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July 1987 



Canada S4.95 U.S. $3.95 



THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



IT 



J 





PARTY! 



Our Sixth Anniversary Issue 



GAMES 

Batter Up trivia fun, and 
enter the world of Le Lutin 

MUSIC 

CoCo tunes up 
for the Fourth of July 

SURPRISES 

Hall of Fame ballot, 
learning tools, and 
CoCo writes a program 

PLUS Dennis Weide, T.C. 
Taulli, Leslie Foster's 
sixth year index to 
Rainbow, Novices Niche 
shorties, utilities, a dozen\ 
new product reviews 
and much more! 



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From Computer Plus to YOU 




after 




after 






Tandy 1000 EX $479 
Tandy 1000 SX $759 






BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 479.00 

Tandy 100 SX 1 Drive 384K 679.00 

Tandy 1000 SX 2 Drive 384K 759.00 

Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 512K 1229.00 

Model IVD 64K with Deskmate 889.00 
PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 160.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130 100 CPS 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 



RadioShackDWP-230 Daisy Wheel310.00 

Star Micronics NP-10 100 CPS 199.00 

Star Micronics NX-10 120 CPS 249.00 

Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 410.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 120 CPS 239.00 

Panasonic P-1091i 160 CPS 299.00 

Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 389.00 

Okidata 182 120 CPS 269.00 

Okidata 192 • 200 CPS 375.00 

Okidata 292 240 CPS 559.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Radio Shack DCM-212 179.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 179.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 
BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 
KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 
TIMELY DELIVERY 
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 39.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit24.95 
HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 
COCO Max Y Cable 27.95 
Color Computer Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Interface 62.95' 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 14.95 
CM-8 6 Extension Cable 19.95 
Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 59.95 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 26.95 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 99.00 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Nuke the Love Boat (CoCo3) 34.95 

The Magic of Zanth (CoCo3) 34.95 



Major Istar 24.95 27.95 

Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 

Dungeon Quest 24.95 27.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 

COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 

AutoTermbyPXEComputing29.95 39.95 

TelePatch III by Spectrum^ 29.95 

C III Graphics by Spectrum 19.95 

Font Bonanza by Spectrum 29.95 

Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Pro Color Series 79.95 

Max Fonts (72 COCO Max Fonts) 64.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 

Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo351 2K Ram Disk byCerComp 19.95 

OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71.95 

VIP Writer (disk only.) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

'Sale prices through 7/15/87 

Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 




20 




58 



105 



Cover illustration copyright © 1987 
by Fred Crawford 



The cassette tape/disk symbols 
beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's RAINBOW ON 
TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
RAINBOW ON TAPE. For details, check the 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK 

ad on Page 38. 



FEATURES 

Red, White and B\ue/lngrid Lawrence and Mark Bourdeaux 20 

MUSIC A 211th birthday salute to the U.S. 

The Perfect Disk Manager/A L. McGarrity. 

DISK UTILITY Organization at your fingertips 

Colorful Resistance/Gary MacLellan 



30 




EDUCATION Learn color codes for different resistances 

£^ Achieving Simple Equa\\\y/ Richard Monroe 



EDUCATION Reinforce problem-solving skills 



£^ Le Lutin/Louis Parson 




ADVENTURE An interesting challenge in a fascinating world 

The C0C0 Writes a Program/ Dennis H. Weide 

PROGRAMMING UTILITY Use machine language in BASIC 

Purr-fect Friends and Pull-Out Calendar/Sfatf 

ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL C0C0 Cat excitement abounds 

& A Computer's Ancient Native Language/Peter Dibble. 

TUTORIAL A look at some profound magic for the C0C0 

^ Batter Up!/ T. C. Taulli. 



44 



50 



58 



84 



99 



GAME Trivia fun for the whole family 

Hall of Fame Ballot 




ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL Nominate the candidate of your choice 

Who's Gonna Know?/ Edward Samuels 

COPYRIGHT LAW What you can do with others' programs 

The Sixth Year of Rainbow/Z.es//e A. Foster 

INDEX A guide to articles, reviews and authors of the past year 

NOVICES NICHE ^ 



100 



105 



109 



123 



145 



Powerful Pages 

Matt Krom 

Hit The Road _ 

Fred Rau 

An Inside View 

Michael Berenz 



94 



95 



97 



Prompt Attention 

Joseph Forgione 

Backup And Go . 

Matt Lawson 



97 



98 



NEXT MONTH: The dog days of August are here, so relax, take it slow. 
We make it easy with our Games Issue. Take out your frustrations with action- 
packed shoot-'em-ups, get rid of the summertime blues with tricky brain 
teasers, and test yourself with devious delights. Of course, there's always our 
fine offering of tutorials, utilities, reviews, commentary and Q & A columns. 

Whether it's fun time, or you're playing for keeps, the rainbow is the primary 
information source for the Color Computers 1, 2 and 3. 



4 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/Joseph Kolar 

Graphics experience you can draw from 

Building July's Rainbow/J/>77 Reed 

Managing Editor's comments 

CoCo Consultations/Marty Goodman - 
Just what the doctor ordered 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg 



Some changes, a map and Hutchison's database report 

Doctor ASCW/Richard Esposito 

The question fixer 

Education No\es/Steve Blyn 



Spell down to vocabulary fitness 

PRINT#-2 ,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 

Turn of the Screw/ Tony DiStefano 

Cache of the da y 

£=5^ Wishing Well/Fred Scerbo 

Keying into CoCo's power 



''Education Overview" will return next month. 



RAINBOWTECH 



Bits and Bytes of BAS\C/Richard White 



BASIC09 and Level 11: Focusing on modules 
Downloads/Dan Downard 



Answers to your technical questions 

0 KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 

An OS-9 convert speaks out 



"Barden's Buffer" will return next month. 



DEPARTMENTS 



Advertiser Index 



Back Issue Information 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



176 
135 
_18 



Letters to Rainbow 
The Pipeline 



111, 137 

6 



Rainbow Info 

Received & Certified 
Scoreboard Pointers 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



144 Subscription Info 



One-Liner Contest 
Information 



Where to Find Rainbow 



88 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 



Product Review Contents 



157 



16 



78 



120 



126 



56 



12 



89 



112 



163 



161 



167 



_99 
131 
76 



_54 
111 
174 



129 




July 1987 



Vol. VI No. 12 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 
Submissions Editor Jutta Kapf hammer 
Associate Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Technical Editor Cray Augsburg 
Copy Editor Jody Gilbert 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 

Editorial Assistants Sandra Blackthorn, 
Wendy Falk, Angela Kapfhammer, 
Julie Tallent, Monica Wheat 

Technical Consultant Dan Downard 

Editorial Consultants Ed Ellers, 

Belinda C. Kirby, Joe Pierce 
Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 

Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 

Richard Esposito, Martin Goodman, M.D., 

Joseph Kolar, Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, 

Fred Scerbo, Richard White 



Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Tracey Jones, Rita Lawrence, 
Denise Webb 



Lead Typesetter Jody Doyle 

Typesetting Services Jill Hopkins 
Karen Semones 



President 



Falsoft, Inc. 

Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue H. Evans 



Editorial Director James E. Reed 
Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jones 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Ouashnock 

Asst. General Manager For Administration 
Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Customer Service Mgr. Sandy Apple 
Asst. CustomerServiceMgr. Beverly Bearden 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Director of Production Jim Cleveland 

Pre-press Production John Pike 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Asst. Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Pam Workhoven 



Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

West Coast Advertising and Marketing Office 
President Cindy J. Shackleford 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 208 



the rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. the rainbow, RAINBOWfest and the rainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Second class postage paid Prospect, 
KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1987. the rainbow is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color BASIC and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
THE rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mall to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 5 



LETTERS TO THE U/k 




Turning in the Eyepatch: 
A Pirate Reforms 



Editor: 

After reading Mr. Falk's column in the 
April 1987 issue, and remembering several 
other articles and letters addressing the 
subject of piracy, I have finally decided that 
I am tired of being "the bad apple" in my 
CoCo System. Over the past year or so, I 
have pirated several programs — nearly 15 
percent of my library and accounting for a 
third of its value. I am truly sorry I have 
done this, and I have erased every pirated 
program from my disks. 1 1 took a long time 
to decide to do it, but I think it was the best 
thing to do. 

To those of you who also have pirated 
software, it's up to you whether or not to 
continue breaking the law. There is no 
effective way of stopping piracy, but piracy 
is an effective way of stopping the CoCo 
Community from the rapid and substantial 
growth that has become a trademark of our 
favorite micro. People often say (I did) that 
the pricing of software is outrageous; it may 
be, it may not. The pricing of the IBM PC 
is outrageous, but that doesn't mean people 
stole them instead of buying them. To the 
software vendors that 1 pirated from, I'm 
really sorry. That probably doesn't do much 
good, though. I will try my best to purchase 
more software from your companies. 

Lost and Mistaken 
Idaho Falls, ID 



An Offer You Can't Refuse 

Editor: 

This letter is being written for two rea- 
sons, the first of which is to tell you that I 
am no longer a member of the CoCo Com- 
munity. I am the owner of an IBM Compat- 
ible and I will be subscribing to RAINBOW'S 
sister publication, SOFT SECTOR. The 
CoCo will be given to my 7-year-old grand- 
daughter so that she can become familiar 
with computers and their use. 

The second reason for writing is that I 
have saved almost all of my RAINBOW 
magazines which date back to November 
1982. I want to get rid of them and don't 
want to toss them out in the trash. I would 
like to donate my collection to a club or 
organization that needs them. I will even 
throw in about 1 8 issues of Color Computer 
magazine, too. 

Harry Nor km 
103 W. Janss Road 
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

6 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



A Fix Here, a Fix There 

Editor: 

I have been a proud owner of a CoCo 2 
for two years and enjoyed OS-9 Level I. I 
recently bought a CoCo 3 and OS-9 Level 
II. Level II is unbelievable. However, when 
updating my DEF5 files with the new system 
calls, I found out that on Page 8-69 of the 
OS-9 II reference manual, important infor- 
mation is missing: the call number of 
FSRllHRam, which should be 1 03F XX. I am 
missing the XX and cannot complete my 
updates. 

In the April I987 issue, I read the letter 
from Mike Roush. Looking at the sche- 
matic, the two rows with O and G are 
hooked to the joysticks. Two capacitors 
(CI 5, CI 8) are also hooked to these rows 
and, after a time, the capacitors tend to leak 
(slowly short to ground). I cured my prob- 
lem by changing those capacitors. I propose 
to Mike to unsolder those two capacitors 
and, if the problem is cured, just replace 
them. Page 51 of the CoCo 2 Service Man- 
ual, Paragraph 5.3. 1 , "No Keyboard Entry," 
mentions those two capacitors as a potential 
cause. 

Finally, I want to congratulate your 
magazine for having comprehensive and 
honest product reviews that uncover not-so- 
honest suppliers. 

Jean-Maurice Moreau 
Kingston, Ontario 

RoBoCoCo 

Editor: 

I have developed what you might call a 
beginner's robot. It is a remote-controlled 
tank such as Radio Shack sells, hooked up 
to the CoCo, with a minimum of parts. I am 
working on ways of marketing this device, 
but, meanwhile, plans are available for 
enterprising types for $25. If interested, 
contact me at 523 W. Spring Street, 22664. 

Rich Taylor 
Woodstock, VA 

TV Joker Poker 

Editor: 

To make Joker Poker work on a TV set 
instead of a monitor, change the PRLETTE 
RGB commands in lines I and 5999 to 
PALETTE CMP, change PALETTE 0,1:CL51 

in Line 14 to PALETTE 0,0:CLS1, and 
change HCOLOR 2 in lines 1 099, 1 200 and 
59I8 to HCOLOR 6. 

Robert L Brimmer 
Pittsburgh, PA 



Educational Fair 

Editor: 

ECCO, The Educational Computer Con- 
sortium of Ohio, announces its Seventh 
Annual Educational Computer Fair, on 
Thursday and Friday, October 8-9, 1 987, at 
the Stouffer Tower City Plaza in Cleveland. 
For further information, contact me at 
ECCO, 1 1 23 S.O.M. Center Road, Cleve- 
land, OH 44I24, or call (2I6) 46 1 -0800. 

Alice Fred man. Director 
Cleveland. OH 



BACK TALK 



Editor: 

I read with amazement the letter from 
John Tiffany in the March I987 issue. John 
claims to be "against the abuse of illegal 
drugs"but is "shocked and annoyed "at your 
using CoCo Cat to spread the word concern- 
ing the dangers of drug abuse. 

You can't have it both ways. You can't 
oppose illegal drug use and at the same time 
remain silent on the issue, rainbow has 
taken the lead in trying to reach the youth 
of our great nation by using our magazine 
to inform them that drugs are indeed "not 
user-friendly." How can you say that you are 
"against the use of abuse of illegal drugs" 
and in the same breath take our magazine 
to task for saying exactly the same thing? 

Mel Wax man 
Freehold, NJ 

The Borrowing Attitude 

Editor: 

No matter how much protection a small 
developer may have, the economics of law 
make it very difficult for any but the giants 
to bring successf ul action against a company 
that is stealing software — especially since 
most corporate theft occurs when distribu- 
tors underreport copies sold on royalty 
reports. Who, but the largest can afford 
accountants to verify reports? However, the 
theft of computer software in this blatant 
manner is isolated and protected (as your 
article pointed out). 

The reason so much computer software is 
stolen is an attitude in the general public that 
"borrowing" software is OK. I believe this 
attitude is fostered by a number of forces in 
our society. A few of which come to mind 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

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YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
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Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 
XMODEM for machine language 
files. 128 ASCII characters, 1200 
baud, etc. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Handles files larger 
than memory. Print on line with J&M 
or RS232 Pak. Screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, 64. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 

They are sincere, hard working and 

appreciative. Thanks! — . . ... 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



include schools that purchase one copy of a 
piece of software and then make copies for 
all their machines. Software developers 
themselves must shoulder a part of the 
blame. After buying a dozen pieces of 
software that are overpriced or just don't 
work, it's no wonder people are concerned 
about shelling out another $30 for a pig in 
a poke. 

Currently, the Canadian government is 
working on a new copyright law. And 
although there is no doubt that it is needed 
and overdue, I really greet it with a long 
yawn. The fact is that laws are only useful 
when the majority of people decide to obey 
them. What is needed now is a massive 
public education program to change the 
attitudes of the general public. 

Bob van der Poel 
Edmonton, Alberta 



And Still They Complain 

Editor: 

Why all this hostility toward the CoCo 3? 
Tandy gives us a computer that does virtu- 
ally everything we ask and people are not 
happy. I think the only valid thing to get 
upset about is third-party software not 
running. Will there be patches? I think so. 
What about the couple of Tandy programs 
that don't run? I feel Tandy should send a 
patch to all of the registered owners of those 

programs. n 

G*ry Pagac 

Spokane, WA 



COCO 3 

Editor: 

I've been waiting on pins and needles for 
Tandy to finally come out with a new CoCo 
with enhanced graphics, 80-column text 
display and more memory. Now it's here, 
and yet I'm still waiting to buy one. Why? 
Because at a time when everyone else is 
making their computers user-friendly and 
easier to operate, the CoCo 3 requires that 
we learn the OS-9 operating system and 
know how to program. 

Peter M. While 
Coconut Creek, FL 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

Does anyone have a Canadian stamp 
program for the CoCo 2? I have a large 
Canadian collection and would love to be 
able to enter this into my computer. 

W. C Arrow smith 
R.R. ft 4 
Slouffville, Ontario 
Canada L4A 7X5 
Terminal Driver Search 

Editor: 

I am looking for a 300/ 1 200 baud termi- 
nal driver for my custom-designed I 200 
BPS, DCM-5 modem. In the past, I was 
using a 64K CoCo 2 with an unmodified 
DCM-5, Remote 2 terminal driver and the 
CoCo Chronograph [June 1985, page 83]. I 
have upgraded to a 1 28K CoCo 3, 1 200 BPS 

and Xmodem. 0 . 

Steve Fmlayson 

Box 19 

Kaleden, British Columbia 
Canada V0H I K0 



The Indonesian CoCo 2 

Editor: 

I would like to know if there are any 

Indonesian language programs available for 

the CoCo 2. If not, would anybody be 

interested in writing one? _ _ , 

Tracy D. Long 

2805 Butler Street 

Oceanside, CA 92054 



80-Micro Interest 

Editor: 

In the December 1986 "Print#-2,"column, 
mention was made of 80 Micro magazine, 
which is basically for Model I, II, III and 4 
computers. Could you possibly print the 
address of this publication? 

Peter Cormier 
100 Tour Du Lac 
Sle. Agathe Des Monls, Quebec 

Canada J8C IBI 

The address is CIV Communica- 
tions, 80 Pine Street, Peterborough, 
NH 03458. 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I need help getting Radio Shack's Co- 
dump and X-Pad programs to work to- 
gether. I own a 64K CoCo 2 (ECB) with a 
multipack. I can't get both Codump and 
Demo into memory at the same lime, no 
matter where I put Codump in memory. The 

July T987 THE RAINBOW 7 



manual says CLEAR200 , 14848, but this is 

for a 1 6K machine. , . .... 

Andrew Wiesi 

Rt. 6, Box 1 83 A 

Anderson, SC 29624 

Seeking Circle City 

Editor: 

Some time ago I purchased Masierlink 
from Circle City Software, Box 30166, 
Indianapolis, IN 46220. I didn't use it right 
away and only recently discovered that my 
copy does not work. Do you have an address 
for this company? My letter was returned 
with "address unknown" on it. Does anyone 
have a working copy of this program? I get 
an I/O Error in 6. Ben Z ininey 

1644 Seagirt Blvd. 
Far Rock away, N Y 

A Vanishing Act 

Editor: 

1 jusi received Disk Utility 2. 1 A from my 
local Radio Shack. In the January 1987 issue 
of rainbow [Page 110], the Spectrum Pro- 
jects ad stated that Disk Utility is compatible 
with CoCo 3. Mine does not boot. I have 
tried to call Mr. Rosen only to find that his 
answering machine no longer lakes mes- 
sages. I tried to leave him E-Mail on Delphi 
only to find he is not listed in the member 
directory. I don't know what to do. Tandy 
says that they are not responsible for "90 
series" software and that I would have to 
speak to the company that produced it. I 
would appreciate any help you can give me. 

John D. Farrar 
Cumberland University 
Lebanon, TN 37087 

The Spectrum Projects ad indicates 
that a Co Co 3 upgrade is available for 
Disk Utility 2./ and can be had for $ 1 5 
with proof of purchase. 

Get the Connection 

Editor: 

I do a lot of work with the database 
Profile and the word processor Scripsit. I 
would like to know if there is software able 
to connect those two programs so I would 
be able to write an original letter or form 
letter with Scripsit and have names and 
addresses from Profile inserted automati- 
cally. 

If not, can you recommend a database 

that can write the original letter or form 

letter using uppercase and lowercase letters? 

The Report Format of Profile is limited to 

the use of uppercase letters. . , 

Marie LeBlanc 

CP. 431 
Perce, Quebec- 
Canada GOC 2L0 

No Double-Sided Access 

Editor: 

When my new CoCo 3 arrived, I discov- 
ered it is not compatible with my two half- 
size, double-sided drives with a 1 6K JFD- 
CP controller. The CoCo 3 doesn't recognize 
double-sided drives or J&M, so all of my 
disks formatted as such failed to produce 
any working programs. The J&M doesn't 
recognize any of the new CoCo's commands. 
I'm stuck with using my expensive double- 
sided drive system as an RS-DOS single- 
sided system with over 90 percent of my 



programs inaccessable. I have always liked 

J&M and their products, but I have received 

no help as to what I can do to make my two 

systems compatible. ~. . „ , 

J K Rick Butler 

30 Annapolis Lane 

Rotonda West, FL 33947 

Strange Connection 

Editor: ■ 

I have a problem with my modem, the 

DCM-3. My friend has a VIC-20 and a 

modem. So we decided to try to connect. I 

used my Color Compact and we set our 

parameters the same. Something strange 

happened when we connected. I received his 

messages, but he did not receive mine. We 

tried changing the settings. I even checked 

the system at Radio Shack. But nothing 

worked. Please help. ^. , ^ » 

Charles D. Baum 

1116 W. 39th Place 

Hobart, IN 46342 

Where Is Four Star? 

Editor: 

I have been trying, without success, to 
contact Four Star Software in Canada. It 
seems they are no longer in business, as my 
last letter to them was returned "Moved/ 
Address Unknown." I would like to contact 
anyone from Four Star, or one of the Penpal 
programmers, Dave Shewchun or Roland 
Knight. If anyone can help, please write. 

Dave Suiter 
P.O. Box 65 
Harborton, VA 23389 

Escaping With CoCo 3 

Editor: 

How do you set CoCo 3 to send an escape 
character? I would like to access my work 
database over the phone using Compac, but 
I must send an ESCA'A' sequence to identify 
my terminal type. (Pressing break while 
using Compac sends me back to the menu.) 

I could use an IBM 3270-type emulation 
package for the CoCo to take advantage of 
SPF's full screen edit. 

Ron Potter 
10914 Oliver Road 
Cleveland, OH 441 1 1 



BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEMS 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

I'd like to congratulate you on a great 
magazine! I received HOT CoCo magazine 
until its demise in February 1986, and I was 
glad to see that the Doctor ASCII column 
was picked up by your magazine. This 
column has already saved me a painful 
repair bill. 

Mike Mumper Jr. 
Loysville, PA 

Software House Comes Through 

Editor: 

Once again one of your advertisers has 
shown outstanding concern and has gone 
the extra distance to satisfy a customer. I 
would like to publicly acknowledge The 
Software House in Redford, Michigan. 
When I had a problem with an order, Dallas 
Cox corresponded with me and compen- 
sated me far beyond my expectations. 

Ron Draeger 
Spencer, Wl 



CORRECTION : The numbers published in 
RAtNBtw for The Presidio and Colorboard 
of San Francisco, Gatorboard of Redwood 
City, Colorboard of Vallejo, Hal 2001 of 
San Mateo, and Color Users Board of Los 
Angeles are no longer being used for BBS 
activity. We apologize for any inconven- 
ience to our readers and present holders of 
these numbers. 

• The Color Computer Board of Mobile has 
been online since May 1986. It's run on a'D' 
board 64K. CoCo I at 300 baud. Parameters 
are 7 bits. 1 stop bit, no parity. Call (205) 
341-1616. 

Edward Jones 
281 Lakeview Drive 
Mobile, A L 36609 

• I would like to announce the opening of 
Complex, a new BBS in Encino, California. 
Over 30 menus of things to do. Running on 
a CoCo I with eight drives. Call (818) 996- 
9290 24 hrs. 

Cliff Redding 
Encino, CA 

• King Arthur's Court is run on a CoCo 2 
with homemade software. It has up/down- 
loads for several types of computers and is 
currently running at 300 baud. Online 24 
his., seven days a week. Call (619) 320-5072. 

Paul Estes 
352 Glen Circle 
Palm Springs. CA 92262 

• The Citrus Color Computer Club in 
Colton, California, is sponsoring the Color- 
Book BBS. Featuring articles, message base 
and download section. Online 24 hrs. at 300 
baud, even parity and 7 bit. A password is 
required, but new users are allowed online. 

(714) 877-2714. . _ _ 

James C. Grace y 

San Bernardino, CA 

• I am proud to announce a new CoCo BBS 
in the Denver area. It is called the CoCo 
County Airport. 300/ 1200 baud, 24 hrs. It 
has 2 Meg of online storage. Call (303) 343- 

Ronald A. Bihler 
Aurora, CO 

• ParityVille is a great CoCo board running 
on a modified CoBBS 24 hrs., seven days a 
week. Call (404) 949-0596. 

Ernest rielder 
Ga. Tech Box 36353 
Atlanta, GA 30332 

• The High Level BBS now operates with 
over 12 Meg online, 24 hrs. at 300/1200 
baud. Call (312) 566-8856. The system runs 
on a CoCo 2 with a megadisk hard drive. 

Brian Smith 
265 Rouse Avenue 
Mundelein, IL 60060 

• The Nebula Concept BBS is running seven 
days a week from noon to midnight at 7 or 
8 bits, 300 baud. Call (502) 821-1954. 

Joseph L. Adams 
1 142 Perry Street 
Madisonville, K Y 42431 



8 



THE RAINBOW 



July 1987 



BOOKS & GRAPHICS 

500 



POKES, 
PEEKS. 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own MI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKEs, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Basic/ECB/Disk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LLIST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TRON, TROFr. 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, RENUM, PRIMT 
USIMO, DIR, KILL, SAVE, LOAD. 
MERGE, RENAME, DSKIMI, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 

★ Generate a Repeat-key. 

★ Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

★ Speed Up your programs. 

★ Reset MOTOR ON /OFF from 
keyboard. 

★ Recover Basic programs lost by 
NEW. 

★ Set 23 different 
QRAPrtlC/SEMIQRAPHIC modes 

★ Merge two Basic programs. 

★ AND MUCH MUCH MOREJU 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16K/32K/64K/COLOR BASIC/ECB/DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1, 2, * 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



SUPPLEMENT to 

500 POKES, 
PEEKS 'IN EXECS 

ONLY. _ _ 

$9.95 

200 additional Pokes, Peeks' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER. 
Includes commands for 

• flompak Transfer to disk 

• PAINT with 6500Q styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/double sided drives with variable 
step-rates 

• High-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm-P and CoCo Max® 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (lor □ M P printers) & Text Screen Dump 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 5DD POKES. PEEKS N EXECS is a prerequisite 

*5>300 POKES 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 

FOR THE COCO III 

Get more POWER tor your CoCo III. Includes 
commands for 

• 4D/80 Column Screen Text Dump 

• Save Text/ Graphics Screens to Disk 

• Command/Function Disables 

• Enhancements for CoCo 3 Basic 

• 1 28 K/5 1 2 K Ram Test Program 

• HPRINT Characler Modilier 

• AND MANY MORE COMMANDS 

ONLY$19.95 





"MUST" BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $19.95 
BOTH UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
SUPER ECB(CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: $24.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: $59.95 
CGCG3 SERVICE MANUAL $39.95 
INSIDE 0S9 LEVEL II $39.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO 0S9 LEVEL II ON COCO 3: S CALL 
8ASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS SI 4.95 
COCO 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING*: $18.00 



JhJF 




COLOR MAX 3 

Finally, your wait is overt! The ultimate 
graphics program for CoCo 3 has arrived. 
Features include: 

• Icons and pull down menus 

• 320 x 200 hh res screen 

• Choice ol 64 colors 

• Pencil. Eraser. Spray Can Line, Rectangle, Paint Brush & 
more lunctions 

• Electronic Typesetting with 1 1 built-in fonts 

• Zoom-in (Fat Bits] and Undo 

• Variety of brushes and patterns 

• Editing leatures such as invert flip, copy, cut paste and 
clear 

• Load/Save/Compress/Print your work 

• Works with RGB & Composite Monitors 

• Printer Drivers- EPSON, GEMINI & DMP 

• Requires RS Hires joystick interface 

Requires CoCo3, 128K. Tandy Disk Controller, 
Hi- Res Joystick Interface. 

only $59.95 

HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 





MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N. Y. 14450 
Phone(716) 223-1477 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions, 
drawn pictures. 

which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III ORTDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM OF 32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER, compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1. 

Supports the following printers: EPSON 
RX/FX, GEMINI 10X/SG-10, NX-10, 
C-ltoh 8510, DMP-1 00/1 05/400/430, 
SEIKOSHA GP-100/250, LEGEND 808 
and GORILLA BANANA. 

DISK ONLY $29.95 
PICTURE DISK #1: 100 more pictures for 

CGD: $14.95 

FONT DISK #1 : 10 extra fonts! $19.95 
COLORED PAPER PACKS S19.95 



VISA, MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling (USA & 
CANADA, other countries $5.00). COD add $2.50 extra NYS residents pleas eadd 
Sales Tax Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited. 



MotMrOvt) 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1 -800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pm est 7 days a week 

Except NY. For information, technical inlormation, NY orders & atler-hours 1 -71 6-223-1 477 



• The Reservation is run by James and Rose 
Brannigan. It operates at 8 bits, no parity, 
with a complete section for the CoCo. Open 
24 hrs., seven days a week, at 300/ 1200 
baud. Call (504) 886-3151; (504) 886-5505 

Darrell Diolman 
1114 Byrd A venue 
Bogalusa, LA 70427 

• The Duckpond BBS is online 24 hrs. a day 
at 300/1200 baud, running on a Tandy 1000. 
Handles are accepted. Call (318) 745-3646. 

Samurai Duck 
P. O. Box 873 
Day line, LA 7 1023 

• I would like to announce the opening of 
a new BBS in Mansfield. It is run on and 
fully dedicated to the CoCo. It is currently 
running on a 64K with three disks and 
Richard Duncan's CoBBS Version 1.2. It is 
up 24 hrs, a day and goes by the name of 
CoCoBBS. Call (617) 339-1996. 

Roy Jerman 
17 Bonney Lane, tt30 
Mansfield, MA 02048 



• The CoCo-Nuts BBS Service is online at 

(919) 425-8242. _ _ . 

Tom Taylor 

6310 Belle Terre Court 

Fayetteville, NC 28304 

• The War Room BBS can be reached at 
(704) 847-5795, 24 hrs., seven days a week. 
Settings are 300 baud, 7, E, I. Validation is 
required. Devoted entirely to the CoCo. 

Tim Bohnslav 
802 Brenham Lane 
Matthews, NC 28105 

• The Siouxland Color Computer BBS is 
changing. It wiJ! be for members only and 
[here is a sign-up fee to get on the board. I! 
you would like to join, send me your full 
name and address along with a phone 
number where we can call and verify the 
information. There is a $5 per year fee. Call 
(402) 494-2284. 

A Ian Pedersen 
61 1 D Street 
South Sioux City. NE 68776 

• I am pleased to announce another CoCo 
BBS. It will be up 24 hrs., seven days a week, 
on the new Colorama 4.0. Parameters are 8 
bits, no parity, 300 baud, full duplex. 
Supports up/downloads. Call (718) 24 1 - 

Mark Shmueli 
2246 National Drive 
Brooklyn, NY 11234 

• There are two BBSs in the Buffalo, NY, 

area. They are: Tandy Town BBS, 300/ 1200 

baud, CoCo download section, online 24 

hrs., (7 1 6) 735-9625. SysOp Frank Voesburg 

and Trailin Tail BBS, 300/1200 baud, 

operated on a CoCo 2, online 24 hrs., (716) 

433-8108. n , 0 ^ , 

Paul S. Turley 

Grand Island, N Y 

• The Island CoCo Club BBS can be 

reached at (516) 227-1285. ^ „ , 

D.K. Lee 

P. O. Box 426 

Massapequa Park, NY 1 1762 



• The Full Tilt GCT BBS is running on an 
IBM XT for the CoCo Community. We have 
over 300 files and support 300/1200/2400 
baud. Users need to be verified by sending 
a self-addressed stamped envelope, although 
anyone can call and take a look around. Call 
(212) 682-0681. 9 a.m. to midnight. 8 bits, 

no parity. Steve Schechter 

Box 8414 FDR Station 
New York. NY 10/50 

• The CoCo Nut Tree is operating 24 hrs. 

at 300/ 1200 baud. Large download section, 

and allows full access from the first sign-on. 

Call (216) 792-9745. , _ . 

Larry C adman 

P. O. Box 478 

Canfield, OH 44406 

• The BACCUG BBS is online 24 hrs. at 
(513) 836-2741. It supports all models of 
CoCos. 300/1200 baud, 8, N, I or 7, E, 2. 
There are no user fees. First time callers are 
given access lor 20 minutes. Operated by the 
Dayton Area Color Computer Users Group. 

Joe Josey 
707 Angelia Court 
Englewood, OH 45322 

• The Pixel Palace BBS is running from 10 

p.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays and 10 p.m. to 10 

a.m. weekends. Runs at 300/ 1200 baud with 

software especially designed for the Color 

Computer 3 using 5I2K. Call (216) 364- 

5061. . _ 

Alvm Tanpoco 

1025 4th Street N.E. 

New Philadelphia, OH 44663 

• The Encyclopedia Galactica BBS is online 
from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Call (7 1 7) 586- 
0221. 300/1200 baud, 8 bits, no parity, and 

stop it. Andrew Robinson 

R. D. I Box 4 
Pleasant Ml.. PA 18453 

• The Computech-80 BBS, 300 baud, 7 p.m. 

to 7 a.m. Monday-Sunday. 7 or 8 bits, access 

is $2 per month. Multiple computer forums 

available. Call (703) 365-2018 or write 

(please enclose an SASE). . 

Rick v Sutphin 

Route I, Box 20 

Henry. VA 24102 

• We have a new BBS running 24 hrs. Up/ 

downloads, message base, forums and a 

buy/ sell/ wanted board. Access is free. 

Please leave suggestions for improvements. 

Call (608) 735-4509. _ . 

Robert Howard 

RR 2 

Gays Mills. W 1 54631 

• Nightlink is a full-featured, free, Christian 
BBS online 24 hrs., seven days a week at 8 
bit, no parity, I stop bit, full duplex and 300 
baud (1200 on the way). Call (414) 834-4450 
or write. 

Steve Trues dale 
Nightlink International 

Box 222 
Oconto, Wl 54153 

• The Grand Centre Connection BBS runs 
on a Tandy 1000 at 300 baud, 8 bit words, 
no parity and I stop bit. It supports uploads 
and downloads in ASCII and Xmodem 
protocol, with many public domain pro- 



grams available for the CoCo. There is no 

charge for access to this BBS. Call (403) 594- 

1525, Monday through Wednesday, and 

Friday 6 p.m. to 9 a.m., Thursday 9 p.m. to 

9 a.m.. and Saturday 6 p.m. to 9 a.m. (all 

times are Mountain). _ _ 

Steve r ramp ton 

Medley, Alberta 

• The CoCo Knights sponsor two BBSs. 

Rainboard, run by a CoCo, is open 8 p.m. 

to I I p.m. nightly at 382-9080. ComLine, 

run by a Tandy 1000, is also online from 8 

p.m. to I I p.m. at 727-0352. „ . 

A. Ooievaar 

Victoria. British Columbia 

• Announcing a new BBS in northern 
Ontario that is free to all. It features E-mail, 
gallery, up/ downloading, want ads, hints 
and tips and much more. Call (705) 848- 
1221, Monday to Friday from 7 p.m. till 7 
a.m., Friday at 7 p.m. till Sunday at 9 p.m. 
Soon to be run 24 hrs. 

Mike Dicker son, SysOp 
52 Colwill Drive 
Elliot Lake, Ontario 
Canada P5A 228 

the rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type RRI to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 



ARTS AND LETTERS 

Haf^py Birthday 
6 & 





Envelope of the Month 

Bob Nevin 
Ba yside, N Y 



10 



THE RAINBOW 



July 1987 



UTILITIES 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 





• Disk- to- Disk Copy (1 -3 passes) 

• Tape-to-Disk Copy 

• Tape-to-Disk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk-to- Tape Copy 

• Tape- to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ ML programs and DATA files. 
CoCo1,2 & 3 32 K Disk System 

(Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY $24.95 




UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best-selected utilities: 

• 40 K Disk Basic • Disk Cataloger 

• Super Tape-to-Disk Copy (with Automatic Relocate) 

• LList Enhancer • X-Ref for Basic Programs. 

• Graphics Typesetter [two text sizes!] 

• LARGE DMP Graphics Dump • Basic Stepper 

• Hidden 32 K (Use the " hidden" 32 K Irom your 64 K CoCoj 

• RAM Disk (tor Cassette & Disk Users] 

• Single Key Printer Text Screen Dump 

• And much, much more !!! 

Most programs compatible with CoCo 3 

DISK (64 K Req) ONLY $29.95 

UTILITY ROUTINES 
for the TANDY & 
TRS-80 COCO (Vol 1| 

• COMMAND KEYS • CURSOR STYLES • ERROR SKIP 

• FULL LENGTH ERRORS • KEY CLICKER 

• REPEAT KEY • REVERSE VIDEO 
SPOOLER • SUPER SCRDLLER 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE!!! 

For 1 6 K/32 K/64 K Cassette or Disk Systems, 

book $19.95 cas/disk $24.95 

BOTH BOOK AND CAS or DISK $36.95 

UTILITY ROUTINES (Volume II) 

Includes 20 oft-used utilities such as 

• Add SU PE RSC Rl PTS to your D M P pri nter 

• Design your own commands! • Programming Clock 

• Pasl Sort for Basic Strings • CoCo Calculator 

• Create a character sel for your OMP prinler 

• Let the computer locate your errors! 

• Automatic Directory Backup • And much much more! 

64 K DISK ONLY $29.95 



COCO DISKZAPPER 

Are you frustrated with crashed disks? If 
so, this program can save hours of labor by 
restoring complete or part of the information 
from the disk Ifs indespensable 1 

Requires minimum 32K/64 K disk system 

only $24.95 



0 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 

(Except those marked with *) 



AVATEX MODEM: Hayes compatible 
300/1200 Baud, Auto- Dial/ Answer/Redial. 
ONLY S1 29.95 MODEM CABLE: $19.95 
DS-69B DIGISECTOR: Microworks Digitizer 
for CoCo 1, 2 & 3. Includes software. 
ONLY $149.95 

VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference. 
$19.95 

15' PRINTER/MODEM EXTENDER CABLE: 
ONLYS16.95 

UNIVERSAL VIDED DRIVER: For monochrome 

or color monitor $29.95 

INTRDNICS EPROM PROGRAMMER: Best 

EPROM Programmer for the CoCo. Lowest 

Price Anywhere $137.95 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the serial 

porL ONLY $18.95 

3- POSITION SWITCHER: Select any one of 
three RS232 devices (printers/modems) 
from the serial port $37.95 
Y CABLE: Use your Disk System with CoCo 
Max, DS69, etc. ONLYS24.95 




SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 

switch selectable baud rates (300-9600). 

Comes with all cables. $44.95 

256K DYNAMIC RAM CHIPS (8): $39.95 

MAGNAVDX 8505/851 5 Analog RGB Cable: 

$24.95 

DISTO SUPER CONTROLLER: $99.95 

m 

RUN COCO MAX II 

On CoCo III 

The kit contains software & replacement 
PAL chip for 26-3024 Multipack interface 

only $29.95 
512K UPGRADE FOR COCO III 

Fast 120ns chips. Fully tested. Easy installation. No 
soldering. Comes with complete documentation and 
RAM test program on disk 

only $79.95 

(With purchase ol our 512 K RAM DISK program below) 

512K Upgrade without chips $44.95 

512K RAMDISK 

Have 2 superfast RAMDISKs & a print spooler. 

$24.95 



.UIMCllldllUII dill 



OTHER SOFTWARE... 

Telewriter-64 (Cas)$47.95 (Dsk) 57.95 

® 19.95 
29.95 
67.95 
77.95 
29.95 
39.95 



Teleform: Mail Merge for TW-64 
Telepatch III 

CoCo Max(Cas)* 
CoCo Max II (Dsk)* 

Autaterm Terminal Prog (Cas) 
I Latest Version) (Dsk) 
SPIT'N IMAGE: Makes a BACKUP of ANY 
disk $32.95 

COCO UTIL II (Lastest Version): Transfer 
CoCo Disk files to IBM compatible computer. 
Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo 
GRAFPLOT $44.95 
FKEYS III $24.95 
COCO 3 FONT BONANZA $29.95 
RGB PATCH: Displays most games in color on 
RGB monitors. For CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 
EDT/ASM 64 D: Best Disk Based Editor- 
Assembler for CoCo. $59.95 (Specify CoCo 
1, 2 or 3) 

THE SOURCE: Best Disassembler for CoCo 
$34.95 (Specify CoCol, 2 or 3) 
CBASIC: Most powerful Basic Program 
Compiler. 

3) 

ADOS: Advanced disk operating system. 
ONLY $27.95; ADDS3: $34.95 
DISK ANTI- PIRATE: Best copy- protection 
program for disk Basic and ML programs 
CoCo 1,2 & 3 ONLY $59.95 
COLOR SCRIBE III: The CoCo 3 Word- 
Processor $49.95 

DISK TUTORIAL (2 disk package) $36.95 



GAMES (DISK ONLY) 
GANTELET: $28.95 
MISSION F16 ASSAULT: $28.95 
MARBLE MAZE: $28.95 
PAPER ROUTE: $28.95 
KNOCK OUT: $28.95 
KARATE: $28.95 
WRESTLE MANIAC: $28.95 
BOUNCING BOULDERS: $28.95 
THE GATES OF DELIRIUM: $38.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
CALADURIAL FLAME OF LIGHT: $38.95 
LANSFORD MANSION: $38.95 




JILJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone(71 6) 223-1477 



Toordei: All ordersS 5 Q & above shipped by2nd day Air UPS with no extra charge. Last minute shoppers ] 
can benefit VISA, MC, Am Ex, Check MO. Please add S3. 00 shipping and handling I 
(USA& CANADA, other countnes$5.00) COD add $2.50 extra NYS residents please add wm^ 
Sales Tax. Immediate shipmenL Dealer inquiries invited. 



VISA 



Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 AM -9 PM EST 7 days a week 

Except NY. For information, technical information. NY orders & after- hours 1-71 6- 223-1 477 



Sacy, Please Come Home 



This is our Sixth Anniversary Issue, and it is always a time for 
good feelings on everyone's part here and, I hope, in the CoCo 
Community. Naturally, we're pleased and proud to be 
celebrating our Anniversary again and, as usual, we have a nice 
surprise inside — our CoCo Cat calendar. 

The calendar is filled with interesting dates in the history of the 
CoCo as well as the usual holidays and a few "extra special" days 
you probably didn't know about until now. I know everyone will be 
interested, for instance, in celebrating National Pig Week in an 
appropriate manner. 

With all the hullabaloo, I hate to be on a downer, but I am. And, 
though I usually do not share "personal" type things in this column, 
this one has been bothering me for some time. I know no one can 
help, but, somehow, it seems better to share this tale of "man's 
inhumanity to man." 

My eldest daughter, Wendy, is just back from a 
"Semester At Sea," a program through the Universit 
of Pittsburgh. Wendy, who works on the magazine 
when she is home, is now a senior at the University j 
of Wisconsin-Madison. She's 20 years old. } 

Wendy approached me about 18 months ago 
to take a "Semester At Sea." The program is fully 
accredited and includes regular college credit 
courses and practicum studies while the students 
spend about four months on a ship as it circles the 
globe. The spring semester included stops in Spain, 
Yugoslavia, Turkey, the Soviet Union, Egypt, India, Malaysia, 
Taiwan, China, Hong Kong and Japan. The ship left the Bahamas 
and docked a few weeks ago in Seattle. 

To balance out costs for the academic year, Wendy stayed home 
during the fall semester and attended the University of Louisville. 
She also worked part-time — to pay for part of her tuition this spring 
and to provide herself with spending money for the trip. I was really 
proud that she was so mature in accepting part of the financial 
responsibility for the trip. In sum, her junior year in college didn't 
cost "Daddy" any more than it would have had she been at 
Wisconsin. 

And it was a wonderful experience for her. She was exposed to 
many different cultures, formed firsthand opinions of countries, 
peoples and economic systems, and she learned a great deal, too, 
through her practicum classes in addition to more traditional studies 
on ship. 




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PAY ONLY FOR WHAT YOU WANT 



( OVER 100 UTILITIES TO CHOOSE FROM ) 



40k Basic for Cassette Programs^ 
40K for Disk Programs 0 
Alphabetize your disk directory 
Appointment Calendar 
ASCII File Scrambler 
ASCII file utility 
Automatic Disk Backup* 
Automatic Cassette Saver 
Automatic Disk Saver 
Automatic Directory Backup* 
Banner Maker 

Basic Program Autostart for cassette 
Base converter 

Basic Program Line Copy Utility 

Basic Search 

Bowling Score Keeper 

Calendar Maker (DMP Printers) 

Cassette Label Maker (DMP Printers) 

Clock for Programming 

Computerized Checkbook 

CoCo Base (different CoCo Products) 

CoCo Calculator 

Design your own Commands 

Disk Cataloger 

Basic Program Encryptor 

Disk Label Maker 

DMP Character Set Editor 

DMP Superscripts 

Enhanced Basic • 

Enhanced KILL 

Enhanced TRON/TROFF 

Error Locator 

Fast Sort for Basic Strings 

Function Keys 

Gemini/Epson Graphics Dump 
Gradebook for teachers 
Graphics Compression 
Graphics Lettering (2 sizes) 
Graphics Shifter 
Graphics Screen Zoom 
Home Bill Manager 
IO Data Monitor 
Inverse Highlighting 



i 



Keystroke Saver 

Large DMP Graphics Dump 

Last Command Repeater 

Line Cross Reference 

LIST/DIR Pause 

Mailing List (Disk Only) 

ML/Basic Merge 

Memory Monitor 

Message Animator 

Metric Conversions 

ML to DATA Convenor 

Multiple Choice Test Maker 

Numeric Keypad 

ON BREAK GOTO command 

ON RESET GOTO command 

Phone Directory (Disk Only!) 

Printcr-to-Scrcen 

Printer Tutorial 

Program Packer (Basic Pro's) 

Purchase Order Maker 

RAM Disk for Cassette* 

RAM Disk 2 (Cas & Disk)* 

RAM Test • 

Replace Phrases (Basic) 

Restore lost cas Basic pro's 

ROM Switcher * 

Sign Maker 

Single Stepper 

Slow Motion 

Speedup Tutorial 

Super INPUT/LINEINPUT 

Super Command Keys 

Super Editor 

Super Paint (65000 styles)* 
Super Repeat Key 
TAB/SHIFT-LOCK keys 
Tape Encryption 
Tape Index System 
Text Screen Dump 
Title Screen Creator 
UNKILL KILLed Disk pro's 
Variable Cross Reference 
VCR Tape Organizer 



All progrims available on disk only. More thin one program will be lent on the same disk. 
Documentation included. Plcise tdd Si. 00 SAH. NYS residents add sales tax. All programs 
compatible with CoCo 1,2,3. Programs marked with • are compatible with CoCo 1 A 2 only. 



EACH PROGRAM - $9.00 2 PROGRAMS - $16.00 3 PROGRAMS 
4-PROCRAMS - $24.00 5 OR MORE - S3. 00 EACH 



S21.00 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Falrport, N.Y. 14430 
Phon»(716) 223-1477 



Toorfcf. kSl »/Jtn ISO | iitfi || \)fii\ j Ui li| k'y U n «'t I H ntn ctirja last mnutf shopper? 
can benefit VISA MC. Am Ex. Che<< MQ Please add $100 s^pp'^O handling 
(USA & CANADA olher counties $5 00) COO add $2 SO estu NYS r«*denis pleas* *dd 
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Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pm est 7 <j ay s a *«* 

E' Cfpl NY Fcx i nformation technical iMcymali(x\ NY ydtrs A after- houts 1-71 0-2231477 



Everyone was looking forward to 
her return — to hearing the stories, 
getting her impressions, looking at 
her photographs. 

Wendy took 17 rolls of pictures, 
almost 550 of them. Friends 
snapped her standing in front of a 
line of gray-clad Russian soldiers in 
Red Square, at the Taj Mahal, be- 
side the Golden Horn, on a camel at 
the pyramids, at a market in China, 
in front of the bullet train in Japan. 
And so on. 

We don't have a single one of 
those pictures. 

We don't have the one present 
Wendy bought herself — some 
pearls she had saved money for so 
she could get them in Hong Kong. 

We don't have Sacy, either. 

Sacy is Wendy's teddy bear. He's 
17 years old. The name, inciden- 
tally, means "Soft And CuddlY." 
Sacy is who Wendy cried with when 
she didn't get in the high school ciub 
she wanted. He accompanied her on 
a scholarship summer to Israel. He 
kept her company when she broke 
both her arms at the same time. 



Sacy has been to Denver and to 
Washington, D.C. He's been to 
Florida and he's been to Kansas 
City. He's lived in Tuscaloosa, Ala- 
bama, Chicago and Madison, Wis- 
consin. 

And he's been almost all the way 
around the world. 

Someone, you see, stole Wendy's 
tote bag from the customs shed of 
Pier 28 in Seattle while Wendy went 
back onto the ship to get her other 
luggage. That tote bag contained 
Wendy's pearls, a present for Wend- 
y's sister, 17 rolls of film. And Sacy. 

Wendy spent four hours searching 
the pier for her tote bag. She talked 
to longshoremen and ship person- 
nel, to the police and customs 
agents, to other students and 
strangers. No tote bag. No Sacy. 

Wendy has written to all 400 
students who traveled with her, 
asking if anyone might have seen 
something. So far, no one has. 
Students have volunteered to send 
her copies of their pictures — but no 
one has many pictures of Wendy, of 
course. 



And no one has Sacy. 

Just last night, Wendy came to 
talk to me, so upset I thought she 
had broken up with her boyfriend. 

"Why did they have to steal Sacy 
and my pictures?" she asked. 
"Couldn't they have at least sent 
Sacy home?" Then: "Do you think 
Sacy's OK?" 

I told her I was sure Sacy was, but 
we both knew it was a lie. Whoever 
stole the tote bag knew it belonged 
to a youngster — that the film had 
to represent irreplaceable memories 
and the teddy bear had to be very, 
very special. They could have kept 
the other stuff and just sent the 
pictures back. 

And sent Sacy home. 

So I'm down even if this is our 
Sixth Anniversary Issue. Somehow 
it helps to have written about it and 
I hope you'll pardon my injecting a 
personal issue in this space. 

After all, it's the first anniversary 
issue when Sacy hasn't been here to 
celebrate with us. 

— Lonnie Falk 



Hardware 

Specia 

Communications 




fop your Computer 

3CDO/12CO baud 
1 Year Warranty 

S109.00 

[Modem & Cable] 



300/120D baud Fully Hayes 

compatible 
Modem - 2 Year Warranty 






I 

* 

i 

# 

I 
l 



[Modem & Cable] 

THE OTHER GUYS 

I 55 North Mam Street 
■ ■ Suite 301-D 
PO Box H 

Logan Utah S^1321 



'KEEP TRAK 5 General Ledger Reg. $69.95— Only $39.95 

"Double-Entry" General Ledger Accounting System for home or business: 16k, 
32k. 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Program features: balance sheet, income & 
expense statement [current & 'YTD'], journal, ledger. 899 accounts ( 2350 entries on 
32k & 64k (71 0 accounts & entries on 1 6k] [disk only]. Version 1 2 has screen printouts. 

Rainbow Review 1 1 - 9/84 : 1 .2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95 — ONLY $24.95 

Filing data base. File any information with Omega File. Records can have up to 16 fields 
with 255 characters per field [4080 characters/record]. Sort, match & print any field. 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only]. 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 1 0/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs. Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles, elipses. boxes, lines and ARCS. Single joystick operation with on line HELPS at all 
times. Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects on the screen. Can be 
used as a stand-alone graphics editor. Instruction Manual. GRAPHICS EDITOR. REG. 
$39.95— ONLY S24.95 for disk or tape. 64k ECB. 

Rainbow Review 7/B5, Hot CoCo 9/B5 "The graphics bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-IRAK 1 Accounts Receivable. 

Features: auto interest calculation, auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need, detailed statements. 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in, account number checking, credit limit checking & more. User friendly/menu 
driven. Includes manual. S39.95 or 549.95 General Ledger & Accounts Receivables 
[Disk Only], 

'COCO WINDOWS 3 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 1 0 programmable function keys. Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic. Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering. Four function 
calculator, with memory. The above options can be called anytime while running or writing 
in BASIC. APPLE PULL YOUR DRAPES. YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS. 5 24.95 [disk 
or tape] includes manual. 



CBOD 753-7B20 
(BOO) 942-9402 



[Add S3.00 for postage & handling] 
C.O.O., Money Order, Check in U.S. Funds [Please specify if JSM 

controller] 



14 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 




Screen Star 



Screen Star implements the popular WordStar editing capa- 
bilities. Screen Star uses the disk as an extension of memory 
so it will edit tiles larger than memory. Move, copy, or delete 
blocks of text with one keystroke. Powerful cursor commands 
allow fast and easy movement throughout the document. The 
find/replace command makes moss changes and searches 
a snap. Set Tabs, toggle the video, access the OS-9 Shell and 
choose wordwrap. Define up to 10 function keys for fast, repeti- 
tive functions. Imbed Computer ware's Text Formatter com- 
mands in your Screen Stor file for maximum word processing 
capabilities. 

Unlike most spelling checkers that require a huge dictionary 
file, Smart Speller uses a small dictionary which contains the 
most common English misspellings and their correct spellings. 
It also recognizes any abbreviations you commonly use and 
replaces them with their full spelling automatically! Versions 
for Level 1 & bevel 2 OS-9 are included in the Screen Star 
package. The most powerful editing product ever available 
on the Color Computer, 

Requires OS-9 ""^^v $49.95 

With Text Formatter "xSltv S 74, 95 




OS-9 Text Formatter 



OS-9 Text Formatter interfaces with any editor that produces 
standard ASCII text files including Computerwares Screen Star, 
and Radio Shack's TS Edit. Supports 

• Right & Left Justification 

■ Automatic Pagination 

• Headers and Footers 

■ Macros, Tabs. Etc 

• Page numbering 8c Auto Date Insert 

• Send ESC 8cCTL codes to printer 

Why just print it when you can FORMAT it with OS-9 Text 
Formatter 

Requires OS-9 $34.95 



51 2 K Memory for CoCo 3 



L0 




Completely assembled with prime 120ns 
4 Q b.^s?" memory chips. Simple installation. 




CoCo 3 Ramdisk 
and 51 2K Diagnostics 

Ramdisk Creoles two additional drives Ihalcan be configured 
as 0 & 1. or 2 & 3. Memory Diagnostics lexis memory Ihreeways 

$19 95 

Monitors 




12" NAP amber monochrome monitors 

$114.95 
Shipping $5.00 

Universal Video Plus 

Summer Special $29.95 

Video interface for the CoCo 1 or 2 



Terminal Software 




Color Connection for RSDOS, and OS-9 Connection are the 
best in communication software. All of the standard protocols 
are supported, including CompuServe Protocol B XMODEM, 
and XON/XOFF. The auto dial feature for Hayes compatible 
and some Radio Shack modems is supported. Macros allow 
easy entry to often-used passwords and ID'S. Communicate 
with confidence with either Color Connection, or OS-9 
Connection 3.0. 

OS-9 version requires RS232 pak $49.95 
RSDOS versions for CoCo 2 & CoCo 3 inc. $49.95 



Mitsuba 1200 Baud Modem 

SPECIAL $154.00 

100% Hayes compatible, full or half duplex, speaker alert to 
busy signal, touch tone or pulse dialing. 



Entertainment 
for the CoCo 3 

Return of 



.1 



Junior's Revenge^^^ 

A great arcaae game that brings the 
popular Donkey Kong Jr. to your CoCo 3. 
Joystick required, disk 



The Magic of Zanth 

You are on a journey to discover the 
source of magic in the land of Zanth. 

(SSC pak optional), disk 




Nuke the Love Boat! 

Adventure on the high sea. You and the 
entire Love Boat crew must get the 
bomb away from the terrorist. 

Joystick or mouse required, disk 



Ask for your FREE catalog 



Call or Write to: 




COMPUTERWARE I*™) ♦»•-»« 

Box 668 • Enclnltas, CA • 92024 



fsiame - 
Address 
City 



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Surface — SZ minimum 

2% for orders over 5)00 
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TOTAL 




□ 




4 colob 
1 12B £ no* 

26-333* 



26-3<M 



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BUILDING JULY'S RAINBOW 




A muscular Rainbow with an M-60 . . . 

The OS-9 Users Group battles back 

And, Rainbow's Color Computer Hall of Fame 

If you saw People magazine's special issue on Russia a few weeks ago, perhaps 
you read that many videotapes produced here in the West are stolen by 
underground "video garage" operations in the USSR and reproduced to run 
on Russian video cassette recorders. Among the "hot" videos are the Rambo duo. 

Curiously enough, not only is Sylvester Stallone's dialogue dubbed in by a 
woman on one popular, but illegal copy (she does the entire sound track), but 
the word "Rambo" was mistranslated into "Rainbow"! A soprano soldier named 
Rainbow wielding a machine gun! Well, recollection of this came immediately to 
mind during my vacation recently as 1 was riding an express train out of Helsinki, 
Finland. Destination: Moscow. 

We had been warned to use the restrooms early, before the fretfully hot coach 
would be sealed for an enroute immigration/customs inspection. Thus, it was 
expected when a tall Russian soldier came into the compartment I shared with 
my wife and asked to see our documents, which we were careful to have in total 
order. It was just by chance that he asked me to open the very suitcase in which 
I had a copy of what else, TH E RAINBOW. It immed iately caught hiseye. "Rainbow!" 
he said, and, were it anywhere else, I might have blurted, "Oh, are you a reader?" 
Instead, I volunteered, "It's a magazine for home computer users." Home users, 
indeed, in a country where even the hotels and biggest retail stores still use the 
abacus! He thumbed through it, laid it down, picked it up again and muttered 
"Rainbow, Raaaainnnnn-bowww" drawing it out as if he might be considering 
whether this was the book that inspired the video! Replacing it in my suitcase, 
he made a cursory inspection of our compartment and then picked it up a third 
time. I was quite ready to give it to him, but thought better of it when, at last, 
he dropped it, saluted us and moved on. 

Yes, 1 am proud of THE RAINBOW, now entering its seventh year! Was this the 
first copy of THE RAINBOW to enter Russia? Well, while we have no subscribers 
in the USSR, and while I saw no computer magazines at any newsstands anywhere, 
I suspect my copy is not the first. In fact, a while back, I'm told, the Russians 
approached Tandy, as they did Apple, about introducing the Color Computer to 
the Russian marketplace! Whatever negotiations took place apparently did not 
work out, so, alas, the Russian soldier and I still have little common ground. 

Bruce Warner hasn't told me if any copies of the OS-9 Users Group's MOTD 
newsletter are headed toward the Kremlin, but I do want to report that, after an 
eight-month suspension, publication of MOTD has resumed and a fresh copy is 
right here on my desk. If you did n't get one, you might write to: OS-9 Users Group, 
ATTN: Membership, 1715 East Fowler Avenue, Suite R237, Tampa, FL 33612. 
The group has suffered some setbacks over the past year, but appears to be getting 
back on track with folks like Bruce, Bill Turner, David Kaleita and Carl Krieder 
putting in enormous amounts of volunteer hours toget things moving again. That's 
good news for all of us and, while 1 know many of you may be frustrated over 
past experience with the group, I urge you to please show patience and 
understanding and help these new officers get things rolling again. 

Along with my usual invitation for you to join the tens of thousands who 
subscribe to THE RAINBOW (the magazine, not the soprano soldier), let me cordially 
invite you to nominate someone for induction into Rainbow's Color Computer 
Hall of Fame! Yes, you can nominate your favorite CoCo Community citizen and 
the selection committee will carefully consider your nomination. The time and site 
for the formal induction ceremony are yet to be determined, but now is the time 
for nominations. All you do is fill out the nomination form (see Page 104) and 
mail it in. No essay nor documentation is required or desired, and just one 
nomination per reader please. We'll discuss the Hall of Fame in more detail later 
on; in the meantime, keep following THE RAINBOW, the Rambo of computer 
magazines. 

— Jim Reed 



16 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



See our other ads 
on pages 67 & 69 




An introduction to the Color Computer III that compares the 
differences between the CoCo I/II and the NEW CoCo III. Includes: 
GIME chip specs, CoCo II to CoCo III converter, CoCo III memory 
map and a 128K/512K RAM test, "Offers some very good information 
to programmers . " - Rainbow Review Feb '87 $19.95 ~~ 

GET BOTH J™> 
for $29.95 ^s/ 




GRAPHIC 






A drawing program for the CoCo III using the new Enhanced graphic 
features: 320x192 graphics, 16 of any 64 colors, plus the ability 
to Save and Load 32K screens . "Paint pretty pictures on the 
CoCo3." - Rainbow Review Dec '86 $19.95 



With over 100+ pages, it is a must BOOK 
for ANYONE interested in LEVEL II, Has 
FIXES for mem BUGS, how to convert a 
$29.95 ROGUE disk into a WORKABLE LEVEL 
II disk, WINDOWS, tips, tricks and many 
things that TANDY left out!! ! $39,95 
OS-9 Lev II Solution - A front~end "USER 
FRIENDLY" interface for LEVEL II $29. '93 




^^^^^ ^^^^^ HH ^^^^^ MNMtoh MMi 4MM SA **RffiL j555F Iflfl Iflfl tffl 

COLOR MAX III - The CoCo III CoCo Max 

It's here! The CbCoIII BREAKTHROUGH PRODUCT everyone was waiting fori 320x200 graphics , pull down menus, icons 
16 of any 64 colors, RGB support . Req. 128K CoCoIII DISK & Hi-Res Joystick interface. (Specify printer ) $59.95 

COCO III UNRAVELED - The new ROM code! 

Provides a COMPLETE DISASSEMBLY of the new code in the CoCo Ill's ROM! ! 1 (Over 100 pages! ) $29.95 

TW-oO - 80 columns for TW-64 on CoCo III 

It's finally here! An 80 column version of Telewriter-64 for the CoCo III with TKl.EPATCH features plus much, 
much more! Use the Fl & F2 keys to access the MAIN MENU or EDITOR & now you can use the CTRL key instead of 
CLEAR! New FONTS & PRIOT SPOOLER too! Req. TW-64 DISK and 128K CoCo III $39.95 






FKEYS III - Function keys for the CoCo III 

A productivity enhancement that gives you the capability to add twenty (20) pre-defined functions to the CoCo 
III by using the CTL, Fl and F2 keys! $24.95 "Get more from your keyboard with FKEYS III "(4/87 Rainbow Review ) 

Kl l ^ ^^ ^ jf f P^ ^ ^^^^k ^P^L ^P^^L ^^^^ djt ^L^K ^^^Bfl 1 ^agm ^^ ^^^^ ^^^p ^^^^ ^^^^ J ffl ffl fa ^0 ^^^^ ^rif^P^ " ^^ P * 

wr^UtlAMC \mm \J ffff # 9a w^w / PH|^*B? jfr III 

Easy installation with a superior design for a reliable upgrade, processing efficiency and AVAILABLE NOW for 
the CoCo III! ( *$79.95 when purchased with our 512K RAM DISK program for $19.95) A 512K upgrade without RAM 
chips $39.95 - The lowest upgrade prices in the Rainbow magazine, period! ! ! Why pay $119, $139 or more??? 

COCO III FONT BONANZA -irititit Rating 

Replace the 'PLAIN' CoCo III characters from a menu of INCREDIBLE fonts or create your own. 128K DISK $29.95. 
NEW! ! ! FONT DISK ~ffl with over £5 irore FONTS ! $19.95/Buy 'em both for $39.95. *(4/87 Rainbow Review ) 

RGB PATCH - No more BLACK & WHITE dots . . . 

Did you buy an expensive RGB monitor ( CM-8 ) just so that you could see your Hi -Res artifact ing CoCo 2 games in 
BLACK & WHITE ??? RGB PATCH converts most games to display in COLOR on an RGB monitor. 128K DISK $29.95 

PAL SWITCHER - Designed by Marty Goodman! 

Have the best of both worlds by being able to switch between CoCo II and CoCo III modes when using a Multi~Pak 
Interface. Req. OLDER PAL & NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 Multi-Pak Interface $29.95/with NEW PAL chip $39.95 

RGB MONITOR - Better than TANDY CM-8! 

Our monitor is much more versatile than the Tandy CM-8 1 Takes a variety of video inputs, including: RGB 
Analog, Color Composite and RGB TTL. Unlike the CM-8, PMODE 4 artifact colors don't show up BLACK and WHITE 
(when processed through the Color Composite input) $329.95. Magnavox 8515 w/CoCo III cable $339.95 



CoCo III 512K RAM sticker $4.99 
Level II Quick Ref Guide $4.99 
Level II BasicQ9 binder ..$9,95 



Hi-Res Joystick Interface .$14.95 
CoCo III Multipak PAL chip $19.95 
Guide to CoCo III Graphics $21.95 



Better CoCoIII Graphics $24.95 
CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 
512K CoCo III Computer $299.95 



All orders plus $3 8/H (Foreign $5) - COD add $2 extra - NYS Residents add Sales ' 

Most orders shipped from stock. Allow 1-3 weeks for processing backorders. 

e MMMMM v ************ ^^^aaa^^ nu uu MHHBBB jaflaJw WWWfc vvvvv^bbb^ y flflfflflflflfflfc BR Uiiiiiiiiit ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^m 

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nnn n bs .'Tv.v nn jbbb ^g^Br n hbhwht to *m *m ni n nx 

^T^^^ ffiuuuji QBuunD Bfi njoMMAfflP HOP wXr JBOC HT^^^ fl^^^^fl hmmmim h TOiuuuuOT Mb^^^n QDuuu0 Bfi 



BOX S64 
HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 

COCO HOT LINE 71B-B3B-1344 




Tranquility Base 

James Upperman 

James of Amlin, Ohio, 
created this graphic of 
the aerospace outpost 
with a basic drawing 
utility he wrote. He is an 
architect and has had a 
Color Computer for 
about 4'/2 years. 





Unicorn 

James Stewart 

James of Highland Falls, 
New York, created this 
dreamland in basic on the 
C0C0 3. He is confined to 
a wheelchair and does his 
programming with a 
mouthstick. 



July 1QQ . 




created" £ u M so. i#* se this 
ho* » d,splaV „ ori hv someone else. > 

rt 11S wwthW °^lr V e d images ; d 

e lse*we. ft _° « ^ nol ?° °^« 6 , one tot me 
a boofc or foa9« t puzesou on( j pf'W 



1 





Spring Window 

Logan Ward 

Color Max 3 and the 
CoCo 3 were used to 
create this varie- 
gated scene. Logan 
lives in Memphis, 
Tennessee, and is a 
technician for The 
Computer Center. 



HONORABLE MENTION 




The Oval Prism Ron Stanwood 

This bright and colorfuf graphic was 
created on the CoCo 3 with a program Ron 
wrote. He is an independent software 
designer in Langley, British Columbia. 




& 



:®C® D 

Liberty 

Thomas White 

CoCo Draw was used to 
visualize "Liberty 
Enlightening the World." 
Thomas lives in Mission 
Viejo, California. He 
enjoys art, bicycling and 

his CoCo. 




?Mv?S. THE 
' | ', STATUE 

OF '■ 
LIBERTY 



-1. -» M , 



• i 

i 

• i 



TOfl 
IKETE 





Juty 



1987 



THE 



By Ingrid Lawrence 
and Mark Bourdeaux 



From sea to shining sea, the United States is celebrating 
its 211th birthday this year and we are in the spirit! 
For your listening pleasure, we have combined 
submissions from two RAINBOW readers who are program- 
ming patriots. 

Ingrid Lawrence salutes the Hag with her rendition of 
"The Star-Spangled Banner." Mark Bourdeaux adds to the 
festivities with "America the Beautiful," "My Country Tis 
of Thee" and "The Stars and Stripes Forever." But these 
songs are not for the ears only; there are stirring graphics, 
too. So come on and join us in wishing the U.S. a very happy 
birthday! □ 

Ingrid Lawrence lives in Elkton, Ohio, where she attends 
Beaver Local School. Ingrid is 14 years old and enjoys 
programming her 64 K CoCo. 

Mark Bourdeaux is a freshman at Western High School 
in Spring Arbor, Michigan. Mark is 14 years old and enjoys 
computing, golf and basketball. 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



The Amazing A-BUS\& 



o 

QC 
QC 






An A-BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter in foreground 

The A-BUS system works with the original CoCo, 

theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 



Aboutthe A-BUS system: 

All IhP A-BUS cards are vnrv easy to use with any language that can 
>ad nr write to a Port or Memory In BASIC, use INP and OUTtor PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

it cnmpatibln with each other You can mix and match up to 25 
cards 1 application Card addresses are easily set with jumpers 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-123) and 
detailed manuals i including schematics and programming examples) 

Relay Card re-140: $129 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts SPSD individually 
controlled and latched 8 LED's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC) Card address is lumper selectable 

Reed Relay Card re-156: $99 

>ame features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays lo switch low level signals 
(20mA max) Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card ad 142: $129 

Eight analog inputs 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 100V by adding a 
resistor 8 bit resolution (20mV) Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc. Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter aism 46: $1 39 

This analoq to diqital converter is accurate to .025% Input range is — 4V to 
-HV Resolution 1 millivolt The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read mic sion time 15 1 30ms Ideal lor thermocouple 

Strain gauge etc 1 char' <pand to 8 channels using the RE-156 card) 

Digital Input Card in-i41:$59 

The eirjhl inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"Ofl/otr devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops etc to your 
computer To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK) 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-i48:$65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O Uses the 8255A chip 

Clock with Alarm cl-144: $89 

Powerful clock/calend battery backup for Time. Date and Alarm 
sotting (time and date); built in alarm relay Jed and buzzer: timing to 1/100 
second Ea?y to use decimal format Lithium battery included 

Touch Tone' Decoder ph-i45:$79 

Each lone is converted into a number which is stored on the board Simply 
read (he number with INP nr POKE Use for remote control protects etc 

A-BUS Prototyping Card pr-i52-.$is 

3'6 by 4M? in with power and ground bus Fits up to 10 I C s 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable tc connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 




^^^^ 




AD-142 



Smart Stepper Controller sc-i49:$299 

World's finest stepper controller On board microorocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
'Move arm 1 0.2 inches left" Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored m the on board memory For each axis, you can control 
coordinate (relativeor absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half full, wave) 
scale factor unils. holding power, etc Many inputs: 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, elc On the fly reporting of position, speed etc On 
board drivers (350mA) for small steppers (MO-t 03) Sendfor SC-1 49 flyer 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive lo 5 amps per phase For two motors (eight drivers). 
Breakout Board Option BB-1 22: $1 9 

For easy connection of 2 motors 3 ft cable ends with screw terminal board 

Stepper Motor Driver st-i43:$79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control The special package 
(below) includes everything you need to get familiar with them Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V bidirectional 4 phase. 350mA per phasei 
Special Package: 2motors(M0-103) +ST-143 PA-1 81 : $99 

Stepper Motors mo-i 03: $1 5 or4 tor$39 

Pancake type. 2V*" dia. Vi" shaft. 7.5 '/step. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec 12V 36 ohm. bipolar. 5 oz-in torque same as Airpax K82701-P2 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer. 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter, 4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter Counter Timer Voice Recognition 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot AR-1 33 $69 

Tandy 1000 1000 EX &SX. 1200. 3000 Usesoneshortslol AR-133...S69 

Apple IIJI+ lie. Uses any slot AR-134 $49 

TRS-80 Model 102 200 Pluqs into 40 pin system bus" AR-136 $69 

Model 100 Uses40 pin socket (Sockelisduplicatedon adapter) AR-135 $69 

TRS-80 Mod3.4.4D Fils50pinbus (Withharddisk useV-cableV AR-132 $49 

TRS-80 Model 4 P Includes extra cahle (5 Op in bus is recessed) AR-137 $62 

TRS-80 Model I Piiiqs into 40 pin I/O bus on KB or E/l AR-1 31 $39 

Color Computers (Tandy)fits ROM slot Muitioak. or Y-cabie AR-138...S49 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft, so cond.) ca-163: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i20:$99 

Each Motherboard holds live A-BUS cards A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 
161 $12). Up to five Motherboards can be joined this way to a single A- 
BUS adapter Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included 
• Tlie A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 



kdd S3. 00 per order for shipping. 

Msa. MC. checks, M O welcome. 
CT A NY residents add sales tax. 
C.O.O. add S3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is S5 
Overseas add 10% 





a S>9ma inouvr<m$ ComptOf 



242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



Technical info (203) 656-1806 

g2SV8 ly 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern lime 



You'll use it all the time and love using it 



What isCoCo Max? 

Simply the most incredible graphic 
and text creation "system" you have 
ever seen. A Hi-Res Input Pack (more 
on the pack later) is combined with 
high speed machine language 
software. The result will dazzle you. 




CoCo Max disk systam, with Y- cable. 

Is CoCo Max for you ? 

Anyone who has ever held a pencil or 
a crayon for fun, school or business 
will love it. A 4 year-old will have fun 
doodling, a 1 5 year-old will do class 
projects and adults will play with it for 
hours before starting useful 
applications (illustrations, cards, 
artwork, business graphics, flyers, 
charts, memos, etc.) This is one of the 
rare packages that will be enjoyed by 
the whole family. 

What made CoCo Max an 
instant success? 

First there's nothing to learn, no 
syntax to worry about. Even a child 
who can't read will enjoy CoCo Max. 
Its power can be unleashed by simply 
pointing and clicking with your 
mouse or joystick. With icons and 
pull down menus, you control CoCo 
Max intuitively; it works the same way 
you think. 

Don't be misled by this apparent 
simplicity. CoCo Max has more power 
than you thought possible. Its blinding 
speed will astound you. 
It lets you work on an area 3.5 times 
the size of the window on the screen. 
It's so friendly that you will easily 
recover from mistakes: The undo 
feature lets you revert to your image 
prior to the mistake. As usual, it only 
takes a single click. 
Later, we will tell you about the 
"typesetting" capabilities of CoCo 
Max II, but first let's glance at a few of 
its graphic creation tools: 



With the pencil you can draw free 
hand lines, then use the eraser to 
make corrections or changes. For 
straight lines, the convenient rubber- 
banding lets you preview your lines 
before they are fixed on your picture. 
It's fun and accurate. Lines can be of 
any width and made of any color or 
texture. 

The paint brush, with its 32 
selectable brush shapes, will adapt to 
any job, and make complicated 
graphics or calligraphy simple. 
For special effects, the spray can is 
really fun: 86 standard colors and 
textures, all available at a click. It's 
like the real thing except the paint 
doesn't drip. 

CoCo Max will instantly create many 
shapes: circles, squares, rectangles 
(with or without rounded corners), 
ellipses, etc. Shapes can be filled with 
any pattern. You can also add 
hundreds of custom patterns to the 
86 which ars included. 

The Glyphics are 58 small drawings 
(symbols, faces, etc.) that can be used 
as rubber stamps. They're really great 
for enhancing your work without effort. 




Pull down menus 



Zoom In I 



Control Over Your Work 

CoCo Max's advanced "tools" let you 
take any part of the screen, (text or 
picture) and perform many feats: 
• You can move it around • Copy 
it • Shrink or enlarge it in both 
directions • Save it on the electronic 
Clipbook • Flip it vertically or 
horizontally • Rotate it • Invert 
it • Clear it, etc. etc. 
All this is done instantly, and you can 
always undo it if you don't like the 
results. 

For detail work, the fat bits (zoom) 
feature is great, giving you easy 
control over each pixel. 
To top it all, CoCo Max II works in 
color. Imagine the pictures in this ad 
in color. If you own a Radio Shack 
CGP-220 or CGP-1 1 5, you can even 
print your work in full color ! 



There is so much more to say, such as 
the capability to use CoCo Max 
images with your BASIC programs, 
the possibility to use CoCo Max's 
magic on any standard binary image 
file. There are also many advanced 
features such as the incredible lasso. 




Inside the Hl-Res Input Pack 

Why a Hi-Res Input Pack ? 

Did you know that the CoCo joystick 
input port can only access 4096 
positions (64x64)? That's less than 
1 0% of the Hi-Res screen, which has 
491 52 points! (256x1 92). You lose 
90% of the potential. The Hi-Res Input 
Pack distinguishes each of the 491 52 
distinct joystick or mouse positions. 
That's the key to CoCo Max's power. 
The pack plugs into the rom slot (like 
a rom cartridge). Inside the pack is a 
high speed multichannel analog to 
digital converter. Your existing 
joystick or mouse simply plugs into 
the back of the Hi-Res Pack. 

Electronic Typesetting... 

You'll be impressed with CoCo Max's 
capability. Text can be added and 
moved around anywhere on the 
picture. (You can also rotate, invert 
and flip it...) At a click, you can choose 
from 1 4 built in fonts each with 1 6 
variations. That's over 200 typestyles ! 




Examples of printouts 



Printing Your Creations 

There are a dozen ways to print your 
work. All are available with a click of 
your joystick (or mouse) without 
exiting CoCo Max. Your CoCo Max 
disk includes drivers for over 30 
printers ! 



All the CoCo Max pictures are unretouched screen shots or printouts (Epson RX-80). 





Jemaon Report 



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no mfljoe hews today 



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Publish a newsletter 
or bulletin 



coco Man 

COCO H«H 



CoCo 

CoCo Mq% 
CoCo Max 



CoCo max 
CoCo max 

CoCo max 
CoCo max 

CoCo Max 
CoCo Max 



CoCo t\ax 
CoCo ttux 

CoCo /tox 
CoCo Alax 



<£^& iter 




T/ie whole family will enjoy 
CoCo Max. Here are a few 
examples of the possibilities. 

All these pictures are unretouched screen photos 
or printouts (on an Epson RX-80). 




AMERICAN 



SCHNOID 



ma?* 



Pulley 



PROFIT .1 

2*< 



Fun for children while 
stimulating creativity* 




©Business graphs, cherts, 
diagrams, Atso memos 



CAR T 




©Video portrait 
(with optional digitizer). 



Junior's homework 
^£ Bn d science projects. 
Term papers too f 




is 

Ct COrloon 




ItttM 



Over 200 typestyles to 
choose from I 
generate flyers. 




^0 This is a cartoon. 



CoCotiaxW 



4 now way to express 
your imagination. 



schematics 
and floor plans* 



I CoCo Mai II 



7) Logos and tetterheet 



CoCo Max II 



now works 
with the 



CoCo 3 



The new CoCo Max II has exactly the same features and resolution (256 x 192) as the original CoCo Max If 



System Requirements: 

Any 64K CoCo and a standard joystick or mouse. (Koala 
pads and track balls work, but are not recommended.) 
Disk sy si ems need n MLiMi-Pak or our Y-Cable CoCo Max 
Is compatible wUh any Radio Shack DOS & ADOS, 
Note: the tape version o' CoCo Mn* mdudes almost all 
the teal ores of CoCo Max u except shunk. Siretcn, Rotate, 
andGiyphtcs Also, II has 5 fonts instead of 14. 
CoCo Max is nol compatible with J DOS. OouWeDOS, 
MDOS t OS*9, ihe X-pad find Daisy Wheel Printers 

Printers Supported: 

Hoion MX. RX. FX iind LX merles. Gemini Sinr Micro nix Delia 
10 tOX 15 i5X.SG-IO,Okidataa2A 92 ItohPro-vyriler 
Apple Imaoe-wnier Hewletl-Ppickucit Thinkiel, Radio Shach 
DMP too. 105. 1 1 0^ 120. 200. 400, 500. Line Printer 7. Line 
Pr>nter8 TRPOOO, CGP-220 tDMP-1 lOuBeLinePnnterVllh 
PMC prmlerB Gorilla Banana 
Colur printmcj CGP^OOb COP'1 15 



New Video Digitizer DS-69B 

This Low Cost Digitizer is the next stepm sophist- 
ication for your CoCo Max system. With the DS- 
69B you will be able to digitize and bring into 
CoCo Max a frame from any video source, such as 
your VCR, tuner, or video camera 
Works with any CoCo. 8 frames per second. 
Includes software on disk . ... $149.95 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with it, 
we will refund every penny. 



Pricing 

CoCo Max on tape S69.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manu.il 

CoCo Max II (on diskonly) $79,95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

Upgrade to make CoCo Max (I compat- 
ible with the CoCo 3: Send your CoCo 
Max Hi-Res Pak (the cartridge) to us. We 
will modify it and return it to you. Enclose 
payment of $29.95 

Y-Cable: Special Price, S 1 9.95 

Super Picture Disks #1, #2, and #3 

each: $14.95 

All three picture disks . S29-95 



Add S3, 00 per order for ihipprng. 
Vila, MC. checki. M+O, welcome 
CT & NY raiment* add tales tax. 
C O D, add $3 DO extra. 
Canada; shipping la 55 
Gveraaan add 1 0% 



GOLORWAREl 



242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 

A division of Stqma Industries. Inc 



Technical info (203) 656-1606 

&°p y 800 221-0916 

Conner licul oiaers (203) 348-9436 

aii hoes open weekdays 5 id 5 Eastern time 



Listing 1: SSBRNNER 



^ — 

<S/f 110 137 

V 170 136 

400 75 

656 151 

END 85 



T 



1 1 INGRID LAWRENCE 

3 'PO BOX 2 3 

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4j3 PRINT 11 



ii 



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10 CLS 

80 PRINT @ 9 6, 11 OH 1 SAY CAN YOU S 
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L8 ; A ; B ; 04 ; L4 ; C ; 03 ; L4 ; E ; F # ; L2 ; G" 



The Rainbow Introductory Guide to 





Most people have been using statistics since they learned 
to talk. Statistical results and concepts turn up everywhere. 
A large part of our daily news consists of statistics. Results 
of opinion polls, surveys, research studies, the Dow Jones 
industrial average and, of course, our sports news are all 
statistics. But statistics are often misused. The informed 
person needs to understand the basic concepts in order to 
judge the appropriateness of applications. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor Dr. Michael Plog and co- 
author Dr. Norman Stenzel have written The Rainbow 
Introductory Guide to Statistics just for beginners. It is an 
easy-to-understand guide to this sometimes mysterious area 
o£ mathematics. Their aim is to introduce readers to the 
realm of statistical processes and thinking, and they believe 
that the Tandy Color Computer is an ideal machine for the 
reduction of data. 

Sharpen your skills with The Rainbow Introductory 
Guide to Statistics for only $6.95. Included in the book is 
the CoCo-Stat program, a BASIC statistics program just for 
the Color Computer. (80-column printer required.) Forget 
the typing hassle by ordering the accompanying Statistics 
Tape or Disk for only $5.95. Spend your time learning and 
enjoying the new material, not debugging your typing. Just 
pop in the tape or disk and you're ready for action! 



Save when you buy The Rainbow Introductory Guide to 
Statistics book together with the tape or disk. Get both for 
only $11.95. 



Please send me: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Book S6.95* 

The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk $5.95 
The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Book/ Disk Set $ 1 1 .95 



Name 



Address 
Ciiv _ 



.Stale 



ZIP 



□ Mv check in the amount of. 



.is enclosed' 



I 



Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Acct. No. Exp. Date 

Signature 

Mail to: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics. The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385. Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 

*Add $1,50 per book for shipping and handling in ihc U.S. Outside ihe U.S. add $4 per 
book (U,S, currency only)- Kcniucky residents add 5% sales lax. In order to hold down 
costs, wc do not bill. Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. 

Note: The tape and disk arc not stand-alone products. If you buy cither the tape or disk, 
you still need to purchase the book for instructions. 



24 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



C0MPUT1ZE, INC. • (215) 946-7260 • P.O. BOX 207 • LANGHORNE, PA 19047 




r iM ■ I ■ t • • ' I - r 

' . .,1 

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ine vJ^PvOTipuierf 
GRAPHICOM FEATURES: 4 page animation 
mode, Send/Receive pictures over modem • 
multiple Hi-Res fonts • Utility for transferring 
Graphicom screens to basic or M/L programs 
• Built in Hi- Res screen print program • 
Send/Receive slow scan TV 
Many additional features, operating hints 
hardware mod's and suggestions, elc Re- 
quires 64K CoCo. i disk drive, and 2 analog 
joysticks 

Order Catalog* 1 1 1 GO. See RAINBOW REVIEW (4/84 
on page 225) 

GRAPHICOM DISK $24.95 



Ofimui nniK urnii MCWffciC 
i nn • > Mini t • ■ »n i 

a ai t:i 




3 



i nifil 



Lira pn ico m Pari II requiresT^viKC^o;^ 

III) and disk drive, it will load and save ooth 
STANDARD/BIN liles and GRAPHICOM 
screens GRAPHICOM PART II does NOT re- 
quire Graphicom to RUN! 

Graphicom Part II is a video processing 
package that provides many functions lhat are 
missing in GRAPHICOM Here are just a few 
of the features provided by Graphicom Part li. 
Enlarge/Reduce/Rotale • Muti-pattern Paint 
• Pan & Zoom • Typesetter & Font Edilor • 
Pixel 8laster. GRAPHICOM PART II does NOT 
require Graphicom to RUN 1 

Order Catalog* 132WO. Seo RAINBOW REVIEW 
(11/85 on pago 209) 

GRAPHICOM PART II DISK $24.95 



DM1RIUUKD &V f. Ilni'iil 17 > INC 




1*1 {••» 


T 










■♦^ 


ID 


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® 




.0 



(Ql 904 MH1 T F S m I T H U: 1 .0 



HARDCOPY is more lhat jusl a^^Eh pnn 
utility, compare these features with any other 
graphic dump program on the market: Gray 
Scale or 8&W printouts. 1x1 2x2. 3x3, 
Lables. posters, and greating cards with your 
graphics and much much more 1 See 
RAINBOW REVIEW (10/85) on page 21B) 
HARDCOPY requires a 64K CoCo (I. II. or III) 
and disk drive. Please specify printer and 
catalog W when ordering 

IDS 4B0/S60G C« I70WO • OKI 8?A (Ok.gtaphl C* 179WO • 
OKlOATA 97 C» 17IW0 • GEMINI IOX C« I74WD ■ GEMINt SO 
iQ/lO C» 17BV.D • DMP-105 C» 18T\ND ' DMP-110. C* 160WO • 
OMP-120 C» I76WI) ■ OMP-nD Z» 1B2W0 ■ OMP-20O C« 
175WO • CGP??0 C* 161 WO • EPSOM LX-aO. C* t?3W0 • EPSON 
MX-OD C» 17?WD • EPSON HX/tt BD C# I73W0 ■ RHEMAN 
PLUS C# 177WO 



HARDCOPY DISK 



$29.95 



• Ml III I I Mil I I I'KINII H Mill I I V 

r. p li i 



QIP 



l im-j win Tiisini r mi o 

»H ■ICIMt HLM !• Ul i' 




Arising COLORSCAN. new sottware tor 
the CGP-220 and your 64K CoCo (I. II. III). 
This program is a must for anyone who owns 
a Radio Shack Ink Jet Printer, and enjoys 
creating graphics with Graphicom. Graphicom 
Part II. CoCo MAX. or any other program (hat 
produces a standard 6K binary picture files 
COLORSCAN will print program listings in 
blazing color. Help create colorful banners up 
to 55 inches in length, produce 1x1/2x2 or 
poster printout of your tavorile 6K graphic 
disk files 

Order Catalog* 184WD, Seo RAINBOW REVIEW 
(1/87 page 136) 

COLORSCAN DISK $29.95 



• • ♦ • • » • * - • • . . • • 

• • •* • • .... . ■ • • . . 

• • v* - - - . . . . . - • » - • - • 
>• • • wm •• •» *• *• «» 

«*•*•• «• ....-» •*••*• 

• • • • •••••» - • - * - 

COLOMSCAN in 0€ . PflINT UMl I»t 




COMPUTIZE, INC. • (215) 946-7260 • P.O. BOX 207 • LANGHORNE, PA 19047 




Our 
Fourth 
Adventure 
Contest 



Time passes quickly as you use your nimble fingers to escape 
the very passion that consumes you. Thoughts are fleeting at 
a time in which you need them most. The spidery web of 
mystery and intrigue you have spun is now entangling you. Every 
breath you take . . . Every move you make ... Is it correct? Will it even 
accomplish the task at hand? Is there any time left? 

No, we don't mean to imply time is nearly up for our Fourth 
Adventure Contest. Plenty of time remains. However the final 
deadline for your entry in this contest is August 15, 1987 - a date 
that is rapidly approaching. So, you'd better get started soon, if you 
haven't already begun. 

What? No ideas, you say? Just take a look around you! Your 
everyday life presents you with hundreds. Just sit down and start now! 
We await the very best you have to offer. If you want some pointers, 
check out "The Adventure Writer's Toolkit" (April 1985, Page 105) by 
Eric W. Tilenius. Or, for another helping hand, see "The Adventure 
Processor"' (August 1986, Page 26) by Bill Cook. These articles, and 
many more, are Just what you need to get started on the right track. 

Your Adventure can be written for a 4K early model CoCo, or it 
can be written to take advantage of all the features in a 512K CoCo 
3. It can be written under Disk basic, or it might be a creation in 

BASIC09. 



Judging: The judges of the Fourth Rainbow Adventure Contest will be looking fa several 
things in each entry. In addition to ensuring each submission is complete, they will consider 
the following: 

• Originality • Vocabulary and Grammar 

• Creativity • Responsiveness 

• Programming Efficiency « Level of Challenge 

• Clarity of Instructions • Enjoyment 

• Ease of Use 

The judges will also be concerned with the "publishability" of each Adventure. A shorter 
program is easier to fit into print (both in THE RAINBOW and any subsequent Adventure 
book) as well as being easier for the reader to type in. While the use of graphics tends 
to enhance any program, graphics are not necessary for an Adventure to win. The winning 
entry will be chosen for its unique appearance. Make your Adventure stand above the 
rest! 

RULES: Your submission should include all programs and information needed to set up and 
run the Adventure. All programs must be sent on tape or disk with several saves of each 
program including at least one ASCII save. If an Adventure cannot be loaded, It cannot 
be judged. We will not type in even the shortest of programs! Hard copy of all program 
listings and instructions must also be included. If your Adventure uses machine language 
routines, oil source code, as well as assembled object code, should be included on the 
tape or disk. Indicate the minimum CoCo system required to run your Adventure and 
include a complete solution! 

Please, don't use packed lines that can't be LiSTed or LLISTed for the benefit of our readers. 
Your program should run on standard Radio Shack equipment without requiring any 
special modifications and should not rely on commercial software for its execution. The 
only exception is the use of the OS-9 operating system (level I and Level II) and BASIC09. 
If your Adventure uses graphics, make sure the graphics are self-contained. In other words, 
don't submit a program that loads several different graphics screens unless those graphics 
are aeated by a publishable program included in the submission. 

In summary, send a complete package. Put the accompanying article, documentation, 
listings, complete instructions and solution, and cover letter on paper. Include your name, 
address and telephone number on each page of all materials. Be sure to write-protect 
your disk or punch out the tabs on your cassette to avoid accidental erasure, and label 
each with the name of the program(s) and your name and address. As In any contest 
packaging does make a difference. 
Your entry must be postmarked no later than August 15. 1 987, in error-free condition. Each 



entrant will receive a free pass to the RAINBOWfest of his or her choice. You may also win 
one of the many prizes donated by our generous advertisers as well as have your program 
published in THE RAINBOW. So, get a move on! Write it up. put it together and send it 

to: 

Adventure Contest Editor, Rainbow Magazine, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, 
P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Additional Rules: All entries must be original, unpublished and unmarketed works (no 
"conversions"). No programs that have been placed in the public domain are eligible. 
All entries become the properly of Ralsoft Inc., publisher of the THE RAINBOW. The decisions 
of the judges will be final. Duplicate prizes will be awarded in the event of a tie. Winning 
entries will be featured In a future issue of THE RAINBOW. 

Prizes: Following is partial list of the prizes the winners of our 
Fourth Rainbow Adventure Contest will be receiving. And. 
many more prizes are being donated each day! 



Tandy /Radio Shack 

Tandy Home 
Education Systems 



Computer Island 



Frank Hogg 
Laboratory, Inc. 

Howard Medical 
HJL Products 

Computize 

RAINBOW'S Delphi 
SIGs 



Diecom Products 



Computer Plus 
Derringer Software 

Speech Systems 



Tom Mix Software 
Spectrum Projects 



CompuServe 

Microcom Software 
Sugar Software 



DMP-106 Printer 
VIDTEX 

Creative Exploration Series 
Spectaculator 
Hands On 

Problem Solving Series 
Cooperative Strategy Series 

Chemistry Tutor 
Area & Perimeter 
Division of Fractions 
Quadratic Equations Tutor 
Distance Problems 
Cloze Exercises 
First Games 

The CoCo Wheel of Fortune 

Inside OS-9 Level II (5 books) 

Zenith 12" Amber Video Monitor 

Softswitch Auto/Manual Printer 
Switch with cables 

Color Max 3 (2 programs) 

Three five-hour free evenings in 
your choice of the CoCo or OS-9 
Online SIGs. 

Bouncing Boulders 
Caludril 

Lansford Mansion 

Color Computer 2 

Pro-Color-Series Enhanced Ver- 
sion 2.1 

Super Voice Speech Synthesizer 
includes Text-to-Speech Transla- 
tor Program 

Worlds of Flight (2 programs) 

Three Book Set: 
CoCo III Secrets Revealed 
The History of the CoCo 
basic Programming Tricks 

IntroPak - An Introductory Sub- 
scription (3 IntroPaks) includes 
$15 usage credit 

Utility Routines Volume II 

Trig Attack 



$200 
$30 

$99 



$30 
$20 
$20 
$20 
$20 
$20 
$25 
$20 

$40 ea. 
$150 

$140 
$60 ea. 



$36 ea, 
$29 
$39 
$39 

$100 
$80 



$80 

$35 ea. 



$50 



$15 ea 

$30 

$20 



26 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



140 PLAY B$ 
15 J3 CLS 

160 PRINT@96, "OH! SAY DOES THAT 
STAR SPANGLED BANNER YET WAVE, 0 
•ER THE LAND OF THE FREE, AND T 
HE HOME OF THE BRAVE. 

170 C$="03 ; L4 ; G ; 04 ; L4 ; C ; C ; L8 ; C ; O 
3 ;L8 ;B;L4 ;A;A;A;04 ;L4 ;D;L8 ;F;E;D 
; C ; L4 ; C ; 03 ; L3 ; B ; L8 ; G ; G ; 04 ; L3 ; C ; L 
8 ; D ; E ; F ; L2 ; G ; L8 ; c ; D ; L3 ; E ; L8 ; F ; L4 
;D;L1;C" 



18j3 


PLAY 


c$ 


19j3 


CLS 




rs. rt /~t 

20fd 


CLS 


(5) 


2j35 


FOR 


A = 2 TO 27 


2J36 


SET 


(A, 1,3) 


2j37 


NEXT 


A 


21J3 


SET 


(If 1/3) 


22j3 


SET 


(1,2,3) 


23j3 


SET 


(1,3,3) 


24j3 


SET 


(1/4,3) 


25j3 


SET 


(1,5,3) 


orf 

26j3 


SET 


(1,6,3) 


27(5 


SET 


(1/7,3) 


28j3 


SET 


(1,8,3) 


29j3 


SET 


(1/9,3) 


r-\ ri ri 

3J3J3 


SET 


( 1 / 10 / 3 ) 


31j3 


SET 


(1/11/3) 


^ <N /T< 

32j3 


SET 


(1, 12 # 3) 


^ 

33j3 


FOR 


B = 2 TO 2 7 


34j3 


SET 


(B,2,3) 


3 5j3 


NEXT 


B 


36j3 


FOR 


C = 2 TO 27 


37(5 


SET 


(C,2,3) 


39j3 


SET 


(C,3,3) 


4j3j3 


SET 


(C,4,3) 


410 


SET 


(C,5,3) 


420 


SET 


(C,6,3) 


430 


SET 


(C,7,3) 


440 


SET 


(C,8,3) 


450 


SET 


(C,9,3) 


460 


SET 


(C,10,3) 


470 


SET 


(C,ll,3) 


480 


SET 


(C, 12,3) 


490 


NEXT 


C 


500 


FOR 


D = 28 TO 63 


510 


SET 


(D,l,4) 


530 


SET 


(D,5,4) 


550 


SET 


(D,9,4) 


570 


SET 


(D,13,4) 


580 


NEXT 


D 


583 


FOR 


E = 1 TO 63 


585 


SET 


(E,17,4) 


590 


SET 


(E,21,4) 


600 


SET 


(E,25,4) 


610 


NEXT 


E 


650 


FOR 


F=l TO 63 


652 


SET 


(F,27,l) 


653 


SET 


(F,28,l) 



COLOR MAX 3 

The Choice for CoCo 3 Graphics' 

Simple "point and click" menus allow you to 
create the ultimate in graphic designs on your 
CoCo 3. Just check out some of its features. 

* 16 out of 64 Colors * 
' 320 X 200 resolution * 

* Pencil Draw * 

* Cut & Paste * 

* Lasso * 

* Built-in Fonts * 
' Pattern fills * 

COLOR MAX 3 requires a CoCo 3 with 128K, 
disk drive and Radio Shacks Hi-Res 
Joystick Interface 

Specify Printer when ordering: Epson MX, RX or FX 

STAR SG-10, DMP 130 

$59.95 

Compatibility with printers 
not listed is not guaranteed 
<NO-RETURNS> 



COLOR MAX FONTS 

Contains 40 additional Fonts to Use in Color 
Max 3. Professionally designed and easy 
to use. Just "click" on the filename and 

start typing. 

$29.95 



MAX FONTS 

Two different volumes of over 40 fonts each to 
use with CoCo MAX 1 or 2. Filenames appear 
in the "pull down" menu for easy access. 

$29.95 per Volume 



DERRINGER SOFTWARE, INC. 

P.O. Box 5300 Florence, SC 29502 

include for Shipping 
(S3 00 /S'i2 overseas or) 

Send Check or Money Order (No COD's) 
VISA/MC" Call: (803) 665-5676 
All programs on disk only 

'Chorge cord order subject \o 5% service chorge 



July 1987 THE RA/NBOW 27 



655 SET 


740 


SET 


( 11 , 7 , 5) 


656 SET f F . 3 1 . 1) 


750 


SET 


( 11 , 11 , 5) 


658 NEXT F 


160 

w x^ J™» 


SET 


15 , 3 , 5) 


66 0 PRINT @ 454 , 11 *** AMERICAN FLA 


110 


SET 


( 15 , 7 , 5) 




780 


SET 


(15,11,5) 

\ f r / 


670 SET (3,3,5) 


79j3 


SET 


( 19 , 3 , 5) 


680 SET (3,7,5) 


800 


SET 


( 19 , 7 , 5) 


690 SET (3,11,5) 


810 


SET 


( 19 , 11 , 5) 


100 SET (7,3,5) 


820 


SET 


(23 ,3.5) 


710 SET (7,7,5) 


830 


SET 


(23 ,7,5) 


120 SET (7,11,5) 


840 


SET 


(23 ,11,5) 


73j3 SET (11,3,5) 


850 


GOTO 


850 



Listing 2: USSONGS 



310 . 
450 . 
600 . 
770 . 
END 



143 
161 

.83 
.13 
188 



T 



10 J=0 

20 PMODE 3, 1:PCLS: SCREEN 1,0 
30 LINE(1, l)-(240, 130) , PSET, B 
40 LINE (1,1) - (95, 6,0) ,PSET,B 
50 FOR T=60 TO 12 0 STEP 10 
60 LINE(1,T)-(240,T) , PSET 
70 NEXT 

80 FOR Y=10 TO 50 STEP 10 
90 LINE(95,Y) -(240, Y) , PSET 
100 NEXT 

110 FOR T=5 TO 130 STEP 20 
120 PAINT(110,T) ,0,0 
130 NEXT 

140 FOR T=15 TO 125 STEP 20 
150 PAINT(99,T) ,2,0 
160 NEXT 

170 PAINT (5,5) ,3,0 

180 FOR T=2 TO 92 STEP 10 

190 FOR Z=5 TO 7 ' 

200 PSET(T,Z,2) 

210 NEXT: NEXT 

220 FOR T=2 TO 92 STEP 10 

230 FOR Z=18 TO 20 



240 PSET(T,Z,2) 

250 NEXT: NEXT 

260 FOR T=2 TO 9 2 STEP 10 

270 FOR Z=31 TO 33 

280 PSET(T,Z,2) 

290 NEXT: NEXT 

300 FOR T=2 TO 92 STEP 10 

310 FOR Z=44 TO 4 6 

320 PSET(T,Z,2) 

330 NEXT: NEXT 

340 FOR T=2 TO 92 STEP 10 

350 FOR Z=57 TO 59 

360 PSET(T,Z,2) 

370 NEXT: NEXT 

380 IF J=>1 THEN J=0:GOTO 470 
390 GOTO 530 

400 PLAY"V15T3L402FL3FL8DL4DDL3F 

L8CL4CDE-FGAL2FP8L4FL3FL8DL4DFL3 

FL8CL4CO+CO-BO+CDO-GO+L2CP80-L4F 

0+L3DL8DL4CO-B-L3B-L8AL4AB-0+CO- 

AGFL2B-P8L4B-L3B-L8GL4GL4B-L3B-L 

8FL4FFGB-FO+CO-L1B-" : GOSUB510 

410 PLAY"T2 " 

420 POKE 65495,0 

430 GOTO 670 

440 F0RA=1T02 : PLAY"L502L5FL16D01 
L4B-02DFL3B-03L5DL8C02L4B-DEL3FL 
8 FF03 L3 DL8 C02 L4 B-L3 AL8GAL4 B-B-FD 
01B-" : NEXT: PLAY"02L8DDL4DE-FL3FL 



A, 



fV 4? >t> 7 -a- ^ ^?<>/AsJ , & a* \^ C- 



V 




U,S. check 
money order 
RI residents 
please add 6% sales tax 

TEPCO 

30 Water Street 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 



28 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



8E-DL4CDE-L3E-03L4E-L3D02L4B-L3A 

L8GAL4 B-DEL3 FL4 FB-B-L8 B-AL4GGG03 

CL8E-DC02B-L4B-AL8FFL3B- 

45j3 PLAY"03L8CDE-L3F02L8B-03CL3D 

L8E-L4C02L2B-" :GOSUB51j3:GOSUB73j3 

:PIAY"02L4FFGL3EL8FL4GAAB-L3AL8G 

L4FGFEL2F03L4CCCL3C02L8B-L4AB-B- 

B-L3B-L8AL4GAL8V2 5B-AGFV3 1L3AL8B 

-03L4CL8D02B-L4AGL1F" : GOSUB 510 

460 GOSUB 79j3 

410 PLAY" T502 L3 DDL4 CO 1 BL3 BL4 A#BL 
1BL4 A# BL3 BL4 A # BO 2 L3 DO 1 L4 B02 DL1 CO 
1 L2 AL4 AL3 AL4 G # A L 3 AL4 G # A02 L 1 CO 1 L4 
BAB02L3DL4DL3EE01L1AL3A02DDL4C01 
BL3 BL4A#BL1BL4A#BL3BL4A#B02C01BL 
3AL8F#L1AL2GL4GL3GL4F#GL3B-AG02L 
1GL4 GOIGAB" 

480 PLAY"02D01GAB02L4D01DEBL1AL4 
GP404G" : GOSUB 51,0 : POKE 654 94,$:G 
OTO 390 

500 Z$=INKEY$:IF Z$= ,MI THEN 500 
510 LINE ( 1, 15J3 )- (23j3 , 185) , PRESET 
, BF 

52j3 RETURN 

530 A=0:B=2 : C=3 

54j3 A$=INKEY$ 

55j3 DRAW"BM8,18 5;C=A;U3j3Rlj3Llj3Dl 
5R5BM38 , 185 ; C=B ;U3j3Rlj3Dlj3Llj3D5Fl 
5BM68, 185;C=C;U3j3Rl$Llj3D15Rlj3Ll$ 
D15Rl$BM98,185;C=A;U3j3Rlj3Llj3D15R 
l$Llj3D15Rlj3BM128 , 185 ; C=B;U3J3F1#D 
lj3Glj3BM158 , 185 ; C=C ;U3 0R10D3 01.10B 
M188, 185;C=A;U3j3F10Elj3D3j3BM228, 1 

85 ; C=B ; U5C1 ; U5 ; C=B ;U2 0 " 

560 GOSUB 58J3 
57J3 GOTO 650 

580 A=A+1:IF A=l THEN A=2 

59 0 IF A=>4 THEN A=0 

600 B=B+1:IF B=l THEN B=2 

610 IF B=>4 THEN B=0 

620 C=C+1:IF C=l THEN C=2 

630 IF C=>4 THEN C=0 

640 RETURN 



650 IF A$="" THEN 54j3 
660 DRAW " C0 ": GOTO 400 
610 A=0 : B=2 : C=3 
680 B$=INKEY$ 

690 DRAW"BM4$, 185 ;C=A;Rl$U15Llj3U 

15Rlj3BM7 0 , 18 5 ; C=B ; U3j3Rlj3D15Llj3Rl 

J3D15BM1J3J3, 185Rlj3Llj3U3j3BM13#, 185; 

C=C;U3j3D3^Rlj3U3j3BM165,185;C=A;U3 

J3R5L1J3BM19J2), 18 5 ; C=B;U3j3Rlj3Llj2)D15 

Rlj3Llj3D15Rl^" 

100 GOSUB 580 

110 IF B$ = ,MI THEN 680 

120 DRAW"Cj3":GOTO 44j3 

130 A=3 : B=2 :C=j3 

74j3 C$=INKEY$ ' 

150 DRAW"BM3j3, 185;C=A;U3j3D3j3Rlj3B 

M65,18 5;C=B;L5Rlj3L5U3$R5Ll$BM9$, 

185;C=C;U3j3F5Dlj3L5R7F5Dlj3L9BM12j3 

,185;C=A;U3j3Rl$Llj3D15Rl$Llj3D15Rl 

0BK150, 18 5;C=B;U3j2)Rl#D15Llj3D5FlJ2) 

BM 185, 185;C=C;U3j3R5LllBM215, 185 

;C=A;U15E15G15H15" 

160 GOSUB 58j3 

77j3 IF C$= ,MI THEN 74j3 

180 DRAW "C0" : RETURN 

79j3 A=2 :B=j3:C=3 

800 D$=INKEY$ 

81j3 PCLS:PMODE3, l:SCREENl,j3 
820 IF J=l THEN GOTO 30 
830 J=J+1 
84j3 DRAW"C2" 

85j3 LINE(9$,27)-(9$,15j3) ,PSET 

860 LINE-(19j3,7j3) ,PSET 

87J3 LINE- ( 2J2) , 7 J3 ) , PSET 

88j3 LINE- (19$, 145) , PSET 

89$ LINE-(9$,3$) ,PSET I 

900 PAINT (95 ,40) ,2,2 

910 PAINT(16$,8$) ,2,2 

92$ PAINT {50,80} ,2,2 

930 PAINT(16$, 120) ,2,2 

940 PAINT (95,8$) ,2,2 

95$ PAINT(95, 12$) ,2,2 

960 RETURN /R\ I 



THIS IS IT.* THE HOT NEW PROGRAM FROM BOILING SPRINGS.* 
POLYTINT WILL ENABLE YOU TO RECOLOR YOUR PMODE3 AND PM0DE4 
IMAGES IN 16 BEAUTIFUL COLORS OF YOUR CHOICE. COLORING IS 
QUICKLY AND EASILY DONE BY A FRIENDLY NEW APPROACH . YOUR NEW 
COLORED PICTURES ARE SAVED IN ONLY THREE TO SIX GRANULES. 

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS. COCO 3. DISK DRIVE. RGB MONITOR. 

ORDER POLYTINT FROM :- BOILING SPRING LAKES SOFTWARE, 

P.O.BOX 2536 B.S.L. , SOUTHPORT 
NC 28461 TEL. (919) 845-2881 

MONEY ORDER OR CHECK. $17.50 PLUS $1.50 POSTAGE AND HANDLING. 

NC RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 5% SALES TAX. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 29 



The 
Perfect 
Disk 
Manager 

By A.L. McGarrity 



I suppose my personal search for the 
quintessential disk management 
utility really began almost the day 
I plugged in my first CoCo disk drive. 
After storing a few short test files, I 
eagerly typed DIR, and filename, exten- 
sion, file type, format, and number of 
granules appeared. I suppose 1 was 
relatively content with DIR at that 
moment — until I stored my 15th file. 
Whoops! Didn't an entry "roll off" the 
top of the screen? 

Reading a bit, 1 became acquainted 
with (but not very good at) the SHIFT- 
@ technique. There had to be a better 
way. 

Later, having obtained a GE Ter- 
miNet 300 to produce hard copy, 1 
encountered the first of several referen- 
ces to the "device number" poke: POKE 



Mr. McGarrity holds a BS in mechan- 
ical engineering from the Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology and has been design- 
ing teleprocessing applications for 
clients of General Electric Information 
Services since 1967. He took up micro- 
computers as a hobby about two years 
ago. 



111,254:DIR. I could finally view the 
entire directory at one time. Still, by 
now I had been through the RS Disk 
Manual with a fine-toothed comb and 
knew that just about all the information 
I could ever want was there on Track 
17. 

At about this time, Michael Plog's 
article and program on a printed direc- 
tory appeared in RAINBOW (March 
1983, Page 126). The format was partic- 
ularly handy, because it printed the 
directory entries into columns: When 
cut out and folded in half, it made a nice 
record to tuck in the jacket with the 
disk. 1 quickly added a number of 
enhancements (sorted filenames, time 
and date, suppression of the printing of 
deleted filenames, and the option of 
printing the File Allocation Table) and 
still use it today. 

The next thing that attracted my 
attention was Melvin Hefter's article in 
the July 1983 rainbow (Page 152), 
describing his program to provide a 
granule trace for each file. I had just 
encountered an incident where DOS 
had obviously become a bit confused 
and allocated some of the same granules 
to several different files. This hasn't 
happened again, but Melvin's program 
was useful in helping me salvage what 
I could from that disk before re- 
initializing it. Also, when one of the 
many published disk-checking pro- 
grams advises you that, say, Track 10, 
Sector 6, Granule 20 is bad, it allows 
you to immediately see which program 
is damaged. 

Then Marvin Swan's comprehensive 
Handler utility was published in the 
November 1984 rainbow (Page 100), 
providing interesting composite infor- 
mation across all disks. Although I 
found the package as a whole a bit time- 
consuming for my own regular use, I 
was intrigued by the calculation of the 
total number of bytes in each file. I 
think there are at least two good reasons 
for having this information handy. 
First, it provides a fairly reliable clue in 
comparing two versions (copies) of the 
same program to determine whether 
they are identical — if the totals agree, 
they probably are. 

Second, when you see, for example, 
that you have accumulated three or four 



RAINBOW ON DISK - ,04/87 



,04/28/87 



FILENAME 


EXT 


TYP 


FMT 


GR 


BYTES 

USED LOST 


NS 


ODD 




GRANULE 


3 WRITER 


BAS 


BAS 


3IN 


3 


6 , 608 


3,04 


8 


208 


50 


51 


52 


ADDITION 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


3 


4, 617 


2 , 295 


1 


9 


53 


54 


55 


BASEBALL 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


1,098 


1 , 2,0 6 


5 


74 


21 






BLUEBERT 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


2 , 169 


135 


9 


121 


39 






CEMENT 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


1,072 


1,232 


5 


48 


24 






CHECKS 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


818 


1,486 


4 


50 


25 






CIRCLES 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


221 


2 ,083 


1 


221 


18 






COCOCALC 


BAS 


BAS 


3IN 


3 


4,810 


2,1.02 


1 


202 


29 


30 


31 


EASTER 


BAS 


BAS 


3IN 


4 


6,978 


2 ,238 


1 


66 


35 


36 


37 38 


FIFTHDIM 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


1,-035 


1,269 


5 


11 








FREEZER 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


3 


5, 279 


1,633 


3 


159 


6 


7 


8 


GRAPHS 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


2 


2,308 


2,300 


1 


4 


9 


10 




GROCERY 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


1, 597 


707 


7 


61 


20 






HURRTRAK 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


5 


11,418 


102 


9 


154 


1 


2 


3 4 


INPUT 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


1,302 


1,002 


6 


22 


49 






IPOPPER 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


216 


2 ,088 


1 


216 


19 






LIFESKL6 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


3 


5 ,984 


928 


6 


96 


26 


27 


28 


LISTER 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


670 


1,634 


3 


158 


64 






MENU 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


2 


2 ,366 


2,242 


1 


62 


33 


34 




MPG 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


1,630 


674 


7 


94 


23 






RECIPE 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


1,386 


918 


6 


1.06 


22 






RNDROBIN 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


3 


6, 499 


413 


8 


99 


46 


47 


48 


ROMANS 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


2,055 


249 


9 


7 


58 






SAUCER 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


3 


4 , 652 


2 , 260 


1 


44 


43 


44 


45 


SPINNER 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


1 


281 


-2,023 


2 


25 


17 






SPREAD 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


5 


11, 179 


341 


8 


171 


59 


60 


61 62 


WORDGUES 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


3 


6, 160 


752 


7 


16 


14 


15 


16 


YARDSALE 


BAS 


BAS 


BIN 


3 


6,468 


444 


8 


68 


12 


13 


11 


TOTALS 








66 


110,079 


41,985 












AVAILABLE 








2 


4 , S08 















63 



Sample output from DI5KDRTR. 



30 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



M 



MicroWorld 



in CT o 



AF 



O R O ^ B- l_ e: 





4> o / 


CoCo III 


$169 


T Drive 0 


$175 


CM-8 Mon i t or 


$248 


Deluxe Joys t i ck 


$ 24 


Joys ticks (pair) 


$ 13 


Mouse 


$40 


t Mul t iPak 


$63 


D i sk Storage Box 


(50)$8.50 


CCR-81 Cass.Rer. 


$42 



t Limited time only! 



Di sks(SS) 
Di sks ( DS) 

(Including 



$7 . 50/box 
$8.00/box 
Library Case) 



DWP-106 $159 
t DMP 130A-120cps $225 
DMP-430 $545 



Tandy 1000 EX 
Tandy 1000 SX 



$495 
$790 



VM-4 Monitor 
CM-5 Monitor 
CM- 1 1 Mon i tor 



$ 99 
$240 
$360 



CoCo 3 512K Upgrade 




$130 


Mul tiPak Upgrade (26 


-3024) 


$8 


MultiPak Upgrade (26 


-3124) 


$ 7 


0S-9 Level 2 




$63 .95 


Mini mum Order 


$1 5 .00 





# Please Note - Our ads are submitted 
early, so prices are subject to change!'! 
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understanding in this matter 



Method of Payment 
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C er-t " f i e d Check or Money 0rde<~ 
Persona": Checks - AHow 1 week 



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disk utility programs each containing 
400 to 500 bytes (but each taking up 
Ves of a disk), it suggests the need to 
combine them into a single file for 
storage efficiency. In the simplest case, 
you can just RUN 1000, RUN 2000 5 etc. 
If you want to get a little fancier, you 
can add a short "menu" program (at the 
lowest range ofline numbers) informing 
the user what is available, should he 
neglect to type a line number after RUN. 

With this rich background of ideas, 
I carefully considered what information 
1 most wanted in directory reporting for 
my expanding disk library (preferably 
in an Sl^-by-l 1 format), and the result 
is embodied in the programs Diskdata 
and Locator, 

Diskdata 

First, only currently stored files are 
listed, and these are sorted alphabeti- 
cally (using a fairly fast "pointer" 
sorting algorithm). Extension, file type, 
and file format are listed, along with the 
number of granules, bytes used, and 
total bytes lost — that is, the unused 
bytes in the last granule. The granules, 
bytes used, and bytes lost columns are 
totaled, so it will be evident what degree 
of storage efficiency you are achieving. 

Referring to the column headings, NS 
is the number of sectors used in the last 
granule ( I to 9), and ODE) is the number 
of bytes used in the last sector (0 to 256); 
these are not terribly useful, perhaps, 
except in verifying the correctness of the 
figure shown for total bytes used. You 
could, in fact, replace them with other 
information (e.g., storage efficiency = 
100 x [used] / [used + lost]) — or delete 
them altogether and "close up" the 
report format. Lastly, the granule trace 
is shown for each file. The logic flow is 
as follows: 

After sizing the string pool, declaring 
the dimensioned variables, and defining 
the PRINT USING formats and report 
header strings (lines 160 to 280), the 
program prompts for disk name and the 
current date and time (320 to 440). It 
then prints the report headings (460 to 



560) and reads in the File Allocation 
Table from Track 17, Sector 2 (600 to 
630), 

It next begins reading the (up to) nine 
sectors of Track 1 7 containing directory 
entries and storing all the d ata for each 
file (including calculated values such as 
number of granules and total bytes) in 
the dimensioned arrays (670 to 1080). 

When data for the last file has been 
stored away, the program jumps to the 
sort routine, which alphabetizes the 
filename array, N$ (1120 to 1360). 
Finally, the sorted directory entries are 
printed (1400 to 1520), footed by the 
afo rementioned totals. Note that the 
subroutine to slew to top of form (1570 
to 1630) has substantial delays built in 
for my TermiNet 300, which predates 
buffered printers. If you are fortunate 
enough to have a modern, buffered 
printer, you can probably replace lines 
1570 to 1590 with a simple PRINTtt - 
2,CHR$(12). 

Also note that the program keeps you 
informed (via the text screen) as to 
exactly what is going on at each phase 
of the run — something of a personal 
fetish. 

The program, of course, requires. 
Extended BASIC (since RS-DOS itself 
does) and fits easily into 32K. It prob- 
ably could be made to run in I6K via 
PCLEfiR 1 (or the pokes to achieve 
PCLERR 0 — see RAINBOW September 
1 983, Page I 12) and, if necessary, 
shrinking the DIMs in Line 220 (after all, 
it is very unlikely that you will ever get 
68 files on one disk anyway!). 

Locator 

When you bought your second disk, 
you undoubtedly stored copies of at 
least some of your favorite programs 
from old number one either for 
convenience, backup or both. As you 
continued to expand your disk library, 
it became expedient to store more and 
more files on more than one disk 
some high-use utility programs on every 
one, perhaps. After acquiring about a 
dozen disks, 1 found I could no longer 



remember where a particular file (and/ 
or its backup copies) could be found. 
Thus, the need for a program 1 ike 

Locator. 

Locator simply reads and accumu- 
lates the directory entries (Track I 7) for 
each disk in your library and generates 
a paged, sorted, cross-referenced listing 
of filename/extension versus disk ID. 
The disk IDs have arbitrarily been 
limited to two-character strings, so that 
20 of them will comfortably fit on a line 
no more than 80 columns wide. 1 refer 
to my disks as 00, 01, 02, etc, but Al, 
A2, etc., would work just as well. 

The program first prompts for the 
current date, which is centered in the 
report heading. So, whether you prefer 
December 20, 1985, or I 2/20/85, it still 
looksneat. ltthenpromptsyouto insert 
each disk and enter the two-character 
ID associated with it. A null response 
(i.e., ENTER only) indicates you have no 
more d isks to insert. 

Notice that after the first one is read, 
cumulative totals for number of disks 
and number of (unique) filenames ap- 
pears at the bottom of the screen, as well 
as a list of IDs of disks already pro- 
cessed. 

When the last disk has been pro- 
cessed, you are asked whether you 
would like the filenames sorted. If so, 
the same pointer sort used in Diskdata 
takes place. Sorting 200 filenames (with 
their extensions) takes about 95 sec- 
onds. The report is then printed. 

As with Diskdata, you may want to 
remove some of the printer delays that 
my unbuffered TermiNet requires. 

With Diskdata and Locator, I fee! 
that 1 have finally achieved my own 
quintessential disk management utility. 
Perhaps it will become yours, too, or 
maybe it will merely provide the starting 
point in your own search. 



( Questions about these programs can 
be addressed to the author at 861 Beaver 
Lane, Li/burn, GA 3§247. Please en- 
close an SASEfor a response.) □ 




350 .......77 1250 . . . 170 

580 .... . .127 1480 . . . . .214 

810 195 END 154 

1000 . . . .123 



Listing 1: DISKDRTR 

1J3J8 1 SORTED DIRECTORY TO PRINTE 

R 



120 
13j3 

14J3 
5 jo 
160 
210 
220 
68) 

8) ,W(68) ,P(68) 



* By: A. L. McGarrity 

i 

Last Modified: j3 1/3 1/85 

CLEAR 2000 
CLS 

DIM N$(68) ,E$ (68) ,A$ (68) , Y$ ( 
? ( 6 8 ) , G ( 6 8 ) / B ( 6 8 ) , S ( 68 ) ,0(6 



32 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



230 Fl$="% % % % % % % % 

### ###,### #,###" 
24J3 F2$="#### #### % 

%" 

250 F3$="% % 

### ###,### ##,###" 
260 T$="SORTED DIRECTORY TO PRIN 

TER" 

270 H1$="FILENAME EXT TYP FMT 

GR BYTES NS ODD" 

280 H2$=" GRANULE TRACE — 

29J3 ' 

300 ' PROMPT FOR INPUT 
310 1 

320 PRINT© 34, T$: PRINT: PRINT 

330 PRINT@135,"NAME OF DISKETTE 

. ii 

■ 

340 PRINT@194,STRING$(28,"-") 
350 PRINT@162 , "" ; 
360 LINE INPUT X$ 

370 PRINT@263, "DATE (MM/DD/YY) : " 

380 PRINT@331," — / — / — " 

390 PRINT@29 9,""; 

400 LINE INPUT DA$ 

410 PRINT@391, "TIME (HHMM EST):" 

420 PRINT@459," " 

430 PRINT@427,""; 
440 LINE INPUT TI$ 
450 CLS 

460 PRINT@34,T$ 

470 PRINT© 3 2 7, "PRINTING HEADINGS 
ii 

480 1 

49J3 1 PRINT HEADINGS 
5J3J3 1 

51J3 GOSUB 1570 

52 0 PRINT#-2 , X$ ; TAB (36) ; DA$ ; TAB ( 
69) ;TI$ 

530 PRINT#-2," ":PRINT#-2," 

540 PRINT#-2 ,H1$;H2$ 

550 PRINT#-2,TAB(33) ; "USED LOS 

560 PRINT#-2,STRING$(7 6, "-") 
570 1 

580 ' READ FILE ALLOCATION TABLE 
590 • 

600 PRINT@320,STRING$(32," ") 
610 PRINT© 3 23 , "READING TRACK" 17" 

SECTOR" 2 
620 PRINT@388, " (FILE ALLOCATION 
TABLE ) " 

630 DSKI$ 0,17,2,F$,X$ 
640 • 

650 ' READ ALL SECTORS CONTAININ 
G DIRECTORY ENTRIES 
660 • 

670 FOR S=3 TO 11 



680 PRINT© 3 2 3, "READING TRACK"17" 
SECTOR" S 

690 PRINT@388," (DIRECTORY ENTR 
IES) " 

700 DSKI$ 0,17,S,A$,B$ 

710 X$=A$+LEFT$ (B$, 112) 

720 GOSUB 750 

730 NEXT S 

740 GOTO 1120 

750 FOR F=l TO 8: F0=32*F 

760 N1$=MID$ (X$,F0-31,8) 1 FILE 

NAME 

770 IF LEFT$(N1$,1)=CHR$(255) TH 
EN 1120 

780 IF LEFT$ (Nl$ , 1) =CHR$ (0 ) THEN 

920 
790 N1=N1+1 
800 N$(N1)=N1$ 

810 E$(Nl)=MID$(X$,F0-23,3) • EX 
TENSION 

820 X=ASC(MID$(X$,F0-20,1) ) 1 FI 
LE TYPE 

830 IF X=0 THEN Y$ (Nl) ="BAS " ELS 
E IF X=l THEN Y$(N1)="DAT" ELSE 
Y$(N1)="M/L" 

840 X=ASC(MID$ (X$,F0-19,1) ) ' FI 
LE FORMAT 

850 IF X=0 THEN A$(N1)="BIN" ELS 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

After an evening of looking at the stars in the sky, 
maybe this program will answer some of those off-the- 
wall questions you have. 

The listing: 

1 DATAMERCURY, 4.1, .37, 620, VENUS, 
1.6, .88, 900, MARS, .53, .38,-10,JUP 
ITER, .08, 2. 64, -240, SATURN, .03,1. 
15, -300, URANUS, . 0 1 , 1 . 15 , -340 , NEP 
TUNE, .006, 1.12, -370, PLUTO, .004, • 
04 , -400 : CLS : INPUT" YOUR AGE" ; A: IN 
PUT"YOUR WEIGHT" ; B : F0RX=1T08 : REA 
DA$,C,D,E 

2 CLS0:PRINT"ON "A$" YOU'D BE"A* 
C" YEARS OLD, WEIGH"B*D"POUNDS AN 
D LIVE WITH A NORMAL CLIMATIC TE 
MPERATURE OF "E"DEGREES FAHRENHE 
IT. ": PRINT :INPUT"PRESS enter FOR 

ANOTHER PLANET " ; F : CLS 0 : NEXTX 

Jerry Gerhardt 
Alameda, CA 

(For this winning two-iiner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Timet Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The Third 
Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 33 




Unbeatable Prices from Howard Medical 

Star NX-10 Printer Only $238 

■ 




disk NEW FROM J&M 

CONTROLLER ^flVij^ 




The DC-4 is a scaled-down version of the popular DC-2 
without a parallel port, It includes a switch with 2 ROM 
sockets, JDOS, manual and such features as gold connec- 
tors and metal box. It accesses double sided drives and ac- 



cepts RSDOS 1.1 for Radio Shack compatability. 



Kcepts RSDOS 
$65 



DC-4 with memory minder 
($2 shipping) 




RS DOS ROM CHIP 




ROM chip fits inside disk controller 24 pin fits both J&M 
and R5 controller Release 1.1. For CoCo 3 Compatibility. 



r 



$20 



each 



Reg. $40 
($2 shipping) 




DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 

DRIVE 0 + Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MPl drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only. Add $34 for a Disto DC-3 replacement, {£5 shipping} 



$178 4 s 



DOUBLE SIDED 
DOUBLE DENSITY 
360K 



Separate Disk Drive Components 

DD-3 An MPl 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 




$9S 



( s 5 shipping) 




DD-2 A TEAC 5 SB V2 height, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a V2 height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



$188 



( s 2 shipping) 



ND 04 Toshiba bare drive, V* height, double-sided, double 
density with all mounting hardware fits FLS, 501 

^1 32 ( s3sni pp in 9) 





BOTEK 

Serial to parallel convener converts the CoCo 4 pin serial output to run 
a parallel printer like Star or Epson. Includes all cables. Add $10 for 
modem attachment. ($2 shipping) $gg 45 



CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to the drive, 

CA-2 



$2495 



ne Drive 



$29 95 

Two Drive 




G U A RAN TE E — Howard Med ica I 's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
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it out, test it for compatibility. Jf you're not happy with it for 
any reason, return it in 30 days and well give you your 
money back (less shipping). 




EPSON 

LX-86 *238 (*5 shipping) 
with FREE sh eet feeder 



(*5 shipping) 




SF-1 sheet feeder for LX-80, 
LX-86, or LX-90 



$69.95 




Star NX-10 Only $238 



WORD PACK RS 



This ROM pack is the hardware answer for an 80 column 
display. It includes a built-in video controller to drive a 
monochrome monitor like our 123A. To get started, you need 
OS-9 2.0, a Y-cable or multipack interface drive 0, and a 
monochrome monitor. &■ m f\ 

($2 shipping) (*2 shipping) 

White supplies last 

New basic driver runs word pack without 
need for an OS-9, 



mtJiiu^j ii unit; 

S89 



$10 K 





MONITORS 



$305 

($14 shipping) 

Sony KV-1311CR $449 



Thompson RG 





($15 shipping) 



Monitor/Trintron TV with remote control 

• 640 X 240 resolution at 15MHZ 

* RGB analog & digital, TTL; composite input 

♦ Cable to CoCo 3 $36 



Zenith 1220A 



$125 

f£7 «hinninn\ 




{*7 shipping) 



$78.45 



Lets the graphic capabi lities 
of your CoCo EXPLODE 



Needed to connect CoCo 
Max and disk drive at same 
time. 



{ 



COCO 
MAX II 

Y CABLE $19- 45 

MAX Cf 4% Three sets include 72 different 

FONTS fonts for tv P esetting 

COLORING $ 1 5 
BOOK ■ 

($2 shipping for each product) 




Twenty-two pictures of clip- art 
by Glenside Color Computer Club 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Mouiv: 
U.IW ilOO MOA. Fn 
I Li: 00 t.ufi S,( 



WE ACCEPT: VISA - MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

CO D OR CHECKS * SCHOOL PO S !^ pin ! i har l es * ' e tor t f fLffe 

APQ and Canada order slmhtlv 



The Bigg« st 
The Best 
The indispensable 




The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains more than 200 pages 
and up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns 
and as many as 20 product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 




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Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and 
run. No work. No wait 

Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
250 new programs: games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications. And, with RAINBOW 
ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at a price that's 
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To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
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Use our 800 number! 

For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

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We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

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In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 

Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
THE RAINBOW today! 

YES! Sign me up for a year (1 2 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

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r 



FI 



E A$ (N1)="ASC" 

860 X=ASC(MID$(X$,F0-18,1) ) • 
RST GRANULE 

870 IF X>9 THEN R$ (Nl) =STR$ (X) 
LSE R$(N1)=" "+STR$(X) 
880 Z1=ASC(MID$ (X$,F0-17, 1) ) 
890 Z2=ASC(MID$ (X$,F0-16, 1) ) 
900 Z3=256*Z1+Z2 
910 GOSUB970 
920 NEXT F 
930 RETURN 
940 ' 

950 ■ SUBROUTINE TO CALCULATE NU 
MBER OF GRANULES, SECTORS, TOTAL 

BYTES 
960 ■ 
970 G=0 
980 G=G+1 

990 B=ASC(MID$ (F$,X+i, 1) ) 
1000 IF B>=70 THEN 1040 
1010 X=B 

1020 IF X>9 THEN R$ (Nl) =R$ (Nl) +S 
TR$(X) ELSE R$(N1)=R$ (Nl)+" "+ST 
R$(X) 

1030 GOTO 9 80 
1040 G(N1)=G 

1050 B(N1)=2 304* (G-l) +2 56* (B-193 
)+Z3 ' TOTAL BYTES 



1060 S(N1)=B-192:0(N1)=Z3:W(N1)= 

2304*G-B(N1) 

1070 TG=TG+G 

1080 RETURN 

1090 1 

1100 1 NOW SORT THE FILE NAMES 
1110 ■ 

1120 PRINT@323, "SORTING DIRECTOR 
Y ENTRIES" 

1130 PRINT@384,STRING$(32," ") 

1140 M=127 

1150 FOR 1=1 TO Nl 

1160 P(I)=I 

1170 NEXT I 

1180 FOR K=l TO 6 

1190 M=(M-l)/2 

1200 IF Nl-M-1 < 0 THEN 1360 

1210 M1=M+1 

1220 I=M1 

1230 I1=P(I) 

1240 M2=I-M 

1250 J=l 

1260 J1=M2-J+1: I2=P(J1) 

1270 IF N$(I1) >=N$ (12) THEN 1330 

1280 P(J1+M)=P(J1) 

1290 IF J+M > M2 THEN 1310 

1300 J=J+M: GOTO 1260 

1310 P(J1)=I1 



*_ »J *_ «_* j j »_ » >~ _» _» «_» I \ I _* 






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CALL FOR BEST PRICES 



5512 POPLAR MEMPHIS, TN 36119 901-761-4565 

ADD S4.=K> FOR SHIPPING AMD HANDLIMij. VISA^MC £ MONEY ORDERS ACCEPTED 
ALLOW 3 WEEKS FOR PERSONAL CHECKS, NO CODS. PRICES MAY CHANCE WITHOUT NOTICE 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 35 



1320 GOTO 134)3 

1330 P(J1+M)=I1 

1340 IF 1+1 > Nl THEN 1360 

1350 1=1+1: GOTO 123)3 

136) 3 NEXT K 

137) 3 1 

138) 3 1 FINALLY, PRINT THE DIRECT 
ORY ENTRIES 

139) 3 ' 

14^)3 PRINT@32 3,STRING$ (28 , 11 11 ) 

141) 3 PRINT@32 3 , "PRINTING DIRECTO 
RY ENTRIES" 

142) 3 FOR K=l TO Nl 

143) 3 I=P(K): J=P(K+D) 

144) 3 PRINT#-2 , USING F1$;N$ (I) ;E$ 

(I) ;Y$(I) ;A$(I) ;G(I) ;B(I) ;W(I) ; 

145) 3 PRINT #-2, USING F2$ ;S (I) ;0(I 
) ;R$ (I) 

14 60 TB=TB+B (I) : TW=TW+W ( I ) 

1470 NEXT K 

1480 FR=FREE (0) 

1490 PRINT#-2 , " " 

1500 PRINT#-2, USING F3$; "TOTALS 

" ; TG ; TB ; TW 
1510 PRINT#-2," " 
1520 PRINT #-2, USING F3$;"AVAILAB 
LE" ? FR; 2 304*FR 
1530 END 
1540 1 

1550 ' SUBROUTINE TO EJECT PAGE 
(TERMINET 300) 
1560 1 

1570 FOR UU=1 TO 500 : NEXT 

1580 PRINT#-2,CHR$(0) ;CHR$(12) ;C 

HR$(0) 

1590 FOR UU=1 TO 800: NEXT 
1600 FOR UU=1 TO 3 
1610 PRINT#-2 , 11 
1620 NEXT 
1630 RETURN 



it 




T~fJ* 

W 340 


— 

248 


520 


91 


730 


209 


END , , 


15 



Listing 2: LOCATOR 

Ij3j3 ' PROGRAM TO GENERATE A DISK 
FILES LOCATOR REPORT 

110 * 

120 ' By: A. L. McGarrity 
130 ' 

140 ■ Last Modified: 02/03/85 
150 ' 

160 CLEAR 12000 



170 DIM N$(20) ,F$(400) ,W$ (400) ,P 
(400) ,G(20) 
180 CLS 

190 PRINT: PRINT" DISK FILES LO 
CATOR PROGRAM": PRINT: PRINTTAB (7) 
; " DATE : "; 

200 DH$=STRING$(15,"-") 
210 LINE INPUT D$ 
220 PRINT 

230 TP=INT( (78-LEN(D$) )/2) 

240 PRINT@32* (ND-9*INT (ND/9) )+16 

0, "INSERT NEXT DISK, ENTER ##"; 

250 SOUND 32, 2: SOUND 89,4 

2 60 INPUT N$ 

2 70 IF N$="" THEN 470 1 NO MORE 
DISKS 

280 ND=ND+1 : N$(ND)=N$ 
290 FOR S=3 TO 11 
300 DSKI$ 0,17,S,A$,B$ 
310 A$=A$+LEFT$ ( B$ , 112 ) 

3 20 FOR F=l TO 8 

330 F$=MID$ (A$, 32*F-31, 11) 

340 IF LEFT$ (F$ , 1) =CHR$ (255) THE 

N 4 40 1 NO MORE FILES THIS DISK 

350 IF LEFT$ (F$ , 1) =CHR$ (0) THEN 

420 ' THIS FILE HAS BEEN DELETED 

360 IF NF=0 THEN 400 

370 FOR 1=1 TO NF 

380 IF F$=F$(I) THEN 410 

390 NEXT I 

400 NF=NF+1:F$ (NF) =F$:W$ (NF) =STR 

ING$(20,"-") :I=NF 

410 MID$ (W$ (I) ,ND, 1)="X" 

420 NEXT F 

4 30 NEXT S 

440 G (ND) =FREE (0) 

450 PRINT@480 , "DISKETTES :";ND;T 
AB ( 18 ) ; " FILES : " ; NF ; 
460 GOTO 240 

470 CLS : PRINT"NUMBER OF DISKS :" 
ND 

480 PRINT "NUMBER OF FILES : "NF 
490 GOTO 610 

500 FOR K=l TO 500 : NEXT : PRINT#-2 
, CHR$ (0) +CHR$ (12) +CHR$ (0) : FOR K= 
1 TO 800 : NEXT 

51* wKpflsFOR K-l TO 3 : PRINT#- 
2," " :NEXT:PRINT#-2 , TAB (2 6) ;" 
DISK FILES LOCATOR REPORT" ; TAB ( 6 
9) ; "PAGE"NP 

520 PRINT#-2," M :PRINT#-2,TAB 

(TP) ;D$ 

530 FOR J=l TO 2:PRINT#-2," 11 
: NEXT 

540 PRINT#-2 , "FILENAME EXT 11 ;D 
H$;" DISKETTE (S) ON WHICH STORED 
";DH$ 

550 PRINT#-2,TAB(16) ; 
560 FOR J=l TO ND 



36 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



II II 



57J3 PRINT#-2,N$ (J) 
58J3 NEXT 

59J3 FOR J=l TO 2:PRINT#-2 
: NEXT 



ii 



ii 



6J3J3 

61J2J 

/N) 
62J3 

610 
63J3 
64J3 
650 
66J2J 



NL=0: RETURN 

PRINT@128, "SORT FILENAMES (Y 
";:INPUT R$ : R$=LEFT$ (R$ , 1) 
IF R$o"Y" AND R$o"N" THEN 



M=511: NL=48 

FOR 1=1 TO NF:P(I)=I:NEXT I 
IF R$="N" THEN 810 
PRINT@192, "SORTING — PLEAS 
E WAIT" :TIMER=0 
670 FOR K=l TO 8:M=(M-l)/2 
680 IF NF-M-1 < 0 THEN 790 ELSE 
M1=M+1:I=M1 

690 I1=P (I) :M2=I-M: J=l 
700 J1=M2-J+1: I2=P(J1) 
710 IF F$ (II) >=F$ (12) THEN 760 

720 P(J1+M)=P(J1) 

730 IF J+M>M2 THEN 750 

740 J=J+M:GOTO 700 

750 P(Jl)=Il:GOTO 770 

760 P(J1+M)=I1 

770 IF I+1>NF THEN 790 

780 1=1+1: GOTO 690 



790 NEXT K 

800 PRINT@2 

(TIMER/ 60) ; 

810 FOR L=l 

820 IF NL=4 

830 PRINT#- 

; RIGHT $ (F$ ( 

840 FOR J=l 

850 PRINT#- 
ii . 

860 NEXT J 

870 PRINT#- 

880 NL=NL+1 

890 NEXT L 

900 PRINT#- 

910 PRINT#- 

920 FOR 1=1 

NG "###";68 

930 PRINT#- 
ii 



56, "SORTING TOOK"; INT 
"SECONDS" 

TO NF: I=P(L) 
8 THEN GOSUB 500 
2 , LEFT$ (F$ ( I ) ,8) ;" 
I), 3);" 

TO ND 
2,MID$(W$(I) ,J,1) ;" 



ii 



2 " 



ii 



2 t " " 

2 , "GRANULES USED " ; 

TO ND: PRINT #-2, US I 
-G(I) ; : NEXT I 
2 , " " :PRINT#-2 , " 



ii 



940 PRINT # -2 , "GRANULES FREE 
950 FOR 1=1 TO ND: PRINT #-2,USI 
NG "###" ;G(I) ; : NEXT I 
960 PRINT#-2 , " 



ii 



WORLDPORT 1200 





2* 



DA\IA\¥ROniC§ 



AUTOANSWER 
AUTODIAL 
MODEM 



The Versatile, World-Class 
Battery-Powered 1200 bps Modem 

BELL 103/2I2A and CCITT V.2I/V.22 

HAYES INSTRUCTION' SET. 

DATA RATE: 

300 or I ZOO BAUD. 

TONE or PULSE DIAL. 

OPERATES ON A 9V. BATTERY. 

PERFICT FOR PORTABLE WORK t'SINC 

RADIO SHACK ACOUSTIC CUPS 26-3805A, 

26-5818 or EQUIVALENT. 




$239.00 

DISCOVERY 2400E 

BELL 103/212A 4 CCITT V22 
300/1200/2400 BAUD RATES 
VOICE/DATA SUITCH 
CALL PROGRESS MOMTOR 
BUILT IS SPEAKKR. 
TONE AND PU1.SE DIALING. 
AUTO DIAL/AUTO AMSUER/ALTO 
SPEED SELECT /AUTO PROTOCOL 
SELECT/AUTO PARITY ADJUST. 
HAYES COMPATIBLE. 



$149.00 
HALLENCER 1 200E 

SAME AS 2600E 
300/1200 BAUD ONLY. 

New Price on 

Precision*" 

Mfg. by Xldex/Dyia* 
High Qual 1 ty at low 
cost DSOD 51" Diiks 



BULK 5k" DSDD DISKS $41.00 per 100 
complete with lables, sleeves, & tabs. 

300-100L HOLDS 100+ 5V DISKS. 

COMES WITH DEVIDERS. 
SMOKE PLASTIC HINGED 
LID WITH LOCK & KEY. 

S9.90 ea. $2 for $13. 



BOX OF 10 
3 BOXES FOR 





i 8.95 
$ 25.50 



-us: 



(818)904-1398 

Canyon County Devices 
P. O. Box C 
Saugus, Ca. 91350 

SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER 
OR ORDER C.O.D. BY PHONE . 
FOR ORDERS LESS THAN $20. 
ADD $ 1 . 50. HANDLING. 
ADD $1.50 FOR C.O.D. 



Samsung 12" Amber Monitor 
Takes Composit Video in. 

$98.50 

Better for working wich High Rcsoluc Ion 
GRAPHICS . Easier on the eyes for chose 
64 or 80 Column Data Displays. 

P I I tf T I I RIBBONS 

Star Hlcconlcff NX-10 S9.09 $8. i9 

C. Itoh ProwrUcr I L II $5.05 Si. 65 

Epson KX/FX/RX 70/80 $4.95 $4,55 

Cenlnl SC-10 $2.20 $2.00 

Okldata ML 8*» $5.15 $4. 70 

Box of 5 colors for the Okldat.i 80 or 
SC-10 <red ,y el ., green .blue .brovn) $12.50 



MLBASIC 2.0 - BASIC Compiler 

The wait is over. WASATCHWARE announces the latest version 
of MLBASIC designed to allow more compatibility with existing BASIC 
programs than ever available before for the Color Computer. This 
version also allows fuil use of the capabilities and memory of the 
CoCo 3. Written in machinelanguage, MLBASIC can compile programs as 
large as 64K bytes. Standard floating point ( 10 digit precision ), 
INTEGER, and String type variables and arrays supported. 

COMMANDS SUPPORTED! 



1 . I/O commands 

CLOSE CLOADM CSAVEM DIR 
FILES GET INPUT KILL 
RSET USING LINEINPUT 

2. Program control commands 
CALL DEFUSR END 
IF THEN ELSE 

3. Functions 
ABS ASC ATN 
HPOINT INSTR INT 
PEEK POINT PPOINT 
TIMER VAL VARPTR 

4. String functions 

CHRS INKEYS LEFTS MIDS 
Graphic/Screen commands 



DRIVE DSKIS DSKOS FIELD 
LSET OPEN PRINT PUT 



EXEC 


FOR 


NEXT 


GOSUB 


GOTO 


ERROR 


ON 


RETURN 


STOP 


USR 


COS 


CVN 


EOF 


EXP 


FIX 


LEN 


LOG 


LPEEK 


LOC 


LOF 


RND 


SGN 


SIN 


SOR 


TAN 



MKNS RIGHTS STRS 



STRINGS 



ATTR 
HUNE 
LINE 
PRESET 



COLOR 
HPAINT 

LOCATE 
PSET 



CLS 
HPRINT 
PALETTE 
RESET 



CIRCLE 
HRESET 
PAINT 
SCREEN 



DRAW HCOLOR HSCREEN HDRAW 

HCIRCLE HQS HSET JOYSTK 

PCLEAR PCLS PLAY PMODE 

SET SOUND WIDTH 



6. Other commands 
DATA DIM MOTOR POKE 
TRON TROFF TAB VERIFY 
Plus many more commands not ava 
interfacing with hardware registers 



LPOKE RESTORE READ 



REM 



ilable with regular BASIC which allow 
and machinelanguage programs. 



NEW <<<< Special ONE-MONTH offer - S49.95 > > > > NEW 

COCO 3 WITH DISK REQUIRED -Add S4.00 Postage 
CHECK or MONEY ORDERS only. No C.O.D. or Bank cards. 
Foreign orders use U.S. MONEY ORDERS only. 



WASATCH WARE 

7350 Nulree Drive 
Salt Lake City, Utah S4121 
Phone (80'1) 943-6263 



July 1987 THE RA/NBOW 37 



wtdatdct 




Give it, and yourself, a break! Subscribe to rainbow on tape 
or rainbow ON disk today! Every month, these convenient 
services bring as many as two dozen ready-to-run programs 
right to you. Using the current issue of the rainbow as 
documentation, all you have to do is load and run them. Just 
a one-year subscription givesyou more than 230 new programs! 





RAINBOW ON TAPE 
For No-Fuss Fun 

The typing time you save is time that you can spend enjoying your 
CoCo! Back issues of rainbow on tape are available beginning with 
the April 1982 issue, so there's no need to miss out on any of our great 
offerings. A single copy of rainbow on tape is $10 within the United 
States; U.S. $12 in all other countries. The annual subscription rate 
for rainbow on tape is $80 within the U.S.; U.S. $90 in Canada; 
and U.S. $105 for all other countries. U.S. currency only, please, 
in order to hold down costs, we do not bill.* 

AINBOW ON DISK 
Offers OS-9 Programs 



In addition to all the programs offered on tape, part 
of one side of the disk is formatted for the OS-9 
operating system program. That means you can now 
get all the OS-9 programs from the magazine — 
programsthat cannot be put on tape. And, with the 
introduction of the CoCo 3, OS-9 programs will 
become more and more prevalent. Back issues 
of rainbow on disk are available beginning with 
October 1986. Subscriptions to rainbow on disk 
are $99 a year in the U.S. Canadian rate is U.S. 
$115. All other countries, U.S. $130. Single copy 
rate is $12 in the U.S.; U.S. $14 in Canada; and 
U.S. $16 in all other countries.* 




Look for our order envelope between pages 34 and 35 

rainbow on tape and rainbow on DISK are not stand-alone products, but are intended as adjuncts and 
complements to the magazine. You will need the magazine for loading and operating instructions. 

* Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for first copy. 

To order by phone {credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 

For your convenience, these products can also be ordered via the Delphi Information Network in our Shopping Service area 
of THE RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG (Special Interest Group). 

Programs from our past issues are also available for immediate download in the rainbow on tape database area in the 
RAINBOW'S Color Computer SIG on Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



Oft 




I Missed 'The Speech Systems Super SaCe 



S 




6° 



Cheer Up, It's <Bact^Until JuCy 31 

FOR YOUR COCO 1, 2, or 3 




SUPER VOICE (COCO's Premiere Speech Synthesizer) 
EARS (Now you can really talk to your computer) 
SYMPHONY 1 2 (A real 12 voice music synthesizer) 
LYRA (The musical COCO MAX) 

COCO MIDI 2 (Complete hardware & software for MIDI) 
PIANO KEYBOARD (A professional 61 note keyboard) 
PROTO BOARD&CASE (For the experimenter) 
TRIPLE Y CABLE (Connect 3 hardware paks together) 
DOUBLE Y CABLE (Connect 2 hardware paks together) ^ro7T?^i 
MUSICA 2 (The ideal music & printing composer) 
MUSIC LIBRARY (100 songs per volume, 9 vols available) J$^Ty^ 
LYRA LYBRARY (50 songs of 7 & 8 voice music) 






$59.95 
79.95 
59.95 
44.95 
119.95 
119.95 
14.95 
29.95 
23.95 
24.95 
24.95 
29.95 



EXCLUSIVELY FOR YOUR COCO 3 



512 K TURBO RAM (FAST 120 NS MEMORY) 

512 K TURBO RAM W/O CHIPS 

MAGIC OF ZANTH 

RETURN OF JUNIOR's REVENGE 







99.95 
49.95 
29.95 
29.95 



For product descriptions of items not listed in this issue of Rainbow 
see our 7 page catalog in the May issue starting on page 39. 




EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 

Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



a3 ^ Ju^g? 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 

QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 




Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French. In factyou do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece ot cake ! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is alsocapable of high qual- 
ity speech. Wemean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
B79-6044, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking lo your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or (he 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 





FREE 
BbMMK DISK 

OR TAPE 
WITH EVERY 



r 




%4 -^\Vf " 



Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



'//' 



peec 



It 



uslems 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada S3. 00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge $2.00 

Illinois residents add 6V*% sales tax 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 




mm 



RAM 



TM $3*9&5 
$119.95 



TURBO CHARGE YOUR COCO 3 



W 5I2K Fast High Quality Memory. 

Super Easy Solclerless Installation. Installs in minutes. 
\* Assembled, tested, and burned-in. 
^ 120 ns RAM Chips 

\* High Quality Double Sided, Solder Masked, Silkscreened PC Board. 
Ideal tor OS9 Level | 
2 Year Warranty. 

Free GIME Chip Technical Specs (SI 0.00 without Turbo Ram). 
w Free 51 2K Ram Test Program [$10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
V Free MUSICA RAM Disk ($10 00 without Turbo Ram). 
is S5 OFF TURBO RAM Disk. 

W Also available, TURBO RAM less memory chips. . . . $69.95 





INSTALLATION 

It you know how to hold a screwdriver, we're convinced you can 
install Turb« Ram in minutes. However, il you like, send us your 
COCO 3 insured, postage paid, and we will install it, pny the return 
postage and guarantee it lor I yenr. . . . , $15.00 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

It' for any reason vou wish to return Turbo Ram, you may do so 
within 1 5 clays and be charged only a 10% restocking charge. You 
may keep the GIME CHIP Technical Specs, 5I2K Ram Test program 
and MUSICA RAM DISK, a $.*() value. 



TURBO RAM DISK 



TURBO RAM DISK adds 2 lightning last Ram Disks to your ( '< HO system. 
Imagine saving and loading programs instantaneously and having hundreds 
of your programs "on line" tor last access. Single disk system hssr$ can 



use TURBO RAM DISK to easily make backups without continuously 
switching disks. 

Requires 5I2K Turbo Charged COCO 3 $24.95 

When purchased with TURBO RAM . $19.95 



COCO 3 128K 



COLOR CONNECTION IV 

This is the most comprehensive modem package t'or the COCO i. All 
standard protocols are supported including CompuServe's Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol, and XON/XOFF. Full support of the auto answer/auto 
dial feature for both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems is 
provided. Single key macros allow easy entry of otten-used passwords and 
ID's with a single key stroke. 

Disk $49.95 

COLOR SCRIBE III 

This great Word Processor can take full advantage of the 8i column "display 
of the COCO 3. Justification, Headers, Footers, and Pagination make it 
perfect for letters and documents as well as programming in BASIC, PAS- 
CAL, "C," and Assembly Language. Over 20 line editing commands include 
capabilities like character insert and delete, skip over words, breaking a 
line, and more! 

Disk . . . , $49.95 



THE MAGIC OF ZANTH 

In the Land of Zanth, magic is commonplace. Dragons, Griffins, Centaurs 
and Demons abound. You are sent on a quest to discover the source of 
magic in the Land ol Zanth. This intriguing adventure features over 2 
dozen hi -res 1 6 color animated graphic screens, 4 voice music and sound 
effects. The lb color, 320 x I92 graphics look great. 
Disk ... . . $34.95 

RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE 

This is the same Junior you've seen in the Kong arcade series, but with 
new COCO 3 graphics. This tireless little monkey must overcome all sorts 
of obstacles (4 screens wor(h) to rescue his lather, The King, from the 
mean zookeeper. He will traverse the jungle and swamp, climb vines, 
avoid chompers and birds, open locks, and more before he finally meets 
with his big daddy. The 16 color. *20 x \ c )2 graphics are superb. 
Disk ... , * . . $34.95 



Wr accept CASH, CHECK. COD, VISA and MAS fER CAKI ) ureters 
Shipping ,md handling US and Canada S LOO 

Shipping and handling ouiside the US and C.inocl.i Si. 00 

COD Charpe SJ.OO 
Illinois resident «utd U'/\'\> sa;os ui\ 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 



w*6 




TM 



\r.ol 



LEGE 



FILE EDIT hlDI MISC 



All Voices UTi 
Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Tenpo 

Reset block 



FILE EDIT nun HISC 



Block de 1 e t e 



Block copy 



6 



■A 



JJ1 JtfJJL. 




LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we re n 1 1 y mean tiny com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or n professional 
musician with MIDI equipment \mu will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. If you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to youi 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC 158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CMI47). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not a 
misprin! i) 

Super Simple Editing Supports 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 
Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



*x Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 
12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 
drum machines. 

*x Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 
channels 

Transpose music to any key 
*x Modify music to any tempo. 
t> Automatically inserts bar for each measure 

as you compose 

Key signature lets you specify sharps and 
flats only once, LYRA will do the rest 
t> Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 
(#LCI64). 

Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased 

*x Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading 

LYRA OPTIONS 



Solo capability 
<x Block edits are highlighted 

Tie notes together for musical continuity. 

Name of note pointed to is constantly 

displayed. 
\s> Jump to any point in the score 

instantaneously 

Memory remaining clearly displayed, 
however you will have plenty of memory 
even for the most demanding piece 
\^ Help menu makes manual virtually 

unnecessary 
*x LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 
hardware unless you want more power. 
Music easily saved to tape or disk 
Requires 64K and mouse or joystick 



LYRA (Disk only) #LY122 



$54.95 



These LYRA options are 

LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 files to LYRA 
files. 

(Disk) #LC164 $14.95 

VERSION UPDATE 

To receive the latest version of LYRA return your 
original disk. #UP162 $10.00 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to y«ur MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 $19.95 

We accept CASH, CHECK, COD. VISA nnri MASTER CARD orders 
Shipping jnd handling US and Canada $.(.00 
Shipping and handling outtide fhe US and Canada $5.00 
COO Charge S2.00 
Illinois residents add sales tax 



not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play nil 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(Disk) #L5177 . $19.95 

LYRA LIBRARY 

A collection of 50 songs ready to play for hours. 
Most have 7 and 8 voices. #LLl37 $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesiser, lets LYRA 
play all 8, voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 , . . , $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 

A professional quality MIDI interface for MIDI 
synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CMl47 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 900 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 



COCO MAX is a tr.xlem.ark oi Colorware 
ORCHESTRA l J0 a trademark oi Radio Shack 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 



P C* / BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

(312) 879-6880 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



..a ' n : n 



1*1 1^1 t-1 I.-. 



MIDI Instruments: 



0 
2 
4 

6 
8 
A 

C 
E 



QJ01 


Brass 


1 


: 005 


S t r i i»g 


006 


P i ano 


3 


: 009 


Gui tar 


013 


E Organ 


5 


: 014 


P Organ 


003 


Trumpet 


7 


016 


Flute 


018 


Oboe 


9: 


019 


Clarne t 


021 


V i brphn 


B 


026 


Harpsch 


025 


C 1 av i er 


D 


: 032 


Ti npan i 


043 


Snaredr 


F 


: 045 


Percuss 




Lyra 

COMPATIBLE! 





3 



^ $1.0 

So l^f S 



l 


■ i J k 1 4 * p L i t ^ 71 
r i i i » i i i > i i i 1 

B jy dyJI 


V **** ** 


-- ■ ■ m 1 1 i M^^BMI 

^ lb ^Ljg|j|jV|^Ju IH^^BW 







'Afooj snipping 

ous us&ii IE turn 
oiLcjLtitii Jisk ant/2 $20. 



Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MUSICA 
Professional COCO 



O Supports 16 Track recording and playback 
Adjustable tempo 

*x Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible) 

Record to any track 
<x Low Level track editing 
\* LYRA editing (one voice per track) 

Playback from any number of tracks. 

Quantizing to 7ie, 'A?. V&* intervals. 
<x Dynamic memory allocation 



*x Filter oul MIDI data 

Key pressure Control Change 

Program change Channel Pressure 

Pitch wheel System Message 

*x Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode 

*x Adjustable Key (Transposition) for each 
track. 

1* Save recording to disk for later playback or 
editing 

\* Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE. 



MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our 
MIDI 2 system. 



PUNCH IN and PUNCH OUT editing 

*x Sequencer features 

1* 100% machine code 

<x "Musician Friendly" Menu Driven 

*x Metronome 

Many songs included 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64K C0C0, Y-Cable or Mufti-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 

DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DY 181 $28.95 

TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY1 73 $34.95 



DX LIBRARIAN 1 



Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100^X-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting yo!WSd the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX 143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 



Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, 



memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 ... . $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



TM 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plentyof music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 $29.95 




By Gary MacLellan 



es is tors is a colorful, educational program that can 
help leach the color codes that denote different 
amounts of resistance. It is self-prompting and easy 
to use, which makes it useful for individuals learning 
electronics or for electronics classes, as well as for anyone 
who needs a handy way to identity the various color codes. 

Resistors first prompts for type of monitor, then displays 
a set of color bars for a color test. After you make any 
necessary adjustments, you have two choices. If you enter 
a resistance (e.g., 680 ohms), the program will provide a 
graphic display of the corresponding color code (blue/ gray/ 
brown, in this case). 

The other option is to enter the color code. You are 
prompted to enter the names of three colors, one at a time. 
The program then res ponds with the corresponding 
resistance. 

Whether you Ye an electronics novice looking for a 
learning aid or an experienced electronics enthusiast in need 
of a timesaving resource, 1 hope this program makes 
identifying resistors easier for you. 

(You may direct questions to the author at 160 Neville 
Street, Dominion, No via Scotia, Canada BOA 1 EO. Please 
enclose an SASE for a response.) □ 



Gary MacLellan lives in Dominion, No via Scotia, where he 
works as a meat cutter, Gary has been working with his 
Co Co for jour years, and he hopes to learn machine 
language and become a full-time programmer. 




r 




The listing: RESI5T0R 

10 ON BRK GOTO310 

20 POKE65497,0:HSCREEN 2:HCLS8:H 
PRINT (5, 10) , "Do you have an RGB 
Monitor [y/n]?" 

3)3 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="Y" THEN380 E 
LSEIF A$=»'N M THEN400 ELSEIFA$<>" 
Y" OR A$<>"N" THEN30 
40 HCLS0 
50 GOSUB9)3 

60 HC0L0R5 : HPRINT (16,0) , "Resisto 
rs" : HPRINT (14 , 4) , "Programed by: " 
: HPRINT (13, 8) , "Gary MacLellan. ": 
HPRINT(13,9) ,"160 Neville ST.":H 
PRINT ( 13, 10) /'Dominion, N.S.":HP 
RINT(17, 11) , "CANADA. " 
70 GOSUB180 
80 GOTO220 

90 HC0L0R15:HLINE (0,116) -(320, 11 
6) , PSET jKC 
i 100 HPAINT (0,127) ,4,15 

110 HDRAW"BM65,144;C14R32U5E2U4E 
7R6F1R1F2R90E3R1E2R5F7D5F1D5NR3 2 
D5G1D4G7L6H2L1H2L90G2L1G2L5H7U4H 

iu5 w3&£EK~ k ■ mBSBKL ' 

120 HPAINT(160, 144) ,9,14 
130 FOR Y=118 TO 178 STEP20 
140 FOR YY=128 TO 188 STEP 20 
150 HLINE (Y, 12 9) -(Y, 155), PSET: HL 
INE(YY, 129) - (YY, 154) ,PSET 
160 NEXTYY , Y 
170 RETURN 
180 HCOLOR 0 

190 HPRINT (8, 22 ), "Press any key 
to continue" 

200 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN200 ELS 
E HPAINT (0,0) , 12, 15 
210 RETURN 

220 HCOLOR5: HPRINT (2, 2) , "This pr 
ogram is to help with finding" :H 

PRINT (16,0) , "RESISTORS" 

2 30 HPRINT (10, 4) , "1) The resista 

nee or" : HPRINT (10 , 6) , "2 ) The col 

or code" 

240 GOSUB180 

250 HPAINT(0,0) ,14, 15 

260 GOSUB350 

270 HCOLOR5: HPRINT (7, 1) , "If you 



know the resistance, ": HPRINT (5 , 2 
) ,"and want to know the color co 
de" : HPRINT (17,4) , "PRESS C" 
280 HPRINT (19, 5) , "or" : HPRINT ( 7 , 7 

),"If you know the color code,": 
HPRINT (5,8) , "and want to know th 
e resistance" : HPRINT (17, 10) , "pre 

SS R" 

290 HPRINT (13, 13 ), "PRESS Q to qu 

it" 

300 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN 300 EL 
SEIFA$o"C" AND A$<>"R" AND A$<> 
"Q" THEN 3 00 ELSEIFA$="C"THEN420 
ELSEIFA$="R"THEN700 ELSEIFA$="Q" 

THEN 310 
310 HCLS0 

320 HPRINT(2,9) ,"I hope this pro 
gram was of some help" : HPRINT ( 6 , 
10), "and I thank you for using i 
t. " :HPRINT(4 , 11) , "Press the Q to 

end this program." 
330 POKE65496,0 

340 Q$=INKEY$:IF Q$="" THEN 340 
ELSE IFQ$<>"Q" AND Q$o"g" THEN 
340 ELSECLS : END 

350 HCOLOR1: HLINE (0, 175) -(320, 18 
5),PSET,BF 

360 HDRAW"BM65, 144C4R15C14G2L1G2 
D26C1D11C14D2 ; BM257 , 142C4L15C14F 
2R1F2D2 8C1D11C14D2" 
370 RETURN 

3 80 PALETTE RGB : PALETTE0 , 0 : PALE T 
TE1 , 34 : PALETTE2 , 3 6 : PALETTE3 , 3 8 : P 
ALETTE 4 , 54 : PALETTE 5 , 16 : PALETTE 6, 
11 : PALETTE 7 , 41 : PALETTE 8 , 56 : PALET 
TE9 , 63 : PALETTE 15 , 46 
390 GOSUB1180:GOTO40 
400 PALETTE0, 0: PALETTE 1, 4: PALETT 
E2 , 6 : PALETTE 3 , 21 : PALETTE 4 , 36 : PAL 
ETTE5 , 18 : PALETTE 6 , 10 : PALETTE7 , 23 
: PALETTES ,32: PALETTE9 , 4 8 
410 GOSUB1180:GOTO40 
420 HPAINT (0,0) , 10, 15 
430 HCOLOR13: HPRINT (7,0) , "Please 

input the resistance" : HPRINT (13 
, l),"and press ENTER" 
440 Z$=INKEY$: IFZ$=" "THEN440ELSE 
HPRINT (15, 10) ,Z$ 

450 Z1$=INKEY$:IFZ1$=""THEN4 5J3EL 
SEIFZ1$="K" OR Z1$="M" THENHPRINT 
(16,10) ,Z1$+" OHMS" ".GOTO540: ELSE 
HPRINT(16,10) ,Z1$ 

4 60 Z2$=INKEY$: IFZ2$=" "THEN4 60EL 
SEIFZ2 $=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENHPRINT ( 18 , 10 
) ," OHMS" : GOTO540 : ELSEIFZ2$="K" 
OR Z2$="M"THENHPRINT(17, 10) ,Z2$+ 
" OHMS" : GOTO550 : ELSEHPRINT ( 17 , 10 ! 

. — 

July 1987 THE RAINBOW 45 




You nothing 



Obviout direction* to go, 
Hortb, South, East, R*tt 

HelcoH* to The Hi Id H«ttl 
B 



JOVflSOFT! 



*Vegas Slots 

— Color III Only — 

Seven of the most popular slot machine 
games found in VEGAS are yours for the 
price of one. Designed to be as real as 
being there. You simply will not believe your 
eyes when you see the graphics ana realistic 
movement. This is by far one of the most 
outstanding programs we have ever offered. 

Disk only $34.95 




*Lunch Time 

Your chef, Peter Pepper, is surrounded! 
Dodge pickles, hot dogs, and eggs while 
building hanburgers. This high res game 
features 7 difficulty levels of wild 
entertainment. Fast-paced action for either 
one or two players. Have a Burger Time 

Require s 32K & Joysticks $21.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 



*The Wild West 

— Color III Only — 

Get out your six shooter and polish your 
spurs! Journey into the gunslinging land of 
the old west. As sheriff of Dry Gulch, your 
job is to keep the peace. But the notorious 
desperado Black Bart has escaped from jail 
and is on his way to Dry Gulch to recover 
his hidden fortune! 

•Incredible animated 320 x 192 16 color hi 

resolution graphic scenes! 
•Four voice music and sound effects. 
•Save and load games in progress. 
•A vocabulary of over 100 words. 
•Automatically SPEAKS with a Tandy 

Speech Pak. 

Disk Only $25.95 




*Moneyopoly 

Play the popular board game on one ot 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

32K Joystic k Req uired $22.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 




Neutroids 



Fast-paced action, super graphics and 
above all else, sound from your COCO the 
likes you have never heard before. Be 
careful — don't let a meltdown occur before 
you complete the "NEUTROID 
PROJECT"! 

16K — $22.95 
S pec i f y Tape or Disk 




•four CUBE 
•MAUI VICE 

•DONUT 
DILEMMA 



— Now you can play TlC-TAC-TOE in 3D! Pit your wits against the computer Requires 32K — 1 or 2 Players 
and you'll agree — it's a "real challenge" $1895 

— Step into the shoes of Crock & Bubbs with this state-of-the-art that guaran- 64K Ext. Basic & Joystick Requited 
tees excitement and newness every time you play 



Angry Angelo has raided Antonio's Donut Factory and you must restore law 
— and order, But hurry! Time is running out! 



'CHAMBERS — Exciting high res graphics game with multiple screens and outstanding sound 
Destroy the evil creatures in 20 levels, 30-35 rooms per level. 



•CUBER 

•BREWMASTER 
•FANG MAN 

TAK PANIC 



Another exciting release that approaches the challenges of any Video Ar- 
cade. The hazards are many, the dangers always present. 

. Move along to the end of the bars to serve your thirsty customers, but watch 
out for falling glasses and rowdies! Loads of fun! 

■ A high res graphics arcade-type game based on the Dracula legend. You 
are Dracula and must evade countless hazards in your search tor new victims. 

A fast paced game in which 'Pakman' is steered through a maze, pursued 
by four monsters, while trying to eat dots and power pills. 



Disk Only $21.95 
Re quires 32K 
S24.95 

32K & Joysticks Required 

$22.95 
32 K & Joystick Required 

$23.95 

32K — Joysticks Required 
$1795 

16K & Joyssrk s Required 
$2295 

32 K & Joysticks Required 
$2295 



*Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in all! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! Joysticks Required. 
16K $27.95 

Specify Tape or Disk 



*COCO 3 Compatible 

NOVfiSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 

Ordering Information 

Add $3 shipping/handling 
Ml residents add 4% sales tax 
jealers welcome 

Many more titles-write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 





TOM MIX'S MINI-CATALOG 




FLIGHTS 



IS- <bPV 

•Flight 16 

Our very newest flight simulator. A full 
instrument aircraft that features the 
following: 

• Works with all COCO's 

• Realistic flight controls 

• Flight editor included to change flight 
parameters 

• Design your own airports and flight 
areas 

• Flies like Cessna 150 

• Full graphics & sound 

Joysticks Required $34.95 
Specif y Tape or Disk 



—Educational Best-Sellers! — 

* Teachers Database II— Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

■ Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

• Many easy-to-follow menus 

• Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

■ Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

■ Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TDBII $59.95 Disk Only 
32KTDB $42.95 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR IBM PC & 

COMPATIBLES-Holds information on up to 
250 students with as many as 60 individual 
items of data for each. Contains the 
features listed above PLUS. 

Requires 128K - $89.95 

Factpack- Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/-/X" Grades 1-6. 
32K Ext. Basic $29.95 
Sped f y Tape or Disk 

Vocabulary Management System -Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

Requires 16K Ext. Basic/ $42.95 
32K for Printer Output 

Specify Tape or Disk 

Fractions-A Three-Program Package. 
1/Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32K Ext. Basic $35.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 




'Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 

32K Ma c h ine Language 
Joysticks Required $34.95 

Specify Tape or Disk 

Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

* Dragon Slayer- Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
160 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Keyboard 
Disk $24.95 



COCO 3 Compatible 





* Sailor Man -Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 


win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 


64K 


$27.95 


* The King- 




32K 


$27.95 


* Draconian ~ 




32K 


$22.95 


• Ms. Maze- 




32K 


$22.95 


•Kater Pillar II- 




16K 


$22.95 


* Warehouse Mutants- 




16K 


$21.95 


• Buzzard Bait— 




32K 


$22.95 


All Above Specify Tape or Disk 



*P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require acopy of this program). 
The P-51 flight simulator letsyou fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations 
against another player, OR a non com- 
batant computer drone. 

32K Machine Language 
Joys_ticks_ Required $34.95 

Specify Tape or Disk 

'Goldfinder 

Here's the quality you've come to expect 
from TOM MIX. Endless possibilities await 
you in this exciting new creation. Move over 
Goldrunner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLDFINDER. . 

32K & Joysticks. Requir ed $22.95 

Disk 



'Approach Control 
Simulator 

A complete simulation package which will 
lead to countless hours of discovery and 
adventure. 

• Specify Disk or Tape 

• Quick Reference Guide 

• Comprehensive Manual 

• No Joysticks Required 

32K Machine Language $34.95 

'Trapfall 

The "Pitfalls" in this game are many. Hid- 
den treasures, jump over the pits, swing on 
the vine, watch out for alligators, beware of 
the scorpion. Another game for the Color 
Computer with the same high resolution 
graphics as "The King." 

16K Machine Language $23.95 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 



Specif y Tape cr Disk 



Ordering Information 

Call us at 616/676-8172 
for Charge Card orders 
Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

Authors-We pay top 
royalties! 




) i Z 2 $ 

470 Z3$=INKEY$: IFZ3$=" "THEN470EL 
SEIFZ3$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENHPRINT ( 19 , 10 
) ," OHMS":GOTO550:ELSEIFZ3$="K" 
OR Z3$="M"THENHPRINT(18, 10) ,Z3$+ 
" OHMS" : GOTO560 : ELSEHPRINT ( 18 , 10 
) ,Z3$ 

480 Z4 $=INKEY$ : IFZ4 $=" "THEN480EL 
SEIFZ4$=CHR$ (13) THENHPRINT (20, 10 
I )," OHMS" :GOTO560: ELSEHPRINT (19, 
10) , Z4$ 

490 Z5$=INKEY$:IFZ5$=""THEN490EL 
SEIFZ5 $=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENHPRINT ( 2 1 , 10 
) ," OHMS" : GOTO570 : ELSEHPRINT (20 , 
10) ,Z5$ 

500 Z6$=INKEY$:IFZ6$=""THEN500:E 
LSEIFZ6$=CHR$ (13) THENHPRINT (22, 1 
0 ) , " OHMS " : GOTO580 : ELSEHPRINT ( 2 1 
,10) ,Z6$ 

510 Z7$=INKEY$:IFZ7$=""THEN510EL 
SEIFZ7$=CHR$ (13) THENHPRINT (23 , 10 
) , M OHMS" : GOTO590 : ELSEHPRINT (22, 
10) ,Z7$ 

520 Z8$=INKEY$:IFZ8$=""THEN520EL 
SEIFZ8$=CHR$ (13) THENHPRINT (24 , 10 
) , " OHMS " : GOTO600 : ELSEHPRINT (23, 
10) ,Z8$ 

530 Z9$=INKEY$ : IFZ9$=" "THEN530EL 
SEIFZ9 $=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENHPRINT (25,10 
) , " OHMS" SGOTO610 
540 R$=Z$+Z1$:GOTO620 
550 R$=Z$+Z1$+Z2$:GOTO620 
560 R$=Z$+Z1$+Z2$+Z3$:GOTO620 
570 R$=Z$+Z1$+Z2$+Z3$+Z4$:G0T062 

0 

580 R$=Z$+Z1$+Z2$+Z3$+Z4$+Z5$:G0 
TO620 

590 R$=Z$+Z1$+Z2$+Z3$+Z4$+Z5$+Z6 
$:GOTO620 

| 600 R$=Z$+Z1$+Z2$+Z3$+Z4$+Z5$+Z6 
$+Z7$:GOTO620 

610 R$=Z$+Z1+Z2$+Z3$+Z4$+Z5$+Z6$ 
+Z7$+Z8$ 
620 L=LEN(R$)-2 

630 IF MID$ (R$, 2 , 1) <>". " AND MID 
$(R$, 2 , 1) <> M K" AND MID$(R$,2, 1) < 
>"M" AND MID$ (R$ , 3 , 1) <>"K" AND M 
ID$ (R$, 3 , 1) <>"M" AND MID$(R$,4,1 
) <>»K M THENHPAINT ( 160 ,130) ,L, 14 
640 IFMID$ (R$, 3 , 1)="0 M AND MID$ { 
R$,4,1)="K" THEN HPAINT(160, 130) 
,4,14 

650 HPAINT(120, 130) , VAL (LEFT$ (R$ 
, 1) ) , 14 : IF MID$ (R$ , 2 , 1) =» . "THEN 
HPAINT(140, 130) ,VAL(MID$ (R$, 3 , 1) 
),14 ELSEIF MID$(R$,2,1)="K" OR 
MID$(R$,2,1)="M" THEN HPAINT(140 
,130), 0,14 ELSE HPAINT(140, 130) , 



VAL(MID$(R$,2,1) ) ,14 
660 IFMID$(R$,2,1)="K" OR MID$ (R 
$,2,1)="." AND MID$(R$,4,1)="K" 
THENHPAINT (160, 130) , 2 , 14ELSEIFMI 
D$ (R$ , 3 , 1) ="K" THENHPAINT ( 160 , 130 
),3,14 ELSEIFMID$(R$,2,1)="M" OR 
MID$ (R$ , 4 , 1 ) ="M" THENHPAINT ( 160 , 
130) , 5 , 14ELSEIFMID$ (R$, 3 , 1) ="M"T 
HENHPAINT ( 160 , 130 ) ,6,14 
670 HPRINT (11, 13) , "Another one 

Cy/nj?" 

680 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="" THEN 680EL 
SEIFA$<>"Y" AND A$<>"N" THEN680 
ELSE IFA$="Y" THENHPAINT (120, 130 
) ,9,14:HPAINT(140,130) ,9,14:HPAI 
NT (160, 130) ,9,14:HPAINT(0,0) ,14, 
15:GOTO420 ELSE IFA$="N" THEN 69 

0 

690 HPAINT(120, 130) , 9 , 14 i HPAINT ( 
140,130) ,9, 14: HPAINT (160, 130) ,9, 
14:GOTO250 

700 HPAINT (0,0) ,10,15 

710 HPRINT (7,1) , "Press ENTER aft 

er each color" 

720 HPRINT (5,2) , "Please type in 

the first color" 

730 C$=INKEY$:IFC$=""THEN730 ELS 
EHPRINT(17,3) , C$ 

740 C1$=INKEY$ : IFC1$=" "THEN740EL 
SEHPRINT (18,3) ,C1$ 

750 C2$=INKEY$:IFC2$="" THEN750E 
LSEHPRINT ( 19 , 3 ) , C2 $ 
7 60 C3 $=INKEY$ : IFC3 $=" "THEN760EL 
SEIFC3$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN790ELSEHPRIN 
T(20,3) ,C3$ 

770 C4$=INKEY$ : IFC4$=""THEN770EL 
SEIFC4$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN8 0 0 E LS EHPRI N 
T(21,3) ,C4$ 

780 C5$=INKEY$: IFC5$=" "THEN780EL 
SEIFC5$=CHR$(13)THEN810ELSEHPRIN 
T(22,3) ,C5$ 

781 C6$=INKEY$:IFC6$=""THEN781EL 
SEIFC6$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN820 

790 F$=C$+C1$+C2$:GOTO830 
800 F$=C$+C1$+C2$+C3$:GOTO830 
810 F$=C$+C1$+C2$+C3$+C4$ :GOT083 

0 

820 F$=C$+C1$+C2$+C3$+C4$+C5$ 
830 IFLEFT$(F$,3)="BRO" THENC=1 
ELSE IFLEFT$ (F$,1)«"R" THEN02 E 
LSEIFLEFT$(F$,1)="0" THENC=3 ELS 
EIFLEFT$(F$, 1)="Y" THENC=4 ELSEI 
FLEFT$ (F$ , 3 ) ="GRE" THENC=5 ELSEI 
FLEFT$(F$,3)="BLU" THENC=6 ELSEI 
FLEFT$ (F$ , 1) ="V" THENC=7 
840 IFLEFT$ (F$, 3)="GRA" THENC=8 
ELSEIFLEFT$ (F$ , 1) = M W" THENC=9 

850 HPRINT(5, 4) , "Please type in 



48 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



the second color" 

8 6/3 D$=INKEY$ : IFD$=" "THEN8 60ELSE 
HPRINT(17,5) ,D$ 

870 D1$=INKEY$:IFD1$=""THEN870EL 
SEHPRINT(18,5) , Dl$ 

880 D2$=INKEY$:IFD2$=""THEN880EL 
SEHPRINT(19,5) ,D2$ 
890 D3 $=INKEY$ : IFD3 $=" "THEN890EL 
SEIFD3 $=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN920ELSEHPRIN 
T(20,5) ,D3$ 

900 D4 $=INKEY$ : IFD4 $=" "THEN900EL 
SEIFD4$=CHR$ (13 ) THEN9 30ELSEHPRIN 
T(21,5) ,D4$ 

910 D5$=INKEY$:IFD5$= ,,M THEN910EL 
SEIFD5$=CHR$(13)THEN940ELSEHPRIN 
T(22,5) ,D5$ 

911 D6$=INKEY$:IFD6$=""THEN911EL 
SEIFD6$=CHR$(13)THEN950 

920 S$=D$+D1$+D2$:GOTO9 60 
930 S$=D$+D1$+D2$+D3$:GOTO960 
940 S$=D$+D1$+D2$+D3$+D4$:GOT096 

0 

950 S$=D$+D1$+D2$+D3$+D4$+D5$ 
960 IFLEFT$(S$,3)= ,f BLA" THEND=0 
ELSEIFLEFT$ (S$ , 3 ) ^"BRO" THEND=1 
ELSEIFLEFT$(S$, 1)="R" THEND=2 EL 
SEIFLEFT$(S$,1)="0" THEND=3 ELSE 
IFLEFT$(S$,1)="Y" THEND=4 ELSEIF 
LEFT$(S$,3)="GRE" THEND=5 ELSEIF 
LEFT$(S$,3)="BLU" THEND=6 ELSE I 
FLEFT$ (S$ , 1) ="V" THEND=7 
970 IFLEFT$(S$,3)="GRA" THEND=8 
ELSEIFLEFT$ (S$ , 1) = H W" THEND=9 
980 HPRINT (5, 6) , "Please type in 
the third color" 

990 M$=INKEY$: IFM$=" "THEN990ELSE 
HPRINT (17, 7) ,M$ 

1000 M1$=INKEY$ : IFM1$=""THEN1000 

ELSEHPRINT ( 18 , 7 ) , Ml$ 

1010 M2 $=INKEY$ : IFM2 $=" "THEN1010 

ELSEHPRINT (19, 7) ,M2$ 

1020 M3$=INKEY$ : IFM3$=""THEN1020 

ELSEIFM3 $=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN1050ELSEHP 

RINT(20,7) ,M3$ 

1030 M4$=INKEY$:IFM4$=""THEN1030 
ELSEIFM4$=CHR$ ( 13) THEN1060ELSEHP 
RINT(21,7) ,M4$ 

1040 M5$=INKEY$ : IFM5$=" "THEN1040 
ELSEIFM5$=CHR$ (13) THEN1070ELSEHP 
RINT(22,7) ,M5$ 

1041 M6$=INKEY$:IFM6$=""THEN1041 
ELSEIFM6S=CHR$ (13) THEN1080 

1050 T$=M$+M1$+M2$:GOTO1090 
1060 T$=M$+M1$+M2$+M3$:GOTO1090 
1070 T$=M$+M1$+M2$+M3$+M4$:G0T01 
090 

1080 T$=M$+M1$+M2$+M3$+M4$+M5$ 
1090 IFLEFT$(T$,3)="BLA" THENL$= 



'"• ELSEIFLEFT$ (T$ , 3) = M BRO" THENL 
$="0" ELSEIFLEFT$ (T$ , 1 ) ="R" THEN 
L$="00" ELSEIFLEFT$(T$, 1)=»0" T 
HENL$="000" ELSEIFLEFT$ (T$ , 1) ="Y 
" THENL$="0000" ELSEIFLEFT$ (T$ , 3 
)="GRE" THENL$= "00000" 
1100 IFLEFT$ (T$ , 3) ="BLU" THENL$= 
"000000" ELSEIFLEFT$ (T$,1)="V" T 
HEN L$= "0000000" 
1110 L=LEN ( L$ ) 

1120 A=120:B=140:E=160:F=140 

1130 HPAINT (A, F) , C, 14 : HPAINT (B, F 

) , D, 14: HPAINT (E,F) ,L, 14 

1140 HPRINT(14, 10) ,C:HPRINT(15, 1 

0) ,D:HPRINT( 17,10) ,L$+" Ohms" 

1150 HPRINT(11,13) ,"Another one 

[y/n]?" 

1160 A$=INKEY$:IFA$= , " , THEN1160 
ELSEIFA$<>"Y" AND A$<>"N" THEN11 
60 ELSE IFA$="Y" THENHPAINT ( 120 , 
130) ,9, 14: HPAINT (140, 130) , 9, 14 :H 
PAINT (160, 130) ,9, 14: HPAINT (0,0) , 
14,15:GOTO700 ELSEIFA$="N" THEN1 

1170 HPAINT (120, 130) ,9, 14 : HPAINT 
(140,130) ,9, 14: HPAINT (160, 130) ,9 

,14:GOTO250 

1180 HSCREEN 2 

1190 FOR C=0 TO 3 20 STEP 20 

1200 HCOLOR5:HLINE(C,0)-(C,191) , 

PSET 

1210 NEXT C 

1220 A=0:FORB=5 T0315 STEP20 
1230 HPAINT (B, 10) , A, 5 
1240 A=A+1:NEXT B 

1250 HCOLOR0:HLINE(0,0)-(320,50) 
, PSET, BF:HLINE(320, 191) -(0,141) , 
PSET, BF 

1260 HCOLOR13:HPRINT(10,0) , "This 
is a color test . " :HPRINT (5 , 1) , " 
The colors should be as follows" 
: HPRINT (6, 2) , "Black, Brown, Red, Or 
ange,Yellow":HPRINT(6,3) , "Green, 
Blue , Violet , Gray , White" : HPRINT ( 6 
, 4 ) , "Black, White, Black, Green, Bla 
ck" : HPRINT ( l 8 , 5 ) , " Pink . " 
1270 HPRINT (9, 19) , "Are the color 
s correct? " : HPRINT ( 18 , 20 ) , " [ Y/N ] 



ii 



1280 B$=INKEY$:IFB$="" THEN1280 
ELSEIFB$="Y" THEN 1290ELSEIFB$=" 
N" THEN 1300 ELSEIFB$<> ,I Y" OR B$ 
<>"N" THEN1280 
1290 RETURN 

1300 HPRINT(8,21) , "Please ajust 
your colors" : HPRINT (16 , 22 ) , "and 
rerun" 

1310 GOTO1310 /R\ 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 



Achieving 



Simple Equ 



ii V 



By Richard Monroe 





Balance is an educational game that I use with 5- 
to 7-year-old children who have some type of 
learning handicap. It is designed to develop/ 
reinforce problem-solving skills in relation to simple 
equalities, after the concepts of simple addition and 
missing addend have been taught. 

Our school uses Wynroth Math Programs (Copy- 
right 1975 by Lloyd Wynroth, Ph.D., LLB) to teach the 
four basic operations and the base 1 0 system. The screen 
format is based on one type of problem presentation 
from Wynrothfs worksheets. This allows easy transfer 
from paper/ pencil task to the use of the computer. 
To solve a problem, Balance requires a two-step 

Richard Monroe has been a teacher for 20 years and 
has laughl handicapped students for the last 10 years. 
He has a CoCo at home, as well as one in his special 
education classroom. 



THE RAINBOW 



July 



approach. First, the child must solve the left side of the 
equation by adding two randomly chosen numbers from 0 
to 10. The "Scratch Pad" area reproduces this problem in 
the lower part of the screen. This sum must be solved 
correctly before the second step is encountered. If the sum 
is entered correctly, it appears and "floats" over and up to 
the left side of the equation. This sum will stop over the 
plus sign. 

The second step begins with an arrow cue, which points 
to the empty box on the right side of the equation. The child 
is now required to apply the missing addend concept to 
balance the equation. Incorrect responses are not tallied 
during the first step, but are tallied during the second step, 
accompanied with sound cues and screen messages. On the 
third incorrect response, a special sound cue is used to alert 
the teacher. When the problem is solved, the sum on the 
right side of the equation will appear over the plus sign, 
indicating that the equation has indeed been balanced. 

After 10 problems, the screen displays the score and a 
prompt to continue or end the program. The sounds at the 
end of the program were adapted from Raymond Larabie's 
One-Liner that appeared in the December 1985 issue of 

RAINBOW. 

Ideally, the empty box (missing addend) should appear 
in different positions on the screen. But since this is my first 



Variable List 



Variables 


Function 


A$-Z$ 


Draw Statements for alphabet 


N$ 


Numeric array (1-20) 


BX$ 


Draw statement for box 


DA$ 


Draw statement for dash 


EQ$ 


Draw statement for question mark 


PL$ 


Draw statement for plus sign 


RE$ 


INKEY$ response for sum 


RT$ 


INKEY$ response for tens-place 


D.L.N.U.X.Y.Z 


FOR/NEXT variables 


F.S.T 


First, second, and third addends 


O.T 


Ones and tens 


Q 


Number of problems or the problem number 


R 


Number correct on first try 


TR 


Number of attempts to solve problem 


V 


Array for GET/PUT 



graphics program, I will leave that refinement to other 
interested readers/ teachers, who are f ree to modify any part 
of this program. □ 



i 



BALANC I N 




§2 + HH = [T] + \~ 





SCRATCH PAD 



6 + 3 = 



Sample printout 



Lines 

10-80 

90-210 

220 

230-260 

270 
280 

290-340 

350-440 

450-600 

610-750 

760-920 

930-990 

1000-1070 

1080-1550 

1560-1610 

1620-1690 

1700-1720 



Program Outline 

Function 

Remarks for name 

Program set up and send to screen display 
Send to scratch pad routine for first sum 
Determine if sum is double digit, get and evalu- 
ate response 

Evaluate and send to correct response routine 
Evaluate and send to incorrect response rou- 
tine 

Double digit routine 

Incorrect response routine 

Correct response routini 

Scratch pad display anc routine 

Get/Put response 

Screen display routine 

Remarks for credits for alphanumerics 

Alphanumeric strings/array 

Sound warning for help 

Report score 

Continue/end program 



The listing: BALANCE 



270 . 
430 . 
620 . 
760 . 
1010 
1250 
1410 
1600 
END 



.57 
.12 
.31 
254 
.26 
222 
.85 
107 
.66 



70 1 ** 12524 ** 

30 1 ************************* 

90 CLEAR 5000:DIM N$(20):DIM V(3 

100 GOSUB 1040: REM alphanumerics 
110 PCLS(0) 
120 PMODE4,l 
130 SCREEN1 , 1 

140 PCLS:Q=Q+1:TR=0:RT=0:IF Q>10 

THEN GOTO 16 60 
150 GOSUB 960:REM screen display 



1J3 ' 


' ************************* 


160 F=RND(11) -1:S=RND(11) - 




** 


BALANCING EQUATIONS 


** 


D(ll) -1 


30 ' 


** 


A PROGRAM BY 


** 


170 IF T>F+S THEN 160 


40 1 


1 ** 


RICHARD MONROE 


** 


180 IF F+S-T>10 THEN 160 


5J3 1 


' ** 


17 EAST COURT 


** 


190 DRAW fl S8 ; BM2 2 , 6 6"+N$ (F) 


6JZ> 1 


1 ** 


FISHKILL, N. Y. 


** 


200 DRAW fl BM8 8 , 6 6 fl +N$ (S) 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 51 



210 DRAW"BM144,66"+N$(T) 

22 p GOSUB 64j3:REM scratch pad 

23j3 IF F+S-T>9 THEN GOSUB 290: RE 

M double digit response 

240 RE$=INKEY$ : IF RE$=""THEN 240 

250 SOUND 1,4 

26j3 RE= V AL ( RE $ ) +RT 

270 IF RE+T=F+S THEN DRAW " C 0 ; BM2 

20, 22;D6E3G3H3":DRAW"C5;S8 ;BM211 

, 66"+N$ (RE) : GOSUB 45j3:REM correc 

t response 

280 IF RE+TOF+S THEN GOSUB 350: 

REM incorrect response 

290 REM DOUBLE DIGIT RESPONSE 

300 RT$=INKEY$ : IF RT$=" "THEN 300 

310 IF RT$<>"1" THEN SOUND 200,5 

: SOUND lj3j3,5:GOTO 300 

320 SOUND 1,4 

33JZ) RT=VAL(RT$) *10 

340 RETURN 

350 REM incorrect response 

360 TR=TR+1 

370 IF TR=1 THEN DRAW"S8 ; BM3j3 , 13 

j3"+0$+0$+P$+S$+DA$ 

380 IF TR=2 THEN DRAWS8 ; BM7j3 , 15 

j3"+0$+N$+C$+E$ : DRAW "BM 14,0 , 15JZ)"+M 

$+0$+R$+E$ 

39j3 IF TR=>3 THEN DRAW"S8 ; BMlj3j3 , 
18j3"+H$+E$+L$+P$ : GOSUB 16j3j3:REM 
help sound warning 

400 IF TR>1 THEN LINE ( 8 , 1 10 ) - ( 2 4 

8, 188) , PRESET, BF 

41JZ) SOUND 2j3j3,3:SOUND 185,6 

42J3 DRAW"BM11JZ), 13JZ)"+T$+R$+Y$ 

430 DRAW"BM16j3, 13JZ)"+A$+G$+A$+I$+ 

N$ 

44 0 GOTO 23JZ) 

45,0 REM correct response 

460 DRAWBM179 , 4J3"+N$ (RE+T) 
470 IF TR=0 THEN R=R+1 
48j3 FOR Z=l TO 255 STEP 10 
490 SOUND Z,l 
500 NEXT Z 

51J3 DRAW"BM18j3 , 4J3"+N$ (RE+T) 
52j3 IF Q=l THEN DRAW'S 12 ; BM3J3 , 16 
J3"+B$+L$+A$+S$+T$ : DRAW"BM16j3 , 16j3 
"+0$+F$+F$ 

530 IF Q=2 THEN DRAW"S12 ; BK40 , 16 
JZ)"+N$+I$+C$+E$ : DRAW"BM140 , 16JZ)"+W 
$+0$+R$+K$ 

540 IF Q=3 THEN DRAWS12 ; BM7J3 , 16 

j3"+A$+DA$+DA$+DA$+0$+K$ 

55j3 IF Q=4 THEN DRAW" S 12 ; BMlj3 j3 , 1 

6j3"+W$+0$+W$ 

56j3 IF Q=5 THEN DRAW"S12 ; BMlj3 , 16 

j3"+G$+0$+0$+D$: DRAW"BMllj3, 16j3"+T 

$+H$+I$+N$+K$+E$+R$ 

57j3 IF Q=6 THEN DRAW " S 1 2 ; BM8 0 ,16 



j3"+G$+R$+E$+A$+T$ 

58j3 IF Q=7 THEN DRAW"S12 ; BM5j3 , 16 

j3"+G$+0$+0$+D$+DA$+J$+0$+B$ 

59j3 IF Q=8 THEN DRAW"S12 ; BM7j3 , 16 

j3"+G$+E$+N$+I $+U$+S$ 

600 IF Q=9 THEN DRAW"S12 ; BM4j3 , 16 

j3"+F$+A$+N$+T$+A$+S$+T$+I$+C$ 

61j3 IF Q=lj3 THEN DRAW"S12 ; BM82 , 1 

6j3"+S$+U$+P$+E$+R$ 

620 LINE (8,llj3)-(248,188) , PRESET 
, BF 

63j3 GOTO 14J3 

640 REM scratch pad 

65j3 DRAW"S4 ;BM85 , 12j3"+S$+C$+R$+A 
$+T$+C$+H$:DRAW"BM145, 12j3"+P$+A$ 
+D$ 

660 DRAW"S8 ;BMlj31, 15j3"+N$ (F) : DRA 
W"BM128, 152"+PL$:DRAW"BM142, 15j3" 
+N$(S) 

67j3 DRAW"BM17 2,152"+EQ$ 

68j3 DRAW" BM17J3, 117 ;R8F1F1D4E3G3H 

3 

69j3 IF F+S>9 THEN GOSUB 2 9j3:REM 
double digit 

700 RE$=INKEY$ : IF RE$="" THEN 70 
0 

710 RE=VAL ( RE $ ) +RT 

72j3 IF RE=F+S THEN SOUND 1 , 4 : DRA 

W"S8;BM18j3, 15j3"+N$ (RE) 

73j3 IF REOF+S THEN SOUND 200,5: 

SOUND lj3j3,5:RT=j3:GOTO 64j3 

740 GOSUB 79j3:REM get/put respon 

se 

75j3 IF RE=F+S THEN SOUND 168, 5 :D 
RAW"S8;BM54, 39"+N$ (RE) : RT=j3 : LINE 
(8, llj3) - (248 , 188) , PRESET, BF 
760 FOR Z=125 TO 255 STEP 2j3:SOU 
ND Z,1:NEXT Z 

770 IF RE=F+S THEN DRAW"BM22j3 , 22 

;D6E3G3H3 

78j3 RETURN 

79,0 REM get/put response 

800 GET(175, 135) -(210, 165) ,V,G 
81j3 FOR D=l TO 2,0 STEP 3 
82j3 PUT (175, 135+D) - (21j3, 165+D) , V 
, PSET 

83 0 SOUND D, 1 
840 NEXT D 

85j3 FOR L=l TO 126 STEP 3 

860 PUT(175-L, 135+D) -(21J3-L, 165+ 

D) ,V,PSET 

870 SOUND L,l 

88j3 NEXT L 

89j3 FOR U=l TO 14 0 STEP 5 

900 PUT(175-L,16j3-U)-(21j3-L,19j3- 

U) ,V,PSET 

910 SOUND U+D,l 

92 0 NEXT U 



52 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



- 'mm 

:->:-:-::■:.•■■ 




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XTERM 

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• Menu oriemed 

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• Definable macro keys 

* Works with standard serial port, RS232 

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$49.95 with source $89.95 



m 



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XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

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Full block commands 

Find and Replace commands 

Execute OS-9 commands fiom within 

Proportional spacing supported 

Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
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10 header/footers 

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iiilii 




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This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
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outputs include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
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Journal Posting List. $79 95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory control, 
with user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis of the business' sales and the sales force. One 
may enter/update inventory data, enter sales, run five 
sales, analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter /update salesman iecords, and 
update the SB AP inventory. $59 95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up to 200 hourly and salaried employees 
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for straight time, overtime and bonus pay and del- 
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Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as j 
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Includes detailed audit trails and history reports 
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Designed for the maintenance of vendor and A/P 
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(612) 633-6161 



930 DRAW n S12 ; BM6 4 , 7 2 ,f +PL$ 

94,0 DRAWBM15 , 76;R7 4 
9 5J25 RETURN 

9 60 REM screen display 

97J3 LINE (8 , 1) -(248, 18) ,PSET,B 

98J3 DRAW'S 8 ;BM64, 15 M +B$+A$+L$4-A$ 

+N$+C$+I$+N$+G$ 

99,0 DRAW" BM1J2J8 , 96 ;El J 0F10L2j3 

CIRCLE (128 , 96) , 1 
1010 DRAW'S 12 ; BM18 , 7 2 "+BX$+PL$+B 
X$+EQ$+BX$+PL$+BX$ 
1020 RETURN 
Ij33j3 
Ij34j3 
Ij35j3 
Ij36j3 
Ij37j3 
Ij38j3 
1090 
1100 
1110 



f -k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 



** 
* -k 
■k -k 
■k-k 
■k -k 



ALPH ANUMER ICS 
DATA BASED ON 
GEO GAME 
BY J. S. PARAVATI 
RAINBOW, 8/84 
AND R. VAN DYKE 
TRS-80 NEWS, 4/82 

' -k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k'k 

1120 A$="U4E2F2D2NL4D2 ;BM+3 ,0" 
1130 B$ = "U6R3F1D1G1NL3F1D1G1L3 ;B 
M+7 ,0" 

1140 C$="BM+1 , -0 ;H1U4E1R2F1 ; BM+0 

,+4 ;G1L2 ;BM+6, 0" 

1150 D$="U6R3F1D4G1L3 ; BM+7 ,0" 

1160 E$="NR4U3NR2U3R4 ; BM+3 , +6 " 

1170 F$== ,! U3NR2U3R4 ; BM+3 , + 6" 

1180 G$= M BM+1 , -0 ; H1U4E1R2 Fl ; BM+0 



,+2 ;NL1D2G1L2 ; BM+6 ,0" 
1190 H$ = "U3NTJ3R4NU3D3;BM+3,0" 
12^0^ I$="BM+1,0 ;R1NR1U6NL1R1;BM+ 
4, +6" 

1210 J$="BM+0, -1 ;F1R1E1U5NL1R1; B 
M+3 ,6" 

1220 K$="U3NU3RlNE3F3;BM+3,0" 
1230 L$="NU6R4Ul;BM+3,+l" 
1240 M$="U6F2ND1E2D6; BM+3 ,0" 
1250 N$ = M U6F1D1F2D1F1NU6 ; BM+3 ,0" 
1260 O$="BM+1,0;H1U4E1R2F1D4G1L2 
;BM+6 , / 0 n 

1210 P$= M U6R3F1D1G1L3 ; BM+7 , 3" 
1280 Q$="BM+1,0;H1U4E1R2F1D3G1NH 
1NF1G1L1/BM+6, 0" 

1290 R$="U6R3F1D1G1L2NL1F3 ;BM+3, 
pit 

1300 S$="BM+0, -1;F1R2E1U1H1L2H1U 
lElR2Fl;BM+3 ,+5" 

1310 T$= M BM+2 ,+0;U6NL2R2 ; BM+3 ,+6 



132$ U$="BM+0 , -1 ; NU5F1R2E1U5 ; BM+ 
3 , 6" 

1330 V$=» 3M+0, -6 ;D2F1D1F1ND1E1U1 
E1U2 ;BM+3 ,+6" 

1340 W$="NU6E2NU1F2U6 ; BM+3 , 6" 
135$ X$="UlE4Ul;BM-4 ,0 ;D1F4D1;BM 
+ 3,0" 

136$ Y$= n BM+0 , -6 ;D2F2ND2E2U2 ; BM+ 
3 , 6" 



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RAINBOW 

CJRTIflCATION 
SEAS. 




Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that 
are useful/helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and 
it is best to make several saves, at least one of them 
in ASCII format, We're sorry, but we do not have time 
to key in programs. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary explaining how the 
program works. Generally, we're much more inter- 
ested in how your submission works and runs than 
how you developed it. Programs should be learning 
experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Those wishing remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed 
information on making submissions, please send a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submis- 
sions Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some 
more comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



54 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



137jZJ Z$ = "NR4U1E4U1L4 ;BM+7 ,6" 
138)3 BX$= f, U9R9D9L9 ; BM+16 , J3 n 

139j3 DA$="BM+2 , -3 ;R2 ; BM+4 , +3 " 
14J3J3 EQ$="BM-3 , -5 ;R3 ; BM-3 , +3 ;R3 ; 
BM+3 , +2" 

141)8 PL$= ,f BM-2 , -4 ;R4 ; BM-2 , -2 ; D4 ; 

BM+6,+2" 

142j3 QU$= H BM+2 , -5 ;E1R2F1D1G2 ; BM+ 
J3,+1;D1" 

143J25 REM numeric $ 

144,0 N$(J3) ="BM+1, / 0;H1U4E1R2F1D4G 
lL2;BM+6,j3" 

145J3 N$ (1)="BM+1, J3;R1NR1U6G1;BM+ 
5, + 5" 

146j3 N$ ( 2 ) = tr NR4UlElRlE2UlHlL2Gl ; 
BM+9,+5" 

147J8 N$(3)= ,r BM+J3, -1 ; F1R2E1H2E2H1 
L3;BM+ljZJ,6 ?? 

148J2? N$(4) ="BM+3 , J3 ;U2NR1L3U1E3D3 
;BM+6, 3 ,f 

14 9J25 N$(5) = "BM+j3, -1 ; F1R2E1U2H1L3 
U2R4 ;BM+5,+6" 

15J25.0 N$ (6) ="BM+4 , -5 ;H1L2G1D4 F1R2 

E1U1H1L3 ;BM+lj3,+3'» 

151J3 N$(7) ="U1E4U1L4 ; BM4-1J3 ; +6 !f 

152j3 N$(8)="BM+1, -J3 ; H1U1E1H1U1E1 

R2F1D1G1NL2F1D1G1L2 ; BM+8 , J3 " 

153J3 N$(9)="BM+0 , -1 ; F1R2E1U4H1L2 

G1D1F1R2 ;BM+6, +3" 

154j3 T=1:O=0:FOR N=1J3 TO 2jZJ 



155J2J N$ (N)=N$(T)+N$ (0) 
156j3 0=0+1 

157 IF 0>9 THEN T=T+ 1:0=0 

158) 3 NEXT N 

159) 3 RETURN 

16j3j3 REM help sound warning 

161)3 FOR Z=l TO 5 
162j3 SOUND 2J3J3,5 

163) 3 SOUND 1)3)3,5 

164) 3 NEXT Z 
16 5)3 RETURN 

166) 3 REM report card 

167) 3 DRAW"BM5J3, 4j3 ff +S$+C$+0$+R$+E 
$+DA$ 

168) 3 DRAW" BM17 8 , 4)3" 4- N$ (R) 

169) 3 LINE (8,8) - (246, 18)3), PSET , B 
17)3)3 POKE178,l:PAINT(128,7) , ,5:P 
OKE178 , 3 

171) 3 DRAW "BM 6 5 , 125 "+A$+G$+A$+I$+ 

N$+QU$ 

172) 3 DRAW" BM95 , 1 6)3 ,r + Y$ + DA$ + N$ 
1730 Z = 16)3:FOR X=l TO 3 : FOR Y = l 
TO 1)3: SOUND Z, 2: READ Z : NEXT Y : RE 
STORE: NEXT X : DATA 16)3,3,224,35,3 
5,83,99,51,243 ,8)3, )3 

174)3 RE$=INKEY$ : IF RE$="" THEN 1 
74)3 

1750 IF RE$— 11 Y M THEN Q=)3:G0T0 14 
0 

1760 IF RE$<>"N fl THEN END /7S 



SPECIAL DEAL ON THE GREATEST SOFTWARE DEAL 

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July 1987 THE RAINBOW 55 



EDUCATION NOTES 




Spell Down to 
Vocabulary Fitness 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



This month, we present a language 
arts game we have played with 
classes for many years. It is use- 
ful for helping students become more 
familiar with certain key words. These 
are usually spelling words, but may be 
any kind of vocabulary words. 

We call this game Spelldown. It is a 
way of practicing spelling and diction- 
ary skills. A key word is introduced on 
the blackboard or computer. The word 
is then written vertically, letter by letter, 
down the side. The word is also written 
in backward spelling order. 

The idea is to make a word that 
begins with the first letter and ends with 
the last. Next, try to make a word that 
starts with the second letter and ends 
with the second to last letter. The game 
proceeds in this fashion until all of the 
letters are used. The student has now 
thought of or used the dictionary to 
locate as many words as there are letters 
in the key word. 

Let us suppose that the word "disk" 
is typed in as the key word. The com- 



Steve Blyn leaches 
both exceptional 
and gifted children, 
holds two master's 
degrees and has 
won awards for the 
design of programs 
to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



J 



puter prints the letters D, I, S and K 
down the side of the screen. The letters 
K, S, I and D form the word spelled 
backward. They are also written down 
the side of the screen. The screen looks 
like this: 



D - 


- K 


I - 


- S 


S - 


- I 


K - 


- D 



The student's task is to figure out 
words that begin and end with the 
letters on each line. Examples might be 
as follows: 

DESK 
ICICLES 
SOME 
KEND 

After these four words are entered, 
the computer has you evaluate each. 
Since the words "desk," "icicles" and 
"kend" begin and end with the correct 
letters, you will merely be asked 
whether or not they are correct — real 
words spelled correctly. The child's 
honesty is assumed here. 

A dictionary would have to be in- 
serted into this program if we wanted 
the computer to check the spelling of the 
many words that are possible. We would 
hope, instead, that the child uses a real 



dictionary to check the spelling. A 
teacher, parent or a buddy may also be 
used to check the correctness of these 
words. 

At this point, the student should get 
credit for the words "desk" and "ici- 
cles." Since "kend" is not a real word, 
no credit is given for it. 

Words that do not start or end with 
the proper letters are flagged by the 
computer. A message appears to tell the 
student where the mistake is. In our 
example, the word "some" is incorrect 
because even though it is a real word, 
it does not end with the required letter 
I. 

After all of the words are evaluated, 
the score for this round is shown. In our 
sample, the child receives a score of 50 
percent. The student may then either 
press the letter E to end the program or 
A to go again. 

Here is how the main program ele- 
ments operate. Lines 50 to 80 ask the 
child to put in a key word. The program 
rejects words that are longer than 10 
letters. The reason for this is that the 
screen would not accommodate longer 
words neatly. The new CoCo 3 has a 
larger screen that overcomes such prob- 
lems. 

Lines 90 to 190 print the first and the 
last letters of the word up and down 
near the right side of the screen. Lines 
210 to 240 allow the child to put in the 
created words. Lines 260 to 360 evaluate 
these words. Correct words are stored 



56 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



by the variable R, so Line 380 can then 
print out the final score at the end of 
each session. 

We have played this game in classes 
with several computers. The children 
were divided into teams. Each team 
types in the same key word. The team 



having the most complete list of words 
was judged the winner. We have also 
tried to encourage greater thought by 
sometimes assigning greater point 
values for longer words. We have en- 
couraged the use of real dictionaries by 
the students during the game. Our 



feeling is that it is important to encour- 
age students' use of reference materials 
whenever possible. 

As always, we at Computer Island 
hope that your children or students 
both enjoy and learn from our pro- 
grams. □ 



The listing: SPELDOWN 

1J8 REM SPELLDOWN GAME 

2J3 REM (C) STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER I 

SLAND , STATEN ISLAND , NY , 1987 

3j3 CLS:P$=STRING$(3 2,255) 

4j3 PRINT@8, "spelling game"; 

5j3 PRINT@384 , "TYPE A SPELLING WO 

RD" ; 

6J3 INPUT A$ 

7J3 A=LEN(A$) :X=A 

8JZJ IF A>lj3 THEN PRINT@48j3 , "THIS 
WORD IS TOO LONG" ; :FORT=lTO 2j3j3j3 
: NEXT T : RUN 
9j3 FOR T= 1 TO A 

Ij3j3 PRINT@34+D,MID$ (A$,T, 1)+" " + 
f i 1 1 . 

11J3 PLAY"O4L20AB" 
12j3 D=D+3 2 
13 jd NEXT T 
14J3 T=j3 : D=0 

15j3 FOR T=A TO 1 STEP-1 

160 PRINT@4j3+D, "+MID$ (A$ , T , 1 ) 



: LINE INPUT C$ 



17) 3 D=D+32 

18) 3 PLAY"02L2j3AB" 

19) 3 NEXT T 
2)3)3 D=)3:T=)3 

21) 3 FOR T= 1 TO A 

22) 3 PRINT@47+D, "" 
(T) 

23) 3 D=D+32 

24) 3 NEXT T 

2 5)3 PRINT P$; 

26) 3 FOR T= 1 TO A 

27) 3 EN$=" " :PRINT@384 , " ": PRINT© 
416," " 

28) 3 IF LEFT$(C$(T) , 1 ) <>MID$ ( A$ , 
,1) THEN PRINT@3 8 4,T; 11 . " ;C$(T) 

DOESN ! T START" : PRINT " WITH 
THE LETTER "MID$ ( A$ , T , 1 ) : GOTO 

29) 3 IF RIGHT$(C$(T) ,1)<>MID$(A$, 
A,l) THEN PRINT@384,T; " . ";C$(T) 
" DOESN'T END": PRINT" WITH T 
HE LETTER " ;MID$ ( A$ , A, 1) : GOTO 33 

0 



T 
it 



33 



3)3)3 PRINT@384,T;". IS "C$(T)" CO 
RRECT ? "; 

31) 3 EN$=INKEY$ 

32) 3 IF EN$="Y" THEN R=R+1 ELSE I 
F EN$ = "N" THEN W=W+1 ELSE 31)3 

33) 3 PRINT EN$ 

34) 3 AN$ = INKEY$ 

35) 3 IF AN$=CHR$(13) THEN 36)3 ELS 
E 34)3 

3 6)3 A=A-1:NEXT T 

37) 3 PRINT@384,P$+P$; 

38) 3 PRINT@452 , "YOUR SCORE IS"; IN 
T( (R/X) 5) ;"%" 

39) 3 PRINT@484 , "PRESS f A f OR ! E f 



ii 



4)3)3 IN$=INKEY$ 

41) 3 IF IN$="A" THEN RUN ELSE IF 
IN$="E" THEN 42)3 ELSE 4)3)3 

42) 3 CLS : END ^ 



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July 1987 THE RAINBOW 57 



ADVENTURE 




58 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 





efis 




Tfie kingdom of 

lie Lufin. 



Houia Larson 




Every morning and evening, I travel across 
Rigaud Mountain to reach the school where I 
work. One day, I was intrigued by small tracks 
left in the snow; tracks that bore no resemblance 
to the ones already familiar to me and whose sight usually 
delighted me: deers being pursued by coyotes, hares looking 
for food and partridges walking to their hide-outs. I was 
curious as to what sort of creature could niake tracks like 
that, but 1 soon forgot about them. 

One rainy day last summer, I noticed the same peculiar 
tracks glistening on a big rock by the side of the road. My 
curiosity was piqued. The following weekend, I decided to 
make an expedition to examine those strange tracks that 
sometimes looked like very small human footprints. 

What I couldn't have known was where this expedition 
would lead me — right into a fairy world! This world is now 
for you to discover. Can you get to the wonderful, tiny 
human being I discovered with luck and magic? The only 
thing I can tell you is that his domain is well-protected 
against intruders. Good luck! You're going to need it. 

Le Lutin (The Elf) is a beginners graphics Adventure. It 
doesn't have a save feature, but it offers an interesting 
challenge in the fascinating world of imagination. Like most 
Adventures, Le Lutin requires two-word commands. 
The only abbreviations used are INV for inventory and 

V- 

Louis Parson is the principal of a small elementary school 
in Ste-Marthe, Quebec. He also is in charge of coordinating 
the children's computer classes for the Vaudreuil School 
Board, whose elementary schools all have a computer 
laboratory of at least 15 CoCos. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 59 




EXAM for examine, When asked for the password, you need 
only type one word. All other words should be completely 
and correctly spelled. You should not be surprised if some 
objects leave traces after being picked up (this is an 
imaginary world). 

( Questions about this Adventure may be addressed to the 
author at 82 St. Pierre, CP. 12, Rigaud, Quebec, Canada 
JOP IPO. Be sure to include an SASE when writing for a 
reply.) □ 




YOU ARE IH THE DEAD WOODS 

OBVIOUS EXITS: HORTH SOUTH EAST WEST 

YOU SEE A KEY . . . A SWAMP 

AMD HOW? 



Editor's Note: The following listing is for the CoCo 
1 and 2. A version for the CoCo 3 is included on 
this month's RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON 
DISK. 




5 84 160 

13 59 183 

28 126 198 

48 75 214 

68 71 219 

84 168 228 

94 135 236 

104 13 247 

116 100 260 

124 138 272 

140 61 277 



.20 
156 
244 
.39 
162 
194 
242 
. .4 
.50 
243 
181 



290 77 

296 53 

302 8 

310 9 

317 126 

321 202 

332 16 

346 69 

EN D 27 



T 



The listing: LE LUTIN 

1 POKE65495, j3 : CLSjZJ : PRINT@99 , "les 
!I ;CHR$(12 8) ;"lutins";CHR$(12 8) ; 11 
du" ;CHR$ (12 8) ; "mont" ;CHR$ ( 128 ) ; 11 
rigaud"; : PRINT@2 38 , "par" ; : PRINT© 
329,"louis";CHR$(128) ; "parson" ; : 
PRINT@459, "<C> 1986" ; :FORX=lT03j3 
jdjd : NEXT: CLE AR8j3j3 : PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS1 : 
SCREEN1, 1 

2 X=14:Y=15:DIML$(X+1) :DIMLO$(Y+ 
1) :DIMO$(Y+l) :DIMC$(22) :DIMT(4,X 
+1) :DIMC(27) :DIMO(Y+l) :DIMG$(Y+1 
) :DIMW$(35) : W$ ( 1 ) ="BM+3 , J8 ;U4E2F2 
D2 L4R4D2 " : W$ ( 2 ) ="BM+3 , j3 ; R3 L3U6R3 
FDGL3R3FDGBR" : W$ ( 3 ) ="BM+3 , j3 ; BUFR 



YOU ARE AMONG THE ROCKS 

OBVIOUS EXITS: EAST 

YOU SEE A STRAH6E BOULDER 



AND HOW? 

I 



] 



3L3HU4ER3BD6":W$ ( 4 ) ="BM+3 , 0 ;R3L3 
U6R3FD4GBR" 

3 W$ (5)="BM+3, j3;R4L4U3R3L3U3R4BD 
6":W$ (6) ="BM+3,0;U3R3L3U3R4BD6BL 
11 : W$ ( 7 ) = " BM+3 , J3 ; BUFR2 EUHLBL2 D2U4 
ER3BRBD6" :W$ (8) ="BM+3 , 0 ;U6D3R4U3 
D6" :W$ (9) ="BM+3 ,0;R4L2U6L2R4BD6" 
: W$ ( 10 ) ="BM+3 , 0 ; BUFR2EU5BD6 " : W$ ( 
ll)="BM+3 ,j3;U6D3RE3G3F3" 

4 W$ (12) = "BM+3 , j3;BU6D6R4BL" :W$ (1 
3)="BM+3,J3;U6F2E2D6":W$ (14)="BM+ 
3 , 0;U6DF2F2DU6BD6 ; 11 : W$ ( 15 ) ="BM+3 
,0; BUU4ER2FD4GL2HFBR3" :W$ (16)="B 
M+3 , 0 ;U6R3FDGL2BD3BR3 » : W$ ( 17 ) ="B 
M+3 , 0 ; BUU4ER2FD4GL2HFR2EHF2BL" : W 
$ (18)="BM+3, j3;U6R3FDGL3R2F2D" 

5 W$ (19) =" BM+3 , 0 ; BUFR2EUHL2HEUR2 
FBD5" :W$ (2j3)="BM+3 , j3 ; BU6R4L2D6BR 
2 " : W$ ( 2 1 ) =" BM+3 , 0 ; BU6D5FR2EU5BD6 
":W$ (2 2) ="BM+3,p;BU6D2FD2FEU2EU2 
BD6" :W$ (23)="BM+3 , j3;BU6D6E2F2U6B 
D6" :W$ (24)="BM+3 ,p;UE4UBL4DF4D": 
W$(25) ="BM+3, j3;BU5UDF2E2UDG2D3BR 



ii 



6 W$ (2 6) ="BM+3, j3;BU6R4DG4DlR4" 

7 DATA IN THE GREEN WOODS , IN THE 
GREEN WOODS, AMONG THE ROCKS , AMO 

NG THE ROCKS, IN THE DEAD WOODS , I 
N THE DEAD WOODS 

8 DATA IN THE DEAD WOODS , IN A SW 
AMP, IN THE SECRET CAVES , IN THE G 
REEN WOODS, AMONG THE ROCKS 

9 DATA NOWHERE. . . , IN THE LEPRECH 
AUN'S PLACE , NOWHERE 

lj3 DATA AN URN , WIND, 7 , BUTTERFLY 

WINGS , WINGS ,2, ,*,9,A KEY , KE 

Y , 5 , A PARCHMENT , PARCHMENT , 3 

1 1 DATAA MUSHROOM , MUSHROOM , 1 4 , A 
SHOVEL, SHOVEL, 1, A TUBE , TUBE , 4 , A 
TORCH , TORCH , 6 , A BOX , BOX, 10 

12 DATAA STRANGE BOULDER ,*, 11 ,. . 



60 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



.A SWAMP , * , 4 , . . . A SWAMP,*, 5, SIGN 
S ON A TREE,*, 6, . . .A SWAMP,*, 6 

13 DATA 2, 0, 10, 11, 4,1,5,3,4,-7,2 
, 0 , 1000 ,2,-2,3, 1000 , 10 , 6 , 2 , 1000 , 
7, 0,5, 6, 0,0, 10, 1000 , 1000 , 1000 , 10 
00,-3,-4,0,-2,5,0,7,1,-7,0,1,0,0 
,-1,-5,0,0,1000,-6,0,0,-3,0,-6 

14 DATATAKE , 1 , GET , 1 , PUT , 2 , DROP , 2 
,GO, 3 , LOOK, 4 , EXAM, 4 , READ, 4 , USE , 5 
, GLUE , 6 , RUB , 7 , STRIKE , 7 , UNLOCK , 8 , 
OPEN, 9, EAT, 10, DIG, 11, LIGHT, 12 , SW 
IM, 13 , FLY, 14, PUSH, 15, DRINK, 16, IN 
V,17 

15 FORC=lTOX:READL$ (C) :NEXTC 

16 FORC=lTOY : READLO$ (C) ,0$ (C) , 0 ( 
C) :NEXTC 

17 F0RC=1T0X:READT(1,C) ,T(2 , C) ,T 
(3,C) ,T(4,C) :NEXTC 

18 T$(1)="N0RTH":T$(2)="S0UTH":T 
$ (3) ="EAST" :T$ (4) ="WEST" 

19 N=2 2 

20 F0RC=1T0N:READC$ (C) ,C(C) : NEXT 
C 

21 L=ll 

2 2 GOSUB3 2 5 
2 3 SCREEN1,1 
2 4 GOSUB3 3 5 

25 PCLSl:ONLGOSUB178 , 211, 227 , 234 
,2 50,271, 275,280,281, 288, 297,305 
,310,318 

2 6 FORC=lTOY:IFO(C)=LTHENGOSUB3 2 
5:POKE178 , 3 : DRAWG$ (C) 

27 NEXTC 

28 IFL=9ANDWM=1ANDO(9)=1000THENG 
OSUB2 8 3 

29 IFL=11ANDZA=1THENGOSUB304 

30 IFL=14ANDVL=1THENG0SUB3 2 4 

31 C0L0R8,l:N$= fl Y0U ARE " + L$(L): 
DRAW n BM5 , 108 ; " : GOSUB150 

' 32 N$= n OBVIOUS EXITS: 11 

33 F0RC=1T04 : IFT(C,L) >0THENN$=N$ 
+T$(C)+" 11 

3 4 NEXTC 

35 DRAW'BM 5 , 123 ; " : GOSUB150 

36 N$="YOU SEE 11 

37 F0RC=1T0Y:IF0(C)=LTHENN$=N$+L 
0$(C)+" " 

38 NEXTC 

39 IFLEN (N$) <3 9THENGOT041 

40 IFLEN (N$) >38THENGOT0339 

41 IFN$= n YOU SEE n THENN$= n YOU SE 
E NOTHING INTERESTING" 

42 DRAW'BM 5 , 138 ; 11 : GOSUB150 : GOTO 
43 

43 N$="AND NOW?": DRAW "BM0, 168;": 
GOSUB150 

44 LINE(10,172)-(255,184) ,PSET,B 



:SOUND2 50 , 1 
4 5 C0L0R6,1 

46 A$="":GOSUB165 

47 IFA$= n CALM f, ANDL=6ANDZE=lTHENG 
OT0338 

48 IFZE=1ANDL=6ANDA$<>" CALM" THEN 
330 

49 F0RC=1T0LEN(A$) : IFMID$ (A$,C, 1 
)=" "THENA1$=LEFT$ (A$,C-1) : B$=MI 
D$ (A$ , C+l , LEN ( A$ ) -C) : G0T05 1ELSEN 
EXTC 

50 A1$=A$ 

51 F0RC=1T0N 

52 IFC$(C)=A1$THENA=C(C) :G0T055 

53 NEXTC 

54 GOSUB331:N$="WHAT. . ■ ?" : G0SUB1 
50 : G0SUB3 3 2 : G0T04 6 

55 ONAGOT056, 65,73,78,98,100,102 
,106,108,113, 116, 119,121, 122, 12 4 
,126,133 

56 IFB$="URN"THENB$="WIND" 

57 IFB$="MATCHES"THENB$="BOX" 

58 IFVV<4THEN59ELSEGOT064 

59 F0RC=1T0Y 

61 IFB$=0$ (C) AND 0(C) =L AND 0$ (C 
)<>»*" THEN 0 (C) =1000 :GOSUB325: P 
OKE178,0:DRAW G$ (C) : G0SUB3 3 1 : N$= 
"DONE YOU HAVE IT ! " : W=VV+1 : GOSU 
B150 :GOSUB332 : GOSUB334 :GOT036 

62 NEXTC 

63 GOSUB331:N$ = fl YOU CAN 1 T fl : GOSUB 
150:GOSUB3 32 :GOT04 6 

64 GOSUB331:N$="YOUR HANDS ARE F 
ULL" : GOSUB150 : GOSUB332 : GOT046 

65 I FB $ = " MATCHES "THENB$ = 11 BOX" 

66 IFB$="URN"THENB$="WIND" 

67 IFB$=" TORCH "THEN WM=0 

68 IFB$="TORCH" AND L=9 THENPOKE 
178,0:GOSUB284 

6 9 F0RC=1T0Y 

70 IFB$=0$ (C) ANDO(C)=1000THENO(C 
)=L:VV=VV-l:GOSUB325:POKE178, 3 : D 
RAWG$ (C) : POKE178 ,0 : G0SUB3 3 1 : N$=" 
DONE. . . ! " :GOSUB150 :GOSUB3 32 

71 NEXTC 

72 GOSUB33 4:GOT03 6 

73 IFB$="H0LE"ANDL=11ANDZA=1THEN 
L=3 : GOTO 2 5 

74 F0RC=1T04 : IFB$=T$ (C) THENDR=C: 
GOT07 6 

75 NEXTC:GOT04 6 

76 IFT (DR, L) >0THENL=T (DR, L) : IFL= 
1000THENGOSUB331:N$="YOU ARE SIN 
KING . . . TOO BAD . " : GOSUB150 : G0T02 8 
6 

77 GOT024 

78 IFA$=Al$THENGOSUB3 35:GOT02 5 



July 1987 THE RA/NBOW 61 



79 GOSUB3 31 

80 IFB$="WIND"THENB$="URN" 

81 I FB$=" BOX" THENB$=" MATCHES" 

82 IFB$="URN" ANDO (1) ~l / 0 / 0 / 0THENN$ = 
"IT IS PRESSURIZED WIND" : GOSUB15 
j2S:GOSUB3 3 2 :GOT046 

83 IFB$="RING" ANDO ( 3 ) = 1)3)3)3THENN$ 
="A GOLD RING. . .MAGIC?" :GOSUB15)3 
: GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 

84 IF B$=" WINGS "ANDO (2 ) = 1)3)3)3 THENN 
$="HUGE AND VERY STRONG" : GOSUB15 
/ 0:GOSUB3 32 :GOT04 6 

85 IFB$="KEY" ANDO (4) =l / 0 / 0 / 0THENN$ = 
"MADE OF SILVER. . .PRECIOUS. " :GOS 
UB15)3:GOSUB33 2 :GOT046 

86 I F B $ = " PARCHMENT "ANDO ( 5 ) =1000T 
HENN$=" . . .WITH CALM YOU WILL SUC 
CEED . " : GOSUB15)3 : GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 

87 IFB$ = "MUSHROOM"ANDO (6) =1000TE 
ENN$=" BIZARRE. . .MIGHT BE EDIBLE" 
: GOSUB15)3 : GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 

88 IF B$=" SHOVEL" ANDO ( 7 ) =1000THEN 
N$="MADE OF STEEL WITH A WOOD HA 
NDLE " : GOSUB15 0 : GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 

89 IFB$= "TUBE "ANDO (8 ) =l / 0 / 0j3THENN$ 
="LOOKS LIKE STRONG GLUE":GOSUBl 
5)3:GOSUB33 2 :GOT04 6 

9j2S IFB$ = "TORCH"ANDO (9 ) =1 / 0J3 / 0ANDWM 
<>1THENN$="0F RESIN. . .ACTUALLY 0 
FF" : GOSUB15 J2J : GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 

91 IFB$="T0RCH"ANDWM=1THENN$=" . . 
.IT IS AFLAME. " : GOSUB15)3 : GOSUB3 3 
2 :GOT04 6 

92 IF B$=" MATCHES "ANDO (10) =1000TU 
ENN$="MATCHES . . . DRY AND WELL PRE 
SERVED" :GOSUB15)3: GOSUB3 3 2 :GOT04 6 

93 IFB$="HOLE"ANDL=3THENN$="BIG 
ENOUGH FOR TOU TO ENTER. ..": GOSU 
B15)3:GOSUB332 :GOT046 

94 IFB$=" B0ULDER"ANDL=11THENN$=" 
SEEMS A LITTLE UNSTABLE .": GOSUB3 
32:GOT04 6 

95 IFB$=" TREE "THENB$=" SIGNS" 

96 IFB$ = "SIGNS"ANDL=6ANDO(5) =1)3)3 
j2THENN$="THE PASSWORD ?":GOSUB15 
0 : F0RX=1T06)3)3 : NEXTX : GOSUB3 3 2 : ZE= 
l:GOT04 6 

97 N$="YOU DON'T HAVE IT.":GOSUB 
15)3 :GOSUB3 32 :GOT046 

98 1 FB $= "WIND" ANDO ( 1 ) = 1)3)3 )3ANDVG= 
1ANDL=4THENG0SUB3 3 1 : N$=" YOU ARE 
FLYING OVER THE SWAMP .": GOSUB 15)3 
: GOSUB3 3 2 : GOSUB2 87 : L=14 : GOT02 5 

99 GOSUB331:N$=" NOTHING TO DO": 
GOSUB15 0 : GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 

1)3)3 IFB$ = "WINGS"ANDO(2)=10J3J3ANDO 
( 8 ) =1)3)3 )3ANDVK=1THENG0SUB 3 3 1 : N$=" 
DONE I " :VG=l:GOSUB15)3:GOSUB332 : 
GOT046 



1)31 GOSUB331:N$ = " NOTHING TO DO 
" : GOSUB15)3 : GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 
1)32 IFB$ = "MATCH"ANDO (1)3) =1)3)3)3THE 
NGOSUB3 31:N$=" IT IS LIT.":VH=1: 
GOSUB15 )3 : GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 
1)33 IFB$ = "RING" ANDO (3) =1)3)3 )3ANDL= 
14THENGOSUB331:N$=" THERE IS NOW 
A WAY . . . " : VL=1 : GOSUB15 )3 : GOSUB3 3 

2 

1)34 IFVL=1THENT(4 , 14) =12 :T(1,12) 
=14 : GOSUB32 4 : GOSUB3 3 6 : GOT03 2 
1)35 GOSUB331:N$ = " NOTHING TO DO" 
: GOSUB15 )3 : GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 
1)36 IFB$ = "DOOR"ANDL=9ANDO(4) =1)3)3 
)3ANDWM=1THENG0SUB3 31:N$ = "IT IS U 
NLOCKED" : VJ=1 : GOSUB15)3 : GOSUB3 32 : 
GOT04 6 

1)37 GOSUB331:N$ = "IMPOSSIBLE" :GOS 
UB15)3:GOSUB3 32 :GOT046 
1)38 IFB$ = "DOOR"ANDL=9ANDVJ=lTHEN 
POKE178 , 0 : GOSUB2 8 5 : : GOSUB3 3 1 : N$= 
"YOU ARE GIVEN SOMETHING ...": 0 ( 3 
) =1000 : GOSUB15)3 : GOSUB3 32 : GOSUB3 3 
6:GOSUB334 :GOT03 2 

109 IFB$ = "TUBE"ANDO(8) =1)3)3 )3THENG 
OSUB3 3 1 : N$=" DONE ! " : VK=1 : GOSUB 
15)3:GOSUB332 :GOT04 6 

110 IFB$ = "BOX"ANDO (10) =1)3)3)3THENG 
OSUB3 3 1 : N$=" DONE I " : GOSUB15)3 : G 
OSUB332:GOT046 

111 IFB$="URN"THENB$="WIND" : GOTO 
98 

112 GOSUB331:N$=" IMPOSSIBLE" : G 
OSUB15)3 : GOSUB3 3 2 : GOT04 6 

113 IFB$="MUSHROOM"ANDL=12ANDO ( 6 
) =l)3)3)3THENGOSUB3 3 1 : N$=" YOU HALLU 
CINATE. . . ":GOSUB15)3:GOSUB3 3 2 :T(3 
,12) =13 :T(4 , 13) =12 :GOSUB336 : 0 (3) 
=1000: GOT03 2 

114 IFB$="MUSHROOM"ANDO (6) =1000T 
HENGOSUB331:N$="NOT BAD. . . " : GOSU 
B150 :GOSUB3 3 2 : 0(6) =100 :GOT046 

115 GOSUB331:N$="YOU CAN'T. ":GOS 
UB15)3 : G0SUB3 3 2 : GOTO 4 6 

116 IFA$=A1$ANDL=4ANDO(7)=10)3)3TH 
ENT ( 3 , 4 ) =9 : T ( 4 , 9 ) =4 : G0SUB3 3 1 : N$= 
"...AN UNDERGROUND PASSAGE APPEA 
RS " : GOSUB15)3 : G0SUB3 3 2 : G0SUB3 3 6 : G 
OT03 2 

117 IFA$=A1$AND0(7) <>l)3)3)3THENGOS 
UB331:N$ = "TOO HARD. . . ! " rGOSUBlSjZ 
:GOSUB33 2 :GOT046 

118 IFA$=A1$THENG0SUB3 3 1 : N$ = "NOT 
HERE" : GOSUB15)3 : G0SUB3 3 2 : G0T04 6 

119 IFB$ = "T0RCH"AND0(9) =1)3)3)3ANDV 
H=1THENG0SUB331:N$=" ONE SEES CL 
EARLY NOW. ,." :WM=1: GOSUB 15)3: GOSU 
B3 3 2 : IFL=9ANDWM=1THENG0SUB2 8 3 : GO 
SUB33 2:GOT04 6 



62 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



120 GOSUB331:N$ = " ? ? 
? ?":GOSUB15j3:GOSUB3 3 2 :GOT046 

121 IFA$=A1$ANDL=40RL=50RL=6THEN 
GOSUB331:N$="YOU ARE S INKING... T 
00 BAD . " : GOSUB15J3 : G0T02 8 6 

122 IFA$=A1$ANDL=4ANDVG=1THENG0S 
UB331:N$="IT IS NOT WINDY ENOUGH 
" :GOSUB15j3 : GOSUB3 32 : GOT046 

123 GOSUB331:N$="YOU CAN'T. ":GOS 
UB15 ft : G0SUB3 3 2 : G0T04 6 

124 IFB$=" BOULDER" ANDL=11THENG0S 
UB3 31:N$="IT MOVES. . . " :GOSUB150: 
GOSUB332:T(l,ll)=3:T(2,3)=ll:LO$ 
(11)="A DARK HOLE":GOSUB3 34:GOSU 
B33 6: ZA=l:GOSUB3j34:GOT032 

125 GOSUB331:N$="YOU CAN'T" : GOSU 
B150 : G0SUB3 3 2 : G0T04 6 

12 6 IFA$=A1$THENG0SUB3 3 1 : N$="WHA 
T. . .?":GOSUB15j3:GOSUB3 32:GOT046 

127 IFB$="WATER"ANDL=4THENGOT013 
1 

128 IFB$=" WATER" ANDL=5THENG0T0 13 
1 

129 IFB$=" WATER" ANDL=6THENG0T0 13 
1 

13J3 GOT0132 

131 GOSUB331:N$="WATER PARALYSES 
YOU . . . " : G0SUB1 5 j3 : G0SUB3 3 2 : GOSUB 



286 

132 GOSUB331:N$="NOTHING TO DRIN 
K. . . ":GOSUB15j3:GOSUB332:GOT04 6 

133 IFA$=Al$THENGOSUB335:N$="YOU 
ARE CARRYING : " 

134 H0RIZ0NTAL=lj3 :VERTICAL=1 

135 DRAW"BMlj3 , 118 ; " : GOSUB15j3 : DRA 
W"BM 45,128;" 

136 N$=" " 

137 F0RV=1T0Y 

138 IFO(V)=lj3j3j3THENN$=N$+LO$(V) + 
ii ii 

139 H0=H0+6*LEN(N$) : I FHO> 1,0,0 THEN 
141 

14/3 GOT0146 

141 VE=VE+l:H0=lj3 

142 IFVE=2THEN DRAW " BM 10,138" 

143 IFVE=3 THENDRAW " BM 10,148;" 

144 IFVE=4THENDRAW"BM 1)3,158;" 

145 IFVE=5THENDRAW"BMlj3, 168;" 

146 IFVE=6THENDRAW"BM1,0, 178 ; " 

147 GOSUB15j3:N$=" " 

148 NEXTV:FORX=lT012j3j3:NEXTX:GOS 
UB335:GOT031 

149 STOP 

150 F0RC=1T0LEN(N$) 

151 N1$=MID$ (N$ ,C, 1) 

152 N1=ASC(N1$) 




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(91 5) 584-7784 




July 1987 THE RAINBOW 63 



153 IFNl=32THENDRAW ff BM4-6 , 0" : GOTO 
163 

154 IFNl=58THENDRAW"BM+3 , 0 ; BR1BU 
1U1BU2U1BU1BR2BD6BR2" : GOT0163 

155 IFNl=3 9THENDRAW n BM+3 , 0 ; BR2BU 
4U2BR1BD6 " : G0T0163 

156 IFN1=4 6THENDRAW" BM+3 , 0 ; BR1R1 
BR1" : G0T0163 

157 IFNl=63THENDRAW"BM+3 , 0 ; BU4U2 
R2D3BL1D3BR1" : GOT0163 

158 IFNl=3 3THENDRAW n BM+3 , 0 ; BR1R1 
BU2U4BR1BD6 11 : GOT0163 

159 IFNl=44THENDRAW"BM+3 , 0 ; BR1U2 
BD3 BL1L1BR3 BUI 11 : GOT0163 

160 IFN1>=65ANDNK=90THENGOTO161 
ELSENEXTC 

161 Nl=Nl-64 

162 DRAWW$(N1) 

163 NEXTC 

164 RETURN 

165 LINE (75 , 161) - (256 , 169) , PRESE 
T, BF : DRAW 11 BM7 5 , 168 ; " : A$=" " :GOT01 
67 

166 DRAWBM75, 191;": A$= nn 

167 I$=INKEY$ 

168 IFI$ = ,M, THEN167 

169 SOUND230,1 

170 IFI$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THENRETURN 

171 N1=ASC(I$) 

172 IFNl=3 2THENDRAW"BM+7 , 0" :A$=A 
$+CHR$ (32) :GOT0167 

173 IFN1=8ANDLEN (A$) >0THENA$=LEF 
T$ (A$ , LEN (A$) -1) :POKE178 , 3 : DRAW" 
BM-6 , 0 ; R6U1L6U1R6U1L6U1R6U1L6U1R 
6D6BL7 11 : POKE17 8 , 0 : GOT0167 

174 IFN1>=65ANDNK=90THENA$=A$+I 
$ELSEGOT0167 

175 N1=N1-64:DRAWW$(N1) 

176 IFLEN (A$) > 3 j3 THENRETURN 

177 GOT0167 

178 GOSUB328 

179 IFL=2THENGOT0182 

180 LINE(20,60) -(32 , 27) , PSET 

181 IFL=10THENGOTO184 

182 LINE(32,28)-(20,22) ,PSET:LIN 
E(36,12)-(16,4), PSET : LINE (20,6)- 
(20,0) ,PSET:LINE(36,12)-(4j3,j3) ,P 
SET 

183 IFL=2THENGOT019j3 

184 LINE(76,8j3) -(76, 68) ,PSET:LIN 
E(76,68)-(96,64) , PSET : LINE ( 9 6 , 64 
)-(96,52) ,PSET 

185 IFL=lpTHENGOT0187 

186 LINE(96,52) -(8j3,52) ,PSET:LIN 
E(8J3,52) - (92,J3) ,PSET 

187 LINE(76,8j3)-(96,96) , PSET 

188 LINE(2j3,64)-(2j3,22) , PSET 

189 IFL=lj3THENGOT0192 

19J0 D^AP^ n BM12 , 96 ; E10F5E12F12E8F8 



E5Flj3 n 

191 LINE(124,j3)-(112,16) ,PSET:LI 
NE(112 , 16) - (14 4, 16) , PSET 

192 LINE (144, 16) -(120,44) ,PSET:L 
INE(12j3, 44) -(144, 48) , PSET: LINE (1 
44,48) -(140, 56) , PSET : LINE ( 140 , 5 6 
) - (168 , 62 ) , PSET: LINE (168 , 62 ) - ( 17 
6,72) ,PSET 

193 LINE (17 6, 72) -(224,44) ,PSET:L 
INE(2 24,44) -(2 44,60) , PSET: LINE (2 
24,44) -(244,28) , PSET : LINE ( 24 4 , 60 
)- (256, 60) ,PSET 

194 IFL=2THENGOT0198 
.195 I FL= 1 0THENRETURN 

196 LINE(160,60)-(152,96) , PSET 

197 LINE(224, 44) -(234,95) , PSET 

198 LINE(250, 60) -(234,95) , PSET 

199 I F L= 2 THE NRETURN 

200 LINE(116,96) -(156, 80) , PSET 

201 CIRCLE (116, 132) ,65,0,1, .65, . 
86 

202 POKE178,0:PAINT(40,40) , ,0:PA 
INT (2 20, 60) , ,0: PAINT (252, 68) , ,0 

203 POKE178 , 2 : PAINT(40 , 92) , ,0:PA 
INT (136, 92) , ,0: PAINT (200,1) , ,0:P 
AINT(120, 80) , ,0 

204 POKE178,101:PAINT(236, 60) , ,0 
: PAINT (3 2, 4) , , 0 : PAINT ( 2 6 , 3 2 ) , ,0: 
PAINT(100,1) , ,0 

205 POKE178 , 2 : DRAW"BM79 ,79 ;U10BR 
8BU2D8BR8U9BR8BU7D9BR8BU1U19BR8B 
D3D19BR8D1U12BR8U3D17BR8D3U16BR8 
BD4D16BR8BU5U11" : DRAW n BM9 5, 7 ; D16 
BR8BD4U11BU5U5BU2U3BR8BD3D2 7BR8B 
U4U1 0BR8 BD4 D9 BR8 BU6U7 " 

206 I FL=2 THENRETURN 

207 LINE (212 , 82)- (214,92) , PSET 

208 I FL= 1 0THENRETURN 

209 P0KE178,1:F0RLL=1T075:XX=RND 
(44) +16 : YY=RND (12 ) +80 : PSET (XX , YY 
) : NEXTLL 

210 RETURN 

211 GOSUB178 

212 LINE(164,61)-(164,96) ,PSET:L 
INE ( 180 , 69) - ( 180, 9 6) , PSET : LINE (2 
00, 58) -(200,9 6) , PSET : LINE ( 2 2 8 , 9 6 
) - ( 2 2 8 , 4 7 ) , PSET : I F L= 10 THENRETURN 

213 LINE(121, 51) -(142,53) ,PSET:L 
INE (36,12)-(40,24) , PSET : LINE ( 40 , 
24) -(32,28) ,PSET 

214 LINE (91, 23) - (92 ,0) , PSET: LINE 
(146,88) - (150,90) , PSET : LINE ( 180 , 
76)-(200,80) ,PSET 

215 LINE(36, 12)-(52,2) ,PSET:LINE 
(52,2) -(60,10) , PSET: LINE (60, 10)- 
(84,4) , PSET: LINE (8 4, 4) -(7 6, 16) ,P 
SET: LINE (76, 16) -(104, 28) , PSET: LI 
NE (104, 28)- (104, 40) , PSET : LINE ( 10 
4,40)-(120,48), PSET : LINE (120,48) 



64 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



-(124, 60) ,PSET: LINE (124 , 60) - (14 8 
, 88 ) , PSET 

216 LINE (3 8, 26) -(67, 42 ), PSET: LIN 
E(68,39)-(38,23), PSET : LINE ( 12 6 , 7 
7)- (143, 86) , PSET: LINE (84, 51) -(10 
1,61) , PSET: LINE (61, 18) -(4 7,27) ,P 
SET: LINE (4 5, 34) - (4 2,56) , PSET: LIN 
E(73,64)-(66,41) , PSET 

217 LINE (9 6,57) -(108,54) , PSET: LI 
NE(96,62)-(^B,76) , PSET : LINE ( 6 6 , 
37) -(91, 34) , PSET: LINE (12 4, 61) -(1 
47,88), PSET 

218 LINE(32,8j3)-(16,52) ,PSET:LIN 
E( 16, 52) -(32, 28) ,PSET 

219 LINE(148,88)-(^H,92) ,PSET:L 
INE ( 120 , 92 ) - ( 104 , 92 ) , PSET : LINE ( 1 
0A , 92 ) - (100 , 88 ) , PSET: LINE ( 100 , 88 
)-(92,88) , PSET: LINE (92, 88) -(88, 7 
6) , PSET: LINE (88,76)-(76,8j3) , PSET 
:LINE(lj34,92)-(112,96) , PSET 

220 LINE (112, 96) -(76, 8/9) , PSET: LI 
NE(76,8j3)-(44,72), PSET : LINE (44,7 
2 ) - ( 3 2 , 80 ) , PSET : LINE ( 2 2 8 , 8 0 ) - ( 2 4 
4,80) ,PSET:LINE(2j3,22)-(20,48) ,P 
SET 

221 P0KE178, 0:PAINT(8 ,8) , ,j3:PAIN 
T( 170,72) , ,0: PAINT (224, 56) , ,0:PA 
INT (252, 68) , ,0 : PAINT (64,4) , ,0:PA 







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INT(84,8j3) , , 0 : PAINT (99,89) , ,0 

222 POKE 178 , 2 : PAINT (56,8) , ,0: PAI 
NT(4j3,8 8) , , 0 : PAINT ( 14 2 , 6j3 ) , ,j3:PA 
INT(2j3j3,4) f ,0: PAINT (188 , 88) , ,j3:P 
AINT ( 60 , 48) , , j3 : PAINT (235, 85) , ,0 

223 POKE178, lj3 1 : PAINT ( 32 , 4 ) , ,0:V 
AINT (24, 32) , , j3 : PAINT ( 1J38 , 8 ) , ,j3:P 
AINT (19 2 ,72) , , 0 : PAINT ( 2 4j3 , 60) , ,0 

224 POKE178 , 2 :FORWW=lT03j3:XX=RND 
( 12 ) +3 2 : YY=RND ( 4 ) +2 j3 : PSET ( XX , YY ) 
:NEXT:POKE17 8 , 1 : F0RWW=1T045 : XX=R 
ND(28) :YY=RND(8)+88:PSET(XX,YY) : 
NEXT 

225 GOSUB2j35 

226 RETURN 

227 GOSUB328:GOSUB234:LINE(8j3, 96 
) -(96, 84) , PSET: LINE (96, 84) -(92,9 
6) , PSET: LINE (9 6, 84) -(8 4, 68) , PSET 
: LINE ( 8 4 , 68 ) - ( 64 , 64 ) , PSET : LINE ( 1 
12 , 42 ) - (12j3, 96) ,PSET 

228 LINE (113 , 52)- (140,36) ,PSET:L 
INE(14j3, 36) - ( 172 , 4j3) , PSET: LINE ( 1 
7 2,4j3) - (184, 64) , PSET: LINE ( 18 4 , 64 
) - ( 2J32 , 76), PSET: LINE ( 184 , 64 ) - ( 18 
0 , 72 ) , PSET : LINE ( 18j3 , 72 ) - ( 164 , 78 ) 
,PSET 

22 9 IFL=7THENRETURN 

23j3 POKE178,2 : PAINT ( 6j3 , 4 ) , , j3 : PAI 



ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU'RE IIM 



. . . where learning to read music 
is easy and fun! 

ffrxfi 



RAINBOW 

CER7t*t€ATlQN 



NOTELAND, a unique combination of a musical instru- 
ment and a course in music developed by Boston composer 



Andy Gaus, will let you: 

• approach music as a complete 
beginner; 

• learn from an audio cassette 
and a written manual; 

• fool around— and be (earning; 

• play a tune with a joystick 
(optional) or cursor keys; 

• record a tune and play it back, 
with notation: 

• save your tunc on rape or 
disk; 

• rest yourself with a beat- the- 
clock quiz; 

• load the program from disk or 
cassette if vou have a CoCo i 



1 



•■I 



-rt w-J* 



TV 



or CoCo 2 with 32K and 
Extended Color Basic; 
* take it home with vou- IF 
YOU ORDER NOW- for the 
special introductory price of 
$24.95. (Mass. residents add 
5% sales tax.) 



Be sure to specify disk or cassette. 

Eleerant Software 



89 Massachusetts Avenue, lox 251 
Boston, MA 02115 



July 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



65 



NT (60, 8)8) , ,0 

2 31 POKE178,)3:PAINT(88,92) , ,)3:P0 
KE 1 7 8 , 1 : FORLL= 1T03 )3 : XX=RND ( 7 6 ) + 1 
2: YY=RND(14)+72 :PSET(XX, YY) : NEXT 
LL : POKE178 , 2 : LINE (212,53)-(228,5 
6) , PSET: LINE (2)3)3, 6)3) -(22)3, 6)3) , PS 
ET 

232 POKE 17 8, 1 : F0RLL=1T03)3 : XX=RND 
( 7 6 ) +12 : YY=RND ( 14 ) +7 2 : PSET ( XX , YY 
) :NEXTLL 

2 33 RETURN 

234 GOSUB328:LlNE()3,)3) -(52 f 2)3) ,P 
SET: LINE (52 , 2)3) -(68,2)3) , PSET: LIN 
E(68, 2J3) -(8J3,26) , PSET: LINE (8)3 , 2 6 
)- (1)34, 12) , PSET: LINE (1)34, 12) -(84 
,)3) ,PSET 

235 IFL=3THENGOT02 3 7 

236 LINE(2)3, 96) -(48 ,8)3) ,PSET:LIN 
E (48, 8)3) -(56, f; 8) , PSET : LINE ( 56 , 68 
) - ( 8 6 , 52 ) , PSET : LINE ( 8 6 , 5 2 ) - ( 1)3)3 , 
43) ,PSET:LINE (1)3)3, 43)- (116, 4)3) ,P 

SET 

237 LINE(1)34,12)-(112,41) , PSET : D 
RAW"BM52 , 2)3 ; D7L1D7BD8BL2D4L1D4BR 

3 2BU2 3D5L1D3BD4D5L1D4" 

238 LINE 03, 0) - (52 f 2)3) f PSET: LINE ( 
52, 2)3) - (68, 2)3) , PSET : LINE ( 68 , 2)3) - 
(8)3,26) , PSET: LINE (8)3 ,2 6) - (1)34 , 12 
) , PSET: LINE (1)34 , 12) -(84 , J3) , PSET 

239 LINE(24)3,)3) -(22)3 , 12) ,PSET:LI 
NE(22J3,12)-(212,53) , PSET : LINE ( 2 1 
2 , 5 3 ) - ( 2 J8J8 , 6J3 ) , PSET : LINE ( 2)3)3 , 6)3 ) 
-(2)34, 96) , PSET:DRA'a"BM2)3)3, 6)3;R18 
BL6BU7R4D1R4D1R4D1R4D1" 

24)3 l£ , L=3THENGOT02 4 3 

'241 DRAW"BM48 , 8)3 ;R4D1R4D1R4D1R4D 

1F5R4D1R4D1R4D1BR4 4BU24E1)3R4U1R4 

U2R3U2E5R2U2" 

242 LINE(116, 4)3) -(144,4)3) ,PSET:L 
INE(14 4, 4)3) -(156,44) , PSET: LINE (1 
56, 44) -(164, 6)3) , I SET : LINE ( 164 , 6)3 
)-(172, 68) , PSET: LINE (17 2, 68) -(19 
6,8)3) , PSET: LINE (196,8)3) -(2)34 , 96) 
,PSET 

243 LINE()3, 48) -(36, 62) ,PSET:LINE 
(36,62)-(64,64) , PSET 

244 IFL=3THENRETURN 

245 CIRCLE ( 172 , 44) ,52, , .25, .57, . 
92: LINE (151, 32) -(149,J8) , PSET: LIN 
E(199,33)-(2)31,)3), PSET 

246 POKE178,2:PAINT(6)3,4) , ,)3:PAI 
NT (172 , 44 ) , ,)3: PAINT (4, 6)3) , ,)3 

247 POKE178 , 3 : DRAWBM147 , 34 ;R48B 
D2R12L7 2BD2L6R8 5BD2L67BD2BR3R61B 
D2L54BD2BR1R53BD2L51BD2R51BD2L5)3 
BD2BR1R4 6BD2BL3L4 1BD2R3 7BD2BL3L3 
2BD2BR1R3 1BD2L2 9BD2BR2R2 9BD2L2 6B 



D2BR3R2 3BD2L18BD2BR3R15BD2L1)3BD2 
BR3R6BD2L2BD2BR1R2BD2R2BD2L1" 

248 POKE17 8, 1:F0RLL=1T02)3:XX=RND 
(3 6) +4 : YY=RND(16)+62 :PSET(XX,YY) 
: NEXTLL 

249 RETURN 

25) 3 GOSUB328 

2 51 ' IFL=7THENRETURN 

252 IFL=6THENRETURN 

253 SO$ = "U2 4E32R12D4R12Fl)3R12F7H 
2D4L4G3H3L16U4H5L8U4H1)3 ;BR5)3BD2)3 
D3 8 ;F15D3L2 4H17L16H3L3 9 M 

254 I FL= 6 THENRE TURN 

255 DRAW"S4 ; BM)3 ,76; " + SO$ 

256 EP$ = "U4L2)3E2)3L2)3E2)3U4L16E16U 

4L16E16U8 ;R4D4F14E6U4E2F2D4F8L8D 

4F8E12U4L12E12U4R4F12L12D4F16L16 

D4F2)3L2)3F2)3L2)3D8 ; L4U4L2)3E2)3U4L2)3 

F12L12D8L4U4L12 ; F1)3L2)3D8L4U4R2U2 
n 

257 I FL= 6THENRETURN 

258 I F L= 6 THENRETURN 

259 DRAWS3 ;BM11)3, 84 ;"+EP$ 

26) 3 TR$="D7F3E8L6E2L6" : DRAW "BM 11 
8 , 42 ;R7D3G2H5" : DRAW"BM115 , 49 ;R5G 
4L2U5" : DRAWBM114 ,63 ;R4G4U4" : IFL 
=6THENRETURN 

261 DRAW"BM131, 45;R12G6H6" 

262 DRAW n BM114 , 3)3 ; n +TR$ 

263 AR$="D32E28D8R4G32D32 ;E24D4R 
4G12R8D2L1)3G14D12 ; L2 8U2 4H1)3L6U2R 
4H8E4U4F16 ;U2 8H2 4U4.E4F2)3U21R2 8 n 

264 IFL=6THENRETURN 
2 65 I FL=7 THENRETURN 

2 66 DRAW'S 4 ;BM2 2 4 , )3 ; "+AR$ 

267 POKE178 ,)3:PAINT(41, 64) , ,)3:PA 
INT (1)36, 3)3) , ,)3: PAINT (2)38, 8) , ,)3 

268 LINE(64, 56) -(256,84) ,PSET:CI 
RCLE(17)3, 66) , 95 , , . 2 5 , . 55 , . 9 6 : POK 
E178, 2: PAINT (13 6, 6)3) , ,)3: PAINT (13 
6,4 6) , ,)3: PAINT (117, 51) , , )3: PAINT ( 
99, 54) , ,)3: PAINT (16 6, 54) , ,)3: PAINT 
(191,51) , ,)3: PAINT (23 1, 53 ) , ,)3 :PAI 
NT(249 , 65) , ,)3 

269 POKE178,88:PAINT(8)3,4) , ,)3:PA 
INT (117, 33) , ,)3: PAINT (187, 6) , ,)3:P 
AINT(236,6) , , )3 : PAINT ( 2 4)3 , 3 6 ) , ,)3: 
PAINT (12)3, 4) , ,)3: PAINT (172, 2)3) , ,)3 
: DRAW"BM75 , 4p ;H3L11H7L3H3BR13BD4 
D5F6" : F0RLL=1T02 5 : XX=RND ( 6)3 ) +4 : Y 
Y=RND ( 8 ) +8)3 : PSET ( XX, YY) : NEXTLL 

2 7)3 RETURN 

271 GOSUB2 5)3:GOSUB2 53 : DRAW" S3 ;BM 
166,76; n +SO$:GOSUB263 :DRAW n S4 ;BM 
156 , )3 ; "+AR$ : GCSUB2 5 6 : DRAW 11 BM3 2 , 8 
4 ; "+EP$ : DRAW" BM16 6 , 7 6 ; D1R1 11 : DRAW 
"BMl 6 6, 62 ;G19R19E8" : POKE17 8 , 3 : DR 



66 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



^gggggg ilaHftf ( 

■ 1 mmS 






^I^^^P ffi jgjP SErB '^^f 

LIC 




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2764 EPROM $4.95 27128 EPROM $6.95 

6821 Standard PIA-$fr»a5: $6.95 

68766 EPROM - Closeout price I ! I $9.95 

Basic ROM 1.1 Chip 3*9*35: $9.95 

6847 VDG ChipJ»*aSc , $12.95 

6809E CHJ Chipi^h^S; $12.95 

CoCo III Multipak - }| NBW if PAL chip (For Gray and 

White 26-3024 models ONLY) $19.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) $19.95 

Disk ROM 1.1 - (Needed for CoCoIII ) $29.95 

Original SAM Chip (6883) $29.95 

Bet Basic 1.1 ROM ~ NEW LOW PRICE $29.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two'PIA's, 6809E CPU 

and SAM Chips (BE PREPARED) $49.95 

EPROM Programmer - uses 2716s up to 27512 s 1 Super 
fast programming ! - See April *86 review .$149.95 

A History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 $6.95 

CoCo Memory Map Reg. 2z3A*£3r Now only $9.95 

New! 200 MORE Pokes , Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 

Basic Programming Tricks Revealed $14.95 

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Basic 09 Tour Guide $19.95 

A Guide to CoCo III GRAPHICS $21.95 

Better Graphics on CoCo3 w/2 disks $24.95 

........... u ■■iIBIw.w-iuw'm™ ^ ■ 

CoCo II Service Manual (Specify Cat.#) $29.95 

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The Complete Rainbow Guide to C§9 $19.95 

Guide with Two Disk Package of domo pgms . ..$49.95 
Color / Extended/Disk Basic Unraveled - A completely 
cem ented disassembly of the CoCo ROMS 1 ....$49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF ... 

WI00 Adapter- Hookup 2 Atari type joy sticks. $19. 95 
CoCo Keybd - Low profile, fits all CoCo lis & "F M s 
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^100 Trackball - Regularly $69,95 , Now only. $24.95 
Universal Video Drvr - All monitors & CoCos .$29.95 
(2) Chip 64K Upgrade - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II .$29.95 

28 pin Ext Basic - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II $34.95 

Top FD-501 Drive 1 (#26-3131) - SAVE $60 . .$139.95 
CoCo III DISK DRIVE 0 - (Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $150 plus value 1 i 1 ) ...$239.95 
2400 Baud Modem (Great for Delphi & CIS) . .$249.95 
512K COLOR COMPUTER III (Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150 plus value J ! ! ) . . .$299.95 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
COD add $2*00 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



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Disk Drive Cable ( 34pin - 34pin) $19.95 

Cassette ? Y* Cable - Connect a 26-3028 Hi -Res Joy - 
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Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

Joy st i ck / Mouse 10 1 Ext Cable ......$19.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3~34pin) $24.95 

MAGNAVX 8505 / 8515 Analog RGB cable $24.95 

Other Analog RGB monitor cable ( Specify ! ) . .$39.95 
15" Multi-Pak/Rom Pak Extender - Move your Multi- 
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40 Pin D ual "Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk with a 

Voice Pak, Wor* Pak, CoCo Max, etc $29.95 

CoCo RS232 Switcher - Now easily switch between a 
printer & modem at the flick of a switch ! . .$29.95 

OTHER GOOD STUFF ... 

5 1/4" Diskettes in any quantity 4 9 cents 

C-10 tapes in any quantity 59 cents 

Rompak w/Blank PC Board 27xx series $9.95 

"D H Rev itot^ierboard w/o socketed chips $16.95 

Video Clear - This cable will reduce TV interfer- 
ence created by CoCo! $19.95 

DOS Switcher - Select from any two DOSs (Disk 1.0 

1.1, JDOS) in a J&M disk controller $29.95 

CoCo III keyboard - upgrade your CoCo II keyboard! 
" Package " deal w/FKEYS III($24.95) software $39.95 
CoCo K eyboard Extender - This cable allows you to 

EXTMO and/or ADD a CoCo Keyboard $39.95 

Extender cable w/EXTERNAL CoCoII Keyboard . .$49.95 
CoCo III 256K upgrade - Add another bank of 128K 
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HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM (SAVE$20) $79.95 

Super Controller - Up to 4 DOSs by a POKE ..$99.95 

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1200 Baud Modem ( Hayes compatible) Auto-dial/answer 
$139.95. Req's Modem cable ( 4pin or DB25) ..$19.95 
PBH-64 - A combo Parallel Printer interface & 64K 

Print Buffer I COMPUTE while you PRINT $149.95 

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364 

HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 



COCO HOT LINE 
71 8-835-1 344 



AWBM166 , 80 ;U16" : P0KE178 , 0 

272 PAINT (87, 67) , ,j3: PAINT (135, 67 
) , ,0: PAINT (169, 67) , , 0 : PAINT ( 193 , 
68) , ,0: LINE 08,40) -(256,76) ,PSET: 
CIRCLE (178, 48) ,86, , . 11, .54,l:POK 
E178 , 3 : DRAWBM199 , 40R11" : POKE178 
,2:PAINT(123, 48) , ,0 : PAINT (164 , 48 
) , ,0 : PAINT (106, 48) , , 0 : PAINT (238 , 
52) , ,0 

273 POKE178,88:PAINT(14,6) , ,0:PA 
INT (49, 6) , ,0:PAINT(97, 6) , ,0:PAIN 
T(120 , 6) , ,0:PAINT(167 , 6) , , 0 : POKE 
178,0: FORLL=1TO50 : XX=RND ( 100 ) : YY 
=RND(24)+68 :PSET(XX,YY) : NEXTLL: F 
ORLL=lTO 2 5 : XX=RND ( 60 ) + 1 60 : YY=RND 
(12 ) +78 : PSET (XX, YY) : NEXTLL 

274 RETURN 

275 GOSUB250 : GOSUB256 : DRAW'S 4 ; BM 
32 , 84 ; "+EP$ : GOSUB256 : DRAW" S3 ; BM1 
10 , 84 ; "+EP$ : GOSUB2 63 : DRAW'S 4 ; BM2 
24,0;"+AR$ 

276 LINE(232,0) -(232,96) ,PSET:LI 
NE (251,0) -(251, 96) , PSET : POKE178 , 
3: LINE (2 40, 2) -(240,94) , PSET: POKE 
178,0: PAINT (240, 90) , ,0: PAINT (214 
,13) , ,0: PAINT (14 3 ,39) , ,0: PAINT (7 
6,39) , ,0: PAINT (252, 13) , ,0:LINE(0 
,56) - (256, 28) , PSET 

277 FORLL=1TO50 : XX=RND ( 170) +6 : YY 
=RND (32 ) +62 : PSET (XX, YY) : NEXTLL 

278 POKE178, 88 : PAINT (9 , 16) , ,0 : PA 
INT (57, 3) , ,0: PAINT (100, 3) , ,0:PAI 
NT( 230,4 ) , ,0:PAINT(100,37) , , 0 : PA 
INT (185, 2) , ,0 

279 RETURN 

280 :GOSUB328: RETURN 

281 GOSUB328 

282 PAINT( 100,2) , ,0: RETURN 

283 POKE178,3 

284 DRAW'BM80,80 ;U32BR12U8D32BR2 
8BU16BL4L4BR8U32R24D32BR3R5" : LIN 
E(64,96)-(80,80) , PSET: LINE (80,48 
)-(92,40) , PSET: LINE (94, 70) -(108, 
56) , PSET: LINE (15 6, 56) -(200, 96) ,P 

SET 

285 DRAWBM124 , 38 ; D6BD12R8BR4R4 " 
:POKE178,0:RETURN 

286 POKE178,0:FORP=175TO1STEP-1: 
CIRCLE (128, 96) ,P,0,1, .5:NEXTP:FO 
RP=1TO1500 :NEXT : POKE65494 , 0 : END 

287 SCREEN0:CLS7 : FORC=1TO10 : CLS 3 
:FORP=1TO30 :NEXTP:CLS5 :F0RP=1T03 
0 : NEXTP : CLS1 : FORP=1TO30 : NEXTP : NE 
XTC : PCLS1 : SCREE Nl , 1 : RETURN 

288 GOSUB211 

289 LINE (0,8) -(12,20) ,PSET:LINE( 
12 , 20) - (30 , 22 ) , PSET: LINE (30 , 22 ) - 



(48,44) , PSET: LINE (48 , 44 ) - ( 68 , 36) 
, PSET: LINE (68, 36) -(80, 52) ,PSET:L 
INE (80, 52) -(94,52) , PSET : LINE ( 120 
,45) -(143,16) ,PSET 

290 LINE(94,52)-(112,40) ,PSET:LI 
NE (112, 40) -(120, 44) , PSET : LINE (11 
6,96) -(164, 88) , PSET : LINE ( 180 , 88 ) 
-(196,96) , PSET: LINE (240, 96) -(240 
,55) , PSET: LINE (152,0) -(144, 8) , PS 
ET:LINE(144,8)-(144, 16) , PSET 

291 DRAWBM0, 64 ," E8F16E4F8E8F20E4 
Fll" 

292 POKE178,2:PAINT(80,4) , , 0 : PAI 
NT (200, 4) , ,0:PAINT(8,64) , ,0:PAIN 
T(154,92) , , 0 : PAINT (184,92) , ,0:PO 
KE178,0:PAINT(8,20) , ,0: PAINT (168 
,80) , ,0: PAINT (208, 80) , ,0: PAINT (2 
50,80) , ,0 

293 POKE178,101:PAINT(24, 28) , ,0: 
PAINT (120, 48) , ,0: PAINT (192, 80) , , 
0: PAINT (2 35, 80) , ,0 

294 POKE178 , 2 : DRAWBM79 , 68 ;D5BR8 
U6D7BR8BU2U7BR8BU2U14BR8U9BD14D5 
BD4D5BR8BU3U17BR8U4D8BD8D4BR8BD3 
U12BU4U4BR8BD8D3BD5D8BR8BU2U12BR 
8D8BR2 4BD2D5BR8D3U15BR40BU12D12B 
D3D9 " : DRAW" BM2 3 , 2 4 ; D7 BD4D6 " 

295 POKE178, 1:FORLL=1TO30:XX=RND 
( 32 ) +20 : YY=RND ( 12 ) +64 : PSET (XX, YY 
) : NEXTLL 

296 RETURN 

297 GOSUB328:LlNE(0,24)-(32,40) , 
PSET: LINE (32,0) -(40,40) , PSET: LIN 
E( 32, 40) -(68, 48) , PSET: LINE ( 68 , 48 
)-(80,96) , PSET: LINE (70, 52) -(0,7 6 
) ,PSET 

298 LINE (70,56) - (92 , 60) , PSET : LIN 
E (92 , 60 ) - ( 109 , 44 ) , PSET: LINE ( 115 , 
44) -(134, 46) ,PSET:LINE(136,48)-( 
160 , 56 ) , PSET : LINE (132,24)-(142,1 
4) , PSET: LINE (148, 14) -(172, 24) , PS 
ET: LINE (172, 24) -(180, 36) , PSET 

299 DRAW" BM1 3 6,48 ;U2L1U2L1U2L1U2 
L1U4L1U4U4R1U4R2" :DRAW"BM142 , 14; 
R2U1R2D1R2" : DRAW "BM 160 , 56 ;R4U1R4 
U1R4U2R4U1R2 " 

300 LINE (184, 20) - (176, 64) , PSET:L 
INE (176, 64) -(176,72) , PSET: LINE (1 
76,72) -(192,86) , PSET: LINE ( 192 , 86 
)-(216,88) , PSET: LINE (216, 88) -(22 
4,96) , PSET: LINE (2 13, 88) -(220,56) 

, PSET: LINE (184, 20)- (196,8) ,PSET: 
LINE (196, 8) -(232,0) , PSET 

301 DRAWBM104 , 56 ;E4U24G10U4E10U 
12G5U4E5U9R6D17F5D4H5D32R2D1R2D1 
R2D1R2D1L4L2U1L2U1L2U1L2U1G5L4E3 
": LINE (2 20, 56) -(22 2, 93) , PSET: PAI 



68 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



««< COLORFUL UTILITIES »»> 



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Save R QMPAKs to your 64K Disk system using the RS Multi-Pak Interface. Eliminate constant p lugg ing in of ROMPAKs now by 
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All the FEATURES of TELEPATCH plus the classically proportioned characters of the WIZARD with TRUE lowercase ! Now CoCo 
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A mul t i - featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling. Utilize a directory window to selectively sort, move, rename and 
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package of EliteWord and EliteSpel for $99.95 (see Rainbow Review Mar 1 87 page 134) 

SOFTWARE BONANZA PACKAGE 

Create an instant library of Spectrum Projects TOP Colorful Utility software. Select any of the following 12 programs to 
customize your own SPECTACULAR SOFTWARE BONANZA i CoCo Checker, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, 
Spectrum Font Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, Fast Dupe II, 64K Disk Utility, Spectrum DOS, CoCo Calendar, Schematic 
Drafting Processor, OS-9 Solution, Basic Plus, EZ Base or Blackjack Royale (a $300 plus value ) for only $99.95111 



BUY ANY TWO - COCO 



CoCo Checker ....$19.95 

MIKEY-DIAL $19.95 

CoCo Calendar ...$19.95 



Fastdupe III ....$19.95 
64K Disk Utility $24.95 
OS-9 Solution ...$24.95 



POTPOURI - 

Wizard's Castle ..$27.95 

Spectrum DOS $29.95 

Font Generator ...$29.95 



AVE 10°/o 

ADOS-3 $34.95 

Spit 'N' Image ...$34.95 
CoCo Util II ...$39.95 



U.S. orders plus $3 S/H (Other $5) 
COD add $2 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
CoCo HOT LINE 718-835-1344 



HOWARD 



NY 11414 



Now Create Your Own Signs, 
Banners, and Greeting Cards. 



Introducing The 
Coco Graphics Designer 

La«t Chrlttmiu we introduced our 
COCO Greeting Card Deiigner program 
(lee review April 86 Rainbow). It ha* 
been io popular that we've now 
expanded it into a new program called 
the COCO Graphic! Deiigner. The 
Coco Graphic! Deiigner produce! 
greeting cardi plui bannen and ligni. 
Thii program will further increase the 
uiefullneii and enjoyment of your dot 
matrix printer. 

The Coco Graphics 

Designer allowi you to mix text and 
picture! in all your creation!. The 
program feature* picture, border, and 
character font editors, so that you can 
modify or expand the already built in 
librariei. Plus a special "grabber" utility 
ii included to capture areas of high 
reiolution icreem for your picture 
library. 



Requirements: a Coco or Coco II 
with a minimum of S2K, One Diik Drive 
(Diik Ext. BASIC 1.0/l.l.ADOS, or 
JDOS). Printers lupported include: 
Epion RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX-10, C-Itoh 8510, DMP-100/ 130/ 
400/ 430, Seikoiha GP-100/250, Legend 
808 and Gorilla Bannana. Send a SASE 
for complete list of compatible printer*. 
#CSS2 Coco Graphic! Deiigner $20.05 



Over 100 More Pictures 

An optional lupplementary library 
diskette containing over one hundred 
additional picture! ii available. 
#C33S Picture Diik #1 114.05. 

Colored Paper Packs 

Now available are packi containing 120 
iheeti of tractor-feed paper and 42 
matching envelope! in assorted bright 
RED, GREEN, and BLUE. Perfect for 
making your production! unforgettable. 
#C274 Paper Pack $10.05 




With Zebra's Coco Graphics Designer it's easy and enjoyable 
making your own greeting cards, signs, and banners. 



NEWS FLASH! 
CGP-220 and DMP-105 
NOW SUPPORTED 



As o-f June 1, 1987 we are 
shipping version 2-3 o-f the 
CoCo Graphics Designer- This 
version includes drivers -for 
the CGP-220 and DMP-105 
printers, and improved menu 
dialogs -for single disk drive 
users- By the time this 
appears in print we 
probably also have 
Okidata printer drivers — 



l ssue 
will 
added 
check 



with us i-f you have an Okidata. 



Ordering Instructions: All order* 

add 13.00 Shipping it Handling. UPS 
COD add 13.00. VISA/MC Accepted. 
NY reetdente add lalee tax. 



Zebra Sytems, Inc 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



NT (217, 85) , , 0 : LINE (184, 20) -(220, 
28) , PSET : LINE (220,28) - (256,24) ,P 
SET 

302 POKE178, 0 : PAINT ( 40 , 80 ) , ,0:PA 
INT (112,4): POKE17 8 , 2 : PAINT ( 2 40 , 4 
) , ,0:PAINT(120,80) , , 0 : PAINT (20 , 4 
4) , ,0:FORLL=1TO70:XX=RND(8)+212: 
YY=RND ( 1 6 ) + 7 6 : PSET ( XX , Y Y ) : NEXTLL 
: POKE1 7 8,0: FORLL=lT05 0 : XX=RND ( 9 6 
) +80 : YY=RND ( 3 6 ) +60 : PSET ( XX , Y Y) : N 
EXTLL 

303 RETURN 

304 : POKE178 , 0 : PAINT ( 160 , 40 ) , ,0: 
RETURN 

305 GOSUB3 2 8 

306 GOSUB309 

307 POKE178,160:PAINT(4,4) , ,0:PA 
INT (2 40, 4) , ,0:POKE178,0: PAINT (12 
0,80) , ,2:POKE17 8,2:CIRCLE(128,14 
6) ,88, , 1, . 62, . 90:DRAW"BM8 5,51;U2 
L1U5L1U12R1U8R1U5R1U4R2U3BR87U2D 
2R2D6R2D7R2D10L1D7L1D5L1D3L2D3L2 
D3L1" :GOSUB309 

308 POKE178 , 1 : DRAW 11 BM 12 1,66; D1U6 
6BR14D3L13D8R13U8D16L13D8R13U8D1 
6L13D8R13U8D16L13D8R13U8D15" : FOR 
LL=1T03 0 : XX=RND ( 80 ) +92 : YY=RND ( 16 
)+68:PSET(XX,YY) : NEXTLL : RETURN 

309 CIRCLE (160, 40) ,115, ,1, .43, .6 
0: CIRCLE (9 6, 40) , 115 , , 1 , . 93 , . 09 : D 
RAW ,! BM59 , 95 ;U3R1BR13 6U1L1BD4R2 " : 
RETURN 

310 GOSUB3 2 8 

311 CIRCLE (12.8, 96) ,12 8,0, .8, .5:C 
IRCLE(12 8, 13 6) , 152 , 0 , . 5 , . 60 , . 92 : 
CIRCLE (128 , 70) ,80,0, .95, . 5 : CIRCL 
E( 12 8, 58) ,40, ,1.5, . 49 , 1 . 0 1 : DRAW" 
BM168 , 58 ;D2L1D3 ,! : POKE178 , 3 : DRAW" 
BM119 , 61 ;R1E1R13F1R2 11 : POKE178 ,0 

312 DRAW"BM117,88;L1U7E1U13E1U13 
E1U8R1U1L1U3E1U6D6G1L1U2H1U2H1U8 
R1E1R2E1R2E1R1BD2BR2R1U1L1H3U5E1 
U2E1U3E1U2E1U2D2F1D3F1D3F1D2L2G1 
L1H1L2BR7D5G3E2F1R1F1R2F1R2 F1R1D 
8G1D2G1D2L1H1U6BD7BR1D4L1D1R1D8F 
1D13F1D13F1D7L1G1L2G1L2G1L2G1L2H 
1L2H1L2H1L2H1L1" 

313 CIRCLE(53 ,84) ,8, , .3:CIRCLE(8 
6,71) ,8, , . 3 : CIRCLE (96, 85) ,9, , .3: 
CIRCLE (154, 70) ,8, , . 3 : CIRCLE ( 167, 
8 6) ,9, , . 3: CIRCLE (201, 83) ,9, , .3 

314 POKE178,6:PAINT(128,2) , ,0:PO 
KE178,88:PAINT(2 40,2) , ,0: PAINT (2 
,2) , ,0:POKE178,l:PAINT(40,49) , ,0 
:PAINT(219,4 9) , ,0 : PAINT (53 , 84) ,, 
0: PAINT (154, 70) , ,0 

315 POKE178,2:PAINT(68,49) , ,0:PA 
INT (181,49) , ,0:PAINT(9 6,85) , ,0:P 
AINT(201,83) , ,0:PAINT(12 8,40) , ,0 



70 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



: POKE178 , 0 : PAINT (40 , 92) f , j3 : DRAW 11 
BM126, 19 ;R1BR2R1BD2BL2L1 M 

316 GOSUB33 5: DRAW"BMlj3, 123 ; » :N$ = 
"YOU ARE IN THE LEPRECHAUN 1 S PLA 
CE. ,f :GOSUB15j3 : FORV=lTO6 0j3 : NEXTV: 
GOSUB3 3 5 : DRAW 11 BM1J3 , 138 ; " :N$="HE 
IS GLAD TO MEET YOU ADVENTURER! ! 
I !f :GOSUB15j3 

317 DRAW" S 8 ; BVL10 , 168 ; " : N$= n CONGR 
ATULATIONS ! ,f : GOSUB15J3 : DRAW" S 4 ; BM 
6j3,19j3;":N$ = !f YOUR QUEST IS OVER! 
" : GOSUB15j3 : FORV=lT08j2j3 : NEXTV : POK 
E178 , 3 : FORXX=175T01STEP-2 : CIRCLE 
(128,96) , XX, 3,1, . 5:NEXT:GOSUB351 
:POKE65494,j3:END 

318 GOSUB328 :CIRCLE 32) ,80,0,1 
, .80 , .095: CIRCLE (8,0) ,114,0 , .80 , 
. 161 , . 5 : DRAW"BM55 , 81U2R1U3R1U3R1 
U3R1U3R1U4R1U4R1U5R1U5R1U12L5D1L 
4D1L4D1L7D1L6D5L1D4L1D5L1D5L1D4L 
lD6LlD4LlD5LlD6LlD3BU27BRlj3D3Ll" 

319 CIRCLE (15j3, 192) , 280,0, . 65, .7 
20, .78: LINE (7 8, 15) -(9 6,14) , PSET 

320 CH$="U2L1U3L1U8R1U5R1U2L1U1L 
4U1L4U1L3U1L1U1L1U1L1U3R1U3R1E7R 
1U1R2U1R5U1R1J3D1R5D1R2D1R2D1R2D1 
R1D1R2F3R1D2R1D2R1D2R1D3L2D1L3D1 
L5D1L4D1L3D1L13U1L3BR17D2R1D1R1D 
5R1D7L1D3L1D2L5D1L9U1L4U1" 

321 DRAW" S 8 ; BM18 9 , 90 ; "+CH$ : DRAW 11 
S4;BM122 ? 56; "+CH$ : POKE17 8 , 160 :PA 
INT(9j3,2) , ,j3:POKE17 8,j3:PAINT(9j3, 
80) , ,j3:POKE178, 15:PAINT(2,2) , ,01 
PAINT (13 2, 42) , ,0 : PAINT ( 2j33 , 73 ) , , 

0 

322 POKE178, 2 :PAINT(2j33 , 48) , ,0:F 
0RLL=1T03 0 : XX=RND (104) +72: YY=RND 
( 2 8 ) + 6 0 : PSET ( XX , YY ) : NEXTLL : POKE 1 
7 8,1: PAINT (141, 28) , ,0 

323 RETURN 

324 POKE178, j3: PAINT (53 , 48) , ,0 :RE 
TURN 

325 G$(7)="BM65, 69 ;R4L2D2j3U5LlR3 
D3BL1BD1L2BRD1BU2BL2U3" :G$ (2) ="B 
M3 ,64 ; D6F3R2L5Dlj3E5UllH5BR15G5Dl 
lF5Ulj3L4R2E3U7BD14BL3UlBLlj3Dl" : G 
$ (5) = fl BM37, 67 ; L8BD1L1R8BD1BL1L8R 
1BD1R8BDR1L8BD1L1R8BD1BL1L8" :G$ ( 
l)="BM24j3, 94 ;U9R4U1L2U1R2D2R2D9L 
5" 

326 G$ (4) ="BM78 , 94 ;U4R2D4U2R12D2 
U1R1" :G$ (6) = lf BM241, 80 ;U4L4R7L1U1 
L5" :G$ (10) ="BM72 ,83 ; R7F3L7H3D2F3 
R7U2 " : G$ (8 ) ="BM10 , 85 ;R13U1R2L15U 
1R13 " :G$ ( 9 ) ='» BM196 , 78 ;U13L1R2U1L 
2U1R2" : RETURN 

32 7 RETURN 

328 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : POK 
E178 , j3:LINE(j3,j3) - (25 6, 96) ,PSET,B 



Pro-Co 





Our Pm-Color-Series consists of three programs. 

Pro-Color-File ^Enhanced* V2.0 Design a record structure 
up to 80 fields with 1020 spaces per record, four 
custom-designed data entry screens and math functions on 
single records. Report totals, averages and summaries, Gen- 
erate mailing labels. Output reports to the printer, disk or 
screen. Send information directly into a DynacalcP compati- 
ble file for use in spread sheets, Streamline repetitive tasks 
into one keystroke with the command processor. Sort 750 
records in less than five minutes and create special indexes 
of your file for reporting and accessing. Store as many 
records as your disk will hold! $59.95 

Pro-Color-Forms V2.0 This mail-merge feature will allow 
you to write a letter and have names from your database 
inserted automatically. Design invoices, inventory cards and 
other forms. Or, if you use preprinted forms, you can set up a 
template to print information in the appropriate place. If you 
have our Telegraphies® program, you can have hkes 
pictures included as part of the form! $29.95 

Pro-Color-Dir Read the directory of all your diskettes and 
create a data file that can be accessed by Pro-Color-File 
Store up to 1 s 000 entries on one diskette and generate a 
master report that shows where each program is in your 
library. Included FREE with Pro-Color-Forms. 

Our Pro-Color-Series gives you database capabilities 
found on larger computers, at a fraction of the cost! So if 
you're serious about getting organized, try our Pro-Coior- 
Series, It lets you organize important information together in 
one place, right at your fingertips, and at a savings -just 
$79.95 for all three! 



erringer Software, Inc. 




PO Box 5300 Florence, SO 29502-5300 
Shipping: $3/$12 air mail (overseas). 
SC Residents add 5% sales tax, 
Send check or money order. ViSA/MC* customers call 



m af IB M^m **Tw m Mm "* ff' ■r~ m 1* Wum^ 

m Itf I M «# m fffiiiMiii wt-xfl^ m*mt* BiHi iffiifllii m4B±. 



(Credit card orders subject to 5% service charge.) 
Canadian Distributor: Kelly Software 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 71 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 




Fill out your CoCo library 
with these selections 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to take 
advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser features. An easy- 
to-read, step-by-step guide packed with hints, tips, tutorials and free 
software in the form of program listings. 
Book $19.95 

Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 



The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid introduction 
to the realm of statistical processes and thinking for both the 
beginner and the professional. (80-column printer required.) 
Book $6.95, Tape or Disk $5.95, Package $1 1 .95 



The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adventure contest. 
Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors, Horror House, One Room, Dr. 
Avaloe and more. Plus hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 



The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue Meanies, find a 
hidden fortune, or win the heart of a mysterious princess. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 



The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. Discover 
backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, attempt a daring space 
rescue, or defeat evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. Evil 
Crypt, Spy master, Time Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the 
beginning! 

Book $1 1 .95, Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $1 4.95 




The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first Simulations 
contest. You are a Civil War Commander, an air traffic controller, 
a civil defense coordinator, or a scientist on Mars . . . your wits are 
on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 

The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winners from oursecondSimulations contest. Fly through 
dense African jungle, bull your way down Wall Street, lead a bomb 
squad, or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and 
talents. Book $9.95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 

Coming soon: A complete Rainbow guide to 
using OS-9 Level II on the Color Computer 3 



l " 1 

/ want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Name 

Address 

City 

State 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 (book only) 

□ Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Disk Package (2 disks) 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

□ The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicale choice) 

□ Guide to Statistics Package (indicate choice of tape or 
Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 
(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) 



9.95. 
$ 9.95 . 
$ 9.95 . 
$ 9.95 . 
$10.95. 
$19.95, 
$31.00. 
$ 3.50 £J&. 
$ 3.50 

513.95. 
$13.95. 
$11 95. 
$ 9.95 . 
$14.95. 
$ 6.95 . 
$ 5.95 . 
disk) $11.95. 



Total 



L 



Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847- 
0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
228-4492. 

Please note; The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. 
That is, they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape 
or disk, you will still need the appropriate book. OS-9* is a registered trademark of the Microware 
Systems Corporation. 



: RETURN 

329 N$="YOU'R WELCOME .": GOSUB15j3 
:GOT03 31 

33j3 GOSUB331:N$="MY MAGIC IS CAR 
RYING YOU. . . ":L=RND(7) :GOSUB15j3: 
ZE=j3:GOT024 

331 DRAW"BMlj3,182;":RETURN 

332 FORX=lT08j3j3:NEXTX:LINE(ll,17 
3)- (255, 183) , PRESET, BF : LINE (1J3,1 
72)-(255,184) ,PSET,B 

333 RETURN 

334 LINE (j3,13j3)-(256,16j3) , PRESET 
, BF : RETURN 

335 COLOR8,l:LINE(j3,lj3j3)-(255,19 
1 ) , PRESET , BF : RETURN 

336 LINE (60, 116) -(248, 124 ) ,PRESE 
T,BF 

337 DRAWBM10 , 19J3 ; " : RETURN 

338 GOSUB331:N$="RIGHT. GOOD LUC 
K ! ! ! " : GOSUB15J3 :T(1,6)=9:T(2,9) = 
6:L=9:ZE=j3:GOT024 

339 CX$=CHR$(32) 

34j3 FOR CX=3 8T01STEP-1 

341 IF MID$ (N$,CX, 1) =CX$THENCV=C 

X:ZB$=LEFT$ (N$,CV-1) :GOT034 3 



342 NEXTCX 

343 PP=38+CV 

344 FOR CX= PP TO 1 STEP-1 

345 IFMID$ (N$,CX, 1 ) =CX$THENCC=CX 
:ZC$=MID$ (N$,CV+1,CC-LEN(ZB$) -2) 
:GOT0347 

346 NEXTCX 

347 IFLEN (N$ ) <PP+1THEN349 

348 ZD$=MID$ (N$,CC+1,LEN(N$) -CC) 
:GOT03 5j3 

349 N$=ZB$+CX$ : DRAWBM5 , 13 8 ; 11 :GO 
SUB15j3 : N$=ZC$+CX$ : DRAW" BMj3 , 148 ; 11 
:GOSUB15^:GOT04 3 

350 N$=ZB$+CX$ : DRAWBM5 , 138 ; " : GO 
SUB15j3 : N$=ZC$+CX$ : DRAW" BM,0 , 148 ; " 
: GOSUB15J3 : N$=ZD$+CX$ : DRAW"BMj3 , 15 
8 ; " : GOSUB150 : GOT04 3 

351 A$=" ;T5;c;e;f;li;g;P4;L4 ;c;e 
; F ; Li;G" : b$="P4 ; L4 ; c ; e ; F ; L2 ;G ; E ; 
c ; E ; Ll ; D " : c$= " P8 ; L4 ; E ; E ; D ; L2 ; c ; L 
4 ; c ; L2 ; E " : D $ = " L 4 ; G ; G ; G ; L 1 ; F ; L4 ; E 
; F" : E $ = " L2 ; G ; E ; L4 ; c ; L8 ; D ; D+ ; E ; G ; 
L4;A;Ll;03 ;C" :X$=a$+b$+c$+d$+e$: 

PLAYX$ : X$="V6 ; "+A$+B$+C$+D$+E$ : P 
LAYX$: RETURN 




OS-9 

SUPER BOARD I/O 



3 or 5 Users 
on Your 

CoCo 



2 Serial Ports 
(up to 19,200 BAUD) 




Plugs 
Into 
MULTI PACK 



CENTRONICS 
PARALLEL 
PORT 

159. 

INTRODUCTORY PRICE 

(Second I/O card without clock 

or beeper adds up to 5 users...$ 1 39.) 

Using our I/O cards and 512K 
upgrade, up to 5 users!!! (Our Hard 

Drive allows rapid access and does 
not shut down other users for Disk I/O) 



NEW 51 2K UPGRADE 
-►FOR COCO 3«- 

Now available the LR Tech 512K upgrade 
with all gold contacts and 1 20 nanosecond 
256K chips. Useable as a RAM disk from 
basic or as large system memory for OS 9 

level 2!!! ^ . 

$105. 



INTRODUCTORY 
PRICE... 



$59. 

WITHOUT 256K 
CHIPS 




WITH 256K CHIPS 



Soo next page 
for more specials. 



YOU CAN USE THIS SYSTEM WITH 

OUR SUPER BOARD 

A THREE USER SYSTEM UNDER OS 9 

works wrm our hard drive. 



TOLL FREE 
ORDER LINE 

(800) 
245-6228 




M.C. & VISA 
Accepted 



OWL-WARE 



P.O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA. 
19539 
PA Res lnclude6%Tax 

(215) 682-6855 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 73 




OWL-WA 

WINCHESTE 




NEWIII CoCo 3 Version of 
Master Artist Now Available! 



CR£«TE BEAUTIFUL PICTURES WITH 



Ma 



.. the Development of a Major Break 
HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS for the COLOR C 



<h in 



m m aoaac apnm JpE Jjf 



Several months ago OWL-WARE introduced the Finest OS9 Hard Drive System for the Color Computer, 
Now we are about to introduce the only RSDOS Interface System worthy of our computer, OWL-WARE 
Winchester Basic. For the first time you have available a true Winchester System, although there are 10 

directories made available to BASIC, the only limit to size of any file is the size of your drive. On a 
10 meg drive you could have a 8 meg file on directory 5 and a 1 meg file on directory 8 and small files 
everywhere. You turn the computer on and you can immediately access your drive from BASIC or any language 
using commands you already know. You do not have to know or use OS9 to use OWL-WARE WINCHESTER 
BASIC, but if you do f all flies saved from RSDOS are available to OS9, All files generated from OS9 can 
be made available to RSDOS by copying to the WINCHESTER BASIC directories. There are no partitions to 
wall you into, only one operating system, but nothing forces you to use an operating system you don*t like. 

Call for further details and awailability on this breakthrough product!!! 




0 ] \i c INI 1mm Y ■ « 

1 II f mum 

BELOW 





'■4STE 

i 





m Conufi 




w r $ 
2 . O 



| c c » p 4 % 



input #r@i*i 
"AO. nr 



M 
H 
H 
* 

M 

m 



n««gri 4 # j c mX & on Hodt 

Or mm writn cuf ton piiniDruihffi 

10 color f «t « % it*® 

Pictyf*! *r« Madu for uf in 

Bfffttc progr«Mr 
Uiitfihf in amy fix* 
tcntcn etymp to Color Inftc-J«% 



64K DISK 



$29.95 



. WITHOUT DRIVE 

OS9 HARD DRIVES FOR CoCo 1, 2.3 
WINCHESTER BASIC CoCo 1, 2 ONLY (CoCo 3 Version Pending) 







Disk Access is at Least... 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives. 

Control up to 2 Drives. EACH with Continuous Massive 
lemoryH! Complete OS-9 Hard Drive System Includes, 
ftware, Hard Drive, Controller and L.R. Tech Interfac 

TE: OS-9 and RS DOS... "This may prove to be the perfect mating of 
NEW pricingii! both systems." RAINBOW (May 86} 

$CQQ <t70Q 
W W ■ I &m W ■ 

10 MEG 20 MEG SYSTEM 
OWL-WARE 

is pleased to announce 
an exclusive arrangement 
to Distribute the L.R. TECH 
Hard Drive Interface and Software 



ow works 

ith OS 

Level 2!l 




Interface & 
Software Only $11 9. 

Please note that an Interface 
te not a controller, 
A Xebec SASI controller 
is $139. additional, 
If you need one. 

INSTALL IN ANY SLOT OF 
MULTI-PAK OR USE Y CABLE. 



DEALERS INQUIRES INVITE 




OWL-WARE'S TOLL FREE ORDER LINE (800) 245-6228 





TECHNICAL ADVICE 
(215) 682-6855 

All Prices Include 
Case and Power 

Supply 




SHhhh... Ask about the WISPER DRIVE!!! 



Single 




Call for SPECIAL PRICES on Drive 0, 1,2,3 Combos. Double 

drive 1 » i uy .to a> 1 4D. 

PLUS.SHIPPING 



HALF HEIGHT DRIVE 

UPGRADE KIT FOR 
NEW RS SYSTEM 

Why only double capacity 
when you can triple in the same 
case. KIT INCLUDES:double sided 
drive to fit in your case, includes 
hardware and chip to run double 
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POINTERS 



In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column of 
pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, we 
encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



FEEDBACK 

In response to letters from: 

• Marshall Miller: The cover must be 
examined and then opened by using the 
scepter in Sands of Egypt, 

• Noel Nelson and Matthew Lohse: In 
Dallas Quest, the parrot knows how to 
get past the anaconda. Try EXAMINING 
him. To get through the wheat field, you 
first must calm the cows in the pasture 
by playing the bugle for them and then 
you must dig. Read the message written 
on the stone and it will tell you the 
directions to get through the wheat field. 

In Raaka-Tu, where do you find the 
jeweled lever, the candle and the lamp 
that are used to get past the gargoyle? 

Philip Manwarren 
Harrington, ME 

• John Austin: On Zork I, you have to 
read the book after you light the candles 
and ring the bell. 

• Chad Johnson: When you meet up 
with the ghosts in Wishbringer^ there is 
nothing you can do to keep them from 
taking your items. When you hear the 
boots coming, go in a different direction. 
There is a token in the fountain that is 
guarded by piranhas. To get the token, 
you need a worm. 

In the Interbank Incident , what do you 
do with the book, vase of roses, rope, 
dice, perfume, pass, quarter and the old 
newspaper? 

John Haupt 
Salem, OH 



• Ian Renauld: In Vortex Factor, to 
open the safe you must travel back to get 
the document from the desk; it has the 
combination on it. 

• Emilie Bruchon: In Black Sanctum, 
have you tried going upstairs? Type GO 
DOOR and GO MIRROR, 

In the Interbank Incident, how do I get 
on the train to get to Paris? In Ghostown, 
where is the bag of gold and how do you 
blow up the safe? 

Dianne Piper 
Belait, WI 



• Normand Schafer: To get past the 
serpent in Pyramid, GET the statue box, 
then GO EAST to the room with the bird 
statue and get the statue. Go to the 
serpent and THROW the bird. 

Andrew Irwin 
Port Haron, MI 

Half a Chance 

Scoreboard: 

Some hints for Sands of Egypt: You 
need the oil from the snake to get the 
scepter. With the scepter you can unplug 
the drain and go underground. Be sure 
you save the game right when you are 
underground because you only have a 50 
percent chance of making the right move. 

Phil Derksen 
Hendersonville, NC 

Two-Bit Lock 

Scoreboard: 

In Dallas Quest, what do you do after 
you give the chief of the cannibals your 
gift of courage? 

In The Interbank Incident, I can un- 
lock the locker at the Seattle Metro 
station by putting the quarter in it, but 
I can't open it. 

Chris Hogg 
Canoga Park, CA 

Coconuts Come First 

Scoreboard: 

I have a few helpful hints for Dallas 
Quest. Once in Africa, go south, stay on 
the path and talk to the parrot. To find 
the eggs, you must first get the coconuts 
and choose a nest egg. 

Jeff Pag Hue a 
Taunton, MA 



Asks About Flasks 

Scoreboard: 

How do you incant the Vulcan ring in 
Dungeons of Daggorathl Are there 
scrolls or flasks on the first level? At what 
point do the other torches reveal them- 
selves? 

Amber Murray 
Gresham, OR 



Ring Request 



Scoreboard: 

How do you use the ring to get by the 
cannibals in Dallas Quest? 

Lori Morrish 
Toronto, Ontario 

Tribal Diplomacy 

Scoreboard: 

To get past the angry tribesmen in 
Dallas Quest, try typing WAVE RING and 
see what happens. 

Roy Grant 
Toledo, OH 

Snake in the Quest 

Scoreboard: 

How do you get past the snake in 
Dallas Quest? 

Howard Larsen 
Gait, CA 

Blob-icide 

Scoreboard: 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, how do 
you kill the blobs and are there any 
scrolls or flasks on levels 1 and 2? How 
do you kill the warrior on Level 2? 

Richard Little 
Columbiana, OH 

Monkey Business 

Scoreboard: 

To get out of the jungle in Dallas 
Quest, go south. When the chief sends 
you to the crossroads, get the coconuts 
and go to the nest egg. To unmask the 
chief, give the monkey the mirror. 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, kill most 
of the other creatures before you kill the 
blobs. It also helps to find the shield. 

In Sands of Egypt, how do you get the 
treasure in the treasure room and how do 
you get out of the underground passage? 

Jason Bell 
Goff, KS 

Respiration Aggravation 

Scoreboard: 

In The White Fire of Eternity, I can't 
figure out what to do at the corner of the 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



76 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



underground tunnel where it says 
"Cough . . . Gasp ... I can't breathe." 

I can't figure out what to do at the pool 
in the Northern Castle in Delirium, 

Craig Schreder 
Sarnia, Ontario 

Opportunity for Advancement 

Scoreboard: 

In Madness and the Minotaur, I can't 
advance through the rooms or get out of 
the maze. 

Someone said never carry more than 
three items, but where do you put the 
rest, and which three do you keep? What 
does it mean when you step into a room 
and hear garbled noise from the TV and 
when it says, "Nothing special happens"? 

Tony Kwan 
Rosemead, CA 



Sweet Sixteen 

Scoreboard: 

In Madness and the Minotaur, once 
the ledge has been exposed, CLIMB 
LEDGE (with the rope). The pack rat is a 
devious creature. There are 16 treasures 
worth points and the packrat always 
controls one of these treasures. At the 
beginning of the game, the packrat is 
given his treasure and one of the 16 
treasures worth points becomes the "key" 
to get the packrat to give up his treasure. 
When you enter the packrat's room with 
the "key" treasure, he will give up his 
treasure. If the packrat's treasure and the 
"key" treasure are one and the same, the 
packrat gives up his treasure the instant 
you enter the room. 

John Holladay 
Tacoma, WA 

Out of Gas 

Scoreboard: 

In Zaxxon, how can I improve my 
score? I keep running out of gas. 

Daniel Bradford 
Birmingham, A L 

Level Best 

Scoreboard: 

I cannot find the exit on Level 13 in 
Gantelet. 

On Level 2 there are three foods for 
extra health. On Level 7 the exit is in the 
lower left-hand corner. You can get extra 
armor, magical health, extra shots, a 
potion, five foods and a lot of points or t 
damage. 

On Level 8, ho w do you get the warrior 
and wizard through the first teleporter? 

David Gordon 
Pierre, SD 



Bell, Book and Candle 

Scoreboard: 

In Enchanter, try talking to the frog 
after using the Nitefall spell on him. You 
can use the scroll from inside the egg in 
the treasure room to bring the Adven- 
turer in front of you. 

In Zork, try ringing the bell, lighting 
the candles, and reading the black book, 
while standing in the entrance to hades. 
How do I get the powerful scroll in 
Enchanter without dying? In Hitchhik- 
er's Guide to the Galaxy, how do I get 
past the brick? 

Joseph Delaney 
Augusta, GA 

Fill 'er Up 

Scoreboard: 

How d o you fill the pool in Hall Of The 
King? 

Erik Yoder 
Evans ton, IL 

Lake Mistake 

Scoreboard: 

In Magic of Zanth, I am stuck at the 
lake. How do you open the bottle? How 
do you find out what is under the water? 
If I swim the lake, I can't get out of it. 
How do you get past the lake? 

Joan Michel 
Kennewick, WA 

The First Rainbow Book 
of Adventures 

Scoreboard: 

On Polynesian Adventure, how do | 
get the Hot Knife? I tried to use the mat 
as a potholder but that didn't work. I 
tried to get water in the gasoline can to 
pour on it but that didn't work either. 

In Search for the Ruby Chalice, how 
do I keep the wildcat from killing me? 

How do I get out of the first room in 
Dr. Avaloe? 

John Tiffany 
Washington, D. C 

Jump the Gate 

Scoreboard: 

How do I get out of the subway in 
Robot Odessey /? I keep trying to get the 
token but I get caught by the sentry. 

Thomas Paylon 
Anderson, SC 

Extra, Extra 

Scoreboard: 

In Paper Route, I found that by throw- 
ing the papers from the street you avoid 
being hit by the cars, kids, dogs and the 
lady with the boomerang. It is best to 



wait to see if a paper makes the mailbox 
before going farther down the street. This 
allows for a second chance at the box. 
Don't be alarmed when the man count 
resets to zero after nine men, as only the 
last digit is displayed. The f ull 10 or more 
men are still there. Pick up the bundle 
halfway down thestreet for best results. 

Neil Haupl 
Elyria, OH 

Wall Fire 

Scoreboard: 

To make the monsters shoot through 
the wall in the game Monster Maze, face 
the wall you want to shoot through. Ease 
up to the wall by holding the firebutton 
and letting go and then holding it in 
again. Be sure to turn around before you 
stop firing or else you run into the wall. 

Chris Buziak 
Buffalo, NY 

Ladder Chatter 

Scoreboard: 

Here are a few tips for Planetfall: 
Look in Floyd; get the key from the 
crevice in the Admin Corid or South with 
the bar; extend the ladder and put it over 
the rift; and send Floyd through the 
robot doorway in the repair shop. 

Marshall Miller 
Oneonta, NY 

Shedding Some Lamp Light 

Scoreboard: 

Once you get inside the pyramid in 
Pyramid 2000, type LIGHT LAMP and 
DROP PANEL. Go south and you will see 
bars of silver and a hole that leads east 
and west. 

James Ruth 
Newark, NJ 

★★★★★★★★★★★ 

To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
sectionofour Delphi CoCoSIG.From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 

— Jody Doyle 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 77 



COCO CONSULTATIONS 



The Values of the Hi-Res 

Joystick Interface 



By Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



How can I read the values of the 
Tandy Hi-Res Joystick interface? How 
does this device work? 

Gill Winograd 

(DEMONN) 

Glen Ellyn, IL 

The Interface cannot be read without 
special machine language subroutines. 
Steve Bjork presented such asubroutine 
in his Mouse articles in the July and 
August 1986 issues. A glance at that 
source code will assist programmers 
who want to write their own drivers for 
this device. OS-9 Level II has drivers for 
the Hi-Res Interface, too, so program 
development can be done to support it. 

The Interface consists of a quad op 
amp and an RC ramp generator circuit. 
Using a trigger signal from the cassette 
output line, it starts the ramp generator, 
and then timing loops in assembly 
language software are used to measure 
the exact amount of time it takes for the 



Martin H. Good- 
man, M.D., a phy- 
sician trained in 
anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electron- 
ics tinker er and out- 
spoken commenta- 
tor — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the Co Co world. 
Marty is the database manager of RAIN- 
BOWS CoCo and OS -9 Online SIGs on 
Delphi. His non-computer passions 
include running, mountaineering and 
outdoor photography. Marty lives in 
San Pablo, California. 




voltage in the RC circuit to rise to the 
level of the wiper of the pots in the 
joystick. By measuring this time very 
precisely, the joystick position can be 
read to 10 times the precision measured 
with the ordinary (6-bit DAC) joystick 
port. 

The price for such great resolution is 
that it takes more time to read the thing, 
and the readings may jitter just a little. 
But the port stiil can be read at 30 times 
per second in an application like Color 
Max 3, which is fast enough to produce 
the feel of smooth response. Only pro- 
grams written specifically for the Hi- 
Res Joystick Interface can use it. 



Try to Remember 

I'd like to know how to keep a BASIC 
program in memory while I format a 
disk. 

Vince C a sin gal 
(DESH) 
Miami, FL 

The DSKINI (format) command in 
BASIC wipes out any program residing 
in the ordinary part of the computer's 
memory, for it uses that area to build 
the image of the track it writes to disk 
in the course of formatting that disk. 
There is no simple way around this. 
You'd have to write your own disk 
format code in assembly language and 
place it elsewhere in memory (and hope 
that your BASIC program is not so big 
as to conflict with that special format- 



ter) in order to format a disk and still 
have a BASIC program left in memory. 
I actually did that with my MS-DOS 
formatter program published in the 
July 1986 issue. I suggest you just 
remember to format a bunch of disks 
before starting any programming ses- 
sion. 



Drive Power 



How much po wer do I need to supply 
to a disk drive system that has four Sc- 
inch drives? 

James A . Nyman 
(NY MAN) 

Seattle, WA 

These drives use 300 milliamps on the 
5-volt line and a maximum of 600 
milliamps on the 12-volt motor line. But 
that maximum current figure on the 12- 
volt line is for both motors going; the 
spindle motor spinning and the head 
stepper motor madly stepping the head 
back and forth. On the CoCo, while all 
drive spindle motors are turned on 
when any drive is accessed, only one 
head at a time is stepped! The figures 
cited are rule of thumb figures, and the 
figures for any given specific model of 
drive may vary by as much as plus or 
minus 50 percent. Qume drives are 
noted by several owners to be power 
hogs, requiring more power than most 
others. 

For your four-drive system, I'd say 
allow for 1 .2 amps on the 5-volt line and 



78 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



2.0 amps on the 12-volt line, if the power 
is being supplied by a single source for 
all drives. Many disk drive power sup- 
plies use a separate monolithic linear 
voltage regulator for each drive's vol- 
tage supply. Of course, it is critical that 
you properly mount (for heat dissipa- 
tion) those regulators on a well venti- 
lated heat sink. 

I recommend using your multitester 
to measure the actual current consump- 
tion of your brand of drive. Measure it 
on the 12-volt line first with just the 
spindle motor spinning, then write a 
BASIC two-1 ine program to step the head 
madly back and forth. Run that pro- 
gram, then measure the current con- 
sumption again. This should give you a 
good idea of how power hungry your 
particular drives are. 



Hosting a Hard Drive 

I own a CoCo 3, an upgraded Multi- 
Pa k. an RS-232 pack, Speech/ Sound 
pack, disk drive system and printer. I 
just acquired a 20 -megabyte Seagate 
SJ225 hard drive and want to hook this 
to my system under OS -9. I cannot 



obtain the Tandy host adapter for the 
hard drive system. Can you suggest an 
approach for this? 

Mike Perron 

(MIKE PA ) 
Sudbury, Ontario 

Hard drive systems require a "host 
adapter" that plugs into the CoCo 
system bus. Some hard drive systems 
(those made by Disto/CRC and by 
J&M) have the hard drive host adapter 
port on the floppy disk controller card, 
but for those, you'd have to buy their 
particular brand of disk controller. 

In general, hard drive systems on the 
CoCo consist of the host adapter, which 
is a simple dedicated kind of parallel 
port (SASI or SCSI standard) that 
connects (usually through a 50-pin 
ribbon cable) to a hard disk drive 
controller board. The hard drive con- 
troller board is a smart device, with 
CPUs and memory and all sorts of good 
stuff. In turn ? this hard drive controller 
board hooks to the bare hard drive, 
such as the Seagate you have. Different 
host adapters are designed to work with 
differing brands of hard drive controller 
boards. For example, the Tandy host 
adapter requires the Western Digital 



WD lOlOtypecontroller board. Where- 
as the L&R Tech (sold by Owlware) and 
the Disto host adapters are designed to 
work with the XEBEC 1410A hard 
drive controller board. 

Owlware offers what may be an at- 
tractive deal: For around $1 10 they sell 
you their host adapter, OS-9 driver 
software, and instructions on how to 
hook in a hard drive controller and hard 
drives. You then can "do it yourself" in 
terms of obtaining the hard drive con- 
troller board and drive. 



Clean Up Your Act 

/ want to know how to keep the drive 
motor on long enough to properly use 
my disk drive head cleaning kit. 

Richard Jackson 

(GOFER ) 
Brandon, FL 

A quick and dirty solution would be 
the following. Place a normal formatted 
disk in the d rive. Type CLERR 
10000: T = RND [33 )+l:D5KIS 
0,T ,1,R$,B$ and press ENTER (this 
moves the head to a random track). Put 
your disk-cleaning disk in the drive, and 



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July 1987 THE RAINBOW 79 



type POKE &HFF40,B. This starts the 
drives spinning. To stop the drives from 
spinning, type POKE &HFF40,0 or just 
press reset. 

To clean a drive other than Drive 0, 
substitute the drive number for that first 
zero in the D5KI$ command above. 

There are machine language pro- 
grams that "exercise" the head, causing 
it to wipe over all parts of the cleaning 
disk. But my quick and dirty approach 
should do the job for you. 



Jostle Prevention 

/ have recently blown out the 6809 in 
both my old CoCo 2 and my new Co Co 
3. This has happened when the Multi- 
Pak got jostled and partly unplugged 
while the power was on. Can you sug- 
gest a way of preventing this? 

Rick Bet t is 
Oakland, CA 

1 suggest you obtain a piece of 1-inch 
thick plywood, the size of the area 
covered by both the CoCo and the 
Multi-Pak. Open up both the CoCo and 
the Multi-Pak, and attach both cases to 
the plywood using wood screws or 
counter-sunk bolts. This should make 
jostling less likely to result in the CoCo 
and Multi-Pak being separated. I might 
add that I recommend putting this unit 
at some distance from your main work 
area using a remote keyboard cable, to 
further lessen the likelihood of the 
system being jostled. 



Missing Analog Input 

/ purchased a Magnavox 8 CM 562 a 
while ago for my CoCo 2. At that time 
I was told it had an analog RGB input. 
And so I reasoned it would work with 
the CoCo 3. When I got my CoCo 3, I 
was unable to find the analog input on 
the 8 CM 562. Can you help? 

Jim Stewart 

(WHEEL/1 MMER) 

Fort Wayne, IN 

The Magnavox 8CM562 lacks an 
analog RGB input and so cannot be 
used in RGB mode with the CoCo 3. 
The two Magnavox monitors that will 
work with the CoCo 3 and give a nice 
80-column display are the 8CM515 and 
8CM643. The 8CM505 does possess an 
analog input, but its resolution is too 
poor to support readable 80-column 

80 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



display. 1 recommend you write to the 
dealer who sold you the thing under 
such false pretenses and to North Amer- 
ican Phillips, the maker of the monitor. 
Perhaps one of those can give you some 
satisfaction on this unfortunate incident 
of apparent product misrepresentation. 



"NEC DRAM chips 
are generally felt to be 
the best for upgrading 
current CoCo 3s. " 



A Hot512K 

The chips on my PBJ '512 K board run 
disturbingly hot. Will this be a problem? 

Bill Jackson 

(B1LUACKSON) 

Sacramento, CA 

Because of a flaw in the GIME chip, 
the timing for the DRAM chips used on 
the 512K upgrade boards is a bit off, 
and this results in both the chips run- 
ning hotter than one might like and in 
some particular brands and speeds of 
chips doing better than others. NEC 
DRAM chips are generally felt to be the 
best for upgradingcurrent CoCo 3s. 120 
ns are usually preferred, although one 
recent rumor has it that the 150 ns chips 
may do as well or better. As long as you 
can put your finger on the chip and hold 
it there without suffering pain or a real 
burn, things should be OK. Hopefully, 
in the future, a fix for this problem will 
be available. 



ROM Switching 

/ own a Radio Shack controller and 
want to switch between two different 
DOS ROMs. How can 1 do this? 

Mike Tolbert 

(M1KEGT) 

Greenville, SC 

SpectroSystems currently is market- 
ing a clever device that allows you to use 
either a 28-pin 2764 (8K-by-8) or a 28- 
pin 27128 (16K by 8) with the Radio 
Shack disk controller. This 24-pin to 28- 



pin adapter allows for several tricks. 
Apart from allowing the use of the 
inexpensive and common 2764-type 
EPROMs in the Radio Shack con- 
troller, it also allows you to prepare a 
27128 with one DOS in the lower 8K 
and another in the upper 8K, and to 
switch between the two by switching the 
state of the A 1 3 address line on the chip 
between ground and +5 volts. The 
device comes with instructions for use, 
although some sophistication and pos- 
session of or access to an EPROM 
programmer is required. When used as 
an adapter for a 2764, no soldering (but 
some pin bending) is required. When 
used as an adapter for a 27128, solder- 
ing of one or two connections will be 
required. The really clever thing about 
this adapter is that it permits the 
adapted EPROM to actually fit inside 
the tight space inside the controller. 
Look for the SpectroSystems ad in 

RAINBOW. 



Avatex Difference 

What is the difference between the 
Avatex 1200 and the Avatex 1200 HC 
modems? 

Jay Browning 

(ZARATHUSTRA) 

Savannah, GA 

The "HC" in "Avatex 1200HC" 
stands for "Hayes-Compatible." The 
old Avatex 1200 was apparently rushed 
to market with emulation of only a very 
minimal subset of the Hayes com- 
mands. The 1200HC is fully Hayes- 
compatible. The Avatex 1200 is ade- 
quate for use with most CoCo terminal 
software, but may give problems if you 
want to use it with sophisticated auto- 
mated software written for IBM PCs 
and clones. Also, full and proper Hayes 
compatibility is often required for use 
with CoCo Bulletin Board host systems. 
Overall, I recommend spending the few 
extra dollars to get full Hayes compat- 
ibility. Your modem will then be far 
more flexible and usable with other 
systems. 



Disto Compatibility 

How can I make my Disto Controller 
work properly with my CoCo 3? 

Denis Giguere 
(GIGVEREDENIS) 
Shawinigan-Sud, Quebec 



To the best of my knowledge, the 
Disto Controller is completely 
hardware-compatible with the CoCo 3. 
If there are problems, they probably 
stem from use of some DOS ROM 
other than an unmodified Radio Shack 
Disk Extended BASIC ROM. Most 
current alternate DOS ROMs (ADOS, 
CDOS, JDOS, SpectrumDOS, EDOS 
and others) will not work properly with 
the CoCo 3. Art Flexser will soon be 
releasing ADOS-3, a totally re-done 
version of his ADOS that will work with 
the CoCo 3. The Disto controller pres- 
ents the problem of not supporting a 
legitimate Radio Shack ROM because 
all of its ROM slots are 28-pin. Most 
Disto owners who also own EPROM 
programmers will burn a 2764 with the 
data from a legitimate Disk BASIC 
ROM and use it to make their Disto 
Controller compatible with the CoCo 3. 



DRAM Trouble on CoCo 2s 

I've heard of some DRAM problems 
with the Co Co 2 that sells for $99. What 
can you tell me about this? Is it true that 



blown 68B09s are the most common 
cause of dead CoCo 3s? 

Dennis McMillan 
Pittsburg, CA 

It is true that some of the suffix 
CoCo 2s being sold appear to have an 
odd sort of DRAM problem. Specifi- 
cally, these are the CoCo 2s that had 
provisions on the main board for up- 
grade to 64K in any one of three ways: 
via two 4464 chips, by a satellite board 
that had eight 64K-by-l chips, or by 
soldering eight 64K-by-l chips directly 
to the motherboard. It seems the units 
that have the problems are those made 
to have 64K by using eight 64K-by-l 
chips, either soldered directly to the 
motherboard or on a satellite adapter. 
Such computers fail to work with some 
educational software ROM packs sold 
by Tandy. Most of these problem units 
had Hitachi brand 64K-by-l DRAM 
chips. The fix for this consists of re- 
moving the eight 64K-by-l DRAM 
chips and then doing the upgrade using 
two 4464 chips inserted into the two 18- 
pin DRAM chip sockets. 

A dead 68B09 is commonly found as 
the cause of a dead CoCo 3. In most 
cases, the 68B09 is zapped due to abuse 



by the owner of the CoCo 3. It is a great 
pity Tandy did not elect to socket that 
vulnerable chip. On my own unit, which 
I subject to hideous risks in occasional 
hacking experiments, I de-soldered and 
socketted that chip, knowing that 
sooner or later I will want to be able to 
quickly and cleanly replace it. I recom- 
mend also socketting the 74LS245 data 
line buffer chip (IC 3) and the 74LS04 
inverter/ buffer on the RGB sync lines 
(IC 15) because both of these chips also 
have pins that connect directly to the 
outside world. 

Your technical questions are welcomed 
Please address them to CoCo Consultations, 
THE rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow Maga- 
zine Services, then, at the RAINBOW> 
prompt, type ASK (for Ask the Experts) to 
arrive at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "CoCo Consultations" 
online form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



TANDY COMPUTER 
DISCOUNTS 



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26-334 CoCo 3 
26-3131 1st disk drive 
26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 



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269.95 
259.95 



PRINTERS 



26-2802 DMP 106 169.95 

26-1277 DMP-430 580.00 

26-1280 DMP-130 269.00 
Complete line of Tandy (Daisy Wheel) print wheels 

MODEL 4 and MSDOS COMPUTERS 



25-1050 Tandy 1000 EX 
25-1051 Tandy 1000 SX 
25-1011 Plus expansion board 
25-1023 CM-5 color monitor 

25- 1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 

26- 1070 mod 4D 64k 2dr. 



530.00 
850.00 
179.00 
249.95 
110.00 
920.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



3-D GRAPHICS ANIMATION 

MORE FEATURES ATA LOWER PRICE! 




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• Comes with Data to Create Your Own 3-D Animation 
with a Spaceship, Car, Pyramid, Cube and Sphere. 
Includes Animation Examples with these Objects. 

• Includes Editor to Create and Edit Data for 3-D Graphics 
Animation of Any Objects, including: Cars, Boats, 
Airplanes, Etc. 

• Now Supports Elimination of Hidden Lines. 

• Print 3-D Graphics Images on Radio Shack® Dot 
Matrix Printers. 

• Easy to Use • Requires 64K • COCO 2 or COCO 3 • Disk Only 

• Reg. $32.95 Now $24.95 + $3 Shipping/Handling 

• Only $5 + $2 Shipping/Handling for 3-D Demo-Disk 
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Later Purchase of the Entire Program. 

Visa and Mastercard Accepted 

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2346 W Estrella Drive Chandler, AZ 85224 (602) 821-2465 

Radio Shack is a registered trademark of Tandy Corporation 



RAINBOW 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 81 



T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE CELEBRATES 5 YEARS 



ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 

COVER 1 
RACETRACK 
HANGMAN 
MUSIC ALBUM 
LIFE EXPECTANCY 
WORD TESTS 
K/LLER MANSION 
BARTENDER 
CALENDAR 
ROBOT WAR 

ISSUE #2, AUGUST 1982 

UFO COVER PT. 1 
BIORHYTHM 
BOMBARDMENT 
BLACK JACK 
COST OF LIVING 
FRENZY 

BUSINESS LETTER 
QUICK THINK 
QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 
QUEST FOR LENORE 

ISSUE #3, SEPTEMBER 1982 

UFO COVER PT 2 
BASKETBALL 
CHUCKLUCK 
SLOT MACHINE 
ALPHABETIZER 
NFL PREDICTIONS 
FLAG CAPTURE 
ROBOT BOMBER 

ISSUE #4, OCTOBER 1982 

UFO RESCUE 

TANK BATTLE 

DRIVEWAY 

SOUNDS 

BALLOON DROP 

MIND BOGGLE 

COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 

CALORIE COUNTER 

JACK-O-LANTERN 

ISSUE #5, NOVEMBER 1982 

CATALOG COVER 
BOWLING 

PROGRAM INVENTORY 

PROMISSORY-LOANS 

CHECKBOOK BALANCER 

TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 

CONVOY 

BAG-IT 

SPECTRA SOUND 
CONVEYOR BELT 

ISSUE #6, DECEMBER 1982 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
RAINDROPS 
STOCK MARKET 
ADVANCED PONG 
DESTROY 
SOUND ANALYZER 
CREATIVITY TEST 
VOICE DATA 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 1 
LOONY LANDER 



ISSUE #7, JANUARY 1983 

NEW YEARS COVER 
LIST ENHANCER 
SUPER PRECISION DIV. 
BOMB DIFFUSE 
SPACE STATION 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 2 
SHOOTOUT 
FIND UTILITY 
CYBORG INS. 
CYBORG FACES 

ISSUE #8, FEBRUARY 1983 

COVER 8 
DEFEND 

3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 
COCO CONCENTRATION 
AUTO LINE NUMBERING 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 3A 
ML TUTORIAL PT.3B 
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 
DUAL BARRIER 
BRICKS 

ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 

TIME MACHINE COVER 
TRIG DEMO 
PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 
PROGRAM PACKER 
BUDGET 

ELECTRONIC DATEBOOK 
ML TUTORIAL PT 4 
TAPE DIRECTORY 
BLOCK-STIR 

COCO ADDING MACHINE 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 

TENTH COVER 
PYRAMID OF DANGER 
TYPING TUTOR 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 5 
TINYCALC 

STOCK MARKET COMP 
YAH-HOO 
MISSILE ATTACK 
SCREEN PRINT 
BRIKPONG 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 

ELEVENTH COVER 
ARCHERY 
FROG JUMP 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 6 
MLT DICTIONARY 
BASIC SPEED UP TOT. 
METRIC CONVERTOR 
GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 
GRAPHICS PROGRAM 
CATERPILLAR CAVE 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 

TWELFTH COVER 
SHOOTING GALLERY 
BOMB STOPPER 
VALLEY BOMBER 
STARFIGHTER 
WHEEL OF FORTUNE 
ML TUTORIAL PT. 7 
MERGE UTILITY 
RAM TEST 
LANDER 



ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 

THIRTEENTH COVER 
FLASH CARD 
ICE BLOCK 
COSMIC FORTRESS 
MAIL LIST 
DOLLARS & CENTS 
ML TUTORIAL PT.8 
SDSK COPY 
MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 
CRAWLER 

ISSUE #14, AUGUST 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
ROW BOAT 

COMPUTER TUTLPT. 1 
INDEX DATABASE 
DISK ZAPPER 
COCO-MONITOR 
COCO-ARTIST 
ROBOT COMMAND 
TEST SCREEN PRINT 
HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 

ISSUE #15, SEPTEMBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER PI 2 
GOLD VALUES 
TREK INSTRUCTIONS 
TREK 

HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 
ASTRO DODGE 
DR. COCO 
PEG JUMP 
MORSE CODE 
PURGE UTILITY 

ISSUE #16, OCTOBER 1983 

MYSTERY COVER 
BOPOTRON 
DIRECTORY RECALL 
VECTOR GRAPHICS INST. 
VECTOR GRAPHICS 
SKYDIVER 

SWERVE AND DODGE 
NIMBO BATTLE 
TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 
LIFE GENERATIONS 

ISSUE #17, NOVEMBER 1983 

THANKSGIVING COVER 

3-DTIC-TAC-TOE 

INDY500 

COLLEGE ADVENTURE 
MEMORY GAME 
DUNGEON MASTER 
WEATHER FORECASTER 
GRID FACTOR INST. 
GRID FACTOR 
DRAW 

ISSUE #18, DECEMBER 1983 

CHRISTMAS COVER 
CLIMBER 

GALACTIC CONQUEST 
WARLORDS 
STATES REVIEW 
MATH TUTOR 

MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 
PRINTER UTILITY INST 
PRINTER UTILITY 
MUTANT WAFFLES 



ISSUE #19, JANUARY 1984 

BANNER 
PROBE 

DISK DIRECTORY PROTECTOR 
OPTICAL CONFUSION 
WORD PROCESSOR 
WORD SEARCH 
ASTRONAUT RESCUE 
STAR TRAP 
PIE CHART 
FORCE FIELD 

ISSUE #20, FEBRUARY 1984 

INTRODUCTION: 
HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 
ESCAPE ADVENTURE 
SEEKERS 
MASTER BRAIN 
LIST CONTROLLER 
DISKETTE CERTIFIER 
ROM COPY 

BASIC RAM 
SNAFUS 

ISSUE #21, MARCH 1984 

BASIC CONVERSIONS 
FINANCIAL ADVISE 
CASTLE STORM 
DOS HEAD CLEANER 
COCO TERMINAL 
SNAKE CRAWLER 
WAR CASTLE 
SKY FIRE 
EASY BASIC 
DOTS 3-D 

ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 

HEALTH HINTS 
GLIBLIBS 

CLOTHER SLITHER 
BIBLE 1 & 2 
BIBLE 3 & 4 
CATCH ALL 
INVADER 
ALIEN RAID 
MOON ROVER 
IO ERROR IGNORER 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 

MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 
STOCKS OR BOMBS 
WALL AROUND 
COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 1 
NUCLEAR WAR INST. 
THERMONUCLEAR WAR 
CIRCUIT DRAWER 
MOUSE RACES 
SUPER-SQUEEZE 
DATA FALL 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 

DIR B\CK & SORT 
BRICK OUT 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOKPT.2 
USA SLIDE PUZZLE 
51 '24 SCREEN EDITOR 
51 *24 SCREEN 
CITY INVADERS 
PRINTER SPOOLER 
. STEPS 
SNAKE 



ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 

CLOCK 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT. 3 
SKID ROW ADVENTURE 
MONEYMAKER 
PIN-HEAD CLEANING 
LINE EDITOR INST. 
LINE EDITOR 
BOOMERANG 
BUBBLE BUSTER 
RECOCHET 

ISSUE #26, AUGUST 1984 

PEEK, POLE & EXECUTE 
SAUCER RESCUE 
YOUNG 1YPER TUTOR 
O-TEL-0 

OLYMPIC EVENTS 
DOUBLE DICE 
COCO DATABASE 
BATTLE STAR 
COCO-PIN BALL 
MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

ISSUE #27, SEPTEMBER 1984 

COCO TO COM 64 

GALACTIC SMUGGLER 

INDYRACE 

ACCOUNT MANAGER 

CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 

STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 

SPACE DUEL 

BUGS 

TRAP-BALL 

BALLOON FIRE 

ISSUE #28, OCTOBER 1984 

HANGING TREE 
CHECKERS 
FOOTBALL f 
MORE PEEKS, POKES 
SPELLING CHECKER 
SOUND DEVELOPMENT 
WORD GAME 
SCREEN REVERSE 
AUTO COPY 
RATATTACK 

ISSUE #59, NOVEMBER 1984 

DISK ROLLOUT 
ROBOT ON 
MULTIPONG 

ADVENTURE GENERATOR 
QUEST ADVENTURE 
QUARTER BOUNCE 
DUAL OUTPUT 
KEY REPEAT 
FULL EDITOR 
METEOR 

ISSUE #30, DECEMBER 1984 

MATH HELP 
ZECTOR ADVENTURE 
WORLD CONQUEST 
DRAG RACE 
MINE FIELD 
T-NOTES TUTORIAL 
T&D PROGRAM INDEXER 
SYSTEM STATUS 
ERROR TRAP 
DROLL ATTACK 



VISA 




SUPER SAVINGS 

Single Issue $8.00 

2-5 Issues $6.00 ea. 

6-10 Issues $5.00 ea. 

11 or more Issues . $4.50 ea. 
All 60 Issues $165.00 



Every Issue Contains 
10 or More Programs 
Many Machine Language 
Programs 

Available for COCO I, II and 
All Programs Include 
Documentation 



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No Charge 

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ISSUE #31, JANUARY 1985 

TREASURES OF BARSOOM 
BATTLE GROUND 

STRUCTURED COMPILED LANGUAGE 
LIBRARY MODULE 
MINIATURE GOLF 
STAR DUEL 

ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 
GRID RUN 
SPIRAL ATTACK 
FAST SORT 
MUNCHMAN 

ISSUE #32, FEBRUARY 1985 

DR. SIGMUND 
ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 
LOTTERY ANALYST 
BASIC COMPILER 
MUSIC CREATOR 
MEANIE PATROL 
TRI-COLOR CARDS 
SHAPE RECOGNITION 
DISK BACKUP 
SRftCE PROTECTOR 

ISSUE #33, MARCH 1985 

LIGHT CYCLE 
PAINT 

SKEET SHOOTING 
GUITAR NOTES 
ML DISK ANALYZER 
PERSONAL DIRECTORY 
NAUGHA ADVENTURE 
EGGS GAME 
DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 
SPEED KEY 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 

HOVER TANK 
POWER SWORD 
TERMITE INVASION 
SPELLING CHECKER 
DOS BOSS 
NINE CARD CHOICE 
MUSIC GENERATOR 
FYR-DRACA 
DRIVE TEST 
GRAPHIC TOUR 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 

SELECT A GAME 1 
TAPE PROBLEMS 
STROLL TRIVIA 
SOFTBALL MANAGER 
FONTS DEMO 
CLOWN DUNK MATH 
ALPHA MISSION 
DOS ENHANCER 
HAUNTED HOUSE 

ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 

SELECT A jGAME 2 
VIDEO COMPUTIZER 
SPEECH SYNTHESIS 
SPEECH RECOGNITION 
SPACE LAB 
AUTO COMMAND 
COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 
KNIGHT AND THE LABYRINTH 
STAR SIEGE 

TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 



ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 

CHESS MASTER 
BIBLE 5-7 

SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 
FILE TRANSFER 
FOUR IN A ROW 
MARSHY 

TAPE CONTROLLER 
CATACOMB 
AUTO TALK 
SGR8PAK 

ISSUE #38, AUGUST 1985 

GOLF PAR 3 
WIZARD ADVENTURE 
KITE DESIGN 
ROBOTS 
GOMOKU 

AMULET OF POWER 
LINE COPY UTILITY 
DISK PLUMBER 
SUPER RAM CHECKER 
GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

ISSUE #39, SEPTEMBER 1985 

DRUNK DRIVING 
CAR MANAGER 
SQUEEZE PLAY 
SUPER BACKUP 
RECIPE MACHINE 
ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 
SUPER VADERS 
AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

ISSUE #40, OCTOBER 1985 

STAR TREK 
HAM RADIO LOG 
COCO-WAR 
DISKLABELER 
SHIP WAR 
ELECTRIC COST 
MULTIKEY BUFFER 
NUKE AVENGER 
CURSOR KING 
SAND ROVER 

ISSUE #41, NOVEMBER 1985 

GRUMPS 

DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 
SOLAR CONQUEST 
GAS COST 

RIME WORLD MISSION 
WUMPUS 

CHARACTER EDITOR 
GRAPHIC TEXT 
GRAPHIC LOOPY 
BOLD PRINT 

ISSUE #42, DECEMBER 1985 

HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 
YAHTZEE 
DISK UTILITY 
MACH II 

ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 
CAR CHASE 

SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 
SLOT MACHINE GIVEAWAY 
TEXT BUFFER 
TUNNEL RUN 



ISSUE #43, JANUARY 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WTER COST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 
KEYPAD ENTRY 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEBRUARY 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 

ISSUE #45, MARCH 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT. 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COLOKEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
LIBERTY SHIP 
SINGLE STEP RUN 

ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DISK LOCK 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 

BOMB RUN 

TANKS 

TAR PITS 

BASEBALL 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 

ROULETTE 

GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFF. 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
TV SCHEDULE 
BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTI COPY 
AUTO MATE 
SCROLL PROTECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 



ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 
DISK DISASSEMBLER 
BAKCHEK 
PACHINKO 
STOCK CHARTING 
HAUNTED STAIRCASE 
CANYON BOMBERS 
DRAGONS 1 & 2 
GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 
AUTO BORDER 

ISSUE #50, AUGUST 1986 

BUSINESSWVENTORY 
D & D ARENA 
DISK CLERK 
PC SURVEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH 
NFL SCORES 
BARNSTORMING 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPTEMBER 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
FISHING CONTEST 
RIP OFF 
HAND OFF 
BUDGET51 
VAN GAR 
DOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 

ISSUE #52, OCTOBER 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 
INVASION 

THE TRIP ADVENTURE 
FOOTRACE 
FLIPPYTHE SEAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE BUILDERS 
SUPER ERROR 2 

ISSUE #53, NOVEMBER 1986 

CORE KILL 
LUCKY MONEY 
COOKIES ADVENTURE 
NICE LIST 
SPANISH QUIZZES 
PAINT EDITOR 
CAVERN CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

ISSUE #54, DECEMBER 1986 

JOB LOG 
PEGS 

DIGITAL SAMPLING 
JUNGLE ADVENTURE 
PAINT COCO 3 
CONVERT 3 
COMPUTER TYPE 
PANZER TANKS 
MRS PAC 
BIG NUM 



ISSUE #55, JANUARY 1987 

GRADE BOOK 
MAIL LIST 
DOWN HILL 
FIRE FOX 
JETS CONTROL 
GALLOWS 
DIR MANAGER 
FIRE RUNNER 
GRAPHICSBORDER 
COSMIC RAYS 

ISSUE #56, FEBRUARY 1987 

CALENDAR PRINT 
CRASH 
GALACTA ? 
OCEAN DIVER 
CLUE SUSPECT 
WORD EDITOR 
ALIEN HUNT 
DEMON'S CASTLE 
PICTURE DRAW 
DIG 

ISSUE #57, MARCH 1987 

THE BAKERY 

ENCHANTED VALLEY ADV. 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR 1 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 

ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 
PLANT CARE 
CHECK WRITING 
HELI RESCUE 
KABOOM 
NEW PONG 
CROQUET 
SUPER MONOPOLY 
ZOOM UTILITY 
ELECTRONICS II 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
CATCH A CAKE 
CONCENTRATION II 
PROGRAMMABLE ROBOTS 
CT ADVENTURE 
MOTORCYCLING 
STAR EXPLORER 
ELECTRONICS III 
GRAPHICS EDITOR 
GRAPHICS UTILITY 



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8 


15 22 


29 


36 43 


50 


57 


2 


9 


16 23 


30 


37 44 


51 


58 


3 


10 


17 24 


31 


38 45 


52 


59 


a 


11 


18 25 


32 


39 46 


53 


60 


5 


12 


19 26 


33 


40 47 


54 




6 


13 


20 27 


34 


41 48 


55 




7 


14 


21 28 


35 


42 49 


56 








PLEASE CIRCLE 










TAPE 


or 


DISK 







The CoCo 
Writes a Program 



By Dennis H. Weide 



Have you ever wanted to use a 
machine language program in a 
BASIC program you've written? 
ML programs of ten offer f unctions only 
available on more expensive machines. 
You can write the BASIC program to 
load the ML program from tape or disk, 
but that can create more problems than 
it solves. The answer, of course, is to 
convert the ML program to BASIC DPTfl 
statements, write the FOR-NEXT loop 
and then append the resulting BASIC 
programto your program. BASIC Data 
Writer can accomplish this function for 
you in a matter of seconds. 

BASIC Data Writer was written in 
PASCAL and compiled into a machine 
language program. It writes a complete 
BASIC program using REM, DATA, CLS, 
CLEAR, POKE, EXEC and FOR-NEXT 
statements and saves it to disk, cassette, 
screen or printer in ASCII format. The 
program can then be reloaded and run 
like any other BASIC program. 



Dennis Weide is a communications 
technician for A T&T communications 
in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he 
programs A T&T and IBM PCs. He 
enjoys making toys and teaching com- 
puter programming. 



ASCII stands for American Standard 
Code for Information Interchange and 
is an alphanumeric character (non- 
binary) code that can be read by most 
computers. It is often used to transfer 
BASIC programs files from one comput- 
er to another. BASIC programs are 
usually stored in a tokenized format to 
reduce access time and the amount of 
cassette or disk space required to save 
them. But the CoCo can load-and save 
BASIC programs in ASCII format. Since 
word processors read and write ASCII 
files, BASIC programs for the CoCo can 
be written on a word processor such as 
VIP Writer and saved to disk or 
cassette. After saving the program and 
exiting the word processor, the BASIC 
program can be reloaded and run in the 
normal manner. If you've used a word 
processor, you can see the advantage of 
using its global text editor when creat- 
ing BASIC programs. 

BASIC Data Writer takes advantage 
of that ability to create a BASIC program 
from a machine language program 
stored in memory. The listing shows the 
PASCAL source code for the program. If 
you have Deft or another version of 
PASCAL, you can key in the source code 
and compile it. Otherwise, you can get 



84 THE RAINBOW July 1987 




3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns X 24 Sines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full-screen 
editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 
control codes 

Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than vou'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
Ti, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fsn. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 




...one ♦/ (he best programs for the Color 
Computer f have seen... 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TIPI |?U/DITI?I> fLA 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— I6K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on ihe screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows' 1 that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Irives any printer 
(LPVtl/VJIf, »MP-l00/2#0, Epson, Okidaia, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Term in el, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access 10 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript , variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bouom. page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends iyped lines directly 
to your printer, and Wired mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use wish MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line headers and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features; ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files {for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from oiher word 
processors. Compatible wiih spelling checkers (like 
Spell f n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for sire saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and /or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
dekie, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free- form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 





RAINBOW 

CEBTIHCAMON 
36*1 



.. . truly a slate of the an word processor.. . 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to; 

O 

704 Nob Street 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Californians add 6% stale tax.) 

Available at 

Radio /hack stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple II is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.: Atari is a trademark 
of Atari, Inc.. TRS-80 is ;i trademark of Tandy Corp; MX-80 is s 
trademark *f £ps*n America, Inc. 



the machine language version from 

RAINBOW ON TAPE. 

Using the Program 

To use the program, first load the 
machine language program to be con- 
verted according to the instructions 
provided with it. You*ll need to know 
the decimal addresses of the program. 
These are usually included in the in- 
structions or articles that accompany 
the program. If not, here's how to find 
them. For a program loaded from 
cassette, usethe followingcommands to 
determine these addresses: 

Start: PRINT PEEI<(487)*256 

+PEEI<(488) 
End: PRINT PEEI<(126)*256 

+PEEK(127)-1 
Exec: PRINT PEEI<( 157)*2S6 

+PEEI<(158) 

For programs loaded from disk, only 
the start and execute addresses are 
saved in RAM when loading. It is eas le r 
to use one of the many disk utilities 
available to print these addresses. How- 
ever, if you don't have a disk utility to 
do this, find the start and execute 
addresses by using these commands: 



Start: PRINT PtEI<( 3288 ) *256 

+PEEI<(3289) 
Exec: PRINT PEEK ( 157) *256 

+PEEK(158) 

You'll have to make an educated 
guess to determine the end address. 
Usually, but not always, data state- 
ments containing zeroes for the last 
severaj data elements indicate blank 
memory after the ML program. The 
resulting BASIC program will have the 
start, end and execute addresses listed 
as remarks in the BASIC program. 

Once the ML program has been 
loaded and the addresses determined, 
load BASIC Data Writer. The ad- 
dresses of BASIC Data Writer are: 

Start: Decimal 25000 
End: Decimal 30698 
Exec: Decimal 25000 

If any part of the ML program falls 
inside the range of addresses of BASIC 
Data Writer , use the start address offset 
option with the CLOflDM or LOflDM com- 
mand (see the computer manual for a 
complete description of these com- 
mands). Use a positive offset to load 



BASIC Data Writer at a higher address 
or a negative offset to load it at a lower 
address. Deft PASCAL generates 
position-independent code so the pro- 
gram will load anywhere in RAM in- 
cluding the upper 32K. 

Once loaded, execute BASIC Data 
Writer and answer the prompts. Enter 
the filename followed by the device 
number you want to save the BASIC 
program to. Here's a list of the device 
numbers used by Deft PASCAL: 

:-3 Screen 

:-2 Printer 

:-l Cassette 

:0 Drive 0 

: 1 D ri ve I 

:2 Drive 2 

:3 Drive 3 

Filename . BPS : 0 would save the 
BASIC program to Drive 0. File- 
name* 8fl5: -1 would save the BASIC 
program to cassette. Saving to screen or 
printer only prints the program; it 
doesn't save it for future use. Be sure the 
output device is ready to receive the 
program, then press ENTER. Enter the 
start, end and execute addresses in 
decimal when prompted. When the NOW 




<«G1MMES0FT>» 

A new generation of CoCo III software 





mm 



UK 





1 BSD 



A user friendly, user programable function key utility 
that creates up to 20 function keys. Other features 
include DOS mods, DISABLE, and is EPROMable. 
Compatible with CoCo \/\\ and includes enhanced 
CoCo III version! (See review in April '87) 

Disk Version 1.3 £19.95 




MUX Tl-f JHtfT 111 
VERSION 1.01 




An easy to use, versatile label creating program in- 
cluding many new CoCo III features. Even if you al- 
ready own a label program, this one's a must for 
the III!! [See review in July '87) 

Disk ..£16,95 



Custom ef oletie J^lgnefc 

Easily alter the contents of any palette without 
having to remember numbers or colors! Once con- 
figured, all sixteen palettes can be saved to disk as a 
single subroutine which may then be used in a basic 
program, 

Disk ...$19.95 



c.\pi * 




This disk utility allows the use of three y double sided 
drives without any special hardware modifications. 
CoCo l/ll/III compatible, and it's EPROMable. 

Disk £16.95 

With purchase of FKEYS III £12,95 



Technical assistance; 7pm to 9pm GIMMESOFT Add 52.50 for shipping 

Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time P.O. Box 421 MD residents add sales tax 

On-line orders: Deiohi's CoCo Sig Perry Hall, MD 21 1 28 Phone 301 -256-7558 



86 THE RAINBOW July 1 987 



WRITING BRSIC PROGRAM message 
appears on the screen, BASIC Data 
Writer is writing your BASIC program. 
When the YOUR BRSIC PROGRAM IS 
FINISHED message appears on the 
screen, you can load it back into the 
computer and run it or append other 
programs to it. It is a good idea to resave 
it again in the standard tokenized 
format so that it will load faster the next 
time you want to use it. 

Testing the Program 

To test the program, first CLEAR 
200,25000 to protect memory. Then 
load and execute it. Follow the 
prompts, as explained earlier. When 



prompted for the addresses, give it its 
own addresses. When the BASIC pro- 
gram has been written to the device 
specified, turn the computer off, wait a 
few seconds and turn it back on. Since 
this is a long ML program (5,698 bytes), 
first PCLEAR1 then load the BASIC 
program back in and run it. You should 
get BASIC Data Writer back. 

This program can be used to create 
BASIC programs from any binary file 
including music and graphics. 

Notes on Using the Program 

I) Always use CLEAR 200, 25000 
before loading and running Data 
Writer. 



2) Be careful with start addresses. If 
you transfer a graphics file, the 
resultant BASIC program will issue a 
CLEAR 200, 35B4. This gives BASIC 
a high address of 3584 bytes. You will 
want to delete this from the BASIC 
listing. 

3) Be patient when running the result- 
ant BASIC listing. Poking all those 
values in takes time! 

If you have any questions or com- 
ments, you can address them to me at 
14201 Marquette N.E., Albuquerque, 
NM 87123. Please be sure to include a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope if you 
want a reply. □ 



The listing: DATAWRIT 








PROGRAM DATAWRITER( INPUT , OUTPUT) ; 


(* ANY MACHINE LANGUAGE PROGRAM 


*) 






(* INCLUDING GRAPHICS AND MUSIC 


*) 






(* TO A COMPLETE BASIC PROGRAM 


*) 


WRITTEN BY DENNIS H. WEIDE 


*) 


<* AND STORE IT IN ASCII FORMAT 


*) 


(* 14201 MARQUETTE N.E. 


*) 


(* ON THE SPECIFIED DEVICE. 


*) 


(* ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO 


*) 


(* THIS PROGRAM WAS CREATED 


*) 


(* 87123 


*) 


(* USING DEFT PASCAL WORKBENCH. 


*) 


(* PHONE (505)293-5228 


*) 






(* THIS PROGRAM WILL CONVERT 


*) 


CONST LINEl$J= ' BASIC DATA STATEMENT WRITER'; 



" I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up lo a CoCo 3 . A powerful new machine. Now, it's time to give BASIC a shot i n the arm, with ADOS-3. 
Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your choice, 
with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz (double speed) without having to slow down for 
disk and printer operations? This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation of the 
acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% compatibility with commercial software. After 
customizing ADOS-3 using the provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs into 
the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM + burning will cost $15-20; we provide 
information concerning how you can have this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35, 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC 
programs, auto-edit of error line, and many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk . , $34.95 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 $27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 
THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the target program. An excellent learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable 
debugging aid for the expert. CoCo 1. 2, or 3 compatible. 
Disk $23.95 Assembler source listing Add $3.00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

Magnavox 8CM515/8CM505/8CM643 



$19.95 



Sony KV1311CR . S29.95 




_ _ 11111 N. Kendall Drive, 

SPECTROSYSTEMS/ -—\^r ft* aids 

^ - w ' ' ^ — " Miami, Florida 33176 

(305) 274-3899 Day or Eve. 

No delay on personal checks • Please add $2 00 shipping • Sorry, no credit cards or COD's. 



July19B7 THE RAINBOW 87 



I LINE20=' WRITTEN BY DENNIS H. WEIDE ' ; 


(* AND SAVE ON DESIRED *) 


LINE30-'30 CLS: CLEAR 200, ' ; 


(* DEVICE *) 


LINE40='40 FOR X-' ; 




LINE50=' 50 READ A$ ' ; 


LINENUMBER: =1000; 


LINE60-'60 A$="&H ,, +A$ ' ; 


STARTADDRESS : -ENCODE (ENTERSTART) ; 


LINE70='70 POKE X,VAL(A$)'; 


ENDADDRESS : -ENCODE (ENTEREND) ; 


LINE80='80 NEXT X' ; 


EXEC ADDRESS : -ENCODE ( ENTEREXEC) ; 


LINE90='90 EXEC * ; 


CURRENTADDRESS : =START ADDRESS ; 

WHILE CURRENTADDRESS<=ENDADDRESS DO BEGIN 


VAR OUTFILE : TEXT ; 
■ 

FILENAME: STRING; 


DECODE( LINENUMBER , 4 , DATA) ; 


DATA : =DATA+ 1 DATA ' ; 


DATA: STRING (95) ; 




CONTENTS :STRING(2) ; 


FOR COUNT :=1 TO 29 DO BEGIN 


ENTERSTART , 


HEX (CURRENTADDRESS , 1 , CONTENTS) ; 


ENTEREND , 


DATA : =DATA+CONTENTS ; 


ENTEREXEC: STRING (5) ; 


IF COUNT<29 THEN DATA : =DATA+ ' , ' ; 


COUNT , 


CURRENTADDRESS : =SUCC ( CURRENTADDRESS) ; 


LINENUMBER, 


END; 


STARTADDRESS , 




ENDADDRESS , 


WRITELN (OUTFILE , DATA) ; 


EXECADDRESS, 
CURRENTADDRESS : INTEGER; 


LINENUMBER :=SUCC (LINENUMBER) ; 
END; 




WRITELN (* YOUR BASIC PROGRAM IS FINISHED*); 


CLOSE(OUTFILE) ; 
END. 


PAGE; 




(* SET UP SCREEN *) 




(* ENTER ADDRESSES *) 





WRITELN (LINE10) ; 

WRITELN (LINE20) ; 
WRITELN; 

WRITELN; 

WRITE ( 1 ENTER FILENAME >'); 

READLN (FILENAME) ; 

WRITE (' ENTEfl START ADDRESS > f ); 

READLN (ENTERB TART) ; , 

WRITE ('ENTER END ADDRESS >'); 

READLN (ENTEREND) ; 

WRITEC ENTER EXEC ADDRESS >'); 

READLN (ENTEREXEC) ; 

WRITELN ; 

WRITELN (* NOW WRITING BASIC PROGRAM 1 ) ; 

(* OPEN DISK FILE *) 
(* WRITE LINES 10-90 *) 

REWRITE (OUTFILE, FILENAME) ; 

WRITELN (OUTFILE , '0 REM 1 .FILENAME); 

WRITELN (OUTFILE , '1 REM START ADDRESS= 1 , ENTERSTART) ; 

WRITELN (OUTFILE , 1 2 REM END ADDRESS-' .ENTEREND) ; 

WRITELN ( OUTFILE, ' 3 REM EXEC ADDRESS^' .ENTEREXEC) ; 

WRITELN ( OUTFILE , 1 10 REM' ,LINE10) ; 

WRITELN (OUTFILE , ' 20 REM 1 ,LINE20) ; 

WRITELN (OUTFILE , LINE30 , ENTERSTART) ; 

WRITELN (OUTFILE, LINE40, ENTERSTART, * TO ', ENTEREND); 

WRITELN ( OUTFILE, LJNE50) ; 

WRITELN (OUTFILE, LINE60) ; 

WRITELN (OUTFILE , LINE70 ) ; 

WRITELN(OUTFILE , LINE80) ; 

WRITELN (OUTFILE , LINE90 , ENTEREXEC ) ; 

(* CONVERT ML PROGRAM *) ■ 

(* TO BASIC DATA STATEMENTS *) 





THE RAINBOW S 

ne-Liner Contest 
has now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines. This 
means a new dimension and new 
opportunity for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sure your line, or lines, aren'tpacked so tightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 



Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 



CP 



*>5 



88 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Cache of the 



By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



I recently asked some people who 
own computers, "What would you 
like to add to your computer?" 
Almost 80 percent of them said they 
wanted more memory. This is a univer- 
sal problem. It is not limited to just the 
CoCo. The Apple, Commodore, Atari 
and IBM PC owners all said that thay 
wanted more memory, too. They want 
it in whateverformthey can get it: Main 
memory, bank-switched memory, 
RAM disk memory, ROM disk mem- 
ory, ported memory — whatever the 
format, they want more! Well, the CoCo 
3 has up to 512K of memory bank- 
switched into 8K blocks, we all know 
that. RAM disk adapters are available 
from several sources, including Disto 
(me). ROM disks are not that popular 
because they require an EPROM pro- 
grammer and a knowledge of machine 
language programming. 

What is left is ported memory. Now 
some people may say there is no differ- 
ence between a RAM disk memory and 
ported memory. And as far as the 
hardware goes, there isn't. The differ- 
ence is all in the software. A RAM disk 
and related software emulate a disk 
drive. You read and write to the RAM 
disk via files. To save data, you have to 
open a file, output to it, then close the 



Tony DiStefano is a 
well-known early 
specialist in com 
puter hardware 
projects. He lives in 
Laval Ouest, Que- 
bec. 



it 




file. When you want to retrieve data you 
have to open the file again, read your 
data and close it up when you are 
finished. This processtakes time. It also 
uses the DOS (Disk Operating System). 
Now, ported RAM is the same, but 
since it doesn't use the DOS, it is not 
restricted to using DOS and files. 

You have to configure the use of the 
ported RAM yourself. The ported 
RAM you will see today is only 2K long. 
That means you will have 2,048 bytes to 
work with. Now, these bytes are only 
eight bits wide. The CPU in the CoCo 
can only handle eight bits at a time. So, 
when you want to save a numerical 
value, it can only be a number from 0 
to 255. If you want to use numbers that 
aregreater, you must use more than that 
one byte. For instance, if you want to 
use a number f rom 0 to 65,535, you will 
need two bytes. Or, if you want to use 
a signed number (i.e., a number from 
-32,767 to 32,767) you still need two 
bytes. 

If you need still bigger numbers, you 
will have to go to a different type of 
format. A floating-point number takes 
up five bytes of memory f or its mantissa 
and exponent. An explanation of these 
numbers goes beyond the scope of this 
article; see a math book for more de- 
tails. You can also store alphanumeric 
characters. You need one byte for every 
character you have to store. 

Now let's talk about memory- 
mapping. What, more memory- 
mapping? I am starting to sound like a 
broken record, but I still get a lot of 
letters about this subject. So, here we go 
again. 

The CPU that is used in the CoCo is 



an MC6809E. This CPU can directly 
access only 64K of memory. In order to 
access that much memory, the CPU has 
16 address lines. If you count in binary 
numbers, 16 lines gives you 65,535 
different locations, better known as64K 
memory. There are ways of fooling the 
CPU into accessing more memory. The 
technique is called page- or bank- 
switching. Bank-switching means you 
have more memory than the CPU can 
use at one time, but the memory is 
switched back and forth. An example is 
the CoCo 3. It comes standard with 
128K memory and is upgradable to 
512K memory. How is this done? 

There is a chip in the CoCo 3 called 
the GIME. One of the functions of the 
GIME is called an MMU or Memory 
Management Unit. The MMU part of 
the GIME has the job of accessing 512K 
of memory and, at the request of the 
CPU, accesses all of it a bit at a time. 

A good illustration of this is a radio. 
A radio can receive many stations, but 
only one at a time. The CoCo 3 has the 
equivalent of eight radios. Each radio 
can tune in one station at a time. Each 
radio (at the choice of the CPU) can 
access the same station. In the CoCo 3, 
each radio or page is 8K or 8192 bytes. 
There are 64 of these pages in a 512K 
CoCo 3 (8K x 64 = 512K). These eight 
pages of 8K bytes represent 64K to the 
CPU. There are eight control bytes in 
the MMU for pages. Each byte tells the 
MMU which page the CPU wants to 
see. Changing the data in these bytes 
changes which page the CPU can ac- 
cess. That is how the CPU can access 
more than 64K memory. 

Now, what I am about to show you 

July 1987 THE RAINBOW 89 



NEW 

DISK 

DRIVES 



Starting at 



89 




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ill 

Hill 



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with case & 
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1 29.95 



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Capacity 250k unformatted 
Tracks 40 

Warranty DOW 1 Year 

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ALL DRIVES FULLY TESTED AND WARRANTEED 

We carry only the finest quality disk drives 
no seconds • no surplus 



S 40 Tks 6Ms 
Double Sided 
Double Density 

40 or 80 Tracks 
7? Hght. Teac/Panasonic 




Free Software for Drive 0 Systems 

CoCo Checker ...Test roms, rams, disk drives and & controller printer, keyboard cassette & more. 
Tape/Disk Utility... Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



169 



95 



Drive 0 



189 



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Drive 0 



289 



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Single Case 

Heavy Duty Power Supply 
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Controller & manuals 



Double Sided Slim Line Drive 
Case holds 2 slim line drives 
Heavy Duty Power Supply 
2 Drive Cable 
Gold plated contacts 
Controller & Manuals 



2 Double Sided Slim Line Drive 
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Heavy Duty Power Supply 
2 Drive Cable 
Gold plated contacts 
Controller & Manuals 



Other Drive Specials 
119 



Drives cleaned, aligned & tested, 29 



95 



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Full Ht Drive 89 95 

Full Ht Drive Ps/Case... 129 95 

Slim Line Drive 99 95 

Slim Line Drive Ps/Case... 139 95 
2 Slim Drives Ps/Case . 239 95 
Disk Controller 59 95 



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Disk Controller 


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10 Diskettes 

with free library case 


995 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 
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•C.O.D. Add $2. 



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Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 

Hours: Mon.-Sat., 9-6 (EST) 



Call us today! 61 7-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



Software Included 

• Pc-Write word processor 

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• Ram Disk 

• Runs all popular software 



IBM XT 
COMPATIBLE 



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4.77 mhz and 8mhz Turbo 
360k Floppy Disk Drive 
Monochrome or Color Card 
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Game, Printer and Serial Port 
Real Time Clock 
150 watt power supply 
640k memory 

At keyboard optional expanded 
Monochrome Monitor 
Optional Hard Disk Drive 




tart 



PRINTER CABLES AND 
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PRINTERS 




NP10 (New 100 CPS NLQ 80 col.) 
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64K Upgrades 19 95 
Video Driver 29 

Enables your CoCo to operate with a video monitor 
instead of a television! 



95 




TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 

9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 





Screen Dump Program 19 95 

The best screen dump program for the Epson & 
Star printers ever!! Have the option of standard 
images reverse w/regular or double sized pictures. 

Dealer Inquiries invited 
617-278-6555 

Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



is a mini-version of the MMU. Very 
mini. For users of the CoCo 3 with 5 12K 
of memory, this may not excite you, but 
for the memory-poor CoCo 1 or 2 user, 
a few extra bytes are always handy. The 
amount of extra memory is only 2K 
bytes. Not much by today's standards, 
but if you are working on that "does 
everything" program and you need "just 
a few more bytes" for something, this is 
where you are going to find them. I say 
mini because the "pages" are only 256 
bytes long. With some special circuitry, 
that means this only uses up one byte 
of memory in the memory map. You 
also need one control or address byte. 
That is a total of two bytes in the 
memory map. Not too bad for 2K of 
memory. There is, however, a catch. 
There are two ways of memory- 



mapping this extra memory. The first is 
to have a couple of latches that hold the 
address of the memory. You set up the 
address of the memory byte you want, 
and then you read from, or write to, that 
address. That is the fastest way to get 
to any one byte, but you need to change 
the address every time you want another 
byte. The second way is to "auto- 
increment" every time you access data. 
For example, you read one byte, then 
when you read that same location again, 
you get Data Address 2; when you read 
it again, you get Address 3 and so on, 
until you get to the end of your memory. 
This is faster than setting up the address 
every time you need more data, but 
slower when the data you need is at the 
end of the file. If you are familiar with 
the structure of BASIC files, the first is 



COMPUTER 
CONNECTOR 



+5V 




GND 



R/W 

D7 

D6 

D5 

D4 

D3 

D2 

D1 

DO 



33 



18 



21 



R/W 



17 



16 



15 



15 



14 



T3j 
12 



14 



13 



11 



10 



RESET 



1 1 



10 



D7 
D6 
D5 
D4 
D3 
D2 
D1 
DO 



H 
M 
6 
1 
r 
6 



A10 A9 A8 



A7 

A6 

A5 

A4 

A3 

A2 

A1 

AO 

CE 

OE 



-3 
4 



6 



11 



19 



13 



U 



7 
4 
L 
S 
1 
7 



22 



23 



8 



2 






9 


3 






10 


4 






11 






* 


r 1 


1 


4 


8 


3 



7 
4 
L 
S 
3 
9 
3 



12 



* 1 



r 





i '6 



_E 

scs 



AO 



36 



li 



19 



7 
4 
L 
S 
1 
3 




Figure 1 



92 



like a Random Access File and the 
second is like a Sequential File. Both 
have advantages and disadvantages. 

What I have in mind is the best of 
both worlds. A little bit of auto- 
incrementing and a bit of address- 
latching. This way, you auto-increment 
by pages. I think a good auto-increment 
value is 256 bytes. That just happens to 
bethesize of adisk sector. In a 2K RAM 
chip, there are eight 256-byte sectors, 
which means you can have up to eight 
pages of 256 bytes each. This is the basic 
description of the hardware project I 
have in mind for today. It is divided into 
three parts. The first is the hardware, 
the second is the memory-mapping of 
the hardware and the third is the soft- 
ware. 

First, the hardware. In Figure 1, you 
will find the schematic diagram of the 
Memory Cache Project. The heart of 
the project is an HM61 16 memory chip. 
This is a 2K-by-8-byte RAM (Random 
Access Memory) CMOS memory chip. 
It is made by virtually every memory 
manufacturing company. The 6116 
number will always be the same, but the 
letters (which tell you which company 
the part comes from) may change. 

Attached to the lower eight address 
lines is a binary counter. That is the 
auto-incrementing part. Attached to the 
upper address lines is a latch. That is the 
direct access part of the circuit. The 
fourth and fifth chips in the group are 
decoder chips, which map the thing 
properly. 

The standard "project-building" 
tools are necessary, but there is one 
thing to remember. The memory chip I 
used is a CMOS part. It is easily de- 
stroyed by static electricity, so use a 
static-free work place. Also use sockets 
when trying out this circuit. It is better 
than soldering the chips directly — if 
you happen to burn one out, you won't 
have to desolder and resolder. All of 
these chips are available f rom your local 
electronics shop or from CRC Inc. The 
project board (to build your circuit on) 
can also be obtained from CRC Inc. 

The second part of this project is 
memory-mapping. The circuit in Figure 
1 is mapped at SFF40 (65344). That, as 
you know by now, is where the disk 
drive and controller are mapped. If you 
have a multipack interface, it is not too 
bad; you can switch the multipack to the 
different slot and work with the extra 
memory from there. 

If you only have a 'Y' cable, then the 
circuit in Figure 1 won't work. You need 
the second part. Figure 2 contains a 
circuit that decodes the address bus of 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



the CPU and maps it into a different 
place, ft re-maps the address of SFF40 
(65344) to SFF74 (65396), leaving 
SFF40 free for the disk drive. This area 
of the memory map may be used by 
other products, so watch out for mem- 
ory conflicts. 

Finally, the software. It is not hard to 
access this memory cache. It is in two 
parts. The first part is to set up which 
of the eight pages you want to use. You 
do this by storing the page value at the 
base location. An example of this in 
BASIC is POKE X , A y where X is the base 
address. The base address is SFF40 
(65344) if you are using just the circuit 
in Figure I and SFF74 (65396) if you are 
also using the circuit in Figure 2. The 
value A is the page number you want 
to access. 

The second part is reading data or 
writing data into the 256-byte block. 
Remember, it is auto-incrementing and 
you have to access it 256 times to get to 
the last byte. An example of writing to 
the page in BASIC is: 

1000 FDR /= 1 TO 256 
1010 POKE Y , A{l) 
1020 NEXT / 

where / is your 256 auto-increment 
value. Y is your base address + I and 
A[l) is an array of data 256 bytes long, 
which must be previously defined. To 
read the block in BASIC, use this exam- 
ple: 

2000 FOR / = 1 TO 25S 
2010 A{1) = PEEK ( Y) 
2020 NEXT / 

where / is again your auto-increment 
value, Y is the base address + 1, and 
A[I) is your data array. Remember^ 
though, this is just an example of how 
to read and write data to the RAM 
cache, just to show you how it is done. 



You can use any method you choose. 
One point to keep in mind: Before you 
access a page, you must store the proper 
page number in the base address. This 
also clears your auto-increment counter 
to make sureyoustart atthe right place. 
You wouldn't want to start in the mid- 
dle. 



COMPUTER 
CONNECTOR 



E 
A7 
A3 
A1 
AO 

+ 5V 
GND 

A15 
A14 
A13 
A12 
A11 
A10 
A9 
A8 
A6 
A5 
A4 
A2 



33 



1 



39 



If you have a problem with the circuit 
or want to make a comment on my 
projects, send me your letter along with 

a self-addressed, stamped envelope to 
me in care of rainbow, and I will get 
you an answer as soon as possible. 
(Please remember: no envelope, no 
answer.) □ 



16 



28 


4 


22 


3 




2 


1 


1 



7 




4 




L 




S 




1 


Y1 


3 




8 




YO 



Figure 2 



X 8 



15 



-# NEW XO 



14 



~#NEWX1 



38 




2 


37 




3 


31 




4 






5 






6 


28 




7 


27 




10 






11 


24 




12 


23 




13 


21 


m 


14 



15 




74LS133 



LOT Z ALUK 

13 HERE ' 

LOTZALUK , a machine language program for COCO 1 , 2,& 3 , lets a 
user study history of a LOTTO game just as a handicapper studies the 
horses ♦ Valuable data on Cali f ornia LOTTO 6/49 game is included. 

California program is complete* Other state's games will follow* 



William G* Brigance , Sr . 
1001 Fairweather Drive 
Sacramento , CA 95833 
(916 ) 927-6062 



On Disk! 
$29 • 9 5 

Introductory Price 



Cal i f ornia residents add 6% sales tax 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 93 




ummertime, 
And The Programs 





asy 



The rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our continuing 
effort to always keep the new user in mind and in addition to the 
many beginner feature articles and programs published in every issue, 
"Novices Niche" contains shorter basic program listings that entertain as 
well as help the new user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 




raphics 




[Powerful [Pages 

By Matt Krom 



Here's a short little program that demonstrates a very 
powerful capability of the CoCo called "page-flipping." Just 
run Listing I, sit back, and watch! What you see is actually 
four separate screens being rapidly switched, much like 
flipping pages of a book. This creates the illusion of motion. 

Line 60 erases the first four graphics pages to white. These 
four pages will be used by the program as the four separate 
pictures. 

Lines 80 to 110 set the computer to PMODE 0 and draw 
large letters spelling "Hi!" You can change these lines to 
draw anything you like. This is the drawing that will be in 
front of the moving grid. Line 130 then copies this drawing 
from the first page to the other three pages. 



Lines 140 to 240 are the lines that draw the grid on the 
four pages. These lines may be a little difficult to under- 
stand, but if you carefully study the formulas in lines 190 
and 230, you will see that each grid is moved down and to 
the right of the grid on the previous page. The grid lines 
do not affect the drawing because they are of the same color. 
The infinite loop in lines 250 to 290 then displays the pages 
in sequence, and the animation appears! 

But how do you draw on the different pages? The secret 
here is the PMODE 0, x statement, where x denotes a number 
telling the computer what page to go to. For example, say 
you want to make a program in which a circle goes 
horizontally across the screen. The program should first set 
the computer to Page 1 by using PMODE 0,1. Then draw a 
circle at the desired location. Now use PMODE 0 , 2 and draw 
a circle a little to the right of the last one. Continue this 
procedure until you have drawn on as many pages as you 
want. When using PMODE 0, the number of pages can range 
from 1 to 8. 

Listing 2 is a program like the one just described. It is 
less involved than the first, so programmers who are new 
to this technique should study it more closely. The PCLERR 
B statement was necessary to reserve enough memory for 
the eight graphics pages. 



94 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Listing 1: HI 

10 'HI! - BY MATT KROM 
20 ' Ij361j3 18TH ROAD 
30 'ARGOS, IN 4 6501 
4 0 f (219) 892-5226 
50 ' 

60 PMODE4,l:PCLSl 

70 CLS:PRINT@227, "WAIT TEN SECON 
DS PLEASE ..." 

80 »******DRAW "HI!" ON PAGE 1 
90 PMODE0,1 

100 DRAWC0BM54 , 50S16D25R5U10R5D 
10R5U2 5L5D10L5U10L5BR20R5D5L5U5B 
D25U15R5D15NL5BR5NR5U5R5ND5BU5U1 
5L5D15R5" 

110 PAINT(56,52) , 0 , 0 : PAINT ( 13 8 , 5 
2) ,0,0: PAINT (138 , 13 2) ,(5 ,(5: PAINT ( 
180,52) ,0,0: PAINT (180, 132) ,0,0 
120 »******PTJT "HI!" ON THE 
OTHER 3 PAGES 

130 PCOPY1T02 : PCOPY1T03 : PCOPY1TO 
4 

140 »******LOOP TO DRAW GRIDS 
150 F0RP=1T04 'P=PAGE # 
160 PMODE0,P 

170 »***DRAW VERTICAL LINES 

180 FORH=0TO248STEP8 

190 LINE(H+P*2-2,0)-(H+P*2-2,191 

) , PRESET 

200 NEXT 

210 '***DRAW HORIZONTAL LINES 

220 FORV=0TO184STEP8 

230 LINE(0, V+P*2-2 ) - ( 2 5 5 , V+P*2-2 

) , PRESET: NEXT 

240 NEXT P 

250 '******"FLIP" ALL FOUR PAGES 
TO CREATE ILLUSION OF MOVEMENT 



260 F0RK=1T04 

270 PMODE0,K:SCREEN1, 1 

280 F0RL=1T025:NEXT 'TIME DELAY 

290 NEXT:GOTO260 



Listing 2: CIRCLE 

10 PCLEAR8 

20 PMODE 0,1:PCLS1 

30 CIRCLE(60,96) , 40 ,0 : PAINT ( 60 , 9 
6), 0,0 

40 PMODE 0,2:PCLS1 

5j3 CIRCLE(80,96) , 40 , 0 : PAINT (80 , 9 
6) ,0,0 

60 PMODE 0,3:PCLS1 

70 CIRCLE(100,96) , 40 , 0 : PAINT ( 100 
,96) ,0,0 

80 PMODE 0,4:PCLS1 

90 CIRCLE(120, 96) , 40 , 0 : PAINT ( 120 
/96) ,0,0 

100 PMODE 0,5:PCLS1 

110 CIRCLE(140, 96) ,40,0: PAINT (14 

0,96) ,0,0 

12,0 PMODE 0, 6:PCLS1 

130 CIRCLE(160,96) , 40 , 0 : PAINT ( 16 

0,96) ,0,0 

140 PMODE 0,7:PCLS1 

150 CIRCLE(180, 96) , 40 , 0 : PAINT ( 18 

0,96) ,0,0 

160 PMODE 0,8:PCLS1 

170 CIRCLE(200,96) , 40 , 0 : PAINT ( 20 

0,96) ,0,0 

180 FOR X=l TO 8 

190 PMODE 0,X: SCREEN 1,1 

200 FOR T=l TO 90: NEXT 

210 NEXT 

220 GOTO180 



ome 



Irflelp 




^itThe^oad 

By Fred Rau 



Vacation Log prints a log sheet for recording expenses 
when traveling on a business trip or a family vacation. There 
is room for up to four gas stops per day and three days per 
each printout. 




July 1987 



ut Educed) 

THE RAINBOW 95 



The listing: VACATION 



10 
20 

30 
40 

50 

60 

10 

80 

90 



■ ********************** 

1 * VACATION LOG * 
i * * 

'* BY FRED RAU * 

• * * 

• ********************** 

CLS3 

INPUT "NO. OF PAGES" ;C 
FOR P=l TO C 
100 CLS3 : PRINT§104 , " VAC 
ON "; 

110 PRINT @ J: 41, " LOG "; 

120 PRINT§168," PRINT 
ii • 



ATI 



I N G 



ii 



130 PRINT#-2, "":PRINT#-2 , "" 
140 FOR X=l TO 3 
150 K=2:L=K+L 
160 PRINT#-2,"" 

170 PRINT #-2, "DATE : 

180 PRINT #-2, "" 

190 PRINT#-2, "ENDING MILES 

— ENDING MILES ENDING MIL 

ES ENDING MILES " 

200 PRINT#-2,"" 

210 PRINT#-2, "MILES START 

— MILES START MILES STAR 

T MILES START " 

220 PRINT#-2,"" 

230 PRINT # -2 , "TOTAL MILES 

— TOTAL MILES TOTAL MILE 

S TOTAL MILES " 



240 PRINT#-2,"" 

250 PRINT#-2,"GALS.OF GAS 

— GALS. OF GAS GALS . OF GA 

S GALS. OF GAS " 

2 60 PRINT#-2,"" 

270 PRINT#-2 , "M.P.G. 

M.P.G. M.P.G. — 

M.P.G. 

280 PRINT#-2,"" 
290 PRINT#-2, "MEALS 



ii 



II 


300 
310 


PRINT#-2 , 
PRINT#-2, 


ii ii 

"CAMPGROUND/MOTEL — 


ii 


320 
330 


PRINT#-2 , 
PRINT#-2 , 


ii ii 

"MISCELLANEOUS 


ii 


340 


PRINT#-2 , 


ii 



II 



350 NEXT X 

3 60 PRINT#-2 , " " : PRINT#-2 , " 11 : PRIN 
T#-2 , " " : PRINT#-2 , " " : PRINT#-2 , " " : 
PRINT#-2 , " " :PRINT#-2 , "" :PRINT#-2 
," ":PRINT#-2," » 

370 NEXT P 

380 PRINT@324,"* * FINISHED PRIN 
TING * *"; 
390 GOTO 390 



Hint 



• * • 



A Coordinated Effort 



Using the hardware joystick/ mouse cartridge from 
CoCo MAX in your own programs is a snap! The 
address map for the cartridge is as follows. 

SFF90 Button value — 0 if button is pressed 
$FF9 1 Vertical coordinate (0-255) 
SFF92 Horizontal coordinate (0-255) 

The port can be accessed directly in BASIC or 
BASIC09 using peeks to the given location. For 
example, in BASIC09 you would use the following code 
to find the horizontal coordinate: 

DIM xposrBYTE 
xpos = PEEK($ff92) 

Some operational notes are in order here. First, the 
vertical coordinate can be anything from 0 to 255 but 
•the screen only uses 0 to 191. You should use a 
conditional statement to check for this. Second, in 
OS-9 the vertical coordinates are reversed so you 
should subtract the actual value from 255 to get the 
proper location. 

Tim Harris 
Des Moines, I A 



Two-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This one is for those of you who have taken it easy 
this summer and haven't been exercising. Just sit back, 
relax and let your CoCo do all the work. 

The listing: 

Ijd PMODE1 f 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 : DIMV ( 
10j3,4j3) :CIRCLE(72,53) , 2 j3 : CIRCLE ( 
184 ,53) , 2j3:PAINT(72 ,53) : PAINT (18 
9,53) : LINE (9 3 , 53) -(164,53) ,PSET 
2j3 GET(52 , 33)-(2P4,72) ,V:PCLS:PU 
T(52 , llj3) - (2J3 4 , 18J3) , V: F0RX=1T099 
:NEXTX:GET(52 , 11J3) - (2J34 , 18J2J) ,V:P 
CLS : PUT ( 52 , 3 3 ) - ( 2j34 , 72 ) , V : FORX=l 
T099 : NEXTX: GOT02j3 : 'EASY EXERCISE 

Dana Gongaware 
Greensboro, NC 



(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The Third 
Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



96 



THERAINBOW July 1987 



Utilities 



AnOnsideWiew 

By Michael Berenz 




Disk Seek is a simple program that allows you to view the 
contents of a disk. Upon running, the program prompts you 
to place a disk in the drive. The current track and sector 
appear at the bottom of the screen. The up and down arrow 
keys change the track, and the left and right arrow keys 
change the sector. Moving up from Sector 18 will bring you 
to Sector 1 on the next track, and vice versa. You need not 
repeatedly press a key because of the peeks in Line 150. 
Holding the key down will suffice. 

The program does not allow for editing of sectors, but 
is simply a fun little utility that tells you just what your 
drives are writing as they chomp away at your disks. 

The listing: DISKSEEK 

5 1 ***************************** 

6 »* DISKSEEK - BY MIKE BERENZ * 

7 ****************************** 



10 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(3 3,175) ; 11 D 
ISKSEEK - BY: MIKE BERENZ 11 ;STR 
ING$(33,175) 

20 PRINT@449, "INSERT DISK AND HI 

T <ENTER>" ; : LINEINPUT Z$ 

3 0 CLEAR 500:T=17:S=9:CLS 

40 PRINT @ 4 80 , " TRAC K= " T , " S E CTOR= " 

S ; 

50 DSKI$0,T,S,A$,B$ 
60 PRINT@0,A$;B$ 

70 FOR Q=341 TO 344:POKE Q,255:N 
EXT 

80 IF PEEK(341) =247 THEN T=T+1 E 
LSE IF PEEK(342)=247 THEN T=T-1 
ELSE IF PEEK(343) =247 THEN S=S-1 
ELSE IF PEEK(344) =247 THEN S=S+ 
1 ELSE 80 

90 IF S<1 THEN S=18:T=T-1 
100 IF S>18 THEN S=1:T=T+1 
110 IF T<0 THEN T=0 
120 IF T>34 THEN T=34 
130 CLS:GOTO 40 



64K 

Prompt Attention 

By Joseph Forgione 

Are you tired of the color-changing cursor and OK 
prompt on your CoCo? Conversion will allow you to change 
it. 

Upon running, the OK prompt will be replaced by 
"Ready." However, for Conversion to work properly, you 
must be in the "all-RAM" mode. This means your CoCo 
must have all the ROM copied into RAM and be running 
entirely from RAM memory. Some DOSs have special 
commands allowing this, and the CoCo 3 is always in the 
RAM mode. But if you are using a standard Radio Shack 
CoCo 1 or 2 system, you can enter the RAM mode by first 
running Listing 1, DRIVER. 

Then, by running CONVERT, you can change the color of 
the cursor by entering POKE 1023, xxx where xxx is the 
appropriate value from the following table: 



Black 128 

Green (invisible) 143 

Yellow 159 

Blue 175 

Red 191 

White 207 

Blue/ Green 223 

Purple 239 

Orange 255 



For example, if you want to change the cursor color to 
purple, type POKE 1023,239 after running CONVERT. 

Some program notes are in order. First, if you have the 
HJL keyboard, Line 110 allows you to use the F4 key to 
pause a screen scroll (works like SHlFT-@). If you do not 
have the HJL or similar keyboard, remove Line 1 10. 

Second, if you want to retain the OK prompt, remove 
Line 90; if you want to retain the old cursor, remove lines 
50, 60 and 70. 

Finally, the program changes the message you receive 
when you press the BREAK key (Line 150). Instead of 
printing "Break In," the computer will respond with "Break 
At." 

Listing 1: DRIVER 

1 DATA 26,80,142, 128,0,127,255,2 
' 2 2,166, 132, 12 7,2 55,22 3, 167,13 2,4 

8,1, 140, 2 55, 0,38, 239, 28, 159 , 57 

2 FORA=&HE00 TO &HE18 : READX : POKE 
A,X:NEXTA: EXEC3 584 : POKE65503 , 0 : P 
RINT"OS IS NOW IN RAM! " 

Listing 2: CONVERT 

10 DATA 82,69,65,68,89,13,0,246, 
3,2 54,32,3,0,46,0, 193, 191,3 9,8,1 
98 , 191, 247 , 3 , 254 , 247 , 3 , 255 , 17 7, 3 
,2 55, 39, 5, 18 2, 3, 2 55, 32, 2, 134, 96, 
32,57,0 

15 F=PEEK(41299) : L= PEEK ( 41301 ) 
20 FORA=41287 TO 41328 

3 0 READX :POKEA,X:NEXTA 

July 1987 THE RAINBOW 97 



I 



I 



40 1 Jump to NEWBLINK rout in 

50 POKE &HA1A5, 12 6 

60 P0KE&HA1A6,&HA1 

70 P0KE&HA1A7,&H4E 

80 'Tell basic were 1 READY 1 is. 

90 POKE44151,161:POKE44152,70 

100 'Pauses basic program with F 

4 

110 POKE44533,4 



120 'Allows 255 chracters on lin 
e 

130 POKE41954, 255 

14 0 'Change BREAK IN to BREAK AT 
150 POKE44009, 65 : POKE44010 , 84 
155 POKE41299,F:POKE41301,L'RESE 
T VERSION AND RELEASE NUMBERS 
160 CLS :EXEC49152 



[Backup And 

By Matt Lawson 




CoCo 3 
Disk 



Anyone who has ever made a disk backup knows how 
tedious it is switching disks back and forth. However, now, 
with Fast Copy and any disk-based Color Computer 3, the 
problem can be eliminated. 

Upon running the program, the computer asks if it should 
report errors to the printer or screen, then prompts you to 
insert the source disk (the disk to copy). The drive will churn 
for about 40 seconds and then ask for the destination disk 
(the disk to be copied to). This procedure must be repeated 
only one time before the disk copy is complete. 

If the disk drive should encounter an error, the error type 
and where it occurred are reported. Note: The copying 
procedure does not stop for a disk error. This way, all of 
the intact data on the source disk can be copied, while the 
bad data could never be read again anyway. If you should 
encounter ^Write Error, it will be necessary to reformat 
the destination disk and start over. 

By the time the program finishes, most of the computer's 
memory is filled with disk data, so after making a backup, 
you should turn off the computer to achieve a cold start 
before doing anything else. 

How It Works 

The computer reads (or writes) half the disk at a time with 
the buffer in virtual memory locations (Hex) $60000 to 
S6FFFF and $74000 to S77FFF The program uses a 
machine language ROM routine so that the user is not 
stopped with an ?IO Error message. 

It appears as though the only memory locations used are 
$4000 to S7FFF. However, the CoCo 3 has a method of re- 
arranging the memory map with a chip called the Dynamic 
Address Translator (DAT). The computer fills up $4000 to 
$5FFF, then swaps it for a different portion of memory, 
even though it uses the same addresses. One interesting, 
important note: The DAT switches are located at $FFA0 
to $FFA7. 

The ability to copy around disk errors should be a 
welcome feature to every disk owner. 

The listing: FASTCOPY 

10 1 COPYRIGHT 1987 MATT LAWSON 
20 PCLEAR1: FILES0 ,0 : CLEAR 300, &H 
3FFF:DSK=256*PEEK(&HC004) +PEEK(& 
HC005) :V1=&HEA 

30 CLS: INPUT 11 RE PORT ERRORS TO (S 
) CREEN OR (P) RINTER" ; A$ : IF A$ 
= "P If OR A$="p" THEN D=-2 ELSE D= 



0 

40 CLS : PRINT" INSERT SOURCE DISK 
AND PRESS (ENTER) 11 : GOSUB 220 

50 PG=48:POKE VI, 2: POKE V1+1,0:P 
OKE V1+4,&H40:POKE V1+5,0:POKE V 
1+6, 0: AD=&H40 

60 FOR TK=0+Z TO 16+Z+I:FOR SC=1 
8 TO 1 STEP-1 

70 POKE VI, 2: GOSUB 140: NEXT SC,T 
K 

80 PRINT" INSERT DESTINATION DISK 
AND PRESS ( ENTER) " : GOSUB2 2 0 

90 AD=&H40:PG=48 

100 FOR TK=0+Z TO 16+Z+I:FOR SC= 
18 TO 1 STEP-1 

lip POKE VI, 3 :GOSUB140:NEXTSC,TK 
120 IF Z=0 THEN Z=17 : 1=1 : GOTO 40 
13 0 PRINT" DONE! " ; ER ; " TOTAL ER 
RORS" :END 

14 0 POKE &HFFA2,PG:POKE V1+2,TK: 

POKE Vl+3,SC:POKE V1+4,AD:EXEC D 

SK:IF PEEK(Vl+6) >jd THEN 19j3 

15 jd AD=AD+1:IF AD<&H6j3 THEN RETU 

RN 

16j3 AD=&H4j3:IF PG=59 THEN PG=58: 
RETURN 

17 0 IF PG=55 THEN PG=59: RETURN 
lap PG=PG+1: RETURN ^ 
190 PRINT #D, "DISK ERROR #";PEEK( 
V1+6):IF PEEK(V1)=2 THEN Z$="REA 
D" ELSE Z$="WRITE" 
2j3j3 ER=ER+1 

21p PRINT#D," "+Z$+" TRACK"; 

TK;" SECTOR" ;SC: GOTO 150 
220 A$=INKEY$:IF A$=CHR$(13) THE 
N RETURN ELSE 2 20 



Contributions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of short programs that can 
be typed in at one sitting and are useful, educational and fin. 
Keep in mind, although the sho rt programs are limited in scope, 
many novice programmers And it enjoyable and quite educa- 
tional to improve the software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, 

but we cannot key in program listings. Ail programs should be 

supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how the 

program works. If your submission is accepted for publication, 

the payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior to 

publication. , „ 

— Jutta Kaptnammer 

Submissions Editor 



O 

: 



98 THE RAINBOW July 1 987 




The 1987 Chicago RAINBOWfest went very smoothly. While the terms "relaxed" and "excited" seem 
contradictory, they best describe the atmosphere at this show. Both exhibitors and attendees knew 
exactly why they were there and what they were doing, but they were clearly excited about all 
the new things to see. However, few were as excited as 3-year-old Austin Holt (above). Austin had 
known for two weeks that CoCo Cat would be making a first-time appearance and travelled all the 
way from Brandon, South Dakota, to see the fuzzy feline. The words Austin used to describe the meeting, 
"I love him!", are evident in his smile. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 99 




ASSEMBLY TUTORIAL 



CoCo 3 



9 



OS-9 
Level II 



A Computer's Ancient 
Native Language 



Bv Peter Dibble 




Sorcery books are almost unani- 
mous: The most potent spells are 
written in strange, usually an- 
cient, languages. It works the same way 
for computers. The most profound 
magic forthe Color Computer is written 
in assembly language, the ancient native 
language of OS-9. 

I want to include some assembly 
language code here, but there is a 
problem. Tandy chose not to include an 
assembler with OS-9 Level II. Old- 
timers will have the assembler from 
Level I. It works under Level II, but the 
defs files are incorrect. (The Level I 
defs files usually fit Level II, provided 
you stay out of the system data struc- 
tures.) In any case, I will assume you 
don't have an assembler. 

The assembler converts assembly 
language programs into modules. I 
could save you the trouble of typing in 
the program, if I could print the module 
here. However, modules are full of 
unprintable characters and RAINBOW is 
unable to print them. 

This month's programs are a solution 
to the assembly language problem. 
CDump converts any file into a printable 
format. Il is the program that I will use 
to encode modules so RAINBOW can 
print them. If you want to use it, type 
CDump into BASIC09 and save it to a disk 
file. Run CDump and tell it the name of 
the file to print. Wait while it writes 
CDump . output. CDump. output con- 
tains a printable code thai can be 
converted back into the original file. 
When I asked CDump to encode the 
CDump source, the first few lines of 
CDump. output were: 

1: 5052 4F43 4544 5552 4520 B0B26. 
2: 4344 756D 700D 4449 4D20 78478. 
3: 496E 4669 6C65 2C4F 7574 87306. 



Peter Dibble has a bachelor's degree in 
chemistry and is currently a graduate 
student in computer science. He has 
worked as an applications programmer, 
systems programmer and as the user 
services assistant director for the Uni- 
versity of Rochester Computing Center. 
With Dale Puckett, he is the co-author 
of The Complete Rainbow Guide to 
OS-9. 



If you have a good text editor, you 
might want to modify CSave so it works 
with input from a file. You should 
require check codes in the input and 
quit when you find an incorrect check 
code. 

CDump and CSave were written to 
solve the problem of the missing as- 
sembler, but they have other uses. 
CDump encodes any file in a printable 
format with error-detection codes. 
CSave decodes the file and checks the 
codes. Use them any time you need to 
send a file through a process that insists 
on printable characters and may be 
unreliable. For instance, if you want to 
send a module to an IBM mainframe 
over the phone line, you might want to 
send the CDumped code for the file. □ 



Listing 1: cdump 

PROCEDURE CDump 



0000 DIM InFile,OutFile:BYTE 

000B DIM FileName : STRING [ 100 ] 

0017 DIM Buf fer (10) : BYTE 

0023 DIM INTEGER 

002E DIM line: INTEGER 

0035 DIM Sum: REAL 

003C 

003D INPUT "What file do you want to print :", FileName 

0064 ON ERROR GOTO 100 

006A OPEN #InFile, FileName: READ 

0076 ON ERROR GOTO 110 

007 C CREATE #OutFile, "CDump. output" : WRITE 
0093 

009 4 ON ERROR GOTO 50 

009A line:=j3 

00A1 LOOP 

00A3 line:=line+l 

00AE FOR i:=l TO 10 

00BE GET #InFile,Buffer(i) 

00CC NEXT i 

00D7 GOSUB 30 

00DB ENDLOOP 

00DF 

00E0 30 REM Write a checksummed buffer 

0100 Sum:=j3 

010S PRINT #OutFile, line; ": "; 

j3118 FOR j :=1 TO i-1 

012C PRINT #OutFile USING "H2 " , Buf f er ( j ) ; 

013F IF MOD(j,2)=j3 THEN 

j3l4E PRINT #OutFile," "; 

0159 ENDIF 

015B Sum:=Sum*2 + Buf fer ( j ) 

016F NEXT j 

017A PRINT #OutFile,TAB(31) ; Sum 

j3188 RETURN 

j318A 50 REM End of file or read error 

j3lA9 ON ERROR 

j31AC GOSUB 30 
01B0 CLOSE #InFile / #OutFile 



Each line has three parts: A line 
number, codes for 10 bytes of data and 
a check code for that line. You can use 
CSave to decode the output from 
CDump. To use it, type CSave into 
BASIC09 and save it to a disk file. Run 
CSave and tell it where to put the 
decoded file, then follow the directions 
CSave gives. 

CSave prompts for input one line at 
a time. For each line, enter the five, 
four-character words of data and press 
ENTER. For instance, if line one from 
CDump is: 



: 5052 4F43 4544 5552 4520 B0B26- 

you should respond: 



I 5052 4F43 4544 5552 4520 

when CSave prompts you for the first 
line. You may leave out the spaces if you 
like. 

CSave computes a check code for the 
line and asks you if it is correct. If the 
code CSave calculates matches the one 
that CDump put at the end of the line, 
you probably typed the line correctly. 
Tell CSave you are content with the line 
by responding with a T to the question: 
"Right?" If you respond with an F, 
CSave prompts you to enter the same 
line again. After you have entered all the 
lines, and CSave prompts you for 
another line, press CTRL-BREAK to 
indicate end of file. 



July 1 987 THE RAINBOW 1 01 



01BB 

pice 

01E8 
020A 
0227 
024k 
026F 

Listing 2: csave 



110 



END "Dump finished" 

REM Error Opening the file 

PRINT "Error "; ERR; " opening file: 11 , FileName 

END "CDump ended with an error" 

REM Error Opening the output file 

PRINT "Error: "; ERR; " opening CDump . output" 

END "CDump ended with an error" 



PROCEDURE 

00PP 
000C 

0018 

0024 

0030 

0037 

0042 

0049 

0050 

0057 

005E 

005F 

0083 

0089 

0095 

0096 

009C 

00A3 



CSave 

DIM FileName: STRING [100] 

DIM Buffer: STRING [25] 

DIM c : STRING [1] 

DIM OutputBuf f er (10) : BYTE 

DIM FileNo : BYTE 

DIM i, j : INTEGER 

DIM Output Size: INTEGER 

DIM line: INTEGER 

DIM Sum: REAL 

DIM ok: BOOLEAN 

INPUT "What file name do you want 

ON ERROR GOTO 100 

CREATE #FileNo, FileName: WRITE 

ON ERROR GOTO 200 

line:=l 



" , FileName 



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Model 102 
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Model 105 
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Hard plastic storage boxes for 
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Pin-Feed Cassette Labels 
White $3.00/100 
Colors $3.60/100 (specify 
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Same features as 101 plus 

• Built in serial port for your 
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• Switch between parallel 
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• Size is 4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25" 

• Comes complete with 
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• Connect to your COCO 
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show switch position 

• Lights also serve as a 
power on indicator for your 
COCO 

• Heavy guage blue anodized 
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slip rubber feet 

The 101 and 104 require 
power to operate. Most print- 
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interface. (Star, Radio Shack 
and Okidata are just a few that 
do - Epson and Seikosha do 
not). The interfaces can also 
be powered by an AC adap- 
tor; Radio Shack model 273- 
1431 plugs into all models, If 
you require a power supply, 
add a "P" to the model number 
and add $5.00 to the price. 
(Model 101P $44.95, Model 
104P $56.95). 




• Connects to your COCO 
to give you 2 switch select- 
able serial ports 

• 3 foot cable to connect to 
your COCOs serial port 

• The perfect item to use to 
connect a printer and a 
modem to your COCO 

• Smallinsize, only4.5 x2.5 
x 1.25 



The Model 101, 102, 104 and 
1 05 work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory 
size. These products are co- 
vered by a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 101 and 1 04 work 
with any standard parallel 
input printer including Gemini, 
Epson, Radio Shack, 
Okidata, C. loth, Seikosha, 
Panasonic and many others. 
They support BASIC print 
commands, word processors 
and graphic commands. 

We manufacture these 
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Cassette Label 
Program $6.95 

• New Version - tape trans- 
ferable to disk - save and 
load labels from tape to disk 

• Prints 5 lines of information 
on pin-feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven, easy to use 

• Standard, expanded and 
condensed characters 

• Each line of text auto- 
matically centered. 

• Label display on CRT, en- 
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• Program comes on tape 
and is supplied with 24 
labels to get you started 

• 16K ECB required 

Ordering 
Information 

Free shipping in the United 
States (except Alaska and 
Hawaii) on all orders over 
$50.00. Please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling on or- 
ders under $50.00. 
Ohio residents add 6% 
sales tax. 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use 
your VISA or MASTERCARD 
or request CO.D. (Please 
add$2.00forC.O.D. orders). 
If you prefer, send check or 
moneyorder; payable in U.S. 
Funds to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



102 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



00A4 
00KE 
00C6 
00CF 
00ED 
0104 
010D 
0137 
0142 
0144 
0148 
014E 
015C 

015D 
017k 
0181 
0188 
018F 
0195 
019C 
01AE 
01BC 
01C9 
01D2 
01DD 
01E1 
01EC 
01F8 



20 



WHILE NOT (EOF ( #0) ) DO 

PRINT "Enter line "; line; 
READ #0, Buffer 

GOSUB 20 \REM digest the input buffer 
GOSUB 2 5 \REM Confirm checksum 
IF ok THEN 

GOSUB 30 \REM write the buffer to the output file 

line:=line+l 
ENDIF 
ENDWHILE 
CLOSE #FileNo 
END "CSave done" 

REM Digest the input buffer 

DIM acc: INTEGER 

DIM half: BOOLEAN 

OutputSize:=0 

half : =FALSE 

acc: =0 

FOR i:=l TO LEN (Buffer) 
c=MID$ (Buffer, i, 1) 

IF CO" • " THEN 
IF half THEN 
acc:=acc*16 

GOSUB 22 

Ou t pu t S i z e : =Ou t put S i z e + 1 
OutputBuf fer (OutputSize) :=acc 
acc:=0 



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FEATURESlwo different drive select assignments: 

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Ramdisk is compatible whh GlMMESOFT's SIXDRIVE 



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HOURS: Weekdays 7 p.m. -9 p.m.; Sat. Noon-5 p.m. EASTERN TIME, usually, if no answer tiy later. 

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Refer to back Issues of RAINBOW for other products. 



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July 1987 THE RAINBOW 103 




01FF 

0205 

0209 

020D 

0213 

0215 

0217 

0222 

0224 

0241 

0256 

0265 

027D 

0292 

02AA 

02BF 

02C1 

02C3 

02C5 

02C7 

02E1 

02E9 

02FA 

030E 

0319 

032E 

033D 

033F 

0368 

0379 

0387 

0392 

0394 

03AD 

03D0 

03F3 

040B 

0418 

041E 




22 



25 



30 



100 



200 



to acc 
THEN 



half :=FALSE 
ELSE 

GOSUB 2 2 
half :=TRUE 
ENDIF 
ENDIF 
NEXT i 
RETURN 

REM Add a nyble in c 
IF c>="0" AND c<="9" 
acc : =acc+VAL ( c ) 

ELSE IF c>="A" AND c<="F" THEN 

acc:=acc+(ASC(c) -ASC ("A") +10) 
ELSE IF c>="a" AND c<="f" THEN 

acc : =acc+ (ASC (c) -ASC ( "a" ) +10 ) 

ENDIF 
ENDIF 
ENDIF 
RETURN 

REM Confirm the checksum 
Sum : =0 

FOR i:=l TO Outputs ize 

Sum: =Sum*2+OutputBuf f er ( i ) 
NEXT i 

PRINT "Checksum is: "; Sum 
INPUT "Right? ",ok 

RETURN 

REM Write the buffer to the output file 
FOR i:=l TO Outputs ize 

PUT #FileNo,OutputBuf fer (i) 
NEXT i 

RETURN 

REM Can't create a file 

PRINT "Error: "; ERR; "creating file: " 

END "Couldn't create the output file" 

REM Error in main loop 

PRINT "Error: "; ERR 

CLOSE #FileNo 

END "CSave done" 



FileName 



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JFD-CP Drive 1. 1 System with two double sided drives S379.00 



104 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Trivia hysteria hits our national pastime 





By T.C. Taulli 




'ver since Trivial Pursuit burst onto the board game 
Lscene, trivia has affected us in one way or another. Let's 
Iface it, it's fun to show your friend or opponent how 
intelligent you are. Beating someone in a game that requires 
your ability to think and recall information provides 
immense satisfaction, not to mention a boost to your ego. 
For those who are Machiavellian adherents, trivia is an 
excellent, nonviolent means of revenge. 

When playing trivia games, you must be careful. You 
don't want to be known for having the IQ of a doorknob. 
Relax and let your mind fetch the information. Psycholo- 
gists have proven that we remember everything. The only 
thing preventing you from taking advantage of your 
memory is your attitude. If you say you can't, you're telling 
your subconscious to accomplish the task. 

In Latin, the word "trivia" means "belonging to 
the crossroads," hence "commonplace." This 
seems inaccurate. Trivia exercises your 
mind, builds up that hunk of gray 
mass while providing fun. It was 
Edmund Burke who said that "the 
wisest in council, the ablest in debate, and the most 
agreeable in the commerce of life, is that man who has 
assimilated to his understanding the greatest number of 
facts." 

T.C. Taulli lives in Monrovia, California, and is the author 
of Do or Die. T.C. is a member of I he Color America Users 
Group. 



4 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 105 



Come to Radio Shack for the Yery 



What a selection! 

At Radio Shack, we're dedicated 
to making sure that you never run 
out of ways to use and enjoy your 
Color Computer. Weve got a ter- 
rific line of software — here's just 
a sample! 

Games for the whole family 

Let your Color Computer open 
the door to an amazing world of fun 
and adventure. Radio Shack has a 
dazzling selection of popular and 
challenging games. 

Explore a secret cave, collecting 
keys, gold and diamonds in 
Downland. Challenge awesome 
beasts to reach your ultimate 
opponent — the evil wizard — in 



Dungeons of Daggorath. Avoid 
steam vents, fireballs, bullets and 
the Great White Bat in Cave 
Walker. Take part in a daring raid to 
claim the Ancient's exotic technol- 
ogy in Koronis Rift Or enter the 
world of Rogue, an ever-changing 
game of magic and hidden perils. 

Take off into the wild blue yonder 
with Flight Simulator I to learn the 
basics of aviation skill — instrument 
recognition, take-off and landing re- 
quirements and more. Get down 
on the basepaths with Color 
Baseball — it plays just like the 
real game! Or get into role-playing 
secret agent action with the 
Interbank Incident and recover a 
stolen codebook for a satellite. 



Make learning fun 

One of the most valuable poten- 
tials of your Color Computer is giv- 
ing your children a head start in 
education. We've got programs for 
kids of all ages that will give them 
hours of productive fun. 

Younger children will learn with 
Color Math — older kids will enjoy 
developing logical problem-solving 
skills with Robot Odyssey, which ex- 
plores the concepts of electronic 
circuitry, circuit design and logic. 
And there are also entertaining 
teaching programs featuring popu- 
lar Disney characters like Winnie 
the Pooh, Mickey Mouse and 
Donald Duck. You'll find programs 
that develop hundreds of skills. 




Best in Color Computer Software 



Get the power of OS-9 

Step up to a whole new world of 
power with the OS-9 operating sys- 
tem. OS-9 lets you access the entire 
memory of the 64K Extended 
BASIC Color Computer. OS-9 
Level II supports 512K and dual- 
speed operation. We also support 
OS-9 with programming languages 
like BASIC '-09, PASCAL-09, D.L. 
LOGO and C Compiler. 

Boost your productivity 

No matter what your personal 
needs, we've got programs that'll 
put your Color Computer to work 
where you need it most. 

Spreadsheet analysis? Choose 
from Spectaculator™ or Dynacalc 



for planning, forecasting and prob- 
lem solving. Word processing? Get 
our easy-to-use SCRIPSIT® or 
TSEDIT and TSWOBD for perfect 
letters, manuscripts and reports. 

Get your household budget in or- 
der with Personal Finance II. Chart 
your stock holdings and market 
trends with Investograph. 

And with Color DeskMate® and 
DeskMate 3 you get seven of the 
most popular productivity applica- 
tions — Text, Ledger, Index Cards, 
Paint, Telecom, Calendar and 
Calculator — all on one diskette. 

Need more suggestions? Drop by 
your local Radio Shack today — it's 
your one-stop software center. 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 





Send me an RSC-18 Software Guide. 



I 



Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. 88-A-76 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102 

Name 



Address 
City 



I 
I 



State 



ZIP 



Phone 




Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating 
stores and dealers. Koronis Rift/TM Lucasfilm Ltd. Rogue/TM 
EpyK. Flight Simulator/TM Microsoft Corp. Robot Odyssey/TM 
The Learning Company. OS-9 and BASIC-09/TM Microware and 
Motorola. Dynacalc/TM Computer Systems. 



3X1 



tra it W i II M A* it**** fc^v^v>r. 









Since baseball is our national pastime, what would be 
more appropriate than having a program that tests your 
ability to answer questions about the game? But, beware! 
It's not as easy as you might think. The questions Tve 
included cover many years, from Ty Cobb to Nolan Ryan 
— all the greats who fill the Hall of Fame. 

My questions are fair. For example: Who was called the 
Bambino? And, of course, the answer is Babe Ruth. The 
questions are not like this: At what time in the day did Babe 
Ruth tie his shoes on October 2, 1930? 

The program has several questions to fill your mind, to 
force you to concentrate and to learn. You don't have to 
worry about typing in the answer. The program is joystick 
controlled. I've also used Hi- Res graphics to make the 
program more attractive. We can't have anything but the 
best for baseball trivia. □ 



Editor's Note: While the original program includes 
120 questions, the following listing only includes 
30. This is due to magazine space considerations. 
However, the 120-question version will be included 
on RAINBOW ON DISK and RAINBOW ON TAPE. 




210 . , 


.,.,178 


400 . . 


. . .129 


620 ., 


...221 


820 


,..244 


1040 . 


. . 241 


1170 , 


. ... 1 55 


1330 . 


, . . * . 63 


1480 . 


...251 


1630 . 


. ...181 


END . 


..123 



The listing: TRIVIA 

10 CLEAR 500:CLS:DIMH$(120,2) ,Y$ 
(120,4) ,QI(120) ,I$(120) ,MV(120) , 
O$(120) 

20 H=RND ( -TIMER) 
30 H=0:P=1 

40 TU=0 : GH=0 

50 FOR X=l TO 4 1 : READ 1$ (X) : NEXT 
:X=0 

60 X=X+1:READH$(X,1) : IFH$ (X, 1) =" 



CRC/Disto wishes all of our customers 
a very nice summer holiday! 

CRC COMPUTERS inc. 

10802 Lajeunesse 
Montreal, Quebec 
Canada, H3L2E8 
1 -51 4-383-5293 

We will be closed July 1 1 - July 26 
and will be returning to our regular 
business hours on July 27. 



-1"THENZ5=X-1 : X=0 : GOTO500 
70 READH$ (X, 2) 

80 READY $ (X, 1) , Y$ (X , 2 ) , Y$ ( X , 3 ) , Y 

$(X,4) ,QI(X) :GOTO60 

90 DATA U8;R4;D4;L4;R4;D4;BR4 

100 DATA U8;R4;D3;L4;R4;D5;L4;R4 

;BR4 

110 DATA U8;R4;L4;D8;R4;BR4 
120 DATA U8;R2;BR2;BD1;D6;BD1;BL 
2;L1;R1;BR6 
130 DATA U8;R4 
;BR4 

140 DATA U8;R4 



8 

150 DATA U8;R4 
R4 

160 DATA U8;D4 
170 DATA R2;U8 
4 

180 DATA U2;D2 
190 DATA U8 ; D4 



;D2;L2 ;R2 ;D2 ;R2 ;D2 ; BR4 



200 DATA U8;D8 
210 DATA U8;F2 
2 20 DATA U8;R4 
230 DATA U8;R4 
240 DATA U8;R4 
2 50 DATA U8;R4 
;F3;BR4 

2 60 DATA U4;R2 
D2 ;BD2 ;D3 ;BR4 
270 DATA U2;D2 
;U2;BU1;BR2;R2 
2 80 DATA BR2 ■ 
290 DATA U8;D8 



L4 ;D4 ;R3 ;L3 ;D4 ;R4 

L4 ;D4 ;R3 ;L3 ; D4 ; BR 

L4;D8;R4;U3;BD3;B 

R4;U4 ;D8 ; BR4 
L2;R4;L2;D8;R2;BR 

R4 ;U8;D8;BR4 

R2 ;U2 ;R2 ;U2 ;D2 ;L2 



R4 ; BR4 
E2 ;D8 ;BR4 
D8 ; BR4 

D8 ;L4 ;R4 ;BR4 
D4 ;L4 ;D4; BR 8 
D7 ;G1;L3;R3 ;E1;H2 

L2^«;R2 ;BR2 ;BD1 ; 



R3 ;E1;U2 ;H1;L2 ;H1 
D2 ;BD6 ;BR4 
|;L2 ;R4;BD8;BR4 
R4 ;U8 ;D8 ;BR4 
300 DATA BR2;U4;L2;U4;D4;R2;D4;R 
2 ;U4 ; R2 ; U4 ; D4 ; L2 ; D4 ; BR6 
310 DATA U8;D8;E2;F2;U8;D8;BR4 
3 20 DATA U3;BU2;U3;BR4;D3;BD2;D3 
;U3 ; BUI ; BL2 ; LI ; BD4 ; BR7 
330 DATA BR2 ;U4 ;R2 ;U4;D4;L4 ;U4 ;D 
4;BD4;BR8 

340 DATAR4 ; L4 ;U2 ;R2 ;U3 ;R2 ;U3 ; L4 ; 
R4 ; BD8 ; BR 4 
3 50 DATA BR4 

360 DATA U8;R4;L4;D8;R4;BR4 
370 DATA R4;U8;L4;R4;D8;BR4 
3 80 DATA BR1;R2;BR6 
390 DATA U8;R4;D8;L4;R4;BR4 
400 DATA R2;U8;L2;R2;D8;R2;BR4 

410 DATA R4;L4;U4;R4;U4;L4;R4 ;BD 

8 ; BR 4 

420 DATA R4 ;U4 ;L4 ;R4^H;L4 ;R4 ;D8 

;BR4 

430 DATA BR4;U8;D4;L4;U4;D4;R4;D 
4 ; BR 4 

44 0 DATA R4 ;U4 ;L4 ;U4 ;R4 ;BD8 ;BR4 



108 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



4 50 DATA U8 ;R4 ; L4 ; D8 ;R4 ;U4 ; L4 ;R4 
; D4 ; BR4 

4 60 DATA BR4 ;U8 ; L4 ;R4 ; D8 ; BR4 
470 DATA U8 ;R4 ; D4 ; L4 ; D4 ;R4 ;U4 ; D4 
;BR4 

4 80 DATA BR4 ;U8 ; L4 ; D4 ; R4 ; D4 ; BR4 
490 DATA BU8 ;R4 ; D3 ; L4 ; D2 ; BD2 ; Dl ; 

BR8 

500 PM0DE3 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PCLS 5 

510 CIRCLE (35, 50), 30, 4,1, .16, .84 

520 CIRCLE(95,50) ,30,4 

530 CIRCLE (165, 50) ,30,4,1, .16, .8 

4 

540 CIRCLE (225, 50) ,30,4 

550 DRAW" BM68 , 100 ; C3 11 : P$- ff BASEBA 

LL TRIVIA" :GOSUB600 

560 DRAW" BM7 5 , 124 ;C3 " :P$="BY T.C 

. TAULLI 11 : GOSUB600 

570 DRAWBM100, 150" :P$= H (C) 1985 
lf :GOSUB600 

580 DRAW "BM 4 5 , 190" : P$="PUSH THE 
JOYSTICK BUTTON" :GOSUB600 
590 GOTO 7 20 

600 FOR X=l TO LEN(P$) :U$-MID$(P 
$,X,1) : IFP$= ,? "THENRETURN 
610 U=ASC(U$) 

620 IF U=46 THEN U=30:GOTO 690 
630 IF U=32 THEN U=27:GOTO 690 
640 IF U=40 THEN U=2 8:GOTO 690 
650 IF U=41 THEN U=2 9 :GOTO 690 
660 IF U=63 THEN U=41:GOTO690 
670 IF U=<57 THEN U=U-17:GOTO 69 

0 

680 U=U-64 
690 DRAW I$(U) 
700 NEXT 
710 RETURN 

720 B=PEEK(65280) : IFB=2540RB=126 
THENPLAY" L802B" :GOTO870 
730 GOTO 720 

740 J1=INT(JOYSTK(0)/15*75) : JY=I 

NT(JOYSTK(l)/15. 75) 

750 P=R:K=U: B=PEEK( 65280) : IFB=25 

40RB=126THENQS-R: PLAY ?I L802B" : GOT 

0960 

760 IF J=JY THEN 740 
770 IFJY=0THENR=130: J=JY:GOTO820 
780 IFJY=2THENR=150: J=JY:GOTO820 
790 IFJY=3THENR=170: J=JY:GOTO820 
800 IFJY=4THENR=190: J=JY:GOTO820 
810 GOTO7 40 

820 LINE(K, P) - (K+5, P-5) , PRESET, B 
F 

830 LINE (U,R) - (U+5, R-5) ,PSET,BF 
840 B=PEEK ( 65280) : IFB=2540RB=12 6 
THENQS=Rs PLAY"L802B" : G0T09 60 
850 GOTO740 

860 U=1:R=130:K=1:P=130:LINE(U,R 
)-(U+5,R-5) ,PSET,BF:GOTO740 




ou are invited 
to submit nominations 
or 1 he Kainboiv 
Color Computer 

W W 11 P ITt 

Hall of r ame 




I hereby nominate 



(please print) 

as a candidate for 
induction into The Rainbow 
Color Computer Hall of Fame 

Name 

(your own name) 

Address . 

City 

State, ZIP 

Phone 

Signature 

(sponsor) 

R.S.V.P. to: 
Hall of Fame Committee 
The Falsoft Building 

Box da^ 

Prospect^ KY 40059 

We ask that you nominate only one person. Please include 
your name and address on the nomination form, 



July 1987 THERAINBOW 109 



87,0 PCLS : A=/3 : X=/3 : H=RND ( Z 5 ) :T1=T1 
+ 1: IFTl>15THENl/38/3 

880 MV(T1)=H: IFO$ (H) ="NO"THENH=R 
ND(Z5) :GOT088/3ELSE89/3 
890 0$(H)="NO" 

900 DRAW"BM2 ,10" : P$=H$ (H, 1) : GOSU 
B600 

910 DRAW"BM2,25":P$=H$(H,2) : GOSU 
B600 

920 J1=1:JY=1 

930 F0RM=1T04:A=A+2J3 

940 P$=Y$(H,M) : LINE (1,1/8/8) -(15,1 

1/3+A) , PRESET :GOSUB6/3/3 

950 NEXT : GOT08 6 0 

960 IFR=13/3THENQS=1 

970 IFR=15/3THENQS=2 

980 IFR=17/3THENQS=3 

990 IFR=19/3THENQS=4 

1000 IFQS=QI(H) THENP$= ,I RIGHT":R 

I=RI+ 1 : ELSEP$=" WRONG" : WR=WR+1 

1010 PCLS : DRAW " BM1/3 , 50 " : GOSUB6 0 0 

1020 IFP$="WRONG"THENDRAW"BMl/3,8 

/3":P$="THE CORRECT ANSWER IS ":G 

OSUB6/3/3 

1030 IFLEFT$ (P$ , 1) ="T"THENDRAW"B 

Ml/3, 100" : J1=QI (H) :P$=Y$(H,J1) :GO 

SUB6/3/3 

1/34/3 IFP$= ,I RIGHT"THENPLAY"T401L8 
CCCCBB" 

1050 DRAW"BMl/3, 12/3" : P$="PRESS JO 

YSTICK BUTTON" :GOSUB 6/3/3 

1060 B=PEEK( 6528/3) :IFB=2540RB=12 

6THEN87/3 

1070 GOTOl/36/3 

1080 P$="SCORE" : DRAWBM9/3 , 10" : GO 
SUB6/3/3 

1090 P$=STR$ (RI) :P$=P$+" RIGHT": 
DRAW'BMl/3 , 5/3" :GOSUB6/3/3 :RI=/3 
1100 P$="" :P$=STR$ (WR) :P$=P$+" W 
RONG" : DRAWBM1/3 , 70" : GOSUB6/3/3 : P$= 
" " : WR=/3 

1110 P$="PRESS JOYSTICK BUTTON": 
DRAW"BM2/3 , 90" : GOSUB6/3/3 : Tl=/3 
112/3 F0RX=1T015:KL=MV(X) :0$ (KL) = 
" " : NEXT 

113/3 B=PEEK(6528/3) :IFB=2540RB=12 

6THEN87/3 

114/3 GOT0113/3 

115/3 DATAWHO HAD AN OVER 800 BAT 
TING, AVERAGE IN ONE SEASON? 
116/3 DATATED WILLIAMS , BABE RUTH, 
LOU GEHRIG, HANK AARON, 2 
1170 DATAWHO STOLE 50 OR MORE BA 
SES FOR, 12 CONSECUTIVE SEASONS? 

118/3 DATAPETE ROSE, MAURY WILLS, L 
OU BROCK, TY COBB, 3 
1190 DATAWHO SWIPED 27 CONSECUTI 
VE BASES, WITHOUT BEING THROWN OU 



T? 

1200 DATATY COBB, JOE MORGAN, LOU 
BROCK, RON LEFLORE, 4 
1210 DATAWHO PITCHED TWO CONSECU 
TIVE NO, HITTERS? 

122/3 DATANOLAN RYAN , CY YOUNG, JOH 
NNY VAN DERMEER, SANDY KOUFAX,3 
1230 DATAWHO HIT A FAIR BALL OUT 

OF, YANKEE STADIUM? 
12 4/3 DATAMICKEY MANTLE, JOE DIMAG 
GIO, ROGER MARIS, NO ONE HAS HIT 0 
NE OUT, 4 

1250 DATAHOW MANY CONSECUTIVE GA 

MES DID, LOU GEHRIG PLAY? 

126/3 DATA2/3/3/3, 2/3 13, 2 13/3, 3/3/3/3,3 

1270 DATAWHO PITCHED THE MOST NO 

HITTERS? , 
128/3 DATANOLAN RYAN, SANDY KOUFAX 
, JOHNNY VANDERMEER , BOB GIBSON, 1 
1290 DATAWHO HIT THE MOST HOME R 
UNS IN, A CAREER? 

1300 DATAROGER MARIS, BABE RUTH , H 
ENRY AARON, MICKEY MANTLE, 3 
1310 DATAWHO HIT THE MOST HOME R 
UNS IN A, SINGLE SEASON? 
1320 DATABABE RUTH, HENRY AARON, R 
OGER MARIS, MICKEY MANTLE, 3 
1330 DATAHOW MANY HOME RUNS DID 
ROGER, MARIS HIT IN 1961? 
134/3 DATA4/3,3j3,45,61,4 
1350 DATAHIT THE MOST HOME RUNS 
FOR TIMES, AT BAT IN HIS CAREER. 
1360 DATAROGER MARIS, HENRY AARON 
, BABE RUTH, MICKEY MANTLE, 3 



NETTLES , STEVE SAX , 1 
39/3 DATAWHEN WAS THE FIRST BASE 
BALL, GAME TELEVISED? 
14/3/3 DATA1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 3 
141/3 DATAWHEN WAS THE FIRST WORL 
D SERIES, TELEVISED? 
142/3 DATA1939, 1946, 1947, 1948, 3 
143/3 DATAWHAT STATION TELEVISED 
THE 1947, WORLD SERIES? 
144/3 DATANBC , ABC , CBS , RKO , 1 
145/3 DATAWHO PLAYED IN THE 1947 
WORLD, SERIES? 

146/3 DATADODGERS VS YANKEES , DODG 
ERS VS REDS, REDS VS YANKEES , YANK 
EES VS CUBS,1 

147/3 DATAWHO PLAYED IN THE FIRST 

MAJOR, LEAGUE GAME ON TV? 
148/3 DATACUBS VS DODGERS, REDS VS 

DODGERS, CUBS VS REDS, YANKEES VS 
DODGERS , 2 



110 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



149)3 DATAWHO DID JOE DIMAGGIO MA 
RRY?, 

15j3j3 DATAMARILYN MONROW, JANE RUS 
SELL, LARAINE DAY, ELYSE KNOX, 1 
151/3 DATA WHAT IS A FULL COUNT?, 

152) 3 DATA2 BALLS AND 2 STRIKES, 1 
BALL AND NO STRIKES , 3 BALLS AND 
2 STRIKES, 3 BALLS AND 3 STRIKES 

,3 

153) 3 DATAWHO HAS HAD 9 SHUT OUTS 
IN A, SEASON? 

154) 3 DATABOB GIBSON, RON GUIDRY, N 
OLAN RYAN, CY YOUNG, 2 

1550 DATAIN 198 J21 WHO DID WILLIE 
RANDOLPH, PLAY FOR? 

156)3 DATADODGERS, YANKEES, REDS, CU 
BS,2 

1570 DATAWHAT IS THE DISTANCE BE 
TWEEN THE, THREE BASES? 
1580 DATA 80 FEET, 50 FEET, 60 FEET 
,90 FEET, 4 

1590 DATAWHO DID DIZZY DEAN PLAY 

Fop 

1600 DATAST LOUIS , REDS , CUBS , YANK 
EES , 1 

1610 DATAWHO DID DAFFY DEAN PLAY 
FOR?, 

1620 DATAST LOUIS , REDS , CUBS , YANK 



EES , 1 

1630 DATAHOW LONG DID HENRY ARRO 
N PLAY, FOR? 

1640 DATA20 YEARS, 21 YEARS, 22 YE 
ARS,2 3 YEARS, 4 

1650 DATAWHO HIT 5 HOMERUNS IN 0 

NE DAY?, 

16 60 DATASTAN MUSIAL, BABE RUTH , R 
OGER MARIS, MICKEY MANTLE , 1 
1670 DATAWHO DID ROD CAREW PLAY 
FOR IN, 1977? 

1680 DATACUBS , RED SOXS , TIGERS , TW 
INS, 4 

1690 DATAWHO WAS THE MANAGER OF 
THE YEAR, IN 19 80 IN THE AMERICAN 
LEAGUE? 

1700 DATA YOGI BERRA, TOM LASORDA, 
BILLY MARTIN, WALTER ALSTON, 3 
1710 DATAWHO THREW A SHUT OUT IN 

THEIR, FIRST GAME? 
1720 DATAMIKE MORRIS, NOLAN RYAN, 
LEFY GROVE, SANDY KOUFAX, 1 
1730 DATAWHO WON THE 1980 MOST V 
ALU ABLE, PLAYER AMERICAN LEAGUE A 
WARD? 

1740 DATAGEORGE BRETT, ROD CAREW, 
RON CEY, CECIL COOPER, 1 
1750 DATA -1 



About Your Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is sent second class 
mail. You must notify us of a new address when 
you move. Notification should reach us no later 
than the 15th of the month prior to the month in 
which you change your address. Sorry, we cannot 
beresponsibleforsendmg another copy when you 
fail to notify us. 

Your mailing label also shows an account 
number and the subscription expiration date. 
Please indicate this account number when renew- 
ing or corresponding with us. It will help us help 
you better and faster. 

For Canadian and other non-U. S. subscribers, 
there may be a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial office address. Do not 
send any correspondence to that mailing address. 
Send it to our editorial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
This applies to everyone except those whose 
subscriptions are through our distributor in 
Australia. 



(Also, see Page 137) 



Charting the Ups and Downs of Life M (March 
1987, Page 86): Michael Sims has written to alert us 
to a few minor errors in his program, Graphii, While 
the program appears to work normally, some of the 
output will be incorrect. To correct these errors, alter 
the following lines accordingly: 

4110 S = 24)3/RNUM 



4175 IF A$= ,f L !f THEN IF R5=RNUM+2 
THEN 4 2)3)3 ELSE IF R5=RNUM+1 THE 
N 42J30 



9)35)3 PRINT#B,NAME$:PRINT#B,STRIN 
G$ (LEN (NA$) ,"-») :FORX=lTORNUM:PR 
INT#B , TEST (X) : NEXTX 

Also, Mr. Sims has offered a little hint for program 
execution. He suggests you not use lowercase letters 
in the titles or labels. Otherwise, the program will 
crash. 

For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DATA 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFD at the TOPIC?> 
prompt. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 111 




Keying Into CoCo's Power 



By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the " Wishing Well, " submit it to Fred 
c/o THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don 7 forget that 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 



I hope that you all enjoyed our little 
graphics experiments in the last two 
issues of THE RAINBOW. Both pro- 
grams were the direct result of sugges- 
tions sent in by readers who use the 
Color Computer to educationally mo- 
tivate their children. In recent months, 
I have received even more letters along 
the same line. We will take a look at 
what a few of these readers have had to 
say and then launch into another wish 
that took a little time to develop but will 
satisfy those of you who want to intro- 
duce the very young to computer skills. 
The program is called CoCo Keys and 
can be used with or without the Radio 
Shack Sound/ Speech Cartridge. 



Fred Scerbo is a 
special needs in- 
structor for the 
North Adams Pub- 
lic Schools in North 
Adams, Massachu- 
setts. He holds a 
master's in educa- 
tion and has published some of the first 
software available for the Color Com- 
puter through his software firm, Illus- 
trated Memory Banks. 



What Readers Say 

Sometimes I spend a great deal of 
time developing an educational pro- 
gram only to have one of my students 
dismiss it with a wise-guy remark like, 
"Couldn't you come up with anything 
better than that?" I am often tempted to 
dare them to come up with something 
better, but that would be a rather cheap 
way of soothing my bruised ego. In- 
stead, I can counteract their remarks by 
turning to the reader mail, which arrives 
every few days. Since it is impossible to 
respond to these letters individually, I 
will take a crack at a few of them here. 

Several readers have commented that 
they have had difficulty getting some of 
these talking programs to work, espe- 
cially on the CoCo 3. Since I haven't 
made the jump to CoCo 3 yet, I am not 
sure whether any changes are needed to 
make speech programs work when the 
CoCo 3 is in its CoCo 2 mode. Shirley 
Moncrief of Hayward, California, ran 
into this problem. The program works 
perfectly with no error messages, but it 
just won't speak. There are two possible 
fixes for this. 

First, sometimes the Voice Pak can be 
reactivated by pressing the reset button 
several times. 1 have run into this 
problem on my CoCo 1 and 2 every so 
often. For some reason, sometimes the 
Pak just seems to not engage. 

Second, recheck the listing directly 
after the title card at the section where 
you select talking or non-talking. It is 
possible that the non-talking variable 
may have been accidentally typed into 
both lines. Naturally, there is a different 



value for each, so it is possible that if 
the wrong value were typed into the 
talking line, it might make the program 
ignore the talking subroutines when the 
program is running. Again, to be safe, 
subscribe to RAINBOW ON TAPE and you 
will get a bug-free version every time. 
(No, the magazine listings do not have 
bugs in them. Those seem to creep into 
your CoCo somewhere between the 
pages and your typing fingers. A pro- 
gram need not show an error message 
to have a typo in it!) 

Mae R. Hipp of Sun Valley, Nevada, 
had a little problem with our under- 
standing relationships between frac- 
tions, decimals and whole numbers 
program in the January 1987 column. 
The caret, or little upward pointing 
sign, in Line 210 after the varible R=10 
is actually the up arrow on your key- 
board . My lineprinter (an Okidata 82A) 
prints that figure as an arrow, but 
apparently the rainbow's professional 
lineprinter uses the up caret instead. If 
you see an up caret in any of these 
listings, be sure to use the up arrow 
when you type in the program. (Also, 
be sure to type it in correctly the first 
time, since if you try to edit it into the 
line using the EDIT command, you will 
not be able to. Using the up arrow exits 
the EDIT mode in Extended Color 

BASIC.) 

This Month's Idea 

Sonya Hurst of Richmond, Califor- 
nia, wrote a letter that served as the 
inspiration for this month's program. 
On a very colorful letterhead she ob- 



it 2 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 



VIDEO 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 




COCO 3 SCREEN 



USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS 1 




'TM 



DS-69Band C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR 

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we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



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buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
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The excitement continues! 



The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Nineteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our third 
Adventure competition. Discover backstage intrigue at the London 
Theatre, attempt a daring space rescue, or travel through time to save the 
universe, and that's only the beginning! 

Challenge yourself! Put your wits to the test with Adventures like: 

Evil Crypt — Encounter bottomless pits, graves that kill, flesh-frying fires. 
Even the rocks and trees conceal dangers. 

The Professional — You're hot on the trail of international jewel thieves. 

Cleopatra's Pyramid — Perilous action along the banks of the treacherous 
Nile River. 

Johnny Zero — Fight against evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. 
And when you're at the end of your rope, revenge is in reach with: 

Balm — You are the Adventure, determined to exterminate anyone fool 
enough to travel your cavern. 

Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these 
winning authors: Mark and Mike Anderson, Jon Blow, Jason Dolinsky, Matt 
Hazard, Joab Jackson, Curtis Keisler, Franklin Marrs, Ann Mayeux, Scott 
McCleary, Chris McKernan, Philip Newton, Fred Provoncha, Carlos Rocha, 
Michael Shay, Don Sheerin, and WaltThinnes. 

The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures is only $11.95! 

Save yourself from typing listings with — the Third 
Adventures Tape or Disk Set. 

Get on with your game and eliminate typing hassles. Just load these great 
programs into your computer and run. 

Tape $9.95, Two- Disk Set $14.95 

The tape and disks are adjuncts and complements to the book; the book is necessary for 
introductory material and loading instructions. 



Please send me: The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures $1 1.95 

The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape $9.95 

The Third Rainbow Adventures Disk Set $14.95 

Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ My check in the amount of is enclosed* 

Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Acct. No. Exp. Date 

Signature 

Mail to: The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492 

*Add $1 ,50 shipping and handling per book. Outside the U.S. add $4. Allow 6 to 8 weeks 
for delivery. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax for book and tape. In order to hold 
down costs, we do not bill. U.S. currency only please. 




viously created with her CoCo and 
Color Ink Printer, she wrote: 

I have been trying to write a pro- 
gram that will draw a picture of the 
computer keyboard on the screen and 
put the letters and numbers on the 
keys. This was to be part of a spelling 
program for my 5-year-oid daughter. 
I wanted to have the Speech/ Sound 
Cartridge ask her to spell a word. If 
she spelled it incorrectly, I wanted the 
proper letters to be highlighted on the 
screen so she could see them, one at 
a time ... I can get the picture of the 
keyboard, but not the letters. 

She then included a short listing that 
would draw the keys on the screen. 
Rather than take this idea all by itself, 
I decided to write an entirely new 
routine that would draw a very precise 
keyboard with all the little details that 
I could cram into the resolution of 
PM0DE4. 

If you recall, my last two programs 
included a new graphics text routine 
that helped do the explaining about the 
blood and your heart. I tried this with 
our Speech Pak and even managed to 
get the results displayed in PMDDE2/1, 
rather than PMDDE 4^3. However, using 
PMQDE2/1 would not give me enough 
detail to display the text for our double- 
duty keys on our CoCo keyboard (such 
as those that have shift characters). 
Therefore, it was necessary to make a 
few changes in this routine to get it to 
work in PMQDE4. Even the DRTR state- 
ments had to be changed. 

The resulting program, CoCo Keys, 
is not the spelling program that Ms. 
Hurst was trying to write but, instead, 
is a very elementary (but classy looking) 
keyboard ing program that introduces 
the user to the workings of the CoCo 
keyboard. It is not a typing tutor pro- 
gram. Rather, it is a program that will 
help the very young or very inexpe- 
rienced to become more familiar with 
where to find specific keys on the 
keyboard. 

Before we wrap up, I will also show 
you how to merge my graphics key- 
board into your own BASIC keyboard 
program. With that in mind, let's launch 
into how to use CoCo Keys. 

Using the Program 

CoCo Keys uses the PCLERRB com- 
mand, so some older CoCo 1 models 
may give a syntax error when the pro- 
gram is first run. Simply re-run the 
program to proceed, or type PCLERR B 
before running or loading the program. 

To start the program, enter RUN. If a 




red screen appears, press ENTER to 
continue. If the screen is blue, press 
reset and run it until the screen appears 
red. Then you may proceed with a full- 
scale running of the listing. 

On running the program, you get our 
very familiar "Wishing Well" title 
screen. You are asked to choose between 
(T)alking or (N)ot by pressing the 
appropriate key. CoCo Keys does not 
need speech to be run effectively. If you 
choose non-talking, you may read the 
text to a child who is using the program. 
It can be just as effective when used this 
way. In fact, it can be more effective if 
the child cannot understand the 
computer's artificial speech. 

The screen will make a slight pause 
while it is jumbling the order of the keys. 
The screen will then display 58 different 
keys f or the user to find and press when 
prompted. Pressing the correct key will 
cause that key to be highlighted on the 
screen. Another choice will then be 
displayed quickly. 

Granted, it may not seem to be much, 
but creating the keyboard was quite 
time-consuming. It will be put to use in 
other programs in later issues. Besides, 
you may want to use it yourself. 

In any case, CoCo Keys can be a good 
introduction to coordinating key- 
strokes with visual and speech prompts. 
When using the Speech Pak, the com- 
puter will say which key it wants 
pressed. If you press the correct key, the 
key flashes on the screen and the com- 




puter speaks a correct response to you. 
If you press the wrong key, the screen 
flashes green and waits for you to try 
again. 

A few warnings: Do not press the 
keys too quickly because your CoCo 
holds a number of keystrokes in its 
buffer. You may press several keys and 
end up with several incorrect responses. 
Also, be sure to shift for the shifted 
characters on the keyboard. If you press 
without the SHIFT, the response is 
wrong. If you want to check your 
progress, press SHIFT-CLEAR to go to 
the scorecard. You will see how well you 
have done and may choose to either 
start over, end or press C to continue 
where you left off. 

Using the Graphic Keyboard 

There is a very simple way to remove 
the graphic of the keyboard from this 
program if you have a disk. Run the 
program up to the point where the 
keyboard is drawn and then press 
BREAK before the text is printed at the 
bottom of the screen. With a disk in the 
drive, type: 

5RVEM"KEYBRD",35B4, 9727 , 0 

and press ENTER. The graphic of the 
keyboard will now be saved to disk. You 
may reload it into your own program by 
including a line with: 

PM0DE4,1:5CREEN1,1:LDRDM' / 
KEYBRD" 

July 1987 THE RAINBOW 115 



This will reload the keyboard to your 
screen. The DflTR statements include the 
locations of each key and character. 

If you do not have a disk drive, you 
would have to use most of the program 
lines listed here. Anyone wanting to use 
the keyboard graphic in their own home 



programs is free to do so. However, 
please do not ask me if you may use it 
in a commercial program. The answer 
is no. 

While this program may seem almost 
pre-school, believe me, older users will 
not get a perfect score the first time. It 



can be very valuable for learning where 
things are on your keyboard. In fact, 
very soon you may see this graphic 
included in an educational game I am 
working on. Until then, keep your 
letters and requests coming in. They are 
getting better all the time. □ 



45 


169 


115 


, 79 


220 


27 


290 


91 


360 


158 


395 


33 


450 


21 


580 


178 


700 


142 


END 


. . .235 



The listing: CDCDKEY5 

0 PCLEAR8 

1 REM ************************ 

2 REM * CO CO KEYS * 

5 REM * BY FRED B.SCERBO * 

6 REM * 60 HARDING AVE. * 

7 REM * NORTH ADAMS, MA 012 4 7 * 

8 REM * COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 * 

9 REM ************************ 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : S CREEN1 , 1 : PMOD 
E3 :PCLS2 

15 X$=INKEY$:IFX$<>CHR$(13)THEN1 
5 

20 CLS0 : PRINTSTRING$ ( 32 , 156) ; : FO 
RI=1T02 5 6 : READA : PRINTCHR$ ( A+12 8 ) 
; : NEXT : PRINTSTRING$ (32, 156) ; 
25 DATA46, 44, 44, 44, 42, 46,44,44,4 
5,116,126, , ,112,12 6,120,12 6,124, 
12 4,12 4,12 2,12 2, , ,112,122,117,12 
4,124,124,124,125 

30 DATA 4 2 , , , , , 42, , ,37, , 122 , , 112 , 
118 ,, ,12 2, , ,,120, 12 2, ,,112, 122,1 

35'dATA4 2, ,, ,34, 42 , , , 37, , 122 , 112 
,118, , , ,122, , , , ,122, , ,112,122 ,11 

40 DATA44,44,44,44,40,44,44,44,4 
4 f ,123,118, , , , ,123,115,115,119, , 
121 , 112 , ,113, 120, 117, 115, 115, 115 
, 115 , 115 

45 DATA110, 108, 108, 108, 106, 110,1 
08,108,109,112,12 2,116,114, , , , 12 
2, , ,116,112, f 121, 115, 12 0 / / / f i i / I 
17 

50 DATA106, , , , , 106, , , 101, , 122 , , 1 
16,114, ,112,122, , , , , , ,122, , , , , , , 
,117 



55 DATA106, ,,, 98,106,96,96,101, , 

12 2, ,,116, 114, ,12 2, ,,112, 114, ,11 

2,122, , ,113,112, , , ,117 

60 DATA108, 108, 108, 108, 104, 108,1 

08, 108 , 108, 116, 124 , , , , 116, 120 , 12 

4,124,124,124, 120, , 116 , 124 , , , 116 

, 124, 124 , 124, 124 , 124 

65 PRINT@357," KNOWING THE KEYBO 

ARD " ; : PRINT@389 , " (T)ALKING OR 

(N)OT ? »; 

70 PRINT@421," BY FRED B.SCERB 
O "; 

75 PRINT@453 , " COPYRIGHT (C) 19 
87 " ; 

80 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="T"THEN100 
85 IFX$="N"THEN95 
90 GOTO80 
95 NT=1 

100 CLS0:PRINT@264 , " PLEASE STAN 
D BY "; 

105 XX=&HFF00 : YY=&HFF7E 

1 10 POKEXX+ 1,52: POKEXX+3 , 6 3 

115 POKEXX+3 5, 60 

120 DIMR(23) ,L$(26) ,Y(40) ,A(58,2 
) ,K$(58) ,G$(58) ,K(58) ,L(58) :C$(1 
)="C1":C$ (2)="C2":C$(3)="C3 ,, :C$( 
4)="C4" 

125 FORI=lT058 

130 K(I) =RND(58) : IFL(K(I) ) =1THEN 
130 

135 L(K(I) ) =1:NEXTI 

140 FORI=lT02 6 : READL$ ( I ) : NEXT 

145 GOT0275 

150 AA$=JK$ 

155 A$=STR$ (A) : B$=STR$ (B) 

160 DRAW " BM " + A $ + " , "+B$+C$ (CL) 

165 IF LEN ( JK$) <=2 4THEN185 

170 FOR T=24TO0STEP-1:IF MID$(JK 

$,T,1)=" "THEN180 

175 NEXT T:GOT0185 

180 L$=LEFT$(JK$,T) : W$=L$ : GOSUB1 

90:JK$=" "+RIGHT$ (JK$, (LEN (JK$) ) 

-T) :GOT0155 

185 W$=JK$: B=B+14 : GOSUB190 : RETUR 
N 

190 SL=LEN(W$) :FORI=lTOSL: BB$=MI 

D$(W$,I,1) :C=ASC(BB$)-64:IF C=-3 

2 THEN DRAW" BR6 " : GOT02 1 0 

195 IF C=-18THENDRAW"BR2RBR9 " :GO 

TO210 

200 IFC=-20THENDRAW"BR2R2D2G2E4B 



116 THE FMfNBOW July 1987 



R7" :GOT021j3 

2j35 DRAWL$(C) 

210 NEXTI : B=B+14 : RETURN 

215 IFNT=1THENRETURN 

220 F0RII=1T0LEN(AA$) 

225 IF PEEK( YY) AND 128=J3 THEN225 

23)3 P0KEYY,ASC(MID$(AA$,II,1) ) 

235 NEXTII 

24j3 IFPEEK ( YY) AND12 8=j3THEN2 4 0 
245 P0KEYY,13 

250 F0RHH=1T06 0 0 : NEXTHH : RETURN 
2 55 RETURN 

260 DATA U6E2R2F2D2NL4D4BR6 / U8R4 
F2G2NL4F2G2NL4BR8 , U8R6ND2 BD8NU2N 
L6BR6,U8R4F2D4G2NL4BR8 ,U8NR4D4NR 
4D4R4BR6,U8NR4D4NR4D4BR1£J ,U8R6BD 
4NL2D4NL4BR6 / U4NU4R6U4D8BR6 
2 65 DATA R2U8L2R4 L2 D8R2 BR6 , NU4R4 
U8L4R6BD8BR6 , U8D4R2NE4 F4BR6 , NU8R 
4BR6 , U8F4E4D8BR6 , U8F6NU6D2BR6 , U8 
R6D8NL6BR6 / U8R6D4L6D4BR12 / U8R6D8 
NL6NH4NF2BR6 

270 DATA U8R6D4L4F4BR6,R6U4L6U4R 
6BD8BR6 , BR4U8L4R8BD8 BR 6 , NU8R6NU8 
BR6 , BU8D4F4E4U4BD8BR6 , NU8R4NU6R4 
NU8BR6 , E8G4H4F8BR6 , BU8D2F4ND2E4U 
2BD8BR6 , NR8E8NL8BD8BR6 
275 GOT028J3 

280 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PMO 
DE3 

285 LINE (j3 # j2)-(256,92) , PRESET, BF 

290 DRAW i? BM10 , 16" : FORI = 1 TO 13 : GOS 
UB4 65 : PAINT (4+ (1*18) ,12) , 3 , 3 : NEX 

T 

295 DRAW 11 BM2 , 34" : F0RI=1T014 : GOSU 

B4 65 : PAINT ( (I * 18 ) -6 f 2 8 ) f 3 f 3 : NEXT 

300 DRAW" BM4 , 52 " : F0RI=1T011 : GOSU 

B4 65: PAINT ( (1*18) -2 ,42) ,3 , 3 : NEXT 

:DRAW"C4U14R32D14NL32BR4" : PAINT ( 

(1*18) -2 , 42) ,4,4: GOSUB465 : PAINT ( 

242,42) ,3, 3: PAINT (242, 42) ,4,1 

305 DRAW"BM4,7£JU14R28D14NL28BR4" 

: FORI=lT01j3 : GOSUB465 : PAINT ( (1*18 

) +6, 60) , 3 ,3 :NEXT:DRAW f, U14R2 8D14L 

2 8": PAINT ( (1*18 ) +6 , 60 ) ,3,3: PAINT 

(236, 60) , 3 , 3 :PAINT(2 36, 60) ,4,1 

310 PAINT(24 , 6j3) ,4,1: PAINT (10, 32 

) ,4,1: PAINT (lj3,48) , 4 , 1 : PAINT (2 4 8 

,32) ,4,1: PAINT (2 18, 32) ,4,1 

315 CL=1:A=6:FORF=1T01J3:READJK$: 

A=A+18 : B=32 : GOSUB155 : NEXT 

320 DATA Q,W,E,R,T,Y,U,I,0,P 

325 A=8 : F0RF=1T09 : READJK$ : A=A+18 

: B=50 : GOSUB155 : NEXT 

330 DATA A,S,D,F,G,H, J,K,L 

335 A=2 2 : F0RF=1T07 : READJK$ : A=A+1 

8 : B=68 : GOSUB155 : NEXT 

34£J DATA Z,X,C,V,B,N,M 

345 COLORl,4:LINE(6j3,74)-(196,88 



) , PRESET, BF 

350 PAINT (2 3 6, 6) ,2,1 

355 PMODE4:DRAW"Cj3BM12,4 8NE3NH3U 

8BU1J2BL2U8NF3G3" 

360 PMODE4 : DRAW" BM6 , 64Q0" : FORI=l 
T02 :DRAW ,f R4U2L4U2R4BR2D4U2R4U2D4 
BR4U4BR4ND4NR2D2NR2U2BR4R2ND4R2B 
D4BR186 ,f : NEXT 

365 DRAW" BM2 0A , 4 6Cj3NR4U2NR4U2R4B 
R2ND4F4U4BR2R2ND4R2BR2NR4D2NR4D2 
R4BR2U4R4D2L4R2F2BR1£JNR2U4R2 BR4D 
4NR2BU2£JNH2NG2L8BL1£JL8NE2NF2" 
310 PMODE3 : DRAW M C1BD7BL14L2H2U6E 
2R4F2D4G2L2H2U4R2BG14BL2 BDD2NR2N 
L2D2BD2DBD2DG2 ff 

375 DRAW" BL19BD5G3F3BLBD2D2G2BR1 
8BUU2BU3E3H3 BR16R4D2L2 D2BD2DBD5E 
4 

3B0 PMODE3 :DRAW"BM18, 15C1U5NGBU2 
UBU2U2BR14ND2BR4D2BD4NL4D3L4D3R4 
BR14R4U3NL2U3L4BU2U2NL2NR6U2NL2N 
U2R6L2U2D6BR14R4U3 L4U3R4L2NU2D8B 
L3D4R8U4D6" 

385 DRAW"BR12R4U3L4U3R4BU3NEBL4E 
4BL4LBR18R3DG2DR4H4BD7NR4D6R4U4N 
L4BU2BR14R6M-4,+6BUl£JU2BR2j2BUG2D 
F2BD2BL2R4D3L4U3D6R4NU3BR14R4U3L 
4U3R4ND3BU2 BL2E2UH2BR14BD7D6NE4B 
RR4U6NL4BR14BD2NRBD2NRBU8NE2NH2N 




Use your Color Computer to improve your perfor- 
mance at the track! Separate programs for thorough- 
breds, harness horses and greyhounds rank the hors- 
es or dogs in each race. Handicap a race in minutes, 
even if youVe never handicapped a race before! 

A1P the data you need is readily available in the thor- 
oughbred Racing Form, harness or dog track program. 
We even provide diagrams showing you where to find 
the information you need. Data entry is quick and easy. 
Our manual shows you how to bet, when to bet, and 
when to sit out, one of the reaf secrets of good handi- 
capping. 

The handicappers will run on any Color Computer 
(including the CoCo3) with at least 16K of memory. 
Thoroughbred, Harness or Greyhound Handicappers, 
$39,95 each on tape or disk. Any two for $59.95, all 
three only $79.95. You can buy a more expensive hand- 
icap per, but you can't buy a better one! 

, Federal Hill Software _ a 

'fflfiji 8134 Scotts Level Rd ws4 

— Baltimore, Md. 21208 
Toll-free Orders 800-628-2828 Ext. 850 
Information 301-521 -4885 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 117 



F2NG2NU2ND2BR16BDR4BU2L4BD8R4C4B 

R14U6NL2R4D3NL4D3NL6BR4U6 

39j3 REM 

. 395 F0RI=1T058:READA(I,1) ,A(I,2) 
,K$(I) ,G$(I) :NEXT:G$(49)=CHR$(34 

) 

4j3j3 PC0PY1T05:PC0PY2T06:PC0PY1T0 
7:PCOPY2T08 

4J35 LINE (j3, 96) - (256, 13 4) , PRESET , 
B:JK$=" FIND THIS CHARACTER 

ON YOUR KEYBOARD. 11 :A=j3:B=112 
:CL=2:GOSUB15j3 

41j3 AA$="FIND THIS KARRECTER ON 
YOUR KEY BOARD" :GOSUB2 15 
415 FORZZ=lT058:COLORl,4:PMODE4, 
1 : LINE (j3,14j3)-(256, 192) ,PSET,BF: 
PMODE3:Z=K(ZZ) : QW=LEN ( K$ ( Z ) ) : QR= 
INT ( (26-QW) /2 ) +2 : JK$=STRING$ (QR, 
32)+K$(Z) :CL=3 :B=16j3:GOSUB15j3:GO 
SUB215 

42j3 X$=INKEY$: IFX$=CHR$ (3)THEN42 
0 

,425 IFX$=CHR$ (92) THEN7 6 0 
43j3 IFX$=G$ (Z) THEN44J3ELSEIFX$="" 
THEN42j3 

435 AA$="SORRY. YOU ARE WRONG" :G 
OSUB215 : F0RJL=1T06 : PMODE4 , 1 : SCRE 
EN1 , 0 : FORJM=lT09j3 : NEXTJM: SCREEN1 
, 1 : FORJM=lT09j3 : NEXTJM, JL: NW=NW+1 
:GOT042j3 

44J3 AA$="THAT IS CORRECT" :: GOSUB 
215 : PCOPY7T05 : PCOPY8T06 : PMODE3 , 5 
:LINE(A(Z,1) ,A(Z,2) ) - ( A ( Z , 1) +14 , 
A(Z, 2)+14) ,PSET,BF 
445 FORW=lT01j3 
45j3 PCOPY5T01:PCOPY6T02 
. 455 PCOPY7T01 : PCOPY8T02 : NEXTWtNR 
=NR+1: :NEXTZZ 

46j3 F0RWW=lTO5j3j3:NEXT:G0TO76j3 
465 DRAW"C3U14R14D14NL14BR4":RET 

' URN 

47 j3 DATA 1,0 , 2 , THE NUMBER ONE,l 
475 DATA2 8,2, THE NUMBER TWO, 2 
48j3 DATA4 6,2, THE NUMBER THREE, 3 
485 DATA64 , 2 , THE NUMBER FOUR, 4 
49J3 DATA82 , 2 , THE NUMBER FIVE, 5 
495 DATAlj30,2,THE NUMBER SIX, 6 
5J3J3 DATA118 , 2 , THE NUMBER SEVEN, 7 
5J35 DATA1 36,2, THE NUMBER EIGHT, 8 
510 DATA154 , 2 , THE NUMBER NINE, 9 
515 DATA172,2, ZERO,j3 
52 0 DATA19j3,2,A COLON,":" 
525 DATA2j38,2,A DASH OR MINUS, - 
53 0 DATA2 0 , 2 0 , THE LETTER Q,Q 
535 DATA3 8 , 2 j3 , THE LETTER W,W 
54j3 DATA5 6 , 2j3 , THE LETTER E,E 
545 DATA74 ,20 , THE LETTER R,R 
55j3 DATA9 2 ,20 , THE LETTER T,T 
555 DATAllj3 ,20 , THE LETTER Y,Y 



56j3 DATA128 ,20 , THE LETTER U,U 

565 DATA146 ,20, THE LETTER 1,1 

570 DATA164 , 2j3,THE LETTER 0,0 

575 DATA182 ,20 , THE LETTER P,P 

58j3 DATA2 00 ,20 , THE AT SIGN,@ 
585 DATA2 2 , 3 8 , THE LETTER A, A 

59 0 DATA4 0 , 3 8 , THE LETTER S,S 

595 DATA58 ,38, THE LETTER D,D 

600 DATA7 6 , 3 8 , THE LETTER F,F 

6j35 DATA9 4 , 3 8 , THE LETTER G,G 

61j3 DATA112,38,THE LETTER H,H 

615 DATA13 j3 , 3 8 , THE LETTER J, J 

62 0 DATA148,38,THE LETTER K,K 

625 DATA166,38,THE LETTER L,L 

63j3 DATA184,38,A SEMICOLON,; 

635 DATA184,38,A PLUS SIGN,+ 

64 0 DATA3 6, 5 6, THE LETTER Z,Z 

645 DATA5 4,56, THE LETTER X,X 

65j3 DATA7 2 , 5 6 , THE LETTER C,C 

655 DATA9 0,56, THE LETTER V,V 

66j3 DATA1J38 , 56 , THE LETTER B,B 

665 DATA126,56,THE LETTER N,N 

67j3 DATA144,56,THE LETTER M,M 

675 DATA162,56,A COMMA, "," 

68 0 DATA18J3, 5 6, A PERIOD,"." 

685 DATA198,56,A SLASH,/ 

69j3 DATA162 , 56 , LESS THAN SIGN,< 

695 DATA 1 8 0, 5 6, GREATER THAN SIGN 

100 DATA198, 5 6, QUESTION MARK,? 
7J35 DAT Alj3, 2, EXCLAMATION POINT,! 
71j3 DATA2 8, 2, QUOTATION MARKS, 
715 DATA4 6,2, THE NUMBER SIGN,# 
72j3 DATA64,2,A DOLLAR SIGN,$ 
725 DATA82,2,A PERCENT SIGN,% 
73 0 DATAlj3^J , 2 , THE AND SIGN,& 
735 DATA118 , 2 , AN APOSTROPHE , ' 
74j3 DATA136,2,OPEN PARENTHE S I S , ( 
745 DATA154,2,CLOSE PARENTHESIS, 

) 

75j3 DATA19j3, 2, AN ASTERISK,* 
755 DATA2J38 , 2 , AN EQUAL SIGN,= 
76j3 CLS 

765 CLS : PRINT© 1^) 1 , " YOU TRIED" NR+ 
NW" PROBLEMS &" : PRINT@165 , "ANSWER 
ED"NR" CORRECTLY" 

77j3 PRINT@2 29 , "WHILE DOING"NW"WR 
ONG . " 

775 NQ=NR+NW:IFNQ=j3THEN NQ=1 

78j3 MS=INT(NR/NQ*lj3j3) 

785 PRINT@2 93, "YOUR SCORE IS"MS" 



% " 



79j3 PRINT@357, "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N/ 

C) ?"; 

795 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THENRUN 

800 IFX$="N"THENCLS : END 

8 05 IFX$="C"THENPM0DE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 

,l:PMODE3:GOT042j3 

81j3 GOT0795 ^ 



118 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



11 

:lware 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Calligrapher - (Hybrid basic/ml) 
Turn your CoCo and dot- matrix printer 
into a calligrapher's quill. Make beautiful 
invitations, nyers, certificates, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon, The letters are l h 
inch high and variably spaced. Works with 
many printers including Epson, Gemini, 
Radio Shack, Okidata 02 A, Banana and 
Pro writer. Additional fonts are available 
(see below). Tape/Disk; $24.95. 

OS0 Calligrapher - (C) Although a 
different program from the CoCo Galligra- 
pher, the OS9 Cal'ligrapher prints all the 
same fonts. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and formatting direc- 
tives. You may specify the font to use, 
change fonts at any time, centering left, 
right or full justification, Sine fill, margin, 
line width, page size, page break and in- 
dentation. Similar to troff on UNIX (tm) 
systems. Includes Gay Nineties, Old En- 
glish and Cartoon fonts. Additional fonts 
are available (see below). Disk only; OS9; 
$24.05. 

Cailigrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $ 1 4.0 5 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced- reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - (8 fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
way; Set #3 - (8 fonts) Antique and Busi- 
ness; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West and 
Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, He- 
brew and Victorian; Set #0 - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; speci- 
fy RSDOS or OS9; 20.05: Font Pack- 
age #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 
fonts) on one disk. Font Package #2 - 
Above font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on 
one disk. 

UTILITIES 

Auto Run 64 - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Utility to 
allow your own tape-based BASIC or ML 
programs to display a graphics title screen 
and then self-start after loading. Includes a 
graphics editor to create professional look- 
ing title screens. Tape only; 1 OK ECB; 
510.05. 

Piratector - (ioo% ML) Utility to allow 
your own disk-based BASIC or ML pro- 
grams to display a graphics title screen 
and then self-start after loading. Adds 
copy protection to your programs but still 
allows users to create non- executable back- 
ups! Includes Semigraf. Disk only; CoCo 
1, 2, 3 (except Semigraf); $30.05. 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



NEW U TRIG ATTACK t3 - (ioo% ml) In this educational game, enemy trigs with names 
like sine, cosine and tangent, travel along math curves. Players learn important mathematical 
concepts as they destroy the trigs with their rotating slope, Trig Attack is, filled with sound effects 
and colorful graphics. The game features 11 challenging levels and 7 different trig enemies. First class 
mathematical entertainment for ages 9 and up. Excellent manual includes an introduction, to 
trigonometry. Tane 18K CB/Disk 32K ECB: CoCo 1. 2. 3: $10.05. 



Semigraf Graphics Editor - (\oo% ML) 
Use 8 colors and standard text characters 
to draw graphics pictures and screens in 
high resolution semigraphics mode. In- 
cludes sample pictures. Tape/Disk; 16K 
CB; $10.95. 

Super Screen Machine - (ioo% ML) Put 
your CoCo into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML p rograms. S mooth 
scroll, key click, lower case with colored 
characters, many other features. 
Tape/Disk; 32K CB; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except 
64 K mode); $10.05. 

Color Disk Manager - (ioo% ML) Disk 
utility with these features: Disk repair, 
selective track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; CoCo 1, 2, 3 (except for 64 K 
mode); $24.05. 

Color Tape Manager - {\oo% ml) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert ML programs into BASIC DATA 
statements, append ML to BASIC, load, 
display /modify and save tape file, handles 
missing EOF and filename blocks, much 
more! Tape/Disk; 16KECB; CoCo 1, 2, 3 
(except for 6-iK mode); $10,05. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (Hybrid basic/ml) Tape or disk, 
fast and simple general data base program. 
Create files of records that can be quickly 
sorted, searched, deleted and updated. 
Powerful printer formatting. Up to 8 user 
fields, sort on up to 3 fields. Tape/Disk; 
$10.05 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Mail - (Hybrid basic/nil) Tape or 
Disk based mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 1, 
2 or 3 across, 2VS to 4 inches wide. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid basic/nil) Utility 
companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail to al- 
low multi-term search (AND and OR log- 
ic), global change and delete, split large 
files and more! Tape/Disk; $14.05 (see 
combo pkg below). 

TIMS Combo Package - All three of the 
above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail and 
TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.05. 

SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coach, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported, The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ball and Soccer. Disk only; $10.05 each. 



EDUCATIONAL 

Silly Syntax - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 5 and 
up. Story creation game; output to screen 
or printer; includes 2 stories or create your 
own. Tape/Disk; Si 0.0 5 or disk with 62 
stories for $20.05. Sets of 10 stories on 
tape/disk for $4,05: Fairy Tales, Current 
Events, X-Rated, Sing-Along, Adventure, 
Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
SV5IC/ML) Ages 4 & up. A graphics adven- 
ture game for young children & their fami- 
lies. Old testament. Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

The Presidents of the USA - (300% ML) 
Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, user 
modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $10.05. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 and up. Trivia 
game of the 50 states. Capitals, nick- 
names, abbreviations, flowers, trees and 
birds. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $19.05. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist to the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word, vo- 
cabulary. Tape/Disk; 1GK ECB; $10,95. 

PreReader - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 3-5 
(level I); Ages 5-7 (level 2); Great graphics 
and music. Level 1: match colors, shapes, 
letters and numbers; Level 2: match letters 
and consonant blends with their sounds. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $10*05. 

Statgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
print graph with screen print program 
(not supplied); Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output su pported. 28 ex- 
pense categories, This program may be lax 
deductible. Disk only: $20.05. 

Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations common- 
ly used in design or evaluation of land 
mobile radio systems, satellite TV, etc. 
Tape/Disk; $19.05. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set- in Sleeve; 3 weights 
or yarn; 8 sizes from baby to man. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

Flying Tigers - {m% ML) Fast Defenders 
style arcade game. 5 levels of difficulty; 
Great graphics and sound effects. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $10,05. 




RAINBOW 

C<N1lf€AT>ON 

HAL 













fix 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run <m the CoCo i, $ and $, 82K 
Extended Basic, unlet* otherwise noted. Add 
$1.50 per tape or disk for postage and handling. 
Florida residents add h% sales tax. COD orders 
add $4. Dealer inquiries invited. 



All Roads Lead to 

The CoCo SIG 



By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Editor 



What Does The 
CoCo SIG 
Look Like? 



Delphi Main Menu 



Groups and Clubs 



I 



The CoCo StQ Menu: 


Announcements 


Shopping Service 


Conference 


Topic Descriptions 


Dainbniot 


Who 3 Here 


EntryLog 


Workspace 


Forum IMosseges) 


"*I0 


MAIL (Electronic) 


Exit 


Member Directory 


DS9 Online 


Poll 


Ouestions & Fecobacf* 


Set Prcteionce* 


Rambow Magannp Services 



J- 



Oelebase Topics 

Conor allnlormalion 

CoCO 3 News « Information 

Sourco (Or 6609 Assemblers 

Ulthsei A Appt ications 

Hardware Hacking 

Gomes 

Graphics 

MuliC 4 Sound 

Into in Rainbow 

OS-9 

HELP 

Product Reviews & Announcements 
Aair»D»w On Tape 
Data Communications 



Oetebase Uanu: 

Directory oi Groups 

Read (and Download) 

Search (by keyword) 

Set Topic 

Submit 

Workspace 

Help 

Exit 



Workspace Menu-. 

APPEND 

CATALOG 

COPY 

CREATE 

CELETE 

DOWNLOAD 

EDIT 

EXIT 

HELP 

LIST 

PUBLISH 

PURGE 

ftENAME 

SETTINGS 

SUOMIT 

UNPROTECT 

UPLOAD 

XUPLOAO 

XDOWNLOAO 

KUPLOAD 

KOOWNLOAD 

HERMIT 



Prttertnce* Mtmr. 

NameChnngc 
Editor Preference 
Topic Selection 
Sellings (Profile) 
HELP 



Action U*nu. 

Next Group/File 
Download (Butter Capture) 
Xmodem Download 
Kormil Download 
List (Unformatted) 
Display (Word'wrappoO) 
Description ol Group 
Set Topic 
Help 
Exit 



Entry tog: 

Entry togtetiiyou wiien a given 
user was last online. Example 

tut rtARTTGOOOnrw 



Announcements Menu: 

Conlerencu News 
Oatabaj* Upo.ne 
Membership Notice 
User Board 
Wnat's New 
Shopping News 
Mam Banner 
Exit 



Member Directory Minu: 

I- Am 
VVho-ls 

list-Keywords 

drowse 

Search 

Help 

Exit 



Pott Menu; 

BROWSE Through Poll Results 

CREATE * New Poll 

EDIT Your Poll Comment 

LIST Poll Names 

RESULTS writ) Comments' 

VOTE ana Poll 

HELP 

EXIT 



M»lp(Hlnli) Menu: 

Same as ToPic* Menu 



Settings Menu: 

BUSY Mode 

DEFAULT-Menu 

DOWN LO AD-Line-Termmators 

ECHO-Mode 

EDITOR 

KERMIT-Settinga 

LENGTH (Linna/Pnoe) 

NETWORK-Paramoters 

PASSWORD (Change) 

PHOMPT-Modo 

SET High. Oil 

SLASH-Term-Selnngs 

TERMINAL-Type 

TIMEOUT 

UTILITIES 

WIDTH (Columns) 

XMODEM-Selimgs 

HELP 

EXIT 



Shopping Strvicos Menu; 

In.slruclions 
Product Listings 
Advertiser D .rectory 
Set Paymenl Mothod 
HELP 
EXIT 





Help (Hints) Menuttems: 


t) 


APPOINTMENT CALENDAR 


29) menus Can Be eliminated 


2) 


AUTO-HANGUP ON TELENET 


30) MORE' PROMPT CAN Bt ALTEREO 


3) 


CONFERENCE HINT 


31) NEW SIGWARE U/15.'86 


41 


CONFERENCE /DtR & /DISPLAY 


32) NO SUCH USEB 


SI 


CONTROL CODES 


33) PAGERS ARE TOO 1MPAT l£NT 


6) 


CONTROL-0 RESPONSIVENESS 


34) PROFILE NEEDED FROM YOU 1 


7> 


CONTROL-Z IS HANDY 


35) OUIT COMMAND IN FORUM 


B) 


DATABASE HINT. LEADING SPACES 


36) RAINBOW ON TAPE DATABASE 


9) 


DECEMBER OELPHI NEWSLETTER 


37) RAINBO WON TAPE DOWNLOADING 


tO) 
It) 


DEFAULTING INTO THE COCO SIG 


38) RAiNBOW ON TAPE CROERS 


DELPHI COMMAND CARD 


39) READING NONSTOPOVFR RANGE , 


1?) 


DISABLING CALL WAITING 


40) ROLL THEM BONES 


13) 


DOT COMMANDS IN FORJM 


41) SETTING SETTINGS 


14) 


ECHO CAUSES DOUQLE LETTERS 


42) SUBMITTING A FILE 


»5) 


EDIT MODE 


43) SURCHARGED FILES EXPLAINED 


1*1 


EDITOR PICK FROM TWO 


44) TELENET LOGON PROCEDURE 


17) 


EDM MAIL IN WORKSPACE DlR 


45) TIMEOUT CAN BE VARIED 


m 


ENT TO SEE LAST ENTRY 


46) TIP FOR PRINTOUTS 


59) 


FOLDERS ENHANCE MAIL FACILITY 


47i TO SKIP A SECTION 


20) 


FORUM CHANGES. 11/8/65 


48) TO STOP OUTPUT 


?t) 


FORUM CHANGES. 


49) THY/TIME 


7?) 


FORUM COMMAND LIST 


SO) USERNAME CAN BE CHANGED 


S3) 


FORUM ENHANCEMENT, 1/5/06 


51) USING THE MEMBER DIRECTORY 


?4) 


FORUM HELP 


S2) VOTE IN OUR POLLS 


25) 


GETTING INTO MAIL OUICKLY 


S3) WHEN YOU ARE PAGED 


m 


HANDLES ARE HANDY 


54) XMODEM DOWNLOADING 


}7) 


HELP tS ALWAYS AVAILABLE 


55) XMODEM UPLOADING 




HOW TO DOWNLOAD FILES 


56) YOUR OWN NAME NEEDED 



120 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Some of you may have been won- 
dering about recent changes in 
the opening banners for the CoCo 
and OS9 Online SIGs. Because of my 
ever-increasing duties here at RAl NBOW, 
and also because of the type of work 
Marty Goodman (martygoodman) 
has been doing in the CoCo SIG, Marty 
has officially been named SIGop of the 
CoCo SIG. For some time now Don 
Hutchison (DONHUTCHISON) has been 
doing quite a bit of work in the database 
areas and, therefore, when Marty was 
named SIGop, Don is placed in charge 
of the CoCo SIG databases. I will 
continue to write "Delphi Bureau" each 
month and serve as rainbow's "techni- 
cal liaison" to the CoCo SIG. However, 
to reflect the change in database man- 
agers, Don is also taking over Marty's 
duties in writing the Database Manag- 
er's report. 

In the OS9 Online SIG, Greg Law 
(GREGLAW) has been spending greater 
amounts of online time handling "staff" 
matters. At the same time, Dale Lear 
(DALELEAR) has found that he has been 
unable to be online as much as he would 



like due to work and family. To reflect 
this, Greg has been officially named the 
SIGop of the OS-9 Online SIG. Dale 
has agreed to stay with the SIG and, 
along with Rick Adams (RlCKADAMS), 
serve in the capacity of OS-9 Consul- 
tant. 

Jim Reed (JIMREED) remains the 
Group manager for both SIGs as well 
as r or the Aviation SIG recently formed 
for NEW pilot by Falsoft. 

These changes more accurately re- 
flect the work actually being done by the 
various staff members. We believe they 



are in the best interest of all concerned 
and believe you will agree. Please take 
a moment online to welcome these 
people to their new positions and show 
them your support. 

This month's "Delphi Bureau" will 
run rather short so that we can bring 
you the map of the CoCo SIG. Actually, 
we created this map for the "Intro to the 
Delphi SIGs" seminar at the recent 
Chicago RAINBOWfest. It seemed to 
be a great help to people there, so we 
decided to publish it here. 



DATABASE REPORT 



The latest Chicago RAINBOWfest 
was a huge success! 
Our Delphi booth was manned by 
Rusty Williams (rusty) of Delphi's 
marketing division and Marty Goodman 
(MARTYGOODMAN) from the SIGs. Vis- 
itors to RAINBOWfest noted that Marty 
added his usual color and pageantry to 
the booth, while Rusty provided a pro- 
fessional touch to the operation. Roger 
Bouchard (HARB1E), Steve Bjork 
(6809ER), Erik Gavriluk (ERlKGAV) and 



Greg Miller (gregmiller) also spent 
considerable time at the Delphi booth 
and helped to make it a success. 

Several CoCo SIG and OS-9 Online 
staff members contributed time, provid- 
ing online demonstrations to prospective 
Delphi members during the show. At 
various times, Rick Adams (RlCKA- 
DAMS), Greg Law (gregl), Richard 
Esposito (doctorascii) and 1, Don 
Hutchison (donhutchison), were f ound 
online from different areas of the country 



CM 

Uh 1r>s eeieflr-o* -1 you «*H » 




Topic Orecnplionr 

Fi'sl you *r* be prompted to' a 
50ec>l>c teprc Then you vwll t>e 
able to use (he toiloiyt' 1 ?! menu 
lo«bt;i,n mioftnauofi u b »'it \i\a\ 
JoprC 

SCAN raDie ot Coments 
REAB ItemCs] 
HELP <vnh Conmar.ds 
£XIT:o Previous .Menu 
N6XT l!«m 

BACK So Previous item 

clear 

DOWNLOAD itemts) 



Wha t Here: 

This selwctiOn will tell you wTlflt 
users art! currently .ivjuiobic in 
mo CoCo S'G 



OSS Online Menu: 

Annojnce»nerils 
Conference 
Onl.'itjnsiis 
Enl/ y Log 
Forum (Messages) 
MAIL (Elcclurnic! 
Member OircstOty 
Questions, <S Feedback 
Set Pfolefcntes 
Topic Derscnptiens 
Voting Boeth 
Who's Here 
Workspace 
Help 
Exit 

Portal to CoCo Sif, 
R;inH»ow Services 



Questions & Feedback Monti: 

FrtertbJck \o Sig S;;ill 
Retinas! fo< f tee UP loud TifiH.' 
Suggestion Box 
tfoiibli' Aepott 
Em 



Itnlnbow Mngmine Menu 

Annouiicefiienis 
As,k The 8xp,etts 
Address Change 
Lo!lc»s t» nambct'A- 

MAIL 

Order [lAiNFlGWlusI Tickets 

Sub&cnPtiOnS On- Litui 

Ventig Boosh 

Help 

E».i 



Conference Menu 1 

WrtO IfrSt groupst 
JOJNa Jj/Otip 
PAGE 4 us<Jr 
NAME nickname 
E>IT 



|| 



Matt: 

NO complete menu exist? )0r 
Mat) but >iVe<J bole* m« some 
ol tnv most used commands 

SEND .i Message 
PEA* a Massage 
DELETE In* Message Last Read 
FILE a Message in it Foldw 
DIRECTORY ot Messages 
SELECT a F Older 
FORWARD to Another User 
REPLY to J Mosvige 



Forum Menu: 

ADO New Message (iriroac) 

REPLY To Gu'TOnI Message 

HEAOMossiigcJs) 

FOLLOW Thread 

BACK To • ■ • •. oos Message 

directory oi Messages 

MAIL 

TAG Intetcsin-ig Message 
FILE Messao.e<n!o '.Ve<iis».aa? 
FORWARD Message bv Marl 
DEL.ETE Message 
EDIT ii c osted Message 
NEXT Messagt- 
TOPICS tS<st/Shew») 
hiGh Message- (Set/Showi 
HELP 
EXIT 



OS9 Online Toplcv 

Geni»f«j information 

Users Group 

App/ic;iben$ 

Utilities 

D(s«n:eDriveji 

P.itenes 

Telcorn 

Graphics 

Music 

Classic OS9 trton CoCoJ 
S4K-GS9 

BinnbOwOS-S Materia! 'i} 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 121 



demonstrating the instantaneous com- 
munications that Delphi offers. The 
conference area of the CoCo SIG fea- 
tured a nearly continuous online conver- 
sation entitled "Live from RA1NBOW- 
fest." Rick Adams amused the online 
crowd continuously by demonstrating 
the humorous macros he uses with Rick- 
eyterm, the CoCo 3 terminal program he 
authored. 

Other Delphi regulars present were 
Kevin Darling (KDARL1NG), Roy Cosby 
(uncle) and Art Flexser (artflexser). 
Of course, most of the rainbow staff was 
present, including Lonnie Falk (lfalk), 
Jim Reed (JIMREED), Dan Downard 
(dandownard) and Cray Augsburg 

(CRAY). 

OS-9 Online 

We are getting a good number of 
uploads, as more and more of our 
members acquire OS-9 Level II and begin 
to spend their time learning about it. 

In the General Information section of 
the OS-9 Online service, Bill Brady 
(wbrady) gave us a file called WI Z. PRD, 
which describes his new terminal pro- 
gram The Wiz, to be marketed by Frank 
Hogg. 

In the Utilities section, Dennis Weldy 
(OS9ER) gave us his BASIC09 alarm pro- 
gram. This utility will cause a beep after 
one minute. 

In the Patches topic area, Karl Quinn 
(qkq) sent us a file for fixing DynaCalc 
to eliminate two bugs in off-the-shelf OS- 
9 DynaCalc from Tandy. Bruce On- 
dersma (beo) sent us instructions on 
using Profile under Level II of OS-9. Jim 
Manning (J 1MBM) sent us a file describing 
how to patch your drives /DO and /Dl 
to use 40 tracks instead of 35 on OS-9 
Level II. 

In the Graphics area, Bob Montowski 

(GRAPHICSPUB) sent us his SHOW09 pro- 
gram set for viewing DS-69 16-level 
digitized pictures under OS-9 Level II on 
the CoCo 3. 

In the Telcom topic area, Randy Long- 
shore (randyf) provided us with the 
COM09 package. These files constitute a 
terminal package written in BAS1C09. It 
has many useful features, including a 
keystroke-multiplier file for automatic 
logins and automatic logging to disk for 
recording a conference session or saving 
messages from the Forum. It was written 
by Jason Shouler of the United Kingdom 
and is public domain software. 

The Users Group area enjoyed the 
most new additions, with 1 1 new submis- 
sions, due to the hard work of SysOp 
Greg Law; ACIA Mapin, a filter to 
change control strings from a terminal 
into corresponding ANSI strings; ACIA 
Mapout, an appendage for the ACIA 
driver to get control of ini t, read and 
write and pass them through ACIA to 
the physical device; Arc, an archive 
utility useful for backing up a hard disk 



to multiple floppies; XCOM9, a terminal 
program for OS-9 that supports Xmo- 
dem file transfers and has an extremely 
high throughput; Append and AP, file 
append utilities; Antenna, which designs 
amateur radio VHF long yagi antennas; 
Amort, which prints a complete amorti- 
zation schedule to screen or printer; 
Alias, which creates a program in the 
current execution directory with the 
name newname; Advent, which is an 
Adventure game for OS-9; and AD J, 
which limits maximum line length in a 
text file without splitting words. 

CoCo SIG 

In the General Information topic area, 
Marty Goodman posted a report on the 
1987 Chicago RAINBOWfest. David 
Kay (peashooter) furnished us with an 
amusing article concerning IBM compat- 
ibility. 

Medical articles increased this month, 
starting with CDC03CPR . BR5 by Dave 
Schaefer (daveschaefer). Joe Carney 
(joecarney) posted his response to 
Marty Goodman's article concerning the 
"war on drugs." Soon thereafter, Marty 
Goodman posted his reply to Joe Carney. 

In the Utilities section, Roger Krupski 
(HARDWAREHACK) provided us with 
ERRDRV.BIN, a utility for printing more 
descriptive error messages from BASIC. 
Charles Pippin (cwp) gave us his Check- 
pro program for keeping up with the 
monthly budget. Mike Fischer (M1KE88) 
gave us a nifty BBS cataloguer program 
for the CoCo 3, as well as a long list of 
his favorite BBSs. David Brown (NASAi) 
gave us 5CRDLL.BR5, an experimental 
program for scrolling messages across 
the screen of your CoCo 3, and David 
Ferreira (skeeve) posted his latest ver- 
sion of the OMGUTL programs. 

In the Hardware area, Marty Good- 
man posted an article on his favorite 
places to purchase chips. 

The Graphics section received a large 
number of new files. First, the "CoCo 
Galleries" for February and May 1987 
arrived. Of notable mention is the entry 
from the May issue entitled Seascape, 
drawn using CoCo BASIC by James Up- 
perman. It features an animated night 
scene of a man beside a fire at the beach. 
This picture is for the CoCo 3. 

David Brown gave us PRLETTE . BR5. 
Billy Hambric (SNOOPYDOG) gave us 
MRXHDRDM.PIX, a digitized picture from 
the Max Headroom show. This picture 
was used, in turn, by Erik Gavriluk to 
produce his Color Max Headroom dem- 
onstration program. Alan DeKok ( ALAN- 
dekok.) gave us his version of the Rock- 
fest 1+2 programs for the CoCo 3. Mike 
Fischer pleased us with his Spectrum 
BBS demo for the CoCo 3. This program 
features, among other things, a moving 
text display at the bottom of the screen. 
Along the same lines, Jim Sparks (ESCO 
man) gave us his BBS logo featuring an 



animated, old-fashioned buckboard 
wagon. 

For those interested in exercise, Rick 
Adams donated an interesting sight V 
sound Jumping Jacks program, which 
features a young woman performing her 
exercises in time with the background 
music. Bob Wharton (BOBWHARTON) 
sent us a great collection of Garfield 
pictures drawn for the CoCo 3. 

Greg Miller donated two utilities for 
use with Color Max 3 pictures: bsctool 
and Gallery. Gallery is a stand-alone 
program that lets you load and view 
Color Max 3 pictures, while BSCTOOL is 
a basic "tool"that allows you to load and 
view the pictures from within a BASIC 
program; it is intended to be used as a 
subroutine. Greg also generously gave us 
F4E.MGE, one of the first pictures ever 
drawn with Color Max 3. Drawn by Jeff 
Shane, it is a picture of a camouflaged jet 
fighter plane. 

In the Games topic area, Steven Macri 
(dracman) posted a revision to his 
popular Kelly checkers program. Daryl 
Kent (DJKENT) gave us his Color Kismet 
game, and Michael Brant (mbrant) 
favored us with a set of "chronology" 
files. While intended for use in a trivia 
game, these files also serve as an educa- 
tional aid for school children. 

In the Music topic area, we were 
extremely fortunate to receive 71 
Orchestra-90/ CC files from such notable 
contributors as Bryan Eggers (SOFTAF- 
FAlR), Jerry Bradshaw (JOB45), David 
Browder (dbrowder), Bill Teeters 
(clambake), Larry Wimble (theas- 
SEMBLER), Ron Cook (COOKY) and Gary 
McCarty (bandman). The files were 
transferred to us from the Tandy SIG 
following the acquisition of that SIG by 
Falsoft, Inc. 

Additionally, Marc Genois (marc- 
GENOis) favored us with a well-done 
collection of songs from the group Gene- 
sis, and Bill Starr (wstarr) provided us 
with five more Orchestra-90/ CC files: 
Ragtime Night, Spring Song, Cradle, 
Bossa Nova and Top Gun. 

The coming month on the CoCo SIG 
may see the publication of Version 2.0 of 
Rickeyterm, which will support the bit- 
banger serial port on the CoCo 3 at 300 
and 1200 baud. For sure, more 
Orchestra-90 music files are on the way. 

In the OS-9 SIG, members will con- 
tinue to see more of what will eventually 
become five megabytes of OS-9 Users 
Group files. The OS-9 Online staff is now 
hard at work creating this new topic area. 
Also, we are expecting a huge influx of 
files concerned with using and modifying 
OS-9 Level II, as more SIG members 
purchase it and begin to use it. See you 
online! 

— Don Hutchison 

Rainbow's Delphi Database Manager 



122 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



What you can and can't do 
with someone else's progra 



You Ve purchased a computer pro- 
gram on tape or disk, typed it in 
from THE rainbow, down- 
loaded it from a bulletin board, or 
borrowed it from a friend. Now you'd 
like to make copies of the program, alter 
it, send copies to your friends, or adapt 
certain subroutines or programming 
techniques for use in your own pro- 
grams. Under the copyright law, which 
of these things are you allowed to do? 

Copyright law, in a nutshell, provides 
that a person who owns the copyright 
of a computer program has the "exclu- 
sive" rights to copy the program, dis- 
tribute copies of the program or to 
make adaptations that are substantially 
similar to the program. Anyone else 
who copies or distributes copies of the 
program beyond the exceptions pro- 
vided in the copyright law infringes the 
copyright, unless the owner grants 
permission, which will usually be con- 
ditional upon payment of a royalty fee 
or purchase of an authorized copy of the 
program. 

I want to discuss the exceptions to 
this rule: the limited rights of the person 
who has a copy of a computer program 
to use the program, to sell or give away 
the copy, to make backup copies and 
adaptations, or to use the "idea" of the 
program. I will also consider programs 
that are in the public domain. 

Using the Computer Program 

If you obtained an authorized copy of 
thecomputer program f rom a magazine 
or a bulletin board, or by purchase, then 
you most certainly have the right to use 
the program — that is, to load it into 



Edward Samuels, a professor of law at 
New York Law School, has taught 
copyright and other legal subjects for 
more than 10 years. An avid reader of 
RAINBOW, Professor Samuels enjoys 
sharing his CoCo with his children, 8- 
year-old Richard and 4-year-old Claire. 



Who's 
Gonna 
Know? 

By 
Edward 

Samuels 



your CoCo and run it. By making the 
work available to you, the author has I 
granted you a license to use it for its 
intended purpose. 

If, however, you obtained an unau- 
thorized copy of a program — from a 
friend or from a bulletin board, or by 
purchase from someone who made an 
unauthorized copy — then there is no 
implied license from the copyright 
owner to use it. When you load the 
program into your CoCo to run it, you 
are making a further unauthorized copy 
and infringe the copyright owner's 
rights. 

Selling, Giving Away, or Lending Your 
Copy of the Program 

If you obtained an authorized copy of 
a program, you may clearly sell that 
particular copy or give it away to a 
friend. For example, if you buy a game 
contained in a ROM pack, or on a disk, 
and you want to give away that partic- 
ular ROM pack or disk, you may do so, 
and neither you nor your friend will 
infringe the copyright owner's copy- 
right. The legal principle that allows this 
is called the "first sale doctrine." The 
presumption is that the copyright owner 
was paid a royalty when the copy of the 
work was originally sold and is not 
entitled to a second payment for the 
resale of that particular copy. However, 
this theory would not allow you to make 
copies of the program to distribute to 
f riends, whether f or a f ee, f or f ree, or as 
part of a trade. Similarly, if you make 
a copy for yourself and give the original 
to a friend, the copy that you made is 
probably an infringing copy and sub- 
jects you to suit under the copyright act. 

Under the first sale doctrine, you are 
allowed to lend the authorized copy you 
obtained or to rent it out, as well as to 
sell it. This is what videotape stores are 
doing when they buy a popular video- 
tape and then rent it to others without 
paying any further royalty fees to the 
copyright owners. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 2 



Making Backup Copies and Adapta- 
tions 

Under a 1980 amendment to the 
copyright law, if you obtained an au- 
thorized copy of a copyrighted comput- 
er program, you are allowed to make 
another copy of that program "for 
archival purposes only." This means 
that you may make a backup of the 
program to use in case anything disas- 
trous should befall your original, but 
you may not distribute your backup 
copy to others. 

In addition, the 1980 amendment 
provides that you may make an adap- 
tation of the program "as an essential 
step in the utilization of the computer 
program in conjunction with a ma- 
chine" if the adaptation "is used in no 
other manner. " At the very least, this 
means that you may make minor mod- 
ifications to a program to make it run 
on your particular machine, with your 
particular configuration. For example, 
you may certainly delete the speed-up 
poke to make a program run on a CoCo 
that can't handle it or make minor 
alterations to make a CoCo 2 program 
run on your CoCo 3. Although argu- 
ments have been made that this right of 
adaptation can be fairly broad, I think 
that the intent of the amendment is 
fairly narrow, and the amendment 
should not be used as an excuse for 
making extensive alterations in a pro- 
gram to suit the whim of the user. 

If you make a backup of the program, 
you may sell the backup or give it away 
to others in conjunction with the sale or 
lease of the original from which you 
made the copy. However, if you adapted 
a program to make it work on your 
machine, you are theoretically not 
allowed to sell or give away that adap- 
tation when you dispose of the original 
program, except by permission of the 
copyright owner. 

Using the "Idea" of a Copyrighted 
Program 

If you write computer programs, you 
may well get some of your best ideas by 
studying programs written by others. In 
copyright law, under a principle known 
as the "idea-expression dichotomy," 
you are free to create programs that 
accomplish the same results as pro- 
grams you have studied, so long as you 
don't take so much of those programs 
as to constitute the "expression" of 
them. In practice, trying to distinguish 
between unprotected idea and protected 
expression is one of the most difficult 
problems in all of copyright law. 



In a 1986 case decided by a federal 
court of appeals, the court found copy- 
right infringement even though there 
was no verbatim copying, but only 
copying of "the structure, sequence and 
organization" of the files, screen out- 
puts and five particularly significant 
subroutines. The court emphasized that 
it takes a great deal of time to develop 
a sophisticated design of a computer 
program and that "the coding process 
is a comparatively small part of pro- 
gramming." This and other recent cases 
make it clear that the scope of copyright 
protection is broad and that even non- 
literal copying can infringe. To play it 
safe, you should try not to copy the 
structure, display or subroutines of 
copyrighted programs, particularly if 
you intend to sell your programs com- 
mercially. 

This discussion of the idea- 
expression dichotomy assumes you are 
copying a program you are able to view. 
If you play an arcade game without 
seeing the program listing, or merely 
read a description of a program, then 
you probably don't infringe the copy- 
right by making another program that 
accomplishes a similar result. Even if it 
should turn out that your program is 
similar, if you had no "access" to the 
original program — if you independ- 
ently created it without directly copying 
either particular coding or structure — 
then your work doesn't infringe. 

However, you should be aware that 
the audiovisual display, particularly of 
arcade games, may be separately pro- 
tected. For example, the pac-man char- 
acter is both copyrighted in its visual 
presentation and protected by a trade- 
mark in the particular name. You 
should not commercially use the PAC- 
MAN character, or mislead ingly use the 
PAC-MAN name, to describe your prod- 
uct. You may say your game plays like 
PAC-MAN, if that is a true statement, but 
you should not sell the program claim- 
ing that it is the PAC-MAN game. 

Using Public Domain Materials 

The discussion up to now has as- 
sumed that the computer program you 
intend to copy is copyrighted. However, 
this is not always the case; the program 
might be in the "public domain." If it 
is, you need have no fear of infringing 
the copyright in the work, because there 
is no copyright in a public domain 
work. You can make copies, adapt the 
program, or even incorporate it into 
your own programs, to your heart's 
content. You need not even give credit 



to the author of the program, although 
it is obviously more courteous to do so. 

Since so much depends upon whether 
the work is copyrighted or is in the 
public domain, it is obviously impor- 
tant to be able to tell the difference 
between a copyrighted program and a 
public domain program. Sometimes 
this is easy. If the program contains a 
copyright notice, in the form "Copy- 
right © 1987 by Edward Samuels," then 
someone claims copyright to it, and you 
are not free to make copies of the work 
except as already discussed. (For a 
magazine or ne wsletter, a general copy- 
right notice at the beginning of the issue, 
as is contained in all issues of THE 
RAINBOW, will protect all of the con- 
tents of the issue, including individual 
programs.) 

What if you don't find such a notice? 
I can think of several reasons why the 
lack of notice doesn't necessarily mean 
that the work is in the public domain. 
For example, if the copy you obtained 
was not authorized by the copyright 
owner, then the lack of notice has no 
effect in placing the work into the public 
domain. 

Another example is if the work is not 
"published." If a friend who wrote a 
program gives you a copy and asks for 
your comments, then the work is still 
protected by copyright, even though no 
notice appears on it. On the other hand, 
if the work was published by the author 
in a newsletter, or on a general bulletin 
board to which the public had access, 
or if the work was sold by the author 
to anyone who wanted a copy, then it 
would probably be considered to have 
been published, and lack of notice may 
place the work into the public domain. 

There are, however, some "savings" 
provisions in the copyright law that may 
still save the work from going into the 
public domain. For example, if the 
notice was omitted from "no more than 
a relatively small number of copies," 
then the copyright in the work will not 
have been lost. Also, if the author 
published the work and omitted notice 
inadvertently, then the author has five 
years to register the work with the 
copyright office and affix notice to all 
subsequently published copies, thereby 
saving the work from going into the 
public domain. 

As you may gather from this brief 
description, there are some cases in 
which it is practically impossible to 
ascertain whether a program that omits 
the copyright notice is in the public 
domain or is still subject to copyright, 



124 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



particularly within the first five years 
after publication of the work. If you 
plan to distribute copies of such a 
program commercially, you put your- 
self at risk if you do not or cannot 
contact the author to obtain permis- 
sion. However, if you rely upon the 
absence of notice on an authorized copy 
of the program, the recovery that a 
copyright owner will be able to obtain 
against you will be reduced, in some 
cases, to nothing at all. The result 
represents a compromise, on the one 
hand protecting copyright owners who 
may inadvertently omit notice from 
some copies, and on the other hand 
giving some protection to copyright 
users who may innocently infringe a 
work, not knowing that it is still subject 
to copyright. 

But Who's Gonna Know? 

Despite what I may say about what 
you are "allowed" to do and what you 
are "not allowed" to do, people do in 
fact copy computer programs. People 
share their copies with friends by ex- 
change, by gift, through computer clubs 
and through computer bulletin boards. 
What happens to them when they do so? 
Generally nothing. 

It is a criminal offense to infringe a 
copyright willfully and for purposes of 
commercial gain, so don't knowingly 
copy computer programs to sell them. 
The potential gain is not worth the risk, 
however small, of getting convicted, 
fined and jailed. But even if you do copy 
to exchange or give away software, 
there is the possibility that you can, and 
may, be sued by the copyright owner. 



As a lawyer, I have to point out that 
if you infringe, you may be liable for 
"statutory damages," that is, between 
$250 and $10,000, even if the copyright 
owner cannot prove specific injury, and 
even if you have made no profit from 
your infringement. If you have in- 
fringed "willfully," the judge may grant 
damages up to $50,000. 

Some companies adopt copy- 
protection schemes that are supposed to 
prevent, or at least reduce, unauthor- 
ized copying. Do you infringe the copy- 
right if you "break" the protection 
scheme to make a copy? Presumably so, 
since you clearly make an unauthorized 
copy, and you may even create a "de- 
rivative work" that omits the copy- 
protection scheme from your copy of 
the work. Some people argue that this 
activity is authorized by the 1980 
amendment to the copyright act if you 
use the copy "for archival purposes 
only," but you certainly infringe if you 
distribute the copy or use it in any other 
way than as a backup. 

Some software companies print 
"software license agreements" in their 
documentation, describing what the 
user may or may not do with the pro- 
gram. There is some debate as to 
whether these so-called agreements 
have any validity. Under traditional 
principles of contract law, an "agree- 
ment" requires the knowing consent of 
both parties. Conditions that are not 
disclosed until after the purchaser buys 
the product are not knowingly con- 
sented to. Some states have passed laws 
that specifically approve such software 
license agreements. However, I remain 
skeptical about the validity of such laws 



and such agreements, particularly to the 
extent that they may exceed the rights 
already allowed under the copyright 
law. Of course, the copyright law is still 
applicable. 

I'm afraid I don't have the ultimate 
answer to the computer copyright di- 
lemma. Computer programs sometimes 
cost a lot of money to develop, but a 
user can usually, with little or no diffi- 
culty, make an unauthorized copy. If 
too many users make their own copies, 
the programmer's profits are undercut, 
and the programmer is less likely to 
make the effort to develop programs in 
the future. I can only add my voice to 
those who have urged that we must 
respect the rights of copyright owners. 
Otherwise, we will put more good 
programmers out of business and ulti- 
mately have fewer quality programs. 
OK, make your backup copies. But 
please, don't copy programs for others 
— even if you think it unlikely you'll get 
caught — because doing so will destroy 
something that is valuable to all of us! 

( Questions about this article and the 
companion article, "Computer Pro- 
gram Copyrights: A How-to Guide," 
published in the April 1987 issue of THE 
RAINBOW, may be addressed to Prof 
Samuels at New York Law School, 57 
Worth Street, New York, NY 10013. 
Although he is interested in discussing 
copyright matters of general interest to 
computer programmers and users, he is 
not currently engaged in the practice. of 
law and will not give specific legal 
advice. If you have a serious copyright 
problem, you should consult an attor- 
ney who specializes in the field.) /Rn 





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July 1987 THE RAINBOW 125 



DOCTOR ASCII 



What's the Address? 



By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 



How can I find the starting,, ending 
] and execution addresses of a tape 
machine language program? 

Larry Vorhee 
Laurel, MD 



Ty To find the start address, use 
A 7£PEEK(4B7)*2S6+PEEK(488). To 
find the end address, use PEEK 
(12G)*25G+PEEK(127) -1. To find 
the EXEC address, use PEEK (157)* 
25G+PEEK(15B). 

MC-10 Defended 

Regarding my letter to you in your 
April 1987 column: I agree with you 
that the MC-10 owners' best choice 
is to upgrade to a CoCo 3, but there are 
many out there who cannot (or will not ) 




Richard Esposito (left) is a senior 
project engineer with Northrop Corp. 
He holds bachelor's, master's and doc- 
torate degrees from Polytechnic Insti- 
tute of Brooklyn. He has been writing 
about microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 

126 THE RAINBOW July 1987 




do so, and 1 appreciate your allowing 
me the chance to share what informa- 
tion we have with them. 

Larry Allen 
Owensville, IN 



I see what you mean (see next 
letter). 

The Controversy Continues 



Here we go again. Your comment to 
Larry Allen (April, 1987) was com- 
pletely unnecessary. It's an insult to 
listen to you "pros " condemn and judge 
the MC-10. Unless you used one, you 
wouldn't know that it has 192-by-l 28, 
four-color graphics, the enhanced 
ROM, RAM disk capabilities, and an 
outstanding 80-column word processor. 



At a recent Co Co show in Spokane, it 
was the MC-10 that got the publicity, 
not the CoCo. You might not be aware 
of this, but when you advise someone 
to dump their MC-10 for a CoCo 3, you 
are giving them very bad advice. Drives, 
multipacks, OS-9 Speech Paks, modem 
packs, cables and an RGB A Composite 
monitor cost more than many people 
can afford. I try to help tape users 
through your magazine because 1 was a 
frustrated Co Co user for two years. The 
CoCo 3 is extremely touchy and is filled 
with "bugs. " You should report the 
HPRINT, EDIT, LIST, LPOKE, LPEEK and 
Hi-Res screen bugs. Maybe you don't 
do enough programming to experience 
lost programs and crashed disks. Now 
the cure is to patch the CoCo 3 's ROM 
and LOflDM DOS on power up. The 
CoCo isn't an Atari or Apple, and 
LOflDMwg DOS is inexcusable! At this 
time I have given up all work on the 
CoCo 3 and am concentrating whole- 
heartedly on my Atari XL (which, by 
the way, is a super computer) and my 
CoCo 2 and MC-10. If it came down to 
brass tracks, I'd sell all my CoCo hard- 
ware/software and buy a J 040 ST with 
which the CoCo can never compete. Try 
accessing a BBS with an ST running it! 
Don 7 condemn my XL because the 
CoCo will never have its software; 
Koronis Rift and Rescue on Fractulus 
are old games I've had for two years! 
Have you checked the specs on the Atari 
PC? Have you heard of the BLITTER 
chip in the ST's 32000-by-32000 resolu- 
tion? Atari execs never lost one minute 
of sleep over the CoCo 3. 

Jay Thomas 
Great Falls, MT 




Apparently, Larry Allen disagrees 
with you (see his letter above). I 
still stand by my recommendation: 
Don't waste money upgrading an "or- 
phan" computer of which the MC-10 is 
one. Everything you mentioned — 
drives, multipacks, OS-9 Speech Paks, 
cables, and RGBA monitors — are 
optional. The CoCo 3 works fine with 
tape. A stock, out-of-the~box CoCo 3 
will blow away an MC-iO, an Atari XL, 
an Apple II /e or any other eight-bit 
micro on the market. In fact, in some 
ways the CoCo 3 is even superior to 
IBM PCs, Atari STs and Amigas. It has 
a far superior operating system. IBM 
liked it so much that they are cloning 
it for their new Personal System 2. If 
you don't believe me, compare the 
specs: multitasking, multiuser, win- 
dows, UNIXlike — sound familiar? 
This isn't the first time IBM cloned 
CoCo software, IBM's BASICA has its 
roots in Extended Color BASIC. The ST 
is a nice piece of hardware, but it's 
saddled with TOS. The AMIGA is 
stuck with Amiga DOS. Sure, there are 
some OS-9 ports to these machines, but 
the CoCo 3 is the only one of the bunch 
with an OS-9 that is officially supported 
by its manufacturer. 

Why is it OK to have to load a DOS 
into other machines but not the CoCo? 
Notthatyou needto;Disk BASIC 1.1 has 
been around for quite a while, and it is 
the same DOS used with the CoCo 3, 
Sloppy programming can get you into 
trouble quicker on the CoCo 3 than 
with the CoCos 1 and 2 because with it, 
BASIC is in RAM and you can modify 
this code, either intentionally or by 
mistake, 



CoCo 3 Pascal 

/ have a CoCo 3 and want to know 
if it is possible to get the DEFT 
Pascal Compiler and DEFT Linker 
to work with it. Programs that I created 
using my CoCo 2, which worked just 
fine, now result in a screen full of errors 
on my 3, Everything works until I try 
to link a program. Can you tell me if a 
new version will be available for the new 
CoCo and how much it will cost? 



Joe S, A Iderman 

(JSA) 

Newington, CT 




DEFT Systems, at this writing, 
has not yet announced a CoCo 3 



version, and copy protection increases 
the problem of patching the old version; 
however, the PASCAL of choice on the 
CoCo 3 will be the OS-9 version, for the 
CoCo 3 was designed specifically with 
that OS in mind (128K to 5I2K, 80- 
column display). 

Ink Jet Graphics 

/ have an Olivetti PR2300 Ink Jet 
Printer that presents a problem. 
When I wrote a small screen 
dump program and used it with my 
printer, the pictures came out with 32 
vertical bars over them. I believe they 
are a type of binary code to identify the 
character as a number or as a letter for 
the device. I have had this problem for 
a year now and would appreciate any 
help you can give, 

Rick Hamilton 
Jacksonville, FL 

|/ The only explanation I can offer 
jL for this phenomenon, since I do 
not have access to such a printer and 
you supplied neither copies of the code 
nor the documentation^ is that some- 
how not enough graphics information is 
being sent by your program to be pro- 
cessed by the printer. I base this on the 
fact that there are 32 bytes per line of 
graphics information, and there are 32 
bars being printed by your printer, I 
assume your program has three loops 
where loop one controls the number of 
times looptwo is executed to process an 
entire screen in steps of L. Loop two 
loops from lines L through L+N-l 
where L is the starting line of a partic- 
ular sweep and N is the number of pins 
or jets on your print head that are used 
for bit image graphics. Loop three 
extracts the appropriate bit from each 
of the N lines and fills a byte(s) to be 
passed to the printer. In this third loop 
is where I suspect that you are not 
supplying the value for the final bit of 
each byte. 

Beginning With Assembly Language 

/ have been using a spreadsheet 
program for home management pur- 
poses. It is not a commercial version 
and is written in BASIC. When I first 
began using it, I realized it had many 
shortcomings, all of which I have over- 
come except one; it is horrendously 
slow. Interpretation and manipulation 
of the cells require a lot of string oper- 
ations. With the additions I have made, 
mostly in the size of the spreadsheet, 




execution time is greatly increased. The 
obvious solution was to rewrite the 
program in assembly language. Every- 
thing progressed well until I got to the 
arithmetic. My programming so far has 
only dealt with integers; now I am 
confronted with fractions. If I under- 
stand my texts, fractions must be dealt 
with in floating point notation. William 
Barden recommends his book Micro- 
computer Math in Color Computer 
Assembly Language Programming, but 
I have not been able to find it anywhere. 
Surprisingly, Ltnce LeventhaVs 6809 
Assembly Language Programming does 
not even mention floating point nota- 
tion or fractions. The only information 
I have gotten so far explains what 
floating point notation is, nothing 
more, I understand what it is, I just 
don't understand how to use it. My 
question is this: Where do I start? 

Curt Roberts 
Prospect, KY 

The MC6809, like most micro- 
processors, including the 8088 
and the 80286 used in IBM's PC-XT 
and PC-AT, does not have any direct 
floating point capabilities. Floating 
point arithmetic must be done via 
subroutines. You can get help on this by 
disassembling some of the CoCo's 
ROM routines. The CoCo uses two 
floating point accumulators for BASIC: 
FPAC1, exponent at 54 F, mantissa at 
$50 - $53, sign at $54. The correspond- 
ing addresses for FPAC2 are $5C, $5D 
- $60, and $61. The following ROM 
routines should be of interest; subtract 
at $B9B9 s add at SB9C2, multiply at 
SBACA and divide at $BB8F. 

Getting the Sign-On Screen 



When I load DOS I.I over the top 
of my DOS 1.0 on my CoCo 3, I get 
all the commands but I don't get the 
sign-on screen for the CoCo 3. How can 
I get the sign-on screen? 

Carl Lulz 

(CARLLVTZ) 
Jacksonville, NC 

Assuming that you correctly 
patched all of the hooks whenyou 
loaded it in, just type EXEC S.HC000. 



Romfix Problems 

/ now have a CoCo 3 and have found 
that your program from HOT CoCo 
magazine called Romfix doesn't 
work on the CoCo 3, What patch or 




July 1987 THE RAINBOW 127 



patches do I need to make it work? Any 
help would be greatly appreciated. 

Jim Shoop 

(BAZAR) 

Salt Lake City, UT 

Ty Tandy did not follow their own 
/C rules with some of their ROM 
packs. Some ROM packs that have 
been fixed with Romfix do indeed run 
on the CoCo 3. 

Boot's Hidden Code 

II read with great interest David 
Johnson 's letter regarding the boot 
program. I have (and use) the same 
program myself and have yet to chase 



it all down. A machine language pro- 
gram does in fact exist, but as far as I 
can tell, it is inherent in the Disk BASIC 
operating system. If you run the pro- 
gram exactly as it is written (lines 10- 
90) on a newly powered up machine, 
you will get 16 lines of directory listing, 
which you may scroll up and can select 
and run any program with the push of 
a button! My guess is that this is some- 
thing that Microsoft left in the coding. 
If you can find out anything else on this, 
please let me know because I'm baffled 
myself! 

Mark G. Miller 

(MGM1LLER) 

San Leandro, CA 



There is hidden code, but it's right 
/C. in front of your eyes, a very clever 
machine language program embedded 
in the tokenized BASIC commands by 
the author Marty Goodman. This code 
that is buried inside the BOOT. BPS 
program is what provides the up/ down 
scroll for the directory display. Conse- 
quently, if the code is not typed exactly 
as it was originally written, it will not 
work. Jerry Dill of Fabyan, Conn., 
reports that David Johnson's version 
contained a typo. Line 20 should read: 

20 A = PEEK(&H1B)*256+PEEI< 
(&H1CJ-G 

He added that lines 30 to 70 can be left 
out if desired. 




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A Problem Drive 

I own an FD500 disk drive that is 
constantly needing realignment. 
Would you have any ideas why? 
Also, is there any product available 
that will allow me to perform my 
own alignments? 

Timothy Volk 

(TRV) 

Aiken, SC 

You must have one of the old 
A > "problem" TEK drives. The 
program Memory Minder and the 
necessary precision alignment disk 
are both marketed by J&M system, 
(505) 292-4182. 

For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, 
at the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
ASK for "Ask the Experts" to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete 
instructions. 




128 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Discover the Benefits of Customizing/ SpectroSy stems 138 

Backup and Backup III 

Promising CoCo Ut i I \t\es/Brainchild Software 142 

Checkbook III 

Track Your Money Quickly and Efficiently/S£C>A 133 

Checkerboard Filesort 

Organizes Cassette-Based Systems/Se/byfe Software 137 

Disk Manager 

Helps Control and Modify Files/ Bangert Software Systems 140 

A Guide to CoCo 3 Basics and Graphics 

Help With Expanded Graphics Capabilities//Woreton Bay Software 136 

Mapper 

A Dynamite Debugging Tool/C/WD Micro Computer Services 132 

Multi-Label III 

Produces Professional Mailing Labels/G/'/rz/r/esoff 135 

RGB Patch 

Brings Artifact Colors to L\\e/Spectrum Projects, Inc 142 

Title 

Lets You Design Title Screens/S. Erickson Software 140 

Ultra Editor 

A Timesaver for Programmers/C/WD Micro Computer Services 139 

Spectrum DOS 

A Bag Full of Treats for the CoCo/Spectrum Projects, Inc 134 



FOR DELIVERY IN AUGUST, 1987 



he 

Complete 
Rainbow Guide 

to OS-9 
Level 




Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble have doneitagain! They've been busy pulling apart, examining 
and testing the new OS-9 Level II. Find out what they've discovered with The Complete Rainbow Guide 
to OS-9 Level II. 

The manual that accompanies OS-9 Level 1 1 is nearly 3 inches thick! That's a lot of material to digest. 
Cut through the confusion, and let the Puckett-Dibble team uncover the mysteries of OS-9 for you. 

This easy-to-follow book will lead you step by step through the sophisticated new operating system 
for the Color Computer 3. Clear, precise text, insightful examples and helpful tips make The Complete 
Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II the definitive resource for OS-9 Level II. 

Get Yours for Only $19.95! 

This book will only be sold by an advance order. 
We will only print sufficient copies to cover the orders on hand. 

ALSO AVAILABLE - The Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II Disk 

An adjunct and complement to the book. You'll want the book for the tutorials and the disk to save 
the many hours of typing in lengthy programs. Disk $19.95 

□ Please send me The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II for $19.95* 

□ Please send me The Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II Disk for $19.95* (Does not include book) 

Name „ 

Address a 

City : 



State 



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□ Payment enclosed or Charge my: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account No. Exp. Date 

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Mail to: The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries, 
call (502) 228-4492 

*Add $1.50 per book shipping and handling in U.S. Outside U.S. add $4 per book. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. Ky. residents add 5% sales tax. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. All orders in U.S. funds 
only, please. 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corporation. 



RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



The following products have recently been received by THE RAIN BOW, 
examined by our magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow Seal of 
Certification, your assurance that we have seen the product and have 
ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 

This month the Seal of Certification has been issued to; 



Better Graphics on Your CoCo 3, a guide 
to using the expanded capabilities of the 
CoCo 3. Topics include memory manage- 
ment, new graphics modes, moving video 
memory and adding animation to graphics. 
The package also includes two disks con- 
taining the BASIC routines discussed. For the 
CoCo 3. Morelon Bay Software, 316 Cas- 
tillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 
962-3127. $24.95 plus $2 SI H. 

Bug Buster, a 32K Hi-Res game that frees 
the various parts of your computer system 
from the dreaded "computer bugs." For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3 with a disk drive and one 
joystick. Tot hi an Software, Inc., Box 663, 
Rimer sburg, PA 16248; $19.95. 

Caladuril Flame of Light, a 64K. graphics 
Adventure game that lets you use the arrow 
keys to scroll your player around the coun- 
tryside. Features include listing the current 
inventory on the right side of the screen, 
displaying the names of objects on the screen 
and the use of full sentence commands. For 
the CoCo I, 2 and 3. Diecom Products, Inc., 
6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, Canada 
L9T 2X8; (416) 878-8358, $38.95 U.S., 
$52.95 Cdn. 



The Crossword Puzzler, a 32K program 
featuring a collection of puzzles. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Dellray Software Com- 
pany, 360 North San Antonio Avenue, Suite 
#/, Up/and, CA 91786; (7 14) 985-0026. 

DYPRINT, a collection of programs that 
allows graphics pictures and banners to be 
printed sideways. Banner prints banners and 
continuous signs in four sizes. MaxPrinl 
prints any PflODE 4 graphics picture up to 
eight pages. For the CoCo I, 2 and 3. 
Dynamic Electronics, Inc., P.O. Box 896, 
Hartselle, AL 35640; (205) 773-2758, $19.95 
plus $2 SI H. 



Gates of Delirium, a 64K game that lets you 
travel through towns and explore strange 
lands in a fantasy role-playing game. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Diecom Products, Inc., 
6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, Canada 
L9T 2X8; (416) 878-8358, $38.95 U.S.; 
$52.95 Cdn. 

Lansford Mansion, a 64K graphics Adven- 
ture. The secret to the knowledge and wealth 
of Robert Lansford lies hidden in and 
around his mansion. Avoid the traps that 
have guarded the treasures for years as you 
face the challenge of solving the puzzle. For 
the CoCo 1 , 2 and 3. Diecom Products, Inc., 
6715 Fifth Line, Milton, Ontario, Canada 
L9T 2X8; (416) 878-8358, $38.95 U.S.; 
$52.95 Cdn. 1 

Master Disk, a 32K cataloging program for 
your collection of disks. Catalog up to 250 
program names in each directory and up to 
18 different directories. For the CoCo I, 2 
and 3. Bob's Software, P.O. Box 391, 
Cleveland, OH 44107; (216) 871-8858, $15 
plus $2.50 SI H. 

Mini Ledger, a 32K accounting program 
that allows the user to keep a general ledger 
for home or business. For the CoCo 1 , 2 and 
3. Drayon Software, P.O. Box 2516, Ren- 
ton, WA 98056; $6. 

Restorit and Scan, two utility programs for 
the Color Computer. Restorit restores a 
BASIC program lost to an I/O Error. Scan 
lets you scan any program for ASCII char- 
acters that may be helpful while playing an 
Ad venture game. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 
Semmesqfl, Inc., 10 Slrawhal Road, tt2A, 
Owings Mills, M D 21 1 17; $2 1 .95. 

Rickeyterm 2.0, a commercial edition of the 
popular shareware terminal program. For 
the CoCo 3. Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. 
Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 11414; (718) 
835-1344. $39.95 plus $3 S/ H. 



S.B. Inventory III, a 1 28 K program de- 
signed for small-business inventory control. 
For the CoCo 3. SEC A, P.O. Box 3134, 
Gulfport, MS 39505; (601)832-8236. 

Sixdrive, a machine language DOS utility 
that modifies Disk Extended BASIC 1.0, 1.1 
or FKEYS 111 to allow the use of three 
double-sided drives. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 
3. Gimme soft, 4 Hallfield Court, Baltimore, 
MD 21236; (301) 256-7558, $16.95; with 
FKEYS III, $12.95. 

Stock Market Portfolio, an investment 
program that lets you keep track of stocks, 
profits, losses and dividends. For the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3. Paparis Enterprises, Inc., 700 
Young Street, Williamsburg, VA 23185, $22 
plus $3 S/H. 

Vegas Slots, a 128K package that features 
seven different slot machine games: three 
one-line multipliers, two three-line pays and 
two five-line pays. For the CoCo 3. Tom 
Mix Software, 4285 Bradford NE, Grand 
Rapids, Ml 49506; (616) 957-0444. $34.95. 

Video Draw Poker, a 32K ECB program 
that simulates some of the casino video draw 
poker slot machines. For the CoCo 1 , 2 and 
3. Prometheus, 1 4684 Joshua Tree Avenue, 
Moreno Valley, CA 92388; (213) 606-1021, 
$15. 

The Seal of Certification program is open to 
all manufacturers of products for the Tandy 
Color Computer, regardless of whether they 
advertise in THE rainbow. 
By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies 
the product does exist — that we have 
examined it and have a sample copy — but 
this does not constitute any guarantee of 
satisfaction. As soon as possible, these 
hardware or software items will be 
forwarded to the rainbow reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 131 



Software Review* 



Mapper — 
A Dynamite 
Debugging Tool 



Here is a fine utility f or CoCo programmers. Mapper is 
a machine language cross-reference tool for BASIC pro- 
grams. It will generate listings to screen or printer of all line 
number references like GOTO, G05UB, THEN and ELSE 
commands. It also generates listings for variable occurren- 
ces. The output to screen or printer is formatted and fills 
the screen or printer one page at a time. All you need is 
a minimum of 16K and any level of BASIC. The program 
is simple to use. Just LOflDM "MRPPER" and type EXEC. You 
are greeted with a title page with credits and asked for a 
title to use for printer output. If you don't have a printer 
or don't want a hard-copy printout, just press ENTER. A 
second screen appears with the menu of options. 

The first thing you will want to do is make a backup copy 
of the program for your protection. Instructions are 
provided for both tape and disk systems. 

Once the BASIC program has been loaded, call Mapper 
by typing EXEC and pressing ENTER. Then it's a simple 
matter of choosing any of the menu options to locate the 
commands, variables or cross-referenced line numbers that 
you are looking for. It's a dynamite debugging tool! 



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Kellynews is now available and contains news, 
hints, programs and articles from the crew at Kelly 

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Another nice feature is a built-in screen dump option. By 
pressing the SHIFT and @ keys, the information displayed 
on the screen goes to the printer. This is useful when you 
don't want or need the entire listing. 

The menu includes five options. The first, Occurrence 
Count, scans the program in memory for all the variables 
and then lists them in the order of their frequency. The 
listing is shown in two parts — simple and array-type 
variables. This feature is really valuable for programmers 
since it not only shows all of the variables used, but you 
can speed up program operation if you initialize variables 
in the order in which they are used most. 

Option 2, Line-X-Reference, scans the program for all 
line number references appearing after a GOTO, GDSLIB, THEN 
or ELSE. The output shows the line numbers in the left 
column, and the numbers in the right columns are those that 
reference that line. This can be invaluable and very time 
saving in debugging and modifying programs. 

The next option, Variable-X-Reference, scans the 
program for all the variables used and then lists them in 
alphabetical order with the line numbers they appear in. 
Four categories are shown: Numeric, String, Numeric 
Arrays and String Arrays. Imagine how easily you can 
locate and modify variables scattered throughout a large 
BASIC program! 

Option 4 is the Command Reference. Here you can type 
in the command or string you want to find. All of the line 
numbers that it occurs in will be listed. This is a very 
powerful option and one that debuggers will love. 

The last option, Exit to Basic, lets you select when you 
are ready to load your BASIC program for debugging or to 
use BASIC to test your program. Re-enter Mapper at any 
time by typing EXEC. 

I found Mapper to be an excellent utility and one that 
any CoCo user will get a lot of benefit from. It's easy to 
use and user-friendly, typical of other programs from Bob 
van der Poel. In my opinion Mapper represents another hit. 
The price is right and you will be delighted to see what it 
can do! 

(CMD Micro Computer Services, LTD., 10447 124th St., 
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6M 1E1; 403-488-7109, 
$14.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



One-Liner Contest Winner ... 

A few minutes' study on this one is all it takes to see 
that trigonometry can actually be interesting (some- 
times) and useful when programming graphics. 

The listing: 

1J3 PMODE3 , 1 : SCREEN 1 , j(3 : PCLS : B=RND 
('10) :C=RND(lj3) :D=RND(6j3) : FORA=j3 
TO 36j3 STEP 2 : TH=A/D: X=125+9j3*SI 
N(TH*B) : Y=lj3j3+9j3*COS (TH*C) : FCOL= 
RND(3)+l:COLOR FCOL, 1 : LINE- (X, Y) 
,PSET: NEXT: RUN 

Bernard Florence 
Croyden, NSW, Australia 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The Third 
Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



132 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Software Review 



Checkbook III Helps Battle 
the Big Bank Blues 



Checkbook III is a program aimed at tracking money 
quickly and efficiently. It is designed to help you manage 
your checkbook, from daily transactions right through the 
monthly balancing act when your statement arrives. To run 
this program, you need a CoCo 3, at least one disk drive, 
and, to utilize the program's complete potential, a printer. 

What the program does is deceptively simple: You enter 
checks, deposits and withdrawals; it tells you your balance. 
It stores that information on a disk and lets you look it over 
later. But the program does far more than that. It also lets 
you define up to nine expense areas, and keeps track of all 
expenses incurred in each area. It displays information in 
a variety of ways, allowing you to view only the data you 
need to see - or all of it ? if you want. 

When r unning Checkbook III for the very first time, you 
are prompted for some basic information on your account: 
name, beginning balance, date opened, and account 
number. Here, I discovered one of only two minor flaws in 
the program. The account number is stored in a numeric 
variable, as opposed to a string variable. Thus, if your 
account number is longer than eight digits, it appears as an 
exponential equation; my account number is 10 digits long 
(1505504351), but it appears in the file as 15055043EI0. 

After the account number prompt, you are asked to 
define up to nine different expense categories. You may use 
as many (or few) as you like. This feature is designed to help 
track expenses like rent, groceries, etc. I could have used 
more than nine categories (1 tend to get very detailed in this 
sort of thing), but nine is more than adequate for the average 
person. All the data you enter is written on your disk, and 
you are now ready to enter checking account transactions. 

The main menu gives a variety of options for entering, 
correcting and viewing account transactions. Your options 
key off five different types of transactions: checks, ATM 
withdrawls, deposits, interest earned and service charges. 
You can select any of the above for entering, correcting and 
viewing. In addition, you can also view all transactions on 
the account within a selected time frame, as well. 

Anything you can view on screen is supported in the print 
menu, too, But here is the second minor problem. The 
program uses the faster clock speed of the CoCo 3 for 
everything except disk I/O. This makes all functions run 
very fast — including print. If you use the standard 600 baud 
printer rate, the data will be coming out the serial port at 
[200 baud (thanks to the speed-up poke). I spoke with 
Darryl Hawkins, president of SECA, and he tells me there 
is a version of the program in development that allow users 
to select their own baud rate within the program. Here is 
the fix to get the old version to run with your printer: 



Insert PDKE150 ,„v.v at beginning of Line 230 
(xx is the baud rate you use). 

Insert PDKE6549S , 8 just before the RETURN statement 
in lines 3400 and 3410. 



Another nice thing about this program is that it makes 
extensive use of the CoCo 3's new features — without trying 
to squeeze an example of each into the program. The new 
□N BRK GOTO function is utilized as the way out of any 
selected function. The screen is a very pleasant white with 
blue lettering, and features the inverse and blinking text 
when telling you how to proceed. The two function keys 
are used in various places to select options (most notably, 
in the printer routines). 

Normally, I don't like to suggest editing commercial 
products. I will make an exception in this case. I feel that 
the program has enough merit to justify the little bit of fine 
tuning you need to do. I am also encouraged that Mr. 
Hawkins has the program s author, B.J. Anderson, working 
on improving an already excellent piece of work. 

In short, if you are looking for a financial guru to make 
you fabulously wealthy, keep looking. If you need a good 
program to help you understand what the bank hath 
wrought on your checkbook, and to help you keep track 
of where that hard-earned paycheck goes, I don't think you 
could do much better than this. The price and features make 
this program a very good buy. 



(SECA, P.O.Box 3134, Giaifport MS, 39505; 601-832-8236; 
$19.98 plus $3 S/H) 



— D.A. Ferreira 




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July 1987 THE RAINBOW 133 



Software Revlew^^^^^^^^^^^^^S/^\ 

Spectrum DOS — 
A Bag Full of Treats 
for the CoCo 

(This program was originally reviewed in the August J 984 
issue of THE RAINBOW, but we're taking this ''second look" 
for the benefit of new readers.) 

There have been a number of attempts to add features 
to the CoCo in the form of a modified or replaced operating 
system. I tried a few of the earliest ones, but I always ended 
up back with my own collection of programs and patches 
to correct various deficiencies. With the possible exception 
of a system or two where I have 10-Meg disks operating, 
Spectrum DOS could supply all the things I feel were 
lacking in the CoCo. These include a built-in Hi-Res screen, 
error trapping, reset trapping, access to double-sided disks 
and more tracks per disk. This is just the beginning of the 
list of goodies offered. 

Spectrum DOS has gone a long way beyond putting 
together some of my early most desperate needs into one 
package. How many times have you typed NEW and 
immediately regretted it? Well, now there is Did, and you 
have that destroyed program right back. How about those 
several long lines of pokes that have the wrong line number 
on them? No problem, Spectrum DOS will let you move 
them to the correct line (LMove feature) or simply copy 
them to another spot where they are needed (LCopy, which 
is non-destructive). 

There are many such programmer aids. For example, 
PPeek and PPoke deal with the full, 16-bit value you 
generally want to deal with in peeking and poking. FKey 
lets you easily define keys as function keys. Auto generates 
line numbers (giving you the choice of start number and 
increment). Load will look on all disks for the program you 



want. All keys repeat if held (a slight problem for my heavy- 
handed keyboard approach). If you happen to interrupt a 
program you are debugging and it is functioning in upper/ 
lowercase at the time, you can still enter commands in 
lowercase, and the system will understand them. There's 
nothing earthshaking about this feature, but it exemplifies 
the fine thought put into this piece of software. Bob Colin 
is certainly to be congratulated for a truly professional 
product. It contains some features that I still find missing 
in the high priced micros. 

"True upper- and lowercase letters" is among the claims 
that I did not find to be true. Perhaps there is a definition 
problem here, but I used the Hi-Res option extensively, 
which has options of 32, 51 and 64 for screen widths. They 
work simply and are very readable (even the 64 width that 
I used most of the time), but the letters such as 4 p' and 'q' 
do not go below the line, which is my definition of "true 
lowercase." The quality and spacing is good, so I could 
certainly compromise on this deficiency to gain all the other 
goodies in the package. There is even a Memo feature, which 
permits you to write a one page memo and then dump it 
to the printer. It uses the four arrow keys for editing your 
text (though there apparently is no delete function). I was 
disappointed that I could not get this Memo feature to work 
in conjunction with Hi-Res 64, since this would permit a 
much longer memo, but nevertheless, I found it an 
interesting and useful system feature. 

The documentation is a simple six-page manual that is 
well-written and well-organized. The system features work 
so simply, and the system installs so easily that long 
explanations are not necessary. The system can be used by 
many as it is delivered, but the install program lets you 
modify parameters to fit your system (number of disks, disk 
types, prompt character, printer speed, cursor type, etc.). 
Defaults are taken simply by pressing the return key, and 
the whole install should not take much over a minute. 

Spectrum DOS can also be burned into a regular 
EPROM after customizing it to your setup, but do get a 
128K EPROM, or you will lose Hi-Res Help and Flex — 
two features you would not want to lose. 

Best of all, it works! I have by no means exhausted the 
list of all the features, but I think I did try most everything, 
and I found no bugs, nor even spots, where I wasn't quite 
sure what to do next. Spectrum DOS is well-protected from 
accidental blowout. I did manage to load a program of mine 
that had its own On Error system poked into memory, and 
that sure did some strange things to the Inverse screen and 
Normal functions, but one can hardly fault the Spectrum 
DOS operating system when you start poking code 
randomly into memory. I used the system with a rather large 
word processing program of my own design, and it worked 
fine, so little or no memory is consumed and operational 
speed is not sacrificed to any degree that I could notice. 

1 love computer power with simplicity. That's what 
brought me to CoCo in the first place, even though I have 
been a professional in the computer field for more than 25 
years and worked on many multi-million dollar machines. 
Spectrum DOS carries on the CoCo tradition in fine style, 
with value, power and simplicity. 

(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
11414; 718-835-1344, $24.95) 



Hint . . . 

Put 'Call Waiting' on Hold 

If you have a modem and have call waiting on your 
telephone line, there is a good chance you have been 
bumped offline by an incoming phone call. (Actually, 
the problem is not the tone you hear to announce the 
call, but during the tone the connection is broken 
momentarily.) 

In many areas, you can temporarily disable call 
waiting by dialing 1170 (or *70 if you have tone 
dialing), waiting for the dial tone to return, then 
dialing the number just as you normally would. When 
you hang up, call waiting is restored, so you will need 
to dial 1 170 (*70) before every modem call. 

If you get a recording instead of a dial tone, this 
usually means the switching office serving your area 
hasn't been upgraded to add the disable feature. Check 
with the phone company to make sure your call 
waiting is actually working. If it is, find out when 
"equal access" long distance service starts because the 
change will usually be made at that time. 



Tom Carl 



134 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Software Review* 



• >»«••> »*••»•» i'Vi »t*3kt * ■ i ■«■ »4 i 

■ 



Professional Mailing Labels 
With Multi-label III 

If you are responsible for your church, club or business 
mailing list, you will find Multi-label III a valuable tool. 
It stores your mailing lists and prints them in one of 1 3 styles 
you select. You can mail notices, bills, and correspondence 
with business-like labels using your CoCo and printer. 

We've all been looking for programs for our shiny new 
CoCo 3 computers, and Multi-label III is a good example 
of what to expect. It uses the super colors, speed and error- 
trapping commands to provide a very well put together 
program. Written in BASIC, it requires a CoCo 3, single disk 
drive (or multiple), and a printer. It is user-friendly and 
foolproof, as far as I could tell. 

The specific CoCo 3 features built into this program 
include either a 40-by-24, or 80-by-24 high resolution 
screen. It uses the Fi key as an upper/ lowercase toggle and 
the F2 key to toggle between the screens. Multi-label III uses 
the ON ERROR GOTO command to trap errors such as DISK 
I'D and FILE NOT FOUND preventing program crashing. It 
also uses the ON BREAK GOTO command to return to its main 
menu should the BREAK key be pressed. The program uses 
the CoCo 3 high speed poke and escape poke to provide 
high speed operation. 

Multi-label III is supplied with the PALETTE command 
for an RGB monitor. However, the manual provides three 
simple editing changes to convert it for a composite monitor 
or TV. Using a TV, I was very impressed with the colors 
but, as with otherCoCo 3 programs, some were faded, and 
some screen instructions difficult to read. 

This did not seriously detract from the program; however, 
I think programmers should select colors with an eye on 
TV and composite monitor users, as well as those with RGB 
equipment. A little experimentation with my color control 
helped, too, 

The program worked perfectly for me on my first attempt. 
I was able to input, store and print labels easily. Multi-label 
///requires the use of the standard V/i- by 15 /i6-inch, single- 
column, gummed labels, readily available at computer 
stores. The print menu provides 13 combinations of 
printing, including Elite, Pica, Italic, Expanded, 
Condensed, Double Strike and Emphasized. The manual 
lists the printer codes used, and it would be easy to change 
the codes in the program to fit any printer or to select other 
combinations. 

The menu provides 1 1 choices that involve entering 
information, editing, saving to disk, loading, printing and 
reading the files saved. It also has a Help command that 
explains each menu command. The User's Manual is well- 
written, complete and easily understood. 

In summary, Multi-label III is a very useful program for 
producing professional mailing labels. It takes advantage 
of the best features of the CoCo 3 to provide speed, error- 
trapping, and beautiful high resolution screens. 

(Gimmesofl, 4 Hallfield Court, Baltimore, MD 21236; 301- 
256-7558, $16.95 plus $2.50 S/H) 

— Mel Siegel 



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THE COO? COMPUTER MONJH.Y MAGAZINE 





Back copies of many issues of THE 
rainbow are still available. 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
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July 1987 THE RAINBOW 135 



I 2 



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□ Please send me the following back issues: 



Software Revie 



RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years. July 1981 
through June 1984, is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies 
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A Guide to CoCo 3 
Basics and Graphics 



Now that the CoCo 3 is here, we ail find ourselves 
wondering how to best use its expanded graphics features. 
A Guide to Co Co 3 Basics and Graphics is a 54-page booklet 
and disk for the graphics enthusiast. As powerful as the 
CoCo 3 is, many of you have no doubt been dismayed at 
the lack of information contained in Tandy's manual. Color 
Computer 3 Extended BASIC, that comes with each 
machine, This recent offering by Linda Nielson goes into 
the depth and detail that Tandy didn't coven If you are 
serious about graphics on the CoCo 3, you will find useful 
information in this package. The book is written in a 
friendly and understandable manner and is sprinkled with 
programming aids and tips. Lots of sample programs are 
included in the book and on the disk that are used to 
demonstrate the various subjects discussed. An early 
chapter deals with a novel approach to understanding how 
the CoCo 3 uses 5 1 2K of RAM with its Memory M anage- 
ment Unit, Other detailed discussions are provided on the 
following; 



Faster clock speeds 

Built-in error trapping and error codes 

FUNCTION, ALTERNATE and CONTROL keys 

Button function 

Added colors and commands including artifacting 
Monochrome displays 
Palette command 

High and low resolution text screens 
High and low resolution graphics 
Graphics editing 
Patterns and shading 



One noteworthy program on the disk is called Drawback 
and is quite powerful. With it you can draw lines, circles, 
rectangles, enter text, paint and stamp areas with images 
picked from the screen. A demo picture showing a man 
holding a hawk is one of the best CoCo 3 images I've seen 
and can be used with Drawback to develop your graphics 
editing skills. Other programs on the disk are used to 
illustrate color codes, palette slots and artifacting. 

I believe that this book and disk are worthy of your 
consideration if you are Into graphics programming. If 
graphics is not your bag, I suggest you look elsewhere for 
CoCo 3 programs. All of the information in this package 
is supportive in nature and is meant to be a tutorial on 
capitalizing on the CoCo 3's graphics potential. 



(Moreton Bay Software, 316 Castillo St., Santa Barbara, 
CA 93101; 805-962-3127, $21.95) 

— Jerry Semones 



136 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Software Review J * w mm^ ^ 

Checkerboard r lie sort — 
Meireshing Change 

When 1 received Checkerboard Filesort to review, I 
thought it was just another filesort program! But when 1 
sat down and started going through the instruction manual, 
1 got very interested in the program. 

As the developer states in his introduction, this program 
can only be used with a cassette-based system. 1 have to say 
that this was a refreshing change because so much of today's 
software is for disk systems and, in increasing numbers, for 
the CoCo 3, Sometimes it seems as if those of us with 
cassette-based systems are rapidly becoming orphans, 

Checkerboard Filesort was written for a 32K or 64K 
cassette-based CoCo. 1 was really impressed by all of the 
different options that are included in the program. Machine 
language routines handle record entry, editing, reviewing, 
search and sorting. You can number records from one to 
9,999; in this way, you can append (join together) different 
records. 

You can have a minimum of 40 records, each containing 
240 characters, or a maximum of 200 records containing 
42 characters in the 32K version. In the 64K version, you 
can have a minimum of 86 records, containing 240 
characters, or a maximum of 400 records that contain 46 
characters. You can use this program to keep an address file, 
mailing lists, inventories, recipes, etc. The only constraint 
to what you can do is that you have a limit of 240 characters 
per record. 

You also have the option of using a printer to get a hard 
copy of your records. Although this program was written 
for use with an 80-column printer, 1 have been using my 
D MP- 105, which is a 32-column printer, with no problems 
at all. 1 called Dave Siebold, the program developer, to see 
if 1 would have to change any of the printer codes. He was 
very helpful, and sent me all the information that 1 needed. 
Dave also told me that if anyone wanted to purchase the 
program, and they are not using the Radio Shack printer, 
he will make the needed modifications to the program at 
no additional charge. 

After loading Checkerboard Filesort^ you are prompted 
to enter the printer codes. If you are not using a printer, 
you can enter any number for each prompt. After the printer 
codes are entered, the main menu appears. You can choose 
one of the following options: 

1) Create file 

2) Edit record data 

3) Add/ Delete record 

4) Search/ Review records 

5) Hard copy options 

6) File tape load/ append 

7) Save to tape 

8) Display/ Rename fields 

9) End program 

The first option allows you to create your files. The 
second allows you to edit any of the records you have 



created. You do this by entering the number of the record 
you want to edit or, if you don't know the number, you have 
the option of using the search routine to find a particular 
record, You can also use the review section to find the record 
and then edit it. The third option allows you to add or delete 
records. 

The fourth section allows you to review all records, a 
single record, or a group of records, The second part of this 
option allows you to search for a particular record using 
partial data or a set of records that contain similar data. 

The fifth section allows you to choose many different 
ways to get a hard copy of your records. You can have them 
displayed in one of the following ways: 

1) Single column 

2) Two columns 

3) Three columns (can only be used with the condensed 
=> 16.7 cpi) 

4) Mailing labels 

5) Envelope labeler 

The sixth section allows you to load or append a file from 
cassette. The seventh option allows you to save a file to tape. 
After the file is saved, you are prompted to verify the save. 
The eighth option allows you to display or rename the fields. 
The fields are used for your information and are not 
displayed while you are creating a record. The ninth option 
allows you to end the program. If you choose to end the 
program, you will be returned to the normal power-up 
configuration. The instruction manual included with the 
program is very well-written and provides an in-depth 
discussion of each of the above options. 

There is a BASIC program called Convert that follows the 
machine language portion of this program. The program 
is used to convert Filesort programs to a format that is 
acceptable to most word processors. So you can convert a 
file and then load it into your word processor. 1 have Color 
Scripset on a ROM pack, and 1 tried the convert program. 
1 had no trouble loading the converted file into the program. 

After using this program on numerous occasions, 1 am 
impressed by the program and its ease of operations, It is 
completely menu-driven and user-friendly. The options that 
are included make it very nice to have around. I especially 
like all of the hard-copy options. 

1 have been very happy in my dealing with Dave, and 1 
would not hesitate to buy Checkerboard Filesort from him. 

(Seibyte Software, P.O. Box 6464, Bakersfield, CA 93386; 
805-366-4540, $16.95) 



John H. Appel 




CUKKlLC I lUJNiS (Also, see Page 111) 

In the May 1987 issue of the THE rainbow©, a work 
and computer program entitled The Rhythm of Life 
MsipubHshed as being the work and computer 
program of Steve Tenney, Subsequently it has been 
glelmeijfhat the work aijl computer program were 
! ^p^Mshed previously by Tom Rugg and Phil Feldman 
aril Appear in TRS-80 Color Computer Programs®, 
a^ffoak published by delithium Press. Our apologies 
to delilkium Press and Messrs. Rugg and Feldman. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 137 



Software Review, 



Discover the Benefits of 

ADOS-3 

By Dale Shell 



WeJi, it is finally here. ADOS-3 — for all of you who have 
a new CoCo 3 and really miss all the enhancements of 
ADOS that you grew so used to and thought you could 
never do without. The best news is that ADOS-3 really is 
more than just a modified version of the original ADOS. 
It offers a lot more enhancements. 

Of course, the bad news is that since ADOS-3 is almost 
a new program, and it is bigger and better, it is not offered 
as an upgrade to current ADOS owners. It must be 
purchased separately. However, I do think that when you 
get it, you will not be disappointed that you put out the 
money, It adds so much to the CoCo 3 that I cannot imagine 
the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; it would not be a complete 
machine. 

There are so many good things about it, I am not sure 
where to start. Since versions of ADOS have been reviewed 
in two previous issues of RAINBOW (December 1984 and 



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Polygon Computers Tel (21 3) 483-4406 
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June 1 987), I will not cover in detail every enhancement the 
new ADOS-3 adds to the Radio Shack DOS. I will, 
however, list some of the features of the original ADOS that 
are still supported, just in case someone out there is not 
familiar with ADOS. 

These features include repeat and edit of the last direct- 
mode command; CONTROL key abbreviated entry of BASIC 
commands; automatic line-number prompts; upper- or 
lowercase command entry; DOS command for OS-9; one- 
or two-column directory with free granules (to screen or 
printer); COPY filename TD drive number alternate form of 
COPY command; AE Error ("file already exists") override 
option; RUNM command to load and execute machine 
language programs; SCAN command, which will list ASCII 
files to the screen or printer and give the start, end and 
execute addresses for binary files; PRT ON/OFF to enable/ 
disable routing text output to printer as well as screen; M0N, 
a mini-monitor command that provides hexadecimal 
memory examine-and-change capability; the ability to use 
35- or 40-track, single- or double-sided drives; and the 
option to change the start-up logo, instead of seeing the 
familiar Radio Shack logo come up every time you turn on 
your CoCo, you can have whatever message you want 
(limited to 63 characters). This is a good place to put your 
name for a type of theft protection. 

All these features are great just as they are, but ADOS- 
3 adds even more and improves on a few of these. First of 
all, two new commands, FAST and SLOW, have been added. 
These two commands control the processor speed. FR5T sets 
the processor speed to the double-speed (1.8 MHz) mode. 
Of course SLOW sets the speed back to the .9 MHz mode. 
You must be aware that while these two commands 
automatically adjust the printer baud rate constant to take 
into account the processor speed, this may cause a problem 
if you have a program that changes the baud rate constant. 
This was the case while I was using VIP Writer. I always 
set the baud rate to 7, which is 9600 baud. My printer went 
bonkers. I had to set baud to 6 (4800 baud) so at the FR5T 
speed, it would print at 9600 baud. This can definitely be 
a concern with communications software. 

The safest thing to do if you start to have problems is 
to go to the SLOW mode, see if things work normally and 
proceed from there. This is no big concern if you are aware 
of the possible symptoms and remember to enter the SLOW 
command, adjust the program accordingly or just enter a 
line in the BASIC loader that contains the SLOW command. 
[ had no problems with disk I/O using the FAST mode. 

ADOS-3 adds some very powerful editing features. When 
a BASIC program is in memory, the up and down arrow keys 
can list the program forward and backward, a line at a time. 
If held down, these keys will repeat. This is a very convenient 
way of controlling the scrolling of the program, especially 
when you are editing a program. Once you have listed the 
line you want to edit, you simply press the right arrow key. 
This puts you in the edit mode and you may edit the line 
as usual. This also becomes a very powerful debugging 
feature if you get dumped out of a basic program by an 
error; pressing the right arrow puts you in the edit mode 
for the line that caused the error. 

The slash command (/), which repeats the last direct- 
mode command, has also been modified. It will allow you 
to list a line of BASIC code and edit even the line numbers. 
This is good for copying lines of code to other parts of the 
BASIC program. 



138 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



If you use a monochrome monitor, you will be very 
interested in ADOS-3's option to kill the colorburst signal. 
Pressing CTRL-F2 while in the direct mode kills the 
colorburst signal, resulting in a monochrome display if you 
are using a composite or TV output, This greatly enhances 
the signal if you are using a monochrome monitor. 

When you start to customize ADOS-3 to be burned into 
an EPROM, there are many options you can include. While 
ADOS-3 will run as a disk utility, to get the full benefit from 
ADOS-3, you need to eventually get it into an EPROM. 
One of the options that can be selected when customizing 
ADOS-3 is the default screen display. ADOS-3 allows the 
equivalent of a WIDTH command, a PALETTE RGB command, 
four PALETTE color assignment commands and an ATTR 
command to be selected for automatic execution when the 
computer is turned on or on any cold start. 

The default borders for the 32-, 40- or 80-column screens 
can also be configured, so you can have the default screen 
be just about any color or width you desire. Even the 32- 
column screen uses real lowercase letters rather than the old 
inverse characters, Once these are in the EPROM, the 
screen setup, with the exception of WIDTH, will also be re- 
established on a warm reset. The documentation gives some 
good tips on setting up the screen display the way you like 
it. 

When you are finished with the screen, you can decide 
at what speed you want the processor to run when the 
computer is turned on. This will allow you to have the 
equivalent of a FAST command executed on a cold start. 
Also configured in the customizing is the repeat rate of the 
up and down arrow keys. The up and down arrow keys are 
also used to control the display when using the MON 
command. 

While the original ADOS allowed you to have 35- or 40- 
track drives, ADOS-3 adds the option of having 80-track 
drives. All 1 58 granules of an 80-track drive are usable under 
the 80-track option, ADOS demands that all drives be 
configured to the same number of tracks. You may have a 
40-track drive connected to a system configured for 80 
tracks, but be careful not to try to access any nonexistent 
tracks. 

ADOS-3 has also redefined which key will be used to clear 
the screen. F2 is used instead of the clear key because many 
users accustomed to the CoCo 1 or 2 keyboard might find 
themselves clearing the screen when they intended to hit the 
backspace key. F2 is also used instead of the very awkward 
,SHlFT-up arrow for exiting the insert mode when line 
editing. Both of these redefinitions are optional and can be 
configured back to the original use if desired. 

If you are like some people I know, you only read the 
last paragraph of a review. So, the bottom line is: If you 
have a CoCo 3, go out immediately and buy ADOS-3 for 
your CoCo; your CoCo will not be complete without it. If 
you have a CoCo J or 2 and will be getting a CoCo 3 in 
the near future, ADOS-3 will work in your controller now 
You just won't have access to all its benefits until your CoCo 
3 arrives. On a scale of I to 10, I rate ADOS-3 a solid 15. 
Buy it; you and your CoCo 3 need it. 



(SpectroSystems, 1 1111 N. Kendall Dr., Suite A 108, Miami, 
FL 33176; 305-274-3899, $34.95 plus $2 S/H) 



Software Review ^ ^^^ ^^^^^m 

Ultra Editor — A Timesaver 
for Programmers 

Ultra Editor is the first Color Computer 3 program 
written by Bob van der Poel and is certain to be a hit with 
his followers. Bob consistently turns out excellent software 
for the CoCo, and his latest effort is no exception. 

Ultra Editor is a full-featured, 40- or 80-column screen 
line editor. It's designed to edit lines of text such as basic, 
assembly language and pascal programs. It incorporates 
a host of commands that allow virtually any manipulation 
and modification to any program or word processor file. 
Its main purpose is not for use as a word processor, but 
the editing features are similar and the program is handy 
for editing such files if needed. 

The software is supplied on disk, but the I/O can be 
modified to use with cassette. The disk contains a short 
IAS1C loader, but the main program is written in 6809 
machine language. Documentation is ample. Sixteen pages 
are packed with explanations of the many commands. 

This is the kind of software that will please programmers 
since it provides many valuable, timesaving methods to edit 
programs. 

Full cursor movement is available using the arrow keys. 
Rapid movement from beginning to end of file is provided 
with the ALT key and a combination of either the or Y 
keys. Using the ALT key in combination with other keys 
provides some very powerful editing commands such as 
Find, Jump, Change, Global Change, Kill Line, Unkill 
Line, Hack Line, Yank Character, Backspace and Insert. 
You can also insert or delete blocks, move blocks, copy 
blocks and transfer blocks. An excellent feature is that Ultra 
Editor maintains two separate buffers. The main buffer is 
approximately 5 OK bytes long, while the second one is 
about 16K bytes long. Using the Transfer command allows 
data to be transferred between the buffers. Macro com- 
mands are also supported. These are great timesaving 
commands that can be set up to duplicate any sequence of 
keystrokes that you desire. The only limitation is that the 
macros cannot exceed 49 characters, and no more than nine 
macros are available. They can be saved as part of the 
program that you are editing so you can have different 
macros for different situations. 

Onscreen help is also available at the tap of a key, H itting 
Fi d isplays multiple pages of the various commands 
available so you won't have to thumb through the docu- 
mentation if you forgot how to do something. 

This program is very well done, and I am convinced that 
it offers the software hacker some real opportunities. Many 
hints, tips and examples are used thoughout the documen- 
tation to help the user understand the concepts presented. 
It's not difficult to use and, while a bit sophisticated in terms 
of what it does, it is not a program that novice programmers 
would want or need. But as programming skills are 
sharpened and programs become more complex, Ultra 
Editor will become a well-used utility. 

(CMD Micro Computer Services Ltd., 10447 124th St., 
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6M 1E1; 403-488-7109, 

$19.95 plus $2 S/H) 



— David Gerald 



July 198? THE RAINBOW 1 39 



Software Review, 



V^n Software Revie 



77^ 



Disk Manager Helps 
Control and Modify Files 

Looking for a program that will help you manage your 
CoCo 3 disks? Look no more — Disk Manager will come 
to your rescue! The functions this BASIC program provides 
are plentiful and just what I needed to help control my CoCo 
3 disk directories. I use it primarily for my TCBBS Bulletin 
Board disks, but you can use it for any application of your 
own. 

The program requires a 128K CoCo 3 (it is written 
specifically for this machine and will not work on a CoCo 
1 or 2). A choice of using either the 40- or 80-column 
character screens is provided. A 32-column screen is not 
supported, so a monitor may be necessary in order to see 
the full screen (most TVs will cut off the first couple of 
characters on the left side of the screen). Colors are used 
and can be changed from within the program, although it 
is rather confusing to figure out how to modify the code 
if you're not familiar with the new Enhanced Extended 
BASIC commands. 

Several different commands are available. Files can be 
copied, killed, moved or renamed. These functions can be 
done with individual files or by groups of them. One can 
also print directories or sort them. Options to turn the verify 
on and off are also provided. Complete documentation is 
provided with the package and explains all the different 
commands in detail. 

One disadvantage with this program is that you must have 
the documentation in front of you, since there aren't any 
menus. The time it takes to look through the documentation 
is frustrating. But in the long run, you'll eventually 
memorize most of the functions, since the small abbrevi- 
ations coincide with the function you want to perform (e.g., 
4 C stands for Copy). 

This is a nice utility, and I recommend it to anyone 
wanting to quickly modify their files without having to type 
in the full BASIC commands that would otherwise be 
required. 

(Bangert Software Systems, P.O. Box 21056, Indianapolis, 
IN 46221; 317-262-8865, $14.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Darren Nye 



BUDGET FORECASTER 

PROJECT HOW MUCH YOU WILL HAVE AND WHEN 
YOU WILL HAVE IT BASED ON YOUR 'WHAT IF' BUDGET 
STRATEGIES. INPUT YOUR CONSTANT AND VARIABLE, 
FIRST OF THE MONTH. END OF THE MONTH, SEMI- 
MONTHLY, AND BI-WEEKLY EXPENSES, INCOMES, AND 
INVESTMENTS (INCLUDING RATE OF RETURN). ENTER 
YOUR STARTING CASH BALANCE AND INVESTMENT 
BALANCES. SEE YOUR RESULTS IN INCREMENTS OF 
TWO WEEKS UP TO THE CALENDAR LIMIT OF 
12/31/9999! 

64K TAPE VERSION $34.95 



Dress Up Programs and 
Design Title Screens 
With Title 

Title is a program written in BASIC that helps program 
authors design title screens without spending large amounts 
of time figuring out how to make them. Once the title screen 
is drawn, Title creates a subroutine that can be merged with 
a BASIC program in order to recreate the title screen just 
drawn. A simple GOSUB will recreate the title screen, and 
multiple title screens may be included in a BASIC program 
subject only to memory restrictions. 

Title is supplied in unprotected form on disk, and the user 
is cautioned to operate from a backup of the disk at all 
times. Title is available for 32K disk-based Color Comput- 
ers, including a version for the CoCo 3. 

The Title characters are four lines high by three spaces 
wide. Any printable character entered from the keyboard 
may be used in the title screen, except for the lowercase 
alphabet. A full screen of characters requires about six 
minutes to process into a subroutine. 

Foreground and background colors are available, but are 
limited to the capabilities of the low resolution text screen. 
Letters may be green, yellow, blue, red, buff, cyan, magenta, 
or orange on a black background, as well as black letters 
on each of these background colors in turn. 

The documentation for Title deserves some comment. 
The documentation is in the form of a4-by-5 booklet and 
is printed in elite type. The author also wrote the program 
(called Book) that produced the documentation. I found 
this format to be an interesting and novel approach to 
documenting. 

I found Title to be a well-behaved utility program and 
one that can be of use to program authors or those who 
simply want to "dress up" their programs a bit. The price 
may be considered a bit high by some for a BASIC utility 
program, but Title works well and has no quirks in 
operation. 



(B. Erickson Software, P.O. Box 11099, Chicago, IL 60611, 
$30) 

— Don Hutchison 



GAME SIMULATORS 

COMPUTE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING BASED ON 
PLAYING AND BETTING STRATEGIES. SIMULATE UP TO 
10,000 GAMES! 64K TAPE VERSIONS. 

"CRAPS" $22.95 

"BLACKJACK" $19.95 

"5 CARD DRAW" $19.95 



SEND CHECK OR MO. + $1.50 EACH S/H TO: 

PROBITAT, 2213 VENETION DRIVE 
STOCKTON. CA 95207 

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 



140 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



II Plus V4.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTOPILOT in d AUTO-LOG Command Processors 
X-MODEM DISK FILE TRANSFER SUPPORT 
YT-1 0Q & y..Ll52. TERMINAL EMULATION 

* No lott dala uftng Hi-R«« Oiipl»y, Cv«n at ! 200 Baud «n tha Serial port. 

* Q Hi-Res OispJays, 28 to 255 columns by 24 lines 4 true Upper/tower case 

* 4SK Text buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display and Disk 
» ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM, 

* Directly record receive data to a disk file while online. 

* VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

* VT- 1 00/52 cursor keys L position, insert/delete, PF 4 All. Kbd. keys. 

* Programmable Word length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates 300 to 9600. 

* Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

* Send lull 128 character set from Keyboard with control codes. 

* Complete Editor Insert, Oelele, Change or Add to Buffer, 

* 0 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers. 
1 Programmable Printer rates from 1 10 to 0600 Baud. 

* Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Key Buffers or Disk. 

* Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

* freeze Display & Review information On line with no loss of data. 

* Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

* And much much more. 

Supports: Word-Pak I, II, ft.S, and Double Density 60 Column Cards 
Oisto Controller w/SQ column card &> parallel printer 
PBJ Parallel Printer Card and Dual Serial Port (2SP-Pak) 
ft. S.Modem-Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 52K & Disk, Only $59.95 



HI-RE5 !! Screen Commander 

Tired of looking at the 16 line by 32 character display on your 
CoCo? Wish you could see more lines and characters? Then HI-RES II 
is the answer, it can give you the big screen display you've always 
wanted. It will display 2A lines of 32, 42, 51, 64 and even 85 true 
upper and lower case characters per line without extra hardware, 

HI-RES II is the most powerful screen enhancement package available 
for the Color Computer, yet it is the least expensive. It is completely 
compatible and transparent to Basic. Once the program is loaded, 
everything works the same as bef ore, only you have a much better 
display to work with. It even allows you to have mixed text and 
Hi-resolution graphics en the same screen or have separate text and 
graphics screens. It also has an adjustable automatic key repeat 
f eature and allows you to protect up to 23 lines on the screen. 

HI-RES II features over 30 special control code functions that allow 
you to change characters per line, protect display lines, change 
background color, position cursor, switch normal/reverse video, 
underline, double size characters, erase line/screen/to end of 
screen, home cursor, character highlight and much more. It works on 
all models of the CoCo with 16, 32 or 64K and provides automatic 
reset control so HI-RES II won't disappear when you press reset. 

Only 24.95 on Tape or $29.95 on Disk 



The Source 

Now you can easily Disassemble Color Computer machine language 
programs directly from disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
Source Code. And "The Source" has all the features and functions you 
are looking for m a Disassembler, 

* Automatic Label generation and allows specifying FCB j FCC and FDB areas. 
16 Disassembles programs directly from Disk or ROM. 

* Output Disassembled listing with labels t» the Printer.Screen or both. 

* Generates Assembler source files directly to disk, or o printed listing. 

* Generated source files are in standard ASCII format. 

* Built in Hex/ASCH dump/display to locale FCB, FCC and FOB areas. 

* Built in Disk Directory and Kill file commands. 

* Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

* Written in fast machine language, one of the easiest to use Disassemblers 

Requires 32K Disk $34.95 



The CBA5IC Editor/Compiler VI. 1.2 
Do you want to write fast machine language programs but you 
don't want to spend the next few years trying to learn how ??? 
Wei) with CBASIC, you could be writing them right now! 

CBASIC is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and program 
editing system available for the Color Computer. II will allow you to 
take full advantage of all the capabilities available in your color 
computer without having to spend years trying to learn assembly 
language programming. CBASIC allows you to create, edit and 
convert programs from a language you are already familiar with 
Extended Disk Color Saslc, into f ast efficient machine language 
programs easily and quickly. We added advanced features like n full 
blown program editor, Hi-Res text Displays and 80 column hardware 
support f or editing, compiling and your compiled programs. Plus we 
made it exceptionally easy to use. CBASIC is the friendliest and 
easiest compiler available for the Color Computer, 

"The most complete Editor/Compiler I have seen lor the CoCo.. " 

- - The RAINBOW, Msrch I0S6 

CBASIC is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced 
Basic or Machine Language programmer, You can write programs 
without having to worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory 
allocation and so on, because CBASIC will do it for you automatically. 
Or, CBASIC will let you control every aspect of your program, even 
generating machine code directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC features well over 1 00 compiled Basic Commands and 
Functions that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, 
Tape, Printer and Screen I/O, CBASIC supports ALL the High and Low 
Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play and String Operations available in 
Extended Color Basic, including Graphics GET, PUT, PLAY and DRAW, 
all with 99.9% syntax compatibility, CBASIC also supports the built 
in Serial I/O port with separate printer & serial I/O baud rates. You 
can send and receive data with PRINT, INPUT and INKEY commands, 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor 
which allows you to load, adit or create programs for the compiler, 
It is a full featured editor designed specifically for writing and editing 
Basic programs. It has block move & copy, program renumbering, 
automatic line numbers, screen editing, printer control and more. 

"The Editor is a very good one and could be the sub feet lor review 
aft by itself... " - The RAINBOW, March IQB6 

"Comparing fCB's edit mode to CBASfC's text editor is like comparing a 
World War It jeep to a modern sedan Both get you to your destination 
but what a difference in the ride. - - Hot CoC o 4 feburary IQ&b 

The documentation for CBASIC is an 8 1/2 * 11 Spiral Bound book 
which contains approximate 120 pages of real information. 

"CBA SIC 's manual IS easy I o read and writ ten with a minimum o f 
technicatese. " - -Ho t CoCo f rbrvary , 1086 

The price of CBASIC is % 149,00. It is the most expensive Color 
Basic Compiler on the market, and well worth the investment, 
Compare the performance of CBASIC against any Color Basic 
compiler. Dollar for dollar, CBASIC gives you more than any other 
compiler available. Requires 64K & Disk, not JDOS compatible, 

"The price tag ft carries seemed a bit steep for an integer compiler on first 
glance, but when you add hi-res drivers, and full-screen editing, CBASIC 
begins to look more like? a bargain. " —Mot CoCo February, I Q86 
-A Complete Editor /Compiler Welt Worth its Price" —RAINBOW March IQS6 



TEXTPRO III 
"The Advanced Word Processing System " 

• 9 Hi-Res Displays from 28 to 255 columns by 24 lines & Upper/lower Cose 

• Three Programmable Header lines that con be re-defined at anytime, 

• Programmable Fooler Hne L Automatic Footnote System, 

• SO Programmable Tab stops L 1 Powerfull Tab Function Commands. 

• Completely Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left and right, 

• On screen display oi underline and Double size characters, 

• Change indents, margins, line length, etc, parameters anytime in the text, 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to the size of a full disk. 

• Easily Imbed any number »f formal and control codes. 

• Aulomalic Memory Sense 1 wilhup lo 48K of memory workspace, 

• Fully supports the use of 80 column hardware cards. 

TEXT PP.0 111 is an advanced word processing system designed for 
speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is not like 
most of the other word processing programs available f or the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write 
letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be belter off 
with one of the other simpler word processors. But, if you want a 
powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex 
f ormating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO III is what your 
looking f or. TEXTPRO works in a totally different way than most 
word processing programs. It uses simple 2 character abbreviations 
of words or phrases f or commands and formatting inf ormalion that 
you imbed directly in your text. There are over 50 diff erent 
formating commands you can use without ever leaving the text your 
working on, There are no time comsuming, and often f urstrating 
menu chases, you are in total control at all times, The f ormatted 
output can be displayed directly on the screen, showing you exactly 
what your printed document will look like before a single word is ever 
printed. This includes margins, headers, foolers, page numbers, page 
breaks, underlining, column formating and full justification. 

DISK $59.95 TAPE $49.95 



EDT/A5M 64D 

64K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EOT/ ASM 640 is a Disk based co-resident Tex t Editor & Assembler. 
It has a Hi -Resolution 51 , 64 or 85 column by 24 line display, so you 
see your program listings easily and it supports Column cards. The 
disk also contains a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug 
your assembled programs. 

This is the most powerful!, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/ Assembler package for the Color Computer, It even has 
automatic line number generation for easy entry of program material. 

* Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

* Full screen line editing with immediate line update. 

* Easy lo use Single keystroke editing commands. 

* Load &$ave standard ASCII formatted Tape/Disk files. 

* hove or Copy single & multiple texl I ines. 

* Create and Edit disk files larger than memory. 

* Hi-Res Texl Display 28 to 85 columns by 24 lines. 

* Supports Word-Pak 1 ,11. & R.S. and Oisto 80 column display cards. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASfl 64D features include: 

* Supports the full 6800 instruction set. 

* Supports conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

* Supports Disk Library files (include). 

* Supports standard motorola assembler directives 

* Allows multiple values for FDB L FCB directives. 

* Generates listings to Hs-ftes text, screen or prinler. 

* Assembles directly to disk or tape in LOADM format. 

* Supports up to 0 open disk files during assembly. 

* Al lows assembly from editor buffer. Disk or both. 

The freestanding DEBUG program provided includes: 
" Examine and change the contents o( memory. 
« Set, Remove and display up to 1 0 breakpoints in memory. 
" Display/Change processor register contents. 

* Move a Block of memory or Fill Memory range with specified data. 

* Search memory range for data pattern, 

8 Disassemble memory range into op-code format. 

Requires 32K Disk $59.95 



To order products by mail, send check order for the amount of 

purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to th« address below 
To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thrv Saturday, 6am to 5pm PST). 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Aventse 
Las Veges, Nevada 89 1 10 

702-452-0632 



Software R e vie w ^!!^^ 

Backup and Backup III 
Lots of Promise 

I received my first original CoCo utility, and it has a lot 
of promise. I unwrapped the package from BrainChild 
Software and actually found two products, Backup and 
Backup III, Backup is for CoCo Is and 2s, and Backup III 
takes advantage of the 128K of the CoCo 3. 

As you can tell from the name, these are backup utilities. 
But unlike Disk BASIC, which only copies five tracks at a 
time, Backup copies 10 and Backup ///copies 19 tracks at 
a time. This cuts disk swaps from seven (eight if 40 tracks) 
down to four and two. Another advantage is that if an 
I/O Error is encountered, the procedure is not aborted as 
in Disk BASIC but, instead, the tracks, sector numbers and 
errors encountered are reported onscreen. This allows you 
to salvage data from disks that have bad sectors. The error 
messages are displayed on the bottom half of the screen in 
the following format: 

0214 DRIVE NOT RERDV 

The first two digits designate the track number, and the last 
two represent the sector. You can note these and work on 
restoring the data in these sectors later with another utility. 

Both Backup programs support 35-, 36-, 40- and 80-track 
drives. The documentation goes even further and states that 
if you have really non-standard drives, you can select any 
number between one and 99 for the number of tracks. The 
Backup programs also perform a much faster verify than 
Disk Basic's. All this sounds really good, but I would like 
to see a modification. I only have one big complaint. While 
the Backups reduce the number of disk swaps, 1 normally 
use a two-drive backup. Therefore, I do not do any "disk 
swaps."! would liketoseeanoptionaddedthatwould allow 
a two-drive backup. It seems it would be easy to add to the 
programs. 

Along with the main backup utility on each disk, a utility 
named ZRP . BR5 is also included on the disk. This program, 
Zap, can be used to copy single sectors from one disk to 
another. You are prompted to enter the track and sector. 
Enter it in the same format as the errors are reported in 
either Backup or Backup III, e.g., 0214. This program can 
help salvage data from a disk with bad sectors. While it will 
not help on some really bad sectors, successive attempts on 
some sectors may result in restored data. 

Overall, I believe Backup and Backup III are useful 
utilities. For the price, they are very reasonable. While I 
would really like to see an option for multiple drive backups, 
these utilities will be extremely useful for those who only 
have one disk drive. 



(BrainChild Software, Rt #5, Calhoun, GA 30701; Backups 
SS. 9 5; Backup JJJ, $10.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Dale Shell 



Software R e vie y ^^s^^ ^^^^S!^ ^^S yg\ 

RGB Patch Brings PMODE4 
to Life on CoCo 3 



From what I gather, a lot of CoCo 3 users are having 
somewhat mixed emotions about the switch to analog RGB 
output; it's very nice and a worthwhile improvement, but 
the many programs that use PM0DE4 artifact colors just 
display gray lines instead of red and blue. There are several 
ways around this; one is to use a color TV set, tuned to 
channel 3 or 4, to receive the CoCo RF output, while 
another is to buy a monitor that has both RGB and 
composite inputs. Both of these are hardware approaches 
and work reasonably well, but some are no doubt looking 
for a software patch. 

RGB Patch is a short machine language routine that loads 
from disk into the CoCo 3, tucks itself away and stands by, 
almost invisibly, to do its work when called upon. When 
a machine language program switches the system to PMDDE4 
with a black/ buff screen (the mode used for artifact colors), 
RGB Patch re-switches the CoCo 3 to its 320-by-200 Hi- 
Res screen instead. As the program writes to the PMDDE4 
screen, RGB Patch updates the 320-by-200 screen by 
checking where the dots are, analyzing the dot patterns to 
determine what color they are — in effect approximating 
the NTSC color decoding process — and then putting the 
corresponding dots on the 320-by-200 screen in the proper 
colors. The color quality is quite good. The results 1 saw 
were sharper and clearer than composite displays. I was 
initially afraid that RGB Patch would mis-identify some 
white areas as color, as do some boards that are used to 
display Apple II graphics on RGB monitors. I didn't see 
any trace of this effect. RGB Patch apparently is able to 
determine white with some degree of intelligence, perform- 
ing a task somewhat akin to that of the comb filters used 
to separate color and luminance in the better color TV sets. 

RGB Patch is said to be compatible with 90 percent of 
the ML programs that need it, but is not compatible with 
BASIC programs, OS-9 or with ROM packs. I don't have 
any way to tell if that percentage is accurate without testing 
a lot of programs, but the first two programs I tried did 
not work; one gave no color and the second never got past 
the color test screen, possibly because of an incompatibility 
with the CoCo 3. Once I got a program that did run in color, 
all was well. 

As for those color test screens, it should be noted that 
RGB Patch does not have a normal method of switching 
the red and blue artifacts to conform with different 
programs. If, however, you find that the colors are wrong, 
you can poke in new palette values for "red" and "blue" to 
fix it; you can also change them, and "black" and "white" 
as well, to whatever CoCo 3 colors you desire. 

If you have an RGB monitor, and want PM0DE4 colors, 
RGB Patch just might be the best way to get them. 

(Spectrum Projects, P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
1 1414; 718-835-1344, $29.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Ed Ellers 



142 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



C0CG-3 ONLY PRODUCT 



TEXTPRO IM-3 
"The Advanced Word Processing System " 

• 8 0i^)lay5 from 32/40/6^80 cokjrns by 24 linos 192cr225tos»fuUGn. 

• Three Programmable Header lines that can he re-defined at anytime . 

# Prooramrrcble Fooler line cV Automatic Footnote System, 

* 1 0 ^og^Trmabie Tab sta & 7 Powerful! Tab Function Conrnancfe . 

* CorrplelEty Adsxrdk Justification, Cenlaing, FhjEh left are right. 

* Ch screen display of underline arid Dcdble size cfwactars, 

® Change indents, margins, lire length, etc. parameters anytime in the tad. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to Ire size of a full disk ( 1 56K). 

• Easily imbed any rimber of formal and control codes. 

* Bull in Ultra Fast 2 frw PAf'DGC for 5 1 2K support 

TEXTPRO III is an advanced word processing system designed for 
speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is not like 
mostof the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer, if you are looking for s simple word processor to write 
letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be better 
off with one of the other simpler word processors. But, if you want 
a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex 
formating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO 111 is what 
your looking f or, TEXTPRO works in a totally diff erent way than 
most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 character 
abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 
50 different formating commands you can use without ever leaving 
the text your working on. There are no time comsuming, and often 
furstrating menu chases, you are in total control at all times. The 
formatted output can be displayed directly on the screen, showing 
you exactly what your printed document will look like before a 
single word is ever printed. This includes margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, underlining, column formating 
and full justification. 

Requires 128/512K & DISK $59.95 

EDT/ASM III 
128/512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM 111 is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor cV Assembler. 
It is similar to our EDT/ASM 64D for the COCO 1 & 2 but designed 
to take advantage of the new features of the COCO 3. It has 8 
Display formats f rom 32/40/14/80 columns by 24 lines in 192 or 
225 Resolution, so you can use the best display mode whether you 
are using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your 
display. Plus you can select any foreground and backbround colors 
or even color or monochrome display modes. It even supports 5 12K 
by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra FastRAMDISK for lightning 
fast assembly of program source code larger than memory. The 
disk also contains a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you 
debug your assembled programs. See our other Advertisement for 
information on some of the advanced features supported in the 
Editor, Assembler and Debugger, 

Requires 128/51 2K & Disk $59>95 

512K RAM UPGRADE 
Assembled & Tested w/120 nsec RAM 

Give your COCO 3 all the power it deserves with this easy to Install 
(no soldering/plug in) 100% Tandy compatible 512K memory 
upgrade. Completely assembled and tested (in a COCO-3), not like 
some upgrades that give you a bare board and a set of ram chips to 
assemble & test yourself, (upgrade without RAM $49.95} 

Now only $99.95 Assembled & Tested 
Ultra Hi-Speed 5 1 2K RAMDISK 

and MEMORY Tester 

RAMDiSK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 
ULTRA High Speed Ram Disks in your 512K COCO III. It does not 
need or require the 05-9 operating system. It works with R.S. DOS 
VI .0 or VI .1 and it is completely compatible with Enhanced Color 
Disk Basic!!! Plus it allows your 5 12K COCO-3 to run at double 
speed all the time even for floppy disk access!!! The MEMORY 
tester is s fast Machine Language program to test the 512K 
COCO-3. It performs several bit tests as well as an address test so 
you know that your 5 1 2K of memory is worki ng perfectly. 

Requires 512K & DISK $19.95 
COMING SOON 

Maybe even by the time you read this!!! 

TEXTPRO IV- Word Processor with ON Screen Underlining, Italics, 
Bold and Double Width display. What you see is what you get. 
THE SOURCE-3- Disassembler Source Generator better than ever. 
CBASIC3 - With Enhanced Graphics & 5 1 2K RAM support plus more! 



DataPack lit Plus V I . 1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTO P I LOTand AUT0-L06 Command Processors 
X-MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 

VT- 100 & VT -52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

• No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port 

• 8 Sefedabfe Display Formats, 32/40/64^0 cohjms at 192 or 225 Resolution. 

• 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi -Res Text Display and Disk . 

• ASCII & BINARY cfek file transfer support via XMCOEtt 

• Directly record receive data to a disk file while online (Data togging), 

• VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, LMXand other systems. 

• VT- 100/52 cursor keys & position, insert/detelB, PF & AIL KM keys. 

• Prograrrm±te Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates 300 to 96C0 . 

• Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

• SendflJ! 5 28 character set from Keyboard with control codes. 

• Complete Editor, Insert, Delete, Change or Add to Buffer. 

• 9 Variable length, Ftogrm^ 

• ProoranTrdDfePf%4^f^from \ !0to9600Baud. 

• Eend Files direct)y from ire Buffer , nacro Key Buffers or Disk . 

• Display on Screen or ftnnt lie contents of the Buffer. 

• Freeze Display St Review ir/crmaticn Ch line with no loss of data. 
® f3ui1t in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

• Ml in 2 Drive RAMDISK for 5 12K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R. S.Modem-Pek & Deluxe RS-232Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 1 28/5 \ 2K & Disk, Only 159.95 

HI RES III Screen Commander 

Now you can have up to 54 different character sizes on 
your COCO-3 scrocn si the same time!!! 

• 54 Different Character Sizes available Mlo2l2c.pl. 

• Bold, /is// cor Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad Width characters. 

• Full 96 Upper/Lower case characters, 

• Continious or Individual Character Highlighting. 

• Scroll Protect f rom 1 to 23 lines on the screen, 

• Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCRHEN3 mode. 

• PRINT @ available in all character sizes. 

• Programmable Automatic Key repeat, 

• Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

• Full Cursor Control command support. 

• Selectable Character Background color. 

• Color or Monochrome Display modes, 

• Uses only 4K of Extended or Basic ram. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES HI was designed to improve the standard display capabilities 
of the Color Computer 3, even the 40 and 80 column displays have 
several features missing. For example you can't use PRINT © or 
have different character sizes on the same screen, even mixing 
text and graphics with the HPRINT command leaves a lot to be 
desired. HI-RES 111 can give you the kind of display capabilities you 
always dreamed about having on your color computer but didn't get 
with your COCO-3. Weil now it's here and with a wide variety of 
display options that you can easily use with your Basic or ML 
programs. HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color 
Basic and its operation is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the 
normal screen display with an extremely versatile display package. 
It also overcomes some of the disadvantages found when using the 
Width 40 £* 80 screens. You can use the Print © function on any 
line length with Hl-RES III, it also gives you a programmable 
automatic key repeat that can be very handy for editing your Basic 
programs. Automatic key repeat can be adjusted from ultra fast ti 
super slow and can be disabled entirely if desired. You also get a 
full control code keyboard using the "CTRL' key. So many of HI-RES 
Ill's extended functions can be controlled directly from the keyboard 
easily. With just a couple of simple keystrokes you can change 
character sizes and styles at any time. You can even switch back 

and f »rth botwoon the standard COCO-3 display and MI-RES IH with a 

simple keyboard entry or under program control. But, after you 
use HI-RES III, you most likely won! want to do without it again. 

HI-RES III can be used for a wide variety of applications, with its 
many different character sizes and styles. You can make your 
program really look professional, wttn protected menus, Doid or 
italic emphasis. Double or Quad characters for easy to read displays 
&. menus. It can be idealy suited for Video Titles or Store Displays. 
Printing Signs or Fliers in conjunction with a Hi-res Screen dump 
program. The visually impared will espically appreciate the extra 
large character sizes available. 

Requires 128/512K Tape or Disk $34.95 

To orderproducls by mail, send check or money order for the amount of purchase, 
plus S3.0t for shipping & bundling to the address below. 
To ortferby VISA, MASTERCARD or COO call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, Sam to SpmPST), 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 891 10 

702-452-0632 




COCO 3 DRIVES J & M Systems, Ltd. has 
introduced its 3/2-inch floppy drive subsystem for 
the Color Computer 3. The user-installable 
subsystems are available in two basic configura- 
tions. An external, stand-alone model with case, 
power supply and cable is available for $250. 
Users wanting to add a drive to their current case/ 
power supply unit can purchase a 3 J /4-i nch drive 
mounted on an adapter bracket, which will fit in 
place of a 5^-inch floppy, for $199. 

Both subsystems are 80-track units with 720K 
formatted capacity under OS-9 Level II. The 
drives may be used with Disk Extended Color 
BASIC and will yield I60K capacity. For addi- 
tional information and details, contact J & M 
Systems, Ltd., 15 / 00 A Central S.E., Albu- 
querque, NM 87123, (505)292-4182. 

uP DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM The P68000 
uLAB microprocessor development system with 
an educational price of $197.50 has just been 
announced by University Research and Develop- 
ment Associates, Inc. (URDA, Inc.) and is being 
manufactured by Quasitronics, Inc. The P68000 
uLAB is a 68000 microprocessor and support 
chips with keypad, LED display, 4K bytes 
SRAM, 8K bytes of EPROM, cassette interface, 
software operating system, power supply, User's 
Manual and Programmer's Reference Manual 
completely packaged in a three-ring binder, i.e., 
a Notebook Computer. 

The uLAB is engineered to be low cost, provid- 
ing a complete microprocessor development 
system for hands-on experience for engineers, 
technicians and students. Because of its size, the 
uLAB can be carried to the home, dormitory, or 



other work or study location for experimentation 
at the user's convenience. It is also suitable for use 
in conjunction with lecture-type courses. 

The uLAB comes complete with a listing of the 
software monitor, including comments and 
documentation, and a schematic including every 
component. The P68000 uLAB lists for $295 with 
discounts to $197.50 for educational institutions, 
faculty and students. To order, contact Quasi- 
tronics, Inc.. 211 Vandale Drive. Houston, PA 
15342, {800)245-4192. For technical informal i*n, 
contact URDA, Inc. (412)683-8732. 

GROUND COVERAGE Pilgrim Electric Com- 
pany has announced a new grounding device for 
antistatic equipment. The Model GAM-1 Smart 
Static Ground Monitor provides two Fail-Safe 
discharge ports and monitors the quality of the 
building ground. 

When the GAM-I is plugged into a standard 
1 5- or 20-amp 1 20 VAC receptacle, it continuously 
checks the outlet circuit wiring and its Go-No-Go 
light turns on if the outlet is correctly wired and 
the building ground is adequate for draining static 
charges. 

The new GA M- 1 provides two "Fail-Safe" ESD 
ground connections, a standard Banana Jack and 
an Apple Jack. The Banana Jack accepts a 
standard banana plug. The Apple Jack accepts a 
stranded or solid wire of 18 to 22 gauge, and 
alligator clip adapter, a ring terminal, fork lug or 
quick disconnect — without using tools. Its quick 
insertion and retention method facilitates wiring 
and maintains electrical contact integrity. Both 
jacks have integral I -megohm current limiting 
resistors to safeguard users from shock hazard. 



The GAM-I carries a list price of $24.95. F#r 
more informati0n, contact Pilgrim Electric 
C0mpany, 105 New/own Road, Plainvirw, NY 
11803. 




4 




The GAM -J offers fml-safe monitoring of your 
building's ground connection. 

LOOPHOLES IN COMPUTER FRAUD ACT 

Computer crime is not a youthful prank by 
teenage "hackers," as it is often portrayed in 
movies. Each year, economic losses due to 
computer crime are estimated in the multimillion 
dollar range. Many of those losses go undetected 
or unreported. 

The recently enacted Computer Fraud and 
Abuse Act of 1986 remedies many of the short- 
comings of a previous bill passed in 1984. But, 
some of the earlier bill's deficiencies remain 
uncorrected, and the new statute adds difficulties 
in criminal prosecution, according to an article in 
the current issue of Criminal Justice, published by 
the American Bar Association's Criminal Justice 
Section. 

Some important terms, particularly "access," 
"use," "affects" and "without authorization," 
remain undefined bythenewlaw, according to the 
authors of the article, Joseph B. Tompkins, Jr. and 
Federick S. Ansell. 

Under the new law, even if someone accesses 
a financial institution's computer without author- 
ization, no crime is committed unless he obtains 
information or causes damage totaling $1,000. 

Additionally, the statute concerns only crimes 
against data, but does not protect software. 

Tompkins and Ansell call for increased prose- 
cution of computer crimes. Although many 
computer owners are reluctant to report crime — 
banks, for instance, may not want their depositors 
to know that their institution is vulnerable — 
everyone would be better off if computer crime 
were prosecuted, both to obtain restitution for 
victims and to deter future criminal activity. 




The P68000 uLAB — computer in * notebook. 



144 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



TKa Civtk 




An index to the 
articles, reviews an< 
authors appearing 

in THE RAINBOW 

from July 1986 
throuah June 1987, 



Compiled and Edited 
by Leslie A. Foster 



Copyright© 1987, Falsoft. Inc. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 145 



AN INDEX TO THE RAINBOW 
JULY 1986 - JUNE 1987 

TOTAL NUMBER OF ARTICLES 
(July 1981 to June 1987) — 3518 

This is the fourth index to the Rainbow. Changes 
in this year's index include: 
-editorial comments are indexed 
-hints and one - (or two-) liner programs are indexed 
-names of Rainbow on Tape/Disk programs are 
included with each citation 
-question and answer citations include a sample of 
question topics 

-in "The CoCo gallery," titles of graphic art are noted 

Previous indexes to the Rainbow are available as 
follows: 

July 1981 to June 1984— July 1984 issue 
July 1984 to June 1985 — July 1985 issue 
July 1985 to June 1986— July 1986 issue 

The subject breakdown, and number of items per 
heading are shown below. The number following in 
brackets is the total number of articles published 
since 1981 in that topic (where indexed). 

ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE —3 (43) 
BUSINESS — 1 (30) 
CASSETTE — 1 (6) 
CLUBS — 5 (12) 
COMMUNICATIONS — 21 (65) 
DATABASE MANAGEMENT — 0 (9) 
DISK — 5 (58) 

DRAGON COMPUTER —0 (3) 

EDITORIAL COMMENT —24 (not indexed) 

EDUCATION - ELEMENTARY — 11 (52) 

EDUCATION - GENERAL — 34 (178) 

EDUCATION - LOGO — 0 (4) 

GAME — 45 (248) 

GAME - ACTION — 0 (12) 

GAME- ADVENTURE — 3 (25) 

GAME - SIMULATION — 1 (18) 

GENERAL — 31 (164) 

GRAPHICS — 56 (216) 

HARDWARE —0 (18) 

HARDWARE PROJECT — 18 (45) 

HARDWARE TUTORIAL — 11 (18) 

HINT — 31 (not indexed) 

HOME APPLICATION — 18 (94) 

HOME FINANCE — 9 (30) 

MC-10 MICRO COLOR COMPUTER — 0 (6) 

MUSIC — 13 (51 ) 

ONE OR TWO LINER PROGRAMS — 65 (not 

indexed) 
OPERATING SYSTEMS — 0 (3) 
OPERATING SYSTEMS - OS9 — 26 (81) 
PASCAL — 0 (13) 
PRINTER — 8 (64) 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS — 32 (74) 

SOUND SYNTHESIS — 0 (4) 

TUTORIAL — 12 (52) 

UTILITY — 16 (138) 

WORD PROCESSING — 3 (13) 

TOTAL NUMBER OF ARTICLES — 699 (3516) 



AUTHORS — 472 (1836) 



PRODUCT REVIEWS — 196 (1549) 



Leslie A. Foster is a 
librarian with Dal- 
housie Law Library in 
Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
Canada, and has re- 
cently been appointed 
System Manager for 
the implementation of 
an integrated library 
system for the univer- 
sities in the Halifax 




ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE 

Barden, William, Jr. "Interfacing tricks for BASIC 
and Assembly Language." (July 1986) 216 
WORDCNT1; WORDCNT2 EXPLODE1; 
EXPLODE2 

Barden, William, Jr. "More interfacing tricks for 
Assembly Language and BASIC." (August 1986) 
188 CHARGEN 

Barden, William, Jr. "Presenting a quiz for Color 
Computer Assembly Language." (November 

1986) 192 

BUSINESS 

Dettmann, Harvey. "The bookkeeper's helper." 
(March 1987) 97 PAYROLL 

CASSETTE 

Nelson, Mark. "Fast relief for tape-loading 
headaches." (February 1987) 182 — Correction, 
June 1987, p.116. TAPE DOC 

CLUBS 

"Clubs, clubs, clubs." (January 1987) 70 — 

Quarterly list of CoCo clubs. 
"Clubs, clubs, clubs." (April 1987) 149 
"CoCo community." (July 1986) 204 
"CoCo community." (October 1986) 189 
Haverstock, Mark. "The care and feeding of a 

CoCo club." (January 1987) 67 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Adams, Rick ;and Lear, Dale. "Coming to terms 

with the CoCo 3." (November 1986) 93 — 

Terminal program for CoCo 3. Corrections to 

Rainbow on tape/disk January 1987, p. 164. 

TERM3BAS; TERM3 
Augsburg, Cray. "Building an OS-9 support 

network." (July 1986) 88 — News from Delphi. 
Augsburg, Cray. "Changes make Delphi even 

easier to use." (March 1987) 92 — Includes a 

Delphi command card. 
Augsburg, Cray. "Checking into conference." 

(April 1987) 94 
Augsburg, Cray. "Command options in the 

workspace." (October 1986) 154 — About 

Delphi. 

Augsburg, Cray. "A follow-up on SIG mail." 

(December 1986) 169 
Augsburg, Cray. "Help is just a SIG away." (May 

1987) 120 

Augsburg, Cray. "Help one, help all." (June 1987) 
126 

Augsburg, Cray. "A look at workspace." 

(September 1986) 172 — Delphi hints. 
Augsburg, Cray. "A review of the personal 

settings profile.'" (January 1987) 168 
Augsburg, Cray. "SIG changes include new 

selections, new sections." (February 1987) 68 — 

Delphi information. 
Augsburg, Cray. "Using mail in the SIG." 

(November 1986) 102 — Delphi news. 
Augsburg, Cray. "Using the CoCo SIG." (August 

1986) 174 

Bailey, Eric. "Graphically speaking: The artistic 

BBS." (November1986j 108 — Correction, 

February 1987, p. 160. LRWSEDIT 
Crosby, Mark. "The evolving REMOTE." 

(November 1986) 70 REMOT232 
Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS message editor." 

(November 1986) 80 SMH 
Goodman, Marty. "Database report." (September 

1986) 173 — Delphi news. 
Goodman, Marty. "RTTY for the Color Computer." 

(November 1986)36 RTTY 
Kyte, Ted. "Two CoCo BBS system." (November 

1986) 86 

Miller, Eric ; and Gavriluk, Erik. "Long distance 
draughts." (November 1986) 114 — Checkers by 
modem. MCLOAD; MCDRAW 

Popyack, Len. "Hamming it up." (November 1986) 
43 — Packet radio discussion. 



DISK 

Armstrong, Kerry M. "Transplant surgery for the 
disk controller." (July 1986) 68 — Upgrade the 
disk controller. 

Goodman, Marty. "Transfer CoCo text files to MS- 
DOS disks." (July 1986) 176 MS19GEN; 
MSFORMAT ADOLF COC02MS 

Jorgenson, Michael N. "Take command of CoCo 3 
drives." (February 1987) 94 — Disk utility for the 
CoCo 3. DU-3 

Perevosnik, Joe. "Double duty." (May 1987) 92 — 
Print hard copies of disk directory. DISK DIR 

Schrag, Roger. "The limousine utility: A tape-to- 
disk transfer vehicle." (February 1987) 73 — 
Reprint from January 1984, p. 48. TPTODSK 

EDITORIAL COMMENT 

Arnott, Jo Anna. "Building April's Rainbow." (April 
1987) 16 — Introduction to home help issue 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Printtf-2." (July 1986) 12 — 
Fifth anniversary memories. 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Print«-2." (August 1986) 12 — 
Come visit Falsoft; Chicago RAIN BOWfest. 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Print«-2." (September 1986) 12 

— All about CoCo 3. 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Print«-2." (October 1986) 12 — 

Comments on CoCo 3. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "Printtf-2." (November 1986) 12 

— 'Tandy's got IT.' 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Printtf-2." (December 1986) 12 

— CoCo 3 comments. 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Print«-2." (January 1987) 12 — 

Comments on availability of CoCo 3 software. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "PrintW-2." (February 1987) 12 

— How to promote the CoCo. 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Printfl-2." (March 1987) 12 — 

Availability of software for CoCo 3. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "Printtf-2." (April 1987) 12 — 

Comments about software piracy. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "Print«-2." (May 1987) 12 — 

Comments about adventure contest. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "Printtf-2." (June 1987) 12 — 

Discussion of Chicago RAINBOWfest. 
Reed, James E. "Building August's Rainbow." 

(August 1986) 16 — Assorted commentary. 
Reed, James E. "Building December's Rainbow.' 

(December 1986) 16 — CoCo 3 comments. 
Reed, James E. "Building February's Rainbow.' 

(February 1987) 16 — Just can't retire the old 

CoCo 1! 

Reed, James E. "Building January's Rainbow." 
(January 1987) 16 — Introduction to beginner's 
issue. 

Reed, James E. "Building July's Rainbow." (July 

1986) 16 — Notes for beginners. 

Reed, James E. "Building June's Rainbow." (June 

1987) 16 — Discussion of Chicago 
RAINBOWfest. 

Reed, James E. "Building March's Rainbow." 

(March 1987) 16 
Reed, James E. "Building May's Rainbow." (May 

1987) 16 — Attach a CoCo to your exercise bike! 
Reed, James E. "Building November's Rainbow." 

(November 1986) 16 — Comments on copyright 

issues. 

Reed, James E. "Building October's Rainbow." 

(October 1986) 16 — All about Rainbow on Disk. 
Reed, James E. "Building September's Rainbow.' 

(September 1986) 16 — All about CoCo 3. 



EDUCATION - ELEMENTARY 

Blyn, Steve. "Let the little ones learn by counting 

on CoCo." (January 1987) 76 CARCOUNT 
Blyn, Steve. "Mystery word puzzles." (September 

1986) 74 — Help learn spelling or vocabulary 

lists. SPELPUZL 
Blyn, Steve. "Word fun: The three bears come of 

age." (November 1986) 74 FUNWORDS 
Plog, Michael. "The role of teachers in educational 

software development." (June 1987) 32 
Rigsby, Mike. "Your face or mine?" (September 

1986) 88 FACE BASND SOUND 



146 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Scerbo, Fred B. "The challenge returns: Driller II is 
a thriller, too." (October 1986) 173 DRILLER2 

Scerbo, Fred B. "Understanding relationships 
between fractions, decimals and whole 
numbers." (January 1987) 78 MATHQUIZ 

Scerbo, Fred B. "Updating the Color Change 
quiz." (September 1986) 98 CHNGQUIZ 

Schneider, Harold. "The odd man out." (October 
1986) 125 — Rainbow on tape program also on 
September tape. NOTLIKE 

Turner, Del. "Is is a fish, or a phish, or a pheish?" 
(June 1987) 148 — BASIC09 helps with 
phoneme recognition. SOUNDPUZ (BASIC09) 

Turowski, Donald. "I before E except after C..." 
(September 1986) 78 SPELDRIL 

EDUCATION - GENERAL 

Bennett, Jim. "The vocabulary tightrope." (July 
1986) 188 — Match synonyms. TITEROPE 

Blyn, Steve. "Developing logical reasoning skills." 
(July 1986) 132 — Development of reasoning 
powers. TRUEFALS 

Blyn, Steve. "Exploring the card catalog." (August 

1986) 94 — Training in library skills. CARD LOG 
Blyn, Steve. "A flexible program for teaching line 

graphs." (April 1987) 46 GRAPHS 
Blyn, Steve. "It's back to basics with an adjective 

review." (October 1986) 152 ADJECTIV 
Blyn, Steve. "Learning about scales: Key to 

understanding maps." (May 1987) 112 

MAPSCALE 

Blyn, Steve. "Making the Dewey Decimal system 

user-friendly." (March 1987) 74 DEWEY 
Blyn, Steve. "Presidents take Precedence." 

(February 1987) 46 — Presidential quiz. 

PRESIDNTS 
Blyn, Steve. "A square deal for teaching math." 

(June 1987) 47 MATHPLAY 
Blyn, Steve. "Understanding the computer with 

binary dice conversions." {December 1986) 88 

BINARY 

Collicot, John. "Cipher fun for CoCo kids." (April 

1987) 166 ADDITION 

Hood, Thomas. "Counting with Caesar." (April 

1987) 172 — Roman numeral drill. ROMANS 
Kenny, Keiran. "Rational thinking." (September 

1986) 38 — Conversion of fractions to ratios and 

percentages. RATIOS 
Kolar, Joseph. "Translation sensation." (July 

1986) 93 LANGTUTR 
Kolar, Joseph. "Uncomplicating translating." 

(August 1986) 48 — Second part of translation 

demo. LANGTUT1, LANGTUT2 
Norton, Dennis. "Chronologist in CoCo land." (Sep- 

tember 1986) 58 — Teach children how to read a 

clock. CLOCK 
Plog, Michael. "Do teachers like computers?" 

(February 1987) 65 
Plog, Michael. "Finding resources for computer 

learning." (March 1987) 90 
Plog, Michael, "The 'hidden' computers." (August 

1986) 97 — Use of the CoCo in videotape 

editing. 

Plog, Michael. "The most important educators of 

all." (November 1986) 166 
Plog, Michael. "Programming the LOGO turtle: 

Studies in learning transfer." (April 1987) 86 
Plog, Michael. "The question of assessment." 

(January 1987) 176 
Plog, Michael. "S-P analysis: Comparing the 

curves." (May 1987) 82 — Aid in curriculum 

improvements. 
Plog, Michael. "Special education and the 

computer." (July 1986) 135 
Plog, Michael. "Tandy grants and the status of 

educational computers." (September 1986) 76 
Powers, Ron. "CoCo testmaker revisited." 

{September 1986) 160 — Make multiple choice 

tests updated (from Sept. 1985, p. 30). 

TESTMAKR 
Powers, Ron. "The teacher's pel." [September 

1986) 47 — Computerized grade book. 

GRADCALC 
Scerbo, Fred B. "CoCo conquers the metric 

system." (April 1987) 76 LIFESKL6 



Scerbo, Fred B. "Computer-paced learning." 

(August 1986) 167 LIFESKL4 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Graphics, education and speech 

come together." (May 1987) 38 —Graphic 

simulation of blood flow. BLOOD 
Scerbo, Fred B. "More graphics, speech and 

education." (June 1987) 106 — Simulation of the 

heart. HEART 
Scerbo, Fred B. "A spelling program that speaks 

for itself." (February 1987) 166 H&SPELL 
Terrio, Christine. "Teacher's pet." (January 1987) 

32 — Spelling practice lists. 
White, Edward A, "Hail to the Chief." (September 

1986) 153 — Presidential quiz. PRESIDNT 

GAME 

Baumgardt, Kent. "Explosive word fun." (April 

1987) 59 — Hangman game WORDGUES 
Behrmann, Darrel. "Alien raiders blitz." (November 

1986) 52 RAIDERS 
Bell, Bruce K. "The eyes have it." (January 1987) 

52 — Visual memory games. DISCRIM 
Bell, Bruce K. "Hint." (June 1987) 81 — 

Modification to Discrimination (January 1987 

p.52). 

Bernico, Bill. "Double whammy." (October 1986) 
101 — Based on dice game, Skunk. WHAMMY 
Bernico, Bill. "Laying down the chips." (August 

1986) 80 — Bingo caller. BINGO 

Blound, Andy. "Masonry madness." (August 1986) 
83 — Lo-res puzzle game. BRICKS 

Branigan, Arron. "Fortune wheel." (August 1986) 
156 — Modification, December 1986, p. 50, and 
March 1987, p. 182. WHEEL CREATOR 

Brimner, Robert. "Joker poker." (March 1987) 99 

— Correction, May 1987, p. 128. POKER 
Brunotte, Benjamin W. "This one's a puzzler." 

(May 1987) 152 — Construct word search 

puzzles. WDSEARCH 
Buttacavoli, Paul D. "CoCo 3 gets you over a 

barrel." (March 1987) 52 — Similar to Rubik's 

cube. BARREL 
Camirand, Rene. "Save the astronauts!" 

(September 1986) 33 ASTRONAT 
Collins, Dale R. "Life of the party for $200, please." 

(March 1987) 58 — Similar to TV's Jeopardy. 

Correction, May 1987, p. 128. GPARTY 
Coty, Curt. "Lei the laser battle begin." (January 

1987) 36 — Correction, May 1987, p. 128. DEF 
MOV 

Dash, Raju. "The evil tyrantstar lord." (August 

1986) 58 STARLORD 

Dick, Brien. "Which Nym is Witch?" (August 1986) 
40 — Educational game. Correction, October 
1986, p. 92. NYMATCH 

Drennan, Allen. "Bombs away!" (October 1986) 18 
BOMBAWAY 

Drennan, Allen. "A Visit to the past." (January 

1987) 28 — New version of Breakout. 
BACKSTAB 

Farris, Charles. "Mission: hold the bridge." 

(December 1986) 29 MORTAR 
Galibois, Michel. "Paramission: Fast and 

dangerous!" (May 1987) 114 PARAMISS 
German. J. D. "Up on the rooftop." (December 

1986) 124 — Christmas theme game. SANTA 
Goldwyn, Ira. "Perplexing picture puzzles." 

(September 1986) 108 SCRAMBLE LATECOCO 
Hoggins, Jay R. "Vigilance is vital for victory over 

vicious Vic." (July 1986) 74 VIC 
Huang, David. "Calling to mind." (August 1986) 81 

— Memory game. REPEATIT 

Hutchinson, David. "Hand-me-downs." (February 

1987) 120 HAND OFF 

Jensen, Paul. "The evictor." (July 1986) 62 
EVICTOR 

Jones, Tim. "The eye of the tiger." (August 1986) 

122 — Boxing game. BOXING 
Jones, Tudor P. "The Solitary endeavor." 

(December 1986) 76 — Solitaire on the CoCo. 

Correction, March 1987, p.182. SOLTAIRE 
Kenny, Keiran. "Mastering the gates." (August 

1986) 79 GATES 
Keyes. Chris. "Air rescue." (June 1987) 26 — 

Balloon attack game. POKE1; POKE2 



Kromeke, Michael B. "Tricks of the trade." (March 

1987) 76 — Puzzle type game SWITCH 
Lear, Dale. "There's evil doings afoot at the Hotel 

CoCo." (February 1987) 27 SETUP (OS9) 

HOTEL (OS9) 
Meyers, Peter. "The menace of the SandWorm." 

(August 1986) 18 SANDWORM 
Noble, James A. "Battlin' blue Bert." (April 1987) 

105 BLUEBERT 
Petit, Laura ; and Petit, Chris. "Hippity hoppity 

down the bunny trail." (April 1987) 99 — Pattern 

discrimination game. EASTER 
Powers, Courtney. "Instant graphics and Hogs in 

Space.'' (February 1987) 106 — Correction. May 

1987, p. 128. HOGSPACE 
Rittenhouse, James E. "Wet'n wild." (January 

1987) 27 — Leaky roof game. LEAKY 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Achieving arcade game speed in 

BASIC." (July 1986) 98 — Advanced Star-Trench 

Warfare (see also November 1982, p. 8) 

Corrections, August 1986, p. 98, and October 

1986, p. 92 TRENCH 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Creating designer arcade 

games." (December 1986) 163 — Updated snail 

invaders. CRTVADER 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Roboflip: Anatomy of a game." 

(March 1987) 168 ROBOFLIP 
Tucker, Eric. "Treasure quest: The golden 

adventure." (November 1986) 18 TREASURE 
Wells, John T. "Saucer, saucer, in the sky." (April 

1987) 116 SAUCER 
White, Eric. "CoCo-nect-a-dot." (January 1987) 60 

COCONECT 
Wood, James W. "Tic-tac-CoCo." (August 1986) 

36 — Polar version of game. TICTACTO 
Wright, Archor. "Fly off the handle." (August 1986) 

81 — Flight simulator. FLIGHT 

GAME - ADVENTURE 

Cook, Bill. "The adventure processor." (August 

1986) 26 — Help in writing adventure games. 
Correction, November 1986, p. 78. ADV-PRO 

Duerig, Jean ;and Duerig.AI. "The goblins'll 
getcha if you don't watch out!" (October 1986) 
26 HALOWEEN 

Ruby, Paul, Jr. "Success mansion." (January 

1987) 108 — Correction, April 1987. p. 128. 
SUCCESS 

GAME - SIMULATION 

Kromeke, Michael B. "Rattle rattle thunder clatter 
boom boom boom." (September 1986) 49 — A 
model of a car engine. ENGINE 

GENERAL 

Adams, Rick ; and Lear, Dale. "Color chart for the 
CoCo 3." (January 1987) 20 COLOR3 

Augsburg, Cray. "The RAIN BOWfest reporter." 
(February 1987) 83 — Princeton, October 1986. 

Barden, William, Jr. "How does the CoCo stack 

up?" (August 1986) 90 — Rating of CoCo with 

other micros. 
Bernico, Bill. "Get chart smart with mileage 

mapper." (May 1987) 30 — Calculate distances 

on a map. DISTANCE 
Bernico. Bill. "Songwriter's word rhymer." 

(January 1987) 32 — Add endings to words. 

RHYMER 

Biggs, Brian. "Where is it?" (December 1986) 93 — 

Disc label program. LABELER 
Bjork, Steve. "The Color Computer3: A 

programmer's dream." (September 1986) 26 
Bouchard, Roger. "Date tracking through the 

ages." (January 1987) 46 — Generate calendars 

for any year. Correction, April 1987, p. 128. 

CALENDAR; CALMOD 
"CoCo 3 is born!" (September 1986) 30 
"The faces of Falsoft: The Rainbow makers." (July 

1986) 37 — Staff pictures. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "CoCo better again? 

Impressions of the newCoCo3." (September 

1986) 18 

Foster, Leslie A. "The fifth year of Rainbow." (July 
1986) 193 — Index July 1985 - June 1986. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 147 



Hyre, Leonard. "The key to success." (March 
1987) 66 — Typing tutor. Correction. May 1987, 
p. 128. COCOTYPE 

Laun, Robert E. "Enter the fifth dimension." (April 
1987) 20 — Five dimensional arrays explained. 
FIFTHDIM 

McGrath. Dick. "The envelope please." (November 

1986) 125 — Crossword puzzle contest winner. 
Montowski, Robert C. "July fashion forecast: 

Classic clothes by CoCo." (July 1986) 115 — 
Make iron-on transfers. BOOTFLIP FLIP-L2R; 
FLIPPOKE 

Parker, Jeffrey, "The RAINBOWfest reporter." (Oc- 
tober 1986) 83 — Chicago, May 23-25. 1986. 

Plog, Michael. "Computers and our English 
vocabulary." (December 1986) 173 

Plog. Michael. "A discussion about sexism in the 
computer industry." (October 1986) 164 

Samuels, Edward. "Computer program copyrights: 
A how-to guide." (April 1987) 82 

Scerbo, Fred B. "Prepare for Thanksgiving 
cooking with liquid measure." (November 1986) 
62 — Gallons to ounces, etc. LIQUID 

Schuster. Tobin. "The 8088 sounds off." (March 

1987) 40 — Unusual use for the 8088 
microprocessor. 

Siegel. Mark. "The third one's the charm." 
(November 1986) 30 — More details on CoCo 3. 

Staff, "Rainbow's holiday shopping guide." (De- 
cember 1986) 25 — Christmas gift suggestions. 

Steinbrueck, Richard. "The tournament master." 
(April 1987) 120 — Keep track of round robin 
games. Correction, June 1987, p. 116. 
RNDROBIN INPUT 

Tenney, Steve. "The rhythm of life." (May 1987) 20 
— Chart your biorhythms. BIOCH ART 

White, Richard A. "Exploring the CoCo 3 color 
system." (March 1987) 112 C03COLOR 

White. Richard A. "The first days with CoCo 3: 
Experimentation and discovery." (January 1987) 
188 

White, Richard A. "Making the most of CoCo 3 
features without overdoing it." (April 1987) 194 
LISTER 

Williamson, H. G. "Tracking the tempest." (April 

1987) 26 — Predict a hurricane landfall. 

Correction, June 1987, p. 116. HURRTRAK 
Zumwalt. Greg L. "Tandy Color Computer 3 does 

windows, and a whole lot more." (September 

1986} 20 



GRAPHICS 



Adams, Rick . and Lear. Dale. "The power of the 

palette: Graphics on the Color Computer 3." 

(October 1986) 37 — Corrections to Rainbow on 

tape/disk January 1987, p. 164. TUNNEL WHEEL 
Barden. William, Jr. "More on PSET, PRESET and 

graphics speed." (January 1987) 181 LINEBAS; 

LINEBIN RADARBAS; RADARBIN 
Benway. Patrick J. "Space attack." (October 1986) 

1 1 3 — Demonstrate graphics commands. RAID 
Berenz, Michael. "The boogie box. " ( October 

1986) 113 — Print jam box on printer. RADIO 
Bernico, Bill, "The case of the shifty-eyed 

animation tutor." (January 1987) 82 FACE ONE; 

FACE TWO; FACETEST 
Bernico, Bill. "Colors of the spectrum." (October 

1986) 112 — Combine colors on screen. 
SPECTRUM 

Bernico, Bill. "A Thanksgiving pizza party." 

(November 1986) 28 PIZZA 
Billen, David C. "CoCo bright." (February 1987) 49 

— Give colored text on screen. BOOT 

CHARLOAD PROGLOAD DEFINE 
Brown, Chris W, "Get the picture." (February 

1987) 88 — Graphic printout directory, GRADIR 
Cassel. Randy. "Graphics trio." (April 1987) 66 — 

Graphics demos. SPJNNER CIRCLES IPOPPER 
"The CoCo gallery." (July 1986) 18 — Pictures: 

Uncle Sam; America; 4th of July; Abraham 

Lincoln; Chapel. 
"The CoCo gallery." (August 1986) 114 —Pictures: 

Where worlds meet; Pioneer 1837; Basketball 

zone; Saturn; Comet; Beginning golfer. 



"The CoCo gallery." (September 1986) 122 — 

Pictures: Oratory; Beyond; Truck; Independence 

Hall; The Knight; Robot. 
"The CoCo gallery.'* (October 1986) 122 — 

Pictures: Spaceship earth; Co Covilla; Serpent; 

Halloween; Scorpion; Center. 
"The CoCo gallery." (November 1986) 26 — 

Pictures: Summer; Orbital drag race; P51 

Mustang; Editor; CoCo Cat; Wolf. 
"The CoCo gallery." (December 1986) 114 — 

Pictures: Strictly CoCo; Cowboy; X-Mas; 

Christmas morning; Waterfall; Football. 
"The CoCo gallery." (January 1987) 18 —Pictures: 

Castle; The Staff; Rainbow; The Enchantment of 

Crashk; Townhall; Space Dome. 
"The CoCo gallery." (February 1987) 18 — 

Pictures: Jenny Grist Mill; Mountain; Maison; 

Pete Rose; Ape; Birds. 
"The CoCo gallery." (March 1987) 18 —Pictures; 

Telecoco; The super computer; Lighthouse; 

Haupt's mill bridge; O!' Smokey. 
"The CoCo gallery." (April 1987) 18 — Pictures: 

Sugar house; USA; World; Downtown 

Columbus; Eagle, 
"The CoCo gallery." (May 1987) 18 — Pictures: 

Seascape; Gettysburg Battlefield; Boat, Emily; 

Something fishy. 

"The "CoCo gallery." (June 1987) 18 — Pictures: 
Ship; Saturn; White Mill Creek; Old Mill; 
Mountain. 

Curtis, H. Allen. "Festive CoCo: Ready to PAINT 
the town." (July 1986)46 — Expanded PAINT 
command. Correction. February 1987, p. 160. 
PAINT 1 TO PAINT 4 

Curtis. H. Allen. "Our highfalutin' feline does a CoCo 
3 fandago." (May 1987) 52 — Dancing CoCo cat, 
CATDANCE; RECTANGL 

Curtis, H Allen. "PUT speedy GETzales to work." 

(November 1986) 158 GETPUT1 TO GETPUT4 
DiZazzo, Ernie. "CoCo can play cupid, too." 

(February 1987) 36 — Make a Valentine's card. 

LOVECARD 
Fortin, llene. "From our house to yours," 

(December 1986) 62 — Dot matrix Christmas 

cards. CARDSHOP 
Golias, Ruth. "A public service message." 

(February 1987) 124 — Graphics demo on safety 

theme. MESSAGE 
Harper. Jeff. "Graph-o-matic." (September 1986) 

82 — Plot 3-D functions. 3DFNCPLT 
Herr, Darin. "CoCoDraw concoctions." (October 

1986) 59 MENUGEN COCODRAW 

Jones. Edward. "Two-tone text." (May 1987) 89 — 
Experiment with different combinations. 
COLORS 

Kenny. Keiran. "The electronic marquee." 

(September 1986) 41 DISPLAY 
Kenny. Keiran. "PEEKasso prints." (January 1987) 

30 — Drawing program PEEKASSO 
Kolar, Joseph. "Exploring CoCo graphics." (April 

1987) 112 

Kressman, Robie, "Astronomer's heaven." 
(January 1987) 30 — Display the night sky. 
BIGDIPPR 

Kyte, Ted. "That's the way the ball bounces." (May 

1987) 88 — CoCo 3 graphics demo. BALLDEMO 
LaBonville, Helen. "Halloween foolery." (October 

1986) 108 — Talking pumpkin PUMPKIN 
Matthews. Becky F." Acycle-delic palette." 

(February 1987) 60 — Graphics demo for CoCo 

3. CYCLDRAW 
Matthews, Becky F. "O, Tannenbaum." (December 

1986) 116 — Christmas graphics. TRIMTREE 
Mayeux, Ann B. "Portraits by BASIC." (October 

1986) 49 DRAWFACE 
Montowski, Robert C. "Picture perfect graphics 

commands." (March 1987) 156 — For OS-9 only. 

GSAVE (OS9) GLOAD (OS9) MAKE PIX (OS9) 
Polsz, Steven R. "Optimum animation." (October 

1986) 116 

Ropson, Ronald T. "The shifting, reducing, 

stretching, enlarging transfiguration band." 

(October 1986) 44 ZOOM1 TO ZOOM4 
Satvaii, Pierre. "Four shades of gray." (May 1987) 

90 — Prints graphics screens. COLRDUMP 
Sims, Michael. "Charting the ups and downs of 

life." (March 1987) 86 — Draw graphs of data. 

GRAPHIT 



Snook, Allen. "The spit and image." (May 1987) 36 

— Screen dump program. GRAPHGEN 
Thomas, Carmie A. "Happy new year!" (January 

1987) 29 — Graphics demo. NEW YEAR 
Vasconi, Eugene. "Holiday hearth." (December 

1986) 108 — Christmas fireplace XMASFIRE; 

XMASDRVR 
Vasconi, Eugene. "Season's greetings." 

(December 1986) 18 — Graphics Christmas 

messages. GREETING 
Ventling. James. "Keycad/Keyflow: CoCoad and 

CoCoflow modifications." (November 1986) 126 

COCOMOD1 TO COCOMOD3 
White. Eric. "Esch-a-sketch." (August 1986) 75 — 

Correction, December 1986. p. 101. ESCHER 

PRINT200 

White, Jeff. "The great picture show." (July 1986) 
26 — Display graphics files. MAGICIAN 
WIZARD LATECOCO MERLIN LOADER SHOW 

White, Jeff. "Picture file extension changer." 
(October 1986) 182 EXTCHNGR 

White, Richard A. "The CoCo 3 color palette from 
a BASIC program." (February 1987) 200 
BASICPAL 

Womack. Wayne. "The CoCo scaler." (October 

1986) 166 SCALER 
Wright, Archor. "Amnotron animation." (July 

1986) 54 — Animation program. AMNOTRON 

HARDWARE PROJECT 

DiStefano. Tony. "The CoCo is music to the ears." 
(February 1987) 176 — Digital to analog 
converter. 

DiStefano, Tony. "An expandable relay project." 

(June 1987) 84 
DiStefano. Tony. "The hardware project basics 

review," (May 1987) 156 
DiStefano, Tony. "The No-switch VDG." 

(December 1986) 98 
DiStefano, Tony. "Some hardware fixes for the 

video display generator." (October 1986) 161 
Goodman, Marty. "A PAL for your CoCo 3." (January 

1987) 98 — Upgrade Multi-Pak Interface. See note 
February 1987, p. 160. 

Goodman, Marty. "Remote control CoCo." (July 

1986) 71 — Make a detachable keyboard. 
Goodman, Marty. "The shock absorber." (October 

1986) 158 — Protect from power spikes. 
Goshorn, Bruce W. "The quick joystick fix." 

(August 1986) 116 — How to modify the deluxe 

joystick. 

Haverstock. Mark. "The old switcheroo." (August 

1986) 108 — Joystick port switchbox. 

Correction. October 1986, p. 92. 
Lewis, Emmett J. "Presenting the smarter-than- 

average printer buffer. 1 ' (May 1987) 160 

PRINTBUF 

Mcintosh, Tim. "Do-it-yourself video output 
board." (September 1986) 171 — Correction, 
November 1986. p. 78. 

Merryman. Robert C. "The super switcher/' 
(November 1986) 168 

Ward. Logan. "LED power indicator." (December 

1986) 160 — LED for the disk drive. 
Weide. Dennis H. 'The CoCo ROS, part 1 " 

(December 1986) 85 — Build a robot operating 
system. 

Weide. Dennis H. "The CoCo ROS. part 2: 
Building the ROS circuit." (January 1987) 153 
ROS TEST 

Weide, Dennis H. "The CoCo ROS. part 3: The 
Robotics program and interfacing." (February 

1987) 152 ROBOT RBT22SRC 

Wolff, Harold L. "Look what they've done to my 
CoCos." (March 1987)46 — Battery backup for 
the CoCo. 

HARDWARE TUTORIAL 

Augsburg, Cray. "Dissecting the CoCo 3." 

(October 1986) 94 
DiStefano. Tony. "Investigating the PIA." (July 

1986) 108 

DiStefano. Tony. "Let's take a look at the 

CoCo2B." (September 1986) 125 
DiStefano. Tony. "More on the new video display 

generator." (November 1986) 88 



148 THERASNBOW July 1987 



DiStefano, Tony. "Taking a look at how monitors 
work." (January 1987) 94 — Correction, March 
1987, p.182. 

DiStefano. Tony. "Timing and the SAM chip." 
(August 1986) 101 

DiStefano, Tony. "Transistor buffers for stereo 

application." ( April 1987) 88 
Ellers, Ed. "What's an analog RGB monitor 

anyway." (September 1986) 27 
Goodman, Marty. "Fixing CoCo and Multipak- 

power supplies." (December 1986) 54 
Goodman, Marty. "Inside the CoCo 3." (October 

1986) 90 

Goodman, Marty. "A recipe to fix CoCo fried ' 
chips." ( Aug ust 1986) 24 — See retraction 
October 1986, p. 92. 

HINTS 

Besherse, Bernie. "Hint." (April 1987) 147 — 
Increase the line delay if printer communication 
problems, 

Cooke, H. D. "Hint." (April 1987) 142 —Conversion 

from hex to decimal to octal. 
Daniels, Randy. "Hint." (December 1986) 96 — 

DMP-105 large letters. 
Deich, Donald E. "Hint." (February 1987) 183 — 

Cassette loading tip. 
Demaree. Jack. "Hint." (February 1987) 142 — 

Inexpensive bulk tape eraser. 
Devlin, Paul. "Hint." (June 1987) 164 — How to 

lock the keyboard. 
Dillon, John. "Hint." (June 1987) 52 — Put in 

sound prompts. 
Forbes, Jason. "Hint." (February 1987) 92 —CoCo 

3 custom colors. 
Gagnon, Marc. "Hint." (April 1987) 147 — 

Interesting addresses in the CoCo 3. 
Haughey. Stephen A. "Hint." (February 1987) 144 

— Inexpensive racks for computer equipment. 
"Hint." (August 1986) 136 — Disk directory 

printout. 

"Hint." (August 1986) 139 — What's your ROM 
version? 

"Hint." (January 1987) 83 — Enter Hi-Res screen 

without clearing it. 
"Hint." (January 1987) 134 — May be necessary to 

turn cassette recorder upside down 
"Hint." (January 1987) 148 — Printout disk 

directory. 

"Hint." (January 1987) 150 — Cassette loading tip. 

"Hint." (January 1987) 166 — Printer baud rates. 
"Hint." (April 1987) 24 — Printer baud rate table. 
"Hint." (June 1987) 1 12 — Hints on debugging a 
program. 

Knoppow, Jim. "Hint." (November 1986) 54 —Alter 
the cursor. 

Law. Greg. "Hint." (April 1987) 47 — Rainbow 

CHEK plus fix. 
Mattia, Frank. "Hint." (March 1987) 171 — Use 

cassette port to get sound to a monitor. 
Mills, David. "Hint." (May 1987) 125 — RGB 

shortcut. 

Nash, Jon. "Hint," (February 1987) 72 — Use 
cassette relay command to make interesting 
sounds. 

Nellis, Michael. "Hint." (May 1987) 97 —Cassette 
I/O errors. 

Rosen, Bob. "Hint." (January 1987) 146 — CoCo 3 
lowercase in 32 columns., 

Rosen, Bob, "Hint." (March 1987) 160 — CoCo 3 
tips, 

Schmidt, Fred. "Hint." (December 1986) 133 ) Make 

an RS-232"Y" cable. 
Strike, Thomas J., Jr. "Hint." (March 1987) 142 — 

Avoid burn-in of monitor. 
Valentine, John. "X marks the spot," (May 1987) 

125 — Utility. 
Wilson, Stephen R. "Hint." (November 1986) 73 — 

Multi-Pak tips. 

HOME APPLICATION 

Allen, David M. "Seal it with a CoCo kiss " (March 
1981) 80 — Make an envelope on printer, 
ENVELOPE 



Andrews, Alan L. "Library labeler." (May 1987) 91 

— Prints labels for cassettes. CASBXLBL 

Bell, Bruce K, "Finger sprints." (January 1987) 26 

— Typing practice. HOME ROW 

Bell, Bruce K. "Interiors by CoCo." (May 1987) 58 

— Graphics editor that allows one to draw and 
design floor plans. ARCHIE; ARC 

Borger, J. E. "Auto economy." (April 1987) 73 — 

Figure out miles/gallon. MGP 
Carrigan, Bill. "It all adds up." (April 1987) 90 — 

Convert computer to calculator. COCOCALC 
Fugh, John, Jr, "Who's on first?" (April 1987) 70 — 

Produce baseball score card. BASEBALL 
Gonce, Burt. Jr. "CoCo yields." (April 1987) 74 — 

Calculate amount of cement needed to fill a 

form. CEMENT 
Griffard. Robert. "Banishing the freezer burn 

blues." (April 1987) 37 — Freezer inventory 

control. FREEZER 
Kenny, Keiran. "It figures." (March 1987) 78 — 

Calculate total of list of figures. TOTAL 
Lake, Robert C. "Ma Bell gets personalized." (May 

1987) 74 — Vanity phone numbers for fun. 

VANIPHON 

Large, Donald. "Grocery " (April 1987) 68 —Make 

grocery lists, GROCERY 
March, Keith. "Recipe printer." (April 1987) 72 

RECIPE 

Reed. Bill. "Plottin' and Plannin'." (April 1987) 174 — 
Spreadsheet program. SPREAD 

Rittenhouse, James E. "Cassette organization." 

(February 1987) 125 TAPEMENU 
Rocci, Kathryn. "That's the ticket." (May 1987) 26 — 

Print tickets for parties, dances, etc. TICKET 
Rogers, Robert, "Decisions, decisions." (February 

1987) 122 — Help you decide alternative 

choices. DECISION 
White, Eric. "CoCo presents the well-behaved yard 

sale." (April 1987) 52 YARDSALE 

HOME FINANCE 

Bernico, Bill. "Planning ahead." (February 1987) 
127 — How long to save up for a purchase. 
SAVINFOR 

Evans. Mark. "See how your stocks stack up." 

(March 1987) 122 STOCK GRAPH 
Gallagher, John. "Payday pal." (March 1987) 77 — 

Calculate pay increases. WAGECALC 
Green. Robert A, "Check it out.'* (March 1 987) 20 

— Check writer. CHEKRITR 

Haas, David V."The budget master's companion." 

(March 1987) 172 BUDGET 
Miller, Ralph D. "A matter of principal." (March 

1987) 82 — Print amortization schedules. 

AMORTIZE 

Musumeci. John. "Checks and balances." (April 

1987) 75 — Check book balancer CHECKS 
Phillips, Jim A. "The private accountin§ wizard." 

(March 1987) 26 — Keep track of personal 

records. ACCOUNT TAPEUSER 
Zanger, Murray. "Thrifty CoCo handles what-if 

calculations." (March 1987) 36 FNANPL AN 

MUSIC 

Bernico, Bill. "S§t. CoCo's only starters club 
band." (June 1987) 44 — Guitar help. 
STRUMMER 

Bernico, Bill. "Up with the beat." (June 1987) 80 — 

A metronome. METRNOME 
Branigan, Arron. "Go tell it on the CoCo." 

(December 1986) 66 — Christmas music and 

graphics. WINTER 
Burke. Val. "Singing with the bird." (June 1987) 20 

-■■ A tribute to jazz legend Charlie Parker. 

YARDBIRD 

Camp, Mark S. "Pick and choose from the music 

menu." (June 1987) 49 — Menu selection for 

MUSIC+. MUSXMENU HYMN 
Josue Vigil, Julian. "New Mexican folk dances." 

(June 1987) 76 FOLKSONG 
Mueller, John E. "Uncovering the MIDI section." 

(June 1987) 36 — Digital interface for CoCo 

music. 

Nickel, Harold. "The CoCo composer." (June 
1987) 114 — Play the CoCo like a two-level 
organ. PiANO 



Plaster, Gip W., II. "Sound off." (June 1987) 81 — 

Music and sound effects. SOUNDOFF 
Piatt. Joseph D. "The sweet strains of CoCo," 

(June 1987) 94 — • Upgrade to Music + . 

MUSIC+TR OLD100TH HOWGREAT JESU JOY 
Schuff, David. "The color conductor." (June 1987) 

78 — Various popular songs. GAVOTTE TEXAS 

CHIEF FOLLOWME JETPLANE COUNTRY 
Thompson, Matthew. "Steppin' out with my 

CoCo." (June 1987) 58 — Music synthesizer. 

BW2; BW2C3FIX AXEL F ENTRTANR 
Woods, Rick. "Deck the halls." (December 1986) 

42 — Songs for Musica II. DECKHALL 

MUSCLOAD TAPELOAD 

ONE-LINER AND TWO-LINER PROGRAMS 

Barnett. Calvin. "One-liner," ( June 1987) 144 — 

Graphics demo. 
Baylie, Tom. "One-liner." (September 1986) 149 — 

Average out grades. 
Beck, John. "One-liner." (January 1987) 144 — 

Graphics demo. 
Bentley, Jonathan. "Two-liner." (March 1987) 141 

— Type on computer, immediate output to 
printer. 

Biasillo, Keith. "One-liner." (January 1987) 136 — 

Draw a grid on the screen. 
Bisbee. Daniel. "One-liner." (September 1986) 141 

— PRINT demo. 

Bolle. Francois. "One-liner." (September 1986) 134 

— Looks and sounds like rain, 

Breznai, Mark M. "One-liner." (September 1986) 

132 — Typing practice. 
Buck, Tim. "Two-liner." (August 1986) 148 — Pick 

me is rather interesting — you'll have to type it in. 
Butterworth, James. III. "One-liner." (October 

1986) 148 — Draw a rainbow. 
Carroll, Gerald. "One-liner." (March 1987) 143 — 

Exchange rate conversion. 
Coenen, Matthew. "Two-liner," ( June 1987) 143 — 

Sound demo. 
Cooney, Mike. "Two-liner." (September 1986) 137 

— Horse race. 

Cross, David. "One-liner." (December 1986) 143 — 

Display characters in ROM/RAM. 
David, Eddie. "Two-liner." (March 1987) 143 — 

Print out a bill of sale. 
Derby, Kevin. "Two-liner." (August 1986) 

(September 1986) 54 — Game with joysticks. 
Edmonds, Philip. "Two-liner." (July 1986) 150 — 

Draw line between two points. 
Ferullo. Joseph. "One-liner." (December 1986) 199 

— Calculate equivalent resistance. 

Frerking, Anthony. "One-liner." (April 1987) 148 — 

Calculate grade percentages. 
Goicuria, Eddie. "Two-liner." (June 1987) 145 — 

Music demo. 
Goodman, Richard. "One-liner." (October 1986) 

143 — Calculate pi. 

Greene, Bobby. "Two-liner." (May 1987) 198 — 

Print out PRINT work sheets. 
Halko, Steve. "One-liner." (October 1986) 153 — 

Graphics demo. 
Hall, Mike. "One-liner." ( October 1 986) 153 —Flip 

a picture upside down. 
Harper, Jeff. "One-liner." (December 1986) 139 — 

Graphics and sound demo. 
Hazard. Matt. "Two-liner." (May 1987) 106 —Make 

up a scrambled word. 
Hiatt. Stan. "Two-liner." (July 1986) 182 — 

Simulate Etch-a-Sketch. 
Hughes, Blake C. "One-liner." (July 1986) 157 — 

Draw face of ciock. 
Johnson, David. "Two-liner." (May 1987) 79 — 

Pri nt labels for disks. 
Johnson, Timothy. "One-liner." (December 1986) 

144 — Calculate antenna lengths for a HAM. 
Kenny, Keiran. "One-liner." (February 1987) 138 — 

Miniature monitor program. 
Kim. Joon Y. "One-liner." (May 1987) 28 — Print 

out disk directory. 
Kimmel, Tony, "One-liner," (July 1986) 155 — 

Reverse 4 digit number. 
Kromeke, Michael B. "Two-liner." (July 1986) 232 

— Pri nt out a calendar. 

Kromeke, Michael. "Two-liner." (May 1987) 198 — 
Set baud rate for printer. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 149 



Lammers, Charles. "One-liner." (July 1986) 165 ~ 

Yin and Yang symbol. 
Marino, Frank. "One-liner." (September 1986) 184 

— Count vowels in sentence. 

Maulick, Charles P. "One-liner." (October 1986) 

149 — Graphics demo. 
McClusky, Lonnie. "One-liner." (August 1986) 140 

— Use joystick to move racing car. 
McCullough, Erik. "Two-liner," (July 1986) 207 — 

Basic alarm. 
McDowell, Jim. "One-liner." (May 1987) 146 — 

Label print program. 
McGinnis, Matthew, "Two-liner.' 1 (June 1987) 145 

— Sound demo. 

Mishra, Vick. 'Two-liner," ( October 1986) 69 — Hit 

the while balloons with your arrows. 
Murphy. Craig. "Two-liner," (June 1 987) 45 — 

Graphics demo. 
Newell. Aaron. "Two-liner." (August 1986) 1 35 — 

Electronic dice. 
Ncyle, Jeff. "One-liner." (August 1986) 150 — 

Maneuver racer through course, 
Pritchett. Steven D. "One-tiner." (January 1987) 

141 — Light show, 
Puiien, Walter. "One-liner." (September 1986) 135 

~ Moving sine wave. 
Guel'horst, George. "Two-liner." (March 1987) 1 44 

— Screen printer 

Rogers, Robert. "One-liner." (October 1986) 147 

— Graphics demo. 

Rosen, Russ. "One-liner." (December 1986) 126 — 

Create a cash register. 
Ruangchotvit Chinarut. "One-liner." {July 1986) 

64 — Produce integer factors. 
Satir. Gregory. "One-liner," (February 1987)66 — 

Convert integer to binary. 
Selbee, Keith "Two-liner." (April 1987) 176 — 

Create cassette index cards on printer. 
Sipos, Anton. "One-liner." (August 1986) 151 — 

Disk utility. 

Small, Ric. "One-liner." (September 1986) 54 — 

Shoot-'em-up game. 
"Two-liner." (May 1987) 1 40 — List your BBS 

numbers. 

"Two-liner," (May 1987) 144 — Prevent lock-up if 

printer not turned on, 
Walter, Rick A. "One-liner." (April 1987) 47 — 

Monthly payments on a loan. 
Walton, Byron, "One-liner/* (February 1987) 166 

— 2 programs io list ASCII from disk. 
Weinberg, Rob. "One-liner." (August 1986) 153 — 

Interesting graphics. 
Weils, John T. "One-liner. ' (February 1987) 143 — 

Hexadecimal dump. 
Wiedman. Barry, "One-liner," (April 1987) 170 — 

Vacation planning helper. 
Wigowsky, Paul. "Two-liner." (July 1986) 168 — 

Play tune from popular movie, 
Wilkes, Ernest. "One-liner." (February 1987) 138 — 

Disk utility. 

OPERATING SYSTEMS - OS9 

Adams, Rick. "Exploring Level ITs new features 

from BASIC09," (June 1987) 154 

DEMONSTRATION 
Barden, William. Jr, "Sailing off to C," (March 

1987) 186 ADDNUM (OS9) PRIMENUM (OS9) 
Dibble, Peter. "The advantage of processes." (May 

1987) 191 — Slicing programs for more memory. 

EDITOR (OS9) PRINTER (OS9) 
Dibble, Peter, "Finding your way with OS-9 level 

II." (March 1987) 194 
Dibble, Peter. "Understanding how OS-9 manages 

memory." (April 1987) 192 
Dodge, CaWin. "Readable equivalents to C," 

(November 1986) 191 
Ewart, Nancy. "Taming the beast; Get comfortable 

with OS-9," (January 1987) 160 
Goldberg, Stephen B. "OS-9 spooler: print a file as 

a background task." (December 1986) 1 83 

SPOOLER (OS9) 
Ladouceur, Paul. "A pause for thought." (May 

1987) 194 — Avoid mistake lock-ups. PAUSE 

(OS9J 

Puckett. Dale L. "Bootstrapping many systems,'' 
(March 1987) 196 BINARY (OS9) SPLIT (OS9) 



COL (OS9) PROMPT (OS9) MODCRC (OS9) 

DATE (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L. "A bundle of holiday goodies," 

(December 1986) 198 DEL {OS9) DNAME (OS9) 

EXIT (OS9) TIME (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L. "Choices; The reason for 

modularity." (July 1986)224 
Puckett, Daie L "Debunking the myth of OS-9 

user hostility." (January 1987) 193 FIXTIME 

(OS9) REBOOT (OS9) 
Puckett, Daie L. "Experimenting with RAM disks." 

(August 1986) 197 
Puckett, Date L. "Frank Hogg sees the light and a 

Level II report." (February 1987} 190 FILESIZE 

(OS9) FILEPIR (OSS) DEMOTEST {OS9} 

UNLOAD (OS9) SYSGO (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L. "Getting revved up for fall fun." 

(October 1986) 196 GOTOXY (OS9) HGRAPH.C 

(OS9) CLS (OS9) PRINTAT (OS9) TOGGLE 

(OS9) BOX (OS9) FILLBOX (OS9) PIXSAVER; 

PiXSHOW (OS9) CALC (OS9) MAKE- 
SCRATCHPAD (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L. "Good times with OS-9 on the 

hard disk." {September 1986) 200 
Puckett. Dale L, "Looking at blue sky for OS-9 

level II." (November 1986) 199 SYSGO (OS9) 

CLS (OS9) ALTERNAT.CLS (OS9) 
Puckett. Dale L, "Rambo takes us all back to the 

beginning," (April 1987) 197 DRIVEOFF; 

DRIVEOFF. LISTING IOMAN. PATCH 

TERMINAL, ASM MDIR.C STRIP. C 
Puckett, Dale L, "Setting the stage for OS-9 levei 

II." (May 1987) 196 WIZDRAW (OS9) XMODE 

(OS9) HEXDUMP (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L. "Shooting for a standard." (June 

1987) 162 AT; ATRUN 
Warner, Bruce N. "Pipesand filters forthe 

masses." (February 1987) 204 
White, Richard A. "BASIC09 on the CoCo 3." 

(November 1986) 188 SIEVE (OS9) 
White, Richard A. "Dealing with variables in 

BASIC09." (December 1986) 195 
White. Richard A. "Getting started with BASIC09." 

(June 1987) 158 
Zum wait, Greg L. "Living on Rainbow time." 

(November 1986) 170 CLOCK1; CLOCK2 (OS9) 

PRINTER 

Barden, William, Jr. "The adventure of the too 
many printers." (September 1986) 1 93 — 
Discussion of screen dumps. B A SPRINT 
MLPRINT 

Glaberson, Aryeh. "Hebrew writer." (December 

1986) 36 — Print Hebrew characters on dot 
matrix printer. HEBWRITE 

Hughes. Blake C, "Printing with style." (May 1987) 
93 — Set up for DMP-105 printer, PRNTFONT 

Jenkins, David R. "The printer that came in from 
the code," (May 1987) 108 — Set up the SG-10. 
SG10SET 

King, David. "The DMP-105 takes a bow." (May 

1987) 104 — Screen dump. DUMP 105 
Ouellhorst. George. "Pretty little listings, all in a 

row," (May 1987) 1 78 — Print listings in two 
columns. LL1S 1 ER 
Vaughn, Horace D, "The old-time fix." (November 
1986) 55 — Disk fix to May 1 986, p.1 50. 
SHORTEN 

White. Forrest K. "Sized to fit." (May 1987) 91 — 
Set up for Gemini 10X printer. FORMATTR 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Downard, Dan, "Downloads." (July 1986)210 — 

Upgrade problems; BBS setup; printer problems; 

joysticks, etc. 
Downard. Dan. "Downloads." (August 1986) 166 

— Disk drive problems; I/O errors; New VDG; 

64K explained. 
Downard. Dan, "Downloads," (September 1986) 

186 — Telewriter problems; OS-9 hints; Ham 

radio software; EDTASM+ corrections. 
| Downard, Dan, "Downloads." (October 1986} 194 — 

OS-9; Monitors; Printer interface problem, etc. 
Downard. Dan. "Downloads/' {November 1986} 

186 — Add Extended BASIC; BBS; Printer; 

Multipak. etc. 



Downard, Dan. "Downloads," ( December 1986) 
1 78 — Modem; RGB monitor; Reset; Machine 
language, etc. 

Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (January 1987) 178 — 
Assembly language; RS-232; Screen dump, etc 

Downard, Dan, "Downloads." (February 1987) 186 

— DSKCON with 128K; Disk directories; 
Program merging, etc. 

Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (March 1987) 184 — 
Cooling fan. Modem problems; Downloading 
from Delphi, etc. 

Downard. Dan. "Downloads," {April 1987) 189 — RS- 
232 problems; BBS; Disk I/O; Machine language, 
etc. 

Downard, Dan "Downloads." (May 1987) 188 •••••• 

Telecommunicatons; Artifact colors; VIP 

problem, etc. 
Downard. Dan. "Downloads." (June 1987) 152 — 

Disk drives; Delphi hint; Printer; Multi-Pak, etc, 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (November 

1986) 154 — New Rainbow column — INKEY$; 

Printer repair; disk to tape copy, etc. 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (December 

1986) 156 — PCOPY; Barcodes; Merge 

programs; Hard disk; Screen dump, etc, 
Esposito, Richard E. <J Dr. ASCII." (Jaunary 1987) 162 

— Animation; Printer decision; OS-9; TV interfer- 
ence; hard disk, etc. 

Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII," (February 1987) 

178 — Screen colors; Error tracing; CoCo2 

upgrade; File transfer, etc. 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (March 1987) 

164 — New keyboard; ZBUG; DOS 

determination;Bar code reader etc. 
Esposito, Richard E "Dr. ASCII." (April 1987) 161 — 

CoCo 3; MC-10; 9600 baud; OS-9 patches, etc. 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." ( May 1987) 94 — 

Remote terminals; Artifact colors; S pectaculator; 

Model 1 00 to CoCo, 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (June 1987) 90 

— Disk drives; RAM disk; Artifact colors; 
Commodore compatibility, etc. 

Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." (August 

1986) 178 — Color monitor; 64K upgrade; 

Brother printer, etc. 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." 

(September 1986) 1 78 — Y cable; Multipaks; 

Serial port; Auto answer modem. 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations," ( October 

1986) 180 — EPROMs; Keyboard problem; 
Reserve power; correction to August column, 

Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations," 
(November 1986) 182 — Upgrade CoCo 2; offset 
ML programs; transfer to MS-DOS, etc, 

Goodman. Marty. "CoCo consultations." 
(December 1986) 1 02 — Processor chips; Disk 
controller; Multipak, etc. 

Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." (January 

1987) 92 — PMODE 4 on CoCo 3; Monitor 
recommendation, Modem, etc. 

Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations " 
(February 1987) 150 — Coco 2 upgrade; Multi- 
pak extension; RGB monitors; J&M controller 
fix, etc. 

Goodman, Marty. fi CoCo consultations. if (March 

1987) 150 — CoCo 3; RS-232; Disk drive addition; 

Null modem cable. 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations. if (April 

1987} 186 — Print quotation mark; RGB monitor; 

Atari; CoCo 3, etc. 
Goodman, Marty, "CoCo consultations," (May 

1987) 174 — Fix disk controller; GIME chip; 

Monitor adapter; RS-232, etc. 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations," (June 

1987) 53 — Disk drives; Joystick interface; 64 

color display; Hard disk, etc. 
Goodman, Marty, "Getting to the details of the 

CoCo 3." (October 1986) 104 

TUTORIAL 

Barden, William, Jr, "The BASIC PSETand 
graphics display speeds." (December 1986) 190 

Bernico, Bill. "The menu selector." (January 1987) 
158 MENUTUTR 



150 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Kolar, Joseph. "Creating a review program." 

(February 1987) 101 — Tutoriai with educational 

example. LANGTRAN 
Kolar, Joseph. "The creative muse: How to dredge 

up those ideas." (June 1987) 96 
Kolar, Joseph. "Doing the program shuffle." 

(March 1987) 108 PART 1 ALT; ALT1; ALT 2 

PROBLEM 

Kolar, Joseph. "The formatting review: MID$ struts 

its stuff." (January 1987) 86 MAJUNGA ROMAN 

ANGLO MODIFIED 
Kolar, Joseph. "Formatting text presentations to 

suit yourself." (December 1986) 80 DEMO 
Kolar, Joseph, "Learning howto function in 

BASIC.*' (October 1986) 77 STRINGS1: 

STRINGS2 

Kolar, Joseph. "One character space at a time," 

(November 1986) 46 — Tutorial on LEFTS etc 

HEADING HOMEWORK 
Kolar, Joseph. "Real-life uses for the seven-value 

CIRCLE statement." (May 1987) 77 
Kolar, Joseph. "Using inverse characters," 

(September !986) 165 INVERSE STUTTER1: 

STUTTER2 

Vasconi, Eugene, "Escape from Ihe bug zone." 
(January 1987) 59 

UTILITY 

Aftamonow. Ellen , and Aftamonow. George. 

"Don't string me along/ (October 1966) 100 — 

Track down FC errors. 
Atwater. Dale "Joystick directory." (February 

1987} 126 — Use joystick to load and execute 

programs. DIRECTRY 
Babich. Tio "Settle a score." (August 1 986) 83 — 

Use joysticks for scoring. JOYSCORE 
Bjork. Steve "CoCo mouse: The final chapter." 

(September 1986} 180 
Bjork, Sieve. "CoCo mouse!" (July 1986) 121 ----- 

Use a mo use /joy slick to give commands. 

MOUSE LINES DISKTIME 
Bjork, Steve. "What's inside a mouse?" (August 

1986) 180 — Correction, October 1 986, p. 92. 
Dahlgren. Glen. "I nvisilist," (February 1987} 20 

LOADMASK; LOADER 
Gault. Robert. 'Disabling the CoCo 3 color burst 

signal." (April 1987) 64 
Harrison, Eric. "Break key disable." (August 1986) 

82 BREAKDIS 

Jenkins, David R. "A simple font creator for the Hi- 
Res screen." (May 1987) 99 — For CoCo 3. FONT 
GEN 

Kocourek, Thomas ; and Rockwell, Kenneth. 

"Thanks for the memory," (May 1987) 186 — Use 

the lull 64K. NEWBOOTS 
Kooser. Lindsay. "The digital dimension." (June 

1987) 38 — Utility for Speech/Sound pak. 
NUMBTEXT 

Lengel, Dave. "Sound off." (February 1987) 125 
KEY BEEP 

Stewart, John. "Echo." (February 1987) 126 — 

Send screen output to printer. ECHO 
Sundberg, Lynn. "I can see clearly now.'* (July 

1986) 20 — Formatted printer listings of 

programs. SRLIST 
White, Eric. "Tips on the CoCo 3, (March 1987) 78 

COLORCKEK 

WORD PROCESSING 

Cook, Bill. "The write stuff." (April 1987) 156 — 
Word processor on the CoCo 3. WRITER 

Millard. Ian. "Writer-zap." (September 1986) 1 16 — 
Utility for VIP writer. WRITRZAP 

White, Richard A. "CoCo word processing." (July 
1986) 212 



AUTHORS 

Adams, Rick ; and Lear, Dale. "Color chart for the 
CoCo 3." (January 1987) 20 COLOR3 

Adams, Rick ; and Lear. Dale. "Coming to terms 
with the CoCo 3." (November 1986) 93 — 
Terminal program for CoCo 3 Corrections to 
Rainbow on tape/disk January 1 987, p. 164, 



TERM3BAS; TERM3 
Adams, Rick ; and Lear, Dale. "The power of the 

palette: Graphics on the Color Computer 3." 

(October 1986) 37 — Corrections to Rainbow on 

tape/disk January 1987 p.164. TUNNEL WHEEL 
Adams, Rick. "Exploring Level ll's new features 

from BASIC09," (June 1987) 154 

DEMONSTRATION 
Aftamonow, Ellen . and Aftamonow, George, 

"Don't string me along." (October 1986) 100 — 

Track down FC errors 
Allen. David M. "Seal it with a CoCo kiss." (March 

1987} 80 — ■ Make an envelope on prinler. 

ENVELOPE 

Andrews, Alan L. "Library labeler." (May 1987) 91 

- Prints labels for cassettes. CASBXLBL 
Armstrong, Kerry M. "Transplant surgery for the 

disk controller." (July 1986)68 — Upgrade the 

disk controller. 
Arnott, Jo Anna. ' Building April's Rainbow," (April 

1987) 16 — Introduction to home helpissue. 
Atwater, Dale, 'Joystick directory." (February 

1987) 126 — Use joystick to load and execute 

programs DIRECTRY 
Augsburg, Cray. "Building an OS-9 support 

network." (July 1986) 88 — News from Delphi. 
Augsburg, Cray. "Changes make Delphi even 

easier to use." (March 1 987) 92 — includes a 

Delphi command card. 
Augsburg, Cray. "Checking into conference." 

(April 1987) 94 
Augsburg, Cray. "Command options in the 

workspace." (October 1986) 154 — About 

Delphi. 

Augsburg, Cray. "Dissecting the CoCo 3." 

(October 1986) 94 
Augsburg, Cray. "A follow-up on SIG mail." 

(December 1986) 169 
Augsburg, Cray. "Help is just a SIG away ." (May 

1987}^ 20 

Augsburg, Cray. "Help one, help all " (June 1987) 
126 

Augsburg, Cray, "A look at workspace," 

(September 1986) 172 — Delphi hints, 
Augsburg, Cray. "The RAINBOWfest reporter." 

(February 1987) 83 — Princeton, October 1986 
Augsburg, Cray. "A review of the personal 

'settings profile."' (January 1987) 168 
Augsburg, Cray. "SIG changes include new 

selections, new sections." (February 1987) 68 — 

Delphi information, 
Augsburg. Cray. "Using mail in the SIG." 

(November 1986} 102 — Delphi news. 
Augsburg. Cray. "Using the CoCo SIG." (August 

1986} 174 

Babich. Tio "Settle a score." (August 1986} 83 — 
Use joysticks for scoring JOYSCORE 

Bailey. Eric. 'Graphically speaking: The artistic 
BBS." (November 1986) 108 — Correction. 
February 1987. p 160. LRWSEDIT 

Barden, William, Jr. "The adventure of the too 
many printers." (September 1986) 1 93 — 
Discussion of screen dumps BASPRINT 
MLPRINT 

Barden William. Jr. "The BASIC PSET and 
grapnics display speeds " (December 1 986) 1 90 

Barden, William, Jr. "How does the CoCo stack 
up?' (August 1 986} 90 — Rating of CoCo with 
other micros. 

Barden, William. Jr. "Interfacing tricks for BASIC 
and Assembly Language " (July 1 986) 216 
WORDCNT1; WORDCNT2 EXPLODEI. 
EXPLODE2 

Barden. William, Jr. "More interfacing tricks for 

Assembly Language and BASIC." ( A ug ust 1986} 

188 CHARGEN 
Barden, William, Jr, "More on PSET, PRESET and 

graphics speed." (January 1 987) 1 81 LINEBAS; 

LINEBIN RADARBAS; RADARBIN 
Barden, William, Jr. "Presenting a quiz for Color 

Computer Assembly Language." (November 

1986) 192 

Barden, William, Jr. "Sailing off to C." (March 

1987) 186 ADDNUM (OS9) PRIMENUM {OS9) 
Barnett, Calvin, "One-liner." (June 1987) 144 — 

Graphics demo. 
Baumgardt, Kent. "Explosive word fun.' 1 (April 
1987 ) 59 — Hangman game WORDGUES 



Baylie. Tom. "One-liner." (September 1986) 149 — 

Average out grades. 
Beck, John. "One-liner," ( January 1987) 144 — 

G raphics demo. 
Behrmann, Darrel. "Alien raiders blitz. " (November 

1986) 52 RAIDERS 
Bell, Bruce K. "Finger sprints." (January 1987) 26 

-- Typing practice. HOME ROW 
Bell, Bruce K. "The eyes have it." (January 1987) 

52 — Visual memory games. DISCRIM 
Bell, Bruce K. "Hint." (June 1987) 81 — 

Modification to Discrimination (January 1 987 

p.52). 

Bell. Bruce K. "I nteriors by CoCo." (May 1 987) 58 

— Graphics editor that allows one \o draw and 
design floor plans. ARCHI E; ARC 

Bennell, Jim. "The vocabulary tightrope " (July 

1986) 188 — Match synonyms. TITEROPE 
Bentley. Jonathan. "Two-liner," (March 1987) 141 

— Type on computer, immediate output to 
printer, 

Benway, Patrick J, "Space attack." (October 1986) 

1 13 — Demonstrate graphics commands, RAID 
Berenz. Michael, "The boogie box " f October 

1 986) 113 — Print jam box on printer. RADIO 
Bernico, Bill, "The case of the shifty-eyed 

animation tutor." (January 1987) 82 FACE ONE; 

FACE TWO; FACETEST 
Bernico, Bill. "Colors of the spectrum. " (October 

1986) 112 — Combine colors on screen 

SPECTRUM 
Bernico, Bill. "Double whammy." (October 1986) 

101 — Based on dice game. Skunk. WHAMMY 
Bernico, Bill. "Get chart smart with mileage 

mapper." (May 1987) 30 — Calculate distances 

o n a map. DISTANCE 
Bernico, Bill. "Laying down Ihe chips." (August 

1 986) 80 — Bingo caller. BINGO 
Bernico, Bill. "The menu selector. " (January 1987) 

158 MENUTUTR 
Bernico. Bill "Planning ahead," (February 1987) 

127 — How long to save up for a purchase. 

SAVINFOR 
Bernico. Bill. "Sgt. CoCo's only starters club 

band." (June 1987} AA — Guitar help. 

STRUMMER 
Bernico. Bill. "Songwriters word rhymer. " 

(January 1987) 32 — Add endings to words. 

RHYMER 

Bernico. Bill, "A Thanksgiving pizza party." 

(November 1986} 28 PIZZA 
Bernico, Bill. "Up with the beat." (June 1987)80 — 

A metronome, METRNOME 
Besherse, Bernie. "Hint." (April 1987) 147 — 

Increase the line delay if printer communication 

problems, 

Biasillo. Keith. "One-liner." (January 1987) 136 — 

Draw a grid on the screen. 
Biggs. Brian. "Where is it?" (December 1986) 93 — 

Disc label program. LABELER 
Billen, David C, "CoCo bright," (February 1987)49 

— Give colored text on screen. BOOT 
CHARLOAD PROGLOAD DEFINE 

Bisbee. Daniel. "One-liner." (September 1986) 141 

— PRINT demo. 

Bjork, Steve. "CoCo mouse: The final chapter." 

(September 1986) 180 
Bjork, Steve, "CoCo mouse!" (July 1986) 121 — 

Use a mouse/joystick to give commands. 

MOUSE LINES DfSKTI ME 
Bjork, Steve. "The Color Computer3: A 

programmer's dream." (September 1986) 26 
Bjork, Steve. "What's inside a mouse?" (August 

1986) 180 — Correction, October 1986, p, 92. 
Blound, Andy, "Masonry madness." (August 1988} 83 

— Lo-Res puzzle game. BRICKS 

Blyn, Steve. "Developing logical reasoning skills." 

(July 1986) 132 — Development of reasoning 

powers. TRUEFALS 
Blyn, Steve. "Exploring the card catalog." (August 

1 986) 94 — Training in library skills. CARD LOG 
Blyn, Steve. "A flexible program for teaching line 

graphs." (April 1987} 46 GRAPHS 
Blyn, Steve "It's back to basics with an adjective 

review." (October 1986) 152 ADJECTIV 
Blyn. Steve, "Learning about scales: Key lo 

understanding maps," (May 1 987} 112 

MAPSCALE 



Juiyl987 THE RAINBOW 151 



Blyn, Sieve. "Let the little ones learn by counting 
on CoCo." (January 1987) 76 CARCOUNT 

Blyn, Steve. "Making the Dewey Decimal system 
user-friendly." (March 1987) 74 DEWEY 

Blyn, Steve. "Mystery word puzzles," (September 

1986) 74 — Help learn spelling or vocabulary 
lists. SPELPUZL 

Blyn, Steve. "Presidents take Precedence." 

(February 1987) 46 — Presidential quiz. 

PRESIDNTS 
Blyn, Steve. "A square deal for teaching math." 

(June 1987) 47 MATHPLAY 
Blyn, Steve. "Understanding the computer with 

binary dice conversions." (December 1986) 88 

BINARY 

Blyn, Steve. "Word fun: The three bears come of 

age." (November 1986) 74 FUNWORDS 
Bolle. Francois. "One-liner." (September 1986) 134 

— Looks and sounds like rain. 

Borger, J E. "Auto economy." (April 1987) 73 — 

Figure out miles/gallon. MGP 
Bouchard, Roger. "Date tracking through the 

ages." (January 1987) 46 — Generate calendars 

for any year. Correction, April 1987, p. 128. 

CALENDAR; CALMOD 
Branigan, Arron. "Fortune wheel." (August 1986) 

156 — Modification, December 1986, p. 50, and 

March 1987, p.1 82. WHEEL CREATOR 
Branigan, Arron. "Go tell it on the CoCo." 

(December 1986) 66 — Christmas music and 

graphics. WINTER 
Breznai, Mark M. "One-liner." (September 1986) 

132 — Typing practice. 
Brimner, Robert. "Joker poker." (March 1987) 99 

— Correction, May 1987, p. 128. POKER 
Brown, Chris W. "Get the picture." (February 

1987) 88 — Graphic printout directory, GRADIR 
Brunotte, Benjamin W, "This one's a puzzler." 

(May 1987) 152 — Construct word search 
puzzles. WDSEARCH 
Buck, Tim. "Two-liner." (August 1986) 148 — Pick me 
is rather interesting — you'll have to type it in. 

Burke, Val. "Singing with the bird." (June 1987) 20 

— A tribute to jazz legend Charlie Parker. 
YARDBIRD 

Buttacavoli, Paul D, "CoCo 3 gets you over a 
barrel." (March 1987) 52 — Similar to Rubik's 
cube. BARREL 

Butterworth, James, III. "One-liner." (October 

1986) 148 — Draw a rainbow. 
Camirand, Rene. "Save the astronauts!" 

(September 1986) 33 ASTRONAT 
Camp, Mark S. "Pick and choose from the music 

menu." (June 1987) 49 — Menu selection for 

MUSIC + . MUSXMENU HYMN 
Carrigan, Bill "It all adds up." ( April 1987) 90 — 

Convert computer to calculator. COCOCALC 
Carroll, Gerald. "One-liner." (March 1987) 143 — 

Exchange rate conversion. 
Cassel, Randy, "Graphics trio," (April 1987) 66 — 

Graphics demos. SPINNER CIRCLES IPOPPER 
Coenen, Matthew. "Two-liner." (June 1987) 143 — 

Sound demo, 
Collicoi. John. "Cipher fun for CoCo kids," (April 

1987) 166 ADDITION 

Collins, Dale R. "Life of the party for $200, please." 
(March 1987) 58 — Similar to TV's Jeopardy, 
Correction, May 1987, p. 128. GPARTY 

Cook, Bill. "The adventure processor." (August 

1986) 26 — Help in writing adventure games. 
Correction, November 1986, p. 78. ADV-PRO 

Cook, Bill. "The write stuff." (April 1987) 156 — 
Word processor on the CoCo 3. WRITER 

Cooke, H. D. "Hint." (April 1987) 142 —Conversion 
from hex to decimal to octal. 

Cooney, Mike. "Two-liner." (September 1986) 137 

— Horse race. 

Coty, Curt. "Let the laser battle begin." (January 

1987) 36 — Correction, May 1987, p. 128. DEF 
MOV 

Crosby, Mark. "The evolving REMOTE." 

(November 1986) 70 REMOT232 
Cross, David. "One-liner." (December 1986) 143 — 

Display characters in ROM/RAM. 
Curtis, H. Allen. "Festive CoCo: Ready to PAINT 

the town." (July 1986) 46 — Expanded PAINT 



command. Correction, February 1987, p. 160 

PAINT 1 TO PAINT 4 
Curtis, H. Allen. "Our highfalutin' feline does a 

CoCo3 fandango." (May 1987) 52 — Dancing 

CoCo cat. CATDANCE; RECTANGL 
Curtis, H. Alien. "PUT speedy GETzales to work." 

(November 1986) 158 GETPUT1 TO GETPUT4 
Dahlgren, Glen. "InvisiList." (February 1987) 20 

LOADMASK; LOADER 
Daniels, Randy. "Hint." (December 1986) 96 — 

DMP-105 large letters. 
Dash, Raju. "The evil tyrant star lord." (August 

1986) 58 STARLORD 
David, Eddie. "Two-liner." (March 1987) 143 — 

Print out a bill of sale. 
Deich, Donald E. "Hint." (February 1987) 183 — 

Cassette loading tip. 
Demaree, Jack. "Hint." (February 1987) 142 — 

Inexpensive bulk tape eraser. 
Derby, Kevin. "Two-liner." (August 1986) 

(September 1986) 54 — Game with joysticks. 
Dettmann, Harvey. "The bookkeeper's helper." 

(March 1987) 97 PAYROLL 
Devlin, Paul. "Hint." (June 1987) 164 — How to 

lock the keyboard. 
Dibble, Peter. "The advantage of processes." (May 

1907) 191 — Slicing programs for more memory. 

EDITOR (OS9) PRINTER (OS9) 
Dibble, Peter. "Finding your way with OS-9 level 

II," (March 1987) 194 
Dibble, Peter, "Understanding how OS-9 manages 

memory." (April 1987) 192 
Dick. Brien. "Which Nym is Witch?" (August 1986) 

40 — Educational game, Correction, October 

1986, p. 92. NYMATCH 

Dillon, John. "Hint." (June 1987) 52 — Put in 

sound prompts. 
DiStefano, Tony. "The CoCo is music to the ears. " 

(February 1987) 176 — Digital to analog 

converter. 

DiStefano, Tony. "An expandable relay project." 

(June 1987) 84 
DiStefano, Tony. "The hardware project basics 

review." (May 1987) 156 
DiStefano, Tony. "Investigating the PIA." (July 

1986) 108 

DiStefano, Tony. "Let's take a look at the 

CoCo2B." (September 1986) 125 
DiStefano, Tony. "More on the new video display 

generator." (November 1986) 88 
DiStefano, Tony. "The No-switch VDG." 

(December 1986) 98 
DiStefano, Tony. "Some hardware fixes for the 

video display generator." (October 1986) 161 
DiStefano, Tony. "Taking a look at how monitors 

work." (January 1987) 94 — Correction, March 

1987, p. 182. 

DiStefano, Tony. "Timing and the SAM chip." 

(August 1986) 101 
DiStefano, Tony, "Transistor buffers for stereo 

application." (April 1987) 88 
DiZazzo. Ernie. "CoCo can play cupid, too." 

(February 1987) 36 — Make a Valentine's card. 

LOVECARD 
Dodge, Calvin. "Readable equivalents to C." 

(November 1986) 191 
Downard. Dan. "Downloads," (July 1986) 210 — 

Upgrade problems; BBS setup; printer problems; 

joysticks, etc. 
Downard, Dan, "Downloads." (August 1986) 186 

— Disk drive problems; I/O errors; New VDG; 

64K explained. 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (September 1986) 

186 — Telewriter problems; OS-9 hints; Ham 

radio software; EDTASM+ corrections. 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (October 1986) 194 — 

OS-9; Monitors; Printer interface problem, etc. 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads," (November 1986) 

186 — Add Extended BASIC; BBS; Printer; 

Multipak, etc. 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (December 1986) 

178 — Modem; RGB monitor; Reset; Machine 

language, etc. 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (January 1987) 178 — 

Assembly language; RS-232; Screen dump, etc. 

Downard, Dan. "Downloads." ( February 1987) 186 



— DSKCON with 128K; Disk directories; 
Program merging, etc. 

Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (March 1987) 184 — 
Cooling fan; Modem problems; Downloading 
from Delphi, etc. 

Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (April 1987) 189 — RS- 
232 problems; BBS; Disk I/O; Machine language, 
etc. 

Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (May 1987) 188 — 

Telecommunicatons; Artifact colors; VIP 

problem, etc. 
Downard, Dan. "Downloads." (June 1987) 152 — 

Disk drives; Delphi hint; Printer; Multi-Pak, etc. 
Drennan, Allen. "Bombs away!" (October 1986) 18 

BOMBAWAY 
Drennan, Allen. "A Visit to the past." (January 

1987) 28 — New version of Breakout 

BACKSTAB 
Duerig, Jean , and Duerig, Al. "The goblins'll 

getcha if you don't watch out!" (October 1986) 

26 HALOWEEN 
Duncan, Richard. "CoBBS message editor." 

(November 1986) 80 SMH 
Edmonds, Philip. "Two-liner." (July 1986) 150 — 

Draw line between two points. 
Ellers, Ed. "What's an analog RGB monitor 

anyway." (September 1986) 27 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (November 

1986) 154 — New Rainbow column — INKEYS; 

printer repair; disk to tape copy, etc. 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." ( December 

1986) 156 — PCOPY; Bar codes; Merge 

programs; Hard disk; Screen dump, etc. 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (January 1987) 162 

— Animation; Printer decision; OS-9; TV interfer- 
ence; hard disk, etc. 

Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (February 1987) 
178 — Screen colors; Error tracing; CoCo 2 
upgrade; File transfer, etc. 

Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (March 1987) 

164 — New keyboard; ZBUG; DOS 

determination; Bar code reader etc. 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (April 1987) 161 — 

CoCo 3; MC-10; 9600 baud; OS-9 patches, etc. 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (May 1987) 94 — 

Remote terminals; Artifact colors; Spectac ulator; 

Model 100 to CoCo. 
Esposito, Richard E. "Dr. ASCII." (June 1987) 90 

— Disk drives; RAM disk; Artifact colors; 
Commodore compatibility, etc, 

Evans, Mark. "See how your stocks stack up." 

(March 1987) 122 STOCK GRAPH 
Ewart, Nancy. "Taming the beast: Get comfortable 

with OS-9." (January 1987) 160 
Falk, Lawrence C. "CoCo better again?" 

Impressions of the new CoCo 3. (September 

1986) 18 

Falk, Lawrence C, "Printtf~2." (July 1986) 12 — 

Fifth anniversary memories. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "Printfl-2." (August 1986) 12 — 

Come visit Falsoft; Chicago RAI N BOWfest. 
Falk. Lawrence C. "Print«-2." (September 1986) 12 

— Ail about CoCo 3. 

Falk, Lawrence C . " Print#-2." (October 1986) 12 — 

Comments on CoCo 3. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "Print#~2." (November 1986) 12 

— 'Tandy's got IT ' 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Printtf-2. " (December 1986) 12 

— CoCo 3 comments, 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Print«-2." (January 1987) 12 — 

Comments on availability of CoCo 3 software. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "Print#-2." (February 1987) 1 2 

— Howtopromote the CoCo. 

Falk, Lawrence C. "Print^-2." (March 1987) 12 — 

Availability of software for CoCo 3. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "Print«-2," (April 1987) 12 — 

Comments about software piracy. 
Falk, Lawrence C. "Print#-2." (May 1987) 12 — 

Comments about adventure contest. 
Falk, Lawrence C, "Printtf-2." (June 1987) 12 — 

Discussion of Chicago RAINBOWfest. 
Farris, Charles. "Mission: hold the.bridge." 

(December 1986) 29 MORTAR 
Ferullo, Joseph. "One-liner." (December 1986) 199 

— Calculate equivalent resistance. 



152 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Forbes, Jason. "Hint." (February 1987) 92 — CoCo 

3 custom colors. 
Fortin, llene. "From our house to yours." 

(December 1986) 62 — Dot matrix Christmas 

cards. CARDSHOP 
Foster, Leslie A. "The fifth year of Rainbow." (July 

1986) 193 — Index July 1985 - June 1986. 
Frerking, Anthony. "One-liner." (April 1987) 148 — 

Calculate grade percentages. 
Fugh, John, Jr. "Who's on first?" (April 1987) 70 - 

Produce baseball score card. BASEBALL 
Gagnon, Marc. "Hint." (April 1987) 147 — 

interesting addresses in the CoCo 3. 
Galibois, Michel. "Paramission: Fast and 

dangerous!" (May 1987) 114 PARAMISS 
Gallagher, John. "Payday pal." (March 1987) 77 — 

Calculate pay increases. WAGECALC 
Gault, Robert. "Disabling the CoCo 3 color burst 

signal. " (April 1987) 64 
German, J. D. "Up on the rooftop." (December 

1986) 124 — Christmas theme game. SANTA 
Glaberson, Aryeh. "Hebrew writer." (December 

1986) 36 — Print Hebrew characters on dot 

matrix printer. HEBWRITE 
Goicuria ; Eddie. "Two-liner." (June 1987) 145 — 

Music demo. 

Goldberg, Stephen B. "OS-9 spooler: print a file as 

a background task." (December 1986) 183 

SPOOLER (OS9) 
Goldwyn, Ira. "Perplexing picture puzzles " 

(September 1986) 108 SCRAMBLE LATECOCO 
Golias, Ruth. "A public service message." 

(February 1987) 124 — Graphics demo on safety 

theme. MESSAGE 
Gonce, Burt, Jr. "CoCo yields." (April 1987) 74 — 

Calculate amount of cement needed to fill a 

form. CEMENT 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." (August 

1986) 178 — Color monitor: 64K upgrade; 

Brother printer, etc. 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations," 

(September 1986) 178 — Y cable; Multipaks; 

Serial port; Auto answer modem. 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." (October 

1986) 180 — EPROMs; keyboard problem; 
Reserve power; correction to August column. 

Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." 

(November 1986) 182 — Upgrade CoCo 2; offset 

ML programs; transfer to MS-DOS, etc. 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." 

(December 1986) 102 — Processor chips; Disk 

controller; Multipak, etc. 
Goodman, Marty, "CoCo consultations." (January 

1987) 92 — PM ODE 4 on CoCo 3; Monitor 
recommendation; Modem, etc. 

Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." 
(February 1987) 150 — Coco 2 upgrade; Multi- 
pak extension: RGB monitors; J&M controller 
fix, etc. 

Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." (March 

1987) 150 — CoCo 3; RS-232; Disk drive addition; 

Null modem cable. 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." (April 

1987) 186 — Print quotation mark; RGB monitor; 

Atari; CoCo 3. etc. 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." (May 

1987) 174 — Fix disk controller; GfME chip; 

Monitor adapter; RS-232, etc, 
Goodman, Marty. "CoCo consultations." (June 

1987) 53 — Disk drives; Joystick interface; 64 

color display; Hard disk, etc. 
Goodman, Marty. "Database report." (September 

1986) 173 — Delphi news. 
Goodman, Marty. "Fixing CoCo and Multipak 

power supplies." (December 1986) 54 
Goodman, Marty. "Getting to the details of the 

CoCo 3," (October 1986) 104 
Goodman, Marty. "Inside the CoCo 3." (October 

1986) 90 

Goodman, Marty. "A PAL for your CoCo 3." (January 

1987) 98 — Upgrade Multi-Pak Interface. See note 
February 1987, p. 160. 

Goodman, Marty. "A recipe to fix CoCo fried 
chips." (August 1986) 24 — See retraction 
October 1 986, p. 92. 

Goodman, Marty. "Remote control CoCo." (July 
1986) 71 — Make a detachable keyboard. 



Goodman, Marty. "RTTY for the Color Computer." 

(November 1986) 36 RTTY 
Goodman, Marty. "The shock absorber." ( October 

1986) 158 — Protect from power spikes. 
Goodman, Marty. "Transfer CoCo text files to MS- 
DOS disks." (July 1986) 176 MS19GEN; 

MSFORMAT ADOLF COC02MS 
Goodman, Richard. "One-liner." (October 1986) 

1 43 — Calculate pi, 
Goshorn, Bruce W, "The quick joystick fix." 

(August 1986) 1 16 — How to modify the deluxe 

joystick. 

Green, Robert A. "Check it out." (March 1987) 20 

— Check writer. CHEKRITR 

Greene, Bobby. "Two-liner." ( May 1987) 198 — 

Print out PRINT work sheets. 
Griffard, Robert. "Banishing the freezer burn 

blues." (April 1987) 37 — Freezer inventory 

control. FREEZER 
Haas, David V. "The budget master's companion." 

(March 1987) 172 BUDGET 
Halko. Steve. "One-liner." (October 1986) 153 — 

Graphics demo. 
Hall, Mike, "One-liner," (October 1986) 153 —Flip 

a picture upside down. 
Harper, Jeff. "Graph-o-matic." (September 1986) 

82 — Plot 3-D functions. 3DFNCPLT 
Harper, Jeff. "One-liner," (December 1986) 139 — 

Graphics and sound demo. 
Harrison, Eric. "Break key disable," (August 1986) 

82 BREAKDIS 
Haughey, Stephen A. "Hint." (February 1987) 144 

— Inexpensive racks for computer equipment. 
Haverstock, Mark. "The care and feeding of a 

CoCo club." (January 1987) 67 
Haverstock, Mark. "The old switcheroo." (August 

1986) 108 — Joystick port switchbox. 

Correction, October 1986, p. 92, 
Hazard. Matt. "Two-liner." (May 1987) 106 —Make 

up a scrambled word. 
Herr, Darin. "CoCoDraw concoctions." (October 

1986) 59 MENUGEN COCODRAW 
Hiatt, Stan. "Two-liner," (July 1986) 182 — 

Simulate Etch-a-Sketch. 
Hoggins, Jay R. "Vigilance is vital for victory over 

vicious Vic." (July 1986) 74 VIC 
Hood, Thomas. 'Counting with Caesar." (April 

1987) 172 — Roman numeral drill, ROMANS 
Huang, David. "Calling to mind." (August 1986) 81 

— Memory game. REPEATIT 

Hughes, Blake C. "One-li ner." ( July 1986) 157 — 

Draw face of clock. 
Hughes, Blake C. "Printing with style." (May 1987) 

93 ----- Set up for DMP-105 printer. PRNTFONT 
Hutchinson, David. "Hand-me-downs." (February 

1987) 120 HAND OFF 
Hyre, Leonard. "The key to success," (March 

1987) 66 — Typing tutor. Correction, May 1987, 

p. 128. COCOTYPE 
Jenkins, David R, "The printer that came in from 

the code." ( May 1987) 108 — Set up the SG-10. 

SG10SET 

Jenkins, David R. "A simple font creator for the Hi- 
Res screen." (May 1987) 99 — For CoCo 3. FONT 
GEN 

Jensen, Paul. "The evictor." (July 1986) 62 
EVIC-TOR 

Johnson, David. "Two-liner." (May 1987) 79 — 

Print labels for disks, 
Johnson, Timothy. "One-liner." (December 1986) 

144 — Calculate antenna lengths for a HAM, 
Jones, Edward. "Two-tone text." (May 1987) 89 — 

Experiment with different combinations. 

COLORS 

Jones, Tim. "The eye of the tiger." (August 1986) 

122 — Boxing game. BOXING 
Jones, Tudor P, "The Solitary endeavor." 

(December 1986) 76 — Solitaire on the CoCo, 

Correction, March 1987, p. 182. SOLTAIRE 
Jorgenson, Michael N. "Takecommand of CoCo 3 

drives." (February 1987) 94 — Disk utility for the 

CoCo 3. DU-3 
Josue Vigil, Julian. "New Mexican folk dances." 

(June 1987) 76 FOLKSONG 
Kenny, Keiran. "The electronic marquee." 

(September 1986) 41 DISPLAY 



Kenny. Keiran. "It figures." (March 1987) 78 — 

Calculate total of list of figures. TOTAL 
Kenny, Keiran. "Mastering the gates." (August 

1986) 79 GATES 
Kenny, Keiran. "One-liner." (February 1987) 138 — 

Miniature monitor program. 
Kenny, Keiran. "PEEKasso prints." (January 1987) 

30 — Drawing program PEEKASSO 
Kenny, Keiran. "Rational thinking." (September 

1986) 38 — Conversion of fractions to ratios and 
percentages. RATIOS 

Keyes, Chris, "Air rescue." (June 1987) 26 — 
Balloon attack game. POKE1; POKE2 

Kim, Joon Y. "One-liner." ( May 1987) 28 — Print 
out disk directory. 

Kimmel, Tony. "One-liner." (July 1986) 155 — 
Reverse 4 digit number. 

King, David. "The DMP-105 takes a bow." (May 

1987) 104 — Screen dump. DUMP105 
Knoppow, Jim. "Hint." (November 1986) 54 —Alter 

the cursor. 

Kocourek, Thomas ; and Rockwell, Kenneth. 

"Thanks for the memory." (May 1987) 186 — Use 

the full 64K. NEWBOOTS 
Kolar, Joseph. "Creating a review program." 

(February 1987) 101 — Tutorial with educational 

example. LANGTRAN 
Kolar, Joseph. "The creative muse: How to dredge 

up those ideas." (June 1987) 96 
Kolar, Joseph. "Doing the program shuffle." 

(March 1987) 108 PART 1 ALT; ALT 1 ; ALT2 

PROBLEM 

Kolar, Joseph. "Exploring CoCo graphics." (April 
1987) 112 

Kolar, Joseph. "The formatting review: MID$ struts 

its stuff." (January 1987) 86 MAJUNGA ROMAN 

ANGLO MODIFIED 
Kolar, Joseph, "Formatting text presentations to 

suit yourself." (December 1986) 80 DEMO 
Kolar, Joseph. "Learning howto function in 

BASIC," ( October 1986) 77 STRINGS1; 

STRINGS2 

Kolar, Joseph, "One character space at a time," 
(November 1986) 46 — Tutorial on LEFTS etc. 
HEADING HOMEWORK 

Kolar, Joseph. "Real-life uses forthe seven-value 
CIRCLE statement." (May 1987) 77 

Kolar, Joseph. "Translation sensation." (July 

1986) 93 LANGTUTR 

Kolar, Joseph. "Uncomplicating translating." 

(August 1986) 48 — Second part of translation 

demo. LANGTUT1; LANGTUT2 
Kolar, Joseph. "Using inverse characters," 

(September 1986) 165 INVERSE STUTTER1; 

STUTTER2 

Kooser, Lindsay. "The digital dimension," (June 

1987) 38 — Utility for Speech/Sound pak. 
NUMBTEXT 

Kressman, Robie. "Astronomer's heaven." 
(January 1987) 30 — Display the night sky. 
BIGDIPPR 

Kromeke, Michael B. "Rattle rattle thunder clatter 

boom boom boom." (September 1986) 49 — - A 

model of a car engine, ENGINE 
Kromeke, Michael B. "Tricks of the trade." (March 

1987) 76 — Puzzle type game SWITCH 
Kromeke, Michael B, "Two-liner." (July 1986)232 

— Print out a calendar. 
Kromeke, Michael. "Two-liner." (May 1987) 198 — 

Set baud rate for printer. 
Kyte, Ted. "That's the way the ball bounces." (May 

1987) 88 — CoCo 3 graphics demo. BALLDEMO 
Kyte, Ted. "Two CoCo BBS system." (November 

1986) 86 

LaBonville, Helen. "Halloween foolery." (October 

1986) 108 — Talking pumpkin PUMPKIN 
Ladouceur, Paul. "A pause for thought." (May 

1987) 194 — Avoid mistake lock-ups, PAUSE 
(OS9) 

Lake, Robert C. "Ma Bell gets personalized." (May 
1987) 74 — Vanity phone numbers for fun. 
V ANfPHON 

Lammers. Charles. "One-liner." (July 1986) 165 — 

Yin and Yang symbol. 
Large, Donald. "Grocery," (April 1987) 68 —Make 

grocery lists. GROCERY 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 153 



Laun, Roberf E. "Enter the fifth dimension." (April 
1987)20 — Five dimensional arrays explained. 
FIFTHDIM 

Law. Greg, "Hint." (April 1987) 47 — Rainbow 

CHEK plus fix. 
Lear, Dale. "There's evil doings afoot at the Hotel 

CoCo," (February 1987) 27 SETUP (OS9) 

HOTEL {OS9) 
Lengel, Dave. "Sound off," (February 1987) 125 

KEY SEEP 

Lewis, Emmett J, "Presenting the smarter-than- 
average printer buffer." (May 1987) 160 
PRINTBUF 

March, Keith. "Recipe printer." (April 1987) 72 
RECIPE 

Marino, Frank, "One-liner," (September 1986) 184 

— Count vowels in sentence. 
Matthews, Becky F. "A cyclo-delic palette," 

(February 1987) 60 — Graphics demo for CoCo 

3. CYCLDRAW 
Matthews, Becky F. "O, Tannenbaum." (December 

1986} 116 — Christmas graphics. TRIMTREE 
Mattia. Frank. "Hint." (March 1987) 171 — Use 

cassette port to get sound to a monitor. 
Maulick. Charles P. "One-liner." (October 1986) 

149 — Graphics demo. 
Mayeux, Ann B. "Portraits by BASfC." ( October 

1986)49 DRAWFACE 
Mcdusky, Lonnie. "One-liner." (August 1986) 1 40 

— Use joystick to move racing car. 
McCuflough. Erik. "Two-finer." (July 1986) 207 — 

Basic alarm. 
McDowell, Jim. "One-liner." (May 1987) 1 46 — 

Label print program. 
McGinnis, Matthew. "Two-liner;' (June 1987) 145 

— Sound demo. 

McGrath. Dick, "The envelope please." (November 

1986) 1 25 — Crossword puzzle conlesl winner. 
Mcintosh, Tim. "Do-it-yourself video output 

board." (September 1986) 171 — Correction. 

November 1986, p. 78. 
Merryman, Robert C. "The super switcher," 

(November 1986) 1 68 
Meyers, Peter. "The menace of Ihe SandWorm," 

(August 1986) 1 8 SANDWORM 
Miliard. Ian. "Writer-zap." (September 1986) 116 — 

Utility for VIP writer. WRITRZAP 
Miller, Eric ; and Gavriluk, Erik. "Long distance 

draughts." (November 1986) 1 1 4 — Checkers by 

modem, MCLOAD; MCDRAW 
Miller. Raiph D. "A matter of principal," (March 

1 987) 82 — Print amortization schedules. 

AMORTIZE 
Mills, David. "Hint." (May 1887) 125 — RGB 

shortcut. 

Mishra, Vick. "Two-liner." (October 1986) 69 — Hit 
the white balloons with your arrows. 

Montowski. Robert C. "July fashion forecast: 
Classic clothes by CoCo." (July 1986) 115 — 
Make iron-on transfers. BOOTFLIP FLIP-L2R; 
FLIPPOKE 

Montowski. Robert C. "Picture perfect graphics 

commands." (March 1987) 156 — For OS-9 only. 

GSAVE (OS9) GLOAD (OS9) MAKEPIX (OS9) 
Mueller, John. E. "Uncovering the MIDI section." 

(June 1987) 36 — Digital interface for CoCo music. 
Murphy, Craig. "Two-liner." (June 1987) 45 — 

Gra phics demo. 
Musumeci. John. "Checks and balances," (April 

1987) 75 — Check book balancer CHECKS 
Nash, Jon, "Hint," (February 1987) 72 — Use 

cassette relay command to make interesting 
sounds. 

Nellis. Michael. "Hint." (May 1987) 97 —Cassette 
I/O errors, 

Nelson, Mark. "Fast relief for tape-loading 

headaches." (February 1987) 182 — Correction, 

June 1987. p. 11 6. TAPE DOC 
Newell, Aaron, "Two-liner." (August 1986) 135 — 

Electronic dice, 
Nickel, Harold. "The CoCo composer." (June 

1987} 1 1 4 — Play I he CoCo like a two-level 

organ, PIANO 
Noble. James A, "Battlin* blue Bert." (April 1987) 

105 BLUEBERT 
Norlon, Dennis. "Chronologist in CoCo land." (Sep- 



tember 1986) 58 — Teach children how to read a 
clock. CLOCK 

Noyle. Jeff. "One-liner," (August 1986) 150 
Maneuver racer through course. 

Parker, Jeffrey, "The RAINBOWfest reporter." (Oc- 
tober 1986) 83 — Chicago, May 23-25, 1986. 

Perevosnik, Joe. "Double duly." (May 1987)92 — 

Print hard copies of disk directory. DISK DIR 
Petit, Laura . and Petit, Chris. "Hippity hoppity 

down the bunny trail." (April 1987) 99 — - Pattern 

discrimination game. EASTER 
Phillips, Jim A. "The private accounting wizard." 

(March 1987) 26 — Keep track of personal 

records. ACCOUNT TAPE USER 
Plaster, Gip W., II. "Sound off." (June 1987) 81 - 

Music a nd sound effects. SOUNDOFF 
Piatt, Joseph D. "The sweet strains of CoCo." 

(June 1987) 94 — Upgrade to Music+. 

MUSIC + TR OLD100TH HOWGREAT JESU JOY 
Plog, Michael. "Computers and our English 

vocabulary," (December 1986) 173 
Plog, Michael. "A discussion about sexism in the 

computer industry," (October 1986) 164 
Plog, Michael. "Do teachers like computers?" 

(February 1987) 65 
Plog, Michael. "Finding resources for computer 

learning." (March 1987) 90 
Plog. Michael. "The 'hidden' computers." (August 

1986) 97 — Use of the CoCo in videotape 

editing. 

Plog. Michael. "The most important educators of 

all." (November 1986) 166 
Piog. Michael. "Programming the LOGO turtie: 

Studies in learning transfer." (April 1987) 86 
Plog, Michael, "The question of assessment." 

(January 1987) 176 
Plog, Michael. "The role of teachers in educational 

software development." (June 1987) 32 
Plog, Michael. "S-P analysis; Comparing the 

curves." (May 1987) 82 — Aid in curriculum 

improvements. 
Plog, Michael. "Special education and the 

computer." (July 1986) 1 35 
Plog, Michael. "Tandy grants and the status of 

educational computers." (September 1986) 76 
Polsz, Steven R, "Optimum animation." (October 

1986) 116 

Popyack, Len. "Hamming it up." (November 1 986) 

43 — Packet radio discussion. 
Powers, Courtney, "Instant graphics and Hogs in 

Space." (February 1987) 106 — Correction. May 

1987, p. 128. HOGSPACE 
Powers. Ron, "CoCo testmaker revisited." 

(September 1 986) 160 — Make multiple choice 

tests updated (from Sept. 1985, p. 30). 

TESTMAKR 
Powers, Ron. "The teacher's pel," (September 

1986) 47 — Computerized grade book. 

GRADCALC 
Pritchett. Steven D. "One-liner." (January 1987) 

1 4 1 — Light show. 
Puckett. Dale L. " Bootstrapping many systems," 

(March 1987)196 BINARY (OS9) SPLIT (OS9) 

COL (OS9) PROMPT (OS9) MODCRC (OS9) 

DATE (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L. "A bundle of holiday goodies." 

(December 1 986) 198 DEL (OS9) DNAME (OS9) 

EXIT (OS9) TIME (OS9) 
Puckett. Dale L. "Choices: The reason for 

modularity." (July 1986) 224 
Puckett, Dale L. "Deb un Ki ng the myth of OS-9 

user hostility." (January 1987) 193 FIXTIME 

(OS9) REBOOT (OS9) 
Puckett. Dale L, "Experimenting with RAM disks," 

(August 1986) 197 
Puckett, Dale L. "Frank Hogg sees the light and a 

level 111 report." (February 1987) 190 FiLESIZE 

(OS9) FILEPIR (OS9) DEMOTEST (OS9) 

UNLOAD (OS9) SYSGO (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L. "Getting revved up for fall fun." 

(October 1986) 196 GOTOXY (OS9) HGRAPH C 

(OS9) CLS (OS9) PRINTAT (OS9) TOGGLE 

(OS9) BOX (OS9) PILLBOX (OS9) PIXSAVER; 

PIXSHOW (OS9) CALC (OS9) MAKE- 
SCRATCHPAD (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L, "Good times with OS-9 on the 

hard disk," (September 1 986) 200 



Puckett, Dale L. "Looking at blue sky for OS-9 

level II." (November 1986) 199 SYSGO (OS9) 

CLS (OS9) ALTERN AT.CLS (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L "Rambo takes us all back to the 

beginning." (April 1987) 197 DRIVEOFF; 

DRIVEOF F.LI STING IOMAN. PATCH 

TERMINAL. ASM MDI R.C STRIP, C 
Puckett, Dale L. "Setting the stage for OS-9 level 

II." (May 1 987) 196 WIZDRAW (OS9) X M ODE 

(OS9) HEXDUMP (OS9) 
Puckett, Dale L. "Shooting for a standard." (June 

1987) 1 62 AT: ATRUN 
Pullen, Walter. "One-liner." (September 1986) 1 35 

— Moving sine wave. 

Quellhorst, George. "Pretty little listings, all in a 
row." (May 1987) 178 — Print listings In two 
columns. LLISTER 

Quellhorst, George. "Two-liner." (March 1987) 1 44 

— Screen printer 

Reed, Bill. "Plotim 1 and PlanninY" (April 1987) 174 — 

Spreadsheet program. SPREAD 
Reed, James E. "Building August's Rainbow." 

(August 1986) 16 — Assorted commentary. 
Reed, James E. "Building December's Rainbow." 

(December 1986) 16 — CoCo 3 comments. 
Reed, James E. "Building February's Rainbow." 

(February 1 987) 16 — J ust can't retire the old 

CoCo 1! 

Reed, James E. "Building January's Rainbow." 
(January 1987) 16 — Introduction to beginner's 
issue. 

Reed, James E. "Building July's Rainbow." (July 

1986) 16 — Notes Sor beginners. 

Reed, James E, "Building June's Rainbow." (June 

1987) 16 — Discussion of Chicago 
RAINBOWfest, 

Reed, James E, "Building March's Rainbow," 

(March 1987)^6 
Reed. James E . "Building May's Rainbow." (May 

1 987) 16 — Attach a CoCo to your enercise bike! 
Reed, James E "Building November's Rainbow," 

(November 1986) 16 — Comments on copyright 

issues. 

Reed, James E. "Building October's Rainbow." 

(October 1 986) 1 6 — AH about Rainbow on Disk. 
Reed, James E. "Building September's Rainbow." 

(September 1 986) 16 — All about CoCo 3. 
Rigsby, Mike. "Your face or mine?" (September 

1986) 88 FACE BASND SOUND 
Rittenhouse, James E "Cassette organization." 

(February 1987) 125 TAPEMENU 
Rittenhouse, James E, "Wet 'n wild," (January 

1987) 27 — Leaky roof game. LEAKY 

Rocci, Kathryn. "That's the ticket." (May 1987) 26 — 
Print tickets for parties, dances, etc. TICKET 

Rogers, Robert, "Decisions, decisions." (February 
1987) 122 — Help you decide alternative 
choices. DECISION 

Rogers. Robert, "One-liner," (October 1986) 147 

— Graphics demo, 

Ropson, Ronald T. "The shifting, reducing, 

stretching, enlarging transfiguration band." 

(October 1986) 44 ZOOM1 TO ZOOM4 
Rosen, Bob, "Hint," (January 1987) 146 - - CoCo 3 

lowercase in 32 columns. 
Rosen, Bob, "Hint." (March 1987) 160 - - CoCo 3 

tips, 

Rosen, Russ. "One-liner." (December 1986) 126 — 

Create a cash register, 
Ruangchotvit. Chmarut, "One-liner." (July 1986) 

64 — Produce integer factors. 
Ruby. Paul. J r. "Success mansion." (January 

1987) 108 — Correction, April 1987, p.128. 

SUCCESS 

Sal vail. Pierre. "Four shades of gray." (May 1987) 
90 — Prints graphics screens. COLRDUMP 

Samuels, Edward. "Computer program copyrights: 
A how-to guide." (April 1987) 82 

Satir, Gregory. "One-liner," (February 1 987)66 — 
Convert integer to binary. 

Scerbo, Fred B. "Achieving arcade game speed in 
BASIC." (July 1986)98 — Advanced Star-Trench 
Warfare (see also November 1982. p. 8) 
Corrections, August 1986, p. 98, and October 
1986, p.92 TRENCH 

Scerbo, Fred B. "The challenge returns: Driller <l is 
a thriller, too." (October 1986) 173 DRILLER2 



154 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Wood, James W. "Tic-tac-CoCo." {August 1986) 

36 — Polar version of game. TiCTACTO 
Woods, Rick, "Deck (he halls." (December 1986) 

42 — Songs for Musica II. DECKHALL 

MUSCLOAD TAPELOAD 
Wright, Arch or. "Amnotron animation." (July 

1966)54 — Animation program, AMNOTRON 
Wright, Archor. "Fly off the handle " (August 1986) 

81 — Ffight simulator. FLIGHT 
Zanger, Murray. "Thrifty CoCo handles what-if 

calculations." (March 1987) 36 FN ANPLAN 
Zumwalt, Greg L. "Living on Rainbow time," 

(November 1986) 170 CLOCK1; CLOCK2 (OS9) 
Zumwalt, Greg L. "Tandy Color Computer 3 does 

windows, and a whole lot more" (September 

1986) 20 




PRODUCT REVIEWS 



Scerbo, Fred B. "CoCo conquers the metric 

system." (Apnl 1987) 76 LIFESKL6 
Scerbo, Fred 8 "Computer-paced learning." 

(August 1986) 167 LIFESKL4 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Creating designer arcade 

games." (December 1986) 163 — Updated snail 

invaders. CRTVADER 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Graphics, education and speech 

come tofether." (May 1987) 38 — Graphic 

simulation of blood flow. BLOOD 
Scerbo, Fred B. "More graphics, speech and 

education." (June 1987} 106 — Simulation of the 

heart. HEART 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Prepare for Thanksgiving 

cooking with liquid measure." (November 1986) 

62 — Gallons to ounces, etc. LIQUID 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Roboflip: Anatomy of a game," 

(March 1987) 168 RG BO FLIP 
Scerbo, Fred B. "A spelling program that speaks 

for itself." (February 1987) 166 H&SPELL 
Scerbo, Fred B. "Understanding relationships 

between fractions, decimals and whole 

numbers." (January 1 987) 78 MATHQUIZ 
Scerbo. Fred B. "Updating the Color Change 

quiz/' (September 1986) 98 CHNGQUIZ 
Schmidt, Fred, "Hint." (December 1986) 133 — Make 

an RS-232 "Y" cable, 
Schneider, Harold, "The odd man out." (October 

1 986) 125 — Rainbow on tape program also on 
September tape. NOTLIKE 

Schrag, Roger. "The limousine utility: A tape-to- 
disk transfer vehicle." (February 1987 ) 73 — 
Reprint from January 1984, p, 48, TPTODSK 

Schuff, David. "The color conductor." (June 1 987) 
78 — Various popular songs. GAVOTTE TEXAS 
CHIEF FOLLOWME JETPLANE COUNTRY 

Schuster, Tobin. "The 8088 sounds off." (March 

1987) 40 — Unusual use for the 8088 
microprocessor. 

Selbee, Keith. "Two-liner," (April 1987) 176 — 

Create cassette inde,x cards on printer. 
Siegel, Mark, "The third one's the charm." 

(November 1986) 30 — More details on CoCo 3. 
Sims, Michael. "Charting the ups and downs of 

life/' (March 1987) 88 — Draw graphs of data, 

GRAPHIT 

Sipos, Anion. "One-liner." (August 1986) 151 — 
Disk utility. 

Small, Ric. "One-liner." (September 1 986) 54 — 

Shoot-'em-up game, 
Snook, Alien. "The spit and image. ' (May 1987) 36 

— Screen dump program GRAPHGEN 

Staff, "Rainbow's holiday shopping guide." (De- 
cember 1986) 25 — Christmas gift suggestions, 

Steinbrueck, Richard. "The tournament master." 
(April 1987) 120 — Keep track of round robin 
games. Correction, June 1987, p. 116. 
RNDROBIN INPUT 

Stewart, John. "Echo." (February 1987) 126 — 
Send screen output to printer. ECHO 

Strike, Thomas J., Jr. "Hint." (March 1987) 142 — 
Avoid burn-in of monitor. 

Sundberg, Lynn. "I can see cfearly now." (July 

1986) 20 — Formatted printer listings of 
programs. SRLIST 

Tenney, Steve. "The rhythm of life." (May 1987) 20 

— Charfyour biorhythms, B IOCH ART 
Terrio, Christine. "Teacher's pet," (January 1987) 

32 — Spelling practice lists. 
Thomas, Carmie A. "Happy new year!" {January 

1987) 29 — Graphics demo. NEW YEAR 
Thompson, Matthew, "Steppin* out with rrsy 

CoCo." (June 1987) 58 — Music synthesizer. 

BW2; BW2C3FIX AXEL F ENTRTANR 
Tucker, Eric. '"Treasure quest: The golden 

adventure," (November 1986) 18 TREASURE 
Turner, Del. " I s i s a fish, o r a phish, or a pheish?" 

(June 1987) 148 — BASIC09 helps with 

phoneme recognition. SOUNDPUZ (BASIC09) 
Turowski, Donald. "I bef«re E except after C..." 

(September 1986) 78 SPELDRIL 
Valentine, John. "X marks the spot." (May 1987) 

125 — Utility. 
Vasconi, Eugene. "Holiday hearth." {December 

1986) 1 08 — Christmas fireplace XMASF IRE; 

XMASDRVR 
Vasconi, Eugene, "Season's greetings." 



(December 1986) 18 — Graphics Christmas 
messages, G REETING 

Vasconi, Eugene. ''Escape from the bug zone." 
(January 1987) 59 

Vaughn. Horace D. "The old-time fix." (November 
1986) 55 — Disk fix to May 1 986, p,150. 
SHORTEN 

Venthng, James. " Keycad/Keyflow: CoCoad and 

CoCoflow modifications." (November 1986) 126 

COCOMOD1 TO COCOMOD3 
Waiter, Rick A. "One-liner." (April 1987) 4? — 

Monthly payments on a loan. 
Walton, Byron. "One-liner." (February 1987) 166 

— 2 programs to list ASCII from disk- 
Ward, Logan. "LED power indicator." (December 

1986) 160 — LED for the disk drive. 
Warner, Bruce N. "Pipes and filters for the 

masses " (February 1987) 204 
Weide, Dennis H. "The CoCo ROS, part 1 " 
(December 1986) 85 — Build a robot operating 
system. 

Weide, Dennis H "The CoCo ROS, part2: 
Building the ROS circuit." (January 1987) 153 
ROS TEST 

Weide, Dennis H, "The CoCo ROS, part 3; The 
Robotics program and interfacing." (February 

1987) 152 ROBOT RBT22SRC 

Weinberg, Rob. "One-liner." (August 1986) 153 — 

I nteresting g raphics. 
Wells, John T. "One-liner," (February 1987) 143 — 

Hexadecimal dump. 
Wells, John T. "Saucer, saucer, in the sky." (April 

1987) 116 SAUCER 
White. Edward A "Hail to the Chief." {September 

1986) 153 — Presidential quiz. PRESIDNT 
White, Eric. "CoCo presents the well-behaved yard 

safe," (April 1987 ) 52 YARDSALE 
White, Eric. "CoCo-nect-a-doi," (January 1987) 60 

COCONECT 
White, Eric. "Esch-a-sketch." (August 1986) 75 — 

Correction, December 1986, p. 101. ESCHER 

PRINT200 

White, Eric. "Tips on the CoCo 3. (March 1987)18 

COLORCHEK 
White. Forrest K. "Sized to fit." (May 1987) 91 — 

Set up for Gemini 1 0X printer. FORMATTR 
White, Jeff "The great picture show." (July 1 986) 

26 — Display graphics files. MAGICIAN 

WIZARD LATECOCO MERLIN LOADER SHOW 
White, Jeff, "Picture file extension changer." 

(October 1986) 182 EXTCHNGR 
White, Richard A. "BASIC09 on the CoCo 3," 

(November 1986) 188 SIEVE (OS9) 
White, Richard A, M CoCo word processing," (July 

1 986) 212 

White, Richard A. "The CoCo 3 color palette from 
a BASIC program," (February 1987) 200 
BASICPAL 

White, Richard A, "Dealing with variables in 

BASIC09." (December 1986} 195 
White, Richard A. "Exploring the CoCo 3 color 

system." (March 1987) 112 C03COLOR 
White, Richard A. "The first days with CoCo 3. 

Experimentation and discovery." (January 1987) 

188 

White, Richard A. "Getting started with BASIC09." 

(June 1987) 158 
White, Richard A, "Making the most of CoCo 3 

features without overdoing it," (April 1987) 194 

LISTER 

Wiedman, Barry, "One-liner," (April 1987) 170 — 

Vacation planning helper. 
Wigowsky. Paul. "Two-liner." (July 1986) 168 — 

Play tu ne from popular movie. 
Wilkes, Ernest. "One-liner." (February 1987) 138 — 

Disk utility. 

Williamson, H. G, "Tracking the tempest." (April 

1987) 26 — Predict a hurricane landfall 
Correction, June 1987, p. 116. HURRTRAK 

Wilson, Stephen R. "Hint." (November 1986) 73 — 

Multi-Pak tips. 
Wolff, Haroid L. "Look what they've done to my 

CoCos." (March 1987) 46 — Battery backup for 

the CoCo. 

Womack, Wayne. "The CoCo scaler." (October 
1986) 1 66 SCALER 



"ADOS version 1 .02." (June 1987) 146 
"Advanced BASIC programming aid." (July 1986) 
158 

"Adventure in mythology. " f August 1 986) 139 
"Alphabetizing," (September 1986) 135 
"Theamazin' maze game," (June 1 987) 1 37 
"Art gallery," (April 1987) 135 

"Assembly language progra mming for the TRS-80 
Color Computer (book)." (December 1986) 142 
"Avatex 1200 modem." ( December 1986) 132 
"A2D deluxe joystick." (August 1986) 150 
"Banner," (January 1987) 146 
"Battle hymn," (December 1986) 144 
"Bouncing boulders." (April 1987) 139 
"Bowling league secretary." (September 1986) 141 
"Bowling league secretary." (April 1987) 140 
"Business bankbook." (August 1986) 144 
"C Compiler." (October 1986) 143 
"Car dealer assistant " (October 1986) 142 
"Casper CoCo quick assembler." (September 

1986) 137 

"Cave walker." (June 1987) 135 

"CC3 draw." (December 1986) 148 — Correction, 

February 1987, p. 160, 
"Champion." (May 1987) 141 
"Citizen 1 20D printer" (March 1987) 147 
"CM-8 extender cable." ( May 1987) 140 
"CMOS conversion kit," (April 1987) 138 
"CoCo Base I." (August 1986) 152 
"CoCo diskzap utility." (October 1986) 147 
"CoCo guru." (February 1987) 134 
"CoCo hymnal," (March 1987) 143 
"CoCo til font bonanza." (April 1987) 148 
"CoCo III secrets reveafe* (book)," (February 

1987) 140 

"CoCo III 512K upgrade." (March 1987) 145 
"CoCo-util II" (November 1986) 136 
"CoCoachiever." (November 1986) 146 
"CoCoSize," ( April 1987) 143 
"Code practice." (November 1986) 134 
"Color connection." (April 1987) 134 
"Color scribe III," (June 1987) 136 
"Coiorchesfra." (October 1986} 135 
"Colorscan," (January 1987) 136 
"COMM-4," (December 1986) 134 
"Computer bankbook." (August 1986) 144 
"Computer hammer." (February 1987) 141 
"The computer phone book." (November 1 986) 
135 

"CyberTank." (November 1986) 149 
"D.L, Logo." (January 1987) 147 
"Darkmoor hold " (August 1 986) 135 
"Data pack II Plus; Datapack HI Plus." {May 1987) 
142 

"DDAY " (February 1987) 138 
"Digisector DS-69A." (November 1 986) 140 
"Disk BASIC unraveled (book)," ( October 1986) 
146 

"Disk programming package." (January 1987) 144 
"Diskman." (May 1987) 134 
"Disto super RAM 3." (May 1987) 144 
"DMS-3B digital memory scope." ( December 
1 986) 146 

"Dragon blade." (November 1986) 151 
"Dragon slayer," (January 1987) 135 
"The Dragon's castle." (June 1987) 143 



July 198? THE RAINBOW 155 



"Dragon's temple." (December 1986) 136 
"Drive 1 upgrade." (November 1986) 150 
"DSKUtil." (July 1986) 153 
"Dual DOS switcher." (February 1987) 138 
"Eagle lander." (September 1986) 134 
"Easy gradebook / Easy testwriter." (July 1986) 
154 

"The electronic robot dog." (January 1987) 139 
"Elite word/80." (March 1987) 134 
"Enhanced racing analysis package." (July 1986) 
167 

"Filesafe." (April 1987) 145 

"FKEYS III." (April 1987) 142 

"Flash card drill." (November 1986) 148 

"Fourcube." (May 1987) 139 

"Full screen editor & varisave." (April 1987) 144 

"Gantelet." (February 1987) 135 

"Gold finder." (May 1987) 137 

"Graphic echo." (October 1986) 138 

"The guidebook for winning adventures (book)." 

(February 1987) 146 
"Hall of the king II; The inner chamber." 

(September 1986) 140 
"Homeware." (July 1986) 169 
"Infomania: The guide to essential electronic 

services." (July 1986) 157 
"I nside information (book)." ( December 1986) 1 38 
"Interbank incident." (March 1987) 139 
"An introduction to the doctrines of grace." (July 

1986) 165 

"Introductory Spanish courses." (April 1987) 146 
"JramR." (June 1987) 134 
"Kameleon." (September 1986) 133 
"Kamelion." (March 1987) 141 
"Karate." (September 1986) 145 
"Keep-trak." (July 1986) 162 
"Keeping track." (March 1987) 142 
"Language arts software." (March 1987) 146 
"The Learning Company software." (June 1987) 
142 

"LEO." (November 1986) 145 

"Listaid." (July 1986) 165 

"LISTER." (November 1986) 139 

"Little letters." (December 1986) 144 

"Lockout." (June 1987) 140 

"The lottery player." (February 1987) 143 

"Lyra." (December 1986) 133 

"The magic of Zanth." (March 1987)140 

"Mailing list/data information." (August 1986) 149 

"Map 'n zap." (January 1987) 148 

"Master disk." (August 1986) 150 

"Mathpack." (September 1986) 132 

"Max fonts." (October 1986) 144 



"Tne memory game." (October 1986) 146 
"Memory manager." (October 1986) 139 
"Memory minder." (September 1986) 144 
"Micro fire." (October 1986) 149 
"Mikeydial." (December 1986) 143 
"MiniDOS9." (February 1987) 149 
"Miscellaneous writings." (January 1987) 141 
"Mission F-16 Assault." (October 1986) 136 
"Modem pak (Radio Shack)." (August 1986) 146 
"Mouse top." (January 1987) 140 
"Music libraries." (February 1987) 137 
"MYDOS." (June 1987) 144 
"OS-9 utilities." (September 1986) 146 
"OS-9 version 2.00." (July 1986) 166 
"OTERM." (July 1986) 148 
"Packer." (December 1986) 139 
"PAL switcher." (June 1987) 138 
"Paper route." (November 1986) 147 
"PBH-64 print buffer." (November 1986) 144 
"PenPal." (August 1986) 194 
"PenPal." (September 1986) 188 
"Pinball factory." (August 1986) 134 
"Plateau of the past." (September 1986) 139 
"Pony express 24A modem." (January 1987) 148 
"Portraits of Christ." (August 1986) 141 
"Tne presidential decisions of George 

Washington." (April 1987) 147 
"Probaloto version 2.0." (November 1986) 143 
"Psycho I." (September 1986) 138 
"OS-9 level II." (May 1987) 148 
"Pump man." (October 1986) 134 
"Puzzle math." (February 1987) 145 
"The quest for reality." (November 1986) 150 
"Quotes." (April 1987) 137 

"The return of junior's revenge." (May 1987) 135 

"River crossing." (March 1987) 135 

"Rocky's boots." (April 1987) 135 

"Roller controller." (May 1987) 150 

"Rommel 3-D." (August 1986) 138 

"Rules of writing." (April 1987) 142 

"Salvdisk." (August 1986) 137 

"SC68008 RAMdisk." (March 1987) 137 

"SECA coupon filer." (June 1987) 139 

"The SECA fraction review." (May 1987) 136 

"Seikosha SP-1000A printer." (October 1986) 148 

"ShockTrooper " (July 1986) 157 

"Sigmaword." (May 1987) 147 

"Skance." (August 1986) 140 

"Snap study system." (July 1986) 164 

"Softreader." (March 1987) 144 

"Software bonanza package." (July 1986) 149 

"Soundscope." (June 1987) 133 

"Spectrum keyboard." (August 1986) 151 



"State the facts game." (May 1987) 146 
"StopBurn." (June 1987) 140 
"Studies in the parables." (February 1987) 142 
"Super collection of super games." (June 1987) 
145 

"Super programming aid version 2." (January 
1987) 138 

"Super programming aid." (July 1986) 158 
"Super programming aid." (April 1987) 136 
"Survey programs." (May 1987) 138 
"A synopsis of books of the Holy Bible." (March 
1987) 143 

"Teacher pak plus." (March 1987) 138 
"Telepatch II." (July 1986) 168 
"TX." (December 1986) 136 
"TXD." (July 1986) 151 

"U.S. stamp inventory management system." (July 

1986) 156 
"U-buff." (August 1986) 151 
"Ultra label maker." (February 1987) 144 
"Ultra telepatch." (November 1986) 138 
"UNDERWARE." (February 1987) 136 
"Uninterrupted power source." (September 1986) 

149 

"Unkill." (October 1986) 144 

"VIP write enhancer." (February 1987) 148 

"Vortex factor." (July 1986) 152 

"Wall Street." (October 1986) 137 

"White fire of eternity." (December 1986) 135 

"Wico command control trackball." (September 

1986) 136 

"Wishbringer." (August 1986) 148 

"The witness." (July 1986) 163 

"Wizard's castle." (August 1986) 136 

"Wizard," (July 1986) 168 

"The Word Factory's word meaning." ( March 

1987) 136 

"The Word Factory— synonyms and antonyms." 

(June 1987) 132 
"The word search game." (April 1987) 140 
"WordPak-RS." (October 1986) 149 
"Writest." (January 1987) 150 
"XWord. XSpell, XMerge." (July 1986) 170 
"York 10 educational software." (January 1987) 

134 

"York 10 Educational Software." (May 1987) 144 
"York 10 Software Library — physics." (February 

1987) 140 
"Zork I." (July 1986) 150 
"1986 tax estimate. " (September 1986) 148 
"3-D graphics." ( January 1987) 145 



Hint . 



I Screen, You Screen 



The PfiLETTE command is used to easily change the 
colors of the screen you are working on. The following 
table indicates the slots used for various screen 
parameters. 



Mode 

32-column 
40/80-column 



Foreground Background 
Slot Slot 



Slot 12 
SlotO 



Slot 13 
Slot 8 



As an example, in the 32-column mode, 
PfiLETTE12,63:PfiLETTE13,0 will give white letters 
on a black background. In the 40- or 80-column mode, 
Pfil_ETTE0,0 :PflLETTEB , 63 : CLS1 will accomplish 
the same thing. Note that the CLS1 is used to make 
the border color the same as the background. 

Bertrand Dugre 
Quebec, Canada 



Hint 



Neat Little Modification 



The following is intended mostly for those who have 
some experience in hardware alterations. You can 
easily mount a DB-25 connector on the side of your 
CoCo and hook it to the existing keyboard connec- 
tions on the bottom of the board. Then take an old 
CoCo keyboard (or buy a new one) and an old CoCo 
case (or build your own) and make a stand-alone 
keyboard. Just wire the keyboard to a DB-25 connec- 
tor that will mate with the one mounted on the CoCo. 
Nine of the conductors on a 25-conductor cable are 
not needed. However, they open up the possibility for 
remote reset, power-on indicator, etc. Once you have 
worked out the particulars and constructed your 
remote keyboard, move the CoCo and Multi-Pak 
Interface and other accessories off your desk. You will 
be surprised at the neat appearance this little modi- 
fication offers. 

Fred Schmidt 
Englewood, CA 



156 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



jjAMQjjAlNIM, 


16K 






ECB 





Graphics Experience 
You Can Draw From 

By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



The purpose of this and next 
month's tutorial is to teach the 
newcomer how to correct or 
modify a lengthy DRAW statement that 
may contain up to the maximum al- 
lowed number of characters. 

Why bother? One of the chief obsta- 
cles that frustrates CoConauts is that a 
well-stuffed DRAW statement is complex 
and confusing. After creating a picture/ 
display and finding an error or wanting 
to alter the drawing, the newcomer is at 
a loss. He has difficulty identifying the 
offending portion of the program line. 
He is leery of making corrections that 
may destroy or distort his masterpiece. 
This can be a baffling problem. In order 
to make corrections and changes, we 
shall first draw a stylized head. (See 
Figure 1.) 

A picture was drawn on graph paper. 
Each corner of a square is equal to one 
unit from an adjacent corner or neigh- 
boring intersection. The picture is 
drawn in pencil. Then the straight-line 
segments are guided to the nearest 
intersection. Dots are placed at these 
intersections and straight lines are 
drawn connecting the dots. (Think of a 
child's "connect the dots" puzzle.) After 
all the lines in the drawing are con- 
nected, go over them in some color, say 
red. The end points of every straight line 

Florida-based f ~~ r 

Joseph Kolar is a 
veteran writer and 



programmer who 
specializes in intro- 
ducing beginners to 
ihe powers of the 
Color Computer. 




segment are tick-marked in a contrast- 
ing color (black). 

Figure 1 is ready to be reproduced on 
CoCo's screen. This drawing looks 
fairly neat, but when itis translated into 
DRAW statements and viewed on the 
screen, it may look distorted. 

One reason is that the 256-by- 1 92 Hi- 
Res screen squares are not true squares. 
The horizontal lines are shorter than the 
vertical ones. To verify this, type: 

10 PMDDE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 
20 DRAWS16U10R10D10L10" 
100 GOTO 100 

Now run. With a ruler, measure each 
side of the square. 

Another reason the picture may not 
translate well from graph paper to the 
screen is that the drawing may be 
sloppily created and not follow the 
intended lines closely. CoCo pinpoints 
and locates every instruction exactly, 
without distracting deviations. 

BM12B,9GU10 makes a straight line 
from 128,96 to 128,86. You get what you 
ordered in the DRAW statement. Nothing 
freehand here! 

Study Figure 1. Where to begin? At 
any convenient point that suits your 
fancy. You might choose to start at the 
left shoulder, then follow the hairline 
above the right eye, working around the 
head to the other side and then skipping 
up to finish the hairlines. You could 
begin at an eye and do all the facial 
features; start at the neck and do one 
side or the other of the shirt. You could 
do one side of the jaw line and work 
around to the other side. 

Truly, you can begin anywhere and 
go in any direction, skipping and back- 



tracking at will. This being the case, you 
can easily understand why, since each 
programmer has his druthers, it is 
difficult to follow his train of thought 
as he programs his DRAW lines. You can 
easily get lost and throw up your hands 
in disgust. To keep you off balance, I am 
not going to tell you where I am begin- 
ning the drawing and in what direction 
I am traveling. 

Look at the right shoulder. You will 
see a line that moves three boxes to the 
right and one box up. If you started at 
the second point, the line would go three 




Figure 1 



boxes to the left and one box down. It 
is all howyou look at it and where your 
starting point is. 

In the DRAW statement, this particular 
line segment can be drawn using M, plus 
or minus a numeral, and a comma (,), 
plus or minus a second numeral. 

Rule: From the starting point, a move 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 157 



to the right or down is plus. A move up 
or to the left is minus. The first value 
must be the one that indicates motion 
to either the left or right separated by 
a comma; the second value will reflect 
whether or not it moves up or down. 

Type NEW and key in SQUARE if you 
need to get an overview of the M option. 
Otherwise, continue with this tutorial. 

Beginning at the right shoulder (Fig- 
ure 1), we move three spaces to the right 
(+3) and one space up (-1). The move- 
ment would be interpreted by CoCo as 
M+3,-1. If you started at the second 
point and moved the line to the first 
point, the line would go three spaces to 
the left (-3) and one space down (+ 1) or 
M-3, + 1. You may omit the + from the 
second value. To see your handiwork, 
type NEW. 

Rekey lines JO and 100. Type 20 
DRAW"516M+3,-l" and run. From the 
last end point, you now move three 
spaces f urther to the right and one space 
down. This translates to M+3,1. Insert 
it in front of the closing quote and run. 
You have the raw material for a zigzag 
line. 

Add Line 15 and rekey Line 20: 

15 A$="M+3,-lM+3,l" 
20 DRAW"SB"+A$+A$+A$ 

Now run it. We placed our zigzag into 
a string and assigned it the variable, A$. 
Now it looks like a wave. To make a 
long wave and avoid the bother of 
tacking on all those +A$s, type: 



16 B$=A$+A$+A$ 

20 DRAW"SBBM2,96"+B$+B$ 

and run. 

Out of String Space Error! Correct 
by reserving adequate space: 5 CLEAR 
500, then run. 

You can concatenate up to seven +B$s 
before CoCo gets upset and protests 
with an LS Error. If we get an LS Error, 
simply knock off enough +B$s so the 
line functions and put them into a fresh 
DRAW statement. 

21 DRAWB$+B$ 

Check Line 20 to make sure you have 
seven +B$s, then run. 

To make an attractive chain add: 

1? C$="M+3, lM+3,-1 " 
IB D$=C$+C$+C$ 

and rekey Line 21 : 

21 DRAW"SBBM2,9G"+D$+D$+D$+ 
D$+D$+D$+D$ 

and run. 

If you offset the horizontal locator 
value in Line 21 from 2 to 5, you get 
a variant chain that looks like a pair of 
twisted ropes. Run this, then restore 2. 

Let us make a vertical rope so it 
crosses in the center. To make it go 
down three boxes and right one box, we 
get M+1,3, and to go in the opposite 
direction, we get M~l, 3. Note: Horizon- 
tal value is the first element! 



30 E$="M+1,3M-1,3" 

31 F$=E$+E$+E$ 

35 DRAW"SBBM129,G"+F$+F$+ 

F$+F$+F$. 
Now run. 

To make the strand another way, 
type: 

36 DRAW"SBBM12B,G"+F$+F$+ 
F$+F$+F$ 

Two things stand out. First, the links 
are slightly larger, and second, we have 
a mismatched pair of strands. This can 
be repaired. The strand in Line 36 must 
have M-1,3 inserted in front of the 
closing quote. Line 35 must have 
+M+1,3 added after the final +F$. Run 
this. 

Note the horizontal values in lines 35 
and 36. This was done to maintain a 
shape as close as possible to the hori- 
zontal rope. 

Problem to solve! Notice the vertical 
strand is off-center. It crosses the hori- 
zontal rope neatly, but overflows off the 
screen at the bottom. Can you center it 
better? Try to work it out. 

First, drop one +F$ from both lines 
35 and 36, and run. We could use about 
2/2 links on each vertical strand. One 
link equals +E$. Let us insert +E$ in 
both lines 35 and 36. Caution: Not at 
the beginning or the end! Now run. 

Let us add another link, +E$, right 
next to the +E$ we injected into the two 



Listing 1: 

J3 , <LISTING1> 
5 CLEAR6J3J3 

1J3 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , J3 

15 A$="M+3 , -1M+3 , 1" 

16 B$=A$+A$+A$ 

17 C$="M+3,lM+3,-l" 

18 D$=C$+C$+C$ 

2J3 DRAW n S24BM35,99 n + B$+B$ 

21 DRAW"BM2 6,95"+D$+D$ 

22 DRAW"BM24,lj3l ,f +B$ + B$ 
3J3 E$ = n M+l,3M-l, 3" 

31 F$=E$+E$+E$ 

35 1 DRAWS8BM129 , 6 "+F$+F$+E$+E$+ 
F$+F$+E$ 

36 'DRAWS8BM128, 6M-1, 3"+F$+F$+E 
$+E$+F$+F$+"M+l,3" 

4J3 LINE (2J3,94)-(34,1J32), PRESET, B 
F 

41 LINE (218 , 93) -(256 , 1J32) , PRESET 
, BF 

1J3J3 GOT01J3J3 



Listing 2: 

J3 ' <SQUARE> 
1 GOT02j3j3 

1J3 PM0DE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,J3 

16 FOR X=35 TO 18)3 STEP2J3 

19 A$="Ulj3Rlj3NDlj3Rlj3NDlj3Rlj3NDlj3R 

1J3D1J3" 

2J3 DRAW"S8BM2 8,=X; "+A$+A$ + "U1J3R1 

J3ND1J3R1J3D1J3" 

25 NEXTX 

3J3 LINE(28,175)-(228,175) , PSET 

31 LINE (J3, 95) -(255,97) , PSET, BF 

32 LINE(127, J3)-(129, 191) , PSET, BF 

33 CIRCLE (128,96) ,5,1 

34 LINE(J3, 96)-(255, 96) , PRESET 

35 LINE(128,J3) -(128,191) , PRESET 
4J3 B$="U6F3E3D6BR3NU6BR3U5NUF4NU 
5DBR3NU6R4U6BR3NR4D3R4D3NL4 11 

41 C$= M U6R4D3NL4BE3D6R4BR3NU6R4U 
6BR3NR4D3R4D3NL4 " 

42 D$="NE3NF3R2 J3" : E$ = "R2J3NH3G3 11 

43 F$="U6F3E3D6BG3D6BG3BRDND5F4N 



158 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



lines. Run this. In Line 35, delete the 
final +"M+1,3" and tack on +E$ and 
run it, That leaves one piece missing at 
the end of Line 36. Add +"M+1 , 3" and 
run. It isn't perfect, but it will do, 

By the way, what was this tutorial 
supposed to cover? It seems I wandered 
off down some primrose path. Even 
though it was difficult to create the 
vertical rope, wasn't it a fun challenge? 
Now, you know two ways to make a 
rope. 

Suppose we wanted to make a three- 
strand rope? First, mask lines 35 and 36 
with REM markers to get them out of the 
road. Re-size lines 20 and 21. Change 
Line 20 to S1G and delete SB from Line 
2!. Since both lines will be the same size, 
a second S1G would be redundant. Run 
this. 

Lop off four each +B$s and + D$s from 
lines 20 and 21, and run. Re-center by 
inserting 0 in lines 20 and 21 to make 
the horizontal value 20. Now run. 

The size must be enlarged to S24. 
Make the change and run. To make the 
third strand, type: 

22 DRRW"BM12,101" + B$+B$ 

Rekey lines 20 and 21, then type: 

20 DRflkTS24BM23,99"+B$+B$ 

21 DRflkJ"BM15,95"+D$+D$ 

and run. 

The starting locations (H,V) were an 
exercise in trial and error, They were 



adjusted, this way and that, until the 
strands looked moderately twisted. 

We now have staggered strands. Re- 
center by adding + ! 2 to each horizontal 
value in lines 20 through 22. Now run. 
Allwe have to do is tie up the loose ends, 
I will have to ask CoCo to cheat and 
resort to LINE statements to do the 
trick: 

40 LINE(20,94 )- (34,102) , 
PRESET, BP 

41 LINE(21B,93)-(256,102) , 
PRESET, BP 

Now run it. 

Incidentally, there are better, more 
complex ways to tie the ends of the 
braided, three-strand rope, That would 
send us further down another primrose 
path, Suffice to say, using LINE was 
good practice. How did I come up with 
the values in the two LINE statements? 
1 used PSET,BP. This allowed me to see 
what was being zapped because little 
windows overlaid the dangling ends. 
Merely adjusting the values to encom- 
pass the desired portions indicated 
vividly what was being blanked out. The 
mission was finalized by changing the 
PSET to PRESET. 

Save it as Listing 1 and type NEW. Here 
is a problem! Using lines 10 and 100, 
create a DRAW LINE 20 and usingM-2,4, 
manipulate the pluses and minuses to 
create a diamond shape in size SIS. 

Usingthe A option, make a diamond- 
shaped cross. Going further, an optical 
illusion was created, using the same 



game plan. Type NEW. Quickly, key in 
OPTICAL and run. If you stare at the 
display, it seems as if the diamond tends 
to rotate on its vertical axis, sometimes 
clockwise and sometimes counterclock- 
wise. 

Your homework assignment is to 
make a small program using 10 
PMDDE4 , 1 : PCLS :SCREEN1,0 and 
create the eyeless wonder in Figure 1 
using the DRAW statement. Think of it as 
if all of the tick marks at the end of each 
straight segment are dots. You must 
connect all the dots to make the lines 
flesh out the face. Begin anywhere you 
like. When you mustjump to a new area 
to connect up with another group of 
lines, use B in front of one of the eight 
normal directions, UDLREFGH, or before 
M ? when you must move at some angle 
that is less than 90 degrees. 

For example, from the end of the 
figure's right jaw, up to the outer edge 
of the right eye, BR2BU9 will bridge the 
gap by making a 90-degree angle; to the 
right two units and then up nine units. 
If you are really into the M option, 
BM + 2,-9 will do the same thing more 
directly and d raws an invisible line 
linking the two areas. 

Save your "face" program. Next 
month, we shall continue. I will make 
the official drawing for the tutorial 
When you compare my rendition with 
your version, you may be shocked to 
realize that even though we created the 
exact same figure, our program lines are 
as different as the two sides of the 
moon. U 



U5DBD3BL4D6R4NU6BD3BL4NR4D3R4D4L 
4" 

4 4 G$ = "R4D3L4NU3D3BD3D6NR4BD3D6R 
4NU6BD3BL4NR4D3R4D4L4 11 

45 H$ = "E3NF3D2j3 l? 

46 I$ = "D2)3NH3E3" 
5)3 DRAW 
,1J3» + C$ 



51 DRAW 
185"+C$ 
5 2 DRAW 
+ E$ 

53 DRAW 
182 !f +E$ 

5 4 DRAW 
2 !f + F$ 

55 DRAW 
1)32"+G$ 

56 DRAW 
5"+H$ 

57 DRAW 
14)3" + I$ 



S4BM9 j 0 / 1)3 " + B$: DRAWBM13 5 
BM9j3, 185 "+B$: DRAWBM13 5, 
BM65 , 7 !f + D$ I DRAW" BM165 , 7 11 
BM64 , 18 2 ,f + D$ : DRAW 11 BM16 5 , 
BMlj3,52"+F$:DRAW"BM24j3, 5 
BM11 ,1)32 !f +G$ : DRAW" BM2 4 1 , 
BM1)3 , 25"+H$ : DRAW 11 BM 2 4)3 , 2 
BM13 , 14)3 "+I$ : DRAW" BM243 , 



PSET 



PSET 



PSET 



6) 3 CIRCLE (48, 55) , 3 , 1: CIRCLE (28 , 1 
35) , 3 , 1: CIRCLE (14 8, 35) , 3 , 1:CIRCL 
E (188, 115) ,3,1 

7) 3 'LINE (48,55)-(12 8,96) , 

M-4 , -2 

71 'LINE (28, 135) - ( 128, 96) 

M-5,+2 OR M-5, 2 

72 'LINE (14 8, 35)-(12 8,96). 

M+l, -3 

7 3 'LINE (18 8, 115)- (128,96) , PSET ' 
M+3 ,+1 OR M+3 , 1 

1) 3)3 GOT01)3)3 

191 PRINT: PRINT 

2) 3)3 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" FROM A STA 
RTING POINT, (CEN- TER) , THE FI 
RST M VALUE IS A 
ED FROM EITHER TO 
THE RIGHT OF THE 
E. IF IT IS TO THE 
A MINUS VALUE, ELSE 

VALUE . 11 

2)31 PRINT: PRINT" THE SECOND IS 



NUMBER DERIV 
THE LEFT OR 
VERTICAL LIN 
LEFT, IT IS 
IT IS A PLUS 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 159 



EITHER ABOVE OR BELOW THE HORIZO 
NTAL LINE. IF IT IS ABOVE THE 
LINE, IT IS A MINUS VALUE, IF 
IT IS BELOW THE LINE IT IS A PLU 
S VALUE. 

202 LINE INPUT" TO CONTINUE, PRE 
SS <ENTER>";OA$ 

210 CLS: PRINT" THE DISPLAY WILL 
SHOW A START-ING POINT AND AN E 

NDING POINT INEACH OF THE FOUR Q 
U ADR ANTS . FROM THE LEGEND AR 

OUND THE DIS- PLAY, FIGURE OUT W 
HAT THE TWO M VALUES ARE. 

211 PRINT: PRINT" THEN TAKE THE 
REM MARKER FROM LINES 7j3-73 AND 
YOU WILL SEE THELENGTH OF THE LI 
NE. AT THE END OF THE PROGRAM L 
INE, THE CORRECTM VALUES ARE LIS 
TED, 

212 PRINT: LINEINPUT" TO CONTINU 
E, PRESS <ENTER>" ;OA$ 

213 CLS : PRINT : PRINT " THE PROBLE 
M IN THE UPPER LEFT QUADRANT, IS 

IN LINE 10. THE PROBLE 

M IN THE LOWER LEFT QUDRANT IS F 
OUND IN LINE 71. THE PROBLE 

M IN THE UPPER RIGHTQUADRANT IS 
FOUND IN LINE 72. THE PROBLE 

M IN THE LOWER" 

214 PRINT "RIGHT QUADRANT IS FOUN 
D IN LINE 73. 

215 PRINT: LINEINPUT" TO SEE THE 
PROBLEMS AND STUDY THE FORMAT 0 

F THE M VALUES PRESS <ENTER 

> sl ;OA$ 



216 GOT01j3 

217 GOT0217 



Listing 3: 
0 ! <OPTICAL> 

lj3 PMODE4,l:PCLS:SCREENl,l 

15 FOR X=4 TO 4j3 STEP3 

20 DRAW"S=X;BM128 , 46M+2 , 4M-2 , 4M- 

2 , -4M+2 , -4" 

3 5 NEXT 

1J3J3 GOT01J3J3 



Listing 4: 

0 ' <REFER>ENCE FOR CROSSED CHAIN 
5 CLEAR600 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 0 

15 A$="M+3 , -1M+3 , 1" 

16 B$=A$+A$+A$ 

17 C$="M+3,lM+3,-l" 

18 D$=C$+C$+C$ 

20 DRAW"S8BM2 , 96"+B$+B$+B$+B$+B$ 
+B$+B$ 

21 DRAW"S8BM2 , 96"+D$+D$+D$+D$+D$ 
+D$+D$ 

30 E$="M+1, 3M-1,3" 

31 F$=E$+E$+E$ 

35 ' DRAW"S8BM129 , 6"+F$+F$+E$+E$+ 
F$+F$+E$ 

36 DRAW"S8BM128, 6M-1, 3"+F$+F$+E$ 
+E$ + F$+F$ + I! M+1, 3" 

100 GOT01J3J3 



/55\ 



PRINTERS! 

NE WS Okidata 192+ (Par. or Ser.) s 370 

NE W5 Okidata 193 (Parallel) s 540 

NE Wl Okidata 193+ (Serial) S 6I0 

Okimate 20 Color Printer s 1 3 5 

Fujitsu 2100 (80 col.) S 4I0 

Fujitsu 2200(132 col.) , s 520 

Toshiba 32 S (Par. or Ser.) s 5!0 

Qume Letterpro 20 (Letter Qual.) s 445 

Silver Reed 420 (Daisy Wheel) % 240 

Silver Reed 600 (Daisy Wheel) s 575 

(Add s 10 Shipping for Printers) 



ACCESSORIES! 

Taxan 12" Green Monitor s 1 2.5 

Taxan I 2" Amber Monitor. s 1 3 5 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot(80 col.) $ 30 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot (132 col.) , s 45 

Stand w/ Diskette Storage (80 col.) ., s 47 

Stand w/Diskette Storage (132 col.) s 57 

Other Printers, Monitors, and Accessories for CoCo 
and IBM upon request. 

MS off interface wsch purchase of printer. 

Find your cheapest published price and we'll bent it!!! 



DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS! 

ALL >/i HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives!) s 235 

Drive 0, 1 (addressed as 4 drives!) S 3S0 

All above complete with HDS controller, 
cable, & drive in case with power supply 

Bare Double Sided Drives 5 1 09 

Dual x h Height Case w/Power Supply % A9 

Double Sided Adapter s 25 

HDS Controller, RS ROM & instructions s 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes s 32 & s 3 s/h 

We use the HDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROM's. 
Shipping Costs: s 5/drive or power supply, 5 10 max. 

Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft.-* 10. Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft.-*20. 
Other cables on request, (Add s 3 00 shipping) 



SP-2 INTERFACE for 
EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19.200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Optional external switch ( s 5 00 extra) frees parallel 
port for use with other computers 

i s 49 9s (plus S 3 C0 shipping) 



SP-3 INTERFACE for 
MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

i 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem/printer switch— no needfor Y-cables or 
plugging/unplugging cables 

■ S 64 9S (plus ^shipping) 



Both also available for IBM, RS-232 and Apple iiC computers. 




P.O. Box 293 
Raritan, NJ 08869 
(201) 722-1055 

ENGINEERING 



160 



THE RAINBOW 



July 1987 



DOWNLOADS 



You Need to Know 
When to Stop 



By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Consultant 



/ am having problems with my new 
printer. It's a Brother M-/I09. The 
problem is when printing out a fair 
amount of data, it loses part of the data 
and resumes somewhere down the line. 
Here is how I have it connected: 
DIN Printer DB-25 

1 Unconnected 

2 to 4 

3 to J 

4 to 3 

I am running at 9600 baud and used the 
line delay pokes to slow it down. I am 
now using 151=128, 152-64. It still loses 
data in the middle of the printed page 
or close to the end. I have slowed the 
printer all the way down to 600 baud 
with no luck. 

Mike Tolbert 
(MIKEGT) 
Greenville, SC 

Mike, we haven't touched the subject 
of printers for a while, so let's get down 
to the basics. Your CoCo uses three of 
four pins on the DIN plug, better 
known as the serial I/O connector, to 
communicate with the printer. The 
pinouts are as follows: 

Pin 1 Not used N/A 

Pin 2 Handshake/ busy Input 

Pin 3 Signal ground Common 

Pin 4 Data Output 

Dan Downard is an 
electrical engineer 
and has been in- 
volved in electron- 
ics for 27 years 
through Ham radio 
(K4KWT). His in- 
terest in computers 
began about eight years ago, and he has 
built several 68XX systems. 




The industry standard for serial 
communications is called RS-232. RS~ 
232 uses a 25-pin connector called a DB- 
25. RS-232 calls for the following 
connectionsto a DB-25 connectoratthe 



printer: 






Pin I- 


Chassis ground 


Common 


Pin 2- 


TxD transmit 
data 


Output 


Pin 3- 


RxD receive 
data 


Input 


Pin4- 


RTS request to 
send 


Output 


Pin 5- 


CTS clear to 
send 


Input 


Pin 6- 


DSR data set 
ready 


Input 


Pin 7- 


SG signal 
ground 


Common 


Pin 8- 


DCD data car- 
rier detect 


Input 


Pin 20- 


DTR data ter- 
minal ready 


Output 



At least we know what the pinouts are 
on the CoCo. The problem is at the DB- 
25 end of the cable. First of all, let's 
assume we are dealing with serial I/O. 
Your printer manual should give the 
pinouts for the RS-232/ DB-25 connec- 
tion. Even though it's an industry 
standard, some printer manufacturers 
use different pins for the handshake 
signal. Use the RS-232 pinouts above to 
identify your printer signals. If you 
don't have a DB-25 connector, match 
the signal descriptions with those given. 

The following connections should 
work: 



DIN 


DB-25/ Printer 


Pin 1 


No Connection 


Pin 2 


Pin 20 


Pin 3 


Pin 7 


Pin 4 


Pin 3 



In most cases you must connect a 
jumper between Pins 4,5,6 and 8 on the 
DB-25 connector. 

If the handshake signal is properly 
connected, you shouldn't have to worry 
about line delays, etc. This is accom- 
plished by a hardware signal between 
the printer and the computer. Just as an 
explanation of your problem, your 
printer has a buffer. The buffer is 
accepting characters at a faster rate than 
it can print. When the buffer is full, your 
CoCo is still sending, because no signal 
has told it to stop. As a rule of thumb, 
baud rate = characters per second x 10. 
In other words, if you have a 120-cps 
printer you should be able to print 1200 
baud without any handshake signals. 
This tidbit assumes that you have no 
buffer, but it's close enough. Obviously 
your printer is not capable of 960 cps. 



Leave Out the Spaces 

Regarding the question in your May 
1987 column from Bill Hodges, about 
underlining every word: The computer 
does exactly what you tell it to do. Most 
underlining routines are set up to under- 
line only characters, not spaces. The 
solution? Don't use any spaces. So, use 
an underline character where spaces 
should be. 

Marc I. Leavey 
Baltimore, MD 

Thanks for the nifty hint, Marc. I 
have been reading your ham radio 

July 1987 THE RAINBOW 161 



column ("RTTY Loop" in 73 Amateur 
Radio) for a long time and am sure glad 
to hear from you. 73's de K4KWT. 



The Unpublished Feature 

In replying to a writer concerning a 
Teac 55 B floppy disk drive, you stated 
that the user's drive was operating 
normally because ''The disk motor is 
turned on for a few seconds to allow the 
drive to get up to speed before any 
operation takes place. " This is true. 
However, your reader's query was 
"when I either insert or extract the disk, 
the motor runs for about ten seconds on 
its own before the lever is engaged. Is 
this normal?" 

It is an unpublished feature of the 
Teac drives (I have one myself) that they 
turn on the spindle motor when a disk 
is inserted or removed from the drive. 
The spindle motor will remain running 
for about ten seconds, as your reader 
noted. I'm told that this feature allows 
for better "clamping and declamping" 
of the disk hub upon insertion and 
removal. This is an isolated hardware 
case j which is peculiar to Teac drives, 
and is not related to the normal V/2- 
second, motor-on delay that is part of 
Radio Shack 's normal Disk BASIC. 

Don Hutchison 

(DONHUTCH1SON) 

Atlanta, GA 

Thanks for the info, Don. I am also 
informed through Delphi and Marty 
Goodman that Shugart, Panasonic and 
Matshushita 455 drives all have the 
same hardware delay built in. 



What's a Control-Z? 

/ operate amateur radio and got my 
CoCo 2 to use on a packet radio station. 
It works just fine on packet, but in order 
to use the major BBS, you need to sign 
your message with a CONTROL-Z. Is it 
possible to get a CONTROL-Z out of the 
CoCo 2? 

Billy R. Thomas 
Streamwood, IL 

You must be using some kind of 
communications, or terminal, software, 
Billy. Most of the CoCo 2 terminal 
programs I have seen use the down 
arrow as a control key. By pressing the 
down arrow and the Z key at the same 
time, a CONTROL-Z will be sent. Read 
the manual for the software in question 
to confirm this! 



How Much Memory? 

/ just bought my new CoCo 3 and 
typed PRINT MEM, and it said 22824 with 
my disk drive plugged in. Is something 
wrong with it? I thought you got more 

162 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



memory with a new 3. Also, what do 
you do to disable the reset button? 

Sean Bishop 
Hazard, KY 

Sean, as long as you are using Disk 
BASIC, the memory in your CoCo 3 is 
limited. Keep in mind, though, that 
CoCo 3 does have the ability to store 
graphics pages in the extended memory 
area. So even though the memory avail- 
able is still about the same, it can be 
used for programs and variables, and 
your OM Errors will be fewer. 

To take advantage of the extended 
memory of your CoCo 3, I would rec- 
ommend programs written in OS-9 
Level II. Even though an OS-9 process 
is limited to 64K, there are ways to take 
advantage of the full 512K of memory 
allowed. Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble 
are writing a new book about OS-9 
Level II that will be available later this 
year. 



Updating the CoCo 2 

/ have a 64 K CoCo 2, two double- 
sided disk drives, Epson LX-80, DCM- 
3 and a Multi-Pak. I have some ques- 
tions about getting a monitor (non- 
RGB). Would I need some kind of 
driver/ adapter to hook it up to my 
CoCo 2? I would also like to have 80 
columns. Do I need an 80-column card 
or something? I would also like to gei 
a 64 K buffer for my printer. How do 
they work? Does it have a CPU in it? 

Craig J. Vincek 
Benton, KY 

1 would recommend buying a CoCo 
3 instead of investing in more hardware 
for your CoCo 2, Craig. First of all, a 
video driver is not sufficient to produce 
readable 80-column text with a CoCo 2. 
Therefore, we will assume that you will 
need an 80-column interface, such as 
those made by Disto and PBJ. 

As far as the buffer is concerned, 
there are three types that come to mind. 
First, most printer manufacturers offer 
a buffer as part of the printer. Second, 
there are hardware printer buffers 
available. Try the Spectrum Projects ad 
in this issue. Last, but certainly not 
least, is software spooling. Using this 
method, the printer operates as a back- 
ground task while other programs are 
running. This is a built-in feature of OS- 
9. Programs are also available for RS- 
DOS to do this, but I am not aware of 
one for the CoCo 3. I'm sure it will be 
available shortly. 



RS-232 ROM 

In your March 1987 column, you 
suggested to Vince Falcone to remove 



the R OMfrom his RS-232 pack. Would 
you please show a schematic of the pack 
so that I will know which chip to re- 
move? 

Kevin Krug 
Derwood, MD 

Kevin, we cannot publish a schematic 
here but will give you enough info to 
pick it out of the Pak. In the RS-232 
pack, you will find two large chips. One 
has 28 pins and is indicated with the 
symbol Ul on the circuitboard. The 
other chip has 24 pins and is called U3. 
This 24-pin chip is the ROM. If the chip 
is socketed, simply remove it. If it isn't 
socketed, you will need to desolder Pin 
20 and bend it up out of the way. 



Scroll Stopper 

I tried your rewritten version of Disk 
Directory Lister. There are a few ques- 
tions I would like to ask. When I try to 
run it on a disk, I get an NE Error. Is 
there a way to halt the program when 
it reaches the bottom of the page so that 
it doesn't overflow to the next page? 

Willie E. Turner 
Baldwin Park, CA 

It sounds as if you are trying to read 
an OS-9 disk, Willie. OS-9 uses a dif- 
ferent directory structure. Direct was 
written for RS-DOS directories. 
Another thing to look for is copy- 
protected disks. As far as making the 
listing stop, try inserting the following 
lines: 

45 LN=1 

305 GDSUB600 

600 LN=LN+1 

610 IF LN<59 THEN RETURN 
620 FDR LX=1 TO B 
630 PRINTH2 
640 NEXT LX 

650 INPUT"HIT RNT KEY TO CON- 
TINUE"; IN$ 
660 LN=1 
670 RETURN 

I'm glad you liked the program. Have 
fun with it. 

Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From 
the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type R5K (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "Down- 
loads'' online form which has complete 
instructions. 




ITU 



CoCo 3 



OS-9 
Level II 



BASIC09 



BITS AND BYTES OF BASIC 



BASIC09 and Level II 
Focusing on Modules 



By Richard A. White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Everything was happening at once. Income tax and this 
column's deadline were near at hand. Preceding them 
was the Chicago RAINBOWfest. I decided to get the 
taxes out of the way and they were getting on well when Level 
II arrived on a Tuesday. I hurried home to format disks and 
make backups. Well, I could not even format a disk and had 
to fall back to Level I to get the backups. The CoCo 3 
sometimes "went west" even before the Level II boot was 
complete. Things like this are totally frustrating. Wednesday 
evening brought the news that two friends had experienced 
identical problems, and the search for a solution was on. 1 
felt a tad better knowing it was not just my machine. 

A Thursday evening session on the Delphi OS-9 Forum 
brought an answer: Some old 12-volt disk controllers could 
not take the 1 .8-M Hz clock speed. So the disk controller swap 
began and solved the problem. Our controllers dated from 
February 1983 when we made a group buy of drives. Some 
earlier and later 12-volt controllers work as all 5-volt only 
units do. 

Still there was a bit of time to work with Level II and 
BAS1C09, which comes with it. Early on it was apparent that 
128K would not cut it. I solved this at RAINBOWfest by 
purchasing a 512K upgrade, as did many others. BAS1C09 is 
nearly identical with the Level I version except for support 
for CoCo 3 graphics. This is going to take some careful 
digestion, all the more reason to focus, for now, on 
applications common to CoCos 1, 2 and 3. 

My first order of business was to get a Level II boot set 
up to take advantage of windows and the added memory, 
then work up the program for this article. That done, it was 
time to sit back and be impressed. Wow, we have been 
scraping for memory for years. Now I load nearly everything 
I routinely use in memory at boot and still have half the 



Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in BASIC pro- 
gramming. With Don Dollberg, he is 
the co-author of the TIMS database 
management program. 




available memory left. I start BASIC09 with a nice big buffer 
and still can go to OS-9 and have plenty of memory to do 
anything I want. 

Level II provides two ways to leave BASIC09 to use OS-9 
utilities. One is to type $ at the B: prompt. This puts you in 
OS-9. You get back to BAS1C09 by pressing CLEAR-BREAK 
(CTRL-BREAK on the CoCo 3). However, with a number of 
windows active on the CoCo 3, pressing the CLEAR key 
advances one to another window. This can be done from a 
running BAS1C09 program. 1 discovered some of the protec- 
tions built into OS-9. For example, it is impossible to change 
or delete a file in use by a running program. 

Documentation for Level II BASIC09 is much improved 
over the Level I version. Program examples are given for 
virtually all commands. Unfortunately, some of the early 
examples use line numbers. Perhaps someone thought people 
could not go off line numbers cold turkey. Most later 
examples dispense with line numbers. What is not so 
apparent in these examples is the importance of modularity 
in BASIC09. 

A good BASIC09 program consists of a number, perhaps a 
large number, of separate modules. Some will be drawn from 
a library of modules that have been used in other programs. 
Others will be written for the application. This simplifies 
writing the modules and testing them to begin with. It also 
makes it easier to upgrade programs later. For example, I can 
quickly write an editing module that may be a simple 
substitution editor and come back later to write a new more 
powerful version. 

Modules have memory implications. They can be loaded 
as needed and killed out of memory when they are no longer 
needed. Parameters allow large blocks of variables to be 
passed to other modules to be changed and returned to the 
calling module. 

I am focusing on modules since I plan to discuss the 
beginning modules of a much larger program that will roll 
out over the next few months. The program now goes under 
the name PersonFile. It's basically an enlarged mailing list 
and membership program. All such files have common needs, 
the name and address, telephone numbers, dates and some 
general note fields. The intent is to provide a generic record 
structure whose fields can be renamed to meet a variety of 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 163 



purposes. As a computer user group membership file, the 
basic address information is required along with expiration 
date, perhaps date joined, home and office telephone 
numbers and miscellaneous interest information. On the 
other hand, the Christmas list file needs addresses, telephone 
numbers, birthdays perhaps, names of others in the family, 
etc. These are the same fields, just different uses for the fields. 

I like to start with a "main" module. Basically, it 
dimensions the record variables, opens and closes files and 
calls other modules that do most of the work. One has some 
discretion as to what goes in the main module. Some short 
routines may be better in the main module because of the 
memory overhead in passing parameters and defining them 
in separate modules. Still, almost everything must be 
considered for its own module. 

Rather than start with main, I will first deal with two 
"library" procedures that ! have re-used from previous 
programs, isupper simply converts any lowercase letters to 
uppercase. This way a user may answer with either a y or 
a Y, and the program needs only test for a Y. 

PROCEDURE isupper 



000$ DIM oount , 1 ine_length : INTEGER 

000B PARAM answer; STRING [40] 

0017 DIM ascii: INTEGER 

,00 IE DIM char » STRING [ 1 ] 

00 2 A DIM work_string : STRING [ 40] 

0036 



The first section of the program defines the variables. A 
variable defined with dim is local to this procedure, param 
answer : st ring [ 40 ] defines a string variable, up to 40 
characters long, that will be provided by the calling 
procedure. Note that BAS1C09 strings are dimensioned with 
a specified length for which fixed storage is provided. A 
shorter string of characters may be put into the variable, but 
any characters in excess of the specified length are lost. 
BAS1C09 supports long variable names, which are a major help 
in program readability. While theseuse memory in the source 
code, they are stripped out when the procedure is packed. 



0037 count :=1 

003E line__length:=L£N (answer) 

0047 work_string:= M " 

004E 



BASIC09 does not automatically initialize variables. As 
initially dimensioned, work_s tring contained whatever 
garbage was in the memory BAS1C09 allocated to it. The 
expression wo rk__s tring: sets its length to zero so 
BAS1C09 will disregard everything in its memory space. 



004 F WHILE coant<line_length+l DO 

005F ascii : =ASC{MID$ {answer , count , 1)| 

006E IF ascii<96 THEN 

007A char=CHR$ (ascii) 

,0,083 work_strir>g^^rk_strir^cJ^ar 

008 F count : =count+l 

009A ELSE 

009E char :=OiR$ (ascii-32) 

00AA work_string=^^rk__string-K±iar 

00 B6 count : =count+l 

00C1 ENDIF 

,00C3 ENCWHILE 

00C7 



Now, isupper gets the ASCII value of each character in 
the string answer and tests each value. If ASCII<96, the 
character must be uppercase, a number or punctuation mark 
so ASCII is converted back to a character and added to 
wo rk__s tring. Characters with ASCII values greater than 96 
must be lowercase. Subtracting 32 will make the conversion 



to an uppercase number. The new ASCII is converted back 
to a character and added to work__s tring. 

The whi le-do-endwh i ie keeps the program looping until 
each character in answer has been tested. It and the i f-then- 
eise-endif are control structures. Each BAS1C09 control 
structure has its own end statement. Above we see endi f and 
endwhiie. Others we will see are endexi t and endioop. 
Most are familiar with NEXT which ends a for-to-next 
structure. 

00C8 answer :^=work__string 

00E0 END 

In passing the string answer to isupper, BAS1C09 really 
passed the memory location of answer. Whatever isupper 
puts into answer will be known to the calling procedure when 
it regains control. So, we can assign the uppercase string in 
work__s t r i ng to answer to get it back to the calling 
procedure, end terminates isupper and passes control back. 
By the way, the numbers to the left are offsets from the 
beginning of the program in Hex bytes to the beginning of 
the line. 

PROCEDURE printat 
0000 PAP AM col, rw; INTEGER 

00 JB PRINT CHR$(2) ; CHR$ (col+32) ; CHR$ (rcwK$2 ) ; 

0021 END 

Maybe I should rename printat to locate to be 
consistent with CoCo 3 basic. It simply receives a column 
and a row number and uses the print statement to move 
the cursor to that screen location. We will use it frequently. 

FROCEDI5RE irain 
0000 DIM field_nane (15) : STRING [ 6 ] 

0011 TYPE add_rec=f irst , last , addl , add2 , city: STRING [ 15 ) ; 

zip4: STRING [4] ; zip5 : STRING [ 5 ] 
0047 TYPE data_reo=y l , ml , dl , y2 , y2 , m2 , d2 : STRING [ 2 ] ; 

acl,exJ.,ac2,ex2:STRING[3] ; nol, no2 , cdl , otf2 : STRING [ 4 ] ; 

ntl , nt2 , nt3 ; STRING [ 24 ] 
00B0 DIM addrec : aid_rec ; datarec:data__rec 

OK, here starts the procedure main. Since we have 15 
field names, we will need an array to store them in. 
Field_nam_e( 15) provides this array. Next, things get muddy 
fast, type defines a new variable type that is used in the same 
way as integer, stringf] and the other atomic variable 
types. The new type add_rec consists of five, I5-character 
strings named first, last, addl, add2 and city, plus a 
four-character string named zip4 and the five-character 
zip5. The names of these strings are descriptive of their uses. 
The second new type, data_rec, provides storage for the 
remaining data to be in the record. Finally, storage for the 
records is provided by dim addrec : add_rec ; da- 
tarec : da ta_rec. 

Understanding how BASIC09 stores its variables will help 
in understanding the type statement. Type add_rec consists 
of five, 15-character strings, one of four characters and 
another of five characters for a total of 84 characters. When 
the program comes to dim addrec : add^rec it allocates 84 
contiguous bytes of memory and maps it according to the 
type add_rec= statement. The variable first gets the first 
1 5 bytes, i as t gets the next 1 5 and so on. When BAS1C09 sees 
addrec . f i rs t : ="j ohn", it knows to look in the map 
provided by add_rec to find the place to put "j ohn". "john" 
will go in the first four bytes of the 84 bytes allocated to 
addrec. 

^0C1 DIM f ile_naira : STRING [12] 

00CD DIM file, path: INTEGER 

00D3 DIM count , count 1 , count2 : INTEGER 

00E7 DIM answer: STRING [1] 

00F3 



164 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



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The remaining dimensioning statements hold no suprises. 

ppF4 PRINT CHP.$(12) 

HUN printat(p # 8) 
plp4 INPOT "FILE NAME " , f ilejiane 

pill file:=0 
jdllE 

print chr$[12) is the equivalent of CL5 in CoCo BASIC 
and clears the screen. We have discussed the printat 
procedure. Now we see how to call it: run printat[0,B). 
The 0 and 8 are the column and row parameters we are 
sending, run is quite flexible. It can call a source code 
procedure in the BAS1C09 workspace, a packed code proce- 
dure inside or outside the workspace or a machine language 
procedure line like inl<ey below. 

Next we get the filename of our database. The system will 
use a number of files, but the program will handle naming 
using this root word. The variable file will be used for a file 
path number, which is assigned when a file is created or 
opened. The number will always be four or higher, As long 
as f ile=0, we know that no files have been opened. 



011F 


LOOP 




0121 






0122 


REM Print ircenu 


012F 






0130 


PRINT CHR$(12) 


0135 


PRINT TAB (8) ; "PERSONFILE MENU" 


J314C 


PRINT 




014E 


IF file=p THEN 


015A 


PRINT 


" p. CREATE NEW FILE" 


(3112 


ENDIF 




,0174 


PRINT !f 


1. RENAME FIELDS" 


J318A 


PRINT " 


2. ENTER/EDIT DATA" 


plA2 


PRINT ! » 


3. SORT FILE" 


01B4 


PRINT " 


4. PRINT MAILING LA WETS 


J31D1 


PRINT ! * 


5. PRINT ENTIRE RECORDS 




PRINT " 


6. PRINT CUSTOM REPORT" 


p2pA 


PRINT " 


7. EXIT' TO OS-9" 


p21P 


PRINT 




J3221 


PRINT "KEY NUMBER OF OPERATION 


J323F 






p24j3 


answer : = 


111! 


,0247 


WHtLE answer= ,! " DO 


^253 


RUN" inksy (answer) 


P25D 


ENCWHILE 





loop is a goto killer. Whenever a program comes to an 
endloop, it goes back to loop and starts the enclosed code 
over. This segment of the loop prints the menu and gets the 
response. Note that we offer the Create New File option only 
when the procedure is first entered, which is the only time 
f ile=0. 

inkey looks for an input character and then lets the 
program continue. If there is no character, there is a problem 
that the while answer^"" do-endwhi le solves by forcing 
the program to loop until there is a character to read. 
Compare this to the now rather inelegant BASIC. 

1)3 A$=IKKEY$t IF A$="" THEN 1J3 ELSE RETURN 

Note that the parameter being sent inkey is a variable. It 
is not passing data to inkey, though it could. It is there to 
return any character that inkey finds, 

^261 

£5262 REM Process choice 
p273 

p274 IF answer="0" AND file=J3 THEN 

p288 RUN init ( f ield_jiai*e, ad dree, datarec , f ilejiame) 

J32A1 ENDIF 

J32A3 IF f ile=p THEN 

p2AF OPEN #file / file_nan^+ ,, flds":UPDATE 

p2C2 OPEN #path, file_rai^ M recs": UPDATE 

p2D5 ENDIF 
p2D7 



I said that I did not want to go to the create routine if 
files were already open. Here is a dual test where the user 
had to have entered a 0 and file must be 0. When these 
conditions are met, init is run and sent field_name, 
addrec, datarec and file_name as parameters, These 
parameters allow init to access over 300 bytes of storage, 
and init will change each variable in these records. Now you 
can see why we did not want to be able to call init while 
some other file was active. 

Once having passed the init call, there will be a file 
somewhere to work on. If ini t was used, it will have placed 
two files on disk. Otherwise, the filename entered should be 
a path to pre-existing files. In either case, filename has 
suffixes appended and two files are opened for update. This 
means BAS1C09 may either write to the files or read from them. 
Bf i le and 8pa th provide variables pa th and file that will 
hold the path numbers OS-9 assigns when it opens the files. 



p2D8 


IF answer^" 1" THEN 


p2E5 


RUN rename f ( field name, file) 


P2F4 


ENDIF 


p2F6 




p2F7 


EXTTIF answer="7" THEN 


,0304 


CLOSE flfile 


p3pA 


CLOSE #path 


J331p 


ENDEXTT 


£5314 




£5315 


ENDLOOP 


P319 




P31A 


END 



With the files open, we go forward to other work. We can 
rename fields at any time since that does not change the data. 
The procedure rename f does this. All it needs is the field 
name array and the file path number for the file where it will 
store the modified array. 

In order to test the init and rename f procedures, main 
needed to provide some minimum housekeeping. Accord- 
ingly, the exit routine was written. Meet exitif-then- 
endexit. This construction provides a way to include all 
sorts of final housekeeping tasks after the then prior to 
finally leaving the loop. In our case, we close the files, 
exi ti f is the only way to exit a loop without using a goto. 
It can be put anywhere in the loop, and there can be multiple 
exi ti f -then-endexi t constructs in a given loop. It can be 
used with any of BASiC09's looping control structures. 

After an exi ti f-then-endexi t, control goes to the next 
statement after endloop. In our case it's end, which 
terminates the procedure. 

At this point, I think I have dispensed sufficient BAS1C09 
for one sitting. Next month we will take up the init and 
renamef procedures and get started on enter/edi t. /P* 




mm 

% % % % 3 
% \ \ >n 

% i % % \ 
% % %%%% 

o 




$ L.UJ. 138? Q 

QOODDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD 



166 THE RAINBOW July 1987 




OS-9 




KISSable OS-9 



An OS-9 Convert Speaks Out 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Steve Bjork first worked with com- 
puters while studying electronics 
during the early 1970s when he 
enrolled in his programming course at 
a Los Angeles area college. Before long, 
Bjork had "put together" his own elab- 
orate calculator — a computer com- 
pletely built with discrete components. 
"I used the 7400 series technology to 
come up with a whopping 64 bytes of 
memory, four bits or one nibble wide," 
he said. "It cost me more than $200 to 
build this overgrown calculator. Today 
I can buy a 128K CoCo 3 for the same 
money." 

Bjork continued his education in 
computer programming and electronics 
at several colleges in Southern Califor- 
nia. "While I was at San Diego, they 
were developing UCSD PASCAL," he 
said. "As a student I got to work on a 
few of the trivial parts of the program 
and served as a guinea pig to test the 
rest." 

In 1970 Bjork went to work for the 

Dale L. Puckett is a 
free-lance writer 
and programmer. 
He is author of The 
Official BASIC09 
Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter 
Dibble, of The Com- 
plete Rainbow Guide to OS-9. He 
serves as direct or -ai-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale is a 
U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and lives 
in Rockville, Maryland. 




first of several small software compa- 
nies. By the end of the decade, he wound 
up at DataSoft and was immediately 
assigned to develop software for the 
Color Computer. It was at this time that 
he grew to know and love the 6809 for 
all its power and simplicity. While there, 
he racked up credits for Sands of Egypt, 
Clowns and Balloons, Zaxxon and 
many more hit Color Computer games. 

In 1983 Bjork left DataSoft and 
formed his own company, SRB Soft- 
ware. A few months later, Radio Shack 
named OS-9 as the official operating 
system for the Color Computer. While 
it took them nearly a year, with Bjork 
kicking and screaming all the way, 
Tandy finally convinced SRB Software 
that OS-9 was the way to go. How? 

"Since Radio Shack was no longer 
accepting programs that were not devel- 
oped on OS-9, the choice was simple," 
Bjork said. "If you wanted to write 
software for the Color Computer, you 
had to use OS-9." 

While the kicking and screaming 
made it a bittersweet experience, 
Bjork's introduction to OS-9 was like a 
blast from the past. 

"After I had a chance — or should 1 
say after I was forced — to sit and look 
into OS-9, I began to rediscover what 
computers are all about," Bjork said. 
"When I was in college, most of the 
computers I used were mainframes that 
had elaborate operating systems built 
in. This cut down the amount of work 
the programmer had to do. I re- 
experienced this same phenomenon 
with OS-9." 



How did Bjork learn OS-9? "1 must 
admit I had some help from Tandy and 
a good friend in Fort Worth who was 
able to answer my questions," he said. 
"And even though the OS-9 manuals 
were technically oriented, I was already 
familiar with operating systems and 
what they were supposed to do. There- 
fore, OS-9 was not foreign to me. But, 
like most folks, I find that additional 
reference material is always handy and 
I bought one of the first copies of the 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9.'" 

When we asked for his advice to first- 
time OS-9 users, Bjork suggested they 
talk to other users. He cited Special 
Interest Groups such as rainbow's OS- 
9 online on Delphi and the OS-9 SIG 
on CompuServe as excellent sources of 
both contacts and information for 
beginners. He also encouraged them to 
seek help at a local club. 

"Talk to these people," Bjork said. 
"They have run into the same problems 
and they can help you. Also, don't be 
afraid to buy extra books on the subject 
and read them! Most importantly, if 
you haven't been to school for a while, 
you may need to relearn how to learn 
— because you forget." 

When Bjork formed SRB, his first 
projects were Level II products, but he 
did cut his teeth with Level I. His first 
Level II product hasn't hit the market 
yet. What is that program? He can't 
comment. Why? 

"Because specifications change and 
contracts may be cancelled," Bjork said. 
"If that happens, a product can become 
vaporware. And one vaporware pro- 



July 1987 THE RAJNBOW 167 



gram can ruin the reputation generated 
by 10 excellent products." 

We asked Steve to look into his 
crystal ball and tell us what he sees for 
the future of OS-9, "Generally, most 
general software developers feel that we 
now have, in the CoCo 3, a computer 
system with the capability of an IBM 
PC," Bjork said. "In other words, many 
companies that felt the CoCo didn't 
have the power of other machines are 
now in the process of porting their 
existing programs or developing new 
ones for OS-9 Level II. Koronis Rift — 
ajoint venture by Lucas films and Epyx 
— is a good example." 

Lucas has been developing software 
for microcomputers, and Epyx has been 
marketing them for the past few years. 
What do these companies think about 
the CoCo 3 and OS-9 Level II? 

"They say the OS-9 Level II port of 
Koronis Rift is the best version on any 
micro," Bjork said. "And this type of 
response is typical of many developers 
today." 

Bjork feels that we will finally start to 
see the high quality software that has 
been missing from the Color Computer, 
"And it will all be running on OS-9 
Level If — no exceptions!" he said. 

Could Bjork give us any hints about 
what we can expect to see? "In addition 
to games, you should see many home 
applications and quite a few small 
business applications as well as produc- 
tivity software packages like More and 
Side Kicky 

What time frame? Bjork- thinks it will 
be April 1988 before we see what is 
planned now. "It takes many months to 
develop hardware and software in a new 
environment," he said. "For example, it 
took 13 months to put my high resolu- 
tion joystick online.'* 

Bjork thinks that most of the prod- 
ucts being developed today will be sold 
through Tandy. "Let's face it, they have 
a very effective d istribution system. 
Also, most of the software in the future 



will use the windowing capability of 
OS-9 Level IL 

Multi- Vue Will Make Life Easier 

"We're going to see a new class of 
software with more power and more 
sophistication, but the underlying fac- 
tor will be the greater ease of use of the 
software," he said. "User-friendly will 
become real!" 

How? "First of all, Multi-Vue - a 
user program that can tie all application 
programs running under the OS-9 en- 
vironment together — will make it 
happen," Bjork said. "Multi-Vue will 
have the same effect on programmers as 
the Macintosh toolbox. Both environ- 
ments force a programmer to make his 
programs user-friendly." 

Bjork thinks that most programs 
developed in the future will be able to 
run on their own from the shell but will 
also be able to be run from Multi- Vue. 
"This means Multi-Vue will control 
their operation," he said. "Multi- Vue 
will vary their window sizes, call them 
into being, put them to sleep or remove 
them completely" 

Is there anything special a software 
developer must do to make sure his 
programs are compatible with Multi- 
Vuel "They must be able to receive a 
signal from Multi-Vue that tells them 
the window size has changed and then 
be able to use that new window size," 
Bjork said. "Existing programs — those 
on the market right now — will simply 
stay in one window." 

What must a programmer do when he 
receives the signal from Multi- Vuel 
"After you receive the signal, you 
simply clear the screen and then do a 
call to find the new window size. After 
making this call, your program should 
run within the bounds of the new win- 
dow, " Bjork said. "Programs today 
check to see if Multi- Vue is alive by 
doing a ge ts ta t call to see if windows 
are available." 

How can software developers com- 



pete in a marketplace driven by users 
demanding friendly and intuitive soft- 
ware? "Without Multi-Vue, you must 
think about what your customer is 
going to do with your program and how 
he is going to use it," Bjork said. "The 
more intuitive you can make a program, 
the better! 

"The second step — if you have 
Multi- Vue use the extended system 
calls. These calls will let you put up a 
menu automatically just by doing a 
system call. When Multi-Vue returns 
control to your program, it will tell you 
if any of the options on a menu were 
selected," Bjork said. 

Multi-Vue'^ automation accom- 
plishes two things. First, it saves code. 
Second, it makes for uniform menus. 
The people who buy your database 
program will load or save their data in 
exactly the same way they load or save 
their text files when they work with a 
word processor from another vendor. 
They will only need to learn how to use 
their computer once. They can then 
concentrate on the job they are trying 
to do. 

Tandy hopes the standardization 
brought about by Multi-Vue will force 
all programmers to provide a friendly 
user interface. Further standardization 
can be expected from the Multi- Vue 
clipboard. The clipboard should prove 
to be a very handy tool because it's 
always in the system and ready to use. 
It gives developers a standard way to 
pass data from one application program 
to another. 

Steve also had comments about the 
Level 11 manuals. "They make excellent 
reading," he said. "But, you must take 
the initiative to read them. If you are a 
beginner, it*s obvious that you must 
understand everything in the beginning 
chapters. Don't skip a page!" 

And, if you're an expert? "Don't skip 
over the beginning chapters," Bjork 
said. "You'll discover many subtle 
nuances are covered early in the man- 
ual" 

With Steve not talking too much, we 
guessed he must be under contract to 
develop several products. Color Com- 
puter Artist is in the catalog. Could it 
be his? 

"The title is a little misleading," Bjork 
offe red. "People really don't realize how 
powerful the OS-9 Level 11 windows 
are! It's not that intuitive. But, you can 
draw pictures of one size and one color 
in one window and then re-display them 
in a different window that is a different 
size and a different mode. Even though 



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168 



THE RAINBOW July 1987 



you are using the same data, the picture 
will display properly. When you try this 
with the different graphics modes while 
running under Disk Extended BASIC, 
you lose half the picture or fill only half 
the screen. And often, you can find no 
rhyme or reason." 

What else will the windows do? "If 
you shrink the window, your image 
shrinks accurately," Bjork said. 'The 
scaling algorithm is really accurate." 

How will we get a hard copy of these 
fantastic images? u OS-9 allows many 
different types of dump programs," 
Bjork said. "Many will be available. 
You simply grab a line, put it in a buffer, 
read it and then send it out. You should 
be able to dump the active window or 
the entire screen with some of these 
programs." 

Will we see big companies with big 
names porting their software to OS-9 



Level II? "I can't name names, but most 
of these companies are very impressed," 
Bjork said. "In fact, many of them are 
giving me a run for my money. They've 
put me under a lot of pressure. I'm a 
one-man operation. A big company can 
hire a dozen programmers to do a 
project." 

How can a company afford to invest 
that much in a single program? "Most 
companies make most of their money in 
the first six months following the release 
of a program," Bjork said. "If they get 
out there first, they're OK. If they don't 
get there first, they may be lost because 
everybody that has to have a copy gets 
it right away. In a sense, a company 
can't afford not to hire a dozen pro- 
grammers and be first." 

Come on, Steve, any hints? "You're 
going to see CAD and integrated pack- 
ages like Microsoft Works," Bjork said. 



"All these things are hot prospects for 
entrepreneurs looking at OS-9 Level II 
on the CoCo 3. It's not a function of 
Level H, or windows, or the CoCo 3 
alone! It's what happens when you 
combine them. 1 ' 

Bjork feels this synergism will be 
expanded even more by Mulli-Vue. 
But, he doesn't think CDI will have any 
effect on the CoCo market. "Here's an 
analogy. You could use your CoCo to 
control your VCR. But, your VCR 
already does it better," he said. 

Any afterthoughts or advice? "When 
OS-9 Level II first came out, everybody 
wanted to patch this, change this, and 
rearrange that. But, there are already 
commands available that let you change 
most of the things you want to change. 
So many times I've seen people try to 
patch the window device descriptor 
when all they had to do was use the 



Listing 1: prime— tbl .c 

char modid[] = "@(#)prime_tbl . c 1.0"; 

/* OS-9 utility prime_tbl 

* 

* by Dennis J. Duke 

* Bessemer, A.1 . 

* 30 October 86 
* 

* A simple program to print a table of prime numbers. 

V 

# include <stdio.h> 

ma in ( ) 
( 

int i; 

long int begin, limit, number; 

pflinit() ; /* Enable printing of long integers */ 

/* Get the lower limit of the table */ 

fprintf ( stderr, "\nEnter the beginning number wanted in table\n" ); 
scanf ( "%ld", &begin ) ; 

/>v Get the upper limit of the table */ 

fprintf ( stderr, "\nEnter the highest number wanted in table\n ,f ); 
scanf ( "%ld" , &limit ) ; 

putchar ( ' \n ' ) ; 

/* Catch the number 2 */ 
if ( begin == 2 ) { 

printf ( " 2" ) ; 

i = 2; 

begin = 3; 

) 

/* Catch the numbers 0 and 1 */ 
else if ( begin <= 1 ) { 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 69 



wcreate command to define the win- 
dow they wanted. They can do that in 
their start-up file!" 

Dan Johnson Spotlights Diskmaster at 
Chicago 

SDisk author Dan Johnson picked 
up the small black box with the Disk- 
master label and shook it. "It's as solid 
as a brick," he said. "Not a bit flimsy." 
Johnson had teamed up with Hemphill 

printf ( " 
i = 3; 
begin = 3 ; 

} 

else 



Electronics again. This time the dy- 
namic duo was at RAINBOWfest Chi- 
cago selling an integrated hardware and 
software product designed "to turn the 
CoCo 3 into the highest performance 
personal computer available today." 

'We wanted to eliminate the need for 
a Multi-Pak," Johnson said. "Diskmas- 
ter gives you two high-density, half- 
height floppy drives or a high-density 
drive and a 20-megabyte hard disk 

1 " 2" ); 



drive. Three serial RS-232 ports, a 
bidirectional parallel port configured to 
work like the Centronics printer port on 
an IBM PC, and a battery-backed up, 
real-time clock come with the standard 
package. OS-9 drivers for all of these 
ports set up to run on the CoCo 3 with 
OS-9 Level II are also standard." 

Johnson's Diskmaster system will 
boot directly from the hard disk after an 
initial setup. In fact, it will start up 



i = l; 



/* Don't start with an even number */ 
if ( begin % 2 == J? ) 
begin += 1; 

for ( number = begin ; number <= limit ; number += 2 ) { 

/* Call function to test 'primeness 1 of number 
if ( 1 prime test ( number ) ) { 

if ( i <= 5 ) 

printf ( « " ) ■ 

else f 

t - 1; 

printf ( H \n " ); 

} 



printf ( n81d" , number ) ; 
i++; 



putchar ( 1 \n 1 ) ; 



] 



/* Sub-function to test f primeness f of number, 
to main . 

*/ 

prime test( num ) 
long int num; 



If number is not prime, * will return the factor 



COCO 3 OS-9 
HARDWARE UPGRADES 




The PLUS 100 — The PREMIER 512K 
Memory Expansion for the COCO 3. 

Brochures and price list available on request. 



DISKMASTER Disk Drive Systems 
Absolutely Without Equal in the COCO World! 

20 MB SCSI Hard Drive 
1 MB High Speed Floppy Drive 
Hardware Real Time Clock with Battery Backup 
3 Hardware Serial Ports 

Bi-Directional Centronics Compatible Parallel Port 
Sophisticated OS-9 Drivers by D. P. JOHNSON 
RAMDISK options up to 1.5 MB 
Expansion Port foradditional Floppy Drives 
Single Cable Interlace to COCO 3 

A VERY HIGH PERFORMANCE, 4 Station, Multi-User System 
can easily be assembled using a DISKMASTER System. 

HEMPHILL ELECTRONICS, INC. 

1922 Cogswell Road 
South El Monte, CA 91733 

(818) 575-4530 

(Mon. thru Thurs., 1:30 to 4:30 PM Pacific Time) 



170 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



automatically each time you hit the 
reset button or turn on your CoCo 3. 

"One thing needs explaining," John- 
son said. "That's the high-performance 
nature of the floppy disks built into the 
system. They are high-density drives 
that hold as much data as an 8-inch 
floppy. They run at 360 revolutions per 
minute instead of 300. But, we've made 
them dual speed so you can read all of 
the standard OS-9 formats." 

Johnson's drives let you store 4,480 
sectors on each disk — or just slightly 
more than 1.1 megabytes. "The 
throughput is close to that of a hard disk 
with these floppy drives," Johnson said. 
They transfer data at twice the rate of 
a standard drive, plus they step between 
tracks in 3 milliseconds." 

By designing a caching floppy disk 
controller system that operates inde- 
pendently of the processor, Johnson 
was able to set up Diskmaster to run 
without pulling up the halt line on the 
CoCo 3 1 s 6809. Diskmaster is also 
partially intelligent, keeping the most 
recently used sectors in RAM memory. 
In fact, Johnson's algorithm also con- 
siders the frequency of use so your 
CoCo 3 doesn't need to go out and read 
the disk very often. 

Johnson demonstrated by typing di r 
x. Everything worked normally, albeit 
very quickly. Then he repeated the 
command. This time it ran even faster, 
and the drive light didn't come on. 
Magic! 

The Diskmaster drives are set up to 
issue a disk change signal so, when you 
change disks, the buffer is flushed and 
youstart with a fresh read. The software 
also always does a write through to the 
disk so you won't get caught with a non- 
updated disk. 

If you are in a real hurry, you can 
purchase an optional internal RAM 
disk that holds up to a megabyte and a 



long int 



fact ; 



/>'<• Test all odd numbers >v/ 
for ( fact - 3; fact * fact <- num; fact 
if ( num % fact = 0 ) 

return ( fact ) ; 



2 ) 



/* We got this far so the number must be prime! */ 
return ( ft ) ; 



Listing 2: maclist 



PROCEDURE 
WW 

0165 

plAE 

plBA 
J31C5 
01E1 
01E8 
plFp 
01F8 

0208 

0210 

0216 10 

021A 

021C 

024C 

,0258 

025F 

0263 

02 65 

0271 

0292 

0294 

029E 

02A9 

02BE 

02C4 

02C8 

02CE 

J32D0 

02D9 

02E8 20 

02EC 

02F3 

030F 

0314 

0316 

0322 

0326 



MACLIST 



( * 
(* 
(* 
(* 
(* 
(* 
(* 
(* 
(* 
( * 



By William L. Brady 

Allows direct transfer of text files from CoCo 

to Macintosh with minimum of hassle. Handles indented 

paragraphs by deleting spaces after CR. Strips CR's if 

they are followed by text. 

Replaces them with a space 



Back to Back 
Tables end 



CR's creane new paragraphs on the Mac. 
up as a paragraph, but it is easier to space 
through and add CR's than to try to take them out with a 
Mac editor. 



DIM inpath, outpath: BYTE 

DIM inname, oname: STRING 

DIM tt, c,cc,cr, sp: STRING [1] 

DIM o: BOOLEAN 

tt=*"$" 

count=0 

outcount=0 

cr-CHR$(13) 

sp=" » 

ON ERROR GOTO 200 
PRINT 

INPUT "OS-9 File name (<CR> for Directory 
IF inname*"" THEN 

SHELL "dir" 

GOTO 10 
ENDIF 

OPEN i inpath , inname : READ 

PRINT "Create output file (y/<n>)? " ; 

REPEAT 

RUN inkey(a$) 
UNTIL a$>"" 

IF a$="y" OR a$="Y" THEN 

o=TRUE 
ELSE 

o^FALSE 
ENDIF 
IF o THEN 

oname=inname+" . MAC" 



>>>" , inname 



PRINT CHR$ ($0C) ; 
PRINT " 
PRINT oname 
PRINT 

CREATE tfoutpath , oname : UPDATE 
ELSE 

SHELL "tmode -echo" 



it 



OS-9™ SOFTWARE/HARDWARE 



SDISK— Standard disk driver module allows the full use of 35, 40 
or 80 track double sided disk drives with COCO OS-9 plus you 
can read/write/format the OS-9 formats used by other OS-9 
systems. (Note: you can read 35 or 40 track disks on an 80 track 
drive). Now updated for OS-9 ver. 02.00.00 $29.95 

SDISK + BOOTFIX— As above plus boot directly from a double 
sided diskette $35.95 

L1 UTILITY PAK— Contains all programs from Filter Kits Nos. 1 
& 2 plus Hacker's Kit #, plus several additional programs, Over 
35 utilities including "wild card" file cmds, MacGen command 
language, disassembler, disk sector edit and others. Very useful, 
many of these you will find yourself using every time you run your 
system. These sold separately for over $85. $49.95 

SKIO— Hi res screen driver for 24 x 51 display; does key click, 
boldface, italics; supports upgraded keyboards and mouse. With 
graphics screen dump and other useful programs. Now UPDATED 
FOR OS-9 Ver 2.0 $29.95 



PC-XFER UTILITIES— Utilities to read/write and format ss MS- 
DOStm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. $45.00 (requires SDISK) 

CCRD 512K Byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE— Requires RS Multipak 
interface, two units may be used together for 1MB RAM disk. 
Addressing is switch selectable. OS-9 level 1 and 2 driver and test 
software included. $169.00 

All disk prices are forCoCo OS-9 format; forother formats, specify 
and add $2.00 each. Order prepaid or COD, VISA/MC accepted, add 
$1.50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD; actual charges added for 
COD. 

D.P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St. 
Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-8152 

(For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time) 

OS-9 Is a trademark o( Microware and Motorola Inc. 
MS-DOS is a trademark ol Microsoft, Inc. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 171 



half ofRA M disk. Johnson hopes you'll 
plug in his Diskmaster and forget you 
ever needed a Multi-Pak interface. 

After Johnson demonstrated Disk- 
master, we asked him what his update 
policy was for SDisk. "We're rewriting 
it for the CoCo 3, and OS-9 Level II will 
have a separate version," he said. "The 
update price will be about $ 15, and we'll 
make the setup easy." 

When we asked Johnson why anyone 
would want to buy SDisk for Level II, 
since CC3Disk has double-sided and 
quad-density capability built in, he said 
that SDisk will give users a way to 
format 48-track-per-inch disks on 96- 
tpi drives. "The standard CC3Disk 
doesn't allow you to do this," he said. 
"The Level II format command does 
not give you the option. SDisk will! The 
Level II SDisk will do everything the 
older Level I versions did. Additionally, 
if you want to use the PC transfer 
software on the CoCo 3, you will need 
the new Level II SDisk. 

On the hardware side of the house, 
Johnson noted that he would also be 
updating the CCRam disk for OS-9 
Level II running on the CoCo 3. You'll 
receive a replacement PAL chip that lets 
the unit run at 2 megahertz. 

July Listings 

Dennis Duke is back this month with 
a C program that will generate a table 
of prime numbers. Prime_tbl prompts 
for the lowest and highest number you 
want in the table. To get a hard copy, 
you redirect your standard output path 
to your printer: 059: prime_tbl > / p. 

If you are interested in how to write 
a BASIC09 program that changes the 
format of a text file, check out MAC- 
List from WIZ author Bill Brady. He 
wrote the program to make OS-9 text 
files generated by DynaStar compatible 
with text files used by word processors 
running on his Macintosh Plus. 

DynaStar puts a carriage return at 
the end of every line. The Macintosh 
word processors think that two carriage 
returns mark the end of a paragraph. 
They take care of the word wrap auto- 
matically. Brady also handled the prob- 
lem caused by text that has been in- 
dented using spaces. He removes all 
spaces directly following a carriage 
return. Hopefully, MACList will prove 
to be a useful model you can follow 
when you need to write a BASIC09 pro- 
gram to manipulate your text files. 

That's it for July. Until next month 
. . . keep on hacking! □ 



172 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



0335 




PRINT 






0337 




PRINT " (Set Capture Text Mode) type any 


character when 


ready . • . " 


0375 




REPEAT 






0377 




RUN in)cey(a$) 






0381 




UNTIL a$>"" 






038C 




SHELL "tmode echo" 






039A 




ENDIF 






039C 




SEEK 3inpath,0 






03A5 




SHELL "tmode -pause" 






03 B5 


22 








03B9 




WHILE NOT (EOF ( flinpath) ) DO 






03C4 




GET #inpath,c 






03CE 




count=count+l 






03DA 




IF c=cr THEN 






03E7 




REPEAT 






03E9 




GET s(inpath,cc 






03F3 




count=count+l 






03FF 




UNTIL ccosp 






040B 




IF cc=cr THEN 






0418 




IF o THEN 






0421 




PUT #output,c 






042C 




PUT #outpath,cc 






0436 




outcount=outcount+2 






0442 




ENDIF 






0444 










0445 




(* OS-9 deletes second CR, so 






0463 




(* put in space 






0472 










0473 




PUT #l,c 






047C 




put n,sp 






0485 




put n,cc 






048E 




WHILE cc=cr DO 






049B 




GET # inpa th , cc 






04A5 










04A6 




count=count+l 






04B2 




IF o THEN 






04BB 




PUT #,outpath,cc 






04C5 




ENDIF 






04C7 




IF cc=cr THEN 






04D4 




PRINT " "; 






04DA 




ENDIF 






04 DC 




PRINT cc; 






04E2 




outcount=outcount+l 






04EE 




ENDWHILE 






04F2 




ELSE 






04F6 




IF o THEN 






04FF 




PUT floutpath , sp 






0509 




PUT #outpath,cc 






0513 




ENDIF 






0515 




PRINT " "; 






051B 




PRINT cc; 






0521 




outcount=out count+2 






052D 




ENDIF 






052F 




ELSE 






0533 




IF o THEN 






053C 




PUT #outpath,c 






0546 




ENDIF 






0548 




PRINT c; 






054E 




outcount=outcount+l 






055A 




ENDIF 






055C 




ENDWHILE 






0560 


100 








0564 




SHELL "tmode pause" 






0573 




CLOSE rfinpath 






0579 




IF o THEN 






0582 




CLOSE floutpath 






0588 




PRINT "Filesize *= " ; outcount; " bytes" 






05A4 




ENDIF 






05A6 




END 






05A8 


200 








05AC 




en=ERR . 






05B3 




IF en=218 THEN 






05C0 




PRINT "File >"; oname; " Already Exists , 


Replace? " ; 




05EC 




REPEAT 






05EE 




RUN inkey(a$) 






05F8 




UNTIL a$>"" 






0603 




IF a$= M y" OR a$="Y" THEN 






0618 




SHELL "del "+oname 






0624 




GOTO 2,0 






0628 




ENDIF 






062A 




GOTO 10 






062E 




ENDIF 






0630 




IF en=215 OR en«216 THEN 






0645 




PRINT 






0647 




PRINT " Bad Pathname" 






0658 




PRINT 






065A 




GOTO 10 






065E 




ENDIF 






0660 




IF en=2 OR en=3 THEN 






0675 




GOTO 100 






0679 




ENDIF 






067B 




IF en=211 THEN 






0688 




GOTO 100 






068C 




ENDIF 






068E 




END 






0690 




END 







0S9 LEVEL 

SOFTWARE and HARDWARE 

"Frank Hogg Laboratory has supported OS9 longer than ANY other company!!!" 




INSIDE OS9 
LEVEL II 

The definitive 'Inside' story behind OS9 for the CoCo III. 
Kevin Darling and Frank Hogg team up to provide the 'nuts 
and bolts' information needed to really use OS9 Level II. 
This book takes you chapter by chapter thru the inner 
workings of OS9 including the window drivers, fonts and 
patterns, bugs and how to fix them, GIME reference and it 
even shows you how to use Tandys Rogue game disk to 
make a workable OS9 Level II system, plus much more. 
Approximately 100+ pages. Source listings are provided for 
some things plus flow charts and tables. A Must buy for 

anyone interested in OS9 Level II. 

Just $39.95 

Coming next "Inside Multi-View" 



r 



SCULPTOR 

Sculptor is a fourth generation language, an applications 
generator and a database all rolled into one. The 4th GL part 
of Sculptor means that programming time is cut by a factor 
of 5 or 10. The applications generator part of Sculptor writes 
programs for you and the database part is a very fast B+ 
tree. Sculptor is FAST! New users are up to speed in a few 
days, up to speed users can write sophisticated programs 
in half an hour! In our database of over 20,000 names we 
can retrieve any name in less than 1 second!! The program 
that does that only took 2 minutes to write! That's right 2 
(two) minutes! Maximum # of records is 22,000,000! No limit 
to # of fields etc. Includes a menu program, a query program 
and a variety of utilities to maintain the files. The typeset 
manual is the best available with both a table of contents 
and an index. A handy pocket guide is also included. Re- 
quires CoCo III and OS9 Level II. Call for more information. 

List $595 - Special Only $495! 



THE QT CoCo 

Question: The QT CoCo is the second most expensive 
hard drive/floppy drive subsystem for the CoCo? True or 
False? The QT CoCo is 
the only system that 
can be upgraded to a full 
68000 based computer? 
(The QT Plus) True or 
False?The answer to 
both questions is True. 
If you want to have the 
best drive subsystem 
for your CoCo then The 
QT CoCo is for you. 
20 Meg HD + 360 or 
720K floppy $1350. 

Fast 40 Meg HD with 360K or 720K floppy is $1 998. 
Requires a host adaptor. (Disto etc) 

Call or send for more information today! 




The WIZ 



By Bill Brady 

The Wiz is the First and Only program designed for 
the CoCo III that uses WINDOWS! The Wiz is a smart ter- 
minal and communications program for the CoCo III and 
OS9 Level II. Making use of multiple windows and overlay 
windows with pop up dialog boxes The Wiz really shines. 
Features include: Autolog- lets you configure The Wiz's col- 
ors, characters boldface etc, Xmodem and text send and 
receive, sleep mode, conference mode uses a separate 
window for your text, usage log and much more. Does not 
work with the CoCo's internal bit banger serial port. The 
complete package includes a special ACIA driver that al- 
lows baud rates from 300 to 19,200 baud. Requires the 
RS232 pak or the Disto RS232 or similar port plus a CoCo II 
withOS9 Level II. 

Only $79.95 



Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. Est. 1976 - 770 James Street - Syracuse New York - 13203 
315/474-7856 Visa, M/C, Amex, Diners club accepted. Prices do not include shipping. 



THESE FINE STORES 
CARRY THE RAINBOW 

The retail stores listed below carry the rainbow on a regular basis and may have 
other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We suggest you 
patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 




Birmingham 


Jefferson News Co. 


Brewton 


McDowell Electronics 


Florence 


Anderson News Co. 


Gieenville 


M & B Electronics 


Madison 


Madison Books 


Montgomery 


Trade 'N' Books 


ALASKA 




Fairbanks 


Electronic World 


API7DNA 




Phoenix 


TRI-TEK Computers 


Sierra Vista 


Livingston's Books 


Tempe 


Computer Libray 


Tucson 


Anderson News Co. 


ARKANSAS 




Fayefteville 


Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 


Ft. Smith 


Hot Off the Press Newsstand 


Little Rock 


Anderson News Co. 


CALIFORNIA 




Citrus Heights 


Software Plus 


Grass Valley 


Advance Radio, Inc 


Half Moon Bay 


Strawflower Electronics 


Hollywood 


Levity Distributors 




Polygon Co. 


Sacramento 


Tower Magazine 


San Jose 


Computer Literacy Bookshops 


Santa Rosa 


Sawyer's News, Inc 


Sunnyvale 


Computer Literacy 


COLORADO 




Westminster 


Software City 


DELAWARE 




Middletown 


Delmar Co. 


Mllford 


Milford News Stand 


Wrlminglon 


Normar, Inc. —The Smoke Shop 


FLORIDA 




Boca Raton 


Software, Software. Inc. 


Cocoo 


The Open Door 


Davie 


Software Plus More 


Deltona 


Wilson Assoc. dba Radio Shack 


Ft. Lauderdale 


Electronics Engineers 




Mike's Electronics Distributor 


Jacksonville 


The Book Nook 




Book Town 




White's of Downtown Bookstore 


North Miami 




Beach 


Almar Bookstore 


Orlando 


Book Mania 


Panama City 


Boyd-Ebert Corp. 


Pensacola 


Anderson News Co. 


Pinellos Park 


Wolf's Newsstand 


Sarasota 


Family Computers 


Staike 


Record Junction. Inc, 




Radio Shack Dealer 


Tallahassee 


Anderson News Co. 


Tampa 


Fine Print Bookstore 


Tltusville 


Computrac 



GEORGIA 

Athens 

Bremen 

Jesup 

Marietta 

Toccoa 

IDAHO 

Lewiston 
Moscow 

ILLINOIS 

Aurora 
Belleville 
Chompaign 
Chicago 



The Academic Resource Center, Inc. 

Bremen Electranics/Radio Shack 

Radio Shack 

Act One Video 

Martin Music Radio Shack 

Books, Etc. 

Johnson News Agency 

Kroch's & Brentano's 
Software or Systems 
Book Market 
B. Dalton Booksellers 

N. Wabash St. 

West Jackson St. 
Bob's In Newtown 
Bobs News Emporium 
Bob's Rogers Park 



Chillicothe 

Danville 

Decatur 



East Moline 

Evanston 

Geneseo 

Kewanee 

Lisle 

Newton 

Oak Brook 

Oak Park 

Paris 

Peoria 



Schaumberg 

Skokie 

Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Columbus 

Garrett 

Greenwood 

Indianapolis 



Jasper 
Madison 
Martinsville 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Ottumwa 

KANSAS 

Topeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Hozard 
Hopkinsvllle 
Paducah 
Pikeville 

LOUISIANA 

Crowley 
Manroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Carlbau 

Sanford 

Waterboro 



Book Market 

East Cedar 

North Cicero 

West Diversey 
E.B. Garcia & Associates 
Kroch's & Brentano's 

South Wabash 

West Jackson 

516 N. Michigan 

835 N. Michigan 
Parkway Drugs 
Parkwest Books 
Sandmeyer's Bookstore 
Univ. of Chicago Bookstore 
Univ. of Illinois Bookstore 
Videomat, Inc. 
Book Emporium 
Book Market 
Book Emporium 

K-Mait Plaza 

Northgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Chicago-Main News 
B & J Supply 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Bill's TV Radio Shack 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 

Sheridan Village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Book Market 
illinois News Service 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 

Sangamon Center North 

Town & Countiy Shopping Ctr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Place 
North Shore Distributors 

D & D Electronics 
Radio Shock 

White Cottage Electronics 
Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 
Finn News Agency, Inc. 
The Computer Experience 
Book land, Inc. 
Delmar News 
Indiana News 
Elex Mart 

Arco Office Supplies 
Radio Shock 
Mlttlng's Electronics 

Interstote Book Store 
Southside Drug 

Palmer News. Inc. 
Town Crier of Topeka, inc. 
Dondys/Radio Shack Deoler 
Amateur Radio Equipment Co 
Lloyd's Rodio 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Hobby Shop 
Radio Shack 

Roy's Furniture/Radio Shack Dealer 

Acadiana Newsstond 
The Book Rack 

Magazines, Inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 



MASSACHUSETTS 




Brocktan 


Voyager Bookstore 


Cambridge 


Out Of Town News 


Fitphhi irn 




Ipswich 


Ipswich News 


Littleton 


Computer Plus 


Lynn 


North Shore News Co. 


Swansea 


Newsbreak. Inc 


MICHIGAN 




Alten Park 


Rnnk Nnolf Inc 


Dearborn 


DSl Comoutpr Pioducts 


Durand 


Robbins Electronics 


Harrison 


Hairison Radio Shack 


Howell 


Howell Auto Parts 


Lowell 


Curt's Sound & Home Arcade Center 


Mt. Clemens 


Michigan Radio 


Muskegon 


The Eight Bit Corner 


Owosso 


C/C Computer Systems 


Peny 


Perry Computers 


Royal Oak 


Software City 


o i tti in iy 




Heights 


Sterling Book Center 


Trenton 


Trenton Book Store 


Wyoming 


Geny's Book Co 


MINNESOTA 




Duluth 


Carlson Books 


Minneapolis 


Read-More News 


Willmar 


The Photo Shop 


MISSISSIPPI 




Jackson 


North Sin's Now; 


MISSOURI 




Farmington 


i<ay s iv a kadio bhack 


Ififf Ar^nn Oifv 

jwii uidwi i Vw»M y 


Pnwlfiu Di^tfihi itinn 


Kirksville 


T&R Floctronics 


Mobprlv 

1 V IULAj J i y 


Audio Hut 


St Lnuis 






Computer Xchange 




Front Page News 


St. Robert 


Bailey's TV & Radio 


MONTANA 




Bulls 


P\n?n Rr>nk StnfA 


Whitefish 


r^nn^i imAr Flftptrnnip*: nf Whitftfkh 

V> \J 1 1DVJI 1 Ivl C 1 0 1 1 1 U Vj- J Ul VVI IJIOMDI 1 


NEBRASKA 




Omaha 


Nelson News 


►JEW AH A 




Las vegas 


nuriey biecironics 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 




West Lebanon 


Verham News Corp. 


NEW JERSEY 




Cedar Knolls 


Village Computer & Software 


Clinton 


Micro World II 


Marmora 


Outpost Radio Shack 


Pennsville 


Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 


River Edge 


Software City 


Rockaway 


Software Station 


NEW MEXICO 




Alamogordo 


New Horizons Computer Systems 


Albuquerque 


Desert Moon Distributors 




Front Page Newsstand 




Page One Newsstand 


NEW YORK 




Brockport 


Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 


Brooklyn 


Cromland. Inc. 


Elmira Heights 


Southern Tier News Co.. Inc. 


Fredonia 


On Line: Computer Access Center 


Hudson Falls 


GA West & Co. 


Johnson City 


Unicorn Electronics 


New York 


Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 




Coliseum Books 




Eastern Newsstand 




Grand Centtal Station, Track 37 




200 Park Ave. (Pan Am #1) 




55 Water Street 




World Trade Center #2 



174 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 





First Stop News 




Idle Hours Bookstore 




International Smoke Shop 




lonlt Smokp 




Penn Book 




Software Cily 




State News 




Usercom Systems, Inc. 




Walden Books 




World Wide Media Services 


N, White Plains 


Software Cily 


Pawling 


Univeisal Computer Service 


Rochester 


Village Green 




World Wide News 


Woodhaven 


Spectrum Projects 


NORTH CAROLINA 


Aberdeen 


King Electronics 




waaic onack 


Caiy 


News Center in Cary Village 


Charlotte 


Newsstand Int'J 




PaDers & Paceiback 


Havl*ck 


Computer Plus 


Hickaiy 


C 2 Books & Comics 


Marion 


Boomers Rhythm Center 


Wilmington 


JB's Newsstand 






Blanchester 


JR Computer Control 


Canton 


Utile Professor Book Center 


Chardon 


Thrasher Radio & TV 


Cincinnati 


Cinsoft 


^/-xli i nr> i iO r\ iO 
V^/VJIUI 1 lLJlvJi itJ 








Pinvf ton 


(lULJd llt^iyi llo DUUK CX v^LJI \J 




VA/ill/o Mdu/c 

VVIIKt? INtJWo 


r{j\\ LJvJl E 1 




Kpnt 

II 


ThA Now? 9hnn 

Jl IO 1 Ol lv_J^ 


\( Antnn 

1 1 \Jt 1 


T \A/ Honnn A A<i<;r>Hrit a<; 

I.vy. J 1 W y 0 1 1 La r UJU^/ 1 1 ™ o 


LUKWWUUCJ 


LUKfc3WC>UCJ II llfcJII lUIIUI ICJI INWWS 


LH 1 1U 


Diuiiiitst i NtJ wo rAytJi loy 






^/^nn^^ic^"\l ir/~i 
IVKLil 1 iiouuiy 


VvllKCf INt7W^ 


IVIUUI 11 ^1 UU 


IvlUUIil ^JICJU KCJCJIO oliaCK 


Rocky River 


Programs Unlimited 


Toledo 


Leo's Book & Wine Shop 


Woodsfield 


Day Appliance & TV/Radio Sh< 




De*ler 


Xenia 


Fine Print Books 


OKLAHOMA 




Oklahoma 




City 


Merit Micro Software 


Taklequah 


Thomas Sales, Inc. dba Radio 


Tulsa 


Steve's Book Stare 


OREGON 




Portland 


Fifth Ave. News 


PENNSYLVANIA 




Allison Park 


Software Cily 


Aftoona 


Newborn Enterprises 


Brookville 


Larry's Stereo Shop 


Malvern 


Persona! Soflware 


Philadelphia 


Cily Software Center 




Newsy 


Phoenixville 


Stevens Radio Shack 


Pittsburgh 


All-Pro Souveniers 


Pleasant Hills 


Pit1 Computer & Software 


Temple 


Soflware Corner 


Wind Gap 


Micro World 


York 


The Computer Center of York 


RHODE ISLAND 




Warwick 


Soflware Connection 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Charleston Hts. 


Software Haus, Inc. 


Gaffney 


Gaffney Book Store 


Greenville 


Palmetto News Co 


Spartanburg 


Soflware Cily 


Union 


Fleming's Electronics 



TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxville 

Memphis 

Smyrna 
Union City 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Brenham 
Elgin 
Orange 

VIRGINIA 

Gafton 
Norfolk 
Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Sealtle 
Tacama 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

Cudahy 

Milwaukee 



Minocqua 
Racine 

WYOMING 

Casper 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Kingsford 

CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Blairmare 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 
Drayton VaSley 
Edmonton 
Edsan 
Fairview 
Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hlnton 
Innlsfail 
Leduc 
Lethbridge 
Lloydminster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 
Stetller 



Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
First Byte Computer Co. 
Computer Center 
Software, Inc. 
Delker Electronics 
Cox Eleclranics Radio Shock 

Poncho's News 
Moore's Electronics 
The Homing Pigeon 
Northway Books & News 

Electronics Marketing 
l-O Computers 
Software City 

Adams News Ca„ Inc 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles J N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's ESectranics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Volley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
Book Tree 
Booked Solid 
Booked Solid II 
Harvey Schwartz Bookshop 
Univ. of Wisconsin Bookshop 
Island Technologies 
Little Professor Book Center 

The Computer Store 



Informatica Y Telecomunicaciones 



Strathmore Wheatland Eleclronics 
Taber Pynewood Sight & Sound 

Westlock Westlock Stereo 



Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shock 
L & K Sports & Music 
Paul Tercier 

Double T>" A.S.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Kelly Soflware Distributors 
Radio Shock Associated Stares 
Langard Eleclronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shock 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
A.S.C. Radio Shock 

Ft. Moll Radio Shack. ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 
Jim Cooper 
L & S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Dotatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shock 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Soflware 
Walter's Electronics 
Stetller Radio Shack 



Wetaskiwin 


Radio Shack 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Burnabv 


ComDUlit 


Burns 1 ake 


VT Video Works 


Campbell 




River 


TRS Electronics 


Chilliwack 


Charles Parker 


Coortenay 


Rick's Music & Stereo 


Dawson Creek 


BelS Radio & TV 


Golden 


Taks Home Furnishings 


Kelowna 


Telesoft Marketing 


Lang ley 


Langley Radio Shack 


N. Vancouver 


Microwest Distributors 


Neison 


fill! Irtr C Dz-vy-vl jn 

unvers books 


Parksville 

i ^ji r\j v ni\> 


Parksville TV 


Penticton 


DJ.'s 




Four Corner Groceiy 


Sidney 


Sidney Electronics 


Smithers 


Wall's Home Furniture 


Squamish 


Kotyk Electronics 


iuu rviiie 




House 


Tip Top Radio & TV 


MANITOBA 




Altona 


LA Wiebr Ltd, 


Lundar 


Goranson Elec. 


Morden 


Central Sound 


The Pas 


Jodi's Sight & Sound 


Selkirk 


G.L. Enns Elec. 


Vlrden 


Archer Enterprises 


Winnipeg 


J & J Electronics Ltd. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 




Moncton 


Jeffries Enterprises 


Sussex 


Dewitt Elec. 


NEWFOUNDLAND 




Botwoo«l 


Seaport Elec 


Carbon ear 


Slade Realties 


NOVA SCOTIA 




Halifax 


Atlantic News 



ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsville 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assiniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shell brooke 
Tlsdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



Micro Computer Services 

Campu Vision 

Ingram Soflware 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Huntsville Elec 

Donny "B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Messageries de Presse Benjamin Enr 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Piace 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCoClub 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Soflware Library 
Gee Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H & O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 



Soflware Cily 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and selected Coles Bookstores, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



July 1987 THE RAINBOW 175 



ADVERTISER INDEX 

We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the 
Tandy Color Computer. Wewill appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when 
you contact these firms. 



Alpha Products 21 

Boiling Spring 

Lakes Software 29 

Canyon County Devices 37 

Cer-Comp 141, 143 

Cinsoft 133 

Clearbrook Software 

Group 125 

CNR Engineering 160 

Cognitec 72 

Colorware 22, 23 

Computer Center 35 

Computer Island IBC 

Computer Plus 3 

Computerware 15 

Computize 25 

D.P. Johnson 171 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

Derringer 

Software 27, 71 

Diecom IFC 

Disto 108 

Elegant Software 65 

F.M. Technology 168 

Federal Hill Software 117 

Frank Hogg Laboratory 173 



Gimmesoft 86 

Hard Drive Specialists 177 

Hawkes Research 

Services 103 

Hemphill Electronics 170 

Howard Medical 34, 178 

J & M Systems 79, 104 

J & R Electronics 103 

Kelly Software 

Distributors 132 

Logicware 81 

Metric Industries 1 02 

Micro Works, The 113 

Microcom Software 9, 11, 13 

Microtech Consultants 

Inc 53 

MicroWorld 31 

Moreton Bay 85 

Novasoft 46 

Other Guys Software, The. ... 14 

Owl-Ware 73, 74, 75 

Perry Computers 16 

Polygon 138 

Preble's Programs, Dr BC 

Prickly-Pear Software 63 

Probitat 140 

PXE Computing 7 



Rainbow Adventure 

Book III 114 

Rainbow Introductory 

Guide to Statistics 24 

Rainbow on Tape and Disk ...38 

OS-9 Book 130 

Robotic Microsystems 65 

Seca 57 

Software House, The 79 

SpectroSystems 87 

Spectrum Projects 

Inc 17, 67, 69 

Speech Systems 

39, 40, 41, 42, 43 

Sugar Software 119 

Sunrise Software 54 

T & D Software 55, 82, 83 

Tandy/Radio Shack 106, 107 

Tepco 28 

Tom Mix Software 47 

True Data Products 90-91 

Wasatchware 37 

William Brigance 93 

Woodstown Electronics 81 

Zebra Systems 70 




Call: 

Shackleford, Nolan, Davis, Gregg and Associates 

Cindy Shackleford, president 

Marian Nolan Carpenter 

Advertising Representative 

P.O. Box 725 

516-1 89th St. Court East 

Spanaway, WA 98387 

(206) 847-9901 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 
The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 



Call: 

Jack Garland 
Garland Associates, Inc. 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

(617) 749-5852 



176 THE RAINBOW July 1987 



The Best Money Can Buy . . . 

HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 




DRIVE SPECIALIST 

COLOR COMPLtTtn VOHTHQltttt 
< 



Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drive Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Color Computer Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shack ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM $99. 

(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 

Completed and Tested Board without ROM . . . $79. 

(Includes CaSfe) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual $30. 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1.0 $40. 



Ordering information : 

Use our WATS line tp place your order via Visa, MasterCard, or Wir.e Transfer. Or 
mail your payment directly to us. Any npn -certified funds will be held until proper 
clearance is made. COD orders are accepted as well as purchase orders from 
government ag>nCie%. Most items are shipped off the shelf with the exception ol hard 
drive products that are custom built. UPS ground is our standard means o f shipping 
unless otherwise specified Shipping coal* aje available upon request. 



CM 



Drive 0 Complete w $199. 

Drive 1 Complete $129. 

Drive 0 & 1 Dual Drive $319. 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 



1-713-480-6000 
Order Line 1 -800-231 -6671 
16208 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, Texas 77059 



Save $200 on Magnavox Monitors 
Magnavox 8CM643 RGB Analog only $385!! 



MONITORS 

TfNITH 





122A Zenith 1 2" Amber Screen offers 
the same 640 dots x 200 lines reso- 
lution at 15MHz and a 90-day war- 
ranty valid at 1200 locations. 



$88 



has 



( s 7 shipping) 

MAGNAVOX 
8 CM 515 

analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB 
for Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and 
composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. 
Built-in speaker. 14" screen with 
640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 
2 years parts and labor warranty. 

reg. list $499 

SAVE 
$200 

$298 

+ $14 Shipping 
CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable. 

only $19.95 

Magnavox Monitor order. 
$29.95 w/o monitor. 



1230 A 12" 

This 12' 1 green screen high resolution 
monitor offers 80 column capability, 
Zenith quality and a 30-day warranty 
valid at any of Zenith's 1200 locations. 

Retail $199 $10*\ 
Our price ^ I 

($7 shipping) BRAND NEW 

All monitors require an amplifier cir- 
cuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer. 
They attach with spring connectors 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one for audio and one for 
video. CoCo 3 does not require an 
amplifier circuit. 

VA-1 for monochrome monitors only, 
fits all color computers 



$24.45 



(*2 shipping) 

VC-4 for monochrome or color, fits all 
color computers 

($2 shipping) 



$39. 45 



MAGNAVOX 




CM 8505 has analoq 

RGB and TTL RGB and compo- 
site color input. Built in speaker. 
13" screen with 690 dots x 240 
resolution in RGB mode. Plus 2 
years parts & labor warranty. 

reg. list $585 

SAVE 
$200 



with 



$220 

+ $14 Shipping 




DRIVE 0 +. 



Howards Drive 0 gives you a 
DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for onlv 



$17845 

( s 5 shipping) 
Udd $34 for a Disto DC-3. 



DOUBLE SIDED 
DOUBLE DENSITY 
360K 



GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty- 
of dealing with a company through the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test It for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for any 
reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) 

Shipping charges are for 48 states. 

APO, Canada and Puerto Rico orders slightly higher. 



DISK CONTROLLER 



Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. 



$98 



DC-3 

$2 shipping on all DISTO products 



ADD-ON BOARDS 



DC-38 includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and all 
software $138 

DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM $QQ 

DC512 512K RAM Board with 
software $125 

DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port $40 



DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer in- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips 



2764 8K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 

27128 16K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 

C-DOS 3 28 pin Eprom makes Disto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

$20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 



Payrol / BAS™ #M 

* ( $ 2 shipping) 

• Nonprotected basic modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
state and federal calculation 

• Custom code for every state 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 

• Print payroll and nonpayroll 
checks 



Payrol /BAS™ 



30 



Trial 



$79.95 



VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package in- 
cludes VIP writer terminal, data 
base, call and disk zap which can 
fix a diskette that is giving I/O 

$125 

( s 2 shipping) 



errors 



MEMORY 

Memory for CoCo 3 PC memory 
board plugs into the spare slots in- 
side the computer and can be 
populated with 256K ram chips. 
Completely solderless with com- 
plete easy to install instructions. 

$49.50 

PC Memory board with 512K 599 

Software spooler and RAM disk 
for lightning quick response or no 
disk swapping drive backup for 1 
drive system and printer spooler to 
free computer during long listings. 

$19.45 

($2 shipping on 
products) 



fi 



64-2 for CoCo 2. Kit requires one 
solder point, no trace cuts. 

(«2 shipping) $24.45 

64-E1 for E Boards with complete 
instructions. Remove old chips 
and replace with preassembled 
package— no soldering or trace 
cuts. 

( $ 2 shipping) 28.45 

64-F1 forF Boards. No soldering 
needed. Capacitor leads must be 
cut. 

(*2 shipping) 



$24.45 



Memory 



64-22 Two chip set for 26-3134A 
and B, 26-3136A and B. Koren Col- 
or Computers require 1 solder 
point. 

(*2 shipping) 28.45 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



Chicago, IL 60622 
(312) 278-1440== 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 



Showroom Hours: 
6:00 - 5:00 Mon. - Fri. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL RO.'S 



Computer Island Educational Software 



CLOSEOUT - LIMITED TIME ONLY.' 3 SUNBURST FAVORITES 

REGULARLY S44.95 EACH 
NOW AT SPECIAL CLOSEOUT PRICING 
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST 

1 FOR $30 2 for $50 
All 3 for $65 



THE POND 
Lead the frog 
across the pond 
in the f ewest 
moves. 6 levels. 
Grade 2 - adult. 



THE FACTORY 

3 level program 
chal I enges users 
to create geo- 
metric items on 
a user des igned 
machine. Grade 

4 - adult. 

TEASERS BY IV BBS 
Solve math puzzles 
on a grid. Tricky 
and chal lenging 
on 6 levels. 
Grade 2 - adult. 




VGA 




J VVEW PRODUCTS FOR YOUR 
COCO 3 AND RGB MONITOR 



NAME THAT FLAG 

Identify the flag 
and the country it 
represen ts. Tes t 
your knowledge, 
beautiful hi -res 
graphics. 



PEG OF MY HEART 

Fit pegs into the 
right place. Visual 
perception game. 
Multilevel - 6 to 
ado J t. Graphics 
galore.' Joystick 
or arrou keys. 



COCOUHEEL OF FORTUNE 
COCO 3 VERSION 

A near version of this 
popular fa vor i te that 
takes advantage of 
the special features 
of the Coco J and RGB 
monitor. As beaut i fu I 
as it is enjoyable ' 



SUMMER 
SPECIAL 



Tape or Disk 



1 for $20 



2 for $30 



3 for $40 



LANGUAGE ARTS SPECIAL 



SEND FOR A FREE CATALOG OF 
OVER 75 EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS. 



TAKE 25% OFF PRICES LISTED 
BELOW. GOOD UNTIL 8/15/87. 



FREE 



GIFT 



WITH 



ORDERS 



0 F 



TWO 



TITLE 


GR 


ADE 


PRI 


CE 


Beyond Words I 


3- 


5 


$19 


.95 


Beyond Words II 


6- 


8 • 


19 


.95 


Beyond Words III 


9- 


12 


19 


.95 


Vocabulary I 


3- 


5 


19 


.95 


Vocabulary II 


6- 


8 


19 


.95 


Vocabulary III 


9- 


12 


19 


.95 


Context Clues 4,5 


,6, 


or 


7 17 


.95 


Context Clues 


2- 


■3 


19 


.95 


Cloze Exercises 


3 




19 


.95 


Cloze Exercises 


4 




19 


.95 


Cloze Exercises 


5 




19 


.95 


Cloze Exercises 


6 




19 


.95 


Cloze Exercises 


7 




19 


.95 


Story Details 


2- 


■3 


19 


.95 


Story Details 


4- 


•5 


19 


.95 


Drawing Conclusions 


3- 


■4 


19 


.95 


Drawing Conclusions 


5- 


■6 


19 


.95 


Punctuation Practice 


3- 


■7 


19 


.95 



0 R 



MORE 



ITEMS 



Comjwttf^land 



227 Hampton Green 
Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

(718) 948-2748 

Please include $1.00 postage 
per order. NY residents, please 
add proper sales tax. Visa and 
MasterCard accepted. Payments 
in U.S. funds only. 



Dr. Preble's Programs 
Striking A Blow For 




■ . Freedom is nothing else but a chance to be better . . . 

— Albert Camus 



*** Mental Freedom 



for CoCo 2 and 3! 

(Will not work withCoCo 1) 

A Thought-Controlled Video Challenge 

We call it The Preble Thoughtware. 

DOES GREEN BLOOD flow in your veins like Mr. Spock? Is your mind well 
ordered? Or is your mind a mass of conflicting emotions like most 
humans? 

THOUGHTWARE may answer these questions and more. 

IMAGINE! Some day, a computer so advanced that it responds to your very 
thoughts and emotions. Imagine, some day, ihoughl-conlrolled 
graphics: levitation and materialization! 

PLUG IN YOUR MIND and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS - 
now! The Radio Shack Color Computer has many ad- 
vanced capabilities, just waiting to be tapped. Dr. Preble's 
Programs combines the advanced technology of the CoCo 
with the amazing Radio Shack BIOFEEDBACK MONITOR 
to bring you "Preble Thoughtware." 

THOUGHT-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any 
video game you have ever played, Thoughtware tests your 
ability to handle stress, to remain calm under adverse 
circumstances. 

LIGHTNING FAST reflexes will do you no goodhere, unless you 
first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. 
YOU HAVE SELF-CONTROL? Many people can keep a 
"Poker Face'^ even when they are worried so that others 
may not notice; but can you really stop the worry itself? Thoughtware 
will find out! 

AND IT TALKSI Did you know that the CoCo can produce incredibly realistic 
digital speech without a special speech synthesizer? And I mean really 
high quality speech! Forget the mechanical robot voice. This voice 
quality is so good, it sounds human! Honest. Best of all, no extra 
hardware is needed for speech. None. The CoCo produces this amazing 
digital speech all by itself (with a wee bit of programming by Dr. Preble). 

THOUGHTWARE — Next time your friends ask what your computer can do, 
show them the Preble Thoughtwarei 

Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback Monitor Catalogue #63-675 

The Preble Thoughtware — TAPE $27.95 + s/h, on DISK $29.95 + s/h 




DO 




*** Basic Freedom *** 

for The Color Computer 3 
(with versions for CoCo 1 & 2) 

A Full Screen Editor for BASIC Programming 

We call it EDITOR 3. Chris Babcock wrotea pure, efficient Machine Language 
program to open a new dimension of ease and power for anyone typing in 
a BASIC program. 

Here are your BASIC Freedoms! 

FULL CURSOR MOVEMENT — Use the arrow keys to move anywhere on a 
screen. If you are using a Color Computer 3, then even the 40 or 80 
column screen is supported! 

INSERT, CHANGE or DELETE CHARACTERS anywhere on the 
tijt screen. Simply move to what you wish to change, change 

it and continue working! 
LOWERCASE COMMANDS are OK! EDITOR 3 letsyou type in 
lowercase any time or all the time. Lowercase command 
words areautomatically translated to uppercase for BASIC. 
Of course, lowercase text within quotes stays lowercase. 
This is great when typing wiht the CoCo 3's 40 or80 column 
mode with true lowercase! 
MERGE LINES within a program with just a few keystrokes! 
AUTO KEY REPEAT — Hold down any key and it will repeat. 
INVISIBLE — Once EDITOR 3 has been loaded in, it is activated 
V^- With a single keystroke! It hides itself out of the way of other programs 
and can be turned off any any time. Pressing RESET will not hurt 
EDITOR 3! 

EASY TO USE — Installation takes seconds! Weil-written goof-proof manual 
included. 

COCO 1 & 2 — Yes, even though this program was conceived for the powers 
of the new CoCo 3, we still support the previous Coior Computers. They 
too, need their BASIC Freedom! 

EDITOR 3 — So easy and handy, you'll never want to run your CoCo without 
it! 

Available on DISK only for CoCo 3 @ $29.95 + s/h 

CoCo 1/2 version can not support 40 or 80 column screens. CoCo 1/2 version 
is available on TAPE for $27.95 + s/h or DISK for $29.95 + s/h. 



For CoCo 1, 2 and 3! 

Disk Directory Dazzler — Dress upyourdisk directory with colorful messages, 
notes and graphics — only $14.95 

Also Availiable for CoCo 1 & 2 only: 

VDOS. the UnDlSK: Save multiple programs in memory 1 Works with or withoul a disk 
drive. TAPE S27.95 * s/h. DISK S29 95 «■ s/h 

VDUMP. for the UnDlSK: Save multiple programs in a single file 1 $14.95 * s/h on tape 
VPRINT. for the UnDlSK: Printout UnDlSK Directory' $9.95 + s/h on tape 

Check, Money Order, MasterCard, VISA or COD accepted. For Shipping to USA and 
Canada add $1.50, to other countries add $5.00. 



Order From 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 

Technical questions answered 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday