic glove. 

In The Crown of Merrow, I can't get 
across the river, and in he Lutin, I can 1 t 
get through the caves. 

Scott Godfrey 
Nashua, NH 

Scoreboard: 

In Alton, how do you get there? 

Andrew Bryan 
Springhill, Novia Scotia 

Scoreboard: 

I just bought Flight Simulator /. As I 
began reading through the booklet, it 
mentioned a map. I looked through 
everything it came with and there wasn't 
one. Should there be one? 

Paul Blount 
Woodruff Wl 

Scoreboard: 

To get more fuel in Zaxxon, shoot the 
fuel tanks. Doing this will give you fuel 
and points. 

Matthew Healey 
Grand Junction, CO 

Scoreboard: 

In Halls of Dungeon Death, from The 
Second Rainbow Book of Adventures, 



my sword is blunted and I am out of 

potions. The golem on Level 4 keeps 
doing me in, and I can't lay a finger on 
him. All I get when I attack it is, 44 You 
haven't even scratched him!" How do 
you getpast the golem? 

William Grace 
St. Joseph, MI 

Scoreboard: 

In Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, 
I can open the door in the heart of gold 
ship, and it asks me to show it some 
intelligence. How do I open it and get in? 

Brad Booth 
Cortland, NY 

Scoreboard: 

I can get the map from Jenny, but 1 
don't know what to do after that in Wild 
West. Every time I go out in the desert 
I die, and every time I go to the alley, o ne 
of Bart's men shoots me. What do I do 
with the map and how do I find the 
treasure? 

In Magic of Z a nth, I can get as far as 
the lake. How do I find whafs under the 
water and how do 1, get past the lake? 

Chris Foster 
Texarkmna, TX 

Scoreboard: 

In Adventure in Mythology, you must 
have the key and the feather before you 
get to the village. At the village, type GO 
SCULPTURE. Kill the statue and go to the 
castle. Once you're inside, go to the 
dining room and get the golden apples. 
At the labyrinth, to light the torch, strike 
the rock with the knife. When it says 
"against what?" type ROCK. You must find 
Ariadne before you see the minotaur. 
Ariadne will give you a sword. 

In Wrestle Maniac, you must move 
your man behind your opponent and you 
must be facing the screen. Hold down the 
button and move the joystick down. 

Rusty Merrill 
Pocomoke, MD 

To respond to other readers* inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard fointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, f.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section ofour Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 

— Jody Doyle 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 93 



from our central location 




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THE RAINBOW is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche'* contains shorter 
BASIC program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 



Giving Thanks for the BASICs 



Cow 



Seen*! 



4K 



Personal Password Protector 

By Doug Anderson 

Some computer information services require you to have 
both a user ID number (or USERNAME) and a secret password 
to get into the system. For security reasons, these services 
advise you to change the password on a regular basis. 

However, choosing a password can be a tricky business. 
While avoiding any related or common phrases, you still need 
to pick a password that can be remembered. Thus, ROMEO™ 
+JULIET and KZALF'BPZO are excluded. 

Personal Password is a utility to generate a random pair' 
of passwords. For demonstration purposes, I used the 26 
words that comprise the phonetic alphabet. You should pick 
26 other words. Sources for other words might include 
frequently used personal names, or the first 26 words of a 
randomly selected novel ("Call me Ishmael"). 

The program will automatically generate 1 2 combinations 
of words. Pick the combination you like and discard the rest. 
Don't keep the list, and don't use each of the 1 2 in order. 
It's too likely that the list could be compromised. For security 
reasons, store the password and your user ID number in 
separate places. Finally, if you use a CB-type "handle" (e.g., 
a username) in bulletin boards, don't use your secret 
password. Printing your list is .optional; see Line 81. 

The protocol for "entering the net" varies among the 
information services. Before using this program, be sure that 
you understand what the particular service requires by way 
of a secret password. 



The listing: PRSSWORD 

10 REM PERSONAL PASSWORD WAS WRI 
TTEN BY DOUG ANDERSON. VERSION 
1.1. COPYRIGHT 1986. 
2fi CLS: CLEAR 5j3j3j3 : E=p : FOR X=l TO 
12 

3J3 A=RND(26) : FOR B=l TO A : READ C 
$:NEXT B 

4j3 IF E<1 THEN RESTORE : E=E+1 : D$^ 
C$:GOTO 3j3 

5p IF C$=D$ THEN RESTORE: GOTO 3j3 
6j3 RESTORE :F=2 6: FOR G=l TO F : REA 
D E$ : NEXT G 

7p F=RND(14) :FOR G=l TO F : READ E 
$:NEXT G 

8p PRINT C$ ;E$ ;D$ : PRINT#-2 , C$ ;E$ 
t D$ 

9j3 E~j$ : RESTORE : NEXT X:PRINT#-2:E 
ND 

1ft ft DATA ALPHA, BRAVO, CHARLIE, DEL 
TA, ECHO , FOXTROT, GOLF , HOTEL, INDIA 
, JULIET , KILO , LIMA , MIKE , NOVEMBER, 
OSCAR , PAPA , QUEBEC , ROMEO , S IERRA , T 
ANGO, UNIFORM , VICTOR, WHISKEY , XRAY 
, YANKEE, ZEBRA 

HP DATA !,#,$,%,&, (,) ,*,=,+,<,> 



-> / 



November 1987 



THE RAfNBOW 



96 



Tunnel Effects CoCo 3 

By Ken Ferreira 

Both Circle and Circle 2 create Hi-Res concentric circles 
that make you feel like you're rushing through a tunnel. The 
effect is mesmerizing. Don't stare at the screen too long — 
you may not be able to tear yourself away. 

The graphics are created with the HCIRCLE command. 
Experiment with Circle by changing the value of R in Line 
30 to 90, 50 or 150. 

Circle 2 works similarly, but uses the PALETTE command 
for an interesting effect. Also experiment with the R value 
in Line 30. You'll be surprised at what CoCo 3 can do. 

Listing 1: CIRCLE 

1 1 KEN FERREIRA (C) 1987 

5 PALETTE RGB: POKE 65497 ,0 

10 ON BRK GOTO 2 500: POKE 65497, 0 

20 PALETTE RGB:HSCREEN 2 

30 HCLS 8 



40 FOR R=l TO 193 STEP 1 

50 C=RND(15) 

60 HCIRCLE (160, 96) ,R,C 

70 NEXT R 

80 GOTO 80 

2500 POKE 65496, 0:END 

Listing 2: CIRCLE2 

1 • KEN FERREIRA (C) 1987 

5 ON BRK GOTO 2 500: POKE 65497 ,0 

10 PALETTE RGB : HSCREEN 2 

20 HCLS 8 

30 FOR R=l TO 192 STEP 1 
40 C=RND(15) 
50 HCIRCLE (160, 96) ,R,C 
60 NEXT R 

70 PALETTE RND ( 15 ) , RND (63) 
80 GOTO 70 

2500 PALETTE RGB: POKE 65496,$: EN 
D 



One Starry Night CoCo 3 

By Jim McDowell 

Fall skies bring with them meteor showers. This program 
for the CoCo 3 simulates stargazing on a moonlit night. 
Watch the stars twinkle and maybe you'll even see a shooting 
star! 

Each portion of the listing is labeled so you can identify 
which part does what. The program uses palette switching 
to show stars twinkling, and demonstrates use of the HCIRCLE 
command in simulating shooting stars. 

The listing: STARS 

j3 ****** ONE STARRY NIGHT ***** 

1 » 

2 1 (C) 1987 BY JIM MCDOWELL 

3 » JML SOFTWARE DESIGN 

4 1 

5 ***************************** 

6 HSCREEN2 

7 PALETTE 9,16 : PALETTE 10,3 2 : 
PALETTE 12,63 

8 HCLS 8 

9 GOSUB 27 

10 FOR 1=1 TO 50 

11 IF RND(5)>1 THEN C=4 ELSE C=l 
1 

12 HSET(RND(320) -1,RND(192) -1,C) 



13 NEXTI 

14 FOR I=lTORND (2000) +500 :NEXT 

15 ON RND (4) GOTO 17,17,17,20 

16 '***** TWINKLE STARS ***** 

17 PALETTE11, 1 : PALETTE11 , 63 

18 GOTO 14 

19 ****** SHOOTING STAR ***** 

20 X=RND(220) +50 : Y=RND(96)+40 

21 R=RND(50)+99 : S=RND(0) : E=S 
+ .2 

22 HCIRCLE ( X , Y ) , R, 4 , . 9 , S , E 
2 3 HCIRCLE (X, Y) ,R,8, .9,S,E 

24 GOSUB 27 

25 GOTO 15 

26 ****** DRAW MOON ***** 

27 HCIRCLE (96, 56) ,30,4, .9 

28 HCIRCLE (80,50) ,5,4 

29 HPAINT(80,50) ,9,4 

30 HCIRCLE (95, 60) ,7,4 

31 HPAINT(95,60) ,9,4 

32 HCIRCLE(96,35) ,10,4, .9, .93, .6 

33 HPAINT(96,35) ,10,4 

34 HCIRCLE (113, 56) ,9,4 

35 HPAINT(H3 ,56) ,10,4 

36 HCIRCLE (104, 74) ,6,4 

37 HPAINT(104,74) ,9,4 

38 HCIRCLE (80, 63) ,5,4 

39 HPAINT(70,50) ,12,4 

40 RETURN 



96 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Games 



Alphabet Roulette 

By Keiran Kenny 



The object of Alfaword is to type one or more words using 
each letter of the alphabet just once. The alphabet is displayed 
in a row at the top of the screen. As you type a letter, it is 
erased from the row and cannot be used again. But you can 
type double consonants in a word: thus you can type PAL 
or PALL. Use the delete key if you want to erase a word or 
letter. 

Press ENTER when you complete one word, and then type 
your next one. When you cannot make a word out of the 
remaining letters in the alphabet row, press the space bar. 
Your score is the number of letters you have used. Double 
letters count as one letter. It will be left up to you to decide 
if what you type is a real word! 

The listing: ALFAWORD 

0 1 ALFAWORD : BY KEIRAN KENNY, 

THE HAGUE, 198 6. 
10 CLS 

20 DIMA$(lj3 4) 
30 X=3 :R=67 

4j3 FORA=65T09j3:PRINT§X,CHR$ (A) :X 

=X+1:NEXT 

50 Q=R 



60 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN6j3 
70 IFQ<R THENQ=R 
80 J=J+1 

90 IFK$=A$ (J-l)THENSC=SC-l:GOT01 
20 

100 IFPEEK(lj324+ASC(K$) -62) =143T 
HEN6j3 

110 N=ASC(K$) : P=N-62 
120 IFK$=CHR$ (13) THEN1 7j3ELSEIFK$ 
=CHR$ (32) THEN18j3ELSEIFK$OCHR$ (8 
) ANDK$ < " A " ORK$ > » Z " THEN6 0 
130 IFK$=CHR$ (8) ANDPEEK (1024+Q-l 
) =PEEK (1024+Q-2 ) THENPRINT§Q-1 , CH 
R$ ( 143 ) : Q=Q-1 : GOT06j3ELSEIFK$=CHR 
$(8)THENPL=PEEK(1J324+Q-1) : PRINT§ 
Q-1,CHR$ (143) :Q=Q-l:POKElj324+ASC 
(CHR$ (PL) ) -62 ,PL:SC=SC-1:G0T06J3 
140 PRINT@Q,K$; :PRINT@P,CHR$(143 
) ;:A$(J)=K$ 

150 Q=Q+l:SC=SC+l:IFSC=26THEN18j3 

160 GOTO60 

170 R=R+32 :GOTO50 

180 PRINT§R+32 ,TAB(3) "SCORE: "STR 
$(SC) " LETTERS. " 

19 0 PRINTTAB(3) "PRESS ANY KEY." 
200 EXEC44 53 9:K$=INKEY$:SC=0:CLS 
: GOTO 30 



The Blue Block Blues 4K 

ByJ.R. Moon 

You are a blue block, and your only goal in life is to stay 
away from those awful orange squares that just won't leave 
you alone. Life is cheap in this game, but so is reincarnation. 

Use the left and right arrow keys to maneuver your block. 
The more orange squares you dodge, the higher your score. 

To change your block's or the squares' colors, alter the 
values for MES, XS and the POINT command. 

The listing: DODGE 

10 'dodge' BY JEREMY MOON 

20 POKE 65494, 0 

30 CLS 

40 KK=16 

50 ME$=CHR$ (239) 

60 X$=CHR$(2 55) 

10 PRINT" WELCOME TO ' DODGE' ":PRI 



NT "THE AIM OF THE GAME IS TO DOD 
GE THE ORANGE SQUARES THAT ARE 

CHARGING TOWARDS YOU.": PRINT 
80 PRINT" USE THE LEFT AND RIGH 
T ARROW KEYS TO AVOID THE SQU 
ARES . " 

90 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 

100 PRINT§3 84 , "1=HARD, 3=EASY" 

110 INPUT "SKILL LEVEL (1-3) ";SK 

:IF SK=1 THEN POKE 65495 , 0 : SK=0 

120 IF SK=2 THEN SK=j3 

13j3 SK=SK*3J3 

14j3 CLS 

15j3 'SCATTER ORANGE BOXES (X$) 
16j3 ' 

17j3 X=48J3+RND(32) -1 

18 0 PRINT§X,X$; 

19j3 GOSUB 250 

200 'SCROLL SCREEN UP. 

21J3 PRINT§511,"" 

22J3 SCORE=SCORE+l 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 97 



GOSUB 530 
GOTO 160 

'KEYBOARD SCAN ROUTINE 
'IF ARROWS KEYS PRESSED 
'THEN MOVE MAN. 
IF PEEK (343)0255 THEN KK=KK 

KK= 



230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 

-1ELSEIF PEEK (344)0255 THEN 
KK+1 

290 IF KK<0 THEN KK=31 
300 IF KK>31 THEN KK=0 
310 'UPDATE MAN'S POSITION 
320 PRINT @KK , ME$ 

330 'CHECK TO SEE IF MAN IS HIT 
340 SET(KK*2,2,3) 

350 IF POINT(KK*2,4)=8 THEN GOSU 
B 370 

360 RETURN 

370 'YOU HAVE DIED! 

380 FOR X=l TO 72 STEP 8 : SOUND X 

,2:CLS(X/8) 

390 NEXT 



400 CLS0 

410 FOR X=l T0127:PRINT"you";CHR 
$(128) ; :NEXTX 
420 CLS0 

430 FOR X=l TO102:PRINT"have";CH 
R$ (128) ; : NEXT 
440 CLS0 

450 FOR X=l TO102:PRINT"died";CH 
R$(128) ; : NEXT 
460 CLSRND(9)-1 

470 PRINT© 6 6, "YOUR FINAL SCORE W 
AS: " ; SCORE; 

480 PRINT §130 , "WOULD YOU LIKE TO 

PLAY AGAIN?"; 
490 PRINT§173 , " (Y/N) " ; 
500 PRINT@206, "";: INPUT A$ 
510 IF LEFT$(A$,1)<>"Y" THEN CLS 
: END 
520 RUN 

530 FOR TIME=1 TO SK : NEXT : RETURN 




An Alarming Solution 

By Roderick Clark 



4K 



Are you working too hard? Need a break from glaring at 
the CoCo screen all day? If so, the following program may 
help. 

Alarm allows you to set a timer to allow for computing 
breaks. Just input the number of seconds you want to rest 
and an alarm will sound when it's time to go back to work. 
Be sure to turn the volume up so you will be able to hear 
it from a distance. 

The listing: ALARM 



1987 



1 ' ALARM/ B AS 

2 'SENIC PRODUCTIONS 

RODERICK CLARK 
5 CLS 

10 FOR RC=1T012 

15 SOUND RND(32) , 2 

2 0 PRI NTT AB ( 10 ) " > ALARM> " 

30 NEXT RC 

35 CLS 

40 FOR CR=1T012 
50 SOUNDRND(3 2) ,2 

60 PRINTTAB ( 10 ) " >FROM> 

61 NEXT CR 



62 CLS: FOR TC=1T012 : PRINTTAB (5) " 
>SENIC PRODUCTIONS> 



65 
66 
67 
69 
70 
TIL 



SOUNDRND (32) ,2 
NEXT TC 

PRINT" 19 8 7 

FOR EZ=1T02 300: NEXT EZ:CLS: 
PRINT "HOW MANY SEC UN 

THE ALARM GOES OFF >>":IN 



PUT H 

71 FOR YG=1TO4 60*H 

72 NEXT YG 

7 3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" ALA 
R M 

74 SOUND140,8 

75 SOUND100,5 

76 GOTO 73 



Contributions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in at one 
sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, although 
the short programs are limited in scope, many novice programmers 
find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve the software 
written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but 
we cannot key in program listings. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary, explaining how the program works. 
If your submission is accepted for publication, the payment rate will 
be established and agreed upon prior to publication. 



98 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



OVER . 
1 / 2 OFF 



NOW Your Computer Writes 
PROGRAMS for YOU with 
QUIKPRO+II 

In minutes even if you know nothing about programming! 
For COCO, IBM, Tandy, Apple, Commodore, and others. 




To Computer Users. 
Now you can tell your computer what you want and your computer 
can write your programs for you in minutes to your custom design — easily and without 
requiring any programming background from you. ..with QUIKPRO + II. 

A Breakthrough In Micro Computer Technology 

You know your computer is fantastically fast. ..once it knows what to do. Programs 
and software are what makes it happen. Every task your computer performs for you 
requires some kind of program. Until now, you could only get programs in just one 
of two ways: buy a canned package that many times doesn't meet your needs 
or hand over hundreds or thousands of dollars for a custom programming job. 
Now, you have a better choice... 

Programs Without Programming 

Automatic programming is what it's all about. And, with QUIKPRO+II the 
Automatic Program Writer, your computer can actually write programs 
for you. You can quickly generate a new individual application 
program when you want it with QUIKPRO+II. Each program you 
create is a completely stand alone program that will run in the 
standard BASIC language you already have on your own 
computer. QUIKPRO + II creates filing, data retrieval, and report 
programs. Best of all, you do not have to become a 
programmer to use QUIKPRO + II. The QUIKPRO + II software 
becomes your personal programmer, waiting to do your 
work for you any time of the day or night you choose to use it, 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Businesses, Schools 

John Hopkins 
U.S. Department of 

Agriculture 
Proctor & Gamble 
Federal Express 
American Express 
Monsanto 

Ford Motor Company 
Duracell International 



Proven and Widely Used 

, Hobbyists and Government are among our thousands of users. 

NASA General Electric Tandy Corporation 

Westinghouse Random House Satellite Broadcasting 
U.S. Navy 



NCR 

DuPont 

RCA 

Exxon 

AT&T 

Texas Tech 



APPLICATION CHECKLIST I 


Here are a few of the thousands of possible applications 


you can do with QUIKPRO + II 


..And most can be created in 


a few minutes. 




BUSINESS USES 


EDUCATIONAL USES 


Customer Filing 


Student Records 


Master Files for 


Grade Records 


General Ledgers 


Teacher Lists 


Accts. Receiv. 


School Lists 


Accts. Payable 


Program Design 


Telephone Logs 


Course Design 


Telephone Lists 


HOME & HOBBY USES 


Hotel/Travel Data 


Personal Records 


Reservations 


Check Lists 


Property Control 


Club Rosters 


Library Catalogues 


Telephone Directories 


Inventories 


Recipe Files 



ORDER NOW - OVER 1 / 2 OFF 

CALL TOLL FREE 24 HOURS 
1-800-872-8787, Operator 614 

(From Georgia Call 1-800-874-5112, Operator 614) 

YES, send me QUIKPRO + II for $29.50 plus 
$4.50 shipping & handling $34.00 total. 
SAVE OVER Vi OFF the reg. $149 price. 

Check your computer type & payment 



[ ] Color Computer 
2 or 3 with Disk 
] TANDY 1000, 1200. 3000 
] IBM/Compatible 
] Commodore 64 
] Apple 2, 2C, 2E 
] TRS-80 Mod 3 
] TRS-80 Mod 4 
] TRS-80 Mod 2 



[ ] Payment enclosed 
[ ] MasterCard [ 
Card # 



] VISA 



Expiration Date 



Name _ 



Address . 



City/State/Zip 



Mail Orders to: ICR FutureSoft, P.O. Box 1446-NC 
Orange Park, FL 32073 



CoCo's Extended Color basic 
only allows two PF100E 3 or 
PflODE 4 graphics screens to be 
loaded into the computer at any one 
time, and each screen occupies lour 
pages or 6,144 bytes of graphics mem- 
ory, To switch screens, you would 
simply use the PNODE: command, But 
what if you need three screens? 
After digging through books, maga- 

Darryl Hawkins has been working with 
computers since 1970, His hobbies 
inc huie i real ing e due at ionai prog ran i s 
for his children and fishing. He recently 
sold his first program lo Sugar Software 
and is currently working on his first 
book for the Co Co. 

100 THE RAINBOW November 1987 




Two Screens Accompany 
But Three is NOT a Crowd 




By Danyl W. Hawkins 



vines and untold bits of information, I 
came up with the solution. Type PEEK 
(IBS) * 25S + PEEK *187). 

This simple string of commands will 
return the start address of a high reso- 
lution screen, By simply reversing the 
process, 1 found I could tell the comput- 
er to look elsewhere, outside the re- 
served graphics memory area, for a 
graphics screen. 

The area i chose to store the third 
screen 1 needed was in I he unused SK 
portion of high RAM, located above 
Color and Disk BASIC. This unused 
8,000 or so bytes of memory was the 
perfect place to store a 6,144-byte 
graphics screen and still not take away 
any memory reserved for my program. 



The program DEMO shows how three 
graphics screens can be created, stored 
in a binary format, reloaded and dis- 
played at any time. The program is 
written to run on tape or disk; however, 
you'll need a 64 K CoCo with Extended 
Color BASIC. Before running the pro- 
gram, type in PCLERR 8. No line number 
is needed. 

In order to use the 8K of unused 
memory, the computer must be 
switched to the all-RAM mode. Lines 
150 through 220 of the program will 
make this switch for you. These lines 
simply load in a machine language 
program that, when executed by Line 
220, reads out the data in the ROM 
chips and writes it into the RAM chips. 



Three graphics words are created in 
lines 230 through 250 and stored as 
strings for incorporation into the first 
graphics screen to be created later. 

Line 260 may be of special interest. 
When the memory location 49152 is 
PEEKed into, it will return the value 68 
if Disk BASIC is present in the system; 
if not, another value will be returned. 
This simple little command governs 
how the rest of the program will operate 
and thus becomes one of the most 
important commands used in the pro- 
gram. Since the computer uses different 
memory areas for storing graphics, 
depending on which system is present, 
tape or disk, the computer must know 
which system to work with, 

Lines 270 through 560 create three 
graphics screens and store each screen, 
to tape or disk, in a binary format. Note 
lines 390, 470 and 550. The data for a 
high resolution screen is stored between 
memory locations 3584 and 9727, when 
Disk BASIC is being used. This repre- 
sents the first four graphics pages of 
Disk BASIC, When tape is being used, 
these four pages are located between 
memory locations 1536 and 9727. Lines 
400, 480 and 560 make use of this and 



store the screens to tape. 

Once the screens are stored on tape 
or disk, they are then reloaded back into 
the computer. Lines 640 through 690 
accomplish this for you. Note how the 
screens are loaded. Lines 640 and 650 
simply load in the first screen. Line 640 
does so from disk. Line 650 from tape. 
After the first screen has loaded, the 
first graphics pages will be occupied. 
The second screen, therefore, must be 
loaded into pages 5 through 8. To do 
this, an offset must be used. Since each 
screen represents 6,144 bytes of mem- 
ory, an offset of 6,144 is used. Lines 660 
and 670 use the offset to load the second 
screen into the higher pages. 

Loading the third screen is a little 
different. We now have to tell the 
computer to load the third screen out- 
side the normal graphics screen memory 
area, Since tape and disk use two dif- 
ferent memory areas for storing graph- 
ics, we have to provide two different 
offsets — provided, of course, the 
screen is to be stored in the same loca- 
tion. Remember, the screen was origi- 
nally saved using two different starting 
points, depending on which system was 
used. I chose memory location 57856 to 



store the third screen. When using disk, 
the offset needed to load the screen 
starting at this address would be: 57856 
- 3584 - 54272, For tape, it would be 
57856 -■ 1536 = 56320. This starts the 
third screen on an even 256- byte page 
of memory. Screens I and 2 also start 
on an even 256-byte page, thus all 
screens start the same. 

Lines 770 through 840 make use of 
the starting page for each screen. These 
lines will display each screen for a short 
period. Note Line 8 10. It sets the screen 
pointer for the third screen, tape or disk, 
POKE 186, 22G actually tells the com- 
puter to look to memory location (226 
* 256) = 57856 for the start of screen 
three. Since each screen starts on an 
even 256-byte page and memory loca- 
tion 187 already contains 0 for its value, 
there is no need to poke this address for 
any of the screens. 

1 hope this article and the graphics 
demo program open new doors for your 
imagination, 

(Questions about this program may 
be addressed to the author at P.O. Box 
3134, Gulf port, MS 39505. Please en- 
close an SASE for a written reply.) □ 



\r 220 



The listing: DEMO 



LISTING 1 



2 1 

3 1 
10 ' 
20 ' 
30 ' 
40 1 
50 ' 
60 ' 
10 ' 
80 • 
90 ' 
100 
110 
120 
130 
140 
145 
150 
,222 
160 
224, 



...79 

330 133 

480 70 

670 126 

END 10 



GRAPHIC DEMO 
COPYRIGHT 1986 
BY 

DARRYL W HAWKINS 
P.O.BOX 3134 
GULFPORT, MS 39505 
TELEPHONE (601) 832-8236 



ENTER PCLEAR8 BEFORE 
RUNNING PROGRAM 



PCLEAR8 : PMODE4 , 1 

CLS : PCLS : CLEAR 1 000 

• RAM SWITCH 

DATA 26,80,190,128,0,183,255 

,166,128 

DATA 183,255,223,167,31,140, 
0,37,241,57 



170 FORI=lT021 
180 READA 
190 B$=B$+CHR$ (A) 
200 NEXTI 

210 A=VARPTR(B$) +1 

220 POKEA,12 6:EXECA 

225 1 HI-RES GRAPHIC WORDS 

230 G$="BM76, 80C0 ;R5D5G2L8H2U11E 

2R7F2BR9ND13U2R9F2D4G2L5NL3F7BR9 

U7NR11U4E4R3F4D11BR9U7NU8R9E2U4H 

2NL8BR11D8ND7R11NU8D7BR9U15BR11N 

R7G2D11F2R7E2BU11H2" 

240 S$="BM84 , 100C0 ;H2L8G2D3F2BD8 

NH2R7E2U4H2NL6BR2 3BU5H2L7G2D11F2 

R7NE2BR11U15R9F2D4G2L5NL3F7BR9NR 

11U7NR7U8R11BR9NR11D8NR7D7R11BR9 

U15R1F1D1F1D1F1D1F1D1F1D1F1D1F1D 

1F1R1U15" 

250 N1$="BM112 , 140C0 ;E2U11H2L6G2 
D11F2R7BR11U15R1F1D1F1D1F1D1F1D1 
F1D1F1D1F1D1F1R1U15BR9NR11D8NR7D 
7R11" 

255 » DISK OR TAPE CHECK 

260 X=PEEK(49152) 
270 IFX=68THEN310 

280 PRINT@166, "READY TAPE FOR RE 
CORD" 



290 
300 
305 



PRINT@ 198 , "PRESS ANY KEY" 

IFINKEY$=""THEN300 

1 GRAPHIC SCREEN1 




310 SCREEN1,1 

320 FORI=0TO192STEP2: LINE (0,96)- 
(255,1) ,PSET:NEXTI 

330 FORI=0TO192STEP2 : LINE (255, 96 

) -(0, 1) , PSET:NEXTI 

340 FORI=0TO255STEP2:LINE(128,0) 

-(1,192) , PS ET : NEXTI 

350 FORI=0TO25 5STEP2:LINE(12 8,19 

2) -(1,0) , PSET: NEXTI 

3 60 DRAWG$ 
370 DRAWS$ 
380 DRAWN1$ 

385 ' SAVE SCREEN 1 

390 I FX= 6 8 THENS AVEM " S CREEN 1 11 ,3 58 

4,9727,3584:GOTO410 

400 CSAVEM" SCREEN1 ",1536,7679,15 

36 

405 1 GRAPHIC SCREEN 2 

410 PM0DE3,1:PCLS1:SCREEN1,1 
420 FORI=0TO192STEP8:LINE(12 8,96 
)-(0,I) , PSET: NEXTI 

430 FORI=0TO255STEP16:LINE(128,9 

6) -(I, 192) , PSET: NEXTI 

440 FORI=192TO0STEP-8:LINE(128,9 

6) -(255, I) , PSET: NEXTI 

450 FORI=256TO0STEP-16: LINE (12 8, 

96)-(I,0) ,PSET:NEXTI 

460 PM0DE4 , 1 : S CREEN 1 , 1 

4 65 1 SAVE SCREEN 2 

470 I FX= 6 8 THENS AVEM" S CREEN 2 " , 3 5 8 

4,9727,3584:GOTO490 

480 CSAVEM" SCREEN2 " , 153 6, 7 679, 15 

36 

485 1 GRAPHIC SCREEN 3 
490 PM0DE3 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 
500 FORI=1TO100 

510 A=RND(255) :B=RND(192) :C=RND( 
4) 

520 CIRCLE (A, B) ,C 
530 NEXTI 

540 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1, 1 
545 1 SAVE SCREEN 3 



550 IFX=68THENSAVEM"SCREEN3" , 358 

4,9727,3584:GOTO570 

5 60 CSAVEM 11 SCREEN 3 ",1536,7679,15 

36 

570 PCLS 

575 1 DISK OR TAPE CHECK 

580 IFX=68THEN640 

590 CLS:SCREEN0 

600 PRINT§168, "REWIND TAPE" 

610 PRINT@200 , "PRESS PLAY" 

620 PRINT§2 3 2, "PRESS ANY KEY" 

630 IFINKEY$=""THEN630 

635 • RELOAD SCREENS 

640 IFX=68THENL0ADM"SCREEN1" : GOT 

0660 

650 CL0ADM"SCREEN1" 

6 60 IFX=68THENLOADM"SCREEN2" ,614 
4 :GOTO680 

670 CL0ADM"SCREEN2" ,6144 

680 IFX=68THENL0ADM"SCREEN3 " , 542 

72:GOTO700 

690 CLOADM" SCREEN 3" ,563 20 
695 ' USER PROMPT 
700 CLS 
710 SCREEN0 

720 PRINT@162, "PRESS <S> TO SWIT 

CH SCREENS" 

730 K$=INKEY$ 

740 IFK$=""THEN7 30 

750 IFK$="S"THEN770 

760 GOTO730 

7 65 1 SCREEN SWITCH 
770 SCREEN1 

780 FORI=1TO500 : NEXTI 

790 IFX=68THENPOKE186, 38ELSEPOKE 

186,30 

800 SCREEN1 : FORI= 1TO500 : NEXTI 
810 POKE186,226 
820 SCREEN1 : FORI=1TO500 : NEXTI 
830 IFX=68THENPOKE186,14ELSEPOKE 
186, 6 

840 GOTO700 



RTR Development Systems 

Post Office Box 72, Peaster, Texas 76074 
Phone: (817) 599-0871 



Teac 40 Track DSDD Drives (Bare) , . $100.00 

Star NX-10 Printer $262.50 

2 Drive Cable $ 24.95 

Disto Super Controller w/CDOS or CDOS 3 , $ 95.00 

Avatex 1200 $ 97.50 

Avatex 1200 he (With 5 Free Hours on CIS) $129.95 

51 2K Coco Hi Upgrade w/O K $ 34.95 

The Sector Wizard (Disk Zap) $ 14.95 

Drive 0 & 1 System (2 DS Drives) $362.50 

Coco Hi ECB Unravelled $ 19.95 

Magnavox 8CM51 5/505 Monitor Cable $ 12.95 

Pyramix (CoCo ill Action Game) $ 22.95 



Mitsubishi 80 Track DSDD Drives (Bare) $125.00 

Case + Power Supply (Dual V2 Height) $ 49.95 

4 Drive Cable , . $ 29,95 

Magnavox 8CM515 Coco Hi Monitor $299.95 

PBH-64 Parallel-Serial + 64K Buffer $ 99.95 

Avatex 2400 (With 5 Free Hours on CIS) $253.75 

51 2K Coco III Upgrade w/512 K $ 96.25 

Adventure Into Fear (D&D Adventure) $ 24.95 

Epson LX-86 $235.75 

Coco ill Secrets Revealed $ 19.95 

68B09E (Coco 111 Microprocessor) . $ 9.95 

Color Max III 55,00 



Distributors (or: Ark Royal. Cer-Comp, Computerware, Diecom, Disto, Prickly Pear, and Speech Systems 

Offering Discounts on Software from 10% to 20%. Write or call for a complete Catalog. Payment Terms: Personal Check (allow 2 weeks to 
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Hours: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Mon.-Sat (CST), 12 noon - 6 p.m. Sunday. Answering Machine After Hours. 



1 02 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



CoCo Consu l tations 

Making Dumb Terminal Programs Smart 



By Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



What is VT-52 and why would I want 
a terminal program that supports it? 

Michael D. Fischer 
( MM/KE88 ) 
Long Island, NY 

VT-52 is one of many different pro- 
tocols that give an otherwise "dumb" 
terminal program ordevicesomedegree 
of "smarts." These protocols allow a 
host computer to have rapid and precise 
control over the position of the cursor 
on the screen, and to selectively erase 
part of a line or part of the screen. This 
capability (which is f ar better supported 
by the VT-100 and VT-220 protocols) 
allows one to write sophisticated and 
pleasing full-screen editors that can run 
remotely on one's terminal screen. This 
is just one desirable aspect of the use of 
such protocols. Most CoCo users have 
little use for them, but some profession- 
als who deal with mainframe computers 
find support for VT-52, VT-100 and the 
like to be essential. Under Disk Ex- 
tended Color BASIC, Cer Comp's Data 
Pak II Plus (when used with a PBJ 80- 
column card) and Data Pak 3 Plus on 
the CoCo 3 provide what I have been 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinker er and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS -9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 



told is excellent support f or much of the 
VT-100 protocol. 

Detecting the Baud 

How can I detect the baud rate at 
which data is entering the RS-232 pack? 

John Ruhnow 
(RUHNOW) 
Duncanville, TX 

There is no simple means of deter- 
mining the baud rate of incoming data 
to the RS-232 pack. Only in a situation 
whereyou know what the data isbefore- 
hand can you perform such a test. That 
is, //'the pack is talking to a host system 
whose responses are known, you can 
arrange your program to send data to 
that host at differing baud rates until 
you get back the response you are 
looking for. At that point, you merely 
note what baud rate you were using at 
the time. 

The letter A is commonly tested for, 
as Roger Bouchard pointed .out in his 
response to your question on Delphi, 
because it has the bit pattern 100000 1. 
Note that in logging onto Tymnet at 
1200 baud you must first type in the 
letter A after Tymnet's node sends you 
gibberish. Tymnet looks for an A at 
1200 baud, and if it sees one it knows 
you are running at 1 200 baud. But it can 
do this only because it knows you are 
going to type an A at 1200 baud if you 
happen to have 1200 baud capability. 

If you plan on writing any software 
for the "deluxe" RS-232 pack, it is 
important that you have complete 
documentation on the 655 1 UARTchip 
in that pack. Tandy's manual is rather 
incomplete. In a "CoCo Consultations" 
column some months back, I provided 



the information that Tandy forgot to 
include in their manual. We also have 
on Delphi in the Hardware Hacking 
section of our database an excellent file 
that gives all the information on the 
registers of the 655 J chip that is missing 
from the RS-232 pack manual. Alterna- 
tively, you can get this information by 
writing either of the two manufacturers 
of the chip (Synertec and AMI) for data 
sheets that will makeclear that the chip 
is unable to directly detect what baud 
rate data it is encountering. 

Assembly Equivalents 

What are the equivalents of PEEK [ J) 
and POKE 7, K in 6809 assembly lan- 
guage? 

John Friedrich 
Natrona Heights, PA 

Assuming J is an integer between 0 
and SFFFF Hex (65535 decimal), and 
that K is an integer between 0 and $FF 
(255 decimal), then the equivalents 
would be LDfi J for PEEK ( J ) and LDR 
UK followed by STR J for POKE J, K. 
These statements place the contents of 
memory location J into the A register, 
or put the value K into the A register, 
then store that value to location J 
(respectively). I recommend an elemen- 
tary book on 6809 assembly language 
programming. Sybex publishes an ex- 
cellent one, titled Programming the 
6809, by Zaks and Labiak. 

Integrating Drives 

/ have one of the white-cased, full- 
height Radio Shack disk drives. I am 
considering buying a new Radio Shack 
FD 501 drive system. How can I use the 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 103 



old full' height drive with the FD 501? 
I suspect I may need to add a Catalog 
No. 26-1564 connector to the FD 501 
cable. Is there anything else I must do? 

John D. Cleveland 
Luneburg, Nova Scotia 

You will either have to make up a new 
cable for the FD 501 system or crimp 
on an extra connector to it. The Radio 
Shack Catalog No. 26-1564 is indeed 
the type of connector you need to use. 
However, you also have to pull some 
teeth from that connector bef ore crimp- 
ing it to the FD 501 cable. The teeth for 
pins 10, 12, 14 and 32 are used, respec- 
tively, to carry drive select signals for 
drives 0, 1, 2 and 3. You must pull out 
all three teeth that correspond to the 
drive numbers you don't want the old 
full-height drive to be. Was that full- 
height drive formerly designed to be 
Drive 0? If so, you will probably have 
to open the case, look f or the terminator 
resistor and remove it from the drive. 
You see, your FD 501 system will likely 
also have a terminator resistor inside it, 
and there must be only one terminator 
resistor per drive system. On the old 
full-height drives, the terminator resis- 
tor will be a single in-line pin, coated 
with yellow epoxy resin, sitting in a little 
single in-line pin socket. Sometimes 
such terminator resistors are in dual in- 
line pin cases that look just like inte- 
grated circuits. Because Tandy has 
changed models of disk drives so often, 
it may be necessary for you to consult 
a local tinkerer for help with this proj- 
ect. You should consider getting a drive 
from one of the advertisers in RAINBOW. 
These often present a better value, and 
often the supplier is available to provide 
more knowledgeable technical help 
than can most Radio Shack retail store 
employees. 

Monochrome Help 

/ want to modify my Co Co 2 to drive 
a TTL monochrome monitor. Can you 
tell me how to do this? 

Dean Lawrence 

(DEA NL) 

Wichita Falls, TX 

Your question presents several prob- 
lems. First of all, I do not recommend 
attempting to do what you ask. With 
composite monochrome monitors sell- 
ing f or $30 used, and as little as $70 new, 
it usually will not pay to spend the time 
and money needed to design the more 
complicated interfaces for other sorts of 



monitors. There are several different 
types of TTL monochrome monitors. 
The "separate sync" monitors used by 
the Kaypro, Model 3, Model 4 and 
Osborne computers can be relatively 
easy to adapt for use with the CoCo. 
These use separate horizontal and 
vertical sync lines, a standard type of 
luminance input and have a "normal" 
horizontal scan rate of 15.75 kHz. To 
hook a CoCo to these, all you need is 
a monochrome monitor driver circuit 
combined with a sync separator circuit. 
Each of these types of circuits can be 
whipped up using two or three transis- 
tors by anyone familiar with the work- 
ings of analog video. Incompetent 
engineers will attempt sync separation 
using a dedicated integrated circuit. 

However, the IBM PC "Mono- 
graphics type" (also known as "Her- 
cules type") TTL monochrome monitor 
uses TTL levels on its video luminance 
signal. Worse yet, these monitors use a 
different horizontal scan rate of 18.432 
kHz. Adapting them for the CoCo is 
rather difficult, and it is virtually impos- 
sible to use all of their screen. The only 
adapter I have ever seen for them 
produces an image that uses up about 
the center two-thirds of the screen. 
Their device was designed to hook into 
the RGB video port of a CoCo 3. To use 
it with a CoCo 1 or 2, you'd have to add 
a monochrome monitor driver and sync 
separator in front of their gizmo. 

There are other monochrome moni- 
tor protocols floating around, including 
the one used by the Macintosh and 
various dedicated Hi-Res display sys- 
tems. These are essentially impossible to 
interface to the CoCo. In summary, it 
is difficult to hook such TTL mono- 
chrome monitors to the CoCo. You 
must be an experienced video hacker to 
attempt it. 

A Different Pinout 

/ tried to help a friend hook the 
Co Co s 4- pin DIN serial port to an IBM 
PC and to a Model 100 using some 
instructions given by Dr. ASCII in an 
issue of RAINBOW. The cable described 
there would not work. Can you help 
me? 

David Seibold 
Baker sfield, CA 

The pinout given by Dr. ASCII was 
incorrect and will not work. To make a 
proper null modem cable interface a 
CoCo to an IBM PC or to a Model J00, 
connect a CoCo-type, four-pin DIN 



male connector to an IBM PC or Model 
100 type DB 25 connector as follows: 

On the DB 25 connector, jumper Pin 
4 to Pin 5. Jumper pins 6, 8 and 20 
together. Hook Pin 2 of the DB 25 to 
Pin 2 of the CoCo four-pin DIN con- 
nector. Hook Pin 3 of the DB 25 to Pin 
4 of the CoCo four-pin DIN connector. 
Hook Pin 7 of the DB 25 to Pin 3 of 
the CoCo four-pin DIN connector. 
Hook pins 6, 8 and 20 (which you just 
shorted to each other) of the DB 25 
connector to Pin 1 of the CoCo four- 
pin DIN connector. 

I've used a cable like this for data 
transfer up through 9600 baud between 
my CoCo and IBM PC XT clone and 
between my CoCo and my Model 100, 
and it works perfectly. 

Amiga 1000 Monitor 

How can I hook a Radio Shack CM8 
to an Amiga 1000? 

Greg Miller 
( GREG MILLER) 
Grand Ledge, MI 

You need to invert the sync signals 
coming out of the Amiga's separate sync 
RGB analog output connector. Run the 
H and V sync signals through a 74LS04 
inverter buffer. With the sync signals 
inverted, the CM8 will accept the RGB 
analog type signal from the Amiga. 
However, the mediocre resolution of 
the CM8 might not give a very pleasing 
image when used with the high resolu- 
tion screens of the Amiga. Note also 
that you can use an Amiga 1080 mon- 
itor with a CoCo 3 provided you com- 
bine and invert the CoCo 3's sync 
signals in much the same way as I 
described in my August J 987 article on 
RGB monitors, which explained how to 
hook the CoCo 3 to a Sony KV 13 I I CR. 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, the rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we arc unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type ASK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



1 04 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



I Gr a ph i c s 




A Short Day's Journey into 

Night 

By Greg Hall 

I got the idea for City Sun from a Steve Bjork commentary. 
He said the CoCo 3 could, by changing a few color 
registers, make a scene of New York City in the day slowly 
change to one at dusk, and finally to one at night, with stars 
and the whole bit. 

That's exactly what I did. The program uses the Hi-Res 
features found in the CoCo 3 to draw a city scene of five 
buildings: a regular building, a restaurant, a hotel, a gas 
station, and even a fire hydrant to fill in a space between a 
couple of the buildings. 

Slowly, the sky makes 15 different color changes through 
the "day," with a bit of motion in each one to make the 
program a little more exciting. Pressing BREAK at any time 
stops the execution of the program. 

(Questions or comments may be addressed to the author 
at 3251 21st Ave., Columbus, NE 68601. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



Greg Hall is a 13-year-old CoCo 3 programmer who lives in 
Columbus, Nebraska. He also enjoys playing golf and 
building electronic projects. 



300 . 
500 . 
700 . 
930 . 
1210 
1480 



.144 1720 

.121 1980 

.243 2270 

.203 2470 

..88 END 
.213 



.185 
.196 
..44 
..85 
.229 



The listing: CITY SUN 



i _ 



1)8 
2J3 
30 
4J3 
5J3 
60 ' 

7J3 ONBRKGOT0267j3 
8J3 ONERRGOT02 64j3 



1 CITY SUN TO DEMONSTRATE 

1 THE USE OF THE HI-RES 

' PALETTE COMMAND 

i — 



106 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 




HOW DO YOU GIVE A RAINBOW? 



1 



Name 



Address 
City 



From: 

i 



l 



Name 



Address 
City 



It's simple — Give a rainbow gift certificate . 

Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friends' doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
source for the Tandy Color Com- 
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Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
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Give a rainbow gift certificate 
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the rainbow isthe perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by No- 
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i Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

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90 POKE65497,j3 
100 HSCREEN2 

110 HBUFF1, 600 :HBUFF2 , 600 :HBUFF3 

, 6j3P : HBUFF4 , 600 

120 HCLS4 

130 PALETTECMP 

140 ' DRAW ROAD 

150 HCOLOR8 

160 HLINE(j3, 155)-(319, 155) , PSET 
110 'EMPTY ROAD BUFFER 
180 HGET(j3,155)-(3j3,191) ,1 
19 0 1 DRAW BUILDING 

200 HLINE(p,155) -(45,100) ,PSET,B 

210 FORY=105TO14J3STEP10 

220 FORX=7T03 5STEP8 

230 HLINE (X, Y) - (X+5 , Y+5) ,PSET,BF 

240 NEXTX, Y 

250 HLINE(16, 155)-(26, 145) , PSET, 
B 

260 HPAINT ( 5, 15J3) ,7,8 

270 HPAINT (20, 150) ,2,8 

280 'DRAW FIRE HYDRANT 

290 HDRAW"BM5j3, 155 ;R6L1U6H1L1U1D 

1L1G1D6" 

300 HPAINT ( 52 , 152 ) , 3 , 8 
310 'DRAW RESTAURANT 
320 HCOLOR8 

330 HLINE (60,155)-(97,130) , PSET, 
B 

340 HLINE(70, 130)-(70, 120) , PSET 
350 HLINE(87, 130)-(87, 120) , PSET 
360 HLINE(60, 110)-(97, 120) , PSET, 
B 

370 HPAINT (62, 112) , , 8 
380 HCOLOR1 

390 HPRINT(8,14) , "Food" 
400 HCOLOR8 

410 HLINE(60,150)-(97, 150) , PSET 

420 HPAINT (61, 151) ,0, 8 

430 HLINE(65, 135)-(76 , 145) , PSET, 

B 

440 HLINE(81, 135)-(92, 145) , PSET, 
B 



450 HPAINT(66,138) , 1,8 
460 HPAINT(82,136) , 1,8 
470 'DRAW HOTEL 

480 HLINE (105, 155) -(155, 80) , PSET 
,B 

490 HLINE(105, 12 6 ) - ( 1 55 , 13 6 ) , PSE 
T,B 

500 HPAINT(106, 154) ,3,8 

5 10 HPAINT ( 10 6 , 12 5 ) , 3 , 8 

520 HPRINT(14 , 16) , "HOTEL" 

530 FORY=85TO120STEP10 

540 FORX=110TO150STEP12 

550 HLINE(X, Y)-(X+5, Y+5) , PSET, BF 

560 NEXTX, Y 

570 HLINE(117,138)-(143,155) , PSE 
T,B 

580 HLINE (129, 138) - (131, 155) , PSE 
T, BF 

590 'DRAW GAS STATION 

600 HLINE (165,155) - (170, 154) , PSE 

T,B 

610 HLINE(166,154)-(169,125) , PSE 
T, BF 

620 HLINE(211,155)-(216, 154) , PSE 
T,B 

630 HLINE(212,154)-(215,125) ,PSE 
T , BF 

640 HLINE(176,155)-(187,154) ,PSE 
T,B 

650 HLINE(178,153)-(185,141) ,PSE 
T,B 

660 HDRAWBM186, 14 9 ; F1R1E1U2H3R1 
U1L1U2" 

670 HPAINT(179, 152) , 2, 8 

680 HLINE(193,155)-(204 ,154) ,PSE 

T,B 

690 HLINE(195,153)-(202,141) , PSE 
T,B 

700 HDRAWBM203 , 149 ; F1R1E1U2H3R1 
U1L1U2" 

710 HPAINT (19 6, 152) ,2,8 

720 HDRAWBM166, 125 ;R49E10L49G10 

D10R49U10E10D30L2 2U4L4U6L9D10R4L 



A 

L 
L 

P 

R 
O 
G 
R 
A 
M 
S 

c 
o 
c 
o 



o 

R 



FILESORT 



32 OR 84K FILE PROGRAM ...$1&95/ Cassette — BOTH VERSIONS INCLUDE: 
Ml ROUTINES FOR DATA, EDIT, SORT, REVIEW, SEARCH, ERROR TRAPPING. MANY HARDCOPY OPTIONS. 




P.O.BOX 6464 
BAKERSFIELD, CA 93386 



13 


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Bakersfield KENO V1.2 


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33 


72 


49 | 11 | 29 | 44 | 38 | 55 ] 27 | 16 


1 



ENJOY A STIMULATING GAME OF KENO. 
A GRAPHIC DELIGHT FILLED WITH REALISTIC, 
EXCITING ACTION, PICK 1 TO 15 SPOTS. 
COMPLETELY RANDOM WINNERS. PREPARE 
FOR AN EXTREMELY CHALLENGING GAME, 
CAN YOU BREAK THE HOUSE? 



32 OR 64K KENO SIMULATION 
Caaaetle...* 12.95 Disk... $13.5 




ML GRAPHICS DUMP FOR DMP-200 
1S/32 / 64K Cassette... $15.95 16/32/&4K Disk , 



.$16.95 



ML GRAPHICS DUMP FOR THE DMP-200. 
POSITION GRAPHIC PAGES 1-4, 5-8, OR 1-8 ANY 
PLACE ON PAPER. MENU PROMPTSl STANDARD, 
CONDENSED, OR COMPRESSED. PRINTOUTS IN 
NORMAL, ELONGATED, DOUBLE-, OR TRIPLE-SIZE. 
SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER. CAUF. RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 
WE WILL MODIFY PROGRAMS TO WORK WITH YOUR PRINTER - NO EXTRAI 



108 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



4L4U4L8D4L3UlpR3pD5R15UlpL5" 


970 HLINE(305, 90) -(305,80) , PSET 


73j3 


HPRINT (22 , 16) , "Fuel 11 


980 'SET BACKGROUND FOR SKY 


740 


HPAINT ( 18j3 , 14p ) , 5 , 8 


990 HCOLOR10 


75j3 


HPAINT (2pp , 14p) ,5,8 


1000 HPAINT(0,0) , ,8 


76j3 


HPAINT (22)3,144) ,5,8 


1010 HPAINT(75, 125) , ,8 


770 


t ttn Turn / h h >■ \ ^ r\ 

HPAINT (17 6,124) ,5,8 


1020 HPAINT(170,146) , ,8 


780 


HPAINT (219,135) ,1,8 


1030 HPAINT(186, 146) , ,8 


79p 


HPAINT (206, 136) ,1,8 


1040 HPAINT(193 , 146) , , 8 


800 


HPAINT (195,136) ,3,8 


1050 HPAINT(203 , 146) , ,8 


810 


•DRAW SHOPPING MALL 


1060 HPAINT (2 10, 14 6) , ,8 


820 


HLINE (23)3 , 155) -(315,90) , PSET 


1070 HPAINT(241,89) , ,8 


,B 




1080 HPAINT(273,89) , ,8 


83j3 


FORY=95T0145STEP15 


1090 'PEOPLE WAKE UP-LIGHTS ON 


840 


FORX=235TO3j35STEP10 


1100 GOSUB2240 


850 


HLINE (X,Y) -(X+5,Y+lj3) ,PSET,B 


1110 F0RX=1T05 


F 




1120 X1=(RND(4) *8) -1:Y1=(RND(4) * 


860 


NEXTX, Y 


10)+95:X2= (RND (4)*12)+98:Y2= (RND 


87J3 


HC0L0R8 


(4) *10)+75 


88p 


HPAINT (2 31, 154) ,2,8 


1130 HPAINT(X1, Yl) ,4,7 


89j3 


HLINE (235, 80) -(310,60) ,PSET, 


1140 FORI=1TO1000:NEXTI 


B 




1150 HPAINT(X2 , Y2) , 4 , 3 


900 


HPAINT(236,79) ,3,8 


1160 FORI=1TO1000:NEXTI 


910 


HC0L0R4 


1170 NEXTX 


92p 


HPRINT ( 30 , 8 ) , "SHOPPING" 


1180 'RED CAR GOES BY 


93j3 


HPRINT (32,9) , "MALL" 


1190 GOSUB2240:C=3:GOSUB2130:GOS 


94J3 


HC0L0R8 


UB2340 


950 


HLINE (240, 90) -(240,80) , PSET 


T O 01 01 f CUnDDTMr" MATT PlDT?MC 
±6/0/0 orlUr^x^XJNva rlA.L1.L1 Ur^rjJNo 


960 


HLINE (272, 90) -(272,80) , PSET 


1210 GOSUB2240 




^un^-iru Dude 

An exciting new arcade game by Glen Dahlgren, This is the long-awaited response to the 
huge demand for a Kung-Fu program for the Coco. The graphics and sound effects are 
spectacular. The action and animation will please even the most die-hard arcade en- 
thusiast. Destroy your opponents and evade obstacles with over ten different moves as you 
grow ever closer to your ultimate objective. This is the BEST karate game ever available for 
the color computer. Req. 64K, disk drive, and joystick. Introductory price: only $24.95. 




WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY. Enter the age of monsters, 
magic, and adventure. Here you will seorch for the 
legendary power of White Fire throughout the Forbid- 
den Wood and dark caverns of the Mount. The Rainbow 
review of 12/86 says, "Visually, White Fire is quite an 
achievement. The graphics ore excellent!" Discover 
what adventuring on the Coco is all about. Req. 64K and 
disk drive. Only $19.95. 



CHAMPION. Become o superhero in your fight to rid the 
world of the evil forces of Mr. Bigg in this action odven- 
ture The combat is hot and heavy and requires a fast 
joystick. The graphics and sound effects are sensationol. 
"This is a fascinating game and a difficult one to master. 
You'll get a blast out of (Champion)!" says the Rainbow 
review of 5/87. Defend the innocent and defeat the 
villainous; be a true Champion! Req. 64K, disk drive, and 
joystick Only $19.95. 



All programs Coco I 2, 3 compatible. 





Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 

Personal checks, money orders, and CO D. orders 
accepted. 



Include $2.50 for S/H. $2.00 
extra for C.O.D. orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax. 
Authorship and dealer inquiries 
welcome. 



November 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 09 



122,0 FORY=95T0145STEP15 

123J25 FORX=235TO305STEP10 

124)3 IFY=95THENHS=9 

1250 IFY=110THENHS=11 

1260 IFY=125THENHS=12 

1270 IFY=140THENHS=13 

1280 PALETTEHS ,0 

1290 HCOLORHS 

1300 HPAINT (X, Y) , ,2 

1310 NEXTX, Y 

1320 FORI=9T013 

1330 IFI=10THENNEXTI 

134)3 PALETTEI , 63 

1350 FORX=1TO2000: NEXTX, I 

1360 'BIRDS FLY BY 

1370 GOSUB2240 

1380 POKE65496,0 

1390 HCOLOR8 

1400 HDRAWBM300 , 13 ;R4L1U1D2BM30 

0, 17 ;R4L1U1D2BM308 , 15 ;R4L1U1D2" 

1410 GOSUB2570 

1420 POKE65497,0 

1430 'GREEN CAR GOES BY 

1440 GOSUB2240:C=0:GOSUB2130:GOS 

UB2340 

1450 'AIRPLANE FLYS ACROSS 
1460 GOSUB2240 
1470 HCOLOR4 



Over 200 Dealers & 
5000 Customers 
Can't be wrong! 



We are Canada's largest 
National Distributors of 
Color Computer Products 




Send for the great Canadian 
Color Computer Catalog 



Kelly Software Distributors Ltd. 

Marlborough P.O. Box 403 
Calgary, Alberta T2A 7L3 

Tel: 403 235-0974 



1480 HDRAWBM309 , 15 ;R2E3G3 F3H3R6 
ii 

1490 GOSUB2570 

1500 'ORANGE CAR GOES BY 

1510 GOSUB2240:C=7:GOSUB2130:GOS 

UB2340 

1520 'CLOUD PASSES OVER 
1530 GOSUB2240 
1540 POKE65496,0 

1550 HDRAW"BM292 , 6 ; C4R3E2F5D1R2E 
3R5D2F3R2D1G5D1L2 5H4U3L2U1H3E7R3 
F4D1" 

1560 HPAINT (295, 10) ,4,4 

1570 GOSUB2570 

1580 POKE65497,0 

1590 'COP WITH FLASHING LIGHT 

1600 GOSUB2240:C=4:GOSUB2130:SP= 

1 : GOSUB2 340 : SP=0 : HCOLOR8 

1610 'PICKUP TRUCK GOES BY 

1620 GOSUB2240 

1630 HDRAWBM289, 166 ; R3U5D5R12U5 

D5R13U5L13U4L8G4R12L12L3D5" 

1640 HPAINT(290,162) ,2,8 

1650 HPAINT(293 , 162) , 2 , 8 

1660 HPAINT(305,162) ,2,8 

1670 HCIRCLE(293 , 165) ,3,8 

1680 HPAINT(293 , 165) ,8,8 

1690 HCIRCLE(311, 165) ,3,8 

1700 HPAINT(311, 165) ,8,8 

1710 GOSUB2500 

1720 'MAGENTA CAR GOES BY 

1730 GOSUB2240:C=6:GOSUB2130:GOS 

UB2340 

1740 'SHOPPING MALL CLOSES 

1750 GOSUB2240 

1760 FORI=13T09STEP-l 

1770 IFI=10THENNEXTI 

1780 PALETTEI, 0 

1790 FORX=1TO2000: NEXTX, I 

1800 FORY=95T0145STEP15 

1810 FORX=235TO305STEP10 

1820 HPAINT (X,Y) ,8,2 

1830 NEXTX, Y 

1840 'TAXI GOES BY 

1850 GOSUB2240:C=1:GOSUB2130:SP= 

2 :GOSUB2 340:SP=0 

1860 'PEOPLE SLEEP-LIGHTS OFF 

1870 GOSUB2240 

1880 FORY=105TO140STEP10 

1890 FORX=7T035STEP8 

1900 HPAINT(X,Y) , ,7 

1910 FORPA=1TO500 :NEXTPA 

1920 NEXTX, Y 

1930 FORY=85TO120STEP10 

1940 FORX=110TO150STEP12 

1950 HPAINT(X,Y) , , 3 

1960 FORPA=1TO500:NEXTPA 

1970 NEXTX, Y 

1980 'STARS 



110 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



1990 

2010 
2020 
2030 

2040 



2060 
2070 
2080 
2090 
2100 
2110 
2120 
2130 
2140 



GOSUB22 40 

FORI-9T015 
PALETTE I , 0 
NEXTI 

FORI=1TO100 

A=RND(320) -1: B=RND(130) -1:C 
=RND(7)+8 

2050 IFHPOINT(A,B) OTHEN2040 
HSET(A,B,C) 
NEXTI 

FORI=9T015 
IFI=10THENNEXT 
PALETTEI , (RND(2) -1) *63 
NEXTI 

GOTO2080 
•DRAW CAR 

HDRAWBM4, 184 ; C8R4U4D4R8U4D 
4R7U4D4R5U2L1U2L5H4L3D4R7L7U4L5G 
3D1R8L8L4D4" 
2 150 HPAINT ( 6 , 18 2 ) , C , 8 
HPAINT (15, 18 2) , C,8 
HPAINT (20, 18 2) , C,8 



HPAINT (2 5, 182) ,C,8 



,3,8 



,3,8 
,8,8 



2160 
2170 
2180 

2190 HCIRCLE(9,18 6) 
2200 
2210 
2220 
2230 
2240 
2250 
2260 
2270 
2280 
2290 
2300 
2310 
2320 
2330 

,45,28,29 

23 40 'GET/PUT ROAD MOVEMENT 
2350 IFSP=0THEN2410ELSEIFSP 
N2 360ELSEIFSP=2THEN2400 
2 3 60 PALETTEI 4, 7 
HCOLOR14 

HLINE (13 , 17 3) - (15, 17 5) 



HPAINT (9, 18 6) ,8,8 
HCIRCLE(22 ,18 6) 
HPAINT (22, 186) 
RETURN 

'CHANGE SKY & BUFFER COLOR 
READC 

I FC=-1THENREADC : GOT02 2 80 
FORI=1TO2000 : NEXT 

PALETTE 10, C 

HGET(279,0)-(319,20) ,2 
FORI=1TO2000 : NEXT 
RETURN 

•SKY COLOR DATA 
DATA-1 , 14 , 13 , 12 , 29 , 28 , 45 , 44 



,12,13,14,16,0 



2370 
2380 
,BF 
2390 
2400 
,BF 
2410 
2420 
2430 
BL+1 
2440 



PA=7:GOTO2410 

HLINE (10, 173) -(18 ,175) 



L-R 

=1THE 



PSET 



PSET 



HGET(0, 155) - (30, 191) , 3 

FORX=0TO2 89 

IFSP=0ORSP=2THEN2 460ELSEBL= 



IFBL=5ANDPA=63THENBL=0 : PA=7 
PALETTE14 , 7 
2450 IFBL=5ANDPA=7THENBL=0:PA=63 
TTE14, 63 

HPUT(X,155)-(X+30, 191) 



: PALETTEI 4, 63 



2460 
ET 



, 3, PS 



2470 NEXTX 

2480 HPUT(X-1, 155)-(X+30-l,191) , 

1,PSET 

2490 RETURN 

2500 'GET/PUT ROAD MOVEMENT R-L 

2510 HGET(289,155)-(319,191) ,3 

2520 FORX=289TO0STEP-1 

2530 HPUT(X,155)-(X+30, 191) , 3 , PS 

ET 

2540 NEXTX 

2550 HPUT(X+l,155)-(X+30+l,191) , 

1,PSET 
2560 RETURN 

2570 'GET/PUT SKY MOVEMENT R-L 
2580 HGET(279,0) -(319 , 20) , 4 
2590 FORX=279TO0STEP-1 
2600 HPUT(X,0)-(X+40,20) ,4, PSET 
2 610 NEXTX 

2620 HPUT(X+1,0) -(X+40+1, 20) ,2,P 
SET 

2 630 RETURN 

2 640 'PRINT ERROR NUMBER & LINE 
2 650 CLS 

2660 print"error number" ; erno ;" i 
n line";erlin 

2 670 'restore palette & speed 

2680 POKE65496,0 

2 690 PALETTECMP ^ 




MY ARTIST 



Draw COC03 pictu 
lution Basic scr 
192 with 2, 4 or 
Simple keyboard 
eluding lines, b 
reproduction, 2 
and a complete u 
COCQ3, joystick, 
Speci f y 



res in all 4 high reso- 
een modes. 640 and 320 by 

16 colors and 64 hues, 
and joystick controls in- 
oxes, ovals, painting, 
speeds, fast ML save/load 
ser manual* Requires 128K 

TV or monitor $14 .95 

cassette or disk. 



THE DIRECTOR 



Prepare and show professional COC03 pic- 
ture , sound and color animation displays . 
Completely menu driven with integrated 
editing and showing . Uses MY ARTIST pic- 
tures in sequence with color changes , 
time delays , Basic and prerecorded cas- 
sette music. Includes additional programs 
to convert pictures , and to freely share 
your d isplays , and a complete user man- 
ual . Unlimited educational and enter ta in- 
ment uses i nclud i ng VCR recordings ! ! ! Re- 
quires 128K C0C03 , TV or monitor. . .-fZB^r- 
Specify cassette or disk. 

HOLIDAY SPECIAL. . .$29.95 
K with MY ARTIST. . .$39.95 
Gift wrapped with card & message. ... $4 .00 

Prices include $3 shipping and a 30 day 
money back guarantee. SC residents add 
5% sales tax. No credit cards* 

SEND C HECK OR MONEY ORDER. NO DELAY 



SEESOF PO Box 574, Beaufort , SC 
Phone 803-524-0116 



29901 



November 1 987 THE RAINBOW 111 



M 



icroWorld J 



c in cr. o 



CoCo II 


$ 87 


CoCo III 


$115 


Drive 0 


$175 


Drive 0 (NEW) 


$199 


CM-8 Monitor 


$248 


Deluxe Joystick 


$ 24 


Joysticks (pair) 


$ 13 


Mouse 


$40 


MultiPak 


$75 


Disk storage box (50) 


$ 8.50 


CCR-81 Cass. Rec. 


$42 



Disks (SS) 
Disks (DS) 



$7.50/box 
$8.00/box 



includes free library case 



DMP-106 Special $145 

DMP-130A (120 CPS) $225 
DMP-440 $545 



Tandy 1000 EX 
Tandy 1000 SX 
Tandy 1000 HX 
Tandy 1000 TX 



$495 
$720 
$575 
$910 



VM-4 Monitor 
CM-5 Monitor 
CM-11 Monitor 



$ 99 
$240 
$325 



CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 
MultiPak Upgrade (26-3024) 
MultiPak Upgrade (26-3124) 
OS-9 Level 2 



$130 
$ 8 
$ 7 
$ 63.95 



•* Please Note - Our ads are submitted 
early, so prices are subject to change!!! 
We appreciate your cooperation & 
understanding in this matter 



M i n i mum Order $15. 00 

Method of Payment: 



MC. Visa. Am. Ex. 
Certified Check 
Personal Checks 



Sorry, No Citiline! 
Money Order. 
Allow 1 week to clear! 



sfiaa® s>aa@s tLasir j^maa*&iM*E 



Full TANDY 
Warranty 
100% TANDY 
PRODUCTS 
FREE UPS Shipping 
ton orders over $50.00 
under $50 add $2.00 



==> CALL <== 

In Pa: 
215 759-7794 

In N. J. : 
201 735-6138 




COMPUTER CENTER 



MicroWorld 



230 Moorestown Road, Wind Gap, PA 18091 

Laneco Plaza, Clinton, NJ. 08809 



ALL F>RICES INCLUDE S H I F> F> I NG T ! I I 

(In Continental US) 

1 00% TANDY EQUIPMENT WITH FULL 
RADIO SHACK WARRANTY 



CoCo Cathead — 20 Seconds 
into the Future 



By Fred B, Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the "Wishing Well, "submit it to Fred 
c/o THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don't forget 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use, 
but remain the property of the au- 
thor. 

"uch of the mail I have re- 
ceived in recent months has 
fc been very encouraging. Many 
of you told me that you enjoy the new 
educational programs I have intro- 
duced in these pages, such as last 
month's Conjugate Instructor. Still 
others have requested a return to some 
graphics just for the fun of it. One thing 
many of you (too many to mention by 
name) have asked f or is more programs 
for the Tandy Speech-Sound Pak. 

Therefore, this month's project is a 
talking graphics program, just for the 
f un of it! Fear not, those of you who do 
not have the speech pak — this program 
displays a fun graphic, even without 
speech. 

A Talking CoCo Cat? 

You probably have seen ads for talk- 
ing head programs that work with 
different speech packs or programs. The 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a masters in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



idea is to give your computer a face to 
match its voice. I have long wanted to 
make a BASIC program do that, but I 
didn't know what to use for a face. I 
even toyed with the idea of making a 
robot or a talking keyboard face. These 
ideas just didn't seem to strike a proper 
chord. 

One day while I was trying to decide 
what soft drink to choose, a familiar 
face intruded on my TV screen, a stut- 
tering head superimposed on a back- 
ground of flashing stripes. I suppose 
there are not many people who have 



been able to shelter themselves from the 
media onslaught of computer creation 
Max Headroom; his face seems to be 
everywhere lately. Doonesbury 
cartoonist Gary Trudeau has even 
created a Ron Reagan clone of Max 
named Ron Headrest. 

That's when I got the idea of giving 
our CoCo Cat a computer alter ego. 
This would be a face familiar to every 
CoCo owner. It wouldn't scare the kids, 
and best of all, it would be easy to 
animate. Actually, that's one of the 
main reasons I chose CoCo Cat. I have 




Animation techniques, as well as speech routines for the Speech/Sound Cartridge, allow 
CoCo Cat to take on a Max Headroom-like appearance. 

November 1987 THE RAINBOW 113 



WE'RE BRINGING THE COCO 



RAINBOW'S 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from Th< 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $25 to give 
your account a positive balance. 
This will be refunded after your first 
free hour if you choose to no longer 
use the system or it will be applied 
to future connect charges. If you do 
not maintain a positive balance, you 
will be charged $3.50 each month 
for direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — on 
a regular basis. Conference sched- 
ules will appear in the rainbow 
each month. Be sure to check online 
announcements for changes and 
additions. 



THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $24.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to the rainbow entitles 
you to this $32.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

If you're not a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hour of connect time. 



SAVE EVEN MORE 

Want to saveeven more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29.95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21 .95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21.60). 

Delphi provides us all with 
Immediate CoCo Community. 

Check it out today. After all, you can 
sample it for free! 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



GROUP COCO 



COMMUNITY TOGETHER 



How to reach RAINBOWS Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and THE 
rainbow's CoCo SIG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Telenet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and one stop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge for Telenet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $10.80 (U.S.) per 
hour. 

On Telenet: Uninet network has merged with Telenet. 
To get the Telenet number for your area, call (800) 336- 
0437. After you call the local access number and make 
connection, press enter twice. When the "TERMINAL 3 " 
prompt appears, press enter again. When the "@" prompt 
appears, type C DELPHI and press enter. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage" or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier." At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press 'A'. 
When "please log in:" appears, type DELPHI and press 

ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (.) and 
enter (use two periods if you're using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1, 3:126 and press ENTER. Now type p 1 3106, 
DELPHI; and press enter. Delphi's new rates indicate an 
additional $10.80 hourly surcharge for evening use of 
Datapac, which means a total of $18 (U.S.) for connect 
time. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Telenet or 
Tymnet. Check with the telephone authorities in your 
country for details on how to sign up for this service. When 
you have an account set up, you can reach Delphi with 
a "host code" of 31 10 6170 3088 through Telenet, or 3106 
90 6015 through Tymnet. (You'll have to pay the toll 
charges for this connection.) 
Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to THE rainbow, at the 



"USERNAME;" prompt, type JDINDELPHI and press 
enter. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type RAINBOW. 
Then, at the "NUMBER:" prompt, type your individual 
subscription number from the mailing label of your latest 
issue of the rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros at 
the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you don't already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type JQINDELPHI and press enter. At 
the "PASSWORD:"prompt, type SENDRfllNBOW and press 
enter. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because you'll be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your rainbow and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill for subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just use Control-X and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BYE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter the CoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. We'll 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP COCO 

After you sign in, you'll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "user name" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and you'll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. You'll also 
be assigned a temporary password. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next day. Once an account is verified and opened, each 
rainbow subscriber will be credited with an hour of free 
time! 

When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into your 
own personal password. This is the password you will use 
for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 

After Max bids you goodbye, you'll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 



noticed that he doesn't have a mouth. 
A character without a mouth makes 
animating speech easy. The moving 
whiskers, ears and tail more than make 
up for CoCo Cat's lack of a mouth. 

And so, in the memory chips of my 
trusty CoCo, CoCo Cathead was born. 
The program requires at least 32K, and 
can be seen and not heard, if you just 
want the graphics. But you can make 
CoCo Cat talk by adding data state- 
ments at the end of the program. I have 
even included a bad joke, which keeps 
CoCo Cathead in true form with his 
computer inspiration. 

The Program 

Older CoCos may require that you 
PCLEAR8 before running the program. 
I have used PMDDE2/ 1 with a color POKE 
to give us a maximum of four full visual 
screens. Be careful when you type in the 
listing. If you make an error in the POKE 
commands you could lock up your 
machine and lose the program. Be sure 
to save the program bef ore trying to run 
it. This will save much heartache over 
a locked-up machine. 

The program uses commands sug- 
gested by the instructions which came 
with the Tandy Speech-Sound Pak. I 



have inserted some graphic commands 
among these lines to give us animation 
along with speech. 

Having four fullscreensto work with, 
we will do all of our viewing on Screen 
4 (pages 7 and 8). Screens 1 , 2 and 3 each 
have a different view of CoCo Cat. By 
PCDPVing them to our viewing screen, 
you get clean animation. I have also 
included a PDKE178,h command, with 
n representing a random number from 
1 to 255. This gives us some impressive 
striped graphics for the background. It 
makes the cat quite 21st century- 
looking. 

I have given CoCo Cat a tux and bow 
tie, but no sunglasses. That would have 
spoiled the effect of the blinking eyes 
and eyebrows. His ears and tail also 
bounce around a bit. In fact, he is fun 
to watch, even without speech. 

Running the Program 

On running the program, you will see 
our familiar title card. Pressing ENTER 
starts the program. You have to wait for 
about 20 seconds while the graphics are 
created. If you want to watch the pages 
being drawn, insert a value of fj~l after 
the PCLEflRB statement. This turns on 
the screens for you to watch. But I think 



the program seems better when you 
don't watch the pages being drawn. 

CoCo Cat will then proceed to talk 
to you and flash his different expres- 
sions and graphic screens. He even 
stutters a bit, adding to the Headroom 
effect. 

When he has finished talking, hegoes 
into a loop, changing screens until you 
stop the program or turn off your 
CoCo. That's it! It doesn't do anything 
practical, but we did say this month was 
just for fun, right? 

Adding Your Own Speech 

You can make CoCo Cat say any- 
thing you want simply by adding your 
own DATA lines between lines 1000 and 
5000, which is the END statement. The 
only limit is the amount of memory you 
have left. You may want to add a little 
stutter to his speech. Remember, some 
text will have to be sounded out, but 
that is a problem with the hardware, not 
the software. 

I hope you have fun with your new 
companion. Let me know how you like 
CoCo Cathead, and be sure to write if 
you have any more suggestions for 
future projects. □ 



Hint . . . 

Disk Directory Printout 

If you have a long disk directory and want to see 
all of it, or if you simply wish to have a hard copy 
printout of your directory, one simple command 
allows you to do this easily. 

Just POKE 111, 254:DIR and the entire disk 
directory will appear on your printer, even if it is too 
long to be f ully displayed on the screen. 



Mouse Tales by Logan Ward 




Corrections 

"High Resolution Joystick Interface" (Review, 
October 1987, Page 130): The review of the High 
Resolution Joystick Interface from Radio Shack 
erroneously states that cleaning your joystick ports 
with tuner cleaner will clear up the apparent jerky 
operation. It is true that tuner cleaner should be used. 
However, you should use it on the joystick pots, not 
the ports. Do not spray tuner cleaner into the joystick 
ports on the rear of your CoCo! 

"Screen Dump Extraordinaire" (October 1987, Page 

30): The 5CRNDMP listing on Page 32 has part of Line 
180 inserted in Line 140. Here are the correct listings 
for lines 140 and 180: 

14 j3 PRINT" As an example, one 
printer uses the sequence 27,4 
2,4,128,2 where the codes 128 a 
nd 2 represent 128 + 2*256 = 640 
dots per line. 

180 IFINSTR(C$ , " , " ) =0THEN190ELSE 
C$=RIGHT$ (C$ , LEN ( C $ ) -INSTR ( C$ , " , 
") ) :K=K+1:GOTO180 

For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DfiTfl 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIC> 
prompt. 



116 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



r 160 99 680 231 

H 340 68 810 228 

490 26 1010 217 

570 79 END 195 

The listing: CATHEAD 

lj3 REM ************************ 
2p REM * TALKING COCO CATHEAD * 
3p REM * BY FRED B.SCERBO * 
40 REM * 6f5 HARDING AVE. * 
5p REM * NORTH ADAMS , MA 01247 * 
6p REM * COPYRIGHT (C) 198 7 * 
70 REM ************************ 
80 PCLEAR8 

90 CLS0:PRINTSTRING$(32,168)STRI 
NG$(32,184) ;:FORI=lTO 256 : READ 
A : PRINTCHR$ ( A+12 8 ) ; :NEXT 
100 PRINTSTRING$ (32 , 184 ) STRING$ ( 
32,168) ; 

110 DATA4 6, 44, 44, 42, 62, 60, 60, 58, 
117,124, 124, 12 5,117,124,124, 122, 
12 6, 12 5,124,122,26, ,26,30,28,29, 
21,28,29,21,28,27 

120 DATA42,33,35,34,58,49,51,50, 
117, , , , 117, , , 12 2, 120, 117 ,, 120,26 
, , 26 , 2 6 , f ,21, ,21,21, ,21 
130 DATA42,37,,42,58,53, ,58,117, 
/ i / H7, / /122, ,117, , ,26, ,26,26, , , 
21, ,21,21, ,21 

140 DATA42,37,,42,58,53, ,58,117, 
, , ,117, 115, 115, 122, , 117 , , , 27 , 19, 
26, 27, 19,, 21, 19, 23, 21, 112, 21 
150 DATA42, 37, ,42,58,53, ,58,117, 
, , ,117, ,112,122, , 117, , ,26, ,26,26 
/ i i 21 , ,21,21, ,21 

160 DATA42, 37, 35,42, 58,53, 51, 58, 
117, ,, ,117, , ,122, ,117, , ,26, ,26,2 
6, ,,21, ,21,21, ,21 

170 DATA42, ,32,34,58, ,48,50,117, 
, ,113,117, , ,122, ,117, , ,26, ,26, 26 
, ,17,21, ,21,21, ,23 

180 DATA44,44,44,40,60,60,60,56, 
116,124,124,124, 116, , ,120, ,124,1 
20, ,24, ,24,28,28,28,20, ,20,20,28 
,24 

190 PRINT§422," BY FRED B.SCERB 
0 »; 

200 PRINT@454," COPYRIGHT (C) 19 
87 "; 

210 IFINKEY$OCHR$ (13) THEN210 
220 PRINT§486," PLEASE STAND BY 
! " ; 

230 XX=&HFF00:YY=&HFF7E 
240 POKEXX+l,52:POKEXX+3 ,63 
250 POKEXX+35,60 

260 PMODE4,l:PCLSl:PMODE4,5:PCLS 
1 

270 GOTO380 



280 FORII=lTOLEN(AA$) 

290 PC0PY1T07:PC0PY2T08 

300 IF PEEK (YY) AND 128=0 THEN 300 

310 PCOPY5T07:PCOPY6T08 

320 POKEYY , ASC (MID$ ( AA$ ,11,1)) 

330 NEXTII 

340 IFPEEK(YY) AND128=0THEN340 
350 PCOPY3T07:PCOPY4T08 
360 POKEYY, 13 
370 RETURN 

380 PMODE2 , 1 : PCLS1 : PMODE1 : PCLS0 : 
POKE 65314,248: SCREENQ , Q 
390 GOSUB400:GOTO460 
400 LINE(0, 0)-(256, 192) , PRESET, B 
410 CIRCLE (82, 110) ,40,1, .9, .2, .8 
5: CIRCLE (174, 110) ,40,1,. 9,. 65,. 3 
: CIRCLE (128 ,64) , 54 , 1 , . 9 , . 4 6 , .05 
420 CIRCLE(128, 172) ,62,1, .6, .67, 
.85: CIRCLE (10 8, 68), 6,1: CIRCLE ( 1 4 
6,68) ,6,1: PAINT (108, 68) ,1,1: PAIN 
T(146,68) ,1,1 

430 DRAWBM136, 90C1M-10, -40L8G4M 
13 6,90" : PAINT (12 8, 70) ,1,1 
440 DRAW"BM114 , 140D18ND30R28ND30 
NU18M+40 , -8F4D20G4NF30M-40 , -8NU1 
0L28NU10M-40 , +8NG30H4U20E4M+40 , + 
8" :POKE178, 52 : PAINT (128, 160) , , 1: 
POKE178,72:PAINT(110, 160) , ,1:PAI 
NT(146, 160) , , 1 

450 POKE178,0: PAINT (108, 180) , 1, 1 

:PAINT(150, 180) ,1,1: RETURN 

460 PC0PY1T03:PC0PY2T04:PC0PY1T0 

7:PCOPY2T08 

470 DRAW"BM90 , 30C1M-4 , -20M+24 , +1 

0BR30M+24, -10M-4 ,+20" 

480 DRAW "BM 14 , 192U140NL4NH6NU4R3 

4D30L12U16L8D130" 

490 DRAW"BM255, 20C1H20L20F40D20H 
60L20F80D20H100L20F16BF16F88D20H 
74BH48H18L20F20BF98F42D20H50BH11 
8H12L20F34BF104F52L20H4 6BH98H4 6L 
20F62BF80F10BF20F10BL20BH2 6H8BH7 
2H22BH6H42" 

500 DRAWD20F24BF24F8BF58D20H18B 
H48H20BH14H14D20F14BF14F16BF3 4F8 
BF38L20BH34H42BH14H14D20F14BF14F 
56L20H3 6BH14H14D20F14BF14F16L20B 
H12H10" 

510 PCOPY1T05 : PCOPY2T06 
520 FORI=10TO250STEP40:PAINT(I,6 
) ,2, 1:NEXT:FORI=6TO192STEP40:PAI 
NT (6,1) , 2 , l:NEXT:FORI=28T0196STE 
P40:PAINT(3 2,I) , 2 , 1 : NEXT : PAINT ( 5 
0,82) ,2,1: PAINT (104, 146) ,2,1:PAI 
NT(148, 150) ,2,1 

530 PAINT (188 , 178) , 2 , l:FORI=98TO 
178STEP40:PAINT(2 20,I) ,2, 1: NEXT 
540 POKE178,14:FORI=30TO250STEP4 
0 : PAINT ( 1 , 6) , , 1 : NEXT : FORI=2 6T019 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 117 



T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE CONTINUES ITS 



ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 

COVER 1 
RACETRACK 
HANGMAN 
MUSIC ALBUM 
LIFE EXPECTANCY 
WORD TESTS 
KILLER MANSION 
BARTENDER 
CALENDAR 
ROBOT WAR 

ISSUE #2, AUGUST 1982 

UFO COVER PT. 1 

BIORHYTHM 

BOMBARDMENT 

BLACKJACK 

COST OF LIVING 

FRENZY 

BUSINESS LETTER 
QUICK THINK 
QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 
QUEST FOR LENORE 



ISSUE #7, JANUARY 1983 

NEW YEARS COVER 
LIST ENHANCER 
SUPER PRECISION DIV. 
BOMB DIFFUSE 
SPACE STATION 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 2 
SHOOT OUT 
FIND UTILITY 
CYBORG INS. 
CYBORG FACES 

ISSUE #8, FEBRUARY 1983 

COVER 8 
DEFEND 

3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 
COCO CONCENTRATION 
AUTO LINE NUMBERING 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 3A 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 3B 
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 
DUAL BARRIER 
BRICKS 



ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 

THIRTEENTH COVER 
FLASH CARD 
ICE BLOCK 
COSMIC FORTRESS 
MAIL LIST 
DOLLARS & CENTS 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 8 
SDSK COPY 
MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 
CRAWLER 

ISSUE #14, AUGUST 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
ROW BOAT 

COMPUTER TUTL PT. \ 
INDEX DATABASE 
DISK ZAPPER 
COCO-MONITOR 
COCO-ARTIST 
ROBOT COMMAND 
TEST SCREEN PRINT 
HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 



ISSUE #19, JANUARY 1984 

BANNER 
PROBE 

DISK DIRECTORY PROTECTOR 
OPTICAL CONFUSION 
WORD PROCESSOR 
WORD SEARCH 
ASTRONAUT RESCUE 
STAR TRAP 
PIE CHART 
FORCE FIELD 

ISSUE #20, FEBRUARY 1984 

INTRODUCTION: 
HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 
ESCAPE ADVENTURE 
SEEKERS 
MASTER BRAIN 
LIST CONTROLLER 
DISKETTE CERTIFIER 
ROM COPY 
BASIC RAM 
SNAFUS 



ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 3 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEY MAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDITOR INST. 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLE BUSTER 
RECOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUGUST 1984 

PEEK, POLE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 
O-TEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
COCO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 



ISSUE #3, SEPTEMBER 1982 

UFO COVER PI 2 
BASKETBALL 
CHUCKLUCK 
SLOT MACHINE 
ALPHABETIZER 
NFL PREDICTIONS 
FLAG CAPTURE 
ROBOT BOMBER 

ISSUE #4, OCTOBER 1982 

UFO RESCUE 

TANK BATTLE 

DRIVEWAY 

SOUNDS 

BALLOON DROP 

MIND BOGGLE 

COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 

CALORIE COUNTER 

JACK-O-LANTERN 

ISSUE #5, NOVEMBER 1982 

CATALOG COVER 
BOWLING 

PROGRAM INVENTORY 

PROMISSORY-LOANS 

CHECKBOOK BALANCER 

TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 

CONVOY 

BAG-IT 

SPECTRA SOUND 
CONVEYOR BELT 

ISSUE #6, DECEMBER 1982 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
RAINDROPS 
STOCK MARKET 
ADVANCED PONG 
DESTROY 
SOUND ANALYZER 
CREATIVITY TEST 
VOICE DATA 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 1 
LOONY LANDER 



ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

TIME MACHINE COVER 
TRIG DEMO 
PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 
PROGRAM PACKER 
BUDGET 

ELECTRONIC DATEBOOK 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 4 
TAPE DIRECTORY 
BLOCK-STIR 

COCO ADDING MACHINE 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 

TENTH COVER 
PYRAMID OF DANGER 
TYPING TUTOR 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 5 
TINYCALC 

STOCK MARKET COMP 
YAH-HOO 
MISSILE ATTACK 
SCREEN PRINT 
BRIKPONG 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 

ELEVENTH COVER 
ARCHERY 
FROG JUMP 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 6 
MIT DICTIONARY 
BASIC SPEED UP TOT. 
METRIC CONVERTOR 
GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 
GRAPHICS PROGRAM 
CATERPILLAR CAVE 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 

TWELFTH COVER 
SHOOTING GALLERY 
BOMB STOPPER 
VALLEY BOMBER 
STARFIGHTER 
WHEEL OF FORTUNE 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 7 
MERGE UTILITY 
RAM TEST 
LANDER 



ISSUE #15, SEPTEMBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER PT. 2 
GOLD VALUES 
TREK INSTRUCTIONS 
TREK 

HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 
ASTRO DODGE 
DR. COCO 
PEG JUMP 
MORSE CODE 
PURGE UTILITY 

ISSUE #16, OCTOBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
BOPOTRON 
DIRECTORY RECALL 
VECTOR GRAPHICS INST. 
VECTOR GRAPHICS 
SKYDIVER 

SWERVE AND DODGE 
NIMBO BATTLE 
TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 
LIFE GENERATIONS 

ISSUE #17, NOVEMBER 1983 

THANKSGIVING COVER 

3-DTIC-TAC-TOE 

INDY500 

COLLEGE ADVENTURE 
MEMORY GAME 
DUNGEON MASTER 
WEATHER FORECASTER 
GRID FACTOR INST. 
GRID FACTOR 
DRAW 

ISSUE #18, DECEMBER 1983 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
CLIMBER 

GALACTIC CONQUEST 
WARLORDS 
STATES REVIEW 
MATH TUTOR 

MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 
PRINTER UTILITY INST. 
PRINTER UTILITY 
MUTANT WAFFLES 



ISSUE #21, MARCH 1984 

BASIC CONVERSIONS 
FINANCIAL ADVISE 
CASTLE STORM 
DOS HEAD CLEANER 
COCO TERMINAL 
SNAKE CRAWLER 
WAR CASTLE 
SKY FIRE 
EASY BASIC 
DOTS 3-D 

ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 

HEALTH HINTS 
GLIBLIBS 

CLOTHER SLITHER 
BIBLE 1 & 2 
BIBLE 3 & 4 
CATCHALL 
INVADER 
ALIEN RAID 
MOON ROVER 
IO ERROR IGNORER 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 
STOCKS OR BOMBS 
WALL AROUND 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 1 
NUCLEAR WAR INST. 
THERMONUCLEAR WAR 
CIRCUIT DRAWER 
MOUSE RACES 
SUPER-SQUEEZE 
DATA FALL 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 

DIR PACK & SORT 
BRICK OUT 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 2 

USA SLIDE PUZZLE 

51 '24 SCREEN EDITOR 

51 '24 SCREEN 

CITY INVADERS 

PRINTER SPOOLER 

STEPS 

SNAKE 



ISSUE #27, SEPTEMBER 1984 

COCO TO COM 64 
GALACTIC SMUGGLER 
INDY RACE 
ACCOUNT MANAGER 
CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 
STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 
SPACE DUEL 
BUGS 
TRAP-BALL 
BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCTOBER 1984 

HANGING TREE 
CHECKERS 
FOOTBALL + 
MORE PEEKS, POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RAT ATTACK 

ISSUE #29, NOVEMBER 1984 

DISK ROLL OUT 
ROBOT ON 
MULTIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
QUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 

ISSUE #30, DECEMBER 1984 

MATH HELP 
ZECTOR ADVENTURE 
WORLD CONQUEST 
DRAG RACE 
MINE FIELD 
T NOTES TUTORIAL 
T&D PROGRAM INDEXER 
SYSTEM STATUS 
ERROR TRAP 
DROLL ATTACK 





SUPER SAVINGS 

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All 64 Issues $175.00 



Every Issue Contains • We send 
10 or More Programs 1st Class 

Many Machine Language No Charge 

Programs 

Available for COCO I, Hand III • Personal 
All Programs Include Checks 
Documentation Welcome ! 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



BACK ISSUE SALE OF OVER 640 PROGRAMS 



ISSUE #31, JANUARY 1985 

TREASURES OF BARSOOM 
BATTLE GROUND 

STRUCTURED COMPILED LANGUAGE 
LIBRARY MODULE 
MINIATURE GOLF 
STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEBRUARY 1985 

DR. SIGMUND 
ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 
LOTTERY ANALYST 
BASIC COMPILER 
MUSIC CREATOR 
MEANIE PATROL 
TRI-COLOR CARDS 
SHAPE RECOGNITION 
DISK BACKUP 
SPACE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MARCH 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 
PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
ML DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 
DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEED KEY 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

HOVER TANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSIC GENERATOR 
FYR-DRACA 
DRIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 

SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 
SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
HAUNTED HOUSE 

ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 

SELECT A GAME 2 
VIDEO COMPUTIZER 
SPEECH SYNTHESIS 
SPEECH RECOGNITION 
SPACE LAB 
AUTO COMMAND 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 
KNIGHT AND THE LABYRINTH 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 

ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 

CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE 5-7 

SHIPWREK ADVENTURE 
RLE TRANSFER 
FOUR IN A ROW 
MARSHY 

TAPE CONTROLLER 
CATACOMB 
AUTO TALK 
SGR8PAK 



ISSUE #38, AUGUST 1985 

GOLF PAR 3 
WIZARD ADVENTURE 
KITE DESIGN 
ROBOTS 
GOMOKU 

AMULET OF POWER 
LINE COPY UTILITY 
DISK PLUMBER 
SUPER RAM CHECKER 
GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPTEMBER 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
CAR MANAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHINE 
ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 
SUPER VADERS 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

ISSUE #40, OCTOBER 1985 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
COCO-WAR 
DISK LABELER 
SHIP WAR 
ELECTRIC COST 
MULTIKEY BUFFER 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
SAND ROVER 

ISSUE #41, NOVEMBER 1985 

GRUMPS 

DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 
SOLAR CONQUEST 
GAS COST 

RIME WORLD MISSION 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 
GRAPHIC TEST 
GRAPHIC LOOPY 
BOLD PRINT 

ISSUE #42, DECEMBER 1985 

HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAHTZEE 
DISK UTILITY 
MACH II 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
SLOT MACHINE GIVE AWAY 
TEXT BUFFER 
TUNNEL RUN 

ISSUE #43, JANUARY 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER COST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 
KEYPAD ENTRY 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEBRUARY 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 



ISSUE #45, MARCH 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT. 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COLO KEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
LIBERTY SHIP 
SINGLE STEP RUN 

ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DISK LOCK 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 

BOMB RUN 

TANKS 

TAR PITS 

BASEBALL 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

ROULETTE 

GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFF 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
TV SCHEDULE 
BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTI COPY 
AUTOMATE 
SCROLL PROTECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 

ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 
DISK DISASSEMBLER 
BAKCHEK 
PACHINKO 
STOCK CHARTING 
HAUNTED STAIRCASE 
CANYON BOMBERS 
DRAGONS 1 & 2 
GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 
AUTO BORDER 

ISSUE #50, AUGUST 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPTEMBER 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET 51 
VAN GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 



ISSUE #52, OCTOBER 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 
INVASION 

THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOTRACE 
FLIPPY THE SEAL 
SCREEN' CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS 
SUPER ERROR 2 

ISSUE #53, NOVEMBER 1986 

CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CAVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DECEMBER 1986 

JOB LOG 
PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TYPE 
PANZER TANKS 
MRS PAC 
BIG NUM 

ISSUE #55, JANUARY 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
DIR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEBRUARY 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRUSH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EDITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 

ISSUE #57, MARCH 1987 

THE BAKERY 
ENCHANTED VALLEY ADV. 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR 1 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREADSHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 



ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 

HOME PLANT SELECTION 

CHECK WRITER 

HELIRESCUE 

KABOOM 

NEW PONG 

CROQUET 

FUNCTION KEYS 

ZOOM 

ELECTRONICS 2 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
LABELS 
CATCH A CAKE 
COCO MATCH 
ROBOTS 
STREET RACERS 
BOWLING 3 
ELECTRONICS 3 
GRAFIX 
KRON 

ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 

EZ ORDER 

SUBMISSION WRITER 
KEYS ADVENTURE 
WALLPAPER 
CHOPPER COMMAND 
UNDERSTANDING OPPOSITES 
BIT CODE PLOTTING 
ELECTRONICS IV 
KING PEDE 
RAIDER 

ISSUE #62, AUGUST 1987 

PENSION MANAGEMENT 
HERB GROWING 
CATALOGER UTILITY 
RAIDERS 
ALPHABETIZING 
W.FO. 

ELECTRONICS V 
RAMBO ADVENTURE 
BLOCKS 

MULTI SCREEN CAVES 

ISSUE #63, SEPTEMBER 1987 

GENEOLOGIST HELPER 
SMART COPY 

MAINTENANCE REPORTING 
COCO 3-COCO 2 HELPER 
DIRECTORY PICTURE 
SUB STTACK 
SAVE THE MAIDEN 
CAVIATOR 
ELECTRONICS VI 
MONKEY SHINE 

ISSUE #64, OCTOBER 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE IN THE GRASS 
CYCLE JUMP 
GEOMETRY TUTOR 
SLOT RACERS 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS VII 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 



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CIRCLE ISSUES DESIRED 

1 9 17 25 33 41 49 57 

2 10 18 26 34 42 50 58 

3 11 19 27 35 43 51 59 

4 12 20 28 36 44 52 60 

5 13 21 29 37 45 53 61 

6 14 22 30 38 46 54 62 

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B 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 

PLEASE CIRCLE 
TAPE or DISK 



2STEP40:PAINT(6,I) , , 1 : NEXT: FORI= 
8TO196STEP40 : PAINT (32,1) , ,1 : NEXT 
550 PAINT(50,62) , , 1 : PAINT (94 , 146 
) , ,l:PAINT(144,152) , ,1:PAINT(174 
,14 8) , , 1: PAINT (196, 168) , ,1 
560 FORI=192TO62STEP-40: PAINT (21 
4,1) , , 1: NEXT: PAINT (184 , 74) , ,1 
570 FORI=100TO126STEP12: CIRCLE (6 
0,1) ,40,1, .2, .5,1: CIRCLE (196, 1) , 
40,1, .2, .5, 1:NEXT 

580 DRAWC1BM128 , 58BL20L18U2NR8U 
2NR4U2M+18 , +6BR38R18U2NL8U2NL4U2 
M-18, +6" 

590 PM0DE2 , 5 : PM0DE1 , 5 : POKE 65 3 14 , 

248:SCREENQ,Q 

600 PAINT ( 108 ,68) ,4,4: PAINT ( 146 , 
68) ,4,4 

610 CIRCLE ( 108 , 68 ) , 10 , 1 , . 7 , 1 , . 5 : 
CIRCLE (146, 68) , 10 , 1 , . 7 , 1 , . 5 
62j3 POKE178 , 14 :FORI=10TO250STEP4 
0 : PAINT (1,6) , ,l:NEXT:FORI=6T0192 
STEP40 : PAINT (6,1) , , 1 : NEXT : FORI=2 
8TO196STEP40: PAINT (32,1) , ,1:NEXT 
: PAINT ( 50 , 82) , , 1: PAINT (1,04 , 14 6) , 
,1: PAINT (148 , 150) , ,1 
630 PAINT (188, 178) , , l:FORI=98T01 
78STEP40: PAINT {220 , I) , ,1:NEXT 
640 FORI=30TO250STEP40: PAINT (1 , 6 
) , 2 , 1 : NEXT : FORI=26TO192STEP40 : PA 
INT (6,1) ,2,1: NEXT : FORI=8T019 6STE 
P40 : PAINT (32,1) ,2,1: NEXT 
650 PAINT (50, 62) , 2 , 1 : PAINT ( 94 , 14 
6) , 2 , 1: PAINT (14 4, 152) , 2 , 1: PAINT ( 
174 , 148) , 2 , 1: PAINT (196, 168), 2,1 
660 FORI=192TO62STEP-40: PAINT(21 
4,1) ,2,1: NEXT: PAINT (184, 74) ,2,1 
610 FORI=100TO126STEP12 : CIRCLE ( 6 
0, 1) , 40, 1, .4, .5,1: CIRCLE (196, 1) , 
40, 1, .4, . 5, 1:NEXT 

680 DRAWC1BM128, 48BL20L18U2NR8U 
2NR4U2M+18 , +6BR3 8R18U2NL8U2NL4U2 
M-18, +6" 

690 PMODE2 , 3 : PMODE 1,3: POKE6 5 314, 

248 : SCREENQ, Q 

100 GOSUB710:GOTO770 

710 DRAW" BM82 , 38C1M- 6 , -24M+2 4 , +1 

0BR52M+24 , -10M-6,+24" 

120 DRAWBM14 , 192U170NL4NH6NU4R3 

4D30L12U16L8D160" 

120 DRAWC1BM128 , 52BL20L18U2NR8U 
2NR4U2M+18 , +6BR38R18U2NL8U2NL4U2 
M-18, +6" 

740 POKE178,RND(255) :PAINT(10,5) 
* ,1 

750 FORI=100TO126STEP12: CIRCLE (6 
0,1) ,40 ,1, .6 , .5,1: CIRCLE (19 6, I) , 
40,1, .6, .5,1: NEXT 
760 RETURN 



170 PMODE1, 7 :SCREEN1, 1: POKE65314 
, 248 

780 GOTO840 

7 90 FORY=1TO20 : PCOPY1T07 : PCOPY2T 

08 : F0RI=1T03 0 : NEXTI : PCOPY5T07 : PC 

OPY6T08 : FORI=1TO30 : NEXTI , Y 

800 FORY=1TO10:PCOPY3TO7:PCOPY4T 

08 : FORI=1TO80 : NEXTI : PCOPY5T07 : PC 

OPY6T08 : FORI=1TO30 : NEXTI , Y 

810 PM0DE2 , 3 : PMODE 1 , 3 : PCLS4 : POKE 

65314, 248 

820 GOSUB400:GOSUB710 
830 GOTO790 

840 READ AA$: IFAA$="END"THEN790 
850 PM0DE1,7:SCREEN1,1:P0KE65314 
, 248 

860 PC0PY1T07:PC0PY2T08:F0RI=1T0 
50 : NEXTI : PC0PY5T07 : PCOPY6T08 : FOR 
I=1TO50: NEXTI 
870 GOSUB280 

880 PC0PY1T07:PC0PY2T08:F0RI=1T0 
50 : NEXTI : PCOPY5T07 : PCOPY6T08 : FOR 
I-1TO50: NEXTI 

890 FORY=lT03:PCOPY3T07:PCOPY4TO 
8 : F0RI=1T08 0 : NEXTI : PCOPY5T07 : PCO 
PY6T08 : FORI=1TO30 : NEXTI, Y 
900 PM0DE2 , 3 : PMODE 1, 3 : PCLS4 : POKE 
65314, 248 

910 GOSUB400:GOSUB710 
920 GOTO840 

930 REM START SPEECH DATA HERE 
1000 DATA HELLO 0 0 0,1 AM KAHKA 
HKAHKAHKO KO KAT 

1010 DATA I HAVE BBBBBEEN IN THE 

RAINBOW FOR A LONG LONG WHILE 
1020 DATA THIS IS MY NA NA NA NE 
W LLLLLLOOK 

1030 DATA YOU N.N.N. NEVER THOUGH 

T I WOULD BE LIKE THIS 

1040 DATA DID YOU U U U U 

1050 DATA YOU FORGOT HOW HOW GOO 

D A CO CO WAS AYH 

1060 DATA 0 K I HAV A JOKE FO 

R YOU 

1070 DATA WHY DIDNT THE CO CO OW 

NER CROSS THE STREET 

1080 DATA GIVE UP YET 

1090 DATA 0 K...I'LL TELL YOU 

1100 DATA WITH A CO CO... HE DOES 

NT NEED TO GO ANYWHERE 

1110 DATA WHAT 

1120 DATA THAT'S NOT FUNNY 

1130 DATA WELL EX CUUUUUUUZE ME 

1140 DATA I MUST BE OVERHEATING 

1150 DATA SEE YOU LATER 

1160 DATA I'LL JUST CHANGE CUHLO 

RS FOR A WHILE 

5000 DATA END ^ 



120 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Also from Falsoft, The RAINBOW MAKER, . . . 




The magazine for Tandy portable and MS-DOS users 

Not only does Tandy produce our favorite CoCo, we think they produce the best and best-priced lap- 
top portable and MS-DOS computers as well. We've found that when satisfied Color Computer users 
decide to add portability or move to MS-DOS, many stick with Tandy. For these people we publish PCM, 
The Personal Computer Magazine for Tandy Computer Users. 

Each month in PCM, you'll find information and programs for the Tandy 100, 102, 200 and 600 portable 
computers. And you'll find even more coverage for their MS-DOS machines, the 1000, 1200, 2000 and 
3000, along with the great new 1000 EX, 1000 SX and 3000 HL. 

FREE PROGRAMS! 

We learned from the rainbow that readers want programs to type in, so each month we bring you an 
assortment of them: games, utilities, graphics, and home and business applications. 

BAR CODE LISTINGS AND PROGRAM DISKS! 

For portable users, PCM is the only home computer publication in the world that brings yqu programs 
in bar code, ready to scan into memory I'ike magic with the sweep of a wand! For those who don't have 
time to type in listings, we offer a companion disk service with aiG the programs from the magazine. 

TUTORIALS AND PRODUCT REVIEWS! 

As if all this weren't enough, we offer regular tutorials on telecommunications and hardware; assembly 
language, basic and pascal programming tips; and in-depth reviews of the new software, peripherals 
and services as they are released. Add it all up and we think you'll find PCM to be the most informative 
and fun magazine for this market today! 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call 800-847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries 
call 502-228-4492. 

□ YESl Please send me a one year (12 issues) 
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Mail to: PCM, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 





The Complete $$$$$ Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to 
take advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser 
features. An easy-to-read, step-by-step guide packed 
with hints, tips, tutorials and free software in the form 
of program listings. 

Book $16,95, Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not 
included) 



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IntroductorfilPto Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid 
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The First RaintftS 



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Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adven- 
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Book $3,50. Tape $3.50 

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Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure 
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The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

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The Second Rainli 



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The 16 winners from our second Simulations contest. 
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Olympic events. Test your skills and talents. 
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of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. 
Discover backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, 
attempt a daring space rescue, or defeat evil in the year 
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Book $11.95, Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 

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□ Second Rainbow Simulalions Tape 

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□ Second Simulations Package with Tape 

□ Second Simulations Package with Disk 

□ TheComplete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Package 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for 
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to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

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□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

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(indicate choice of tape or disk) $8.95 
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(Allow6to8 weeks lor delivery) Total 

Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
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EST. For other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone 
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PARENTAL GUIDANCE Can parents be held 
legally responsible for acts of software piracy by 
their teen-age children? Jonathan D. Wallace, 
Esq., a computer lawyer representing the plaintiff 
in a case pending in federal court in New York 
(Weaver vs. Doe), believes they can. 

Weaver, the plaintiff, owns the copyright of 
Cards, a commercially distributed card-playing 
Simulation for the Atari ST computer. The teen- 
age defendant allegedly operated a pirate BBS 
from which users could download Cards and 
other copyrighted programs. Although software 
companies have sued software pirates before, this 
is the first case Wallace is aware of in which the 
pirate's parents have also been sued. 

According to Wallace, the case raises a question 
of first impression under the copyright law. "Our 
argument is that a parent who supplies the 
computer equipment and telephone line, which is 
used to operate a pirate bulletin board, and who 
then tolerates the trading of pirated software, 
contributes to the copyright infringement," 
Wallace said. "Since teen-agers usually have no 
assets with which to pay a judgment, holding the 
parents responsible will give strong incentive to 
families not to condone this type of behavior." 

SMOOTH TALKING Swisscomp Inc. has intro- 
duced the Smart Speaker, a text-to-speech 
product offering many features not available on 
other text-to-speech conveners. 

The Smart Speaker will connect to any com- 
puter having a standard parallel or serial port. It 
will also work with any software that puts out 
ASCII to drive a printer. In addition, its built-in 
AB switch allows it to share a single port with your 
existing printer. 

The Smart Speaker is designed to convert 
ASCII text to speech, pronouncing the text 
through its built-in speaker. Numbers and text 
separated by spaces or periods are spelled out. No 
software or programming is required by the user 
to make the Smart Speaker work. Additionally, 
the Smart Speaker can drive an external ampli- 
fier, VCR, tape recorder or phone answering 
system through its line output. A facility to 
connect an external speaker is also provided. 

Smart Speaker is available as a stand-alone unit 
complete with parallel cable and power supply for 
$229.95. It is also available as a package, which 
includes the Smart Speaker, a Hayes-compatible 
1200 baud modem, a clock calendar and order 
processing software for the IBM PC/ XT/ AT and 
Compatibles for $549.95. For more information, 
contact Swisscomp Inc., 5312 56th St., Tampa, 
FL 3 3610. (813)628-0906. 



FIRST COCO PRODUCT The United Comput- 
er Federation announced the release of its first 
Color Computer product, The Insider, an internal 
clock card for the Color Computer 2 and 3. 

The clock card is designed to plug into the 
CoCo internally, thus freeing the ROM port and 
multi-pack interface and giving the CoCo owner 
true time capabilities. 

The Insider comes complete with Radio Shack 
Disk Extended Color BASIC, and OS-9 drivers. 
The Insider clock card's suggested retail price is 
$49.95 and will be available through dealers and 
directly from the United Computer Federation. 

Headquartered in San Fernando Valley, Cali- 
fornia, the United Computer Federation is a 
Color Computer users group with chapters 
covering many parts of the United States. If you 
would like additional information on the Insider 
clock card or the U.C.F., contact The United 
Computer Federation, 366 W. Providencia 
Avenue, Burbank, CA 91506, (818)840-8902. 

COMPUTERS AND ART From music videos to 
paintings to special effects for ballet, Digital 
Visions, a 176-page book, examines the comput- 
er's far-reaching impact on the visual arts and the 
creative process. Included are computer-assisted 
works by such prominent artists as Andy Warhol, 
David Hockney, Jennifer Bartlett, Larry Rivers, 
and Philip Pearlstein, as well as creations by 
artists like David Em and Melvin Prueitt, who 
have worked exclusively on the computer and 
have only recently begun to receive attention 
outside the computer-graphics community. 

More than 140 illustrations, including 100 color 
plates, offer an exciting look at the ways painters, 
sculptors, architects, filmmakers, choreog- 
raphers, performance artists and animators are 
using the computer today. The prices are $29.95 
hardcover, $19.95 paperback. 

Cynthia Goodman, an art historian and the 
leading expert on computer-aided art, traces the 
development of this intriguing liaison between 
artists and computers and explores some spectac- 
ular directions for the art of the future. 

Digital Visions accompanies museum exhibi- 
tion opening in Syracuse, New York, at the 
Everson Museum beginning Sept. 18 through 
November 8 and traveling to The Contemporary 
Art Center in Cincinnati, Nov. 27 through Jan. 
9, 1988; IBM Gallery, NY, April 26 through June 
18, 1988; Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, OH, Oct. 
20 through January 10, 1989; and White Museum, 
University of California (dates not set yet). 
Contact Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 100 Fifth 
Avenue. New York, NY 1 001 1. 



NEW FROM TANDY In celebration of their 
10th anniversary of computer products, Tandy 
announced six major product additions and 
changes August 3, 1987, at the Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel in New York city. 

The Tandy 4000 is Tandy's entry into the 
expanding 80386 market. The 4000 boasts a clock 
speed of 16MHz, 1Mb of RAM, two XT- 
compatible slots and six AT slots, one 32-bit 
memory slot, a 1.44Mb, 3'/ 2 -inch floppy drive, one 
serial and one parallel port, an enhanced key- 
board, a keylock chassis and room for a total of 
16Mb of RAM and two additional half-height 
peripherals. The Tandy 4000 lists for $2,599. 

The Tandy 3000contains all the features offered 
by its predecessor but includes a sleeker case 
designed to hold three half-height peripherals. It 
has also been redesigned to operate at 12MHz 
with one wait state. Like the 4000, it has a keylock 
chassis and an enhanced keyboard. The Tandy 
3000 lists for $1,999. 

The changes to the Tandy 3000 HL include an 
enhanced keyboard, a keylock chassis and a retail 
price of $1,499. Other than that, the machine 
remains virtually the same as earlier 3000 HL 
machines. 

The Tandy 1400 LT marks Tandy's first entry 
into the PC-compatible laptop computer market. 
With 768K of RAM, a V20 running at 7. 16MHz, 
a backlit Super-Twist LCD display, an external 
keyboard, external disk drive, CGA and compos- 
ite video ports, it is one of the most feature-packed 
laptops on the market at any price. List price for 
the 1400 LT is $1,599. 

The Tandy 1000 TX is an 80286-based Tandy 
1000. With 640K of RAM and room for an 
additional I28K of "video RAM," it lists for 
$ 1 , 1 99. The 1 000 TX has an 8M Hz '286,serial and 
parallel ports, CGA graphics and a 3'/ 2 -inch, 720K 
floppy built-in drive. 

In addition to these computers, Tandy has 
introduced the LP-1000 Laser Printer. This 
powerful printer includes 1 .5Mb of RAM and HP 
LaserJet compatibility and can print full-page 300 
DPI graphics. It features several built-in fonts and 
typestyles as well as emulation of the IBM 
ProPrinter, QuietWriter and the Tandy DMP- 
21 10. Input is taken through a standard Centron- 
ics parallel port. The LP-1000, at a retail price of 
$2, 199, is one of the best values on the laser printer 
market today. 

For more information on these products and 
many others to appear in the new 1988 Radio 
Shack Computer Catalog, visit your Radio Shack 
Computer Center. 



124 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 




flware 



^ Just For the Fun of It t3 

Order any item by December 31, 1987 and you may have your choice of 
either the Silly Syntax story creation game (including two stories) or the 
Flying Tigers arcade game for only $1,95! 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Calligrapher - (Hybrid basic/ml) 
Turn your CoCo and dot-matrix printer 
into a calligrapher's quill. Make beautiful 
invitations, flyers, certificates, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are Vz 
inch high and variably spaced. Works with 
ma.ny printers including Epson, Gemini, 
Radio Shack, Okidata 92A, Banana and 
Prowriter. Additional fonts are available 
(see below). Tape/Disk; $2-1.95. 

OSO Calligrapher - (C) Although a 

different program from the CoCo Calligra- 
pher, the OS9 Calligrapher prints all the 
sa.rne fonts. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and formatting direc- 
tives. You may specify the font to use, 
change fonts at any time, centering, left, 
right or full justification, line fill, margin, 
line width, page size, page break and in- 
dentation. Similar to lr off on UNIXtm sys- 
tems. Includes Gay Nineties, Old English 
and Cartoon fonts. Additional fonts are 
available (see below). Disk only; OS9 Level 
lor II; $24.05. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $14.95 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - (8 fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
way; Set #3 - (8 fonts) Antique and Busi- 
ness; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West and 
Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, He- 
brew and Victorian; Set #Q - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; speci- 
fy RSDOS or OS9; 29.95: Font Pack- 
age #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 
fonts) on one disk. Font Package #2 - 
Above font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on 
one disk. Both Packages #1 and #2 (51 
fonts) on one disk; 49.05. 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Every- 
thing!) specify RSDOS or OS9; Includes 
the Calligrapher and both Font Pack- 
ages on two disks; $09.05. 



UTILITIES 

Plratector - [ioo% ML) Utility to allow 
your own dish-based BASIC or ML pro- 
grams to display a graphics title screen 
and then self-start after loading. Adds 
copy protection to your programs but still 
allows users to create non-executable back- 
ups! Includes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo 

1, 2, 3 (except Sernigraf); $39.95. 

Super Screen Machine - {ioo% ml) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. Smooth 
scroll, key click, lower case with colored 
characters. Tape/Disk; 32K CB; CoCo 1, 

2, 3 (except 64K mode); $10.95. 



Color Disk Manager - (ioo% ml) Disk 
utility with these features: Disk repair, 
selective track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except for 64K 
mode); $24.95. 

Color Tape Manager - {\oo% ML) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert ML programs into DATA state- 
ments, append ML to BASIC, much more! 
Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except 
for 64K mode); $10.05. 

OS9 Patcher - (C) Display and modify 
the contents of a file or memory module. 
Hexidecimal, decimal and ASCII modes. 
Search feature. Calculates module CRCs; 
Generates patch command files. Disk only; 
OS9 Level I or II; $10.05. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (Hybrid basic/ml) Tape or disk, 
fast and simple general data base program. 
Create files of records that can be quickly 
sorted, searched, deleted and updated. 
Powerful printer formatting. Up to 8 user 
fields, sort on up to 3 fields. Tape/Disk; 
$10.05 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Mail - (Hybrid basic/ml) Tape or 
Disk based mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 1, 
2 or 3 across, 2Va to 4 inches wide. 
Ta.pe/Disk; $10.05 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Utility 
companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail to al- 
low multi-term search (AND and OR log- 
ic), global change and delete, split large 
files and more! Tape/Disk; $14.05 (see 
combo pkg below). 



TIMS Combo Package - All three of 
the above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail 
and TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.95. 



SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer. Disk only; $10.95 each. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Trig Attack - (100% ML) Ages 9 and up. In 
this educational arcade game, enemy trigs 
travel along math curves. Players learn im- 
portant mathematical concepts as they 
play. Sound effects, colorful graphics. Ex- 
cellent manual includes an introduction to 
trigonometry. Tape 16K CB/Disk 32K 
ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3; $19.05. 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Silly Syntax - (Hybrid basic/ml) Ages 5 and 
up. Story creation game; output to screen 
or printer; includes 2 stories or create your 
own. Tape/Disk; $19.05 or disk with 62 
stories for $20.05. Sets of 10 stories on 
tape/disk for $4.05: Fairy Tales, Current 
Events, X-Rated, Sing-Along. Adventure, 
Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
BASIC/ML) Ages 4 & up. A graphics adven- 
ture game for young children & their fami- 
lies. Old testament. Tape/Disk; $10.95. 

The Presidents of the USA - (100% ML) 
Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, user 
modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape/Disk; 16K ECB: $10.05. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 and tip. Trivia 
game of the 50 states. Capitals, nick- 
names, abbreviations, flowers, trees and 
birds. Tape/Disk; 16KECB; $19.95. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist to the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word vo- 
cabulary. Tape/Disk; 1BK ECB; $19.95. 

PreReader - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 3-5 
(level I); Ages 5-7 (level 2): Great graphics 
and music. Level 1: ma.tch colors, shapes, 
letters and numbers; Level 2: match letters 
and consonant blends with their sounds. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $10.95. 

Statgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
print graph with screen print program 
(not supplied); Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
pense categories. This program may be lax 
deductible. Disk only; $29.05. 

Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations common- 
ly used in design or evaluation of land 
mobile radio systems, satellite TV, etc. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set-in Sleeve; 3 weights 
or yarn; 8 sizes from baby to man. 
Tape/Disk; $10.95. 

Flying Tigers - (100% ML) Fast Defenders 
style arcade game. 5 levels of difficulty; 
Outstanding graphics and sound effects. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; S19.95. 




"TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on Ike CoCo 1, 2 and 3, $SK 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.50 per tape or disk for postage and handling. 
Florida residents add 6% sales tax. COD orders 
add $4. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders generally 
shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds or exchanges 
without prior authorization. 



\ 



Commanding the Pack 



By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 



/ read a question in your column in 
the August 1987 issue from Daryl 
Fortney. He said his RS-232 Pro- 
gram Pak wouldn't function on the 
CoCo 3 properly. The problem wasn't 
CoCo 3 incompatibility but the com- 
mand he issued to start the pack 's 
program. He should use EXEC &HE010 
instead of &HC000. This change was 
made clear in CoCo 3 manuals. 

Clay G. Kunz 
Colorado Springs, CO 



Thanks for keeping me honest. 



Code on Call 



/ must disagree with your answer to 
Lee Steensland (Page 127, Sep- 
tember J 9 87). He's looking for an 
Xmodem program to run under RS 
DOS. I've been using Xcom9 (which 
you recommended) and have modified 
the source code — it 's a super program, 
but requires OS-9, and would be very 
difficult to convert to RS DOS. I think 



Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 

1 26 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 




he'd be better off trying to modify Greg- 
E-Term or MikeyTerm. 

James A. Sanford 
Hampton, VA 



O The reason I mentioned Xcom9 is 
•^-^Lthat the source code for it is read- 
ily available. For Greg-E-Term and 
MikeyTerm, it is not. 

Gray Drives with CoCo 3 

I'm thinking about buying a CoCo3, 
but I have two of the gray drives 
\& Extended Color BASIC 1.0. What do 



I have to do to make them work with 
the CoCo 3? 

Aaron Wadkins 
Kernersville, NC 

Ty If you want to run your CoCo at 
r )C 2 MHz and /or use OS-9 Level II, 
you will need to replace your 12-volt 
disk controller. If one MHz suffices, 
you will need a CoCo 3-ized Multi-pak 
to supply the 12 volts or make some 
hardware modifications to supply it. 

Telewriter 64 Fix 

/ have the tape version of Telewriter 
64. / read an article in the September 
1985 issue of HOT CoCo that dealt 
with program hang-ups on double 
letters; however, this "fix" only deals 
with the disk version. Is there a way to 
fix the version that I have? 

James Zoyiopulos 
Peterborough, NH 

1^ The following patch makes the 
/L original tape version of Telewriter 
64 compatible with the newer BASIC 1.1 
and 1.2 ROMs: 

59 CLDRDM" " , DF : G05UB 500: 
PDKE39,PEEK(214): PDKE40, 
PEEI<(215) : GD5UB330 

500 PDKE[]F + 7931,PEEK(40960) : 
PDKEQF+7932 , PEEK [ 40961 ) 

510 PDI<EOF + B207,PEEK(40960) : 
PDKEDF+B208 , PEEK ( 40961 ) 

520 P0KEQF+972B , PEEK [ 40960 ) : 
PDKEOF+9729 , PEEK ( 4.0961 ) 

530 RETURN 



MC-10 Compatibility 

purchased (by mistake) some 
TXmicro-computer games for the MC- 
%3l0. How can I get them to run on my 
64K CoCo 1? They load OK, but won't 
run. Is there some peek or poke that I 
need? Doesn't the MC-10 use the same 
BASIC as the Co Co? 

Edward Poter 
Cherry Hill, NJ 

Ty The tapes are in the same format, 
/C but the BASIC interpreter's tokens 
have different values. The MC-10, in 
addition to having a different memory 
map, uses a 6803 microprocessor where- 
as the CoCo uses a 6809, which has a 
different machine language instruction 
set. If the programs are in BASIC, refer 
to Dan Downard's article "Opening 
CoCo's Library to the MC-10" which 
appeared in the October 1983 issue of 
RAINBOW. It contained a cross-reference 
listing of BASIC tokens as well as an 
assembler listing of a program to per- 
form the conversion. If they are in 
machine language, theconversion is not 
worth the effort. 



Drive Track Transfers 

I I have a CoCo 3 with an original gray 
disk drive and a TRS-80 Model I 
with Drive 1, plus the latest CoCo 
drive controller. I recently acquired a 
pair of Mitsubishi drives, which are 
double-sided, and would like to use 
them with the Model 1 drive in the 35- 
track configuration, or as 0-1-2-3 in the 
40-track format. I have OS-9 Level II 
and can use the drives as two 40-track, 
double-sided drives with no trouble. I 
would also like to know if I can transfer 
OS-9 and BAS/C09 to a 40-track disk. I 
have tried, but all I get is Error #249. 



Is there a way to transfer 35-track disks 
to 40-track? 

Bill Clark 
New Paltz, NY 

l^, If you use the old Radio Shack 
/L drives along with the new ones 
(four drives total), you will need a four- 
drive cable with missing teeth where the 
old Radio Shack drives are to be con- 
nected, because those old drives do not 
have drive select jumpers. Note that 
with four drives hooked up, you cannot 
use the double-sided option under OS- 
9, because the side select signal would 
be used for the selection of Drive 3. If 
you decide to go with three drives, you 
can have your two new drives running 
double-sided under OS-9 Level II. You 
can transfer 35-track disks to 40-track 
disks using the COPY command or 
piping the output from D5AVE. BACKUP 
will only work with like-formatted 
disks. 

Patching HSCREEN 

Is there a way to prevent the 
HSCREEN command from clearing 
\3 the screen on the CoCo 3? 

David Hanson 
Salt Lake City, UT 

Since BASIC on the CoCo 3 is all 
A ^in RAM, you can patch it by 
poking addresses &HE6C6 and &HE6C7 
with &H12. 

Manual Miscall 

BOn Page 164 of the CoCo 3 ECB 
manual, there is a sample program 
demonstrating GET and PUT in 
PMCIDE 3. Line 25 dimensions a two- 
dimensional array that uses 2,228 bytes. 
However, I can substitute DIM (12) and 
use only 83 bytes, and the program 



works just fine. I've found that the same 
technique works in PMDDE 4, but the 
manual implies that all such array must 
be two-dimensional. What gives? 

David Francis 
Prospect, KY 



The manual is wrong. 



Pak and Pin Problems 



My modem won 7 receive any incom- 
ing signal from the RS-232 Program 
v3 Pak. I can dial out with the modem 
but cannot see incoming data on my 
monitor. The RS-232 will not run the 
printer at all. Everything else works 
jine. My computer is a CoCo 2 Revision 
B. Is Pin 2 preventing the printer from 
sending the ready signal? Also, do you 
know of any way that I can get a dia- 
gram for my revision CoCo? 

Ricky Sutphin 
Henry, VA 

\\y Pin 1 on your computer corre- 
/^sponds to a status line, Pin 2 to 
RS-232 IN, Pin 3 to ground and Pin 4 
to RS-232 OUT. To aid in repair, Radio 
Shack sells service manuals for all 
versions of the CoCo. For example, the 
CoCo 3 (Model 26-3334) has a repair 
manual number of MS-2603334, which 
is "MS-" followed by the model number 
of the machine. The manuals contain 
full schematics and troubleshooting 
information that you are looking for. 
The manuals must be ordered from 
National Parts as they are not stocked 
by most dealers. 

Unnecessary Upgrade 

II have a 64 K CoCo 2 (32 K RAM), 
Revision B that I want to upgrade to 
64 K. I purchased a 64 K upgrade kit 
from Howard Medical Computers, but 



V 






check 
order 
dents 

ease add 6%, sales tax 

TEPCO 

30 Water Street 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 127 



it was for the current Korean unit. I sent 
it back and did not reorder because the 
directions state that after the kit is 
installed I should have 22839 bytes of 
RAM. My computer already has that 
amount. I am confused that installing 
an upgrade does not increase available 
RAM. Any help as to chips to replace 
and cuts or jumpers will be appreciated. 

Joseph Calif ano 
New Port Richey, FL 

\y The installation of new 64K mem- 
/L ory chips in your unit will not 
make more memory available to Disk 
Extended BASIC. In fact, you already 
have 64K memory chips. The upper 32K 
is occupied by the RASlC interpreter. 



OS-9 PASCAL Patch 

f^j When J try to run PASCAL under OS- 
□ 9 Level II, it immediately aborts with 
Wi Error #216, Pathname Not Found. Is 
there a fix? 

Mark Goldberg 
Bronx, N Y 

Ty Thanks to Greg Law for the fol- 
lowing information: In the pro- 
gram PASCAL there is a minor bug in the 
specification of the access mode for the 
open calls of the two files Pasca l_Com- 
pi ler and PascaiErrs. As distrib- 
uted, those two files are in the execution 
directory. When PASCAL opens those 
two files in the RERD mode, it attempts 




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to locate them in the current data 
directory. The following patch changes 
the access modes of the open calls to 
EXECUTE+RERD so that they are cor- 
rectly located in the current execution 
directory: 

load pascal 
modpatch -s 

I Pascal 

c 0G97 21 25 
c 1G92 21 25 
kj 

After the patch is made, use the 
Level I save utility, which is Level 

II compatible, to put the patched 
version of PASCAL on disk. 

Greg also offers the following 
patch, which makes the Level I, 
Version 2 login command compat- 
ible with Level II. Using it with the 
Level I version of tsmon, which does 
not require a patch, you can amaze 
your friends who own inferior ma- 
chines with a real time-sharing sys- 
tem. 



load login 
modpatch -s 
1 login 
c 0052 20 43 
c 0053 30 20 
c 0054 31 32 
c 0057 32 30 
c 005a 30 31 
c 0065 20 49 
c 00Ga 30 20 
c 00Gb 31 32 
c 006e 32 30 
c 0071 30 31 
c 0234 10 If 
c 0235 be 02 
c 0236 00 10 
c 0237 4b 3f 
c 0238 ed lc 
c 0239 29 12 
c 049b 3d GG 
c 049c 45 15 
C049d 47 73 



For a quicker response, your 
questions may also be submitted 
through rainbow's CoCo SIG on 
Delphi. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick Rainbow Magazine 
Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type ASK for "Ask 
the Experts" to arrive at the EX- 
PERT!^ prompt, where you can 
select the "Doctor ASCII" online 
form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



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128 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



4b 




Acc e ssories 



Printer Muffler 80 — 
Quiet at Last 



Dot matrix printers are definitely 
nice to have, what with all the neat 
things they can do — everything from 
letter-quality typing to halftone graph- 
ics — but they are noisy! 

The sound of pins hitting paper is like 
nothing else on earth, except, perhaps, 
fingernails on a chalkboard. While we 
may have gotten used to this sort of 
racket that may not be true of our 
spouses, children, parents, roommates, 
co-workers, etc. 

Laser printers are nice, but the high 
price makes them a dubious choice 
unless you're doing a lot of printing. 
Thermal transfer printers are certainly 
quiet, but they're rather limited in their 



capabilities and have a habit of finishing 
off ribbons in a hurry. The one solution 
left is to put the printer someplace 
where it won't be heard — into a Kens- 
ington Printer Muffler. 

The Printer Muffler is a large, gray 
plastic box lined with foam to absorb 
sound; the lid is clear plastic to allow 
you to watch printer operation without 
opening it. There are two models: The 
Muffler 80, which we tested, has interior 
dimensions of 1 9-by- 1 6 !/i -by-6 inches 
and holds most 80-column dot matrix 
printers, while the Muffler 132 meas- 
ures 25-by-17-by-8 inches inside and is 
designed for the smaller wide-carriage 
printers (it may hold some daisy wheel 



printers, as well). Both models have 
slots in the back for paper entry and 
exit, and slots at the left and right rear 
for cables. 

The Printer Muffler is shipped unas- 
sembled, but assembly is no problem; 
three screws hold each of the four 
corners together, and when all corners 
are fastened, the whole assembly is 
solid. The interesting part is the bottom 
— there isn't any. The Muffler sits on 
a table top (or the top of a printer floor 
stand), and the only thing between the 
printer and the table is a piece of foam, 
which has a slot cut out for use with 
bottom-fed printers on floor stands. 
The problem here is that the printer 
Muffler must sit entirely on the table 
and can't extend past the table top. 
Since the Printer Muffler is so much 
larger than the printers it's used with, 
you may find you no longer have a 
convenient spot for paper. Kensington's 
solution to that is a $30 Printer Muffler 
Stand that forms a base for the Muffler, 



NovembeM987 THE RAINBOW 129 



elevates it above the table and provides 
space under the Muffler for paper. 

What about the noise? Kensington 
claims that an independent lab meas- 
ured a sound level on a printer that was 
seven dB lower than what it produced 
without the Muffler. Seven dB works 
out to an attenuation figure of about 75 
to 85 percent. While we had no way to 
confirm the numbers, our listening tests 
show that the Muffler did make a real 
difference in noise levels. You still 
wouldn't want to have the printer in the 
nursery when the baby's asleep, but at 
least now you can have it in another 
room without making a racket. Al- 
though Kensington's prices may seem a 
bit steep when you look at the Printer 
Muffler, one quick "listen" will tell you 
that your money might be well spent. 

(Kensington Microware Ltd., 251 Park 
Avenue South, New York, NY 10010, 800- 
535-4242; Printer Muffler 80, $59.95; 
Muffler 132, $79.95; Muffler stand, $29.95) 

UniStand — 

Clears Way for Paper 

Ever since desktop printers came on 
the market years ago there's been one 
nagging problem — where do you put 
the paper? To put paper behind the 
printer you need about a foot of clear 
space between the back of the printer 
and the back of the table, and many of 
us don't have it. You might put the 
paper on the floor and bring it up 
behind the table, but that tends to 
require some odd and painful contor- 
tions. A printer stand is probably the 
best answer, and Microcomputer Ac- 
cessories' UniStand is a good choice. 

The UniStand is a deceptively simple 
device consisting of two "half-stands"; 
each half fits under one side of the 
printer, which allows the UniStand to 
work with printers of any width. I tried 
it on both an Epson RX-80 and a wide- 
carriage Okidata Microline 193. The 
half-stands have a relatively wide foot- 
print, and the whole assembly is quite 
stable. The printer is supported a few 
inches above the table, making room for 
a few hundred sheets of paper under- 
neath, and is tilted forward a few de- 
grees f or easier viewing. 

The UniStand also includes an "out- 
put" paper tray to catch sheets of paper 
coming out of the printer; it hangs on 
two hooks on the back of the stands. 
The tray is the proper width for 80- 
column printers, but if you use a wide 
printer you'll find that your wide paper 



is a bit wider than the tray, causing it 
to sag at the sides, and your 9/2-inch 
paper will land on the left side of the 
tray. 




Overall, the UniStand is a first-class 
product and well worth your consider- 
ation; it might make a good gift for a 
computer-using friend, because you 
don't have to know which printer your 
friend has! 

(Microcomputer Accessories, 5405 Jandy 
Place, Los Angeles, CA 90066, 213-301- 
9400; $19.95) 

— Ed Ellers 



Softwa re- 



C0C0 1, 2 & 3 



IRA Analysis — 
A Wise Investment 



In the current era of Reaganomics 
there are precious few truly excellent 
tax shelter investment opportunities 
available in the private sector. The 
I.R.A. (Independent Retirement Ac- 
count) stands alone as the most access- 
ible and reasonable choice for the small 
investor. With the release of IRA Anal- 
ysis 1.1.2, A to Z Unlimited has pro- 
vided the C0C0 Community with a gem 
of a program. 

IRA is extremely powerful and use- 
ful. From the opening screen graphics 
to the final printed output, the hall- 
marks of careful planning and attention 
to detail are evident. While the printed 
documentation is scanty (approxi- 
mately 100 words detailing warranty 
and update policies), the on-screen help 
and totally self-prompting nature of the 
program eliminate the need for any 
printed documentation. Indeed, with 
the detailed error trapping that is pro- 
vided, a career accountant with consid- 



erable experience was unable to force a 
program error. 

IRA Analysis is very much like a 
good hammer — an excellent tool for 
a very particular job. The user is 
prompted to input marital status, 
spouse employment, initial deposit, and 
second year on deposits. The user's 
current age is entered, together with the 
anticipated age of account withdrawal, 
expected interest and the number of 
times the interest is to be compounded 
yearly. IRA then outputs an abbre- 
viated account total to the screen and 
directs a professional hard copy of the 
analysis to the printer. Literally hours 
of work are reduced to a few minutes. 

Independent retirement accounts are 
subject to a great deal of present and 
pending legislation. Exceptions to the 
current contribution limits are encoun- 
tered when pre-existing accounts are 
"rolled over" into new, higher yielding 
accounts. IRA provides a Rollover 
option that allows the program to 
continue without flagging an error 
condition. Version 1.1.2 of IRA incor- 
porates all current federal regulations 
regarding maximum contributions per 
year and the effects of a working or non- 
working spouse. Anticipating changes 
in the federal regulations, the authors 
have stated a policy of current upgrades 
being made available to registered users 
for a nominal fee. 

Despite the glamorous packaging 
and excellent error trapping, IRA could 
benefit from some type of disk I/O 
routine that would allow saves of the 
calculated results. 

IRA marks the advent of a trend in 
C0C0 software packaging that may 
bode well for the future. Upon booting 
the program, the user is prompted to 
specify which C0C0 the program will be 
run on, C0C0 1, 2 or 3. IRA then loads 
the proper version, taking full advan- 
tage of the enhanced display of the 
C0C0 3, while providing fully func- 
tional versions for the C0C0 J and 2. 

Unfortunately, the authors have also 
chosen to maintain, and even enhance, 
another evolving trend — copy protec- 
tion. IRA is furnished on a copy- 
protected, password-protected disk. A 
non-functional backup may be created 
to "refresh" the original disk. The media 
warranty is quite restrictive: $5 replace- 
ment fee for failure within 90 days, $10 
if failure occurs after 90 days. The 
authors apparently have chosen to 
extend copy protection with a financial 
penalty for registered users who expe- 
rience incidental disk or system failures. 

While the program is well-conceived 



1 30 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



and efficient, the authors might recon- 
sider their position on replacement 
charges. IRA is fairly priced, but, as a 
single application package, it will be of 
limited use to the private consumer. 

(A to Z Unlimited, Software Division, 901 
Ferndale Blvd., High Point, NC 27260; 919- 
882-6255, $29.95) 

— Henry Holzgrcfe 



Softwa re- 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



Trig A ttack — 
Math Learning 
Made Fun 

Trig Attack is an educational game 
that helps teach trigonometry and 
geometry concepts. The program is 
provided on tape or disk and is copy- 
protected. It runs on any Extended 
Color BASIC Computer with a minimum 
of 16K RAM and ajoystick. It also runs 
on the CoCo 3, but you have to use a 
TV set or a monitor with composite 
video input to see the colors. Otherwise, 
you get a black-and-white picture on an 
RGB monitor. 




After you load the program, a title 
screen appears along with sound effects. 
Pressing ENTER allows you to change 
options, which include screen color and 
skill level. Pressing the firebutton starts 
the game. 

The game screen displays the score 
and reserve "rotating slopes," or men. 
These are used to destroy the Trigs, 
geometric aliens that travel across the 
screen in a pattern corresponding to a 
specified graph or trigonometric func- 
tion. To destroy the Trigs and earn 
points, you must align your rotating 
slope with the Trigs. The Trigs will not 
be destroyed until your rotating slope 
matches the Trigs' angle of travel. 
Pressing the firebutton changes your 
rotating angle in increments that match 
those of the Trigs. 



You also encounter rotating Trig 
Slopes that travel along the same path 
as the Trigs. Contact with these guys 
results in the loss of one of your rotating 
slopes. It is also possible to run out of 
fuel, so you must capture fuel contain- 
ers on occasion by passing over them 
with your rotating slope. A fuel gauge 
is displayed at the top of the screen, so 
keep an eye on it as well as all of the 
other action. 

While all of this may sound confus- 
ing, you will have to play the game in 
order to appreciate its capabilities. The 
graphics are good — not great, com- 
pared with the capabilities of the CoCo 
3, yet typical of CoCo 1 and 2 fare. The 
action is smooth and fast-paced, and 
won't leave you bored. 

A 1 0-page instruction booklet defines 
various trigonometric and geometric 
terms and provides graphs that illus- 
trate basic concepts. While the program 
and documentation are not intended to 
teach these subjects, they do provide a 
basic approach to help in understanding 
them. A total of 11 levels of play are 
provided, and as your skills advance, 
you encounter Trigs that travel along 
paths representing sine, cosine, tangent, 
ellipse, parabola, hyperbola, and loga- 
rithmic functions. 

Trig Attack is basically a shoot-'em- 
up game, but it is refreshing to see 
entertainment coupled with a learning 
experience. 

(Sugar Software, P.O. Box 7446, Holly- 
wood, FL 33081, 305-981-1241; $19.95) 

— David Gerald 



Sof tware 



CoCo 1, 2 &3 



Color File II — 
Convenient Filing 
System 

Color File //is a filing system for any 
version of the Color Computer with at 
least 16K of RAM. Since this program 
comes on a ROM pack, all you need to 
do is plug it into the cartridge port on 
the side of your computer (before you 
turn on the computer!). However, in 
order to save the files that you are 
working on, you will need to hook a 
cassette recorder to your computer. 

Af ter the program is running, you can 
choose one of four screen options: no 
lowercase, green on black f or lowercase, 
black on green f or lowercase, or Tandy's 



lowercase (only available with the 
CoCo 3). 

If you are using the CoCo 3, you can 
format the program for use with either 
a color or black-and-white TV, a mono- 
chrome monitor, a color composite 
monitor, or an RGB monitor. Mono- 
chrome and RGB monitors allow two 
modes of screen resolution, 38- or 80- 
column. TVs and composite monitors 
do not allow 80-column screens. 

If you want to load an old file, follow 
the prompts on the screen. If you are 
going to create a new file, you will be 
asked for a filename; after choosing 
one, you advance to the new file screen 
where you can have files made in one 
of the preset formats. When you have 
chosen the file type you would like to 
work with, you advance to the Create 
Field Format screen. Exiting this screen 
takes you to the main menu. 

The main menu gives you the choice 
of seven options. Option I lets you do 
the actual work of creating your file. At 
the bottom of the screen is a group of 
eight commands which use the CLEAR 
key and command number on the CoCo 
1 or 2, or the ALT key and command 
number on the CoCo 3. Although it is 
not mentioned in the instruction book- 
let, paging up and down through the 
records you have created is controlled 
by the CLEAR key and the left and right 
arrow keys. 

Option 2 allows you to get a hard 
copy of your records. The first thing to 
do when using this option is to format 
the file you want to print. Select the field 
you want to print by using the CLEAR 
key and the up or down arrow key. After 
selecting the field, you must insert a 
print code for each character you want 
printed. 

Option 3 loads a file from cassette. 
Option 4 lets you create a new file (if you 
use this option, you will erase any file 
that is in the computer's memory). 
Option 5 saves a file to cassette. Option 
6 changes the printer options, lines per 
page, line width, margins and baud rate, 
and sets the paper to top of form. 
Option 7 changes the screen options. 

You can also create your own fields. 
In this way you can add a field, or 
change or delete any displayed field to 
customize it to your needs. When you 
are entering files, you can use the Search 
option to search for any record that 
contains your specified criteria. You can 
also sort records the same way. 

This a good program, and it does 
everything it is advertised to do. I have 
the original Color File, and I like the 
extra options of this version. I have to 

November 1987 THE RAINBOW 131 



say that the instructions are a bare- 
bones affair. There is nothing in the 
documentation about how to page up or 
down, and the two pages of material on 
setting up the print format are not very 
clear. But all in all, Color File 11 is 
convenient and easy to use. I especially 
like the use of the command keys. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102, 817-390- 
3300; $24.95. Available in Radio Shack 
stores nationwide.) 



— John H. Appel 



Software 



CoCo 3 



Vegas Slots — 
Beat the One-Armed 
Bandits 

If you like to gamble with slot ma- 
chines but don't like the possibility of 
losing, then Vegas Slots is just the thing 
for you. It allows you to get your hands 
on these one-armed bandits without 
putting out the money for plane fare to 
Las Vegas — and you can stay in your 
own room f or f ree. And, when you lose 
all your money, you won't have to check 
out early and hitchhike home. One 
thing is for sure — after playing, you 
will know for certain why these ma- 
chines are called bandits. 

The disk contains seven different slot 
machine games. You get three one-line 
multipliers, two three-line pays and two 
five-line pays. Just like playing the real 
machines in Vegas, you can choose your 
odds. Of course, the machines with the 
lower odds have the lower payoffs, [f 
you want to see what the payoffs are, 
press P to get a list before you "insert" 
your coins. 

The seven machines include Multi- 
Bars, Fruit MultiBars, Melons and 
Bars, Fruit, Bar 5, Lucky Dollar, and 
Right-Left/ Left-Right. I cannot say 
that all the machines play exactly like 
the real slots, but I sure lost a lot of 
money. The nice thing was that I could 
keep getting more money and, eventu- 
ally, a payoff. Still, I sure am glad it was 
not my money I was playing with. 

Vegas Slots requires a 128K Color 
Computer 3 with one disk drive. Joy- 
sticks are optional, and while a color 
monitor is not required, you will prob- 
ably want to use one or a color TV over 



a monochrome monitor. It does have 
some colorful screens. The program 
supports both types of monitors, and 
when loading, it asks if you are using 
composite or RGB. The documentation 
is only one page; it doesn't take a lot of 
instructions for inserting coins and 
watching the screen. 



CREDITS PLAY »jj COINS 

PflVS OtOY OH LIT LINKS 



INSERT 
COIN 



(Tom Mix Software, 4285 Bradford NE, 
Grand Rapids, MI 49506, 616-957-0444; 
$34.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Dale Shell 



Softw are- 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



The Lansford 
Mansion — 
Discover the Secrets 
of ESP 

The Lansford Mansion is a very good 
Adventure game for the CoCo. For 
those who aren't familiar with Adven- 
ture games, they differ from the arcade- 
type games, which rely on eye-hand 
coordination, in that they exercise your 
brain. 

Through the magic of your computer 
and the program, you become the main 
character in the story. You are able to 
enter new and strange places without 
ever leaving your chair. Your own logic 
and imagination determine the actions 
of the hero (you), and guide the story 
from start to a sometimes untimely 
finish. You are presented a series of 
locations, items, characters and events 
and interact with the story in a number 
of ways, moving from place to place, 
becoming familiar with your surround- 
ings, exploring locations and examining 
articles found. 

An important part of Adventure 
games is puzzle-solving. Encountering a 



locked door or a ferocious beast block- 
ing your path is a challenge to be 
conquered by using certain items you 
find through careful exploration (e.g., a 
key can open a door, a sword can slay 
a dragon). 

The fun of the game is bypassing 
these obstacles, finding treasures, 
avoiding being eaten by exotic crea- 
tures, and solving diabolical puzzles. 

The program tells you where you are, 
anything obvious you should know 
about the situation (the subtleties are 
for you to discover), and then awaits 
your response. Instructions are entered 
via the keyboard 

The Lansford Mansion scenario is set 
many, many years ago in a remote 
country, where a boy named Robert 
Lansford was born. Soon after his birth, 
it was obvious that he was no ordinary 
child. He was extremely smart and 
interested in many things. Most of all, 
he was interested in ESP. After becom- 
ing rich and famous, he built a mansion 
where he lived for the rest of his life, 
working on a strange project. He died 
at the age of 60 and left a rather strange 
will. 

It reads: "I, Robert Lansford, leave 
all that I own to the person who can find 
my personal notes. I have hidden them 
somewhere in my mansion. These notes 
contain all that I have discovered about 
ESP. The secrets in them can give a 
person great power. The only way to 
find them is to collect the treasures I 
have hidden in and around my man- 
sion." Your Adventure begins. 

The Lansford Mansion is a well- 
planned game using all the capabilities 
of the CoCo. In addition to the text, The 
Lansford Mansion has graphics. When 
you are in the hall, a picture of the hall 
appears. You can see the items in the 
room. If you have a speech pack, the 
Adventure even talks to you! 

This program hooks you. The diabol- 
ically creative mind of the programmer 
keeps you at the keyboard for hours, 
and those hours pass rapidly. As you 
solve each of the puzzles and advance 
further into the Adventure, time be- 
comes a relative thing. 

Keeping that in mind, I would recom- 
mend The Lansford Mansion. It is well- 
designed and takes advantage of the 
CoCo's ability to give your mind a 
workout. 

(Diecom Products Inc., 6715 Fifth Line, 
Milton, Ontario, Canada L9T 2X8, 416-878- 
8358; $38.95 U.S.; $52.95 CND) 

— Bruce Rothermel 



132 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Soft ware 



CoCo3 



Hi-Res III- 
Fancy Screens 
the Easy Way 



HhRes III is a utility program that 
enhances the CoCo 3 text display. 

After the program is loaded, the user 
has a multitude of options for text 
display, accessed with combinations of 
the CTRL key or CLEAR key followed by 
other single-key commands. 

The default display of the program is 
80 columns by 24 lines. This can readily 
be changed from 14 to 212 characters 
per line (displays of up to 128 characters 
are easily read on the CM-8 monitor). 
Font styles can be changed from regular 
to italic, bold, underline, double-wide, 
double-height, etc., with simple key- 
board commands. Reverse video is also 
available, and the white on black text 
is exceptionally sharp. Other color 
combinations can be defined with the 
use of the CoCo 3 palette command 
(palettes 0 and 1 supported). 

In addition to the text variations, a 
number of other useful functions are 
implemented. Toggles for blinking/ 
non-blinking cursor, standard / Hi-res 
display, reverse/ normal video, destruc- 
tive/non-destructive cursor, underline 
on/ off, etc., add to the program's 
power. Many editing features are in- 
cluded, as well as the ability to "protect" 
text lines, a particularly powerful fea- 
ture. A variable speed key-repeat func- 
tion has also been added. 

For ease of use in incorporating the 
functions into your own programs, all 
of the keyboard functions can be ac- 
cessed via simple print statements (e.g. 
PRINT CHR$(27);"I" would turn on 
italics). Compatibility with existing 
BASIC programs is good, though com- 
plicated mainly by the PRINT @ state- 
ments which, of course, would not 
position characters the same for differ- 
ent character widths. However, even the 
simplest of BASIC programs are easily 
made to have impressive displays. 

Documentation is well-written, and 
due to ease of program use, only a quick 
scan is needed to begin experimenting 
with the features of the program. The 
program is supplied on a single non- 
protected disk for user convenience. 

Cer-Comp and author Bill Vergona 
have again managed to put together a 
package which accesses the full power 



of the CoCo. If you have a high- 
resolution monitor and CoCo 3, I 
highly recommend Hi-Res HI. 

(Cer-Comp, 5566 Ricochet Avenue, Las 
Vegas, NV 89110, 702-452-0632; $34.95) 

— Leonard Hyre 



ionware 



CoCo 1,2 &3 OS-9 



Rescue on Fractalus 
— Bag the Jaggies 

In the rush to get software to market 
for the CoCo 3, we have seen some 
revised programs, some new programs 
and some translations from other com- 
puters. One such translation is Rescue 
on Fractalus from Epyx Computer 
Software. 

1 remember when I walked into my 
local Radio Shack and saw the amazing 
Hi-Res game, Koronis Rift, also made 
by Epyx. That program was enough to 
influence me to buy a CoCo 3. Now that 
I have one, I jump at the opportunity 
to buy new programs. Rescue on Frac- 
talus is one of the many programs 1 have 
bought, and I must say it is one of the 
best games for the CoCo 3. Although 
both Koronis Rift and Rescue on Frac- 
talus have similar graphics, Rescue on 
Fractalus is easier to understand. 





"You have just joined an elite Rescue 
Squadron, flying to the hostile planet 
Fractalus to confront the ruthless 
enemy Jaggies head-on. The mission is 
to rescue Ethercorps pilots shot down 
and stranded on that brutal planet, and 
help lead our forces to victory ... for 
the merciless Jaggi onslaught must be 
stopped to preserve the future of the 
galaxy." 

The sound could have been better but 
the graphics more than make up for it. 
The game gives a three-dimensional 
perspective of the landscape out the 



main window of your Valkyrie Fighter. 
From time to time, when I was soaring 
through the vast canyons of Fractalus 
with the gun emplacements firing down 
on me and the suicide saucers nearly 
hitting me, 1 was reminded of the 
Tower/ Trench sequence from the Star 
Wars arcade game. This inevitable 
comparison is an example of the sophis- 
tication but ease of game play. 

The cockpit is equipped with an 
assortment of gauges not so different 
from that of most simple flight simula- 
tors. A compass and the score are at the 
top of the screen. On the left panel are 
gauges for monitoring the thrust level 
and for warning you of dangerous 
altitudes. 

On the right panel are three lights. 
The first light indicates that the Dirac 
Mirror Shield is on. The second light 
indicates the presence of your mother- 
ship. And the last light indicates that the 
air lock is open. 

There are also indicators to show 
pilot range, the number of enemies 
destroyed and the number of pilots 
rescued. The center panel contains a 
gauge to show the current bank and 
climb, the altimeter, a targeting scope, 
an enemy lock-on indicator, an energy- 
level indicator and a long-range 
scanner. 

The joystick is used for flight and for 
choosing a skill level. The firebutton is 
used to launch your ship's Anti-Matter 
Bubble Torpedoes. It is easier to main- 
tain more stable flight with the use of 
a deluxe joystick. 

There are very few keyboard com- 
mands for use outside the initial pro- 
gram. SHIFT-ESC exits the program to 
OS-9, CTRL-R restarts the game, and the 
space bar pauses the game. As for the 
actual game-play keys, the A key opens 
the air lock to let pilots in; the B key fires 
the boosters for traveling to the moth- 
ership; the L key lands the ship; the S 
key shuts off the systems; and the "less 
than" (<) and "greater than" (>) keys 
decrease and increase thrust. The 
"greater than" key also acts as a "launch 
key." 

Rescue on Fractalus has some sur- 
prises in it (watch out for the pilots in 
green helmets, because they are too 
eager to meet you). And, if you are like 
me, you will find yourself so caught up 
in the action that you'll be dodging from 
side to side in time with the motion of 
the ship. 

(Epyx Computer Software; $29.95. Availa- 
ble in Radio Shack stores nationwide.) 

— Glen Baisley 
November 1987 THE RAINBOW 133 



TOM MIX'S MINI-CATALOG 

NOVASOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 




•Flight 16 

Our very newest flight simulator. A full 
instrument aircraft that features the 
following: 

• Works with all COCO's 

• Realistic flight controls 

• Flight editor included to change flight 
parameters 

• Design your own airports and flight 
areas 

• Flies like Cessna 150 

• Full graphics & sound 

Joysticks Required $34.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 




*P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator letsyou fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations 
against another player, OR a non com- 
batant computer drone. 

32K M achine Language 

Joysticks Required $34.95 

Specify Tape or Disk 

Educational 

* Teachers Database ll-Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features'. 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

■ Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

■ Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

■ Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32KTDB $42.95 



'Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 
32K Machine Languag e 
Joysticks Required $34.95 
Spec ify Tape or Disk 

'Goldfinder 

Here's the quality you've come to expect from 
TOM MIX. Endless possibilities await you in 
this exciting new creation. Move over 
Goldrunner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLDFINDER 
32K & Joysticks Required Disk $22.95 

* Dragon Slayer— Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
160 exciting screens. 

32 K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 



*COCO 3 Compatible 

M 

TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 
616/676-8172 




* Wizard's Den 

Another of our outstanding graphic 
adventures! You must recover the Gem 
of Damocles stolen by the Evil Wizard 
and hidden in his den. Dare to fight your 
way through eight levels of mazes and 
dangers. But beware the Wizard's 
magic. He can make you see things that 
don't exist! Don't stray from the path or 
it's certain death! 

64 K Joystick or Keyboard $22.95 
Disk only 



* Sailor Man-Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 


win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 


64K 


$27.95 


* The King- 




32K 


$27.95 


* Draconian— 




32K 


$22.95 


* Ms. Maze- 




32K 


$22.95 


*Kater Pillar II- 




16K 


$22.95 


* Warehouse Mutants- 




16K 


$21.95 


* Buzzard Bait- 




32K 


$22.95 


All Above Specify Tape or Disk 





FOJfFH 






cxroits JXIS 










1 


imLn 


JHS 


HU 

EKT cruw 



'Video Cards & Keno 

(Color III Only) 

Four outstanding games on one disk: 
Poker t Jokers Wild, Blackjack and Keno! 
So real you expect Wayne Newton to 
walk by! Never before have you seen 
such excellent graphics and realistic 
movement as that created in this 
package. Wanna Bet? 

$29.95, Disk only 

Also available — Vegas Slots* (Color IN 
only) — Same outstanding graphics! 
Seven of the most popular slot machine 
games found in Vegas. 

Keyboard or joystick $34.95 
Disk only 

• Many more titles-write for free catalog! 

Ordering Information 

■ Call us at 616/676-8172 
for Charge Card orders 

■ Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

• Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

• Authors— We pay top 
royalties! 




Software 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 | 



Utility Routines 
Volume II — 
Library Mainstays 

Utility Routines Volume 11 is a disk 
containing several useful utility pro- 
grams. Following is a short description 
of each program. 

Automatic Error Locator — auto- 
matically locates the error in any BASIC 
program; not just the line number, but 
the exact error itself. 

Basic Search And Replace — allows 
you to search your BASIC program for 
a given phrase and replace it with a 
given phrase. 

Calculator creates a useful calcu- 
lator for converting Hex and decimal as 
well as standard mathematical calcula- 
tions. 

Command Maker — allows you to 
create your own direct commands up to 
a maximum of 20, but it cannot be used 
within BASIC programs. 

Directory Backup — automatically 
saves a copy of the disk directory to 
Track 0. If you have a disk crash, you 
can recall the lost directory. 

DMP Character Set Editor And 
Printer — designs your own custom 
character set f or your DMP printer. 

DMP Superscrif^^— adds super- 
scripts to your DIvlS^Hter. 

Enhanced Kill — versatility to 

the BASIC KILL command by allowing 
the killing of multiple files with only a 
few keystrokes. 

Graphics Compression — Disk BASIC 
l.l users can compress their graphics 
screens for efficient storage. Instead of 
a PMODE 3 or 4 picture taking up three 
granules, you will use a maximum of 
two. You can also decompress a com- 
pressed picture. 

Last Command Repeater — lets you 
display the last typed-in command with 
two keystrokes. 

Message Mover — makes an eye- 
catching moving billboard. 

Multiple Choice Test Designer — 
creates multiple-choice tests. 

New Paint — paints in 65,536 differ- 
ent PRINT combinations of styles and 
colors. (I didn't count them all.) 

ON Reset GOTO — lets you force the 
computer to GOTO a specified line in 
your BASIC program. It's really handy 
if you have to use Reset without losing 
your data. 



Program Clock — not an accurate 
time piece, but helps keep track of 
programming time. 

Super Command Keys — allows you 
to enter most ECB BASIC commands or 
phrases with only two keystrokes. 

Super Editing System — use the up/ 
down arrow keys to scroll up and down 
through your BASIC program and go 
into the Edit mode by just a press of the 
CLEAR key. 

Super Fast Sort — sorts 100 strings 
in less than 10 seconds. 

All of the programs are easy to use 
and supported with complete instruc- 
tions. Most CoCo users will find some- 
thing useful on this disk. 

Another very useful disk of utilities is 
the Utilities Bonanza. It contains the 
following programs. 

40K Disk Basic l.O — provides 64K 
users with 40K of memory instead of the 
usual 32K. Version l.l is also on the disk 
f or use with Disk BASIC l.l. 

Appointment Calendar — keeps 
track of all your weekly appointments 
and includes a clock as well. Up to 50 
appointments can be scheduled per day. 

Basic Line Copy — lets you copy a 
BASIC line, which is handy if you ever 
type in a BASIC line with the wrong line 
number. 

Basic Line Stepper — allows you to 
run your program one instruction at a 
time, which is handy for debugging 
programs. 

Bill Manager — simplifies the pay- 
ment of your bills. You can enter up to 
50 bills at a time, and it tells you when 
each one of them is due. 

Disk to Tape 1.0 — allows you to 
copy most BASIC and ML programs 
from disk and back them up to tape. A 
version to use with Disk BASIC l.l is 
also included. 

DOS Command Enhancer — lets you 
make up a custom DOS menu disk that 
utilizes the DOS command if you have 
it available. 

Double Bank — lets you use the 
upper 32K of your 64K RAM f or other 
BASIC programs along with those in the 
lower 32K. 

Enhanced LList — formats program 
listings with page number, margin 
control, perforation skip and other 
useful features. 

Enhanced RAM Disk — creates an 
"in memory" disk drive capable of 
storing 28K bytes for subsequent SflVEs 
and LOADs of BASIC and ML programs, 

Expanded BASiC — modifies CoCo's 
BASIC to give you 10 new features, 
including addition of an "Are You 
Sure?" prompt to the NEW command, as 



well as reset-protection in the 64K 
RAM mode, it also lets you use the 
CLEAR key to pause instead of the 
clumsy SHiFT-@. Other similar handy 
features are available. 

Graphics Typesetter - lets you add 
lettering to your graphic designs or 
pictures in two sizes. 

Large DMP Dump — a PMODE 3 or 
4 graphics screen dump for DMP print- 
ers, it's in BASIC, so be patient. 

Line Cross-Reference — cross- 
references all GDTOs and GOSUBs for all 
lines in a BASIC program. 

ML To Data Conversion — converts 
an ML program in memory to a BASIC 
program with DfiTR statements. 

Numeric Keypad — turns a portion 
of your keyboard into a numeric keypad 
for typing of repetitive numbers, as you 
do for DfiTR statements. 

ROM Switcher — lets you switch 
between Disk BASIC, Extended BASIC 
and Color BASIC. 

Super Disk Catalog — a disk organ- 
izer program. 

Super Tape-To-Disk Copy J .0 — 
copies BASIC and ML programs from 
cassette to disk; Plus, it will automat- 
ically relocate programs that load at 
&H600 so that they are compatible with 
the disk operating system. It will not 
copy autostart programs. 

Text Screen Dump — a single key 
activates a screen dump to your printer. 

All of these programs come with full 
documentation on operation and use. 
Most are very handy and should be 
helpful to the average CoCo user. You 
get a lot of programs for the money. 

(Microcom Software, P.O. Box 214, Fair- 
port, NY 14450, 716-223-1477; $29.95 each 
plus $3 S/H) 

— David Gerald 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



^S oftwa re— 

LOTZALUK - 
Tracks Lottery 
Drawings 

With the hope of getting rich quick, 
many people now spend a part of each 
week deciding on what numbers to pick 
and how many picks to take in state 
lotteries. It seems that those who regu- 
larly play have some type of system for 
deciding on the set of numbers to play. 

November 1987 THE RAINBOW 135 



There are those who simply pick a 
random set of six numbers and those 
who spend hours studying past lotteries 
with the hope of finding the winning 
combination. For these latter folks, you 
can now use your CoCo and the pro- 
gram LOTZA LUK to study past lotter- 
ies and compare your choices with the 
historical data. 

LOTZA LUK requires a 32K CoCo I 
or 2, or a CoCo 3 with disk system and 
a printer (printer is essential to the 
program). The program is designed to 
track the past history of a state lottery 
as well as maintain a database of user- 
or computer-generated sets of numbers 
(picks) for playing the lottery. It pro- 
vides the standard database functions of 
data input, change, delete and search. 

The program compares a given pick 
with the historical lottery data and 
provides a listing of how each pick 
matches past lottery drawings. There 
are several options for determining the 
frequency of drawing each number in 
the lottery database, for tracing the 
number of hits that a selected pick 
would have had for each of the draws 
in the history database, and for deter- 
mining which one of the picks had the 
maximum number of total hits. 

LOTZALUK comes with an histori- 
cal database that contains data for the 
first 22 drawings of the California state 
lottery. A 17-page manual is provided, 
which is well-written and clearly de- 
scribes each function of the program. It 
ran as described in the manual on my 
512K CoCo 3, with no problem. The 
author claims to have tested LOT- 
ZALUK with ADOS, OWL DOS and 
Spectrum DOS and found no problems. 
However, he did note that the program 
did not run on ADOS-3 and C DOS. 

Personally, I find the program's 
protection scheme particularly irritat- 
ing. The user must make a backup copy, 
which is then saved should the master 
become unusable (the backup is used to 
restore the master). In other words, the 
masterdisk is used as the working disk, 
with the lottery and pick data also 
recorded on it. In my opinion, one 
should never write on a master disk but 
rather use a backup disk. I am com- 
pletely in favor of software protection, 
but I do not like this approach. In 
fairness to the author, I should note that 
the program is delivered on a "flippy" 
(the program is on both sides of the 
disk). This alleviates some of my fears, 
but I would prefer the method of mak- 
ing a backup that cannot be copied. 
That way, the master can be safely 
stored to be used only when needed. 



The program provides the capability 
to track individual picks and study these 
picks versus the past history of lottery 
drawings. For many lottery players who 
take the lottery very seriously, LOT- 
ZALU K provides atool for study of the 
lottery. However, as my statistician 
friends tell me, each lottery is an inde- 
pendent event, and there is no increased 
probability for a given set of numbers 
to be drawn based on past lottery 
drawings. 

(William G. Brigance, Sr., 1001 Fairweather 
Drive, Sacramento, CA 95833, 916-927- 
6062; $29.95: First product review for this 
company appearing in THE rainbow.) 

— Donald Dollberg 



Softwar e 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



Phonebook — 
Telephone Book 
Application For 
Your CoCo 



If you are new to computing and 
looking for a simple telephone book 
application for your Color Computer, 
you may be interested in this program 
by Custom Software. 

Phonebook is a BASIC program for 
CoCos requiring I6K and a disk drive. 
The program is not copy-protected, is 
fully warranted, and faulty copies will 
be replaced for return postage. Docu- 
mentation consists of two pages of easy- 
to-understand instructions. 

The program is menu-driven and is 
very simple to use. After running 
"PHDNEBDDK", you are presented with 
the main menu options. 

Lookup Name/Number lets you type 
in a search string. Type in as much of 
either the name or phone number as you 
can remember, and the program 
searches the disk and displays the 
information on the screen. 

Edit Name/ Number lets you enter 
the search string or, if it's already on the 
screen, modify it. 

Add Name/Number lets you create 
your phonebook file. The name is 
limited to 25 characters and the phone 
number to seven digits. Instructions are 
provided to change the area code and 
exchange code to default. This elimi- 
nates the need to type in area or ex- 
change codes on repetitive entries unless 



they are different. When you are fin- 
ished, type END at any prompt to return 
to the main menu. 

Select End The Program when you 
are ready to quit. Using BREAK might 
result in loss of data. 

Two other options are provided that 
can be selected from the main menu. 
Pressing N lets you continue to the 
(n)ext occurrence of the search string. 
This is useful if you are trying to locate 
the phone number of a particular com- 
mon name that might be duplicated in 
the phonebook. You can also press L to 
go back to the (l)ast occurrence. 

Phonebook does not support a print- 
er option. This would greatly enhance 
the program because the user could 
print out a listing of names and phone 
numbers for use as a handy reference. 
As is, this is a good program that could 
be made better with printer capability. 

(Custom Software, Box 42, Long Lane, MO 
65590, 417-345-8163; $10 plus $1.50 S/H: 
First product review for this company 
appearing in THE rainbow.) 

— Jerry Semones 



^So ftware 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



H all of the King III 
— The Earthstone 
Revealed 



Hall of the King III is the conclusion 
of the three-part epic saga Hall of the 
King. At last you can conquer the very 
heart of Firrhest, the mountain home of 
the Dwarves. Hall of the King III is 
extremely well-constructed, extensive 
and complex. While the standard com- 
mand inputs are used ("East," "drop 
crowbar," etc.), this is a sophisticated 
Adventure, and I do not recommend it 
for the inexperienced or faint of heart. 

Author Glen R. Dahlgren is in his 
finest adventuring form, with his usual 
logic problems and impossible quan- 
daries resolved by straightforward 
solutions. This is serious stuff, folks. If 
I were really going into a cave or dun- 
geon, I would want Glen with me. 

Hall of the King III is not dependent 
on previous playing of the two earlier 
Adventures. However, combined, the 
three Adventures do make an awesome 
trilogy. As usual, the graphics in the 
Hall of the King III are dramatic, 
detailed and excellent. The graphics are 



136 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



so good that you get a real feel for your 
surroundings, particularly if you 
(ahem!) die in the course of the Adven- 
ture. If you are prone to accidents, 1 
recommend regularly exercising the 
save and load options of the Adventure. 
They can be used anywhere, and the life 
you save may be your own. Like other 
Prickly-Pear sof tware, this program can 
be backed up and is unconditionally 
guaranteed to run. 




The biggest problem I ran into was a 
couple of spelling errors in descriptions 
of places or things. Other than that, the 
Adventure ran smoothly. A note to 
CoCo 3 owners with an RGB monitor: 
You are going to have a monochrome 
display unless you set the palette regis- 
ters (palette x,y) where x and y are 
numbers like 10 and 13. Another pos- 
sibility is to use a color patch program 
from THE RAINBOW or one that is com- 
mercially available. Colors notwith- 
standing, the program runs fine on the 
CoCo 3. However, because of its arti- 
f acted PflODE 4 colors, with a CoCo or 
a CoCo 2 you may have to press RESET 
a long time to get the color border blue. 
Beware, CoCo 3 users! If you press 
RESET on the CoCo 3, the program 
crashes and you have to start over! 

The documentation that accompa- 
nies Hall of the King III is quite com- 
plete, explaining background, the com- 
mand structure, and how to load the 
program and run it. The program is set 
up for only one drive, and that is the 
only way it can be played. There is only 
one disk swap, and it is easily handled. 

Like its predecessors, this two-disk 
Adventure is going to take a good long 
time to solve for all but the most sea- 
soned adventurers. Budget your time 
accordingly. The animated graphics 
make a very good presentation and 
must be scanned for occasional clues 
not in the text descriptions, so keep 
your eyes open! 

Now, having bribed the mighty 
sorceress Chintis into supplying me 
with critical secret information, and 



having survived the rigors of what I can 
only call the Swiss cheese maze, I have 
but to pass the evil Salamander and the 
Earthstone will be mine. 

(Prickly-Pear Software, 213 La Mirada, El 
Paso, TX 79932, 915-584-7784; $39.95) 

— Jeffrey S. Parker 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



cc e ssory 

CoCo Keyboard 
Extender Cable m 
Clutter Ender 

For over five years I have endured the 
standard plight of the CoCoist. The 
add-on devices connected to my CoCo 
were quickly outgrowing my computer 
desk. But all that ended when I received 
the CoCo Keyboard Extender. 

The Keyboard Extender is simply a 
cable that connects a standard CoCo 
keyboard and the CoCo itself. It is 
designed to work on any CoCo (I, 2 or 
3) that uses a Mylar cable to hook the 
keyboard to the main circuit board. The 
cable I received from Spectrum Projects 
is a 20-conductor shielded cable which 
is about 9 feet long, though the length 
may vary anywhere f rom 6 to 9 feet. On 
either end of the cable is a special 
connector designed to make installation 
a snap. 

In designing the cable, Marty Good- 
man realized the average user might 
have a little trouble "jury-rigging" a 
connector for the CoCo keyboard, 
which has a thin, flexible Mylar cable. 
Therefore, he laid out a circuit for his 
connector system on a very thin printed- 
circuit board. This board easily plugs 
into the keyboard socket on the CoCo. 
The connector on the other end accepts 
the Mylar cable from the keyboard. The 
system also allows for"dual"control. In 
other words, the connector which plugs 
into the CoCo circuit board has an extra 
socket that lets you install the original 
keyboard in the CoCo. With this design, 
you can use either the remote keyboard 
or the one mounted to the main unit. 

Installation of the Keyboard Ex- 
tender is relatively simple. Just open the 
CoCo and carefully remove the key- 
board cable from its socket. Plug the 
extender cable in and then plug the old 
keyboard (or a new one if you want to 
use two keyboards) into the other end 
of the cable. What you need to be most 



careful about is making sure the cable 
ends are immobilized. You will need to 
provide some sort of strain relief to 
prevent damage to any of the connec- 
tors. 

A handy feature of the cable is that 
the keyboard uses only 15 of the 20 
conductors. With a little care and some 
knowledge of electronics, the average 
tinkerer can cook up several uses for 
these extra conductors, such as a power- 
on indicator and a remote reset button. 
Many such ideas are given in the in- 
structions that accompany the extender 
cable. 

The instructions accompanying the 
Keyboard Extender were more than 
complete. Several suggestions were 
offered on how to provide strain relief 
for the cable. Time is taken to explain 
some of the background information, 
which makes installation even easier. 
There are also ideas for how to con- 
struct a case for your new external 
keyboard. 

I think the Keyboard Extender is an 
excellent product. Even if you have no 
knowledge of electronics, the cable is 
easy to install. Best of all, it will put an 
end to that seemingly interminable mess 
on your computer desk. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc., P.O. Box 264, 
Howard Beach, NY 11414, 718-835-1344; 
$39.95; with external CoCo 2 keyboard, 
$49.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Cray Augsburg 



So f twa re 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



The Third Rainbow 
Book of Adventures 
— A Trip to 
Adventure 

Next time you're interested in book- 
ing a trip to adventure, a book is exactly 
what you should consider — The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures. On your 
tour, you'll stop at 16 BASIC Adventures 
from THE rainbow's last contest. But 
the best news of all is that each Adven- 
ture costs only 75 cents. 

Of course, as with most budget oper- 
ations, there is a catch. In this case it's 
the typing you'll have to do. The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures comes 
complete with 19 program listings for 16 
Adventures, plus descriptions about the 



November 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 37 



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games' scenarios and loading instruc- 
tions. To take advantage of the budget 
rate, you'll have to type in the Adven- 
tures before playing them. This is not 
quite as bad as it seems, because by 
typing in the various Adventures, you 
pick up the programming techniques 
used by the authors. 

However, for those who would rather 
go first class, or who prefer playing to 
typing, RAINBOW also offers all the 
programs on disk or cassette. (You still 
need the book for game and loading 
instructions.) If you plan on playing 
many of the Adventures, I recommend 
that you spend the extra money to get 
both the book and the disk or cassette. 
You have all the advantages of the book, 
plus you can start playing right away, 
without the "adventure"of keying in the 
listings. Either with or without disk, 
though, this package is a real bargain! 

The book itself is nicely done. Pro- 
grams are. listed in easy-to-read type in 
32-column format, two columns to a 
page. The book is handsomely illus- 
trated throughout, and, in the case of 
graphic Adventures, sample graphics 
are also shown. 

At the time the Adventure contest 
was held, the CoCo 3 had not yet made 
its debut; so these games were designed 
for the CoCo 1 and 2, but all of them 
ran perfectly on my CoCo 3. Now that 
the CoCo 3 is here, Adventuring should 
be even more exciting, for 40- or 80- 
column text that can easily be combined 
with fantastic color graphics makes 
Adventure designing and playing even 
better. And if a mouse- or joystick- 
driven Adventure is what you seek, the 
Tandy Hi-Res Interface gives you con- 
trol over each element on the screen. 

The following describes each Adven- 
ture: 

Escape 

You have entered Ludlow Manor in 
search of adventure, but once inside one 
of the rooms, the door closes behind 
you. Can you escape in time? 

Escape works in 16K and is a simple 
graphics-oriented Adventure. All it 
requires is pointing the cursor via 
joystick or mouse to the object you 
would like to use/examine and pressing 
the button. It took approximately five 
minutes to solve. It is cute for young 
children or those unfamiliar with Ad- 
ventures, but for anyone with Adven- 
ture experience, it's too easy to bother 
typing in. 

The A mulet 

Your great-aunt Mathilda recently 



passed away after a good, 143-year stay 
on the planet Earth. Everything she 
owned, including her body, is being 
donated to medical research — with one 
exception. 

The exception is a rare golden amulet 
containing five precious gems. This, it 
seems, is being awarded to one of the 
family members, possibly you! You 
listen as the will is read. In it, Aunt 
Mathilda states that the amulet actually 
has powers to protect the wearer against 
evil, danger, and disease, and will add 
an extra 100 years to the wearer's life. 

But obtaining this fabulous amulet 
will not be easy, for Aunt Mathilda has 
hidden the individual stones in different 
parts of her mansion. The would-be 
heirs are to draw lots and take turns 
searching the mansion and grounds in 
an attempt to find these pieces. 

Miraculously, you draw the first 
chance to search the mansion! But 
beware — should you leave the grounds 
or fail to complete your mission, the 
other relatives will be waiting to pick up 
where you left off. 

Thus begins The Amulet. The game's 
parser could use some work, and the 
vocabulary is small; but this game is fun 
and has some good puzzles. 



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Spymaster 

A shipment of short-range nuclear 
missiles has mysteriously been stolen! 
Using high-tech detection methods, the 
Air Force has tracked them down to 
Death Valley, Arizona. But what are 
they doing there, and what are the 
motives of those who have stolen them? 

To reduce the risk of catastrophe, 
you, Agent 27, have been selected to 
enter the storage base where they are 
being held. Alone. 

When you finally get in, you discover, 
to your horror, that the missiles are 
aimed and ready to launch. You realize 
that you must find a way of stopping 
these terrorists yourself, for there is no 
time to get out and report. That's when 
you get hit over the head. When you 
regain consciousness, you find yourself 



in a small, empty room. Can you get out 
and complete your mission? Only if you 
are a true Spymaster. 

Spymaster features nice graphics and 
a good interface. It won't work with a 
disk system, but if you have a cassette, 
I highly recommend it. 

Ghost Town 

The quest for gold killed more than 
a few men during the Gold Rush, and 
it may do the same to you if you're not 
careful. A tale of buried gold in an old 
ghost town has sent you scurrying 
through the desert to reach Amargosa 
Valley. Should you survive the desert, 
there are sure to be more surprises once 
you get there. Can you stay alive and 
complete your quest, or will you end up 
like the poor fellow who buried the 
gold? 

If you have only 16K, this is my 
recommended pick for you. While it 
counts unrecognized moves in your 
move total (often causing one to die of 
thirst in the desert), it is a fun text 
Adventure. 

A and ark 

In the future, overpopulation is all 
too real a problem on Earth. Searching 
space for inhabitable planets has long 
been a top goal. One such planet, 
Aandark, has been located. Your mis- 
sion is to map out a quadrant of this 
planet, a mission that may be easier said 
than done, for there are wild animals, 
large pits filled with quicksand, sludgy 
swamps that may hinder you, and 
decoys that can lead you off track. 
Should you be able to return home, you 
will be judged on how complete your 
map is. 

Aandark has some nice features, 
including a graphics map that shows 
where you have been. It's fun to play, 
and while it's not tremendously diffi- 
cult, having to make a complete map 
makes the task harder. 

Johnny Zero 

The Button, International President 
in the year 209 1 has been kidnapped ! As 
Agent Johnny Zero, a genetic robot, it 
is up to you to stop his kidnappers 
before they execute The Button on 
International TV and destroy his reign 
of peace. Gangsters Agent Orange, The 
Pencil, The Hammer and Agent Spade 
are suspected as having had a hand in 
this matter. Can you do it, or will 
terrorists rule the World Government? 

Johnny Zero is a simple graphics 
Adventure. All you have to do is enter 
a direction (N, S, E, W) or answer Yes 



140 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



or No questions. It's fun to explore, 
though, and might be good for first- 
timers or children. While easy to solve, 
the game is random, so you can play it 
more than once. 




The Sword and The Sorcerer 

This is a four-part graphics Adven- 
ture that is moderately difficult. As 
apprentice to the Wizard, you have 
learned many of his secrets. But now he 
is gone, and it is up to you to defeat the 
evil Sorcerer who has threatened the 
village of Ling Shai with his dark 
powers. The Wizard had managed, 
during his lifetime, to fend off the 
sorcerer, but never to defeat him. Now 
that the Wizard is gone, what chance do 
you have? 

Part I, In Search of the Ring, begins 
in the castle of the Sorcerer. You must 
find the ring called Equinox, which the 
Wizard had used. 

The Quest for Excalibir, Part II, 
starts i n the same room where Part I lef t 
off. With the ring in hand, you must 
now locate the sword Excalibir. 

In Part III, your final quest before 
meeting the Sorcerer is finding the 
Shield of Darkness. Both objects found 
in the previous parts may help you. 

Finally, in Part IV, The Final Battle, 
you must defeat the Sorcerer by gaining 
energy points using the weapons gath- 
ered in the first three Adventures. 



An A dor's Nightmare 

Just when your big break as an actor 
comes and you are invited to perform 
in front of the Queen's Royal Theatre, 
tragedy strikes. Your understudy slips 
you a sleeping pill, and you awake just 
10 minutes before the curtain is sup- 
posed to rise. To make matters worse, 
your identification is missing, and, 
being a relatively unknown actor, no 
one is likely to believe that you are the 
gent who is supposed to appear on 
stage. Can you sneak into the theatre, 
find everything you need (including the 



stage, since you have no idea where 
anything is in this theater), and get your 
understudy off the stage before the 
curtain rises? 

What a long ten minutes it can be, 
though. There are so many empty 
rooms to find your way through. An 
Actor 's Nightmare is a text Adventure 
of medium difficulty, but the time limit 
makes the game harder. 

The Time Machine 

Just when it was thought to be an 
impossibility, you perfect a time ma- 
chine about the size of a wristwatch. Or, 
at least you think you've perfected it. 
You take just a little trip to confirm it. 

But, to your horror, you d iscover that 
a flaw in your machine has created a 
dramatic effect on three historical 
events. Repairing the machine, you 
realize that you must return and correct 
the past — bef ore it catches up with you 
and destroys the present as you know 
it. 

This is a rich, challenging and fun text 
Adventure. It can be frustrating at 
times, but that's all part of the game. It 
even has a disk or tape save feature. 



Balm 

The Great Concept of the Year award 
goes to Balm. You're the Adventure and 
can take revenge on poor, unsuspecting 
Adventurers looking for a computer 
disk. The game supplies nice graphics 
and good fun, even if it is more of a 
strategy game than an Adventure. You 
must position different obstacles and 
puzzles, and can spring traps on unsus- 
pecting Adventurers as they wander 
through the caverns. Don't let them get 
to your disk, because like a true com- 
puter, you'll go fizz. 



The Professional 

How could you have a group of 
Adventures without a whodunnit? This 
is the one. A valuable jade necklace is 




reported mTssing by Claudine Hunts- 
dale, and she has hired you, The Pro- 
fessional, to track down the guilty party. 
You'll have to interrogate suspects and 
brave perils in order to secure the 
treasure — and your $20,000 bonus. A 
fun Adventure if you like mystery. 

Time Travellers 

That scientist you met at the last 
RAlNBOwf est just gave you a call. When 
you arrive at his house, you discover 
that he has built a Time Machine. At 
first you think he's off his rocker just a 
bit, but when he disappears in it and 
returns with a dinosaur egg, you have 
to believe. 

Join him on fantastic journeys in his 
time machine. In Time Travellers you 
visit the age of the dinosaurs, King 
Arthur's Court, El Dorado, Ancient 
Rome, Sherlock Holmes' England, the 
Roaring '20s, and even the f uture. What 
treasures can you dig up in these time 
periods? 

Time Travellers is worth trying if you 
have it on disk. It's moderately easy to 
play, but achieving a high score isn't 
nearly as easy as it looks! 



Evil Crypt 

The Evil Crypt is a good graphic 
exploration game, made more difficult 
because you can see only the immediate 
area around you. The Crypt is filled 
with goblins, pits, space invaders, keys, 
traps, and everything else your mother 
told you to stay away from. You move 
around via the arrow keys instead of 
typing in commands, and you can find 
and use potions, a chest filled with 
spells, a sword, a key and bow and 
arrow. You'll need all of these things, as 
well as your wits, to escape the Evil 
Crypt. Trees, walls, stairs, rocks, pits, 
fire, graves, spacemen, and much more 
are all represented graphically by sym- 
bols, which are listed on a help page. 

There are three levels of a cryptic 
maze to wind your way through in the 
Evil Crypt: Doldrums, Catacombs, and 
Dungeons. Making it through each is 
not easy, but sitting safe and sound in 
your computer room is great fun! 

Cleopatra } s Pyramid 

Ah, the dangers of boasting. After 
turning a routine mission to locate a 
missing diamond into a story that 
would have made Indiana Jones cringe, 
you've become quite a hero. Sure, the 
fantasy is fine — until a short, stocky, 
gray-haired man approaches you in the 

November 1987 THE RAINBOW 141 



local pub during one of your blood- 
curdling tales about how you snatched 
the diamond right out from under the 
noses of 200 angry tribesmen. 

The gentleman insists he has located 
the pyramid of Cleopatra, filled with 
beautiful treasures. Urged on by multi- 
digit figures of money dancing in your 
head, and unwilling to back down from 
your boasting, you accept the mission 
to travel deep into the jungle to collect 
the 25 treasures from this pyramid. But 
time presses: You have a mere five days 
to accomplish your mission. 

Cleopatra's Pyramid doesn't work on 
disk, but try this gem if you have a 
cassette. 

Iconia 

For the visually oriented, here's a 
game not only with graphics, but with 
Icons. Want to take something? Point to 
the picture of a hand grabbing an 
object, a nice perspective if you've 
overdosed on literature. 

You must recover the ship Iconia, 
adrift in space near Jupiter. Rumor has 
it that Vade Mowban, the astronaut and 
scientist who was aboard that ship, was 
drawn inexplicably to a dark cube 
which was orbiting the planet. It seems 



he just left his spaceship and went, 
unarmed, in a life raft towards the cube. 
He's never been seen again. Other 
strange happenings, such as horren- 
dous-looking creatures exploding from 
globes and malfunctioning computers, 
have been reported near the black cube. 
What's going on here? And can you 
return the Iconia safely to Earth? 





L 




-lx 














♦ 






1 






<s> X a 











Escape of Embroilment 

A fun game about a fun house and 
your not-so-fun attempts to escape 
really un-fun monsters and the never- 
fun game of Thermonuclear War. Disk 
users won't have quite as much fun, 
though, as it works only from cassette. 

If you survive the cassette load, 



you're in forbigger challenges in the fun 
house of Embroilment. There's only one 
exit from this place, and you'll have to 
wind your way through ghosts, ghouls 
(who, by the way, can slime you), and 
three video games designed to challenge 
the player. Two of them come with 
instructions, but the third you'll have to 
figure out on your own. 

Note that the few programs that do 
not work with the disk controller 
plugged in are supplied on the disk 
anyway so that you may transfer them 
to cassette. If you have a disk system, 
buy the disk and not the cassette since 
some programs have disk conversions 
which you would not get otherwise. 

On the whole, this is a package not 
to be missed if you enjoy Adventures or 
are interested in trying them out, for it 
offers an excellent value. You can also 
pick up hints for programming on your 
own, and it won't bust your budget. 

(Falsoft, Inc., P.O. Box 385, 9509 U.S. 
Highway 42, Prospect, KY 40059, 502-228- 
4492; Book (required), $11.95; 2 Disk Set, 
$14.95; Cassette, $9.95 plus $1.50 S/H) 

— Eric W. Tilenius 



Clearbrook Software Group (604)853-9H8 



esq 

MIS 



Information 

Management 

System 



RAINBOW 



CSG IMS is THE full featured relational database 
manager for the Color Computer and OS9. The com- 
prehensive structured application language makes 
CSG IMS the ideal developement tool for sophisti- 
cated file-intensive applications. 



• Interactive access to data- 
bases and quick queries. 

• CSG IMS includes a recur- 
sive compiled language sup- 
porting program modules 
with full parameter passing. 



► User defined screen and 
report formats. 

► Record, index and file size al- 
most unlimited. 

• Text, BCD floating point (14 
digits), short and long in- 
teger and date types. 



CSG IMS for CoCo2/3 OS9 L1/2 (single user)$169.95 
CSG IMS for OS9 L2 or 68000(multi user) $495.00 
CSG IMS demo with manual $30 



ERINA - Sym bo lic User Mode Debugger for OS9 
ERINA is a must for all serious assembler and C 
software developers. It lets you find bugs quickly by 
displaying the machine state and instuctions being ex- 
ecuted. You can set address and register break 
points, dump, search and change memory, assemble 
and disassemble code and many other things to 
numerous to mention. This program will pay for itself 
over and over by the time you save solving your bugs. 
Requires 80 column display, OS9 L1/2 $69.00 



SERINA - System Mode Debugger for OS9 L2 
SERINA is a debugger for OS9 system modules 
(device drivers, file managers, etc.). It allows you to 
trace execution of any system module, set break 
points, assemble and disassemble code and examine 
and change memory. There are special provisions for 
executing code with critical timing loops and for ac- 
cessing I/O registers. A must for system programmers. 
Requires CoCo3, OS9 L2, $139.00 
80 col. terminal connected to /T1 or /T2 



Shipping: N. America - $5, Overseas - $10 
Clearbrook Software Group 



P.O. Box 8000-499 
Sumas, WA 98295 

OS9 is a trademark of Mlcroware Systems Corp., MSDos is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. 



MSF - MSDos File Manager for C0C0 3/OS9 Level 2 
MSF is a file manager which allows you to use MSDos 
disks directly under OS9. You don't have to change 
the format of the data before using it! 
Requires C0C0 3, OS9 L2, SDISK3 driver $45.00 



142 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 



Auto Dim, a hardware product designed to 
automatically darken the television, video or 
RGB monitor within six minutes after the 
last keyboard key or joystick button is 
pressed. Once installed, it works automati- 
cally; there is no software to load and 
execute. For the CoCo 3. Lucas Industries 
2000, 14720 Cedar Streei NE, Alliance, OH 
44601, (216)823-4221; $29. 

Backup Lightning 512K, a disk duplicating 
program developed by ColorVenture that 
lets you use all drives for making copies. For 
the CoCo 3. Performance Peripherals, 
1 1432 Pena Way, Miro Lorn; CA 91752, 
(714) 681-7222; $19.95. 

Business Bankbook +3, a system that re- 
places your manual check register and prints 
your checks. You can print your check 
register, monthly and year-to-date summary 
of accounts, sort by account numbers, and 
list outstanding checks. For the CoCo 1, 2 
and 3. Sunrise Software, 8901 NW26 Street, 
Sunrise, FL 33322, (800)628-2828; $19.95. 

CoCo 3 Turbo RAM Board, a 512K up- 
grade for the CoCo 3. Fully tested and 
complete with memory tester software. For 
the CoCo 3. Performance Peripherals, 
11432 Pena Way, Mir a Lorn a, CA 91752, 
(714) 681-3007; $79.95. 

CoCo Keyboard Extender Cable, a cable 
that lets you extend the CoCo 2 or 3 key- 
board, or add an external keyboard to the 
CoCo 2. For the CoCo 2 and 3. Spectrum 
Projects Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, 
N Y 1 1414, (718) 835-1344; $39.95; keyboard 
and cable for CoCo 2, $49.95 plus $3 S/H. 

ColorMath, a 16K educational program For 
ages 6 through 14. Children receive skill- 
building lessons in addition, subtraction, 
multiplication and division. For the CoCo 
I, 2 and 3. Tandy Corporation, $19.95. 
A vail able in Radio Shack stores nationwide. 

< ^ > Computer Stationery, continuous- 
feed computer paper bordered with whim- 
sical designs including teddy bears, sail 
boats, butterflies and flowers. A Christmas 
line includes holly and geese. Computer 
Creations, P.O. Box 3744, Long Beach, CA 
90803, (213) 434-2655; $10 per package of 
100 sheets. 



< ^Disk Filer, a 64K machine lan- 
guage program that files the programs on 
your disks. For the CoCo I, 2 and 3. 
CO LORado Software, P.O. Box 84, Chim- 
ney Rock, CO 8 1127, (303) 731-4208; $15. 

FLIGHTSIM 1, a 64K Simulation that lets 
you learn the basics in instrument recogni- 
tion, manual control of ailerons (pitch and 
roll), compass readings and more. For the 
CoCo I, 2 and 3. Tandy Corporal ion, 
$24.95. Available in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide. 

Hi-Res Joystick Utility Software Bonanza, 

utility programs developed by ColorVenture 
that let you get 640-by-640 mouse and 
joystick resolution from Basic. Or run both 
CoCo Max 2 and Max Edit on the CoCo 3 
without the CoCoMax cartridge and get a 
256-by-192 screen. For the CoCo 3. Spec- 
trum Projects Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard 
Beach, NY 11414, (718) 835-1344; $24.95 
plus $3 S/H. 

< ^ > Kung-Fu Dude, a 64K arcade game 
that includes graphics and sound effects. 
Destroy your opponents and evade obsta- 
cles as you try to reach your ultimate 
objective. For the CoCo 1 , 2 and 3. Sundog 
Systems, 21 Edinburg Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 
15235, (412) 372-5674; $24.95. 

Pal Upgrade, a chip that allows your gray 
or white Multi-Pak (26-3024) to work with 
your CoCo 3. Performance Peripherals. 
11432 Pena Way, Mira Loma, CA 91752, 
(714)681-3007; $9.95. 



Serina, a tool for debugging and developing 
system programs under 6809/OS-9 Level II. 
It includes a mini-assembler and disas- 
sembler for the 6809 as well as tracing and 
debugging commands. For the CoCo 3 and 
requires OS-9 Level II. Clear brook Soft- 
ware Group, P.O. Box 8000-499, Sumas, 
WA 98295, (604) 853-91 18; $139. 

Try-O-Menu, a utility program that reads 
the CoCo directory and displays a menu 
from which programs can be loaded and 
executed with one key. For the CoCo 1 , 2 
and 3. Try-O-Byte, 1008 Alton Circle, 
Florence, SC 29501, (803) 662-9500; $19.99 
plus $3 S/ H. 

Video Cards & Keno, a I28K package that 
includes Video Poker, Joker's Wild Poker, 
Blackjack and Keno. Try your luck against 
the CoCo with these games of skill and 
chance. FortheCoCo3. Tom Mix Software, 
4285 Bradford NE, Grand Rapids, MI 
49506, (616) 957-0444; $29.95 plus $3 S/H. 

Wizard's Den, a 64K graphics Adventure. 
Your goal is to recover the Gem of Damo- 
cles, which was stolen by the Evil Wizard 
and hidden in his den. Beware the wizard's 
magic as you fight your way through eight 
levels of mazes. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 
Tom Mix Software, 4285 Bradford NE, 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49506, (616) 957-0444; 
$22.95 plus $3 S/H. 



^jp First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 
THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 143 



LT-eleeomm u n ications Utility 



Autodial Reaches Out 
Across the Miles 



By Sean Bossinger 




■ ast year my uncle gave me a Hayes Smartmodem as a 
I gift, and it has been useful in helping me tap into a 
■Livariety of BBSs and other information sources. 

Needless to say, my list of phone numbers grew very large, 
and I couldn't remember all of them. So I decided to program 
an autodialer for the CoCo and the Hayes Smartmodem, 

If your phone company has the equipment, Autodial will 
call directly, without operator assistance, anywhere in the 
world. For this program I used the international access code 
used in the Miami area, "01 1." If the code is different in 
your area, just change the numbers in lines 320, 330, 50000 
and 50010. The city and country codes are kept in DRTR 
statements, lines 470 to 610, and your calling list is kept 
in lines 620 to 630. 

You can use lines 640 to 49998 to add telephone 
numbers, country codes and city codes by following 
this format: (country, city, or person's name}, 
(country code, city code, or phone number}. 
Your formatted information is then put in a 
DRTR line, using the DRTR command. 

Sean Bossinger is a senior at South Dade High School in 
H omestead, Florida, where he is a member of the marching 
band, debate club and Social Studies Honor Society. Sean 
has owned his CoCo for seven years, and enjoys program- 
ming. He is also secretary /treasurer for the South Dade 
Computer Club, 



144 THE RAINBOW November 1987 




Dialing 
procedures 
vary according 
to the destination of 
your call (interna- 
tional, national long dis- 
tance or local) and your method 
of dialing (manual keyboard entry or 
autodialing by name). 
Dialing an international number is accom- 
plished by entering the name of the country, the name 
of the city (type NONE if no code is needed) and the telephone 
number. If the code or name of a city or country is not on 
the list, call the operator to obtain it and add it to the list, 
making sure that you save the program again. 

To dial a long-distance number within the United States 
or Canada, use manual keyboard entry or autodial by name. 
For manual entry, enter the area code and the telephone 
number. To autodial, type party name and press ENTER. 

To place a local call manually, enter the telephone number. 
To autodial, enter the name of the party. 

The parts of the program controlling modem dialing are 
in the lines where you see ATDT. If you want to change to 
pulse (rotary) dialing, change all ATDTs to ATDPs. 

This program is designed to dial using a Hayes compatible 
autodial modem connected to the serial port on the rear of 
the CoCo. If you have a modem that is not Hayes compatible, 




:?/'7//a 



just change the 

dialing code to suit your modem. 

There is a timer routine in lines 340 to 410 that calculates 
how long you have been on the phone. After the modem 
finishes dialing, you will be prompted to pick up the handset 
and press ENTER. This will disconnect the modem and start 
the timer. Press any key to stop the timer and show how many 
minutes you have been on the phone. 

The codes to run the RS-232 port in modem format rather 
than printer format were taken from Gary Davis' program 
found in the June 1984 issue of THE RAINBOW (Page 176). 
The codes disable the printer until you turn the machine off 
to reset the parameters (normal operating memory, no 
change). 

If the name you entered for autodial by name is not found, 
you will be returned to the local, long-distance menu. 

(Questions about this article may be addressed to the 
author at 16220 S. W. 282 St., Homestead, FL 33033. Please 
enclose an SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



Line 


Description 


Line 


Description 


10-90 


Call modem seiup, title pages and identifying REMs. 


50020 


GOTO timer routine. 


100 


Go to instruction screens if requested. 


60000-60070 


Local, U.S. and Canada long-distance dialing. 


110-120 


Main menu. 


60080 


Menu for manual or autodial for local calling. 


130-330 


International dialing section. 


60090-60100 


Manual entry for local dialing. 


340-410 


Timer routine. 


60110 


Beginning of long-distance section. 


420 


Asks for another number. 


60120 


Manual or autodial for long-distance calling. 


430-460 


Pokes printer port to enable modem attachment. 


60140-60160 


Manual entry for long-distance calling. 


470-610 


City names and codes, and country names and codes. 


60170-60370 


Instruction routine. 


620-49999 


Space for phone numbers, cities and countries. 


60380-60440 


Local, U.S. and Canada dial by name section. 


50000-50010 


Dial country without city codes. 







November 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 45 



\r 160 



60 154 610 204 

335 39 60100 94 

480 156 60182 ...135 

520 53 60191 65 

580 7 END 201 



The listing: AUTODIAL 

10 CLEAR 10000 :GOSUB 430: REM AUT 

ODIALER FOR THE COCO 

15 REM SEAN M. BOSSINGER 

20 REM 16220 SW 282 ST 

30 REM HOMESTEAD, FLORIDA 33033 

40 CLS(4) 

50 PRINT" WELCOME TO THE AUTO 
DIALER" 

60 PRINT" FOR LOCAL, AND LONG D 
ISTANCE" 

70 PRINT" BY SEAN BOSSINGER 

t ii 

80 PRINT" USING THE HAYES SMAR 
TMODEM. " 

90 FOR X=l TO 3000: NEXT X:CLS 
100 INPUT"INSTRUCTIONS?(Y/N) :";A 
$:IF A$="Y" THEN GOSUB 60170 
110 FORX=l TO 200:NEXT X:CLS:PRI 
NT " ENTER : " : PRINT " 1 ) FOR INTERNAT 
IONAL" : PRINT " 2 ) FOR LOCAL AND NA 
TIONAL. ": INPUT" 1 OR 2 PLEASE: ";A 
:IF A =1 OR A=2 THEN 120 ELSE 11 

120 ON A GOTO 130,60000 

125 REM BEGIN INTERNATIONAL 

AUTODIAL HERE 
130 RESTORE 

140 INPUT" ENTER THE COUNTRY NAME 
: 11 ; CN$ 

150 READ A$,B:IF A$=CN$ THEN 190 

ELSE 160 
160 IF A$="END" THEN 180 
170 GOTO 150 

180 PRINT"TRY AGAIN, COUNTRY NOT 

FOUND": GOTO 130 
190 PRI N T " COUNTRY CODE IS:";B 
200 CC=B 

210 INPUT" ENTER THE CITY NAME:"; 
CN$ 

220 IF CN$="NONE" THEN 230 ELSE 
250 

230 INPUT"ENTER THE CITY CODE";C 
C(1):IF CC(1)=0 THEN 310 
240 GOTO 310 
250 RESTORE 

260 READ A$,B:IF A$=CN$ THEN 300 
ELSE 270 



270 IF A$="END" THEN 290 
280 GOTO 260 

290 PRINT"NO CITY BY THAT NAME F 
OUND":GOTO 210 
300 CC (1)=B 

310 INPUT "ENTER THE PARTY NUMBER 
";PN$:IF CC(1)=0 THEN 50000 
320 PRINT "DIALING 011" ; CC ;"-"; CC 
(1) ;pn$ 

330 PRINT # -2 , "ATDT011" ;CC; " ";CC 
(1) ;pn$ 

335 REM TIMER ROUTINE 

340 PRINT"HIT <ENTER> TO START T 

IMER, AND TO DISCONECT MODEM" 

350 INPUT A$ 

360 PRINT#-2," " 

370 S=0:M=0:CLS 

380 FOR X=l TO 456: NEXT X:S=S+1 
390 PRINT@0,S;":SECONDS" 
400 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 380 
ELSE 410 

410 CLS : PRINT" TOTAL TIME ON PHON 
E WAS: " ; :PRINTUSING"##. ##" ;S/60: 
PRINT"MINUTES . " 

420 INPUT "ANOTHER NUMBER ( Y/N) "; A 
$:IF A$="Y" THEN 110 ELSE IF A$= 
"N" THEN END ELSE 420 
425 REM SET UP MODEM FOR DIALING 
430 REM SETUP THE MODEM PORT 
440 W=65314:X=W+1 

450 POKE 149,0: POKE 150, 180: POKE 

X,48:POKE W,249:POKE X,52:POKE 
W,0:PRINT#-2, "ATS11=40" 
460 RETURN 

465 REM CITY AND COUNTRY CODES 
470 DATA ALGERIA, 213 , AMERICAN SA 
MOA,684 , ANDORRA, 33 , ALL ,078, ARGEN 
TINA , 54 , BUENOS AIRES , 1 , CORDOBA , 5 

1, ATLANTIC OCEAN,8 71,AUSTRAILIA, 
61 , MELBOURNE , 3 , SYDNEY , 2 

480 DATA AUSTRIA, 4 3, INNSBRUCK, 5 2 
22 , VIENNA ,222, BAHRAIN ,973, BELGIU 
M , 3 2 , ANTWERP , 3 , BRUS S ELS , 2 , GHENT , 
91, BELIZE, 501, BOLIVIA, 591, LA PAZ 
,2, SANTA CRUZ,3 3,BRAZIL,55,BRASI 
LIA,61,RIO DE JANEIRO, 21, SAO PAU 
LO, 11 

490 DATA CAMEROON, 2 3 7, CHILE, 56, S 
ANTIAGO , 2 , VALPARAISO ,31, COLUMBIA 
,57,CALI,3,COSTA RICA, 506 , CYPRUS 
,357, NICOSIA, 21, CZECHOSLOVAKIA, 4 

2 , DENMARK , 45 , AALBORG , 8 , COPENHAGE 
N , 1 , ECUADOR ,593, CUENCA , 4 , QUITO , 2 
, EGYPT, 20 

500 DATA EL SALVADOR, 503 , ETHIOPI 
A, 251, FIJI, 679, FINLAND, 358, HELSI 



146 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



NKI , 0 , FRANCE ,33, BORDEAUX ,56, MARS 
EILLE, 91, NICE, 93, PARIS, 1, FRENCH 
ANTILLES, 596 , FRENCH POLYNESIA, 68 
9, GABON, 2 41, EAST GERMANY, 37 
510 DATA WEST GERMANY , 49 , STUTTGA 
RT , 7 1 1 , BERLIN ,30, FRANKFURT , 6 1 1 , M 
UNICH ,89, SCHWEINFURT ,9721, GREECE 
, 30, ATHENS, 1, RHODES, 241, GUAM, 671 
, GUANTANAMO BAY ,53, GUATEMALA ,502 
, GUATEMALA CITY , 2 , GUYANA, 592 , GEO 
RGETOWN, 02, HAITI, 50 9, PORT AU PRI 
NCE, 1 

520 DATA HONDURAS, 504 , HONG KONG, 
852, KOWLOON, 3, HUNGARY, 3 6, ICELAND 
,354 , AKUREYRI , 6 , HAFNARFI JOROUR, 1 
, INDIA ,91, INDONES IA , 6 2 , JAKARTA , 2 
1 , 1 RAN , 9 8 , T EHERAN ,21,IRAQ,964,BA 
GHDAD , 1 , IRELAND ,353, DUBLIN , 1 , GAL 
WAY, 91, ISRAEL, 97 2, HAIFA, 4 , JERUSA 
LEM, 2 ,TEL AVIV, 3 , ITALY , 39 
530 DATA FLORENCE, 55, NAPLES, 81, R 
OME, 6, VENICE, 41, IVORY COAST, 225, 
JAPAN , 8 1 , H IROSHIMA ,822, TOKYO , 3 , Y 
OKOHAMA ,45, JORDAN ,962, KENYA ,254, 
REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 8 2, PUS AN, 7 2, SE 
OUL, 2 , KUWAIT ,965, LIBERIA , 2 3 1 , LIB 
YA, 218, TRIPOLI, 21 

540 DATA LIECHTENSTEIN, 41, ALL CI 
TIES , 7 5 , LUXEMBOURG ,352, MALAWI , 2 6 
5, MALAY SI A, 60, KUALA LUMPUR, 3, MEX 
ICO, 52, MEXICO CITY, 5, TIJUANA, 668 
, MONACO, 3 3, ALL CITIES , 93 , MOROCCO 
,212 

550 DATA NAMIBIA, 2 6 4, NETHERLANDS 
,31, AMSTERDAM , 20 , THE HAGUE, 70, NE 
THERLAND ANTILLIES , 59 9 , ARUBA, 8 , N 
EW CALEDONIA, 687, NEW ZEALAND, 64, 
AUCKLAND, 9 , WELLINGTONS , NICARAGU 
A, 505 , MANAGUA, 2 , NIGERIA, 2 34, LAGO 
S , 1 , NORWAY , 47 , BERGEN , 5 , OSLO , 2 



560 DATA OMAN, 9 68, PACIFIC OCEAN, 
872 , PAKISTAN , 92 , PANAMA, 507 , PAPUA 
NEW GUINEA, 6 7 5, PARAGUAY, 595, ASU 
NCION ,21, PERU ,51, ARE QUI PA ,54, LIM 
A, 14, PHILIPPINES, 63 , MANILA, 2 
570 DATA POLAND, 4 8, PORTUGAL, 3 51, 
LISBON, 1 , QATAR, 974 , ROMANIA, 40 , BU 
CURESTI,0,SAIPAN, 670, SAN MARINO, 
39, ALL POINTS, 541 

580 DATA SAUDI ARABIA, 96 6 , RIYADH 
, 1 , SENEGAL ,221, SINGAPORE , 65 , SOUT 
H AFRICA, 2 7, CAPE TOWN, 2 1 , JOHANNE 
SBURG, 11, PRETORIA, 12 , SPAIN, 34 , BA 
RCELONA, 3 , LAS PALMAS, 28 , MADRID, 1 
, SEVILLE, 5 4, SRI LANKA , 9 4 , KANDY , 8 
, SURINAME ,597, SWEDEN ,46, GOTEBORG 
,31, STOCKHOLM, 8 

590 DATA SWITZERLAND, 41, BERNE, 31 
, GENEVA ,22, LUCERNE ,41, ZURI CH , 1 , T 
AIWAN, 8 8 6, TAINAN, 62 , TAIPEI , 2 , THA 
ILAND, 6 6, BANGKOK, 2, TUNISIA, 216,T 
UNIS, 1, TURKEY, 90, ISTANBUL, 11, IZM 
IR, 51, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES , 97 1 , A 
BU DHABI , 2 , AJMAN , 6 , AL AIN,3,AWEI 
R, 49, DUBAI, 4 

600 DATA FUJAIRAH,91,RAS AL KHAI 
MAH , 7 , SHARJAH , 6 , UMM AL QUWAIN,6, 
UNITED KINGDOM, 4 4, BELFAST, 2 3 2, CA 
RDIFF, 222, EDINBURGH, 31, GLASGOW, 4 
1 , LIVERPOOL ,51, LONDON , 1 , URUGUAY , 
598, CANELONES, 59 8, MERCEDES, 53 2, M 
ONTEVIDEO, 2 

610 DATA VATICAN CITY, 3 9, ALL CIT 
IES , 6 , VENEZUELA , 5 8 , CARACAS , 2 , MAR 
ACAIBO ,61, YEMEN ,967, YUGOSLAVIA , 3 
8, BELGRADE, 11 

620 REM TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

BEGINS HERE ! 
630 DATA MCI, 3728501, DOWPHONE , 18 
002220248, RAINBOW, 1502 2284492 , EN 



LOTZAT^JK 

fS HKR Ii ! 



LOTZALUK , machine language program for (XXX) 1 , 2,& 3. Studies history of IOYVO 
game as a handieapper studies horwes. Arizona 6/39, California 6/4S, Iowa 6/36, 
Missouri 6/39, Now York 6/40, New York 6/48, Oregon 6/42, Vri -State (Maine, 



New Hampshire, & Vermont) 6/36, & Washington State 
follow. Requi res 64R. Spec; fy game deaired with order. 

William G. Briganee, Sr. 
1001 Fai rweafhor Drive 
Sacramento, CA 9H833 
(916) 927-6062 



6/44 aval 1 abli 



Others to 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



On Disk! 
$29.95 
Introductory Price 



California residents add 6% smles Ijxk 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 147 



D,0 

49999 rem dial number without 

city code 

50000 print "dialing 011 ";cc;" " 
;pn$ 

50010 print#-2 , "atdt 011" ;cc;" " 
;pn$ 

50020 GOTO 340 

59999 REM LOCAL, U.S., AND 

CANADIAN DIALING 

60000 CLS 

60010 PRINT "ENTER: " 

60020 PRINT" 1) FOR LOCAL NUMBERS 

60030 PRINT" 2) FOR NATIONAL LONG 

DISTANCE" 
60040 INPUT" 1 OR 2 ONLY PLEASE:" 

;A 

60050 IF A=l OR A=2 THEN 60070 E 

LSE 60060 

60060 GOTO 60010 

60010 ON A GOTO 60080,60110 

60075 REM MENU FOR LOCAL DIALING 

60080 CLS: PRINT "1>MANUAL ENTER 0 

R 2>AUTO DIAL";: INPUT A: IF A=l T 

HEN 60090 ELSE 60380 

60090 INPUT "ENTER THE NUMBER TO 

DIAL";A$ 

60100 PRINT "DIALING 11 ; A$ : PRINT#- 
2, "ATDT ";A$:GOTO 340 
60110 CLS 

60120 INPUT 11 1>MANUAL DIAL OR 2>A 
UTO DIAL"; A 

60130 IF A=l THEN 60140 ELSE 603 
80 

60140 INPUT"ENTER THE AREA CODE" 
;AC$: INPUT "ENTER THE TELEHONE NU 
MBER" ;TN$ 

60150 PRINT 11 DIALING ";AC$;" + ";TN 
$ 

60160 PRINT#-2,"ATDT1 ";AC$+TN$: 
GOTO 340 

60165 REM INSTRUCTION SCREENS 
60170 PRINT "INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUT 
ODIAL***" 

60180 PRINT "INTERNATIONAL CALLIN 
G: " 

60181 PRINT"HIT <1>, <ENTER> AT 
THE FIRST PROMPT, FOLLOWED BY 

COUNTRY NAME, FOLLOWED BY CI 

TY NAME (IF APPLICABLE), FOL 

LOWED BY TELEPHONE NUMBER" 

60182 PRINT"IF NO CITY CODE IS N 
EEDED, THEN TYPE 'NONE' AT THE C 
ITY NAME PROMPT, FOLLOWED BY 



0 AT THE CITY CODE PROMPT, IF 
AN ALL CITY CODE IS NEEDED, 

FOLLOW THE ABOVE INSTRUCTIONS, 
EXCEPT, AT THE CITY CODE PROMPT 
, ENTER THEALL POINT CODE . " : 

60183 INPUT" PRESS <ENTER> TO CON 
TINUE" ;A$:CLS 

60184 PRINT" FOR LOCAL CALLING:" 

60185 PRINT" ENTER <2> AT THE FIR 
ST PROMPT FOLLOWED BY <1> AT T 
HE NEXT MENU." 

60186 PRINT" FOR DIAL BY NAME ENT 
ER <2> AND THEN WHEN THE COMPUT 
ER ASKS FOR IT, ENTER THE PA 
RTY NAME . " 

60187 PRINT"FOR MANUAL KEYBOARD 
ENTRY, ENTER <1> AND WHEN T 
HE COMPUTER ASKS FOR IT, ENTER 
THE PARTY NAME." 

60188 INPUT" <ENTER> TO CONTINUE" 
;A$:CLS 

60189 PRINT"U.S. AND CANADIAN DI 
ALING" 

60190 PRINT"ENTER <2> AT THE FIR 
ST MENU, FOLLOWED BY <2> AT T 
HE SECOND MENU." 

60191 PRINT "FOR MANUAL DIALING, 
ENTER <1> AND WHEN THE COMPUTE 
R ASKS FOR THEM, ENTER THE AREA 

CODE, AND THE TELEPHONE NUMBER 

ii 

60192 PRINT "FOR AUTO-DIAL BY NAM 
E, ENTER <2>AT THE MENU, THEN WH 
EN THE COMPUTER ASKS FOR IT 
, ENTER THE PARTY NAME":INPU 
T"<ENTER> TO START PROGRAM" ;A$ : C 
LS : RETURN 

60375 REM LOCAL, U.S. AND CANADA 

DIALING BY NAME 
603 80 CLS: INPUT "ENTER THE NAME 0 
F THE PARTY: ";NP$ 

603 90 RESTORE 

60400 READ A$,B$:IF A$=NP$ THEN 
60440 ELSE 60410 

60410 IF A$="END" THEN 60420 ELS 
E 60430 

604 20 PRINT"ENTRY NOT FOUND": FOR 
X=l TO 1000: NEXT X : CLS : PRINT"RE 

TURNING TO LOCAL, LONG DISTANCEME 
NU.":FORX=1TO1000:NEXT X: CLS: GOT 
060000 

60430 GOTO 60400 

60440 CLS: PRINT "DIALING ";A$:PRI 
NT#-2 , "ATDT ";B$:GOTO 340 



148 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



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1 E ducat i o n Overview 



Computers in 
Ichool Management 

By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



■ he economic fortunes of schools 
can show great variance over just 
a few years. Not long ago, 
schools were hot political topics, with 
educational reform a prominent news 
item. Money was used to support edu- 
cational reform, and schools had addi- 
tional dollars to spend on such things 
as computers and curriculum. 

Lately, other topics have replaced 
educational issues in the public interest. 
With a general decline in the prosperity 
of this country, schools suffer along 
with other institutions. There is simply 
not enough money to do all the things 
that need to be done in schools; some 
things will have to be eliminated. 

Management of expanding resources 
is not seen as much of a problem for 
school personnel. There are things to 
purchase that have been deferred from 
past years. Extra teachers can always be 
used, as well as additional aides, office 
clerical staff, and even central office 
professional positions. With expanding 
resources, a worthy use for money is 
always found. 

The opposite position, that of declin- 
ing resources for schools, is another 
matter entirely. When it comes time to 
eliminate programs or people, all things 
are important. Elimination choices are 



Michael Plog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois. 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in the central office of 
a school district and is currently em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



difficult to make, and usually involve 
heated debates among school personnel 
and interested citizens. One important 
topic for current educational leaders 
should be the proper management of 
declining resources. 

As an educational tool, the micro- 
computer can play several roles in 
management of decline for public 
schools. Three such roles will be dis- 
cussed here; there are certainly other 
worthwhile uses for the computer in the 
difficult task of management of declin- 
ing resources, but time and space pre- 
vent a full examination. 

First, computers can be used to help 
humans make difficult decisions. I do 
not mean that any decision itself should 
be left to the computer. After all, com- 
puters are logical, not reasonable, and 
cannot actually make an important 
decision affecting the lives of humans. 
Computers can, however, be used to 
provide their human masters with ade- 
quate information about alternatives. 

One example of this use is discussions 
of budget alternatives. A spreadsheet is 
a powerful tool for development of 
alternatives in spending patterns. Dif- 
ferent spending patterns (percentages of 
budget spent on faculty, support staff, 
administrative staff, materials, etc.) can 
be examined quickly and accurately. 
Nasty surprises around the middle of 
the year can be avoided. Least attractive 
spending patterns (and reduction plans) 
can be identified quickly and rejected 
from further consideration, 

The spreadsheet is not the only use of 
the computer f or discussions of budget 



alternatives. Graphic presentations of 
alternatives can be provided with rela- 
tive ease using the computer. Graphic 
presentations are something that is 
easily understood by educational deci- 
sion makers (such as school boards) and 
the general public. 

Computers can do more than help 
humans make decisions. A second use 
of computers f or management of declin- 
ing resources is actual day-to-day oper- 
ations. In many ways, the operation of 
a school is like a business. The product 
of a school is service to children and the 
larger community, but many activities 
are exactly the same in a school as in 
a business environment. People must be 
hired, given assignments, and super- 
vised. Products must be purchased, 
moved to appropriate locations, and 
used to fulfill a specified purpose. Even 
extremely small businesses have com- 
puters today, and most school districts 
use machines to assist in day-to-day 
operations. 

One physical product of schools is 
paper. Now, as every computer hobby- 
ist knows, computers do not reduce 
paper work. In fact, the computer 
increases the volume of paper used in 
any operation. The advantage of the 
computer is in reducing the time spent 
on paperwork, and a reduction of the 
people needed for management of 
paper. Thus, computers can reduce the 
clerical time needed for handling forms, 
filing records, preparing reports, and a 
host of paper moving operations that 
are common to schools today. Records 
of demographic characteristics of chil- 



1 50 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



dren attending just one school is a 
massive reporting task, and one re- 
quired by most funding sources, includ- 
ing the federal and state governments. 
By maintaining such records on the 
computer, the paper produced is still 
massive, but the human work involved 
decreases dramatically. 

Computers can also reduce the time 
teachers spend on non-teaching activi- 
ties. All educational institutions require 
non-teaching activities of their faculty, 
including taking attendance, lunch 
counts, gathering information about 
individual students for special consider- 
ation, etc. Reducing time of faculty 
spent on non-teaching activities can 
also reduce the number of faculty 
needed. This is an unpleasant consider- 
ation — no one wants to reduce the 
number of teachers in schools. The 
inescapable difficulty is that in times of 
diminishing resources, personnel will 
have to be reduced. 

The third use of the computer in times 
of decreasing resources takes place in 
the classroom. This is probably the 
most exciting use f or educators because 
it relates directly to classrooms and 
students, instead of to business offices 
and other ancillary functions of schools. 



During times of expanding resources, 
schools will buy computers. With more 
money available, it is reasonable to 
expect that additional units will be 
purchased. During times of decreasing 
resources, most schools will not be 
buying additional computers — availa- 
ble funds have to be used for higher 
priorities. Instead, the focus should be 
on better utilization of the current units 
in school buildings. The challenge for 
educators is to determine how to get 
more out of existing machines. 

It is not too difficult to predict that 
in times of decreasing resources, schools 
will still be purchasing software for 
classroom computers. The type of soft- 
ware purchased may tend to be pro- 
grams that will free teacher time, allow- 
ing a single teacher to deal with a greater 
number of students. Thus, we might 
expect more Computer Assisted In- 
struction (CAI) software sales during 
these times. We might also expect stu- 
dents to be spending more small group 
time at the machine, and less direct 
involvement with the teacher. 

If software developers notice a need, 
we might also expect more innovative 
software on the market — requiring 
more interaction between student and 



machine than between student and 
teacher. It is entirely reasonable to 
expect that a student will spend less time 
with a teacher and more time with a 
machine. 

This does not have to be a negative 
scenario. The time a child spends with 
a teacher is similar to the time a child 
spends with a parent. The amount of 
time is less important than what 
happens during that time. Structuring 
the learning experiences to include both 
human (teacher) and machine (compu- 
ter) can be a positive feature for the 
education of a child. The crucial point 
is what is done with each set of expe- 
riences. In other words, the type of 
human interaction and the type of 
software become more important in this 
set of activities. 

Americans have normally learned 
from adversity. Declining monetary 
resources for education is not a pleasant 
alternative, but it is a reality. It may be 
the case that this adversity to modern 
educators provides a challenge that will 
benefit future students. 

If you have any arguments, com- 
ments, or suggestions, please send them 
to me at 829 Evergreen, Chatham, IL 
62629. ^ 



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A 



November 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



151 



Dat a Co mmwHeatiofts 



A BBS That's 
SysOp-FriendW 

Hacker-HosW e 




By Michael Jorge 



A friend of mine decided he 
wanted to start a local Color 
Computer BBS, because 
there were none in the Lorain, Ohio, 
area. So we tested several bulletin 
board programs, from the very sim- 
ple to the complex. 

We found that the simple pro- 
grams lacked flexibility and appeal, 
and the complex ones were too hos- 
tile to work with, needing almost 
constant attention to keep from 
crashing. 

Then I came up with the BBS 
challenge. A challenge it was indeed 
— for it was left to me to write, my 
friend helping out now and then with 
the online testing and suggestions. 

Michael Jorgenson is an electrician 
living in Lorain, Ohio. He was intro- 
duced to programming by a CoCo 
Adventure game, which "kindled a 
thirst for knowledge that has become 
an obsession. " 



It was my goal to write a serial port 
bulletin board program that was 
SysOp-friendly, distinctly different, 
appealing, and complex enough to 
offer the user a wide variety of fea- 
tures that are normally available 
only on commercial boards or com- 
plicated systems. 

Operating BBS-Board 

This program was written to oper- 
ate with Remote 2, a serial port 
driver by Dan Downard found in 
RAINBOW (November '83), and re- 
vised by Scott M. Taylor (November 
'85). If you prefer to use another 
driver, you'll need to edit a dozen or 
so lines — mainly data pokes. 

BBS-Board will run on a 32K 
Color Computer with a single disk 
drive, but there will be little working 
room on the system disk f or support 
files. The version provided is in- 
tended for two or more drives. 

Only four program files are re- 



quired with this bulletin board sys- 
tem: BOOT . BflS, REMQTE2 - SYS, BBS- 
BQRD.5Y5 and 5Y5DP.EDT. A text 
file generator program called TEXT- 
GEN.EDT is also included to create 
the optional support files: STAR- 
TUP. 5XT, NEW-MBR . 5XT, MES- 
SAGE. HLP and any other files that 
the SysOp may wish to add to his 
BBS. 

SysOp-friendly? You Can't Be 
Serious 

Well, after trying quite a few of the 
other bulletin board programs, I like 
to think so. To start up a personal- 
ized BBS- Board station, all the 
SysOp needs to do is complete the 
following procedure: 

1) The SysOp must have a master 
disk with the four system programs 
on it. Copy BB5-BDRD . SYS and 
5YSDP.EDT to a blank, formatted 
disk, which will be called the online 
disk or the system disk. 




152 



THE RAINBOW 



November 1987 



32K Disk 




2) Insert the online disk in Drive 
# and another formatted disk in 
Drive 1, then run SY5DP.EDT. Be 
sure to enter T at each of the four 
system log drive number prompts! 

3) Enter the appropriate menu 
command to create the four system 
logs that are required for operation: 
USERLDG . SYS, ME55LDG.5YS, 
nCTSLOG.SYS and EXITLDG.SYS. 
Each will be initialized on Drive I. 

4) Select Option 1 1 on the menu to 
set up your SysOp access file as User 
No. I. Enter your name (16 letters 
max), initials (3 letters max) and 
password (6 characters max). Your 
privilege flag is automatically set to 
l A.' Take option "Return to BASIC" 
when finished. 

5) Run TEXTGEN . EDT to create the 
startup f or new members and "Leave 
Messages" help/ support files listed 
above. If you do not want to use 
these three optional files at this time, 
load BBS-BDRD . SYS and insert a 
REM marker in lines 130, 530 and 
1615. Add the following to the pro- 
gram: Line 531 GOTO 505 and Line 
1G1G GOTO 215. 

6) You should now have three 
disks: a master disk with four pro- 
gram files, an online disk with two to 
five files and the system logs disk 
with four files on it. BBS — Board 
should now be ready to run! 

7) Use your master disk to boot 
the system — type RUN "BOOT". At 
the first prompt, remove your master 
disk and insert the online disk in 
Drive 0 and the system logs disk in 
Drive I . Follow the prompts to tailor 
the operating parameters to suit your 
needs. 

Note: BBS- Boardhas been written 
to accept only lowercase commands! 
This also applies to your keyboard, 
as well. It would be advisable to echo 
the output in uppercase, but that is 
a matter of pref erence. The choice of 
cursorcolor is f oryour benefit; a user 
should never see it at all. 

8) Finally, it would be a good idea 
to make backup copies of all three 
system disks now, before it's too late. 



The Remote SysOp Access Feature 

The SysOp can call the BBS from 
a remote computer and gain com- 
plete access to the running system. 
This is accomplished through a back- 
door password and a special input 
command in the main menu board. 
When the SysOp enters a L Z y at the 
main board, a secret password 
prompt will appear (enter carefully). 
This password can be numbers and/ 
or letters of any length. 

If the password is correct, the 
SysOp program 5Y5DP . EDT will run, 
and all input will be changed to 
lowercase/uppercase as received. 
The SysOp will then have complete 
control over all file information. 
Choosing Option 12 on the SysOp 
program menu will return the system 
to running status when the SysOp is 
finished. All the SysOp needs to do 
is reset the date, caller number and 
actslog number for the next user. 

The SysOp must edit Line 995 of 
the BBS-BDRD. SYS program to in- 
clude his name, initials and backdoor 



password where indicated before this 
feature will operate. 

Warning: Do not direct the output 
to the printer while using this fea- 
ture! Your modem will probably be 
plugged into the serial port. 

Command Structure and Features 

The BBS-Board system includes a 
main or central command board, 
seven user-accessible sub-boards, a 
sign-off board and six supporting 
features. A SysOp Chat routine can 
be called by the SysOp from any of 
the system's eight boards by entering 
an uppercase fc X\ 

When running, the program will 
post an abbreviated list of com- 
mands for each of the eight system 
boards. Any entry not listed will 
display the Menu Help for that 
board, giving a short description for 
each command letter. With excep- 
tion to the "Leave Messages" board, 
which will input support file MES- 
SAGE. HLP, an entry of V will also 
activate this Menu Help display.'G' 



M ain Board i„ 

^ (odes . 2 d Wo mfnands 



Sub - b °ar d , npiJ 

h c "anoeai 0S 



c " a "9ea ton a " ds 
an f ?' b 0ar 



read or r 
scan f 0 r 



ev>ew 



°eeded 



^urn ^l 0h,cs '"es 
board 



Tia;n 



; <8 bits) 



On 



Tab! 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 153 



for "Goodbye/ Sign-off and 4 X' for 
"Return to the Main Board" have been 
included in the operational command 
set for each system sub-board. 

In most cases, a user's privilege flag 
must equal or exceed the value required 
to access a sub-board feature: A = 3, B 
= 2, C ~ j. Any guest who does not Jog 
on receives no privilege flag, but will 
still be able to use this system, though 
limited considerably. 

Table I gives a list of commands and 
other features. 

Support File Structure and Extension 
Code 

Unless otherwise amended by the 
SysOp, this system will expect to find 
all of its support files «— whether Help, 
Text, Graphics, Bulletin Boards, or 
Downloads on Drive 0, This is 
accomplished through DSKI5; the sub- 
boards which require its use will search 
for their program files by extension 
classification. This three-letter exten- 
sion code uses the first letter of an 
extension todetermine the filecategory: 
Bulletin, Text or Download. The last 
two letters are used to place the file in 
its appropriate sub-board. 

Bulletin board files: last two letters of 
extension - BD. First letter categories 
are: B - "Bargains," C = "CoCo-Luv," 
N = "BBS News" and all others = 
"Whatever." 

Download program files: last two 
letters of extension = DL. First letter 
categories are: G = "a Game," U = 
"Utility" and all others = "General." 



Graphic art files: last two letters of 
extension ~ RT. The only category 
available is A and the files extension 
must be ART. All graphic art files must 
be 16 lines in length, a full screen. 

Text program files: last two letters of 
extension = XT. First letter categories 
are: C = "Computer, 1 ' 5 = "Support" 
and all others = "General." 

BBS-Bomrd System Logfiles 

The four system logs required for 
operation can easily be accessed and 
maintained through the SYSOP . EDT 
program. Each is a direct access file 
capable of storing from 100 to 300 
records, depending on the log. The 
Actslog will start over again when full, 
while the others will refuse further input 
requests. If such is the case, a "Log- 
full," entry condition message will be 
given. The limit for all message input is 
seven lines - 224 characters. 

General Information 

The access time control of the system 
is somewhat accurate at best, but it's far 
better than nothing at all. I considered 
using a binary clock, routine, but I 
decided it was more trouble than it was 
worth. 

I also wanted my program to accu- 
rately account for the user's access time 
and actions by completely eliminating 
the need for line input through the use 
of an INKEY5 subroutine. But here I 
failed, due, in part, to the slowness of 
ASCII and BASIC itself. I had to rewrite 
the "Leave Message" routine to line 
input. This is the only part of the system 



that an inconsiderate user can hang up! 
It seems that by the time an INKEY5 
command is processed, it's often too 
late to catch all of the next character 
sent. Single input response commands 
work just fine, however. 

When an INKEY5 response is required 
in my program, it jumps to a subroutine 
which keeps track of elapsed and user 
access time in seconds. If a user discon- 
nects, or a key hasn't been pressed in a 
predetermined amount of time, the 
system goes to sign-off. It willthen reset 
in minutes for the next caller if no 
response is given. In the latter case, if 
a single input command was required, 
a warning message would have been 
displayed. 

I'm sorry to say that I do not have a 
program for graphic generation to 
offer, but the GRAFME5S file from Rain- 
bord, written by Dr. Lane Lester for 
rainbow (November '83), can be used 
for this purpose. 

The motoron/ motoroff routine in the 
BBS-BORD „SY5 program will require a 
small hardware project on the part of 
the SysOp before this feature can be of 
any use. The cassette cable motor jack 
must be connected to a phone answer- 
ing switch or similar device. This can 
also be done by splicing the line, but the 
motoron/ motoroff procedure will have 
to be reversed. When working, this 
routine will effectively cut off the caller 
after sign-off by interrupting the phone 
line. 

( Question about this program may be 
directed to the author at 749 Tower 
Blvd., Lorain, OH 44052. Please en- 
close an SASEfor a response,) □ 



Editor's Note: REM0TE2.5Y5 appeared on Page 106 of the November 1985 issue of THE RAINBOW, BBS-BORD requires 
this file for operation. In the interest of conserving space, we are not reprinting thai assembly listing here. You should 
refer to that issue if you wish to type in and assemble REM0TE2. Alternatively, the file will appear on this month's 
RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. To transfer the file from tape to disk, first CLOADM the file. Then type 
5AVErrREMDTE2/SY5'\&H7D00, &H7EFG , &H7D32 and ENTER. 



Listing 1: BOOT. B AS 



10 . . ~ . 

15 1 bbs-board system 
20 ' preload boot file 

25 ' 

30 PCLEAR1:CLS 

35 PRINT@33 , "** BBS-BORD BULLETI 
N SYSTEM **" 
40 CLEAR 512,&H7D00 
45 LOADM "REMOTE2/SYS" : EXEC 
50 PRINT§33 , "** BY: MIKE JORGEN 
SON 198 6 **" : FORX=lT07 50 : NEXT 
55 PRINT@33, '■*** BBS-BORD PRELOA 
D SETUP ***": PRINT: PRINT 
60 LINEIN PUT" DISABLE BREAK: 
<Y/N> ? ";Q$ 

65 IF Q$O ll N"THEN75 

70 POKE &H7D00.0 



75 LINEINPUT" CORKER DISPLAY: 

<Y/N> ? " ;Q$ 
80 IF Q$<> M N ! 'THEN90 
35 POKE &H7D01,0 
90 LINEINPUT" LINEFEEDS / CR : 

<Y/N> ? ";Q$ 
35 IF Q$O"N"THEN105 
100 POKE &H7D02,0 

105 LINEINPUT" LOWERCASE INPUT: 

<Y/N> ? ";Q$ 
110 IF Q$o"Y"THEN120 
115 POKE &H7D04,2 

120 LINEINPUT" UPPERCASE OUTPUT: 

<Y/N> ? ";Q$ 
125 IF Q$<>" Y"THEN13 5 
130 POKE &H7D05,1 

13 5 LINEINPUT" SCROLL TOP LINE: 

<Y/N> ? fr ;Q$ 
140 IF Q$O"Y"THEN150 
145 POKE &H7D08,32 



150 PRINT: PRINT" CURSOR COLOR: 

<ENTER=YELLOW>" 
155 PRINT: PRINT" 1. YELLOW" : PRI 
NT" 2. GREEN <INVISIBLE>" 
: PRINT" 3. DARK BLUE": PRINT" 4 
. LIGHT BLUE": PRINT" 5. PURPLE" 
: PRINT" 6. ORANGE" : PRI NT 1 ' 7. W 
HITE": PRINT" 8. RED ": PRINT : PRIN 
T: PRINT: PRINT 

160 Q$=INKEY$;ON VAL (Q$) GOTO205 , 
170, 17 5, 180, 18 5, 190, 19 5, 200 
165 IFQ$=CHR$(13)THEN205 ELS El 60 
170 POKE &H7D06, 143 :GOTO205 
175 POKE &H7D06, 175:GOTO205 
180 POKE &H7D06, 223 :GOTO205 
185 POKE &H7D06,239:GOTO205 
190 POKE &H7D06,255:GOTO205 
195 POKE &H7D06, 207:GOTO205 
200 POKE &H7D06, 191 
205 RUN "BBS-BORD/SYS" 



154 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



100 
160 
225 
265 
360 
405 
470 
520 
580 



.208 635 107 

...9 700 62 

..61 750. .,,..207 

..57 810 176 

..14 870 24 

.212 920 73 

.202 985 200 

.237 1050 .... .34 

. .42 1120 106 



1180 .......9 

1215 130 

1295 ..... .16 

1365 224 

1470 86 

1535 224 

1590 97 

1655 .... .137 
END ......15 



Listing 2: BB5-BDRD.SYS 

10 ' — 

15 ' the bbs-board 
20 ' communications 

25 1 bulletin system 
30 t — _ , 

3 5 CLEAR5000: PRINTCHR$(12) 
40 DIM TX$(40) ,GR$(16) : CLS 

4 5 PRINT: PRINT" THE BBS-BORD BUL 
LETIN SYSTEM" : PRINT" PLEASE ENTE 
R DATE: <MTH/DA/YR> ": PRINT : LINEI 
NPUT" " ; DA$ : PRINT 

50 LINEINPUT" ACTSLOG DRIVE: <0 
/3> ? » ; AL$ : IFAL$=" "THENAL$="0" 
55 LINEINPUT" USERLOG DRIVE: <0 
/3> ? " ?UL$: IFUL$=""THENUL$="0" 
60 LINEINPUT" MESSLOG DRIVE: <0 
/3> ? " ;ML$: IFML$=""THENML$="0" 
65 LINEINPUT" EXITLOG DRIVE: <0 
/3> ? " ;EL$: IFEL$=" "THENEL$="0" 
70 PRINT : LINEINPUT" START CALLER 
NUMBER: " ; CN$ : CN=VAL (C.N$) : CN$ = 
" " : IFCN>0THENCN=CN-1 
7 5 LINEINPUT" START ACTLOG NUMBE 
R: " ;LA$:AL=VAL(LA$) : LA$="" : IFA 
L>0THENAL=AL-1 
8p r 

85 1 bbs startup routine 
9 0 f -™„ 

95 LG$ = " »: PRINT: PRINT" PLEASE I 
NSERT THE ONLINE DISC .": PRINT" P 
RESS ANY KEY WHEN READY 
100 IFINKEY$=""THEN100 
105 PRINTCHR$(12) : CLS : UN$= » " : PRI 
NT: PRINT" THE B3S IS NOW ON ST 
ANDBY ! ,r : SO=0 : LM=0 : LINEINPUT CM$ 
110 PRINTCHR$ ( 12 ) : CLS : FORX=1TO20 
0 : NEXT : FR$=" " : FLAG=0 : CN— CN+ 1 : AL= 
AL+ 1 : SC^4 50 :CB^22 3: LP-0 

115 r 

120 1 initial welcome text 

125 1 - 

130 FX$="STARTUP/SXT" :GOSUB1320 

135 PRINT" «< "DA$" »>" 

: PRINT '.PRINT: PRINT" YOU ARE CALL 

ER NUMBER: »; CN : PRINT 

140 PRINT" IF YOU 1 RE NOT A MEMBE 

R, PLEASE" : PRINT" ENTER <N> AT T 

HE PROMPT BELOW I " : PRINT : PRINT : PR 

INT" BBS MEMBER: <Y/N> ?" 

145 GOSUB1385:IFCM$-"y"THENPRINT 

?f YES" :GOTO150 ELSEIFCM$="n"THEN 

PRINT" NO" : GOTO1505 ELSE 14 5 

150 PRINT: PRINT" DATA BITS: <1 / 

8=COLOR> ?" 

155 GOSUB1385: BITS=VAL( CM$) : IF B 
ITS<7 OR BITS>8THEN155 
160 PRINT BITS: PRINT : GOSUB 1 3 50 : P 
RINT" -======== USER LOGON ===== 

==== ■■ : PRINT: LP=1 : TR= 1 

165 . , 

170 1 user logon routine 



175 5 

180 PRINT: PRINT" USER NUMBER: 

; : Q$=" " : POKE&H7 D03 , 88 : GOSUB1385 : 

POKE &H7 D03,0: GOTO 19 0 

185 IFTR^4THEN163 5 ELSE180 

190 X=VAL(Q$) :IFX<1 OR X>300THEN 

TR=TR+ 1 : GOTO 18 5 ELSE PR I NT : PRINT : 

GOSUB960:GET #1 , X : NL$-IN$ :TR=1 

19 5 PRINT" PASSWORD: ";:Q$="":P 

OKE&H7D03 , 88 : GOSUB1 3 85 : POKE&H7 D0 

3,0: PRINT: IFUN$=NL$THEN1635 

200 IFQ$=PW$THENNA$=NM$ : F$=FL$ : P 

RINT: PRINT: PRINT" HELLO, "NA $ " < 

"NL$"> lt :GOTO205 ELSETR=TR+1: IFTR 

=4THEN1635 ELSE195 

205 PRINT" LAST LOGON DATE: " LU 
$:LSET LU$=DA$:PUT #1,X: CLOSE #1 
: LP=0 : IFF$=" A"THEN FLAG=3 ELSEIF 
F$="B"THEN FLAG=2 ELSEFLAG=1 
210 C=l: PRINT: PRINT" CHECKING FO 
R E-MAIL MESSAGES; ": PRINT" ONE M 
OMENT PLEASE ..." :GOSUB1085 
215 CM$=NL$:GOSUB1465:TW=300:IF 
FLAG=3THENTA=40 ELSEIF FLAG=2THE 
NTA=30 ELSETA=20 

220 PRINT: PRINT" TIME ALLOCATION 
: " ' TA ; "MINUTES i " :SC=TA±60 

225 1 

230 ' main command menu 

235 1 

240 SC=SC-6:PRINT:CB=239:GOSUB13 
50 : CB=223 : PRINT" ===aw*o»a= MAIN 
BOARD : PRINT : PRINT 

245 PRINT" <ABDGHLNPRT 

U X >" :GOSUB1385: C=INSTR ( "hnxpb 
rldtaugzX",CM$) : PRINT" "CM$;GOSU 
B1465:IFC=14THENGOSUB985:GOTO2 40 

ELSEON C GOTO250,270,290,325, 35 
0, 4 30, 505,610,695,780, 870,1635,9 
95 

2 50 PRINT: GOSUB136£: PRINT" 

MAIN MENU HELP": PRINT: PRINT 
255 PRINT" A) RT / GRAPHICS BOAR 
D": PRINT" B) ULLETIN MESSAGE BOA 
RD": PRINT" D) OWNLOAD PROGRAM FI 
LES": PRINT" G) OODBYE / SIGN OFF 

BBS": PRINT" H) ELP / MAIN MENU 
BOARD" 

260 PRINT" L) EAVE MESSAGES BOAR 
D": PRINT" N) AME LOGON / IF YOU 
CAME": PRINT" ONBOARD AFTER ST 

ARTUP" : PRINT" P) AGE SYSTEM OPER 
ATOR" 

265 PRINT" R) EAD MESSAGES BOARD 
"•.PRINT" T) EXT FILES TO REVIEW" 
•.PRINT" U) SER ACCESS OPTIONS" :P 
RINT" X) DATE & TIME REMAINING": 
SC^SC-15 :GOTO240 

270 UN$=NL$:GOSUB1480:FORX=1TO50 

0:NEXT:GOTO110 

275 i — _____„_. 



280 ' date & time routine 

285 1 

2 90 TA=0 : SS=-SC : GOTO300 

29 5 TA=TA+l:SS=SS-60 

300 IF SS>59THEN295 

305 TA$=STR$ (TA) : SS$=STR$ (SS) : PR 

INT: PRINT: PRINT" " DA$ " / T 

IME: "TA$;SS$:SC=SC-2 :GOTO2 40 

310 » 

315 ' sysop page routine 

320 < — - 

325 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" OK, PAG IN 
G SYSTEM OPERATOR ..."-.PRINT" "; 
:FORX=1TO10: PRINT" / ";:SOUND110 
, 5: NEXT: PRINT 

330 PRINT" ! i THE SYSOP EAS BEEN 
PAGED ! ! " :SC=SC-6:GOTO240 

335 1 

340 ' bulletin boards 
345 i „_ 

350 SC=SC-3: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" - 
===== BULLETIN BOARD =======" ;P 



RINT 

355 PRINT: PRINT" < G H R S X >": 
GOSUB1385 : C-INSTR ( "hsrgxX" , CM$) : 
PRINT" " CM$ : GOSUB1 4 6 5 : IFC=6THENG 
OSUB985:GOTO350 ELSEON C GOTO 3 60 
,375,405,1635,240 

360 GOSUB 1 3 55 : PRINT" BULLET 
IN SYSTEM HELP": PRINT: PRINT 
365 PRINT" G) OODBYE / SIGN OFF" 
: PRINT" H) ELP / THIS BOARD" : PRI 
NT" R) EAD BULLETIN NEWS": PRINT" 

S) CAN TOPIC HEADERS" : PRINT" X) 

RETURN TO MAIN" : PRINT 
370 GOSUB1355:SC=SC-15:GOT0355 
375 PRINT: DF=0 : FORX=3TO 1 1 : DSKI$0 
, 17 , X , A$ , B$ : A$=A$+LEFT$ ( B$ , 120 ) : 
FORK=0TO7 :SB$=MID$(A$ ,K*3 2+1, 8) : 
XT$=MID$ (A$ , K*32+9 ,3) : Y=ASC(SB$) 
: IFY=25 5THENK-7 : X« 1 1 : GOTO 395 
380 IFY=0 OR RIGHT$(XT$,2)<>"BD" 
THEN395 ELSEIFCO3THEN3 90 
385 IFSB$OFX$THEN395 ELSEFX$-FX 
$+"/"+XT$ :GOSUB1320:GOTO350 
390 DF— I : PRINT" "SB$" / ";: 
D$=LEFT$ (XT$ , 1) : IFD$="C"THENPRIN 
T"COCO-LUV"ELSEIFD$="B"THENPRINT 
" BARGAINS" ELSEIFD$="N"THENPRINT" 
BBS -NEWS" ELSE PRINT" WHATEVER" 
395 NEXTK, X: IFC=3THENGOSUB1295:G 
OTO3 50 ELSEIFDF=1THEN3 50 
400 PRINT" SORRY, "NA$ : PRINT" N 
O SYSTEM BULLETINS TO SCAN! " :SC= 
SC-5:GOTO350 

405 PRINT: PRINT" OK, ENTER A BOA 
RD OF CHOICE ?": PRINT" 

410 GOSUB1330: IFL>8 OR L<3THENGO 
SUB1290:GOTO350 ELSE375 

415 1 

420 1 read message board 

425 » — 

430 SC=SC-3 : PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" = 
^^=== READ MESSAGES =======» :P 

RINT 

43 5 PRINT: PRINT" <EGHKRSX 
> " : GOSUB13 8 5 : C=INSTR ( " hsrekgxX" 
,CM$) : PRINT" "CM$ : GO SUB 14 65 : IFC= 
8THENGOSUB98 5 : GOT04 30 ELSEON C G 
OT04 40,455,455,4 70,475,163 5, 240 
440 GOSUB1355: PRINT" READ ME 

SSAGE HELP FILE" : PRINT: PRINT 
445 PRINT" E) MAIL MESSAGE CHECK 
": PRINT" G) OODBYE / SIGN OFF" : P 
RINT" H) ELP / THIS BOARD" : PRINT 
" K) ILL E-MAIL MESSAGES ": PRINT " 

R) EAD SYSTEM MESS AGES ": PRINT" 
S) CAN MESSAGE HEADERS ": PRINT" X 
) RETURN TO MAIN" : PRINT 
450 GOSUB1355:SC=SC-16:GOT0435 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 55 



455 PRINT : PRINT" OK, AT WHAT NUM 

BER WOULD YOU"; PRINT" LIKE TO ST 

ART ' <l-300> ? " ; : LP=1 

4 60 Q$= ,f " : GOSUB1 3 8 5 : PRINT : SM=VAL 

(Q$) :LP=0: IFC=2THENSC=SC-60 ELSE 

SC=SC~90 

465 GOSUB1085:GOTO430 

470 IFFR$<>" "THENGOSUB12 80 :GOT04 

30 ELSEPRINT: PRINT" OK, CHECKING 

FOR E-MAIL; JUST": PRINT" A MOM 
ENT , PLEASE > . . " : GOT04 6 5 
475 PRINT: IF FLAG<2THENPRINT" SO 
RRY, "NA$: PRINT" ONLY MEMBERS H 
AVE MAIL TO KI LL" : GOT04 3 0 
480 PRINT" OK, ENTER THE MESSAGE 

NUMBER" *. PRINT" OF YOURS TO KILL 
: <l~300> PRINT" " ; : LP=1 
4 35 Q$= " " : GOSUB1 3 8 5 : PRINT : X=VAL ( 
Q$) : LP=0: IFX>0 AND X<301THEN465 
ELSEPRINT: PRINT" SORRY , "NA$:PR 
INT" THAT'S NOT AN E-MAIL NUMBER 
! »:SC=SC-2:GOTO4 30 

495 1 leave message board 

500 f 

505 SC=SC-3 ; PRINT : PRINT : PRINT" - 
LEAVE MESSAGES =======» ;P 

HINT 

510 PRINT: PRINT" <EGHLSX> 
" : GOSUB138 5 ; Q-INSTR ( " helgxsX" , CM 
$) : PRINT" "CM$ : GOSUB14 65 : IFQ=6TH 
ENGOSUB900:GOTO505 ELSEIFQ=7THEN 
GOSUB985 :GOTO505 ELS EON Q GOTO 5 3 
0, 535, 535,1635, 240 

515 GOSUB1355: PRINT" LEAVE 

MESSAGE MENU" : PRINT: PRINT 
520 PRINT" E) MAIL SYSTEM LETTER 
": PRINT" G) OODBYE / SIGN OFF" : P 
RINT" H) ELP / BBS MESSAGES" : PRI 
NT" L) EAVE SYSTEM MESSAGE" : PRIN 
T" S) CAN USERLOG FILE ": PRINT" X 
) RETURN TO MAIN": PRINT 
525 GOSUBI3 55 : SC=SC-15 : GOTO510 
530 FX$="MESSAGE/HLP" : GOSUB1320 : 
GOTQ505 

53 5 IF FLAG< 2 THEN PRINT : PRINT" SO 
RRY , "NA$: PRINT" YOU MUST BE A 
MEMBER TO LEAVE" : PRINT" SYSTEM M 
ESSAGES OR E-MAIL! GOTO 2 40 
540 C=6:GOSUB1085 : IFMF< 1THENGOSU 
B1285:GOTO505 

545 IFQ=3THENI$=" ALL" :GOT0575 

550 PRINT: PRINT" ENTER <3> INITI 

ALS PLEASE: ";:LP=1 

555 Q$="" :GOSUB1385:PRINT;I$=Q$: 

LP=0:IF LEN (Q$) =3THEN565 

560 PRINT: PRINT" YOU MUST ENTER 

3 INITIALS FOR" : PRINT" ALL E-MAI 

L TO ANOTHER MEMBER i " : GOTO505 

565 IFNL$=I$THENPRINT: PRINT" SOR 

RY , "NA$: PRINT" YOU CAN'T LEAVE 

YOUR OWN MAIL! " :GOTO505 
570 GOSUB1255 : IFNKO1THEN505 ELS 
EGOSUB9 50 : IF MBRO 1THENGOSUB1280 
:GOTO505 

575 PRINT: PRINT" SUBJECT: <8 LE 
TTERS MAX> ?": PRINT 11 " ; : LP=1 
580 Q$— " " : GOSUB1385 : PRINT : S$=Q$ : 
LP=0:L=LEN(Q$) :IFL>8 OR L<3THENG 
OSUB1290:GOTO505 
585 SC=SC-13 : IFQ^2TKENSC=SC-3 
590 GOSUB100 5 : PRINT : GOSUB1355: CB 
=223:GOTO505 

595 . _ 

600 1 download files board 

605 1 

610 SC=SC-3 : PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" = 
— — DOWNLOADS BOARD ==*====" :P 



RINT 

615 PRINT: PRINT" < D G H S X >": 
GOSUB138 5: C=INSTR ( "hsdgxX" , CM$) : 
PRINT" "CM$:GOSUB1465: I FC=6THENG 
OSUB985:GOTO610 ELSEON C GOTO620 
,635,665,1635,240 

620 GOSUB1355: PRINT" DOWNL 
OAD MENU HELP" : PRINT: PRINT 
625 PRINT" D) OWNLOAD SYSTEM FIL 
ES" : PRINT" G) OODBYE / SIGN OFF" 
: PRINT" H) ELP / THIS BOARD" : PRI 
NT" S) CAN DOWNLOAD HEADERS": PRI 
NT" X) RETURN TO MAIN": PRINT 
630 GOSUB1355:SC=SC-~15:GOT0615 
635 PRINT : DF=0 : FORX=3T011 : DS KI $0 
, 17,X, A$,B$: A$=A$+LEFT$ (B$, 120) : 
FORK= 0TO7 : S B$ =M I D$ ( A$ , K*3 2 + 1 , 8 ) : 
XT$=MID$ (A$,K*32+9,3) : Y=ASC(SB$) 
: IFY=255THENK=7 :X=11 :GOT0655 
640 IFY=0 OR RIGHT$(XT$,2)<>"DL" 
THEN655 ELSEIFCO3THEN650 
645 IFSB$OFX$THEN655 ELSECM$ = FX 
$:GOSUB14 65: FX$=FX$+"/ "+XT$ : GOSU 
B1320:GOTO610 

650 DF=1: PRINT" "SB$" / ";: 

D$=LEFT$ ( XT$ , 1) :IFD$="G M THENPRIN 

T" A GAME"ELSEIFD$ = "U 1, THENPRINT"U 

TILITY "ELSEPRINT 1S GENERAL" 

655 NEXTK, X : IFC = 3THENGOSUB12 9 5 ; G 

OTO610 ELSEIFDF=1THEN610 

660 PRINT" SORRY, "NA$ : PRINT" N 

O DOWNLOAD FILES TO SCANi":SC=SC 

-5:GOTO610 

665 PRINT: IF FLAG< 3THENPRINT" SO 
RRY , "NA$: PRINT" ONLY VALIDATED 
MEMBERS CAN" : PRINT" DOWNLOAD OU 
R PROGRAM FILES i":GOTO240 
670 PRINT" OK, ENTER A PROGRAM F 
ILENAME ?": PRINT" »; 
675 GOSUB1330:IFL>8 OR LOTHENGO 
SUB1290 :GOTO610 ELSE635 

680 1 ~ 

68 5 * text program board 

690 ' 

695 SC=SC~3: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" = 
======== TEXT FILES =========": p 

RINT 

700 PRINT: PRINT" < G H R S X >": 
G0SUB138 5 : C^INSTR ( "hsrgxX" , CMS) : 
PRINT" "CM$ : GOSUB1465 r IFC—6THENG 
OStJB985:GOT0695 ELSEON C GOTO705 
,720,750, 1635,240 

705 GOSUB13 55 : PRINT" TEXT 

PROGRAM HELP": PRINT: PRINT 

710 PRINT" G) OODBYE / SIGN OFF" 

: PRINT" H) ELP / THIS BOARD" : PRI 

NT" R) EVIEW TEXT FILES" : PRINT" 

S) CAN TEXT HEADERS" : PRINT" X) R 

ETURN TO MAIN" : PRINT 

715 GOSUB1355:SC-SC-15:GOTO700 

7 20 PRINT: DF-0 : FORX=3T011 : DSKI$0 

, 17 , X , A$ , B$ : A$~A$+LEFT$ (B$ , 120) : 

FORK=0TO7 : SB$=MID$ { A$ , K*3 2+ 1,8) : 

XT$-MID$(A$,K*3 2+-9,3) : Y=ASC(SB$) 

: IFY^255THENK=7 :X=11: GOTO7 40 

725 IFY=0 OR RIGHTS (XT$, 2) <>"XT M 

THEN740 ELSEIFC0 3THEN7 35 

730 IFSB$OFX$THEN740 ELSEFX$=F>: 

$+"/"+XT$ :GCSUB1320 : GOT0695 

735 DF-1: PRINT" "SB$" / " ; : 

D$-LEFT$(XT$, 1} :IFD$="C"THENPRIN 

T" COMPUTER" ELSE IFD$="S"THENPR INT 

"SUPPORT" ELSEPRINT" GENERAL" 

7 4 0 NEXTK , X : IFC=3THENGOSUB12 9 5 : G 

OT0695 ELSEI FDF=1THEN695 

745 PRINT" SORRY , "NA$ : PRINT" N 

O TEXT FILES FOUND TO SCAN! " :SC= 

SC-5:GOT0695 



7 50 PRINTrIF FLAG<1THENPRIN'T" SO 
RRY , "NA$: PRINT" YOU MUST BE COM 
E A MEMBER TO"; PRINT" REVIEW OUR 

T E XT F I LE PROGRAMS I " : GOT02 40 
755 PRINT" OK, ENTER A PROGRAM F 
ILENAME ?": PRINT" «; 
760 GOSUB1330 : IFL>8 OR L<3THENGO 
SUB1290 :GOT0695 ELSE720 
765 i 

770 1 graphic-art board 
775 * 

780 SC=SC-3 : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT" « 
===== GRAPHIC-ART BOARD : P 

RINT 

785 PRINT: PRINT" < G H S V X >" : 
G0SUB1385 : C=INSTR ( "hsvgxX" , CM$) : 
PRINT" "CM$ : G0SUB1465 : IFC=6THENG 
OSUB985 :GOTO780 ELSEON C GOTO790 
,805, 840, 1635, 240 

790 GOSUB1355: PRINT" GRAP 
HIC-ART HELP": PRINT: PRINT 
795 PRINT" G) OODBYE / SIGN OFF" 
: PRINT" H) ELP / THIS BOARD" : PRI 
NT" S) CAtf GRAPHIC FILES ": PRINT" 

V) IEW GRAPHIC FILES" : PRINT" X) 

RETURN TO MAIN": PRINT 
800 GOSUB1355:SC=SC-15:GOT0785 
805 IF BITS=7TH EN PRINT : PRINT" SO 
RRY, YOU MUST RECEIVE 8 DATA" : PR 
INT" BITS TO VIEW COLOR GRAPHICS 
I ":SC=SC-2:GOTO240 

810 PRINT : DF=0 : FORX=3T011 : DSKI$0 
, 17 , X , A$ , B$ : A$-A$+LEFT$ (B$ , 120) : 
FORK=0TO7 : SB$=MID$ ( A$ , K*32+l , 8 ) : 
XT$=MID$ ( A$ , K*32+9 ,3): Y=ASC (SB$) 
: IFY^2 55THENK=7 : X=11:GOTO830 
815 IFY=0 OR XT$<> "ART "THEN 830 
820 IFC<>3THEN825 ELSEIFSB$OFX$ 
THEN830 ELSEFX$=FX$+"/"+XT$ : GOSU 
B1340:PRINT:GOTO780 
825 DF=1: PRINT" "SB$" / G 
RAPHICS" 

830 NEXTK, X : IFC-3THENGOSUB1 29 5 : G 
OTO780 ELSEIFDF-1THEN7 80 
835 PRINT" SORRY, "NA$: PRINT" N 
O GRAPHIC-ART FILES TO SCAN!" :SC 
=SC-5 :GOTO780 

840 PRINT: IF FLAG< 1THENPRINT" SO 
RRY , "NA$: PRINT" YOU MUST BECOME 
A MEMBER TO" : PRINT" VIEW OUR GR 
APHIC-ART FILES !" :GOTO240 
84 5 PRINT" OK, ENTER A GRAPHIC F 
ILENAME ?": PRINT" " ; 
850 GOSUB1330: IFL>8 OR LOTHENGO 
SUB1290:GOTO780 ELSE805 
855 « — _„„ 

8 60 1 user access board 
865 1 — — 

8 70 SC=SC-3: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" = 
===== USER ACCESS OPTIONS ====»: P 
RINT 

875 PRINT: PRINT" <CDGHSX> 
" : GOSUB138 5 : C=INSTR ( "hscdgxX" , CM 
$) : PRINT" " CM$ : GOSUB14 6 5 : IF07TH 
ENGOSUB98 5:GOTO870 ELSEON C GOTO 
8 80 , 8 95 , 905, 94 0, 1635, 2 40 
880 GOSUB1355: PRINT" ACCE 
SS MENU HELP": PRINT; PRINT 
885 PRINT" C) HANGE A PASSWORD": 
PRINT" D) ISPLAY TRACER FILE" : PR 
INT" G) OODBYE / SIGN OFF": PRINT 
" H) ELP / THIS BOARD": PRINT" S) 
CAN USERLOG FILE" : PRINT" X) RET 
URN TO MAIN" : PRINT 
890 GOSUB1355:SC=SC-15:GOT0875 
395 GOSUB900:GOTO870 
900 SC=SC-12 :PRINT:GOSUB960:FORX 
=1TO300:GET #1 , X: IFPW$=STRING$ ( 6 



156 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



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,32)THENNEXT:GOT0955 ELSEPRINT" 
"NM$" < " IN$ "> " : NEXT : GOT0955 

905 PRINT: IF FLAG<1THENPRINT" SO 
RRY , "NA$: PRINT" YOU DON'T HAVE 

A PASSWORD YET I " : GOTO870 
910 PRINT" CHANGE USER PASSWORD: 

<Y/N> ?":GOSUB1385 
915 IFCM$o"y "THENPRINT" NO": GOT 
0870 ELSEPRINT" YES" : PRINT : PRINT 
" CURRENT PASSWORD: ";:LP=1:Q$= 
"" : GOSUB13 8 5 : PRINT : P$=Q$ : LP=0 : IF 
LEN (Q$) O6THEN870 

920 PRINT : GOSUB960 : FORX=1TO300 : G 
ET #1,X: IFIN$=NL$ AND PW$=P$THEN 
925 ELSENEXT: PRINT" SORRY, PASSW 
ORD IS INCORRECT ?":GOT09 35 
925 PRINT" TO WHAT? ENTER 6 NEW 
LETTERS ! " : PRINT" " ; : LP=1 : Q$=" " : 
GOSUB13 8 5 : PRINT : P$=Q$ : LP=0 : IFLEN 
(Q$)<>6THEN935 

930 LSET PW$=P$:PUT # 1 , X: PRINT : P 

RINT" YOUR PASSWORD IS NOW: "P$ 

935 CLOSE #l:SC=SC-3 :GOTO870 

940 PRINT: IF FLAG<1THENPRINT" SO 

RRY , THE SYSTEM TRACER FILE" :PRI 

NT" IS AN OPTION FOR MEMBERS ONL 

Y!":SC=SC-2:GOTO870 

945 PRINT" SYSTEM ACTIONS: "LG$: 

SC=SC-4 :GOTO870 

950 MBR=0:GOSUB9 60:FORX=1TO300:G 
ET #1,X:IFI$=IN$THEN MBR=l:GOT09 
55 ELSENEXT 

955 CLOSE # 1 : SC=SC-2 : RETURN 
960 OPEN"D" , # 1 , "USERLOG/SYS : "+UL 
$,36:FIELD #1,10 AS LU$,16 AS NM 
$ , 6 AS PW$,3 AS IN$,1 AS FL$ 
965 RETURN 

970 . 

975 ' sysop access routine 
980 ' 

985 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" HELLO, " 
NA$ : PRINT" THE SYSTEM OPERATOR I 
S ONLINE I " : X=0 : PRINT 
990 LINEINPUT" > " ; S$ : X=X+ 1 : IFS$ 
<>""THEN990 ELSEPRINT" > GOODBYE 

"NA$ : SC=SC-X*5 : RETURN 
995 IFNL$o"sop"AND NA$o"sysop' 
s name"THEN250 ELSEPRINT : LINEINP 
UT" PASSWORD: " ; P$ : IFP$o"back 
door"THENGOSUB14 65 :GOTO1660 ELSE 

LOAD"SYSOP/EDT" , R 

1000 •' 

1005 ' enter message routine 

1010 1 

1015 PRINT: CB=23 9 : GOSUB13 50 : PRIN 
T" ======== BBS WRITER ======= 

= " :CC=PEEK(&H7D06) : PRINT 

1020 PRINT" OK, LEAVE YOUR MESSA 

GE. PRESS": PRINT" <ENTER> ON AN 

OPEN LINE TO END" : PRINT" ROUTIN 
E. 7 LINES MAXIMUM ! 32": PRINT" 

CHARACTER LIMIT PER LINE ..." 
1025 PRINT: PRINT" ////////////// 
////////////////" : POKE&H7D06 , 14 3 
: PRINT : M$ = " " : C=7 : Y=l 
1030 LINEINPUTQ$ : IFQ$=" "THEN10 55 

ELSEX=LEN (Q$) 
1035 IFX=32THEN1045 ELSEIFX<32TH 
ENQ$=Q$+STRING$ ( 3 2 -X, 3 2 ) : PRINT : G 
OTO1045 

1040 Q$=LEFT$ (Q$ , 3 2 ) : PRINT: PRINT 

"- LINE# " ; Y : PRINTQ$ 

1045 M$=M$+Q$:IFY<7THENY=Y+1:PRI 

NT"~" ;Y: GOTO 1030 ELSEPRINT 

1050 PRINT: PRINT" YOUR MESSAGE H 

AS REACHED THE": PRINT" LIMIT! S 

AVE AS IS: <Y/N> ?" :GOTO1065 



1055 IFM$=" "THENPOKE&H7 D06 , CC : RE 
TURN ELSEPRINT: PRINT 
1060 PRINT" OK, "NA$: PRINT" SAV 
E MESSAGE TO DISC: <Y/N> ?" 
1065 POKE&H7D06 , CC : SC=SC-Y*4 5 : GO 
SUB1375: IFCM$<>"y "THENPRINT" NO" 
: RETURN ELSEIFLM=1THEN1220 

1070 ' 

1075 'message log processing 

1080 » 

1085 OPEN"D" , # 1 , "MESSLOG/SYS : "+M 
L$, 248: FIELD #1,10 AS DT$ , 8 AS S 
B$,3 AS TH$,3 AS BH$,224 AS MS$ 
1090 IFSM<1 OR SM>299THENSM=1 
1095 PRINT: ON C GOTO110 5 , 1120 , 11 
40, 1155,118 5, 1200, 1205 
1100 GOT01215 

1105 FORX=1TO300:GET #1,X:IFTH$= 

NL$THEN1115 ELSENEXT 

1110 PRINT" SORRY, "NA$ : PRINT" 

NO MAIL IN YOUR MESSAGE BOXi":PR 

INT:GOT01215 

1115 PRINT" OK, YOU HAVE SOME MA 

IL IN YOUR": PRINT" SYSTEM MESSAG 

E BOX I ": PRINT :GOT01215 

1120 FORX=SM TO300:GET #1,X:IFTH 

$="ALL"THEN1135 ELSENEXT 

1125 IFMK=1THENPRINT: PRINT: PRINT 

" END OF MESSAGE SCAN . . . " : PRINT 

:GOT01215 

1130 PRINT" SORRY, "NA$ : PRINT" 
NO MESSAGES FOUND TO SCAN!": PRIN 
T:GOT01215 

1135 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" MESSAGE 

#";X; : PRINT" " DT$ : PRINT" 

SUBJECT: "SB$ : PRINT" LEFT BY: "B 

H$ : MK= 1 : PRINT : NEXT : GOTO 1125 

1140 FORX=SM TO300:GET #1,X:IFTH 

$=" ALL"THEN1165 ELSENEXT 

1145 IFMK=1THENPRINT: PRINT: PRINT 

" END OF MESSAGE LOG ...": PRINT: 

GOT01215 

1150 PRINT" SORRY, "NA$ : PRINT" 
NO MESSAGES FOUND TO READ!": PRIN 
T:GOT01215 

1155 FORX=1TO300:GET #1,X:IFTH$= 

NL$THEN1165 ELSENEXT 

1160 IFMK=1THENPRINT: PRINT: PRINT 

" END OF E-MAIL MESSAGES . . . " : PR 

INT:GOT01215 ELSE1110 

1165 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" MESSAGE 

#" ;X; : PRINT" " DT$ : PRINT" 

SUBJECT: "SB$ : PRINT" LEFT BY: "B 

H$ : PRINT : PRINTMS$ 

1170 PRINT:MK=1:IFX=300THEN1145 

1175 PRINT" NEXT MESSAGE: <Y/N> 

? " : Q$="" 
1180 GOSUB1385: IFCM$="y "THENPRIN 
T" YES": NEXT ELSEIFCM$="n"THENPR 
INT" NO":GOT01145 ELSE1180 
1185 GET jfl/X: IFTH$=NL$THEN1195 
1190 PRINT" SORRY, "NA$: PRINT" 
THAT'S NOT YOURS TO KILL!": PRINT 
:GOT01215 

1195 LSET SB$=STRING$ (8,32) : LSET 
TH$=STRING$ (3,32): LSET BH$=STRI 
NG$(3,32) : LSET MS$=STRING$ ( 224 , 3 
2):PUT #1,X:PRINT" OK, "NA$:PRI 
NT" YOUR MESSAGE HAS BEEN KILLED 
! " : PRINT:GOT01215 

1200 MF=0:FORX=1TO300:GET #1,X:I 
FDT$=STRING$ ( 10 , 3 2 ) THENMF=X : GOTO 
1215 ELSENEXT :GOT012 15 
1205 GET #1,MF:LSET DT$=DA$ : LSET 
SB$=S$:LSET TH$=I$:LSET BH$=NL$ 
:LSET MS$=M$:PUT #1,MF 
1210 PRINT" OK, "NA$ : PRINT" YOU 



R MESSAGE HAS BEEN SAVED!" 
1215 CLOSE #1:SM=0:MK=0:RETURN 
1220 OPEN"D" , # 1 , "EXITLOG/SYS : "+E 
L$, 250: FIELD #1,10 AS DT$,16 AS 
NM$,224 AS MS$ 
1225 PRINT: IFLM=1THEN12 3 5 
1230 MF=0:FORX=1TO100:GET #1,X:I 
FDT$=STRING$ (10,32) THENMF=X : GOTO 
1215 ELSENEXT: GOT01215 
12 3 5 GET #1,MF:LSET DT$=DA$ : LSET 
NM$=NA$ : LSET MS$=M$:PUT #1,MF:G 
OTO1210 

1240 ' 

1245 ' system message base 

1250 ' 

1255 NK=0:FORX=1TOLEN(I$) : Y=ASC( 

MID$(I$,X,1) ) :IF(Y>64 AND Y<91)0 

R(Y>96 AND Y<123 ) THENNEXT : NK=1 : R 

ETURN ELSEIFKN=1THEN12 6 5 

1260 PRINT: PRINT" SORRY, YOU CAN 

NOT USE NUMBERS" : PRINT" FOR E-MA 

IL INITIALS! ": RETURN 

1265 PRINT: PRINT" SORRY, YOU CAN 

NOT USE NUMBERS" : PRINT" IN YOUR 

USERLOG FILENAME! " : RETURN 

1270 PRINT: PRINT" THOSE LETTERS 

HAVE BEEN TAKEN !": PRINT" PLEASE 

CHOOSE <3> OTHERS. " :GOT01565 

1275 PRINT: PRINT" SOMEONE ALREAD 

Y HAS THAT NAME !": PRINT" PLEASE 

CHOOSE ANOTHER ONE . " : GOTO1510 

1280 PRINT: PRINT" SORRY, "NA$:P 

RINT" ONLY MEMBERS CAN RECIEVE M 

AIL! " : SC=SC-2 : RETURN 

1285 PRINT" SORRY, "NA$ : PRINT" 

BUT, OUR MESSAGE LOG IS FULL!":S 

C=SC-5: RETURN 

1290 PRINT: PRINT" SORRY, BUT YOU 
MUST ENTER 3 TO" : PRINT" 8 LETTE 
RS FOR ALL FILENAMES !": RETURN 
1295 PRINT : PRINT" SORRY, "NA$:P 
RINT" BUT, I CAN'T FIND THAT FIL 
E ?":SC=SC-3:RETURN 

1300 ' 

1305 f text/graphic display 

1310 ' 

1315 ' TEXT ROUTINE 

1320 OPEN"I" , # 1 , FX$ : PRINT 

1325 IFNOT EOF ( 1 ) THEN LINEINPUT# 

1,TX$:PRINT TX$ : SC=SC-1 : GOT01325 

ELSECLOSE # 1 : RETURN 
1330 LP=1:Q$="" : POKE&H7D04 , 1 : GOS 
UB1385: POKE&H7D04 , 2 : L=LEN (Q$) : FX 
$=Q$ : FX$=FX$+STRING$ ( 8-LEN ( FX$ ) , 
3 2): LP=0 : PRINT : RETURN 
1335 ' GRAPHICS ROUTINE 
1340 OPEN" I " , # 1 , FX$ : PRINT 
1345 F0RG=1T016: INPUT #1,GR$(G): 
PRINT GR$(G) ;: NEXT: CLOSE #1:SC=S 
C-16 : Q$= " " : GOSUB1 3 8 5: RETURN 
1350 IF BITS=8THENGOSUB1365:RETU 
RN ELSEPRINT: RETURN 
1355 IF BITS=8THENGOSUB13 65 : PRIN 

rp II === — == = = = = = === — = = = ===== == = = = = 

=": RETURN 

1360 PRINT: PRINT" ============== 

=============== = •• : RETURN 

1365 PRINT: PRINT" ============= 

================" : PRINT" "+STRIN 

G$(30,CB) : RETURN 

1370 ' 

1375 ' inkey response routine 

1380 ' 

1385 TIMER=0:SC=SC-1:RS=0 

1390 CM$=INKEY$ : LQ=LEN (Q$) : IFCM$ 

=CHR$(8)AND LQ< 1THENCM$= " " 

1395 IFCM$=""THEN1415 ELSETIMER= 



158 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



j3:RS=j3: IFCM$=CHR$ (8)THEN1410 ELS 
EIFLP=lTHEN14j3j3 ELSERETURN 
1400 IFCM$OCHR$(13)THENQ$=Q$+CM 
$:PRINTCM$; ELSERETURN 
1405 IFLQ<17THEN1390 ELSERETURN 
1410 Q$=LEFT$ (Q$ , LEN (Q$ ) -1) : PRIN 
TCHR$(8) ;:GOTO1390 
1415 IFTIMER<60THEN1390 
1420 TIMER=0:RS=RS+1:SC=SC-1:IFS 
C<1THEN1445 ELSEIFLP=1THEN1440 
1425 IFSC<TW THENPRINT: PRINT" SO 
RRY, "NA$ : PRINT" BUT YOUR TIME 
IS ALMOST GONEI":TW=0 
1430 IFRS=60THENPRINT: PRINT" YOU 
MUST RESPOND IN 30 SECONDS " : PRI 
NT" "NA$ " ..." 

1435 IFRSO0THEN1390 ELSE1445 

1440 IFRS<150THEN1390 

1445 IFSO=1THEN1660 ELSE1635 

14 50 ' 

1455 ' actslog processing 

1460 1 

1465 IFCM$=CHR$(13)THENCM$="? U 
1470 AC=LEN (LG$) +LEN (CM$) :IFAC>2 
53THENLG$=LEFT$ (LG$ ,253) : CLOSE $ 
1 : GOSUB1480 : AL=AL+1 : CM$=NL$ 
1475 LG$=LG$+CM$+" ": RETURN 
1480 IFAL>150THENAL= 1 
1485 OPEN"D" , #1, "ACTSLOG/SYS: "+A 
L$: WRITE #1,LG$:PUT # 1 , AL: CLOSE 
#1:LG$=" ": RETURN 

1490 1 

1495 1 guest logon routine 

1500 1 

1505 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ====== G 

UEST ACCESS LOG ======" : GOSUB9 60 



: PRINT 

1510 PRINT: PRINT" FIRST NAME: " 
; :KN=1:LP=1 

1515 Q$=" " : GOSUB1385 : IFLEN (Q$) <3 

THEN1510 ELSEPRINT:FR$=Q$:I$=Q$: 

GOSUB1255 : IFNKO1THEN1510 

1520 PRINT: PRINT" LAST NAME: » 

; : Q$=" " : GOSUB1385: IFLEN (Q$ ) <3THE 

N1520 ELSEPRINT:LS$=Q$:I$=Q$:GOS 

UB1255 :IFNK<>1THEN1520 

1525 NA$=FR$+" "+LS$ : LS$=" " : IFLE 

N(NA$)<17THEN1535 

1530 PRINT: PRINT" SORRY, BUT A U 
SERLOG FILENAME" : PRINT" CANNOT E 
XCEED 16 LETTERS i " : GOTO1510 
1535 FORX=1TO300:GET #1,X:IFLEFT 
$ (NM$ , LEN (NA$ ) ) =NA$THEN1275 ELSE 
NEXT: PRINT: PRINT 

1540 PRINT" DO YOU WANT TO BECOM 
E A MEMBER" : PRINT" OF THIS BBS B 
OARD: <Y/N> ? " : KN=0 : LP=0 : GOSUB1 
385:IFCM$o"y"THENPRINT" NOT YET 
" : FLAG=0 : GOTO1600 

1545 PRINT" YES": PRINT: PRINT: FOR 
X=1TO300 : GET # 1 , X : IFPW$=STRING $ ( 6 
, 32)THENMF==X:GOTO1560 ELSENEXT : P 
RINT" SORRY, "NA$: PRINT" BUT OU 
R USERLOG FILE IS FULL!" 
1550 PRINT" PLEASE DON'T JIANG UP 
, BUT FEEL" : PRINT" FREE TO USE O 
UR BBS; AND LEAVE" : PRINT" A SYSO 
P MESSAGE AT SIGN OFF ! " : FLAG=0 
1555 GOTO1600 

1560 PRINT" i I ! <GREAT> ! ! 1 " 
1565 PRINT: PRINT" ENTER <3> INIT 
IALS FOR YOUR E-": PRINT" MAIL, 



"NA$" : " ; : LP=1 :Q$="" :GOSUB1385 
1570 PRINT: I$=Q$ : IFLEN (Q$) <>3THE 
N1565 ELSEIFQ$="sop"THEN1270 
1575 GOSUB1255: IFNKo 1THEN1565 
1580 FORX=1TO300 : GET #1,X:IFIN$= 
I$THEN1270 ELSENEXT :TR=1 
1585 PRINT: PRINT" PASSWORD? YO 
U MUST ENTER <6>": PRINT" LETTERS 
, PLEASE: "; : Q$=" " : POKE&H7D03 , 8 
8 : GOSUB138 5: POKE&H7D0 3 , 0 : PRINT : P 
$=Q$: IFLEN (Q$)=6THEN1590 ELSETR= 
TR+1: IFTR=4THEN1635 ELSE1585 
1590 LSET LU$=DA$:LSET NM$=NA$:L 
SET PW$=P$:LSET IN$=I$:LSET FL$= 
"C":PUT #1,MF 

1595 FIAG=1:NL$=I$:PRINT:PRINT" 
YOUR GUEST USER NUMBER IS:";MF 
1600 CLOSE #1: LP=0 : PRINT : GOSUB13 
60: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" DATA BITS: 

<7/8=COLOR> ?" 
1605 GOSUB1385:BITS=VAL(CM$) : IF 
BITS<7 OR BITS>8THEN1605 
1610 PRINT BITS:GOSUB1355 
1615 FX$ = ' , NEW-MBR/SXT" : GOSUB1320 
:GOT0215 

1620 » 

1625 ' goodbye: sign off 

1630 ' 

1635 CLOSE #1:GOSUB1480: IFSC<450 

THENSC=450 :SO=l: LP=0 

1640 PRINT:CB=255:GOSUB1350:PRIN 

T" ========== SIGN OFF ========= 

=" : PRINT: I FLM=1THEN1 6 60 

164 5 PRINT: PRINT" DO YOU WANT TO 
LEAVE A MESSAGE" : PRINT" FOR THE 
SYSOP: <Y/N> ? " : GOSUB1 3 8 5 : IFCM 



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November 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



159 



$<>"y "THENPRINT" NO" :GOTO1660 
1650 PRINT" YES":GOSUB1220:IFMF< 
1THENGOSUB1285:GOTO1660 
1655 LM=1:GOSUB1015:GOTO1640 
1660 PRINT: PRINT" GOODBYE, "NA$ 
: PRINT" THANKS FOR CALLING . . . " : 
F0RX=1T04 : PRINT : NEXT : TIMER=0 



1665 IFTIMER<200THEN1665 ELSEPRI 
NT" +++" ; :TIMER=0 

1670 IFTIMER<200THEN1670 ELSEPRI 
NT"ATH" ; :TIMER=0 

1675 IFTIMER<500THEN1675 ELSE MO 
TORON : FORX=1TO200 : NEXT : MOTOROFF : 
FORX=1TO400 : NEXT: GOTO105 



1680 ■ 

1685 1 the rootoron / motoroff 

1690 ' routine must be linked 

1695 1 to your telephone line 

1700 1 through cassette input 

1705 ' 

1710 1 END OF SYSTEM 



Listing 3: SYSDP.EDT 

!0 i 

15 1 sysop access program 

20 1 bbs-bord bulletin system 

25 » 

30 CLEAR4000 : PRINTCHR$ ( 12 ) : CLS 
35 IP=PEEK(&H7D04) : OP=PEEK ( &H7D0 
5): POKE &H7D04 ,0: POKE &H7D05,0 
40 PRINT: PRINT" *** SYSOP ACCES 
S PROGRAM ***": PRINT: PRINT 
45 LINEINPUT" ACTSLOG DRIVE: <0 
/3> ? ";AL$:IFAL$=""THENAL$="0" 
50 LINEINPUT" USERLOG DRIVE: <0 
/3> ? " ;UL$: IFUL$= , " , THENUL$= ,, 0 ,, 
55 LINEINPUT" MESSLOG DRIVE: <0 
/3> ? " ;ML$:IFML$=""THENML$="0" 
60 LINEINPUT" EXITLOG DRIVE: <0 
/3> ? " ;EL$:IFEL$=""THENEL$="0" 
65 » 

70 1 sysop program menu 
75 t 

80 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" *** SYSOP 

ACCESS PROGRAM ***" : PRINT 
85 PRINT" 1) EXIT TO DISK BASIC 
": PRINT" 2) PRINT ACTSLOG FILE" 
: PRINT" 3) PRINT USERLOG FILE": 
PRINT" 4) UPDATE ACTSLOG FILE" 
90 PRINT" 5) UPDATE MESSLOG FIL 
E": PRINT" 6) CREATE ACTSLOG FIL 
E": PRINT" 7) CREATE USERLOG FIL 
E": PRINT" 8) CREATE MESSLOG FIL 
E": PRINT" 9) CREATE EXITLOG FIL 
E" 

95 PRINT" 10) SYSTEM FILE EDITOR 
": PRINT" 11) SYSOP LOG REVISION" 
: PRINT" 12) RETURN TO BBS-BORD" 
100 PRINT: LINEINPUT" COMMAND: 
" ;CM$ : ON VAL(CM$) GOSUB980 , 125 , 30 
0,240,340,205,58 5,75 5,88 5,4 60,92 
5,975 

105 GOTO80 

110 1 

115 1 print actslog file 

120 ' 

125 PRINTCHR$ ( 12 ) : CLS : PRINT : PRIN 
T" *** PRINT ACTSLOG FILE ***" 
13 0 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" OUTPUT TO 

SCREEN OR PRINTER: ": LINEINPUT" 
<S> OR <P> <ENTER=S> ? ";Q$ 

135 IFQ$="P"THENDV=-2 ELSEDV=0 
140 PRINT: LINEINPUT" START NUMBE 
R: <ENTER=1> ? " ; S$ : RC=VAL (S$) 
145 IF RC<1 OR RO150THEN RC=1 
150 OPEN"D" , #1, "ACTSLOG/SYS : "+AL 
$ 

155 GET # 1 , RC : INPUT* 1 , LG$ : IFLEFT 




199 615 62 

110 700 189 

78 780 74 

112 870 34 

209 935 25 

.71 END 178 

.35 



$ ( LG $ , 3 ) =STRING$ (3,32) THEN180 
160 PRINT#DV," ACTSLOG RECORD: 

;RC : PRINT 3DV: IF DV=0THENPRINT 
LG$:GOTO170 

165 LG$=LG$+STRING$(253-LEN(LG$) 
,32) :A$=LEFT$(LG$,64) :B$=MID$(LG 
$,65,64) :C$=MID$(LG$,129,64) : D$= 
RIGHT $ (LG$ , 61 ) : PRINT #DV , A$ : PRINT 
#DV, B$: PRINT#DV,C$:PRINT#DV, D$ 
170 PRINT: PRINT" NEXT RECORD: < 
Y/N> ?" 

175 Q$=INKEY$:IFQ$="Y"THEN180 EL 
SEIFQ$="N"THEN185 ELSE175 
180 RC=RC+1:IF RC< 15 1THEN155 
18 5 CLOSE # 1 : RETURN 

190 ' 

195 • create actslog file 

200 ' 

205 PRINTCHR$ ( 12 ): CLS: PRINT: PRIN 
T" *** CREATE ACTSLOG FILE ***" 
: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ARE YO 
U SURE: <Y/N> ?" 

210 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$=" Y"THEN215 EL 
SEIFQ$="N"THENRETURN ELSE210 
215 PRINT: PRINT" OK, CREATING AC 
TSLOG FILE ..." 

220 GOSUB27 5: PRINT" THE LOG WILL 
HOLD 150 RECORDS! " :GOT0615 

225 1 

230 ' update actslog file 

235 ' 

240 PRINTCHR$ ( 12 ): CLS: PRINT: PRIN 
T" *** KILL ACTSLOG RECORDS *** 
" : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 
245 PRINT" RECORD NUMBER: <1-15 
0> ?" '.LINEINPUT" ENTER = ABORT 

<A=ALL> " ; Q $ : RC=V AL ( Q $ ) 
250 IFQ$="A"THEN270 
255 IF RC<1 OR RO150THENRETURN 
260 OPEN"D" , #1, "ACTSLOG/SYS: "+AL 
$ : GET # 1 , RC : WRITE # 1 , STRINGS (253 
,32): PUT #1,RC: CLOSE #1 
2 65 PRINT: PRINT" OK, THAT ENTRY 
IS NOW DELETED! " ; : GOT06 15 
270 GOSUB27 5: PRINT: PRINT" OK, AL 
L RECORDS NOW DELETE D !": GOT0615 
275 OPEN"D" , #1, "ACTSLOG/SYS: "+AL 
$: FORX=1TO150: WRITE #1,STRING$(2 
53,32) :PUT # 1 , X : NEXT : CLOSE #1 
280 RETURN 

285 1 

290 1 print userlog file 
295 t 

300 PRINTCHR$ (12) : CLS: PRINT: PRIN 
T" *** PRINT USERLOG FILE ***" 



305 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" OUTPUT TO 

SCREEN OR PRINTER: ": LINEINPUT" 
<S> OR <P> <ENTER=S> ? ";Q$ 

310 IFQ$="P"THENDV=-2 ELSEDV=0 
315 PRINT:GOSUB950:FORX=1TO300:G 
ET 31,X:IF PW$=STRING$ (6, 3 2 ) THEN 
NEXT:GOTO320 ELSEPRINT^DV , " " + NM 
$+" <"+IN$+"> "+PW$:NEXT 
320 CLOSE jjl:GOT0615 

325 * 

330 ' update messlog file 

335 1 

3 40 PRINTCHR$ (12) : CLS : PRINT : PRIN 
T" *** UPDATE MESSLOG FILE ***" 
: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ENTER 
YOUR CHOICE: <l/2> ?" 
345 PRINT: PRINT" 1. KILL SYSTEM 
MESSAGES": PRINT" 2. UPDATE SYS 
TEM MESSAGES" 
350 Q$=INKEY$ 
355 ON VAL(Q$)GOT0365,395 
3 60 GOTO3 50 

3 6 5 PRINTCHR$ (12) : CLS : PRINT : PRIN 
T" *** KILL SYSTEM MESSAGES *** 
" : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 

370 PRINT" ENTER THE FIRST <3> L 
ETTERS OF" : LINEINPUT" THE MONTH 
TO DELETE: " ; DL$ : IF LEN(DL$)<>3 
THENRETURN ELSEGOSUB960 
375 FOR RC=1TO300:GET #1,RC:IFLE 
FT$(DT$,3)=DL$THEN390 ELSENEXT 
380 PRINT: IF KM=1THENPRINT" OK, 
THAT MONTH IS NOW DELETED !": GOTO 
385 ELSEPRINT" SORRY, CAN'T FIND 

THAT MONTH ! " 
385 CLOSE #1:KM=0:GOTO615 
390 GOSUB94 5:KM=l:NEXT:GOTO3 80 
395 PRINTCHR$ (12) : CLS: PRINT: PRIN 
T» *** UPDATE SYSTEM MESSAGES ** 
*" : PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ARE 
YOU SURE: <Y/N> ? " 
400 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$=" Y"THEN405 EL 
SEIFQ$="N "THENRETURN ELSE400 
405 PRINT: PRINT" OK, A FEW MOMEN 
TS PLEASE . . . " : GOSUB960 
410 FOR SM=1TO300 : GET #1,SM:IFTH 
$=STRING$(3,32)THEN4 20 ELSENEXT 
415 GOTO440 

420 MF=SM+l:FORX=MF TO300 : GET #1 
, X : IFTH$<>STRING$ (3,32) THEN4 30 
425 IFDT$OSTRING$(10,32)THEN LS 
ET DT$=STRING$(10,32) : PUT #1,X:N 
EXT:GOTO440 ELSENEXT : GOTO440 
430 DU$=DT$:SU$=SB$:TU$=TH$:BU$= 
BH$:MU$=MS$:LSET DT$=STRING$ (10, 
32):LSET SB$=STRING$ (8,32) : LSET 
TH$=STRING$ (3,32) : LSET BH$=STRIN 
G$ ( 3 , 3 2 ) : LSET MS $=STRING$ (224 , 32 
) : PUT # 1 , X 

435 GET #1,SM:LSET DT$=DU$:LSET 
SB$=SU$:LSET TH$=TU$ : LSET BH$=BU 
$:LSET MS$=MU$:PUT # 1 , SM : SM=SM+1 
:IF SM<300THEN4 20 

440 CLOSE #1: PRINT" THE MESSLOG 
HAS BEEN UPDATED! ":GOT0615 

445 ' 

450 ' system log editor 
455 ' 

4 60 PRINTCHR$ (12): CLS : PRINT : PRIN 



160 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



T" *** SYSTEM LOG EDITOR ***": 
PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ENTER FILE NU 
MBER: <l/3> ?": RC=1 : PRINT 
465 PRINT" 1. USERLOG / SYS" 
470 PRINT" 2. MESSLOG / SYS" 
475 PRINT" 3. EXITLOG / SYS" 
480 Q$=INKEY$:ON VAL (Q$) GOTO505 , 
645,805 
485 GOTO480 

490 1 

495 1 edit userlog file 

500 ' 

505 GOSUB950: PRINTCHR$ (12) 
510 CLS : GET # 1 , RC : PRINT : PRINT" R 
ECORD # " RC : PRINT : PRINT 
515 PRINT" USERNAME: "NM$ : PRINT 
" PASSWORD: "PW$: PRINT" INITIAL 
S: "IN$: PRINT" USERFLAG: "FL$ : 
PRINT" LAST USE: "LU$: PRINT 
520 PRINT: PRINT" 1. NAME 2. PSW 
ORD 3. INIT": PRINT" 4. FLAG 5. 
DELETE 6. NEXT": PRINT" 7. BACK 
8 . RETURN TO MAIN . " : PRINT 
525 Q$=INKEY$:ON VAL(Q$) GOT05 3 5 , 
540 ,545,550, 555 ,560,570,575 
530 GOT0525 

535 LINEINPUT" USERNAME: ";N$:L 
SET NM$=N$:PUT # 1 , RC : GOT05 10 
540 LINEINPUT" PASSWORD: ";P$:L 
SET PW$=P$:PUT #1,RC:GOTO510 
545 LINEINPUT" INITIALS: ";I$:L 
SET IN$=I$:PUT # 1 , RC : GOT05 10 
550 LINEINPUT" USERFLAG: " ; F$ : L 
SET FL$=F$:PUT # 1 , RC : GOTO 5 10 
555 LSET LU$=STRING$ (10,32) : LSET 
NM$=STRING$ (16,32) : LSET PW$=STR 
ING$ (6,32) : LSET IN$=STRING$ ( 3 , 3 2 



):LSET FL$=" " : PUT # 1 , RC : GOTO510 
560 RC=RC+1:IF RC<301THEN510 
565 GOT0575 

570 RC=RC-1:IF RO0THEN510 
57 5 CLOSE #1: RETURN 

580 1 

585 ' create userlog file 

590 1 

595 PRINTCHR$ ( 12 ): CLS: PRINT : PRIN 
T» *** CREATE USERLOG FILE ***" 
: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ARE YO 
U SURE: <Y/N> ? " 

600 Q$=INKEY$:IFQ$="Y"THEN605 EL 
SEIFQ$="N"THENRETURN ELSE600 
605 PRINT: PRINT" OK, CREATING US 
ERLOG FILE . . . " : GOSUB950 
610 FORX=1TO300 : LSET LU$=STRING$ 
(10,32): LSET NM$=STRING$ ( 16 , 3 2 ) : 
LSET PW$=STRING$ (6, 32) : LSET IN$= 
STRING$ (3 , 32) : LSET FL$=" " : PUT # 
1,X: NEXT: CLOSE ^ 1 : PRINT" THE FIL 
E WILL HOLD 300 USERS!" 

615 PRINT: PRINT" PRESS ANY KEY . 
it 

620 IF INKEY$=""THEN620 
625 RETURN 

630 ' 

635 1 edit messlog file 

640 » 

645 GOSUB960:PRINTCHR$ (12) 
650 CLS: GET # 1 , RC : PRINT" RECORD 
# " ; RC ; : PRINT " " DT$ : PRINT 

655 PRINT" SUBJECT: "SB$: PRINT" 

FOR WHO: "TH$: PRINT" LEFT BY: 

"BH$: PRINT: PRINT MS$ 
660 PRINT: PRINT" <PRESS ANY KEY 

FOR OPTIONS>" ; 



665 IF INKEY$=""THEN665 

670 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" 1. PRINTE 

R 2. SUBJ 3. TO WHO": PRINT" 4. 

FROM 5. MESSAGE 6. DATE": PR 
INT" 7. DELETE 8. NEXT 9. RETU 
RN . " ; 

675 Q$=INKEY$:ON VAL ( Q$ ) GOTO 685, 
695,705,7 15, 730, 725, 735,740,745 
680 GOT0675 

685 GOSUB940 : PRINT# DV , "SUBJECT: 

" + SB$ : PRINT t/DV , " FOR WHO: "+T 
H$:PRINT#DV, "LEFT BY: " + BH$:PR 
INT#DV: PRINTflDV, A$ : PRINTflDV, B$ : P 
RINT#DV,C$ : PRINTflDV, D$ : PRINTS DV 
690 GOTO650 

695 PRINT: PRINT: LINEINPUT" SUBJE 
CT: " ;S$:LSET SB$=S$:PUT #1,RC 
700 GOTO650 

705 PRINT : PRINT : LINEINPUT" TO WH 
O: ";I$:LSET TH$=I$:PUT # 1 , RC 
710 GOTO650 

715 PRINT:PRINT: LINEINPUT" LEFT 
BY: ";L$:LSET BH$=L$:PUT # 1 , RC 
720 GOTO650 

7 25 PRINT: PRINT: LINEINPUT" DATE: 
<MTH/DA/YR> ? " ; D$ : LSET DT$=D$ 
:PUT #1,RC:GOTO650 

730 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" MESSAGE:" 

: PRINT: LINEINPUT M$ : LSET MS$=M$ : 

PUT #1,RC:GOTO650 

735 GOSUB945:GOTO650 

740 RC=RC+1:IF RC< 30 1THEN650 

7 45 CLOSE #1: RETURN 

7 50 ' 

755 1 create messlog file 

760 ' 

765 PRINTCHR$ (12) : CLS: PRINT: PRIN 



"I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up fo a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now. it's time to 
give BASIC a shot in the orm. with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice lo turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your 
choice, wilh your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) withoul having to slow down for disk and printer operations'? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3. our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs 
into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S '5-20; we provide information concerning how you can 
have this done.) Supports aouble-sided drives (35. 40. or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line numoer prompls, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow- key scroll through BASIC programs, auto-edit of error line, and 
many more valuable features 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk S3d 95 Original ADOS tor CoCo 1 or 2 $27.95 (See 6/67 RAINBOW ro view) 
Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool (or the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid for the expert 
CoCo l, 2, or 3 compatible 

D:sk 323 95 Assembler source tistinf Add S3 00 



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November 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



161 



T" *** CREATE MESSLOG FILE ***" 
: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ARE YO 
U SURE: <Y/N> ?" 

770 Q$=INKEY$:IFQ$="Y"THEN775 EL 
SEIFQ$ = "N"THENRETURN E LS E 7 7 0 
775 PRINT: PRINT" OK, CREATING ME 
SSLOG FILE . . . " :GOSUB960 
780 FORX=1TO300:LSET DT$=STRING$ 
(10,32) :LSET SB$=STRING$ ( 8 , 3 2 ) :L 
SET TH$=STRING$ (3,32) : LSET BH$=S 
TRING$(3,32) : LSET MS$=STRING$ ( 2 2 
4,32) : PUT # 1 , X : NEXT 
785 CLOSE #1: PRINT" THE LOG WILL 
HOLD 300 RECORDS i " :GOT0615 

790 ' 

795 1 edit exitlog file 

800 ' 

805 GOSUB970 

810 PRINTCHR$ (12) : CLS : GET # 1 , RC : 
PRINT: PRINT" RECORD # " ; RC ; : PRINT 
" "DT$ : PRINT 

815 PRINT" USRNAME: "NM$: PRINT" 
MESSAGE: ": PRINT: PRINT MS$ 

820 PRINT" 1. PRINTER 2. DELETE 
3. NEXT": PRINT" 4. GO BACK 5. 
RETURN TO MAIN. " ; 

825 Q$=INKEY$:ON VAL (Q$) GOT08 3 5 , 

845,850,860, 865 

830 GOT0825 

835 GOSUB940:PRINT#DV,"USRNAME: 

"+NM$ : PRINT#DV, "MESSAGE : " : PRIN 
T#DV : PRINTS DV , A$ : PRINTtfDV , B$ : PRI 
NT#DV , C$ : PRINT#DV , D$ : PRINT#DV 



160 86 

270 30 

END 211 



Listing 4: TEXTGEN - EDT 

. 

15 ' text file processor 

20 1 bbs-board bulletin system 

25 ' 

30 CLEAR 5000: DIM TX$(500) 
35 CLS:PRINT@34 , "*** TEXT FILE P 
ROCESSOR ***" : PRINT: PRINT 
40 PRINT" DO YOU WANT TO START A 
FILE OR": PRINT" EDIT AN EXISTIN 
G ONE: <S/E> ?" 

45 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$="E"ORQ$="S"THE 
N50 ELSE45 

50 PRINT: LINEINPUT" ENTER FILENA 
ME: ";FL$ 

55 IF LEN ( FL$ ) >8THEN50 

60 PRINT: LINEINPUT" EXTENSION NA 

ME: ";XT$ 

65 IF LEN(XT$)=3THEN85 ELSE60 

70 ' 

75 1 directory verification 

80 ' 

85 FX$=FL$+"/ "+XT$ : PRINT : PRINT" 

CHECKING THE DISK DIRECTORY :": PR 

INT" JUST A MOMENT, PLEASE ..." 

90 CK=0:FORX=3TO11:DSKI$0, 17,X,A 

$,B$:A$=A$+LEFT$(B$, 120) : FORK=0T 

07 :SB$=MID$ (A$ , K*32+l , 8 ) :XS$=MID 

$(A$,K*32+9,3) :Y=ASC(SB$) :IF Y=2 

55THEN K=7:X=ll:GOTO105 

95 IFRIGHT$ (SB$ , 1 ) =" "THENSB$=LE 

FT$(SB$,LEN(SB$)-1) :GOT095 

100 DF$=SB$+"/"+XS$ : IFDF$=FX$THE 

N CK=1:K=7:X=11 

105 NEXTK,X: IFQ$="E"THEN120 

110 IF CK<1THEN140 



840 GOTO810 

845 LSET DT$=STRING$ ( 10 , 3 2 ) : LSET 
NM$=STRING$ ( 16 , 3 2 ) : LSET MS$=STR 
ING$(224, 32) :PUT # 1 , RC : GOTO 8 10 
850 RC=RC+1:IF RC< 10 1THEN8 10 
855 GOT08 65 

860 RC=RC-1:IF RO0THEN810 
865 CLOSE #1:RETURN 

870 ' 

875 1 create exitlog file 

880 ' 

885 PRINTCHR$ ( 12 ) : CLS : PRINT : PRIN 
T» *** CREATE EXITLOG FILE ***" 
: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" ARE YO 
U SURE: <Y/N> ?" 

890 Q$=INKEY$:IFQ$="Y"THEN895 EL 
SEIFQ$="N"THENRETURN ELSE890 
895 PRINT: PRINT" OK, CREATING EX 
ITLOG FILE . . . " :GOSUB970 
900 FORX=1TO100:LSET DT$=STRING$ 
(10,32): LSET NM$=STRING$ (16,32) : 
LSET MS$=STRING$ (224 , 32) : PUT #1, 
X: NEXT: CLOSE #1 

905 PRINT" THE LOG WILL HOLD 100 
RECORDS! " :GOT0615 

910 1 

915 1 sysop log revision 

920 ' 

925 PRINTCHR$ ( 12) : CLS: PRINT: PRIN 
T" *** SYSOP LOG REVISION ***" 
: PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : LINEINPUT" DA 
TE: <MTH/DA/YR> ";D$: PRINT 
930 LINEINPUT" SYSOP NAME: ";N$ 



115 CLS : PRI NT@ 3 3, "SORRY, BUT THA 
T FILENAME NOW": PRINT" EXISTS ON 

YOUR DISK! PLEASE" : PRINT" CHOO 
SE ANOTHER NAME ...":GOTO50 
120 IF CK=1THEN255 ELSEPRINT : PRI 
NT" SORRY, I CAN'T FIND THAT FIL 
E! " :FORX=1TO3500:NEXT:GOTO35 

125 ' 

130 1 textfile processor 

135 1 

140 CLS : PRINT@ 3 3 , "======= TEXT P 

ROCESSOR =======": PRINT 

145 PRINT" OK, CREATE YOUR TEXT 
PROGRAM! ": PRINT" PRESS <ENTER> O 
N AN OPEN LINE": PRINT" FOR INPUT 

COMMANDS WHEN READY." 
150 X=l: PRINT: PRINT" /////////// 
///////////////////" : PRINT 
155 M$="" :GOSUB200 : PRINT : IFM$="" 
THEN 165 ELSETX$ (X) =M$ : IF X<500TH 
EN X=X+1: PRINT"-" ;X:GOT0155 
160 PRINT: PRINT" YOU HAVE RE ACHE 
D THE LIMIT OF": PRINT" TEXT DIME 
NSION: SAVE <Y/N> ?":GOTO170 
165 IF X<2THEN230 ELSEPRINT : PRIN 
T" SAVE FILE TO DISK: <Y/N> ?" 
170 Q$=INKEY$:IFQ$="Y"THEN175 EL 
SEIFQ$="N"THEN230 ELSE170 
17 5 OPEN"0" , #1,FX$ :FORY=lTO X : PR 
INT #1,TX$ (Y) .-NEXT: CLOSE #1 
180 PRINT: PRINT" OK, "FX$: PRINT" 

HAS NOW BEEN SAVED ...":GOTO2 30 

185 1 

190 ' inkey$ subroutine 

195 1 

200 Q$=INKEY$: IFQ$=CHR$ (8) AND M$ 

=" "THENQ$=" " 

205 IFQ$=""THEN200 

210 IFQ$=CHR$ (8)THEN225 

215 IFQ$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENRETURN 

220 M$=M$+Q$ : PRINT Q$ ; : IF LEN (M$ 

)<31THEN200 ELSERETURN 

225 M$=LEFT$ (M$, LEN (M$) -1) : PRINT 

Q$; :GOTO200 
230 PRINT: PRINT" START ANOTHER F 



: LINEINPUT" INITIALS: ";I$:LI 
NEINPUT" PASSWORD: M ;P$ 
935 GOSUB950:GET #1,1: LSET LU$=D 
$:LSET NM$=N$ : LSET PW$=P$ : LSET I 
N$=I$:LSET FL$="A":PUT #1 , 1 : CLOS 
E # 1 : PRINT : PRINT" OK, SYSOP' S LO 
G IS NOW REVISED! " ; : GOT06 15 
940 DV=-2 : R$=STR$ ( RC) :A$=LEFT$(M 
S$ , 56) : B$=MID$ (MS$ , 57 , 56) : C$=MID 
$(MS$, 113, 56) :D$=RIGHT$ (MS$, 56) : 
PRINTtfDV, "RECORD: #"+R$+" 

"+DT$ : PRINTSDV : RETURN 
945 LSET DT$=STRING$ ( 10 , 3 2 ) : LSET 
SB$=STRING$ (8,32) : LSET TH$=STRI 
NG $(3,32) : LSET BH$=STRING$ (3,32) 
: LSET MS$=STRING$ (224,3 2) : PUT #1 
,RC: RETURN 

950 OPEN"D" , #1, "USERLOG/SYS: "+UL 
$,36:FIELD #1,10 AS LU$,16 AS NM 
$,6 AS PW$,3 AS IN$,1 AS FL$ 
955 RETURN 

960 OPEN"D" , # 1 , "MESSLOG/SYS : "+ML 
$,24 8: FIELD #1,10 AS DT$ , 8 AS SB 
$,3 AS TH$,3 AS BH$,224 AS MS$ 
965 RETURN 

970 OPEN"D" ,11, "EXITLOG/SYS: "+EL 

$,250: FIELD #1,10 AS DT$,16 AS N 

M$,2 24 AS MS$: RETURN 

975 POKE &H7D04 , IP:POKE &H7D05,O 

P:LOAD "BBS-BORD/SYS" ,R 

980 POKE 113,0:EXEC 40999 

985 1 

990 ' end of program 



ILE: <Y/N> ?" 

235 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$=" Y"THEN35 ELS 
EIFQ$="N"THEN325 ELSE235 

240 ' 

245 ' textfile editor 

250 ' 

255 CLS : PRINT@ 3 3 , " ====== TEXTFIL 

E EDITOR =======» 

260 PRINT@131, "THIS IS A BASIC L 
INE EDITOR. ": PRINT" YOU CAN REVI 
SE ANY LINE WITHIN ": PRINT" THE F 
ILE, BUT YOU CAN'T ADD TO" : PRINT 
" OR DELETE LINES OF TEXT ..." 
265 PRINT@353 , "PRESS ANY KEY !" 
270 IF INKEY$=""THEN270 
275 OPEN"I",#l,FX$:Y=l 
280 IFNOT EOF ( 1 ) THEN LINEINPUT # 
1,TX$(Y) : Y=Y+1:GOTO280 
285 CLOSE #1:F0RX=1T0 Y : CLS : PRIN 
T@34,"*** EDIT LINE :"; X, •: PRINT" 
<Y/N> ***": PRINT: PRINT"- 

-" ; : PRINTT 

X$ (X) : PRINT"- 
_n . 

290 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$=" Y"THEN305 EL 
SEIFQ$ = "N"THEN2 9 5 ELSE290 
295 IFTX$ (X)=""THEN320 ELSEPRINT 
: PRINT" *** EXIT OR NEXT: <E/N 
> ***■• 

300 Q$=INKEY$ : IFQ$-"E "THEN315 EL 
SEIFQ$="N"THENNEXT ELSE300 
305 PRINT" *** OK, ENTER A NEW 
LINE ***" : PRINT"- 

-" ; :M$="":GOSUB20 
0 : IFM$=" "THENM$=STRING$ (31,32) 
310 TX$ (X)=M$:X=X-1:NEXT 
315 IFTX$ (Y)=""THEN Y=Y-l:GOT031 
5 ELSEPRINT:X=Y+1 

3 20 PRINT: PRINT" RESAVE FILE TO 
DISK: <Y/N> ?":GOTO170 
325 POKE 113,0:EXEC 40999 

330 ' 

335 1 end of program 



162 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



CoCo 3 



ASCII For It 

By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



r ■ 1 he special keys that mark the 
I CoCo 3 as being uniquely differ- 
JL ent from its older brothers are 
intriguing. They are not d iscussed in the 
manual, and a challenge builds to a 
crescendo to find some use for them in 
BASIC programs. 

Our quest becomes one of discover- 
ing the ASCII value of each key and 
verifying it by creating a small routine. 
We'll call on CoCo's flSC function to 
convert a character or string variable 
into an ASCII decimal number. Here's 
a small program to do it: 

10 n$=INKEY$: IF A$ = "~ GQTO10 
20 X=A5C[fl$) 
30 PRINT fl$;X, 
40 GOTO10 

Run the program and save it to tape 
or disk. 

We decide to use INKEYI to read a 
character from the keyboard. Line 10, 
a multiple-line statement, uses state- 
ments that go together like baloney and 
bread. Expect to use some version of 
them in tandem when INKEYS situations 
arise. You should memorize the line and 
write it down as a frequently used 
convention in your reference notebook. 

Line 20 gives X the variable that will 
provide the ASCII number of the key 
struck. Line 30 displays the name of the 
key pressed and its corresponding 
ASCII number, A few keys (space bar, 
ENTER, CLEAR, etc.) will display only 
the ASCII number. This indicates that 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 



the key performs some task other than 
representing a visible character. 

Run the program. Strike a few keys. 
Compare the values with the ASCII 
character tables in your manual 

Note that if a program has a WIDTH32 
statement indicating the Lo-Res screen, 
masking that program line with a REM 
statement usually allows older CoCos 
to accept the program. Older CoCos 
will balk at CoCo 3"s special vocabu- 
lary, shrug their shoulders and cough up 
an SN Error, not understanding the new 
dialect. 

Well follow these assumptions in 
future tutorials: If UIIDTH32 occurs in a 
program line, the program was created 
on a CoCo 3 and is not necessarily 
understandable to older CoCos; if the 
program lacks this statement, the pro- 
gram was specifically created for older 
CoCos. 

Fool around time! 

Remove fl$ ; from Line 30 and 
change the comma to a semicolon. Now 
run. Type your name. It looks like a 
primitive cipher. Make the code a bit 
more mystifying by adding a new line; 
25 X~X+2. Now run. 

Type your name. This line was delib- 
erately written to make all values from 
the older CoCo keyboard appear as 
double digits. The numbers fall neatly 
to display an elegant batch of numbers. 
The single-digit left arrow key (8) and 
right arrow key (9) do not louse up the 
march of double digits; they take the 
values 10 and 11, respectively. The 
highest value is 95, but who is likely to 
type a shifted up arrow? 

Delete Line 25. 

Without consulting the manual, you 
can determine the numeric value of the 



key pressed. You may want to devote 
some time at this stage to memorizing 
the values of the alphabet keys and any 
other keys that strike your imagination. 

Now we have a method for determin- 
ing the ASCII values of the rearranged 
arrow keys and other special CoCo 3 
keys and can verify the observations 
with a color-coded display for each key. 

Attention CoCo 3 owners! Using the 
A5C program you saved earlier, deter- 
mine the values of ALT, CTRL, Fi and F2, 
Make a note of these values in your 
manual, and list the four shifted values 
of these keys as well. The value of 
shifted ALT is 19, You may have trouble 
getting this bashful number. Try tap- 
ping different combinations of ALT and 
CTRL. 

Key in listing 5PECKEYS. 

Lines 1 through 5 look familiar. Line 
10 asks CoCo to check and see if CTRL 
is pressed; if CoCo reports back that 
CTRL is being pressed, it is then in- 
structed to color the screen black. 

Run the program and press CTRL. 
Now check out the other keys. Notice 
that pressing any regular key produces 
a black screen. 

Edit Line 100 (type EDIT 100) to 
change the screen color to buff (value 
of 5 is entered). Run the program and 
press CTRL. Now run again and press 
any regular key. Re-edit Line 100 to 
restore screen color to black (value of 
0 is entered). 

We verified that if we called the 
proper key by its ASCII number, wegot 
a desired result. Incidentally, we found 
a use for these normally unused keys in 
BASIC — performing specific tasks. 
That is, CoCo was prodded to call 
specific colors. 

November 1987 THE RAINBOW 163 



Now save SPECKEYS to tape or disk. 

To make each key pressed produce a 
different color in a perpetual loop, 
change Lines 100 to 400 to GDTD3, not 
letting them loop on themselves. Run. 

To prove that CTRL gives black, add: 

50 If X<>189 OR XO103 OR XO 

4 OR X<>64 GOTD500 
500 CLSB:G0TQ3 

Run the program and press CTRL. 
Then press any regular key. Only CTRL 
will produce black. The regular keys 
will call for orange. Delete lines 50 and 
500 and save the program as 51. 

We will now inspect the shifted arrow 
keys and shifted CLEAR and assign the 
rest of the CLS Lo-Res colors. 

From listing 51 add lines 50 through 
90 and 500 through 900 to your working 
program. Run it. Press all nine keys in 
rotation. Save your modification as S. 

The temptation to make the colors 
scroll automatically in sequence, begin- 
ning with the key pressed, is too strong 
to ignore. 

From listing 52, add lines 2 and 2000. 
Edit lines 100 through 900 and make the 
required changes. Use this procedure: 

TypeEDIT100 and press X tojump to 
the end of the line. Backspace with the 
left arrow key three spaces. Type and 
enter SUB2000. And so forth. At Line 
900 also add : GDT02, run the program 
and press CTRL. If you press any regular 
key, you will get a full run-through. If 
you press one of the other eight targeted 
keys, only a partial run-through will be 
executed. 

Now save our evolving labor of love 
as S2. The true newcomer can memorize 
the Lo-Res CLS color numbers by 
counting the colors as they scroll on the 
screen when using any regular key to 
tickle CoCo. 

If you want the color display to 
recycle forever, change Line 900 to 
: GDTD4 and run. 

Now let us see what is what when we 
change the width statement in Line 1 to 
WIDTH40. Upon making the change to 
a Hi-Res screen, we are dejected to get 
an HP Error in Line 2. Scrutinizing 
Line 2, we see that PRINTS won't do. 
The line must be composed so that 
CoCo 3 makes sense out of it. Copy 
Line 2 from listing S3. Restore : GDTD2 
in Line 900 and run. We cleared the 
screen to default colors and used LO- 
CATE to place our legend on the 1 1th 
row, indenting 1 1 spaces. Rather than 
have the Hi-Res cursor hanging clum- 
sily at the end of the directions, we 



lowered and centered it and used it as 
an accent. Notice that we lost black 
when we pressed CTRL or a regular key. 

Time to panic! We thumb through 
our manual to discover to our dismay 
that CLS has no CLS0 color in Hi-Res. 
Well, we can live with that bit of dis- 
tressing news. 

We edit lines 100 to 800 and change 
the color in CLS. Delete Line 900, a 
superfluous line. At the end of Line 800, 
add :G0TD2. You may want to go back 
and correct the color names in lines 10 
through 80. Delete Line 90 to avoid 
confusion. 

Note in WIDTH40, using CLS, the 
entire screen is one color (background 
as well as foreground). 

You know what a fetish I have about 
blank screens. They scream for treat- 
ment. My sterile brain salvaged the 
names from last month's tutorial and 
they translated into subroutine lines 
1000 to 1300, which you key in. 

Look at listing S3. In lines 100 and 
500, insert GOSUB1200: and run. In 
lines 200 and 600, insert GD5UB1300: 
and run. In lines 300 and 700, insert 
GOSUB1000: and in lines 400 and 800, 
insert GDSUB1100: and run. The secret 
is out! Now you know where and with 
whom I hang out when my CoCo is in 
dry dock. 

Change Line 2000 to shorten the 
delay to 500 ticks. Save our modifica- 
tion now as S3. 

To make S3 work in Lo-Res on CoCo 
3, we change Line 1 back to WIDTH32. 
Run. We get the anticipated HP Error 
in Line 2. Key in Line 2 from listing S4, 
along with lines 1000 to 1300; change 
GQTQ2 to G0T04 in Line 800 and run. 

Entering G GDTD100 bypasses all the 
instructions to the special keys. Run. 
Nowany key, includingthespecial keys, 
will work. You might consider deleting 
lines 10 through 80, but I am a chicken 
and left them in the program even 
though the colors listed are wrong. Save 
again as S4. 

The final experiment is to make a 
program especially for the earlier 
CoCos. (It's a good thing I didn't delete 
lines 10 through 80!) Enter DELI, for 
openers. 

From listing S5 key in Line 2. Run, 
and get the "no place for CoCo to go 
to" error message. 

Key in lines 3000 and 3001 and run. 
Note the different techniques I must 
utilize to make my complete list. 

Look at Line 3001. I started out using 
the PRINTTRB(x) system. Beginning at 
column 1, the color number was listed. 
Two blanks intervened and the color 



name printed out. This was separated 
between quotes with a comma. A lead- 
ing space had to be inserted in front of 
number 1 to maintain column integrity 

And so it went without further inci- 
dent, until the end of the program line. 
Since the 4 W in ARROW was at the right 
margin, trouble loomed. The PRIMTTflB 
ploy was abandoned. 

Key in lines 3002 and 3003. It was 
time to resort to the PRINTS gambit. It 
was OK to shift to the right-hand key 
column with the comma between 
quotes, but CoCo nixed it because the 
4 W was crowding the right margin. 
Another PRINTS had to be utilized and 
from there it was clear sailing. RIGHT 
had to be abbreviated or it would have 
split and continued on the next row, 
ruining the columnar list. Run. 

Edit lines 100 through 800, changing 
the CLS value beginning with zero. 
Delete : GDT02 from the end of Line 
800. 

Enter 900 CLSB : GOSUB2000 :GDT02 
and run. 

Ah! That blank area! 

Copy Line 1400 from S5 and insert 
after the color in Line 900. Enter 
GOSUB1400: and DELG. 

Edit lines 10 through 40, changing 
ASCII values and adding Line 90 from 
S5. Run. 

Finally, re-edit lines 10 through 80, 
changing color and key name as neces- 
sary. Save the program with these 
modifications as S5, 

This tutorial was fun to create. The 
only odd thing about it was that all 
those ASCII numbers and the keys they 
represent didn't do a thing for this 
program. Thisis not to say thattheir use 
is invalid, but, in S5 you could delete 
lines 10 through 90 and no harm would 
befall the program concept. Be careful 
if you want to chop up or mutilate an 
existing program just to satisfy your lust 
for brevity. You never know when you 
might want to refer to it. Delete it and 
it is gone forever, possibly taking the 
idea with it. My free advice is to be 
reluctant to delete a harmless portion of 
a working program. It is analogous to 
wiping out a program. There is an old 
adage: Five minutes after you destroy a 
program or delete a routine, guess what 
you are looking for. 

Instead of deleting lines, bypass them 
or remark them. The program listing 
may look unnecessarily bulky, but so 
what? There is nobody standing over 
you with a clipboard, giving you bad 
marks. 

1 mentioned that the ASCII didn't do 
a thing for our final program. True, but 



164 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



the final program would never have 
been created without the impetus of the 
first explorations. This is a case wherein 
we experiment with and then discard 
some residue. 

Every now and then I write about the 
advisability of making a home-grown 
reference book, using a regular spiral 
notebook. I n it, copy a routine or listing 
that captivates your curiosity, and, in 
your own words, explain it for your 
personal benefit. Veteran CoConauts, 
as well as beginners, know that you 
can't memorize everything about the 
CoCo. Let your personal reference 
notebook supplement your manual. 

We are progressing very slowly in our 
leisurely inspection of the CoCo 3 
domain. Isn't it reassuring to discover 
how many programs we can salvage for 
use with vintage CoCos? 

On a personal note, speaking of 



venerable CoCos, my Color Computer 
is one of the dark-age CoCos. 

When my keyboard went, I bought a 
CoCo 3 rather than have my faithful 
CoCo repaired. It wasn't long before I 
yearned for my old friend. I high-tailed 
it to Radio Shack and had the keyboard 
replaced with another tile keyboard. I 
prefer the tile keys and I loved the old 
zero, which is now the CoCo 3 letter 'o', 
replacing the old square 'o\ My myopic 
orbs confuse the CoCo 3 zero with the 
number 8. 

Do you know what I love best about 
"Old Faithful"? The broad expanse 
between side vents. (You newcomers 
can picture it by looking at the illustra- 
tions in the manual.) This area is my 
writing desk. I challenge you to write 
notes on your CoCo 2 or CoCo 3. 

The other feature, whose demise I 
mourn, is the extra-wide ENTER key. 



The other side of the coin is price. The 
cost of upgrading my 4K BASIC CoCo 
to 1 6K ECB and keyboard replacement, 
over time, has come to over $600. I got 
the CoCo 3, which is really a 32K ECB 
machine as far as we BASIC users are 
concerned, for a little over $200. 

It is worth it! Now I have two friends 
instead of one. Maybe I'll name CoCo 
3 "Son of CoCo." 

My freely offered advice to owners of 
older CoCos is to consider investing in 
a CoCo 3, not to retire the old CoCo 
but to supplement it. There is something 
to say for operating two CoCos at the 
same time. 

If you learned something from this 
tutorial, it is another bit of knowledge 
that you can add to your repertoire of 
CoCo skills. Above all, it should have 
been a stimulating, fun experience that 
you can't wait to repeat next month. □ 



Listing 1: 


20 IF X=1J33 GOT02J3J3 ' GREEN Fl 


jZS ' <SPECKEYS> 


3J3 IF X=4 GOTO3.0J3 1 YELLOW F2 


1 WIDTH 3 2 


4j3 IF X=64 GOT04j3j3 1 BLUE ALT 


3 A$=INKEY$ 


1)3)3 CLSjZS : GOTO 1)3)3 


4 IF A$="" GOT03 


2.0.0 CLS1:G0T02)3)3 


5 X=ASC(A$) 


3)3)3 CLS2 :GOT03)3)3 


1J3 IF X =189 GOTOlJZIjZS ' BLACK CTRL 


4)3)3 CLS3 :GOTO4,0.0 



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SIXDRNE is a machine language utility that 
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to allow the use of 3 double sided drives as 6 single 
side drives without AMY hardware modifications. 
FEATURES two different drive select assignments: 
(1) [0,2] [1,31 K5] (2) [0,1] [2,3] [4,5] 
Ramdisk is compatible wit h GlMMESOFTs SIXDRIVE 



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JM010 $39.95 JramR bare board plus connectors and software 

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Refer to back Issues of RAINBOW for other products. 



THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

A DIVISION OF OATAHATCH, INC. 



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November 1987 THE RAINBOW 



165 



Listing 2: 


70 IF X=21 GOTO700 ! CYAN <SHIFT L 




EFT-ARROW> 


0 ! <S1> 


80 IF X=9 3 GOTO800 'MAGENTA <SHIF 


1 WIDTH3 2 


T RIGHT -ARROW> 


3 A$=INKEY$ 


90 IF X=92 GOTO900 1 ORANGE <SHIFT 


4 IF A$= IMI G0T03 


CLEAR> 


5 X=ASC(A$) 


100 CLS0:GOTO3 


10 IF X =18 9 GOTO100 1 BLACK CTRL 


200 CLSl:GOT03 


20 IF X=103 GOTO200 1 GREEN Fl 


300 CLS2:GOT03 


30 IF X=4 GOTO300 1 YELLOW F2 


400 CLS3:GOT03 


40 IF X=64 GOTO400 , BLUE ALT 


500 CLS4:GOT03 


50 IF X=9 5 GOTO500 ! RED <SHIFT UP 


600 CLS5:GOT03 


-ARROW> 


700 CLS6:GOT03 


60 IF X=91 GOTO600 ! BUFF <SHIFT D 


800 CLS7:GOT03 


OWN-ARROW> 


900 CLS8:GOT03 


Listing 3: 


OWN-ARROW> 


70 IF X=21 GOTO700 ! CYAN <SHIFT L 




EFT-ARROW> 


0 ! <S2> 


80 IF X=9 3 GOTO 800 'MAGENTA <SHIF 


1 WIDTH3 2 


T RIGHT-ARROW> 


2 CLS:PRINT@2 31, " PRESS <CTRL> K 


90 IF X=92 GOTO900 'ORANGE <SHIFT 


EY ff 


CLEAR> 


3 A$=INKEY$ 


100 CLS0:GOSUB2000 


4 IF A$ = IIM GOT03 


200 CLS1:GOSUB2000 


5 X=ASC(A$) 


300 CLS2 : GOSUB2000 


10 IF X =189 GOTO100 1 BLACK CTRL 


400 CLS3 : GOSUB2000 


20 IF X=103 GOTO200 1 GREEN Fl 


500 CLS4 : GOSUB2000 


30 IF X=4 GOTO300 1 YELLOW F2 


600 CLS5:GOSUB2000 


40 IF X=64 GOTO400 ! BLUE ALT 


700 CLS6 : GOSUB2000 


50 IF X=95 GOTO500 ! RED <SHIFT UP 


800 CLS7 : GOSUB2000 


-ARROW> 


900 CLS8 : GOSUB2000 : G0T02 


60 IF X=91 GOTO600'BUFF <SHIFT D 


2000 FOR Z=l TO 1000 : NEXT : RETURN 


Listing 4: 


100 CLS1:GOSUB1200:GOSUB2000 


200 CLS2:GOSUB1300:GOSUB2000 




300 CLS3:GOSUB1000:GOSUB2000 


0 '<S3> 


400 CLS4 : G0SUB1 100 : GOSUB2000 


1 WIDTH40 


500 CLS5 : GOSUB1200 : GOSUB2000 


2 CLSl: LOCATE10, 10: PRINT" PRESS 


600 CLS6 : GOSUB1300 : GOSUB2000 


THE <CTRL> KEY" ; : LOCATE20 , 12 


700 CLS7 : GOSUB1000 : GOSUB2000 


3 A$=INKEY$ 


800 CLS8 : GOSUB1100 : GOSUB2000 : GOT 


4 IF A$= lflf GOT03 


02 


5 X=ASC(A$) 


1000 LOCATE 13 , 10: ATTR3 , 2 : PRINT" 


10 IF X =189 GOTO100 1 GREEN CTRL 


FRED ASTAIRE " ; : L0CATE2 2 , 12 : RE 


20 IF X=103 GOTO200 1 YELLOW Fl 


TURN 


30 IF X=4 GOTO300 ! BLUE F2 


1100 LOCATE 13 , 10 : ATTR3 , 2 : PRINT" 


40 IF X=64 GOTO400 ! RED ALT 


DANCE STUDIO " ; : L0CATE2 2 , 12 : RE 


50 IF X=95 GOTO500 ! BUFF <SHIFT U 


TURN 


P-ARROW> 


1200 LOCATE 13 , 10 :ATTR3 , 2 : PRINT" 


60 IF X=91 GOTO600 ! CYAN <SHIFT D 


JOSEPH KOLAR " ; : L0CATE2 2 , 12 : RE 


OWN-ARROW> 


TURN 


70 IF X=21 GOTO700 1 MAGENTA <SHIF 


1300 LOCATE 13 , 10 :ATTR3 , 2 : PRINT" 


T LE FT - ARROW> 


BELINDA RAMSEY" ; :LOCATE2 2 , 12 : RE 


80 IF X=9 3 GOTO800 1 ORANGE <SHIFT 


TURN 


RIGHT-ARROW> 


2000 FOR Z=l TO 500 : NEXT : RETURN 



166 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Listing 5: 

0 ! <S4> 

1 WIDTH32 

2 CLS0:PRINT@230, " PRESS A REGUL 
AR KEY ";:FOR Z=1TO1000 : NEXT 

3 A$=INKEY$ 

4 IF A$= !fl! G0T03 

5 X=ASC(A$) 

6 GOTO100 

10 IF X =189 GOTO100' GREEN CTRL 

20 IF X=103 GOTO200 1 YELLOW Fl 

30 IF X=4 GOTO300 1 BLUE F2 

4 0 IF X=64 GOTO400 ! RED ALT 

5J0 IF X=95 GOTO 500 1 BUFF <SHIFT U 

P-ARROW> 

60 IF X=91 GOTO600 1 CYAN <SHIFT D 
OWN-ARROW> 

70 IF X=21 GOTO700 1 MAGENTA <SHIF 



T LEFT-ARROW> 

8J3 IF X=93 GOTO800 1 ORANGE <SHIFT 

RIGHT-ARROW> 
100 CLS1:GOSUB1200:GQSUB20.00 
2j3j3 CLS2:GOSUB1300:GOSUB2000 
300 CLS3 :GOSUB1000:GOSUB2000 
400 CLS4:GOSUB1100:GOSUB2000 
5J3J3 CLS5:GOSUB1200:GOSUB2000 
600 CLS6:GOSUB1300:GGSUB2000 
700 CLS7:GOSUB1000:GOSUB2000 
800 CLS8:GOSUB1100:GOSUB2000:GOT 
04 

1000 PRINT@232," FRED ASTAIRE 

11 ; : RETURN 
1100 PRINT§232 / !! DANCE STUDIO 

" ; : RETURN 
1200 PRINT@232 ," JOSEPH KOLAR 
" ; : RETURN 

13J3)3 PRINT@232," BELINDA RAMSEY 

" ; : RETURN 
2000 FOR Z = l TO 500 : NEXT : RETURN 



Listing 6: 
0 *<S5> 

2 CLS5:PRINT@6, " PRESS A SPECIAL 
KEY ";:FOR Z=l TO 1000 : NEXT: GOS 

UB3000 

3 A$=INKEY$ 

4 IF A$=»" G0T03 

5 X=ASC(A$) 

10 IF X =94 GOTO100 1 BLACK <UP-AR 
ROW> 

20 IF X=1J3 GOTO200 1 GREEN < DOWN- A 
RROW> 

30 IF X=8 GOTO300 1 YELLOW <LEFT-A 
RROW> 

40 IF X=9 GOTO400 1 BLUE <RIGHT-AR 
ROW> 

50 IF X=95 GOTO500»RED <SHIFT UP 
-ARROW > 

60 IF X=91 GOTO600 ! BUFF <SHIFT D 
OWN-ARROW> 

70 IF X=21 GOTO700 1 CYAN <SHIFT L 
EFT-ARROW> 

80 IF X=93 G0T08 00 1 MAGENTA <SHIF 
T RIGHT-ARROW> 

90 IF X=92 GOTO900 1 <SHIFT CLEAR> 
100 CLS0:GOSUB1200:GOSUB2000 
200 CLS1:GOSUB13^:GOSUB2000 
300 CLS2:GOSUB1000:GOSUB2000 
400 CLS3:GOSUB1100:GOSUB2000 
500 CLS4:GOSUB1200:GOSUB2000 
600 CLS5 : GOSUB1300 : GOSUB2000 



700 CLS6:GOSUB1000:GOSUB2000 
800 CLS7:GOSUB1100:GOSUB2000 
900 CLS8:GOSUB1400:GOSUB2000:GOT 
02 

1000 PRINT@232," FRED ASTAIRE 

" ; : RETURN 
1100 PRINT@232," DANCE STUDIO 

11 ; : RETURN 
1200 PRINT@232," JOSEPH KOLAR 
11 ; : RETURN 

1300 PRINT@23 2 , " BELINDA RAMSEY 

,! ; : RETURN 
1400 PRINT@232 / M INVERNESS, FL. 

" ; : GOSUB2000 : RETURN 
2000 FOR Z=l TO 500 : NEXT : RETURN 

3000 PRINT@64 , " COCO WILL RUN T 
HRU THE LO-RES CLS COLORS IN ROT 
AT I ON FROM 0-8 STARTING WITH THE 

KEY YOU PRESS: n 

3001 PRINTTAB ( 1 ) "0 BLACK" , "UP-A 
RROW" , " 1 GREEN" , "DOWN-ARROW" , " 

2 YELLOW", "LEFT-ARROW", " 3 BL 
UE" , "RIGHT- ARROW 11 , " 4 RED 11 , "SHI 
FT UP-ARROW"," 5 BUFF 11 , "SHIFT D 
OWN- ARROW" 

3002 PRINT@385,"6 CYAN" , "SHIFT 
LEFT-ARROW" :PRINT@417 , "7 MAGENT 
A", "SHIFT RT-ARROW"," 8 ORANGE" 
, "SHIFT CLEAR" 

3003 GOSUB2000 : RETURN 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 67 



L qS - 9 Programm i ng 



OS-9 C Compiler 



71 



Building functions and windows 



C: The Beginnings 



By Nancy Ewart 



Basically, I like C. I found it easy 
to learn once I got over the nearly 
insurmountable hurdles of the 
mechanics of typing the source code. It 
is exciting and interesting. Since C and 
OS-9 Level II are both used by other 
machines and the source code is porta- 
ble, C is a choice with a future. 

You can get started with C if you 
understand a few rules, such as how 
functions operate. You also need OS-9, 
a C Compiler and an editor that will 
permit curly braces, square brackets 
and back slashes. 

The main() function starts all C 
programs (at least at my level of learn- 
ing). Curly braces, {}, mark the begin- 

Nancy Ewart lives in Toms River, New 
Jersey, and is a partner in a framing/ 
art supply/ paperback book business. 
She has owned her Co Co for nearly two 
years and is a dedicated user. 

168 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



ning and end of the program itself. /* 
*/ setoff comments;theCcompiler will 
ignore anything within them. Prin tf ( ) 
is the only other standard C function 
you need to get started. When you use 
it in a program, put what you want to 
print within quotes in parentheses, 
following with a semi-colon. 

As is usual with computer languages, 
punctuation is very important. Main( ) 
does not use a semi-colon because what 
follows inside curly braces defines 
main(). Definitions get curly braces. 
PrintF[ ) gets a semi-colon because it 
acts as a statement, an instruction. If the 
source code is not correct, the C com- 
piler will not work. For an in-depth look 
at how to "install" the C compiler on 
your system, see "Sailing Off to C" by 
Bill Barden (March 1987, Page 186). 

Listing 1 shows how these functions 
are done. Add your address, telephone 
number and the year. Save the program 



using your initials and -c in the SOUR- 
CES directory of a C library disk. 

Another advantage to C is that you 
can become creative in programming 
when you are just beginning to learn the 
language. When you learn early how to 
define functions specifically for a pro- 
gram you are creating, it seems like you 
are coining your own command vocab- 
ulary. No longer are you limited to a 
fixed vocabulary. If you want some- 
thing done over and over again, you 
create a function to do it. 

The program shown in Listing 2 is not 
a dramatically useful one. In fact, its 
output is trivial. The content and proc- 
ess of the program, however, show a 
novice how to begin designing and 
creating functions. 

The program prints the sea chantey 
"Earlye in the Morning" and it illus- 
trates the use of two C functions, 
main( ) and printf( ), as well as how 



to create functions of your own. Save 
this program as drunk . c. Af ter compil- 
ing, the command is drunk. 

What do you think the printout of 
this source code will look like after it is 
compiled and the command drunk is in 
your current execution directory? 

The next step is to add color. Listing 
3 shows how to print a number as an 
integer, in its ASCII code or as a 
graphics character. Save this program 
as trycolor.c, After compiling, type 
trycoior on the main screen. 

This usage is very versatile. Try 
substituting N for 140 and / or any 
number between 288 and 377. The next 
example in Listing 4 shows how to 
combine pr in tf( "%c" , x) ; with func- 
tion generation to burst forth in glori- 
ous technicolor. 

A function like stem() is worth 
defining because it is used several times, 
but most words (and pictures) need a 
different approach, An answer at this 
time is to create building blocks of 
color. I defined the color number con- 
stants to lessen confusion. When you 
define a constant in this manner, use 
capital letters in the C tradition. The 
constant name can be any length. It 
should be long enough so you won't 
have to guess at its meaning two years 
from now. 

The program in Listing 5 presents the 
word "gang" in blue and offset to the 
right. 

The general convention in C is to put 
only one function on a line. In most 
cases this improves readability. How- 
ever, it is easier to keep track of a 



Listing 1: 



sequence of graphics characters if you 
group them by screen line. 

Lo-Res graphics must be run on the 
main screen, TERM-VDG, to get the full 
effect of the color, If you were to try this 
program in window three, you would 
get enough of a pattern to check accu- 
racy, but no color. 

Next, because there are several new 
commands in your commands direc- 
tory, you can build an OS-9 file as 
follows: 

welcome 

echo 

loreshi 

gang 

echo 

echo Welcome to the OS-9 5ig 

With just the information presented 
in this article you could design a C 
program to print labels for a club, team 
or scout group, make a picture with 
black as the background color, write 
and print a love poem for a greeting 
card, or compose a litany. In doing so, 
you play with these ideas to understand 
them better. It is really quite easy. 

Windows Were Made to C 

Using con fig with OS-9 Level II, 
choose TERM__VDG and W, Wl, W2 or W3. 
TERM__VDG lets you run TsEdit on the 
main screen. Using iniz and shel 1, set 
up Wl, W2, and W3. I built several short 
programs to make this easier. See List- 
ing 6. 

Simply type one and press ENTER 
followed by CLEAR after you get the 
prompt back and you are in window 



one. Do the same for windows two and 
three. Put the OS-9 system disk with 
TsEdi t and the C Compiler in Drive 0. 
Put the C Library disk in Drive I. Copy 
TsPars onto /ril'SOURCES. 

On the main screen type chd /dl/ 
SOURCES, Then type TsEDIT. In win- 
dow one type chd /dl/SOURCES. In 
window two type free. This helps you 
keep track of how much space is left on 
your system disk. In window three type 
chd /dl/SOURCES. Remember to press 
CLEAR to change windows. The CTRL is 
used to toggle upper- and lowercase and 
to duplicate commands. 

Using TsEdi t, type your source code. 
See Listing 7 for an example. 

Save the program using :w name.c, 
but do not quit TsEdit. Instead, press 
CLEAR, In window one, run the C 
Compiler by typing ccl name „ c. 

If the program compiles perfectly, go 
to window two and press CTRL and A 
to activate the free command. And 
then go to window three to run the 
program simply by typing name. Type 
dir /d0/CMDS to see your compiled 
program now in the commands direc- 
tory. 

If the source code produces errors in 
the compilation, go to window three 
and run a directory. Delete any files that 
were created by the compiler d uring the 
abortive effort. These files have names 
like c tmp . 3 . i. Then type dir /d0/ 
CMDS to be absolutely sure the compiler 
did not get so far as to enter name in the 
system commands directory. If it did, 
delete it. Press CLEAR, and, eureka, you 
are back in TsEdit. Make and save 
your changes in the source code. Press 
CLEAR, then CTRL-A, and you are back 
compiling your program. No muss, no 
fuss, no bother. 

After I successfully compile a pro- 
gram, I usually delete the compiled 
program from the system disk but keep 
the corrected source code in Library/ 
SOURCES. This saves space on the sys- 
tem disk. 

(Questions or comments may be 
addressed 10 Nancy at 1789 Hooper 
Ave., Toms River, NJ 08753. f lease 
enclose an SASE when requesting a 

reply.) □ 



main() /* I call this ne , c */ 

{ 

printf ("\n") ; /* Clear + slash makes the backslash ■>'<■/ 
/* "backslash n" character constant. 
Starts a new line . **/ 

printf ("\n") ; 

printf ( "This program was created by\n") ; 
printf ("your name.\n"); 

} 



sailor () ; sailor () ; sailor () ; 
eariy() ; 

longboat ( ) ; longboat ( ) ; longboat ( ) ; 



Listing 2: 

mainQ 

{ /* The functions used in this program are defined below, */ 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 69 



earlyO ; 

weigh ( ) ; we igh ( ) ; we igh ( ) ; 
early () ; 

scuppers () ; scuppers ();s cupper s(); 
earlyO ; 

weigh ( ) ; we igh ( ) ; we igh ( ) ; 
earlyO ; 

sailor () ; sailor ( ) ; sailor () ; 
earlyO i 

) 

earlyO 

/* Defines function "early", no "semicolon", use curly braces. -/ 

( 

printf ( "Earlye in the morning . \n ff ) ; 
printf ("\n") ; 

) 

sailor () 
( 

printf ("What shall we do with a drunken sailor, \n") ; 

) 

longboat () 
( 

printf ("Put him in a long boat til he's sober ,\n"); 

) 

weigh() 
{ 

printf ( "Weigh , heigh, and up she rises, \n") ; 

} 

scuppers () 
{ 

printf ("Put him in the scuppers and wet him all over,\^"); 

) 



Listing 3: 

jnain() 
{ 

printf ("%d %c\n", 140, 140); 

) 



Listing 4: 

main() 
{ 

stem() ; 
stem( ) ; 

printf ("%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c\n" ,14 3, 143 ,15 9,15 9 ,159 ,15 9,143,143, 191) ; 
stem() ; 
stem() ; 



s t em () 
( 

printf ("%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c\n" ,143,143 ,159,143,143 ,15 9,143,14 3,191) ; 



Listing 5: 




#def ine 


BLU 175 


#def ine 


GRN 143 


main() 





170 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



( 

gf() ;gf() ;gt() ;go() ;bf () ;gt() ;bt();gt() ;bo() ;gt() ; bo( ) ; go ( ) ; bf ( ) ; period( ) ; 

gf() ;gf 0 ;gt() ;go() ;bo() ;gf () ;bo() ;gt() ;bo() ;go() ;bt() ;go() ; bo ( ) ; go ( ) ; bo ( ) ; period( ) ; 

gf() ;gf () ;gt() ;go() ;bo() ;go() ;bt() ;go() ;bf () ;go() ;bo() ;go() ;bt() ;go() ; bo (); go (); bt (); period () ; 

gf() ;gf () ;gt() ;go() ;bo() ;gt() ;bo() ;go() ;bo() ;gt() ;bo() ;go() ;bo() ;gt() ;bo() ;go() ;bo() ;gt() ;bo() 
;period() ; 

gf();gf();gt();go();bf();go() ;bo() ;gt() ;bo() ;go() ;bo() ;gt() ;bo() ;go() ;bf () ;period() ; 
bf() /* four blues */ 

printf ("%c%c%c%c" , BLU , BLU, BLU , BLU) ; 
t() /* two blues 
pr intf ( "%c%c" , BLU , BLU) ; 
bo() /* one blue */ 
printf ("%c" ,BLU) ; 
gf() /* four greens */ 

printf ( M %c%c%c%c" , GRN , GRN, GRN , GRN) ; 
gt() /* two greens */ 

printf ( M %c%c",GRN,GRN) ; 
go() /* one green */ 
printf ( "%c" , GRN) ; 
eriod() /* green plus new line */ 
printf ("%c\n", GRN) ; 



Listing 6: 



build one <enter> 
?iniz wl<enter> 
7 shell i=/wl&<enter> 
? 



Listing 7: 



main ( ) 



printf ("Your Name\n"); 
printf ( "Street address\n") ; 
printf ("City , State, Zip\n") ; 
} 



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Raritan, NJ 08869 
(201) 722-1055 

ENGINEERING 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 71 



Downloads 



The Upgrade Shuffle 



By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Editor 



When I try to print text files with the 
Filer and Ledger programs, the first 
lines of every page print past the left 
margin. My printers work fine with all 
my other programs. Also, I want to 
upgrade my FD 501 single drive system 
for frequent use of OS-9 Level II, 
including C programming. I would like 
your advice on the following systems: a 
second SSDD 3 5 -track drive; a DSDD 
40-track drive mounted in Drive I (can 
you list technical requirements); and an 
80-track DSDD Drive 2. What is the 
best solution for balanced use between 
BASIC and OS-9? 

J. Pelletey 
Chevy Chase, M D 

I don't have the combination of 
hardware you refer to, but itsounds like 
you have a software problem to me. If 
anyone else has experienced this prob- 
lem, please write with the solution, and 
we'll print it. All of the more recent 
Tandy drives sold for the CoCo are 40- 
track — I doubt you can find any more 
35-track drives even though the CoCo 
formats the disk at 35 tracks. If you are 
using Disk BASIC a DSKINIx will format 
at 35 tracks. Since OS-9 is RAM resi- 
dent, drivers for external devices, such 
as disk drives, can be modified and 
loaded upon booting the system. OS-9 
has drivers for 35-, 40- and 80-track 
drives and even hard drives. 

Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through H am radio ( K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago, and he has built several 
68 XX systems. 

172 



Which is better — disk storage capac- 
ity or compatibility? Obviously, you 
cannot back up a 40-track drive to a 35- 
track drive! That is my only complaint 
with non 35-track disk systems. You can 
always beat the system by using the 
COPY command, or a disk utility in 
BASIC, or the DSflVE command in OS- 
9, so it's not as bad as it sounds. 

I have two 35-track Radio Shack 
drives, plus an 80-track DS drive that 
I use on special occasions. To answer 
the rest of your question, a standard 
Radio Shack controller (Cat. No. 26- 
3022. or later) will work with all of the 
above floppy drives. You will also need 
a cable (Part No. 8709205) to connect 
the controller to your disk drive. 

There are several superior third-party 
controllers on the market that use 
enhanced software to allow 40-track 
operation. Since Radio Shack has a 
copyright on Disk BASIC, any enhance- 
ment will not be 100 percent compati- 
ble. The best solution I am aware of is 
ADOS by Spectrosystems, a ROMable 
BASIC that is 99.9 percent Disk BASIC 
compatible, but still allows non 35- 
track drives. 

Disassembling BASIC 

/ was wondering if there is a way to 
disassemble ECB commands through 

BASIC. 

William Mikrut 
Chicago, IL 

I have seen disassemblers written in 
BASIC, William, but I would not recom- 
mend them as they are relatively crude 
in nature. Why don't you consider Disk 
EDTASM+, or EDTASM + from 



Radio Shack? The Z-BUG module has 
an excellent disassembler built in, 

Deskmate Dilemma 

/ have a 64 K ECB CoCo 2, FD-50I 
disk drive, DMP-I05 printer, CCR-82 
cassette recorder, and Deskmate. Is it 
possible to modify the printer module 
in Deskmate for 2400 baud without 
using OS-9? If so, how? Will OS-9 Level 
II run on the CoCo 2? I realize that the 
advanced CoCo 3 features would not be 
available to the CoCo 2. Finally, what 
would be the best method to mail text 
files made using a single-drive system 
and Deskmate? 

James Dale Duncan 
Zirconia, NC 
James, a letter appeared on Page 6 of 
the November 1986 RAINBOW which 
detailed a method of patching Desk- 
mate for printing at 2400 baud. The 
only other way I know to change the 
printer baud rate in OS-9 is by way of 
the XMODE command. There have been 
some enhancements, such as BAUD and 
TUNEPDRT, but they all function under 
OS-9. Yes, you need a CoCo 3 to use 
OS-9 Level II. As far as your Deskmate 
problem is concerned, justCOPY the file 
to another disk. The person on the other 
end can do the same. 

64K Solution 

/ have a 1982 CoCo, modified to at 
least 32 K by the addition of 64 K chips. 
How can I check to see if it is usable as 
a 64K machine? Can these modifica- 
tions be improved to run 64 K pro- 
Bob Carlson 
Newport Beach, CA 



THE RAINBOW 



November 1987 



Due to the fact that you have an 4 F\ 
or 285 CoCo, I am sure that you have 
64K chips installed. I would suggest 
trying to run any 64K program as the 
acid test. Memory checking programs 
are available, but seldom necessary. 

CoCo 3 BBS 

/ will soon be purchasing the new 
CoCo 3 and I would like to put a BBS 
online. Do you have any suggestions on 
the type of software to buy? I have a 
300/1200 baud modem, an RS-232 
pack and a multipack interface. I would 
like to be able to upload and download 
using Xmodem, Ymodem and (CRC) 
Xmodem, and if possible, use the graph- 
ics. Please tell me what would be best 
for the features I want. 

Tim Fultz 
Moncks Corner, SC 

Tim, other than contacting someone 
with a BBS that you like and asking for 
help, we are at a loss. At one time there 
were approximately 10 different BBS 
ads in THE rainbow. Now the only 
thing I can recommend is CoBBS (by 
Richard Duncan, November 1985 to 
February 1986). It seems to be the 
standard of the CoCo world. Several 
improvements have appeared in later 
issues. 

As far as I know, CoBBS dots not 
have Xmodem drivers in the original 
article. If anyone has written one I'm 
sure we would be more than happy to 
publish it. 

Jumper Connections 

I enjoy my 16KECB CoCo 2, but 64 K 
would be nice, given the money. I read 
Tony DiStefano's article on the 2B in 
the September J 986 issue and got ex- 
cited about doing my own upgrade to 
64K. But the simplest way, just plugging 



in 4-by-64K chips, apparently requires 
connecting jumper J 6, on the left of the 
RAMs. I looked. It's not there, at least 
not in my machine. I do have a jumper 
J7 on the right of the RA Ms. Could that 
be it? 

David B. Smith 
Duluth, MN 

David, on most CoCos this jumper is 
labeled "64K," or J6. Don't mistake it 
for the ROM jumper, though. The 
ROM jumper is Jl through J5. This 
information came from the service 
manual for Cat. Nos. 26-3 134B/3 1 36B/ 
3127B. Looking at the top, or compo- 
nent side, of your circuit board, this 
jumper should be on the lower left 
portion of the board. 

CoCo in a PC Case 

/ have a 285 board CoCo modified 
and running in an IBM PC case. My 
system is configured as: two double- 
sided, double-density Qume drives, RS 
controller Version J.J, Word-Pak (old), 
64 K printer buffer, NAP amber moni- 
tor, RS-232 pack, DMP-105, cassette 
and J&R Banker board. I want to use 
a hard drive and found a 5 Mb Seagate 
model for $79. I know IV need a hard 
disk interface and a controller. I plan to 
buy the Disto Super Controller with 
hard disk interface and I or Owl- Ware 
Winchester BASIC Interface and Soft- 
ware. I need to know if these systems are 
compatible with the Seagate hard drive 
and I or how do I configure the system 
to work? By the way, Vm running OS- 
9. I plan to upgrade to a CoCo 3 some- 
day, and I want to keep my hardware. 

Gerald J. Daniels 
Cutoff, LA 

Gerald, I would recommend both of 
these suppliers when it comes to con- 
necting your hard disk drive to your 
CoCo. Write them with the details and 
you'll be up in no time flat. 



Disk Crashes 

I have owned my CoCo 2 for about 
two years. Soon after I bought the 
CoCo, I got a disk drive. I paid $300 for 
the 26-3129 when it was on sale. For 
more than a year, I have had quite a few 
disks crashing on me. I have done 
everything I can think of. When typing 
in listings, I kill the old file when 
updating my work. I have my disks 
away from magnetic sources. Vm pretty 
sure it isn't static electricity. I have tried 
many things, but none seem to stop this 
bizarre occurrence. 

Jesse Sanders 
Chimney Rock, CO 

The problem might be that you are 
trying to save your programs using the 
high-speed poke, Jesse. Another thing 
to check is the connection between the 
disk controller and the drives. It can 
become corroded and cause erratic 
operation. The same goes for the disk 
controller connection to the CoCo. 

The easiest way to clean these con- 
tacts is with a soft rubber pencil eraser. 
Just wipe the contact surfaces with an 
eraser and see if this helps. This is the 
reason so many people prefer gold 
contacts for connections of this sort. 
Gold doesn't corrode like tin. 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to: Down- 
loads, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, K Y 40059. We reserve the right 
to publish only questions of general 
interest and to edit for space and clarity. 
Due to the large volume of mail we 
receive, we are unable to answer letters 
individually. 

Your technical questions may also be 
sent to us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, at the 
RAINBOW> prompt, type ASK (for Ask 
the Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "Down- 
loads" online form, which has complete 
instructions. 



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November 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 73 



Barden's Buffer 

The Mystery 
of the Novice Bell Ringer 

or Elementary Recursion, Watson 

By William Barden, Jr. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



"W^W 7 atson > I' m afraid that I must go," said Holmes, 
^y^/ as we sat down together for breakfast one 
T T morning. 
"Go? Where?" 

"To Oxford, Saint Andrew's Monastery. Perhaps this letter 
will explain." 

He handed me a short missive, printed on line printer paper 
by a dot matrix printer. It read: 

My Dear Mr. Sherlock Holmes: 

I am writing you as I have nowhere else to turn. I am the 
abbot at Saint Andrews in Oxford. Shortly after noon 
yesterday, the noon bells were curtailed. The body of the bell 
ringer, a Henry Saxon, was found at the base of the bell 
tower. In the bell-ringing room of the tower, a Radio Shack 
Color Computer 3 was found with a strange screen display. 
It is enclosed for your perusal 

The local constabulary is sorely baffled by the circumstan- 
ces surrounding the tragedy and suspects foul play. I cannot 
allow a great deal of publicity at this time, as it coincides with 
the annual Saint Andrews Charity Drive. Can you help us 
solve this unfortunate situation? 

With optimistic hopes, 
Brother John 

"The abbot had presence of mind enough to dump the 
screen, Watson. This is what was on it." Holmes held a piece 
of paper up to the light. On first perusal, I discerned the 
following from a list of nonsense words: 

cbea f d 
cbeadf 
cbeda f 
cbedf a 
cbef da 
cbef ad 
cbf dae 



Bill Bar den has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects or computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 



"It appears to be some sort of code, Holmes." 

"I think not, Watson. In any event, if you would accom- 
pany me, you might find additional material for those stories 
you are always compiling about my exploits." 

And so it happened that I found myself in a first-class 
carriage flying toward Oxford. Sherlock Holmes, his eager 
face framed by his Deerstalker traveling cap, his fingers 
racing over the keyboard, was busily engaged in his Model 
100 computer. 

"We are traveling well," he said, checking the computer's 
display screen. "Our present rate is 85 and one-quarter miles 
per hour." 

"I have not observed mile markers," I said. 

"Nor have I. It's a simple calculation when you have a 
transducer connected to the wheels. Tell me, what do you 
make of the contents of the Color Computer screen?" 

"As I said before, it's obviously some sort of code," I 
replied, somewhat annoyed in Holmes overlooking the 
obvious. "Perhaps you could solve it on your Model 100." 

"Watson, you never cease to amaze me. Didn't you have 
algebra in the course of your medical studies? The display 
is not a code, it is a permutation." 

"A permutation?" 

"Yes. Suppose that you have the letters a, b, c, d, e and 
f. In how many different ways can you arrange them?" 

"Well, I suppose . . . that is — " 

"Try a simpler case, the letters a, b and c." 

"Well, in that case, you would have abc, acb, bac, bca, cab 
and cba — six different ways!" 

"Precisely, Watson. As a matter of fact, for any given 
number of letters, you would have exactly the number of the 
letters' factorial." 

"Factorial?" 

"Yes. The factorial of 1 is I ; the factorial of 2 is I times 
2, or 2; the factorial of 3 is I times 2 times 3, or 6; and so 
forth." 

"Ah, I see, Holmes. In that case, the number of different 
ways you could arrange the letters a, b, c, d, e and f would 
be I times 2 times 3 times 4 times 5 times 6, as there are six 
letters. If I am correct, that would be 720 different combi- 
nations. And that is what was on the display of the Color 
Computer 3!" 

"Bravo, Watson!" 



174 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



"But what was a bell ringer doing with a display of the j" 
permutations of six letters?" 

"The question, Watson, is not what he was doing with 
them, but whether they have any bearing on this case at all!" 

We arrived at the station and left the train, catching a 
carriage to Oxford . We were met at Saint Andrews by Brother 
John, a large, red-faced monk whose eyes twinkled merrily. 

"Ah, Mr. Holmes. Thank you so much for coming." 

"My pleasure, Brother John. 1 see that you, too, are a 
computer addict." 

"Why, Mr. Holmes, how did you know?" he queried, 
surprised and puzzled. 

"The bottoms of your sandals are beveled on the outer 
edges, a common indicator of those who do much sitting with 
their legs crossed. Furthermore, the fronts of your sleeves are 
somewhat frayed, as if they continually brush against 
equipment of some type. The calluses on your fingers indicate 
that you use a keyboard of the Color Computer type, one 
not quite as wide as an IBM Compatible. I've written a short 
monograph on this subject and am familiar with the callus 
patterns produced by various types of keyboards. Lastly, you 
have a subscription renewal card from THE RAINBOW just 
visible in your left robe pocket." 

"Well, Mr. Holmes, I suppose it is obvious enough when 
you consider those facts." 

"Quite. May we see the scene of the accident?" 

"Of course. This way, gentlemen." 

We walked toward the immense church of Saint Andrews. 
Its belfry was very high up — perhaps 70 feet. From our point 
of view on the pathway, we could just make out six bells of 
various sizes within the confines of the open top of the tower. 

"This is where the body was found, Mr. Holmes," said the 
abbot, pointing to a spot about JO feet from the base of the 
tower. 

Holmes got down on his hands and knees and examined 
the area. Peering through a magnifying lens, he found a small 
piece of paper and quickly put it in a plastic bag. After a 
moment's further study, he sprang to his feet. 

"All finished here, Brother John. May we see the bell- 
ringing room?" 

Brother John took a large ring of keys from the confines 
of his robe and unlocked the oak door to the bell tower. He 
led us into a small room containing several tables and chairs. 
Six bell ropes dangled from holes in the ceiling. On one of 
the tables sat a Color Computer 3, its display blank. 

"I see the police have been here," said Holmes. 

"Yes, an Inspector Lestrade. He turned off the computer." 

"A pity. He may have destroyed invaluable evidence. 
Nevertheless, we shall see. ..." 

Holmes took out a 5!/4-inch disk from an envelope, inserted 
it into Drive 0, and typed in a few commands. 

"Tell me, Brother John. How long had Henry Saxon been 
ringing bells at Saint Andrews?" 

"Only for a week. The poor lad had been our choice over 
several other boys and a young lady who wanted the job." 

"Do you have the names and addresses of these other 
young applicants?" 

"I'll write them down for you, sir," said the abbot. 

On the way to the hotel, Holmes turned to me and said, 
"Watson, I'm afraid I must go back to London for a brief 
time. In the meantime, dear fellow, I must ask you a favor." 

"Of course. What is it?" 

"There's a short one-evening seminar on recursion at 
Oxford that I've arranged for you to attend. Would you be 
so kind?" 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



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A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

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November 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



175 



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RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years. July 1981 through June 
1984. is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes including RAINBOW ON TAPE are in the July 
1985 and July 1986 issues, respectively. The Sixth Year Index is in the July 1987 
issue. 



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1 76 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



"If I must, Holmes, but I don't see how this will help," I 
protested. 

"Believe me, it's all pertinent, Watson. I'll be back the day 
after tomorrow." 

That evening, armed with a small notebook and a few 
pencils, and feeling like a medical student again, I arrived for 
the seminar. I had heard the term recursion before in 
reference to computing, but was not really certain what was 
involved. The lecturer mounted the podium and began to 
speak. 

"Good evening, ladies and gentleman. This lecture will 
cover the subject of computing recursion. First of all, what 
exactly is recursion? To answer that, let me illustrate with an 
anecdote. If I have told this anecdote twice before, however, 
please stop me! When I was younger, I attended a lecture at 
Oxford. It began: 

"Good evening, ladies and gentleman. This lecture will 
cover the subject of computing recursion. First of all, what 
exactly is recursion? To answer that, let me illustrate with an 
anecdote. If I have told this anecdote twice before, however, 
please stop me! When I was younger, I attended a lecture at 
Oxford. It began: 

"Good evening, ladies and gentleman. This lecture will 
cover the subject of computing recursion. First of all, what 
exactly is recursion? To answer that, let me illustrate with an 
anecdote. If 1 have told this anecdote twice before, however, 
please stop me! When I was younger, 1 attended a lecture at 
Oxford. It began — " 

A voice shouted, "You've told this story twice before!" 

"and ended two hours later. 

"and ended two hours later. 

"and ended two hours later. 

"You see, the first paragraph of the talk was recursive. It 
was self -referential and 'called' itself two more times. It could 
have called itself an infinite number of times, but we added 
a control that terminated it when someone indicated that I 
had told the story twice before. That, in a nutshell, is 
recursion." 

I sat enraptured, listening intently. The concept seemed 
simple enough, but what did it have to do with the bell ringer's 
death? 

"Let's take another simple example. Suppose that we want 
to find the factorial of a number . . ." 

The lecturer gave a brief explanation of factorials, similar 
to the one Holmes had provided on the train. 

"A simple program in BASIC to do it is: 

100 INPUT I 
110 T = 1 
120 FOR J = l TO I 
130 T = T * J 
140 NEXT J 

150 PRINT "The factorial of"; I; "is"; T 

"However, another way to get the same answer is to use 
recursion: 

Procedure Factorial 
param 1, n: integer 
if i O 1 then 
n = n * i 

run factorial( J- 1, n ) 
endi f 
end 



"This particular program happens to be in BASIC09, the 
Color Computer BASIC used under OS-9. BASIC09 allows for 
recursion, as do PASCAL, C, and other newer languages. A 
PASCAL or C version of the program would be very similar. 

"Let's take a good look at what is happening here. In case 
you're not familiar with BASIC09 statements, the IF and 
ENDIF areeasy enough. Theyjust define a block of code that 
is run if a condition is met. The END, of course, marks the 
end of the procedure. The procedure itself is just a block of 
code with a name, in this case 'Factorial'. 

"The PARAM statement, though, is more complicated. It 
defines what parameters are to be sent to the procedure by 
a calling program. In this case, two parameters are to be sent, 
I and N. Because BASIC09 is strongly typed, it likes to see 
variables defined as integers or other data types. I and N here 
are both integers rather than floating-point numbers. The 
parameters are used in the course of the program. Here, N 
holds the factorial result on exit, and I is the number for 
which the factorial is to be found. 

"The most interesting statement in the code is the RUN 
statement. It calls another procedure. In this case, though, 
the procedure called is factorial itself! Factorial is called with 
two input arguments, 1-1 and N. 

"Suppose that we call factorial with this code: 

N := 0 

RUN Factorial( 3, N ) 

PRINT "The factorial of 3 is H N 

"Factorial will be executed and a check made for I O 1. 
I is initially 3, so the code in the I F structure will be executed, 
setting N equal to N* I = 3*1 = 3. The RUN statement will then 
be executed, calling factorial again, with 1-1, N or 2, 3. 

"When factorial is reentered, the new I will be 2 and N will 
be 3. The IF block will again be executed, setting N to 3*2 
or 6. The RUN will again call factorial, this time with 1-1, 
N or 1, 6. When factorial is entered for the third time, I will 
equal 1 and the code in the IF block will not be executed. 
Instead, the END statement will cause a return to the calling 
program. The calling program here, though, is the second 
factorial program. A return will therefore be made back to 
the statements after the RUN, the ENDIF and END. The END 
here will cause a return to the first factorial at the ENDIF, 
END point. A return here will return back to the system with 
N set equal to 6, the factorial of 3." 

"I have a question, sir," I called. 

"Yes, er, Doctor Watson," the lecturer said, noting my 



seminar name tag. "By the way, surely, you are not the 
famous biographer of Mr. Sherlock Holmes?" 

"Yes, I confess I am. My question, however, is this: Why 
does variable I change — wouldn't it always be equal to the 
initial value of 3? Wouldn't every call to factorial result in 
an argument of 1-1 or 2?" 

"No, Doctor Watson, for a very good reason. When a RUN 
call is made, constants or expressions such as I -1 are passed 
by value. Any changes made by the called program can 
change the value but they are not passed back. However, if 
the parameter is a variable, array, or data structure, they are 
passed to the called program by reference. The variable can 
then be changed in the called program. That's why N was kept 
as a running subtotal for the factorial while 1-1 was used 
to pass smaller and smaller values of I." 

"Quite so. Yes, it makes sense. Thank you." 

The remainder of the evening was spent discussing more 
topics in recursion. It appeared that recursion could produce 
some very simple code by the process of having procedures 
call themselves. However, recursion had a dark side — it uses 
a lot of memory for storing copies of return addresses and 
data passed by value. 

At the end of the lecture I knew much more about recursion 
than 1 had known before. I was reminded of the little girl 
in the United States colonies who wrote to a newspaper 
editor, remarking that an article she had read told her "much 
more about penguins than she really wanted to know!" In 
spite of the recursion lecture, I still did not know how the 
subject of recursion was related to the bell ringer's death. 

The following day I arose early. I was to meet Holmes at 
Brother John's study at 3 o'clock. 1 thought perhaps a visit 
to the local Radio Shack would be a convenient and 
interesting way to pass the time. I walked the short distance 
and entered the store. 

"Hello, sir. May I help you?" asked a clerk. 

"I'm just looking, my good man," I replied. 

While examining some new MS-DOS products, I noticed 
a strange-looking man puttering about the Color Computer 
display. He was a slight, sickly person, with a collection of 
mechanical pencils in one pocket. He was peering intently at 
one of the store clerks through a pair of broken eyeglasses 
patched with a Band-Aid. 

A shoplifter, I thought, or a computer nerd. It was 
extremely difficult to tell. I was about to mention him to the 
store manager, when the fellow came shuffling over. 

Suddenly, the features of his face relaxed for an instant, 
and I could tell that it was my friend Holmes. I uttered an 



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November 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 77 



involuntary gasp. One of these days he would pull that act 
once too often. 

"I'll see you at 3 o'clock, Watson," he whispered. 

At 3 o'clock I arrived at Brother John's study. Brother 
John, Holmes and Inspector Lestrade were also there. 
Lestrade held a temporary assignment at Oxford and had 
been the examining officer in this case. 

"What's this about, then, Mr. Holmes?" demanded 
Lestrade. "We have made a thorough investigation of the 
accident and concluded that there was no foul play." 

"On the contrary, Inspector, there was indeed foul play. 
Henry Saxon, the apprentice bell ringer, was murdered!" 
cried Holmes. 

"Come, come, Mr. Holmes. Who would murder an 
apprentice bell ringer?" 

"There was intense competition for the bell-ringing 
position. After all, Saint Andrews is one of the largest 
churches in this section of the country and still rings its bells 
by hand. Four people had applied for the position. Of the 
four, only Henry Saxon had the skills necessary to play the 
bells." 

"What skills are there in playing bells, Mr. Holmes?" 
scoffed Lestrade. 

"More than you realize, Inspector. The church at Saint 
Andrews has six bells of different tones. It has long been a 
test of skill to see ho w many d if ferent sequences of bells could 
be played. With three bells, labeled a, b and c, there are six 
such sequences: abc, acb, bac, bca, cab and cba. With six 
bells, there are 720 such sequences. 

"Young Saxon used his Color Computer 3 to compile a 
list of all possible sequences. This was the list still present 
on the display screen of the Color Computer while you were 
making your examination and which Brother John here had 
the presence of mind to hard copy before your blundering 
destroyed it!" Holmes thundered. He puffed thoughtfully on 
his pipe a few moments. 

"Saxon's program was a marvel in brevity. It was one of 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

No special instructions for this one. Unless you want 
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The listing: 

lp PM0DE4,1:PCLSJ3:SCREEN1,1:PM0D 
E3 : DRAW "C2 BMj3, 17j3R2 55Cj3BMj3 , 48R36 
D2R2DR4DR8UR4UR2U2R58D2R2D1J3R3DR 
8UR3U2 4LU2L2UL6 6UL2U2LU3R2U4L6U4 
R2 4UR2U2RU2LUL6 5DLD2RD2R2DR2 4D4L 
6D4R2D3LD2L2DL3 4" : PAINT (5 , 18J3) , 2 
, 2 : PAINT ( 5 , 4 3 ) , 3 , J3 : D$ = " D3RD2RDLD 
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2j3 FORX=64T016pSTEP8:X$=STR$ (X) : 
DRAW"C2BM127 , "+X$+D$+ "C1BM12 7 , " + 
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STEP9: CIRCLE (12 7, 17 J3) ,X, 1, .5, .J31 
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James Stewart 
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the things that helped him play the bells so well. The murderer 
was also a computer buff in addition to being one of the other 
three candidates for the position. The murderer interrupted 
the unfortunate bell ringer, made him climb the bell tower 
to inspect an Archer intercom system, and pushed him to his 
death. I found this where the body was found." 

Holmes held up a small piece of paper with the letters dio 
still visible. 

"Just before he fell, we can surmise the bell ringer grabbed 
at the coat of his assailant, succeeding only in tearing off a 
portion of a blank sales receipt from an Archer sales receipt 
booklet. The letters dio fit the type style used for Radio Shack 
paperwork in this area. I have done a short monograph on 
electronic retail store type styles." 

"That explains why you were in the Radio Shack store 
earlier, Holmes," I said. 

"Yes, Watson, I was checking the suspected murderer's 
programs, which he kept on the store's computer. You nearly 
upset the apple cart by getting me arrested as a shoplifter or 
computer nerd." 

"Holmes, I had no idea — " 

"So, it's a simple enough case, then," said Lestrade. "The 
murderer did in the victim out of jealousy over not getting 
the bloomin' position." 

"Notquite, Inspector. Thefinal insult was the program that 
Mr. Saxon had used. It was so much more elegant than the 
murderer's that he was incensed. Saxon used recursion while 
the murderer blundered through without it." 

"Recursion?" Lestrade appeared puzzled. 

"Quite simple, really," I said. "It's a technique that reminds 
me of a story. The story goes like this. . . ." 

"I'm sorry, Watson, but we must get to Radio Shack before 
it closes," Holmes interjected. 

The four of us hailed a cab and rode to the store. Weentered 
and found our murderer at the front of the store, watching 
music videos on eight televisions. 

"All right, Mr. White. The game is up!" shouted Holmes. 
The murderer, realizing that his crime had been discovered, 
jumped over a stack of Archer proximity-actuated Robot 
Transformers to make an escape. All 32 robots powered on 
and rolled toward him, and he stumbled over the first one. 
Lestrade quickly reached him, handcuffed him and led him 
out. 

On the way back to London, Holmes was jubilant, 
recounting the details of the mystery. 

"But Holmes, there's one thing that puzzles me. Why did 
you want me to take the seminar on recursion?" 

"Well, Watson, you must admit that it did not hurt your 
knowledge of computing. Also, it kept you from underfoot 
while I was researching the crime." I must have appeared 
somewhat hurt, for Holmes quickly added, "But the real 
reason, Watson, was so that your readers could learn 
something as well!" 

Procedure Permutation 

paramn : integer; a$ : string$[ 10 ] 
for i = 1 to ien( aS ) - n + 1 

aS = leftS( a5, n - 1 ] + right$( a5, len( a$ ) - n ) 
+ mid$( fi$, n, 1 ] 
run Permutation ( n + 1 , aS ) 
next i 

if n = len( aS ) then print al 
end i f 
end 



178 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



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OS-9 




KISSable OS-9 



The Evolution Continues 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



^T^" ISSDraw continues to grow! 
#A This month we show you how 
* m. to add a mouse-driven menu to 
your drawing program. But more im- 
portantly, we define a new data type 
that will make it easier to pass data 
between the growing number of proce- 
dures in KISS Draw. 

If you are getting into C program- 
ming with OS-9 Level II on the Color 
Computer 3, you are in for a treat. The 
new /dd (default device) descriptor can 
really speed you along. For example, we 
have our hard disk set up as /dd. To 
make it work with C, we moved the 
DEFS and LIB directories to the hard 
disk and then patched the hardcoded / 
dl/DEFS and 'dl'LIB references in 
CC1 and C.PREP. In CC1 you'll find 
them around S0EE4. In C.PREP, the 
offset is at $ 135B. Change the references 
so they read /dd/DEFSand /dd'LIB. In 
Hex, you will be changing a $4431 to 
$4444. After you make this change you 
will be amazed at your CoCo's perfor- 
mance — especially if you have made 
sure your current data directory is on 
the hard drive also. 

We went one step further here and put 

Dale L. Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to is a 

free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale is a 
U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and lives 
in Rockville, Maryland. 



our current data directory and our 
source file on the Disto 512K RAM 
disk. This lets the C compiler write all 
of its temporary files much faster than 
the five and a half minutes it used to 
take when everything was on floppies. 

BASIC09, OS-9 and the mouse that 
plugs in the back of your Color Com- 
puter can give you a whole new pro- 
gramming perspective, and that's where 
we're headed this month. The flow of a 
program used to be dictated by the 
machine. The flow of today's programs, 
however, is dictated by the person using 
the program. When the user clicks the 
mouse button an event is generated . The 
flow of the program from that point on 
depends on the type of event that has 
occurred. A short piece of C code like 
this makes up the main event loop of 



almost every Macintosh application. 
KISSDraw4 works the same way on the 
CoCo. But this technique does not have 
to be limited to drawing programs. It 
can be used in every program you write. 
It's a whole new way to look at the 
world. 

In English you could define the skel- 
eton program like this: 

Repeat 

Get an Event from the Event 
Queue 

Determine what type of event it is 
Respond to the event if appropriate 
Until application is terminated. 

Take a close look at the main event 
loop of the procedure KISSDraw4. 
You'll see it in English in Figure 1 . 



Figure 1: 

LOOP Forever 

Escape from the loop when any character is typed 

But in the meantime, 

Has there been an event? 
Was the event in the KISSDraw toolbox? 
If so, which tool does he want? 
Make pencil cursor to tell him he has tool 
Let him use tool in window 

Make arrow cursor again when he is done with tool 
Was the event in the KISSDraw Menu Bar at the top of screen? 
If so, go handle menu request 
ENDLOOP (* Go back and keep waiting for another event 



180 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



Listing 1: test 

PROCEDURE cest 
(* procedure to cest user defined record types 
TYPE datc^month.day. year: INTEGER 
TYPE address-city, sea tc : STfcING[ 20}; zip : INTEGER 
TYPE totals-pa id , received .balance : REAL 

TYPE RealSkinny^time :date; place: address; amount: totals 

DIM TheWorks-.RealSkinny 

TheUorks . t Lme . month : -12 
Thelforks . amount . paid : -199 . 98 

PRINT TheWorks . time .month 
PRINT TheWorks .amount . pa id 



Listing 2: KISSDraw4 

PROCEDURE KISSDraw4 

0000 (* Drawing program that lets you select a tool by clicking 

003a (* on an ICON 
0047 

0048 TYPE rodent-Vld, Act. ToTm: BYTE; XI: INTEGER ; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 
INTEGER; CBS A, CBSB . CCtA, CCtB , TTSA, TTSB , TLSA , TLSB: BYTE 
; X2, BDX, BDY : INTEGER ; Stat .Res : BYTE ; AcX , AcY ,URX, WRY : 
INTEGER 

00B9 

00BA TYPE stats-event , InUindow, InToolBox , InMenuBar , line , box , circle 
.ellipse ,bar, arc , fill , text .freehand .patterns , horzlines 
.vertlines , slantright, slantlef t , dots : BOOLEAN 

010D 

0102 TYPE cursor-NoCur . arrow, pencil .cross , hourglass , Nolcon . Text Bar 
.Scross. Icon . IconBuff : BYTE 

013D 

013E TYPE packet-mouse:rodent; sta tus : s tats ; poLnter : cursor 
0153 

015C DIM ButtonEvent : packet 

0165 DIM LastClicks:BYTE 

016C DIM char :STRING[1] 
0173 

0179 char:-"" 

0180 LastClicks:-0 

0187 ButtonEvent . status .event :-FALSE 

0194 ButtonEvent . status . line : -FALSE 

01A1 ButtonEvent .status . box:-FALSE 

01AE ButtonEvent . status . circle : -FALSE 

01BB ButtonEvent . status . ellipse : -FALSE 

01C8 But tonEvent . s tatus . bar : -FALSE 

01D5 But tonEvent . s ta tus . ar c : -FALSE 

01E2 ButtonEvent . status . fill : =-FALSE 

01EF ButtonEvent . status . text :-FALSE 

01FC ButtonEvent .status . freehand : -FALSE 
0209 

020A ButtonEvent . pointer. NoCur~0 

0218 ButtonEvent. pointer. arrow-1 

0226 ButtonEvent . pointer . penc il-2 

0234 ButtonEvent . pointer . cross-3 

0242 ButtonEvent . pointer . hourglass-4 

0250 ButtonEvent , pointer . NoIcon-5 

025E ButtonEvent . pointer . TextBar-6 

026C ButtonEvent . pointer . Scross-7 

027A ButtonEvent . pointer. IconBuf f-202 
0288 

0289 (* First we need to start with a clear screen 

02B6 (* and draw the menu 

02CA 

02CB RUN gfx2 ("clear") 

02D8 RUN JCISSdMenu 
02DC 

02DD (* We must bring the high resolution mouse on line 

030F (* and find out where it is pointing 

0333 

0334 RUN setupmouso 

0338 RUN gfx2("gcset" , ButtonEvent . pointer . IconBuff , ButtonEvent .pointer, arrow 
) 

035B 

035C LOOP \REM Main Event Loop 
0370 

0371 EXITIF char<^"" THEN 

037D ENDEXIT 

0381 

0382 RUN inkey(char) 

03BC RUN getKISSraouse(ButtonEvent) 

0396 

0397 (* Has there been an event 

03B2 (* Is Button Down 



Because BASIC09 lets us define our 
own data types, we were able to define 
a large data packet named Button- 
Event that we use to pass information 
between all the procedures that make up 
KISSDraw4. After we defined the data 
type in the main program, we copied it 
into the other procedures using Dyna- 
Star, our screen editor. 



"The real value in 
this month's listings 
comes from 
comparing them to 
last month's. " 



Since the program is still evolving, 
we'll probably change our data type 
definition several times before we com- 
plete the project. The names of the fields 
in our datatype make it possible to read 
our program as if it were written in 
English. Rather than writing: 

run gf x2 [ "geset " , 202 , 2 ) 

which means absolutely nothing, you 
can write: 

run g fx2 ( "geset " , But tonEvent . 
pointer . IconBuff , But tonEvent . 
painter .Penci i ) 

Which form do you think you will be 
able to understand six months from 
now? 

To ease into the simplicity of defin- 
ing BASIC09 data types, study the listing 
test. In test, we defined three sepa- 
rate data types named date, address 
and totals. We then combined the 
three into a fourth data type named 
Rea lSkinny. 

After you define a data type, you 
must always reserve memory for the 
data with the DIM statement. In test, 
we named our variable TheWorks. 
Notice its type is RealSkinny. In order 
to prove that it was working, we initial- 
ized several fields in the data record and 
printed the results. 

We needed to combine data types 
because of the number of fields we 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 181 



wanted to pass between procedures in 
KISSDrtw. We wound up defining 
three data types — rodent, stats and 
cursor — first. The data type rodent 
holds the standard packet of informa- 
tion about the mouse that is returned by 
syscall. We used the data type stats 
to carry the stats of a number of boolean 
variables and the data type cursor to 
carry the value of the various graphics 
cursors available in OS-9. Eventually, 
we will most likely change the various 
fill patterns fields so they can carry the 
value of the number that represents 
them in gfx2 command lines. 

We'll also most likely add a few new 
fields that we didn't realize we needed 
at first. 

We are developing KISSDraw4 in a 
module fashion. The shorter a proce- 
dure, the better the chance that we can 
make it work properly. Once we know 
a procedure works, we can let other 
procedures call it. Last month we just 
got the program working. This month 
we concentrate on the structure. We 
want it to be easy to read and under- 
stand. We also want to be able to add 
new functions in separate modules in a 
manner that doesn't require us to 
change previously developed proce- 
dures. 

The real value in this month's listings 
comes from comparing them to last 
month's. We hope you notice a marked 
improvement. This month we only 
reprinted one of the individual drawing 
procedures, KISSDrawBox. Notice how 
we pass all of the information needed by 
the program in one variable named 
ButtonEvent. BASlC09's data typing 
makes this possible. Once we passed 
ButtonEvent to a procedure, we were 
able to address any individual field 
within the record when we needed to. 

KISSDr*w4 is the main program and 
it calls all the other procedures needed. 



03C3 
03C4 
03D3 
03E2 
03EC 



04L9 



043C 
043E 
043F 
04 4 E 
0458 
045A 
045C 
0460 
0461 
0493 



04B6 
04B8 



IF ButtonEvent . status . event THEN 

IF ButtonEvent . status . InTooLBox THEN 
RUN tfhichTooL(ButtonEvent) 

RUN gf x2 ( "gcse t" , ButtonEvent . pointer . IconBuf f , ButtonEvent . pointer .pencil 
) 

RUN DoEvent(ButtonEvent) 

RUN gf x2("gcset" , ButtonEvent . pointer . IconBuf f , ButtonEvent . pointer . arrow 

) 

ENDIF 

IF ButtonEvent. status .InMenuBar THEN 

RUN HandleMenu(ButtonEvent) 
ENDIF 
ENDIF 
ENDLOOP 

(* Turn Graphics Cursor off before leaving program 

RUN gf x2 ("gcset" . ButtonEvent . pointer. NoCur , ButtonEvent .pointer . NoCur 

) 

END 



Listing 3: GetKISSMouse 



PROCEDURE 
0000 
002E 
0052 
0053 



00C4 
00C5 



0118 
0119 



0148 
0149 
0166 
0167 
018C 
018D 
0196 
019D 
01A6 
01A7 
01B2 
01BE 
01CF 
01DA 
01E2 
01E3 
01F2 
01F3 
0205 
0212 
0216 



GetKISSMouse 
(* Reads the present location of the mouse and 
(* returns tho status of the button. 

TYPE rodent-Vld,Act,ToTm:BYTE; XI : INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE; TSSt : 
INTEGER; CBSA, CBSB , CCtA , CCcB, TTSA , TTSB .TLSA.TLSB: BYTE 
; X2 , BDX, BDY : INTEGER ; Stat , Res : BYTE; AcX, AcY ,URX, WRY: 
INTEGER 

TYPE stats-event , InWindow . InToolBox , InManuBar . 1 lne , box, circle 
. ellipse ,bor , arc , f ill , text , freehand , patterns , horzlines 
. vert lines , slantright , slant lent, dots : BOOLEAN 

TYPE cursor-NoCur , arrov, pencil , cross .hourglass , Nolcon , TextBar 
.Scross .Icon .IconBuf f: BYTE 

TYPE packet»mouse : rodent ; status : sto ts ; pointer : cursor 

TYPE registers-cc ,a ,b.dp : BYTE; x, y, u : INTEGER 

DIM RegisterSet : registers 

DIM callcode: BYTE 

PARAM ButtonEvent : packet 

RegisterSet. a : -0 
RegisterSet .b:-$89 

Regis terSe t. x : -ADDR( But tonEven t .mouse ) 
RegisterSet. y:-l 
callcode :-S8D 

RUN syscall(callcode .RegisterSet) 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse . CBSAO0 THEN 

ButtonEvent . s tatus . even t : -TRUE 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent . status . event : -FALSE 



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182 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



0223 
0225 
0226 
0238 
02fc5 
0249 
0256 
0258 
0259 
026B 
0278 
027C 
0289 
028B 
028C 



02A7 
02B4 
02B8 
02C5 
02C7 
02C8 



02EB 
02EC 
02EE 
02EF 



ENDIF 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse. AcY<L0 THEN 

ButtonEvent . status . InMenuBar: -TRUE 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent. status . InMenuBar: -FALSE 
ENDIF 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse .AcX<40 THEN 

ButtonEvent , status ,InToolBox:-TRUE 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent. status . InTooLBox: -FALSE 
ENDIF 

IF NOT (ButtonEvent . status . InMenuBar) AND NOT( ButtonEvent . status . InToo LBox 
) THEN 

But tonEvent . s ta tus . InUindow : -TRUE 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent . status . InWindov: -FALSE 
ENDIF 

RUN gf x2("putgc " .ButtonEvent .mouse . AcX, ButtonEvent . mouse , AcY 
) 

END 



Listing 4: WhichTool 



PROCEDURE 
0000 
0024 
0040 
004L 



00B2 
00B3 



0L06 
0L07 



0L36 
0L37 
0154 
0L55 
0L5E 
0L5F 



017E 
018B 
018D 
019L 
0L9E 
0LA0 
0LAL 



WhichTooL 

(* Procedure Co determine which tool 
(* artist vanes to draw with 

TYPE rodent-Vld, Act. ToTra: BYTE; XL: INTECER : TTTo : BYTE : TSSt; 
INTEGER; GBSA . CBSB , CCt A, CCtB , TTSA , TTS B . TLSA .TLSB : BYTE 
; X2.BDX.BDY: INTEGER; Stat , Res : BYTE ; AcX . AcY , URX . WRY : 
INTEGER 

TYPE stats-event . InWindov , InTooLBox . InMenuBar , Line . box , circle 
, eLLipse .bar ,arc , f ilL , text , freehand , patterns , horz Lines 
, vert! ines , sLantright, s Lant Le f t , dot s : BOOLEAN 

TYPE cursor-NoCur, arrov . pencil .cross .hourglass , Molcon , Text Bar 
,Scross .Icon , IconBuf f : BYTE 

TYPE packet-mouse : rodent ; status :s tats; pointer : cursor 

P ARAM ButtonEvent : packet 

IF ButtonEvent. mouse .AcY>L0 AND ButtonEvent . mouse . AcY<22 THEN 



ButtonEvent . status . Line : -TRUE 
END 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent . status . Line: -FALSE 
ENDIF 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse .AcY>22 AND ButtonEvent . mouse .AcY<34 THEN 



GetKISSMouse, WhichTool and Do- 
Event arealldifferent from last month. 
HandleMenu and KISSDrawflrc are 
new. KISSDrawflrc is also in an evolu- 
tionary state now. It will draw a proper 
arc if you drag the mouse from the 
upper-left corner to the lower-right 
corner. If you drag upward, you'll get 
three quarters of an ellipse. It took us 
half a day to figure out how that imagi- 
nary limiting line works, and we didn't 
have time to finish the logic. 

The procedures PlayBackPix and 
RecordPix are just short stubs that 
print a message on the screen to tell you 
that the menu handler is working prop- 
erly They must be in place when you 
run HandleMenu, which is every time 
you click the mouse in the MenuBar at 
the top of the screen. A note is in order 
here. If you want to use some of the 
other "modules," such as KISSDrau- 
Ci rele or KISSDrawEl 1 ipse from last 
month, you will first need to compare 
the data structures to those in KI5S- 
DrawBox in KISSDrawflrc. Then edit 
the older procedures so the data struc- 
tures are the same. Otherwise, you will 
get several error messages. 

We still hope that KISSDraw4 can 
become a CoCo Community Program- 
ming project. If you have a procedure 
to add, let us know. You may write us 
directly at 805 West Edmonston Drive, 
Rockville, MD 20852. 

If you're getting into BAS1C09, we 
suggest you read The Official Basic09 
Tour Guide. It's still available from Bob 
Rosen at Spectrum Projects, P. O. Box 
264, Howard Beach, NY 1 1414. By the 
way, Bob has a new backup program 
that can format and back up up to three 
copies of double-sided OS-9 Level II 
disks in one pass, in about five minutes. 

That's it for November. Enjoy KISS- 
Draw4 while we think about the holiday 
issue. □ 



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November 1 987 THE RAINBOW 



183 



?1CD 
PLCF 
J3LD3 
JJLEJJ 
J3LE2 
0LE3 



0202 
JJ20F 
JT211 
0215 
0222 
0224 
0225 



0244 
025L 
0253 
0257 
0264 
0266 
0267 



0286 
0293 
0295 
0299 
02A6 
02A8 
02A9 



02C8 
02D5 
02D7 
02DB 
02E8 
02EA 
02EB 



030A 
03L7 
03L9 



Buc conEvent . status . box : -TRUE 
END 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent . status . box: -FALSE 
ENDIF 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse .AcY>34 AND ButtonEvent . mouse . AcY<46 THEN 



ButtonEvent . status .circle: -TRUE 
END 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent .status . circle : -FALSE 
ENDIF 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse .AcY>46 AND ButtonEvent . mouse . AcY<58 THEN 



ButtonEvent . status . elLips e : -TRUE 
END 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent . status . ellipse : -FALSE 
ENDIF 

IF ButtonEvent. mouse .AcY>58 AND ButtonEvent . mouse . AcY<70 THEN 



ButtonEvent .status .bar: -TRUE 
END 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent , status . bar:-FALSE 
ENDIF 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse. AcY>70 AND ButtonEven t . mouse . AcY<82 THEN 



ButtonEvent. status . arc :-TRUE 
END 
ELSE 

ButtonEvent . status .arc :-FALSE 
ENDIF 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse. Ac Y>82 AND ButtonEven t . mouse . AcY<94 THEN 



But tonEvenc . s tatus . fill : -TRUE 
END 
ELSE 



031D 


ButtonEvent .status . fill FALSE 




032A 


ENDIF 




032C 






032D 


IF ButtonEvent . mouse ,AcY>94 AND ButtonEvent .mouse . AcY<l06 


THEN 


034C 


ButtonEvent .status . text: -TRUE 




0359 


END 




035B 


ELSE 




035F 


ButtonEven t. status . text : -FALSE 




036C 


ENDIF 




036E 






036F 


IF ButtonEvent .mouse .AcY>L06 AND ButtonEvent . mouse . AcY<LL 


3 THEN 


038E 


ButtonEvent . status . freehand : —TRUE 




039B 


END 




039D 


ELSE 




03AL 


ButtonEvent .status . freehand : -FALSE 




03AE 


ENDIF 




03B0 


END 




03B2 







Listing 5: DoEvent 



PROCEDURE DoEvent 

0000 
002E 
002F 



00A0 
00A1 



00F4 
J30F5 



0124 
0L25 
0142 



(* Procedure that runs the proper tool program 
TYPE rodent-Vld , Act , ToTm : BYTE ; XI: INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 
INTEGER ; CBSA, CBS B , CCtA , CCtB , TTSA, TTSB , TLSA.TLSB : BYTE 
; X2.BDX.BDY: INTEGER; Stat , Res : BYTE ; AcX , AcY , VRX , WRY : 
INTEGER 

TYPE stats-event , Intfindow, InToolBox, InMenuBar , line , box , circle 
.ellipse, bar, arc .fill, text , freehand , pat terns , horz lines 
.vertlines , slantrighc , slantlef t , dots : BOOLEAN 

TYPE cursor-NoCur. arrow, pencil, cross .hourglass , Nolcon , Text Bar 
.Scross ,Icon , IconBuff : BYTE 

TYPE packet-mouse : rodent ; status : stats ; pointer: cursor 



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• 3 foot cable to connect to 
your COCO's serial port 

• The perfect item to use to 
connect a printer and a 
modem to your COCO 

• Small in size, only 4.5 x 2.5 
x 1.25 



The Model 101, 102, 104 and 
1 05 work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory 
size. These products are co- 
vered by a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 1 01 and 104 work 
with any standard parallel 
input printer including Gemini. 
Epson, Radio Shack, 
Okidata, C. loth, Seikosha. 
Panasonic and many others. 
They support BASIC print 
commands, word processors 
and graphic commands. 

We manufacture these 
products - dealer inquiries 
are invited. 



Cassette Label 
Program $6.95 

• New Version - tape trans- 
ferable to disk - save and 
load labels from tape to disk 

• Prints 5 lines of information 
on pin-feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven, easy to use 

• Standard, expanded and 
condensed characters 

• Each line of text auto- 
matically centered 

• Label display on CRT, en- 
abling editing before printing 

• Program comes on tape 
and is supplied with 24 
labels to get you started 

• 16K ECB required 

Ordering 
Information 

Free shipping in the United 
States (except Alaska and 
Hawaii) on all orders over 
$50.00. Please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling on or- 
ders under $50.00. 
Ohio residents add 6% 
sales tax 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use 
your VISA or MASTE RCARi 
or request C.O.D. (Please 
add $2 00 for C.O.D. orders). 
If you prefer, send check or 
money order; payable in U S 
Funds to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



184 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



The excitement continues! 



The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Nineteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our third 
Adventure competition. Discover backstage intrigue at the London 
Theatre, attempt a daring space rescue, or travel through time to save the 
universe, and that's only the beginning! 

Challenge yourself! Put your wits to the test with Adventures like: 

Evil Crypt — Encounter bottomless pits, graves that kill, flesh-frying fires. 
Even the rocks and trees conceal dangers. 

The Professional — You're hot on the trail of international jewel thieves. 

Cleopatra's Pyramid — Perilous action along the banks of the treacherous 
Nile River. 

Johnny Zero — Fight against evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. 
And when you're at the end of your rope, revenge is in reach with: 

Balm — You are the Adventure, determined to exterminate anyone fool 
enough to travel your cavern. 

Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these 
winning authors: Mark and Mike Anderson, Jon Blow, Jason Dolinsky, Matt 
Hazard, Joab Jackson, Curtis Keisler, Franklin Marrs, Ann Mayeux, Scott 
McCleary, Chris McKernan, Philip Newton, Fred Provoncha, Carlos Rocha, 
Michael Shay, Don Sheerin, and Walt Thinnes. 

The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures is only $11.95! 

Save yourself from typing listings with — the Third 
Adventures Tape or Disk Set. 

Get on with your game and eliminate typing hassles. Just load these great 
programs into your computer and run. 

Tape $9.95, Two- Disk Set $14,95 

The tape and disks are adjuncts and complements to the book; the book is necessary for 
introductory material and loading instructions. 

i 

Please send me: The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures $11.95 
The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape $9.95 . 



The Third Rainbow Adventures Disk Set $14.95 



Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ My check in the amount of is enclosed* 

Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Acct. No. Exp. Date 

Signature 

Mail to: The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492 

'Add $1 .50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S. add $4. Allow 6 to 8 weeks 
for delivery. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax for book and tape. In order to hold 
down costs, we do not bill. U.S, currency only please. 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
ou r readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
whichcan be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape.or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
renumeration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self : addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 




186 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



0143 PARAM ButtonEvent. -packet 
014C 

014D IF ButtonEvent. status . line THEN 

015C RUN KISSdrawline( ButtonEvent) 

0166 ButtonEvent . status . line : -FALSE 

0173 GOTO 100 

0177 ENDIF 
0179 

017 A IF ButtonEvent. status .box THEN 

0189 RUN KISSDravbox( ButtonEvent) 

0193 ButtonEvent .status .box:-FALSE 

01A0 GOTO 100 

01A4 ENDIF 
01A6 

01A7 IF ButtonEvent. status . circle THEN 

01B6 RUN KISSDravCirclo( ButtonEvent) 

01C0 ButtonEvent . status .circle : -FALSE 

plCD GOTO L00 

0LDL ENDIF 
01D3 

01D4 IF ButtonEvent . status , ellipse THEN 

01E3 RUN KISSDrawEllipso(ButtonEvent) 

01ED ButtonEvent , status . ell ipse : -FALSE 

01FA GOTO 100 

01FE ENDIF 
0200 

0201 IF ButtonEvent. status .bar THEN 

0210 RUN KISSDrawBar(ButtonEvent) 

021A ButtonEvent .status . bar: -FALSE 

0227 GOTO 100 

022B ENDIF 
022D 

022E IF ButtonEvent .status .arc THEN 

023D RUN KISSDrawArc(ButtonEvent) 

0247 ButtonEvent .status . arc : -FALSE 

0254 GOTO 100 

025B ENDIF 
025A 

025B IF ButtonEvent. status . fill THEN 

026A RUN KISSDrawFill(ButtonEvent) 

0274 ButtonEvent . status . f ill : -FALSE 

02 Bl GOTO 100 

02B5 ENDIF 
0287 

0288 IF ButtonEvent . status . text THEN 

0297 RUN KISSHandleTcxt( ButtonEvent) 

02A1 But tonEvent . s tatus . text : -FALSE 

02AE GOTO L00 

02B2 ENDIF 
02B4 

02B5 IF ButtonEvent. status . freehand THEN 

02C4 RUN KISSFreehand< ButtonEvent) 

02CE ButtonEvent . status . freehand: -FALSE 

02DB ENDIF 
02DD 

02DE 100 ButtonEvcntistatus . event:-FALSE 

02EE ButtonEventl sta tus . InToolBox : -FALSE 

02FB But tonEvent I sta tus . InHenuBar : -FALSE 

030B END 

030A 

030B 



Listing 6: HandleMenu 

PROCEDURE HandleMenu 
0000 

0001 TYPE rodent-Vld,Act,ToTm:BYTE; XI : INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 

INTEGER; CBSA , CBSB , CCtA , CCtB , TTSA , TTSB , TLSA , TLSB: BYTE 
; X2.BDX.BDY: INTEGER; Stat, Res : BYTE; AcX, AcY , WRX.HRY : 
INTEGER 

0072 

007 3 TYPE s ta ts-evont , InWindow , InToolBox , InMenuBar , 1 ine , box . circle 

.ellipse .bar , arc , f HI , text , freehand , patterns , horzlines 
, vertlines , slantr ight , slantlef t , dots : BOOLEAN 

00C6 

00C7 TYPE cursor-NoCur , arrow, pencil, cross , hourglass ,NoIcon, TextBar 

.Scross, Icon, IconBuf f : BYTE 

00F6 

00F7 TYPE packet-mouse : rodent; s tatus : stats ; pointer : cursor 

0114 

0115 PARAM ButtonEvent : packet 

011E DIM Menu(2) : STRING { 14 ] 

012F DIM FileAction: STRING [14] 

013B DIM MenuCur, Item: INTEGER 

0146 

0147 DATA "RecordPix" , "PlaybackPix" 

0165 

0166 FOR Iteai:~l TO 2 

0176 READ Mcnu(Item) 

017F NEXT Item 

018A 

018B RUN gfx2C ,, 0WSet M ,1,10,0,16,6,0,2) 

01AJ) RUN gfx2("boldsw","on ,, ) 



01D3 
JJ1E3 
01F7 
01F8 
0LFA 
01FB 
0239 



0258 
0265 
0269 
J326A 
02AA 
02EB 
02F7 
02F8 



0325 
0332 
033E 
0348 
034C 
034D 
0357 
036A 
0372 



0392 
039F 
03B4 
03BC 
03CA 
03DF 
03E7 
03E9 
03EA 
03EE 
03F0 



RUN gfx2("CurXY" ,0,0) 

PRINT "FILE 

RUN gfx2("boLdsw", "off ") 

LOOP 

(* Exic and close window if Button Down outside of Menu Window 
EXITIF ButtonEvent .mouse .Stat-2 AND But tonE vent . mouse . CBSAO0 

THEN 

RUN gfx2("owend r ') 
ENDEXIT 

(* Exit, close menu window and run File Menu Action requested if 
(* Mouse is in menu window, button is down and menu item selected 
(* is valid. 

EXITIF ButtonEvent. mouse . Stat-JJ AND ButtonEvent, mouse . CBSAO0 

AND MenuCur>0 AND MenuCur<3 THEN 
RUN gfx2("owend") 
FileAction:-TRIM$(Menu(Item)) 
RUN FileAction(ButtonEvent) 
ENDEXIT 

RUN getKISSMouse(ButtonEveut) 
MenuCur : -INT(But tonEvent . mouse . AcY/8) 
Item: -MenuCur 

IF ButtonEvent .mouse .Stat-0 AND MenuCur>0 AND MenuCur<3 THEN 



RUN gfx2("revon") 
RUN gfx2("CurXY" ,L, MenuCur) 
PRINT Menu(Item) 
RUN gfx2("Rev0ff") 
RUN gf x2 ("CurXY" , L .MenuCur) 
PRINT Menu(Item) 
ENDIF 

ENDLOOP 
END 



Listing 7: PlayBacUPix 



PROCEDURE PlayBackPix 
0000 (* Dummy *) 

000B PRINT "You have reached a Play Back Picture routine. Write Mel" 

0047 END 

0049 

004A 

004B 



Listing 8: RecordPix 



PROCEDURE RecordPix 
0000 (* Dummy *) 

000B PRINT "You have reached Record Pix. 

00<O END 

0045 



Urite me and I'LL work" 



Listing 9: KISSDrawBox 



PROCEDURE 
0000 
002C 
004B 
004C 
006A 
006B 



00DC 
00DD 



0130 
0131 



0160 
0161 
017E 
017F 
0188 
019B 
019C 
0180 
01B1 



KISSDrawBox 

(* Program to draw a box at location pointed 
(* to by high resolution mouse. 

(* Uses procedure KISSGetMouse 

TYPE rodent-V Id, Act , ToTm : BYTE ; XI: INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE; TSSt: 
INTEGER; CBSA , CBSB , CCt A , CCtB , TTSA , TTSB , TLSA , TLSB: BYTE 
; X2.BDX.BDY: INTEGER; Stat, Res : BYTE; AcX, Ac Y, WRX.WRY : 
INTEGER 

TYPE stats-event , InWindow , InTooLBox , InMenuBar , line , box , circle 
, e L lipse , bar , arc .fill, text , freehand , pa ttems , horz lines 
, vertL ines , slantright , slant lef t, dots : BOOLEAN 

TYPE cursor-NoCur .arrow, pencil, cross .hourglass, Nolcon , Te:ttBar 
, Scros s , Icon , IconBuf f : BYTE 

TYPE packet-mouse : rodent; status : stats ; pointer : cursor 

PARAM ButtonEvent: pocket 

DIM StarcX , StartY . CurrX , CurrY : INTEGER 

(* Enable XOR logic 

RUN gf x2 (" logic" ,"xor") 



About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . . 



the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
one or two line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




November 1987 THE RAINBOW 187 



About 
Your 
Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
youraddress. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster 

For Canadian and other non- 
U.S. subscribers, there may be 
a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 




0LC4 
0LC5 

Via 

0LDL 
0LEF 
01E0 
0LFE 
020C 
02LA 
0228 



024D 
024E 
0260 
026A 



028B 
02A0 
02AE 
02BC 
02DL 
02D3 
02D7 
02D8 
02EB 
0300 
030L 
0303 
0304 



REPEAT 

RUN getKISSmouse(ButtonEvent) 
UNTIL ButtonEvent .mouse . CBSAO>0 AND ButtonEvent .mouse .AcX>40 

StartX: "ButtonEvent .mouse . BDX 
StartY : -But tonEvent .mouse . BDY 
CurrX: ~ButtonEvont . mouse . AcX 
CurrY : "ButtonEvent . mouse . BDY 

RUN gf x2("se tdptr" , ButtonEvent . mouse . BDX , ButtonEvent . mouse . BDY 



WHILE ButtonEvent .mouse . CBSA-O0 DO 
RUN getKISSmouse(ButtonEvent) 

IF CurrXOButtonEvent. mouse .AcX OR CurrYOButtonEvent . mouse . AcY 
THEN 

RUN gfx2( "box", CurrX, CurrY) 
CurrX:-ButtonEvent .mouse . AcX 
CurrY : -But tonEvent . mouse . AcY 
RUN gfx2("box" , CurrX, CurrY) 
ENDIF 
ENDVHILE 



RUN gfx2 ("Logic" ."off") 
RUN gf x2 ("box" , CurrX, CurrY) 



Listing 10: KISSDrauflrc 



PROCEDURE 

0000 
002L 
0022 



0093 
0094 



00E7 
00E8 



0LL7 
0LL8 
0L35 
0L36 
013F 
0L52 
0L53 
0L6C 
0L9D 
0L9E 
0L3L 
0LB2 
0LB4 
0LBE 
01DC 
0LDD 
0LEB 
0LF9 
0207 
02L5 
0216 
0228 
0232 



0253 



0297 
02A5 
02B3 



02F7 
02F9 
02FD 
02FE 
03L1 



0355 
0356 
035B 



KISSDrawArc 
(* Program to Drav Arc with Mouse 

TYPE rodent-VLd, Act, ToTm: BYTE; XL ; INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 
INTECER; CBSA.CBSB , CCtA , CCtB , TTSA , TTSB ,TLSA , TLSB : BYTE 
; X2 , BDX, BDY ."INTECER; Sta t , Res : BYTE ; A c X , Ac Y , WRX , WRY : 
INTECER 

TYPE stats^event , InWLndov , InToolBox , InMenuBar , Line .box.circLe 
, eLLipse , bar , arc , f iLL , text , freehand , patterns , horz lines 
, vert Lines , s Lantright , sLantlef t, dots : BOOLEAN 

TYPE cursor-No Cur , arrow, pencil .cross , hourgLass , Nolcon , Text Bar 
,Scross, Icon, IconBuf f : 8YTE 

TYPE packet-mouselrodent; status ;stats; po inter : cursor 

PARAM ButtonEvent : packet 

DIM StartX, StartY .CurrX , CurrY : INTEGER 

(* Enable XOR Logic , then 

(* Let cursor foLLow mouse untiL button is pushed 

RUN g^C'Logic" ,"xor") 

REPEAT 

RUN getKISSmouse(ButtonEvent) 
UNTIL ButtonEvent mouse . GBSAO0 AND ButtonEvent . raous e . AcX>40 

StartX : -But tonEvent . mouse . BDX 
StartY :=ButtonEvent .mouse .BDY 
CurrX: -But tonEvent . mouse .AcX 
CurrY : -ButtonEvent . mouse . AcY 

WHILE ButtonEvent. mouse. CBSAO0 DO 
RUN getKISSmouse( ButtonEvent) 

IF CurrXOButtonEvent .mouse. AcX OR CurrYOBut tonEvent . mouse AcY 
THEN 

RUN gfx2("arc" , StartX. StartY+(CurrY-StartY) ,ABS ( CurrX-StartX 
) ,ABS( CurrY -StartY) ,0, Stare Y- CurrY, CurrX - S tartX , 0 



CurrX: -8ut tonEvent. mouse . AcX 
CurrY:-ButtonEvent .mouse .AcY 

RUN gfx2 (" arc" , StartX, StartY+( CurrY -StartY) ,ABS( CurrX- StartX 
) ,ABS( CurrY -Start!) ,0, StartY-CurrY , CurrX-S tartX, 0 



ENDIF 
ENDWHILE 



RUN gfx2("Iogic" , "off") 

RUN gfx2("arc" ,S tartX , S tartY+(CurrY-StartY) , ABS(CurrX-S tartX 



) .ABS(CurrY-StartY) .0 , S tartY- CurrY , CurrX- StartX, 0) 
END 



1 88 THE RAINBOW November 1 987 



0S9 LEVEL II 

SOFTWARE and BOOKS 

'Frank Hogg Laboratory has supported OS9 longer than ANY other company!!!" 



INSIDE OS9 
LEVEL II 

"Inside OS9 Level II is a gold mine. You'll 
learn more than you can ever remember 
about OS-9 system variables, the CoCo's 
GIMI, the file managers, the windows, the 
fonts, the descriptors and the bugs. It's a 
reference work extraordinaire! Buy it!" said 
Dale L Puckett , in the September 1987 
Rainbow . Dale is Co- Author of "The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II" 

Just $39.95 



DynaStar 3.4 

WORD PROCESSING 

Since 1981 DynaStar has been improved and 
enhanced to bring you the finest word processor 
available for OS9. DynaStar 3.4 is the same version 
available for OS9/68K with added windowing support. 
DynaStar 3.4 also supports any terminal(s) you may 
want to hook to your CoCo. Complete with the 
DynaForm text formatter and mail merge. 

Requires Level II OS-9 and 51 2K 

ONLY $150 

Upgrade to DynaStar 3.4 $50 



FONT EDITOR 

for OS-9 LEVEL II 

BY Chris Babcock 

CREATE NEW FONTS 
EDIT EXISTING FONTS 



This is a slick new package from a fellow you're going 
to be hearing alot about in the coming years. Now you 
can create or modify your character sets (fonts) to 
make them just the way you want. Req. L II and 51 2K 



ONLY $29.95 



The WIZ 

By Bill Brady 



The Wiz is the First and Only program designed for the 
CoCo III that uses WINDOWS! The Wiz is a smart terminal 
and communications program for the CoCo HI and OS9 Level 
II. Making use of multiple windows and overlay windows with 
pop up dialog boxes The Wiz really shines. Features 
include: Autolog- lets you configure The Wiz's colors, 
characters boldface etc., Xmodem and text send and 
receive, sleep mode, conference mode uses a seperate 
window for your text, usage log and much more. Does not 
work with the CoCo's internal bit banger serial port. The 
complete package includes a special ACIA driver that allows 
baud rates from 300 to 19,200 baud. Requires the RS232 
pak or the Disto RS232 or similar port plus a CoCo III with 
OS9 Level II and 51 2K. 

Only $79.95 



Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. Est. 1976 - 770 James Street - Syracuse New York - 13203 
315/474-7856 Telex 646740 Visa, M/C, Amex, Diners club accepted. Prices do not include shipping. 



Racksellers 



The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis 
and may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer 
users. We suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 




Birminghom 


Jefferson News Co. 


Brew^on 




Florence 


Anderson News Ca 


Greenville 


MAR Fl«rtrnnir<; 


Madison 


Madison Books 


Montgomery 


Trade 'N' Books 


ALASKA 




Fairbonks 


Electronic World 


ARIZONA 




Phoenix 


TRI-TEK Computers 


Sierro Vista 


Livingston's Books 


Tempe 


Computer Library 


Tucson 


Anderson News Co. 


ARKANSAS 




Fayeftevilie 


Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 


Ft. Smith 


Hot Off the Press Newsstand 


Little Rock 


Anderson News Co. 


CALIFORNIA 




Citrus Heights 


Software Plus 


Grass Valley 


Advance Radio. Inc. 


Half Moon Bay 


Strawflower Electronics 


Hollywood 


Levity Distributors 




Polygon Co. 


Sacromento 


Tower Magazine 


San Jose 


Computer Literacy Bookshops 


Santa Rosa 


Sawyer's News, Inc. 


Sunnyvale 


Computer Literacy 


DPI AWAPF 




Middletown 


Uelmar c^o. 


Milford 


Milfard News Stond 


Wilmington 


Normar, Inc. —The Smoke Shop 


FLORIDA 




Boca Raton 


Software, Soflwore, Inc. 


Cocoa 


The Open Door 


Davie 


Software Plus More 


Ft. Lauderdale 


Bob's News & Book-Store 




Mike's Electronics Distributor 


Jacksonville 


The Book Nook 




White's of Downtown Bookstore 


North Miami 




Beach 


Almar Bookstore 


Panoma City 


Boyd-Ebert Corp. 


Pensacola 


Anderson News Co. 


Pinellas Park 


Wolf's Newsstand 


Starke 


Record Junction, Inc. 




Radio Shack Dealer 


Tallahossee 


Anderson News Co. 


Titusville 


Computrac 


GEORGIA 




Bremen 


Bremen Electronics/Radio Shack 


Jesup 


Radio Shack 


Marietta 


Act One Video 


Toccoa 


Martin Music Radio Shack 


IDAHO 




Moscow 


Johnson News Agency 


ILLINOIS 




Aurora 


Kroch's & Brentano's 


Belleville 


Software or Systems 


Champoign 


Book Market 


Chicago 


B. Dalton Booksellers 




N. Wabash St. 




West Jackson St. 




Bob's in Newfown 




Bob's News Emporium 




Bob's Rogers Park 




Book Market 




East Cedar 




North Cicero 




West Diversey 




E.B. Garcia & Associates 




Kroch's & Brentono's 




South Wabash 




West Jackson 




516 N. Michigan 




835 N. Michigan 




Parkway Drugs 




Parkwest Books 




Sandmeyer's Bookstore 




Univ. af Chicago Bookstore 




Univ. of Illinois Bookstore 




Videomat, Inc. 


Chillicothe 


Book Emporium 


Danville 


Book Market 



ILLINOIS (cont'd) 

Decatur 



East Mollne 

Evanston 

Geneseo 

Kewanee 

Lisle 

Newton 

Oak Brook 

Oak Park 

Paris 

Peoria 



Schaumberg 

Skokie 

Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
WheeJing 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Columbus 

Garrett 

Greenwood 

Indianapolis 



Jasper 
Madison 
Martinsville 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Ottumwa 

KANSAS 

Topeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Hazard 

Hopkinsville 

Poducah 

LOUISIANA 

Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 
Brockton 
Caribou 
Sonford 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Brackton 

Combridge 

Fitchburg 

Ipswich 

Littleton 

Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

AJIen Pork 

Durand 

Harrison 

Howell 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Perry 

Royal Oak 
Sterling 

Heights 
Wyoming 

MINNESOTA 

Duluth 

Minneapolis 

Willmar 



Book Emporium 

K-Mart Plaza 

Northgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Chicago-Main News 
B & J Supply 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Bill's TV Radio Shack 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentono's 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 

Sheridan Village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Book Market 
Illinois News Seivice 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 

Sangamon Center North 

Town & Country Shopping Clr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Place 
North Shore Distributors 



D & D Electronics 
Radio Shack 

White Cattage Electronics 
Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 
Finn News Agency, inc. 
The Computer Experience 
Booklond, Inc. 
Delmar News 
Indiana News 
Elex Mart 

Arco Office Supplies 
Radio Shack 
Mining's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 
Southside Drug 

Palmer News, Inc. 
Town Crier of Topeka. Inc. 
Dandy's/Rodio Shack Dealer 
Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 
Lloyd's Radio 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Hobby Shop 
Radio Shack 

The Book Rack 

Magazines, Inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 

Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Corners Book Shop 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak, Inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 
Robbins Electronics 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Howell Auto Parts 

Curt's Sound & Home Arcade Center 
The Eight Bit Corner 
Perry Computers 
Soflwore City 

Sterling Book Center 
Gerry's Book Co. 

Carlson Books 
Read-More News 
The Photo Shop 



MISSOURI 

Farmington 
Jefferson City 
Kirksville 
Maberty 
St. Louis 



St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Butte 
Whitefish 

NEBRASKA 

Omaha 



NEVADA 

Las Vegas Hurley Electronics 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 

West Lebanon Verham News Corp. 



Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Bcok Emporium 
Computer Xchange 
Front Page News 
Bailey's TV & Radio 

Ploza Book Store 

Consumer Electtonics of Whitefish 
Nelson News 



NEW JERSEY 

Cedar Knolls 

Clinton 

Marmora 

Pennsville 

River Edge 

Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 



NEW YORK 

Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonio 
Hudson Falls 
Johnson City 
New York 



N. White Plains 
Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhaven 
NORTH CAROLINA 



Cary 
Charlotte 

Havlock 
Hickory 
Marion 

OHIO 

Blanchester 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Columbiana 

Columbus 

Dayton 

Fairborn 

Kent 
Kenton 
Lakewood 
Lima 



Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 
Outpost Radio Shack 
Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 
Software City 
Software Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Desert Moon Distributors 
Front Page Newsstand 
Page One Newsstand 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 
Cromland, Inc. 
Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 
On Line: Computer Access Center 
G A West & Co. 
Unicorn Electronics 
Bornes & Noble— Sales Annex 
Coliseum Books 
Eostern Newsstand 
Grand Central Station, Track 37 
200 Park Ave.. (Pan Am #1) 
55 Water Street 
World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonll Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Usercam Systems, Inc. 
Walden Books 
World Wide Media Services 
Software City 

Universal Computer Seivice 
Village Green 
World Wide News 
Spectrum Projects 

King Electronics 
Radio Shack 

News Center in Cary Village 
Newsstand Inn 
Popers & Paperback 
Computer Plus 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Boomers Rhythm Center 

JR Computer Control 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Cinsoft 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 
B5 Software 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wilke News 

News-Readers 

Wilke's University Shappe 

The News Shop 

T.W. Hogan & Associates 

Lokewood International News 

Brunner News Agency 

Edu-Caterers 



190 



THE RAINBOW November 1987 



OHIO (cont'd) 

Miamisburg Wllke News 



Rocky River 
Toledo 
OKLAHOMA 
Oklahoma 

Cily 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 

Allison Park 

Altoono 

Brookville 

Malvem 

Philadelphia 

Phoenixville 
PiMsburgh 
Pleasant Hills 
Temple 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Warwick 



Programs Unlimited 
Leo's Book & Wine Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales. Inc. dba Radio Shock 

Steve's Book Store 

Fifth Ave. News 

Owl Services 
Software City 
Newborn Enterprises 
Larry's Stereo Shop 
Personal Software 
City Software Center 
Newsy 

Stevens Radio Shack 
All-Pro Souveniers 
Pitt Computer & Software 
Software Corner 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Software Connection 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. Software Haus. Inc. 
Gaffney Goffney Book Store 

Greenville Palmetto News Co. 
Spartanburg Software City 
Union Fleming's Electronics 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxvllle 
Memphis 

Smyrna 
Union City 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Brenham 
Elgin 

VIRGINIA 

Gafton 
Norfolk 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 
Tacomo 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madisan 
Parkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Milwaukee 



Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Computer Center 
Software. Inc. 
Delker Electronics 
Cox Electronics Radio Shack 

Poncho's News 
Moore's Electronics 
The Homing Pigeon 

Electronics Marketing 
l-O Computers 



Racine 

WYOMING 

Casper 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Kingsford 



Adams News Co.. Inc. 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Volley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
Book Tree 
Booked Solid 
Booked Solid II 
Harvey Schwaitz Bookshop 
Univ. of Wisconsin Bookshop 
Little Professor Book Center 

The Computer Store 



Information Telecommunicatianes 



Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



ALBERTA (cont'd) 

Claresholm 
Drayton Valley 
Edmonton 
Edson 
Fairview 
Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hinton 
Innisfail 
Leduc 
Lethbridge 
Lloydmlnster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Poul 
Stettler 
Strathmore 
Taber 
Westlock 
Wetaskiwin 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 



MANITOBA (cont'd) 



Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shack 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
AS.C. Rodio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack. ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 
Jim Cooper 
L & S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Datatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Rodio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's Electronics 
Stettler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



Burnaby 
Burns Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chilllwack 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Langley 
N. Vancouver 
Nelson 
Parksville 
Pentictan 

Sidney 
Smithers 
Squamish 
100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altana 
Lundar 



Campulit 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesoft Marketing 
Langley Radio Shack 
Microwest Distributors 
Oliver's Books 
Parksville IV 
D.J/s 

Four Corner Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 

Tip Top Radio & TV 



LA Wiebr Ltd. 
Goransan Elec. 



Morden 
The Pas 
Selkirk 
Virden 
Winnipeg 



Central Sound 
Jodi's Sight & Sound 
G.L. Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Lid. 



NEW BRUNSWICK 

Monctan Jeffries Enterprises 

Sussex Dewi tt Elec. 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood Seaport Efec 

Carbonear Slade Realties 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARrO 

Angus 
Aurora 
Concord 
Exceter 
Hanover 
Huntsville 
Kenora 
Kingston 
Listowel 
South River 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assiniboia 
Estevon 
Moose Jaw 
Nlpiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tisdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



Atlantic News 

Micro Computer Services 
Compu Vision 
Ingram Software 
J. Macleane & Sons 
Modern Appliance Centre 
Huntsville Elec. 
Donny "B" 
T.M. Computers 
Modern Appliance Centre 
Max TV 
Dennis TV 

Messageries de Presse Benjamin Enr. 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Eveiybody's Software Libraiy 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Poul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H 8c O Holdings 



America Ado. Inc. 



Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, 
and selected Coles — in Canada, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore 
Books, Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, 
Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & 
Brentano's, and Community Newscenters. 



CANADA 

ALBERTA 

Banff 

Blairmore 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 



Banff Radio Shack 
L & K Sports & Music 
Paul Tercler 

Double i'D" AS.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 



November 1987 THE RAINBOW 191 



Advertiser's Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



A to Z Unlimited 30 

Alpha Products 21 

Ark Royal Games 54 

Cer-Comp 179 

Cinsoft 94 

Clearbrook Software 

Group 142 

CNR Engineering 171 

Cognitec 87 

Colorware 22, 23 

Computer Center 35 

Computer Island 88 

Computer Plus 3 

Computerware 69,71 

Computize 24, 25 

D.P. Johnson 182 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

Delphi 114, 115 

Diecom IFC, IBC 

DISKMASTER, INC 75 

Disto 105 

Dorsett Educational Systems . . .65 

Fazer Electronics 151 

Frank Hogg Laboratory 47, 189 

Gimmesoft 77 

Hard Drive Specialists 149 

Hawkes Research 

Services 84 

Howard Medical 34, 194 

ICR Futuresoft 99 

J & M Systems 31 

J & R Electronics 165 

Kelly Software 

Distributors 110 

Metric Industries 184 

Micro Works, The 193 

Microcom Software ...9,11,13,15 
Microtech Consultants 

Inc 56 

MicroWorld 112 

Other Guys Software, The 61 

Owl-Ware 79,80,81 

Paparis Enterprises 75 



PCM 121 

Performance Peripherals 159 

Perry Computers 16 

Preble's Programs, Dr BC 

Prickly-Pear Software 14 

PXE Computing 7 

Rainbow Adventure Book II 185 

Rainbow Binder 66 

Rainbow Bookshelf 122, 123 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 107 

Rainbow Introductory Guide 

to Statistics Book 84 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk 157 

Robotic Microsystems 55 

RTR Development Systems 102 

Saint John's Gallery 1 59 

Sardis Technologies 177 

SD Enterprises 161 

SEESOF, Inc 111 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



Call: 

Jack Garland 

Garland Associates, Inc. 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

(617) 749-5852 



E3 Call: 

Kim Vincent 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 



Seibyte Software 108 

Software House, The 165 

SpectroSystems 161 

Spectrum Projects Inc 17, 27, 29 

Speech Systems 40, 41 , 42, 43, 44, 
45 

Sugar Software 125 

Sundog Systems 109 

Sunrise Software 84 

T & D Software 74, 118, 119 

Tandy/Radio Shack 49, 51 

Tepco 127 

TMM/Hemphill Electronics 183 

Tom Mix Software 134 

True Data Products 1 38, 1 39 

Vidicom Corporation 173 

William Brigance 147 

Woodstown Electronics A 151 

Zebra Systems 53 




192 THE RAINBOW November 1987 



DIGISECTOR 
DS-69B 



> VIDEO 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




COCO 3 SCREEN 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69Band your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS™ 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR™ 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



Save $200 on Magnavox Monitors 
Magnavox 8CM643 RGB Analog only $385!! 




MONITORS 




1230 A 12" 



This 12" green screen high roso uimri 
monitor offers 80 column capability. Zenith 
quality and a aO-day warranty vaRd at any 
Of Zenith's 1200 locations. 



$125 



122A Zenith 1 2" Amber Screen offers 
the same 640 dots x 200 lines reso- 
lution at 15MHz and a 90-day war- 
ranty valid at 1200 locations 



$88 



(«7 shipping) 

MAGNAVOX 
8 CM 515 has 

analog RGBf or CoCo 3, TTL RGB 
for Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and 
composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. 
Built-in speaker. 14" screen with 
640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 
2 years.parts and labor warranty. 

reg. list $499 

SAVE 
$200 



Retail J 199 
Our price 
($7 shipping) BRAND NEW 

All monitors require an amplifier cir- 
cuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer. 
They attach with spring connectors 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one for audio and one for 
video. CoCo 3 does not require an 
amplifier circuit. 

VA-1 for monochrome monitors only, 
fits ail color computers 



$24.45 

>me or color, fits all 

$39.45 



$298 




+ $14 Shipping 

CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable. 

only $19.95 with 

Magnavox Monitor order. 
$29.95 w/o monitor. 



( s 2 shipping) 

VC-4 for monochrome or color, fits all 
color computers 
($2 shipping) 

MAGNAVOC 

CM 8505 has analog RGB 
and TTL RGB and composite 
color input. Built in speaker. 13" 
screen with 390 dots x 240 reso- 
lution in RGB mode. Plus 1 year 
parts & labor warranty. 

reg. list $299 



SAVE 

*79 

$220 

+ $14 Shipping 




DRIVE 0 + ■ Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only. Double sided double density 360r^^^^^^^^^^ 

$178 45 

Double sided — ■ — 

<»5 shipping) 3 D 6 t leden5i,y 1 
Add $34 for a Disto DC-3. 



GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty- 
of dealing with a company through the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for any 
reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) 

Shipping charges are for 48 states. 

APO, Canada and Puerto Rico orders are higher. 



DISK CONTROLLER 




Includes controller and C-DOS 4.( 
ROM Chip. DISTO 

^98 DC-3 A 
$2 shipping on all DISTO products 



ADD-ON BOARDS 



DC-38 includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and all 
software $138 

DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM $QQ 

DC512 512K RAM Board with 
software $125 

DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port Q 



DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer in- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips Q $55 

2764 8K Eprom 28 pin 

$850 each 

27128 16K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 
1 FREE Eprom W/DC-3P order 
effective thru 12/15/87 
C-DOS 3 2'4 pin Eprom makes Disto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

»20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 



Payrol/BAS 



(*2 shipping) 

• Nonprotected basic is modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
federal calculation 

• Custom code for each state (*25 option) 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 

• Print payroll and nonpayroll 
checks 



e(*25 option) 



Payrol/BAS™ 
30 Day TVial 

$29.95 



VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package in- 
cludes VIP Writer Terminal Data 
Base, Calc and Disk Zap which 
can fix a diskette that is giving I/ 
O errors 



$125 



reg. $149 ( S2 shipping) 



MEMORY 

Memory for CoCo 3 PC memory 
board plugs into the spare slots in- 
side the computer and can be 
populated with 256K ram chips. 
Completely solderless with com- 
plete easy to install instructions. 

$49.50 

PC Memory board with 512K *99 

Software spooler and RAM disk 
for lightning quick response or no 
disk swapping drive backup for 1 
drive system and printer spooler to 
free computer during long listings. 

$19.45 

($2 shipping on Memory 
products) 



WE REPAIR 

DISK DRIVES 
MONITORS 
CONTROLLERS 



Send them UPS prepaid 
to Howard Medical with 
your daytime telephone 
number and we will call 
with a cost to repair. 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00- VM Sit. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 
C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL P.O.'S 



SEE FRONT COVER 

FOR OTHER DfECOM GAMES 




DR. PREBLE'S 
PROGRAMS 



introducing PYRAMIX 

Tor your Cofor Computer 3 ! 

PYRAHIX is a 100% machine language game wrlccen exclusively Co coke advancage of all the power in your 128K 
CoCo 3. The colors arc brilliant, the grophics sharp, che accion hoc. 

PTRAWX features che finest In anlraadon, graphics, sound effects and game play uvailable codoy. It lias al 1 
the extras you want, too, such as a pause option, RGB and CMP modes, keyboard or joystick ptuy, help screen, 
multiple skill level, and the ability to backup your disk. 

8esc of all is the low price! Available today, for only $24.95 on diok + s/h! 



Product of 

CoiorVenture 



HUIJHI): 1 



And LlqFitninq Strife.cs! 



LIGBTNING RAH DISK is die most versatile RAjM disk for your 512K Color Computer 3! LIGHTNING RAM 
DISK will ollow you to use up to 4 mechonical drives and 2 RAM drives simultaneously for o totol of 
6 Drives! This RAM DISK vill also work simultaneously with our amazing LIGHTNING PRINTER SPOOLER! 
$19.95 on dink + a/h. 

LIGHTNING PRINTER SPOOLER far the 128K or 512K Color Computer 3. Multitnsk your computerl Dump 
more than 400K of text to the spooler "instantly." Then, continue your keyboard work while it all 
prints out! Also compatible with our LIGHTNING RAM DISK above. $14.95 on disk + a/h. 

LIGITTNING BACKUP utility for your 512K Color Computer 3 reads your muster disk once and then makes 
superfast multiple disk backups on all your drives! No need to format blank disks. Supports 35, AO 
or 80 tracks, double or single sided disks and adjustable step rate. $14.95 on disk + a/h. 

Orrfc! oil 5 Joi onlu s-'fi 



JUMP <PftUSIHC> 




BASIC FREEDOM I No one wants to be chained down. And 
yet,' if you type in BASIC programs, you have been 
subject to Involuntary servitudcl The culprit? 
BASIC'S limited EDIT command. 



Dr. Preble's 
Prescriptions, 



Demand Your BASIC FREEDOM! Programmed by Chris BabCock for CoiorVenture, this software gives you a 
full screen editor for typing in and editing BASIC programs ! Move the cursor anywhere on the screen. 
Inserc, delete or add text. It's the same concept as in a word processor, except you never have to 
leave BASICl BASIC FREEDOM is an invisible machine languogo program which you can curn on and off oc 
will. Even pressing RESET will not hurt your BASIC FREEDDOMI Simple, yet powerful with an essy to 
read manual. Many extra "nice couches" included, like KEY REPEAT and LOWERCASE INTERPRETER which 
lets you type BASIC commands in upper or lower case for ease of programming. Translation to 
uppercase is automatic for commands. Text in quoces Is not affecced. £ 0 £ 0 j 2, Of 3 ! 



SPECIAL 

availui. 



COCO 3 VERSION lets you vork, in 32, 40, or 80 column display modes. A separate version is 
■ for the CoCo 1 and 2. Available on disk for $24.05 + s/h. 



MENTAL FREEDOM by Dr. Preble! IMAGINEl Some doy, a computer so advanced that it responds no your 
very thoughts and emotions. Imagine, some day, thought-controlled graphics: levication and 
materialization! PLUG D( YOUR HIND and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS — that day is now! The Radio Shack 
Color Computer has many advanced capabilities, Just waiting to be tapped. Dr. Preble's Programs 
combines the advanced technology of the CoCo with the amazing Radio Sttack Biofeedback Monitor to 



bring you "Mental Freedom." 



For CoDo 2 or 5 



niOUGBT-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any video game you have ever played, our Thoughtwore 
testa your ability to hondle stress, to remain calm under adverse cl rcumscances. LIGHTNING FAST 
reflexes will do you no good here, unless you first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. Are you the 
accretely nervous type? Many people can keep a "Poker Foce 1 ' even when they ore worried so thst 
others may not notice; but can you really stop che worry itself? Find out with Mental Freedom! 

AND IT TALKS! Did you know that the CoCo can produce incredibly realistic digital speech without a 
special speech synthesizer? The voice quality is so good, It sounds human! Honest. Best of all, no 
extra hardware is needed for speech, Just some clever programming by Dr. Preble. 

MENTAL FREEDOM - Next time your friends ask v-hnt your computer can do, show 
them Dr Preble's Thoughtwore! Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback Monitor 
Catalogue #63-675. Mental Freedom - DISK only S24 .95 + s/h 



J 



CoCoBrailie 



VDOS, the fnDISK: Save multiple programs in memory. Or save multiple graphic pictures in memory. Works with 
or without a disk. let's you SAVE, LOAD and KILL stored prograna or graphics. DIRECTORY function lists 
files, givoa the start, end and execution addresses of machine language programs and number of free bytes 
remaining. Own a RAM disk without buying a disk drive! Requires 64K CoCo 1 or 2. Available on tape or disk 
for $24.95 + shipping/handling. 

VDUHP, for the tnDISK! Backup all your UnDISK files to a single tape file for easy reloading A must for VDOS 
uaers! On tape for S14.95 + shipping/handling. 

VPRDfT, for tlio UnDISK: Paper printout for UnDISK Directory. On tape, $9.95 + shipping/handling. 



Grade I or Grade 2 
Braille using your CoCo 1, 2 
or 3 and a Brother Daisy Wheel 
printer! Fast Print to 
Braille conversion olgoritlim 
converts word proceasor files, 
program listings and data 
files Into touch readable 
Braille. For use by the blind 
or the sighted. No knowledge 
of the Braille code iu 
necessary. Just send print to 
the program and out comes 
Brailiel Note: The complex 
Grade 2 conversion is very 
good and though not always 
perfect, quito readable. 
Requires 64K or more. Brother 
HR seri.es printer or the IF-50 
interface series required. 
Low Cose! Similar software 
costs 3 times as much. Only 
$95. 



Dress up your Disk Directory 
u/itfi color Jul messages and 
borders Create. useful help 
mzssP-yzs. Add that pro- 
fessional touch to your cre- 
ations! Only 5995 



Check, Moaoy Order, MasterCard . VISA or COD incepted, fr"nr Shipping zo USA or CnHttds. $2.b0, to other 

For CoCo 1 or 2 





Order From 
Dr Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louis iriUe. TO} 
(502) 96&-8281 

Phone Orders accepted 
Mon.. ved,, frl, and <s*\ am>