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THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 






SEE BACK COVER 

FOR OTHER DtECQM GAMES 



From Computer Plus to YOI 
PLUS after PLUS after 




Tandy 1400 LTS1239 
Tandy 102 24KS379 
Tandy 200 24KS649 



Color Computer 3 
W/128K Ext. Basic $159 




Tandy 1000 HX $539 
Tandy 1000 TX$889 




DMP-130A$279 



0 



Color Computer Disk Drive 
Drive 0 $ 249 Drive 1 $ 1 49 




BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

The Magic of Zanth (CoCo3) 34.95 
Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 
Color Max 3 (CoCo3) 59.95 
COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 
COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTerrmbyPXEComputing29.95 39.95 
TelePatch III by Spectrum 29.95 
C III Graphics bySpectrum(CoCo3)19.95 
Font Bonanza by Spectrum (CoCo3)29.95 
TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo3 512KRamDiskbyCerComp 19.95 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 7195 
Inside OS-9 Level II Book by FHL 39.95 
VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 479.00 
Tandy 1000 SX 1 Drive 384K 649.00 
Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 512K 1129.00 
Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg. Ram 1959.00 
Color Computer 2 w/64K Ext. Basic 89.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 169.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130A 120 CPS 279.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP230 Daisy Wheel339.00 

Star Micronics NP-10 100 CPS 169.00 
Star Micronics NX-10 120 CPS 
Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 
Panasonic P-1080i 120 CPS 
Panasonic P-1091i 160 CPS 
Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 
Okidata 182 120 CPS 
Okidata 192+ 200 CPS 
Okidata 292 240 CPS 
MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Radio Shack DCM-212 179.00 



199.00 
359.00 
189.00 
210.00 
349.00 
269.00 
339.00 
489.00 



Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Interface 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 
CM-8 6' Extension Cable 
Serial to Parallel Conv. 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 99.00 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 
COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 
Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 
Flight 16 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 
Nuke the Love Boat (CoCo3) 34.95 



89.00 
14.95 
19.95 
59.95 
26.95 
329.00 



Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 



com 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



Under 
The 




28 



1 




58 





114 



Cover illustration copyright © 1987 
by Fred Crawford 



The cassette tape/disk symbols 
beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's RAINBOW ON 
TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
RAINBOW ON TAPE. For details, check the 
RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK 
ad on Page 188. 



FEATURES 

A Frightfully Good Time/Ricky Sutphin 

GAME A Halloween search to chill and thrill 

Screen Scrolling Made Easy/8/7/ Bernico 

GRAPHICS UTILITY Make more appealing presentations 

Queens Quarrel/Scof Allen 

GAME Challenge yourself with this brainteaser 

C=^ Screen Dump Extraordinaire/H. Allen Curtis 

PRINTER UTILITY A Hi-Res screen dump for the Co Co 3 

PMODE Power/8ec/cy F. Matthews 

GRAPHICS ANIMATION Give pictures the illusion of movement 

Graphics Creation Transfer/Scoff Montgomery 

GRAPHICS UTILITY From tape to disk and back again 

^ Initially 3-D/Archor Wright 

GRAPHICS Display your initials boldly 

<^ On a Shoestring/H. Allen Curtis 

UTILITY Desktop publishing made easy 

£=5^ CoCoDraw Update/ John G. Williams 

MODIFICATION A clever drawing refinement 

^ Yakety-Yak/8ofc> Roberts 

DEBUGGING UTILITY Help for programmers and typists 

Animation Film Festival/So//a Carrock 

GRAPHICS Make your own CoCo movies 

^ Where We Started From U/Brian LeBlanc 

GENEALOGY Generate the lineage printout 

Simple Solutions/Dai//d W. Ostler 

PROGRAMMING TUTORIAL Answers to last month's quiz 



20 



26 



28 



30 



44 



48 



53 



58 



98 



106 



114 



144 



182 



NOVICES NICHE 



Freaky Face 

San jay Parker 
Merry Martian 

Ed Machurek, Jr. 

Demonstration in Art 

Ricky Sutphin 
Mirror Image 



78 



79 



80 



Before You Paint _ 

Bill Bernico 

How Cold Is It? 

Harvey Dettman 

It's a Touchdown! 

Darrel Behrmann 



82 



82 



83 



81 



Keiran Kenny 



NEXT MONTH: Reach out and touch someone — get online 
— make contact! We make it easy with our November Telecommuni- 
cations issue. There's a whole world out there for you to discover, and 
the rainbow is ready with the answers to your communications 
questions. Look for information services and much more. Plus a wide 
selection of games, utilities, Q-and-A columns, helpful programs, 
hints, tips and lots more all for the CoCo. 

Call on us — the rainbow — for aN your Color Computer 1 , 2 and 
3 needs! 



4 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/Joseph Kolar 

Much ado about nothing 

Building October's Rainbow/ J utta Kapfhammer- 
Managing Editor's comments 

CoCo Consultations/Marty Goodman 
Just what the doctor ordered 
Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg . 



.84 



.16 



.103 



SfG conversation and Hutchison's database report 

Doctor ASCU/Richard Esposito 

The question fixer 

f«5^ Education Notes/Stei/e Blyn 

Learning in the end zone 

PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 

Turn of the Screw/ Tony DiStefano 

Dissecting the disk controller 

S^Wishing Well/Fred Scerbo 

Understanding verb use 

"Education Overview" does not appear this month 

RAINBOWTECH 



.100 



.110 



.94 



.12 



126 



.158 



Barden's Butter/William Barden, 
From flatland to 3-D 

Downloads/Dan Downard 



Jr.. 



166 



.163 



Answers to your technical questions 

KISSable OS-9/Da/e L. Puckett 

Unlock graphics potential 

OS-9 Programming/Peter Dibble 

Using compressed files 



.176 



.164 



PRODUCT REVIEWS. 

Art-Deli/ Specialty Projects . 

Color Max Ill/Computize 

Gates of Delirium/ Diecom . 



High Resolution Joystick Interface/Tandy Corp. 

Leonardo's Pencil/ E.Z. Friendly 

My Artist/Seesof- 



Polytint/ Boiling Spring 

Restorit & Scan/Semmesoft _ 



ScreenStar and OS-9 Text Formatter/Computerware_ 
Stock Market Portfolio/Paparis. 



Super Tape/Disk Transfer/Microcom 
TW-80/Spectrum Projects 



134 
_129 
_136 
_130 
_132 
_131 
_132 
_134 
_139 
_138 
_135 
_138 



DEPARTMENTS 

Advertiser Index 



Back Issue Information 
CoCo Gallery 
Corrections 



Letters to Rainbow 
Maxwell Mouse 
One-Liner Contest 
Information 



.192 
167 

_18 

_50 
_6 
_38 



Racksellers 

Received & Certified 
Reviewing Reviews _ 
Scoreboard Pointers. 
Submitting Material 

to Rainbow 

Subscription Info 



190 
142 
_143 

_96 



.184 
187 



186 



mm 




October 1987 



Vol. VII No. 3 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Associate Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Consulting Editor Jody Gilbert 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 
Submissions Editor Angela Kapfhammer 
Copy Editor Lauren Willoughby 
Technical Editor Cray Augsburg 
Technical Consultant Dan Downard 
Technical Assistants Ed Ellers, 

Joe Pierce 
Editorial Assistants Wendy Falk, 

Monica Wheat 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 

Richard Esposito, Martin Goodman, M.D., 

Joseph Kolar, Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, 

Fred Scerbo, Richard White 



Art Director Heidi Maxedon 
Designers Tracey Jones, Rita Lawrence, 
Denise Webb 



Lead Typesetter Jody Doyle 



Falsoft, Inc. 
President Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue H. Evans 



Executive Editor James E. Reed 
Editorial Coordinator Jutta Kapfhammer 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jones 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quash nock 

Asst. General Manager For Administration 
Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Director of Fulfillment Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Rep. Beverly Beardon 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Director of Production Jim Cleveland 

Dispatch Sharon Smith 

Business Assistant Laurie Falk 



Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 192 



THE RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. THE rainbow, RAINBOWfestand THE rainbow and RAIN BO Wf est logotypes are registered • trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect, 
KYand additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT. Inc., 1987. THE RAINBOW is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy. Color BASIC, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered • trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
THE RAINBOW are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 5 



^mfl(MB@W 

CoCo Party Plan 



Editor: 

While I am grateful for the continued 
support of frankly frustrated publishers, 
programmers and software vendors in the 
wide world of CoCo, I am somewhat dis- 
mayed at the vitriol used against program 
pirates. I feel this subject needs less vitriol 
and more ideas, and I have a few to shell out. 

We all know that software piracy is 
destructive to the CoCo Community and 
discourages promising programmers, but 1 
don't feel that the situation is as bad as many 
have led us to believe. After all, true software 
"crackers" are relatively few, and the pirate 
programs of yesteryear don't work on the 
new CoCo 3. Your magazine and others in 
the community should not advertise pirate 
programs as a matter of policy, and the 
professional software manufacturers should 
avoid making them, of course. 

Further, a different marketing strategy 
should be used: there are many companies 
now that use parties and clubs as a medium 
of sales — Tupperware and Avon to name 
a few. Why not CoCo? 1 have quite a grudge 
against Tandy, and the general move in the 
direction of selling programs via Radio 
Shack stores is repugnant to me because 
Tandy personnel don't generally know 
enough about their own wares, much less 
CoCo wares. I don't suggest sending out 
programs and hardware willy-nilly to every 
club around, but I do suggest full-time 
salesmen using the medium of CoCo clubs 
to sell their wares. Salesmen could even 
support these clubs with regular freeware in 
return for showing off their wares, perhaps 
tying freeware grants to sales through the 
club, offering discounts for sizable sales and 
other aids to boost membership. 

I feel that much software theft is a result 
of attempts to bring people together. The 
theft of software is too widespread simply to 
be the result of a rise in the crime rate of 
users. Powerful psychological factors are at 
work: the need to "belong" to a group and 
to bring something sensational to it 
(newcomers may feel this especially), the 
desire to bring others to your own level, the 
desire to obtain something of proven value 
instead of a pig in a poke, the desire to see 
how something works, the desire to out- 
smart a pro. All these desires are present, 
and many more besides. Direct sales 
through clubs would eliminate several of 
these motives, especially that of buying 

6 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



something strictly on the basis of advertising 
reputation. 

This is not the answer to all our needs, but 
it provides an answer to several problems; 
and similar innovations will do so, too. 
Piracy is currently easy, and that ease is 
something that CoCo enthusiasts will have 
to be weaned from with constant, diligent 
reminders and innovation. 

Thank you for the forum. 

Mike Brant 
Martinez, CA 

SIGs International 

Editor: 

Since the first computer clubs were estab- 
lished, the number of members has grown 
to several million. There is a need for an 
international organization of computer 
clubs that can help all the clubs, organize 
meetings, publish its own journal and so on. 

The difficulty is that the millions of 
computer users do not form an integral 
whole. At the best, clubs are joined together 
in a partnership in the same country only. 
The reason they can't form connections with 
clubs in foreign countries is rather simple: 
partners are unknown to each other. 

To overcome on this difficulty, NJSZT is 
ready and willing to give a helping hand as 
an agent. 

NJSZT has called into action several 
computer clubs in Hungary. If you're inter- 
ested please send a letter with the following 
information to NJSZT, P.O. Box 240, H- 
1368, Budapest, Hungary. 

Include the club's name, address, tele- 
phone number; leader's name, address, 
telephone number; types of computers used 
by the members in the club; names of 
sections (if any); number of members; 
frequency of the meetings; the goal of the 
meetings; partnerships (if any). 

Also, please tell us what you think is 
required of an international organization. 

M. Havass 
General Secretary 
Budapest. Hungary 



CoCo on Ice in Holland 

Editor: 

Sadly, I have to report that the last CoCos 
seem to have disappeared from Tandy 
outlets here in The Netherlands. The word 



is that the CoCo 3 will not be available here. 
I assume that will also be the case in other 
countries on the 220/240 volt and PAL 
television systems. 

When my trusty old gray CoCo I . I even- 
tually gives up the ghost, will this mean 
farewell CoCo and farewell rainbow? Let's 
hear from CoCo fans in Australia, Western 
Europe and elsewhere. 

Keiran Kenny 
The Hague, Holland 



BACK TALK 

Editor: 

The August issue of rainbow contained 
a letter from a D.J. Leffler under the title 
"Bit-Banger Rebuttal." This letter needs a 
little clarification since it contained a few 
incomplete statements. 

Mr. Leffler says his CoCo's serial port (the 
"bit-banger") can operate at baud rates up 
to 4800 "in duplex," but he failed to mention 
whether it is operating in half or full duplex. 
From the application he mentioned (two 
CoCos in a master-coprocessor configura- 
tion), I believe he meant half duplex since 
full duplex would not be necessary in his 
dedicated application. In any event, very few 
CoCo owners would apply their computer 
in this manner. Most prefer to purchase a 
modem and get online with Delphi or their 
local BBSs. 

It is quite true that CoCos can achieve 
transfer speeds of 9600 bits per second in 
half duplex mode, and many CoCo owners 
routinely operate their printers at 9600 bits 
per second through the serial port. Half 
duplex operation, of course, requires data 
transmission in only one direction at a time. 

However, in full duplex mode, one must 
be able to send and receive data at the same 
time. While full duplex operation through 
the serial port may appear to be successful, 
a continuous incoming stream of data will 
cause the terminal software to drop either 
incoming or outgoing characters, or possi- 
bly both. Additionally, some "garbling" will 
appear from time to time as the terminal 
software attempts to maintain synchroniza- 
tion with both the incoming and outgoing 
bit streams. This situation is unavoidable, 
even if one takes unusual care in the design 
of the time delay loops. 

Conversely, full duplex operation at 1 200 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S £* 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

NOW HI-RES * 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 
XMODEM for machine language 
files. 128 ASCII characters, 1200 
baud, etc. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Handles files larger 
than memory. Print on line with J&M 
or RS232 Pak. Screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51. 64. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 

They are sincere, hard working and 

appreciative. Thanks! nL „. 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 
MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



bits per second is quite possible through the 
CoCo 3's bit-banger port. The popular 
terminal programs Rickey term and GeTerm 
support such operations quite well. This is 
primarily due to hardware differences incor- 
porated in the design of the CoCo 3. 

On the CoCo 3, the programmable inter- 
rupt timer can be used to provide a stable 
time base from which the terminal software 
may sample the incoming bit stream and 
send the outgoing bit stream very reliably. 
This allows for the creation of a software 
U ART, and unlike the situation in the CoCo 
I and 2, it allows more precise timing. Since 
it's a hardware device, fewer actual inter- 
rupts occur, which means a noticeably larger 
amount of processor time is available. In 
actual practice, baud rates higher than 2400 
are still rather hard to do using the bit- 
banger on the CoCo 3 in full duplex mode. 
Both GeTerm and Rickey term will function 
at 2400 bits per second in fulJ duplex mode. 

So, you see, even if using a well-designed 
modem and appropriate terminal software, 
the integrity of data communications may be 
jeopardized because of the unreliability of 
the CoCo's PIA-driven serial port. A 
hardware-based serial port, such as the 
Deluxe RS-232 Program Pak, is the way to 
go. 

Don Hutchison 
Atlanta, GA 

Obsoletion Scare 

Editor: 

I am very angry that you have switched 



most of your programs so that they only 
work on the new CoCo 3! I, who have had 
the original CoCo for several years, am not 
happy that half of your programs can't be 
run on my computer! I am sure [ am not 
alone. Reading the August 1987 issue of 
RAINBOW, l was disappointed when l saw 
that the game Danger Zone was only for the 
CoCo 3. [ would like to know the reason for 
this switch. 

Jason Max 
Phoenix, AZ 

The A ugust 1987 issue presented ] 7 
programs for the CoCo 1 and 2 and 
four for the CoCo 3. We will continue 
to support the CoCo 1 and 2 users. 
However, we must also support the 
newer CoCo 3! Yes, some programs 
will only run on the CoCo 3, but that 
is because the enhancements in the 
machine allow such programs to be 
written. The earlier CoCos can 't run 
these programs because they don't 
have these enhancements. 



HINTS AND TIPS 



Editor: 

Vd like to share a simple little program for 
making a blue and red checkerboard design 
on your computer. If you change the SCREEN 
value in Line 3 to SCREEN 1,0, you'll get 
green and blue on a green background. If 



you change the step rate at the end of Line 
3, you'll see many different patterns emerge. 
Enjoy! 

1 PMDDE4,1:PCLS1 

2 SCREEN1,1: COLORS, 1 

3 FOR Z=0 to 247 STEP 1.93 

4 LINE (Z,0)-(Z+9,191), P5ET 

5 NEXT Z:EXEC44539:G0T0 1 

Bill Bernico 
Sheboygan, WI 

CoCo in the Key of 3 

Editor: 

In using Joseph Piatt's program Mu- 
sic + TR from June 1987, I discovered a way 
to combine several keys of music into the 
same song. 

You must place the first half of the song 
in the desired key on disk, then copy the 
second half to begin at the end address of 
Part One, plus one. Transpose Part Two then 
load Part One back from the disk. Part One 
will load over Part Two, zeroing only the 
first two notes of Part Two. By replacing 
these you will have a key change within the 
same song. 

Jim Hill house 
Live Oak, FL 

The BASIC Solution 

Editor: 

I have read that in order to benefit from 



October 1 987 THE RAINBOW 



the 80 columns available on the CoCo 3 you 
must use the RGB monitor. 

While it's true that a color composite 
monitor is less than ideal for the 80-column 
format, such is not the case with a mono- 
chrome. While awaiting the availability of 
the CoCo 3, I dug out my Amdek 300 green 
screen, which had been packed away since 
I got a new color monitor. Every night I had 
visions of a nice 80-column display on that 
lovely green screen. When the big day came 
I was very disappointed at the first results. 

On power-up, the default values give you 
black characters on a green background in 
all three text formats. A monochrome 
monitor displaying this combination 
produces undesirable vertical bars in32-and 
40-column format and makes 80 columns 
unreadable. However, as in most cases with 
the CoCo, problems are usually greatly out- 
numbered by solutions. On the CoCo 3, the 
solutions are built into BASIC. Within 10 
minutes of that first disappointment, I had 
found my favorite combination of bright 
letters on a black background using 
PALETTE 2,0 and ATTR 3,2. I Feel this 
combination on a green screen monitor is 
unbeatable. On my black-and-white moni- 
tor I prefer dark characters on a light 
background. Using ATTR 6,4, this, too, is 
asnap. Boththe 13-inch green and the9-inch 
black-and-white display beautifully sharp 
and crisp characters in 80 columns. 

Mikey Kay lor 
Cleveland, TN 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I am interested in finding a genealogy 
program for the CoCo 2. If you have or 
know of any program available please write. 

Mvke Mortensen 
4734 East 17 Street 
Tucson, A Z 85711 

Big Blue CoCo? 

Editor: 

I would Like to ask all of the hardware 
buffs out there if they have plans for either 
of the following. I would like to see an 
accelerator card for the CoCo 3. How about 
a card to let the CoCo 3 be IBM-compatible? 
We've got all the right specs (memory, 
graphics, drive format, etc.). The market 
would be Immense for such products. 

Eric A. Wolf 
South Bend, IN 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I own a Model 101 Metric Industries 
Interface for my printer, a Legend 880. I 
bought the interface on sale from a private 
owner. The owner said no instructions for 
the interface came in the box when he 



bought it. If someone has instructions for 
the Model 101, I would appreciate it. 

Concerning my Legend 880 printer, I 
would like to find anyone who has one and 
can share their experience with it. I am 
trying to find compatible graphics and word 
processing software for it. 

John C Onken 
1 13 South A Una 
Roanoke, IL 61561 



Picture This 

Editor: 

I wrote a program displaying a picture on 
the CoCo 3's 320-by-l92 graphics screen. I 
would like to save it to MGE format so it 
can be loaded into Color Max 3. 

Randy Lyman 
2560 East Adobe 
Mesa, A Z 85203 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

Determined to learn how to access the 
CoCo 3's extra memory using assembly 
language, and after beating my brains out, 
making call after call and poring over the 
CoCo 3 articles in the rainbow, I finally 
called rainbow and talked to Cray Augs- 
burg. He suggested I purchase a CoCo 3 
service manual, because sometimes it ex- 
plains technical information not supported 
elsewhere. I ordered one from my local 
Radio Shack for $15, and Cray was correct. 
This manual contains all the information 
needed to access the extra memory. As an 
added bonus it even tells how to access the 
PALETTE from assembly language. At $15 
this is a very worthwhile investment. Thanks 
a lot to Cray Augsburg; my hat is off to you. 

Arron W. Branigan 
Jacksonville, AR 



A KDSK Fan 

Editor: 

I recently downloaded KDSK by Ken 
Wuelzer after reading Richard White's 
enthusiastic review in the April 1987 issue. 
I totally agree with Mr. White that this is one 
of the best programs written for the CoCo. 
I rate it up there with my favorite program, 
ADOS, by Art Flexser. Art really outdid 
himself on this one. He has succeeded in 
taming the unruly CoCo 3 with his modified 
RSDOS program. For those users like 
myself who use a monochrome monitor, 
now you can boot up the CoCo 3 with a good 
monochrome picture without having to type 
in commands to make the display readable. 
Plus, there are numerous other "custom- 
ized" subroutines you can create to make 
your CoCo easier to use by using single 
keystroke entries. 

R.C. Buescher 
Madison, Wl 



Telecommunication Inflation 

Editor: 

The Federal Communications Commission 
(FCC) has announced a proposal that calls 
for assessing additional connect charges of 
about $5 hourly for computer telecommu- 
nications services going through packet 
switching, value-added services such as 
Telenet and Tymnet, starting January I, 
1988. This will add at least $5 an hour cost 
to any service connected to packet switches 
such as CompuServe, Bix, Source, Delphi, 
Genie and People-Link, and will add an 
hourly charge to such services as the pending 
Tymnet's PC Express and Telenet's PC 
Pursuit (which charges $25 a month for non- 
prime time use of Telenet reaching local 
systems in the 25 largest cities in the U.S.). 

Of course this will kill off such efforts by 
Tymnet and Telenet to offer mass-consumer, 
inter-city telecommunications at low rates, 
and will probably just about kill off individ- 
ual subscribers (rather than corporations 
and government agencies) to national servi- 
ces like CompuServe, Source, Genie and 
BIX. It will also ensure that no public 
educational institution will get into these 
type services. The minimum non-prime time 
rates for any national service will exceed $10 
an hour, and daytime rates will be above $25 
an hour. 

The new chairman of the FCC is Dennis 
Patrick. The other commissioners are James 
Quelle Mimi Dawson and Patricia Diaz 
Dennis (there is still an unfilled seat vacated 
by chairman emeritus Mark Fowler). 

The FCC is accepting comments on the 
ruling. You can write to: Office of Opinion 
and Review, The Secretary, 19 19 M Street, 
N.W., Room 222, Washington, D.C 20554. 
Refer to "Interstate Access Charges Exemp- 
tion for Enhanced Service Providers CC 
Docket 87-208." 

Copies of this document are available by 
calling the FCC at (202) 632-7000, who will 
refer you to a transcript company called ITS 
at (202) 857-3800. 

John Gordon Reid 
Woodside, NY 



In Response to Recurrent Inquiries . . . 

While group purchases of RAINBOW ON 
TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK, are permitted, 
no license to make copies is conveyed or 
implied. Yes, yourgroup may even purchase 
a subscription to our disk/ tape services, but 
such purchase in no way authorizes that any 
copies be made of that original disk/ tape. 

Specifically, this means that the original 
disk/ tape itself may indeed be kept in a club 
library for use by members. However, a 
group purchase does not entitle club 
members, individually or as a group, to copy 
that disk/tape. 

Unauthorized copying of any copyright 
product is strictly illegal. The copyright 
(right to make copies) is in no way conveyed 
in the purchase transaction. 



8 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



BOOKS & GRAPHICS 



500 

POKEs, 

PEEKS. 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you 'GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own MI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKES, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Bask/ ECB/Disk 
Basic commands like LIST. 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC. CSAVE(M). 
DEL, EDIT. TROM. TROFT, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD. REMUM, PRIMT 
USIMQ, DIR. KILL, SAVE. LOAD. 
MERGE, RENAME. DSKIMI, 
BACKUP. DSK1$. and DSKO$. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY. CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON, 

★ Generate a Repeat-key. 

★ Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

★ Speed Up your programs. 

★ Reset, MOTOR OM/OFT from 
keyboard. 

★ Recover Basic programs lost by 
MEW. 

★ Set 23 different 
QRAPHIC/SL.HQRAPHIC modes 

★ Merge two Basic programs. 

★ AND MUCH MUCH MOREill 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16K/32 K/64K/ COLOR BASIC/ ECB/ DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1. 2. fit 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



SUPPLEMENT to 

500 POKES, 
PEEKS 'IN EXECS 

ONLY. _ _ _ 

$9.95 

200 additional Pokes, Peeks 1 n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER. 
Includes commands for 

• flompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT withBSOOO styles' 

• Use ol 40 track single/double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64 # , Edtasm+® and CoCo Ma^ 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (lor OMP printers) & Text Screen Oump 

• ANO MUCH MUCH MOHE! 

• 500 POKES. PEEKS' N EXECS Is a prerequisite 



^300 POKES 
PEEKS ' N EXECS 

FOR THE COCO III 

Get more POWER for your CoCo III. Includes 
commands for 

• 40/80 Column Screen Text Dump 

• Save Text/Graphics Screens to Oisk 

• Command/ Function Disables 

• Enhancements lor CoCo 3 Basic 

• 128K/512K Ram Test Program 

• H PHI NT Character Modifier 

• ANO MANY MOHE COMMANDS 



ONLY$19.95 



"MUST" BOOKS* 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: S39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: SI 9.95 
BOTH UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
SUPER ECB (CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: $24.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $59.95 
COCO 3 SERVICE MANUAL $39.95 
INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II S39.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 LEVEL II ON C0C03: $19.95 
BASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS SI 4.95 
COCO 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING*: S18.00 

ADDENDUM FOR COCO 3: $12.00 
UTILITY ROUTINES VOL 1 BOOK: SI 9.95 



AJF 



COLOR MAX 3 

Finally, your wait is over!! The ultimate 
graphics program for CoCo 3 has arrived. 
Features include 

• Icons and pull down menus 

• 320 x 200 hi- res screen 

• Choice ol 64 colors 

• Pencil Eraser. Spray Can. Line. Rectangle. Paint Brush & 
more (unctions 

• Electronic Typesetting with 1 1 built-in fonts 

• Zoon>in (Fat Bits) and Undo 

• Variety of brushes and patterns 

• Editing features such as invert flip. copy, cut paste and 
clear 

• Load/Save/Compress/ Print your work 

• Works with RGB & Composite Monitors 

• Printer Drivers- EPSON, GEMINI, 0MP& CGP-Z20 

• Requires RS Hires joystick interface 

Requires CoCo 3, 128K, Tandy Disk Controller, 
Hi- Res Joystick Interfaca 

only $59.95 
HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 



PIX CONVERTER 1: $29.95 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions. Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures. Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III ORTDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM 0F32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER, compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 AND JDOS. 
Supports the following printers: C-ltoh 
851 0AP.DMP100/1 05/1 10/1 30/430CGP- 
220, some OKI DATA Printers, SEIKOSHA 
GP1 00/250, LEGEND 808 and GORILLA 

BANANA DISK ONLY $29.95 
PICTURE DISK #1: 100 more pictures for 
CGD: $14.95 

FONT DISK #1:10 extra fonts! $19.95 
COLORED PAPER PACKS $19.95 




All orders, $50 & above (except CODs) 
shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at no extra 
charge. Last Minute Shoppers can benefit 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone(716) 223-1477 

VISA MC, AMEX, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 S&H(USA& Canada), other 
countries $5.00 S&H. COD(US only) 
add sales tax. Computerized processing 
Dealer inquiries invited 



add $2.50 extra NYS residents please * 
& tracking of orders Immediate shipment 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 AM - 9 PM Monday - Saturday 

Except NY. Order Statua Information Technical Information, NY Orders call 1 -71 6-223-1 477 



Pen Pals 



• I am 40 years old and am seeking pen pals 
who are licensed radio amateurs and short- 
wave listener hobbyists. I have a CoCo2 and 
3, an FD-500 SSDD drive, and a Legend 
880-DMP. 

John C. Onken 
1 13 South Celina Street 
Roanoke, 1L 61561 

• I am 10 years old and searching for pen 
pals around my age. I have a CoCo 2, a 
CoCo 3, disk drives and a printer. 

Jeremy Radach owsk v 
P.O. Box 60 
Bantam, CT06750 

• I am looking for pen pals seriously inter- 
ested in BASIC programming. I have a CoCo 
3, disk drive, printers and a Speech/Sound 
Pak. 

Jim Cannon 
526 Industry Road 
Aiwaier. OH 44201 

• I am interested in having a pen pal any- 
where in the United States. I am 12 years old 
and have a 64K CoCo 2, multi-pack, disk 
drive, DMP-105 printer and a cassette 
recorder. 

Mike O'Neal 
437 Main Street 
P O. Box 233 
West Towns end, MA 0/474 

• I'm 61 years old and retired. I have plenty 
of time to trade ideas. So, take a chance, and 
drop me a line. We could be friends for many 
years. 

John Jenkins 
7333 West H2ih Place 
Worth, 1L 60482 

• I am looking for pen pals in northern New 
York and eastern Vermont. I am 13 and have 
had my CoCo for four years. I also have a 
disk drive, CCR-81 cassette deck and a 
DM P-130 printer. I would especially like to 
correspond with any dungeons and dragons 
players. 

David M. Endersbee 
33 Scenic Pt. Drive 
Jay, NY 12941 

• I have three 64K CoCo 2s, six disk drives, 
cassettes, multi-pack, SG-10 printer, CGP- 
I 15 printer and a CGP-220 printer. I have 
just started a new club in my area and any 
advice will be appreciated. I will answer all 
who write. 

Bobby Roger Queen 
1737 Farmville Road 
Shelby, NC 28150 

• I have just moved to San Antonio, and I 
feel very much alone. I would like to get in 
touch with the CoCo Community of San 
Antonio. I have a CoCo 3 with two disk 
drives, a DMP-105 and a modem. I am an 
avid OS-9 hobbyist, too. 

Todd La r sen 
7371 Estrid Trail 
San Antonio, TX 78244 

10 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



• I am looking for a pen pal who enjoys 
Adventures and music programs. I have a 
CoCo 2, joysticks, mouse, disk drive, 
cassette recorder and I'm going to purchase 
a printer soon. I am a 16-year-old male. 

Curtis Schaaf 
RR I, Box 186 
Moro, IL 62067 

• I have a CoCo I with two drives, cassette 
and a DMP-100 printer. The CoCo has 
I28K, but operates as a 64K machine. My 
interests are games, Adventures and utilities. 

Richard Durr 
7337 Brookview Circle 
Tampa, FL 33614 

• I am 12 years old and have a CoCo 2, 
DMP-105, modem and disk drive. 

Eric Mathurin 
1129 Soderlincl 
Ottawa, Ontario 
Canada K2C3BI 

• I'm 28 years old and proud owner of two 
CoCo 2s. If there are any other "old fogies" 
out there (if you aren't 14 and brilliant, you 
can't really understand computers) who'd 
like to correspond with a merely-adequate- 
but-obsessive programmer, please write. 

David B. Smith 
4112 Trinity Road 
Duluth, MN 55811 

• I have a 64 K CoCo 2, one FD-501 drive, 
a CCR-8 I recorder, a DM P- 1 05 printer and 
a DCM -3 modem. I would love to hear from 
anyone to talk about the glorious CoCo. 

Andy Eng/e 
2303 Highland Hill 
St. Peters, MO 63376 

• I would like only pen pals who are Doctor 
Who fans. All letters will be answered. 

Chris Curtis 
Route I. Box 186 
Walling, TN 38587 

• I am a publisher of a fledgling newsletter 
for world-wide pen pal hobbyists. I do most 
of the writing myself, but there is a lot of 
reader participation. My "printing press" is 
none other than a64K CoCo 2, a DMP-105 
and Color Scripsit. 

The best way to enjoy La Pluma is to read 
it, write to people who list themselves for pen 
pals and even list yourself. Have fun discuss- 
ing computers, or anything else that you 
like. Anyone wishing tojoin Lm Pluma Press 
should write to me at P.O. Box 77, Crom- 
pond, NY 105 17. People of all ages from any 
place are welcome. 

Jacqueline D. Gannuscio 
Edit or I Publisher LLP 

• I am 14 years old and looking for a pen 
pal who lives anywhere in the world. I own 
a CoCo 2, CoCo 3, FD-501 disk drive, 
DMP-130 and CCR-81 cassette. I love 
games and have just started working with 
OS-9 Level II. 

Jason Ebb e ling 
Gulf Road 
Berkshire, MA 01224 



• Tm 10 years old and have a 64K CoCo 2, 
disk drive, cassette recorder and a DM P-105 
printer. Tm a game nut — I like all games, 
especially arcade. I'm looking for Canadian 
pen pals of any age. 

Jason Nielsen 
1535 Winslow Drive 
Sooke, British Columbia 
Canada V0S I NO 

• I am 15 years old and own a CoCo 2 and 
3, a CGP-220 printer and a CCR-8 I cassette. 
I will soon own a disk drive and a CM -8 
monitor. 

I enjoy using my CoCo, drawing and 
reading, and would like to have a pen pal 
between 14 and 16 years of age. I would like 
someone with a creative mind who likes to 
write Adventure games. 

Dana E. Sonnie 
21 Chapel Street 
Yalesville, CT 06492 

• I'm 23 and looking for someone who likes 
to write their own programs and graphs. I 
have a CoCo, disk drive, cassette player, and 
a modem. 

Maryann Exum 
2987 S. Clara 
Fresno, CA 93706 

• I am 17 years old and looking for pen pals. 
My present system consists of a 64K CoCo 
2, DMP-130 printer and cassette recorder. 
I will return all letters sent to me. 

Eddie Mendonca 
3000 Merlan Way 
Hanford. CA 93230 

• I am IOV3 years old and have a CoCo 2 

and some joysticks. Anyone wanting a pen 

pal, please write to me. . n 

Armando Perea 

824 N. Humbolt 84 

San Mateo, CA 94401 

• I am 17 years old and have a 64K with two 
disk drives and a multipack interface with 
many accessories. I would like to have a pen 
pal who is interested in exchanging ideas. 

Marc Steinman 
620 28th Ave. So. 
Grand Forks. ND 58201 

• I am 14 years old and am looking for a 
girl pen pal who Jives on the East Coast and 
has a CoCo 2 or 3. I have everything you 
can attach to the CoCo, and then some. I 
also have a very good sense of humor. 

Eric Humphreys 
327 Snowden Lane 
Princeton, NJ 08540 

THE rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIC. From the 
CoCo SIO prompt, type Rfil to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIC. At the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 



UTILITIES 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
^ TRANSFER 




• Disk- to- Disk Copy (1-3 passes) 

• Tape- to- Disk Copy 

• Tape- to- Disk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk-to- Tape Copy 

• Tape-to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ M L programs and DATA files. 
CoCo1,2& 3 32K Disk System 

(Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY $24,95 

COCO DISKZAPPER 

Are you frustrated with crashed disks? If 
so, this program can save hours of labor by 
restoring complete or part of the information 
from the disk If s indcspensable'. 
Requires minimum 32K/64K disk system 

only $24.95 



DISK TUTORIAL 

(2- Disk Package) 




An indispensable tutorial for serious disk 
Basic/ML programmers. Gives almost 
everything you MUST know about the disk 
system CoCo 1, 2 & 3 

ONLY $36.95 

UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best-selected utilities 
• 40K Disk Basic • Disk Cataloger 
• 



Super Tape- to-Oisk Copy (with Automatic Relocate) 
Hist Enhancer • X-Ref tor Basic Programs 
Graphics Typesetter (two text sizes!) 
LARGE DM P Graphics Dump • Basic Stepper 
Hidden 32 K (Use the " hidden" 32 K from your 64 K CoCo) 
RAM Disk (for Cassette & Disk Users) 
Singte Key Printer Text Screen Dump 
• And much, much more !!! 

Most programs compatible with CoCo 3 

DISK(64K Req) ONLY $29.95 



SUPER PACKAGE 

The indespensible utility package 
comprising: SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER, COCO DISK ZAPPER, DISK 
TUTORIAL and UTILITY BONANZA 

REGULAR $11 6.80 

YOU PAY $79.95 (Save $36.85) 



word processors ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE 



TeleWriter-64: Best Word Processor For 
CoCo 1, 2 & 3. (Cas) $47.95 
(Disk) $57.95 

TW-80: 80 Column Displays more features 
forTW-64. CoCo 3 Disk $39.95 
TELEPATCH III: TW-64 Enhancements - 
Overstrike, Spool, Fast I/O, more $29.95 
TELEFORM: Mail Merge& Form Letters for 
TW-64. $19.95 

COLOR SCRI8E3: Best Line Editor for CoCo 
3. $49.95 

DATABASE 

Pro Color File * Enhanced* 2.0: Multi-feature 
Database. $59.95 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Autoterm: Superb Terminal Program Works 
with any modem' (Cas) $29.95 
(Disk) $39.95 

RTerm2.0: CoCo3 Terminal Prog Supports 
40/80 columns & more. Disk $39.95 
Wiz: For OS9 II. 300-19200 baud rate, 
windows! Req 51 2K & RS232 Pak 
$79.95 

(See our Communications Extravaganza 
on Page 15!) 

ASSEMBLERS/COMPILERS 

EOT/ ASM 64 0: Best Disk Based Editor- 
Assembler for CoCo. $59.95 (Specify CoCo 
1 , 2 or 3) 

THE SOURCE: Best Disassembler for CoCo. 
$34.95 (Specify CoCo 1, 2 or 3) 
CBASIC: Most powerful Basic Program 
Compiler $1 49.95 (Specify CoCo 1,2or3) 

TUTORIALS 

MACHINE GENESIS: Excellent Assembly 
Language Tutor. Includes Editor 
Assembler/debugger/ Disassembler and 
other utilities. Disk $34.95 

COPY PROTECTION 

OISK ANTI-PIRATE: Best copy-protection 
program for disk Basic and ML programs. 
ONLY$59.95. 

HI OE-A- BASIC 1.1: Best copy- protection 
program for Cassette Basic programs 
ONLY $24.95. 

(Both Disk Anti- Pirate & Hide-A-Basic 1 .1 
for ONLY $79.95) 



WITH COCO 1 9 2 & 3 



OTHER SOFTWARE 

A00S3: Advanced Disk Operating System 
for CoCo 3. $34.95. ADOS: $27.95 
COCO UTIL II: (Latest Version): Transfer 
CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible 
computer. Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo. 
$36.95 

SPIT ' N IMAGE: Makes a BACKUP of ANY 
disk $32.95 

GRAFPLOT: Generate graphs from data or 

spreadsheets Fully automatic with print 

function. Disk $44.95 

FKEYS III: Function Keys for CoCo 3. 

$24.95 

COCO 3 FONT BONANZA $29.95 

RGB PATCH: Displays most games in color 

on RGB monitors For CoCo 3 Disk 

$24.95 

CoCo Max (Cas) $67.95 

CoCo Max II (Disk) $77.95 

RUN COCO MAX II ON COCO III: The kit 

contains software & replacement PAL chip 
for 26-3024 Multipak Interface. $29.95 

GAMES 

(DISK ONLY) 

IRON FOREST: $28.95 

LIGHT PHASER 

W/INTERFACE: $34.95 
MISSION! RUSH'N 

ASSAULT: $28.95 
GRANDPRIX 

CHALLENGE: $28.95 
GANTELET II: $28.95 
GANTELET: $28.95 
MISSION F-16 

ASSAULT: $28.95 
MARBLE MAZE: $28.95 
PAPER ROUTE: $28.95 
KNOCK OUT: $28.95 
KARATE: $28.95 
WRESTLE MANIAC: $28.95 
BOUNCING BOULDERS: $28.95 
THE GATES OF DELIRIUM: $38.95 
CALADURIAL FLAME OF LIGHT: $38.95 
LANSFORD MANSION: $38.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
PYRAMIX: Cubix $24.95 for CoCo 3 





MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (716) 223-1477 



All orders S50 & above (except COOs) shipped by UPS 2 nd Day Air at no extra charga Last minute shoppers 
can benefit VISA MC, AMEX, Check. MO. Please add$3. 00 S&H(USA& Canada), other countries 
$5 00 S&H. COD (US only) add $2.50 extra NYS residents please add sales tax §j§| 
Computerized processing & tracking ol orders. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited fjjjjjg 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 g am-9 pm Monday Saturday 

Except NY. Order Status, Information, Technical Information, NY Orders call 1-71 6-223-1477 



We're Doing OK 



Probably the most common letter I get these days is from those 
readers who ask why THE RAINBOW has decreased its number 
of pages in the past year. I think it is a fair question, and one 
that needs to be answered. 

The way we determine the number of pages that appear in the 
magazine is simply by the number of advertisements we have. We 
establish a ratio of advertising to editorial copy and try as much as 
we can to adhere to that. So, when the number of ads goes down 
— as it has been doing lately — then the number of total pages in 
the magazine goes down, too. 

Of course, the inverse is also true. You will notice that this month's 
issue is larger, in terms of pages, than last month's issue. The reason 
is that we have more ads. By the way, pages are usually added in 
increments of 16, although we would like to be able to add 32 at 
a time. Why? Because the 32-page package is the most economical 
to run on a printing press. 

Despite the fact that our editorial (and advertising) pages have 
been down in the last year or so, THE RAINBOW continues to be in 
good financial health. We have a wealth of subscribers, a good, stable 
advertising base, and we work hard to keep our costs down. This 
translates into sure knowledge that we will be a part of the CoCo 
Community for a long time to come. 

I get most distressed when I see letters from readers who try to 
draw comparisons between some of the defunct Color Computer 
magazines in their last months of life and a decrease in the pages 
of THE RAINBOW. There are vast differences between the two 
situations. The main one is we have a strong subscriber base and 
sell well in the bookstores we allow to carry THE RAINBOW. Those 
late and lamented publications never had a strong subscriber base 



INSTANT SOFTWARE" 3 

Pay only for what you want! 
w Quality Utility Softujare at Unbelievable Prices! 



40K for Cassette Programs: tlOO 
40K for Disk Basic Programs: 1101 
ALPHA-D I R: Alphabetize vour DIRs. #102 
APPOINTMENT CALENDAR: 1103 
AUTOMATIC DISK BACKUP: Rea. 2 drives' # 1 OA 
AUTOMATIC 5 Min. CASSETTE SAUE: #105 
AUTOMATIC 5 Min. DISK SAUE:#106 
AUTO DIR BACKUP: No more F3 Errors! #107 
BANNER MAKER: 7 B Hi ah Letters' 1108 
BASIC PROGRAM AUTORUN FROM TAPE: 1109 
BASIC SEARCH: Search lor a string. #110 
BORDER MAKER: 255 Border Stvlesl #111 
BOWLING SCORE KEEPER: #112 
CALENDAR MAKER: For DMP Printers. #113 
CASSETTE LABEL MAKER: DMP's Only. #114 
CLOCK: Keeps tiie as you program.! 115 
COMMAND KEYS: Short Hand for Basic. #116 
COMMAND MAKER: Design your own CDa01and5.il 17 
COMMAND SAUER: Saves/Recalls Coitmands. #118 
CALCULATOR: On-screen calc. when programing. #119 
COMPUTERIZED CHECKBOOK: 1120 
CURSOR STYLES: 65535 cursor styles' #121 
DISK CATALOGER: Puts DIRs into Master DIR.I122 
DISK ENCRYPT: PassHord-protect Bas. Progs. #123 
DISK LABEL MAKER: DMP Printers! #124 
DMP CHARACTER SET EDITOR: #125 
DMP SUPERSCRIPTS: Great for Ten-papers! #126 
DOS COMMAND ENHANCER: #127 
ENHANCED KILL: #128 
ENHANCED LLIST: Beautiful Listings! #129 
ERROR LOCATOR: C0C0 locates your errors. #130 
FAST SORT: 100 strings in 3 seconds;! #131 
FILE SCRAMBLER: Hide your private files! #132 
FULL ERRORS: English error »essages! #133 
FUNCTION KEYS: Speeds prog. tine. #134 
GEMINI /EPSON GRAPHICS DUMP: #135 
GRADEBOOK: Great for teachers! #136 
GRAPHICS SCREEN COMPRESSION: #137 
GRAPHICS SCREEN DMP DUMP: #138 
GRAPHICS SCREEN LARGE DMP DUMP: #139 
GRAPHICS LETTERINGS sizes! #140 
GRAPHICS MAGNIFY/EDIT: #141 
HOME BILL MANAGER: Keep track of bill 5. #142 
INPUT/OUTPUT DATA MONITOR: #143 

KEY CLICKER: Ensures inout accuracy. #144 

1 PROGRAM - S3 2 PROGRAMS - 

4 PROGRAMS - $24 5 GR MORE 
Ail programs on disk. More t 
disk. Documentation included 



KEY SAUER: Save/Recall your keystrokes. #145 
LAST COMMAND REPEATER: #146 
LINE COPY: Copy Basic Lines. #147 
LINE CROSS REFERENCE: 1148 
LIST/DIR PAUSE: No flore flybys! #149 
LOWERCASE COMMANDS: #150 
MAILING LIST: With Zipcode Sort! #151 
MASS INITIALI2ATI0N:I152 
ML/BASIC MERGE: Herae HL fc Bas. Progs. #153 
MESSAGE ANIMATOR: 6reat Billboard" 1154 
ML TO DATA CONUERTOR: 1155 
MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST MAKER: #156 
NUMERIC KEYPAD: Great for nuibers. #157 
ON BREAK GOTO COMMAND: #158 
ON ERROR GOTO COMMAND: #159 
ON RESET GOTO COMMAND: #160 
PHONE DIRECTORY: #161 
PAUSE CONTROL: Put prograas on hold! #162 
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RAM DISK: Irmenory disk drive. #165 
REPLACE: Find/replace strings. #166 

REUERSE UIDEO CGREEN5 : Eliminates eyestrain. #167 

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RAM TEST: Checks your RAH. #169 

SIGN MAKER: RUNs on any printer! #170 

SINGLE STEPPER: Great debugger! #171 

SPEEDUP TUTORIAL: #172 

SPOOLER : Speedup printouts! #173 

SUPER INPUT/LINEINPUT:#174 

SUPER COMMAND KEYS: #175 

SUPER COPY: COPY multiple files. #176 

SUPER EDITOR: Scroll thru Bas. Progs. #177 

SUPER PAINT: 65535 patterns! #178 

SUPER REPEAT: Repeat Key. #179 

SUPER SCROLLER: View Scrolled Lines. #180 

TAB/SHIFT LOCK. KEYS: #181 

TAPE ENCRYPT: Password protect Bas. Progs. #182 

TEXT SCREEN DUMP: #183 

TEXT SCREEN SCROLL LOCK: #184 

TITLE SCREEN CREATOR: #185 

UNK ILL: your Killed disk prograas. #186 

UARI ABLE CROSS REFERENCE: #187 

UCR TAPE ORGANIZER: #188 

$15 3 PROGRAMS - $21 
PROGRAMS - £5 EACH 
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JhJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



All orders$50 & above (except CDDsj shipped by UPS2 nd Day Air at no extra charge. Last minute shoppers 
can benefit VISA MC. AMEX, Check MO. Please add $3.00 S&H(USA& Canada), other countries 
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Except NY. Order Statu* Information Technical Information, NY Orders call 1-71 6-223-1 477 



and their circulation figures were gener- 
ated primarily by the number of mag- 
azines they printed to be sold (as com- 
pared to actually sold). 

Yes, we're not as thick as we were, but 
I feel we're working harder on quality. 
The desktop publisher program we are 
printing in this issue is but one example 
of our efforts to bring you more quality 
in the future. You will see more exam- 
ples of this sort of thing. 

Can you help us? Yes, of course you 
can. And, at the same time, you'll be 
helping the CoCo Community itself 
grow stronger, too. 

First, patronize our advertisers. I 
know it is a trite saying, but it is a very 
important one. If someone advertises in 
these pages, let them know you saw 
their ad. If they don't advertise, and you 
hear about them in some other way, ask 
them, "Why not?" Second, and just as 
important, continue to subscribe. Help 
us by renewing your subscription when 
you get your notice (we only send one!). 
And just as important, help us get new 
subscribers. Encourage others to join 
our ranks. 

Yes, we're doing OK. But we'd like to 
do better. It'll help us do a better job for 
you. 

* * * 

While on the subject of advertising, 
I would like to mention a recent mail- 
order computer sales scam about which 
many of you have, no doubt, heard. 

One of the reasons for my writing is 
to reassure you. We're not looking to 
pat ourselves on the back, but, at the 
same time, when we accept advertising 
f or a magazine like this one — in a field 
where there is a great deal of mail-order 
buying and selling — we have to do a 
little more than make cursory checks. 



One of our ad sales people got a call 
several weeks ago from a company 
called Compusystems in California. 
The company wanted to advertise in 
this magazine and sent an impressive 
array of credit materials: an audited 
financial statement from a certified 
public accountant, bank references, 
business references and the like. All 
including telephone numbers, addresses 
and so forth. The company listed assets 



"That seemed 
somewhat 

suspicious, but, after 
all, we're a 
magazine, not a 
detective agency. " 



of more than $6 million and an inven- 
tory of about $4.5 million. Not too 
shabby. They wanted to run a full-page 
advertisement offering excellent prices 
on both software and hardware. 

Our credit department checked their 
references. All of them checked out very 
well — the companies they were doing 
business with, the bank, the CPA firm. 
In fact, the reports were glowing. 

However, our sales rep was some- 
what disconcerted. It seemed that every- 
one she talked with sounded alike; no 
matter who she called, and no matter 
what number, the voices were of the 
same man and the same woman. 



Hint . . . 



That seemed somewhat suspicious, 
but, after all, we're a magazine, not a 
detective agency. All the phone numbers 
were different and even in different area 
codes. We checked with information, 
which had all the companies listed. 

Every time we checked, though, even 
in different area codes, we discovered 
the same two voices. Then, upon realiz- 
ing that there had recently been some 
changes in the Los Angeles area code — 
so that either one could be used for a 
time — we decided to do a little more 
investigating. 

A call to the Federal Reserve Bank in 
Los Angeles revealed that the bank and 
the banker we had called did not exist. 
A call to the Los Angeles association of 
CPAs revealed no firm or accountant by 
the name we had been given. The Better 
Business Bureau had never heard of 
them. 

We declined the advertisement, and 
we sent the information we had to the 
Federal Reserve and the CPA associa- 
tion for them to follow up. 

Several other publications, including 
CW Communications' InfoWorld, ac- 
cepted it. In a story about the scam, 
which was run a week after the Compu- 
systems full-page ad appeared, Info- 
Wo rid said that the credit was checked 
by "the credit department at IDG, 
Info World's parent company." IDG, as 
many of you probably know, is a big 
company that owns a large number of 
magazines, including 80 Micro. 

I would not try to pretend that we 
were not concerned that we would not 
be paid for the ad — after all, that is the 
purpose of a credit check. But I am also 
glad that we're small enough to be 
thorough — and to prevent our readers 
from being caught in a scam. 

— Lonnie Falk 



Hint . . . 

Returning from BREAK 

I am sure there has been, or will be, a time in every 
computer user's life when a BASIC program stops 
because of an inadvertent press of the break key. 
Many times, typing CDNT doesn't get you back into 
the program. And, if you type RUN, all the variables 
and counters will be reset and you will lose any data 
you were working on. What do you do? Keep in mind 
that, in most cases, you can enter GOTO followed by 
the line number at which the program stopped 
execution. If it stopped with an error, use the next line 
number in the program. Such a re-entry preserves all 
data, CLEAR values and even the counter values in 
FOR-NEXT loops. 

Darryl L. Petrak 
House, NM 



Peeking the INKEYS 

Most Color Computer programmers are aware of 
the INKEYS statement and how to use it to scan the 
keyboard f or a specific key press. Quite a f ew of these 
people also know that you can use EXEC 44539 for 
the same purpose. But, did you know that the ASCII 
value of the key press is stored and can be found at 
memory location 135? All it takes is a quick peek there 
and you can test for which key was pressed. This really 
helps if you are trying to d o something f ancy and need 
to perform calculations on the ASCII value. 

Steven Shimatzki 
Dunbar, PA 



14 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



ALL HARDWARE COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 



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DRIVE CABLES: 1 DRIVE CABLE: $19.95 2 DRIVE CABLE: $24.95 
(For Drives, add $7.00 S&H in USA/ CANADA) 



I 



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3- POSITION SWITCHER: Select any one of 
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MAGNAV0X8505/8515 Analog RGB Cable: 
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CM-8 RGB ANALOG CABLE: $19.95 



EPROM 



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EPROMS: 2764 -$8.00, 271 28 -$9.00 
Call for other EPROMs. 



DIGITIZER 



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Digitizer for CoCo 1, 2 & 3. Includes 
software ONLY $149.95 



_ PRINTER INTERFACES _ 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 

switch selectable baud rates(300-9600) 
Comes with all cables $44.95 
PARALLEL PRINTER BUFFER: 64K Print 
Buffer with Self Test Reset Button, Auto- 
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allow 1 week for shipment) 



VIDEO 



MISCELLANEOUS 



5 %" DISKS (QTY of 100| .45 EACH 
DRIVE CLEANING KIT (30 CLEANINGS) 
$16.00 



UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: For 

monochrome or color monitor. $29.95 
VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference 
$19.95 



JhJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone(716) 223-1477 



We accept VISA/ MC/AMEX, Check or MO. NOCODs. Please add $3.00 S&H, 
except where otherwise mentioned. NYS Residents please add sales tax. 
Prices are subject to change All products are covered by manufacturer's 
warranty. 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 am -9 pm Monday -Saturday 

Except NY. Order Stalua Information Technical Information NY Orders call 1 -71 6-223-1 477 



Bui l d i ng Octob e r's Ra i nbow 



.600 



TANDY'S NEW PRODUCTS 

1000-HX 256k 1-3 1/2" Drive 

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Tandy 4000 1-3 1/2" 1.4meg Drive 
1 Meg Ram, 80386-16 MHZ. 



List $2599.00 Our Price 



2160.00 



Tandy 3000 1-5 1/4" 1.2meg Drive 

1 Meg Ram, 80286-12 MHZ 

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2-3 1/2" Drives, 80 x 25 Display 

List $1599.00 Our Price 1325.00 

TANDY COMPUTERS 

1000-EX256k 1 Drive 470.00 

Color Computer 3 128k 165.00 

102Portabfe24k 375.00 

MONITORS & BOARDS 

VM-4 Monochrome Green 95.00 

CM-5 Color RGB 220.00 

CM-11 Color RGB 335.00 

EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 510.00 

Tandy Dual Display Card 180.00 

Tandy EGA Card 255.00 

DRIVES 

Color Drive 0 220.00 

Portable Computer Drive 155.00 

5 1/4" External Drive 1000EX 180.00 

3 1/2" External Drive 1000EX 200.00 

Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 595.00 

Zucker20 Meg Hardcard 445.00 

Seagate 20 Meg Hard Drive 275.00 

AT HD/1 2M Controller 200.00 

PRINTERS 

DMP-1 06 Dot-Matrix 1 50.00 

DMP-130 Dot-Matrix 255.00 

Epson LX-800 Dot-Matirx 185.00 

Epson FX-86E Dot-Matrix 335.00 

Epson FX-286E Dot-Matirx 470.00 

Epson EX-800 Dot-Matrix 405.00 

Epson EX- 1 000 Dot-Matrix 540.00 

Epson LQ-800 Dot-Matrix 470.00 

Epson LQ-1000 Dot-Matrix 670.00 

Epson LQ-2500 Dot-Matrix 940.00 

Epson GQ-3500 Laser 1550.00 



All pncos.'ind offers may be ChangoO or withdrawn witiioul noiice. Adutfi- 
used prices ate cash pnces COD. accepted add 2"Vo (minimum charge 
SiO.OO) M.C.. Visa add 2% All non dofecuve iioms roquue toium 
mercriandrse authorization Call lor BMA Nunibor before relurnmg 
Oelivery is eub|Od \o product availahdity Add i v?% for shipping and 
handling, $5.00 minimum charge 

TM - Registered Trademark of Tandy. Epson, and IBM 
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124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



6 Adventuritis" strikes . . . 

RAINBOWfest rounds the corner _ 

And, RAINBOW splashes on the color 



A graphics Adventure game on Cray Augsburg's monitor stopped me in my tracks 
the other day. It was a stunner! "Where did that come from?" I quizzed him. 
"It's an Adventure Contest entry," our Technical Editor boasted in a playful, 
but keep-your-mitts-off tone. 

As it turns out, it's this year's contest entry from last year's grand prize winner, Dr. 
Bruce K. Bell, and it's sure to be "in the money" when Cray, our contest chief judge, 
and his able assistant (and wife) Ruth Ann announce the contest winners in our February 
issue. A long time away, you say? Well, do remember you'll be getting that issue right 
at the beginning of the new year, and, since 1 was the chief judge of our last Adventure 
contest, believe me when I promise you they'll be quite busy over the next three months! 

After all, there are entries from Maine to Florida, California to Washington. Would 
you just look at a sampling of some of these towns: Natrona Heights, Red Wing, Apulia 
Station, Dunkirk, Beeville, Dayton (Tennessee, not Ohio), Okanogan, York, Irmo, 
Chippewa Falls, Carigan, Ogalla, Villas, Crivitz, Kent, Toronto (Ohio), Olivet, 
Cynthiana, Kankakee, Lebanon, Crete — even some from Milwaukie (with an "ie" in 
Oregon and an "ee" in Wisconsin) and one from Miller Place. Yes, more readily known 
communities such as Tucson, Orlando, Montreal and Charleston are represented, too. 

Add in all the others from Canada, many more from the United States and one from 
Cordoba, Argentina, and you get the idea. Since Judge Ruth Ann is also a registered 
nurse, maybe she'll have something for red eyes, insomnia and the other symptoms of 
"Adventuritis" that's bound to infect our judges. Considering that we'll be busy on our 
December holiday issue by the time you see this, our February issue is not as far away 
as it might seem. 

What's just around the corner is out Princeton RAINBOWfest! We're finalizing the 
schedule, including the new "Delphi Saturday Night" get-together and our new 
"Educational Sandbox" programs for children and their parents. CoCo Cat's already 
packed! Our keynote speaker, rainbow's own Jim Reed, is so busy making notes that 
all of us here in Prospect are a bit nervous about what he's going to divulge when he 
"tells all." 

With the great seminar lineup, you'll want to be there all day Saturday and Sunday 
if at all possible. Among our new speakers are copyright expert Professor Ed Samuels, 
OS-9 expert Greg Law and high-flying programmer Dr. Larry Preble. Longtime CoCo 
telecommunicator Don Hutchison is going to be "downloaded" from Atlanta via 
something he'd probably call "Delta protocol." 1 do hope you'll be able to make it to 
this Test, our fifth East Coast show, and get to know other members of our CoCo 
Community. 

Have you noticed that we're "up" 16 pages this month? 1 know many of you have 
written in to comment on rainbow's size this summer, so it feels good to see our annual 
prediction that we'll get bigger in the fall and winter hold true again this year. You see, 
computer magazines in general have a slow spell in the summer, presumably because 
people are out in the sunshine and on vacation, etc., and then things get back into the 
groove as we head indoors again. 

Speaking of annual events, this is our annual Graphics issue and we welcome H. Allen 
Curtis back to our pages, this time helping harness the power of the CoCo for desktop 
publishing! John Williams provides a new version of CoCo Draw to help you create 
Hi-Res graphics, and even OS-9 guru Dale Puckett is at the drawing board. Solla Carrock 
introduces Animate and Picture Book for displaying your creations and, if you're 
ambitious, you can produce movies, too! Bill Bernico's back again and so is Becky 
Matthews for "splash on the color" month as we explore the brightest side of CoCo. 

So, the CoCo Adventure continues, our 14th RAINBOWfest beckons and you can 
color us excited in this seventh year of our CoCo Community. I hope you'll join with 
us as we keep exploring the CoCo world. 

— Jutta Kapfhammer 



16 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



GREAT COCO III PRODUCTS 



FALL SPECIALS*!!! 



s 

A 
V 
E 

$ 





Reg. Price 


Sale Price 










CoCo III Utilities .. 


...$24.95 




....$19.95 


CoCo III Screen Dump 








(DMP-105 and Epson) 


...$24.95 




$19.95 


Tape/Disk Utility .... 


...$24.95 




....$19.95 






....$19.95 


















Disk Utility 2.1A ... 


...$29.95 




....$19.95 


OcLLcLb ixcvuulcu Of 








C III Graphics .... 


...$29.95 




....$19.95 


CoCo III Font Bonanza 


...$39.95 




....$24.95 


CoCo III Terminal 








Program (RTERM 2.0) 


...$39.95 




....$29.95 


CoCo III 








Software Bonanza ... 


...$49.95 




$39.95 


Software Bonanza Pack 


...$99.95 




....$59.95 


EliteWord 80/Spel 


...$99.95 




....$79.95 



s 

A 
V 
E 

S 



300 

COCO III POKES 

Get more POWER for your CoCoIII . Has 
commands for 40/80 column screen text 
dump, Command/ Function disables, plus 
enhancements for CoCoIII Basic! $19.95 

INSIDE 
OS9 LEVEL II 

With over 100 + pages, a must BOOK for 
ANYONE interested in LEVEL II. $39.95 

COCO III 
UNRAVELED 

A COMPLETE DISASSEMBLY of the CoCoIII's 
new ROM code I "Well worth the price "- 
Rainbow review. Over 100 pages 1 $29.95 




*- See July ' 87 Rainbow pg.17 & pq.69 for product descriptions 1 ! 1 
LAST chance at these LOW prices 1 1 ! Offer expires 10/15/87 1 ! 1 







COLOR MAX III - The CoCo III CoCo Max C F°ont Editor $29.95 

It's herel The CoCoIII BREAKTHROUGH PRODUCT everyone was waiting for! 320x200 graphics , pull down menus, icons 
the choice of any 16 c olors from the CoCo Ill's 64 color palette plus RGB support 1 Eleven (11) fonts are 
included for hundreds o£ lettering styles and painting is a breeze with 16 colors an- 1 32 editable patterns!! ! 
Color Max III requires a 128K CoCo III and Hi-Res Joysti ck interface. ( Speciiy~p7inter !T$59.95. Color Max in 
Pix Converter - contains six (6) converter programs for CoCo Max , Graphicom and bK binary files $29.95. Hi -Res 
Joystick interface $14.95. 

^ > SPECIAL BONUS - BUY ABOVE 3 for only $99.95 ! 1 ! < ^ 

TW-80 - 80 columns for TW-64 on CoCo III Rafnbow^ew. 

It's finally here! An 80 column version of Telewriter-64 for the CoCo III with TFJ.KPATCH features plus much, 
much more! Includes PRINT SPOOLER & (2) ultra- fast RAM DISKS for 512K users, plus changeable CHARACTER FONTS & 
a setup CONFIG pgm for BACKGND & F0RBGND colors, BAUD rates, etc.. Req. TW-64 DISK and 128K CoCo III "$39. 95 

PYRAMIX - Best CoCo III action game ever! 

CoCoIII version of the popular 3D Cube Maze game, Cubix! Written exclusively to take ADV ANTAGE of all the 
power in your CoCoIII . Colors are absolutely BRILLIANT , the graphics SHARP & the action HOT! T28K DISK $29.95 

51 2K UPGRADE ($79.95*) VmcES b-*^'- $29 - 95 

Easy installation with a superior design for a reliable upgrade, processing efficiency and AVAILABLE NOW for 
the CoCo III! (* $79.95 when purchased with our 512K RAM DISK program for $24.95) A 512K mxir^ik- without RAM 
chips $39.95 - The lowest upgrade prices in the R ainbow magazine, period! I I FREE 512K RAM sticker w/ pur chase i 

HI-RES JOYSTICK utility software BONANZA! 

New useful programs for the Tandy Hi-Res Joystick Interface ! Get FULL 640X640 mouse & joystick resolution from 
BASIC or .run both CoCoMaxII & MaxEdit on tha CoCol 1 1 w/o Die CoCoMax cartridge & get a 256X192 screen! $24.95 

RGB PATCH - No more BLACK & WHITE dots . . . 

Did you buy an expensive RGB monitor ( CM~8 ) just so that you could see your Hi-Res art if acting CoCo 2 games in 
BLACK & WHITE ??? RGB PATCH converts most games to display in COLOR on an RGB monitor. 128K DISK $29.95 

PAL SWITCHER - Designed by Marty Goodman! 

Have the best of both worlds by being able to switch between CoCo II and CoCo III modes when using a Multi-Pak 
Interface. Req. OLDER PAL & NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 Multi-Pak Interface $29.95/witil NEW PAL chip $39.95 

RGB MONITOR - Better than TANDY CM-8! 

Our monitor is more versatile than the Tandy CM-8 1 Includes RGB Analog , Color Composite & RGB TTL video input. 
Unlike the CM-8, PMODE 4 artifact colors don't show up BLACK & WHITE (thru the Color Composite input) Magnavox 
8515 w/ CoCo III cable $329.95 



up BLACK & white (thru the Color Composite input) Magnavox 
BONUS 1 Includes FREE $19.95 6* RGB Analog Video Ext Cable - Add $14 shipping . 



CoCo III 512K RAM sticker $4.99 
Level II Quick Ref Guide $4.99 
Level II Basic09 binder . .$9.95 



CoCo III Multipak PAL chip $19.95 
CoCoIII Assembly Language- .$19.95 
SmHe - to CoCoIII Graphics .$21.95 



Better CoCoIII Graphics $24.95 
CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 
5T2"K~ CoCo III Cqnpuner $299.95 



FA^IDUPE 512 - Format & Backup SS/DS, 35/40 trk disks in ONE PASS! Even 0S9 Level II! Up to 4 DRIVES ! $19.95 
BIG BUFFER - ^ 437,888 byte spooler for 512K CoCoIII 1 Print up to 200 text pages while using your CoCo J $19.95 

All orders plus $3 S/H (Foreign add $5) - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
Most orders shipped from stock. Please allow 1-3 weeks for processing backorders. 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

PO BOX 264 HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 
See our other ad on page 67 







This multicolored scene was developed with Color Max 3. Logan also designs the 
Maxwell Mouse cartoons printed in the rainbow, and lives in Memphis, Tennessee. 



Honorable Mention 




Tina and Haunted House 

Robert Hermanek 



Tina and Robert, who live in Chaska, Minnesota, 
used BASIC to create this frightening scene. 



18 THE RAINBOW October 1987 




This graphic creation shows the organization of Chris' 
computer setup and was created with Color Max 3. He lives 
in Texarkana, Texas, and is a sophomore in college. 



Francisco Rios 



Space Ace 



Francisco used a program he wrote to 
display his perception of a ship in outer 
space. He lives in Houston, Texas. 




Dennis created this rich and full-toned 
view of the harvest in basic on the CoCo 3. 
He lives in Cockeysville, Maryland. 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." Share your creations with the 
CoCo Community! Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you created your picture (what programs you 
used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please include a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV programs or material that's already been submitted 
elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

We will award twofirst prizes of $25, one for the CoCo 3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize of $15 and one third prize of $10. Honorable Mentions 
may also be given. 

Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo Gallery, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Remember, this is a contest and your 
entry will not be returned. _ Angelg Kapfhammer) Curator 

October 1987 THE RAINBOW 19 



i 



The Amazing A-BUS 




An A-BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter in foreground 

The A-BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 

Abo ut the A- B U S sy ste m : 

• All the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with anv language that can 
reador write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC. use 1NP and OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other. You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers. 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except P 0-1 23) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 



Relay Card re-i 40: $1 29 

Includes eight industrial relays, (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LED's show status. Easy to use (OUT or P0 K E in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable. 

Reed Relay Card re-156: $99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card AD-142:$129 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5Vrangecan be expanded to 1 00V by adding a 
resistor. B bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

12 Bit A/D Converter AN-146:$139 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to.025% tnput range is -4Vto 
+4V. Resolution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 130ms. Idealforthermocouple. 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the R E-1 56 card). 

Digital Input Card in-i41:$59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer. To read the eight inputs, simpty use BASIC INP (or PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-148: $65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer. The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255A chip. 

Clock with Alarm cl-i44: $89 

Powerfut clock/calendar with: battery backup for Time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built in alarm relay, led and bu?zer; timing to 1/100 
second. Easy to use decimal format Lithium battery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph-i45:$79 

Each tone is converted into a number which is stored on the board. Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 

A-BUS Prototyping Card PR-152:$15 

3% by 4V2 in. with power and ground bus. Fits up to 1 0 I.C.s 




ST-143 



- 

w *9 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 



Smart Stepper Controller sc i49:$299 

World's finest stepper controller. On board microprocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously. Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 10.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory. For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half, full, wave), 
scale factor, units, holding power, etc. Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed, etc. On 
board drivers (350mA) for small steppers (M 0-1 03) Send for SC-149 flyer. 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teacrf sequences of motions. 
Power Driver Board Option PD-123: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase. For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-1 22: $19 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 f t. cable ends with screw terminal board. 

Stepper Motor Driver st-i 43: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with them. Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V. bidirectional. 4 phase. 350mA per phase). 
Special Package: 2 motors (MO-1 03) + ST-143: PA-181: $99 

Stepper MotOrS MO-103: $15or4for$39 

Pancake type, 2%" dia. %" shaft. 7.5°/step. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec. 1 2V, 36 ohm, bipolar. 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701 -P2. 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter. 4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer. Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT. AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot. 
Tandy 1 000. 1 000 EX& SX, 1200. 3000. Uses one short stot. 
Apple II, II +. He. Uses any slot. 
TRS-80 Model 1 02. 200 Plugs into 40 pin "system bus" 
Model 1 00. Uses40 pin socket (Socket is duplicatedon adapter). 
TRS-80 Mod 3.4,4 D. Fits 50 pin bus. (With hard disk, use Y-cable). 
TRS-80 Model 4 P. Includes extra cable. {50 pinbus is recessedV 
TRS-80 Model I. Plugs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or EM. 
Color Computers (Tandy ).Fits ROM slot Muittoak. or Y-cabie 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft, 50 cond.) ca-163: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard. 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i20:$99 

Each Motherboard hotds five A-BUS cards. A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 
161: $1 2). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 




CM44 




RE-140 




IN-141 



AR-133..S69 
AR-133...S69 
AR-134...S49 
AR-136...S69 
AR-135...S69 
AR-132...S49 
AR-137...S62 
AR-131 $39 
AR-138 $49 




AD-142 



Add $3.00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC, checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT & NY residents add sales tax. 
C.O.D. add S3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is $5 
Overseas add 1 0% 




a Sigma Industries Company 



ALPHA [Pm&ho&M 

242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



Technical info: (203) 656-1 806 

gSW 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders: (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



V ' All 



270 114 

430 96 

680 25 

790 77 

END 4 



The listing: HORROR 

10 1 (COMPUTECH-80 BBS) 

20 'RICKY SUTPHIN 

30 'ROUTE 1 BOX 20 

40 'HENRY, VA 24102 

50 '703-365-2018 

60 '8PM- 6AM MON-SUN 300 BAUD 

70 ' 

80 'halloween horror find 

90 '64K COCO 2 

100 ' 

110 CLS0 

120 X=1000 

130 W$=CHR$(128) 

140 PRINT@228 , "halloween" ;W$ ; "ho 

rror" ;W$;"find" ; 

150 FORB=lTOX+X:NEXTB 

160 PRINT@262 , "by" ;W$ ; "ricky" ;W$ 

; "sutphin" ; 

170 FORB=lTOX+X:NEXTB 
180 FORB=1TO10 
190 SOUND100,1 
200 CLS 

210 SOUND100,1 

220 CLS0 

230 SOUND100,1 

240 CLS 

250 NEXTB 

260 PRINT@ 19 2, "HERE ARE 20 QUEST 
IONS THAT ARE ABOUT HORROR MOVI 
ES OR THEME CHARACTERS FROM H 
ORROR MOVIES. THE QUESTIONS ARE 

ARRANGED IN A WORDFIND FORMAT. 
HAVE FUN!":GOSUB540 
270 CLS 

280 READA$,S,A1$ 

290 IFA$="END"AND S=99 9 AND Al$= 
"END"THEN410 

300 PRINT@5, "halloween horror fi 
nd" 

310 PRINTS 12 8, "here are the clue 
s:" 

320 PRINT@192 , A$ : PRINT : PRINT "num 
ber of letters :";S 
330 PRINT@480,STRING$(31, " " ) ; 
340 PRINT @ 3 52 , "enter guess " 
350 PRINT@384 , "or h for search 1 
ist ":PRINT@416,"or q to give up 

->•• ; 
360 INPUTG$ 
370 IFG$=""THEN300 
380 IFG$="Q"THENPRINT@448 , "the w 



ord was-" ;A1$ : FORB=lTOX+X: NEXTB: 
GOTO270 

390 IFG$="H"THEN C=3 : GOTO810 
400 IFG$=A1$THENGOSUB420ELSEGOSU 
B480 

410 GOTO9 50 
420 CLS 

430 PRINT@235,"! correct!" 

440 SOUND200,1 

450 FORB=lTOX+X: NEXTB 

460 C=2 

470 GOTO540 

480 CLS:PRINT@2 3 5, "<wrong>" 

490 PRINT@265 , "<try" ;W$ ; "again>" 

500 SOUND100,1 

510 FORB=lTOX+X: NEXTB 

520 C=l 

530 GOTO540 

540 PRINT@483 , "press any key to 
continue" ; 

550 I$=INKEY$: IFI$=" "THEN550 

560 IFC=1THEN300 

570 IFC=2THEN270 

580 IFC=3THENCLS:GOTO300 

590 RETURN 

600 DATA "ONE HUNGRY VAMPIRE TO A 

NOTHER: 'HAVE A ***** i '" , 5 , HEART 

610 DATA "I'VE A HUNCH YOU WON'T 

GET THIS ONE. " , 9 , QUASIMODO 

620 DATA "NOT APPEARING THIS WEEK 

: THE ********* MAN. " , 9, INVISIBL 

E 

630 DATA "WHAT THE BLOB IS BEST A 
T .", 7 , GROWING 

640 DATA "THE VAMPIRE'S FAVORITE 
COWBOY: *** MASTERSON. " , 3 , BAT 
650 DATA "THE MOST FAMOUS FRANK!" 
, 12 , FRANKENSTEIN 



Two-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This program produces some very interesting designs 
by rotating each of five lines about the endpoint of the 
last line. 

The listing: 

0 COLOR1,0:PCLEAR8:PMODE4:PCLS:P 
MODE4 , 5 : PCLS : FORT= 0TO4 : D ( T ) =RND ( 
360) :I (T)=RND(16) -8:L(T) =RND(25) 
+9 : NEXT : FORT=0TO1STEP0 : PMODE4 : GO 
SUB1 : PMODE4 , 5 : GOSUB1 : NEXT 

1 X=12 8:Y=96:LINE-(X,Y) ,PSET:FOR 
T=0TO4:X=SIN(D(T)/57) *L(T) +X:Y=C 
OS(D(T)/57) *L(T)+Y:LINE-(X,Y) , PS 
ET: D (T) =D (T) +1 (T) :NEXT: SCREEN1 , 1 
: RETURN sage Radachowsky 

Bantam, CT 

(For Ihis winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion Tlie Third 
Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



22 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



I 





"The best program ever written for the Color Computer" 



That's how thousands of enthusiastic users rated 
theCoCo Max II drawing program. With CoCo Max 
III we are ready to amaze them again. Instead of 
"patching" CoCo Max II, we rewrote it from scratch 
to take advantage of the CoCo Max III hardware. 
The results will knock your socks off! Below is a 
brief list of some of the new features, but some, 
such asanimation, color sequencing, ortheslide 
show, have to be seen. Send for the Demo Disk, and 
see for yourself. 

Everybody's favorite drawing package features: 

- A 50% larger editing window. - Zoom area 400% 
larger. - New drawing tools: rays, 3D cubes, arcs,... - 
New editing tools: shadow, text size,... - Rotate by 1.5° 
steps - Select any 16 of the 64 possible colors (all 64 
colors displayed at once!) - Powerful color mix: additive, 
subtractive, overlay,... - Full color editing of patterns 
and color changing patterns. - Incredible special eff- 
ects with color cycling up to 8 colors with variable 
speed. -Animation adds the dimension of motion to 
your image. (Must be seen.) - Sophisticated data com- 
pression saves up to 70% of disk space when saving 
pictures. 

In addition, there are dozens of enhancements to the 
multitude of features that made CoCo Max II a best seller. 

More about CoCo Max III 

• CoCo Max Mi is not an upgrade of CoCo Max II. It is entirely 
rewritten to take advantage of the new CoCo 3 hardware 
(More memory, resolution, colors, speed,...) 

• The new CoCo Max III Hi-Res Interface and the CoCo Max II 
Hi-Res Pack are not interchangable. 

• The new interface plugs into the joystick connector. 

• The CoCo Max III disk is not copy protected. 

• CoCo Max III only works with the CoCo 3. 

• A Y-Cable or Multi-pak is not necessary. 

• Colors are printed in five shades of gray. 

• CoCo Max III can read CoCo Max II pictures and fonts. 



Note: CoCo Max I) (forthe CoCo 2) is still available on disk 
($79.95). CoCo Max I is still available on tape ($69.95). For 
details, refer to our double page ad in any Rainbow from 
January *86 to July '87 



Toll Free operators are for orders only. If you need precise answers, call 
the tech line. (Detained CoCo Max specs are included with the Demo Disk.) 



Add $3.00 por arilnr (or xhlppina. 
Visa. MC. checks. M.O. walcome. 
CT residents add sales tax. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping Is $5 
Overaeu idri 10% 



{ 



Technical info (203) 656-1 806 

S2W 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




Imagine this picture in sixteen colors ! 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Umm CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with It, 
we will refund every penny. 



System Requirements: 

Any CoCo 3 disk system with a Joystick or a Mouse. 

We apologize to tape users, CoCo Max III needs the flexibility of a disk. 

The CoCo Max III system includes: • The special Hi-Res 
interface(foryour mouse or joystick) • The CoCo Max III disk • Many 
utilities: (Toconvert Max ii pictures. Max 1 1 fonts, etc.) • A detail led User's 

Manual. Complete system; nothing else to buy. CoCo Max III: $79.95* 

|iHiWiHBBBBlBBBBlBBBBlBBBBl> WITH COUPON ONLY ■ H HBBBB BBBB W BBB1 

! FREE DEMO DISK 

Name 
Street 



3f Beware of cheap and inferior imitations that DO NOT include a Hi-Res interface 
or charge extra for each utility. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

In 

I 
I 
I 

I 



City 
State Zip 
Printer used: 

Please include $2 to help defray Processing and Shipping 
costs. (Check, Money Order, etc. Sorry, no COD or Credit 
Cards). Coupon (or copy) must be mallled to: 



[COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries. Inc. 



COLORWARE 

242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 



660 DATA "IS BELA A NAME FOR A FE 
LLA?",6,LUGOSI 

670 DATA"MONSTERS 1 FAVORITE COME 

DIAN: **** HOPE . " , 4 , BLOB 

680 DATA "ONE GIANT ANT TO ANOTHE 

R: i he **** ME!'", 4, BUGS 

690 DATA "MAKE A FACE, LON.",6,CH 

ANEY 

700 DATA"MONSTERS EAT HERE.", 9, C 
LEVELAND 

710 DATA"SOUND OF A SAD GHOST.", 
6 , BOOHOO 

72,0 DATA "THE KING", 4, KONG 
730 DATA "WHAT THE MONSTER SAID A 
FTER EATING STEVE MARTIN .", 9 , EXC 
USE ME 

740 DATA" SOUND OF A MONSTER ON W 

ALL STREET" , 5 , CRASH 

750 DATA "THE MONSTER BURNED DOWN 

PITTSBURGH BECAUSE HE LIKED HIS 

MEAT WELL ****.", 4 , DONE 
760 DATA"WHAT THE BLOB MAKES PEO 
PLE" ,6, QUEASY 

770 DATA" ONE STARVING GHOST TO A 
NOTHER: 'I'M TRYING TO *** OUT A 

LIVING! ' ",3,EEK 
780 DATA "FOR THE VAMPIRE IT WAS 
**** AT FIRST BITE", 4, LOVE 



790 DATA "WHERE THE MONSTERS GET 
THEIR CARS: ****** RENT-A-CAR.", 
6, HE ARSE 

800 DATA"END" , 999 , "END" 

810 CLS: PRINT (§11, "searchlist" :PR 

INT 

820 
830 
840 
850 
860 
870 
880 
890 
900 
910 
920 
930 
940 
950 
960 



PRINTTAB (10 ) 
PRINTTAB (1,0) 
PRINTTAB ( 10 ) 
PRINTTAB (10) 
PRINTTAB (10) 
PRINTTAB (10) 
PRINTTAB ( 10 ) 
PRINTTAB ( 10 ) 
PRINTTAB (10) 
PRINTTAB (10) 
PRINTTAB ( 10 ) 
PRINTTAB (10) 
GOT054J3 



" cbexcusemebc " 
"bhtraehbcdbd" 
" f rankenstein" 
" ombnmbcb 1 dma " 
"bdonecdbugsl " 
"mnobcyicgbde" 
"alhmbsblobhv" 
"growingbsdee" 
"brovdsbciral" 
"kongebahsarc" 
"midcbldumcsr" 
" ldcysaeuqeek" 



CLS 

PRINT© 160," DID YOU HEAR ABOU 
T THE GIRL WHO MARRIED THE OLD E 
GYPTIAN KING? WELL IT TURNS OUT 
THAT SHE WAS ONLY AFTER HIS MU 
MMY ! " : PRINT : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 12 ) ; " 
bye now! " :GOTO960 
970 K COCO 2 



COLOR TALK 3 



The Complete Terminal/Communications Program you've been waiting for! 



Just look at this partial list of Impressive Features: 

♦Supports COCO 3 ns well as COCO 1 & 2. ♦Screen Display options: COC03: 80x24, 

40x24, 32x16 Standard COCO: 32x60, 32x24, 51x24, 64x24, 85x24. ♦Supports PBJ 

Wordpack & Double 80 + . ♦XMODEM & YMODEM. ♦Upload & Download. 
♦Save to buffer or direct to disk. ♦Pull ASCII XON/XOPF support. ♦ASCII filtering. 
♦ASCII buffering. ♦Customizer-sct and store frequently used options/parameters. ♦lO - 
64 character user programmable macros. ♦Conference/Chat mode. ♦Selectable Baud 
rates of: 110,300,600,1200,2400,4800,9600 (will support RS232 Pak to achieve the baud 
rates to 9600). ♦Parity: Odd, Even, Mark, Space, None. ♦VT-52 Terminal Emulation. 
♦Duplex: Half, Full, Echo. ♦Set Begin Block/End Block for selected save and print func- 
tions. ♦Browse/View through buffer. ♦Define margins, word-wrap, and justification for 
print-outs. ♦Complete support of the COCO's serial port and the RS232 Pack. ♦Op- 
tional prompted ASCII upload. ♦Customize Colors to suit your display. Much, Much 
More! 

Ideal for accessing Compuserve & Delphi & other Information Services. Send your Color 
Max 3 "MGE" pictures to friends and fellow COCO users. THIS IS THE ONLY COM- 
MUNICATIONS PROGRAM AVAILABLE FOR YOUR COCO WITH ALL OF THIS 
POWER! Compare COLOR TALK 3 with programs for the "PC" market costing 4 to 
5 limes as much. I'm sure you'll agree that COLOR TALK 3 represents real value for 
your COCO Dollars! 



Cat.# 255MD Disk Only. 



Introductory price...Just $49.95 




P.O. BOX 207 • LANGHORNE, PA 19047 



HORNE, PA 19047 T ~ ^ 



Add 1300 shipping * PA residents add 6% sales lax 



24 THE RAINBOW 



October 1987 



G raph i c s Ut il ity 



16K ECB 





ore than games, more than 
Adventures, more than utili- 
ties — come to think of 
it, more than almost any other as- 
pect of computing, my favorite part is 
discovering new ways to improve my 
own original programs. Programming 
hints and tips are tucked away on a 
special disk all their own in my collec- 
tion, and I refer to them often. 

I recently added another helpful hint 
to that disk, concerning Hi-Res gra- 
phics screen presentations. Normally, 
after I've displayed a picture or graphics 
text, or both, and I want to move on to 
the next part of the program, 1 include 
the PCL5 command to clear the screen 
and make room for whatever is coming 
up next. 

This is technically the correct proce- 
dure, but by itself it is rather bland and 
unexciting. With the procedure de- 
scribed here you'll be able to display 
your graphics screen as usual, but when 
it comes time to move on to the next 
screen, you can scroll the contents off 
instead of quickly erasing them, as with 
the PCL5 command. 

If you'd like to save some time 
entering the program from the key- 
board, you can leave out lines 10 
through 40 and any odd-numbered line. 
They are merely remark statements 
describing what's happening in the next 
line. For example, Line 45 tells you 
what the purpose of Line 50 is. The REM 
lines are there to help you understand 
how to modify this procedure to suit 
your own program. 

Bill Bernico is a self-taught computerist 
who enjoys golf, music and program- 
ming. He is a drummer with a rock band 
and lives in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. 




fpuiwmmMmmm 




mc||« *(f"i |H Ji»fl#iJP rrlf i>t.n *li rh •'ftfffrtV fill 
g|..<j| > *t *.tl,lp Jit* < m^ci rdirrf n*i X 

r.im.'h tint* lii bi.ia r .b Mao, * 

.ifltflm r,.»r j6 ylti.ibo p il .itiiaan a rUalj -fl i.u([ 

d ftn A II. i> iipwk cn i ill ub ,m pun!**) ii4 
»>»>> (nlil tikivllub rrau tout* Un; •■ .slijK 
• ro^.iU) tp brmi.tVr.l! hn» »»rrb • yr.ar <T. rail 
ylldtr Jl ryyl p| tmbtu lua ftugif rrllrn nm 3 
r«u«iri h flul. I ■» bni k • ib>l p...^ rial) gltan * 
.li-Uam I «».»J> glbaborp il .noaarr a rUalj *?> uny 
{■ ftiiA Ha noaarr on ml wft mi ^niual) ria 
(i«tf '"V l'h« llub "•'« '■"»■ •' ••'»' ."''J* 

-i.W 




IIIIINI||l|!l!ll|l||l!|^ 




2MI IBcrnito 



26 



THE RAINBOW October 1 987 




Basically, there are three steps to 
this procedure. First, define the scroll 
address and assign it to the variable A, 
as in Line 50. Next, set up the graphics 
screen and draw your picture, text or 
whatever. Lastly, after the screen is 
displayed, EXEC the variable from Line 
50 — in this case you will type EXEC fi. 
This starts the scrolling and continues 
until the screen is clear. 

Notice the remark in Line 65. It says 
that if you frame the screen all the way 
to the bottom (vertical screen position 
I9l), it will scroll up black instead of 
white. Keep this in mind when drawing 
a picture or text. Avoid drawing down 
as far as 19 1 if you want a "clean" scroll. 

Finally, it's just as easy to use this 
procedure with binary picture files. For 
example, if you want to make a binary 
picture file of these particular screen 
contents, type in lines 60 to 2 1 0, leaving 
out the remark lines in between. Then 
type 220 SflVEM" PICTURE ",35B4, 
9727, 35B4 and run the program, mak- 
'ng sure you have a disk in the 
drive. This will create a binary 
picture file for later use. 
Your next step is to type in lines 50, 
60, 220 and 230, leaving out all other 
lines. Now add 70 LOflDM "PICTURE " 
and save this five-line program as your 
"loader" program. When run, it will 
load the picture file and wait for you to 
press any key before scrolling up and off 
the screen. You can substitute any other 
picture file you like. The effect is really 
worthwhile. 

(Questions or comments may be 
addressed to the author at 708 Michigan 
A venue, Sheboygan, Wl 53081 . Please 
enclose an SASE when requesting a 
reply.) □ 



INC. • ffilS) 946-7260 • P.O. BOX 207 • LANGHORNE, PA 19047 Hi 











: 














Hi-Res Joystick Interface. 

(Radio Shack #26-3023) 
Cat. #221CH 



$12.00 



Picture Converter 1 (C) 
6 Picture Format Converters: 
* CoCo Max B&W to "MGE" 
CoCo Max artifact to "MGE" 
6K B&W binary file to "MGE" 
6K artifact binary to "MGE" 
Graphicom B&W to "MGE" 
Graphicom artifact to "MGE" 
(MGE is Color Max 3 Pix format) 
Cat.#220MD $29.95 



MOUSE PADS 

Super High Quality Rubberized 
Mouse Pads with Felt Finish. 
10 3/4 x 8 1/2" Specify Color... 
Red 
Blue 
Silver 

$10.99EA 



Cat.#210CH 
Cat.#211CH 
Cat.#212CH 



Picture Converter 2(C) 
Converts ATARI (tm) Low Res 
320x200 picture files to "MGE" ' 
format used by Color Max 3. 
Works with ATARI pictures with 
file extensions .ST, .NEO, and 
.TNY. 

NOTE: This utility is designed to allow 

the user to retrieve picture files from 

Bulletin Boards and Information Services. 

Files must be "Un-Arced". 

Most databases have "UN-ARC" utilities 

available. 

Cat.#222MD $29.95 

Color Max 3 Font Editor(c) 

Create/Modify fonts for use with 
Color Max 3. Create Keyboard 
driven Icons. Customize existing 
fonts. Works in a "Fat Bits" type 
mode. Variable Height & Width. 
Let your imagination "go to work"! 
Cat.#224MD $29.95 



CM3 Basic Tool & Gallery 

Load & Save "MGE" pictures for 
display outside of Color Max 3. 
Incorporate into basic programs. 
Gallery lists all MGE files-just 
Point & Display! 

Cat.#225MD ' $19.95 

Color Max 3 FONTS 

Max3 Fonts from Derringer 
Software. Quality fonts like those 
created for CoCo Max(r). 
Over 25 Fonts in all! 
Cat.#223DD $29,95 

YOU HA VENT PURCHASED 
COLOR MAX 3??? TRY A 

DEMO DISK SHOWS YOU 

THE P O W E R OF CM3! Price 
of demo is deducted when you buy! 
Why Wait???ORDER NOW 
Cat.#219MD $5.00 



LU 

ec 
O 
X 

o 
■z. 
< 



The listing: SCROLL 



'GRAPHICS SCREEN SCROLL 
•FROM KROMICO SOFTWARE 
•BY BILL BERNICO 



1)8 
2£ 

3£ 
4j3 ' 

45 'FIND SCROLL START ADDRESS 
5j3 A=(PEEK(27) *2 56+PEEK ( 2 8 ) ) -543 
55 'SET UP HI -RES SCREEN 
6j3 PMODE 4, 1:PCLS1: SCREEN 1,1: COLO 
Rpf 1 

65 'FRAME THE GRAPHICS SCREEN.. 
IF YOU CHANGE (255,190) TO 
(255,191) IT WILL SCROLL UP 
IN BLACK INSTEAD OF WHITE 
7j3 LINE(j3,j3)-(255, 190) , PSET , B 
75 'DRAW A SQUARE IN THE UPPER 

LEFT CORNER OF THE SCREEN 
8j3 DRAW"BMlj3, 10R30D30L3 0U3 0 
85 'POKE FOR ORANGE COLOR PAINT 
90 POKE 178,1 

95 'PAINT UPPER LEFT SQUARE 
100 PAINT (12 ,12) , ,0 
105 'POKE TO CANCEL ORANGE COLOR 
110 POKE 178,0 

115 'DRAW A DIAMOND IN THE LOWER 

RIGHT CORNER OF THE SCREEN 
120 DRAW"BM200,160E20F20G20H20 

12 5 'POKE FOR BLUE COLOR PAINT 
130 POKE 178,2 

13 5 ' PAINT LOWER RIGHT DIAMOND 



140 
145 
150 
155 
160 
165 
170 
175 
180 
185 
190 
195 



COLOR 



PAINT (205, 160) , ,0 
'POKE TO CANCEL BLUE 
POKE 178,0 

'DRAW CIRCLE IN CENTER 
CIRCLE(128,96) ,50 
'POKE FOR STRIPED COLOR 
POKE 178,100 

•PAINT CIRCLE WITH STRIPES 
PAINT (128 , 96) , ,0 
'POKE TO CANCEL STRIPE COLOR 
POKE 17 8,0 

'DRAW LETTERS TO SPELL OUT 
"SCROLL TEST" IN UPPER RIGHT 
200 DRAWBM13 8 , 2 8R5U4L5U4R5BR4NR 
5D8R5BR4U8R4FD2GL3F4BR4NR 6U8R6D8 
BR4NU8R5BR4NU8R5BM200, 20R6L3D8BR 
7NR5U4NR4U4R5BR4NR5D4R5D4L5BR12U 
8L3R6 

205 'DRAW LETTERS TO SPELL OUT 
"HIT ANY KEY" IN LOWER LEFT 
210 DRAWBM2 0 , 175D8U4R5U4 D8BR5U8 
BR4R6L3D8BR13U8R5D4NL5D4 BR4U8DF6 
DU8BR4DF2E2UDG2 D5BR12U8D4NE4F4BR 
4NR5U4NR4U4R5BR4DF2E2UDG2D5 
215 'PAUSE THE SCREEN UNTIL YOU 
HIT ANY KEY 
IF INKEY$=" "THEN 220 
'ONCE A KEY IS HIT, BEGIN 
SCREEN SCROLLING 
EXEC A 

CLS:LIST-30 /E\ 



220 
225 

230 
240 



SPEAK -EASY, 

BY FAZER ELECTRONICS 

PRINT * -2 . "HELLO . " 

THIS AMAZING SPEECH SYN- 
THESIZER PLUGS INTO THE 
PRINTER PORT AND SPEAKS 
WHAT YOU WOULD PRINT ! 

MORE FEATURES ! ! 

» SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR THE 
RADIO SHACK COLOR COMPUTER 

ft HAS INTERNAL AMPLIFIER 

* NO RAM NEEDED FOR DICTIONARY 
OR DRIVER PROGRAM 

ft ATTRACTIVE CONSTRUCTION 

ft INDEPENDENTLY POWERED 

ft CAN BE USED WITH PC COMPATABLES 
EQUIPPED WITH RS-232 

BY FAR THE EASIEST 
SYNTHESIZER TO USE ! 

** ALL FOR ONLY $1 49 . 00 ! 
ORDER NOW BY PHONE visa or 
OR MAIL CHECK TO 



M/C 



539 MCOANIEL 
CONYERS . G A. 



ELECTRON ICS , INC . 

404-929 -1 557 



MILL RD. 
30207 -9998 





MY ARTIST 



A COCO 
pictur 
Keyboa 
trol f 
paint , 
hues , 2 
modes , 
BASIC 
Requir 
TV or 
casset 



3 high r 
e drawin 
rd & joy 
or lines 
repro , 16 
menus , 2 
fast ML 
with man 
es COC03 
monitor, 
te or di 



esolut ion 
g program, 
stick con- 
,box,oval , 
colors ,64 
speeds , 4 
save/load . 
ual . 

/joystick / 
Specify 
sk. -$14.95 



THE DIRECTOR 

A COC03 pictur e / sound an 
color animation program. 
Prepare and edit display 
sequences of MY ARTIST format pictures, 
color changes/time delays, BASIC & cas- 
sette sound. Great for VCR recordings!!! 
BASIC with manual and a display sharing 
program. Requires COC03/TV or monitor. 
Specify cassette or disk $39.95 

BOTH MY ARTIST & THE DIRECTOR $49.95 

Prices include $3 shipping and a 30 day 
money back guarantee. SC residents add 
5% sales tax. No credit cards. 

SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER 

SEESOF 

PO Box 574, Beaufort, SC 29901 
Phone 803-524-0116 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 27 




By Scot A 





M M tie ens Quarrel is a puzzle written in BASIC 
M^W for the Color Computer 3. The object is 
jt^^to place eight queens on a chess board so 
that no one may capture another — that is, no 
piece may line up with another either vertically, 
horizontally, or diagonally. 

Just load and run the program. The title screen 
will appear and the letters will change colors. 
You'll then be asked whether you're using an 
analog RGB monitor or a composite monitor 
(television). After you answer the question, the 
chess board pops up on the screen with a flashing 
box in the center. 

To put a queen on the board, just move the 
flashing box to the desired square using the arrow 
keys and press ENTER. If you have made a legal 
move, then a white queen appears in the square. 
If you cannot place a queen in the square, then 
you have attempted an illegal move (another 
queen is in line with the square) and need to try 
some other square or remove another piece or 
pieces from the board. To remove a piece from 
the board, just move the flashing box over the 
piece, press ENTER, and the piece will vanish. 

Get all eight queens on the board and you'll see 
"you win" on the screen. If you get too frustrated, 
you may press the S and the computer will show 
you a possible solution to the puzzle. 

( Questions about this program may directed to 
the author at 6905 Kinard Road, Plant City, FL 
33566, 813-986-1645. Please enclose an SASE 
when writing for a reply.) □ 

Scot Allen is a 16-year-old junior at Plant City 
High School in Plant City, Florida. He has owned 
a Color Computer for many years and has 
recently bought a Color Computer 3. 



THE RAINBOW 



October 1987 



20C 



200 223 



The listing: QUEENS 



330 . 
440 . 
END 



.199 
.229 
.244 



10 ONBRKGOTO580:POKE&HFFD9,1:REA 
DSX, S Y : DIMGD (7,7): FORI=0TO15 : PAL 
ETTE 1,0: NEXT 

20 HSCREEN2:HCLS0:WIDTH32 : POKE&H 

95C9 , &H7 F : POKE &HE 6 C 6 ,18: POKE&HE6 

C7 , 18 : POKE&HFF2 2 , &H10 

30 PRINT @ 10 8 , " Queens ' " 

40 PRINT@172, "Quarrel" 

50 PRINT@239,"by" 

60 PRINT@29 9,"Scot Allen" 

70 POKE&HE6,2 

80 HBUFF 1,400 

90 HDRAWC15BM16 ,0RF2RFG3DF2L2D6 
FDF2R2DFL15EUR2E2UEU6L2E2UH3ERE" 
:HPAINT(17, 1) , 15:HDRAW"C14BM-3,+ 
3R9BM-1,+6L7" 

100 HGET(0,0)-(31,23) ,l:HCLS13 

110 F0RX=1T08 

120 F0RY=1T08 

130 PALETTE12,X*8+Y 

140 IFX=INT(X/2) *2THENC=8ELSEC=1 

9> 

150 IFY=INT(Y/2) *2THENIFC=8THENC 

=10ELSEC=8 

160 HCOLORC 

170 HLINE(X*32, Y*24-24) -(X*32+31 
, Y*24) ,PSET,BF 
180 NEXTY, X 

190 PRINT : PRINT" Do you have a 
n RGB monitor" 

200 PRINT" or a composite monit 
or (tv)?" 

210 PRINT" R or C" 

220 M$=INKEY$ : IFNOT (M$="c"ORM$=" 
C ,l ORM$= ,l r"ORM$="R" ) THEN220 
2 30 HSCREEN2 : IFM$="c"ORM$="C ,, THE 
NPALETTE7 ,22: PALETTE5 ,22: PALETTE 
0,48: PALETTE 1 ,32: PALETTE8 ,38: PAL 
ETTE10 , 6 : PALETTE 15 , 48 : PALETTE 14 , 
32:GOTO250 

240 PALETTE7 , 38 : PALETTE5 , 38 :PALE 

TTE0 ,63: PALETTE 10 , 3 3 : PALETTE 1,56 

: PALETTE8 ,51: PALETTE15 ,83: PALETT 

E14,56 

250 X=3:Y=4 

260 HPUT(X*32+38, Y*24+4) -(X*32+5 

7,Y*24+20) , l,NOT:HPUT(X*32+38,Y* 

2 4+4) -(X*32+57,Y*24+20) , l,NOT 

270 IFSO=1THENGOSUB360ELSEA$=INK 

EY$:IFA$=""THEN260 

280 PLAY"05T255CD" 

2 90 IFA$="S"ORA$="s"THENSO=l 



300 IFA$=" A "THENIFY>0THENY=Y-1EL 
SEY=7 

310 IFA$=CHR$ (10) THENIFY<7THENY= 
Y+1ELSEY=0 

320 IFA$=CHR$ (8) THENIFX>0THENX=X 
-1ELSEX=7 

3 30 IFA$=CHR$ ( 9 ) THENIFX<7THENX=X 
+1ELSEX=0 

3 40 IFA$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENIFGD (X, Y) =0 
THENGOSUB4 80ELSEGD ( X , Y ) =0 : NQ=NQ- 
1 : HCOLORHPOINT (X* 32+32, Y*24+1):H 
LINE(X*32+32, Y*24+l) -(X*32+61,Y* 
24+23) ,PSET,BF 
350 GOTO 2 60 

3 60 IFGD (SX, SY) THENREADSX, SY : GOT 
0360 

370 FORI=0TO7:IFGD(I,SY)THENFL=1 
:XC=I 

380 NEXT: IFFL=0THEN410 

390 FL=0:IFX<XC THENA$=CHR$ ( 9 ) : R 

ETURNELS E I FX > X C THENA$=CHR$ ( 8 ) : R 

ETURNELSEIFY>SY THENA$=" A " : RETUR 

NELSEIFY<SY THENA$=CHR$ ( 10 ) : RETU 

RN 

400 A$=CHR$ ( 13 ) : RETURN 

4 10 FORI=0TO7 : IFGD ( SX, I ) THENFL=1 

: YC=I 

420 NEXT : IFFL=0THEN4 50 

430 FL=0:IFY<YC THENA$=CHR$ ( 10 ) : 

RETURNELS E I FY > Y C THEN A$ = " A " : RETU 

RNELSEIFX>SX THENA$=CHR$ ( 8 ) : RETU 

RNELSEIFX<SX THENA$=CHR$ ( 9 ) : RETU 

RN 

440 A$=CHR$ ( 13 ): RETURN 
450 IFX<SX THENA$=CHR$ ( 9 ): RETURN 
ELSEIFX>SX THENA$=CHR$(8) : RETURN 
ELS E I F Y < S Y THEN A$ = CHR $ ( 10 ) : RETUR 
NELSEIF Y>S Y THENA$=" A " : RETURN 

4 60 A$=CHR$ ( 13 ): RETURN 
470 GOTO 3 60 

480 1=0 

490 IFGD(X,I)ANDSO=0THEN570 
500 IFGD(I,Y) ANDSO=0THEN570 
510 IFY-X+K0ORY-X+I>7THEN530 
520 IFGD(I,Y-X+I) ANDSO=0THEN570 
530 IFY+X-K0ORY+X-I>7THEN550 
540 IFGD (I, Y+X-I) ANDSO=0THEN570 
550 1=1+1 :IFK8THEN490 
560 GD (X, Y) =1 :HPUT (X*32+32 , Y*24+ 
l)-(X*32+62, Y*24+2 3) ,l,OR:NQ=NQ+ 
1 : IFNQ=8THENHCOLOR15 : HPRINT (16,1 
6) , "You win! 11 : PLAY"CDFGFGFDCGFDC 
GD" : FORI=0TO5000 : NEXT: GOTO580 
570 RETURN 

580 POKE&HFFD8 , 0 : IFM$="r ,, ORM$="R 
"THENRGBELSECMP 

590 DATA2, ,1,2, ,4,4,1,7,3,6,5,5, 
7,3,6 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 29 



Screen 



v . ; , 

^3 



Ext 



up 



e 



dUn, P that V ^ 1 «van» I fers 1 
Pf °*r aiJ1 ,o '""'ting a I Van '« 

3 *« dot L ' S,i0 * SCfiN «»»P 



^BCDEFGHI JABCDEFGH1 JABCDEFGH1 JHBCDErGHI JHBCDt-FX.HI JftBCDEFGHI JhBCDEFGHI JABCDEFGHI J 
H2345S?898l234567838123456789812$56789812345li!8981234567898i2345??838123456789 
»CIEF6H 1 JA1C9CF6KIJ AICIEFCtt I JAfCKFGH IJ AfiC9CF6lH J A BCICFGK I JABC1EF GH £ JA1CBEFCH I J 
H234567838l234567898l2345S789ltf34567838l234567W812345678381c34567898123456789 
iFCBEF GHIJAFCBEFG'il JAiCDEFGHIJABCDEF GH I -JABCBEFGM I ^tBCEEFGHIJABCBEFGH I JABCBEFGHIJ 
!1234567898123456?898l2345678?812345£?«99tt34567 



8 co 'umo „/■ ^ Peters f I ^can 
"iter / i. **** 



I Print 




tBCBEFGHI JAICBEFGHI JABCBEFGHf irfBCBEFGHI JABGlEFGHI^AftCBEFGHI JABG1EFGHI JABCBEFGHI J 

tBCBEFGHl JABCtEFGH I JABCBEFGHfiJABCBEFGH 1 JA8CBEFGH I JAfCBEFGH I JABCKFGH I JA1CBEFGH IJ 
)l23456?83812345678381234587B9J23456788812345678S8iE3456783812345S7838l23456789 
JBCBEFGHl JABCBEFGHI JABCBEFGH [UASCBEFGH I JABCBEFGHIJAIK BEFGHIJABCBEFGH IJABCBEFGH IJ 
12345k78S8t23456?838123458?^12345J789812345J7838f23456?8S8l23458?838123456783 
ICIEFGH IJABCBEFGHIJABCBEFGHUfrSfBEFGHIJABCBEFGIUdAjCBEFGHIJABCBEFGHIJABCBEFCHIJ 
»234567838123458783812345678S812SJ5678381234Hfl3M234567838l234567838123456789 
)BCBEFGHIJABCBEFGH1JABGBEF(HIjABCBEmUAC«BEfGHIJ0BCBEFGHIJABCBEFGHIJABC9EFGHIJ 



11 yields 



Mode 



-640 



H2345678381234587838i2345i78^123456?838l23458?89«1234587838i2345$?8 

::FGHK'A|C9EF6HIJABCBEFGHLJABCBEFCHIJASCBEFeHlJABCBEFGHIJ 
8123458783812345b78!i8123455?8S8T234587839123458?,838123456783e!23<58783»123458?8 < » 



IBCBEFCH 1JABCBEFSR I JABC BEFGH IJ 



^BCBEFGH] JABCBEFGHI JABCBEFGHI JAB&BEFGHI JABCBEFGHI JABC-BEFGHI JABCBEFGHI JABCBEFGHI J| 
n23455789812345878981234567838123%78981234|6783812:" 



B BCBEFGHIJABC»EFCHIJABrnFFr.HI.IARrnFFWI 



J45678381234567898I23456783 
JAJS£-BEFCH1 JABCBEFGHI J AB CBEFCHI JABCBEFGHI J 



*'gure f . 



r a w,l} a«so 



eei, 



»ork. ****** SfeSg* 



All three screen dumps contain pokes 
of data values to CoCo 3's memory. A 
typing error associated with a poke 
address could lead to a program self- 
destruct situation. Therefore, it's advis- 
able to save the typed screen dump 
before running it. When you do run it, 
you may be greeted with either an OD 
Error message or a Data Error message. 
The omission of one or more data 
values or of one or more commas in a 
DATA statement (lines 400 to the end of 
each listing) is a likely cause of an OD 
Error. Typing one or more data values 
incorrectly will cause the appearance of 
the Data Error message. 

For your initial use of SCRNDMP or 
SCRNDMPS, have your printer manual 
handy. You'll need to consult the man- 
ual to determine ASCII control code 
sequences that these two programs 
require. Through a series of prompting 
messages, each of these programs will 
tell you what kinds of control code 
sequences are needed and what their 
purposes are. Additionally, editing lines 
320 through 350 of either of these two 
programs lets you take any of four 
different options. 

In brief, the four options are as 
follows: 



1) Reverse dot in eight-dot column. 

2) Allow negative image. 

3) Set line feed. 

4) Set baud. 



The first option means that a printer, 
in producing a column of eight dots, 
responds to an eight-bit character code. 
Usually the top through bottom dots 
printed correspond to the highest 
through lowest bit positions, respec- 
tively, of the associated character code. 

Some printers require codes whose 
low to high bit positions cause the 
printing of the top to bottom dots. The 
option associated with Line 320 allows 
the reversal of the bit structure of the 
codes for eight-dot columns. 

The second option permits the print- 
ing of a negative, rather than a positive, 
image of the Hi-Res graphics screen. 

Some printers provide an automatic 
line feed with every carriage return. 
Other printers don't. The third option 
is a necessity for printers that do not 
have one. 

The CoCo 3 sets the rate at which it 
sends information to the printer at 600 
baud. If your printer accepts informa- 
tion at a higher rate, you may want to 
take the fourth option. 




Figure 2: Upright Negative Image of Test Screen 



Each of the options is taken by merely 
deleting the first apostrophe in its 
associated line — 320, 330, 340 or 350. 
The baud-setting option of Line 350 
requires one further change. You must 
replace the question mark in the poke 
command with a number. The number 
should be 41, 18 (6 or 7) or I for baud 
rates of 1200, 2400, 4800 or 9600, 
respectively. 

Listing 4 shows a program that pro- 
vides a Mode 3 graphics screen suitable 
for testing the operation of each of the 
three screen dumps. The graphics screen 
consists of patterns of numbers and 
letters accompanied by a circle within a 
large ellipse. A bordering rectangle 
encloses ali of this. 

For printers that can print eight-dot 
columns, try SCRNDMPS first. If your 
printer needs a reversed eight-dot col- 
umn and you do not take the first 
option, then the numbers and letters 
will be printed as mirror images of those 
on the test screen. Thus, for your first 
run of SCRNDMPS, print the test screen 
to determine whether you need to take 
the first option. 

Use of LP7BDMPS does not require 
any consultation of your printer man- 
ual. It also doesn't offer any options and 
doesn't set the baud rate: You must do 
this prior to running LP7BDMPS. 



Each of the BASIC programs gener- 
ates and executes a machine language 
routine that does the actual screen 
dumping. These routines are stored and 
executed from the low resolution graph- 
ics screen area of CoCo 3. 

If you have a disk system, Line 370 
of each of the three BASIC screen dumps 
allows you to save the associated ma- 
chine language routine. Merely delete 
the apostrophe in Line 370. Then when 
the program has completed a screen 
dump, the associated machine language 
routine will be saved on disk. Later, the 
saved machine language screen dump 
routine can be loaded and executed by 
employing one of the following com- 
mand sequences: 



LDRDM"SCRNDMP": EXEC 
LGRDM "SCRNDMPS" : EXEC 
LDRDM"LP7BDMPS" : EXEC 



By deleting the apostrophes in lines 
380 and 390 of the BASIC screen dumps, 
you can save the associated machine 
language routines on cassette tape. 
Each of these machine language screen 
dumps can later be loaded and executed 
by typing CLDflDM : EXEC after you have 
positioned the tape appropriately. □ 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 31 



$r so.... 


153 


w 180 


143 


280 


213 


380 


97 


560 


209 


END 


150 



T 



Listing I: SCRNDMP 

5 •*** SCRNDMP *** 
By H. Allen Curtis 
Copyright 1987 
10 X=&H1200:WIDTH40 
20 FOR I=0TO2 3:READ D:POKEX+I,D: 
NEXT 

30 FOR I=24T0299:READ D$:D=VAL(" 
&H"+D$) : C=C+D : POKEX+I , D : NEXT 
40 IFC=30030THEN50ELSELOCATE14,4 
: PRINT "DATA ERROR" : STOP 
50 CLS2 : LOCATE4 , 4: PRINT "Have you 
customized SCRNDMP to suit you 
r printer? <Y/N> " ; 
60 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN60ELSEIF 
K$="Y"THEN280 

70 LOCATE4,7:PRINT"Consult your 
printer manual to find ASCII co 
des for setting an 8 dot line 
spacing. If your printer only h 
as an 8 dot line spacing for gra 
phics, then look for a code 

or codes to turn on graphics 

8p PRINT 11 As an example, one 
printer uses the ESCape code 27 
, followed by 65 (the ' ASCII 
code for A) , followed by 8 (the 

dot spacing) . For this code s 
equence you would type 27,65,8 
Now, type the sequence for y 
our printer: 11 ; 
90 LINEINPUTQ$ 

1W C$=Q$:K=1:Z$=",0":L1$="400 D 
ATA 11 

110 IFINSTR(C$, 11 , ") =0THEN120ELSE 
C$=RIGHT$ (C$,LEN(C$) -INSTR ( C$ , 11 , 
11 ) ) :K=K+l:GOT011)3 

120 L1$=L1$+STR$ (K) +" , "+Q$ : FORJ= 
1T07-K: L1$=L1$+Z$ : NEXT 
130 CLS5:LOCATE4,4:PRINT"Next, f 
ind the ASCII codes for se 
tting the desired graphics mode 
and the number of dots per lin 
e. SCRNDMP requires 640 dots 
per line. 

140 PRINT" As an example, one 



") ) :K=K+1:GOTO180 

printer uses the sequence 27,4 

2,4,128,2 where the codes 128 a 

nd 2 represent 128 + 2*256 = 640 

dots per line. 

150 PRINT 11 Now, type your cod 

e sequence. Remember to i 

nclude commas between codes 
it • 

160 LINEINPUTQ$ 

170 C$=Q$:K=l:L2$ = "410 DATA 11 

180 IFINSTR ( C$ , 11 , 11 ) =0THEN190ELSE 

C$=RIGHT$ (C$,LEN(C$) -INSTR(C$, 11 , 

190 L2$=L2$+STR$ (K) +" , "+Q$ : FORJ= 

1T08-K : L2 $=L2 $+Z $ : NEXT 

200 CLS3:LOCATE4,4:PRINT n Look up 

the code sequence to turn of 
f graphics and return to the tex 
t mode. The example printer 

uses the code sequence 27,6 

4 which resets the printer to 

its power-up state. 

210 PRINT 11 Type the correspon 

ding sequence for your printer, 
ii • 

220 LINEINPUTQ$ 
230 C$=Q$:K=1:L3$="420 DATA " 
240 IF INSTR (C$ ,", " ) =0THEN250ELS 
EC$=RIGHT$(C$,LEN(C$) -INSTR(C$," 
, ") ) :K=K+1:GOTO240 
250 L3$=L3$+STR$ (K) +" , "+Q$:FORJ= 
1T06-K : L3 $=L3 $+Z $ : NEXT 
260 CLS6 : LOCATE4 , 4 : PRINT"Custoini 
ze SCRNDMP by EDITing lines 40 
0, 410, and 420 to : 11 : LOCATE4 , 9 : P 
RINTL1$ : LOCATE 4 , 11 : PRINTL2 $ : LOCA 
TE4 , 13 : PRINTL3$ : PRINT 
270 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" If you 
have not already done so, E 
DIT lines 320-350 to take option 
s you want. ": PRINT: PRINT" 

Then rerun SCRNDMP. ": LOCATE0 , 
22: END 

280 CLS5:LOCATE4,8:PRINT"Is your 

printer ready? <Y/N> 11 ; 
290 K$=INKEY$: IFK$=""THEN290ELSE 
IFK$=" Y"THEN300ELSELOCATE2 , 10 : PR 
INT"Ready your printer and rerun 

SCRNDMP . " : LOCATE0 ,22: END 
300 CLS 5: LOCATE 4, 8: PRINT "Do you 
have a mode 1 or 3 screen re 
ady to dump? <Y/N> " ; 
310 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN310ELSE 
IFK$=" Y"THEN3 20ELSELOCATE4 , 12 : PR 
INT"Run a program to generate th 
e desired screen. Then r 

eload SCRNDMP and run it.":LO 



32 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



OVER 
1 / 2 OFF 



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PROGRAMS for YOU with 
QUIKPRO+II 

In minutes even if you know nothing about programming! 
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Now you can tell your computer what you want and your computer 
L can write your programs for you in minutes to your custom design — easily and without 
^ requiring any programming background from you... with QUIKPRO+II. 

^ A Breakthrough In Micro Computer Technology 

You know your computer is fantastically fast. ..once it knows what to do. Programs 
^ and software are what makes it happen. Every task your computer performs for you 
L requires some kind of program. Until now, you could only get programs in just one 
^ of two ways: buy a canned package that many times doesn't meet your needs 
^ or hand over hundreds or thousands of dollars for a custom programming job. 
^ Now, you have a better choice... 

^ Programs Without Programming 

Automatic programming is what it's all about. And, with QUIKPRO + II the 
Automatic Program Writer, your computer can actually write programs 
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program when you want it with QUIKPRO + II. Each program you 
create is a completely stand alone program that will run in the 
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programs. Best of all, you do not have to become a 
programmer to use QUIKPRO + II. The QUIKPRO + II software 
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QUICKPRO+lt comes 
complete in its own 
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and disk ready to use. 



RAINBOW 

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Proven and Widely Used 

Businesses, Schools, Hobbyists and Government are among our thousands of users. 



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APPLICATION CHECKLIST 


Here are a few of the thousands of possible applications 


you can do with QUIKPRO + II 


...And most can be created in 


a few minutes. 




BUSINESS USES 


EDUCATIONAL USES 


Customer Filing 


Student Records 


Master Files for 


Grade Records 


General Ledgers 


Teacher Lists 


Accts. Receiv. 


School Lists 


Accts. Payable 


Program Design 


Telephone Logs 


Course Design 


Telephone Lists 


HOME 8c HOBBY USES 


Hotel/Travel Data 


Personal Records 


Reservations 


Check Lists 


Property Control 


Club Rosters 


Library Catalogues 


Telephone Directories 


Inventories 


Recipe Files 



ORDER NOW - OVER Y 2 OFF 

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SAVE OVER 1 / 2 OFF the reg. $149 price. 

Check your computer type & payment 



] Color Computer 

2 or 3 with Disk 
] TANDY 1000, 1200. 3000 
] IBM/Compatible 
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] Apple 2, 2C 2E 
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] TRS-80 Mod 4 
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Address 

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Mail Orders to: 



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Orange Park, FL 32073 



_ 



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The DC-4 is a scaled-down version of the popular DC-2 
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cepts RSDOS 1.1 for Radio Shack compatability. 



DC-4 with memory minder 
($2 shipping) 



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DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 
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Separate Disk Drive Components 

DD-3 An MPI 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive rn a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



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DD-2 A TEAC 55B Vi height, double density. 360K disk 
drive m a Vz height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



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TEAC 55B bare drive, Vz height, double-sided, double density with 
all mounting hardware, needs CA-2 below to fit R.S. 501. 



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SP-C 



Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial output to run 
a parallel printer like Star or Epson. Includes all cables. Add $10 for 
modem attachment. ($2 S hj PP j n g) 



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CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to the drive. 



$2495 

One Drive 



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$2995 

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WORD PACK RS 

This ROM pack is the hardware answer for an 80 column 
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OS-9 2.0, a Y-cable or multipack interface drive 0, and a 
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need for an OS-9. 



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Sony KV-1 31 1 CR $449 



• Vivid Color 

• Vertically flat 13" screen 

• Monitor/Trinitron TV with remote control 

• 640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ - 37 Dot 

• RGB analog & digital, TTL: composite input 

• Cable to CoCo 3 

• VCR inputs $36 



($15 shipping) 



Zenith 1220 A 



m 



• 12" Amber screen 

• 640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ 



$125 

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s 



Lets the graphic capabilities 
of your CoCo EXPLODE 

Needed to connect CoCo 
Max and disk drive at same 
time. 



COCO $70 45 
MAX II **0. TO 

Y CABLE $19- 45 

MAX O ^% Three sets include 72 different 

FONTS ^UlJ fontS for typesetting 

COLORING $4 ^% Twenty-two pictures of clip-art 
_^ I %J by Glenside Color Computer Club 

BOOK 

($2 shipping for each product) 

Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 



JUL 



ORDERS 



inr 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



I 



Showroom Ho lift: 
S:00 ->;<w Man. - Frt 
10:00- i:D0SdC. 



WE ACCEPT VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

CO D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL PO/S Shipping charges are for 48 states. 

T 



CATEJ3,22:END 

3 2p ! POKEX+2 7 6, 3 3 f REVERSE DOTS 
IN 8 DOT COLUMN 

33J2 f POKEX+296,67 'NEGATIVE IMAG 
E 

34J2 f POKEX+46,189 f SET LINE FEED 
35p 1 POKEX+7,0,? :X=X-4 f SET BAUD 
36p EXECX+73 

37p f SAVEM" S CRNDMP ,f , &H12pp , &H132 
B,X+73 

3 8j2 f CLS 3 : MOTORON : LOCATE 4,4: PRIN 
T ,! Position tape for recording.": 
PRINT" Then press any key. " :G 
OSUB39 ft : MOTOROFF : ATTR5 , 6 : PRINT 11 D 
epress recorder buttons PLAY and 
RECORDand then press any key,"; 
: GOSUB3 9 jS : CSAVEM" S CRNDMP " , &H12j2p 
, &H132B,X+73:END 

39$6 1 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN39j3ELS 
ERETURN 

40J2) DATA 3 ,27, 65,8,0,0,0,0 

410 DATA 5,27,42,4,128,2,0,0,0 

420 DATA 2,27,64,0,0,0,0 

430 DATA 34,10,30,8C,E3,8D,1B,35 

,10,39 

440 DATA 3 4, 10, 30, 8C, El, 8 6, D 
450 DATA BD,A2,85,86, A,8C,A2,85, 
20, EA 



460 DATA 34,10,30,8C,D9,20,E3 

470 DATA E6,80,A6,80,BD,A2,85,5A 
,26,F8 , 39 

480 DATA C6,12,D7,96,C6,FE,D7,6F 
,8D,C9 

490 DATA 1F,52,31,A8,AD,1E,42,8E 
,70,71 

500 DATA BF,FF,A2,CE,40,0,C6,30, 
D7,52 

510 DATA C6,50,D7,51,8D,B9,8D,38 
, 8D, 3E 

520 DATA 80,44,80,46,80,53,80,50 
,8D,66 

530 DATA 8D,71,8D,7D,33,41,A,51, 
26, E8 

540 DATA 33,C9,0,F0,A,52,26,DA,8 

E, 7A,7B 

550 DATA BF,FF,A2,1E,42,8D,A0,86 
f D 

560 DATA BD, A2 , 85 , 8 6 , A, BD , A2 , 85 , 

F, 6F,39 

570 DATA BD,A2,85,1F,31,4F,C6,4, 
D7,50,39 

580 DATA E6, 84 , 8D, 58 , 26 , FA, 20, 61 
,E6,84 

590 DATA 58,8D,4F,26,F9,20,58,E6 
,84,58,58 

600 DATA 8D,45,26,F8 / 20,4E,E6,84 



I I II II l_ll I % m 

Km KJ Km KJ I I Km Km C 




>IT C* O I $Z C* 




HEW-4 DRIVE SYSTEM C2 DSDD DRIVES ACCESSED 

UNDER RS DOS) *-53?9.35 
£ DRIVE SYSTEM 3K£ DSDD DRIVES IN ONE CASE) 

J3£9.35 

DRIVE 1 UPGRADE CI DSDD UPGRADE FOR YOUR 

£6-31£ 9,3131.. OR 313£ -$113,3S PLEASE 

SPECIFY CATALOG NUMBER WHEN ORDERfNG ! J 

DRIVE M-SSDD FrH DRIVE S-S133.3S 

DRIVE 1-SSDD F,H DRIVE CUSE W.-EXISTING DR0> 

S1ES.3S 



£- INCLUDES EITHER R .S. OR DISTO CONTROLLER 



CDCD 3 

5l£K UPGRADE-J103.35 TECH MAHUAL-f £3.35 
RAM DISK & DIAGNOSTICS -I13.3S 
MONITOR CONNECTOR FOR CM-3 -f 4.35 



OTHER STUFF 

MONITOR INTERFACE -*£3.35 AD0S-S£3.3& 
KEYBOARDS~f2l-4.3B ADAPTERS- £3.35 
SERIAL TO PARALLEL CONVERTERS -S-M.35 
NEW — EPSON LX-SOO PRINTER 16-0 CPS DRAFT/ 
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5512 POPLAR MEMPHIS, 1H 38119 901-761-4565 

ADD i-4.30 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. VISA^MC & MONEY ORDERS ACCEPTED. 
ALLOW 3 WEEKS FOR PERSONAL CHECKS- NO CODS. PRICES MAY CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 35 



^58/58/58 

610 DATA 8D,3A,2 6,F7,2J3,43,E6,84 
,58,58 

620 DATA 58, 58 , 8D, 2E, 26,F6 , 20, 37 
,E6,84 

630 DATA 58, 58, 58, 58,58, 8D, 21, 26 
,F5,20, 2A 

640 DATA E6, 84 , 58 , 58 , 58 , 58 , 58 , 58 
,8D,13 

650 DATA 26,F4,20,1C,E6,84,58,58 
, 58 , 58 

660 DATA 58,58,58,8D,4,26,F3,2j3, 
D,48,48 

670 DATA 58, 24, 2, 8A, 3, 30, 88, 50, A 
,50,39 

680 DATA 2)3,12,48,56,48,56,48,56 
,48, 56,48,56 

69j2 DATA 4 8 , 56 , 48 , 56 , 4 8 , 56 , IF , 98 
,12, 16, FF, 74 



W 90 



,43 



180 .65 

280 .13 

380 137 

END .....141 



Listing 2: SCRNOMPS 

5 1 *** SCRNDMPS *** 

By H. Allen Curtis 
Copyright 1987 
10 X^&H1200:WIDTH40 
20 FOR I=0TO23:READ D: POKEX+I , D : 
NEXT 

30 FOR I = 24T0192:READ D$:D=VAL( ,f 
&H"+D$) :C=C+D: POKEX+I, D: NEXT 
40 IFC=19727THEN50ELSELOCATE14, 4 
•.PRINT" DATA ERROR" : STOP 
50 CLS2 : LOCATE 4 , 4 : PRINT "Have you 
customized SCRNDMPS to suit you 
r printer? <Y/N> " ; 
60 JC$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN60EL8EXF 
K$="Y'»THEN280 

70 LOCATE4 / 7:PRINT"Consult your 
printer manual to find ASCII co 
des for setting an 8 dot line 
spacing. If your printer only h 
as an 8 dot line spacing for gra 
phics, then look for a code 

or codes to turn on graphics 

80 PRINT" As an example, one 
printer uses the ESCape code 27 



, followed by 65 (the ASCII 
code for A) , followed by 8 (the 

dot spacing) . For this code s 
equence you would type 27,65,8 
Now, type the sequence for y 
our printer: " ; 
90 LINEINPUTQ$ 

100 C$=Q$:K=ltZ$=",0"lLl$="400 D 
ATA " 

110 IFINSTR(C$, 11 , " ) =0THEN120ELSE 
C$=RIGHT$ ( C$ , LEN (C$ ) -INSTR ( C$ , » , 
") ) :K=K+1: GOTO 110 

120 Ll$=Ll$ + STR$(K)+'», "+Q$:FORJ= 
1T07-K: L1$=L1$+Z$ : NEXT 
130 CLS5:LOCATE4,4:PRINT"Next, f 
ind the ASCII codes for se 

tting the desired graphics mode 
and the number of dots per lin 
e. SCRNDMPS requires 384 dots 
per line. 

140 PRINT" As an example, one 

printer uses the sequence 27,7 

5,128,1 where the codes 128 a 

nd 1 represent 128 + 1*256 = 384 

dots per line* 

150 PRINT" Now, type your cod 

e sequence. Remember to i 

nclude commas between codes 
it . 

160 LINEINPUTQ$ 
170 C$=Q$:K=1:L2$="410 DATA " 
180 IFINSTR(C$, " , l? )=0THEN190ELSE 
C$=RIGHT$ ( C$ , LEN (C$) -INSTR (C$ , " , 
") ) :K=K+1:GOTO180 

190 L2 $-L2 $+STR$ (K) + » , " +Q$ : FORJ= 

1T08-K : L2 $=L2 $+Z$ : NEXT 

200 CLS3:LOCATE4 , 4: PRINT" Look up 

the code sequence to turn of 
f graphics and return to the tex 
t mode . The example printer 

uses the code sequence 27,6 

4 which resets the printer to 

its power-up state. 

210 PRINT" Type the correspon 

ding sequence for your printer, 
if . 

22)3 LINEINPUTQ$ 
230 C$=Q$:K=1:L3$="420 DATA " 
240 IF INSTR ( C$ , " , ") =0THEN250ELS 
EC$=RIGHT$(C$ / LEN(C$) -INSTR (C$, " 
, ") ) : K=K+1:GOTO240 

25,0 L3$=L3$+STR$ (K)+", "+Q$: FORJ= 

1T06-K : L3 $=L3 $+Z$ : NEXT 

2 60 CLS 6: LOCATE 4, 4 : PRINT "Customi 

ze SCRNDMPS by EDITing lines 40 

0, Alp, and 420 to : " : LOCATE4 , 9 : P 

RINTL1$ : LOCATE 4 , 11 : PRINTL2 $ : LOCA 

TE4,13:PRINTL3$ 

270 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" If you 



36 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



S culptor 

40 times faster than other 




Works with MS-DOS, Unix, Xenix, VMS, OS9, QNX and more. 

100% Portable to over 90 machines - Micros to Mainframes. 



OS9 LEVEL II SPECIAL $295 

FHL 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 
770 James St. - Syracuse, NY 13203 - 315/474-7856 TELEX 646740 - Since 1976 



have not already done so, E 
DIT lines 320-350 to take option 
s you want . " : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT" 
Then rerun SCRNDMPS . " : L 
OCATE ,0,22: END 

280 CLS5:LOCATE4,8:PRINT"Is your 

printer ready? <Y/N> " ; 
290 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=""THEN290ELSE 
IFK$="Y"THEN300ELSELOCATE2 , 10: PR 
INT"Ready your printer and rerun 

SCRNDMPS . 11 : LOCATE0 , 22 : END 
300 CLS5:LOCATE4,8:PRINT"Do you 
have a mode 1 or 3 screen re 
ady to dump? <Y/N> "; 
310 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN310ELSE 
IFK$="Y"THEN320ELSELOCATE4 , 12 : PR 
INT"Run a program to generate th 
e desired screen. Then r 

eload SCRNDMPS and run it.":LO 
CATE0,22 :END 

320 'POKEX+77,3 3 'REVERSE DOTS I 
N 8 DOT COLUMN 

330 'POKEX+97,67 'NEGATIVE IMAGE 
340 'POKEX+101, 189 'SET LINE FEE 
D 

350 'POKEX+131, 18 :X=X-4 'SET B 
AUD 

360 EXECX+134 

370 ' SAVEM" SCRNDMPS" , &H1200 , &H12 
C0,X+134 

380 'CLS3:MOTORON:LOCATE4,4:PRIN 
T"Position tape for recording.": 
PRINT" Then press any key.":G 
0SUB3 9 0 : MOTOROFF : ATTR5 , 6 : PRINT "D 
epress recorder buttons PLAY and 
RECORDand then press any key."; 
: G0SUB3 9 0 : CSAVEM" SCRNDMPS " , &H12 0 
0 , &H12C0 , X+134 : END 
390 ' K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN3 90ELS 
ERETURN 

400 DATA 3,27,65,8,0,0,0,0 

410 DATA 4,27,75,128,1,0,0,0,0 

420 DATA 2,27,64,0,0,0,0 

430 DATA 34,10,30,8C,E3,8D,11,35 

,10,39 

440 DATA 34,10,30,8C,E1,20,F4 
450 DATA 34,10,30,8C,E3,20,ED 
460 DATA E6,80,A6,80,BD,A2,85,5A 
,26,F8,39 

470 DATA A6,84,8D,E,BD,A2,85,BD, 
A2,85,30,88,B0,A,50,26,EF,39 
480 DATA 20,12,48,56,48,56,48,56 
,48,56,48,56 

490 DATA 48, 56, 48, 56, 48,56, IF, 98 
,12,39 

500 DATA 86,A,8C,A2,85,86,D,BD,A 
2, 85, C6, 7, 86, 20 

510 DATA BD,A2,85,5A,26,F8,8D,A9 



38 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



,33, 41, IF, 31,C6,C0,D7,50,3 9 

520 DATA C6, 12 , D7, 96,C6,FE,D7 , 6F 

, 8D, 8C 

530 DATA 1F,52,31,A9,FF,70,1E,42 
,8E,70."7I 

540 DATA BF,FF,A2,CE,7B,AF,C6,50 
,D7,51 

550 DATA 8D,C0,8D,96,A,51,26,F8, 
8E,7A,7B 

560 DATA BF,FF,A2,1E,42,17,FF,75 
, 86 , D, BD, A2 , 85 

570 DATA 86,A,BD,A2,85,F,6F,39 



^^40... ...201 

570 102 

END 218 



Listing 3: LP7BDMPS 

5 i*** LP78DMPS *** 

By H. Allen Curtis 
Copyright 1987 
10 X=&H1200:WIDTH40 
30 FOR I=0TO324 :READ D$:D=VAL("& 
H"+D$) :C=C+D:POKEX+I,D:NEXT 
40 IFC=37030THEN45ELSELOCATE14,4 
: PRINT " DATA ERROR " : STOP 
45 'POKE&H129B, 3 2 : POKE&H129C , 8 : R 
EM DELETE APOSTROPHE FOR ELONGAT 
ED USE 

50 EXECX+183 

370 'SAVEM"LP78DMPS" , &H1200, &H13 
44, &H12B7 

380 'CLS3:MOTORON:LOCATE4,4:PRIN 
T"Position tape for recording.": 
PRINT" Then press any key . " : G 



MOUSe Tales by Logan Ward 



D 
13 
D 
D 

a 
□ 

a 

13 

□ 
a 
a 
□ 

D 

a 

D 



t i ff " 1 1 ' \ 

il! I .I.J 


w 




n 


Ml 







fflOLEE 




/AMD i THOUGHT 
fyffttfe FOR 



□ 

a 



a 

D 

a 

JB 

iquilTlD 

Mo 

D 
B 



□ 



Q 

5 ; ;iwi :.;.g 

acouDuontsnoDaDUDdonbaiQaDQ 



0SUB3 9p : MOTOROFF : ATTR5 , 6 : PRINT "D 
epress recorder buttons PLAY and 
RECORDand then press any key."; 
:GOSUB390:CSAVEM"LP78DMPS" , &H120 
0 , &H1344 , &H12B7 : END 
39^ •K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN39PELS 
ERE TURN 

40p DATA E6,84,8D,57,2^I,64,E6,84 
,57,46 

410 DATA E6,l,8D,4F,2p,5A,E6,84, 
58,58,58 

420 DATA 58,58,58,8D,4B,E6,1,8D, 
41, 20, 4A 

430 DATA E6, 84, 58, 58, 58, 58, 58, 8D 
,3A,E6,1 

440 DATA 8D,34,20,3B,E6,84,58,58 
,58,58 

450 DATA 8D,2A,E6,1,8D,28,20,2D, 
E6,84,58 

460 DATA 58, 58,8D,1B,E6, 1,8D, ID, 
20,20 

470 DATA E6,84,58,58,8D,D,E6,1,5 
8,46, 20, 14 

480 DATA E6, 84, 58, 20, A7, 58, 46, 58 
,46,58,46 

490 DATA 58,46,58,46,58,46,58,46 
,39,46 

500 DATA 8A, 80,BD,A2 , 85,BD,A2 , 85 
, A, 50 , 39 

510 DATA 8D,39,8D,86,26,FA,8D,13 
,8D,31,8D,84 

520 DATA 26,FA,33,41,8D,9,8D,27, 
8D,84 

530 DATA 26, FA, 33, 41, 39, 86, D,BD, 
A2,85,86 

540 DATA IE, BD,A2, 85,06,7,86,20, 
BD,A2,85 

550 DATA 5A,26,F8,86,12,BD,A2,85 
,1F,31 

560 DATA C6,C0,D7,50,39 , 30,89,FF 
,B0,4F,39 

570 DATA C6,FE,D7,6F,8D,D4,1F,52 
,31,A9 

580 DATA FF,3F,12,1E,42,8E,70,71 
, BF,FF, A2 

590 DATA CE,7C,0, IF , 3 1 , CC , C0 , B , D 
D,50 

600 DATA 8D,9E,8D,B7,8D, D5, 17, FF 
,41,26,F9 

610 DATA 33,41,8D,AC,8D,CA,17,FF 
,45,26,F9 

620 DATA 33,41,8D,A1,8D,BF,17,FF 
,48,26,F9 

630 DATA 33,41,8D,96,8D,B4,17,FF 
,4A,26,F9 

640 DATA 33,41,8D,8B,8D,A9,17,FF 
,4B,26,F9 

650 DATA 33, 41, 8D, 80, A, 51, 26, CI, 
17, FF, 5E 



660 DATA 17,FF,76,8D,94,E6,84,58 
,58,58 

670 DATA 58,58,17,FF,3C,46,46,46 
,46 

680 DATA 17,FF,3C,26,EB,8E,7A,7B 
, BF , FF , A2 

690 DATA 1E,42,86,D,BD,A2,85,86, 
1E,BD,A2,85,F,65,39 



Listing 4: TESTSCRN 
10 HSCREEN3 

20 A$=" 01234567 8 9 " : B$="ABCDEFGHI 
J" 

30 FORI=0TO22STEP2 

40 HPRINT(0, I) ,A$+A$+A$+A$+A$+A$ 

+A$+A$ 

50 NEXT 

60 F0RI=1T023STEP2 

70 HPRINT(0, I) ,B$+B$+B$+B$+B$+B$ 

+B$+B$ 

80 NEXT 

90 HCIRCLE(320, 96) ,96,1,2 

100 HCIRCLE(320,96) ,90,1 

110 HLINE(0,0) -(639,191) , PSET , B 



s 



;ssssssss$sssssss$s$$$sss$sss.ss$s 



*3S> 



RAINBOW 



If You Arc Serious About Stocks. 
This Program Is A Must! 



Stock Market portfolio for the color computer 
will keep track of all your current stock listings 
and keep a listing of stocks you have sold by the 
year, they were sold with all totals, profit and 
loss, and percentages. More than one person 
can use this program as long as the first three 
letters on both first and last name are not the 
same. The program is menu driven and will 
give you the option for either screen print or 
information to be printed on printer. 



Rush Check for $22.00 plus $3.00 shipping & handling to: 
Paparis Enterprises 
700 York St. 

Williamsburg, VA 23185 
Please allow 2-3 weeks for delivery 
Sorry no CO.D.S 
VA residents add 4.5% sales tax. 



ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssmsssssssssssssssssssssssssssss $ 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 39 




EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 
Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

•HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

• HIGH 
QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 



0& 




Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In factyou do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN : MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



blank m<ae 



8 LANK DISK s- 

OR TAPE <L 
WITH fVERV 
ORDER 




cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. Fora limited time,wewill 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 



ems 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada S3. 00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6'A% safes tax 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 




TURBO RAM 



TM 1^91 

99.95 

TURBO CHARGE YOUR COCO 3^Wk 



5I2K Fast High Quality Memory. 
i> Super Easy Solcleriess Installation. Installs in minutes. 
i> Assembled, tested, and burned-in. 

120 ns RAM Chips 

High Quality Double Sided, Solder Masked, Silkscreened PC Board. 
is Ideal for OS9 Level | 
is 2 Year Warranty. 

V Free CIME Chip Technical Specs ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 

Free 5I2K Ram Test Program ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
is Free MUSlCA RAM Disk ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
is $5 OFF TURBO RAM Disk. 

is Also available, TURBO RAM less memory chips. $49.95 





INSTALLATION 

If you know how to hold a screwdriver, we're convinced you cnn 
install Turbo Ram in minutes. However, it you like, send us your 
COCO 3 insured, postage paid, and we will install it, pay the return 
postage and guarantee it tor I year $15.00 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

If for any reason you wish to return Turbo Ram, you may do so 
within 15 clays and be charged only a 10% restocking charge. You 
may keep the CIME CHIP Technical Specs, 5 1 2 K Ram Test program 
and MUSlCA RAM DISK, a $30 value. 



TURBO RAM DISK adds 2 lightning fast Ram Disks to your COCO system. 
Imagine saving and loading programs instantaneously and having hundreds 
of your programs "on line" for fast access. Single disk system users can 



TURBO RAM DISK 



use TURBO RAM DISK to easily make backups without continuously 
switching disks. 

Requires 512K Turbo Charged COCO 3 $24.95 

When purchased with TURBO RAM $19.95 



COCO 3 128K 



COLOR CONNECTION IV 

This is the most comprehensive modem package for the COCO 3. All 
standard protocols are supported including CompuServe's Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol, and XON/XOFF. Full support of the auto answer/auto 
dial feature lor both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems is 
provided. Single key macros allow easy entry of often-used passwords and 
ID's with a single key stroke. 

Disk $49.95 

COLOR SCRIBE III 

This great Word Processor can take full advantage of the 00 column'display 
of the COCO 3. Justification, Headers, Footers, and Pagination make it 
perfect for letters and documents as well as programming in BASIC, PAS- 
CAL, "C," and Assembly Language. Over 20 line editing commands include 
capabilities like character insert and delete, skip over words, breaking a 
line, and more! 

Disk $49.95 



THE MAGIC OF ZANTH 

In the Land of Zanth, magic is commonplace. Dragons, Griffins, Centaurs 
and Demons abound. You are sent on a quest to discover the source of 
magic in the Land of Zanth. This intriguing adventure features over 2 
dozen hi-res 16 color animated graphic screens, 4 voice music and sound 
effects. The 16 color, 320 x I92 graphics look great. 
Disk $34.95 

RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE 

This is the same Junior you've seen in the Kong arcade series, but with 
new COCO 3 graphics. This tireless little monkey must overcome all sorts 
of obstacles (4 screens worth) to rescue his father, The King, from the 
mean zookeeper. He will traverse the jungle and swamp, climb vines, 
avoid chompers and birds, open locks, and more before- he finally meets 
with his big daddy. The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics are superb. 
Disk . .... . . . . $34.95 



Wc accept CASH, CHECK. COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders 
Shipping and handling US ond Caivida S i.00 

Shipping ,md handling outside the US and Can.ida S5.00 
COD Charge m S2.00 
Illinois residents add ()'ai"„ sales lax 



E}72$ 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 




FILE EDIT niDl HI5C 



All Voices On 
LEGE Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 



aeiee 



Y0 uC „ „ 



FILE EDIT HIDI HISC 



LEGEND 



0 ! § 1 SUB© 




"I HI 



use bS 



LYRA is (he most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
• any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you w iH find LYRA <t powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proot, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Edilor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not < 
misprint 1 ) 

Super Simple Editing Supports. 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to| 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to A voices without additional 
hardware 



These LYRA options are 

LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA 
files. 

(Disk) #LC164 $14.95 

VERSION UPDATE 

To receive the latest version of LYRA return your 
original disk. #UP162 . . $10.00 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 $19.95 

We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA.ind MASTER CARD orders, 
Shipping and handling US and Canada 53.00 
Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada i5.00 
COD Charge $v.(J0 
Illinois residents add 6'A% sales tax 



Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 
12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 
drum machines 

Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 
channels 

Transpose music to any key- 
Modify music to any tempo| 

Automatically inserts bar for each measure 
as you compose 

Key signature lets you specify sharps and 
flats only once, LYRA will do the rest. 
Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 
(#LC164). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

Each measure is numbered lor easy 
reading. 



v 0 Solo capability 

V Block edits are highlighted. 

Tie notes together for musical continuity 
v 0 Name of note pointed to is constantly 
displayed. 

V Jump to any point in the score 
instantaneously. 

Memory remaining clearly displayed, 
however you will have plenty of memory 
even for the most demanding piece 
^ Help menu makes manual virtually 

unnecessary. 
^ LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 
hardware unless you want more power 
Music easily saved to tape or disk 
Requires 64K and mouse or joystick 



LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 



$54.95 



LYRA OPTIONS 



not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12 

(Disk) #LS1 77 $19.95 

LYRA LIBRARY 

A collection of 50 songs ready to play for hours. 
Most have 7 and 8 voices. #LL137 $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 

A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 900 songs. When used with 
CONVERT it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 



COCO MAX is ;i trademark 01 ColoYware 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark oi Radio Shack 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 



C7 P C / BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

c^p^san <^>u$tzm$ 012) 879-6880 



FILE EDIT MIDI RISC 



\T\ i7i iyj 



HIDI InstrunentS' 

0;[J01 Brass 1:005 String 

2:006 Piano 3:009 Guitar 

I 4: 013 E Organ 5: 014 P Organ 

*j 6: 003 Trunpet 7:016 Flute 

£8:018 nboe 9:019 Clarnet 

^ A: 021 Vibrphn B: 026 Harpsch 

C: 025 Clavier D: 032 Tinpani 

E: 043 Snaredr F: 045 Percusn 




Lyra 

COMPATIBLE! 



AAV** ~* 
So 1^" 




Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUS1CA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system. 



W Supports 16 Track recording and playback. 

Adjustable tempo 

Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible) 

Record to any track 

Low Level Irack editing 

LYRA editing (one voice per track), 
i/* Playback from any number of tracks 
v 0 Quantizing to V-.e. V32. Vfca intervals. 
v 0 Dynamic memory allocation. 



*> Filter out MIDI data 

Key pressure Contro1 Change 

Program change Channel Pressure 

Pitch wheel s V stem Message 

i> Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode 

Adjustable Key (Transposition) for each 
track. 

Save recording to disk for later playback or 
editing 

Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE. 



PUNCH IN and PUNCH OUT editing 

Sequencer features. 
^ 100% machine code, 
\** "Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 

Metronome 

*> Many songs included 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64 K CoCo, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 

DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY181 $28.95 

TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173 $34.95 



Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



DK LIBRARIAN 



TM 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 ....... $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 



Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, 



memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 $29.95 



Graph i cs An i mation 



16K ECB 



Electrifying Graphics 

Using PMODE Power 

By Becky F. Matthews 




44 



There is nothing like a colorful computer 
animation to pique a person's interest. 
Using animation, the most serious sub- 
ject can become as entertaining as Saturday 
morning cartoons are to a child. You want 
to get a point across? Catch someone's eye 
(and attention) by using lots of color and 
movement. 

Computer animation is easy. Energy pro- 
Becky Matthews has a degree in music educa- 
tion from the University of Mississippi. She 
and her husband, David, have three Co Cos and 
two Co Co cats. 

THE RAINBOW October 1987 



vides three examples of simple animation 
sequences illustrating three different sources of 
energy. Each animation uses two PM0DE1 
screens. A picture is drawn on the first screen 
(PMODE 1,1), which uses graphics pages I and 
2. The second screen for each animation 
(PMODE 1,3) uses graphics pages 3 and 4. The 
animation is achieved by offsetting on the 
second screen the portions of the picture that 
you want to animate. 

In the wind power sequence (see Figure I), 
the blades of the windmill are horizontal and 
vertical on the first screen. On the second 
screen the blades are drawn di- 
agonally. The top edge of 
the field is also 
offset to 





the Color Computer Word Processor 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 

columns x 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full-screen 

editor 

Right justification 
Easy hyphenation 
Drives any printer 
Embedded format and 
control codes 
Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 
Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 
The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case chtr Meters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time, in fact, more on 
screen text than vou'd get with Apple Ii, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 
On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fan. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 
Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



. .. one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer / htve seen. .. 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Tclewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both, Ii 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of ail available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, f or example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen «/ one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple, 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
texi, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any primer 
(LPVII/VIII, DMP-I0G/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. koh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript , variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins: line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable justification. 
Menu-driven control of shese parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line hefders and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of tiles from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files - 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even *ext files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for su-c saves. Cassette auto* 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 
Read in, save, paniaf save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor wiih 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
phis CLEAR. 



.. truly * sttte of the *rt word processor. . . 
outstanding in every respect, 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



RAINBOW 

CfRTJFfCATlO* 
SE*L 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59,95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries inviied. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Californians add 6% state tax,) 

Available at 
Radio Zhaek stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple !! is a trademark of Apple Computer. Inc.: Atari is a trademark 
of Atari. Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy C«rp; MX-80 is a 
trademark of Epson America, Inc. 



look like a field of wheat blowing in the 
breeze. Line 250 animates the sequence 
by flipping back and forth between the 
two pictures. 

In the second animation sequence, 
hydroelectric power, the water wheel 
paddles and the waves in the river are 
offset. The illusion of movement at the 
end of the water wheel is achieved by 
circles drawn there on the first screen 
(Line 360) but not on the second screen. 
The water wheel sequence is animated 
by Line 530. 

The third animation illustrates solar 
power (see Figure 2). The sun's rays are 



offset and the flowers are drawn slightly 
larger on the second screen to show 
tlieir growth from the sun's energy. This 
sequence is animated by Line 790. 

In each animation, the second picture 
is drawn on a hidden screen. This is 
possible by using the PMDDE statement 
(PMODE 1,3 in this example) and not 
following it with a SCREEN command 
(see lines 190, 460 and 690). The SCREEN 
command displays the screen. Without 
the SCREEN command, that screen is 
active (that is, you can draw on it), but 
it is not shown. To see the second screen 
of the wind power animation being 



drawn, edit Line 190, inserting SCREEN 
1,0: after PMDDE 1 , 3 : . To see the other 
two second screens as they are drawn, 
edit lines 460 and 690, inserting SCREEN 
1,1: after PMDDE 1,3: in each line. 

I hope this simple program has dem- 
onstrated how easily you can animate 
an object. The next time you have a 
point to make, remember, cartoons can 
entertain, but they can teach, too! 

(Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at 3917 Baxter 
Street, Nashville, TN 37216. Please 
enclose an SASE when writing for a 
reply.) □ 





186 


340 


45 


490 


154 


660 


94 


END 


179 



The listing: ENERGY 

1J3 ' ***ENERGY BY BECKY MATTHEWS 
20 '* TITLE PAGE 

3j3 CLS4 : PRINT§7 5 , " SOURCES " ; : PR 

INT@107,"OF ENERGY"; 

4j3 PRINT@196, "1. WIND POWER 

" ; :PRINT@2 28, "2 . HYDROELECT 
RIC POWER " ;:PRINT@2 60,"3 . SOLAR 

POWER " ; 

50 PRINT@3 58 , "CHOOSE ONE (1-3)" ; 
60 INPUT A 

70 ON A GOSUB 90 , 210 , 550 
80 GOTO30 

90 '**WIND POWER SUB 

100 '*1ST SCREEN 

110 'DRAW WINDMILL 

120 PMODE1,1:PCLS3:SCREEN1,0:DRA 

W"BM178 , 76C2S8BH2H2U30R8D30NG2R3 

0D8L30NH2D30L8U30NE2L30U8R30NF2B 

D8G6D45R20U45H6" 

130 'DRAW FIELD 

140 DRAW'BMl, 192NU14R254U15L2 " : C 
IRCLE(82,180) ,100,2, .35,-6, .906: 
CIRCLE (210, 160) , 42 , 2 , . 5 , 0 , . 3 
150 'PAINT 

160 PAINT (178 , 76) , 4 , 2 : POKE178 , 22 
: PAINT (178, 160) , , 2 : PAINT ( 5 , 188) , 
2,2 

170 '*2ND SCREEN 
180 'DRAW FIELD 

19J0 PMODEl,3:PCLS3:CIRCLE(82,179 
) ,100,2, .35,-6, .906: CIRCLE (210,1 
59) ,42,2, -5,0, . 3 :DRAW"S8C2BM1, 19 
2NU16R254U16L2" 



200 'DRAW WINDMILL 

210 DRAW " C2 S 6 BM1 7 8 , 68BU2U2E30F8G 
30NL2F30G8H30NU2G30H8E30NR2H30E8 
F30D2BD16BG13D52R2 6U52" 
220 'PAINT 

230 PAINT(178,76) , 8 , 6 : PAINT ( 5 , 18 
8 ) , 2 , 2 : POKE17 8 ,22: PAINT (178,170) 
, ,6 

2 40 ' * ANIMATE 

250 FORC=1TO40:PMODE1, 1:SCREEN1, 
0:FORT=1TO50:NEXTT:PMODE1, 3 :SCRE 
EN1 , 0 : FORT=lT05 0 : NEXTT : NEXTC 

2 60 RETURN 

270 ' **HYDROELECTRIC POWER SUB 
280 '*1ST SCREEN 
290 'DRAW FRAME 

300 PMODE1, 1:PCLS1:SCREEN1, 1 : COL 
OR6:LINE (1,1) -(256, 192) ,PSET,B 
310 'DRAW MOUNTAINS/SKY 
320 COLOR7:LINE(0,70)-(3,65) , PSE 
T:FORX=3T0256STEP5: Y=RND(70) +20: 
LINE- (X , Y) ,PSET:NEXTX:LINE- (256, 
65) ,PSET: PAINT (20, 10) ,6,7 

3 30 'COPY MOUNTAINS/SKY TO 2ND S 
CREEN 

340 PCOPY1T03 : PCOPY2T04 

350 'DRAW WATER WHEEL 

360 COLOR6:FORR=2T022STEP4:CIRCL 

E (140, 150) ,R,7:NEXTR 

370 LINE(160,140)-(208,120) , PSET 

: LINE (150, 130) -(19 6,114) , PSET: LI 

NE( 162, 155) -(2 12, 135) , PSET 

380 CIRCLE(196, 130) ,20,7,1, .7, .9 

9: CIRCLE (19 6, 130) ,20,7,1,0,-2 

390 LINE(142, 128)-(188, 112) , PSET 

: LINE (152 , 169) - (208 , 147) , PSET: CO 

LOR7: PAINT (140, 150) ,8,7 

400 'DRAW RIVER 

410 DRAW"BM0, 100S8C7ND10R6 6F2R8F 
1R6F2R4F4R2F3F4D4F4R2 2BM0, 120S8R 
62F2R4F1R6F4R4F8D5F4D4F4R2 8U17" : 
PAINT (5, 105) ,6,7 
420 'DRAW WAVES 



46 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



430 DRAW"BM15,110C5R5BD4R3BR2R2B 

E5R6BF1BR2R6BE3R3BD7R2BE6R4BR8BD 

2R2F2BF4BR6F3BF4F4BU8R1F3 BF3F2BD 

7F3R4 BR3R3BU5L3BD9R5" 

440 '*2ND SCREEN 

450 1 DRAW WATER WHEEL 

460 PM0DE1, 3 : COLOR6 : CIRCLE (19 6,1 

30) ,20,7,1, .7, .99: CIRCLE (140, 150 

) ,22, 7: LINE (156, 135) -(204, 116) ,P 

SET: PAINT (140, 150) ,8,7 

470 CIRCLE(196, 130) ,20,7,1,0, .2: 

LINE (152, 169) -(208, 14 7) ,PSET:LIN 

E( 152, 162) -(208, 140) ,PSET:LINE(1 

60,145)-(210,125) ,PSET 

480 1 DRAW RIVER 

490 LINE(142,128)-(188,112) , PSET 
:DRAW"BM0,100S8C7ND10R66F2R4F1R6 
F2R6F4R4F3R2F4D4F4R20BM0, 120S8R6 
0F2R4F1R6F4R4F8D5F4D4F4R30U17" :P 
AINT(5,105) ,6,7 
500 1 DRAW WAVES 

510 DRAWBM20 , 110C5R6BF2R2BR2R4B 

U4R6BF3R8BD5R5BE5R2BF2R4BU6R2BF8 

R4F2BE3R4F3BF4R2F2BF4F2BU2F3BD8F 

2R2BU4F3R4BD3R3BU9L6" 

520 ■* ANIMATE 

530 FORC=1TO40:PMODE1, 1:SCREEN1, 
1 : FORT=1TO50 : NEXTT : PMODE1 , 3 : SCRE 
EN1 , 1 : FORT=1TO50 : NEXTT : NEXTC 
540 RETURN 

550 '**SOLAR POWER SUB 
560 • *1ST SCREEN 
570 1 DRAW SUN 

580 PMODE1,1:PCLS3:SCREEN1,0:CIR 
CLE (23 5, 20) ,30,2, . 9 : PAINT ( 2 20 , 20 
) , 2 , 2 : COLOR2 
590 'DRAW RAYS 

600 FORX=185TO5STEP-20:LINE(X,20 

)-(X+10,20) ,PSET:NEXTX 

610 FORY=55TO170STEP17 : LINE (235, 

Y)-(235,Y+8) ,PSET:NEXTY 

620 Y=45:FORX=206TO80STEP-15:LIN 

E (X, Y) - (X-6 , Y+6 ) ,PSET: Y=Y+15:NEX 

TX 

630 Y=35:FORX=196TO10STEP-20:LIN 
E(X,Y) -(X-10, Y+2) ,PSET: Y=Y+8:NEX 
TX 

640 Y=50:FORX=218TO180STEP-5:LIN 
E(X,Y) -(X-2,Y+8) ,PSET: Y=Y+15:NEX 
TX 

650 'DRAW SMALL FLOWERS 

660 COLORl:FORX=16T024 5STEP2 2 :LI 

NE(X, 190) -(X, 180) , PSET: CIRCLE (X, 

180) ,7,2:PAINT(X,180) ,4, 2: CIRCLE 

(X,180) ,1,2:NEXTX 

670 '*2ND SCREEN 

680 'DRAW SUN 



690 PMODE1,3:PCLS3:CIRCLE(235,20 
) ,30,2, .9:PAINT(2 20,20) , 2 , 2 : COLO 
R2 

700 'DRAW RAYS 

710 FORX=175TO5STEP-20:LINE(X,20 

) - (X+10 , 20 ) , PSET : NEXTX 

720 FORY=65TO160STEP17:LINE(235, 

Y)-(235,Y+8) , PSET : NEXTY 

730 Y=50:FORX=201TO80STEP-15:LIN 

E(X,Y) -(X-6, Y+6) ,PSET:Y=Y+15:NEX 

TX 

740 Y=43:FORX=186TO10STEP-20:LIN 
E(X,Y) -(X-10, Y+2) ,PSET: Y=Y+8 :NEX 
TX 

750 Y=58:FORX=215TO180STEP-5:LIN 
E(X,Y) -(X-2 , Y+8) ,PSET:Y=Y+15:NEX 
TX 

760 'DRAW LARGE FLOWERS 

770 COLORl:FORX=16T02 45STEP2 2:LI 

NE(X, 190) - (X, 175) , PSET: CIRCLE (X, 

175) , 8, 2: PAINT (X, 175) , 4 , 2 : CIRCLE 

(X,175) ,3, 2: NEXTX 

780 ' *ANIMATE 

790 FORC=1TO40:PMODE1,1:SCREEN1, 
0 : FORT=1TO50 : NEXTT : PMODE1 , 3 : SCRE 
EN1 , 0 : FORT=1TO50 : NEXTT : NEXTC 
800 RETURN 



NEW * INNOVATIVE * EXCITING 



COLOR WRITER — 1 28 

THE WORD PROCESSOR FOR THE COCO 3 



$24.95 



NOT A PATCH, BUT AN EXCITING NEW CONCEPT THAT USES YOUR 
COC03'STEXT COLORING CAPABILITIES TO DISTINGUISH BETWEEN 
SCRIPT, SUPER SCRIPT, BOLD, ELONGATED AND UNDERLINE. A 40/80 
COLUMN TOGGLE WITH ON-SCREEN HELP MENU IS ALSO FEATURED. 
REQUIRES A 1 28K COCO 3WITHDISKDRIVEOR CASSETTE. ANYPRIN- 
TER WORKS. $24.95 



BLACKBOOK 

FOR THE COCO 1 ,2 AND COCO 3 



$7.95 



HAVE YOU EVER LOST OR MISPLACED YOUR ADDRESS BOOK AT A 
CRUCIAL MOMENT? THEN YOU NEED BLACKBOOK. IT SAVES OVER 
500 NAMES TO DISK AND WILL FIND THEM QUICKLY WITH ITS 
DEDICATED SEARCH BY NAME, ADDRESS, CITY, STATE OR ZIP CODE. 
FEATURES PASSWORD PROTECTION, A PRINT FUNTION AND AN EASY- 
TO-USE EDIT AND ADD. $7.95 



CARTOONAMATOR 

FOR THE COCO 2 AND COCO 3 



$14.95 



CARTOONAMATOR IS A NEW AND EXCITING PROGRAM THAT USES 
ALL NINE OF YOUR 64K COCO 2'S VIBRANT COLORS. IT FEATURES 
THE SAME ANIMATION TECHNIQUE THAT DISNEY USED IN HIS 
CREATIONS. CREATE CARTOONS OF HUNDREDS OF FRAMES AND UP 
TO A MINUTE IN LENGTH. THIS EXCITING PRODUCT IS BEING 
INTRODUCED AT THE LOW PRICE OF $1 4.95 

COCOTRONICS SOFTWARE 

4330 BARRANCA PKWY.. STE. 101-296 
IRVINE, CA 927 14 (714)651-0283 

PLEASE ADD $1.50 P&H, C.O.D. ADD $2.50 EXTRA 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 47 



Here is a program that graphics 
f anatics might find useful. Since 
graphics screens reside in differ- 
ent memory locations in disk and tape 
systems, even commercial transfer util- 
ities don't fix your favorite graphics 
files. Suppose you have a disk-based 
system (as I do) and your friends have 
tape-only systems. How do you transfer 
your graphics creations to tape format 
for your friends? This is where Graftran 
comes in. It's for PMODE 3 or 4 standard 
6K graphics screens. 

Graftran is written in Extended Color 
BASIC and is menu-driven. There are 
five selections on the menu: load in a 
tape graphic, load in a disk graphic, 
view graphic in memory, save graphic 
to disk and save graphic to tape. These 
are all straightforward, but 1 have 
outlined the various options below. 

The first is loading in a tape graphic. 
Press Play on your cassette player when 
you have inserted the tape containing 
the graphic. Press the number 1 on the 
computer keyboard and press any key 
except ENTER. If no I/O Error occurs, 
the graphic will be loaded into memory. 
If you press ENTER by itself, the load 
process will be aborted and you will be 
returned to the main menu. 

The next option is loading in a disk 
graphic. Pressing 2 from the main menu 
puts you into the disk load routine. If 



Scott Montgomery of Seymour, Indi- 
ana, has a certificate in electronics from 
the Cleveland Institute of Electronics 
and is completing an associate's degree 
in electronics at Indiana Vocational 
Technical College. He, his wife, Cyndi, 
and daughters Cheri and Sara, are all 
confirmed CoCo maniacs. 



you want to see the directory, enter DIR. 
Otherwise enter the filename and exten- 
sion of the graphic you want to load. 
Pressing ENTER by itself will send you 
back to the main menu once again. 

Next is viewing a graphic in memory. 
Upon pressing 3, you will be prompted 
to enter either 3 or 4 for the PMODE in 
which you want to view the graphic. 
When you are finished viewing the 
graphic, pressing ENTER returns you to 
the menu. 

The fourth option is saving a graphic 
to disk. After selecting this option, you 
will have to enter the filename and 
extension of the graphic to be saved. 
Again, ENTER returns you to the menu. 

The last option is saving a graphic to 
tape. This is the only tricky part. Enter 
the filename of the graphic you want to 
save. If a disk controller is connected to 
your computer, you will be informed 
that the resulting tape copy of the 
graphic will not be compatible with 
tape-only systems. To make it tape-only 
compatible, you must have a tape copy 
of Graftran to load into your tape-only 
system. All you have to do is disconnect 
the disk controller, load in and run 
Graftran from tape, select 1 , load in the 
tape copy of the graphic and select 5 to 
save it back again. Graftran will do the 
rest. The resulting copy of the graphic 
image will be saved at the correct 
addresses for a tape-only system. I'd like 
to thank Andy Kluck for his tape load 
routine which appeared in the October 
1984 RAINBOW 

(Questions or comments may be 
addressed to the author at 600 Polley 
Drive, Seymour, IN 47274. Please 
enclose an SASEfor a reply.) □ 



Tandy Computers: 
Because there is 
no better valuer 



Tandy Color Computer 3 






We cut $ 20 off our most 
powerful Color Computer- 
nowjust $ 199. 

Now Radio Shack's most advanced version of 
the famous Color Computer is more affordable 
than ever! The Color Computer 3 is great for 
small business and home applications such as 
education, programming, word processing, 
graphics, entertainment and more. 

It's easy to expand with disk drives, 
printer, telephone modem and more. 
Plus, the Color Computer 3 comes 
with 128K RAM (expandable to 
512K), giving you greater programming 
and data-processing power. And for 
added versatility, the Color Computer 
3 is compatible with software and ac- 
cessories designed for the popular 
Color Computer 2. 

Create razor-sharp graphics with our 
CM-8 high-resolution monitor (sold sepa- 
rately). You can achieve up to 
160 X 192 or 320 X 192 resolution 
graphics using 16 colors, or 640 X 192 
with 4 colors. 

The Color Computer 3 offers uncom- 
promising performance at a terrific price. 
Visit Radio Shack today for a demonstration! 



I 



Send me a new 1986 
computer catalog. 



Mail To: Radio Shack 
Dept. 88-A-79 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth. TX 76102 



Address _ 
City 



I 

El 
J 



Radio /hack 



Was $2 19.95 in Cat. RSC-17B. Price applies at Radio Shack 
Computer Centers and participating stores and deuleis. Moni- 
tor, stand, Program Pak and disk drive sold separately. 



The Technology Store 7 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



V 130 



410 . 
END 



. .56 
.185 
..91 



The listing: GRAFTRAN 

10 CLS:A$=STRING$(32,"*") : PR I NT A 
$;"* GRAPHICS TRANSFER UTILITY # 
2 ** (C) 1987 MONTGOMERY SOFTWAR 
E *";A$; 

2)2 PRINT" PLEASE SELECT A NUMBER 

(1-5) 11 : PRINT 
3J3 PRINT" (1) LOAD A TAPE GRAPHIC 
S FILE": PRINT 

40 PRINT" (2) LOAD A DISK GRAPHIC 
S FILE": PRINT 

50 PRINT" (3) VIEW GRAPHICS IN ME 
MORY" : PRINT 

60 PRINT" (4) SAVE A GRAPHICS FIL 
E TO DISK" 

70 PRINT" (5) SAVE A GRAPHICS FIL 
E TO TAPE"; 

80 X$=INKEY$: X=VAL(X$):IF X<1 0 
R X>5 THEN 80 

90 ON X GOTO 100, 200, 300, A00 , 
100 REM ANDY KLUCK'S TAPE LOAD 

ROUTINE FROM 1J3/84 

RAINBOW ARTICLE. 
110 CLS : PRINTA$ ; : PRINT" *PRESS AN 
Y KEY TO LOAD GRAPHICS** OR <ENT 
ER> TO RETURN TO MENU *";A$ 
115 L$=INKEY$:IF L$=" "THEN 115 E 
LSE IF L$=CHR$(13) THEN 10 
117 PRINT: PRINT"LOADING GRAPHICS 



120 P0KE&H78,J3 
130 P0KE&H1D1,J3 
14J2 EXEC&HA648 

15^ P0KE&H1E7,PEEK(&HBC) :POKE&Hl 
E8,0 

160 EXEC&HA5^)5 
17 0 GOTO 10 

200 CLS : PRINT A$ ;: PRINT"* NAME OF 
DISK GRAPHICS FILE TO** LOAD (F 
ILENAME/EXT) OR DIR OR**<ENTER> 
TO RETURN TO MAIN MENU*";A$ 
210 PRINT"> " ; :LINEINPUTF$:IF F$ 
=" DIR"THEN CLS : DIR : PRINT : LINEINP 
UT" FILENAME TO LOAD (FILENAME/ EX 
T) > ";F$ 

22J3 IF F$="" THEN 10 
230 LOADM F$ : GOTO 10 
300 CLS : PRINTA$ ; : PRINT" * PMODE 3 

OR 4 GRAPHICS SCREEN?** (PRESS 
EITHER NUMBER 3 OR 4 ) ** PRESS E 
NTER WHEN DONE VIEWING*" ;A$ 



310 P$=INKEY$:P= VAL(P$):IF P<3 
OR P>4 THEN 310 

320 PMODE P,1:SCREEN1,1:EXEC4453 
9 

330 GOTO 10 

A00 CLS : PRINTA$ ;: PRINT"* FILENAM 
E/EXT TO SAVE TO DISK ** OR <ENT 
ER> TO RETURN TO MENU *";A$ 
41J3 LINEINPUT"> ";D$ 

A20 IF D$=""THEN 10 

430 SAVEM D$, 3584, 9727, 44539 

440 GOTO 10 

500 CLS : PRINTA$ ;: PRINT"* FILENAM 
E TO SAVE TO TAPE OR ** <ENTER> 

TO RETURN TO MENU *";A$: 
520 LINEINPUT"> ";R$ 
522 IF R$=" "THEN 10 
530 IF PEEK(188)=14 THEN PRINT "T 
HE TAPE YOU ARE NOW CREATING W 
ILL NOT BE NON-DISK COMPATIBLE. Y 
OU MUST LOAD IN GRAFTRAN ON THET 
APE-ONLY SYSTEM AND LOAD IN THEG 
RAPHIC ON THIS TAPE AND SAVE ITB 
ACK OUT AGAIN TO TAPE . " 
535 PRINT 

54J3 PRINT" PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTI 
NUE" 

550 EXEC44539 

560 PRINT "SAVING ";R$;" TO TAPE" 
570 CSAVEM R$ , PEEK ( 188) *256 , PEEK 
(188) *256+6143, 44539 
580 GOTO 10 ^ 



Corrections. 



"The Kingdom of Le Lutin" (July 1987, Page 58): 
Some readers have indicated they could not get Le 
Lutin to run on their machines. Upon entering RUN, 
the computer would lock up. The problem revolves 
around the high speed poke in Line I. The high 
speed poke, POKE G5495,0, will not work on any 
CoCo revisions earlier than the 'F' board. Just 
delete POKEG5495,0: from that line and Le Lutin 
should work fine. 

"CoCo Sets the Pace" (September 1987, Page 140): 
For those wishing to use Tachistoscope on a disk 
system, three changes are indicated at the bottom 
of the first column on Page 141. The second change, 
the one to Line 4030, is unnecessary and, in fact, 
will not work. Only the changes to Lines 4010 and 
4040 should be made. We apologize for any 
inconvenience this might have caused. 

For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted 
on Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info 
on Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type 
DATA at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the 
TOPIC> prompt. 



50 



THE RAINBOW October 1 987 




Tandy Computer 
Accessories: 
Because there is 



no better value. 



rui 



Radio Shack has the 
best of everything* 




Accessories make the difference between 
just a computer system and an efficient com- 
puter system. That's why Radio Shack offers 
a wide selection of accessories to make the 
most of your computer. 

Organize your computer workspace with 
our Computer Workcenter (A, $99.95). Our 
Universal Monitor Pedestal (B, $16.95) ro- 
tates and tilts for a perfect viewing angle. 
The Universal Printer Supports (C, $16.95) 
allow you to stack paper beneath your 
printer. Fanfold printer paper (D, from 
$8.95) is available in various sizes, colors 
and quantities. 

We've got the diskettes (E) you need, for as 
little as $11.95. Protect your diskettes using 
our Disk Library Box (F, low as $12.95), and 
Disk Drive Head Cleaning Kits (G, from 
$7.95). Provide protection against power 
surges with a Twin Outlet Power Protector 
(H, $18.95). 

Come in and see our complete line of com- 
puters and accessories. 



Send me a new 
1988 computer 
catalog. 

Mall To: Radio Shack 
Dept. 88-A-79A 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 



Address _ 
City 



Phone . 



Radio /hack 



Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating stores 
and dealers. Accessories shown with computer componenrs (not 
included). 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



HOW DO YOU PRESCRIBE A RAIHBOW? 

It's simple — Give a RAINBOW gift certificate . . . 



the rainbow is the perfect 
remedy for an ailing CoCo; let a 
gift subscription perk up your 
friends' tired old computers, the 
rainbow is the information 
source for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — more than 
200 pages loaded with as many 
as 24 programs, 15 regular col- 
umns and lots of helpful hints 
and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
safe at home. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate 
and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by Oc- 
tober 25 and we'll begin your 
friends' subscriptions with the 
December issue of rainbow. 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 



Name 



Address 
City 



_State 



ZIP 



From: 

Name 



Address 
City 



_State 



ZIP 



□ My payment is enclosed. 

Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Acct. # Exp. date 

Signature 

Mail to: Rainbow Gift Certificate 
The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

Subscriptions to THE RAINBOW are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate. U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



i 



J Graphic s 




By Archor Wright 



This program turns your initials into 3-D letters. To 
enter your initials, press the 1 key and type your first 
initial; you won't see it yet, so press the 1 key again 
for your first initial to appear. 

To enter your other initials, just press the 2 key, type in 
your second initial, then press 2 again. Finally, press 3, type 
in your third initial, and press 3 again. 




Now that you have three initials, jazzthem up by pressing 
the zero key. Then the program starts over. 

(Questions about this program may be addressed to the 
author at 1 1 12 N. Keene Road, Clearwater, FL 335 J 5. 
Please enclose an SASE for a written response.) □ 

Archor Wright is a junior at Clearwater High School in 
Florida. He enjoys science and art and is an amateur 
inventor. In the past, he was a volunteer computer counselor 
at the Clearwater Library and taught people of all ages how 
to use the CoCo. 



22 .. 
44 .. 
65 . . 
81... 
END 



.251 
. .76 
.158 
...6 
.138 



The listing: 3DLETTER 



ft 1 CREATED BY: ARCHOR WRIGHT 

1 PMODE4,l:PCLS:SCREENl, l:POKE17 
8,1: LINE (ft, ft) -(115, 45) , PSET , BF: D 
RAW"BM116, j3;S4ClD45E45" :POKE178 , 
1 : PAINT (12 ft , ft) , , 1 : POKE 17 8 , 2 : LINE 
(4,4) -(111,41) , PSET, BF: LINE (7, 7) 
- ( 1J38 , 3 8 ) , PRESET , BF : POKE17 8 , 3 : LI 
NE(9,8)-(107,37) ,PSET,B 

2 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$="j3"THENPAINT (1ft 
ft, 3ft) ,1,1:LINE()2),6J3)-(255,191) ,P 
SET, BF : LINE (255 , ft) - (17 ft , 6 ft) , PSET 
, BF: FORT=j3TO 2555 :NEXTT : RUN 

3 IFA$="l"THENGOSUB34 

4 IFA$="2 "THENGOSUB3 6 

5 IFA$="3"THENGOSUB38 

6 IFA$="A"THENGOSUB4^ 

7 IFA$="B ll THENGOSUB42 

8 IFA$="C"THENGOSUB44 

9 IFA$="D"THENGOSUB46 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 53 



NEW 



DISK 
DRIVES 



Starting at 




New Low Price! 




89 



95 



with case & 
Power Supply 
129.95 



TANDON MPI TEAC 

Speed 6ms tk to tk and up 
Capacity 250k unformatted 
Tracks 40 

Warranty HOW 1 Year 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!! 

ALL DRIVES FULLY TESTED AND WARRANTEED 

We carry only the finest quality disk drives 
no seconds *no surplus 



AO Tks 6Ms 
Double Sided 
Double Density 

40 or 80 Tracks 
V? Hght. Teac/Panasonic 




Free Software for Drive 0 Systems 



CoCo Checker...Test roms, rams, disk drives and & controller printer, keyboard cassette & more. 
Tape/Disk Utility... Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



169 



95 



Drive 0 



189 



95 



Drive 0 



289 



95 



Drive 0 & 1 



• Full Ht Drive 

• Single Case 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & manuals 



► Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

► Case holds 2 slim line drives 

► Heavy Duty Power Supply 

► 2 Drive Cable 

► Gold plated contacts 

► Controller & Manuals 



• 2 Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



Other Drive Specials 
119 



95 



2nd Drive 

for new Radio Shack 
includes: 

• Slim Line DS/DD Drive 

• Cabling & Instructions 

• Mounting Hardware 



Full Ht Drive 

Full Ht Drive Ps/Case 

Slim Line Drive 

Slim Line Drive Ps/Case. 
2 Slim Drives Ps/Case.... 
Disk Controller 



Drives cleaned, aligned & tested, 29 



95 



89 95 
129 95 

99 95 
139 95 
239 95 

59 95 



Single Ps & Case 

Dual '/ 2 ht Ps & Case 

Dual Full Ht. Ps & Case . 
Disk Controller 



10 Diskettes 

with free library case 



4495 

54 95 
79 95 
59 95 

995 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 
617-278-6555 




TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 



We welcome nmmtr^si 

• Visa/Mastercard EmESzI 

• Checks (allow 2 weeks for clearing) 
•C.O.D. Add $2. 



9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 

Hours: Mon.-Sat., 9-6 (EST) 



Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



Software Included 

• Pc-Write word processor 

• PoCalc Spreadsheet 

• Pc-File Database 

• Print Spooler 

• Ram Disk 

• Runs all popular software 



XT 

COMPATIBLE 



Complete 
system 



only 



699 



95 



Hardware Included 

• 4.77 mhz and 8mhz Turbo 

• 360k Floppy Disk Drive 

• Monochrome or Color Card 

• At style Case w/pwr light & key 

• Game, Printer and Serial Port 

• Real Time Clock 

• 150 watt power supply 

• 640k memory 

•At keyboard optional expanded 

• Monochrome Monitor 

• Optional Hard Disk Drive 



PRINTER CABLES AND 
INTERFACES AVAILABLE 
Call for current pricing 




NX10 (New 120CPS NLQ 80 col.) 

19995 

NX15 (New 120CPS NLQ 132 col.) 3499 5 
PANASONIC PRINTER 

10801 (New 120CPS NLQ 80 col.) 



17995 



Complete Packages 

10801 

22995 NX10 2599 5 

includes: includes: 

• Panasonic 10801 Printer • Star NX10 Printer 

• Interface • Interface 

• Screen Dump Program • Screen Dump Program 




Serial to Parallel Interface 
for Color Computer I, II, II 



► 300-19,200 BAUD rates only 
» External to printer — No AC plugs 
» Built in modem/printer switch — 

No need for Y-cables or plugging/ 

unplugging cables Power SU PP'V + 500 



54 



95 



64K Upgrades 


19* 


Video Driver 


29 95 


Enables your CoCo to operate 


with a video monitor 


instead of a television! 






TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 

9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 



IP 



Screen Dump Program 19 95 

The best screen dump program for the Epson & 
Star printers ever!' Have the option of standard 
images reverse w/regular or double sized pictures. 

Dealer Inquiries invited 
617-278-6555 

Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



10 IFA$="E ll THENGOSUB48 

11 IFA$="F"THENG0SUB5^ 

12 IFA$= m G;'THENGOSUB52 

13 IFA$="H"THENGOSUB54 

14 IFA$="I"THENGOSUB56 

15 IFA$="J"THENGOSUB58 

16 IFA$="K"THENGOSUB6)3 

17 IFA$="L"THENGOSUB62 

18 IFA$="M"THENGOSUB64 

19 IFA$="N"THENGOSUB66 
2J3 IFA$="0"THENGOSUB68 

21 IFA$="P"THENG0SUB7J3 

22 IFA$="Q"THENGOSUB72 

23 IFA$="R"THENGOSUB74 

24 IFA$="S"THENGOSUB76 

25 IFA$="T"THENGOSUB78 

26 IFA$="U"THENG0SUB8J3 

27 IFA$="V"THENGOSUB82 

28 IFA$="W"THENGOSUB84 

29 IFA$="X"THENGOSUB8 6 
3j3 IFA$="Y"THENGOSUB88 

31 IFA$="Z"THENG0SUB9^ 

32 LINE(H, 19) - (H, 19) ,PRESET:DRAW 
"CI" 

33 G0T02 

34 H=12 : DRAW"S15" : DRAW C$ 

35 RETURN 

36 H=42:DRAW"S15":DRAW C$ 

37 RETURN 

38 H=74:DRAW"S15":DRAW C$ 

39 RETURN 

4)3 C$="R5D4L2U2L1BU1R1L1BD1D2E1G 
1L2U4E2R5G2E2D4G2 

41 RETURN 

42 C$="R5D2L1BL1BU1L1R1BD2L1R1BU 
1BR1R1D2L5U4E2R5G2E2D4G2 

43 RETURN 

44 C$="BR1G1E1R4D1L3D2R3D1L4H1U2 
E3R4G2E2D1G2BG2BL1E2BR1R2G2E2D1G 
2 

45 RETURN 

46 C$="BD1R4F1D2L3BU1R1U1L1D1BD1 
L2U3R4E2F1G2E2D2G2E2U2H1L4G2 

47 RETURN 

48 C$="BR1R4D1L3D1E1G1R3D1L3D1E1 
G1R3D1L4U4E2R4G2E2D1G2E2BD1L1R1G 
2E2D1G2E2BD1L1R1G2E2D1G2 

49 RETURN 

5j3 C$="R5D1L3D1E1G1R3D1L3D2E2G2L 
2U4E2R5G2E2D1G2E2BD1L1R1G2E2D1G2 

51 RETURN 

52 C$="R5D1L4D2R3H1R2D2L5U4R5L5E 
2R5G2E2D1G2L4D2E2G2BR2BU1E1G1BR2 
E2L1R1D2G2 

53 RETURN 

54 C$="BR1U1R1D2R2U2R1D5L1U2L2D2 
L1U5E1R1G1E1D2G1E1R1U1E1R1G1E1D5 
G1BL3E2 



55 RETURN 

56 C$="BR2R2D4L2U4E2R2G2E2D4G2 

57 RETURN 

58 C$="BR4R1D4L3U2E2R1L1G2R1E1G1 
D1R1U3R1L1E2R1G2E2D4G2 

59 RETURN 

6)3 C$="E2R2D1U1G2L2R2D1E3R2G2L2R 
2G2F2E2H2F2G2L2H1D1L2U4 

61 RETURN 

62 C$="BR1E2R1G2L1R1D3E2U3D3R3L3 
G2R3E2D1G2U1D1L4U4R1 

63 RETURN 

64 C$="BR1R1F1E1R1D4L1U3G1H1D3E2 
G2L1U4E2R1G2E2F1G1E2R1G2E2D4G2 

65 RETURN 

66 C$="BR.lR.l.F2U2RlD4r,lH2D2ElGlLl 
U4E2R1G2E2F1E1G2E2R1G2E2D4G2 

67 RETURN 

68 C$="BR1R4D4L2BU1R1U2L2D2E2G2R 
1BD1L2U4E2R4G2E2D4G2 

69 RETURN 

7J3 C$="BR1R4D2L2BU1L1R1BD1L1D2L2 
U4R5L5E2R5G2E2D2G2L1G2 

71 RETURN 

72 C$="BR1R4D3H1F2E2H1F1G2D1E2U1 
D1G2H2U2L2D2E2G2R2F1L4U4R4L4E2R4 
G2E2D4G2 

73 RETURN 

74 C$="BR1BD1BR1R1L1BL1BU1E2R3G2 
L3R3D2E2U2D2G2L1F2E2H1U1D1F1G2L2 
H2D2E1G1L1U4R1L1 

75 RETURN 

76 C$="BR1BU1R4D1L3D1E1G1R3E1L1R 
1D3G1U3D3L4U1E1G1R3U1L3U3E1R4G1E 
1D1G1 

77 RETURN 

78 C$="R5D1L2D3E2U1D1G2L1U3L2U1E 
2R5G2E2D1G2E2 

79 RETURN 

8J3 C$="BR1R1D3E1G1R1U3E2R1D4G2E2 
U4G2L1R1D4L3U4E2R1G2E2D1 

81 RETURN 

82 C$="BR1BD1R1F2E4R1D1G4L1R1E4U 
1G2L1R1G3H3E2R1G2E2F2 

83 RETURN 

84 C$="R1D2R1U1E1R1L1G1R1E1G1D1R 
1U2E2R1G2L1R1D4E2U4D4G2L2U1D1L2U 
4E2R1G2E2D2 

85 RETURN 

86 C$="R2F1E1R2G2F2E2H2F2G2L2H1G 
1L2E2H2E2R2G2E2F1E1G2E2R2G2 

87 RETURN 

88 C$="BR1R1F2E2R1G2D2E2U2D2G2L2 
U2H2E2R1G2E2F2E2R1G2 

89 RETURN 

9J3 C$="BD1R5G2R3E2L3R3D1G2E2U1G2 
D1L5E2L3U1E2R5G2 

91 RETURN ^ 



56 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



c «'or Computer 



Enha ncemen 
for Productivity 
,ron "*J«. Product, 





r 



P-tXa7e r Kr^H JLfafni)yof 

MODELS ofZ ScT ,0r ^ 
Including Coco 3 Com Putor, 



The HJL-S7 

«»V«»oer d K f ,. $59 . 9s/(!g95 

PTOv 1( j es (he smX^K HJL ' 57 keyboard 

w "h minimum inmu I "^"""n speed 
Vour color comS f - s ' 'stalls 
^ t s « «59.9S toTortjK™ BoWe "no. 



numbers, jf has 3 n ti, 

Except some CorS I r 8 °Wwlno 
v 'deo ch/psj Here ° of W " h s °'<W in 

VouVe come ioVxmc '^'"'V 

ex Pect from HJL Products, 

The Monitor. S99 . 85 
<=om piJtef pros S nr ® red by mos ' 



,ns e" a si mp 7 e D ^,' n,ers manually 0 ° 
<° b * Printed foK^e the »e° 
s °»d-stat e sw Z£l ' V ' automatic, all 

operating Instructions 
The HJL Warranty 

^ a Pair and save l 5 y 
,h » 5 ad wnen you 0 *er a JuSt me ™0 



Q^Ba alcP(lJa . Sl99s 

26 one-touch < function keys 

defined macros a j 5 , Stafemer "s. 10 °se' r 
S *S of maeSe as you r f 'f aVe as ™nT 
"umbering, instant ^ ^ aiJto "ne- 
0f| n'er, andgX, Cre ?. n dum P lo 
software idea in? , arch - ma ke this 
Spec,f y d is d f 0 '/ c ^ e VaAS,Cp roQ h ^ 



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-___J Pec '^fs k orcass; ) ; ie 

° f aj- New Yotfi afaie 



Oiv. Of TourW„ t 



A Desktop Publisher 
on a Shoestring 




58 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



CoCo1,2or 3 32K Disk 



L n.-.. 




October 1987 THE RA/NBOW 59 



Desktop publishing is riding the 
crest of popularity in business 
computing. It is also widely 
appealing to the individual who would 
like to produce attractive newsletters, 
schedules, greeting cards, pamphlets, 
ads, and so on. Unfortunately, desktop 
publishing is too costly for the typical 
CoCo owner. 

The great popularity and expense of 
desktop publishing provided the inspi- 
ration for the development of the shoe- 
string desktop publisher presented in 
this article. The requirements for using 
the publisher are a CoCo 1, 2 or 3, 
Extended Color BASIC, 32K RAM, a 
disk system and a dot matrix printer. 

The main program comprising the 
desktop publisher has two versions — 
one for CoCos 1 and 2 and the other for 
the CoCo 3. The CoCo 1 and 2 version 
is called Desktop Low (for low resolu- 
tion) and is shown in Listing 1. The 
CoCo 3 version, Desktop High, is 
presented in Listing 2. Listings 3 and 4, 
GENF0NT1 and GENF0NT2 generate two 
data files called F0NT1 and FDNT2, and 
are necessary for the running of either 
Desktop Low or Desktop High. Each of 
the DATA files is a fancy font for 84 of 
the CoCo's character keys. Henceforth, 
Desktop Low and Desktop High will be 
referred to as DL and DH, respectively. 

DL and DH have been designed to 
work witheight other fonts. The details 
on how you can obtain the additional 
fonts aregiven at the conclusion of this 
article. 

Type and save Listing 3 first. Then 
run it to obtain the F0NT1 file necessary 
for the proper execution of DL or DH. 
Next, type and save DL or DH depend- 
ing on which CoCo you are using. After 
you get DL or DH working properly, 
type, save and run the program of 

H. Allen Curtis lives in Williamsburg, 
Virginia. He is interested in 17th and 
1 8th Century history and enjoys biking 
through the colonial Capital. He balan- 
ces past and present with his computer 
work. 



FONT SELECT 
INPUT 
KEYS LISTED 
MARGIN SET 
OUTPUT 

RESOLUTION CHANGE 
SCREEN SWITCH 
ThB SET 
U0R1WRAP SET 
Ecu T IESKTQP 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllll 



if 1 1M I E llj^ 1 PI j M 

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A AM A A 



m rr\ i-ri *-r^» 

L\A L\A L\Jl L\-l L\Jj 

''ZCJF "3_._F- <§Cj^ ^_!_F- ^L-JP 

■liiiiii'ii'iiiiiiiiiiii-' 




Figure 3: Border design options 



I VERTICAL STRIPES 

2; HORIZONTAL STRIPES 

3- CONCENTRIC SQUARES 

4: HEART 

5: KM AS TREE 

6 DIAMINES * TRIANGLE 

?: COCO CAT 

8 BELL 

9 : VERTICAL BAP 



Listing 4 to make a second font choice 
available for your use. Note: If you have 
a CoCo 3, augment each of the listings 
3 and 4 by inserting WIDTH32: before 
CLS in Line 0. 

Each of the programs is easy to learn 
because of its menus and information 
list. For DLor D//,youmust remember 
that when in doubt, press the CLEAR key 
or the function key F2, respectively. In 
their respective programs, these keys 
summon the main menu to the screen 
(see Figure 1). Via the main menu, you 
can gain access to other menus and the 
information list, as well as carry out DL 
or DH commands and return to the 
graphics screen. 

On the graphics screen, you can 
compose documents. DLor DH acts as 
a rudimentary screen editor. An infor- 
mation list accessible through the main 
menu describes the keys needed for 



RIGHT ARROU M#VE CURSOR RICHT 

LEFT hRROU EACKSPhCE 

UP ARROW CAPRI AGE RETURN * 

MOVE UP 1 LIME 
DOWN ARROU TAB 

SH FT PICHT ARROU 1PAU DESIGN 
SH F T LEFT ARROU CLEAR LINE 
SH FT DOWN ARRIU: UNDERLINE 
SH FT CLEAR CLEAR SCREEN 
ENTER CARRIAGE RETURN i 



? H T F T 



MOVE DO UN 1 LINE 
y UP PER/ LOWER CASE 



£ R h C r TO RETURN TO MENU 



Figure 1 



Figure 2 



cursor control in working your way 
around the screen (see Figure 2). DL or 
DH commands on the main menu are 
also available to set top, left and right 
margins of the screen, to set tabs, and 
to enable or inhibit word wrap. Word 
wrap is the automatic erasing of an 
incomplete word from the very end of 
one line and rewriting it at the very 
beginning of the next line. The spacing 
between characters and at the begin- 
nings of lines is better in DL than in DH 
due to idiosyncracies of the CoCo 3's 
HGET, HPUT and HBUFF commands. 

Usually, the CoCo's garbage collec- 
tion routines, used period ically to clean 
out memory space for strings to be 
stored, have a decided slowing effect on 
allowed typing rates. Programming has 
been incorporated in DL and DH to 
minimize these effects. Also, high-speed 
pokes have been included f or additional 
typing rate increases. If your CoCo 1 or 
2 does not support the high-speed poke, 
omit PDKE&HFFD7,0 from Line 340 of 
Listing 1. 

Besides being able to type with a 
variety of fonts, you can further dress 
up your documents with border designs 
(see Figure 3), which are drawn by 
means of a key whose associated design 
is selected from the DL or DH main 
menu. The default design (the design 
available before you make a selection) 
is the face of CoCo Cat. He was given 



60 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



XTEAM 
OS -9 



XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program. 

• Menu oriented ■ Definable macro keys 

• Upload/download. Ascii • Works with standard serial port, RS232 

or XMODEM protocol PAK, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers. 

• Execute OS-9 commands • Works with standard screen. XSCREEN, 
from within XTERM WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board. 

$49.95 with source $89.95 



XDIR & 


XCAL 


Hierarchial directory 


OS-9 calculator 


• Full sorting 


• Decimal, Hex, Binary 


• Complete pattern matching 


• +, -, * /, AND.OR, XOR, NOT 


$24.95 


with source $49.95 



XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 
$34.95 with source $54.95 



HARDWARE 




512k memory upgrade 


$80.00 


Printers 




Citizen 120D 


CALL 


Star NP10 


CALL 



BOTH 
WINNERS i 



£ All of out OS * prddutnV 
\ work with: v 
> vtrsFon 1 » 

OS-* version 2 V- 
OS 3 Lev«t 1 $ 
y 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

• Works with standaid text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

• Tiue character oriented f uLl screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

• Execute OS-9 commands from within 
» Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
overstrike, underline, super/sub-scripts 

• 10 header/footers 

• Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

• Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source $4 9. 9 5 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 with XWORD/XMERGE sourc«1 9 9.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 



FOR RS DOS ... 



SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING 

This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
also contains the flexibility for the accounting ori- 
ented user to set up a double entry journal with an 
almost unlimited chart of accounts. Includes Sales 
Entry, transaction driven Accounts Receivable and 
Accounts Payable, Journal Enry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check Reg- 
ister, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and a 
Journal Posting list. $79 95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory control, 
with user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis ofihe business' sales and the sales force. One 
may enter/update inventory data, enter sales, run five 
sales analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter /update salesman records, and 
update the SB AP inventory. $59.95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up to 200 hourly and salaried employees 
with 8 deductions each. Calculates payroll and tax 
amounts, prints checks and maintains year-to-date 
totals which can be automatically transferred to the 
SBA package. Computes each pay period's totals 
for straight time, overtime and bonus pay and det- 
ermines taxes to be withheld. Additional outputs 
include mailing list, listing of employees, year-to- 
date federal and/or state lax listing, and a listing of 
current misc. deductions. Suited for use in all states 
except Oklahoma and Delaware. $59.95 



PERSONAL BOOKEEPING 2000 

Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense categories. 
Menu driven and user friendly. $39.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history reports 
for each customer, prepares invoices and monthly 
statements, mailing labels, aging lists, and an alpha- 
betized customer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance cha rges 
for revolving accounts. This package functions as a 
standalone A/R system or integrates with the Small 
Business Accounting package. $59 95 



ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor and A/P 
invoice files. The system prints checks, voids 
checks, cancels checks, deletes cancelled checks, 
and deletes paid A/P invoices. The user can run a 
Vendor List, Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged 
report, and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used cither as a standalone A/P system or 
can be integrated with the Small Business 
A c counting Package. $ 5 9 95 



MICROTECH 
CONSULTANTS 
.INC. 



1906 Jerrold Avenue 



St. Paul, TVfN 

DeuUr tmjuints In *ii*d 
A miliar Submissions acitpttd 



55112 



|MiiLcrC*nJ 



Ordering Information 

Add S3.00 shipping & handling, MN nssideiis add (>% sales U*. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $2.50), personal checks. 



(612) 633-6161 



this honor in appreciation of the mot- 
ivation he inspired in the development 
of CoCo 3 screen mode switching (see 
"Our Highfalutin' Feline Does a CoCo 
3 Fandango," on Page 52, May 1987 
issue of THE RAINBOW), which was 
crucial in the formulation of DH. 

DH permits the use of a Mode 1 or 
Mode 3 screen as well as switching back 
and forth f rom these two modes. Mode 
switching allows you to incorporate the 
large size print and / or border designs of 
Mode 1 into a Mode 3 screen document 
with its smaller print and design sizes. 
The smaller print and designs of Mode 
3, when switched to Mode 1, undergo 
deformation. Fortunately, they regain 
their pleasing shapes when a switch is 
made back to Mode 3. 

DL employs a PNODE 4 graphics 
screen only. However, you are given a 
choice of either of the available two- 
color sets of PNDDE 4. Furthermore, you 
may swap foreground and background 
colors, but for proper operation you 
must clear the screen just before or after 
making the swap. DH allows color 
swapping, too, and you needn't accom- 
pany the swap with a screen clear. 

Both DL and DH provide facilities 
for saving and loading screens as disk 
files. In both saving and loading, you 
must furnish (when prompted) a file- 
name without an extension. In loading, 
the filename must necessarily be that of 
a file on the disk in the default drive. 
The loaded screen may be one that you 
composed using DL or DH or a graph- 
ics screen derived by the employment of 
some other program. In the case of a 
PNDDE 4 screen from another program, 
it must have been recorded from the 
video page whose starting and ending 
addresses are 3584 and 9727, respec- 
tively The use of screens from other 
programs in DL and DH permits 
greater versatility in blending graphics 
and text in your documents. 

The D//save and load routines were 
patterned after the HI5RVE and HILDRD 
routines developed by Richard Esposito 
in his "Doctor ASCII" column (Janu- 
ary 1987 issue of the rainbow), hi- 
5 FIVE and HILDRD were designed to 
work in short programs and long pro- 
grams but not in medium-sized pro- 
grams where string location informa- 
tion resides in the memory area from 
hexadecimal addresses 4000 to 5FFF. 
DH is a program of the latter class. Its 
save and load routines were adjusted to 
work properly by the use of "dummy" 
filenames during the actual loading and 
saving processes (when the true file- 
name string is lost) and then renaming 



the files to their true filenames after the 
string information is once more avail- 
able. This means that when saving a 
screen, you must not choose a filename 
of a file already on disk. Otherwise, the 
RENRNE command will induce an AE 
Error. 



"You can work on 

two Mode 1 or 
Mode 3 screens and 

switch back and 
forth between them" 




There is one command noticeably 
lacking in both DL and DH — a line 
print command. To obtain a hard copy 
of a screen, you must terminate DL or 
DH with an exit command, load an 
appropriate screen dump and run it. If 
you have a CoCo 1 or 2 but no screen 
dump program for your particular 
printer, refer to back issues of THE 
RAINBOW (see Richard Lack's "Get the 
Picture With Gemini Screen Print" 
[May 1985, Page 45] and Mark Sullins' 
"Picprt: Good Things Come in All 
Sizes" [May 1986, Page 72] ) to remedy 
the situation. If you have a CoCo 3 and 
a dot matrix printer 1 recommend that 
you use one of the three programs listed 
in this month's "Screen Dump Extraor- 
dinaire" beginning on Page 30. If you 
are using a printer capable of printing 
a column of eight dots at each print 
position as the print head moves across 
the page, the program called 5CRNDNP 
shown in Listing 1 may be used. 

There is one innovation included in 
DH worth pointing out for its applic- 
ability in other programs. The employ- 
ment of the innovation doubles the 
amount of screen memory usable for 
Mode 1 and Mode 3. The high resolu- 
tion graphics screen is located in 32K 
bytes of memory from Hex address 
60000 through 67FFF. Each of the 
Mode I and Mode 3 screens uses only 
the first 16K bytes of this memory area. 
Line 1 of DH installs a short machine 
language routine that interchanges the 
contents of the first and last 16K bytes 
of the screen memory area. You can call 



for the screen interchange in DH by 
making use of the main menu command 
5 (screen switch). Thus, you can work 
on two Mode 1 or Mode 3 screens and 
switch back and forth between them. 
Two such screens correspond to one 
full, 8/2-by-Il, printed page when 
5CRNDNP controls the printing. One 
word of caution: Use of the SHIFT- 
CLEAR key combination will clear all 
32K bytes of the screen memory. 

5CRNDNP was originally designed to 
handle only the screen at the first I6K 
bytes of the screen memory area. The 
following changes in 5CRNDNP allow it 
to print each of the two screens in 
succession. 

Change Line 35 to: 

35 POKEX+145,22:POKEX+146,0: 
POKEX+147,152:Q$="30BDFF2 
7ECB4C1712G0BC30202EDQ41G 
FF11830202ED8417FEED8G0D1 
GFF4fi":FORI=0T030:T$=LEFT$ 
(05,2) :PDKEX+I+300,VRL 
( "&H"+T$ ) :Q$=RIGHT$(Q$, 
LEN(Q$)-2) : NEXT 

Change Line 370 to: 

370 'SfiVEN"SCRNDNP2",&H1200 
,&H13 4R,X + 73 

Editor's Note: The font menu (see 
Figure 4) of DL or DH provides small 
samples of each of 10 different fonts. 
However, due to space limitations, only 
the files which generate fonts I and 2 are 
listed in the magazine, therefore, you 
will only be able to choose between 
fonts I and 2. Selection of any other 
font or pressing a non-number key will 
result in a beep sound and a return to 
the graphics screen. 









2: F«nt 












5 : Font 




6: Font 




7: For it 
8: Tout 




9: |ront 


Figure 4 


The additional eight font files, FDNT3 



through F0NT9 and FDNT0, may be 
obtained by ordering them from H. 
Allen Curtis at 172 Dennis Drive, 
Williamsburg, V A 23 185. The complete 
cost of the disk containing eight font 
files is $6.50. Please include payment by 
check or money order. □ 



62 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



\0r 60 110 445 74 

115 130 510 59 

195 102 550 115 

250 175 600 16 

350 47 END 65 

390 148 

I — 

Listing 1: DESKTDPL 

0 CLS:PRINT§201, "DESKTOP LOW" : PR 
INT@262,"BY H. ALLEN CURTIS" : PRI 
NT § 2 9 6 , " COPYRIGHT 1987": FORI=j3TO 
500 : NEXT 

5 CLEAR5j3j3j3:W=2 56 

10 K$=K$+"C" :A1=PEEK(VARPTR(K$)+ 
2) :A2=PEEK(VARPTR(K$) +3) :IFA2<2T 
HENA2=254 : A1=A1-1 : GOT02 5ELSEA2=A 
2-2 :GOT02 5GOT025 

15 GOSUB4 40 : CLS : PRINT@ 200 , 11 FILEN 
AME : " ; : LINEINPUTF$ : SAVEMF$+"/LR 
", &HE0J3, &H2 6j3j3,&HAC73 : RETURN 
20 GOSUB44j3:CLS:PRINT@2j3j3, "FILEN 
AME : " ; : LINEINPUTF$ : LO ADMF $ + 11 / LR 
" : RETURN 

25 L2=1:P=176:D=15:S=8:DIMF$(84) 
,M(84) ,R(500) ,S(100) ,F(500) ,G(20 



0) :GOSUB565:F$(j3)=D$(7) :M(j3)=D(7 

) : PMODE4 : PCLS1 : COLORS , 1 : C2=l 

20 GET(J3,0)-(1,D) ,S 

35 GET (18,2j3)-(113,17j3) ,R,G: GET ( 

18,20) -(113, 170) , F,G:K$="l":GOTO 

310 

40 PCLS:T=V:L=U 

45 IF(Q=j3 OR Z=U) AND L+4>W-1THE 

NL=U:IFT<P THENT=T+D+1 

50 IFQ=1 AND ZOU AND L+4>W-1THE 

NGOSUB175 

55 GET (L,T) - (L+l , T+D) , S : LINE (L,T 

)- (L+l, T+D) ,PSET,BF 

60 POKE&H2 3,Al:POKE&H24,A2 

65 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN65 

70 K=ASC(K$) : IFK>64 AND K<9 1THEN 

N=K-64:B=N:LINE(L,T) -(L+l, T+D) ,P 

RESET, BF: GOTO 160 

75 IFK>96 AND K<123THENN=K-9 6 : B= 
N+2 6:LINE (L, T) - (L+l, T+D) , PRESET, 
BF:GOT016j3 

80 IFK>47 AND K<58THENN=K-47 : B=N 
+52:LINE(L,T) - (L+l, T+D) , PRESET, B 
F-.GOT016J3 

85 IFK>32 AND K<4 8THENN=K-32 : B=N 
+62 : LINE (L,T) -(L+l, T+D) , PRESET, B 
F:GOT016j3 



i'UNOOO S'l/VTFMV 




An exciting new arcade game by Glen Dahlgren. This is the long-awaited response to the 
huge demand for a Kung-Fu program for the Coco. The graphics and sound effects are 
spectacular. The action and animation will please even the most die-hard arcade en- 
thusiast. Destroy your opponents and evade obstacles with over ten different moves as you 
grow ever closer to your ultimate objective. This is the BEST karate game ever available for 
the color computer. Req. 64K, disk drive, and Joystick. Introductory price: only $24.95. 




WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY. Enter the oge of monsters, 
magic, and adventure. Here you will seorch for the 
legendary power of White Fire throughout the Forbid- 
den Wood and dark caverns of the Mount. The Rainbow 
review of 12/86 says, "Visually, White Fire is quite an 
achievement. The graphics are excellent!" Discover 
what adventuring an the Coco is all about. Req. 64K and 
disk drive. Only $19.95. 



CHAMPION. Become a superhero in your fight to rid the 
world of the evil forces of Mr. Bigg in this action adven- 
ture. The combat is hot and heovy and requires a fast 
joystick. The graphics and sound effects are sensationai. 
"This Is a fascinating game and a difficult one to master. 
You'll get a blast out of (Champion)l" says the Rainbow 
review of 5/87. Defend the innocent and defeat the 
villainous; be a true Champion! Req. MK, disk drive, and 
joystick. Only $19.95 




All programs Coco I 2, 3 compatible. 





systems 



Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 

Personal checks, money orders, and C.O.D. orders 
accepted 



Include $2.50 for S/H. $2.00 
extra for C.O.D. orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax. 
Authorship and dealer inquiries 
welcome. 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 63 



90 IFK>57 AND K<65THENN=K-57 : B=N 
+77 : LINE (L,T) -(L+l, T+D) PRESET, B 
F: GOTO 160 

95 IFK=3 2THENZ=L+S:IFL+8<W THENL 
INE (L, T) - (L+7 , T+D) , PRESET , BF : L=L 
+S : GOT045ELSELINE (L, T) - (L+l , T+D) 
, PRESET , BF : L=U : T=T+1+D : GOT045 
100 IFK=13THENPUT (L, T) - (L+l , T+D) 
, S : L=U 

1J35 IFK=13 AND T<P THENT=T+1+D : G 
OT045 

llj3 IFK=8 AND L> 1THENLINE (L, T) - ( 
L+l, T+D) , PRESET, BF:L=L-2 :GOT045 
115 IFK=93THENB=0 : LINE (L,T) -(L+l 
,T+D) , PRESET, BF: GOTO 1 6 0 
12 0 IFK=94THENPUT (L, T) - ( L+l , T+D) 
,S:L=U:IFT>D THENT=T-l-D:GOT045 
125 IFK=91THENZ=U:PUT(L,T) -(L+l, 
T+D) , S : DRAW"BM"+STR$ (L) +" , "+STR$ 
(T+l+INT ( . 75*D) ) +"R3" : L=L+4 : IFL> 
W-5THENL=L-4 

13j3 IFK=9 AND L+4<W THENPUT (L, T) 
-(L+l, T+D) ,S:L=L+4:GOT045 
135 IFK=92THEN4j3 

14j3 IFK=12THENPUT (L, T) - (L+l , T+D) 
,S:GOTO200 

145 IFK=lj3THENPUT(L,T) -(L+l, T+D) 
,S:IFT3=j3THENT3=l:L=Tl ELSEIFT3= 
1THENT3=0 : L=T2 

15j3 IFK=21THENPUT(U,T) - (W-1,T+D) 

,R,PSET:L=U:GOT045 

155 GOT045 

160 IFL+M(B)<W THENGOSUB195:L=L+ 
2+M ( B ) : I FL> W- 1THENL2 =L-W+ 1 : L=W- 1 
:GOT045ELSE45 

165 IFQ=j3 OR Z=U THENL=U : IFT<P T 

HENT=T+D+1 : GOT07j3ELSE7j3 

17 0 GOSUB17 5:GOT07j3 

175 Z1=2*INT(.5*Z) :Z=Z1 

180 GET (Z,T)-(L,T+D) ,G,G: PUT ( Z , T 

) - ( L, T+D) , R , PSET : L1=L-Z : L=U : Z=U : 

IFT<P THENT=T+D+1 

185 IFL+Ll<0THENLl=Ll+2 :GOT0185 
190 PUT(L,T) -(L+L1,T+D) ,G,PSET:L 
=L+L1+L2 : L=2 *INT ( . 5*L+ . 5 ) : L2=j3 : R 
ETURN 

195 DRAW"BM"+STR$ (L) +" , "+STR$ (T) 
+F$ (B) : RETURN 

200 CLS:PRINT@4j3, 11 B: BACK TO SCR 
EEN":PRINT@72, "C: COLOR SWAP": PR 
INT@lj34,"D: DESIGN SELECT" : PRINT 
@13 6,"F: FONT SELECT" : PRINT@168 , 
"I: INPUT" :PRINT@2j3j3, "K: KEYS LI 
STED" : PRINT@2 32 , "M: MARGIN SPECI 
FY" : PRINT@264 , "O : OUTPUT 
2j35 PRINT@296, "S: SWITCH COLOR S 
ET":PRINT@328,"T: TAB SET": PRINT 
@36j3,"W: WORDWRAP SET" : PRINT§392 



,"X: EXIT DESKTOP" : POKE &H2 3, Al:P 

OKE&24, A2 :POKE&HFFD6,j3 

21j3 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN21j3 

215 IFK$="D" OR K$="d"THENGOSUB6 

15:GOT02j3j3 

22j3 IFK$="F" OR K$="f "THEN285 
225 IFK$="C" OR K$="c"THENC3=C2 : 
C2=C1 : C1=C3 : COLORC1 , C2 : GOT02j3j3 
23j3 IFK$="I" OR K$="i"THENGOSUB2 
j3:GOT02j3j3 

235 IFK$="K" OR K$="k"THENGOSUB5 
4j3:GOT02j3j3 

240 IFK$="0" OR K$="o"THENGOSUBl 
5:GOT02j3j3 

245 IFK$="M" OR K$="m"THENGOSUB4 
55:GOT02j3j3 

250 IFK$="B" OR K$="b"THEN280 
255 IFK$="T" OR K$="t"THENGOSUB5 
25:GOTO200 

26j3 IFK$="X" OR K$="x"THENEND 
265 IFK$="S" OR K$="s"THENC=ABS ( 
C-l) :GOT02j3j3 

270 IFK$="W" OR K$="w"THENGOSUB5 
j3j3:GOT02j3j3 

275 SOUND6j3,5:SOUND6j3,3:GOT02j3j3 
280 SCREENl,C:GOT034j3 
285 GOSUB345 

290 POKE&H2 3,Al:POKE&H24, A2 
295 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" " THEN295 
300 IFK$<"1" OR K$>"2" THENSOUND 
6j3,lj3:GOT0295 
3j35 GOSUB440 
310 GOSUB450 

315 OPEN"I" , #1, "FONT"+K$ 

32J3 F0RI=1T084:LINEINPUT#1,F$ (I) 

:NEXT 

325 F0RI=1T08 4 : INPUT# 1 , M ( I ) : NEXT 
33j3 INPUT#l,D,S:CLOSE#l 
335 PUT (18, 20)- (113, 170) ,F, PSET 
34J3 SCREEN1,C:G0SUB495:GET(L,T) - 
(L+l, T+D) ,S:POKE&HFFD7,j3:GOT045 
345 SCREEN1,C:GET(18,20)-(113,17 
0) ,F,G:PUT(18,2j3)-(113,17j3) ,R,PS 
ET : DRAW" BM2 5 , 2 8NGD6NL2RNR2U6BM3 2 
, 29RDLBD3RDL 

35j3 DRAWBM50, 24G3ERE2R4GNL3G4D5 
EU4BR2D5G4UH2LG2ER3FERE2URUE2NFG 
2U4E4F2DH2DFBM64 , 29G2ND4LD4NHFRE 
2NU5RU4FBM72 , 29G2RD4NHFNEU4NU2E3 
ND6FNFD6E2BM83 , 25G3LR3NR2NUD8NE2 
H2RU5 

355 DRAW"BM24 , 43NGNDR3ND2FDGL2NG 

2DG2R5ULBM32 , 44RDLBD3RDL 

36J3 DRAWBM49 , 43R6NDNGL5D3NR3D3N 

LR2HU4BM59 , 45ND3GD2FR3NU3EU2HL2B 

M66 , 45D4RU4R3D4RU3BM76 , 43ND5G2NR 

4FD2FRE 

365 DRAW"BM24 , 62NGNDR3ND5FDGNL2F 



64 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 




IRON CROSS 

War in Russia 

by John & Michael Galus 



***** 



The German invasion of Russia 
began at 0300 on 22 June 1941. 
iw^ tW ^ Two massive armies faced each 

^^s*** ° ther in a titan/c stru gg ,e wn,ch 



to*** 



, would decide World War II. The 



object of IRON CROSS is to 
defeat the Russian forces con- 
trolled by the computer & to 
take control of the Russian cities. 



Requires 64K, Ext. Basic, Disk. S24.95 



Color Max 3 




Now 320 x 200 screen resolution & a choice of 
16 of the 64 colors are available on your CoCo ^ 
3, Painting is a snap with its easy to use icons, 
pull down menus, & dialog boxes. Color Max 3 has 1 1 fonts mak- 
ing hundreds of lettering styles possible. Please specify printer type 
when ordering. 

Req. 128K, disk, hl-res Joystick Interface S57.50 



Colorbowl Football 

by David Klncald 



Choose from a variety of plays on 
offense & defense like screens, 
sweeps, bombs, & slants. You con- 
trol the quarterback or roving 
safety w/ joystick. 

Req. 32K, RSDOS, & joystick 
Cass S24.95 Disk S27.95 



Pro Golf 

by John Sandberg 

Tee off into a challenging com- 
puter simulation of 36 holes of 
realistic golf plus practice sessions 
with the putting green & driving 
rangel 

Req. 32K, RSDOS, Ext. BASIC, 
joystick & Disk S 29.95 



l — OS-9 Tools 






Screen Star 

by Scott Cablt 



This excellent screen editor implements the popular WordStar edit- 
ing capabilities on OS-9 & includes a unique Speller. Move, copy, 
or delete blocks of text with one keystroke. Powerful cursor com- 
mands allow fast, easy movement throughout the file. The find/ 
replace command makes mass changes & searches a snap. Set tabs, 
toggle the video, access the OS-9 shell & define up to 10 function 
keys for fast repetitive functions. And it will edit files larger than 
memory tool Easy interface with Computerware's Text Format- 
ter makes an exquisite word processing package! 



Requires OS-9 
With Text Formatter 



$49.95 
S74.95 



OS-9 Text Formatter 

The OS-9 Text Formatter turns text files into beautifully printed 
documents. It supports right & left justification, automatic pagi- 
nation, headers & footers, macros, tabs, page numbering, auto 
date insert, ESC & CTL codes for printer directives & more. It inter- 
faces with any editor that produces standard ASCII text files like 
Computerware's Screen Star & Radio Shack's TS Edit. Why just print 
it when you can format it?! 



Requires OS-9 



S34.95 



coming soon . . . 

Computerware's new fall catalog! 
Call or write for your copy today! 



Call or Write to: 




Item 



Format 



Price 



QOMPUTERWARE |6W|««-»« 

~^T r Box 668 • Enclnltas, CA • 92024 



Name 

Address . 
City 



Yes! Send me your FREE catalog! 

VISA MasterCard 

Card # 



. State . 



CoCo □ 

Exp. . 



Signature , 



Shipping 

Surface — s2 minimum. 

2% for orders over S 100 
Air or Canada — $5 minimum. 

5% for orders over $100 
Checks are delayed for bank clearance 



6% Calif. Sales Tax . 
CODAddSS. 
Shipping* „ 
TOTAL . 



DGL3ULBM32 , 63RDLBD3RDL 
3 70 DRAWBM50, 56R5BR2DNLNRDRNRDR 
E2BL7 L5DLNGBR5G2ND8GD8BDBL2L2DR2 
DFNDRURE2U9NE3RD3ND4REFBM64 , 61G2 
ND6LD5LF2RE2NU7RU6FBM7 2 , 61NG2D3E 

3 DRFLD7 NE2 HNU 6 BL2 GNU5 LNHU7 BM8 3 , 5 
7G2RD11NE2H2RU8L2R5 

375 DRAWBM2 6 , 81G3DE4D6NLRNRU2NR 

NL4U4BM3 2 , 8 2RDLBD3RDL 

380 DRAW"BM46,78R11D2RHL2BL6D6R3 

D2ENRHL3D6GU13LBM62 , 82G3D2F3R5E3 

U2H3L4G3D2F3R3E3U2H2BM72 , 82R3GNL 

D7RU5NU2E3R2DRD7LNUE2U4BM88,80DL 

GR7NR5G5UNE2FDRDRDR4E2 

385 DRAW"BM23 , 98NR5D2EDR3ND3 FD2G 

L3ULBM32 , 99RDLBD3RDL 

39JZ5 DRAWBM4 8 , 96NR6D8RU4NU3R3BM5 

6, 99ND4GD3FR4NU5EU3HL3 BM64 , 99D5R 

U5R4D5U4BM74 , 9 6D7FRHU5NL3NR2U2 

395 DRAWBM25, 110NR2G2D3FR3NU2EU 

HL3ND2UEBM32 , 111RDLBD3RDL 

400 DRAWBM4 8 , 109R7NDL6D8NLR2HU3 

NU3R3NUDBM58 , 112ND4GD3 FR4NU4EU3H 

L3BM66, 112RD5NLR2HU3ER3D5NLR2HU3 

BM79 , 109D8REBL3U4NR3NL2U2 

4)35 DRAW" BM 2 3 , 124NDNFR5D2HDG2D2R 

U2EBM32 , 125RDLBD3RDL 

410 DRAWBM52, 123R4NFL4G2D2NR3D4 

BM60 , 125G2D2F2R2E2U2H2LBM68 , 125N 

D6FER2F2D4BM7 8 , 123DND7GR4 

415 DRAWBM24, 13 6ND5GDFGDFR3NU5E 

UHNL2EUHL2BM32 , 13 7RDLBD3RDL 

420 DRAWBM50, 136NGR3NR4D4L2NGR3 

NU3NR2D2HD2GL3BM62 , 13 8G2 DED2R3E2 

UGU2L2 BM70 , 138NGD4RUNU3E3RD4RNEU 

3BM81, 136D6R2NEL2HU4GR4 

425 DRAW"BM24 , 149ND2GDFR3DG2NLRE 

2U3HND2L2BM32 , 150RDLBD3RDLBM50 , 1 

48NG3NR7ND3 FD3NR4L3NGR3ND7LD8GL3 

BM60 , 148G3NRF2NU3R3E2NU2LU3L2BM6 

8, 148G2RD3RU2NU2E3RD5RNE2U4BM79 , 

147NG2D2NR2ND3LD3FR2E2 

43JZ5 DRAWBM24 , 163ND5GD4FR3U5G2DE 

3ND4HL2BM32 , 164RDLBD3RDLBM50 , 164 

NR3 D2NR2D3 BM5 6,16 6 GDFREUHBM 61,16 

6D2NDE2FD2BM68 , 164D2NLNRD2FE 

4 35 RETURN 

440 POKE&H23,Al-l:POKE&H24,A2:RE 
TURN 

445 POKE&H23,Al-2:POKE&H24,A2:RE 
TURN 

45j3 POKE&H23,Al-3:POKE&H24,A2:RE 
TURN 

455 GOSUB44p : CLS : PRINT@129 , "ENTE 
R TOP MARGIN (j3 - 10): ";:LINEIN 
PUTV$ 

46j3 PRINT@193 , "ENTER LEFT MARGIN 
(p-2pp): ":PRINT@2 2p,""; 



4 65 GOSUB445: LINEINPUTU$: V=VAL(V 
$) :U=VAL(U$) : Z=U 

47j3 IFV<j3THENV=j3 
475 IFV>lj3THENV=lj3 

48j3 IFU>W-5j3THENSOUND6j3, 3:PRINT§ 
2 62, "LEFT MARGIN TOO BIG": PRINT" 
RELATIVE TO RIGHT MARGIN!": PR 
INT§33j3, "TRY AGAIN. ": GOT046j3 
485 IFU<j3THENU=j3 
490 IFH=3 AND U>40J2THENU=4 j3p 
495 P=V+(D+1) *(-l+INT( (192-V)/(D 
+1) ) ) :L=U:T=V: RETURN 

CLS : PRINT@194 , "VALUE j3 MEANS 
NO WRAP-AROUND. ANY OTHER VAL 
UE SPECIFIES THE RIGHT MAR 

GIN. " 

505 GOSUB44j3:PRINT@290 , "ENTER VA 
LUE (50 TO 256): ";:PRINT@31 

6 , " " ; : LINEINPUTW$ : IFVAL (W$ ) =0THE 
NQ=0 : RETURN 

510 Q=1:W=VAL(W$) : IFW<U+50THENSO 

UND60 , 3 : PRINT@356 , "RIGHT MARGIN 

TOO SMALL RELATIVE TO L 

EFT MARGIN. 11 : PRINT@425, "TRY AGAI 

N. " :GOTO505 

515 IFW>256THENW=25 6 

520 RETURN 

525 GOSUB440:CLS:PRINT@130, "ENTE 
R 1ST TAB VALUE: " ; : LINEINPUTT$ : 
T1=VAL(T$) : IFT1>256THENT1=256 
530 GOSUB440 : PRINT§194 , "ENTER 2N 
D TAB VALUE: " ; : LINEINPUTT$ : T2=V 
AL(T$) : IFT2>256THENT2=256 
535 RETURN 

540 CLS : PRINT @ 3 3, "RIGHT ARROW: M 
OVE CURSOR RIGHT": PRINT§6 5, "LEFT 

ARROW: BACKSPACE" :PRINT@9 7 , "UP 
ARROW: CARRIAGE RETURN & " : PRINT@ 
139, "MOVE UP 1 LINE" :PRINT@161, " 
DOWN ARROW: TAB" 

545 PRINT§193 , "SHIFT RIGHT ARROW 
: DRAW DESIGN" :PRINT§225, "SHIFT 
LEFT ARROW: CLEAR LINE" : PRINT@25 

7, "SHIFT DOWN ARROW: UNDERLINE": 
PRINT§289, "SHIFT CLEAR: CLEAR SC 
REEN 

550 PRINT@3 2 1 , "ENTER: CARRIAGE R 
ETURN & " : PRINT @ 3 6 3 , " MOVE DOWN 1 
LINE" : PRINT (§385, "SHIFT 0: UPPER/ 
LOWER CASE 

555 PRINT§48 1 , "PRESS SPACE TO RE 
TURN TO MENU"; 

5 60 K$=INKEY$: IFK$=""THEN560ELSE 
RETURN 

565 D(1)=14:D$ (1) ="D15BR5U15BR5D 
15BR5U15 

570 D(2) =14 :D$ (2) ="R15BD5L15BD5R 
15BD5L15 



66 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



0 SHOPPING LIST B 



COCO CABLES AND ... 

Printer/Modem 10 1 Extender Cable $14.95 

TANDY CM-8 RGB Analog 6'Video Ext Cable ....$19.95 

Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pin) $19.95 

Cassette 1 Y 1 Cable - Connect a 26-3028 Hj-Res Joy - 
stick interface & Tape Recorder to CoCoIII .$19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

Joystick / Mouse 10 1 Ext Cable $19.95 

No more Deluxe R£>-232 paks left to hook up ptr & 

irodem ? Buy our R5-232 "Y" Cable (4 pin) $24.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) $24.95 

MAGNAVQX 8505/8515 / 8CM643 Analog RGB cable .$24.95 
Other Analog RGB monitor cable ( Specify ! ) ..$39.95 
15 " Multi-Pak / Disk Pak Extender - Move your Multi- 
Disk Paks further away ^4^5: Closeout $29.95 

40 Pin Dual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk with a 

Voice Pak, Word Pak, CoCo Max, etc $29.95 

CoCo RS232 Switcher - Now easily switch between a 
printer & modem at the flick of a switch! ..$29.95 

OTHER GOOD STUFF ... 

5 1/4 " Diskettes in any quantity 49 cents 

C-10 tapes - Minimum quantity (20 pes) ...69 cents 
CoCoIl/CoCoIII KEYCAPS - Replace worn keys! .$4.99 

Rompak w/Blank PC Board 27xx series $9.95 

"D" Rev motherboard w/o socketed chips $16.95 

Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV interfer- 
ence created by CoCo! $19.95 

CoCo Util II - Transfer CoCo files to your MS-DOS 

machine ( Tandy 1000 & IBM PC! ) $39.95 

CoCo III keyboard - upgrade your CoCo II keyboard! 
" Package 1 * deal w/ FKEYS III ($24.95) software $39.95 

HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM (SAVE$20) $79.95 

MAGNAVQX TV tuner - Now you can watch TV with your 

8505/8515 RGB monitor ! $99.95 

Super Controller - Up to 4 DOSs by a POKE ..$99.95 
1200 Baud Mod em (Hayes compatible) Auto-dial/answer 
$139.95. Req f s Modem cable (4pin or DB25 ) ..$19.95 
PBH-64 - A combo Parallel Printer interface & 64K 
Print Buffer! COMPUTE while you PRINT ! ....$149.95 

MAGNAVQX 8505 RGB Analog monitor $249.95 

SONY KV-1311 CR Analog monitor w/cable ....$499.95 



Breaking your back 
typing on your 
CoCo??? 





Sit back and relax with 
a Spectrum keyboard 
extender cable! §39.9^ 



Now you can extend your present keyboard away from 
your CoCoIl/CoCoIII ! Easier typing & requires no 
soldering! You also have the option to leave your 
present keyboard intact & hook up a second board 
for remote operation ; Spectrum Keyboard extender 

cable w/ EXTERNAL CoCoII keyboard $49.95 

Design by Marty Goodman , so you know it's quality! 



SUPER CHIP -SALE- ... 

2764 EPROM $4.95 27128 EPROM $6.95 

6821 Standard PIA^r95LCloseout price! $6.95 

Basic ROM 1.1 Chip^^S: Closeout price! ...$9.95 

6847 VDG Chip ^3^*a5: Closeout price! $12.95 

6809E CPU Chip35&~&S Closeout price! $12.95 

CoCo III Multipak - "NEW" PAL chip (For Gray and 

White 26-3024 models ONLY) $19.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) $19.95 

Disk ROM 1.1 - (Needed for CoCoIII ) $29.95 

Original SAM Chip (6883) $29.95 

Ext Basic 1,1 ROM - Closeout price! $29.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two PIA's, 6809E CPU 
and SAM Chips (BE PREPARED) Closeout price! $49.95 
EPROM Programmer - uses 2716s up to 27512 s! Super 
fast programming! - See April f 86 review .$149.95 
New! " Upgraded " CoCoIII ' GIME ' chip WRITE 

COCO LIBRARY ... 

A History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 $6.95 

CoCo Memory Map Reg. I$3^r§5: Now only $9.95 

New! 200 MORE Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 

Basic Programming Tricks Revealed ^4t^5T .... $9 .95 

500 Pokes, Peeks f N Execs $16.95 

300 CoCoIII POKES - #1 CoCoIII bestseller! .$19.95 

Comp lete Rainbow Guide to 0S9 Level II $19.95 

Rainbow Guide to 0S9 Level II Disk $19.95 

A Guide to CoCo III GRAPHICS (7/87 review) .$21.95 
Better Graphics on CoCo3 (8/87 review pgl43) $24.95 

CoCo II Service Manual (Specify Cat.#) $29.95 

CoCo III Unraveled ~ A best seller!!! $29.95 

CoCo III Service Manual - Current version! .$39.95 
Color/Extended / Disk Basic Unraveled $49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF ... 

WTCO Adapter- Hookup 2 Atari type joysticks. $19. 95 
CoCo Keybd - Low profile, fits all CoCo lis & "F"s 
WAS $39.95 - NOW $19.95. D/E CoCo I adapter $12.95 
CoCoMaxIl/CoCo3 patch - Reg. 26-3024 Multi-Pak 
Interface. Reg. Price $29.95 CLOSEOUT price .$14.95 
CoCo Checker - Test your ROMs, RAMs, PIAs, Disk 
Drives & Ctlr, Printer, Keybd, Joystk, etc.. $19. 95 
WTCO Trackball - Regularly $69.95 , Now only. $24. 95 
OS-9 Level II Solution - A front-end " USER 

FRIENDLY " interface for LEVEL II $29.95 

Universal Video Dryr- All monitors & CoCos .$29.95 
(2) Chip 64K U pgrade - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II .$29.95 

28 £in get Basic - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II $34.95 

Top FD-501 Drive 1 (#26-3133) - SAVE $60 ..$139.95 
CoCo III DISK DRIVE 0 - (Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150 plus value ! ! ! ) . . .$239.95 
2400 Baud Modem (Great for Delphi & CIS) ..$249.95 
512K COLOR COMPUTER III ( Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150 plus value !!!) ...$299.95 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 
PO BOX 264 
HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
See our other ad on page 17 ! ! ! 



575 D(3)=14 :D$ ( 3 ) ="R15D15L15U14B 
R2BDRllDllLllUlj3BR2BDR7D7L7U6BR2 
BDR3D3L3U2 

580 D ( 4 ) =14 : D$ ( 4 ) ="BR3G2NUDLD5NF 
7EDF6NE6RE6NHU5LU2LNL3HL2G2NRNH2 
DH3DL 

585 D (5) =14 : D$ (5) ="BR7BDG3RNE2DG 
3RNE3DG3RNE3R6ND2R7H3LNF2ENH3RH3 
UNHRH2 

590 D(6) =14 :D$ ( 6 ) ="R5G5NU4BD2E7F 

7G7H7BD2D5R5NH4BR4R5U5NG4BU4U5L5 

NF4BL2BD3G4F4E4H4BD3GFE 

595 D(7) =62 : D$ (7) ="BR3 1BD4L3GL3N 

U2D2GNU4GD2GD3R5NFUL2GL2GLGNDL8G 

LNG2BR8D2LGL2NG2BR4ENFGD3NR2DL2G 

LBR5 FRFR5ER2 ER5 FR2 FR5 ERE 2 R2 FRLHL 

2UNL2U4LNGR2FR2NF2L2H2U2R6FRF2BL 

10U3L2NDHLHL5NGUR2BR3U2HU2HNU4HU 

3NUGL2HL3BD13U3LND3U2HUH2RGFDFD 

600 D ( 8 ) =15 : D$ ( 8 ) ="BR5R5FL7ND6GD 



\r/ 35 31 475 84 

95 32 540 155 

160 62 585 125 

230 176 630 55 

290 34 665 158 

385 161 END 230 

430 251 

I J 

Listing 2: DESKTOPH 

0 RGB:WIDTH4J3:CLS3:L0CATE14,8:AT 
TR7 , 2 : PRINT " DESKTOP " ; : ATTR7 , 2 , U 
: PRINT "HIGH" ; : ATTR7 , 2 : LOCATE 11 , 1 
2: PRINT "BY H. Allen Curtis" : LOCA 
TE13 , 14 : PRINT "COPYRIGHT 1987 ": LO 
CATE24,8:ATTR7,2 

5 CLEAR4j3j3j3 : A=&H16j3j3 : A$="34761F5 

2313AlE428E7j372BFFFA2 8D188E7A7BB 

FFFA28E7173BFFFA28DJ3A" : GOSUB6j3j3 : 

A=A+3 0 : A$=" 8E7A7BBFFFA2 1E42 3 5F68 

E4j3j3j3CE6j3j3j3A684E6C4A7C0E78j38C6j30 

02 6F3 39" :GOSUB6j3j3 

10 CLEAR500j3:W=320:H=l 

15 HCOLOR3 , 0 : ON BRK GOT0715 

20 K$=K$+"C":A1=PEEK(VARPTR(K$)+ 

2) :A2=PEEK(VARPTR(K$) +3) :IFA2<2T 

HENA2=2 54 : A1=A1-1 : GOTO40ELSEA2=A 

2-2:GOT04j3GOT04j3 

25 GOSUB485:CLS:LOCATE12,8:PRINT 
"FILENAME : " ; : LINEINPUTF$ : POKE&H 
FFA2 , &H7j3 : SAVEM"OUTl" , &H4000 , &H5 
FFF, &HAC73 : POKE&HFFA2 , &H71: SAVEM 
"OUT2 " , &H4j3j3j3 , &H5FFF , &HAC7 3 : POKE 
&HFFA2 , &H7A: RENAME "OUTl/BIN"TOF$ 



8HNUD2LGDR7D2RU2R7UH2DNU3HU8LD5 
605 D$(9)="D15 
610 RETURN 

615 CLS : PRINT@12 , "DESIGNS" : PRINT 
@65,"1: VERTICAL STRIPES" : PRINT§ 
97 ,"2: HORIZONTAL STRIPES ": PRINT 
@129,"3: CONCENTRIC SQUARES " : PRI 
NT@161, "4: HEART" :PRINT@193 , "5: 
XMAS TREE" 

620 PRINT@225, "6: DIAMONDS & TRI 
ANGLES" : PRINT §257, "7 : COCO CAT": 
PRINT@289, "8: BELL" : PRINT@ 3 2 1 , " 9 
: VERTICAL BAR 
625 POKE&H23,Al:POKE&H24,A2 
63j3 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN63j3 
635 IFK$<"j3" OR K$>"9"THENSOUND6 
0,5: RETURN 

640 K=VAL(K$) :F$(p)=D$(K) :M(p)=D 
(K) : RETURN 



+"/HRl" :RENAME"OUT2/BIN"TOF$+"/H 
R2 " : RETURN 

30 GOSUB485:CLS:LOCATE12,8:PRINT 

"FILENAME : " ; : LINEINPUTF$ : RENAME 

F$+"/HRl"TO"INl/BIN" :RENAMEF$+"/ 

HR2 "TO"IN2/BIN" : POKE&HFFA2 , &H7J3 : 

LOADM" INI " : POKE&HFFA2 , &H7 1 : LOADM 

"IN2 11 : POKE&HFFA2 , &H7A 

35 RENAME "INl/BIN"TOF$+"/HRl" : RE 

NAME"IN2/BIN"TOF$+"/HR2" : RETURN 

4)3 L2=1:P=176:DIMF$(84) ,M(84) : GO 

SUB630:F$(j3)=D$(7) :M(j3)=D( 7) : K$= 

" 1" : GOSUB3 50 : POKE&HFFD9 , 0 

4 5 Cl=63:PALETTEj3,63:PALETTEl,0: 

PALETTE 2 , 63 : PALETTE 3 ,0 

50 HSCREENH:HBUFF1,99-:HGET(8,152 

)-(9,152+D) ,1 

55 HBUFF4, 1824 :HBUFF5, 3624 :HGET( 
16, 20) -(111,95) ,4:HBUFF6,152j3:HG 
ET(16,20)-(lll,17p) ,5 
60 HCLS:T=V:L=U 

65 IF(Q=j3 OR Z=U) AND L+4>W-1THE 

NL=U:IFT<P THENT=T+D+1 

10 IFQ=1 AND ZOU AND L+4>W-1THE 

NGOSUB195 

75 HGET (L, T) - (L+l , T+D) , 1 : HLINE (L 

,T) -(L+1,T+D) ,PSET,BF 

8j3 POKE&H23,Al:POKE&H2 4,A2 

85 K$=INKEY$: IFK$=" "THEN85 

90 K=ASC(K$) : IFK>64 AND K<91THEN 

N=K-64 : B=N: HLINE (L, T) - (L+l , T+D) , 

PRESET , BF : GOT018j3 

95 IFK>96 AND K<12 3THENN=K-96 : B= 
N+26: HLINE (L,T) -(L+1,T+D) , PRESET 
,BF:GOT018j3 



68 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



100 IFK>47 AND K<58THENN=K-47 : B= 
N+52 : HLINE (L, T) - (L+l , T+D) , PRESET 
,BF:GOT018j3 

105 IFK>32 AND K<48THENN=K-32 : B= 
N+62 : HLINE (L,T) - (L+l, T+D) , PRESET 
,BF:GOT018j3 

110 IFK>57 AND K<65THENN=K-57 : B= 
N+77:HLINE(L,T) -(L+1,T+D) , PRESET 
,BF:GOT018j3 

115 IFK=32THENZ=L+S:IFL+8<W THEN 
HLINE (L, T) -(L+7, T+D) , PRESET, BF : L 
=L+S:GOT065ELSEHLINE(L,T) - (L+1,T 
+D) , PRESET , BF : L=U : T=T+1+D : GOT065 
120 IFK=13THENHPUT(L,T) - (L+l ,T+D 
) , 1 : L=U 

125 IFK=13 AND T<P THENT=T+1+D : G 
OT065 

13 0 IFK=8 AND L>1THENL=2 *INT ( . 5* 
L) : HLINE (L,T) - (L+l , T+D) , PRESET, B 
F:L=L-2:GOT065 

135 IFK=93THENB=j3 : HLINE ( L, T) - ( L+ 
1,T+D) , PRESET, BF: GOTO 1 8 0 
140 IFK=94THENHPUT (L, T) - ( L+l ,T+D 
) , 1:L=U:IFT>D THENT=T-1-D : GOT065 
145 IFK=91THENZ=U:HPUT(L,T) -(L+l 
,T+D) ,1:HDRAW"BM"+STR$ (L) +" , "+ST 
R$ (T+l+INT ( . 75 *D) ) +"R3 " : L=L+4 : IF 
L>W-5THENL=L-4 



150 IFK=9 AND L+4<W THENHPUT ( L , T 
)- (L+l, T+D) ,l:L=L+4:GOT065 
155 IFK=92THEN6j3 

160 IFK=4THENHPUT (L,T) - (L+l , T+D) 
,l:GOT02 3j3 

165 IFK=lj3THENHPUT (L, T) - (L+l , T+D 
) , 1 : IFT3=j3THENT3=l : L=T1 ELSEIFT3 
=lTHENT3=j3:L=T2 

17j3 IFK=21THENHPUT(U,T) - (W-1,T+D 
) ,4:L=U:GOT065 
175 GOT065 

18 0 IFL+M(B)<W THENGOSUB225:L=L+ 

2*INT( . 5+M(B) * . 5) +2 : IFL>W-1THENL 

2=L-W+1 : L=W-1 : GOT065ELSE65 

185 IFQ=j3 OR Z=U THENL=U: IFT<P T 

HENT=T+D+ 1 : GOTO 90 ELSE9 0 

190 GOSUB195:GOTO90 

195 IFH=3THENZ1=8*INT( .125*Z) 

200 IFH=1THENZ1=4*INT( .25*Z) 

205 Z=Z1 

210 HGET ( Z , T) - (L, T+D) , 6 : HPUT ( Z , T 
) - (L,T+D) , 4 : L1=L-Z : L=U: Z=U: IFT<P 

THENT=T+ D+ 1 
215 IFL+LKj3THENLl=Ll+2 :GOT0215 
220 HPUT (L,T) -(L+Ll, T+D) ,6:L=L+L 
1+L2 : L=2 * INT ( . 5 *L+ . 5 ) : L2=j3 : RETUR 
N 

225 HDRAW"BM"+STR$ (L)+ M , "+STR$ (T 



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cTKc Salrxt 3-oKa «J.all«ty. 

THE ASTRO 

FORTURE TELLER 



fi/^SFD UPOM YOUR PEflSCHVAL 

AFTEH LWWMG YOUR QrtVEh/AVW: 
YOUfitiiRlHbfiftr 4r7HC PfW.A/rU)AV . 

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OR 30 PflcoeriNFD QocstiomS 

THOSE QUESTMXVS OP UPE-LAX/E* 

<~>aS r orrp£>\FD Br wroiff uoneoj 

THIS PHO&h/Ml /5 OVEYf /S0tf YETDU^ 

To rooDm-m approach u3ill Rixv on SYsrrcns 

FOf) THE SERIOUS KVQUIREff OH Grf{Ef\T FOK FW\T JET5 If 




THE BEST BIBS 



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mvcromi coco momzr /wo save yout\ speech 



2>/S/fS UHE LPiRQC OOfjD PROCttSltM FtL£\ -£ISK # 



SE/ifD CHEQUE Ot\ C^lJXrt $ J,?F ffrtf (C ftMAQrt fZ.^O 7o O 
SZ J6\\VjZ^tW a RO+&OiC6l3 COT* Slftttf tO^WGG 

October 1987 THE RAINBOW 69 



)+F$ (B) : RETURN 

230 HSCREEN0:CLS:ATTR0,4:LOCATE1 
0, 5: PRINT "B: BACK TO SCREEN" :LOC 
ATE10,6:PRINT"C: COLOR SWAP":LOC 
ATE10,7:PRINT"D: DESIGN SELECT 
235 LOCATE 10,8: PRINT 11 F : FONT SEL 
ECT" : LOCATE10 , 9 : PRINT" I : INPUT" : 
LOCATE10, 10: PRINT" K: KEYS LISTED 
":LOCATE10, 11:PRINT"M: MARGIN SE 
T" : LOCATE 10 , 12 : PRINT"0 : OUTPUT" : 
LOCATE10 , 13 : PRINT"R: RESOLUTION 
CHANGE 

240 LOCATE10,14:PRINT"S: SCREEN 
SWITCH" : LOCATE 10 , 1 5 : PRINT " T : TAB 
SET" : LOCATE 10 , 16 : PRINT" W: WORDW 
RAP SET":LOCATE10,17:PRINT"X: EX 
IT DESKTOP" : LOCATE 14 , 17 : POKE&H2 3 
,A1:P0KE&24 , A2 : POKE &HFFD8 , 0 
245 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN245 
250 IFK$="D" OR K$="d"THENGOSUB6 
80:GOTO230 

255 IFK$="F" OR K$=" f "THENGOSUB3 
25:GOTO380 

260 IFK$="B" OR K$="b"THEN320 
265 IFK$="I" OR K$="i"THENGOSUB3 
0:GOTO2 30 

270 IFK$="K" OR K$="k"THENGOSUB6 
05:GOTO2 30 

275 IFK$="0" OR K$="o"THENGOSUB2 
5:GOTO230 

280 IFK$="M" OR K$="m"THENGOSUB5 
00:GOTO230 

285 IFK$="R" OR K$= 11 r 11 THENI FH= IT 

HENH=3 : U=2 *U : W=2 *W: Tl=2 *T1 : T2=2 * 

T2 :GOTO230ELSEH=1:U=. 5*U:W=. 5*W: 

Tl=. 5*T1:T2=. 5*T2 :GOTO230 

290 IFK$="T" OR K$="t "THENGOSUB5 

85:GOTO230 

295 IFK$="C" OR K$="c"THENGOSUB7 
10:GOTO230 

300 IFK$="S" OR K$="s"THENEXEC&H 
1600:GOTO230 

305 IFK$="W" OR K$="W"THENG0SUB5 
50:GOTO230 

310 IFK$="X" OR K$="x"THEN715 
315 SOUND60,5:SOUND60,5:GOTO230 
320 POKE&HE6E4,&HE6:HSCREENH:POK 
E&HE6E4 , &HE7 : POKE&HFFD9 , 0 : GOT038 
5 

325 GOSUB390 

330 POKE&H2 3,Al:POKE&H2 4,A2 
335 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" 11 THEN335 
340 IFK$<"1" OR K$>"2" THENSOUND 
60, 10: RETURN 
345 GOSUB485 
350 GOSUB495 

355 OPEN" I", #1, "FONT"+K$ 

360 F0RI=1T084:LINEINPUT#1,F$(I) 



:NEXT 

365 F0RI=1T084 :INPUT#1,M(I) :NEXT 
370 INPUT#l,D,S:CLOSE#l 
37 5 RETURN 

380 HPUT(16,20) -(111, 170) ,5 

385 GOSUB545:HGET(L,T) -(L+1,T+D) 

, l:GOT065 

390 POKE&HE6E4 , &HE6 : HSCREENH : POK 
E&HE6E4 , &HE7 : HGET ( 16 , 20) - ( 111,17 
0) ,5:HPUT(16,20)-(lH/95) ,4:HPUT 
(16,96) -(111,170) ,4:HDRAW"BM25,2 
8NGD6NL2RNR2U6BM3 2 , 29RDLBD3RDL 
395 HDRAWBM50 , 24G3ERE2R4GNL3G4D 
5EU4BR2D5G4UH2LG2ER3FERE2URUE2NF 
G2U4E4F2DH2DFBM64 , 29G2ND4LD4NHFR 
E2NU5RU4FBM72 , 29G2RD4NHFNEU4NU2E 
3ND6FNFD6E2BM83 , 2 5G3LR3NR2NUD8NE 
2H2RU5 

400 HDRAW"BM24 , 4 3NGNDR3ND2FDGL2N 

G2DG2R5ULBM32 , 44RDLBD3RDL 

405 HDRAW "BM49 , 4 3R6NDNGL5D3NR3 D3 

NLR2HU4BM59 , 45ND3GD2FR3NU3EU2HL2 

BM66,45D4RU4R3D4RU3BM76,43ND5G2N 

R4FD2FRE 

410 HDRAW"BM24, 62NGNDR3ND5FDGNL2 

FDGL3ULBM32 , 63RDLBD3RDL 

415 HDRAW "BM50, 56 R5BR2DNLNRDRNRD 

RE2BL7 L5DLNGBR5G2ND8GD8BDBL2L2DR 

2DFNDRURE2U9NE3RD3ND4REFBM64 , 61G 

2ND6LD5LF2RE2NU7RU6FBM72 , 61NG2D3 

E3DRFLD7NE2HNU6BL2GNU5LNHU7BM8 3 , 

57G2RD11NE2H2RU8L2R5 

420 HDRAW"BM2 6 , 8 1G3DE4D6NLRNRU2N 

RNL4U4 BM3 2,82 RDLBD3 RDL 

425 HDRAW"BM46 , 78R11D2RHL2BL6D6R 

3D2ENRHL3D6GU13LBM62 , 82G3D2F3R5E 

3U2H3L4G3D2F3R3E3U2H2BM72 , 82R3GN 

LD7RU5NU2E3R2DRD7 LNUE 2 U4 BM8 8 , 8 0 D 

LGR7 NR5 G 5 UNE 2 F DRDRDR4 E 2 

430 HDRAW"BM23 , 98NR5D2EDR3ND3FD2 

GL3ULBM32 , 99RDLBD3RDL 

435 HDRAW"BM48,9 6NR6D8RU4NU3R3BM 

56,99ND4GD3FR4NU5EU3HL3BM64 , 99D5 

RU5R4D5U4BM74,9 6D7FRHU5NL3NR2U2 

440 HDRAW"BM25,110NR2G2D3FR3NU2E 

UHL3ND2UEBM32 , 111RDLBD3RDL 

445 HDRAW" BM48, 109R7NDL6D8NLR2HU 

3NU3R3NUDBM58 , 112ND4GD3FR4NU4EU3 

HL3BM66 , 112RD5NLR2HU3ER3D5NLR2HU 

3BM79, 109D8REBL3U4NR3NL2U2 

"450 HDRAW"BM23 , 12 4NDNFR5D2HDG2 D2 

RU2EBM3 2 , 12 5RDLBD3RDL 

455 HDRAW"BM52 , 12 3R4NFL4G2D2NR3D 

4BM60, 125G2D2F2R2E2U2H2LBM68, 125 

ND6FER2F2D4BM78 , 12 3DND7GR4 

460 HDRAWBM24 , 13 6ND5GDFGDFR3NU5 

EUHNL2 EUHL2 BM3 2 , 13 7RDLBD3RDL 

465 HDRAWBM50 , 13 6NGR3NR4D4L2NGR 



70 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



3NU3NR2D2HD2GL3BM62 , 138G2DED2R3E 

2UGU2L2BM7j3,138NGD4RUNU3E3RD4RNE 

U3BM81, 136D6R2NEL2HU4GR4 

470 HDRAWBM2 4 , 149ND2GDFR3DG2NLR 

E2U3HND2 L2 BM3 2 , 150RDLBD3RDLBM50 , 

148NG3NR7ND3FD3NR4L3NGR3ND7LD8GL 

3BM60 , 148G3NRF2NU3R3E2NU2LU3L2BM 

68 , 148G2RD3RU2NU2E3RD5RNE2U4BM79 

, 147NG2D2NR2ND3LD3FR2E2 

475 HDRAWBM2 4 , 163ND5GD4FR3U5G2D 

E3ND4HL2BM32 , 164RDLBD3RDLBM50 , 16 

4NR3D2NR2D3BM5 6 , 166GDFREUHBM61 , 1 

66D2NDE2FD2BM68 , 164D2NLNRD2FE 

480 RETURN 

485 POKE&H23 , Al-1 : POKE&H24 ,A2:RE 
TURN 

490 POKE&H23,Al-2:POKE&H2 4,A2:RE 
TURN 

495 POKE&H23,Al-3:POKE&H24,A2:RE 
TURN 

500 GOSUB485:CLS:LOCATE6,8:PRINT 
"ENTER TOP MARGIN (0 - 10): ";:L 
INEINPUTV$ : LOCATE 6 , 12 : PRINT "ENTE 
R LEFT MARGIN "; 

505 LOCATE2 4 , 12 : IFH=1THENPRINT" ( 
0 - 200): " : LOCATE3 5 , 12ELSEP 

RINT" (0 - 400): ":LOCATE35,l 
2 

510 GOSUB490:LINEINPUTU$:V=VAL(V 
$) :U=VAL(U$) :IFH=1THENU=4*INT(.2 
5*U):Z=U ELSEU=8*INT(.125*U) :Z=U 
515 IFV<0THENV=0 
520 IFV>10THENV=10 

525 IF U>W-50THENSOUND60,5:LOCAT 

E10, 15: PRINT" LEFT MARGIN TOO BIG 

":LOCATE8,16:PRINT"RELATIVE TO R 

IGHT MARGIN! " : LOCATE 14 , 20 : PRINT" 

TRY AGAIN. 11 : GOTO 50 5 

530 IFU<0THENU=0 

535 IFH=1 AND U>200THENU=200 

540 IFH=3 AND U>400THENU=400 

545 P=V+(D+1) *(-l+INT( (192-V)/(D 

+1) ) ) :L=U:T=V: RETURN 

550 CLS:LOCATE6, 6: PRINT "VALUE 0 

MEANS NO WRAP-AROUND.": LOCATE 6, 8 

: PRINT "ANY OTHER VALUE SPECIFIES 

":LOCATE9,9:PRINT"THE RIGHT MARG 

IN." 

555 GOSUB485 : LOCATE 6 , 12 : PRINT"EN 
TER VALUE ( 0 -" ; 320+ (H-l) *160 ; " 
) : 11 : LOCATE 3 1 , 12 : LINEINPUTW$ 

: IFVAL (W$) =0THENQ=0 : RETURN 
560 Q=1:W=VAL(W$) : IFW<U+50THENSO 
UND60 , 5 : LOCATE8 , 16 : PRINT "RIGHT M 
ARGIN TOO SMALL" :LOCATE8, 17 : PRIN 
T"RELATIVE TO LEFT MARGIN .": LOCA 
TE15 , 19 : PRINT "TRY AGAIN . " : GOT055 
5 



565 IFH=1 AND W>3 20THENW=320 

570 IFW>640THENW=640 

575 IFH=1THENW=4*INT(.25*W)ELSEW 

=8*INT( . 125*W) 

580 RETURN 

585 GOSUB485: CLS : LOCATE6 , 8 : PRINT 
"ENTER 1ST TAB VALUE: ";:LINEINP 
UTT$:T1=2*INT(VAL(T$)*.5) : IFH=1 
AND T1>320THENT1=320ELSEIFT1>640 
THENT1=640 

590 GOSUB4 85 : LOCATE 6 , 12 : PRINT"EN 

TER 2ND TAB VALUE: " ; : LINEINPUTT 

$:T2=2*INT(VAL(T$) *.5) : IFH1 AND 

T2>3 20THENT2=320ELSEIFT2>640THEN 

T2=640 

595 RETURN 

600 FORI=0TO29:B$=LEFT$(A$,2) :PO 
KEA+I,VAL("&H"+B$) :A$=RIGHT$ (A$, 
LEN ( A$ ) -2 ) : NEXT : RETURN 
605 CLS:LOCATE5,3:PRINT"RIGHT AR 
ROW: MOVE CURSOR RIGHT" : PRINT" 
LEFT ARROW : BACKS PACE 11 : PR I N T 11 
UP ARROW: CARRIAGE RETURN & 
": PRINT" MOVE UP 1 LIN 

E": PRINT" DOWN ARROW: TAB" 

610 PRINT" SHIFT RIGHT ARROW 



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CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 71 



: DRAW DESIGN" : PRINT" SHIFT 
LEFT ARROW: CLEAR LINE": PRINT" 

SHIFT DOWN ARROW: UNDERLINE": 
PRINT" SHIFT CLEAR: CLEAR SC 

REEN 

615 PRINT" ENTER: CARRIAGE R 

ETURN &": PRINT" MOVE D 

OWN 1 LINE": PRINT" SHIFT J3 : 

UPPER/ LOWER CASE 

62J3 LOCATE5, 22: PRINT" PRESS ";:AT 
TRJ3 , 4 , U : PRINT " S PACE " ; : ATTRJ3 , 4 : PR 
INT" TO RETURN TO MENU" ;: LOCATE 1 
2,22 

625 K$=INKEY$: IFK$=" "THEN62 5ELSE 
RETURN 

63J3 D(1)=14:D$ ( 1) ="D15BR5U15BR5D 
15BR5U15 

635 D(2)=14:D$ ( 2 ) ="R15BD5L15BD5R 
15BD5L15 

64J3 D(3) =14:D$ (3) ="R15D15L15U14B 
R2BDRllDllLllUlj3BR2BDR7D7L7U6BR2 
BDR3D3L3U2 

645 D (4 ) =14 : D$ (4 ) ="BR3G2NUDLD5NF 
7EDF6NE6RE6NHU5LU2LNL3HL2G2NRNH2 
DH3DL 

65J3 D(5)=14:D$ (5) ="BR7BDG3RNE2DG 
3RNE3DG3RNE3R6ND2R7H3LNF2ENH3RH3 
UNHRH2 

655 D(6)=14:D$ ( 6) ="R5G5NU4BD2E7F 

7G7H7BD2D5R5NH4BR4R5U5NG4BU4U5L5 

NF4BL2BD3G4F4E4H4BD3GFE 

66J3 D(7)=62:D$ ( 7 ) ="BR3 1BD4L3GL3N 

U2D2GNU4GD2GD3R5NFUL2GL2GLGNDL8G 



LNG2BR8D2LGL2NG2BR4ENFGD3NR2DL2G 
LBR5FRFR5ER2ER5FR2FR5ERE2R2FRLHL 
2UNL2U4LNGR2FR2NF2L2H2U2R6FRF2BL 
1J3U3L2NDHLHL5NGUR2BR3U2HU2HNU4HU 
3NUGL2HL3BD13U3LND3U2HUH2RGFDFD 
665 D(8)=15:D$ (8) ="BR5R5FL7ND6GD 
8 HNU D2LGDR7D2 RU 2R7UH2DNU3HU8LD5 
67j3 D$(9)="D15 
675 RETURN 

68J3 CLS:L0CATE15,6:ATTRJ3,4,U:PRI 
NT" DESIGNS" ; : ATTRJ3 , 4 : LOCATE9 , 9 :P 
RINT"1: VERTICAL STRIPES" : LOCATE 
9,lj3:PRINT"2 : HORIZONTAL STRIPES 
" : LOCATE 9 , 1 1 : PRINT " 3 : CONCENTRIC 
SQUARES" :LOCATE9, 12 :PRINT"4 : HE 
ART":LOCATE9,13:PRINT"5: XMAS TR 
EE" 

685 LOCATE9,14:PRINT"6: DIAMONDS 
& TRIANGLES" : LOCATE 9 , 15 : PRINT" 7 
: COCO CAT":LOCATE9,16:PRINT"8: 
BELL" : LOCATE 9 , 17 : PRINT" 9 : VERTIC 
AL BAR":LOCATE15,6 
69J3 POKE&H2 3 ,A1:P0KE&H2 4 ,A2 
695 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN695 
7J3J3 IFK$<"j3" OR K$>" 9 "THENSOUND6 
J3 , 5 : RETURN 

7)35 K=VAL(K$) :F$(J3)=D$(K) :M(j3)=D 
(K) : RETURN 

71J3 C3=C1:C1=C2:C2=C3:PALETTEJ3,C 
1 : PALETTE 1 , C2 : PALETTE2 , CI : PALETT 
E3,C2: RETURN 

715 RGB:CLS3:POKE&HFFD8,j3 



iStf 28 110 122 . 

44 206 148 . 

66 96 END 

94 155 



. .78 
.198 
.99 



Listing 3: GENFDNT1 

J3 CLS:PRINT@ 199, "GENERATE FONT1" 
:PRINT@261, "BY H. ALLEN CURTIS": 
PRINT@295 , "COPYRIGHT 1987 

8 DIMF$ (84) ,M(84) 

9 D=15:S=8 

1J3 M(l)=12 :F$ (1)="BR4BDG3D2NFUE4 
NR3DR6UD11EL2NHU9G4U2LNGBD3GNR5G 
2NG2R3GR3GL" 'A 

12 M(2)=12:F$(2) ="BR3BDNG3R5GL4N 

GR4G4NUFDLDBU8BR8ND2FDG5U3NE3LD4 

GL3NG2R2 DRNR2 DR4E 3UGUH" 1 B 

14 M(3)=12 :F$ ( 3 ) ="BR4BDG4D3RNU3N 

RDNR2FNRF2R5NE3UL5U7NGEND5E2D2ED 

2R2NE2UL" 1 C 

16 M(4)=12:F$ (4 ) ="BR3BDG2NGRE2NR 



7GR8ND7DL2FD6G2L2NL2UL3EL3NG2E2N 
U2LU2E3" 'D 

18 M(5)=15:F$(5) ="BR3BDG3ERE2R4G 

NL3G4ND2RNDBR2NRE5D2EDNRD2NE3G2N 

R3L4D2NEDR3D2R2ENEL6HL2G2" ' E 

2j3 M ( 6 ) =16 : F$ (6) ="BR6BDG3ERE2R4G 

NL3G4D5EU4BR2D5G4UH2LG2ER3FERE2U 

RUE2NFG2U4E4F2DH2DF" • F 

22 M ( 7 ) =12 : F$ ( 7 ) ="BR4BDG4ND3RD4F 

3R5E3U2LND2L4NLE4NEL3NDNFLNEU2G4 

RND6ED4GD2R5 " 1 G 

24 M ( 8 ) =13 : F$ ( 8 ) ="BR3 BDG3ERE2NR4 

DR3G4NRNFD2BD2LNG2R3GR3FL3U2EU3N 

E5RD2E5FND6LD8GDF" 'H 

26 M(9)=11:F$(9) ="BR3BDG3ERE2NR4 

DR3 G3 LGLNGR3 DL2 F BD 2 LNG 2 R2 D FU 2 RU4 

RND2UE4" 'I 

28 M(lj3)=14 :F$ (1J3) ="BR6BDG3ERE2N 

R4 DR3 G5LNGR3 NUDNL2 D2HD2 BD2 DLH2 LG 

2ER3FDE5NU4LU4E5" 1 J 

3j3 M(11)=15:F$(11)="BR3BDG3ERE2N 

R4DR3G4NRNFD2BD2LNG2R3GNR3FR3LH2 

ENU3EU3E4D2EDR2NEL2BD2L3NGR3DLG2 



72 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



FRD3E2HD" 1 K 

32 M(12)=15:F$ (12)="BR3BDG3ERE2N 

R4 GR3 G4NRNFD2 BD2NG2R6F2E2 GLGLUL3 

U5END3E4D2ED2RNUE2 " 'L 

34 M ( 13 ) =15 : F$ ( 13 ) ="BR3BDG3ERE2R 

GR3G4RD2HD3LNG2R3GFNR3UR4NENU9HU 

3NLUNR2NU5E5D11NHE2LU8" 'M 

36 M(14)=16:F$(14) ="BR2 BDG2ER3NH 

GD7LNG2R2GR3GNLBR4HUH2UHUH2RF2DF 

DF2DFU11NRGR3GR3NEGL" 'N 

38 M(15)=13:F$ (15)="BR4BDG4ND3RD 

4ED2ED2FNU7NR5ER5E3NU3LU4GU2GU2N 

GNL3HL2G3NGRD4 " 1 0 

40 M(16) =12 :F$ (16) ="BR5BDG2R2NUD 

9F2RNELH3D2NGU5R2NUR2GNRFRE3NU5L 

U6LG 4 L4NGFRDGLG 2 F " 1 P 

42 M ( 17 ) =14 : F$ ( 17 ) ="BR4BDG4ND3RD 

4NER2 D2NHNR7 FR5E 2 H 2 LNGRF3 REG 2BU3 

NU5EU3L2U2GU2GUNL2UL2G2NG2D5GNDU 

4" 'Q 

44 M(18)=13:F$ (18) ="BR3BDG3ERE2N 
R4DR3G4D2EUBD4L2NG2R3GNR3FR3BR3N 
U3E2NLH2LHE3NU2LU3G5D3E2LU" 'R 
46 M ( 19 ) =13 : F$ ( 19 ) ="BR5BDG3RDR2B 
U2URDR5NE2GL3BD2NL2RGR3 GR2G3LEL3 
ELNL3HL2G2DF2RE" 'S 

4 8 M(20)=14:F$ (20) ="BR3 BDG3ERE2N 
R5DR6DR3NEGL2HLG3RND3ED3G2UH3NRN 



E3D2RDRDF2NU2R5NE3UL4" 'T 

50 M(21) =12 :F$ (21) ="BR4BDG2R2NUN 

D5G2LNGF2NU2D3LNGR3GR2NRGR3E2ND2 

NFNR2UNU8RU7L2G" 'U 

52 M(22)=10:F$(22)="BR4BDG2R2NUN 
D5G2LNGF2NU2D3LNGR3GR2GRE4NU6LU7 
G2" 'V 

54 M(23)=14:F$(23)="BR4BDG2R2NUN 

D5GD2L2NGF2NUD2LNGR3GRDE3NDU8NG2 

FD9FNU3E3NU7EU6HG2 " ' W 

56 M(24) =13 :F$ (24) ="BR2BDNG2ND2F 

2LDR2D2NL3HR2DG4NG2R3GR3GNLBR5E2 

H4NR3LF4LH4R2E3NEL3EL3ER" 'X 

58 M(25) =12 : F$ (25) ="BR4BDG2RED6H 

NU3HLNGF2D2LNGR3GR2NRGR5FDGL5EL3 

NGR3BR6UHNU10HU10G2" 'Y 

60 M(26)=14:F$(26)="BR3BDNG2R3GR 

3DNL2R4UGLG3NL3NR3G3NR5LNG3DNGR7 

GNLNR3FR2E2 " ' Z 

62 M(27 ) =7 : F$ (27) ="BRBD5GF2GND3L 
D2R3EF2NEH3R2NDU3NEHL2F2NUD" 'a 
64 M(28)=6:F$(28)=" BR3 BDG2NHD8NH 
FNU9E2R2NU4HU4G2" 'b 
66 M(29)=5:F$ ( 29) ="BR2BD5G2RD4NH 
FNE2U6EDR2G" 1 c 

68 M(3j3)=8:F$(3j3)="BDF4LND6GD5NH 

FE2R2U4NEH5LF5ND3L" 'd 

70 M(31)=6:F$ (31)="BR2BD5G2RD4NH 



I 
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Software 



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Suite 301-D 
PO Box H 

Logan Utah 84321 



'KEEP TRAK' General Ledger Reg. 569.95— Only 539.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k. 
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32k & 64k (71 □ accounts Gentries on 1 6k) [disk only]. Version 1 .2 has screen printouts. 
Rainbow Review 1.1- 9/B4 ■ 1 2-4/B5 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. 569.95— ONLY 524.95 

Filing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 1 6 fields 
with 255 characters per field [4080 characters/record]. Sort, match & print any field. 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only]. 

Rainbow Review 3/B5. Hot CoCo 1 0/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles, elipses. boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on line HELPS at all 
times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects on the screen. Can be 
used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. GRAPHICS EDITOR. REG. 
S39.95— OWL V S24.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 

Rainbow Review 7/B5. Hot CoCo 9/B5 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-IRAK 1 Accounts Receivable. 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & more. User friendly/menu 
driven. Includes manual. S39.95 or S49.95 General Ledger & Accounts Receivables. 
[Disk Only] 'COCO WINDOWS' 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 1 □ programmable function keys. Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering. Four function 
calculator, with memory. The above options can be called anytime while running or writing 
in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES. YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. S 24.95 [disk 
or tape] includes manual. 



C8D1) 753-7B2D 
CBOO) 942-94D2 



[Add S3. (DO far postage & handling] 
C.O.Q., A/loney Order, Check in U.S. Funds [PIbbbb specify if J&fVI 
controller) 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 73 



FE2HE2RGU2L2UGD5" 1 e 

72 M ( 3 2 ) =7 : F$ ( 3 2 ) =" BR4 BDRFNELHG3 

NLRD7NHFNE 2 U 9 FR 11 1 f 

74 M(33)=9:F$(33)="BR3BD5ND6G2RD 

4NHFG2NGRNR4FR3E2ULU4NG3NE2U2LND 

5UG2 " 1 g 

76 M(3 4) =6 : F$ ( 3 4 ) =" BR3 BDG2NHD8NH 
FNEU4NU5E3ND7FD4GDF" 'h 
78 M ( 3 5 ) =3 : F$ ( 3 5 ) =" BR2 BDGBD4NGD5 
NHFNEU7F" 1 i 

80 M(36) =5 : F$ (36) ="BR4BDGBD4NENR 
2NGD 5RNU 4 DRDG 2 LNH 2 UR " 1 j 
82 M ( 3 7 ) =8 : F$ ( 3 7 ) =" BR3 BDG2NHD8NH 
FUNRU3NU5E3ND2FDG2NLFRGRDE2" 'k 
84 M(38)=3:F$ (38) ="BR3 BDG2NHD8NH 
FNEU9" 1 1 

86 M(39)=12 :F$ ( 3 9 ) ="BR2BD5G2RD4N 
HFNEU6FE2D6FNEU6FE2D6FNE2U6E" 'm 
88 M(40)=8:F$(40)=" BR2 BD5G2 RD4NH 
FNEU4NU2E3ND6FNFD6E2 " 'n 
90 M(41)=7 :F$ (41) ="BR4BD5G2ND4LD 
4NHFRE2NU5RU4F" 'o 

92 M ( 42 ) =8 : F$ ( 4 2 ) ="BR3 BD5G2RD3NG 
2D4NGENFU5NU2E3ND5FD4NFG2H" 'p 
9 4 M(43)=7:F$ ( 4 3 ) ="BR2BD5G2RNE2N 
D3RD5NH2RE2D4NGENFU6NEHNLD3 " 'q 
96 M(44)=7:F$ (44) ="BR2BD5ND6G2RD 
4NHFNE2U4E3DRFG" ' r 
98 M(45)=8:F$ (45) ="BRBD5GNDRD2R3 
G3NGR3GR3NE2UE2LH2NDNE2UL2EL2 " 1 s 
100 M(4 6)=5:F$ (46) ="BR4BDG3LR3NR 
2NUD8NE2H2RU5" 't 

102 M(47)=7:F$ (47) ="BR2BD5ND6G2R 

D4NHFE2F2NEU7G2RD3" 'u 

104 M(48)=7:F$ (48) ="BR2BD2G2DED7 

NEFNU6E3NU3DEU4NFUG2 11 ' V 

106 M(4 9)=11:F$(49)="BR2BD3G2DED 

FND4LD4HDERE2ND3U3F2LD3RE2U3F2LD 

3NRHD2" "w 

108 M(50)=10:F$(50)="BR2BD5NG2D2 
ENFD3G2NGEND2E2R2E3G2NU2G2F3NE2U 
2 LU " ' x 

110 M(51)=7:F$ (51)="BR2BD5ND6G2R 
D4NHFE3U3NGENFD5LDRDRDG2NL2UL4G" 

'y 

112 M(52 ) =10 : F$ (52 ) ="BR2BD5NG2NR 
3DRBD2R3E2NENL2G2NR3G3LNGR2FR3HR 
2E" " Z 

114 M(53 ) =8 : F$ (53 ) ="BR3BD2G3D4NF 
3NERNF3RF3E3U4GU2GU2GU2LD" '0 
116 M(54)=4:F$ (54 ) ="BR3BD2NG3D10 
NEHNHU7 " 1 1 

118 M(55)=8:F$ (55) ="BR3BD2G2DE3N 
DF3NLDGUNG2LG5DE2DRFR2NUE2" 1 2 
120 M(56)=7:F$(56)="BR3BD2NG3RNG 
2NDF3NDLDGNL2F2UGDG2LH3FRFR" 1 3 
12 2 M(57) =8 : F$ (57) ="BR6BD2ND8G6R 
7NFG2DNR2NFHEU5" 1 4 
124 M(58)=7:F$ (58 ) ="BRBD2R5GL4D4 



RE2R2ND4FD3G3LH2NHRFR" 1 5 
126 M(59 ) =7 : F$ (59) ="BR4BD2F2NEL2 
ULG3ND3RD2E2R2F2NDLD2G2LH2RFR" 1 6 
128 M(60) =8:F$ (60) ="BRBD2NR7GR7D 
G3ND4GD4 " '7 

130 M(61)=5:F$ (61) ="BR2BD2G2DF2G 
2DED2FRE2ULULUNH2E2UGU2H" '8 
132 M(62)=7:F$ (62) ="BR3BD2G3 DFUF 
2E2RND2UH2NLUF3D3G4U2L2 NGF" 1 9 
134 M(63)=1:F$ (63) ="BDFND3LD5BD3 
DRD" 1 ! 

13 6 M(64) =4:F$ (64) ="BDDRD2BR3U2L 
U" 1 11 

138 M(65) =9:F$ (65) ="BR3BD3G2LR2D 
4NL2D2EU6FRE2D2NR2D4NR2NL3DGU6" 1 
# 

140 M( 66) =8 : F$ ( 66) ="BR4BDND11G3D 
RDR2UE2NEL3 D4R2 DRDG2 L2UL2NEG " 1 $ 
142 M ( 67 ) =9 : F$ ( 67 ) ="BRBD2GFEBR5N 
UG6DE7BD5GFE" •% 

144 M( 68 ) =9 : F$ (68 ) ="BR2BDG2DF2G2 
DFNU 2FRE3D3FNE2U3 ENRGH 2 LNFHNH 2 E 2 
UHND2H" ' & 

146 M(69)=1:F$(69) ="BDDRDG" 1 1 
148 M(70)=5:F$ (70) ="BR3BDNR2G3D5 
F3R2LH3U5 " ' ( 

150 M(71) =5:F$ (71)="BDRF3D6G2NL2 
E3U5H3" 1 ) 

152 M(72)=9:F$ (72) ="BRBD4F3NL4E3 
RNFG3NR4NF3G3LNHE2 " 1 * 
154 M(73 ) =9 : F$ (73 ) ="BR5BD4D5GU3N 
U2NL4NR5" '+ 

156 M(74)=1:F$ (74) ="BD10DRDG" 1 , 
158 M(75) =9:F$ (75) ="BD7R9" •- 
160 M(76)=2:F$(76)="BD10DR2D" 1 . 
162 M(77) =10:F$ (77)="BR10G10DE10 
"'/ 

164 M(78)=2:F$(78) ="BRBD4GR2GBD3 
GR2G" 1 : 

166 M(79)=l:F$ (79) ="BD4DRDBD4HDF 
G" • ; 

168 M(80)=4:F$ (80) ="BR4BD3G4F4UH 
3E3" 1 < 

170 M(81)=9:F$(81)="BD6R9BD3L9" 1 



172 M(82)=4: 
ii i > 

174 M(83)=6: 
DNG3RG4BD3DRD" 1 
176 M(84)=13:F$ 
2UHD4G3U4LD2ND2 
NRG3ND5GD4F2UF2 



F$ (82 ) ="BD3F4G4UE3H3 
F$ (83) ="BR2BDNG2R2DR 



(84)="BR5BDR5F3ND 
G3NU3HU2E2NRBL5E3 
R5ERE" 1 § 
1000 OPEN"0", #1,"F0NT1" 
1010 F0RI=1T084:PRINT#1,F$ (I) :NE 
XT 

1020 F0RI=1T084 
T 

1030 PRINT#1,D: 



:PRINT#1,M(I) :NEX 
PRINT#1,S: CLOSE #1 



74 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



26 143 126 245 

45 244 149 35 

67 131 173 216 

86 176 END 221 

109 15 



T 



Listing 4: GENFCNT2 

0 CLS: PRINT© 19 9, 11 GENERATE FONT2" 
:PRINT@261, "BY H. ALLEN CURTIS": 
PRINT@295, "COPYRIGHT 1987 

8 DIMF$(84) ,M(84) ,X(84) , Y(84) 

9 P=184:D=7:S=6 

10 M ( 1) =7 : F$ ( 1) ="BR3RFL3D3GDLUEN 
R5UER3DRD3RU 

11 DATA 7,3,0 

12 M ( 2 ) =6 : F$ ( 2 ) ="R5ND6FDGNL4FDGL 
5EU4RD4 

13 DATA 6,0,0 

14 M ( 3 ) =6 : F$ ( 3 ) ="BR2R3NDNFL3G2D2 
F2R3NUNEL2H2U2E 

15 DATA 6,2,0 

16 M ( 4)=6 : F$ (4) ="R4NDF2ND2LD3LDL 
4EU4RD4 

17 DATA 6,0,0 

18 M ( 5 ) =6 : F$ ( 5 ) ="R6NDNGL5D3NR3D3 
NLRNU5R4UL 

19 DATA 6,0,0 

20 M(6)=6 : F$ (6) ="R6NDNGL5D3NR3D3 
NLR2HU4 

21 DATA 6,0,0 

22 M(7 ) =6 : F$ (7) ="BR2R3NDNFL3DLND 
4GD2F2NUR3U3NLRD3 

23 DATA 6,2,0 

24 M(8)=5:F$ (8 ) ="D6RU3NU3R4U3LD6 
RU2 

25 DATA 5,0,0 
M ( 9 ) =5 : F$ ( 9 ) ="R3NR2D6NR2LNL2U 



26 
5 

27 
28 



DATA 5,0,0 

M(ip)=5:F$ (ip)="BR3R2ND5GD5L3 
U2LD 

29 DATA 5,3,0 



30 M(ll) =6: F$ (11) ="RD6NLRU3NU3R2 
F2DLUH2E3NLDG 

31 DATA 6,0,0 

32 M(12)=6:F$ (12) ="RD6NLR5U2G2L2 
U6R 

33 DATA 6,0,0 

34 M(13)=6:F$ ( 13 ) ="D6RU5F2NLNDNR 
E3D6LU4 

35 DATA 6,0,0 

36 M ( 14 ) =6 : F$ ( 14 ) ="D6RU6F2NLDNFR 
3U3LD6RU2 

37 DATA 6,0,0 

38 M(15) =6 : F$ ( 15) ="BR2NDG2ND2RD3 
RDR2 URNU 3 EU 2 H 2 LF 

39 DATA 6,2,0 

40 M(16) =6 : F$ (16) ="R5ND2FDGL3D3N 
RL2EU4RD 

41 DATA 6,0,0 

42 M(17) =6:F$ (17)="BR2DLND3GD2F2 
NUR3 DNRU 2 NLNU 3EU2H2NDL 

43 DATA 6,2,0 

44 M( 18 ) =7 : F$ ( 18 ) ="RD6NLRU6R3ND2 
FDGNL2NGD2 FRH 

45 DATA 7,0,0 

4 6 M ( 19 ) =5 : F$ ( 19 ) = " BRR3 NDNFL3 ND2 
GDFNER2 DR2 DNLGL3UL 
47 DATA 5,1,0 

4 8 K(20) =5:F$ (2j3) ="NDR5NDL2D6NRL 
2EU4 

49 DATA 5,0,0 

50 M(21) =5 : F$ (21) ="ND5RD6R3U6RD6 

51 DATA 5,0, id 

52 M(22)=7:F$(22)="NDRD3ED3ED2RN 
U2EU3FU3RD 

53 DATA 7,0,0 

54 M(23)=6:F$ (2 3) ="ND6RD6E2NLNUN 
RF2U6RD6 

55 DATA 6,0,0 

56 M(24)=7:F$(24)="F6RH3NH3E3LG6 
RE2 

57 DATA 7,0,0 

58 M( 25) =7 : F$ ( 25) ="NDRD2RDRD3NLR 



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October 1987 THE RAINBOW 75 



2HU2E3LFG2 

59 DATA 7,0,0 

60 M(26)=6:F$(26)="D2E2NLR4NG6DG 
5R5U2G 

61 DATA 6,0,0 

62 M ( 27 ) =6 : F$ (27) ="BRBD2R3ND3FDL 
3GLFR2ERDR 

63 DATA 6,1,2 

64 M(28)=6:F$(28)="RND5RD6R3NU3E 
U2HLG 

65 DATA 6,0,0 

6 6 M ( 29 ) =5 : F$ (29) ="BRBD2R3NDNFL3 
ND3GD2FR3UR 

67 DATA 5,1,2 

68 M(30)=6:F$ (30)="BR3R2D6NRHGL2 
NU3HU2ERF2U3 

69 DATA 6,3,0 

70 M(31)=5:F$(31) ="BRBD2ND3R3NDF 
DL5NUDFR3 

71 DATA 5,1,2 

72 M(32)=6:F$ ( 3 2 ) ="BR2R2NDNFL2D3 
NRD3 NRL2 EU2 NLU2 

73 DATA 6,2,0 

74 M ( 3 3 ) =7 : F$ ( 3 3 ) ="BR2BD2ND2GDFN 
R2GNLDR4NEU4FU2NRGHL 

75 DATA 7,2,2 

76 M(34)=6:F$ ( 3 4 ) ="RD6NLRU2NU4E2 
RD4RU3 

77 DATA 6,0,0 

78 M(35)=3:F$(35)="BRRBD2D4NRL2E 
U3L 

79 DATA 3,1,0 

80 M(36)=5:F$ (36)="BR4RBD2ND4LD5 
L3UL 

81 DATA 5,4,0 

82 M(37 ) =6 : F$ (3 7) ="RD6NLRUNU5E3R 
G2DRDR ' 

83 DATA 6,0,0 

84 M(38)=3:F$ ( 3 8 ) ="RD6NLR2HU5 

85 DATA 3,0,0 

86 M(39)=6:F$ (39) ="BD2D4RU4F2E2N 
LD4RU3 

87 DATA 6,0,2 

88 M(40)=5:F$ (40)="BD2D4RU4R3D4R 
U3 

89 DATA 5,0,2 

90 M(41)=5:F$(41) ="BRBD2ND3GD2FR 
3NU3EU2HL2 

91 DATA 5,1,2 

92 M ( 42 ) =6 : F$ ( 42 ) ="BD2RD5NLR2HU3 
ER2ND2FDGL2 

93 DATA 6,0,2 

94 M ( 43 ) =6 : F$ (43) ="BRBD2ND2GDFR3 
D2R2HU3NEGU2L2 

95 DATA 6,1,2 

96 M(44)=6:F$(44) ="BD2RD4NLR2HU3 
FERD2RU 

97 DATA 6,0,2 

98 M(45)=5:F$ (4 5) ="BRBD2NR4NDGFR 



3NDFGL4 

99 DATA 5,1,2 

100 M(4 6)=4:F$ (46)="BR2ND5G2NR4F 
D2FRE 

101 DATA 4,2,0 

102 M(47) = 6:F$(4 7)="B.D2ND3RD4R2E 
U3RD4R 

103 DATA 6,0,2 

104 M(48) =5:F$ (48) ="BD2ND2RD3NR2 
FRE2U2LD2 

105 DATA 5,0,2 

106 M(49) =6:F$ (49)="BD2ND2RD4RUE 
NUFDRU4RD2 

107 DATA 6,0,2 

108 M(50) =6:F$ (50) ="BD2F2G2RE4RG 
2F2LH4 

109 DATA 6,0,2 

110 M(51)=5:F$ (51) ="BD2ND2RD3FDN 
L2E2NL2U3RD2 

111 DATA 5,0,2 

112 M(52)=5:F$ (52) ="BD2NDR5G4LNE 
3R5U 

113 DATA 5,0,2 

114 M(53)=5:F$ (53)="BRND5GD4FR3U 
5G2DE3ND4HL2 

115 DATA 5,1,0 

116 M(54)=5:F$(54)="BR2NGD6NL2RN 
R2U6 

117 DATA 5,2,0 

118 M(55) =5:F$ (55) ="BRNGNDR3ND2F 
DGL2NG2DG2R5UL 

119 DATA 5,1,0 

120 M(56) =5 : F$ (56 ) ="BRNGNDR3ND5F 
DGNL2FDGL3UL 

121 DATA 5,1,0 

122 M(57)=6:F$ (57) ="BR3G3DE4D6NL 
RNRU2NRNL4U4 

123 DATA 6,3,0 

124 M(58)=5:F$ (58) ="NR5D2EDR3ND3 
FD2GL3UL 

125 DATA 5,0,0 

126 M(59)=5:F$ ( 59 ) ="BR2NR2G2D3FR 
3NU2EUHL3ND2UE 

127 DATA 5,2,0 

128 M(60) =5:F$(60)="NDNFR5D2HDG2 
D2RU2E 

129 DATA 5,0,0 

130 M(61)=5:F$ (61) ="BRND5GDFGDFR 
3NU5EUHNL2 EUHL2 

131 DATA 5,1,0 

132 M ( 62 ) =5 : F$ ( 6 2 ) ="BRND2GDFR3DG 
2NLRE2U3HND2L2 

133 DATA 5,1,0 

134 M(63)=3:F$ ( 63 ) ="BRD4RU4FL3DR 
3GBD3L 

135 DATA 3,1,0 

13 6 M(64)=4:F$(64)="DRUBR2DRU 

137 DATA 4,0,0 

138 M(65)=6:F$ ( 65 ) ="BRD6RU4NU2NL 



76 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



2R4HULD6RU2NL5RH 

139 DATA 6,1,0 

140 M(66)=5:F$ (66 
3DRG2LEL3 

141 DATA 5,2,0 

142 M(67)=6:F$ (67 
G5BR4RUL 

143 DATA 6,0,1 

144 M(68)=6:F$(68 
R2EFRH3DR2ELHU2NFL 

145 DATA 6,2,0 

146 M(69)=2 :F$ (69 

147 DATA 2,1,0 

148 M(70)=3:F$(70 
U2E2 

149 DATA 3,2,0 
M(71)=3:F$(71 



150 
2 

151 
152 



DATA 3,0,0 
M(72)=7:F$(72 
R5NRHELGLD 2 R 2 DR 

153 DATA 7,1,1 

154 M(73)=5:F$(73 
3D2RU4 

155 DATA 5,2,1 

156 M(74)=2:F$(74 

157 DATA 2,1,5 

158 M(75)=5:F$(75 



="BR2RFRL4GRDR 

= " BDDRUBR4NG5R 

="BR2ND3GD4HDF 

="BRRDLDL 
="BR2G2D2F2RH2 

="F2D2G2RE2U2H 

="BRBDRD4LEHNL 

="BR2BDD2NL2NR 

=" BRBD5D2NLEU 
="BD3R5 



159 DATA 5,0,3 

160 M(76)=1:F$ (76) ="BD5DRU 

161 DATA 1,0,5 

162 M(77)=7:F$ (77) ="BR6G6RE6 

163 DATA 7,6,0 

164 M(78)=1:F$ (78 ) ="BDDRNUBD3DLU 

165 DATA 1,0,1 

166 M(79) =2 : F$ (79) ="BRBDDRNUBD3D 
GLEU 

167 DATA 2,1,1 

168 M(80)=4 :F$ ( 80 ) ="BR3G3F3RH3E3 

169 DATA 4,3,0 

170 M(81)=5:F$(81)="BD2R5BD3L5 

171 DATA 5,0,2 

172 M(82)=4:F$(82)="F3G3RE3H3 

173 DATA 4,0,0 

174 M(83)=5:F$(83)="BRNGNDR3ND2F 
DG2UGBD2R 

175 DATA 5,1,0 

176 M(84) =6:F$ ( 84 ) ="BRGD4FNR3U5E 
R3FD3L3U2R2NUDL 

177 DATA 6,1,0 

1000 OPEN"0", #1,"F0NT2" 

1010 F0RI=1T084 :PRINT#1,F$ (I) :NE 

XT 

1020 F0RI=1T084 : PRINT# 1 , M ( I ) :NEX 
T 

1030 PRINT #1,D:PRINT#1,S:CL0SE#1 



J & M'S 3.5" MICROFLOPPY DRIVES 




Upgrade to the Latest In Technology: J & M's 3.5" microfloppy drives 
allow a 720K format under OS-9 Level 2. (Four limes the storage capacity of 
a standard Coco format OS-9 disk on a single microfloppy diskette!) 
Two Configurations Available: The external drive comes complete with 
case, power supply and cable. The internal drive is ready for installation. It 
simply replaces an existing 5.25" half-height drive. Utilize JDOS, RS DOS or 
your DOS. 

Internal $199.00 External $250.00 

We accept VISA, Mastercard or prepayment. Or, we can ship COD for cash 
or certified check. Shipping is extra. 

J&M Systems Ltd. 

15100- A CENTRAL SOUTHEAST 
ALBUQUERQUE. NEW MEXICO 87123 
505/292*4182 



i//A 



ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU'RE IIM 



NOT ELAND 



.where learning to read music 
.x^lcN is easy and fun! 



RAINBOW 

CEBTIfXATlON 
SEAL 



NOTELAND, a unique combination of a musical instru- 
ment and a course in music developed by Boston composer 
Andy Gaiis, will let you: 



• approach music as a complete 
beginner; 

• learn from an audio cassette 
and a written manual; 

• fool around- and be learning; 

• play a tune with a joystick 
(optional) or cursor keys; 

• record a rune and play it back 
with notation; 

• save your tune on tape or 
disk; ' 

• test yourself witli a bear-the- 
clock quiz; 

• load the program from disk or 
cassette if vou have a CoCo 1 



43^ 



3C 



IF 



frnnrrmmfi 



or CoCo 2 with 32K and 
Extended Color Basic; 
take it home with vou -IF 
YOU ORDER NOWMbr the 
special introductory price of 
$24.95. (Mass. residents add 
5% sales tax.) 

Be sure to specify disk or cassette. 

Elegant Software 

89 Massachusetts- Avenue, Box 251 
Boston, MA 02115 

617-232-3896 



October 1987 TH? RAINBOW 7 



the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 



Fall Fun on the Run 




Freaky Face 

BySanjay Parker 



16K 
ECB 



Try this program for a quick laugh. The result looks like 
an escapee from the CoCo Freak Show! 

The listing: FUNFflCE 

110 REM SAN JAY PARKER 
120 REM FUNNY -FACE 
140 PMODE 3,1 
150 PCLS3 

160 CIRCLE(78,70 ),07,4 

170 CIRCLE (177, 070) ,7,4 

180 CIRCLE (78, 70) ,17,4 

190 CIRCLE (177, 70) ,17,4 

200 PAINT (177, 70) ,2,4 

210 PAINT (78, 70) ,2,4 

220 CIRCLE (177, 70) ,2,4 

230 CIRCLE (78 , 70) , 2 , 4 

240 LINE(96 , 70 ) - ( 116 , 70 ) , PSET 

250 LINE (159, 70) -(139,70) , PSET 

260 LINE(116,70) -(123 ,55) , PSET 

270 LINE(139, 70) -(132,55) , PSET 

78 THE RAINBOW October 1987 




280 LINE(132 , 55) -(123 ,55) , PSET 

290 CIRCLE (114,135) ,7,4 

300 CIRCLE (143, 135) ,7,4 

310 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,90,4 

320 CIRCLE (128, 129 ) ,48,4,1,0, 



50 

330 CIRCLE(128, 96) ,33,4,2 
340 COLOR 4,3 

350 LINE(195,70)-(279,40) , PSET 

360 LINE (61, 70) -(00,40) , PSET 

370 PAINT ( 198 , 109) ,2,4 

380 PAINT(100,30) ,2,4 

390 LINE (102 , 125) -(154 ,125), PS 

ET 

400 PAINT(115,147) ,4,4 
410 PAINT (128, 96) ,2,4 
420 PAINT (118 ,48) ,2,4 
430 PAINT (187, 70) ,1,4 
440 PAINT(87,70) ,1,4 



450 CIRCLE (216, 85) ,24 , 4,1,. 75,. 
25 

460 PAINT(219,85) ,2,4 

470 CIRCLE (38,85) ,24,4,1, .25, .75 

480 PAINT(31,86) ,2,4 

490 CIRCLE(128, 96) ,114,4,1, .54, . 

97 

500 PAINT (60, 34) ,4,4 
510 PAINT(22 , 67) , 4,4 
520 PAINT(234,67) ,4,4 
530 SCREEN1,0 

540 FOR X=l TO 2000:NEXT X 

550 X=RND (2 5 5) : SOUND X,1:GOTO550 



Merry Martian 

By Ed Machurek, Jr. 



16K 
ECB 



Who says Martians are green and mean? This little guy 
winks and smiles and raises his eyebrows all the while. 

The listing: MARTIAN 

0 CLS 

1 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 8 ) "MARTIAN 

2 PRINT: PRINTTAB (4) 11 MA 
RTIAN 

3 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 10 ) " MARTIAN 

4 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 14 ) 11 

MARTIAN 

5 PRINT: PRINTTAB (20) 

"MARTIAN 

6 FORX=1TO3000: NEXT: CLS 

7 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 4 ) " BY 

8 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 8 ) 11 ED MACHU 
REK 

9 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 12 ) " NEW CAST 
LE 

10 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 14 ) " DELAWAR 
E 

110 FORX=1TO6000: NEXT: CLS 

120 PMODEl,l 

130 PCLS 

140 SCREEN1,1 

150 DRAW"BM129,130;R70;G14;H10;G 
10 ;H10 ;G10 ;H10 ; G10 ;H10 ; G10 ;H10 ;G 
10;H10;G10;H14;R78" 
160 CIRCLE(086,086) , 20 , 3 
CIRCLE (172, 86) ,20,3 
CIRCLE(126,99) ,07,4 
DRAW "BM6 0 , 50 ; U4 ; R30 ; D4 ; L3 0 " 
DRAW'BM 168,50 ;U4 ;R30 ; D4 ; L3 



170 
180 
190 
200 
0" 
210 




220 CIRCLE(90,90) ,10,3 
230 CIRCLE(176,90) ,10,3 
240 PAINT(90,90) ,6,3 
250 PAINT(176,90) ,2,3 
260 CIRCLE(90,90) ,5,0 
270 CIRCLE(176,90) ,5,0 
280 PMODEl,3 
290 PCLS 

300 DRAW"BM129 , 130 ;R70 ;G7 ;H5 ;G5 ; 
H5 ; G5 ; H5 ; G5 ; H5 ; G5 ; H5 ; G5 ; H5 ; G5 ; H5 
; G5 ; H5 ; G5 ; H5 ; G5 ; H5 ; G5 ; H5 ; G5 ; H5 ; G 
5;H7;R125" 

310 CIRCLE(86,86) ,20,3 

CIRCLE (172, 86) ,30,1, .50,0 
CIRCLE(126, 99) ,7,4 
DRAW"BM60,50;U8;R30;D8;L30" 
DRAW"BM168 , 50 ; U8 ;R3 0 ; D8 ; L30 11 
CIRCLE (12 6, 96) ,95,3 
CIRCLE(90,90) ,10,3 
CIRCLE(176,90) ,10,3 



CIRCLE(126,96) ,95,3 



320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
390 
400 
410 



PAINT(90,90) ,6,3 
PAINT(176,90) ,2,3 
CIRCLE(90, 90) ,5,0 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 79 



420 PM0DE1,1 46 £> SCREEN1,3 

430 SCREEN1,1 47 £> FORI=1TO200 : NEXTI 

440 FORI=1TO200: NEXTI 480 GOTO420 

450 PMODE 1,3 




\0» 



A Demonstration in Art 



in 



Looking for a way to show off your CoCo? Run this 
program and become the center of attention! You'll think 
yourCoCo went to a modern art gallery and absconded with 
an objel d' art. 

The computer starts by picking random start and stop 
points in the Hi-Res (PMODE 4) mode. You can gain access 
to the main menu by pressing any key once the artwork has 
stopped . By pressing the key of the option you want, you can 
save and load a picture, draw a new picture, look at a list 
of available pictures or end the program. Selecting the End 
option completely erases the program from memory and your 
computer resets. You might omit this line, if enteringby hand, 
until you're through typing and have a copy on disk. 

When saving a copy, don't enter an extension with the 
name; the program automatically adds . ART to the filename. 
It's the same when loading files, too. 

Your files will consume three grans each. To save other 
PMODE 4 screens to disk, use this command: 

SPNZWname.ext" , 3584,9727, 3584 

The listing: COCDART 

10 GOTO90 

20 FORJ=0TOM 

30 POKE65495 , 0 1 HIGH SPEED 
40 P(J)=P(J)+V(J) 

50 IFP(J) <0THENP(J)=0:V(J)=-V(J) 

60 IFP(J)>L(J)THENP(J)=L(J) :V(J) 

=-V(J) 

70 NEXT 

80 RETURN 

90 CLEAR 

100 DIMP(3) ,V(3) ,L(3) 

110 PCLEAR4 : PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS5 : SCREE 




Nl, 1 
120 
130 
140 
150 
160 
170 
180 
190 



L(0)=255:L(1)=191 
L(2)=L(0) :L(3)=L(1) 
FORJ=0TO3 
P(J)=RND(L(J) ) 
V(J)=RND(0) *2-4 
IFV(J) =0THENV( J) =1 
NEXT 
M=3 



200 FORI=0TO200 
210 GOSUB20 

220 LINE(P(0) ,P(1) )-(P(2) ,P(3) ) , 

PRESET 

230 NEXT 

240 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=""THEN2 40 
250 POKE654 94,0 'NORMAL SPEED 
260 CLS : PRINT, , 11 COCO GRAP 

HICS DEMO"," MENU" 



SAVE 
VIEW 



[1] 
[3] 

[5] DIR"," [6] 
ENTER OPTION 



IT"," 
IT", " 



2 70 PRINT, , , , 11 
[2] LOAD IT"," 
[4] DRAW IT"," 
QUIT" , , , H , » 
NUMBER" 

280 A1$=INKEY$:IFA1$=""THEN280 
290 IFA1$="1"THENGOSUB380 
300 IFA1$="2"THENGOSUB450 
310 IFA1$="3"THENGOSUB490 
320 IFA1$="4"THENGOSUB510 
330 IFA1$="5"THENGOSUB520 
340 IFA1$="6"THEN570 
350 GOTO260 
360 GOTO360 
370 GOTO10 

380 CLS: INPUT" GIVE IT A NAME" ;N$ 
390 IFN$=""THEN3 80 

400 IF LEN (N$) >8THENPRINT"THAT 1 S 
TOO LONG" :FORX=1TO500:NEXTX: GOT 
0380 

410 SAVEM N$+"/ART", 3584, 9727, 35 
84 

420 PRINT"ITS DISK FILE NAME IS 



80 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



n ;N$; ,l /ART" 

430 FORX=1TO4000:NEXTX 
440 GOTO260 

450 CLS: INPUT 11 WHAT'S ITS NAME" ;N 
1$ 

46J3 IFN1$=""THEN450 
470 LOADM Nl$+"/ART" 
480 GOTO260 

490 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 

500 A2$=INKEY$: IFA2$=" "THEN500EL 

SE2 60 

510 GOTO10 



520 DIR 

530 PRINT : PRINT" WITH" ; FREE (0) ; 11 
GRANULES REMAINING," 
540 PRINT"PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTI 
NUE . " 

550 EXEC44539 'HOLD UNTIL KEY IS 

PRESSED 

560 GOTO260 

570 POKE113,0:EXEC40999 'CLEARS 0 
UT MACHINE! LIKE TURNING IT OFF 
AND THEN ON AGAIN! 



Mirror Image I 

By Keiran Kenny 

Playing with this fun program is like creating a Rorschach 
test with an Etch-a-Sketch. After you finish drawing, you can 
give someone a personality test. 

With this program, you can draw a picture in the right half 
of the graphics screen(128, 1-255, 191), and it will be repeated 
as a mirror image on the left half of the screen. 

The program uses PEEK (135) and the keyboard. Use the 
arrow keys for up, down, left or right movement; Q for 
northwest; W for northeast; A for southwest; and S for 
southeast. 

Start with a pixel set at 128,96. Pressing I gives you a 
flashing cursor, and 2 restores the pixel. Press 3 to save a 
picture and 4 to load a saved picture. 

You need only press a direction key once, and your trace 
or cursor will continue moving in the chosen direction until 
you press another key. When your trace or cursor is at the 
edge of the screen or at horizontal position 128, it stops until 
you press another key. 

The program only responds to direction keys that will 
move it along or away from the boundary of the graphics 
screen. 

The listing: MIRORPIX 

0 'MIRORPIX': BY KEIRAN KENNY, 

THE HAGUE, 1987. 
10 PMODE4 , 1 : COLOR0 , 5 : PCLS : SCREEN 
1,1 

20 X=128: Y=96 :H=128:V=96 
30 PSET(X,Y,0) : GOTO90 
40 P=PEEK(13 5) 

50 IFX=128ANDP=650RX=12 8ANDP=810 
RX=12 8ANDP=8THENH=12 8 : POKE13 5,0: 
GOTO220 

60 IFX=255ANDP=870RX=255ANDP=830 
RX=255ANDP=9THENH=1 : POKE135 , 0 : GO 
TO220 

70 IFY=1ANDP=810RY=1ANDP=870RY=1 
ANDP=94THENV=Y:POKE135,0:GOTO220 
80 IFY=191ANDP=650RY=191ANDP=830 
RY= 1 9 1 ANDP= 10 THEN V= Y : POKE 1 3 5 , 0 : G 




100 IFP=10THENY=Y+1:V=Y 

110 IFP=8THENX=X-1:H=H+1 

120 IFP=9THENX=X+1:H=H-1 

130 IFP=65THENX=X-1:Y=Y+1:H=H+1: 

V=Y 

140 IFP=81THENX=X-1:Y=Y-1:H=H+1: 
V=Y 

150 IFP=87THENX=X+1:Y=Y-1:H=H-1: 
V=Y 

160 IFP=83THENX=X+1:Y=Y+1:H=H-1: 
V=Y 

170 IFP=49THENC=5 
180 IFP=50THENC=0 
190 IFP=51GOSUB230 
200 IFP=52GOSUB240 

210 IFC=5THENCOLOR0:LINE(X-1,Y-1 
) -(X+l, Y+l) , PSET , BF : COLORC : LINE ( 
X-1,Y-1) -(X+1,Y+1) , PSET, BF: COLOR 
0:LINE (H-l, V-l) - (H+1,V+1) ,PSET,B 
F : COLORC: LINE (H- 1, V-l ) -(H+l, V+l) 
,PSET,BF ELSEPSET(X,Y,C) :PSET(H, 
V,C) 

220 GOTO40 

230 POKE 135,0: CSAVEM" " , PEEK ( &HBA 
) *256,PEEK(&HB7) *2 56-1 , &HB44 A: RE 
TURN 

240 PCLS:POKE13 5,0:CLOADM:RETURN 

October 1987 THE RAINBOW 81 



Prepare Before You Paint 

By Bill Bernico 



16K 
ECB 



Poke 1 78 and Graphics Locator is a handy tool for graphics 
programmers. 

Part one is the Locator section and uses the right joystick. 
Upon running, you'll see two numbers separated by a comma 
in the upper left-hand corner of the screen. Moving the 
joystick advances a cross-hair cursor around the screen. As 
it moves, the coordinates of that cursor will also change. 
Locator helps you estimate the approximate location on the 
screen where you'd like to draw something. 

To move on to part two, the Poke section, press P and a 
new screen appears. POKE 178,0 is displayed, and directly 
below that is a black box, which is colored by a POKE 178 
with a zero. Use the up and down arrow keys to change that 
zero to a number up to 255. Change the number and the box 
will be colored by that particular poke value. This is handy 
for visualizing how graphics would look printed a certain 
color. 

The box is colored using PSET,BF, which is Background 
Fill. You can also use the POKE 178 values in PRINT 
statements to achieve these colors. Right before your PRINT 
statement, add POKE 178, v (v is the value of the color you 
want). Now change your PRINT statement to PRINT 
(X, V) , ,0 and your paint will use the color in the POKE 178 
statement. 

To return to part one, press L. Exit either screen by pressing 

Q(Quit). 

The listing: P178&GL 

1 ' POKE 178 & GRAPHICS LOCATOR 

by Bill Bernico 

2 DIMK$ ( 57 ) : C$="NU2ND2NL2NR2 " : M$ 
="BR4RDNGUBR" : FORL=48T057 : READK$ 
(L) : NEXT: DATA" BR4HU4ERFD4GNLBR2" 



, "BR3R2U6NGD6R2" , "BR3BU5ER2FDG3L 
DR4" , "BR3BU5ER2FDGNLFDGL2NHBR3 " , 
"BR6U6G3R4BD3" , "BR3 BUFR2EU2HL3U2 
R4BD6" , "BR3BU3R3 FDGL2HU4ER2BD6BR 
" , "BR3BU6R4DG3D2BR3 

3 DATA" BR4HUER2EUHL2GDFR2FDGNL2B 
R" , "BR4R2EU4HL2GDFR3BD3 " : PMODE4 , 
1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : COLORS , 1 

4 I$=INKEY$: IFI$="P"THEN7ELSEIFI 
$="Q"THENCLS: END 

5 POKE178,0:GOSUB6:H=INT(JOYSTK( 
0) *4 .049) : V=INT ( JOYSTK ( 1) *3 .045) 
:GOT04 

6 PCLS 1 : K$=STR$ ( H ) : DRAW" BM2 , 10 " ; 
GOSUB17 : DRAWBM27 , 10DNGU" : K$=STR 
$ (V) : DRAW "BM 30 , 10" :GOSUB17 : DRAW" 
BM=H; , =V;C0"+C$: RETURN 

7 V=0: PCLS 1: DRAW" BM50, 20U8R4FD2G 
L4D4 BR10HU6ER4FD6GNL4BR6U8D4RNE4 
F4BR4NR6U4NR4U4R6BM95 , 20RU6NGD6R 
BR3BU6R4DG3 D2BR7HUER2EUHL2GDFR2F 
DGNL2BR3URDNLGBU5" : LINE (59 , 39) - ( 
101,71) ,PSET,B 

8 GOSUB16 : POKE178 , V : LINE ( 60 , 40 ) - 
(100,70) ,PSET,BF 

9 I$=INKEY$ :IFI$=""THEN9 

10 IFI$=CHR$ (94)THENV=V+1 

11 IFV>25 5THENV=0 

12 I FI $=CHR$ ( 10 ) THENV=V- 1 

13 IFV<0THENV=255 

14 IFI $="L"THEN5ELSEIFI$="Q"THEN 
CLS : END 

15 GOT08 

16 POKE178,0:LINE(117,22)-(143,1 
2) , PRESET, BF:K$=STR$ (V) : DRAW'BMl 
18 , 20C0 " : GOSUB1 7 : RETURN 

17 FORX=lTOLEN(K$) :Y=ASC(MID$(K$ 
, X , 1 ) ) : DRAWK$ ( Y ) : NEXT : RETURN 



How Cold Is It? 

By Harvey Dettmann 



16K 
ECB 



Wind Chill is an accurate way to determine the wind chill 
temperature just by entering the temperature and wind 
velocity at the prompts. When you enter anything above 9 
degrees Fahrenheit and a wind velocity, you get the wind chill. 
If you enter 9 degrees or lower with a wind velocity of 10 
mph or more, you will get a little surprise! (Try entering 86 
degrees with a wind velocity of 0, and you'll get another little 
surprise.) 

The listing: WINDCHIL 

1)8 1 WIND CHILL 

2j3 1 k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k kk 

30 ' * HARVEY DETTMANN * 

82 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



1 * SUSSEX, WIS. * 

• * 53089 * 

* k k k k k k k k k k k kk k k k k k k 

CLS 

PRINT§40,"** WIND CHILL **" 
PRINT: PRINT 



ii 
ii 



40 

50 
60 
70 
80 
90 

100 INPUT 
INT: INPUT 
: IF V<4 THEN 
110 C=( (10.45 
V) ) - ( . 447041 
1.4)) +91.4 
120 PRINT 
130 PRINT USING " 

#.####";c 

140 PRINT: PRINT 
150 IF C<-10 THEN 
R C-C-C-COLD 1 1 " 



TEMP (F) : " ; T : PR 
WIND VELOCITY: " ; V 
V = 4 

+ (6.686112 * SQR( 
*V) ) /22.034 * (T-9 



WINDCHILL ## 



PRINT " BR-R- 



160 IF C>85 THEN PRINT » HHHHH 
-HOT HOT" 
170 PRINT 

180 INPUT" ANOTHER TRY (Y/N)";R 
$ 



190 IF R$="Y"THEN 70 ELSE 200 

200 CLS:PRINT@236, "e n d":GOTO 2 
10 

210 GOTO 210 




It's a Touchdown! 

By Darrel Behrmann 



4K 



This program is a Simulation based on hand-held football 
games. The object is simply to score a touchdown. 

The player is shown on the screen as an 'X', and the 
opposing team (controlled by the computer) is shown with 
dashes (--). Press the arrow keys to move the player up, down 
and across the screen. The player can't move backward. 

The tacklers move toward the player at a rate determined 
by the level of difficulty you select. Two tacklers may occupy 
the same position simultaneously. Yards to go to a first down 
areshownat the top of the screen, while yards to a touchdown 
are shown below. Have fun! 

The listing: FOOTBALL 

0 'COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 
BY DARREL BEHRMANN 
l^J i *************************** 

20 '** FOOTBALL 

30 •** BY DARREL BEHRMANN 

40 '** U-251 RD. 16 RT. 1 

50 '** NAPOLEON, OH 43545 

60 '** JANUARY 1987 

7^3 **************************** 

80 CLS: INPUT "EASY OR HARD (0-9) 
" ; DF 

90 YDS =8J3:DN=1J3:D=1 
100 CLS 

110 K=0:V=0:K(1) =3 :V(1) =-l:H(2)= 
3:V(2)=,0:H(3)=3:V(3)=1:H(4)=5:V( 
4)=0:H(5)=7:V(5) =0 

120 FOR X=17j3 TO 181: PRINT @X,CH 

R$ (12 8) ; : NEXT : PRINT@2 02 , CHR$ (128 

) ; :PRINT@2 34 ,CHR$ (12 8) ;:PRINT@26 

6,CHR$(128) ; :PRINT@213,CHR$(128) 

;:PRINT@24 5,CHR$(128) ; :PRINT@277 

,CHR$(12 8) ;:FORX=298 TO 3J39:PRIN 

T@X, CHR$ ( 12 8 ) ; : NEXT 

130 PRINT @23 5+H+V*3 2, "X" ; 

140 FOR X=l TO 5: PRINT @235+H(X) 

+V(X) *3 2, "-" ; : NEXT 

150 PRINT@2 , "YARDS TO GO :";DN:P 
RINT @34,"DOWN NO : " ; D 
160 PRINT® 4 50, "YARD TO GO TO TOU 
CHDOWN :";YDS 



170 I$=INKEY$ 
18 0 OH=H:OV=V 

190 IF I$=" A " THEN IF V<>-1 THEN 
V=V-1 

200 IF I$=CHR$(9) THEN YDS=YDS-1 
:DN=DN-1:IF H<>9 THEN H=H+1 ELSE 
E=0 

210 IF YDS=0 THEN SOUND 2 55,55:R 
UN 

220 IF DN<=,0 THEN DN=,0:MI=1 
23J3 IF I$=CHR$(1J3) THEN IF Vol 
THEN V=V+1 

24J3 PRINT@23 5+OH+OV*3 2, " "; 
250 FOR X=l TO 5 : IF H=H(X) AND V 
=V(X) THEN SOUND 100 ,10'. SOUND 1, 
5:DN=DN+l: YDS=YDS+l:GOTO 290 
260 NEXT X 

270 IF RND(10-DF)=1 THEN GOSUB 3 

30: 'MOVE TACKLERS 

280 GOTO 13J3 

290 I$=INKEY$: 'TACKLED 

300 IF MI=,0 THEN D=D+1:IF D=5 TH 

EN SOUND 10, 10: SOUND 1,5:CLS:PRI 

NT YDS;" YARDS TO A TOUCHDOWN.": 

D=l : YDS=8 0 : INPUT "PRESS ENTER TO 

PLAY AGAIN" ;AN$: RUN 
31J3 IF MI=1 THEN MI=J3 : DN=1J3 : D=l 
320 GOTO 100 
330 MT=RND ( 5 ) : HV=RND ( 2 ) 
34J3 OH(MT)=H(MT) :OV(MT)=V(MT) 
35J3 IF HV=1 THEN IF H (MT) <H THEN 

H(MT)=H(MT)+1 ELSE IF H (MT) >H T 
HEN H (MT) =H (MT) -1 

360 IF HV=2 THEN IF V(MT)<V THEN 
V(MT) =V(MT)+l" ELSE IF V(MT)>V T 
HEN V(MT) =V(MT) -1 

370 PRINT@235+OH(MT)+OV(MT) *32," 
ii . 

3 80 RETURN 

Contributions to"Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in at one 
sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, although 
the short programs are limited in scope, many novice programmers 
find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve the software 
written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but 
we cannot key in program listings. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary, explaining how the program works. 
If your submission is accepted for publication, the payment rate will 
be established and agreed upon prior to publication. 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 



83 



^B a s i c Tra i ning 







CoCo 3 



Much Ado About 
Nothing 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Last month we took our first ten- 
tative steps to immerse ourselves 
into the vast, newly-discovered 
sea of CoCo 3 concepts. The water 
wasn't too deep, and we got a taste of 
things to come. 

Our thesis for today is that, too often, 
we race through a tutorial, complete 
and save the results, and race off to 
chase down the next challenge, little 
realizing more challenges stalk us at the 
very instant we supposedly finish our 
last project. 

We need to oil the squeaky cogs of our 
minds and use the resultant program as 
a stepping stone to greater creative 
efforts. 

Type Listing 1. You may have saved 
it last month and squirreled it away. If 
so, save time — load and run it. Did you 
notice on the first trial, the screen was 
completely green? Only after pressing 
BREAK and typing RUN did the desired 
screen color emerge. 

The three strips of text seem final. At 
first blush, it seems that except for 
relocating the lines, we can do nothing 
further to enhance, modify or improve 
our work. A creative dead end has been 
reached. 

The three strips were placed near the 
top of the screen to keep the work in 
progress as near toeyelevei as practical. 
Relocating can wait until the program 
is set in concrete. Repositioning is a joy 
using the LOCATE statement. 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 



If you pause to stare at the display 
and don't get mesmerized by the blink- 
ing strip, you may detect a flickering 
creative thought. You will find, as a 
newcomer to the CoCo 3, that revising 
an existing tutorial is very- productive. 
You get additional practice to sharpen 
your new skills. 

The first thing that came to mind was 
to replace my name with another. Since 
I love my name, the next idea was to 
restore it in place of the unsurping 
name. This is just another way to say 
"alternate two names." 

The plan evolved! Without changing 
any colors of KDK0NUT1, modify the 
program to alternate Joseph Kolar and 
Belinda Ramsey. 

When working on a program, it is 
advisable to make frequent saves. After 
I give my first save a full name, each 
following modification uses only the 
first letter and a number for each suc- 
ceeding save. If it is merely a variant of 
the previous one with no significant 
change, I add a letter. Thus, K4R is the 
fifth progression of KDKDNUT1 that is a 
renumbered version of l<4. K4B is the 
sixth progression, but the multiple LINE 
statements were broken up into individ- 
ual LINE statements. Type 61 PRINT" 
BELINDA RAMSEY"; and run. 

This is Listing K3A, which indicates 
this is a slight modification, A, of the 
fourth modification, 3, in the KDKDNUT, 
K, series. 

DEL199- 

300 WIDTH40:LIST 
100 GDTD100 

Now run this. Belinda came out OK, 
but we lost Joseph. Type: 



60 IF PEEI<(343 = 191] THEN 

GDTD61 ELSE 62 
62 PRINT" JOSEPH KOLAR"; 

Run this. All we get is Joseph. Fi 
doesn't do a thing. 

Mask Line 60 with a REM and run. We 
get both names. Unmask Line 60. Now 
type PRINT PEEI<=(343) and press 
ENTER. 

We get 255, which is why we get Line 
62. If Fl were pressed, it would be 191 
and the CoCo would be directed to Line 

61. We must find some way to activate 
Line 61. 

At the end of Line 61, type: 

:GOTD200 (We want to bypass 
Line 62.) 

DEL100 

199 IF PEEI<(342) = 191 THEN 
G0T061 ELSE 200 

200 IF PEEI<(342)=191 THEN 
GOTD 62 ELSE 199 

Now run and press CTRL. We are on 
the right track, even though it doesn't 
look like it. Line 199 tells us to type 
G0T061 to see if CTRL is pressed. If it 
isn't, type GOTD200. If it is pressed, type 
GDTD62 or else go back to Line 199. In 
other words, CTRL must be pressed or 
the CoCo loops, patiently waiting for 
that happy event. 

What we must do now is bring the 
two names into the red ribbon strip. REM 
both lines 40 and 50. 

At the beginning of both lines 61 and 

62, type LOCATE 11 , 5 : ATTR4 , 7 : . Run 
and press CTRL. Repeat this a few times. 
Sometimes we get one or the other of 
the two names. The third ribbon of text 



84 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



is shaky. Once in a blue moon, we get 
an orange background. 

This is Listing K. Type DEL40-50. 

In order to stop the third strip from 
quivering Jike jelJo, stabilize the display 
and get rid of the cursor after Belinda, 
in front of Line 200, type LO- 
CATES, 0 : RTTR2 , 4 : . This moves the 
cursor away from the main display. Just 
to be safe and make sure we don't get 
an orange screen, in front of Line 199 
type RTTR2 , 4 : and run. 

To use the ALT key for Belinda, 
change 342 to 341 in Line 200. Now 
run. Toggle between the CTRL and ALT 
keys. This is Listing Kl. 

Mask Line 50 and run. The third strip 
is missing until CTRL is pressed. This 
means we must relocate lines 61 and 62 
after Line 90. 

Rekey Line 61 as Line 91 and rekey 
Line 62 as Line 92. Type DEL60-62. 

In Line 99 change 61 to 91. In Line 
200 change 62 to 92 and run. Type 
RENUM10000,0,10 and run. This was 
done to avoid programming confusion, 
because the first digit of the line number 
falls off the screen on my TV. This is 
Listing l<2. 

Toggling back and forth gave me the 



idea to coord inate the blue strip with the 
orange strip by giving the blue strip a 
meaningful title. It didn't take much 
head-scratching to pick a pair of titles. 

Since Belinda appeared after typing 
RUN, rekey 10050 " TUTOR I RL FDR 
BEL INDR " ; . Start with two blank spa- 
ces to maintain symmetry. Now run. It 
looks good. Toggle between the CTRL 
and ALT keys. 

It finally dawned on me that I needed 
two parallel constructions to keep 
Joseph and Belinda separate. 

Edit Line 10090 to insert at the begin- 
ning the information embedded in lines 
10030 to 10050. Type 10090 L □ - 
CRTEB , 2 : RTTR3, 2 , B : PRINT" TUTDR- 
IRL FDR BELINDR. Now run. 

Edit Line 101 00 and insert at the 
beginning the hot scoop from lines 
10030 to 10050 — except change BE- 
LINDR to JOSEPH. Leave a blank trail- 
ing space after JOSEPH and don't forget 
to insert a colon (:) between each state- 
ment in the new line. Now run. Type 
DEL10030-10050 and run. This is 
Listing l<3. 

Type DEL10110. In front of Line 
J0120, type LOCRTE0,0: and run. 

This is Listing K3R, which indicates 



this is a slight modification, R, of the 
fourth modification, 3, in the KDKDNUT, 
K, series. 

All we must do now is add the infor- 
mation in lines 10060 to 10080 to the 
end of Line 10100. 

Add the following to Line 10100: 
LOCRTEB , B : RTTR2 , 4 : PRINT" INVER- 
NESS, EL., 32650"; and run. 

In Line 10090, in front of :G0T0 
10130, type LOCRTEB ,8:RTTR2,4 
:PRINT" HERNRNDO , PL . , 32642". 
Note two blank spaces in front of the 
ZIP. Now run. 

Type DEL10060-100B0 and run. 
Note that you always check your work 
to see if it is OK — before you delete 
supposedly redundant program lines. 
This is Listing l<4. 

Type RENUM0, 10000, 10 and run. 
This is Listing K4H. 

If you want to view the listing in the 
regular 32-by- 16 text format, simply 
type WIDTH32, press ENTER and type 
LIST. 

Since the high program line numbers 
tend to confuse, Listing K4R is merely 
a more acceptable line numbering se- 
quence. It is a condensed, multiple LINE 
statement program. 



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Checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. 



October 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



85 



For the newcomer KoKonuts, or 
should ! say CoConauts, who find 
multiple LINE statements uncomforta- 
ble to handle, K4B is broken down into 
one statement per program line. 

You should be able to dope it out and 
follow the action. You will be struck 
with how simple the program really is. 
Outside of being aware that the pro- 
gram isn't earth-shattering, you may 
wonder, why K4B wasn't created in the 
first place. 

Sad to say, but the obvious solution 
eluded me. Only through trial and error 
did I manage to get on the right track, 
and even then I had to grope around 
seeking the best way to make it work to 
my satisfaction. It was fun solving each 
small problem that inexorably ad- 
vanced to its completion. 

When I looked at KDKQNUT1, I didn't 
foresee the final product. Each vaguely 
defined idea gradually coalesced until a 
definite program was envisioned. Once 
the end product was conceptualized, it 
was a matter of working stubbornly 
toward the goal. You were left to your 
own initiative to save or not to save any 
of the intervening listings we developed. 

For your homework assignment, 
from what you have discovered in last 
month's tutorial, substitute the Fl and 
F2 keys to flip back and forth between 
displays. ■ 

If you are a glutton for punishment, 
type in TRON, press ENTER and study 
K4B. You will see some jittery line 
numbers in brackets at the top of the 
display. Press CTRL and hold it. You will 
be able to compare the bracketed line 
numbers with Listing K4B. It starts out 
waiting for a key to be pressed. One or 
the other must be pressed. The default 
is the Belinda display, which skirts the 
Joseph one with the GOTO30 instruc- 
tion. Can you trace the routes that the 
program took? 

To come full circle and convert K4B 



on the CoCo 3 to the Lo-Res, 32-by-l 6 
text screen and make an equivalent 
program, type 20 WIDTH32 and run. 

It was relatively easy to convert the 
program. Whatever lines bombed out, 
the CoCo began from the beginning of 
the listing and rewarded me with an HP 
Error message (Hi-Res print error). I 
edited the guilty line to an equivalent 
Lo-Res statement (i.e., PR I NT@jc, " " ; in 
place of LDCATEa, 6). 

X was determined by trial and error 
and the lines adjusted to maintain 
symmetry. These were the changes I 
made: 

Lines 31 and 40, typePRINT@37, ""; 
Lines 33 and 43, type PRINTS 
104/'"; 

Lines 36 and 46, type PRINTS 
165,""; 

Lines 32 and 42, remove one space at 

the beginning. 
Lines 35 and 45, take out one space 

between the names. 
Line 38, remove one space before the 

ZIP number. 
Line 45, insert one space at the end. 
Line 48, remove the period. 
Lines 50 and 60, mask with REM and 

run. 

Note: flTTR statements are ignored by 
the CoCo 3. Remarked, Hi-Res lines are 
harmless. If you have a CoCo 3, you 
may use the ALT, CTRL, Fl and F2 keys 
in the 32-by-16 mode. 

Type 29 CL53. In front of Line 40, 
type CLS4:. Delete lines 31, 34, 37, 41, 
44, 47, 5 1 and 6 1 . In Line 52, change 30 
to 25 and run. This is Listing l<5. 

The program could have been refined 
further by making Line 32 begin with 
PRINT@37, instead of PRINT and 
DEL30 and so forth. Make all the re- 
quired changes. Type DEL50 and DEL 60. 
In lines 39 and 52, change 60 to 62. This 
is Listing l<6. 



The enterprising CoCo 3 owner will 
want to convert l<6 so owners of older 
CoCo models can view the unvarnished 
version. 

Compare listings K6 and K7. Lines 10 
and 20 were both killed because older 
CoCo models did not understand the 
CoCo 3 statements. Now run. 

Lines 32 and 35 added the final blank 
space, and Line 38 had the period 
removed. Moving to the other display, 
Line 48 was relocated one unit to the 
left; the period was edited out; a final 
blank space was added. 

Do you recall that last month it was 
brought to your attention that in a 
PRINT statement the CoCo 3 automat- 
ically adds a final blank space if the 
semicolon is used? This is not the case 
with the older models; therefore, we had 
to realign the characters. 

Type DEL52-62. These lines were 
unintelligible to older versions of the 
CoCo 3. To parody these missing keys, 
ALT and CTRL, the INKEY$ function was 
substituted. If the up arrow key was 
pressed, the CoCo was instructed to 
display Belinda, and if the SHI FT and up 
arrow keys were pressed, then Joseph 
would be displayed. If the @ key was 
tapped, the program would be listed. If 
no keys were pressed, the CoCo would 
wait patiently for some instruction. 

Finally, Line 39 was changed, after 
the initial display of Belinda, to go to 
INKEY$ to await the user's pleasure. 

When I printed the listing from the 
CoCo 3, Line 53, the left arrow was 
printed as an underline in the listing on 
my printer. This is Listing l<7. 

Looking back at what we created, it 
sure isn't impressive. In fact, it is down- 
right mundane. This tutorial is much 
ado about nothing. Thanks to the ado, 
I hope you have enjoyed the jaunt 
through some of CoCo's features and 
had a productive learning expe- 
rience. □ 



Listing 1: 

j3 '<KOKONUTl> 
5 ON BRK GOT03£J£J 
10 WIDTH4£J 
16 LOCATE 8, 2 
20 ATTR 3,2,B 

30 PRINT" Tutorial For Kokonuts" 

4£J LOCATEll,5 

50 ATTR4 , 7 

60 PRINT 11 JOSEPH KOLAR 11 ; 

70 LOCATE 8, 8 



80 ATTR2 , 4 

90 PRINT 11 INVERNESS, FL. , 3265£J ff 
I 

95 LOCATE£J,£J 

199 IF PEEK(3 41)=191 THEN LOCATE 
12,11 ELSE IF PEEK(342)=191 THE 

N LOCATE 12,15 ELSE GOTO 199 

200 PRINT 11 HELLO THERE! ";:LOCA 
TE0 ,0 

201 IF PEEK(343)=191 THEN RUN EL 
SE IF PEEK(344)=191 THEN LIST EL 
SE 201 

300 WIDTH32:LISTlj3j3- 



86 THE RAINBOW October 1 987 




During September 1987 OWL-WARE is 5 years old! Our current owl logo 
was first formed in October of that year. Now that our logo is five years, 
someone said it should have a name. We don't know if the owl is a he, she, 
or it. You help us decide! Rules are as follows: 

All enrnes must be is urm/ig and received by Oct. 8, 1987 or at Rainbowfest 
Oct. 9 or 10. No phone entries. 

2 All entries becomes the property of OWL- WARE, and owl names will be 
used in ads as we wish. 

3. No purchase necessary. 

4. To win you must be ihe first entry of a selected name. There will be 4 
different names winning prizes. 

At least one of the winning names will be selected from an entry at 
Rainbowfest. 

. Prizes will be in OWL-WARE gift certificates as follows: 1st S250, 2nd 
$100, 3rd. S50, and S50 from Rainbowfest entries only. 
7. Winners will be announced at Rainbowfest Oct. 1 1 . 



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For those who want to put together 
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Disk Tutorial 3 Utilities 2 Games 

DISK TUTOR Version 1.1 

LEARN EVERYTHING ABOUT DISK BASIC 
FROM THIS MACHINE LANGUAGE 
PROGRAM. THE TUTOR TAKES YOU STEP 
BY STEP THROUGH THE LESSONS AND 
CORRECTS YOUR MISTAKES A MULTI- 
LESSON TUTORIAL THAT WILL GIVE YOU 
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OWL DOS 

AN OPERATING SYSTEM THAT GIVES 
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USE OF DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES . 
CORRECTS FLOATING POINT NUMBER 
ERROR. 

COPY-IT 

QUICKLY COPIES SELECTED PROGRAMS 
FROM DISK. USE WILD CARD OPTION 
SEARCH TO SELECT GROUPS OF 
PROGRAMS FOR COPY (NOT FOR PRO- 
TECTED PROGRAMS) 

VERIFY 

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DISK DRIVE PURCHASE!!! 



Listing 2: 
0 '<K> 

5 ON BRK GOTO300 
10 WIDTH40 
16 LOCATE8,2 
20 ATTR 3,2,B 

30 PRINT" Tutorial For Kokonuts" 

• 

40 'LOCATE 11, 5 
50 1 ATTR4 , 7 

60 IF PEEK(34 3)=191 THEN GOT061 
ELSE 62 

61 L0CATE11,5:ATTR4,7:PRINT" BEL 
INDA RAMSEY" ; :GOTO200 

62 LOCATE11, 5 : ATTR4 , 7 : PRINT" JO 
SEPH KOLAR" ; 

70 LOCATE8,8 
80 ATTR2 , 4 

90 PRINT" INVERNESS, FL. , 3 26 50" 

ft 

A 

95 LOCATE0, 0 

199 IF PEEK(342)=191 THEN GOT061 
ELSE 200 

200 IF PEEK(342)=191 THEN GOT062 
ELSE 199 

300 WIDTH4j3 : LIST 



Listing 4: 



10000 '<K2> 

10010 ON BRK GOTO10140 
10020 WIDTH40 
10030 LOCATE8,2 
10040 ATTR 3,2,B 

10050 PRINT" Tutorial For Kokonu 
ts" ; 

10060 LOCATE8,8 
10070 ATTR2 , 4 

10080 PRINT" INVERNESS, FL. , 326 
50"; 

10090 L0CATE11,5:ATTR4,7:PRINT" 
BELINDA RAMSEY" ; :GOTO10 130 
10100 LOCATE 1 1, 5 :ATTR4, 7: PRINT" 

JOSEPH KOLAR" ; 
10110 LOCATE0,0 

10120 ATTR2,4:IF PEEK(342) =191 T 

HEN GOTO10090 ELSE 10130 

10130 LOCATE0,0:ATTR2,4:IF PEEK( 

341) =191 THEN GOTO10100 ELSE 101 

20 

10140 WIDTH40:LIST 



Listing 3: 
0 '<K1> 

5 ON BRK GOTO300 
10 WIDTH40 
16 LOCATE8,2 
20 ATTR 3,2,B 

30 PRINT" Tutorial For Kokonuts" 

60 IF PEEK(343) =191 THEN GOT061 
ELSE 62 

61 L0CATE11,5:ATTR4,7:PRINT" BEL 
INDA RAMSEY" ; :GOTO200 

62 LOCATE 1 1, 5 :ATTR4, 7: PRINT" JO 
SEPH KOLAR" ; 

70 LOCATE8,8 
80 ATTR2 , 4 

90 PRINT" INVERNESS, FL. , 32650" 
95 LOCATE0,0 

199 ATTR2,4:IF PEEK(342 ) =191 THE 
N GOT061 ELSE 200 

200 LOCATE0,0:ATTR2,4:IF PEEK(34 
1)=191 THEN GOT062 ELSE 199 

300 WIDTH40:LIST 



Listing 5: 



10000 '<K3> 

10010 ON BRK GOTO 10 140 
10020 WIDTH40 
10060 LOCATE8,8 
10070 ATTR2 , 4 

10080 PRINT" INVERNESS, FL. , 326 
50"; 

10090 LOCATE 8 , 2 : ATTR 3 , 2 , B: PRINT" 
Tutorial For Belinda" ;: LOCATE1 
1 , 5 : ATTR4 , 7 : PRINT" BELINDA RAMS 
EY" ; :GOTO10130 

10 100 LOCATE8 , 2 : ATTR3 , 2 , B: PRINT" 
Tutorial For Joseph ";:LOCATEl 
1,5:ATTR4,7:PRINT" JOSEPH KOLA 
R" ; 

10110 LOCATE0,0 

10120 ATTR2,4:IF PEEK(342) =191 T 

HEN GOTO10090 ELSE 10130 

10130 LOCATE0,0:ATTR2,4:IF PEEK ( 

341)=191 THEN GOTO10100 ELSE 101 

20 

10140 WIDTH40:LIST 



90 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



Listing 6: 

10000 '<K3A> 

10010 ON BRK GOT01J314J3 

10020 WIDTH4j3 

10060 LOCATE8,8 

10070 ATTR2 , 4 

10080 PRINT" INVERNESS, FL. , 326 
50" ; 

10090 LOCATE 8 , 2 : ATTR3 , 2 , B : PRINT" 
Tutorial For Belinda" ; : LOCATE1 
1,5:ATTR4,7:PRINT" BELINDA RAMS 
EY" ; :GOT01j313j3 

10100 LOCATE8 , 2 : ATTR3 , 2 , B : PRINT" 
Tutorial For Joseph " ; : LOCATE1 
1,5: ATTR4 , 7 : PRINT 11 JOS EPH KOLA 
R"; 

10120 LOCATE^ , 0 : ATTR2 , 4 : IF PEEK( 
342) =191 THEN GOTO10090 ELSE 101 
30 

10130 LOCATE^ ,0 : ATTR2 , 4 : IF PEEK( 
341) =191 THEN GOT01j31j3j3 ELSE 101 
20 

10140 WIDTH4J3 :LIST 



RNANDO, FL., 3 2 642 " ; : GOT01J313J3 
10100 LOCATE 8 , 2 : ATTR3 , 2 , B : PRINT" 
Tutorial For Joseph 11 ; : LOCATE1 
1,5:ATTR4,7:PRINT" JOSEPH KOLA 
R" ; : LOCATE8 , 8 : ATTR2 , 4 : PRINT" INV 
ERNESS, FL., 3265)3"; 
10120 LOCATEj3,j3:ATTR2,4:IF PEEK ( 
342) =191 THEN GOTO10090 ELSE 101 
30 

10130 LOCATEj3,j3:ATTR2,4:IF PEEK ( 
341) =191 THEN GOTO10100 ELSE 101 
20 

10140 LIST 



Listing 7: 
10000 '<K4> 

10010 ON BRK GOT01j314j3 
10020 WIDTH4J3 

10090 LOCATE8 , 2 : ATTR3 , 2 , B : PRINT" 
Tutorial For Belinda" ;: LOCATE 1 
1,5:ATTR4,7:PRINT" BELINDA RAMS 
EY" ; : LOCATE 8 , 8 : ATTR2 , 4 : PRINT" HE 



Listing 8: 

0 '<K4A> 

10 ON BRK GOT07j3 

20 WIDTH4J3 

30 LOCATE8,2:ATTR3,2,B:PRINT" T 
utorial For Belinda" ;: LOCATE11 , 5 
:ATTR4,7:PRINT" BELINDA RAMSEY" 
; : LOCATE 8,8: ATTR2 , 4 : PRINT " HERNA 
NDO, FL. , 32642 ";:GOT06j3 
40 LOCATE8,2:ATTR3,2,B:PRINT" T 
utorial For Joseph " ; : LOCATE11 , 5 
: ATTR4 , 7 : PRINT " JOSEPH KOLAR" ; 
: LOCATE 8,8: ATTR2 , 4 : PRINT " I NVERN 
ESS, FL., 32S50"', 

50 L0CATEJ3,J3:ATTR2,4:IF PEEK (342 

)=191 THEN GOT03J3 ELSE 60 

60 L0CATEJ3,J3:ATTR2,4:IF PEEK (3 41 

)=191 THEN GOT04j3 ELSE 50 

10 LIST 



PRINTERS! 

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Okimate 20 Color Printer 5 1 35 

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Fujitsu 2200 (132 col.) s 520 

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Qume Letterpro 20 (Letter Qual.) S 44S 

Silver Reed 420 (Daisy Wheel) ... s 240 
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ACCESSORIES! 

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Taxan 12" Amber Monitor 5 1 35 

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w/Slot (80 col.) s 30 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot (1 32 col.) M5 

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Stand w/Diskette Storage (132 col.) s 57 

Other Printers, Monitors, and Accessories for CoCo 

and IBM upon request. 

*15 off interface with purchase of printer. 

Find your cheapest published price and we'll beat it.'!! 



DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS! 

ALL '/ 2 HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives') ... J 235 

Drive 0, 1 (addressed as 4 drives') . *350 

All above complete with HDS controller, 
cable, & drive in case with power supply 

Bare Double Sided Drives . s 1 09 

Dual '/2 Height Case w/ Power Supply M9 

Double Sided Adapter . $ 25 

HDS Controller, RS ROM & Instructions s 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes s 32 & *3 s/h 

We use the HDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROM's. 
Shipping Costs: *5/ drive or power supply, *I0 max. 
Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft — HO. Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft-*20. 
Other cables on request. (Add $ 3 00 shipping) 



SP-2 INTERFACE for 
EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Optional external switch ( s 5°o extra) frees parallel 
port for use with other computers 

■ M9 95 (plus S3°° shipping) 



SP-3 INTERFACE for 
MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem/printer switch — no need for Y-cables or 
plugging/unplugging cables 

■ *64 95 (plus ^3oo shipping) 



Both also available for IBM, RS-232 and Apple IIC computers. 



P.O. Box 293 
Raritan, NJ 08869 
(201) 722- 1 OSS 

ENGINEERING 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 91 



Listing 9: 
0 '<K4B> 

10 ON BRK GOTO70 
20 WIDTH 4 p 

30 LOCATE8,2 

31 ATTR3 , 2 , B 

3 2 PRINT" Tutorial For Belinda" 

3 3 LOCATEll,5 
3 4 ATTR4 , 7 

35 PRINT" BELINDA RAMSEY" ; 
3 6 LOCATE8,8 

37 ATTR2 , 4 

38 PRINT" HERNANDO, FL. , 32 6 42 
it . 

39 GOT06J3 

40 LOCATE8,2 

41 ATTR3 , 2 , B 

42 PRINT" Tutorial For Joseph " 

• 

43 L0CATE11,5 

44 ATTR4 , 7 

45 PRINT" JOSEPH KOLAR"; 

46 LOCATE 8, 8 

47 ATTR2 , 4 

48 PRINT" INVERNESS, FL. , 3265)3" 

50 LOCATE (3,0: 

51 ATTR2 , 4 

52 IF PEEK(342) =191 THEN 30 ELSE 
60 

6(3 LOCATE^) , 0 

61 ATTR2 , 4 

62 IF PEEK(341) =191 THEN 40 ELSE 
50 

70 LIST 



Listing 10: 
0 '<K5> 

10 ON BRK GOTO 70 
20 WIDTH3 2 

29 CLS3 

30 PRINT@37, "»; 

3 2 PRINT" Tutorial For Belinda"; 

3 3 PRINT© lj34," " ; 

35 PRINT" BELINDA RAMSEY"; 

3 6 PRINT@165," "; 

38 PRINT" HERNANDO, FL, 32642 "; 

39 GOTO60 

40 CLS4:PRINT@37,""; 

42 PRINT" Tutorial For Joseph 11 ; 

43 PRINT@104, ""; 

45 PRINT" JOSEPH KOLAR "; 

4 6 PRINT@165, "" ; 

48 PRINT" INVERNESS, FL, 32 650"; 
50 1 LOCATE0 , 0 



52 IF PEEK(342 )=191 THEN 29 ELSE 
60 

60 'LOCATE0,0 

62 IF PEEK(341) =191 THEN 40 ELSE 
52 

70 LIST 



Listing 11: 
0 '<K6> 

10 ON BRK GOTO70 
20 WIDTH32 
29 CLS3 

32 PRINT@37," Tutorial For Belin 
da" ; 

35 PRINT@lj34," BELINDA RAMSEY"; 

38 PRINT@165," HERNANDO, FL, 326 
42 "; 

39 GOT062 

40 CLS4 

42 PRINT@37," Tutorial For Josep 
h "; 

45 PRINT@lj34, " JOSEPH KOLAR "; 
48 PRINT@165," INVERNESS, FL, 32 
650" ; 

52 IF PEEK(342)=191 THEN 29 ELSE 
62 

62 IF PEEK(341) =191 THEN 40 ELSE 
52 

70 LIST 



Listing 12: 

0 ! <K7> 
10 1 
20 ' 

29 CLS3 

32 PRINT@37," Tutorial For Belin 
da "; 

35 PRINT@lj34 , " BELINDA RAMSEY 11 ; 

38 PRINT© 16 5," HERNANDO, FL. , 32 
642 "; 

39 GOT05J3 

40 CLS4 

42 PRINT@37," Tutorial For Josep 
h "; 

45 PRINT@lj34," JOSEPH KOLAR 11 ; 
48 PRINT@164," INVERNESS, FL. , 3 
2650 "; 

50 A$=INKEY$ 

51 IF A$=" A " GOT029 

53 IF A$="_" GOTO40' <SHIFT> < A > 

54 IF A$="@" GOTO 70 ELSE 50 

70 LIST ^ 



92 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



The Best Money Can Buy . . . 
HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 




Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drive Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Color Computer. Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shack ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM $99. 

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Completed and Tested Board without ROM . . . $79. 

(Includes Case) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual $30. 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1.0 $40. 



Ordering Information : 

Use our WATS line to place your order via Visa, MasterCard, or Wire Transler. Or 
mail your payment directly to us. Any non- certified funds will be held until proper 
clearance is made. COO orders are accepted as wed as purchase orders from 
government agencies. Most items are shipped off the shelf with (he exception of Hard 
drive products that are custom built. UPS ground is our standard means of shipping 
unless otherwise specified Shipping costs are available upon request. 



Drive 0 Complete r $199. 

Drive 1 Complete $129. 

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Order Line 1-800-231-6671 
16208 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, Texas 77059 



Learning in the 
End Zone 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Fear not, sports fans! As the base- 
ball season draws to a close, the 
football season is gearing up. For 
our junior sports fans, we are presenting 
a learning tool in the form of a football 
game. Blitz Quiz is given here as a quiz 
testing knowledge of the Color 
Computer, but it is really a quiz format 
that can be used in almost all school 
subject areas. 

Blitz Quiz is an entertaining way for 
students to review information to be 
learned, memorized or reviewed. We 
have used this program with greatly 
varied data for students of all ages. 

Computers are wonderfully conven- 
ient tools that can easily catch the 
interest of children through their senses. 
The more methods we have to present 
material, the more likely it is to be 
absorbed. I have long felt that new 
computer approaches in presenting 
familiar material often provide the 
spark that piques a reluctant student's 
interest to finally learn a topic. 

We have included 20 questions in a 
short computer terms quiz. You may 
increase the number of questions by 
adding more data pairs in extra DRTR 
lines. You must also be certain to adjust 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



that amount in Line 30, which contains 
the variable Z telling the computer how 
many DATA groups there are. 

"Computer terms" is merely one of 
many topics that you may use. Foreign 
language words or phrases, math flash- 
card facts or social studies facts are a 
few other areas this program can be 
used for. In fact, most school subjects 
have facts to be memorized or reviewed, 
and they can be applied to this program. 

The game shows the outline of a 
football field similar to the one below. 
It is drawn by lines 100 to 210. 

The football is represented by an 
asterisk, and is initially placed at the 50 
yard line by Line 220. CoCo asks a 
question, and the student enters an 
answer. If the student answers correctly, 
the ball moves toward the goal line. If 
the student is incorrect, the ball moves 
a loss of 10 yards in the opposite direc- 
tion. The game is over when the ball 
reaches either the goal or the other end 
of the field. 

The variable A represents the current 



position of the football. A$[R) repres- 
ents the question. B$(R) is the correct 
answer. AN$ is the student's answer. The 
program compares the student's answer 
with the correct answer in lines 300 and 
310. The football repositions and the 
user is informed of a correct answer. If 
a wrong answer is given, the correct 
answer will be shown. 

Lines 380 through 390 check to see if 
the ball has reached either end of the 
field, ending the game. After each game, 
the user may press either the G key to 
play again or the E key to end the 
program. 

We hope you find many uses f or Blitz 
Quiz. It is a good idea to save the 
program before you want to change the 
contents. Then you merely replace old 
data with your new data to have a new 
program. You may repeat this proce- 
dure as often as there is new informa- 
tion to be learned. We at Computer 
Island hope your children have fun and 
learn, too, while scoring touch- 
downs. □ 




94 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



The listing: CCBLITZ 

10 REM 11 EDUCATIONAL FOOTBALL QUIZ 
n 

2f3 REM 11 STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 
D SOFTWARE, STAT EN ISLAND , NY , 198 7 
3j5 Z = 2f3 

40 DIM A$ (Z) , B$ (Z) 

5j3 FOR Y=l TO Z : READ A$(Y),B$(Y) 
:NEXT Y 

6j3 A= 303: R=RND ( -TIMER) 
70 CLS0 

80 PRINT@ 0 , STRING$ (32 , 239) ; 
90 PRI NT@8 , " FOOT BALL QU I Z 11 ; 
100 REM SET UP THE FOOTBALL 



S 

110 
OKE 
120 
OKE 
130 



TO 
T 

TO 
T 

TO 



1408 STEP 



FIEL 
32 :P 



1438 STEP 32:P 



1246:POKE T,14 
TO 1438: POKE T,15 



1308 STEP 3:PO 
1340 STEP 3:PO 
1372 STEP 3:PO 
1404 STEP 3 :PO 
1407 STEP 32:P 
10 20 30 40 50 



FOR T=1216 
T, 159 : NEXT 
FOR T=124 6 
T, 159 : NEXT 
FOR T=1216 
7: NEXT T 
140 FOR T=1408 
6: NEXT T 

15,0 FOR T=1251 TO 1277 STEP 3 : PO 
KE T, 149 : NEXT T 
160 FOR T=1283 TO 
KE T, 149 :NEXT T 
170 FOR T=1315 TO 
KE T, 149: NEXT T 
180 FOR T=1347 TO 
KE T, 149 : NEXT T 
190 FOR T=13 79 TO 
KE T, 149: NEXT T 
200 FOR T=1279 TO 
OKE T, 207: NEXT T 
210 PRINT@160," 

40 30 20 10" 
220 PRINT@A, ; 

PRINT@64 , 11 " : PRINT@9 6 , " " 
REM ASK A QUESTION 
PRINT@64 , 1111 : PRINT@96, " 11 
R= RND(Z) 
PRINT@64 ,A$ (R) 
PRINT@9 6 , 11 ? "; 
LINE INPUT AN$ 

IF AN$=B$(R) THEN PLAY M L100C 
EGG" : A=A+3 : PRINT@4 28 , "CORRECT 11 ? 
310 IF AN$OB$(R) THEN PLAY "L10 
C" : A=A-3 : PRINT@428 , B$ (R) ; 
320 EN$=INKEY$ 

330 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 340 ELS 
E 320 

340 PRINT@416,STRING$ (32,128) ; 
350 FOR T=1315 TO 1340 STEP 3 : PO 
KE T, 149: NEXT T 
3 60 PRINT@A, "*" ; 
3 70 REM CHECK FOR END 
380 IF A=288 THEN 
RY , GAME OVER"; 

390 IF A=318 THEN PRINT@4 2 5 , "TOU 

CHDOWN !!!";: PLAY" L150CEGGFEDCCC 
it 

400 IF A=288 OR A=3 18 THEN 410 E 



230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 



OF GAME 
PRINT@456, "SOR 



LSE 2 40 

410 PRINT@489 , "PRESS g OR e " ; 
420 EN$ -INKEY$ 

430 IF EN$="G" THEN RUN ELSE IF 
EN$="E" THEN END ELSE 420 
440 DATA ALLOWS INSERTIONS OF CO 
MMENTS , REM , PUT BACK ALL OF TTHE 
READ DATA, RESTORE, EXECUTES A PRO 
GRAK , RUN , TURNS ON THE PROGRAM TR 
ACER, TRON 

4 50 DATA LOADS A MACHINE LANGUAG 
E TAPE, CLOADM, CLEARS THE SCREEN, 
CLS, TRANSFER CONTROL TO M/L PROG 
RAM, EXEC 

4 60 DATA PRINT THE AMOUNT OF FRE 
E MEMORY, PRI NTMEM, TELL CONTENTS 
OF MEMORY LOCATION , PEEK , INPUT DA 
TA FROM A CASSETTE,INPUT#-1 
470 DATA CALLS A SUBROUTINE , GOSU 
B, JUMPS TO A LINE NUMBER , GOTO , AS 
SIGNS VALUE TO A VARIABLE , LET 
480 DATA LISTS PROGRAM TO A PRIN 
TER,LLI ST, TURNS CASSETTE ON,MOTO 
RON, ERASES EVERYTHING IN MEMORY, 
NEW, RESERVES GRAPHIC PAGES , PC LEA 
R 

4 90 DATA PUTS VALUES INTO LOCATI 
ONS , POKE, SELECTS DEGREE OF RESOL 

ution,pmode, prints items on a pr 
inter; print#-2 /r\ 



THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

A DIVISION OF DATANATCH, INC. 




UJOtM ! 



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Send Card Number & Exp. Date Min. Charae Order $20.00 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 95 



★★★★★★★**★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



SCOREBOARD POINTERS 

^Hkw^junction^/vItt^^E RAiNBOvTs^coreboard, wTicTTppears^ 

bimonthly, we offer this column of pointers for our game-playing 
readers' benefit. If you have some interesting hints, tips or responses 
to questions, or want help yourself, we encourage you to write to the 
Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. j 



FEEDBACK 

In response to letters from: 

• Howard Larsen: To get past the ana- 
conda in Dallas Quest, try typing T ICKLE 
PNACONDA and see what happens. 

Michael Jones 
Mobile, AL 

• John Tiffany: In Polynesian Adven- 
ture, to get the hot knife, go to the lagoon 
and fill the gas can by typing FILL CAN. 
Then go to the room with the hot knife 
and type POUR CAN. 

In Search for the Ruby Chalice, to stop 
the wildcat, get the gun from your base 
camp. When it leaps at you, type SHOOT 
GUN. 

In Dr. Avaloe, to get out of the first 
room, type LOOK HOLE. After its re- 
sponse, type DOWN HOLE. 

Fred Reiss 
McAlester, OK 

• Thomas Payton: If you are talking 
about the locked room where you first 
find the 5-Bota token in Robot Odessey, 
grab the key with the top-most part of the 
cursor, unlock the door, drop the key and 
ride inside the robot, rewiring as you go 
along. 

If you are talking about after the coin 
falls through the slot, this is how to do 
it. When the turnstile starts moving, get 
through as fast as possible. When you 
need the token again, start the robot with 
the wallcrawler chip hooked up inside it 
at the upper-right coiner with the 
grabber connected. Grab whatever it 
touches, and get to the lower left-hand 
corner. The exit ticket is at the laundro- 
bot station. 

How do I get through the Master 
Control Center of Robot Odessey /? I've 
pressed the first button, but I can't get 
any farther. 

Alex Beckers 
Middletown, RI 

• Erik Yoder: To fill the pool in Hall of 
the King, you need the bucket. First you 
must repair the bucket and go to the 
kitchen to fill it. 

D. Harold Kruse 
Peoria, IL 



• Dianne Piper: To get on the train to 
Paris in the Interbank Incident, you have 
to get a ticket. After you get a ticket, 
point the arrow at the foot and then at 
f (forward). 

How do you get to the ghost town? 

James Carr 
Twin Falls, ID 

• Neil Johnson: In Pyramid, you don't 
have to change the batteries. Just buy 
them and the computer will change them 
when it wants to. 

How do you find the mummy's chest 
in the maze, and do you use the scepter? 

Chad Glover 
Absecon, NJ 

• Joseph Delaney: To get the powerful 
Kulcad spell in Enchanter, go out 
through the south gate and go to the 
beach. Use the Nitefall spell on the turtle 
and ask him to follow you. Then go to 
the engine room in the tower. Cast the 
EXEX spell on the turtle and type TUR- 
TLE. Go southeast and get the scroll. Go 
northwest and the obedient rainbow- 
hued turtle will retrieve the scroll for you. 

Is it possible to get the adventurer to 
help you? 

Barret Kelley 
Kerrville, TX 



• Troy Phelps: In Dallas Quest, to get 
the shovel you must first give the sun- 
glasses to the owl. The owl will come to 
you and you should then go into the barn 
and the owl will eat the rat. 

• Domenick Doran: In Dallas Quest, to 
get past the cannibals by the cave, you 
have to type WAVE RING. 

• Jeff Hurteau: In Dallas Quest, to get 
all the inventory down the ladder, you 
must take one item down at a time (take 
the flashlight first) and find the direction 
for the village. Then take one item down 
at a time and drop it. Repeat these steps 
until the rest of the items are downstairs. 
Remember to turn the flashlight off when 
you're done! 

Roger Rosebrock 
Leipsic, OH 



• Jeff Stewart: In Wrestle Maniac, when 
your opponent is on the mat, stand your 
man over him, hold down the button and 
pull the joystick back. 

In Sands of Egypt, type HELP for each 
object you find. 

What does the shovel remind you of? 

In One-On-One, how do you get 3- 
pointers and how do you do a backwards 
slam? 

Eric Reitz 
Mendham, NJ 

• Rick Moore: To get past the dog in 
Bedlam, first you have to get the blue pill 
in the dispensary. Next, open the refrig- 
erator and get the hamburger meat that 
falls on the floor. Put the blue pill in the 
meat and feed it to the dog. 

How do you get the green key? 

Thomas Overmyer 
Round Lake Beach, IL 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, to kill the 
blobs, you must hit them with your sword 
quite a few times, or use an ice ring. 

In Dallas Quest, to get past the ana- 
conda, you must tickle him. Also, when 
you get to the crossroads, grab the 
coconuts and go to the screen with the 
bird's nest.Tostop the boatfrom leaking, 
give some tobacco to the monkey. 

In Trekboer, you must refill the beaker 
with acid and pour the acid on the grate. 

In Calixto Island, you must take the 
pottery to the professor's study. Make 
sure you take the tire pump with you 
when you go to the island. Also, to get 
past the jungle edge, you must cut the 
foliage with the machette that you trade 
either the rug or the chest for. 

To bend the bars in Hall of the King 
I, you must get the key piece. You will 
find the key piece in a room hidden 
behind the fermented grain. You must 
burn the grain, then go into the room. In 
the room there is a pedesta/ surrounded 
by beams of light. Reflect the light otT of 
the mirror and take it from there. You 
will need the vile of acid. 

In Black Sanctum, to get past the 
cabin, you must walk through the mirror. 
Make sure you have the robe first. 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



96 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



In Sea Quest, how do you buy the 
diving equipment and how do you get 
past the pirate? 

Jared Brookes 
Alberta, Canada 



Scoreboard: 

To get through the bronze doors in 
Dragon's Blade, go to the grave and dig 
to get the key. 

To use the scroll, you must go into the 
room with the gargoyle and type SAY 
KRSSflMRY. 

How do you get past the tunnel? 

Richard Deane 
Chicago, IL 

Scoreboard: 

How do you get past the green fierce 
monster in Pyramid 20001 

Marc Hodgson 
Georgetown, Ontario 

Scoreboard: 

How do you get past the serpent in 
Pyramid 20001 

Brian Ferro 
Burke, VA 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, when I get to the 
tunnel under the trap door at the trading 
post, it says to turn on the flashlight. 
Where do I get the flashlight? 

In Hal] of the King III, what must I do 
to get past the snake in the hole on the 
river bank? 

Robert Taylor 
Yuma, AZ 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, ask the parrot; he'll 
tell you a way to avoid being eaten by the 
anaconda; try the shovel as an oar; bribe 
the monkey and the boat won't sink; at 
the crossroads, go to mama vulture and 
get her eggs. 

In Sands of Egypt, you'll have to dig 
for the magnifier and torch. To leave the 
underground passage, get underneath the 
exit and untie the rope, drop and climb 
the ladder. Ride only once from the pool 
and you will end up at the pyramid. To 
empty the pool, type HOOK SCEPTER TO 
HRNDLE and PULL SCEPTER. 

Beware: If you use the canteen in any 
way, except for drinking, you will auto- 
matically drop it! 

Duane Whit lock 
North East, MD 

Scoreboard: 

Anytime you want to restart play in 
Wrestle Maniac, press the R key. If you 
want to have a demonstration of the 



game running, press the D key at the 
single players or teams prompt. 

David Kauffman 
South Haven, MI 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, I have the drain 
open, but I cannot find the torch to enter 
the hole. 

John Barsh 
Strykersville, NY 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, where are the dates 
and the pool? 

Jason Jasmin 
Margate, FL 

Scoreboard: 

In Raaku-Tu, how do you get across 
the rug to the carved door on the other 
side? 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, how do 
you kill the wizard's image? 

Fallon Yager 
Bellevue, ID 

Scoreboard: 

W hat d o I do after you have the golden 
chopstick in Raaku-Tu! How can I open 
the wooden door that says "do not 
enter"? What use is the secret tunnel? 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, what is the 
use of the Abye flask? When is the best 
time to use the Hale flask? 

In Pyramid, how can I keep the 
mummy from taking my treasures? How 
do you open the sarcophagus'? After 
chasing the serpent away, is there any 
other use for the statue? 

Steven Kaschimer 
Tucson, AZ 

Scoreboard: 

In Trekboer, roman numerals will lead 
you to an unusual planet, but I cannot 
find the amulet that helps you get across 
the bridge. 

In Major Isttr, I have found the dome 
and have landed safely, but how do you 
beat the security guard droids? 

Rick Kelton 
Newport News, VA 

Scoreboard: 

In Rogue, when battling a lot of mon- 
sters in a room, stand in a doorway. 
Doing this will allow only one monster 
to attack you at a time. 

To keep your man alive, after you save 
a game, cover the write protect notch on 
the disk. This way, when your man dies 
it won't erase your saved game. This also 
prevents your man from being perma- 
nently entered into the hall of fame. 

Wands and staves may ricochet. Zap- 
ping creatures diagonally may be less 



convenient, but is safer. Polymorphing 
magic is dangerous at beginning levels 
because the chances are greater that you 
will change a monster into something 
more powerful. 

Around the fifth or sixth level, Aqua- 
dors start appearing. If you see one, 
remove your armor. These creatures do 
no physical damage; they just rust your 
armor. If you save all your enchant armor 
scrolls, use them on the first leather 
armor you find — leather can't rust. 

Where are the dates in Sands of Egypt? 

Brent Dingle 
Norwalk, I A 

Scoreboard: 

You can shoot the wildcat with the rifle 
in Ruby Chalice. Typing DOWN HOLE in 
the first room of Dr. A valoe will send you 
to the monster room. 

How do you move the slab in Ruby 
Chalice? How do you get out of the dark 
in Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, and 
how do you cross the rug in Raaku-Tu? 

Chris Casey 
Vernon, MI 

Scoreboard: 

In the Interbank Incident, if you want 
to get on the train at Paris just past the 
Louvre, simply type GO and point to the 
door of the train. To get on the next train 
to Germany, you need the orange Euro- 
pean train pass. It can be f ound anywhere 
in Paris. Remember to search the flower 
pots. 

The locker at the Seattle terminal will 
open as soon as you put in the quarter. 
Now search the locker. If nothing 
happens after your search, the locker is 
empty. I f something is in the locker, you 
should see the message, "Look, you 
found something!" 

The rope is used later to lie someone 
up and the pass is used to ride the train 
or ferry boat in Seattle. 

Randy Cassel 
Middle town, PA 

To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo SJG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 

— Jody Doyle 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 97 



Mod i ficatio n 



32K ECB 



CoCoDraw Update 

By John G. Williams 



Congratulations to Darin Herr 
for the fine work he did on the 
CoCoDraw program ("CoCo- 
Draw Concoctions," Page 58) published 
in the October 1986 issue. It is a very 
well-written program with excellent 
documentation. In fact, it would not 
have been possible for me to modify the 
program without the line descriptions 
he provided. The only part of the pro- 
gram that gave me any trouble was the 
switching back and forth from joystick 
to arrow keys for precise pointer posi- 
tioning. I just could not seem to master 
that procedure with any speed or accu- 
racy at all. 

One way around the pointer position- 
ing problem is to use the joystick com- 
mand as "change of position" command 
rather than position command itself. 
That is, the joystick position tells the 
pointer how many pixels to move dur- 
ing each blinking cycle of the pointer. 
Both vertical and horizontal position- 
ing of the pointer can be controlled in 
this manner. A stick movement of one 
unit could result in a pointer movement 
of one pixel and so on. 

The problem with this simple rela- 
tionship is that the extreme sensitivity 
the pointer exhibits is no improvement 
at all over the original method. What is 
needed here is a non-linear stick com- 
mand so that near-center movement of 
the stick results in very slow pointer 
movement, yet rapid pointer motion 

John Williams is an aircraft industry 
structural engineer. He lives in Azle, 
Texas, and enjoys his Co Co very much. 
His son, OmTexas A &M engineering 
major, is also a CoCo fan. 



can be obtained when needed. 

This method may be familiar to some, 
as it was the subject of a short article 
in the August 1985 issue ("The Joystick 
Fix It," Page 226). In that article I 
demonstrate how the stick command 
could be tailored to any requirement 
with a non-linear equation. Such an 
equation could be solved repeatedly for 
new pointer location and would suit our 
CoCoDraw problem exactly. However, 
we already know about that method, so 
why not learn yet another way to use 
stick commands for our purposes? 

Since the joystick has only 64 possible 
positions in each axis, an equation 
relating stick command to pointer 
motion could have only 64 answers for 
each axis. Rather than solving the 
equation over and over for only 64 
possible pointer motion commands, 
why not solve the equation once for 
each stick position and save the results 
in a table? We can then look up these 
results in the table and move the pointer 
as slowly or quickly as desired. In fact, 
this procedure is known as the "table- 
look-up" method and is much faster 
than having to solve the non-linear 
equation repeatedly. 

The table is a one-dimensional array 
of values I call DP( J), where J is the 
subscript of DP and ranges from zero to 
63, which is of course the range of our 
joystick command. If you need to re- 
view arrays and subscripts, see your 
BASIC manual for more information. 

The name DP stands for "delta point- 
er," since the Greek letter delta is 
frequently used to represent change in 
a variable. 

To generate the table of stick com- 



mands, insert Line 1 I into the CoCo- 
Draw program: 

11 DIM DP(63) :FORJ=0T063:N=J 
-31 : DP ( J ) =INT ( . 5+( ABS(N)* 
N/50) :NEXT 

This line provides space for the array 
with DIM DP(63), calculates all 64 
values of DP ( J ) and stores them in the 
array. Of course other equations could 
be derived which would do just as well. 
For example, the sensitivity of the 
pointer can be adjusted by changing the 
divisor. Larger values such as 70 or 80 
give slower movement, while smaller 
values give faster movement 

If you are interested, it would be easy 
to list out the values of DP (J), just to 
see what the array looks like. Another 
possibility is to put the values of DP( J) 
in DATA statements and use a READ 
statement to store the values. 

The lines in the original program that 
read joystick and arrow key commands 
are 9400 through 9540. Those lines must 
be deleted and the following new lines 
must be added which read the stick and 
calculate the new pointer position. 

5400 X=X+DP( JOYSTI<(0) ) :Y=Y+ 

DP ( JO YSTK ( 1 ) ) : FB = PEEI< ( & 

HFF00)OR&HB0 
9410 IFX<0THENX=0ELSEIFX>255 

THENX=255 
9420 IFY<0THENY=0ELSEIFY>191 

THENY=191ELSERETURN 

The new position (X or Y) is the old 
position plus the delta position (DP) 
commanded by the joystick. Note the 
joystick command is the subscript of the 



98 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



array DP. In this manner the stick 
position is directly related to the pre- 
viously calculated table of DP ( J J 
values, and the stick merely tells which 
value of DP to add to the old pointer 
position. 

The range checks in lines 9410 and 
9420 are added to prevent crashes 
resulting from trying to plot off the 
screen. 

Two other minor changes are neces- 
sary to make the pointer behave prop- 
erly with these new commands. The 
following statement must be inserted in 
Line 6280 just before the GOTO 62B0 at 
the end of the line: 

X=XX:Y=YY: 

Line 5630 must be modified by insert- 
ing the following statement between 
ELSE and 5600 near the end of the line: 

X=XX:Y=YY:G0T0 

These modifications result in better 
control of the pointer. It is now very 
easy to move one pixel at a time for 
precise control, yet it can be moved 
rapidly when you want to get to a 
distant part of the screen. The motion 
is different since the pointer does not 



follow the position of the stick but 
moves in the direction the stick points, 
at a velocity related to stick displace- 
ment. After just a few minutes of prac- 
tice, it feels natural. 

One other difference in the program 
now is how the Ray function works. To 
use Ray, move the pointer to the center 
point as before and click the button (do 
not hold it down). Move the ray to 
where you want it and click again. So 
far, no difference; but now if you want 
another ray, click the button again and 
move the new ray to the desired point. 
Repeat as desired. When you don't want 
another ray from that origin, just hold 
the button down until it beeps and 
continue with another set of rays or 
select another option. 

I hope you find this modification 
useful. It has made an already fine 
program just a little easier to use. 
CoCoDraw now has the ability to easily 
put the pointer on any pixel without an 
expensive analog-to-digital converter 
like Co Co Max uses. I have tried it with 
both the standard and deluxe joysticks, 
but not with a mouse. The deluxe stick 
is much better because of self-centering, 
and I would encourage everyone to use 
one if possible. With the standard stick 



you will probably want to slow the 
motion down as described earlier. 

Keep in mind that there are ways to 
use joysticks other than what is shown 
in the manuals, and that this array/ 
subscript procedure has other applica- 
tions limited only by your imagination. 
Our CoCo is a marvelous machine and 
is capable of doing far more than most 
of us ever ask it to do, as are our own 
brains. 

Again, thanks to Mr. Herr for a very 
nice job of programming and documen- 
tation. If anyone has comments or 
questions about the modification, write 
me at Rt. 2, Box 285, Azle, TX 76020. 
Please remember to enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply. □ 



Editor's Note: The complete CoCo- 
Draw system consisting of two pro- 
grams, MENUGEN and COCDDRRU, will 
appear on RAl N BOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BO w ON DISK this month. The modifi- 
cations detailed in this article will have 
already been made. Refer to your Oc- 
tober 1986 issue of RAINBOW for specific 
instructions regarding how to use Co- 
CoDraw. Page 168 contains informa- 
tion on ordering back issues. /£\ 




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October 1987 THE RAINBOW 99 



A Conversation With 
the CoCo SIG Manager 



ver the past several months, 
many readers and Delphi users 
have asked why RAfNBOW 
doesn't publish some of the excellent 
programs that have been uploaded to 
Delphi. To gain some insight into this 
matter, I discussed the subject with Jim 
Reed (JlMREED), who is both the CoCo 
SIG Manager on Delphi and the Exec- 
utive Editor here at Falsoft. 

Cray: What is the basic reason THE 
RAINBOW doesn't publish material that 
has been uploaded to Delphi? 

Jim: Certainly, there is a great deal of 
very good Color Computer material on 
Delphi, Cray. But, we must keep in 
mind the availability of this same mate- 
rial from many sources, such as Com- 
puServe and local bulletin boards. I can 
see someone saying, u How dare you 
print and charge money for a magazine 
with public domain listings I can get lots 
of other places! 11 We like to think of our 
Delphi service as an extension of THE 
RAINBOW. I don't see it as an either/or 
situation. 

Cray: Is all of the material in the 
CoCo SIG public domain? 

Jim: No! Most of the material on the 
SIG is not public domain. The great 
majority of the items are copyrighted. 
A lot of people do not understand this. 
We can't, for instance, just grab Mikey- 
Term, Greg-E-Term or Ricky term and 



Cray Augsburg is rainbow's technical 
editor and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His user name 
on Delphi is CRA Y. 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Editor 

print them in the magazine; they are all 
copyrighted! 

Cray: But, what about all of the 
programs that are, in fact, in the public 
domain? Many of our readers don't 
have modems. 

Jim: Yes, there are a lot of clearly 
designated public domain programs in 
the databases, and, yes, many RAINBOW 
readers cannot just jump online and 



download them easily. But, please keep 
in mind that Delphi is a for-profit 
business. It does not make good busi- 
ness sense for Delphi to lose revenue by 
allowing the best stuff to be published 
in a magazine. 

Additionally, even if we were to 
"commandeer" some of the best public 
domain programs, in order to print 
them, we would have to give up space 



Database Report 



This month was a busy one on the 
rainbow SIGs! Uploading activity 
was brisk in spite of the summer heat as 
users were busy drawing and digitizing 
pictures for others to enjoy. The Graphics 
topic of the database is the largest by far 
of all the topic areas, occupying about 40 
percent of the entire database. If you're 
interested in graphics, (especially Color 
Max 3 graphics) then the RAINBOW CoCo 
SIG on Delphi is the place to be! 



OS-9 Online 

In the Graphics topic area, Dave 
Archer (DAVEARCHER) contributed 
FflT.FNT, a "fat" IBM font converted 
from the RS-DOS font of the same name 
that Marty Goodman uploaded to the 
CoCo Sig. Jerry Greiner (jerrycg) gave 
us a graphics editor with documentation 
and a sample start-up window. Jason 
Forbes (COC03K1D) contributed 33 Level 
II fonts in an RRed file for use with 
graphics windows. Jason also included a 
documentation file giving full informa- 
tion on how to load and display the fonts 
on Level II windows. 



In the Users Group topic area, OS-9 
Online SIGop Greg Law (GREGl) 
enabled seven more of the Users Group 
files: CRL, CCGOTOXY, CHRNGE PRSS- 
WORD, CHRNGE TERM, CHRR TO INT TO 
CHRR, CHECK and CHECKBOOK. 

In the Utilities topic area, George 
Janssen (GBJANSSEN) contributed an 
updated version of his fine PA K utility. 
PA K compresses several files into a 
single file, which is called an "archive" 
file. Such archived files take up a minimal 
amount of space. Another good use for 
PAK is storing all pieces of a system into 
one archive and eliminating excessive 
directory entries. 

George also provided FILEX.PRK, a 
utility for a recursive directory listing 
showing name, date last modified and 
size of the file. The listing may be in 
name, date or size sequence, in either 
ascending or descending order. FILEX 
also has a Find option that will search for 
all filenames beginning or ending with 
xxxx y such as all files ending in -c or all 
files beginning with test. 

Steve Bjork (6809ER) submitted his 
program Setype, which allows a user to 




100 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



in the magazine used for original mate- 
rial we purchase from our readers — 
programs that are not available any- 
where else. As it stands now, you get a 
variety of material, both in the maga- 
zine and on Delphi. 

Cray: Couldn't RAINBOW alterna- 
tively add a couple of public domain 
programs on RAINBOW ON TAPE and 
RAINBOW ON DISK each month to help 
those who cannot access Delphi? 

Jim: That would be a problem, too. 
As you know, there is often little room 
left on the tape and disk when we finish 
saving all the programs appearing in the 
magazine. Sometimes we even have to 
use both sides of RAINBOW ON TAPE, 
rather than have one side as a backup, 
just to hold all the material. 

More important, we already have 
problems with readers being unable to 
use RAINBOW ON TAPE programs, 
simply because they have not bought — 
or bothered to read — the magazine 
article corresponding to the program. I 
hate to think of the situation we would 
create if we decided to "throw in" some 
extra, totally undocumented programs. 

Finally, keep in mind that we do 
copyright the tape and disk products, as 
well as the magazine. Therefore, we 
would be in the position of copyrighting 
a product that clearly had some public 



set the joystick type (low or high resolu- 
tion) and monitor type using an option 
list or a menu for selection. It's very 
handy for autoboot programs and may 
be added to the start-up file. Bert Chal- 
lenor (BERTac) sent us the source code to 
his spooler program, which allows up to 
five files to be spooled. 

In the Patches topic, Kevin Darling 
(kdarling) submitted an interesting text 
file describing the known bugs, fixes and 
patches for CoCo 3 OS-9 Level II Version 
2.00.01. 

CoCo SIG 

In the General topic area, Brian 
Wright (poltergeist) sent us some 
interesting jokes from his collection and 
a text file clarifying his first grouping of 
files about the FCC proposal for Value 
Added Networks. Brian has also pub- 
lished a copy of the entire FCC docket, 
as well as some counterproposals and 
arguments. Rick Adams (RICKADAMS) 
provided a list of Tandy's top 10 games 
for the CoCo. Kevin Nickols (nickols) 
provided us with the Tandy Newsletter 
for July. (Kevin is the SIG manager for 
the Tandy and PC Compatibles SIGs.) 

In the Source Code topic area, Roger 
Krupski (hardwarehack) posted the 



domain programs on it! Now, there is 
actually nothing wrong with that — for 
instance, a copyrighted history text- 
book has lots of public domain material 
in it — but I think it would serve to 
"muddy the water" as to whether RAIN- 
BOW ON TAPE/ DISK is indeed a copy- 
righted product. 

Cray: Then, there are no plans to 
somehow publish some of the Delphi 
material in THE RAINBOW? 

Jim: In spite of my foregoing con- 
cerns, we do discuss such possibilities as 
finding some avenue to deliver to our 
RAINBOW readers material that is avail- 
able on Delphi, but inaccessible to those 
without modems, local nodes, etc. But, 
the key thing is that we cannot ruin the 
market for Delphi by "skimming off the 
cream." Delphi is providing a needed 
service and deserves a return on its 
investment, too. Remember, Delphi 
usually provides free upload time as an 
incentive, and it pays people to organize 
the databases, to publicize the existence 
of these CoCo programs and to help 
members with these programs. Plus, 
Delphi keeps it all stored on disk. All 
of this constitutes an investment that 
should provide a reasonable return. 

Cray: What would you recommend 
to those who do not have access to 
Delphi? 



source code for the newest version of his 
popular Morse Code generator program, 
and an enhanced Screen command for 
CoCo 3s that allows the user to set up a 
40- or 80-column screen without compli- 
cated PRLETTE and WIDTH commands. 1 
posted the source code for a short line 
feed stripper utility, and a similar utility 
that converts all-uppercase text files into 
all-lowercase. I use these utilities some- 
times to clean up documentation files on 
the SIG, making them a bit more read- 
able. I also posted the source code to the 
BR5FIX utility I submitted in the Utilities 
topic. 

In the Utilities topic area, Roger 
Krupski favored us with an updated 
version of his Morse Code generator 
program. Glen Hathaway (Hathaway) 
posted an experimental version of his 
SNA P disk editor for the CoCo 3. Sev- 
eral SIG members downloaded the pro- 
gram and made suggestions for improve- 
ment, which lie has promised to include 
in the final version. 

Roger Bouchard (harbie) posted an 
ML utility to add the SaveS and LoadS 
commands to ADOS-3 users, just as 
Steve Bjork's DFIX utility provided for 
the users of Disk basic. Kenneth 
Wuelzer (wuelzerken) posted Version 



Jim: I'd point out that I've seen brand 
new modems for as little as $ 1 5, There's 
a whole new world to explore with your 
CoCo when you reach out through the 
telephone lines. It's mighty handy to be 
able to post a gnawing technical ques- 
tion on the CoCo SIG — even in the 
middle of the night — and have it 
answered in a matter of hours, some- 
times minutes. I'd also point out that 
Christmas is coming! 

Online Shopping 

Jim Reed invites all SIG members to 
visit the Shopping area in the CoCo 
SIG. Recently, the Shopping area un- 
derwent active development, and sev- 
eral advertisers have already started 
selling their products online. Along 
with all Falsoft products, you can order 
items from such advertisers as Comput- 
er Plus, Gimmesoft, Speech Systems 
and Spectrum Projects. 

To get to the Shopping area, just 
enter SHOP from the CoCo SIG or OS- 
9 Online SIG prompt. Once there, you 
can browse the area for vendors or 
products. If it is your first time in the 
Shopping area, you will first need to set 
up a method of payment. Then, when 
you order a product, the process will be 
much quicker and easier. □ 



2.5 of his very popular KDS Kdisk editor. 
KDSK can examine/ modify any sector 
on a disk in either R/S, OS-9. FLEX, or 
MS-DOS formats. It has provisions for 
fast copies, backups, formatting, sorting 
and cataloging disks, printing labels and 
other features. 

Jason Forbes posted a program for 
astronomy buffs called POSITION. BAS, 
written by Jeff Yoder. Give the program 
a date and a planet and it will return the 
correct ascension and declination relative 
to the Celestial Plain. I also posted my 
line feed/ null remover programs as well 
as the previously described uppercase to 
lowercase utilities. These files were 
posted in response to a user's request in 
Forum. 

Additionally, I posted a program 
called BASFIX, which I hope will elim- 
inate several problems for cassette users. 
basic programs saved on disk contain 
control information which is not present 
in BASIC programs on cassette, making 
files on disk incompatible with cassette 
systems unless that control information 
is removed. BASFIX is a machine lan- 
guage utility that reads a compressed 
BASIC cassette file that originated on a 
disk system and removes the control 
information. This will make the rain- 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 101 



bow on TAPE files in the database acces- 
sible to tape users. 

In the Hardware topic. Bob Mahoney 
(COC03) sent us a complete listing of the 
RS-232 connector for the RS-232 pack. 
This file includes information that is not 
found in Tandy's otherwise excellent 
documentation. Marty Goodman 
(martygoodman) continued providing 
us with his informative, hardware-related 
articles. This month, Marty contributed 
an article describing how to repair a 
damaged disk controller. This file origi- 
nated as the result of several Forum 
questions from SIG members. 

Marty also provided us with an inter- 
esting technique for breaking out of 
protected games and programs in his file 
called "SH1FT-BREAK.-R.eset Trick Re- 
vealed." Using this technique, you may 
examine and modify your game pro- 
grams to get more lives, or you may 
choose to modify your utilities according 
to your own needs. This technique will 
usually work with programs that auto- 
start, and is usually effective even with 
the ones that normally require one to 
power-down to exit the game. 

Marty then provided us with a descrip- 
tion of how to get a composite color 
signal from a CoCo 2. This file contains 
information that is peculiar to the CoCo 
2 and resulted from a member's question 
in the Forum. Marty is available fre- 
quently in the Forum to assist you with 
your hardware problems. The mure 
interesting ones may also be published in 
Marty's "CoCo Consultations" column 
in rainbow Magazine. 

In the Games topic, Rick Adams and 
Mike Ward (mikeward) teamed up to 
provide patches for the Dungeons of 
Daggorath game to allow it to run on the 
CoCo 3, as well as to provide some 
enhancements. Brian Wright posted a 
bowling game, and Jim Pogue (JlM- 



POGUE) posted a revised and greatly 
enhanced version of his very popular 
Scrabble game. James McDaniel (new- 
KlD) contributed an excellent game called 
Crescue. This game features several high 
resolution screens and very interesting 
action. 

In the Graphics topic area, Bob Whar- 
ton (bobwharton) posted a total of 18 
MGE files! This makes Bob this month's 
most prolific contributor. Bob posted 10 
nudes converted from ST pictures and 
several other original and converted 
pictures. I posted a couple of digitized 
pictures of possible candidates for CoCo 
Cat at the Princeton RAINBOWfest. 
(Others are invited to post their candi- 
dates/dreams also.) 1 also posted four 
new "fantasy" style pictures that are 
converted ST pictures. These are all quite 
detailed and unusual. Mike Andrews 
(mandrews) posted his patch to Erik 
Gavriluk's Macverter program. Mike's 
program converts Erik's program to 
print on a Tandy DMP-I05 printer 
instead of an Epson printer, and may 
work with other Tandy printers, as well. 

Jason Forbes posted two MGE pic- 
tures of the starship Enterprise from the 
movie Star Trek and an outstanding 
converted ST picture of a springboard 
high diver. Eric Robichaud (EGROBI- 
CHAUD) contributed a very colorful 
MGE picture of everybody's hero, Bugs 
Bunny. The quality of this picture is truly 
outstanding. Rick Adams contributed a 
basic program that changes the palette 
positions of selected colors in an MGE 
format picture. It does not change the 
actual colors, just the palette positions. 
This is useful for pictures whose colors 
in palette positions 0 and 1 5 are so similar 
(or identical) that it is next to impossible 
to use Color Max 3 to view or edit them. 

D.K. Lee (HORNETl) posted four new 
original pictures he drew using Color 



Max 3. Roger Bouchard posted Mandril 
Mania, two pictures of the gorilla that 
you've seen on the Amiga, the ST, the 
Apple II GS and the IBM. Now you can 
see that gorilla face to face on your CoCo 
3. James Farmer (modem master) sent 
us a digitized picture of Charles D. Tandy 
in MGE format. Tandy buffs will want 
this one for sure. 

Clay Kunz (zafodbeblbrx) contrib- 
uted an interesting raindrop "splash" 
program that draws concentric circles 
spreading out from the center of the 
screen. Billy Hambric (snoopydog) gave 
us an interesting Peanuts MGE picture of 
Lucy holding the football for Charlie 
Brown. Just in time for the Fourth of 
July, he also sent us an MGE picture of 
Snoopy waving the flag and shooting 
fireworks, plus a digitized, 16-level 
picture of Snoopy and Alf done with the 
DS-69 digitizer. 

In the Music topic area, Randy Cassel 
(BBTROLL) sent us his rendition of "Jingle 
Bells" as done on the CoCo Composer, 
which was published in the December 
1983 rainbow. John Brennan (FIREFLY) 
sent us three of his favorite classic folk 
rock songs, which he arranged using the 
Bells and Whistles program from rain- 
bow. Bryan Eggers (softaffair) pro- 
vided us with 17 new music files for 
Orchestra-90. All Orchestra-90 fans 
should check these out because Bryan 
sent us some of the best of his collection. 

In the Data Communications topic 
area, Bill Tucker (billtucker) sent us a 
listing of governmental BBSs that may be 
accessed by the public. Mike Fischer 
(MIKE88) sent us Version 2,2 of Phone 
Clone, a disk transfer utility. 

We hope to see all of you on the 
rainbow CoCo SIG on Delphi! 

— Don Hutchison 
rainbow CoCo SIG Database Manager 



Two-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This little graphics quickie will surely excite some of 
you sci-fi fans out there. 

The listing: 




1 CIRCLE (115 ,45) , 5 : CIRCLE ( 14 2 , 45 
) , 5 : F0RX=1T015 jd jd : NEXTX : COLOR1 , 3 : 
FORY=75TO19 < 0 : LINE (12 < 0 / Y)-(136 / Y) 
, PSET : NEXTY : FORX= 1T05 j0 jd : NEXTX : CO 
LOR3 , 3 : FORY=190TO75STEP-1 : LINE ( 1 
20,Y) -(136,Y) , PSET: NEXTY :F0RX=1T 
02jdp : NEXTX: COLOR4 , 3 : CIRCLE (128,4 
5) ,5:F0RZ=£)T01STEPP:NEXTZ 



Mark Rucinski 
Oshkosh, Wl 



(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The Tfiird 
Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



102 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



€e©e-GensnWetieFis 



Computer/ Baud Rate 
Destruction 

By Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



/ have the old Color Scripsit ROM 
pack. When I type POKE 150,18 to set 
the Co Co to 2400 baud ( which I like to 
use for my DMP-I30), and then plug in 
the Color Scripsit ROM pack, the POKE 
does not "take. " That is, the baud rate 
is still 600 under Color Scripsit. How 
can I make that POKE stick? Also, I have 
found my Co Co 2 contains 88 in loca- 
tion J 50, not the 87 1 read was supposed 
to be there. Why is this? 

Michael R. Wetzstein 
Tift on, GA 

Never ever plug in a ROM pack 
cartridge with your computer turned 
on! This will result in the destruction of 
the computer. If you read the literature 
Tandy supplies with the computer and 
the ROM pack, you would have been 
warned against this most dangerous 
practice. 

The old Color Scripsit ROM pack 
uses its own internal program code to 
operate the RS-232 port on the CoCo, 
and this code is fixed at600 baud. There 
is little you can do about that. I recom- 
mend you switch to a better word 
processor. Telewriter 64 is available as 
a tape program. It has provisions for 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS -9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, Calif mrnia. 



baud rates from 300 to 9600 in addition 
to supporting 51-, 64- and 85-column 
displays, plus many other things not 
found in Color Scripsit. 

Microsoft changed the official baud 
rate constant for 600 baud from 87 to 
88. Thus, later model CoCo 2s have 88 
in the baud rate delay constant location 
150, not the 87 that is usually referred 
to in older Color Computer literature. 

Saving PMODEs 

How do I save PMDDE 4 graphics 
screens to tape or disk? 

John Smith, Jr. 
St. Peter, FL 

If you have a tape system, the com- 
mand CSRVEM 'filename", &HG00, 
&H1DFF , &HR027 will save the screen to 
tape. With a disk system, the way to 
save such a screen would be SRVEM 
"filename. ext" , &HE00, &H25FF, 
&HR027. Just substitute your file in 
place of filename. The first two numbers 
in those commands are the addresses in 
memory of the CoCo'siirst four graph- 
ics pages. The last number in each 
command (&HR027) is the address of the 
reset routine in the CoCo, and is used 
as a safety factor, just in case you 
accidentally mistake those graphics files 
for a machinelanguage program and try 
to execute it. If you have a graphics 
screen saved to tape and want to load 
it into the graphics area on a disk 
system, merely load it using the com- 
mand CLDRDM "filename", &HB00. This 
will "offset load" the tape system graph- 
ics screen into the area that is correct for 
a disk system. 



Converting Speech to Sound 

What is the address of the analog- to- 
digital converter in the CoCo? I want to 
use the joystick line to convert speech 
to digitized sound. 

Brian Kschak 
Reigelsville, PA 

The analog-to-digital conversion 
hardware in the CoCo is not accessible 
via a simple address. It is largely soft- 
ware driven: You must, using assembly 
language, operate the digital-to-analog 
converter a multiple of times and com- 
pare the values to what is seen by the 
analog-to-digital port, adjusting the 
value up or down depending on whether 
the value you have was reported as 
higher or lower than what was on the 
analog lines. Naturally, this must be 
done quite rapidly, in assembly lan- 
guage, to be at all useful. The routine 
in the BASIC ROM located at the ad- 
dress contained in locations SA00A and 
SA00B does this. You might want to 
study that routine, even though the one 
given in BASIC is rather slow. The best 
means of digitizing voice on the CoCo 
is to use Delta modulation. Delta mod- 
ulation is far more memory-efficient 
than digitizing the amplitude of the 
wave form. With Delta modulation you 
merely use a single bit per sample of the 
sound to record whether a "guess" at the 
amplitude of the wave form was higher 
or lower than the actual wave form. 
Thus, you can pack eighttimes as many 
samples into memory, and digitization 
of the sound proceeds far faster, too. 
This approach "chases" the wave form 
as it rises and falls. 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 103 



Dead Keys 

My CoCo 3's keyboard is malfunc- 
tioning. Two rows of characters in the 
wiring matrix no longer work. I have 
substituted a second keyboard, but the 
problem remains, and the original 
keyboard works fine on another CoCo. 
I have also replaced the 74LS30 chip on 
the CoCo 3, but this has not cured the 
problem. Can you help? 

Bill Jackson 
(BILLJA CKSON) 
Sacramento, CA 

Keyboard problems of the sort you 
describe (a row or column of dead keys) 
are often caused by a break in the wires 
on the keyboard mylar cable and are 
very hard to fix without replacing the 
keyboard. In your case, however, you 
have proven that this is not the problem. 
Another cause of a row or column going 
out is a damaged P1A chip. On the 
CoCo 3, IC 5 (LSC81001) is the key- 
board PIA chip. You will have to de- 
solder this 40-pin chip, socket it and 
obtain a replacement chip from Tandy. 
Fortunately, the replacement chip is 
relatively inexpensive and available 
from National Parts. I recommend you 
"destructively" remove the old chip, 
cutting each pin off it, desoldering the 
pins and removing them using long- 
nosed pliers, then cleaning up the holes 
with a solder slurper prior to placing a 
socket there and soldering it in. Of 
course, you will first have to remove the 
CoCo 3 motherboard and remove its 
ground plane metal sheet. The 74LS30 
chip is involved in generating the key- 
board interrupt and could not cause the 
type of problem (one or more rows or 
columns dead) you describe. The only 
other thing to check before replacing 
your PIA is to make sure all lines from 
the keyboard connector on the CoCo 3 
are intact on their way to the pins of the 
keyboard PIA. 

Cheap Communications 

What communications program do 
you recommend for a 64 K CoCo 2 that 
costs under $25? 

John Freidrich 
Natrona Heights, PA 

I am in full agreement with Dr. 
ASCII (see Page 1 27 of the August 1987 
RAINBOW) that your two best bets are 
Mikeyterm and GEterm. Each is avail- 
able for $10 from their authors (Mike 
Ward, 1807 Cortez, Coral Gables, FL 
33134, and Greg Miller, 9575 Royston 



Road, Grand Ledge, Ml 48837). 1 
recommend you buy both, for both are 
excellent, and the total cost will be 
under $25. 

Malfunctioning Joysticks 

/ have connected a Sony KV131 ICR 
monitor/ TV to my CoCo 3 using a 
cable like the one you described in the 
August RAINBOW. It "steals" 5 volts 
from the joystick port to run its sync 
combiner chip. But now my joysticks do 
not function. Full movement of the 
joystick no longer fully affects the value 
seen by the computer. Can you help me? 

Herbert F. Farmer 
Ipswitch, MA 

The problem is caused by a current- 
limiting resistor in the joystick port 
circuit. The cure is quite simple: Merely 
open your CoCo 3 and short out the 
resistor labeled R 13. This resistor is 100 
ohm (color code brown, black brown) 
!/2 watt (slightly fatter than most other 
resistors on the CoCo 3), that can be 
found to the right of the rear-most of 
the four 4464 18 pin DRAM chips on 
the CoCo 3, near the rear of the com- 
puter. The Sony KV131 ICR to CoCo 3 
RGB cables currently being sold by 
Spectrosystems and by Spectrum Pro- 
jects now have two extra pages of 
instructions added to explain this and 
give several alternative approaches to 
curing this problem. 

Remote Keyboard 

/ read your article giving tips on how 
to make a remote keyboard cable for the 
CoCo. Could you please list the com- 
ponents needed and provide me with 
step-by-step directions for making one? 

Mike Duval I 
Zanesvi/le, OH 

Without the use of special adapter 
boards, making a keyboard extender 
cable is a job f or an experienced hacker, 
and it is not easy to provide step-by-step 
instructions. But because I had so many 
requests like yours for more specific 
instructions on making such a cable, I 
engineered a keyboard extender cable 
that is now available to the public (see 
Spectrum Projects ad). This cable still 
requires some ingenuity to fully and 
properly install, but much of the hard 
part of keyboard cable construction 
(especially the connection between 
cable and CoCo and cable and key- 
board) is done for you. You still have 



to supply your own case for the remote 
keyboard. 

Drive Alignment 

I've had problems with the drives on 
my CoCo 2. Finding a place that would 
do alignment on them was difficult, and 
the work was expensive. After the drive 
was repaired, our CoCo 2 behaved as if 
it had only 32K. Why? We plan to gel 
an NEC monitor but are not sure how 
to hook it up. 

Thomas Crowe 
Villa vicencio, Col ombia 

J&M systems sells Memory Minder. 
This package, which costs about $90, is 
a superb disk drive alignment system. 
With it, those who are familiar with the 
basics of how floppy drives work and 
how they are adjusted can do all com- 
mon disk drive alignment tasks without 
use of an oscilloscope. I've tested this 
program extensively against the more 
traditional method of disk drive align- 
ment and find it to be extremely accu- 
rate and much easier to use. 

1 have no idea why the upper bank of 
RAM on your CoCo 2 has ceased to 
operate. It is possible that one or 
another chip in your CoCo 2 has been 
damaged. 

There are many vendors that adver- 
tise in RAINBOW (Moreton Bay, How- 
ard Medical, Computerware, and oth- 
ers) that sell adapters needed to hook a 
monitor to a CoCo 2. It is important 
that you specify whether the monitor is 
a color or a monochrome monitor and 
what kind of monitor it is. The CoCo 
2 can be easily made to work with 
composite color and composite mo- 
nochrome monitors. It cannot be 
adapted to RGB monitors, nor can it be 
adapted to IBM type TTL monochrome 
monitors. 

Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to CoCo Consultations, 
THE rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow Maga- 
zine Services, then, at the RAINBOW> 
prompt, type ASK (for Ask the Experts) to 
arrive at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "CoCo Consultations" 
online form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



1 04 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



«s£5S?3ff 





• ASSIST • 

^«io#°"Sto* 0 Z 



.-aw* 



$2.9 



ft**** 



1 #9.9* 

W* t-Ai 




\ 



,J*P* sse 



D e bugging Utility 



32K ECB 




Yakety-Yak 

the CoCo Talks Back 



By Bob Roberts 




Unless you are a better typist than 
I am, you are in for a debugging 
session after keying in a long 
program listing. The listing on the 
screen must be compared to the printing 
on the page. Your eyes will shift back 
and forth between the screen and the 
magazine many times. It would be a lot 
easier to have the computer read the 
program while you sit in your easy chair 
and follow along until an error is found. 
The program Readprog uses the 
Speech/Sound Cartridge to read BASIC 
programs residing in the computer's 
memory. ■ 

Once Readprog is typed in and de- 
bugged, save it to tape or disk. To use 
the program, load it into the computer 
before beginning work on a new listing. 
Readprog's line numbers begin at 60000 
to avoid conflict with the program being 
entered. If you have a disk system, you 
can merge Readprog after you've fin- 
ished typing. Remember that in order to 
use the MERGE command, Readprog 
must first be saved in ASCII format 
(i.e., SAVE "REflDPRDG", fi). 

To get Readprog started, type RUN 
60000. A menu will appear with the 
option to begin reading at the start of 
the program, start reading at a specified 
line number or read only line numbers. 

The option of reading only line 
numbers was included as a quick check 
for one of my favorite errors, leaving 
out a line. 

The program is most useful f or read- 
ing long, number-packed code, such as 
DfiTfl statements containing machine 
language instructions or DRAW strings. 
So, I built in the ability to skip the 
mundane stuff and get directly to the 
area of the program that is causing the 
problem. 

Bob Roberts is an industrial engineer 
for Anchor Hocking Corporation in 
Lancaster, Ohio. He is married and has 
two daughters who are more interested 
in boys than computers, a cat (also non 
Co Co) and a cocker spaniel. 



1 06 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



If you select any option but reading 
the line numbers, you will have two 
morechoices to make. The program will 
ask if you want to pronounce the word 
"space" each time a blank is encoun- 
tered. With a few exceptions, spaces do 
not affect the proper functioning of 
BASIC programs, so I usually elect not 
to have blanks spoken. The next choice 
is whether or not to read all of the 
material following a REM statement or 
apostrophe. Again, remarks do not 
affect the operation of the program, and 
a lot of time can be spent listening to 
program notes or to the computer 
saying "asterisk" 32 times. If you opt 
not to hear the remarks, the program 
will say the line number and then say 
"skipping" to indicate the omission. 

The BASIC keywords are pronounced 
as they might be spoken instead of being 
read literally. For example, RND is read 
as "random;" CL5 is read as "clear the 



screen" instead of simply C-L-S. If you 
don't like my versions of the pronunci- 
ation, you can substitute your own. The 
DATA statements contain strings for 
saying and printing the keywords. 

If the pronunciation of a word is 
different from the way the word will be 
printed, the string consists of the part 
to be pronounced to the left of an up 
arrow and the printed part to the right 
of the arrow. Words sounding the same 
as they are printed, e.g., LIST, do not 
have an arrow. 

Integer numbers less than 10,000 are 
also spoken as they are usually pro- 
nounced. Line number 943 will be read 
as "nine hundred forty-three" instead of 
"nine four three." 

The computer will print the words on 
the screen as it says them. To pause, 
press any key. Press any key again to 
continue. 

Readprog will run on CoCo 2s and 



3s, and it will read Color BASIC, Ex- 
tended BASIC, Disk BASIC and CoCo 3 
keywords. 

Start up Readprog and follow along 
as it reads, noting any changes you will 
need to make to the program. Enter all 
changes in one editing session, and you 
should be in business. When you are 
finished, don't forget to delete Read- 
prog by typing DEL 60000- before 
saving your new program. 

By the way, if anyone knows how to 
make the Speech/Sound Cartridge 
sound like a female Klingon, I'm dying 
to hear from you. I hope you find the 
program useful. 



(Questions regarding this program 
may be directed to the author at 3180 
Meadowbrook Drive, Lancaster, OH 
43 J 30. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 



W 6C 



60120 14 60640 ....164 

60220 69 60700 . . .237 

60340 25 60840 ....171 

60390 92 END 108 

60590.... 202 



The listing: READPROG 



60000 
60010 
60020 
60030 



60050 
60060 
60010 
60080 



• *********************** 
' BASIC PROGRAM READER 

• (READPROG) 
'REQUIRES RS SPEECH/SOUND 

CARTRIDGE 

i 



' BY BOB ROBERTS 

1 COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 

• *********************** 

CLEAR2 000 : DIM T$ ( 120) ,U$ (4 
5) ,TE$(18) :QF=1 

60090 CLS : PRINTTAB (9) "PROGRAM RE 
ADER":PRINT@12 8,"1. READ FROM ST 
ART OF PROGRAM . " : PRINT : PRINT " 2 . 
START READING AT A SPECIFIED 
LINE NUMBER. ": PRINT: PRINT "3. REA 
D LINE NUMBERS ONLY . " : PRINT@ 448, 
"ENTER YOUR CHOICE :"; 
60100 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="" THEN6,010 
0 ELSEA=VAL(A$) :IFA<1 OR A>3 THE 
NSOUNDipp, 1:G0T06PP9P ELSEIFA=2T 
HENCLS:PRINT@22 4 , "" ; : INPUT"KEY I 
N LINE NUMBER TO START AT THEN 

PRESS <ENTER> " ; A$ : LN=VAL ( A$ ) E 
LSEIFA=3 THENLQ=1 

60110 IFA=3 THENCLS:GOT06pi5£> EL 
SECLS:PRINT@192,"DO YOU WANT THE 
COMPUTER TO SAY " ; CHR$ ( 3 4 ) ; "SPA 
CE" ;CHR$(34);" EACH TIME IT FI 



NDS ONE OR TO IGNORE IT ?": PRINT 
:PRINT"PRESS <S> TO SAY OR <I> T 
O IGNORE. 11 ; 

60120 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="" THEN6J312 
0 ELSEIFA$="S" THENSF=1 ELSEIFA$ 
<>"I" THENSOUND1PJ3, l:GOT06j312p 
60130 CLS:PRINT@22 4,"DO YOU WANT 
THE COMPUTER TO READREMARKS (Y/ 
N) ?" ; 

60140 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" " THEN6014 

0 ELSECLS:IFA$="N" THENRF=1 ELSE 
IFA$o"Y" THENSOUND2PP , 1: GOTO 6,01 
30 

60150 READ I$:IF I$o"XTOKEN" TH 
EN6j315p 

60160 READ I$:IFI$o"ENDT$" THEN 

T$ (I) =1$ : 1=1+1: GOTO6J3160 
60170 1=0 

60180 READ I$:IFI$o"ENDU$" THEN 

U$ ( I ) =1 $ : 1=1+1 : GOT06 j318 0 
60190 FORI=l TO 18 : READ TE$(I):NE 
XTI 

60200 X=&HFF0J3: Y=&HFF7E: POKEX+1, 

52 : POKEX+3 , 63 : POKEX+3 5,60: POKE&H 

FF7D , 1 : POKE&HFF7D, p : M=256*PEEK ( 2 

5) +PEEK ( 2 6 ) +2 : GOT06P2 60 

60210 P=PEEK(M) :M=M+1 

6J322J3 IFP>47 AND P<58 THENA$=A$+ 

CHR$ (P) :NF=l:GOT06j321j3 ELSEIFNF= 

1 THENNF=,0:M=M-l:GOTO6j375j3 
6J323J3 IFP=255 THEN 60420 
60240 IFP>127 THEN 60400 

60250 1YVO0 THEN 60300 ELSEP=PE 
EK(M):IF V=0 THENCLS2:PRINT@22 9, 
"REACHED END OF PROGRAM" ; : END EL 
SEPRINT : M=M+2 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 107 



60260 LZ=256*PEEK(M)+PEEK(M+1) : I 
FLZ<LN THEN M=PEEK(M-2) *256+PEEK 
(M-l)+2 :GOTO60260 

60210 IF L,Z>=60000 THEN CLS:PRIN 
T@229 , "REACHED END OF PROGRAM";: 
SOUND200, 1:END 

60280 IFLQ=p THENA$="LINE NUM BE 
R"":M=M+2 ELSE A$=RIGHT$ ( STR$ ( LZ 
) ,LEN(STR$(LZ) )-l) : M=PEEK (M-2 ) *2 
56+PEEK(M-l)+2:GOTO607 60 
60290 GOTO 60450 

60300 IFP>64 AND P<91 THENA$=CHR 
$(P) :GOTO60450 

60310 IF P=3 2ANDSF=1THENA$="SPAC 
E" "ELSEIFP=32ANDSF=j3 THENA$=" * 
"ELSEIFP=33 T HE N A $ = " E X C LAM AN ATI 
ON POINT"!" ELSEIFP=34 THENA$="Q 
UOTE"" :QF=QF*-1 ELSEIFP=35 THENA 
$="CARRAT*#" ELSEIFP=36 THENA$=" 
DOLLAR" $" 

60320 IFP=37 THENA$="PER CENT"%" 
ELSEIFP=3 8 THENA$="AMBERSAND" &" 

60330 IFP=39 THENA$="APOSTRUPHE " 

• it 

60340 IFP=4j3 THENA$=" OPEN PAREN* 
(" ELSEIFP=41 THENA$=" CLOSE PARE 
N")" ELSEIFP=42 THENA$="ASTERIK" 
*" ELSEIFP=43 THENA$="PLUS"+" EL 
SEIFP=44 THENA$="KAW MAW" , " ELSE 
IFP=45 THENA$="MINE US*-" 
60350 IFP=46 THENA$="PEER E ID". 
" ELSEIFP=47 THENA$="SLASH*/" EL 
SEIFP>47 AND P<58 THENA$=CHR$ (P) 
+"""+CHR$(P) ELSEIFP=58 ANDPEEK 
(M) =13 1 THENA$=" APOSTRUPHE * ' " : GO 
TO60950 ELSEIFP=58 ANDPEEK (M) =13 
2 THEN6j3210 ELSEIFP=58 THENA$="C 
OLE UN " : " 

60360 IFP=59 THENA$="SEM E COALU 
N " ; " ELSEIFP=6j3 THENA$="LESS THE 
N"<" ELSEIFP=61 THENA$="E QUALS* 
=" ELSEIFP=62 THENA$ = " GREATER TH 
AN">" ELSEIFP=63 THENA$="QUESTIO 
N MARK"?" ELSEIFP=64 THENA$="AT" 

§" ELSEIFP=94 THENA$="UP . AER OW" 

* ii 

60310 IFP=93 THENA$="RIGHT BRACK 
ET"]" ELSEIFP=91 THENA $ = " LE FT BR 
ACKET" [ " ELSEIFP=92 THENA $= " BACK 

SLASH" \" ELSEIFP=95 THENA$="LEF 
T AER OW" " ELSEIF P>96 ANDP<123 

THENA$=CHR$ ( P-3 2 ) +" " "+CHR$ ( P) 
60380 IFA$<>"" THEN6j345j3 
60390 IFP<128 THEN6021j3 
60400 P=P-128 

60410 A$=T$(P) :IFRF=1 ANDP=2THEN 
60950 ELSE6j345j3 
60420 P=PEEK(M) :M=M+1 
60430 P=P-128 



60440 A$=U$(P) 

60450 Z=INSTR(A$,""") :IFZ=J3 THEN 
PRINTA$; ELSEPRINTRIGHT$ (A$ , LEN ( 
A$)-Z) ; :A$=LEFT$(A$,Z-1) 
60460 IF A$="QUOTE" THENPRINTCHR 
$(34) ; 

60410 IF LQ=1 THENPRINT 

60480 FORA=l TO LEN (A$) 

60490 IF (PEEK(Y) AND 128) =0 THE 

U60490 

60500 POKE Y,ASC(MID$(A$,A, 1) ) 
60510 NEXTA 
60520 POKE Y,13 

60530 IFPEEK(Y) <>255 THEN6j353j3 
60540 IFINKEY$<>"" THENGOSUB6j394 

60550 IFA$="LINE NUM BER" THENA$ 
=RIGHT$(STR$(LZ) , LEN (STR$ ( LZ ) ) -1 
) :NF=l:GOTO6j3760 ELSEA$ = "" 
60560 IF LQ=1 THEN6j326j3 
60570 GOT06p21p 

60580 DATA XTOKEN, 4 "FOR,GOW"GO 
, REMARK" REM, APOSTRUPH E* 1 , ELSE , I 
F , DATA , PRINT , ON , INPUT , END , NEXT , D 
IMENS I ON "DIM, REED "RE AD, RUN, RE ST 
ORE "RES TORE, RE TURN "RETURN, STOP, 
POKE , CONTINUE * CONT , LIST , CLEAR 
60590 DATA NEW,C LOAD"CLOAD,C SA 
VE " CSAVE , OPEN , CLOSE , L. LIST " LLIST 
, SET, RE SET "RESET, CLEAR SCREEN"C 
LS,MOW TER" MOTOR, SOUND, AUDEO'AUD 
IO,EXECUTE"EXEC,SKIP F"SKIPF,TAB 
H. OPEN PAREN" TAB ( , 2 "TO, SUB "SUB 
60600 DATA THEN, NOT, STEP, OFF, PLU 
S"+,MINE US "-,TYMES**, DIVIDED BY 
*/,TO THE POWER OF" " , AND, OR, GREA 
TER THEN " > , E QUALS "=, LESS THEN " < 
, DELETE" DEL, EDIT, TRACE ON*TRON,T 
RACE OFF "TROFF, DEFINE FUNCTION *D 
EFFN, LET, LINE 

60610 DATA P CLEAR SCREEN " PCLS , P 
SET"PSET,P.RE SET " PRESET , SCREEN 
,P CLEAR" PCLEAR, COLOR, CIRCUL'CIR 
CLE , PAINT , GET , PUT , DRAW 
60620 DATA P COPY"PCOPY,P MODE'P 
MODE, PLAY, D LOAD* DLOAD, RE NUMBER 
" RENUM , FUNCTION " FN , USING 
60630 DATA DIRECTOREYE" DIR, DRIVE 
, FEELD" FIELD , FILES , KILL, LOAD , L . S 
ET"LSET, MERGE, RE NAME " RENAME , R . S 
ET"RSET, SAVE, RIGHT, VERIFI "VERIFY 
,UN LOAD "UNLOAD, DISK INITIALISE" 
DSKINI , BACK UP "BACKUP, COPY, DISK 
IN PUT "DSKI$, DISK OUT PUT"DSKO$ 
60640 DATA QUESTION" ?, WIDTH, PAL 
ETTE ,H.SCREEN"HS CREEN , L POKE " LPO 
KE, H.CLEAR SCREEN" HCLS ,H . COLOR *H 
COLOR , H . PAI NT " HPAINT , H . C IRCUL " HC 
IRCLE , H . LINE " HLINE , H . GET " HGET , H . 



108 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



PUT'HPUT 

6j365j3 DATA H. BUFF ER * HBUFF , H . PRI 
NT ' HPRINT , AIRER " ERR , BRAKE "BRK, LO 
CATE, H.STAT US * HSTSTUS , H . SET ~HSE 
T , H . RE SET "HRESET,H. DRAW "HDRAW,C 
.M.P. " CMP, R.G.B. 'RGB, ATTRIBUTES" 
ATTR 

6j566j5 DATA ENDT$ 

60670 'TOKENS WITH LEADING 2 55. 

PUT IN ARRAY U$ 
60680 DATA SIGN* SGN, INTUHGER" INT 
, ABSOLUTE VALUE "ABS, USER ~USR,RA 
NDUMB * RND , SI NE "SIN, PEEK, LENGTH * L 
EN, MAKE STRING *STR$, VALUE "VAL, AS 
KEY " AS C , CAREAKTER " CHR$ , END OF FI 
LE"EOF,JOY STICK" JOYSTK, LEFT. DOL 
IAR" LEFT$ , RIGHT . DOLLAR" RIGHT$ , MI 
D . DOLLAR " MI D $ , POINT 
60690 DATA INKEY " INKEY$ , MEMORY" 
MEM, ARK TAN GENT* ATN, CO SIGN "COS 
, TAN GENT "TAN, EXPONENT "EXP, FIX, L 
OGRITHUM'LOG, PUHSITION" POS , SQWHE 
RE ROOT "SQR, HEX DOLLAR" HE X$ 
60700 DATA VARIABLE POINTER'VARP 
TR, IN STRING" INSTR, TIMER, P POINT 
"PPOINT, STRING DOLLAR " STRING$ 
607 10 DATA CONVERT NUMBER " CVN , FR 
EE , L 0 C"LOC,LAST OF FILE'LOF 
607 20 DATA MAKE NUMBER " MKN $, AH S* 
AS, 3 3 3, L PEEK" LPEEK, BUTTON, H.POI 
NT "HPOINT, AIRER NUMBER" ERNO , AIRE 
R LINE" ERLIN 
607 30 DATA ENDU$ 

60740 DATA TEN, E LEVHEN ., TWELVE , 
THIR TEEN, 4 TEEN, FIF TEEN, 6 TEEN 
,7 TEEN, 8 TEEN, 9 TEEN , TWENTY , THI 
R T,4 T , FIF T,6 T,7 T,8 T,9 T 
60750 REM TRANSLATE NUMBERS INTO 



EXPRESSIONS 
60760 L=LEN(A$) : I $=A$ : Z$="" : IFVA 
L(A$)=0 THEN60450 

60770 ON L GOTO 60920,60860,6083 
0, 60800 

60780 GOTO 60920 

60790 REM 4 DIGITS 

60800 Z$=LEFT$ (A$, 1) +" THOUSAND 
it 

60810 A$=RIGHT$(A$,L-1) :L=L-1 
60820 REM 3 DIGITS 

60830 IFLEFT$ ( A$ , 1 ) <>"0 " THENZ$= 

Z$+LEFT$(A$,1)+" HUN DER ED." 

60840 A$=RIGHT$ (A$ , L-l ) 

60850 REM 2 DIGITS 

60860 IFA$="00" THEN60910 

60870 IFLEFT$(A$,1)= M 0" THENZ$=Z 

$+" AND "+RIGHT$(A$,1) :GOTO60910 

60880 IFVAL(A$)<20 THENZ$=Z$+" " 

+TE$(VAL(A$) -9) :GOTO60910 

60890 Z$=Z$+TE$(VAL(LEFT$(A$,1) ) 

+9) 

60900 IF RIGHT$(A$,1)O"0"THENZ$ 

=Z$+" "+RIGHT$(A$,1) 

60910 A$=Z$+"""+I$ 

60920 IFNF=1 THENNF=0 : A$=A$+" " 

60930 GOTO60450 

60940 IF INKEY$=" " THEN60940 ELS 
ERETURN 

60950 IFRF=0 ANDP=58 THEN60210 
60960 IFRF=0 ANDP=2 THEN60450 
60970 IFP=58 THEN A$="APOSTROPHI 
E SKIPPING"' SKIPPING" 
60980 IFP=2 THEN A$="REMARK SKIP 
PING "REM SKIPPING" 

60990 P=PEEK(M) :IFP<>0 THENM=M+1 
:GOTO60990 

61000 GOTO60450 /R\ 



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NOW COCO 3 Compatible * 




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JFD-EC DISK CONTROLLER 

The JFD-ECnnomicaJ controller combines the best features of the 
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lines and Memory Minder 
in ROM. The JFD-EC re- 
places the JFD-COCO in 
our product line at an even 
lower price. The controller 
includes JDOS, the J DOS 
I manual and Memory Mind- 
er in ROM. {Precision Alignment Disk not included.) 
JFD-EC DiskControllerwithJDOS $75 

OPTIONS 

Precision Alignment Disk & Memory Minder Manual D/S $ 40.00 

Prec ision Alignment Disk & Memory Minder Manual S/S $ 26.00 

JFD-EC Disk Controller with RS DOS 1.1 $ 75.00 

JFD-EC DiskControllerwithJDOS and RS DOS J. 1 $ 95.00 

JFD-EC Drive O System with one double sided drive $250.00 

JFD-EC Drive 0.1 System with two double sided drives $365.00 

'JFD-EC and JFD-CP with JDOS or RS DOS are COCO 3 compatible. 



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Drive systems include our JFD-CP or J FD-EC 
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drive(s) with case and power supply. 

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15100-A CENTRAL SE 
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JFD-CP DISK CONTROLLER 

Our newJFD-CP, compatible with the original COCO. COCO 2 and 

the new COCO 3, features 
a parallel port to support a 
Centronics compatible 
printer or our hard drive, 
and an external ROM 
switch, which allows you to 
select JDOS or an optional 
1 RS DOS-type ROM. It 
comes in a case and in- 
cludes JDOS 1 .2 and man- 
ual. JDOS implements all RS DOS commands, plus many more, in- 
cluding auto line numbering, error trapping, baud rate selection. 
OS/9 boot from floppy or hard drive, and Memory Minder, our disk 
drive analysis program. (Precision Alignment Disk not included.) 




JFD-CP DiskControllerwithJDOS 
OPTIONS 

Precision Alignment Disk & Memory Minder Manual D/S 
Precision Alignment Disk & Memory Minder Manual S/S 
JFD-CPDisk Controllerwith RS DOS 1 . 1 
JFD-CP Disk Controller with JDOS and RS DOS 1 . 1 
JFD-CP Drive O System with one double sided drive 
JFD-CP Drive 0, 1 System with two double sided drives 



$ 99.00 



$ 40.00 
$ 26.00 
$ 99.00 
$119.00 
$265.00 
$379.00 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 109 



Doctor ASC I I 



A CoCo 3 Grab Bag 



By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 



^\ How can I make my Co Co 3 display 
Ij true lowercase letters in the 32- 
Ul column mode? At what speed is my 
computer at power-up? Is it true that my 
Co Co 3 is in the all- RAM mode at 
power-up? Also, what happened to the 
I60-by-I92 Hi-Res screen that Tandy 
advertises in its catalogs? 

Douglas McLaurin 
Nogales, AZ 

You can get true lowercase and 32 
^jC columns with POKE &H95C9 , &H39 : 
P0KE&HFF22,&H34. Your CoCo comes 
up at 1 MHz. POKE 65497,0 puts it in 
2 MHz mode. The CoCo 3 is in all- 
RAM mode after it powers up. En- 
hanced BASIC puts the machine in all- 
RAM mode, then patches CoCo 2 
BASlCand adds the extensions to RAM. 
The !60-by-192 graphics are only avail- 
able to machine language pro- 
grammers. 

Using BASIC09 

•^j / recently purchased OS-9 Level 11, 
for which I waited over four months. 
My problem is that my CoCo will not 
load in BASIC09, but gives me an error 
— file not found. I checked the direc- 
tory of the BASIC09 disk, and everything 
is there. The local Radio Shack can't 

Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




help me. What is wrong? Also, how do 
you get into BASIC09? 

Walter Dovawa 
Bradenton, FL 

If you are still using the anemic 35- 
/C track, single-sided drives, after 
booting up replace your system disk 
with the BASIC09 disk and type CHX 
C^DS. Then type BR5IC09 H40K to get 
into BASIC09 with maximum RAM 
availability. 

Head Banging 

II have problems with floppy disk 
drive head alignment. I currently use 
a CoCo with three disk drives, and 
my son runs a BBS (Co Co Jet) on a 
CoCo 2 with four disk drives. One drive 
on each system will make clanking 



sounds during the first access after 
power-up or a cold start, and the heads 
will go out of alignment. Is there any 
way to correct the problems other than 
using another operating system or 
running a short program to set the 
heads at a low track after power-up? 

Bill Sobczak 
Mesa, A Z 

If you want a permanent fix to the 
head-banging problem, get an 
EPROM version of ADOS, which also 
adds some other nice features, while 
largely maintaining compatibility with 
Disk BASIC 1.0. 

Composite Monitor Colors 

Although what you tell Eric Crich- 
low in your June 1987 RAINBOW 
column is true, there is a way to get 
several hundred colors on screen at the 
same time with a composite color TV 
monitor. A program called Color 640 
from More ton Bay Software is included 
in A Guide to CoCo 3 BASIC and 
Graphics. These are artifact colors, but 
they have a very nice appearance. I 
suggest that future commercial pro- 
grams include this feature, as I will not 
buy any that do not. 

John Dotson 
Mason City, I A 

Thanks for the information. 

Piggyback Upgrade 

I Regarding "64K Modification Revi- 
sited" June 1985, HOT CoCo; / 
would like to upgrade my grand- 
daughter's 16 K CoCo 2 to 64 K using 



110 THERA/NBOW October 1987 



2 1 18 RAM chips in piggyback config- 
uration. I have had no luck in locating 
a source for 2 1 18 RAM Chips. Is there 
a different ID number 1 can ask for? 

Bill Rosenfeld 
Roslyn Heights, N Y 

The 21 18 chips are 5-volt-only, 
7LI6K-by-l dynamic RAMs and 
with piggybacking can bring your ma- 
chine to 32K. If you do not already have 
these chips on hand, you may consider 
a set of 4164 chips, which are 64K-by- 
I dynamic RAMs, require significantly 
less installation effort, and cost about 
the same. 



Lame Drives 

9/ own a 512K CoCo 3, an RS-DOS 
1.0 Disk Controller and OS-9 Level 
II. Since OS-9 Level II seemingly 
supports 80- track, double-sided drives, 
I recently bought a pair of Mitsubishi 
80-track drives from True Data Prod- 
ucts, who assured me that these drives 
were compatible with the Teac 55 F. The 
drives did not come with any documen- 
tation, and I am not even certain what 
kind of drives they are. I have tried 
many different things, but I cannot 
format an 80-track disk without effec- 
tively disabling everything else. I can 't 
make the drives double step. I attempt- 
ed the procedure outlined in your June 
1987 column, but once I had modified 
the device descriptors I could not access 
any of the drives. Calling True Data 
Products did not help me, but they 
offered the advice that OS-9 Level II 
might still be a bit buggy and that 
TEA C has stopped ma king 5 '5 Fs. Great. 
It looks like I may be stuck with a 
couple of lame drives. Can you help me? 

Bryan Mau 
College Station, TX 

Ty You said you have a DOS 1.0 
controller. Assuming it is one of 
those that needs 12 volts, it may beyour 
problem, since no one on Delphi has 
reported fully successful Level II oper- 
ation with one of those. I am also aware 
of instances with CoCo 3 operation 
where overheating problems in the 
computer resulted in problems with 
disk I/O when running Level II. These 
were solved by adding a cooling fan. 



mat or back up disks. Radio Shack told 
me disk drive alignment was extremely 
critical for OS-9, and I sent my drives 
to a Radio Shack repair facility. Still no 
success. The computer still hangs up 
and a series of lines moves across the 
screen if I try to format a disk. From 
successfully using OS-9 with a friend's 
system, I am convinced that the prob- 
lem must lie in the Disk Controller. 
Perhaps you can give me some advice 
as to the best next move. 

Russell Obbink 
Prospect, KY 



It appears as though you, too, have 
an old 12-volt controller. Most 
likely, if you replace it with one of 
Tandy's newer 5-volt-only ones, the 
problems will go away. 



Download Troubles 

II am having problems getting the 
programs ARCHIE. BR5 and 
ARC .BPS to run on my CoCo 2 
or CoCo 3. In an attempt to access any 
of the submenus, I get RG Errors in 
lines 525, 545, etc. The article by Bruce 
K. Bell was in the May 1987 issue of 
RAINBOW and was downloaded from 
Delphi. 

Calvin Fuller 
Jacksonville, FL 



There were three complaints 
/L about the ARCHIE series shortly 
after it was made public, and in each 
case it was because a tape user had 
downloaded the tokenized files from the 
database using MikeyTerm. This was a 
problem because MikeyTerm cannot 
save tokenized BASIC programs to tape. 
Such saves work fine on disk systems, 
however. Also, Don Hutchison (DON- 
HUTCHISON) has uploaded BA5FIX, a 
program designed to fix tokenized 
programs downloaded to tape, to the 
Utilities section of the database on 
Delphi. 



Disto Controller Hang Up 



i 



12-VoIt Controller 

/ have a major problem with OS-9 
Level II and my 5 12 K CoCo 3. It will 



I recently acquired a CoCo 3 to 
upgrade my CoCo 2 system, which 
includes a Disto Super Controller 
with CoCo 3 DOS 1.1, CDOS 2.3, and 
RS-DOS 1.1. I can't get any of my 
programs that require an OS-9 boot 
(such as Microlllustrator and Child- 



pace) to run under any of the DOSs. 
When I boot up using either the DOS 
command or the boot program supplied 
with the programs, the OS-9 boot 
screen is displayed, but then either the 
computer gets hung up or garbage is 
displayed on the screen. 

John P. Penny 
(JOHNPENNY) 
Staten Island, NY 



1^ Tony DiStefano of C.R.C. Com- 
/L puters, 10802 Lajeunesse, Mont- 
real, Quebec, Canada H3L 2E8, (514) 
383-5293, reports that a timing problem 
in some of the older Disto controllers 
can cause the computer to "hang up" 
while accessing a disk. The CoCo 3 
update can be obtained for $8. This 
includes return shipping and handling. 

A Major Blowout 

While using my system recently I had 
^ a "blowout. " A flash came from the 
_J port, frying everything. I have spares 
for the CoCo 2 and my controller but 
my FD-501 drive is down. When pow- 
ered up, the LED is on, and when 
activated the motor spins but it returns 
an 1/ O Error. The LED always remains 
on. None of the internal components 
are visibly damaged or hot. I thought 
this would only happen if the controller 
was removed, but it wasn 't even nudged. 
Help! 

Bill Nattress 
Prospect Hts., IL 



In addition to the chips, resistors, 
capacitors, etc., in the computer 
and the controller, there are vulnerable 
components on the PC board attached 
to your disk drive. Try swapping major 
components (CoCos, disk controllers 
and drives) to localize the problem 
before testing individual piece parts. 



For a quicker response, your 
questions may also be submitted 
through rainbow's CoCo SIG on 
Delphi. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick Rainbow Magazine 
Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOWS prompt, type ASK for "Ask 
the Experts" to arrive at the EX- 
PERTS> prompt, where you can 
select the "Doctor ASCII" online 
form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 111 



T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE CELEBRATES 5 YEARS 



ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 

COVER 1 
RACETRACK 
HANGMAN 
MUSIC ALBUM 
LIFE EXPECTANCY 
WORD TESTS 
KILLER MANSION 
BARTENDER 
CALENDAR 
ROBOT WAR 

ISSUE #2, AUGUST 1982 

UFO COVER PI 1 
BIORHYTHM 
BOMBARDMENT 
BLACK JACK 
COST OF LIVING 
FRENZY 

BUSINESS LETTER 
QUICK THINK 
QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 
QUESTFOR LENORE 

ISSUE #3, SEPTEMBER 1982 

UFO COVER PT. 2 
BASKETBALL 
CHUCKLUCK 
SLOT MACHINE 
ALPHABETIZER 
NFL PREDICTIONS 
FLAG CAPTURE 
ROBOT BOMBER 

ISSUE #4, OCTOBER 1982 

UFO RESCUE 

TANK BATTLE 

DRIVEWAY 

SOUNDS 

BALLOON DROP 

MIND BOGGLE 

COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV 

CALORIE COUNTER 

JACK-O-LANTERN 

ISSUE #5, NOVEMBER 1982 

CATALOG COVER 
BOWLING 

PROGRAM INVENTORY 

PROMISSORY-LOANS 

CHECKBOOK BALANCER 

TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 

CONVOY 

BAG-IT 

SPECTRA SOUND 
CONVEYOR BELT 

ISSUE #6, DECEMBER 1982 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
RAINDROPS 
STOCK MARKET 
ADVANCED PONG 
DESTROY 
SOUND ANALYZER 
CREATIVITY TEST 
VOICE DATA 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 1 
LOONY LANDER 



ISSUE #7, JANUARY 1983 

NEW YEARS COVER 
LIST ENHANCER 
SUPER PRECISION DIV. 
BOMB DIFFUSE 
SPACE STATION 
ML TUTORIAL PT.2 
SHOOTOUT 
FIND UTILITY 
CYBORG INS. 
CYBORG FACES 

ISSUE #8, FEBRUARY 1983 

COVER 8 
DEFEND 

3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 
COCO CONCENTRATION 
AUTO LINE NUMBERING 
ML TUTORIAL PT.3A 
ML TUTORIAL PT.3B 
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 
DUAL BARRIER 
BRICKS 

ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

TIME MACHINE COVER 
TRIG DEMO 
PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 
PROGRAM PACKER 
BUDGET 

ELECTRONIC DATEBOOK 
ML TUTORIAL PT.4 
TAPE DIRECTORY 
BLOCK-STIR 

COCO ADDING MACHINE 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 

TENTH COVER 
PYRAMID OF DANGER 
TYPING TUTOR 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 5 
TINYCALC 

STOCK MARKET COMP 
YAH-HOO 
MISSILE ATTACK 
SCREEN PRINT 
BRIKPONG 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 

ELEVENTH COVER 
ARCHERY 
FROG JUMP 
ML TUTORIAL PT 6 
MLT DICTIONARY 
BASIC SPEED UP TOT. 
METRIC CONVERTOR 
GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 
GRAPHICS PROGRAM 
CATERPILLAR CAVE 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 

TWELFTH COVER 
SHOOTING GALLERY 
BOMB STOPPER 
VALLEY BOMBER 
STARFIGHTER 
WHEEL OF FORTUNE 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 7 
MERGE UTILITY 
RAM TEST 
LANDER 



ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 

THIRTEENTH COVER 
FLASH CARD 
ICE BLOCK 
COSMIC FORTRESS 
MAIL LIST 
DOLLARS & CENTS 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 8 
SDSK COPY 
MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 
CRAWLER 

ISSUE #14, AUGUST 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
ROW BOAT 

COMPUTER TUTL PT. 1 
INDEX DATABASE 
DISK ZAPPER 
COCO-MONITOR 
COCO- ARTIST 
ROBOT COMMAND 
TEST SCREEN PRINT 
HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 

ISSUE #15, SEPTEMBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER PT. 2 
GOLD VALUES 
TREK INSTRUCTIONS 
TREK 

HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 
ASTRO DODGE 
DR. COCO 
PEG JUMP 
MORSE CODE 
PURGE UTILITY 

ISSUE #16, OCTOBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
BOPOTRON 
DIRECTORY RECALL 
VECTOR GRAPHICS INST. 
VECTOR GRAPHICS 
SKYDIVER 

SWERVE AND DODGE 
NIMBO BATTLE 
TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 
LIFE GENERATIONS 

ISSUE #17, NOVEMBER 1983 

THANKSGIVING COVER 

3-DTIC-TAC-TOE 

INDY500 

COLLEGE ADVENTURE 
MEMORY GAME 
DUNGEON MASTER 
WEATHER FORECASTER 
GRID FACTOR INST. 
GRID FACTOR 
DRAW 

ISSUE #18, DECEMBER 1983 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
CLIMBER 

GALACTIC CONQUEST 
WARLORDS 
STATES REVIEW 
MATH TUTOR 

MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 
PRINTER UTILITY INST. 
PRINTER UTILITY 
MUTANT WAFFLES 



ISSUE #19, JANUARY 1984 

BANNER 
PROBE 

DISK DIRECTORY PROTECTOR 
OPTICAL CONFUSION 
WORD PROCESSOR 
WORD SEARCH 
ASTRONAUT RESCUE 
STAR TRAP 
PIE CHART 
FORCE FIELD 

ISSUE #20, FEBRUARY 1984 

INTRODUCTION; 
HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 
ESCAPE ADVENTURE 
SEEKERS 
MASTER BRAIN 
LIST CONTROLLER 
DISKETTE CERTIFIER 
ROM COPY 
BASIC RAM 
SNAFUS 



ISSUE #21, MARCH 1984 

BASIC CONVERSIONS 
FINANCIAL ADVISE 
CASTLE STORM 
DOS HEAD CLEANER 
COCO TERMINAL 
SNAKE CRAWLER 
WAR CASTLE 
SKY FIRE 
EASY BASIC 
DOTS 3-D 



ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 

HEALTH HINTS 
GLIBLIBS 

CLOTHER SLITHER 
BIBLE 1 & 2 
BIBLE 3 & 4 
CATCHALL 
INVADER 
ALIEN RAID 
MOON ROVER 
IO ERROR IGNORER 



ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 
STOCKS OR BOMBS 
WALL AROUND 
COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 1 
NUCLEAR WAR INST.. 
THERMONUCLEAR WAR 
CIRCUIT DRAWER 
MOUSE RACES 
SUPER-SQUEEZE 
DATA FALL 



ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 

DIR PACK & SORT 
BRICK OUT 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT.2 

USA SLIDE PUZZLE 

51 "24 SCREEN EDITOR 

51 *24 SCREEN 

CITY INVADERS 

PRINTER SPOOLER 

STEPS 

SNAKE 



ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 3 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEY MAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDITOR INST. 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLE BUSTER 
RECOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUGUST 1984 

PEEK, POLE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 
O-TEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
COCO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

ISSUE #27, SEPTEMBER 1984 

COCO TO COM 64 

GALACTIC SMUGGLER 

INDYRACE 

ACCOUNT MANAGER 

CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 

STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 

SPACE DUEL 

BUGS 

TRAP-BALL 

BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCTOBER 1984 

HANGING TREE 
CHECKERS 
FOOTBALL + 
MORE PEEKS, POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RAT ATTACK 

ISSUE #29, NOVEMBER 1984 

DISK ROLL OUT 
ROBOT ON 
MULTIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
QUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 



ISSUE #30, DECEMBER 1984 

MATH HELP 
ZECTOR ADVENTURE 
WORLD CONQUEST 
DRAG RACE 
MINE FIELD 
T-NOTES TUTORIAL 
T&D PROGRAM INDEXER 
SYSTEM STATUS 
ERROR TRAP 
DROLL ATTACK 



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ISSUE #31, JANUARY 1985 

TREASURES OF BARSOOM 
BATTLE GROUND 

STRUCTURED COMPILED LANGUAGE 
LIBRARY MODULE 
MINIATURE GOLF 
STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEBRUARY 1985 

DR. SIGMUND 
ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 
LOTTERY ANALYST 
BASIC COMPILER 
MUSIC CREATOR 
MEANIE PATROL 
TR1-COLOR CARDS 
SHAPE RECOGNITION 
DISK BACKUP 
SPACE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MARCH 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 
PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
ML DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 
DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEED KEY 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 
HOVER TANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSIC GENERATOR 
FYR-DRACA 
DRIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 

SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 
SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
HAUNTED HOUSE 



ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 

SELECT A GAME 2 
VIDEO COMPUTIZER 
SPEECH SYNTHESIS 
SPEECH RECOGNITION 
SPACE LAB 
AUTO COMMAND 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 
KNIGHT AND THE LABYRINTH 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 



ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 

CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE 57 

SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 
FILE TRANSFER 
FOUR IN A ROW 
MARSHY 

TAPE CONTROLLER 
CATACOMB 
AUTO TALK 
SGR8PAK 

ISSUE #38, AUGUST 1985 

GOLF PAR 3 
WIZARD ADVENTURE 
KITE DESIGN 
ROBOTS 
GOMOKU 

AMULET OF POWER 
LINE COPY UTILITY 
DISK PLUMBER 
SUPER RAM CHECKER 
GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPTEMBER 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
CAR MANAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHINE 
ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 
SUPER VADERS 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

ISSUE #40, OCTOBER 1985 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
COCO-WAR 
DISK LABELER 
SHIP WAR 
ELECTRIC COST 
MULTIKEY BUFFER 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
SAND ROVER 

ISSUE #41, NOVEMBER 1985 

GRUMPS 

DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 
SOLAR CONQUEST 
GAS COST 

RIME WORLD MISSION 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 
GRAPHIC TEXT 
GRAPHIC LOOPY 
BOLD PRINT 

ISSUE #42, DECEMBER 1985 

HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAHTZEE 
DISK UTILITY 
MACH II 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
SLOT MACHINE GIVEAWAY 
TEXT BUFFER 
TUNNEL RUN 



ISSUE #43, JANUARY 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER COST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 
KEYPAD ENTRY 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 



ISSUE #44, FEBRUARY 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 



ISSUE #45, MARCH 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT. 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COLO KEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
LIBERTY SHIP 
SINGLE STEP RUN 



ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 
SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DISK LOCK 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 

BOMB RUN 

TANKS 

TAR PITS 

BASEBALL 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

ROULETTE 

GLOBAL EDITOR 



ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFF. 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 



ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
TV SCHEDULE 
BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTI COPY 
AUTO MATE 
SCROLL PROTECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 



ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 
DISK DISASSEMBLER 
BAKCHEK 
PACHINKO 
STOCK CHARTING 
HAUNTED STAIRCASE 
CANYON BOMBERS 
DRAGONS 1 & 2 
GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 
AUTO BORDER 



ISSUE #50, AUGUST 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAME 



ISSUE #51, SEPTEMBER 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET 51 
VAN GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 

ISSUE #52, OCTOBER 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 
INVASION 

THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOT RACE 
FLIPPYTHE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS 
SUPER ERROR 2 



ISSUE #53, NOVEMBER 1986 

CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CAVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DECEMBER 1986 

JOB LOG 
PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TYPE 
PANZER TANKS 
MRS PAC 
BIG NUM 



ISSUE #55, JANUARY 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
DIR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEBRUARY 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRASH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EDITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 



ISSUE #57, MARCH 1987 

THE BAKERY 
ENCHANTED VALLEY ADV. 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR 1 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 



ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 



ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 
PLANT CARE 
CHECK WRITING 
HELI RESCUE 
KABOOM 
NEW PONG 
CROQUET 
SUPER MONOPOLY 
ZOOM UTILITY 
ELECTRONICS II 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
CATCH A CAKE 
CONCENTRATION II 
PROGRAMMABLE ROBOTS 
CT ADVENTURE 
MOTORCYCLING 
STAR EXPLORER 
ELECTRONICS III 
GRAPHICS EDITOR 
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Animation Film Festival 

By Sol la Carrock 





A nimate uses the Lo-Res screen 
j/W to draw up to 20 pictures and 
^ 1 save them to tape for later 
viewing. While the program may be 
used simply to draw and store pictures, 
there are many things you can do with 
the screens created with Animate. 

Using its companion program, Pic- 
ture Book, you can create a picture 
show or a short, animated movie, with 
or without captions. To aid the anima- 
tion process, Animate allows you to 
copy one screen to the next, shift screens 
up, down, left and right, and show them 
one after another at a speed and order 
you choose. By choosing a faster speed 
to show your pictures you may develop 
short, animated cartoons. The pro- 
grams may also be used to encourage 
writing by elementary-age children. As 
pictures are randomly chosen and dis- 
played, the child can write a sentence 

Solla Carrock is a writer and artist who 
has a master 's degree in psychology. She 
has worked with 'children, both normal 
and emotionally disturbed, in a variety 
of settings, including alternative schools 
and daycare, and has taught and coun- 
seled adults as well. She purchased a 
Color Computer about a year ago for 
her daughter and has been writing 
programs ever since. Solla lives in 
Portland, Oregon. 



about each picture in order to create 
his/her own story. 

Once you type in or load the Animate 
program and run it, you will be pre- 
sented with a list of choices: Draw, Read 
in pictures from tape, Tape stored 
pictures, View pictures, Copy last draw- 
ing on next screen, Shift a picture, Redo 
a drawing, Animate, Choose a different 
picture screen to be last, and End. 

Draw 

When you choose to draw, you first 
see a list of drawing directions. Pressing 
different keys on the keyboard causes a 
line to be drawn on your screen. There 
are eight keys that control the direction 
of the line. These are the four arrow 
keys and Q, W, A and S. Their direc- 
tions are given in the chart below. The 




drawing point is initially in the center 
of the screen. To draw with it you simply 
press a direction key and a number from 



1 to 9 to tell how far. To move rather 
than draw, press the D key. To begin to 
draw, just press the D key again. 

To change the drawing color, simply 
press one of the color keys (H to P). The 
keys and their corresponding colors are: 
H, black (erase); I, green; J, yellow; K, 
blue; L, red; M, buff; N, cyan; O, 
magenta; and P, orange. 

You may also add a line of text to the 
bottom of your screen. The text will 
start at the bottom left-hand corner, 
taking up the last two drawing rows (the 
screen holds 32 rows of drawing pixels, 
but only 16 lines of text). The first line 
will wipe out anythingthere. If you type 
more than one line of text, your whole 
screen will move up two drawing lines 
in order to make space for it. So Icuvc 
space at the top of the drawing if you 
have a lot of text. 

Press T for text. Press ENTER when 
finished with text, then you can draw 
again if you wish. If you press T again, 
you can write text, but it will write Qtfei 
everything in the bottom two drawing 
rows (or over the last line of text). 

You may clear the whole screen by 
pressing the CLEAR key. 

To store your completed drawing in 
the computer memory, press the @ key. 
Once this is done, the program will 
instruct you about how to return to 
make a new choice. If vou choose to 





October 1987 THE RAINBOW 115 



draw again, the next screen will be 
Screen 2. In this way you can fill up all 
20 screens. The program will let you 
know when all 20 are filled. Any draw- 
ing made after that will replace a pre- 
vious one, beginning with Screen I. 

Read in Pictures From Tape 

At the beginning of the program a 
drawing will be read into Screen 1 and 
the next into Screen 2, etc. But if screens 
are occupied by previous drawings, a 
drawing will move into the next avail- 
able screen. The program continues 
reading until all the pictures on the tape 
are read in or until the 20 screen storage 
areas are full. You can create a collec- 
tion of captioned movies or animation 
features to play back whenever you 
want. If you finish only part of a movie, 
you may tape the finished screens, later 
read them in, add more screens and 
retape the entire movie. 

Reading in the pictures from tape 
does take some time, however — about 
30 seconds per screen, or 10 minutes for 
20 screens. 

Store Drawings on Tape 

Again, saving screens takes about 30 
seconds each. One side of a 20~minute 
tape (10 minutes per side) will hold 20 
screen drawings or a 20-screen movie. 

View Pictures 

This choice lets you view the screens 
as slowly as you want. This can be 
helpful if you have lost track of which 
screen you are on or want to look at a 
screen at length. You choose when the 
screen is changed, as opposed to the 
Animate choice, which changes screens 
automatically. 

Copy Last Screen Onto a New Screen 

This is a feature to help you with 
animation. It copies the last picture 
drawn onto the next available screen. 
The drawing is displayed on the screen, 
and you can make any changes needed. 
One way to make a cartoon is to draw 
a beginning picture, then make just a 
few changes to it in each succeeding 
frame. This feature makes cartooning 
much easier to do. 

Another use of this feature is in 
combination with the Shift feature. For 
example, you could copy Screen 1 onto 
Screen 2, store Screen 2, then use Shift 
to move Screen 2 to the right. You could 
then copy Screen 2 onto Screen 3 and 
shift Screen 3 to the right, and so on. 
Using Animate, you would see the 
object you had drawn moving to the 
right. 

116 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



Shift Screen 

Use this choice to shift the screen just 
drawn or copied. You are given a choice 
of shifting it left, right, up or down. 

Redo a Drawing 

You do need to know which screen 
you want to change; if you don't, use 
View and count the screens until you 
reach the one to be changed. Then use 
the Redo option. 




"One way to make 
a cartoon is to 
draw a beginning 
picture, then make 
just a few changes 
to it in each 
succeeding frame. " 

Animate 

This is the core of the program. After 
you have drawn as many screens as you 
want, you may show them with Ani- 
mate. There are five speeds possible. 
The two fastest speeds work for anima- 
tion, moving screens so fast that move- 
ment is simulated. The slower speeds 
are more like a movie, with the slowest 
speed allowing time for reading a cap- 
tion. To have text in fast animation, 
simply repeat the words in the same 
place on subsequent screens. The text 
will appear to remain still as the rest of 
the screen appears to move. You are 
given the option of showing the screens 
once and stopping or having them 
repeat until you press a key to stop. 

Change Number of End Screen 

After I had used an old version of the 
Animate program a few times, I discov- 
ered 1 needed this choice. For instance, 
my daughter was using it once and she 
accidentally pressed the BREAK key. For 
some reason, typing CONT and pressing 
ENTER did not work to return the pro- 
gram. Since the computer hadn't been 
turned off, I knew her pictures were still 
there stored in the computer memory, 
but I had no way to get to them. 

Suppose you had eight screens drawn 
and you wanted to insert a new one after 
Screen 6. It would take a little manip- 
ulation, but here's how to do it: 



1) Choose to copy the last screen. 
Copy Screen 8 onto Screen 9. 

2) Change the number of the last 
screen to 7. Then choose Copy and 
copy Screen 7 onto Screen 8. 

3) Change the number of the last 
screen to 9. What you have now 
are nine screens; screens 7 and 8 
are exactly the same. 

4) Choose to Redo a screen, changing 
Screen 7 to what you want. Be 
careful with this choice. It would 
be easy to wipe out something you 
want by copying over it. Re- 
member, you can always choose to 
view the screens to find out exactly 
where you are. 

End 

When you make this choice the pro- 
gram asks you several times whether 
you would like to tape your pictures 
first so that you don't lose something 
you want to keep. 

The Picturebook Program 

This is a program I wrote to make use 
of a picture file created with the Ani- 
mate program. It is a program for use 
with a child, preferably one who already 
can write a little. But with adult help, 
it can be used with a younger child as 
well. The idea is to provide a stimulus 
to write by presenting the child with 
pictures of a picture book, which the 
child writes the words for. 

When the program is run, it first 
instructs the user how to load the 
picture files, which were previously 
created with Animate. Next, thechild is 
asked how many pages (up to 10) he or 
she wants in the picture book. The 
pictures for the pages are chosen ran- 
domly from those in the PICTURES file. 
Ideally there are 20 pictures for the 
program to choose from, but you may 
have fewer in your file, which just means 
there will be less variety and greater 
chance of a picture being repeated. 

The child is instructed to type a line 
for each picture and press ENTER when 
finished. After ENTER is pressed, the 
next picture is shown. Once alJ the 
pictures have captions, the child is 
asked to press ENTER to see the picture 
book. Then the entire book is shown, 
one screen after another, like a cap- 
tioned movie. At the end, the child is 
asked if he or she would like to see it 
again. If not, the text is printed on the 
screen to be copied, if the child wishes. 

When you are creating a picture file 
with Animate, keep in mind that the 
first line of text the child writes will 
cover a narrow space at the bottom of 
the picture. The next line of text and 



following lines will push the entire 
picture upward. Therefore, the best 
approach is to leave the last two draw- 
ing rows of the picture blank and also 
to leave some space at the top in case 
you have a prolific writer. 

Incorporating Pictures Into Another 
Program 

Begin your program with an instruc- 
tion to go to a block of commands at 
the end of your program. I have used 
Line 200 to begin the block, but you 
may use a bigger number if your pro- 
gram is longer. At the end of the block, 
return to the main program. 

The following is a machine language 
program to display pictures from 
among those read into memory areas 
from the tape file: 

200 CLERR 10240, 22500:CLERR 

20,22470:PCLEfiR 1 : CLERR 

1000.-CLS0 
210 DIN R$(10) ,R(10) 
215 DRTR &HBD , &HB3 , &HED , &H1F , 

&H01,&H10,&HBE 
220 DRTR &H04,&H00,&HRG,&HB0, 

&HR7,&Hfi0,&H10 
225 DRTR &HBC, &H0G ,&H00 , &H2G , 



&HFG,&H39 
230 FDR J=224?0 TD 22489 
235 READ DPI: POKE J, DP 
240 NEXT J 
245 DEFUSR1=22470 

This loads a desired picture file into 
the memory area of the computer: 

315 CL50 : PR INT"LDRD THE PIC- 
TURE TRPE. CHODSE THE ONE 
YOU WRNT TD USE , PUT IT IN 
THE TRPE RECORDER RND RE- 
WIND IT. PRESS DOWN THE PLRY 
BUTTON." 

320 LINE INPUT"PRESS<ENTER> 
WHEN RERDY" ; RN$ 

330 I=22500:K=I+20*512-1 

335 DPEN"I",a-l, "PICTURES" 

340 FOR LD=I TO K 

345 IF EOF(-l) THEN LD=K:XT=1 
:CL0SEtt-l:GDT0 3G0 

350 INPUTtt-1, fi 

355 POKE LD,R 

3G0 NEXT LD 

3G5 IF XTOl THEN CL0SEB-1 
370 CLS0 : PRINT0192 , "PRESS RNY 

KEY TO BEGIN" 
375 PLRY"CDE" 

380 I$ = INKEY$: IF 1$="" THEN GO 
TD 375 ELSE GOTO 4 



Line 4 would continue with the main 
program. Now the pictures are in mem- 
ory, but to be used they must be called 
by the program. Let R be the variable 
that represents the number of the pic- 
ture you want. Suppose you want to call 
picture four; use these lines: 

110 R=4:D=I+(R-1 )*512 

115 DI=USR1(D) 

120 FOR TI=1 TO 3000:NEXT TI 

(Line 120 is merely a delay t o enable the 
picture to be seen. You may vary the 
count for a longer or shorter exposure.) 

To use another picture, just change 
Line 110 to set R equal to a different 
value (I to 20). Or to have the picture 
chosen randomly, use these lines in- 
stead: 

105 Z=RND(-TIMER) :R=RND(20) 

110 D=I+(R-1)*512 

115 DI=USR1(D) 

120 FDR TI = 1 TO 3000:NEXT TI 



(Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at 2555 N. W. 
Savier H Portland, OR 972/0. Please 
enclose an SASEfor a reply.) □ 



Clearbrook Software Group (604)853-9H8 



Information 

Management 

System 



RAINBOW 



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• Interactive access to data- 



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CSG IMS for OS9 L2 or 68000(multi user) $495.00 
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ERINA - Symbolic User Mode Debugger for OS9 
ERINA is a must for all serious assembler and C 
software developers. It lets you find bugs quickly by 
displaying the machine state and instuctions being ex- 
ecuted. You can set address and register break 
points, dump, search and change memory, assemble 
and disassemble code and many other things to 
numerous to mention. This program will pay for itself 
over and over by the time you save solving your bugs. 
Requires 80 column display, OS9 L1/2 $69.00 



SERINA - System Mode Debugger for OS9 L2 
SERINA is a debugger for OS9 system modules 
(device drivers, file managers, etc.). It allows you to 
trace execution of any system module, set break 
points, assemble and disassemble code and examine 
and change memory. There are special provisions for 
executing code with critical timing loops and for ac- 
cessing I/O registers. A must for system programmers. 
Requires CoCo3, OS9 L2, $139.00 
80 col. terminal connected to /T1 or /T2 



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OS9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corp., MSDos Is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. 



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MSF - MSDos File Manager for C0C0 3/OS9 Level 2 

MSF is a file manager which allows you to use MSDos 
disks directly under OS9. You don't have to change 
the format of the data before using it! 
Requires C0C0 3, OS9 L2, SDISK3 driver $45.00 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 117 




Change line color 

75 IF ASC(A$)<81 AND ASC(A$)>71 
THEN CC=ASC(A$) -72: GOTO 50 



Clear screen 



Listing 1: ANIMATE 



80 
50 



IF ASC(A$)=12 THEN CLS0:GOTO 



Make choices 
1 GOTO 800 

5 CLS0 : PRINT "MAKE YOUR CHOICE:": 
PRINT "1) DRAW" : PRINT" 2) READ IN PI 
CTURES FROM TAPE" : PRINT" 3 ) TAPE S 
TORED PICTURES" : PRINT 11 4) VIEW PI 
CTURES ":PRINT"5)COPY LAST DRAWI 
NG ON NEXT SCREEN" 

6 PRINT "6) SHIFT A PICTURE" : PRIN 
T "7) REDO A DRAWING" : PRINT "8) AN 
IMATE": PRINT "9) CHOOSE DIFFERENT 

PICTURE SCREEN TO BE LAST": PRIN 
T "10) END" 

10 INPUT"TYPE NUMBER, THEN PRESS 
<ENTER> . " ;AN: IF AN<1 OR AN>10 T 
HEN 5 

15 ON AN GOTO 705,305,505,405,10 
9 5,720, 1110,1020, 1175 ,605 



Draw (Choice 1) 

50 PP=POINT(X,Y) 

51 A$=INKEY$:SET(X,Y,4) :RESET(X, 
Y) :IF A$="" THEN 51 

52 IF PP=0 THEN RESET (X,Y) : GOTO 
55 

53 IF PP>0 AND PP<9 THEN SET(X,Y 
,PP) 



To store 

55 IF A$="@" THEN GOTO 200 
60 IF A$="T" THEN GOTO 1150 



Draw line or move drawpoint 

65 IF A$=" A " OR A$=CHR$(10) OR A 
$=CHR$(9) OR A$=CHR$(8) OR A$=" 
W" OR A$="Q" OR A$="S" OR A$="A" 
THEN GOSUB 100: GOSUB 115 
10 IF A$="" THEN 50 



Change from draw to move or from move to draw 

85 IF A$<>"D" THEN 95 

90 IF DR=0 THEN DR=1 : PLAY "CD":G 

OTO 50 ELSE DR=0:PLAY "B":GOTO 5 

0 

95 GOTO 50 



Subroutine to read how far to draw or move 

100 B$=INKEY$:IF B$="" THEN 100 
105 B=VAL(B$) 
110 RETURN 



Set points and check that points are not off screen 

115 FOR TI=1 TO B 

120 GOSUB 150: IF X<0 THEN X=0 

125 IF X>63 THEN X=63 

130 IF Y<0 THEN Y=0 

135 IF Y>31 THEN Y=31 

140 IF DR=0 THEN SET (X , Y , CC) : IF 

CC=0 THEN RESET (X,Y) 

144 NEXT TI 

145 RETURN 



Subroutine to set line direction 



150 IF A$= 
155 IF A$= 
TURN 

160 IF A$= 
URN 

165 IF A$= 
URN 

170 IF A$= 

ETURN 

175 IF A$= 

ETURN 

180 IF A$= 

ETURN 

185 IF A$= 

ETURN 



: ii a ii THEN Y=Y-1: RETURN 
=CHR$(10) THEN Y=Y+1:RE 

=CHR$(8) THEN X=X-1:RET 

=CHR$(9) THEN X=X+1:RET 

"W" THEN X=X+1: Y=Y-1:R 
"Q" THEN X=X-l: Y=Y-1:R 
"S" THEN X=X+1: Y=Y+1:R 
"A" THEN X=X-1: Y=Y+1:R 



118 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



Store drawn pictures in one of 20 storage areas in 
computer memory 

200 N=N+1:IF N>20 THEN N=1:NI=1 

205 1=22500 +(N-1)*512 

206 IF NFLAG=1 THEN NFLAG=0 : N=NS 
AVE 

210 STORE=USR0 (I) 

215 IF N>=20 THEN CLS0 : PRINT "THE 
PICTURE STORAGE SPACE IS NOW FU 

LL. SAVE PICTURES ON TAPE BEFORE 
DRAWING MORE, OR YOU WILL LOSE 

YOUR FIRST DRAWINGS . " 

220 LINE INPUT "PRESS ENTER FOR 

NEW CHOICE. ";AN$ 

225 GOTO 5 

Read pictures from tape (Choice 2) 

305 N=N+1:IF N>20 THEN N=l 

310 1=22500+ (N-l) *512 :K=22500+20 

*(512)-1 

315 CLS0:PRINT"POSITION TAPE BEF 
ORE PICTURE FILE. PRESS PLAY BUT 
TON . " 

320 LINE INPUT "PRESS <ENTER> WHE 
N READY" ;R$ 

325 OPEN "I" , #-1, "PICTURES" 
330 FOR LD=I TO K 

335 IF EOF(-l) THEN LAST=LD-1:LD 
=K:CLOSE#-l:XT=l:GOTO 3 50 
340 INPUT#-1,A 
345 POKE LD, A 
350 NEXT LD 

355 IF XT<>1 THEN CLOSE#-l : NI=1 : 

LAST=K:PRINT"PICTURE STORAGE ARE 

A IS FULL." ELSE XT=0 

3 60 LINE INPUT "PRESS <ENTER> TO 

MAKE NEW CHOICE. ";AN$ 

365 N= (LAST-22499 ) /512 : IF N>INT ( 

N) THEN N=INT(N)+1 . 

370 GOTO 5 



View pictures one at a time (Choice 4) 

405 CLS0:PRINT"PRESS<ENTER> TO S 
EE STORED PICTURES . PRESS ANY KEY 
TO SEE NEXT PICTURES." 
LINE INPUT AN$ 

IF NI=1 THEN Nl=20 ELSE N1=N 
FOR D=l TO Nl 
1=22500+ (D-l) *512 
DI=USR1(I) 

AN$=INKEY$: IF AN$="" THEN 43 



410 
412 
415 
420 
425 
430 

435 
440 



NEXT 
GOTO 



Store pictures on tape (Choice 3) 

505 CLS0: PRINT "REWIND EMPTY TAPE 

. PRESS PLAY AND RECORD BUTTONS, 
n 

510 LINE INPUT" PRESS <ENTER> WHE 
N READY."; AN $ 

512 IF NI=1 THEN Nl=20 ELSE N1=N 

515 EP=22500+(N1*512) -1 

525 OPEN "0", #-1, "PICTURES" 

530 FOR 1=22500 TO EP 

535 A=PEEK(I) 

540 PRINT#-1,A 

545 NEXT I 

550 CLOSE #-1 

555 GOTO 5 



End (Choice 10) 

605 INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO TAPE PI 
CTURES BEFORE ENDING" ;AN$ 
610 IF LEFT$ (AN$, 1) ="N" THEN END 
ELSE GOTO 5 



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October 1 987 THE RAINBOW 119 



Draw instructions (Choice 1) 

705 CLS0: PRINT"PRESS < A > FOR UP, 
<DOWN ARROW> FOR DOWN, <BACKSPACE 

> FOR LEFT , <RIGHT ARROW> FOR RIG 
HT,<A> FOR DOWN AND LEFT , <S>FOR 
DOWN AND RIGHT, <W> FOR UP AND RI 
GHT, <Q> FOR UP AND LEFT. THEN PRE 
SS A KEY (0-9) TO TELL HOW FAR TO 

DRAW. ; » 

708 PRINT" PRESS D TO MOVE, NOT D 
RAW, THEN PRESS D AGAIN WHEN YOU 

WANT TO DRAW." 

709 LINE INPUT" PRESS ENTER FOR M 
ORE DRAWING DIRECTIONS ."; AN$ 

710 CLS0: PRINT" PRESS THE LETT 
ERS H-P FOR DIFFERENT COLORED LI 
NES. H IS INVISIBLE. PRESS < CLEAR 

> TO CLEAR SCREEN. TO SAVE A PIC 
TURE PRESS <@>." 

711 PRINT"TO ADD TEXT PRESS<T>.E 
NTER WHEN DONE AND YOU WILL BE A 
BLE TO DRAW AGAIN." 

715 LINE INPUT"PRESS ENTER TO ST 
ART DRAWING . " ; AN$ : CLS0 

716 CC=4:X=3 2:Y=15:DR=0 

717 GOTO 50 



Shift picture (Choice 6) 

720 CLS0: INPUT" CHOOSE SHIFT DIRE 
CTION 1 ) RIGHT ; 2 ) LEFT ; 3 ) UP ; 4 ) DOWN 
. TYPE NUMBER AND ENTER ."; SD : CLS 
0:IF SD<1 OR SD>4 THEN 720. 
725 1=22500 +(N-1)*512 
730 ON SD GOSUB 750,755,760,765 
740 CLS0: PRINT"YOU MUST VIEW SC 
REENS TO SEE RESULT OF SHIFT. PR 
ESS <ENTER> FOR NEW CHOICE.": LIN 
E INPUT AN$ 
745 GOTO 5 

750 FOR T=l TO 4 :A=USR2 (I) : ST=US 
R0(I):NEXT T: RETURN 
755 FOR T=l TO 4 : A=USR3 ( I ) : ST=US 
R0 (I ) : NEXT T : RETURN 
760 FOR T=l TO 2 : A=USR4 ( I ) : ST=US 
R0(I):NEXT T: RETURN 
765 FOR T=l TO 2 : A=USR5 ( I ) : ST=US 
R0(I) : NEXT T: RETURN 
800 REM DRAW FILE C . SOLLA CARROCK 
2/87 



Machine language programs 
805 CLEAR 200,22200 



Store picture 

815 DATA &HBD, &HB3 , &HED, &H1F, &H0 
1,&H10,&H8E 

820 DATA &H04,&H00,&HA6,&HA0,&HA 
7, &H80, &H10 

825 DATA &H8C , &H06 , &H00 , &H2 6 , &HF 
6 , &H39 

830 FOR J=22450 TO 22469 
835 READ DA: POKE J , DA 
840 NEXT J 

845 DEFUSR0=22450 



Display picture 

850 DATA &HBD, &HB3 , &HED, &H1F, &H0 
1,&H10, &H8E 

855 DATA &H04 , &H00 , &HA6 , &H80 , &HA 
7,&HA0, &H10 

860 DATA &H8 C , &H0 6 , &H00 , &H2 6 , &HF 
6,&H39 

865 FOR J=22470 TO 22489 
870 READ DA: POKE J , DA 
875 NEXT J 
880 DEFUSR1=22470 



Shift picture right 

885 DATA &HBD, &HB3 , &HED, &H1F, &H0 
1, &H10, &H8E, &H04 , &H00 , &H86 , &H10 

886 DATA &HB7 , &H57 , &HB1 , &HC6 , &H1 
F , &HA6 , &H80 , &HA7 , &H21 , &H3 1 , &H2 1 

887 DATA &H5A , &H2 6 , &HF7 , &HF6 , &H5 
7 , &HB1 , &HA6 , &H80 , &HA7 , &HA8 , &HE1 

888 DATA &H3 1 , &H2 1 , &H5A , &HF7 , &H5 
7 , &HB1 , &H26 , &HE5 , &H39 

889 FOR 1=22201 TO 22242 

890 READ DA 
895 POKE I, DA 
900 NEXT I 

905 DEFUSR2=22201 



Shift left 

910 DATA &HBD, &HB3 , &HED, &H1F, &H0 

1, &H10, &H8E,&H04, &H00, &H86, &H10, 

&HB7,&H57,&HB1, &HC6 

915 DATA &H1F,&HA6, &H80 , &HA7,&HA 

8,&H1F,&H31, &H21, &HA6, &H80, &HA7, 

&H3F, &H31, &H21, &H5A 

920 DATA &H2 6,&HF7,&HF6,&H57,&HB 

1, &H5A, &HF7 , &H57 , &HB1, &H2 6 , &HE5, 

&H39 

925 FOR 1=22243 TO 22284 
9 30 READ DA: POKE I , DA 
935 NEXT I 
940 DEFUSR3=22243 



120 THE RAINBOW Oclober 1987 



Shift up 

945 DATA &HBD, &HB3 , &HED, &H1F, &H0 
1 , &H10 , &H8E , &H04 , &H00 , &HC6 , &H20 , 
&HA6, &H80 

950 DATA &HA7,&HA9,&H01,&HE0,&H3 
1,&H21,&H5A, &H2 6,&HF5, &HA6,&H80 
955 DATA &HA7 , &HA8 , &HE0 , &H3 1 , &H2 
1, &H10,&H8C, &H06, &H00, &H2 5, &HF3 , 
&H39 

960 FOR 1=2228.5 TO 22320 
965 READ DA: POKE I , DA 
970 NEXT I 
975 DEFUSR4=22285 



Shift down 

985 DATA &HBD, &HB3 , &HED , &H1F, &H0 
1 , &H10 , &H8E , &H04 , &H00 , &HA6 , &H80 , 
&HA7, &HA8,&H20 

986 DATA &H31, &H21, &H10 , &H8C, &H0 
5 , &HE0 , &H2 5 , &HF3 , &HC6 , &H2 0 , &HA6 , 
&H80 

990 DATA &HA7,&HA9,&HFE,&H20,&H3 

1 , &H2 1 , &H5A , &H2 6 , &HF5 , &H3 9 

995 FOR 1=22321 TO 22356 

1000 READ DA: POKE I , DA 

1005 NEXT I 

1010 DEFUSR5=2 2321 

1015 GOTO 5 



1085 LINE INPUT"PRESS <R> AND <E 
NTER> TO RETURN FOR NEW CHOICE, 
OTHERWISE ENTER TO SEE AGAIN. ";A 
N$ 

1090 IF LEFT$(AN$,1)="R" THEN 5 



Copy last picture to new screen (Choice 5) 
ELSE 1055 

1095 I=22500+(N-1) *512 
1100 A=USR1(I) 
1105 GOTO 716 

Redo a screen (Choice 7) 

1110 PRINT"WHICH PICTURE (1-20) D 
0 YOU WISH TO CHANGE? IF YOU DON 
'T KNOW, TYPE 99 TO RETURN TO CHO 
ICES. CHOOSE A DIPLAY OF PICTURES 
(CHOICE 4) TO FIND OUT THEN RETU 
RN HERE." 
1115 INPUT N3 
1120 IF N3=99 THEN GOTO 5 
1125 IF N3<1 OR N3>20 THEN GOTO 
1110 

1130 NSAVE=N:NFLAG=l:N=N3-l 
1135 I=22500+(N3-1) *512 
1140 A=USR1(I) 
1145 GOTO 716 



Animate (Choice 8) 

1020 CLS0: INPUT 11 CHOOSE SPEED: 1)V 
ERY HIGH; 2 ) HIGH ; 3 ) MEDIUM ; 4 ) SLOW ; 
5) VERY SLOW. TYPE NUMBER AND ENTE 
R";SPEED:IF SPEED<1 OR SPEED>5 T 
HEN 1020 

1025 IF SPEED=2 THEN SPEED=50 
1030 IF SPEED=3 THEN SPEED=500 
1035 IF SPEED=4 THEN SPEED=1500 
1040 IF SPEED=5 THEN SPEED=3000 
1045 CLS0: INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO 1 
)STOP AFTER ONE SHOW, OR 2) KEEP 
GOING TIL ANY KEY IS PRESSED (TYP 
E NUMBER AND ENTER) " ;KP : IF KPOl 

AND KP<>2 THEN 1045 
1050 IF NI=1 THEN Nl=20 ELSE Nl= 
N 

1055 FOR D=l TO Nl 
1060 1=22500+ (D-l) *512 
1065 DI=USR1(I) 

1070 FOR TI=1 TO SPEED: NEXT TI 
1075 NEXT D 

1080 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" AND KP=2 
THEN GOTO 1055 



Subroutine to type words on screen 
1150 PRINT @4 80, 1111 ; 

1155 T$=INKEY$:IF T$="" THEN GOT 
0 1155 

1160 IF T$=CHR$(13) THEN GOTO 50 
1165 PRINT T$; 
1170 GOTO 1155 



Change which screen is last (Choice 9) 

1175 INPUT "NUMBER OF LAST PICTUR 
E YOU WISH STORED" ;N: IF N<1 OR N 
>20 THEN 1175 

1180 PRINT "THE NEXT SCREEN TO B 
E DRAWN ON WILL BE NUMBER";: IF N 
=20 THEN PRINT" 1"; ELSE PRINT N+ 

i; 

1185 PRINT "ANY PICTURE ALREADY O 
N THIS SCREEN WILL BE ERASED IF 
YOU DRAW AGAIN, AND WON'T SHOW W 
HEN YOU DISPLAY PICTURES." 
1190 LINE INPUT"PRESS<ENTER> FOR 
NEW CHOICE"; AN $ 
1195 GOTO 5 

2000 INPUT N: PRINT N:GOTO 2000 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 121 



c 

o 

Q> V 





RAINBOWfest is the only comput- 
er show dedicated exclusively 
to your Tandy Color Computer. 
Nowhere else will you see as many CoCo-related 
products or be able to attend f ree seminars con- 
ducted by the top Color Computer experts. It's like 
receiving the latest issue of THE RAINBOW in your 
mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for com- 
mercial programmers to * how off new and innova- 
tive products for the first time. Princeton is the 
show to get information on capabilities for the 
new CoCo 3 h along with a terrific selection of the 
latest CoCo 3 software. In exhibit after exhibit, 
there will be demonstrations, opportunities to 
experiment with software and hardware, and spe- 
cial RAINBOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace between visiting exhibits and 
attending the valuable, free seminars on all as- 
pects of your CoCo — from improving BASIC skills 
to working with the sophisticated OS-9 operating 
system, 

Many people who write for THE rainbow - as 

well as those who are written about — are there to 
meet you and answer questions. You'll also meet 
lots of other people who share your interest in the 
Color Computer. It's a person-to-person event and 
a tremendous learning experience in a fun and re- 
laxed atmosphere* 

To make it easier for you to participate, we 
schedule RAINBOWfests in different parts of the 
country. If you missed the fun in Chicago, why 
don't you make plans now to join us in Princeton? 
For members of the family who don't share your 
affinity for CoCo, RAINBOWfest is located in an 
area with many other attractions. 

A special feature of RAINBOWfest is the 
Educational Sandbox, which features child- 
oriented workshops to give hands-on experience 
to an age group often neglected. There are ses- 
sions for the kindergarten through third-graders, 
and for fourth- through seventh -graders. And, as 
an additional treat for CoCo Kids of all ages, we've 
invited frisky feline CoCo Cat to join us for the 
show RAINBOWfest has something for everyone 
in the family! 

The Hyatt Regency Princeton offers special 
rates for RAINBOWfest, The show opens Friday 
evening with a session from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's a 
daytime show Saturday — the CoCo Community 
Breakfast (separate tickets required) is at 8 a,m>. 
then the exhibit hall opens promptly at 10 a.m. and 
runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, the exhibit hall opens 
at 1 1 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained di- 
rectly from THE RAINBOW. We'll also send you a 
reservation form so you can get your special room 
rate, 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through RAINBOW affiliate. POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH treat- 
ment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at 
(502) 893-331 1. All POSH services are available at 
no charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 



1 



CoCo Cat 
in person! 



That fun-loving 
feline is on the 
loose and ready 
to mmt the CoCo M 
Community in 



A A ▲ ▲ ▲ 





Free Seminars 



A A A A 



Cray Augsburg 

RAINBOW Technical Editor 
OS-9 For Absolute Beginners 

Steve Blyn 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
CoCos For Remedial Education 



Jutta Kapfhammer 

RAINBOW Managing Editor 
Writing for Publication 

Marty Goodman 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 

Open Forum, CoCo Consultations 

Greg Law 

independent Programmer and Author 
Rainbow's OS-9 Online SlGop 
Programming, An Overview 

Jeffrey Parker 

independent Programmer and Author 

CoCo DOS and MS-DOS: Bridging the Gap 

Between the Worlds 



Dale Puckett 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Level II Windows and The New 
BASIC09 Graphics 



Jim Reed 

Executive Editor, Falsoft, Inc, 

An Introduction to RAINBOW'S Delphi SIG 



Tom DiMarco, Sr. 

Senior Field Engineer, Gimmesoft 
Drive Installation, Maintenance 
and Operation 

Richard Esposito 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Doctor ASCII Open Forum 

Art Flexser 

President, Spectro Systems 

Adding Features to the basic ROMs 



John Ross 

Ross Computer Services 

and John Gibney 

Delphi National Sates Director 

Open Forum, Telecommunications 

Ed Samuels 

Professor of Law, New York Law School 
Computer Copyright: A How-to Guide 



CoCo Community Breakfast 

Jim Reed — Executive Editor, Falsoft, Inc. 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo Community Breakfast is Jim 
Reed, who served for 4V? years as managing editor of THE RAINBOW, Not 
only does Jim know the CoCo Community intimately, he's been "back- 
stage" at the rainbow since the magazine s early days when it was pro- 
duced in the basement of Lonnie Falk's house, Jim has the "inside story" on 
CoCo developments and CoCo people and says his testimony "will tell it all: 
the good, the bad and the funny," 



Dale Puckett will be autographing copies of 
Trie Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 
Level If, Volume I: A Beginners Guide to 
Windows in the exhibit hall on Saturday and 
Sunday- 

RAINBOWfest - Princeton, New Jersey 
Dates: October 9-11, 1987 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Princeton 
Rooms: $86 per night, single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline: October 2, 1987 



Join us at a future RAINBOWfest! 

RAINBOWfest - Chicago, Illinois 
Dates: May 20-22, 1988 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $64 per night, single or double 
Advance Ticket Deadline; May 13, 1988 



FREE T-Shir to first five ticket orders received from each state. 
First 500 ticket orders received get a Chromasette tape. 




YES, I'm coming to Princeton! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special advance sale price. 
Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 

Pleasesend me: 

Three-day tickets at $9 each total 

One-day tickets at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 

Saturday CoCo Breakfast at $12 each total 

RAINBOWfest T-shirts at $6 each total 



Name (please print) 

Address 

City 

Telephone 



. State 



.ZIP 



(Advance sale-priced T-shirts must he picked up at the door.) 
Handling Charge $1 $ 1QQ 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 

(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 

□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the Hyatt Re- 
gency Princeton ($86, single or double room). 



Company 

□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 



Exp. Date 
Signature 



Advance ticket deadline: Oct. 2, 1987. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the door. Tickets will also be 
available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky call (800) 847-0309. 



Listing 2: PICTBOOK 
1 GOTO 200 

3 1=22500 

Randomly choose pictures for the picture book 

4 CLS0: INPUT 11 THE COMPUTER WILL S 
HOW YOU PICTURES. WRITE A LINE F 
OR EACH ONE, THEN PRESS <ENTER> . 

AT THE END THE COMPUTER WILL SH 
OW YOU YOUR STORY. TYPE HOW MANY 

PICTURES YOU WANT, UP TO 10, TH 
EN PRESS ENTER. 11 ; EN: IF EN<1 OR E 
N<10 THEN 4 

5 FOR N=l TO EN 

6 Z=RND( -TIMER) 

10 R=RND(20) :R(N)=R 

Display picture and wait for user to enter a line 

15 D=I+(R-1) *512 
20 DI=USR1(D) 
25 PRINT@480, ; 

30 T$=INKEY$:IF T$=" "THEN GOTO 3 
9> 

35 IF T$=CHR$(13) THEN GOTO 45 
40 PRINT T$; :A$ (N)=A$(N)+T$:GOTO 
30 

45 NEXT N 

Show each picture with the text written by user 

50 INPUT"PRESS<ENTER>TO SEE YOUR 

PICTURE BOOK";AN$ 
55 FOR N=l TO EN 
60 R=R(N) 
65 D=I+(R-1) *512 
70 DI=USR1(D) 
75 PRINT@480,A$ (N) ; 
80 FOR TI=1 TO 3000: NEXT TI 
85 NEXT N 

Check to see if user wants viewing repeated; if not 
print the story on the screen 

90 INPUT "PRESS R AND ENTER IF YO 
U WANT TO SEE IT AGAIN. IF NOT, 
JUST PRESS ENTER. ";AN$ 
95 IF LEFT$(AN$,1)="R" THEN GOTO 
55 

100 CLS0 : PRINT@0 , "HERE IS YOUR S 
TORY : 11 ; 

105 FOR N=l TO 5 
110 PRINT A$ (N) ; 
115 NEXT N 

120 IF EN>5 THEN LINE INPUT"... P 
RESS ENTER FOR PAGE 2";AN$ 
125 FOR N=6 TO EN 
130 PRINT A$(N) 



135 NEXT N 

140 INPUT "DO YOU WANT TO WRITE A 
NOTHER STORY" ;AN$ 

145 IF LEFT$(AN$,1)="N" THEN END 



Clear story array if new story desired 

150 FOR N=l TO 10 
155 A$(N)="":NEXT N 
160 GOTO 4 

Machine language program to display randomly 
chosen pictures from among those read into memory 
areas from tape file 

200 REM PICTUREBOOK C. SOLLA CAR 
ROCK 1/87 

205 CLEAR 10240 , 2 2500 : CLEAR 20,2 

2470:PCLEAR 1: CLEAR 1000:CLS0 

210 DIM A$(10) ,R(10) 

2 15 DATA &HBD , &HB3 , &HED , &H1F , &H0 

1,&H10,&H8E 

220 DATA &H04,&H00,&HA6,&H80,&HA 
7 , &HA0 , &H10 

225 DATA &H8C , &H06 , &H00 , &H2 6 , &HF 
6,&H39 

230 FOR J=22470 TO 22489 
235 READ DA: POKE J , DA 
240 NEXT J 
245 DEFUSR1=22470 

Load desired picture file into memory 

315 CLS0: PRINT "LOAD THE PICTURE 
TAPE, CHOOSE THE ONE YOU WANT TO 
USE, PUT IT IN THE TAPE RECORDE 
R AND REWIND IT. PRESS DOWN THE 
PLAY BUTTON." 

320 LINE INPUT 11 PRE SS<ENTER>WHEN 
READY"; AN $ 

325 CLS0 : PRINT@202 , "TAPE LOADING 

":PRINT@224,"THIS WILL TAKE ABOU 

T 10 MINUTES" 

330 I=22500:K=I+20*512-1 

335 OPEN"I",#-l, "PICTURES" 

340 FOR LD=I TO K 

345 IF EOF(-l) THEN LD=K:XT=1:CL 
OSE#-l:GOTO 3 60 
350 INPUT#-1,A 
355 POKE LD, A 
360 NEXT LD 

3 65 IF XTOl THEN CLOSE#-l 

370 CLS0 : PRINT@192 , "PRESS ANY KE 

Y TO BEGIN" 

375 PLAY"CDE" 

380 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN GOTO 
375 ELSE GOTO 4 /R\ 



124 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



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Turn of th e Screw 



Dissecting the Disk 
Controller 

By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



A little over a year ago, I started 
a series of articles describing the 
LSI (Large Scale Integrated) 
circuit chips of the CoCo. There was the 
CPU, the SAM, the PIAs and the VDG 
along with a whole lot of other TTL 
support chips. One thing that I did not 
touch upon is the disk controller. The 
controller from Radio Shack also has 
some LSI chips. In fact, the first Radio 
Shack controller, Catalog No. 26-3022, 
used a three-chip set. The later con- 
trollers used more up-to-date parts. 
What I intend to do this month is to 
describe the older controller and the 
newer controller. In both cases, you will 
learn more about the FDC (Floppy 
Disk Controller). 

The controller chip that Radio Shack 
used in their first controller is a part 
made by Western Digital. The FD1793- 
02 is a floppy disk formatter/ controller. 
That means that the controller can 
format a disk as well as read and write 
to it. This chip had many features: soft 
sector format compatibility, automatic 
track seek with verification, single and 
double density, and IBM 3740 and 34 
densities, just to name a few. This was 
a wonderful chip. It came in a 40-pin 
package, very compact for its day. But 
it required at least two other support 
chips — the WD 1691 Data Separator 
and the WD2143-01 Four Phase Clock 
Generator. Together these three chips 

Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Quest, Quebec. 



and a half-dozen or so other support 
chips made up the controller. The power 
requirements f or this setup is 5 volts and 
12 volts. 

The chips in Figure I are the pinouts 
of the three Western Digital parts that 
make up the heart of the controller 
followed by a pin-by-pin description of 
the FD 1793-02 controller. Overlines 
indicate that the signal is an active low 
pm. 

The other two chips are used to 
support the FDC. They connect to each 
other in various ways and connect to 
other TTL circuitry. It would be a little 
too long to explain each pin of these two 
chips and maybe even useless. Yes, 
useless, because the three-chip FDC 
combination is now obsolete. Western 
Digital has since redesigned the FD1793 
and made a new chip called the 
WD1773. This chip has the WD1691 
and the WD2143 built right into the new 
FDC. That's right, three chips in one. 
Another welcomed feature of the 
WD1773 is that it does not require +12 
volts. It will run on a +5 volt supply 
only. 

This development was great for 
Radio Shack because they had just 
released the new CoCo 2. It was smaller, 
lighter and less expensive than the 
CoCo I. Following the new CoCo 2 
came a new controller. Radio Shack had 
to come up with a new controller that 
did not use +12 volts. It was easy with 
the new FDC. Not only did it not use 
+ 1 2 volts but was less expensive than the 
older three-chip set. It also required less 



support circuitry. Another plus for the 
new FDC was that it did not have any 
adjustments. The older 1793 had three 
trim pot adjustments. 

This new controller was great all 
around. Less money, no +12 volts, only 
one part, and no adjustments. It also 
had one more feature: It came in a 28- 
pin package. Figure 2 shows the pinout 
of the WD1773 and a pin-by-pin des- 
cription. Notice that functionally, the 
parts in Figure I and Figure 2 are the 
same. 

Since the introduction of this new 
FDC chip, many companies have used 
it to make their own version of Radio 
Shack's controller. Though the exact 
circuitry may vary from design to de- 
sign, they have to follow certain rules. 
First, the FDC has to be mapped to the 
same memory area. That requires some 
sort of memory-mapping chips. The 
way in which the FDC and the CPU 
transfer data has to be the same if it is 
to be compatible. 

The technique used in a Radio Shack 
or compatible controller to transfer 
data (a complete sector) is not too 
difficult to understand. It starts off with 
the CPU setting up the FDC registers 
for the right track and sector. It then 
turns on the proper drive motor and 
drive select. Next, it gives the read or 
write sector command to the FDC. It 
checks to see that everything is all right, 
then, it flips the bit that halts it. This is 
done by hardware that pulls the HALT 
line of the CPU low. When the FDC has 
data ready or needs data from the CPU, 



126 THE RAINBOW October 1987 





1 




40 


r— VDD 


WE — 


2 




CO 


— INTRQ 


cs — 


3 




38 


— DRQ 


RE — 


4 


p 


37 


— DDEN 


AO — 


5 


D 


36 


— WPRT 


A1 — 


6 


1 

7 


35 


— IP 


DO — 


7 


34 


— TROO 


D1 — 


8 


f 
Q 


33 


— WF/VFOE 


D2 — 


9 


y 

Q 


32 


— READY 


D3 — 


10 


o 


31 


— WD 


D4 — 


11 


0 


30 


— WG 


D5 — 


12 


2 


29 


— TG43 


D6 — 


13 




28 


— HLD 


D7 — 


14 




27 


— RAW READ 


STEP — 


15 




26 


— RCLK 


DlRC — 


16 




25 


— RG 


EARLY — 


17 




24 


— CLK 


LATE — 


18 




23 


— HLT 


MR — 


19 




22 


— TEST 


VSS — > 


20 




21 


— VCC 






A 







WDIN — 


1 




20 


— VCC 


02 — 


2 


W 


19 


— 


03 — 


3 


D 


18 


— LATE 


01 — 


4 


1 


17 


— EARLY 


STB — 


5 


6 


16 


— vco 


WDOUT — 


6 


9 


15 


— DDEN 


WG — 


7 


1 


14 


— PD 


WF/VFOE — 


8 




13 


— PU 


TG43 — 


9 




12 


— RCLK 


vss— 


10 




11 


— RDD 






B 






04 — 


1 


W 


18 


— * VCC 


04 


2 


D 


17 


— 0 PW 


03 — 


3 


2 


16 


— 04 PW 


03 — 


4 


1 


15 


— 03 PW 


02— 


5 


4 


14 


— 02 PW 


02 — 


6 


3 


13 


— 01 PW 


oT— 


7 




12 


— NC 


01 — 


e 


0 


11 


— STB IN 


GND — 


9 


1 


10 


— NC 



Figure 1 



1 — NC. This pin has to be left N/ 

C though it connects to a back 
b ias g enerator. 

2 — WE. The Write Enable pin tells 

the FDC to write data. 

3 — CS. The Chip Select is used to 

map the FDC into the CPU's 
memory area. 

4 — RE. The Read Enable pin tells 

the FDC that a read cycle is being 
done. 

5 and 6 — AO and Al. Two address 

lines select one of the four regis- 
ters of the FDC. 

7 to 14 — DO to D7. The eight data 
lines that transfer data to and 
from the FDC and the CPU. 

15 — STEP. This output steps the 



it unhalts the CPU via the DRQ line of 
the FDC. The CPU then stores that byte 
of data into memory on a read or fetches 
another byte from memory on a write 
and then halts itself again. This proce- 
dure is repeated until all the data of that 
sector is transferred. At this point the 
FDC fires the INTRQ; this signal is 
connected to the IRQ of the CPU. The 
IRQ routine then gets the CPU out of 
this loop and continues to the rest of the 



disk drive to the next track. 

1 6 — DIRC. This output tells the disk 
drive which direction to step. 

1 7 — EARLY. This indicates an early 
write precompensation. 

18 — LATE. This indicates a late 
wri te p recompensation. 

19 — MR. A low on this pin resets 
the FDC completely. 

20 — VSS. This line is the ground line 
for the FDC. 

21 — V CC. Th is line requires +5 volts. 

22 — TEST. This pin is used for 
testing and should be kept high 
during normal operation. 

23 — HLT. The Head Load Timing 
signal is high when the head is 
engaged. 



read/ write sector software. 

This procedure is the same for all 
controllers that hook to the CoCo. 
Until now that is. Disto is soon to 
announce a new controller called the 
Super Controller II. This controller will 
do everything the Radio Shack con- 
troller can and more. It also has a 
different way to transfer data. It has 
built-in RAM memory and the support 
circuitry to transfer data to and from 



24 — CLK. This input requires a free- 
running 1MHz. clock. 

25 — RG. The Read Gate is used to 
synchronize the external data 
separators. 

26 — RCLK. The Read Clock is a 
square-wave signal derived from 
the data stream. 

27 — RAW READ. Data stream 
directly from the drive. 

28 — HLD. Head Load controls the 
loading of the disk head against 
the floppy disk. 

29 — TG43. This outputs tells the 
support circuits that the head is 
sitting on a track greater than 43 
(for 80-track drives). 

30 — WG. Tells the drive that a write 
is to be done. 

31 _ WD. The Write Data output 
contains the data and address 
marks to be written to the drive. 

32 — READY. The Ready input tells 
the FDC that the disk is ready for 
a read o r a writ e operation. 

33 _ WF/VFOE. A bi-directional 
signal. When WG=0, a low will 
terminate any write command. 
When WG= I, this pin remains low 
un til the end of the data field. 

34 — TROO. This input tells the FDC 
when the head is positioned over 
Track 0. 

35 — IP. This Index Pulse input tells 
the FDC that the index hole has 
just jone_by. 

36 — WPRT. The Write Protect 
input tells FDC that you cannot 
wri te to the disk. 

37 — DDEN. Double Density pin 
tells the FDC if you want double 
or single density. 

38 — DRQ. This output indicates 
that the FDC is ready for another 
byte in the write mode and that the 
buffer is full in the read mode. 

39 — INTRQ. The Interrupt Request 
indicates that any command has 
been finished. 

40 — Vdd. This input requires +12 
volts. 



this RAM without the use of the CPU. 
In the OS-9 operating system, this is a 
big boost. Data is transferred without 
the use of the HALT line. The CPU 
does not have to mask the interrupts. 
That means that once the CPU gives the 
command to the FDC, it is free to do 
other things and return to get the data 
when the FDC is finished. That means 
no more missed characters on the key- 
board when a disk operation is running. 

October 1987 THE RAINBOW 127 



1 — CS. The Chip Select is used to 

map the FDC into the CPU's 
memory area. 

2 — RW. The Read /Write pin tells 

the FDC what cycle is being done. 

3 and 4 — AO and Al. Two address 

lines select one of the four regis- 
ters of the FDC. 
5 to 12 — DO to D7. The eight data 
lines that transfer data to and 
from the FCD and the CPU. 

13 — MR. A low on this pin resets 
the FDC. 

14 — GND. The ground return for all 
signals. 



15 — Vcc. Power supply of +5 volts 
only. 

16 — STEP. This output steps the 
disk drive to the next track. 

17 — DIRC. This output tells the disk 
drive which direction to step. 

18 — CLK. This clock input requires 
an 8MHz. clock. 

19 — RD. This input requires raw 
data from the disk drive. 

20 — PRECOMP. This input tells the 
FDC when to use the write pre- 
compensation circuit. 

21 — WG. Tells the drive that a write 
is to be done. 




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22 — WD. The Write Data output 
contains the data and address 
m arks to be written to the drive. 

23 — TR00. This input tells the FDC 
when the head is positioned over 
Track 0. 

24 — IP. This Index Pulse input tells 
the FDC that the index hole has 
just gone by. 

25 — WPRT. The Write Protect 
input tells FDC that you cannot 
writ e to the disk. 

26 — DDEN. Double Density pin 
tells the FDC if you want double 
or single density. 

27 — DRQ. This output indicates 
that the FDC is ready for 
another byte in the write mode 
and that the buffer is full in the 
read mode. 

28 — INTRQ. The Interrupt Re- 
quest indicates that any com- 
mand has been finished. 




CS — 


1 




28 


— INTRQ 


R/W — 


2 




27 


— DRQ 


AO — 




W 


26 


— DDEN 


A1 — 


4 


D 


25 


— WPRT 


DO — 


5 


1 


24 


— ip 


D1 — 


6 


7 


23 


— TROO 


D2 - 


7 


7 


22 


— WD 


D3 — 


8 


3 


21 


— WG 


D4 — 


9 




20 


— PRECOMP 


D5 — 


10 


0 


19 


— RO 


D6 — 


11 


0 


18 


— CLK 


07 — 


12 




17 


^DIRC 


MR — 


13 




16 


— STEP 


GND — 


14 




15 


— vcc 



Figure 2 



Information for this column was 
taken from Storage Management Pro- 
ducts Handbook 1986, Western Digital 
Corporation, Literature Department, 
Irvine, California, and Color Comput- 
er Disk Interface, Tandy Corporation, 
Fort Worth, Texas. /R\ 




128 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 




CoCo3 



Color Max 3 — 
Graphics Editing System 



For the first month or so after the 
introduction of the Color Computer 3 
very little software existed that would 
take advantage of this new machine's 
enhanced powers. Soon we began to see 
a few minor pieces of software enter the 
market. We had even seen a few simple 
graphics programs. But it was not until 
the recent Chicago RAINBOWfest that 
we saw a full-blown graphics editing 
system that utilized nearly every feature 
of the CoCo 3. To be sure, I am speaking 
of Color Max 3 from Computize. 

Color Max 3 is a full-featured graph- 
ics editor with a simple-to-use point and 
click user interface such as is found on 
other systems and even on some pro- 
grams designed for earlier CoCos. A 



point and click interface means exactly 
what it says. First you "point" at a 
picture of what you want to do (an icon) 
with your mouse or joystick and then 
you "click" the button to select that 
option. It is easy enough that even 
young children can learn to use the 
program in a short amount of time. 
That is, if they can get mom and dad 
away from the system long enough. 

Don't let its simplicity fool you, 
though. Color Max 3 offers complete 
control over an image 320-by-200 pixels 
in size, in any 16 of 64 colors. It supports 
the use of both RGB and color compos- 
ite monitors. You can edit your picture 
on a pixel-by-pixel basis or make 
sweeping changes to the image with one 



or two quick mouse movements. At the 
touch of a button, you can add text to 
the drawing in any of several fonts and 
styles. Your imagination is the limit to 
what you can create. 

I am by no means an artist. In fact, 
my main interest in computer graphics 
stems from my technical background 
and the need to create circuit diagrams. 
However, Photo 1 will give you some 
idea of what a neophyte da Vinci can do 
in just a few hours. It also gives you 
some idea of what Color Max 3 looks 
like on the screen. (Both Photo 1 and 
Photo 2 were taken from a Radio Shack 
CM-8 RGB monitor.) 

The words you see across the top of 
the screen are the titles for the pull- 
down menus. When you click on one of 
these titles, a menu full of options will 
scroll down the screen. The File menu 
lets you save and load pictures as well 
as clear the screen or print an image. 

The Edit menu gives you the ability 
to transfer and copy sections of the 
screen from one place to another. You 
can use options under this menu to save 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 129 



certain portions of the screen, as well. 
Other options allow you to invert an 
image or "flip" it horizontally and/or 
vertically. 

The Goodies menu offers several 
interesting items. It is through this 
menu that you enter "Fat Bits." Fat Bits 
literally blows a certain section of the 
screen up to a size that allows easy 
single-pixel editing (see Photo 2). Some 
of the other options allow you to change 
your color selection or edit a fi-11 pattern 
or select the shape and color of the 
paintbrush. 




The Font menu lets you select any of 
the standard II fonts included with 
Color Max 3. It also works in conjunc- 
tion with the Style menu, which allows 
you to alter the 1 1 fonts with the follow- 
ing options: Plain, Bold, Italic, Outline 
and Shadow. In addition, several styles 
can be active simultaneously, which 
gives you quite a choice of how your 
text will look. 

On the far left side of the Color Max 
3 screen you will see the usable icons. 
These allow you to select which basic 
designs Color Max 3 will draw next. If 
you click on the Box icon, Color Max 
3 knows you want to draw boxes. If you 
click on the Pencil icon, you are all set 
to do some freehand drawing. Other 
icons include the Eraser, Circle, Paint- 
brush, Text Entry and Edit Lasso. The 
most used functions of Color Max 3 are 
available through the icons. 

Just below the icons is a section that 
allows you to select how wide you want 
lines to appear when drawing lines, 
circles and boxes. Just click on the line 
width you desire and off you go. 

To the right of the line width section 
are the fill patterns and colors. You can 
select any of the 16 colors in thetop row 
as your foreground and/ or background 
colors. Also, through the Goodies 
menu, you can change which colors you 
are allowed to use. Color change is done 
by choosing a mix of different hues of 
red, green and blue, if you are using an 
RGB monitor. If you are using a com- 
posite color monitor, simply select an 
intensity level for the colors available in 



the CoCo 3's CMP mode. 

The bottom row on the screen indi- 
cates the patterns you can use to fill 
sections of your picture. These patterns 
are all black-and-white when you first 
run Color Max 3, but, again, you can 
edit colors into the patterns as well as 
completely alter the patterns. My only 
misgiving about the patterns is that, 
once created for a given image, they are 
not saved with that image when it is 
saved to disk as the selected colors are. 
This means you must recreate the pat- 
terns during a different editing session. 

Now, let's talk about printing your 
picture. Keep in mind that Color Max 
3 allows the use of up to 16 colors on 
the screen. I don't know about you, but 
my Radio Shack DMP-200 can't quite 
handle that many colors. In fact, the 
Color Max 3 manual tells you it might 
be best to use black-and-white designs 
if you are using a dot matrix printer. It 
also suggests that one of the best ways 
to keep a copy of the screen is to use a 
good 35mm camera. 

Computize does sell versions of Color 
Max 3 that support the Epson printers, 
Radio Shack dot matrix printers and 
even a version that produces 16-color 
printouts of the screen on a CGP-220. 
For those whose printer is not yet 
supported, Computize offers a version 
of the program containing no printer 
driver. Instead, you receive a coupon 
that entitles you to a free printer driver 
when one for your printer is written. 



Each copy of Color Max 3 includes only 
one printer driver. This is an interesting 
and commendable way to deter soft- 
ware piracy, but it can be annoying to 
those people lucky enough to own two 
different printers. 

Color Max 3 can be controlled with 
either a joystick or a mouse. In either 
case, it requires the new High Resolu- 
tion Joystick Interface (Catalog No. 26- 
3028) from Radio Shack. This is the 
only way to achieve single-pixel control 
on the Hi-Res screen. I have used Color 
Max 3 with both a mouse and ajoystick. 
If it is at all possible, you will want to 
purchase and use a mouse. You will find 
that pointer control is much smoother 
(see following review of the High Reso- 
lution Joystick Interface). 

When you first run Color Max 3, the 
program will use defaults that set it up 
for the RGB monitor and also set the 
printer baud to 600. Both of these 
defaults and how to change them are 
thoroughly covered in the manual. All 
that is required is one or two simple 
changes to a BASIC program. This is 
very handy and will allow present users 
with TVs to change their systems when 
they upgrade to RGB-capable moni- 
tors. It also enables those with RGB 
monitors to view pictures created on 
composite monitors. 

Speaking of the manual, I have seen 
few CoCo software manuals that devote 
as much time to helping the user as this 
one. Each aspect of the program is 



1 H ardwar e CoCo3 1 

High Resolution 
Joystick Interface 

The new Radio Shack High Resolu- 
tion Joystick Interface is both literally 
and figuratively a "black box." It is a 
design marvel that will allow your CoCo 
3 to access any of its possible 640-by-192 
pixels. Simply connect the interface to 
your CoCo 3's cassette port and one of 
lhe two joystick ports. Then plug your 
joystick or mouse into the port on the 
interface. 

Unforiunately, the interface is not 
easily programmed with BASIC. Because 
of speed requirements, the software must 
use machine language drivers to read the 
joystick. This, however, is not a major 
drawback when you consider the abilities 
of the unit. Also, plenty of software is, 
and will be, available to utilize the 
interface. 



Personally, I find the results far better 
when using a mouse with ihis unit. When 
using ajoystick, screen movement seems 
jerky. I also found that, when setting 
points on the Hi-Res screen, the joystick 
will sometimes set two dots in different 
locations. Before I go any further, I must 
say that this is not the fault of the 
interface or the software! It has happened 
with several different programs, and the 
problem clears up completely when a 
clean mouse is used. Ii appears that the 
joystick ports get a little dirty and cause 
the erratic behavior. The joystick seems 
to work just fine if you use a little tuner 
cleaner to clean the ports up before using 
it. I have seen lhe problem occur when 
the mouse is dirty, as well. Once cleaned, 
though, everything works OK. 

I must admit, I was quite surprised that 
a simple product could produce such 
accuracy. Needless to say, just as a 
hammer is the first important tool a 
carpenter has, every CoCo 3 owner 
should have one of these. 

(Tandy Corporation; $9.95. Available in 
Radio Shack stores nationwide.) 



130 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



covered. While you really don't need the 
manual to get started with the software 
(it really is user-friendly), it is handy for 
some of those complicated maneuvers 
Color Max 3 allows. In addition, the 25- 
page manual explains some of the 
technical and background concepts 
behind the software. I tip my hat to 
Computize for their consideration in 
this area. It really shows their support 
for the user. 

Another area in which Color Max 3 
is supported is optional utility pro- 
grams. In addition to offering several 
versions of Color Max 3, Computize 
sells picture converter utilities, which let 
you convert pictures created with CoCo 
Max, Graphicom and even the Atari ST 
to a format compatible with Color Max 
3 (the MGE format used by Color Max 
3 is designed to allow full use of the 
CoCo 3's capabilities and, additionally, 
to allow easy compression of graphics 
files to reduce the amount of required 
disk space). Also available is a set of 
over 25 additional Color Max 3 fonts 
from Derringer Software and even a 
Font Editor, which allows you to create 
your own font designs. Unfortunately, 
we have not yet received these items for 
review. However, we will let you know 
about them as soon as they are submit- 
ted. 

All in all, Color Max J is a well- 
designed graphics editing system for the 
CoCo 3. It takes full advantage of many 
of the CoCo 3's capabilities and is very 
easy to use. 1 can certainly recommend 
this program to anyone whose interests 
include computer graphics. 



(Computize, Inc., P.O. Box207, Langhorne, 
PA 19047, 215-946-7260; $59.95) 



— Cray Augsburg 



Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



My Artist — 
Graphics Editor for 
the CoCo 3 

I remember well the rush of excite- 
ment that overcame me when I first laid 
eyes on my CoCo 3. New, improved 
BASIC commands! Up to 80-by-24 true 
text modes! Direct monitor connectors! 
Enhanced keyboard! Ahh — but all 
these features paled next to the feature 
that really made the CoCo 3 shine — 
graphics! Up to 1 6 different colors from 
a palette of 64 different colors, shades 
and hues, and resolution as high as 640- 
by-192. With all this power waiting to 
be tapped, I knew it would not take long 
for the software companies to release 
new software to bring out the Picasso 
in all of us. 

My Ar/isi by Seesof is a graphics 
editor written in Super Extended BASIC 
for the CoCo 3. It supports the four new 
HSCREENs, which vary in resolution 
from 320-by-l92 to 640-by-l92 with 
four colors available. Saved in an 
unprotected format to allow the user to 
easily back up the original disk for 
safekeeping, the program is simple to 
load and run. 

Upon running the program, the user 
is presented with a brief title screen and 
has the option to load a previously 
stored creation, or create a new one. At 
this point either the stored graphics are 
loaded, or the user is prompted to select 
from the various graphics modes. After 
this, the graphic screen is presented, and 
editing can begin. 

Because the entire screen is used for 
your artwork, there are no icons or 
other point-and-click type amenities. 
Instead, the user selects the choice of 



tools from the keyboard. Various com- 
mands support the drawing of simple 
points, lines, boxes, filled boxes and 
ovals. In most cases, the user keys the 
appropriate letter, selects the initial 
point, presses the firebutton, relocates 
the cursor to the terminal point, and 
presses the firebutton again. 

The current location is indicated by 
a small crosshair cursor. Movement is 
achieved by pushing the joystick in the 
direction you want the cursor to move. 
In the fast mode, the cursor moves five 
to 1 0 pixels at a time. In the slow mode, 
the cursor moves on a pixel-by-pixel 
basis. These modes are selected by the 
F2 and Fl keys, respectively. The user 
may also move directly to a desired 
location by choosing the 'J 1 option 
which moves the cursor to a point on 
the screen directly represented by the 
X,Y coordinates of the joystick. How- 
ever, because the resolution of the 
screen is up to 10 times greater than that 
of the joystick, the user will need to 
choose the slow mode afterward to 
achieve precise positioning. 

Some of the other supported com- 
mands include copying, whereby the 
user can store a portion of the screen 
contained in a rectangle of any size and 
duplicate it in any area as many times 
as desired; text mode, which allows the 
user direct entry of characters from the 
keyboard; and paint, which allows the 
filling of an enclosed area with any 
available color. The hue command 
allows the selection of the various 
shades available for the palette slots, 
while the color command selects the 
current color in use. Save allows the 
pictures to be stored either to disk or 
cassette. Finally, a help screen is avail- 
able at the touch of the ? key. 

Unfortunately, I found the program 
difficult to use and flawed to a certain 
extent. The program does not support 



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October 1987 THE RAINBOW 131 



a true 'undo 1 command, which I came 
to regret quite often. The manual sug- 
gests that the user save the file prior to 
using the Paint command; however, I 
cannot envision doing this every five to 
10 minutes, as it is a tedious process for 
the disk user and takes up quite a bit of 
disk space, and for the cassette user, it 
is even more tedious. Also, the Paint 
command itself was very difficult to use, 
as the user is required to know the 
numeric code representing the border of 
the object. The manual states that the 
user should write down the color name 
and its code value, but this is an incon- 
venience that could have been easily 
avoided. I would suggest that the new 
user make his/ her own 'crib sheet' until 
he/she is familiar with all the com- 
mands. 

On the plus side, My Artist has 
adequate documentation and is suited 
for very simple pieces of work. 

(Seesof, P.O. Box 574, Beaufort, SC 29901, 
803-524-011 6; $14. 95: First product review 
for this com^WTappearing in THE RAIN- 
BOW) 

— David C. Barry Jr. 



S oftwar e 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



Leonardo's Pencil — 
Draw Special 
Graphics 

Leonardo 's Pencil is a BASIC program 
that lets you create very detailed graph- 
ics. It also converts your picture into a 
stand-alone BASIC program you can 
save to tape or disk for later use. 

After you load and run the program, 
you must center the joystick (your 
drawing tool). Once this is accom- 
plished, press the firebutton to see the 
go-ahead message. Type RUN and press 
ENTER, and you see the title screen of 
the program. Pressing any key on the 
keyboard or the firebutton brings up the 
drawing board. Written across the 
bottom of the board is a list of options: 
Keys, Speed, Erase, Undo, Test, Basic, 
Hcopy and Art. The first option shows 
which keys and what direction they 
move the cursor. You can select the 
drawing Speed (slow or fast); Erase a 
drawing; back up and erase the previous 
move with Undo; have the computer 
draw your graphic with Test; save your 
graphic as a stand-alone BASIC pro- 
gram; get a Hard copy of the BASIC 



commands used in your graphic; or load 
a previously created graphic to edit with 
the Art option. 

If you are using the joystick to make 
your drawing, move the cursor with the 
lever, and press the firebutton when you 
want to draw a line. When using the 
keyboard as your drawing tool, you can 
do exact, one-pixel-at-a-time drawings. 
Using one of the eight directional keys 
allows you to move the cursor one pixel 
up, down, left, right or any of the four 
diagonals. Pressing ENTER draws a line. 

To load a graphics screen to be used 
with the Art option, you must first save 
the BASIC program in the binary format. 
The instructions are very well-written 
on this point, but I misread this part and 
couldn't get the graphics program to 
load back into Leonardo s Pencil to edit 
it. I called James M. Bennett, who 
developed the program, and he pa- 
tiently explained the procedure to me. 
This was impressive, because one of the 
main things I look for when I buy 
software is after-sale support. 

There is a second program included 
called Paint. With this program you can 
have your computer write routines for 
coloring the outline drawings you have 
created with Leonardo's Pencil. When 
you have colored your picture, you can 
save the program in BASIC. This will not 
be a stand-alone program so you will 
have to merge it with a drawing pro- 
gram preceeding it. 




Jim has suggested you make a draw- 
ing with a felt marker on clear plastic 
wrap and tape it to your monitor. This 
way you can simply trace the drawing. 
Jim included a demonstration program 
on the cassette version and it really 
shows what you can draw using this 
program! I have been using Leonardo s 
Pencil since I received it for review, and 
although I am not very good at drawing 
with the joystick, I was able to draw a 
very respectable bear using the key- 
board. 

I am very impressed with the ease of 
operation and user-friendliness of this 
program. The instruction manual is 



well-written and easy to understand. I 
would certainly recommend Leonardo s 
Pencil for anyone who would like to be 
able to create special graphics. 

(E.Z. Friendly Software, 1308 Belmont 
Ave., Front Royal, VA 22630, 703-635- 
1354; Tape $10.95; Disk $12.95 plus $1.50 
S/ H: First product review for this company 
appearing in the rainbow) 

— John H. Appel 



CoCo3 



Software 

Polytint — 
Changes Palette 
Colors 

With so many new features to play 
with, it was only a matter of time before 
CoCo 3 products that use those features 
hit the market. Polytint is just such a 
program, designed to copy PMDDE 3 or 
4 images to the Hi-Res 16-color screen. 
On that screen, you can modify the 
image by changing colors to any 1 6 you 
select from the 64 possible choices. 

The program performs as advertised. 
Images are quickly transferred to the 
left four-fifths of the Hi-Res screen from 
your disk. The right fifth is dedicated to 
a box showing the 16 available colors 
and offering instructions on how to 
proceed. A lot of time and effort went 
into this program, and it shows in the 
fine online help it offers. 

First up when running the program 
is a menu that lets you choose between 
loading and coloring a new image or 
looking at a previously colored image. 
For now, we will choose the first — load 
and color. You are prompted for a 
filename (the extension .BIN is as- 
sumed as this is a disk-only program) 
and the file is loaded. It takes about 
three seconds to move the image to the 
Hi-Res screen. The picture appears on 
the left four-fifths with the right fifth 
displaying your palette. 

Now, you can begin to change palette 
colors to suit your taste. Color selection 
is made by positioning the cursor in 
front of a palette box (using the up or 
down arrow keys) and entering the 
numeric value desired for that slot. The 
small box displays the color you se- 
lected and you can proceed to the next 
slot or change this slot again. You might 
want to use one of the fine public 
domain programs to familiarize your- 
self with the colors and their values, as 
stepping through the other 48 values to 
find 16 you like can take some time. 



132 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



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After color selection is complete, you 
can start coloring your picture. The 
cursor is placed in the first area avail- 
able for coloring and can now be ma- 
nipulated with the right and left arrow 
keys. The cursor appears as a small 
flashing graphics block. Color selection 
is made by entering the palette slot 
desired. The slots and their colors are 
still on display on the right fifth. When 
ENTER is pressed, the area is colored. 
Press one of the arrow keys to move on 
to the nextareato color. It's that simple. 

When you have finished coloring 
your picture, you can save the image or 
recolor any portion of the picture. This 
program was written before the advent 
of editors such as Color Max J, so the 
save is not in a true Hi-Res format. It 
is quite ingenious, though. The regular 
PMODE 3 or 4 screen is saved, with the 
palette values, X and Y coordinates for 
painting and the paint value, appended 
to the end of the image. Thus, a fairly 
complex image (requiring many places 
to be painted) takes more disk space 
than a rather simple image. 

The other option on start-up is to 
view a picture already colored. This 
option loads the image, copies it to the 
Hi-Res screen and colors it. You may 
then observe the picture. When you are 
through looking it over, you return to 
the main menu and can either look at 
another picture or start coloring 
another image. 

A second program is included that 
enables you to add on to the Hi-Res 
screen. Once an image is loaded and 
colored, press the BREAK key and exit 
the main program. Then run the second 
program (called RDDITS), which clears 
the color block from the right fifth of 
the screen. By adding BASIC statements 
to the RDDITS program (the manual 
tells you how), you can use that right 
fifth and add anything to the picture — 
or, if you want, you can add anything 
to the left four-fifths, as well. 

While you can save the updated 
image, the manual advises you to save 
your own version of the RDDITS pro- 
gram to conserve disk space. The next 
time you want to view that picture, you 
follow the procedures above, substitut- 
ing the name of your custom version of 
the RDDITS program. 

There are a few very minor flaws in 
the program, but some of these cannot 
be helped. One such flaw is that ex- 
tremely complex images cannot be 
loaded as there are too many paint 
locations. The manual warns about this 
problem, although I couldn't find an 
image that wouldn't work. You are 



allowed up to 2,047 different paint 
locations, more than enough for the 
average picture. Another problem is the 
size of the paint cursor. Although it 
flashes, it is still very small and difficult 
to find on occasion. A small plus sym- 
bol (+) would better suit the purpose. 

The last problem is something that 
may be ongoing trouble. Because there 
is no real standard for saving Hi-Res 
screens (yet), the method used works. 
When a standard is adopted by the 
CoCo community, though, it is my 
suggestion that the program be changed 
to reflect that standard and to make it 
compatible with what I am sure will be 
a flood of other programs. 

All in all, Polytint is a fine program. 
The manual is very clear and not too 
technical. You have not just one, but 
four different examples to play with. 
The program is virtually "goof-proof." 
The price makes it one of the CoCo 3 
bargains. 

(Boiling Spring Lakes Software, P.O. Box 
2536 B.S.L., Southport, NC 28461, 9 19-845- 
2881; $17.50 plus $1.50 S/H: First product 
review for this company appearing in THE 

RAINBOW) 

— D.A. Ferrcira 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



Softwa re— 

Art- Deli — 

A Smorgasbord 

of Images 

As editor of your club's newsletter, 
you find yourself in somewhat of a jam. 
The Christmas edition is due in the mail 
in three days and you don't have a nice 
picture for the cover. There isn't enough 
time to create your own, and everyone 
has seen the picture you used last year. 




This is where Art- Deli comes to the 
rescue. The package consists of 10 
double-sided disks with a total of 440 
different pictures. They are all PMDDE4 



black and white images, and most are 
printer-ready. 

All of the images are high quality. 
They load easily into your favorite 
graphics editor. This is beneficial, as 
there are a few pictures that require 
some sort of text or other addition. Be 
warned, though — the pictures are not 
meant to be colored. You may add a 
background color to most, but given the 
nature of the digitized images, even that 
may require work (such as closing off 
areas you don't want painted). 

Almost all of the pictures are ready 
to go as-is, though. And if you don't 
have access to a graphics editor 
(Mc Paint, CoCo Max, Graphicom, 
etc.), never fear. A utility is provided 
that allows you to view all the pictures 
on the disk. Once loaded, any screen 
dump that works with your printer will 
do the trick. 

The cost may be a little prohibitive 
for the average club, so there is an 
option that allows you to buy one 
double-sided disk at a time. A single 
disk gives you 44 pictures with the 
following titles: Travel, Pets, Christmas 
1 & 2, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Win- 
ter, New Year, Patriotic, Creative Art, 
People 1 & 2, Spring, Summer, Easter, 
Valentines, Sports, Fun Sports, Food, 
and the ever popular Miscellaneous. 
When ordering the single disk, you can 
specify any two of the above titles. 

Finances permitting, the way to go is 
to purchase the full set. There are more 
than enough pictures to justify the cost. 
Also, when purchasing the full set, a 
book showing the entire gamut of 
available images is included, thus saving 
the tedium of looking through each disk 
for just the right picture. 

In short, Art- Deli is the perfect re- 
source for the newsletter editor, club 
leader or anyone who organizes activ- 
ities. The package is a virtual smorgas- 
bord of images for special occasions. 

(Specialty Projects, 4810 McCrory, Mem- 
phis, TN 38122, 901-682-8737; $12.95 per 
disk; $99.95 for the set plus $3 S/H: First 
product review for this company appearing 
in the rainbow) 

— D.A. Ferrcira 



-S oftwar e 



CoCo 1, 2 &3 



Scan and Restorit — 
Recovers Lost Files 

Scan is a program designed to scan 
a binary file and display to the screen 
and /or printer any ASCII sequences 



134 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



that it finds. The author mentions one 
intended usage of Scan, that of finding 
the right command to use in an Adven- 
ture game. 

The program is distributed in unpro- 
tected form on disk and requires at least 
32K of memory in which to operate. It 
is loaded into the computer with the 
LOADfl command from BASIC. 

Scan is a machine language utility 
that contains its own disk module, 
presumably for purposes of indepen- 
dence from the various incompatibili- 
ties between several of the alternative 
disk ROMs in use. It is invoked with a 
command line from BASIC in the form 
of EXEC filename. exl >DEV. The >DEV 
parameter, if replaced with >PRN, will 
route all output to the printer. If left 
blank, output will be sent to the screen. 

The special command EXEC ' VER 
would not work. However, most people 
would not be too concerned with which 
version of the program is in use, so I 
don't feel this deficiency is of major 
importance. 

Scan worked well when tested on 
several M/L files. It displays only the 
ASCII codes within a file, and this 
could be an attractive feature when 
scanning Adventure games. I think that 
Scan belongs with every true Adventure 
gamer. It is also a convenient, clever 
utility for the curious. 

Resfrii is a program designed to aid 
the novice user in restoring text files 
that have been made unreadable for 
some reason. It is in the form of a BASIC 
program made to "look like" a machine 
language program in that it is loaded 
into the computer with the LOADM 
command. Resttrit will scan an entire 
text file in search of the readable por- 
tions. The program is capable of detect- 
ing if a file is intact and correctly 
structured. If a file is determined to be 
flawed, then a new file is written to disk 



with the extension RES, Portions not 
readable are marked within the new file. 
This allows recovery of as much o f t he 
original file as possible. Both single- and 
multiple-drive systems are supported. 

The author of Restorii realized that 
many folks will not have an unreadable 
disk file available, so he provided a 
special modifier program. I did most of 
my testing with the Restorii program 
merged with the special program called 
RESTDR . TST, which modifies the main 
program to report disk errors when 
none actually exist. 

Restorii displays a binary representa- 
tion of the file in the top half of the 
screen as it is being restored. The 
bottom half of the screen contains a 
status display, such as line numbers and 
sector numbers of the input file. 

I encountered IE and FC Errors while 
using Resioril. These errors came from 
BASIC and indicate that a few problem 
areas remain in the program. A bit more 
attention to error trapping and recovery 
is probably all that is needed. 

The documentation and miscellane- 
ous disk files could use a minor amount 
of attention. For instance, the 
RDOC .DAT file is a small text file that is 
almost the same as the printed docu- 
mentation, yet two different individu- 
als, addresses and phone numbers are 
supplied in case the user has questions 
about the product. Also, the BASIC 
program called RUNTHI 5 . BAS (which 
prints the RDOC . DAT file) should have 
been four lines in length, yet it had an 
earlier version of the Restorii program 
appended to it, which increased the 
apparent size of the program to four 
grans. These are minor points and are 
probably indicative of some last minute 
changes by the program's author 

However, Restorii could be a valua- 
ble utility for many users. After all, if 
it saves just one file, it may well be worth 



its initial cost. The author stales that the 
loss of a file representing three months 
of work was the reason Restorii was 
written. 

(Semmesoft, 10 Sfrawhat Road, #2A, Ow- 
ings Mills, MD 21117, $21.95 each: First 
product review for (his company appearing 
in THE RAINBOW) 

— Don Hutchison 



Softw are- 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 



Super Tape/Disk 
Transfer — Simple 
and Useful 

Super Tape/ Disk Transfer is a collec- 
tion of useful I/O utilities for the CoCo 
user, It features menu options that 
provide the following transfers: 

Disk To Disk Copy backs up your 
disk in one to three swaps instead of the 
usual six to seven. It also works on 
multiple drive systems. 

Disk to Tape Copy archives your disk 
onto cassette tape. Each disk file is 
displayed and can be copied to tape or 
bypassed. ML starting, ending and 
execution addresses will be displayed. 

Tape To Disk Copy reads your favor- 
ite programs from tape to disk. Each 
tape file is read into the computer, and 
you are given the opportunity to save it 
to disk or ignore it. 

Tape To Disk Copy Automatic Re- 
locate lets you copy all of the files on 
tape to disk without prompting. It also 
automatically relocates any ML pro- 
gram with starting addresses between 
I 536 and 3584 to 3584 in order to avoid 
conflict with disk memory. 



POLYTINT converts your disk-saved CoCo 1 or 2 pictures to CoCo 3 format and gives you a fast, 
friendly way to recolor them in any 1 6 colors of your choice. Your new masterpieces will be 
saved in far less disk space then usual. See Rainbow Review Oct. 1 987. 

Requires CoCo 3, disk drive, RGB monitor preferred. 

Order from: BOILING SPRING LAKES SOFTWARE 
P.O. Box 2536, BSL 
Southport, NC 28461 
Telephone: (919) 845-2881 

Money order or check: $1 7.50 plus $1 .50 postage and handling 
NC Residents please add 5% sales tax. 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 135 



Tape To Tape Copy prompts you as 
it reads each tape file to copy to another 
tape. 

There are a couple of features I liked 
about this program. The program will 
not crash if it encounters an I/O Error. 
Instead it issues an error warning and 
just restarts. This can be a real help on 
those tapes or disks that are partially 
bad. Another special feature is that you 
can copy DRTfl files as well. 



(Microcom Software, P.O. Box 214, Fair- 
porl, NY 14450, 716-223-1477; Disk, $24.95 
plus $3 S/H) 



— David Gerald 



Softw are- 



CoCo3 | 



Gates of Delirium — 
Fantasy Role Playing 

As you enter the dungeon, fear creeps 
up your spine. You, Orniix the wizard, 
along with Gazer the Cleric and Sheena 
the fighter, move stealthily through the 
myriad passages hoping to find some 
clue or artifact (or at least a little gold) 
to help you on your quest. You suddenly 
come face to face with a band of ske- 
letons. Already weak from past fights, 
you realize this might be it. As you enter 
into combat, you know that at least you 
will go down fighting! 

Gates of Delirium, a new graphics 
ad venture/ fantasy Simulation by Die- 
corn products is another attempt to 
mimic fantasy role-playing games on 
the computer. Yet, this is the closest and 
best done rendition 1 have seen for the 
Color Computer to date. It is basically 
a conversion of similar games available 
on other computers, but 1 believe that 
Roland Knight, Dave Shewchun and 
Dave Dies have done the CoCo Com- 
munity a great favor by producing 
Gates. 

The premise of Gates is this: You 
enter the ancient and extensive land of 
Gates alone, with no knowledge of a 
purpose, only the need to add other 
people to your group and survive. In 
your adventures, you enter cities, castles 
and dungeons. You attempt to find the 
mystic lunar gates and transport your- 
self to a more fruitful land. You will 
fight skeletons, trolls, thieves, wizards, 
and many horrible monsters. 

The game comes with two disks. The 



game disk is copy-protected and Die- 
corn will replace it within one year of 
purchase if anything goes wrong. It is 
important you make a copy of the 
player disk (which is not copy- 
protected) and use it, for the disk is 
continually updated during play. Also 
included are 14 pages of documenta- 
tion, with a page of corrections and 
additions, and the "Ancient Map of the 
Land of Gates." 

You start the Adventure by generat- 
ing a character. This is done by choosing 
a class or profession (such as a fighter 
or a cleric) and a race (such as human 
or elven). You then 7 divide up 50 points 
into four areas: Strength, Dexterity, 
Intelligence and Wisdom. The more 
points you put into an attribute, the 
betteryou are in thatarea. Forexample, 
a fighter would want to maximize his 
strength since he specializes in fighting. 
A thief might want to put extra points 
into dexterity since his profession relies 
on quickness and agility (not to mention 
his ability to swipe chests of gold under- 
neath the noses of the town guards). A 
cleric or holy man would want high 
wisdom, and a wizard high intelligence 
as these attributes affect spell-casting 
ability. The race you choose sets the 
limits of how many points you can 
eventually fit into each category (you 
must start out with a minimum of 5 in 
each slot and a maximum of 25). The 
documentation covering this is fairly 
well-done, but is poorly typeset, which 
might possibly confuse the reader. After 
a little examination, you should be able 
to divine the correct procedure. One of 
the little pleasures of this game is that 
you need go through this task only once. 
The master program automatically 
scans the player disk to see if a character 
has been generated and, if found, starts 
the game near where the player last left 
off. 

The documentation is intentionally 
brief. This is to prevent the player from 
learning too much before starting the 
Adventure and, thereby, spoiling the 
fun of discovery. I believe it could have 
been more complete without risking the 
fun or mystery of the game. A minor 
background could have been intro- 
duced that would have given the player 
some purpose, and the text itself could 
have been greatly expanded. Things 
such as weapon and armor limitations 
for class have been incorporated into 
the game but left out of the directions. 
This is discouraging when you've just 
bought a sling for your cleric only to 
find he can't use it. An experienced role- 
player could be expected to know these 



things, but a player with little or no 
knowledge will have some difficulty. 







1 






* . . , . . . . -- 




MNvt 















The game board itself is a graphics 
display of the character and his/her 
companions and their surroundings. 
The game uses what it terms "shadow- 
ing," that is, showing basically only 
what the character can see, and hiding 
that which is hidden (usually by moun- 
tains or walls). This effect and the 
animation present in the graphics takes 
any tedium out of the play. The graphics 
are a pleasure to watch. The sound 
effects are complimentary, not compet- 
itive (but even these can be turned off). 
The character and his party always stay 
in the middle of the graphic display as 
the countryside scrolls around them. In 
the upper right-hand corner is a box 
that shows the members of your group 
and how healthy they aie. The lower 
right-hand area is taken up by the 
"dialogue box." It displays the com- 
mands entered and any responses and 
messages. 

The game play itself is controlled via 
approximately 22 one-key commands 
with other commands that must be 
typed in. These one-key commands and 
auto-repeat-on-movement keys make 
playing relatively easy once the com- 
mands are mastered. They consist of the 
arrow keys for north, south, east and 
west and other manipulative commands 
such as Open, Steal and Transact. The 
typed-in commands must be learned 
during the course of play. 

Combat is hand led by switching to a 
different combat screen that cannot be 
left unless either you or your opponent 
is dead. Retreat is not an option. Nor 
is running from a monster once it has 
locked onto you. Here, you and your 
party move around the screen or attack 
one at a time and, at the end of every- 1 
one's turn, the monsters may also move 
or attack. It progresses in this series 
until the eventual conclusion. One can 
learn to predict the movement of the 
monsters, however, and use that knowl- 
edge to help defeat the enemy. 

One minor irritation 1 had with the 



136 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



* * * * * COLOR COMPUTER III SOFTWARE * * * * » 



CBASIC !!! EDITOR/COMPILER 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer ill Basic Compiler!!! 

If you warn to write fast efficient machine language programs and you 
don't want to spend the next few years trying to learn how ro write them in 
Assembly language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!!! 

CBASIC ill is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program 
Editing System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take 
full advantage of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K 
RAM, without having to spend years trying to learn assembly language 
programming. CBASIC III allows you to create, edit and convert' programs 
from a language you are already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into 
fast efficient machine language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III 
supports all the enhanced hardware available in the CoCo-3. including Hi-Res 
Graphics & Screen displays, Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard. 
Timer. Serial & Clock). We even added advanced commands not available in 
Basic to give you a level of control only available to very advanced Machine 
Language Programmers. Plus we made it exceptionally easy to use, not like 
some other compilers. CBASIC III is the friendliest and easiest compiler 
available for the Color Computer HI. 

CBASIC HI is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced 
Basic or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs without 
having to worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory allocation and so on, 
because CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. For Advanced users. 
CBASIC III will let you control every aspect of your program, even generating 
machine code directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC III features well over 150 Compiled Basic Commands and 
Functions that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files. Tape, 
Printer and Screen I/O. It supports ALL the High and Low Resolution 
Graphics, Sound, Play and String Operations available in Enhanced Color 
Basic, including Graphics H/GET. H/PLT, H/PLAY and H/DRAW. all with 
99.9% syntax compatibility. CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O 
port with separate programmable, printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can 
send and receive data with easy to use PRINT, INPUT. INKEY, GETCHAR 
and PUTCHAR commands. 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the Color 
Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128Kof RAM available and install 2 Ultra 
Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation. Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 512K of memory in a Compiled 
program thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 
SKblocks and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor which 
allows you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a full 
featured editor designed specifically for writing and editing Basic programs. It 
has block move & copy, program renumbering, automatic line numbers, screen 
editing, printer control and much more. 

The documentation provided with CBASIC III is an 8 1/2 by 11 Spiral 
Bound book which contains approximatly 121 pages of real information. We 
went to great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and 
understand, but complete and comprehensive enough for even the most 
sophisticated user. . 

CBASIC III is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and 
well worth the investment. You can buy a less expensive compiler for your 
CoCo-3, and then find out how difficult it is to use. or how limited its features 
are. Then you'll wish you had bought CBASIC III in the first place. Dollar for 
dollar, CBASIC I II gives you more than any other compiler available. If you 
can find a better CoCo-3 Basic Compiler then buy it!!! 

Requires 128/512K & Disk $149,00 

DATAPACK III PLUS V1.1 

SUPER SMART T ERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTOPILOT & AUTO-LOG PROCESSORS 
X-MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT-IQQ & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

* No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port. 

* 8 Display Formats. 32/40/64/80 columns at 192 or 225 Res. 

* 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi- Res Text Display and Disk. 

* ASCII A BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 

* Directly record receive data to a disk file (Data Logging). 

* VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

* VT-100/52 cursor keys, position, insert/delete. PF & Alt. keys. 

* Programmable Word Length. Parity. Stop Bits and baud rates. 

* Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

* Send full 128 character set from Keyboard with control codes. 

* Complete Editor, Insert, Delete. Change or Add to Buffer. 

* 9 Variable length. Programmable Macro Key buffers. 

* Programmable Printer rates from 110 to 9600 Baud. 

* Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 

* Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

* Freeze Display & Review information On line with no data loss. 

* Built in Command Menu (Help) Display, 

* Built in 2 Drive RAM DISK for 512K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R.S. Modem-Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128/512K & Disk, Only $59.95 



TEXTPRO IV 

"The Advanced Word Processing System" 

* 9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Resolutior 

* On Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 

* Up to 8 Proportional Characters Sets Supported with Justification, 

* Up to 80 Programmable Function keys & loadable Function key sets. 

* Fully Buffered keyboard accepts data even during disk access. 

* Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system configuration. 

* 8 Pre- Defined Prin ter function commands & 10 Programmable ones. 

* Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

* Disk file record access for MAIL MERGE & BOILER PLATE printing. 

* Completely Automatic Justification. Centering. Flush left and right. 

* Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 

* Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

* Easily imbed any number of printer form a r and control codes. 

* Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 512K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is an advanced word processing system designed for speed, 
flexabi lity and extensive document processing, It »s not like most of the other 
word processing programs available for the Color Computer. If you are 
looking for a simple word processor ro write letters or other short documents, 
then most likely you II be better off with one of the other simpler word 
processors. But, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive 
document formatting features to handle large documents, term papers, 
manuals, complex formating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV 
is what your looking for. TEXTPRO IV works in a totally different way than 
most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 character abbreviations of 
words or phrases for commands and formatting information that you imbed 
directly in your text. There are over 70 different formatting commands you 
can use without ever leaving the text your working on. There are no time 
comsuming, and often furstrating menu chases, you arc in total control at all 
times. You can see what the formatted document will look like before a single 
word is ever printed. This includes margins, headers, footers, page numbers, 
page breaks, column formating, justification and Bold, Italic, Underline and 
Double Width characters right on the screen. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional 
fonts, take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an 
OKI DATA LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All the character sets used on this 
AD are proportional spaced characters, all centering, justification, and text 
printing was performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

Requires 128/512K & Disk $89.95 

HI-RES III Screen Commander 

The display von wanted but didn't get on vour CoCo-3. 

* 54 Different Character Sizes available 14 to 212 cpl. 

* Bold. Italic or Plain character styles. 

* Double Width. Double Height and Quad Width characters. 

* Scroll Protect from 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

* Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN3 mode. 

* PRINT (w available in all character sizes. 

* Programmable Automatic Key repeat. 

* Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

* Selectable Character & Background color. 

* Uses only 4K of Extended or Basic RAM. 

* Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES III will improve the standard display capabilities of the Color 
Computer 3. even the 40 and 80 column display have several features missing. 
For example you can't use PRINT @ or have different character sizes on the 
same screen, even mixing text and graphics with the HPRIXT command leaves 
a lot to be desired. HI-RES III can give you the kind of display capabilities 
you always dreamed about having on your colorcomputer but didn't get with 
your COCO-3. Well now it's here and with a wide variety of display options 
that you can easily use with your Basic or ML programs. 
HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color Basic and its operation 
is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the normal screen display with an 
extremely versatile display package. It also overcomes some of the 
disadvantages found when using the Width 40 & 80 screens. You can use the 
Print (§ function on any line length with HI-RES III. It also gives you a 
programmable automatic key repeat that cat\ be very handy for edvurvg your 
Basic programs. Automatic key repeat can be adjusted from ultra fast to super 
slow and can be disabled entirely if desired. You also get a full control code 
keyboard using the 'CTRL' key. So many of HI-RES Ill's extended functions 
can be controlled directly from the keyboard easily. With just a couple of 
simple keystrokes you can change character sizes and styles at any time. 
Requires 128/5I2K Tape or Disk $34.95 

To order products by maiL send check or money order for the amount of 

purchase, plus S3, 00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
• To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday- 8am to 5pm PST) 
CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 

(702) 452-0632 



game was the fact it locks up if everyone 
in the party dies (and this tends to 
happen quite a lot early in your career). 
This necessitates rebooting the whole 
game, which gets a little tedious. If you 
have two drives, it is not as time con- 
suming because you can keep the main 
disk in Drive 0 and the player disk in 
Drive I . This eliminates switching disks 
all the time. 

I have to conclude by restating that 
Gales of Delirium, in my opinion, 
despite minor problems, is one of the 
finest and most professional conver- 
sions of fantasy role playing games 
available for the Color Computer. It is 
exciting, extensive, and pleasing to the 
eye. 

(Diecom Products, 6715 Fifth Line, Ontar- 
io, Canada L9T 2X8, 416-878-8358; $38.95 
U.S.; $52.95 CDN) 

— Glen Dahlgren 



Software 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



Stock Market 
Portfolio — 
Track Your 
Performance 

With all of the interest Tn the stock 
market these days, the investor needs a 
means of keeping track of his invest- 
ments. Are you making money on your 
portfolio? Are you keeping track so you 
can pay Uncle Sam his share of your 
profits? Stock Market Portfolio is a 
program that can help you in these 
matters, using the faithful CoCo. 

Stock Market Portfolio is designed to 
keep track of all your current stock 
holdings and to keep a listing of stocks 
you have sold by year. It also maintains 
a tally of your total investment and the 
amount of profit or loss you have at the 
moment. 

The manual supplied with the pro- 
gram is clear and easy to follow. It 
contains three major programs: Setup, 
Current Stock List and Stocks Sold. It 
also contains sample printouts of the 
two stock programs. 

The Setup program creates the files 
that will be stored and maintained on 
the program disk. Several people can 
create files that will be maintained 
simultaneously. The program calls for a 
first and last name for the file, which 



provides access for future activities. The 
Setup program also allows for changes 
in information as required. One of 
Setup's features is the input of a "Stop 
Loss Percentage. 1 ' This is a fixed percent 
of the cost of a stock that, when sub- 
tracted from the cost, represents the 
selling price you would use to prevent 
losses on the down side. The program 
uses this stop loss feature against the 
original purchase price. I would suggest 
to the author that it be modified to be 
a percentage of the current quoted 
price, which is representative of a 
realistic situation to protect profits or 
minimize losses. 

The Current Stock List program is 
designed to be a file of all stocks cur- 
rently held. The menu asks for such 
information as Ticker Code, Stock 
Name, Number of Shares Held, Date 
Bought, Purchase Price and Current 
Price. Information can be easily 
changed, and you can review your entire 
holdings either on the screen or printer. 
The current price of stocks in this 
program can be updated by using the 
Change Current Stock Price option on 
the menu. This program also provides 
a summation of the entire portfolio 
showing the total cost, current value, 
profit or loss total, and percentage of 
profit or loss. When a stock is sold, it 
can be transferred to the Stocks Sold 
program. The program accomplishes 
this transfer when you change the status 
from B (bought) to S (sold). The capac- 
ity of this program appears to be very 
large, certainly more than a typical 
investor may have in his portfolio. 

The Stocks Sold program maintains 
files on stocks that have been sold by 
year of sale. This is particularly useful 
at income tax time, because it provides 
all the information required for your 
IRS return by year. Again, you can 
change information if necessary and can 
review the entire file on the screen or 
printer. This program also provides a 
summation of total portfolio cost, total 
sale price and total profit or loss in 
dollars and percent. You should note 
that to obtain true profit or loss, the 
actual price per share, including broker 
commissions, should be used. 

The program also handles dividends 
by requesting the annual dividend by 
year, showing the dividend as a percent 
of purchase price, and showing the total 
dividend per year for the number of 
shares held. This is useful in reporting 
dividend earnings to the IRS by year. 

I would not hesitate to recommend 
Stock Market Portfolio to any serious 
stock market investor or to amateurs 



who want to follow the market on 
paper. The program is easy to use, and 
it provides a good picture of your 
current portfolio and your transaction 
history by the year. 

(Paparis Enterprises, Inc., 700 York Street, 
Williamsburg, VA 23185; $22 plus $3 S/H: 
First product review for this company 
appearing in THE RAINBOW) 

— Mel Siegel 



Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



1 



TW-80 - A CoCo 3 

Telewriter-64 

Enhancer 

1 don't often get a chance to review 
software that really gets me fired up, but 
that's just what happened when I 
opened the package containing a new 
program from Doug Masten. 1 have 
written many reviews using TW-64 and 
its various enhancements which made it 
a delight to use on the CoCo I and 2. 
Now I have the pleasure of reviewing an 
enhancement for the CoCo 3. 

Besides a Color Computer 3 with at 
least 1 28 K of RAM, this enhancement 
requires one disk drive and an unmod- 
ified version of TW-64. If you have 
5 1 2K, you will also be able to utilize the 
built-in RAM Disk feature. 

After you have backed up your new 
TW-80 disk, you're all set to install the 
software. This is very easy to do, and the 
six-page instruction booklet explains 
each step. The documentation also 
explains how to use the new features of 
the program. When this is all done, TW- 
64 with the TW-80 enhancement is 
booted up using the familiar LDRDM"T" 
ENTER, but that is where the similarity 
ends. TW-80 is written specifically for 
the CoCo 3, and the new features are 
truly outstanding. 

The first thing you'll notice is a clean, 
uncluttered main menu. 

All of the options work the same as 
on the previous versions, but there are 
some differences. One of the most 
obvious is a reverse video (black on 
white) status line at the bottom of the 
screen. This line shows you at a glance 
the current cursor position as a line and 
column number. Insert or overstrike 
modes are displayed and can be toggled 
using the CTRL-0 key. Also indicated is 
whether or not Wordwrap is on or off 



138 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



and the name of the file you are reading. 
Memory available for text is displayed 
and counts down as you type. On my 
512K CoCo 3, this number was 45056, 
or just over 45K of text space available 
in an empty buffer. The program de- 
faults to 80-characters per line with 
white letters on a jet-black background. 
The filename is displayed in the status 
line. 

A program called CONFIG . BPS is 
included on the disk and lets you change 
all of the default parameters in the 
program such as screen and text color, 
key click and repeat rate, disk drive 
stepping rate, and printer format. 

The displayed text with true lower- 
case letters with descenders is very easy 
to read on my CM-8 RGB monitor. Six 
available screen fonts are included on 
the disk, but changing them is some- 
what of a pain in the neck; so once you 
choose your favorite, you won't want to 
change often. Because each font is 
unique in style and image quality, I 
ended up making a TW-80 disk for each 
one. Now all I have to do is load in the 
TW-80 disk with the particular font 
style I'm in the mood for. I was delight- 
ed with all the fonts. They are a big 
improvement over the 80-column text 
contained in CoCo 3 1 s ROM. I can 
clearly see all three top points in the 
lowercase 4 w\ 

The added CoCo 3 CONTROL and alt 
keys are also supported. The ALT key 
used with four other characters yields 
left and right brackets and braces. 
Visible carriage returns are also avail- 
able and are a big help when setting up 
columns. 

The Disk J/O menu is clean and neat 
looking and contains the two columns 
of commands. The most noticeable 
change in these commands is evident 
when selecting Read, Append, Name 
Change or Kill. In those cases, all of the 



file names on the disk appear on the 
screen, and the up or down arrow keys 
are used with a highlighted cursor to 
select the file name. And like earlier 
TW-64 enhancements, the Disk I/O is 
in memory; there is no delay in access- 
ing Disk I/O. I especially liked the use 
of the Fi and F2 keys. Switching from 
the text screen to the main menu and 
back is a snap. Also added to the Disk 
I/O menu is Format. How many times 
have you tried to save a TW-64 file only 
to find out the disk was full? You either 
had to kill something else on the disk 
or exit to BASIC to format a disk. Now 
you can format a disk without losing 
your text. And much to my delight, you 
can go direclly to the Disk I/O menu 
from the text screen without going to 
the main menu first. 

Another nice touch that has been 
added is an automatic file backup. The 
new disk driver for TW-80 checks 
before saving a file to disk to see if there 
is already a file under the same name. 
If there is, it renames that file with an 
extension of BfiK (Backup). If there is 
also a file with the same name and BRK 
extension, then TW-80 kills the original 
BfiK file, renames the existing TXT file to 
BfiK, and saves the current file with a 
TXT extension. And to top it all off, if 
you are using a 5 1 2K CoCo 3, the extra 
memory can be used for two RAM 
Disks. You'll find this instant disk 
access a pleasure to use, but be sure to 
save your work to a floppy disk before 
you quit TW-80; otherwise, you will 
lose your work. 

The Format menu has the same com- 
mands as earlier versions except an 
Abort Printing command has been 
added. Again, the menu is clean, or- 
derly, and it also incorporates the FI 
and F2 keys to get back quickly to either 
the main menu or the text screen. 

About the only negative point I can 



make is that some mention needs to be 
made in the documentation of printer 
baud rate settings. The CDNFIG.BfiS 
program shows a default of 7 for 9600 
baud, but my old version of TW-64 uses 
a l for 9600 baud. I think a table or 
other explanation would be helpful for 
those using different types and speeds of 
printers. 

As you can see, I'm excited about 
TW-80. This is a fine piece of software 
for the CoCo 3, and l highly recom- 
mend it. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc, P.O. Box 264, 
Howard Beach, NY H414, 718-835-1344; 
$39.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



CoCo 1, 2 & 3 OS-9 



Software 

Screen Star/ OS -9 
Text Formatter — 
Word Processing 
Made Easy 

Screen Star is billed as a WordStar 
clone. WordStar is a popular MS-DOS 
word processor that has been around 
for quite a while. Although it is a 
difficult piece of software to learn, it is 
considered by many to be one of the 
best. The advantage of using a Word- 
Star clone on the CoCo is that you can 
work comfortably on both the MS- 
DOS and OS-9 systems without having 
to relearn commands. I have not used 
WordStar, but my Dynastar experience 
made learning Screen Star quite easy 
since the commands are very similar. 

One difference between the Word- 
Star clones and most RS-DOS word 



LOTZA F ,1 JTC 

i;s HERE ? 

LOTZALUK, machine language program for (XXX) i, 2,& 3. Studies history of IjOTTO 
game as a handi capper studies horses. Ari zona 6/39, California 6/49, Jowa 6/36, 
Missouri 6/39, New York 6/40, New York 6/48, Oregon 6/42, Tri. -State (Maine, 
New Hampshire, & Vermont) 6/36, & Washington State 6/44 available. Others to 
follow. Requires 64K. Specj fy gajue desired wi th order. 



William G. Brigance, Sr, 
1001 Fair-weather Drive 
Sacramento, CA 95333 
(916) 927-6062 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



California residents add 6% sales tax 



On Disk! 
$29.95 
Introductory JVice 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 39 



processors such as Telewriter is that 
word processing is done in two stages 
with two different programs. Screen 
Star is described as a text editor, which 
is used f or entering and editing text. In 
order to obtain the printed hard copy, 
a second program, OS-9 Text Format- 
ter, is used. While the two packages are 
sold separately, they are usually pur- 
chased together, especially when setting 
up a word processor. 

The Screen Star package comes with 
two versions — OS-9 Level I and Level 
II. Also included is a spelling checker 
with dictionary. The disk contains a 
Level I OS-9 boot and a limited number 
of OS-9 commands for Level I opera- 
tion of Screen Star. This version has its 
own 50-character screen, similar to 
other RS-DOS word processors. The 
screen scrolls horizontally so you can 
see the whole text, and the scrolling is 
very crisp. However, it is no substitute 
for an 80-column screen. 

I tried running Screen Star with my 
80-column driver under Level I, Version 
2, but was unsuccessful since Screen 
Star looks for its own screen driver. I 
would like to see Computerware change 
this, as there are many Level I users who 
have 80-column screen capability. It is 
important to note that those of you who 
do not own OS-9 can still have a good 
word processor without a major 
expenditure. Hopefully, you will like 
OS-9 and purchase the operating sys- 
tem at a later date. 

The Level II version does not come 
with a Level II boot and commands. 
Those who want to use this version will 
have to purchase OS-9 Level II sepa- 
rately from Tandy. Also, a 512K CoCo 
is required for the Level II version. This 
version provides the extra options to 
directly call the text formatter and the 
spelling checker from within Screen 
Star. 

Starting up Screen Star is easy. For 
OS-9 Level I, simply make a backup of 
the master disk and, using the backup 
disk, type DD5 after powering up your 
CoCo. OS-9 will prompt you for the 
date, and at the OS-9 prompt enter 
55TRR. For Level II you will have to 
copy the Level II version of Screen Star 
to /d0/CMD5 of your system disk. Also, 
make sure you are in an 80-by-24 text 
screen before starting Screen Star. You 
will also want to set up the colors in the 
palette to your liking if you are using a 
color monitor. 

Although Screen Star is a WordStar 
clone, Computerware has done some 
simplification of cursor movement, 
which has always been a "pain" for new 



users of WordStar. Cursor motion on 
the screen is controlled by the arrow 
keys, as we have come to expect. For 
seasoned users of WordStar, Screen 
Star also retains the original cursor 
motion control. 

Before going further in the discussion 
of Screen Star commands, I will talk a 
little about the online help facility, 
which can be eliminated once you are 
proficient in Screen Star's commands. 
This option is available in both ver- 
sions. Screen Star comes configured 
with the online help activated. If you 
enter the appropriate help command, a 
window will open that gives informa- 
tion on the four categories of Screen 
Star commands. 



"In the Level II 
version, capability is 
provided for setting up 
10 function keys that 
make Screen Star 
operations easier. " 



The basic command set (alt-i) takes 
care of the most commonly used com- 
mands for cursor movement, insertion 
and deletion. The CTRL-K commands 
(Block and Disk I/O) handle the disk 
I/O and the block text copying, mov- 
ing, inserting, deleting and saving/ 
loading of files to disk. The CTRL-P 
commands (Parameter Features) are 
used to set up tabs, line length, word 
wrap and several other features. These 
parameters can be saved in a parameter 
file that is read by Screen Star on start- 
up. The CTRL-Q commands (Quick Key 
Sequences) are used for rapid horizon- 
tal and vertical motion as well as jump- 
ing to the beginning or end of the 
document. The CTRL-Q commands also 
cover the search and replace options. 

In the Level II version, capability is 
provided for setting up 10 function keys 
that make Screen Star operations eas- 
ier. The definitions for each key can be 
saved in a parameter file along with line 
length, tabs and other parameters so 
that everything is ready to roll each time 
that you run Screen Star. The function 
keys are used by pressing the combina- 
tion of ALT plus a number from 0 to 9. 

The evaluation was done using the 
Level II version of Screen Star. Overall, 
it is agood introductory word processor 



with quite a bit of power. However, I 
found two problems with Screen Star — 
speed and lack of screen formatting. 1 
never lost any characters, but I found 
that text insertion was very slow, as was 
block movement of paragraphs. 

Screen Star provides a very nice 
feature when doing block moves, copies 
or deletions. After marking the start 
and end of the block, the block is 
reprinted in inverse video so you can see 
exactly what has been marked. While 
this is a handy feature, it is slow, since 
a complete screen refresh occurs to the 
point of a block. The printing of the 
block in inverse video is extremely slow 
and almost negates the value of this 
feature. 

A bit of caution is also in order here. 
I found that marking a part of a line 
with the block commands resulted in 
the loss of the entire line when I did a 
block delete. This is unusual since block 
deletion works on parts of lines on every 
word processor that I have used and is 
quite useful. The only way around this 
problem is to use the word delete com- 
mand, CTRL-T. One positions the cursor 
at the start of the deletion and presses 
CTRL-T to delete words to the right. 
There was no provision for a left word 
delete. 

The use of windows for help menus 
is also slow. I don't believe that this is 
due to the OS-9 system, as I have seen 
faster window operation using BASIC09, 
In any case, the windows are nicely set 
up and provide valuable information 
for the new user. I did run into several 
situations where the text under a win- 
dow was not restored after the window 
was closed. At first, I thought I had lost 
several lines of text; however, moving 
the cursor to the appropriate lines 
somehow restored the text. This is 
obviously a non-destructive bug, but it's 
quite disheartening to see lines of text 
vanish. 

As I said in the beginning of this 
review, the philosophy of WordStar 
clones is to let one program do the 
editing and another do the formatting. 
Screen Star does exactly this — there is 
no screen formatting. Everything is left 
to the text formatter. 

One of the major advantages of OS- 
9 is the hierarchical directory system. 
For example, on my document disk I 
have a directory for RAINBOW reviews, 
/dl/RfllNBDW-REVI EH5. Unless you 
remember to do a change directory 
before starting Screen Star, there is no 
way to change directories from within 
it. I found out the hard way by calling 
a shell with CTRL-PO and trying to do 



140 THE RAINBOW Oclober1987 



a chd. The net result was [ hung up the 
CoCo and could not get back into 
Screen Star. The bottom line is doing 
the chd before starting Screen Star; 
hopefully, Computerware will add this 
option (which is virtually a standard on 
any OS-9 software). 

I mentioned earlier when talking 
about the function keys thai Screen Star 
sets up a parameter file that is read on 
start-up. Thus, you are able to set 
various parameters and customize 
Screen Star to your liking. One parame- 
ter is tab spacing. Screen Star comes 
with a default setting of tabs every 16 
spaces. This can be changed to whatever 
spacing you like, but only equally 
spaced tabs can beset, such as every five 
spaces. 

The documentation provided con- 
sists of a 23-page manual, which pro- 
vides all the necessary information to 
run Screen Star. The manual provides 
a discussion of all of the commands and 
a command summary at the end of the 
manual. In addition, a help card is 
provided. Since I had experience with 
the WordStar command approach, 1 
had no problem using Screen Star. For 
the beginner, 1 think that it would be 
appropriate for Computerware to pro- 
vide a tutorial illustrating Screen Star 
operation. Otherwise, the manual is 
easy to use as a reference of command 
information. 

Included on the Screen Star disk is a 
spelling checker program called Smart 
Speller (Spell), along with a 25,000- 
word dictionary and a dictionary editor. 
The approach taken in Smart Speller is 
different from most spelling checkers. 
The dictionary contains misspellings of 
the most common words used in a 
typical document. Instead of scanning 
through a large dictionary of proper 
spellings, Spell looks in a small file of 
misspellings. This is presumably a faster 
approach than the more traditional 
versionsand takes about 80 seconds per 
page of text. Of course, if you are like 
me and type non-standard misspellings, 
Spell will miss the error. This is the price 
you pay for speed . 

Spell can be run either directly from 
the OS-9 command line or, if using the 
Level 11 version of Screen Star, by 
entering the command CTRL-KZ. For no 
specific reason, I prefer to run Spell 
from the command line where the two 
options are D, display all misspellings 
and the correct spelling; and P, the 
prompted mode that displays each 
misspelling and prompts if you would 
like to replace the misspelled word with 
its correct spelling. The latter option is 



to be preferred since there are always 
some words that are correct but a 
spelling checker might change. Of 
course, with this option you must re- 
main at the computer in order to tell 
Spell whether it should replace each 
word that it finds with the correct word 
from the dictionary. 

Also provided with the Smart Speller 
is a dictionary editor, Edict, which will 
allow you to add or delete words within 
the limit of 25,000 words. This is a 
menu-driven program that provides 
easy editing of the dictionary. 

"Text provides a wealth 
of commands to meet 
almost any printing 
situation, " 

1 ran Spell several times during the 
time spent with the Screen Star package 
and found no problems. It works espe- 
cially nice if you have a two-disk system 
since you can place the new copy on the 
second drive. 

Now that you have entered and edited 
a text file with Screen Star and checked 
the spelling with Spell, it is time to print 
the file. You will recall in the beginning 
of this review, I mentioned that Word- 
Star and its clones consist of two pro- 
grams, the screen editor and the text 
formatter. This approach is quite differ- 
ent from that of most RS-DOS word 
processors, in which the setup for the 
printed page is done within the word 
processor, usually from a menu. In the 
WordStar approach, text formatting 
commands are embedded in the text file 
using the screen editor. 

Text formatting commands, often 
refered to as dot commands, consist of 
a period followed by two letters that 
identify the command function. Each 
command must be placed at the begin- 
ning of a line; otherwise, Text will print 
the line as part of the text. A number 
of the commands have arguments that 
are entered on the same line following 
the command. For example, the com- 
mand . 5P causes one blank line to print 
whereas . 5P 3 causes three lines to 
print. Text provides a wealth of com- 
mands to meet almost any printing 
situation. 

Besides commands for text format- 
ting, there are commands for setting up 
the printer, inserting data or text from 
other files such as mail merge files, 



stopping the printer to directly enter 
text from the keyboard, and macro 
capability. This last capability is very 
important since it allows the user to 
create specific sets of instructions for 
special formats. A very good example, 
which is provided in the documenta- 
tion, is a macro for creating footnotes 
at the bottom of a page. Anyone who 
has ever typed aterm paper knows quite 
well the problem of allowing enough 
space at the bottom of the page to type 
the footnotes. With the footnote macro, 
all you have to do is type . BF when you 
enter the foootnote reference in the text. 
This command is then followed by the 
actual reference citation. When Text 
begins processing the file to the printer, 
it will save all references encountered 
and print them at the bottom of the next 
page. In this way you let the computer 
takecare of calculating needed space for 
footnotes. 

There is a lot of powerful capability 
that will meet almost any type of page 
formatting. It will take time to learn all 
the options as well as the interactions of 
all of the commands; however, the 
effort will be well worth it. For those 
who plan to do simple word processing 
such as letters and documents, you will 
only need a few commands such as the 
margins, line spacing and perhaps some 
printer format commands. Also, many 
of the commands have defaults that 
meet most conditions. This review used 
only the centering command and relied 
on the default settings. 

Overall, the combined package of 
Screen Star, Spell and OS-9 Text For- 
matter makes a very good word process- 
ing package. The price for the combined 
package is reasonable, especially con- 
sidering the capability provided. I do 
have reservations about the Screen Star 
editor with regard to speed. Since 1 use 
a word processor almost on a daily 
basis, with a lot of formatting that 1 
want to see onscreen as opposed to the 
printed page, I would rate the editor as 
fair. The user should always take into 
consideration such factors as cost, 
expected usage and any special needs 
before buying any word processor. 
However, no matter what your likes or 
dislikes, this package provides the 
capability to meet all home computer 
needs. 

(Computerware, 4403 Manchester Ave., 
Suite 102-Box 668, Encinitas, CA 92024, 
619-436-3512; Screen Star, $49.95; OS-9 
Text Formatter, $34.95; both $74.95 ) 

— Donald Dollberg 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 141 




□ 

'ON 



The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that 
it is what it purports to be. 




Assembly Language Programming for 
the CoCo 3, a book that describes the 
CoCo 3 enhancements and how to use 
them with assembly language. This is a 
continuation of the book Assembly 
Language Programming for the TRS- 
80 Color Computer. Tepco, 30 Water 
Street, Portsmouth, R1 02871, (401) 
683-5312; SJ2 plus SJ S/H. 

Color Max 3, a 128K graphics editor 
that allows use of 16 colors in 320-by- 
200 resolution. Features icons, pull- 
down menus and dialog boxes. For the 
CoCo 3. Computize, Inc., P.O. Box 
207, Langhorne, PA 19047, (215) 946- 
7260; $59.95. 

DeskMate 3, an integrated package of 
seven personal productivity applica- 
tions: Text, Ledger, Index Cards, Paint, 
Telcom, Calendar and Calculator. Text, 
Ledger and Telcom permit the use of 
either 40 or 80 columns. For the CoCo 
3. Tandy Corporation, 1 700 One Tandy 
Center, Ft. Worth, TX 76125; $99.95. 
A vailable in Radio Shack stores nation- 
wide. 

^GrafFind, a disk utility that lets you 
view, transfer, rename, and kill stand- 
ard graphics files. FortheCoCo 1,2 and 
3. Rainy Day Software, 10625 SE 
362nd, Sp. B-32, Boring, OR 97009, 
503-663-7160; $10. 

Iron Cross: War in Russia, a 64K war 

game for the armchair general. The 
German invasion of Russia began on 
June 22, 1941. The object of this pro- 
gram is to defeat the Russian forces 
controlled by the computer to take 
control of the Russian cities. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Computerware, Inc., 
4403 Manchester Avenue, Suite 102, 

142 THE RAINBOW October1987 



Encinitas, CA 92024, (619) 436-3512; 
$24.95. 

Mickey's Space Adventure, a 64K Ad- 
venture game for ages 8 and up. Join 
Mickey and Pluto on ajourney through 
the solar system in their quest to help 
friendly aliens recover lost pieces of a 
valuable memory crystal. For the CoCo 
I, 2 and 3. Sierra On-Line, Coarsegold, 
CA; $34.95. Available in Radio Shack 
stores nationwide. 

MLBASIC Revision 2.0, a 128K en- 
hanced BASIC compiler that allows users 
who are unfamiliar with machine lan- 
guage programs to create a machine 
language program from a BASIC pro- 
gram with little or no effort. For the 
CoCo 3. Wasatch Ware, 7350 Nutree 
Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84121, (801) 
943-6263; $69.95 CoCo 2, $49.95 CoCo 
3 plus $4 SI H. 

PYRAMIX, a 128K arcade game. The 
object is to hop Kubix — a short, 
roundish little guy with a long snout - 
on the tops of the blocks that make up 



the pyramid. Your goal is to change all 
the blocks in the pyramid to the same 
color and move on to a higher level of 
play. For the CoCo 3. Dr. Preble's 
Programs, 6540 Outer Loop, Louisville, 
KY 40228, (502) 966-8281 ; $24.95. 

Robot Odyssey 1, a 64K educational 
program that helps develop skills in 
logical problem-solving, abstract rea- 
soning and creative thinking. Design 
robots, navigate invisible mazes, solve 
puzzles, and sneak past sentries to 
unlock the secret exit from Robotropo- 
lis. For the CoCo I, 2 and 3. The 
Learning Company, 545 Middlefield 
Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, (800) 
852-2255; $34.95. Available in Radio 
Shack stores nationwide. 

> TW-80, an 80-column enhancement for 
Telewriter-64 with Telepatch using the 
Fi and F2 keys to access the main menu 
or editor. Includes new fonts and print 
spooler. For the CoCo 3. Spectrum 
Projects, P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, 
NY 11414, (718) 835-1344; $39.95 plus 
$3 S/H. 

First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 
THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



WRITEST 

Editor: 

I would like to update the infor- 
mation on my program WRITEST 
as reviewed by Mel Siegel (January 
1987). As a result of his comments, 
the program has been condensed 
twice, for a gain of about 5K ? so it 
now handles a CLERR4500 rather 
than the 1500 for Version 1.0, 

The edit feature has been re- 
worked twice and is being touched 
up a bit more. It is very similar to 
the EDIT in the CoCo's Extended 
BASIC, but slower, due to the use of 
BASIC programming. 

Filing now includes an append 
feature so two files from the same 
section can be combined. For those 
with non-Radio Shack recorders, 
MOT DRON and MOTDROFF can be 
controlled from the file menu. 

Auto-wordwrap no longer wipes 
out following lines, but appends 
them. Line spacing can be set and 
changed within the "line processor." 

For those with a memory prob- 
lem, a split version of the program 
is sent direct (disk and tape). The 
program is available on disk (RS- 
DOS or J DOS) with cassette filing 
for merge. The program is now 
available for Tandy DMP-130 and 
similar printers, for the Star Gemini 
10 and similar printers, as well as for 
the original Epson Graftrax, 

I will continue to send the pro- 
gram at my duplication and mailing 
costs ($3) and rely on the buyer to 
be conscientious enough to subse- 



quently send me fair value for what 
it is worth to him/her. 

Darryl L. Petrak 
House, NM 

Backup and Backup III 

Editor: 

In your review of Backup and 
Backup ///(July 1987), Dale Shell 
stated that he would like to be able 
to use the utilities on multiple drive 
systems. The programs were in- 
tended primarily for single-drive 
users but can be modified for two 
drives with the following patches: 

Backup: 

10 CLERR1000: D5 1< I $0 , 16 , 1 , 
P$,B$: DSKI$0,16,2,C$, 
D$: MID$ ( B$ , 94 , 1 ) =CHR$ 
(33) ;MID$(B$,116,1)=CHR$ 
( 1 ) : MID$ ( C$ , 67 , 1 ) =CHR$ 
(33) :MID$(D$,75,1)=CHR$ 
(1) :DSKO$0,16,1,R$,B$: D5t<Q 
$0,16,2,C$,D$ 

Backup J/J: 

10 CLEPR1000: D5KI$0,16,1, 
R$,B$: DSKI $0 , 16 , 2 , C$ , 
D$:MID$(B$,123,1)=CHR$ 
(33) :MID$(C$,30,1)~CHR$ 
( 1 ) ;MID$( C$,118, 1 )=CHR$ 
(33) :MID$(D$,12G,1)=CHR$ 
(1) :DSKO$0,1G,1,A$,B$: D5K0 
$0,16,2,C$,D$ 

Enter the proper patch and run it 
with a backup copy of your utility 
in Drive 0. (Don't use it on the 
original — a typing mistake will 



destroy the program!) The patches 
change the destination drive to 

Drive i, 

Carl England 
Brainchild Software 
Calhoun, GA 

Telewriter 64 

Editor: 

In the August 1987 issue of RAIN- 
BOW is a review of Telewriter 64. It 
states that TW-64 "defaults to the 
Insert mode rather than to the Over- 
strike mode . . . besides, you can 
select the overstrike mode, if you 
prefer, with a simple keystroke/' 

I have searched through the in- 
struction manual and can find no 
reference to Overstrike mode nor a 
simple keystroke. 

I would appreciate your telling 
me how to initiate an Overstrike 
mode for making corrections in 
text. 

Ralph C McCormic 
Keno r OR 

Editor's Note: You are quite 
correct in your observation 
concerning the Insert mode 
(TW-64). The review was sup- 
posed to point out that Tele- 
patch or Ultra Telepatch de- 
faults to the Insert mode. In 
these programs you simply 
press CLEAR-0 for overstrike. 

We're sorry for the incon- 
venience this may have caused 
you and appreciate your cal- 
ling this error to our attention, 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 143 



CoCo3 




Genealogy 



Right Back 

Where We 
Started Froin 

Part II 

By Brian LeBlai 




L 



ast month, we presented the first 
part of the Genealogy program — 
fthe part that generates family 
information sheets. Now that you have 
gathered data from your family 
members, it's time to enter that infor- 
mation into the computer and generate 
a lineage printout. 

Load the FAMILY program and insert 
a newly formatted data disk. FAMILY 
creates two files on this disk. The first 
file, NAMES, contains the first eight 
entries on a family history information 
page, plus the data location on the DATA 

Brian Le Blanc is a licensed industrial 
electrician and a qualified electronics 
technician. He troubleshoots and re- 
pairs industrial computers and pro- 
grammable controllers. Brian holds 
eight diplomas from various computer 
courses, and he lives in Digby County, 
Nova Scotia. 



file. The second file, DATA, holds a 
complete record for each family 
member. 

After 50 records have been entered, 
the program will prompt for a new data 
disk. Disregarding this notice could 
cause a system crash, and some or alJ 
of the data on the disk could be lost. 

Entering Data 

When entering data, try having the 
family members information close at 
hand to avoid undue errors. If a DATA 
line has more than 28 characters, the 
excess will be cut off. The first three 
entries on the first page (i.e., last name, 
first name, middle name) must contain 
names or, if the names are not known, 
a letter must be inserted for the program 
to continue. 

The lineage number can be any 
number from I to 99,999,999. (See the 
lineage chart for possible uses.) The 



144 



THE RAINBOW October 1 987 



generation, baptized date, birth date 
and death date can be any number from 
J to 99,999,999. The above notes will 
only accept numbers. 

When entering dates, it is imperative 
that they are entered as year, month, 
day; they do not contain any spaces or 
commas, and they contain eight digits. 
As an example, January 5, 1987, would 
be 13870105. 

When all the data has been entered, 
you can skip to the end of the routine 
by pressing L for Last Entry. You then 
have two choices: aborting (press M to 
abort and return to the menu), which 
will erase all entered data; or saving 
data(pressS tosaveon disk), which will 
ask if the proper disk is in the drive (the 
proper disk being any initialized disk). 

After the data has been saved on disk, 
you can either press E to enter more 
data or press M to return to the menu. 

Searching Data 

Trying to search an empty disk will 
cause an error and prompt you to return 
to the menu. The program will search 
for a full name or part of a name. As 
an example, entering P for Last Name 
will display all last names beginning 
with P. 

You can search for a specific birth 
date: all birth dates up to and after a 
specific date, and those between two 
specific dates. You can also search for 
a specific death date: all death dates up 
to and after a specific date, and those 
between two specific dates. The screen 



will show how many matches were 
found in the file. 

When displaying a searched record, 
press the space bar to display the next 
page. When changing a searched re- 
cord, press the space bar. Display the 
next page. Pressing C will put the cursor 
on the top of the page, pressing the 
down arrow will lower the cursor one 
line at a time, and pressing the left arrow 
or right arrow will erase the current 
DRTR line and put the cursor at the 
beginning of the line. 

After the data has been entered, 
pressing ENTER will place the cursor at 
the left of the page. To continue down 
the page, press the down arrow key. 
When the cursor reaches the bottom of 
the page, the next page will be dis- 
played. 

For example, to change the birth date 
of John Doe: 

1) Call up the Search routine. 

2) Enter DDE for the last name. 

3) Enter JOHN for the first name. 

4) Press ENTER until the cursor 
reaches the bottom of the page. 

5) Press S to begin the Search. 

6) Press 1 (display record) to verify 
that the correct record has been 
found. 

7) Press the space bar until the menu 
is displayed. 

8) Press 5 (change record). 

9) Press C to begin the data Change 
routine. 

10) Press the down arrow until the 



cursor is opposite the birth date. 
1 I) Press the left arrow or right arrow 
to put the cursor on the old data. 

12) Enter the correct data and press 

ENTER. 

13) Press the down arrow until the 
cursor reaches the bottom of the 
page. 

14) When the next page is displayed, 
press the space bar to scroll 
pages. 

15) At the Screen prompt, press S to 
save the data on disk. 



Printouts of Records 

Pressing 2 (printout complete record) 
will ask you to make sure the top of the 
printer paper is flush with the tractor 
feed cover. Pressing P will cause the 
printer to scroll through one page and 
begin printing the record on the second 
page. And, pressing 3 (printout partial 
record) will print the first page only 

Record printouts consist of two 
pages. Page I contains the first three 
screen pages and Page 2 contains the 
remaining two screen pages. 

The printer I used is the Tandy DMP- 
105. You may have to adjust lines 1730 
and 4230 for your printer to adjust the 
start position of printing on the paper. 

( Questions about this program may 
be directed to the author at RR1 
Church Point Box 67- B, Digby County, 
Nova Scotia, Canada BOW I MO. Please 
enclose an SASE when writing for a 
reply.). □ 



260 206 2750 182 4900 96 

510 170 2900 62 5100 190 

770 223 3030 85 5340 175 

1010 161 3220 57 5550 77 

1240 250 3430 207 5760 133 

1450 182 3680 175 5890 115 

1670 68 3860 187 6150 210 

1910 98 4050 134 6280 154 

2180 187 4200 140 6560 210 

2400 152 4440 77 END 255 

2560 160 4660 103 



Listing 1: FAMILY 

1/3/3 CLEAR 195)3 

11) 3 ON ERR GOTO 667)3 

12) 3 DIM A$(137) , B$ (125) ,H(5)3) ,N$ 
(5)3) ,S$ (16) :WIDTH 4)3 

13) 3 DUMMY $= 11 

ii 

14) 3 REM LOGO 



15) 3 HSCREEN 1 : PALETTE CMP : PALETT 
E )3,)3 

16) 3 HPRINT (6, 2) , "************** 
************** 

17) 3 HPRINT (6,3) , 11 * 

*'» 

18) 3 HPRINT (6,4), 11 * FAMILY 
TREE *" 

19) 3 HPRINT (6,5) , "* 

*»' 

2)3)3 HPRINT (6,6),"* PROG 
RAM *" 

21) 3 HPRINT (6,7) , "* 

*»» 

22) 3 HPRINT ( 6 , 8 ), 11 ************** 
************** 

23) 3 HPRINT (9,1)3)," (C) BRIAN L 
EBLANC 11 

24) 3 HPRINT (4, 16), "FOR COCO 3 /D 
ISK DRIVE/PRINTER" 

25) 3 HPRINT (9,18)," JANUARY 2 4/1 
987" 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 45 



260 FOR 1=1 TO 1200 : NEXT I 
270 GOSUB 6090 

280 PALETTE CMP : HSCREEN 0 : CLS 
290 REM MENU ROUTINE 
300 CLS 

210 LOCATE 18,1: PRINT "MENU" 
320 FOR 1=125 TO 129 
230 LOCATE 8 , 1-120 : PRINT A$(I) 
340 NEXT I 

350 LOCATE 5,20: PRINT "YOUR CHOI 
CE : ?" 

360 Q$=INKEY$: IF Q$= M " THEN 3 60 
370 IF Q$<"0" OR Q$>"3" THEN 360 
380 ON VAL(Q$) GOTO 410,2320,231 
0 

390 STOP 

400 REM DISPLAY FAMILY HISTORY I 

NFORMATION PAGE 

410 CLS 

420 R=1:C=1 

430 FOR 1=1 TO 16 

440 LOCATE C,R: PRINT A$(I)+B$(I) 

450 R=R+1 

4 60 NEXT I 

470 R=1:C=12 

480 FOR 1=1 TO 3 

490 LOCATE C,R:LINE INPUT Q$ 



J&R ELECTRONICS 

Easy, Solderless Installation 
"JramR" 

512K COCO 3 Memory Expansion Board. Upgrades stock 128K COCO 3 to full 
512K for 0S9 Level II. Similar lo RS upgrade. 

Now pardner... reach for your 

SIXDMVE! 

With purchase of a BANKER II or JramR 
you can have a /P9008 SIX DRIVE 



for only 

SIXDRNE is a machine language utility that 
modifies Disk Extended Basic 1.0, 1.1, or FKEYS 111 
to allow the use of 3 double sided drives as 6 single 
side drives without ANY hardware modifications. 
FEATURES two different drive select assignments: 
(1) [0,2| [1,3] [4,5| (2) [0,1] [2,3] [4,5] 

Ramdisk is compatible with QMMESOFT's SIXDRIVE 



Made in U.S.A. 




Complete Hardware & Software 



COCO 3 ONLY 

It 10 10 $39.95 JramR bare board p!u3 connectors and software 

#1011 $79.95 JramR hit includes all pans plus memory chips and software 

W 1012 $99.95 JramR assembled and tested plus memo;y chips and software 

N 1013 $19.95 JramR S/W deluxe customizable ramdlsk & spooler, memory test, and 

ramdisk uiilily programs. Compatible with aJI CoCo 3 512K 
#1014 $49.95 JramR 0K bytes (#1012 less memoiy chips) 

Readily available: User Replaceable Socketed Memory Chips, no hard-to find SIP memories. 

To place an order, write to J&R Eleclronlcs, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MD 21045, OR call (301) 
987-9067-Jesse or (301) 76&0861— Ray. 

HOURS: Weekdays 7 p.m.-9 p.m.; Sat. Noon-5 p.m. EASTERN TIME, usually. II no answer tiy later. 
Add $4.00 shipping & handling (FOREIGN ORDERS $7.00), COD charge $3.00. Maryland residenis add 
5% slate lax. Foreign orders must include payment on U.S. bank 

CHECKS. MONEY ORDERS OR COD's only please (personal check— 2 weeks for clearance). IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY. Give COCO Radio Shack model »f(i.e. 26 3136), Disk or Tape when ordering. 
QUANTITY DISCOUNT AVAILABLE. For information on shipping or previously placed orders call (301) 
788-0861. COCO II 26-31XX owners call (soldering experience may be required). 

Refer to back Issues of RAINBOW for other products. 



500 IF Q$<"A" OR Q$>"Z" THEN 490 
510 IF LEN(Q$)>15 THEN Q$=LEFT$ ( 
Q$,15) 

520 IF LEN(Q$)<15 THEN Q$=Q$+" " 

: GOTO 520 

530 B$(I)=Q$ 

540 R=R+1 

550 NEXT I 

560 FOR 1=4 TO 8 

570 LOCATE C,R:LINE INPUT Q$ 

580 IF LEN(Q$)<8 THEN Q$=Q$+" ": 

GOTO 580 

590 B$(I)=Q$ 

600 R=R+1 

610 NEXT I 

620 R=9 

630 FOR 1=9 TO 16 

640 LOCATE C,R:LINE INPUT Q$ 

650 IF LEN(Q$)>28 THEN Q$=LEFT$ ( 

Q$,28) 

660 B$(I)=Q$ 
670 R=R+1 
680 NEXT I 
690 CLS 

700 LOCATE 1, 10 : PRINT"PRESS (C) 
FOR PERSONAL NOTES PAGE" 
710 LOCATE 1,12: PRINT" (L) 
FOR LAST ENTRY" 

720 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 720 

730 IF Q$="L" THEN 1560 

740 IF Q$o"C" THEN 700 

750 REM DISPLAY PERSONAL NOTES P 

AGE 

7 60 CLS 

770 R=1:C=1 

780 FOR 1=17 TO 35 

790 LOCATE C,R:PRINT A$(I);B$(I) 

800 R=R+1 

810 NEXT I 

820 R=1:C=12 

830 FOR 1=17 TO 35 

840 LOCATE C,R:LINE INPUT Q$ 

850 IF LEN(Q$)>28 THEN Q$=LEFT$ ( 

Q$,28) 

860 B$(I)=Q$ 
870 R=R+1 
880 NEXT I 
890 CLS 

900 LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "PRESS (C) 
FOR FIRST MARRIAGE PAGE" 

910 LOCATE 1,12: PRINT 11 (L) 
FOR LAST ENTRY" 

920 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 920 

930 IF Q$="L" THEN 1560 

940 IF Q$<>"C" THEN 900 

950 REM DISPLAY PERSONAL FAMILY, 

FIRST MARRIAGE PAGE 

9 60 CLS 



146 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



910 R=0 : C=l 

980 FOR 1=36 TO 58 

990 LOCATE C,R:PRINT A$(I);B$(I) 

lpjap R=R+1 

1010 NEXT I 

1(52(5 R=j3:C=12 

1(53(5 FOR 1=36 TO 58 

1040 LOCATE C,R:LINE INPUT Q$ 

1050 IF LEN(Q$)>28 THEN Q$=LEFT$ 

(Q$,28) 

1060 B$(I)=Q$ 
1J37J3 R=R+1 

1(580 IF 1=40 THEN 1=1+1 : R=R+1 : C= 
1 

1090 IF 1=49 THEN 1=1+1 : R=R+1 : C= 
1 

1100 NEXT I 
1110 CLS 

1120 LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "PRESS (C 
) FOR SECOND MARRIAGE PAGE" 
1130 LOCATE 1,12:PRINT " (L 
) FOR LAST ENTRY" 

1140 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 114 

9> 

1150 IF Q$="L" THEN 1560 

1160 IF Q$o"C" THEN 1120 

1170 REM DISPLAY PERSONAL FAMILY 

, SECOND MARRIAGE PAGE 



1180 
1190 
1200 
1210 
) 

1220 
1230 
1240 
1250 
1260 
1270 



CLS 

R=0 : C=l 

FOR 1=59 TO 81 
LOCATE C,R: PRINT 



A$(I) ;B$(I 



R=R+1 
NEXT I 
R=0: C=12 
FOR 1=59 TO 81 
LOCATE C,R:LINE INPUT Q$ 
IF LEN(Q$)>28 THEN Q$=LEFT$ 
(Q$,28) 

1280 B$(I)=Q$ 
R=R+1 

THEN 1=1+1 



1290 
1300 
1 

1310 
1 

1320 
1330 
1340 



IF 1=63 



:R=R+1:C= 



IF 1=72 THEN 1=1+1 : R=R+1 : C= 



NEXT I 
CLS 

LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "PRESS 
) FOR THIRD MARRIAGE PAGE" 
1350 LOCATE 1 , 12 : PRINT " 
) FOR LAST ENTRY" 
13 60 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 

9> 

1370 IF Q$="L" THEN 1560 
1380 IF Q$o"C" THEN 1340 



(C 
(L 
136 



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RAINBOW 



RAINBOW 

rrflCAT 



OUR LATEST ISSUE CONTAINED 

1. Accounts Receivable 6. Foot Race 

2. Work Mate 7. Flippy the Seal 

3. Calendar 8. Screen Calculator 

4. Invasion 9 Able Builders 

5. Trip Adventure 10. Super Error 2 



Available on COCO 1. 2 and 3' 
All Programs Include Documentation' 



T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, 2490 MILES STAN DISH DR., HOLLAND, Ml 49424 (616) 399-9648 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 147 



1390 REM DISPLAY PERSONAL FAMILY 

, THIRD MARRIAGE PAGE 

1400 CLS 

1410 R=0 : C=l 

1420 FOR 1=82 TO 104 

1430 LOCATE C,R:PRINT A$(I);B$(I 

) 

1440 R=R+1 

14 50 NEXT I 

1460 R=0:C=12 

1470 FOR 1=82 TO 104 

1480 LOCATE C,R:LINE INPUT Q$ 

1490 IF LEN(Q$)>28 THEN Q$=LEFT$ 

(Q$,28) 

1500 B$(I)=Q$ 
1510 R=R+1 

1520 IF 1=8 6 THEN 1=1+1 : R=R+1 : C= 
1 

1530 IF 1=95 THEN 1=1+1 : R=R+1 : C= 
1 

1540 NEXT I 

1550 REM DISK SAVING ROUTINE 
1560 CLS 

1570 LOCATE 1 , 8 : PRINT "PRESS (S) 

TO SAVE TO DISK" 
1580 LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "PRESS (M 
) TO ABORT AND RETURN TO MENU" 
1590 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$=" " THEN 159 
0 

1600 IF Q$="M" THEN FOR 1=1 TO 1 
04 : B$ ( I ) =" 11 : NEXT I: GOTO 2300 
1610 IF Q$<>"S" THEN 1590 
1620 REM PROPER DISK CHECK 
1630 CLS 

1640 LOCATE 1 , 8 : PRINT "ENSURE PR 
OPER DATA DISK IS IN DRIVE" 
1650 LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "PRESS (C 
) TO CONTINUE" 

1660 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 166 

9> 

1670 IF Q$o"C" THEN 1660 

1680 OPEN "D", #2, "DATA", 32 

1690 IF LOF(2)=0 THEN 1740 

1700 GET #2,1 

1710 INPUT #2,Q$ 

1720 LET LASTREC=VAL(Q$) 

17 30 GOTO 1780 

1740 Q$=STR$(1) 

1750 WRITE #2 ,Q$ 

1760 PUT #2,1 

1770 LAS TRE C= V AL ( Q $ ) 

1780 CLOSE #2 

1790 LAS TRE C= LAS TRE C+ 1 

1800 STARTREC=LASTREC 

1810 REM OPEN DATA FILE AND DUMP 

ENTRY ARRAY 
1820 OPEN "D", #2, "DATA", 32 
1830 RECORD=STARTREC 
1840 FOR 1=1 TO 104 



1850 IF I>8 THEN IF LEN(B$(I))=0 

THEN B$ (I)=DUMMY$:GOTO 1870 
1860 IF I>8 AND LEN(B$ (I) ) <28 TH 
EN B$(I)=B$(I)+LEFT$(DUMMY$,28-L 
EN(B$(I) )) 
1870 WRITE #2,B$(I) 
1880 PUT #2, RECORD 
1890 IF I>9 THEN B$(I)=" " 
1900 RECORD=RECORD+l 
1910 NEXT I 

1920 WRITE #2 ,STR$ (RECORD) 
1930 PUT #2,1 
1940 CLOSE #2 

1950 REM CHECK DISK FOR NAME FIL 
E 

1960 OPEN "D",#l, "NAMES ",9 3 

1970 IF LOF(1)=0 THEN 2020 

1980 GET #1,1 

1990 INPUT #1,Q$ 

2000 LET LAS TREC=VAL(Q$) 

2010 GOTO 2050 

2020 Q$="l" 

2030 WRITE #1,Q$ 

2040 PUT #1,1 

2050 CLOSE #1 

2060 REM UPDATE NAME FILE 

2070 E$=B$ (1)+B$ (2)+B$ (3)+B$ (4)+ 

B$ (5) +B$ (6)+B$ (7) +B$ (8 ) +STR$ (STA 

RTREC) 

2080' OPEN "D",#l, "NAMES", 93 

2090 GET #1,1 

2100 INPUT #1,Q$ 

2110 LET LASTREC=VAL(Q$) 

2120 REM ADVANCE RECORD POINTER 

2130 LET LAS TRE C = LAS TRE C+ 1 

2140 WRITE #1,E$ 

2150 PUT #1,LASTREC 

2160 WRITE #1,STR$ (LASTREC) 

2170 PUT #1,1 

2180 CLOSE #1 

2190 CLS 

2200 LOCATE 1,8: PRINT "DATA HAS 
BEEN SAVED TO DISK" 
2210 LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "PRESS (M 
) FOR MENU" 

2220 LOCATE 1,12: PRINT "PRESS (E 
) FOR NEXT ENTRY" 
2230 IF LASTREC<50 THEN 22 70 
2240 LOCATE 1 , 16 : PRINT"CAUTION D 
ISK IS FULL" 

2250 LOCATE 1 , 18 : PRINT "FURTHER E 

NTRIES MAY CRASH SYSTEM" 

2260 LOCATE 1 , 20 : PRINT" INSERT A 

NEW DISK FOR MORE ENTRIES" 

2270 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 227 

2280 IF Q$="E" THEN FOR 1=1 TO 1 
04:B$(I)="":NEXT I : GOTO 410 
2290 IF Q$<>"M" THEN 2270 



148 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



2300 
2310 
2320 
2330 
2340 
2350 
2360 
2370 
2380 
2390 
2400 

(I) 
2410 
2420 
7) 

2430 
=8 TO 
480 
2440 
8) 

2450 
9) 

2460 
10) 
2410 

11) 
2480 
12) 



GOTO 300 
CLS : END 

REM SEARCH ROUTINE 
CLS 
X=0 

LOCATE 10,1: PRINT A$(105) 
FOR 1=106 TO 124 
LOCATE 1, 1-104 :PRINT A$(I) 
NEXT I 

FOR 1=1 TO 6 

LOCATE 12, 1+2: LINE INPUT S$ 
NEXT I 

LOCATE 12, 11: LINE INPUT S$( 

IF VAL(S$(7))<>0 THEN FOR K 
11 : S$ (K) ="0 " : NEXT K:GOTO 2 



LOCATE 


12, 


12 


: LINE 


INPUT 


S$( 


LOCATE 


12, 


13 


: LINE 


INPUT 


s$( 


LOCATE 


12, 


14 


: LINE 


INPUT 


s$( 


LOCATE 


12, 


15 


: LINE 


INPUT 


s$( 


LOCATE 


22, 


11 


: LINE 


INPUT 


s$( 



2490 IF VAL(S$ (12) ) <>0 THEN FOR 
K=13 TO 16 : S$ (K) ="0" :NEXT K:GOTO 
2550 

2500 LOCATE 22, 12: LINE INPUT 



13) 

2510 

14) 

2520 

15) 

2530 

16) 

2540 

2550 

2560 

I) 

2570 
2580 
0 

2590 
2600 
NTER 
2610 
) TO 
2620 
)- TO 
2630 
0 

2640 



S$( 

LOCATE 22, 13: LINE INPUT S$( 

LOCATE 2 2, 14: LINE -INPUT S$( 

LOCATE 2 2, 15: LINE INPUT S$( 

REM CHECK FOR VALID ENTRY 
FOR 1=1 TO 16 

CHECKENTRY$=CHECKENTRY$+S$ ( 



NEXT I 

IF CHECKENTRY$<>" 11 



THEN 2 67 



CLS 

LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "PLEASE E 
VALID SEARCHING DATA" 
LOCATE 1,12: PRINT "PRESS (R 
REDO ROUTINE" 

LOCATE 1,14: PRINT "PRESS (M 
RETURN TO MENU" 
Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 263 

IF Q$="M" THEN 3540 



" I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now, it's time to give BASIC a shot in the arm, with ADOS-3. 
Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your machine and be greeted by an 80column display, in the colors of your choice, 
with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz (double speed] without having to slow down for 
disk and printer operations? This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation of the 
acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% compatibility with commercial software. After 
customizing ADOS-3 using the provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs into 
the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM + burning will cost $15-20; we provide 
information concerning how you can have this done.] Supports double-sided drives (35, 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
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October 1987 THE RAINBOW 149 



2650 IF Q$<>"R" THEN 2 6 3 p 
2660 GOTO 2320 

2670 LOCATE 1,21: PRINT "PRESS (S 
) TO BEGIN SEARCH" 

2680 LOCATE 1,22: PRINT "PRESS (M 

) TO RETURN TO MENU 

2690 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 269 

0 

2700 IF Q$="M" THEN 3540 

2710 IF Q$o"S" THEN 2690 

2720 REM READ FILE AND SEARCH AR 

RAY 

2730 OPEN "D",#l, "NAMES ",9 3 
2740 FOR 1=1 TO LOF(l) 
2750 GET #1,1 
2760 INPUT #1,Q$ 
2770 LET N$(I)=Q$ 
2780 NEXT I 

2790 LASTREC=VAL(N$ (1) ) 

2800 FOR 1=2 TO LASTREC 

2810 IF S$(l)<>"" THEN IF S$(l) = 

MID$ ( N$ ( I ) , 1 , LEN ( S $ ( 1 ) ) ) THEN 28 

20 ELSE 2980 

2820 IF S$(2)<>"" THEN IF S$(2) = 
MID$(N$(I) , 16,LEN(S$ (2) ) ) THEN 2 
830 ELSE 2980 

2830 IF S$(3)<>"" THEN IF S$(3)= 
MID$ (N$ ( I ) ,31, LEN (S$ ( 3 ) ) ) THEN 2 
840 ELSE 2980 

2840 IF VAL(S$(4))<>0 THEN IF S$ 

(4) =MID$ (N$ (I) , 46,8) THEN 2850 E 
LSE 2 980 

2850 IF VAL(S$(5))<>0 THEN IF S$ 

(5) =MID$(N$(I) ,54,8) THEN 2860 E 
LSE 2980 

2860 IF VAL(S$(6))<>0 THEN IF S$ 

(6) =MID$ (N$ (I) ,62,8) THEN 2870 E 
LSE 2980 

2870 IF VAL(S$(7))<>0 THEN IF S$ 

(7) =MID$(N$ (I) ,70,8) THEN 2880 E 
LSE 2980 

2880 IF VAL(S$(8))<>0 THEN IF VA 
L(S$(8) )=>VAL(MID$(N$(I) ,70,8)) 
THEN 2890 ELSE 2980 
2890 IF VAL(S$(9))<>0 THEN IF VA 
L(S$(9) )=<VAL(MID$(N$(I) ,70,8) ) 
THEN 2900 ELSE 2980 
2900 IF VAL(S$ (10) ) <>0 THEN IF V 
AL(S$(10) )=<VAL(MID$(N$(I) ,70,8) 
) AND VAL(S$ ( 11) ) =>VAL(MID$ (N$ ( 
I), 70, 8)) THEN 2910 ELSE 2980 
2910 IF VAL(S$ (12) ) <>0 THEN IF S 
$(12)=MID$ (N$ (I) ,78,8) THEN 2920 

ELSE 2980 
2920 IF VAL(S$ (13) ) <>0 THEN IF V 
AL(S$ (13) ) =>VAL(MID$ (N$ (I) ,78,8) 
) THEN 2930 ELSE 2980 
2930 IF VAL(S$ (14) ) <>0 THEN IF V 
AL(S$(14) )=<VAL(MID$(N$(I) ,78,8) 



) THEN 2940 ELSE 2980 

2940 IF VAL(S$ (15) ) <>0 THEN IF V 

AL(S$(15) )=<VAL(MID$(N$(I) ,78,8) 

) AND VAL(S$ (16) ) =>VAL(MID$ (N$ (I 

),78,8)) THEN 2950 ELSE 2980 

2950 LET STORE$ (X) =N$ (I) 

2960 LET H(X)=I 

2970 X=X+1 

2980 NEXT I 

2990 Y=0:W=0 

3000 CLOSE #1 

3010 IF X>0 THEN OPEN "D",#2,"DA 
TA",32 

3020 IF X>0 THEN OPEN "D",#1,"NA 

MES",93 

3030 CLS 

3040 LOCATE 1,1 

3050 IF X=l THEN PRINT " THERE WAS 

(";X;") MATCH FOUND" 
3060 IF X>1 THEN PRINT "THERE WAS 

(";X;") MATCHES FOUND" 
3070 IF X<1 THEN PRINT" THERE WAS 

NO MATCHES FOUND" 
3080 FOR 1=130 TO 136 
3090 LOCATE 1 , 1-126 : PRINT A$(I) 
3100 NEXT I 

3110 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 311 
P 

3120 IF Q$<"1" OR Q$>"6" THEN 31 
10 

3130 IF Q$="4" AND X=0 THEN PRIN 
T "ILLEGAL COMMAND, NO NEXT RECOR 
D":GOTO 3110 

3140 IF Q$<="5" AND X=0 THEN PR 
INT "ILLEGAL COMMAND, NO RECORD I 
N MEMORY": GOTO 3110 
3150 IF Q$="4" AND X=0 THEN PRIN 
T "ILLEGAL COMMAND, NO NEXT RECOR 
D":GOTO 3110 

3160 IF Q$<>"6" AND X=0 THEN PR 
INT "ILLEGAL COMMAND, NO MATCHES 
FOUND": GOTO 3110 

3170 ON VAL(Q$) GOTO 3190,3570,4 

310,4560,4650,6060 

3180 REM DISPLAY RECORD 

3190 T=l 

3200 T=l 

3210 Z=VAL(MID$(STORE$(Y) ,87,4) ) 

3220 FOR I=Z TO Z+103 

3230 GET #2,1 

3240 INPUT #2,B$(T) 

3250 IF B$(T)=DUMMY$ THEN B$(T)= 
it it 

3260 W=W+1:T=T+1 
3270 NEXT I 
3280 CLS 

3290 FOR 1=1 TO 16 

3300 LOCATE 1,I:PRINT A$(I);B$(I 

) 



150 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



3310 


NEXT I 


3760 PRINT 


#- 


-2,CHR$ (15) ;CHRS (27) 


3320 


Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$<>" " THEN 3 


;CHR$ (14) 




320 




3770 PRINT 


#- 


-2,CHR$(2 7) ;CHR$(21) 


3330 


IF Q$="Q" THEN 3 540 


3780 PRINT 


#- 


■2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$ (90) 


3340 


CLS 


;CHR$(12) 




3350 


FOR 1=17 TO 35 


3790 PRINT 


#- 


■2, "FAMILY HISTORY I 


3360 


LOCATE 1,1-16: PRINT A$(I);B 


NFORMATION 1 






$(D 




3800 PRINT 


#- 


■2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(90) 


3370 


NEXT I 


;CHR$ (12) 






3380 


Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$<>" " THEN 3 


3810 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$(14) ;CHR$(27) 


380 




;CHR$(15) 




3390 


CLS 


3820 FOR 1= 


= 1 


TO 16 


3400 


FOR 1=3 6 TO 58 


3 8 30 PRINT 


#- 


•2,TAB(6) ;A$(I) ;B$(I 


3410 


LOCATE 1,I-36:PRINT A$(I);B 


) 






$(D 




3840 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$(90) 


3420 


NEXT I 


;CHR$(12) 






3430 


Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$<>" " THEN 3 


3 8 50 NEXT I 






430 




3 8 60 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(90) 


3440 


CLS 


;CHR$(12) 






3450 


FOR 1=59 TO 81 


3870 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$(15) ;CHR$(2 7) 


3460 


LOCATE 1,1-59: PRINT A$(I);B 


;CHR$ (14) 






$(D 




3 880 PRINT 


#- 


2,"PERSONNAL NOTES" 
2 , CHR$ (2 7) ;CHR$ (90) 


3470 


NEXT I 


3 890 PRINT 


#- 


3480 


Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$<>" " THEN 3 


;CHR$(12) 






480 




3900 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$ (14) ;CHR$ (2 7) 


3490 


CLS 


; CHR$ ( 15 ) 






3500 


FOR 1=82 TO 104 


3 910 FOR 1= 


17 


TO 35 


3510 


LOCATE 1,1-82: PRINT A$(I);B 


3920 PRINT 


#- 


2, TAB (6) ;A$(I) ;B$(I 


$d) 




) 






3520 


NEXT I 


3930 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$ (90) 


3530 


Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$<>" " THEN 3 


; CHR$ ( 12 ) 






530 




3940 NEXT I 






3540 


CLS 


3950 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(90) 


3550 


GOTO 3080 


;CHR$(12) 






3560 


REM PRINTER ROUTINE 


3960 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$(15) ;CHR$(27) 


3570 


T=l 


; CHR$ (14) 






3580 


Z=VAL(MID$ (STORE$ (Y) ,87,4) ) 


39 70 PRINT 


#- 


2, "PERSONAL FAMILY, 


3590 


FOR I=Z TO Z+103 


FIRST MARRIAGE" 


3600 


GET #2,1 


3980 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$(2 7) ;CHR$(90) 


3610 


INPUT #2,B$(T) 


;CHR$(12) 






3620 


IF B$(T)=DUMMY$ THEN B$(T)= 


3990 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$(14) ;CHR$(27) 


it n 




;CHR$(15) 






3630 


W=W+1:T=T+1 


4000 FOR 1= 


36 


TO 58 


3640 


NEXT I 


4010 PRINT 


#- 


2,TAB(6) ;A$(I) ;B$(I 


3650 


PRINT #-2,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$ (22) 


) 






3660 


CLS 


4020 PRINT 


#- 


2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(90) 


3670 


LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "ENSURE T 


;CHR$(12) 






OP OF PRINTER PAGE" 


4030 NEXT I 






3680 


LOCATE 1,12: PRINT " IS FLUS 


4040 PRINT 


#- 


2 , CHR$ (27) ;CHR$ (90) 


H WITH ROLLER" 


; CHR$ (36) 






3690 


LOCATE 1,14: PRINT "PRESS (P 


4050 PRINT 


#- 


•2 , CHR$ (15) ;CHR$ (27) 


) TO 


PRINT, OR (Q) TO QUIT" 
Q$=INKEY$ :IF Q$="" THEN 37 


;CHR$ (14) 






3700 


4060 PRINT 


#- 


•2, "PERSONAL FAMILY, 


00 




SECOND MARRIAGE" 


3710 


IF Q$="Q" THEN 4290 


4070 PRINT 


#- 


■2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(90) 


3720 


IF Q$<>"P" THEN 3700 


;CHR$(12) 






3730 


FOR 1=1 TO 4 7 


4080 PRINT 


#- 


■2,CHR$(14) ;CHR$(27) 


3740 


PRINT #-2,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$(54) 


;CHR$(15) 






3750 


NEXT I 


4090 FOR 1= 


= 5S 


) TO 81 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 151 



410J2 PRINT #-2,TAB(6) ;A$(I) ;B$(I 


;CHR$ (15) 


) 




FOR T = l TO 1 6 

X \J±\ X. _L X \y _L VJ 


4110 PRINT #-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(9j3) 


4 51,0 


PRINT # -2 TAB (6} :A$>(1) ;B$(I 


;CHR$(12) 


) 




4120 NEXT I 


4 52,0 


NEXT I 


4130 PRINT #-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(90) 


453,0 


CLS 


;CHR$(12) 


*T mj *± %J 


CiOTO T080 

v-7 w x w ~j yj <d yj 


4140 PRINT #-2,CHR$(15) ?CHR$(27) 


A R R (A 
ft 3 D p 


DT7M nTQPT.AV NTYT PFPOPn 
x\J_il v l UlOrLinl In LjA 1 x\J_iV^ VJxxU 


;CHR$(14) 


*-r ~J \J JU 


Y=y-f 1 

X XIX. 


4150 PRINT #-2 , "PERSONAL FAMILY, 


AR1 (A 

ft D I p 


Ta7— 1 

w — _L 


THIRD MARRIAGE" 


fto op 


A — A _L 


4160 PRINT #-2 ,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$ (90) 


ft p 


T"P Y^^Gf rpTj-pvr 4 ^ o ^ 
j_ r j\^^p ±ni_jiN ^ d o /y 


;CHR$(12) 


AC. (ACS 
Qopp 


ir .K_L IN x ±. IjxjiliLj/ixj KJ rlrl fiiN U t lilxjrC 


4170 PRINT #-2,CHR$(14) ;CHR$(27) 


TP T ^ 

Hi J- O 


IN vj IN Hi A X r\.i_jV^vJx\LJ 


; CHR$ ( 15 ) 


A C 1 fk 


"D"D T MT 1 


4180 FOR 1=82 TO 104 


A £ 0 (A 
4 D Z,p 




4190 PRINT #-2, TAB (6) ;A$(I) ; B$ ( I 


463,0 


GOTO 319 0 


) 


464,0 


REM CHANGE RECORD 


4200 PRINT #-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(90) 


465J3 


T=l 


;CHR$ (12) 


4 6 6^ 


Z=VALfMID$ ( STORES ( Y) ,87,4) ) 


4 210 NEXT I 




FOR T=Z TO Z+l 03 


4220 PRINT #-2,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$(22) 


A 68 (A 

L ± Vj O HJ 




4230 FOR 1=1 TO 35 


A 6 9 (A 

4 u j yj 


TNPTTT i ? Rg 

x ii r u i Tf^^xjty^xy 


4240 PRINT #-2 ,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$ (54) 


47 00 
h / pp 


TF B$ fT) =DUMMYS THEN B$ (T) = 


4250 NEXT I 


if if 




42 60 LOCATE 1,22 


4 710 


T=T+1:NEXT I 

X XIX.* 11 J—J W X _L 


42 70 PRINT "PRESS (M) TO RETURN 


472,0 


CLS 


TO MENU" 


A 7 1 0 


t?0"R T = 1 TO 1 f\ 
r UJa j_ — _L X \J _L D 


4280 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$o"M" THEN 4 


474 0 


LOCATE 1 T • PRTNT A £ ( T i : Rg ( T 


280 


) 




4290 CLS 


Al R 0 

'-k / Dp 


IN ii A 1 J_ 


4 300 GOTO 3080 


A 7 £ (A 


s> — -L IN 1\xj i 9 • IT — 1 ilililN ft/D 


4310 T=l 


0 




4 320 REM PRINT OUT PARTIAL RECOR 


Ann (A 
ft / / p 


± r irixjiN ftooy? 


D 


ah &(A 
ft / op 


_L r v^p^P*" 1 il Hi IN ft / Op 


4330 Z=VAL(MID$(STORE$(Y) ,87,4) ) 


A 7 Q (% 
ft / ztp 


x\ — ± » \*—p 


4340 FOR I=Z TO Z+103 


AO. (A (A 
ft op p 




4350 GET #2,1 


AO. 1 (A 
ft o ±,p 


TP 1 Psl & TWFN 4RR0 
j_r x\^±d x niiiiN L ± o op 


4360 INPUT #2,B$(T) 


AO.*) (A 
ft o Z, p 


— x in jl\£j iyi ir vv — IrixjiN ftoz 


4370 IF B$(T)=DUMMY$ THEN B$ (T) = 






it ii 


483j2 


IF Q$=CHR$(lj3) THEN R=R+1:G 


4 380 W=W+1:T=T+1 


OTO < 


48j3j3 


4 390 NEXT I 


484j3 


IF Q$OCHR$(8) AND Q$<>CHR$ 


4400 CLS 


(9) THEN 482j3 


4 410 LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "ENSURE T 


485j3 


LOCATE 12, R: PRINT " 


OP OF PRINTER PAGE" 




ii 


4 420 LOCATE 1,12: PRINT "IS FLUSH 


486J3 


LOCATE 12, R: LINE INPUT B$(R 


WITH ROLLER" 


) 




4 4 30 LOCATE 1 , 14 : PRINT "PRESS (P 


487$ 


GOTO 4 8j3j3 


) TO PRINT, (Q) TO QUIT" 


48SJ3 


CLS 


4440 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 444 


489j3 


CLS 


P 


49j3j3 


FOR 1=17 TO 3 5 


4450 IF Q$="Q" THEN 4530 


491j3 


LOCATE 1,1-16: PRINT A$(I);B 


4460 IF Q$<>"P" THEN 4440 


$(D 




4470 PRINT #-2,CHR$(15) ;CHR$(27) 


492J3 


NEXT I 


;CHR$(14) 


493j3 


Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$=» , '» THEN 493 


4 4 80 PRINT #-2, "FAMILY HISTORY I 


P 




NFORMATION" 


494J25 


IF Q$=" " THEN 5J35J3 


4490 PRINT #-2,CHR$(14) ;CHR$(27) 


495J3 


IF Q$o»C" THEN 493J3 



1 52 THE RAINBOW October 1 987 



R=17:C=0 

LOCATE C,R-16 

IF R>35 THEN 5050 

Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" 



496J3 
4970 
4980 
499J3 
0 

5000 IF Q$=CHR$(10) 
OTO 4970 

5010 IF Q$OCHR$(8) 
(9) THEN 4990 

5020 LOCATE 12 , R-16 : PRINT 11 



THEN 499 



THEN R=R+1:G 



AND Q$<>CHR$ 



5170 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$=" M THEN 517 
0 

5180 IF Q$=CHR$(10) THEN R=R+1:G 
OTO 5140 

5190 IF Q$OCHR$(8) AND Q$OCHR$ 
(9) THEN 5170 

5200 IF R>40 THEN C=0 ELSE C=12 
5210 LOCATE C ,R-36 : PRINT" 



5030 

$(R) 

5040 

5050 

5060 

5070 

5080 

$(D 
5090 
5100 
0 

5110 
5120 
5130 
5140 
5150 
5160 



LOCATE 12, R-16 : LINEINPUT B 

GOTO 4970 

CLS 

CLS 

FOR 1=3 6 TO 58 

LOCATE 1,I-36:PRINT A$(I);B 

NEXT I 

Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$= M " THEN 510 

IF Q$=" " THEN 5240 

IF Q$o"C" THEN 5100 

R=36: C=0 

LOCATE C,R-36 

IF R>58 THEN 5240 

IF R=40 OR R=49 THEN R=R+1 



5220 

(R) 

5230 

5240 

5250 

5260 

5270 

$(D 
5280 

5290 
0 

5300 
5310 
5320 
5330 
5340 
5350 
5360 
0 



LOCATE C,R-3 6:LINE INPUT B$ 

GOTO 5140 

CLS 

CLS 

FOR 1=59 TO 81 

LOCATE 1,I-59:PRINT A$(I);B 

NEXT I 

Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$=" M THEN 529 

IF Q$=" " THEN 5430 

IF Q$o"C" THEN 5290 

R=59 :C=0 

LOCATE C,R-59 

IF R>81 THEN 5430 

IF R=63 OR R=72 THEN R=R+1 

Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$='»" THEN 536 



<« GIMMESOFT »> 

A new generation of CoCo III software 

0 FKEYS III ^ m SIXDRIVE 

A user friendly, user programmable function key utility This machine language utility modifies DECB 1 .0, 1 .1 , or 

that creates up to 20 function keys. Other features FKEYS III to allow the use of 3 double-sided drives (or 2 

include an EDITOR, OOS mods . and DISABLE. Comes double-sided drives and J S R'S RAM DISKS) as 6 

with an enhanced CoCo III version and it's single-sided drives without ANY hardware mods. 

EPROMable. [See April '87 review) Includes 2 selectable drive assignments and it's 

Disk (latest version) , $1 9.95 EPROMable. 

_ _ _ Disk $16.95 

j|Jff|#f f MffiAl Iff Wlth Purchase of FKEYS III $12.95 

fflVllff "LIIVvl Iff With purchase of any JramR $ 9.95 

[CoCo III only] ImimD £f9lf IIm#»<#VJ#A 

An easy to use, versatile label creating program including J§ Ofiffm JIaIi VKrUf CfUCr 

many new CoCo III features. Even if you already own a (CoCo 1 1 1 only ) 

label program, this one's a must for the III!! #1010 JramR bare board, connectors, and 

(See July '87 review) Disk $16.95 software $39.95 

- #1014 JramR assembled and tested with software, 

^ffC##%fM D*ml AaCMIIAV without memory chips $49.95 

LlOfUfff ■ IffCrffCr IrCrMUffCrV #1012 JramR assembled and tested with software, 

01 (CoCo III only) ^ 5 12K memory $99.95 

M?WM (See June '87 review) 

Easily alter the contents of any palette without having to k| pvd AMIY 

remember numbers or colors! Once configured, all six- rrr * YKAPIIA (CoCo III only) 

teen palettes can be saved to disk as a single subroutine Experience brilliant colors, sharp graphics, and 

which may then be used in a basic program. hot action in this super machine language 

(See Aug. '87 review) Disk $19.95 arcade game! $24.95 

Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm GIMMESOFT Add $2.50 for shipping 

Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time P.O. Box 421 MD residents add sales tax 

Dn-line orders: Delphi's CoCo Sig Perry Hall, MD 21128 Phone 301 -256-7558 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 153 



5310 IF Q$=CHR$(1)3) THEN R=R+1:G 
OTO 5330 

5380 IF Q$<>CHR$(8) AND Q$<>CHR$ 
(9) THEN 5360 

5390 IF R>63 THEN C=0 ELSE C=12 

54) 3)3 LOCATE C,R-59 : PRINT" 

ii 

541) 3 LOCATE C,R-59 : LINE INPUT B 

$(R) 

542) 3 GOTO 533)3 

543) 3 CLS 

544) 3 CLS 

545) 3 FOR 1=82 TO 104 

546) 3 LOCATE 1,1-82 :PRINT A$(I);B 
$(D 

547) 3 NEXT I 

548) 3 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 548 
0 

549) 3 IF Q$ = " " THEN 562)3 

55) 3)3 IF Q$<>"C" THEN 548)3 

551) 3 R=82:C=)3 

552) 3 LOCATE C,R-82 
5530 IF R>1)34 THEN 562)3 

554) 3 IF R=8 6 OR R=95 THEN R=R+1 

555) 3 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 555 

556) 3 IF Q$ = CHR$(1)3) THEN R=R+1:G 
OTO 552)3 

557) 3 IF Q$OCHR$(8) AND Q$<>CHR$ 
(9) THEN 5550 

558) 3 IF R>86 THEN C=0 ELSE C=12 

5590 LOCATE C,R-82: PRINT " 
n 

56) 3)3 LOCATE C,R-82:LINE INPUT B$ 
(R) 

561) 3 GOTO 552)3 

562) 3 CLS 

563) 3 LOCATE 1 , 1)3 : PRINT "PRESS (S 
) TO SAVE DATA ON DISK" 

564) 3 LOCATE 1,12: PRINT " (M 
) TO RETURN TO MENU" 

565) 3 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 565 

566) 3 IF Q$ = "M" THEN 6)33)3 

567) 3 IF Q$<>"S" THEN 565)3 

568) 3 REM SAVE DATA TO DATA FILE 

569) 3 CLS 

57) 3)3 T=l 

5 71)3 LOCATE 1 , 1)3 : PRINT "SAVING DA 
TA ON DISK" 

572) 3 IF LEN (B$ (1) ) <15 THEN B$(l) 
=B$(1)+" " :GOTO 572)3 

573) 3 IF LEN ( B$ ( 1 ) ) >15 THEN B$(l) 
=LEFT$ (B$ (1) , 15) 

5740 IF LEN(B$ (2) ) <15 THEN B$(2) 
=B$(2)+" ":GOTO 574)3 
575)3 IF LEN(B$ (2) ) >15 THEN B$(2) 
=LEFT$ ( B$ (2) , 15) 

5760 IF LEN(B$(3) )<15 THEN B$(3) 



=B$(3)+" ":GOTO 5760 

577)3 IF LEN(B$ (3) ) >15 THEN B$(3) 

=LEFT$ (B$ (3) , 15) 

5780 IF LEN(B$(4))<8 THEN B$(4) = 
B$(4)+" ":GOTO 578)3 
579)3 IF LEN(B$(4))>8 THEN B$(4) = 
LEFT$ (B$ (4) ,8) 

58)3)3 IF LEN(B$(5))<8 THEN B$(5) = 
B$(5) + " ":GOTO 5800 
581)3 IF LEN(B$(5))>8 THEN B$(5) = 
LEFT$ (B$ (5) , 8) 

5820 IF LEN(B$(6))<8 THEN B$(6)= 
B$(6)+" ":GOTO 5820 

583) 3 IF LEN(B$(6))>8 THEN B$(6) = 
LEFT$ (B$ (6) ,8) 

584) 3 IF LEN(B$(7))<8 THEN B$(7) = 
B$(7)+" ":GOTO 5840 

5850 IF LEN(B$(7))>8 THEN B$(7)= 
LEFT$ (B$ (7) ,8) 

5860 IF LEN(B$(8))<8 THEN B$(8) = 
B$(8)+" ":GOTO 5860 

587) 3 IF LEN(B$(8))>8 THEN B$(8) = 
LEFT$ (B$ (8) , 8) 

588) 3 FOR I=Z TO Z+l)33 

5890 IF LEN(B$ (I) ) =)3 THEN B$(I) = 
DUMMY $ : GOTO 591)3 

5900 IF I>8 AND LEN ( B$ ( I ) ) <2 8 TH 

EN B$(I)=B$(I)+LEFT$(DUMMY$,28-L 

EN(B$(I))) 

5910 WRITE #2,B$(T) 

5920 PUT #2,1 

5930 IF T>9 THEN B$(T)=" " 
594)3 T=T+1 
5950 NEXT I 

5960 REM SAVE DATA TO NAME FILE 

597) 3 E$ = B$ (1)+B$ (2) +B$ (3 ) +B$ (4) + 
B$(5)+B$ (6)+B$(7)+B$ (8)+STR$ (Z) 

598) 3 WRITE #1,E$ 
5990 PUT #1,H(Y) 

6000 LOCATE 1,16: PRINT "DATA HAS 

BEEN SAVED ON DISK" 
6010 LOCATE 1 , 18 : PRINT "PRESS (M 
) TO RETURN TO MENU" 
6020 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$o"M" THEN 6 
020 

6030 CLS 

6040 GOTO 3080 

6050 REM RETURN TO MAIN MENU 
6060 CLOSE #2 
6070 CLOSE #1 
6080 GOTO 300 

6090 REM SUB SCREEN DISPLAY ARRA 
Y 

61)3)3 FOR 1=1 TO 136 

6110 READ Q$ 

6120 LET A$(I)=Q$ 

613) 3 NEXT I 

614) 3 GOTO 280 

6150 DATA LASTNAME ; , FIRSTNAME 



154 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



; , MIDDLENAME; 

616j3 DATA GENERATION ;, LINEAGE NO 
; , BAPTIZED ; 

617j3 DATA BORN DATE ;,DIED DATE 
;, FATHER LST; 

618j3 DATA 11 FST 1 11 , 11 

MID ; 11 , MOTHER LST; 
619^J DATA 11 FST ; 11 , 11 

MID ; 11 , NO. OF BRS ; 

62j3j3 DATA NO. OF SIS;,GOD FATHER 
;,GOD MOTHER; 

621j3 DATA NICKNAME ; , BORN LOC 
;, RESIDENCE ; 

622j3 DATA B f RD LOC ;, RELIGION 
;, SCHOOLING ; 
623 j3 DATA 11 



• SI If 



. If If 



• II 1 1 



If ff ff ff ft ff 

/ / 
II If II If ff ff 

/ / 



6240 DATA OCC/TRADE ;," 

; " , EMPLOYMENT ; 
625J3 DATA " 

; 11 , ABROAD 
6260 DATA " ;", MILITARY 

; , LASTNAME ; 
6270 DATA FIRSTNAME ; , MIDDLENAME 
; , MAR 1 D DATE; 

6280 DATA MAR 1 D LOC ; , BORN DATE 
; SONS NAME 
6290 DATA " "," " 

6300 DATA " »," " 

6310 DATA 11 "," 11 , BORN DATE ; DA 
UGHTERS NAME 
6320 DATA 
6 330 DATA 
6340 DATA 11 " , " LASTNAME ; 
6350 DATA FIRSTNAME ;, MIDDLENAME 
; , MAR ' D DATE; 

6360 DATA MAR' D LOC ; , BORN DATE 

; SONS NAME 

6370 DATA " "," 11 , " 11 

6380 DATA 11 "," "," " 

6390 DATA 11 " , 11 " , BORN DATE ; DA 

UGHTERS NAME 

6400 DATA " » , " " , " 11 

6410 DATA 11 "," "," » 

6420 DATA 11 " , 11 11 , LASTNAME 

6430 DATA FIRSTNAME ;, MIDDLENAME 

; , MAR 1 D DATE; 

6440 DATA MAR • D LOC ; , BORN DATE 

; SONS NAME 

6450 DATA " " , " » , " " 

64 60 DATA " »," " 

6470 DATA 11 " , 11 11 , BORN DATE ; DA 

UGHTERS NAME 

6480 DATA " "," ",» " 

6490 DATA " 

6500 DATA " "," SEARCHING CAN 
BE BY; 

6510 DATA 11 11 , LASTNAME ;, 

FIRSTNAME ; 



GENERATION 



ii ii 

r 



6520 DATA MIDDLENAME 
;, LINEAGE # ; 
6530 DATA BAPTIZED 

BORN DIED" 
6540 DATA SPECIFIC 
UP TO ; , AFTER 

f 

6550 DATA FROM ; , 

TO 

6560 DATA " 11 

6570 DATA DATES MUST BE ENTERED 

AS;," " , YEAR MONTH DAY 

; YYYYMMDD 
6580 DATA 11 " 

6590 DATA 1/ ENTER DATA, 2 /SEARCH 
FILES 

6 600 DATA 3/QUIT, " " 
6610 DATA " " 

6620 DATA 1/DISPLAY RECORD, 2/PRI 

NTOUT COMPLETE RECORD 

6630 DATA 3/PRINTOUT PARTIAL REC 

ORD,4/DISPLAY NEXT RECORD 

6640 DATA 5/ CHANGE RECORD, 6/RETU 

RN TO MENU 

6 650 DATA " " 

6 6 60 RETURN 

6670 CLS 

6680 CLOSE #1: CLOSE #2 



|^ \f you're stitt plugging prax^^TI 
circuit cards into your 

CoCo i 
CoCo2 

UOUO 3 

zidtdcut a card guide . . . 



I 
! 
I 

I 

I 



CUT IT OUT. 

Write or call for a free brochure describing 
printed circuit cards and guides designed 
for the CoCo expanstion port. Bare cards 
or with connector for disk controller. 

206 782-6809 
ROBOTIC > T < MICROSYSTEMS 

BOX 30807 SEATTLE, WA 98103 



I 
I 
I 



i 





October 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 55 



6690 PRINT"A MAJOR SYSTEM ERROR 
HAS OCCURED" 

6700 PRINT" 



6710 PRINT" 1/CHECK DISK DRIVE" 
6720 PRINT"2/CHECK INFORMATION B 
EING ENTERED" 



6730 PRINT"3/CHECK PRINTER" 
6740 PRINT 

6750 PRINT"PRESS (SPACE) TO REST 
ART PROGRAM" 

6760 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$<>" " THEN 
6760 

6770 GOTO 300 



310 123 

490 118 

650 244 

790 144 

END 241 



Listing 2: CHRRT 

90 REM (C) BRIAN LE BLANC 
95 REM JANUARY 24 1987 
100 CLS 

110 PRINT #-2,CHR$(30) 

120 PRINT #-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(22) 

130 WIDTH 40 

140 PRINT"THIS PROGRAM WILL MAKE 

PRINTOUTS OF" 
150 PRINT "THE GENEOLOGY CHART" 
160 PRINT" ■ 



170 PRINT "HOW MANY COPIES OF TH 
E CHART" 

180 LINEINPUT Q$ 

190 LET PGONE=VAL(Q$) 

200 PRINT" 



210 LOCATE 1,10: PRINT "ENSURE TO 
P OF PRINTER PAGE" 

220 LOCATE 1,12: PRINT " IS FLUSH 

WITH ROLLER" 
230 LOCATE 1,14: PRINT "PRESS (P) 

TO PRINT, OR (Q) TO QUIT" 
240 Q$=INKEY$ : IF Q$="" THEN 240 
250 IF Q$="Q" THEN 1000 
260 IF Q$<>"P" THEN 240 
270 FOR 1=1 TO 50: PRINT #-2,CHR$ 
(27) ;CHR$ (54) : NEXT I 
280 G$=CHR$(95) 

290 A$=G$+G$+G$+G$+G$+G$+G$+G$+G 
$+G$+G$+G$+G$ 

300 B$=CHR$(240)+CHR$(241) 

310 C$=CHR$ (246)+CHR$ (241) 

320 D$=CHR$(241)+CHR$(249) 

330 E$=CHR$(62) 

3 40 F$=CHR$(245) 

350 FOR J=l TO PGONE 

3 60 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ;T 

AB ( 15 ) ; "LINEAGE CHART" ; CHR$ (27); 

CHR$ (15) 



370 PRINT#-2,TAB(71) ; "PAGE ; " ; G$ ; 
G$;G$ 

380 PRINT#-2 
390 PRINT#-2 

400 PRINT#-2,TAB(64) ;B$;A$;E$ 
410 PRINT#-2,TAB(64) ;F$;TAB(66) ; 
A$ 

420 PRINT#-2,TAB(48) ;B$;A$;D$ 

430 PRINT#-2,TAB(48) ;F$;TAB(50) ; 

A$;TAB(64) ;C$;A$;E$ 

440 PRINT#-2 , TAB (48) ;F$ ;TAB ( 66) ; 

A$ 

450 PRINT#-2,TAB(48) ;F$ 

460 PRINT#-2,TAB(32) ;B$;A$;D$ 

470 PRINT#-2,TAB(32) ;F$;TAB(34) ; 

A$;TAB(48) ;F$;TAB(64) ;B$;A$;E$ 

480 PRINT#-2 , TAB (32) ;F$;TAB(48) ; 

F$;TAB(64) ;F$;TAB(66) ;A$ 

490 PRINT#-2,TAB(32) ;F$;TAB(48) ; 

C$;A$;D$ 

500 PRINT#-2 , TAB (3 2) ;F$;TAB(50) ; 

A$;TAB(64) ;C$;A$;E$ 

510 PRINT#-2,TAB(32) ;F$ ;TAB (66) ; 

A$ 

520 PRINT#-2,TAB(32) ;F$ 

530 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(32) ;F$ 

540 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ;B$ ;A$ ;D$ ;TA 

B(64) ;B$;A$;E$ 

550 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ;F$;TAB(18) ; 
A$;TAB(32) ;F$;TAB(64) ;F$ ;TAB (66) 
;A$ 

560 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ; F $ ; TAB (32) ; 

F$;TAB(48) ;B$;A$;D$ 

570 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ;F$;TAB(32) ; 

F$;TAB(48) ;F$;TAB(50) ; A$ ;TAB ( 64) 

;C$;A$;E$ 

580 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ;F$;TAB(32) ; 
F$;TAB(48) ;F$;TAB(66) ;A$ 
590 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ; F$ ; TAB ( 3 2 ) ; 
F$;TAB(4 8) ;F$ 

600 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(16) ;F$;TAB(32) ; 
C$;A$;D$ 

610 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ;F$;TAB(34) ; 
A$;TAB(48) ;F$;TAB(64) ;B$;A$;E$ 
620 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ;F$;TAB(48) ; 
F$;TAB(64) ;F$;TAB(66) ;A$ 
630 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ;F$;TAB(4 8) ; 
C$ ; A$ ; D$ 

640 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ;F$ ;TAB (50) ; 
A$;TAB(64) ;C$;A$;E$ 



156 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



65J3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (16) ;F$;TAB(66) ; 
A$ 

66j3 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ;F$ 

67,0 PRINT#-2 , TAB (16) ;F$ 

68j3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(2) ;A$ ;D$ ;TAB(64 

) ;B$;A$;E$ 

69,0 PRINT#-2,TAB(2) ;A$;TAB(16) ;F 



A$ 

F$ ;TAB(48) ; 

F$;TAB(48) 
;C$;A$;E$ 
F$;TAB(48) . 

F$;TAB(48) , 

F$ ;TAB(32) 

F$;TAB(32) ; 



$;TAB(64) ;F$;TAB(66) 
70P PRINT#-2 , TAB (16) 
B$;A$;D$ 

710 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(16) 
F$;TAB(5j3) ;A$;TAB(64 
72j3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (16) 
F$;TAB(66) ;A$ 
73j3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(16) 
F$ 

74,0 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(16) 
B$;A$;D$ 

75j3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (16) 
F$;TAB(34) ; A$ ; TAB (48 ) ;F$;TAB(64) 
;B$;A$;E$ 

76J3 PRINT* -2 , TAB (16) ;F$;TAB(32) ; 
F$;TAB(48) ;F$;TAB(64) ;F$;TAB(66) 
;A$ 

77)3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(16) 
F$;TAB(48) ;C$;A$;D$ 
78J3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(16) 
F$;TAB(5j3) ;A$;TAB(64 
79)3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(16) 
F$;TAB(66) ;A$ 

8) 3)3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (16) 
F$ 

81) 3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (16) 
F$ 

82) 3 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) 
B(64) ;B$;A$;E$ 

83) 3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (18) 
F$;TAB(64) ;F$;TAB(66; 

84) 3 PRINT* -2, TAB (32) 
B$;A$;D$ 

85) 3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(32) 
F$;TAB(5)3) ; A$ ;TAB ( 64 ] 

86) 3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (32) 
F$;TAB(66) ;A$ 

87) 3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (32) 
F$ 

88) 3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (32) 

89) 3 PRINT#-2 ,TAB(34) 
F$;TAB(64) ;B$;A$;E$ 

9) 3)3 PRINT#-2,TAB(48) 
F$;TAB(66) ;A$ 

91) 3 PRINT#-2 , TAB (48) 

92) 3 PRINT#-2,TAB(5)3) 
C$;A$;E$ 

930 PRINT#-2 , TAB (66) 

94) 3 FOR 1=1 TO 8 : PRINT#-2 , CHR$ ( 
27) ;CHR$(54) : NEXT I 

95) 3 NEXT J 

1)3)3)3 END ffs 



F$ 


•TAB(32) 


F$ 


•TAB (32) 


;a 


?;A$;E$ 


F$i 


TAB (32) 


F$ 


•TAB (32) 


F$ 


' TAB (32); 


c$, 


•A$;D$;TA 


A$ 


•TAB (32) ; 


;A$ 


F$ 


' TAB (48) 


F$ 


?TAB ( 48 ) 


;c: 


?;A$;E$ 


F$ 


; TAB (48) 


F$ 


?TAB (48) 


c$ 


rA$;D$ 


A$ 


?TAB(48) 


F$ 


; TAB (64) 


c$ 


;A$;D$ 


A$ 


; TAB (64) 


A$ 





Now Create Your Own Signs, 
Banners, and Greeting Cards. 



Introducing The 
Coco Graphics Designer 

Lajt Christma* w« Introduced our 
COCO Greeting Card Designer program 
(■ee review April 86 Rainbow). It has 
been so popular that we've now 
expanded it into a new program called 
the COCO Graphic! Designer. The 
Coco Graphics Designer produces 
greeting cardi plus bannert and tigns- 
Thii program will further increase the 
uiefulineii and enjoyment of your dot 
matrix printer. 

The Coco Graphics 

Designer allowf you to mix text and 
picture! in all your creation!. The 
program feature* picture, border, and 
character font editors, so that you can 
modify or expand the already built in 
libraries. Plui a ipecial "grabber" utility 
is included to capture areas of high 
resolution icreeni for your picture 
library. 



Requirements: a Coco or Coco II 
with a minimum of 32K, One Diik Drive 
(Disk Ext, BASIC 1.0/1. l.ADOS, or 
JDOS). Printer! supported include: 
Epson RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX-10, C-Itoh 8510, DMP-100/ 130/ 
400/ 430, Seikosha GP-100/260, Legend 
BOB and Gorilla Bannana. Send a SASE 
for complete lilt of compatible printers. 
#C332 Coco Graphics Designer $29.96 

Over 100 More Pictures 

An optional supplementary library 

diskette containing over one hundred 
additional pictures is available. 

#C3S3 Picture Disk #1 $14.05. 

Colored Paper Packs 

Now available are packs containing 120 
sheets of tractor-feed paper and 42 
matching envelopes in assorted bright 
RED, GREEN, and BLUE. Perfect for 
making your productions unforgettable. 
#C274 Paper Pack $10.96 




With Zebra's Coco Graphics Designer It's easy and enjoyable 
making your own greeting cards, signs, and banners. 



NEWS FLASH! 
CGP-220 and DMP-105 
NOW SUPPORTED 



are 
the 



As o-f June 1, 1987 we 
shipping version 2.3 of 
CoCo Graphics Designer. This 
version includes drivers for 
the CGP-220 and DMP-105 
printers, and improved menu 
dialogs -for single disk drive 
users. By the time this issue 
appears in print we will 
probably also have added 
Qki data printer drivers — check 
with us if you have an Okidata. 



Ordering Instructions: aji order* 

add $3.00 Shipping it Handling. UPS 
COD add $3.00. VISA/MC Accepted. 
NY residents add sales tax. 



Zebra Systems, inc. 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 157 



Wish i ng Wel l 



16K ECB 




Understanding Verb Use 



By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the "Wishing Well," submit it to Fred 
c/o THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don't forget this 
is BASIC. All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use, but remain 
the property of the author. 



I'd like to offer my thanks to all of 
you who sent letters of encourage- 
ment with suggestions on new edu- 
cational programs. Judging from my 
mail, many of you have enjoyed our Life 
Skills series as well as our newer series 
on How Your Body Works. 

I regret that I cannot offer individual 
responses to your kind letters; however, 
I am sure all of you would rather I spent 
what little time I have available for 
programming rather than for corre- 
sponding, especially when many re- 
quests for help with program bugs are 
simply a result of incorrect typing. 

With your letters and suggestions in 
mind, I am presenting a slightly differ- 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a masters in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



ent educational program this month, 
titled Conjugate Instructor. It will help 
with some English grammar skills that 
are too often neglected by software 
writers: the sometimes confusing skill of 
conjugating verbs, both regular and 
irregular. This program will allow you 
to study the various forms of the verb 
"be" as used in the present, past, future, 
present perfect, past perfect and future 
perfect tenses. The best part of Conju- 
gate Instructor, unlike some other 
"Wishing Well" programs, is that you 
add absolutely nothing to it in terms of 
data. The program is designed to gener- 
ate its own text sample sentences. The 
random possibilities are great, in fact. 
With all of its features, it is designed to 
keep from constantly repeating the 
same examples and, hence, boring you 
to death. 

Why Verbs 

About four years ago I listed a pro- 
gram in our second "Wishing Well" 
called VerbQuiz, which dealt with 
irregular verbs in the present, past and 
past participle. It was a relatively simple 
program that required you to supply the 
three forms of any irregular verbs you 
wanted to have the program quiz. You 
would then store these verbs in DATA 
statements at the end of the program, 
which would generate sentences such as: 

Today I eat it. 

Yesterday I ate it. 

I have eaten it many times. 



The verbs you selected would fit into 
sample sentences such as the ones 
above. While the program is a valuable 
tool in grammar education, it is limited 
to using irregular verbs (i.e., verbs that 
change in each of their tenses). There is 
little sense in using verbs that do not 
change in their written form, such as: 

Today I read it. 

Yesterday I read it. 

I have read it many times. 

As you can see, all the responses 
would be the same. I have always 
wanted to go one step further, but I 
haven't really had the need to develop 
any new English programs, since for 
most of the last few years I have been 
teaching either math or, more recently, 
science and history to my students. 

Some readers suggested I develop 
more programs along this line, but the 
spark just wasn't there. This summer, 
things changed a bit. A good friend 
asked me to tutor her son, Kevin, during 
the summer in both math and English. 
In fact, Kevin is an average student. His 
mother just wanted him to get a little 
help before returning to school in the 
fall for his final year in middle school. 

As part of Kevin's work, I dug up the 
old VerbQuiz and let him work with it. 
As you all know, since necessity is the 
mother of invention, the stimulus I 
needed to create a new English gram- 
mar program was no longer lacking. 
Therefore, Kev, this one's for you! 



1 58 THE RAINBOW October 1 987 



TOM MIX'S MINI-CATALOG 




flight 16 

Our very newest flight simulator. A full 
instrument aircraft that features the 
following: 

• Works with all COCO's 

• Realistic flight controls 

■ Flight editor included to change flight 
parameters 

• Design your own airports and flight 
areas 

• Flies like Cessna 150 

• Full graphics & sound 

Joysticks Required $34.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 




*P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator letsy ou fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations 
against another player, OR a non com- 
batant computer drone. 

32K Machine Language 

Joysticks Required $34.95 

Sp ecify Tape or Disk 

Educational 

* Teachers Database II -Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

■ Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32KTDB $42.95 




'Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
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different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 
32K Mac hine Language 
Joysti cks Required $34.95 
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'Goldfinder 

Here's the quality you've come to expect (rom 
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this exciting new creation. Move over 
Goldrunner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLDFINDER 
32K & Joysticks Required Disk $22.95 

• Dragon Slayer-Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
1 60 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 



*COCO 3 Compatible 

M 

TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 
616/676-8172 



NOVflSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 




* Wizard's Den 

Another of our outstanding graphic 
adventures! You must recover the Gem 
of Damocles stolen by the Evil Wizard 
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dangers. But beware the Wizard's 
magic. He can make you see things that 
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it's certain death! 
64K Joystick or Keyboard $_22.95 
Disk only 



'Sailor Man-Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 


win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 


64K 


$27.95 


* The King- 




32K 


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* Draconian— 




32K 


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* Ms. Maze- 




32K 


$22.95 


*Kater Pillar II- 




16K 


$22.95 


* Warehouse Mutants— 




16K 


$21.95 


* Buzzard Bait- 




32K 


$22.95 


All Above Specify Tape 


or Disk 











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* Video Cards & Keno 

(Color III Only) 

Four outstanding games on one disk: 
Poker, Jokers Wild, Blackjack and Keno! 
So real you expect Wayne Newton to 
walk by! Never before have you seen 
such excellent graphics and realistic 
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$29.95, Disk only 

Also available — Vegas Slots* (Color III 
only) — Same outstanding graphics! 
Seven of the most popular slot machine 
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Keyboard or joystick $34.95 
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• Many more titles-write for free catalog! 

Ordering Information 

• Call us at 616/676-8172 
for Charge Card orders 

• Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

• Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

• Authors-We pay top 
royalties! 




The Program 

Conjugate Instructor, unlike Verb- 
Quiz, is designed to be instructional as 
well as a quiz program. It is written 
entirely with Color BASIC commands, 
so it should work on the Color Comput- 
er 1, 2 and 3. (It should even work on 
the MC-10 with 20K, but I have not had 
a chance to test it out on that machine. 
Any of you with an MC- 10 are welcome 
to try it; you will have to change the - 
TIMER command to -9999.) 

This program uses quite a few multi- 
dimensional arrays to store the various 
tenses and sentence fragments. By 
generating random numbers to select 
the arrays, it can create an endless 
number of sentences with different 
tenses, openings and endings. 

One drawback is the time it takes to 
set up these arrays. I have included a 
PLEASE STAND BY screen so you do not 
think your computer has locked up. 
There is quite a bit of data to read in, 
and each verb is also recreated in an 
inverse video form so you can obtain a 
flashing effect on the screen. 

When typing in the program, you will 
notice some lowercase letters in the 
listing. To type these in on your CoCo, 
press SHlFT-0 to get into lowercase. The 
letters will appear as inverse video on 
the screen. Press SHlFT-0 again to return 
to uppercase. (This may be old hat to 
most of you, but I have to assume we 
may have a few new CoCo users out 



there who do not know these little 
tricks. I always get a few letters about 
these simple things each month.) 

Running the Program 

Upon running the program, you will 
be asked if you want to review (R) or 
quiz (Q). If you press R, the program 
will present an explanation of each of 
the tenses with the correct use in each 
person, both singular and plural. Press- 
ing ENTER will advance you to each new 
screen. At the end of the review, the 
program will return to the start so you 
may go through the review part again 
if you want. 

If you press Q, the program will then 
ask you to select a difficulty level, I 
through 6. The levels correspond to the 
various tenses in order: 

1 ) Present 

2) Past 

3) Future 

4) Present Perfect 

5) Past Perfect 

6) Future Perfect 

After selecting a level, you will be 
asked if you want to have the levels 
assorted. If you press N for no, the 
program will quiz you only on the level 
you selected. If you press Y for yes, then 
the program will jumble the tenses up 
to the level you selected. 

After making this choice, the pro- 
gram will ask you to PLEASE STAND BY. 



The screen will next read something 
like: 

■ 

STATEMENT NUMBER 1. 

HOW WOULD YOU CONJUGATE <BE> 
IN THE PRESENT TENSE? 

HE SITTING QUIETLY 

NOW. 

YOUR ANSWER=> 

You must type in your response ex- 
actly as it should fit into the blank. The 
screen will inform you whether your 
answer is correct or incorrect. In either 
case, the sentence will be reprinted on 
the screen with the correct answer 
flashing in the sentence. This serves as 
a good visual indicator. You may con- 
tinue to the next problem by pressing 
ENTER. To check your score, press the 
(@) key. The score card will then come 
up on the screen. To continue with the 
program, press C. You may rerun the 
program by pressing Y for yes or end 
by pressing N for no. You may do as 
many problems as desired. 

Conclusion 

This program was valuable to me in 
my work with Kevin. I hope you will let 
me know what you think of it and will 
also come up with some suggestions on 
how we can take this type of program 
even further. □ 







205 
300 



141 


395 


118 


189 


495 


132 


101 


530 


84 


119 


END 


. . . 202 



The listing: VERBTEST 



1 REM************************** 

2 REM* CONJUGATE INSTRUCTOR * 

3 REM* CONJUGATING <BE> * 

4 REM* BY FRED B.SCERBO * 

5 REM* 6j3 HARDING AVE * 

6 REM* NORTH ADAMS, MA j3l247 * 

7 REM* COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 * 

8 REM* DEDICATED TO KEVIN * 

9 REM************************** 
1J3 CLEAR22J3J3 : CLSJ3 : F0RI=1T032 : PRI 
NTCHR$(188) ? :NEXT:F0RI=1T0288:RE 
ADA : PRINTCHR$ (A+12 8) ; :NEXT:FORI= 
1T032 :PRINTCHR$ (18 8) ;:NEXT 

15 DATA46,44,44,42,46,44,45,37,4 



2, ,42,44 
4,44,44, 
44 

2) 3 DATA4 
,42, , ,37 
,42, ,42, 

2 5 DATA4 
f/37,,,4 
i 42 , 

3) 3 DATA 4 
37, , ,42 , 
2, ,42, ,4 

3 5 DATA4 
37, , ,42, 
2, ,42, 
4p DATA4 
2,32,42, 
5,35,39, 
45 DATA7 
6,68,76, 
,78,76,7 
6,77 

5j5 DATA, 
74, ,69,7 



,44,45,44,4)3,42 ,, 37 , 37,4 
37,44,44,42,44,46,40,46, 

2, , 32, 4J3, 42,, 37, 37, 45, 32 
/ / / 4 2 / r 31 r 31 r , , r 31 r , , 42 , 

2, , , ,42, ,37,37, 36,42,42, 
2 / r 31 f 31 r f , f 31 r f ,42, ,42, 

2/ , / /42, r 31 r 31 r ,45,42, , , 
, 37, 37 , , 35,35 , 37 , 35,35,4 
3,35 

2, , , ,42, ,37 ,37 , ,36,42, , , 
,37,37, , ,37,37, ,32,42 , ,4 

3, 35, 35, 42, 43, 35, 39, 37, 3 
37,35,39, , ,43,35,39,37,3 
37, , ,42, ,42,32,43,35 
6,78,72,79,66,74,78,76,7 
78, 76, 69, 76, 76, 74, 74,, 74 
2, 76, 77, 76, 72, 78, 77, 69, 7 

74, ,74,77,74,76,76,77, , , 
6,78,72,74, ,74,74, , , ,69, 



160 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



,,74,69,69,76,78 

55 DATA76, 76,72, 72, ,72,76,76,76, 
,,72 ,, 68,, 76, 72, 76, 76, 72, 76, 76, 7 
2, ,68, , ,76,76,68, ,76 

60 PRINT§357," CONJUGATION OF < 
BE> " ; 

65 PRINT@389," BY FRED B.SCERB 
0 " ; 

10 PRINT§4 21," COPYRIGHT (C) 19 
87 "; 

75 PRINT@453," <R>EVIEW OR <Q>U 
IZ "; 

80 X$=INKEY$ : MU=RND ( -TIMER) : IFX$ 
=" "THEN8J3 

85 IFX$="R"THEN RV=l:GOT0145 ' 
90 IFX$="Q"THEN RV=0 : GOT01j3j2 
95 GOT08J3 

100 PRINTS 4 53 , 11 DIFFICULTY (1 - 
6) "; 

105 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THENlj35 
110 XX=VAL(X$) : IFXX>6THENlj35 
115 IFXX<lTHENlj35 

120 PRINT@453," ASSORTED (Y / 
N) »; 

125 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=" ,I THEN12 5 
130 IFX$="Y"THEN SS=1 : GOT0145 
135 IFX$="N"THEN SS=0 : GOT0145 
140 GOT0125 

145 SW=3j3:CLS:PRINT@2 3 2 , M PLEASE 
STAND BY"; 

150 DIM N$(8) ,T$(6,8) ,WH$(6,6) ,L 
K$(15) ,CJ$(6) ,RV$(6,8) ,EX$(6) 
155 GOSUB16j3:GOT0215 
160 F0RI=1T08 : READN$ ( I ) : NEXT 
165 F0RI=1T08 : READT$ (1,1) : NEXT 
170 F0RI=1T08 : READT$ (2,1) : NEXT 
175 READQ$ : F0RI=1T08 : T$ ( 3 , I ) =Q$ : 
NEXT 

180 F0RI=1T03 : READT$ ( 4 , I) :NEXT:T 
$(4,4)=T$(4,3) :T$(4,5)=T$(4,3) :R 
EADQ$ : FORI=6T08 :T$ (4 , I) =Q$ : NEXT 
185 READQ$ , V$ : F0RI=1T08 : T$ (5,1)— 
Q$:T$ (6,1) =V$: NEXT 

190 F0RY=1T06:F0RI=1T06:READWH$( 
Y,I) : NEXTI , Y 

195 F0RI=1T015 : READLK$ ( I ) : NEXT : F 

0RI=1T06 : READ CJ$ (I) : NEXT : FORI=l 

T06 :READ EX$(I):NEXT 

200 F0RI=1T06:F0RY=1T08:Q=LEN(T$ 

(I, Y) ) :FORZ=lTOQ:H=ASC(MID$ (T$ (I 

,Y) ,Z,1) )+3 2 : IFH=64THENH=3 2 

205 RV$(I,Y)=RV$(I,Y)+CHR$(H) : NE 

XTZ,Y,I 

210 RETURN 

215 IF RV=0 THEN27 5 

220 F0RI=1T06 : CLS : PRINT : JK$=" " 

+EX$(I) : GOSUB35J3 : PRINT 

225 PRINT" ";N$(1)" "T$(I,1) 

230 PRINT" ";N$(2)" "T$(I,2) 



235 PRINT" " ;N$ (3) " , "N$ (4) " , "N 
$(5)" »T$(I,3) 
2 40 PRINT 

245 PRINT" " ;N$ (6) " "T$ (1,6) 
250 PRINT" " ;N$(7)'» "T$(I,7) 
255 PRINT" ";N$(8) H "T$(I,8) 
260 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$=""THEN26j3 
26 5 NEXTI 
210 RUN 

2 75 CLS:A=RND(8) :B=RND(XX) :C=RND 

(6) :D=RND(15) : IFA=5 THEN D=l 

280 IF SS=0 THEN B=XX 

285 CR$=" "+N$(A)+" "+T$(B,A)+" 
"+LK$(D)+" "+WH$(B,C)+" . " :P$=" 
"+N$(A)+" "+LK$(D)+" "+W 

H$(B,C)+"." 

290 FL$=" "+N$(A)+" "+RV$(B,A)+ 

" "+LK$(D)+" "+WH$ (B,C)+" . " 

2 95 KK=KK+1: CLS: PRINTS 3 3, " STATE 

MENT NUMBER " ; KK ; " . " 

300 PRINT: PRINT" HOW WOULD YOU 

CONJUGATE <BE> IN THE ";CJ$(B 

) ;" TENSE?" 

305 PRINT@192, "" ; : JK$=P$ : GOSUB3 5 
0 

310 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" YOUR ANS 
WER=> " ; :LINEINPUT YR$ 
315 PRINT: IF YR$=T$ ( B, A) THEN NR= 
NR+1: PRINT" YOU ARE CORRECT ! ! " 



GRAFPLOT 



GRAFPLOT DEMO t 
• 3.00 DISK It TAPE #g 
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* PULL-PASE 8CREENPRINTS ON ANY PRINTER* 8PKIF.Y ..MUH. 
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I 



October 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 61 



:GOT032 5 

32,0 PRINT" SORRY, THAT IS INCOR 
RECT ! !":NW=NW+l:GOT03 25 
325 PRINT: PRINT" PRESS <ENTER> 
TO CONTINUE."; 

33 0 PRINTQ192 , "" ; : JK$=CR$ : GOSUB3 
50 : PRINT@192 , " " ; : JK$=FL$ : GOSUB3 5 

0 

335 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="@"THEN390 
340 IFX$OCHR$ (13) THEN330 
345 GOT0275 

35)3 IF LEN(JK$)<=SW THEN370 

355 FOR T=SW TO 0STEP-1:IF MID$ ( 

JK$,T,1)=" "THEN365 

360 NEXT T:GOTO370 

365 L$=LEFT$ (JK$,T) : W$=L$ : GOSUB3 

75:JK$=" "+RIGHT$ (JK$, (LEN(JK$) 

) -T) :GOTO3 50 

370 W$=JK$ : PRINTW$ : RETURN 
375 PRINTW$: RETURN 

3 80 REM SCORE CARD 

38 5 REM NW=WRONG:NR=RIGHT 

39 0 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 

395 PD=NR+NW : PRINTTAB ( 3 ) " PROBLEM 
S COMPLETED = "PD: PRINT 
400 PRINTTAB (3) "CORRECT RESPONSE 
S = "NR: PRINT 

405 PRINTTAB (3) "INCORRECT RESPON 

SES = "NW: PRINT 

410 TR=NR+NW : I FTR= 0THENTR= 1 

415 SC=INT(NR/TR*100) 

420 PRINTTAB (3) "YOUR TOTAL SCORE 

= "SC"%": PRINT 
425 PRINTTAB (3) "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N 
) OR (C) ?"; 

430 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN4 30 

435 IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 

440 IFX$="N"THEN CLS : END 

445 IFX$="C"THEN 275 

450 GOTO4 30 

455 GOT0455 

460 DATA I , YOU , HE , SHE , IT , WE , YOU, 
THEY 

465 DATA AM, ARE, IS , IS , IS , ARE , ARE 
, ARE 

4 70 DATA WAS , WERE , WAS , WAS , WAS , WE 
RE, WERE, WERE 

475 DATA WILL BE 

4 80 DATA HAVE BEEN, HAVE BEEN, HAS 

BEEN, HAVE BEEN 
485 DATA HAD BEEN 
490 DATA WILL HAVE BEEN 
495 DATA NOW, AT THIS MOMENT, TODA 
Y,AS WE SPEAK, TODAY, AT THE PRESE 
NT TIME 

500 DATA LAST WEEK, AN HOUR AGO , Y 
ESTERDAY, LAST NIGHT, LAST WEEK, LA 
ST TUESDAY 



505 DATA TOMORROW, NEXT WEEK, LATE 
R ON, PRETTY SOON, AFTER SOME TIME 
,IN A SHORT TIME 

510 DATA FOR MANY YEARS , FOR ONLY 

ONE WEEK, SINCE 1984, SINCE LAST 
JUNE, FOR ABOUT A MONTH NOW, FOR T 
HREE SLEEPLESS NIGHTS 
515 DATA BEFORE IT HAPPENED, EVER 
SINCE WE STARTED TALKING, BEFORE 
THE SHOW, WAY BEFORE THE MIDDLE 
OF THE NIGHT, BEFORE WAITING FOR 
A REPLY, BEFORE HEARING THE NEWS 
520 DATA BY THE TIME IT IS FINIS 
HED, IN THE NEAR FUTURE, AFTER A L 
ITTLE WHILE, AFTER GRADUATION , AFT 
ER THE CONCLUSION, AFTER THE TRAI 
NING SESSION 

525 DATA HERE, READING THIS BOOK, 
LISTENING TO THE TAPE, WRITING LE 
TTERS, LIVING HERE , OFFICIALLY ENR 
OLLED , THE MOST QUALIFIED , VERY SA 
TISFIED 

530 DATA COMPLETELY DISGUSTED, IN 
GOOD HEALTH, TIRED OF WAITING, TY 
PING A MANUSCRIPT, EARNING A LIVI 
NG, SITTING QUIETLY, FLYING BY JET 
PLANE 

535 DATA PRESENT , PAST , FUTURE , PRE 
SENT PERFECT, PAST PERFECT , FUTURE 
PERFECT 

540 DATA THE present TENSE IS US 
ED TO DESCRIBE SOMETHING WHICH I 
S HAPPENING AT THIS MOMENT. 
545 DATA THE past TENSE IS USED 
TO DESCRIBE SOMETHING WHICH ALRE 
ADY HAPPENED AND IS COMPLETED. 
550 DATA THE future TENSE IS USE 
D TO DESCRIBE ACTION WHICH HAS N 
OT HAPPENED. IT IS FORMED BY ADD 
ING will OR shall TO THE PRESENT 
TENSE . 

555 DATA THE present perfect TEN 
SE IS USED WITH ACTION WHICH STA 
RTED EARLIER BUT MAY STILL BE CO 
NTINUING. IT IS FORMED BY ADDING 
have OR has TO THE PAST PARTICI 
PLE. 

560 DATA THE past perfect IS USE 
D TO DESCRIBE SOMETHING WHICH HA 
PPENED BEFORE ANOTHER PAST ACTIO 
N. IT USES THE HELPING VERB had 
AND THE PAST PARTICIPLE. 
565 DATA THE future perfect DESC 
RIBES AN ACTION THAT WILL BE FIN 
SIHED SOME TIME IN THE FUTURE. I 

T USES will have OR shall have A 
ND THE PAST PARTICIPLE. 



162 THE RAINBOW October 1987 




DOWNLOADS 



A Case of CDs 
and WORMs 

By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Consultant 



Since the introduction of the compact 
disc player, I have wondered if it would 
be possible to record programs and data 
on a CD. With the price of CD players 
at $200, would they work as fast as a 
disk drive or faster than my slowpoke 
cassette recorder? Would it cut down on 
annoying // O Errors? 

Andy Bailey 
Madison, WV 

Andy, you have the makings of an 
electronic pioneer. In fact, CDs are the 
upcoming technology for storage 
media, but at present there is no way to 
write to a CD. The CD players you are 
referring to are "play" only. Equipment 
to cut the masters f or these CDs is very 
expensive. 

Fear not, though, the latest technol- 
ogy is the WORM. A WORM is a "write 
once" memory disc that is coated with 
an organic dye. Once you write to it, you 
can read it as many times as you like. 
The problem with these drives is that 
they are extremely expensive, as a small 
system starts at around 10 gigabytes. 
Maybe you can use that much storage 
space for your library, but I can't 
imagine needing one for my CoCo. 

Assembling Low Memory 

/ have a CoCo 3 with a disk drive and 
I recently purchased Disk EDTASM 



Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through Ham radio (K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago, and he has built several 
68 XX systems. 



from Radio Shack. When trying to 
assemble an 800-byte program (position 
independent), I got "bad memory" 
errors below H5600, but it assembled 
fine above that address. 

Il seems, after some experimentation, 
that the object code interferes with the 
source code below this address. I am 
afraid that for larger programs, I will 
have to assemble at even higher ad- 
dresses, leaving little RA M for my 
program. Do I need a different as- 
sembler for the CoCo 3, or can you 
suggest a solution for using Disk ED- 
TASM on this computer? Is there any 
way to access memory above SFFFF 
using this, or other, assemblers? 

David Harris 
Utica, MI 

David, you can't assemble programs 
in low memory due to conflicts with low 
RAM pointers in the CoCo. At the 
same time you don't have to assemble 
programs in memory. If you issue the 
command A without an IM, you will 
indeed assemble the program inthenext 
free memory area available to your 
assembler program. 

BBS Garbage 

/ have a CoCo 3 with a Multi-Pak 
Interface and one disk drive. I am 
attempting to use a Modem l-B with an 
RS-232 interface without success. I can 
dial onto the BBS, but I end up with 
complete garbage on the screen. What 
is my problem? 

Richard A. Ye hie 
Sacramento, CA 



Richard, make sure you have the 
baud rate of your software set to 300. 
The Modem l-B is only capable of 300 
baud. Evidently, it is working, since you 
are at least getting garbage on your 
screen. 

CoCo 3 Memory Capacity 

/ just bought my new CoCo 3. I typed 
PRINT MEM, and it said 22824 with my 
disk drive plugged in. Is something 
wrong with it? I thought you got more 
memory with a new CoCo 3. 

Sean E. Bishop 
Hazard, KY 

Sean, my CoCo 3 has 512K in it and 
I get the same memory as you do. In 
fact, you must have OS-9 Level II to 
take advantage of the extra memory for 
programs. At present, though, you can 
use the extra memory for graphics. 
BASIC still limits you to 22K (if you 
don't PCLERR1) for programs. 

Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From 
the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type R5K (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "Down- 
loads" online form, which has complete 
instructions. 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 163 




Using 
Compressed Files 

By Peter Dibble 



Compressed files are a wonder- 
fully useless way to consume 
disk space unless you have a 
program to uncompress them. Fortu- 
nately, it is even easier to uncompress 
run length encoded files than it is to 
compress them. Unfortunately, it takes 
about as much time. 

The compression program writes 
one-byte codes. Half of each code is a 
count and the other half is data. To 
uncompress the data, we just replicate 
it as many times as the count indicates. 

There are some tricks you have to 
watch out for. First, since there is no 
such thing as a run of length zero, I 
replicate the data one more time than 
the count seems to call f or(the compres- 
sion program uses a count of zero to 
indicate a run length of zero). Second, 
since the data is only half a byte long 
(four bits), the program needs to build 



Peter Dibble has a bachelor's degree in 
chemistry and is currently a graduate 
student in computer science. He has 
worked as an applications programmer, 
systems programmer and as the user 
services assistant directory for the 
University of Rochester Computing 
Center. With Dale Puckett, he is co- 
author of The Complete Rainbow 
Guide to OS-9 and the first volume of 
The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS- 
9 Level II. 



bytes out of the data instead of just 
dropping it into an array. 

To try the program, compress a win- 



dow with Savelmage (from last 
month's article), then run Gstlmags, 
You might not get back the exact image 



Editor's Note: The following procedures will be 
combined in one source file, UnPress, on this month's 
RAINBOW ON DISK. 

Listing 1: Get Image 

PROCEDURE Getlmage 

0000 DIM FIleName : STRING [99] 

000C INPUT "Image file name: ".FIleName 

0025 RUN unpress (FIleName) 

002F END 

Listing 2: UnPress 

PROCEDURE unpr ess 



WW 


PAHAM FIleName : STRING [99] 


000c 


DIM c : BYTE 


0013 


DIM nyble:BYTE 


001A 


DIM RunL: BYTE 


0021 


DIM Path: BYTE 


0028 


DIM buf fer (7680) : BYTE 


0034 


DIM section, 1, posit ion: INTEGER 


0043 


DIM LeftNyb: BOOLEAN 


004A 


DIM WinType,horiz, vert: INTEGER 


0059 




006E 


OPEN #Path, FIleName: READ 


007A 


section: =1 


0081 


position :=1 


0088 


LeftNyb :=TRUE 


008E 


GET #Path,WinType 


0098 


GET #Path,horiz 


00A2 


GET #Path,vert 



1 64 THE RAINBOW October 1 987 



you saved. Since the compression pro- 
gram did n't save the palette, the original 
color won't be restored. The window 
type was saved in the disk file, but this 
program displays in the current win- 
dow. OS-9 will convert the data to the 
new window type, but the conversion 
may not give you just what you expect. 
If you want more accurate reproduc- 
tion, it would be easy to alter the 
Get I mage program so it sets up a new 
window with the type from the file. 

This decompression program and the 
compression program that goes with it 
were designed to compress Color Com- 
puter graphics windows. They won't 
work well for text or for modules. They 
don't really work very well as stand- 
alone programs, either. You have to run 
them in the window that you want to 
save, and running them messes up the 
image in the window. 

The best way to save screens is by 
building the compression code into 
programs that need it. The compression 
and uncompression programs work on 
their own standard output path because 
working with another program's win- 
dow can be almost impossible. If you 
want to save images from windows that 
aren't being used by any other program, 
you can make a slight modification to 
compress and use it to save images f rom 
any window. 

Both the compression and the un- 
compression programs are too slow. 
They are good BASIC09 programs, but 
they just don't run fast enough. This is 
the time to use assembly language. □ 



JZjZAC WHILE NOT(EOF (#Path) ) DO 

j?j?B7 GET #Path,c 
RunL:=c/16 
nyble :=LAND(c ,$JJF) 

J2fj2fD8 GOSUB 10 JJ \REM Put RunL copies of Nyble in the buffer 

0105 ENDWHILE 

0109 GOSUB 100 

010D CLOSE #Path 

0113 END 

0115 100 REM Put RunL copies of Nyble in buffer 

013D FOR i:=0 TO RunL 

014E IF LeftNyb THEN 

0157 buf f er(position) : =16*nyble 

0166 ELSE 

016A buf fer (position) : =buffer (posit ion) +nyble 

017D pos ition : =position+l 

0188 ENDIF 

018A LeftNyb : =NOT(Lef tNyb) 

0193 IF position>7680 THEN 

01A0 RUN PutBuf fer (buf fer, section, WinType , horiz, vert/4) 

01C0 section :=section+l 

01CB positional 

01D2 ENDIF 

01D4 NEXT i 

01DF RETURN 

Listing 3: PutBuf fer 

PROCEDURE PutBuffer 

PARAM buf f er(7680) : BYTE 
PARAM section: INTEGER 
PARAM typecode: INTEGER 
PARAM horiz , vert : INTEGER 

TYPE registers=cc,a,b J dp:BYTE; x , y ,u : INTEGER 
DIM regs : registers 
DIM i, group: INTEGER 



000C 
0013 
001A 
0025 
004A 
0053 
005E 
005F 
J307F 



J3098 
009 E 

00B9 100 

00D8 

0103 

010C 

012D 

0145 



REM Get this process's process id 

RUN syscall($0C,regs) 

group :=regs . a 

ON ERROR GOTO 100 

RUN gf x2 ( "def buf f " , group , 1 , 7680) 

REM The buffer is now defined 

RUN gf x2( "gpload" , group , 1 , typecode , horiz- 1 , vert ,7 680) 
PUT #1, buffer 

RUN gfx2("put" , group, 1,0, vert*(section-l) ) 
RUN gfx2("killbuff group, 1) 

END /E\ 



SB 



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Case + Power Supply (Dual V2 Height) $ 49.95 

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Distributors for: Ark Royal, Cer-Comp, Computerware, Diecom, Disto, Prickly Pear, and Speech Systems 

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October 1987 THE RAINBOW 165 



BAR DEN'S BUFFER 



From Flatland to 3-D 



By William Bardeii, Jr. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



"W" "W" olographic video would be great on the CoCo! Can't 
■ '■ you imagine the Death Starexploding in space about 
JL JLfive inches in front of your CoCo monitor? Better 
yet, Princess Leia imploring Obi Wan Kenobi to help her? 
Until that time, however, we're going to have to be content 
with two dimensions on the screen, like the creatures of 
Flatland that had only height and width. 

Or will we? On reflection T thought it might make an 
interesting column to see just how difficult it is to implement 
three dimensions. Although I wouldn't mind a 3-D display 
of Carrie Fisher, I aimed my sights a little lower — 3-D bar 
graphs. 

3-D Guns and Butter 

I'm sure you've seen the type of thing S mean. They're 
usually displayed in the business section of your local 
newspaper or USA Today and show such things as countries 
on one axis, the year on another and number of computer 
systems on still another, as shown in Figure !. 



Number of CoCos by Country and Year 




200.000 
units 



Figure 1: Sample Bar Graph 



Bill Bar den has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects on computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 

166 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



I thought this would be an easy, short project. As it turned 
out, it was relatively short, but not all that straightforward. 
There are a lot of things to consider when converting Flatland 
graphs to three dimensions. 

In the following discussion I thought it might be nice to 
use the powerful 640-by-l92, four-color graphics of the CoCo 
3. CoCo 2 readers should be able to modify the programs 
to work in the 256-by- 1 92 mode without a great deal of 
trouble. We'll talk in terms of Extended Color BASIC and not 
BAS1C09 to keep things simple. 

A Graphic Review of Graphs 

The CoCo uses an X,Y screen reference in graphics modes. 
There are 640 pixels in each row, numbered 0 through 639, 
and I92 pixels in each column, numbered 0 through J9I. 
M5CREEN 4 sets the 640-by-l92 mode, in which four colors 
can be used. Theupper-left corner is pixel 0,0; the upper-right 
corner is pixel 639,0; the bottom-left corner is pixel 0,l9l; 
and the bottom-right corner is pixel 639, 19l (see Figure 2). 



Column 
0 


Column 
639 


Row 0 


V 

Pixel 0,0 


s 

Pixel 
639,0 




Row 191 


Pixel 0,191 


Pixel 
639,191 




Figure 2: CoCo 3 HSCREEN 4 





This is not quite the same as common Cartesian coordi- 
nates, in which X increases to the right and Y increases 
toward the top of the graph, as shown in Figure 3. Cartesian 
coordinates (named after Rene DesCartes and not Hymie 
Descartes, as many think) are widely used in mathematics and 
other applications. Both a positive and negative X and Y 
region can be shown, and the graph can represent any range 



of values. The center, or origin, of the graph is usually in the 
center of the viewing area. 
There are two problems right off the bat: 

« How can we convert to Cartesian coordinates? 
• How can we make the axes (X and Y) represent any range 
of numbers? 



Y=20 
X=-40 X=-20 



, Origin (0,0) 



H +- 



-¥ x 



X=20 X=4Q X=& 



1? 
-V 



Figure 3: Cartesian Coordinates 



Converting to Cartesian Coordinates 

Suppose we make the center of the graph at X=320, Y=96, 
We can draw the X and Y axes by this code: 

100 HSCREEN 4 

110 HCLS 

120 HDRfiW "BF1320, 9G; NR319; NU95" 

The resulting display is shown in Figure 4. HSCREEN sets 
the high resolution screen mode (the H prefix is used for all 
Hi-Res CoCo 3 commands) and HCLS clears the screen. The 
HDRftW subcommands move the graphics cursor to 320,96 
(near screen center). Draw a line from screen center right 319 
pixels to 639,96, and draw a line up 96 pixels to 319,0. The 
horizontal line is the X axis; the vertical line is the Y axis. 
The screen center represents X=0, Y=0. 



Y axis 






NU95 


NR319 


X axis 




/ 

BM320.96 


Figure 4: Drawing X and Y Axes 





The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



DaCK ISSU6 

A., 
vaiiaDMity 



'Ok,'-- . 



BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
pages of material, it's all just for CoCo users 
— a great way to expand your library! 

A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
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each additional issue for postage and han- 
dling if sent by United Parcel Service. There 
is a $5 charge for the first issue, plus a $1 
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sent by U.S. MaiL UPS will not deliver to a 
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MOST ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 are 
available on white paper in a reprint form. All 
others are in regular magazine form. VISA, 
MasterCard and American Express ac- 
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Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
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supplies last. 

To check availability and order, reviewand 
fill out the form on the next page and mail 
it with your payment to: 

THE RAINBOW 
The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 67 



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RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1 981 through June 
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The Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes including rainbow On TAPE are in the July 
1985 and July 1986 issues, respectively. The Sixth Year index is in the July 1987 
issue. 



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Scaling 

The next problem is to scale the graph. As it stands, the 
graph can represent points whose X coordinate is 0 through 
639 and whose Y coordinate is 0 through 19 J. We'd like the 
graph to represent points with different X and Y ranges. As 
an example, suppose that we wanted X to be -100 through 
+ 100 and Y to be -100 through +100, and in Cartesian 
coordinates. Well call these the "real-world" coordinates. 

On the screen, 320 horizontal pixels correspond to 1 00 real- 
world integers (or 640 pixels to 200 real-world integers), so 
each real-world X coordinate must be multiplied by 320/ 100, 
or 3.2, 

On the screen, 96 vertical pixels correspond to 100 real- 
world integers, so the real-world Y coordinate must be 
multiplied by 96/100, or .96. 

Converting the Origin 

In screen coordinates, the origin of the graph is at X=0, 
Y=0 at the upper left-hand corner of the screen. In real-world 
coordinates, the origin is at screen center 320,96. After 
scaling, any real-world coordinate must be converted to 
screen coordinates by adding 320 to the scaled X coordinate 
and by subtracting the scaled Y coordinate from 96. For 
example, suppose the real-world coordinate is X=-20 > Y^O. 
After scaling: 



X 
Y 



-20 * 3,2 = -64 
50 * .96 = +48 



Adjusting for the origins: 

Xscreen = -64 + 320 - 256 
Yscreen = 96 - +48 = 48 

The result is shown in Figure 5. 



y=4s 



Real Wtfid. 
Y=50\9S=48 
96 -(*48)«48 screen 



H r- 



Real World: 

X-20'3 2=-64+320-256 screen 



T 





s X--20 real 




V-50 real 




X-256 screen 




Y-48 screen 




1 1 



Figure 5: Converting from Real-World Coordinates 
to Screen Coordinates 



A short program to plot three real-world points is shown 
below: 

100 DATA 50, 50, 70, 70, -10, -10 
110 HSCREEN A 
120 HCL5 

130 HDRfiW "BM320, 96; NR319; NU95" 
140 HSCREEN 0 
150 READ X,Y 

160 HCIRCLE ( ( X * 3.2 ) = 320, 96 - ( Y * .96 ) 
). 3 

170 A$ = INKEYS : IF A$ = THEN GOTO 170 ELSE GOTO 
150 



168 



THE RAIN BOW October 1 987 



Another point is plotted when a key is pressed. Each point 
is plotted as a small circle. 

The codescales and converts points in two dimensions. But 
what about three dimensions? 

From Flatland to 3-D 

Let's add another axis to the graph above. It's called the 
Z axis and represents depth. Normally, this axis would 
appear as a point, because it would be coming out at a 
perpendicular angle to the screen, as shown in Figure 6. 



Front View 
Y 



Side View 



*z * 



Figure 6: Ideal X,Y,Z Representation 



Since we can't really bring out the axis this way (without 
holography), the Z axis is represented as shown in Figure 7. 
The axis to the left represents a positive Z value. The missing 
axis to the right represents negative Z values. 



Y axis 



Z axis 





-Z values y * 




y 

Y y 
"IS* s' 

w y ix 

! 







X axis 



Figure 7: Compromise X,Y,Z Representation 



Points are plotted in three dimensions on this graph by first 
plotting the point in the X and Y dimension and then moving 
along the Z axis. The greater the Z value, the greater the 
distance from the origin along Z. A program to plot the point 
in this fashion is shown in Listing I. It draws lines repre- 
senting the intersection of X and Y and then moves out along 
the Z axis to plot a small circle. 



Listing 1: 

100 ' PLOT POINT IN X,Y,Z 
110 INPUT X,Y,Z 
120 HSCREEN 4 
130 HCLS 

1 PRELIMINARY AND DRAW AXES 
i 30 

= 100: YS = 100: ZS = 100 



140 
150 AA 
160 XS 



170 AN • AA / 57.29583 

180 AM = ( 90 - AA ) / 57.29583 

190 CA = COS( AN ) 

200 SA = SIN( AN ) 

210 HDRAW "BM320,96; NR319 NU96" 
220 IF AA <= 45 THEN CX = 0: CY 
= 96 * TAN ( AN ) +96 
2 30 IF AA > 45 THEN CY = 191: CX 

= 320 - TAN ( AM ) * 3 20 
2 40 HLINE ( 3 20, 9 6 ) - ( CX, CY 

) , PSET 

250 ' LOCATE POINT AND DRAW LINE 
S AND POINT 

260 X = ( X / XS ) * 320 + 320 
270 Y = 96 - ( Y / YS ) * 96 
280 XD = -( Z * COS( AN ) / ZS ) 
* 320 

290 YD = ( Z * SIN( AN ) 
* 96 

320, Y ) - 



300 HLINE ( 
PSET 

310 HLINE (X, 9 6 
PSET 

320 HLINE ( X, Y 

+ YD ) , PSET 
330 HCIRCLE ( X + XD, Y + YD 
XS/20 

340 GOTO 340 



/ ZS ) 
( X, Y ) , 
) - ( X, Y ) , 
) - ( X + XD, Y 
) , 




Preliminary Code 

Suddenly things have gotten more complicated! However, 
if you can understand this program, you'll understand much 
of what is involved in drawing shapes in three dimensions. 

The X, Y and Z values are first input, the 640-by-192 mode 
is set, and the Hi-Res screen is cleared. 

The next section does all of the preliminary work and 
draws the axes. Variable RR defines the angle of the Z axis, 
as shown in Figure 8. This angle could be close to 0 or close 
to 90 degrees and would represent a different vantage point 
for the graph with each different angle as shown in the figure. 
We'll use 30 degrees as the nominal angle. 





Y 









* 2 1 




IX 

1 

i 







Y 


f 


— i*, 

J .X 

1 






Figure 8: Angle 


of the Z Axis 



Real-World Scaling 

Next, variables X5, Y5 and ZS are set to 100. This represents 
the real-world scales for each axis. The X axis, for example, 
represents -100 to +100 in the real-world, with the origin at 
0. Next, variable AN is set to the angle of the Z axis in radians. 
All of the BASIC trigonometric functions work in radians 
rather than degrees. A radian is an angular measurement like 
degrees. One radian equals 57.29583 degrees, so dividing the 
angle by 57.29583 gives the angle of Z in radians. 

Next, variable RM is set to the complement of the RN angle. 
This is the second angle in the triangle formed by the Z axis, 
as shown in Figure 9. 



90° 

J _. 







AN angle 
AM angle (90-AN) 



Figure 9: AM Angle 



Sine and Cosine 

Next, CR and 5R are computed. These are the sine and 
cosine values of the Z axis angle. Given any Z axis angle and 
a distance along either X, Y or the Z axis (hypotenuse), we 
can find the other two distances by using sine, cosine or 
tangent functions. 

As a refresher to these functions, look at Figure 10. The 
sine function is the ratio of the opposite side of the triangle 
to the hypotenuse. When the angle is small, the opposite side 
is small and this ratio approaches 0. When the angle 
approaches 90 degrees, the opposite side is large and the ratio 
approaches I. The length of the opposite side (Y) can be 
found by multiplying the sine of the angle times the length 
of the hypotenuse (the distance along the Z axis). 




A 

-c 



A=opposite side 
B=near side 
C=hypotenuse 



C 



TAN = .2 TAN=.9 TAN=4 



Figure 10: SIN, COS and TAN Functions 



The cosine function is the ratio of the near side of the 
triangle to the hypotenuse. When the angle is small, the near 
side is large and this ratio approaches 1. When the angle 



170 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



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approaches 90 degrees, the near side is small and the ratio 
approaches 0. The length of the near side (X) can be found 
by multiplying the sine of the angle times the length of the 
hypotenuse (the distance along the Z axis). The sine and 
cosine, then, vary from 0 to 1 and complement each other 
— when the sine of the angle is near 0, the cosine is near 1, 
and vice versa. 

The tangent of an angle is the ratio of the opposite side 
of the triangle to the near side. When the angle is small, this 
ratio is close to 0, as the opposite side is very small. When 
the angle approaches 90 degrees, however, the ratio becomes 
very large (much greater than one), as the opposite side is 
very large and the near side is very small. At 90 degrees, the 
opposite side is infinitely large and the near side is infinitely 
small, making the tangent ratio infinite. Given any angle and 
one of the two sides, the length of the other side can always 
be found by using the tangent value of the angle. 

Drawing the Axes 

Next, the X and Y axes are drawn as before. Now, the Z 
axis must be drawn. There are really two cases here. If the 
angle of the Z axis is less than or equal to 45 degrees, the 
Z axis intersects the left side of the screen. If the angle of 
the Z axis is greater than 45 degrees, the Z axis intersects the 
bottom of the screen. A check is made of Rfi, therefore, to 
see which case applies. If the first case applies, variable CX 
is set to 0 and variable CY is set using the tangent function 
to compute the length of Y. If the second case applies, variable 
CY is set to 191 and variable CX is set using the tangent 
function to compute the length of X. The Z axis is then drawn 
using the HLINE statement in BASIC. These two cases are 
shown in Figure 1 1. 



This side 
96'TAN(AN) 

CX=0 ^¥ 








/ 

/ AM 

/ 





f 

CY=191 



This side=320*TAN(AM) 

Figure 11: Two Cases for Z Axis 



Finding the Point 

Next, the distance along X and Y are found. This is a 
scaling computation similar to what we did before, changing 
the real-world values of X and Y to screen values. 



Two displacements, XD and YD, are now computed. These 
represent the displacement along the Z axis to represent the 
point. The cosine and sine values are used to find XD and YD. 
Adding X to XD and Y to YD gives the screen coordinate of 
the point in three dimensions. 

Now the three locating lines can be drawn by three LINE 
statements. The lines defining X and Y in two dimensions 
are easy and involve only X and Y values. The line repre- 
senting the displacement along the Z axis uses the XD and 
YD displacements to locate the end of the line. This line end 
is also used to locate the point and to draw a small circle at 
its location. 

Confused? If so, use the program to change the angle of 
Z and to draw various points. The final calculations are 
shown in Figure 12. 



X + XD.Y + YD 




YD 

T 



XD 



Figure 12: Finding the Point 



Drawing Vertical Columns 

Listing 2 shows another program. This one draws a vertical 
column in three dimensions. A 3-D bar graph will be made 
up of vertical columns, and this is a good exercise before we 
look at the actual 3-D bar graph. 



Listing 2: 



100 

110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
160 
170 
180 
190 
200 
210 
= 96 



' DRAW A VERTICAL 
INPUT X,Y,Z 
HSCREEN 4 
HCLS 

30 
100: 
AA / 
( 90 
COS ( 
SIN( 



COLUMN 



AA 
XS 
AN 
AM 
CA 
SA 



ZS 



100 



29583 



YS = 100: 
57 . 29583 
- AA ) / 57 
AN ) 
AN ) 

HDRAW "BM320,96; NR319 NU96" 
IF AA <= 45 THEN CX = 0 : CY 
* TAN ( AN ) +96 



220 IF AA > 45 THEN CY = 191: CX 



= 320 - TAN ( AM 
230 HLINE | 320, 

) , PSET 
240 X = ( X / XS 
250 Y = 96 - ( Y 



) * 320 
96 ) - ( 



CX, CY 



) * 320 + 320 
/ YS ) * 96 



172 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



26j3 XD ■ - ( Z * COS( AN ) / ZS ) 
* 32j3 I 

27j3 YD H 2 * SIN( AN ) / ZS ) 
* 96 

28j3 HLINE ( X + XD, Y + YD ) - ( 

X + XD, Y + YD + Y ) , PSET 
29j3 GOTO 29j3 



This program is very similar to Listing 1. However, only 
one line is drawn, the line from X,Y,Z down to the "floor" 
of the graph — the plane made up of the Z and X axes, as 
shown in Figure 13. 

At this point we could draw a 3-D bar graph by drawing 
consecutive vertical lines. However, the next program draws 
a better column than just a straight line. 



X + XD.Y + YD 




loor 



This line 
is drawn - 
its height 
is Y 



X + XD.Y + YD + Y 



Figure 13: Drawing a Vertical Column 



A 3-D Bar Graph Program 

OK, ready for the grand finale? Listing 3 shows the 3-D 
bar graph program. It draws an unlabeled bargraph as shown 
in Figure I with any angle you'd like from 0 to 90 degrees. 
The bar graph in the figure uses vertical columns with a width 
and depth for better appearance. 




Listing 3: 

1J2J0 1 THREE-D BAR GRAPH 

11J3 DATA 2j3,8j3,2j3,4j3,6j3,2j3,6j3,4j3 

,2j3,8j3,2j3,2j3 

12J3 DATA 2J3, 6j3 , 4j3 , 4j3 , 4j3 , 4j3 , 6j3,2j3 
,4j3,8j3,lj3,4j3 

13J3 DATA 2j3,5j3,6j3,4j3,55,6j3,6j3,45 
,6j3,8j3,55,6j3 

14J3 DATA 2j3,lj3,8j3,4j3,15,8j3,6j3,5, 

8j3 , 8j3 , 5 , 8j3 

15J3 DATA -1,-1,-1 

16J3 HSCREEN 4 

17)3 HCLS 

18J3 AA ■ 35 

19J3 XS = 1J3J3: YS = 1J80 : ZS ■ 1)8)8 



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October 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 73 



AN 
AM 
CA 
SA 
WD 
XE 
YE 



200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
U96" 
280 IF 
= 96 * 
290 IF 

= 320 
300 

), 
310 



AA / 
( 90 
COS( 
SIN( 
20 

COS ( 
SIN( 



57 .29583 

- AA ) / 57.29583 
AN 
AN 



AN 
AN 



* 
* 



WD 
WD 



* .3 

HDRAW "CI; BM3 20,9 6; NR319 N 



= 0: CY 



AA <= 45 THEN CX 
TAN ( AN ) + 96 
AA > 45 THEN CY = 191 
- TAN ( AM ) * 3 20 



CX 



(320, 96 ) - ( CX, CY 



320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
390 

) * 

400 
* 



HLINE 
PSET 
RESTORE 
READ XX,YY,ZZ 
IF XX = -1 THEN GOTO 3 30 
GOSUB 3 60 
GOTO 3 20 

• DRAW COLUMN SUBROUTINE 
X = ( XX / XS ) * 320 + 320 
Y = 96 - ( YY / YS ) * 96 
XD = -( ZZ * COS( AN ) / ZS 
3 20 

YD = ( ZZ * SIN( AN ) / ZS ) 
96 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATABLE WITH 04C43 
MO PATCHES REQUIRED 





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410 HDRAW "C2" 
420 HLINE ( X 
X + XD + WD, 
T, B 

430 HLINE - 

Y + YD + YY 
440 HLINE - 

Y + YD - YE 
450 HLINE - 
D ) , PSET 
460 HLINE 

X + XD + 

T 

470 HLINE - ( 

Y + YD - YE 



( 
( 

) , 
( 



( X 
XE, 



+ XD, Y + YD ) - ( 

Y + YD + YY ) , PSE 

X + XD + WD + XE, 
YE ) , PSET 
X + XD + WD + XE, 
PSET 

X + XD + WD, Y + Y 

+ XD, Y + YD ) - ( 

Y + YD - YE ) , PSE 



) 



+ WD + XE, 
Y 



+ 
Y 



XD, Y + YD ) - ( 
+ YD + YY ) , PSE 



X + XD 
PSET 

480 HPAINT ( X + XD + WD / 2, 
+ YD + YY / 2 ) , 3 , 2 
490 HPAINT ( X + XD + WD + XE / 
2, Y+YD+YY/2),3, 2 
500 HPAINT ( X + XD + WD, Y + YD 

- YE / 2 ) , 3 , 2 
510 HDRAW "CI" 
520 HLINE ( X 
X + XD + WD, 
T, B 

530 HLINE - 

Y + YD + YY 
540 HLINE - 

Y + YD - YE 
550 HLINE - 
D ) , PSET 
560 HLINE ( X 

X + XD + XE, 

T 

570 HLINE - ( X + XD + WD + XE, 

PSET 



I 

( 

) , 
( 



X + XD + WD 
YE ) , PSET 
X + XD + WD 

PSET 
X + XD + WD, 



+ XE, 
+ XE, 



Y + Y 



+ XD, Y + YD ) 
Y + YD - YE ) , 



- ( 

PSE 



Y + YD - YE 

580 RETURN 



), 



Preliminary Operations 

The data to be plotted is held in DATA statements at the 
beginning of the program. Each column is represented by 
three values — X, Y and Z. The height of the column is 
represented by Y. The DATA values are terminated by 
X=Y=Z=-1. The DATA values must be arranged so that 
columns in the back of the graph are drawn first. These 
columns are overdrawn by other columns. One way to do this 
is to sort all X,Y,Z data by Z coordinate, putting all larger 
values of Z later in the DATA statements. 

The beginning of the program is very similar to the 
previous programs, aside from the DATA values. Variable WD 
is new and defines the width of the column in pixels. We're 
using 20 pixels for the width here. Variable XE and YE define 
the displacement of X and Y to draw the sides of the column, 
as shown in Figure 14. These displacements depend upon the 
angle of the Z axis, and the sine and cosine functions are used 
to find them. 

The three axes are drawn as in the other program. The 
program then reads X, Y and Z values from the DATA list, 
assigningthem to XX, YY and ZZ. A Draw Column subroutine 



174 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



is then called to draw the bar graph subroutine. This process 
continues until the terminating values of -1, - 1 , -1 are read 
for XX, YY and ZZ. 

Draw Column Subroutine 

The Draw Column subroutine is the heart of the Bar Graph 
program. It uses the same basic scheme as Program 2 to draw 
a vertical column. The subroutine is divided into three parts: 
drawing the column outline, painting the column and 
redrawing the column outline. 

The graph axis lines are color code 1 . The column outline, 
however, is drawn with color code 2 because color code 2 
can now be used as a boundary condition for painting the 
inside of the column. Each column outline is drawn by six 
separate LINE statements. 

The first LINE statement draws the front of the column by 
a line with the "box" option. The WD variable is used to define 
the column width. 

The second through sixth LINE statements draw the sides 
and top of the column. Variables XE, YE and WD are used to 
define the starting and ending points of the lines. 

Next, the three areas of the column are painted. There may 
be an overdrawn axis line (such as the X axis), but as this 
is color code 1, it is ignored in PRINT. Notice that PRINT takes 
care to find a point that is near the center of each area to 
be painted. 

At this point the column is solid color with no outline. The 
next set of LINE statements is the same as the first set, but 
use a color code of 1, the same as the axes color code. After 
these LINE statements, the column has an outline that is the 



same color as the axes. This outline is ignored in case the 
column is later overwritten by another column in the graph. 

Using the Bar Graph Plotter 

The Bar Graph Plotter is not a perfect program. You can 
blow it up by choosing extreme values for X, Y and Z. It 
does not have error-checking for out-of-screen coordinates, 
for example. However, it might make a good basis for your 
own experiments in three-dimensional plotting. An interest- 
ing thing the program does is change the angle of the Z axis 
to get another view of the graph data. This is especially 
helpful if some of the columns are hidden by columns in front. 
Done fast enough, changing the angle of Z gives a three- 
dimensional rotation effect. 

Display labels by using the HPRINT statement, which 
displays text data directly on the Hi-Res screen. The location 
of the labels is dependent upon the angle of Z, so choose the 
fifi angle before labeling the graph. 

Change the real-world coordinates by changing XS, Y5 and 
ZS. The origin, however, will always be in the center of the 
screen. 

Any number of columns can be used and the width of the 
columns may be varied. You might, for example, have a 
continuous strip of columns both across and out from the 
screen. 

Although this wasn't the easiest project in the world, you'll 
have to admit it is fun to see 3-D bar graphs on the CoCo. 
It convinced me that more work should be done in this area. 
I may try Princess Leia next. 

See you next month with more CoCo topics. /R\ 




PflOCfllMS- PfflrPHfflMS- Sl/PPl (f S • SfOviCf 



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MLBASIC 2.0 - BASIC Compiler 

The wait is over. WASATCHWAEE announces the latest version 
of MLBASIC designed to allow more compatibility with existing BASIC 
programs than ever available before for the Color Computer. This 
version also allows full use of the capabilities and memory of the 
CoCo 3. Written in machine language, MLBASIC can compile programs as 
large as 64K bytes. Standard floating point (10 digit precision), 
INTEGER, and String type variables and arrays supported. 

COMMANDS SUPPORTED: 



1 . I/O commands 

CLOSE CLOADM CSAVEM DIR 
FILES GET INPUT KILL 
RSET USING LINEINPUT 

2. Program control commands 
CALL DEFUSR END 
IF THEN ELSE 

3. Functions 
ABS ASC ATN 
HPOINT INSTR INT 
PEEK POINT PPOINT 
TIMER VAL VARPTR 

4. String functions 

CHR5 INKEYS LEFTS MID$ 

5. Graphic/Screen commands 



DRIVE 
LSET 



DSKIS 
OPEN 



DSKOS FIELD 
PRINT PUT 



EXEC 


FOR 


NEXT 


GOSUB 


GOTO 


ERROR 


ON 


RETURN 


STOP 


USR 


COS 


CVN 


EOF 


EXP 


FIX 


LEN 


LOG 


LPEEK 


LOC 


LOF 


RND 


SGN 


SIN 


SQR 


TAN 



MKN$ RIGHTS STR$ 



STRINGS 



ATTR 
HLINE 
LINE 
PRESET 



COLOR 
HPAINT 
LOCATE 
PSET 



CLS 
HPRINT 
PALETTE 
RESET 



CIRCLE 
HRESET 
PAINT 
SCREEN 



6. Other commands 
DATA DIM MOTOR POKE 
TRON TROFF TAB VERIFY 
Plus many more commands not ava 
interfacing with hardware registers 



DRAW HCOLOR HSCREEN HDRAW 

HCIRCLE HCLS HSET JOYSTK 

PCLEAR PCLS PLAY PMODE 

SET SOUND WIDTH 



LPOKE RESTORE READ 



REM 



ilable with regular BASIC which allow 
and machinelanguage programs. 



NEW <<<< ONIiY «B9 OH > > > > 

COCO 3 WITH DISK REQUIRED -Add $4.00 Postage. 
CHECK or MONEY ORDERS only. No C.O.D. or Bank cards. 
Foreign orders use U.S. MONEY ORDERS only. 



WASATCH WARE 

7350 Nutree Drive 
Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 
Phone (801) 943-6263 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 



175 



• Call • 

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SHIPPING will bechaiged at out ACTUAL COST 
Ohio residents add S S° 0 Sales Tax COD add 2 00 




KISSable OS-9 



Unlock the 
Graphics Potential 
of OS-9 Level II 

By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The ability to bootstrap is a won- 
derful thing. In fact, it's turned 
an innocent programming exam- 
ple into a lot of fun — and a major 
project. Hopefully, KISSDraw will help 
you unlock the graphics potential of 
OS-9 Level II and you'll see how easy 
it is to develop programs using your 
CoCo 3. 

While Peter Dibble and I were writing 
The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS- 
9 Level II, Volume I: A Beginners Guide 
to Windows, we wanted to show you 
how to use Tandy's optional high reso- 
lution mouse. In the meantime, I had 
been using MacDraw for several years 
and always wondered how to program 



Dale L. Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-ahlarge of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale is a 
U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and lives 
in Rockville, Maryland. 



this kind of magic. I volunteered and 
CoCoDraw was born. 

Don't get me wrong, CoCoDraw is 
very primitive. With the version we 
published in our new book you can only 
draw boxes, circles and lines. First, you 
select the object you want to draw from 
the pull-down menu. Then, you move 
the pencil to one corner of the area 
where you would like to draw the 
object. And finally, you move the pencil 
pointer to the opposite corner and click 
the mouse button again. 

In a split second, the object you 
selected from the menu is drawn on the 
screen. It is contained within the area of 
an imaginary box you defined by click 
on two corners. 

After completing CoCoDraw and the 
new book, I amused myself for several 
hours by drawing many different ob- 
jects using the three graphics tools. 
Before long, however, it was time to 
write "KISSable OS-9" for the Sep- 
tember issue of rainbow. I was so 
fascinated with CoCoDraw that I wanted 
to enhance it. Before the column was 
complete, we had added a bar and an 
ellipse to the toolbox. We also used a 



new method to address the packet of 
information from the mouse and 
changed the way the program worked. 
We gave it a new name, too — KISS- 
Draw was born! 

After you selected a tool with KISS- 
Draw, you moved the pencil to one 
corner of the target area and pushed the 
mouse button. This time, however, you 
did not release the button or click it. 
Rather, you held the button down and 
dragged the pencil across the screen 
until you reached the opposite corner of 
the target area. When you released the 
button, KISSDraw went to work and 
drew the object you had selected. 

This method of operation was better, 
but it still left a lot to be desired. For 
example, it was hard to imagine what 
an ellipse placed in the area between the 
two corners would look like. But, it 
worked better than the original version 
where you simply clicked the mouse in 
the two corners. 

And while you were typing in the 
code, you were learning how to make 
menus out of overlay windows and how 
to use them. You were also learning how 
to pass parameters to OS-9's internals 



176 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



with the SysCall procedure and how to 
get back and use a packet that contains 
several dozen pieces of information 
generated by the mouse plugged into the 
high resolution adapter. 



"Once you have 
bootstrapped a 
minimal program, 
you can use it to 
build additional 
parts. " 



We played with September's KISS- 
Draw for several hours too. We still 
wanted more! Enter KISSDraw 2. 

Once you have bootstrapped a min- 
imal program, you can use it to build 
additional parts. That's the way KISS- 
Draw seems to be evolving. During the 
past month we discovered how to make 
BASIC09 draw the object we selected in 
varying sizes as we moved the pencil 
around on the screen. Each time we 
move the pencil, the program erases the 
object it drew at that location and d raws 
another one at the new location. 

As you pull the pencil across the 
screen with the mouse, the box (or 
whatever you happen to be drawing) 
expands or contracts before you. When 
you get it just the size you want it, you 
release the mouse button and KISSDraw 
finishes the drawing and leaves the 
object on the screen. 

That addition was nifty enough, but 
we wanted more. We didn't want to have 
to type a number to select an object 



Editor's Note: The following procedures will be 
combined into one source file, KISSDraw2, on this 
month's RAINBOW ON DISK. 



Listing 1: KISSdMenu 



0030 
0031 
0038 
004D 
0060 
0061 
008F 
00A6 
00A7 
00D5 
00EA 
0106 
0111 
0112 
012C 
0156 
0157 
016F 

0170 
0188 
019F 
01A0 
J41BC 
01D3 
01D4 
01F9 
0214 
0215 
022E 
0245 
0246 
0263 
0288 
?289 
02A6 
02BD 
02D4 
02EC 
JH04 
031C 
031D 
0343 
035E 
0371 
0377 
0378 
039E 
03AD 
03D2 
03F7 
03F8 
0417 
0431 
0444 



(* Procedure to draw 'tools' menu bar on screen 

DIM vert : INTEGER 

RUN gfx2( "pattern" ,0,0) 

RUN gfx2( "logic", "off ") 

(* tfe'll draw Sn outline of the menu 1 W first 
RUN gfx2("boxMJ?,l^ p 40,l7a) 

fc* Now we= need to fi&U ±n the individual bojc.es 
TOR ver-t-22 TQ -178 STEP 12 

RUN gfx2 ("line", 10, vert, 40, vert) 
NEXT vert 

/ 

(* Now we'll add the icons 

(* First, an Icon that means 'Draw a Line' 

RUN gfx2("line" ,12,20,38,12) 

Nbw an Icon. Sor a, Box 
RUN gEx-2 £ "box" , 1*4 , 24 , 3 6 , 32} 

(* A Circle is our next Icon 
RUN gfx2("circle" ,25,40,8; 

Now, we need an 'icon' for an ellipse 
RUN gf x2 { "e llipsa " ,25,52,12,3) 

(* Now, an icon for a Bar 
RUN gfx2("bar'\14,61,36,67) 

(* An Icon for an Arc is next 

RUN gfr2( "arc", 25, 76, 7, 4, -14, -8, 18, 14) 

(* Now we'll fake a spray can 
RUN gfx2("box" ,21,86,29,93) 
EUN gfx2("bar" ,24,84,26,86) 
RUN gfx2("line",26,84,34,82) 
RUN gfx2("line" ,26,84,38,84) 
RUN gfx2 ("line", 26, 84, 34, 85) 

(,* We r ll let the Letter VT' be an icon 
(* to represent typing text 
RUN gfx2("curxy",3,12) 
PRINT "T" ; 

(* For a freehand icon, we'll use two 
(* crossed arcs 

RUN gf x2 ("arc" , 20 , 114 , 7 , 4 , -14 , -8 , 18 , 4) 
RUN gf x2("arc" , 30 , 110 , 7 , 4 , 14 ,8 , -18 , -4) 

(* Now we'll give you five fill 
(* patterns to choose from 
(* Large Dots First 
RUN gfx2 ("pattern", 204, 8) 



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graphics screen dump and other useful programs. Now UPDATED 
FOR OS-9 Ver 2.0 $29.95 



PCXFER UTILITIES— Utilities to read/write and format ss MS- 
DOStm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. $45.00 (requires SDISK) 

CCRD 512K Byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE— Requires RS Multipak 
interface, two units may be used together for 1MB RAM disk. 
Addressing is switch selectable. OS-9 level 1 and 2 driver and test 
software included. $169.00 

All disk prices are forCoCoOS-9format; for other formats, specify 
and add $2.00 each. Order prepaid orCOD, VISA/MC accepted, add 
$1.50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD; actual charges added for 
COD. 

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(For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time) 

OS-9 ia a trademark of Mlcroware and Molorola Inc. 
MS-DOS Is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 177 



PU59 


RUN gfx2("f ill" ,25,125) 


046B 


(* Followed by horizontal lines 


043A 


RUN gfx2( ,, pattern , \204,3) 


049F 


RUN gfx2("fill" ,25 ,135) 


04B1 


(* Now we'll use vertical lines 


04D0 


RUN gfx2("pattern" ,204 , 2) 


04E5 


RUN gfx2("fill",25, 146) 


04F7 


(* and left slanted lines 


0510 


RUN gfx2 ("pattern" ,204,5) 


0525 


RUN gfx2( ,, fill",25,156) 


0537 


(* and finally right slanted lines 


0559 


RUN gfx 2 ("pattern" ,204, 6) 


056E 


RUN gfx2("fill",25 , 172) 


058)3 


(* You must always return to a solid pattern 


05AC 


(* before you try to draw again 


05CB 


RUN gfx2( "pattern" ,0,0) 


05E0 




05E1 


(* Now we'll draw a menu bar across the top of the screen 


06LA 


(* Initially, we'll only put a 'file' menu on it, 


064B 


RUN gfx2( M bar",0,0,639 ,8) 


0663 


RUN gfx2("curxy" ,10,0) 


0676 


RUN gfx2( H revon") 


068$ 


PRINT "File "; 


068D 


RUN gfx2("revoff") 


Listing 2: KISSDraw2 


0000 


(* Drawing program that lets you select a tool by clicking 


003A 


<* on an ICON 


0047 




0048 


TYPE regist&rs=cc,a,b,dp:BYTE; x.y.u: INTEGER 


006D 




006E 


TYPE rodent-Vld,Act,ToTm:BYTE; XI: INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 




INTEGER; CBSA , CBSB , CCt A , CC tB , TTSA , TTS B , TLSA , TLSB : BYTE 




; X2.BDX.BDY: INTEGER; S ta t , Res : BYTE ; AcX,AcY, WRX.WRY : 




INTEGER 


00DF 




00E0 


DIM ;nouse : rodent 


00E9 


DIM pointer , pencil , line , box, circle, ellipse , bar , arc , fill , text 




.freehand: BOOLEAN 


0118 


DIM patterns ,horzlines , vert lines , slant right .slant left ,dots : 




BOOLEAN 


0133 




0134 


(* First we need to start with a clear screen 


0161 


(* and draw the menu 


0175 




0176 


RUN gfx2("clear") 


0183 


RUN KISSdMenu 


0187 




0188 


(* We must bring the high resolution mouse on line 


01BA 


(* and find out where it is pointing 


01DE 




01DF 


RUN setupmouse 


01E3 




01E4 


LOOP 


01E6 




01E7 


pointer : "FALSE 


01ED 


REPEAT 


01EF 


RUN getKISSmouse(mouse) 


01F9 




01FA 


IF mouse. AcX<40 OR mouse. AcY<10 THEN 


0213 


pointer: =TRUE 


0219 


ELSE 


021D 


pointer:-FALSE 


0223 


ENDIF 


0225 




0226 


IF pointer THEN 


0.22F 


RUN gfx2("gcset", 202,1) 


0242 


ELSE 


0246 


RUN gfx2("gcset", 202, 2) \(* A pen to draw with 


026E 


ENDIF 


0270 




0271 


RUN gf x2("putgc" , mouse. AcX, mouse. Ac Y) 


028E 


UNTIL mouse. CBSAO0 AND pointer 


02A0 




02A1 


RUN gfx2(""bell") \RUN gf x2( ,, bell") 


02B9 


GOSUB 10 \REM Go select the proper tool 


02D9 


GOSUB 20 \REM Go Use It 


02E9 


ENDLOOP 


02ED 





from a pull-down menu. We thought it 
would be nicer if we could point to an 
object, click the mouse button to select 
a tool, then use that tool to draw the 
desired object. To do the job, we wrote 
KISSdMenu. 

This month, we present new versions 
of KISSDrawBox and KISSDrawEl- 
lipse. Compare KISSDrawBox to the 
earlier versions in CoCoDraw and KI5S- 
Draw. Compare KISSDrawEl 1 ipse to 
the version we published last month. As 
you can see, the modifications required 
to add the "watch while you draw" 
feature were minimal. Study the differ- 
ences and file them in your bag of tricks. 
In fact, you can use them to modify last 
month's version of KISSDrauiL ine, 
KISSDrauCircle and KISSDrawBar. 

Notice again the advantages of the 
bootstrapping process. Once you have 
a minimal solution running, you can use 
it to fine-tune future versions. For 
example, the new versions of KISS- 
DrawBox and KISSDrawEl 1 ipse can 
be run from the KI SSDrawObj ec ts 
menu we published last month. In fact, 
we used the original menu to test our 
new procedures. 

Our listings this month include 
KISSDraw2, KISSdMenu, KISSDraw- 
Ellipse, KISSDrawBox and KISS- 
FreeHand. Short procedures are in- 
cluded for arc, full and text tools. 

Once again, keep in mind that our 
efforts here are still primitive. We 
haven't workea out all the details 
needed to update the menu when it's 
overwritten, etc. Again we are boot- 
strapping ourselves into a new and 
exciting world. There are so many 
features we want to add and so little 
time. We need to write a procedure that 
will let us pick a pattern and fill an area 
on the screen. Notice, we have already 
placed the icons for this function on the 
menu. 

We also need to complete a pull-down 
menu that will pop up in an overlay 
window when you click the mouse 
button while pointing to the word file 
on the menu bar at the top of the screen. 
On that pull-down menu, we hope you 
will eventually be able to select com- 
mands that let you undo your last act, 
save your drawing commands to a file 
while you are working, load a file 
created earlier, print the screen to your 
printer, or erase an area of the screen. 

Further in the future, it would be nice 
to add commands that let you change 
the foreground and background colors 
— either from a pull-down menu or by 
clicking on an icon. And ultimately, we 



178 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



hope to design a data structure that will 
let us save each object we draw in 
memory as we draw it. After we do this, 
we will be able to select an object so we 
can edit, duplicate, move, change or 
delete it. 

In this month's offering, the proce- 
dure l<IS5Draw2 is the driving force. It 
runs KISSdNenu to draw the menu, sets 
up the mouse and then enters a loop 
waiting for the user to push the button 
on the mouse. If the mouse is over the 
drawing area, the graphics cursor looks 
like a pencil. If it is over the menu bars, 
it looks like an arrow or pointer. 

As soon as you point to a drawing 
tool and click the mouse button, KI55- 
Drau calls the proper tool and lets you 
draw exactly one object. Once that 
object is drawn, it returns to the loop 
and waits foryou to select another tool. 
This loop will run forever or until you 
press BREAK to stop execution of the 
program. Eventually we'll have to add 
a quit command to the file menu. 

If you would like to contribute any- 
thing to this package, get in touch with 
me at 805 West Edmonston Drive, 
Rockville, MD 20852. If we all pool our 
efforts, we could come up with one heck 
of a drawing program. Let me know 
what you think. 

Presently, KISSdMenu draws the 
menu "live" when it is called by KI55- 
Drau2. Eventually, we will pack 
KISSdMenu and run it from the OS-9 
shell, redirecting its output to a file. 
Then, we'll simply use the BASIC09 
Shell command to merge that file into 
our window. After we have done this, 
our menu will appear on the screen 
several times faster. 

Later on, we'll probably use KI55- 
FreeHand to draw a freehand logo, save 
it in a buffer and scale it into the menu 
bar as a new freehand icon. That's 
another one that will have to wait. 



02EE 


10 


(* Subroutine co determine which tool 


0316 




(* artist wants to draw with 


0332 






0333 




IF mouse. AcY<22 AND mouse. AcY>10 THEN line:«=TRUE \ RETURN 


0353 




ELSE 


0357 




line: -FALSE 


035D 




ENDIF 


035F 






0360 




IF mouse. Ac Y>22 AND mouse. AcY<34 THEN box:=TRUE \ RETURN 


0380 




ELSE 


038A 




box : «=FALSL 


038A 




ENDIF 


038C 






038D 




IF mouse. AcY>34 AND mouse. AcY<46 THEN circle :=TRUE \ RETURN 


03AD 




ELSE 


03B1 




circle :=FALSE 


03B7 




ENDIF 


03B9 






03BA 




IF mouse. AcY>46 AND mouse. AcY<58 THEN ellipse : -TRUE \ RETURN 


03DA 




ELSE 


03DE 




ellipse : -FALSE 


03EA 




ENDIF 


03E6 






03E7 




IF mouse. AcY>58 AND mouse. AcY<70 THEN bar:=TRUE \ RETURN 


0407 




ELSE 


0A0B 




bar : -FALSE 


0411 




ENDIF 


04-13 






0414 




IF mouse. Ac Y>70 AND mouse. AcY<82 THEN arc: -TRUE \ RETURN 


0434 




ELSE 


0438 




arc : -FALSE 


043E 




ENDIF 


0440 






0441 




IF mouse. AcY>82 AND mouse. AcY<94 THEN fill: -TRUE \ RETURN 


0461 




ELSE 


0465 




fill: -FALSE 


046B 




ENDIF 


046D 






046E 




IF mouse. Ac Y>94 AND mouse . AcY<106 THEN text: -TRUE \ RETURN 


048E 




ELSE 


0492 




text : -FALSE 


0498 




ENDIF 


049A 






04 9 B 




IF mouse. AcY>106 AND mouse . AcY<118 THEN freehand : -TRUE \ RETURN 


04BB 




ELSE 


04BF 




freehand: -FALSE 


04C5 




ENDIF 


04C7 






04C8 




RETURN 


04CA 






04CB 


20 


(* Subroutine that runs the proper tool 


04F5 






04F6 




IF line THEN RUN KISSdrawline (mouse) \line : -FALSE \ RETURN 


.0510 




ENDIF 


0512 






0513 




IF box THEN RUN KISSDrawbox(mouse ) \box: -FALSE \ RETURN 


052D 




ENDIF 


052F 







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October 1987 THE RAINBOW 179 



f-, '^iiTiiiMtit'Hi "r 

The Rainbow Bookshelf 



Fill out your CoCo library 
with these selections 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to take 
advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser features. An easy- 
to-read, step-by-step guide packed with hints, tips, tutorials and free 
software in the form of program listings. 
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The Windows and Applications Disk for The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I 

Puckett and Dibble have done it again! Here are aJI the great 
programs from the first volume of the Level II guide. Clever new 
applications ready to run. Disk $19,95 



The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 

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The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adventure contest. 
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The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

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v ■/ f f /> 



The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first Simulations 
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Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



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I Name I 

I Address I 

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□ TheRainbowBook of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape f 9.95 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk $10.95 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 (book only) $19.95 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Package (2 disks) $31.00 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I $19.95 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) $ 7.95 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) $ 7.95 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures $13.95 

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□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) $14.95 

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□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) $ 5.95 

□ Guide to Statistics Package (indicate choice of tape or disk) $1 1 .95 
Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 

Outside U.S., add $4 per book 
Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 lo 8 weeks for delivery) T Ota I 



Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone [credit card orders only) call (800) 847- 
0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The flainboW Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. 
That is, they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape 
or disk, you will still need the appropriate book. OS-9® is a registered trademark of the Microware 
Systems Corporation. 



As you type in the listings this month, 
you'Jl notice that these programs use the 
procedures SetUpMouse and GetKISS- 
Mouse, which we published in Sep- 
tember. You'll also need KISSDrawCir- 
cle, KISSDrawLine and KISSDrawBar 
from last month's listings. KISSDraw2 
will run them if you click on the corres- 
ponding icon. 

You'll probably want to delete the 
lines that print the instructions on the 
screen after you know how to use each 
tool because KI5SDraw2 assumes you 
know how to use each tool. It does not 
erase the prompt lines like the proce- 
dure DrawDbjects did. 

We run KISSDraw in a 640-by-192 
pixel, Type 07, four-color window. 
Before you run them, you will need to 
merge the 5 YS^S tdFon ts, SYS/ 
StdPtrs and SYS^StdPats 4 files into 
an OS-9 graphics window. We do this in 
a procedure file we call from Startup. 

That's about it for October. Next 
month, we hope to add more to KISS- 
Draw. If you have ideas for KISSDraw 
or even a short procedure to add to it, 
drop it in the mail. In the meantime, be 
sure to join us in Princeton, New Jersey, 
for RAINBOWfest! □ 



054A 
054C 
054D 



0567 
0569 
056A 
0584 
0586 
0587 
059B 
059D 
059E 
05B2 
05B4 
05B5 
05C9 
05CB 
05CC 



05EP 
05E2 
05E4 



IF circle THEN RUN KISSDrawC IrcLe (mouse ) \circle :=FALSE \ RETURN 
ENDIF 

IF ellipse THEN RUN KISSDrawEllipse (mouse) \ellipse: -FALSE \ 

RETURN 
ENDIF 

IF bar THEN RUN KISSDrawBar(mouse) \bar: -FALSE \ RETURN 
ENDIF 

IF arc THEN RUN KISSDrawArc \arc : -FALSE \ RETURN 
ENDIF 

IF fill THEN RUN KISSDrawFill \fill: -FALSE \ RETURN 
ENDIF 

IF text THEN RUN KISSHandleText \text :-FALSE \ RETURN 
ENDIF 

IF freehand THEN RUN KISSFreehand \f reehand : =FALSE \ RETURN 



ENDIF 
RETURN 



Listing 3: KISSDrawBar 



9999 

002C 
004B 
0P4C 
006A 
P06B 

9999 
9991 



(* Program co draw a bar at location pointed 
(* to by high resolution mouse. 

(* Uses procedure KISSCetMouse 

TYPE regis ters=»cc , a , b , dp : BYTE ; x , y , u : INTECER 

TYPE rodent-Vld, Act , ToTm: BYTE ; XI : INTEGER ; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 
INTEGER ; CBSA , CBSB , CCtA , CCtB , TTSA ,TTSB, TLSA , TLSB : BYTE 



Model 101 
Interface $39.95 



Model 104 Deluxe 
Interface $51.95 



Model 102 
Switcher $35.95 



Model 105 
Switcher $14.95 





• Serial to parallel interlace 

• Works with any COCO 

• Compatible with "Centron- 
ics" parallel input printers 

• 6 switch selectable baud 
rates 300-600-1 200-2400- 
4800-9600 

• Small size 

4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 



Other Quality 
Items 

High quality 5 screw shell C- 
10 cassette tapes. $7.50/ 
dozen 

Hard plastic storage boxes for 
cassette tapes. $2.50/dozen 

Pin-Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00/1 00 
Colors $3.60/100 (specify 
red, blue, yellow, tan) 



Same features as 101 plus 

• Built in serial port for your 
modem or other serial device 

• Switch between parallel 
output and serial output 

• Size is 4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 

NEW! Cables for 
your COCO 

• U.L. listedfoil-shielded cable 

• 2 Types: male/female exten- 
sion cables (used between 
a serial device and existing 
cable) male/male cables 
(used between two serial 
devices such as a modem 
and one of our switchers). 

• 3 ft./$3.95, 6 ft./$4.49, 

10 ft./$5.59 Specify M/M 
or M/F and length. 



• Connect to your COCO 
serial port and have 3 switch 
selectable serial ports 

• Color coded indicator lights 
show switch position 

• Lights also serve as a 
power on indicator for your 
COCO 

• Heavyguageblueanodized 
aluminum cabinet with non- 
slip rubber feet 

The 101 and 104 require 
powertooperate. Mostprint- 
erscansupply powerto your 
interface (Star, Radio Shack 
and Okidata are just a few that 
do - Epson and Seikosha do 
not). The interfaces can also 
be powered by an AC adap- 
tor; Radio Shack model 273- 
1431 plugs into all models. If 
you require a power supply, 
add a"P"tothe model number 
and add $5.00 to the price. 
(Model 101P $44.95, Model 
104P $56.95). 



• Connects to your COCO 
to give you 2 switch select- 
able serial ports 

• 3 foot cable to connect to 
your COCO'S serial port 

• The perfect item to use to 
connect a printer and a 
modem to your COCO 

• Small jn size, only 4.5 x 2.5 
x 1.25 



The Model 101. 102, 104 and 
1 05workwith any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory 
size. These products are co- 
vered by a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101 and 104 work 
with any standard parallel 
input printer including Gemini, 
Epson, Radio Shack, 
Okidata, C. loth, Seikosha, 
Panasonic and many others. 
They support BASIC print 
commands, word processors 
and graphic commands. 

We manufacture these 
products - dealer inquiries 
are invited. 



Cassette Label 
Program $6.95 

• New Version - lape trans- 
ferable to disk - save and 
load labels from tape todisk 

• Prints 5 lines of information 
on pin-feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven, easy to use 

• Standard, expanded and 
condensed characters 

• Each line of text auto- 
matically centered. 

• Label display on CRT, en- 
abling editing before printing 

• Program comes on tape 
and is supplied with 24 
labels to get yon started 

• 16K ECB required 

Ordering 
Information 

Free shipping in the United 
States (except Alaska and 
Hawaii) on all orders over 
$50.00. Pleaseadd S2.50 for 
shipping and handling on or- 
ders under $50.00 
Ohio residents add 6% 
sales tax 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use 
your VISA or MASTERCARD 
or request CO D. (Please 
add $2.00 for CO. D orders). 
If you prefer, send check or 
money order; payable in U.S 

Funds to- 
Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 181 



Simple Solutions 



By David W. Ostler 



Here are possible answers to the 
exercises presented in "Basic for 
Beginners, Lesson 1" (September 
1987, Page 26). 

Exercise 1 

10 CLS : A=0 : PRINT : PRINT : INPUT" ENT 
ER DESIRED NUMBER" ; A 
20 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT"W 
ORKING " 

30 3^A*2 :FORX=1TO500STEP1:NEXT 
40 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT " 

TOTAL IS : " ; B 
50 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 
" HIT ANY KEY TO CONTINUE" 

60 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=""THEN60ELSE10 



Exercise 2 

10 CLS: PRINT :PRINT"ENTER YOUR NA 
ME: ":INPUTA$ 
15 PRINT"ENTER 
PUTB$ 

20 PRINT"ENTER 
1$ 

25 PRINT"ENTER 
TC2$ 

30 PRINT" ENTER 
3$ 

40 PRINT"ENTER 
MBER: ": INPUTD$ 
50 CLS I PRINT: PRINT" WORKING 

1! 

60 FORX=1TO500STEP1 : NEXT 

70 CLS : PRINT: PRINT" 1. YOUR NAME: 

": PRINT" " ;A$ : PRINT" 2 . YOUR AD 

DRESS: ": PRINT" " ; B$ : PRINT"3 . Y 

OUR CITY, ST, ZIP:":PRINT" "?C 

i$;"i ";C2$;", » ; C3 $ : PRINT" 4 . YO 

U PH. NO: " : PRINT" " ; D$ 

90 PRINT: PRINT" IS ALL DATA CORR 

ECT (Y/N)?" 

100 H$-INKEY$ : IFH$=""THEN100ELSE 
IFH$=" Y"THEN110ELSEIFH$="N"THEN1 
0ELSE100 

110 CLS: PRINT" YOU HAVE SUCCESSFU 
LLY DONE THIS PROGRAM. CONGRATUL 
ATIONSi i " : END 



f □□□□□□ 
□ □□□□□[ 
□□□□□□ 

□□□□□c 



YOUR ADDRESS : " : IN 
YOUR CITY":INPUTC 
YOUR STATE: " : INPU 
YOUR ZIP:":INPUTC 
YOUR TELEPHONE NU 



; X2,BDX,'BDY; INTEGER; Stat , Res : BYTE ; AcX , AcY , WRX , WRY : 
INTEGER 

9192 

0103 DIM Mouse: rodent 

DIM S tar tX, Start Y , CurrX, CurrY : INTEGER 

011F 

9129 (* Let's draw with a pencil cursor 

0142 

0143 RUN gfx2( M gcset'\ 202,2) 
0156 

0157 (* Enable XOR logic 
016B 

016C RUN gfx2("logic", "xor") 

017F 

0180 REPEAT 

0182 RUN getKISSmouse(Mouse) 

018C RUN gf x 2 ("putgc", Mouse. AcX, Mouse. AcY) 

01A9 UNTIL Mouse. CBSAO0 

01B7 

01B8 StartX:-Mous i. BDX 

01C3 StartY: -Mouse. BDY 

01 CE CurrX: -Mouse. AcX 

01D9 CurrY: -Mouse. BDY 

01E4 

01E5 RUN gfx2("setdptr M .Mouse. BDX, Mouse. BDY) 

0204 

0205 WHILE Mouse. CBSAO0 DO 
0214 RUN getKISSmouse (Mouse) 

021E IF CurrXOMouse . AcX OR CurrYOMouse . AcY THEN 

0239 TvUN gfx2 ( "box" , CurrX, CurrY) 

024E CurrX: -Mouse. AcX 

0259 CurrY: -Mouse. AcY 

0264 RUN gfx2(" box", CurrX, CurrY) 

0279 ENDIF 

027B RUN gfx2 ("putgc" , Mouse .AcX, Mouse .AcY) 

0298 ENDWHILE 

029C 

029D RUN gfx2( M logic M ,"off ") 

432B0 

02B1 RUN gfx2("bar", Mouse. AcX, Mouse. AcY) 

02CC 

02CD END 

02CF 

02D0 

Listing 4: KISSDrawLine 

9999 (* Program to draw a line at location pointed 

002D (* to by high resolution mouse . 

004C 

004D (* Uses procedure KISSGetMouse 

006B 

006C TYPE registers-cc,a,b,dp:BYTE; x , y , u : INTEGER 

0091 

0092 TYPE rodent-Vld, Act ,ToTm: BYTE; XI: INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE; TSSt : 

INTEGER ; CBSA , CBSB , CC t A , CC t B , TTSA , TTSB , TLSA ; TLSB : BYTE 
; X2 , BDX , BDY : INTEGER ; Stat , Res : BYTE ; AcX , AcY , WRX, WRY : 

INTEGER 

0103 

0104 DIM StartX,StartY, CurrX, CurrY: INTEGER 
0117 DIM Mouse: rodent 

0120 

0121 (* Let's draw with a pencil cursor 

0143 

0144 RUN gfx2("gcset",202,2) 
0157 

0158 RUN gfx 2 ("logic", "xor") 
016B 

01 6 C REPEAT 

016E RUN getKISSmouse (Mouse) 

0178 RUN gfx2( "putgc", Mouse. AcX, Mouse. AcY) 

0195 UNTIL Mouse. CBSAO0 

01A3 

01A4 StartX : -Mouse . BDX 

01AF StartY: -Mouse. BDY 

01BA CurrX: -Mouse. AcX 

01C5 CurrY : -Mouse . AcY 

01D0 

?1D1 RUN gfx2("setdptr", StartX, StartY) 

01EA 

01EB WHILE Mouse. CBS AO0 DO 

01FA 

01FB RUN getKISSmouse (Mouse) 

0205 

0206 IF CurrXOMouse .AcX OR CurrYOMouse . A'cY THEN 
0221 RUN gfx2("line" , StartX, StartY, CurrX, CurrY) 
0241 

0242 CurrX: -Mouse. AcX 



182 



THE RAINBOW October 1987 



0S9 LEVEL II 

SOFTWARE and BOOKS 

"Frank Hogg Laboratory has supported OS9 longer than ANY other company!!!" 



INSIDE OS9 
LEVEL II 

"Inside OS9 Level II is a gold mine. You'll 
learn more than you can ever remember 
about OS-9 system variables, the CoCo's 
GIMI, the file managers, the windows, the 
fonts, the descriptors and the bugs. It's a 
reference work extraordinaire! Buy it!" said 
Dale L Puckett , in the September 1987 
Rainbow . Dale is Co-Author of "The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II" 

Just $39.95 



DynaStar 3.4 

WORD PROCESSING 

Since 1981 DynaStar has been improved and 
enhanced to bring you the finest word processor 
available forOS9. DynaStar 3.4 is the same version 
available for OS9/68K with added windowing support. 
DynaStar 3.4 also supports any terminal(s) you may 
want to hook to your CoCo. Complete with the 
DynaForm text formatter and mail merge. 

Requires Level II OS-9 and 512K 

ONLY $150 

Upgrade to DynaStar 3.4 $50 



FONT EDITOR 

for OS-9 LEVEL II 

BY Chris Babcock 

CREATE NEW FONTS 
EDIT EXISTING FONTS 



This is a slick new package from a fellow you're going 
to be hearing alot about in the coming years. Now you 
can create or modify your character sets (fonts) to 
make them just the way you want. Req. L II and 512K 

ONLY $29.95 



=4 



The WIZ 

By Bill Brady 

The Wiz is the First and Only program designed for the 
CoCo III that uses WINDOWS! The Wiz is a smart terminal 
and communications program for the CoCo III and OS9 Level 
II. Making use of multiple windows and overlay windows with 
pop up dialog boxes The Wiz really shines. Features 
include: Autolog- lets you configure The Wiz's colors, 
characters boldface etc., Xmodem and text send and 
receive, sleep mode, conference mode uses a seperate 
window for your text, usage log and much more. Does not 
work with the CoCo's internal bit banger serial port. The 
complete package includes a special ACIA driver that allows 
baud rates from 300 to 19,200 baud. Requires the RS232 
pak or the Disto RS232 or similar port plus a CoCo IN with 
OS9 Level II and 512K. 

Only $79.95 



j. 



Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. Est. 1976 - 770 James Street - Syracuse New York - 13203 

315/474-7856 Telex 646740 Visa, M/C, Amex, Diners club accepted. Prices do not include shipping. 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter If it interests you. it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can beentered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
renumeration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 




1 84 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



f?24D Cur rY : -Mouse. Ac Y 

0258 

0259 RUN gfx2("line" , S tartX , Star tY , CurrX , CurrY) 

0279 ENDIF 

027B 

027C RUN gfx2("putgc" .Mouse. AcX, Mouse. AcY) 

0299 

029A ENDWHILE 
029E 

029F RUN gfx2("logic" ,"off") 

02B2 RUN gf x2 ( " line" .Mouse . AcX, Mouse . AcY) 

02CE 

02CF END 

02D1 

02D2 

Listing 5: KISSDrawCircle 

0000 (* Program to draw a circle at location pointed 

002F (* to by high resolution mouse. 

004E 

004F (* Uses procedure KISSGetMouse 

006D 

006E TYPE registers-cc,a,b.dp:BYTE; x , y . u : INTEGER 

0093 

0094 TYPE rodent-Vld, Act, ToTm: BYTE; XI: INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 

INTEGER; CBSA.CBSB, CCtA , CCtB , TTSA , TTS B ,TLSA , TLSB : BYTE 
; X2.BDX.BDY: INTEGER; Stat . Res : BYTE ; AcX , AcY , WRX , WRY : 

INTEGER 

0105 

0106 DIM Mouse: rodent 

010F DIM StartX.StartY, CurrX. CurrY: INTEGER 
0122 

0123 (* We'll use pencil cursor 

013E RUN gfx2<"gcset , \202,2) 
0151 

0152 (* Enable XOR logic, then 

016B (* let cursor follow mouse until button is pushed 
019C 

019D RUN gfx2< "logic" ,"xor") 
01B0 

01B1 REPEAT 

01B3 RUN getKISSmouse(Mouse) 

01BD RUN gf x2 ( " putgc " , Mouse . AcX , Mouse . AcY) 

01DA UNTIL Mouse. CBSAOy 

01E8 

01E9 StartX:-Mouse.BDX 

01F4 Start Y:=Mouse. BDY 

01FF CurrX: -Mous e . AcX 

020A CurrY: -Mouse. AcY 

0215 RUN gfx2("setdptr", StartX.StartY) 

022E 

022F 

0230 WHILE Mouse. CBSAO0 DO 

023F RUN getKISSmouse (Mouse) 

0249 IF CurrXOMouse .AcX OR CurrYOMouse . AcY THEN 

0264 RUN gfx2<"circle",ABS<CurrX-StartX)) 

027B CurrX: -Mouse. AcX 

0286 CurrY: -Mouse. AcY 

0291 RUN gfx2<"circle", ABS(CurrX-StartX)) 

02A8 ENDIF 

02AA RUN gfx2("putgc" .Mouse. AcX. Mouse. AcY) 

02C7 ENDWHILE 

02CB 

02CC RUN gfx2("logic , \ "off") 
02DF 

02E0 RUN gfx2( ,, circ3e",ARSCMouse . BDX- Mouse .AcX) ) 
02FD 

02FE END 

0300 

0301 



Listing 6: SetUpMouse 



0000 


(* 


This procedure uses the program 'SysCall' to 


002F 


(* 


do a set status call which sets up OS-9 to treat 


0062 


(* 


the Color Computer Mouse as a high resolution device 


0099 


<* 


using the right joystick port. Because, this change Is 


00D3 


(* 


systemvide, another program using the mouse later would 


010D 


(* 


also need to know how to use the optional high 


013F 


(* 


resolution mouse adapter. 


015B 






015C 


C* 


Since this set status call is also used to change the 


0194 


(* 


key repeat start constant and delay speed, It tells 


01CA 


(* 


OS-9 to leave those parameters unchanged. 


01F6 






01F7 


TYPE regis ters-cc ,a,b,dp : BYTE; x , y f u : INTEGER 


021C 







JJ21D DIM regs : registers 

0226 DIM callcode : BYTE 
022D 

022E (* Now set up the mouse parameters 

0251 regs.a:-0 

025C regs.b:-$9A 

0268 regs.x:-?0101 

0274 regs.y:-$FFFF 

0280 callcode:-$8E 
0288 

0289 RUN syscall(callcode,regs) 
0298 

0299 END 

029B 

029C 

Listing 7: GetKISSMouse 

0000 (-* Reads the present location of the mouse and 

&£2Z (* returns tha status of the button. 

0052 

0053 TYPE r egisters-cc , a , b , dp : BYTE ; x . y , u : INTEGER 
0078 

0079 TYPE rodent-Vld,Act,ToTm:BYTE; XI: INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE; TSSt:: 
INTEGER ; CBS A , C BSB , CC t A , CC t B , TTSA , TTSB , TLSA , TLSB i BYTE 
; X2.BDX.BDY: INTEGER; Stat , Res : BYTE; AcX , AcY , WRX , WRY : 
INTEGER 

00EA 

00EB DIM RegtsterSet:registers 

00FA DIM callcode : BYTE 

00FB PARAM Mouse: rodent 
010A 

0105 RegisterSet.a:-0 

0110 RegisterSet.b:-$89 

011C RagisterSet ,x:»ADDR(Mo^j»e) 

?l?.k RegisterSet.y:-l 

0135 

0136 callcode:-$8D 
013E 

013F RUN syscall(callcode .RegisterSet) 
01AE 

01AF END 

0151 

0152 



Listing 8: KISSFreeHand 

0000 (* Program to draw freehand with high resolution mouse 
0036 

0037 (* Uses procedure KISSGetMouse 
0055 

005 6 TYPE r egisters-cc, a, b, dp: BYTE; x.y.u: INTEGER 
007 B 

007 C TYPE rodent^Vld , Act , ToTm : BYTE ; XI: INTEGER; TTTo: BYTE; TSSt: 
INTEGER ; CBSA , CBSB , CCt A , CCtB , TTSA , TTSB , TLSA ,TLSB: BYTE 
; X2.BDX.BDY: INTEGER; Stat , Res : BYTE ; AcX. AcY.WRX, WRY: 
INTEGER 

00ED 

00EE DIM Mouse: rodent 

00F7 DIM StartX.StartY: INTEGER 

0103 (* Let's draw with a pencil cursor 
0125 

01.26 RUN gfx2("gcset'\ 202,2) 
0139 

013 A (* We must make sure we have turned on the 

016A (* the high resolution mouse 

0180 

0181 RUN Setupmou.se 

01B5 

0186 

0187 REPEAT 

0189 RUN getKISSMouse (Mouse) 

0193 RUN gfx2("putgc" ,Mouse . AcX , Mouse, AcY) 

01B0 UNTIL Mouse. CBSAO0 

01BE 

01BF StartX:=Mouse.AcX 

01CA StartY:=Mouse.AcY 

01D5 RUN gfx2("setdptr ".Mouse. BDX, Mouse . BDY) 
01FA 

01F5 WKILE Mous e . CBSAO.0 DO 

0204 RUN getKISSMouse (Mouse) 

020E RUN gfx2("line" , StartX.StartY, Mouse. AcX, Mouse. AcY) 



C0C0 Wizard 

(This is to the tune of The 
Who's "Pinball Wizard.") 

From Ft. Worth down to Pros- 
pect, I thought Fd seen 'em all, 
But I ain't seen nothing like it 
in any shopping mall, 

It's brand new from Tandy, it's 
Commodore's nightmare, 
That new little C0C0, sure runs 
some great software. 

I stand like a statue, become part 
of the machine, Pecking at the 
keyboard, Fm staring at the 
screen, 

This CoCo's so much fun, it's 
more than I can bear, That new 
little C0C0, sure runs some 
great software. 

He's a C0C0 Wizard, just watch 
his fingers fly, A C0C0 Wizard 
will hack until he dies, How do 
you think it does it — 1 don't 
know. What makes it so good? 

Can't run Lotus 1-2-3, but it 
burns with Dynacalc, And it 
beats it every time, just ask 
Lonnie Falk, 

That sixty-eight oh nine, no eight 
bit can compare, That new 
little CoCo, sure runs some 
great software. 

1 thought 1 was the home comput- 
er king, But 1 just handed my 
I/O crown to him. 

Even on my favorite program, his 
graphics are the best, I start by 
typing run, the GIME does the 
rest, 

OS-9 gives me more, multi-task if 
1 dare, That new little C0C0, 
sure runs some neat software. 



— Mark E. Sunderlin 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 85 




About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . . 

the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
one or two line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
nocalling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




1 86 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



0234 RUN gfx2( "putgc" .Mouse. AcX, Mouse .AcY) 

0251 StartX: =Mouse . AcX 

025C Start Y: -Mouse. AcY 

0267 ENDWHILE 

026B 

026C END 

026E 

026V 

Listing 9: KISSDrauEll ipse 

0000 (* Program which allows more natural drawing of ellipse 
0037 

0038 TYPE registers=cc,a,b,dp;BYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 
005D 

005E TYPE rodent-Vld,Act,ToTm:BYTE; xl: INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 
INTEGER ; cbsa ,cbsb, ccta, cctb , ttsa, ttsb , t lsa , tlsb : BYTE 
; x2 , bdx , bdy: INTEGER; stat ,res:BYTE; AcX , AcY , WrX, WrY: 
INTEGER 

00CF 

00D0 DIM Mouse : rodent 

00D9 DIM StartX, StartY, CurrX, CurrY: INTEGER 
00EC 

00ED (* We'll use pencil cursor 

0108 RUN gfx2("gcset", 202,2) 

011B RUN setupmouse 
011F 

0120 (* Enable XOR logic, then 

0139 (* let cursor follow mouse until button is pushed 
016A 

016B RUN gfx2("logic" , "xor") 
017E 

017F REPEAT 

0181 RUN getKISSmouse(Mouse) 

018B RUN gfx2("putgc" .Mouse. AcX, Mouse. AcY) 

01A8 UNTIL Mouse. cbsaO0 

01B6 

01B7 StartX : -Mouse . bdx 

01C2 Star tY: -Mouse .bdy 

01CD CurrX : -Mouse . AcX 

01DS CurrY : »Mous e . AcY 

01E3 RUN gfx2("setdptr", StartX, StartY) 

01FC 

01FD 

01FE WHILE Mouse. cbsaO0 DO 

020D RUN getKISSmouse (Mouse) 

0217 IF CurrXoMouse.AcX OR CurrYOMouse . AcY THEN 

0232 RUN gfx2("ellipse" , ABS(CurrX-StartX) , ABS.(CurrY-StartY) ) 



0253 CurrX: -Mouse. AcX 

025E CurrY: -Mouse. AcY 

0269 RUN gfx2("ellipse" , ABS (CurrX-StartX) .ABS(CurrY-StartY) ) 



028A ENDIF 

028C RUN gfx2("putgc" .Mouse. AcX, Mouse. AcY) 

02A9 ENDWHILE 

02AD 

02AE RUN gfx2 ("logic", "off") 

02C1 RUN gfx2( "ellipse" , ABS(Mouse . bdx-Mouse . AcX) , ABS (Mouse . bdy-Mouse . AcY 

)) 

02EE RUN gfx2("bell") 

02FA END 

02FC 

Listing 10: KISSDrawBox 

0000 (* Program to draw a box at location pointed 

002C (* to by high resolution mouse. 

004B 

004C (* Uses procedure KISSGetMouse 

006A 

006B TYPE registers-cc,a,b,dp:BYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 

0090 

0091 TYPE rodent-Vld .Ac t,ToTm: BYTE ; XI ; INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 

INTEGER; CBSA , CBSB , CCt A , CCtB , TTSA , TTSB , TLSA ,TLSB : BYTE 
; X2, BDX, BDY: INTEGER; Stat , Res : BYTE ; AcX, AcY, WRX, WRY: 
INTEGER 

0102 

0103 DIM Mouse:rodent 

010C DIM StartX, StartY, CurrX, CurrY: INTEGER 

011F 



0L20 (* Let's draw with a pencil cursor 
0U2 

0L43 RUN gfx2("gcset" ,202,2) 
0L56 

0L57 (* We must make sure we have turned on the 

0L8L (* the high resolution mouse 

0L9D 

0L9E RUN Setupmouse 
0U2 

01A3 (* Enable XOR logic 

01B7 / 

01B8 RUN gf x2(" logic ","xor") 

01CB 

01CC REPEAT 

01CE RUN getKISSmouse (Mouse) 

01D8 RUN gfx2("putgc" .Mouse. AcX.Mouse . AcY) 

0LF5 UNTIL Mouse. CBSA*c*0 

0204 StartX : -Mouse. BDX 

020F StartY:-Mouse.BDY 

02 LA CurrX: -Mouse. AcX 

0225 CurrY: -Mouse. BDY 

0230 RUN gfx2("setdptr'\ Mouse. BDX, Mouse. BDY) 
024F 

0250 WHILE Mouse . CBSAO0 DO 

025F RUN getKISSroouse(Mouse) 

0269 IF CurrXoMouse.AcX OR CurrYoMous e . Ac Y THEN 

0284 RUN gf x2 ("box", CurrX. CurrY) 

0299 Cur rX: -Mouse. AcX 

02A4 CurrY : -Mouse .AcY 

02AF RUN gfx2("box",CurrX,CurrY) 

02C4 ENDIF 

02C6 RUN gfx2("putgc", Mouse. AcX.Mouse. AcY) 

02E3 ENDWHILE 

02E7 

02E8 RUN gfx2( M logic'\ "off") 

02FB RUN gfx2 ( "box" .CurrX, CurrY) 

0310 RUN gfx2("bell") 
031C 

031D END 

031F 

0320 

Listing 11: KISSHandleText 

0000 0 V Procedure to type text at position 

0025 (* selected with graphics cursor 
0045 

0046 TYPE rodent-Vld, Act, ToTm: BYTE; XI: INTEGER; TTTo : BYTE ; TSSt: 
INTEGER ; CBSA , CBSB , CC tA , CCtB , TTSA , TTSB , TLSA , TLSB : BYTE 
; X2, BDX, BDY: INTEGER; Stat, Res : BYTE ; AcX , AcY , WRX, WR Y: 
INTEGER 

00B7 

00B8 DIM Mouse : rodent 

00C1 DIM CharPosX.CharPosY: INTEGER 

00CC DIM char: BYTE 

00D3 

00D4 (* We'll use the veritical bar cursor 

00FA (* that represents a text insert point 
0120 

0121 RUN gfx2("gcset",202,6) 
0134 

0135 REPEAT 

0137 RUN getKISSmouse (Mouse) 

0141 RUN gfx2( ,, putgc", Mouse. AcX, Mouse. AcY) 

015E UNTIL Mouse. CBSAO0 

016C 

016D (* Now we must translate the pixel position 

0198 (* returned to a character position 

01BB 

01BC CharPosX: -Mouse, AcX/8 

01CA CharPosY:-(2+Mouse.AcY)/8 
01DB 

01DC (* Now we can position the cursor 
01FD 

01FE RUN gfx2( M CurXY", CharPosX.CharPosY) 
0215 

0216 (* Make sure Echo is off 

022E SHELL "tmode -echo" 

023D WHILE charol3 DO \REM Carriage Return 

025B GET #0,char 

0264 PUT #l,char 

026D ENDWHILE 

0271 SHELL "tmode echo" 

027F END 

0281 

0282 

0283 




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the 15th of the month prior to 
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be responsible for sending 
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Your mailing label also 
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date. Please indicate this ac- 
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For Canadian and other non- 
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torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
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applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 




October 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 87 



Give it, and yourself, a break! Subscribe to rainbow on tape 
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© 




The typing time you save is time that you can spend enjoying your 
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Offers OS-9 Programs 

In addition to all the programs offered on tape, part 
of one side of the disk is formatted for the OS-9 
operating system program. That means you can now 
get all the OS-9 programs from the magazine — 
programs that cannot be put on tape. And, with the 
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of rainbow on disk are available beginning with 
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Look for our order envelope between pages 34 and 35 

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To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

■ 

Please note: While group purchases of rainbow ON tape and rainbow on disk are permitted (and multiple subscriptions are even discounted, if purchased in one order from a club), no license 
to make copies is conveyed or implied. Yes, your group may even purchase a subscription to our disk/tape services, but such purchase in no way authorizes that any copies be made of that original disk/tape. 
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Listing 12: KISSDrauFill 




WW 


(* Procedure to fill an area of the 






(* screen with a pattern selected 




jarjarAA 


(* with the high resolution mouse 




WS5 






0066 


TYPE rodent-Vld,Act,ToTm:BYTE; XI: INTEGER; TTTotBYTE; TSSt: 






INTEGER; CBSA.CBSB . CCtA , CCtB ,TTSA , TTSB ,TLSA ,TLSB : BYTE 






; X2,BDX,BDY: INTEGER; Stat , Res : BYTE ; AcX , AcY , WRX , WRY : 






INTEGER 




WW 








DIM Mouse: rodent 






DIM pointer , patternset : BOOLEAN 










JJ0ED 


patternset :-FALSE 






pointer :=-FALSE 










P0FA 


(* First, we must select the pattern ve want to fill with 




0133 


(* This means we must point to it 




0154 






0155 


WHILE NOT(pattemset) DO 




J315F 


REPEAT 




0161 


RUN getKISSMouse(Mouse) 




016B 


IF Mouse. AcX<40 THEN \REM pointer is true 




018C 


pointer: =TRUE 




0192 


RUN gfx2( "gcset" , 202 , 1 ) \REM pointer icon 




01B4 


ELSE 




01B8 


pointer :=FALSE 




01BE 


RUN gfx2 ("gcset ",202 , 5 ) \R£M Mark illegal position with icon 




01F3 


ENDIF 




01F5 


RON gfx2("putgc" .Mouse .AcX, Mouse . AcY) 




J32L2 


UNTIL Mouse, CBSAO0 




0220 






0221 


IF pointer THEN 




J322A 


IF Mouse. AcY>118 AND Mouse . AcY<l30 THEN 




J3243 


RUN gfx2 ("pattern" ,204 ,8) \pat ternset : =-TRUE \REM Large Dots 




026B 


ELSE IF Mouse. AcY>130 AND Mouse . AcY<lA2 THEN 




0287 


RUN gfx2 ( "pattern" ,20A , 3) \patternse t : =TRUE \REM Horizontal 


lines 


02B5 


ELSE 




02B9 


IF Mouse .Ac Y>1A2 AND Mous e . AcY<l 5A THEN 




02D2 


RUN gfx2("pattem" ,204,2) \pa t terns e t : =TRUE \REM Vertical 


lines 


02FE 


ELSE 




0302 


IF Mouse. AcY>15A AND Mouse . AcY<l 66 THEN 




031B 


RUN gfx2("pattern" ,204 ,6) \pa tternse t :=TRUE \REM 






Right Slanted Lines 




034C 


ELSE 




0350 


IF Mouse. Ac Y>166 THEN 




035F 


RUN gfx2("pattem" ,204,5) \pa ttemse t : -TRUE \REM 






Left Slanted Lines 




038F 


ELSE 




0393 


RUN gfx2("pattem" ,0,0) \REM make sure pattern is solid 


03C5 


patternset : -FALSE 




03CB 


ENDIF 




03CD 


ENDIF 




03CF 


ENDIF 




03D1 


ENDIF 




03D3 


ENDIF 




03D5 


ENDIF 




03D7 


ENDWHILE 




03DB 






03DC 


(* We have the pattern now 




03F6 


(* Let's do actual fill 




0A0D 






0A0E 


REPEAT 




0410 


RUN getKISSMouse(Mousc) 




0A1A 


■ 




0ALB 


IF Mouse.AcX<A0 OR Mouse.AcY<10 THEN 




0A3A 


RUN gfx2("goset'\202 . 1) \REM pointer is true 




0A59 


ELSE 




0A5D 


RUN gfx2("goset" ,202, 3) \REM Use Cross Hair on drawing screen 




0493 


ENDIF 




0495 






0A96 


RON gfx2("putgc", Mouse. AcX, Mouse .AcY) 




0AB3 


UNTIL Mouse. CBSAO0. AND Mouse. AcX>^0 




0ACB 






0AGC 


RUN gfx2("f ill", Mouse. AcX, Mouse. AcY) 




0AE8 


RUN gfx2("pattem n , 0,0) \REM We must always reset to solid pattern 




0525 


END 




-0527 






Listing 13: KISSDrauflrc 




0000 


<* To be completed at a later date *) 




0025 


END 





Hint . _ 

80-Column EDTASM+ 

By now. most people know that Disk 
EDTASM+ can be used in the 80- 
column mode of the Color Computer 3. 
AM you have to do is set up your screen 
before entering RUN"D05". However, it 
is even easier to boot EDTAS M+ in an 
80-column mode. Just load the DOS 
program from disk. You can then edit 
this basic program as you please. Just 
add a line somewhere near the begin- 
ning that sets up the 80-column width 
and whatever color selections you 
might want. When finished, just resave 
the program. Make sure you perform 
this procedure on a backup and not on 
your original EDTASM+ master. 

You will still not be able to see what 
the DOS program displays when you 
are in the 80-column mode so you will 
have to remember the keystrokes neces- 
sary to execute EDTASM+. An easy 
way to do this is to rename the ED- 
TAS M+ program to something like E. 
After running DOS, wait for the drives 
to stop. Then press 2, which will cause 
DOS to execute a program. The next 
time the drives stop, just press E and 
ENTER. Thai's all there is to it. 

Marc Gagnon 
Cap-cle-la- Madeleine, Quebec 



Hint . . . 

Changing Color Sets 

Now that you've settled in with your 
CdCo 3, have you ever wondered how 
to change to the alternate artifact color 
set without having to hold down Fi and 
press reset? Here's how you can do it. 

If you are at the OK prompt (i.e., if 
the computer is not presently under 
control of a program), jusl enter POKE 
&HE033,32. You will immediately 
change color sets. To gel back to the 
original set, enter POKE &HE033,0. 

If you want to change sets from 
within a program, put POKE 
S.HFF'BEl , 32 at the appropriate point in 
the program. To return, use POKE 
&HFF9e,0. What you are essentially 
doing in both cases is inverting the burst 
phase of the video signal. 

One more hint: Many programs that 
prompt you for a color change will 
continue the moment you press Fi, 
thereby not allowing you to change 
color sets. The solution is to hold in the 
reset button, before pressing fi, then 
press and hold down Fi. While holding 
Fi, release the reset button. 

Will C. Power 
Coiopaxi, CO 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 189 



Racksellers 



The retail stores listed below carry the rainbow on a regular basis 
and may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer 
users. We suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Phoenix 
Sierra Vista 
Tempe 
Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayetteville 
Ft, Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Citrus Heights 
Grass Valley 
Halt Moon Bay 
Hollywood 

Sacramento 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Sunnyvale 

DELAWARE 

Middletown 

Milford 

Wilmington 

FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Cocoa 

Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 
Jacksonville 

North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Park 
Starke 

Tallahassee 
Tltusville 

GEORGIA 

Bremen 
Jesup 
Marietta 
Toccoa 

IDAHO 

Moscow 

ILLINOIS 

Aurora 
Belleville 
Champaign 
Chicago 



Chlllicothe 
Danville 



Jefferson News Co 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 

Electronic World 

1'RI-TEK Computers 
Livingston's Books 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Software Plus 
Advance Radio. Inc. 
Strawflower Electronics 
Levity Distributors 
Polygon Co. 
Tower Magazine 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Computer Literacy 

Delmar Co. 

Milford Newsstand 

Normar, Inc.— The Smake Shop 

Software, Software, Inc. 
The Open Door 
Software Plus More 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
The Book Nook 

White's of Downtown Bookstore 

Almar Bookstore 
Boyd-Ebert Corp. 
Anderson News Co. 
Wolfs Newsstand 
Record Junction. Inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Anderson News Co. 
Computrac 

Bremen Electranics/Radlo Shack 

Radio Shack 

Act One Video 

Martin Music Radio Shack 



Johnson News Agency 

Kroch's 8c Brentono's 
Software or Systems 
Book Market 
B. D'blton Booksellers 

N, Wabash St. 

West Jackson St. 
Bob's in Newtown 
Bob's News Emporium 
Bob's Rogers Pork 
Book Market 

Eost Cedar 

North Cicero 

West Diversey 
E.B. Garcia & Associates 
Kroch's 8c Brentano's 

South Wabash 

West Jackson 

516 N. Michigan 

835 N Michigan 
Parkway Drugs 
Parkwest Books 
Sandmeyer's Bookstore 
Univ. af Chicago Bookstore 
Univ. of Illinois Bookstore 
Videomat, Inc. 
Book Emporium 
Book Market 



ILLINOIS (cont'd) 



Decatur 


Book Emporium 




K-Mart Plaza 




Northgate Mall 


East Moline 


Book Emporium 


Evanston 


Chicago-Main News 


Geneseo 


B & J Supply 


Kewanee 


Book Emporium 


Lisle 


Book Nook 


Newton 


Bill's TV Radio Shack 


Oak Brook 


Kroch's 8c Brentano's 


Oak Park 


Kroch's 8c Brentano's 


Paris 


Book Emporium 


Peoria 


Book Emporium 




Sheridan Village 




Wesftake Shopping Center 




Book Market 




Illinois News Service 


Schaumberg 


Kroch's 8c Brentano's 


Skokie 




Springfield 


Book Emporium 




Sangamon Center North 




Town 8c Country Shopping Ctr. 


Sunnyland 


Book Emporium 


West Frankfort 


Paper Place 


Wheeling 


North Shofe Distributors 


INDIANA 




Angola 


D 8c D Electronics 




Radio Shack 


Berne 


White Cottage Electronics 


Columbus 


Micro Computer Systems. Inc. 


Garrett 


Finn News Agency, Inc. 


Greenwood 


The Computer Experience 


Indianapolis 


Bookland. Inc. 




Delmar News 




Indiana News 


Jasper 


Elex Mart 


Madison 


Arco Office Supplies 


Martinsville 


Radio Shack 


Wabash 


Mittlng's Electronics 


IOWA 




Davenport 


Interstate Book Store 


Ottumwa 


Southside Drug 


KANSAS 




Topeka 


Palmer News. Inc. 




Town Crier of Topeka, Inc 


Wellington 


Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 


Wichita 


Amateur Radio Equipment Ca. 




Lloyd's Radio 


KENTUCKY 




Hazard 


Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 


Hopkinsville 


Hobby Shop 


Paducah 


Radio Shack 


LOUISIANA 




Manroe 


The Book Rack 


MAINE 




Bangor 


Magazines, Inc. 


Brockton 


Voyager Bookstore 


Caribou 


Radio Shack 


Sanford 


Radio Shack 


MASSAC HUSETTS 




Brockton 


Voyager Bookstore 


Cambridge 


Out Of Town News 


Fitchburg 


Corners Book Shop 


Ipswich 


Ipswich News 


Littleton 


Computer Plus 


Lynn 


North Shore News Co. 


Swansea 


Newsbreak. Inc. 


MICHIGAN 




Allen Park 


Book Nook, Inc. 


Durand 


Robbins Electronics 


Harrison 


Harrison Rodio Shack 


Howell 


Howell Auto Parts 


Lowell 


Curt's Sound 8c Home Arcade Center 


Muskegon 


The Eight Bit Corner 


Peny 


Perry Computers 


Royal Oak 


Software City 


Sterling 




Heights 


Sterling Book Center 


Wyoming 


Gerry's Book Co. 


MINNESOTA 




Duluth 


Carlson Books 


Minneapolis 


Read-More News 


Willmar 


The Photo Shop 



Ray's TV 8c Radio Shack 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Computer Xchange 
FrontPage News 
Bailey's TV 8c Radio 

Plaza Book Store 

Consumer Electronics of Whitef ish 
Nelson News 



MISSOURI 

Farmington 
Jeffeison City 
Kirksvllle 
Moberly 
St. Louis 



St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Butte 
Whitefish 

NEBRASKA 

Omaha 



NEVADA 

Las Vegas Hurley Electronics 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 

West Lebanon Verham News Corp. 

NEW JERSEY 

Cedar Knolls 
Clinton 
Marmora 
Pennsvllle 
River Edge 
Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 



NEW YORK 

Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmlra Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Falls 
Johnson City 
New York 



N. White Plains 
Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhaven 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Aberdeen 

Cary 

Charlotte 

Havlock 
Hickory 
Marion 

OHIO 

Blanchester 
Canton 
Chardon 
Cincinnati 
Columbiana 
Columbus 
Dayton 

Fa'iTbom 

Kent 
Kenton 
Lakewood 
Lima 



Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 
Outpost Radia Shack 
Dove's Elect. Rodio Shack 
Software City 
Software Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Desert Moon Distributors 
Front Page Newsstand 
Page One Newsstand 

Lift Bridge Book Shop. Inc. 
Cromland, Inc. 
Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 
On Line: Computer Access Center 
GA West 8c Co. 
Unicom Electronics 
Bomes 8c Noble— Sales Annex 
Coliseum Books 
Eostem Newsstand 
Grand Central Station. Track 37 
200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1) 
55 Water Street 
Worid Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonll Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Usercom Systems. Inc. 
Walden Books 
Worldwide Media Services 
Software City 

Universal Computer Service 
Village Green 
World Wide News 
Spectrum Projects 

King Electronics 
Radio Shack 

News Center in Cary Village 
Newsstand Inf i 
Papers 8c Paperback 
Computer Plus 
C 2 Books 8c Comics 
Boomers Rhythm Center 



JR Computer Control 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio 8c TV 
Clnsott 

Fidelity Sound 8c Electronics 
B5 Software 

Huber Heights Book 8c Card 
Wilke News 
News-Readers 
Wilke's University Shoppe 
The News Shop 
T.W. Hogan 8c Associates 
Lakewood international News 
Brunner News Agency 
Edu-Caterers 



190 THE RAINBOW October 1987 



OHIO (cont'd) 

Miamisburg 
Mount Orab 
Rocky River 
Toledo 
Woodsfield 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 
Allison Park 
Altoona 
Brookville 
Malvern 
Philadelphia 

Phoenixville 
Pittsburgh 
Pleasant Hills 
Temple 
Wind Gop 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Warwick 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Gofrney 
Greenville 
Spartonburg 
Union 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 



Wilke News 

Mount Orab Radio Shack 

Programs Unlimited 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Day Appliance & TV/Radio Shock 

Dealer 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales. Inc dba Radio, Shack 

Steve's Book Store 



CANADA; 
ALBERTA 



Dickson 
Knoxville 
Memphis 

Smyrna 
Union City 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Brenhom 
Elgin 

VIRGINIA 

Gafton 
Norfolk 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 
Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Milwaukee 



Minocqua 
Racine 

WYOMING 

Casper 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Kingsford 



Fifth Ave, News 

Owl Seivices 
Soflware Ci1y 
Newborn Enterprises 
Larry's Stereo Shop 
Personal Soflware 
City Software Center 
Newsy 

Stevens Rodio Shock 
All-Pro Souvenlers 
Pitt Computer & Soflware 
Software Corner 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 

Soflware Conneclion 

Soflware Haus. Inc. 
Goffney Book Store 
Palmetto News Co. 
Soflware City 
Fleming's Electronics 

Anderson News Co 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Computer Center 
Softwore. Inc. 
Delker Electronics 
Cox ElectTonics Radio Shack 

Poncho's News 
Moore's Electronics 
The Homing Pigeon 

Electronics Mo/keting 
l-O Computers 

Adams News Co.. Inc. 
B & I Magozines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 



Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 

Cudahy News & Hobby 

Book Tree 

Booked Solid 

Booked Solid II 

Harvey Schwart2 Bookshop 

Univ. of Wisconsin Bookshop 

Island Technologies 

Little Professor Book Center 

The Computer Store 



Information Telecommunlcationes 

Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff 


Banff Radio Shack 


Of Ull 1 1 IKJl o 


L & K Snorts & Musir 

L W l\ O^JvJI PO Ok IVIUOI(~ 


dui H iyviiit> 


Paul Tercler 




Double "D" AS.C. Radio Shack 


Cnlnniv 
vuiyui y 


Billy's News 


Claresholm 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


Drayton Valley 


Lcngcrd Electronics 


Edmonton 


CMD Micro 


Edson 


Radio Shack 


Faiiview 


D.N.R. Furniture & TV 


Fox Creek 


Fox City Color & Sound 




AS.C. Radio Shack 


Ft. Saskatche- 




wan 


Ft. Mall Radio Shack. ASC 


Grande 




Cache 


The Stereo Hut 


Grande 




Centre 


The Book Nook 


Hlnton 


Jim Cooper 


Innisfail 


L & S Stereo 


Leduc 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


Lethbridge 


Datatron 


Lloydminster 


Lloyd Radio Shack 


Okotoks 


Okotoks Radio Shack 


Peace River 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 




Tavener Software 


St. Paul 


Walter's Electronics 


Stettler 


Stettler Radio Shack 


Strathmore 


Wheatland Electronics 


Taber 


Pynewood Sight & Sound 


Westlock 


Westlock Stereo 


Wetasklwln 


Radio Shack 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Burnaby 


Compultt 


Burns Lake 


vr. Video Works 


Campbell 




River 


TRS Electronics 


Chilliwack 


Charles Pqrker 


Coortenay 


Rick's Music & Stereo 


Dawson Creek 


Bell Radio & TV 


Golden 


Taks Home Furnishings 


Kelowna 


Telesoft Marketing 


Langley 


Langley Radio Shack 


N, Vancouver 


Microwest Distributors 


Nelson 


Oliver's Books 


Parksville 


Parksvilie TV 


Pentlcton 


DJ.'s 




Four Coiner Grocery 


Sidney 


Sidney Electronics 


Smithers 


Woll's Home Furniture 


Squamlsh 


Kotyk Electronics 


100 Mile 




House 


Tip Top Radio & TV 



MANITOBA 




Altona 


LAWIebr Ltd. 


Lundar 


Goranson Elec. 


Morden 


Central Sound 


The Pas 


Jodi's Sight & Sound 


Selkirk 


G.L Enns Elec. 


Virden 


Archer Enterprises 


Winnipeg 


J & J Electronics Ltd. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 




Moncton 


Jeffries Enterprises 


Sussex 


Dewitt Elec. 


NEWFOUNDLAND 




Botwood 


Seaport Elec. 


Carbonear 


Sbde Realties 






Halifax 


All V 

Atlantic News 


ONTARIO 




Angus 


Micra Computer Seivices 


Aurora 


Compu Vision 


Concord 


Ingram Software 


Exceter 


J. Macleane & Sons 


Hanover 


Modem Appliance Centre 


Huntsville 


Huntsvllle Elec. 


Kenorc 


Donny "B" 


Kingston 


T.M. Computers 


Llstowel 


Modern Appliance Centre 


South River 


Max TV 




Dennis TV 


QUEBEC 




LaSalle 


Messagerles de Presse Benjamin Enr. 


Pont. Rouge 


Boutique Bruno Laroche 


SASKATCHEWAN 




Asslnlboia 


Telstar News 


Estevan 


Kotyk Electronics 


Moose Jaw 


D&S Computer place 


Nlpiwan 


Cornerstone Sound 


Regina 


Regina CoCo Club 




Software Supermarket 


Saskatoon 


Everybody's Software Library 


Shellbrooke 


Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 


Tisdale 


Paul's Service 


Unity 


Grant's House of Sound 


YUKON 




Whitehorse 


H & O Holdings 


JAPAN 




Tokyo 


America Ada Inc 


PUERTO RICO 




San Juan 


Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, 
and selected Coles Bookstores, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore 
Books, Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, 
Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & 
Brentano's, and Community Newscenters. 



October 1987 THE RAINBOW 191 



Advertiser's Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



Alpha Products 21 

Boiling Spring 

Lakes Software 135 

Cer-Comp 137 

Cinsoft 175 

Clearbrook Software 

Group 117 

CNR Engineering 91 

CoCotronics 47 

Cognitec 45 

Colorware 23 

Computer Center 35 

Computer Island 133 

Computer Plus 3 

Computerware 65 

Computize 24, 25 

D.P. Johnson 177 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

Diecom IFC, IBC 

DISKMASTER, INC 85 

Disto 105 

Elegant Software 77 

Fazer Electronics 27 

Frank Hogg Laboratory 37, 183 

Gimmesoft 153 

Hard Drive Specialists 93 

Hawkes Research 

Services 161 

HJL 57 

Howard Medical 34, 194 

ICR Futuresoft 33 

J & M Systems 77, 109 

J & R Electronics 146 

Kelly Software 

Distributors 69 

Metric Industries 181 

Micro Works, The 171 

Microcom Software . . .9, 11, 13, 15 
Microtech Consultants 

Inc 61 

MicroWorld 125 

Other Guys Software, The 73 



Owl-Ware 87, 88, 89 

Paparis Enterprises 39 

Performance Peripherals 119 

Perry Computers 16 

Preble's Programs, Dr BC 

Prickly-Pear Software 99 

PXE Computing 7 

Rainbow Bookshelf 180 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 52 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk ....188 

RAINBOWfest 122, 123 

Robotic Microsystems 155 

RTR Development Systems 165 

Saint John's Gallery 69 

Sardis Technologies 173 

SD Enterprises 85 

SEESOF 27 

Seibyte Software 131 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 
(502) 228-4497 



□ Call: 

Jack Garland 

Garland Associates, Inc. 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

(617) 749-5852 



□ Call: 

Kim Vincent 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 



Software House, The 95 

SpectroSystems 149 

Spectrum Projects Inc 17, 67 

Speech Systems 40, 41, 42, 43 

Sugar Software 193 

Sundog Systems 63 

Sunrise Software 1 74 

T & D Software 112, 113, 147 

Tandy/Radio Shack 49, 51 

Tepco 169 

TMM/Hemphill Electronics ....179 

Tom Mix Software 159 

True Data Products 54, 55 

Vidicom Corporation 75 

Wasatchware 175 

William Brigance 139 

Woodstown Electronics 71 

Zebra Systems 157 




1 92 THE RAINBOW October 1987 




nr. 



Ftware 



JNEW CF 089 CATCHER - (c) This is a useful utility for your 0S9 Level I or 
II system. It allows you to modify the contents of a file or memory module using easy to 
understand commands^ Data may be displayed and entered in either decimal, hexadecimal, 
octal or ascii characters. Module CRCs calculated and patched automatically Patch 
command files may be used as input to the Patcher and patch command files can be 
generated from an original and already patched file. Disk onlv: OS9 Level I or II: $19.95. 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Calligrapher - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) 
Turn your CoCo and dot-matrix printer 
into a calligrapher's quill. Make beautiful 
invitations, flyers, certificates, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are l /a 
inch high and variably spaced. Works with 
many printers including Epson, Gemini, 
Radio Shack, Okidata 92A, Banana and 
Prowriter. Additional fonts are available 
(see below). Tape/Disk; $24.05. 

OSQ Calligrapher - (c) Although a 
different program from the CoCo Calligra- 
pher, the OS9 Calligrapher prints all the 
same fonts. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and formatting direc- 
tives. You may specify the font to use, 
change fonts at any time, centering left, 
right or full justification, line fill, margin, 
line width, page size, page break and in- 
dentation. Similar to troff on UNIXtm sys- 
tems. Includes Gay Nineties, Old English 
and Cartoon fonts. Additional fonts are 
available (see below). Disk only; OS9 Level 
I or II; $24.05. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $14.05 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - f8 fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
way; Set #3- - (8 fonts) Antique and Busi- 
ness; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West and 
Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, He- 
brew and Victorian; Set #ft - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; speci- 
fy RSDOS or OS9; 20.05: Font Pack- 
age #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 
fonts) on one disk. Font Package #2 - 
Above font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on 
one disk. Both Packages #1 and #2 (51 
fonts) on one disk; 40.05. "^D NEW 



NEW O- Calligrapher Combo 
Package - Everything!; specify RSDOS or 
OS9; Includes the Calligrapher and both 
Font Packages on one disk: $ftft.Q5. 



UTILITIES 

Piratector - (ioo% ML) Utility to allow 
your own disk-based BASIC or ML pro- 
grams to display a graphics title screen 
and then self-start after loading. Adds 
copy protection to your programs but still 
allows users to create non- executable back- 
ups! Includes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo 

1, 2, 3 (except Semigraf); $39.05. 

Super Screen Machine - (ioo9S ML) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. Smooth 
scroll, key click, lower case with colored 
characters. Tape/Disk; 32K CB; CoCo 1, 

2, 3 (except f^4K mode); $10.05. 



Color Disk Manager - (ioo% ml) Disk 
utility with these features: Disk repair, 
selective track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except for 64K 
mode); $24.05. 

Color Tape Manager - (ioo% ML) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert ML programs into BASIC MATA 
statements, append ML to BASIC, load, 
display/ modify and save tape file, handles 
missing EOF and filename blocks, much 
more! Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3 
(except for 64K mode); $10.05. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (Hybrid basic/ml) Tape or disk, 
fast and simple general data base program. 
Create files of records that can be quickly 
sorted, searched, deleted and updated. 
Powerful printer formatting. Up to 8 user 
fields, sort on up to 3 fields. Tape/Disk; 
$10.05 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Mall - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Tape or 
Disk based mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 1, 
2 or 3 across, 2Vz to 4 inches wide. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Utility 
companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail to al- 
low multi-term search [ANB and OR log- 
ic), global change and delete, split large 
files and more! Tape/Disk; $14.05 (see 
combo pkg below). 

TIMS Combo Package - All three of the 
above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail and 
TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.05. 

SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer. Disk only; $10.05 each. 

EDUCATIONAL 



NEW CT Trig Attack - (ioo9Sml) In 
this educational arcade game, enemy 
trigs travel along math curves. Players 
learn important mathematical concepts 
as they play. Trig Attack is filled with 
sound effects, colorful graphics and 
features 11 challenging levels. First class 
mathematical entertainment for ages 9 
and up. Excellent manual includes an in- 
troduction to trigonometry. Tape 16K 
CB/Disk 32K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3; 



Silly Syntax - (Hybrid basic/ml) Ages 5 and 
up. Story creation game; output to screen 
or printer; includes 2 stories or create your 
own. Tape/Disk; $10.05 or disk with 62 
stories for $20.05. Sets of 10 stories on 
tape/disk for $4.05: Fairy Tales, Current 
Events, X-Rated, Sing-Along, Adventure, 
Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
BASIC/ML) Ages 4 & up. A graphics adven- 
ture game for young children & their fami- 
lies. Old testament. Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

The Presidents of the USA - (ioo% ml) 
Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, user 
modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $10.05. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 and up. Trivia 
game of the 50 states. Capitals, nick- 
names, abbreviations, flowers, trees and 
birds. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $10.05. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist bo the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word vo- 
cabulary. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $10.05. 

PreReader - (Hybrid basic/ml) Ages 3-5 
(level I); Ages 5-7 (level 2); Great graphics 
and music. Level 1: match colors, shapes, 
letters and numbers; Level 2: match letters 
and consonant blends with their sounds. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $10.05. 

Statgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
print graph with screen print program 
(not supplied); Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
pense categories. This program may be lax 
deductible, Disk only; $20.05. 

Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations common- 
ly used in design or evaluation of land 
mobile radio systems, satellite TV, etc. 
Tape/Disk; $10.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set-in Sleeve; 3 weights 
or yarn; 8 sizes from baby to man. 
Tape/Disk; $10.95. 

Flying Tigers - (100% ml) Fast Defenders 
style arcade game. 5 levels of difficulty; 
Outstanding graphics and sound edects. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $10.05. 



A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
ICAt 




*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and 3, 3SK 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.5i per tape or disk for postage and handling. 
Florida residents add 5% sales tax. COD orders 
add $4. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders generally 
shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds or exchanges 
without prior authorization. 




Save $200 on Magnavox Monitors 
Magnavox 8CM643 RGB Analog only $385!! 





MONITORS 



1230 A 12" 

This 12" green screen high resolution 
monitor offersSO column capability. Zenith 
quality and a 90-day warranty valid at any 
of Zenith's 1200 locations. 



$125 

BRAND NEW 



122A Zenith 12" Amber Screen offers 
the same 640 dots x 200 lines reso- 
lution at 15MHz and a 90-day war- 
ranty valid at 1200 locations. 



$88 



(S7 shipping) 

MAGNAVOX 
8 CM 515 ^ 

analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB 
for Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and 
composite color f or CoCo 2 and 3. 
Built-in speaker. 14" screen with 
640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 
2 years parts and labor warranty. 

reg. list S499 

SAVE 
$200 



Retail $199 
Our price 
($7 shipping) 

Ail monitors require an amplifier cir- 
cuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer. 
They attach with spring connectors 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one for audio and one for 
video. CoCo 3 does not require an 
amplifier circuit. 

VA-1 for monochrome monitors only, 
fits all color computers 



$24. 4 5 

>me or color, fits all 

$39- 45 



$298 




+ $14 Shipping 

CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable. 

only $19.95 with 

Magnavox Monitor order. 



($2 shipping) 

VC-4 for monochrome or color, fits all 
color computers 
($2 shipping) 

MAGNAVOX 

CM 8505 has analog RGB 
and TTL RGB and composite 
color input. Built in speaker. 13" 
screen with 390 dots x 240 reso- 
lution in RGB mode. Plus 1 year 
parts & labor warranty. 

reg. list «299 

SAVE 
$79 



$29.95 w/o monitor. 



$220 

+ S14 Shipping 




DRIVE o + ■ Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for onlv. Double sided double density 360 



$17845 

($5 shipping) 
Add $34 for a Disto PC-3. 




GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee i s meant to eliminate the uncertainty- 
of dealing with a company through the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compatibility. If you Ye not happy with it for any 
reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) 

Shipping charges are for 46 states. 
APO, Canada and Puerto Rico orders slightly higher. 



DISK CONTROLLER 

A* 




includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. DISTO 

$98 DC-3 A 

$2 shipping on all DiSTO products 



ADD-ON BOARDS 



DC-38 includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and all 
software $138 

DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM $QQ 



DC512 512K 
software 



RAM 



Board with 

$125 



DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port Q 



DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer in- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips Q $55 

2764 6K Eprom 28 pin 

*8 50 each 

27128 16K Eprom 28 pin 

«8so each 

C-DOS 3 26 pin Eprom makes Disto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

$20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 



Payrol/BAS 



($2 shipping) 

• Nonprotected basic modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
federal calculation 

• Custom code for every state (*25 option) 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register Includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 

• Print payroll and nonpayroll 
checks 



Payrol/BAS™ 
30 Day Trial 

$29.95 



VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package in- 
cludes VIP writer terminal, data 
base, call and disk zap which can 
fix a diskette that is giving I/O 
errors 



$125 



($2 shipping) 



MEMORY 

Memory for CoCo 3 PC memory 
board plugs into the spare slots in- 
side the computer and can be 
populated with 256K ram chips. 
Completely solderless with com- 
plete easy to install instructions. 

$49.50 

PC Memory board with 512K *99 

Software spooler and RAM disk 

for lightning quick response or no 
disk swapping drive backup for 1 
drive system and printer spooler to 
free computer during long listings. 

$19.45 

($2 shipping on Memory 
products) 



64-2 for CoCo 2. Kit requires one 
solder point, no trace cuts. 

($2 shipping) $24.45 

64-E1 for E Boards with complete 
instructions. Remove old chips 
and replace with preassembled 
package— no soldering or trace 
cuts. 

( s - shipping) 28.45 

64-F1 for F Boards. No soldering 
needed. Capacitor leads must be 
cui. 

(S2 shipping) §24.45 

64-22 Two chip set for 26-3134A 
and B, 26-3136A and B. Koren Col- 
or Computers require 1 solder 
point. 

($2 shipping) 28.45 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 

^^^^^1 ORDERS INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

y}={] | (800) 443-1444 =(312) 278-1440 



Shuwruoin Hours: 
4:00 - 'i" Mun, - Fri, 
10:00 - 3:00 Sal. 



WE ACCEPT; VISA ♦ MASTERCARD ♦ AMERICAN EXPRESS 
C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO.'S 





flea 1 






#2s 




SEE FRONT COVER 

FOR OTHER OtECOM GAMES 




DR. PREBLE'S 
PROGRAMS 



Introducing PYRAMIX 

For i) our Cotor Computer 3 ! 



Product of 
CoJorVenture 



Now, PYRAMU, for your CoCo 3, is a source 



The Pyrsmid has long been associated with mystery ond power, 
endless arcade fun, 

PYRAMIX is a 100% machine language game written exclusively to take advantage of all the power in your 128K 
CoCo 3. The colors are brilliant, the graphics sharp, the action hot. 



HI* H 1 HCifttt 



The object of 
indicated color. 



PYRAMIX looks deviously simple. Just change the tops of the klocks in the pyramid to the 
But the accomplishment can be elusive! 



Palling boulders, Che relentless pursuit of the Snake, the slow moving "death square" and precipitous falls 
challenge you from all sides. Then there's that little sneak with sunglasses, who undoes your hard-earned 
color changes if you don'c catch him. 

It's all quite moddeningl As you reach more challenging levels, you'il find that you need to hop on the 
squares not once but twice in order to chnnya their color. Or, worse yet, hopping on a square you already 
visited might undo the work you've just done. 

But you do hove saaw help in PYRAMU. There are elevator discs. Hop on one and it will take you to the top, 
possibly luring the greedy Snake over the edgel If you catch a Time-Stopper Orb, time will freeze, allowing 
uninterrupted work for while. 

PYRAMIX features the finest in animation, graphics, sound effects and game play available today. It has all 
the extras you want, too, such as a pause option, RGB and CMP modes, keyboard or Joystick play, help screen, 
nultiple skill level, and the ability to backup your disk. 

Beat of all 1b the low price! Available today, for only $24.05 on disk! 



^^^^ 

JUMP <PA|JHIHC> 




BASIC FREEDOM! No one wants to be chained down. And 
type in DASIC programs, you have been 
The culprit? 



Dr. Preble's 
Prescriptions 



yet, if 

subject to involuntary servitude! 
BASIC'S limited EDIT comoond. 

Demand Your BASIC FREEDOM! Developed by ColorVenture, this software gives you a full acrceu editor 
for typing in and editing BASIC programs! Move the cursor anywhere on the screen. Insert, dtilete or 
add text. It's the same concept as in o word processor, except you never have to leave BASIC! DASIC 
FREEDOM is an invisible machine language program which you can turn on and off at will. Even 
pressing RESET will not hurt your BASIC PREEDDQM '. Siaple, yet powerful with an easy to read manual. 
Many extra "nice couches" included, like KEY REPEAT and LOW RCASE INTERPRET R which lets you type 
BASIC commands in upper or lower case for ease of programming. Translation to uppercase is automatic 
for commands. Text in quotea is not affected. jr or Q 0 Q 0 { 2 or 3 I 



A separate versLon is 



SPECIAL COCO 3 VERSION lets you work i n 32, 40. or 80 column display modes, 
available for the CoCo I and 2. Available on disk for $29.95 + s/h. 

MENTAL FREEDOM ky Dr. Preble I IMAGINE! Some day, a computer so advanced that it responds to your 
very thoughts and emotions. Imagine, some day, thought-controlled graphics: levitation and 
materialization! PLUC Hi YOUR MIND nod UNnOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS— that day is now! The Radio Shack 
Color Computer has many advanced capabilities, Just waiting to be tapped. Dr. Preble's Programs 
combines the advanced technology of the CoCo with the amazing Radio Shack Biofeedback Monitor to 
bring you "Mental Freedom." y Q{ €o£o 2 or 5 

THOUGH-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any video game you have ever played, our Thoughtware 
testa your ability to handle stress, to remain calm under' adveroe clrcumstancea. LIGHTNING FAST 
reflexes will do you no good here, unless you first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. Are you the 
aecretely nervous type? Many people can keep n "Poker Face" even when they ore worried so that 
others may not notice; hut can you really stop the worry itself? Find out with Mental Freedom! 

AND IT TALK! Did you know that the CoCo can produce incredibly realistic digital speech without o 
special speech'synthesizer? The voice quality is so good, it sounds human! Honest. Best of all, no 
extra hardware is needed for speech, Just some clever programming by Dr, Preble. 



MENTAL FREEDOM - Ne 
them Eh- Preble's 
Catalogue #63-675. 



ct time your friends ask what your computer can do, ahow 
Thoughtvure! Requires Radio Shock's Biofeedbock Monitor 
Mental FrMdoa - TAPE or DISC 529.95 4 s/h 



J 



CoCoBraiJJe 



Emboss Grade 1 or Grade 2 
Braille using your CoCo 1, 1 
o r 3 and a Brother Daisy Wheel 
printer! Feat Print to 
Braille conversion algorithm 
converts word processor files, 
program listings and data 
files into touch readable 
Braille. For uae by the blind 
or the sighted . No kaowledge 
of th« Braille code is 
necessary. Just send print to 
the program and out comes 
Braillel Note: The complex 
Grade 2 conversioa is very 
good and though not always 
perfect, quite readable. 
Requires 64K or more. Brother 
HS series printer or the IF-50 
interface aeries required, 
low Cost! Similar software 
costs 3 times as much. Only 
$95. 



VDOS, tbe UnDISK: Save multiple programs in memory. Or save multiple graphic pictures in memory. Works with 
or without a disk. Let's you SAVE, LOAD and KILL stored programs or graphics. DIRECTORY function lists 
files, gives tho start, end and execution oddresaes of machine language programs ond number of free bytes 
remaining. Own a RAM disk without buying a disk drive! Requires 64K CoCo 1 or 2. Available on tape or disk 
for $24.95 + shipping/handling. 

VDUMP, tor the UaDISK: Backup all your UnDlSK files to a single tape file for easy reloading A must for ViOS 
users! On r.npe for $14.95 + shipping/handling. 

VPRINT, for the InDISK: Paper printout for UnDISK Directory. On tape, $9.95 + shipping/handling. 
Check, Money Of dec. MasterCard, VISA dr COP accepts, For Shl^illS to LISA or Oimia »dJ $2.50. to other 

for CoCo 1 or 2 



R^SU: FR££DCn 
y fUmaL F reedom 
in r - n 




Dress tip if our Disk Directory 
until color ful messages and 
borders. Create useful help 
messages Add that pro- 
fessional touch to your cre- 
ations! Only $995 



VfSA 



iMortorCardl 



Cheek. Money Order or 
COD 





Order From 
Dr Prebte's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
LouisiriUe. Xy 40228 
(502) 966-8201 

Phone Orders aooept«d 
Mon., W«d. p P'ri., and (Sjt im)