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THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 

THE GAME SHOW 

Our^pnual ^ 

fun4o|jall v.* J 

Blastime 

Munchkin Blaster, 
Danger Zone, and 
Rootin' Tootin' CoCo 

Pastime 

Sneaky Snake, 
Lunar Rescue, and 
CoCo Concentration 

Class time 

Bill looks at lingo 
Tony on memory 
Marty on monitors 

Including OS-9 time with 
Puckett and Dibble, three 
Q & A columns, hints, tips, new 
product reviews and more! 






Pft*.»ofO 




FOR THE COCO 1, 2, AND 3 



From Computer Plus to YOU . 



after 



after 



^^^^^^^ ^^ln ^^L^^^ ^^^^^^ 









BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 479.00 

Tandy 1000 SX 1 Drive 384K 679.00 

Tandy 1000 SX 2 Drive 384K 759.00 

Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 512K 1229.00 
Color Computer 2 W64K Exl. Basic 89.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 160.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130 100 CPS 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel31 0.00 

Star Micronics NP-10 100 CPS 169.00 

Star Micronics NX-10 120 CPS 199.00 

Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 359.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 120 CPS 189.00 

Panasonic P-1091i 160 CPS 210.00 

Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 349.00 

Okidata 182 120 CPS 269.00 

Okidafa 192+ 200 CPS 365.00 

Okidata 292 24G CPS 559.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Radio Shack DCM-212 179.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 39.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

The Magic of Zanth (CoCo3) 34.95 
Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 
Color Max 3 (CoCo3) 59.95 
COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 
COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTerm byPXEComputing29.95 39.95 
TelePatch III by Spectrum " 29.95 
C III Graphics by Spectrum (CoCo3)1 9.95 
Font Bonanza by Spectrum (CoCo3)29.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Pro Color Series 79.95 
Max Fonts (72 COCO Max Fonts) 64.95 
Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo 3 51 2KRam Disk byCerComp 19.95 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71.95 
VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 



8.95 
27.95 
44.00 
89.00 
14.95 
19.95 
59.95 
26.95 



Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



HI-RES Joystick Interface 
COCO Max Y Cable 
Color Computer Mouse 
Multi Pak Interface 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 
CM-8 6' Extension Cable 
Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 

PBJ 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 99.00 
Tandy 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 34.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 
Flight 16 Flight Simul. 34.95 34.95 

Nuke the Love Boat (CoCo3) 34.95 



Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 







P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



Under 
The 



26 





58 




FEATURES 



CoCo Concentration//\//an J. Belanger 

GAME Challenge yourself and strengthen memory skills 

Sneaky Snake/ Peter Kerckhoff 



20 



26 



GAME Snake 's a-poppin ' at the root beer stand 



Keeping Score/Lou Ashby 



36 



GAME UTILITY Paper-eating program for joystick jocks 

J ^ Munchkin Blaster/Sfeve Donald 



44 




GAME Put an end to alien-ation 

Learn CoCo Learn/ William D. English 

GAME Artijlcial intelligence helps CoCo to play 

gU The Danger Zone/ Eric A. Wolf 

GAME Protect your territory from enemy aircraft 

RGB Monitors/ Marty Goodman 

COMMENTARY A guide to analog monitors for the CoCo 3 

[^f Rootin' Tootin' CoCo/ Albert P. Marsh 

GAME Take revenge on optimistic androids 

Lunar Rescue/C/ycte Johnson, Jr. 



50 



58 



68 



.105 



116 



GAME The Lunar Rescue Squad needs your talent 



NOVICES NICHE % 



116 



Cover illustration copyright © 1987 
by Fred Crawford 



Beat the Dealer 

Bill Bernico 

and George Aftamonow 

Start Your Engines 

David Jolley 

Theater Management 

Paul Flaishaker 

Making Magic 

John Morrison 



84 Hangman. 



Shawn Stewart 

Scrambled Screen 

86 Neil Johnson 

Help for Adventurers 

88 Neil Haupt 

Joy for Joysticks 

88 Richard S. Ellis 



89 



90 



90 



91 



(^jfr The cassette tape/disk symbols 
^* beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's rainbow on 
tape and rainbow on DISK. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, check the 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK 

ad on Page 166. 



NEXT MONTH: The long, hot summer is nearly at an end, and CoCo kids of all 
ages are getting geared up to go back to school. Students will be looking for subjects that 
challenge their skills and imagination; parents and teachers will be looking for ways to make 
learning exciting and meaningful. And just in time, our September Education issue will deliver 
a full line-up of programs to illuminate, edify and amuse! 

Look for an assortment of imaginative educational features, including Hi-Res ABCs, math 
and reading comprehension programs, along with the regular — and always educational — 
product reviews, tutorials and columns. 

Exploring the world of the Color Computer is an ongoing education for one and all, and 
THE RAINBOW will put you and your CoCo at the head of the class! 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/Josep/7 Kolar 

Getting the picture 

Building A Rainbow/J/m Reed 

Jim Reeds last Rainbow "train" 

CoCo Consultations/ZWarfy Goodman 
Just what the doctor ordered 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 



Battle line and Hutchison s database report 

Doctor ASCW/Richard Esposito 

The question fixer 

Education Uo\es/Steve Blyn 



Number fun for the very young 

Education Overview/ Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Approaches for lifelong learning 



PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 



Turn of the Screw/7ony DiStefano 

Clever uses for memory 

^ Wishing Well/Fred Scerbo 

The spelling game 

RAINBOWTECH 



Barden's Buffer/ William Barden f Jr. 
Learning the lingo 

Downloads/Dan Downard 



Answers to your technical questions 
4^ KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 



Controller attacks halt line problem 

£ The Problem With BASIC09/Peter Dibble 

OS-9 MEMORY Improving the Editor procedure 

DEPARTMENTS 



Adventure Contest 
Advertiser Index _ 



Back Issue Information 
CoCo Clubs 



CoCo Gallery 
Corrections _ 



Letters to Rainbow 
Maxwell Mouse 



172 
176 
139 
146 
_18 
139 

_6 



The Pipeline 

Rainbow Info 

Received & Certified 
Scoreboard 



Scoreboard Pointers 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



165 Subscription Info 



One-Liner Contest 
Information 



Where to Find Rainbow 



94 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 

Product Review Contents. 



149 



16 



64 



102 



126 



97 



32 



12 



124 



92 



168 



154 



157 



163 



112 
177 
131 

_78 
_80 



_24 
152 
174 



129 



ii. 




August 1987 



Vol. VII No. 1 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 
Submissions Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Associate Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Technical Editor Cray Augsburg 
Copy Editor Jody Gilbert 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 
Editorial Assistants Sandra Blackthorn, 

Wendy Falk, Angela Kapfhammer, 

Monica Wheat 
Technical Consultant Dan Downard 

Editorial Consultants Ed EMers, 
Joe Pierce 

Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 



Art Director Heidi Maxedon 
Designers Tracey Jones, Rita Lawrence, 
Denise Webb 



Lead Typesetter Jody Doyle 
Typesetting Services Jill Hopkins 
Karen Semones 



President 



Falsoft, Inc. 

Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue H. Evans 



Editorial Director James E. Reed 
Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jones 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 

Asst. General Manager For Administration 
Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Customer Service Mgr. Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Director of Production Jim Cleveland 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Asst. Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Pam Workhoven 



Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 176 



THE rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. THE rainbow, RAINBOWfest and therainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect, 
KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1987. the rainbow is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty ol any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
the amnbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 5 



LETTERS TO THE 





SysOp Stands up for a Clean Board 



Editor: 

I applaud your "Print#-2" column in the 
April 1987 issue. The column discussed 
copyright laws and the clubs, BBS and pen 
pal listings provided by THE rainbow. I am 
a SysOp of Lansing's CoCo BBS. Ever since 
I began operating Benchboard BBS in 1984, 
I've had to deal with ridicule from a few 
users for attempting to run a "clean" board. 
I've also had to deal with the mentalities 
expressed by both SysOps mentioned in 
your column; the "I didn't know" type and 
the 44 1 know it's OK because I got them f rom 
another BBS" type. 

1 appreciate the support of the Greater 
Lansing Color Computer User's Group 
(CCUG) and articles such as yours. Please 
continue to remind those who "don't know," 
while maintaining THE rainbow's clubs, 
BBS and pen pal listings. These listings 
provide contact for the many computerists 
who do respect copyright laws, j ^ Evans 

Lansing, MI 

Bit-Banger Rebuttal 

Editor: 

In the "CoCo Consultations" column of 
the March 1987 issue, Page 151, a reader 
used the expression "bit-banger"in a request 
for information. This expression has been 
used in a derogatory sense for some time by 
columnists in THE rainbow as though the 
serial port of the CoCo is in some way 
inferior. As your readers seem to be starting 
to use the expression, it is probably time to 
set the record straight. 

The RS-232 specification defines an 
industry standard for serial data communi- 
cations that is a bit-by-bit transmission and 
reception standard. It does not matter 
whether one uses a PIA or a UART to 
produce those bits to provide the serial bit 
stream. The UART produces other signals 
as well that a modem's hardware and soft- 
ware may expect; however, if the modem 
and its sof tware are designed caref ully, it will 
still operate with a simple bit stream satis- 
f actorily. What does matter a lot is the design 
of the terminal software at each end of the 
communications loop and the care used in 
writing and tuning the time delay loops. 

Super Color Terminal, by Dan Nelson 
(Softlaw, VIP), is an example of quality 
software that works reliably through the 
CoCo serial port, in duplex, at baud rates 
up to 4,800. 

My two "old gray "CoCos run in a master- 



coprocessor mode, communicating at 8,000 
baud, through their serial ports. Addition- 
ally, the transmit and receive routines in my 
Kamelion [See March 1987, Page 141] 
software for the C0C0/SC68OO8 combina- 
tion operate reliably through the serial port, 
at 4,800 baud, duplex, with a Tektronics 
4105 color terminal. 

So, you see, if unreliability is encountered 
when using a well-designed modem, it is the 
software, not the CoCo's PIA-driven serial 
port that is not reliable above 300 baud. 

D.J. Leffler 
Cocoa Beach, FL 

Computer Contributions 

Editor: 

I represent a non-profit, charitable organ- 
ization that uses microcomputer equipment 
in virtually every aspect of its affairs. We 
would be grateful if your readers would 
consider contributing additional equipment. 
Donations of this sort can have substantial 
tax benefits. If you are in a position to 
contribute or would like more information, 
please write or call (collect, if you like) (617) 

495-9020. _ D , _ 

Dr. Robert Epstein 

Executive Director 

Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies 

II Waterhouse St. 

Cambridge, MA 02138 

Discovering CoCo Software 

Editor: 

Why don't Radio Shack stores sell THE 

rainbow? I think the thing that hurts the 

CoCo most is that many new CoCo owners 

think the only programs available for the 

Color Computer are the ROM packs and 

disk software from Radio Shack. They fail 

to see the super programs from Diecom 

Products, Colorware and many other great 

software dealers. I'm not trying to put down 

Radio Shack (they did make this awesome 

computer), I just wish people would quit 

saying "Yeah, I got a Trash-80 Computer, 

but their games are sorry." _ 

Francisco Rios 

Houston, TX 



BACK TALK 



multitasking capabilities are astounding. 
However, there are a few of us who use the 
CoCo in a multiuser mode and require the 
capabilities Login provides. 

We use a CoCo 2 with hard drive and two 
DT-I00 terminals as a point-of-sale system 
in our store. The system operates under OS- 
9 Level I and is written in BASIC09. (Perfor- 
mance rivals and often exceeds similar 
systems provided by the three-letter and 
other large companies.) 

We are completing the conversions neces- 
sary to run the system on the CoCo 3 under 
Level II. One major stumbling block has 
been the lack of restrictions to accessing 
certain files. Everyone is super-user. Also, 
should two salespersons write sales tickets 
simultaneously, the printer will print both 
sales tickets simultaneously, alternating 
lines. To prevent this, we had to rewrite the 
printer device descriptor making it non- 
shareable which, in turn, required that some 
of the associated software be rewritten. A 
Login capability, normally part of OS-9, 
would have alleviated these problems. 

Edward Gresick 
Middletown, DE 



HINTS & TIPS 



Editor: 

I must disagree with Dale Puckett's 
implied position that Login for OS-9 Level 
II is superfluous. Admittedly, most users do 
not require multiuser capabilities, and the 



Editor: 

I just received my May rainbow and, as 
always, read it from cover to cover right 
away. In it, two people ask about printer 
codes for underlining using VIP Writer and 
the Smith-Corona printer. Since I use both 
in my home business, I thought I would help 
if I can. 

Smith-Corona L-1000 Printer Codes 

Code 3 turns on underline — all words: 
3"2?;69 

Code 1 turns on underline — one word : 

1=2?;90 
Code 4 turns off both underlinings: 

4=2?;82 

Since I use two printers (the other is an 
Epson LX-80), I have a list of codes for each 
and load each one before doing any writing. 
This also helps remind me which printer to 
turn on and which to turn off. You must use 
the "no print" comment (CLEAR-SH1FT+) in 
front of anything you do not want printed. 

Roxann Brown 
Franklinville, NY 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

NOW HI-RES 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 
XMODEM for machine language 
files. 128 ASCII characters, 1200 
baud, etc. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Handles files larger 
than memory. Print on line with J&M 
or RS232 Pak. Screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, 64. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 

They are sincere, hard working and 

appreciative. Thanks! . „. 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



The Button '11 Fool Ya 

Editor: 

The CoCo 3 with an analog RGB monitor 
gives no indication when it is turned on. Its 
power button, when turned on, extends 
farther out than the power button on a 
CoCo 1 does when it is turned off. I recom- 
mend that the computer plug be discon- 
nected when inserting or extracting the disk 
controller. Had I taken these precautions, I 
would not have blown my controller within 
15 minutes after having received it. 

The chip most likely to be damaged in 
CoCo disk controllers is the 7416. There are 
two of them in the Disto controller. The 
WD 1 773-PH can also be destroyed, but less 
often. Since the cost of a 7416 chip is 
currently about $2.40 from most electronics 
parts distributors, it is a reasonably good 
gamble to try replacing this chip before 
sending the entire controller to be repaired 
for a charge of about $30. 

James Harris 
Troy, MI 



COCO 3 

Editor: 

There are those who are worried about 
rainbow covering mostly CoCo 3 in the 
f uture, but I am sure what you give the most 
attention to will be governed by what you 
receive from your readers. We bought a 
CoCo 3 as soon as it was available and are 
enjoying it more with each new program 



from your magazine. I do hope your guide 

to OS-9 Level II will be helpful, as I couldn't 

get anywhere on my own. _ _ . , 

Tom David 

Ganges, British Columbia 
Keyboard Substitution 

Editor: 

When I read your September '86 preview 
of the CoCo 3 home computer, dreams of 
complex new word processing and /or data- 
base management, combined with fully 
integrated graphics applications (running 
concurrently under OS-9 Level II) floated in 
my mind. Alas, Radio Shack kept the old 
repulsive Model I and Apple 11+ compatible, 
non-Selectric keyboard. 

It's incredible that they didn't implement 
the excellent layout of the now-obsolete 
IBM PCjr (the replacement one, not the 
original Chiclet-type). It includes all the 
necessary keys (and more), in a small, 
portable, detachable, cordless, Selectric- 
type unit. 

Now, I wonder, is there any way to 
interface a PCjr (or Compatible) keyboard 
to the CoCo 3 and thus solve Tandy's 
mistake? Then it would be simple to write 
a device-driver under OS-9 to gain access to 
it. I know many people who would sell their 
PCjr keyboards. Surely this could make the 
CoCo 3 Number One in the home computer 
arena. Long live CoCo! 

Carlos A. Osuna Roffe 
Monterrey, N.L. 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I am looking for all the CoCo users in the 
(509) area code of Washington State. Please 
call 547-4293, or write. 

Troy Sanders 
209 S. 26th 
Pasco, WA 9930 J 

Program Wish List 

Editor: 

I am looking for a program to use with 
my 64K ECB CoCo 2, C-Itoh Prowriter 8510 
printer, and twin Digital drives. I am a sales 
manager with 470 part-time and full-time 
real estate agents and have to keep a running 
roster of them that can be updated period- 
ically. I am currently using a program called 
Label III by Owl's Nest Software, but it has 
limitations that make it difficult to operate. 
The program I need must do the following: 

1. Store names, addresses (street, city, and 
ZIP codes with a provision for an extra 
line) and phone numbers. 

2. Sort quickly through the files (auto- 
loading files as it sorts). Search by last 
name (by ZIP and first name would be 
nice, too). 

3. Print files on fan-fold paper "3 wide" and 
be able to stop at end of page and start 
at the top of the next page. 

4. Print files on adhesive mailing labels. 

5. Store large amounts of files (400 to 600). 
It is OK to refer back and forth to the disk 
automatically. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 7 



I would prefer for the program to be 
written in machine language, but BASIC is 
OK if it will do the above functions. 

Donald Skaff 
Toledo, OH 

BBS Quest 

Editor: 

I was reading the section called "Bulletin 
Board Systems" in your May issue. I have 
been wanting to set up a bulletin board for 
a long time and have called all over the area 
looking for one, but haven't been able to find 
one. I see that there are a lot of them listed 
here in your magazine. Could someone tell 
me where I can purchase a BBS program? 

Jeff Sweet 
R.D. til Box 480 
Glover sville, NY 12078 

Check out our four-part series on 
the Co BBS bulletin board system in 
the November '85 through February 
'86 issues. 

VIP Frustrations 

Editor: 

I am the happy owner of a new CoCo 3. 
It's been a long time coming and I sure like 
it. However, I have the entire VIP series and 
none of it works on my new CoCo. I have 
been hoping for months that a patch would 
be published in THE rainbow. I've read that 
a patch is on Delphi, but [ can't get there 
because I have VIP Terminal. Can anyone 
out there help me? 

Also, can anyone tell me how many CoCo 

3s have been sold so far? Now that our 

favorite computer has the memory that the 

big guys do, will we get programs like Lotus, 

dBASE, Pfs y etc.? „ . . 

Robert W. Jobm 

5430 Quail Run West 

Theodore, A L 36582 

Seeking an Encore 

Editor: 

There must be someone out there who can 
solve my problem. I have a JX-80 Epson 
printer. I have Bob van der Poel's Ultra 
Telepatch and a CoCo 3. Once, I got the 
embedded commands to work correctly in 
the text of a letter to make selected words 
print in color for emphasis. The next time 
1 tried, I could not get them to work. Would 
someone please give me the correct proce- 

^ UrC ' George Barber 

Box 353 

Summit City, CA 96089 
All Done With Mirrors 

Editor: 

I was paging through an electronics 
magazine and read about someone who was 
able to interface the Commodore 64 
computer to drive digital radio control 
airplane servos. I was impressed with the 
article, as it involved a Helium-Neon laser 
and the ability to store coordinates input 
f rom joysticks to later drive the servos in the 
desired sequence. Mirrors were hooked onto 
the servos and a rather impressive laser light 
show followed. 

I have heard that my CoCo is the best 
there is and I certainly believe it can outper- 
form any C-64 on the street. My question is: 



Can anyone tell me of a source or article in 
any magazine that will allow me to emulate 
this device? I am not an engineer and, 
therefore, must rely upon someone with that 
special genius to help me out. Thank you for 
providing a great magazine for the CoCo 
user and keep up the good work. 

Gregory J. Zamites Jr. 
602 Alexander St. 
St. Marys, GA 31558 



Faithful Feline 




Editor: 

Wejust thought you might like to 
see what our CoCo Cat looks like! 

Ira and Leo Goldwyn 
Great Neck, NY 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I have a 64 K CoCo ROM Color BASIC 1.2, 
Disk ECB I.I, a CCR-81 cassette, Modem 
IB, a Smith-Corona SE-200 with messenger 
module and a Line Printer VII. I have 
Version 1.0 of Elite-home and would really 
like to be able to use it as it's advertised in 
the rainbow. However, after loading 92 
albums in the records file I got an IE Error. 
I called Elite Software, was told no one else 
had reported such a problem, and to return 
the disks and they would see what they could 
do. 

A few days later, I received new disks in 
the mail and, after backing up a set to work 
from, I started using the Checks program. 
After loading 184 checks, I got an IE Error. 
I called Elite Software, who called me back 
a couple of days later and told me I must 
have removed the disk from the drive 
without exiting the program properly. 

I formatted another disk and started over. 
I had been at the keyboard continuously the 
entire time and the disk had definitely not 
been removed from the drive. I again got an 
IE Error after 184 entries. I called Elite and 
was told the only possible way the IE Error 
could occur was if I had pulled the disk out 
without followingthe proper exit procedure. 



I denied pulling out the disk and was told 
I must have pulled it out without noticing. 

I did my print free (0) on both disks, and 
on the records disk found that Records took 
10 granules (which left me with 8 granules 
free) and the Checks disk took 11 granules 
(which left me with 0 granules free). I tried 
deleting other programs on both disks to 
gain room, but it didn't work. Neither 
program will take any more entries. My 
questions are: 

1. What ami doing wrong? 

2. How can I correct it? 

3. Can I use a third disk for specific fields 
(e.g., checks, records, etc.)? If so, how do 
I do it? 

4. Is there anyone out there who has had and 
solved similar problems? 

Harry K. Buchanan 
314 S Walnut 
Maroa, IL 61 756 



Poke Preservation 

Editor: 

Being a novice CoCo owner is really a 
ball. I've had my CoCo 2 for two months. 
64 K is plenty of memory for me right now, 
but I've got a couple of questions about 
some pokes and peeks I have been reading 
about in the rainbow's last two issues. 

I have a DMP-130 printer and it will 
accept up to 2400 baud. The higher speeds 
that are achieved at this baud rate are great 
when I have written a program I want to 
print out, but how do I use this faster rate 
when using a program pack like Color 
Scripsitl 

I realize POKE 150,18 will do the trick 

while programming, but what can I do to 

keep this poke intact after inserting the 

cartridge? The computer always wants to 

drop back to its normal rate. Also, when I 

PEEK 150, my CoCo 2 prints 88, not 87 like 

you would expect. ... . . „ ... 

Michael R. Wetzstein 

1155 O'Quinn Drive 

Tift on, GA 31794 

The Upgrade Dilemma 

Editor: 

Is it worth upgrading to a better, eight-bit 
machine (CoCo 3) when there are 16-bit 
machines that don't cost much more? When 
I speak of 16-bit machines, I don't mean a 
Tandy 1000 or IBM PC. I am convinced an 
OS-9 Level II CoCo 3 is better than these. 
I am interested in the new MC68000-based 
computers, like the Atari ST and Amiga. 
How important is CPU clock speed? I love 
my 64 K CoCo 2 and would like to love a 
CoCo 3, but I have reservations. 

Mike Links vayer 
305 Cart wright 
Springfield, IL 62704 

Another CoCo Heard From 

Editor: 

Is there anyone out there in CoCo land 
who can tell me how to get my CoCo 2 to 
talk without any additional hardware? I 
have seen many programs advertised that 
say they have good quality speech, and the 
speech is made possible through program- 



8 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



BOOKS & GRAPHICS 

500 



POKES, 
PEEKS, 
'N 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS*80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKS and EXECs to: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Basic/ECB/Disk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TRON, TROFF, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, RENUM, PRINT 
USinQ, DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD, 
MERGE, RENAME, DSKINI, 
BACKUP, DSKt$, and DSKO$. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 
Generate a Repeat-key. 
Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

Speed Up your programs. 

Reset, MOTOR ON /OFF from 
keyboard. 

Recover Basic programs lost by 
NEW. 

Set 23 different 
GRAPH IC/SEMIGRAPrUC modes 
Merge two Basic programs 

AND WUCI1 MUCH MORE! It 
COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16 K/32K/64K/ COLOR BASIC/ECB/DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1,2,8:3. 

ONLY $16.95 



* 
* 

* 
* 



★ 
* 



ONLY 



SUPPLEMENT to 

500 POKES, 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 

$9.95 

200 additional Pokes, Peeks' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER 
Includes commands for 

• Hompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/double sided drives with variable 
step- rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm+ <s> and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (lor DMP printers] & Text Screen Dump 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 500 POKES, PEEKS' N EXECS is a prerequisite 

*>m POKES 

PEEKS 'N EXECS 

FOR THE COCO III 

Get more POWER tor yourCoCo III. Includes 
commands for: 

• 40/80 Column Screen Text Dump 

• Save Text/Graphics Screens to Disk 

• Command/ Function Disables 

• Enhancements for CoCo 3 Basic 

• 128K/512K Ram Test Program 

• HPRINT Character Modifier 

• AND MANY MORE COMMANDS 

ONLY $19.95 





MUST" BOOKS 

UNRAVELLEO SERIES: These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $39.95 
OISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
BOTH UNRAVELLEO BOOKS: $49.95 
SUPER ECB(CoCo3| UNRAVELLED: $24.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLEO BOOKS: $59.95 
COCO 3 SERVICE MANUAL $39.95 
INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II $39.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 LEVEL II ON COCO 3: $ CALL 
BASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS $14.95 
COCO 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING*: ST8.D0 




COLOR MAX 3 

Finally, your wait is over!! The ultimate 
graphics program for CoCo 3 has arrived 
Features include: 

• Icons and pull down menus 

• 320 x 200 hi- res screen 

• Choice ol 64 colors 

• Pencil Eraser, Spray Can, Line, Rectangle, Paint Brush & 
more functions 

• Electronic Typesetting with 1 1 built-in fonts 

• Zoom-in (Fat Bits] and Undo 

• Variety of brushes and patterns 

• Editing features such as invert flip, copy, cut paste and 
clear 

• Load/ Save/ Compress/ Print your work 

• Works with RGB & Composite Monitors 

• Printer Drivers- EPSON. GEMINI & DMP 

• Requires RS Hires joystick interlace 

Requires CoCo 3, 128K, Tandy Disk Controller, 
Hi- Res Joystick Interfaca 

only $59.95 

HI- RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 




The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions. Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures. Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III ORTDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM 0F32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 AND JDOS 
Supports the following printers: EPSON 
RX/FX, GEMINI 10X/SG-10, NX-10, 
C-ltoh 8510, DMP-1 00/1 05/400/430, 
SEIKOSHAGP-1 00/250, LEGEND 808 
and GORILLA BANANA 

DISK ONLY $29.95 
PICTURE DISK #1: 100 more pictures for 



MJF 




CGD: $14.95 

MICROCOM SOFTWARE FONT DISK #1:10 extra fonts! $1 9.95 
P.O. Box 21 4 COLORED PAPER PACKS $19.95 

Fairport, N.Y. 14450 

Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



VISA, MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling (USA & 
CANADA, other countries $5.00). COD add $2.50 extra NYS residents please add 
Sales Tax. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited. 




Call Toll Free ( For Orders) 1 -800-654-5244 9 AM - 9 PM EST 7 days a week 

Except NY. For information, technical information, NY orders & after-hours 1-716-223-1477 



ming. I would appreciate any information 
anyone can give me on this great trick. 

Jim Patterson 
7044 Brandy wine Drive 
Derby, NY 14047 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

I had to send this letter to rainbow to let 
your readers know about the outstanding 
service I got on a recent order to Micro- 
World Computer Center. 

I ordered a Color Computer 3 by mail — 

no phone call — and received it in less than 

a week at quite a savings! MicroWorld rates 

high in my book. _ .... 

David Johnstone 

Torrington, CT 06790 
Speedy Disk Delivery 

Editor: 

T & D Software should be congratulated 
on its expedient service and reliability. It is 
the only company out of several which 
promptly sent software as part of a "free 
software" campaign in conjunction with my 
subscription order to THE rainbow. Orders 
to T & D are filled quickly and often arrive 
within two weeks. Recently, I experienced 
trouble with some disks and returned them 
for replacements. The new disks arrived the 
same week! It is refreshing to find a business 
that conducts "good business" — and T & 
D accomplishes that task. 

Lynn Simmons 
New Orleans, LA 

An Assortment of Support 

Editor: 

I would like to take this opportunity to 
thank all the rainbow staff for bringing 
such a fine publication to the CoCo world. 

I would also like to pass on special thanks 
to Greg Miller and Erik Gavriluk f or taking 
the time out of their day to talk to fellow 
users about seemingly trivial bits of CoCo 
information. These are two very talented 
programmers, and I appreciate very much 
what they are doing for the CoCo world. 

More thanks are in order f or Computize's 
service department, which has been very 
friendly and helpful every time I've called. 

Finally, my hat is off to Mr. B.J. Chamb- 

less and Computerware for their long-term 

and continued support of the CoCo. I 

bought Magic of Zanth [See March 1987, 

Page 140] and Ramdisk from them — two 

great programs for the CoCo 3. . , _ , 

Alan Parker 

Grissom A FB, IN 
RAINBOWfest Raves 

Editor: 

We want to express sincere thanks to two 
organizations: 

First, to THE rainbow, f or sponsoring the 
Chicago RAINBOWfest. It was amazing to 
seeso many people in one place all dedicated 
to a computer that so few people seem to 
know about. (My wife likened it to the 
Dayton Hamvention,andshe was right!) All 
the vendors and rainbow people we met 
were just great, and we certainly intend to 
return next year. (And yes, we did pig out 
on software, not to mention hardware!) 
Second, our thanks to the Elliotts at HJL 



Products. We bought an HJL Numberjack 
at RAINBOWfest, and had trouble getting 
it to work. A letter to HJL brought a very 
prompt, helpful answer, but when that 
didn't work, a phone call (on their quarter, 
yet!) got the information we needed. Sup- 
port like this is hard to find these days, but 
HJL really came through, and we thank 

them for it. ^ 

David Wendt 

Indianapolis, IN 



PEN PALS 



• I am 10 V3 years old and have a CoCo 2 

and some joysticks. Anyone wanting a pen 

pal, please write to me. , _ 

Armando Perea 

824 N. Humbolt #4 

San Mateo, CA 94401 

• I would like to have some pen pals. I am 
16 years old and own a 64K CoCo, a printer, 
a disk drive and a lot of software. 

David Jolley 
6656 Lake Avenue 
Elyria, OH 44035 

• I am 15 years old and looking for a pen 
pal who has a 64K Extended Color BASIC 
CoCo 2 with cassette player. 

Shannon Webb 
Rt. 1 Box 29 
Wa tonga, OK 73772 

• I am 14 years old and looking for a pen 

pal. I have a CoCo 2 and enjoy almost 

everything. I would like to have pen pals 

from all around the world. _ 

Dena Warren 

3428 So. 109 E. Ave. 

Tulsa, OK 74146 

• I would like to know if there are any CoCo 
users in the Pennsylvania area who would 
like to have a pen pal. I have a I28K CoCo 
3, CCR-81 cassette recorder and a D MP- 105 
printer. I am 1 1 years old and enjoy games. 

Pete Malizia 
331 Gertrude St. 
Latrobe, PA 15650 

• I am interested in having pen pals from the 

United States and around the world. I am 

15 years old, have a CoCo 2, and a CoCo 

3 with two disk drives, along with a DMP- 

105 and CGP-220 printer. I will try to answer 

all responses. „ . _ . 

r Ed Emelett 

108 Hani in Drive 

Nanticoke, PA 18634 

• I'm looking for pen pals once again. I have 

a DCM-3 modem, a DMP-105 and 130 

printer, a disk drive, 64K CoCo, a CCR-82 

tape and a Radio Shack monitor. I would 

like pen pals from everywhere and I will 

answer all replies. ~. . ~ 

Chris Curtis 

Route 1 Box 186 

Walling, TN 38587 

• I am a 23-year-old fiction writer seeking 

pen pals from anywhere with any type of 

system. I have a CoCo 2 with cassette only, 

but have access to an IBM PC (GW- BASIC, 

MS-DOS), and am especially interested in 

a pascal tutor. _ „ , 

Ron Corder 

3030 Elmside Drive U23 

Houston, TX 77042 



• I own a CoCo 2, disk drive, tape deck and 
a D MP- 100 printer. I have lots of games and 
programs, and have solutions to Adventures 
like Dallas Quest, Trekboer, To Preserve 
Quandic, etc. Anyone who wants to write, 
please do so. I'm into action games like 
F-16, Wrestle Maniac and Shock Trooper. 
I just purchased a CoCo 3, also. 

Michael Cress 
P.O. Box 427 
Bridgetown, Nova Scotia 
Canada BOS 1 CO 

• I am 14 years old and looking for pen pals 
to exchange programs, preferably on disk. 
I own a CoCo 3, FD-500 disk drive and a 
CCR-82 tape recorder. I also love solving 
Adventures and playing CoCo 3 games. 

Brendan Wood 
360 Victoria U204 
Greenfield Park, Quebec 
Canada J4V 1M2 

• I want to correspond with a pen pal who 
shares my interest in programming utilities 
and general BASIC programming. I do not 
have a computer, but I have quite a consid- 
erable amount of programming knowledge. 
I will be getting a computer in the near 
future. I am 12 years old and considering 
learning assembly language soon. 

Mathew Dafilis 
19 Carolyn Crescent 
Bundoora, Victoria 
Australia 3083 

• I have a 64K CoCo 2 with a cassette 
system. I'd like to have a pen pal to exhange 
programs. I have about 200 games. 

Ariel Bensimon 
9816 Erne k Hefer 
42220 Natania Israel 

• It's a long distance letter from Egypt! I am 
25 years old and have a 64K CoCo 2 with 
a tape system. No one here has a CoCo 
except me and a couple of my friends. 
Anyone looking for a pen pal, please write 
me. 

Remon Samy Ebrahem 
8 Aziz Fahmy St. 
Tanta, Egypt 

• I am 26 years old and looking for a pen 
pal. I have a 512K CoCo 3 and 64K CoCo 
2, disk drive, cassette recorder, multipack 
interface and DMP-200 printer. I have many 
games and OS-9 Level I and II. 

John D. Cleveland 
P.O. Box 735 
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia 
Canada B0 J 2 CO 

THE RAINBOW welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type RRI to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 



10 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



UTILITIES 




SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 




• Disk- to- Disk Copy (1-3 passes) 

• Tape-to- Disk Copy 

• Tape-to- Disk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk- to- Tape Copy 

• Tape-to-Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ ML programs and DATA files. 
CoCo1,2& 3 32 K Disk System 

(Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY $24,95 

UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best- selected utilities: 

• 40 K Disk Basic • Disk Cataloger 

• Super Tape-to-Disk Copy (with Automatic Relocate] 

• LList Enhancer • X-Ref for Basic Programs 

• Graphics Typesetter 1 1 wo text sizes!) 

• LARGE OMP Graphics Dump • Basic Stepper 

• Hidden 32 K (Use the "hidden" 32 K Irom your 64 K CoCoJ 

• RAM Disk (for Cassette & Disk Users) 

• Single Key Printer Text Screen Dump 

• And much, much more !!! 

Most programs compatible with CoCo 3 

DISK (64 K ReoJ ONLY $29.95 

UTILITY ROUTINES 
for the TANDY & 
TRS-80 COCO (Vol 1) 

• COMMAND KEYS • CURSOR STYLES • ERROR SKIP 

• FULL LENGTH ERRORS* KEY CLICKER 

• REPEAT KEY • REVERSE VIDEO 
SPOOLER • SUPER SCROLLER 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE!!! 

For 16 K/32 K/64 K Cassette or Disk Systems, 

book $19.95 cas/disk $24.95 

BOTH BOOK AND CAS or DISK $36.95 

UTILITY ROUTINES (Volume II) 

Includes 20 oft- used utilities such as: 

• Add SUPERSCRIPTS to your OMP printer 

• Design your own commands! • Programming Clock 

• Fast Sort for Basic Strings • CoCo Calculator 

• Create a character set for your DM P printer 

• Let the computer locate your errors! 

• Automatic Directory Backup • And much much more! 

64K DISK ONLY $29.95 

COCO DISK ZAPPER 

Are you frustrated with crashed disks? If 
so, this program can save hours of labor by 
restoring complete or part of the information 
from the disk If s indespensable! 

Requires minimum 32 K/64 K disk system 

ONLY $24.95 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 




^0}j (Except those 

^cables/hardwar" 

AVATEX MODEM: Hayes compatible 
300/1200 Baud, Auto- Dial/ Answer/ Redial. 
ONLY $129.95 MODEM CADLE: $19.95 
DS-69D DIGISECTOR: Microworks Digitizer 
for CoCo 1, 2 & 3. Includes software 
0NLY$149.95 

VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference 
$19.95 

15' PRINTER/MODEM EXTENOER CABLE: 
ONLY $16.95 

UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: For monochrome 
or color monitor $29.95 
INTRONICS EPRDM PROGRAMMER: Best 
EPROM Programmer for the CoCo. Lowest 
Price Anywhere. $137.95 
RS232 V CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the serial 
port ONLY $18.95 

3-P0SITI0N SWITCHER: Select any one of 
three RS232 devices (printers/ modems) 
from the serial port $37.95 
Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with CoCo 
Max, DS69, etc ONLY $24.95 



marked with *) 




SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 

switch selectable baud rates (300-9600). 

Comes with all cables. $44.95 

256K DYNAMIC RAM CHIPS (8): $39.95 

MAGNAVOX 8505/851 5 Analog RGB Cable: 

$24.95 

III STO SUPER CONTROLLER: $99.95 

RUN COCO MAX II 
On CoCo III 

The kit contains software & replacement 
PAL chip for 26-3024 Multipack interface. 

only $29.95 



512K UPGRADE FOR COCO III 



Fast 120ns chips. Fully tested Easy installation No 
soldering Comes with complete documentation and 
RAM test program on disk 

only $79.95 




UMIGMIallUM dill 



(With purchase of our 512 K RAMDISK program below) 

512K Upgrade without chips $44.95 

512K RAMDISK 

Have 2 superfast RAMDISKs & a print spooler 

$24.95 



OTHER SOFTWARE . . . 

Telewriter-64 (Cas)$47.95 (Dsk) 57.95 



TW-80 for CoCo 3 39.95 
Telepatch III 29.95 

CoCo Max (Cas)* 67.95 
CoCo Max II (Dsk)* 77.95 

Autoterm Terminal Prog (Cas) 29.95 
(Latest Version) (Dsk) 39.95 
SPIT N IMAGE: Makes a BACKUP of ANY 
disk $32.95 

COCO OTIL II (Lastest Version): Transfer 
CoCo Diskf iles to IBM compatible computer. 
Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo. $36.95 
GRAFPLOT $44.95 
FKEYS III $24.95 
COCO 3 FONT BONANZA $29.95 
RGB PATCH: Displays most games in color on 
RGB monitors For CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 
EOT/ASM 64 0: Best Disk Based Editor- 
Assembler for CoCo $59.95 (Specify CoCo 
1. 2 or 3) 

THE SOURCE: Best Disassembler for CoCo. 
$34.95 (Specify CoCo 1, 2 or 3) 
CBASIC: Most powerful Basic Program 
Compiler. $149.95 (Specify CoCo 1, 2 or 
3) 

ADOS: Advanced disk operating system 
ONLY $27.95; AD0S3: $34.95 
DISK ANTI-PIRATE: Best copy- protection 
program for disk Basic and ML programs 
CoCo 1,2 & 3 ONLY $59.95 
COLOR SCRIBE III: The CoCo 3 Word- 
Processor $49.95 

DISK TUTORIAL (2 disk package) $36.95 
Teleform: Mail Merge for TW-64® 1 9.95 

GAMES (DISK ONLY) 
GANTELET: $28.95 
MISSION FIB ASSAULT: $28.95 
MARBLE MAZE: $28.95 
PAPER ROUTE: $28.95 
KNOCK OUT: $28.95 
KARATE: $28.95 
WRESTLE MANIAC: $28.95 
BOUNCING BOULDERS: $28.95 
THE GATES OF DELIRIUM: $38.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
CALADURIAL FLAME OF LIGHT: $38.95 
LANSFORD MANSION: $38.95 



1 




— 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N. Y. 14450 
Phone 171 6) 223-1 477 



Toorder: All orders$50 & above shipped by2nd day Air UPS with noextracharge. Last minuteshoppers 
can benetit VISA MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling 
(USA& CANADA other countries $5.00) COD add$2.50 extra NYS residents please add 
Sales Tax. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 AM - 9 PM EST 7 days a week 

Except NY. For information, technical information NY orders & after-hours 1-71 6- 223-1 477 



Some Seventh 
Year Chances 



All's well that ends well. 

William Shakespeare wrote it, Wendy Falk said it. 

For those of you who read this space last month, 1 have news to 
report, Sacy has been found. 

Sacy is my eldest daughter's (Soft And CuddlY) teddy bear, who 
turned up missing when she came home from an around-the-world 
educational semester aboard ship. Somehow, Wendy's tote bag was 
lost — and with it her 17 rolls of film, a number of presents and 
Sacy. 

Wendy is 20 and Sacy is 17, so you can imagine how upset she 
was. After a couple of weeks of hoping he might turn up somehow, 
Sacy had to be decreed lost. It was depressing, 1 wrote about it last 
month. And one of the things 1 said was that it was a shame Sacy 
would miss our Sixth Anniversary issue of the rainbow because it 
would be the first one he had missed. 

As it turned out, Sacy was on hand after all. Just a couple of days 
after we went to press with the July issue and the Saga of Sacy, Wendy 
got a letter from Delta Air Lines. They had a bag in Atlanta lost 
and found, they wrote. If she could identify it, they would send it 
to hen ' 

Wendy didn't fly on Delta, but they apparently ended up with her 
bag all the same. Her first question when she called Delta was 
whether Sacy was safe. He was. And it was Sacy's presence that 
seemed to be adequate to "identify" her lost tote bag. 

We're not sure exactly how Sacy ended up in Atlanta or on Delta, 
but we do know that Sacy arrived on the late flight from Atlanta 
and Wendy was there to meet him. He's home now, and all the film 
has been developed and pictures looked at many times already. 

Just this evening I came home with the first copy of the 
Anniversary Issue, Sacy was there to look it over, too. Everyone 
was glad. 




PAY ONLY FOR WHAT YOU WANT 



( OVER 1 00 UTILITIES TO CHOOSE FROM ) 



40k Basic for Cassette Programs* 
40K for Disk Programs* 
Alphabetize your disk directory 
Appointment Calendar 
ASCII File Scrambler 
ASCII file utility 
Automatic Disk Backup* 
Automatic Cassette Saver 
Automatic Disk Saver 
Automatic Directory Backup* 
Banner Maker 

Basic Program Autostart for cassette 
Base converter 

Basic Program Line Copy Utility 

Basic Search 

Bowling Score Keeper 

Calendar Maker (DMP Printers) 

Cassette Label Maker (DMP Printers) 

Clock for Programming 

Computerized Checkbook 

CoCo Base (different CoCo Products) 

CoCo Calculator 

Design your own Commands 

Disk Cataloger 

Basic Program Encryptor 

Disk Label Maker 

DMP Character Set Editor 

DMP Superscripts 

Enhanced Basic * 

Enhanced KILL 

Enhanced TRON/TROFF 

Error Locator 

Fast Sort for Basic Strings 

Function Keys 

Gemini/Epson Graphics Dump 
Gradebook for teachers 
Graphics Compression 
Graphics Lettering (2 sizes) 
Graphics Shifter 
Graphics Screen Zoom 
Home Bill Manager 
IO Data Monitor 
Inverse Highlighting 



Keystroke Saver 

Large DMP Graphics Dump 

Last Command Repeater 

Line Cross Reference 

LIST/DIR Pause 

Mailing List (Disk Only) 

ML/Basic Merge 

Memory Monitor 

Message Animator 

Metric Conversions 

ML to DATA Convertor 

Multiple Choice Test Maker 

Numeric Keypad 

ON BREAK GOTO command 

ON RESET GOTO command 

Phone Directory (Disk Only!) 

Printer-to-Screen 

Printer Tutorial 

Program Packer (Basic Pro's) 

Purchase Order Maker 

RAM Disk for Cassette* 

RAM Disk 2 (Cas & Disk)* 

RAM Test * 

Replace Phrases (Basic) 

Restore lost cas Basic pro's 

ROM Switcher * 

Sign Maker 

Single Stepper 

Slow Motion 

Speedup Tutorial 

Super INPUT/LINEINPUT 

Super Command Keys 

Super Editor 

Super Paint (65000 styles)* 
Super Repeat Key 
TAB/SHIFT-LOCK keys 
Tape Encryption 
Tape Index System 
Text Screen Dump 
Title Screen Creator 
UNKILL KILLed Disk pro's 
Variable Cross Reference 
VCR Tape Organizer 



All programs available on disk only. More than one program will be sent on the same disk. 
Documentation included. Please add $1.00 S&H. NYS residents add sales tax. All programs 
compatible with CoCo 1,2,3. Programs marked with * are compatible with CoCo 1 & 2 only. 



EACH PROGRAM - $9.00 2 PROGRAMS - $16.00 3 PROGRAMS - $21.00 
4-PROGRAMS - $24.00 5 OR MORE - $5.00 EACH 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Falrport, N.Y. 14450 
Phon#(716) 223-1477 



Toorder A!! flrdiri J50 & ikivi iklpM' kyZirfdu Air UPS villi m ixtn ckir|i Last minute shoppers 
can benefit VISA MC, Am Ex, Check, M0. Please add $1.00 shipping and handling 
(USA& CANADA other countries 55.00) C0Dadd$2.50 extra NYS residents please add 
Sales Tax lamtdliti iklpmiit Dealer inquiries invited 




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I 



Thanks, Delta Air Lines. I guess 
sometimes it helps to wish on a Rain- 
bow. 

Year Seven of THE RAINBOW brings 
some changes. 

Jim Reed, who has been managing 
editor for many years, is moving to a 
new position as assistant vice president 
of programs and projects for our parent 
firm, Falsoft, Inc, and Jutta Kapf- 
hammer — who has been Number Two 
to Jim for several years — takes over as 
managing editor. 

Expect to see some changes. Jutta 
comes with a charge to spruce things up 
a bit, both as far as content is concerned 
and, with art director Heidi Maxedon, 
will be looking at new design-type 
things as well. 

Jim will be in charge of a number of 
special things — some new and some 
that we hope to expand. He will, of 
course, as executive editor, continue to 
work with and advise me directly on this 
magazine, in addition to our other 
publications. 

There are a number of other changes 
associated with all of this, of course, but 
they should not really affect the way you 
relate to the magazine. 



One other change, which may affect 
a number of you, is in our advertising 
area. Cindy Shackleford, who has run 
our West Coast operation for a number 



"Year Seven of 

THE RAINBOW 

brings some 
changes. " 



of years — first as an employee and then 
as an independent representative — has 
decided to seek another opportunity. 

As a result, we have decided to move 
all of the advertising territory that 
Cindy formerly had into our own office 
here in Prospect. If you are interested 
in advertising and are in the western 



part of the United States, you can now 
get information from Belinda Kirby 
here. Her number is (502) 228-4497. 
Those who have worked with Kim 
Vincent and Jack Garland are unaf- 
fected by any of this. 

I know you will want to wish Jim, 
Jutta, Cindy and Belinda well in their 
new ventures. 

By way of "finally," IVe been asked 
to point out two important things here. 

The first is that our new OS-9 book, 
expected to be ready very soon now, is 
available from us only on a pre-order 
basis. We are not planning to print more 
copies of the book than for which we 
have orders on hand when we u go to 
press. "So, if you want one, please order 
it in advance. a 

Also, and very important, please fill 
out (or photocopy and fill out) the 
Color Computer Hall of Fame ballot on 
Page 109 of the July issue. And, please, 
only one ballot per nominator. This is 
a special program we are planning in 
conjunction with one of our future 
RAINBOWfests, and we want everyone 
to have a chance to make nominations. 

— Lonnie Falk 



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OUR LATEST ISSUE CONTAINED 

1. Accounts Receivable 6. Foot Race 

2. Work Mate 7. Flippy the Seal 

3. Calendar 8. Screen Calculator 

4. Invasion 9. Able Builders 

5. Tnp Adventure 10. Super Error 2 



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14 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



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Drive 0 


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CM-8 Monitor 


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Joysticks (pair) 


$ 13 


Mouse 


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MultiPak 


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Disk storage box (50) 


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CCR-81 Cass. Rec. 


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Disks (SS) $7.50/box 
Disks (DS) $8.00/box 
includes free library case 


DWP-106 

DMP-130A (120 CPS) 
DMP-430 


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Tandy 1000 EX 
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VM-4 Monitor 
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$ 99 
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CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 
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OS-9 Level 2 



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Minimum Order $15.00 



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MC. Visa. Am.Ex. - Sorry, No Citiline! 

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BUILDING A RAINBOW 



it 



Jim Reed jumping off • — 

Jutta Kapfhammer coming on . • • 
and Rainbow train keeps rollin' • • . 



"W" T^T^he first installment of my "Building A Rainbow" column, which began 
I l^^l in the April 1983 issue, I compared the creation of each month's issue 
A*. ^ of THE RAINBOW to a train. I also explained that, at a certain point 
in time, even though my heart remained with "those still on board" as the 
Production Express" clattered on down the line toward "Printer's Station," I 
would have to jump off, roll down the bank and get about the process of forming 
the next month's "train." 

After 55 of these monthly tumbles, this time I'm not forming up another 
trainload of material as this issue's caboose disappears into the distance. In fact, 
the September RAINBOW is already chugging along the production line with Jutta 
Kapfhammer at the controls. She's been appointed the new managing editor of 

THE RAINBOW. 

We were still in that crowded, former-beauty-salon of a RAINBOW office when 
German-born, but American-raised Jutta (pronounce that "Utah") joined the staff 
in February of 1983. So, even though she's only 28, Jutta's an "old-timer" by 
RAINBOW standards. She's been our submissions editor for four years and for the 
past year has also supervised editorial production for all of our publications. Thus, 
becoming RAINBOW managing editor, while hard-earned, is but one more feather 
in her Falsoft cap. 

For those who don't know, the managing editor is the one who actually decides 
what will be in THE RAINBOW, based on broad general guidelines established by 
editor and publisher Lonnie Falk. Thus, each month, Jutta will make the selection 
of specific articles to fit the monthly theme as well as "book" a variety of material 
to ensure a balanced "editorial mix." She will then oversee the entire editorial 
process, from "putting out fires" to making decisions about style and content, until 
it's time for her to "jump off the train" and start forming yet another issue. Given 
the same dedicated support, enthusiastic encouragement and enduring patience 
that it has been my good fortune to receive from readers and contributors alike, 
I am sure Jutta will find the challenge a rewarding one, too. 

No, no gold watch for me yet. I'm simply going to be exploring and pursuing 
some new avenues here at Falsoft as assistant vice president for programs and 
projects. As executive editor, I'll retain a general oversight responsibility for the 
editorial content of all Falsoft publications and, as groups manager on Delphi, 
I'll be online almostevery evening, as I am now. In fact, many of you will be hearing 
from me more often than before. So, no goodbyes are in order, but it's impossible 
to say thank you too often and I want to use this juncture as an opportunity to 
express my appreciation to all of you, too numerous to mention individually, for 
helping us "Build a Rainbow" each month over the 4'/2 years of my tenure as 
managing editor. I like to think that, together, we met the goal of "something for 
everyone, and some things for everybody." 

Thank you, CoCo Community. lH miss the rumble, the rhythm and the roar 
of the monthly train ride, but look for me waving at the crossing whenever the 
"Rainbow Special" whistle blows. As it was when I first began, "my heart is with 
those still on board," and I'm proud to be a part of it all. 

Finally, the same invitation I extended in that very first "Building A Rainbow": 
"If you aren't among those who have a year 'round pass to THE rainbow's train 
load of top-flight articles and programs, I hope you'll pull out the subscription 
card and climb aboard." 

Let's keep in touch, keep working together and keep following the RAINBOW 



— Jim Reed 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



SUMMER SPECIALS*!!! 




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*- See July '87 Rainbuw pg 69 for product descriptions ! 1 ! Also 5% 
off any product on pg 67 of same issue 1 1 1 Offer expires 8/25/87! 




Products! 



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Color Max III requires a 128K CoCo III and Hi-Res Joystick interface. ( SpeciTy prir>ter O~$59.95. Color Max III 
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TW-80 - 80 columns for TW-64 on CoCo III 

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A productivity enhancement that gives you the capability to add twenty £20) pre -defined, functions to the CoCo 
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BLACK & WHITE ??? RGB PATCH converts most games to display in COLOR on an RGB monitor. 128K DISK $29.95 



PAL SWITCHER - Designed by Marty Goodman! 

Have the best of both worlds by being able to switch between CoCo II and CoCo III modes when using a Multi-Pak 
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CoCo III 512K RAM sticker $4.99 CoCo III Multipak PAL chip $19.95 CoCo MaxIl/CoCo3 Patch * $29.95 

Level II Quick Ref Guide $4.99 Guide to CoCo III Graphics $21.95 CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 

Level II Basic09 binder . .$9.95 Better CoCo Ilf^raphlcs . $24.95 5T2K CoCo III Colter $299.95 

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Most orders shipped from stock. Allow 1-3 weeks for processing backorders. 

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1 





scavenger 



nai ftatscrike 



Hal, of Frankfort, Illinois, depicts a scene from the far future when mankind may need 
to mine the asteroids for fuel. He created this using Color Max 3. 



Honorable Mention 




Paper 



Tio Babich 




Tio created this graphic with a program he wrote. 
He lives in Miller Place, New York. 



18 



THE RAINBOW August 1 987 



This aquatic reptile enjoys a "pondside" lunch on a hot 
August day. Mr. Lee is the Technical Training Director for 
a major business equipment manufacturer and created this 
graphic with Color Max 3. He lives in Massapequa, New 
York. 



r j-t 



nil \ Uij$ £k 

»f , f , f if 




The Summoning 




\ 



Francisco Rios 



This graphic displaying mystic powers was 
created in basic. Francisco lives in 
Houston, Texas, and is a junior in high 
school. 



The mystery of the ancients is revealed in 
this graphic created with DeskMate and 
basic. Mark is a self-taught programmer 
who lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 




SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo Galleiy " Share your creations with the CoCo Community! Be sure 
to send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you created your picture (what programs you used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please include 
a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy 
of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is not an original work. 
We will award two first prizes of $25. one for the CoCo 3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize of $15 and one third prize of $10. Honorable Mentions may also be given. 
Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo Gallery. THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385. Prospect, KY 40059. Remember, this is a contest and your entry will not be returned. 

— Angela Kapf hammer, Curator 
August 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 9 



GAME 




CoCo Concentration 



By Allan J. Belanger 



Memocards is a game that requires a good mem- 
ory and strong powers of concentration. It runs 
on any 16K Color Computer with Extended 
Color BASIC. 

The game has a 40-card grid containing 20 identical pairs 
that must be matched within a given amount of turns. If 

A llan Belanger is a computer technician who has experience 
with eight- and 16-bit microprocessors. His hobbies are 
designing and building circuits for the TRS-80 systems and 
writing the software to drive them. He has been involved 
with electronics for 10 years. 







N/1 




K/l 









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□□□□□□□□□□ 



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15 13 14 IE IE 11 IB 19 ED 



□ □ 



□ □ 



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El EE S3 EH E5 EE El E B SB 3D 



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31 32 33 3H 35 3E 31 3B 33 HQ 



5 □ □ R E | 







TUR N 


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20 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



r 



The Amazing A-BUS\& 




An A-BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter In foreground 

The A-BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 

About the A-BUS system: 

• All the A- BUS cards are verv easy to use with any language (hat can 
read or write to a Port or Memory In BASIC use INP and OUT lor PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are ail compatible w>th each other You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application Card addresses are easily set with jumpers 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-123) and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples) 

Relay Card re-140: $129 

includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts SPST) individually 
controlled and latched 8 LEO's show status Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC) Card address is lumper selectable 

Reed Relay Card re 1 56: $99 

Same teatures as above but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max) Use as a channel selector solid state relay driver, etc 

Analog Input Card ad-i42:$i29 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 100V hy addimj a 
resistor 8 bit resolution (20mV) Conversion time 120us Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature light levels, pressure, etc Very easy to use 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-i46: $139 

This analog to digital converter is accuiate to .025% Input range is — 4V to 
mv Resolution. 1 millivolt The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts Conversion time Is 1 30ms Ideal for thermocouple 
strain gauge, etc 1 channel (Expand lo8channelsusing the RE- 156 card) 

Digital Input Card in 141: $59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/oil" devices, such as switches thermostats, alarm loops, etc to your 
computer To read the eight inputs simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK) 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-148: $65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computei The card can be set for input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O Uses the 8255 A chip 

Clock with Alarm CL-144: $89 

Powerful clock/calendar with battery backup tor Time. Date and Alarm 
setting (lime and date); built in alarm relay led and buzzer timing to t / 1 00 
Bcond Easy to use decimal format Lithium battery included 

Touch Tone" Decoder ph-i45:$79 

_5h tone is converted into a number which is stored nn the board Simply 
read the number with INP or POKE Use lor remote control projects, etc 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pr i52 $is 

3ft by 4V2 m with power and ground bus Fits up to 10 I C.s 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple. 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required 1 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10 




Smart Stepper Controller sc-i49:$299 



World's linosl 

motor ' SI 



nultaneously Incredibly it 
n 102 mc 
and 



tlAI 



coordinate In 



controller On board microorocessor controls 4 
s olam English commands like 
ft" Many enmnlex sequences can be defined as 
onboard memory For each axis vou can control 
olute) ramping, speed step type lhalf full wave) 
scale factor units holdmrj power etc Many inputs 8 limit & 'wait until" 
switches, panic button etc On the fly reporting of position speed etc On 
board drivers 1350mA) for small steppers (MO- 1 03) Send lor SC- 1 49 Hyer 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: S89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase For two motors (eight drivers) 
Breakout Board Option BB- 1 22: $1 9 

For easy connection of 2 motors 3 ft cable ends with screw terminal board 

Stepper Motor Driver st-143: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to qcI l.imiliar with them Each card 
drives two stepper motors (12V. bidirectional 4 phase 350mA per phase) 
Special Package: 2 motors (M0-1 03) -f-SM 43 PA-181 : $99 

Stepper Motors mo- 1 03: si 5 or 4 tor$39 

ancake type. 2V*" dia. v*" shaft 7 5 /step 4 phase bidirectional, 300 
step/sec. 1 2V. 36 ohm, bipolar. 5 oz-in torque same as Airpax K8270 1 • P2 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesiser 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter 4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter Counter Timer Voice Recognition 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

_ M PC XT AT and compatibles Us** snort sim 
Tandy 1000 1000 EX&SX 1200.3000 Uses rw* short slot 
Apple II. 11+ He Uses &ny slot 
TRS-80 Model 102 200 PIuqs into 40 oin svsiem bus' 
Model 100 Uses40 pm socket (Socket isdutficaierionadanlert 
TRS-80 Mod3 4 4D Ris50oir»bus (Wihrwddtsk useY-cabla) 
TRS-80 Model 4 P includes extia cable 150 om bus i« recessed) 
-80 M 

oinputers (Tandy) Fits ROM slot Muit tpak or Y-caWe 
rB 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-RUS card or to first Molherooard 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: C A-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb i20:$90 

Each Motherboard holds live A-BUS cards A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA 
61 SI 2). Up to live Motherboards can be imned this way to a single a 
iUS adapter Sturdy aluminum frame and card quides included 
The A-BUS is not a replacement (or the Multi-pak 



AR-133 
AR-133 
AR-134 
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AR-135 
AR-132 



188 
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AR-137 $62 



AR-138 S49 



Add S3. 00 par order tor shipping 
Vise, MC. checks. M.O. welcome. 
CT A NY resident* add teles tex. 
C O D. edd S3.00 extra. 
Canada, shipping Is SS 
Oversees sdd 10% 



ALPHA ; -Mism 



4 ■■■>}■*■> Inautttft Cofiptny 



242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



Technical info (203)656-1806 

&°ct v 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders (203) 348-9436 

All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 



you are successful in completing the grid, another grid will 
be dealt out, and a bonus score will be awarded for the 
number of turns left upon completion of the grid. 

After you load and run the program, the screen shows 
the main title and the message "Building Graphics" in the 
center of the screen. After a few seconds, the main playing 
grid appears showing the 40-card grid, the score set at 0, 
and the turn indicator set at 60. You are now ready to start 
playing the game. 

Use the digits (0 to 9) on the keyboard to enter the card 
numbers you want to look at. Two cards must be selected 
for each turn. The number of the card chosen must be from 
01 to 40. For example, if you want to see the two cards 
numbered 0 1 and 02, type 01, and af ter that card is revealed , 
type 02 to reveal the second card. A tone sounds for every 
key pressed. A high-pitched tone indicates that your entry 
was accepted, and a second key may be pressed. If a low 
tone sounds after you enter a two-digit number, this 
indicates that your entry was rejected. You may now enter 
another two-digit number. Typing any letter resets the 
keying sequence in case you type a wrong number by 
mistake. 

If the two cards revealed are not a match, the computer 
lets you examine them for about one second. Your turn 
indicator will then be decremented by one, and the cards 



will be turned face down again. At this point, you may make 
another selection. 

When you select two cards that match identically, the 
computer removes them from the grid, you are scored for 
the pair, and the turn indicator is decremented by one. At 
this point, you may make another selection. 

If you complete all 20 pairs of the grid within the allowed 
amount of turns, you are scored a bonus of 10 points for 
each turn left on the turn indicator and dealt a new grid 
of 20 pairs, and your turn indicator is set with five fewer 
turns than the previous round. 

A player may play many rounds. The more rounds a 
player completes, the harder it becomes, since there are 
fewer turns allowed to complete the grid. 

When a player runs out of turns on the turn indicator, 
the computer reveals the entire grid, your total score is 
displayed on the score board, and the turn indicator will 
display 0. To play again, simply press the space bar. 

The computer scores your matched pairs according to 
their added total face values. For example, two 5's are worth 
10 points; two aces are worth 28 points. 

( Questions about this program may be addressed to the 
author at 1857 Durocher St., Varennes, Quebec, Canada 
JOL 2P0. Please enclose an SASE for a written re- 
sponse.) □ 




The listing: MEMOCARD 



MEMOCARDS VERSION 1.0 
WRITTEN BY ALLAN J. BELANG 



COPYRIGHT (C) 1985 

FOR 16K EXTENDED COLOR BA 



10 ' 
20 1 
ER 
30 ■ 
40 1 
SIC 
50 » 

60 CLEAR200:CLS:A=8:T1=61:Z=RND( 
-TIMER) :POKE65495,0:DIMC$ (14) ,S$ 
(4) ,1(52) ,CP(40) ,B(52) ,H(2) ,D(2) 
: GOSUB300 : PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS1 : LINE ( 7 , 
7) -(249,184) , PRESET, B : POKE178, 1: 
PAINT (0 ,0) , ,2 

70 PRINT@71, "MEMOCARDS VER.1.0" 
; :PRINT@199, "building" ;CHR$(128) 
;CHR$(12 8) ; "graphics" ; :PRINT§358 
," BY: ALLAN J. BELANGER" : PRINT§3 9 
3, "COPYRIGHT (C) 1985" 

80 N=0 : Z=0 : U=0 : SP=3 :O=0:T=T1:X=1 

0 : Y=30 : V=0 : GOSUB3 60 
90 Z=Z+1 

100 Q=RND(52) : IFB(Q) =1THEN100ELS 
EI(Z)=Q:I(Z+20)=Q:B(Q)=l:IFZ<20T 



HEN90ELSEGOSUB3 60 
110 Z=Z+1 

120 Q=RND(40) : IFB (Q) =1THEN120ELS 

ECP (Z)=I (Q) : B ( Q) =1 : N=N+1 : Xl=X+4 : 

Y1=Y+21 : IFN<10THENE=1 

130 Q=Z :R=0:GOSUB220:Xl=X+4 :Y1=Y 

+21:GOSUB340:E=2 : IFZ<40THEN110EL 

SEGOSUB3 60:DRAW"C2S6BM41, 150BU2R 

35D8L3 6U8BD2BR3NR4D2R4D2L4BR7NR4 

U4R4BR3R4D4 L4U4BR7ND4R4D2L4R2F2B 

R3NR4U2NR4U2R4" 

140 DRAW"BM157,150BU2R28D8L28U8B 
D2BR2R4L2ND4BR4D4R4U4BR3ND4R4D2L 
4R2F2BR3U4F4U4" 

150 FORZ=lT02 : DRAW"C2S12BM"+STR$ 
(18+Z)+" , 12ND3F3E3D3BR4NR4UNR4UR 
4BR4BUND3F3E3D3BR4U2R4D2L4BR8NR4 
U2R4BR4ND2R4DNL4DBR4U2R4DL4R2FRB 
R4U2R3 FGL3BR8R4UL4UR4 " : NEXT : GOSU 
B270:GOSUB280:SCREEN1, 1 
160 FORP=lT02 

170 D(2) =0:D$="" :FORZ=lT02 
180 A$=INKEY$ 

190 IFA$=""THEN180ELSEIFA$<"0" O 
RA$>"9" OR(Z=lANDA$>"4") THEN260E 
LSED$=D$+A$ : PLAY"T50O4F" : NEXTZ : D 
(P)=VAL(D$) :IFD(P)>40ORD(P)<1ORD 
( 1 ) =D ( 2 ) THEN2 60ELSEIFB ( D ( P) ) =1TH 
EN260ELSEH(P)=CP(D(P) ) :V=l:GOSUB 
210 :NEXTP: V=0 : IFH ( 1 ) =H ( 2 ) THENGOS 
UB390:U=1:GOSUB270 
200 FORP=1TO100*A:NEXT:FORP=1TO2 



22 THE RAINBOW August 1987 




3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns X 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full-screen 
editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 
control codes 

Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated. Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The originai Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
Ti, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of thai, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fern. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriters chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without ihe major additional 
cost of a disk. 




...»m» of (he best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen.. 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— I6K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both, It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, f or example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85! 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 f ormats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on (he screen at one 
a me. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get.** This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPV1I/VIII, DMP-!00/2#0, Epson, Okidaia, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Tenninel, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript , superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bouom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi line headers and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell *n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for su r e saves. Cassette auio- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk; print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line* end line, top of te&t, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen, 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast ''free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 




. . . tntiy a stale of the art w*rd processor.. . 
outstanding in every respect, 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



RAINBOW 

CfRTlFiCATION 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Californians add 6% state tax,) 

Available at 

Radio /hack stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple II is a trademark of Apple Computer. Inc.; Atari is & trademark 
of Atari. Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp; MX-80 is s 
trademark of Epson America. Inc. 



-I — 



: G0SUB2 10 : NEXT : G0SUB2 8 0 : U=0 : GOTO 
160 

210 C=H(P) :Q=D(P) :R=0:IFU=1THENB 
(D(P) )=1 

220 IFQ>10THENR=R+1:Q=Q-10:GOTO2 
20ELSEX=10+(20*Q) :Y=30+(28*R) 
230 S=l 

240 IFC>13THENS=S+l: C=C-13 :GOT02 

4 0ELSECOLOR1 : LINE ( X , Y ) - ( X+ 1 6 , Y+ 1 

9 ) , PSET , BF : IFV=0THEN2 50ELSEDRAW" 

S4C2BM"+STR$ (X+3 ) +" , "+STR$ ( Y+2 ) + 

C$ (C) : DRAW"BM"+STR$ (X+7) +•• , "+STR 

$(Y+14)+S$(S) : RETURN 

250 COLORU: LINE (X, Y) - (X+16 , Y+19 ) 

, PSET, B: LINE (X+3 ,Y+2) -(X+13, Y+17 

) , PSET , BF : RETURN 

260 PLAY"T15O2D":GOTO170 

270 0=2:SP=4:N=SC:COLOR2:LINE(93 

,147) -(135, 159) ,PSET,BF:X1=9 6:Y1 

=150 : GOSUB3 4 0 : RETURN 

280 O=2:SP=4:T=T-1:N=T:X1=202:Y1 

=150 : COLOR2 : LINE ( 200 , 147 ) - ( 216 , 1 

59) ,PSET,BF:GOSUB340 

290 IFT=0THEN370ELSEFORZ=1TO40:I 

FB (Z) =0THENRETURNELSENEXTZ : FORZ= 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to THE RAIN80W are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that 
are useful/helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and 
it is best to make several saves, at least one of them 
in ASCII format. We're sorry, but we do not have time 
to key in programs. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary explaining how the 
program works. Generally, we're much more inter- 
ested in how your submission works and runs than 
how you developed it. Programs should be learning 
experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Those wishing remuneration should so sfafe 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed 
information on making submissions, please send a 
self -addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submis- 
sions Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some 
more comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



1TOT: PLAY"T10G" : SC=SC+10 : GOSUB27 
0 : NEXTZ : Tl-Tl-5 : SCREEN1 , 0 : GOTO80 
300 C$ ( 1 ) ="BRNGR3 FD2GL3GD2R5BU7B 
R" : C$ ( 2 ) ="BRNGR3 FDGNLFD2GL3HBR6B 
U6" : C$ ( 3 ) ="BD4NE4R5LD3U7BR2 11 : C$ ( 
4)="NR5D3R4FD2GL3HBR6BU6" :C$ (5)= 
"BRR3 FHL3GD5FR3EU2HL3GBU4BR5 11 
3 10 C$ (6)="NDR5DG3D3BR4BU7" :C$(7 
)="BRNGR3FDGNL3FD2GL3HU2EHUBEBR5 
" : C$ (8 ) ="BRNR3GD2 FR3EU2HFD5GL3NH 
BR5BU7" : C$ (9 ) ="BLNGD7BR3HU5ER3FD 
5GL3 11 : C$ ( 10) ="BLBD6NUR4U6LR2 11 : C$ 
(11)="R4D6NHL4NU6R5ND" :C$ (12)="D 
6U3RNE3F3" :C$ (13 ) = 11 BDER3 FHL3 GD3N 
R5D3BR5U6" 

320 N$ (0)="NR4D6R4U6" :N$ (1) ="BR2 
ND6":N$ (2) ="R4D3L4D3R4BU6" :N$ (3) 
="R4D3NL4D3NL4U6" :N$(4)="D3R4U3N 
D6":N$ (5)="NR4D3R4D3NL4BU6" :N$(6 
)="NR4D6R4U3NL4BU3" :N$ (7) ="R4ND6 
" : N$ ( 8 ) ="R4 D6L4U3NR4U3R4 11 : N$ ( 9 ) = 
"NR4D3R4U3D6NL4U6 11 

330 S$ ( 1 ) ="BLERFDGLHUBE3ERFDGLHU 
BF3ERFDGLHUBLD4 LU4BR3 D2E2 L2 BL5D2 
H2R2BE3D2H2R2 11 : S$ (2 ) ="E4F4DGLH2N 
D4NU2G2LHUBRE3F3GH2G2HEND3R4D3E2 
BL6D2H2 11 : S$ ( 3 ) ="E4F4G4H4 11 : S$ ( 4 ) = 
"BUE2 F2E2F2DG4H4U 11 : RETURN 
340 POKE178 ,0:Q$=STR$ (N) : FORQ=E 
TOLEN (Q$) :M=VAL(MID$(Q$,Q, 1) ) : DR 
AW"S"+STR$ (SP) +"BM"+STR$ (XI) +•• , 11 
+STR$ ( Yl ) +N$ (M) : I FM=1 AND S P= 3 THEN 
X1=X1+SP+2ELSEX1=X1+ (SP*2 ) 
350 NEXTQ: RETURN 

360 FORZ=1TO52:B(Z)=0:NEXT:Z=0:R 
ETURN 

370 FORZZ=1TO40:IFB(ZZ)=0THENPLA 
Y"T4AGAT1F" :V=l: FORZ=1TO40:C=CP( 
Z ) : R=0 : Q=Z : GOSUB2 20 : NEXTZ : SC=0 : T 
1=61ELSENEXTZZ : Tl=Tl-5 : SCREEN1,0 
: GOTO 80 

380 IFINKEY$=""THEN380ELSE70 
390 PLAY"T10O3AGDEFGDGEAAGDEGF" : 
SC=SC+( (C+l) *2) : RETURN /R\ 



Hint . . 



Circuit Solution 



When my tape recorder began giving me numerous 
I/O Errors, I began to look for the cause. It appears 
the dropping resistor in the aux input circuit of the 
recorder had "gone high." This resulted in marginal 
program saves. I replaced the resistor with one of the 
proper value and all is well now. So, if you are 
technically minded and the usual head alignment 
adjustment doesn't do the trick, you might check for 
this possibility. Theodore Looman 

Sacramento, CA 



24 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



COMPUTIZE, INC. • (215) 946-7260 • P.O. BOX 207 • LANG HORN E, PA 19047 




I 



INTRODUCiN 



Unleash the power ol your CoCo 3 with 320 x 20D 
screen resolution, and the choice of any 16 colors 
from the CoCo 3's 64 color palette, and your 
graphic creations almost can't help, but come alive 
with color and detail. Icons, pull down menus* and 
dialog boxes make DOLOR MAX -3 very easy to use. 
1 1 touts are supplied, making hundreds of I altering 
styles possible. Text can use any combinations of 
color, sriadow, outline, bold, and italics. Painting is 
a snap with 16 colors and 32 editable patterns 
COLOR MAX 3 requires a 128K CoCo 3 with disk 
drive. High-Resolution Joystick interface, and a 
joystick device (mouse, touch pad, or joystick) 

ORDER YOURS TODAY! 

F'eise iptiutfe S3 00 shipping & handling. PAresidenis add 6% safc 
:.u Speedy catalog numtiers urtwn orbing 

200MD ColQr Max 3 {without print driver) 

201 M D Color Max 3 (with EPSON MX/RX/FX S 
compatibles driver) " 

202MD Color Max 3 (with DMP-1D5/1 20/1 30 
driver} 

203MD Color Max 3 [with " CGP-220 'driver ) 

CtjlQf Max 3 Accessories 

220MD Color Max 3 Pix Converter 1 

(Contains 6 converters! S29.95 

i CoCo MAX B&W to M G E ' format 

• CoCo MAX artifact to MGE' tor mat 

• 6K B&W binary file to k MGE' format 

• 6K artifact binary tile tc MGE' format 

• GhAPHOM BSW lile to MGE' format 

• GHAPHICOM artifact Ilia Id MGE format 



221 CH Hlgh-flesolulion Joys lick Interlace Si 2,00 
(Radio Shack Cat. No. 26 3026} 





ii. 



fiiputer f 

GRAPHICOM FEATURES: 4 page animation 
mode. Send/ Receive pictures over modem • 
multiple Hi-Res fonts • Utility lor transferring 
Graphicom screens to basic or M/L programs 
• Built m Hi-Res screen print program • 
Send/ Receive slow scan TV 
Many additional features, operating hints, 
hardware mod s and suggestions, etc. Re- 
quires 64K CoCo. 1 disk drive, and 2 analog 
joysticks 

Ordor Catalogf 11 160. See RAINBOW REVIEW (4/84 
on page 225) 

GRAPHICOM DISK $24.95 



urapnicom Part II requires To^K uoco [i 
ill) and disk drive. It will load and save both 
STANDARD/BIN files and GRAPHICOM 
screens. GRAPHICOM PART II does NOT re- 
quire Grapnicom to RUN! 

Graphicom Part II is a video processing 
package that provides many tunctions that are 
missing in GRAPHICOM Here are just a few 
of the features provided by Graphicom Par! II: 
Enlarge/Reduce/Rotate • Muti-paltern Paint 
• Pan & Zoom • Typesetter & Font Editor • 
Pixel Blaster. GRAPHICOM PART II does NOT 
require Graphicom to RUN' 

Order Catalog* 132W0. See RAINBOW REVIEW 
(11/85 on page 209) 

GRAPHICOM PART II DISK . $24.95 



HARDCOPY is more that just aT^Gh pnTl 
utility, compare these features with any other 
graphic dump program on the market: Gray 
Scale or B&W printouts. 1x1. 2x2. 3x3, 
Lables. posters, and greating cards with your 
graphics and much much more! See 
RAINBOW REVIEW (10/85) on page 218) 
HARDCOPY requires a 64K CoCo (I. II. or 111) 
and disk drive. Please specify printer and 
catalog # when ordering 

IDS 480/560 G Cf WOWQ • OKI 8?A lOkigrapti} CI 179WD • 
OKIOAtA 9?. CI 171W0 • GEMINI IOX. CI I74W0 • GEMINI SG 
10/)S. Ci I7BW0 • DMP-lOS CI I83W0 • OMP-110. Cl 1B0W0 * 
DMP I?0 Cl W6W0 • 0MP-J30. Cl 162W0 • OMP-ZOQ. Cl 
I7SW0 * CGP-220 Cl IBtWD • EPSOttU-88 Cl J73W0 « EPSOH 
MX-80 Cl 172WO • EPSOM RX/FX 30. Cl 173W0 - RIIEMAK 
PLUS Ci 17 7WD 



AfiW^Ing COLORSCAN, new soltware lor 
the CGP-220 and your 64K CoCo (I. II. III). 
This program is a must for anyone who owns 
a Radio Shack Ink Jet Printer, and enjoys 
creating graphics with Graphicom, Graphicom 
Part II, CoCo MAX. or any other program that 
produces a standard 6K binary picture files. 
COLORSCAN will print program listings in 
blazing color. Help create colorlul banners up 
to 55 inches in fength. produce 1x1/2x2 or 
poster printout ol your favorite 6K graphic 
disk files. 



HARDCOPY OISK 



$29.95 



Order Catalog* 184W0, 
(1/87 page 136) 

COLORSCAN DISK 



See RAINBOW REVIEW 



$29.95 



Ci a 

•iSKr su!.:.:. iixzn, 



Of ii'tur 

COk UK 




It. I II I 





(1)19114 Wt4KTESfl11~ra* il t.O 



tMC III. I I HA 1 t I'M I H II H Uf II ili 




(DlBB'j WHITESII1ITH U:l.O 

ALL H I C H V H l - L M VfO 



- • - • • - • « 
•••••• •••»•• ••••»* 



♦ - - • * 
- • - • » - • 



* » " • ww www w w m • • • w » wmmm 

COLUO^CAM MI-MfS PKIHf UMIITY 



□ H IB L 




r-nm 

Q 



tot iaf> w »« ■ I » ti m ■ t n «i i n 



COMPUTIZE, 



INC. • (215) 946-7260 • P.O 



. BOX 207 • LANGHORNE, PA 19047 









Kerckhof f 



neaky Snake is a colorful game with 
sound effects the whole family can enjoy. 
You lead a snake around on the screen 
looking for root beer, avoiding snake pits 
and tying your snake into a knot. It 
requires a 32K Color Computer, a disk drive, and, as 
an option, a joystick. 

Type in the program from the listing and save it to 
your disk as SNEAKY. Be careful typing in lines 780 on, 
as these lines contain the data needed to generate the 
machine language portion of Sneaky Snake, Most of 
the program is written in BASIC, but where quick 
response is needed, machine language is used. 

When you've copied Sneaky Snake onto your disk, 
plug a joystick into the left joystick port (if you don't 
have a joystick, you can elect to use the arrow keys 
on the keyboard) then type RUN "SNEfiKY" to start the 
program. The screen will display the opening graphics 
while the computer pokes in the machine language 
program. Once the machine language program is in 
memory, the rules and objectives of Sneaky Snake will 
be displayed. Follow the instructions on the screen. 
In general, the rules and objectives are to guide your 
snake around on the screen using the joystick (or 
keyboard), trying to lead the snake to the little blue 
mugs of root beer, avoiding the red snake pits. Hitting 
a mug of root beer causes your snake to grow one body 
length; hitting a snake pit causes your snake to shrink 
one body length. The game ends if you run your snake 
into a wall (outside edges of the play field) or tie your 
snake into a knot (run the snake over itself"). As you 
will quickly learn, short snakes are easy to guide 
around the screen, but long snakes can be difficult. 
I hope you enjoy Sneaky Snake. Be careful about 
who you let play with the game, espe- 
cially with joysticks. 1 lost two 
joysticks when a frustrated friend 



Peter Kerckhoff has been working with computers 
since 1975. He and his wife, Re nee, and daughters 
Danielle and Brittany live and work in the Silicon 
Valley. M 




i 







i 






















i 
i 
i 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 27 



170 
270 
380 
500 
570 
640 



223 


710 


156 


88 


750 


224 


214 


830 


15 


105 


880 


45 


13 


END 


41 


210 



T 



The listing: SNEAKY 



SNEAKY SNAKE 



VR 2.1 



COPYRIGHT (C) 1982 
BY PETER KERCKHOFF 
REV. 6/86 P. KERCKHOFF 



10 

20 

30 
40 

50 

60 

70 

80 

90 

100 CLEAR1390,&H7A9F:SP=0:SR=3 :G 
OSUB680 : GOSUB440 : GOSUB49 0 : DIMA ( 7 

) 

110 POKEXC, 10:POKEYC, 10:A$=CHR$ ( 
2 9 ) +CHR$ (28) +CHR$ (24): GOSUB3 50 : G 
OSUB3 70 : POKECH , 30 : POKEXC , XP : POKE 
YC , YP : Z=USR3 ( Z ) : IFSP=lTHENGOSUB3 
7 0 : POKECH ,31: POKEXC , XP : POKE YC , YP 
:Z=USR3 (Z) 

120 X=&H7AA0:POKEX, 10:POKEX+1, 11 
:POKEX+2, 12 :X=&H7B68:POKEX, 10 : PO 
KEX+1 , 10 : POKEX+2 , 10 : POKEM, 1 : POKE 
LN,2:A$=INKEY$ 

130 X=JOYSTK(0) :X=JOYSTK(2) :Y=JO 
YSTK ( 3 ) : A$=INKEY$ : IFPEEK (J) =0AND 
A$<> 11 "THEN15 0 

140 IF (X<50RY<50RX>580RY>58 ) ANDP 

EEK(J)=1THEN150ELSE130 

150 PLAY"AG" : Z=USR1 ( Z ) : FORX=0TO5 

0STEPSR : NEXT : IFPEEK (G ) =1THEN150 

160 ONPEEK(G)GOTO170, 180,260,300 

,310 

170 GOTO150: 'SHOULD NEVER GET HE 
RE 

180 PLAY"L255V3104BAGFEDC" : POKEL 
N,PEEK(LN)+1:X=&H7AA0+PEEK(LN) :Y 
=&H7B68+PEEK(LN) : LX=PEEK(X-1) : LY 
=PEEK (Y-l):ONPEEK(M) GOTO 190,200, 
210,220 

190 LX=LX+1:GOTO230 

200 LY=LY-1:GOTO230 

210 LX=LX-1:GOTO230 

220 LY=LY+1:GOTO230 

230 POKEX, LX: POKEY, LY: POKEXC, PEE 

K(X-2) :POKEYC,PEEK(Y-2) : POKECH, 2 

9 : Z=USR3 ( Z ) : GOSUB3 7 0 : POKEXC , XP : P 

OKEYC,YP: POKECH, 30 :Z=USR3 (Z) :IFS 

P=lTHENGOSUB3 7 0 : POKEXC , XP : POKEYC 

, YP : POKECH ,31: Z=USR3 ( Z ) 



240 IFPEEK(LN) <200THEN150 : 1 MAXI 

MUM SNAKE LENGTH = 200 

250 A$="YOU HAVE OBTAINED A MEGA 

-SNAKE 11 : POKEXC , 0 : POKEYC , 0 : GOSUB3 

50:A$="THE SNAKE LENGTH IS 2001 I 

! 11 : POKEXC , 0 : POKEYC , 0 : GOSUB3 50 : GO 

SUB540:GOTO110 

260 A$="BFBFBFBF" : PLAY"L100O1V31 
XA$ ;V15XA$ ; V7XA$ ; V3XA$ ; V2XA$ ; V1X 
A$;V0XA$;V31O4L2 55" 
270 XP=PEEK(&H7AA0+PEEK(LN) ) : YP= 
PEEK ( &H7B68+PEEK ( LN) ) : POKEXC, XP: 
POKEYC , YP : POKECH ,32: Z=USR3 ( Z ) 
280 X=PEEK(LN)-1:IFX<2THENX=2 
290 POKELN,X:GOTO150 
300 A$="YOU HAVE TIED YOUR SNAKE 
INTO A" :B$="KNOT. . .LENGTH WAS": 
GOTO320 

310 A$="YOU HAVE RUN YOUR SNAKE 
INTO A" : B$="WALL. . . LENGTH WAS" 
320 POKEXC, 0: POKEYC, 0:GOSUB3 50: A 
$=B$+STR$ (PEEK(LN) +1)+" . 11 : POKEXC 
, 0 : POKEYC , 1 : GOSUB3 5 0 : POKEXC , 0 : PO 
KEYC,3:A$="PRESS TRIGGER FOR SAM 
E GAME" :GOSUB350: POKEXC, 0: POKE Y 
C,4:A$="OR PRESS ENTER FOR NEW S 
ET-UP" :GOSUB350 

330 A$=INKEY$ : Z=PEEK( &HFF00) AND2 
:IFA$=""ANDZ=2THEN330 ELSE IF Z= 
0 THEN GOSUB620:GOTO 110 ELSE GO 




SUB560:GOTO110 

340 • CHARACTER OUT RTN 

350 FORL= 1TOLEN ( A $ ) : POKECH , AS C ( M 

ID$(A$,L,1) ) :Z=USR3 (Z) :PLAY"04V1 

0 L2 5 5 AG " : POKEX C , PE EK ( XC ) + 1 : NEXT : 

PLAY"V31L255BFBF" : RETURN 

3 60 • RND RTN FOR RB OR SNK PIT 

370 XP=RND(27)+2 : YP=RND(18)+2 :AP 

=&H0E00+YP*256+XP: IFPEEK(AP) <>0T 



28 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



HEN37j3ELSEA ( 0 ) =AP+1 : A ( 1 ) =AP+2 56 : 
A ( 2 ) =AP-256 : A ( 3 ) =AP-1 : A ( 4 ) =AP+2 : 
A(5)=AP+512 : A (6) =AP-512 : A ( 7 ) =AP- 
2 

380 Y=&Hj36j3j3 + PEEK(&H7B68+PEEK(LN 
) ) *2 5 6+PEEK(&H7AAj3+PEEK(LN) ) : FOR 
X=j3T07 : IFY=A (X) THEN3 7j3ELSENEXTX : 
RETURN 

3 90 RESTORE : CLS 

400 READ A$ : PRINT@j3 , A$ ; ff 11 ; : IFA$ 

<>"*"THEN4j3j3ELSECLS 

410 READA$ : PRINTA$ ; !f - ff ; 

420 IFINKEY$<> !! !f THEN42j3ELSE4 10 

430 A$=INKEY$:IFA$= !f!f THEN4 3j3ELSE 

PRINTHEX$ (ASC(A$) ) :GOT043j3 

440 RESTORE : AD £ =&H7DD / 0 

450 READD$: IFD$<> !! * !f THENPOKEAD r V 

AL( !f &H !f +D$) :AD=AD+l:GOT045j3 

460 AD=&H7C3A;DEFUSR1=&H7C3E: DEF 

USR3=&H7D7E : YC=&H7C37 : XC=YC+1 : CH 

=XC+1 : LN=&H7C31 : POKELN-1 , 0 :M=LN+ 

1 : J=M+1 : G=J+ 1 : POKE J , 1 

4 7 0 READD$ : I FD$<> 11 * 11 THENPOKEAD , V 

AL ( 11 &H"+D$ ) :AD=AD+l:GOT047j3 

480 RETURN 

490 PMODE3 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 0 : PCLS : LINE 
(0,0) -(2 55, 191) , PSET, B : LINE ( 4 , 4) 
-(251, 18 7) ,PSET,B: POKEYC, 2: POKEX 
C, 10 :A$= ff SNEAKY SNAKE 11 : GOSUB3 50 
500 POKEXC , 3 : POKEYC , 4 : A$ = ff WELCOM 
E TO THE GAME SNEAKY 11 : GOSUB3 50 : P 
OKEXC,l: POKEYC, 5 :A$= !f SNAKE. THE 
OBJECT OF THIS GAME 11 : GOSUB3 50 : PO 
KEXC, 1: POKEYC, 6: A$ = !f IS TO GUIDE 
YOUR SNAKE ( "+CHR$ ( 2 9 ) +CHR$ ( 2 9 ) 
+CHR$(28)+CHR$(24)+ !f ) 11 :GOSUB35j3 
510 POKEYC, 7 : POKEXC, l:A$ = !f TO THE 

MUG OF ROOTBEER ( !f + CHR$ ( 3 0 ) + " 
) , 11 :GOSUB35j3: POKEYC, 8 : POKEXC, 1: A 
$ = !f AVOIDING THE SNAKE PITS ( !f + C 
HR$(31)+ !f ) . 11 : GOSUB3 5j3 : POKEYC , 10 
: POKEXC, l:A$ = !f YOUR SNAKE WILL GR 
OW LONGER AS !f :GOSUB 3 50 
520 POKEYC, 11: POKEXC, l:A$= !f IT DR 
INKS THE ROOTBEER — BUT IF !f :GOSUB 
350: POKEYC, 12 : POKEXC, l:A$ = !f THE S 
NAKE FALLS INTO A SNAKE 11 : GOSUB3 5 
0 : POKEYC , 13 : POKEXC , 1 : A$= H PIT THE 

SNAKE WILL SHRINK . 11 : GOSUB3 5 0 
530 POKEYC, 15 : POKEXC, 4 : A$ = !f THE G 
AME ENDS IF YOU TIE 11 : GOSUB3 50 : PO 
KEYC, 16: POKEXC, l:A$= !f YOUR SNAKE 
INTO A KNOT OR LEAD 11 : GOSUB3 5j3 : PO 
KEYC, 17 : POKEXC, l:A$= !f IT INTO A W 
ALL, 11 :GOSUB3 5j3:PLAYTN$ 
540 POKEYC, 21: POKEXC, 4 :A$ = !f PRESS 

ANY KEY TO CONTINUE 11 : GOSUB35j3 : A 







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August 1987 THE RAINBOW 29 



$=INKEY$ 

550 Z=PEEK( SlKTF00) AND2 : IF INKEY$ 
= AND Z = 2 THEN 550 
560 PCLS : POKEXC , 2 : POKEYC ,21: A$ = !f 
PRESS ENTER OR USE TRIGGER" : GOSU 
B3 50 : POKEYC , 2 2 : POKEXC , 2 : A$= 11 BUTT 
ON TO ENTER VALUE 11 : GOSUB3 50 
570 POKEXC, 10: POKEYC, 2 :A$ = !f SNEAK 
Y SNAKE 11 : GOSUB35)3 : POKEXC, 2 : POKEY 
C,6:A$= !f SNAKE PITS ( 1=YES J3=N0) 
" :B$=RIGHT$(STR$ (SP) ,1) :GOSUB3 5j2 
:A$=INKEY$ : GOSUB64)3 : IFB$ = !f l !f THEN 
SP=lELSEIFB$ = !f )3 !f THENSP=)3 
580 POKEYC, 8: POKEXC, 2 :A$ = ff SNAKE 
SPEED (1 TO 5) " :B$=RIGHT$(STR$( 
SR) ,1) :GOSUB35)3:A$=INKEY$:GOSUB6 
40 : IFB$> !! )3 !f ANDB$< 11 6 11 THENSR=VAL ( B 
$) : POKEYC, 1)3: POKEXC, 2 : A$="KEYBOA 
RD (J3) OR 11 : GOSUB3 5)3 
590 POKEYC, 11: POKEXC, 2 :A$=="JOYST 
ICK (1) 11 : B$=RIGHT$ ( STR$ ( PEEK 

(J) ) , 1) :G0SUB3 5J3:A$=INKEY$:G0SUB 
64 0 : POKE J , 0 : IFB$=» 1 11 THENPOKE J , 1 
600 POKEYC, 14 : POKEXC, 2 :A$='»** PR 
ESS ANY KEY TO START **":GOSUB3 5 
)3:A$=INKEY$ 

610 Z=PEEK(&HFF 1 0J2) AND2:IF INKEY$ 

= !f!f AND Z=2 THEN 61J3 

62 J3 PCLS : POKECH ,23: F0RX=J3T03 1 : PO 

KEXC , X : POKEYC , J3 : Z=USR3 ( Z ) : POKEYC 

, 23 : Z=USR3 (Z) : NEXT : FORX=)3T023 : PO 

KEXC ,J3: POKEYC, X:Z=USR3 (Z) : POKEXC 

,31: Z=USR3 ( Z ) : NEXT : RETURN 

630 'KEYBOARD INPUT 

64)3 POKECH, ASC ( B$ ) : Z=USR3 ( Z ) 

650 A$=INKEY$ : Z=PEEK ( &HFF)3 0 ) AND 2 

:IF A$= l,,f AND Z=2 THEN 650 ELSE 

IF Z=0 THEN RETURN ELSE IFA$ = !fff T 

HEN65j3ELSEIFA$> ,, / !f ANDA$< ,f : "THENP 

LAY !f V31L255B !f : B$=A$ : GOT064j3ELSER 

ETURN 

660 GOT066)3 

670 1 TITLE PAGE GRAPHICS 

68)3 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PCLS1 : DRA 

W"BM15,84C)3S8F3R7E2U6H2L3H2U2E2R 
2E5R4E2U6H2L3H2UE2R2E2R2U3EUDRLG 
L3D2GL3G3D4F2R3F2D2 G2 L3G5L2G3D5F 
2R3F2D2G2L5H3D2" 

690 DRAW" BM+14 , +3U8R2 F5U5R2D8L2H 
5D5L2BM+11,+)3U6E2R2F2D6L2U2L2D2L 
2BM+2 , -3R2U2L2D2BM+6,+3U8R2D4E4R 
2G4F4L2H3GD2L2BM+16 , +J3L6U8R6DL4D 
3R2DL2D2R4DBM-27 , -2 1U8R2F5U5R2D8 
L2H5D5L2BM+11,+)3U8R6DL4D3R2DL2D2 
R4DL6BM+8 , +J0U6E2R2F2D6L2U2L2D2L2 
BM+2 , -3" 

700 DRAW !f R2U2L2D2BM+6,+3U8R2D4E4 



R2G4F4L2H3GD2L2BM+13 , +)3U4H3UR2F2 
E2R2DG3D4L2 11 : CIRCLE ( 180 , 100) , 20 , 
0, . 2 :LINE( 160,100 )-(160, 13 0) , PRE 
SET: LINE (200 , 1)3)3) - ( 2)3)3 , 1)35 ) , PRES 
ET : CIRCLE ( 18)3 , 13)3 ) , 2)3 , J3 , . 2 , J3 , . 5 : 
LINE (16)3, 13)3) - (16)3, 14)3) , PRESET 
710 LINE (2)3)3, 13)3) -( 2)3)3 , 14)3) , PRES 
ET: CIRCLE (18)3, 14)3) ,2)3,)3,.2,)3,.5: 
LINE (19 5, 1)38 ) - (210 , 1)34) , PRESET : L 
INE( 19 5, 13)3) - (21)3, 126) , PRESET: LI 
NE( 21/3, 1)34) - (210 , 126) , PRESET: LIN 
E(19 5,113)-(2)35,ll)3) , PRESET: LINE 
(19 5, 125) -(2)3 5, 122) , PRESET : LINE ( 
205, 110) - (205, 122) , PRESET 
120 LINE (200, 112) -(200, 122) , PRES 
ET : FORX=9T02 7STEP9 : LINE ( 15 9+X, 10 
9) - (15 9+X, 12 6) , PRESET: LINE (158+X 
, 111) - (158+X, 124) , PRESET: NEXT: PR 
ESET(5 5,12) : PRESET (53, 10) 
730 F0RX=1T01)3: XC=X*4 + 16)3: YC=100 
-RND(lj3) : LINE (XC-1 , YC) - (XC + 1, YC) 
, PRESET: LINE (XC,YC-1) -(XC, YC+1) , 
PRESET: NEXT 

74)3 DRAW 11 BM5 , 11J3S12RULU2D3 BM+2 , - 
1 FUD2 LBM+ 4 , - 1 S 8U5R2 D2 L2 BM+ 5 , + 3 L2 
URLUR 2BM+2,+)3R2LD2 BM+ 5 , + J3 L2 URLUR 
2BM+3,+£LD2URFHUBM+7,+2H3D3U5D2E 
2BM+5 , + 5 L2 URLUR 2 BM+ 2 , +2U2RDLRFBM 
+ 3 , +,0LU2RBM+3 , +2HEGDU5BM+3 , +)3D5U 
2 R2 D2 BM+ 2 , +J3U2 R2 D 2 L2 BM+ 4 , +)3U 5 RBM 
+ 3 ,+)3LD5BM-4 , -3R6" 

7 50 DRAW"BM3£i, 190S8HU3ER2FD3GL2B 
M+5,+j3U5F5U5BM+5, +)3L3 D2R2L2D3R3B 
M+5 , +J3U5F2E2D5BM+3 , +)3HU3ER2FD3GL 
2BM+5, +)3U5F2E2D5BM+5,+J3L3U3R2L2U 
2R3BM+2 , +5U5F5U5BM+2 , +)3R4L2D5BM+ 
7 , +J3U5R3 D 3 L3 BM+ 5 , - 3D5R3BM+ 5 , +J3L3 
U3R2L2U2R3BM+2 , +5U3E2F2DL4R4D2BM 
+ 2 , +)3R3U3L3U2R3 BM+5 , +)3L3 11 
7 60 DRAW !f D2R2L2D3R3 !f :TN$ = "V31T50 
3L4CDL2E-DCL4CDE-FDE-L2CL4GGGGGA 
-GFDE-FFFGFE-L4CDL2E-DCL4CDE-FDE 
-L2CP8T204L255P8 11 : RETURN 
770 1 CHARACTER FONT TABLE 
78)3 DATA28 , 82 , 82 , 82 , 82 , 82 , 82 , 28, 
)3,)3,3,FC,FC,3,)3,)3,)3,33,33,3F,C,C 
, C, C, 0 , 0 , C0 , 3F , 3 F, CJ3 ,0 ,0 , C , C , C , C 
, 3F, 3 3 , 3 3 ,0 , 14 , 14 , 69, 69 , 69 , 69 , 14 
, 14, 55, 55,69, 7D, 7 D, 69, 55,55, A8, A 
8 , AA , A2 , A2 , A2 , A8 , A8 , 3 C , FF , FF , FF , 
FF,FF,FF,3C 

790 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,4,4,4,4 
,4,)3,4,)3,ll,ll,ll,|!,)3,p,)3,)3,)3,)3, 
0,0,0, 0,0,0,4, 15,10,4,1, 15,4,0,0 
,0,0, 0,0, 0,0, 0,0, 0,0, 0,0, 0,0, 0,4 
,4,4,)3,)3,)3,p,)3,l,4,4,4,4,4,l,)3 
8)3)3 DATA1)3,4,4,4,4,4,1)3,)3,)3,11,4 



30 THE RAINBOW August 1 987 



,15, 4 ,11, 0,0,0,0,4, 15, 4, 0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,1,1,4,0,0,0,0,15,0,0,0,0,0 
,0,0,0,0,4,4,0,1,4,4,4,4,4,10,0, 
4,11,11,11,11,11,4,0,4,14,4,4,4, 
4,15,0 

810 DATA15,1,1,15,10,10,15,0,15, 

1,1,5,1,1,15,0,11,11,11, 15,1,1,1 

,0,15,10,10,15,1,1,15,0,15,10,10 

,15,11,11,15,0,15,1,1,1,1,1,1,0, 

15,11, 11, 15,11, 11, 15,0, 15, 11, 11, 

15,1,1,15,0,0,4,4,0,4,4,0,0 

820 DATA0, 1,1, 0,1, 1,4, 0,0, 1,1, 4, 

4,1,1,0,0,0,15,15,0,0,0,0,0,10,1 

0,4,4,10,10,0,4,11,11,1,4,0,4,0, 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,15,11,11,11,15,1 

1,11,0,14,11,11,14,11,11,14,0,5, 

10,10,10,10,10,5,0 

830 DATA14,11,11,11,11,11,14,0,1 
5,10,10,14,10,10,15,0,15,10,10,1 
4 , 10 , 10 , 10 , 0 , 15 , 10 , 10 , 1 1 , 1 1 , 1 1 , 5 
,0,11,11,11,15,11,11,11,0,15,4,4 
,4,4,4,15,0,1,1,1,1,11,15,4,0,11 
,11,14,14,11,11,11,0,10,10,10,10 
,10,10,15,0 

840 DATA11,15,15,11,11,11,11,0,1 
4,15,11,11,11,11, 11,0,15,11, 11,1 
1,11,11,15,0, 15,11, 11, 15,10,10,1 
0,0,4,11,11,11,11,15,5,0,15,11,1 
1,15,14,11,11,0,15,10,10,15,1,1, 
15,0,15,4,4,4,4,4,4,0,11,11,11,1 

I, 11,11,15,0 

850 DATA11,11,11,11,11,11,4,0,11 
,11,11,11,15,15,11,0, 11,11, 11,4, 

II, 11,11,0,11,11,11,11,4,4,4,0,1 
5,1,1,15,10,10,15,0,* 

860 ' MACHINE CODE FOLLOWS 

870 DATAEF,DF,F7,BF,B6,7C,33,26, 



1B,C6,4,8E,7C, 3A, A6 , 80 , B7 , FF, 2,B 
6,FF,0,84,8,27,5,5A,26,F1,20,26, 
F7,7C,32 , 20,21, BD,A9,DE,B6,1, 5D, 
C6,2,81,5,23,EF,C6,4,81, 3A,24,E9 
,B6,1,5C,C6,3,81,5,23,E0,C6,1,81 
,3A,24,DA,CC,7A,A0 

880 DATAF3 ,7C, 30, IF, 1,A6, 84,B7,7 
C,3 6,CC,7B, 68,F3,7C,30,1F,1,A6,8 

4, B7,7C, 35, B6,7C, 32,81,1,26,5,7C 
,7C,3 6,20,19,81,2,26,5,7A,7C,35, 
20, 10, 81, 3, 26, 5, 7A,7C, 36, 20, 7, 81 
,4,2 6,3,7C,7C,3 5,CC,E,0,F3,7C,3 5 
,1F,1,A6,84,C6,5,81,28,27, 10, 5A, 
81,55,27,B,5A,81,3C,27,6 

890 DATA5A,81,A8,27,1,5A,F7,7C,3 
4,8E,7A,A0,A6,84,B7,7C,38,8E,7B, 
68,A6,84,B7,7C,37,86,20,B7,7C, 3 9 
,BD, 7D, 7E, CC, 7A,A0, F3 ,7C, 30, IF, 1 
,A6,84,B7,7C,38,CC,7B,68,F3,7C,3 
0,1F,1,A6,84,B7,7C,37 
900 DATA86 , 1C, B7 , 7C , 39 , BD , 7D, 7E , 
7A,7C,31,CC,7A,A0,F3 ,7C, 30 , IF , 1 , 
A6 , 84 , B7 , 7C, 38 , CC, 7B, 68 , F3 , 7C , 30 
,1F,1,A6,8 4,B7,7C,3 7,8 6,1D,B7,7C 
,3 9,BD,7D,7E, 7C,7C, 31,B6,7C, 32, 8 
B, 17,B7,7C, 39,B6,7C,36,B7,7C,38, 
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August 1987 THE RAINBOW 31 



Approaches for 
Lifelong Learning 



By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Too often, we think of education 
as something only for young 
people. Sometimes we expand 
our definition of education to college 
students. The truth is that we learn at 
any age, indeed at all ages. Instead of 
thinking just about young people, con- 
sider for a moment the adult learner, 
especially the adult in need of computer 
education. 

Adult learners come in all types. For 
example, many businesses offer 
computer training for employees. Most 
of these programs are oriented toward 
specific applications, such as word 
processing, database manipulation, 
spreadsheets, or a general orientation to 
computers. Many times, the learner 
(company employee) is only taught 
enough to start a computer, run the 
specific application, and get out of the 
task. In some cases, training is severely 
limited to job-specific applications. For 
example, some businesses only want 
employees to update information in a 
database file. Training is limited only to 
how updating is done. There is no 
broader learning about databases in 
general or about how the machine 
works. 

This limited type of training serves a 

Michael Plog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois, 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in the central office of 
a school district and is currently em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



purpose for the business — employees 
can now complete the tasks assigned to 
them. It is not, however, much in the 
way of adult education. The purpose of 
adult education is the same as the 
purpose of education for children: to 
increase the knowledge level of the 
learner and provide a set of skills that 
can be used in a variety of situations. 
Thus, this trainingis not true education. 

There are millions of people who 
entered the world of computers late. In 
my own case, it has been over two 
decades since I was in high school. 
When I went to high school and college, 
computers were discussed, but only as 
powerful machines available to a few 
and understood by even fewer. I know 
some people who did not have the 
opportunity to learn about computers 
— when micros were on the market — 
until they were retired! 

There are many adults who want to 
learn some general information about 
computers, master a few applications, 
or just increase their knowledge in some 
specific area. These people represent the 
need for adult education. Different 
options exist to satisfy the need. All 
have advantages; all have disadvan- 
tages. 

Most adults learn about computers 
by the informal method. It is impossible 
to talk with adult computer enthusiasts 
f or very long without hearing the phrase 
"self -taught." Some people say it with 
pride; some people say it with an apol- 
ogy. The fact of the matter is that most 
adult computer users are indeed self- 



taught in many aspects of their ma- 
chines. The idea of "self-taught" is a 
little deceptive, however. Many people 
have tutors — friends or relatives who 
provide the basic instruction necessary 
for continuing education to occur. After 
the initial introduction, the computer 
user becomes truly self-taught, learning 
from books and trial and error. 

This approach to computer knowl- 
edge is not without merit. People tend 
to learn more and faster when a topic 
interests them. Informal learning also 
centers very quickly on specific areas of 
major importance to the learner. For 
example, a person wants to learn about 
spreadsheets. After a period of agony 
and review, a spreadsheet is purchased. 
The user quickly becomes familiar with 
that package and with spreadsheets in 
general. 

Informal learning does not necessar- 
ily mean reliance only on self. Many 
computer users have friends who pass 
on information and "tricks" about 
manipulating the machines. Informa- 
tion is shared freely among hobbyists. 
The problem is that learning is spotty 
and incomplete. The informal learner 
misses many of the details, some of 
which may be important. 

One aspect of informal learning is 
information shared at conferences. 
Some people attend RAINBOWfest 
primarily to talk to other users with 
similar problems or to ask questions of 
those with more experience. 

There are other options for adult 
learners besides the informal method. 



32 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 




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The indispensable 




MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains more than 200 pages 
and up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns 
and as many as 20 product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 




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& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
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Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
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ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
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about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
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Use our 800 number! 

For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

inquiries please call (502) 228-4492. 

We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

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is $103 (U.S.). All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 

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In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



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CoCo every month of the year! 

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THE RAINBOW today! 



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'omputer conferences also provide a 
lore formal type of education through 
orkshops and presentations. Some of 
\c presentations deal with very specific 
pplications, such as database manage- 
lent or spreadsheets. 
Other, less informal, training is pro- 
'ed by equipment dealers. Tandy still 
jlfers classes through Computer Cen- 
ters for people who buy Tandy equip- 
nent. The learner must pay a fee for 
hese classes, but gets continuing sup- 
)ort (includingtelephonesupport) from 

■ local Center. Other dealers may also 
vide training for local markets, but 
Tandy training is a national institu- 
n. 

Vlany adult learners have discovered 
>n-credit courses at community (two- 
ear) colleges. In most states, these 
istitutions have continuing education 

adults. Community college admin- 
rations have discovered that comput- 

education is a hot-selling topic at 
resent. All types of students will enroll 
1 computer classes. Classes are typi- 
fy for specific applications, such as 
\SLC instruction or word processing. 

addition, most community colleges 
fer a course in beginning computer 



literacy. The beauty of this somewhat 
formal education for adult learners is 
that tuition is often inexpensive, and 
community colleges are often easy to get 



to. 



"No matter 
how much you 
know about 
your computer, 
there is still 
more to learn. " 



However, adult learners are not lim- 
ited to community colleges for formal 
instruction about computers. Private 
firms are rapidly getting into the act, 
also. In most towns, you can find 
private instructors offering classes in 
computer applications. Adults can 
attend classes on a variety of topics, 



from computer literacy to detailed 
training in specific software packages. 
Fees for these courses range from down- 
right cheap to outrageous. 

Forma! instruction is even offered by 
users clubs. Some of these clubs offer 
free instruction to members, although 
others charge a fee for instruction. This 
seems like an ideal situation for adult 
learners. Local experts can set up 
classes for club members on topics of 
interest. Club members determine the 
areas of interest. 

In order to institute this activity, a 
fairly large club is necessary. The club 
needs to be large enough to have more 
than one expert in several areas. Also, 
the club would need to have a fairly 
large pool of members as students. This 
activity offers benefits for the club, as 
well as for members. The lure of free or 
inexpensive adult education can help 
boost membership. 

Education is truly a lifelong activity. 
No matter how much you know about 
your computer, there is still more to 
learn. With the possibilities available to 
the adult learner, the limits of your 
education are only what you decide to 
place on yourself. 




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August 1987 THE RAINBOW 35 




GAME UTILITY 




j 

! 

T, 



Keep track of those hard-won scores 

Keeping Score With CoCo 



hi 



By Lou Ashby 



Until recently, the area around my 
computer was a mess. Lots of 
little bits of paper with cryptic 
messages, such as "Bill Zaxxon 18000" 
and "Luanne — Pacatak — 23,450," 
were scattered all over the place. They 
represented (I discovered) landmarks of 
achievement. Arcade gamesters are 
proud of their high scores — and heaven 
help anybody who misplaces one! My 
three resident joystick jocks think their 
game scores are even more important 
than the latest issue of rainbow! 

My solution to this problem is a 
paper-eating program called CoCo 
Scoreboard. I wrote it, put it on a disk 
and stuck it in the box with the games 
disks, and the clutter disappeared. 
Neatness has returned and errant 
breezes no longer threaten to disperse 
the scores of my offspring. 

The menu allows you to create the 
games file, add games, insert or change 
high scores, and display and print the 
scoreboard, all from one LOAD or RUN. 
Those with only 16K will have to delete 
lines 10 through 90 and PCLEflR 1 to 

Lou Ashby is an independent computer 
consultant and an old CoCo nut who 
enjoys programming in BASIC, FORTH 
and 6809 assembler. Lou lives in Phoe- 
nix, Arizona. 



avoid an OM Error in the game-add 
function. 

One advantage of direct file organi- 
zation is that if a file doesn't exist, DOS 
will build one, so you use the game-add 
function to create your initial games 
file. Just type in your game names in any 
order (maximum length: 1 5 characters). 
When you have entered them all, a final 
ENTER will drop the program into a sort 
to alphabetize the names and write the 
records to disk. You also use this func- 
tion whenever you add new games to 
your collection. Your new additions will 
be merged with the existing records and 
sorted into their proper positions in the 
file. 

The second function allows you to 
randomly insert or change player names 
and scores on the game records. At the 
"Game?" prompt, simply type in the 
name of the game record you want to 
update; if it exists, the system will find 
it, display the current data and prompt 
for changes. 

If no update is to take place to a field, 
press ENTER and the current data re- 
mains. Otherwise, enter the player's 
name (maximum: 10 letters), press 
ENTER and type the score at the "Score" 
prompt. One hint about the score field 
— it is alphabetic. You can enter non- 
numeric data (maximum: 10 charac- 



L i 



36 




THE RAINBOW August 1987 



ters), such as times, ratings or scores, 
with punctuation for better visual im- 
pact. Press Q to return to the menu. 

The third function displays the score- 
board sequentially on your monitor or 
TV. This is an ego-builder for one and 
all — see your name on the screen as 
best-in-the-house at something. 



To prevent excessive wear and tear 
from looking up scores to see if a new 
record has been achieved, use Function 
4 to print an occasional list for quick 
reference. This also helps minimize the 
"oops" factor. Those without a printer 
might want to keep the code for this 
feature intact and simply change Line 



150 from DN C GOTO 170, 2B0, 540, 
790 to ONC GOTO 170, 2B0, 540, 100, 
which will reject entry into hard copy 
logic until your printer arrives. (You will 
get one sooner or later!) 

Now if I can just design a program 
that untangles joystick cables. □ 




60 196 

120 167 

270 140 

420 206 

580 32 

730 232 

END 87 



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30 DRAW"C0BM12,55F4R12E4U2H4L12H 

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3) , 1 : CIRCLE (X+5, 121) , 1: CIRCLE (X+ 
8,119) , 1:NEXT: CIRCLE (110, 85) ,3,1 
:CIRCLE(130,85) , 3 , 1 : CIRCLE ( 120 , 9 
5) ,12 , 1, .6 ,1, . 5:SCREEN1,1 
70 SC$="NF2L6G2D6F2R6E2BR5NU6F2R 
6E2U6H2L6G2BR2 5H2L6G2D6F2R6E2BR5 
NU6F2R6E2U6H2L6G2BR35H2L6G2DF2R6 
F2DG2L6H2BR25G2L6H2U6E2R6F2BR5D6 



F2R6E2U6H2L6NG2BR13ND10R8F2DG2L3 
NL5F5BR5NR10U5NR8U5R10BR5ND10R8F 
2DG2NL8F2DG2NL8 BR7H2U6E2R6F2D6G2 
NL6 

80 SD$="BR7U5NR10U3E2R6F2D8BR5U1 
0R8F2 DG2 L3 NL5F5BR5U10R8F2 D6G2L8 " 
: FORX=3 0TO3 1 : FORY=17 0TO17 1 : DRAW" 
S4C0BM"+STR$ (X) +" , "+STR$ ( Y) +SC$ : 
DRAW SD$ : NEXTY , X : T0$="T5P8L4AO+C 
0-BAGEL4 . CL8DEGFL4EDL1C" : T1$="L3 
2C+DE-EFF+GG+AA+BO+C" 
90 FORO=4T01STEP-l:PLAY M 0 M +STR$ ( 
O)+T0$: NEXT :FORO=lT04: PLAY T1$:N 
EXT 

100 CLS: PRINT© 3 3, "COCO SCOREBOAR 
D IS ON THE AIR." 

110 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 3 ); "WHAT WOUL 
D YOU LIKE TO DO?" 
120 PRINT : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 4 ) ;"1) 
ADD NEW GAMES " : PRINTTAB ( 4 ) ; " 2 ) U 
PDATE SCORES" : PRINTTAB (4) ; "3) DI 
SPLAY THE SCOREBOARD" : PRINTTAB (4 
);"4) PRINT A SCORE LIST":PRINTT 
AB(4) ;"5) QUIT 

130 PRINT : PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 7 ) ; "TAK 
E YOUR PICK";: INPUT C$:C=VAL(C$) 
140 IF C<1 OR C>5 THEN PRINT : PRI 
NTTAB(9) ; "NOT A CHOICE" ;: FOR D=0 

TO 800:NEXT D:GOTO 100 
150 ON C GOTO 170,280,540,790 
160 CLS : END 

170 CLS : CLEAR 3500:DIM G$(100):O 
PEN "D",#l, "GAMES/DAT", 35: FIELD 
#1,35 AS GM$:IF LOF(1)=0 THEN 19 

0 

180 FOR 1=1 TO LOF(l):GET #1,I:G 
$(I)=GM$:NEXT I 

190 INPUT "NAME ";G$:IF G$="" TH 
EN 210 

200 1=1+1 :G$ (I)=LEFT$ (G$+STRING$ 
(35, " ") ,35) :GOTO 190 
2 10 CLS : PRINT@2 3 6 , "SORTING" : PRIN 
T@256, "" ; 

220 FOR J=l TO I: FOR K=J TO I 

230 IF LEFT$ (G$ ( J) , 15) < LEFT$ (G 

$(K) , 15) THEN 250 

240 T$=G$ (J) :G$ ( J) =G$ (K) :G$ (K) =T 

$: PRINT"* "; 

250 NEXT K : NEXT J 

260 CLS:PRINT@200,"ONE MOMENT PL 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 37 



EASE" : PRINT© 2 6 5, "WRITING TO DISK 
it 

27J3 FOR J=l TO I : LSET GM$ = G$ (J 
):PUT #1, J: NEXT J: CLOSE #l:GOTO 
100 

28j3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" GAME SCORE 
UPDATE" 

29J3 OPEN "D",#l, "GAMES/DAT", 35 
3j3j3 FIELD #1,15 AS G$, 1J3 AS N$, 
1J3 AS S$ 

31j3 PRINT@128, "GAME" ;: INPUT GN$ : 
IF GN$="" THEN CLS : CLOSE : END 
32J3 IF LEN(GN$)<15 THEN GN$=GN$+ 
" ":GOTO 32J3 

33J3 IF LEN(GN$)>15 THEN GN$=LEFT 
$(GN$,15) 

34j3 F = l:M = INT ( (LOF ( 1 ) +1 ) /2 ) : 
L = LOF(l) :C = J3 

35J3 GET #1,L:IF G$ = GN$ THEN M= 
L:GOTO 39j3 

36j3 GET #1,M:IF C > (LOF(l)+l)/2 

THEN 48,0 
37J3 IF G$ < GN$ THEN 4 6j3 
38J3 IF G$ > GN$ THEN 47 j3 
39J3 CLS: PRINT @ 64, GN$ : PRINT @ 
128, N$: PRINT @ 192, S$ 
4j3j3 PRINT: PRINT: INPUT 11 PLAYER N 
AME" ;P$ 

41j3 IF P$="" THEN P$=N$ 

42J3 PRINT : PRINT : LINE INPUT " HIG 

H SCORE ";R$ 

43j3 IF R$="" THEN R$=S$ 

44J2J LSET G$ = GN$ : LSET N$ = P$ : L 

SET S$ = R$:PUT #1,M 

45j3 GOTO 49j3 

46j3 F = M:M = (M+L)/2:C ■ C + 1: 
GOTO 3 6J3 

47j3 L = M:M = (M+F)/2:C = C +1:G 
OTO 36)3 

48J3 CLS: PRINT § lj3j3,GN$;" NOT FO 
UND" 

49j3 PRINT @ 44 8," TO DO ANOTHER 

- PRESS <ENTER> ELSE PRESS <Q> 
ii 

5j3j3 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN 5j3j3 
51j3 IF I$="Q" THEN CLS : CLOSE : GOT 
O 100 

520 IF I$=CHR$(13) THEN 31J3 
53 0 GOTO 500 

540 CLS5:PRINT@48j3,STRING$ (32 , "% 
") ; :PRINT@48j3,STRING$(9,255) ;"co 

co" ;CHR$ (12 8) ; "scoreboard" ;STRIN 

G$ (8,255) ;STRING$ (32 , "%") ; 

55j3 FOR N=1T011:PRINT§4 80, STRING 

$(32,2j37) ; :GOSUB 76j3:NEXT 



56j3 A$="ALPHA":GOSUB72j3:A$="TO" : 
GOSUB7 20 : A$=" ZAXXON" : GOSUB7 2J3 :A$ 
="SEE WHO'S BEST AT WHAT . . . " 
:GOSUB72j3 

57j3 OPEN "D",#l, "GAMES/DAT", 35 
58j3 FIELD #1,15 AS G$, 10 AS N$ , 
10 AS S$ 

590 FOR 1=1 TO LOF(l):GET #1,I:G 
N$=G$ : NN$=N$ : SN$=S $ 
600 IF GN$="" OR GN$=STRING$ (15, 
" ") THEN 69j3 

61J2J IF RIGHT$(GN$,1)=" 11 THEN GN 
$=LEFT$ (GN$ , LEN (GN$) -1 ) : GOTO 61j3 
620 IF RIGHT$(NN$,1)=" " THEN NN 
$=LEFT$ (NN$, LEN (NN$) -1) : GOTO 62j3 
63j3 IF RIGHT$ (SN$ , 1) =" " THEN SN 
$=LEFT$(SN$,LEN(SN$) -1) :GOTO 63 0 
64j3 P=192+( (32-LEN(GN$) )/2) : PRIN 
T@P,GN$ ; 

65j3 P=256+( (32-LEN(NN$) )/2) : PRIN 
T@P,NN$; 

66j3 P=32j3+( (32-LEN(SN$) )/2) : PRIN 
T@P,SN$; 

67j3 FOR DY=0 TO 2j3j3j3:NEXT DY 
68j3 PRINT§192,STRING$ (32,2j37) ;:P 
RINT@256,STRING$ (32,2j37) ; : PRINT@ 
32j3,STRING$(32,2j37) ; 
69 0 NEXT I 

700 PRINT@2j32, "THAT'S ALL" ; : FORW 

=j3T02j3j3j3:NEXTW 

71j3 CLOS E : GOTO 100 

120 S=224 : P=2 55 : D=0 

730 IF D<>LEN(A$) THEN D=D+1:B$= 

B$+MID$(A$,D,1) 

74j3 IF P=S THEN B$=RIGHT$ (B$ , LEN 

(B$)-l) ELSE P=P-1 

75^3 PRINT@P,B$+CHR$(2j37) ; 

76j3 PLAY"T250"+STR$(RND(5) )+"N"+ 

STR$ (RND(12) ) 

77J2J FORW=lT01j3:NEXTW 

78j3 IF B$="" THEN RETURN ELSE 73 

9> 

790 PRINT#-2," «< THE COCO S 
COREBOARD »>" : PRINT#-2 , " " 
800 PRINT #-2, "GAME 
PLAYER SCORE" :PRINT#-2, " 

ii 

81J3 OPEN "D",#l, "GAMES/DAT", 35 
82j3 FIELD #1,15 AS G$, lj3 AS N$, 
10 AS S$ 

83J3 FOR 1=1 TO LOF(l):GET #1,I:P 
RINT #-2,G$;" ";N$;" ";S$:NE 
XT I 

84j3 CLOSE #l:GOTO Ij3j3 



38 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



Oh 




I fMissed the Speech Systems Super Sale 



te 



to 



to 




Cheer Up, It's Back Until August 10 

FOR YOUR COCO 1, 2, or 3 



SUPER VOICE (COCO's Premiere Speech Synthesizer) 
EARS (Now you can really talk to your computer) 
SYMPHONY 12 (A real 12 voice music synthesizer) 
LYRA (The musical COCO MAX) 

COCO MIDI 2 (Complete hardware 8c software for MIDI) 
PIANO KEYBOARD (A professional 61 note keyboard) 
PROTO BOARD&CASE (For the experimenter) 
TRIPLE Y CABLE (Connect 3 hardware paks together) 
DOUBLE Y CABLE (Connect 2 hardware paks together) 
MUSICA 2 (The ideal music 8c printing composer) 
MUSIC LIBRARY (100 songs per volume, 9 vols available) 
LYRA LYBRARY (50 songs of 7 8c 8 voice music) 

EXCLUSIVELY FOR YOUR COCO 3 




$59.95 
79.95 
59.95 
44.95 
119.95 
119.95 
14.95 
29.95 
23.95 
24.95 
24.95 
29.95 



512 K TURBO RAM (FAST 120 NS MEMORY) 

512 K TURBO RAM W/O CHIPS 

MAGIC OF ZANTH 

RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE 







99.95 
49.95 
29.95 
29.95 



For product descriptions of items not listed in this issue of Rainbow 
see our 7 page catalog in the May issue starting on page 39. 




EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 

Recognition 
Svstem 



$99.95 



t=j % ^ ; 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 

QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 




Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by you r voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In factyou do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



free 
blank disk 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 
ORDER 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
giveyou the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 

COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 






Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



-//- 



s, 



peec 



li ^ifstemS 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois res/dents add 6%% sales tax 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 




1URB 



RAM 



$1 1 9.95 



TURBO CHARGE YOUR COCO 3 




i> 512K Fast High Quality Memory. 

Super Easy Solclerless Installation. Installs in minutes. 
V Assembled, tested, and burned-in. 
t> 120 ns RAM Chips 

t> High Quality Double Sided, Solder Masked, Silkscreened PC Board 
^ Ideal for OS9 Level II 
2 Year Warranty. 

Free CIME Chip Technical Specs ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
^ Free 512K Ram Test Program ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
^ Free MUSICA RAM Disk ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 



t> $5 OFF TURBO RAM Disk. 

t> Also available, TURBO RAM less memory chips. 



$69.95 




INSTALLATION 

If you know how to hold a screwdriver, we're convinced you can 
install Turbo Ram in minutes. However, it you like, send us your 
COCO 3 insured, postage paid, and we will install it, pay the return 
postage and guarantee it tor I year $15.00 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

It' for any reason you wish to return Turbo Ram, you may do so 
within 15 days and be charged only a 10% restocking charge. You 
may keep the GIME CHIP Technical Specs, 51 2K Ram Test program 
and MUSICA RAM DISK, a $30 value. 



TURBO RAM DISK 



TURBO RAM DISK adds 2 lightning fast Ram Disks to your COCO system. 
Imagine saving and loading programs instantaneously and having hundreds 
of your programs "on line" for fast access. Single disk system users can 



use TURBO RAM DISK to easily make backups without continuously 
switching disks. 

Requires 5I2K Turbo Charged COCO 3 $24.95 

When purchased with TURBO RAM $19.95 



COCO 3 128K 



COLOR CONNECTION IV 

This is the most comprehensive modem package for the COCO 3. All 
standard protocols are supported including CompuServe's Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol, and XON/XOFF. Full support of the auto answer/auto 
dial feature for both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems is 
provided. Single key macros allow easy entry of often-used passwords and 
ID's with a single key stroke. 

Disk $49.95 

COLOR SCRIBE III 

This great Word Processor can take full advantage of the 80 column'display 
of the COCO 3. Justification, Headers, Footers, and Pagination make it 
perfect for letters and documents as well as programming in BASIC, PAS- 
CAL, "C," and Assembly Language. Over 20 line editing commands include 
capabilities like character insert and delete, skip over words, breaking a 
line, and more! 

Disk $49.95 



THE MAGIC OF ZANTH 

In the Land of Zanth, magic is commonplace. Dragons, Griffins, Centaurs 
and Demons abound. You are sent on a quest to discover the source of 
magic in the Land of Zanth. This intriguing adventure features over 2 
dozen hi-res 16 color animated graphic screens, A voice music and sound 
effects. The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics look great. 
Disk $34.95 

RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE 

This is the same junior you've seen in the Kong arcade series, but with 
new COCO 3 graphics. This tireless little monkey must overcome all sorts 
of obstacles (4 screens worth) to rescue his father, The King, from the 
mean zookeeper. He will traverse the jungle and swamp, climb vines, 
avoid chompers and birds, open locks, and more before he finally meets 
with his big daddy. The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics are superb. 
Disk $34.95 



We accept CASH. CHECK. COD, VISA nnd MASTER CARD orders 38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 

Shipping and handling US and Canada bJ.UU // tf"^ 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada S3. 0U V / / X / BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

r., s c X„; „*, !* " 00 » 2EZC/2 <^U^tsmi 012)879-6880 



ic 




TM 



do&o 



FILE EDIT HID! Til SC 



All Voices Dn 
Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 



LEGE 



9—*h 



$U CAN 



pose 



FILE EDIT MIDI MISC 



Pi 



lock delete 



Block copy 



■#— 3-IA 



-4L. 



BiiBIDIZ)© 



4^ 




I 



2, 



3 



LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
■any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRAMIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CMI47). 



Ultra Easy to use, just pointwith joystickor 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not 
misprint!) 

Super Simple Editing Supports: 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 
Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



t> Outpul all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 
12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 
drum machines. 

t> Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 
channels. 

V Transpose music to any key. 
^ Modify music to any tempo. 

V Automatically inserts bar for each measure 
as you compose. 

*^ Key signature lets you specify sharps and 
flats only once. LYRA will do the rest. 
Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 
(#LC164). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

*x Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 

LYRA OPTIONS - 



f Solo capability 

Block edits are highlighted. 

Tie notes together for musical continuity. 
*x Name of note pointed to is constantly 

displayed. 

Jump to any point in the score 
instantaneously. 

Memory remaining clearly displayed, 
however you will have plenty of memory 
even for the most demanding piece. 

i> Help menu makes manual virtually 
unnecessary. 

^ LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 
hardware unless you want more power. 
Music easily saved to tape or disk. 

*x Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 



LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 



$54.95 



These LYRA options are not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA 
files. 

(Disk) #LC164 . $14.95 



VERSION UPDATE 

To receive the latest version of LYRA return your 
original disk. #UP162 , * > , , $10.00 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MCT58 , . , , $19.95 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD «rders. 
Shipping and handling US and Cannda £3.00 
Shipping and handling outside the US and Canadn S5.00 
C«D Charge 52.00 
Illinois residents add (> l A% sales tax. 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(Disk) #LSI77 . . $19.95 

LYRA LIBRARY 

A collection of 50 songs ready to play for hours. 
Most have 7 and 8 voices. #LL I3 7 . $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 
play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 ... . ♦ » . $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 

A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CMI47 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 900 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 



COCO MAX is a trademark of Colorware. 
ORCHESTRA 90 is ,1 trademark of Radio Shock. 




38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



a d t n ~_r^_ 



H J 1 tI I 



MIDI Instruments: 



0: 


LJ01 


B p as s 


1 ; 


005 


S t r i n9 


2 


: 006 


Piano 


35 


009 


Gu i t ar 


4 


: 013 


E Organ 


5: 


014 


P Organ 


6 


i 003 


Truupe t 


7\ 


016 


Flute 


8 


: 018 


□ boe 


9: 


019 


C 1 arne t 


A 


: 021 


Vibrphn 


B: 


026 


Harpsch 


C 


: 025 


Clavier 


D 


: 032 


Tinpani 


E 


: 043 


Stiaredr 


F 


: 045 


Percusn 




Lyra 

COMPATIBLE! 





3 



1 



J- 



t * 



so M 



}3& 



1 I 1 F I 1 I i t I 1 

i 1 I I A i * t i 1 

T | -t f r * * l 





oiiguzal cliJz ivitfz $20. 



Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MU5ICA MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system. 



Supports 16 Track recording and playback. 

u 0 Adjustable tempo. 

Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible) 

^ Record to any track 

\S Low Level track editing. 

\* LYRA editing, (one voice per track). 

^ Playback from any number of tracks 

^ Quantizing to Vi6. 732, V64 intervals. 

^ Dynamic memory allocation. 



Filter out MIDI data: 
Key pressure 
Program change 
Pitch wheel 



Control Change 
Channel Pressure 
System Message 



^ Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode. 

Adjustable Key (Transposition) for each 
track. 

Save recording to disk for later playback or 
editing. 

^ Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE. 



PUNCH IN and PUNCH OUT editing. 

^ Sequencer features. 

100% machine code. 

"Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 

Metronome 

^ Many songs included. 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64K CoCo, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 
DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY1B1 .... $28.95 
TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY173 $34.95 



DK LIBRARIAN 



TM 



Save and load voice parametersfor the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 

Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the; presets, cartridge, CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



MUSICA Ml Dl takes any MUSICA 2 music fi le and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



usingMUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plentyof music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 . . . $29.95 



Put an end to alien-ation 




Battle Back With Munchkin 

Blaster 

By Steve Donald 



Aliens are attacking, zooming around the sky, 
shooting laser bolts at your fuel tanks and crashing 
"kamikaze" into your laser cannons. You're in 
charge of defense at this military base, so it's up to you to 
eliminate the aliens by aiming the cross hairs of your heavy 
lasers and firing a bolt of energy at them. 

To play Munchkin Blaster, push the firebutton to bring 
up the game screen. In the bottom corners are your two laser 
cannons, and in between them are your four white fuel 
tanks, which must be protected at all costs. When either or 
both of your lasers are destroyed, or all of your fuel tanks 
are blown up, the game is over and you are asked, "Another 
planet?" 



After 20 aliens are eliminated, bonus points are awarded 
for lasers and fuel tanks remaining. Then, a new set starts, 
with all damages repaired and more vicious aliens to defeat. 

I added the rapid fire feature to save your firing finger, 
and you have the options of using the speed-up poke and 
a high score. To make your high score permanent, change 
Line 30 so that H5= your high score and H$= your name, 
then resave the game. Good Luck! 



( Questions about this game may be sent to Steve Donald, 
Oba, Ontario, Canada POM 2P0. Please enclose an SASE 
for a response.) □ 



44 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



w 230 



159 1050 

430 208 1240 

620 203 1300 

760 240 1380 

930 90 END 



243 
185 
...2 
243 
160 



The listing: BLASTER 



T 



lj3 ' 

2j3 ■ 

3j3 f 

40 f 

5j3 ■ 

6j3 1 

7)2 1 

8j3 ' 

110 
12)3 
13J3 

14) 3 

15) 3 
OKE 

16) 3 
OTOl 



########################## 
########################## 



## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 



MUNCHKIN BLASTER 
BY 

STEPHEN DONALD 

0 BA , ONT AR 1 0 , CANADA 
P)3M2P)3 



## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 
## 



»########################## 
»########################## 
X=Y=M=N:CLS: PRINT "SPEED UP P 
[Y/N]?" 

P$=INKEY$ : IFP$=' f N"THENPO=l : G 
70ELSE IFP$<> !! Y"THEN16)3 



162 PRINT " DOUBLE OR TRIPLE [2/3] 
ii 

164 P$=INKEY$ : IFP$ = ff "THEN164ELSE 
IFP$ = "3"THENPOKE65497 , )3 : PO=3 EL 
SE IFP$ = n 2 n THENPOKE6 54 9 5 , f5 : PO=2 
ELSE164 

17) 3 DIMS(34) ,C(31) ,B(25) ,G(9) :0= 
1 : HS=4 4)3 : H$ = n STEVE M 

18) 3 IFTA=8THENRESTORE:TA=)3 

19) 3 READEA$:HH=)3:F=)3:T=)3:H=)3:P=)3 

2) 3)3 PLAY"T2 55L2 55" :PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS 
:BS=1 

21) 3 DRAW n C4BMl)3)3 / 1)3)3E5R5F5G5L5H5 

22) 3 PAINT (1)35, 1)3)3) , 4 , 4 

23) 3 DRAW n R5C2D2BR5U2BM15)3 / 1)3)3E6F 
6D4ND4L12ND4U4 

24) 3 PAINT(155, 1)3)3) ,2,2 

25) 3 DRAW n R3C3D2BR6U2BM15)3, 15)3E6N 
H4NE4F6ND4G6H6ND4 

26) 3 PAINT (155, 15)3) , 3 , 3 

27) 3 DRAW ff R5BU8C2D2BR4U2 

28) 3 GET(9)3,9)3)-(124,11)3) ,S,G 

29) 3 GET (143 , 89) - (169 , 112) , C,G 

3) 3)3 GET(146 , 134) - (166, 156) ,B,G 
31)3 IFHH>)3THEN32)3ELSEGOSUB128)3 
3 2)3 PCLS 

3 3)3 COLOR3,l 



Model 101 
Interface $39.95 




• Serial to parallel interface 

• Works with any COCO 

• Compatible with "Centron- 
ics" parallel input printers 

• 6 switch selectable baud 
rates 300-600-1200-2400- 
4800-9600 

• Small size 4" x 2" x 1" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 



Other Quality 
Items 

High quality 5 screw shell C- 
10 cassette tapes. $7,507 
dozen 

Hard plastic storage boxes for 
cassette tapes. $2.507dozen 

Pin-Feed Cassette Labels 
White S3.00/100 
Colors $3.60/100 (specify 
red, blue, yellow, tan) 



Model 104 Deluxe 
Interface $51 .95 




Same features as 101 plus 

• Built in serial port for your 
modem or other serial device 

• Switch between parallel 
output and serial output 

• Size is 4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 

NEW! Cables for 
your COCO 

• U.L. listed foil-shielded cable 

• 2 Types: male/female exten- 
sion cables (used between 
a serial device and existing 
cable) male/male cables 
(used between two serial 
devices such as a modem 
and one of our switchers) 

• 3 ft./$3.95, 6 ft./$4.49, 

10 ft./$5.59 Specify M/M 
or M/F and length. 



Model 102 
Switcher $35.95 



4 



A 




• Connect to your COCO 
serial port and have 3 switch 
selectable serial ports 

• Color coded indicator lights 
show switch position 

• Lights also serve as a 
power on indicator for your 
COCO 

• Heavy guage blue anodized 
aluminum cabinet with non- 
slip rubber feet 

The 101 and 104 require 
powerto operate. Most print- 
ers can supply power to your 
interface. (Star, Radio Shack 
and Okidata are just a few that 
do - Fpson and Seikosha do 
not). The interfaces can also 
be powered by an AC adap- 
tor: Radio Shack model 273- 
1431 plugs into all models, If 
you require a power supply, 
add a"P" to the model number 
and add $5.00 to the price 
(Model 101 P $44 95, Model 
104P $56.95). 



Model 105 
Switcher $14.95 




• Connects to your COCO 
to give you 2 switch select- 
able serial ports 

• 3 foot cable to connect to 
your COCO's serial port 

• The perfect item to use to 
connect a printer and a 
modem to your COCO 

• Small in size, only4,5x2.5 
x 1.25 



The Model 101, 102. 104 and 
1 05 work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory 
size. These products are co- 
vered by a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101 and 104work 
with any standard parallel 
input printer including Gemini, 
Epson, Radio Shack, 
Okidata, C. loth, Seikosha, 
Panasonic and many others 
They support BASIC print 
commands, word processors 
and graphic commands. 

We manufacture these 
products - dealer inquiries 
are invited. 



Cassette Label 
Program $6.95 

• New Version - tape trans- 
ferable to disk - save and 
load labels from tape to disk 

• Prints 5 lines of information 
on pin-feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven, easy to use 

• Standard, expanded and 
condensed characters 

• Each line of text auto- 
matically centered. 

• Label display on CRT, en- 
abling editing before printing 

• Program comes on tape 
and is supplied with 24 
labels to get you started 

• 16K ECB required 

Ordering 
Information 

Free shipping in the United 
States (except Alaska and 
Hawaii) on all orders over 
$50.00. Please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling on or- 
ders under $50.00. 
Ohio residents add 6% 
sales tax. 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use 
your VISA or MASTERCARD 
or request C.O.D. (Please 
add $2.00 for C.O.D. orders). 
If you prefer, send check or 
money order; payable in U.S. 
Funds tol 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 45 



34$ DRAW ff C4BM$ , 16$R2$F1$R195E1$R 

2$D31L2 5 5U31C4BM5$, 17 2F4D6F4D4L4 

H4G4L4U4E4U6E4 

35$ PAINT(5$, 18$) ,4,4 

36$ CIRCLE (8j3,18p) ,8,2, ,5 

37$ C0L0R3 , 1 

38$ LINE(3$,171)-(225,171) , PSET 
39$ CIRCLE(12$, 18$) ,8,2, , 5 
4$$ CIRCLE ( 1 6$ , 18$ ) ,8,2, .5 
41$ CIRCLE (2$$, 18$) ,8,2, .5 

42$ FORI=8$T02$$STEP4$:PAINT(I , 1 
8$) , 2 , 2: NEXT 

43$ DRAW H C3BM38 , 19 1U14NR6U4BL4 D4 
NR4D14E4H4E4H4BM75 , 19 1U4E4R4F4D4 
U4L12BM115 , 191U4E4R4F4ND4L12BM19 
5, 191U4E4R4F4ND4L12BM155 , 191U4E4 
R4F4ND4L12 

44$ LINE(1$$,1$$)-(1$8,1$$) ,PSET 
45$ LINE(1$4,96)-(1$4,1$4) , PSET 
46$ GET(95 , 91) - (115, 1$9) ,G,G 
47$ X=95:Y=91:M=RND(235) :N=RND(1 
2$) 

4 8$ C0L0R4,1 

49$ LINE (95, 91) -(115, 1$ 9) , PRESET 
,BF 

5$$ LINE($, 16$)-(2$, 191) , PSET, BF 
51$ LINE(235, 16$)-(255, 191) , PSET 
, BF 

52$ F0RQ=1T02 $ $ : NEXTQ : SCREEN1 , $ 
53$ 0=RND(3):0N 0 GOTO 540,680,8 

54$ FORI=lTO 1$-H 

55$ IFJOYSTK($) <l$THENX=X-5: IFX< 

$THENX=$ 

56$ IFJOYSTK($) >53THENX=X+5 : IFX> 
235THENX=23 5 

57$ IFJOYSTK(l) <l$THENY=Y-5: IFY< 
$THENY=$ 

58$ IFJOYSTK(l) >53THENY=Y+5: IFY> 
141THENY=141 

59$ PUT(X,Y) -(X+2$, Y+18) ,G, PSET 
6J2S$ PUT(M,N)-(M+26,N+23) ,C,PSET 
61$ BU=PEEK( 6528$) : IF BU=126 OR 
BU=2 54 THENPLAY ff 01EFEFDDFEFBBFC ff 
:ON BS GOSUB 96$, 97$, 98$ ELSEGOT 
063$ 

62$ PUT(M,N) -(M+26,N+23) , C , PSET : 
IFPPOINT (X+l$, Y+9) <>1THENF0RI=1T 
01$:PLAY ff Vl$01GF ff : PUT(M,N) - (M+I+ 
26 ,N+I+2 3 ) , C , PSET : NEXT I : G0T01$2$ 
63$ M=VM+M : N=N+VN 

64$ I FM<$THENM=$ELSEIFM> 2 2 9THENM 
=2 2 9 

65$ I FN<$THENN=$ELSEIFN> 1 2 $THENN 
=12$ 

66$ NEXT 
67$ GOT099$ 



68$ F0RI=1T0 15-H 

69$ IFJOYSTK($) <l$THENX=X-5 : IFX< 

$THENX=$ 

7$$ IFJOYSTK($) >53THENX=X+5 : IFX> 
2 3 5THENX=2 3 5 

71$ IFJOYSTK(l) <10THENY=Y-5 : IFY< 
$THENY=$ 

72$ IFJOYSTK(l) >53THENY=Y+5: IFY> 
141THENY=141 

73$ PUT(X,Y) -(X+2$, Y+18) ,G, PSET 
74$ PUT(M,N) -(M+3 4,N+2$) ,S,PSET 
75$ BU=PEEK(6528$) :IF BU=12 6 OR 
BU=2 54THENPLAY n 01EFEFDDFEFBBFC" : 
ON BS GOSUB96$, 9 7$ , 98$ELSEG0T077 

76$ PUT (M,N) -(M+34,N+2$) ,S, PSET: 
IFPPOINT (X+l$, Y+9) <>1THENF0RI=1T 

01$ : PLAY"01FG ff : PUT (M, N) - (M+I+3 4 , 
N+I+2$) , S , PSET: NEXTI : G0T01$2$ 
77$ M=VM+M : N=N+VN 

78$ IFM<$THENM=$ELSEIFM>2 2 1THENM 
= 221 

79$ I FN<$ THENN=$ ELS E I FN > 1 2$ THENN 
= 120 

8$$ NEXT 
81$ GOT099$ 

82$ VM=RND(2) : IFVM=2 THENVM=-1 
83$ IFJOYSTK($) <l$THENX=X-5: IFX< 

$THENX=$ 

84$ IFJOYSTK($) >53THENX=X+5 : IFX> 
235THENX=235 

85$ IFJOYSTK(l) <l$THENY=Y-5: IFY< 

$THENY=$ 

8 6$ IFJOYSTK(l) >53THENY=Y+5 : IFY> 
141THENY=141 

87$ PUT(X,Y) -(X+2$, Y+18) ,G, PSET 
88$ PUT(M,N) -(M+2$,N+22) ,B,PSET 
89$ BU=PEEK (6528$) : IF BU=126 OR 
BU=2 54THENPLAY ff 01EFEFDDFEFBBFC 11 : 

ON BS GOSUB96$, 97$, 98$ELSEG0T091 

P 

9$$ PUT (M,N) - (M+2$, N+22) , B, PSET: 
IFPPOINT (X+l$ , Y+9 ) <>1THENF0RI=1T 
01$ : PLAY ff 01FG ff : PUT(M,N) - (M+I+2$, 
N+I+22) , B, PSET: NEXTI :G0T01$2$ 
91$ M=M+VM*4 : IFM<$THENM=$ : GOT094 

P 

92$ IFM>23 5THENM=23 5:GOT094$ 
93$ GOT083$ 

94$ N=N+H+1: IFN>169THENPLAY ff 01FG 
FGFGBBDAGFEBDGFFFAAFDGEGEDBFBFBD 
GCCCDGEFDBCGDEFAAGDBE 11 : G0T0114$ 
95$ GOT08 3$ 

96$ LINE (10, 16$) - (X+l$, Y+9) , PSET 
:LINE-(24 5,16$) , PSET : LINE ( 1$ , 16$ 
) -(X+l$, Y+9) , PRESET: LINE- (24 5, 16 
$) , PRESET: RETURN 



46 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



970 LINE (10, 160) -(X+lj3, Y + 9) , PSET 
: LINE (10, 160) -(X+10,Y+9) , PRESET: 
RETURN 

980 LINE(245, 160) -(X+10,Y+9) , PSE 
T: LINE (245, 160) - (X+10, Y+9) , PRESE 
T: RETURN 

990 VM=(RND(10)-5) :VN=RND(10) -5 

1000 I FRND ( 5 ) = 1THEN 1070 

1010 ON 0 GOTO 540,680,820 

1020 P=P+10:LINE(M,N)-(M+44,N+22 

) , PRESET, BF:PLAY"04 ; AGDFBAGDFEGC 

BDGEGAF 

1030 M=RND(2 21) :N=RND(120) 
1040 0=RND(3) 

1050 T=T+l:IFT=10THENT=0 :GOSUB14 
30 : HH=HH+ 1 : SCREEN0 , 0 : CLS 6 : PRINT@ 
200 , ff CONGRADULATI ONS 11 ; : PRINT@2 28 
, "YOU'VE CLEARE D 1 1 HH ,? SET" ; :IFHH>1 
THENPRINT" S ,f ; : GOTO1460ELSEGOTO14 
60 

1060 ON 0 GOTO 540,680,820 
1070 F=40+RND(4) *40 : LINE (M+12 , N+ 
12) - (F, 190) , PSET : PLAY f! 05EDEEDEBC 
CE ,f : LINE (M+12 , N+12 ) - (F, 190) , PRES 
ET: FORCC=1TO10: CIRCLE (F, 180) , CC, 
4 : PLAY" OlDEDE" :NEXTCC : PLAY f! 01EED 



DEEBBCCB" : LINE (F-10 , 170) - (F+10 , 1 
91) , PRESET, BF 

1080 IFPPOINT(200,180) 01THEN113 

1090 IFPPOINT(80, 180) O1THEN1130 
1100 IFPPOINT(120, 180 ) 01THEN113 

1110 IFPPOINT(160, 180) 01THEN113 
P 

1120 GOTO1190 

1130 ON 0 GOTO540, 680, 820 

1140 IF BS=3ANDM>200THEN1190 

1150 IF BS=2ANDM=0THEN1190 

1160 IFM=0THEN BS=3 

1170 IFM>200THEN BS=2 

1180 M=RND(221) :N=RND(120) :0=RND 

(3) :GOTO1130 

1190 GET(40,172)-(60,190) ,S,G 

1200 FORY=160TO0STEP-5 

1210 PUT ( 40 , Y ) - ( 60 , Y+ 18) , S , PSET 

1220 LINE (40, Y+18) -(60, Y+24) , PRE 

SET, BF 

1230 NEXT 

1240 CLS4:IF P>HS THEN HS=P:PRIN 
T@ 2 2 4, "YOU HAVE HIGH SCORE I " ; : PR 
INT ff WRITE YOUR NAME AND PRESS E 



Hardware 

Specia 

Communications 




3DD/1 2DD baud Fully Hayes 

compatible 
Modem - 2 Year Warranty 

S129.00 

[Modem & Cable] 

300/1 2DD/24DD baud 
Fully Hayes 
Compatible Modem - CCITT 
2 Year Warranty 

$249.00 

[Modem S Cable] 



THE OTHER GUYS CoCo 

55 North Main Street 
Suite 3D1-D 
PO Box H 

Logan Utah B4321 




'KEEP-TRAK' General Ledger Reg. S69.95— Only S39.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k. 
32k, 64k User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement [current & 'YTD'j, journal, ledger, 899 accounts [ 2350 entries on 
32k & 64k [71 □ accounts & entries on 1 6k] [disk only] . Version 1 .2 has screen printouts, 

Rainbow Review 1 1 - 9/84 1.2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. S69.95 — ONLY S24.95 

Filing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 16 fields 
with 255 characters per field [4080 characters/record]. Sort, match & print any field 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only] 

Rainbow Review 3/85 Hot CoCo 1 0/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles, elipses, boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on line HELPS at all 
times Allows text on the graphics screen S. movement of objects on the screen Can be 
used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. GRAPHICS EDITOR. REG. 
S39.95 — ONLY $24.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB 

Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/85 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements, 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & more User friendly/menu 
driven. Includes manual. S39.95 or $49.95 General Ledger & Accounts Receivables 
[Disk Only] 

1 'COCO WINDOWS 1 ■ 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 10 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering. Four function 
calculator, with memory. The above options can be called anytime while running or writing 
in BASIC. APPLE PULL YDUR DRAPES YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS $24.95 [disk 
or tape] includes manual 



(BOD 753-762D 
C800) 94S-94QS 



[Add 553. OO for postage & handling] 
C.O.O., Money Order, Check in U.S. Funds [Please specify if J&M 

controller] 



I 
I 

I 

4 

[ 

« 

I 

■ 

I 

< 

I 

I 

I 

I 
I 

( 

4 

I 

i 

I 
I 

1 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 47 













1 










The excitement continues! 

The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Nineteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our third 
Adventure competition. Discover backstage intrigue at the London 
Theatre, attempt a daring space rescue, or travel through time to save the 
universe, and that's only the beginning! 

Challenge yourself! Put your wits to the test with Adventures like: 

Evil Crypt — Encounter bottomless pits, graves that kill, flesh-frying fires. 
Even the rocks and trees conceal dangers. 

The Professional — You're hot on the trail of international jewel thieves. 

Cleopatra's Pyramid — Perilous action along the banks of the treacherous 
Nile River. 

Johnny Zero — Fight against evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. 
And when you're at the end of your rope, revenge is in reach with: 

Balm — You are the Adventure, determined to exterminate anyone fool 
enough to travel your cavern. 

Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these 
winning authors: Mark and Mike Anderson, Jon Blow, Jason Dolinsky, Matt 
Hazard, Joab Jackson, Curtis Keisler, Franklin Marrs, Ann Mayeux, Scott 
McCleary, Chris McKernan, Philip Newton, Fred Provoncha, Carlos Rocha, 
Michael Shay, Don Sheerin, and Walt Thinnes, 

The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures is only $11.95! 

Save yourself from typing listings with — the Third 
Adventures Tape or Disk Set. 

Get on with your game and eliminate typing hassles. Just load these great 
programs into your computer and run. 

Tape $9.95, Two- Disk Set $14.95 

The tape and disks are adjuncts and complements to the book; the book is necessary for 
introductory material and loading instructions. 



Please sendme:The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures $1 1 .95 



The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape $9.95 

The Third Rainbow Adventures Disk Set $14.95 



Name _ 
Address 
City _ 



.State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of 



is enclosed* 




Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Acct. No. Exp. Date 

Signature 

Mail to: The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492 

'Add $1 .50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S. add $4. Allow 6 to 8 weeks 
for delivery. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax for book and tape. In order to hold 
down costs, we do not bill. U.S. currency only please. 







NTER. 11 ; : INPUT H$ ELSEG0T012 6J3 
125^ CLS3 : PRINT ff HIGH SCORE" : PRIN 
T;H$; ff = ff ;HS ; :F0RI=1T03 :PLAY"T2j3L 
4 CCGGAAL2GL4FFEEDDL2CL4GGFFEEL2D 
L4GGFFEEL2DL4CCGGAAL2GL4FFEEDDL2 
C" :NEXTI 

126J3 CLS8 : PRINT@224 , EA$ ; 11 WAS DE 
STROYED BUT YOU ESCAPED IN YOUR 
ROCKET ALIVE. DO YOU WANT TO TRY 
YOUR LUCK AT ANOTHER PLANET? 11 
127j3 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" Y !f THENTA=TA 
+1:GOTO180ELSEIFA$="N"THEN ON PO 

GOT02 J3 , 2p 1J5 , 2 J32 0 : ELSE 12 7j3 
12 8j3 PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 : DRAW 11 C8BMj3 , 6 
J2R15F5D1J3G5NL15F5D10G5L15U4J3BR35 
D4j3R20BR15U2j3NR2j3Ul#ElJ21FlJ2)D3J2)BRl 

513 T TCPCT)"! rt TJ» pT T T "1 ft TJ (T T "1 ^XJP%TT"| flj "U 1 CT"Q 1 $ Tp K 12 
J™f w *«/ JL ■»!>» Jfc/ JL-J ««/ Ku? «Jm ]&/ a a .A.. x a -w* >L JL/ XyJ -w/ a\ JL « HU ^ in/ 

U5BR15Rlj3NRlj3D4j3BR2 5NR2j3U2£SNRlj3U 

2jZ)R2^BR15ND4j3R15F5DlpG5NL15F5D15 

129j3 DRAW"C7BM2J8, 2j3ND20Flj3Elj3D2j3 

BR5BU2j3D15F5Rlj3E5U15BR5ND2£SF2j3U2 

,0BR2 j 0NF5Ll j 0G5Dlj3F5Rl J 0NE5BRlj3Ulj3N 

Ulj3R2j3NUlj3Dlj3BR5Ulj3Rlj3NFlj3NElj3Ll 

j 0U1 j 0BR3 j 0D2 / 0BR1$U2 j 0F2 j 0U2,0 

13j3j3 DRAW"BM2j3, 182C6ND8R2F2G2NL2 

F2G2L2 BE8F2NE2D6BR16R4U4L4U4R4BR 

4R4L2D8BR6NR4U4NR4U4R4BR4D6F2E2U 

6BR4NR4D4NR4D4R4BR14NU8R2E2U4H2L 

2BR8D8R4 U8L4BR8ND8F8U8BR4ND8R4D4 

NL4D4BR4NR4U8BR8D8R2E2U4H2L2 

131) 3 FORI=2 21T01j3STEP-5:PUT(I,ll 
0)- (1+34, 13)3) , S ; PS ET: NEXT: FORI =J3 
T01j3j3STEP5: PUT (1 , 14 6) - ( 1+2 6, 179) 
, C , PSET : NEXT : FORI=2 3 5T02j3 j3STEP-2 
:PUT(1, 11)3) -(1+2)3, 13 2) ,B,PSET:NE 
XT : F0RI=1T05)3)3*P0 : NEXT 

132) 3 SCREEN1,)3 

133) 3 DRAW"C2BMlj3j3, 12J3R4F2D2G2NL4 
F2D2G2L4U12BR13G3 D3ND6R6ND6U3H3B 
R11NF2L2G2D2F2R2 F2D2G2L2NH2BR8NR 

6U6NR4U6R6BR6D6NE6NF6D6BR10U12BR 
4D12R6BR4NU12R6BR4NR6U6NR4U6R6BR 



4ND12R4F2D2G2NL4F2D4 

134j3 DRAW !f BM134 / 164U12F3E3ND12BR 

4Dlj3F2R2E2Ulj3BR4ND12F12U12BR6NR4 

G2D8F2R4BR4U12D6R6U6D12BR4U12D6N 

E6F6BR4U12BR4ND12F12U12 

135J3 DRAW 11 BMJ2) , 14 j3D12R4E2U2H2NL4E 

2U2H2L4BR1J3D12R6BR6H2U8E2R2F2D8G 

2L2BR8U12R4F2D2G2NL4F2D2G2L4 

136J3 FORI=lTO 2 5 j3 j3 * PO : NEXT : CLS 7 

137j3 PRINT@1J3, "INSTRUCTIONS" ; 

138j3 PRINT896, "THE OBJECT IS TO 

MOVE YOUR CROSS OVER THE BADGUYS 

AND USING THE FIRE BUTTON HIT 
THEM WITH YOUR LASERS . BEWARE OF 
THE BASEKILLER. HE WILL TRAVEL T 
OWARDS ONE OF YOUR BASES AND D 
ESTROY IT. THE GAME IS OVER WHEN 

BOTH BASES" ; 
139j3 PRINT" AREDESTROYED OR ALL 
YOUR WHITE FUELTANKS ARE GONE," 
14J3J3 PRINT@418 , "PRESS BUTTON TO 

START" ; 

141J8 PRINT@45J2S, "HIGH SCORE=";HS; 
"BY " ;H$; 

142J3 FORK=lT01j3j3j3: BU=PEEK(65 2 8j3) 
:IF BU=12 6 OR BU=254THEN SOUNDlj3 
, 5 : RETURNELSENEXTK: GOT0128j3~ 
143j3 FORX=8j3T02j3^STEP4j3: IFPPOINT 

144j3 NEXT:IFBS=lTHENP=P+10j3j3 
145j3 RETURN 

146)3 PRINT@29j3, "POINTS=" ; P ; : FORI 

=lT05j3j3*PO:NEXTI 

147j3 H=HH: IFH>lj3THENH=lj3 

148j3 GOT02j3j3 

149J3 DATA 11 THE EARTH"," MARS 
" , " JUPITER" , " SATURN" , " UR 
ANUS " , " VENUS " , " PLUTO " , " 

MERCURY" , " NEPTUNE" 

2j3,0j3 END 

2J31J3 POKE 6 5 4 9 4 , ^ : END 

2J32J3 P0KE65496,J3 #a 



THIS IS IT.* THE HOT NEW PROGRAM FROM BOILING SPRINGS . * 
POLYTINT WILL ENABLE YOU TO KECOLOR YOUR PMODE3 AND PMODE4 
IMAGES IN It BEAUTIFUL COLORS OF YOUR CHOICE. COLORING IS 
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COLORED PICTURES ARE SAVED IN ONLY THREE TO SIX GRANULES. 

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS. COCO 3. DISK DRIVE. RGB MONITOR. 

ORDER POLYTINT FROM :- BOILING SPRING LAKES SOFTWARE , 

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MONEY ORDER OR CHECK. $17.50 PLUS $1.50 POSTAGE AND HANDLING. 

NC RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 5% SALES TAX. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 49 




A int n t^ n U ."computer 
stU l in us infancy i can 

think logically and uea x 
sibilities are both exotmg pUsh l f 
ing. What would gemm haveto ^ 

human needs u»« access to 



wh en U loses. This « move 
labeling boxes waheaen p 

Thus, every game has 
beforehand. - { lhe c0 mput- 

1 felt it would be wa« differ ent 

j er ^ memory ^^^age of the 
! games were Placed- in dsolha tthe 

i ^m-^ ^tme situation would 

same movc^ k 
I only be stored once. lay a game. 

| Think how you learn P 

1 M fust, y° ur ^, V e eS vou begin to find 

1 But, after a whi te, you b ^ 

1 certain methods** Th to 

B aIl d others ^.^o Learn to be able 

to do. r- aul rewarded witn a 

moves in the game , oses> * 

h,« computer literacy. . . pro babihty. O W* babi hty. 
BUI EngM ^^alhemati^ at ^ are given a toj*^ win 
&i£!Tmi* School s ' wiUl a ood Pj^ 1 * " player, it 

0Vt,t ''f r//' X" • IfJ lcarn quiC " l \Tng okarn winning 

am-njieUi. I> «" „ H j llf{ <if « fli wn , take much lonfccr 



ways- 




50 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



■ «t<wed on a 3-by-3 

iu are like Tic laci ihe boUom 0 f 
yellow *f " $ three b i ue 
he screen, and uov IS 
markers at the top. - n a game 

numbered I trough 9. * ^ 
by either having ; one o yo ^ of by 
the opposite end o &n pos . 

blocking your opponent 

siblemovc lo pawns .in 

Movement is sim ahead 
ch ess. You may move t g 
only U that ^ l \ f ° P a e n 'opponent's 
move d»*6 ondl J " ua re. The object 

marker °?rcompS a to play better 
1S to teach the corn? every 
and better, eventually 
game. CoCo will learn lrom 
P^V" 1 ' j (1 Unlays which opponent 
T tEt - 'KSther person or Jte 
you're facing the computer 

computer - ana w memory, 
i, playing at ^f^mber of wins lor 
each move, and , ita > nu 
each player- To beg aboUt th e 

mus t answer two quesuo ^ 
lypc and spwdtftM g are ready 

- 11 Uie " SEfS^SfiS in every gam^ 
to begm. You mov program 
The manner in wh icn t tQ 

stor es the move nwy * moVCS , 0 

you. Fo f l»e oppw« contains the 
bytes are required sccond contain8 

actual ^fKons In ^mory to 
the number oi k is ml . For 

thc next P^^rtthreeW^ 

CoCo's ^« v v c I^ningthe probabil- 
addUional byte coma a s Thig mem _ 

■ ity of that P'rt^^joOO for 

ory " SU m I We totoVat this area alter 
You might like to type FOR X-L 

a few games. To jo so, j ^ and prcss 

TO E"- 9 *. PEEK I* » - 



„ ,kp shift and @ keys to 
scroll. C°M) si ol . 

them; thus, , fc Rem ember, 

Here is a^o^amp ^ 
the opponent (you MJ^ m 7 
Suppose the first 8 beginning at E 
4, 3-6 and 4-2. w- » ' 0 ^ L +2,13G, 

would be L^ 4 ' L 5 41 and L+G,®. 
L + 3,0, L+4 '?' 0 ^e is completed with 
Then, a second game »c ^ ^ ^ 

mOVCS Winning this game. The mem- 
computer *inn»b L w L+E , 

ory would be ^^vould contain a 
except for L+3 * mc ber possible first 
5 to point to CoCo > s oin i M 
move. L+7 through^ 4 " h d , 

rprdinlon m h:w e many moves are 



common to a previou gam , ^ 
No w a third game »^ a * in the feat 
first two moves the sarn d game 

S amC ' Th TaoTn in memory, and the 
are moved down in ^ c 

third game is added atte ^ wb , e 

of the first game ine 
shows the situano af ^ dw . u 

Uyo uhave a l6K eo P ^ 

the 3O0«» -^fbefore running- 
and enter PCLEH* a 



fQ „,„ i0M *- sees. «5 

407. GreerfeldJ" S ASE for * 
603 4. Pl^se enclos* an Q 

reply when wnW$4 



t,T4 
L*2,136 

L*7,B6 
L'9/12* 

L*13,0 
L^17i96 



- each game by opponent 
Same Mil m J^HgS move yet 
The 0 since no other rtrt e S ible move 

Coco's first move f<jr ano1he r possible 

01 moving to 8-6 hts game 

So other posslbilllies 

SSSSA response 

CoCo's oine, pos S m.e W* ««- 

Mo others 

Probabituy 

Opponent 

CoCo 
Probability 

Tab le l: Situation after third game. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 51 




210 


142 


1770 . . 


...151 


450 


...125 


1850 . . 


...73 


750 


.140 


2000 . . 


. .190 


880 


..87 


2270 


221 


1130 


43 


2460 


116 


1330 


118 


2580 


136 


1600 


80 


END 


.244 



The listing: COCDLERN 

0 '*********************** 

1 1 LEARN COCO LEARN 

2 1 BY BILL ENGLISH 

3 1 R. R. 1 BOX 407 

4 1 GREENFIELD, IN 4 6140 

5 ************************ 

20 CLEAR 1000, 30000 
2 5 R=RND( -TIMER) 

30 E=30000:L=E:FOR X=L TO L+100: 
POKE X,0:NEXT X :MU$= if O3L100A ,f :MO 
$- n L32G» 

40 GOSUB 2 560 : 1 INITIAL QUESTIONS 

50 GOSUB 2 4 40: 'DRAW GAME BOARD 

60 GOTO 740 
70 1 ********* 

80 'STORE MOVES 

90 NM=1W : I F WF=-1 THEN PB=4 ELSE 
PB=-4 

100 CC=0:ML=L:KM(0)=0:FL=0 
110 IF CC=NM THEN RETURN 
120 P=PEEK (ML) 
130 IF POM(CC) THEN 200 
140 KM(CC)=ML 

150 IF CC/2=INT(CC/2) THEN NE=2 
:GOTO 180 
160 NE=3 

170 MZ=ML: GOSUB 640: 'STORE PROB 

180 ML=ML+NE: CC=CC+1 

190 GOTO 110 

200 PZ=PEEK(ML+1) 

210 IF PZ=0 THEN KI=ML : KM ( CC ) =ML 

:GOTO 2 40 

2 20 ML=ML+PZ 

230 GOTO 120 

240 KK=CC 

250 P=PEEK(KM(KK)+1) 
260 IF PO0 THEN 300 
270 KK=KK- 1 

28 0 IF KK<0 THEN KM— E : FL=E : GOSUB 



53 0: RETURN 
290 GOTO 250 
300 FL=P+KM(KK) 
310 EL=0 

3 20 FOR X=CC TO NM-1 

330 IF X/2=INT(X/2) THEN NE=2 EL 

SE NE=3 

3 40 EL=EL+NE 

3 50 NEXT X 

3 60 FOR X=E-1 TO FL STEP -1 
370 PK=PEEK(X) 
3 80 POKE X+EL,PK 
3 90 NEXT X 
400 KM=FL 

410 FOR X=FL-1+EL TO FL STEP -1 
: POKE X,0:NEXT X 
420 ' ******** 

430 GOSUB 530 
440 BG=L 

450 IF BG>=KI THEN 520 

460 PZ=PEEK(BG+1) 

470 IF PZ+BG<FL THEN 490 

480 POKE BG+1,PZ+EL 

490 IF PEEK(BG)>100 THEN NE=3 EL 

SE NE=2: 'FOUND COMPUTER MOVE 

500 BG— BG+NE 

510 GOTO 450 

520 RETURN 

530 FOR X=CC TO NM-1 
540 POKE KM,M(X) 
550 POKE KM+1,0 

560 IF X/2=INT(X/2) THEN NE=2 : GO 
TO 590 
570 NE=3 

580 MZ=KM:GOSUB 640: 'STORE PROB 

5 90 KM=KM+NE 

600 E=E+NE 

610 NEXT X 

620 POKE KI+1,FL-KI 

630 RETURN 

640 'STORE PROBABILITY 

650 PM=PEEK(MZ+2) 

660 IF PM=1 AND PB=-4 THEN 710 

670 IF PM=0 THEN PM=5 

680 PM=PM+PB 

690 IF PM<0 THEN PM=1 

700 IF PM>99 THEN PM=99 

710 POKE MZ+2, PM 

720 RETURN 

730 *************** 

74j3 'INITIALIZATION FOR EACH GAM 
E 

75j3 PRINT@386,USING"###" ;TC; : PRI 

NT@41j2,USING"###" ;TH; 

7 6J2S PRINT@483,USING"###" ;ZC; : PRI 

NT@5J37 ,USING"###" ; ZH ; 

77 p FOR KD=7 TO 9 t GOSUB 1980 :CL= 



52 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



159:GOSUB 2j32j3:NEXT KD 

78j3 FOR KD=4 TO 6 : GOSUB 198j3:CL= 

143:GOSUB 2j32j3:NEXT KD 

79j3 FOR KD=1 TO 3 : GOSUB 198j3:CL= 

175: GOSUB 2j32j3:NEXT KD 

8j3j3 FOR P=l TO 9 : P (P) =INT ( (P+2 ) / 

3) -2: NEXT P 

810 WF=j3:MN=p: f WIN FLAG AND MOVE 
NUMBER 

815 SCREEN 0 , 1 : FOR JZ = 1 TO lj3:PL 
AY n L255GEC ff :NEXT JZ:SCREEN j3,j3 
82 J3 'GET HUMAN MOVE 
83j3 H1=254:H2=286 

84j3 IF HR=1 THEN PRINT @ 15 3 , "RAND 
OM" ; 

85j3 IF HR=j3 THEN PRINT @1 53 , "HUM A 
N"; 

855 PRINT@185,CHR$ (159) "YOUR"CHR 
$(159) ; 

86j3 PRINT@217,CHR$(15 9) "MOVE"CHR 
$(159) ; 

87 J3 PRINT @H1 ,""; 
880 PRINT@H2, nn ; 

89j3 PRINT@H1,CHR$ (191) ; : PRINT@H2 
,CHR$(191) ; 

90j3 IF HR=j3 THEN 91)3 ELSE PA=RND 
(6)+3:A$=STR$(PA) :GOTO 92)3 

91) 3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 91)3 

92) 3 HF=VAL(A$) 

93) 3 IF HR=)3 THEN PLAY MU$ 

94) 3 PRINT@H1,RIGHT$(A$,1) ; 

95) 3 IF P(HF)<>1 THEN 87)3 

96) 3 PRINT @H2 , ; 

97) 3 IF HR=)3 THEN 98)3 ELSE PA=RND 
(6) : A$=STR$ (PA) :GOTO 99)3 

98j3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 98)3 
99)3 HT=VAL(A$) 
1)3)3)3 IF HR=)3 THEN PLAY MU$ 
1)31)3 PRINTRIGHT$ (A$ , 1) ; 
1)32)3 IF HF=7 AND HT=3 THEN 87)3 
1)33)3 IF HF=6 AND HT=4 THEN 87)3 
1)34)3 IF HF-HT=3 AND P(HT)=)3 THEN 
1)37)3 

1)35)3 IF (HF-HT=4 OR HF-HT=2) AND 

P(HT)=-1 THEN 1)37)3 
1)36)3 GOTO 87)3 

1)37)3 GOSUB 14 1)3: REM MAKE MOVE 
1)38)3 PRINT@217," ";:PRINT@1 
85," "; 

I) 39)3 P(HF)=)3:P(HT)=1: 'UPDATE GAM 
E BOARD 

II) 3)3 M(MN) =1)3*HF+HT: 1 STORE MOVE 
AWAY 

III) 3 MN=MN+ 1 

112) 3 IF MN>1 THEN GOSUB 16)3)3: 1 CH 
ECK FOR WINNER 

113) 3 IF WF<>)3 THEN 74)3:'IF WINNE 



R START OVER 

114) 3 'COMPUTER MOVES AT RANDOM 

115) 3 GOSUB 2)38)3: 'SEE IF GAME IN 
MEMORY 

116) 3 C1=23)3:C2 = 262 

117) 3 PRINT@194,"MOVE"; 

118) 3 IF RF=1 THENCF=RND ( 6 ) : PRINT 
@129 t "RANDOM" ; 

119) 3 IF RFOl THEN PRINT@129 , "ME 
MORY" ; : PLAY"L255EC" 

12) 3)3 IF P(CF)<>-1 THEN 118)3 

121) 3 CF$=STR$ (CF) 

122) 3 PRINT@C1,RIGHT$ (CF$ / 1) ; 

123) 3 IF RF=1 THEN CT=RND(6)+3 

124) 3 IF CT=7 AND CF=3 THEN 123)3 

125) 3 IF CT=6 AND CF=4 THEN 118)3 

126) 3 IF CT-CF=3 AND P(CT)=)3 THEN 
13)3)3 

127) 3 IF (CT-CF=4 OR CT-CF=2) AND 
P(CT)=1 THEN 13)3)3 

128) 3 GOTO 118)3 

129) 3 PLAY MU$ 

13) 3)3 CT$=STR$ (CT) 

131) 3 PRINT@C2 ,RIGHT$ (CT$ f l) ; 

132) 3 PLAY MU$ 

133) 3 GOSUB152^J: 'MAKE MOVE 

134) 3 PRINT@194 / " "; 



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Quadruple the Memory of Your COCO 3! 

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COCO 3 TURBO RAM BOARD 

Choose Either A Bare Board Or A 51 2KB Board! 



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W Fully 

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ORDER NOW! 
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VISA OR MC ORDERS ACCEPTED 



Shipping & Handling: 

Within the U.S. & Canada: add $3.00 
Outside the U.S. & Canada: add $5.00 
COD Orders: add $2.00 
(Calif. Residents: add 6% sales tax) 



Or send Check or Money 
Order to: 

Performance Peripherals 
11432 Pena Way 
Mira Loma, CA 91752 

August 1987 THE RAINBOW 53 




TOM MIX'S MINLCA 




FLIGHTS 



Flight 16 

F 

Our very newest flight simulator. A full 
instrument aircraft that features the 
following: 

• Works with all COCO's 

• Realistic flight controls 

• Flight editor included to change flight 
parameters 

• Design your own airports and flight 
areas 

• Flies like Cessna 150 

• Full graphics & sound 

Joysticks Required $34.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 



—Educational Best-Sellers! — 

* Teachers Database II -Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

• Up to 100 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

• Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32KTDB $42.95 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR IBM PC & 

COMPATIBLES-Holds information on up to 
250 students with as many as 60 individual 
items of data for each. Contains the 
features listed above PLUS. 

Req uires 128K - $89.95 

Factpack— Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/-/x" Grades 1-6. 

32K Ext. Basic $29.95 

Specify Tape or Disk 

Vocabulary Management System— Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

Requires 1 6K Ext. Basic/ $ 42.95 
32K for Printer Output 

Specify Tape or Disk 

Fractions— A Three-Program Package. 
1/Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32KExt. Basic $35.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 




'Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 

32K Machine Language 
Joysticks Re quired $34.95 

Specify Tape or Disk 

Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

Dragon Slayer— Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
160 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 



Disk $24.95 


* Sailor Man— Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 


win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 


64K 


$27.95 


* The King- 




32K 


$27.95 


* Draconian— 




32K 


$22.95 


* Ms. Maze- 




32K 


$22.95 


* Kater Pillar II- 




16K 


$22.95 


" Warehouse Mutants — 




16K 


$21.95 


" Buzzard Bait- 




32K 


$22.95 


All Above Specify Tape or Disk 



COCO 3 Compatible 




TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 



*P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
TheP-51 flight simulator letsyou fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations 
against another player, OR a non com- 
batant computer drone. 

32K Machine Language 
Joysticks Required $34.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 

*Goldfinder 

Here's the quality you've come to expect 

from TOM MIX. Endless possibilities await 
you in this exciting new creation. Move over 
Goldrunner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLDFINDER . 

32K & Joysticks Requir ed $22.95 

Disk 



*Approach Control 
Simulator 

A complete simulation package which will 
lead to countless hours of discovery and 
adventure. 

• Specify Disk or Tape 

• Quick Reference Guide 

• Comprehensive Manual 

• No Joysticks Required 

32K Machine Language $34.95 

*Trapfall 

The "Pitfalls" in this game are many. Hid- 
den treasures, jump over the pits, swing on 
the vine, watch out for alligators, beware of 
the scorpion. Another game for the Color 
Computer with the same high resolution 
graphics as "The King." 

16K Machine Language $23.95 



Specify Tape a Disk 



Ordering Information 

Call us at 616/676-8172 
for Charge Card orders 
Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

Authors— We pay top 
royalties! 




VISA* 




You nothing 



Obviout directions to go* 
Horth. South, Ea»t, R«*t 

HelcoMf to The Hi Id H«*t! 
1 



JOVfiSOFT! 



*Vegas Slots 

— Color III Only — 

Seven of the most popular slot machine 
games found in VEGAS are yours for the 
price of one. Designed to be as real as 
being there. You simply will not believe your 
eyes when you see the graphics ana realistic 
movement. This is by far one of the most 
outstanding programs we have ever offered. 

Disk only $34.95 




*Lunch Time 

Your chef, Peter Pepper, is surrounded! 
Dodge pickles, hot dogs, and eggs while 
building hanburgers. This high res game 
features 7 difficulty levels of wild 
entertainment. Fast-paced action for either 
one or two players. Have a Burger Time . . . 

Re quires 32K & Joysticks $21 .95 

Specify Tape cr Disk 



*The Wild West 

— Color III Only — 

Get out your six shooter and polish your 
spurs! Journey into the gunslinging land of 
the old west. As sheriff of Dry Gulch, your 
job is to keep the peace. But the notorious 
desperado Black Bart has escaped from jail 
and is on his way to Dry Gulch to recover 
his hidden fortune! 

•Incredible animated 320 x 192 16 color hi 

resolution graphic scenes! 
•Four voice music and sound effects. 
•Save and load games in progress. 
•A vocabulary of over 100 words. 
•Automatically SPEAKS with a Tandy 

Speech Pak. 

Disk Only $25.95 




•Moneyopoly 

Play the popular board game on one ot 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

3 2K Joystick Required $22.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 



'FOUR CUBE 

*MAUI VICE 

•DONUT 
DILEMMA 

'CHAMBERS 
•CUBER 

•BREWMASTER 
•FANG MAN 



Now you can play TIC-TACTOE in 3D! Pit your wits against the computer Requires 32K — 1 or 2 Players 
and you'll agree — it's a "real challenge" $1895 

Step into (he shoes of Crock & Bubbs with this state-of-the-art that guaran- 64K Ext. Basic & Joystick Required 
lees excitement and newness every time you play. . 



Angry Angelohas raided Antonio's Donut Factory and you must restore law 

■ and order. But hurry! Time is running out! 

. Exciting high res graphics game with multiple screens and outstanding sound. 
Destroy the evil creatures in 20 levels, 30-35 rooms per level. 

■ Another exciting release that approaches the challenges of any Video Ar- 
cade. The hazards are many, the dangers always present 

Move along to the end of the bars to serve your thirsty customers, but watch 
out for falling glasses and rowdies! Loads of lun! 

A high res graphics arcade-type game based on the Dracula legend. You 
are Dracula and must evade countless hazards in your search for new victims 



*PAK PANIC — A fast paced game in which 'Pakman' is steered through a maze, pursued 
bv tour monsters, while trying to eai dots and power pills. 



Disk Only $21.95 
Requires 32K 
$24.95 

32K & Joysticks Required 

$22.95 
32K & J oystick Required 

$23.95 

32K — Joysticks Required 
$17.95 

1 6K & Joy s'irks Required 
~$22~95~ 

32K & Joysticks Required 
$22.95 




Neutroids 

Fast-paced action, super graphics and 
above all else, sound from your COCO the 
likes you have never heard before. Be 
careful — don't let a meltdown occur before 
you complete the "NEUTROID 
PROJECT"! 

16 K — S22.95 
S oec i fy Tape or Disk 




Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in all! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! Joysticks Required. 

16K $27.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 



*COCO 3 Compatible 

NOVflSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 

Ordering Information 

Add $3 shipping/handling 
Ml residents add 4% sales tax 
Dealers welcome 

Many more titles— write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 





135/3 P(CF) =/3:P(CT)=-l 

136/3 M(MN) =1/3 *CF+CT+ 1/3/3 

137/3 MN=MN+1 

138/3 IF MN>1 THEN GOSUB 175/3: 'CH 

ECK FOR WINNER 

139/3 IF WFO/3 THEN 74 /3 

14/3/3 GOTO 8 2/3 

141/3 'MAKE HUMAN MOVE 

142/3 FOR Q=l TO ZT : NEXT Q : PLAY M 

0$ 

143)3 KD=HF: GOSUB 198/3 

144/3 CL=143 

145/3 GOSUB 2/32/3 

146 /3 KD=HT 

147/3 FOR Q=l TO ZT : NEXT Q : PLAY M 
0$ 

148/3 GOSUB198/3 

149/3 CL=159 

15/3/3 GOSUB 2/32/3 

151/8 RETURN 

152)3 'MAKE COMPUTER MOVE 

153 J3 FOR Q=l TO ZT : NEXT Q : PLAY M 

0$ 

154/3 KD=CF:G0SUB198j3 

155/3 CL=143 :GOSUB2j32j3 

156j3 FOR Q=l TO ZT: NEXT Q : PLAY M 

0$ 

157/3 KD=CT:GOSUB198/3 
158/3 CL=175 :GOSUB2j32j3 
159/3 RETURN 

16/3/3 'CHECK FOR WINNER HUMAN 
161/3 'BLOCKED MOVE 

162/3 IF P(l)=-1 AND P(3)=-l AN 
D P(5)=-l AND P(4)=l AND P(6)= 
1 AND P(8)=l AND P ( 2 ) =0 AND P( 
7)=/3 AND P(9)=j3 THEN 169j3 
163/3 IF P(2)=-l AND P(5)=l AND P 
( 1 ) =j3 AND P(3)=/3 AND P(4)=/3 AND 
P(6)=j3 AND P(7)=j3 AND P(8)=/3 AND 

P(9)=j3 THEN 169/3 
164/3 'CHECK FOR OUTRIGHT WIN 
165/3 FOR P=l TO 3 
166/3 IF P(P)=1 THEN 169j3 
167/3 NEXT P 
168/3 GOTO 174/3 

169/3 FOR XZ=1 TO 2/3 : PRINT@89 , "WI 
NNER" ; : PLAY"Ll/3/3A" : PRINT@89 , " 

" ; -.NEXT XZ 
17/3/3 TH=TH+1 
171/3 ZH=ZH+1: ZC=/3 
172/3 WF=1 

17 3/3 GOSUB 8/3 : ' STORE GAME AWAY 
174/3 RETURN 

175/3 'CHECK FOR COMPUTER WIN 
176/3 'BLOCK MOVE 

177/3 IF P(l)=-1 AND P(5)=-l AND 
P(4)=l AND P(8)=l AND P(2)=/3 AND 
P(3)=/3 AND P(6)=/3 AND P(7)=/3 AN 



D P(9)=/3 THEN 192/3 

178/3 IF P(4)=-l AND P(5)=-l AND 

P(l)=/3 AND P(2)=/3 AND P ( 3 ) =/3 AND 

P(6)=/3 AND P(7)=/3 AND P(8)=/3 AN 
D P(9)=/3 THEN 192/3 
179/3 IF P(5)=-l AND P(6)=-l AND 
P(l)=/3 AND P(2)=/3 AND P(3)=/3 AND 

P(4)=/3 AND P(7)=/3 AND P(8) =/3 A 
ND P(9) =/3 THEN 192/3 
18/3/3 IF P(2)=-l AND P(3)=-l AND 

P(5)=l AND P(6)=l AND P(l)=/3 i 
AND P(4)=/3 AND P(7)=/3 AND P(8)=/3 

AND P(9)=/3 THEN 192/3 
181/3 IF P(l)=-1 AND P(2)=-l AND 

P(4)=l AND P(5)=l AND P(3)=/3 A 
ND P(6)=/3 AND P(7)=/3 AND P(8)=/3 
AND P(9)=/3 THEN 192/3 
182/3 IF P(l)=-1 AND P(6)=-l AND 

P(4)=l AND P(9)=l AND P(2)=/3 
AND P(3)=/3 AND P(5)=/3 AND P(7)=/3 

AND P(8)=/3 THEN 192/3 
183/3 IF P(3)=-l AND P(4)=-l AND 

P(7)=l AND P(6)=l ANDP(l)=/3 AND 

P(2)=/3 AND P(5)=/3 AND P(8)=/3 AN 
D P(9)=/3 THEN 192/3 
184/3 IF P(2)=-l AND P(4)=-l AND 
P(5)=l AND P(7)=l AND P(l)=/3 AND 

P(3)=/3 AND P(6)=/3 ANDP(8)=/3 AND 

P(9)=/3 THEN 192/3 
185/3 IF P(2)=-l AND P(6)=-l AND 

P(5)=l AND P(9)=lANDP(l)=/3 AND 
P(3)=/3 AND P(4)=/3 ANDP ( 7 ) =/3ANDP ( 
8)=,0 THEN 1920 

186/3 IF P(l)=-1 AND P(6)=-l AND 
P(4)=l AND P(9)=l AND P(2)=/3 AND 

P(3)=/3 AND P(5)=/3 AND P(7)=/3 AN 
D P(8)=/3 THEN 192/3 
187/3 IF P(3)=-l AND P(5)=-l AND 
P(6)=l AND P(8)=l AND P(l)=/3 AND 

P(2)=/3 AND P(4)=/3 AND P(7)=/3 AN 
D P(9)=/3 THEN 192/3 
188/3 FOR P=7T0 9 
189/3 IF P(P)=-1 THEN 192/3 
19/3/3 NEXT P 
191/3 GOTO 197/3 

192/3 FOR XZ=1 TO 2/3 : PRINT§ 65 , "WI 
NNER" ; :PLAY"Ll/3/3;E" : PRINT© 65, " 

" ; : NEXT XZ 
193/3 WF=-1 
194/3 ZC=ZC+1: ZH=/3 
19 5/3 GOSUB 8/3: 'STORE GAME AWAY 
196/3 TC=TC+1 1 
197/3 RETURN 

198/3 RO=INT( (KD-l)/3) : 'COMPUTE R 
0W()3 TO 2) 

199/3 IF KD/3=INT(KD/3) THEN C0=3 , 

ELSE IF (KD+1)/3=INT( (KD+l)/3) 
THEN C0=2 ELSE C0=1 



56 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



2j3pj3 R=4*RO+4 :C=5* (C0-l)+9 : 1 COMP 
UTE PROPER ROW AND COLUMN TO DRA 
W PIECE IN 
2j31j3 RETURN 

2j32j3 1 DRAW ACTUAL MOVE 

2j33j3 FOR R1=R TO R+l 

2j34j3 FOR C1=C TO C+3 

2j35j3 PRINT@R1*32+C1,CHR$ (CL) ; 

2j36j3 NEXT C1,R1 

2j37j3 RETURN 

2j38j3 'COMPUTER MOVE BY LEARNING 
2j39j3 NM=MN:CC=j3:ML=L 
21j3j3 P=PEEK (ML) 

211)3 IF P=j3 THEN RF=1 : RETURN : 1 NO 

MOVES STORED 
212j3 IF P=M(CC) THEN 218j3 
213j3 PZ=PEEK(ML+1) 

214j3 IF PZ=j3 THEN RF= 1 : RETURN : ' M 
OVE NOT STORED 
215j3 ML=ML+PZ 

216j3 IF ML>E THEN RF=1 : RETURN : ' S 
ET RANDOM MOVE FLAG 
217j3 GOTO 21j3j3 

218j3 IF CC/2 = INT(CC/2) THEN NE=2 

ELSE NE=3 
219j3 ML=ML+NE 
22j3j3 CC=CC+1 
2 21j3 IF CC=NM THEN 2 23j3 
222)3 GOTO 21j3j3 
223j3 K=j3:TP=j3 

224j3 SM (K) =PEEK (ML) : SP (K) =PEEK (M 
L+2) 

225j3 P=PEEK(ML+1) 
226j3 IF P=j3 THEN 23pj3 
227j3 K=K+1 
2 2 8j3 ML=ML+P 
229j3 GOTO 224j3 

2 3j3j3 FOR X=j3 TO K: TP=TP+SP (K) :NE 
XT X: 'ADD UP PROBS 

231j3 RP=RND(TP) :IF TP<3 THEN RF= 
1 : RETURN: 1 IF NOT MUCH TO CHOOSE 
FROM GO BACK TO PICK MOVE AT RAN 
DOM 

232j3 TP=j3 

233j3 FOR X=j3 TO K 

234j3 TP=TP+SP(K) 

2 3 5j3 IF TP>RP THEN 2 3 7j3 

2 3 6j3 NEXT X 

237p CM=SM(K) -Ij3j3 : CF=INT (CM/lj3) : 
CT=CM-lj3*CF 

238j3 RF=-1: RETURN: 'SET RANDOM FL 

AG TO MEMORY 

23 9j3 REM STORE GAME AWAY 

24j3j3 NM=MN 

241j3 IF WF=-1 THEN PB=4 ELSE PB= 
-4: 'CHOOSE PROBABILITY 
242j3 GOSUB 8j3 
243j3 RETURN 



244j3 'DRAW BOARD 
245j3 CLS 

246j3 B$=STRING$ (16, 128) :M$ = "MOVE 
" : F$="FROM" : T$="TO" : TT$="TOTAL" : 
W$="WINS" 

247j3 C$=STRING$(8 / 175) :0$=STRING 
$(8,159) :PRINT@5 6,0$; : PRINT@24, 0 
$; :PRINT@32,C$ ; : PRINT@j3 , C$ ; 
248j3 PRINT@4j3, "LEARN COCO LEARN" 
; : PRINT@8 , STRING$ (8,169) ; : PRINT@ 
16,STRING$(8,153) ; 
249j3 PRINT@72,B$; : PRINT@2j3p , B$ ; : 
PRINT@3 28 , B$ ; : PRINT@456 , B$ ; 
25j3j3 FOR R=2 TO 13: FOR C=8 TO 2 3 
STEP 5:PRINT@R*32+C,CHR$(128) ; : 
NEXT C,R 

251j3 FOR R=3 TO 11 STEP 4 : FOR C= 
1J3 TO 2j3 STEP 5 : 1=1+1 : PRINT@R*32 
+C, I; :NEXT C,R 

252j3 PRINT@98, "COCO"; : PRINT@12j3 , 
"OPPONENT"; : PRINT@22 5 , F$ ; : PRINT@ 
249, F$; 

253J3 PRINT@259,T$; : PRINT@2 83 , T$ ; 

:PRINT@322,TT$; : PRINT@3 4 6 , TT$ ; :P 

RINT@3 5 4 , W$ ; : PRINT § 3 7 8 , W$ ; 

254j3 PRINT@488 , "CONSECUTIVE WINS 
it « 

2 5 5j3 RETURN 
256j3 CLS 

257j3 PRINT@4j3, "LEARN COCO LEARN" 
• 

258)3 PRINT: PRINT "DO YOU WISH TO 
PLAY AGAINST THE COMPUTER YOURSE 
LF OR TO WATCH THE GAME PLAY 

ED AT RANDOM" 

2 59j3 PRINT" TYPE H FOR HUMAN 

GAME OR R FOR RANDOM 

GAME" 

26j3j3 PRINT@235,"H OR R" ; 

261j3 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$="" THEN 261 

J3 

262j3 IF Z$="H" THEN HR=p ELSE IF 

Z$="R" THEN HR=1 ELSE 26j3j3 
263j3 PRINT" " ; : IF Z$="H" THEN P 
RINT"HUMAN" ELSE PRINT" RANDOM" 
264j3 PRINT: PRINT" SELECT THE 
SPEED OF PLAY (1 THRU 5, 1 IS 

FAST 5 IS SLOW) " 
265j3 PRINT@363 ,"1 THRU 5"; 
266j3 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$="" THEN 266 

267j3 Z=VAL(Z$) 

268j3 IF Z>5 OR Z<1 THEN 265j3 ELS 

E Z=INT(Z) 

269j3 PRINT" ";Z 

27j3jd ZT=(Z-1) *8j3 

271j3 FOR ZZ=1 TO lj3j3j3:NEXT ZZ 

272 jd RETURN /R\ 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 57 



GAME 





he scenario: You are flying your F-15 Eagle in 
pursuit of anenemy fleet of craft intruding on your 
airspace. Your orders are to shoot to kill. 



F-15 Ground Assault Simulator is an action game 
written specifically for the new Color Computer 3 with 
128K. An RGB monitor is recommended for correct 
color interpretation, but not needed. 

You must perf orm your mission using the right joystick 
and various keys on the keyboard to operate plane 
functions. 

Af ter running the program, you are greeted by the title 
screen and a short song. Next, you need to type the skill 
level at which you want to play. The easiest is Level 0; 
Level 9 is nearly impossible. Let's play Skill Level 3, just 
for starters. 

The game screen appears and you see a fuel gauge, a 
horizon gauge, a thrust meter and radar (all of which 
work in real time). Control your ship like a real aircraft: 
to go up, pull the stick back and vice versa for down. 
If you are not using an RGB monitor, you will not be 
able to see your own aircraft. You will only see its shadow 
on the ground. Therefore, pulling back and pushing 
forward on the stick will have little visible effect. 

The radar shows the enemy position in relation to the 
screen, and the horizon gauge shows the ground in 
relation to your craft. The fuel gauge shows how much 
fuel is left in your tanks; when you run out of fuel, you 
will crash. The thrust gauge controls the speed and 
maneuvers of your plane. Use the up and down arrows 
to control this factor. The more thrust you've got, the 

more quickly fuel is used. 

Move your ship into position and press the joystick 
button to fire. Watch out: The enemy may shoot back. 
The frequency of the enemy's attacks depends on the skill 
level you picked at the start of the game. 




Now that you know how to play, let's take a look at 
how some of the game's effects are achieved. The moving 
scenery is drawn in two palette colors. One is a visible 
color and the other is the background color (invisible). 
These colors are switched from visible to invisible, using 
the palette command, at a speed that achieves 



Eric Wolf is 14 years old and attends Dickinson Middle 
School. He is currently writing a line of computer 
software that deals with games and utilities. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 59 




flicker-free animation. The variable for thrust controls how much 
time passes before the next switch of scenery lines. 

The game's graphics, like the plane's in-flight positions, are drawn 
at the very beginning of the program right before the title screen 
is displayed. 

F-15 Ground Assault Simulator uses the speed-up poke, G5497 , 0, 
to make the program run even faster. It also uses the new Color 
Computer 3's advanced graphics system and the 320-by-192, 16- 
color screen. The palette colors for the screen may be changed to 
fit your personal preferences; they are contained in Line 185. 

I hope this explanation will get you started, but if you have any 
questions, please feel free to write. 

(Questions about this game may be addressed to Eric Wolf, 1630 
N. Johnson St., South Bend, IN 46628. Please enclose an SASEfor 
a reply.) □ 



190 
260 
360 
460 
580 
640 



.20 
255 
.19 
109 
229 
239 



730 . 
850 . 
970 . 
1080 
1190 
END 



219 
.62 
.60 
186 
192 
118 



T 



The listing: F15ERGLE 
10 REM ===== 



F-15 EAGLE 
"GROUND ASSAULT" 

WRITTEN BY: ERIC WOLF = 
1630 N. JOHNSON STREET= 
SOUTH BEND, INDIANA 

46628= 



20 REM - 
30 REM s 
40 REM = 
50 REM = 
60 REM = 
70 REM = 
80 REM = 

90 REM ========================= 

100 REM 

110 CLEAR 1000 

120 PALETTE RGB: WIDTH 40:CLEAR20 
00:POKE 65497,0 

130 FORY=lT05 : HBUFF Y, 27 5: NEXTY: 
HBUFF 6, 100: HBUFF 7 , 100 : HBUFF 8, 
100 

14 0 ON BRK GOTO 9 90 

150 FORY=0TO15 : PALETTEY , 0 : NEXTY : 

POKE &HFF9A,0 : HSCREEN2 

160 HCLS0:HDRAW"C15;BM2,2 ;R4L2U1 

L4R8L4U1L1R2" : HGET (0,0) - (8,2) ,6 

170 HCLS13 : PL$="S4 ;BM20 , 6 ;NL8NR8 

UlNL6NR6UlNL2NR2NL12NR12UlNLlj3NR 

1J3U1NL7NR7U1NL2NR2U1NL1NR1" :HDRA 

W "Cll"+PL$:HCOLOR14:HSET(17 / 6) : 

HSET(18 f 6) :HSET(22 f 6) :HSET(23 f 6) 

: HGET (0,0) -(40, 6) ,3:HCLS13 

180 PM$="S3 ;BM10 , 10 ; NG8NE8L2NG6N 

E6U2NG12NE12L2NG10NE10U2NE7NG7L2 

NG2NE2U2NG2NE1" : HDRAW "C11"+PM$ : 

HSET(8 , 12 , 14) :HSET(12,8,14) : HGET 

(0,0) -(18,18) ,4:HCLS 13 

190 PM$="S3 ;BM8 , 10 ; NF8NH8R2NF6NH 



6U2NF12NH12R2NF10NH10U2NF7NH7R2N 
F2NH2U2NF2NH1" : HDRAW "C11"+PM$:H 
SET(6,8,14) :HSET(10,12,14) : HGET ( 
0,0)-(18,18) ,5 

200 HCLS13 : HDRAW"C8"+PL$ : HGET (0 , 
0)-(40,6) ,1 
210 HCLS 

220 HCOLOR4 : FORY=0TO3 2 0STEP10 : HL 
INE (Y,0)-(Y,192) ,PSET: NEXTY : FORY 
=0TO19 2STEP12 :HLINE (0 , Y) - ( 3 19 , Y) 
,PSET: NEXTY 

230 P$ (1) ="R8F8L2F12R4M+8 , -4 ;M-6 
, -16R1M-8 , -4L6U2M+6 , -1U8M-6 , -1U1 
R6U2L6U1M+6 , -1U8M-6 , -1 ;U2R6M+8 , - 
4L1M+6 , -16M-8 , -4L4G12R2G8L8U20M+ 
4,-20;M-16, -6L4M-40,46;BR55BD3 6D 
20M+4, 20;M-16, 6L4M-40,-4 6" 
240 P$ (2)="M-28,-4NR20L12U7R4U2L 
32 ;M-8 , -2;H2U2E2 ;M+8,-2 ;R32U2L4U 
7R32L20M+28 , -4 ; " 

250 P$ (3) ="U16E2R16F2D4G2L8D4R8F 
2D4G2L8D12G2L6H2U2 4BR2 6BD6E2R8F2 
D4G2L8H2U4D4F2R8BR8D12F2R6E2U30H 
2L6G2D30BR16NU4F2R20E2U16H2L13U6 
R13E2U4H2L20G2D15F2R13D6L13G2 
260 P$ (4) ="BR48D5F2R24E2U4H2L16U 

5R16E2U4H2L16U5R16E2U4H2L24G2D24 

BR3 4D6F2R8E2U6R4D6F2R8E2U30H2L24 

G2D24BR12BU8R4U8L4D8 

270 P$ (5) ="BR2 2D14F2R2 8E2U16H2L1 

6G2D4F2R8D4L10H2U14E2R16E2U4H2L2 

6G2D24BR3 8D6F2R2 8E2U6H2L16H2U20H 

2L8G2D2 8BR3 8D2F2R24E2U4H2L16U5R1 

6E2U4H2L16U5R16E2U4H2L24G2D28 

2 80 FORY=0TO0 : FORX=0TO1 : HDRAW "BM 

"+STR$ ( 13 8+X) +" , "+STR$ (14 6+Y) +" ; 

C3;"+P$(l) : HDRAW P$ (2 ) : NEXTX , Y 

290 HPRINT(8 , 6) , "Written By Eric 

A. Wolf" 
300 HPAINT(80, 130) ,2,3 
310 HPRINT(23 , 11) , "Range: 4000": 
HPRINT(23, 12) , "Speed: 0- Mach 2" 



60 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



: HPRINT (23 , 13) , "Fuel: 



2£Jp£J£J lbs 



320 HPRINT(23 , 14) , "Ceiling: 8500 
0 ft" : HPRINT (23,15) , " Armourment : 
":HPRINT(24,16) ,"- Sidewinders" 
330 HPRINT ( 24 , 17) , "- Sparrows" :H 
PRINT (24 , 18) , "- GBU 15 bombs": HP 
RINT(24,19) ,"- 30 mm Gun Pods" 
340 HPRINT (2 3, 20 ), "Thrust: 25000 
lbs" 

3 50 Xl=20 : Yl=20 : HDRAW"C1 ; BM"+STR 
$ (XI) +" , "+STR$ ( Yl) +" ; "+P$ ( 3 ) : HDR 
AW P$(4):HDRAW P$ ( 5 ) : HPAINT (Xl+4 
,Yl+4) : HPAINT (Xl+32,Yl-4) : HPAINT 
(Xl+52,Yl+4) : HPAINT (Xl+64, Yl+9) : 
HPAINT (Xl+112 , Yl+9 ) 
360 HPAINT (Xl+150, Yl+9) : HPAINT (X 
1+180, Yl+9) :HPAINT(X1+218, Yl+9) : 
HPAINT (Xl+258 , Yl+9 ) 
370 Xl=24: Yl=24 :HDRAW"C3 ;BM"+STR 
$(X1)+", "+STR$(Yl)+";"+P$(3) :HDR 
AW P$(4):HDRAW P$ ( 5 ): HPAINT (Xl+4 
,Yl+4) : HPAINT (Xl+32 ,Yl-4) : HPAINT 
(Xl+52,Yl+4) :HPAINT(Xl+64,Yl+9) : 
HPAINT (Xl+112 , Yl+9 ) 
380 HPAINT (Xl+150, Yl+9 ): HPAINT (X 
1+180, Yl+9) : HPAINT (Xl+2 18, Yl+9) | 
HPAINT (Xl+2 58 , Yl+9 ) 



390 '* DELETE LINE 420 IF YO 

U * 

400 f * ARE USING A CMP MONITOR 0 
R TV * 
410 ! ' 

420 GOTO 480 
430 ■ 

440 • **** CMP COLOR PALETTES *** 
** 

450 PALETTE0, 0: PALETTE 1, 16: PALET 
TE2 ,32: PALETTE3 , 63 : PALETTE 4 , 13 : P 
ALETTE5 ,21: PALETTE 6 ,36: PALETTE 8 , 
0: PALETTE9 , 14 : PALETTE 10 , 32 : PALET 
TE11 , 63 : PALETTE 12 ,32: PALETTE 13 , 3 
6: PALETTE 14, 7 
460 GOTO 490 

470 • **** RGB COLOR PALETTES *** 
** 

480 PALETTE0,0: PALETTE 1, 7 : PALETT 
E2 , 56 : PALETTE 3 , 63 : PALETTE4 , 8 : PAL 
ETTE5 ,34: PALETTE 6 , 54 : PALETTE 8 , 0 : 
PALETTE 9 , 3 : PALETTE10 , 56 : PALETTE1 
1,63: PALETTE 12 , 56 : PALETTE 13 , 48 : P 
ALETTE 14 ,32 

490 POKE65496,0:PLAY"V20 ;T2 ;L8 ;A 

;04 ; L16 ; c ; L4 ; c ; 03 ; L16 ; B- ; L16 ; A ; L 
8 ; G ; L4 ; A ; L4 ; B- ; L4 ; B ; 04 ; L4 ; C ; L8 ; D 
; LI 6 ; F ; L4 ; F ; L 1 6 ; G ; LI 6 ; F ; L8 ; D ; L4 ; 



J&R ELECTRONICS 

Easy, Solderless Installation 

"JramR' 1 

512K COCO 3 Memory Expansion Board. Upgrades stock 128K COCO 3 to full 
512K for 0S9 Level II. Similar to RS upgrade. 

Now pardner... reach for your 

SIXDRIVE! 

With purchase of a BANKER D or JramR 
you can have a y^9008 SIXDRIVE 




for only 

SIXDRIVE is a machine language utility that 
modifies Disk Extended Basic 1.0, 1.1, or FKEYS III 
to allow the use of 3 double sided drives as 6 single 
side drives without ANY hardware modifications. 

FEATURES two different drive setect assignments: 

(1) [0.2] [1,31 [4,5] (2) [0,1] [2,3] [4,5] 

Ramdisk is compatible with GIMMESOFTs SIXDRIVE 

Made in U.S.A. 



#1010 

moii 

#1012 
#1013 

#1014 




Complete Hardware & Software 



COCO 3 ONLY 

$39.95 JramR bare board plus connectors and software 
$79.95 JramR kit includes all parts plus memory chips and soltware 
$99.95 JramR assembled and lasted plus memory chips and software 
$19.95 JramR S/W deluxe customizable ramdisk & spooler, mamory last, and 

ramdisk utility programs. Compatible with ell CoCo 3 512K. 
$49.95 JramR 0K bytes (#1012 lass memory chips) 



Readily available: User Replaceable Socketed Memory Chips, no hard-to-find SIP memories. 

To place an order, write to J&R Electronics. P.O. Box 2572. Columbia. MD 21045, OR call (301) 
987-9057^Jesse or (301) 788-0861— Ray. 

HOURS: Weekdays 7 p.m.-9 p.m.; Sal. Noon-5 p.m. EASTERN TIME, usually, if no answer try later. 

Add$4.0Q shipping & handling (FOREIGN ORDERS $7.00). COD charge $3.00. Maryland residents add 
5% state lax. Foreign orders must include payment on U.S. bank 

CHECKS. MONEY ORDERS OR COD s only please (personal check— 2 weeks for clearance), IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY. Give COCO Radio Shack model If (i.e. 26-3136). Disk or Tape when ordering 

QUANTITY DISCOUNT AVAILABLE. For inlormaiion on shipping or previously placed orders call (301) 
786-0861. COCO II 26-31XX owners call (soldering experience maybe required) 

Refer to back Issues of RAINBOW for other products. 



ALL SOFTWARE CQ MP AT ABLE WITH C:0C=03 
NO PATCHES REG. LURED 

COLOR BANKBOOK +3 * $19.95 



BOSINESS BANKBOOK 

SPECIFY 1 OR £ DISK DRIVES 



$49.95 



+ TU BLACKOUT BINGO * $19.95 



# OCR FILE 

# SOPEROISK UTILITY 

SEE REVIEW IN MAY 
RAINBOW PAGE iSl 



RROIOLOG 

SEE REVIEW IH MAY 'S6 
RAINBOW PAGE £0* 

CODE PRACTICE 

SEE REVIEW IN NOV 
RAINBOW PACE 134 

ORDERS OR INFORMATION 

CALL 1-800-628-2828 
EXTENSION 552 

ALL PROGRAMS INCLUDE MANUALS 
RECLUIRE 32K AND i DISK DRIVE. 
ADD *£.')0 SHIPPING I HANDLING 
FLORIDA RES. ADD SY. SALES TAX 



$19.95 



$ 9.95 



$ 9.95 



$ 9.95 





-Q 



SUNRISE 



SOFjTilUflRiE 



RAINBOW 

CEATlFIC*riON 
SEAL 



8901 NILI 26 ST DEPT R 
SUNRISE, FL 33322 

INCLUDES SPECIAL EDITION FOR C0O03 !!! 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 61 



C" :POKE65497, )3:T=)3 

5)3)3 T=T+1:IF T>1,0)3)3 THEN 52)3 ELS 

E IF BUTTON ()3 ) <>0 THEN 52)3 

51) 3 IFINKEY$="" THEN 5pp 

52) 3 HSCREEN)3 : POKE &HFF9 A , 0 : ATTR3 
, )3 : CLS : PRINTTAB ( 5 ) "F-15 Ground A 
ssault S imulator 11 : ATTR2 , J5 : PRINTT 
AB( 7) "Written By: Eric A. Wolf": 
ATTR1 , )3 : PRINTSTRING$ ( 4 )3 , " - 11 ) ; 

53 ) 3 LOCATES , 12 : ATTR2 , j3 : PRINT" Ent 
er Difficulty Level (J3-9)" 

54) 3 LOCATE19,14:ATTR3,)3 

55) 3 A$=INKEY$:IFA$<")3" 0RA$>"9" 
THEN 55p ELSE PRINT A$ ;: S0UND2 )3)3 , 
1 

56) 3 ATTR3 , )3 : LOCATE 7 , 22 : PRINT" St a 
nd by.... For Level "+A$:LV$=A$: 
LV=VAL(A$) 

57p POKE &HE6,2 'SETUP FOR HSCRE 
EN 2 

58p HCLSJ3 : HC0L0R3 : HDRAW"BMp , 0 ; BF 
6BU2BR4NG4E4R292F8D118G8L2 92H8U1 
18":HPRINT()3,17) , "Thrust ": HPRINT 
(8,17) , "Radar" :FORY=146 TO 192 S 
TEP11 . 5 : HLINE ( 8 , Y) -(12, Y) ,PSET:H 
LINE ( 1)3 , Y+5 . 7 5 ) - ( 12 , Y+5 .75), PSET 
: NEXTY 

59)3 HLINE (54 , 146) -( 11^, 192) , PSET 
,B:HLINE(16, 146) -(2 6, 192) ,PSET,B 
: HC0L0R14 : HLINE ( 17 , 169 ) - ( 2 5 , 19J8 ) 
, PSET, BF:HC0L0R3: HPRINT (15, 23) , " 
Fuel " : HLINE ( 16j3 , 184 ) - ( 3 19 , 192 ) , P 
SET,B:HPAINT(168 ,188) , 6, 3 :HCIRCL 
E(16j2f, 158) ,2)3 

6J3J3 HPRINT(28,17) , "F-15 Ground": 
HPRINT (3j3, 18) , "Assault" 

61) 3 FORY=138 TO 178 STEP 8: HLINE 
(132,Y) -(136,Y) , PSET: HLINE ( 184, Y 
) - ( 188 , Y ) , PSET : NEXTY 

62) 3 HPRINT(28, 21) , "Play Level M + 
LV$ : HLINE (7,46)-(313,46) , PSET : HP 
AINT(16J3 ,4 5) ,4,3 

63J3 HCOLOR5:HLINE(7,58) -(7,46) ,P 
SET:FORY=7 TO 313 STEP 16:HLINE- 
( Y , RND ( 1 6 ) +3)3 ) , PSET : NEXTY : HLINE- 
(313,58) , PSET: HLINE (7, 58) -(313,5 
8) , PSET : HPAINT ( 16^0 , 57 ) 

64) 3 HC0L0R12: HLINE (7, 58) -(7,5)3) , 
PSET:FORY=7 TO 313 STEP 12: HLINE 
- ( Y , RND ( 1 6 ) +4)3 ) , PSET : NEXTY : HLINE 
-(313,58) , PSET : HLINE ( 7 , 58 ) - ( 3 13 , 
58) , PSET: HPAINT (16,0, 57) :HCOLOR3: 
HLINE (7,58)-(313,58),PSET: HPAINT 
(16)3,59) ,13,3 

65) 3 P2=13)3:Y=59:T=2 : F=318 : Xl=7 : X 
2 = 313 :GOSUB66)3 :GOT069)3 



66) 3 HCOLOR7 : HLINE (XI, Y) -(X2,Y) ,P 
SET:HCOLOR15:IF Y+(T/2)<128 OR Y 
+(T/2)<P2 THEN HLINE (XI , Y+ (T/2) ) 
-(X2, Y+(T/2) ) ,PSET 

67) 3 Y=Y+T:T=T+(T/2) :IF Y>128 THE 
N 68^0 ELSE 66$ 

68p RETURN 

69)3 FOR X=55 TO 1 1)3STEP3 : HSET (X , 
15)3,2) :HSET(X, 16)3,2) : HSET (X, 17)3 , 
2) :HSET(X, 18)3,2) :HSET(X, 19)3,2) :N 
EXTX 

7)3)3 FORX=147 TO 191 STEP3:HSET(5 

5, X,2) :HSET(65,X,2) : HSET ( 7 5 , X , 2 ) 
: HSET ( 8 5 , X , 2 ) : HSET ( 9 5 , X , 2 ) : HSET ( 

1) 35, X, 2) :NEXTX 

71) 3 HDRAW"BM82, 168 ;C3;NG4F4U1H4G 

72) 3 POKE &HE6C6, 18 : POKE &HE6C7,1 
8 : HS CREEN2 : TH=2 1 : L=l : L1=PEEK ( &HF 
FBD) : L2=PEEK ( &HFFB5) :SW=^):PLAY"T 
255L2 55 ; V3 1 ; " : PO=l : PN=1 : TIMER=p : 
P1=14)3:P2=96:M1=PEEK(&HFFB6) :M2 = 
PEEK ( &HFFBE) : HT=p : TT=1 : El=13)3 

73) 3 PLAY"T255L255" :FORY=31 TO 1 
STEP-l:PLAY "V"+STR$ ( Y) +" ; FBFCFD 

": NEXTY : PLAY "V31" I 

74) 3 HGET(E1,56) -(El+8,58) ,7 

75) 3 SW=SW+l:IF SW> ( (46-TH) /9 ) TH 

EN SW=p:IF L3=p THEN POKE &HFFBF ' 
, LI: POKE &HFFB7,L2:L3=1 ELSE L3= 
^):POKE &HFFBF , L2 : POKE &HFFB7 , LI 

76) 3 ON L GOSUB 1)3)3)3,1)36)3,12)3^,11 

2) 3, 8)3)3, 84)3 , 87)3 , 11)3)3 !| 

77) 3 L=L+1:IF L>8 THEN L=l || 

78) 3 GOTO 75)3 

79p GOT079)3 |l 
8S3P IFPEEK(341) =247 THEN TI=2 EL 
SE IFPEEK(342 ) =247 THEN TI=-1:HC 
OLOR)3: HLINE (17, 19)3-TH) - ( 2 5 , 19)3-T 
H),PSET ELSE RETURN 
81^f TH=TH+TI : IF TH<0 THEN TH=p E 
LSE IF TH>4 3 THEN TH=4 3 

82) 3 HCOLOR14 :HLINE (17, 19)3-TH) -(2 

5, 191-TH) ,PSET,BF j 

83) 3 RETURN 

84) 3 F1=F1+1:IF FK(48-TH)/6 THEN 
RETURN ELSE IF F>21p THEN 8 5)3 E 

LSE IF CF=1 THEN CF=jd I POKE &HFFB 

6, Ml ELSE CF=l:POKE &HFFB6 , M2 I 

85) 3 F1=^):HLINE(F,185)-(F,19)3) ,PR ' 
ESET:PLAY"CC":F=F-l:IF F>16)3 THE 

N RETURN 

86) 3 GOTO 91)3 

87) 3 IF G=l THEN G=p:GOTO 112)3 EL 
SE G=l 

88) 3 A=PO:HCOLOR)3 :GOSUB8 9)3 :A=PN:H 



62 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



- 



C0L0R3 : GOSUB89 j3 : PO=PN : RETURN 
89j3 IF A=l THEN HDRAW" BM16j3 , 158 ; 
NG12NE12BF4G4E8 11 ELSE IFA=2 THEN 
HDRAW"BM16j3 , 158 ;NL16NR16BD4L4R8 
11 ELSE HDRAW" BM16j3 , 158 ; NF12NH12B 
G4H4F8 ff 
9j3j3 RETURN 

91j3 T=TIMER : HSCREEN0 : CLS : ATTR3 , j3 
, B : PRINTTAB ( 4 ) "<<==- YOU RAN OUT 

OF FUEL ! -==»" :GOT09 3j3 
92j3 T=TIMER: HSCREEN0 : CLS : ATTR3 , j3 
, B: PRINTTAB (4) "«==- YOU WERE SH 
OT DOWN -==»" 

93j3 POKE&HFF9A, j3 : PLAY" T255L255 ; V 
3 1 ; 11 : F0RY=1T05 : F0RX=1T012 : PLAY S 
TR$ (X) : NEXTX , Y : ATTR2 , jd : LOCATE^ , 5 
: PRINT 11 Flight Time" : LOCATE 3 j3 , 5 : P 
RINTINT(T/3 6j3j3) ; 11 : 11 ; INT ( (T-INT (T 
/36Sdp) *26pp)/6p) ; : LOCATE^, 7 : PRIN 
T ff Hit/Miss Rating" 

94j3 IF TT=j3 THEN I=j3 ELSE I=INT ( 

lj3j3*(HT/(TT-l) ) ) 

95j3 LOCATE3j3,7:PRINTI; ff % M 

951 LOCATED, 9: : PRINT 11 Total Score 

: 11 : LOCATE 3j3 , 9 : PRINT ( I*lj3* (1-V+l) ) 

: FORY=lT01j3j3j3 : NEXTY 

96j3 LOCATE lj3 , 16 : PRINT" Play anoth 

er game ?" 

97j3 A$=INKEY$:IF BUTTON (j3 ) =j3 AND 

A$=»» THEN 97j3 
98j3 IF BUTTON ( jS ) Op THEN 15j3 ELS 
E IF A$= f! Y ff THEN 15j3 ELSE IF A$= 
f! N ff THEN CLS: END ELSE 9 7j3 
9 9j3 ATTRjZJ , j3 : PALETTE RGB: STOP 

P3=JOYSTK(j3) :P4=JOYSTK(l) :P 
4=63-P4:IF P3<16 THEN PN=1:P1=P1 
-4:P1=P1-(TH/11) ELSE IF P3>48 T 
HEN Pl=Pl+4 :P1=P1+ (TH/11) :PN=3 E 
LSE PN=2 

Ij31j3 P1=INT(P1) :IF PK15 THEN PI 
=15 ELSE IF Pl>265 THEN Pl=265 
Ij32j3 IFP4<26 THEN P2=P2-4 : P2=P2- 
(TH/22) ELSE IF P4>36 THEN P2=P2 
+4:P2=P2+(TH/22) 

Ij33j3 P2=INT(P2) : IF P2<64 THEN P2 
= 64 ELSE IF P2>lj37 THEN P2 = lj37 
Ij34j3 HPUT(Pl,126)-(Pl + 4j3,132) ,1, 
PSET 

Ij35j3 RETURN 

Ij36j3 ON PN GOTO Ij37j3 , Ij38j3 , Ij39j3 
Ij37j3 HGET(Pl+lj3,P2) - (Pl+28 , P2+18 
) ,2 :HPUT(Pl+lj3,P2) - (Pl+2 8 , P2 + 18 ) 
,4, PSET: RETURN 

Ij38j3 HGET(P1,P2) -(Pl + 4j3,P2 + 6) ,2: 
HPUT ( PI , P2 ) - ( Pl+4 0 , P2 + 6 ) , 3 , PSET : 
RETURN 



Ij39j3 HGET(Pl+lj3,P2)-(Pl + 23,P2 + 18 
) ,2: HPUT ( Pl+lj3 , P2 ) - (Pl+2 8 , P24-18 ) 
, 5 , PSET : RETURN 

Ilj3j3 IF PN=2 THEN HPUT ( PI , P2 ) - ( P 
l+4j3, P24-6) , 2 , PSET: RETURN ELSE HP 
UT (Pl+lj3 , P2 ) - (Pl+2 8 , P24-18 ) , 2 , PSE 
T : RETURN 
lllj3 RETURN 

112j3 IF BUTTON (j3)=j3 THEN RETURN 
ELSE TT=TT+1 

113j3 HCOLOR 14: ON PN GOSUB 117j3, 
118j3,119j3 

114j3 PLAY 11 F" : HCOLOR 13: ON PN GOS 
UB 117j3, 118j3, 119j3 

115j3 IF FP<E1 OR FP>El+6 THEN RE 
TURN ELSE HT=HT+1 : SOUNDlj3j3 , 1 : HDR 
AW ff BM ff + STR$ (INT (54+ (El/6) ) )+»' ,15 
2 ;Cj3 ;U1R1D1L1 M : HPUT (El ,5 6) - (El + 8 
, 58 ) , 7 , PSET : E1=RND ( 2 5j3 ) +2 5 : HGET ( 
El, 56) - (El+8 , 58) , 7 : RETURN 
116j3 RETURN 

117j3 HLINE(P1 + 9,P2 + 18)-(P1+I8,6j3 
) ,PSET:HLINE-(P1+27,P2) , PSET:FP= 
Pl+18: RETURN 

118j3 HLINE(Pl+6,P2 + 4)-(Pl+2j3,6j3) 
, PSET: HLINE- (Pl+3 2 , P2+4) , PSET: FP 
=Pl+2j3: RETURN 

119j3 HLINE(P1 + 9,P2)-(P1+I8,6j3) ,P 
SET : HLINE- ( Pl+2 7 , P2+17 ) , PSET : FP= 
Pl+18: RETURN 

12j3j3 HDRAW 11 BM ff +STR$ ( INT (54 + (El/ 6 
) ) )+ ff , 15 2 ;Cj3 ;U1R1D1L1 M : HPUT (El, 5 
6) -(El+8, 58) ,7,PSET:E2=INT(RND(L 
V)*3.5):IF RND(2)=1 THEN E1=E1+E 
2 ELSE E1=E1-E2 

121j3 IF EK18 THEN El=18 ELSE IF 

El>274 THEN El=274 
122j3 HGET(El,56)-(El+8,58) , 7 : HPU 
T(E1,5 6) - (El + 8, 58) , 6 , OR : HDRAW 11 BM 
M +STR$ (INT (54+ (El/6) ) ) + f! , 152 ;C3 ; 
U1R1D1L1" 

123j3 IF RND(11-LV)<>1 THEN RETUR 
N ELSE IF El+4<Pl-4 THEN RETURN 
ELSE IF El+4>Pl+24 THEN RETURN 
124j3 HGET(El + 4,56)-(El + 4,P2 + 8) ,8 
:HCOLOR15 : HLINE (El+4 ,56) - (El+4 ,P 
2 + 8) , PSET : PLAY" AB ff 

125j3 IF (El+4<Pl+lj3 OR El+4>Pl + 3 
j3) THEN HPUT (El+4, 56) -(El + 4,P2 + 8 
), 8 , PSET: RETURN ELSE PALETTE 14 , 3 
2:FORY=31 TO 1 STEP-1 : HCIRCLE (El 
+4,P2+8) , (31-Y) , 14 : PLAY ff V ff + STR$ ( 
Y) + ff ; CDCD ; P3j3 11 : PALETTE 11,RND(64 
) -1 : F0RX=1T015 : NEXTX : NEXTY : PALET 
TE11, 63 :GOT09 2j3 ^ 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 63 



COCO CONSULTATIONS 



Technicians Tackle Shifty 

Display 

B) Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing: Editor 



I have a CoCo 1 and 2, two Co Co 3 s, 
three Zenith televisions, a CM-8 mon- 
itor and some other brands of TVs. 
When I hook either of the Co Co 3s to 
the Zenith TVs, the picture jumps a 
little. This does not happen when I hook 
the Co Co 3 to either a CM-8 or another 
brand of TV. Nor does it happen when 
I hook the Co Co 1 or the CoCo 2 to the 
Zenith TVs. Can you help me? 

Wooten A. York 
Lincolnton, GA 

I have heard a dozen or so reports via 
Delphi of problems with a jumpy pic- 
ture with the CoCo 3. I'm still not really 
sure what the problem is. However, 
Tandy has noted a different, but per- 
haps related, video problem with the 
CoCo 3. It seems that on some CoCo 
3s when you power them up, the 32- 
column display either is missing or is 
shifted over one or two horizontal 
character spaces to the left and will 
wrap around on the same line on the 
right. 

They discovered two possible causes: 
In some cases, the GIME chip was 
poorly seated in its socket, with some of 
its pins making poor contact. In that 
case, they advised their repair techni- 
cians to remove the GIME chip (a very 
delicate matter!) and clean both it and 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinker er and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOWS CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 

64 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



its socket with alcohol, then carefully 
reinsert it. 

They also noted that in some cases 
there was a problem with a capacitor in 
the clock circuit. In this case, they 
advised their technicians to replace C- 
64 (which is originally 150 picofarads) 
with a 220-picofarad capacitor. I'm not 
sure whether either of these manipula- 
tions will help with your particular 
problem, but you might want to try 
them. 



Pin Assignments 

/ have a book that describes the pin- 
out of the CoCo 's parallel port and lists 
one of them as +12V and another as 
-12 V. Does this mean that the book 
only applies to the CoCo 1? What are 
the pin assignments for the CoCo 2? 
Where can I find books with specs on 
the 7400 series of IC logic chips? 

Steve Roy 
Cincinnati, OH 

The book you have is probably the 
old, green "Technical Reference Man- 
ual" for the ancient CoCo 1 'D' board. 
What you are calling the "parallel port" 
is more accurately termed the CoCo's 
"system bus." As it happens, the pin 
assignments for that system bus are 
exactly the same on all models of CoCo, 
with the one exception: Those two pins 
you mentioned (the + and - 1 2-volt pins) 
are, on the CoCo 2 and 3, not connected 
to anything. Other than that, all pin 
assignments are the same. 

Actually, much of the CoCo's circuit- 
ry has remained fundamentally the 
same through all revisions of the ma- 
chine. But to get an accurate reference 



for your particular model CoCo, you 
should order the service manual for that 
particular model. The price will be 
around $12. These service manuals tend 
to be extremely well-written and very 
educational. 

As for the 74 series of logic chips, 
National Semiconductor, Motorola 
and Texas Instruments all publish 
extensive reference books on these 
items. Call your local representative for 
any of these companies and find out 
how to order one. They might give you 
one free. These books are often on sale 
at technical book stores, too. 



Disk Access Problem 

A friend complained to me of a Color 
Computer that shows garbage on the 
screen on the right-hand side during 
disk access. It appears to work well 
otherwise. Have you any idea how to 
cure this? 

Dave Archer 

( DA VEA RCHER ) 

In a Technical Bulletin to its repair 
technicians, dated May 23, 1985, Tandy 
discusses this problem. They say it can 
be cured by soldering lOK-ohm, pulJ-up 
resistors to the AO and Al pins on the 
main system bus of the CoCo. That is, 
solder a 10K resistor between the pad 
for the AO line of the system bus and a 
source of +5 volts (which can be found 
at Pin 9 of the connector, as well as at 
about a hundred other places on the 
board). Then do the same for the Al 
line. Note that to reach the Al line you 
will probably have to take off the 
motherboard and work on the solder 
side, whereas it is possible to accom- 




October 9-11 







Come meet 
CoCo Cat 
in person! 



; 




Princeton 



A ▲ A ▲ 



RAINBOWfest is the only comput- 
er show dedicated exclusively 
- ^ to your Tandy Color Computer. 

Nowhere else will you see as many CoCo-related 
products or be able to attend free seminars con- 
ducted by the top Color Computer experts. It's like 
receiving the latest issue of THE RAINBOW in your 
mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for com- 
mercial programmers to show off new and innova- 
tive products for the first time. Princeton is the 
show to get information on capabilities for the 
new CoCo 3, along with a terrific selection of the 
latest CoCo 3 software. In exhibit after exhibit, 
there will be demonstrations, opportunities to 
experiment with software and hardware, and spe- 
cial RAINBOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace between visiting exhibits and 
attending the valuable, free seminars on all as- 
pects of your CoCo — from improving BASIC skills 
to working with the sophisticated OS-9 operating 
system. 

Many people who write for THE RAINBOW — as 

well as those who are written about — are there to 
meet you and answer questions. You'll also meet 
lots of other people who share your interest in the 
Color Computer. It's a person-to-person event and 
a tremendous learning experience in a fun and re- 
laxed atmosphere." 

To make it easier for you to participate, we 
schedule RAINBOWfests in different parts of the 
country. If you missed the fun in Chicago, why 
don't you make plans now to join us in Princeton? 
For members of the family who don't share your 
affinity for CoCo, RAINBOWfest is located in an 
area with many other attractions. 

A special feature of RAINBOWfest is the 
Educational Sandbox, which features child- 
oriented workshops to give hands-on experience 
to an age group often neglected. There are ses- 
sions for the kindergarten through third-graders, 
and for fourth- through seventh-graders. And, as 
an additional treat for CoCo Kids of all ages, we've 
invited frisky feline CoCo Cat to join us for the 
show. RAINBOWfest has something for everyone 
in the family! 

The Hyatt Regency Princeton offers special 
rates for RAINBOWfest. The show opens Friday 
evening with a session from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It's a 
daytime show Saturday — the CoCo Community 
Breakfast (separate tickets required) is at 8 a.m., 
then the exhibit hall opens promptly at 10 a.m. and 
runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, the exhibit hall opens 
at 1 1 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained di- 
rectly from THE RAINBOW. We'll also send you a 
reservation form so you can get your special room 
rate. 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through RAINBOW affiliate, POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH treat- 
ment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at 
(502) 893-3311. All POSH services are available at 
no charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 





plish the addition of the pull-up to the 
AO line without removing the board. 



Seeking Schematics 

I have some Disto equipment and am 
interested in getting the schematic 
diagrams for it. These have not been 
available in the past. Can you help me? 

Dennis Ska I a 

(DENNY SKALA) 

Fairview, PA 

1 am pleased to announce that CRC/ 
Disto has started providing schematic 
diagrams for their products. Currently, 
diagrams of their later revision RAM 
disk card and their later revision Super 
Disk Controller card are available. 
Regrettably, the schematic they released 
of the Super Disk Controller, while 
showing the main disk controller 
circuitry, still does not show the details 
of the ROM select circuitry. Still, the 
inf ormation they have released is a giant 
step in the right direction. 

Disto also has information available 
on how to upgrade early model Super 
Controllers to make them work with the 
CoCo 3 (there were some problems with 
some of these early models) and infor- 
mation on how to upgrade the earliest 
model RAM disk card to allow it to 
function at 2 MHz, making it usable 
with OS-9 Level II on the CoCo 3. Disto 
will perf orm these upgrades f or you f or 
a reasonable service and shipping fee, or 
it will provide you with the information 
you need to do it yourself. Both of these 
sets of upgrade instructions are also 
posted on Delphi in the CoCo SIG 
Hardware Hacking topic area. 



Six-Pin DIN 

Where can I get a cable to hook my 
new Magnavox Monitor 40 to my 
CoCo 3's RGB port? This monitor has 
a six-pin DIN socket for RGB input and 
also features composite video input. I 
can make one up myself if you tell me 
how. 

Jason McCampbell 
St. Johns, MI 

Your "Magnavox Monitor 40" is 
probably the Magnavox 8CM505 mon- 
itor, judging from your description of it. 
This monitor (and also the Magnavox 
8CM515 and 8CM643) all have the 
same sort of six-pin DIN RGB input 



jack. To make up a cable for it, you need 
6 feet of 10-conductor ribbon cable, to 
which you must crimp a 10-conductor 
female dual in-line IDC connector, of 
the sort that mates to the CoCo 3's RGB 
connector. This connector is not avail- 
able at Radio Shack, but can be ordered 
from major electronic supply houses. 
You also need a six-pin DIN connector, 
available at Radio Shack. 

Then, all you do is hook pins on the 
Magnavox connector to pins with the 
identical signal function on the CoCo 
RGB connector: 





CoCo 


Magnavox 




10-pin 


six-pin 




RGB 


DIN RGB 


ground 


1,2 


3 


red 


3 


4 


green 


4 


1 


blue 


5 


5 


H sync 


8 


2 


V sync 


9 


6 (center pin) 



CoCo RGB connector pins 6, 7 and 10 
are not used in this cable arrangement. 

You are quite lucky that the Mag- 
navox takes separate and upgoing sync 
for its RGB input — just the type of sync 
the CoCo 3 provides! Note that some 
other RGB monitors (like the Sony 
KV1311CR) require combined and 
down-going sync, which in turn require 
a sync combiner circuit in order to 
accept the CoCo 3's RGB signals. 



SAM Chip Assessment 

In your February 1987 column, you 
wrote that the 74LS785 is significantly 
better than the old 6883 SAM chip. Is 
this chip pin-compatible with the older 
Co Cos? Where can I get one? My store 
manager here in Canada refuses to help 
me acquire one. 

Also, I just discovered that the F, N 
and V keys won 't work on my CoCo. 
My G and SHIFT keys have just died, 
too. When I try my keyboard on my 
friend's CoCo, it works fine, but his fails 
in the same way on my CoCo. I noticed 
that my 6821 (U17 on my CoCo 'F' 
board) is running hot too. Is this the 
problem? Where can I get a new 6821? 

Steven Stady 
Colinton, Alberta 

If your CoCo is working fine, there 
is no reason to replace the SAM chip. 
The 74LS785 is indeed totally pin- 
compatible with the older 6883 chip 
(also known as 74LS783) and can 



simply be dropped into older CoCos, 
where it will work just fine. If you were 
having problems with your old SAM, 
however, it is possible that this new one, 
which has somewhat refined internal 
timing, may work better. It also may run 
cooler and last longer. 

The part number for the 74LS785 
chip is MX-6433. When ordering it, say 
you want "a 74LS785, Part Number 
MX-6433, for a CoCo Catalog No. 
263I34A." In the U.S., Radio Shack 
stores can order parts directly from. 
National Parts. You may have to call 
Fort Worth and order the part yourself. 

As to your second problem, U17 has 
nothing to do with reading the key- 
board, which is governed by U18, the 
6822 chip. But U17 (the 6821) should 
not be running hot to the touch, and so 
it may need replacement. Before you 
run around replacing chips without 
knowing what you are doing, I strongly 
urge you to get a service manual for 
your particular model CoCo. If you 
don't have a schematic and technical 
reference for your machine, you really 
should not be attempting any repairs. 

The F,V, period and N keys (along 
with the right arrow and 6 key) are all 
in the same column of the keyboard 
scan, hooked to Wire Number 15 of the 
keyboard connector. The G and SHIFT 
keys (along with the O, W, space, 7 and 
slash key) are in the column hooked to 
keyboard Line Number 16. Thus, I 
suspect that either at least two lines are 
out on your motherboard, or your U18 
6822 is on the fritz. 

All CoCo parts can be ordered from 
Tandy National Parts. The 6821 chip is 
a standard chip available from dozens 
of electronic parts suppliers. The Tandy 
National Parts number for the 6821 chip 
in my CoCo 1 'F' board service manual 
is 8040821, and for the 6822 chip is 
8040822. The 'F' board is catalog 
number 26-3004A. 

Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to CoCo Consultations, 
THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow Maga- 
zine Services, then, at the RAINBOW> 
prompt, type RSK (for Ask the Experts) to 
arrive at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "CoCo Consultations" 
online form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



66 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



m 

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.m 

m 

■yyyy. 








AIL of our OS 9 produclj^ 
work wlih: 

OS ' vers km 1 

OS-9 vtrjkin J 



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XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program. 

Menu oriented ■ Definable macro keys 

Upload/download. Ascii • Works with standard serial port, RS232 

or XMODEM protocol PAK, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers. 

Execute OS-9 commands • Works with standard screen. XSCREEN, 

from within XTERM WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board. 

$49.95 with source $89.95 



XDIR 


& 


XCAL 


Hierarchial directory 




OS-9 calculator 


• Full sorting 




• Decimal, Hex, Binary 


• Complete pattern matching 




- +, -, *, /, AND.OR, XOR, NOT 


$24. 


95 


with source $49.95 



;o;": 

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XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 with source $54.95 



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HARDWARE 




512k memory upgrade 


$80.00 


Printers 




Citizen 120D 


CALL 


Star NP10 


CALL 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

- Woiks with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

■ Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

« Execute OS-9 commands from within 

• Proportional spacing supported 

- Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
overstrike, underline, super/sub-scripts 

- 10 header/footers 

■ Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

■ Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source $4 9. 9 5 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, with 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

XWORD/XMERGE/XS PELL 
$1 1 4.95 wilhXWORD/XMERGEsourc*199.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 



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SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING 

This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
also contains the flexibility for the accounting ori- 
ented user to set up a double entry journal with an 
almost unlimited chart of accounts. Includes Sales 
Entry, transaction driven Accounts Receivable and 
Accounts Payable, Journal Entry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment, and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounts 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check Reg- 
ister, Sales Reports, Account Status Lists, and a 
Journal Posting List. $79 95 

INVENTORY CONTROUSALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory control, 
with user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis of the business* sales and the sales force. One 
may enter/update inventory data, enter sales, run five 
sales analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter /update salesman records, and 
update the SB AP inventory. $59.95 



PAYROLL 

Designed formaintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up to 200 hourly and salaried employees 
with 8 deductions each. Calculates payroll and tax 
amounts, prints checks and maintains year-to-date 
totals which can be automatically transferred to the 
SBA package. Computes each pay period's totals 
for straight time, overtime and bonus pay and det- 
ermines taxes to be withheld. Additional outputs 
include mailing list, listing of employees, year-lo- 
date federal and/or state tax listing, and a listing of 
current misc. deductions. Suited for use in all states 
except Oklahoma and Delaware. $59.95 



PERSONAL BOOKEEPING 2000 

Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense categories. 
Menu driven and user friendly. $39.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and histoiy reports 
for each customer, prepares invoices and monthly 
statements, mailing labels, aging lists, and an alpha- 
betized customer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance charges 
for revolving accounts. This package functions as a 
standalone A/R system or integrates with ihe Small 
Business Accounting package. $ 5 9 95 



ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor and A/P 
invoice files. The system prints checks, voids 
checks, cancels checks, deletes cancelled checks, 
and deletes paid A/P invoices. The user can run a 
Vendor List, Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged 
report, and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P system or 
can be integrated with the Small Business 
Accounting Package. $59 95 



I 





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Ordering Information 

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Visa, Mastercard, COD (add 52.50), personal checks. 



(612) 633-6161 



A r • i . ti |^ tj a | 
LrlllQC tO IVvTiJ /VllcllOff 

onitors for the CoCo 3 




By Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



r ■ i 



he term "RGB monitor" refers to 
those color monitors that accept 
luminance information for red, 
green and blue intensities on three 
separate wires. All such monitors must 
also be given synchronization ("sync") 
information. This is accomplished by 
providing sync pulses either combined 
with the green luminance line, on a 
single separate wire (Sony), or via two 
separate wires, 

Other things that can vary on RGB 
monitors are whether the luminance 
information is sent in analog or digital 
fashion, the exact details of the timing 
of the sync information, the voltage 
levels the monitor wants to see on the 
R, G and B lines, and the horizontal 
scan rate of the monitor, I want to make 
it clear that there is no such thing as a 
standard RGB monitor, 



Analog Versus Digital 

One of the major divisions among the 
many sorts of RGB monitors is between 
"analog" and "digital" (sometimes also 
called TTL, RGB I or RGB X) RGB 
monitors. The Color Computer 3 must 
have an analog RGB monitor in order 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., is a long- 
time electronics tinker er and lives in 
San Pablo, California. Marty is a RAIN- 
BOW contributing editor and writes the 
"CoCo Consultations** column. He is 
also the SIGop of rainbow's CoCo 
SIG and database manager of OS-9 
Online on Delphi. 

68 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



lo resolve its full palette of 64 colors. 
Most inexpensive RGB monitors on the 
market today are digital RGB monitors, 
and cannot be used to display more than 
eight colors with the CoCo 3, and even 
for that it takes a special hardware 
adapter (currently made and sold by 
J&M Systems). The reason digital RGB 
monitors are so prevalent is that the two 
most common RGB protocols used 
with IBM PCs and clones are digital in 
nature. These are the Color Graphics 
Adapter standard (CGA RGB I) and 
Enhanced Graphics Adapter (EGA 
RGB). The T refers to the presence of 
a separate intensity line in the signal 
protocol. 

On a given line, digital RGB monitors 
can recognize only an "on" or "off 1 
condition. Thus, on the CGA protocol, 
the R, G and B intensity at a given point 
can be only either on or off. This yields 
capability to display a total of eight 
different colors. By adding an I line that 
can exist in either of two states (on or 
oft) the IBM CGA standard is able to 
double this and display a total of 16 
different colors. The IBM EGA stand- 
ard adds an extra R, G and B line and 
so allows for 8 by 8 or 64 possible color 
combinations. IBM EGA standard also 
involves a faster horizontal scan rate, 
allowing for greater vertical resolution. 

Analog RGB monitors do notneed or 
use intensity lines. Instead, intensity 
information is conveyed by the exact 
voltage on each of the red, green and 
blue lines. This voltage may vary con- 
tinuously, and, in theory, an RGB 
analog monitor can express 16 million 



or more different colors. In practice, the 
number of different colors an RGB A 
monitor can resolve will be limited by 
how finely the computer driving it is 
capable of varying the R, G and B signal 
levels. In the Color Computer 3, the 
GIME chip reserves a total of two bits 
per luminance line for specifying vol- 
tage and thus can set the R, G and B 
lines to one of four different voltage 
levels, allowing for 4 by 4 by 4 or 64 
different total colors in its palette. By 
comparison, the Atari 520 and 1040 ST 
systems allow for three bits of voltage 
level data on each of the luminance 
lines. They can set the R, G and B lines 
to any one of eight voltage levels and so 
can resolve a total of 512 different 
colors in the palette. The Amiga, allow- 
ing four bits per luminance line, has 
provisions for any of 16 different vol- 
tage levels on its R, G and B lines, 
resulting in a total of 4,096 colors in its 
palette. The IBM "PGA" standard (a 
seldom-used analog RGB protocol used 
on some IBM systems) also can resolve 
a total of 4,096 colors. 

Analog RGB protocol is used for 
professional video signal transmission. 
This is because its analog nature allows 
expression of the full range of possible 
colors. Its separate transmission of 
RGB and sync information allows for 
much greater image resolution than 
does the "mushy ,s compositecolor video 
protocol commonly used on most home 
video equipment. In composite color 
video, all of the color and sync informa- 
tion is mashed into a single wire. The 
result is reduced signal quality. 




Screen Star 



Screen Star implements the popular WordStar editing capa- 
bilities. Screen Star uses the disk as an extension of memory 
so it will edit files larger than memory. Move, copy, or deiete 
blocks of text with one keystroke Powerful cursor commands 
allow fast and easy movement throughout the document. The 
find/replace command makes mass changes and searches 
a snap. Set Tabs, toggle the video, access the OS-9 Shell and 
choose wordwrap. Define up to 10 function keys for fast repeti- 
tive functions. Imbed Computerware's Text Formatter com- 
mands in your Screen Star file for maximum word processing 
capabilities. 

Unlike most spelling checkers that require a huge dictionary 
file, Smart Speller usesa small dictionary which contains the 
most common English misspellings and their correct spellings, 
it also recognizes any abbreviations you commonly use and 
replaces them with their full spelling automatically! Versions 
for Level 1 & Level 2 OS-9 are included in the Screen Star 
package The most powerful editing product ever available 
on the Color Computer, 

Requires OS-9 ^^sv $49.95 

With Text Formatter $ 74.95 



^gggfc i^Mtf A 6555BP ifi? Jflf 

OS-9 Text Formatter 



OS-9 Text Formatter interfaces with any editor that produces 
standard ASCII text files including Computerware's Screen Star; 
and Radio Shack's TS Edit. Supports: 

• Right 8c Left Justification 

• Automatic Pagination 

• Headers and Footers 

• Macros, Tabs, Etc, 

« Page numbering & Auto Date insert 

• Send ESC 8c CTL codes to printer 

Why just print it when you can FORMAT it with OS-9 Text 
Formatter. 

Requires OS-9 $34.95 




■ ■•■ exaxa wax xtc 
j*r*JKmWk Teem VI 



Terminal Software 



Color Connection for RSDOS, and OS-9 Connection are the 
best in communication software All of the standard protocols 
are supported, including CompuServe Protocol B, XMODEM, 
and XON/XOFF, The auto dial feature for Hayes compatible 
and some Radio Shack modemsis supported. Macros allow 
easy entry to often-used passwords and ID's. Communicate 
with confidence with either Color Connection, or OS-9 
Connection 3.0, 

OS-9 version requires RS232 pak $49.95 

R5-DC^<S- versions • for C-oOo 2 OoCo 3 mo* $49*95 



Mitsuba 1200 Baud Modem 

SPECIAL $145.00 

100% Hayes compatible, full or half duplex, speaker alert to 
busy signal touch tone or pulse dialing. 



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Complete 512K package 

for KQ£ SO 

Price limited to quantity on hand. 

512K Memory Board that is easy to install 

i20 ns Ramships included for fast, reliable use. 

Ramdisk Software that creates two additional drives that 

can be configured as 0 8c 1 or 2 8c 3. 

Memory Diagnostics for 512K that tests three ways - 

convergence rotating bit 8c latency 

GIME Chip technical specifications 

This is the lowest price you'll find anywhere Read the others' 
fine print and compare!!! 



Ask for your FREE catalog! 



ew Color Max 3 

Now 320 x 200 screen resolution, and a choice of 16 of the 
64 colors are available onyourCoCo 3. Painting is a snap with 
it's easy to use icons, pull down menus, and dialog boxes. 
Color Max 3 has 11 fonts making hundreds of lettering styles 
possible Any combinations of color, shadow, outline, bold and 
italics are available for text. 

Requires 128K, disk, hi-res joystick 
interface 

(Specify printer type when ordering) 





ij.,.» AMjfll 

MOniiOfS 

12" NAP amber monochrome monitors 

$114.95 
Shipping $5.00 

Universal Video Plus 

Summer Special $29.95 

Video interface for the CoCo 1 or 2 



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5% for orders over S!00 
Checks are delayed for bank clearance 



Monochrome as an Option 

Note that it is the mashing of all the 
color information into a single wire that 
causes the degradation of signal quality. 
Composite monochrome signals are 
usually of quite fine resolution. Color 
picture tubes of fine-resolution phos- 
phor are difficult and expensive to 
produce. This is due to the need to lay 
down extremely tiny dots or stripes of 
red, green and blue phosphor, fabricate 
and precisely position inside the tube a 
"shadow mask" to allow the electron 
beam to individually light up each 
cluster of red, green and blue phos- 
phors. In a monochrome monitor, a 
single phosphor is "smeared" continu- 
ously across the surface of the tube, and 
there is no need for a shadow mask. All 
of this makes a color monitor with 
resolution equivalent to a monochrome 
monitor cost six to 10 times as much. 

If all you want is to resolve 80-column 
text, then perhaps you don't need an 
RGB monitor at all, but rather a com- 
posite monochrome monitor. Tandy 
sells one such (the VM-4), and so do 
Computerware, Howard Medical and 
other RAINBOW advertisers. Tandy's 
VM-4 is perfectly compatible with the 
CoCo 3 and will sharply resolve 80- 
column text. Indeed, the 80-column text 
you get with the $115 VM-4 is some- 
what sharper than that which you 
would get using a $600 NEC Multisync 
RGB monitor. 

What Monitors Work With a CoCo 3? 

When looking for an RGB monitor 
for the CoCo 3, you need to get an 
analog RGB monitor. Most monitors 
advertised as "digital," "TTL," "IBM- 
compatible," or "RGB I" will not work 
with a CoCo 3. However, a few mon- 
itors have been designed to provide a 
variety of different inputs, including 
RGB I, RGB A and, in some cases, 
composite video. These monitors are 
most desirable to CoCo 3 owners. Such 
monitors will work fine with an IBM 
PC or Tandy 1000 or similar clone, and 
will work fine with a CoCo 3. Monitors 
that also have a composite video input 
will allow CoCo 3 owners to view the 
vast number of CoCo games and edu- 
cational software written over the last 
five years using "artifact colors." Any 
attempt to display such "artifact colors" 
on an RGB A-only monitor will result 
in the screen appearing in black and 
white. 

Shopping for an RGB A Monitor 
for Your CoCo 3 

As J have noted in some "CoCo 



Consultation" columns, there are many 
factors that make up a good RGB 
monitor. Some are product specifica- 
tions and others are seldom measured 
or listed. But the bottom line is that no 
combination of product specs will tell 
you exactly which RGB A monitor is 
better than another. You must look at 
the image made by the CoCo 3 on all 
monitors and compare. This is difficult 



"If all you want is to 
resolve 80-column 
text, then perhaps 
you don't need an 
RGB monitor at all, 
but rather a compos- 
ite monochrome 
monitor. " 



because the different RGB A monitors 
are never sold in the same stores and 
often are hard to find, or they are 
available only by mail order. It is even 
more difficult because f or each diff erent 
monitor, a special RGB A cable usually 
has to be made up. Over the last three 
months, I have viewed the CoCo 3's 
output on six different RGB A 
monitors. 

Probably the most relevant of the 
commonly listed specifications for RGB 
monitors is the "stripe width" (or, for 
those monitors whose phosphor is laid 
down as dots, the "dot diameter" or 
"dot pitch"). Ed Ellers, RAINBOW Con- 
sulting Editor, tells me that .50mm 
stripe width is often considered, by rule 
of thumb, the absolute minimum 
needed for proper resolution of 80- 
column text. The monitors I discuss 
below feature stripe widths ranging 
f rom .65mm to .25mm. Notethat unless 
we are talking about monitors that all 
have the same size tube, the stripe-width 
figures have to be "normalized" to the 
tube size in order to provide a meaning- 
ful comparison of the resolution of the 
system. That is, a 26-inch diagonal 
monitor with a stripe width of .74 will 
be able to resolve exactly the same 
sharpness of image as a 13-inch diago- 
nal monitor with a stripe width of 
.37mm. Obviously, the issue here is the 
total number of stripes per horizontal 



line. The monitors we compare are all 
in the 12- to 14-inch diagonal measure 
range. I judge this range to be suffi- 
ciently narrow, so I will not attempt to 
"normalize" the stripe widths to tube 
size. 

Tandy CM-8 

This is the monitor Radio Shack 
specifically designed to work with the 
Color Computer 3. It has a phosphor 
rated at .52mm stripe width and provi- 
sions for only CoCo 3 type analog 
inputs. The diagonal tube measure is 13 
inches. It will not work with any other 
type of computer, nor will it work with 
a VCR. It cannot display artifact colors 
because it lacks a composite video 
input. The resolution of 80-column text 
is adequate, but not strikingly crisp. Its 
screen image is somewhat dimmer than 
that of the other RGB monitors dis- 
cussed in this group. In addition, many 
owners have complained that the cable 
provided is a tad short. On the positive 
side, it is (at the $250 mail order price) 
by far the least expensive RGB A mon- 
itor available that will work with the 
CoCo 3. Should it develop problems, it 
can be serviced via any Radio Shack 
store. Spectrum Projects sells an RGB 
video extender cable that can add about 
6 feet to the length of the CM-8's(or any 
other CoCo RGB monitor's) cable, 
without substantial loss of signal qual- 
ity. The CM-8 is by far the easiest CoCo 
3 RGB A monitor to find. Because of 
its availability and low price, the CM- 
8 from Tandy is likely to be the most 
popular CoCo 3 RGB monitor. 

The Magnavox "Professional" 
8CM515 Monitor 

This was the first CoCo 3 RGB A 
monitor I owned, and it is the one 
currently used by Steve Bjork, Richard 
Esposito ("Doctor ASCII") and Paul 
Searby (founder of Computerware). It 
has a rated stripe width of .42mm and 
a tube measure of 13 inches diagonally. 
It features provisions for RGB I, RGB 
X, RGB A and composite video inputs 
and boasts a frosted anti-glare screen. 
It also has audio inputs and a s witchable 
comb filter. It will work with IBM PCs 
(CGA RGB I protocol), CoCo 3s (RGB 
A), CoCo 2s and VCRs (composite 
color video) and can resolve artifact 
colors on the CoCo 3. You can switch 
between RGB A and composite video 
inputs via a convenient push button on 
the front panel of this monitor. It 
resolves 80-column text a bit more 
sharply than does the CM-8 from 



70 THE RAINBOW August 1987 




ECTOR 
S-69B 



S 
R 



VIDEO 
DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 




USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to ■ 
the printer with simple Ljm 
joystick control of g| 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS™ 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR™ 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69Ato DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



COCO 3 SCREEN 



THE, 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 



Fill out your CoCo library 
with these selections 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to take 
advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser features. An easy- 
to-read, step-by-step guide packed with hints, tips, tutorials and free 
software in the form of program listings. 
Book $19.95, Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 



The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first Simulations 
contest. You are a Civil War Commander, an air traffic controller, 
a civil defense coordinator, or a scientist on Mars . . . your wits are 
on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II 
Vol. I: A Beginners Guide to Windows 

Puekett and Dibble have done it again! They uncover the 
mysteries of the new windowing environment and demonstrate 
clever new applications. More hints, tips and plenty of program 
listings. Book $19.95, Disk $19.95 

The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid introduction 
to the realm of statistical processes and thinking for both the 
beginner and the professional. (80-column printer required.) 
Book $6.95, Tape or Disk $5.95, Package $1 1 .95 

The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adventure contest. 
Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors, Horror House, One Room, Dr. 
Avaloe and more. Plus hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 

The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue Meanles, find a 
hidden fortune, or win the heart of a mysterious princess. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 

The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. Discover 
backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, attempt a daring space 
rescue, or defeat evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. Evil 
Crypt, Spymaster, Time Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the 
beginningl Book $11.95, Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 




The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winners from our second Simulations contest. Fly through 
dense African jungle, bull your way down Wall Street, lead a bomb 
squad, or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and 
talents. Book $9.95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 



/ want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 



\ Name _ 
I Address 

I City 

State 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 



ZIP 



] 



I □ VISA □ MasterCard 
Account Number 



□ American Express 



I 



I Card Expiration Date 



Signature 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 (book only) 

□ Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Disk Package (2 disks) 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Level II 
Vol. I: A Beginners Guide to Windows 

□ The Windows & Applicalions Disk 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

□ The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

□ Guide to Statistics Package (indicate choice of tape or disk) 
Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) Total 



$ 9.95 . 
$ 9.95 . 
$ 9.95 . 
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Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847- 
j 0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
| 228-4492. 

| Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. 
I That is, they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape 
or disk, you will still need the appropriate book. OS-9® is a registered trademark of the Microware 
I Systems Corporation. 



Tandy, and its screen image is some- 
what brighter, as well. Its styling is 
compatible with the rest of the Color 
Computer system. The specific type of 
RGB A protocol that Magnavox uses is 
exactly the same as that of the Color 
Computer 3, Both use separate and up- 
going H and V sync lines. Making a 
cable to hook the CoCo 3 to the Mag- 
navox is easy. Merely obtain the ap- 
propriate 10-pin CoCo RGB A type 
connector and 6-pin DIN connector 
used on the M agnavox (the same as that 
used on the newer Tandy two-button 
joysticks) and, referring to the user 
manuals for the CoCo 3 and the Mag- 
navox, merely hook R to R } G to G, B 
to B, H sync to H sync, V sync to V sync, 
and ground to ground. Sound is sup- 
plied via a separate phono connector 
that can hook to the CoCo 3's separate 
audio output. 

As you can probably tell, I am im- 
pressed with the Magnavox 8CM515 
monitor. But it does have some flaws, 
its handling of composite video input is 
less than excellent. When used in com- 
posite video mode, some 8CM5)5s 
occasionally fail to pick up the color 
burst signal from the CoCo, resulting in 
a black and white image. A few of the 



Magnavox 8CM515 monitors I've 
tested have trouble accepting the verti- 
cal sync pulse from the CoCo 3, al- 
though in some cases, analysis indicated 
that the CoCo 3 in question had a 
marginal 74LS04 buffer chip, which 
needed to be replaced. Finally, while the 
video is a bit sharper than that of the 
Tandy CM-8, there still is some appreci- 
able blurriness in the 80-column display. 
Not a whole lot, but some. 

The Magnavox 8CM515 is approxi- 
mately $100 more than a Tandy CM-8. 
It is currently being offered by Spec- 
trum Projects and Howard Medical 
[See review on Page 140]. Both of these 
are rainbow advertisers. Spectrum 
Projects and SpectroSystems (of ADOS 
fame) also sell, separately, cables that 
can be used to hook the CoCo 3 to the 
Magnavox series of monitors. As I 
designed and, in most cases built, those 
cables, it would not be fair for me to 
review them. For the average CoCo 3 
owner, when all is said and done, a 
Magnavox 8CM515 will end up costing 
about $330 to $350. In my opinion, the 
added cost is well worth the added 
quality and capability it yields, but the 
individual user and his pocketbook will 
have to be the final judge. 



The Sony KV-1311CR 

This has virtually all of the features 
of the Magnavox monitor (except for 
support for Apple's RGB X protocol), 
but features a somewhat brighter and 
sharper phosphor (.37mm stripe width). 
It also is a full-function, infrared remote 
control, 13-inch diagonal measure tele- 
vision! It has somewhat better quality 
circuitry for its color composite video 
input than does the Magnavox 
8CM515. 

This is the monitor that Bob Rosen, 
of Spectrum Projects, and I currently 
use on our CoCo 3s. When used with 
80-column text, the image is very sharp 
with only a trace of fuzziness to the 
letters. When used to display CoCo 3 
graphics, the images are extremely 
sharp and the colors quite vibrant. 
When used as a color TV, it produces 
a stunningly sharp picture, so much so 
that quite a few of my friends have, 
without prompting, remarked on its 
fine picture quality. There is one quirky 
trick to using the audio input on the 
Sony KV-I3HCR: To use the separate 
phono jack audio input with the analog 
RGB input, you must simultaneously 
push down both the RGB and "Video" 
(composite color video) selector but- 




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Requires CoCo3, OS9 L2 S $139.00 
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August 1987 THE RAINBOW 73 



tons on the front panel so that they both 
lock in the ON position. Only then will 
you get RGB A video input and be able 
to pipe in sound through the RCA 
audio input jack on the side of the 
monitor. 

Howard Medical Computers now 
offers the KV-1311CR for $449 (plus 
$15 S/H) and has the necessary cable 
for $36. Spectrum Projects also carries 
the cable to hook up a CoCo 3 ($40). 
The cables are complex and, therefore, 
expensive. Overall, I am very pleased 
with my Sony KV-1311CR. 

Note: In a "CoCo Consultations" 
column I incorrectly stated that the 
Sony KV-1311CR had been discon- 
tinued. This was my mistake. 

Hackers Note Regarding 
the Sony KV-1311CR 

The Sony KV- 131 ICR uses a rather 
odd 34-pin RGB A connector, and its 
provisions for RGB A input are for a 
slightly different protocol than that 
used by the CoCo 3. The Sony wants to 
see a combined and down-going sync 
signal, whereas the CoCo produces 
separate and up-going sync signals. In 
order to hook it to the CoCo 3, you have 
to combine and then invert the sync 
lines from the CoCo 3. A single NOR 
gate on a 74ALS02 chip does this quite 
nicely. A second problem faced by 
would-be cable makers for the Sony 
K V-l 3 1 1 CR is that you need a source 
of +5 volts to power the 74ALS02 chip. 
The Sony does not supply this, and it 
is not present on the CoCo 3 RGB A 
connector either. Using a "sneaky trick" 
in commercial Sony RGB A to CoCo 
3 cables that I designed for Spectrum 
Projects, I "stole" a source of +5 volts 
from one of the joystick connectors on 
the CoCo 3. Although note, on my own 
Sony, I opened the monitor and 
brought a source of +5 volts out to two 
of the unused pins on its 34-pin connec- 
tor (pins 1 and 2), This enabled me to 
make a cable that did not have to take 
up one of the joystick ports. Regulated 
+5 volts is available on either Pin 14 of 
the 14-pin IC or Pin 16 of the 16-pin IC 
that is near the 34-pin RGB A connector 
on the vertical PC board inside the 
Sony 

Magnavox 8CMS0S 

Despite the similarity of its model 
number to the Magnavox "Profes- 
sional" 8CM515, the Magnavox 
8CM505 is a less desirable beast. Its 
stripe width is only .65mm and cannot 
adequately resolve 80-column text. It is 
a possible choice for those who want to 
use the CoCo 3 for dedicated color 

74 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



graphics systems, for it will quite ade- 
quately resolve 320-by-200 pixel resolu- 
tion graphics. Like the 8CM5I5, it 
features RGB A, RGB I and composite 
video inputs. In my area, Toys R Us 
sells this monitor for $200 plus tax. It 
can be hooked to the CoCo with the 
same cable used for the Magnavox 
8CM515. 

Magnavox 8CM643 

If you run across a Magnavox 
8CM643 monitor at a reasonable price, 
it might be a good choice for the CoCo 
3. It is very similar to the 8CM5I5 
except that it has a somewhat better 
quality picture tube that boasts a stripe 
width of ,39mm (compared to the 
.42mm stripe width of the 8CM515). 

NEC MultiSync 

This monitor costs approximately 
$580 and is primarily of interest to IBM 
PC users who want support for high- 
quality EGA and PGA video screens. It 
is a very popular ultra-high-quality 
IBM video monitor, so RAINBOW read- 
ers encountering it may want to put it 
to use on their CoCo 3s. The NEC 
MultiSync boasts a dot width of .3 i mm, 
A 14-inch diagonal screen accepts 
analog RGB input. It also accepts IBM 
CGA, IBM EGA and IBM PGA inputs, 
although it does not have provisions for 
composite video input. Making a cable 
for it is easy. It uses standard DB 9 
connectors and calls for the same up- 
going and separate sync arrangement as 
that used by the CoCo 3 in analog RGB 
mode. Its image is superbly crisp and 
sharp. Spectrum Projects sells CoCo 3 
to NEC MultiSync cables, designed and 
manufactured by yours truly 

Sony CDP-1302 (Multiscan) 

This is the finest quality monitor you 
can buy for under 51,000. Retailing for 
$800, it boasts a stripe width of.25mm, 
and its "multiscan" feature, like that of 
the NEC MultiSync, allows it to be used 
with the high resolution IBM EGA and 
PGA protocols as well as with the lower 
resolution IBM CGA and CoCo 3 
RGB A type of video signals. Unfortu- 
nately, it lacks composite video inputs, 
so it cannot be used with the CoCo 2 
or 3 to display artifact colors, As is the 
case with the NEC MultiSync, this 
monitor represents "overkill" when 
used with a CoCo 3. Unlike the NEC 
MultiSync, construction of a proper 
cable to hook it to the CoCo 3 is a little 
tricky, for the same reasons that hook- 
ing the Sony KV-131 ICR to the CoCo 
3 is tricky: its preference for combined 
and down-going sync pulses. 



Teknika MJ30S 

This monitor offers support for both 
RGB A (CoCo 3 compatible) and RGB 
I (IBM CGAcompatible) video signals. 
I saw it used with a CoCo 3 in a booth 
at Color Expo *87, It has a rated stripe 
width of ,41mm and a diagonal measure 
of 14 inches. Its image has about the 
same quality as the Magnavox Profes- 
sional 8CM515. Unfortunately, it costs 
a bit more than the Magnavox 8CM515 
and does not have provisions for com- 
posite video input. Therefore, unless 
you get a good deal on it, I cannot 
recommend it. 

Sony CDP-1310 

This 1 3-inch d iagonal measure, 
.37mm stripe width monitor offers the 
same fine display in Analog RGB video 
mode as does the Sony KV-131 ICR. 
However, although it supports RGB I 
for the IBM CGA, it does not have 
provisions for composite video input. 
Thus, it lacks flexibility. Like the KV- 
131 ICR, it is a little tricky to interface 
to the CoCo 3. Unlike the KV-1311CR, 
it uses a rectangular 8-pin RGB video 
connector. 

Sony CDP-9000 and CDP-1201 

These monitors are, respectively, 9 
and 12 inches in diagonal screen mea- 
sure. Both boast a super fine stripe pitch 
of „25mm, making them possessors of 
the finest resolution phosphors among 
these monitors discussed. Note that the 
CDP-9000, with only a 9-inch diagonal 
measure tube, offers roughly the same 
resolution as the KV-131 ICR with its 
13-inch tube and .37mm stripe width 
phosphor. 

Both of these support only RGB A 
and CGA RGB I type inputs and do not 
provide for composite video. Like the 
CDP-1310, they use an 8-pin RGB 
connector and require combining and 
inverting of the CoCo 3's sync lines in 
order to work. 

I've seen the CDP-9000 selling for as 
little as $250, At that price, if you are 
a hacker capable of making up a proper 
cable for it, it represents a better value 
than the CM-8 from Tandy, with a 
smaller screen size, of course. 

The CDP-1201 is rather overpriced 
($500) and under-featured (it lacks 
MultiSync capability), so unless you 
already own one or can get a real deal 
on one, I would not recommend it. 

Sony KX-1211HG ("Profeel") Monitor 

This is a 12-inch diagonal RGB mon- 
itor with similar properties to that of the 
KV-131 ICR. It is an older unit and 
offers a slightly less fine stripe width on 



its phosphor. It still produces a good 
quality image. It has all the flexibility 
of input as the KV-1311CR (RGB I, 
RGB A, and composite video). It also 
features a more complex implementa- 
tion of the Sony 34-pin RGB A "stand- 
ard" connector, which includes support 
for stereo audio and, of greater interest 
to CoCo 3 owners, supplies regulated +5 
volts on pins 1 and 2 of that connector. 
Thus, it is possible to make a "cleaner" 
RG B A CoCo 3 cable f or an unmodified 
KX-121 1 HG. I've made two such cables 
for friends with this model of TV/ 
monitor, and both are quite pleased 
with the images that resulted. 

Sony KV-20XBR, KV-25XBR, KV- 
2011CR, KV-2511CR 

These are 20- and 25-inch diagonal 
RGB monitors/TV sets. The 20-inch 
models offer .37mm stripe width, and 
the 25-inch models offer .55mm stripe 
width (the latter combination should be 
equivalent to a 13-inch monitor with a 
.29mm stripe width). I have not inter- 
faced any to a CoCo 3, but suspect the 
process would be similar to that of 
hooking a KV-131 ICR to it. 

Miscellaneous Monitors 

Beware of the Magnavox 8CM562 



monitor! This monitor does not support 
RGB A and is of no use to CoCo 3 
owners. Thomson is putting out a line 
of RGB monitors, but my preliminary 
assessment of that line is that it is 
overpriced and under-featured. Some 
don't have RGB A input and, of those 
that do, some lack composite video 
input. Their stripe widths are not that 
impressive. The Atari ST RGB Color 
monitor would seem to be a possibility 
for use with the CoCo 3. Superficially, 
all of its relevant video signals match 
those of the CoCo 3's output. But Atari 
slipped a joker into the deck by imple- 
menting an odd variant of sync timing. 
If you try to put up a CoCo 3 image on 
an Atari RGB monitor, the picture is 
shifted up and to the right to an extent 
that it cannot be compensated for with 
the external horizontal and vertical 
position adjustments. A video hacker 
could probably fix this. The Amiga 
model 1080 monitor might be usable 
with the CoCo 3, but, in RGB analog 
mode, it wants a combined down-going 
horizontal and vertical sync. I'd be 
interested to know if readers have 
gotten the Amiga monitor to work on 
a CoCo 3. The approach should not be 
more tricky than that which I used with 
the Sony KV-131 ICR, unless the Amiga 



design has surprises similar to those in 
the Atari. 

Conclusions and Recommendations 

The information here will better 
enable you to make the best possible 
choice of RGB A monitor for your 
CoCo 3. Hopefully, if you encounter a 
monitor other than those described 
here, this article will have armed you 
with the knowledge needed to assess 
whether it is likely to work with a CoCo 
3 and how good a value it represents. 

There are three monitors I particu- 
larly recommend. The CM-8 from 
Tandy, though lacking in flexibility and 
image quality, represents the least 
expensive and most accessible CoCo 3 
monitor. It's the easiest to have re- 
paired. 

The Magnavox 8CM515 represents 
the best compromise monitor I know of. 
Although priced a hundred dollars 
higher than the CM-8 from Tandy, it 
offers better quality and much greater 
flexibility of video input modes. 

For those who want a little better 
quality, or who want the option of using 
their monitor as a TV at times, and who 
can afford to spend another $50 to $100, 
the Sony KV-1 3 1 ICR would be the best 
bet. 




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August 1987 THE RAINBOW 75 




OWL-WARE 



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J V. 

Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE RAINBOW's 
"Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed — 
legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your high score. 
Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, c/o THE RAINBOW. 
The "Rainbow Scoreboard" is now a bimonthly feature. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



it Current Record Holder 



Shutout 



ADVANCED STAR'TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 



3,975 
3,960 



★David Schaller, Clarkston, WA 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
Robbi Smith, Helena, HI 
Shaw Muniz, Los Angeles, CA 
John Fredericks, Kalkaska, Ml 
ALPINE SLOPES (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 

5,216 *Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
AN DRONE (Radio Shack) 



3,960 
3,800 
2,600 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 
* 

* 
* 

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



107,901 
85,240 
81,375 
71.035 
63,600 

58,200 



★ Steve Nealon, St. Louis, MO 
Judy Haviland, Caldwell, ID 
Corey Jackson, Monongahela, PA 
Quinn Grantor, Bismark. ND 
Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
Scott Bellman, Bettendorf, IA 



87 

87 
89 

89 
89 
89 
90 
91 



BIOSPHERE (Radio Shack) 



★Robert St. Pierre, Coventry, Rl 
Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
Carlos Gameros, El Paso, TX 
Vincent Knight. Harvey, IL 
Robert de Lambert, Everett, WA 
BOUNCING BOULDERS (Diecom) 

3,994 ★Louis Bouchard, Gatlneau, Quebec 
36 Andre Grenier, Quebec, Canada 
BOXING (THE RAINBOW, 8/86) 



25,345 
21,372 
10,056 
3.101 
2,491 



1,075 
995 
940 
775 



775 
720 
600 



★Steve Bullard, Allen, OK 
Jonathan Wanagel, Freeville, NY 
Chris Norman, Liberty, PA 
Patricio Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 
Quinn Grantor, Bismark, ND 
Konnie Siewierski, Schaumburg, 
Adam Broughton. Morris, PA 
BREWMASTER (Novasoft) 

120,375 ★Thomas Crowe, Colombia, South 
America 

BUBBLE WARS (THE RAINBOW, 2/86) 

41 ,400 ★Becky Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
BUZZARD BAIT (Tom Mix) 

763,550 ★Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 



150,200 
145.800 
135,600 
125,000 
112,700 



★Brian Lewis, Baltimore, MD 
Darren King. Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
Eric Rose, Grand Coulee, WA 
Tony Fortino, Tacoma, WA 
Jesse Binns, Phoenix, AZ 



CASTLE (THE RAINBOW, 6/86) 



326,352 
228,622 
202,659 
116,606 

93,672 



★Richard Donnell, Penns Grove. NJ 
John Broussard Jr., Alexandria, LA 
Brendan Powell, La Grande, OR 
Darryn Bearlsto, New Carlisle, 
Quebec 

Maurice MacGarvey, Dawson Creek, 
British Columbia 
CLOWNS & BALLOONS (Radio Shack) 

1 1 ,850 ★Cliff Armoogan, Las Vegas, NV 
COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

999-0 ★•Erik Munson, Tucson, AZ 
★•Danny Wlmett, Rome, NY 
•Eugene Paoli, Wilmington, DE 
•Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
Ghislaln Chillis, Trois-Rivieres, 
Quebec 
•John Licata, Richton Park, IL 
Frank D'Amato, Brooklyn, NY 



COLOR CAR ACTION (Tom Mix) 

187,454 ★Louis Bouchard, Gatineau, Quebec 
COMMANDO (THE RAINBOW, 2/86) 

8,900 ★Robbie Smith, Helena, HI 
8,530 Becky Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 

87 ★Douglas Bell, Duncan, OK 
★David & Shirley Johnson, 

Leicester, NC 
★Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 
Chris Piche, White Rock, British 

Columbia 
Milan Parekh, Fullerton. CA 
Andrew Urquhart, Metairie, LA 
Steve Zemaitis, Howell, Ml 
Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
John Semonin, Akron, OH 
DECATHALON (Spectral Associates) 

10,368 ★Sylvain Duguay, St. Bruno, Quebec 
DEF MOV (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

30,892 ★Henry Patterson, Marshall, TX 
30,051 Dave Allessi, Iselin, NJ 
27,346 Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
23,530 Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
DEMOLITION DERBY (Radio Shack) 
210,700 *Duke Davis, Sandwich, IL 
124,000 Judy Haviland, Caldwell, ID 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Tom Mix) 

623,550 ★Dale Krueger, Maple Ridge, British 
Columbia 

75,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
59,200 Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
DISCRIMINATION (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

19 ★Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
DOODLEBUG (Computerwara) 
10,099,110 *Andre Grenier, Valleylield, Quebec 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

99,980 *Danny Wlmett, Rome, NY 

Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
Stephane Deshaies, Beloeil, Quebec 
Neil Edge. Williston, FL 
Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 
Jean-Francois Morin, Loretteville. 
Quebec 

Chris Goodman, Baltimore, MD 
Cooper Valentin, Vavenby, 

British Columbia 
Keith Yampanis, Jaffrey, NH 
Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
Patrlco Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 
Danny Perkins, Clifton Forge, VA 
Mike Elis, Charlotte, Ml 
Jesse Blnns, Phoenix. AZ 
Andrea Mayfield, Melbourne, FL 
Timothy O'Neal, Commerce, TX 
Sam DICerce, Wlllowich. OH 
StephaneMartel, Laval, Quebec 
Steve Nealon, St. Louis, MO 



149,520 
116,280 
107;570 
104,870 
98,770 
73,520 



98,985 
97,740 
89,490 
77,254 
73,348 

70,142 
68,142 

67,721 
82,442 

55.300 



49,500 
43,502 
40,360 
34,424 
25,147 
18,251 
16,239 
1 4,523 



999- 
998- 
982- 
866- 



814-0 
814-1 



DRAGON BLADE (Prickly-Pear) 

69 ★Jason Damron, Folsom, CA 

ENCHANTER (Infocom) 

400/212 ★Charly Rushing, Santa Rosa, CA 
400/621 Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
400/431 Truman Bryerton, Jr., B.Ville, NY 



224/358 Joseph Delaney, Augusta. GA 
185/186 David Tarleton, Williamsburg, VA 
ESCAPE 2012 (Computerwere) 

202 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
EVICTOR (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 

12,915 ★Spencer Metcalf, Longview, TX 
10,560 Patricio Gonzalez, Buenos Aires, 
Argentina 

FALCON'S LAIR (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 
45,425 ★Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/86) 

5.680 ★Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, WJ 
3,760 Rick Beevers, Bloomfield, MN 
3,505 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 

169,410 *Danny Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 

Vernon Johnson Mi, Parkville, MD 
Scott Jamison, Billerica, MA 
Kyle Madruga, Hanford, CA 
Chris Dunne, Pittsfield, NH 
Etienne Duguay, St. Bruno, Quebec 
Neil Edge, Williston, FL 
GALAX ATTACK (Spectral Associates) 

236,350 ★Corey Leopold, Nada, TX 
GALLOPING GAMBLERS (THE RAINBOW, 12/85) 

3,427,660 ★Sean Lair, Ewing, MO 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
23,643,720 ★Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
Ken Hubbard, Madison, Wl 
Stirling Dell, Oundalk. Ontario 
Jason Steele, Pensacola, FL 
Rory Kostman, Hershey, NE 
Jerry Honigman, Waggoner, IL 
Jerry Colbert, Bakersfield, CA 
Robert Fox, Dover, OH 
Donnie Pearson, Arvada, CO 
Michael Wallace, Bronx, NY 
John Hotaling, Duanesburg, NY 
Edward Swatek, Chicago, IL 
Yvan Langlois, Laval, Quebec 
Brian Hunter, South Berwick, ME 
Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
Robbie Smith, Helena, HI 
Scott Jamison, Billerica, MA 
Billy Helmick, Independence, KY 
David Gordon, Pierre, SD 
GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 

523,080 ★Joseph Delaney, Augusta, GA 
GIN CHAMPION (Radio Shack) 

1.456 ★Lee Deueil, Shell Rock, IA 
GOLD RUNNER (Novasoft) 

1,088,240 ★Bob Hester, Arlington, TX 
HOME ROW BOMBER (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 
6,384 ★Timothy Hennon, Highland, IN 
2,420 Stephane & Patrick Martel, Laval, 
Quebec 

KAMAKAZIE KAR (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 

144.85 ★Chris Piche, White Rock, British 
Columbia 
Steven Darden, Woodson Terrace, 
MO 

Dan Dawson, Fort Wayne, IN 
Tim Glenn, Havertown, PA 
KARATE (Diecom Products) 

6,300 ★David Darling, Longlac, Ontario 



20,921,490 
10,020,500 
7,493,340 
2.512,620 
2,312,640 
2,115.790 
2,011,200 
1,108,750 
1.094,280 
1,081,530 
1,025,900 
1.016,050 
933,740 
932,660 
787.780 
685,840 
667,390 
456,220 
410,868 
79,570 



123.55 

83.85 
75.75 



78 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 





THE KING (Tom Mix) 
3,824,280 #Andre Grenier, Quebec, Canada 
22,400 Spencer Metcalf, Longview, TX 
KNOCK OUT (Dlacom Products) 



183.675 
181.085 
174,150 
168.385 
161.125 
149.190 



★Rush Caley, Port Orchard. WA 
Rush Caley, Port Orchard, WA 
Vernon Johnson III, Parkville, MD 
John Licata, Richton Park, IL 
Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
Daniel Lesage, Laval, Quebec 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 

84,830 ★Thomas Beruheimer, Yoru, PA 
11,430 Timothy Hennon, Highland, IN 
2,785 Tony Rapson, Tulsa, OK 
LANCER (Spectral Associates) 

567,200 *Luke Birinyi. Pefferlaw. Ontario 
227.800 Andre Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
178,800 Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
99,700 David Kauffman, South Haven, Ml 
LUNCHTIME (Novasoft) 

42,025 ★Steve Place, Webster, NY 
26,425 Joshua Conley, Springfield, OH 
MICROBES (Radio Shack) 

337.880 ★Judy Haviland. Caldwell, ID 
121,330 Minesh Patel, Benton, AR 
77,700 Brian Abeling, Monticello, IA 
MINIGOLF (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 



1.059.350 
830.950 

720.580 
531 .600 



PAPER ROUTE (Diecom Products) 
1.120,350 ★Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 

David Kauffman, South Haven, Ml 
Christopher Darden, Woodson 

Terrace, MO 
Konnle Slewierskl, Schaumburg, IL 
Larry Shelton, Marion, IL 
PINBALL (Radio Shack) 

142.400 ★Thomas Payton, Anderson. SC 
PITSTOP II (Epyx) 

51 ★Christian Grenier, Valleyfield, Quebec 
POO VAN (Datasoft) 

99,500.300 *Danny Wimett. Rome, NY 
Rich Fiore, Clemson, SC 
Carlos Gameros, El Paso, TX 
Ben Collins, Clemson. SC 
Jon Sowle, Sanford, FL 
Jason Maxwell. Manchester, TN 



3,820 

3.540 
2,550 
2.000 
1.740 



1 .404,000 
1.003.104 
205.335 
104.034 

38.957 
19.410 



21 
23 
23 



★Chris Lynd. Groesbeck, TX 
Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
Wilfrid Sloan, Newport-on-Tay, 

Scotland 
Richard Donnell. Penns Grove. NJ 
Billy Helmick, Independence. KY 
Chris Banas, North West Territories, 
Canada 

-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
★Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
Jeremy Pruskl, Sandwich, IL 
Michael Heitz, Chicago, IL 
Vernon Johnson Hi, Parkville, MD 
Edward Swatek, Chicago, IL 
Chuck Mdrey. Bakersfield. CA 
Chris Wright, New Albany, IN 
OMNIVERSE (Computerware) 

112 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 



25 
25 
32 

MISSION: F- 

468,750 
355,570 
318,160 
127,550 
120.670 
49.630 
45,500 
45.375 



4.510.740 
1.945.110 
1.768.940 
1.631 .750 



2.008 
1.995 
1.988 
1.975 
1.968 
1.952 
1.908 



10,489 
6.294 
4,643 
3.285 



100/483 



210 



* 

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



★•Chad Johnson, Benton, AR 
•Mark Lang, Downieville. CA 
Dan Liffmann. Andover, MA 
Rick Beeyers, Bloomfield, NM 
David Blahkenship, Princeton, WV 
Toby Jacobs, Bellefontaine, OH 
Tim DeJong, Rock Valley, IA 
Jamie Keels, Gulfport, MS 
PAC DROIDS (Programmer's Guild) 

19.710 ★Jody Ronnlng. Melrose, Wl 



1,204-0 

1.160-0 

1.132-23 

1.106-15 

1.086-17 

1.078-2 

1.064-16 

1.028-60 



97.500.000 
54.500.000 
3.785.000 
1.987,000 
1,546.000 
OUIX (Tom Mix) 
8.407.772 ★John Haldane. Tempe, AZ 

Curtis Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
Elisa Goodson, Sao Paulo, Brazil 
John Hotaling, Duanesburg, NY 
Christopher Conley, 

North Attleboro. MA 
Patrick Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Thomas Crowe, Colombia, South 
ArnoricQ 

RADIO BALL (Radio Shack) 
6,330,350 ★Myriam Ferland, Trois-Rivleres, 
Quebec 
Les Dorn, Eau Claire, Wl 
Dominic Deguire, St. Basile, Quebec 
Brian Buss, Whitehall, PA 
David Del Purgatorlo, Antioch, CA 
RAIDERS (THE RAINBOW, 11/86) 

2,100 ★Dave Allessi, Iselin, NJ 
REACTOIDS (Radio Shack) 

483.020 *Henry Patterson, Marshall, TX 
ROGUE (Epyx) 

4.508 *Tony Rapson, Tulsa, OK 
SALVAGE OF THE ASTRONAUTS (THE RAINBOW. 9/86) 

1,090 ★Spencer Metcalf, Longview, TX 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

87 ★-Neil Haupt, Elyria. OH 
SANDWORM (THE RAINBOW, 8/86) 

737 ★Becky Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
SHAMUS (Radio Shack) 

120,480 *Lynn Shrewsberry, Sunnyside, WA 
47,260 Jamie Keels, Gulfport, MS 
38.075 Kay Shrewsberry, Sunnyside, WA 
SPACE AMBUSH (Computerware) 

30,400 ★Thomas Crowe, Colombia, South 
AmGricQ 

SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

130,720 ★Patricio Gonzalez. Buenos Aires. 
Argentina 



SPIDERCIDE (Radio Shack) 

6.170 ★Tallb Khan. Bronx, NY 

Eddie Lawrence, Pasadena, 

Newfoundland 
James Church, Pointe Claire. Quebec 
Charles Marlow. Briarwood, NY 
Mike Watson, Northville, NY 
Joel De Young, Manson, Manitoba 
STELLAR LIFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 

629,000 ★Steven Smith, Matthews, NC 
SUCCESS MANSION (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

13/13 ★DaveAllessi, Iselin, NJ 
SUPER ROOTER (THE RAINBOW, 5/86) 

3,910 ★Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
TUTS TUMB (Mark Data) 

60,020 ★Don Siler, Muncie, IN 
45,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) 

2,032 ★Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 

Philip Puffinburger, Winchester, VA 
Denise Rowan, Minneapolis, MN 
Randall Edwards, Dunlap, KS 
Bernard Florence, Croydon, Australia 
Donnie Pearson, Arvada, CO 
Lynn Shrewsberry, Sunnyside, WA 
Domenick Doran, Coram, NY 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
18.813 ★Tallb Khan, Bronx, NY 

Karl Gulliford, Summerville, SC 
Pat O'Neill, Nepean, Ontario 
Martha James, Swarthmore, PA 
Richard Donnell, Penns Grove, NJ 
THE VORTEX FACTOR (Mark Data) 

1 00/276 ★Tommy Crouser, Dunbar, WV 
Rick & Brenda Stump. 

Laureldale. PA 
Paul Maxwell, Vancouver, 
British Columbia 
WILDWESTfTomM/xJ 

38 ★Neil Haupt, Elyria, OH 
WRESTLE MANIAC (Diecom) 

546,315 ★Louis Bouchard, Gatineau, Quebec 
39,086 Billy Helmick, Independence. KY 
5,000 Christian Grenier, Quebec, Canada 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
2,061 .000 *Byron Alf ord, Raytown, MO 
Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
Dan Brown, Pittsford, NY 
Andrew Urquhart, Metairie, LA 
Bob Dewitt, Blue Island, IL 
Daniel Bradford, Birmingham, AL 
Jeff Miller, Bronson, Ml 
David Darling. Longlac, Ontario 
Tom Maccarone, Swampscott, MA 
Carlos Gameros, El Paso. TX 
Garrett Stangel, Milwaukee, Wl 
Mike Ells. Charlotte, Ml 



1,950,000 
1.300.500 
1,100.600 
253.400 
163.700 
111.400 
83.700 
72.800 
67.400 
59,800 
11.400 



— Jody Doyle 





In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, which appears 
bimonthly, we offer this column of pointers for our game-playing 
readers' benefit. If you have some interesting hints, tips or responses 
to questions, or want help yourself, we encourage you to write to the 
Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



FEEDBACK 

In response to letters from: 
• Travis Stromer: In Raaku-Tu, go to 
the gargoyle's room, light the candle and 
leave. Go to a room or two and wait for 



a while, then go back to the gargoyle's 
room and extinguish the candle. 

• Jason Thomas Wysokowski: To open 
the safe in Vortex Factor, go back in time 
to the old museum and go to the room 



with the desk. Open the desk and read the 
document inside. 

Tony Warchules 
Nanlicoke, PA 

• Jason Jones: In Bedlam^ you cannot 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 79 



open the cabinet. You must get the key 
in the hole with the window hook in order 
to open the red doors. 

• Frank Morrison: In Pyramid 2000, you 
must drop the scepter and get the bird. 
You must have the box, though. When 
you get to the pharaoh's room, type 
THROW BIRD. 

• Bill Hoban: In Shenanigans, you must 
find the woman in the clover field and 
type PUSH WOMAN in order to obtain the 
shamrock to kill the snake. 

In Sands of Egypt, I can't find the 
scepter everyone is referring to in order 
to drain the pool, and I can't keep the 
rope from crumbling to dust. Is this rope 
useful? 

In Shenanigans, I can't get the 1 2-foot 
pole into the cave. 

David Davidson 
Chicago Heights, IL 

• David Harris: When in the casino in 
the Interbank Incident, take about $650 
with you, goto the room with the roulette 
wheel and give the money to the roulette 
wheel. 

When you get the "special dice" at the 
farmer's market, how do you use them? 

Matt Smith 
Fredericksburg, VA 

Mummy Dearest 

Scoreboard: 

To get the bird statue in Pyramid 2000, 
you must be holding one specific item 
and not holding another. To get the 
Pharaoh's Treasure Chest after the 
mummy has stolen your treasure, go to 
the room where it says, "The west end of 
the hall of thegods." From here, go south 
to enter the maze. 

To make it safely back to the jungle in 
Raaku-Tu, wait a little before you go up 
the hole. 

When running Cave Walker on a 
CoCo 2 system, the CLEAR key works as 
a CONTROL key. Also, be sure to pick up 
seven locks before you try to get the first 
part of the key. 

Brent Dingle 
Norwalk, I A 

Pin Problems 

Scoreboard: 

Could anyone tell me the actual situa- 
tion and position necessary to pin some- 
one in Wrestle Maniac! Also, is there any 
way to consistently hit 3-pointers in One 
On One! 

Jeff Stewart 
Charleston, IL 



Pyramid Progression 

Scoreboard: 

In Pyramid 2000, after you have 
climbed the plant and collected the key 
and egg, what is next? What does the 
scepter have to do with the game? 

Bo Van Cleave 
Eugene, OR 

Paint Me Crazy 

Scoreboard: 

In Bedlam, when I try to open the 
painted door, it says, "Are you crazy?" 
Also, I can't find the kennel. 

Rusty Merritt 
Pocomoke, MD 

Unnecessary Quest 

Scoreboard: 

Does anybody have some tips on how 
to cut out some unnecessary moves in 
Dallas Quest! 

Meagan Pufahl 
Windsor, Ontario 

*T' For Try 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, I can't find the 
torch and in Raaku-Tu, when I get the 
ring, I go back to the 'T'-shaped room 
and try to go to the gargoyle, but I go 
back to the statue and get killed. 

Jaan Laansoo 
Barrie, Ontario 

Tricky Thickets 

Scoreboard: 

What can I do to find the pyramid in 
Infidel, and how do you get around the 
thickets? 

Sean McDonough 
Hillsboro, OH 

Closed Cabinet 

Scoreboard: 

In Bedlam, you cannot open the cab- 
inet in the dispensary. To get the red key 
out of the cabinet, go to the maintenance 
room and get the window hook, then go 
back to thedispensary and getthe red key 
with the hook. 

How do you get past the dog in Bed- 
lam! 

Rick A. Moore 
Greensburg, IN 

Stay Still Statue 

Scoreboard: 

I haven't found a way to get out of my 
cell in Bedlam. In Sands of Egypt, how 
can I get water? 



In Pyramid 2000, 1 opened a panel but 
nothing happened. I tried what Danny 
Flores suggested, but I could not go up 
the stairs and didn't know what to do 
after I got to the bottomless pit. When 
in the pharaoh's room, I can't get past the 
serpent. I tried to get the statue, but it just 
moves away. 

Brien Lougue 
Paulina, LA 

Shovel Shuffle 

Scoreboard: 

How do you get the small shovel in 
Dallas Quest! 

Troy Phelps 
Baraboo, WI 



Dying With Nothing 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, I keep dying with- 
out finding anything. 

Scott Melton 
Seminole, OK 

Secrets of the Inner Chamber 

Scoreboard: 

Some hints for Sands of Egypt: You 
have to have the canteen to drink water. 
The water is from the pool. You must dig 
to find the canteen. The snake oil is useful 
at the pyramid. 

After translating the hieroglyphics, 
you place the object mentioned some- 
where in the inner chamber. You only 
have to ride the camel once, not three 
times, to get to the pyramid. 

I'm in the treasure room with the 
ladder and I'm stuck! 

Anna Fiehler 
Waipahu, HI 

Ax Facts 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, do I need an ax? 
If so, where can I find it? 

In Dallas Quest, how do I get down 
into the tunnel with my inventory or 
items? 

Jeff Hurteau 
Troy, NY 

Sea the Seahorse 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest: Don't accept JR's 
offer. Give the sunglasses to the owl. 
Never carry more than one object when 
going down the ladder. 

In Wishbringer: The way to the Mag- 
ick Shop is across the bridge. Don't let 



itititititititititititititititititititi^ 



80 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



the seahorse die; put it back in the sea. 
He could save you later. 

Luis Blando 
Mendoza, Argentina 

Can't Pass Cannibals 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, I can't get past the 
cannibals by the cave. 

Domenick Dor an 
Coram, NY 

Beach House Bafflement 

Scoreboard: 

In ShenaniganSy I found the girl in the 
clover field, but I can't get back. 

In Black Sanctum, to build an altar, be 
sure to pull the nails and get the boards 
from the room near the bookcase. When 
in the room with the casket, type OPEN 
COFFIN. When someone callsyour name, 
be sure to listen. 

In Calixto Island, go up the hill and 
take the rug with you to trade with 
Trader Jack for a machete. 

In Sea Quest, make sure you dig inside 
the cave after you move the boulder. To 
get to the beach house, type GO FALLS 
and follow the directions. Where is the 
key to open the door in the bea£h house. 

Russ Maede 
Fairbury, IL 

Combo, Combo, Who Knows the 

Combo? 

Scoreboard: 

I am stumped by the safe in Vortex 
Factor. What is the combination? When 
you use the right combination, how do 
you open the safe? 

Scott Gar ling 
Norman, OK 

Battery Operated 

Scoreboard: 

Does anyone know if the food serves 
any purpose in Raaku-Tu! 

In Sands of Egypt, where are the dates 
to feed to the camel? 

In Pyramid, I can get the batteries but 
I can't figure out how to put them into 
the lamp. 

Neil Johnson 
Walnut Creek, CA 

Galaxy Guidelines 

Scoreboard: 

Some hints for Hitchhiker's Guide to 
the Galaxy: First, keep all the objects that 
you see. Typing VERBOS causes the com- 
puter to give you a full description of a 
room when you enter it. The Nutrimat 
eventually spews out your tea, but do not 



drink it\ Type GET TEA and GET NO TEA. 

How do you inflate the Thing so that 
it doesn't fall through the catwalk? 

In Vortex Factor, how do I get to 
Cairo Moon? I can't read the hieroglyph- 
ics on the ring, and I don't have any idea 
what to do with the Mutant. 

David Hill 
Alberta, Canada 



Plotter Plea 

Scoreboard: 

I need help getting the plotter in 
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. 

Dale Kaczmarek 
Oaklawn, IL 

Un-Pharaoh Advantage 

Scoreboard: 

I can't seen to get past the bottomless 
pit or the serpent in the Pharaoh's 
chamber in Pyramid. 

Tom Gray 
Tucson, AR 

Pointed Predicament 

Scoreboard: 

How do you score points on Madness 
and the Minotaur! 

Allen Bruce 
Brodhead, WI 

Same Time, Same Place 

Scoreboard: 

I am having a problem solving Level 
2 of Dragon Slayer. I keep getting stuck 
at the same place every time. 

Bruce Girard 
Laguna Niguel, CA 

Sure Shootin' 

Scoreboard: 

Some hints for Gantelet: Play the Elf. 
He is the only player who shoots diago- 
nally. Try shooting targets that are far 
away, and be sure to master Level 7. Save 
your potions for the Death. 

Rory Kostman 
Hershey, NE 

Southern Discomfort 

Scoreboard: 

At the pyramid in Sands of Egypt, oil 
the scepter and take it back to the pool. 
When at the pool, type HOOK SCEPTER, 
then PULL SCEPTER to drain the pool. 

In Pyramid 2000, to kill the snake, 
throw the bird statue at it and be sure you 
have the scepter. 

In Dallas Quest, to get the monkey to 
take the mask off the head hunter chief, 



show the monkey the mirror or give it to 
htm. 

In Madness and the Minotaur, beware 
of going south, because it is the only 
direction that leads to the dreaded maze. 

In Raaku-Tu, after you find the secret 
passage behind the altar, then what do 
you do? 

In Madness and the Minotaur, where 
are the spells? How do you escape the 
maze? 

Steve Moore 
Ontario, CA 



Boulder-dash 

Scoreboard: 

In Dragon Blade, after I throw the 
boulder down the corridor and go 
through the tunnel, I fall into a shaft 
because it's too dark. 

Harry Keener 
Knoxville, TN 



Moon Mobility 

Scoreboard: 

To get past Cairo Moon 2 in Vortex 
Factor, get the bird. Then go into the 
dungeon, search the skeleton and get the 
string. To get out, CUT BARS using the 
hacksaw. 

In Raaku-Tu, how do you get past the 
rug? 

Pat Cameron 
Shippewa Falls, WI 



★★★★★★★★★★★ 

To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers' 9 and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 

— Jody Doyle 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 81 





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SATISFACTION GUARANTEEDII 

ALL DRIVES FULLY TESTED AND WARRANTEED 

We carry only the finest quality disk drives 
no seconds * no surplus 



40 or 80 Tracks 
Vi Hght. Teac/Panasonic 




Free Softurare for Drive O Systems 

CoCo Checker..,Test roms, rams, disk drives and & controller printer, keyboard cassette & more. 
Tape/Disk Utility... Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



169 



95 



Drive 0 



189 



9C 



Drive 0 



289 



95 



Drive 0 & 1 



• Full HI Drive 

• Single Case 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 
•Controller & manuals 



• Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duly Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



• 2 Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



C/tDGT JJTIWC ^pCClMJS 

4 4 Q 

B B aj 

■ ■ '(HP 



Drives cleaned, aligned & tested, 29 



95 



2nd Drive 

for new Radio Shack 
includes: 

• Slim Line DS/DD Drive 

• Cabling & Instructions 

• Mounting Hardware 



Full Ht Drive 89 95 

Full Ht Drive Ps/Case. 129 95 

Slim Line Drive 99 95 

Slim Line Drive Ps/Case... 139 95 
2 Slim Drives Ps/Case. 239 95 
Disk Controller 59 95 



Single Ps & Case ........... 

Dual V4ht Ps & Case 

Dual Full Ht. Ps & Case 
Disk Controller 



10 Diskettes 

with free library case 



4495 

54 95 
79 95 
59 95 

995 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 
61 7-278-6555 




TRL/E DATA PRODUCTS 



We welcome l—i f _^ 

• Visa/Mastercard Ib&ESzJ 

• Checks (allow 2 weeks for clearing) 

• C.O.D. Add $2. 



9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 

Hours: Mon.-Sat, 9-6 (EST) 



Call us today! 617-278-6555 
Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



Software Included 

• Pc-Write word processor 

• Pc-Calc Spreadsheet 

• Pc-File Database 

• Print Spooler 

• Ram Disk 

• Runs all popular software 



IBM XT 
COMPATIBLE 



Complete 
system 



only 



699 



95 



Hardware Included 

4.77 mhz and 8mhz Turbo 
360k Floppy Disk Drive 
Monochrome or Color Card 
At style Case w/pwr light & key 
Game, Printer and Serial Port 
Real Time Clock 
150 watt power supply 
640k memory 

At keyboard optional expanded 
Monochrome Monitor 
Optional Hard Disk Drive 




PRINTER CABLES AND 
INTERFACES AVAILABLE 
Call for current pricing 



PRINTERS 




NP10 (New 100 CPS NLQ 80 col.) 
NX10 (New 120CPS NLQ 80 col.) 
NX15 (New 120CPS NLQ 132 col.) 
Power Type (18CPS Daisy Wheel) 



189 95 
21 9 95 
379 95 
249 95 





Serial to Parallel Interface 
for Color Computer I, II, 




•300-19,200 BAUD rates only 

• External to printer — No AC plugs 

• Built in modem/printer switch — 
No need for Y-cables or plugging/ 
unplugging cables Power su PP'y + 5 00 



54 



95 



Complete Packages 

279 



64K Upgrades 


19 95 


Video Driver 


29 95 


Enables your CoCo to operate 


with a video monitor 


instead of a television! 





NP10 249 95 

includes: 

•Star NP 10 Printer 

• Interface 

• Screen Dump Program 



_95 

NX10 
includes: 

• Star NX 10 Printer 

• Interface 

• Screen Dump Program 




TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 

9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 




Screen Dump Program 19 95 

The best screen dump program for the Epson & 
Star printers ever!! Have the option of standard 
images reverse w/regular or double sized pictures. 



Dealer Inquiries invited 
617-278-6555 

Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 





idsummer's 



ight 



heme 



J HE RAINBOW is a teaching environment and we realize that the majority 
of our readers will always be beginners. In our continuing effort to always 
J keep the new user in mind, and in addition to the many beginner feature 
articles and programs published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
BASIC program listings that entertain as well as help the new user gain expertise 
in all aspects of the Color Computer: graphics, music, games, utilities, education, 
programming, etc. 




ames 





By Bill Bernico 

and George Aftamonow 

The following program is a Lo-Res text screen version of 
the ever popular card game, blackjack. The object is to beat 
the dealer's hand by getting as close to 21 points as possible 
without going over. 

After the cards are dealt, you will be given the opportunity 
to take additional cards. If you feel your hand is good enough, 
answer no to the prompt. The computer will then deal itself 
a hand, trying to beat yours. 

You start the game with $100 and can bet any or all of it 
at a time. The game ends when the money is gone. 

The listing: BLfiKJfiCK 

1)3 1 BLAKJACK by Bill Bernico and 

George Aftamonow 

2jS BA=lj3j3 

3)3 CLS3:FORX=l)356T01472STEP32:PO 



KEX ,191: NEXT : PRINT@)3 , STRING$ (32, 
191) ; :FORX=l)387T01535STEP32 : POKE 
X, 19 1 : NEXT : PRINT@48j3 , STRING$ (31, 
191) ; :T=j8:CA=l: PRINT© 43, "CASH:"; 
BA; :PRINT@75, "" ; : PLAY"04T6j3B" : IN 
PUT" BET : " ; BE : PL=1 : PRINT@ 8 5 , STRIN 
G$ (1)3, 175) ; : POKE 1119, 191 
4j3 IF BE>BA THEN 3)3 

5) 3 IFCA=1THENP=3 54ELSEIFCA=2THEN 
P=3 59ELSEIFCA=3THENP=3 64ELSEIFCA 
=4THENP=3 69ELSEIFCA=5THENP=374EL 
SEIFCA=6THENP=3 7 9 

6) 3 GOT09J3 

7) 3 IFCA=1THENP=12 9ELSEIFCA=2THEN 
P=134ELSEIFCA=3THENP=13 9ELSEIFCA 
=4THENP=144ELSEIFCA=5THENP=149EL 
SEIFCA=6THENP=154 

8) 3 P=P+1 

9) 3 X=RND (13)4-49: IFX=58THENX=lj3EL 
SEIFX=59THENX=7 4ELSEIFX=6)3THENX= 
75ELSEIFX=61THENX=81ELSEIFX=62TH 
ENX=65 

lj?j3 E=RND ( 2 ) : IFE=1THENE$=CHR$ ( 12 
8 ) ELSEIFE=2THENE$=CHR$ (191) 
11)3 PRINT@P+32 , 11 "+E$ + " ";:IFX=1 
)3THENPRINT@P, " 1)3 11 ; : PLAY"05T6j3B" 



84 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



DataPack 11 Plus V4.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTOP!LOT«nd AUTO-LOS Cemmind Processors 
X-MOOEM DISK, FILE TRANSFER SUPPORT 
y_ T~1 0 0 & ¥1-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

* No lost daU using Hi-R«« Di»play,£v«n»t 1500 Baud on the Serial port. 
1 0 Hi -lies Displays, 28 to 255 columns by 24 lines & true Upper/Lower case. 



HI-RES ii Screen Commander 

Tired of looking at the 16 line by 32 character display on your 
CoCo? Wish you could see more lines and characters? Then HI-RES II 
is the answer, it can give you the big screen display you've always 
wanted. It will display 24 lines of 32, 42, 51, 64 and even 85 true 
upper and lower cast characters per iine without extra hardware. 

HI-RES II is the most powerful screen enhancement package available 
for the Color Computer, yet it is the least expensive. It is completely 
compatible and transparent to Basic. Once the program is loaded, 
everything works the same as before, only you have a much belter 
display to work with. It even allows you to have mixed text end 
Hi-resolution graphics on the same screen or have separate text and 
graphics screens. It also has an adjustable automatic key repeat 
feature and allows you to protect up to 23 lines on the screen. 

HI-RES II features over 30 special control code functions that allow 
you to change characters per line, protect display lines, change 
background color, position cursor, switch normal/reverse video, 
underline, double size characters, erase line/screen/to end of 
screen, home cursor, character highlight and much more. It works on 
all models of the CoCo with 16. 32 or 64K and provides automatic 
reset control so HI-RES II won't disappear when you press reset. 

Only 24.95 on Tape or $29.95 on Disk 

"The Source" 

Now you cen easily Disassemble Color Computer machine language 
programs directly from disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
Source Code. And "The Source" has all the features and functions you 
are looking for in a Disassembler. 

* Automatic Label generation and allows specifying FCB, FCC and FD8 areas. 

* Disassembles programs directly from Disk or ROM. 

* Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

* Generates Assembler source files directly to disk, or a printed listing, 

* Generated source files are in standard ASCI I format. 

* Built in Mex/ASCH dump/display to locate FCB, FCC and FDB areas. 

* Built in Disk Directory and Kill file commands. 

* Menu display with single key commands for Smooth, Easy operation. 

* Written in fast machine language, one of the easiest to use Disassemblers 

Requires 32K Disk $34.95 

TEXTPRO III 
"The Advanced Word Processing System " 

M 0 Mi-Res Displays from 2d to 255 columns by 24 Hnes & Upper/Lower Case 

* Three Programmable Header lines that can be re-defined at anytime. 

* Programmable Fooler line & Automatic footnote System, 

* 10 Programmable Tab slops & 1 Powerful! lab Function Commands. 

* Completely Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left and right. 

* On screen display of underline and Double size characters. 

8 Change indents, margins, line length, etc. parameters anytime in the text. 
1 Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to the size of a full disk. 
» Easily Imbed any number of formal and control codes. 

* Automatic Memory sense I6-64K with up to 48K of memory workspace. 

* Fully supports the use of 80 column hardware cards 

TEXTPRO 111 is an advanced word processing system designed for 
speed, [taxability and extensive document processing. It is not like 
most of the other word processing programs available f or the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write 
letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be belter off 
with one of the other simpler word processors. But. if you want a 
powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex 
formating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO III is what your 
looking for. TEXTPRO works in a totally different wiy than most 
word processing programs, It uses simple 2 character abbreviations 
of words or phrases for commands and formatting information that 
you imbed directly in your text. There are over 50 diff erent 
formating commands you can use without ever leaving the text your 
working on. There ar* no time comsuming, and often furstrating 
menu chases, you are In total control at all times. The formatted 
Output can be displayed directly on the screen, showing you exactly 
what your printed document will look like before a single word is ever 
printed. This includes margins, headers, footers, page numbers, page 
breaks, underlining, column formating and full justification. 

DISK $59.95 TAPE $49,95 



The CBASIC Editor/Compiler Vl.1.2 

Do you want to write fast machine language programs but you 
don't want to spend the next few years trying to learn how ??? 

Well with CBASIC, you could be writing them right now! 
CBASIC is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and program 
sditing system available for the Color Computer. It will allow you to 
take full advantage of all the capabilities available in your color 
computer without having to spend years trying to learn assembly 
language programming. CBASIC ailows you to create* edit and 
convert programs from a language you are already familiar with 
Extended Disk Color Basic, Into fast efficient machine language 
programs easily and quickly. We added advanced features like a full 
blown program editor, Hi-Res text Displays and 80 column hardware 
support for editing, compiling and your compiled programs. Plus we 
made it exceptionally easy to use, CBASIC is the friendliest and 
easiest compiler available for the Color Computer. 

"T he most complete E diior /Compiler I ha ve seen for the CoCo... " 

-The RAINBOW, March 1086 

CBASIC is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced 
Basic or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs 
without having to worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory 
allocation and so on, because CBASIC will do it for you automatically. 
Or, CBASIC will let you control every aspect of your program, even 
generating machine code directly In a program easily. 

CBASIC features well over 100 compiled Basic Commands and 
Functions that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, 
Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. CBASIC supports ALL the High and Low 
Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play and String Operations available in 
Extended Color Basic, including Graphics GET, PUT, PLAY and DRAW, 
all with 99,9% syntax compatibility. CBASIC also supports the built 
in Serial I/O port with separate printer & serial I/O baud rates. You 
can send and receive data with PRINT, INPUT and INKEY commands. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor 
which allows you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. 
It is a full featured editor designed specifically for writing and editing 
Basic programs. It has block move &. copy, program renumbering, 

automatic line numbers, screen editing, printer control and more. 

"The Editor is a very good one and could be the subject for review 
all b y itself... ' — The RAINBOW, March 1086 

'Comparing EC8s edit mode to CBAS/Cs text editor is like comparing a 
World War If jeep to a modem sedan 8olh gel you to your destination 
but what a difference in the ride. --Hot CoCo, f eburary I OSb 

The documentation for CBASIC is an 8 1/2 * 1 1 Spiral Bound book 
which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. 

"CB ASIC's manual is easy to read and written with a minimum of 
technicaiese. " -"Hot CoCo February, 1066 

The price of CBASIC is % 149.00. It is the most expensive Color 
Bask Compiler on the market, and well worth the investment. 
Compare Ihe performance of CBASIC against any Color Basic 
compiler. Dollar f or dollar, CBASIC gives you more than any other 
compiler available. Requires 64K & Disk, not JOOS compatible. 

"The price tag ii carries seemed a bit steep for an integer compiler on first 
glance, but when you add 6 4 A' hi-res drivers, and full-screen editing, CBASIC 
begins to look more Me a bargain.. " — Hot CoCo fehruary, 1 0S6 
'A Complete Editor/Compiler Well Worth its Price " - -RAINBO W March 1086 

_ EDT/ASM 64D 

64K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM 64D Is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler, 
ft has a Hi-Resolution 51. 64 or 85 column by 7A line display, so you 
see your program listings easily and it supports Column cards. The 
disk also contains a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug 
youra ssembled programs. 

This is the most powerfully easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/ Assembler package for the Color Computer. It even has 
automatic line number generation for easy entry of program material. 

* Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

* Full screen line editing with immediate line update. 
" Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

* Load &Save standard ASCII formatted Tape/Disk files. 

* Move or Copy single & multiple text lines. 

* Create and Edit disk files larger than memory. 

* Hi-Res Text Display 28 to 85 columns by 21 lines. 

* Supports Word-Pak I Si R.S. and Disto 80 column display cards. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM 640 f eatures include: 

* Supports the full 6600 instruction set. 

* Supports conditional if /THEN/ELSE assembly. 

* Supports Disk Library files (include). 

s Supports standard motorola assembler directives 

* Allows multiple values for FDB L FCB directives. 

* Generates listings to Mi-Res text screen or printer. 
8 Assembles directly to disk or tape in LOADH format. 

* Supports up to 0 open disk files during assembly. 

* Allows assembly from editor buffer, Disk or both. 

The freestanding DEBUG program provided includes: 

* Examine and change the contents of memory. 

* Set, Remove and display up to 10 breakpoints in memory. 

* Display/Change processor register contents 

* Move a Block of memory or Fill Memory range with specified data, 
s Search memory rrange for data pattern. 

* Disassemble memory range into op-code format. 

Requires 52K Disk $59,95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 
purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at {702)452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 6am to SpmPST). 

CER-eOMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
702-452-0632 



■ isk. texi ourrer wnen using me Hi-Kes text mspsay ana uisk . 

* ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 

* Directly record receive data to a disk file while online. 

* VT-I 00 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

* VT-100/52 cursor keys & position, insert/delete, PF L Alt. Kbd. keys. 

* Programmable Word Length } Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates 300 to 0600. 

* Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

* Send full 128 character set from Keyboard with control codes. 

* Complete Editor, insert, Oelete, Change or Add to Buffer, 

* 0 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers. 

* Programmable Printer rates from 1 f 0 to 0600 Baud. 

* Send Files directly from the Buffer^ Macro Key Buffers or Disk, 

* Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

* Freeze Display & Review information On line with no toss of data, 

* Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 
1 And much, much more. 

Supports: Word-Pak I, Ii, R.S. and Double Density 80 Column Cards 
Disto Controller w/80 column card & parallel printer 
PfiJParallel Printer Card and Dual Serial Port (2SP-Pak) 
ft. S. Modem-Pak L Oeluxe RS-232Pak,even with Disk. 

Requires 32K & Disk, Only $59.95 



: PRINT@P+64 , 11 10" ; : FORU=1TO350 : N 
EXT : R=10 : GOTO 150 

120 PRINT@P,CHR$(X) 11 ";:PRINT@P 
+64," ";CHR$(X) ; : PLAY"O5T60B" : F 
ORU=1TO350:NEXT 

130 R=X-48 : IFR=17THENIFR+T>27THE 

NR=1ELSER=11 

140 IFR>25THENR=10 

150 CA=CA+1 : T=T+R: IFCA=2AND PL=1 

THEN50 

160 IFT>21 AND PL=1 THEN270 
170 IFT>21 AND PL=2 THEN260 
180 IFPL=1THEN210 
190 IFCAOTHEN70 

200 PL(2)=T:IFPL(2)<PL(1) ANDCA< 
6THEN70ELSE2 50 

210 PRINT@258 , "CARD TOTAL" ;T; : PO 
KE12 95 , 96 : EXEC43345 : PRINT@290 , "A 
NOTHER CARD ? " ; : FORF=13 14T01327 : 
POKEF , PEEK ( F ) -64 : NEXT : ELSEPL ( 1 ) = 
T: GOTO 2 40 

220 I$=INKEY$ : IFI$=""THEN220 



220 IFI$="Y"THEN50ELSEIFI$="N"TH 

ENPL(1)=T ELSE220 

240 PL=2:CA=1:T=0:GOTO70 

250 IF(PL(2)=PL(l)OR PL(2)>PL(1) 

)THEN270ELSE260 

260 PRINT@277,"YOU WON" ; : PLAY"03 
FGFGFG" : BA=BA+BE : PRINT© 209 , "any 

key" ; :POKE13 36, 32 : EXEC4 453 9 : GOTO 
20 

210 PRINT@274, "COMPUTER WON";:BA 

=BA-BE:PRINT@306, "hit any key";: 

POKE1333,32:POKE1337,32:POKE1341 
, 32 : PLAY " 02 AB AB AB " : EXEC44539 : IFB 
A<1THEN280ELSE30 

280 PRINT @ 2 5 8 , " YOU 1 RE BROKE ";:P 
RINT@274,STRING$(12,17 5) ; : PRINT@ 
306,STRING$ (12 , 175) ; :PRINT@2 90, " 
ANOTHER GAME ? 11 ; : PLAY"05BAGFEDC0 
4BAGFEDC03 BAGFEDC02 BAGFEDC01BAGF 
EDC 

290 I$=INKEY$: IFI$="Y"THENRUNELS 
EIFI$="N"THENCLS : ENDELSE29 0 




vv7 



tart u our engines 



By David Jolley 



With summer's warmth and sun come an array of outdoor 
extravaganzas — picnics, f airs and sporting events. Catch the 
excitement of this last example with Speedster, an Indiana- 
polis 500-type race car game. 

You take control of a high-speed race car and must stay 
on the dangerously winding road as long as possible. A crash 
ends the game and displays the total score on the screen. 



The listing: SPEEDSTR 

10 A$=STRING$ {20,22) 
20 B$=CHR$(12 8) 
20 C$=CHR$(191) 

40 A$=A$+B$+LEFT$(A$,10)+B$+A$ 

50 L=10 

60 F0RY=1T016 

70 PRINTMID$ (A$,L, 32) ; 

80 NEXT 

90 PRINT@240,C$; 
100 F0RY=1T03 
110 S0UND1,1 
120 FORT=1TO400 



13 0 NEXT 

140 NEXT 

150 SOUND100,3 

160 C=240 

170 R=RND ( 2 ) 

180 ON R GOTO 190,230 

190 L=L+1 

200 D=l 

210 IF L>21 THEN L=21 
220 GOTO260 
230 L=L-1 
240 D=0 

250 IF L<1 THEN L=l 
260 F0RQ=1T02 
270 I$=INKEY$ 

280 IF I$=CHR$(8) THEN C=C-1 
290 IF I$=CHR$(9) THEN C=C+1 
300 NEXT 
310 W=W+1 

320 PRINT@C,CHR$ (191) ; 

330 E=PEEK(C+32+1024) 

340 IF E<>96 THEN 400 

350 PRINT@480,MID$(A$,L, 32) ; 

360 R=RND(10) 

370 IF R>7 THEN 170 

380 IF D=l THEN 190 

3 90 GOTO230 

400 FORY=1TO1000 

410 NEXT 

420 PRINT"YOU CRASHED!" 
430 PRINT" SCORE" ;W*10 



86 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



C0C0-3 ONLY PRODUCT 



TEXTPRO 1 1 1 — 3 
"The Advanced Word Processing System" 

« 0 Displays from32/40/64/90 columns by 24Hnes t92Gr225&aDWjon. 

• Urge Pnjg~3vm<ble header lines that an be re-defined at mytime. 
« Pfa^TTTncfcle Footer line & Automatic Foolrote Sysum. 

• 1 0 Pra^TTTr*£Je Tab steps 2* 7 Powerf all Tab Function Commands. 

• Qnpletefy Autcmatic JtBiificatkn, Cenlfinng, FU-sh lefl end ricfl 

• Ch sctot dsplay of underline and Cxxbls size characters. 

• ChErgBindais, nwgrs, lire length, etc. parameters anytime in Oie text. 

• Create aid Edit files larger thai memory, up to the size of a full disk (156K). 

• My imbed arty amber of fcrrnalEnjaiirol codes. 

• & jilt in Ultra Fast 2 drive IWWK fcr512K'a«xrL 

TEXTPRO II! is an advanced word processing system designed for 
speed, flexability and extensive document processing, it is not like 
most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write 
letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be better 
off with one of the other simpler word processors. But, if youwant 
a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex 
formating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO III is what 
your looking f or. TEXTPRO works in a totally diff erent way than 
most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 character 
abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
inf ormation that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 
50 different formating commands you can use without ever leaving 
the text your working on. There are no time comsuming, and often 
furstrating menu chases, you are in total control at all times. The 
f ormatted output can be displayed directly on the screen, showing 
you exactly what your printed document will look like before a 
single word is ever printed. This includes margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, underlining, column formating 
and full justification. 

Requires 128/512K & DISK $59.95 

EDT/ASM Ml 
128/512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor L Assembler. 
It is similar to our EDT/ASM 64D for the COCO 1 & 2 but designed 
to take advantage of the new features of the COCO 3. It has 8 
Display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 lines in 192 or 
225 Resolution, so you can use the best display mode whether you 
are using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your 
display. Plus you can select any f oreground and backbround colors 
or even color or monochrome display modes. It even supports 5 12K 
by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fast RAMDISK f or lightning 
f ast assembly of program source code larger than memory. The 
disk also contains a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you 
debug your assembled programs. See our other Advertisement for 
information on some of the advanced features supported in the 
Editor, Assembler and Debugger. 

Requires 128/512K & Disk $59.95 

512K RAM UPGRADE 
Assembled & Tested w/120 nsec RAM 

Give your COCO 3 all the power it deserves with this easy to install 
(no soldering/plug in) 100% Tandy compatible 51 2K memory 
upgrade. Completely assembled and tested (in a COCO-3). not like 
some upgrades that give you a bare board and a set of ram chips to 
assemble & test yourself, (upgrade without RAM $49.95) 

Now only $99.95 Assembled & Tested 
Ultra Hi-Speed 5 1 2K RAMDISK 

and MEMORY Tester 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 
ULTRA High Speed Ram Disks in your 512K COCO lif. It does not 
nsed or require the 05-9 operating system. It worka with R.5. DOS 
V 1 .0 or V I . \ and it is completely compatible with Enhanced Color 
Disk Basic!!! Plus it allows your 512K COCO-3 to run at double 
speed all the time even f or floppy disk access!!! The MEMORY 
tester is a fast Machine Language program to test the 512K 
COCO-3. It performs several bit tests as well as an address test so 
you know that your 512K of memory is working perfectly. 

Requires 512K & DISK $19.95 
COMING SOON 

Maybe even by the time you read this!!! 

TEXTPRO I V - Word Processor with ON Screen Underlining, italics. 
Bold and Double Width display. What you see is what you get. 
THE SOURCE-3- Disassembler Source Generator better than ever. 
CBASIC3 - With Enhanced Graphics fc512K RAM support plus more! 



DataPack 1 1 1 Plus V 1 . 1 
SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTOP I LOTand AUTO-LOG Command Processors 
X- MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT- 1 00 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

• No lost dateevsi at 24)0 Baud m the CQ0CK3 Serial I/O pat 

• 8 Selectable Display Formats. 32/40/64/80 cok/ms at 192 or 225 Resolution. 

• 5(K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text. Display and Disk . 

• ASCII & BINARY cSsk file trarsfer support via XMODEM. 

• Directly record receive data to a disk file while cnisne (Data Logging). 

• VT~ 1 00 terrninaJ ernulaiicn for VAX LNIXand other systems. 

• VT- 1 00/52 cursor keys &. position. irsart/detelB, Pf &. Ait. KM keys. 

• i^ogrannm^Utrd Length, Parity. Step Bits sxi baud rates 300 to 96CX). 

• Complete Full end Half CXuiex operation, withno garbled data. 

• Send foil 128 cheater set from Keyboard wit!) •ontrol codes. 

• Complete Edilor. hseri, Delete, Change or Add to Buffer \ 

• 9 Vaiabie length, Frog'mfrafote Macro Key buffers, 

• PW)cjmirnabfe PHnier rates from 1 10b 9500 Baud. 

• Send Files directly from the Buffer. Macro Key Buffers or Disk. 

• Display on Screen or Pnri the cantoris of the Buffer. 

• Freeze Display & Review infermatien Ch line with no loss of data. 

• Built In Qranardrtenu (Help) Display. 

• Built in 2 Drr^ RAJDOC for 5 ! 2K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R. S.rtxkrrPak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128/512K & Disk. Only $59.95 

HI RES 1 1 1 Screen Commander 

How you can have up to 54 different character sizes on 
your COCO-3 screon at the same time!!! 

• 54 Different Character Sizes available Mto212cpl. 

• Bold. Italic or Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad Width characters. 

• Full 96 Upper/Lower case characters. 

• Continious or Individual Character Highlighting. 

• Scroll Protect from 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

• Mixed Text 2* Graphics in HSCREEN3 mode. 

• PRINT & available in all character sizes. 
» Programmable Automatic Key repeat. 

• Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

• Full Cursor Control command support. 

• Selectable Character & Background color. 

• Color or Monochrome Display modes. 

» Uses only AK of Extended or Basic ram. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine tanguage. 

HI-RES III was designed to improve the standard display capabilities 
of the Color Computer 3, even the AO and BO column displays have 
several features missing. For example you can't use PRINT ® or 
have different character sizes on the same screen, even mixing 
text and graphics with the HPRINT command leaves a lot to be 
desired. Hi-RES III can give you the kind of display capabilities you 
always dreamed about having on your color computer but didn't get 
with your COCO-3. Well now it's here and with a wide variety of 
display options that you can easily use with your Basic or ML 
programs. HI-RES Hi is totally compatible with Enhanced Color 
Basic and its operation is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the 
normal screen display with an extremely versatile display package. 
It also overcomes some of the disadvantages found when using the 
Width AO & 80 screens. You can use the Print $5> function on any 
line length with HI-RES III. It also gives you a programmable 
automatic key repeat that can be very handy for editing your Basic 
programs. Automatic key repeat can be adjusted f rom ultra f ast to 
super slow and can be disabled entirely if desired. You also get a 
full control code keyboard using the 'CTRL' key. So many of Hi-RES 
Ill's extended functions can be controlled directly from the keyboard 
easily. With just a couple of simple keystrokes you can change 
character sizes and styles at any time. You can even switch back 

and forth botwoon Lho ntondord COCO-3 display and HI-RE9 III with a 

simple keyboard entry or under program control. But. after you 
use HI-RES III, you most likely won't want to do without it again. 

HI-RES III can be used for a wide variety of applications, with its 
many different character sizes and styles. You can make your 
program really look professional, witn protected menus, Dold or 
Italic emphasis, Double or Quad characters for easy to read displays 
L menus. It can be idealy suited for Video Titles or Store Displays. 
Printing Signs or Fliers in conjunction with a Hi-res Screen dump 
program. The visually impared will espically appreciate the extra 
large character sizes available. 

Requires 128/512K Tape or Disk $34.95 

To orderproducls by mail, send check or money orderfor the amount of purchase, 
plus 13.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To order b/ VISA, MASTERCARD or COO call us at (7023 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, Earn to 5pm PST ). 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 891 10 
702-452-0632 



D 



uzzles 






heater Management 

By Paul Flaishaker 

Can you solve this puzzling problem? You may need to 
develop your own calculation program in order to do so! 

The listing: THERTRE 

5 REM THEATRE 

6 REM WRITTEN BY PAUL FLAISHAKER 

7 REM 1021 E. WILLIAMS DR., 

8 REM PALATINE, IL. 6)3)367. 

1) 8 PRINT 11 CAN YOU SOLVE THIS PROB 
LEM" 

2) 3 PRINT 
S 1ft 0 

3) 3 PRINT 11 
T CAN 
HE SEATS 

4) 3 PRINT 
WOULD 

5) 3 PRINT" 
SEATED . 11 

8) 3 PRINT 
AN SEATED , - 

9) 3 PRINT 11 AND FIVE CENTS FOR EVE 
RY MAN SEATED. REMEMBER ALL SE 
ATS MUST BE FILLED . 11 
Ipp PRINT 

11) 8 PRINT 11 HIT ANY KEY TO CONTI 
NUE . 11 

115 A$=INKEY$:IF A$= flM THEN GOTO 
115 

12) 3 CLS:INPUT fl HOW MANY CHILDREN 



THIS THEATRE IN TOWN HA 

SEATS AVAILABLE 11 

THE MOST THAT MANAGEMEN 

MAKE IS $1.)8)8 FOR ALL T 

SOLD 11 

THE MANAGER FIGURED HE 

CHARGE ONE CENT 11 

FOR EVERY TEN CHILDREN 

TWO CENTS FOR EVERY WOM 
it • • 



WERE SEATED. M ;C 

14) 3 INPUT fl HOW MANY WOMEN WERE SE 
ATED. 11 ;W 

15) 3 INPUT fl HOW MANY MEN WERE SEAT 
ED. 11 ;M 

16) 3 CLS 

165 PRINT@4 3, "SEATS ENTRAN 
CE 11 

17) 3 PRINT@76, "SOLD FEE. 11 
17 5 PRINT 

18) 3 PRINT@13)3, "CHILDREN 11 ; : PRINT@ 
14)3, C 

19) 3 F=C/1)3)3)3:PRINT@152,F 

2) 3)3 PRINT@162 , "WOMEN" ; : PRINT@173 
/ USING"##" ;W 

2 1)3 G=W/ 5)3 : PRINT@ 184 , USING" # . ##" 

;G 

225 PRINT§194,"MEN"; : PRINT§2)35 , U 
SING"##";M 

23) 3 H=M/2J3:PRINT§216, USING" # . ##" 

;H 

24) 3 PRINT@236," " ; : PRINT@2 4 8 , 

ii it . 

r 

25) 3 PRINT@2 5 8, "TOTALS" ; 
2 6)3 T=C+W+M:TT=F+G+H 

262 IF T=<99 THEN PRINT@268,T 

27) 3 IF T=>99 THEN PRINT§267,T 

28) 3 PRINT@278,USING"$ #.##";TT 

29) 3 IF T=( 1)3)3) AND TT=(1) THEN P 
RINT@3 2 6, "THAT'S A NICE!!. 

YOU DID IT" ; :PRINT@3 
9)3, "I HATE A SMARTY ! ! " ; : END 

3) 3)3 PRINT @ 3)3)3, "WRONG 

WANT TO TRY AGAIN? (Y/N) " ; 
31)3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$ = " "THEN 31)3 E 
LSE IF A$="N"THEN END ELSE IF A$ 
= "Y"THEN GOTO 12)3 




Quaking Uwuagic 

By John Morrison 




When magicians take the stage, eyes fill with awe as 
unlikelihoods become realities, over and over again. Now you 
can play with a magic puzzle that has intrigued mathema- 
ticians and magicians alike for centuries — the magic square. 

This program, Magic Square, produces a 16-block square. 
When a number between 35 and 70 is entered, a square of 
different numbers (four columns and four rows) is displayed. 
The sum of these numbers (added vertically, horizontally and 



diagonally) is the original number you entered. Additionally, 
the four corner numbers add up to your original number. 

Since magicians do not disclose how their tricks work, the 
secret to how this program accomplishes its magical display 
is not revealed. However, since you will be entering the 
program into the CoCo, you will be, in effect, behind the 
scene and can figure out the magic of h ow the program works. 
Remember: A good magician never gives away the secret. 

The listing: MRBIC5QR 

1 '**MAGSQR** 

2 »**BY MORRISON-MAGICIAN** 

3 '** 1)324 SECOND STREET ** 

4 ' ** BEAVER, PA. 15)3)39 ** 



88 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



5 •** (C) JAN. 20, 1966 ** 
10 CLS 

20 PRINT© 3 4, "ENTER A NUMBER FROM 

35 TO 70" 
30 INPUT A 
40 CLS 

50 PRINT© 7 8, A 

60 PRINT @ 10,0 , "HERE IS YOUR MAGIC 
SQUARE" 

70 PRINT@170," 1 10 "A-19" 
8" 

80 PRINT@232," "A-18" 7 2 
g ii 

90 PRINT@299,"6 " A-21" 12 
3" 

100 PRINTS 3 6 1,11" 4 5 "A-2 

0 

110 GOSUB400 



240 PRINT@299,"6 +"A-21"+ 12 + 
3 =ii A iiii 

250 GOSUB 480 

260 PRINT@3 61," 11 + 4 + 5 +"A 

-20"="A" " 

27^5 GOSUB 4 40 

280 PRINT@394," — 
ii 

290 GOSUB 440 

300 PRINT@416, "VERTICAL "A" "A" 
"A" "A"" 

310 GOSUB 440 

320 PRINT@449 , " "A" ««<< DIAGON 

ALS »»»"A"" 

330 GOSUB 4 40 

340 PRINT@224 , "FOUR" 

350 PRINT© 2 5 6, "CORNERS 6 + "A- 

21"+ 12+3 ="A"" 



120 PRINT©160, "HORIZONTAL 


1 




10 


360 


PRINT© 2 8 8," 
GOSUB 440 


EQUAL 


"A-19" 8" 








370 




130 GOSUB440 








380 


PRINT@480, " 


FOUR 


140 PRINT© 160, "HORIZONTAL 


1 


+ 


10 


ENTER EQUAL "A"" 


"A-19" 8" 








390 


GOTO 390 




150 GOSUB 440 








400 


S=5 




160 PRINT ©160, "HORIZONTAL 


1 


+ 


10 


410 


FOR Z=l TO 


460*S 


+"A-19" 8" 








420 


NEXT Z 




170 GOSUB 440 








430 


RETURN 




180 PRINT@160, "HORIZONTAL 


1 


+ 


10 


440 


X=l 




+"A-19" + 8" 








450 


FOR Y=l TO 


4 60*X 


190 GOSUB 440 








460 


NEXT Y 




200 PRINT@160, "HORIZONTAL 


1 


+ 


10 


470 


RETURN ■ 




+ "A-19" + 8 |="A 








480 


X=2 




210 GOSUB 480 








490 


FOR Y=l TO 


4 60*X 


220 PRINT@232," "A-18"+ 7 


+ 


2 


500 


NEXT Y 




+ 9 =ii A iiii 








510 


RETURN 





230 GOSUB 480 




un 



p_n 

in 




ave 

n_n 




Lru 



and 




tu^angman 

By Shawn Stewart 

The following program is a simple version of the popular 
Hangman game. The object is to guess random words in six 
tries. 

If the letter you choose is in the word, the computer shows 
you its position in the word. Play continues until you guess 
all the letters or make six mistakes. 

If you want to add your own words, change the DATA 
statements in lines 600 and 610 or add more lines. Afterward, 
count the number of words and make the change in Line 10. 
(The last number in the parentheses should become the 
number of words in your DATA statements.) 



The listing: HANGMAN 

1 RESTORE 
5 CLS 

10 FOR I=1TORND(10) 
20 READ W$ 
30 NEXT I 

40 PRINT "O.K. I'M THINKING OF A 

WORD . " 
50 PRINT :F=1 
60 FOR I=1T0LEN(W$) 
70 D$=D$+"?" 
80 NEXT I 
90 PRINT D$ 

100 PRINT "YOU HAVE" ;M; "MISTAKES 
ii 

110 INPUT" LETTER" ; L$ 
120 REM 

August 1987 THE RAINBOW 89 



200 PRINT CURRENT WORD STATU 

S 

210 FOR I = 1T0LEN(W$) 

220 IF MID$(W$,I,l)OL$ THEN 24j3 

220 D$=LEFT$(D$,I-1)+L$+RIGHT$(D 

$ , LEN ( D $ ) -I) :F=0 

240 NEXT I 

25j3 IF D$=W$ THEN 4j3j3 

26J3 M=M+F:F=1 

270 IF M=6 THEN 500 

3j3j3 GOTO 90 

210 REM 

4j30 PRINT: PRINT" YOU GOT IT!!" 
410 FOR X=1TO210J3 
420 NEXT X 
430 GOTO 1000 



500 PRINT "YOU HAVE TOO MANY MIS 
TAKES . " 

510 PRINT: PRINT "THE WORD WAS "; 

W$ ; " . " 

520 FOR X=1TO2100 
525 NEXT X 
530 GOTO 1000 

550 REM************************* 
555 REM* * * * * DATA STATEMENTS***** 
560 REM************************* 
600 DATA THE , RAINBOW , I S , THE , BEST 
610 DATA MAGAZINE, FOR, YOUR, COLOR 
, COMPUTER 

1000 CLS: PRINT "THANK YOU FOR PLA 
YING" 



crambled creen 




®f Letters 

By Neil Johnson 

Scrambled letters fill the screen. A timer, set at 90 seconds, 
begins its countdown. You must find and write down as many 
words as possible before the timer beeps at zero. 

You can use any combination of letters going in any 
direction (up, down, right, left, diagonal, forward or 
backward) as long as the letters are adjacent. As an example, 
you can f orm a word by going up two letters, diagonally three 
letters, and then left two letters. 

Grab a piece of paper and a bunch of friends, have a seat 
in front of your CoCo, and give this program a try! 

The listing: W0RD1 

10 REM** WORD SEARCH** 
20 REM**BY NEIL JOHNSON** 
30 REM**APRIL 17, 1987** 
40 CLS 

50 CLEAR 250 
60 C=0 

10 PRINT @ 195, "PREPARING SCRAM 
BLE" 

80 FOR 1=1 TO 10 

90 A$(I)="" 

100 FOR K=l TO 20 

110 A$(I)=A$(I)+CHR$(RND(26)+96) 



1, "WORD SEARCH" 
417, "FIND AS MANY W 
CAN" 

44 9 f "IN THE SCRAMBL 



it 



154 
187 
195 



"TIME" 
"LEFT" 
"90 " 

"PUSH ENTER TO 



120 NEXT K 
130 NEXT I 
140 PRINT § 
150 PRINT @ 
ORDS AS YOU 
160 PRINT @ 
E IN 90 SECONDS 
170 PRINT § 122 
180 PRINT 
190 PRINT 
200 PRINT 
START" 

210 AN$=INKEY$ 

IF AN$="" THEN GOTO 210 
FOR 1=67 TO 3 55 STEP 32 
C=C+1 

PRINT @ I, A$(C) ; 
NEXT I 

FOR 1=89 TO 0 STEP -1 
FOR K=l TO 691 
NEXT K 

PRINT § 186, I 
NEXT I 
SOUND 185,7 

PRINT @ 417, "TIME'S UP! 

ii 



220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 



340 PRINT § 449, "PRESS ANY KEY T 
O BEGIN AGAIN. " 
350 AN$=INKEY$ 

360 IF AN$="" THEN GOTO 3 50 ELSE 
RUN 



— I 

filities 



[ru'elp For Adventurers 

By Neil Haupt 




90 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



Mapper is a timesaver for Adventure enthusiasts. The 
program draws blank Adventure maps on an 80-column 
printer. Then, you can fill in the allowed moves and put room 
descriptions into the boxed areas. This makes the map much 
more readable. 



The Adventurer's job of mapping just became quite a bit 
easier! 

The listing: MAPPER 

1 1 ADVENTURE MAP PRINTER 

BY NEIL HAUPT 

2 CLS4:FORD=lT03j3j3:NEXT:CLS7:POK 
E1J372 , 13 : FORD=lT03j3j3 : NEXT: POKE 11 

3 6,1: FORD=lT03j3 J3 : NEXT : POKE12J3J3 , 1 
6: FORD=lT03j3j3:NEXT: POKE1264 , 16 :F 
ORD=lT03j3j3 : NEXT : P0KE13 2 8,5: FORD= 
lT03j3j3:NEXT:POKE1392 , 18 :F0RD=1T0 
6J2J J3 : NEXT : SOUND2j3j3 , 1 

3 CLS3: PRINT 11 NEED INSTRUCTIONS? 
Y OR N" 

4 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN4 

5 IFA$="Y"THENGOSUB16 

6 SOUND2j3j3,l:CLS3 :PRINT"SET UP F 
OR 12j3j3 BAUD! ": PRINT 11 IS YOUR PRI 
NTER SET AT 12J3J3 BAUD" : PRINT "ENT 
ER Y FOR 12j3p BAUD, ANY KEY FOR 

6j3j3 BAUD" : INPUTBD$ 

7 IFBD$="Y"THENPOKE15j3 , 4J3ELSEPOK 
E15j3,87 

9 F0RX=1T012 : GOSUB1J3 : GOSUB12 : GOS 
UB12 : GOSUBljZ) : GOSUB14 : NEXTX : END 

1J3 PRINT#-2," 

• « ■ • •»»•"»■ ■»•■»•■ - • - 




it 



11 RETURN 

12 PRINT#-2, M . 

a • ■ ■ « • 

II 

• * i * * * 

13 RETURN 

14 PRINT#-2 , 1111 

15 RETURN 

16 SOUND2j3j3,l:CLS3:PRINT"THIS UT 
ILITY PRINTS A BLANK MAP FOR USE 

IN SOLVING ADVENTURES. SET A P 
IECE OF PAPER AT THE TOP OF THE 
PAGE AND TURN PRINTER ON HIT ANY 

KEY WHEN READY" : EXEC44539 : RETUR 

N 






oy r or ^Joysticks 

ByR ichard S.En IS 

Do you ever wonder if your joystick is working properly? 
Lots of people do, and, unfortunately, they're either still 
wondering or they've gone out and bought a new one. 

Joystick Check-Out does just what its name implies. The 
program provides information on the position of the left and 
right joysticks and firebuttons simultaneously. It also 
explains how joystick routines work. 

Simply plug in your joysticks, run the program and read 
the data. Refer to Figure 1 to determine if the joysticks are 
working properly. 

The program is short, but informative — perfect for 
inquisitive minds. 



VALUE 
65280 

124 
125 
126 
127 
252 
253 
254 
255 

Note 



RIGHT LEFT 

Closed Closed & Right Horizontal < 1 

Open Closed & Right HorizontaK 1 

Closed Open & Right Horizontal < 1 (Varies) 

Open Open & Right Horizontal < 1 

Closed Closed & Right Horizontal > 1 

Open Closed & Right Horizontal > 1 

Closed Open & Right Horizontal > 1 (Varies) 

Open Open & Right Horizontal > 1 



Open 

Closed is the same as firing or pressing button 
Open is the same as not firing 

Value of the right joystick horizontal (left/right & 0/63) = JOYSTK(O) 
Value of the right joystick vertical (up/down & 0/63) = JOYSTK(1) 
Value of the left joystick horizontal (left/right & 0/63) = JOYSTK(2) 
Value of the left joystick vertical (up/down & 0/63) = JOYSTK(3) 

Figure 1: Joystick Details 



(H=H 



The listing: JDYCHECK 

1 1 JOYSTICK CHECKER BY RS ELLIS 

2 CLS : PRINT@4p , " j oystick" ;CHR$ ( 1 
28) ; "checker" :PRINT@448, " 
ORIZONTAL V=VERTICAL) " 

3 U$=" ##" : PRINT@2 2 6 , "H 

4 PRINT@13j3,USINGU$;JOYSTK(j3) ;:P 
RINT@135,USINGU$;JOYSTK(l) ; : PRIN 
T" right"; :X=PEEK(6528j3) :IFX=1 
240RX=12 60RX=2 520RX=2 54THENPRINT 
" SWITCH closed"ELSEPRINT" SWITC 
H OPEN" 

5 PRINT@322,USINGU$; JOYSTK(2) ;:P 
RINT@327,USINGU$;JOYSTK(3) ; : PRIN 
T" left " ; :IFX=1240RX=1250RX=2 
520RX=2 53THENPRINT" SWITCH close 
d"ELSEPRINT" SWITCH OPEN" 

6 GOT04 | 

Contributions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of short programs thatcanbetypedinatone sitting 
and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, although the short 
programs are limited in scope, many novice programmers find it 
enjoyable and quite educational to improve the software written by 
others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but we 
cannot key in program listings. All programs should be supported by 
some editorial commentary, explaining how the program works. If your 
submission is accepted for publication, the payment rate will be 
established and agreed upon prior to publication. 

— Jutta Kapfhammer 
Submissions Editor 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 91 



Like ducks to water, 
kids really take to 



32K 
ECB 



r 11 ill £^1 # 

Ine bpellm 





W HOW jjjjjf Sm >■» H> 

$L JL A i i \ j 

TflP^'^raB* wSHSfc*. »JB!fa JHftw Ml, 



By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the "Wishing Well," submit it to Fred 
c/o THE rainbow. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don't forget that 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 



TT ast month I introduced a pro- 
■ gram titled CoCo Keys, which 
M «icould be used to introduce 
youngsters to the workings of a comput- 
er keyboard. By now, most of you have 
typed in that program or loaded it from 
your RAINBOW ON TAPE or DISK, Since 
it is still too early to tell whether or not 
any of you liked the program, I can only 
hope that your reactions are similar to 
those of the people I let try the program 
prior to its publication. Their verdict 
was thumbs up! 

That program, if you recall, was 
based on a suggestion from Sonya 
Hurst of Richmond, California. She 
was trying to design a keyboard pro- 
gram that could be used for spelling 
with her 5-year-old daughter. The pro- 
gram would work with Radio Shack's 
Speech/ Sound Cartridge. As of this 
writing, I do not know if she succeeded 

Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North A dams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. Heholds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



in creating her own program. Co Co 
Keys was not exactly what she re- 
quested, but it was a start for the major 
working parts. 

Therefore, this month, CoCo Keys 2 
will completely grant that wish by 
providing a spelling program with a 
graphics keyboard and speech thrown 
in as an added bonus. What is really nice 
about this program, however, is that it 
can also be used as a game without the 
Speech Pak as a way of reinforcing 
spelling skills with keyboard locations. 

Putting the Finishing Touch 

I really thought I had the system beat 
this time by getting the program written 
a few weeks ahead of schedule. Only a 
little work was needed to transform 
CoCo Keys to CoCo Keys 2. Most of 
the hard parts, such as the graphics 
keyboard, were already designed. What 
I did not expect was a major setback in 
another area. 

To put it very simply, I am sitting in 
front of my computer hacking out this 
column with one hand because my left 
arm is in a sling. It seems that I acci- 
dentally ripped a muscle in my left 
shoulder: something called the rotator 
cuff. Talk about pain! The worst part 
about the injury was how I did it. I 
didn't do it while working out with my 
wrestlers, or while lifting weights, or 
even while out taking my daily run. I did 
it while vacuuming out the car! It seems 
that I stretched my left arm a little too 
far while trying to reach something 
under one of the seats. 

Well, besides slowing me down a bit, 



it has made me a little more aware of 
keyboard locations while trying to do 
everything withjust one hand. After all, 
that is what both of these CoCo Keys 
programs are about anyway. Call it 
poetic justice if you must. All I know is 
that I was lucky to get the program d one 
before the injury took place. I only had 
to go through the inconvenience of 
writing the article this way. 

However, that brings to mind what 
the real purpose of writing these pro- 
grams is all about. Working with hand- 
icapped and special needs students 
helps keep you aware of what obstacles 
others must go through in their lives, 
while we take our health and fitness for 
granted. Just last week we had a group 
of handicapped students address our 
student body about the dangers of 
alcohol and drug abuse. 

The students and young adults were 
from an outreach program called 
Operation Street Smarts from Lynn, 
Massachusetts. Some of the members of 
the group were wheelchair bound as a 
result of drug or alcohol use or alcohol- 
related accidents. One person was 
paralyzed from the waist down and only 
had limited use of one hand. These 
people are limited in their actions and 
abilities for the rest of their lives. 
Looking back at that week makes my 
minor injury seem totally insignificant. 
I suppose that minor accidents help us 
keep things in perspective. 

One thing I have gotten from this 
experience is greater resolve to have 
even just one of my programs help 
overcome the handicaps of others. 



92 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



What suggestions do you have? Any 
ideas? Write and let me know of a need 
that our CoCo could help meet for a 
handicapped person. Later I'll tell you 
how this program now seems to be 
helping one such student: a 17-year-old 
named Chris. 

The Program 

Type in the listing exactly as you see 
it, including all commas found in the 
DATA statements. Failure to do this 
correctly will result in an OD Error. The 
DATA statements at the end of the 
program starting with Line 1000 and 
ending in Line 5000 are reserved for you 
to insert your own spelling or game 
words. I have included some simple 
words and their phonetic sound so the 
Speech Pak can pronounce them in a 
way the user can understand. You must 
remember to use two entries for each 
line: the correctly spelled word and the 
phonetic pronunciation. 

Using the Program 

This program can be used in two 
different ways: as a spelling program 
with speech or as a keyboard recogni- 
tion game involving spelling words, 
without speech. 

On running the program, you will see 
a solid-colored screen, either red or 
blue. If the screen is red, press ENTER 
to proceed. If the screen is blue, then 
press reset and run until the screen is 
red. This will help set up the graphics 
keyboard with the correct color pattern. 

Talking Version 

If you are using the Tandy Speech 
Pak, press T for talking when the title- 
card appears. (Be sure to plug in the Pak 
with the power off on your CoCo before 
loading the program.) The computer 
will repeat the spelling word twice, and 
then you must match the flashing keys 
on the screen to the correct keys on the 
keyboard. As a correct key is pressed, 
the letter will be spoken by the comput- 



er. Press the wrong key and the screen 
will flash. 

As you press the correct keys, the 
word will be spelled out at the bottom 
of the screen. If at any time you want 
to check your score, hold down SHIFT 
while pressing the CLEAR key. You may 
continue by pressing C. The score card 
operates like all our other score cards 
from our other "Wishing Well" 
programs. 

As you can tell by now, the program 
will actually spell out each word for you 
by flashing the corresponding key on 
the screen. It is not testing the user on 
the spelling. Instead, it is helping the 
user go through the steps of learning 
and reinforcement. It can be a big help 
in learning new words. (Note: The 
words must be 10 letters or less in 
length.) 

Non-Talking 

If you do not have a Speech Pak, you 
can use this same program in a slightly 
different way without making any other 
changes. Simply press N for non- 
talking; the program works in the same 
way without talking. However, this way 
the program becomes a game to see if 
the user can quickly match the flashing 
key to the keyboard and guess the 
spelling word. The teacher or parent can 
sit with the student to prompt him or 
her along. You could even use a stop- 
watch to time how quickly all the words 
are correctly spelled. (I didn't want to 
write that routine into the program 
because different CoCos, new and old, 
have different clock speeds sometimes. 
It wouldn't be as accurate.) 

Believe me, students will even enjoy 
using the program in this way. It does 
not need speech to be a hit. The graphics 
alone will get it by. 

Using Your Own Words 

To use your own spelling words, 
dump mine by entering: 



DEL1000-4999 
Line 5000 must be: 

DATA END, END 

Keep your words under 10 letters in 
length. Use one word with its pronun- 
ciation per line. Separate each by a 
comma, such as: 

1000 DATA DIRT , DURT 

You may include up to 99 such words, 
but I wouldn't use that many. The 
program would take too long to run. 
Ten to 20 is usually a good number. Be 
sure to save your new version with a 

Field Test 

As soon as I completed this program, 
one of my fellow teachers suggested I let 
one of our students, Chris, try it with 
his spelling words. Chris still has diffi- 
culty with simple words such as "stop," 
"taxi," "if" and "the." 

I put about 10 of these words in the 
CoCo and let him try. While being very 
limited in ability, he has taken to the 
program like a duck to water. He really 
enjoys using the program and, after 
only a few days, is able to guess the word 
after only a few letters. (Special needs 
students sometimes have a problem 
with closure: completing a word, sent- 
ence or picture if part is missing.) This 
program will now become part of his 
daily routine. 

Conclusion 

I hope you all can become more 
appreciative of those who have limited 
abilities. Helping them can be a big part 
of making your day. While this program 
didn't start out that way, the end result 
fit that picture perfectly. I hope some of 
you can come up with suggestions on 
helping others with handicaps by using 
our CoCo. 

Until then, I'm goingrest a bit and let 
my car get a little dirtier than usual. □ 




45 186 385 

110 55 460 

220 218 510 

280 210 END 

350 146 




The listing: CDCDKEY2 

0 PCLEAR8 

REM ************************ 



2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 



* 
it 



CO CO KEYS 

KEYBOARD SPELLER 

A SPELLING GAME 

BY FRED B.SCERBO 

6j3 HARDING AVE. 

NORTH ADAMS, MA 012 4 7 

COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 
************************ 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PMOD 
E3 :PCLS2 

15 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$(13)THENl 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



i 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 93 



2J3 CLSJ3:PRINTSTRING$(3 2,172) ; : FO 
RI=1T0256 : READA : I FA= J3THEN A= 1 6 
25 PRINTCHR$ (A+112) ;: NEXT : PRINTS 
TRING$(32,172) ; 

30 DATA46,44,44,44,42,46,44,44,4 
5, 116, 12 6, , , 112 , 12 6, 120, 12 6, 12 4, 
124,124,122,122, , ,112,122,117,12 
4, 124, 124, 124,125 

35 DATA42, , , , ,42, , ,37, ,122, ,112, 
118, , ,122, ,, ,120,122, , ,112,122,1 

40 DA.TA.42, , , , 34 , 42 , , , 37 , ,122,112 

, 118, , , , 122 , , , , , 122 , , , 112 , 122 , 11 
7 

45 DATA44,44,44,44,40,44,44,44,4 
4, ,123,118, , , , ,123,115,115,119, , 
121,112, ,113,120,117,115,115,115 
,115, 115 

50 DATA110, 108, 108, 108, 106, 110,1 
08,108,109,112,122,116,114, ,,12 
2, ,,116,112, ,121,115,120, , , ,,,1 
17 

55 DATA106, , , , 106 , , , 101 , , 122 , , 1 
16,114, ,112,122, ,,,,, ,122, , , ,,, 
,117 

60DATA106,,, 98,106,96,96,101,, 
122, , ,116,114, ,122, , ,112,114, ,11 





THE RAINBOW'S 

One-Liner Contest 
has now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines. This 
means a new dimension and new 
opportunity for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sure your line, or lines, aren't packed so tightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 

Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 




-2, 122, , , 113 , 112, , , , 117 
65 DATA108,108, 108, 108, 104,108,1 
08,108,108,116,124, ,, ,116,120,12 
4,124,12 4,124,120, ,116,12 4, , ,116 
,124, 124,124, 124, 124 
70 PRINT@357," KEYBOARD SPELLIN 
G 11 ; :PRINT@38 9, 11 (T)ALKING OR 
(N)OT ? 



ii 



PRINT@453, 11 
ii • 



75 PRINT@421, 11 
O " ; 

80 
87 
85 
90 
95 
100 



BY FRED B.SCERB 



COPYRIGHT (C) 19 



X$=INKEY$ : IFX$="T"THEN105 
IFX$="N"THEN100 
GOTO 8 5 
NT=1 



105 CLS0 

110 XX=&HFF00 : YY=&HFF7E 
115 POKEXX+1, 52 : POKEXX+3 , 63 
120 POKEXX+35,60 

125 DIMR(23) ,L$ (26) , Y(40) ,A(26,2 

) ,G$(26) ,K(100) ,L(100) ,SP$(100) , 

PR$(100) :C$(l)="Cl ff :C$(2)="C2 n :C 

$(3)="C3":C$(4)="C4" 

130 F0RI=1T02 6 : READL$ ( I ) : NEXT 

135 GOT0265 

140 AA$=JK$ 

145 A$=STR$ (A) : B$=STR$ (B) 

150 DRAW"BM n +A$+" , "+B$+C$ (CL) 

155 IF LEN(JK$) <=24THEN175 

160 FOR T=24TO0STEP-1:IF MID$ ( JK 



Two-Liner Contest Winner 



As the computer "throws" numbers on the screen, 
wait until the numbers match and then press any key 
except BREAK. But, you'd better be fast. 

The listing: 

1 I$=INKEY$ : CLS : R=RND ( 10 ) : S=RND ( 
10) :PRINT@238,R;S:IF INKEY$<> IMI T 
HENGOT02ELSEGOT01 

2 IF R=S THENPRINT"WINNER! ! 11 : T=T 
+1 : PRINT"SCORE : 11 T: FORY=1TO1000 : N 
EXTY : GOTOIELSEPRINT 11 LOSER" : FORX= 
1TO1000:NEXTX:GOTO1 

David Fye 
Tucson, AZ 



(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The Third 
Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



94 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



$,T,1)=" "THEN17J3 

165 NEXT T:GOT0175 

170 L$=LEFT$ ( JK$ , T) : W$=L$ : G0SUB1 

8j3:JK$=" »+RIGHT$(JK$, ( LEN ( JK$) ) 

-T) :GOT0145 

175 W$=JK$: B=B+14:GOSUB18j3:RETUR 

N 

180 SL=LEN(W$) :FORI=lTOSL: BB$=MI 
D$(W$,I,1) :C=ASC(BB$) -64: IF C=-3 
2 THEN DRAWBR6" :GOT02j3j3 
185 IF C=-18THENDRAW"BR2RBR9 11 : GO 

19^ IFC=-2^iTHENDRAW"BR2R2D2G2E4B 

R7 11 :GOT02j3j3 

195 DRAWL$(C) 

200 NEXTI:B=B+14: RETURN 

205 I FNT= 1 THENRETURN 

210 FORII = lTOLEN(AA$) 

215 IF PEEK( YY) AND 128=j3 THEN215 

220 POKEYY,ASC(MID$(AA$,II,l) ) 

225 NEXTII 

23)3 IFPEEK( YY) AND12 8=j3THEN2 3j2 

23 5 POKEY Y, 13 

2 4j3 FORHH=1TO6J21 J 0:NEXTHH: RETURN 

24 5 RETURN 

250 DATA U6E2R2F2D2NL4D4BR6 ,U8R4 

F2G2NL4F2G2NL4BR8 , U8R6ND2BD8NU2N 

L6BR6 / U8R4F2D4G2NL4BR8 / U8NR4D4NR 

4D4R4BR6,U8NR4D4NR4D4BRlj3,U8R6BD 

4NL2D4NL4BR6 ,U4NU4R6U4D8BR6 

255 DATA R2U8L2R4L2 D8R2BR2 , NU4R4 

U8L4R6BD8BR6 , U8D4R2NE4F4BR6 , NU8R 

4BR6,U8F3ND2E3D8BR6,U8F6NU6D2BR6 

,U8R6D8NL6BR6,U8R6D4L6D4BR12 ,U8R 

6D8NL6NH4NF2BR6 

260 DATA U8R6D4L4F4BR6 , R6U4L6U4R 
6BD8BR6 , BR4U8L4R8BD8BR6 , NU8R6NU8 
BR6 , BU8D4F4E4U4BD8BR6 , NU8R4NU6R4 
NU8BR6,E8G4H4F8BR6,BU8D2F4ND2E4U 
2BD8BR6 , NR8E8NL8BD8BR6 
2 65 GOT02 7J3 

270 PMODE4 , 1 : PC LSI : SCREEN1 , 1: PMO 
DE3 

275 LINE (,0 , J3) - (2 56 , 92 ) , PRESET, BF 
28j3 DRAW ,f BMlj3, 16" :F0RI=1T013 : GOS 
UB495: PAINT (4+ (1*18) ,12) , 3,3:NEX 
T 

285 DRAW 11 BM 2 , 34 " : F0RI = 1T014 : GOSU 
B49 5: PAINT ( (1*18) -6,28) , 3 , 3 : NEXT 
2 90 DRAW 11 BM4 , 52 " : F0RI=1T011 : GOSU 
B49 5: PAINT ( (1*18) -2 , 42) , 3 , 3 : NEXT 
:DRAW !f C4U14R3 2D14NL3 2BR4 !f : PAINT ( 
(1*18) -2 , 42) , 4 , 4 :GOSUB49 5: PAINT ( 
2 4 2,42) , 3 , 3 : PAINT (24 2, 42) ,4,1 
295 DRAW 11 BM4 , 7j3U14R2 8D14NL2 8BR4 !f 
: FORI=lT01j3 : GOSUB4 9 5 : PAINT ( (1*18 
) +6 , 60) , 3 , 3 : NEXT: DRAW !f U14R2 8D14L 
2 8": PAINT ( (1*18) +6 , 60) , 3 , 3 : PAINT 



(2 36, 60) , 3 , 3:PAINT(2 3 6, 6j3) ,4,1 

300 PAINT (24, 60), 4,1: PAINT (10,3 2 

) ,4,1: PAINT (10, 48) , 4 , 1 : PAINT (2 4 8 

,32) ,4,1: PAINT (2 18, 32) ,4,1 

305 CL=1 : A=6 : FORF=1TO10 : READJK$ : 

A=A+18 : B=3 2 : GOSUB14 5 : NEXT 

310 DATA Q,W,E ,R,T, Y,U, I ,0, P 

315 A=8:F0RF=1T09:READJK$: A=A+18 

: B=50 :GOSUB14 5 :NEXT 

32J3 DATA A , S , D, F , G , H, J , K, L 

32 5 A=2 2 : F0RF=1T07 : READJK$ : A=A+1 

8:B=68:GOSUB14 5 : NEXT 

33J3 DATA Z , X, C , V, B , N , M 

335 COLORl,4:LINE(6J3, 74) -(196,88 

) , PRESET, BF 

340 PAINT(236,6) ,2,1 

345 PM0DE4 : DRAW 11 C0BM12 , 4 8NE3NH3U 

8BUlj3BL2U8NF3G3 !f 

350 PMODE 4 : DRAW 11 BM 6 , 6 4 C|J " :F0RI = 1 
T02 : DRAW !f R4U2L4U2R4BR2D4U2R4U2D4 
BR4U4BR4ND4NR2D2NR2U2BR4R2ND4R2B 
D4BR186 11 : NEXT 

355 DRAW"BM204 , 4 6CJ3NR4U2NR4U2R4B 

R2ND4F4U4BR2R2ND4R2BR2NR4D2NR4D2 

R4BR2U4R4D2L4R2F2BR10NR2U4R2BR4D 

4NR2BU2j3NH2NG2L8BLlj3L8NE2NF2 !f 

36j3 PMODE 3 : DRAW H C1BD7BL14L2H2U6E 

2R4F2D4G2L2H2U4R2BG14BL2BDD2NR2N 



TIMESAVERS 



IJIIJlltSl iliilit^l DUIiitSi 



★ In line Stand alone 

★ 64K Expandable to 128K 

★ Self powered 

★ Centronics cable incl. 

★ 5 Year Limited Warrantee 
Reg $149 




SjtitiBhk dtf ^^^^ jflyyyy 
S4p«9w (3) 



80 Track 3Y2 Drive 



★ 3 1 /2" in 5% Frame (fits a 

★ Double Sided Double Density 

★ 720 K Formatted Capacity 

★ Mnfg by Teac 

★ Ready for OS-9 ll/MSDOS 3.3 
Reg. $249 

Horizontal case w/power $49 
with drive purchase, 




only $139(6) 



Polygon Computers Tel (21 3) 483-4406 

P.O. Box 65905 Visa/Mastercard 
Los Angeles, CA 90065 M.O. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 95 



L2D2BD2DBD2DG2 " 

365 DRAWBL19BD5G3F3BLBD2D2G2BR1 
8BUU2BU3E3H3BR16R4D2L2D2BD2DBD5E 
4 

370 PM0DE3 : DRAWBM18 , 15C1U5NGBU2 
UBU2U2BR14ND2 BR4D2BD4NL4D3L4D3R4 
BR14R4U3NL2U3L4BU2U2NL2NR6U2NL2N 
U2R6L2U2D6BR14R4U3L4U3R4L2NU2D8B 
L3D4R8U4D6" 

375 DRAW"BR12R4U3L4U3R4BU3NEBL4E 

4BL4 LBR18R3 DG2 DR4H4 BD7NR4D6R4U4N 

L4BU2BR14R6M-4,+6BU10U2BR20BUG2D 

F2BD2BL2R4D3L4U3D6R4NU3BR14R4U3L 

4U3R4ND3BU2BL2E2UH2BR14BD7D6NE4B 

RR4U6NL4BR14BD2NRBD2NRBU8NE2NH2N 

F2NG2NU2ND2BR16BDR4 BU2 L4BD8R4C4B 

R14U6NL2R4D3NL4D3NL6BR4U6 

380 REM 

385 F0RI=1T02 6:READA(I,1) ,A(I,2) 

:G$ (I)=CHR$ (1+64) : NEXT 

390 FORJ=1TO100:READSP$(J) ,PR$(J 

) : IFSP$ (J) ="END"THEN400 
395 NEXT J 
400 J=J-1 

405 PC0PY1T05:PC0PY2T06:PC0PY1T0 

7:PCOPY2T08 

410 F0RI=1T0J 

415 K(I)=RND(J) :IFL(K(I) )=1THEN4 
15 

420 L(K(I) )=1:NEXTI 

425 LINE(0, 96) -(256, 134) , PRESET, 

B:JK$=" PRESS THESE CHARACTERS 

ON YOUR KEYBOARD. " :A=0:B=112 : 
CL=2 :GOSUB140 

430 AA$=" PRESS THESE KARRECTERS 
ON YOUR KEY BOARD. YOUR WORD IS" 
:GOSUB205 

435 COLORl,4:PMODE4,l:SCREENl,l: 
PMODE3:FORY=lTOJ:AA$=PR$ (K ( Y) ) :C 
OLOR1, 4: LINE (0,150) -(256, 192) , PR 
ESET, BF: GOSUB205 : FORJK=1TO400 : NE 
XTJK : GOSUB2 05 : A=4 

440 QW=LEN(SP$ (K(Y) ) ) :FORI=lTOQW 
: LINE (26*1-4, 150) -(2 6*1-2 6, 174) , 
PSET,B:NEXTI:FORI=lTOQW: Z$=MID$ ( 
SP$(K(Y) ) ,1,1) :Z=ASC(Z$) -64:PMOD 
E3,5:LINE(A(Z,1) ,A(Z,2))-(A(Z,1) 
+14,A(Z,2)+14) ,PSET,BF 
445 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=CHR$(3)THEN44 
5 

450 PCOPY5T01 : PCOPY6T02 

455 IFX$=CHR$ (92) THEN515 

460 PCOPY7T01:PCOPY8T02 

465 IFX$=G$ ( Z ) THEN4 7 5ELSEIFX$=" " 

THEN445 

470 F0RJL=1T06:PM0DE4,1:SCREEN1, 
0 : FORJK=1TO90 : NEXTJK : SCREEN1 , 1 : F 
0RJK=1T09 0 : NEXTJK , JL : NW=NW+1 : GOT 



0445 

475 PCOPY7T05:PCOPY8T06 

480 PM0DE3 , 1 : AA$=Z$ : B=170 : CL=3 : D 

RAW"BM"+STR$ (A) +" , "+STR$ ( B) +"S8C 

3 " +L$ ( Z ) + " S 4 " : A=A+2 6 : NR=NR+1 : AA$ 

=G$ ( Z ) : GOSUB205 : NEXTI 

485 AA$=PR$ (K ( Y) ) : GOSUB205 : FORJK 

=1TO30 0 : NEXTJK : G0SUB2 0 5 : NEXTY 

490 FORWW=1TO500:NEXT:GOTO515 

495 DRAW"C3U14R14D14NL14BR4" :RET 

URN 

500 DATA22 ,38, 108,56,72,56,58,38 
,56,20,76,3 8,94,3 8,112,3 8,146,20 
, 130, 38 , 148 , 38 

505 DATA166, 38, 144,56, 126,56,164 
,20, 182, 20, 20, 20, 74, 20, 40, 38, 92, 
20,128,20 

510 DATA90,56,38,20,54,56,110,20 
,36,56 

515 CLS : PRINT @ 10 1 , " YOU TRIED"NR+ 
NW"TIMES AND" : PRINT@165 , "ANSWERE 
D"NR" CORRECTLY" 

520 PRINT@22 9 , "WHILE DOING"NW"WR 
ONG . " 

525 NQ=NR+NW: IFNQ=0THEN NQ=1 

530 MS=INT(NR/NQ*100) 

535 PRINT@2 9 3 , "YOUR SCORE IS"MS" 

3r 

540 PRINT@357, "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N/ 

c) ?"; 

545 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THENRUN 

550 IFX$="N"THENCLS : END 

555 IFX$="C"THENPM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 

,l:PMODE3:GOT044 5 

560 GOT0545 

1000 DATA SURVIVOR, SER VI VOR 
1010 DATA LUCKY, LUCKY 
1020 DATA RAINBOW, RAYN BOW 
1030 DATA CHOCOLATE, CHAUK O LET 
1040 DATA DANGEROUS , DAYN JUR US 
1050 DATA HAMBURGER , HAMBURGUR 
1060 DATA DEPARTMENT, DEPARTMENT 
1070 DATA NATIONAL, NASHUNN EL 
1080 DATA RECOVERY, RE CUVVERY 
1090 DATA PROJECTION, PRO JECKSHU 
N 

5000 DATA END, END ^€<\ 




96 THE RAINBOW August 1987 




TIP 

MM 

aspll mm b 

9 H BB 

JL v# 



1 ~W""1 

bb gas ssy wsy bsb hst ^BBSSk h» ^^^w a S B^^ sg i Hff sbb 

IBB BBS yflffi ^^^^^JDDB ^nff BBSS BBB 

bqsss saasas !MP ig^stl salst SIPS ! ^ff™^^ BW SiSSI a 999999 sasaas 

H B U w UL D n H B 








By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 




his month's program is geared to 
preschoolers and children in 
early primary school. It is a 
review of the numbers 1 through 9. We 
are aiming at reinforcing which number 
comes before and after each of these 
numbers. I n the beginning, children will 
no doubt need some adult assistance to 
read the directions. However, after they 
have played the game for a while, many 
will probably be able to proceed inde- 
pendently. 

There is no scoring or true end to this 
program. We feel it is pointless to give 
a child this young a numerical score. 
Frequent graphics and musical rewards 
are more appropriate f or this age group. 
After any example, the child may either 
press the ENTER key to go on or the E 
key to end the program. 

There is little pressure when incorrect 
answers are given. Nothing at all 
happens if any of the letter keys are 
pressed. A short sound is heard if a 
wrong number is pressed. The child can 
make as many attempts as he needs to 
get the correct answer. 

The program only proceeds when a 

Sieve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York, 



correct response is made. A pleasant 
tune is played and graphics are drawn 
on the screen. The graphics are random 
figures of a triangle, circle and square. 
This adds an extra dimension to the 
program; the three figures are often 
learned at about the same age as these 
numbers are studied. 

Reinforcement is therefore only for 
positive answers. This is in keeping with 
our longstanding policy of presenting 
no discouraging feedback to the very 
young child. We only want them to have 
positive feelings toward their comput- 
ers. Early experiences and feelings may 
certainly carry over to later ages. We 
want no child to "turn-off" to comput- 
ers at any age, least of all at an early age. 

The program begins by executing a 
GOSUB to Line 390. Lines 400 through 
650 read the strings to draw the letters 
and numbers that are needed. The 
program then returns to lines 40 
through 90, which set up the high 
resolution screen and print the words 
"Which Number Comes." Line J JO 
decides whether the question will read 
"Before" or "After." Either of these 
words then becomes 00$ on Line 140. 
Line 150 prints the number in question 
as Z$. 

The number we are looking f or is the 
variable R> If the word "Before" was 
selected, then R=R-1. Similarly, if the 
word "After" was selected, then R=R+1. 



Lines 120 through 130 take care of this 
job. 

Lines 160 through 270 draw a ran- 
dom triangle, circle and square. This is 
done to both reinforce learning these 
three shapes and to add some more 
pizazz to the program. We have found 
that it is a good idea to add as much 
color, sound and interest as possible to 
programs targeted for early childhood 
or preschool youngsters. They can often 
be distracted away from the computer: 
An extra graphic here and there never 
hurts in holding their attention. 

Lines 280 through 330 get and eval- 
uate the child's answer. If correct, the 
graphics appear and a happy tune is 
played. If an incorrect number is 
pressed, a short tune is played. After a 
correct response, the child is prompted 
to press ENTER, Only by pressing ENTER 
will another example be displayed. The 
program will end if the E key is pressed. 

Please feel free to alter this program 
to suit your needs. One suggestion is to 
change the three geometric figures used 
if your child or class tires of them. 
Another fairly easy modification would 
be to alter the program f or the numbers 
from 10 to 99. 

We at Computer Island hope your 
youngster learns a little and has fun 
playing with this program. As always, 
we enjoy hearing about your experien- 
ces with our programs. □ 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 97 



The listing: NUMREVUE 

10 REM" NUMBER REVIEW" 

20 REM 11 STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 

D, STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1987 

30 CLEAR 2000 :QT=RND( -TIMER) :GOS 

UB 390:R=RND(8) 

40 PMODE 3 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 1,1 

50 COLOR 6:LINE(55,3)-(200,25) ,P 

SET, B: LINE (50,0) -(205,28) ,PSET,B 

: PAINT (52, 2) ,6,6 

60 DRAW"C7A2S12BM80, 5 "+N$+U$+M$+ 
B$+E$+R$+S$ 

70 DRAW"C0A2S8BM20 , 40"+W$+H$+I$+ 
C$+H$ 

80 DRAW" BM 110 , 40 "+N$+U$+M$+B$+E$ 
+R$ 

90 DRAW n BM210,40"+C$+O$+M$+E$+S$ 
100 IF R=l THEN Z$=N1$ ELSE IF R 
=2 THEN Z$=N2$ ELSE IF R=3 THEN 
Z$=N3$ ELSE IF R=4 THEN Z$=N4$ E 
LSE IF R=5 THEN Z$=N5$ ELSE IF R 
=6 THEN Z$=N6$ ELSE IF R=7 THEN 
Z$=N7$ ELSE Z$=N8$ 
110 A=RND ( 2 ) 

120 IF A=l THEN QQ$=A$+F$+T$+E$+ 
R$:R=R+1 

130 IF A=2 THEN QQ$=B$+E$+F$+0$+ 

R$+E$:R=R-1 

140 DRAW"BM60,70"+QQ$ 

150 DRAW n C7BM150,70 n +Z$:GOTO 280 

160 REM 11 DRAW A TRIANGLE" 

170 LINE(0,90)-(255,92) ,PSET,BF: 

LINE(0,176)-(255,178) ,PSET,BF 

180 B=RND(150) : B1=100+RND ( 10 ) 

190 C=50+RND(100) : C1=110+RND (50 ) 

200 D=RND(50) :D1=100+RND(40) 

210 LINE(B,B1)-(C,C1) ,PSET 

220 LINE-(D,D1) , PSET : LINE- ( B , Bl ) 

,PSET 

230 REM" DRAW A SQUARE" 

240 LINE(C+50,Cl+20) -(C+100,Cl-2 

0) ,PSET,BF 

250 REM "DRAW A CIRCLE" 

2 60 CIRCLE (C+RND (20) , Bl+20+RND(2 

0) ) ,3+RND(15) 

270 PAINT (0,93) ,8, 7: RETURN 

280 EN$=INKEY$ 

290 IF EN$="" THEN 280 

300 IF ASC(EN$)>57 OR ASC(EN$)<4 

8 THEN 2 80 

310 IF EN$="" THEN 280 

320 IF VAL(EN$)=R THEN 330 ELSE 

PLAY "AAA" : GOTO 280 

330 PLAY"L100O4CEGCEGBAGFDC" : GOS 
UB 160 

340 COLOR8 :DRAW"BM50, 180"+P$+R$+ 
E$+S$+S$+SP$ 



98 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



350 DRAW+SP$+SP$+E$+N$+T$+E$+R$ 
360 AN$=INKEY$ 

370 IF AN$=CHR$(13) THEN RUN ELS 

E IF EN$="E" THEN 380 ELSE 360 
380 CLS : END 

3 90 REM"HERE ARE THE STRINGS FOR 

THE LETTERS AND NUMBERS 
400 A$="BEHUNU2R4NU2DGL2BGBL6" 
410 B$ = "BEHENR3HER3 D4L3BGBL6 " 
420 C$="BU4ER2FD2GL2HBG2BL4 " 
430 E$="BER3U2NL2U2L4BG5BL2" 
440 F$="BUR4U2NL3U2BG5BL5" 
450 H$="BUU2NU2R4NU2D2BGBL9" 
460 I$="BR2BUU4BU2BD7BL8" 
470 M$="BUNU4E2F2U4BG5BL5" 
480 N$="BUU4F4U4BG5BL5" 
490 0$="BEHU2ER2FD2GL2BGBL6 " 
500 P$="BER3U2NU2L3GNFBG2BL4" 
510 R$="BEHERNH2R2NU2D2L3BGBL6" 
520 S$="BU2FR2EHL2HER2FBG4BL6 " 
530 T$="BUR2NU4R2BDBL10" 
540 U$="BUU3ER2FD3BGBL9" 
550 W$="BUU4F2E2D4BGBL9" 
560 N1$="BE2NU3DEBFBGBL9 " 
570 N2 $ = "BENR3HER3U2L4BG5BL" 
580 N3 $ = "BENR3HENR2HER3BG5BL5 " 
590 N4$="BENU4E3L4BG4BL2" 
600 N5$="BER4U2L3HER3BG5BL5" 
610 N6$="BU2FR2EU2NHGL2HER2BG5BL 
4" 

620 N7$="BUNR4UE3BG5BL4" 
630 N8 $=" BER2 EHEHL2 GFNR2 GFBGBL6 " 
640 SP$="BE4BUBG5BL5" 1 ***SPACER 
650 RETURN _ 



Hint . . . 

Solves Printer Predicament 

For some time, my 3-year-old Gemini 10X has been 
shoving the ribbon up above the pins, thereby printing 
several blank spaces. To correct the problem, I had 
been holding the ribbon in place with a pencil on either 
side of the print head. On a recent visit, my son was 
able to help me out of this predicament (a welcome 
relief, as holding the ribbon manually was a real pain 
in the back). 

He carefully removed the printer head and pointed 
out the large amount of dried ink stuck under the 
plate. After removing the offending material, he 
replaced the head and the printer works great. If your 
printer has these symptoms, you might want to try this 
procedure. Just be very careful when working with the 
small print head parts — new heads are still somewhat 
expensive. 

Douglas C. Shelton 
Little Rock, AR 

i 



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Each month, your friends will 
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First, your gift will be an- 
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Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
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Give a rainbow gift certificate 
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ISSUE #2, AUGUST 1982 

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ISSUE #4, OCTOBER 1982 

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ISSUE #5, NOVEMBER 1982 

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ISSUE #7, JANUARY 1983 

NEW YEARS COVER 
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ISSUE #8, FEBRUARY 1983 

COVER 8 
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ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

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ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 

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ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 

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ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 

TWELFTH COVER 
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ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 

THIRTEENTH COVER 
FLASH CARD 
ICE BLOCK 
COSMIC FORTRESS 
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SDSK COPY 
MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 
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ISSUE #14, AUGUST 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
ROW BOAT 

COMPUTER TUTLPT.1 
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TEST SCREEN PRINT 
HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 

ISSUE #15, SEPTEMBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER PT. 2 
GOLD VALUES 
TREK INSTRUCTIONS 
TREK 

HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 
ASTRO DODGE 
DR. COCO 
PEG JUMP 
MORSE CODE 
PURGE UTILITY 

ISSUE #16, OCTOBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
BOPOTRON 
DIRECTORY RECALL 
VECTORGRAPHICSINST. 
VECTOR GRAPHICS 
SKYDIVER 

SWERVE AND DODGE 
NIMBO BATTLE 
TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 
LIFE GENERATIONS 

ISSUE #17, NOVEMBER 1983 

THANKSGIVING COVER 

3-DTIC-TAC-TOE 

INDY500 

COLLEGE ADVENTURE 
MEMORY GAME 
DUNGEON MASTER 
WEATHER FORECASTER 
GRID FACTOR INST. 
GRID FACTOR 
DRAW 

ISSUE #18, DECEMBER 1983 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
CLIMBER 

GALACTIC CONQUEST 
WARLORDS 
STATES REVIEW 
MATH TUTOR 

MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 
PRINTER UTILITY INST. 
PRINTER UTILITY 
MUTANTWAFFLES 



ISSUE #19, JANUARY 1984 

BANNER 
PROBE 

DISK DIRECTORY PROTECTOR 
OPTICAL CONFUSION 
WORD PROCESSOR 
WORD SEARCH 
ASTRONAUT RESCUE 
STAR TRAP 
PIE CHART 
FORCE FIELD 

ISSUE #20, FEBRUARY 1984 

INTRODUCTION: 
HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 
ESCAPE ADVENTURE 
SEEKERS 
MASTER BRAIN 
LIST CONTROLLER 
DISKETTE CERTIFIER 
ROM COPY 
BASIC RAM 
SNAFUS 

ISSUE #21, MARCH 1984 

BASIC CONVERSIONS 
FINANCIAL ADVISE 
CASTLE STORM 
DOS HEAD CLEANER 
COCO TERMINAL 
SNAKE CRAWLER 
WAR CASTLE 
SKY FIRE 
EASY BASIC 
DOTS 3-D 

ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 

HEALTH HINTS 
GLIBLIBS 

CLOTHER SLITHER 
BIBLE 1 & 2 
BIBLE 3 & 4 
CATCHALL 
INVADER 
ALIEN RAID 
MOON ROVER 
IO ERROR IGNORER 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 
STOCKS OR BOMBS 
WALL AROUND 
COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 1 
NUCLEAR WAR INST 
THERMONUCLEAR WAR 
CIRCUIT DRAWER 
MOUSE RACES 
SUPER-SQUEEZE 
DATA FALL 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 

DIR PACK & SORT 
BRICK OUT 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 2 

USA SLIDE PUZZLE 

51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 

51 '24 SCREEN 

CITY INVADERS 

PRINTER SPOOLER 

STEPS 

SNAKE 



ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 3 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEY MAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDITOR INST. 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLE BUSTER 
RECOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUGUST 1984 

PEEK, POLE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 
O-TEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
COCO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

ISSUE #27, SEPTEMBER 1984 

COCO TO COM 64 

GALACTIC SMUGGLER 

INDYRACE 

ACCOUNT MANAGER 

CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 

STRING RACKING TUTORIAL 

SR*CE DUEL 

BUGS 

TRAP-BALL 

BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCTOBER 1984 

HANGING TREE 
CHECKERS 
FOOTBALL + 
MORE PEEKS, POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RAT ATTACK 

ISSUE #29, NOVEMBER 1984 

DISK ROLL OUT 
ROBOT ON 
MULTIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
QUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 

ISSUE #30, DECEMBER 1984 

MATH HELP 
ZECTOR ADVENTURE 
WORLD CONQUEST 
DRAG RACE 
MINE FIELD 
T-NOTES TUTORIAL 
T&D PROGRAM INDEXER 
SYSTEM STATUS 
ERROR TRAP 
DROLL ATTACK 




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ISSUE #31, JANUARY 1985 

TREASURES OF BARSOOM 
BATTLE GROUND 

STRUCTURED COMPILED LANGUAGE 
LIBRARY MODULE 
MINIATURE GOLF 
STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEBRUARY 1985 

DR. SIGMUND 
ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 
LOTTERY ANALYST 
BASIC COMPILER 
MUSIC CREATOR 
MEANIE PATROL 
TRI-COLOR CARDS 
SHAPE RECOGNITION 
DISK BACKUP 
SPACE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MARCH 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 
PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
ML DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 
DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEED KEY 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

HOVER TANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSIC GENERATOR 
FYR-DRACA 
DRIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, WAY 1985 

SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 
SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
HAUNTED HOUSE 

ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 

SELECTAGAME2 
VIDEO COMPUTIZER 
SPEECH SYNTHESIS 
SPEECH RECOGNITION 
SPACE LAB 
AUTO COMMAND 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 
KNIGHT AND THE LABYRINTH 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 



ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 

CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE 5*7 

SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 
FILE TRANSFER 
FOUR IN A ROW 
MARSHY 

TAPE CONTROLLER 
CATACOMB 
AUTO TALK 
SGR8PAK 

ISSUE #38, AUGUST 1985 

GOLF PAR 3 
WIZARD ADVENTURE 
KITE DESIGN 
ROBOTS 
GOMOKU 

AMULET OF POWER 
LINE COPY UTILITY 
DISK PLUMBER 
SUPER RAM CHECKER 
GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPTEMBER 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
CAR MANAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHINE 
ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 
SUPER VADERS 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

ISSUE #40, OCTOBER 1985 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
COCO-WAR 
DISK LABELER 
SHIP WAR 
ELECTRIC COST 
MULTIKEY BUFFER 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
SAND ROVER 

ISSUE #41, NOVEMBER 1985 

GRUMPS 

DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 
SOLAR CONQUEST 
GAS COST 

RIME WORLD MISSION 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 
GRAPHIC TEXT 
GRAPHIC LOOPY 
BOLD PRINT 

ISSUE #42, DECEMBER 1985 

HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAHTZEE 
DISK UTILITY 
MACH II 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
SLOT MACHINE GIVEAWAY 
TEXT BUFFER 
TUNNEL RUN 



ISSUE #43, JANUARY 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER COST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 
KEYPAD ENTRY 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEBRUARY 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 

ISSUE #45, MARCH 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT. 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COLOKEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
LIBERTY SHIP 
SINGLE STEP RUN 

ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DISK LOCK 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 

BOMB RUN 

TANKS 

TAR PITS 

BASEBALL 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

ROULETTE 

GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFF. 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
TV SCHEDULE 
BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTI COPY 
AUTO MATE 
SCROLL PROTECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 



ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 
DISK DISASSEMBLER 
BAKCHEK 
PACHINKO 
STOCK CHARTING 
HAUNTED STAIRCASE 
CANYON BOMBERS 
DRAGONS 1 & 2 
GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 
AUTO BORDER 

ISSUE #50, AUGUST 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPTEMBER 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET 51 
VAN GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 

ISSUE #52, OCTOBER 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 
INVASION 

THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOTRACE 
FLIPPYTHE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS 
SUPER ERROR 2 

ISSUE #53, NOVEMBER 1986 

CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CAVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DECEMBER 1986 

JOB LOG 
PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TYPE 
PANZER TANKS 
MRS PAC 
BIG NUM 



ISSUE #55, JANUARY 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
DIR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEBRUARY 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRASH 
GALACTA 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EDITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 

ISSUE #57, MARCH 1987 

THE BAKERY 
ENCHANTED VALLEY ADV, 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR 1 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 

ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 
PLANT CARE 
CHECK WRITING 
HELI RESCUE 
KABOOM 
NEW PONG 
CROQUET 
SUPER MONOPOLY 
ZOOM UTILITY 
ELECTRONICS II 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
CATCH A CAKE 
CONCENTRATION II 
PROGRAMMABLE ROBOTS 
CT ADVENTURE 
MOTORCYCLING 
STAR EXPLORER 
ELECTRONICS III 
GRAPHICS EDITOR 
GRAPHICS UTILITY 



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The Battle Line Is Being 

Drawn 



Since it started in September 1985, 
the CoCo SIG has steadily grown 
to become one of the largest and 
busiest SIGs on Delphi. While the SIG 
staff certainly deserves a lot of credit, 
the SIG members themselves are the 
most important reason for this growth. 
To a large extent, we have tried to mold 
the CoCo SIG in a fashion that would 
be of most service to its members. We 
are now introducing a new aspect to the 
SIG, which will greatly enhance its 
information value. 

Beginning in the month of August, 
members of the CoCo SIG will be 
allowed to participate in what is called 
Battle Line. Each month, a subject will 
be chosen and SIG members are invited 
to share their views on that subject. We 
will offer conferences that may well turn 
into controversial debates, and all are 
invited to attend. These conferences will 
be looked upon as a no-holds-barred 
opportunity for everyone to express 
their viewpoints. In addition, through- 
out each month, polls will be posted in 
the Polls section and the Forum will be 
used by members to express their views. 
At the end of each month, all Polls, 
Forum messages and conferences re- 
lated to the Battle Line subject will be 
archived in the database for later pe- 
rusal by members. The OS-9 Online 
SIG will also be running Battle Line and 
may or may not be discussing the same 
subject as the CoCo SIG. 



Cray Augsburg is RAJNBOW's technical 
editor and has an associate 's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is CRA Y. 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Editor 

Battle Line will give everyone a 
chance to "get on a soapbox." While we 
will be in charge of picking the topic 
each month, all members are encour- 
aged to suggest ideas for these topics. 
We also expect SIG members to volun- 
teer to lead a conference. When Battle 
Line becomes a big hit, it is very possible 
we will shorten the time devoted to each 
subject. Instead of a month, we might 
discuss a topic f or a week or two weeks. 
This all depends on the reaction of the 
SIG members to Battle Line. 

The Battle Line topic for August has 
not been chosen at the time of this 



seen this past month have been graphics 
related. 



writing, so go ahead and send your 
suggestions to Jim Reed (JIMREED) or 
Marty Goodman (MARTYGOODMAN) 
via Mail or Forum. To suggest topics for 
Battle Line in OS-9 Online, contact Jim 
Reed or Greg Law (GREGL). In the 
interest of letting everybody in on it, we 
do ask that you try to use the Forum as 
much as possible. For more details, 
watch the Forum for messages. 

New Delphi Handbook 

Michael A. Banks (KZIN), SIGop of 
the Science Fiction SIG on Delphi, has 
been fairly busy writing a new manual 



and Saturn, are converted Atari ST pic- 
tures in VEF (VDG Enhanced) format. 



Many users are also interested in con- 
verting their favorite game programs to 
make use of the enhanced capabilities of 
the CoCo 3. One by one, users are upload- 
ing their best games, converted for the 
CoCo 3. 

OS-9 Level II is becoming available in 
most areas around the country, and users 
are hard at work writing patches and 
applications for it. The OS-9 Online SIG 
is busy with contributions from users 
across the country. 



They may be viewed using the Pix program 
that is also in the Graphics topic of the 
database. 

In the Users Group topic, Greg Law 
(GREGL) has posted seven more additions 
to this expanding section of the database. 
New groups include basutil, a package of 
two assembly routines to set the user ID 
number one to return the name of the 
driver that is in use; CHKNG, a checkbook 
program; cat, a UNIX-style file concate- 
nation utility; CB y which reformats C 



DATABASE REPORT 

Following the introduction at RAIN- 
BOWfest of an outstanding graph- 
ics editor, Color Max 3, a lot of 
interest has been focused on generating 
and converting pictures to use with it. For 
instance, many of the Atari ST graphics 
screens can be converted very simply into 
a display format that is compatible with 
the CoCo 3. Many of the uploads we've 



OS-9 Online 

In the Graphics topic area, Toni Ryan 
(TNTRHODAN) sent US BDRAW . AR, a BASIC09 
procedure that demonstrates a mouse 
interface, graphics pointer and menu 
handling. Kevin Darling (kdarling) sent 
us some Level II pictures and a Level II 
picture loader. These two pictures, Pharoh 



102 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



for Delphi over the past six months. The 
new book, DELPHI: The Official 
Guide, is being published by Brady 
Books, a division of Simon and Schus- 
ter. Through Delphi, the 400-page book 
will sell for $19.95 and includes a 
coupon for two free online hours for 
new subscribers. Unfortunately, present 
subscribers will not be able to use this 
coupon. 

DELPHI: The Official Guide is di- 
vided into four major sections. The first 
section, "Getting Started," deals with 
sign-up and logon procedures. The 
second section discusses the menu 
concept and how it is employed on 
Delphi. Also, this section covers the 
system commands, such as SEND and 
/WIDTH, and control characters. The 
third section details each area of Delphi 
and discusses how they can be used. 
Coverage of topics like Mail, the Li- 
brary and SIGs will be included here. 
Rounding out the book is the reference 
section, where various network 
numbers are listed. This section in- 
cludes a glossary of terms and a trou- 
bleshooting guide. 

Polls, Polls and More Polls 

RAINBOW columnist Richard White 

(DICKWHITE), author of "Bits and Bytes 
of BASIC," has been chosen by Jim 
Reed to serve as Polls Manager. Rich- 
ard's duties will include editing new 
polls and archiving old polls to make 
room for new ones in both the CoCo 



SIG and OS-9 Online. And speaking of 
new polls, Richard has just finished 
archiving several old entries, so there is 
plenty of room for you to create a 
survey on those subjects dearest to your 
heart. 

Upcoming Changes 

Delphi has told us that they have 
started "phase two" for the system 
changes in the Database area. Some of 
the more important (and most wished 
for) changes to be made are: 

• Providing a clearer indication be- 
fore a download is initiated of 
whether a particular file is in ASCII 
or binary f ormat (Text vs. Non-Text). 

• Allowing semiautomatic download 
of all files in a given group. This 
change will become more important 
as software writers start allowing the 
use of Kermit on the CoCo. 

• Changing the DOWNLORD option at 
the flCTIDN> menu to allow the user's 
choice of Xmodem, Kermit, buffer 
capture, etc., with this choice remain- 
ing in effect throughout the session 
unless overridden. Delphi also hopes 
to allow a Profile setting for preferred 
download method. 

• Allowing "serialized" downloads 
of programs so that the system will 
send Mail to the owner and down- 
loader registering serial numbers. 
This will be a great boon to shareware 
uploaders. 



programs along the lines of the K&R 
manual; and comm, a smart terminal 
program that saves the input text in a 
buffer and dumps it to a file later. 

In the Applications topic, Sam Johnson 
(SDJ9060) has sent us the cvtnpast utility 
written in BASIC09 for fairly heavy Delphi 
users who like to save, file and reread some 
of the Forum messages they download. 

In the Utilities topic, Kevin Darling has 
given us his SCF Editor Plus for OS-9 
Level II and more of his utilities for Level 
II. Greg Law has posted MOUSE . B09, a 
short BASIC09 program that demonstrates 
the use of Level IPs system calls to support 
a mouse. Greg also provided the file 
compression/ decompression utility called 

AR. 

The Patches topic area was enhanced by 
the addition of bootpatch from Dave 
Philipsen (dphilipsen). This is a short 
script file for patching the OSSBoot mod- 
ule for faster step rates. 

CoCo SIG 

In the General Information topic area, 



Eric Crichlow (diawa) provided a file from 
another person concerning a pirate's 
justification of software theft. Greg Miller 
(gregmiller) then provided his rebuttal 
file. Larry Hess (bobbihess) sent another 
side of the issue in this controversial series, 
called "Piracy - Another View." Greg 
Miller then posted his response. (This 
subject is also being discussed in the 
Forum.) Marty Goodman, M.D. (MARTY- 
GOODMAN) provided another informative 
medical article called "AIDS and You." 
Mike Fischer (MIKE88) provided Combus- 
tion, a text file describing spontaneous 
human combustion. 

In the Source f or 6809 Assemblers topic 
area, Mike Tolbert (mikegt) posted the 
EOT ASM source code for his B00T3.BAS 
utility. B0DT3 is a version of the popular 
utility BOOT, which has been rewritten by 
Mike to support a similar function on the 
CoCo 3. I posted an Assembly Language 
tutorial in response to a user's question 
about how to test for the key combination 

of SHIFT and ENTER. 

Mike Ward (mikeward) posted his 
excellent utility EDTCVT.BIN, which will 



• Increasing the number of possible 
topics allowed in the database. At 
present, all SIGs are limited to 16 
database topics. 

• Allowing users to: 
search by ownername. 
search by date. 

search on more than one topic at 
a time. 

• Allow a DIR NEW command that 
would give a directory of only those 
files in a given topic that have been 
posted since the last time you entered 
the database. 

• Changing SUBMIT to respect the 
prompt mode you are currently 
using. For those who are very familiar 
with SUBMIT, this will greatly reduce 
the amount of time it takes to go 
about your business. 

• Allowing /SEND, 'WHO and MAIL at 
the DBRSES>, RCT I DN> and WS> 
prompts. 

We will try to keep you apprised of 
the situation as these, and other, 
changes take place. In the meantime, 
please bear with the Delphi service 
people as they go about making the 
changes. There may be times during the 
weekdays, for those of you who are on 
during this time, when you will find 
yourself temporarily "locked out" of the 
SIG or Database area. This is a neces- 
sary precaution Delphi must take and, 
when it occurs, rarely poses a problem 
for more than a half hour or so. 



convert edtasm source code files contain- 
ing embedded tabs into standard ASCII 
files. Tab characters are entered into 
edtasm files whenever you use the right 
arrow key to advance to the next field. 
These tabs are stripped by basic and most 
word processors, which can result in 
unusable files for a user. Mike's utility 
cures this problem. 

Roger Krupski (Hardwarehack) pro- 
vided source code for his excellent Morse 
Code Generator utility. Those interested in 
studying for an amateur radio license will 
appreciate Roger's contribution. 

In the Utilities & Applications topic 
area, Glen Hathaway (Hathaway) pro- 
vided T.BIN, a short M/ L program that 
demonstrates horizontal and vertical 
scrolling on the CoCo 3. Roger Bouchard 
(HARBIE) provided his DFIX Fix file for 
converting Steve Bjork's DFIX utility for 
operation with ADOS. Roger also sent us 
a multiple disk formatter utility for those 
with multiple drives. 

Mike Fischer sent us a basic program 
that contains his favorite patches for Disk 
basic. Brian Wright (poltergeist) sent us 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 103 



his ASCII print utility for producing a 
hard copy of text files and his Super DOS 
utility. I provided a cataloger program for 
disk libraries. Charles Pippin (CwP) sent us 
his checkbook program for the CoCo 3. 

In the Games topic area, Stephen Macri 
(dracman) provided his newest game 
called ACEY2C. Jim Pogue (jimpogue) 
provided an interesting Scrabble program, 
and Dave Ferreira (skeeve) provided a 
welcome converted Star Trek program for 
the CoCo 3. 

Tom Chevrette (shazac) gave us an 
outstanding Escape Adventure game that 
contains 29 files and consumes nearly an 
entire disk. The graphics screens in this 
program are very good. Andrew Robinson 
(arobinson) sent us a patch program that 
enables you to play the popular game 
Pitstop II in color when using an RGB 
monitor. Brian Wright gave us two games, 
called Hotel CoCo and CIA Operative. 
Kurt Stecco (highrailer) provided a 
program for booting some CoCo 3 game 
programs in color. 

The Graphics topic area was enriched 
greatly by Greg Miller (gregmiller), who 
provided us with excellent renditions of 
Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny. Both of these 
pictures are very well done, and quite 
colorful as well. Bob Montowski (graph- 
ICSPUB) sent us a fine addition of Snoopy 
and the Red Baron in MGE format. 



Robert Pierce (rpierce) sent us his 
Diddles program, and Mark OTella 

(mdodelphi) provided an XPAD pro- 
gram for the CoCo 3. Also, Bob Wharton 
(BOB WHARTON) sent us his fine collection 
of American League baseball team logos 
for the CoCo 3. Roger Bouchard sent us 
the specifications for the Tiny files, as well 
as his own ST file conversion utilities. 
Roger also sent us five outstanding ST 
pictures that have been converted into the 
MGE format. 

Brian Wright gave us his lengthy file 
called Pinup Bonanza and a Fan Genera- 
tor graphics demo. Eric Crichlow provided 
us with some excellent CoCo 3 graphics, 
including a graphics tribute to Steve Bjork, 
a picture of an Atari ST displaying a 
moving waterfall graphic, some proposed 
title screens for game programs, and an 
excellent animated waterfall demonstra- 
tion. Eric Tilenius (TlLENius) sent us his 
CVLOGO basic program. As you can tell, 
the graphics topic was really busy this 
month! 

The Music & Sound topic of the data- 
base has also been very busy. The largest 
contributor to the Music topic, by far, is 
Bill Starr (wstarr). Bill has graciously 
donated a total of 82 files to date, amount- 
ing to almost 300 kilobytes of music files! 
If you're serious about Orchestra-90/ CC, 
then Delphi is definitely the place for you 



to be! Bill's uploads cover practically every 
type of music, from oldies, country and 
ragtime, to popular, Latin and jazz. 

Gary McCarty (bandman) provided 
several Orchestra files also, including 
Maple Leaf Rag, Easy Winners, Solace, 
and Battle of Shiloh. Bryan Eggers(S0FT- 
affair) provided a text file describing how 
to write music for Orchestra-90. 

The Data Communications topic was 
the scene of much excitement when Rick 
Adams (rickadams) uploaded the long- 
awaited Version 2.0 of Rickeyterm. This 
latest version provides support for the 
standard serial port on the CoCo 3 for 
communications at 300 or 1200 baud. If 
you still want to use an RS-232 pack, 
Rickeyterm will then provide online print- 
er support. Brian Wright gave us a file 
describing how to set up a new Avatex 
1200-baud modem. I provided a short text 
file describing where and how to obtain the 
three most popular CoCo terminal pro- 
grams, namely, Greg-E-Term, Mikey- 
Term, and Rickeyterm. 

As you can see, this past month was a 
busy one for us. User activity was ex- 
tremely high, and the Conference areas of 
the SIGs were always buzzing. We hope 
you'll join us on Delphi soon! 

— Don Hutchison 
Rainbow's Delphi Database Manager 



























— 1 — 
L — i— 
















— 


— 









The Rainbow Introductory Guide to 



i. 




— 




' 




1 ( 1 1 











r 



— > p 



Most people have been using statistics since they learned 
to talk. Statistical results and concepts turn up everywhere. 
A large part of our daily news consists of statistics. Results 
of opinion polls, surveys, research studies, the Dow Jones- 
industrial average and, of course, our sports news are all 
statistics. But statistics are often misused. The informed 
person needs to understand the basic concepts in order to 
judge the appropriateness of applications. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor Dr. Michael Plog and co- 
author Dr. Norman Stenzel have written The Rainbow 
Introductory Guide to Statistics just for beginners. It is an 
easy-to-understand guide.to.this sometimes mysterious area 
of mathematics. Their, aim is to introduce readers to the 
realm of statistical processes and thinking, and they believe, 
that the Tandy Color Computer is an ideal machineTor theV 
reduction of data. " " \ ■': V_ ; 

Sharpen your skills with The Rainbow Introductory 
v Guide to-§tatistics for only $6.95. Included in. the booit is 
the CoCo- Stat program, a -BASIC statistics programjust : far 
the Color Computer, {80-column printer required.) Forget 
the typing hassle by ordering the accompanying Statistics' 
Tape or Disk for only $5.95. Spend your time learning and 
enjoying the new material, not debugging your typing. Just 
pop in the tape or disk and you're ready for acticjn! 



Save when you buy The Rainbow Introductory Guide to 
Statistics book together with the tape or disk. Get both for 
only $11.95. 



ill 



Please send me: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Book $6.95* 

The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk $5.95 
The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Book/ Disk Set $11.95 



Address 
City _ 



□ My check in the amount of . 



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| Name 

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.Stale 



ZIP 



Please charge to my: D VISA 

Accl No. 

Signature 



is enclosed* 

□ MasterCard □ American Express 



Exp. Date 



Mail to: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics. The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059 ' 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 

*Add SI .50 per book for shipping and handling in the U.S. Outside the U.S. add S4 per 
book (U.S. currency •nly). Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. In order to hold down 
costs, wc do not bill. Please allow 6-8 weeks far delivery. 

Note: The tape and disk are not stand-alone products. If you buy either the tape or disk, 
you still need to purchase the book for instructions. 



I 
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104 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



Rootin' Tootin' 

•» ' -«^J ^Vf j\l Mi ./J *' * .1*0, J*' •'^ . 

Sharpshootin' CoCo 



By Albeit P. Marsh 





eady for a great new game for 
the CoCo 3? Shoot 'n Range is 
a fast-paced action/ strategy 
game that takes full advantage of the 
CoCo 3's possiblities. 

In this game, you are developing your 
snapshooting ability at the local, offi- 
cial practice range. Armed with the 
most advanced push-button-activated 
solar laser gun, you are determined to 
shoot as many happy-faced targets as 
you can. With just one touch of the 
trigger, you can take revenge on those 
optimistic androids. 

Of course, this man versus machine 
battle is not all that easy. In order to 
continue using the shooting range, you 
must keep your hit/ miss percentage 
above 50 percent. Every shot costs you 
a certain amount of energy, determined 
by you (check the power gauge on the 
right side of your tracking monitor). 
Also, because of the new solar cycle bill 
passed by Congress, your gun will only 
re-energize every 10 rounds of play. So 
pick up that gun, aim carefully and fry 
some silicon. 

Shoot 'n Range requires a CoCo 3 and 
will work with any type of color display. 
You control the horizontal movement 
of the gun, along with the power 
amount, by using the right mouse/ 
joystick. Use either button to fire the 
laser. 

Enter the listing carefully then save 
and run it. As soon as the program 
starts, you see a screen prompting you 
to enter the display type you are using. 
If you are using an RGB monitor, such 
as the CM-8, press the I key on the 
keyboard. If you are using a television 
or composite monitor, press the 2 key. 

After a short delay, a title screen 
appears. Press any key except BRK/ESC 
to continue the program. The next thing 
you should see is the playing field. 
Across the top, your score, hit/ miss 
percentage and the gun's power level are 

Albert Marsh is a sophomore at Ante- 
lope Valley Adventist School. He 
started programming in 1982 on an 
Apple II and has been interested in all 
types of computers ever since. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 



105 



Come to Radio Shack for the \fery 



What a selection! 

At Radio Shack, we're dedicated 
to making sure that you never run 
out of ways to use and enjoy your 
Color Computer. We've got a ter- 
rific line of software — here's just 
a sample! 

Games for the whole family 

Let your Color Computer open 
the door to an amazing world of fun 
and adventure. Radio Shack has a 
dazzling selection of popular and 
challenging games. 

Explore a secret cave, collecting 
keys, gold and diamonds in 
Downland, Challenge awesome 
beasts to reach your ultimate 
opponent — the evil wizard — in 



Dungeons of Daggorath. Avoid 
steam vents, fireballs, bullets and 
the Great White Bat in Cave 
Walker. Take part in a daring raid to 
claim the Ancient's exotic technol- 
ogy in Koronis Rift. Or enter the 
world of Rogue, an ever-changing 
game of magic and hidden perils. 

Take off into the wild blue yonder 
with Flight Simulator I to learn the 
basics of aviation skill — instrument 
recognition, take-off and landing re- 
quirements and more. Get down 
on the basepaths with Color 
Baseball — it plays just like the 
real game! Or get into role-playing 
secret agent action with the 
Interbank Incident and recover a 
stolen codebook for a satellite. 



Make learning fun 

One of the most valuable poten- 
tials of your Color Computer is giv- 
ing your children a head start in 
education. We've got programs for 
kids of all ages that will give them 
hours of productive fun. 

Younger children will learn with 
Color Math — older kids will enjoy 
developing logical problem-solving 
skills with Robot Odyssey, which ex- 
plores the concepts of electronic 
circuitry, circuit design and logic. 
And there are also entertaining 
teaching programs featuring popu- 
lar Disney characters like Winnie 
the Pooh, Mickey Mouse and 
Donald Duck. You'll find programs 
that develop hundreds of skills. 



Best in Color Computer Software 



Get the power of OS-9 

Step up to a whole new world of 
power with the OS-9 operating sys- 
tem. OS-9 lets you access the entire 
memory of the 64K Extended 
BASIC Color Computer. OS-9 
Level II supports 512K and dual- 
speed operation. We also support 
OS-9 with programming languages 
like BASIC-09, PASCAL-09, D.L. 
LOGO and C Compiler. 

Boost your productivity 

No matter what your personal 
needs, we've got programs that'll 
put your Color Computer to work 
where you need it most. 

Spreadsheet analysis? Choose 
from Spectaculator™ or Dynacalc 



for planning, forecasting and prob- 
lem solving. Word processing? Get 
our easy-to-use SCRIPSIT® or 
TSEDIT and TSWORD for perfect 
letters, manuscripts and reports. 

Get your household budget in or- 
der with Personal Finance II. Chart 
your stock holdings and market 
trends with Investograph. 

And with Color DeskMate® and 
DeskMate 3 you get seven of the 
most popular productivity applica- 
tions — Text, Ledger, Index Cards, 
Paint, Telecom, Calendar and 
Calculator — all on one diskette. 

Need more suggestions? Drop by 
your local Radio Shack today — it's 
your one-stop software center. 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store' 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 




Send me an RSC-1Q Software Guide. 



I 



Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. 88-A-77 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth. TX 76102 

Name 



Address 
City 



Slate 



.ZIP 



Phone 



1 



■ 



Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating 
stores and dealers. Koronis Rift/TM Lucaslilm Ltd. Rogue/TM 
Epyx. Flight Simulator/TM Microsoft Corp. Robot Odyssey/TM 
The Learning Company. OS-9 and BASIC-09/TM Microware and 
Motorola. Dynacalc/TM Computer Systems. 



COPE 2458 PRC "5 POUER 185 




displayed. Your laser pistol is at the 
bottom, and a marker on the right side 
of the screen shows the amount of 
power needed for that shot. 

The targets appear out of the ground. 
Each round completed decreases the 
length of time the targets stay above 
ground. More targets are added every 
five rounds, and the speed slows back 
down again. 

There can be a total of 10 targets on 
the screen. If you get past Level 20, there 
will be 10 targets on the screen, plus two 
that will appear after there is room for 
them. 

Position the gun so it is directly under 
the target you want to hit. By moving 
the power gauge up and down with the 
controller, you can determine how far 
your shot will go. 

Even though you will still hit the 
target, be careful not to overshoot. By 
doing so, you will be wasting power. 
You only start with 5,000 units of 



power, which is increased 
by 3,000, plus 200 times 
the number of rounds 
you completed every 10 
rounds. For example, 
after 10 rounds you re- 
ceive 5,000 units of 
power, after 20, you re- 
ceive 7,000 units, and so 
on. 

The game is over when 
you either run out of 
power or your percentage 
drops below 50 percent. 
You are then asked if you 
would like to play again. 
If you press the BRK/ESC key, you will 
be asked if you want to restart. Answer 
these questions by pressing Y for yes or 
N for no. 

I hope you enjoy playing Shoot 'n 
Range as much as I enjoyed creating it. 
If you have any questions, comments or 
suggestions, please feel free to write. 




Good luck and have fun gaining a 
little revenge on modern technology. 

(Questions about this game can be 
addressed to the author at 38850 Di- 
vision St., Palmdale, CA 93550; phone: 
805-273-4774. Please enclose an SASE 
if a written response is desired.) □ 




J^220 


155 


1390 


86 


400 


208 


1570 


112 


600 


45 


1770 


39 


840 


121 


1940 


196 


1010 


152 


END 


183 


i 1180 . 


34 















The listing: SHOOTN 



1/8 

2/3 

4/3 
5/3 
6/3 



Shoot'n Range 



M copyright (c) 1987 
fer by 

Albert Marsh 

7/3 POKE 65497, J3 

8/3 ON BRK GOTO 1850: ON ERR GOTO 
178/3 

9/3 PALETTE /3 , 11 : PALETTE 1,63 
100 HSCREEN 2 : HCLS J3 
11/3 HCOLOR l:HPRINT(2 , 12) , "ARE Y 
OU USING 1-RGB OR 2-COMPOSITE? 11 
12/3 I$=INKEY$:IF I$="l" THEN MN= 
1 ELSE IF I$="2" THEN MN=2 ELSE 
11/3 f*fU 

13/3 GOSUB 88/3' SET-UP ffi 

14/3 PALETTE RGB: GOSUB 94/3' HGET 

EVERTHING 

15/3 GOSUB 115/3' TITLE CARD 
16/3 GOSUB 124/3' DRAW SCREEN 
17/3 PRC$=" 1 . /3/3 " : SC=/3 : PO=5/3/3/3 : HI= 
1 : AL=1 : T=/3 : M=2 : TT=2 : F=5 J3 : R=l : PI= 



5/3/3/3 

18/3 PALETTE CMP: ON BRK GOTO 168/3 
19/3 GOSUB 154/3' SET LEVEL 
2/3/3 ' MAIN LOOP 

21/3 JA=INT( (JOYSTK(/3) *5)/2) *2: JB 
=JOYSTK(l) *2 

22/3 HPUT(316, JB+4/3) -(32/3, JB+4/3) , 
l,NOT 

23/3 IF JAOX THEN HPUT ( X, 175 ) - (X 
+3, 189) , 1,PSET:X=JA:HPUT(X, 175) - 
(X+3,189) ,8,PSET 

24/3 IF BUTTON (/3)=1 OR BUTTON (1) = 
1 THEN IF PO>/3 THEN GOSUB 3 3/3 
25/3 IF NU>/3 THEN FOR G=l TO NU:T 
(G)=T(G) -1:IF T(G)=/3 THEN GOSUB 
78/3: NEXT G ELSE NEXT G 
26/3 IF NU<M AND TNO<TT THEN IF R 
ND(F)=1 THEN GOSUB 64/3 : TNO=TNO+l 
27/3 HPUT (3 16, JB+4/3) -(32/3, JB+4/3) , 
l,NOT 

28/3 IF NU=/3 AND TNO=>TT THEN 3/3/3 
29/3 GOTO 21/3 

3/3/3 GOSUB 137/3' ADVANCE LEVEL 
31/3 GOTO 21/3 
32/3 ' FIRE SHOT 
33/3 FL=/3: HCOLOR /3 , 2 
34/3 FOR G=l TO NU 

35/3 IF X>X(G) AND X<X(G)+15 THEN 
IF JB+4/3<Y(G)+2/3 THEN FL=1 : FP=G 
3 6/3 NEXT G 

37/3 IF FL=1 THEN Y=Y(FP) ELSE Y= 
JB+4/3 

380 HGET(X,174)-(X,Y) ,9 



108 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



390 HLINE(X,174)-(X,Y) , PSET 

400 PLAY"L255T2 5503V15 ; 1 ; V- ; 2 ; V- 

; 3 ; V- ; 4 ;V- ; 5 ; V- ; 6 ; V- ; 7 ; V- ; 8 ; V- ; 9 
; V- ; 10 ; V- ; 11 ; V- ; 12 11 

410 HPUT(X, 174) - (X,Y) , 9 ,PSET 

42) 3 HCOLOR 5 : HPRINT ( 3 2 , 0 ) , PO 

43) 3 PO=PO-(128-JB) :IF PO<0 THEN 
PO= 0 

44) 3 HCOLOR )3 : HPRINT ( 3 2 , )3 ) , PO 
4 5)3 IF FL=)3 THEN RETURN 

4 6)3 1 HIT TARGET 

47)3 HPUT(X(FP) , Y(FP) ) - (X(FP) +15, 
Y(FP)+16) ,7, PSET 

4 8 0 PLAY "L255T25501V2)3 AV- A V- A V- A 
V-AV-AV-AV-AV-AV-AV-AV-AV-AV-AV- 
AV-AV-AV-AV-AV-A" 

49)3 FOR G=Y(FP) TO Y(FP)+16 
5)3)3 HPUT(X(FP) ,G) - (X ( FP) +15 , Y (FP 
)+16) ,7, PSET 
5'Ij0 NEXT G 

52) 3 FOR G=FP TO NU 

53) 3 X(G)=X(G+1) : Y(G)=Y(G+1) :T(G) 
=T(G+1) 

54) 3 NEXT G 

55) 3 HI=HI+1:NU=NU-1 

56) 3 HCOLOR5 : HPRINT ( 8, 0 ) , SC 

57) 3 HPRINT ( 2 1, )3 ) ,PRC$ 

58) 3 SC=SC+1)3)3 



59)3 IF HI/TT=1 THEN PRC$=" 1 . 00 " 
ELSE PRC$=LEFT$ (STR$ (HI/TT) , 4) 
6)3)3 HCOLOR)3 : HPRINT ( 8 , )3 ) , S C 

61) 3 HPRINT ( 2 1, )3 ) ,PRC$ 

62) 3 RETURN 

63) 3 1 ADD TARGET TO SCREEN 

64) 3 NU=NU+1 

65) 3 FL=)3:X(NU)=INT( (RND(29)3) +1)3) 
/2) *2:Y(NU )=RND( 1)3)3) +4)3 

66) 3 IF NU<2 THEN 710 

67) 3 FOR G=l TO NU-1 

68) 3 IF INT(X(NU)/2)3)=INT(X(G)/2)3 
) AND INT(Y(NU)/2)3) =INT(Y(G)/2)3) 

THEN FL=1 

69) 3 NEXT G 

700 IF FL=1 THEN 65)3 
710 PLAY"L2 55T25503V)3":P=)3 
72)3 FOR G=Y(NU)+16 TO Y(NU) STEP 
-1 

730 HPUT(X(NU) , G) - (X (NU) +15 , Y (NU 
)+16) ,6, PSET 

740 P=P+1 : P$="V"+STR$ (P) +"A" : PLA 
Y P$ 

750 NEXT G 

760 T (NU) =T+RND ( 10 ) : RETURN 
770 ' TAKE TARGET FROM SCREEN 
780 PLAY"L255T25503V17" :P=17 
790 FOR Q=Y (G) TO Y(G)+16 



" I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now, it's time to give BASIC a shot in the arm, with ADOS-3. 
Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your choice, 
with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz (double speed) without having to slow down for 
disk and printer operations? This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation of Ihe 
acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% compatibility with commercial software. After 
customizing ADOS-3 using the provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPR.OM that plugs into 
the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM + burning will cost $15-20; we provide 
information concerning how you can have this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35, 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC 
programs, auto-edit of error line, and many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk . $34.95 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 . $27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 
THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the target program. An excellent learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable 
debugging aid for the expert. CoCo 1, 2, or 3 compatible. 
Disk . . $23.95 Assembler source listing . Add $3.00 



1 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

Magnavox 8CM515/8CM505/8CM643 



. $19.95 



Sony KV1311CR 



$29.95 



SPECTROSYSJEMS 



No delay on personal checks • Please add $2.00 shipping 



— 11111 N. Kendall Drive, 

~ Suite A 108 

Miami, Florida 33176 
(305) 274-3899Day or Eve, 

Sorry, no credit cards or COD's. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 109 



800 HPUT(X(G) , Q) - (X (G) +15 , Y (G) +1 
6) , 6, PSET 

810 P=P-l:P$="V"+STR$ (P) +"D" : PLA 
Y P$ 

820 NEXT Q 
830 FOR Q=G TO NU 

840 X(Q)=X(Q+1) :Y(Q) =Y(Q+1) :T(Q) 
=T(Q+1) 
850 NEXT Q 
860 NU=NU-1: RETURN 
870 ' SET VARIBLES AND PALETTE 
880 DIM X(16) ,Y(16) ,T(16) 
890 P$(l)="631618075608092537045 
454483 50000000000000000000000000 

900 P$ (2) ="6302 3 31632 11274300030 
0251906000 0000 000 0000 0 0 00000 0000 
00000000" 
' 910 P$=P$(MN) :GOSUB 1630: PALETTE 
15,0 
920 RETURN 

930 1 HGET EVERYTHING 
940 HCLS 1 : HBUFF 1, 220: HGET (1,1) 
-(20,20) ,1 

950 HCLS 2 : HBUFF 2,220: HGET (1,1) 
-(20, 20), 2 

960 HCLS 5 : HBUFF 3,110: HGET (1,1) 
-(20,10) ,3 

910 HCLS 6 : HBUFF & ,110: HGET (1,1) 
-(20,10) ,4 
980 HCLS 7: HBUFF 5,110: HGET (1,1) 
-(20, 10), 5 

990 HCLS 2:HCOLOR 11 : HLINE (0,1)- 
(15,16) ,PSET,BF 

1000 HCOLOR 6:HCIRCLE(3,4) ,3:HCI 
RCLE ( 12 , 4 ) ,3 

1010 HPAINT(3,4) , 0 , 6 : HPAINT ( 12 , 4 
),0,6 

1020 HCOLOR 9 :HCIRCLE(7, 10) ,5, , . 
75,0, .5 

1030 HBUFF 6,200:HGET(0,0)-(15,1 
6) ,6 

1040 HCOLOR 12:HLINE(0,1) -(15, 16 
) ,PSET,BF 

1050 HCOLOR 6:HCIRCLE(3,4) , 3 : HCI 
RCLE (12, 4) ,3 

1060 HPAINT(3 ,4) , 15, 6:HPAINT(12 , 
4) ,15,6 

1070 HCOLOR 9:HCIRCLE(7,12) ,5, , . 
75, . 5,0 

1080 HBUFF 7,200:HGET(0,0)-(15,1 

6), 7 -avt* W 

1090 HCLS 1: HCOLOR 3 : HLINE ( 4 , 1 ) - 
(4,15) , PSET 

1100 HCOLOR 4:HLINE(5,5)-(5,15) , 
PSET l^V*} 

1110 HCOLOR 9:HLINE(6,10)-(6,14) 
, PSET: HLINE (7, 11) -(7,14) , PSET 
1120 HBUFF 8,300:HGET(4,1) -(7,15 



) ,8 

1130 HBUFF 9, 400: RETURN 

1140 ' TITLE SCREEN 

1150 WIDTH 40:CLS 7 

1160 LOCATE 0,3:ATTR 0,4 

1170 READ I$:IF I$="999" THEN 12 

00 

1180 L=40-LEN(I$) :L=INT(L/2) 
1190 PRINT TAB (L) ;I$:GOTO 1170 
1200 ATTR 6,6: LOCATE 39,23: PALET 
TE CMP 

1210 IF INKEY$=" 11 THEN 1210 
1220 PALETTE RGB: RETURN 
1230 1 DRAW SCREEN 
1240 HSCREEN 2:HCLS2 
1250 FOR G=0 TO 3 20 STEP 20 
1260 HPUT(G,0)-(G+19,10) , 3 , PSET 
1270 HPUT(G,11) -(G+19,21) , 4 , PSET 
1280 HPUT(G, 22) - (G+19, 32) , 5, PSET 
1290 NEXT G 

1300 HDRAW"C3 ;BM319,32 ;M0,3 2 ;M80 
, 12 ;M160, 30;M240 , 12 ;M319 , 3 2" :HPA 
INT(80,20) ,3,3 

1310 HDRAW"C4 ;BM80 , 32 ;M240 , 32 ;M1 
60, 12, -M80, 32" : HPAINT (160, 20) ,4,4 
1320 HCOLOR0: HLINE (0,171) -(320,1 
71) , PSET 

1330 FOR G=0 TO 3 20 STEP 20:HPUT 

(G, 172) - (G+20 , 192) , 1,PSET:NEXT G 

1340 HPRINT ( 3,0 ), "SCORE 0 

PRC 1.00 POWER 5000" 

1350 RETURN 

1360 1 LEVEL ADVANCE 

1370 HCOLOR 5 :HPRINT (8 ,0) , SC 

1380 PB=INT( (HI/TT) *500) :SC=SC+P 

B 

1390 HCOLOR 0 : HPRINT (8 , 0 ), SC 

1400 HCOLOR15:PB$=STR$ (PB) +"pts. 
ii 

1410 HPRINT (7, 11 ), "POINTS BONUS- 
"+PB$ 

1420 R=R+l:IF INT (R/ 10) OR/ 10 TH 
EN 1500 

1430 HCOLOR 15 : HPRINT ( 7 , 13 ) , "POW 
ER BONUS - "+STR$(PI)+" units" 
1440 HCOLOR 5 : HPRINT (3 2 , 0 ) , PO : PO 
=PO+PI 

1450 HCOLOR 0 : HPRINT (32 ,0) , PO 
1460 PI=PI+2000 
1470 FOR G=l TO 10 

1480 PLAY"L255T255V20O2 ;A;V+ ;B;V 

+; C; V+ ; D ; V- ; E ; V- ; F ; V- ;E ; V+ ; F ; V+ ; 

G" 

1490 NEXT G 

1500 FOR G=l TO 500: NEXT G 
1510 FOR G=40 TO 280 STEP 8 
1520 HPUT(G,88)-(G+8,112) , 2 , PSET 
:NEXT G 

1530 IF HI/TT <.5 OR PO=0 THEN 1 



110 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



73j3 

154j3 NU=j3:T=T-lj3:IF T<lj3 THEN T= 
55 : TT=TT+2 :M=M+2 : IF M>lj3 THEN M= 

155p F=F-1 : IF F<5 THEN F=5 
156j3 HCOLOR 1J3:HPRINT(15,3) , "ROU 
ND' f :HPRINT(2j3,3) ,R 
157j3 FOR Q=l TO M:GOSUB 64j3:NEXT 

158j3 FOR G=l TO 2pj3:NEXT G 
159p HCOLOR4:HPRINT(15, 3) , "ROUND 
" :HPRINT(2j3,3) ,R 



16J3J3 TN0=M:HI=J3: JA=X 
161)3 RETURN 
162J3 ' PALETTE SET-UP 
163J3 FOR G=j3 TO 31 
164J3 P=VAL(MID$(P$, (G*2)+l,2) ) 
165J3 POKE G+58964,P 
166J3 NEXT G : RETURN 
167)3 1 PROGRAM ABORTED 
168J3 FOR G=3 2 TO 28 8 STEP 1J3:HPU 
T(G,88)-(G+lj3,112) ,2,PSET:NEXT G 
1690 HC0L0R15:HPRINT(11, 11) , "-PR 
OGRAM ABORTED-" tHPRINT (4 , 13) , "WO 
ULD YOU LIKE TO RESTART (Y/N) ?" 
170J3 ON BRK GOTO 171j3 
171J3 I$=INKEY$:IF I$="Y" THEN PA 
LETTE RGB: GOTO 16j3 ELSE IF I$="N 
" THEN 185J3 ELSE 171j3 
172j3 1 GAME OVER 
173j3 HCOLOR15:HPRINT(15, 11) , "GAM 
E OVER" 

174J3 HPRINT(3 ,13) , "WOULD YOU LIK 

E TO PLAY AGAIN (Y/N)?" VV 

175J3 ON BRK GOTO 17 6J3 

176J3 I$=INKEY$:IF I$="Y" THEN PA 

LETTE RGB: GOTO 16j3 ELSE IF I$="N 

" THEN 185J3 ELSE 176j3 

1770 1 ON ERR COMES HERE 

178J3 P$=" 183 611)376 331j39 38j3j318j3j36 

3j3j318j3j3381854j393663274538j3j318j3j36 

3j3j318j3j338" 

179J3 GOSUB 163J3: PALETTE 15,38 



18(3(3 IF MN=1 THEN PALETTE RGB EL 
SE PALETTE CMP 
181j3 WIDTH 32:CLS 

18 2 j3 PRINT "ERROR NUMBER - ";ERN 
0: PRINT "ERROR LINE - ";ERLIN 
183j3 POKE 6549 6 , j3 : END 
184 j3 ' END OF PROGRAM 



185j3 P$ = "18 3 611p7 63 31j3938j3j318j3j36 
3j3j318j3j33818 54j393663274538pj318j3j36 
3j3j318j3j338" 

186j3 GOSUB 163 j3 : PALETTE 15,38 
187 j3 IF MN=1 THEN PALETTE RGB EL 
SE PALETTE CMP: WIDTH 3 2 
188J3 CLS1:P0KE65496, J3:END^H J 
189J3 1 INSTRUCTIONS FOR TITLE 
19j3j3 1 VWf SCREEN fW^'WW 
19ij3 DATA SHOOT'N RANGE by Albe 

rt Marsh tir^VlJ^^k 

19 2 $ DATA " " %l^tr^^jMJ^j 

19 3 S3 DATA " " 

194 j3 DATA Welcome to the Shoot ! n 

Range y£ 
19 5 S3 DATA 11 11 



196j3 DATA There are 
hort rules to 



only a few s 



198 S3 DATA " ^VV^'^l 

199j3 DATA Use the right controll 
er to play 
2J3J3J3 DATA " " 

2010 DATA Use either button to f 
ire 

2j32j3 DATA " " sT^£ 
2j3 3j3 DATA You must keep your per 
centile above 

2)34)3 DATA 5j3% to continue playin 
g 

205)3 DATA » " 

2)36)3 DATA You play untill your p 
ower runs out 



2J38J3 DATA Press any key to start 



2)39)3 DATA 999 



BASIC LISTING INCLUDED !! 

BUDGET FORECASTER 

PROJECT HOW MUCH YOU WILL HAVE AND WHEN 
YOU WILL HAVE IT BASED ON YOUR WHAT IF' BUDGET 
STRATEGIES. INPUT YOUR CONSTANT AND VARIABLE, 
FIRST OF THE MONTH, END OF THE MONTH, SEMI- 
MONTHLY, AND BI-WEEKLY EXPENSES, INCOMES, AND 
INVESTMENTS (INCLUDING RATE OF RETURN). ENTER 
YOUR STARTING CASH BALANCE AND INVESTMENT 
BALANCES. SEE YOUR RESULTS IN INCREMENTS OF 
TWO WEEKS UP TO THE CALENDAR LIMIT OF 
12/31/9999! 

64K TAPE VERSION $34.95 



GAME SIMULATORS 

COMPUTE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING BASED ON 
PLAYING AND BETTING STRATEGIES. SIMULATE UP TO 
10,000 GAMES! 64K TAPE VERSIONS. 

"CRAPS" $22.95 

"BLACKJACK" $19.95 

"5 CARD DRAW" $19.95 

BASIC LISTING INCLUDED !! 

SEND CHECK OR M.O. + $1.50 EACH S/H TO: 

PRO B I TAT, 2213 VENETION DRIVE 
STOCKTON, CA 95207 

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 



* **P *A r \f\. *fT r 



111 




August 1987 THE RAINBOW 



BACK WITH BLACK BOX Fully 
compatible with Hayes and Bell 103/ 
212A modem products, the Black Box 
Auto Modem 1200 is designed for 




Black Box® Auto Modem 1200 



heavy-duty use in any interoffice or long 
distance data communications net- 
work. This desktop device provides f ull- 
duplex, asynchronous transmission 
over the switched telephone network at 
either 300 or J 200 bps data rates. It 
features automatic or manual (touch- 
tone or rotary/pulse) dialing or answer- 
ing, and a soft option control eliminates 
switch-setting for smart or dumb termi- 
nal use. The Auto Modem 1200 retails 
for $275. For more information on the 
Auto Modem 1200 and a copy of their 
new catalog, contact Black Box Cat- 
alog, P.O. Box 12800, Pittsburgh, PA 
15241, (412) 746-5500. 

TAKE IT TO THE BANK Sunrise 
Software has announced the release of 
Business Bankbook +3 for the CoCo 
market. This system is designed to 
replace manual check register systems 
for small business applications. It al- 
lows complete maintenance of your 
checks, including check printing. Sys- 
tem requirements are a 32K or greater 
Color Computer, one or two disk drives 
and a printer. 

The program is shipped on disk only, 
with software f or the original CoCo and 
CoCo 2 on Side One and special pro- 
gramming for the CoCo 3 on Side Two. 
All data is compatible with both ver- 
sions of the program. Business Bank- 
book +3 is priced at $49.95 plus $2 
S/H. Florida residents add $2.50 state 
sales tax. Contact Sunrise Software, 
8901 NW 26 Street, Sunrise, FL 33322. 
To order, call (800) 628-2828. 



GET PROTECTED Dynamic Elec- 
tronics Inc. has announced Memory 
Saver 2, a rechargeable battery backup 
designed to protect your CoCo's mem- 
ory in the event of a power outage. 
Memory Saver 2 mounts inside the 
computer under the keyboard and will 
work with almost any Color Computer 
including the newer Color Computer 3 
with a full complement of 512K. The 
unit will power the Color Computer for 
an hour or more. Supply switching is 
quick and automatic. Memory Saver 2 
is priced at $39.95 plus $3 S/ H. Contact 
Dynamic Electronics Inc., P.O. Box 
896, Hartselle, A L 35640. 

ALSO . . . Another new device from 
Dynamic Electronics Inc. is CC-Therm, 
a digital thermometer for Radio Shack 
Color Computers. This unit consists of 
a thermistor wired to the end of a flat 
cable and is designed to be plugged into 
the CoCo's joystick port. CC-Therm is 
priced at $12.95. A dual version is 
available for $19.95. The dual version 
allows the user to measure temperature 
in two locations. It is also useful for 
measuring inside and outside tempera- 
tures simultaneously. Software on tape 
or disk continuously prints the temper- 
ature in both Farenheit and centigrade. 
Please include $3 S/H. Contact Dy- 
namic Electronics Inc., P.O. Box 896, 
Hartselle, A L 35640. 



BIG BOY PRINTER In a move to 
expand its current printer product line, 
the Panasonic Industrial Company 
Computer Products Division (CPD) 
has announced its first entry into the 
rapidly growing 24-pin dot matrix 
printer marketplace. The new KX- 
P1524 wide-carriage model features 
three levels of print quality (draft, text 
and letter quality) for various applica- 
tions. 

Through the standard parallel port, 
the unit offers speeds up to 240 cps in 
draft mode, 160 cps in text mode and 
80 cps in letter quality mode. Each 
mode runs at either 10, J2, 15 or 17 
pitch. The KX-P1524 features Epson 
LQ-1500, Diablo 630 and IBM 
ProPrinter emulation and is compatible 
with most software. Its easy-to-use 
operator panel offers front panel access 
to font, pitch, margin, line and form 
feed, and page length for convenient 
user setup. 

The KX-P1524 also offers optional 
credit card-size font cards for Roman, 
Bold PS, Prestige, Gothic, Orator, 
Script and Sans Serif font styles. A 
special "memo load" feature has been 
added, which allows the user to feed a 
single sheet of paper or an envelope 
without removing the fanfold. Both 
parallel and DB-25 serial interfaces are 
standard on the KX-P1524, which 
carries a suggested retail price of $899. 




The KX-P1524 from Panasonic. 



112 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



COMPUTER AIDED INSTRUCTION 

Educational Programs for Students Grade K-12 and Adult Self Studies 

NEW PROGRAMS FOR YOUR TANDY 1000 

AND TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 

Compatible with Apple - Atari - Commodore - TRS 80 l t IN, 4 - IBM PC Jr. 
16 New Programs now available in Basic Spanish 



• NEW! VIDEO CASSETTES FOR VHS! 

inner Active ,M Video Tutorials 
Complete with audio narration 

4 cassettes with 8 programs in each of the 
following subject areas: — _ 

• Basic Spanish Grammar ^\ Q 5 

* Basic Algebra 

• Reading by Phonics pei7tape 

* Basic Fractions 

2 programs per tape. Running lime: 45 minutes per tape, 

16 Programs on 8 VHS Tapes $159 M ' 





You may be able to 
reduce youf taxes by 



- Lnccwe 
auerag ins 

- fncofle 
splitting 

- tax shelta 




Lh ich has aiic s>j I I able? 
IS tlM 



Interactive Tutorial Programs for Home or Classroom Use 

Over 1000 programs for your selection with 32 now available on disk for the Color 

Computer and 500 now available for the Tandy 1000, 



"We're Your Educational 
Software Source" 

Subject No. of Programs 

Reading Development 256 (4 on disk) 
Reading Comprehension 48 (4 on disk) 

Mathematics 128 

Algebra 16 (16 on disk) 

History 32 (4 on disk) 

Spelling 16 

Government 16 

Physics 16 (4 on disk) 

16 Programs in each 
of the following: 

Children's Tales - Carpentry - Electronics 
Health Services ■ Office Skills - Statistics 
First Aid/Safety - Economics - Business 
Accounting - Psychology ■ MUCH MORE! 

Send lor our free catalog ol over 1000 Dorset! educa- 
tional programs lor Atari, TRS 80, Apple. IBM PC Jr , 
Commodore. Tandy 1000, elc. 



Apple ll ( TRS 80 I, III, & 4 P and 
Commodore 64 computers require 
respective conversion kits {plug-in board 
and stereo cassette player), $99.00. Atari 
400/600/800/1200 computers require the 
Atari cassette recorder and the Dorsett 
4001 Educational Master Cartridge, 
$9.95. For the IBM PC Jr. a cassette 
adapter cable and a good cassette 
recorder are required. The Tandy 1000 
requires the Dorsett M1001 speaker/ PC 
board kit, $69,00, and a standard 
cassette recorder. A Radio Shack 
CCR-81 or CCR-82 is recommended. 

CASSETTES: $59.90 for an album con- 
taining a 16-program course (8 cassettes 
with 2 programs each); $8,80 for a 
2-program cassette. 

DISKS: $14.95 for a one-program disk; 
$28.95 for two disks; $46,95 for four 
disks, All disks come in a vinyl album. 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome 



Dorsett Educational Software features: 

• Interactive Learning 

• User Friendly 

• Multiple Choice and Typed 

• Program Advance with Correct Response 

■ Full-time audio narration ^Cassette 
Programs Only) 

• Self-Paced Study 

• High Resolution Graphics 

• Easy Reading Text 

For more inlormaiion, or lo order call: 

TOLL FREE 1-800-654*3871 
IN OKLAHOMA CALL (405)288 2301 



DORSETT 

Educational Systems, Inc. 

Box 1228, Norman, OK 73070 




RAINBOW'S 
BROADENING ITS 
SPECTRUM 

the rainbow and the Delphi Infor- 
mation Utility have joined together 
to allow CoCo owners all over the 
world to connect with one another! 

Delphi is a full-service information 
utility. It offers everything from up- 
to-the-minute news stories from Th( 
Associated Press to electronic mail 
services. But, best of all, it now has 
a special forum for Color Computer 
owners, and it's operated by the 
people who bring you the rainbow 
each month. 

The CoCo Special Interest Group 
(SIG) features a variety of services, 
including an open forum where you 
can send and receive messages 
from Color Computer owners all 
over the world. It also has several 
databases to which you can upload 
your favorite programs and from 
which you can download programs 
written by other CoCo enthusiasts. 
Some of these databases are basic 
programming, OS-9 and home ap- 
plications. 

When setting up your account with 
Delphi, if you do not have a credit 
card or prefer not to use it, Delphi 
requires that you send $25 to give 
your account a positive balance. 
This will be refunded after your first 
free hour if you choose to no longer 
use the system or it will be applied 
to future connect charges. If you do 
not maintain a positive balance, you 
will be charged $3.50 each month 
for direct billing. 



PEEK INTO THE 
RAINBOW 

The CoCo SIG's conference feature 
allows you to meet electronically 
with other members of the CoCo 
Community. You can join conferen- 
ces with notables such as Dale 
Puckett, Cray Augsburg, Marty 
Goodman, Don Hutchison, Jim 
Reed, Lonnie Falk and others — on 
a regular basis. Conference sched- 
ules will appear in the rainbow 
each month. Be sure to check online 
announcements for changes and 
additions. 

THE OTHER SIDE 
OF THE RAINBOW 

On Delphi, you also are able to buy 
rainbow on tape — order a whole 
set, or download an individual pro- 
gram immediately. You can also 
renew your rainbow subscription, 
make a fast and easy order for soft- 
ware or hardware from a multitude 
of vendors, or inquire about prod- 
ucts on the CoCo SIG. 

We also have a number of programs 
that you can download and use, just 
for the cost of the time you spend 
transferring them. There'll also be 
corrections for rainbow articles, 
helpful hints and many other useful 
features. 



FREE LIFETIME 
MEMBERSHIP 

the rainbow is offering subscribers 
a free lifetime subscription to Delphi 

— a $29.95 value — and a free hour 
of connect time — a $7.20 value at 
either 300, 1200 or 2400 Baud — so 
you can sample Delphi and the rain- 
bow CoCo SIG. That's right. Your 
subscription to the rainbow entitles 
you to this $37.15 value as a free 
bonus! 

If you're nol a rainbow subscriber, 

just enter your order when you sign 
on with Delphi and you'll get the 
same great deal! For our $31 sub- 
scription fee, you'll get the finest 
Color Computer magazine ever, a 
free lifetime subscription to Delphi 
and a free hour of connect time. 

SAVE even more 

Want to save even more? While 
you're online you can order, for only 
$29.95, a deluxe package which in- 
cludes the Delphi membership, the 
Delphi Handbook and Command 
Card ($21.95) and a total of three 
hours of connect time ($21 .60). 

Delphi provides us all with 
Immediate CoCo Community. 

Check it out today. After all, you can 
sample it for free! 



Problems? Call Delphi: 

(800) 544-4005 
(617) 491-3393 



DELPHI 



TYPE: 

GROUP COCO 





COMMUNITY TOGETHER 



How to reach RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG . . . 



There are several ways to connect to Delphi and THE 
rainbow's CoCo SIG. In most cities you will not even have 
to pay long distance charges; you can use special data 
communications networks like Telenet, Tymnet and the 
Canadian Datapac network. 

First, set your terminal program to operate at either 300 
or 1200 Baud (depending on the modem you have), and 
also select either 7 bits with even parity or 8 bits with no 
parity, and one stop bit. (If one combination doesn't work, 
try another.) 

Decide which network you should use. There is no 
surcharge for Telenet or Tymnet. Canadian residents using 
Datapac will be charged an additional $10.80 (U.S.) per 
hour. 

On Telenet: Call (800) 821-5340 to get the Telenet 
number for your area. After you call the appropriate 
number for your own area and make connection, you'll 
see a prompt of "L?" Press enter, the period key (.) and 
enter again. At the "service:" prompt, type GVC (for 
General Videotex Corporation) and enter. 

On Tymnet: Call (800) 336-0149 to get the Tymnet 
number for your area. After you dial your designated 
number and connect, you will see either "garbage" or a 
message saying "please type your terminal identifier." At 
this point, even if the screen is garbled, simply press *A\ 
When "please log in:" appears, type DELPHI and press 

ENTER. 

From Canada (on Datapac): Call Delphi Customer 
Service at (617) 491-3393 to get the Datapac number for 
your area. After you connect, press the period key (,) and 
ENTER (use two periods if you're using 1200 Baud). Type 
SET 2:1, 3:126 and press ENTER. Now type p 1 3106, 
DELPHI; and press enter. Including the $10.80 per hour 
surcharge, Canadian residents using Datapac are charged 
a total of $18 (U.S.) per hour for connect time, day or 
evening. 

From other countries: Many countries have their own 
data networks that can connect to either Telenet or 
Tymnet. Check with the telephone authorities in your 
country for details on how to sign up for this service. When 
you have an account set up, you can reach Delphi with 
a "host code" of 3 1 10 6170 3088 through Telenet, or 3106 
90 6015 through Tymnet. (You'll have to pay the toll 
charges for this connection.) 
Type in Your Username 

If you're already a subscriber to THE rainbow, at the 



"USERNAME:" prompt, type JOINDELPHI and press 
enter. At the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type RAINBOW. 
Then, at the "NUMBER:" prompt, type your individual 
subscription number from the mailing label of your latest 
issue of the rainbow. (If there are one or more zeros at 
the beginning of this number, include them.) 

If you don't already have a subscription, at the "USER- 
NAME:" prompt, type JOINDELPHI and press enter. At 
the "PASSWORD:" prompt, type SENDRAI NBOW and press 
enter. Have your MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express card ready, because you'll be led through a series 
of questions that will enable us to put your rainbow and 
Delphi subscriptions into effect. In an effort to hold down 
non-editorial costs, we do not bill for subscriptions. 

If you make a typing error, just use Control-X and start 
over. Remember that at any point, when you're on Delphi, 
you can type HELP to get help on how to use the system. 
To get off the system just type BVE. 

If you find that you're unable to log on to Delphi and 
enter the CoCo SIG after following these instructions, call 
us during afternoon business hours at (502) 228-4492. We'll 
be glad to offer assistance. 

Come Visit Us! Type: GROUP COCO 

After you sign in, you'll be prompted to set up your own, 
personal "username" — Delphi is a friendly service, no 
numbers to remember — and you'll be asked a number 
of questions so Delphi can set up your account. You'll also 
be assigned a temporary password. 

Delphi will tell you that your account will be ready after 
6 p.m. the same day if you sign up before noon (Eastern 
time zone.) If not, your account will be ready at 6 p.m. 
the next business day. Once an account is verified and 
opened, each rainbow subscriber will be credited with an 
hour of free time! 

When you log back in, use your chosen username and 
your temporary password to access the system. At that 
point, you will meet Max, who will help you configure 
things and will change your temporary password into your 
own personal password. This is the password you will use 
for subsequent sessions — or until you change it. 

After Max bids you goodbye, you'll wind up at the 
Delphi Main Menu; type in GROUP COCO and join us on 
the CoCo SIG! 




116 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



The astronauts 
stranded on the 
moon are counting 



on you 



f 



By Clyde Johnson, Jr. 



Zunar Rescue is an arcade game 
for a 32K Color Computer. It re- 
quires at least onejoystick. You are 
a member of the Lunar Rescue Squad, 
in charge of the safety of all the 
astronaut-explorers. To rescue astro- 

Clyde Johnson, Jr. is a student at 
Embry- Riddle Aeronautical University 
in Daytona Beach, Florida. He is ma- 
joring in aeronautical engineering and 
has had his color computer for five 
years. 



nauts stranded in the mountains, you 
must pilot your spacecraft to them, pick 
them up with the ladder, and take them 
to the next base. Your fuel supply is 
limited so there is no time to waste. 

After running the program and 
choosing a starting skill level, the game 
screen will appear. Your ship is on the 
lower-left side of the screen, the astro- 
naut you must rescue is in one of the 
valleys of the mountain range, and the 
base you must fly him to is on the lower- 
right side of the screen. The bottom of 
the screen is your control panel and 
displays altitude, vertical velocity, fuel 
remaining, and other necessary infor- 
mation. The ship is controlled with the 
right joystick, and pulling the stick back 
adds downward thrust; the farther back 
you pull, the more thrust. To take off, 
pull the stick all the way back and hold 
it there until you are clear of the base. 

To pick up the astronaut, maneuver 
your ship over him and press the fire- 
button to drop the ladder. You have 
only 30 seconds to pick him up before 
you must close the hatch; therefore, you 
must be in position to get him before 



you drop the ladder. The ladder must be 
positioned directly over him and extend 
below his feet. The extra weight of the 
astronaut will pull the ship down, so be 
prepared to add thrust when he is 
aboard. 

After picking up the astronaut, or at 
least before running out of fuel, you 
must land at the base. To do this you 
must be completely over the flat area on 
the right side of the screen and touch 
down with a velocity less than 10. You 
will be given a score based on your 
performance and, if you successfully 
rescued the astronaut, you will advance 
to the next level. 

When typing in this program, be sure 
to save it to disk or tape before running; 
a machine language routine is used that 
could crash yourcomputer if any typing 
errors are made. This routine also 
disables the BREAK key so you must 
press reset to exit the program. 

(You may direct your questions to the 
author at P.O. Box 1197, Beaufort, SC 
29901; phone: 803-525-0261. Please 
enclose an SASE for a reply when 
writing.) □ 



60 
180 . 
310 . 
410 . 
570 . 
1050 



.29 5150 34 

232 5310 252 

179 5450 183 

182 5620 60 

180 5750 150 

184 6000 6 



5010 130 END 71 



The listing: RESCUE 

p ******** LUNAR RESCUE ******* 

1 GOTO 3 

2 GOT05 

3 PCLEAR8 : GOT02 

5 CLEAR5J3J3, &H7C83 :CLS: INPUT "WHIC 
H VERSION COLOR COMPUTER ARE YOU 

USING (1,2, OR 3)";C:IF C=3 THEN 
SP=65497 :WIDTH32 ELSE INPUT 11 CAN 
YOUR COMPUTER USE THE 'SP 
EED-UP' POKE (Y/N) n ;P$:IF P$="Y" 
THEN SP=65495 ELSE SP=j3 

6 CLS : PRINT@lj38 , 11 LUNAR 11 : PRINT @ 14 

4 , "RESCUE 11 : PRINT@2 3 9 , "BY" : PRINT@ 
3 3j3,"CLYDE JOHNSON" :PRINT@485, "P 



LEASE WAIT ONE MOMENT"; 
1)3 IF SP THEN POKE SP,J3 
2j3 X=RND (-TIMER) 

25 FOR X=&H7C84 TO &H7FFE : READ P 

: POKEX , P : NEXT : EXEC&H7C8 4 

27 GOSUB 6j3j3j3 

3j3 DIM V(24,16) ,C(24,16) 

4j3 GOSUB7j3j3j3:PMODE4,l:PCLSj3 

45 PRINT @j3 , " " ; 

46 PRINT TAB(4) "CHOOSE SKILL LEV 
EL WITH" : PRINTTAB ( 7 ) "RIGHT JOYST 
ICK AND" : PRINTTAB (lj3) "PRESS 'FIR 
E 1 ": PRINTTAB (12) "TO BEGIN" 
47 



SCREEN1 , 1 



t! 



49 PRINT@2j33," 
5j3 L=INT(JOYSTK(j3)/6.4)+l:PRINT@ 
2j33 , "LEVEL " ; L 

6)3 IF PEEK ( &HFFj30 ) AND 1 THEN 5j3 

61 SCR=j3 

62 IF ( PEEK ( &HFFj3j3 ) AND 1)-1 THE 
N 62 

65 IF L>1 THEN BO=l ELSE BO=j3 

7j3 Y3=RND(2j3)+lj3*L: Y4=RND (2 j3 ) +lj3 

*L 

8j3 A$="D3R3NU3L3" : L$="Cj3" :M$ = "C1 
":FOR X=l TO 5 : L$=L$+A$ : M$=M$+A$ 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 117 




Our Pro-Color-Series consists of three programs. 

Pro-Coior-Fiie ^Enhanced* V2D Design a record structure 
up to 60 fields with 1020 spaces per record, four 
custom-designed data entry screens and math functions on 
single records. Report totals, averages and summaries. Gen- 
erate mailing labels, Output reports to the printer, disk or 
screen. Send information directly into a DynacalcP compati- 
ble file for use in spread sheets. Streamline repetitive tasks 
into one keystroke with the command processor Sort 750 
records in less than five minutes and create special indexes 
of your file for reporting and accessing. Store as many 
records as your disk will hold! $59.95 

Pro-Color-Forms V2.0 This mail-merge feature will allow 
you to write a letter and have names from your database 
inserted automatically. Design invoices, inventory cards and 
other forms. Or, if you use preprinted forms, you can set up a 
template to print information in the appropriate place, If you 
have our Telegraphies® program, you can have hkes 
pictures included as part of the form! $29.95 

Pro-Color-Dir Read the directory of all your diskettes and 
create a data file that can be accessed by Pro-Color-File. 
Store up to 1 ,000 entries on one diskette and generate a 
master report that shows where each program is in your 
library. Included FREE with Pro-Color-Forms. 

Our Pro-Color-Series gives you database capabilities 
found on larger computers, at a fraction ofthe cost! So if 
you're serious about getting organized, try our Pro-Color- 
Series. It lets you organize important information together in 
one place, right at your fingertips, and at a savings-just 

C7Q qc fnr all thrppl 
S.iJu IUI a I U ii col 







m 

mm m m M _ 

See He jea gge 

PO Box 5300 Florence, SC 29502-5300 
Shipping: $3/$12 air mail (overseas). 
SC Residents add 5% sales tax. 

(Send check or money order) 

jilfflBik %l .dflHh. jgHmk. mmmw mmmt jmm*. MMttM jttm*. 

1 TFm* 
mm m da mom*, mw^. imnm iiimnnmin # Ia 

Ji J OuO Oulu 

No Credit Cards or CO.D.'s on this special please. 




: NEXT 

90 ZZ=JOYSTK(j3) : IF JOYSTK(l)>35 
THEN PRINT@2 62 , "MOVE JOYSTICK TO 
TOP" 

Ij3j3 ZZ=JOYSTK(j3) : IF JOYSTK(l)>35 
THEN 100 

110 PRINT (§2 62, "ONE MOMENT PLEAS 

Hi « « « 

120 GOSUB7000 

130 P$="L2 5 5;01V31BV3j3FV29DV28GV 

2 7EV2 5CV23FV21CV19GV17BV15 ;L2 10) 

02 ;D#V13C#V11F#V9DV7AV5BV3EV1G" 

140 PMODE4 , 1 : COLORJ3 , 1 : PCLS 

150 GET(7,5)-(23,16) ,C,G 

160 DRAW" BM7 , 16 ;R2 E2R4 D2R2L4R2U2 

R4F2R2L2H2E2U2L12D2F2H2U2R3H2U1E 

2R6F2D1G2" 

170 GET (7 , 5) - (23 , 16) ,V,G 

180 PCLS : LINE (0 , 0) - (255 t 191) f PSE 

T , B : LINE (0 , 169) -(255, 191) , PSET,B 

F:X1=1: Yl=15 3 : PRINT@44 8 , "ALTITUD 

E" , "VELOCITY " , "FUEL" : PRINT@457 , 

0 ; :PRINT@47 3 , 0 ; 

190 YF=7,0+RND(21) *5: YC=YF+15 

195 Y=RND (4j3) 

200 LINE (0, 168) - (35 , 168) , PSET:LI 
NE(22j3,168)-(255,168) , PSET: DRAW" 
BM25, 168": FOR X=65 TO 2j35 STEP 5 
2j35 Y=Y+RND ( 3j3 ) * (RND ( 4 ) -2 ) : IF Y< 

1 THEN Y=l ELSE IF Y>12j3 THEN Y= 
12j3 : Y=Y-RND (20) 

210 IF X=YF+5 OR X=YF+10 OR X=YF 
+15 OR X=YF+2J3 OR X=YF+2 5 THEN Y 
=RND(5) ELSE IF X=YF THEN Y=Y3 E 
LSE IF X=YF+3J3 THEN Y = Y4 
220 IF X=YF+15 THEN YM=Y 
23j3 XM=X:IF X=YF+5 THEN XM=XM+RN 
D(2) ELSE IF X=YF+2 5 THEN XM=XM- 
RND ( 2 ) 

24J2 LINE-(XM, 167-Y) , PSET 
250 NEXT 

2 60 LINE- ( 2 3j3 , 168 ) , PSET 

27 0 DRAW"BM=YC; , ,f +STR$ (167-YM) +" 
;BL3E3NF3U2NR2NL2U2NR1NL1U1" 
28j3 PAINT(128, 167) , 0, 0 
290 SCREEN1,1 

300 S=29:T=.7:M=lj3j3:G=1.635:X=l: 
FUEL= ( 1J8-L) *500+1500 : FM=FUEL: Y=0 
: V=0 : GE-0 i TM-j3 : T2=j3 : G=j3 : ML=1 : LU= 
1 

310 PRINT@489 , INT (FUEL) ; 

32j3 PUT(&H1,&H9D)-(&H11,&HA8) , V, 

PSET 

33j3 ZZ=JOYSTK(j3) : IF JOYSTK(l)<35 
THEN 33j3 ELSE LINE ( 1 , 1 68 ) - ( 12 , 1 
10) , PRESET: LINE- (2 5, 16 8) , PRESET: 
LINE(1, 16 8) -(24, 168) , PRESET: LINE 
(5, 169) -(20, 16 9) , PRESET :S=3j3 



118 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



34j3 FUT(1,157)-(17,168) ,C,PSET 
35j3 ZZ=&H17-JOYSTK(&Hj3) :ZZ=INT(Z 
Z*ABS (ZZ)/-33j3.75) : F=3 1 . 5- JOYSTK 
(&H1) :F=F*ABS (FJ/-&H2 : F=F* ( (F<&H 
0)+&Hl) 

3 6j3 IF ML AND LU THEN IF PEEK ( &H 
FF0j3) AND &H1 THEN3 7j3ELSE TI=1:TI 
MER=j3 : PRINT@496 , "TIME" ; : LU=j3 
37J3 FUEL= (FUEL-ABS (F/&H5 ) *T) : FUE 
L=FUEL* ( (FUEL<&Hj3)+&Hl) : F=F* ( (FU 
EL<=&Hj3)+&Hl) 

3 8j3 IF FUEL THEN IF ZZ THEN FUEL 
=FUEL-&H3*ABS (ZZ) :X=X+ZZ:IF X<&H 
1 THEN X=&H1 ELSE IF X>&HED THEN 
X=&H1 

3 9j3 A=F/M:V=V-A*T+G*T:S=S-V*T: IF 

S<&H1D THEN 55j3 
4j3j3 PRINT@&H1C9, INT(S-&H1D) ; : PRI 
NT@&H1D9 , INT (V) : PRINT@&H1E9 , INT ( 
FUEL) 

41J3 Y=&HA6-S* (&HA6/&H1F4) : IFY<&H 
J3 THENY=&H0 

42j3 IF Y1>=&H1 THEN PUT(Xl,Yl)-( 
Xl+&Hlj3, Y1+&HB) ,C,PSET:IF TI THE 
N DRAW ff BM ff +STR$ (INT (XI) +&H7 ) + ff , 11 
+STR$ ( INT( Yl) +&HA) + " ;XM$ ; 11 
430 IF Y<&H1 THEN 47j3 
44j3 IF PPOINT(X,Y+&HB) =&HJ2! OR PP 
OINT (X+&H9 , Y+&HB) =&Hp OR PPOINT( 
X+&Hlj3 , Y+&HB) =&H0 THEN 49j3 
45j3 PUT(X,Y)-(X+&Hlj3,Y+&HB) ,V,PS 
ET: IF TI THEN DRAW" BM ff +STR$ ( INT ( 
X) +&H7 ) + " , ff +STR$ ( INT ( Y) +&HA) +" ;X 
L$ ; " 

46j3 IF ML THEN DRAW" BM=YC ; , " +STR 
$ (&HA7-YM) + " ;BL3E3NF3U2NR2NL2U2N 
R1NL1U1" 

47j3 IF TI THEN GOSUB Ij3j3j3 
48j3 Xl=X:Yl=Y:GOTO 35j3 
49j3 GOT03j3j3j3 

5p?l GOSUB 4j3j3j3 : PRINT@j3 , 11 YOU CRAS 
HED ..." 

52j3 PRINT 11 TOTAL SCORE ff ;SCR 

53 J3 PRINT" PRESS FIRE BUTTON TO 

TRY AGAIN 11 

540 IF PEEK( &HFFj3j3) AND 1 THEN 5 
40 

545 IF (PEEK(&HFFj3j3) AND 1)-1 TH 

EN 545 ELSE 40 

550 IF X<220 THEN 490 

555 IF S<29 THEN S=29 

560 PRINT@457, INT(S-29) ; : PRINT@4 

73 , INT (V) : PRINT@45 7+3 2 , INT ( FUEL) 

570 V=INT(V) 

580 IF V<=1 THEN PRINT@0 , " PERFEC 
T LANDING" :GOTO2000 
590 IF V<=5 THEN PRINT@0 , "GOOD L 
ANDING" : GOTO2000 



Now Create Your Own Signs, 
Banners, and Greeting Cards. 



Introducing The 

Coco Graphics Designer 

Lait Christmas we introduced our 
COCO Greeting Card Designer program 
(■ee review April 86 Rainbow). It ha* 
been io popular that we've now 
expanded it into a new program called 
the COCO Graphic! Deeigner. The 
Coco Graphic! Designer produce! 
greeting cardi plui banners and signs. 
This program will further increase the 
usefullness and enjoyment of your dot 
matrix printer. 

The Coco Graphics 

Designer allows you to mix text and 
pictures in all your creations. The 
program features picture, border, and 
character font editors, so that you can 
modify or expand the already built In 
libraries. Plus a special "grabber* utility 
ti included to capture areas of high 
resolution screens for your picture 
library. 



Requirements: a Coco or Coco II 
with a minimum of 32K, One Disk Drive 
(Disk Ext. BASIC 1.0/1.1 ,ADOS, or 
JDOS). Printers supported include: 
Epson RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX-10, C-Itoh 8510, DMP-100/ 130/ 
400/ 430, Seikosha GP- 100/250, Legend 
808 and Gorilla B cnnana. Send a SASE 
for complete list of compatible printers. 
#C332 Coco Graphics Designer $29.05 

Over 100 More Pictures 

An optional lupplementary library 

diskette containing over one hundred 
additional pictures is available. 

#C333 Picture Disk #1 114.95. 

Colored Paper Packs 

Now available are packs containing 120 
sheets of tractor-feed paper and 42 
matching envelopes in assorted bright 
RED, GREEN, and BLUE. Perfect for 
making your productions unforgettable. 
#C274 Paper Pack 119.96 




With Zebra's Coco Graphics Designer It's easy and enjoyable 
making your own greeting cards, signs, and banners. 



NEWS FLASH! 
CGP-220 and DMP-105 
NOW SUPPORTED 

As o-f June 1, 1987 we are 
shipping version 2.3 o-f the 
CoCo Graphics Designer- This 
version includes drivers -for 
the CGP-220 and DMP-105 
printers, and improved menu 
dialogs for single disk drive 
users- By the time this issue 
appears in print we will 
probably also have added 
Okidata printer drivers — check 
with us i-f you have an Okidata. 

Ordering Instructions: ah orders Zebra Sytems, Inc 

add $3.00 shipping u Handling, ups 78-06 Jamaica Ave. 

COD add 13.00. VISA/MC Accepted. Woodhaveil, NY 11421 

NY rodent, add .ale. tax. 296^2385 



August 1967 THE RAINBOW 119 



600 IF V<=9 THEN PRINT @0 , "HARD L 
ANDING" : GOTO2000 

610 GOSUB4000:PRINT@0, "YOU'RE DE 
AD" :GOTO520 

1000 IF TIMER/ &H30&H1E THEN TI= 
0:PRINT@&H1F0,STRING$(&H10," ") ; 
:DRAW"BM"+STR$ (INT(X) +&H7)+", "+S 
TR$ (INT ( Y) +&HA) +" ; "+M$+"C0" : RETU 
RN ELSE PRINT@&H1F5,INT( (&H1E-TI 
MER/&H3C) *&HA) /&HA; " " ; 
1010 IF X<YF+&H5 OR X>YF+&H1A TH 
EN RETURN 

1020 IF Y+&H18< (&HA7-YM) THEN RE 
TURN ELSE TM=TM+&H1:IF TM >L THE 
N T2=&H1E-TIMER/&H3C:PRINT@&H1F0 
,STRING$ (&H10, " ") ; : PRINT@&H1F0, 
"GOT HIM" ; : GH=1 : M=175 : ML=0 : TI=0 
ELSE RETURN 

1030 DRAW"BM"+STR$(INT(X)+7)+" , " 
+STR$ (INT(Y) +10) +" ; "+M$ 
1040 DRAW"BM=YC; , "+STR$ ( 167-YM) + 
" ; C1BL3E3NF3U2NR2NL2U2NR1NL1U1" 
1050 RETURN 

2000 ST=INT (250*T2+12000+FUEL-FM 
+ ( 9-V) * 5 00+2000*1,) *GH : IF ST THEN 
BN=25000*BO* (L-l) :BO=0 ELSE ST= 
-10000 

2010 PRINT" PERFORMANCE SCORE ";S 
T 

2020 IF BN THEN PRINT" ***BONUS** 

* " ;BN:ST=ST+BN:BN=0 

2030 SCR=SCR+ST 

2040 PRINT "TOTAL ";SCR 

2050 IF GH THEN L=L+1:IF L>10 TH 

EN L=10 

2060 PRINT "LEVEL ";L 

2070 FOR DL=1 TO 5000 : NEXT : GOTO 

70 

3000 IF ML AND X>=YF+4 AND X<=YF 
+27 AND Y+24> (167-YM) THEN PRINT 
@496,"YOU KILLED HIM" ; : T1=0 : DRAW 
"C1BM=YC; , "+STR$ (167-YM) +" ;BL3E3 
NF3U2NR2NL2U2NR1NL1U1 " : WL=0 : GOTO 



450 ELSE GOTO 500 
4000 IF SP THEN POKESP-1,0 
4010 PLAY P$:IF SP THEN POKE SP, 

4020 FOR RA=1 TO 3 1 STEP 2 : CIRCL 
E(X+8,Y+6) ,RA,p: NEXT: FOR RA=31 T 
O 1 STEP -2 : CIRCLE (X+8, Y+6) ,RA,1 
:NEXT 

4030 RETURN 

5000 DATA 109,140,49,38,27,108,1 
40,44,190,1 

5010 DATA 104,175,140,39,48,140, 
104,191,1,104 

5020 DATA 190,1,155,175,140,30,4 
8,140,29, 191 

5030 DATA 1,155,57,109,140,16,39 
,250, 111, 140 

5040 DATA 11,174,140,9,191,1,104 
,174,140,6 

5050 DATA 32,233,0,130,115,0,130 
,185,52,7 

5060 DATA 246,1,85,134,247,183,2 
55,2,182,255 

5070 DATA 0,138,128,129,247,39,4 
,202,8,32 

5080 DATA 2,196,247,247,1,85,246 
,1,86,134 

5090 DATA 239,183,255,2,182,255, 
0,138, 128 , 129 

5100 DATA 247,39,4,202,8,32,2,19 
6,247,247 

5110 DATA 1,86,53,7,50,98,28,175 
,126,173 

5120 DATA 165,52,54,129,8,16,39, 
0,153, 18 

5130 DATA 18,18,18,18,18,18,18,1 
8,18,18 

5140 DATA 18,18,18,198,45,49,141 
,0,147,161 

5150 DATA 160,39,48,49,39,90,38, 
247,198,36 

5160 DATA 161,160,39,7,49,37,90, 
38,247,53 




U.S. check 
money order 
!I residents 
add 6% sales tax 

TEPCO 

30 Water Street 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 



120 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



517J3 DATA 182,141, 34, 198,1,231,1 
41, 0, 57,198 

518)3 DATA 57,231,141,0,91,23,2,1 
73,18,231 

5190 DATA 141, J3, 43, 198, 167, 231,1 
41,0,77,32 

5200 DATA 224,141,4,141,30,32,21 
8,220,136,52 

5210 DATA 4,68,86,84,84,84,84,13 
4,12,61 

5220 DATA 134,32,61,31,1,53,4,19 
6,31,58 

5230 DATA 220,188,48,139,57,198, 
3,79, 18,18 

5240 DATA 18,18,18,18,18,18,18,1 
67, 132,48 

5250 DATA 13 6,32,90,38,248,198,7 
,166,160,18 

5260 DATA 18,18,18,18,18,18,167, 
132,48, 136 

5270 DATA 32,90,38,239,134,0,167 
, 132 , 167, 136 

5280 DATA 32,57,23,255,178,48,31 
,49,141,1 

5290 DATA 38,141,198,22,255,129, 
65,24,60, 102 

53j30 DATA 102,126,102,102,66,124 
,102,102,124,102 

5310 DATA 102,124,67,60,102,96,9 
6,96,102,60 

5320 DATA 68,120,108,102,102,102 
,108,120,69,126 

5330 DATA 96,96,124,96,96,126,70 
,126,96,96 

5340 DATA 12 4,96,96,96,71,60,102 
, 96,96, 110 

5350 DATA 102,60,72,102,102,102, 
126, 102, 102, 102 

5360 DATA 73,60,24,24,24,24,24,6 
0,74,6 

5370 DATA 6,6,6,6,102,60,75,102, 
102,108 

5380 DATA 120,108,102,102,76,96, 



96, 96,96,96 

5390 DATA 96,126,77,102,126,126, 
102,102, 102,102 

5400 DATA 78,102,118,126,126,110 
,102,102,79,126 

5410 DATA 102,102,102,102,102,12 
6,80.124,102,102 

5420 DATA 124,96,96,96,81,60,102 
, 102, 102 , 118 

5430 DATA 108,58,82,124,102,102, 
124,108,102,102 

5440 DATA 83,60,102,96,60,6,102, 
60,84,126 

5450 DATA 24,24,24,24,24,24,85,1 
02, 102 , 102 

5460 DATA 102,102,102,60,86,102, 
102,102,102,102 

5470 DATA 60,24,87,102,102,102,1 
02,126,126,102 

5480 DATA 88,102,102,60,24,60,10 
2,102,89, 102 

5490 DATA 102,60,24,24,24,24,90, 
126,6,12 

5500 DATA 24,48,96,126,48,60,102 
, 110, 126, 118 

5510 DATA 102,60,49,24,56,24,24, 
24,24,60 

5520 DATA 50,60,102,6,12,24,48,1 
26, 51,60 

5530 DATA 102,6,28,6,102,60,52,1 
4 ,30,54 

5540 DATA 102,126,6,6,53,126,96, 
12 4,6,6 

5550 DATA 102,60,54,60,102,96,12 
4,102,102,60 

5560 DATA 55,126,6,6,12,24,48,96 
,56,60 

5570 DATA 102,102,60,102,102,60, 
57,60,102,102 

5580 DATA 62,6,102,60,32,0,0,0,0 

5590 DATA 0,0,37,48,74,52,8,44,8 
2,12 



A 

L 
L 

P 
R 
O 
G 
R 
A 
M 
S 

C 
O 
C 
O 

1 

O 
R 





P.O.BOX 6464 
BAKERSFIELD, CA 93386 



SOFTWARE 



32 OR 54K FILE PROGRAM . . .$16.95 / Cassette — BOTH VERSIONS INCLUDE: 
ML ROUTINES FOR DATA, EDIT, SORT, REVIEW, SEARCH, ERROR TRAPPING. MANY HARDCOPY OPTIONS. 

ENJOY A STIMULATING GAME OF KENO. 
A GRAPHIC DELIGHT FILLED WITH REALISTIC, 
EXCITING ACTION. PICK 1 TO 15 SPOTS. 
COMPLETELY RANDOM WINNERS. PREPARE 
FOR AN EXTREMELY CHALLENGING GAME. 
CAN YOU BREAK THE HOUSE? 



13 


80 | 54 | 17 | 21 | 75 | 18 | 36 | 63 


9 


62 
3 


Baker sfield KENO VI . 2 


41 

33 


72 


49 | 11 | 29 | 44 | 38 | 55 | 27 | 16 


1 



32 OR 64K KENO SIMULATION 
Cassette ... $1 2.85 Disk ... $1 3.95 




ML GRAPHICS DUMP FOR DMP-200 
16 / 32 / 64K Cassette . . . $15.95 1 6 / 32 / 64K Disk . . . $16.95 



ML GRAPHICS DUMP FOR THE DMP-200. 

POSITION GRAPHIC PAGES 1-4, 5-8, OR 1-8 ANY 
PLACE ON PAPER. MENU PROMPTS! STANDARD, 
CONDENSED, OR COMPRESSED. PRINTOUTS IN 
NORMAL, ELONGATED, DOUBLE-. OR TRIPLE-SIZE. 

SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER. CAUF. RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 
WE WILL MODIFY PROGRAMS TO WORK WITH YOUR PRINTER - NO EXTRA! 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 121 



Also from Falsoft, The RAINBOW MAKER, . . . 




The magazine for Tandy portable and MS-DOS users 

Not only does Tandy produce our favorite CoCo, we think they produce the best and best-priced lap- 
top portable and MS-DOS computers as well. We've found that when satisfied Color Computer users 
decide to add portability or move to MS-DOS, many stick with Tandy. For these people we publish PCM, 
The Personal Computer Magazine for Tandy Computer Users. 

Each month in PCM, you'll find information and programs for the Tandy 100, 102, 200 and 600 portable 
computers. And you'll find even more coverage for their MS-DOS machines, the 1000, 1200, 2000 and 
3000, along with the great new 1000 EX, 1000 SX and 3000 HL 



FREE PROGRAMS! 

We learned from the rainbow that readers want programs to type in, so each month we bring you an 
assortment of them: games, utilities, graphics, and home and business applications. 



BAR CODE LISTINGS AND PROGRAM DISKS! 

For portable users, PCM is the only home computer publication in the world that brings you programs 
in bar code, ready to s can into memory like magic with the sweep of a wand! For those who don't have 
time to type in listings, we offer a companion disk service with all the programs from the magazine. 



TUTORIALS AND PRODUCT REVIEWS! 

As if all this weren't enough, we offer regular tutorials on telecommunications and hardware; assembly 
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Mail to: PCM, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 



56j3j3 DATA 3 9 , 24 , 24 , 24 , j3 , j3 , j3 , j3 , 42 
,16 

5610 DATA 84,56,56,84,16,0,58,0, 
24, 24 

5620 DATA 0,24,24,0,63,60,102,6, 
12, 24 

5630 DATA 0,24,45,0,0,0,126,0,0, 
0 

5640 DATA 46,0,0,0,0,0,96,96,44, 
0 

5650 DATA 0,0,0,8,24,48,97,48,72 
,120 

5660 DATA 72,72,98,112,72,112,72 
, 112, 99,48 

5670 DATA 72,64,72,48,100,112,40 
,40,40,112 

5680 DATA 101,120,64,120,64,120, 
102, 120,64,120 

5690 DATA 64,64,103,48,72,64,88, 
48, 104, 72 

5700 DATA 72,120,72,72,105,112,3 
2,32,32,112 

5710 DATA 106,8,8,8,72,48,107,72 
,80,96 

5720 DATA 80,72,108,64,64,64,64, 
120, 109, 68 

5730 DATA 108,84,68,68,110,72,10 
4,88,72,72 

5740 DATA 111,120,72,72,72,120,1 
12, 112 , 72, 112 

5750 DATA 64,64,113,48,72,72,88, 
52, 114, 112 

5760 DATA 72,112,80,72,115,56,64 
,48,8,112 

5770 DATA 116,124,16,16,16,16,11 
7 , 72 , 72 , 72 

5780 DATA 7 2,120,118,68,68,68,40 
,16,119,68 

5790 DATA 68,68,84,108,120,68,40 
,16,40,68 

5800 DATA 121,68,40,16,16,16,122 
,124,8,16 

5810 DATA 32,124,47,48,72,72,72, 
48, 33 , 16 

5820 DATA 48,16,16,56,34,48,72,1 
6^32 i X <2 J0 

5830 DATA 3 5,48,72,16,72,48,36,2 
4,4j3,12j3 

5840 DATA 8,8,61,120,96,16,72,48 
, 38 , 48 

5850 DATA 64,112,72,48,43,120,8, 
8 , 16 , 32 

5860 DATA 40,48,72,48,72,48,41,4 

8,72,40 

5870 DATA 8,48,18,198,5,231,141, 
253 ,145,23 

5880 DATA 2 5 3,121,198,7,231,141, 



253 ,136, 198, 3 
5890 DATA 57 

6000 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : COLOR 0,1 

6010 Y=191-RND(20) 

6015 DRAW" BMj3, 191; " 

6020 FOR X=5 TO 255 STEP 10 

6030 Y=Y-RND(20)*(RND(4)-2) 

6035 IF Y>190 THEN Y-190 ELSE IF 

Y<70 THEN Y=70: Y=Y+RND(60) 
6040 LINE-(X,Y) , PSET 
6050 NEXT 

6060 PAINT(128,191) ,0,0 
6070 LINE(0, 0)-(255, 191) , PSET, B 
6080 PRINT@108, "LUNAR" : PRINT6144 
, "RESCUE" :PRINT§239, "BY": PRINT@3 
30, "CLYDE JOHNSON" 

6090 PRINT@4 8 3 , "PRESS FIRE BUTTO 
N TO BEGIN" 
6100 SCREEN1, 1 

6110 IF PEEK( &HFF00) AND 1 THEN 
6110 

6120 IF ( PEEK( &HFF00) AND 1)-1 T 
HEN 6120 
6130 RETURN 

7000 FOR PA=1 TO 4 : PCOPY PA TO P 
A+4 : NEXT : PMODE4 , 5 : SCREEN1 , 1 : RETU 

RN 



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5000 Customers 

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Calgary, Alberta T2A 7L3 

Tel: 403 235-0974 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 123 



TURN OF THE SCREW 



Clever Uses for Memory 

By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Many years ago, when the 
CoCo first came out, I was 
studying the memory map of 
the CoCo's CPU. I had only 4K of 
memory then, but soon realized that 
this CPU could access a lot more. In 
fact, everyone should know by now that 
the CPU in the CoCo can access 64K 
of memory. 

I soon upgraded to 16K; that was 
easy. Then I read an article about 
upgrading the CoCo to 32K using a 
technique called "piggyback." That was 
wonderful. I now had a full 32K. Re- 
member, this was before the time of 64K 
chips. I also had BASIC and Extended 
BASIC. That was another 16K, making 
a total of 48K of memory. There was 
16K left, which was reserved for the 
cartridge slot. I started to wonder how 
I could put more memory in there. I 
now have a CoCo 3 with 512K, and I 
am still asking myself the same ques- 
tion! 

I looked in what were then the latest 
catalogs on memory chips and came 
across a memory chip called a 2114. 
This is a IK- by four-bit static RAM 
chip. Static RAM means it does not 
have to be refreshed as does dynamic 
RAM. It took two of these chips to 
make IK of RAM. But I was desperate 
for more RAM, so I bought 16 of them, 
hoping to make an 8K RAM module f or 
the CoCo cartridge slot. 

After many hours of work over a hot 
soldering iron, I managed to make this 
8K module work. It was mapped from 
SC000 to SDFFF. (For you people who 
still think in decimal, from 49152 to 
57343.) It was great; I was the only kid 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Ouest, Quebec. 

124 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



on the block to have that memory. I had 
many hours of fun with it. 

Then came the 64K memory, and out 
went the 32K piggyback memory: A 
little bit of modification to the board 
and a little bit of wiring to the 74LS02, 
and presto — 64K of memory. That was 
great, but when it came time to use my 
8K RAM module, it didn't work any- 
more. What the heck, I had 64K, so I 
just left it. Then I got my disk drive. It 
connected to the cartridge slot and there 
was no longer room for my 8K module. 
I put it on a shelf , where it gathered dust 
for many years. 

Just the other day, I was working on 
something that required a little bit of 
memory that was protected. By pro- 
tected, I mean I could not write to it 
when I needed. That is not the case of 
the CoCo in the 64K mode. You can 
write to anywhere in 64K when in the 
"All-RAM"mode. 1 thought of using an 
EPROM. It would certainly do the job, 
but an EPROM is a lot of trouble. You 
have to get out the EPROM burner, run 
the EPROM software, and erase it 
every time you have to start anew. 

Well, this wouldn't do, so I went over 
to my long-term storage bin and pulled 
out my old 8K RAM module. With a 
bit of modification, I could make my 
RAM module into a ROM module, 
with just a switch to control it. Great 
idea — only one problem. 

When it came time to write to the 8K 
module, nothing worked. I couldn't 
figure it out. Why wasn't I able to write 
to the cartridge area? After a long look 
at the CoCo schematic, I figured it out. 
When I had added the 64K memory 
chips, I had done a modification using 
the 74LS02. That modification pre- 
vented the CoCo from writing to the 
cartridge slot area. I was in trouble; my 



little 8K module was now useless. 

After some thought, I came up with 
a solution. It required a little bit of 
circuitry, but I was able to write to the 
cartridge area. For the circuit I am 
presenting here, I didn't want to use 16 
chips to make 8K of memory, so I 
looked into my newest catalog and 
found one chip that replaced all 16 of 
the old memory chips. This chip is a 
6264, which is an 8K- by eight-bit 
memory chip all rolled into one chip; 
my, how technology has advanced! 

Building this circuit is a two-step 
process. With the proper hardware, I set 
up a one-byte read /write memory latch 
and a flip-flop, mapped at SFF40. 
Remember them, way back when I was 
explaining about TTL gates? The first 
step is to store or poke a value into the 
one-byte memory. I used a 74LS374 for 
this, which is an octal latch. When you 
store the eight-bit value to that latch, 
you also preset half of a 74LS74. This 
is a D-type flip-flop with preset and 
clear. The output of this flip-flop goes 
to one side of a dual-input OR gate. You 
now have a valid byte in the latch and 
have flipped the flip-flop. 

The second step is to read a byte from 
the 8K module. Remember that this 
read is to the non-writable area from 
SC000 to SDFFF, where the module is. 
The read does two things; first, it selects 
the 8K module. You are reading this 
location using a load or a peek com- 
mand. But, if you look at the circuit in 
Figure 1 , you will see that the output of 
the OR gate goes to the R/W (read/ 
write) line of the memory. Normally, 
when you read from this location, the 
R/W line is high, which puts the chip 
in the read mode. Now that the flip-flop 
is flipped, however, the R/ W line will 
go low when you read from the area. So, 



the memory chip goes into the write 
mode. 

But, the CPU is reading, and if the 
CPU is reading and the memory chip is 
writing, where does the data come 
from? Well, remember the latch? The 
output of the OR gate is also connected 
to the Output Enable of our latch. The 
memory chip gets its data from the 
latch, which is putting its data on the 
bus. There is no conflict because noth- 
ing else is putting anything on the bus; 
the CPU is reading and the memory 
chip wants data in the write mode. This 
action causes the data that we put into 
the latch to be put into the memory 
chip. That is how you write to an area 
of memory that is not writable. To end 
things, when we are finished reading, or 
should I say writing, the flip-flop is 
flopped back to the original state. 

To summarize, every time you want 
to write to a location from SC000 to 
SDFFF, you must first store or poke 
that data to SFF40. That loads up the 



latch and flips the flip-flop. Then, read 
the location you wanted to write to, to 
transfer the data into it. That's all there 
is to it! By the way, it is automatically 
write-protected. You can't write to it 
and change the data — that is why I 
made this in the first place. 

Now for the construction of the 
project. There are only four parts to it, 
as you can see from the schematic in 
Figure 1. In the case of the 74LS74 and 
the 74LS32, unmarked pins are unused. 
Here is a list of connections to the chips 
that connect +5V and GND: 



IC# 


Name 


+5V 


GND 


Ul 


6264 


28 


14 


U2 


74LS374 


20 


10 


U3 


74LS32 


14 


7 


U4 


74LS74 


14 


7 



It is recommended that you put all of 
these chips into sockets because if you 
make a mistake and burn out one of 



them, it is a real pain to unsolder all the 
connections. You will also need a board 
to mount the parts on. You can get such 
a board from C.R.C. Computers Inc., 
(514) 383-5293. In fact, they have all the 
parts you need. The standard project 
building tools are necessary for this 
project. 

A note to people who are using a 
Multi-Pak: In order to use this module 
with the Multi-Pak, you must set the 
switch to the slot that the module is in. 
If you have a disk controller and are 
using Disk Extended BASIC, you can 
switch to the modules slot by software, 
but you will lose Disk BASIC software, 
and the computer will crash. A good 
knowledge of machine language pro- 
gramming and Disk Extended BASIC is 
necessary to avoid crashing. The same 
goes with the CoCo 3. You can use it 
with the CoCo 3, but you must know 
how to switch into the ROM/ RAM 
mode. Again, a knowledge of the ma- 
chine is necessary. □ 



coco BUS 

CONNECTOR 




AD 

A1 

A3 


_1 9 

■20 
-?1 


% 


A2 

A4 " 

A5 


-22 
"23 

~ZA 




AG 
A7 
A8 
A9 

A1 0 ' 

ai 1 : 


*25 
"26 
"27 
"28 
"23 

"so 








A1 2 


"31 





s 1 □ 



+5V 
Q 



9 



V 21 



+5V 




^ 23 



20 



26 



27 



22 



U1 



AD 


DO ■ 


A1 


□ 1 ■ 


A2 


□ 2 


A3 


□ 3 ■ 


A4 


DA ■ 


A5 


□ 5 ■ 


A6 


□ 6 ■ 


A7 


□ 7 ■ 


A8 




A3 




A 1 Q 




A1 1 




A1 2 




est 




CS2 




WE 




OE 





11 / 



1 2 



1 3 / 



1 5 



1 6 



1 7 



1 a 



1 9 X 



1 8 



Ir 



1 1 



U2 



DO 

□ 1 

□ 2 
03 
04 
D5 
D6 
07 



□ O 

□ 1 

□ 2 

□ 3 

□ 4 

□ 5 
□6 

□ 7 



C 0C 
>CLK 



74LS374 



2> 



15> 



1 6 



1 9 y 



USA 




74LS74 



+ 5V 



Figure 1 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 125 



DOCTOR ASCII 




Looking for CoCo 3 Answers 



By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 



/ recently purchased a new CoCo 3 
and a Panasonic KX-P1092 DM P. 
Can you tell me where I can get a 
graphics screen dump for my printer 
that will at least work for PMODE 1 
through 4 screens and possibly for the 
new high resolution screens? Do you 
know of a non-OS-9 editor for the 
CoCo 3 that uses the Hi- Res text 
screens and large memory capacity? I'd 
like the editor to be invisible and to be 
able to enter and execute BASIC com- 
mands from inside the editor. I am also 
looking for a smart terminal program 
that supports the screen and memory 
capabilities of the CoCo 3 and emulates 
at least a VT52 terminal. Do you know 
if anyone has developed a validated Ada 
compiler package? I have OS-9 Level I 
and, after reading the documentation 
several times, I can still barely create a 
login command file. I have heard many 
rumors, accusations and praises about 
OS-9 Level II. I would like to use 
OS-9, but its user-hostility has made me 
afraid of it. 

Marc Kovner 
River Ridge, LA 



13 You can get a reprint of "Printer 
Answers" from the March 1985 
issue of HOT CoCo. It contained a 
program, VersaDump, which is a 



Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




screen-dump generator for most 9-pin, 
dot matrix printers using PMDDE3 and 4 
screens. Write to: CW Communica- 
tions, Peterborough, NH 03458. Dr. 
Preble's Programs (6540 Outer Loop, 
Louisville, KY 40228, 502-966-8281) 
markets Basic Freedom, a full-screen 
editor for BASIC programming ($29.95). 
Extended memory support for CoCo 3 
BASIC is currently available only for 
HSCREENs, RAM disks and print spool- 
ers. The only terminal program for the 
CoCo 3 with VT-100 support that I 
know of is Cer-Comp's Data-Pack III 
Plus Version 1.1 ($59.95). You may see 
an Ada package for the CoCo at some 
future date, but I doubt if you will ever 
see a validated version. The most likely 
source of such a product would be 
Frank Hogg Lab. The OS-9 Level II 
documentation is much better than that 
for Level I. Level II has 1 100-plus pages. 



Wants to Use Disk 

/ have backed up my ROM packs 
using ROM Pack Roundup from the 
October 1984 issue and ROMRAM 
from the March 1984 issue. I have been 
using most of them successfully with my 
previous cassette-based system. I re- 
cently purchased a Radio Shack Drive 
0 and find that I cannot get the pro- 
grams to execute after saving them to 
disk. I would like to use Scripsit, ED- 
TASM+, and Spectaculator for creating 
disk files once I can get them to execute 
from disk. My CoCo 2 was purchased 
as a 16K ECB at the end of 1983 and 
its serial number is 001698 and model 
number is 26-3027. I have since up- 
graded to 64K. Another item I am 
concerned about is my VIP terminal 
programs. The cassette version works, 
except when I try to print the buffer. It 
prints the first page and then locks up. 
Pushing reset is the only way out. The 
disk version loads and the title screen 
appears, but then an 'E' appears above 
the title, the disk keeps running, and 
nothing else happens. 

Brock Beske 
Mankato, MN 

1^ For programs like Spectaculator 
/Lthat generate files, the files will 
still go to tape. While patching the file 
routines is possible, it is no simple task. 
The easiest way would be to purchase 
the disk versions of those routines. In 
that vein, I must ask why Scripsit and 
Spectaculator! These are far from the 
best the CoCo has to offer. I suggest you 
consider disk versions of Telewriter and 
Dynacalc as replacements. The VIP 
terminal program, to my knowledge, is 
no longer marketed. Get a disk terminal 



126 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



program with XON/XOFF upload/ 
download protocol so you can reliably 
transfer files and access Delphi and 
BBSs. 

Remote Keyboard 

I've read Marty Goodman's advice to 
those having trouble finding room 
for the CoCo with Multi-Pak at- 
tached. He suggested to "make a remote 
keyboard, and put the main CoCo 
system below, above, or to one side of 
your desk. " Sounds good to me, but 
how does one do it? I'm not familiar 
with availability or sources for key- 
boards nor proper methods for connect- 
ing them. If keyboards are too expen- 
sive or difficult to hook up, can another 
computer, if readily available , hook up 
instead of a keyboard? And if so, how? 

W. V. Barton 
McPherson, KS 

D Hold off a bit on that one. A 
*~}C number of companies are working 
on IBM PC keyboard adapters for the 
CoCo, I expect to see them at 
RAINBOWfest-Princeton. 

Calling ASCII 



I cannot call up ASCII format pro- 
grams. I download from other sys- 
tems into BASIC. I have a CoCo 2 
with cassette drive and modem Df L 
Program Pak. Can you help 9 

A ndy Brady 
Lake Worth, FL 

TjJ After you download the pro- 
•*-^{.grarns, load them into an ASCII 
word processor and edit them so that 
each line starts with a line number and 
there are no statements that continue 
onto a second line. Save the files back 
to tape and then they should load OK. 

Address Conversion 

BASIC programs for the CoCo are 
readily transferable to IBM PCs 
using CoCoUtil. However, machine 
language pokes within BASIC, when 
transferred, yield incorrect code due to 
differences in program map location. 
Do conversion tables exist for map 
location of CoCo Disk BASIC LO or 1.1 
to a PC BASIC such as GW-BASIC? 

Robert Freed man 
Mars, PA 

ID Unfortunately, the PEEK-POKE 
/L address conversion is not that 
simple. From a user's point of view, the 
BASICS are quite similar, while at the 
machine level they are different to the 




extent that a simple PEEK-POKE on one 
computer can easily track to a user- 
provided machine language subroutine 
in the other. 

Those Noisy Drives 

/ purchased two TEA C FD~55As 
about two years ago. I have always 
■3- thought they are pretty noisy, 
especially when compared to other 
computers like the Tandy 1000, Are 
they noisy because they are in a vertical 
case or because they are external? They 
are supposed to be good drives. Canyou 
offer any light on the subject? 

Robert Jobin 
Theodore, A L 

The older TEAC half-high drives 
do run noisy. It is inherent in the 
drives' design and not related to their 
physical orientation. These drives are 
reputed for their reliability, and the 
later models (with BV suffix) do run 
quieter. 

CoCo 3 and the RS-232 

2 / recently purchased a Color 

— Computer 3 and hooked my RS-232 

- to it, expecting it to be compatible. 
When I typed EXEC&HC000, the 
computer refused to operate the inter- 
face. Upon testing the connection and 
the DIP switches, I noticed that the Pak 
worked only during the com puter s first 
cold start. I thought all of Radio Shack 
hardware is compatible with the CoCo 
3. Is there any way I can fix the RS-232 
pack? It will not lock up after the first 
cold start. 

Daryl Fortney 
Lancaster, PA 

^ t The CoCo 3 will run many CoCo 
A X 2 programs, but not all. Accord- 
ing to Tandy, all programs will run "if 
they follow the rules," but, unfortu- 
nately, not even Tandy itself has fol- 
lowed the rules (e.g., the recently re- 
leased ROM pack Cyrus is not CoCo 3 
compatible). June's column contained a 
program, UNDO.BfiS* that will aid in 
running some, but not all, CoCo 2 
software on the CoCo 3. The best way 
to use your RS-232 pack with the CoCo 
3 is with a Multi-Pak interface (up- 
graded for CoCo 3 use) and a real 
terminal program with 80-column sup- 
port and Xmodem upload/download 
protocol. 

Directory Printing 

/ have a CoCo 2 and a DM P- 1 10 
printer plus disk drive. I use 
P0KE1 1 1 ,254:DIR to print out the 



directory. I would like to know how to 
move the printing during the 
P0KE111 ,254:0IR to another position 
on the paper. This would enable me to 
get more use out of the paper in the 
printer. The program I use is modified 
from the one-liner on Page 28 of the 
May issue. 

10 PRINTtt-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(77 
(;CHR$(27); CHRT (28) :PRINTtt- 
2:INPUT"DI5K NRME "; X$ : PRINT tt - 

2, X$: PRINTtt-2, " POKE 

lll,254:DIR:PRINTtt-2:PRINTtt-2, 
'TREE GRANULES "FREE ( 0 ) " 

/ can move the disk name and the 
granules by adding a PR I NT II - 
2 , T AB (40) after the PR I NTtt-2 but not 
for the POKE 11 1,254: DIR. Is it possi- 
ble? 

Edward Kotler 
El Cajon, CA 

D When you P0KE111 ,254, you are 
*-jL modifying the machine language 
program that is accessed when you type 
OIR to use device -2 (Note: 256- 
2=254). To do what you want would 
require either intercepting the CHROUT 
vector with a machine language routine 
or writing a routine from scratch using 
disk I/O to read the sectors containing 
the disk directory directly. 

Terminal Software Sources 



H / am interested in finding a source for 
- MikeyTerm or Greg-E-Term. / have 




1 a CoCo 2 with J DOS, RS-DOS, RS- 
232 cartridge and a Modem IB without 
a compatible terminal program. I un~ 
demand I can V contact Delphi or any 
other BBS, so Vm writing to find a 
source other than the above source. 

Richard Schultz 
Carmichael, CA 

Both Mi key Term and Greg-E- 
Term are available from the au- 
thorsfor$10 plus an RS formatted disk. 
Write the authors at: Michael Ward, 
1807 Cortez, Coral Gables, FL 33134, 
and Greg Miller, 9575 Roston Road, 
Grandledge, MI 48837, respectively. 

Boolean Algebra? 

/ have seen Line 3 in the program 
i below in one form or another in 
O several programs published in THE 
RAINBOW. For example, the program 
Palette Color Checker in the April issue, 



August 1987 THE RAfNBOW 1 27 



Page 80, lines 100 and 110. I know that 
Boolean algebra is involved here, but I 
cannot figure out how and why it works, 
or why it works with the numbers 31 
and 63 but not with 9 or 29. It counts 
from 0 to 31 over and over, but with 
another number it just counts 0 to 1 or 
not at all Can you shed some light on 
this for me? 

10 CLS 

20 P$=INKEY$: IFP$=""THEN2 
30 fl=fl+l AND 31 :PRINT@199,fl 
40 GOTO 2 

George Quell horst 
Painesville, OH 



Thirty-one is the equivalent of the 
binary number 0001 1111, and 63 
is the equivalent of the binary number 
00 1 1 1 1 1 1 . If you AND a number with 63, 
the net effect is that you get the re- 
mainder that would result from dividing 
63 into that number. The same is true 
for any integer number that has its 
binary equivalent of all consecutive Is 
to the left of the decimal point. Now, 9 
is the equivalent of 000001001, and 29 
is the equivalent of 00011101 and con- 
sequently, with them, the above is not 
true. For a more complete description 
of why these conclusions hold, it would 
be necessary to go into a long treatise 
on Boolean algebra. 




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How Much Memory? 

1 own a Color Computer, extended, 
with dual disk drive. I also have the 
older model Multi-Pak, the Color 
File cartridge, and Color Profile. / 
cannot get Color Profile to work even 
though there seems to be nothing wrong 
with it. There is no one in this area 
qualified to give instructions on it. The 
Color File cartridge works fine, with 
one exception. I cannot default the 
baud rate to the printer, hence it is 
extremely slow. Can the CoCo 2 be 
upgraded to I28K? Is there a program 
that would allow me to put the Color 
File cartridge onto disk and also enable 
me to default the baud? I have an 
address list of approximately 340 
names and my 64 K cannot handle it 
on one tape, so I have to load half 
at a time and print them before I can 
load the second half I need the extra 
memory to handle the entire list at 
one time. I purchased the Co Co 3 
because it has 128 K only to find that 
all I have available is what I now 
have in my Extended BASIC CoCo. 

Ronald Rodriguez 
Somerset, MA 

1^ Your Color Profile disk should 
/L work just fine. If you are having 
problems with the disk, you should 
contact the Radio Shack from which 
you purchased the program. Now, in 
answer to your other questions, you 
can obtain memory upgrades to 
128K, or even 512K, for the CoCo 1 
and 2; however, this memory would 
not be used in the CoCo as contig- 
uous memory. As a result, it would 
not be used by commercial software, 
such as Color File or Color Profile, 
for data storage. In most cases, these 
upgrades are designed with the 
hacker in mind or for use as a RAM 
disk or print spooler. For your pur- 
poses, the best solution would be to 
use the CoCo 3 with OS-9 Level II 
and an OS-9 database program. 

For a quicker response, your 
questions may also be submitted 
through rainbow's CoCo SIG on 
Delphi. From the CoCo SIG> 
prompt, pick Rainbow Magazine 
Services, then, at the RAIN- 
B O W > prompt, type R5K for " Ask 
the Experts" to arrive at the EX- 
PERTS> prompt, where you can 
select the "Doctor ASCII" online 
form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



128 



THE RAINBOW August 1987 



RAINBOW REV IE 



Freedom 

Eases Programming in BASIC/Dr. Preble's Programs 135 

Better Graphics on Your CoCo 3 

Tap Into Enhanced Capabilities/Morefon Bay Software 143 

CoCo III Utilities 

Helps Develop Programming Skills/ Sped rum Projects, Inc 141 

Color Scripsit II 

Powerful and Simple Word Processor/ Tandy 138 

Custom Palette Designer 

Makes Color-Handling a Breeze/ Gimmeso ft 134 

Donut Dilemma 

Satisfy Your Appetite for Action/A/ovaSo/f 133 

Gridiron 

Strategy Scores a Touchdown/SPOft TSware 142 

Koronis Rift 

A "Shoot-'em-up" Adventure/Epyx Computer Software 136 

Magnavox Professional RGB Monitor 

Plenty of Resolution, Great Display/Howard Medical Computers 140 

Print Spooler, Directory Date, TYP-O-MATIC, Screenprint 

New Utilities for the CoCo 3/Bangert Software Systems 132 

Super Extended Basic Unravelled 

Hi-Res Graphics on the CoCo 3/Microcom Software 139 

Telewriter-64 

A Second Look at an Old Friend/Cogn/tec 143 



FOR DELIVERY IN AUGUST, 1987 




Comp 



ainbow 





Level 



Vol. I: A 



inners Guide 





indows 



Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble have done it again! They've been busy pulling apart, 
examining and testing the new OS-9 Level II. Find out what they've discovered with 
The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II, Vol I: A Beginners Guide to Windows. 

Let these popular authors open the window to OS-9 for you. 

This easy-to-follow book leads you step by step through OS-9 Level It. Clear, 
precise text, insightful examples and helpful tips make this almost 300-page book 
an indispensable resource. This book will only be available from us by advance order. 
We will only print sufficient copies to cover the orders on hand. 

Get Yours for Only $1 9.95! 

ALSO AVAIUBIE - The Windows & Applications Disk 

An adjunct and complement to the book. You'll want the book for the tutorials 
and the disk to save the many hours of typing in lengthy programs. Disk $19.95 

Please send me: 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I: A Beginners Guide to Windows for $1 9.95 1 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for $19.95* (Does not include book) 

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To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 

*Add $1.50 per book shipping and handling in U.S. Outside U.S. add $4 per book. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery. Ky. residents should 
add 5% sales tax. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. All orders in U.S. funds only, please. 

OS-9 Is a trademark of Microware Systems Corporation. 



RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



The following products have recently been received by THE RAINBOW, 
examined by our magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow Seal of 
Certification, your assurance that we have seen the product and have 
ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 

This month the Seal of Certification has been issued to: 



20 Solved Adventures, a booklet listing 
the solutions to 20 popular Adventure 
games. Volumes 3 and 4 are now avail- 
able in English, French and Spanish. 
Lomiq, Inc., CP 105 Succursale A, 
Jonquiere, Quebec, Canada G7X 7V8; 
$8 per volume. 

ALF, an artificial learning file that 
generates a master file of questions and 
answers. The user can generate a master 
file for any topic and have up to 300 
different answers in memory at one 
time. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. High 
Altitude Software, 339 32 l / 2 Road, 
Palisade, CO 81526; $8.95. 

Art Deli, a set of 10 picture disks 
featuring holiday and seasonal pictures. 
Each disk contains 22 pictures for a 
total of 440 pictures. Every picture is 
black and white, PMDDE4, and can be 
loaded into CoCo Max or your favorite 
graphics software program. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Specialty Projects, 
4810 McCrory, Memphis, TN 38122; 
(901) 682-8737, $12.95 per disk; $99.95 
set of 10 disks plus $3 S/H. 

Art Gallery II, an improved version of 
the 32K Art Gallery program. It now 
reads Graphicom and CoCo Max pic- 
tures. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Tothian 
Software, Box 663, Rimer sburg, VA 
16248; $19.95. 

Blackbook, a 16K address book that 
stores names, addresses and phone 
numbers on disk for easy retrieval. 
Features search selection, password 
protection, edit and add. For the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3. Cocotronics Software, 29 
Southbrook, Irvine, CA 92714; (714) 
651-0283, $7.95 plus $1 S/H. 

Color File II, a 16K filing system that 
helps you retrieve and use information. 
The program comes with five pre- 
defined file types and also lets you 



define your own files. For the CoCo 1, 
2 and 3 . Ta ndy Corporation; 
$24.95. Available in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide. 

Financial Time Conversions, a 32K 

program that performs calculations 
necessary to make good financial deci- 
sions. The program enables you to 
compare the value of different types of 
transactions at the same point in time. 
It will also print a loan amortization list. 
For the CoCo I, 2 and 3. Prometheus 
Software, 14684 Joshua Tree Avenue, 
Moreno Valley, CA 92388; $14. 

Fraze Craze, a 128K computer version 
of the popular TV program Wheel of 
Fortune. Score points as you select the 
correct letters. For the CoCo 3. RAM 
Electronics, 814 Josephine Street, Mon- 
mouth, OR 97361; (503) 838-4144, 
$12.95. 

GRPH200, a I6K position-independent 
ML graphics dump designed specifi- 
cally for the Tandy DMP-200 printer. 
Features vertical page placement, 
graphics preview, and vertical or hori- 
zontal and vertical manipulation of the 
graphics pages. For the CoCo 1 and 2. 
Seibyte Software, P.O. Box 6464, Bak- 
ersfield, CA 93386; Disk, $16.95; Tape, 
$15.95. 

Hall of the King III: The Earthstone 
Revealed, a 64K graphics Adventure 
game. The final chapter in a trilogy of 
two disk Adventures. Your quest is to 
enter the very heart of the mountain 
known as Firrhest and find the Earth- 
stone to regain the ancient wealth and 
power for the Dwarvan race. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Prickly- Pear Soft- 
ware, 213 La Mirada, El Paso, TX 
79932; (915) 584-7784, $39.95. 

Indiana Jim, a 64K Adventure game. 
Join Indiana Jim in his efforts to avoid 



danger as he eludes the Indians. For the 
CoCo 2 and 3. Lomiq, Inc., CP 105, 
Succursale A, Jonquiere, Quebec, Can- 
ada G7X 7V8; $28.95 U.S.; $38.95 Cdn. 

LOTZALUK, a 32K program to help 
increase your odds of picking a winning 
Lotto 6/49 chance. For the CoCo 1, 2 
and 3. William Brigance, Sr., 1001 
Fairweather Drive, Sacramento, CA 
95833; $29.95. 

Noteland, a 32K music education pro- 
gram for beginners that lets you play a 
tune with a joystick or cursor keys and 
save tunes on cassette or disk. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Elegant Software, 89 
Massachusetts Avenue, Box 25, Bos- 
ton, MA 02115; $24.95. 

POLYTINT, a 128K program that 
permits recoloring of PMDDE3 and 
PMDDE4 images in 16 colors. For the 
CoCo 3. Boiling Spring Lakes Soft- 
ware, 411 Pine Lake Road, Southport, 
NC 28461; (919) 845-2881, $19. 

Rescue on Fractalus!, a 128K strategy 
game. Your mission is to rescue pilots 
shot down and stranded on the brutal 
planet of Fractalus and help lead our 
forces to victory. For the CoCo 3. Epyx 
Computer Software, Sunnyvale, CA; 
$29. 95. A vailable in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide. 



The Seal of Ceri if i cation program is open to 
all manufacturers of products for the Tandy 
Color Computer, regardless of whether they 
advertise in the rainbow. 
By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies 
the product does exist — that we have 
examined it and have a sample copy — but 
this does not constitute any guarantee of 
satisfaction. As soon as possible, these 
hardware or software items will be 
forwarded to the rainbow reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 131 



Software R e m e w JZ ^!^^ 

Powerful New Utilities 
for the CoCo 3 

How many of you have bought a new utility program for 
your CoCo to find out that it was too much trouble to look 
up the loading address or figure out the offset, or, no matter 
what, the miserable thing crashed your computer if you 
sneezed at the wrong time? I know that it's happened to me 
more times than I want to remember. Bangert Software 
Systems has four utilities for the CoCo 3 that will not 
become dusty, never used relics. They work, they do what 
they're supposed to do, and they recover from a reset intact. 

The system requirements are a CoCo 3, one disk drive, 
either, RGB or composite monitor, or a TV, and a printer 
for two of the four programs. They can be copied to one 
disk so you have almost the equivalent of an OS-9 startup 
file or an MS-DOS batch file. 

Each utility is supplied on a separate disk, not copy- 
protected, along with the assembly language source code, 
a special file called 5PAEXI T * BIN (which is called by 
pressing the reset key and leaves with all utilities still intact), 
and a whole barrel full of other supporting files that allow 
the user to list the full manual to the screen and send it to 
the printer, BASIC loader programs for each utility, and a 
master loader for all of them. 

Don't let the assembly language reference scare you. You 
don't need it to run any of these routines. It is supplied only 
as an extra for those who are interested. 

Each utility d isk has a program called PR I NT , BA5 on it 
that lets you RUN "PRINT and be prompted as to the 
documents you want sent to your printer. You have the 
option of entering ALL, and I suggest that be done. Then 
you'll have the total manual for all four utilities, and it will 
give you an idea of how they interact and whether you want 
to purchase the rest of the package. Unless the final edition 
has one small bug perfected, you will have to first load 
PRINT „ BA5 and then list Line 40. If the last word in that 
line is 5TARTTYP, you will have to edit Line 40. Change 
5TARTTYP to 5TARTYPM, Then type RUN, answer the 
prompts, and you can go feed the cat while the manual is 
being printed out. Also, when asked for the baud rate for 
your printer, just enter the value you're poking, not the 
location. That is, f or 9600 enter 1, not 150 , 1. 

If you don't have a printer, you may use the LIST program 
to read the same information on your screen. This is an 
example of the attention to detail Bangert has employed to 
make these utilities easy to use. 

Print Spooler is probably the most usef ul of the package, 
First of all, you may LLI5T a BASIC program to the printer, 
and while the printer is churning away, you can continue 
to edit the same program, run it, load another program and 
run it, or go watch TV. If you have a BASIC word processor, 
the document can be printed while you work on another 
one, clean up your disk files or write another program. 
Formatted LLISTings can be made with a simple poke. If 
you're writing a program, a formatted LLI5T will make 
debugging much simpler. All baud rates are allowed, 
whether using a serial or parallel printer. 

The spooler is a tad over 1 IK, but will process anything 
within the limits of memory. 



Directory Date is another important utility if you have 
a lot of files on a lot of disks and tend to lose track of when 
files or programs were last updated. It prompts the user to 
set the time and date on power up and stamps that 
information on all disk saves. That means if you type DIR, 
the time and date you saved the file will be shown. 

Typ-O-M alic incorporates several functions. The first is 
an automatic key repeat, which repeats each key if held 
down for a half second. The next is an audible key click, 
which means when you press a key, you can hear a soft 
thump. Once you use these, you won't want to do without 
them. If you have the screen print utility Installed, it can 
be called from Typ-O-Maiic with two keystrokes. The last 
feature, and least useful, is an alternate keypad mode. The 
author has given 10 keys on the computer a second 
definition, which are accessed by pressing the ALT key, This 

"They work, they do 
what they're 
supposed to do, and 
they recover from a 
reset intact " 

is designed to give you a numeric keypad and hard ly seems 
worth the trouble, but more creative types than I might 
think differently. Incidentally, the 10 keys plus 25 more can 
be redefined by the user and saved into a startup file. 

Screenprint prints the contents of your Hi-Res text screen 
to your printer on command. 

There were a few aspects of these utilities that I found 
troublesome. The auto key repeat works with CTRL and 
ALT, which makes the user stop and think before typing a 
two-key combination using them. When the ALT key is 
depressed to change to the redefined keyboard, an T is 
generated on the screen. These aren't bugs, only a little 
awkward; however, when I called Bangert the author said 
he had already corrected these plus the Print program listing 
error. 

I should mention one other undocumented feature of the 
date/time module. When you first boot your computer, you 
are prompted to enter the time and date. The program asks 
for MMDD; that is, May 1 would be entered 0501, with 
no provision for the year. It will accept five digits, so you 
can enter 05017 for May 1, 1987. Actually, you can enter 
the full year until October rolls around, because the leading 
zero is ignored. 

This is an excellent package. It's user-friendly and easy 
to install; it can be customized to your system, thanks to 
the examples and the BASIC loaders, and also provides all 
the assembly language source code. In my opinion the key 
click, key repeat, print spooler and date/time routines are 
worth the price by themselves. 

I also congratulate Bangert for publishing a program(s) 
that requires only six or seven commands to remember, 
operates transparently, uses only 112 bytes of BASIC 
memory, and pays attention to both the beginner and 
advanced user. 

(Bangert Software Systems, P.O. Box 21056, Indianapolis, 

IN 46221; 317-262-8855, $9.95 per module; All, $24.95) 

— Frank Mardon 



132 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



Software Review 

Satisfy Your Appetite for 
Action With Donut Dilemma 

NovaSoft has added a new program, Donut Dilemma, 
to their list of excellent arcade games. The documentation 
is covered on two pages. As in most arcade games, you do 
not need much in the way of instructions; all you really need 
is experience. The documentation also includes a good 
description of the arcade scenario. 

Angry Angelo has raided Antonio's Donut Factory 
sending everything into disarray. Donuts have come alive. 
They are jumping around in a wild frenzy and are deadly 
to the touch. Machines have gone out of control, throwing 
cooking fat, dough and icing sugar everywhere. All these 
can also be fatal to Antonio. Your job is to help Antonio 
climb ladders, jump platforms and ride elevators to reach 
the top floor and shut down the factory's power generator. 
For each floor level (except Floor 10), you must get to the 
small elevator platform that takes you up through the 
ceiling and into the next floor level. Unfortunately, due to 
circumstances beyond anyone's control, the three circuit 
breakers on each floor that activate the elevators have been 
switched off. You must, therefore, activate all three circuit 
breakers to activate the elevator for that floor. Bouncing 
donuts will be in your way. The only way to get past them 
is to pop them by throwing a handful of dough mix at them. 

"Your ultimate goal is to 
reach Floor 10 and 
deactivate the power 
generator to restore law 
and order in Antonio's 
Donut Factory. " 



To get some dough mix, you must first get the blue bag. 
You see, each floor has a blue bag that contains five handfuls 
of dough. Your ultimate goal is to reach Floor 10 and 
deactivate the power generator to restore law and order in 
Antonio's Donut Factory. Besides having to work against 
all these obstacles, you also have to work against the clock, 
[f you do get into trouble, or rather, when you get into deep 
trouble, there is a panic button available that you can use 
once during each game. This refills your dough bag and 
temporarily stalls the timer. 

When you first start a game, you have the option of 
playing a practice game. This is a very nice feature because, 
otherwise, I would have never seen all 1 0 floors. The practice 
game is just like a regular game except there is no scoring 
and you have unlimited lives. This is where you can get all 
the practice you want on each level. You do have to start 
from the bottom, though; you cannot just pick the level or 
floor you want. The instructions state that Floor 9 is not 
impossible; it just needs a lot of thought. I can agree and 
add, it takes some good timing. Once you think you have 
had enough practice, exit the practice mode and see how 
good you are on the regular game. 




Donut Dilemma only requires 32K and runs as well on 
the CoCo 1 as it does on the CoCo 3. I used the disk version, 
but it also comes on tape. 

I don't think you can go wrong with Donut Dilemma. 
It can be a source of hours of fun. 

(NovaSoft, P.O. Box 201, Ada, MI 49301; 616-676-8172, 
Tape, $21.95, Disk, $24.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Dale E. Shell 



3-D GRAPHICS ANIMATION 

MORE FEATURES AT A LOWER PRICE! 




• Rotate, Move, Zoom, and Animate Mutiple Objects 
Simultaneously. 

• Comes with Data to Create Your Own 3-D Animation 
with a Spaceship, Car, Pyramid, Cube and Sphere. 
Includes Animation Examples with these Objects. 

• Includes Editor to Create and Edit Data for 3-D Graphics 
Animation of Any Objects, including: Cars, Boats, 
Airplanes, Etc. 

• Now Supports Elimination of Hidden Lines. 

• Print 3-D Graphics Images on Radio Shacfc* } Dot 
Matrix Printers. 

• Easy to Use • Requires 64K « COCO 2 or COCO 3 • Disk Only 
- Reg. $32 95 Now $24.95 + $3 Shipping/Handling 

• Only $5 + $2 Shipping/ Handling for 3-D Demo-Disk 
with Animation Examples using a Spaceship, Car; 
Pyramid, Cube, and Sphere. The $5 Applies Toward a 
Later Purchase of the Entire Program. 

Visa and Mastercard Accepted 

Logic ware 

2346 W. Estrella Drive Chandler, AZ 85224 (602) 821-2465 

Radio Shuck is a registered trademark of Tandy Corporation 

August 1987 THE RAINBOW 133 




Software Reviewi 



Custom Palette Designer 
Makes Color-Handling a 

TV 
H w 



I have been involved with the TRS-80 world since 1977 
when I bought a 4K Level I, Model I computer. I have 
always been interested in graphics and love the way they've 
developed. I am always interested in programs that make 
graphics or color-handling easier, and the Custom Palette 
Designer Version LO makes palette color manipulation a 
breeze. This well-written program requires a 128K CoCo 
3 using either 1.0 or 1.1 Disk BASIC, and at least one disk 
drive. The Custom Palette Designer allows you to change 
any palette slot to any other color you desire — without 
having to remember names or numbers of colors. The 
program modifies any or all of the 16 slots (0-15) to any 
of the 64 colors available on the CoCo 3. 

After loading the program^ you are asked if you are using 
the RGB monitor or not, and then you are presented with 
the main screen, which shows the 16 default palette slots 
and a pointer beneath Slot 0. Altering the color contents 
of the palette slots is easy and handled with the arrow keys. 
The up and down arrows move the pointer either forward 
or backward one slot at a time, and the left and right arrows 
change the color of the palette. 







If you re stiii plugging printed 
circuit cards into your 

CoCo 1 
CoCo 2 
CoCo 3 

without a card gaidt . . . 

CUT IT OUT. 

Write or call for a free brochure describing 
printed circuit cards and guides designed 
for the CoCo expanstion port. Bare cards 
or with connector for disk controller. 

206 782-6809 






ROBOTIC 





MICROSYSTEMS 




BOX 30807 SEATTLE, WA 98103 






The Custom Palette Designer also makes use of the 
additional keys on the CoCo 3 keyboard. The Fl key resets 
the foreground color to white; F2 resets the background 
color to black; and the ALT key resets all the palettes back 
to the default colors. This is especially helpful if you make 
an error and need to start all over again with a clean slate. 
After you have the palette slots the color you want them, 
you have the option of saving the configured palettes to disk 
as an ASCII file with the line numbers of your choice so 
you can use the files as a subroutine. 




The power of this program is obvious. If you'd like to 
give your BASIC CoCo 3 programs a different look, and you 
use the PRLETTE command a lot but don*t want to be 
bothered with changing the color manually each time you 
run it, create several alternate palette subroutines, merge 
them into the BASIC program you're using, and, presto, 
different colors! 

The Custom Palette Designer has a place in the library 
of the BASIC programmer. The manual is small but easy to 
use, and the software can be a great timesaver. 

(Gimniesoft,4 Hallfield Ct., Baltimore, MD 92136; 301-256- 
7558, $19.95) 



Joe Simon 



Hint . . . 

Useful Commands 
for Controlling Graphics 

C3 ST 

Most people, when writing graphics programs for 
the CoCo, use an infinite loop (e.g., 1000 GOTO 1000) 
to make the graphics stay on the screen. In many cases, 
it is better to use the LINEINPUT or INKEYS com- 
mands. These commands allow you to enter a line of 
text or just a single keystroke, which the program can 
interpret, transferring control to the appropriate line. 
This is especially useful if you want to graph functions 
and you want to see several different values graphed. 

Cornelius Caesar 
West Germany 



134 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



Software Revien^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Z 

Basic Freedom Eases 
Programming in BASIC 

BASIC on the CoCo is a powerful tool. It has easy to use 
commands to generate graphics and sound, and manipulate 
text and numbers, and it can access both random and 
sequential files on disk. Even with all this power, however, 
we often find ourselves wanting "just one more feature" out 
of BASIC. Many of those people's wishes have now been 
granted: Dr. Preble's Programs has just introduced Basic 
Freedom, a utility to add several new features to BASIC and 
simplify its use for programmers. 

Basic Freedom is a full screen editor for either the original 
CoCo J or 2 or the new CoCo 3. It works in the 32-column 
mode, or the 40- or 80-column mode on the CoCo 3. In 
addition, Basic Freedom modified BASIC so that lowercase 
commands can be executed, added the ability to repeat any 
key just by holding it down, and makes the LIST command 
more powerful. All of this is done without losing any of 
BASIC'S memory as Basic Freedom resides in high memory. 

Basic Freedom comes on a non-protected disk for both 
the CoCo 3 and the original CoCo and on cassette only for 
the CoCo I or 2. It requires 64K on the original CoCo or 
I28K on the CoCo 3. In addition to the cassette or disk, 
Basic Freedom includes a six-page manual. The manual is 
well-written, clear and easy to understand. 

Loading Basic Freedom couldn't be simpler. For those 
with the DOS command, simply put the disk that the 
program comes on in Drive 0 and type DOS. For those 
without a DOS command, simply type RUN "*". The cassette 
version is loaded with a simple CLDflDM statement. Once the 
program loads, it is ready to use. 

To use Basic Freedom's full screen editor, you type EDIT 
□N. On the CoCo 3, you can use the F2 key as a shortcut 
to turn the full screen edit mode on. Once you have the edit 
mode on, you can move the cursor anywhere on the screen 
with the arrow keys and edit the text on the screen with the 
ease of a word processor. After you edit a line of text, you 
move the cursor to the end of the line and press ENTER. The 
line is now entered into the computer with the changes you 
just made. While full screen editing, you may move the 



cursor, delete characters and insert characters. You can 
always tell when the editor is on by looking at your cursor. 
In the 40- or 80-column modes, it is solid instead of blinking 
when the editor is on. In the 32-column mode, the cursor 
blinks a single color when the editor is on. 

In addition to the full screen editor and the lowercase 
interpreter, Basic Freedom also provides a more powerful 
LIST command. In addition to the normal LIST functions, 
you can list a number of lines past a line number, such as 
the next five lines after Line 40, you can add a semicolon 
to the end of a line to execute a command after the LIST 
is over, and you can add a comma to a LIST command to 
list another set of lines after the ones you list. As an example: 

LIST 10-20,50 !B, 90, 100- : EDIT ON 

This command would list lines 10 through 20, eight lines 
starting at Line 50, Line 90, Line 100 to the end of the 
program and would then turn on the full screen editor. 

All these features add up to a program that makes 
programming in BASIC much easier and faster. If you do a 
lot of programming in BASIC, you will like this program. 
The bottom line is that this is a utility. You can use your 
CoCo without it, but it is much easier to program in BASIC 
with it. Is the added ease worth the price? Yes, the price is 
worth what you get and is in line with the rest of the market. 

(Dr. Preble's Programs, 6540 Outer Loop, Louisville, KY 
40228; 502-966-8281, Disk, $29.95; Tape, $27.95) 

— Mark Sunderlin 



ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU'RE IN 

NOTELAJSS 

_ .where learning to read music 
is easy and fun! 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



NOTELAND, a unique combination of a musical instru- 
ment and a course in music developed by Boston composer 
Andy Gaus, will let you: 
• approach music as a complete 



beginner; 

learn from an audio cassette 

.ind a written manual; 

fool around— and be learning; 

play a tune with a joystick 

(optional) or cursor kevs; 

record a tune ami play ir back 

with notarion; 

save your tune on tape or 

disk; 

test yourself "with a beat-the- 
clock quiz; 

load the program from disk or 
cassette ifvou have a CoCo ] 



7t 



- i n 



it**" 



x 




■H 



T 



or CoCo 2 with 32K and 
Extended Color Basic; 
take it home with vou — IF 
YOU ORDER NOW- for the 
special introductory price of 
$24.95. (Mass. residents add 
5% sales tax.) 



Be sure to specify disk or cassette. 

Elegant Software 

89 Massachusetts Avenue. Box 25] 
Boston, MA 02115 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 135 



ADVENTURE LOVERS 

Find the ledger hidden on "CLoud 9" 
within a two week period and you will 

win $25 - $50 - or $100!! A great 
game for all ages! Send $10 for tape 
or disk to SUN RAY Box 681623 
San Antonio, Texas 78268 



So ft ware Reviewi 



Koronis Rift Lets You 
? Shoot 'em up' and a 
Whole Lot More 

By Donald D. Dollberg 



With the introduction of the Level II OS-9 operating 
system for the Color Computer 3, Tandy is now releasing 
several games that use this operating system. The latest 
game, Koronis Rift, is distributed by Tandy but was 
developed by Lucasfilm Games and Epyx. It will only run 
on a CoCo 3 and requires OS-9 Level II. 

As has been Tandy's practice in the past, the OS-9 boot 
is on the game disk, so those not having OS-9 do not need 
to purchase it separately. The game is booted by typing DOS. 
For those with Disk Extended BASIC 2.0, you will need to 
type a short BASIC program, provided in the documentation, 
which performs the function of the DOS command. Upon 
initial loading of the game, you will be prompted as to the 
type of screen device available, i.e., composite or RGB 
monitor. Selection of the composite monitor allows viewing 
on a TV. Also, one joystick is required. 

With the "technical" out of the way, just what is Koronis 



TANDY COMPUTER 
DISCOUNTS 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-3127 64k color comp 
26-334 CoCo 3 
26-3131 1st disk drive 
26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 



89.95 
170.00 
269.95 
259.95 



PRINTERS 



26-2802 DMP 106 169.95 

26-1277 DMP-430 580.00 

26-1280 DMP-130 269.00 
Complete line of Tandy (Daisy Wheel) print wheels 

MODEL 4 and MSDOS COMPUTERS 



25-1050 Tandy 1000 EX 
25-1051 Tandy 1000 SX 
25-1011 Plus expansion board 
25-1023 CM-5 color monitor 

25- 1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 

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530.00 
850.00 
179.00 
249.95 
110.00 
920.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



Riftl Since one of the developers is Lucasfilms, of Star Wars 
fame, you should have guessed that this is another space 
Adventure. Well, you're partially correct. This is not an 
Adventure game as most of us know them, nor is it a 
continuous "shoot-'em-up" game, although you do get a 
chance every now and then to shoot down the aliens. 

The premise of the game is simple. You are a techno- 
scavenger or, in simple terms, a businessman trying to make 
a buck. In your trusty scoutcraft, you have come across the 
legendary planet Koronis, which is a high-tech graveyard 
of the Ancients — a confederation of over 30 different races 
who ruled the universe several hundred thousand years ago. 
The Ancients developed a technology that, even today, is 
unsurpassed. 

Legend has it that the Ancients used the planet Koronis 
for testing their technology. Because of the deep rifts on 




Koronis, it was an ideal testing ground for powerful 
weapons. Until now, no one has ever found the "fabled" 
planet Koronis — and there it is on the view screen of your 
scoutcraft! 

You immediately put your ship into an orbit around 
Koronis and prepare to scavenge the planet for as much 
equipment as possible. With an advanced Psytek series 
computer in control of the scoutcraft, you beam down to 
the surface in a surface rover. When you land on Koronis, 
your radiation alarms sound, confirming the rumors that 
lethal radiation exists on Koronis. Luckily, your surface 
rover is equipped with a repo-tech robot that does the actual 
salvage operations once you find one of the Ancients' hulks, 
which house their high-tech equipment. Using the special- 
ized radar in the scoutcraft, you guide the vehicle toward 
the first hulk with the joystick. 

With all of the technical capablility available to you in 
the scoutcraft, this operation should be a "piece of cake," 
but is it? As you move along the rifts, you suddenly 
remember the other half of the Koronis legend. The hulks 
are protected by the Guardians, a race of genetically- 
engineered warriors created by the Ancients. The Guardians 
were programmed by the Ancients to guard and defend their 
military stockpiles and have steadfastly refused to negotiate 
with anyone. 

As you approach the first hulk on Rift 1, you are thinking 
of the long and dangerous task ahead. The profits are 
enormous and you can quit at any time. However, while 
collecting equipment from the Ancients' hulks, be careful 
that the Guardian saucers don't destroy you first. As you 



136 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



move from Rift 1 to Rift 20, you are able to make use of 
some of the equipment collected. You can also dismantle 
the equipment and eventually sell it for profit. If you make 
it to Rift 20, the Guardian base must be destroyed before 
you can claim the entire planet as your own. 

Just what type of high-tech equipment will you find on 
Koronis and what do you do with it? The standard military 
systems that the Ancients used include chromoquantized 
lasers, which are capable of emiting a beam in a single color 
frequency; chromoquantized shields, which can defend 
against the lasers; standard power supply generators; high 
capacity energy storage devices; remote sensing devices, 
which are designed to locate specific types of hardware; 
electronic countermeasure devices, which are capable of 
interfering with enemy detection gear (making it difficult 
for the Guardians to find you); and propulsion modules, 
which can augment the power drive for the rover for 
different types of terrain. 

As noted earlier, the Ancients were a Confederation of 
many races. Each race built its own version of military 
hardware, which was standardized throughout the Confed- 
eration. Since the races were not of equal intelligence, the 
same type of military hardware will have greater or lesser 
capability. As you travel around Koronis, you find some 
equipment to be more power-efficient, as well as more 
effective. So, you need to evaluate each item taken from the 
hulks and decide whether to put it into service in the rover 
or have it dismantled and sold for scrap. 

At any time during the game, except when under attack, 
you can beam up to your orbiting scoutcraft. Once on 
board, you can have the Psytek 7500 Series Science Droid 
System analyze the equipment and install it in the rover to 
a maximum of six units or store the excess equipment in 
the scoutcraft's storage area. Equipment in storage can 
either be used later in the rover or you can have Psytek 
dismantle it for sale — which is how you make money, i.e., 
points, and eventually win the game. 

Deciding which equipment modules to keep and which 
to dismantle is an important part of the game. Each module 
uses up a certain percentage of the rover's power supply and 
also has an efficiency percentage. The better modules use 
less power and are more efficient. They are found by in- 
depth searching, as you move from one rift to the next. As 
modules are found, they must be analyzed. Psytek will 
perform the analysis and tell you the power usage, 
efficiency, and how many points will be earned for 
dismantling each module. 

Some modules, whencombined in the rover, provideeven 
greater capability. For example, the generator and power 
reserve modules are needed to maintain a good power flow 
for all of the other modules and the rover's functions. Use 
of modules with high power requirements slow the rover's 
speed and may prevent you from firing your lasers at the 
Guardians. 

You begin the game with a laser and a shield. As you fill 
the rover's cargo area, you must keep in mind the obvious 
fact that you will need a laser, shield, generator and maybe 
a power reserve. With the more powerful lasers, you also 
need better power sources because they require time to 
recharge. Also, the high power lasers cannot be fired 
continuously, so if you don't have a good aim you may be 
frustrated waiting for your next chance to shoot. 

Lasers and shields operate at different wavelengths or 
colors of the spectrum. The rover has a monitor that 



displays a horizontal bar graph showing the strength of the 
current shield in use. Six color bands are present; the length 
of the bar indicates how much protection your shield will 
give against a laser of that wavelength. Better shields give 
equal protection against all wavelengths. Some shields 
provide excellent protection against a few wavelengths and 
poor protection against the remaining wavelengths. This is 



"Overall, I liked this game 
and enjoyed it very much. 
The graphics are very well 
done, with fine detail given 
to the Psytek computer 
system and the hulks on the 
planet. The animation is 
realistic and gives the 
viewer the feeling of 
moving up and down over 
the hilly terrain of the planet. " 



good only if you know the color frequency of the alien's 
laser. The laser module works in the same way, but only 
fires at one wavelength. 

The best laser is the one that is farthest away from the 
alien's color in the spectrum. On another monitor in the 
rover, you can find information on your current laser's 
operation. A vertical graph displays two bars. The left bar 
shows the color and amount of power available for the laser, 
and the right bar shows the amount of power needed to fire. 
The left bar decreases with each shot so the laser can only 
be fired after it recharges to the power level indicated by 
the right bar. If there is no right bar, then you can fire almost 
continuously. The laser recharges better when there is a 
good power reserve module, but the power reserve module 
needs a good generator too. 

The documentation provided with the game is well- 
written and interesting. Even more interesting is the fact that 
the documentation never mentions the CoCo 3 but explains 
how to load the game into an Atari or Commodore 
computer! A separate instruction card provides directions 
on use with the CoCo 3. It appears that Tandy had Epyx 
port the game from these computers to the CoCo 3. This 
is a good sign. Since the CoCo 3 graphics screens are very 
similar to these machines, we should see more porting of 
software to the CoCo. 

Overall, I liked this game and enjoyed it very much. The 
graphics are very well done, with fine detail given to the 
Psytek computer system and the hulks on the planet. The 
animation is realistic and gives the viewer the feeling of 
moving up and down over the hilly terrain of the planet. 
Koronis Rift is not a constant "shoot the aliens" game and 
does require the evaluation of the equipment you find so 
that you can make it to Rift 20. For those who like this type 
of game, I recommend that you start your salvage opera- 
tions as soon as possible, and, "May the Force be with you." 

(Epyx Computer Software, Sunnyvale, C A; $29.95. Avail- 
able in Radio Shack stores nationwide.) 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 137 



Software Revie w ^^^^ 

Color Scripsitll Provides 
Power and Simplicity 

Radio Shack has a new word processing program, Color 
Scripsit //, for the original CoCo and the Color Computer 
3. It comes on a cartridge and has no provision for disk use 
— all files are saved to, and loaded from, tape, 

"Word processing," according to the introduction in the 
manual, "does for your writing what the automobile did for 
transportation. It provides you with a powerful new tool 
not available formerly to individuals." Color Scripsit //is 
aimed at the computer novice. While VIP Writer, for 
example, emphasizes its powerful features, CS II points to 
its simplicity. "Simply insert the Program Pak and turn on 
your computer. Select an activity from the Main Menu, and 
return to the Main Menu when the operation is finished." 

That is not to say that CS II lacks sophistication. It 
certainly stands head and shoulders above the original 
cartridge Scripsit, which, it may be recalled, did not even 
permit varying the baud rate from the Radio Shack 
standard of 600. The new program (not a revised version 
of the original by any means, but a totally new program) 
not onJy permits you to select the baud rate, but also to 
"tune" it, if your printer happens to require such a thing. 
And, unlike its predecessor, CS II produces ASCII- 
compatible text files, yet can read files created by the old 
Scripsit. 

Like most other word processors, CS //permits format- 
ting, global search and replace, right-justification, block 
moving, block copying, block deleting, centering, headers 
and footers, page numbering, underlining and printer 
control codes. 

CS II does not have wide, high-resolution display screens. 
A 38-by-24 screen, genuine lowercase characters and a 
variety of foreground/ background color choices are 
available on the Color Computer 3. With the CoCo 1 or 
2, you can have any display you want, as long as you want 
the basic 32~by-16 black on green. 

The eight menu options are: Edit, View/ Format, Print, 
Unformatted Print, Load from Tape, Append from Tape, 
Save to Tape and Skip Tape File. Edit is where you go to 
write and make changes in your text. Unformatted Print 
prints a hard copy of your text file with format command 
lines treated as though they were printable text instead of 
commands. Skip Tape File is the equivalent of BASIC'S 
SKIPF command. It advances the tape to the start of the 
next jjle, while displaying the title of the file that's being 
bypassed. 

Edit has two subsidiaries — command mode and insert 
mode. When you press E for Edit from the main menu, you 
are placed in command mode. Before you can start writing, 
you must get into insert mode. In insert mode, all you can 
do is write (and backspace with a destructive cursor). To 
do anything else, you must break out of insert mode, move 
the cursor to the appropriate point, and then insert or 
"replace" as required. 

Personally, I found all this mode-switching a bit annoy- 
ing, but maybe that's because I'm used to a word processor 
that does things differently. Also, the screen and the cursor 
look exactly the same in the two modes. A slight variation 
would have been helpful. 



The view mode displays the current page of your 
document as it would appear if it were a printed page. What 
you see are not the actual characters — they would be too 
small to be legible — but a depiction of the location of 
characters and spaces on the page. 

What you get is a rectangle with blocks and dashes that 
show you how the paragraphs will be arranged on the page. 
I would have liked this much better if the screen background 
had been white instead of green. Along with the blocks and 
dashes, you get a cursor (represented by a cross), which you 
move with the arrows until it's over the paragraph you want 
to format. Then you enter the format mode, where you 
make your formatting selections by answering the onscreen 
prompts. Each selection generates a format command line, 
which is inserted into the textfile. As an alternative, you may 
type your format command lines manually, in the same way 
that you type in text. 

Perhaps the best feature of CS //is its instruction manual. 
It has 63 pages — but its size is only 4»by-4 ! /2 inches. It 
makes learning CS II easy for those who have never used 
a word processor. 

As good as it is, however, the manual is not without its 
faults. It lacks an index, and one important feature called 
Fill is explained inadequately. 

The underlining and other formatting features are 
command lines, preceded and followed by carriage returns, 
and they apply to subsequent paragraphs until amended by 
subsequent format command lines. But suppose you want 
to underline only a single word in a line, as I have just done. 

That's where Fill comes in. You must type the word to 
be underlined as though it were a separate paragraph and 
then use fill to join the separate paragraphs into a single 
line. I had a lot of trouble figuring out how to get it to work 
right, finally discovering by trial and error that any line to 
be joined to a subsequent one must have no space preceding 
its carriage return and that the No Fill command must 
precede rather than follow the last line to be filled. 

Color Scripsit II requires a minimum of 16K. On a 64 K 
CoCo, the text buffer will hold 47,607 characters. 

(Tandy Corporation; $29,95. Available in Radio Shack 
stores nationwide.) 

— N.E. Parks 



Hint ... 

A Passel of Pokes 

When you ask your CoCo to print a number, it 
prints your number with a leading blank space if it 
is positive and with a minus sign if .it, is, ..negative. To 
eliminate the sign altogethe^J4:■;;e'n■|fer■ POKE 
| &HBDE4 , IB :PDKE &HBDE5 , IB. Plea$e.^;n- : ^e this will 
also remove the minus signs! To restore your CoCo 
so that it includes the sign, enter POKE 
&HBDE4,&HR?:P0KE &HBDE5,&HC0. 

If you want a plus sign instead of the blank space 
for positive numbers, enter POKE &HBDDD , &H2B, To 
restore your CoCo, enter POKE SHBDDD, &H20. All of 
these pokes work with the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 

Marc Gagnon 
Quebec, Canada 



138 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



Software Review* 



CORRECTIONS 



"Presenting the Smarter-Than- Average 
Printer Buffer" (May 1987, Page 160): 
This article was written by Emmett M. 
Lewis Jn> not Emmett J. Lewis Jr. as 
indicated. We apologize to Mr. Lewis 
for this mistake, 

"Received & Certified" (June 1987, 
Page 130): Leonardo 's Pencil, a graph- 
ics programming utility, was incorrectly 
reported to be titled Leonard's Pencil 
We extend our apologies to E.Z. 
Friendly Software. 

For quicker reference, Corrections 
will be posted on Delphi as soon as they 
are available in the Info on Rainbow 
topic area of the database, Just type 
DRTfl at the CoCo SIG> prompt and 
INFO at the T#PIC > prompt. 



Super Extended Basic 
Unravelled for the CoCo 3 



Super Extended Basic Unravelled is a bound, soft-cover, 
magazine-sized book that details everything you want to 
know about the super high resolution graphics commands 
and BASIC enhancements on the Color Computer 3. It 
provides the reader with a complete and detailed, fully 
commented source listing of the super high resolution 
graphics packages available on the CoCo 3 with Color 
BASIC 2.0 ROM. 

Thebook is not a tutorial or a how-to manual, but rather, 
a comprehensive source of the assembly listings. The reader 
needs to have at least a basic knowledge of 6809 assembly 
language programming to be able to take full advantage of 
the opportunities that the book offers. 

The subject matter includes CoCo 3 hardware differences, 
memory management, super Hi-Res graphics, colors and 
palettes, interrupts, and Super Extended BASIC. 

This book is loaded with useful information for the 
serious CoCo 3 hacker. I believe that the information 
supplied is well worth the price; in fact, the disassembled 
listing of Super Extended BASIC 2.0 is worth the price of 
the whole book. 

(Microcom Software, P.O.Box 214, Fairport, NY 14450; 
716-223-1477, $24.95 plus $3 S/H) 

i 

David Gerald j 

! 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Back Issue 

Am m m m m m m 

variability 





fa 




BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
pages of material, all just for CoCo users. It's 
a great way to expand your library! 



A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PR! 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents for 
each additional issue for postage and han- 
dling if sent by United Parcel Service. There 
is a $5 charge for the first issue, plus a $1 
charge for each additional issue on orders 
sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not deliver to a 
post office box or to another country. 



I M OST ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

I 

I Issues July 1981 through June 1982 are 
i available on white paper in a reprint form. All 
j others are in regular magazine form. VISA, 
I MasterCard and American Express ac- 
cepted, Kentucky residents please add 5 
percent state sales tax. In order to hold down 
costs, we do not bill and no C.O.D. orders are 
accepted, 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To check availability and order, review and 
fill out the form on the next page and mail 
it with your payment to: 

Tffl ffi sum ttflttftb ft jBttt jttMMfe w^w , itt in iff 

He KAINdUW 

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f 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 139 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 

Please send me the following back issues: 



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RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1981 through June 
1984, is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes including rainbow ON tape are in the July 
1985 and July 1986 issues, respectively. The Sixth Year Index is in the July 1987 
issue. 



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SIGNATURE 



TO ORDER BY PHONE (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



1 40 THE RAINBOW August 1 987 



Hardware ftev/etr^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ST^N 

Magnavox RGB Monitor 80 
Provides Plenty of Resolution 
and an Excellent Display 

The Color Computer 3's analog RGB output certainly 
provides very nice pictures, but it does have its limitations 

not the least of which is its inability to display the PMDDE 
4 artifact colors used by many existing CoCo programs. The 
fact that the RGB colors are vastly different from those seen 
on TV sets or composite monitors (a problem only partly 
dealt with by the PALETTE CMP and RGB commands) doesn't 
help matters, especially for those who want to write 
programs designed to work with both types. One way to 
get around this is to use both an RGB monitor and a 
composite monitor or TV set, but this can get clumsy (not 
to mention the expense of buying two monitors, if that's 
what you need to do). Another is to use a single monitor 
that can switch between RGB and composite video, and the 
Magnavox Professional RGB Monitor 80 (model 8CM515) 
is one of the better ones. (I should note here that Magnavox 
also sells a similar monitor, model 8CM505, which is called 
the RGB Monitor 40; it uses a less expensive picture tube 
that delivers somewhat less resolution. This review deals 
strictly with the 8CM5I5.) 




Don't let the Magnavox name fool you; the RGB Monitor 
80 was designed and built by Philips, the European electrical 
giant that bought out the Magnavox TV and audio 
businesses some years back. Philips has a fine reputation 
for quality and innovation, and their skill shows in the 
design of the RGB Monitor 80. 

The Magnavox monitor doesn't look particularly 
unusual; it's about the same size as most RGB monitors, 
and its off-white color matches the CoCo case nicely. All 
the controls except for the power switch are concealed 
behind a flip-down cover below the screen. The monitor has 
a tilt stand that drops down from the front edge to prop 
it up to a good viewing angle. 

In the RGB analog mode, the RGB Monitor 80 gives a 
very nice display; all the CoCo 3 colors are displayed well, 
and the fine-pitch screen gives plenty of resolution for 
displaying 80-column text. The picture tube has both a 



tinted faceplate for higher contrast (though not quite as high 
as some other monitors and TV sets), and this has been 
treated with an anti-reflective surface that helps reduce 
reflected glare to a great degree. Although some monitors 
(such as the Sony KV-1311CR or the NEC MultiSync) do 
provide even better resolution, it's hard to find fault with 
the Magnavox display. 

Composite color performance is quite decent as well, 
though with a few minor defects. The composite picture is 
just a bit less sharp than what I'm used to seeing, probably 
due to the low-pass filter used to keep the color subcarrier 
signal from appearing in the picture when the comb filter 
is switched out. (The comb filter circuit used by Magnavox, 
unlike that used by RCA and some others, has some 
unfortunate side effects on the picture in some situations; 
the RGB Monitor 80 has a switch to disable the comb filter, 
and for CoCo use it should be switched out.) Despite this, 
the Magnavox monitor provides reasonably good results on 
the CoCo composite video output, and when I used it to 
watch regular TV programs (feeding the video output of my 
VCR into the monitor), the pictures were very good with 
pleasing color fidelity. (I even tried watching a newscast 
from London, received by satellite, which was transmitted 
using the European PAL system; the Magnavox monitor 
automatically switched over to the "foreign" 50 Hz scan 
rate, although I got a black-and-white picture because the 
monitor was built for the U.S. NTSC system.) 

The RGB Monitor 80 can also be used to display the 
"TTL RGBI" output of a PC-compatible computer such as 
the Tandy 1000; since this is only a secondary consideration 
to most RAINBOW readers, I'll simply say that this worked 
every bit as well as did the analog RGB mode. The 
Magnavox monitor has a "green only" switch to give you 
the equivalent of a green-phosphor monitor. 

To sum up ? I would definitely recommend the RGB 
Monitor 80 to anyone who has a CoCo 3; it gives an 
excellent analog RGB display and, even if you don't need 
the composite video mode, it's one of the better monitors 
on the market. 

(Howard Medical Computers, 1690 North Elston, Chicago, 
IL 60622; 312-278-1440, $298 plus $14 S/H; CoCo 3 cable, 
$19.95 with monitor purchase) 

— Ed Ellers 



Software Review ^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^S f7%s 

Develop Programming Skills 
With CoCo III U tilities 

CoCo III Utilities is a set of nine programs on disk that 
can be used for practical applications with many of the new 
features on the CoCo 3. 

MEMTEST is a 1 28/ 5 1 2K memory test program. 

The new high resolution screen uses 32K of memory and 
is not part of your BASIC program. This means that while 
your BASIC program no longer is limited because of 
graphics, you cannot directly save the screen to tape or disk. 
The LOADSAVE routine solves this problem. 

VERSCROL is a utility that demonstrates how to smooth 
scroll vertically using the joystick; and HORSCROL, a 
horizontal direction. 

CHARPOKE lets you change the attributes of individual 
text characters such as blink, underline, color and back- 
ground, as well as the number of screen columns. 

CC3WORD is a simple, single-screen, word processor 
with which you can fill the screen with text. You can even 
save it and print it, but its intent is to demonstrate how to 
effectively use the 40- and 80-column text modes. 

CC2TOCC3 converts graphics and text to CoCo 3 
format. This utility assists in making this conversion, 
although it won't take care of everything and only works 
on disk. 

CIRCLES is a palette registers demo. This utility lets you 
display your choice of 64 different colors, 16 at a time, on 
either an RGB or Composite monitor. 

SPINBALL is a utility that lets you create a ball that 
appears to be spinning by changing the palette registers 
color. 

All of these programs are useful to CoCo 3 users and 
especially for those who want to develop programming 
skills. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
11414; 718-835-1344, $24.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— David Gerald 



T a CD * Jf j^^. T._j ~5 ~S^- 
IS HERE! 



IXXFZALUK, machine language program for (XXX) 1 , 2 ,& 3. Studies history of LOTTO 
game as a handieapper studies horses . Arizona 6/39, California 6/49 , Iowa 6/36 , 
Missouri 6/33, New York 6/40, New York 6/48, Oregon 6/42, Tri -State (Maine, 
New Hampshire, & Vermont) 6/36 , & Washington State 6/44 available. Others to 
follow. Requires 64K. Specify game desired with order . 




William G. Brigance, Sr. ■ " ill ~$9S^S5 

1001 Fai rweather Drive RAINBOW On Disk! 

CERTIFICATION 

Sacramen to , CA 95833 seal $29.95 

(916) 927-6062 Introductory Price 

California residents add 8% sales tax 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 141 



Software Review, 



7^ 



Gridiron Strategy 
Scores a Touchdown 



For all you CoCo nuts who are football fans, SPORTS- 
ware has come out with a Hi-Res football game that will 
ease the withdrawal pains that come with the Super Bowl 
each season. 

Gridiron comes in an attractive, hard-cover folder with 
program disk (not copy-protected), two Offense/ Defense 
cards, two Defense selectors, and an 11 -page manual. 
System requirements are a CoCo 3, one disk drive and a 
color monitor. I tried it on both RGB and composite color 
monitors. The graphics were great on the RGB and fair on 
composite. The author said he intends to put an RGB or 
composite option in the release version. 

The manual is well-organized and well-written and will 
probably be needed only about 10 minutes, as the game just 
about runs itself. The only criticism of any importance is 
that it doesn't stress, or even mention for that matter, the 
importance of backing up the program disk. 

Thegame is written in machine language so after a LDflDM 
and EXEC, it takes about 30 seconds to load and give you 
the game screen. This consists of a scoreboard at the top, 
showing the team names, timeouts remaining, score, 
quarter, down, yards to go for a first down, yardline the 
ball is on, and time left in quarter. 

"With more than 20 
offensive plays and 10 
defensive plays, there are 
200 -plus possibilities. 



In the center of the screen is an overhead view of the 
football field, and on the bottom is an information window 
that shows the last offensive and defensive plays used and 
tells how much the play gained or lost. There is also a 
message window that comes down over the field itself that 
asks for prompts, tells you when you made a touchdown, 
scored an extra point or had a pass intercepted. 

You are first given the opportunity to change the name 
of the teams; next, to change the default time (15 minutes) 
of a quarter. This is all prompted by the program and, again, 
almost runs itself. Next, you get to call the coin flip to see 
who kicks and who receives. This was the only bug I could 
find in this program; it always came up "heads"! The author 
says this has been fixed. 

Once the preliminaries are over, the kicking team is given 
the choice of a regular or onside kick. The computer does 
a simulated dice roll (shown graphically and based on 
football statistics) and you have the field in front of you 
with the ball marked, the 10-yard marker on your screen 
in your team color, and a drive marker that extends if you 
have a sustained march. 

Now the competition begins. Each player has a card with 
offensive plays on one side and defensive plays on the other. 
Each selects what he feels appropriate to the situation. The 
defensive player must signal — via a defense-ready marker 
— that the offense can enter his play in the computer. The 



defense then enters the play he has picked as shown when 
he turns his marker over. Neither team knows what the other 
one is going to do ahead of time. 

The computer moves the ball marker, changes the down, 
changes the yards to go for first down, changes the clock, 
and changes the possession if it was a fourth-down attempt. 

At the end of each half, you are given a two-minute 
warning. You are also given a screen print of halftime and 
end game statistics, the latter after the fourth quarter. 



UKiUiKUH b K * 


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Quarter 1 


Time 


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Down 1st To go 10 


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: Gain of 8 
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The heart of the strategy are the play cards. Each card 
has 20 offensive plays plus punt and field goal on one side 
and 10 defensive plays on the other. The offensive plays are 
diagramed, categorized by runs, short passes, medium 
passes and long passes. They are also grouped to show 
average gain per play. The defensive alignments are just as 
thoroughly documented. Each defense is rated for its 
success against the type of play anticipated. This sounds 
complicated, but isn't. 

There is very little randomness in this game. That is to 
say, if you run up the middle against a defense that's set 
to stop a run up the middle, you aren't going to gain much 
yardage. But the important thing to keep in mind is that 
with more than 20 offensive plays and 10 defensive plays, 
there are 200-plus possibilities. There are also penalties, 
interceptions and timeouts that give this game a real football 
feel. 

This is not a shoot-'em-up, fast fingers, joystick-type 
game. The program waits for the players rather than the 
other way around. There' are sound effects, but they do not 
slow the play. The error protection is flawless. Good use is 
made of the CoCo 3's graphics. The game is not played in 
real time, but the author has done a clever job of accounting 
f or time and timeouts. 

In summary, this is an excellent game. After three weeks 
with it, I still find it fascinating. If you have your CoCo 3 
connected to an old TV or composite color monitor with 
a bad picture, I would stay away from it, unless the issue 
version has a menu option for RGB or composite. Other 
than that, I give Gridiron a very high recommendation. 

(SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Rd., Suite 414, Toledo, 
OH 43615; 419-389-1515, $29.95) 

— Frank Mardon 



142 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



Book fleWeivJ™^^^^^^^^ Software R e vie w^^^^^^^^^^^^^Sf7?\ 



Tap Into Better Graphics 
on Your CoCo 3 

Most would agree that one of the most important aspects 
of the Color Computer 3 is its enhanced graphics capabil- 
ities. Now, Moreton Bay has introduced Better Graphics on 
Your Co Co 3, a book designed to let you tap into these 
wonderful graphics abilities. 

Better Graphics on Your Co Co 3, or Better Graphics for 
short, is a 43-page, staple-bound manual chock full of 
information nearly anyone can use as they learn about their 
new machine. It offers five major sections, each detailing 
certain aspects of graphics operation on the CoCo 3. 

The first section, Memory Organization and Manage- 
ment, discusses at some length just how memory is allotted 
in the Color Computer 3. It is good to see that the author, 
Linda Nielsen, chose to discuss such an important subject 
first. Manipulation of graphics does require a working 
knowledge of memory organization. 

The second section offers some information about the 
binary number system and discusses how graphics memory 
is translated into a usable onscreen image. It also gives 
detailed information on the assorted graphics modes 
available on the CoCo 3. 

The third section of Better Graphics shows the reader how 
to use the various graphics modes and also how to create 
text on the high resolution screens. This section, along with 
the first section, would be suggested reading for any CoCo 
3 owner. 

The fourth section covers animation and scrolling 1 
techniques, while the fifth section pulls everything out of 
the hat and gives you detailed information on using your 
CoCo 3 in ways BASIC never heard of. 

Now, lest you think you might have to type in numerous 
examples, Moreton Bay includes two disks with all 
programs on them. In my opinion, this complete package 
approach really enhances the educational value of Better 
Graphics. After all, if you have to spend your time typing 
in example programs, it can be quite difficult to follow and 
comprehend the principles the book is trying to teach. 

Certain parts of the book may be more than some people 
can understand. The book is intended for those people who 
want to program, especially with graphics. However, the 
book takes the chore out of understanding graphics and 
memory utilization on the CoCo 3. With few minor 
exceptions, all points are clearly presented and anyone with 
a basic working knowledge of Color Computer program- 
ming should be able to follow it with little or no problem. 
Better Graphics on Your CoCo 3 should be a part of 
everyone's library. 

(Moreton Bay Software, 316 Castillo Street, Santa Barbara, 
CA 93101; 805-962-3127, $24.95) 



A Second Look at 
Telewriter -64 and Friends 

By Jerry Semones 

(This program [June 1983 J and its patches have been 
reviewed in previous issues of THE RAINBOW, but we*re 
taking this "second look 7 ' for the benefit of new readers.) 

I remember about 10 years ago when I first heard the term 
"word processor." At first it seemed odd that anyone would 
want to use a computer to write letters, articles or reports 
instead of a typewriter. But the more I read of and watched 
this new writing technique, the more its many advantages 
became obvious. 

The rest is history. Just about everyone has some idea of 
what a word processor does even if they have never used 
one. This is due largely to the computer revolution that we 
are all participating in, as well as the vast usage of word 
processing in the work place. 

For those of you new to the CoCo community who want 
to use your computer for some serious applications, you 



J & M'S 3.5" MICROFLOPPY DRIVES 




the "^Boosti 



Upgrade to the Latest in Technology: J & M's 3.5" microfloppy drives 
allow a 720K format under OS-9 Level 2. (Four times the storage capacity of 
a standard Coco format OS-9 disk on a single microfloppy diskette!) 

Two Configurations Available: The external drive comes complete with 
case, power supply and cable. The internal drive is ready for installation. It 
simply replaces an existing 5.25" half-height drive. Utilize JDOS, RS DOS or 
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or certified check. Shipping is extra. 

J&M Systems Ltd. 

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ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO 87123 
505/292-4182 




— Cray Augsburg 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 143 



should consider word processing in general and Telewriter- 
64 in particular. I suggest TW-64 not only because I use it, 
but also because of the obvious popularity I see in the many 
submissions to THE rainbow prepared with TW-64. 

TW-64 comes in either disk or tape versions and will run 
on any CoCo with as little as 16K of RAM. Since it 
automatically configures itself to your computer's memory 
size, your text buffer will grow as you add memory. (By the 
way, it runs fine on the CoCo 3.) 

The user can select any one of three different screen 
formats. The screen "wakes up" in the standard 51 -column 
by 24-line mode, but 64-by-24 and 85-by-24 are available, 
as well. The 51 -column and 64-column are easily read on 
a composite monitor or a good quality TV set, but the 85- 
column mode is only good to see the overall layout of your 
printed page. I use the 51 -column mode exclusively and 
select 65 characters per line when I send the text to the 
printer. This results in a nice looking letter or other printed 
text, 

The user's manual that comes with TW-64 is very detailed 
and complete in everyway, with dozens of examples of what 
the various functions do. 

Since TW-64 is a screen editor, all of the data or text is 
always present and can be scrolled up or down on the screen. 
This is done using the arrow keys. If you type a sentence 
and make a mistake, you can simply move the cursor to the 
mistake and type in the correction. TW-64 is somewhat 
different in this regard, in that it defaults to the Insert mode 
rather than the Overstrike mode. This means that the key 
depressed at the cursor will add the character rather than 
replace it. 

While this may sound a little confusing, and takes a little 
bit of getting used to, I love it. In the Insert mode you will 
never lose text by inad vertent keystrokes. Besides, you can 
select the Overstrike mode if you prefer with a simple 
keystroke. 

TW-64 features three menu screens. The first allows you 
to select either the Edit mode or a Newfile mode, which 
erases your text if selected. A counter keeps track of the 
number of words you have typed, as well as the number of 
lines. You can also select either cassette or disk I/O as well 
as the second Format menu. 

The Format menu is used in conjunction with your 
printer. Here you can select line spacing, margins, lines per 
page, printer baud rate and queue, as well as right justify. 
You can even select where you want the page number to 
appear at the bottom of the page, Also supported is a 
percent print function, which allows you to print just the 
part of the text that you select to your printer. 

The third menu screen is for disk I/O. This handles all 
of the disk read and write functions. It offers the same 
options as for cassette I/O, except for the Verify command. 
In the disk I/O menu, you can also see the disk directory 
files on the screen or send them to your printer. Here you 
can also save, kill or rename disk files without having to 
go back to BASIC. 

TW-64 also supports the use of embedded commands in 
your text. This allows you to perform font changes, 
underlining, double-strike, etc., if your printer has the 
capability. You can also use these codes to flush text to the 
left while maintaining pre-defined columns. 

There are far more features than space allows me to go 



into here, but the ability to align, scroll and copy blocks 
of text, and do easy searches for specified words, makes it 
a real workhorse of a program. TW-64 is a full-blown word 
processor offering virtually all of the features you would 
expect to find in a word processor used on far more 
expensive machines than the CoCo. It's available for $49.95 
on cassette or $59.95 on disk, plus $2 S/H, from Cognitec, 
704 Nob Street, Del Mar, CA 92041, oryoucanorder it from 
your local Radio Shack Store. 

But Wait — There's More 

Telepatch II with The Wizard are two fine TW-64 
enhancements available from Spectrum Projects. Telepatch 
11 provides the user with the ability to configure TW-64 so 
that the disk I/O is RAM-resident. This is a big improve- 
ment, in that the disk I/O is instant since the program does 
not have to be accessed from the TW-64 disk. The only 
disadvantage to this is that about 4K of text buffer space 
is sacrificed. A buffered keyboard is added with Telepatch 
IL Since I am not a super fast typist, I never really noticed 
that such a buffer was needed, but I did notice that, every 
now and then, TW-64 would drop a character during the 
Insert mode. This bug has been fixed with Telepatch IL The 
new keyboard routine remembers what characters have 
been typed regardless of speed. 

The main menu of TW-64 with Telepatch II contains 
obvious changes, the most notable being that the cassette 
I/O functions are no longer visible. They are fully func- 
tional, however, should you need to use them. This was done 
to reduce screen clutter and confusion with the correspond- 
ing disk I/O functions, since Telepatch II will only work 
on a disk system. Other features such as auto-key repeat, 
key click, visible carriage returns, overstrike mode and disk 
drive stepping rate can be configured in the boot program 
to the default of your choice. 

The Wizard, contained on the Telepatch II d isk, is a nicely 
done, revised TW-64 character set. While the new characters 
only appear on your screen, they are a big improvement. 
The new characters are gently curled and incorporate true 
descenders. The text is very easy to read and pleasing to 
the eye. 

Ultra Telepatch, available from Bob van der Poel 
Software, is one of the best enhancements available for TW- 
64, This ultra version stores the disk I/O in RAM with no 
loss of buffer space. Word delete is added, so you can delete 
entire words instead of just one character at a time. 

The boot program can be tailored to your needs with disk 
drive stepping rate, key clicks, on/off and reset protection. 
What I like best about Ultra Telepatch II is that the text 
automatically unfolds on the screen as soon as it is read into 
the buffer from disk. Ultra Telepatch //needs 64K of RAM 
and disk. 

Telewriier-64 with Telepatch //and Ultra Telepatch offer 
the CoCo user all that will ever be needed for serious word 
processing. 

(Telewriter-64, Cognitec, 704 Nob Street, Del Mar, CA 
92041; 619-755-1258, Disk, $59,95; Tape, $49.95. Telepatch 
II with The Wizard, Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 264, 
Howard Beach, NY 11414; 718-835 1344; $29.95. Ultra 
Telepatch, Bob van der Poel, 1734 57th Avenue, Edmonton, 
Alberta, Canada T6M 1E1; $19.95) 



1 44 THE RAINBOW August 1987 




ar. 



fbrare 



NEW OS9 PATCHER - (c) This is a useful utility for your 0S9 Level I or 
II system. It allows you to modify the contents of a file or memory module using easy to 
understand commands. Data may be displayed and entered in either decimal, hexadecimal, 
octal or ascii characters. Module CRus calculated and patched automatically Patch 
command files may be used as input to the Patcher and. patch command files can be 
generated from an origina l -a nd already patched file. Disk only ; Level f or II- $19.95. 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Calligrapher - (Hybrid basic/ml) 
Turn your CoCo and dot-matrix printer 
into a calligrapher's quill. Make beautiful 
invitations, flyers, certificates, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are Vz 
inch high and variably spaced. Works with 
many printers including Epson, Gemini, 
Radio Shack, Okidata 92A, Banana and 
Prowriter. Additional fonts are available 
(see below). Tape/Disk; $24.95. 

OS9 Calligrapher - (c) Although a 
different program from the CoCo Calligra- 
pher, the OS9 Calligrapher prints all the 
same fonts. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and formatting direc- 
tives. You may specify the font to use, 
change fonts at any time, centering left, 
right or full justification, line fill, margin, 
line width, page size, page break and in- 
dentation. Similar to troff on UNIXtm sys- 
tems. Includes Gay Nineties, Old English 
and Cartoon fonts. Additional fonts are 
available (see below). Disk only; OS9 Level 
i or II; $24.95. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $14.95 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - fS fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
way; Set #3- - (8 fonts) Antique and Busi- 
ness; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West and 
Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, He- 
brew and Victorian; Set #0 - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; speci- 
fy RSDOS or OS9; 29.95: Font Pack- 
age #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 
fonts) on one disk. Font Package #2 - 
Above font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on 
one disk. Both Packages #1 and #2 (51 
fonts) on one disk; 49.95. "O NEW 



NEW O* Calligrapher Combo 
Package - Everything!; specify RSDOS or 
OS9; Includes the Calligrapher and both 
Font Packag es on one disk; $QQ»Q5i 



UTILITIES 

Piratector - [\oo% ML) Utility to allow 
your own disk-based BASIC or ML pro- 
grams to display a graphics title screen 
and then self-start after loading. Adds 
copy protection to your programs but still 
allows users to create non- executable back- 
ups! Includes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo 

1, 2, 3 (except Semigraf); $39.95. 

Super Screen Machine - (ioo% ML) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. Smooth 
scroll, key click, lower case with colored 
characters. Tape/Disk; 32K CB; CoCo 1, 

2, 3 (except 64K mode); $19.95. 



Color Disk Manager - (ioo% ml) Disk 
utility with these features: Disk repair, 
selective track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except for 64 K 
mode); $24.95. 

Color Tape Manager - (\oo% ml) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of rvIL programs, 
convert ML programs into BASIC DATA 
statements, append ML to BASIC, load, 
display /modify and save tape file, handles 
missing EOF and filename blocks, much 
more! Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3 
(except for 64K mode); $19.95. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System; - (Hybrid basic/ml) Tape or disk, 
fast and simple general database program. 
Create files of records that can be quickly 
sorted, searched, deleted and updated. 
Powerful printer formatting. Up to 8 user 
fields, sort on up to 3 fields. Tape/Disk; 
$19.95 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Mail - (Hybrid basic/ml) Tape or 
Disk based mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 1, 
2 or 3 across, 2Vz to 4 inches wide. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Utility 
companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail to al- 
low multi-term search [AND and OR log- 
ic), global change and delete, split large 
files and more! Tape/Disk; $14.95 (see 
combo pkg below). 

TIMS Combo Package - All three of the 
above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mai) and 
TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.05. 

SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer. Disk only; $19.95 each. 

EDUCATIONAL 



NEW Trig Attack - (ioo%ML) In 
this educational arcade game, enemy 
trigs travel along math curves. Players 
learn important mathematical concepts 
as they play. Trig Attack is filled with 
sound effects, colorful graphics and 
features 11 challenging levels. First class 
mathematical entertainment for ages 9 
and up. Excellent manual includes an in- 
troduction to trigonometry. Tape 16K 
CB/Disk 32K ECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3; 



Silly Syntax - (Kfcrbrld basic/ml) Ages 5 and 
up. Story creation game; output to screen 
or printer; includes 2 stories or create your 
own. Tape/Disk; $19.95 or disk with 62 
stories for $29.95. Sets of 10 stories on 
tape/disk for $4.95: Fairy Tales, Current 
Events, X-Rated, Sing-Along, Adventure, 
Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
BASIC/ML) Ages 4 & up. A graphics adven- 
ture game for young children & their fami- 
lies. Old testament. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

The Presidents of the USA - (ioo% ML) 
Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, user 
modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 and up. Trivia 
game of the 50 states. Capitals, nick- 
names, abbreviations, flowers, trees and 
birds. Tape/Disk; 16KECB; $10.95. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist to the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word vo- 
cabulary. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $10.95. 

PreReader - (Hybrid basic/ML) Ages 3-5 
(level I); Ages 5-7 (level 2); Great graphics 
and music. Level 1: match colors, shapes, 
letters and numbers; Level 2: match letters 
and consonant blends with their sounds. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $10.95. 

Statgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
print graph with screen print program 
(not supplied); Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
pense categories. This program may be tax 
deductible. Disk only; $29.95. 

Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations common- 
ly used in design or evaluation of land 
mobile radio systems, satellite TV, etc. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set-in Sleeve; 3 weights 
or yarn; 8 sizes from baby to man. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

Flying Tigers - (ioo% ml) Fast Defenders 
style arcade game. 5 levels of difficulty; 
Outstanding graphics and sound effects. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $19.05. 



A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products Is available. 



RAINBOW 

C£RW»CAT>OW 
SCAl 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, FUrida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and 8, 3SK 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.50 per tape or disk for postage and handling. 
Florida residents add b% sales tax. COD orders 
add $4. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders generally 
shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds or exchanges 
without prior authorization. 



J 



* * * 

Clubs, Clubs, Clubs 




e compile a list quar- 
terly of Color Computer 
Clubs because of the 



many requests we receive. CoCo 
Clubs may wish to exchange 
newsletters, share ideas for top- 
ics of discussion at monthly 
meetings, etc. 

Please let us know if we have 
omitted any clubs and send us 
complete up-to-date addresses. 
Only those clubs that have 
signed our anti-piracy agree- 
ment form will appear in this 
listing of CoCo Clubs. Also, 
please notify us if you wish to add 
or delete any names on this list. 
Send your information to: 

CoCo Clubs 
THE RAINBOW 
The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



— Karen Semones 



ARIZONA 

Tucson Color Computer Club, Bill Nunn, 9631 E. 
Stella, Tucson, 85730, (602) 721-1085 

CALIFORNIA 

Color America Users Group, Mark Randall, 2227 
Canyon Road, Arcadia, 91006, (818) 355-6111 

Los Angeles-Wilshire Color Computer Users' 
Group, Norm Wolfe, P.O. Box 11151, Beverly 
Hills, 90213, (213) 838-4293 

United Computer Federation, (San Fernando Valley 
Chapter and Headquarters), Pete Ellison, 366 
West Providencia Ave., Burbank, 91506, (818) 
840-8902 

United Computer Federation, (San Francisco 
Chapter), Art Murray, P.O. Box 7007, Redwood 
City, 94063, (415) 366-4560, BBS (415) 364-2658 

United Computer Federation, (Los Angeles Chap- 
ter), Gary James, 4147 Faculty Avenue, Long 
Beach, 90808 

United Computer Federation, (Orange County 
Chapter), Fred Wright, 10112 Melody Park 
Drive, Garden Grove, 92640 

The Davis CoCoNuts, Shneor Sherman, 1818 
Haussler Dr., Davis, 95616, (916) 758-3195 

South Bay Users Group (S-Bug), Patricia Scheffer, 
P.O. Box 653, Hawthorne, 90251, (213) 532-8071 

South Bay Color Computer Club, Bill Tillerson, 73 
Alamitos Ave., Suite 2, Long Beach, 90802, (213) 
432-3037 

Ventura County Color Computer Club (VC4), Doug 
McLaughlin, Oxnard Public Library, 214 South 
,4 C" Street, Oxnard, 93030, (805) 984-4636 or 
BBS (805) 484-5491 

Citrus Color Computer Club, Jack Brinker, P.O. Box 
6991, San Bernadino, 92412, (714) 824-1866 



South Bay Color Computer Users Group, John G. 
Say, 3117 Balmoral Drive, San Jose, 95132, 
(408) 923-2967 

COLORADO 

Colorado Color Computer Club, Lloyd Carroll, 6651 
Beliaire Street, Commerce City, 80022, (303) 
288-6369 

The ESCO Computer Club, David E. Schulz, 1299 
Harrison Street, Denver, 80206, (303) 388-6988 



CONNECTICUT 

The Southeast Connecticut Color Computer Users 
Group, Bill Gross, 30 Sycamore Lane, Groton, 
06340,(203)448-1388 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fuilerton Rd., Dale City, Virginia 22193, (703) 
690-2453 

FLORIDA 

Color Computer Club of Brandon, Richard Stein- 
brueck, 2913 John Moore Road, Brandon, 
33511, (813)681-1526 

Northwest Florida CoCo Nuts, Lee Gottcher, P.O. 
Box 1032, Fort Walton Beach, 32549, (904) 678- 
8894 

Alachua County Color Computer Club, Robert J. 
Lake, 2929 N.E. 12th Street, Gainesville, 32609, 
(904) 378-1993 

Jacksonville Color Computer Club, William H. 
Brown III, 241 1 Hirsch Ave, Jacksonville, 32216, 
(904) 721-0282 

CoCo Chips Color Computer Club, 715 5th Avenue 
NE, Largo, 33540, (813) 581-7779 

Broward County Color Computer Club, George 
Aloia, 2263 N.W. 65 Avenue, Margate, 33063, 
(305) 972-0975 

South Brevard Color Computer Club, Benjamin S. 
Jerome, 496 Hillside Court, Melbourne, 32935, 
(305) 259-4609 

CoCo Nuts of Central Florida, George Ellenburg, 
Box 593790, Orlando, 32859-3790, (305) 855- 
7867 

Color-6809 Users Group, Emery Mandel, 4301 11th 
AvenueNorth, St. Petersburg, 33713-5207, (813) 
323-3570, BBS (813) 321-0397 

C.C. Club of Sarasota, Ernie Bontrager, 4047 Bee 
Ridge Rd., Sarasota, 33583, (813) 921-7510 

GEORGIA 

The Northeast Atlanta Color Computer Club, Joe 
Novosel, P.O. Box 450915, Atlanta, 30345, (404) 
921-7418 

The CoCo Cartel, Dennis M. Weldy, 4059 Acacia 
Drive, Columbus, 31904, (404) 576-5479 

Atlanta Color Computer Users Group, Terry E. 
Love, 5155 Maroney Mill Rd., Douglasville, 
30134, (404) 949-5356 

ILLINOIS 

Illinois Color Computer Club of Elgin, Tony Po- 
draza, 1 1 9 Adobe Circle, Carpentersville, 601 10, 
(312) 428-3576 

Northern Illinois Color Computer Club, Kenneth 
Trenchard, Sr., 6145 N. Sheridan Road 30, 
Chicago, 60660, (312) 973-5208 

Willow-Works Club, Kevin L. Adair, 5753 S. Laflin, 
Chicago, 60636, (312) 737-5716 

Peoria Color Computer Club, R.E. Garvie, 1346 
Georgeanne, Pekin, 61554, (309) 347-8653 

Glenside Color Computer Ciub, Ed Hathaway, 8 W. 
Stevenson Drive, Glendale Heights, 601 39, (312) 
462-0694 

Kitchen Table Color Computer Group, Robert Mills, 
P.O. Box 464, Hanover, 61041, (815) 591-3377 

Motorola Microcomputer Club, Steve Adler, 1301 
Algonquin Rd., Schaumburg, 60196, (312) 576- 
3044 

Chicago OS-9 Users Group, John Chasteen, 480 
Gilbert Drive, Wood Dale, 60191, (312) 860-2580 



INDIANA 

Three RiversColorComputer Club, R.R. 3,Box269, 
Angola, 46703 

CoCo Program Exchange, Erik Merz, 3307 Arrow 
Wood Dr., Fori Wayne, 46815, (219) 749-0294 

Indy Color Computer Club, Kevin S. Jessup, Sr., 
P.O. Box 26521, Indianapolis, 46236, (317) 873- 
5808 

Southern Indiana Computer Club, Route 1 , Box 459, 
Mitchell, 47446 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

IOWA 

CoCo Questers, Scott Bellman, 2420 Salem Court, 
Bettendorf, 52722, (319) 359-7702 

Metro Area Color Computer Club (MACCC), David 
E. Hansen, 3147 Avenue J, Council Bluffs, 
51501, (712) 323-7867 

Mid Iowa CoCo, Terry G. Simons, 1328 48th Street, 
Des Moines, 50311, (515) 279-2576 

Dubuque Tandy Users Group, Wesley Kullhem, 
1995 Lombard, Dubuque, 52001, (319) 556-4137 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson Color Computer Club, James M. Jones, 
612 Idlewild, Hutchinson, 67502, (316) 662-0718 

KC CoCo Club, Gay Crawford, P.O. Box 11192, 
Kansas City, 661 1 1 , (913) 764-9413 

Micro 80 Users Group, Kevin Cronister, 2224 Hope, 
Topeka, 66614, (913) 272-1353 

Color Computer Club of Wichita, David Brimmer, 
527 N. Pershing Ave., Wichita, 67208, (316) 685- 
9587 

KENTUCKY 

Perry County CoCo Users Group, Keith W. Smith, 
General Delivery, Hardburly, 41747, (606) 439- 
4209 

LOCO-COCO, Jim Spillman, 2405 Woodmont Dr., 
Louisville, 40220, (502) 454-5331 

The Basic Byte, Don Henderson, 152 Patty Lane, 
Florence, 41042, (606) 371-9368 

LOUISIANA 

Cajun CoCo Club, Rick Herbert, P.O. Box 671, 
Crowley, 70526, (318) 788-3148 

The CoCo Sig, Christopher Mayeux, 20 Gibbs Drive, 
Chalmette, 70043, (504) 277-6880 

MAINE 

Western Maine Color Computer Club, Michael 
Wewell, Box 780, Bethel, 04217 

Tandy Computer Club, Delmer Cargill, P.O. Box 
428, Westbrook, 04092, (207) 854-2862 

MARYLAND 

Arkade, John M. Beck, 3513 Terrace Drive #D, 
Suitland, 20746, (301) 423-8418 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Greater Boston Super Color Users Group, Robert 
Biamonte, 6 Boulder Drive, Burlington, 01803 

Massachusetts CoCo Club, Jason Rahaim, Spring 
St., Lunenberg, 01462, (617) 582-6514 

CLUB 6809, Jean Salvas, 204 East Street, Spring- 
field, 01104, (413) 734-5163 

MICHIGAN 

Color C.H. LP. S., Jack Pieron, 3175 Oakhill Place, 
Clarkston, 48016, (313) 627-4358 

Tandy Users Group of Grand Rapids, Robert M. 
Worth, Jr., 1726 Millbank S.E., Grand Rapids, 
49508 (616) 245-9324 

Greater Kalamazoo Color Computer Club, Jim Rix, 
1835 Chevy Chase Blvd., Kalamazoo, 49008, 
(616) 344-7631 

Greater Lansing Color Computer Users Group, P.O. 
Box 14114, Lansing, 48901 

Michiana CoCo Club, Clay Howe, 310 S. Jefferson 
St., Sturgis, 49091, (616) 651-4248 

Color Computer Owners Group, Charles Van Ark, 
c/o OSL Computer Products, Inc., 4950Shaefer, 
Dearborn, 48126, (313) 582-8930 



1 46 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



MISSISSIPPI 

Singing River C.C. Club, Mark Welch, 3605 Van- 
cleave Rd„ # 1 1 8, Gautier, 39553, BBS (60 1 ) 875- 
8688 

Gulf Coast Color Computer Assoc., Ed Keels. 22 
Christy Cove, Gulfport. 39503, (601) 832-1210 

Jackson Color Computer Club, Dorothy N. Welch, 
424 Church Street, Madison, 39110, (601) 856- 
7255 

CoCo Art Club, Joel Bunyard, Rt, 16, Box 11, 

Meridian, 39301, (601) 483-0424 
MISSOURI 

North County 80 Group, Tom Vogel, 1 2 Vilie Donna 
Ct., Hazelwood, 63042, (314) 739-4078 

Mid-America Color Computer User's Group, Jerry 
Morgon, 807 Ponca Drive, Independence, 
64056. (816) 796-5813 

Coconuts, Steve Kntttel 1610 N. Marian, Springfield, 
65803. (417) 485-3419 

Mako TRS-80 & Tandy Users Group, David Morgan, 
622 Porter, Joplin, 64801, (417) 781-6546 

NEBRASKA 

Siouxland Color Computer Club. Alan Pedersen, 
61 1 D Street, South Sioux City. 68776, (402) 494- 
2284 

NEVADA 

CAT. F.U.N., Paul A. Osborne, 201 Miners Road, 
Fallon, 89406, (702) 423-5789 

NEW JERSEY 

West Orange CoCo Club, Gregg Favalora, 12 
Blackburne Terrace, W. Orange, 07052, (201) 
736-1748 (let ring 12 times) 

Loco CoCo Club, Bud Lavin, 73B Wavercrest Ave., 
Winfield Park, 07036 

Mercer County Color Computer Users Group, 
Richard C. Keffy, 1904 Country Lane, W. Tren- 
ton, 08628, (609) 883-9270 

NEW MEXICO 

Chaves County Cotor Computer Club, Harry Ma- 
chen, 18 Forest Drive, Roswell, 88201 , 

The Curry County CoCo Club, Ron Bull, 100 
Conestoga Trail, Clovis, 88101, (505) 763-4713 

NEW YORK 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Albany Chapter), Ron Fish. 
Box 4125, Albany, 12204. (518) 465-9793 

Adirondack CoCo Club, (Greene County Chapter), 
Pete Chast, P.O. Box 61, Athens, 12015, (518) 
945-1636 

Adirondack CoCo Club (Glens Falls Chapter), 
Richard Mitchell, 39 Center St., Fort Edwards, 
12828 

The Island Color Computer Club, DK. Lee, P.O. Box 
426, Massapequa Park, 11762. BBS (516) 227- 
1285 

Kings Byte CoCo Club, Morty Libowitz, 1063 East 
84th St., Brooklyn, 11236, (718) 763-4233, BBS 
(718) 837-2881 

C.C. Club of Central N.Y., Joseph Short, 248 S. 
Fourth Ave., Uion, 13357. (315) 895-7730 

Rockland County Color Computer Users Group, 
Harold L Laroff, P.O. Box 131, Monsey, 10952- 
0131, (914) 425-2274 

Olean Area CoCo Users Group. Herman L. Smith, 
P.O. Box 216. Olean, 14760, (716) 933-7488, 
BBS (716) 933-7489 

The Rochester S--80 Computer Club, Inc., Gary 
Panepinto, P.O. Box 15476, Rochester, 14615, 
(716) 392-6133 

New York Color Computer User Group, Carl Glo- 
vinsky, 15 Bolivar St., Staten Island, 10314, (718) 
761-0268 

Broome CoCo Club, Lloyd Shotwell, 18 Adaline 
Street, Owego, 13827, (607) 687-3231 

WORTH CAROLINA 

Bull City CoCo Users Group, Todd Wall, 5319 
Durand Drive, Durham, 27703, (919) 598-1348 

Raleigh Color Computer Club, David Roper, P.O. 
Box 680, Garner, 27529 



OHIO 

Central Ohio Color Computer Club, Jim Upperman, 
5201 Wilcox Road, Amlin, 43002, (61 4) 876-1 767 

Color Computer Club, Inc., William Wills, P.O. Box 
468, Canfield, 44406 

Dayton Color Computer Users Group, Steven E. 
Lewis, 4230 Cord el I Dr., Dayton, 45439, (513) 

299-3060 

Dayton Area Color Computer Users Group, David 
R. Barr, 2278 Yorkshire PL, Kettering, 45419, 

(51 3) 293-2228 

Greater Toledo Color Computer Club, William Paul 
Saba Sr., 3423 Cragmoor Ave., Toledo, 43614. 

(419) 385-9004 

Tri-County Computer Users Group, William J. 
Loeffler, 2612 Daie Avenue, Rocky River, 441 16, 
(216) 356-0779 

Miami Valley CoCo Club, Tim Ellis, 1805 W. Park- 
way Dr., Piqua, 45356, (513) 773-2244 

OKLAHOMA 

Central Oklahoma Computer Organization, Inc., 
Martin Schiel, 5313 Spitz Drive, Oklahoma City, 
73135, (405) 670-6891 

Green Country Computer Association, Michael 
Keller, P.O. Box 2431, TuSsa, 74101, (918) 245- 
3456 (DATA) 

Central Oklahoma Computer Organization Inc., 
Enid Chapter, Jim Sands, 706 South Grand. 
Enid, 73701, (405) 237-5949 

PENNSYLVANIA 

SNUG-Phila., William K. Serody, 1181 Cumberland 
Road, Abington. 19001, (215) 887-0513 

HUG-A-CoCo, George Lurie, 2012 Mill Plain Court, 
Harrisburg, 17110, (717) 657-2789 

Penn-Jersey Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 2742, 
Lehigh Valley, 18001 

Williamsport Area Color Computer Club, John M. 
Rymell, R.D. 3, Box 182, Muney, 17756, (717) 
546-2721 

The CoCo Exchange Club, Daniel Moore, 617 
Prescott Avenue, Scranton, 18510, (717) 961- 
0535 

Skyline Color Computer Ciub of Berks County, 
Lewis F. Brubaker, 4874 Eighth Ave., Temple, 
1 9560, (215) 921-3616 

Pittsburgh Color Group, Ralph Marting, 309 Frazier 
Dr., Pittsburgh, PA, 15235 

Holiidaysburg CoCo Users Club, Shawn S. Senne, 
RD1 Box 77. Holiidaysburg, 16648, (814) 695- 
3522 

The Holiidaysburg Area Color Computer Club, Bill 
Smith, P.O. Box 101, Roaring Spring, 16673, 
(814) 224-5280 



RHODE ISLAND 

New England COCONUTS, P.O. Box 28106, North 
Station, Providence, 02908 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

LoCo CoCo Club, Larry Coyle, 4334 Flynn Dr., 
Charleston, 29405, (803) 747-0802 

Midlands 80 Computer Club, Frank Eargle, P.O. Box 
7594, Columbia, 29202, TBBS (803) 791-7389 

Spartanburg County CoCo Club, Lawrence Easier, 
Jr., Rt. 1 Highway 221, Spartanburg, 29302, 
(803) 578-3120 

TENNESSEE 

Tri-Cities Computer Club, Gary Collins, P.O. Box 
4506 CRS, Johnson City, 37602-4506, (615) 929- 
1862 

Foothills Micro-Computer Club, Aaron Sentell, P.O. 
Box 1541. Maryville. 37801, (615) 982-4629 

Memphis Color Computer Users Group, Logan R. 
Ward, 5512 Poplar, Memphis, 381 19, (901) 685- 
0009 

TEXAS 

Alamo Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 690256, San 
Antonio, 78269 



UTAH 

Salt City CoCo Club. Dennis Molt, 720 E. Browning 
Ave., Salt Lake City, 84105, (801)487-6032, BBS 
(801) 487-6787 

VIRGINIA 

Northern Virginia C.C. Club, Bruce Warner, 14503 
Fullerton Rd., Dale City, 22193. (703) 690-2453 

Central Virginia Color Computer Club, Roger Lee, 
Rt. 2 Box 175, Madison Heights, 24572 

Color Company, Rick Bjouin, 1 2007-C3 Greywing 
Sq., Reston. 22091 , (703) 860-9297 

Richmond Area Color Computer Organization, 
William Mays, 6003 Westbourne Drive, Rich- 
mond, 23230, (804) 282-7778 

WASHINGTON 

Northwest Computer Club, Larry Haines, East 2924 
Liberty, Spokane, 99207, (509) 483-5547 

Mount Rainier Color Computer Club, Ron Amos, 
2450 Lenore Drive N., Tacoma, 98406, (206) 752- 
8735 

Tri-Cities Color Computer Users' Group/OS-9 SIG, 
Jim Vestal, P.O. Box 1213, Richland, 99352, 
(509) 943-4832 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Mil-O-Bar Computer Club, Jim LeMaster. P.O. Box 
130, Ona, 25545, (304) 743-4752 after 4 p.m. 

Blennerhassett CoCo Club, David Greathouse, 
1 306 Wells Circle, Parkersburg, 26101 

WISCONSIN 

Southern Wisconsin CoCo Club, David C. Buehn, 
24607 67th Street, Salem, 53168, (414) 843-3830 



CANADA 

ALBERTA 

Bonnyville User Group (BUG'S), Doug MacDonald, 
Box 2071, Bonnyville, Alberta, T0A 0L0, (403) 
826-4790 

The Calgary Color Computer Club, P.O. Box 22, 
Station M, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2G5 

Edmonton CoCo Users Group, Dexter Dombro, 
P.O. Box 4507 Stn. South, Edmonton, Alberta, 
T6E 4T7, (403) 439-5245 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Vancouver Colour Computer Club, Box 76734, Stn 
S, Vancouver, British Columbia. V5R 5S7 

Salmon Arm CoCo, David Coidwetl, RR #4, Site 26 
Comp. 13, Salmon Arm, British Columbia, V1E 
4M4 

MANITOBA 

Winnipeg Micro-80 Users Group, Robert Black, 
1755 King Edward St., Winnipeg, Manitoba, R2R 
0M3, (204)633-7196 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Campbeltton 6809 E Users Group, Blaine Arsenault, 
80 Deny Street, Atholville, New Brunswick, E0K 
1 AO, (506) 753-4769 

Moncton Color Computer Users Group, Robert E. 
McLaughlin. 73 Lewis Street, Moncton, New 
Brunswick, E1C4S5, (506) 855-3860 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Color Trading Post. Lee A. Sutton. P.O. Box 565, 
Bridgetown, Nova Scotia, BOS 1C0 

Halifax Dartmouth CoCo Users Group, Eugene 
Naugler, P.O. Box 572, Nova Scotia, Dartmouth, 

Colour Computer Halifax User Group (CoCo Hug), 
Paul A. Power. 6354 London St.. Halifax. Nova 
Scotia, B3L 1X3, (902) 455-6341 

ONTARIO 

ESSA Color Computer Club, David Morrow, 1 0 
Berwick Cres., Angus, Ontario, L0M 1B0, (705) 
424-6985 

Kingston CoCo Club, Kenneth Bracey. 316 West- 
dale Ave., Apt. 4-C, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 4S7, 
(613) 544-2806 

K-W CoCo Club, P.O. Box 1291, Station C, Kitch- 
ener, Ontario, N2G 4G8 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 147 



London CoCo Nuts Computer Club, Harry K. 
Boyce, 180 Concord Road, London, Ontario, 
N6G 3H8, (519) 472-7706 

Niagara Regional CoCo Club, Gerry Chamberland, 
6843 Cumberland Crt., Niagara Falls, Ontario 
L2H 2J9, (416) 357-3462 

Ottawa 6809 Users Group, Norm Shoihet, 1497 
Meadowbrook Road, Ottawa, Ontario, K1 B 5J9, 
(613) 741-1763 

Sarnia Computer Users Group, J. Verdon, P.O. Box 
1082, Sarnia, Ontario, N7T 7K5, (519) 344-6985 

Burlington Color Computer Users Group, Lawrence 
T.J, Coffey, 33 Drakes Drive, Stoney Creek, 
Ontario, L8E-4G4, (416) 573-6889 

Durham 80-C Computer Club, Tony Kernohan, P.O. 
Box 95, Whitby, Ontario, L1N 5R7, (416) 728- 
6416 

QUEBEC 

Club d'Ordinateur Couleur du Quebec, Inc., Centre 
de Loisirs St-Mathieu, 71 10- 8e Ave., St-Michel, 
Montreal, Quebec, H2A3C4, (514) 729-8467 

Club Micro Ordinateurde Montreal-Nord, Christian 
Champagne, 12365 Blv. Langelier#7, Montreal- 
Nord, Quebec, H1G 5X6, (514) 323-5958 

Les CoCophiles, Robert Chartrand, 17 Bord-de- 
I'eau, Repentieny, Quebec, J6A 3K2, (514) 581- 
1385 

Club ORCO-RS, Jacques Bedard, 33 Lisiere, St- 
Constant, Quebec, J0L 1X0, (514) 632-4311 

Le Club Couleur du Nord, Gabriel Pigeon, CP. 315, 
Barraute, Quebec, JOY 1A0, (819) 734-2577 

Club CoCo APPE, Andre Patenaude, 10870 Bois de 
Boulogne, Montreal, Quebec, H3M 2X1, (514) 
331-8418 

Advanced Montreal CoCo Club, Richmond Skrzzy- 
pinski, 329 boul. Richelieu, St-Basile-!e-Grand, 
Quebec, J0L 1S0, (514) 653-5182 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Saskatoon Color Computer Club, L. Curtis Boyle, 
35 Bence Crescent, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 
S7L 4H9, (306) 382-1459, BBS (306) 384-8040 



FOREIGN 



ARGENTINA 

Freecoco Club, Novoa, Miguel Angel-lng. Duarte, 
Omar, Mendez de Andes 799, Buenos Aires, 
Capital Federal 1405, Argentina, phone 431- 
2501 

AUSTRALIA 

Blacktown City TRS-80 Colour Computer Users 
Group, Keith Gallagher, P.O. Box 264, River- 
stone, New South Wales, 2765, Australia, (02) 
627-4624 

COCOPUG, Harry Murphy, 8 Lois Court, Regents- 
ville, New South Wales, Australia, 2750 

CoCoHUG (Color Computer Hobart Users Group), 
Robert Delbourgo, 15 Willowdene Avenue, 
Sandy Bay, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia 7005 

Sunshine Color Computer Club, Stephen Jones, 
P.O. Box 111, Sunshine, Victoria, Australia, 3020 

Australian Christian Users Group, Lieutenant 
Raymond L. Isaac, 57 Wittenoom Street, Collie, 
Western Australia 6225, phone (097) 34-1578 

ISRAEL 

The Mid-East CoCo Club, J. Yosef Krinsky, 526/1 1 
Kiryat Kaminetz — Neve Yaacov, Jerusalem, 
Israel 

MEXICO 

Mexcoco Users Group, Sergio Waisser, Paseo de la 
Soledad #120, Mexico City, D.F., 53920, Mexico, 
phone 294-36-63 

First Color Computer Users Group of Hermosillo, 
Arturo Fernandez Diaz-Gonzalez, Javier de 
Leon No. 708, Colonia Pitic, Hermosillo, Sonora, 
Mexico, phone 4-75-78 



the NETHERLANDS 

Color Computer Club Benelux, Jorgen te Giffel, 
Eikenlaan 1, 4641 GB Ossendrecht, the Nether- 
lands 

CoCoCE, J. Slaats, Chopinlaan 11, 5653 ET Eind- 
hoven, the Netherlands, (040) 512222 

PERU 

Piura Color Computer Club, Carlos Alvarez, Box 
142, AV. Guillermo Irazola, J-6 URB. Miraflores 
Castilla, Piura, Peru, phone (074) 327182 

PUERTO RICO 

Puerto Rico Color Computer Users Club, P. A. 
Torres, Cuernavaca 1699, Venus Gardens, Rio 
Piedras, Puerto Rico 00926, Phone (137) 755- 
7598 

WEST GERMANY 

First CoCo Club Hamburg, Theis Klauberg, 2345 
Delaware Drive, Ann Arbor, Ml 48103, West 
Germany (temporary address). 

The Greatest German CoCoCooks, Michael 
Herbes, Dorfstr 23, 4320 Hattinger, West Ger- 
many 



new clubs 



• The Color Computer Club Eindhoven 
meets every first and third Monday of the 
month from 7 to 1 1 p.m. at the Community 
Ha!l, 't SLOT, Kastelenplein 167, Eind- 
hoven (suburb Gestel). One night deals with 
BASIC and the next with ML. We also discuss 
hardware. Call 040-512222 or write for 
information. 

Jan Slaats 
Chopinlaan 11 
5653 E T Eindhoven 
The Netherlands 

• Tri-Cities Color Computer User's Group 
meets twice a month: The second Tuesday 
evening of each month is for all CoCo users, 
and the fourth Tuesday evening of each 
month is our new OS-9 SIG meeting. The 
CoCo club meets at Les Draper's Photo 
Classic Studio, 624 West Lewis, in Pasco, 
Washington. The OS-9 SIG meeting place is 
announced in our monthly newsletter, 4 The 
Tri-Cities CoCo Club News." Both meetings 
start at 7 p.m. There is no cost for member- 
ship except for the newsletter subscription, 
which costs$5 a year. Call Jim Vestal at (509) 
943-4832 or you can write us. 

Th-Ciiies Color Computer User's Group 

P.O. Box 1213 
Richland, WA 99352 

• We would like to inform your readers of 
a new CoCo newsletter being published 
called "Basic Byte." Please enclose an S ASE 
when writing. 

Don Henderson 
152 Patty Lane 
Florence, KY 41042 

• Is there anyone in my area who would be 
willing to share public domain software or 
start a CoCo Club? If so, please write. 

Daniel Thick ins 
102 Oak wood Avenue 
Sim co e, Ontario 
Canada N3Y 1 H9 



• We got it together! Clovis now has The 
Curry County CoCo Club. Check us out. 

Bill Walker 
7214 B Carolina Loop 
Clovis, NM 88101 

• Advanced Montreal CoCo Club will have 
a monthly newsletter, contests with prizes 
worth over $30, even a subscription to 
rainbow. We welcome members from all 
countries. 

Advanced Montreal CoCo Club 
329 boul. Richelieu 
St-Basile-Ie-Grand, Quebec 
Canada, ML 1 SO 

• Announcing the Club CoCo APPE in 
Montreal. For more information, call (514) 
331-8418. You can also write us. 

Andre Patenaude 
10870 Bois- De- Boulogne 
Montreal, Quebec 
Canada, H3M 2X1 

• The Burlington Color Computer Users 
Group meets at Burlington Central High 
School the second Tuesday of each month. 

Lawrence Coffey 
33 Drakes Drive 
Stoney Creek, Ontario 
Canada L8E4G4 

• CCOG would like to invite CoCo users or 
would-be users to join us. We meet on the 
third Tuesday of each month from 7-10 p.m. 
at DSL Computer Products, Inc., 4950 
Schaefer, Dearborn, ML We generally have 
some presentation and much informal 
exchange of information. Anyone interested 
can call me evenings at (313) 334-3934. 

Charles S. Van Ark 
Bloomfield Hills, Ml 



H\ Y\ t * • • 



Waiting for the 

Keystroke 

If you want your BASIC program 
to wait for a keystroke, just type 
EXEC 44539. This performs IH| 
same function as P$=INKEY$: IF 
A$="" THEN (next line). 

The computer waits for any key 
to be pressed before the program 
continues. 



.-.-.-.::-:-.:.-.-.-.-:-:-:-.-.-.-.-.-»:-.- Vr- 



..-=-=: : -:-r.- : -.- : -.-.-r : -rrr : -rr : -=' 



148 THE RAINBOW August 1987 




RAW Statements 




ettinff the Pictu 

o 





By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 




his may well be the most difficult 
tutorial you will experience in 
this column. The DRAW state- 
ment, with all its nuances, is what CoCo 
employs to create nearly all of its best 
graphics. Thus, it is imperative to 
understand how to use DRAW, In the 
past, we have made many cute pro- 
grams using it. In the future, we shall 
study it in more detail. 

The DRAW statement is difficult to 
read and interpret from a listing. It 
makes little sense. But, when the M 
option is also thrown in for good meas- 
ure, program lines make as much sense 
to the newcomer as Chinese. 

As hard as it is to create a picture with 
DRAW, it is infinitely harder to dig into 
the program and make corrections and 
alterations. 

Key in Listing 1. Here are a few 
procedural hints to aid you when you 
are extracting or injecting new or re- 
placement characters into the DRAW 
program line. 

When you locate the place you intend 
to modify, make a notation on scrap 
paper of the actual characters in that 
area. For example, type LIST 200, If 
you are planning to work at the very 
beginning of the line, write on the scrap 
paper, U3NR3U3R4BR3. Figure out your 
expected changes, for instance, 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer, 



U4NR3U2R4, and place them underneath 
your first notation. You then make your 
changes — in this example, change U3 
to U4 and the next U3 to U2. The reason 
for using scrap paper is that after you 
make the change, the result may be 
wrong or disappointing. You will want 
to know what your original data was so 
that you can restore it, especially if you 
have f orgotten which data you replaced. 

Whenever you are changing some 
characters in a program line, take a 
moment to insert a blank space in front 
of your target area and then insert a 
second blank space at the end of the 
work area. This way you will be able to 
locate your bracketed work area at a 
glance, and the included blank spaces 
remain harmless. After you are finished, 
you can leave the blank spaces in the 
program line, except inthe unusual case 
where you have the maximum number 
of characters in a line. You may prefer 
to use the semicolon in place of blank 
spaces. 

Keep in mind that every time you 
tinker with a DRAW statement, there is 
the danger that you might distort a 
segment somewhere down the line. You 
will have to be prepared to make f urther 
remedial corrections. 

If you use the "continuous line" 
method, you will have to adjust the B 
option characters/values. Frequently, 
you will be able to make changes in the 
length of a straight line segment using 
the N option, avoiding the dislocation of 
some part of the program. 

By "continuous line" method, I mean 



that (H,V), the horizontal and vertical 
starting location, is determined in the 
first DRAW line. It is not computed again, 
since no matter how many DRAW lines 
are used, they are merely a continuation 
of the previous line. 

Relocating each succeeding DRAW 
program line is a big waste of time. 
Finding a new set of (H,V) values, after 
having traveled a tortuous route with 
perhaps 40 to 150 direction changes, is 
bori ng and time-consuming. 

If you have a graph paper sketch to 
use as a guide, your job is half-finished. 
Otherwise, you may have to create a 
copy of the picture by plotting the 
information in the DRAW lines onto 
graph paper. 

I never told you debugging was easy! 
(Notice that I have avoided the nasty 
w ord to keep you in a compliant mood.) 
Your graph paper rendition will be an 
exact reproduction of your program 
lines. It will be a great help in planning 
modifications. You will find it is so 
much easier to make corrections on 
graph paper with an eraser than to 
execute tentative, time-consuming 
changes in the program lines. 

To give you an idea how difficult it 
is to rip apart DRAW program lines, Line 
200 contains the printed legend, FIGURE 
1. Suppose I wanted to make the G more 
pronounced. How would you locate it 
and revise it to make the hook higher 
up? Run, then type LIST 200. 

First, you must discover the size, 
height and width of a letter and the 
width of the space between letters. The 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 149 



simplest way is to get some graph paper 
(or make some homemade graph paper) 
and plot it out. Pick some line intersec- 
tion on the graph paper and begin: Go 
up three units; go right three units and 
return three units left; go up three units; 
go right four units. 

If you drew the lines correctly, an F 
appeared. By counting the line lengths, 
U3 + U3 = 6 and R4 = 4, we can infer 
that most of the letters will be six units 
high and four units wide. 

BR3 tells us we moved three s 
right but did not print a visible line. f 
call this the invisible line. Therefore, we 
can conclude that the space between 
letters is generally three units wide. 

Now run. The legend doesn't remain 
on the screen long. You can hold it by 
pressing SHIFT and @ together. What 
we expect to do is make the small, 
vertical part of G one unit longer to 
make it stand out. That part was two 
units long. Depending on which way the 
two-unit line was drawn (downward or 
upward), it is either D2 or U2. Press 
BREAK and type LIST 200, We look for 
a U2 or D2 further along in the program. 
We spot a D2. It is in about the right 
location, We edit it from D2 to D3 and 
run. 

That wasn't it! We restore the original 
D2 and run, then type LIST 200. But, 
it has to be it. If we came from above, 
we must have come down BD4. D2 gives 
us the height of the visible line. 

If we change D2 to D3, then BD4 must 
equal BD3. Type EDIT 200 and locate 
BD4. Make your change. Continue to D2 
and change it, then run. 

It is important that you think out 
your correction. Suppose I wanted to 
make the space between E and 1 one 
unit wider? Type LIST 200. We know 
the numeral 1 is the last character in the 
line. We know that three spaces separate 
each letter. Thus, we are looking for a 
BR3 near the end of the program line. 
The nearest BR3 is too far away, so we 
look for a BR4 or BR2. 

A BR4 stands out. We will change it 
to BR5 and see what happens. Run. Yep, 
that was it. The reason it was four units 
wide was that it looked better; now we 
know that five units wide is even nicer 
looking. 

This legend was written in one con- 
tinuous line. Some letters begin at the 
top and some at the bottom. Five 
programmers might create this line in 
five different variants. I am apt to 
proceed one way, and the next time I am 
creating the same character/ number, I 
might strike off in another direction 



depending on whim. This is what makes 
revising DRRW lines so tricky. It is not 
easy to anticipate the workings of 
somebody else's mind. CoCo allows you 
to create the legend in innumerable 
ways. 

That brings us to the face from last 
month's tutorial. Comparing the draw- 
ing with the actual CoCo rendition, we 
are struck that it is narrow — narrower 
than we would prefer! The figure needs 
eyes badly and that nose has to go! 

For openers, let's put in some eyes 
and eyebrows. Type LIST-100. Yeah! 




Figure 1 



But where are the eyes? Run it. We look 
for clues. It is almost certain that each 
eye consists of ERF. Two eyes means we 
are likely to find two sets of ERFs near 
each other. Type LIST-20. Good news! 
It looks as if the eyes were the first 
feature drawn. A good way to check is 
to inject an obvious pointer between 70 
and E. Insert G10 or H10 and run. The 
graphic is likely to be distorted, but the 
line will point to the edge of the eye. We 
now know where and which eye was 
drawn first. We remove the pointer and 
run. Now type LIST 20. On graph paper 
we trace out the eyes to see in which 
order they were drawn. 

Luckily, we have Figure 1 from last 
month's tutorial to consult. We com- 
pare Line 20 with the sketch and note 
the route followed: right eye to left eye 
to nose to mouth. We now know we can 
work on the eyes in peace. 

Beginning at the inside of the right 
eye, finish up the eye; move up and do 
the right eyebrow; do the left eyebrow 
and drop down to rework the left eye. 
I sketch out my planned units. After the 
first ERF, I make the insertion GUGRHDH 
and run. It looks like a Cyelops, but 
distortions are to be expected. I con- 



tinue inserting, with BHE2R2F, and run. 
Now insert BRER2F2BG and GUGRHDH. 
Run it. Weareofftotheleft. Type LIST 
20, Can you see that BR3 has to go? 

The original eyes were separated by 
BR3, Since we covered the eyes and 
eyebrows without any gaps, we don't 
need that space anymore. Look at 
Figure 1 . What we require now is to 
yank BR3 to do the top of the eye, Run. 
The nose must go over one unit to the 
left — maybe two units. Type LIST 20. 
We see that the move from eye to nose 
is BM-3,1. We try -5 in place of -3 and 
run. No good! Try -4 and run. 

The eyebrows seem too high. Let's 
change E2 to E and F2 to F. Run. Now 
it's cross-eyed. Let's increase the space 
between eyebrows two units, from BR to 
BR3, and run. 

The nostrils are pathetic! How would 
it look if we zapped the nostril and just 
kept FRE to suggest a nose? We want BM- 
2,1 to replace BM- 3, IDE. FRE stays, but 
FNU2goes! NowtypeLIST 20. We know 
D4 is the nose. Change BM-3,1 to BM- 
2 , 1, delete DE and run. Good! Pull out 
FNU2 and run. We need to change BD3 
to BM+1,3. 

If we made the tip of the nose wider, 
R2 instead of R, then we would need BD4 
instead of BM+1,3. Run. Not so hot! 
Let's move the nose tip one unit to the 
left. Type LIST 20. Next, type BM-3,1 
and BM+1, 4 to replace BM-2,1 and BD4 
and run. The nose, D4, should be one 
unit to the left. Or, suppose we change 
D4 to M-1,4 and BM-3,1 to BM-2,1? 
Run. Terrible! Restore D4 and leave BM- 
2 , 1 alone. Run again. I am not too 
crazy about the eyebrows, but let them 
go for now. 

Let's make the face wider by one unit. 
We will add one unit each to the hori- 
zontal areas of the chin, top of head and 
forehead. First, the chin: It is either L4 
or R4. Type LIST 20 and look for either 
one. An R4 is on the bottom line. We 
shall put a pointer in front of R4 to see 
if we are in the right place. Insert D10 
in front of R4 and run, The face is 
distorted, but if you look carefully you 
will see we hit the location right on the 
chin. Delete D10 and, while you are at 
it, change R4 to R5 and run. 

The forehead looks like R2. It must 
be in Line 2 1 or 22. Type L I ST 21. There 
is no R2, but there is an L2, Let's put 
a pointer, D10, in front of L2 and run. 
Yes! The face is distorted, but we are in 
the right pew. Remove the pointer and 
change L2 to L3. 

The last R3 on top of the head must 
be ehanged to R4. Type LIST 21. An R3 



150 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



is down about the 130th character. We 
put a pointer, D10, to verify the loca- 
tion, in front of R3 and run. Right on 
the money! Remove the pointer and 
change R3 to R4 and run. 

The left side of the shirt is one unit 
off. It must be where it touches the neck. 
The part, M-3,2 or M+3, -2, needs to be 
moved over. Type LIST 21. No such 
animal. Type LIST 22. There is an M- 
3,2 about 70 characters into the line. 
Put a pointer, R10, in front of it to see 
if we are zeroed in and run. That's it! 
But, what is the correction? Type EDIT 
22. Remove the pointer, R10. BE looks 
like the guilty party. Change it to BH and 
run. Close! Type EDIT 22 and change 
BH to BU. Now run. 

Back to the eyebrows! Type LIST 20. 
Suppose we change the first E to BE and 
the second F to BF in the eyebrows? 
Run. Now the eyes are not bulging. 

That R5 chin should be R3. That 
would change the preceding M+3, 2 to 
M+4,2 and the following E2 to M+3,- 
2. Make the changes and run. 

At this stage, I wandered away from 
CoCo and took a break. Returning 
refreshed, I looked at the face more 
critically and noted that the R3 lip line 



needs an additional unit to balance it. 
Type LIST 20. It is easy to spot, being 
about 110 characters into the program 
line. Fortunately, the movement in 
front of it is BR. What is easier than 
deleting the B to expose the R and 
accomplishing the mission without 
disturbing the shape of the face? Run. 

This leaves the itty-bitty L or R dim- 
ple/lower lip line. It needs to be wid- 
ened to put the face into a more bal- 
anced position. Type LIST 20. No 
doubt, it followed the RR3. We could 
change this to R4, but who is going to 
inspect our work and object to our 
awkward construction? We must be on 
the lookout for the L that follows. 

To widen L without distortion, caused 
if we use L2 to add one unit, a better 
method is to use NL after L. This way, 
we move one unit left and return one 
unit right. It doesn't affect the following 
offset which, if you check it out against 
Figure I, moves up to the right jaw line. 
Run. 

I don't like it! It is too wide. To try 
to shorten its length, replace LNL with 
GNH and run. It doesn't look especially 
attractive, but I'll settle for it. 

The ear could be integrated with the 



sideburns by removing those angles, but 
I like the suggested, stylized face. 

There is one more error I overlooked. 
It is a problem for you to solve. Note 
that the right, inner side of the lapel 
should be located one space to the left 
(consult Figure 1). Make the modifica- 
tion on your own initiative, then con- 
gratulate yourself on mastering this 
tutorial. Save FINflLF if desired. 

You were subjected to many altera- 
tions in this tutorial so that you would 
have the confidence to rip apart and re- 
arrange those pesky components in the 
DRAW statements. The newcomer may be 
uneasy with the graphics capabilities, 
but now he knows how to debug his own 
programs with every expectation of 
ending up with a solid graphic. 

Some of the changes we made seem 
petty. When you are working on your 
brainchild, they take on an aura of 
importance because you want a perfect 
graphic. 

I hope you enjoyed having your cage 
rattled and working out these little bugs 
because I want to excite, challenge and 
encourage your desire to create an 
innovative program on your favorite 
computer. □ 



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SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER 
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FOR ORDERS LESS THAN $20. 
ADD $1.50. HANDLING. 
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THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 



A DIVISION OF DATANATCH, INC. 



PROGRAMMERS 
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RED, GREEN, BROWN, BLUE $6.50 Ea. 

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August 1987 THE RAINBOW 151 



Listing 1; 

0 ! <LISTING1> 

10 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 0 

11 GOTO 200 

20 DRAW"S16BM105,70 ERFBR3 ERFBM- 
3 , 1D4BM-3 , 1DEFREFNU2BD3M-2 , -1GHM 
-2 , 1BFBRR3BGL BL7BU2NUM+2 , 3ND4M+ 
3,2R4E2M+2,-3U" 

21 DRAW ff BU4BRM+l, -3M-2, -4H2BUNM+ 
3,-4BGL2 M-3,-lM-2,-lM-3, 1 BM+2, 
1GM-1,2M-1,3DM+1,2M-1,2DL UH2ENF 
M-l , -3UM+1 , -4M+1 , -3E3M+2 , -1M+4 , - 

1R3 M+3,1M+2,1M+2,5M+1,4M-1,2M-1 

, 3FG2DLNU" 

22 DRAW" BD5BL2D3BRNF3DM-2 , 3G3 BF 
M+2,-lUR3UE2BRR2M+3,l BD4BL16H3M 
-2,-3U2BEM-3,2GM-2,4 BL3BUM+3,-l 
BD2M+4 , -1D2R2M+2 , IF" 

100 GOTO 10)3 

200 DRAW ff S4BM107 , 95U3NR3U3R4BR3D 
6BR3U6R4BD4NLD2NL4BR3NU6R4U6BR3N 
D6R4D4L2NL2F2BR3U6NR4D3NR3D3R4BR 
4BU5ED6NLR" 

250 FOR Z=l TO 1000 :NEXT: PCLS :GO 
TO20 



About Your Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is sent second class 
mail. You must notify us of a new address when 
you move. Notification should reach us no later 
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Your mailing label also shows an account 
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Please indicate this account number when renew- 
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Send it to our editorial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
This applies to everyone except those whose 
subscriptions are through our distributor in 
Australia. 



Listing 2: 

0 1 <FINALF>ACE 

10 PMODE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 

11 GOTO 200 

20 DRAW ff S16BM105,70 ERF GUGRHDH 
BHBER2 FBR3 ER2 BFBG GUGRHDH ERFBM 
-4 / 1D4BM-2 , 1FR2E BM+1,4 M-2 , -1G 
HM-2 , 1BFRR3BGGNH BL7BU2NUM+2 , 3ND 
4M+4,2R3 M+3,-2M+2,-3U ff 

21 DRAW" BU4BRM+1 , -3M-2 , -4H2BUNM+ 
3,-4BGL3 M-3,-lM-2,-lM-3,l BM+2 , 
1GM-1,2M-1,3DM+1,2M-1,2DL UH2ENF 
M-1,-3UM+1, -4M+l,-3E3M+2 , -1M+4 
1R4 M+3 / lM+2 / lM+2 / 5M+l / 4M-l / 2M-l 
,3FG2DLNU" 

22 DRAW" BD5BL2D3BRNF3DM-2 , 3G3 BF 
M+2 / -lUR3UE2BRR2M+3 / 1 BD4BL16H3M 
-2,-3U2BU M-3 / 2GM-2 / 4 BL3BUM+3, 
-1BD2M+4 , -1D2R2M+2 , IF" 

100 GOTO 100 

200 DRAW ff S4BM107 , 9 5U3NR3U3R4BR3D 
6BR3U6R4BD3NLD3NL4BR3NU6R4U6BR3N 
D6R4D4L2NL2F2BR3U6NR4D3NR3D3R4BR 
5BU5ED6NLR" 

250 FOR Z=l TO 1000 : NEXT : PCLS : GO 
TO20 

300 'PROBLEM SOLUTION: CHANGE 
BL16 TO BL17 IN LINE 22. IF YOU 
PREFER ALSO CHANGE THE FOLLOWING 
BU TO BE. ■ 



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Just enter a word, let the computer scramble it and 
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up with the original word. 

The listing: 

1 DIMM$(100) :CLS: INPUT" ENTER WOR 
D" ;W$ : C$=W$ : L=LEN (W$) : FORI=lTOL: 
R=RND (L) :M$ ( I ) =MID$ ( W$ , R, 1 ) :MID$ 
( W$ , R , 1 ) =CHR$ ( 1 ) : NEXT : CLS : PRINTW 
$ ; : FORI=lTOL : PRINTM$ (I) ; : NEXT : PR 
INT: INPUT ff YOUR GUESS" ;G$ : IFG$=C$ 
THENPRINT" CORRECT" ELSE PRINT" INCO 
RRECT": PRINT" IT WAS: ";C$ 

Evan Durant 
Bay Minette, AL 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The Third 
Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



152 THE RAINBOW August 1987 




The Best Money Can Buy . . . 
HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 




Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drivfc Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Color Computer. Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shack ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM $99. 

(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 

Completed and Tested Board without ROM . . . $79. 

(includes Case) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual $30. 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1.0 $40. 



Ordering Infdrrtfalfo'n : 

Use our WATS line to place'your order via Visa. MasterCard, or Wire Transfer. Or 
mail your payment directly to us. Any non - certified funds will be held until proper 
clearance is made. COD.orders are accepted as well as purchese orders from 
government agencies. Most items are shipped oH the shelf with the exception of hard 
drive products that are custom built. UPS ground is our standard means of shipping 
unless otherwise specified Shipping costs are available upon request. 



\ 



Drive 0 Complete $199. 

Drive 1 Complete $129. 

Drive 0 & 1 Dual Drive $319. 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 



1-713-480-6000 
Order Line 1-800-231-6671 
16208 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, Texas 77059 




DOWNLOADS 



Using the 
6 ms Stepping Rate 



/ have a Radio Shack thinline disk 
drive and a 64 K ECB CoCo 2 (Version 
1. 1 ), and I have been trying to increase 
the stepping rate to 6 ms. I know the 
disk drive can handle it because it works 
at 6 ms on OS-9. I've tried POKE 
55232, 0 : POKE 5531B , 20 but it doesn 't 
work. 

Steven Haase 
Engl e hart, Ontario 

Steven, you are close but missing one 
thing. Memory locations 55232 and 
55318 are in ROM. You cannot change 
ROM memory with peeks and pokes. 
You have to run a program similar to 
ROM RAM, which moves the ROM to 
RAM and enables the 64K RAM mode 
of your CoCo. I'm sure that everything 
will be OK after you run ROM RAM, or 
a similar program. 



DLOAD Discovery 

/ have a 16K CoCo 2 without disk 
drives. One day while experimenting 
with commands, I typed DLDflD and it 
hung up. I had to reset the computer to 
get the cursor back. What does the 
command DLDflD do? If it does nothing, 
why is it there? 

Steve Nilsen 
Seattle, WA 



Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through Ham radio (K4KWT). 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago, and he has built several 
68 XX systems. 

154 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Editor 

DLDflD was a command to transfer 
programs from one computer to 
another, such as in a classroom envi- 
ronment. There was a flaw in the orig- 
inal ROM, and it would not work unless 
the command was patched. This com- 
mand has been overwritten by the CoCo 
3 BASIC ROMs to add new commands. 
Gook luck, Steve, and thanks for writ- 
ing. 



Clever Solutions 

/ bought a CoCo 3 and found it 
consistently destroyed every directory 
when saving over the same file by 
offsetting the directory entries by one 
byte (sometimes the GAT was also 
destroyed, sometimes it was not). When 
I stopped using the high-speed poke, it 
worked perfectly every time. In other 
words, for reliable operation, do not use 
the high-speed poke when performing 
disk II O. 

VIP Desktop automatically sets the 
VDG to colors that look terrible on a 
monochrome monitor. Fortunately, the 
program may be used to fix itself using 
Disk- Zap. 

Track 33, Sector 8 — change byte 41 

from FO to F8 
Track 33, Sector 6 — change byte 34 

from 03 to OF 
Track 33, Sector 7 — change byte 110 

from 03 to OF 
Track 24, Sector 4 — start at byte 9, 

replace 12s with BG 03 87 FF 22 
Track 26, Sector 4 -- starting at byte 

85, put in BG 03 87 FF 22 7E 4G E7 
Kill CHECK G4K/SHT and save the 

following program as VIP . BflS: 



10 POKE&HFFBC , 0 : POKE&HFFBD, 
4B:WIDTH32 :L0ADM "DESKTOP" 

To use Desktop, simply type 
RUN "VIP". This patches everything 
except Terminal ( which uses both high 
and low resolution screens). The low 
resolution is OK (when these patches 
are used). When entering the terminal 
mode, simply press CLEAR-SHIFT-8 to 
change the color. Now everything is 
readable on a monochrome monitor. 

Bill Pinnell 
Winter Haven, FL 

Thanks for the valuable information 
on VIP Writer, Bill. We don't recom- 
mend disk operation at high speed. 



EDTASM Disk I/O 

/ have a 64K ECB CoCo with disk 
drive. I have EDTASM+ in ROM pack. 
Could you print the program instruc- 
tions to convert the ROM pack to disk 
I/O? 

Marcel Beausoleil 
Woonsocket, RI 

See the next answer for some hints for 
the original program to use your £D- 
TASM+ with disk, Marcel. 



Superpatch Fixes 

Roger Schrag's Superpatch (Sep- 
tember 1983) was written for Disk 
BASIC 1.0. After correction was made 



0S9 LEVEL 

SOFTWARE and HARDWARE 

"Frank Hogg Laboratory has supported OS9 longer than ANY other company!!!" 




INSIDE OS9 
LEVEL II 

The definitive 'Inside' story behind OS9 for the CoCo III. 
Kevin Darling and Frank Hogg team up to provide the 'nuts 
and bolts' information needed to really use OS9 Level II. 
This book takes you chapter by chapter thru the inner 
workings of OS9 including the window drivers, fonts and 
patterns, bugs and how to fix them, GIME reference and it 
even shows you how to use Tandys Rogue game disk to 
make a workable OS9 Level II system, plus much more. 
Approximately 100+ pages. Source listings are provided for 
some things plus flow charts and tables. A Must buy for 
anyone interested in OS9 Level II. 

Just $39.95 

Coming next "Inside Multi-View" 



r 



THE QT CoCo 

Question: The QT CoCo is the second most expensive 
hard drive/floppy drive subsystem for the CoCo? True or 
False? The QT CoCo is 
the only system that 
can be upgraded to a full 
68000 based computer? 
(The QT Plus) True or 
False?The answer to 
both questions is True. 
If you want to have the 
best drive subsystem 
for your CoCo then The 
QT CoCo is for you. 
20 Meg HD + 360or 
720K floppy $1350. 

Fast 40 Meg HD with 360Kor 720K floppy is $1998. 
Requires a host adaptor. (Disto etc) 

Call or send for more information today! 




r 



SCULPTOR 

Sculptor is a fourth generation language, an applications 
generator and a database all rolled into one. The 4th GL part 
of Sculptor means that programming time is cut by a factor 
of 5 or 10. The applications generator part of Sculptor writes 
programs for you and the database part is a very fast B+ 
tree. Sculptor is FAST! New users are up to speed in a few 
days, up to speed users can write sophisticated programs 
in half an hour! In our database of over 20,000 names we 
can retrieve any name in less than 1 second!! The program 
that does that only took 2 minutes to write! That's right 2 
(two) minutes! Maximum # of records is 22,000,000! No limit 
to # of fields etc. Includes a menu program, a query program 
and a variety of utilities to maintain the files. The typeset 
manual is the best available with both a table of contents 
and an index. A handy pocket guide is also included. Re- 
quires CoCo III and OS9 Level II. Call for more information. 

List $595 - Special Only $495! 



The WIZ 

By Bill Brady 

The Wiz is the First and Only program designed for 
the CoCo III that uses WINDOWS! The Wiz is a smart ter- 
minal and communications program for the CoCo III and 
OS9 Level II. Making use of multiple windows and overlay 
windows with pop up dialog boxes The Wiz really shines. 
Features include: Autolog- lets you configure The Wiz's col- 
ors, characters boldface etc., Xmodem and text send and 
receive, sleep mode, conference mode uses a separate 
window for your text, usage log and much more. Does not 
work with the CoCo's internal bit banger serial port. The 
complete package includes a special ACIA driver that al- 
lows baud rates from 300 to 19,200 baud. Requires the 
RS232 pak or the Disto RS232 or similar port plus a CoCo III 
with OS9 Level II. 

Only $79.95 



Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. Est. 1976 - 770 James Street - Syracuse New York - 13203 
315/474-7856 Visa, M/C, Amex, Diners club accepted. Prices do not include shipping. 



for the 1.1 Version, the program worked 
beautifully. The corrections are: 



Line 


1.0 


1.1 


149 


SCEA2 


SCF7E 


172 


SCF07 


SCFE3 


258 


SCA3B 


SCAE9 


298 


SC8A4 


SC952 


321 


SC468 


SC48D 


392 


SCBD2 


SCCAC 



Gordon S hep hard, Sr. 

Albany, CA 

Thanks for the information, Gordon. 
As you can see in the previous letter, 
there is still quite a demand for the 
original patched version of EDTASM, 
even though Tandy has introduced a 
disk version. 



Understanding Memory 

What do you recommend for a good 
CoCo memory map that would cover 
BASIC 1.2 and RS-DOS 1.1? lam look- 
ing for a map that comments on what 
each address does and breaks it up into 
the different subroutines it may encom- 
pass. It would have to be in a format 
that could be understood by new ML 
programmers. A lot of maps use codes 
for their comments that are not in- 
cluded in the normal process of assem- 
bly language learning. 

I have looked at Disk Basic Unrav- 
elled and the other books in the set, but 
they are somewhat difficult for a be- 
ginner to understand. What is FDC? 

Merle Metzger 
Tucson, AZ 

I'm glad you wrote, Merle, as you are 
quite typical of the beginning CoCo 
user. To have a good understanding of 
the CoCo, you must have a good work- 



ing knowledge of both hardware and 
assembly language programming. This 
is no easy task for the novice. I suggest 
TRS-80 Color Computer Assembly 
Language Programming by William 
Barden, Jr. (Radio Shack Catalog No. 
62-2077) as an excellent start. By the 
way, FDC stands for floppy disk con- 
troller. 



6809E microprocessor. I would replace 
it and see if the problem disappears. 



High Resolution Graphics 

/ have written an assembler program 
that does graphics on the CoCo 2 based 
on a music input through the cassette 
port, but my output on the text screen 
looks a little crude. How can I get to 
PMDDE 3 or PMDDE 4 in assembler? 

Joseph Weintraub 
Woodside, NY 

The address of the VDG in your 
CoCo 2 is SFF24. Figure out the color 
combination you want using the High 
Resolution Graphics section of the 
Getting Started with Color BASIC 
manual. Load this value into Register A 
and do a STfl $FF24. If you want to see 
how Microsoft did it, disassemble the 
ROM at $9621. 



On the Fritz 



/ have a problem with Color Scripsit. 
Once I accidentally pulled the pack out 
of the computer while it was still on. 
Now my cursor moves across the screen 
randomly. I can't use Color Scripsit, 
and when I press SHIFT-CLEAR, I get a 
T' instead of a slash. What is wrong? 

Keith Tysinger 
Asheboro, NC 

Keith, it sounds like you need a new 



Underlining Made Easy 

In your May 1987 column, Bill 
Hodges said that he was unable to 
underline the spaces between words 
when using his CoCo and Telewriter 64 
with a D WP-220. 1 have the same setup, 
and complete underlining can be had by 
adding one more embedded command 
at the top of your text. Right below ^Dl 
15 and ^D2 14, add ^DP3 95. When 
you type a line you want underlined 
completely, begin the line with a CLEAR- 
1, end it with a CLE A R-2, and wherever 
there is a space in the line, insert a 
CLE A R-3. This causes a _ character to be 
printed in each space, giving you under- 
lining thaljooksji/^ This 
also works with a Tandy D WP-230. 

Dan Weaver 
Amsterdam, NY 

Thanks for the tip, Dan. I have 
received quite a few solutions to this 
problem, and yours is one of the quick- 
est. Evidently you are doing fine with 
word processing from the appearance of 
your letter. 

Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From 
the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type ASK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "Down- 
loads" online form, which has complete 
instructions. 



COCO 3 OS-9 
HARDWARE UPGRADES 




The PLUS 100 — The PREMIER 512K 
Memory Expansion for the COCO 3. 

Brochures and price list available on request. 



DiSKMASTER Disk Drive Systems 
Absolutely Without Equal in the COCO World! 

20 MB SCSI Hard Drive 
1 MB High Speed Floppy Drive 
Hardware Real Time Clock with Battery Backup 
3 Hardware Serial Ports 

Bi-Directional Centronics Compatible Parallel Port 
Sophisticated OS-9 Drivers by D. P. JOHNSON 
RAMDISK options up to 1 .5 MB 
Expansion Port for additional Floppy Drives 
Single Cable Interface to COCO 3 

A VERY HIGH PERFORMANCE, 4 Stalion, Multi-User System 
can easily be assembled using a DISKMASTER System. 

HEMPHILL ELECTRONICS, INC. 

1922 Cogswell Road 
South El Monte, CA 91733 

(818) 575-4530 

(Mon. thru Thurs., 1:30 to 4:30 PM Pacific Time) 



156 THE RAINBOW August 1987 





KISSable OS-9 



Controller Attacks Halt Line Problem 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



recently had the pleasure 
of meeting David C. 
Wiens of Sard is Technol- 
ogies, a man with a great idea in a brand 
new hardware product at the Chicago 
RAINBOWfest. He was taking orders 
for his new DMC Disk controller. 
DMC stands for Dual Mode Controller. 

If you've ever lost half your command 
line trying to type ahead while OS-9 was 
accessing your disk drives, you'll appre- 
ciate Wiens' new disk controller card. 
You'll also appreciate it if you have had 
trouble using your CoCo to gather real- 
time data in a laboratory or lost large 
chunks from incoming messages from 
an online data service like Delphi while 
OS-9 was reading a disk file you were 
printing in the background. 

Wiens' next statement sounded like 
an excellent sales pitch, but it also made 
a lot of sense. "The waste of processing 
power caused by the continuous halting 
of the 6809 microprocessor is up to 
twice as bad with the CoCo 3 as it was 
with the CoCo 2," he said. "Why? 
Because the CoCo 3 can run at twice the 
speed, twice as many instructions could 
have been executed during the time the 
6809E is halted." 

Ironically, the fault does not lie with 

Dale L. Puckett, who is author o/The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale is a 
U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and lives 
in Rockville, Maryland. 



the CoCo itself, or with OS-9. Rather, 
all the blame can be assigned to the disk 
controller. And unfortunately, all other 
disk controllers on the market at this 
time have the same problem. 

To maintain full compatibility with 
existing software, Wiens designed the 
DMC controller with two modes. It 
retains the current Radio Shack "halt" 
mode, but also adds a new "no halt" 
mode. In the latter mode, the DMC can 
read from or write to a disk by itself 
while your 6809E continues to run 



independently, crunching your data or 
scanning your keyboard, etc. The 6809 
is only needed at the beginning when it 
initiates the read or write operation and 
at the end when it checks the status and 
moves the data to your Color Comput- 
er's main memory area. 

The DMC controller comes with an 
8K cache memory, but you may add up 
to 32K. It uses a Western Digital 
WD1773 controller chip and comes 
with a version of Dan Johnson's SDisk 
software, which has been modified to 



Listing 1: Vmode 

* VMODE - COPYRIGHT (c) 1986 by S. B. GOLDBERG 

* Sets and displays disk write verification mode. 
•>v 

* Use: vmode [opt] 

* v= verify on 

* -v=verify off 

* 

* Examples: 

* vmode <ENTER> 

* Displays current verification mode (on/off) . 
* 

* vmode v <ENTER> 

* Turns verification on (default state) . 
■ 

* vmode -v <ENTER> 

* Turns off disk write verification. 

if pi 

use /d0 /def s /os 9 de f s 
endc 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 157 




* 


mod 


len , name , prgrm+ob j ct , r eent+1 , entry , ds iz 


mode 


ALL La/ 


verifv mode 




rmb 


200 stack 




rmb 


50 param 


dsiz 


equ 


» 


name 


f cs 


/vmode/ 




fcb 


1 edition number 




fee 


/(c)1986 S.Goldberg/ 


dJ2f 


fee 


/d0 / device descriptors 


dl 


fee 


/di / 


d2 


fee 


/d2 / 


d3 


fee 


/d3 / 



* CHECK SYNTAX AND INITIALIZE 



entry 



clr mode verify 'on 1 

ldd ,x+ param chars, 

cmpa #$0d param? 

beq display no, display mode 

cmpa # f - hyphen? 

bne chkend no, check for 'on 1 

inc mode yes, set mode 'off 1 

ldd ,x get next chars, 

cmpb #$20 end of param? 

bhi bad no , syntax prompt 

ora #%00100000 yes, make lower case 

cmpa # f v is it f v f ? 

bne bad no, syntax prompt 

ft 

* PATCH DEVICE DESCRIPTORS 
ft 



chkend 



noerr 
out 
patch 



getmode 



leax 
bsr 
leax 
bsr 
leax 
bsr 
leax 
bsr 
clrb 
os9 
bsr 
bec 
cmpb 
bne 
rts 
Ida 
sta 



<d0,pcr 
patch 
<dl ,pcr 
patch 
<d2 ,pcr 
patch 
<d3 ,pcr 
patch 

clear 
f $exit 



dev. descript. 
set mode 

dev. descript. 
set mode 

dev. descript. 
set mode 

dev. descript. 
set mode 
error 
quit 



link link for address 
getmode no error, continue 
#221 module in memory? 
out exit with other error 
no, return 
mode verify mode 
$la,u place in descriptor 

ft ft ft ftft ft ftft ftft ft ft ft ft ft ftft ft ft ft ftft ftft ft ft ftft ft ft 
ft- 
ft CALCULATE DESCRIPTOR CRC 
ft 

tfr u,x module start 
ldd 2,u module length 



make full use of the controller's no halt 
mode under OS-9. It also will let you use 
35-, 40- or 80-track drives, single- or 
double-sided, in every existing OS-9 
disk format including MIZAR OS-9, as 
well as OS-9 68K and Japanese OS-9. 

Database Applications Hit Market 

Two major OS-9 Level II-based data- 
base applications were shown at RAIN- 
BOWfest Chicago. Both CSG IMS 
{Information Management System), 
$169.95 from Clearbrook Software 
Group, 446 Harrison St., P.O. Box 
8000-499, Sumas, WA 98295, Phone: 
(604) 853-9118; and Sculptor, from 
Microprocessor Developments Ltd in 
London and distributed at $495 from 
FHL, 770 James St., Syracuse, NY 
1 3202, Phone: (31 5) 474-7856, appeared 
to be selling quite well. 

We hope to take a detailed look at 
these powerful database products and 
feature sample applications written in 
both languages during the next several 
months. In the meantime, the pressure 
of a book deadline forces us to restrict 
this month's offering to an overview of 
each program. 

The CSG IMS uses a language sim- 
ilar to dBase //from the IBM PC world. 
In fact, its extensions move it close to 
dBase III. IMS uses Balanced Tree 
Indexing, which allows several users to 
access your data files simultaneously. It 
also means you will not need to period- 
ically reorganize your data files. You 
may store up to 1,073,741,824 records 
in a database, and a single text field can 
contain up to 32,768 characters. You 
may use up to 127 unique indexes. 

The CSG IMS compiler lets you 
develop complex applications quickly 
and easily. It contains more than 25 file- 
related functions, more than 20 I/O 
functions and several dozen commands 
and functions that let you control the 
flow of your program, perform math- 
ematical operations, manipulate text 
and trap errors. A unique feature lets 
you convert text values to sound codes, 
which means you will be able to search 
for "sound alike" names. A screen I/O 
program lets you build a "fill-in-the- 
blanks" form on your CoCo screen. 
CGS IMS will take it from there and 
automatically create a database mainte- 
nance program based on that screen. 

An interactive environment built into 
CSG I MS lets you search for important 
data without writing a report program. 
For example, if you need to know which 
salesman sold more than $1,000 worth 
of merchandise in March, you could 
simply type: 



158 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



LIST FDR sales(3) 1000 
print name, sales(3) 

You drive CSG IMS through a menu 
that gives you access to a text editor, file 
generator, screen form generator, re- 
port generator, language compiler, 
language interpreter, interactive envi- 
ronment and OS-9. CSG IMS applica- 
tion and data files may be ported to 
other versions of the program that run 
on all versions of OS-9. Clearbrook 
plans future implementations for MS- 
DOS, the Atari ST and Amiga. 

Clearbrook also has an offering that 
may interest OS-9 hackers. They are 
selling ERIN A, a user-mode debugger 
developed by Seikou Electronics Co. of 
Japan, erina includes a small disas- 
sembler, an assembler and two dozen 
commands that speed up program de- 
bugging. Commands include Compare, 
Dump, Examine Registers, Execute, 
Fill, Goto, Input, Link, Memory Exam- 
ine, Output, Protect, Quit, Search, 
Transfer, Unlink, Verify, Display, 
Trace, Print, Set Breakpoints, Set Dot 
Variables, Evaluate and Help. 

Sculptor. A Fourth Generation Lan- 
guage for CoCo 

Third-generation programs were 
written in high level languages like 
BASIC, COBOL or C. After they were 
written, they had to be compiled or 
interpreted. To generate a database 
application, the programmer had to 
oversee every last detail of the program. 

Today, fourth-generation languages 
like Sculptor from Microprocessor 
Developments, Ltd, and FHL make the 
job of generating a database application 
program much easier. They do this by 
delivering a complete set of develop- 
ment tools. Each part of the set is 
designed to do a particular job for the 
programmer. 



subd #3 less CRC bytes 

tfr d,y update length 

leau d,u CRC accumulator 

ldd #$ffff initialization value 

std ,u initialize the 

sta 2,u CRC accumulator 

os9 f$crc do count 

bcs out exit with error 

com ,u+ complement 

com ,u+ the CRC 

com ,u count bytes 

rts return 

* GET DESCRIPTOR ADDRESS 



link 



back 



clra any type , language 

os9 f$link link to descriptor 

bcs back return on error 

os 9 f$unlink unlink 

rts return 



it 

* DISPLAY THE CURRENT MODE 



display 



leax <d0,pcr device descriptor 

bsr link get address 

bcs out exit with error 

leax <on,pcr verify on message 

Ida #1 standard output path 

ldb $la,u get mode 

beq print verify on, print & quit 

leax <off,pcr off message 

bra print print & quit 

* 

* SYNTAX ERROR PROMPT 

it 

bad leax <syntax,pcr syntax prompt 

Ida #2 standard error path 

print ldy #100 max. length 

os9 i$writln to screen 



OS-9™ SOFTWARE/HARDWARE 



SDISK— Standard disk driver module allows the full use of 35, 40 
or 80 track double sided disk drives with COCO OS-9 plus you 
can read/write/format the OS-9 formats used by other OS-9 
systems. (Note: you can read 35 or 40 track disks on an 80 track 
drive). Now updated for OS-9 ver. 02.00.00 $29.95 

SDISK + BOOTFIX— As above plus boot directly from a double 
sided diskette $35.95 

L1 UTILITY PAK— Contains all programs from Filter Kits Nos. 1 
& 2 plus Hacker's Kit #, plus several additional programs, Over 
35 utilities including "wild card" file cmds, MacGen command 
language, disassembler, disk sector edit and others. Very useful, 
many of these you will find yourself using every time you run your 
system. These sold separately for over $85. $49.95 

SKIO— Hi res screen driver for 24 x 51 display; does key click, 
boldface, italics; supports upgraded keyboards and mouse. With 
graphics screen dump and other useful programs. Now UPDATED 
FOR OS-9 Ver 2.0 $29.95 



PC-XFER UTILITIES— Utilities to read/write and format ss MS- 
DOStm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. $45.00 (requires SDISK) 

CCRD 512K Byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE— Requires RS Multipak 
interface, two units may be used together for 1MB RAM disk. 
Addressing is switch selectable. OS-9 level 1 and 2 driver and test 
software included. $169.00 

All disk prices are for CoCo OS-9 format; forother formats, specify 
and add $2.00 each. Order prepaid or COD, VISA/MC accepted, add 
$1.50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD; actual charges added for 
COD. 

D.P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St. 
Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-8152 

(For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time) 

OS-9 Is a trademark of Microware and Molorola Inc. 
MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 159 





bcs 


out exit with error 




bra 


noerr quit 








syntax 


fdb 


$070a 




fee 


/Use: vmode [opt]/ 




fob 






fee 


/ v=on -v=of f / 




feb 




on 


feb 






fee 


/Verify: ON/ 




feb 




off 


feb 


$0a 




fee 


/Verify: OFF/ 




feb 






emod 




len 


equ 
end 


* 



Listing 2: Fi les 

/* Copyright (c) 1986 by Gregory A., Law */ 
#include <stdio.h> 
#include <ctype.h> 



struct { 

char 

char 
) dir; 

struct new | 
char 

unsigned 

); 

struct { 



name [29] ; 
lsn[3] ; 



/* directory entry structure 



psn[3] ; 
sectors ; 



/* allocation map structure 



char 


attr ; 


unsigned 


owner; 


char 


mod^date [ 5 ] ; 


char 


link; 


long 


size ; 


char 


creat dat [ 3 ] ; 


struct new alloc [48]; 



/* file descriptor sector structure */ 

/* file attributes */ 

/* owners user ID */ 

/* modified date */ 

/* link count */ 

/* file size */ 

/* date created */ 

/* allocation map array */ 



| fd; 

FILE *pn; 

FILE *fpn; 

char filename [ 3£F] ; 

main(argc , argv) 
int argc; 
char *argv[ ] ; 
{ 

char path[255] ; 
char fpath[255] ; 
long offset; 
int i; 

pflinitQ ; 



/* initialize floating point */ 



/* if no arguments */ 
EOF) 



if (argc — 1) ( 

if((pn - open("." , 0x81)) = 

exit(errno) ; 
if((fpn - open ("(§", 0x01)) — EOF) 

exit (errno) ; 

} else { 

if((pn - open(argv[l] , 0x81) ) = EOF) 

exit(errno) ; 
chdir (argv[l] ) ; 

if((fpn - open("@" , 0x01)) — EOF) 
exit(errno) ; 

) 

printf ("Filename LSN Sectors LSN Sectors LSN Sectors\n") ; 

printf(" \n"); 

while( (read(pn. &dir . sizeof (dir) ) ) 1- 0) { 



When you write a fourth-generation 
program, you combine selected por- 
tions from the existing set and tailor 
them to meet your own needs. You do 
not have to go back to the basics and 
code every detail. Essentially, the 
fourth-generation language does the 
low-level coding for you. 



" . . you will be able 
to search for 'sound 
alike' names." 



For example, Sculptor includes tools 
to create and maintain indexed data 
files, describe data dictionaries, create 
and update screen forms, write reports, 
make menus, generate programs and 
make inquiries into a database. 

One of the beauties of the Sculptor 
system is its automatic program gener- 
ation. Two programs, sg and rg, create 
standard programs for you automati- 
cally after you have defined the record 
layout and created a keyfile for your 
data, sg generates a program that lets 
you input, delete or amend data in the 
keyfile by filling in the blank spaces of 
a form on your screen, rg generates a 
program for you that will produce a 
printed report from your database. 

While Frank Hogg awed the RAIN- 
BOWfest crowd with Sculptor, his 
nephew Rich and new assistant Nancy 
sold many copies of DynaStar with 
DynaForm. Both programs have been 
rewritten in C and customized to take 
advantage of the CoCo 3 and OS-9 
Level II. As a bonus for CoCo 1 and 
CoCo 2 users, FHL put all older ver- 
sions of DynaStar on the same disk with 
the new release, including the original 
version that works with any terminal 
supported by the proper GoToXY mod- 
ule. 

The new CoCo DynaStar determines 
what kind of terminal you are using by 
reading a file named termset in your 
SYS directory. The file termset is also 
used by Microware's Scred, the screen 
editor that Tandy includes in the OS-9 
Level II developers package. CoCo 
users don't need to worry about 
termset unless they are using an exter- 
nal terminal. They need only copy the 



160 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



strhcpy(f ilename , dir. name); 

if (filename^] I- ».■ && f ilename[0] !=- ( 
13tol(&off set , dir.lsn, 1); 
offset *- 256; 
lseek(fpn, offset, ; 
read(fpn, &fd, sizeof(fd)); 
shov( ) ; 

) 



} 

shovQ 
{ 



long offset; 
int i; 

printf ("%-15s" , filename); 
for(i - 0; i <48; i++) ( 

13tol(&of f set , fd. alloc [i] . psn , 1); 

/* long way of saying 'if(i % 6 = 0) * */ 

if (i — 6 || i — 12 || i — 18 || i — 24 || i — 36) 

printf ("\n "); 
if((i!-6 || i!-12 || i!-18 || i!-24 || i!-36) && offset =- 0) [ 

printf ("\n") ; 

return; 

) 

if(offset — 0) 
return ; 

printf(" %061X %04X " , offset, fd . alloc [i] . sectors) ; 



SYS'termset file from the FHL Dy- 
naStar distribution to their system disk. 

On the other hand, you can amuse 
yourself for hours just playing with the 
last four parameters on each termset 
line. These bytes change the color of the 
foreground and background of both the 
main window and the overlay windows 
DynaStar uses to display its help mes- 
sages. They are in this order: 

1. Foreground color of help menus 

2. Background color of help menus 

3. Foreground color of text screen 

4. Background color of text screen 

If you load DynaStar first, you can 
pop in and out of it quickly and observe 
what happens each time you change one 
of the bytes above. 1 experimented with 
different color schemes for nearly an 
hour before I made up my mind. 

If you hook up a Televideo 910 ter- 
minal to device 'T2 through the RS-232 
pack in slot one of your Multi-Pak 
interface, you will find that it works 
perfectly. You'll also find lines for a half 
dozen other terminals in the termset 
file supplied. 

DynaCalc Patches 

Karl Quinn of Terminal Island, Cal- 
ifornia, wrote us recently and passed 
along several patches that fix minor 
bugs in Version 1.00.00 of DynaCalc. 
The first change fixes the problem of an 
extra line feed being sent after every 
carriage return when printing a report. 
Specific instructions that use only 
"vanilla" OS-9 commands are available 
at no cost from Radio Shack Computer 
Centers. The quick fix is to use Com- 
puterware's patch utility to make the 
following changes'. 



Offset 


Old 


New 


0007 


80 


81 


0008 


63 


62 


4BE2 


26 


20 



Make sure you use the v command 
before you exit patch, to ensure that 
DynaCalc's CRC is updated. A second 
bugattacksyou if you use the DMP-105 
or DMP-120 Tandy printers, which do 
not recognize the "Top of Form Feed" 
character that DynaCalc sends out. 
Change the following byte: 

Offset Old New 

5000 0C 0D 

Again, don't forget to update the 
CRC with the pa tch v command before 
quitting. 



Try OS-9 on Duane Perkins' BBS 
Before You Buy 

We received an interesting offer from 
Duane Perkins, P.O. Box 255, Mount 
Gretna, PA, (7 17) 964-3536, this month. 
He has written a BBS system named "9- 
Online" that lets CoCo owners run OS- 
9 remotely. Here's how it works. 

You send Perkins an alphanumeric 
username and password and a one-time 
non-refundable fee. He registers your 
username and password, gives you an 
initial allotment of disk space, sends 
you terminal software you can run on 
your non-OS-9 CoCo and instructions. 
Your initial fee buys you three hours of 
online time. You pay the telephone 
charges. 

Perkins has come up with a novel idea 
that could be put to good use by local 
Color Computer Clubs wanting to help 
their members get started with OS-9. If 
a club set up a system like this on a local 



phone line and made it available 24 
hours a day, many new people would be 
able to try OS-9 and get familiar with 
it before they buy it. Go for it! 

This Month's Listings 

S.B. Goldberg has contributed 
VMode. This handy utility lets you turn 
the disk verify routine on and off on the 
fly. To turn verify on, type vmode v. To 
turn verify off, type vmode -v. If you 
don't remember what state you left the 
verify utility in, type vmode and it 
reports the current state. 

Greg Law is back this month with 
files. This utility shows all your files 
and lets you peek at the segment allo- 
cation table. It is hard coded to 80 
columns, as it is primarily designed to 
be used with a printer. It prints the 
filename followed by a table showing 
the LSN and the number of sectors 
allocated in the entry. /R\ 



CG-Cfte.ck Writer if you use Dynacalc to keep track of your 
household bills, then here is the best way to pay them. $19.95 

CC-FMght Log Prepares a flight log to use in flight, airport 
directory built-in, customize it to your airplane. $24.95 

COMING SOONll CC-OFFtCE WORLD accounting package!! 
Requires OS-9 and printer. Works with PBJ Wordpak 

DISKS, 100% CERTIFIED, MADE IN USAjj 

Double Sided , Double Density $4.90/10 disks $43.00/ 100 Disks 

F . M. Tech n o I og y 

14 115 Spencer Road 
Suite 2 
Houston. TX 7704 1 



TO ORDER CALL 
(71 3) 550-3565 



Answering 
machine on 
duty. 8:00AM 
to 8:00PM 



Checks. MasterCard 
and VISA Accepted 
Add $3.00 S&H 



OS-9 trademark of Microware & Motorola Inc. 



Tx Residents add 
6.25% sales tax 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 161 



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OS-9 
Level II 




OS-9 MEMORY 



The Problem with BASIC09 



By Peter Dibble 



BASIC is so powerful I sometimes 
almost forget that assembly lan- 
guage is the ultimate language. 
Getting at more than 64K of memory o n 
the 6809 is a challenge in any language. 
It's almost impossible with BASIC09. 

I don't like the dummy editor/ printer 
program I showed you in the May 1987 
issue. The only way I could find to start 
the printer process from a BASIC09 
program was the Shell command. It 
worked, but it caused trouble. The 
programs had to look foolish as they 
chased around patching the parameters 
so the shell wouldn't laugh at them 
changing them back into poetry. 

I didn't need the shell. The OS-9 
F$Fork system call woul'J have done 
exactly what I wanted. The problem is 
that there's no way to issue the F$Fork 
system call from BASIC09. Or is there? 

There are two ways to do a f ork f rom 
BASIC09. The easiest way is to use the 
SysCall procedure. (It's on Delphi and 
in the OS-9 Users Group software 
library. It also comes with Level II.) It's 
a little harder to write a special proce- 
dure to do a fork, but it will be clean 
and efficient. 

I'll show you how to use an assembly 
language procedure to make the editor/ 
printer pair from May work much more 
smoothly. 



Peter Dibble has a bachelor's degree in 
chemistry and is currently a graduate 
student in computer science. He has 
worked as an applications programmer, 
systems programmer and as the user 
services assistant director for the Uni- 
versity of Rochester Computing Center. 
With Dale Puckett, he is the co-author 
of The Complete Rainbow Guide to 
OS-9. 



The Programs 

Even when it isn't run from the shell, 
BASIC09 can't deal with carriage return 
characters on the command line. How- 
ever, it treats line feeds like any other 
character. Since a line feed generates a 
new line when BASIC09 prints it, I put 
line feed characters, CHR$(10), in the 
text wherever I want a new line. 

The BForl< procedure is an assembly 
language procedure meant to be called 
from BASIC09. It can be called using: 

run BFork [command _ line) 
or 

run BFork [command _ line, op- 
tional - memory ) 

In both cases, BFork starts a process 
running BASIC09 with the specified 
command line. If you give BFork a 
second parameter, it acts like the 8 
option on a shell command line, e.g., 
you can give BASIC09 more memory with 
it. 

BFork starts a BAS1C09 process with- 
out using the shell. This means that the 
command line parameter goes directly 
to BASIC09. For our purposes, that is a 
good thing. It means that we can be less 
careful about what we put in the com- 
mand line. For instance, if the shell were 
involved, an exclamation point in the 
command line would have caused the 
shell to try to set up a pipe. That's not 
what we want at this point! 

What's Going on in BFork 

The first section of BFork is all 
definitions. We set up the page headers 
and the module header and define a 
symbol for the Parameter Error code. 
Except f or the page header inf ormation, 
identical lines will appear at the begin- 
ning of any subroutine module. 

After the module header, we set up 



symbols for the values BASIC09 will pass 
in the stack. BASIC09 puts lots of infor- 
mation in the stack. Starting from the 
bottom (6809 stacks grow down) we 
have: 

• The return address. 

• The number of parameters BASIC09 
is passing us. This had better be one 
or two. 

• The address of the command line. 

• The length of the command line. 

If the caller included an optional mem- 
ory parameter: 

• The address of the amount of extra 
memory. 

• The length of the amount of extra 
memory (2, if this is an integer). 

The next part of BFork is constant 
values. There's the name of the program 
(for the module header to refer to), 
BFork's edition number, the string 
"Basic09," and a constant zero. 

Next, we get to the program itself. If 
we were only passed one parameter, we 
pretend that we were passed an optional 
memory parameter of zero — that's 
what the constant zero is f or. If there are 
two parameters, we use the second one 
as the optional memory. At this point 
we don't do anything with the optional 
memory, just leave the X register point- 
ing at it. 

Now we worry about the length of the 
command line. If it's zero, we have 
problems. There has to be at least the 
name of the BASIC09 procedure to run. 
If it's non-zero we put it into the Y 
register. It looks like it would have been 
better to put the length of the command 
line directly into Y, but we're about to 
use it again. 

OS-9 doesn't allocate extra space to 

August 1987 THE RAINBOW 163 



hold a process's parameters. Since 
parameters are usually shot, this isn't a 
problem. BFork could be passing a long 
command line, so we worry about it. 
Optional memory is given in pages, so 
we have to convert the length of the 
command line (which we cleverly lef t in 
D) to pages and add it to the optional 
memory. 

From here we just set up the rest of 
the values F$Fork needs and do the 
fork. The process that F$Forl< starts is 
called a child. BFork waits for the new 
child to end. 

BFork returns with the most pessi- 



mistic value it can find. If anything went 
wrong in BFork, that error code is 
returned. If BFork runs smoothly, it 
returns whatever the child returns. 

How Does This Fit in? 

Editor and Printer together are 
tiny. There is obviously no need for 
BFork. The programs are supposed to 
represent much larger programs. I gave 
them dignified names to support the 
fiction that they are large and compli- 
cated. 

Imagine complicated programs 
hooked together by BFork. BASIC09 uses 



almost 24K of memory, leaving 40K for 
your program and data. A 56K program 
won't fit in memory. If you can divide 
the 56K program into a 40K part and 
a 16K part and connect them with 
BFork, Level II will go into action and 
give you the memory you need. 

Remember that we are still working 
on the second simplest way to access 
extra memory. The simplest way was to 
use processes that have nothing to do 
with each other. This way uses BFork 
(or Shel 1) like a procedure call that can 
only send values to the called proce- 
dure. Values can't be returned. □ 



Listing 1: BFork 










nn n n~\ 
00001 








NAM 


BFork 




nnn no 

0000Z 








TTL 


A Basic09 


procedure to Fork a Basic09 process 


n n n n o 
\p\fi\fi\fi5 








IFP1 














use 


/d0/defs/os9def s 


nctnn c 
\p\p\fi\pD 








ENDC 






CiCict etc 
\fi\fi\fi\fib 




0021 


Type 


set 


Sbrtn+Objct 


nnnnn 




0081 


Revs 


set 


ReEnt+1 




yjyjyjyjo 




0038 


E$Param 


equ 


$38 








0000 87CD0062 




MOD 


PgmLen , Name , Type , Revs , Entry , 0 




D 


0000 




org 




Parameters 


nnn-\ i 
)D)P)P 11 


D 


0000 


Re turnA 


rmb 


2 


Return Address 




D 0002 


ParamCt 


rmb 


2 


Number of parameters 


yjyJy) 1 J 


D 


0004 


ParmArea 


rmb 


2 


Address of cmd line 


Y>y>)P l^f 


D 


0006 


LParms 


rmb 


2 


Length of cmd line 


)0)0)D LD 




0008 


MoreMem 


rmb 


2 


Amount of extra mem 


yjyjyj lb 


D 


000A 


LMoreMem 


rmb 


2 


Length of MoreMem 


1 / 




000D 42466F72 


Name 


f cs 


/BFork/ 




CiCiCf\ q 




0012 01 


Edition 


feb 


1 




nnn-\ q 

WW iy 




0013 42617369 


Basic09 


f cs 


/Basic09/ 




nnn o n 
000Z0 




flfllk 0000 


DefMem 


fdb 






nnn o t 

00021 




001C 


Entry 








nnn o o 




001C 308DFFFA 




leax 


DefMem, PCR 


nnn o o 




0020 EC62 




ldd 


ParamCt ,S 


Number of parameters 






0022 2335 




bis 


PError 


Parameter Error 


nnn f\ r~ 

00025 




0024 10830002 




cmpd 


#2 


Are there 2 parameters? 


00026 




0028 222F 




bhi 


PError 


More? Error 


00027 




002A 2602 




bne 


UseDefM 


less? no 


00028 




002C AE68 




ldx 


MoreMem , S 


Default to no memory overide 


00029 




002E 


UseDefM 








' 00030 




002E EC66 




ldd 


LParms , S 


Parm length 


00031 




0030 2727 




beq 


PError 


Must be parms 


00032 




0032 1F02 




tfr 


D,Y 


Put parm length where it belongs 


00033 














00034 














00035 




* Make 


sure there 


is enough memory 


for the parameters 


00036 




* by increasing the optional memory 


- requirement by 


00037 




* the length of the parameters (in 


pages) . 


00038 


















0034 C300FF 




addd 


#255 


Round up to next page 


00040 




0037 1F89 




tfr 


A, B 


Put # of pages in B 


00041 




0039 EB01 




addb 


i,'X 


Add extra pages 


00042 


















003B 308DFFD4 




leax 


Basic09,PCR Program to execute 

















164 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



yj yj w t j 


003F 


8611 




1 Ha 

Ilia 


#Prgrm+Objct Type and language of Basic 


yjyjy) HO 














yjyjyjH- / 




Hi Hi D *+ 




1UU 


r airiTiAi: ea , o 


ine aaaress or trie parameter 


(KfXCX Aft 


)0 )0 *+ J 


1 y) J r W J 




Ob? 


r y r oitk. 




ft ft ft A Q 


y/yj *T D 


9 SI 0 




DCS 


Jina 


Jirror r deq exit 
















ww^ _?i 




^ A09 




P b lib 


A 
A 


oave process nuniDer 


yjy? yjjL 






loop 










GfGfAA 


iy j r yj *+ 






r yWdlL 


Wait ior cniid to imisn 


yjyjy/j *+ 


yj yj '-tu 


9 S0F 
z. -/ y j_i 




"Y\ c c 

Ut l) 


TiT TT *v* "v* "v* 


opeciai error exit 




y) yJH-r 


A 1 FA 




cinpd 


c 


Did tne rignt proc complete/ 


yjyjyjD 0 


y/y) D 1. 


z. D r / 




DTlc 


n -t~\ 
loop 


no, try again 


y) yj yj d / 














yjyjyj d o 




19M 




1 A O O 


1 


pop process w 


yjyjyj j s 


yj yj j j 






t- c t-K 

L o U U 






yjyjyjvyj 




9 603 




U lie 






y)y)y) 01 




3Q 


Hilia 


"V" "f~ o 

IT L b 






yjyjyj o z. 
















Cf Cf SQ 

yj yj j y 




"P TT "V* "V* "V* 
1 £il 1 UI 








yjyjyj o *+ 




rfi3ft 

uD JO 




1 u u 




i aLamcLci iLrror 


D _) 






Tj 1 "v» -w» -y* 

iLr r or 








yjyjy) 0 D 




A3 




coind 






y)y)y) 0 / 




3 Q 




IT u b 






yjyJy) DO 


00Rn 




w iLr ror 










005D 


3582 




puis 


a,pc 




00070 


005 F 


2657A8 




EMOD 






00071 


0062 




PgmLen 


equ 







. Listing 2: BFo rl< . dump 






1 


: 87CD 0062 000D 2181 


7A00 


129104. 


2' 


1C00 0042 466F 72EB 


0142 


24496. 


3, 


6173 6963 30B9 0000 


308D 


103613. 


4- 


FFFA EC62 2335 1083 


0002 


233662. 


5 


222F 2602 AE68 EC66 


2727 


44077. 


6 


: 1F02 C300 FF1F 89EB 0130 


52086. 


7' 


8DFF D486 11EE 6410 


3F03 


178529. 


8 


: 2510 3402 103F 0425 


0EA1 


31713. 


9 


: E426 F732 615D 2603 


39C6 


166500. 


10: 3843 3935 8226 57A8 


15662. 




gPMSnftHklELL . IIT1CUSE PP.PR 

□ 



i I 4 



• It 



/T HEARD THAT FALSOF? 
IS PUBLISHING. A MEW 
MA6AZIHE FOR FANS OF 
SYLVESTER STALLONE 
CALLED . . . 





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August 1987 THE RAINBOW 165 




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iters OS-9 Programs 



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Listing 3: Edi tor_ 
PROCEDURE 

0076 

0119 
0120 
0152 
0169 
0193 
01CE 
0209 
0244 
027F 
0286 
0297 
029C 
02A8 
02B3 
02F2 
032D 
0368 
03A3 
03C1 
03CB 
03E9 
0422 
0447 
046E 
0489 



Editor_2 

(ic *) 

(* This program pretends to be part of a text editor that*) 
0* starts a process to print a buffer. *) 
(Jc ■>'<■) 

DIM cmdJLine: STRING [500] \(* Build the print buffer here *) 
DIM i: INTEGER 

DIM InStr: STRING [40] \(* For reading from data statements *) 
DIM DataLength: INTEGER \(* A constant *•) 
DataLength=ll \(* The number of strings in DATA *) 



*) 

*) 
*) 
*) 



*) 



c* 

Read the text from data statements. Of course, a 
(* real editor wouldn't do this. 

<* 

cmd_line := fl " 

FOR i=l TO DataLength 

READ InStr 

cmd_l ine=cmd_l ine+InS tr 
NEXT i 

(* 

(•* Finish off the command line. It will look something *) 

(* like: printer ("...") *) 

■>'<■) 

cmd_l ine : ="pr inter ( " " "+cmd_l ine+" n " ) " +CHR$ (13) 
RUN BFork(cmd_line) 

DATA "Alias, poor Yorick! " , CHR$ (10) 

DATA "I knew him, Horatio , 11 , " a fellow of infinite jest, 11 

DATA CHR$(10)," of most excellent fancy." 

DATA CHR$(10),"He hath bore me on his back " 

DATA "a thousand times" , CHR$ (10) 

DATA " From Hamlet by Shakespeare" 



Listing 4: Printer 
PROCEDURE 
0000 
000C 
0011 



printer 
PARAM buffer: STRING [500] 
PRINT buffer 
BYE 



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c 




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(201) 722-1055 

ENGINEERING 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 167 



1 ^% ifcf 1 5 I i y* st*** 

1 #*% in l/ iu» i n uui I susiri 



Learning the Lin 




By William Barden, Jr. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 




orry about the recent lapse in "Barden's Buffer," I've 
been trapped in the internals of OS-9 trying to figure 
out how things work, In any event, I'm back and ready 
to use the CM-8 Color Monitor I purchased at 
RAINBOWfest-Chicago. I highly recommend the RAIN- 
BOWfests, by the way There's something for everyone, the 
prices are excellent, and there are plenty of free seminars. I've 
attended the last few R AINBOWfests and have given 
seminars on CoCo languages, a subject dear to my heart. Not 
only does the CoCo support a new version of BASIC under 
OS-9, called BASIC09, but it also supports two of the most 
popular computer languages ever: PASCAL and C. I want to 
look at computer languages in general and some of the 
philosophy behind them. In addition, there are some 
interesting things about using languages under OS-9 on the 
CoCo. 

In the Beginning Was Machine Language 

By now, you all know about the 6809 microprocessor in 
the CoCo. In the CoCo 3, it's the 6809E, which is simply a 
faster version of the 6809. Both microprocessors use the same 
instruction set, The instruction set of the 6809 is thought by 
many programmers to be better than the instruction set of 
the 8088/8086/80286/80386 microprocessors used in MS- 
DOS systems (like the Tandy 1000 or 3000) because it's more 
of a "classical" set of instructions — more general purpose 
instructions that can use a variety of addressing modes. 

Machine language instructions perform very primitive 
operations when compared to high-level languages. A typical 
instruction sequence isshown below, which adds the numbers 
from 1 to 10 with the result in the R register. 



0100L111 

1100011000001010 

111101110011000000000000 

101110110011000000000000 

1100P00000000001 

111101110011000000000000 

0010011011110110 



A <— 0 
B < — 10 

Store (B) in 53000 
Add (A) and ($3000) 

B < — • B - 1 
Store B in $3000 
Back 3 instructions 



if <> 0 



Bill Bard en has written 27 hooks and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years 'experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects or computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros, 

1 68 THE RAINBOW August 1 987 



Instructions operate at a byte or word level — eight or 16 
bits of data — - rather than in the floating-point format of 
BASIC, Consequently, you've got to implement your own 
floating-point subroutines and even design your own printer 
or I/O drivers in many cases. 

Machine language refers to writing sets of instruction 
sequences in binary ones and zeroes, the only language that 
a microprocessor really recognizes. Although it's certainly 
possible to write code that way, it's very tedious. Chances are 
that, in a string of ones and zeroes that represent the "add 
the numbers from 1 to 10" code, you've made one or two data 
entry or logical errors. Deleting, modifying or inserting 
instructions means a tedious rehash of the ones and zeroes. 

Assembly language is a way to make that coding less 
tedious. Instead of just ones and zeroes (or the hexadecimal 
equivalent), programmers write down instruction mnemon- 
ics. These are abbreviations for what the machine language 
instructions reallydo, such as RDDR S3E04 for, "Add two one- 
byte operands, one from the R register and the other from 
memory location S3E04, and put the results in the R register." 
An assembler program takes the assembly source code and 
translates it into those ones and zeroes in "object code." The 
object code is what is loaded and executed in the micropro- 
cessor. The assembly language version of the "add the 
numbers" code is shown in the listing. Everything to the right 
of the 0)0) xxx line numbers is written and edited by the 
programmer. The line numbers, and everything to their left, 
are spewed out by the assembler program. 









00100 


★ADD THE NUMBERS FROM 


1 TO 10 


091F 


4F 




00110 


A DDNUM 


CLRA 




ZERO TOTAL 


0920 


C6 




00120 


LDB 


#10 




COUNTER 


0922 


F7 


3000 


fit f& I *% ft 
pp Up 




STB 


$3 000 


STORE 


0925 


BB 


3000 


00140 


ADD010 


ADDA 


$3000 


ADD 10+9 + 


0928 


C0 


01 


00150 




SUBB 


11 


COUNT - 1 


092A 


FT 


3000 


00160 




STB 


$3000 


SAVE CNT 


0920 


26 


F6 


00170 


LOPEND 


BNE 


ADD010 


IF <> 0 



The CoCo has several assemblers available. Some are 
"foreign assemblers," including the excellent Micro Works 
assembler, but the most popular assembler is Radio Shack's 
EDTA3M+ on cassette or disk. This is a highly interactive 
assembler written by Microsoft. It combines the assembler 
proper, an editor similar to the BASIC editor and a debug 
package called ZBUG, which allows you to execute and find 
errors in the assembled program under programmer control. 



The whole package allows in-memory assembly, editing and 
debugging in a nice, interactive environment. 

Radio Shack no longer markets the EDTASM+ disk 
assembler, even though i t is ind ispensable for CoCo assembly 
language. (The cassette version is still around, at S39.95.) 
Why no EDTASM+ disk assembler? Radio Shack is driven by 
what sells. If a product falls below a certain sales level, they 
pull it from the catalog. There are many copies of disk 
EDTASM+ floating around, however. 

One reason for EDTASM+*s demise is the availability of the 
OS-9 assembler. The OS-9 assembler has many of the features 
of EDTASM+, especially in the editing and assembling area. 
However, it does lack the interactiveness of EDTASM+ — it's 
much harder to edit, assemble and debug an OS-9 assembly 
language program. 

The philosophy of OS-9 assembly language is different, as 
well. EDTASM+ assembly language programs run "stand- 
alone" without any operating system. OS-9 assembly 
language programs, or modules as they are called, run under 
the watchful eye of OS-9. This is a mixed blessing. Under 
OS-9 you can use many of OS-9's operating system calls to 
perform tasks such as reading a character or writing to the 
screen. On the other hand, all assembly language code under 
OS-9 must be position-independent. 

Position-independent code means that references to 
absolute addresses in memory, such as the $3E04 reference 
above, are verboten. Instead, an instruction-addressing type 
called program counter relative (PCR) must be used. 
Instructions are referenced to the current program location 
rather than fixed locations. The reasons for this are well- 
founded. OS-9 loads all types of program modules into 
memory at one time and keeps track of where they are. 
Modules must be able to operate anywhere in memory 
because there are no fixed locations. 

Writing code in PCR addressing format is not that difficult 
(compared to normal assembly language code), but is rather 
limiting and just another complexity for a beginner to 
contend with. Coupled with the fact that you must know how 
to use OS-9 to run the assembler, using the OS-9 assembler 
is is no easy chore. 

Assembly language, although difficult to learn and a 
tedious language in which to program, has one great virtue. 
It's extremely fast — up to hundreds of times faster than 
interpretive BASIC. It will always be the language of choice 
for powerful commercial applications that are meant to sell 
in large volumes. 

CoCo 3 BASIC 

CoCo 3 BASIC is mostly interpretive BASIC with a few 
Microware add-ons for the high resolution modes of the 
CoCo 3. HCIRCLE, HCL5, HCOLDR, HDRRW, HGET, HLINE, 
HPflINT, HPOINT, HRE5ET and H5ET are like the counterpart 
commands for the CoCo 2, as are LPEEK and LPDKE (the latter 
are for extended memory). Other goodies allow error- 
trapping (ERLIN, ERND, ON ERR GOTO, ON BRK GOTO) and 
additional screen control (WIDTH, LOCATE). 

Interpretive BASIC for the CoCo 3 is every bit as powerful 
as Microsoft GW-BASIC for the IBM PC Compatible (MS- 
DOS) crowd. 

Structured Languages 

What is OS-9 BASIC (BASIC09) like? Before answering that, 
let me tell you about a controversy that's raging. There are 
computer science professors who literally hate BASIC. One of 
the chief reasons for this is its lack of structure. Industry and 



academia realized that something had to be done about all 
that "spaghetti code." One proposed answer was structured 
programming. 

In structured programming, code is broken up into nice, 
neat modules. Each module performs a well-defined function, 
say, calculating a monthly payment given a principle amount, 
an interest rate and a time period. There is one entry point 
for each module and one exit point. Loops are indicated by 
indentations of code, and there are generally no GOTOs or 
their equivalents. 

How is it possible to write a program without GOTOs? One 
way is by providing enough commands for loops. After all, 
most programs are one big loop with smaller loops inside and 
nested loops within loops. Another feature is the use of 
procedures. Procedures are simply the modules we've been 
discussing and are very similar to subroutines. However, 
procedures use parameters that are passed from a main 
program or another procedure. Variables are used in the 
procedure locally and may not be available outside the 
procedure. 

Loops 

Here's an example of a loop in BASIC09: 

SUM = p 
1 = 1 

WHILE I <> Ippl 

SUM = SUM + I 

1 = 1 + 1 
ENDWHILE 

Here's another: 

SUM = p 

FOR COUNTER = 1 TO Ippp 

SUM = SUM + COUNTER 
NEXT COUNTER 

Both loops do the same thing: compute the sum of the 
numbers from 1 through 1000. Notice one thing about this 
code — it doesn't have line numbers! None of the structured 
languages, including BASIC09, require line numbers, although 
some, including BASIC09, may allow optional line numbers. 

Procedures 

Structured languages get around the lack of line numbers 
and subsequent lack of GOTOs not only with loops, but with 
procedures. There is usually one main procedure that calls 
many other procedures in a program. Sub-procedures may 
call other procedures and so forth. Here's a typical sequence 
in BASIC09: 

PROCEDURE COMPUTEA 
PARAM B , H 
TEMP = .5 * B * H 
PRINT "Area="; TEMP 

END 

PROCEDURE COMPUTET 
PARAM B,S 
TEMP = B + 2, S 
PRINT "Perimeter^' ; TEMP 

END 

REM MAIN 

INPUT SIDE, BASET, HEIGHT 

RUN COMPUTEA ( BASET, HEIGHT ) 

RUN COMPUTET ( BASET, SIDE ) 

The first two modules are procedures, called by the two 
RUN statements in the main body of code. Each procedure 
has variables that are used within the procedure — B,H in 
the first procedure and B,5 in the second procedure. These 
parameters (PRRRMs) are used within the procedure and art 
not recognized within the MRIN program. The l B' in the first 
procedure is a different, local 'B' from the one used in the 

August 1987 THE RAINBOW 169 



second procedure. Parameters are passed between procedures 
by the CALL statements. In this example, the values of BflSET 
and HEIGHT are passed to the COMPUTER procedure and 
become B and H. The values of BflSET and SIDE are passed 
to the COMPUTET procedure and become B and S. Because 
each procedure uses local variables, there is no confusion 
about using variable names more than once in different parts 
of the program. However, global variables are still possible 
and can be used in any procedures if necessary. 

The Controversy 

One of the first structured languages to be widely used was 
pascal, which was designed by a Swiss computer scientist, 
Niklas Wirth. It was developed for computer science use and, 
presumably, was easy for students to use. An example of 
PASCAL code to do the "add numbers" problem is: 

var 

sum, I : integer; 
begin 

I := 1; 

while I <> 1001 do 
begin 

sum := sura + I ; 

I := I + 1; 
end ; 

writeln ( 'The sum of 1 to 1000 is ", sum ) ; 
end . 

You can see that pascal is somewhat "BASIC-Iike" but uses 
many of the elements of a structured language — indented 
code, WHILE loops, etc. 

Another characteristic of structured languages, whether 
BASIC09 or others, is that the variables are strongly typed. In 
interpretive BASIC, you can use any name for a variable and 
really don't have to be concerned about whether the values 
held in that variable are integer (-32768 to 32767) or floating- 
point (values such as -87.88 or 564.002). In most structured 
languages, however, variables must be declared according to 
type, i.e., whether they are integer variables, single-precision, 
character or string variables, and so forth. 

BASIC09 

All of this sets the background f or a description of BASIC09, 
the BASIC language used with OS-9. BASIC09 is definitely a 
structured language; it has optional line numbers, WHILE 
loops, procedures and data types, and it supports indenta- 
tions. In addition, it has its own built-in editor, which is both 
line- and string-oriented. 

BAS1C09 is a compiler rather than an interpreter. The 
Extended BASIC interpreter used in the CoCo 3 processes 
BASIC programs a statement at a time. Each time through a 
statement, the interpreter asks, "What is this statement?" and 
"What are the variables?" Then it goes through methodically 
to search for the variables, compute expressions, and 
implement the BASIC statement before moving on to the next 
statement. If two more statements are processed and a return 
is made back to the original statement (as in a loop), the 
processing starts over from the beginning as if the interpreter 
had never seen the statement before. All of this processing 
of the BASIC text takes a great deal of time, so interpretive 
BASIC is fairly slow. 

Compiled BASIC, however, operates differently. Rather 
than processing each statement every time it is encountered, 
/^e&4S/c compiler makes one pass through all the statements 
from beginning to end (not as the program flows). At the end 
of this pass, the compiler has decoded much of the code into 
an assembly language or machine language form. This object 
code now executes much more rapidly than the interpretive 

170 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



version because much of the processing has already been 
done. 

In general, compiled BASIC is much faster than interpretive 
BASIC. Under OS-9, though, BASIC09 is a lot slower than you 
would expect — only three or four times faster than 
interpretive BASIC in many cases. Why? The overhead of OS- 
9 has a lot to do with the speed — there's a lot going on in 
OS-9 and some of it is not done efficiently. 

Running the BASIC09 compiler requires a different ap- 
proach from CoCo Extended BASIC. Instead of being able 
to immediately edit and execute a line of BASIC code, a 
program under BASIC09 must first be recompiled. This makes 
debugging much more tedious — the quick interactiveness 
you find with Extended Color BASIC is not there, nor are the 
debugging tools, although BASIC09 has a trace mode and some 
interactive hooks. 

On the other hand, because BASIC09 is a structured 
language, it offers certain advantages. It's easy to read and 
maintain code, has modules (procedures) that can become 
part of a library of modules to be used at will, and has some 
compatibility with other structured languages. 

It's interesting to note recent developments of BASIC in the 
MS-DOS world that point to how structured languages are 
being received. Microsoft developed GW-BASIC, a version of 
interpretive BASIC that runs on MS-DOS systems and 
includes just about every convenient command that is 
possible to stick into a BASIC interpreter (including software 
interrupts for keys, communications data and error- 
trapping). 

Microsoft also has a BASIC compiler that is compatible with 
the commands found on their BASIC interpreter. It allows you 
to write a program in interpretive BASIC, use the great 
interactiveness of the interpreter to debug the program, and 
then compile the program for high-speed operation. 

Not too long ago, Microsoft also introduced a new 
compiler called QuickBASIC for MS-DOS machines, which 
not only recognizes GW-BASIC commands, but also provides 
structured programming commands, such as WHILE/WEND 
(looping, also in GW-BASIC), IF/THEN/ELSE IF (a type of 
CASE statement), and DO UNTIL (another type of loop). The 
result is a BASIC language very similar to BASIC09 in a highly 
interactive environment. 

Just a few months ago, Borland International brought out 
its version of a structured BASIC called Turbo BASIC. This 
BASIC also recognizes the GW-BASIC commands, but provides 
a structured programming format and commands as well. 

With premier developers like Microsoft and Borland 
making these efforts, it seems structured programming for 
BASIC is alive and well. BASIC is changing to be competitive 
with the current structured languages like PASCAL and C! 

More on PASCAL 

We've seen a brief example of pascal, but let's look a little 
further into it. PASCAL has achieved a great deal of interest 
as a language because of its use in computer science curricula, 
but it is not widely used in industry. Languages such as COBOL 
(Common Business Oriented Language) and FORTRAN 
(Formula Translator) both see a great deal more use than 
PASCAL. Interestingly enough, both are almost 30-year-old 
languages, which says something about being there first. 

PASCAL is widely used on micros, though. One of the 
reasons for this is the huge success of Borland International's 
Turbo PASCAL. This is a PASCAL compiler for MS-DOS 
systems such as the Tandy 1000 or IBM series. Two reasons 
for Turbo's success are the high degree of interactiveness in 



the compiler — it has a built-in editor — and the raw speed 
of compiled programs. 

Unfortunately, there is no Borland equivalent for OS-9. 
The PASCAL compiler under OS-9 is certainly adequate, but 
not exciting. It's a compiler like many compilers: no built- 
in editor, no interactive debugging tools, and cryptic error 
messages. Also, there's a great deal of overhead to compile 
even short programs under OS-9. Whereas Borland's Turbo 
compiles in a few seconds, OS-9 PASCAL requires a few 
minutes. As I say, though, this is typical for most compilers. 

Here's another sample of a PASCAL program. This one 
computes the area and perimeter of a triangle in similar code 
to the preceding BAS1C09 example. 

{ program to compute area and perimeter of a triangle} 

Program Triangle 

Var 

Side, Base, Height : real; 

Procedure ComputeA; 
var 

Temp : real ; 
begin 

Temp := j3 . 5 * Base * Height; 
writeln ('Area=', Temp); 
end ; 

Procedure ComputeP; 
var 

Temp : real ; 
begin 

Temp := Base + 2 * Side; 
writeln ( 1 Parimeter= ' , Temp); 
end ; 

{maan } 
begin 

writeln ('Enter Side, Base, Height'); 
readln (Side, Base/ Height) ; 
ComputeA ; 
ComputeP; 
end. 



The C Language 

C is another language of the same ilk as BAS1C09 and 
PASCAL. It's highly structured and has many of the same 
commands and capabilities as PASCAL. C has a reputation 
as a systems programmer's language because it gets down to 
the nitty-gritty, allowing programmers to perform bit 
operations. It has become very popular on micros, and many 
applications that would formerly have been done in assembly 
language are now being done in C. 

Here's a sample program in C — the same application as 
previously illustrated: 

/* Program to compute area and perimeter of triangle */ 
float Side; 
float Base; 
float Height; 

compute_area () 
( 

float Temp; 

Temp = j3 . 5 * Base * Height 
printf ("Area=%f \n" , Temp) ; 

\ 

compute perimeter () 



{ 



float Temp; 

Temp = Base + 2 * Side; 

printf ( "Perimeter=% f \n" , Temp); 



ma in ( ) 
{ 

printf ("Enter Side, Base, Height\n"); 
scanf ("%f %f %f", &Side, &Base, SHeight) ; 
compute_area ( ) ; 
compute_perimeter (); 



You can see from the example that C has the same general 
appearance as PASCAL. Also obvious is that C has "type 



VISA 



<« GIMMESOFT »> 




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include an EDITOR, DOS mods, and DISABLE. Comes 
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Disk (latest version) $19.95 

Multi-Label III 




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Custom Palette Designer 



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MD residents add sales tax 
Phone 301-256-7558 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 171 




Time passes quickly as you use your nimble fingers to escape 
the very passion that consumes you. Thoughts are fleeting at 
a time in which you need them most. The spidery web of 
mystery and intrigue you have spun is now entanglingi you. Every 
breath you take . . . Every move you make ... Is it correct? Will it even 
accomplish the task at hand? Is there any time left? 

No, we don't mean to imply time is nearly up for our Fourth 
Adventure Contest. Plenty of time remains. However, the final 
deadline for your entry in this contest is August 15, 1987 - a date 
that is rapidly approaching, So, you'd better get stated soon, if you 
haven't already begun. 

What? No ideas, you say? Just take a look around you! Your 
everyday life presents you with hundreds. Just sit down and start now! 
We await the veiy best you have to offer. If you want some pointers, 
check out "The Adventure Writer's Toolkit" (April 1985, Page 105) by 
Eric W. Tilenius. Or, for another helping hand, see "The Adventure 
Processor" (August 1986, Page 26) by Bill Cook. These articles, and 
many more, are just what you need to get started on the right track. 

Your Adventure can be written fa a 4K early model CoCo, or it 
can be written to take advantage of all the features in a 5 1 2K CoCo 
3. tt can be written under Disk basic, or it might be a creation in 

BASIC09. 

Judging: The judges of the Fourth Rainbow Adventure Contest will be looking for several 
things in each entry. In addition to ensuring each submission is complete, they will consider 
the following: 

• Originality • Vocabulary and Grammar 

• Creativity • Responsiveness 

• Programming Efficiency • Level of Challenge 

• Clarity of Instructions • Enjoyment 

• Ease of Use 

The judges will also be concerned with the "punishability" of each Adventure. A shorter 
program is easier to fit into print (both in THE RAINBOW and any subsequent Ad/enture 
book) as well as being easier for the reader to type in. While the use of graphics tends 
to enhance any program, graphics are not necessary for an Adventure to win. The winning 
entry wilt be chosen for its unique appearance. Make your Adventure stand above the 
rest! 

RULES: Vour submission should include all programs and information needed to set up and 
run the Adventure. Alf programs must be sent on tape or disk with several saves of each 
program including at least one ASCII save. If an Adventure cannot be toaded, it cannot 
be judged. We will not type in even the shofftest of programs! Hard copy of all program 
listings ond instructions must also be included. If your Adventure uses machine language 
routines, all source code, as' well as assembled object code, should be included on the 
tape or disk. Indicate the minimum CoCo system required to run your Adventure and 
include a complete solution! 

Please, don't use packed lines that can't be L'lSTed or LLISTed for the benefit of our readers. 
Your program should run on standard Radio Shack equipment without requiring any 
special rrxxfitTcotions and should not rely on commercial software fa its execution. The 
only exception Is the use of the OS-9 operating system (Level I and Level II) and BASIC09. 
If your Adventure uses graphics, make sure the graphics are self-contained. In other words, 
don't submit a program that loads several different graphics screens unless those graphics 
are created by a publishable program included in the submission. 

fn summary, send a complete package. Put the accompanying article, documentation, 
listings, complete instructions and solution, and cover letter an paper. Include your name, 
address and telephone number on each page of all materials, Be sure to write-protect 
your disk or punch out the tabs on your cassette to avoid accidental erasure, and label 
each with the name of me program(s) and your name and address. As in any contest, 
packaging does make a difference. 

Your entry must be postmarked no later than August 15, 1987, in error-free condition. Each 



entrant will receive a free pass to the RAINBOWfest of his or her choice. You may also win 
one of the many prizes donated by our generous advertisers as well as have your program 
published in THE RAINBOW. So, get a move on! Write it up, put it together and send it 
to: 

Adventure Contest Editor, Rainbow Magazine, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, 
P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Additional Rules: All entries must be original, unpublished and unmarketed woiks (no 
"conversions"). No programs that have been placed in the public domain are eligible. 
All entries become the property of Falsoft, Inc., publisherof the THE RAINBOW. Thedecisions 
of the judges wiill be final. Dupficate prizes will be awarded in the event of a tie. Winning 
entries will be featured in a future Issue of THE rainbow. 



it 




Prizes: Following is partial list of the prizes the winners of our 
Fourth Rainbow Adventure Contest will be receiving. And, 
many more prizes are being donated each day! 

Tandy/Radio Shack 

Tandy Home 
Education Systems 



Computer Island 



Frank Hogg 
Laboratory, Inc. 

Howard Medical 
HJL Products 

Computize 
RAINBOWS Delphi 
SIGs 



Diecom Products 

Computer Plus 
Derringer Software 

Speech Systems 

Tom Mix Software 
Spectrum Projects 




CompuServe 

Mlcrocom Software 
Sugar Software 



DMP-106 Printer 
VIDTEX 

Creative Exploration Series 
Spectaculator 
Hands On 

Problem Solving Series 
Cooperative Strategy Series 
Chemistry Tutor 
Area & Perimeter 
Division of Fractions 
Quadratic Equations Tutor 
Distance Problems 
Cloze Exercises 
First Games 

The CoCo Wheel of Fortune 

Inside OS-9 Level II (5 books) 

Zenith 12" Amber Video Monitor 

Softswitch Auto/Manual Printer 
Switch with cables 

Color Max 3 (2 programs) 

Three five-hour free evenings in 
your choice of the CoCo or OS-9 
Online SIGs. 

Bouncing Boulders 
Caludril 

Lansford Mansion 

Color Computer 2 

Pro-Color-Series Enhanced Ver- 
sion 2.1 

Super Voice Speech Synthesizer 
includes Text-to-Speech Transla- 
tor Program 

Worlds of Flight (2 programs) 

Three Book Set: 
CaCo III Secrets Revealed 
The History of the CoCo 
basic Programming Tricks 

IntroPak - An Introductory Sub- 
scription (3 IntroPaks) includes 
$15 usage credit 

Utility Routines Volume II 

Trig Attack 



S200 
S30 

S99 



S30 
S20 
S20 
S20 
S20 
S20 
S25 
S20 

S40 ea 
S150 

$140 
$60 ea 



$36 ea. 
$29 
$39 
$39 

$100 
$80 



$80 

$35 ea. 



$50 



$15 ea 

$30 

$20 



variables" — variables must be explicitly declared as int 
(integer), float (floating-point), char (character), and 
others. In C, a program is subdivided into procedures that 
are called from the main program or from other procedures. 
No line numbers are used, and there is no GOTO command 
in the language. Although not obvious from this example, 
C has the same type of loop control as in other structured 
languages — WHILE loops, FDR loops, and DD'WHILE loops. 
The scanf and printf commands take the place of PASCAL 
READ and WRITE commands and use special characters for 
formatting action, reminiscent of some of the formatting in 
FORTRAN programs. 

C is so popular that both Borland and Microsoft are 
rushing to put out high-speed C compilers for MS-DOS 
systems. The only version of C we have available for the 
CoCo is the Microware C compiler. Like the PASCAL 
compiler, this is a typical C compiler — it operates from a 
previously edited source file, contains most of the standard 
features found in C, and is somewhat slow in compilation. 
Still, it works well in the OS-9 environment, and we can thank 
Radio Shack that it is available. 

Other Features of BASIC09, PASCAL, and C 

All three languages allow numeric, string and multi- 
dimensional arrays. Arrays in BASIC09 and PASCAL must be 
fixed in size. In C, the arrays may be dynamic. The size of 
the arrays may change as the program requires it. 

User-defined (enumerated) variables can be used in PASCAL 
and C. Suppose you wanted to define computers of a certain 
type. You could define a set of variables called COMPUTER that 
included the items Tandy_L000, IBM_PC, Rpple_IIGS and 
Cray_XMP. 

Linked lists and trees may be processed in PASCAL and C 
by the use of a special data format called pointers. Linked 
lists are advanced data structures that build a list of data 
elements, each element having data and a pointer to the next 
data element in the list. The pointers may be easily changed 
to insert, delete or modify items in the list. 

Functions or procedures can have local variables, as 
mentioned before. This makes each procedure in the three 
languages a stand-alone module that does not have to be 
rewritten with new variable names for a new program. 
Another related feature found in all three languages is 
recursion, the ability of a procedure or function to call itself. 
Recursion can produce elegant code, as in this C example to 
find factorials: 

long int factorial (x) 
int n 
( 

long int answer; 
if ( x == J3 ) 

result = 1; 
else 

result = x * factorial (x-1) ; 
return (answer) ; 

I 

Here, the function factorial calls itself from within the 
function. (You might look upon this as a picture of a man 
reading a newspaper, which contains a picture of a man 
reading a newspaper, etc.) Is recursion useful? Not nearly as 
useful as you might think, because it consumes huge 
quantities of memory in building a stack of return addresses 
and data. On top of that, it has a great deal of overhead. 
However, the code is elegant. 

OS-9 Language Documentation 

Microware documentation on PASCAL and C is terrible. It's 



summed up in these words from the OS-9 PASCAL reference 
manual: "Either you know PASCAL, or you don't." The 
reference manuals don't claim to be courses in PASCAL or C 
programming, and I can understand why tutorial informa- 
tion isn't included. However, operating information is of a 
more generic nature and does not address the problem of 



"Should you use a structured 
programming language or 
interpretive Microsoft/ 
Microware BASIC?" 



using the compilers on the CoCo. Useful information is hard 
to find or nonexistent. 

The BASIC09 portion of the Color Computer 3 operating 
system reference manual, however, is another story. Written 
by Radio Shack's R. Bartly Betts, formerly a RAINBOW 
contributing editor, it does an excellent job covering BASIC09. 
You should have a much easier time learning this language 
than stumbling through the forests of PASCAL or C. 

Conclusions 

If I sound a little tough on the compilers for the CoCo, 
I really don't mean to be. Here's a truly inexpensive machine 
capable of multitasking with relatively high resolution 
graphics and with three of the most popular higher-level 
languages available for it at rock-bottom prices. Since I love 
the CoCo, I only wish we had the equivalent to Turbo 
PASCAL, QuickBASIC and Turbo C to run on the system. 
An easy-to-use compiler would make the task of coping with 
OS-9 a great deal less frustrating. 

However, we don't have these products and must use the 
existing BASIC09, PASCAL or C compilers. The fact is, once 
you've cut through all of the preliminary procedures to 
assemble a working disk for compilations, learned the quirks 
of the system, and put in some time studying the language, 
you have the ability to compile some pretty neat programs 
in the language of your choice. 

I think the crux of the problem here is this: Should you 
use a structured programming language or interpretive 
Microsoft/ Microware BASIC? Certainly, if you're going into 
computer science or business applications programming, 
you'll have to know a structured language like PASCAL or C. 
On the other hand, it's possible to use "street BASIC" with 
line numbers and still crank out some pretty good, efficient 
programs. Anyone capable of writing large programs in non- 
structured BASIC should be capable of using the structured 
languages, as well. Writing programs in structured languages 
seems to produce very "wordy" programs that often are 
slower than they should be. BASIC09 may be a good compro- 
mise between the ease of use of some of BASIC commands 
and functions, and a well-structured language. 

In any event, BASIC09, PASCAL and C are inexpensive and 
available on the CoCo under OS-9. Try your hand at these 
languages and find the one that appeals to you. Don't forget 
assembly language, either — it's worth the grief and agony 
to get the high speed. In future columns, we'll try to provide 
coverage of not only PASCAL, C and BASIC09, but assembly 
language on the CoCo as well. Believe it or not, there's a Jot 
of common ground among all these languages. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 173 



Where to Find Rainbow 



The retail stores listed below carry THE rainbow on a regular basis 
and may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer 
users. We suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Phoenix 
Sierra Vista 
Tempe 
Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayetteville 
Ft. Smith 
Littie Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Citrus Heights 
Grass Valley 
Half Moon Bay 
Hollywood 

Sacramento 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Sunnyvale 

COLORADO 

Westminster 

DELAWARE 

Middletown 

MiKord 

Wilmington 

FLORIDA 

Boca Ratan 

Cocoa 

Davie 

Deltona 

Ft. Lauderdale 

Jacksonville 



North Miami 

Beach 
Orlando 
Panama City 
Pensacofa 
Pinellas Park 
Staike 

Tallahassee 

Tampo 

Tltusviile 

GEORGIA 

Bremen 
Jesup 
Marietta 
Toccoo 

IDAHO 

Lewiston 
Moscow 

ILLINOIS 

Aurora 
Belleville 
Champaign 
Chicago 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 

Electronic World 

TRI-TEK Computers 
Livingston's Books 
Computer Libraiy 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/ Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Software Plus 
Advance Radio, Inc. 
Strawflower Electronics 
Levity Distributors 
Polygon Co. 
Tower Magazine 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News. Inc. 
Computer Literacy 

Software City 

Delmar Co. 

Milford News Stand 

Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 

Software, Software, Inc. 
The Open Door 
Software Plus More 
Wilson Assoc. dba Radio Shack 
Electronics Engineers 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
The Book Nook 
Book Town 

White's of Downtown Bookstore 

Almar Bookstore 
Book Mania 
Boyd-Ebert Corp 
Anderson News Co. 
Wolfs Newsstand 
Record Junction. Inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Anderson News Co. 
Fine Print Bookstore 
Computrac 

Bremen Electronics/Radio Shack 

Radio Shack 

Act One Video 

Martin Music Radio Shack 

Books. Etc. 

Johnson News Agency 

Kroch's & Brentano's 
Software or Systems 
Book Morket 
B. Dalton Booksellers 

N. Wabash St. 

West Jackson SI. 
Bob's In Newtown 
Bob's News Emporium 
Bob's Rogers Park 
Book Market 

East Cedar 

North Cicero 

West Dlversey 
E.B. Garcia & Associates 
Kroch's & Brentano's 

South Wabash 

West Jackson 

516 N. Michigan 

835 N. Michigan 
Parkway Drugs 
Parkwest Books 
Sandmeyer's Bookstore 
L/nfv. of Chicago Bookstore 



ILLINOIS 

Chicago (cont'd.) 



Chllllcothe 

Danville 

Decatur 



East Moline 

Evanston 

Geneseo 

Kewanee 

Lisle 

Newton 

Oak Brook 

Oak Park 

Paris 

Peoria 



Schaumberg 

Skokie 

Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Columbus 

Garrett 

Greenwood 

Indianapolis 



Jasper 
Madison 
Martinsville 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Otlumwa 

KANSAS 

Topeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 



KENTUCKY 

Hazard 

Hopkinsville 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Sanford 

Waterboro 

MASSACHUSE1TS 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Fitchburg 

Ipswich 

Littleton 

Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Durand 

Harrison 

Howell 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Owosso 

Peny 

Royal Oak 
Slertlng 

Heights 
Trenton 
Wyoming 



Univ. of Illinois Bookstore 
Vldeomat. Inc. 
Book Emporium 
Book Market 
Book Emporium 

K-Mart Plaza 

Norlhgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Chicago-Main News 
B & J Supply 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Bill's IV Radio Shock 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 

Sheridan Village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Book Maiket 
Illinois News Service 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 

Sangamon Center North 

Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Place 
North Shore Distributors 

D & D Electronics 
Radio Shack 

White Collage Electronics 
Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 
Finn News Agency, Inc. 
The Computer Experience 
Bookland, Inc. 
Delmar News 
Indiana News 
Elex Mart 

A/co Office Supplies 
Radia Shack 
Mining's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 
Southside Diug 

Palmer News. Inc. 
Town Crier of Topeka, Inc. 
Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 
Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 
Lloyd's Radio 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Hobby Shop 
Radto Shack 



The Book Rack 

Magazines, Inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 

Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Corners Book Shop 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreok, Inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 
Rabbins Electronics 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Howell Auto Paris 

Cuit's Sound & Home Arcade Center 
The Eight Bit Comer 
C/C Computer Systems 
Perry Computers 
Software City 

Sterling Book Center 
Trenton Book Store 
Geny's Book Co. 



MINNESOTA 

Duluth 

Minneapolis 

Willmar 

MISSISSIPPI 

Jackson 

MISSOURI 

Farmington 
Jefferson City 
Kirksville 
Moberly 
St. Louis 



St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Bulte 
Whlteflsh 

NEBRASKA 

Omaha 

NEVADA 

Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Cedar Knolls 

Clinton 

Marmora 

Pennsvllle 

River Edge 

Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 



NEW YORK 

Brackport 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Fails 
Johnson City 
New York 



N. White Plains 
Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhaven 
NORTH CAROLINA 



Carlson Books 
Read-More News 
The Photo Shop 

Noith Side News 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Computer Xchange 
Front Page News 
Bailey's TV & Radio 

Ploza Book Store 

Consumer Electronics of Whiteflsh 

Nelson News 

Hurley Electronics 

Verham News Corp. 

Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 
Outpost Radio Shack 
Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 
Software City 
Softwore Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Desert Moon Distributors 
Front Page Newsstand 
Page One Newsstand 

Lift Bridge Book Shop. Inc. 
Cromland, Inc. 
Southern Tier News Co. Inc. 
On Line: Computer Access Center 
GA West & Co. 
Unicorn Electronics 
Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 
Coliseum Books 
Eastern Newsstand 
Grand Central Station. Track 37 
200 Park Ave.. (Pan Am #1) 
55 Water Street 
World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonll Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Usercom Systems, inc. 
Walden Books 
WortdWlde Media Services 
Software City 

Universol Computer Service 
Village Green 
Worldwide News 
Spectrum Projects 



Aberdeen 

Cary 
Charlotte 

Havlock 

Hickory 

Marlon 

OHIO 

Blanchester 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Columbiana 

Coshocton 

Dayton 

Falrborn 

Kent 

Kenton 



King Electronics 
Radio Shack 

News Center in Cary Village 
Newsstand Int'l 
Papers & Paperback 
Computer Plus 
C 2 Books & Camics 
Boomers Rhythm Center 

JR Computer Control 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Clnsoft 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

Utopia Software 

Huber Heights Book & Cord 

Wilke News 

News-Readers 

The News Shop 

T.W. Hogan & Associates 



1 74 THE RAINBOW August 1 987 



OHIO (cont'd.) 
Lakewood 
Lima 

Mlamlsburg 
Mount Orab 
Rocky River 
Toledo 
Woodsfleld 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allison Paik 
Alroona 
Brookville 
Malvern 
Philadelphia 

Phoenixville 
Pittsburgh 
Pleasant Hills 
Temple 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Warwick 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Gaffney 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 
Union 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxvllle 

Memphis 

Smyrna 
Union City 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Brenham 
Elgin 
Orange 

VIRGINIA 

Gafton 
Norfolk 
Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 
Tacoma 



Lakewood International News 
Brunner News Agency 
Edu-Caterers 
Wilke News 

Mounl Orab Radio Shack 

Programs Unlimited 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Day Appliance & TV/Radio Shack 

Dealer 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales. Inc. dba Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 



Fifth Ave. News 



WEST VIRGINIA 
Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

Cudahy 

Milwaukee 



Mlnocqua 
Racine 

WYOMING 

Casper 



Softwore City 
Newborn Enterprises 
Lany's Stereo Shop 
Peisonal Softwore 
Clly Software Center 
Newsy 

Stevens Radio Shack 
All-Pro Souvenlers 
Pitt Computer & Software 
Softwore Comer 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 

Software Connection 

Software Haus, Inc. 
Gaffney Book Store 
Palmetto News Co. 
Softwore Cily 
Fleming's Electronics 

Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Fiist Byte Computer Co. 
Computer Center 
Softwore, Inc. 
Delker Electronics 
Cox Electronics Radio Shack 

Poncho's News 
Moore's Electronics 
The Homing Pigeon 
Nathway Books & News 

Electronics Maiketing 
l-O Computeis 
Software Clly 

Adams News Co.. Inc. 
B &. I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shock 
Communications. LTD 
Valley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
Book Tree 
Booked Solid 
Booked Solid II 
Harvey Schwartz Bookshop 
Univ. of Wisconsin Bookshop 
Island Technologies 
Little Professor Book Center 

The Computer Store 



CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Blalrmore 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 
Drayton Valley 
Edmonton 
Edson 
Fairvlew 
Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hinton 
Innlsfall 
Leduc 
Lethbrldge 
Uoyd minster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 

Stettter 

Strathmore 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetasklwin 



Banff Radio Shack 
L & K Sports & Music 
Paul Tercler 

Double "D" A.S.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Kelty Software Distributors 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shack 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
A.S.C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack. ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 
Jim Cooper 
L& S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Datatron 

Uoyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shock Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's Electronics 
Stettler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Burnaby 
Burns Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chllllwack 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Langley 
N. Vancouver 
Nelson 
Parksvllle 
Pentlcton 

Sidney 
Smlthers 
Squamlsh 
100 Mile 
House 



Compullt 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Paiker 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & IV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesofl Marketing 
Langley Radio Shack 
Mlcrowest Distributors 
Oliver's Books 
Parksvllle IV 
DJ.'s 

Four Comer Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kolyk Electronics 

Tip Top Radio & TV 



MANITOBA 




Altona 


L.A. Wiebr Ltd. 


Lundar 


Goranson Elec. 


Morden 


Central Sound 


The Pas 


Jodl's Sight & Sound 


Selkirk 


G.L Enns Elec. 


Virden 


Archer Enterprises 


Winnipeg 


J & J Electronics Ltd. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 




Moncton 


Jeff riies Enterprises 


Sussex 


Dewltt Elec. 


NEWFOUNDLAND 




Botwood 


Seaport Elec. 


Carbonear 


S/ade Realties 


NOVA SCOTIA 




Hnlifny 


At! notify Mawc 


ONTARIO 




Angus 


Micro Computer Services 


Aurora 


Compu Vision 


Concord 


Ingram Software 


Exceter 


J. Macteane & Sons 


Honover 


Modern Appliance Centre 


II A III _ 

Huntsvllle 


Huntsville Elec. 




Donnv "R" 


Kingston 


T.M. Computers 


LlSTOWei 


Moaem Appliance centre 


South River 


Max TV 




Dennis TV 


QUEBEC 




LaSaiie 


Messageiles de Presse Benjamin Enr. 


Pont. Rouge 


Boutique Biuno Laroche 


SASKATCHEWAN 




Asslnlbola 


Telstar News 


Estevan 


Kolyk Electronics 


Moose Jaw 


D&S Computer Place 


Niplwan 


Cornerstone Sound 


Reglna 


Regina CoCo Club 




Software Supermarket 


Saskatoon 


Everybody's Software Llbraiy 


Shellbrooke 


Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 


TIsdale 


Paul's Service 


Unity 


Grant's House of Sound 


YUKON 




Whltehorse 


H & O Holdings 


JAPAN 




Tokyo 


America Ado, Inc. 


PUERTO RICO 




San Juan 


Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Book- 
sellers, and selected Coles Bookstores, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore 
Books, Barnes & Noble, Little Profes- 
sors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & 
Brentano's, and Community Newscen- 
ters. 



ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Kingsford 



Informatlca Y Telecomunlcaclones 



Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 75 



Advertiser's Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



Alpha Products 21 

Boiling Spring 

Lakes Software 49 

Canyon County Devices 151 

Cer-Comp 85, 87 

Ci nsof t 1 65 

Clearbrook Software 

Group 73 

CNR Engineering 167 

Cognitec 23 

Computer Center 35 

Computer Island IBC 

Computer Plus 3 

Computerware 69 

Computize 25 

D.P. Johnson 159 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

Delphi 114, 115 

Derringer 

Software 29, 118 

Diecom tFC 

Disto 33 

Dorsett 113 

Elegant Software 1 35 

F.M. Technology 161 

Frank Hogg Laboratory 155 

Gimmesoft 171 

Hard Drive Specialists 1 53 

Hawkes Research 

^Bervices ................... 29 

Hemphill Electronics 156 

Howard Medical 34, 178 

J & M Systems 31,143 

J & R Electronics 61 

Kelly Software 

Distributors 123 

Logicware 1 33 

Metric Industries 45 

Micro Works, The 71 

Microcom Software 9, 1 1 , 13 

Microtech Consultants 

Inc 67 

MicroWorld 15 

Novasoft 55 

Other Guys Software, The 47 

Owl-Ware 75, 76, 77 

176 THE RAINBOW August 1987 



PCM 122 

Performance Peripherals 53 

Perry Computers 16 

Polygon 95 

Preble's Programs, Dr BC 

Probitat 111 

PXE Computing 7 

Rainbow Adventure 

Book III 48 

Rainbow Binder 162 

Rainbow Bookshelf 72 

Rainbow Gift Subscription 99 

Rainbow Introductory 

Guide to Statistics 104 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk 166 

Rainbow OS-9 Level 1 1 Book ... 1 30 

RAINBOWfest 65 

Robotic Microsystems 134 



□ 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4497 



Call: 

Jack Garland 

Garland Associates, Inc. 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

(617) 749-5852 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 
Advertising Representative 

The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 



Seibyte Software 121 

Software House, The 151 

SpectroSystems 109 

Spectrum Projects Inc 17 

Speech Systems 

39,40,41,42,43 

Sugar Software 145 

Sun Ray 135 

Sunrise Software 61 

T & D Software 14, 100, 101 

Tandy/Radio Shack 106, 107 

Tepco 120 

Tom Mix Software 54 

True Data Products 82, 83 

William Brigance 141 

Woodstown Electronics 136 

Zebra Systems 119 




Info 



How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the basic program listings in 
the rainbow are formatted for a 32-character 
screen — sotheyshowupjustastheydo onyourCoCo 
screen. One easy way to check on the accuracy of your 
typing is to compare what character "goes under" what. 
If the characters match — and your line endings come 
out the same — you have a pretty good way of knowing 
that your typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 
rainbow on disk or rainbow on tape service. 
An order form for these services is on the insert card 
bound in the magazine. 



What's A CoCo? 



CoCo is an affectionate name that was first given to 
the Tandy Color Computer by its many fans, users and 
owners. 

However, when we use the term CoCo, we refer to 
both the Tandy Color Computer and the TDP System- 
100 Computer. (While many TDP-100s are still in 
service, the TDP Electronics division of Tandy no longer 
markets the CoCo look-alike.) It is easier than using 
both of the"given" names throughout the rainbow. 

In most cases, when a specific computer is men- 
tioned, the application is for that specific computer. 
However, since the TDP System-100 and Tandy Color 
are, for all purposes, the same computer in a different 
case, these terms are almost always interchangeable. 



and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to besureyou typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X = 25G*PEEl<(35) + 178 

20 CLERR 25,X-1 

30 X=25G*PEEI< (35J+178 

40 FDR Z=X TD X+77 

50 RERD Y:W=U+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

G0 POKE Z, Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=7985THEN80ELSEPRINT 

"DATfi ERROR": STOP 
80 EXEC X :END 

90 DATA 182, 1, 10G, 1G7, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 12G, 183, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 48, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 128, 171, 128 
150 DATA 230, 132, 38, 250, 48, 1, 32 
1G0 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 1GG, 1GG , 132, 28, 254 
180 DRTR 189, 173, 198, 53, 22, 12G, 0 
190 DRTR 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



1) Type load dir list copy and press enter. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd/do 
and press enter. If you havetwodisk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
on disk in Drive 1. Then type chd/dl and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read . me . f i rs t file to the screen by typing 

list read. me. first and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering di r will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow on disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMD5 directory, enter dir cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMDS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system: copy /d0/cmds/ filename /do/ 
cmds/ filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: copy /dl /cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Rainbow Check Plus 



The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command run 
and pressENTER. Once the program has run, type NEW 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: cmds and 5DURCE. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rs t, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMDS directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the SOURCE directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in sourceform sothey will 
only be found in the SDURCE directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 
programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't 'learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 



The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. We ascertain 
that their products are, in actuality, what they purport 
to be and, upon such determination, award a Seal. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee of satisfac- 
tion." The certification process is different from the 
review process. You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whether the product is right for your 
needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not, 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



August 1987 THE RAINBOW 177 



Save $200 on Magnavox Monitors 

Magnavox 8CM643 RGB Analog only $385!! 



MONITORS 



TgNW* 




$125 



122A Zenith 12" Amber Screen offers 
the same 640 dots x 200 lines reso- 
lution at 15MHz and a 90-day war- 
ranty valid at 1200 locations. 



$88 



( $ 7 shipping) 

MAGNAVOX 
8 CM 515 has 

analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB 
for Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and 
composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. 
Built-in speaker. 14" screen with 
640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 
2 years parts and labor warranty. 

reg. list S499 

SAVE 
$200 



1230 A 12" 

This 12" green screen high resolution 
monitor offers 80 column capability, 
Zenith quality and a 30-day warranty 
valid at any of Zenith's 1200 locations. 

Retail *199 
Our price 
($7 shipping) BRANDNEW 

All monitors require an amplifier cir- 
cuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer. 
They attach with spring connectors 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one for audio and one for 
video. CoCo 3 does not require an 
amplifier circuit. 

VA-1 for monochrome monitors only, 
fits all color computers 



$24. 45 . 



( s 2 shipping) 

VC-4 for monochrome or color, fits all 
color computers 
($2 shipping) 



$39- 45 




$298 

+ S14 Shipping 
CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable. 

only $19.95 with 

Magnavox Monitor order. 
S29.95 w/o monitor. 



MAGNAVOX 

CM 8505 has analog 
RGB and TTL RGB and compo- 
site color input. Built in speaker. 
13" screen with 690 dots x 240 
resolution in RGB mode. Plus 2 
years parts & labor warranty. 

reg. list $585 

SAVE 
$200 



$220 

+ S14 Shipping 



DRIVE 0 + . Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MP! drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for onlv 



$17845 

( $ 5 shipping) 
Add $34 for a Disto DC-3. 



DOUBLE SIDED 
DOUBLE DENSITY 
360K 



GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty- 
of dealing with a company through the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compatibility, if you're not happy with it for any 
reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) 

Shipping charges are for 48 slates. 

APO, Canada and Puerto Rico orders siightly higher. 




DISK CONTROLLER 




includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. 



DC-3 

S2 shipping on all DISTO products 




ADD-ON BOARDS 



DC-38 includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and all 
software $138 

DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM $QQ 




DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer in- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips 



2764 8K Eprom 28 pin 



$850 



each 



DC512 512K 
software 



RAM Board with 

$125 



DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port $40 



27128 16K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 

C-DOS 3 28 pin Eprom makes Disto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

$20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 




Payrol/BAS™ c 

J («2 shipping) 

• Nonprotected basic modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
state and federal calculation 

• Custom code for every state 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 
Print payroll and nonpayroll 
checks 




Payrol/BAS™ 
30 Day Trial 



$79.95 




VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package in- 
cludes VIP writer terminal, data 
base, call and disk zap which can 
fix a diskette that is giving I/O 
errors 




$12 

($2 shipping) 



5 



MEMORY 



ft 




Memory for CoCo 3 PC memory 
board plugs into the spare slots in- 
side the computer and can be 
populated with 256K ram chips. 
Completely solderless with com- 
plete easy to install instructions. 




$49.50 



PC Memory board with 512K *99 

Software spooler and RAM disk 
for lightning quick response or no 
disk swapping drive backup for 1 
drive system and printer spooler to 
free computer during long listings. 

$19.45 

($2 shipping on Memory 
products) 



64-2 for CoCo 2. Kit requires one 
solder point, no trace cuts. 

( s 2 shipping) $24.45 

64-E1 for E Boards with complete 
instructions. Remove old chips 
and replace with preassembled 
package— no soldering or trace 
cuts. 

($2 shipping) 28.45 

64-F1 for F Boards. No soldering 
needed. Capacitor leads must be 
cut. 

($2 shipping) §24.45 

64-22 Two chip set for 26-3134A 
and B, 26-3136Aand B. Koren Col- 
or Computers require 1 solder 
point. 

(32 shipping} 28.45 



r 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND OROER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
6:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 
10:00 - 1:00 SjI. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL PO:S 




Computer Island Educational Software 



CLOSEOUT - LIMITED TIME ONLY! 3 SUNBURST FAVORITES 

REGULARLY $44.95 EACH 
NOW AT SPECIAL CLOSEOUT PRICING 
WHILE SUPPL IES LAST 

1 FOR $30 2 for $50 
All 3 for $65 



THE POND 
Lead the frog 
across the pond 
in the fewest 
moves. 6 levels. 
Grade 2 - adul t . 



THE FAC1VRY 

3 level program 
chal lenges users 
to create geo- 
metric items on 
a user designed 
machine. Grade 

4 - adul t . 

TEASERS BY TO BBS 
Solve math puzzles 
on a grid. Tricky 
and chal lengmg 
on 6 levels. 
Grade 2 - adul t . 





3 NEW PRODUCTS FOR YOUR 
COCO 3 AND RGB MONITOR 



NAME THAT FLAG 

Identify the flag 
and the country it 
represen ts. Tes t 
your knowledge. 
Beautiful hi -res 
graphics. 



PEG OF MY HEART 

Fit pegs into the 
right place. Visual 
perception game. 
Mu] ti level - 6 to 
adul t. Graphics 
galore/ Joystick 
or arrow keys. 



COCOUHEEL OF FORTUNE 
COCO 3 VERSION 

A new version of this 
popular favorite that 
takes advantage of 
the special features 
of the Coco J and RGB 
monitor. As beautiful 
as it is enjoyable ' 



SUMMER 
SPECIAL 



Tape or Disk 



1 for $20 



2 for $30 



3 for $40 



LANGUAGE ARTS SPECIAL 



SEND FOR A FREE CATALOG OF 
OVER 75 EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS. 



TAKE 25% OFF PRICES LISTED 
BELOW. GOOD UNTIL 8/15/87. 



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19 


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Beyond Words III 


9- 


12 


19 


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Vocabulary I 


3- 


5 


19 


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Vocabulary II 


6- 


8 


19 


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Vocabulary III 


9- 


12 


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Context Clues 4,5,6, 


or 


7 17 


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Context Clues 


2- 


3 


19 


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Cloze Exercises 


3 




19 


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A 




19 


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Drawing Conclusions 


3- 


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ITEMS 



CqmSut^lsland 



227 Hampton Green 
Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

(718) 948-2748 

Please include $1.00 postage 
per order. NY residents, please 
add proper sales tax. Visa and 
MasterCard accepted. Payments 
in U.S. funds only. 



Dr. Preble's Programs 
Striking A Blow For 




ft 



Freedom is nothing else but a chance to be better . . . 

— Albert Camus 



99 



*** Mental Freedom 



that 



for CoCo 2 and 3! 

(Will noiworK with CoCo l) 

A Thought-Controlled Video Challenge 

Wecall it The Preble Thoughtware. 

DOES GREEN BLOOD flow in your veins like Mr. Spock? Is your mind well 
ordered? Or is your mind a mass of conflicting emotions like most 
humans? 

THOUGHTWARE may answer these questions and more. 

IMAGINE! Some day, a computer so advanced that it responds to your very 
thoughts and emotions. Imagine, some day, thought-controlled 
graphics: levitation and materialization! 

PLUG IN YOUR MIND and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS — 
now! The Radio Shack Color Computer has many ad- 
vanced capabilities, just waiting to be tapped. Dr. Preble's 
Programs combines the advanced technology of the CoCo 
with the amazing Radio Shack BIOFEEDBACK MONITOR 
to bring you "Preble Thoughtware." 

THOUGHT-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any 
videogame you haveeverplayed, Thoughtware tests your 
ability to handle stress, to remain calm under adverse 
circumstances. 

LIGHTNING FAST reflexes will do you no good here, unless you 
first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. 
YOU HAVE SELF-CONTROL? Many people can keep a 
"Poker Face'^ even when they are worried so that others 
may not notice; but can you really stop the worry itself? Thoughtware 
will find out! 

AND ITTALKS! Did you knowthattheCoCocanproduceincredibly realistic 
digital speech without a special speech synthesizer? And I mean really 
high quality speech! Forget the mechanical robot voice. This voice 
quality is so good, it sounds human! Honest. Best of all, no extra 
hardware is needed for speech. None. The CoCo produces this amazing 
digital speech all by itself (with a wee bit of programming by Dr. Preble). 

THOUGHTWARE — Next time your friends ask what your computer can do, 
show them the Preble Thouahlwarei 

Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback Monitor Catalogue #63-675 

The Preble Thoughtware — TAPE $27.95 + s/h, on DISK $29.95 + s/h 




DO 




*** Basic Freedom *** 

for The Color Computer 3 
(with versions for CoCo 1 & 2) 

A Full Screen Editor for BASIC Programming 

We call it EDITOR 3. Chris Babcock wrote a pure, efficient Machine Language 
program to open a new dimension of ease and power for anyone typing in 
a BASIC program. 

Here are your BASIC Freedoms! 

FULL CURSOR MOVEMENT — Use the arrow keys to move anywhere on a 
screen. If you are using a Color Computer 3, then even the 40. or 80 
column screen is supported! 

INSERT, CHANGE or DELETE CHARACTERS anywhere on the 
screen. Simply move to what you wish to change, change 
it and continue working! 
LOWERCASE COMMANDS are OK! EDITOR 3 lets you type in 
lowercase any time or all the time. Lowercase command 
wordsareautomatically translated to uppercase for BASIC. 
Of course, lowercase text within quotes stays lowercase. 
This is great when typing wiht the CoCo 3's 40 or 80 column 
mode with true lowercase! 
MERGE LINES within a program with just a few keystrokes! 
AUTO KEY REPEAT — Hold down any key and it will repeat. 
INVISIBLE — Once EDITOR 3 has been loaded in, it is activated 
wrth a single keystroke! It hides itself out of the way of other programs 
and can be turned off any any time. Pressing RESET will not hurt 
EDITOR 3! 

EASY TO USE — Installation takes seconds! Well-written goof-proof manual 
included. 

COCO 1 & 2 — Yes, even though this program wasconceived for the powers 
of the new CoCo 3, we still support the previous Color Compilers. They 
too, need their BASIC Freedom! 

EDITOR 3 — So easy and handy, you'll never want to run your CoCo without 
it! 

Available on DISK only for CoCo 3 @ $29.95 + s/h 

CoCo 1/2 version can not support 40 or 80 column screens. CoCo 1/2 version 
is available on TAPE for $27.95 + s/h or DISK for $29.95 + s/h. 



For CoCo 1, 2 and 3! 

Disk Directory Dazzler — Dress up your disk directory with colorful messages, 
notes and graphics — only $14.95. 

Also Availiable for CoCo 1 & 2 only: 

VDOS. the UnDlSK: Save multiple programs in memory 1 Works with or without a disk 
drive. TAPE $27.95 ♦ S/h. DISK $29.95 * s/h 

VDUMP, for the UnOlSK. Save multiple programs in a single tile 1 $14.95 * s/h on tope 
VPRINT. for the UnDlSK. Printout UnDlSK Directory 1 $9.95 ♦ s/h on tape 

Check, Money Order, MasterCard, VISA or COD accepted. For Shipping to USA and 
Canada add $1.50, to othercountries add $5.00. 



Order From 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966*8281 

Technical questions answered 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday