Skip to main content

Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

See other formats


u u ii u i cru r 



oanaaa $4.yD 




THE COtOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 

The Sweet Strains of CoCo 



With Our Tribute to Charlie Parker, 
Programmable synthesizer, and 
MIDI Interface tutorial 



Kooser's 
Speech/Sound Pak utility, 

Refinements for Music- 
from Joseph D. Piatt, and 

^ gffrtcowith 
itar tutorial 







FOR THE COCO 1, 2 T AND 3 



6 




Tandy 1000 EX $479 
Tandy 1000 SX $759 






BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 EX 1 Drive 256K 479.00 

Tandy 100 SX 1 Drive 384K 679.00 

Tandy 1000 SX 2 Drive 384K 759.00 

Tandy 3000 HL 1 Drive 512K 1229.00 

Model IVD 64K with Deskmate 889.00 
PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 160.00 

Radio Shack DMP-130 100 CPS 269.00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 180 CPS 559.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 DaisyWheel310.00 

Star Micronics NP-10 100 CPS 199.00 

Star Micronics NX-10 120 CPS 249.00 

Star Micronics NX-15 120 CPS 410.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 120 CPS 239.00 

Panasonic P-1091 i 160 CPS 299.00 

Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 389.00 

Okidata 182 120 CPS 269.00 

Okidata 192 i 200 CPS 375.00 

Okidata 292 240 CPS 559.00 
MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Radio Shack DCM-212 179.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 179.00 

CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 39.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 
COCO Max Y Cable 27.95 
Color Computer Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Interface 89.00 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 14.95 
CM-8 6 Extension Cable 19.95 
Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 59.95 
Radio Shack DelJxe Joystick 26.95 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 99.00 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 129.00 
Mark Data Universal Video Driver 29.95 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 25.95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 34.95 

Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 29.95 34.95 

Nuke the Love Boat (CoCo3) 34.95 

The Magic of Zanth (CoCo3) 34.95 



Major Istar 24.95 27.95 

Sam Sleuth Private Eye 24.95 27.95 

Dungeon Quest 24.95 27.95 

COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max by Colorware 69.95 

COCO Max II by Colorware 79.95 

AutoTerm by PXE Computi ng29.95 39.95 

TelePatch III by Spectrum 29.95 

C III Graphics by Spectrum 19.95 

Font Bonanza by Spectrum 29.95 

Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Pro Color Series 79.95 

Max Fonts (72 COCO Max Fonts) 64.95 

Elite Word 80 79.95 

Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 

CoCo3512KRamDiskbyCerComp 19.95 

OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71.95 

VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Prices are subject to change without 
notice. Please call for shipping charges. 
Prices in our retail store may be higher. 
Send for complete catalog. 




■ 





P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TRS-80isa registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 



20 



26 



58 





FEATURES 



C^l Singing With the Bird/l/a/ Burke 



MUSIC A tribute to jazz legend Charlie Parker 



Air Rescue\/Chris Keyes 



GAME Slip into enemy territory to save hostages 



Uncovering the MIDI Section/Jofrn E. Mueller 

MUSIC TUTORIAL A digital interface for CoCo music 

The Digital Dimension/ Lindsay Kooser 




SOUND UTILITY The Speech/ Sound Pak learns to count 

^ Sgt. CoCo's Only Starters Club Band/Bill Bernico _ 



MUSIC UTILITY Guitar help for would-be Eddie Van Halens 

£=3^ Pick and Choose//War/c S. Camp 



MUSIC UTILITY Easy song selection from the music menu 

Steppin' Oui/Matthew Thompson 

MUSIC SYNTHESIZER Four-voice, programmable and fun 

^ The Sweet Strains of CoCo/Joseph D. Piatt 





s 1 







i 



MUSIC UTILITY Transposition refinements for Music+ 

The CoCo Composer/ Harold Nickel 



MUSIC Play the CoCo like a two-level organ 

4& Fish or Pheish?/De/ Turner 



EDUCATION BASIC09 helps with phoneme recognition 

NOVICES NICHE ^ 



New Mexican Folk Dances 

Julian Josue Vigil 

The Color Conductor r 

David Schuff 



76 Up With the Beat 

8/7/ Bernico 

78 Sound Off 



20 



26 



36 



38 



44 



49 



58 



94 



114 



148 



80 



81 



Gip W. Plaster II 



Cover illustration copyright © 1987 
by Fred Crawford 



The cassette tape/disk symbols 
beside features and columns indi- 
cate that the program listings with those 
articles are on this month's RAINBOW ON 
TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. Those with 
only the disk symbol are not available on 
RAINBOW ON TAPE. For details, check the 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK 

ads on pages 1 72 and 1 17. 



NEXT MONTH: Happy Birthday To Us! 



Please forgive us if we crow 
— we're turning 6, don't you know. 
Hard to believe but, yes, it's true, 
and we've got a party just for you. 
Programs, utilities and surprises galore 

(see the July Anniversary Issue for details) 



Reviews, tutorials and, oh, so much more. 
Find out what's new, what's currently hot 
and what new things the rai nbow's got. 
It's fun, exciting and always a treat 
A present for your CoCo that can't be beat. 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



-1 



COLUMNS 



BASIC Training/Joseph Kolar 

The creative muse 



Building June's Rainbow/J/m Reed - 

A report on RAIN BOW f est Chicago 



CoCo Consultations/Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

Delphi Bureau/Cray Augsburg . 



Help one, help all and Marty's database report 

Doctor ASC\l/Richard E. Esposito 

First aid for what's broken 



Education Notes/Sfei/e Blyn 



A square deal for teaching math 

Education Overview/M/crtae/ Plog, Ph.D 

Teachers and educational software development 



PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C. Falk 

Editor's notes 



Turn of the Screw/ Tony DiStefano 
An expandable relay project 

£=5^ Wishing Well/Fred Scerbo 



More on graphics, speech and education 

RAINBOWTECH 



Bits and Bytes of BAS\C/Richard White 
Getting started with BASIC09 

Downloads/Dan Downard 



i 



Answers to your technical questions 

KISSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 

Shooting for a standard 



I Exploring Level U/Rick Adams 

A look at the new features from BASIC09 

"Harden 's Buffer " will re I urn next month. 

DEPARTMENTS 



Adventure Contest 
Advertiser Index 



Back Issue Information 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



Letters to Rainbow 
One-Liner Contest 
Information 



153 
176 
137 

_18 
116 

_6 



The Pipeline 

Received & Certified 
Scoreboard Pointers 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



Subscription Info 

Where to Find Rainbow 



122 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 

Product Review Contents. 



96 



16 



53 



126 



90 



47 



32 



12 



84 



106 



158 



152 



162 



154 



124 
130 

_88 



_87 
122 
174 



129 



The J JJU ULJJA 




June 1987 



Vol. VI No. 11 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor James E. Reed 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Submissions Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 
Associate Editor Jo Anna Wittman Arnott 
Technical Editor Cray Augsburg 
Copy Editor Jody Gilbert 
Reviews Editor Judi Hutchinson 
Editorial Assistants Sandra Blackthorn, 

Wendy Falk, Angela Kapfhammer, 

Julie Tallent, Monica Wheat 
Technical Consultant Dan Downard 
Editorial Consultants Ed Ellers, 

Belinda C. Kirby, Joe Pierce 

Contributing Editors William Barden, Jr., 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, Michael Plog, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 
Production Coordinator Cynthia L. Jones 
Designers Tracey Jones, Rita Lawrence, 
Sandra Underwood, Denise Webb 

Lead Typesetter Jody Doyle 
Typesetting Services Jill Hopkins 
Karen Semones 



President 



Falsoft, Inc. 

Lawrence C. Falk 



General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 

Asst. General Mgr. for Finance Donna Shuck 

Admin. Asst. to the Publisher Sue E. Rodgers 



Editorial Director James E. Reed 

Asst. Editorial Director Jutta Kapfhammer 



Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 

Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Customer Service Mgr. Sandy Apple 
Asst. Customer Service Mgr. Beverly Bearden 
Word Processor Manager Patricia Eaton 

Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 

Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 

Director of Production Jim Cleveland 

Pre-press Production John Pike 

Dispatch Janice Eastburn 

Asst. Dispatch Mark Herndon 

Business Assistants Laurie Falk, Sharon Smith, 
Pam Workhoven 



Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502) 228-4492 

West Coast Advertising and Marketing Office 
President Cindy J. Shackleford 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, see Page 208 



THE rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect. KY 40059, phone (502) 
228-4492. the rainbow, RAINBOWfest and the rainbow and RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • Secondclass postage paid Prospect, 
KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705-050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed. Authorized as second class postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. • Entire contents copyright © by 
FALSOFT, Inc., 1987. the rainbow is intended for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use 
of information herein is for the single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without 
warranty of any kind whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to 
the rainbow are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin 
with next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount after two 
issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 5 



LETTERS TO THE 





More Excitement Than Ever 



Editor: 

I have been receiving RAINBOW since it 
was a two-page letter put out by an LPV1I. 
I cherish our magazine and praise you for 
its content. 

How about some information on interfac- 
ing hard disk drives with our CoCo^Mow 
about Owl Ware's Winchester BASIC? What 
is it really like? You folks must be using hard 
drives. How about some information on 
which ones and how they work? 

Also, 1 am halfway through the January 
issue, and have seen two references to Multi- 
Vue. Who puts it out, and how about a 
review of it? 

Now, Fm more excited about CoCo than 
ever. Please keep us up on the newest and 
most significant enhancements. 

Gary Br it ting 
San Francisco, CA 

Gary, Multi-Vue is a windowing de- 
velopment system which requires OS- 
9 Level II. It is produced by Radio 
Shack, but has not yet been released 
to the public. 

Super Cosmos Update 

Editor: 

To all owners of a Super Cosmos Connec- 
tion formerly sold by Cosmos Computer 
Services, Inc.: 

The sales and manufacturing rights to the 
Super Cosmos Connection have been ac- 
quired by Premier Data Systems, Inc. Any 
warranty questions or problems with a unit 
sold by Cosmos should be referred to us at 
2734 Hillsdale Ct., Green Bay, WJ 54303, 
(414) 434 1222. Thomas G Fezatte 

Premier Data Systems 

Fixing the Erratic @ 

Editor: 

In March's "Reviewing Reviews," there 
was a letter from us regarding erratic '@ y 
symbols and otherunwanted characters that 
sometimes appear with Ultra Telepatch and 
some other programs. 

I'm pleased to announce that we've found 
the fix. Ultra Telepatch customers are 
invited to write to us regarding update 
information. 



The exact cause? We're not sure, but the 
problem seems to appear only on early 
Korean CoCo 2s, and all the computers we 
examined have very hot power supplies. We 
suspect a bug in the SALT chip is causing 
an erratic power drop to the keyboard. The 
solution is simple — a longer delay time in 
the keyboard debounce routine. 

Unfortunately this will not help Mr. Long 

and his problems with Penpal. Perhaps a 

Penpal user will be able to incorporate a 

similar fix into Penpal's keyboard driver and 

forward it to him. n . , n , 

Bob van der Poel 

Edmonton, Alberta 
The Well-Traveled CoCo 

Editor: 

I brought with me to Ireland a 64K CoCo, 
disk drive and a CGP-II5 printer. I also 
brought a 240v-to-l I5v transformer. Upon 
hooking it all up, everything worked fine. 
The disk drive spun at the right speed, the 
TV looked just fine and CoCo delivered the 
goods. My worst fears were unfounded — 
for about three months. Then, the picture 
started to become unstable and upon "open- 
heart surgery" I discovered some internal 
voltages weren't what they should have 
been. I have since bought a new CoCo from 
England that feeds an English, PAL- 

standard TV. 

I think that Radio Shack's warning aboul 

the transformers for 60 Hz U.S. mains 

voltage not being compatible with 50 H2 are 

probably true and that American CoCos 

don't travel well abroad- . , 

John Perry 

Glenageary, Ireland 



BACK TALK 



Editor: 

The January 1987 '^Downloads'* column 
contains a letter from Allen Drennan. The 
reason the caller's BREAK key (CTRL-C) isn't 
disabled is because of an error in the ma- 
chine language listing of Mr. Downard's 
program. I believe his original listing of the 
program trapped the caller's CLEAR key 
(ASCII 12) and not the caller's break key 
(ASCII 3). 1 made that change a long time 



ago to his fine program, and it works 
beautifully with my modified version of 
Rainboai d. Speaking of modifications to 
Rainboard, has the author ever considered 
adding the Xmodem protocol to it? 

Also, Mr. Downard's review of D.L. 
LOGO is right on the money as far as being 
a superb implementation of LOGO. However, 
the demo program on my disk runs just 
beautifully. I suspect that superfluous driv- 
ers on the boot disk may be causing the OM 

Thomas P. Reitzel 
Ne walla, OK 

Best of Both Worlds 

Editor: 

In response to Tony Rapson's letter 
appearing in January [Page 6], certain 
features of ADOS using the Disto Super 
Controller with the CoCo 3 do work. When 
you first power up, you get the message: 
Disk Extended Color BASIC 2.1. Then, if 
you do the poke to change DOSs, ADOS 
will come up as: Disk Extended Color 
BASIC 2.0. 

Not all of the commands work as before. 
5CPN and CRT do not work, but you still get 
to use your double-sided drives at 6 ms 
stepping (not supported by RS-DOS). 

The next problem is what new features of 
the CoCo 3 will work with ADOS. That all 
depends upon how you do it. Programs 
typed in and immediately run under ADOS 
with new CoCo 3 commands will not work 
and give SN Errors, ff you type a program 
in and debug it under RS-DOS, then switch 
to ADOS and load your program with the 
new commands in it. ft will work fine. When 
you iisi your piogram under ADOS, the 
commands will not appear in the listing as 
they were typed in because they are not in 
the ADOS vocabulary; rather, they will 
appear as commands such as ROM and RUTO, 
which look wrong, but work just as the 
commands that you entered in RS-DOS. 

By doing this you can have the best of 

both worlds: You can use both sides of your 

double-sided disks at 6 ins from ADOS and 

use the new Hi-Res text or graphics screens 

on the CoCo 3! _ , ^ 

Erie banianen 

Stanhope. NJ 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1987 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 



NOW HI-RES 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 
XMODEM for machine language 
files. 128 ASCII characters, 1200 
baud, etc. Works with DC. Hayes or 
any modem. Handles files larger 
than memory. Print on line with J&M 
or RS232 Pak Screen widths of 32, 
40. 42, 51, 64. 



Please hire the mentally retarded 
They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor Find strings instantly too' 
Insert printer control codes Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER 

CASSETTE $29.95 

DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 
MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



COCO 3 

Editor: 

I have been using Roger Schrag's disk 
backup utility since its appearance in the 
December 1983 issue of rainbow. This 
excellent utilitycan be modified todo single- 
pass backups on a 512K CoCo 3 by loading 
the utility and then running the following 
program. Backup time on a two-drive 
system is not improved (ifsalready fast), but 
it really shines if for some reason you gel 
stuck with only a single operating drive. This 
is because only one disk swap is required. 

5 DIMR(BS) ,8(39) 

10 DRTR127 , 255 ,161, IB, IB, IB, 32, 
24 ,26, 118, IBB, 23,78,18,193, 
111,127,255,161,18,18,18,24, 
189,23,78, 18,26,118,91 ,23b, 
108,159,17,94,124,255,161, b7 

20 DRTR4579, 4580,4581 ,4582, 45b 3, 
4584,4585,4618, 46^8, 4669,4^80, 
46Q1 ,4682,4683,4685,4801,4805, 
4806,4807, 4808,4809,4810,4824 , 
4976,4977,4978,4979 ,49BB ,4983, 
4593,4996,5966,5967,5968,5969, 
5970,5971,5972,5973 

30 FORX=0TD36:RERDR:R(X) = 
R'NEXTX 

40 FaRX=0TO38:RERDB(X) = 
8 : NEXTX 

50 FORX=0TO3B:POKE8(X) ,R(X) : 

NEXTX D _ , 

Ron Goodger 

Paw Paw, Ml 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I'm looking for educational software 
focusing on calculus, mechanics and ther- 
modynamics for mechanical engineering 
studies at a university. How do I locate 
information on how to purchase this type of 

software 9 n n 0 , 

Bill Snyder 

565 Leighton Avenue 

Youngstown, OH 44512 

Banners, Banners Everywhere 

Editor: 

I am looking for a printer program pack 
that makes invitations, banners, and signs. 

Mrs. Willie Robinson 
WW N. W. 58th Street 
Miami, FL 33127 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor. 

I own a Digital Equipment LA50 printer. 

J think 1 have ined everything possible to 

make it work with my CoCo. I cannot get 

a line feed with a carriage return. If anyone 

has a similar printer and has overcome this 

problem, please write me at 2410 Imperial 

Oaks, 52761 , D , 

Joe Barnard 

Muscatine, I A 
CoCo 3 Quandary 

Editor. 

I have purchased a CoCo 3. Il works fine 
with two exceptions. It is not compatible 
with my Zenith I 3-inch color TV. The green 
screen continuously bounces making it 
difficult to view. Also, my Dynacalc soft- 



ware Version 5.1:1 will not load. Can some- 
one tell me how to get Dynacalc to load 
beyond the LORDING HELPS . BIN? It stops 
there and the red light on the disk drive 
continues, but the program does not load 

Waller J. Campbell 
605 N. Commercial, Box I 
Mankato, KS 66956 

The ML Roadblock 

Editor. 

I have a problem with my machine — 
some machine language programs do not 
run all the way. For example, with VIP 
Database, it runs fine up to the point of 
using the database. When I try to use that 
portion of the program, the cursor locks up 
on the top line. I cannot get the cursor off 
the line at the extreme left edge, covering the 
first letter, which is replaced by a left 
parenthesis. The disk is OK; my friend's 
database acts the same way. There are other 
programs such as Sands of Egypt that run 
for a time, then lock up. 

Jack Wannenwetsch 
3733 Hulberion Road 
Holley, NY 14470 

Calling All Trekkies 

Editor: 

I would like to hear from anyone who has 
been able to run Jake Commander's Space 
Trek program in the May 1983 issue of the 
Color Computer Magazine. A program 
printout would be greatly appreciated. 

Randall Winter 
10 160 S.R. 53 N 
Upper Sandusky, OH 43351 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 7 



Just Outclassed 

Editor: 

I have a 64K CoCo 2, two drives and an 
Epson JX-80 color printer. 1 run both JDOS 
and RS-DOS. It doesn't make much sense 
to me to have the best color graphics com- 
puter and a fantastic color printer and not 
be able to find graphics software (e.g., CoCo 
Max, Graphicom, etc.) compatible with 
them. 1 have a CoCo Max II that is about 
90 percent usable (the double strike doesn't 
work, and the line spacing is about '/s-inch 
too wide) when configured for the FX-80. 
When configured for the Gemini 10, it only 
prints in double strike and the line spacing 
is about l /8-inch too close. Are there plans 
for CoCo Max to be available for the JX- 
80? Is there any graphics software compat- 
ible with my system out there? It seems my 
printer is only compatible with the more 
expensive IBM systems. Did 1 outclass my 
computer when 1 bought my printer? 

Jo Ernst 
P. O. Box 4044 
APO, NY 09009 



The Beat Goes On 

Editor: 

1 play in a rock group and our light show 
(36 "cans" at approximately 15 kilowatts) is 
completely controlled by Radio Shack Plug 
'n Power Modules. I have read all of Alex- 
ander B. Trevor's articles in past issues 
concerning the XI 0 protocol and applica- 
tion. 1 have been able to tailor the program 
to the group's needs, e.g., scene generation, 
random sequencing, etc. My problem is that 
I can't utilize my program. The new Ap- 
pliance Controller I have(R.S. Catalog No. 
26-3142) doesn't seem to support it, and 
using the included ROM-Pak (both manu- 
ally and pre-programmed) is too sluggish to 
track the dynamics of the music. The orig- 
inal P'n P Controller that Mr. Trevor used 
is his article seems to be the more straight- 
through device I need. 

If anyone has one of these original con- 
trollers, please contact me at (616) 258-8777 

anytime. John M. Fredericks 

P.O. Box 1016 
Kalkaska, Ml 49646 



Terminally Smart 

Editor: 

I have a Kantronics UTU-XT interface, 
which is a smart modem for my ham radio. 
It is designed to use an RS-232 port and just 
about any terminal program. 

However, all of the CoCo terminal pro- 
grams that work well with telephone mo- 
dems lack the features that would make the 
programs more useful with a ham radio 
smart modem. 

Kantronics has a program called UTU- 
Term/ Pacterm for IBM Compatibles, but 
they inform me there are no plans to make 
the program for the CoCo. 

J would like to find a program like the 
Clay Abrams newrttycw , which would 
operate the Kantronics UTU-XT. The only 
addition I could think of would be using an 



RS-232 pack for the UTU-XT and connect- 
ing a printer to the 4-pin CoCo RS-232 port 
for truly deluxe ham operation. 

David J. Johnstone 
19 Margerie Street 
Torringlon, CT 06790 

Death in the 80-Column Mode 

Editor: 

I am using a CoCo 2 with the Disto Super 
Controller and 80-column board. I bought 
this with the idea of using 80 columns on a 
high resolution amber monitor, but I find 
that all my terminal/modem programs die 
when I am in 80-column mode. 

Will I have to go to OS-9 before it be- 
comes possible? Also, I would like to trade 
graphics pictures with other enthusiasts. I 

can use DSDD disks. n . ~ ,. 

Brian Carting 

220 Cedarview Drive 

Antioch, TN 370/3 

A Baudy Question 

Editor: 

I am having trouble with my CoCo Max 
II. 1 have a DMP-130 printer, and 1 don't 
know which baud rate to use. If you could 
give me any help it would be great! 

Chris Casson 
3 Channing Lane 
Camillus, NY 13031 

Vive le Francais 

Editor: 

I am a French speaking person. I own a 
CoCo 2 and I have been using it for the last 
three years. 1 also own two disk drives and 
a DMP-105 printer. In 1985, Radio Shack 
was announcing a French version of Scrip- 
sir, 1 am still waiting for it. I would like to 
know if there is any word processor able to 
generate the French characters that we can 
pass directly to the printer. 

I would like to know if any word proces- 
sor available for the CoCo 3 can generate 
those characters, since those special or 
foreign characters are located in codes 128 

to 159 in high definition. 0 

b Gilbert Bourget 

28 A ve. de I 'Eglise 

Perce, Quebec 

Canada G0C2L0 



dows. I ordered the program on a Saturday 
and received the disk Thursday morning — 
without a doubt one of the fastest mail order 
turn around times I have ever dealt with. 
Thank you, Other Guy's. c/£>// HafmQn 

Wichita, KS 



BOUQUETS 

Editor: 

I would like to tell you about Bob van der 
Poel Software and Plan Net Forms. First I 
ordered Ultra Label and couldn't get it 
configured but, thanks to Bob, I now have 
it working perfectly. It is one terrific pro- 
gram and does everything I want it to. The 
second company, Plan Net Forms, sent me 
the plans for an RS-232 switching box. For 
$5 and $20 worth of parts, I have an RS-232 
switch that works great. It was very easy to 
make and I would recommend it to anyone. 

G. D. Croucher 
Scarbrough, Ontario 



A Pat to the Other Guy 

Editor: 

1 want to praise the Other Guy's Software 
for the extremely fast service they provided 
to me in the ordering of their CoCo Win- 



PEN PALS 



• I have a 64K CoCo 2, disk drive, cassette, 
modem and a DMP-105 printer. I am inter- 
ested in all types of programs. 

Becky Cravens 
1218 North C Street 
Rogers, A R 72756 

• I am looking for a female pen pal. I am 

14 years old and have a CoCo 2 with a disk 

drive. I enjoy Adventures and games with 

Hi-Res graphics. n . k4 

° r Brian Murry 

142 Rock Street 

Tucson, AZ 85747 

• I'm 13 years old and I'm looking for pen 
pals of any age. I have a CoCo and a CoCo 
3 with ears, Super Voice and CoCo Max. 
I have just started using OS-9 and I love to 

P ' aygameS - Andy Blount 

339 32 ! / 2 Road 
Palisade, CA 81526 

• If there are any Korean-based readers out 
there, drop me a line through MPS. 

Gary Br it ting 
HHC 19th Spt. Box 2327 
APO, San Francisco, CA 96212 

• I am looking for pen pals from another 
country. I speak English and am 15 years 
old. I have a CoCo 2 with cassette, disk 
drive, modem and a DMP-130. 

Mike Jakubiak 
125 Elmwood Drive 
Meriden, CT 06450 

• I am 12 years old and am looking for a 

pen pal the same age or older. I have a CoCo 

3 and I enjoy graphics games, Adventures 

and music programs. n . 0/ . . . . 

F & Robert Slabinskt 

195 A State Street Apt. 159 

Meriden, CT 06450 

• I am seeking pen pals with ham radio 
interests for an exchange of ideas and 
concepts. I want to find real ham radio 
terminal programs with split-screen and 
typeahead buffers, etc., to operate Kantron- 
ics UTU-XT/ P and other TNCs. 

David Johnstone 
19 Margerie Street 
Torrington, CT 06790 

• I'm looking for pen pals who love the 
CoCo as much as I do. I have a 64K CoCo 
with disk drives and cassette. 

John Colburn 
604 Maple Street 
Rossville, GA 30741 

• If you love your CoCo, games of all types 
and the rainbow, please write to me. 

Raymond Lueders 
1341 Sea Biscuit Lane 
Hanover Park, I L 60 103 

• I am 16 years old and I am looking for 
someone who is interested in games, Simu- 



8 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



500 

POKEs, 

PEEKs, 

'N 

EXECs 

FOR THE TRS-80 COCO 




NEVER BEFORE has this infor- 
mation of vital significance to a 
programmer been so readily 
available to everyone. This book 
will help you GET UNDERNEATH 
THE COVER' of the Color Com- 
puter and develop your own HI- 
QUALITY Basic and ML pro- 
grams. SO WHY WAIT?? 
This 80-page book includes 
POKES, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

★ Autostart your basic programs 

★ Disable Color Basic/ ECB/ Disk 
Basic commands like LIST, 
LL1ST, POKE, EXEC, CSAVE(M), 
DEL, EDIT, TRON, TROFF, 
PCLEAR, DLOAD, RENUM, PRIMT 
USiriQ, D1R, KILL, SAVE, LOAD. 
MERQE, RENAME, DSKIMI, 
BACKUP, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

★ Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY 
and RESET BUTTON. 
Generate a Repeat-key. 
Transfer ROMPAKS to tape (For 
64K only). 

Speed Up your programs. 

Reset, MOTOR OH/OFF from 
keyboard. 

Recover Basic programs lost by 
MEW, 

Set 23 different 
QRAPHIC/SEMIQRAPrilC modes 
Merge two Basic programs. 

AMD MUCH MUCH MORE! 1 1 

COMMANDS COMPATIBLE WITH 
16 K/32 K/64 hj COLOR BASIC/ ECB/ DISK 
BASIC SYSTEMS and CoCo 1. 2, fltf 3. 

ONLY $16.95 



★ 
★ 

★ 
★ 



★ 
★ 




$9.95 

200 additional Pokes, Peeks' n Execs to 
give you MORE PROGRAMMING POWER 
Includes commands for 

• Rompak Transfer Jo disk 

• PAINT with 65000 styles! 

• Use of 40 track single/double sided drives with variable 
step- rales 

• Nigh-Speed Cassette Operation 

• Telewriter 64®, Edtasm+® and CoCo Max* 
Enhancements 

• Graphics Dumpjfor DMP printers) & Text Screen Dump 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

• 50D POKES, PEEKS N EXECS Is a prerequisite 

^&300 POKES 
PEEKS 'N EXECS 
FOR THE COCO III 

Get more POWER for your CoCo 

• 40/80 Column Screen Text Dump 

• Save Text/Graphics Screens to Disk 

• Command/Function Disables 

• Enhancements for CoCo 3 Basic. 

• 128k/512k Ram Test Program 

• AND MANY MORE COMMANDS 

ONLY $19.95 




DISK TUTORIAL 

(2- Disk Package) ^ ^ j^ 




only $36.95 



RUN COCO MAX II 
On CoCo III 

The kit contains software & replacement 
PAL chip for 26-3024 Multipack interface 

only $29.95 



/jyr 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 21 4 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone(716) 223-1477 



The CoCo Graphics Designer allows you 
to create beautifully designed Greeting 
Cards, Signs and Banners for holidays, 
birthdays, parties, anniversaries and other 
occasions. Comes with a library of pre- 
drawn pictures. Also includes utilities 
which allow you to create your own 
character sets, borders and graphic 
pictures. Requires a TRS-80 COLOR 
COMPUTER I, II OR III ORTDP-100 with 
a MINIMUM 0F32K, ONE DISK DRIVE 
and a PRINTER compatible with DISK 
BASIC 1.0/1.1, ADOS 1.0/1.1 AND JD0S. 
Supports the following printers: EPSON 
RX/FX, GEMINI 10X/SG-10, NX-10, 
C-ltoh 8510, DM P-1 00/1 05/400/430, 
SEIKOSHAGP-100/250. LEGEND 808 
and GORILLA BANANA. 

DISK ONLY $29.95 
PICTURE DISK #1 

This disk includes OVER 100 pre-drawn 
pictures for use with the CoCo Graphics 
Designer. 

DISK ONLY $14.95 



512K UPGRADE 



ForCoCOIII. Fast 120ns chips. 
Easy installation - no soldering. 
Fully Tested. 
Includes Complete Documentation, 
512K RAM TEST program on DISK. 
ONLY $99.95 
Upgrade w/o chips $44.95 

51 2K RAM DISK: ONLY $24.95 

COCO DISK ZAPPED 



A 




T tUn 



Are you frustrated with crashed disks? If 
so, this program can save hours of labor by 
restoring completeor part of the information 
from the disk. If s indespensable! 

Requires minimum 32 K/64 K disk system 
CoCo1,2&3 ONLY $24.95 



VISA, MC, Am Ex, Check, M0. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling (USA & 
CANADA, other countries $5.00) COD add $2.50 extra NYS residents pleas e add 
Sales Tax. Immediate shipmenL Dealer inquiries invited. g 



MottorCord 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1 -800-654-5244 9 am- 9 pm est 7 days a week 

Except NY. For information, technical information, NY orders & after-hours 1 -71 6-223-1 477 



lations and Adventures. I have a 64K CoCo 

2, disk drives and a modem. ~ , ~ ,. 

bred babi 

1513 N. Franklin Street 

Litchfield, IL 62056 

• 1 have started the Trading Post pen pal 
club. Yearly fee is $5. It includes a monthly 
newsletter and a library with many, many 
programs for trading. Just be willing to write 
with hints and tips, and maybe send some 
of your programs to trade. j onn Licata 

5114 Roberta Lane 
Richlon Park, 1L 

• I am looking for pen pals all around the 
world. 1 enjoy programming with my 64K 
CoCo 2, printer, disk drive and cassette. 

Charles Baum 
1116 West 39th Place 
Hobart, IN 46342 

• 1 would like to correspond with rainbow 
readers in the south Louisiana area. I have 
a CoCo 2, disk drive, cassette and modem. 

Tommy LtFleur 
5021 Airline Hwy. $24 
Metairie, LA 70004 

• 1 am almost 1 3 years old and in the seventh 
grade. I have a 64K CoCo, disk drive, 
cassette and a DMP-105. 1 love arcade 
games and Adventures. 

Robbie Fink 
128 Woolens Road 
Elkton, MD 21921 

• I am looking for a pen pal with an active 
imagination to co-author Adventure pro- 
grams. For more information, please send 

an SASE. _ , ^ 

Carl Foote 

16 Johnson Street 

Sanford, ME 04073 

• I would like to write to people of any age 
and from any country. My system includes 
CoCo 2 and 3, SSDD drive, modem, Gemini 
10X printer and phone accountant. 1 want 
to buy a used SSDD drive or DSDD system. 

Mike Lowe 
2093 Candlewood 
Charlotte, Ml 48813 

• Anyone interested in joining the CoCo 
Nuts pen pal club, please write. Different 
programs will be exchanged each month, 
and a newsletter will be available beginning 

in ApriL Paul White 

Rt. 5, Box 379 
Fulton, MO 65251 

• 1 am 13 years old and would like to have 
pen pals. I have a 64K CoCo, disk drive, 
cassette, modem, a CGP-I 15 and a DMP- 
105 printer, and the Speech/ Sound Car- 

tnC ^ e ' Chuck Rice 

21 Mountain Terrace 
Asheville, NC 28806 

• I am looking for a pen pal. I would prefer 
a Canadian or British pen pal, but all are 
welcome. I am a big Dr. Who fan and I have 
an interest in Star Trek. 

Sherman Young 111 
185 Mount Carmel Road 
Asheville, NC 28806 

• There is a new pen pal listing newsletter 
for CoCo users called CoCo Scribe Maga- 



zine. 1 have recently moved, so if you sent 
a letter to my old address and it was re- 
turned, please try again. ^ 

1658 Idelwild Drive 
Reno, NV 89509 

• 1 am looking for pen pals in the NYC area 
for P-51 partner. 1 would like pen pals from 
all over. I have a CoCo 2, modem and disk. 

Richard Craig 
89-25 Parsons Blvd. 
Jamacia, NY 11432 

• 1 am 17 years old and 1 have a CoCo 2, 
disk drive, cassette, modem and a DMP- 
105. T am an avid gamer and have a huge 
library of software. I'm also interested in 
BASIC and assembly programming, and 

astronomy. ~ D , 

J Dan Bow den 

4866 Wild wood Drive 

North Bend, OR 97459 

• 1 am 14 years old and want a pen pal. I 
have a CoCo 2, multipack, disk drive, 
cassette, DMP-105, modem and lots of 

& ames - Dino Di En no 

715 South Hutchinson Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19147 

• As author of CoCo Bright [February 
1987, Page 49], 1 would like to correspond 
with other machine language programmers. 
You can write to me at P.O. Box 100087, 
37210 

David C. Billen 
Nashville, TN 

• Before I discovered THE rainbow, I felt 
like 1 was the only CoCo owner in the world. 
Now 1 feel like the only one in Houston! If 
there's anyone out there, please write! 

Francisco Rios 
4102 Lufborough Drive 
Houston, TX 77066 

• 1 am 15 years old. My system is a 64K 
CoCo I with two disk drives, a DMP-105 
and a modem. I am interested in learning 
OS-9 and machine language. 

Corrie Bender 
11216 SE 235th Place 
Kent, WA 98031 

• I would enjoy having pen pals who have 

experience with the CoCo and like computer 

languages. 1 would like to hear from Seventh 

Day Adventists and others who have a 

CoCo. 1 am 25 years old. „ 

J Ernie Bennett 

Route 2, Box 158- A 

Beckley, WV 25801 

• I would like to have Polish-speaking pen 
pals from all over the world who share an 
interest in the CoCo and in swapping infor- 
mation. I have a 64K CoCo 2 with cassette, 
stacks of rainbow and lots of programs. 

Tom as z Szafraniec 
3/14 Ridley Street 
Albion VIC, Australia 3020 

• 1 would like a pen pal in Belgium, the 
Netherlands, Great Britain, Germany or 
other European countries. 

Rudi Bosschaerts 
Weerstandsplein 7 
B2510 Mortsel, Belgium 

• I'm Brazilian and I have a 64K ECB CoCo 
with one disk drive, a modem and a printer. 



I would like to correspond with other CoCo 
owners around the world. 

Frank Costa Barbosa Hudson 
Rua Constantino Pale la, 26/601 
CEP 36100 - Juiz de Fora - MG 

Brazil 

• 1 would like to correspond with other 

CoCo nuts out there. n . , , 

Rick Normandeau 

P.O. Box 6932 

Wetaskiwin, Alberta 

Canada IV A 2G5 

• 1 am 12 years old and a CoCo user. I'm 
looking for pen pals between the ages of 18 

t0 ' Dean Sheppard 

P.O. Box 117 
Lewisporte, Newfoundland 
Canada AOG 3 AO 

• I am a game collector and would like to 

have more. If you would like to trade games, 

please write. n . . 

v D.A. Heisz 

Roaches Line, Newfoundland 

Canada AO A 1 WO 

• I have a 64K CoCo 2 with cassette re- 
corder, and I am interested in finding pen 

pa ' S ' Deny Wilson 

131 Leeville Drive 
Box 1393 
Assiniboia, Saskatchewan 
Canada SOH 0B0 

• I'm looking for a Canadian pen pal. I am 

13 years old and have a CoCo 3, DMP-105 

printer and a disk drive. , „ . 

Ian Boisverl 

P.O. Box 259 

Burslall, Saskatchewan 

Canada SON OHO 

• I am 14 years old and have a CoCo 2, 
cassette and a Speech/Sound Pak. 1 am 
looking for a Canadian pen pal. 

Randy Pekar 
Box 7, Site I 
Yorklon, Saskatchewan 

• 1 want to get in touch with any Dragon 
or Tandy users wanting to swap informa- 
lion, games, etc. S J 

15 St. Stephen Road 
Penketh, Nr. Warrington 
Cheshire, England WA5 2AN 

• 1 am looking for pen pals all over the 

WOr ^' Werner Daniel Slreidl 

8 Hassan Sabry Street c/o GTZ 

Zamalek, Cairo 
Egypt 

the rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editor. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, TheFalsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be sent to 
us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, type RRI to take you 
into the Rainbow Magazine Services area of 
the SIG. At the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
LET to reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be sure 
to include your complete name and address. 



10 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



UTILITIES/BOOKS 




MUG Mj 



UTILITY ROUTINES for the 
TANDY &TRS-80 COCO (Vol 1) 

• COMMAND KEYS • CURSOR STYLES • ERROR SKIP 

• PULL LENGTH ERRORS • KEY CLICKER 

• REPEAT KEY • REVERSE VIDEO (Green & Red) 
SPOOLER • SUPER SCROLLER • TAPE-TO-DISK 

• AND MUCH MUCH MORE III 

For 16 K/32 K/64 K Cassette or Disk Systems, 

CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 BOOK $19.95 

ROUTINES ON CAS/DISK:$24.95 
BOTH BOOK AND CAS or DISK: $36.95 

UTILITY ROUTINES (Volume II) 

Includes 20 oft- used utilities such as; 

• PAINT with 65000 styles 

• Add SUPERSCRIPTS to your DMP printer 

• Design your own commandsl • Programming Clock 

• Fast Sort for Basic Strings • CoCo Calculator 

• Create a character set (or your DMP printer 

• Find/ Replace phrases in your Basic Program 

• Lei the computer locate your errorsl 

• Super EDITing Basic Programs 

• Automatic Directory Backup • And much much morel 

64 K DISK ONLY $29.95 

UTILITY BONANZA I 

Includes 20 best-selected utilities: 

• 40 K Disk Basic • Disk Cataloger 

• Super Tape-to-Oisk Copy (with Automatic Relocate) 

• LList Enhancer • X-Ref for Basic Programs 

• Graphics Typesetter (two text slzeslj 

• LARGE DMP Graphics Dump • Basic Stepper 

• Hidden 3ZK |Use the' hidden" 32 K lromyour64K CoCo) 

• RAM Disk (for Cassette & Disk Users) 

• Single Key Printer Text Screen Dump 

• And much, much more!!! 

Most programs compatible with CoCo 3 

DISK(64K ReoJ ONLY $29.95 

"MUST" BOOKS 

UNRAVELLED SERIES: These books provide a 
complete annotated listing of the 
BASIC/EDB and DISK ROMs. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: S19.95 
BOTH UN RAVELLED BOOKS: $49.95 
SUPER ECB (CoCo3) UNRAVELLED: $24.95 
ALL 3 UNRAVELLED BOOKS: S59.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO OS-9 (Book): S1B.95 
RAINBOW GUIDE TO OS-9 (2 Disks): $29.00 
BASIC PROGRAMMING TRICKS: Tips and tricks for Basic 
Programmers Only $14.95 
CoCo 3 SECRETS REVEALED: $19.95 
ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING*: $16.00 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE WITH COCO 1, 2 & 3 

(Except those marked with *) 




SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 




• Disk- to- Disk Copy (1-3 passes) 

• Tape- to- Disk Copy 

• Tape-to- Disk Automatic Relocate 

• Disk-to-Tape Copy 

• Tape- to- Tape Copy 

Copies Basic/ ML programs and DATA files 
CoCo 1, 2 & 3 32 K Disk System 

(Disk to Disk Copy requires 64 K) 

DISK ONLY 

$24.95 
CABLES/HARDWARE 

AWATEX MOD EM: Hayes compatible 

300/1200 Baud, Auto- Dial/ Answer/ Redial. 

ONLY $129.95 

MODEM CABLE: $19.95 

DS-69B DIGISECTOR: Microworks Digitizer 

for CoCo 1, 2 & 3. Includes software. 

ONLY $149.95 

VIDEO CLEAR: Reduce TV interference. 
ONLY $19.95 

15' PRINTER/MODEM EXTENDER CABLE: 
ONLY $16.95 

UNIVERSAL VIDEO DRIVER: Use your 
monochrome or color monitor with your 
CoCo (ALL CoCos). Includes audio 
connection. Easy installation - no 
soldering. ONLY $29.95 

INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER; Best 
EPROM Programmer for the CoCo. 
Lowest Price Anywhere - $1 37.95. 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 devices to the 
serial port ONLY $18.95. 

3-P0SITI0N SWITCHER: 

Select any one of three RS232 devices 
(printers/modems) from the serial port 
ONLYS37.95 

Y CAB LE: Use your Disk System with CoCo 
Max, DS69, etc. ONLY $24.95 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE: With 6 
switch selectable baud rates (300-9600) 
Comes with all cables. $44.95 



OTHER SOFTWARE... 

Telewriters (Cos) $47.95 (Dsk) 57.95 

Teleform: Mail Merge for TW-64® 1 9.95 

Telepatch III 29.95 

Graf Plot 44.95 

CoCo Max (Cos)* 67.95 

CoCo Max II (Dsk)* 77.95 

FKEYS III 24.95 

Autoterm Terminal Prog (Cas) 29.95 

(Latest Version) ( Dsk) 39.95 

Font Bonanza 29.95 

SPIT ' N IMAGE: Makes a mirror image 
(BACKUP) of ANY disk, even protected ones. 
Will also initialize and BACKUP in one pass. 
ONLY $32.95 

COCO UTIL II (Latest Version): Transfer CoCo 
Disk files to IBM compatible computer. 
Transfer MS-DOS files to CoCo. 
CoCo 1, 2 & 3 ONLY $36.95 

EARS: Speech recognition system. 
ONLY $99.95 

SUPER VOICE: Speech synthesizer. 
ONLY $79.95 

LYRA: Best music composition program. 
ONLY $54.95 

SYMPHONY 12: A real hardware music 
synthesizer. ONLY $69.95 
ADOS: Advanced disk operating system. 
ONLY $27.95, CoCo 3: $34.95 
DISK ANTI- PIRATE: Best copyprotection 
program for disk Basic and ML programs. 
CoCo1,2&3 ONLY $59.95 

COLOR SCRIBE III: The Coco 3 Word- 
Processor 

ONLY $49.95 

GAMES (DISK ONLY) 
GANTELET: $28.95 
MISSION F-16 ASSAULT: $28.95 
MARBLE MAZE: $28.95 
PAPER ROUTE: $28.95 
KNOCK OUT: $28.95 
KARATE: $28.95 
WRESTLE MANIAC: $28.95 
BOUNCING BOULDERS: $28.95 
THE GATES OF DELIRIUM: $38.95 
P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 



JhJF 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 214 
Fairport, N.Y. 14450 
Phone (71 6) 223-1477 



To order All orders $50 & above shipped byZnd day Air UPS with no extra charge. Last minute shoppers 
can benefit VISA, MC, Am Ex, Check, MO. Please add $3.00 shipping and handling 
(USA& CANADA other countries $5.00) CODadd$2.50 extra NYS residents please add 
Sales Tax. Immediate shipment Dealer inquiries invited. 




Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 AM -9 PM EST 7 days a week 

Except NY. For information, technical information, NY orders & after-hours 1-71 6-223-1477, 



A CoCo 3 Catalyst 



I am just home from the largest and most successful RAINBOWfest 
ever — the one in Chicago, April 10-12. And, while we were certainly 
pleased by the crowds, the success of virtually all the booths, the 
seminars and the reception of our live CoCo Cat mascot, the biggest 
thing at the show, for me and many others, I believe, was the happy, 
smiling, excited faces of those who attended! 

In his report on Delphi, Marty Goodman (who graciously pinch-hit 
as breakfast speaker for Greg Zumwalt who was called away from the 
show at the last minute) ended several pages of copy with this phrase: 
"The CoCo Lives!" 

Credit much of this to CoCo 3 — which, for the first time, saw third- 
party software at a RAINBOWfest — but, also, to a new infusion of 
interest and enthusiasm for CoCo 1 and 2, as well. RAINBOWfest 
proved, I think, to all there, that the CoCo 3 is, indeed, a catalyst not 
only f or itself, but the entire CoCo Community. In fact, Color Computer 
2s sold out at the show. 

How come this happened? My analysis is pretty simple. We had a good 
show last fall in New Jersey, but it came only a couple of weeks after 
the CoCo 3 was available. Consequently, there were CoCo 3s available 
there and a lot of interest — but no product. RAINBOWfest-Chicago 
was the first time products were available in any quantity. And, judging 
from the success of the products that were there, you'll see even more 
in Princeton — at our fall Test. 

Interestingly, here is a parallel. This time, OS-9 Level II has been out 
only a short time. By the time you get to Princeton, developers and 
programmers will have had several months to work with it. I think those 
of you who attend the October RAINBOWfest will see some startling 
things. 

But the really good thing about the RAINBOWfest was the enthusiasm 
and interest in the CoCo in general — be it the Is, 2s or 3s. Yes, Marty, 
CoCo does live! And it will be living for a long time to come. 

I expect the Princeton RAINBOWfest will be larger even than this 
Chicago show. I look forward to seeing you there. 



June 1987 




PAY ONLY FOR WHAT YOU WANT 



( OVER 100 UTILITIES TO CHOOSE FROM ) 



40k Basic for Cassette Programs* 
40K for Disk Programs* 
Alphabetize your disk directory 
Appointment Calendar 
ASCII File Scrambler 
ASCII file utility 
Automatic Disk Backup* 
Automatic Cassette Saver 
Automatic Disk Saver 
Automatic Directory Backup* 
Banner Maker 

Basic Program Autostart for cassette 
Base converter 

Basic Program Line Copy Utility 

Basic Search 

Bowling Score Keeper 

Calendar Maker (DMP Printers) 

Cassette Label Maker (DMP Printers) 

Clock for Programming 

Computerized Checkbook 

CoCo Base (different CoCo Products) 

CoCo Calculator 

Design your own Commands 

Disk Cataloger 

Basic Program Encryptor 

Disk Label Maker 

DMP Character Set Editor 

DMP Superscripts 

Enhanced Basic * 

Enhanced KILL 

Enhanced TRON/TROFF 

Error Locator 

Fast Sort for Basic Strings 

Function Keys 

Gemini/Epson Graphics Dump 
Gradebook for teachers 
Graphics Compression 
Graphics Lettering (2 sizes) 
Graphics Shifter 
Graphics Screen Zoom 
Home Bill Manager 
10 Data Monitor 
Inverse Highlighting 



Keystroke Saver 

Large DMP Graphics Dump 

Last Command Repeater 

Line Cross Reference 

LIST/DIR Pause 

Mailing List (Disk Only) 

ML/Basic Merge 

Memory Monitor 

Message Animator 

Metric Conversions 

ML to DATA Convertor 

Multiple Choice Test Maker 

Numeric Keypad 

ON BREAK GOTO command 

ON RESET GOTO command 

Phone Directory (Disk Only!) 

Printer-to-Screen 

Printer Tutorial 

Program Packer (Basic Pro's) 

Purchase Order Maker 

RAM Disk for Cassette* 

RAM Disk 2 (Cas & Disk)* 

RAM Test * 

Replace Phrases (Basic) 

Restore lost cas Basic pro's 

ROM Switcher * i 

Sign Maker 

Single Stepper 

Slow Motion 

Speedup Tutorial 

Super INPUT/LINEINPUT 

Super Command Keys 

Super Editor 

Super Paint (65000 styles)* 
Super Repeat Key 
TAB/SHIFT-LOCK keys 
Tape Encryption 
Tape Index System 
Text Screen Dump 
Title Screen Creator 
UNKILL KILLed Disk pro's 
Variable Cross Reference 
VCR Tape Organizer 



All programs available on disk only. More than one program will be sent on the same disk. 
Documentation included. Please add $1.00 S&H. NYS residents add sales tax. All programs 
compatible. with CoCo 1,2,3. Programs marked with * are compatible with CoCo 1 & 2 only. 



EACH PROGRAM - $9.00 2 PROGRAMS - $16.00 3 PROGRAMS - $21.00 
4-PROGRAMS - $24.00 5 OR MORE - $5.00 EACH 



jm !■ MICROCOM SOFTWARE Toorder AU ordvrsSSO & mtvi sklppa^ ty 2ii day Air U PS Witt ■■ titn ckir|i. Lastmmute shoppers 

JmmJg P.O. Box 214 can benefit VISA MC. Am Ex. Check. M0. Please add $100 shipping and handling 
^M™' Falrport, N. Y. 14450 (USA& CANADA other countries $5 00) COD add $2.50 extra NYS residents pleaseadd |J||| 

Phon# (71 6) 223- 1 477 Sales Tax InniJIiti iklpnnt Oealer inquiries invited ^jjjjf 


OB 

V7S* 


Call Toll Free (For Orders) 1-800-654-5244 9 am-9pm est 1 days a week 

Exceot NY. For infp nation, technical information, NY orders & after- hours 1-71 6-223.-1477 



"Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble are hard 
at work writing this 
all-encompassing 
Guide, which will 
lead you step-by-step 
in the use and 
operation of OS-9 
Level II." 



* * * 

Two interesting things will happen 
next month that aredeserving of your 
attention. 

First, we will be taking advance 
orders for The Complete Rainbow 
Guide to OS~9 Uvel II. Pale Puckett 
and Peter Dibble are hard at work 
writing this all-encompassing Guide, 
which will lead you step-by-step in the 
use and operation of OS-9 Level 11. 
The Guide will be less technical than 
The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS- 
9 that we published a couple of years 
ago. It is a must buy. 

We will sell the Guide on an ad- 
vance purchase basis only. We expect 
it to be shipped in mid-August, and 
details on how to order will be in next 
month's (Sixth Anniversary Issue) 
magazine. I know you'll have to hurry 
to order it, but we want to get it to the 
printer as quickly as possible. 

In addition, next month's issue will 
carry a nomination ballot for a Color 
Computer Hall of Fame, which we 
plan to inaugurate either at 
R AINBOWfest-Princeton or nex! 
year's Chicago show. This will be 
done, most likely, at a dress-up dinner 



and, I think, it is something long 
overdue. 

We want you to be a part of the Hall 
of Fame, so we will be asking for 
nominations and, later, for ballots 
based on the nominations. Prelimi- 
nary nominations were made by those 
who attended the Chicago show. 

There are a few rules. First, of 
course, there will be a deadline. And, 
second, we will require a name, ad- 
dress and telephone number on each 
nomination. That is because you can 
only make one nomination. We don't 
want anyone to "stuff" the ballot box. 

This is an exciting prospect and as 
soon as we have some details about 
the actual induction banquet, I'll let 
everyone know. In the meantime, in 
the true tradition of the CoCo Com- 
munity, please be thinking of who you 
would like to nominate so that you 
can return the form quickly next 
month. 

Lastly, we do have a surprise for 
you next month in our Anniversary 
Issue. I think you'll like it. Stay tuned ! 

— L onnie Falk 



Hardware 




Communications 




for your Computer 

300/1200 baud 
1 Year Warranty 

S109.00 

[Modem S. Cable] 

300/1200 baud Fully Hayes 

compatible 
Modem - 2 Year Warranty 

S1S9.00 

[Modem S. Cable] 




I 
I 



THE OTHER GUYS 

55 North Main Street 
■ ■ Suite 3010 
PO Box H 

Logan Utah 84321 



'KEEP-TRAK 1 General Ledger Reg. $69.95— Only $39.95 

"Double-Entry 11 General Ledger Accounting System for home or business 16k, 
3?k, 64k. User-friendly, menu-driven. Pr-ograrn fpRtures balance sheec, income 8. 
expense statement: (current Si YTD'], journal, ledger. B9P accounts f 2350 entries on 
32k S 64k [710 accounts S entries on 1 SkJ (disk only] Version 1 P has screen printc its 

Rainbow Revew 1 1 - 9/R4 1 2-4/85 

"OMEGA FILE" Reg. $69.95 — OIMLY $24.95 

Filing data base File any information with Omega File Records can have up to 1 6 fields 
with 255 characters per field (4080 characters/record] Sort, match & print any field 
User friendly menu driven. Manual included [32k/64k disk only] 

Rainbow Review 3/85. Hot CoCo 1 0/85 

BOB'S MAGIC GRAPHIC MACHINE 

Can generate BASIC code to use in your programs Easy drawing and manipulation of 
circles eJipses. boxes, lines and ARCS Single joystick operation with on lme HELPS at all 
times Allows text on the graphics screen & movement of objects on the screen. Can be 
used as a stand-alone graphics editor Instruction Manual GRAPHICS EDITOR. REG. 
S39. 95— ONLY 524 95 for disk or tape 64k ECB 

Rainbow Review 7/85, Hot CoCo 9/85 'The graphics bargain of the year" 

'KEEP-TRAK' Accounts Receivable. 

Features auto interest calculation auto ageing of accounts, installment sales, total due 
sales, explanation space as long as you need detailed statements. 'KEEP-TRAK' General 
Ledger tie in account number checking, credit limit checking & more User friendlv/menu 
driven. Includes manual S39.95 or $49*95 General Ledger & Accounts Receivables 
[Disk Only] 

1 yJ XOCO WINDOWS' 

With hi-res character display and window generator. Features an enhanced key board 
[klicks] and 10 programmable function keys Allows the user to create multiple windows 
from basic Includes menu driven printer setup and auto line numbering Four function 
calculator withmemory The above options can be called anytime while running or writing 
in BASIC APPLE PLILL YOUR DRAPES YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THIS S 24.95 [disk 
or tape] includes manual. • 



(BOD 753 7R20 
(BOO) 942-9402 



[Add $3,QQ for postage S handling] 
CO.D., Money Order, Check in U.S. Funds [Pleaae specify if JG.IV1 

controller) 



I 



I 



14 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



DISKMASTER . . . THE ULTIMATE DISK DRIVE 

SYSTEMS FOR THE OS-9 BASED COCO 3 BAR NONE ! ! 




COCO 3 + OS-9 + DISKMASTER 
THE HIGHEST PERFORMANCE 
PERSONAL COMPUTER 
AVAILABLE TODAY! 



THE DISKMASTER SYSTEM . . . A Completely Integrated System with HARDWARE AND 

SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY GUARANTEED from a Single Source. In addition to Single Source Confidence and Convenience, 
you will get a Disk System that has NO EQUAL in the COCO World 1 Thp Floppy Drives are the High Density (IBM-AT) Types with 
over 1 MB of Storage and TWICE THE DATA TRANSFER RATE of Single or Double Density Drives. Using these High Speed 
Drives is almost like using a Hard Disk. PLUS ... A FIRST FOR COCO COMPUTERS! DMA transfer of Data from the 
Floppy Disk to a SEPARATE HARDWARE DISK CACHE frees up the CPU during Disk Accesses. The Keyboard. Printer etc 
KEEP ON WORKING DURING DISK ACCESSES! 

The Hard Disk Drives are 3 1/2" Drives with the SCSI INTERFACE These are the Next Generation of Hard Drives where the 
Industry has Concentrated the Latest Inovations in Hard Drive Technology The SCSI INTERFACE is THE High Performance 
Industry Standard for these type of Drives. No Non-Standarcl Interfaces used here 1 The Software is by D. P. JOHNSON His 
SDISK Software set the Standard for 40 & 80 track Disk Drive Software for the COCO 2. This Unique Software allows 
DISKMASTER Systems to read 35, 40. or 80 Track Single or Double Sided. Single, Double or High Density Drives in Radio 
Shack. Standard OS-9, Fujitsu or Mizar Formats' 



For Maximum Performance: add the plus 100 

The PREMIER 512K Memory Expansion for the COCO 3 




Save $20.00 off the regular price of $1 09.00 when purchased 
with a DISKMASTER System. 



PLUS!!! 

Each DISKMASTER System 
includes the following additiona 
features . . . 

• 3 Software Selectable Hardware Serial Ports with 
XMODE and special SETBAUD Commands 

• Centronics Compatible Bi-Directional Parallel Port 

• Super Accurate Hardware Clock (+/- 6 seconds/month) 
with Battery Backup 

• Hard Disk Boot Capability 

• Expansion Connector for additional Floppy Drives 

• Optional 0,5 MB, 1 MB or 1.5 MB RAMDISK 



THINK ABOUT IT . . . The Unsightly, 
Cumbersome and Unreliable Expansion Interface is 
Eliminated. NOW compare cost Purchasing an Expansion 
Interface and numerious cards from various suppliers 
results in a system that costs about the same as a 
DISKMASTER SYSTEM but doesn't even begin to compare 
to it in performance' 



HEMPHILL ELECTRONICS, INC. 

1922 Cogswell Road 
South El Monte, CA 91733 

(818) 575-4530 

(Mon. Ihru Thurs., 1:30 to 5:30 PM Pacific Time) 



CC3-1 2 1MB Floppy Drives 

CC3-20H 1MB Floppy + 20MB Hard Drive 

RAMDISK Options Call Factory 



$ 795.00 
$1,295.00 



TANDY 



TWI 



□ 




2* 



30^ 



25-105^ 



£5< 
2&- 



1 022 



^0 



5 C^ of 



T 



360K Otwe 5 
25 .4070 



25- 
26 



1^ 



LO- 



CO* 



□QUULJ r r.s, \, J ■■ , 

^^^^ ^ _ 



BUILDING JUNE'S RAINBOW 




CoCo Community Breakfast with Marty . . . 

a smorgasbord of RAINBOWfest seminars 

. . . and an a la carte feast in our exhibit hall 



RAINBOWfest-Chicago, April 10-12, saw the emergence of new faces, new 
products, new excitement and new optimism about the Color Computer 
Community. We just got back last night from the fifth annual show in the 
Windy City and can report a good time was had by all! 

The keynote of the show was sounded by Dr. Martin H. Goodman. Well-known 
for his outspokenness, as well as expertise, Marty graciously consented at the 
eleventh hour to deliver the CoCo Community Breakfast address when scheduled 
speaker Greg Zumwalt was called away from the show. Sharing the dais with the 
"CoCo establishment/ 1 including Dale Puckett, Bill Barden and Tandy's own Ed 
Juge, maverick Marty maintained his patented "independent perspective" as he 
provided an upbeat review of the CoCo's past and forecast a similar development 
cycle for the CoCo 3. He praised Tandy's openness in making technical information 
available to users and was most optimistic about the future. "OS-9 will really 
unlock the power of the CoCo 3," predicted Marty, adding, "We should expect 
a long life for the CoCo 3, just as we are seeing with the earlier CoCo. 11 In summary, 
Marty echoed the sentiment that prevailed at the show: We've come a long way 
and we're still gathering speed. 

With the physique and the red suspenders of a fireman, Peter Dibble, co-author 
of The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9, made his RAINBOWfest debut. It was 
standing room only in his, and several other, seminars. Peter discussed the new 
OS-9 Level II. 

Another well-attended seminar concerned CoCo 3 graphics. Erik Gavriluk and 
Greg Miller fielded questions about their new Color Max 3 graphics editor, which 
was one of the mostexcitingnew products available at the show — until Computize 
was sold out! 

While CoCo Catdid not hold a seminar, THE rainbow's furry feline has a sore 
paw from shaking hands, claims to be "hugged out,' 1 and gives life-saver credit 
to a concealed, battery-operated fan. In addition to serving as official greeter, 
CoCo Cat led f ans to the Educational Sand box, where youngsters and their parents 
were given a hands-on introduction to the Color Computer by Tandy-trained 
experts. 

The exhibit hall was the usual beehive with Radio Shack, and others, "blowing 
out" all sorts of software. We saw at least one copy of BAStC09 go for 50 cents, 
but couldn't find another in the "half-buck box. "There were hundreds of Speech/ 
Sound Paks available for $19.95 and almost 300 grinning R AINBOWfesters 
carried off CM-3 composite color monitors for $99.95 each! 

Brand new products included The WIZ, a full-featured terminal program that 
uses the windowing capability of OS-9 Level II. It was available in the Frank Hogg 
Laboratory booth. 

HJL introduced the Softswitch, a novel printer switcher that can be toggled 
manually or through keyboard control. 

Tom Mix had two new games. RAINBOW had two new books. Others had new 
utilities, new hardware and new enthusiasm generated by the big crowd that turned 
out to seek, and find, bargains in the exhibit hall, to listen, and learn, at the 
seminars and to celebrate, with each other, that special feeling of CoCo 
Community. 

If you'd like to join the growing CoCo Community, we promise our subscribers 
we'll send THE RAINBOW "welcome wagon" by your house each month with all 
the CoCo news and views, so you'll be ready for our October-fest, in Princeton, 
New Jersey, this fall! 

— Jim Reed 



16 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



lSee our other ads 
on pages 67 & v> 




CoCoUE 

Products! 



• SECRETS REVEALED 



An introduction to the Color Computer III that compares the 
differences between the CoCo I/II and the NEW CoCo III. Includes: 
GIME chip specs, CoCo II to CoCo III converter, CoCo III memory 
map and a 128K/512K RAM test. "Offers some very good information 
to pxograimiera ." - Rainbow Review Feb '87 $19.95 



• C III GRAPHICS 



f Buy 'em both 
^ for $29.95 



A drawing program for the CoCo III using the new Enhanced graphic 
features: 320x192 graphics, 16 of any 64 colors, plus the ability 
to Save and Load 32K screens. "Paint p retty pictures on the 
CpCo3." - Rainbow Review Dec '86 $19.95 



INSIDE 
OS9 LEVEL II 

With over 100+ pages, it is a must BOOK 
for ANYONE interested in LEVEL II. Has 
FTXES for KNOWN BUGS, how to convert a 
$29.95 ROGUE disk into a WORKABLE LEVEL 
II disk, WTNDCWS, tips, tricks and many 
things that TANDY left out!!] $39.95 
WIZ - L EV. II Terminal program w/ windows 
Req. 51 2K CoCoIII & R5-232 PAK $79. 9b 



^ COLOR MAX III - The CoCo III CoCo Max 

It's here! Ine CoCoIII BREAKTHROUGH PRODUCT everyone was waiting for! 320x200 graphics , pull down menus, icons 
16 of any 64 colors , RGB support . Req. 128K CoCoIII DISK & Hi -Res Joystick interface, (Specify printer ) $59.95 

• COCO III UNRAVELLED - It's here !!! 

Provides a COMPLETE DISASSEMBLY of the new code in the CoCo Ill's ROM ! ! ! (Over 100 pages! ) $29.95 

• ELITEWORD 80 - #1 COCO III Word Processor 

The third generation CoCo Word Processor is here! All the powerful features, advantages and benefits of 
r iteWord plus 40 /W column display formats for the CoCo III . Available only from Spectrum Projects! $79-95 
Special word processing package of EliteWord and EliteSpeT~for $99.95 (see Rainbow Review March '87 page 134) 

• FKEYS III - Function Keys for the COCO 

A productivity enhancement that gives you the capability to add t wenty (20) pre-defined functions to the CoCo 
III by using the CTL, Fl and F2 keys] $24.95 "Get more from your keyboard with FKEYS III "(4/87 Rainbow Review ) 

• 51 2K UPGRADE (NOW $79.95*) kmclsM i 

Easy installation with a superior design for a reliable upgrade, processing efficiency and AVAILABLE WOW for 
tHe CoCo III1 (» $79.95 when purchased with our 512K RAM DISK program for $19.95) A 512K upgrade without RAM 
chips $39.95 - Ine lowest upgrade prices in the Rainbow magazine, period!!! Why pay $119, $139 or more??? 

• RGB PATCH - No more BLACK & WHITE dots ... 

Did you buy an expensive RGB monitor ( CM-8 ) just so that you could see your Hi-Res arti f act ing CoCo 2 games in 
BLACK & WHITE ??? RGB PATCH converts most games to display in COLOR on an RGB monitor. 128K DISK $24.95 



coco 




FONT BONANZA - -fr -fr -fr R »« n « 



Replace the ' PLAIN 1 CoCo III characters frcm a menu of INCREDIBLE fonts or create your own. 128K DISK $29.95. 
NEW! ! ! FONT DISK #1 with over 25 more FONTS ! $19.95/Buy 'em both for $39.95. *(4/87 Rainbow Review ) 

• RGB MONITOR - Better than TANDY CM-8 ! 

Our monitor is much more versatile than the Tandy CM~8 ! Takes a variety of video inputs, including: RGB 
Analog, Color Composite and RGB TTL. Unlike the CM-8, PMODE 4 artifact colors don't show up BLACK and WHITE 
(when processed through the Color Composite input) $329.95. Magnavox 8515 w/ CoCo III cable $339.95 

• PAL SWITCHER - Designed by Marty Goodman! 

Have the best of both worlds by being able to switch between CoCo II and CoCo III modes when using a Multi-Pak 
Interface. Req. OLDER PAL & NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 Multi-Pak Interface $29.95/with NEW PAL chip $39.95 



CoCo III 512K RAM sticker $4.99 
Leve l II Quick Ref Guide $4.99 
Lt^i/L" H Basic09 binder ..$9.95 



CoCo ill Multipak PAL chip $19.95 
Guide to CoCo III Graphics $21.95 
Better Graphics on CoCoIII $24.95 



CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 
Video Digitizer III !! $149.95 
512K CoCo ill Computer $299.95 



All orders plus $3 S/H (Foreign $6) - COD add $2 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
Most orders shipped from stock. Allow 1-3 weeks for processing backorders. 



PQ BOX 264 
HOWARD BEACH NY 11414 
COCO HOT LINE 718-835-1344 




CoCo Gallery 




Tom LoConte 
Rocky Point, New York 



Tom created this vivid representation of a rocket ship on the CoCo 3 with a program 
he wrote. Tom has an A.S. degree in computer science and is working on a B.S. 



Honorable Mention 




Saturn 



Andrew Deal 

Kingston, Tennessee 





White Mill Creek 



John Murvine 

Ebensburg, Pennsylvania 



Andrew created this realistic view of the second 
largest planet with BASIC. 



This relaxing view of a stream with the sun peeking through 
the trees was created in BASIC on the CoCo 3. This is a real 
creek by John's home. 



1 8 THE RAINBOW June 1987 





Old Mill 



Floyd Keirnan 

Orange, California 



This picture of a mill was created with 
basic and Graphicom. Floyd is a retired 
electronics engineer and has had his 
CoCo for over five years. 



Steve created this mountainous scene with 
a basic program he wrote on the CoCo 3. 

Steve is currently studying computer 
science at Texas State Technical Institute. 




Mountain 



Steve Boyer 

Mart, Texas 



SHOWCASE YOUR BESTI You are invited to nominate original work lor inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." Share your creations with the CoCo Community! Be sure 
to send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you created your picture (what programs you used, etc.) and how to display it. Also, please include 
a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy 
of a picture that appears in a book or magazine is not an original work. 
We will award two first prizes of $25. one for (he CoCo 3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize of $15 and one third prize of $10. Honorable Mentions may also be given 
Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo Gallery, THE RAINBOW. P.O. Box 385. Prospect, KY 40059. Remember, this is a contest and your entry will not be returned. 

— Angela Kapf hammer, Curator 



June 1967 THE RAINBOW 1 9 



MUSIC 



16K 
ECB 



r 




2 



/0J 





s 




Sin 



# 



1 fhf* 



with the 





Music has always been of great interest to me, and 
I have written Yardbird in order to share my 
interest with the CoCo Community. 
Yardbird is a music program dedicated to the great 
American jazz legend and improvisation genius, Charlie 
Parker. He is known to the music world as "Yardbird," or 
"Bird" for short, thus the name of this program. I have made 
an attempt to adapt one of his most challengingand famous 
compositions, "Donnalee," for the CoCo. 

I am sure that CoCo enthusiasts who play an instrument 
or love to listen to jazz will find this adaptation quite 
interesting. Those who are not musically inclined will find 
it a lot of fun just to try and hum along with the melody, 
or better yet, to learn it. 

Val Burke lives in Red Oak, Georgia, and has owned a 
CoCo for two years. A professional musician, Val is 
learning to program the computer. 




x f 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



The Amazing A-BUS 




An A-BUS system with two Motherboards 
A-BUS adapter in foreground 

The A-BUS system workswiththe original CoCo, 

theCoCo2 and the CoCo 3. 

Abo utthe A-BUS system: 

• All the A-BUS cards are very easy to use with any language that can 
read or write to a Port or Memory. In BASIC, use INP and OUT (or PEEK and 
POKE with Apples and Tandy Color Computers) 

• They are all compatible with each other You can mix and match up to 25 
cards to fit your application. Card addresses are easily set with jumpers 

• A-BUS cards are shipped with power supplies (except PD-1 23} and 
detailed manuals (including schematics and programming examples). 

Relay Card re-i 40: $1 29 

Includes eight industrial relays. (3 amp contacts. SPST) individually 
controlled and latched. 8 LED's show status. Easy to use (OUT or POKE in 
BASIC). Card address is jumper selectable 

Reed Relay Card re-156: $99 

Same features as above, but uses 8 Reed Relays to switch low level signals 
(20mA max). Use as a channel selector, solid state relay driver, etc. 

Analog Input Card AD-142:$129 

Eight analog inputs. 0 to +5V range can be expanded to 100V by adding a 
resistor 8 bit resolution (20mV). Conversion time 120us. Perfect to 
measure voltage, temperature, light levels, pressure, etc Very easy to use. 

1 2 Bit A/D Converter an-i 46: $1 39 

This analog to digital converter is accurate to .025% Input range is — 4V to 
+4V. Resolution: 1 millivolt. The on board amplifier boosts signals up to 50 
times to read microvolts. Conversion time is 1 30ms. Ideal for thermocouple 
strain gauge, etc. 1 channel. (Expand to 8 channels using the RE-156 card) 

Digital Input Card in-i41:$59 

The eight inputs are optically isolated, so it's safe and easy to connect any 
"on/off" devices, such as switches, thermostats, alarm loops, etc. to your 
computer To read the eight inputs, simply use BASIC INP (or PEEK). 

24 Line TTL I/O dg-i48:$65 

Connect 24 input or output signals (switches or any TTL device) to your 
computer The card can be set for: input, latched output, strobed output, 
strobed input, and/or bidirectional strobed I/O. Uses the 8255A chip 

Clock with Alarm cl-144: $89 

Powerful clock/calendar with: battery backup for Time, Date and Alarm 
setting (time and date); built in alarm relay, led and buzzer; timing to 1 /1 00 
second. Easy to use decimal format. Lithium battery included. 

Touch Tone® Decoder ph-i45:$79 i 

Each tone i s converted into a number which i s stored on t h e board Simply j 
read the number with INP or POKE. Use for remote control projects, etc. 



Plug into the future 

With the A-BUS you can plug your PC (IBM, Apple, 
TRS-80) into a future of exciting new applications in the fields 
of control, monitoring, automation, sensing, robotics, etc. 

Alpha's modular A-BUS offers a proven method to build your 
"custom" system today. Tomorrow, when you are ready to take 
another step, you will be able to add more functions. This is ideal for 
first time experimenting and teaching. 

A-BUS control can be entirely done in simple BASIC or Pascal, 
and no knowledge of electronics is required! 

An A-BUS system consists of the A-BUS adapter plugged into 
your computer and a cable to connect the Adapter to 1 or 2 A-BUS 
cards. The same cable will also fit an A-BUS Motherboard for 
expansion up to 25 cards in any combination. 

The A-BUS is backed by Alpha's continuing support (our 11th 
year, 50000 customers in over 60 countries). 

The complete set of A-BUS User's Manuals is available for $10. 




RE-140 






Smart Stepper Controller sc-i49-.$299 

World's finest stepper controller On board microorocessor controls 4 
motors simultaneously. Incredibly, it accepts plain English commands like 
"Move arm 10.2 inches left". Many complex sequences can be defined as 
"macros" and stored in the on board memory For each axis, you can control: 
coordinate (relative or absolute), ramping, speed, step type (half. lull. wave), 
scale factor, units, holding power, etc Many inputs 8 limit & "wait until" 
switches, panic button, etc. On the fly reporting of position, speed etc On 
board drivers (350mA) f orsmall steppers (MO- 1 03) Send for SC- 1 49 flyer 
Remote Control Keypad Option RC-1 21 : $49 

To control the 4 motors directly, and "teach" sequences of motions 
Power Driver Board Option PD-1 23: $89 

Boost controller drive to 5 amps per phase For two motors (eight drivers) 
Breakout Board Option BB-1 22: $1 9 

For easy connection of 2 motors. 3 ft. cable ends with screw terminal board 

Stepper Motor Driver st-143: $79 

Stepper motors are the ultimate in motion control. The special package 
(below} includes everything you need to get familiar with them. Each card 
drives two stepper motors (1 2V. bidirectional. 4 phase. 350mA per phase). 
Special Package: 2 motors(MO-103) + ST-143- PA-1 81 : $99 

Stepper Motors Mo-103: $isor4for$39 

Pancake type. 27*" dia. V*" shaft, 7 5 c /steo. 4 phase bidirectional. 300 
step/sec, 1 2V. 36 ohm, bipolar, 5 oz-in torque, same as Airpax K82701 -P2 

Current Developments 

Intelligent Voice Synthesizer, 14 Bit Analog to Digital converter, 4 Channel 
Digital to Analog converter. Counter Timer, Voice Recognition. 

A-BUS Adapters for: 

IBM PC, XT. AT and compatibles. Uses one short slot 
Tandy 1000, 1000 EX & SX, 1 200. 3000 . Uses one shori slot 
Apple II, ll-h He. Uses any slot. 
TRS-80 Model 102, 200 Plups into 40 "pin "system bus" 
Model 1 00. Uses 40 pin socket. (Socket is duplicated on adapter}. 
TRS-80 Mod 3.4,40. Fits 50 pin bus (Wllb hard disk, use V-cabfe) 
TRS-80 Model 4 P. Includes extra cable. {50 pin bus is recessed). 
TRS-80 Model I. Plugs into 40 pin \I0 bus on KB w Eih 
Color Computers (Tandy).Fiis ROM sioi Muitmak. or Y-cabie 



A-BUS Prototyping Card pr-152: 

3V2 by 4V2 in. with power and ground bus. Fits up to 10 I. C.s 



$15 



mm 

fi- 

■ 1 1 I P 3 F 1 9 

AD-142 



Add S3.00 per order (or shipping. 
Visa, MC, checks, M.O. welcome. 
CT & NY residents add sales tax. 
C.O.D. add $3.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is $5 
Overseas add 10% 



a Sigma Industrie s Company 



242- W West Avenue, Darien, CT 06820 



AR-133 ..$69 
AR-133..S69 
AR-134..S49 
AR-136...S69 
AR-135 ..$69 
AR- 132 .$49 
AR-137 .$62 
AR-131 S39 
AR-m S49 ] 

A-BUS Cable (3 ft, 50 Cond.) CA-163: $24 

Connects the A-BUS adapter to one A-BUS card or to first Motherboard 
Special cable for two A-BUS cards: CA-1 62: $34 

A-BUS Motherboard mb-i2o-.$99 

Each Motherboard holds five A-BUS cards A sixth connector allows a 
second Motherboard to be added to the first (with connecting cable CA- 
161: $1 2). Up to five Motherboards can be |oined this way to a single A- 
BUS adapter. Sturdy aluminum frame and card guides included. 
• The A-BUS is not a replacement for the Multi-pak 



Technical info (203) 656-1 806 

8M! y 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders. (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 




You'll use it all the time and love using it 



What isCoCo Max? 

Simply the most incredible graphic 
and text creation "system" you have 
ever seen. A Hi-Res Input Pack (more 
on the pack later) is combined with 
high speed machine language 
software. The result will dazzle you. 




CoCo Max disk system, with Y-cable. 



Is CoCo Max for you ? 

Anyone who has ever held a pencil or 
a crayon for fun, school or business 
will love it. A 4 year-old will have fun 
doodling, a 1 5 year-old will do class 
projects and adults will play with it for 
hours before starting useful 
applications (illustrations, cards, 
artwork, business graphics, flyers, 
charts, memos, etc.) This is one of the 
rare packages that will be enjoyed by 
the whole family. 

What made CoCo Max an 
instant success? 

First there's nothing to learn, no 
syntax to worry about. Even a child 
who can't read will enjoy CoCo Max. 
Its power can be unleashed by simply 
pointing and clicking with your 
mouse or joystick. With icons and 
pulldown menus, you control CoCo 
Max intuitively; it works the same way 
you think. 

Don't be misled by this apparent 
simplicity. CoCo Max has more power 
than you thought possible. Its blinding 
speed will astound you. 
It lets you work on an area 3.5 times 
the size of the window on the screen. 
It's so friendly that you will easily 
recover from mistakes: The undo 
feature lets you revert to your image 
prior to the mistake. As usual, it only 
takes a single click. 
Later, we will tell you about the 
"typesetting" capabilities of CoCo 
Max II, but first let's glance at a few of 
its graphic creation tools: 



With the pencil you can draw free 
hand lines, then use the eraser to 
make corrections or changes. For 
straight lines, the convenient rubber- 
banding lets you preview your lines 
before they are fixed on your picture. 
It's fun and accurate. Lines can be of 
any width and made of any color or 
texture. 

The paint brush, with its 32 
selectable brush shapes, will adapt to 
any job, and make complicated 
graphics or calligraphy simple. 
For special effects, the spray can is 
really fun: 86 standard colors and 
textures, all available at a click. It's 
like the real thing except the paint 
doesn't drip. 

CoCo Max will instantly create many 
shapes: circles, squares, rectangles 
(with or without rounded corners), 
ellipses, etc. Shapes can be filled with 
any pattern. You can also add 
hundreds of custom patterns to the 
86 which are included. 
The Glyphics are 58 small drawings 
(symbols, faces, etc.) that can be used 
as rubber stamps. They're really great 
for enhancing your work without effort. 




p .i r | pi-" La bd iP ■ tgm 



E= Hllfryp I 



JL Jb. JL 

■ BITS 



■ 


— 

i- 1 




si 



Pull down menus 



Zoom In I 



Control Over Your Work 

CoCo Max's advanced "tools" let you 
take any part of the screen, (text or 
picture) and perform many feats: 
• You can move it around • Copy 
it • Shrink or enlarge it in both 
directions • Save it on the electronic 
Clipbook • Flip it vertically or 
horizontally •Rotate it • Invert 
it • Clear it, etc. etc. 
All this is done instantly, and you can 
always undo it if you don't like the 
results. 

For detail work, the fat bits (zoom) 
feature is great, giving you easy 
control over each pixel. 
To top it all, CoCo Max II works in 
color. Imagine the pictures in this ad 
in color. If you own a Radio Shack 
CGP-220 or CGP-1 1 5, you can even 
print your work in full color ! 



There is so much more to say, such as 
the capability to use CoCo Max 
images with your BASIC programs, 
the possibility to use CoCo Max's 
magic on any standard binary image 
file. There are also many advanced 
features such as the incredible lasso. 




Inside the Hi-Res Input Pack 

Why a Hi-Res Input Pack ? 

Did you know that the CoCo joystick 
input port can only access 4096 
positions (64x64)? That's less than 
1 0% of the Hi-Res screen, which has 
49152 points! (256x192). You lose 
90% of the potential. The Hi-Res Input 
Pack distinguishes each of the 491 52 
distinct joystick or mouse positions. 
That's the key to CoCo Max's power. 
The pack plugs into the rom slot (like 
a rom cartridge). Inside the pack is a 
high speed multichannel analog to 
digital converter. Your existing 
joystick or mouse simply plugs into 
the back of the Hi-Res Pack. 

Electronic Typesetting... 

You'll be impressed with CoCo Max's 
capability. Text can be added and 
moved around anywhere on the 
picture. (You can also rotate, invert 
and flip it...) At a click, you can choose 
from 1 4 built in fonts each with 1 6 
variations. That's over 200 typestyles ! 




Examples of printouts 



Printing Your Creations 

There are a dozen ways to print your 
work. All are available with a click of 
your joystick (or mouse) without 
exiting CoCo Max. Your CoCo Max 
disk includes drivers for over 30 
printers ! 



All the CoCo Max pictures are unretouched screen shots or printouts (Epson RX-80). 



DO IDflJOH HEWS TOEflY 



IS.ii i-nn 14t J; tr»i 
it »»P lr Ar*p : 

'PjLI " i»> Br ,pt il i:m 

'kjjrft J>.-» 
'«(«''*' '»'> ! t»»C u ' 
kirn *ir -id1i»t «■ 

1 ih1!i ?:p, I ! H( Till ■» 
I'Ull H P'd l tip; I'. I 

i.Lp.i< ■ n r*u siuv 

»1 'M ^-"pr ::».p 

pt ,J 'lr -w+i|ap>| r 
ti'l.i' 1 i ■ '■** + §V 

J.t IHI 1 Vlirt- ■( 

N {!¥■■■• J TP :r 
FiflTPj "X-a.-.m | |(>r> 

cth'i .!■ ■■ iim 

■ ::p-1I I i<!,ik 

It ■ji'.-ti.i ifriT-j'tr -l» 

_ldL ' |P' BP pt 'PKlPiP 

1 1.' :•■*.■ .pr 
ii-HIr iTip-kp ^ ip , p 
:ilit .rpp IXf ft i *ll I 
ip:- r <i -ki ■>-..-■ ..^ ■■ , 

rriT^T* I UltM ilflP f JT. 
UP "P l-UIPI" £7.***. *" )-pl| 
-F" l— H..L, |,. 






Wkj ii Uui lad if Smiling? 

Lu J mini If II' 1 H 

* + * III HIM 

it* ft; tit B( *tr 

Litf in Eh* r^n | ln . f ngt all 
H'i crick id up Ed ba 

' .1 r . . s p ■ ■ 

t i »p I'lii'fii <ipf< 
"hp Tfli/iinj* ft .p-ttrt-l 
1th IHI Vr-l >x « Mid 
■ i ii.r.t HK i'< 4-4 I 

»ir *> pP' »rt ■« ».n 

P' Pl* »+m P*t(l" i J lrp,r„L( 
1 'I¥IJ»|Tr 1-n.p,;- i.lf J .r 
[•-Pi* tfc' "d "Ft Pt'i |n "M 
PI J M.P |- bH" -r 
p.J-J J 1 P » T 

.-p l ■— . ■ -n- -...p : 
... p 

"41" 1 3 - I' f I ' • 

■ 4 » "in:-- [ i *uat<< 

F'*"iP.j •'+• - ^ " : . ; . - 



o 



Publish a newsletter 
or bulletin 



E,i>Cp hrjn, 

CaCa Haw 



CqCo max 
CoComax 



Cofo riax 

coCo n*x 

cac 0Mfll CoCoto 
CoCo Atax 



CoCo max 
CoCo max 

CoCo Max 
CoCo Max 



rettic. 



Over 200 typestyles to 
ft/ choose from I 
generate flyers. 



The whole family will enjoy 

CoCo Max. Here are a few 
examples of the possibilities. 

All these pictures are unretouched screen photos 
or printouts (on an Epson RX-80). 




£v Business graphs, charts, 
f*7 diagrams. Also memos 



Fun for children while 
stimulating creativity. 






Junior's homework 
and science projects. 
Term papers too ! 



q± Video portrait 
KB (with optional digitizer}. 



f\ Wis is A ' 





{0 This is a cartoon. 



A new way to express 
your imagination. 



©Steffi 

CoCo/HoxI 




schematics 
and floor plans. 



CoCo Max II 

{Jj) Logos and letterheads. 



CoCo Max II 



now works 
with the 



CoCo 3 



The new CoCo Max II has exactly the same features and resolution (256 x 1 92) as the original CoCo Max II 



System Requirements: 

Any 64K CoCo and a standard joystick or mouse. (Koala 
pads and track balls work, but are not recommended.) 
Disk systems need a Multi-Pak or our Y-Cable. CoCo Max 
is compatible with any Radio Shack DOS & ADOS. 
Note: the tape version of CoCo Max includes almost all 
the features of CoCo Max II except Shrink, Stretch, Rotate. 
and Glyptics. Also, it has 5 fonts instead of 14. 
CoCo Max is not compatible with JDOS, DoubleDOS, 
MDOS. OS-9, the X-pad. and Daisy Wheel Printers. 

Printers Supported: 

Epson MX. RX. FX and LX series. Gemini. Star. Micronix. Delta 
10. 10X. 15. 15X,SG-10.Okidata82A 92.93. C ItohPro-wriler. 
Apple Image-writer. Hewlett-Packard Thinkjet. Radio Shack 
DMP 100, 105. 1 10, 120. 200, 400, 500. Line Printer 7. Line 
Printer8. TRP- 1 00, CGP-220. (DMP- 1 30 use Line Printer VIII). 
PMC printers. Gorilla Banana. 
Color printing: CGP-200. CGP-1 15 



New Video Digitizer DS-69B 

This Low Cost Digitizer is the next step in sophist- 
ication for your CoCo Max system. With the DS- 
69B you will be able to digitize and bring into 
CoCoMax a frame from any video source, suchas 
your VCR T tuner, or video camera. 
Works with any CoCo, 8 frames per second. 
Includes software on disk $149.95 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with it, 
we will refund every penny. 



Pricing 

CoCo Max on tape $69.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

CoCo Max II (on disk only) $79.95 

with Hi-Res Pack and manual. 

Upgrade to make CoCo Max II compat- 
ible with the CoCo 3: Send your CoCo 
Max Hi-Res Pak (the cartridge) to us. We 
will modify it and return it to you. Enclose 
payment of $29.95 

Y-Cable: Special Price $19.95 

Super Picture Disks #1. #2, and #3 

each: $14.95 

All three picture disks $29.95 



Add S3.00 per order for shipping. 
Visa, MC checks. M.O. welcome. 
CT & NY residents add sales tax. 
CO D. add 53.00 extra. 
Canada: shipping is SS 
Overseas add 10% 



COLORWARE 



242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 

A division of Sigma Industries. Inc 



Technical info: (203) 656-1 806 

S» 800 221-0916 

Connecticut orders; (203) 348-9436 
All lines open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern lime 



Upon running the program, a saxophone appears in the 
lower-right corner of the screen. Some musical notes 
appear, going from right to left, and then the music begins. 
If you want to hear the piece again, just press any key. New 
notes are displayed and "Donnalee" is repeated. Enjoy! 

(Questions about this program may be directed to the 
author at P.O. Box 86, Red Oak, GA 30272. Please enclose 
an SASE for a reply.) □ 



The listing: YRRDBIRD 

]_ jj 1 ************************** 

20 ' * TRIBUTE TO JAZZ LEGEND * 

30 ' * CHARLIE PARKER * 

40 1 * BY * 

50 '* VAL BURKE * 

5 j3 ' ************************** 

70 POKE65495,0 

80 PMODE3 , 1 :PCLS2 : SCREEN1 , 0 

90 DIM N(12,26) 

100 DRAWBM244, 100F4L16D22R2D6L2 

D24R2D8L2D4G8L24H8U28R20D16F4R8E 

4U16L4U8R4U12L4U8R4U8E4R12 " 

110 FORP=1TO500:NEXTP 

120 PAINT (200, 156) ,3,4 

130 FORP=1TO500 :NEXTP 

140 DRAWBM200 , 112G4F8G4F6" 

150 FORP=1TO500:NEXTP 

160 DRAWBM204 , 88D20L8U8R8" 

170 PAINT(200,104) ,3,4 

180 PLAY"O3T10A-" 

190 GET(188,84)-(212,136) ,N,G 

200 PUT (13 6, 108) -(160, 160) ,N,PSE 

T 

210 PLAY"O2T10A-" 

220 GET(136,108)-(160,160) ,N,G 

230 PUT(84,84)-(108,136) ,N,PSET 

240 PLAY"O2T10A-" 

250 GET(84,84)-(108,136) ,N,G 

260 PUT(32,108) -(56, 160) ,N,PSET 

270 PLAY"O3T10A-" 

280 DRAW"BM23 2, 40D20L8U8R8" 

290 PAINT (228, 56) ,4,4 

300 DRAW"BM240, 68H4D12L4U4R4" 

310 PAINT(234,74) ,1,4 

320 PLAY"O4T10A-" 

330 FORP=1TO200:NEXTP 

340 GET(220,36) -(244,88) ,N,G 

350 PUT(156,12) -(180, 64) ,N,PSET 

360 PLAY"O4T10A-" 

370 FORP=1TO200:NEXTP 

380 GET(156,12) -(180, 64) ,N,G 

390 PUT(92,20)-(116,72) ,N,PSET 

400 PLAY"O3T10A-" 

410 GET(92,20)-(116,72) ,N,G 

420 PUT(20,12)-(44,64) ,N,PSET 

430 PLAY"O4T10A-" : FORP=1TO200 : NE 

XTP 

440 POKE65494,0 



24 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



450 PLAY"04T3L16GL16A-L16GL8FL16 

E-L8D-L16C03L8B-L16A-L8AL16CL8E- 

L16FL16F+L16A-L16F+L8FL16E-L8DL1 

6FL8A-04L16C03L8GL16F" 

460 PLAY"03T3P2P4P8L8EL16DL8E-02 

L16AL8B-03L16D-L8FL16A-04L8CL16E 

-L8D-03L16FL8A-04L16C03L16BL16BL 

16EL8E-L16D-" 

470 PLAY"03T3L8CL16E-L8GL16B-L8A 
-P16L8E-L16FL8F+L16B-04L8D-L16FL 
8EL16CP8P16" 

480 PLAY"04T3L4 . . E-L16D-L8C03L16 
B-04L8E-04L16D-P4L8F+L16EL8E-L16 
D-L8CL16CL8D-L16DL8E-L16D-L8C03I 
16B-L8A04L16CL8E-L16FL16F+L16A-I 
16F+L8FL16E-" 

490 PLAY"04T3L8DL16C03L8B-L16A-I 
8B-L16A-L8CL16E-L16GL16G-L16FL8E 
P2 " 

500 PLAY"04T3L8E-L16D-03L8FL16A- 
04L8C03L16B-L8FL16A-L8GL16B-04L8 
D-L16E-L16EL16F+L16EL8E-L16D-L8C 
P4" 

510 PLAY"04T3L16GL16A-L16GL8FL16 

E-L8D-L16C03L8B-L16A-L8AL16CL8E- 

L16FL16F+L16A-L16F+L8FL16E-L8DL1 

6FL8A-04L16C03L8GL16F" 

520 PLAY"03T3P2P4L8GL16FL8EL16FL 

8GL16A-L8B-L16A-L8GL16F04L16D-L1 

6E-L16D-L8C03L16B-L16A-L16B-L16A 

-L8GL16EL8FP1P4P8" 

530 PLAY"03T3L16C04L8C03L16B04L8 

CL16C+L8DL16D-L8DL16E-L8EL16E-L8 

EL16E-L8DL16D-L8C03L16B-" 

540 PLAY"03T3L16A-L16B-L16A-L8GL 

16A-L8B-L16A-L8GL16F02L8B03L16DL 

8FL16A-L8B04L16GL8FL16EL8E-L16D- 

L8C03L16B-L8AL16F+L8FL16E-L8DL16 

FL8A-04L16C03L8B-L16A-L8GL16B-L1 

6.A-P1P2" 

550 CLS:PRINT@206, "OUCH! ! ": PRINT 

@233,"<PRESS ANY KEY>" : PRINT@2 62 

, "AND I'LL PLAY IT AGAIN" 

560 I$=INKEY$ 

570 IFI$=""THEN560 

580 PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 

590 CIRCLE(128,96) ,30 

600 LINE (158, 12) - (158, 96) , PSET 

610 PAINT(128,96) ,6,8 

620 FORP=1TO500:NEXTP 

630 CIRCLE(208,124) ,20 

640 DRAW"BM2 48,80H20D58" 

650 PAINT(208,124) ,7,8 

660 FORP=1TO500:NEXTP 

670 CIRCLE (48, 56) ,20 

680 DRAW"BM88, 20H20D56" 

690 PAINT(48,56) ,8,8 

700 GOTO 440 /R\ 



COMPUTIZE, INC. • (215) 946-7260 • P.O. BOX 207 • LANG HORN E, PA 19047 





1 ife ■ IblLHIlhid 1 


"A J 1 


> 


1 r-jh 

■ -t-i 






■ ■Mi - Iwp i 






F ( . y P .r . .- ,,n,H . | 

r « I ■■ viri i{n 









INTRODUCING 



G-0 \JJ \K 



Unleash the power of your CdCo 3 with 320 x ZOO 
screen resolution, and the choice of any 16 colors 
from the- Co Co 3's 64 color palette, and your 
graphic creations almost can't help, but come alive 
with color and detail. Icons, pull down menus, and 
dialog boxes make COLOR MAX -3 very easy to use, 
11 fonts are supplied, malting hundreds of lettering 
styles possible. Text can use any combinations ot 
color, shadow, outline, bold, and italics, Painting li 
a snap with 16 colors and 32 editable patterns. 
COLOR MAX 3 requires a 128K CoCo 3 with disk 
drive, High-Resolution Joystick interlace, and a 
joystick device (mouse, touch pad. or joystick). 

ORDER YOURS TODAY 

Please include S3 00 shipping & nan clung. PMesideri's add 6% safe 
tax Specify catalog numbers wiien o/dennp,.' 

200 MD Color Max 3 {without print driver) 

201 MD Color Max a (With EPSON MX/flX/FX.A 
compatibles driver] 

202MD Color Max 3 (wilh DM P-1 05/1 20/1 30 
driver) 

203MD Color Max 3 (with CGP-220 driver) 

Coloi Max 3 Accessories. 

220 IV) D Color Max 3 Pix Converter 1 

(Contains 6 converters) $29,95 

• CoCo MAX B&W to- k MtiE' format 

• CoCo MAX artllact to 'MGE' lor mat 

• 6K 6&W binary lile to 'MGE 1 format 
t 6K artifact binary tile tn 'MGE 1 I or mat 
- GRAPH (COM SAW lile to 'MGE' format 

• GRAPH (COM artHact file to MGE 1 format 



221 CH High- Re solution Joystick interface $12. OQ 
I Radio Shack CaL No, 26-3028) 




"5r Mie ....^ajmpurer' 

GHAPHICOM FEATURES: A page animation 
mode. Send/Receive pictures over modem • 
multiple Hi-Res fonts • Utility for transferring 
Graphicom screens to basic or M/L programs 
• Built in Hi-Res screen print program • 
Send/Receive slow scan TV 
Many additional features, operating hints, 
hardware mod's and suggestions, etc. Re- 
quires 64K CoCo. I disk drive, and 2 analog 
loysticks 

Order Catalog* 1 1 1 GO, Sob RAINBOW REVIEW (4/84 
on page 225) 

GRAPHICOM DISK $24.95 



uraphicom Part II re quires To j m iilo \\, M 
III) and disk drive n will load and save both 
SfANDARD/BIN tiles and GRAPHICOM 
screens GRAPHICOM PART II does NOT re- 
quire Graphicom to RUN' 

Graphicom Pari II is a video processing 
package that provides many tunctions that are 
missing in GRAPHICOM Here are |usl a few 
of the features provided by Graphicom Part H. 
Enlarge/Reduce/Rotate ■ Mutt-pattern Paint 
• Pan & Zoom • Typesetter & Font Editor • 
Pixel Blaster GRAPHICOM PARI" ii does NOT 
require Graphicom to RUM 1 

Ordor Catalog* 132WD. See RAINBOW REVIEW 
(11/85 on pago 209) 

GRAPHICOM PART II DISK $24.95 



HARDCOPY is more thai |U$t a^^en prii 
utility compare these features with any other 
graphic dump program on the market- Gray 
Scale or B&W printouts. 1x1 2x2, 3x3 
i.ables. posters, and greating cards with your 
graphics and much much more' See 
RAINBOW REVIEW (10/85) on page 218) 
HAROCOPY requires a 6<1K CoCo (I.M or nn 
and disk drive Please specify printer and 
catalog U when ordering 

IDS 480/560 G Cm i?OWD • OKI 82* lOkigiaDDi C» - 
OXtOAlA <J? C« S71WD « GEMINI 103C C* J7JW0 * GFVINI SG 
10/tS C* 1/6W0 • OMP IDS C* 183W0 * OMP I )0 C» '80WP • 
OMP tZO C» 176WD ■ DMP-I30 C« IB?WO - OMP 7Q0 C» 
175WO « CGP-??Q C» tSiWD ■ EPSON LX-80 C» 173WI) -EPSON 
MX- 3D Clf 17?WU » FPSON RX/FX 80 C* t73WO » fllTEMAM 
PLUS O I7 7WO 



HARDCOPY DISK 



$29.95 



Ait^UiiLj COLORSCAN, new sottware for 
the CGP-220 and your 64K CoCo (I, II. III). 
This program is a must for anyone who owns 
a Radio Shack Ink Jet Printer, and enjoys 
c. eating graphics with Graphicom, Graphicom 
Part M CoCo MAX or any other program that 
oroduces a standard 6K binary picture files. 
COLORSCAN will orinf program listings in 
niaz^g ctw Help create colorful banners up 
»c 55mches.n length . produce 1x1/2x2 Dr 
poster printout of your favorite 6K graphic 
disk files. 

Order Catalog* 184W0. Seo RAINBOW REVIEW 
(1/87 page 136) 

COLORSCAN DISK $29.95 



o, "°" c ?m' fkifci *?^ c 

m< e* at 

• ' Aa DC n n i nn rc ' Df;H n r 

□in B-a 





Dja ttiiiiuiLD flv c nwu i n t iir 














® 

A 



£11904 HHITESITIltH V.t.Q 



nnnvbur i 

1Kb III I I fin I I PRINIIR Ul III IY 



a m 





a. i, i ji i *i bh i - r PL^rq-MCD 



K-W-b lllll nil -wfr** ■ * + ■■ 

rlllli ■ ■ ■ * m m k-ri k ■.■ « 

■■ ™™ _ ■■■ ■ ¥ ¥-P -¥¥ ^ "¥ 



h -i * ■* k m ■* ■■ H F * # 4 -r 



I N L (1 H ^ L « K M I - HI P P Cj C H T q 1 r L L 11V 




n-4. i M t Ch i <i * i_ t*t -lp j fl 



COMPUTIZE, INC. • (215) 946-7260 • P.O. BOX 207 • LANGHORNE, PA 19047 




THE RAINBOW June 1987 



This is a game requiring skill, timing 
and a Jot of luck. Balloon is in 
machine language and only re- 
quires 16K. It will work on any CoCo 
including the CoCo 3. Your mission is 
to travel to the enemy base and rescue 
the innocent hostages. They were kid- 
napped by the dastardly dictator of the 
evil country, Litko. Your job is to 
maneuver your sleek hot-air balloon up 
and down, dodging bullets coming from 
both sides. During this, you must try to 
rescue as many hostages and destroy as 
many enemy tanks as possible. 

Use the right joystick to move, and 
press the firebutton to launch bombs. 
Hitting a tank with a bomb scores 50 
points and rescuing a hostage scores 100 
points. To rescue someone, be just 
above the ground as he passes under- 
neath you. Once you've been hit by a 
bullet, the game ends. 

To create this machine language 
program, type in Listing I (PDKE1) and 
save it to tape or disk. Then type in 
Listing 2 (PDKE2) and save it to tape or 
disk. Now reload Listing l and run it. 
If it was typed in correctly, you will be 
prompted to load and run Listing 2. If 
this program was typed in correctly, you 
will be prompted on how to save the 
program. Simply type (C)SAVEM 
"BALLOON" , 13997 , 15BB2 , 13997. 

A word of warning: Keep on the 
move. If you just sit near the bottom 
sneakily trying to gobble up points, 
odds are the left gun will trap you and 
you will be killed. 

Any comments, questions or sugges- 
tions are welcome. My address is P.O. 
Box 399, St. Johns Road, Stroud, 
Ontario, Canada, LOL 2M0. Please 
enclose an SASE if a response is ex- 
pected. □ 

Chris Keyes is a junior at Innisdale 
Secondary School. He is a self-taught 
programmer and has had his CoCo for 
four years. He uses it for games and 
word processing. 




Listing 1: P0KE1 



19 228 

27 218 

38 13 

47 159 

56 249 

END 171 



T 



**************************** 

****** BALLOON ATTACK ****** 
************ BY ************ 
******** CHRIS KEYES ******* 
**************************** 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

7 FORX=13997 TO 14999 

8 READ A 

9 POKE X,A 

10 TT=TT+A 

11 NEXT X 

12 CLS:IF TT<>121960 THEN PRINT" 
DATA WAS ENTERED INCORRECTLY . 11 : P 
RINT "RECHECK YOUR DATA LINES .": S 
TOP 

13 CLS: PRINT" PROCESS COMPLETED." 
: PRINT "LOAD 1 POKE2 1 AND TYPE <RU 
N>. " 

14 DATA 189,169,40,142,4,0,134,1 
59,167,128,140,6,0,37,249,142,4, 
0,134,191,167,128,140 

15 DATA 4,32,37,249,142,5,224,16 
7,128,140,6,0,3 7,249,142,4,0,167 
,132,48 

16 DATA 136,32,140,5,224,35,246, 
142,4,31,167,132,48,13 6,32,140,5 
,255,35,246 

17 DATA 142,5,133,16,142,61,171, 
198,20,166,160,167,12 8,90,38,249 
,142,4,73,16 

18 DATA 142,61,191,198,14,166,16 
0,167,128,90,3 8,24 9, 142,4,172,16 
,142,61,205, 198 

19 DATA 7,166,160,167,128,90,38, 
249,134,66,183,4,206,134,89,183 , 
4,207,142,4 

20 DATA 237,16,142,61,212,198,5, 
166,160,167,128,90,3 8,2 49,142,5, 
13,16,142,61 

21 DATA 217,198,5,166,160,167,12 
8,90,38,249,134,159,183,4,80,183 
,5,138,183,5 

22 DATA 140,183,5,144,183,5,147, 
173, 159,160,0,3 9,250,142, 4,0,134 
,32, 167,128 

23 DATA 140,6,0,37,249,142,4,0,1 
6,142,61,141,198,30,166,160,167, 
128,90,38 

24 DATA 249,173,159,160,0,39,250 
,12 9,57,34,246, 129,48,37,242,128 



,48,198,255,61 

25 DATA 31,1,191,62,3,183,255,20 
3, 183,255, 192, 183 , 255, 19 5, 183 , 25 
5,197,183,255,199 

26 DATA 134,253,183,255,34,142,1 
4,0,79,167,12 8,140,15,63,3 5,249, 
134,255,167,128 

27 DATA 140,36,127,35,249,79,167 
,128,140,3 8,0,35,248,142, 15,19 2, 
134,85,167,132 

28 DATA 48,136,31,167,128,140,36 
,128,37,244,13 4,240,183,33,254,1 
83,34,126,134,224 

29 DATA 183,34,30,183,34,94,79,1 
83,34,62,204,60,102,195,0,56,253 
,61,226,204 

30 DATA 60,158,195,0,56,253,61,2 
30,204,60,218,195,0,30,253,61,23 
4,142,26,16 

31 DATA 191,61,224,142,34,61,191 
,61,252,142,15,193,191,61,2 3 6,12 
7,61,239,127,61 

32 DATA 247,127,61,251,127,61,25 
4,127,61,244,142,0,0,191,61,2 22, 
22,0, 140 , 190 

33 DATA 61,224,16,142,60,102,166 
,160,167,128,166,160,167,132,48, 
136,31, 16, 188, 61 

34 DATA 226, 37, 239, 22, ft, 209, 190, 
61,228,16, 14 2, 60,158, 198,15, 166, 
160,167,128,166 

35 DATA 160,167,128,166,160,167, 
128,166, 160,167,12 8,48,13 6, 28,90 
,38,234,32,80, 182 

36 DATA 255,1,132,247,183,255,1, 
182,255,3,13 2,247,183,255,3,18 2, 
255,35,138,8 

37 DATA 183,255,35,16,190,62,10, 
190,62,5,166,128,132,252,183,255 
,32,246, 62,9 

38 DATA 90,38,253,188,62,7,38,23 
8,49,63,38,231,57,190,61,2 32,16, 
142,60,218 

39 DATA 166,160,167,128,166,160, 
167,132,48,136,31,16,188,61,234, 
37,239,32,0,190 

40 DATA 62,3,48,137,7,208,48,31, 
38,252,17 3,159,160, 10,182,1,91,1 
29,15,37 

41 DATA 7,129,45,34,10,22,255,87 
,134,1,183,61,238,32,5,134,2,183 
,61,238 

42 DATA 182,61,238,129,2,39,25,2 
52,61,224,131,0,64,253,61,224,16 
,131,15,207 

43 DATA 16,46,255,51,195,0,64,25 
3,61,2 2 4,32,46,252 ,61,224, 195,0, 
64,253,61 

44 DATA 224,16,131,31,113,16,45, 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 27 



Four new programs for the CoCo 




DOOM 



POWSR fo"| 



DAMAGE Ll 



TORPEDOES 



□ EH [HE] 

COUNT [ 24 I 



FIRE ONE! 



Submarine ^ arVjre in A'Qrid War li Completely high resolution graphic 
game in which you become the skipper of the USS Squalus. From the 
bridge you set the course ana speed, check radar, plot the course, 
rece've radio reports up the periscope and track the convoy or go on a 
special mission T wert\ sty scenenos with many more. Computer keeps 
hack of torpedoes battery level, diesel fuel, oxygen supply and more 
Four torpedo tubes toward 01 dec* gun are used to send those transports 
to the bottom But watc (~ out '01 those aeaaly patrol vessels Crash dive, full 
nght rudder, fuii speed ahead .sweat oul those depth charge attacks 
provisions foi on surface repair, Target Data Control, special missions, 
radio reports radar t r acking, map plotting, hull damage, depth alarm, 
exploding ships ships log (patrol vessels and transports, missions 
completed points accumulated) four speeds forward, one reverse, 
navigation, isiands ?Ou r periscope positions, supply vessel, visual 
sightings, and pler^y of fun and excitement. 

System requirements. CoCo III computer, disk drive. $32. OO 



m 
m 

mm 

mm 





STALINGRAD 



You become General Von Paulus in command of the German Sixth Army 
consisting of Panzers, Infantry, Mechanized Units, with support from 
Bombers and Fighters of the dreaded Luftwaffe. Starting in the summer of 
1942 you begin your offensive knowing that you have only so much time to 
take control of the city and then defend it from overwhelming Russian 
counterattack. Completely high resolution graphics for ECB 64K CoCo I, 
II, III disk or tape. Colorless on RGB monitors. $28. OO 




FIRE & STEEIMi 



DARK HORSE 



Mammoth game of Napoleon's Waterloo campaign. Player battles 
combined armies of England, Russia and Austria Completely hi res 
ECB 64K CoCo I, II, III, disk. Colorless on RGB monitors. $27.00 



KEYBOARD GENERAL 



Had you subscribed to the Keyboard General back in August and taken 
advantage of our special discounts, you'd have saved almost S30.00 
already! That along with articles on strategy and tactics and hints and all 
kinds of interesting information. Plus, you might have made some new 
friends Yearly subscription USA and Canada $15.00. Overseas $18.00. 



The seauel to Red Star The Soviet Union has taken control of Europe' You 
must rescue Europe from Soviet control and then have the option of 
invading Russia High resolution screens scrolls up. down, right, 
left, .attack modes, unit icons and more ECB 64K CoCo I. II. Ill disk. 
Colorless on RGB monitors. $27.00 



ARK ROYAL GAMES 

P.O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 
(904) 786-8603 



ARK 
ROYAL 

GAMES 



CharGen 



CoCo lil high resolution character generator makes special character set 
that can be used in all sorts of applications Easy to use. Creates as many 
files as desired. Disk only, CoCo III only. $12. OO 



Florida residents odd 5%, COD'S in USA only. aOO roughly S3 00 Sorry, no bankcarOs 
All orders shipped within 24 hours except holidays ana weekenas Write lor free 
colalog CoCo I. H, III refer to the TanOyTM Color Computer 



255 , 2 6, 13 1, j3, 64, 253 ,61 ,224, 19 j3, 6 
1,224,140,30 

45 DATA 250,37,15,182,61,244,39, 
10,190,61,232,140,3 4,176, 16,3 9,2 
,56,182,61 

46 DATA 239,38,33,182,255,0,129, 
12 6,39,6,12 9,254,16,38,0,170,134 
,1,183,61 

47 DATA 239,252,61,224,195,3,192 
,253,61,240, 195, 1,0,2 53 , 61, 242, 1 
90,61,240,134 

48 DATA 255,167,132,48,136,32,18 
8,61,242,3 5,2 46,190,61,240,48,13 
6,64,191,61,240 

49 DATA 190,61,242,48,136,64,140 
,36,111,34,109,191,61,242,166,13 
2,129,255,39,5 

50 DATA 182,61,244,39,21,190,61, 
240,16,142,60,253,166,160,167,13 
2,48,136,32,188 

51 DATA 61,242,37,244,32,80,190, 
61,22 2,198,50,58,191,61,222,142, 
0,1,191,62 

52 DATA 10,134,95,183,62,9,142,1 
32,208,191,62,5,142,13 6,184,191, 
62,7,23,254 

53 DATA 170,190,61,228,134,255,1 
98,15,167,128,167,12 8,167,128,16 
7,128,48,136,28,90 

54 DATA 38,242,247,61,254,190,61 
,240,134,255,198,8,167,13 2,48,13 

6,32,90,38,248 

55 DATA 79,183,61,239,32,0,190,6 
1,236,134,2 55,198,5,167,132,48,1 
36,32,90,38 

56 DATA 248,190,61,236,188,61,22 
4,34,8,48,13 6,3 2,191,61,236,32,6 
,48,136,224 

57 DATA 191,61,236,16,142,60,248 
,198,5,166,160,167,13 2,48,13 6,32 

,90, 38,246,182 

58 DATA 61,247,39,60,134,255,190 
,61,245, 167 ,128,191,61,245, 166,1 
32,129,255,39,20 

59 DATA 52,2,252,61,224,195,3,19 
2,253,61,255, 188,61,2 55,16,37,1, 

91,53,2 

60 DATA 79,167,132,182,61,248,74 
,39,5,183,61,248,32 ,31,79,183,61 
,247,134,255 

61 DATA 167,132,32,21,134,1,183, 
61,247,190,61,23 6,48, 13 6,97,191, 
61,245, 134,28 

62 DATA 183,61,248,32,175,182,61 
,251,39,58,13 4,2 55,190,61,2 49,16 
7,132,48,31, 191 

63 DATA 61,249,166,132,129,255,3 
9,20,52,2,252,61,224,19 5,3,192,2 
53,61,255,188 




Keep track with 

Baseball Statpak 



Finally, Big League Stats for your Color Computer! 
Baseball Statpak will make you a winner with your play- 
ers. Keep track of up to 180 batters and 60 pitchers on 
12 teams. Perfect for Little League, high school, ama- 
teur softball. 

Baseball Statpak contains three separate programs 
to track at bats, runs, hits, errors, walks, home runs, 
RBI's, on-base-percentage, innings pitched, earned 
runs, strikeouts and lots more. Also keeps track of 
team standings for league statistics. Store your data on 
tape or disk. 

Lightning-fast machine language sort will order your 
data by any statfor startling screen displays and beauti- 
ful printed reports! 

You've seen these stats in the newspapers. Now 
you can have them for your team! Baseball Statpak re- 
quires 16K Extended Basic for tape version, 32K for 
disk. CoCo 3 compatible. Only $34.95 on tape or disk. 



The Handicapper 



Use your Color Computer to improve your perfor- 
mance at the track! Separate handicappers for Thor- 
oughbreds, Harness Horses and Greyhounds let you 

rank the horses or dogs in each race quickly and easily, 
even if you've never handicapped before! 

All the information you need is readily available in 
the Thoroughbred Racing Form, harness or dog track 
program. Data entry is quick and easy. We even provide 
a diagram showing you where to find the data! 

Written by a veteran handicapper, our programs use 
sound, established techniques and the power of your 
computer to cut handicapping time from hours to min- 
utes. Ratings are displayed on screen or sent to your 
printer. Our instructions and wagering guide tell you 
which races to bet and which to avoid — a real secret of 
good handicapping. 

The handicappers require 16K for tape versions, 
32K for disk. They're all CoCo 3 compatible, too! Thor- 
oughbred, Harness or Greyhound Handicappers, 
$39.95 each on tape or disk. Any two for $59.95, all 
three only $79.95. 

Federal Hill Software 
8134 Scotts Level Road 
Baltimore, Md. 21208 
Toll free orders 800-628-2828 Ext 850 
Information 30 1 -521 -4886 





June 1987 THE RAINBOW 29 



18 
26 . 
38 .. 
46 . , 
END 



• • • • 



.46 
.92 
217 
135 
179 



Listing 2: P0KE2 



T 



***************************** 

2 ******* BALLOON ATTACK ****** 

3 ************* BY ************ 

4 ********* CHRIS KEYES ******* 

5 ***************************** 

6 FORX=15000 TO 15882 

7 READ A 

8 POKE X,A 

9 TT=TT+A 

10 NEXTX • 

11 CLS:IF TT098481 THENPRINT 11 DA 
TA WAS ENTERED INCORRECTLY . 11 : PRI 
NT"RECHECK DATA LINES . 11 : STOP 

12 CLS: PRINT "PROCESS COMPLETE. 11 : 
PRINT"NOW TYPE : 11 : PRINT : PRINT" (C) 
SAVEM 'BALLOON 1 ,13997, 15882,1399 
7 ^tM^^W^t '* ! ^WWWI ^ 

13 DATA 61,255,16,37,1,3,53,2,79 
,167,13 2,140,3 4,34,39,2,32,23,79 
,183 



TANDY COMPUTER 


DISCOUNTS 




COLOR COMPUTERS 




26-3127 64k color comp 


89.95 


26-334 CoCo3 


170.00 


26-3131 1st disk drive 


269.95 


26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 


259.95 


PRINTERS 




26-1276 DMP 105 


160.00 


26-1277 DMP-430 


580.00 


26-1280 DMP-130 


269 00 


MODEL 4 and MSDOS COMPUTERS 


25-1050 Tandy 1000 EX 


530.00 


25-1051 Tandy 1000 SX 


850.00 


25-0101 1 Plus expansion board 


155.00 


25-1023 CM-5 color monitor 


249.95 


25-1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 


110.00 


26-1070 mod 4D 64k 2dr. 


920.00 


We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 


Computer Products at Discount Prices 


CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 


IN NJ. CALL 609-769-0551 




WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 


Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



14 DATA 61,251,134,255,167,132,3 
2, 13, 134, 1,18 3, 61, 251, 19J3, 61, 2 52 
,191,61,249,32 

15 DATA 185,182,61,254,38,40,182 
,61,2 44,38,84,182,1,19,12 9,100,3 
7,14,134,1 

16 DATA 183,61,254,142,34,186,19 
1,61,22 8,2 2, 253 , 102 , 13 4 , 1, 183 , 61 
,244,142,34,188 

17 DATA 191,61,232,22,253,175,18 
2,62,1,38,103,134,1,18 3,62,1,190 
,61,228, 198 

18 DATA 255,134,15,231,128,231,1 
28,231, 128,2 31, 128, 48, 13 6, 28,74, 
38,242, 190,61,228 

19 DATA 48,31,140,34,161,16,39,0 
,51,191,61,2 28,22,2 53,39,182,62, 
2,38,60 

20 DATA 134,1,183,62,2,190,61,23 
2,198,255,134,15,231,12 8,2 31,132 
,48,136,31,74 

21 DATA 38,246,190,61,232,48,31, 
140,34,161,16,3 9,0,13,191, 61,232 
,22,253,81 

22 DATA 79,183,61,254,22,253,100 
,79,183,61,244,22,2 53,9 3,127,62, 
1,22,253,87 

23 DATA 127,62,2,22,253,81,190,6 
1,2 22,198,100,58,191,61,2 22,14 2, 
0,1,191,62 

24 DATA 10,134,50,183,62,9,142,2 
53,232,191, 62,5, 142,254,2 2 6, 191, 
62,7,23,252 

25 DATA 222,134,255,142,34,176,1 
98,15, 167,12 8, 167 , 13 2 , 48 , 13 6 , 3 1 , 
90,38,246,79,183 

26 DATA 61,244,22,254,73,142,0,5 
0,191,62,10,134,4,183,62,9,142,1 
28,232,191 

27 DATA 62,5,142,130,120,191,62, 
7,23,252,172,182,255,1,13 2,2 47,1 
83,255,1,182 

28 DATA 255,3,132,247,183,255,3, 
182,255,35,138,8,18 3,2 5 5,3 5,79,1 
42,15,64,16 

29 DATA 142,37,224,198,32,167,12 
8,167, 160,134,40,74,38,253,79,90 
,38,243,49,168 

30 DATA 192,16,140,25,200,34,232 
,189,169,81,79,18 3,2 55,19 6, 183,2 
55,194 , 183,255, 192 

31 DATA 183,255,202,183,255,198, 
182,255,34,132,7,183,255,34,13 4, 
128,142,4,0,167 

32 DATA 128,140,6,0,37,249,142,6 
1,5,16,142,4,0,16 6,128,167,160,1 
40,61,22 

33 DATA 38,247,142,61,22,16,142, 



30 



THE RAINBOW June 19B7 



4, 64, 166, 128, 167,160, 140, 61, 4 4, 3 
8,247,134,85 

34 DATA 151,137,252,61,222,189,1 
89,204,142,61,45,16,142,4,12 8,16 
6,128,167,160,140 

35 DATA 61,141,38,247,173,159,16 
0,0,39,250,129,89,16,39, 250,253, 
79,151,113,189 

36 DATA 160,39,255,255,255,255,2 
54,255,240,31,22 6,143,202,167,13 
8,163,170,171,170,171 

37 DATA 42,169,170,171,170,171,1 
38,163,202,167,194,135,208,53,22 
2,247,238,239,236, 111 

38 DATA 224,15,229,79,228,79,228 
,79,229,79,224,15,255,2 55,2 55,25 
5,255,255,255,248 

39 DATA 3,255,0,7,253,255,127,24 
7,253,255,0,7,253,255,255,247,25 
3,255,224,7 

40 DATA 252,3,239,255,255,251,23 
9,255,255,251,224,0,0,3,232,227, 
199,139,215,93 

41 DATA 187,117,183,93,187,118,2 
15,93,187,117,232,227,19 9,139,24 
0,0,0,7,255,127 

42 DATA 252,31,252,159,249,79,25 
3,223,252,31,207,121,247,119,248 
,15,255,127,255,127 

43 DATA 255,127,254,183,253,223, 
243,231, 15,7,0,7,15,12 6,12 6, 19 5, 
195,195,195,231 

44 DATA 231,42,42,42,32,71,65,77 
,69,32,79,86,69,82,32,42,42,42,8 
9,79 

45 DATA 85,82,32,70,73,78,65,76, 
32 ,83 , 67,79 ,82 , 69, 32 , 87 , 65 , 83 , 32 
,58 

! 46 DATA 32,42,42,42,42,42,42,42, 
42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42 
,42 

47 DATA 42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42, 
42,42,42,42,42,87,65,7 8,84,32,84 
,79 

48 DATA 32,80,76,65,89,32,65,71, 
65,73,78,63,32,40,89,47,78,41,3 2 
,32 

49 DATA 32,32,32,32,32,42,42,42, 
42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42 
,42 

50 DATA 42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42, 
42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42,42,87,72 
,73 

51 DATA 67,72,32,76,69,86,69,76, 
32,40,48,61,72,65,82,68,32,45,32 
,57 



52 DATA 61,69,65,83,89,41,63,80, 
82,69,83,83,32,65,32,75,69,89,32 
,84 

53 DATA 79,32,83,84,65,82,84,66, 
65,76, 76, 79, 79,78,32, 65, 84,84, 65 
,67 

54 DATA 75,87,82,73,84,84,69,78, 
67,72,82,73,83,75,69,89,69,83,1, 
44 

55 DATA 27,208,60,158,34,176,60, 
214,34,182,60,248,29,1,1,1,3 3,80 
,34,80 

56 DATA 1,30,80,1,15,34,39,1,34, 
61,0,31,144,1,0,6,249,12 8,2 32,13 

P 

57 DATA 120,4,0 



ALL SOFTWARE COMPATIBLE WITH 00003 
r« PATCHES PE'ilJlRED 

COLOR BANKBOOK +3 * *I9.95 



BOSINESS BANKBOOK $49.95 

SPECIFY 1 G ft £ CilSK DRIVES 

TO BLHCKOOT BINGO * $19.95 



OCR FILE 



* 19.95 



SUPERDISK UTILITY 

SEE REVIEW IN MAY ''86 
RAINBOW PAOE 1*1 



$ 9.95 



"I 



RHDIOLOG 

SEE REVIEW IN MAY 'S& 
RAINBOW PAGE £09 

CODE PRACTICE 

SEE REVIEW IN MOV 'SG 
RAINBOW PAGE 134 

•RDERS OR INFORMATIOH 

CULL 1 800 628 2828 
EXTENSION 552 

ALL PROGRAMS INCLUDE MANUALS 
REQUIRE 3£K AND i DISK DRIVE. 
ADD 12.00 SHIPPING & HANDLING 
FLORIDA RES. ADD 5Y. SALES TAX 



-9 



SUNRISE 



SOFjTiIWAR'E 



$ 9.95 



S 9.95 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 



SEAL 



8901 NIL! 26 ST DEPT R 
SUNRISE, FL 33322 

INCLUDES SPECUL EDITION FOR 00003 !!f 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 31 



EDUCATION OVERVIEW 




The Role of Teachers in 
Educational Software 

Development 



By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Almost everyone will agree that 
education needs high quality 
software specifically designed 
for student learning experiences. The 
problem, however, is obtaining such 
software. Many software packages are 
written by elementary and secondary 
teachers. Naturally, that is viewed as a 
good thing — we want software devel- 
oped by people who are on the "front 
line" of education. However, there are 
a few drawbacks to this situation. 

Most elementary and secondary 
teachers cannot get released time to 
devote to software development. After 
all, there are classes to teach, lunch 
rooms to supervise, playgrounds to 
monitor, committee meetings to attend, 
papers to grade after school, and par- 
ents to meet with. These regular duties 
leave little time to spend on "unessen- 
tial" activities such as sof tware develop- 
ment. So, of all the teachers who have 
the talent and capability to write edu- 
cational software, only a small propor- 
tion of them will actually sit in front of 
their machines to face the difficult task 
of writing software. 

Those teachers who do spend the time 
are not facing an easy task. Preparing 
software for the classroom of a total 
stranger is considerably different from 



Michael Plog received his doctorate 
degree from the University of Illinois. 
He has taught social studies in high 
school, worked in the central office of 
a school district and is currently em- 
ployed at the Illinois State Board of 
Education. 



preparing it to use in your own class- 
room. Creating a commercially accep- 
table piece of educational software goes 
well beyond simply putting good ideas 
in electronic form. A commercial soft- 
ware package for education must not 
only be good, it must be user-friendly, 
since it may be operated by a person 
with no knowledge of computers — 
perhaps even by a teacher who does not 
like computers. 

So, while it would be beneficial to 
have software developed by elementary 
and secondary teachers, we shouldn't 
expect a large amount of such material 
to be available. It places too many 
unreasonable demands on teachers. 

Who else is left? Well, commercial 
firms are now getting into the act with 
software sold like (and often with) 
books at educational conferences. 
Companies seldom maintain writers on 
payroll, though. They usually contract 
with people to prepare hard copy and 
electronic materials for sale. Some of 
these people are elementary and secon- 
dary teachers; however, the majority of 
authors of books and commercial soft- 
ware are university professors. 

This makes a lot of sense. Universities 
are designed to produce a reflective 
atmosphere, where scholarly inquiry 
can be pursued. Ideas are debated 
among leaders in all fields of knowl- 
edge, so that resulting products repre- 
sent the most careful considerations and 
are as accurate as possible. We have 
come to expect most educational mate- 
rials to be developed at universities, but 
we need to consider the limitations of 
such an environment. 



People who teach in universities are 
ranked in order of importance. At most 
universities, ranks go in the order (from 
lowest to highest) of assistant professor, 
associate professor and full professor. 
Moving up in rank has several impor- 
tant benefits for university teachers. 
Perhaps the most significant one is 
tenure, which guarantees a person 
cannot be fired unless there is just cause. 
An assistant professor can be released 
from employment for any reason at all. 
In most universities, a professor who is 
promoted to associate will get tenure. 
This means more than an increase in 
pay; it means job security. To fire an 
associate professor requires just cause, 
and the reasons need to be very good! 

To get promoted, professors are 
measured in three areas: teaching, 
service and scholarship (or research). 
Teaching needs little explanation; the 
professor must conduct classes and 
have students demonstrate some knowl- 
edge of the course content. The service 
component can take many forms, from 
participation on university committees 
to active involvement in professional 
organizations. Scholarship, however, is 
often the key to determining tenure. 

University professors can demon- 
strate scholarship by several means. The 
most common is to have articles pub- 
lished in professional periodicals or 
make presentations at professional 
meetings. Publishing a book that is 
well-received by experts is an almost 
certain guarantee of demonstration of 
scholarship. 

This lengthy diversion into academic 
rank and promotion policies has a 



32 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



M 3 k i r-i = 
C p C d •* 



•t 1 




Micro World 



AFFORDAB !.„ E 



CoCo II 


$87 


CoCo III 


$169 


unve u 




CM-8 Monitor 


$248 


Deluxe Joystick 


$24 


Mouse 


$40 


MultiPak 


$75 


CCR-81 Cass. Rec. 


$42 


Joysticks (pair) 


$13 


Disk storage box (50) 


$ 8.50 



Disks (SS) 


$7.50/box 


Disks (DS) 


$8.00/box 


includes free library case 


DWP-106 »' 


$159 




DMP-130A (120 CPS) 


$265 




DMP-430 


$545 




Tandy 1000 EX 


$495 




Tandy 1000 SX 


$790 




VM-4 Monitor 


$99 




CM-10 Monitor 


$360 




CM-5 Monitor 


$240 





CoCo 3 51 2K Upgrade 


$130 


MultiPak Upgrade (26-3024) 


$ 8 


MultiPak Upgrade (26-3124) 


$ 7 


OS- 9 Level 2 


$ 63.95 



Please Not* - Our ads are submitted 
•arly. so prices art subject to change!!] 
We appreciate your cooperat ion & .. 
understanding In this matter. 

Minimum order 15.00 



Method of Payment: 

MC. Visa. Am. Ex. - Sorry. No Cltillne! 

Certified Check or Money Order. 

Personal Checks - Allow 1 week to clear! 



s>i&a<8j£ a*asif j^&bil^jbjlk 
wast* ass? ®inr v&sm>ir w&mmm&&2£> 



* Full TANDY 

Warranty 

* 100$ TANDY 

PRODUCTS 

* FREE Shipping 



==> CALL <= 
In Pa: 

215/759-7794 
In N . J . : 
201/735-9560 




COMPUTER CENTER 



MicroWorld 



230 Moorestown Road, Wind Gap, PA 18091 



Laneco Plaza, Clinton, NJ, 08809 



ALL F*R I C 



INCLUDE SHIPPING ! ! ! 



1.005*6 TANDY EQUIPMENT WITH FULL 

RADIO SHACK WARRANTY 



Unbeatable Prices from Howard Medical Compute 

Star NX-10 Printer Only $238 



disk NEW FROM J&M 

CONTROLLER 




The DC-4 is a scaled-down version of the popular DC-2 
without a parallel port. It includes a switch with 2 ROM 
sockets, JDOS, manual and such features as gold connec- 
tors and metal box. It accesses double sided drives and ac- 



cepts RSDOS 1.1 for Radio Shack compatability. 




DC-4 with memory minder 
($2 shipping) 



RS DOS ROM CHIP 





EPSON 

LX-86 *238 (*5 shipping) 
with FREE sheet feeder 

SF-1 sheet feeder for LX-80, $ AO 95 
LX-86, or LX-90 05,B 

Star NX-10 Only $238 




ROM chip fits inside disk controller. 24 pin fits both J&M 
and RS controller Release 1.1. For CoCo 3 Compatability. 



$20 




each 



Reg, $40 
($2 shipping) 




i 




3DISK DRIVE SPECIALS 
DRIVE 0 + Howards Drive 0 gives you a 
D D-3 rVTPI drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for only, Add $34 for a Disto DC-3 replacement. ($s ■hip pi rig) 




$178*5 



DOUBLE SIDED 
DOUBLE DENSITY 
360K 



ft 



Separate Disk Drive Components 

DD-3 An MPI 52 double-sided, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a full height case and heavy-duty power supply. 




( s 5 shipping) 



DD-2 A TEAC 55B Vz height, double density, 360K disk 
drive in a Vz height case and heavy-duty power supply. 



M88 



(S2 shipping) 



ND 04 Toshiba bare drive, Vz height, double-sided, double 
density with all mounting hardware fits R.S. 501 



WORD PACK RS 

This ROM pack is the hardware answer for an 80 column 
display. It includes a built-in video controller to drive a 
monochrome monitor like our 123 A. To get started, you need 
OS-9 2.0, a Y-cable or multipack interface drive 0, and a 
monochrome monitor. *fc/| Q 

($2 shipping) ($2 shipping) 

While suppli 

New basic driver runs word pack without 
need for an OS-9. 






$10 




MONITORS 



Thompson RGB 
Magnavox 515 




($14 shipping) 




Magnavox 643 




$305 
$298 

($14 shipping) 

$385 



$132 



($3 shipping) 



Zer 



enith 1220 A 



BOTEK 

Serial to parallel converter converts the CoCo 4 pin serial output to run 
a parallel printer like Star or Epson. Includes all cables. Add $10 for 



modem attachment. 



($2 shipping) 



$68. 45 



CA-1 Cable that connects the disk controller to the drive. 

CA-2 



$2495 

One Drive 



$2995 

Two Drive 



GUARANTEE — Howard Medical s 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our hardware, try 
it out, test it for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for 
any reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your 
money back (less shipping). 





($14 shipping) 



$125 

($7 shipping) 



S78.45 



Lets the graphic capabilities 
of your CoCo EXPLODE 



Needed to connect CoCo 
Max and disk drive at same 
time. 



COCO 
MAX II 

Y CABLE $i9. 45 

MAX ^ Three sets include 72 different 

FONTS ^3^5 fonts for typesetting 

COLORING $15 
BOOK™ 




Twenty-two pictures of clip-art 
by Glenside Color Computer Club 

($2 shipping for each product) 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 




ORDERS 



(800) 443-1444 



INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

(312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hour*: 
H;00 - 5:00 Mon. - Frt. 
10:00 - 3:00 Sal. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

C.O.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL P.O.'S !n£ pm ;! ? ar l es ' or , 4a u S , la T * 

APO and Canada order sllghlly tipgher 



m 



The Bigge st 
The Best 
The indispensable 



The 




THE COO? COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains more than 200 pages 
and up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns 
and as many as 20 product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 



< < w w £ 

co =! x co 

o. £ 5 z w 

O UJ ± " % 

zZ § 




Q 


>- 


CC 


h- 
O 


< 


LU 
n 


0 A" 


PROSI 


Q_ 




LU 


O 
Z 


CC 




CO 


DC 
LU 


CO 


CO- 


LU 


CO 
CO 

< 


z 


CO 
Z) 


o 

co 


CD 


DC 
LL 




LU 
LU 

co 
co 

LU 

DC 
Q 
Q 
< 

00 



< 
Q_ 

LU 

00 



LU 

O 

CO 

o 

CL 




O) 



o 

Q. 

(0 

o 



Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and 
run. No work. No wait. 

Just think how your software library wil( grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
250 new programs: games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications. And, with RAINBOW 
ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs, 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at a price that's 
"small potatoes." And now you even have a choice 
about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
sary. 




co 



LU 
LU 
CO 
CO 
LU 
DC 
Q 
Q 
< 

00 
Q 

< 
Q_ 

LU 
CO 



LU 

o 

CO 

o 

Q_ 




Use our 800 number! 

For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

inquiries please call (502) 228-4492. 

We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 a year in the United States. Canadian 

rate is $38 (U.S. funds only). Surface rate elsewhere is $68 (U.S.). Airmail 

is $103 (U.S.). All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 

6 to 8 weeks for the first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 

In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 

Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
THE RAINBOW today! 

YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

□ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

Name -. > ■ — 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number , ■ 

Signature Card Expiration Date 



Our 800 number is also good for ordering 

RAINBOW ON TAPE or RAINBOW ON DISK! 

Just call (800) 847-0309 anytime from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. Credit card orders only. 
Subscriptions to rainbow on tape are $80 a year in the United States, $90 (U.S. 
funds) in Canada and $105 (U.S.) in all other countries. 

rainbow on disk is $99 a year in the United States, $115 (U.S.) in Canada and $130 
(U.S.) in all other countries. 

Individual issues of rainbow on tape are $10 in the U.S., $12 (U.S.) in Canada and 
all other countries. Individual issues of rainbow on disk are $12 in the U.S., $14 
(U.S.) in Canada, and $16 (U.S.) in all other countries. Kentucky residents please 
add 5% sales tax. 

rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are not stand-alone products; you need the 
magazine for loading and operating instructions and the necessary documentation. 
the rainbow magazine is a separate purchase. 



Give Your Fingers A Break! 

YES! Sign me up: □ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

□ RAINBOW ON TAPE □ RAINBOW ON DISK 

(Available beginning with the October 
1986 issue) 

□ A Full Year □ Single Issue (specify month & year) . 

Name =_ — 

Address . . _ 

City , state ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number , . 



Signature 



— 



Card Expiration Date 



purpose. We may be disappointed if we 
expect large quantities of high quality 
educational software from university 
professors. Full professors, of course, 
can get involved in anything they want 
— they cannot be promoted any higher. 
Full professors, however, tend to be 
older and may have less interest in 
computers. It is from the ranks of 
assistant and associate professors that 
we should expect most educational 
software. 



"Publication of a state- 
of-the-art textbook is 
usually counted as 
research at tenure time, 
so why isn 't publication 
of software?" 



Ah, there's the rub. In the criteria for 
promotion of teaching, service and 
scholarship, where does development of 
computer software lie? It might be 
considered teaching, especially if soft- 



ware is developed for the professor's 
class. It might even be considered 
service, providing something of value to 
elementary or secondary education. In 
many institutions, software develop- 
ment is not considered research — and 
of the three criteria, research is the most 
prestigious and the most important in 
tenure and promotion decisions. 

Many younger faculty members — 
the ones who have had the most expe- 
rience with computing during their own 
years in college — say they are being 
advised to f orget about writing sof tware 
or incorporating computers into their 
courses, at least until after they have 
tenure. They are being told instead to 
spend time doing research and getting 
it published. This means talented people 
are being discouraged from developing 
educational software, so less quality 
educational software will be on the 
market. I do not believe all quality 
software has to come from universities, 
but I am saddened that such a pool of 
talent is not spending more time devel- 
oping software specifically designed for 
educational use: 

Of course, not all colleges and univer- 
sities have a low opinion of educational 
software as scholarly research. Depend- 



ing on the particular institution, educa- 
tional software has been viewed favor- 
ably by tenure and promotion 
committees. Faculty members who have 
written software claim it often has a 
large research component. Writing 
software, they argue, should be consid- 
ered the same as writing a textbook to 
be used in schools. Publication of a 
state-of-the-art textbook is usually 
counted as research at tenure time, so 
why isn't publication of sof tware? 

The use of computers in education 
has extended in directions we could not 
have predicted a few years ago. Educa- 
tors once wondered if computers would 
be a fad in school, used only for games 
to keep students occupied while others 
finished their work. The emergence of 
the tenure question at the university 
level is an indication that computers will 
continue to make a significant impact 
on schools. The educational computer 
revolution is not as simple as teaching 
students how to program in BASIC — 
and the revolution is not over yet! 

Until next month, keep the revolu- 
tion going. I welcome all comments, 
complaints, or suggestions. My address 
is 829 Evergreen, Chatham, IL 
62629. /R\ 



I I II II 



IK 




C Zf Zf *-M ^ I C Zf 




DISH DRIVES 

NEUJ--4 DRIVE SYSTEM C£ DSDD DRIVES ACCESSED 
UNDER RS DOS) * -*4£:9.9E. 

£DF1VE SYSTEM JK£ DSDD DRIVES IN ONE CASE? 

*3£9.95 

DRIVE 1 UPGRADE «!i DSDD UPGRADE FOR YOUR 

£e-31£9,3i31, OR 3±3£ -1119.95 PLEASE 

SPECIFY CATALOG NLIMBER WHEN ORDERING ! ! 



■DRIVE 0-SSDD FxH DRIVE 3-1199.95 



DRIVE 1-SSDD F^H DRIVE (USE W, EXISTING DRCO 

$125.95 



X- INCLUDES EITHER R.S. OR DISTO CONTROLLER 



□□CD 3 

S12K UPGRADE-J109.9S TECH MANUAL-* £9.35 
RAM DISK * DIAGNOSTICS -J19.95 
MONITOR CONNECTOR FOR CM-£ -* 4.95 

□THEPi STUFF 

COCO GRAPHICS DESIGNER-J£9.95 ADOS-*£9.9S 
MONITOR INTERFACE -*£9.95 
KEYBOARDS-*^. 95 AD APTERS-J 9.95 
SERIAL TO PARALLEL CONVERTERS -S44.3S 



FULL LINE OF 

CALL 



PRINTERS IN STOCK ! ! ! 
FOR BEST PRICES 



5512 POPLAR MEMPHIS, TN 33119 901-761-4565 



ADD J4.90 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. VISA. MC * MONEY ORDERS ACCEPTED. 
ALLOW 3 WEEKS FOR PERSONAL CHECKS, NO CODS. PRICES MAY CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 35 



MUSIC TUTORIAL 



Uncovering the MIDI Section 



Imagine your CoCo playing real 
music. Lead lines, bass lines, even 
drums, and doing it all at the same 
time. This is the exciting new world of 
MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital 
Interface). 



John Mueller leaches both band and 
choir in a small school district in 
Oregon. He and his wife, Nannette ( who 
also leaches music), have used their 
Co Co to provide music for many func- 
tions, from her brother's wedding to a 

junior high production of 

The Mikado. 



What Is MIDI? 

MIDI is a system using both hard- 
ware and software to enable electronic 
musical instruments (such as synthesiz- 
ers) to "talk" to each other and to make 
it possible for computers to join in on 
the conversation. This language is in the 
form of a digital data stream where 
numbers take the place of musical 
information. Notes are the most basic 
type of information that can be sent by 
MIDI. Each note sent requires several 
pieces of information (bytes) and they 
must be sent in order. As in the PLAY 
command of your CoCo, MIDI re- 
quires several pieces of information sent 
for each particular note, i.e., 
note name, oc- 





tave, length and volume. MIDI can also 
transmit information to a synthesizer 
for what kind of sound to play, such as 
a trumpet or an organ sound. 

Imagine yourself as a composer sit- 
ting in one room, and a band is sitting 
in another room with a telephone link- 
ing the two. You speak into the tele- 
phone, "Oboe, soft, play C sharp, stop 
playing. Bass, loud, play D sharp, stop 
playing," and so forth. MIDI sends 
information in just this way using 
binary numbers, or a series of ones and 
zeros, instead of words, transmitting 
and receiving at a much higher rate than 
you or the band could. In fact, MIDI 
sends and receives at a higher rate than 
most computers. MIDI sends data at 
the rate of 31 ,250 baud (bits per second) 
while the fastest rate of transmission 

most CoCo owners send to their 

printers is only 9,600. 

CoCo Meets MIDI 

In order to make use of the power 
of MIDI, there are some pieces of 



36 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



By John E. Mueller 



o O 
(A CL 



□ r 

if 



COCO 



SYNTHESIZER 



Figure 1: Sequencer and Sequencer/Editor Setup 



CoCo 



o 

c 

o 
O 

m 





9) 




O 




CO 




r 
















Q 




s 



MIDI in 
MIDI out 



Y-Cable 
or 

Multi-Pak 



Q 

s 



3 

o 

Q 

s 



Synthesizer 



Figure 2: Sequencer/ Recorder Setup 



hardware you must have. The first of 
these is a CoCo with at least 64K of 
memory. Most MIDI software also 
requires that you have at least one disk 
drive, as well. For some applications 
you will need a MIDI interface and, 
finally, you will need a MIDI-equipped 
musical device such as synthesizer or a 
drum machine. If you are thinking 
about buying a synthesizer, be sure and 
ask if it is MIDI-equipped. There are a 
lot of electronic keyboards that look 
like synthesizers. Some have MIDI and 
some do not. 

What you do with this hardware 
depends on what you want to get out of 
your music and at what level you want 
to be involved in its creation. 

If you want your CoCo to play music 
that doesn't sound like it came from a 
video arcade, then all that you need is 
software that enables your CoCo to act 
as a sequencer. A sequencer is a device 
that tells a synthesizer what notes to 
play and in what order (sequence) to 
play them (see Figure 1). When used in 
this way, it is not necessary for you to 
have piano keyboard skills to sound 
great; your CoCo does this work for 
you. In fact, a CoCo can play things a 
human player could never do. It can 
"wiggle its fingers" so fast that the 
"Minute Waltz" only takes five seconds. 

The first MIDI sequencing program 
f or the CoCo was Musica MIDI, writ- 
ten by Charles Lanusse and sold by 
Speech Systems. This program causes a 
CoCo to read Musica //files and output 
them as MIDI information through its 
serial 1/0 printer port. This is a good, 
low-cost way to get into MIDI and, with 
the hundreds of Musica II files availa- 
ble, you may never want to move any 
further. The drawbacks of this program 
are that it only plays four notes at a 
time; to change or add to the music, you 
must exit the program and use Musica 
II. 

If you have a knowledge of musical 
notation, but your piano playing isn't 
very good, you need a sequencer/ editor. 
LYRA, written by Lester Hands and also 
sold by Speech Systems, is a sequencer/ 
editor. With this program you can 
change (edit) the music without leaving 
the program, and you can write and 
play up to eight notes (voices) at one 
time. This program is very user-friendly. 
In fact, my high school band students 
use it to write their music theory assign- 
ments. 

A more advanced use of the CoCo is 
as a sequencer/ recorder (see Figure 2). 
Programs of this sort allow your CoCo 
to act like a tape recorder. What you 



play on your synthesizer is recorded in 
the CoCo's memory and then can be 
played back at any speed and in any key. 
You could record a song at a slow tempo 
and then speed it up, or you could play 
in an easy key and then have the CoCo 
transpose it (move all of the notes 
higher or lower) into a new key. It can 
even do both of these things at the same 
time. Sequencer/ recorders also record 
on up to 16 different tracks. Using this 
feature, you could first play in the bass 
line on Track 1 . Then you could add the 
piano part on Track 2, the brass parts 
on Track 3, the solo part on Track 4, 
and so forth. Each new track is added 
after you get the previous track right. 
This allows you to work on a piece until 
you get it just the way you want it. 

As you might expect, the price on 
sequencer/ recorders is much higher. 
You should expect to pay at least $150 
for an interface and software. The prices 
go up from there depending on the 
interface and the program you choose. 

There are four sequencer/ recorders 
on the market at the present time: 
Colorchestra, written by Charles La- 
nusse and sold by Horizon Software; 
CoCoM I DI ', written by Frank Delargy 
and sold by Speech Systems; Syntrax 



1.0 and Syntrax 2.0, written by Frank 
Cutolo and Mike Serio, and sold by 
Intercomp Sound. 

This article just scratches the surface 
of what you and your CoCo can do with 
MIDI. For more information I suggest 
the following: MIDI for Musicians by 
Craig Anderton. Amsco Publications, 
New York (1986). Synthesizers and 
Computers reprinted from Keyboard 
Magazine. GPI Books, Cupertino, CA 
( 1 986). International M I DI Association 
1 1857 Hartsook St., North Hollywood, 
CA 91607. 

Sources for CoCo MIDI Products 

Horizon Software Corporation, P.O. 
Box 289, Opelousas, LA 70570; (318) 
942-1938. 

Intercomp Sound, 129 Loyalist 
Avenue, Rochester, NY 14624; (716) 
247-8056. 

Speech Systems, 38W 255 Deerpath 
Road, Batavia, IL 60510; (312) 879- 
6880. 

Questions may be directed to the 
author at 30665 South Hwy. 211, Col- 
ton, OR 97017, 503-824-3148. Please 
enclose an SASE for a reply. /R\ 

June 1987 THE RAINBOW 37 



The Speech/Sound Pak learns to count 



The Digital Dimension 



By Lindsay Kooser 



Have you ever sent a sentence like, "That number was 
55," to the Radio Shack Speech/ Sound Pak, only to 
have it say, 'That number was five five," instead of 
fifty-five? Well, then you've discovered that the Speech/ 
Sound Pak can only speak digits. 

How would you like a routine that would take care of 
it for you? How about one that would also be able to take 
a number in a numerical variable and convert it to text? 
Look no further! NumbText is for you. 

NumbText is written as a subroutine so it can be added 
to any BASIC program already containing a text-to-speech 
routine (like the one in the Speech/ Sound Pak manual). All 
you have to do is send the number you want converted to 
the routine as the variable C, and it will be returned as a 
text string in A$. It sounds simple enough, and it is, but let's 
look at it a little closer. 

At first, the working variables will be cleared in Line 
10270; this is where you should GD5UB to. Then it will be 
checked in Line 10290 to see if it is too large for the routine. 
If so, the message "That number is too large" will be 
returned. After this, the number will be taken apart and 
converted one digit at a time until the entire number is 
contained in up to three string variables (Btt, C$, D$). The 
contents of B$, C$ and D$ will be combined into A$, which 
will be returned. A$ can then be sent to the text-to-speech 
routine or combined with other text and spoken. The 
numerical variables C and D are used within the routine and 
are not preserved, so if you need the number contained in 
C again, you must save it before entering the routine. 

I have set up NumbText to resolve numbers from 0 to 
299. If you don't need numbers that large, change the value 



Lindsay Kooser lives in Yakima, Washington, and is one 
of the founders of the CoCo club there. His first contact 
with computers was the Radio Shack 4K Model 1. He also 
serves as SysOp for his club 's BBS. 



in Line 10290 to the largest number you will be using. If 
you need a larger range of numbers, I have included a 
sample of how the program can be expanded in lines 10360 
to 10400. In addition to the logic line, you will have to add 
the data line for the next text value you include. For 
example, if you add the line in my sample, you would GD5UB 
10565, which would read: 10565 B$ = "THREE 
HUNDRED" : RETURN. This adds numbers up to 399. For 
numbers over 1,000, another string variable would be 
needed to remain compatible with the program as it stands. 

I have intentionally left it short and simple so it can be 
changed to fit anyone's needs (maybe negative or non- 
integer numbers could be recognized). If you save Numb- 
Text in ASCII format, you can merge it into any program 
you are working on. Have fun. 

(You may direct questions about this program to Mr. 
Kooser at 800 Windy Lane, Yakima, WA 98903, 509-965- 
1 106. Please enclose an SASE for a reply when writ- 
ing.) □ 



The listing: NUMBTEXT 



10000 
10010 
10020 
10030 
10040 
10050 
10060 
10010 
10080 
1(5(390 
10100 
10110 
10120 



********************** 

* NUMBTEXT * 

* * 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



by Lindsay Kooser 
800 Windy Ln. 
Yakima, Wa. 989j33 
CIS#-71416, 637 
(c) 1986 

Number to text sub 
routine. For con- 
verting a number 
contained in f C ! 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



38 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



10130 
10140 
10150 
10160 
10170 
10180 
10190 
10200 
102 10 
10220 
10230 
10240 
10250 
10260 
10270 

10280 
10290 
10300 
10310 
10320 
GE 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



ii 



10330 
10340 
10350 
10360 
10370 
10380 
10390 



to a string value 

contained in 'A$' 

so that it can be 

spoken by the R/S 

Speech and Sound 

Pack. The routine 

must be called in 

a gosub to operate 

correctly. The 

variables D,A$,B$ 

C$ and D$ are used 

within the program 
********************** 

Subroutine entry point 
B$="" : C$=" " : D$=" " 
'Test for number to large 

IFO299THEN10320 
GOSUB10330 

A$=B$+" "+C$+" "+D$: RETURN 
A$="THAT NUMBER IS TOO LAR 
RETURN 

IFC=0THEND$=" 0 " : RETURN 
IFC<10THENGOTO10520 
I FC<2 0THENGOTO10 510 
'Additional lines for 
'numbers larger than 200 
'go here. I.E. : 

' IFC>299THENC=C-300 : GOSUB 



10430 
10440 
10450 
10460 



10400 'to line containing text 3 
00 

10410 IFC>199THENC=C-200:GOSUB10 
570 

10420 IFC>99THENC=C-100 :GOSUB105 
80 

I FC= 0 THENRETURN 
IFC<10THENGOTO10520 
IFC<20THENGOTO10510 
D=INT(C/10) :C=C- (D*10) 
10470 GOSUB10500 
10480 I FC= 0THENRETURN 
10490 GOTO10520 

10500 ON D-l GOSUB10690, 10700,10 
710, 10720,10730,10740 , 10750, 1076 
0 : RETURN 

10510 ON C-9 GOSUB10590, 10600, 10 

610,10620, 10630, 10640, 10650, 1066 

0 , 10670 , 10680 :RETURN 

10520 ON C GOSUB10770, 10780,1079 

0,10800,10810,10820, 10830, 10840, 

10850 

10530 RETURN 

10540 'Data for text to speech 
10550 'Text is mis-spelled for 
10560 'more correct pronunciatio 
n 

10570 B$="TWOHUNDERED" : RETURN 
10580 B$="ONEHUNDERED" : RETURN 



10590 C$ 
10600 C$- 
10610 C$; 
10620 C$: 
10630 C$: 
10640 C$: 
10650 C$- 
10660 C$= 
10670 C$= 
10680 C$= 
10690 C$: 
10700 C$ = 
10710 C$ = 
10720 C$= 
10730 C$= 
10740 C$= 
10750 C$= 
10760 C$= 
10770 D$= 
10780 D$= 
10790 D$= 
10800 D$= 
10810 D$= 
10820 D$= 
10830 D$= 
10840 D$= 
10850 D$= 



TEN" : RETURN 
EELEVEN" : RETURN 
TWELLVE " : RETURN 
THHIRTEEN" : RETURN 
FORTEEN " : RETURN 
FFIFTEEN" : RETURN 
SSSIXTEEN" : RETURN 
SSSEVENTEEN" : RETURN 
EIGHTTEEN" : RETURN 
NINE TEEN": RETURN 
TWEN T": RETURN 
THHIR T": RETURN 
4 T": RETURN 
FIFTEE" : RETURN 
SSSIXTEE" : RETURN 
SSSEVENTEE" : RETURN 
EIGHTEE" : RETURN 
NINE TEE": RETURN 

1 ": RETURN 

2 ": RETURN 

3 ": RETURN 
FFOR ".'RETURN 
FFFIVE ": RETURN 
SSSIX ": RETURN 
SSSEVEN ": RETURN 

8 " : RETURN 

9 ": RETURN 



THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

ft DIVISION OF BATANATCH. INC. 



/ DD 

PROGRAMMERS 
D I SK 



1 12* FOR 




OW • 



12* FOR 
1 *2»J2» FOR 

W/SLEEVES, LABELS, M.P. TABS 
HADE IN USA! CERTIFIED ERROR FREE. 
5 YEAR WARRANTY 

DISKS 10/*8 



FACTORY PUNCHED - U5E BOTH SIDES 
PRINTER RIBBONS 

EPSON MX/RX/FX 70/80 
RED, GREEN, BROWN, BLUE 
GEMINI 10/10X/SG10 
GEM/OKI COLORS 
OKI DATA 80/82/92/93 
C.ITOH.NEC 8023. APPLE 
DMP/IM AGE WRITER 
RED, GREEN, BROWN, BLUE 



$5.00 Ea. 
$6.00 Ea. 
$2.00 Ea. 
$3.00 Ea. 
$2.00 Ea. 



$6.00 Ea. 
$6.50 Ea. 



6/S28.00 
4/S22.00 

OOZ/S22.00 
4/$10.00 

DOZ/$22.00 

6/S34.00 
4/S25.00 



ALL ITEMS 100% GUARANTEED 



Add $2.50S/Hin U.S.A. ■ Canada Add $3.50 + S1.00/LB 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 
Send Check/Money Order Payable to: 

THE SOFTWARE HOUSE 

^SPP 9020 HEMINGWAY, REDFORD, Ml 48239 

(313) 937-3442 




Send Card Number & Exp. Date 



Min. Charae Order $20.00 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 39 




EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 
Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



^t^: - >=: 1 c—; ^ ca f 



* --a i 



Jttt -urai Man 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 

QUALITY 
SPEECH 

REPRODUCTION 
EARS Does It All! 



Ffrytdtw Structural Pattern 



nking mad fhm Mi 





Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device. Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds. Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory. You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite. 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re- 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, orFrench. In factyoudo 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming. Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH will instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. Wemean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6044, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS. EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULTI-PAK or 
Y-CABLE. Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need. You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to write your own pro- 
grams unless you want to. EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications for EARS are astounding. 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately) or the 
Radio Shack Plug 'N' Power controller. 
For example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or "TV OFF". . $24.95 




FREE 
BLANK DISK 

OR MPf 
WITH EVERY 

^ OROfK ,^ 






Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



-//> 



peec 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD. VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada S5.00 

COD charge S2.00 

Illinois residents add SV*% sales tax 



udlem5 

38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (TO ORDER) 



CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL 




TURB 



RAM 



TM 



ft* 



TURBO CHARGE YOUR COCO 3 



w 512K Fast High Quality Memory. 

Super Easy Solderless Installation. Installs in minutes. 
W Assembled, tested, and burned-in. 
f 120 ns RAM Chips 

W High Quality Double Sided, Solder Masked, Silkscreenecl PC Board, 
f Ideal tor OS9 Level II 
\* 2 Year Warranty. 

\* Free CIME Chip Technical Specs ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 

Free 5I2K Ram Test Program {$10.00 without Turbo Ram), 
f Free MUSICA RAM Disk ($10.00 without Turbo Ram). 
V $5 Off TURBO RAM Disk. 

W Also available, TURBO RAM less memory chips. ...... $69.95 




INSTALLATION m 

It' you know how to hold a screwdriver, we're convinced you con 
install Turbo Ram in minutes. However, if you like, send us your 
COCO 3 insured, postage paid, and we will install it, pay the return 
postage and guarantee it tor 1 year. $15.00 



^ SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

It' tor any reason you wish to return Turbo Ram, you may do so 
within 1 5 days and be charged only a 11% restocking charge. You 
may keep the CIME CHIP Technical Specs, 512K Ram Test program 
and MUSICA RAM DISK, a $30 value. 



TURBO RAM DISK 



TURBO RAM DISK adds 2 lightning fast Ram Disks to your COCO system. 
Imagine saving and loading programs instantaneously and having hundreds 
of your programs "on line" tor fast access. Single disk system users can 



use TURBO RAM DISK to easily make backups without continuously 
switching disks. 

Requires 5I2K Turbo Charged COCO 3 $24.95 

When purchased with TURBO RAM $19.95 



COCO 3 128K 



COLOR CONNECTION IV 

This is the most comprehensive modem package tor the COCO 3. All 
standard protocols are supported including CompuServe's Protocol B, 
XMODEM protocol, and XON/XOFF. Full support of the auto answer/auto 
dial feature for both Hayes compatible and some Radio Shack modems is 
provided. Single key macros allow easy entry of often-used passwords and 
ID's with a single key stroke. 

Disk $49.95 

COLOR SCRIBE III 

This great Word Processor can take full advantage of the 8 0 column 'display 
of the COCO 3. Justification, Headers, Footers, and Pagination make it 
perfect for letters and documents as well as programming in BASIC, PAS- 
CAL, "C," and Assembly Language. Over 2i line editing commands include 
capabilities like character insert and delete, skip over words, breaking a 
line, and morel 

Disk $49.95 



THE MAGIC OF ZANTH 

In the Land of Zanth, magic is commonplace. Dragons, Griffins, Centaurs 
and Demons abound. You are sent on a quest to discover the source of 
mngic in the Land of Zanth. This intriguing adventure features over 2 
dozen hi-res 1 6 color animated graphic screens, 4 voice music and sound 
effects. The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics look great. 
Disk , , . . . , . $34.95 

RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE 

This is the same Junior you've seen in the Kong arcade series, but with 
new COCO 3 graphics. This tireless little monkey must overcome all sorts 
of obstacles (4 screens worth) to rescue his father, The King, from the 
mean zookeeper. He will traverse the jungle and swamp, climb vines, 
avoid chompers and birds, open locks, and more before he finally meets 
with his big daddy. The 16 color, 320 x 192 graphics are superb. 
Disk , ; $34.95 



VVc accept CASH, CHECK. COD, VISA and MASTER CARD order* 
Shipping ond handling US jncl Canada Si.00 
Shipping nnd handling outside the US nnd Cinnd.i $5.00 

COD Charge S2.00 

Illinois residents add (V/-i",> sales tnx 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 



0 



9 




TM 



Jfo> 



I 



file em t mm rtisc 



All Voices On 
Tine Signature 
Key Signature 
Teppo 

Reset block 




■ Bill 



Block delete 



] Block copy 



FILE EDIT MIDI MISC 



LEGEND 
B2 



c y A o N ucaN cOM 

useP s 



Bio® 



LYRA is the most powerful music composition program we have seen on 
any computer. We don't mean just the COCO, we really mean any com- 
puter. Whether you are a novice trying to learn music or a professional 
musician with MIDI equipment you will find LYRA a powerful tool. You 



see, we wrote LYRA for musicians that hate computers. It you want proof, 
purchase a LYRA demo for $7.95. We will apply the demo price to your 
purchase. MIDI output requires the LYRA MIDI cable (#MC158) or COCO 
MIDI Seq/Editor (#CM147). 



Ultra Easy to use, just point with joystick or 
mouse and click. 

Compose with up to 8 completely 
independent voices. 

Room for over 18,000 notes. (This is not 
misprint!) 

Super Simple Editing Supports: 



Note insert 
Note delete 
Note change 
Output music to: 
TV Speaker 
STEREO PAK 
SYMPHONY 12 
MIDI Synth 



Block insert 
Block delete 
Block copy 

Monitor Speaker 
ORCHESTRA 90 
COCO MIDI S/E 
MIDI Drum Machine 



Output up to 4 voices without additional 
hardware. 



Output all 8 voices using either SYMPHONY 
12 or one or more MIDI synthesizers and 
drum machines 

Output any voice on any of the 8 MIDI 
channels. 

Transpose music to any key. 
*> Modify music to any tempo. 

Automatically inserts bar for each measure 
as you compose 

Key signature lets you specify sharps and 
flats only once, LYRA will do the rest 
Plays MUSICA 2 files using LYRA CONVERT 
(#LC164). 

*> Each voice may be visually highlighted or 
erased. 

Each measure is numbered for easy 
reading. 

- LYRA OPTIONS 



Solo capability 
Block edits are highlighted. 
Tie notes together for musical continuity 
Name of note pointed to is constantly 
displayed. 
\* Jump to any point in the score 
instantaneously. 

Memory remaining clearly displayed, 
however you will have plenty of memory 
even for the most demanding piece. 
Help menu makes manual virtually 
unnecessary. 

LYRA is 100% software, no need for extra 
hardware unless you want more power. 
Music easily saved to tape or disk. 
Requires 64K and mouse or joystick. 



LYRA (Disk only) #LY1 22 



$54.95 



These LYRA options are 

LYRA CONVERT 

A program to convert MUSICA 2 tiles to LYRA 
files. 

(Disk) #LC164 $14.95 

VERSION UPDATE 

To receive the latest version of LYRA return your 
original disk. #UP162 $10.00 

LYRA MIDI CABLE 

A cable to connect your computer to your MIDI 
synthesizer. 

#MC158 $19.95 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISAand MASTER CARD orders 
Shipping and handling US and Canada $3.00 
Shipping and handling •uiside (he US and Canada S5.00 
COD Charge $2.00 
Illinois residents add 6'/<% sales fax 



not required. They are provided for those wishing additional flexibility. 



LYRA SYMPHONY 12 ENHANCER 

Lets LYRA play all 8 voices through SYMPHONY 
12. 

(Disk) #LS1 77 .... , $19.95 

LYRA LIBRARY 

A collection of 50 songs ready to play for hours. 
Most have 7 and 8 voices. #LL137 . $39.95 

SYMPHONY 12 

A real hardware music synthesizer, lets LYRA 

play all 8 voices in stereo. 

(T or D) #SY149 $69.95 



COCO MID Seq/Editor 

A professional quality MIDI inierface for MIDI 

synthesizers. 

(Disk only) #CM147 $149.95 

MUSIC LIBRARY 

A collection of over 900 songs. When used with 
CONVERT, it gives an incredible LYRA library. 
Each volume 100 songs. 

(T or D) #MLXXX $29.95 

COCO MAX is a trademark of Coldrw.ire 
ORCHESTRA 90 is a trademark of Radio Shack 




££(2. 




it£mi 



38W255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 



r 



FILE EDIT MIDI HISC 



j&in;n 



NIDI Instru«enis: 



0 
2 
4 
6 
8 
A 
C 
E 



QJO 1 Brass 1 

006 Piano 3 

013 E Organ 5 

003 Trunpet 7 

018 Oboe 9 

021 Vibrphn B 



025 Clavier 
043 Snaredr 



D 
F 



005 String 
009 Guitar 
014 P Organ 
016 Flute 
019 Clarnet 
026 Harpsch 
032 Tinpani 
045 Percusn 



J J II JJ J J. . 




Lyra 



COMPATIBLE! 



ted* 




1 



so 



si 



i i * t t i i * i i i 

♦ V t I * I * t i i y 







//#//g//f{|| | ||IHHU\\Ul\\l 




ozicjinaf dilA tvitli $20. 



Now your COCO can talk to your MIDI music synthesizer. 
Whether you have a Korg, Roland, Casio, Yamaha, or Moog, it 
doesn't matter as long as it's MIDI equipped. Choose from our 



entry level MUSICA MIDI system that plays MUSICA files or our 
Professional COCO MIDI 2 system. 



i> Supports 16 Track recording and playback. 

Adjustable tempo. 

Over 45 Kbytes available 

(Over 15,500 MIDI events possible) 

Record to any track. 
\* Low Level track editing 

LYRA editing, (one voice per track). 

Playback from any number of tracks. 

Quantizing to '/i6. V32, /s* intervals. 
v 0 Dynamic memory allocation. 



*^ Filter out MIDI data: 
Key pressure 
Program change 
Pitch wheel 



Control Change 
Channel Pressure 
System Message 



V Graphic Piano Keyboard Display in both 
record and playback mode. 

\* Adjustable Key (Transposition) for each 
track. 

^ Save recording to disk for later playback or 
editing. 

Syncs to drum machine as MASTER or 
SLAVE. 



DX LIBRARIAN 



TM 



PUNCH IN and PUNCH OUT editing. 
^ Sequencer features. 
100% machine code. 
"Musician Friendly" Menu Driven. 
Metronome 

Many songs included. 
Includes MIDI hardware interface, 2 MIDI ca- 
bles, detailed manual, and software. Requires 
64K C0C0, Y-Cable or Multi-Pak. 
COCO MIDI 2 (disk only) #CM147 . $149.95 

DOUBLE Y-CABLE #DV181 $28,95 

TRIPLE Y-CABLE #TY1 73 $34.95 



Save and load voice parameters for the Yamaha DX series of syn- 
thesizers (DX-7, DX-100, DX-21 etc.). Save sounds individually 
or as a group letting you load the entire synthesizer in seconds. 



Comes with professionally developed voices for the DX-7 worth 
10 times the price. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
DX LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #DX143 $39.95 



CASIO LIBRARIAN 

Save and load voice parameters for any Casio synthesizer (CZ-101, memory or buffer. Requires COCO MIDI hardware interface. 
CZ-1000, CZ-5000 etc.) You can save from the: presets, cartridge, CASIO LIBRARIAN (Disk only) #CL169 $39.95 



MUSICA MIDI 



MUSICA MIDI takes any MUSICA 2 music file and plays it through 
your MIDI synthesizer. We offer you over 800 tunes from our 
MUSIC LIBRARY series (sold separately) or create your own music 



using MUSICA 2. Inlcudes: documentation, plenty of music, and 
the cable to connect between the COCO and your synthesizer. 
MUSICA MIDI Complete (Disk Only) #CM126 $39.95 



MIDI KEYBOARD 



If you own the Casio CZ-101 or similar MIDI synth, you know 
that the mini keys and the short 3 or 4 octave keyboard is limiting. 
MIDI KEYBOARD when used with our full size 5 octave keyboard 



gives you the flexibility you need. Comes with cable to connect 
the COCO to your MIDI synth. 

MIDI KEYBOARD (Disk only) #MK167 $29.95 




V \S Start 



ers C\ub 



CO 



CO 



Band 



By Bill Bernico 



1 began playing guitar in the summer of "64 when the 
Beailes were sill the rage. I've kept up with ii over the 
years, and it s all preity much second nature to me now, 
hui I van remember I he difficulty I had when i first tried 
lo plav a chord. The hooks available weren't the most 
helpl til. I hey simply showed black dots on some lines to 
rv preset! I chords, 

loo bud I didn't have my l rusty CoCo back then, I could 
haw tun this program and saved myself a lot of headaches, 
Sn how a bom ill help you would-be Eddie Van Hale as get 
Marled? All ii mkes is a guitar, your CoCo, this program 
;md some patience. 

Alter you run St rummer, you'll see what looks like the 
lop section of a guitar neck up to Lhe fifth fret. The strings 



Ml fttmiKi is u wtfif&ugkt mmputt'risi who enjoys golf, 
muMt and programming, fie is a drummer with a rock hand 
i i ti i I h\ i - \ to \/i t ■ hi 1 1 g an , It is ton s in . 



are labeled on top and you'll sec a prompt asking for th 
speed — slow, medium or fast. The slow option picks out 
the individual notes of each chord slowly enough for you 
to see how it's done. The fast option allows you to "strum" 
a chord with the touch of a single key. The medium option 
falls somewhere in between strumming and learning. 

Once the speed is selected, the prompt changes to let you 
select which chord you'll play. The choices are natural 
chords from A to G, For those chords, simply press those 
keys. The minor chords are represented by the keys- 1 to 9, 
Keys I to 7 are the chords A minor through G minor. Key 
H is C# minor and Key 9 is F# minor. I threw those two 
in simply because you'll use them in a lot of simple songs. 
Altogether there are 16 chords programmed into St rummer, 

If you want to change speeds, simply press S when 
selecting a chord and the speed prompt will reappear. 

(Questions oh out this program may he directed to the 
author at 708 Michigan Avenue, Sheboygan t W! 53081 
Please enc lose an SASEfor a reply.) □ 



137 

15 76 



26 . . 
39... 
53 . . 
END 



109 

. . .7 
130 
133 



The listing: STRUMMER 

1 1 STRUMMER by Bill Bernico 

2 S$»CHR$(202) :F$=CHR$(128) :Z$=S 
TRING$ (15, 128) : Y$=STRING$ (6,2j37) 
:W$=CHR$ (2J37) :CLS5:F0RX=8T0488ST 
EP32 :PRINT@X,S$; : NEXT : FORX=l 1T04 
91STEP32 : PRINTSX, S$ ; :NEXT: FORX=l 
4T0494STEP32 : PRINTSX, S$ ; :NEXT:FO 
RX=17T0497STEP32 :PRINTSX,S$; :NEX 
T : FORX=2 J3TO5J30STEP3 2 

3 PRINTSX, S$ ;: NEXT: FORX=23TO503S 
TEP3 2 : PRINTSX , S $ ; : NEXT : PRINT § 9 , Z 
$; :PRINT@105,Z$; :FRINT§201,Z$; : P 
RINTS297,Z$; : PRINTS 393 , Z$ ; : PRINT 

(3489, Z$; :PRINTS8, "e" ; :PRINTS11, 11 
a"; :PRINTS14, "d"; : PRINTS 17, "g" ; : 
PRINTS20, "b" ; : PRINTS 2 3 , "e" ; : PRIN 
T@0 , "guitar" ; 

4 PRINTS 3 2 , "chords" ; : PRINTS224 , S 
TRING$(6,207) ; ; PRINTS256 , STRING$ 
(6,207) ; :PRINT@288,S TRING$ ( 6 , 2J37 
) ; :PRINTS320,STRING$(6,207) ; : PRI 
NTS224, "select" ; :POKE1285 , 32 : PRI 
NTS 2 56, " speed" ; : PRINTS288 , "S-M-F 
" ? : FORX=1312T01316:POKEX, PEEK(X) 
-64:NEXT:POKE1317,32 

5 I$=INKEY$ : IFI$="S"THENPLAY"T2" 
: GOTO 6 E LS E I F I $= "M" THENPLAY " T 8 " : G 
OTO6ELSEIFI$="F"THENPLAY"T60" : GO 
T06ELSE5 

6 PRINTS224 , "select" ; : PRINTS256 , 
"chord" f : POKE1285, 32 :PRINTS288 , " 
A - G";:PRINT@320,"1 - 9";:FORX= 
1312T01316: POKEX , PEEK ( X ) - 6 4 : NEXT 
: POKE13 17 ,32: FORX=13 4 4T013 4 8 : POK 
EX,PEEK(X) -64 : NEXT: POKE1349 , 32 

7 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN 7 

8 PRINTS 130, W$+W$+W$; 

9 IFI$="S"THEN4 

IfS IF I$="C"THEN12ELSEIFI$="F"TH 
EN13ELSEIFI$="G"THEN14ELSEIFI$=" 
1"THEN15ELSEIFI$="D"THEN16ELSEIF 
I$="E"THEN17ELSEIFI$="A"THEN18EL 
SEIFI$="B"THEN19ELSEIFI$="2"THEN 
2j3ELSEIFI$="3"THEN21ELSEIFI$="4" 
THEN22ELSEIFI$="5"THEN23ELSEIFI$ 
="6"THEN24 

11 IFI$="7"THEN25ELSEIFI$="8"THE 
N2 6ELSEIFI $=" 9 "THEN2 7ELSE7 

12 PRINTS 13 0, "c" ; : GOSUB31 : GOSUB3 
7 : GOSUB4 2 : GOSUB4 6 : GOSUB53 : GOSUB5 



Two- Liner Contest Winner 



If you like a mix of green and medicine, this one's 
for you. 



The listing: 

5 PMODE4 : PCLS 1 : COLOR4 : SCREEN1 , 1 : 

DRAW"BM5j3,96U4j3F2j3E2j3D4j3BMlj35,96 

U4j3R2j3D2j3L2j3R2j3D2j3BM14j3 , 96R2j3U2j3 

L2j3U2j3R2j3BM18j3 , 96U4j3D2j3R2j3U2j3D4j3 
it 

1J3 PLAY " L3 GL4 FEFEL8 FL4 EL3 . DL4EDE 
DL8EL4 DL3 CL8EL4 DCDCL8 DL4 CL3 02 B03 
L8DL4C02B03C02B03L8CL4DL1EL4 G AGL 
8AL4GL4AL3GPlj3L4GAGL8AL4 GAL3GP10 
L8GEGL8AL404CL3DL8CL803AL4GL1AL4 
GEGA04CDC03AGL1 . A" : GOT05 



Craig Murphy 
Burlington, I A 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies oi 
both Ttie Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



70fy fray exfoa fax aafatAne) 



7 



THE FIRST COMPLETE 
COCO 3 512K UPGRADE 

#1014 JRAMR 0K MEMORY/^ £7] £Jg 



Assembled and Tested 



Includes User Friendly, Highly Customizable 
Double Ram Disk, Customizable Print Spooler, 
Memory Test Program and Ramdisk Utilities 

All Other Products & Software 

UM B17I7 

Offer good thru May 30. 1987. (Add $4.00 shipping & handling; add $3.00 CO D.) 



PHONE TODAY 

RAY JESSE 

(301) 788-0861 (301) 987-9067 

J&R Electronics / PO Box 2572 / Columbia, Md. 21045 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 45 



8 : G0T07 

13 PRINT§130, "f " ; :GOSUB29:GOSUB3 
7 : G0SUB4 3 : G0SUB4 8 : G0SUB5 3 : G0SUB5 
9 : G0T07 

14 PRINT§13 0 , "g" ; : G0SUB3 1 : G0SUB3 
6 : GOSUB40 : G0SUB46 : GOSUB52 : G0SUB6 
1 : G0T07 

15 PRINT§13 0 , "aM" ; : G0SUB2 8 : GOSUB 
3 4 : GOSUB4 2 : G0SUB4 8 : GOSUB53 : GOSUB 
58 : GOT07 

16 PRINT§130, "d"; : GOSUB30 : GOSUB3 
4 : GOSUB40 : GOSUB48 : GOSUB55 : GOSUB6 
0 : GOT07 

17 PRINT§130, 11 e" ; :GOSUB28:GOSUB3 
6 : GOSUB42 : GOSUB47 : GOSUB52 : GOSUB5 
8 : GOT07 

18 PRINT §130, "a"; :GOSUB28:GOSUB3 
4 : GOSUB42 : GOSUB48 : GOSUB54 : GOSUB5 
8 : GOT07 

19 PRINT§130 , "b" ; : GOSUB3 0 : GOSUB3 
6 : GOSUB44 : GOSUB50 : GOSUB56 : GOSUB 6 
0 : GOT07 

20 PRINT§ 1 30, "bM"; :GOSUB30: GOSUB 
3 6 : GOSUB44 : GOSUB50 : GOSUB55 : GOSUB 
60 : GOT07 

21 PRINT§130, "CM"; :GOSUB31: GOSUB 
3 7 : GOSUB4 5 : G0SUB5 1 : GOSUB5 6 : GOSUB 
61:GOT07 

22 PRINT§130, "dM" ; : GOSUB3 0 : GOSUB 
34 : GOSUB40 : GOSUB48 : GOSUB55 : GOSUB 
59 : GOT07 

23 PRINT§130,"eM" ; : GOSUB28 : GOSUB 
3 6 : GOSUB4 2 : GOSUB4 6 : GOSUB5 2 : GOSUB 
58 : GOT07 

24 PRINT§13 0 , " fM" ; : GOSUB2 9 : GOSUB 
3 7 : GOSUB4 3 : GOSUB4 7 : GOSUB5 3 : GOSUB 
59:GOT07 

25 PRINT§130 , "gM" ; : GOSUB3 1 : GOSUB 
3 9 : GOSUB4 5 : GOSUB4 9 : GOSUB5 5 : GOSUB 
61:GOT07 

26 PRINT§130,"C#M"; : GOSUB32 : GOSU 
B3 8 : GOSUB4 2 : GOSUB4 7 : G0SUB5 4 : GOSU 
B58:GOT07 

27 PRINT§130, "f#M" ; : GOSUB3 0 : GOSU 
B3 8 : GOSUB44 : GOSUB48 : GOSUB54 : GOSU 
B60 : GOT07 

28 PRINT© 8, "E" ; : PLAY"02E" : PRINT§ 
8 , "e" ; : RETURN 

29 PRINT§72,"F"; :PLAY"02F": PRINT 
§72, S$; : RETURN 

30 PRINT§168 , "F#" ; : PLAY"02F#" : PR 
INT§168,S$+W$; : RETURN 

31 PRINT§264 , "G" ; : PLAY"02G" : PRIN 
T§264,S$; : RETURN 

32 PRINT§3 60, "G#"; : PLAY"02G#" : PR 
INT§360,S$+W$; : RETURN 

3 3 PRINT§4 5 6 , "A" ; : PLAY "02 A" : PRIN 
T@456,S$; : RETURN 

34 PRINT§11 , "A" ; : PLAY"02A" : PRINT 



46 THE RAINBOW June 1987 

r 



§11, "a" ;: RETURN 

35 PRINT§75,"A#"; : PLAY"02A#" : PRI 
NT§75, S$+W$ ; : RETURN 
3 6 PRINT§171, "B" ;: PLAY "02B" : PRIN 
T§171,S$ ;: RETURN 

37 PRINT§2 67 , "C" ; : PLAY"03C" : PRIN 
T§2 67,S$; : RETURN 

38 PRINT§363 , "C#" ; : PLAY"03C#" : PR 
INT§363,S$+W$; : RETURN 

39 PRINT§459 , "D" ; : PLAY"03D" : PRIN 
T§459,S$; : RETURN 

40 PRINT§14 , "D" ; : PLAY"03D" : PRINT 
§14, "d" ; : RETURN 

41 PRINT§78 , "D#" ; : PLAY"03D#" : PRI 
NT§78 , S$+W$ ; : RETURN 

42 PRINT§174 , "E" ; : PLAY"03E" : PRIN 
T§174,S$;: RETURN 

43 PRINT§270, "F" ; : PLAY"03F" : PRIN 
T§270,S$ ;: RETURN 

44 PRINT§366, "F#"; : PLAY"03F#" : PR 
INT § 3 6 6 , S $+ W$ ; : RETURN 

45 PRINT§462 , "G" ; : PLAY"03G" : PRIN 
T§462,S$; : RETURN 

46 PRINT§17 , "G" ; : PLAY"03G" : PRINT 
§17, "g" ; : RETURN 

47 PRINT§81, "G#"; : PLAY "03G# ": PRI 
NT§81,S$+W$; : RETURN 

48 PRINT§177 , "A" ; : PLAY"03A" : PRIN 
T§177,S$; : RETURN 

49 PRINT§273, "A#"; :PLAY"03A#":PR 
INT§273 , S$+W$ ; : RETURN 

50 PRINT§369 , "B" ; : PLAY"03B" : PRIN 
T§3 69, S$, •: RETURN 

51 PRINT§4 65, "C" ; : PLAY"04C" : PRIN 
T§465,S$; : RETURN 

52 PRINT§20 , "B" ; : PLAY"03B" : PRINT 
§20, "b" ; : RETURN 

53 PRINT§84 , "C"; : PLAY"04C" : PRINT 
§84, S$; : RETURN 

54 PRINT§180, "C#"; : PLAY"04C#" : PR 
INT§18 0 , S$+W$ ; : RETURN 

55 PRINT§2 76 , "D" ; : PLAY"04D" : PRIN 
T§276,S$; : RETURN 

56 PRINT§372 , "D#" ; : PLAY"04D#" : PR 
INT§372,S$+W$; : RETURN 

57 PRINT§4 68, "E"; : PLAY"04E" : PRIN 
T§468,S$; : RETURN 

58 PRINT§23 , "E" ; : PLAY"04E" : PRINT 
§23, "e" ;: RETURN 

59 PRINT§87 , "F" ; : PLAY"04F" : PRINT 
§87,S$; : RETURN 

60 PRINT§18 3, "F#" ; : PLAY"04F#" : PR 
INT§183 , S$+W$ ; : RETURN 

61 PRINT§2 79, "G"; : PLAY"04G" : PRIN 
T§279,S$; : RETURN 

62 PRINT§375 , "G#" ; : PLAY"04G#" : PR 
INT§ 3 7 5 , S $+W$ ; : RETURN 

63 PRINT§471,"A"; : PLAY"04A" : PRIN 
T§471,S$; : RETURN _ 




A Square Deal for 
Teaching Math 

By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Math facts are often a chore for 
many students. Frequently, 
students who have the great- 
est need to master these facts quickly, 
are the very students who have the most 
difficulty learning them. This article 
presents a method for reviewing math 
operational facts. 

It is wise to use a variety of methods 
when learning math facts. Different 
students learn through various means. 
Flash cards are sufficient f or some lucky 
students, while games are the best 
solution for others. Any creative ap- 
proach that can be offered to help all 
students master the basic math facts 
should be tried. 

Our program presents numbers in a 
two-by-two square. The child chooses 
whether to add or multiply the 
numbers. The numbers are computed 
by the student first horizontally and 
then vertically. A final question is given 
after the four initial answers are calcu- 
lated. 

This final question requires adding or 
multiplying the two vertical or horizon- 
tal answers to obtain a final sum. The 



Steve Blyn leaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Stolen Island, New York. 



answer will be the same whether the two 
vertical or the two horizontal numbers 
are used. This aspect of the program 
somewhat resembles traditional "magic 
square" problems that students of ten do 
for extra credit. 

Figure 1 is an example of a typical 



i 



! 



8 



! 



! 



! ?A? 



i 



! ?B? 



?C? ?D? ??E?? 

Figure 1: Example problem 



puzzle from this program. The student 
is to solve for A, B, C, D and, finally, 
E. The plus sign at the top left of the 
puzzle indicates addition was chosen on 
this round. The answers, of course, are 
A- 11, B=13, C=12, D=12 and E=24. 
The answer for E is computed by either 
adding A+B or C+D. 

Our program is set up for addition 
and multiplication squares. Lines 60 to 
100 permit the student to choose be- 
tween the two or end the program. Line 
130 selects random numbers for each 
puzzle and lines 1 90 to 250 make certain 
that numbers work out correctly. 

The puzzle is printed by lines 540 to 
610 and lines 140 to 170. The remainder 
of the program asks for the answers. A 
congratulatory message is printed if a 
correct answer is given. A "sorry" 
message accompanies incorrect 
answers, which are then replaced by the 
correct answer. 

Many simple modifications are pos- 
sible for this program. As it stands now, 
it covers addition and multiplication 
examples. You can easily change the 
random numbers to make the program 
more difficult, and a change to subtrac- 
tion or division would not be much 
trouble. If you try this, however, make 
certain Line 200 or Line 240 checks out 
each example. When doing subtraction, 
checkfor a positive answer. When doing 
division, check for a whole number 
quotient. 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 47 



Any four of the math operations can 
also be used for checking decimal 
number math. Again, change the ran- 
dom numbers to fit your needs. Signed 
number examples are yet another type 
of math that can be used in this format. 
If you are experimenting with any of 
these modifications, please avoid any 
disasters by saving a copy of the orig- 
inal. 

As an added challenge or follow-up 
activity to this program, students may 
be encouraged to do traditional true 
magic squares. These are 3-by-3 squares 
whose resulting sum is the same whether 



the math is done horizontally, vertically 
or diagonally. Several of the puzzle's 
numbers are left out for the student to 
compute. 

Figure 2 shows an example of a magic 
square. The solution to this magic 
square is A=3, B-2 and C= 18. Any 
horizontal row or any vertical column 
(and even the two diagonal rows) will 
equal 18. A nice challenge for our 
readers would be to create a magic 
squares computer program. As always, 
we here at Computer Island enjoy 
receiving letters and comments from 
our readers. Keep them coming! □ 



+ 












- 1 
1 

1 




| - 


1 

1 

j 




, \ — 


A 


I 10 


5 


i 


- I 






















r 


a 
o 


1 fi 
- ■■■> 


I 


A 


i 


- i 














-t 
f 


1 D 

1 P 


1 
i 

+ 




1 
i 



! C ! 



Figure 2: Magic Square 



The listing: MflTHPLAY 




370 IF Y=G THEN PRINT@ 3 2 4 , "GREAT 


10 REM M SUPER SQUARES " 




";: GOSUB 620 : PRINT@ 3 20 , " ": PRINT 


2 0 REM"STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER 


IS LAN 


@325,G; : GOSUB 550 


D, STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1987 




380 IF YOG THEN PRINT@ 3 2 4 , " SORR 


3 0 CLS 




Y";:GOSUB 630 : PRINT@320 , " " : PRIN 


40 PRINT@24 , "super" ; 




T@325,G:GOSUB 550 


50 PRINT@55 , "squares" ; 




390 PRINT@3 30 , " 11 ; 


60 PRINT@449 , "CHOOSE aDD OR 


mULT 


400 INPUT Z 


IPLY OR eND"; 




410 IF Z=H THEN PRINT @ 3 3 1 , " YAY" ; 


70 EN$=INKEY$ 




:GOSUB 620 : PRINT@330 , " ":PRINT@3 


80 IF EN$="A" THEN J$="+ " : PRINT@ 


31, H; : GOSUB 550 


34 , " + " ; :GOTO 120 




420 IF ZOH THEN PRINT @ 3 2 9 ," SORR 


90 IF EN$="M" THEN J$=" * " : PRINT@ 


Y";: GOSUB 620 : PRINT@329 , " " : PRIN 


34, "X" ; :GOTO 120 




T@331,H; :GOSUB 550 


100 IF EN$ = "E" THEN CLS : END 




430 PRINT@369 , " " ; 


110 GOTO 70 




4 40 INPUT R 


120 PRINT@448 ," '» 




450 IF R=I THEN PRINT@370 ," SUPER 


130 A=RND ( 9 ) :B=RND(9) :C=RND(9) :D 


";:GOSUB 620 : PRINT @ 3 69 , I 


=RND ( 9 ) 




460 IF Rol THEN PRINT@3 70 , » SORR 


140 PRINT@134,A; 




Y";: GOSUB 630 : PRINT@ 3 69 , I 


150 PRINT@140,B; 




470 FOR T=1334 TO 1430 STEP 32:P 


160 PRINT@230,C; 




OKE T,128:SOUND 250,1:NEXT T 


170 PRINT@2 3 6,D; 




480 FOR T=1462 TO 1456 STEP-l:PO 


180 IF J$="+" THEN 230 




KE T,128:SOUND 250,1:NEXT T 


190 E=A*B:F=C*D:G=A*C:H=B*D 


: I=A* 


490 PRINT@484 , "PRESS enter TO GO 


D 




AGAIN" ; 


200 IF E*F<>G*H THEN 130 




500 EN$=INKEY$ 


210 I=E*F:J=G*H 




510 IF EN$="E" THEN CLS : END 


220 GOTO 260 




520 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN RUN ELS 


230 E=A+B:F=C+D:G=A+C:H=B+D 


: I=A+ 


E 500 


D 




530 GOTO 530 


240 IF E+FoG+H THEN 130 




540 REM "DRAW THE LINES" 


250 I=E+F:J=G+H 




550 FOR T=1090 TO 1104:POKE T,12 


260 GOSUB 550 




8: NEXT T 


270 PRINT0145, "" ; 




560- FOR T=1220 TO 1232: POKE T, 13 


2 80 INPUT W 




1:NEXT T 


290 IF W=E THEN PRINT@145," 


CORRE 


570 FOR T=1316 TO 1333: POKE T, 12 


CT";: GOSUB 620 : PRINT@145 , E 




8: NEXT T 


300 IF WOE THEN PRINT@145, 


"SORR 


580 FOR T=1060 TO 1316 STEP 32:P 


Y" ; : GOSUB 630 : PRINT@ 145 , E 




OKE T, 128: NEXT T 


310 PRINT@241 , " " ; 




590 FOR T=1130 TO 1322 STEP 32:P 


3 20 INPUT X 




OKE T, 12 8: NEXT T 


3 30 IF X=F THEN PRINT@2 41," 


GOOD" 


600 FOR T=1136 TO 1424 STEP 32:P 


;: GOSUB 620 : PRINT@2 4 1 , F 




OKE T, 12 8: NEXT T 


340 IF X<>F THEN PRINT@241, 


"SORR 


610 RETURN 


Y M ; : GOSUB 630 : PRINT@2 4 1 , F 




6 20 PLAY"L2 00CEGCEGFFFEEEDDDCCC " 


350 PRINT@324 , "" ; 




: RETURN 


360 INPUT Y 




630 PLAY"L30FFGG" : RETURN /«\ 



48 



THE RA/NBOW 



June 1987 



Pick 




From 



the Music lenu 



By Mark S. Camp 



The Music* program by Bob Lud- 
lum (June 1984 and June 1986 
issues) is a terrific program for 
making music with your CoCo. Using 
Music* to create the music, I have 
developed an entire collection of Chris- 
tian hymns (60 as of this writing). I 
quickly tired of trying to remember the 
filename for each hymn and having to 
LDADM and EXEC each one. So, I wrote 
a small program to give me a menu to 
select from, which made things a bit 
easier. Yet, I felt that after all the time 
programming the music, why not also 
display the words to the verses as the 
hymns played. 

I developed Menu to select one hymn 
from a menu of eight hymns or to play 
all the hymns on the menu. You can not 
only select and play songs created with 
Music*, but also print the words to 
verses as the songs play. 

Lines 20 to 100 allow room to write 
a screen for your menu, as well as load 
in a song to play while the title screen 
is being displayed. I have my program 
load a binary picture file. To load a 
picture (an extension of .BIN is as- 
sumed), first remove the REM from lines 
50 and 60. Then, substitute the filename 
of your binary picture in place of TITL- 
PIC in Line 50. To load in a title song, 
simply remove the REM in Line 100 and 
substitute the filename of the song you 

Mark Camp lives in Ballwin, Missouri, 
and is an archives specialist with the 
National Personnel Records Center in 
St. Louis. He is also an ordained min- 
ister in the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion. 



want to play in place of TITLSDNG. 

Lines 170 to 240 contain the titles of 
eight songs that will be displayed on the 
menu. Remember, substitute a regular 
title for the string TITLE. For example, 
if the first song on the menu is "Amaz- 
ing Grace," Line 170 would read: 

170 A$="AMAZING GRACE" 

Line 370 loads in the song that cor- 
responds to Selection 1 on the menu. If 
my binary MUSIC+ file for "Amazing 
Grace" was called AMAZING, I would 
change the XXXXX in Line 370 so the line 
would read: 

370 LO ADM" AMAZING" 

Substitute song filenames in place of 
XXXXX in lines 370, 510, 640, 770, 900, 
1030, 1160 and 1290. 

Now, let's type in words to verses. 
These lines are the beginning of new 
selections: 320, 460, 590, 720, 850, 980, 
1110 and 1240. Following these lines 
you will see some lines that contain the 
statements: 

REM uords to verse 1 (or to verse 
2) 

REM uords 

Delete these REM statements and substi- 
tute lines with PRINT statements con- 
taining the words to one verse. For most 
hymns you will be able to get all the 
words to a verse and chorus in two or 
three program lines. Songs with long 
verses may not fit onto one screen. This 
is a limitation of this program. Using a 
Hi-Res screen would give more room 



for words; however, some Hi-Res 
screens I tried messed up the repeat 
execution of the songs. 

Let's look at the program process for 
one song selection. After the title screen 
is displayed and the title song is played, 
the selection menu appears. You can 
play either one song or all the songs. 
You are asked before each song whether 
or not you want all the verses. 

Suppose you select the first song on 
the menu. Notice the routine beginning 
at Line 330. The title to the song is 
printed and you are asked if you want 
all verses. No matter whether you 
choose Y or N, the words to Verse One 
are displayed and the song is loaded and 
executed. The GOSUB routine in Line 
1380 stops the disk drive after the song 
is loaded and executes the song; other- 
wise, the drive would spin while the 
song is playing. Remember — the EXEC 
in Line 1380 takes care of song execu- 
tion for Verse One on all menu selec- 
tions. 

If you answered Y to the question 
"Do you want all verses?" the program 
plays Verse One then goes to Line 400, 
displays the words to the next verse and 
executes the song again, which is still in 
memory. Notice that if you only have 
one verse to a song, you should delete 
any other lines in that particular song 
section up to the line that reads: 

IF A=0 THEN. . . 

You should only have as many sets of 
PRINT and EXEC statements as you do 
verses. Lines marked: REM WORDS can be 
used to print additional verses. You may 



June 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



49 



need to add a line or two. You will also 
need to add some EXEC statements if 
you intend to execute the song more 
than two times. 

If you answered N to the verse ques- 
tion, the program jumps to Line 440 to 
see if you selected to play all of the songs 
on the menu. If not, you are returned 
to the selection menu. If you did select 
to play all the songs, the program jumps 
to the next song section and the routine 
continues. 

In summary, this is a very simple 
program and there are only a few tips 
to keep in mind: 

• When you make a music file with 
Music+, make it so that it only 
plays through one verse. The EXEC 
statements will make it repeat as 
necessary. 

• You should only have as many 
PRINT and EXEC statements within 
each section as you do verses. If 



you only have words to two verses 
and do not delete any extra EXEC 
statements within each song sec- 
tion of the program, the song will 
continue to EXEC. 

When making a song with Music*, 
I find it helpful to place a quarter 
rest either at the beginning or end 
of the song. This will give a short 
break between the EXEC state- 
ments. 

Be sure to substitute song filenames 
for XXXXX in the LOflDM "XXXXX" 
statements; otherwise, you will get 
an NE Error. 

The regular screen format of the 
CoCo is adequate for printing the 
words to most hymns. If you have 
a chorus that is repeated after each 
verse, save yourself some typing. 
Type the chorus in the bottom of 
the song section and make a GOSUB 



routine after each verse of words 
and before the EXEC statement. 

In closing, let me suggest a use for 
CoCo music. In the past I have pastored 
small churches where often there was no 
organist or pianist. This meant singing 
without instruments. On one occasion, 
I made recorded tapes by playing the 
hymns from my CoCo through the 
stereo. Then, on Sunday, I took the tape 
along with a portable stereo to church. 
You guessed it — CoCo at the piano! 
With the numerous recent develop- 
ments in music programs and stereo 
packs for the CoCo, you might find 
church music can take on dimensions 
never dreamed of before, especially in 
small churches. My thanks to Bob 
Ludlum for a super program in Music*. 

(You may address questions about 
this program to the author at 221 
High view Drive, Ballwin, MO 6301 1. 
Please enclose an SASE for a reply. )D 



Editor's Note: RAINBOW ON TAPE and 
RAINBOW ON DISK will include a Music* 
file, called HYMN, which can be used with 
Musxmenu. 



^^270 ... 



The listing: MU5XMENU 



270 
46G 
710 . 
950 . 
1130 
END 



141 
202 
.58 
216 
235 
142 



T 



CLS 

REM lines 20-70 are for 
REM title screen such as 
REM words or binary picture 

REM LOADM "TTTLPIC" 



10 
20 

30 
40 

50 

60 REM PMODE4,l:SCREENl,l 
70 REM 

80 REM line 100 can be used 

90 REM load a title song 

100 REM LOADM" TITLSONG" : GOSUB150 

0 

110 CLS 

120 CLS : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) "SONG SELECTI 
ON MENU" 

130 PRINTTAB(1)STRING$(30,"%") 
140 PRINT" WHICH WOULD YOU LIKE 
TO HEAR?" 
150 PRINT 

160 REM ***TITLE LINES 170-240** 

170 A$="TITLE" 
180 B$="TITLE" 



190 C$="TITLE" 
200 D$="TITLE" 
210 E$="TITLE" 
220 F$="TITLE" 
230 G$="TITLE" 
240 H$="TITLE" 

250 I$="end program" 

260 J$="play all of above songs" 

270 PRINT " 1 - " A$ : PRINT " 2 - " B$ : PRIN 

T"3-"C$: PRINT"4-"D$:PRINT"5-"E$: 

PRINT " 6 - " F $ : PRINT " 7 - " G $ : PRINT " 8 - 

"H$ : PRINT"9-"I$ : PRINT"0-" J$ 

280 PRINT: INPUT" # OF SONG...";A 

290 CLS: IF A=0 THEN PRINT" YOU WI 

LL BE ASKED AT THE" : PRINT" BEGINN 

ING OF EACH SONG WHETHER" : PRINT" 

OR NOT YOU WANT ALL VERSES.": FOR 

ZZ=1TO2 800:NEXTZZ 

300 IF A=0 THEN 330 

310 ON A GOTO 330,470,600,730,8 6 

0,990,1120,1250,1360 

320 REM ***SONG 1 SECTION*** 

330 CLS :PRINTA$: PRINT :GOSUB13 70 

340 CLS: PRINT" (1) " 

350 REM words to verse 1 

360 REM words 

370 LOADM" XXXXX" 

380 GOSUB1380 

390 IF V$="Y" THEN 400 ELSE GOTO 
440 

400 CLS: PRINT" (2) " 

410 REM words to verse 2" 

420 REM words 

430 EXEC 



50 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



„ £ CO«" P 




■SgSJS!- •••• 



9 * ■ av a° 



I* 



I 




■ IS? 'SKIS***' ' 



_ So 



iV^So ^ D 



.95 



»<30 *° JaUP 10 



R0 G 



TTI- 



{CO 



49 



c 



in* 



U CT* 



A4A0 



QO 



S^ 1 



44JZ) IF A=j3 THEN 47 J3 
45j3 GOT012j3 

46j3 REM ***SONG 2 SECTION*** 

47j3 CLS : PRINTB$ : PRINT : GOSUB137 j3 

48j3 CLS : PRINT" (1) 11 

49j3 REM words to verse 1 

5j3j3 REM words 

51)8 LOADM ff XXXXX ff 

52j3 GOSUB138j3 

53JZ) IF V$= ff Y f! THEN 54j3 ELSE GOTO 
57j3 

54j3 CLS: PRINT" (2) " 

55j3 REM words to verse 2 

56j3 EXEC 

57j3 IF A=j3 THEN 6j3j3 

58) 3 GOT012j3 

59) 3 REM ***SONG 3 SECTION*** 

6) 3)3 CLS:PRINTC$:PRINT:GOSUB137)3 

61) 3 CLS: PRINT" (1) " 

62) 3 REM words to verse 1 

63) 3 REM words 

64) 3 LOADM"XXXXX" 

65) 3 GOSUB138)3 

66) 3 IF V$="Y" THEN 67)3 ELSE GOTO 
7)3)3 

67) 3 CLS: PRINT" (2) " 

68) 3 REM words to verse 2 I 

69) 3 EXEC 

7) 3)3 IF A=J8 THEN 73)3 

71) 3 GOT012)3 

72) 3 REM ***SONG 4 SECTION*** 

73) 3 CLS:PRINTD$:PRINT:GOSUB137)3 

74) 3 CLS: PRINT" (1) " 

75) 3 REM words to verse 1 

76) 3 REM words 

77) 3 LOADM"XXXXX" 

78) 3 GOSUB138)3 

79) 3 IF V$="Y" THEN 8)3)3 ELSE GOTO 
83)3 

8) 3)3 CLS: PRINT" (2) " 

81) 3 REM words to verse 2 

82) 3 EXEC 

83) 3 IF A=J8 THEN 8 6)3 

84) 3 GOT012)3 

85) 3 REM ***SONG 5 SECTION*** 

86) 3 CLS :PRINTE$: PRINT :GOSUB137)3 

87) 3 CLS: PRINT" (1) " 

88) 3 REM words to verse 1 

89) 3 REM words 

9) 3)3 LOADM"XXXXX" 

91) 3 GOSUB138)3 

92) 3 IF V$ = "Y" THEN 93)3 ELSE GOTO 
96)3 

93) 3 CLS: PRINT" (2) " 

94) 3 REM words to verse 2 

95) 3 EXEC 

96) 3 IF A^j3 THEN 99)3 

97) 3 GOT012)3 



98) 3 REM ***SONG 6 SECTION*** 

99) 3 CLS:PRINTF$:PRINT:GOSUB137)3 
1)3)3)3 CLS: PRINT" (1) " 

1)31)3 REM words to verse 1 
1)32)3 REM words 
1)33)3 LOADM"XXXXX" 
1)34)3 GOSUB138)3 

1)35)3 IF V$="Y" THEN 1)36)3 ELSE GO 
TO 1)39)3 

1)36)3 CLS: PRINT" (2) " 

1)37)3 REM words to verse 2 

1)38)3 EXEC 

I) 39)3 IF A=J8 THEN 112)3 

II) 3)3 GOT012)3 

III) 3 REM ***SONG 7 SECTION*** 

112) 3 CLS :PRINTG$: PRINT :G0SUB13 7)3 

113) 3 CLS: PRINT" (1) " 

114) 3 REM words to verse 1 

115) 3 REM words 

116) 3 LOADM"XXXXX" 

117) 3 GOSUB138)3 

118) 3 IF V$="Y" THEN 119)3 ELSE GO 
TO 122)3 

119) 3 CLS: PRINT" (2) " 

12) 3)3 REM words to verse 2 

121) 3 EXEC 

122) 3 IF A=J8 THEN 125)3 

123) 3 GOT012)3 

124) 3 REM ***SONG 8 SECTION*** 

125) 3 CLS :PRINTH$: PRINT: GOSUB 13 7)3 

12 6)3 CLS: PRINT" (1) M 

127) 3 REM words to verse 1 

128) 3 REM words 

129) 3 LOADM"XXXXX" 

13) 3)3 GOSUB138)3 

131) 3 IF V$ = "Y" THEN 132)3 ELSE GO 
TO 135)3 

132) 3 CLS: PRINT" (2) " 

13 3)3 REM words to verse 2 

134) 3 EXEC 

135) 3 GOT012)3 

136) 3 P0KE113 , 3 :EXEC4j3999 

137) 3 PRINT: INPUT" DO YOU WANT ALL 
VERSES (Y/N) ";V$: RETURN 

13813 POKE &HFF4 0,0: EXEC : RETURN 



Hint . . . 

Set the Tone for Input 

In order to make your programs more user-friendly, 
precede all INPUT and INKEYS statements with a tone. 
This is a simple way of letting the user know that the 
computer is asking for input. A good statement to use 
for generating the tone is SDUND100 , 5. While this 
"hint" is really just common sense, the little extra 
trouble will be much appreciated by other users. 

John Dillon 
Fullerton, CA 



52 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



A Matter of Drives 



By Marty Goodman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Are 1.2- Meg, quad-density drives the 
same as 7 20 K drives? Can I use them on 
the Co Co? Can I use an Atari, 3 l / 2 ~inch 
720K drive on a Co Co? 

Mike Knudsen 

(RAGTIMER) 

Wheaton, IL 

The 1.2-Meg, 5 '/4-inch drives used on 
the IBM PC AT are not compatible with 
Color Computerdisk controllers. These 
drives use an electronic protocol for 
data transmission different from that 
used by 160K, 320K and 720K capacity 
drives. They are not the same as the 
double-sided, 80-track drives used by 
other systems. The PC AT type, 1.2- 
Meg drives use a signal protocol iden- 
tical to that used by the older 8-inch 
drive technology at the time 8-inch 
drives became obsolete. Their data 
transfer rate is twice that of other 5 ] A- 
inch drives, and data density is twice as 
great, too. 

Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the Co Co world. 
Marty is the database manager of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo and OS-9 Online SIGs on 
Delphi. His non-computer passions 
include running, mountaineering and 
outdoor photography. Marty lives in 
San Pablo, California, 



The Atari 520 and J 040 ST machines 
use industry standard, 3 14-inch drives 
that, in theory, can be directly hooked 
to a Color Computer disk controller 
with the correct connectors and cable. 
Although Atari uses an odd connector 
on its main com puter box for the drives, 
inside the drive sports a normal 34-pin, 
dual-row header 3 '/2-inch drive connec- 
tor. Connectors that crimp to ribbon 
cable and mate to that connector on the 
3'/ 2 -inch drive are available everywhere, 
including Radio Shack (Catalog No. 
276-J525). However, such Atari drives 
tend to be terminated in an odd way. So 
pay close attention to what kind and 
size of terminator resistors are used on 
the Atari drive you are planning to 
adapt for the CoCo. 

Hi-Res Joystick Interface 

Can you tell me how to use the Radio 
Shack Hi- Res joystick interface? 

Brian Biggs 

( B/GGSER) 

Grove Cily, OH 

OS-9 Level 11 has drivers that support 
the Hi-Res joystick interface built into 
it. This allows OS-9 programmers to 
easily design software supporting the 
Hi-Res joystick adapter. Steve Bjork, in 
his series of articles about the Mouse 
software published in rainbow last 
year, presents source code for using the 



Hi-Res joystick interface. Unfortu- 
nately, the interface is of little use with 
existing software written for Disk Ex- 
tended basic. Assembly language pro- 
grammers should study that code care- 
fully if they plan to write code for the 
interface. In particular, they should 
note how Steve synchronizes the start of 
the ramp generator with the horizontal 
sweep to reduce jitter in the position 
check caused by interference between 
the monitor and the interface. 

Drive Stepping Rates 

How do I change the stepping rates 
of disk drives under OS-9 Level I J? 

Bill Jackson 

(BILLJACKSON) 

Sacramento, CA 

In the Utilities database in the Delphi 
OS-9 Online SIG is a small program 
called Dmode. After downloading it, be 
sure to set the E attribute with attr, 
then set your step rate by typing dmode 
/d0 STP=3, then CDBBLERing a new 
system disk. Thanks to Greg Law 
(GREGL, one of our OS-9 SysOps) for 
this information. 

1 suggest reading the OS-9 manual for 
information about how such parame- 
ters as step rates are stored in the device 
descriptor. Changing the step rate is just 
a matter of altering a single byte in a 
parameter table in the appropriate 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 53 



device descriptor. This can be accom- 
plished using the Dmode utility, or any 
of a number other approaches. 

How Many Drives 

I'd like some clarification about the 
number of floppy drives f can hook to 
a Color Computer. Some say I can hook 
three, others four, and some allege they 
can h0ok 16 or more. 

Paul Ward 

(PKW) 

Arlington, VA 

There are limitations to the number 
of drives you can hook to a CoCo disk 
controller. If you are using single-sided 
drives, the maximum supported is four. 
If youVe using double-sided drives, the 
controllers can support a maximum of 
three floppy drives. The reason for this 
is that the CoCo controller lacks an 
official side-select line and, instead, was 
designed to use Pin 32 (normally the 
side-select line) of its floppy controller 
to select for the fourth drive in the 
system. Thus, when double-sided drives 
are used, there is no select line for the 
fourth drive, because that is now being 
made to serve (by appropriate driver 



software) as a side-select line. Only 
three drive select lines remain, and thus 
only three double-sided floppies can be 
used. 

In practice, three really are all you are 
likely to need. Three double-sided, 80- 
track drives give over two megabytes of 
storage. If you need more, use a hard 
drive system. 

Of course, hardware hackers, by 
combining software and hardware 
modifications, can address any number 
of drives. Indeed, using only a chip or 
two, you can easily support 16 drives. 
To me it seems a waste of effort that 
would be more sensibly directed at 
setting up a hard drive system. 

64 Color Display 

I've seen demonstrator programs that 
display all 64 of the CoCo 3's colors on 
the screen at once. Will we see games 
and other applications that can do this 
too? 

Eric Crichlow 
(DIA wa) 
Las Vegas, NV 

No. The programs that display all 64 
colors use very specialized and "sneaky" 



tricks to accomplish this, which in- 
volves altering the color palette during 
the scan of the video picture. This sort 
of thing eats up an enormous amount 
of processor time and is of little use in 
programs that do more than display a 
single, static picture. On the CoCo 3, it 
also results in some "noise" on the 
screen, due to "settling" of the data in 
the palette registers of the GIME chip. 
On the other hand, it is true that the 
trick of switching color sets has in the 
past been employed on the CoCo. The 
Dragonfire ROM pack uses that trick 
to achieve eight colors on the screen at 
once in a CoCo 2 mode that normally 
only supports four colors. 

Do-It-Yourself Upgrade 

What do you think of piggybacking 
four sets off our 4 J 256 chips and mount- 
ing them on an J 8- pin header as a means 
of achieving a "do-it-yourself" CoCo 3 
51 2K upgrade? Are C65 and C66 in the 
CoCo 3 merely RFI suppression capac- 
itors, and is that why they are often 
removed in the course of doing CoCo 
3 memory upgrades? What about CIO, 
CI 1 and C61? Are they RFI suppres- 
sors, and is there qny advantage to 



GRAFPLOT 



NEW ! — THE 



GRAFPLOT DEMOi 



JEBT J LIST" GOT BETTER ! 

iTWtfstrnxmt Projection: T-Bills, FY '8? 



T 



• 3.00 DIBK b TAPE 

REFUND W/PURCHABE. w~ 

■*-> 
(= 

JCOMPAT I BLE £\ 
IWITH COCO 3 J 

V* 

30 DAY ~ 
UNCOND I T I DNAL % ( 
MONEY-BACK Z J 
GUARANTEE ! ! ~ 



NEW! Sp« b 



— r 1 

ADSHE ETS 



& 



RAINBOW 



W 

OS) 

i. 
u 




— « o 



u 

> 

(VI</> 



OD— ' 



CO 

I 



0 



4 6 3 T25 I~5 

Months Since T-Bi 11 Investments 



Q_ 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



AUTOMATICALLY LOADS DATA FROM MOOT POPULAR BPREADSHEETB. 
29 1 GRAPHING BYHBGLB AND UNLIMITED OVERLAY OF DATA. 
AUTOMATICALLY SCALE B AND LABELB ALL THREE OF THE AXES. 
CALCULATES MATH FUNCTIONS, INTEGRALS AND MOVING AVERAGES. 
FULLY AUTOMATIC, MENU DRIVEN N/ COMPLETE ERROR TRAPPING. 
FULL-PAGE BCREENPRINTB ON ANY PRINTERi SPECIFY WITH ORDER . 

REQUIRES 32K EXT. BABICi TAPE - «40.00 DISK - •43.00 



NEU1 • ! 
F^FR I NTER 

LJM I VERBAL 



Picture Perfect L)T ^^;; 

SCREENPRINT PROGRAM 



COMPAT I BLE UJ I TH COCO III!! 
'PERFECTLY SIMPLE" TO OPERATE - "BIMPLY PERFECT" RESULTS 
'PERFECTLY COMPATIBLE" WITH ALL DOT MATRIX PRINTERS! 

GET "PERFECT CONTROL" OFl HEIGHT, WIDTH, POBITIDN, 
BAUD RATE, DOT DENSITY, NEGATIVE IMAGES, ETC. 

THE "PERFECT SOLUTION" TO YOUR GRAPHICS PRINTING NEEDS ! 

COMPATIBLE WITH GRAPHICOM AND COCO MAX PICTURES! 



ONLY 



« OO OM DISK OR TARE ♦ 



BUY BOTH RROGRAMQ tU SAVE ♦ 1 O - OO 

CALL NOW FOR FREE INFORMATION <41S) 347-7537, OR WRITEi 

HAWKEB RESEARCH BERVICEBi BS? STANFORD AVE, OAKLAND, CA 9460B 
YOUR PERSONAL CHECK IB WELCOME! SHIPMENT WITHIN 46 HOURS 

ADD »3. 00 BHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS. CA. RESIDENTS ADD BALES TAX 



NOW AVAILABLE 

ADOS-3 FOR CoCo 3 

See June "Received and 
Certified" for new features 



Disk $34.95 (for CoCo 3 only) 



ADOS 



ENHANCED, EPROM-ABLE 
DISK BASIC 

Now you can supercharge Basic wiin an impressive array ot extra features 
WITHOUT sacrificing compatibility' AOOS is compatible wiin virtually t00°'a or 
commercial software Customizing utilities are p-ovrded io allow user defined 
command abbreviations baud rale step rale Hacks per rjisk f 35 or dO). supporl ol 
double-sided drives, and more Alter customizing AOOS. you can have it burned mio 
an EPROM that plugs «nto the Disk Basic ROM soCKCl. o' juSt use M m RAM as a 64K 
disk utility (EPROM * burning will COSI about S20-we piOvirJe information 
concerning now you can nave tnis done ) Features include • repeat and edit of the 
last direct-mode command • 26 definable controi.key abbreviations • automatic imc 
number prompts • OOS commano ♦ lowercase command e"try la (me complement io 
a Lowerkii -v PBJ WordPak) • COPY diiename 1 to (drive number) • AE error override 
option • RAM command (64K) • RUNM command * lex I echoing io printer • ML 
monitor ♦ text die scan • ennanced directory • e'toi (rapping • ni res text utility 
included \d2. 5t or 6d characters per iinei 



((or CoCo }. 2 only) 



THE PEEPER 



ML PROGRAM TRACER 




Monitor machiriei?mguage programs AS THEY ARE RUNNING' Peeper actually 
umesM.ires *ith ihe target program giving FULL CONTROL as ML piograms run 
Switch mstaniiy DC-tween watching regular program output and Peeper s trace ot 
registers ano stack on screen or printer inspect memory in any ot 26disptay mooes 
Execution speed can be varied trom fui» speeo to ine barest crawl, or nailed entirely, 
as programs run Single Stepping breakpoints memory Or register examine/Change 
Relocatable, supports 6<iK ust? ;i6k reoui/ed) See February 85 review 
Disk $23,95 Assomblersourca listing Add 3.00 

NEW FOR COC03 

CUSTOM CABLE FOR MAGNAVOX RGB MONITORS 

The Magnavox 8CM515 and 8CM505 monitors, containing RGBA. RGBI, and audio 
inputs, sell at prices comparable to Tandy's CM-8, and represeni a lar belter buy 
for CoCo3 users. Composite input, which CM-8 lacks, is required lor seeing PMOOE 
4 displays in color RGBI allows the Magnavox. unlike the CM-8. to be used with 
PC-Compatibles — a big resale consideration. . Cable 19.95 




11111 N. Kendall Drive. 



SPECTROSYSJEMS^ — A^r ?- urte A108 

w / \ — Miami, Florida 33176 

No delay on personal checks < 305 > 274-3899 Djyu- 
Please add $2.00 shipping Sorry no credit cards or CODs tvo y 



54 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Computer design 
your own 
sportswear 
in color with 

NEW! 
PRINT' n WEAR! 

Transfer Paper 



yanking them? Will the new 1 bit-by- J 
megabyte or the new 4 bit-by-256 K 
chips that are just now being released be 
of use in future Co Co 3 upgrades? 

Vincent S. Estep 
Cameron, MO 

While it should be possible to make 
a working upgrade using the piggyback 
method you suggest, I do not recom- 
mend it, primarily because in its current 
form, the 512K CoCo 3's DRAMs 
generate a lot of heat, and your sug- 
gested piggyback arrangement is rather 
poor for heat dissipation. If you want 
to try such an ill-advised approach, be 
sure to add to each DRAM chip a .33 
mfd deglitching capacitor diagonally 
across its power supply pins. Failure to 
do so will result in an especially unre- 
liable upgrade. 

C65 and C66 are most definitely not 
RFI suppression caps. Instead, they 
appear to be "R AS/ CAS timing fudge 
factor" caps that, in conjunction with 
R22 and R23, alter the timing of the 
RAS and CAS lines to the DRAM 
chips to apparently fix some flaw in the 
GIME chip. This timing fudge factor 
apparently.does not work with the 5 1 2K 
upgrade, and that is why you are in- 
structed to remove one or both of C65 
and C66, or to alter the value of one of 
the resistors in that circuit there. CIO, 
CI I, and C61 do appear to be RFI 
suppressors on the E clock, Q clock and 
CTS line, respectively. I tend to agree 
with your suggestion that removing 
them will improve the reliability of the 
CoCo 3's operation, as I would expect 
them to "mushify" the E and Q clock 
timing signals and the CTS select line. 
But I have not tested this theory. 

Regarding the newer, one megabit 
DRAM chips: I have been watching the 
prices on these items with interest. 
While the 1 bitwide-by-1 megabit chips 
will be of no interest to CoCo 3 owners, 
the 4 bit wide-by-256K chips might 
form the basis of a very sensible upgrade 
for the CoCo 3 when the price comes 
down enough. The last time I checked, 
retail prices for the 1 bit-by- 1 megabit 
chips were around $25, and the 4 bit 
wide-by-256K chips were around $40. 
When the price on the 4 bit-by-256K 
chips drops to $10 or less, they will 
present attractive alternatives for CoCo 
3 upgrades. They will have the advan- 
tage of lower power consumption and 
better timing when used in the CoCo 3. 

Note that the 4 bit-by-256K chips 
have 20 pins, not 18 like the 4 bit-by- 
64K chips that come with a 1 28K CoCo 
3. The pin out is such that they are not 



amenable to being placed in the existing 
18-pin socket used by the 4 bit-by-64K 
chips. Either a redesign of the CoCo 3 
motherboard or a different plug in 
upgrade board will be required. It's 
possible that a year or two from now the 
CoCo 3 could be sold as a 512K only 
computer, with such 4-by-256K chips 
used on the motherboard if Tandy elects 
to redesign the board to support this. 

CoCo 3 Hard Drives 

I'm looking for a hard drive for my 
CoCo 3. I've seen some ads for a 20- Meg 
hard drive and IBM controller in Com- 
puter Shopper priced at about $350 to 
$450. Can / use these? 

Erol Senakis 
(EROL) 
Elmhurst, NY 

The "controller" card used by the 
IBM PC is, strictly speaking, not a 
controller card, but rather a combina- 
tion of a controller card and an IBM- 
specific "host adapter. " Thus, IBM 
"hard drive controller cards" generally 
are useless with the Color Computer. 
Instead, you need to use a CoCo host 
adapter made by Tandy, or L&R Tech 
(sold by Owlware), or by CRC (Disto) 
that, in turn, plugs into one or another 
brand of stand-alone hard drive con- 
troller board, such as the Xebec 140 1 A 
controller. This stand-alone controller 
board in turn can connect to any of a 
number of hard drive units. You might 
find it to your advantage to buy the hard 
drive unit without a controller via 
Computer Shopper, and perhaps, after 
deciding on a particular hard drive host 
adapter, shop for the needed stand- 
alone board via mail order. But IBM 
controller cards tend to be specific for 
the IBM system bus and, as such, are 
worthless for the Color Computer. 

Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to CoCo Consultations, 
THE rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
ques tion s of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow Maga- 
zine Services, then, at the RAINBOW> 
prompt, type ASK (for Ask the Experts) to 
arrive at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "CoCo Consultations" 
online form which has complete instruc- 
tions. 



It 's easy to do! 



1 Use computer graphics 
to create designer 
originals on your 
monitor. 




2 Place New PRINT 'n 
WEAR! 7W transfer 
paper into printer 
and print YOUR 
original designs. 




3 Iron transfers onto 
Beach/Athletic/ 
Sweat/T-Shirts, etc 
(Using ordinary 
hand-iron). 




Great to Wear! Great to Give! 

NOTE: 

• For use with both dot matrix and thermal 
ribbon printers. 

• Color can be added with crayon if printer 
has black ribbon only. When ironed, both 
crayons and print will transfer in soft 
washproof color. 

For Dealer/Distributor information; 
F0T0-WEAR! Inc., 62 Herbert Drive, 
East Brunswick, NJ 08816. 



Mail coupon to: FOTO-WEARt Inc. 
P.O. Box 1040, Grand Rapids, MN 55745 



1 



Please send 



pack(s) of PRINT'n WEAR! 



at $15.95 each (10 transfer sheets in a pack). 
I have enclosed $1.50 for postage and handling. 

□ Payment enclosed (Check or Money Order) 
Q Visa □ Mastercard 



Card i 



Exp. dale 



Signature 



Name 



Address 



L 



Cny State. Zip 



J 



June 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



55 




TOM MIX'S MINI-CA r 




FLIGHTS 



•Flight 16 

Our very newest flight simulator. A full 
instrument aircraft that features the 
following: 

• Works with all COCO's 

• Realistic flight controls 

• Flight editor included to change flight 
parameters 

• Design your own airports and flight 
areas 

• Flies like Cessna 150 

• Full graphics & sound 

Joysticks Required $34.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 



—Educational Best-Sellers! — 

* Teachers Database II— Allows teachers 
to keep computerized files of students. 
Recently updated with many new features! 

• Up to 1 00 students, 24 items per student 

■ Many easy-to-follow menus 

■ Records can be changed, deleted, 
combined 

• Statistical analysis of scores 

■ Grades can be weighed, averaged, 
percentaged 

• Individual progress reports 

• Student seating charts 

• Test result graphs/grade distribution 
charts 

64K TD BII $59.95 Disk Only 
32KTDB $42.95 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR IBM PC & 
COMPATIBLES-Holds information on up to 
250 students with as many as 60 individual 
items of data for each. Contains the 
features listed above PLUS. 

Requires 128K - $89.95 

Factpack-Three programs for home or 
school use provide drill and practice with 
basic "-/+/-/x" Grades 1-6. 
32K Ext. Basic $29.95 
Specify Tape a Disk 

Vocabulary Management System -Helps 
children learn and practice using vocabu- 
lary and spelling words. Eleven programs 
including three printer segments for tests, 
puzzles, worksheets and five games; many 
features make this a popular seller! 

Requires 16K E xt. Basic/ $42.95 
32K for Printer Output 

Specify Tape or Disk 

Fractions-A Three-Program Package. 
1 /Mixed & Improper 2/Equivalence 
3/Lowest Terms. Practice, review and defi- 
nitions make learning easy. 

32 K Ext. Basic $35.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 




'Worlds of Flight 
Small Plane Simulation 

Real-time simulation generates panoramic 
3-D views of ground features as you fly 
your sophisticated plane in any of nine 
different "worlds." Program models over 35 
different aircraft/flight parameters. Realistic 
sound effects too! Manual included helps 
you through a typical short flight. 

32 K Machine Languag e 
Joysticks Required $34.95 

Specify Tape or Disk 

Tom Mix Products at 
New Reduced Prices! 

Dragon Slayer— Defeat the dragon by 
finding your way through a mountain maze. 
Gather treasure but avoid the deadly traps! 
1 60 exciting screens. 

32K & Joystick or Ke y board 
" Disk $24.95 



'Sailor Man— Defeat the bigfatbadguy and 


win Elsie's heart. Super graphics. 


64K 


$27.95 


•The King- 




32K 


$27.95 


* Draconian— 




32K 


$22.95 


* Ms. Maze- 




32K 


$22.95 


"Kater Pillar II- 




16K 


$22.95 


• Warehouse Mutants- 




16K 


$21.95 


•Buzzard Bait- 




32K 


$22.95 


All Above Specify Tape or Disk 



COCO 3 Compatible 





TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 



*P-51 Mustang 
Attack/Flight Simulation 

The ultimate video experience! Link two 
CoCo's together by cable or modem, and 
compete against your opponent across 
the table OR across the country! (Both 
computers require a copy of this program). 
TheP-51 flight simulator letsyou fly this WWII 
attack fighter in actual combat situations 
against another player, OR a non com- 
batant computer drone. 

32K Machine Language 
Joysticks Required $34.95 

Specify Tape or Disk 

'Goldfinder 

Here's the quality you've come to expect 
from TOM MIX. Endless possibilities await 
you in this exciting new creation. Move over 
Goldrunner and Loderunner, here comes 
GOLDFINDER 

32K & Joysticks Requir ed $22.95 

Disk 

'Approach Control 
Simulator 

A complete simulation package which will 
lead to countless hours of discovery and 
adventure. 

• Specify Disk or Tape 

• Quick Reference Guide 

• Comprehensive Manual 

• No Joysticks Required 

32K Machine Lan guage $34.95 

*Trapfall 

The "Pitfalls" in this game are many. Hid- 
den treasures, jump over the pits, swing on 
the vine, watch out for alligators, beware of 
the scorpion. Another game for the Color 
Computer with the same high resolution 
graphics as "The King." 

16K Machine Language $23.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 

Ordering Information 

-Call us at ti 6/676-8172 
for Charge Card orders 

• Add $3.00 postage and 
handling 

• Ml residents add 4% 
sales tax 

• Authors— We pay top 
royalties! 




Look What's New at NOVflSOFT! 





7ou see; nothing. 



Obvious directions to 90* 
Horth, South. ta»t, west . 

HelcoHtf to The Hsld H«»t! 

B 



*Vegas Slots 

— Color III Only — 
Seven of the most popular slot machine 
games found in VEGAS are yours for the 
price of one. Designed to be as real as 
being there. You simply will not believe your 
eyes when you see the graphics ana realistic 
movement. This is by far one of the most 
outstanding programs we have ever offered. 

Disk only $34.95 




* Lunch Time 

Your chef, Peter Pepper, is surrounded! 
Dodge pickles, hot dogs, and eggs while 
building hanburgers. This high res game 
features 7 difficulty levels of wild 
entertainment. Fast-paced action for either 
one or two players. Have a Burger Time. 

R equires 32K & Joysticks $21.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 



'The Wild West 

— Color III Only — 

Get out your six shooter and polish your 
spurs! Journey into the gunslinging land of 
the old west. As sheriff of Dry Gulch, your 
job is to keep the peace. But the notorious 
desperado Black Bart has escaped from jail 
and is on his way to Dry Gulch to recover 
his hidden fortune! 

•Incredible animated 320 x 192 16 color hi 

resolution graphic scenes! 
• Four voice music and sound effects. 
•Save and load games in progress. 
•A vocabulary of over 100 words. 
•Automatically SPEAKS with a Tandy 

Speech Pak. 

Disk Only $25.95 




*Moneyopoly 

Play the popular board game on one ot 
the most realistic computer game simula- 
tions ever! Contains all the features of the 
original. Buy, sell, rent, wheel & deal your 
way to fortune. 

32K Joystick Required $22.95 
Specify Ta pe a Disk . 



•four CUBE 

•MAUI VICE 

•DONUT 
DILEMMA 



— Now you can play TIC-TAC-TOE in 3D 1 . Pit your wits against the computer 
and you'll agree — it's a "real challenge" 



Requires 32K — 1 or 2 Players 
$18.95 



_ Step into the shoes of Crock & Bubbs with this state-of-the-art that guaran- 64K Ext Basic & Joystick Required 
tees excitement and newness every time you play 



Angry Angelo has raided Antonio's Donut Factory and you must restore law 
and order. But hurry! Time is running out! 



"CHAMBERS — Exciting high res graphics game with multiple screens and outstanding sound 
Destroy the evil creatures in 20 levels. 30-35 rooms per level. 



■CUBER 



Another exciting release that approaches the challenges of any Video Ar- 
cade. The Iwards are many, the dangers always present. 



'BREWMASTER — Move along to the end of the bars to serve your thirsty customers, but watch 
out for falling glasses and rowdies! Loads of fun! 

"FANG MAN _ A high res graphics arcade-type game based on the Dracula legend. You 
are Dracula and must evade countless ha2ards in your search for new victims. 

*PAK PANIC — A fast paced game in which 'Pakman' is steered through a maze, pursued 
by four monsters, while trying to eat dots and power pills. 



Disk Only $2) .95 * 
Requires 32K 
$2495 

32K & Joysticks Required 

$22.95 
32K & Joystick Required 

$23.95 

32K — Joysticks Required 
$17.95 

1 6K & Joys'irk s Required 
$2295 ~ 

32K & Joysticks Required 
$22.95 




Neutroids 



Fast-paced action, super graphics and 
above all else, sound from your COCO the 
likes you have never heard before. Be 
careful — don't let a meltdown occur before 
you complete the "NEUTROID 
PROJECT"! 

16 K — $22.95 
Specify Tape or Disk 




Vegas Game Pak 

Six games in all! Blackjack, Keno, Video 
Poker & 3 slot machine lookalikes. Super 
graphics! Joysticks Required. 

16K $27.95 
S p ecify Tape or Disk 



'COCO 3 Compatible 

NOVfiSOFT 

A Tom Mix Company 

P.O. Box 201 
Ada, Michigan 49301 

616/676-8172 



Ordering Information 

Add $3 shipping/handling 
Ml residents add 4% sales tax 
Dealers welcome 

Many more titles— write for free catalog! 

Credit Card Orders 



F T 1 

■ MasterCard] 



VISA' 




Steppin ' 



By Matthew Thompson 

Bells and Whistles 2 is a four- 
voice, programmable music 
synthesizer for the CoCo. It 
requires 32K and Extended or Disk 
basic. There are many four-voice 
music programs on the market for 
the CoCo, all having their strengths 
and weaknesses. But when it comes 
to the final product, the music, Bells 
and Whistles 2 is one of the best 
sounding, all-software music pro- 
grams for the CoCo that 1 have 
heard. 

It is compatible with CoCo Com- 
poser and Music+ files. There are 
eight waveform and eight envelope 
tables that can be custom-designed. 
Any of the four voices can switch 
between any of the tables as the 
music plays. Each voice's volume, as 
well as the tempo and key of the 
music, can be automatically changed 
as the music plays. Percussion 
(noise) is available, and there is 
enough memory for five to 30 min- 
utes of music. Jumps, repeats, break- 
points, labels and placeholders can 
be set to aid in music writing. It has 
a 10.583 octave "window" available 
anywhere from a 1 5.083 octave range 

Matthew Thompson, a 16- year-old 
senior attending Napanee District 
Secondary School lives in Napanee, 
Ontario, He enjoys composing music 
and hardware hacking on his CoCo 
3 t and he has designed a 4 MHz 6809 
board for it. 



r 



58 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



of 0. 1 to 3107 Hz. There is a 128-band, 
graphic equalizer function for custom- 
izing the frequency response. The true 
double-speed poke (POKE 65497) is 
used to double the maximum frequency 
and to double the fidelity. Cassette and 
disk are supported. 

Entering and Loading 

Turn your CoCo off and on to com- 
pletely clear it out. Type in and save 
Listing 1, BW2. Do not run it until you 
save it because the program erases part 
of itself when first run as a memory- 
saving trick. Keep this in mind if you 
change the program. Prior to loading, 
you have to clear as much RAM as 
possible with PDKE25, 6: NEW. For disk 
systems, use PDKE25 ,14 :PDKE35B4 , 
0:NEN. A disk owner may want to make 
a file called BW2INIT like the following: 
10 PDKE25,14:PDKE35B4,0:RUN 
"BW2". This way, all you'll have to do 
is type RUN"BU2INIT". 

On a "cold" start, the program pokes 
the machine language data into mem- 
ory, then deletes the unnecessary pro- 
gram lines, which unavoidably reverts 
the CoCo to the immediate mode. The 
next run you do is a "cool" start. It sets 
up a few tables and then deletes more 
unnecessary lines, reverting the CoCo 
to the immediate mode again. All of this 
deleting releases unnecessary lines so as 
much memory as possible is left for the 
music buffer. Subsequent runs are 
"warm" starts. All that happens is the 
end-of-music pointer is re-determined 
before the main program starts. When 
the program runs on a disk system, 
approximately 628 bytes are left free; 
approximately 2,676 bytes are left on a 
cassette system. If, at any point, you 
mess up the screen, press BREAK or 
reset, and enter GDT01 to get back to 
where you left off. Rerunning the pro- 
gram won't erase your work. 

Note a couple of flukes: If you re- 
number the program for any reason, the 
DEL command escapes untouched, so 
you'll have to change the line number 
in what was Line 136 to equal what was 
Line 135, and the line numbers in what 
was Line 134 to equal what were lines 
133-134. Also, when transferring this 
program between Extended and Disk 
BASIC, note that the LDADM, SflVEM and 
DIR in lines 62, 67 and 77, respectively, 
aren't tokenized by Extended BASIC. 
The easiest way to get around this 
discrepancy is to transfer the program 
between the two systems with an ASCII 
save. Otherwise, the program won't list 
properly on a non-disk CoCo, and a 
disk CoCo wiJJ give SN Errors even 



though the lines look OK. If you own 
a CoCo 3, change the 65495 and G5494 
in Line 73 to 65497 and G5496, respec- 
tively. If your CoCo can't handle the 
speed-up poke, change that G5495 to a 
65494. 

The Window Editor 

When the program runs for the first 
time, the music memory buffer is 
cleared. The "window" is called such, 
because you view a section of the music 
memory through it. Each column in the 
window is called a block and is a group 
of five bytes of memory. To move the 
window ahead in memory, use the right 
arrow. To move back, use the left arrow. 
These keys repeat if you hold them 
down. The column in the middle, 
straddled by the checkerboard charac- 
ters, is referred to as the current block 
because any entries and most of the 
functions you will use affect this block. 
The number of this block is printed at 
the top of the screen. The end block is 
also printed and is the highest block 
location at which something has been 
done. The current block has a cursor 
flashing in it. To move the cursor up and 
down among the five bytes, use the up 
and down arrows. These keys do not 
repeat. There are 2,913 (0-2,912) blocks 
available for music. 

By the way, the window is printed out 
by a machine language subroutine that 
does the job instantly. BASIC would be 
too slow with all the necessary decod- 
ing. To enter a number to be stored in 
the byte at the cursor location, start to 
type it. ??? will appear at the cursor 
location, and the first digit you typed 
will appear on the command line. Con- 
tinue to type the number. Pressing 
ENTER will enter it. If it is above 255, 
it will be aborted. If you make a mis- 
take, you can abort by pressing the 
space bar. 

The first byte of the block, in row 
zero, is the control byte. It determines 
what is the information in the next four 
bytes. This window method of entering 
music is used instead of a Hi-Res graph- 
ics screen for two reasons. It saves 
valuable memory for other functions 
and music. And you will have more 
control over the individual bytes of the 
music buffer. For a memory map of 
Bells and Whistles 2, refer to Figure 1. 

Entering Music 

The first byte of a block, the control 
byte, usually contains the note length 
value. These are the numbers in row 
zero. Their values range from 1 to 252. 
Numbers above 252 are reserved for 



Hex Address 


Function 


600-2DFF 


basic program cassette 


E00-2DFF 


basic program disk 


2E00-2EFF 


Pitch table 

* 


2F00-2FFF 


Equalizer table 


3000-37 FF 


Waveform tables 


3800-3FFF 


Envelope tables 


4000-78E4 


Music buffer 


7906-7FE5 


MachineLanguage routines 




Figure 1: 


Memory Map of Bells and Whistles 2 



-25* 



Ji 



i 



242 



-246- 



250 



236 



222 



228 



Gb 2959 Hz 
Code 254 

Can go to 
3107 Hz 




-2*2- 



216 



-tt8- 



202 



208 



^92- 



194 



180 



4*4- 



188 



174 



160 



4*4- 



168 



456- 



154 



146 



140 



132 




120 



422- 



126 



4£fi- 



112 



-H6- 



10.583 
Octaves 
(127 Notes) 



Add 2 for a 
sharp, 
subtract 2 
for a flat. 



98 



■ - 



106 



-B8- 



92 



-S3- 



84 



78 



72 



64 



58 



uu 



-4fl- 



50 



w —r 



36 



44 



30 



24 



16 



10 



r 



C 2.044 Hz 
code 2 



Figure 2: Frequency Code Table 

other functions. A zero signifies the end 
of the music. The computer stops play- 
ing the music as soon as it hits a zero 
in the control byte. Note that in a 
normal music block, the number zero is 
printed as a".". This makes blank spots 
look blanker and easier to spot. Other- 
wise, the numeral 4 0' is printed. For 
most tunes, the following note length 
values can be used: l 28th note=l, 
64th = 2, 64th.(dotted) = 3, 32nd = 4, 
32nd =6, I6th = 8, 16th. = 12, 8th=16, 
8th.=24, 1/4=32, l/4.=48, 1/2=64, 1/2 
.=96, whole=128, whole. = 192. Any 
value in between these can be used. 

The other four bytes contain the 
frequency values for each of the four 



60 THE RAINBOW June 1987 




181 









XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program, 

Menu oriented ■ Definable macro keys 

Upload/download. Ascii ■ Works wilh standard serial port, RS232 
or XMODEM protocol PAK, or PDJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers 

Execute OS-9 commands • Works wilh standard screen. XSCREEN, 
from within XTERM WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board. 

$49.95 wilh source $89.95 



4 

: 



XDIR & 


XCAL 


Hierarchial directory 


OS-9 calculator 


• Full sorting 


■ Decimal, Hex, Binary 


• Complete paliem maiching 


• +, -, *, /, AND,OR, XOR, NOT 


$24.95 


wilh source $49.95 







XDIS 

OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 wilh source $54.95 



-v-V- •-.'WSSAW 



HARDWARE 




512k memory upgrade 


$80.00 


Printers 




Citizen 120D 


CALL 


Star NX10 


CALL 



AM of cur OS-9 

work wilh: 

OS- 0 version 
OS-9 y«ralon 
OS-9 Lew* I 2 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

Worics wilh standard lext screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

True character oriented full screen cdiling 

Full block commands 

Find and Replace commands 

Execute OS-9 commands from within 

Proportional spacing supported 

Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, 
overstrike, underline, super/sub-scripts 
10 header/footers 

Page numbering in decimal or Roman numerals 

Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 wilh source $1 24.95 

XMERGE 

Mail merge capabiJiiies for XWORD 
$24.95 wilh source $4 9. 9 5 

XSPELL 

OS-9 spelling checker, wilh 20000 and 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 
XTRIO 

X WOR D/XMERGE/XSPELL 
$114.95 wilh X WORD/XMERGE sourc* 199.95 

XED 

OS-9 full screen cdiior 

$39.95 wilh source $79.95 



luct* 




. : ■ . • ■ • : • 



■■::o:o:v:v:o: : :::o:-:o:::v: : ::-:^:v/X^;-:v:^: 



mm 





















: 




•• 







m 



m 



1 ■' 



SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING 

This sales-based accounting package is designed 
for the non-accounting oriented businessman. It 
also coniains the GexibiJity for the accounting ori- 
ented us«r lo s«t up a double entry journal wilh an 
almost unlimited chart of accounis. Includes Sales 
Eniry, transaction driven Accounis Receivable and 
Accounis Payable, Journal Entry, Payroll Disburse- 
ment and Record Maintenance programs. System 
ouipuis include Balance Sheet, Income Statement, 
Customer and Vendor status Reports, Accounis 
Receivable and Payable Aging Reports, Check Reg- 
ister, Sales Reports, Account Staius Lisis, and a 
Journal Posting List. $79 95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed lo handle inveniory control, 
wilh user defined product codes, and produce a detailed 
analysis of the business' sales and the sales force. One 
may enler/updatc inventory daia, enter sales, run five 
sales analysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter / update salesman records, and 
update ihe SB AP inventory. $59.95 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and payroll 
data for up lo 200 hourly and salaried employees 
wilh 8 deduciions each. Calculates payroll and lax 
amounts, prints checks and maintains year-io-dale 
toials which can be auiomaiically transferred lo the 
SBA package. Computes each pay period's totals 
for straight lime, overtime and bonus pay and del- 
ermines taxes lo be withheld. Additional ouipuis 
include mailing list, listing of employees, year-lo- 
daie federal and/or stale tax listing, and a listing of 
curreni misc. deduciions. Suited for use in all stales 
excepi Oklahoma and Delaware. $59 95 



PERSONAL BOOKEEPING 2000 

Handles 45 accounis. Eniers cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense categories. 
Menu driven and user friendly. $39.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history reports 
for each customer, prepares invoices and monihly 
stalemenis, mailing labels, aging lisis, and an alpha- 
betized customer listing. The user can define net 
lenns for commercial accounts or finance charges 
for revolving accounts. This package functions as a 
standalone A/R system or imcgra tes with ihe Small 
Business Accounting package. $59 95 



ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor and A/P 
invoice files. The system prints checks, voids 
checks, cancels checks, deletes cancelled checks, 
and deletes paid A/P invoices. The user can run a 
Vendor List, Vendor Staius report, Vendor Aged 
report, and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P system or 
can be integrated with the Small Business 
Accounting Package. $59 95 




MICROTECH 

CONSULTANTS 
INC. 



1 906 Jerrold A Vt h tie 
St Paul, MN 55112 




Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping A handling, MN residents add 6% sales lax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $2.50), personal checks. 



Author Submissions trtetpttd 



(612) 633-6161 



voices. These values can be found in the 
table in Figure 2. To make a note sharp, 
add two to the value before entering. To 
make it flat, subtract two from the note. 
A rest is set by entering a zero. As a 
time-saver, the CLEAR key puts a zero 
into the byte at the current cursor 
location. 

Because Bells and Whistles 2 has 
envelopes for the voices, you need to 
interpolate the notes you enter. When 
you type in the pitch value for a note, 
press the @ key instead of ENTER. The 
note you typed will be entered with a 
hyphen preceding it. It is actually the 
value you entered plus one, which tells 
the computer to "link" this note to the 
previous one. When the computer plays 
the note, the envelope will continue 
where it left off from the previous one 
in that voice. Otherwise, the envelope is 
reset to the start. To interpolate a 
section of music, you first break down 
the note length values so that the pitch 
in at least one voice changes in each 
block. Study the example in Figure 3 to 



clarify this point. If you want to link a 
note that isn't, or unlink one that is, you 
don't have to retype it. Move the cursor 
over it and press the hyphen key. This 
toggles the link on and off. 

Functions 

There are many useful functions in 
Bells and Whistles 2, and each one is 
summoned with a keystroke. Some of 
the more "dangerous" ones are in up- 
percase letters and require you to use 
the SHIFT in conjunction with them. A 
list of the function keys is given in 
Figure 4. You can escape to the main 
program from some of them should you 
accidentally press the wrong key. Just 
enter an out-of-range value (e.g., over 
2,912 for a block number, a key not 
shown in the function's menu, etc.). 
However, many of them take place 
immediately and most have a certain 
degree of idiot-proofing that chops off 
fractions and eliminates negatives. 

The Fast Play function transfers 
control to the machine-language music- 



1 t 

b) 


Breakpoint Block (BRK) 


c) 


Cancel display 


C) 


Copy 


d) 


Display 


D) 


Delete 


e) 


End Repeat Block (ERT) 


f) 


Find Label 


F) 


Frequency Transposition 


I) 


Insert 


J) 


Window Jump 


J) 


Music Jump Block (JMP) 


k) 


Klaxxon 


1) 


Label Block (LAB) 


L) 


Load 


M) 


Memory Clear 


n) 


Note Transposition 


N) 


NOP Block (NOP) 


o) 


Odd Files 


P) 


Slow Play 


P) 


Fast Play 


Q) 


Quit 


s) 


Start Repeat Block (SRT) 


S) 


Save 


t) 


Tempo Block (TMP) 


v) 


Volume Block (VOL) 


w) 


E/W Create 


W) 


E/W Block (E/W) 


y) 


Sync Block (SYN) 


z) 


Zing Here 


Z) 


Zing End 


-) 


Link Toggle 


=) 


Equalizer 


\) 


Directory-generated with 




SHIFT-CLEAR 


CLEAR) 


Clear 



Figure 4: Function Key Assignments 



generating routine. The CoCo's clock 
speed is set to 1.789 MHz by POKE 
G5497. This poke puts the entire CoCo 
address space into high speed. POKE 
G5495 only speeds up the computer 
every time it accesses memory locations 
above 32767 (BASIC and cartridge 
ROM). This speeds up BASIC programs 
by about 50 percent, but it makes hardly 
any difference with RAM-based pro- 
grams below 32768. The POKE 
does not put the CoCointo triple speed, 
as many CoCo nuts have thought. The 
speed-up has the effect of doubling the 
sampling rate of the music program. 

The machine language' routine takes 
288 clock cycles to calculate and output 
a byte to the CoCo's internal audio 
digital-to-analog converter. Consider- 
ing it has to take into account the 
waveform, envelope, and volume of 
each voice, as well as the tempo and 
note length, the machine code is very 
efficient. At 1.789 MHz, the computer 
can output 1,789,000/288=6,214 bytes 
per second to the DAC. This limits the 
maximum frequency producible to 
6,214/2=3,107 Hz, as at least two sam- 
ples have to be taken from the top and 
bottom of any waveform to make a 
syund. 



This sample bar: 


1 >. 


^ T S f 






II - r- ^ 


P 








■ i mm . 

H~<-t> . 


1 ■ 


P f 


f r _ 



Should be thought of as: 




And coded as: 



0 
1 

2 
3 



= 64 A(32+32) 

WINDOW 2r 4 \ 

16 16 16 8 8 16 8 8 8 8 16 21 22 21 

194-194 198-198-198 194-194-194-194-194-194 202 190 180 

188-188 190-190 184 170 174 180 174 166 170 

170-170-170-170 180 ■ 

130 120 142 142-142 146-146-146 150-150-150 



Figure 3: Interpolation Example 



62 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1987 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 
columns X 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full-screen 
editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 
control codes 

Runs in 16K f 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 
cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 
required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply staled, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 

The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without iower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing, 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads, 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
iower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
Ti, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing ftm. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 




...one of l he best programs for the Color 
Computer j have seen . , . 

Color Computer News, Jan. 19352 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing, We cali this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64, For two reasons, 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Teiewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 4QK of memory to store text, So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 811 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on (he screen at one 
Utne. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
H \[ I^PI EN AT pifpl^ 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Te!ewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVll/Vm, DMP-lOi/200, Epson, Okidaia, 
Centronics, NEC, C, itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: lop, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable justification. 

Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line headers and automatic 
centring. Prim or save all or any section of the text 
buffer Chain print any number of files from casseue 
or disk. 

Vr\v 

RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
crea te and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible wim spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassetie verify command for sire saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 

Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or primer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeai cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice Of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or deleic text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum case of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you . 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 




...truly a state of the art word processor... 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 

ii/Ann i!io/\^iFccwiyiiP i::::: 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59,95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 

704 Nob Street 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store, If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 (weekdays, 
8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries invited. (Add 
$2 for shipping. Calif ornians add 6% state tax.) 

Available at 

Radio /hack stores 
via express order 

catalogue #90-0253 
90-0254 

Apple U is a trademark of Apple Compmer, inc.; Atari is a ir.idemark 
of Alari. Inc.: TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp; MX -80 is 2 
trademark of Epson America. Inc. 



For those of you whose computers 
can't handle the speed pokes, a Slow 
Play function has been included. How- 
ever, the sampling rate is only 3,107 Hz 
for a maximum sound frequency of 
3,107/2-1,554 Hz. The frequency 
values shown in Figure 2 are cut in half 
as well. You will have to cut the tempo 
in half and raise the pitch an octave. 
More on that later. 

When the music plays, you will hear 
a slight background swishing sound. 
This is quantatization noise and is 
unavoidable with digitally generated 
sound at audible sampling rates. When 
the music is played, the printer will spill 
out trash unless you turn it off or put 
it offline due to fact that the RS-232 
output bit shares the same byte with the 
DAC. 

The Insert function pushes all blocks, 
beginning at the current one, ahead by 
one block. This leaves an empty current 
block so you can squeeze something in 
between other blocks. The Delete func- 
tion does the opposite by moving all 
blocks ahead of the current one back by 
one, erasing the current block. Both of 
these functions are done by machine 
language subroutines so they happen 
very fast. 

Before you actually enter and play 
any music, it is vital that you under- 
stand the next four functions, because 
they must be defined at least at the 
beginning of a piece of music. 

The waveform of a sound is basically 
a graphic representation of how it 
sounds. Bells and Whistles 2 allows you 
to create any waveform imaginable. To 
make a new one, enter the Envelope/ 
Waveform Create function, then select 
the Waveform option at the prompt. A 
menu now appears with a choice of 
waveforms. After you have pressed 
your choice, you will be asked to supply 
the table number you want the wave- 
form to be created in. Eight tables are 
available (0-7) allowing a great deal of 
flexibility in your musical creations. 

Under the Waveform options, the 
Square option produces a square wave. 
It has a fairly harsh sound but is good 
for a lot of tunes. The Sawtooth option 
makes a sawtooth wave, which is also 
harsh sounding. The Triangle wave 
option produces a sound similar to a 
flute. The Sine Harmonic option allows 
a little more flexibility You enter the 
relative intensities of the fundamental 
and harmonic multiples of a sound, 
similar to stops on an organ. The com- 
puter will then mix (co)sine waves of the 
specified intensities at the various 
harmonic pitches into one waveform 

64 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



that will have all of the harmonics you 
entered (even if you don't think it looks 
as though it really does). It takes a while 
for the computer to do all the necessary 
trig calculations. 

By setting the first harmonic at l and 
the rest at 0, you can get a sine wave, 
which has a pure sound. Note that many 
waveforms generated by this algorithm 
have less-than-maximum amplitude. 
The program automatically scales them 
up after it is finished, however. 

The Graphics option allows you to 
graphically design a waveform in set/ 
reset graphics. You will see a blank 
black screen with a little white dot in the 
bottom-left corner. The up/down ar- 
rows control the amplitude of the cursor 
dot. When you are satisfied with its 
position, press the right arrow to move 
to the next position. In effect, you are 
drawing the waveform. Note that the 
Lo-Res graphics screen can show 64 
horizontal by 32 vertical pixels. The 
waveform tables have 256 bytes ranging 
in values from 0 to 255. Therefore, each 
vertical pixel from the bottom of the 
screen is worth eight in the actual table, 
and each horizontal pixel actually sets 
four bytes in the table. The waveform 
you draw should represent just one 
complete cycle, as the computer loops 
around from the right-hand side of the 
waveform back to the left when played. 
Unfortunately, if you make a goof, you 
will have to redo the waveform. 

The Byte by Byte option allows you 
to individually enter the value for each 
byte. This can be too tedious to be 
practical. But it is there if you want it. 

Finally, the Noise/ Percussion option 
fills a waveform table with random 
values. When played, it sounds like 
noise. When used with pitch values 
below 100, you can fake a drum sound. 
This can accompany music in the other 
voices. After you are finished with any 
of the waveform options, the wave just 
made will be displayed. Press any key 
to return to the window. The Just 
Checking option puts you there right 
away, allowing you to review the con- 
tents of a table you forgot about, etc. 

The envelope of a sound is basically 
a graphic representation of its volume 
over time. Choose envelopes at the first 
prompt of the Envelope/ Waveform 
Create function. A menu similar to the 
waveform options will appear. The 
Graphics option is the same as in the 
waveform department. Note that each 
byte in the envelope table corresponds 
to one note length unit. Therefore, each 
horizontal pixel of the graphics option 
represents four note length units. The 



Flat option sets a plain, flatenvelope for 
a simple on/off sound, like an organ. 

The most commonly used option is 
Exponential Decay, which causes a 
fading sound like a piano or a bell. The 
decay value determines the speed at 
which the decay drops off. It ranges 
from about 1. 005 for slow decays to 
about 1.5 for sharp boink sounds, such 
as snare drums when combined with the 
noise waveform. The Absolute sub- 
option makes the decay as is, while the 
Relative sub-option takes any envelope 
already in the table and "modulates" it 
with a decay. Under the Absolute sub- 
option, you will be asked for a strum 
factor. This is the note length value you 
want the decay to be reset to each time 
it counts that number. For instance, 256 
makes a simple decay, while at around 
4, banjo effects occur, as every four note 
length units a "strum" will occur. The 
input range is 1 to 256. By using the 
Relative sub-option on a previously 
created strumming envelope, you can 
get a decaying strum. 

The Byte by Byte option is not very 
practical for making entire envelopes. 
Its main purpose is to allow you to have 
accurate control over the attack, or rise, 
of the envelope by setting the first one, 
two, three or more bytes to whatever 
you want. Then, to avoid entering the 
rest of the bytes, enter a 256, which 
makes the computer think you goofed 
and sends you back to the window. Neat 
effects can be produced with this func- 
tion. As with waveforms, you get to see 
the envelope one last time before you 
are returned to the window. The Just 
Checking option works the same. 

Set/Reset graphics are used in the 
Graphic and Just Checking options, as 
well as the display-before-return rou- 
tine because all the RAM was cleared 
with the PQKE25, A' earlier and no Hi- 
Res graphics can be used. However, if 
you have a CoCo 3, the ultra-Hi-Res 
graphics use memory beyond BASIC. 
While the vertical axis still would have 
to be scaled to one pixel per value 
increase of two, the horizontal axis can 
easily show each byte of the 256-byte 
table and then some. This means that 
each horizontal pixel in ultra-Hi-Res 
corresponds to one byte or one note 
length value, while each vertical pixel 
represents an amplitude value of two. 
So if you want to upgrade the graphics 
for your CoCo 3, type in the lines in 
Listing Z BW2C3F IX, over the ones in 
the origBal version. These lines do not 
include the speed poke changes men- 
tioned, or any other changes mentioned 
in this article. 



COMPUTER AIDED INSTRUCTION 

Educational Programs for Students Grade K-12 and Adult Self Studies 

NEW PROGRAMS FOR YOUR TANDY 1000 

AND TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 

Compatible with Apple - Atari - Commodore - TRS 80 I, III, 4 - IBM PC Jr. 
16 New Programs now available in Basic Spanish 

• NEW! VIDEO CASSETTES FOR VHS! 

lnnerActive TV Video Tutorials 
Complete with audio narration 

4 cassettes with 8 programs in each of the 
following subject areas: 

• Basic Spanish Grammar 95 

• Basic Algebra ^Ife VI 

• Reading by Phonics %lf %J Q&til&Q& 

• Basic Fractions 




Interactive Tutorial Programs for Home or Classroom Use 

Over 1000 programs for your selection with 32 now available on disk for the Color 

Computer and 500 now available for the Tandy 1000, 



"We're Your Educational 
Software Source" 

Subject No. of Programs 

Reading Development 256 (4 on disk) 
Reading Comprehension 48 (4 on disk) 

Mathematics 128 

Algebra 16 (16 on disk) 

History 32 (4 on disk) 

Spelling 16 

Government 16 

Physics 16 (4 on disk) 

16 Programs in each 
of the following: 

Children's Tales - Carpentry - Electronics 
Health Services - Office Skills ■ Statistics 
First Aid/Safety - Economics - Business 
Accounting - Psychology - MUCH MORE! 

Send lor our kee catalog ol over 1000 Dor sell educa* 
Mortal programs For Alan. TRS AC, Apple, IBM PC Jr., 
Cornmod;ore h Tandy 1000, ©IC, 



Apple II, TRS 80 I, III, & 4, and 
Commodore 64 computers require 
respective conversion kits (plug-in board 
and stereo cassette player), $99.00. Atari 
400/600/800/1200 computers require the 
Atari cassette recorder and the Dorsett 
4001 Educational Master Cartridge, 
$9.95. For the IBM PC Jr. a cassette 
adapter cable and a good cassette 
recorder are required. The Tandy 1000 
requires the Dorsett Ml 001 speaker/PC 
board kit, $69.00, and a standard 
cassette recorder, A Radio Shack 
CCR-81 or CCR-82 is recommended. 

CASSETTES: $59.90 for an album con- 
taining a 16- prog ram course (8 cassettes 
with 2 programs each); $9.80 for a 
2-prograrn cassette. 

DISKS: $14.95 for a one-program disk; 
$28,95 for two disks; $48.95 for four 
disks. All disks come in a vinyl album. 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome 



Dorsett Educational Software features: 

* Interactive Learning 

* User Friendly 

* Multiple Choice and Typed 

• Program Advance with Correct Response 

• Full time audio narration (Cassette 
Programs Only) 

• Self -Paced Study 

• High Resolution Graphics 

* Easy Reading Text 

For more Information, or lo order call: 

TOLL FREE 1-800*654-3871 
IN OKLAHOMA CALL (405)288-2301 



■MdttwCorf 



VISA* 



DORSETT 

Educational Systems, Inc. 

Box 1226, Norman, OK 73070 



Now that you know how to create 
waveforms and envelopes, you have to 
let each voice in Bells and Whistles 2 
know which combination of tables it 
will use. The Envelope/ Waveform 
Block function turns the current block 
into one that does just that. At each 
prompt, enter the envelope and wave- 
form number combination you want to 
use with each voice. These blocks can 
be placed anywhere in the tune to switch 
combinations in mid-music, but at least 
one should be at the start so that the 
computer knows what to begin with. 
You can alsocreatethis block by putting 
a 255 in the control byte of a block. 
Then each byte in each row contains 
information for each voice. Bits 0-2 of 
the byte are the waveform number, 
while bits 3-5 are the envelope number. 
Bits 6 and 7 aren't used. 

The Volume Block function creates a 
block that allows you to adjust the 
volume of each voice. One of these 
should also be put at the start of the 
music. Once youVe created a volume 
block, use the window cursor to set the 
values for each voice. The values can 
range from 0-255 for silent to full blast. 
However, values below 10 are imprac- 
tical, except 0 for total silence. The total 
volume of the four voices usually ought 
not to exceed 255. If a voice's waveform 
has less-than-maximum amplitude, you 
can squeeze out extra volume with the 
volume function by exceeding the 255 
sum limit, or at least cranking up the 
voice's volume. If you notice a rude 
cracking sound somewhere in the 
music, it is due to the volume being set 
too loud in the offending voice(s). This 
is called foldover distortion. 

Volume blocks can also be placed 
anywhere in the music to change it in 
mid-stream. Although the volume of a 
voice may have been changed, the old 
volume stays in effect until a note is 
played in that voice. This means that 
"leftover" values from previous notes, if 
a voice is playing a rest after a volume 
change, can occasionally cause foldover 
distortion. If that happens, put a block 
with a note length of 1 and (possibly 
linked) pitch values of 2 in each voice 
right after a volume change. The format 
of a volume block consists of a 254 in 
the control byte and the value of each 
voice's volume in the other four bytes. 

The Tempo Block function changes 
the tempo of the music. One of these 
should also be at least at the beginning 
of a tune. The tempo value can range 
from I to 65,535, though values gener- 
ally range from 30 to 200. Note that the 
tempo is printed as two separate bytes. 



The tempo equals the first byte times 
256 plus the second byte. However, the 
tempo rarely exceeds 255, so the bottom 
number is all that usually counts. The 
tempo block consists of a 253 in the 
control byte followed by a 32 tempo flag 
code, then the most and least significant 
bytes of the tempo. Byte 5 is not used. 
Figure 5 is an example of how a typical 
tune should begin. 



Window looks like this: 




0 
1 

2 
3 




E/W VOL TMP 

3,2 60 0 

3,1 60 125 

7,0 60 
0,0 75 

\ / 
Exact values 

of your choosing 



1 

2 
2 
2 
2 

A 



Tune begins here 



Clears out old 
volumes and 
sets new ones 



Figure 5: 
Example of Beginning of a Tune 

The Key Transpose function allows 
you to adjust the pitch of the synthesizer 
as a whole. At the prompt, enter the 
number of semitones* offset you want to 
have from the standard of middle A 
equaling 440 Hz. For instance, -12 
lowers the pitch an octave below the 
standard, while +3.8 would raise it 
3 4 /5ths semitones (decimal values allow 
for positioning the frequency between 
standard values). This can also be used 
to raise the pitch of a tune on a CoCo 
that can't handle the speed-up poke. 
There is one problem: If the pitch is 
raised to a point where a note in the 
music would normally exceed the 3, 107 
Hz limit of Bells and Whistles 2 (1,554 
Hz for regular speed CoCos), it is 
topped out at 3,107 (1,554) Hz. The 
offset range for this function is + /- 256 
semitones. 

A similar function, Note Transpose, 
changes the actual values for the pitches 
in the music buffer for one or all voices. 
You specify which voice(s) you want to 
change, the start and end blocks of the 
section you want to change and the 
actual offset value. For instance, +24 
raises the values by an octave, while 
-2 lowers them by a semitone. Odd- 
numbered values are unnecessary and 
are rounded to the next-lowest, even 
absolute value. If the value when added 
to a byte exceeds 255 or would go below 
2, or if a byte is a rest, the byte is left 
unchanged. Also, if the byte is part of 
a control block, it is ignored. 

Bells and Whistles 2 has a 128-band 
graphic equalizer built in. Normally, the 



frequency response is set to flat, and 
indeed, you may never use this function 
at all. But should you have to, choose 
the Custom option under the Equalizer 
function. Then enter the relative inten- 
sities for all 128 bands at each prompt 
with values from 0 to 255. Unless you 
want total silence, it is wise to keep 
equalizer settings above 50. The Flat 
option simply resets the equalizer table 
to all 255s. One good application of the 
equalizer is to attenuate high-pitched 
notes if they sound too sharp. 

The Memory Clear function lets you 
rapidly annihilate a section of music or 
the entire music buffer. Enter the start 
and end block values at the prompts, 
then choose the increment value: I 
clears out all the bytes, while 5 only 
clears out the row of bytes the cursor 
was in before invoking this function. Be 
sure to set the cursor correctly before 
invoking this function and option! This 
function is also performed by a machine 
language subroutine. 

The Label Block function creates a 
label of a single alphanumeric character 
that you specify at the prompt at the 
current block location. This is ignored 
by the music playing routine. The 
format of Label blocks is 253 in the 
control byte, then a flag of 1, then the 
ASCII code of the character. Bytes 4 
and 5 aren't used. The Find Label 
function searches through the music 
buffer as far as the end block pointer 
and stops at the first occurrence of the 
specified label. These two functions 
make finding a certain spot in the music 
buffer a snap. 

The Quit function allows you to exit 
the program in a single keystroke. The 
computer would usually be in the 
upper/ lowercase and high-speed modes 
if you just pressed BREAK. 

A NOP (no operation) Block func- 
tion creates a block that does absolutely 
nothing and is ignored by the music 
playing routine. It can be used as a place 
holder for future or former blocks. Its 
format is 253 in the control byte, then 
a flag of 128. Bytes 3 to 5 aren't used. 

Breakpoints can be set with the 
Breakpoint Block function. When the 
computer hits one of these while playing 
the music, it stops and waits for you to 
press a key, then continues. If you press 
BREAK, you are aborted to the BASIC 
driver program. This block accesses the 
ROM keyboard routine at low speed 
regardless of whether it is playing fast 
or slow. On some CoCos that can han- 
dle the high-speed pokes, this function 
would still crash due to a slow PIA IC 
for the keyboard. The format for these 



66 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



A 





SHOPPING LIST 



311= 



3 CHIP -SALE- ... 

2764 EPRQM $4.95 27128 EPROM $6.95 

6821 Standard PIA:$£*£S: $6.95 

68766 EPROM - ^&e£2^ Closeout price!!! $9.95 

Basic ROM 1.1 Chip 3a-9*9ft: $9.95 

6847 VDG Chip:2£&*a5: $12.95 

6809E CPU Chip3&tQZL $12.95 

CoCo III Multipak - "NEW" PAL chip (For Gray and 

White 26-3024 models ONLY) $19.95 

Basic ROM 1.3 ( Newest version) $19.95 

Disk ROM 1.1 - (Needed for CoCoIII ) $29.95 

Original SAM Chip (6883) $29.95 

Ext Basic 1.1 ROM - NEW LOW PRICE $29.95 

CoCo First Aid Kit - includes two PIA's, 6809E CPU 

and SAM Chips (BE PREPARED) $49.95 

EPROM Programmer - uses 2716s up to 27512 s! Super 
fast programming! - See April '86 review .$149.95 

COCO LIBRARY ... 

A History of the CoCo / 1980-1986 $6.95 

CoCo Memory Map Reg. ^3£*Q3TNow only $9.95 

New! 200 MORE Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $9.95 

Basic P rogramming Tricks Revealed $14.95 

500 Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $16.95 

Basic 09 Tour Guide $19.95 

A Guide to CoCo III GRAPHICS $21.95 

Better Graphics on CoCo3 w/2 disks $24.95 

CoCo II Service Manual (Specify Cat.#) $29.95 

CoCo III Unraveled - A best seller! ! ! $29.95 

CoCo III Service Manual $39.95 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS9 $19.95 

Guide with Two Disk Package of demo pgms ...$49.95 
Color /Extended/Disk Basic Unraveled - A completely 
cannented disassembly of the CoCo ROMS ! . . . .$49.95 

MORE GOOD STUFF ... 

WICO Adapter - Hookup 2 Atari type joysticks .$19.95 
CoCo Keybd - Low profile, fits all CoCo lis & "F"s 
WAS $39.95 - NCW $19.95. D/E CoCo I adapter $12.95 
WICO Trackball - Regularly $69.95 , Now only. $24 .95 
Universal Video Drvr - All monitors & CoCos .$29.95 
(2) Chip 64K Upgrade - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II .$29.95 

28 pin act Basic - 26-3134 A/B CoCo II $34.95 

Top FD-501 Drive 1 (#26-3131) - SAVE $60 ..$139.95 
CoCo III DISK DRIVE 0 - (Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150 plus value ! ! ! ) . . .$239.95 

AVATEX 2400 Modem (Great for Delphi ) $249.95 

512K COLOR COMPUTER III (Includes CoCoIII Software 
Bonanza Package - a $ 150 plus value!!!) ...$299.95 

All orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
COD add $2.00 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



AND ... 

Printer / Modem 15* Extender Cable £14.95 

Tired of unplugging devices from your RS232 port? 

Try a RS232 "Y" Cable $19.95 

TANDY CM-8 RGB Analog 6 'Video Ext Cable ....$19.95 

Disk Drive Cable (34pin - 34pin) $19.95 

Cassette 1 Y» Cable - Connect a 26-3028 Hi-Res Joy - 
stick interface & Tape Recorder to CoCoIII .$19.95 

Modem Cable - 6ft (DB25-DB25) $19.95 

Joystick / House 10 1 Ext Cable $19.95 

Dual Disk Drive Cable (3-34pin) $24.95 

MAGNA VOX 8505 / 8515 Analog RGB cable $24.95 

Other Analog RGB monitor cable ( Specify ! ) ..$39.95 
15" Multi-Pak / Rom Pak Extender - Move your Multi- 
ROM Paks further away $29.95 

12 llR DuaL 11 Y" Cable - Hook up a Disk with a 

Voice Pak, Word Pak, CoCo Max, etc $29.95 

Triple RS232 Switcher - Now easily select any one 
of three RS232 peripherals $39.95 

OTHER GOOD STUFF ... 

5 1/4 " Diskettes in any quantity 49 cents 

C-10 tapes in any quantity 59 cents 

Rompak w/Blank PC Board 27xx series $9.95 

"D" Rev motherboard w/o socketed chips $16.95 

Video Clear ~ This cable will reduce TV interfer- 
ence created by CoCo! £19.95 

DOS Switcher - Select from any two DOSs (Disk 1.0 

1.1, JDOS) in a J&M disk controller $29.95 

CoCo III keyboard - upgrade your CoCo II keyboard 1 
" Package " deal w/ FKEYS III($24.95) software $39.95 

256K RAM Chips (Set of 8) $39.95 

CoCo III 256K upgrade - Add another bank of 128K 
RAM & switch the 2 banks independently!!! ..$49.95 

HPS Controller w/1.1 ROM (SAVE$20) $79.95 

Super Controller - Up to 4 DOSs by a POKE ..$99.95 
1200 Baud Mod em ( Hayes compatible) Auto-dial /answer 
$139.95. Req's Modem cable ( 4pin or DB25 ) ..$19.95 
PBH-64 - A combo Parallel Printer interface & 64K 

Print Buffer! COMPUTE while you PRINT $149.95 

Amdek Drive System with controller $239.95 

GEMINI Printer - 120cps, NLQ mode $249.95 

MAGNA VOX 8505 RGB Analog monitor $249.95 

SONY" KV-1311 CR Analog monitor w/cable ....$499.95 



HOWARD BEACH MY 11414 

COCO HOT LINE 
718-835-1344 



blocks is 253 in the control byte, then 
a flag of 16. Bytes 3 to 5 aren't used. 

The Sync Block function is used in a 
block just preceding one where any two 
or more voices have to play the exact 
same note. At the prompts, respond 
"yes" to the voice numbers involved. 
Then, any synced voice's waveform 
table counter will be reset, and the 
voices playing the same note won't 
cancel out. There is a possibility of this 
happening if the voices aren't synced. 
You only need one sync block as long 
as each voice plays the same notes 
without separating. See Figure 6 to 
clarify the use of this function. The 



Typical window configuration; exact 
values depend on tune. 



0: 


16 


SYN 


32 


32 


SYN 


128 


1: 


194 


S 


-194 


192 


S 


170 


2: 


184 


S 


194 


192 


S 


170 


3: 


178 




174 


178 


S 


170 


4: 


170 




168 


170 


S 


-170 



Figure 6: Use of Sync Block 

format of a sync block is 253 in the 
control byte, followed by a 2 for the 
sync flag. Bits 0 to 3 of Byte 3, when set, 
synchronize voices 1 to 4, respectively. 
Bytes 4 and 5 aren't used. 

The Jump function jumps the win- 
dow editor display to the current block 
specified at the prompt. 

The Music Jump Block function 
creates a block that skips the music 
playing routine to the block specified, 
when encountered. This can be handy 
when placed at the beginning of a tune 
to change the position where the playing 
begins. This block is displayed in the 
same most/ least significant byte fash- 
ion as is a tempo block. The value of the 
first byte times 256 plus the second 
equals the memory address of the des- 
tination block. If you have to determine 
the block number, subtract hexadec- 
imal 4,000 (16,384) from the address 
and divide by five. This can be done by 
quitting or breaking out of the program 
to find the result (the variable M equals 
16,384 throughout the program and can 
save you a few keystrokes in your 
calculations). Enter GDT01 to return to 
the program. The format for these 
blocks is 253 in the control byte, then 
a flag of 64, then the most and least 
significant bytes of the jump address. 
Byte 5 isn't used. 

The Copy function allows you to 
duplicate sections of the music buffer 
without retyping them. At the prompts, 
enter the start and end block locations 
of the section to be copied, then the 

68 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



destination block (the first block loca- 
tion of the area you are copying to). The 
destination block cannot equal the start 
block, and no copied block can end up 
being copied to beyond block location 
2,912, or this function will abort with- 
out copying. 

For simple repeats, the Start and End 
Repeat Block functions are used at the 
beginning and end of the section you 
want to play twice. The repeat goes 
from the last Start Repeat block en- 
countered to the first End Repeat block 
encountered. Extraneous repeats are 
ignored. The format for these blocks is 
a 253 in the control byte, then a flag of 
4 for a Start Repeat or 8 for an End 
Repeat. Bytes 3 to 5 aren't used. More 
complicated repeat patterns can be 
emulated with the Copy command. 

The Zing Here function "zings" the 
end block pointer to the current block. 
The Zing End function scans ahead 
from the current block until it hits a zero 
in the control byte, thereby determining 
the end block location. This function is 
also invoked after u run, copy, memory 
clear or load. The end block pointer is 
usually updated every time you do 
something to the music buffer (insert, 
delete, enter a number, set a control 
block, etc.). 

The Save function lets you store your 
musical creation on cassette or disk. 
The Music option saves just the music 
buffer, while the more popular Music- 
+Config option also saves the extra 
4.5K preceding the music buffer where 
the envelope, waveform, equalizer and 
pitch tables are located. This is the most 
recommended save. The Config option 
saves just the tables. This can be used 
to store a favorite collection of wave- 
forms and envelopes, saving you from 
having to redo them every time you run 
the program. Unless you are using the 
Config option, you must make sure that 
the end block pointer is set to the end 
block or one or two blocks higher. If it 
isn't, use either of the Zing functions to 
set it or data may be lost or you could 
waste valuable disk or cassette space. 
You are prompted for the filename. If 
it is not specified or exceeds eight 
characters, the save will be aborted. 
Disk users may want to change the B in 
Line 65 to 12 to allow filename exten- 
sions. You are then prompted for 
cassette or disk. The disk option won't 
execute if the controller is not plugged 
Tn. 

The Load function loads a tune from 
cassette or tape. Enter the filename, 
which may be omitted if you are using 
cassette. 



The Odd Files function lets you 
append a second file to the first, load a 
CoCo Composer tune,orload a Music+ 
tune. It does this by setting the load 
offset according to the desired option, 
then jumping to the Load function. To 
append a file to a tune already in 
memory, make sure the file was saved 
without the tables, i.e., by the Music 
and not the Music+Config option under 
the Save function. Then choose the 
Append option. Make sure the end 
block pointer is set properly before 
invoking this function! Bells and Whis- 
tles 2 can load files made by the CoCo 
Composer (Larry Konecky, December 
1983) and Music+ (Bob Ludlum, June 
1984 and 1986). If you have these 
programs, you can easily convert your 
library of tunes to Bells and Whistles 2 
format. Then, with all of Bells and 
Whistles 2's features, like envelopes, 
you can hear them like you've never 
heard them before! The discrepancy is 
that Bells and Whistles 2's buffer begins 
at Hex 4000, while the CoCo Compos- 
er's begins at Hex 2D00 and Music+'s 
begins at Hex 4F22. Therefore, the 
CoCo Composer and Music+ options 
load the files with offsets of Hex 1300 
and Hex -F22, respectively. 

Once the files are loaded, you must 
use the Note Transposition function on 
the whole tune with an offset of +120 to 
bring the pitch values up to Bells and 
Whistles 2 equivalents. Before you do 
this, however, make sure any note 
lengths of 253 or 254 are changed to 252. 
The CoCo Composer and Music+ allow 
note lengths up to 254, but these will 
show up as erroneous control blocks in 
Bells and Whistles 2 and would be 
ignored by the Note Transposition 
function. 

Insert at least three spaces at the 
beginning of the tune for Tempo, Vol- 
ume and E/W blocks. Add features to 
the song accordingly, like linking inter- 
polated notes, throwing in labels, re- 
peats, etc. Save the newly converted file 
in Bells and Whistles 2 format with the 
Music+Config option. The conversion 
is now complete. Note that Music+ and 
CoCo Composer files fill the upper two 
or three envelope tables with trash from 
their own tables when first loaded 
before conversion. This probably won't 
be any problem at all. I suggest you use 
a flat envelope for the voices unless you 
link the desired notes. 

The Directory function does a disk 
directory print to the screen, so you can 
see the filenames if you can't remember 
them. This function won't execute if the 
disk controller isn't plugged in. 



««< COLORFUL UTILITIES »»> 

MULTI-PAK CRAK 

Save ROMPAKs to your 64K Disk system using the RS Multi-Pak Interface, Eliminate constant plugging in c£ ROMPAKs now by 
keeping all your PAK software on disk . Includes POKEs for " PROBLEM " ROMPAKs- including the NEW 16K PAKS1 (Demon 
Attack, Dragons Lair,etc) Now CoCo III compatible! (Upgrade $15 w/ proof of purchase > $29.95 

TELEPATCH III 

All the FEATURES of TELEPATCH plus the classically proportioned characters of the WIZARD with TRUE lowercase! Now CoCo 
III compatible! (Upgrade $15 w/proof of pur chase ) $29.95 

DISK UTILITY 2.1 A 

A mu 1 1 i-fea tured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling. Utilize a directory window to selectively sort, move, rename and 
kill file entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format , copy and backup. Examine contents of files, the Granule Table, 
plus the size, load addresses and entry points of all programs. Single, command execution of both- Basic and ML programs. 
32K/64K DISK $29.95 Now also CoCo III compatible 1 Upgrade only $15 w/proof of purchase, (see Oct '84 Rainbow Review) 

SPECTRUM FONT GENERATOR 

Write files using any CoCo Word Processor (Telewriter-64 , VIP Writer, etc.) and convert them to special Hj^hjlj/ Detailed 
characte r sets 1 Some of the sets supported are Italics , Old English t Futuristic and Block . A character set editor is 
included to create or modify custom sets I Supports most dot - matrix printers 1 DISK $29.95 (see Dec '85 Rainbow Review) 

COCO III SOFTWARE BONANZA PACKAGE 

Create an instant library of Spectrum Projects TOP CoCo III software!!! Get FCtTT BONANZA, PONT DISK 01, FKEYS III, C III 
GRAPHICS, CoCo III UTILITIES and FASTDUPE III (a $150 plus value ) for only $49.95!!! 

THE ULTIMATE COCO III TERMINAL PROGRAM 

Supports 40/80 column mode, ASCII or XMODEM uploads & downloads, Deluxe RS232 PAK or Serial " BITBANGER " port, 300 / 1200 
Baud!! ! Plus " STRINGS " (predefined sequences of text) can be read into the BUFFER from DISK & transmitted by NAME! Type- 
ahead & auto-repeat are also supported. RTERM 2.0 Req. 128K CoColIl DISK $39.95 



Meet the challenge of SUPER FAST J VRCAD& action using the BRILLIAWr colors of the CoCoIII . Six completely different 
MADDENING mazes with PROGRESSIVE skill levels I 128K DISK $29.95 (see Rainbow Review May '87) 

TAPE/DISK UTILITY 

A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic copy of an entire disk 
of programs to tape. Ideal for Rainbow On Tape: to disk. Also copies tape to tape & prints tape & disk directories. 
TAPE/DISK $24.95 (see Sept *83 Rainbow Review) 

COCO III UTILITIES 

Terrific util ity support programs for the new Color C omputer III 1 Includes a CoCo II to CoCo III converter, 32K Hi-Res 
screen saver, 40/80 column Word Processor, RAM tester, DEMO BALL generator, SMOOTH scrolling demos. 128K DISK $24.95 

TW-BO 

It ' s finally here ! An 80 column version of Telewriter-64 for the CoCoIII with TELEPATCH features plus much, much more I 1 1 
Use the Fl & F2 keys to access the MAIN MENU or EDITOR f ALT key for SPECIAL CHARACTERS & now you can use the CTRL key 
instead of CLEAR 1 Req. TW-64 DISK & 128K CoCoIII $39.95 

SOFTWARE BONANZA PACKAGE 

Create an instant library of Spectrum Projects IOP Colorful Utility software. Select any of the following 12 programs to 
customize your own SPECTACULAR SOFTWARE BONANZA! CoCo Checker, Multi-Pak Crak, CoCo Screen Dump, Disk Utility 2.1, 
Spectrum Font Generator, Tape/Disk Utility, Fast Dupe II, 64K Disk Utility, Spectrum DOS, CoCo Calendar, Schematic 
Drafting Processor, OS -9 Solution, Basic Plus, EZ Base or Blackjack Royale (a $300 plus value ) for only $99.95111 

BUY ANY TWO - COCO POTPOURI - SAVE 10°/b 



CoCo Checker $19.95 

MIKEY-DIAL $19.95 

CoCo Calendar ...$19.95 



Fastdupe III $19.95 

64K Disk Utility $24.95 
OS-9 Solution ...$24.95 



Wizard's Castle ..$27.95 

Spectrum DOS $29.95 

Adv Generator $29.95 



ADOS-3 $34.95 

Spit' N' Image ...$34.95 
CoCo Util II ...$39.95 



All U.S. orders plus $3 S/H (Other $5) 
COD add $2 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 
CoCo HOT LINE 718-835-1344 



HOWARD 



NY 11414 



The Display function is really neat. 
You can watch the window move when 
you play the music! The machine lan- 
guage subroutine takes a split second to 
print the window, but it still causes 
noticeable gaps between notes in the 
music. However, it is useful as a debug- 
ging tool. You won't be able to see it, 
though, with the Fast Play function 
unless you have a CoCo 3. 

The Cancel function untoggles the 
display mode, and the music will play 
normally. 

To make audio recordings of Bells 
and Whistles 2, my advice is to use a 
microphone or an in-line attenuator. 
Keep the mike away from the TV, as 
many will pick up the 60 Hz hum from 
the TV's circuitry. You can record 
through the jack on the CoCo's cassette 



cable, but weird things happen with the 
recorder's automatic level control. 
Volume changes become indistinguisha- 
ble and the first second of the music 
sounds like a muffled explosion. To 
overcome the latter problem, the 
Klaxxon function sounds a loud tone 
for about a second to wake up the 
recorder's attenuating circuitry. Have 
the recorder on pause but with the 
record and play keys pressed. Sound the 
tone, then quickly release the pause and 
play the music. 

The CoCo's audio DAC is six bits 
wide, yielding about 36 db of dynamic 
range. Low volume notes get flattened 
out, as do notes where the envelope 
trails off to nothing. T^his explains why 
notes sound different as they trail off. 
When the music playing routine finishes 



a piece of music, it resets the sound 
output to the TV or monitor. This may 
cause a "pop" in the TV or monitor 
and/ or the cassette recorder. Simply 
put a long rest at the end of the music 
to give you a couple of seconds' leeway. 

That wraps up the instructions for 
Bells and Whistles 2. This program is 
the product of almost three years of 
programming and debugging. If you 
have any problems, I'll try to help. You 
can send an SASE to me at 26 Alfred 
Street, Napanee, Ontario, Canada 
K7R-3H7. 

CoCo users need no longer be 
taunted by their friends who have other 
computers and belittle the CoCo's PLAY 
command. I hope you enjoy this versa- 
tile and superior synthesizer pro- 
gram! □ 



Editor's Note: Two music files, AXEL F and ENTRTANR, 
will be included »n this month's RAINBOW ON TAPE 

and RAINBOW ON DISK. 




10 36 85 

26 80 95 . . . 

41 31 106 . . 

53 .210 115. . . 

63 . 42 130 

74 57 136. . . 



.188 141 19 

. .18 145 183 

. .75 151 148 

.104 155 125 

. .65 161 70 

. 141 END 75 




Listing 1: BW2 

j3 GOT07 2 

1 GOSUB2 :GOT05 

2 CLS3 :PRINT fl »»> BELLS AND WHI 
STLES 2 <««"; :PRINT@128, "^0 : " ; 
PRINTS 19 2 , "1: " ; : PRINT@2 2 4 , "2 : 11 ; 
PRINT@256, "3 : 11 ; : PRINT@288 , "4 : 11 ; 
PRINT@32,STRING$(32, 191) ; : PRINT@ 
384,STRING$(32, 191) ; :I$=STRING$( 
4,166) :PRINT@335, 1$; : PRINTS 175, I 
$; : PRINTS 111, 1$; 

3 PRINT@416 , STRING$ (69,32) ; : POKE 
1535,96:PRINT@485, fl BY MATTHEW A, 

THOMPSON 11 ; : RETURN 

4 POKEII,INT(I/256) : POKEII+ 1 , 1-2 
56*INT(I/256) : RETURN 

5 GOSUB3 : POKEHS , : GOT07 

6 PRINT@3 52 , "COMMAND?" : PRINT@64 , 
" CURRENT BLOCK : " ; : PRINTUS ING" # # 
##" ; (CB-M)/5:PRINT@85, "END: " ; :P 
RINTUSING"####" ; (EB-M) /5 : RETURN 

7 GOSUB6 

8 I=CB: II=&H7C8F:GOSUB4 :EXEC&H7C 

92 

9 POKE 2 8 2 , p : POKE 3 4 3,255: POKE 344, 
255 : I$=INKEY$ : IFI$<>" "THEN11ELSE 
POKECM(CU) +CC, PEEK (CM (CU) + CC) -64 
: FORQT=lT03 j3 : NEXT : POKECM ( CU ) +CC , 



PEEK(CM(CU) + CC) +64 

1)3 CC=CC+C3 : IFCC>20RCC<1THENCS=- 
CS:IFI$=""THEN9 

11 IFI$=CHR$ (8) ANDCB>M THENCB-CB 
-5 : POKE&H87 , jZf : GOT07 

12 IFI$=CHR$ (9) ANDCB<&H78E)3 THEN 
CB=CB+5 : POKE&H8 7 , fS : GOT07 

13 IFI$=CHR$ (1)3) ANDCU<4THENCU=CU 



IFI $ = " A " ANDCU>)3THENCU=CU-1 
IFI$>=")3"ANDI$< = "9"THEN18 
IFI$<>" "THENONINSTR ( 1 , CM$ , 1$ ) 



+ 1 
14 
15 
16 

GOT031, 33 , 34 , 35 , 112, 36, 79, 4)3, 113 
,114, 1)39, 42, 41, 48, 49, 53, 55, 56, 59 
,6)3, 61, 64, 12 9, 57, 71, 115, 125, 13)3, 
51,5)3,129,77,52,1)37 

17 GOT09 

18 PRINT@361,I$:PRINT@CM(CU) -1)32 
4," ???";:N$=I$ 

19 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN19 
2)3 IFI$ = " "THEN7 

21 IFI$>=")3"ANDI$<= n 9"THENN$=N$ + 

I$:PRINT@361,N$ 

2 2 N=VAL(N$) 

23 IFN>255THENPLAY"T2L1601V4C" : G 
OT07 

24 IFPEEK(CB) >25 2 AND ( I $=CHR$ (13) 
ORI $= " @ " ) THENPOKECB+CU , N : GOT02 9 

25 IFCU=)3AND(I$=CHR$ ( 13 ) ORI $=" @" 
) THENPOKECB, N : GOTO 2 9 

26 IFI$=CHR$ (13) THENPOKECB+CU, N: 
GOT02 9 

2 7 IFI$="@"ANDN<2 55THENPOKECB+CU 
N+l:GOT02 9 
GOT019 

IFEB<CB THENEB=CB 
GOT05 

I=&H7 9A9 : POKELS , j3 : POKE 3 2 7 6 6 , j3 
POKE2 82 ,255: EXECI : POKEHS , )2 : GO 



28 
29 
3)3 
31 
32 
TOl 



70 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



33 I = &H7C5j3: POKE 32766, l:GOT032 

34 PRINT@3 52 , "INSERT" : I=CB+5 : 11= 
&H7C69 : GOSUB4 : EXEC&H7C5A: FORI=CB 

TOCB+4 : POKEI , j3 : NEXT : EB=EB+ 5 : GOT 
07 

35 PRINT@352 , "DELETE" : I=CB: II=&H 
7C78 : G0SUB4 : EXEC&H7C6B : IFEB>CB T 
HENEB=EB-5 :GOT07ELSE7 

36 PRINTS 352, "ENVELOPE/ WAVE FORM 
BLOCK" : F0RI=1T04 

37 PRINT@4 1 6 , "VOICE " I " ENVELOPE " ; 
:INPUTII:II=FIX(ABS(II) ) :IFII>7T 
HEN5ELSEII=II*8 

38 PRINT@44 8, "VOICE" I "WAVEFORM" ; 
:INPUTIC:IC=FIX(ABS(IC) ) :IFIC>7T 
HEN5ELSEP0KECB+I , IC+II 

3 9 NEXT: POKECB, 2 55: GOTO 2 9 

4J3 PRINT@352 , "JUMP" : PRINT@416 , ; : 
INPUT"TO WHAT BLOCK" ; I : I=FIX ( ABS 

(I) ) :IFI>2912THEN5ELSECB=I*5+M:G 
0T05 

41 PRINTS 3 5 2, "FREQUENCY TRANS POS 
ATION":PRINT@416, "SEMITONES FROM 

A^44j3 HZ"; :INPUTOF: IFOF>2560ROF 
<-256THEN5ELSEGOSUB75 : G0T05 

42 PRINTS 3 52, "MEMORY CLEAR" : PRIN 
T@416, "START BLOCK" ? :INPUTSB:SB= 
FIX(ABS(SB) ) : IFSB>2912THEN5 

43 INPUT"END BLOCK" ; TB : TB=FIX (AB 
S (TB) ) : IFTB>2912THEN5 

4 4 GOSUB3:PRINT@416, "INCREMENT" ; 
: INPUTIC: IC=FIX( ABS ( IC) ) : IFICol 
ANDIC05THEN5 

45 I=SB*5+M:IFIC=5THENI=I+CU 

46 II=&H7C8A:GOSUB4:I=TB*5+M:IFI 
C=5THENI=I+CU ELSEI=I+4 

47 II=&H7C8C: G0SUB4 : POKE&H7C8E, I 
C : EXEC&H7C7A: G0T05 6 

4 8 PRINT@352, "TEMPO" : PRINTS 4 16, ; 
: INPUT f! TEMPO" ; QT : QT=ABS ( FIX ( QT) ) 
:IFQT>65535THEN5ELSEI=QT: II=CB+2 
: G0SUB4 : POKECB, 2 53: POKECB+1 , 32 : G 
OT029 

49 PRINT@3 52 , "LABEL" : POKE282 , 255 

:PRINT@416, "HIT LABEL KEY. " : GOSU 

B78 :I=ASC(QW$) : IFK3 3 0RI>9j3THEN5 

ELSEPOKECB ,253: POKECB+ 1,1: POKECB 

+2,I:GOT029 

5j3 POKE32767,j3:GOT09 

51 POKE32767,l:GOT09 

52 S0UND5j3, 3j3 : G0T09 

53 PRINI@352, "FIND" : PRINT@416 , "H 
IT LABEL TO FIND. ": POKE282 , 255 : G 
OSUB7 8 

54 I=ASC(QW$) : IFK330RI>9j3THEN5E 
LSEPRINT@ 3 5 7 , CHR$ ( I ) : FORII =M TOE 
B+5STEP5 : IFPEEK( II+2 ) <>I THENNEX 
T:G0T05ELSEIFPEEK(II+1) =1ANDPEEK 

(II) =2 53THENCB=II:GOT05ELSENEXT: 



G0T05 

55 POKECB, 254 :GOT029 

56 FORI=CB TO&H78F / 0 STEP5:IFPEEK 
( I ) =0THENEB=I : G0T01ELSENEXT : GOTO 
1 

57 PRINT§352 , "SYNCHRONIZATION" : I 
I=j3 : F0RI=1T04 : PRINT@416 , "VOICE"I 
H (l=Y,j2f=N) ?" :GOSUB78 :IFQW$<>" / 0" 
ANDQW$<>" 1 "THEN5 

58 II=II+VAL(QW$) *2 A (1-1) :NEXT:P 
OKECB,2 53 : POKECB+1, 2 :P0KECB+2,II 
:GOT029 

59 PRINT@352, "MUSIC JUMP": PRINT© 
416 , ; : INPUT"TO WHAT BLOCK" ;I:I=F 
IX (ABS (I) ) : IFI>2912THEN5ELSEI=M+ 
I*5:P0KECB, 253 : POKECB+1, 64 : II=CB 
+2 :G0SUB4 :GOT029 

6j3 POKECB, 25 3: POKECB+1, 4 : GOTO 2 9 

61 POKECB, 253 : POKECB+1, 8 :GOT029 

62 POKE282,255:PRINT§352, "LOAD": 
G0SUB3 : PRINT@416 , ; : LINEINPUT"TIT 
LE: " ;I$:IFLEN(I$) >8THEN5ELSEPOK 
ELS,j3 :GOSUB128 :IFQW$="1"THENCL0A 
DM" " + I$ , I ELSEIFQW$="2 " ANDMEM<7j2 
/ 0THENLOADM""+I$,I ELSE5 

63 POKEHS, j2:CB=M:PRINT@357, "COMP 
LETED. . , WAIT. " :GOT056 

64 P0KE2 8 2,255: PRINT@ 3 5 2 , "SAVE": 
PRINT@416, "1) MUSIC", "2) MUSIC+C 
ONFIG", "3) CONFIG" :GOSUB78 :QT=VA 
L(QW$) : IFQT=1THENI=M: II=EB+9ELSE 
IFQT=2THENI = S : II=EB+9ELSEIFQT=3T 
HENI=S: II=M-1ELSE5 

65 G0SUB3 : PRINT@4 16, "TITLE : ";:L 
INEINPUTI$: IFI$=" " ORLEN ( I $ ) >8THE 
N5ELSEP0KELS , 

66 GOSUB128 : IFQW$="1"THEN69 

67 IFQW$<>"2"ORMEM>7 j 0pTHEN5ELSES 
AVEM"" + I$,I,II,4j39 9 9 

68 GOT07J3 

69 CSAVEM"" + I$,I,II,4J3999 

70 POKEHS , j3 : G0T05 

71 POKECB, 253: POKECB+1, 128 : G0T02 
9 

72 IFPEEK(&H79$8) O1340RPEEK ( &H7 
9J39) 0121THEN135 

73 CLEAR175,&H2DFF:HS=65495:LS=6 
5494 : POKEHS, ,0 : M=&H 4j3j3j3 : W=&H 3j3j3j3 : 
E=&H38j3j2 : S=M2Ej3j3 : EQ=&H2Fj2j2 : CB=M 
: EB=M: CC=j3 : CS = 1 : IFPEEK(&H79j36) <> 
52ORPEEK(&H79 v 07) 0126THEN133 

74 CLS3 : PRINT§2 37 , " WAIT " ; : 1=11 
67 : CM(j3 ) =1 : CM (1) =1 + 6 4 : CM(2) =1+9 6 
:CM(3) =I + 12 8 :CM(4)=I + 16J3:CU=J3:CM 
$= fl pPiDbWwjzQCMFtlfvZJseSLyNn-=d 
co\k"+CHR$ (12 ) : POKEHS , j3 : GOTO 5 6 

75 QT=31214, 74,0j33* ( 1 ♦ j359 4 6 3 1 A 0F) 
:FORII=S+254TOS STEP-2 : I«QT : IFI> 
32768THENI=32768 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 71 



76 G0SUB4:QT=QT/1. 0594631: NEXT :R 
ETURN 

77 IFMEM<700THENCLS:POKELS,0:DIR 
: POKEHS , f5 : GOSUB7 8 : GOT01ELSE9 

78 QW$=INKEY$ : IFQW$=" "THEN7 8ELSE 
RETURN 

79 PRINT@352 , "ENVELOPE/WAVEFORM 
CREATE 11 : PRINT @ 4 1 6 , " W ) AVE FORMS " , , 
"E) NVELOPES" : GOSUB78 : IFQW$="e"TH 
EN98 

80 IFQW$o"w"THEN5 

81 CLS:PRINT"1) GRAPHIC", , "2) SI 
NE HARMONICS 11 , 1 ^) SQUARE" "4) S 
AWTOOTH" , , "5) TRIANGLE" , , "S) JUS 
T CHECKING", "7) NOISE/PERCUSSION 
","8) BYTE BY BYTE" : GOSUB78 : QT=V 
AL(QW$) :IFQT<10RQT>8THEN1 

82 GOSUB1J38: IFI>7THEN1 

83 OF=W+I*2 56:ONQT GOT084 , 89 , 9 4 , 
95,96,97, 132 , 105 

84 QT=j3:CLSj3: II=j3:FORI=OF TOOF+2 
55STEP4 

85 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=CHR$(94)ANDQT< 
=247THENQT=QT+8ELSEIFI$=CHR$ (10) 
ANDQT>=8THENQT=QT-8 

86 FORSB=0TO3 : POKEI+SB , QT : NEXT : S 
B=31-(QT/8-.875) : SET (II , SB, 5) :IF 
SB>=1THENRESET ( II , SB- 1 ) 

87 IFSB<31THENRESET(II,SB+1) 

88 IFI$=CHR$ (9)THENII=II+1:NEXT: 
GOT097ELSE85 

89 CLS: PRINT" INPUT HARMONIC WEIG 
HTS (0-1) : " : PRINT :FORI=1TO10:PRI 
NTI; rINPUTZ (I) :IFZ(I) <0ORZ (I) >1T 
HEN1 

90 NEXT :CLS0: 1=0 :IC=0:FORQT=OF T 
OOF+255:FORII=1TO10: Y(II) =COS (I* 
II) *Z (II) 

91 NEXTII:SB=INT(127-126*( (Y(l) + 
Y (2 ) +Y ( 3 ) +Y ( 4 ) +Y ( 5 ) +Y (6) +Y (7) +Y ( 
8)+Y(9)+Y(10) )/(Z (1) +Z (2)+Z (3)+Z 
(4)+Z(5)+Z(6)+Z(7)+Z(8)+Z(9)+Z(l 



0) ) ) ) :POKEQT,SB: IFSB>IC THENIC=S 
B 

92 1=1+3 .1415926/128:IFQT/4=FIX( 
QT/4) THENSET ( (QT-OF) /4 , 3 1- (PEEK( 
QT)/8-.875) ,5) 

93 NEXTQT:IC=255/IC-( (255/IC)/25 
4):FORI=OF TOOF+255:POKEI,INT(PE 
EK(I) *IC) :NEXT:GOT097 

94 FORI=OF TOOF+127:POKEI+128,25 
5 : POKEI , 0 : NEXT : GOT097 

95 FORI=OF TOOF+255 : POKEI, I-OF:N 
EXT:GOT097 

96 FORI=OF TOOF+127:POKEI,2*(I-0 
F) :POKEI+128 , 255-2* (I-OF) : NEXT : G 
OT097 

97 CLS0: IC=0:FORI=OF TOOF+255STE 
P4:SET(IC,31-(PEEK(I)/8-.875) ,2) 

: IC=IC+1 : NEXT : QW$=INKEY$ : GOSUB78 
: GOTO 1 

98 CLS: PRINT" 1) EXPONENTIAL DECA 
Y","2) FLAT",, "3) GRAPHIC" ,, "4 ) 
JUST CHECKING" , "5) BYTE BY BYTE" 
:GOSUB78 :QT=VAL(QW$) :IFQT<10RQT> 
5THEN1 

99 GOSUB108:IFI>7THEN1ELSEOF=E+I 
*256 

100 ONQT GOTO101, 106,84,97,105 

101 PRINT: INPUT "DECAY VALUE", -SB: 
SB=ABS(SB) :IFSB<1THEN1 

102 PRINT"1) ABSOLUTE", "2) RELAT 
IVE " : GOSUB7 8 : 1 FQW$ < 11 1 11 ORQW$ > 11 2 " T 
HEN1 

103 11=2 55: IFQW$="1"THENQT=0 : INP 
UT"STRUM FACTOR" ; IC: IC=FIX (ABS (I 
C) ) :IFIC<10RIC>256THEN1ELSEF0RI= 
OF TOOF+255:POKEI,II:II=II/SB:QT 
=QT+1:IFQT=IC THENQT=0 : 11=2 55 : NE 
XT : GOT097ELSENEXT : GOT097 

104 FORI=OF TOOF+255 :POKEI, 11/25 
5*PEEK(I) :II=II/SB:NEXT:GOT097 

105 PRINT:FORI=OF TOOF+255 : PRINT 
" BYTE "I-OF" (0-255) " ; : INPUTII : 11= 




Information Management System 



CSG-IMS is The full-featured relational database manager for the Color Computer and OS9. The com- 
prehensive structured application language makes CSG-IMS the ideal development tool for file-intensive 
applications. Sophisticated applications can be developed in a small fraction of the time required for 
traditional languages. 



Interactive access to databases 

and quick ad hoc queries. 

CSG-IMS includes a recursive compiled 

fanguage supporting program modules 

with full parameter passing. 

User defined screen and report formats. 



— Record, index and file size almost 
unlimited. 

— Text, BCD floating point (14 digit), short 
and long integer and date types. 

— Run-time interpreter available. 

— Comprehensive 320 page manual/tutorial. 



CSG-lMS/CoCo2/CoCo3 OS9 $169.95 
CSG-IMS/OS9 Lll (multiuser) $495 
CSG-IMS/OS9 68K $495 
CSG-IMS Demo with manual $30 

Shipping: N.Amenca - $5. Overseas - $10 





Clearbrook Software Group 
P.O. Box 8000-499 
Sumas, Wa 98295 
Phone: (604) 853-9118 
BBS: (604) 859-1266 

Available in Canada from: 

Kelly Software Distributors Ltd. 

Phone: (403) 236-2161 

OS9 is a trademark ol Microware and Motorola inc 



72 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



FIX (ABS (II) ) : IFII>255THEN1ELSEP0 
KEI , II : NEXT : GOT097 

106 FORI=OF T00F+255:P0KEI,2 55:N 
EXT:GOT097 

107 P0KECB+CU,J3 :G0T08 

1J38 PRINT :PRINT"WHICH TABLE (0-7 
) " : G0SUB7 8 : 1 FQW $ < " 0 " ORQW$ > " 7 " THE 
NI=9 : RETURNELSEI=VAL ( QW$ ) : RETURN 

109 PRINT@352, "COPY" : PRINT@416 , " 
START" ; : INPUTSB: SB=FIX (ABS (SB) ) : 
IFSB>2912THEN5ELSEINPUT"END" ; TB : 
TB=FIX (ABS (TB) ) : IFTB>29120RTB<SB 

THEN5ELSEGOSUB3 :PRINT@416, "COPY 
TO" ; : INPUTIC: IC=FIX (ABS (IC) ) : IF 

IC>29120RIC=SB ORIC+TB-SB>29 12TH 

EN5 

110 SB=SB*5+M:TB=TB*5+M+4:IC=IC* 
5+M:IFIC<SB THENFORI=SB TOTB:POK 
EIC+I-SB,PEEK(I) : NEXTELSEFORI=TB 

TOSB STEP-l:POKEIC+I-SB,PEEK(I) 
:NEXT 

111 GOT056 

112 POKECB,2 53:POKECB+l,16:GOT02 
9 

113 EB=CB:GOT07 

114 POKE282,255:POKELS,j3:CLS:END 

115 PRINT@352 , "NOTE TRANSPOSATIO 
N" : PRINT@ 416, "WHICH VOICE (1-4, 
5= ALL) ? " : GOSUB78 : QQ=VAL (QW$ ) : IFQ 
Q=P0RQQ>5THEN5 

116 INPUT "START BLOCK" ; SB: SB=FIX 
(ABS (SB) ) :IFSB>2912THEN5 

117 GOSUB3 :PRINT@416, "END BLOCK" 
; : INPUTTB : TB=FIX ( ABS ( TB ) ) : I FTB> 2 
9120RTB<SB THEN5 

118 PRINT@448 , "TRANSPOSATION VAL 
UE" : PRINT@467 , ; : INPUTIC : IC=2*FIX 
(IC/2) 

119 FORI=M+5*SB TOM+5*TB STEP5:I 
FQQ<5THENII=QQ : GOT012 1 

12J3 F0RII=1T04 

121 QT=II+I:OF=PEEK(QT) :IFPEEK(I 



) <253ANDOF<>j3ANDOF+IC>lANDOF+IC< 
2 5 6THENPOKEQT , OF+I C 

122 IFQQ<5THEN124 

123 NEXTII 

124 NEXTI:GOT05 

125 IFPEEK(CB) >2520RCU=J3THEN9 

126 I=PEEK(CB+CU) :IF(I AND1) =1TH 
ENPOKECB+CU, I-1ELSEPOKECB+CU, 1+1 

127 POKE343 , 255 : IFINKEY$="-"THEN 
127ELSE8 

128 GOSUB3:PRINT@416,"l) CAS SETT 
E OR 2) DISK?" :GOSUB7 8: RETURN 

129 IFI$ = "L"THENI=j3:GOT062ELSEPR 
INT@352 , "ODD FILES " : PRINT@416 , " 1 
) APPEND", "2) MUSIC+","3) COCO C 
OMPOSER" ; : GOSUB78 : IFQW$="3"THENI 
=&H13j3j3:GOT062ELSEIFQW$="2"THENI 
=&HFPDE : GOTO 62 ELSE IFQW$="1"THENI 
=EB-M : GOT062 ELSE5 

13 j3 CLS: PRINT" 1) FLAT OR 2) CUST 
OM" : GOSUB7 8 : IFQW$< " 1 " ORQW$ > " 2 " TH 
EN1ELSEIFQW$="1"THENF0RI=EQ TOEQ 
+255 : POKEI ,255: NEXT : GOTOl 

131 FORI=j3T012 7 :PRINTFIX( (I+. 5)/ 
256*6172) ;"HZ (0-255) " ; :INPUTII: 
II=FIX(ABS (II) ) :IFII>255THEN1ELS 
EPOKEI+EQ , II : NEXT : GOTOl 

132 FORI=OF TOOF+255:POKEI,RND(2 
55) :NEXT:GOT097 

133 CLS:PRINT@j3,">»» BELLS AND 
WHISTLES 2 <««",, "TABLES ARE 

BEING INITIALIZED. WHEN DONE, 
PLEASE TYPE ' RUN ' AGAIN . " : POK 

E&H79P6 , 52 : POKE&H79J37 , 12 6 : FORI=E 
Q TOEQ+255: POKEI, 255: NEXT 

134 OF=j3:GOSUB75:II=&H7C8A:I=&H3 
000 : GOSUB4 : I=&H79 0 p : II=&H7C8C : GO 
SUB4 : POKE&H7C8E , 1 : EXEC&H7C7A: FOR 
I=&H3j3j3j3 TO&H3J37F : POKEI , 0 : POKEI+ 
128 , 255 : POKEI+&H8J3J3 , 255 : POKEI+&H 
8 8 j3 , 2 5 5 : NEXT : PRINT : DELI 3 3 - 1 3 4 

135 CLS : PRINT ">>»> BELLS AND WH 




U.S. check 



money order 
RI residents 
sales tax 



TEPCO i 

30 Water Street 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 

e 1987 THE RAINBOW 73 



ISTLES 2 «<«" ff "COPYRIGHT (C) 
1 1987 BY MATTHEW A. THOMPSON . DRI 
VER ROUTINES ARE BEING INITIALI 
ZED. WHEN DONE, PLEASE TYPE 'R 
UN' AGAIN." 

136 PRINT "BELLS AND WHISTLES 2 I 
S THE BESTSOUNDING, ALL- SO FT WARE 

MUSIC SYNTHESIZER FOR THE CO 

CO IN THE ENTIRE WORLD AS OF DEC 

EMBER • 8 6 ! " : CLEAR 15 0 , &H7 0 0 0 : FORI 

=&H7900 TO&H7FFF:READI$:POKEI,VA 

L("&H"+I$) :NEXT:DEL135- 

137 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,86,79,1 
F, 8B,CE, 0,0 , 10, 8E, 0,0, 8E, 30,80, C 
C, 80,0,C3,0,0,DD, 17, A6,86,8E,3 8, 
80,C6,80,E6,85, 3D,C6,0, 3D, 97, 46, 
8E, 30,80, CC, 80,0, C3, 0,0, DD, 31, A6 
,8 6,8E,38,80,C6,80,E6 

138 DATA 85,3D,C6,0,3D, 8B,0,97,6 
2 ,8E,30 , 80, CC, 80,0,C3 ,0,0,DD, 4D, 
A6,86,8E, 3 8,80,C6,80,E6,85,3D,C6 
,0, 3D,8B,0,97,7E,8E, 30, 80, CC, 80, 
0,C3,0,0,DD, 69,A6,86,8E, 38,80,C6 
,80,E6,85,3D,C6,0,3D,8B,0,B7 

139 DATA FF, 20, 33, 41, 11,83,0,64, 
26,14,CE,0,0,31,3F,26,3,35,7E,39 
,C,24,C,3E,C,5A,C,76,E,13,3D,3D, 
3D, 21,FB,21,F9,7E,79 ,13,0,BD,7C, 
IE , 10 , BE ,7C,11,8E,2E,0, CE, 2F,0 , C 

C, 80, 0,FD, 79,17, FD, 79,31, FD 

140 DATA 79,4D,FD,79,69,7F,7C,17 
,7D,7F,FF,27,B,34,7E, 10,BF,7C,8F 
,BD,7C,92,3 5,7E,E6,A0,C1,0,10,27 
,2,2D,C1,FD, 10,24,0,F2,4F,FD,79, 
11,E6,A0,27,C,C5,1,2 6,7,8 6,80,B7 
,79,24,20,1,5A,5D,26,F,CC,0,0 

141 DATA FD,79,1A,CC,79,A8,F7,79 
,95,7E,7A,2 4,4F,EC,8B,FD,79,1A,B 

D, 7C,1A,E6,CB,B6,7C,13,3D,B7,79, 
29,CC,79,24,F7,79,95,E6,A0,27,C, 
C5,1,26,7,86,80,B7,7 9,3E,20,1,5A 
,5D, 26,F,CC,0,0,FD,79, 3 4,CC,79,A 
8 

142 DATA F7,79,97,7E,7A,5E,4F,EC 
,8B,FD, 79, 3 4,BD,7C, 1A , E6 , CB , B6 , 7 
C,14,3D,B7,79,43,CC, 79,3E,F7,79, 
97 , E6 , A0 , 2 7 , C , C5 , 1 , 2 6 , 7 , 8 6 , 80 , B7 
,79,5A,20,1,5A,5D,26,F,CC,0,0,FD 
,79,50,CC,79,A8,F7,79,99,7E,7A, 9 
8 

143 DATA 4F,EC,8B,FD,79,50,BD,7C 
,1A,E6,CB,B6,7C,15,3D,B7,79,5F,C 
C, 79,5A,F7,79,99,E6,A0,27,C,C5, 1 
,2 6,7,86,80,B7,79,76,20,1,5A,5D, 
26 , F , CC,0 , 0 , FD, 79 , 6C, CC, 79 , A8 , F7 
, 79,9B,7E,7A,D2,4F,EC,8B,FD,79, 6 
C 

144 DATA BD,7C, 1A,E6,CB,B6,7C, 16 



,3D,B7,79,7B,CC,79,76,F7,79,9B,B 

D, 79,6.,7E,79,C8,C1,FE, 2 6, 17,E6,A 
0,F7,7C,13,E6,A0,F7,7C,14,E6,A0, 
F7,7C,15,E6,A0,F7,7C,16,7E,79,C8 
,C1,FF,2 6,61,A6,A0,34,2,84,7,C6, 

80, C3 

145 DATA 30, 0,FD, 79, 14, 35, 2, 47, 4 
7,47,C3,38,0,FD,79,21,A6,A0,3 4,2 
,84,7,C3,30,0,FD,7 9,2E,35,2,47,4 
7,47,C3,3 8,0,FD,79, 3B, A6 , A0 , 34 , 2 
,84,7,C3,30,0,FD,79,4A,35,2,47,4 
7,47,C3,3 8,0,FD,79,57,A6,A0 

146 DATA 34,2,84,7,C3,30,0,FD, 79 
,66,35,2,47,47,47,C3,3 8,0,FD,79, 
73,7E,79,C8,A6,A0,85,1,10,26,0,2 
9, 85, 2, 10, 26, 0,48, 85, 4, 10, 26, 0,6 

C, 85, 8, 10, 2 6, 0,7 4, 85, 10,10,2 6,0, 
16,85,20,10,2 6,0,85,85,40 

147 DATA 10, 26, 0,78, 31, 23, 7E, 79, 
C8,31,23,7E,79,C8,31,2 3,3 4,60,B7 
, FF , D8 , AD ,9F,A0,0,27, FA , 7 D , 7 F , FE 
,27,3,B7,FF,D9,35,60,81,3,10,27, 
0,62,7E,79,C8,3 4 , 10 , 8E , 80 , 0 , E6 , A 
4, C5, 1, 27, 3, BF, 79,17,C5,2,27, 3 

148 DATA BF,79,31,C5,4,27,3,BF,7 
9,4D,C5,8,2 7,3,BF,79,69,3 5,10,31 
,2 3,7E,79,C8,31,23, 10 , BF , 7C , 18 , 8 
6,FF,B7,7C, 17,7E,79,C8,B6,7C,17, 
81, 0,27, A, 7F,7C, 17, 10, BE, 7 C, 18,7 

E, 79,C8,31,2 3,7E,79,C8,EC,A4,1F, 
2 

149 DATA 7E,79,C8,EC,A4,FD,79, 86 
,31,23,7E,79,C8,BD,7C,37,39,40,0 
,3F,40,40,40,0,0,0,1F,89,4F,39,B 
6,FF,3,84,F6,B7,FF,3,B6,FF,1,84, 
F7,B7,FF, 1,B6,FF,2 3,8A,8,B7,FF,2 
3, 3 9,B6,FF, 3 , 8A, 9 , B7 , FF , 3 , B6 

150 DATA FF,1,8A,8,B7,FF,1,B6,FF 
,23,84,F7,B7,FF,2 3,3 9,B7,FF,D9,B 

D, 79,A9,B7,FF,D8,39,8E,79,0,A6,1 

B, A7,84,30,1F,BC,7C, 69, 2 4, F5, 39, 
40,0, BE, 7C, 78,A6,5,A7,80,8C,79,0 
,23,F7,39,40,0,BE,7C,8A,F6,7C,8E 

151 DATA 6F,84,30,85,BC,7C,8C,23 
,F7,39,40,0,78,FC,1,40,0,0,7F,7C 
,91, 10,BE,7C,8F,31, 31,FC,7C, 8F,C 
3,0,14,FD, 7C, 8F, 10, 8C, 40,0,2 5, 5B 
,10,8C,79,4,22,55,10,BC,7C, 8F, 2 5 
,1,3 9,A6,A0,81,FC,22,6B,4D,2 7,11 

152 DATA 1F,89,BD,7F,79,BD,7F,D2 
,8E,7F,B5,BD,7F,D,7E,7C,D7,8E,7E 
,E6,BD,7F, D, 7F, 7E,FA,E6,A0 , 5D, 10 
,27,0,AA,C5, 1,2 6,6,BD,7F,D2,7E,7 

C, EF,5A,BD,7F,DC,BD, 7F,79,8E,7F, 
B5,BD,7F,D,7C,7E,FA, B6, 7E,FA,81, 
4 

153 DATA 25,D8,7E,7C,A4,8E,7E,DE 
,BD,7F,D,8E,7E,DE,BD, 7F,D, 8E,7E, 



74 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



DE,BD,7F,D,8E,7E,DE, BD, 7F, D, 8E , 7 

E, DE,BD,7F,D, 31,25,7E, 7C,A4 , 81, F 

F, 25,3 7,8E,7E,C6,BD, 7F,D,BD,7F, D 
2,7F,7E,FA, 86,2C,B7, 7F,B7,A6,A4, 
84 

154 DATA 7,8B,30,B7,7F,B8,A6,A0, 
44,44,44,8B,30,B7,7F,B6,8E, 7F,B5 
,BD,7F,D,7C,7E,FA,B6,7E,FA,81,4, 
25,DD,7E, 7C,A4,81,FE, 25,2D,8E,7E 
.F6,BD,7F,D,BD,7F,D2,7F,7E,FA,E6 
,A0,BD, 7F,79,8E, 7F, B5,BD,7F,D,7C 
,7E 

155 DATA FA, B6 , 7E , FA, 81,4,25, EB, 
7E,7C,A4,8E,7E,E6,BD,7F,D, 7E,7C, 
F8,A6,A0, 85,1, 10,2 6,0,47,85,2,10 
,2 6,0,7 4,85,4,10,2 6,0,B5,85,8,10 
,26,0,D2,85,10,10,26,0,D2,85,20, 
10, 26, 1,6, 8 5, 40, 10, 26, 0 , CC 

156 DATA 8E,7E,EA,BD, 7F, D, 8E,7E, 
E2,BD / 7F,D,8E,7E,E2,BD,7F / D / 8E,7 

E, E2,BD,7F, D,8E,7E,E2 ,BD,7F,D,31 
,2 3,7E,7C,A4,8E,7E,CA, BD,7F, D,A6 
, A0 , C6 , 20 , F7 , 7F , B5 , F7 , 7F , B6 , F7 , 7 

F, B8,B7,7F,B7,8E / 7F,B5,BD,7F / D, 8 
E 

157 DATA 7E,E2,BD,7F,D,8E,7E,E2, 
BD,7F,D,8E, 7E,E2 , BD, 7F, D, 31 , 22 , 7 

E, 7C,A4,8E,7E,CE,BD, 7F, D,7F,7E,F 
A,7F,7E,5C, 7C,7E,5C / C6,20,F7 / 7F, 
B5 , F7 , 7 F , B6 , F7 , 7F , B8 , C6 , 53 , F7 , 7F 

,B7,A6,A4,B5,7E, 5C,2 6, 8,8E,7E,E2 
, BD 

158 DATA 7F,D,20,6,8E,7F,B5,BD,7 

F, D,78,7E,5C,7C,7E, FA ,B6 , 7E , FA, 8 
1 / 4,25,DE,31,23,7E / 7C / A4,1 / 8E,7E 
,EE,BD,7F,D,8E,7E,E2 ,BD,7F, D,8E, 
7E,E2,BD,7F,D,8E,7E,E2,BD,7F,D, 8 

E, 7E,E2,BD, 7F,D, 31,23 , 7E,7C,A4 

159 DATA 8E,7E,F2,7E, 7E,60,8E,7E 
, DA, 7E,7E, 60,8E,7E,D6,BD,7F,D,EC 
,A1,34,4,1F,89,BD,7F,D2,BD,7F,79 
,8E,7F,B5,BD,7F,D,35,4,BD,7F,79, 
8E,7F,B5,BD,7F,D,8E,7E,E2,BD,7F, 
D,8E,7E,E2,BD,7F,D,31,21,7E,7C,A 
4 

160 DATA 8E,7E,D2,7E,7E,8F,20,45 
,2F, 57, 20 ,40,41,42,20,53,59,4b, 2 
0,54,4D,50,20,4A,4D,50,20,42,52, 
4B,AF,AF,AF,AF,20 / 20 / 20,20,20 / 20 
,2E,20,20,4E,4F / 50 / 20 / 53,52,54,2 
0,45,52,54 / 20 / 56,4F / 4C,0,34 / 12 / 4 

F, E6, 61 

161 DATA 8D,5D,E7,61,E6,62,8D,57 
,E7,62,35,14,39 / F6 / 7C,91,Cl / 23,2 
5,l / 39,CE / 7F,27,E6,C5,4F,C3,4 / 8 3 
, DD, 88, BD,7F,4A,7C, 70,91,39 ,0,40 

, 60, 80, A0, 4, 44, 64, 84, A4, 8, 4 8, 68, 
88,A8,C,4C, 60, 80, AC, 10,50,70,90, 



B0 

162 DATA 14,54,74,94,64,18,58,78 
,98,B8,7F,7F,5E,A6,80,7C,7F,5E,A 
D,9F,A0,2,F6,7F, 5E , 01 , 4 , 25 , F0 , 39 
,0,8E,0, 8, 58, 49, OA, 1,24,4,A0, 62, 
20,8 / A0,62 / 24 / 4 / C4,FE,AB / 62,30,1 
F,2 6,EA, 39,4F, IF, 1,86, 64,BD,7E 

163 DATA FB,BF,7F,B0,1F,89,4F,1F 
, 1,86,A,BD,7E,FB,BF, 7F,B2 ,B7, 7F, 
B4,FC,7F,B0,CB, 30 , F7 , 7F, B6 , FC, 7F 
,B2,CB, 30,F7,7F,B7,F6,7F,B4,CB,3 
0,F7,7F / B8 / BD / 7F, 89,39,0,0,0, 0,0 
/ 20,20,20,20,B6,7F,B6,C6,20 / 81,3 
0 

164 DATA 27,1,39,F7,7F,B6,B6,7F, 
B7,81,30,27,1,39,F7,7F,B7,39,34, 
2,86,20 / B7 / 7F,B5 / 35,2,39,34 / 2,86 
,2D / B7 / 7F / B5 / 35,2,39,0,0 / 0,0,0,0 
,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

,0,0,0,0 



Listing 2: BW2C3FIX 

84 QT=0 : HSCREEN2 : PALETTE0 , 0 : HCOL 
0R1:HLINE( 30 ,60) -(290,191) ,PSET, 
B:II=3 2:FORI=OF TOOF+255 

85 I$=INKEY$ : IFI$=CHR$ (9 4) ANDQT< 
=253THENQT=QT+2ELSEIFI$=CHR$ (10) 
ANDQT>=2THENQT=QT-2 

86 POKEI,QT:SB=FIX(189-QT/2) : HSE 
T(II,SB,4) :HRESET(II,SB-1) 

87 HRESET(II,SB+1) 

90 NEXT : HSCREEN2 : PALETTE0 , 0 : HCOL 
0R1 : HLINE (30,60)-(290,191), PSET , 
B:I=0:IC=0:FORQT=OF TOOF+255: FOR 
II=1TO10: Y(II)=COS (1*11) *Z (II) 
92 1=1+3. 1415926/128 :HSET(QT-OF+ 
32,189-PEEK(QT)/2,4) 
97 HSCREEN2 : PALETTE0 , 0 : HC0L0R1 : H 
LINE (30 ,60) -(290, 191) ,PSET,B:IC= 
32:F0RI=0F TOOF+255 :HSET (IC, 189- 
PEEK ( I ) /2 , 4 ) : IC=IC+1 : NEXT : QW$=IN 
KEY$ : G0SUB78 : HSCREEN0 : PALETTE0 , 1 
8: GOTO 1 

**★*★*★*** 



* 
* 
* 
* 



CoCo II&III Graphics Editor 
II-32K III-128K 

Tape/ Disk $20 

Payment must accompany order. 

La. residents add 5.8% sales tax. 

Jason Guilbeau 

1 15 Mendell Drive 
Carencro, La. 70520 



* 
* 
* 
* 



**★★*★*★★★ 



June 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



75 



Flay Dt Again, 



I 




The new Color Computer owner buys his/her versatile machine for its graphics and music 
capabilities, organization of their home and office, educational purposes — both in the home 
and school and to acquire programming knowledge — and some, simply for pure fun and 
entertainment. 

As far as the CoCo is concerned, the more you learn, the more you realize how little you actually 
know. That is why every session at the keyboard is an adventure in learning. 

THE RAINBOW is a teaching environment and we realize that the majority of our readers will 
always be beginners. In our continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind and in addition 
to the many beginner feature articles and programs published in every issue, "Novices Niche" 
contains shorter BASIC program listings that entertain as well as help the new user gain expertise 
in all aspects of the Color Computer: graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, 
etc. 

Contributions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We like to run a variety of short 
programs that can be typed in at one sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, 
although the short programs are limited in scope, many novice programmers find it enjoyable and 
quite educational to improve the software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We 're sorry, but we cannot key in program listings. 
All programs should be supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how the program 
works. If your submission is accepted for publication, the payment rate will be established and 
agreed upon prior to publication. ¥ v „ 

Submissions Editor 




ew 




exican 




Folk Dances 

By J ulian Josue Vigil 

Almost everyone knows the tune of "La Varsoviana (The 
Girl from Warsaw)", or at least has made an attempt to tap 
their foot to the beat. Other Mexican tunes may not be so 
well-known, but are just as charming. 

The following folk dances were compiled with reference to 
Mela Sedillo's Mexican and New Mexican Folkdances 
(Albuquerque, New Mexico: 1950). The arrangements are 
basically identical to those in Sedillo's book, with two minor 
changes: a triplet of eighth notes in "La Varsoviana" is given 
a length value of L9 instead of L8, and the quarter note 
beginning "La Raspa" has been replaced with an eighth rest 
and eighth note for a smooth replay in Line 7111. 

The following programs can be typed individually or 
incorporated into one main program by putting all the listings 
together. These nine files will be combined on rainbow on 

TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. 



The listing: FOLKSONG 

La Varsoviana 

0 CLS 

5 FOR D=l TO 7 5)3: NEXT D 

I) 3 PRINT @ 2)3)3, "LA VARSOVIANA." 
25 FOR D=l TO 15)3)3: NEXT D 

II) 3 A$="T302L8DGB;03ED02BDGB;03E 
D02BDGB ;03ED02B03DC02B ; L4 . AL8DF# 
A03DC02ADF#A;03DC02ADF#A;03F#EDC 
02BA;L2GL4D; " 

111 PLAY A$- 

12) 3 B$="02L4BL8BA#B03C;02L2AL4D; 
AL8AG# AB ; L2 GL4 D ; BL8BA # BO 3 C ; 02 L4 . 
A03 L9DDD ; L8F#EDC02BA ; L2 . G; " 

121 PLAY B$ 

13) 3 PLAY A$ 

14) 3 PLAY B$ 

El Chote 

1)3)3)3 CLS 

1)3)35 FOR D=l TO 75)3 : NEXT D 



76 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



1)81)3 PRIN'P@2)33 / "EL CHOTE . 11 

1) 325 FOR D=l TO 15)3)3:NEXT D 

111) 3 C$="T302L8GF;EG03EDC02GEG;L 
4EBL2B ; L4FBL8BGAB ; 03L4CEC02L8GF ; 
EG03 E DC02 BEG ; L4 FBL2 B ; L4FBL8 BGAB ; 
03L4CECP4 ; 11 

1111 PLAY C$ 

112) 3 D$ = "03L4D02A03D02A;L8B03C02 
BGL2D;03L4C02A03C02A;L8GF#GAL2B; 
03L4D02A03D02A;L8B03C02BGL2D;03L 
4C02A03C02 A; L8GF#GAL2G ; 11 

1121 PLAY D$ 

113) 3 PLAY C$ 

114) 3 PLAY D$ 

La Vaquerita 

2000 CLS 

2005 FOR D=l TO 750:NEXT D 

2010 PRINT §201, "LA VAQUERITA." 

2) 325 FOR D=l TO 1500: NEXT D 

21 .10 E$="T502 L2 CF ; L4AAAG ; L2 AL4 FA 
; 03L2 C02L4B-G ; 03 L2 C02 L4 B-G ; L4AB- 
AG;L2FL4CF;AAAG; L2AL4FA;03L2C02L 
4B-G ; 03 L2C02 L4B-G ; AB-AG ; L2 F " 
2111 PLAY E$ 

2120 F$="03L4FE;DDD02B-;03L2DL4E 
D;CCC02A;03L2C02L4FA;03L2C02L4B- 
G;03L2C02L4 B-G; AB-AG ;L2F03L4FE;D 
DD02B- ; 03L2DL4ED ; CCC02 A ; 03L2 C02L 
4FA;03L2C02L4B-G;03L2C02L4B-G;AB 
-AG ; L1F ; " 

2121 PLAY F$ 
2130 PLAY E$ 
2140 PLAY F$ 

L a Cuna 

3000 CLS 

3005 FOR D=l TO 7 50: NEXT D 
3010 PRINT @203, "LA CUNA." 
3025 FOR D=l TO 1500: NEXT D 

3110 G$="T303L4C02AL4 . FL8C ; FCFAL 
4AG ; B-GL4EL8 C ; ECEGL4 GF ; 03 C02AL4 . 
FL8C; FCFAL4AG ; B-GL4EL8C ; ECEGL4GL 
8FC; " 

3111 PLAY G$ 

3 120 H$=" FAFCFAFC ; FCFAL4AL8GC ; EG 
ECEGEC ; ECEGL4GL8FC ; FAFCFAFC ; FCFA 
L4AL8GC ;EGECEGEC ;ECEGL4GF ; 11 

3121 PLAY H$ 
3130 PLAY G$ 
3140 PLAY H$ 

L a C ami I a 

4(50(5 CLS 

4005 FOR D=l TO 750:NEXT D 

4010 PRINT @202, "LA C AMI LA. 11 

4025 FOR D=l TO 1500: NEXT D 

4110 I$="T403L2C02B;L8A03C02BAL2 



G ; L8FAGFEGFE ; DFEDL2C ; 03L2 C02B;L8 
A03C02BAL2G ; L8FAGFEGFE ; DFEDL2C; " 
4111 PLAY 1$ 

4120 J$="L8GECEGECE ; GGAEL4GF ;L8F 
D01B02DFD01B02D ; FFGDL4FE ; L8GECEG 
ECE ;GGAEL4GF ; L8FD01B02DFD01B02D; 
FFGDL4EC ; " 

4121 PLAY J$ 
4130 PLAY 1$ 
4140 PLAY J$ 

El Palomo y la Paloma 

5000 CLS 

5005 FOR D=l TO 7 50: NEXT D 

5010 PRINT @197, "EL PALOMO Y LA 

PALOMA . " 
5025 FOR D=l TO 1500: NEXT D 

5110 K$="T4P403L4ED;L2C02L4G;L2A 
L4G ; B03L2 D ; P4L4FE ; L2D02L4G ; L2AL4 
G;03L2 .C;" 

5111 PLAY K$ : PLAY K$ 

5120 L$="P402L8GAB03C;L4EEE;EDC-; 
02A03L2D;P402L8 GAB03 C ; L4 FFF ; FE D ; 
CL2E ; P402L8GAB03C ; L4GGG ; GFE ; FL2A 
; P4L4AA ; L2GL4 F ; L2EL4D ; L2 . C ; L4 CP2 
7 " 

5121 PLAY L$ 

5130 PLAY K$ : PLAY K$ 
5140 PLAY L$ 

El Jilote 

6000 CLS 

6005 FOR D=l TO 750: NEXT D 
6010 PRINT @203, "EL JILOTE." 
6025 FOR D=l TO 1500:NEXT D 

6110 M$="T402L4A;03CCC;C02AA;B-0 
3 CC ; CO 2 AA ; 0 3 CCC ; C02 B- A ; GAG ; " 

6111 PLAY M$ : PLAY M$ 

6112 PLAY "FP2 ; 11 

6120 N $= " L2 FL4 C ; L2 FL8 FG ; L4 AGF ; GE 
E;L2B-L4G;L2B-L8B-03C;L4DC02B-;B 
-AC ; L2 FL4 C ; L2 FL8 FG ; L4 AGF ; GEE ; L2 B 
-G;L2B-L8B-03C;L4DC02B-;03L1C; " 

6121 PLAY N$ 

6130 PLAY M$ : PLAY M$ 

6131 PLAY "P2L4C; 11 
6140 PLAY N$ 

La Rasp a 

7000 CLS 

7005 FOR D=l TO 750: NEXT D 

7010 PRINT @196, "LA RASPA or LA 

S INDITAS." 

7025 FOR D=l TO 1500:NEXT D 

7110 0$="T3P802L8C ; L8FCFC ;L4 . FL8 
C; FL16GFL8EF ;L4 . GL8C;ECEC;L4 . EL8 
C ; EL16FEL8DE ; L2F ; 11 

7111 PLAY 0$:PLAY 0$ 

June 1987 THE RAINBOW 77 



7120 P$="L8AL16AG#L8AL16AG# ;L8A0 
3C02FL16FF; L8GFED ; CP8L8A ; B-03 D02 
B-GA03C02AF ; GB-EG ; L4 . FL8A ; B-03 DO 
2B-G ; A03C02AF ; GB-EG ; L2F ; " 

7121 PLAY P$ 

713j3 PLAY 0$:PLAY 0$ 
7140 PLAY P$ 

Polquita 

8ppp CLS 

80j35 FOR D=l TO 75j3:NEXT D 
8j310 PRINT @203, "POLQUITA." 
8025 FOR D=l TO 1500: NEXT D 
8110 Q$="T302L4CL8FL16A;03L8CCP8 



L16CC ; L8DC02B-A ; B-L4 . G ; L4CL8 . ELI 
6E ; L8B-L4 . B-L16B-B- ; 03 L8C02B-AG ; 
L4AFP4;L4CL8.FL16A;03L8CCP8L16CC 
;L8DC02B-A;L8B-L4 .G;L4CL8 .EL16G; 
L8B-L8 . B-L16B-B- ; 03L8C02B-AG ; AFP 
803L16C02A;" 
8111 PLAY Q$ 

8120 R$="L8FFFA; AGP8L16B-G; L8EEE 
G;GFP803L16C02A;L8FFFA;AGP8L16B- 
G;L8EEEG;L2F; 11 

8121 PLAY R$ 
8130 PLAY Q$ 
8140 PLAY R$ 

8400 FOR D=l TO 2500:NEXT D 
8500 GOTO 0 






?olor Conductor 

By David Schuff 



Do you love computer music but hate entering long 
program lines? Even if you don't know much about music, 
you can spend a few minutes typing and add this music to 
your own programs. Your friends and relatives will, no doubt, 
be amazed at your sudden musical ability. 

The following melodies were developed from sheet music 
and coded into PLAY statements. The run time (length of each 
song) is listed in the remark statements of each program. The 
songs are entertaining and give you something that will show 
off the Color Computer. 

Gavotte f rom Gavotte & Musette 

Listing 1: GAVOTTE 

10 REM * GAVOTTE - CONVERTED * 
20 REM * FOR THE TRS-80 COCO * 
30 REM * BY DAVID SCHUFF * 
40 REM * RUN TIME: 1:12.89 * 
50 CLS : PRINT@257 , "GAVOTTE FROM G 
AVOTTE & MUSETTE" 

60 A1$="03L4GL8B-A;L4B-L8GDL4AL8 
F#D ; L2GL4E-L8C02A ; L403DL802 B-G03 
C02A03L4D02L4B-L8AG03L4GL8B-A" 
70 A2$ = "L4B-L8GDL4AL8F#D;L4 .GL8F 
L8E-DC02B- ; 03AB-DE-FCD ; 02L2B-" 
80 A3$="03L4DL8FE-;L4FL8D02B-03G 
E-C ; L2FL8B-AGA ; B-GECB-AGA; L8B-AG 
FGFEF ;GEC#02A03GFE-F" 
90 A4$ = "GFEDL4AA;L16AB-AB-AB-AB- 
AB-AB-AB-L8 A 7 AFG AB- AGF ;EDC#DGFE- 

100 A5$ = "L2DL4DL8FE-;L4FL8D02B03 
L4A-L8FD ; L4E-L8C02GL403GL8E-C ; L4 
DL802B-G03L4GL8DB-;03L4C02L8AF#L 
4E-C02A" 

110 A6$ = "03L4DL802B-G03C02AB-G;A 
DEF#GAB-G ; 03E-AB-B-CAB-G ; L4ADGL8 



B-A" 

120 A7$="02L8B-F#GDBFGD;03C02DE- 
F03C02G03D02G;03E-BAGEBC02G;03FO 
2GA03CFCGC" 

130 A8$="AEF#DB-FGD;04C03B-D04CO 
3B-AGF# ;GDE-C02L16B-03C02L8B-AG; 
L2G" 

14j3 PLAY "XA1$;XA2$;XA3$;XA4$;XA 
5$ ;XA6$;XA7$;XA8$;" 
15j3 END 

The Yellow Rose of Texas 1 

Listing 2: TEXAS 

lj3 REM * THE YELLOW ROSE OF * 
20 REM * TEXAS - CONVERTED * 
30 REM * FOR THE TRS-80 COCO * 
40 REM * BY DAVID SCHUFF * 
50 REM * RUN TIME: 1:43.14 * 
60 CLS : PRINT@ 2 61," THE YELLOW ROS 
E OF TEXAS" 
70 A0$="O3T3L8GF" 

8 0 A1$ = "L4EGGG ; AL2GL4 F ; EGL4 . 04CL 

8D; L2 . EL4E ; E03GG04E" 

90 A2$="EL2DL4C ; 03L4 . B04L8CL4 . DL 

8E;L2 . DL403G ;EGGG ; AL2GL4F" 

100 A3 $="L4 . EL8G04L4 . CL8D ; L2 . EL4 

03G ; G04FFF ; FEL4 . DL8C ; L4 . CL8GL4 . 0 

4EL8D;L2.C" 

110 A4 $ = " O 3 L8 GF ; L4 EGGG ; AL2GL4 F ; E 

G04L4 . CL8D ; L2 . EL403G" 

120 A5$="G04EEE;EL2DL4C;03B04CDE 

; L2 . D03L8GF ; L4EGGG" 

13 0 A6$ = "AGL4 . GL8F ; L4EG04L4 . CL8D 

; L2 . E03 L8 GG ; L4G04FFF ; FEL4 . DL8C" 

140 A7$="04C03L8G04L4 .EL8D;L1C;L 

2 . C03L8GF" 

150 A8$="L204C03G;04L2 .EL4D;L1C; 
C;C;L4C" 

160 PLAY "XA0$;XA1$;XA2$;XA3$;XA 
4$;XA5$;XA6$;XA7$;XA1$;XA2$;XA3$ 
;XA4 $ ; XA5$ ; XA6 $ ; XA7$ ; XA8 $ ; " 



78 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1987 



Hail to the Chief 

Listing 3: CHIEF 

10 REM * HAIL TO THE CHIEF - * 
20 REM * CONVERTED FOR THE * 
30 REM * TRS-80 COCO BY * 

40 REM * DAVID SCHUFF * 
50 REM * RUN TIME: 0:46.70 * 
60 CLS:PRINT@264, "HAIL TO THE CH 
IEF" 

70 A1$="T303L2GL4 . AL8B ;04L2C03L4 

. BL8A ; L4 . GL8AL4GE ; L2 DC" 

80 A2$="G04L4.CL8D;L2EL4 .DL8C;L4 

. DL8CL4 . DL8E ; LID" 

90 A3$=A1$ 

100 A4$="L2G04L4 . C03L8B ; L4ACGE ; L 

2G04L4 . CL8D;L2 . C;L2EL4 . EL8E" 

110 A5 $= "L4 . EL8EL4 FE ; L2 DL4 DE ; L2D 

03G ; 04EL4 . EL8E ; L2EL4DC" 

120 A6$="L2D03L4 . GL8G ; L1G ; 04L2CL 

4.C03L8B;L2A04L4C03A;G04CCD" 

130 A7$="L2EC;03A04L4.C03L8A;L4G 

AL2G ; G04L4 . CL8D ; L2 . C ; C" 

140 PLAY "XA1$;XA2$;XA3$;XA4$;XA 

5$;XA6$;XA7$;" 

150 END 

Follow Me 

Listing 4: FOLLDWME 

10 REM * FOLLOW ME - ADAPTED * 

20 REM * FOR THE TRS-80 COCO * 

30 REM * BY DAVID SCHUFF * 

40 REM * RUN TIME: 1:25.40 * 

50 CLS : PRINT@268 , "FOLLOW ME" 

60 A1$="T3L4F#F#;L4 . F#L8F#F#L4F# 

L4 . A; L4AL8AL4BT3L1 . A ; " 

70 A2$="L8AL4A;L4 . BL8BL4 .AL8A;L4 

.GL8GL4GF#;L1.E" 

80 A3$="L8F#L4GL3 . A04L8EL4D03L3 . 
G;L8AL4BL2A;L8AAL4F#L3 . D" 
90 A4 $= " L8 DL4 E ; L8F# L4AL2AL8A ; L4 . 
BL8AL4 . GL8 F # " 

100 A5$="L1.E;L8F#L4EL3 .D;L8F#L4 
AL3.G" 

110 A6$="L8 . B04L7E ; L4 . DL8DD03L4A 
L8L1G" 

120 A7$="L8F#L4AL2AL8A ;L4 . GL8F#L 
8EL4EL1 . D" 

130 A8 $="L4AA ; L4 . AL8AL4BL3A ; L8 . A 
AA" 

140 A9$="L4.GL8GL4GG;L2.F#L4F#;L 
4.F#L8F#L4.F#L8F#" 

150 B1$="L3 . AL8AL4AA ; L4BBL8 BAL4G 
;L1AL8A" 

160 B2$="L4.BL8B04L4DL8DL8. .D;03 

L2AL4A ; BBBB ; 03AL8 . . F#L8GL4A" 

170 B3 $="L4 . BL8BL4 . AL8A ; L4 . GL8GL 

4F#F# ;L4GGL4F#L8EL1A" 

180 B4$="T2P5L8F#L4AL3AL4A;GF#L8 



EL4EL1.D" 

190 PLAY "XA1$;XA2$;XA3$;XA4$;XA 
5$ ; XA6 $ ; XA7 $ ; XA8 $ ; XA9 $ ; XB1$ ; XB2 $ 
; XB3 $ ; XA3 $ ; XA4 $ ; XA5 $ ; XA6 $ ; XA7 $ ; X 
B4 $ ; " 

Leaving on a Jet Plane 

Listing 5: JETPLANE 

10 REM * LEAVING ON A JET * 
20 REM * PLANE - ADAPTED FOR * 
30 REM * THE TRS-80 COCO BY * 
40 REM * DAVID SCHUFF * 
50 REM * RUN TIME: 2:35.73 * 
60 CLS:PRINT@2 62,"LEAVING ON A J 
ET PLANE" 

70 • A1$="T2L4GL8F#L4 . D; L8GF#DL4GL 
8F#D;L4GL8F#L4.D;L8GL4F#L8DP8GL4 
A" 

80 A2$="04C03L8BL4 . GL4D ; L8EEL4GA 

G;04L4C03L8BL4 .GL4D;EL8GL4 . . AL8G 
ii 

90 A3$="04L4C03L8BL4 .AL4G;04C03L 

8BL4 . AL4G ; LI . AP4L8GL4A" 

100 A4 $="04C03L8BL4 . GL8 DD ; L4EL8G 

L4 . AL4G;04C03BL8GDL4D; L8EEGL4 . .A 

L8G" 

110 A5$="04L4C03BAG;04C03BAG;L1. 
A;L404D" 

120 A6$="L2D03L4B04D;C03L8BL2G;0 

4 L4 DL8 CO 3 L4 BO 4 L4 D ; C03 L8 BL2 G " 

130 A7$="04L4DL8C03L4B04D;L8C03L 

4 . BL4AG ; LI . AP404L8DL4D" 

140 A8$="L2D03G;04L4EL8DL4CL4. D; 

P5L4D03B04D;C03L8BL4GL8EL3 .D;P50 

4L4D" 

15 0 A9$ = "L4 . C03L8BL4AG ; " : B1$ = "L1 
A;P404L8CL4C" 

160 B2$="03L1A;04P8L4D;L2DD;L4GL 
8F#L4EL4.D;" 

170 B3$="P5L4D03B04D;C03L8BL4GL8 
EL2 . D ; P5L404D ; L1C ; 03L3BAG ; L1A" 
180 PLAY "XA1$;XA2$;XA3$;XA4$;XA 
5$ ; XA6 $ ; XA7 $ ; XA8 $ ; XA9 $ ; XB1$ ; XA2 $ 
; XA3 $ ; XA4 $ ; XA5 $ ; XA6 $ ; XA7 $ ; XA8 $ ; X 
A9$;XB2$;XB3$;" 

Country Roads 
Listing 6: COUNTRY 

10 REM * TAKE ME HOME, COUNTRY * 
20 REM * ROADS - ADAPTED FOR * 
30 REM * THE TRS-80 COCO BY * 
40 REM * DAVID SCHUFF * 
50 REM * RUN TIME: 1:22.24 * 
60 CLS:PRINT@259,"TAKE ME HOME, 
COUNTRY ROADS" 

70 A1$="T302L8A03L4 .AL4C# ;02L8DG 
#03L4EL8B04C#L4E;03L8B04C#L4EL8E 
L4F#" 

June 1987 THE RAINBOW 79 



80 A2$="L8C#03L4.AL4EE;L4.F#L2E; 
P2L4F#L8EL4F#L2A" 

90 A3$="03P2L8BL4 . B;04C#03L2B;L4 

F#F#F#E;L8F#L4AL1A" 

100 A4$="L4P2EE;L4.F#L2E;L4F#AAO 

4C#;L1C#" 

110 A5$="03L4BBBB;04L4 .C#03L2B;L 
4 F # A AL8 B L2 A " 

120 A6$="03L4AB;04L1C# ;L8C#03BL4 
A;L1B;04L4C#03B" 

130 A7$="03L1A;04L4C#E;L1F#;L4F# 
F#;EL2.C#" 

140 A8 $=" L8C#03BL4A ; B04L2 . C# ; L8C 



#03 BL4 A ; LI A ; L4AB" 

150 A9$="L1A;P2L4AAA;L2G#L4AB" 

160 B1$="04C#C#C#C# ; C#03BL4 . AL8A 

;04L4 . DL8DL4DD; DC#03BA" 

170 B2$="L2B04L4.C#L8C#;L2 ,03B;L 

4B;04C#C#C#C# ;03BBL8BL4 . B ; L4AAL8 

AL4.A" 

180 B3$="AL8AAL4.A;L4B04C#03L1B; 
L4B04C#L1D" 

190 PLAY "XA1$;XA2$;XA3$;XA4$;XA 
5 $ ; XA6$ ;XA7 $ ; XA8 $ ; XA9 $ ;XB1 $ ; XB2 $ 
;XB3$;XA6$ ;XA7$ ;XA8$ ; 03 LI A" 




Up With The Beat 

By Bill Bernico 



In the August '86 "Letters to the Editor" section of 
RAINBOW (Page 8), Michael Bridges requested a program to 
allow the CoCo to perform as a metronome: a clockwork 
device used to help maintain a regular tempo while practicing 
music. Granted, it's not sophisticated enough to use in a 
recording studio, like Mr. Bridges wanted, but it will show 
the ambitious programmer how to build one. 

The up and down arrow keys are used to select the speed, 
the ENTER key is used to set the metronome in motion; to 
change the speed, simply press S. As you select a speed, notice 
the numeric speed value in the upper (eft-hand corner of the 
screen. It changes with each arrow keystroke. Make a note 
of the number and it will help you find an appropriate speed 
the next time you run the program. 

Thecommas in the listing are place holders for the graphics 
characters that are not being used in the display. Be sure to 
put them in the correct place when typing the listing. 

The listing: METRNOME 

1 PM0DE4,1:PCLS1:SCREEN1,1:DIMA$ 
(90) :FORA=3 2T09j3:READA$ (A) : NEXT : 
DRAW"CJ3BM165 , 6" : A$="METRONOME" : G 
0SUB18 : DRAWBM3 , 10" : A$="SPEED" : G 
0SUB18 : DRAW 11 BM3 ,20" :A$=" VALUE" : G 
0SUB18 : LINE (0,25)-(40,35), PSET , B 
: DRAW"BM76 , 11" : F0RX=1T025 : DRAW"R 
9BD3L9BD3" : NEXT 

2 DRAW" BM9 p , 1 7 " : A $= " S LOWES T" : GOS 
UB18 : DRAW"BM9j3 , 158" : A$="FASTEST" 
: G0SUB18 : CIRCLE ( 198 , 156) , 3 : LINE ( 
150,10) -(245,160) , PSET, B: DRAW" BM 
198 , 156Cj3M-4p , -14J3" : LINE (0 ,187) - 
(255,177), PSET , B : DRAW" BM2 , 18 5 " : A 
$=" SELECT SPEED WITH ARROW KEYS 

& <ENTER>" : G0SUB18 

3 DRAW"C0BM18, 175":A$="HIT <S> T 
0 CHANGE METRONOME SPEED" : G0SUB1 
8 

4 H=59:V=92: Y=600 : G$="R9NH2NG2R 



5 DRAW "C0 BM=H ; , =V; "+G$ : DRAW"C0BM 
2,33":A$=STR$(Y) :G0SUB18 

6 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN 6 

7 IF I$=CHR$(94)THEN DRAW"C1BM=H 
; , =V ; " +G$ : V=V- 3 : Y=Y+2 5 

8 IF I$=CHR$ (1J3)THEN DRAW"C1BM=H 
; ,=V;"+G$:V=V+3 : Y=Y-25 

9 IF I$=CHR$(13)THEN"15 

10 IF V>158 THEN V=158 

11 IF V<11 THEN V=ll 

12 IF Y>1275 THEN Y=1275 

13 IF Y<50 THEN Y=50 

14 LINE (1,26) -(39 ,3 4) ,PSET,BF:GO 
TO 5 

15 DRAW"Cj3BM198, 156K-40 , -140 " : EX 
EC4 3 3 4 5 : FORX= 1T0Y : NEXT : DRAW " C IBM 
198, 156M-40, -140" : DRAW"Cj3BM198 ", 1 
56M+4P , -140" : EXEC43345 : F0RX=1T0Y 
:NEXT: DRAW"C1BM198 , 156M+40 , -140 

16 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN 15 

17 IF I$="S"THEN DRAW'CP" : CIRCLE 
(198 , 156) , 3 : DRAW"BM198 , 156M-40, - 
14J3" :GOT05ELSE16 

18 F=LEN(A$) : F0RE=1T0F : G=ASC (MID 
$(A$,E,1) ) :DRAWA$(G)+"BR3":NEXTE 
: RETURN 

19 DATABR2 
DF4,^_, 
U6NGD6R2 , BU5ER2 FDGL2GD2R4 , BU5ER2 
FDGNLFDGL2NHBR3 , BR3U6G3R4BD3 , BUF 
R2EU2HL3U2R4BD6 , BU3R3FDGL2HU4ER2 
BD6BR, BU6R4DG3 D2BR3 , BRHUER2EUHL2 
GDFR2FDGNL2BR, BRR2EU4HL2GDFR3BD3 
, ,BR4BU6G3F3 , , E3H3BR4BD6 

2 0 DATA , , , U5ER2 FD2NL4D3 , , BR4BU5H 
L2GD4FR2EBD, RU6NLR2FD4GNL2BR,U6N 
R4D3NR3D3R4 

21 DATAU3NR3U3R4BD6 , BUU4ER3BD4NL 
D2L3NHR3,U3NU3R4U3D6,R2U6NL2NR2D 
6R2 , , U3NU3RNE3F3 , NU6R4 , U6F2DUE2D 
6 , U6F4NU4D2 , BRHU4ER2FD4GNL2 BR , U6 
R3FDGL3D3BR4 , , U6R3FDGL3RF3 , BUFR2 
EUHL2HUER2 FBD5 , BU6R4L2D6BR2 , BUNU 
5FR2ENU5BD,BU6D4F2E2U4BD6 ,NU6E2U 
DF2NU6 , ,BU6DF2E2NUG2D3 , 



, , , , , , BR5BU2G2LHE3UHLG 
, , , , BRHU4ERFD4GNLBR2 , R2 



80 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1987 





ound yjff 

By Gip W. Plaster, II 




One of the most interesting aspects of the Color Computer 
is its ability to produce sounds. The following program 
combines FDR-NEXT loops and short PLHY statements to 
produce two minutes and 45 seconds of music and sound 
effects on the CoCo. 

The listing: SOUNDOFF 
10 CLS 

2j3 PRINT@128,STRING$(3 2,"*") ; 

30 PRINT@288,STRING$(32,"* M ) ; 

40 PRINT@ 19 4, 11 EXPLORERS — BY GIP 

W. PLASTER"; 

50 FORX=1TO500:NEXTX 

60 PRINT@421,"T H E Y ■ R E 0 

F F"; 
70 F0RN=1T02 

80 PLAY"01;T5;L16 ; DCDCDCDCDCDCDC 
DCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDC ; L8 ; DCDCDCDC 
DCDCDCDCDC ; L4 ; DCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDC 
DC;L2 ;DCDCDC;L1;DCDCDC;T1;V15 ;D; 
V10;C;V14 ;DC" 
90 F0RM=1T02 



100 F0RL=1T02 

110 PRINT@4 20, "ORBITING 



EARTH . 



ii 



120 PLAY"V15;01;T5;L8 ; CDEFGABAGF 

EDCDEFGABGFE" 

130 NEXTL 

140 FORJ=2TO100STEP5 

150 PRINT@420, "WHAT WAS THAT ? 

• • / 

160 FORI=255T01STEP-l 

170 POKE140,I:EXEC43345:NEXTI 

180 NEXTM 

190 IFN=1THEN200ELSE220 

200 PLAY "01 ;T1; LI; DC" 

210 PRINT@416 

2 20 NEXTN 

230 F0RP=1T05 

240 FORI=255TO200STEP-1 

250 POKE140,I:EXEC43345:NEXTI 

260 NEXTP 

270 F0RI=255T01STEP-1 

280 POKE140,I:EXEC43345:NEXTI 

290 PRINT@420, "WE MADE IT !!!! 

i I i i i i i n • 
••••>•• / 

300 PLAY "01 ;T1 ; CDEFGABABABABABBB 
AB" 

310 FORI=255T01STEP-l 

320 POKE140,I:EXEC43345:NEXTI /R\ 



Hint 



Arrow-Minded 



Many requests have come my way for a keyboard 
revision to my program, Discrimination (January 
1987, Page 52). After changing/adding the following 
lines to the program, you will be able to use the arrow 
keys for movement instead of the joystick. Instead of 
the firebutton, press the space bar. 

2110 IFQ$="Q" THENRETURNE LSE POKE 1 
78 , C : DRAW"BM=X ; , =Y ; R20D2 0L2 0U2 0 " 
:IFQ$=CHR$(8)THENX=X-88/LD ELSEI 
FQ$=CHR$(9)THENX=X+88/LD ELSEIFQ 
$=»a "THENY=Y-22 ELSEIFQ$=CHR$ (10 
) THENY=Y+2 2 

2112 MX=(LD*2-1) *88/LD+5:IFX<5TH 
ENX=5ELSEIFX>MX THENX=MX 

2113 IFY<104-D THENY=104-D ELSEI 
FY>170-D THENY=170-D 

2115 P=(X-5+(Y+D-104) *8)/ (88/LD) 
:P=INT(P+.5) 

2120 IFQ$=" "THENZ=1ELSEIFZ THEN 
Z=0 : RETURN 

Bruce K. Bell, O.D. 
Rockmart, GA 



NEW 51 2K UPGRADE) 
FOR COCO 3 

Now available the LR Tech 512K upgrade 
with all g old contacts and 120 nanosecond 
256K chips. Useable as a RAM disk from 
basic or as large system memory for OS 9 

level 2!!! ^ ^ ^ _ 

$105. 



INTRODUCTORY 
PRICE... 



$59. 

WITHOUT 256K 
CHIPS 



WITH 256K CHIPS 




YOU CAN USE THIS SYSTEM WITH 
OUR SUPER BOARD (SEE NEXT MONTH) FO 
A THREE USER SYSTEM UNDER OS 9. 
WORKS WITH OUR HARD DRIVE. 



TOLL FREE 
ORDER LINE 

(800) 
245-6228 




See next page 
for more specials. 



M.C, & VISA 
Accepted 

OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA. 
19539 

PA. Res. Include 6%Tax 
(215) 682- 6855 



June 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



81 




OWL-WARE 

WINCHESTER BASIC 

ANNOUNCING... the Development of a Major Breakthrough in 
HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS for the COLOR COMPUTER!!! 

Several months ago OWL-WARE Introduced the Finest OS9 Hard Drive System for the Color Computer. 
Now we are about to Introduce the only RSDOS Interface System worthy of our computer, OWL-WARE 
Winchester Basic. For the first time you have available a true Winchester System, although there are 10 

directories made available to BASIC, the only limit to size of any file is the size of your drive. On a 
10 meg drive you could have a 8 meg file on directory 5 and a 1 meg file on directory 8 and small files 
everywhere. You turn the computer on and you can Immediately access your drive from BASIC or any language 
using commands you already know. You do not have to know or use OS9 to use OWL-WARE WINCHESTER 
BASIC, but if you do, all files saved from RSDOS are available to OS9. All files generated from OS9 can 
be made available to RSDOS by copying to the WINCHESTER BASIC directories. There are no partitions to 
wall you into, only one operating system, but nothing forces you to use an operating system you don't like. 

Call for further details and availability on this breakthrough product!!! 




WITH ^M. V 

DRIVE ONLY... 
BELOW 



$50. 



$75. 



WITHOUT DRIVE 

OS9 HARD DRIVES FOR CoCo 1, 2,3 
WINCHESTER BASIC CoCo 1, 2 ONLY (CoCo 3 Version Pending) 



NEW!!! CoCo 3 version of 
Ma6ter Artist Now Available! 

CREATE BEAUTIFUL PICTURES WITH 




2 O 



PHD , 

JOYiT XCK 



h Convinttnt , on-urttn Mtnu 
m Accept i input #roM x-PAD 

touch-phD. nautf or 
h n«gni # i c at ton nodt 
h DriM Mitn cuitOPi ami nttjrui h*i 
h CfiU #rtt-nind fattening 
m "Paint" coNMand 
h 10 color f at a tint 
to Picturti mrm ready for u>t in 

BASIC programs 
m Lettering in mu M** 
m Screen dbmp to Color Ink-Jet 

or otntr lanagi printers 

64K DISK 



$29.95 



OS-9 HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Disk Access is at Least... 8 Times Faster than Floppy Drives. 

Control up to 2 Drives. EACH with Continuous Massive 
Memory!!! Complete OS-9 Hard Drive System Includes... 
Software, Hard Drive, Controller and L.R. Tech Interface. 

NOTE: OS-9 and RS DOS... "This may prove to be the perfect mating of 
NEW PRICING!!! both systems." RAINBOW (May 86) 

Interface & 
Software Only $11 9. 

Please note that an interface 
Is not a controller. 
A Xebec SASI controller 
Is $139. additional, 
if you need one. 

INSTALL IN ANY SLOT OF 
MULTI-PAK OR USE Y CABLE. 



$599. $729. 

10 MEG 20 MEG SYSTEM 

OWL-WARE 

is pleased to announce 
an exclusive arrangement 
to Distribute the L.R. TECH 



Now works 
with OS-9 
Level 2!!l 




Hard Drive Interface and Software. DEALERS INQUIRES INVITED 




OWL-WARE'S TOLL FREE ORDER LINE (800) 245-6228 






TECHNICAL ADVICE 
(215) 682-6855 

All Prices Include 
Case and Power 

Supply 



SHhhh... Ask about the WISPER DRIVE!!! 



Single 



drive o$179.to$239. 

Call for SPECIAL PRICES on Drive 0,1,2,3 Combos. Double 

DRIVE 1 $ 1 09.to $ 1 45. PLUS^SHIPPING 



HALF HEIGHT DRIVE 

UPGRADE KIT FOR 
NEW RS SYSTEM 

Why only double capacity 
when you can triple in the same 
case. KIT INCLUDES: double sided 
drive to fit In your case, includes 
hardware and chip to run double 
sided Takes only 5 minutes 

1 YR. WARRANTY 0 110 
ONLY.., S> ■ ■ 



All drives are new and fully 
assembled. We ship 

FULLY TESTED and CERTIFIED 
DRIVES at NO ADDED CHARGE! 

CHINONand Other Brands known 
as the highest quality made. 

STATE-OF-THE-ART 
TECHNOLOGY 



NOW FOR CoCo 1, 2, 3W 



OWL-WARE 

has a liberal warranty policy. During 
the warranty period all defective 
Items will be repaired or replaced 
at our option and at no- cost to 

the buyer, except for shipping costs. 

Call our technical advice line 
for return authorization numbers. 
Return of non-defective Items or 
unauthorized returns are subject 
to a service charge. Price does 

not include shipping, but does 
Include a discount for cash. 



Special 
Bundled 
Software 

with 
Disk Drive 
Purchase! 



We have RSDOS, JDOS, 

OWL DOS, ADOS available on 
ROM. Call about Double Sided 
or Special Needs. 



TOLL FREE 
ORDER LINE 
(800) 245-6228 

Call for 
LATEST 

PRICES!!! 



WARRANTIES 

90 day - 1 YEAR 




M.C. & VISA Accepted 

OWL-WARE 

P O. Box 116-D 
Mertztown. PA. 
19539 

PA Res Include 6%Tax 
PA (2 15) 682-6855 



OWL TIP : Our hard drives memory 
upgrade and super board are ideal for 
this new Level 2 OS-9. 

OWL-WARE Software Bundle 

Disk Tutorial 3 Utilities 2 Games 

DISK TUTOR Version 1.1 

LEARN EVERYTHING ABOUT DISK BASIC 
FROM THIS MACHINE LANGUAGE 
PROGRAM. THE TUTOR TAKES YOU STEP 
BY STEP THROUGH THE LESSONS AND 
CORRECTS YOUR MISTAKES A MULTI- 
LESSON TUTORIAL THAT WILL GIVE YOU 
QUICK, PAINLESS KNOWLEDGE OF DISK 
BASIC (THIS PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN 
TUTOR IS EASILY WORTH THE BUNDLE'S 
TOTAL PRICE). 

OWL DOS 

AN OPERATING SYSTEM THAT GIVES 
25% FASTER DISK ACCESS AND ALLOWS 
USE OF DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES . 
CORRECTS FLOATING POINT NUMBER 
ERROR. 

COPY-IT 

QUICKLY COPIES SELECTED PROGRAMS 
FROM DISK. USE WILD CARD OPTION 
SEARCH TO SELECT GROUPS OF 
PROGRAMS FOR COPY (NOT FOR PRO- 
TECTED PROGRAMS) 

VERIFY 

VERIFIES READING EACH SECTOR. BAD 
SECTORS ARE LISTED ON THE SCREEN. 

2 GAMES 

2 GAMES FROM OUR STOCK. 
BOTH HAVE SOLD FOR OVER $17. EACH. 

IF SOLD SEPARATELY OVER 
$125.00 WORTH OF SOFTWARE!!! 

only $27.95 
(or even better) 
$6.95 with 
DISK DRIVE PURCHASE!!! 



TURN OF THE SCREW 




An Expandable Relay Project 



By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



About two years ago, I wrote an article called "Lights, 
Camera, CoCo!" [Dec. '84]. It describes how to 
hook up as many as eight lights to the CoCo and 
have thecomputer control the on and off of each light. Ever 
since then, I have been getting letters about it. Some of the 
letters ask how to add more lights to the system, and other 
letters ask how to connect relays and other devices to the 
circuit. 

Well, this article will answer a whole lot of letters with 
a project that is similar to "Lights, Camera, CoCo!," but 
more expandable. The idea is to be able to put many relays 
online to the computer and to be able to tell if the relay 
is on or off. 

The heart of the circuit is a TTL (Transistor-Transistor- 
Logic) logic gate. I have talked about and used TTL logic 
gates ever since 1 began writing articles, so they should not 
be new to you. I have also used this particular chip many 
times before. The chip is a 74LS138. Ah yes, the good oT 
1 38. Itis a decoder — a three-input to eight-output decoder, 
with three control lines. Remember binary counting? If we 
have a three-bit number, it represents eight separate digits, 
0 to 7. If we connect these three input bits to the lower three 
address lines of the CPU, then the CPU can access eight 
address locations. 

Study the pinout of the 74LS138 in Figure J. Notice that 
the three inputs are connected to three address lines of the 
CPU. That determines the eight address locations to be 
used. The CPU in the CoCo is an MC6809 and is capable 
of accessing 64K locations of memory. We only want eight. 
We can decode the other address lines to map only the eight 
locations we need, or we can use the already-decoded 
location in the computer. 

This decoding is done in the SAM chip inside the CoCo. 
The pin that does this decoding is labeled "SCS" and is an 
active low output. That means the pin is normally high and, 
when accessed, will go low. In this case, the pin will go low 
when the CPU accesses memory locations SFF40 to SFF5F 

Tony DiStefano is a well-known early specialist in computer 
hardware projects. He lives in Laval Quest, Quebec. 



CokH 
Computer 
Connect Of 

E 

SCS 

fUVi 

A? 
Al 



DO 

D< 

0! 

M 

£H 

Pi 

Of 

•5V 
Gun 



N 



19 



r 



Gi 


t 


> ; 


GJfl 


4 


V6 


G?A 


1 


n 




S 


V4 


r 


1 


VI 


n 




Y2 




3 


/. 




Yl 




a 











lO ' mor* /4LS374 Ct>V% 
Louliont t^F41 to IFF47 



i.' 



it; 



33 

n 



1 



70 



CK 
00 
01 
02 
03 
04 
OS 
Ct 
07 



n 

c. 

C7 
OS 



CM 
OS 
06 

0' 



1? 



Vonjoo mult 
be ir>4> oi in* 



13 4 

IS i 

It 



44004 ~K 



-WW- 




1 



LOCH.O/1 JfF40 



nvlifi 0lo61r» W*P linn U ibov* 



Figure 1 



(65344 to 65375 in decimal). This represents a memory area 
of 32 bytes. Jf you have a disk drive system, it is reserved 
for I/O to the hardware of the drive. More on this later. 
We use this pin to activate the 74LS138. Since we only need 
eight of the 32 locations, the other locations will become 
mirror images of these eight locations and should not be 
used. 

The next connection we make is the R/W line. This 
output line comes from the CPU and tells the hardware 
whether the CPU is reading or writing. In this case, the pin 
is high to read and low to write. Since our circuit controls 
relays, the CPU need only be able to write. The last line 
on the input side of the 74LS 1 38 is connected to the E clock 
of the CPU. The E clock is a signal generated by the CPU 
to be used by hardware as a timing signal indicating when 
the data is valid on a read or a write. The other eight pins 
on this chip are outputs. Each of these output lines 
represents one memory location and can control one device. 



84 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Screen Star implements the popular WordStar editing capa- 
bilities. Screen Star uses the disk as an extension of memory 
so it will edit files larger than memory. Move, copy, or delete 
blocks of text with one keystroke. Powerful cursor commands 
allow fast and easy movement throughout the document. The 
find/replace command makes mass changes and searches 
a snap Set Tabs, toggle the video, access the OS-9 Shell and 
choose wordwrap Define up to 10 function keys for fast, repeti- 
tive functions. Imbed Computerware's Text Formatter com- 
mands in yourScreenStar filefor maximum word processing 
capabilities. 

Unlike most spelling checkers that require a huge dictionary 
file. Smart Speller uses a small dictionary which contains the 
most common English misspellings andtheir correct spellings. 
It also recognizes any abbreviations you commonly use and 
replaces them with their full spelling automatically! Versions 
for Level 1 & Level 2 OS-9 are included in the Screen Star 
package. The most powerful editing product ever available 
on the Color Computer, 

Requires OS-9 $49.95 
With Text Formatter $74.95 




OS-9 Text Formatter 



OS-9 Text Formatter interfaces with any ed itor that produces 
standard ASCII text files including Computerware's Screen Star, 
and Radio Shack's TS Edit. Supports: 

• Right & Left Justification 
•Automatic Pagination 

• Headers and Footers 

• Macros. Tabs, Etc 

• Page numbering & Auto Date Insert 

• Send ESC & CTL codes to printer 

Why just print it when you can FORMAT it with OS-9 Text 
Formatter. 

Requires OS-9 $34.95 



Color Connection fa RSDOS, and OS-9 Connection are the 
best in communication software. All of the standard protocols 
are supported, including CompuServe Protocol B, XMODEM, 
and XON/XOFF. The auto dial feature for Hayes compatible 
and some RadioShack modems is supported. Macros allow 
easy entry to often-used passwords and ID's. Communicate 
with confidence with either Color Connection, or OS-9 
Connection 3.0. 

OS-9 version requires RS232 pak $49.95 
RSDOS versions for CoCo 2 & CoCo 3 inc. $49.95 



Mitsuba 1200 Baud Modem 

SPECIAL $154.00 

100% Hayes compatible, full or half duplex, speaker alert to 
busy signal, touch tone or pulse dialing. 



Computerware Means Business 

We offer a full line of accounting software. 



General Ledger 
Check Ledger 
Accounts Payable 
Accounts Receivable 
Inventory 
Payroll 



Call or write for the complete information packet for any or 
all of the business applications. 

Requires 64K, 2 disk drives $99.00 
Payroll $125.00 



Call or write for your FREE 
Computerware Catalog 





V 




51 2 K Memory for CoCo 3 

Completely assembled with prime 120ns 
memory chips. Simple installation. 



Call or Write to: 



CoCo 3 Ramdisk 
and 51 2 K Diagnostics 

Ramdisk creates two additional drives that can be configured 
as 0 & 1, or 2 & 3. Memory Diagnostics texts memory three ways 

519.95 

Monitors 

12" NAP amber monochrome monitors 

$114.95 
Shipping $5.00 

Universal Video Plus 

Summer Special $29.95 

Video interface for the CoCo 1 or 2 





COMPUTERWARE (*">M36-35i2 

Box 668 • Enclnltas, CA • 92024 



Name _ 
Address 
dry 



Yesl Send me your FREE catalog I 

VISA MasterCard 

Card n 



State 



Zip 



□ 



Exp 



Signature 



Item 



Format 



Price 



Shipping 

Surface — S2 minimum, 

2% for orders over SI 00 
Air cr Canada — S5 minimum. 

5% for orders over SI 00 
Checks are delayed for bank clearance 



6% Calif. Sales Tax 
COD Add S5 
Shipping* 
TOTAL 



Having eight locations means that you can control eight 
devices. 

The 74LSI38 chip is used to decode eight memory 
locations. Relax; we are getting closer to the relays. Now, 
the data that goes around on the data bus is always 
changing. The CPU is always busy. We need a component 
that will hold the data we write to these locations and 
remember it. This kind of part is called a latch. The one 
I will use is a 74LS374. It is an eight-bit latch. 

Examine the 74LS374 in Figure I. It has eight input bits 
that are connected to the CPU data bus. It also has eight 
output bits. These bits hold the value that is put into it when 
the CPU writes to that location. The location is controlled 
by the 74LS138. Each of these 374s has eight bits. Each of 
these bits can control one device. For instance, a relay is 
one device. However, the output of the 374 is not strong 
enough to turn on a relay by itself. A driver is needed. A 
one-stage transistor will do in most cases. In the diagram, 
only one circuit is shown, but it is to be repeated for every 
relay to be used. 

Finally, we get to the relays! The relay you use depends 
on your needs. If you use the relay for very small current 
applications, then a relay such as the Radio Shack No. 275- 
243 will do. It will switch 2 amps and works directly off of 
5 volts. If you need a higher capacity relay you must figure 
out the details by yourself. 

The transistor used in this circuit can handle about 30 
volts and can sink about 200 mA. Overdriving the transistor 
may damage it due to overheating. One 374 can control 
eight transistors and eight relays. If you need more than 
eight relays you must use another 74LS374. This will allow 



Color 

Compulor 

Connoclor 



1 

nsw 

A! 
AO 
■5V 



00 
01 
02 
03 
04 
OS 
06 
07 





t 




* 


IB 


.J 




I 


19 1 



St 



Gi 

G2B 

G2A 

C 

e 

A 



Y7 
It 
YS 

f 
VQ 



* 3more74LS374 



* — I 



4-^ 



1 H 



, 3 mor«74LS374 



if 



13 



II 



ifl 



1 



5V 



00 
Oi 
03 
03 
04 

Crt 
08 




To 
iel«y 

*_ a 



_ig. 
>± 

_3 
b 

r 
■:■ 









QO 




00 


Ol 


7 


£)1 


01 


4 


02 


03 


I 


EH 


04 


s 


D4. 


05 


2 


04 


06 


• 


ns 


07 


-1 


07 



Hatty t 



Figure 2 



The Rainbow Introductory Guide to 

Statistics 



Most people have been using statistics since they learned 
to talk. Statistical results and concepts turn up everywhere. 
A large part of our daily news consists of statistics. Results 
of opinion polls, surveys, research studies, the Dow Jones 
industrial average and, of course, our sports news are all 
statistics. But statistics are often misused. The informed 
person needs to understand the basic concepts in order to 
judge the appropriateness of applications. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor Dr. Michael Plog and co- 
author Dr. Norman StenzeJ have written The Rainbow 
Introductory Guide to Statistics just for beginners. It is an 
easy-to-understand guide to this sometimes mysterious area 
of mathematics. Their aim is to introduce readers to the 
realm of statistical processes and thinking, and they believe- 
that the Tandy Color Computer is an ideal machine for the 
reduction of data. 

Sharpen your skills with The Rainbow Introductory 
Guide to Statistics for only $6.95. Included in the book is 
the CoCo-Siai program, a BASIC statistics program just for 
the Color Computer. Forget the typing hassle by ordering 
the accompanying Statistics Tape or Disk for only $5.95. 
Spend your time learning and enjoying the new material, 
not debugging your typing. Just pop in the tape or disk and 
you're ready for action! 




Save when you buy The Rainbow Introductory Guide to 
Statistics book together with the tape or disk. Get both for 
only $11.95. 



Please send me: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Book $6.95* 

The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk $5.95 
The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics Book/ Disk Set $11.95 



Narru 



Address 
City ■ 



Stale 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of is enclosed' 

Please charge 10 my: 0 VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Acct. No. Exp. Date 

Signature 

Mail to: The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics. The Falsofl Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 

*Add SI. 50 per book for shipping and handling in ihc U.S. Outside the U.S. add 54 per 
book (U.S. currency only), Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. In order to hold down 
costs, wc do noi bill. Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. 

Note; The tape and disk are not stand-alone products. If you buy either the tape or disk, 
you still need to purchase the book for instructions. 



86 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



you to connect eight more relays and, for every 374 you add, 
another eight relays can be controlled. When I tried this 
circuit, I used three 74LS374s but only eight relays. 
Theoretically, you can connect up to 64 relays with this 
circuit, but I am sure you would run into power supply 
problems. You will have to drive the relays with a separate 
power supply. 

So far, you can just write to the address locations that 
control relays. The only way the software can find out which 
relay is on is by keeping track of what value you stored in 
that location. But, with a little more hardware, you can read 
the memory locations and find out exactly which relay is 
on and which relay is off. The only drawback to this is that 
it limits the number of relays you can control to 32 instead 
of the 64 write-only relays. The choice is yours to make. 

Figure 2 shows how to make a relay system that allows 
you to read the location as well as write to it. You will first 
notice the changes to the 74LS 138. The A2 line is removed 
and replaced with the read/write line. This divides the eight 
output lines of the 1 38 to four read lines and four write lines. 
The four write lines connect to our transistor and relay 
system just like before. But now we have four read lines. 
We will need a different chip in order to read the output 
of the 374s. There are many chips you can use; I chose the 
74LS244. It is an eight-bit buffer with tri-state. The inputs 
of the chip are connected to the outputs of the 374s. This 
way, the CPU can see right away, by accessing a read to 
the particular location, which relay is on or off by seeing 
which bit is high or low. The outputs of the 244s are 
connected to the CPU data bus. When the chip is selected 
(by a read), the data that is on the input appears to the CPU. 
It is as simple as that. 

Now for the software. As I said before, we are using the 
SCS signal from the SAM chip. This signal-maps our relays 
from SFF40 to SFF5F. If you are using the circuit in Figure 
1, then the following structure is used: 



Memory Location 

SFF40 
SFF41 
SFF42 
SFF43 
SFF44 
SFF45 
SFF46 
SFF47 



Write Only to Relays 

Relay 0 to 7 
Relay 8 to 15 
Relay 16 to 23 
Relay 24 to 3 1 
Relay 32 to 39 
Relay 40 to 47 
Relay 48 to 55 
Relay 56 to 63 



These relays are always least significant bit first. For 
example, relays 0 and 8 are on Data Bit DO and relays 1 
and 9 are on Data Bit Dl. 

If you wired up the circuit in Figure 2, then it should look 
like this: 



Memory Location 

SFF40 
SFF41 

SFF42 

SFF43 



Read/Write to Relays 

Relay 0 to 7 
Relay 8 to 15 
Relay 16 to 23 
Relay 24 to 32 



The memory locations from SFF44 to SFF47 are the same 
as locations from SFF40 to SFF43, respectively. 

Reading the locations SFF40 to SFF47 in Figure I is 
allowed, but the values you get will not be valid. To turn 
onerelay on or off you must store(PDKE command in BASIC) 
a value into one of the locations. What value you use 
depends on where the relay is. If you want to turn on Relay 
0, then you must store a value of 1 in that location. If, for 



example, you also want Relay 3 on, you must add the value 
of 8 to your previous value. Each bit value has a numeric 
value. Remember the binary counting system; I told you it 
would come up over and over again. I hope by now you 
understand what binary is all about. Anyway, the vaJues 
associcated with each'bit go like this: 



Bit Number 

DO 
Dl 
D2 
D3 
D4 
D5 
D6 
D7 



Decimal Value 

1 

2 
4 
8 

16 
32 
64 
128 



Hex Value 

1 

2 
4 
8 

10 
20 
40 
80 



The last thing I must talk about is the Multi-Pak 
Interface. If you are using a Radio Shack Multi-Pak 
Interface and a floppy disk controller, there is some 
switching you must do first. The Multi-Pak has four slots. 
Each of these slots has two memory-mapping pins. The first 
is called the CTS pin. It is used to map up to 16K of memory 
area. The software for the disk drives called DOS usually 
resides there. 

The second is the SCS pin we are using. The Multi-Pak 
has the capability of switching these signals to one of the 
four slots. It also has the capability of switching them 
separately. I mentioned earlier the hardware that controls 
the disk drives uses this pin. It uses the SCS in the slot the 
controller is in. If you want to use the relay complex with 
the Multi-Pak and a disk drive controller, you will have to 
do some switching before you use the relays. After you are 
finished, switch back to the original slot. Place the disk 
controller in Slot 4 and the relay complex in Slot 1. When 
you want to use the relay complex you must first do the 
command POKE &HFF7F , &H30. 

When you are finished and want to use the drive again, 
you must do the command POKE &HFF7F,&H33. 



Submitting Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from 
everyone. We like to run a variety of programs that 
are useful/helpful/fun for other CoCo owners. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk and 
it is best to make several saves, at least one of them 
in ASCII format. We're sorry, but we do not have time 
to key in programs. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary explaining how the 
program works. Generally/ we're much more inter- 
ested in how your submission works and runs than 
how you developed it. Programs should be learning 
experiences. 

We do pay for submissions, based on a number of 
criteria. Those wishing remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who wish more detailed 
information on making submissions, please send a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope (SASE) to: Submis- 
sions Editor, THE RAINBOW, The Falsoft Building, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. We will send you some 
more comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit programs or articles currently 
submitted to another publication. 



June 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



87 



****************** ★**★★*****★ 




BOARD 




In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column 
of pointers for our ganq^-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, 
Vwe encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



FEEDBACK 



In response to letters from: 

• Tom Rawlinson: In Vortex Factor, you 
need to make a candle at London 1200. 
With the string in your possession, type 
MELT BIRD, MAKE CANDLE. Open the sar- 
cophagus and type GIVE RING. After you 
go through the secret passage, type LOOK 
SARC. 

• Steve Adler and Bobby Limoges: When 
in the cell in Vortex Factor, type LOOK 
SKELETON three times. Be sure you have 
the hacksaw when you enter the cell; type 
SAW WIND and GO WIND. 

I cannot find all of the treasures. I am 
told there is a ruby necklace and a dia- 
mond, but I cannot find these. 

• Eric Tabor: To open the safe in Vortex 
Factor, you must turn the dial. The game 
will ask you what the combination is. 

• Mark Reiter: In Dallas Quest, look at 
the parrot. He will help you. 

• Scott Nagel: When you Ye in the dispen- 
sary in Bedlam and you have the hook, 
type GET RED KEY WITH HOOK. In the room 
west of the Electro-Shock therapy room, 
type GET GREEN KEY WITH HOOK. 

• Gregg Thompson: In Dallas Quest, go 
south when you get out of the tree. The 
path is always north to south. 

• Jason Mulig: Wave the ring to get past 
the cannibals and to get into the cave in 
Dallas Quest. 

• Omri Goren: When in the pool in Sands 
of Egypt, type HOOK SCEP. Then, type 
PULL SCEP and UNHO SCEP. Be sure to get 
the scepter; you will need it again. 

• Phil Derkson: After returning the scep- 
ter in Sands of Egypt, type GO CRAC. Don't 
try to get the treasures. Get the ladder, type 
GO ARCH. Then UNTIE ROPE, type LOOK and 
let the boat drift until you see a hole in the 
roof. Drop and climb the ladder. 



• John Wood: In Sands of Egypt, the oil 
is where the snake was killed. 



• Serge Grenier: In Martian Crypt, you 
must type PRY PLAQUE. Then type USE 
STALACTITE. 

• Jerry Honigman: In Black Sanctum, the 
wood you need is from the boarded up 
door. 

• Edward Swatek: In Trekboer, you must 
have the amulet in your possession to go 
through the force field. To get the grate, 
follow the same process you used to open 
the white panel. 

• Dean Muller and Joel DeYoung: In. 
Calixto Island, you need to take the tire 
pump with you when you go to the island. 

• Andy Thornton: In Dallas Quest, type 
GIVE EGGS. Then type GIVE MIRR. 

In Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy, what 
is the right phrase combination to keep 
from getting killed by the flying brick? 

Ray Knoch 
Lawson, MO 

• Larry Lockwood: You can't take the 
scroll the wizard's image lays in Dungeons 
of Daggorath. After the image is de- 
stroyed, you are immediately sent to the 
fourth level. 

• Chris Ravenell: There are two ways to 
get away from the blob in Dungeons of 
Daggorath. The first is to run away and the 
second is to climb up or down a ladder. To 
destroy the blob, hold the sword in your 
right hand and attack from the right. When 
the blob is directly in front of you, press 
ENTER, M and press ENTER again. This will 
damage it and take you out of danger. Type 
RR. When the blob is in front of you, repeat 
the previous step. Blobs can be destroyed 
by a single hit later in the game. 

• Philip Manwarren: In Raaku-Tu, there 
is only one way to kill the gargoyle. You 
must get the candle and the lamp, then 
enter the chamber with the gargoyle and 
bring it to life. Light the candle with the 



lamp and drop the candle. Exit the room 
the same way you came in. Type WAIT 10 
times to give the candle time to kill the 
gargoyle. Go back into the gargoyle's 
chamber and extinguish the candle. Now 
you can enter the next room. 

I am trapped in the tunnel under the 
altar. I have crawled to the south wall, only 
to be killed by the guards. Can I get out 
without dying? 

Tom Biggs 
Hillsdale, NY 



• Chris O'Neal: In Sands of Egypt, the 
scepter is found after you ride the camel. 
Type EXAMINE CARVING and then type 
EXAMINE. You must then use the oil. 

To get off the boat once you have typed 
DROP LADDER, just type CLI MB LADDER and 
ride the camel again for a surprise. 

• Luis Torres: In Sands of Egypt, you 
must get the canteen. The canteen can be 
located by going east three times from the 
snake. Next, go to the oasis. Type CLIMB 
STEPS and then fill the canteen. 

Karl Beyer 
Marengo, JL 

• Alex Abraham: Use graph paper to map 
your steps through Wizard's Castle. Re- 
member to use the command SWIM at the 
river, and when you reach the cavern, do 
what the HELP statement is answered with. 

How do 1 get the gold bar in Gold 
Runner 2's second level — the one at the 
top under the blue bricks? 

John Beck 
\ Suitland, MD 

• Barbara Williams: Before digging down 
to collect the piece of gold in Gold Runner, 
make sure you have all the gold. The ladder 
will appear from the top of the screen down 
through the rock so you can get to it. 

In Pyramid, water the bean plant twice, 
so it will reach the hole. How do you get 
to the maze? 

Justin Wyss 
Warrington, PA 

• Quinn Gran/or: In Chamber 8 in Down- 
land, in order to get to the second vertical 
rope from the horizontal rope, go all the 
way up the first rope and hold the joystick 



***************************** 



•i 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1987 



******** ★★*★***★***★★★★**★★** 



small receptacle on the vector plotter. Then 
put the long dangly bit in the tea substitute 
and flip the switch. 

Steven Smashnuk 
Dawson Creek, British Columbia 



No Shoes Like Snowshoes 

Scoreboard: 

In Omniverse, I found the flute and gave 
it to the eskimo, and he gave me a vial of 
magic dust. What is the dust used for? I 
cannot climb the cliffs or get out of the pits 
because I have no snowshoes. Where do 
you get the snowshoes? 

In Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, I 
can't get the plotter. I typed the first word 
of the second verse of the poetry but 
nothing happens. 

Dale Kaczmarek 
Oaklawn, 1L 



Giddyup Camel, I Want 

To RIDE 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, I can't go anywhere 
besides the pool and the cliff. Is there a way 
to ride the camel that is at the pool, can 
you drain the pool, and by what com- 
mand? What is the snake oil used for? 

Neil Abdollahian 
Akron, OH 

Desert Necessities 

Scoreboard: 

I n Sands of Egypt, 1 have the canteen, 
the torch, the shovel and ihe magnifier. 
What else do 1 need to get to the pyramid? 

Mike Duval I 
Zanesville, OH 

Deperately Seeking Scepter 



to the right. You will slide down onto the 
rope. When you reaGh the other side you 
should have no problem. 

In Chamber 9, be careful on the third 
vertical rope at the top. A drop will cause 
you to fall off the rope. 

Duane Whit lock 
North East, MD 

• Rodrigo Maldonado: When you kill the 
snake go east twice in Sands of Egypt, then 
get the container. You need the oil to get 
the scepter. 

• David Boyd: In Sands of Egypt, go to 
the hole in the roof and go up. 

• Jeff Haase: All you need is a magnifying 
glass, shovel, canteen, snake oil, torch, 
dates and rope in Sands of Egypt. 

• David Hunt: When in the mine in 
Dragon Blade, all you need is the sword. 
When at the sword room go up. 

I need to know how to solve The Inter- 
bank Incident — I solved it once, but 
forget how I did it. 

Don Grey 
Austell, GA 

Something Fishy 

Scoreboard: 

Here are some hints on Hitchhiker's 
Guide to the Galaxy: To get the babel fish, 
put the gown on the hook, get the towel 
(from Ford), put the towel on the drain, get 
the satchel, cover the panel with the 
satchel, put the junk mail on the satchel 
and press the dispenser button, 

How do you steal the Heart of Gold? I've 
gotten the guards to drop their rifles, but 
I cannot get to the ship without being shot. 
What do you say to Prosser to make him 
lie in front of the bulldozer? 

Chuck Poynter, Jr. 
Hector, AR 

The French Connection 

Scoreboard: 

In Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, on 
Damogran, steer toward France. There is 
fluff and the key to the toolbox. On the 
dais, tell the guards to drop their rifles. 

Marc Prudhommeaux 
Winter Harbor, ME 

Time Travel 

Scoreboard: 

I can't get past the screening door in 
Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, but I 
figured out how to travel in time. To build 
the time machine, connect the small plug 
on the spare improbability drive to the 



Block Talk 

Scoreboard: 

I would like to know how to remove the 
block in Pyramid. 

Chris Norman 
Liberty, PA 

Can't Be Beat 

Scoreboard: 

In Knock Out, I can't beat the Knock 
Out Kid. In Sands of Egypt, I can't get into 
the Pyramid. In Raaku-Tu, how do you get 
past the gargoyle and over the rug to the 
door on the other side? 

Derek Myall 
Charlotte, Ml 

Gargoyle Repelent 

Scoreboard: 

How do I get past the gargoyle in 
Raaku-Tui I tried hitting it with every- 
thing I could find, but nothing works. 

If the candle is lit, the gargoyle will not 
attack. The only problem is that after three 
entries, the burning candle will cause you 
to pass out, ending the game. 

Mike Mumper, Jr. 
Loysville, PA 

Frond or Foe? 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, where is the canteen? 
How do I get back from the pyramid to the 
pool? After you drain the pool, what will 
happen? Are the palm fronds useful? 

George Lane 
Chicago, 1L 



Scoreboard: 

I cannot get the scepter in Sands of 
Egypt. Also on Naurius, where is the 
wizard's stick and how do you cross the 
pit? 

Duckie 
Vallejo, CA 

Cannibal Clue 

Scoreboard: 

In Sands of Egypt, to drink the water, 
fill the canteen and drink. To ride the 
camel, feed the camel the dates and mount 
and ride the camel. Then, dismount and 
examine the carving. 

To get out of the jungle in Dallas Quest, 
go south. To get past the cannibals lype 
WAVE RING. To find the eggs, take the road 
to the vulture at the crossroads. 

Philip Manwarren 
Harrington, ME 



To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers," c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, K Y 40059. 
We will immediately forward your letter to 
the original respondent and, just as impor- 
tantly, we'll share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo S1G. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then 
type SEND and address to: EDITORS. Be 
sure to include your complete name and 
address. 

— Jody Doyle 



★★★★★ ************************ 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 89 



DOCTOR ASCII 




The Inadvertent 
Inverse Video 

By Richard E. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 



When using Stylograph Version 
3. 1.2 on my CoCo 3 with OS-9 Level 
II, pressing the CTRL-BREAK keys to 
change back to command mode 
switches the screen display to inverse 
video. Is there a fix? 

Marta Roman 
St. Petersburg, FL 

1/ Using Debug on your Level 1 
system, change, at offset SI09F, 
the value from SAO to $A1, then save 
and verify LL If you want to change any 
parameters, e.g., maximum number of 
parameters, default memory size, etc., 
run styfix because this version of 
styf ix (designed for Level I) will not 
work with Level II. Great Plains Soft- 
ware promises a true CoCo 3 version of 
Stylo, possibly by the time you see this 
in print. 

CoCo 3 3 1 /2-inch Drives 

What is your opinion on using 3 l h- 

Iinch drives on a CoCo 3 with OS-9 
level II? 

Susan Emery 
Glen Ellen, IL 



1^ While the 80-track, double-sided 
/L drives in either size (3/2-inch or 
5yi-inch) are electrically equivalent and 
hold the same amount of data, OS-9 
Level II was obviously designed to be 
used with the 80-track, 5!/4-inch drives 
such as the TEAC 55F. This new release 
automatically "double steps" 40- or 35- 

Richard Esposito is a senior project 
engineer with Northrop Corp. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




s 



i i 



track disks with these drives, giving you 
the ability to read 40- or 35-track disks 
without the need to insert them in one 
of those lower-capacity drives. If you 
have a 40-track DSDD drive as /d2 and 
80 trackers in / dO and /d 1, you can copy 
files from any 5 ! /i-inch OS-9 disk (re- 
gardless of format) to the 40- or 35- 
track disk in /d2. With a 3'/2-inch drive, 
you lose this flexibility and you pay 
more for the "privilege" (both drives 
and disks cost more in the 3/2-inch 
variety). 

You can make an 80-track, bootable 
Drive 0 even though Tandy omitted the 
80-track descriptor for /dd and /dO. 
Although there are more elegant ways 
to do this, here's one way (assuming two 
80-track drives in 0 and !, 35/40 track 
in 2). Copy your Radio Shack OS-9 
Level 11 system disk to Drive 0 from 
Drive 2 using BASIC'S D5KINI0 and 
BRCKUP2TD0 commands giving you a 
pseudo 80-track system disk. Drop 
power, then boot up by typing DOS with 
the pseudo 80-track system disk in 



Drive 0. After typing the date, type the 
following: 

MIDPRTCH -S 

L D0 

C 16 1 3 

C IB 23 50 

C 19 1 2 

V 

L 00 

C 16 1 3 

C IB 23 50 

C 19 1 2 

V 

L Dl 

C 16 1 3 

C IB 23 50 

C 19 1 2 

V 

Press CTRL-BREAK. 

Now put the original 35-track system 
disk in Drive 0 and type the following: 

chx /d0/cmds 

forma t /dl 

cobbler /dl 

makdi r /dl/cmds 

copy /d0/startup /dl/startup 

copy /d0/cmds/shel 1 /dl/cmds/ 

shell 

copy /d0/cmds/da te /dl/cmds/ 
da te 

copy /d0/cmds/se t i me /dl/ 
cmds/set ime 

copy /d0/cmds/l ink /dl/cmds/ 
link 

You now have an 80-track, double- 
sided, quad-density bootable system 
disk in Drive I. Test it and, upon 
verification that it does boot, discard 
the pseudo 80-track disk. Once you 
boot with the new system disk, you can 
read 35-, 40-, or 80-track, single- or 
double-sided disks with your 80-track 
drives. 



90 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Note I: By adding a few commands to the Modpatch 
procedure above, you could also change the step rate of your 
drives from 30 ms to a faster 20 ms, 12 ms or 6 ms by changing 
the value at offset 14 to 1, 2 or 3, respectively 

Note 2: if you have K. Darling's dmode from Delphi or 
a Level II version of save, this procedure can be greatly 
simplified. You could add the missing descriptors to the 
MODULES directory and build the system directly with 
conf ig. 

An Old Disk Controller 

The Disk BASIC 1.0 Radio Shack Disk Controller worked 
fine on my gray 16 K ECB CoCo 2 BASIC 1.0. I recently 
\bought a white 64 K CoCo 2 BASIC LI, but my disk system 
refuses to operate properly with it; / always get an // O Error. 
When /examine the disk status byte (DCSTA), it seems that 
the malfunction occurs because the drive is not ready. Could 
you give me any medicine to make it work again? 

Wim Vandekerckhove 
GeWiMa CoCo Club 

Belgium 

O The disk controller shipped with the original CoCo 
/C drives (the TEC unit in a gray case) required a 12-volt 
power supply from the CoCo to operate. Neither the CoCo 
2 or 3 have this source available on their cartridge connector. 
While there are ways to modify them to operate with the old 
controller (e.g., adding 12 volts to the connector by kludging 
the existing power supply or running a 12-volt line from the 
disk controller's power supply), the simplest method is to use 



a Multi-Pak Interface, which (besides allowing system 
expansion) provides the needed 12 volts. 

Telewriter 64 and a RAM Disk 

Can I use a RAM disk on a CoCo 3 with Telewriter 64? 

Joe Mulholland 
Houston, TX 

X? Jesse W. Jackson of J&R electronics offers the 
jL following to allow you to do it with his JRAMRDSK 
software. The UNDD3„BRS may also allow you to use some 
of your CoCo 2 software that otherwise would not run on 
the 3. On a backup of your TW64 disk, add UND03 . BflS; 
replace 5 .XXX with the one you see here; add JRAMRDSK. BIN 
(sold by J&R). To use TW64 type, RUN "UND03"; RUN"U". 

1)3 WIDTH32 

2j3 'UNDO/BAS VI. ft 

3j3 'THIS PROGRAM WILL UNDO THE B 

ASIC ENHANCEMENTS 11 

4j3 ' IN A COC3 TO MAKE IT COMPAT 

IBLE WITH COCOl/2." 

5j3 CLEAR 2j3j3,&H7DFF 

6j3 CLS 

7j3 PRINT" " STRING $ (30, "*") 

8j3 PRINT" * UND03/BAS 

9j3 PRINT" * 



Model 101 
Interface $39.95 




• Serial to parallel interface 

• Works with any COCO 

• Compatible with "Centron- 
ics'* parallel input printers 

• 6 switch selectable baud 
rates 300-600-1 200-2400- 
4800-9600 

• Small size 4" x 2" x 1" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 



Other Quality 
Items 

High quality 5 screw shell C- 
10 cassette tapes. 57.50/ 
dozen 

Hard plasticstorageboxesfor 
cassette tapes. $2.50/dozen 

Pin-Feed Cassette Labels 
White S3.00/100 
Colors S3.60/100 (specify 
red, blue, yellow, tan) 



Model 104 Deluxe 
Interface $51.95 




Same features as 101 plus 

• Built in serial port for your 
modem or other serial device 

• Switch between parallel 
output and serial output 

• Size is 4.5" x 2.5" x 1.25" 

• Comes complete with 
cables to connect to your 
computer and printer 



NEW! Cables for 
your COCO 

• U.L. listed foil-shielded cable 

• 2 Types: male/female exten- 
sion cables (used between 
a serial device and existing 
cable) male/male cables 
(used between two serial 
devices such as a modem 
and one of our switchers). 

• 3 M./S3.95. 6 ft./$4.49, 

10 ft./$5.59 Specify M/M 
or M/F and length. 



Model 102 
Switcher $35.95 




• Connect to your COCO 
serial port and have 3 switch 
selectable serial ports 

• Color coded indicator lights 
show switch position 

• Lights also serve as a 
power on indicator for your 
COCO 

• Heavy guage blue anodized 
aluminum cabinet with non- 
slip rubber leet 



The 101 and 104 require 
power to operate Most print- 
ers can supply power to your 
interface (Star, Radio Shack 
and Okidata are just a few that 
do - Epson and Seikosha do 
not). The interfaces can also 
be powered by an AC adap- 
tor; Radio Shack model 273- 
1431 plugs into all models. If 
you require a power supply, 
add a "P" to the model numbe r 
and add $5.00 to the price 
(Model 101 P $44.95, Model 
104P $56.95). 



Model 105 
Switcher $14.95 




i 



mm 

• Connects to your COCO 
to giveyou 2 switch select- 
able serial ports 

• 3 loot cable to connect to 
your COCO's serial port 

• The perfect item to use to 
connect a printer and a 
modem to your COCO 

• Small in size, only 4.5x2 5 
x 1.25 



The Model 101, 102, 104 and 
1 05 work with any COCO, any 
level basic and any memory 
size. These products are co- 
vered by a 1 year warranty. 

The Model 1 01 and 1 04 work 
with any standard parallel 
inputprinter including Gemini, 
Epson, Radio Shack, 
Okidata, C. loth, Seikosha. 
Panasonic and many others 
They support BASIC print 
commands, word processors 
and graphic commands. 

We manufacture these 
products - dealer inquiries 
are invited. 



Cassette Label 
Program $6.95 

• New Version - tape trans- 
ferable to disk - save and 
load labels from tape to disk 

• Prints 5 lines of information 
on pin-feed cassette labels 

• Menu driven, easy to use 

• Standard, expanded and 
condensed characters 

• Each line of text auto- 
matically centered 

• Label display on CRT, en- 
abling editing before printing 

• Program comes on tape 
and is supplied with 24 
labels to get you started 

• 16 K ECB required 



Ordering 
Information 

Free shipping in the United 
States (except Alaska and 
Hawaii) on all orders over 
$50.00. Please add$2.50 for 
shipping and handling on or- 
ders under S50.00. 
Ohio residents add 5.5% 
sales tax. 

Call (513) 677-0796 and use 
your VISA or MASTERCARD 
or request C.O.D (Please 
add $2.00 for C.O.D. orders). 
If you prefer, send check or 
money order; payable in U.S. 
Funds to: 

Metric Industries 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 91 



100 


PRINT 




*»» 


110 


PRINT 




* it 


120 


PRINT 




*" 


130 


PRINT 




*»• 


14(3 


PRINT 


ED 


*ii 


15j3 


PRINT 


16j3 


PRINT 


EMORY . 11 ; 



J & R ELECTRONI 
(C) 1987 
BY J.W.JACKSON 
ALL RIGHTS RESERV 



17j3 FOR I=&H7Ej30 TO &H7E24 

1Q0 READ X$ 

190 PRINT 11 . 11 ; 

200 POKE I , VAL( "&H"+X$ ) 

210 NEXT I 

22j3 PRINT: INPUT "PRESS A KEY TO 
EXEC PROGRAM" ;ZZ$ 
230 EXEC &H7E0j3 

240 DATA 1A , 5j3 , 8E , 80 , 00 , 8 6 , 84 , B7 
250 DATA FF, 9j3 , B7 , FF , DE , EC, 84 , B7 
260 DATA FF, DF , ED, 8 1 , 8C , FE , 00 , 2 6 
270 DATA Fl,86,j3F,B7,Aj3,55,0F,71 
28,0 DATA ^)F,72,7E,Aj3,27,FF,FF,FF 



10 
20 
30 
40 
50 
60 



S.XXX V3.0 **************** 
REPLACES TELEWRITER- 6 4 2.0 
FILE NAMED S.XXX FOR USING 
RAM DISK WITH TELEWRITER. 

*************************** 

CLEAR 7j3j3,&H6FEF 
7j3 REM MENU 
8j3 CLS 

90 PRINT: PRINT MENU SELECTIONS 
Ij3j3 PRINT 11 <R> = LOAD RAM DISK P 
ROGRAM " 

llj3 " <B> = BINARY DISK I/O 



ii 



12j3 
13j3 



PRINT" <A> = ASCII DISK I/O 
ii 

PRINT: PRINT 11 PRESS A KEY 



ii 



14j3 MS$=INKEY$:IF MS$ = ,IM THEN 14 

j3 ELSE PRINT MS$ 

15j3 IF MS $ = M B M THEN 19j3 

160 IF MS$ = "A M THEN 2j3j3 1 ASCII 

I/j3 

17 j3 IF MS $ = M R M THEN GOSUB 21j3' R 
AM DISK 

18j3 GOT08j3 1 ******************** 

19j3 LOAD M S/BIN lf ,R 

2j3j3 LOAD M S/ASC M ,R 

21j3 LOADM 11 JRAMRDSK" 

22j3 POKE &H6FF3,&H9 8:POKE &H6FF4 

, &H^J^J 1 PDEST TO &H98j3j3 

23j3 POKE &H6FF7 , &HFF : POKE &H6FF8 

, &HFF 1 DISABLE RESET PROTECT 



24j3 EXEC: RETURN 

25j3 END 1 S.XXX **************** 

Artifact Color Distortion 

I have an old gray CoCo /, Color BASIC LI, Extended 
.BASIC 1.0, upgraded to 64K and an NC board. Everything 
heems to work fine, except when a program with artifact 
colors is run, some of the colors come out wrong. For 
example, one program with flags shows an American flag 
with green stripes instead of red. Some other colors are off 
too. Is there a fix for this problem, or is it something I just 
have to live with? 

Merlin Hansen 
Nam pa, ID 

T3 There are two common causes of the problem you 
/C mention. Ed Ellers suggests that the master clock 
trimmer capacitor may be misadjusted. I'm not sure how it's 
labeled in the NC board you have, but it should be somewhere 
near the SAM chip. First, adjust your TV set for proper color 
on a broadcast TV signal (if you can get a color bar test 
pattern, adjust the tint control so that the third bar from the 
left is light blue and the fifth bar looks purplish — not 
reddish), then hook up the CoCo and adjust the trimmer to 
obtain the proper colors. 

In some TV sets, it is possible for the "chroma demodu- 
lator" stages to become misaligned, causing incorrect colors 
on the screen. If you can't get red and blue at the same time 
at any setting of the tint control, you may need to have the 
TV checked out by a technician. 

One other thing to check is the automatic tint control 
switch (labeled AUTO/AFT, A/T, ACM, Color Sentry or 
one of many other names). This should be switched off for 
proper color rendition when using the CoCo. 

CoCo Joystick for an Apple 

i) My friend and I have different computers (I have a CoCo 
j and he has an Apple lie) and I would like to know if there 
I is a way for us to make a joystick adapter for the Apple. 
The adapter would fit on a Radio Shack joystick and plug 
into the Apple. Can this be done? Providing that it 's possible, 
where can I get schematics of the joystick connections for 
both computers? 

Dan Miller 
Oregon, OH 

X? It should be possible to make the CoCo-to-Apple 
adapter; all you need is a 6-pin DIN jack and a 9-pin 
D plug to fit the Apple Ile/IIc paddle connector. You will 
need to get the Apple pin connections from the Apple lie 
manual, but here are the CoCo jack connections: 

1- X Potentiometer 

2- Y Potentiometer 

3- Ground 

4- Firebutton J 

5- +5 Volts 

6- Firebutton 2 

The CoCo joystick may not operate as well on the Apple 
as it does on the CoCo or the Tandy 1000, but it should be 
usable. Note that if your joystick has only one button, it will 
act as Firebutton 1 and Button 2 may not be available. You 
may be able to use the "solid-Apple" key to the right of the 
space bar as a substitute. 



92 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



CoCo Commodore Compatibility 

1 own a TRS-80, 16 K Extended BASIC Color Computer. 
I have found this computer to be very incompatible with 
other computer accessories. My friend recently purchased 
a Commodore 128 that is a very nice setup. There is a lot 
of software that I would like to transfer over to my TRS- 
80, but can't. Every time I try to load one of the cassette 
programs into my computer, I get an I/O error. There must 
be some way to run programs back and forth. Can you tell 
me how to get the Commodore tapes to load on my TRS- 
80? Also, is there a reverse program for loading TRS-80 
programs into the Commodore? 

Kate Myers 
Peterborough, NH 

W The Commodore is the incompatible machine. The 
/L CoCo uses all standard accessories. It has a standard 
RS-232 serial printer port, and it uses the same standard disk 
drives as the IBM PC. Software-wise, the two machines are 
totally incompatible. The CoCo uses the powerful MC6809 
microprocessor while the Commodore uses the slow and 
impotent 6502. Worse yet. Commodore uses an archaic and 
slow (backing up a single-sided disk can take 20 minutes) 
serial interface to their disk drives, and this single interface 
is shared by other devices, so if you are printing a file from 
a disk, for example, the disk and printer both send /receive 
data even slower. 

Tell Me About Upgrades 

I have an older 16 K Extended BASIC Color Computer 2. 
The board number is 20261043. I want to upgrade to 64 K. 
have read your column, and you touch on upgrading. 



3-D GRAPHICS ANIMATION 

MORE FEATURES ATA LOWER PRICE! 




• Rotate, Move, Zoom, and Animate Mutiple Objects 
Simultaneously. 

• Comes with Data to Create Your Own 3-D Animation 
with a Spaceship, Car, Pyramid, Cube and Sphere. 
Includes Animation Examples with these Objects. 

• Includes Editor to Create and Edit Data for 3-D Graphics 
Animation of Any Objects, including: Cars, Boats, 
Airplanes, Etc., 

• Now Supports Elimination of Hidden Lines. 

• Print 3-D Graphics Images on Radio Shack® Dot 
Ma trix Printers. 

' Easy to Use • Requires 64K • COCO 2 or COCO 3 • Disk Only 

• Reg. $32.95 Now $24.95 + $3 Ship ping I Handling 

• Only $5 + $2 Shipping/Handling for 3-D Demo-Disk 
with Animation Examples using a Spaceship, Car, 
Pyramid, Cube, and Sphere. The $5 Applies Toward a 
Later Purchase of the Entire Program. 

Visa and Mastercard Accepted 



RAJNftOWj 

2346 W. Estrella Drive Chandler, AZ 85224 (602)821-2465 

Radio Shack is a registered trademark of Tandy Corporation 



Logicware 



I have eight 4164 64 K dynamic RAMs, 150 nanoseconds. I 
need lo know everything about upgrading my machine. I 
don 7 have a disk drive. 

Terry Cooper 
Fostoria, OH 

O Assuming you have the original CoCo 2 (made in USA, 
/C small white case), remove the eight 4116 16K-by~l 
memory chips from sockets U14 to U21, then solder a wire 
connecting the two solder pads to the right of W 1 , then install 
your eight new 4164 64K-by-l memory chips oriented 
properly in their sockets. If you have the first generation 
Korean CoCo 2, remove the eight 21 18 16K-by- 1 memory 
chips (they are located in two places: a group of three and 
a group of five). Solder a wire connecting the two pads in 
the box marked 64K, then install the eight new 4164 64K- 
by-1 memory chips oriented properly in their sockets. 

Note: If you have no previous printed circuit board 
soldering experience, leave these upgrades to the pros! 



For a quicker response, your questions may also be 
submitted through rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow Magazine 
Services, then, at the RAINBOW> prompt, type ASK 
for "Ask the Experts" to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete instructions. 



EACH PROGRAM COMES WITH 
** 10 FREE DISKS ** 



CHECKBOOK III - $19.98 COCO 3 ONLY 

Keep track of checks & expenses. Print out check & expense records. 

VCR DATABASE & MINI TITLE SCREEN MAKER - $20.98 

Catalog your VCR tapes. Create VCR title screens. Print out records. 

S.B. INVENTORY III - $24.98 COCO 3 ONLY 

Small business inventory control at a small business price. 

COUPON FILER - $19.98 COCO 1 & 2 ONLY 

For the smart shopper. Keep track of coupons. Print shopping lists. 

S.T.A.G. - A GRADEB00K - $35.00 

Full year. Statistical analysis, weighting & more. Up to 50 students. 

EXAMS III - $24.98 COCO III ONLY 

Create multiple choice, true-false, or short answer tests. 

FRACTION REVIEW - $24.98 GRADES 5-8 

Challenging Hi-Res game for addition & subtraction of fractions. 

WORD GAMES - $24.98 GRADES 2-ADULT 

4 Hi-Res spelling games. Includes 6 word lists. Add more lists. 



If your store does not have SECA software then order direct. Add $3 S/H. 
COD $2 extra. MS Res. add 6% sales tax. We are also carrying software by 
other publishers. See their great products in our free catalog. Dealers invited. 



New software publishers advertise in the SECA catalog. You won't believe 
the rate. Also exciting opportunity for new programmers to market your pro- 
grams. Write for details. 



EST. 
1982 



SECA - P.O. BOX 3134 
GULFP0RT, MS 39505 
(601) 832-8236 



RAINBOW 

CtHTIflCAriOW 
SEAL 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 93 



Transposition refinements for Music + 

The Sweet Strains of CoCo 

By Joseph D. Piatt 



This is a refinement for the Music + 
program by Bob Ludlum from the 
June 1984 and June 1986 rainbow. 
Transpose allows you to transpose 
music in memory. The range of each 
transposition is unison minus six steps 
to unison plus five steps. For example, 
if the original note was C4, the L6 
command would lower the note six 
steps to F#3. Likewise, the R5 com- 
mand would raise C4 (middle C) to F4, 
five steps above C4. 

To add the transpose feature to a 
cassette-based system, you need to add 
Line 28, Line 1 2 1 and lines 9600 to 9840. 
Line 9030 must be revised to display the 
(X)pose message in the alternate menu. 
Refer to Listing 1 for the new lines and 
the revised Line 9030. 

The disk version requires that you 
delete lines 6099 to 6180, the data for 
"Toy For Two Lutes," and lines 45, 54 
and 55 from the setup portion of the 
program. This must be done to prevent 
an out-of-memory condition from oc- 
curring when the transpose code is 
added. 

The transpose routine is called from 
the alternate menu. The alternate menu 
is accessed by pressing the @ key. The 
alternate menu indicates that pressing 



Joe Piatt lives in Quinton, Alabama, 
and is the children's pastor and bus 
director at Hopewell Baptist Church. 
He holds a first class FCC license and 
has worked with his CoCo for four 
years. 



the X key will invoke the (X)pose 
function. Lines 9600 to 9645 print the 
instructions to the screen and process 
the inputs required to carry out the 
selected function. 

Lines 9700 to 9740 perf orm the Raise 
function. All notes are stored in mem- 
ory as even integers as in CoCo Com- 
posing by Larry Konecky in the De- 
cember 1983 RAINBOW. The Music + 
program converts the note name to the 
equivalent number, C4 to 50, for exam- 
ple. The value for C3 (26) is 24 less than 
C4 (50). The octave spread of 24 is a 
result of the 12 steps between notes of 
the same name (not counting the start- 
ing note) multiplied by two. 

Line 9620 selects 9625 if the R key is 
pressed. Line 9625 asks the user to enter 
a number from 1 to 5 to indicate how 
many steps to raise the music. Line 9630 
verifies that the input is within the 
specified range and then sets the vari- 
able XR to equal two times the value 
input. XR will always be an even number 
from 2 to 12 for Lower or 2 to 10 for 
Raise. 

Line 9700 establishes a loop to read 
the music memory. The STEP 5 option 
in the loop ensures that the loop vari- 
able QL always points to the memory 
address that contains the note length 
data. If that data is 0, then the music has 
ended. Line 9705 tests for this condi- 
tion. If it is true, PEEK ( QL) =0, then 
Transpose is terminated and the music 
entry menu is displayed. If PEEK(QL) 
<>0, lines 9710 through 9725 are called 
to read each note in the chord and add 
XR, the transpose offset, to its value. The 



exception to this is that if the value of 
Qrc=PEEI<(QL+>?)+XR exceeds 96, then 
24 is subtracted from Qn to lower the 
note an octave. At this time, the new 
note, Qtt+XR, is poked into location 
( QL+n) . Line 9730 controls the loop, 
and Line 9740 directs the program to go 
to the music entry menu setup in Line 
60. 

Lines 9800 through 9840 accomplish 
the same thing except that in the Lower 
routine, if Qn+XR is less than 8, then 24 
is added to Qn to raise the note an 
octave, then XR is added. The result is 
poked into address [QL+n). In these 
examples, the letter n represents an 
integer from 1 to 4. A 1 added to QL 
causes the value of the soprano note to 
be read. Likewise QL+2 points to the 
alto, QL+3 points to the tenor and QL+4 
points to the bass note. 

In each of the note processing lines, 
9710 to 9725 and 9810 to 9825, if 
PEEK (QL+N )=0 (meaning the note is 
silent or a rest), then no change is made, 
and the next note line is called. I had 
some strange sounding chords before I 
added the 4 0' test. 

The transpose routine can be called 
repeatedly to raise or lower the music 
to the desired key. A word of caution — 
too many transposes in the same direc- 
tion will result in a chord with some of 
its notes an octave off from the original 
relationship. 

(You may direct questions about this 
modification to Mr. Piatt at Route 1, 
Box 25 30, Quinton, AL35130, 205-436- 
3362. Please enclose an SASE for a 
reply when writing.) □ 



94 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Editor's Note: For your convenience, 
the complete updated version of this 
program will be included on both RAIN- 
BOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. 
Three music files, OLD100TH, HDWGREflT 
and JE5U JOY will also be included and 
will immediately follow MU5IC+TR. 



(R) 

LOWER, OR 



TO 

(Q) 



RA 
TO 



THEN 



The listing: MUSIC+TR 

28 IF PEEK(&H4E84)=22 AND PEEK(& 
H4E85)=j3 AND PEEK ( &H4E8 6 ) =13 6 AN 
D PEEK(&H4E87) =134 THEN 6j3 

121 IF LV=88 THEN 9 6j3j3 'TRANSPOS 
E 

96j3j3 CLS:PRINT@32, "** COCO 
TRANSPOSER **" 

96) 35 PRINT -.PRINT" YOU MAY RAISE 0 
R LOWER THE PITCH OF THE CO 
MPOSITION IN MEMORY BY CHANG 
ING THE KEY IN WHICH IT IS TO 
BE PLAYED" 

9615 PRINT@256, "PRESS 
ISE, (L) TO 
QUIT" 

962) 3 XP$=INKEY$ : IF XP$ = "R" 
9625 ELSE IF XP$ = "L" THEN 964)3 E 
LSE IF XP$="Q"THEN 6)3 ELSE 962)3 
9625 PRINT@462 , XP$ : PRINT@ 3 8 4 , "RA 
ISE PITCH ENTER ( 1-5 ) " 

963) 3 XX$ = INKEY$ :XP=VAL(XX$) : IF X 
P<1 OR XP>5 THEN 9 62 5 ELSE XR=XP 
*2:PRINT@4 63,XP;" +";XR;:GOTO 97 
ft ft 

9 64)3 PRINT@462,XP$:PRINT@384, »LO 
WER PITCH ENTER ( 1-6 )" 
9645 XX$=INKEY$ :XP=VAL(XX$) : IF X 
P<1 OR XP>6 THEN 9 64)3 ELSE XR=XP 
*-2 :PRINT@4 63 ,XP; " " ;XR; :GOT09 8 

W 

97pS3 FORQL=A5 TO 32)3)33 STEP 5 

97) 35 IF PEEK(QL)=)3 THEN 6)3 

971) 3 Q1=PEEK (QL+1) : IF Ql=)3 THEN9 
715 ELSE IF Q1+XR>96 THEN Q1=Q1- 
24+XR:POKE QL+1,Q1 ELSE Q1=Q1+XR 
:POKE QL+1,Q1 

9715 Q2=PEEK(QL+2) :IF Q2=)3 THEN 

972) 3 ELSE IF Q2+XR>96 THEN Q2=Q2 
-24+XR-.POKEQL+2 ,Q2:ELSE Q2=Q2+XR 
:POKEQL+2 ,Q2 

972)3 Q3=PEEK(QL+3) : IF Q3=)3 THEN 
9725 ELSE IF Q3+XR>96 THEN Q3=Q3 
-24+XR.POKEQL+3 , Q3 : ELSE Q3=Q3+XR 
:POKEQL+3,Q3 

9725 Q4=PEEK(QL+4) :IF Q4=)3 THEN 

973)3 ELSE IF Q4 + XR>96 THEN Q4=Q 
4-24+XR: POKEQL+4 , Q4 : ELSE Q4=Q4+X 
R:POKEQL+4,Q4 



973) 3 NEXTQL 

974) 3 GOTO 6)3 

98)3)3 FORQL=A5 TO 32)3)33 STEP 5 
98)35 IF PEEK(QL)=)3 THEN 6)3 

981) 3 Q1=PEEK (QL+1) : IF Ql=)3 THEN 
9815 ELSE IF Q1+XR<8 THEN Q1=Q1+ 
24+XR.POKE QL+1,Q1 ELSE Q1=Q1+XR 
:POKE QL+1,Q1 

9815 Q2=PEEK (QL+2) : IF Q2=)3 THEN 

982) 3 ELSE IF Q2+XR<8 THEN Q2=Q2 
+24+XR.POKE QL+2, Q2: ELSE Q2=Q2+X 
R-.POKE QL+2,Q2 

982) 3 Q3 = PEEK (QL+3 ) : IF Q3=)3 THEN 
9825 ELSE IF Q3+XR<8 THEN Q3=Q3+ 
24+XR.POKE QL+3, Q3: ELSE Q3=Q3+XR 
:POKE QL+3,Q3 

9825 Q4=PEEK (QL+4 ) : IF Q4=)3 THEN 

983) 3 ELSE IF Q4+XR<8 THEN Q4=Q4 + 
24+XR.POKE QL+4 ,Q4: ELSE Q4=Q4+XR 
:POKE QL+4,Q4 

9 8 3)3 NEXTQL 

984) 3 GOT06)3 



9)33)3 PRINTS 4 17 , " (T) EMPO ";: PRINT 
@428, " (K)OPY " ; :PRINT@439 , " (M) 
OVE " ; :PRINT@4 4 9 , " (X) POSE " ; : PRI 
NT@46)3," " ; : PRINT@471, " ( 

Z ) ERO » ; ^ 



-oco- 




<M®yj FOR $149.00 




the speech synthesizer that leaves the others eight lipped 



F IN ALL Y . . . 



* No mote £umbiing with Muiti-Pac or Y-Connectors 

* No vocabulary ROM or disk needed 

* Compatible with all operating systems 

* No driver program needed 

* Appears as a printer to Co-Co 




Horvey idyl, Final 
ask for dinner. 



Ily, I Con 



Speak-Easy plugs Into the serial 
port of your Co-Co, not the card 
slot, and appears as a printer 
to the Co-Co. Incorporated in 
Speak-Easy is a unique state o£ 
the art two chip set which 
phonetically converts ASCII text 
to speech. What this means to 
you is extreme ease of use, 
virtually unlimited vocabulary, 
and complete £ le:<a b i 1 i ty in a 
speech synthesizer. Just look at 
this sample BASIC program: 
10 INPUT A* 
20 PRINT #-2,A4» 
30 GOTO 10 
and Imagine how you could 
upgrade your games and 

applications with simple printer 
/ statements to use Speak-Easy. It 

I \L0 CONNECTS TO THE can say anythinq including 
SERIAL I/O PORT! f ore ign words. It you can spell 

it, Speak-Easy can say it. 
Also available in RS-232C configuration with 
selectable baud rate, word length and stop bits. Choose 
between A pin DIM or DB-25 connectors. If you have a 

or configuration, let us know, we will have 



0~fl 
□ 



special need 
you talk i ng in 



no t ime I 



V 539 McDaniel 
Ctnyers, Ca . 



Mill Rd. 
30207 phone 

ooo- 



Plaoia intludi 43 00 loi 5iM in US/Canada 

odd 2 7.00 <Or CO D 
G«orgio rctid«nt» add 3y« toil* ro*t 

Visa and MasterCard 
404-929-1657 welcome 

yc 



J 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 95 



The Creative Muse: How to 
Dredge Up Those Ideas 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



ast month you were left hanging 
with a half-baked happy face. 
You were challenged to use one 
of the variations you saved as a 
jumping-off point to create a master- 
piece of animation or whatever else 
your fertile brain dredged up. 

How do you get ideas? Remember, 
creativity is within the domain of any- 
body who tries. Since all people are 
unique, they will wander down different 
paths looking for inspiration. 

Creating a masterpiece, based on the 
given happy face, should not intimidate 
you. You may not be a Rembrandt, but 
original work should be a joy to behold, 
Thus, even though it is a crude drawing, 
it is still something special. 

Here is my secret "noodle-prodder" 
— a way to get ideas. I display a version 
of the happy face, the p ro ject at hand. 
If possible, I put the animated display 
into a perpetual loop. If I am unable to 
keep the action going, I run the program 
over and over again. Sometimes, it may 
drive me coocoo for a half-hour or 
longer. My secret is tositthereand stare 
at it. I concentrate on each element and 
think, "What can I do?" If nothing 
comes to mind, I look away or day- 
dream. I may get up and walk away, I 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 



will return and concentrate again, 
looking for an easy element to work on. 

The eyebrows of the happy face are 
simple to draw, Happy face cries out to 
make the eyebrows go up and down. As 
soon as you begin to develop the idea, 
you are off and running creatively. 

You begin thinking, "I must erase the 
existing pair of eyebrows. Then I can 
raise the vertical-locating value a few 
units and draw them. Then I must erase 
the higher set. No! There are no eye- 
brows at all. I have to make sure the 
original pair are called. One way is to 
draw the lower set again. There are 
other ways, but I can't fig ure them out, 
But, so long as I have one safe way to 
accomplish my desired mission, I am in 
good shape." 

You are on your way! 

Consider each idea or sub-idea as an 
individual problem and solve each, 
sequentially, 

Rest assured, you need not think your 
way through the entire problem. As you 
erase the eyebrows, your mind will 
present the next problem. Every time 
you finish a problem, the next, one is 
either being suggested or waiting in the 
wings. You will have solved all the 
problems and added a new dimension 
to the happy face. When you are satis- 
fied that you have achieved your goal, 
make a save and/or a listing of your 
recently minted program. 

Display the newly crafted work on 
the screen and try to figure out some- 
thing else to do to it. There will be times 



when you are unable to solve some 
vexing problem. That's life! 

After toying with the challenging 
problem for some time, stop! Make a 
save; sleep on it, If you are gung-ho, 
your mind will sort through possible 
avenues of attack. Remember, you can 
always return to face up to the thwart- 
ing gremlin in the program. 

My motto is, "If you can think of 
something to do, CoCo usually has a 
way to do it." It may not be readily 
apparent, but persistence pays off. 
Remember, you are apt to learn more 
meaningfully when you try working out 
a problem and toss aside each unwork- 
able approach. 

Which is more satisfying? Copying 
my listings and following along on a 
tutorial or expressing yourself by dig- 
ging in and doggedly creating some 
goodie on your own initiative? Hard- 
won success is so much sweeter. 

At this time, look over Listing I. You 
will note that it is rather long, consid- 
ering the final result, A running record 
or memory left on my 16K ECB CoCo 
was kept. As the program ballooned, 
and knowing that happy face might be 
just a portion of a greater program, it 
became more important to keep track 
of memory used. In fact, lines 2 to 99 
were kept in a virgin state, for some 
other unrelated program insertion. 

Often, you may wonder why I did it 
this way. Why did I do it in a sloppy, 
memory-wasting, red undant way? Why 
didn't I take out the chaff and revise the 




96 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



program lines to make a tighter, more 
elegant finished product? 

When in hot pursuit of a solution, 
you are unconcerned with techniques. 
The main purpose is to find solutions. 
When one solution after another tumble 
into place, you keep creating. At such 
times, who cares about sloppy or disor- 
ganized program lines and routines? 
First things first! So long as you get 
answers to your problems that you can 
live with, and make a working program, 
everything else follows. 

You may key in listings 1 and 2 for 
practice and amusement. You may 
prefer to key in and save Listing 2 only. 
Listing I is buried in Listing 2. Without 
further discussion, you are left on your 
own to locate and identify the subrou- 
tines that comprise most of the enhance- 
ments of Listing 2. It seems easier to 
study Listing 1, which purports to 
create a talking happy face first and 
then study the final version. 

Back to the keyboard. Here is an 
example of doodling and the eight 
programs that resulted. Staring at the 
beckoning blank screen, I began simply 
enough: 

10 PMDDE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 

15 FOR X=4T024STEP4 

20 DRAW"S=X$ ; BM12B , 9 S U 2 R 4 

D2L4" 

25 NEXT 

100 GQTO100 

Type RUN. Nothing special! Change 
Line 15 to read: 

15 FDR X = l TO 24 5TEP2 

This produced an interesting two- 
tone effect that intrigued me. What 
could I do with it? Type NEW and key in 
ADESIGN, First, I decided to make four 
boxes around a convenient central 
point, 12B,96. Place a REM in front of 
lines 5 and 90 and change Line 10 to 
read 4 rather than P and run. Curious 
to see how this design would look in all 
PMCIDEs, lines 5 and 90 were unmasked 
and Line 10 read P instead of 4, Run. 
That was interesting! In Line 10, 
5CREEN1 , 0 was changed to 5CREEN1 , 1 
temporarily, to see how the other set 
looked. Run. Replace 5CREEN1,0 in 
Line SO and save RDE5IGN. 

Notice, in a barracuda-like frenzy of 
creating, a separate loop routine was 
used to place each A option around the 
central point. Note also, $ in the four 
DRAW lines was not required. Further, 
Line 90 could be deleted and Line 85 
revised to B5 NEXTX,P. Right now, we 
are creating, not refining. Later on, we 
shall tend to this chore. Type NEW. 



Key in TUIDKINDS. The best display 
was PM0DE4,L It was decided to make 
an angle point and each A option line, 
D2, was altered to FG. The four loops 
were condensed to one loop. 5=X was 
removed from lines 40, 60 and 80 since 
the size would be the same in all four 
units, A slight pause was added after 
each display to give it a jerky, blinking 
effect. Now run. 

To add larger units in random steps, 
Line 15 was unmasked and Line 16 
masked. This gave rise to some colorful 
variations. Save TW0KIND5 and type 
NEW. 

Rather than key in all of the remain- 
ing listings, you may want to make 
alterations in TUIDKINDS. If so, ignore all 
further key in and NEW instructions. It 
will evolve, generation by generation, 
into the final listing. 

Key in CROSS. I decided to push the 
four units apart to make a cross. This 
was done by relocating the 12B, 96 
central point in lines 20 through 80. 

Line 15 was altered with 5TEP-3 so 
the elements in each unit would de- 
crease in size. Run. Now, change to 
5TEP-4 and run. Try 1 and 2. Save 
CROSS and type NEW. 

Tiring of the results, all the locations 
were restored to 12B,56 and the units 
were altered to be twice as wide. U2 and 
FG were doubled in value to U4 and 
F2G2 in lines 20 through 80. Run. It 
looked like a hidden swastika but oth- 
erwise was a pedestrian design. Save Rl 
and type NEW. 

Key in R2. The object was to put an 
angle on the remaining outer border of 
each unit. This was done quickly by 
changing R4F2 to E2F4 in lines 20 
through 80. Run. This wasn't too bad! 
Save R2 and type NEW. Time to fool 
around. 

Key in A3. The F4G2 portions of each 
A option unit were blanked out; BF4G2 
in lines 20 though 80 and STEP 4 re- 
placed -3. Now run. A feathery effect 
was created. Save A3 and type NEW. 

Key in A4, Time to tighten up and 
ultimately simplify the program. The E2 
was changed to R4 and the location of 
the unit of design was pulled from lines 
20 through 80 and placed in a string 
variable in Line 1 1. The string variable, 
A$, was concatenated to each A option. 

Now, mask lines 40 through 80. Run. 
Can you imagine what the design will 
look like, as you release each additional 
design unit by unmasking each A option 
in turn? Unmask Line 40 and run. 
Unmask Line 60 and run, and then Line 
80 and run. This proves the point that 
observing a single unit doesn't reveal the 



end result when using A options. Save 
R4 and type NEW. 

Key in R5. The only change is the 
removal of the two EPs in Line 16. By 
adding the long side of the angle, FA, 
and the short side, G2, to the previous 
program, we alter the appearance of the 
design considerably. Run. 

To make the design symmetrical, 
change G2 to G4. If you want to save 
both variations, mask Line 16 and 
create 17 A$~"BM12B , 96U4R4F4 
G4L4". Make a comment at the end of 
Line 0, TWO VARIATIONS AT 16-17, as 
a reminder. Save A5. 

R5 is a linear descendant of ADE5IGN. 
You saw it evolve, generation after 
generation. Changing values and steps 
in the loop in Line 15 will do wonders. 
So will changing the shape of the design 
element in Line 17. 

Consider a minor change in Line 17. 
Change R4 to R3 and run. Did you see 
the difference? No? Well, change R3 to 
R2 and run. What happens when you 
change R2 to R? The change is dramatic. 

Only one direction, R, was altered 
while the others remained constant. 
Can you imagine all the possibilities 
available to be manipulated and ex- 
plored? 

By constant experimentation, you 
may luck into a unique display that may 
be worth saving for posterity. More 
importantly, the resultant display may 
give you ideas to pursue and suggest 
new channels for investigation. Your 
mind may be jogged into developing a 
new approach. 

Just one last change. (See how addic- 
tive experimentation can become?) 
Change R to E4 and run. 

These casual, unpremeditated 
changes can, and often do, lead to 
unintentional but superb designs. 

One more and that's it. Promise! 
Change Line 15 to STEP -2 and run. One 
more, OK? Change F4 to BF4 and run. 

You see, there is no end. Try changing 
Line 15 to STEP-3 and then STEP-1. 

Whew! There are so many things to 
check out. It seems the more alterations 
or modifications you make, no matter 
how trivial the change, the more you are 
lead remorselessly from one generation 
to the next. I hate to admit it, but we 
have progressed through about 12 
generations from ADE5IGN with no end 
in sight. 

I was compelled to turn CoCo off or 
this tutorial would never be completed. 
1 leave it to you to have fun, burning the 
midnight oil, creating all kinds of 
goodies that may have been based on 
the seeds scattered here. □ 

June 1987 THE RAINBOW 97 



NEW 

DISK 
DRIVES 



Starting at 




89 



95 



with case & 
Power Supply 
129.95 



TANDON MPI TEAC 

Speed 6ms tk to tk and up 
Capacity 250k unformatted 
Tracks 40 

Warranty DOW 1 Year 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!! 

ALL DRIVES FULLY TESTED AND WARRANTEED 

We carry only the finest quality disk drives 
no seconds • no surplus 



New Low Price! 




hi! 



s 



40 Tks 6Ms 
Double Sided 
Double Density 



40 or 80 Tracks 
V2 Hght. Teac/Panasonic 




Free Software for Drive O Systems 



C0C0 Checker ...Test roms, rams, disk drives and & controller printer, keyboard cassette & more. 
Tape/Disk Utility—Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



169 



95 



Drive 0 



189 



95 



Drive 0 



289 



95 



Drive 0 & 1 



• Full Ht Drive 

• Single Case 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Coniroller & manuals 



• Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



2 Double Sided Slim Line Drive 
Case holds 2 slim line drives 
Heavy Duty Power Supply 
2 Drive Cable 
Gold plated contacts 
Controller & Manuals 



Other Drive Specials 
119 



95 



2nd Drive 

for new Radio Shack 
includes: 

• Slim Line DS/DD Drive 

• Cabling & Instructions 

• Mounting Hardware 



Drives cleaned, aligned & tested, 29 95 



Full Ht Drive 89 95 

Full Ht Drive Ps/Case... 129 95 

Slim Line Drive 99 95 

Slim Line Drive Ps/Case... 139 95 
2 Slim Drives Ps/Case. 239 95 
Disk Controller 59 95 



Single Ps & Case 

Dual V 2 ht Ps & Case 

Dual Full Ht. Ps & Case 
Disk Controller 



10 Diskettes 

with free library case 



4495 

54 95 
79 95 
59 95 

9 95 



Dealer Inquiries Invited 
617-278-6555 




VTIA 





TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 



We welcome 

• Visa/Mastercard _ 

• Checks (allow 2 weeks for clearing) 
•C.O.D. Add $2. 



9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 

Hours: Mon.-Sat, 9-6 (EST) 



Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-O30O 



Software Included 

• Pc-Write word processor 

• Pc-Calc Spreadsheet 

• Pc-File Database 

• Print Spooler 

• Ram Disk 

• Runs all popular software 



IBM XT 
COMPATIBLE 



Complete 
system 



only 



699 



95 



Hardware Included 

4.77 mhz and 8mhz Turbo 
360k Floppy Disk Drive 
Monochrome or Color Card 
At style Case w/pwr light & key 
Game, Printer and Serial Port 
Real Time Clock 
150 watt power supply 
640k memory 

At keyboard optional expanded 
Monochrome Monitor 
Optional Hard Disk Drive 




m 

PRINTERS 



PRINTER CABLES AND 
INTERFACES AVAILABLE 
CafJ for current pricing 




NP10 (New 100 CPS NLQ 80 col.) 
NX10 (New 120CPS NLQ 80 col.) 
NX15 (New 120CPS NLQ 132 col.) 
Power Type (18CPS Daisy Wheel) 



189 95 
21 9 95 
379 95 
249 95 



Complete Packages 




Serial to Parallel Interface 
for Color Computer I, II, 

• 300-19,200 BAUD rates only 

• External to printer — No AC plugs _ — - _ 

• Built in modem/printer switch — 
No need for Y-cables or plugging/ 
unplugging cables 




Power supply + 5.00 



64K Upgrades 


19 95 


Video Driver 


29 95 


Enables your CoCo to operate 


with a video monitor 


instead of a television! 





NP10 249 95 

includes: 

•Star NP10 Printer 

• Interface 

• Screen Dump Program 



NX10 279 95 

includes: 

•Star NX10 Printer 

• Interface 

• Screen Dump Program 




TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 

9 South Main Street 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 
617-278-6555 




Screen Dump Program 19 95 

The best screen dump program for the Epson & 
Star printers ever!! Have the option of standard 
images reverse w/regular or double sized pictures. 

Dealer Inquiries invited 
617-278-6555 

Call us today! 617-278-6555 

Order Toll Free 1-800-635-0300 



Listing 1: 

0 '<LISTING1> 11-28-' 86 

100 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 

104 GOTO110 

105 FORZ=1TO40 : NEXT : RETURN 

106 FORZ=1TO50: NEXT: RETURN 

107 FOR Z=l TO 150: NEXT: RETURN 
lip CIRCLE (13/3,98) ,50,1, .8 

111 CIRCLE (80,96) ,10,1, .9, .25, .7 
5 

112 CIRCLE (180, 96) ,10,1, .9, .75, . 
25 

113 DRAWBM130 , 58H3E3H3E3H3E3H3 " 

114 DRAWBM105 , 66U2H4U4H4" : DRAW" 
BM155 ,66U2E4U4E4" 

115 DRAW"BM127 , 95BLD9F3R5E3U9 " 

116 DRAW"C1BM112, 118F3M+15 , 7R5M+ 
15,-7E3U2" 

117 DRAW"BM114 , 89C1BL2E2R5F2G2L5 
H2BR30E2R5F2G2L5H2" 

120 A$="C1BL2E5R7F5G5L7H5" 

121 B$="C1BL2E2R5F2G2L5H2" 

122 C$="C0BL2E2R5F2G2L5H2" 

12 5 DRAWBM110 , 90"+A$ : DRAWBM140 
,90"+A$:GOTO200 

130 GOSUB107 : DRAW"BM114 , 90"+B$ : D 
RAW"BM144,90"+B$ 

131 GOSUB107 : DRAW"BM114 , 90"+C$ : D 
RAWBM144 , 90 "+C$ : RETURN 

200 X=RND(4): ON X GOTO 201,202, 
203,204 

201 GOSUB130:GOSUB700:GOSUB1100: 
GOT0125 

202 GOSUB130:GOSUB600:GOTO125 

203 GOSUB1000:GOSUB500:GOTO117 

204 GOSUB130:GOSUB500:GOSUB1200: 
GOT0125 

500 DRAWC0BM112 , 118FEM+15 , 7R5M+ 
15 , -7E3 " : GOSUB800 : GOSUB105 : DRAW" 
C1BM112 , 118FEM+15 , 7R5M+15 , -7E3 " : 
RETURN 

600 F0RY=1T03 : DRAWC0BM130 , 58H3E 
3H3E3H3E3H3 " : GOSUB106 : DRAW"C1BM1 
30, 58E3H3E3H3E3H3E3" :DRAW"C0BM13 
0, 58E3H3E3H3E3H3E3" : DRAW"C1BM130 
, 58H3E3H3E3H3E3H3 " : NEXT : RETURN 
700 FOR Y=1T02 : DRAW" C0BM109 , 8J3E2 
R9F2BR18E2R9F2 11 : GOSUB106 : DRAW'Cl 
BM109 , 78E2R9F2BR18E2R9F2 " : GOSUB1 
06 : DRAW"C0BMip9 , 78E2R9F2BR18E2R9 
F2" :GOSUBip6:DRAW"ClBMip9,80E2R9 
F2BR18E2R9F2 " : NEXT : RETURN 

800 X=RND(8): ON X GOTO 8j31,8j32, 
8j33,8j34,8j35,8j36,8j37,8j38 

801 PLAY"02V25L16ACEF" : RETURN 

802 PLAY"O3V30L16CEFA" : RETURN 

803 PLAY"O4V20L32EFAC" : RETURN 



804 PLAY "05 V30L3 2 CAFE ": RETURN 

805 PLAY"O5V20L3 2 FCEA" : RETURN 

806 PLAY"O2V30L16FCAE": RETURN 

807 PLAY "O3V20L32EACF": RETURN 

808 PLAY"O5V30L3 2 FACE ": RETURN 

900 CIRCLE(80,96) ,10,0, .9, .25, .7 
5: CIRCLE (180, 96) , 10,0, .9, .75, .25 
: CIRCLE (80, 96) , 10, 1,1.1, .25, .75: 
CIRCLE (180, 96) ,10,1,1.1, .75, .25: 
GOSUB105 : CIRCLE (80, 96) ,10, 0,1.1, 
.25, .75: CIRCLE (180, 96) ,10,0,1.1, 
.75, .25 

901 CIRCLE(80,96) ,10,1, .9, .25, .7 
5: CIRCLE (180, 96) ,10,1,. 9,. 75,. 25 
: RETURN 

1000 DRAW"C0BM127 , 95BLD9F3R5E3U9 
" : DRAW"C1BM127 , 95BLBD2D14F3R5E3U 
14" : GOSUB800 :GOSUB107 : DRAW"C0BM1 
27 , 95BLBD2D14F3R5E3U14 " : DRAW'CIB 
M127, 95BLD9F3R5E3U9" : RETURN 
1100 F0RX=1T03 : DRAW"C0BM105 , 66U2 
H4U4H4" :DRAW"C0BM155, 66U2E4U4E4" 
:DRAW"C1BM105, 66U2E4U4E4" :DRAW"C 
1BM155 , 66U2H4U4H4" : GOSUB106 : DRAW 
"C0BM105 , 66U2E4U4E4" : DRAW"C0BM15 
5 , 66U2H4U4H4" : DRAW"C1BM105 , 66U2H 
4U4H4 " : DRAWC1BM155 , 6 6U2E4U4E4 " : 
NEXT : RETURN 

1200 DRAW"C0BM105, 66U2H4U4H4" :DR 
AW"C0BM155, 6 6U2E4U4E4" :DRAW"C1BM 
105,66U2H4U4E4" : DRAW" C1BM155 , 66U 
2E4U4H4 " : GOSUB10 6 

1201 DRAWC0BM105, 66U2H4U4E4" : DR 
AWC0BM155 , 6 6U2E4U4H4" : DRAW "C IBM 
105,66U2H4U4H4" : DRAWC1BM155 , 6 6U 
2E4U4E4" : RETURN 

Listing 2: 

0 '<LISTING2> 11-29-' 86 

1 'MEM 5154 

100 PM0DE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,1 

101 DRAWS8BM48 , 28U6F3E3D6BR3U6R 
4D4L2NL2F2BR2RBR5 U6NL2R2BR3NR4D 
3NR3D3R4BR3U6R4D4NL4D2BR6U3NU3R2 
NE3F3BR3 NR4U3NR3U3R4BR3R2NR2D6 
BR7U6NL2R2 BR3D6R3BR3 NR4U3NR3U3R4 
S4" 

102 DRAWC1BM118, 170U6R3FD4GNL2B 
R5U6R3FD2GL3BRF2BR5NU6BR5U6R3FD2 
GL3 " 

104 GOTO109 

105 FORZ=1TO40: NEXT: RETURN 

106 FORZ=1TO50: NEXT: RETURN 

107 FOR Z=l TO 150: NEXT: RETURN 

109 DRAWC1BM109 , 80E2R9F2BR18E2R 
9F2" 

110 CIRCLE (130, 98) ,50,1, .8 

111 CIRCLE(80,96) ,10,1, .9, .25, .7 

5 



100 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



DataPack II Plus V4. 1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTOPILOTind AUTO-LOS Commind Processors 
X-MODEM DISK FILE TRANSFER SUPPORT 
VT-IOO & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

* No lomt dot* using Mi-R«« Display, £v»n at I 200 Baud on the Eoriol port. 

8 Q Hi-Res Displays, 28 to 255 columns by 24 lines &» true Upper/Lower case. 

* 4SK Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display and Disk 
« ASCI! & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 

* Directly record receive data to a disk file while online. 

* VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems, 

« VT-i 00/52 cursor keys & position, insert/delete, PF & Alt. Kbd. keys. 

* Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates 300 to 0600. 

* Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

* Send full 1 28 character set from Keyboard with control codes 

* Complete Editor. Insert, Delete, Change or Add to Buffer. 

* 0 Variable lengln^ Programmable Macro key buffers. 

* Programmable Printer rates from HQ to 0600 Baud. 

* Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Key Buffers or disk. 
a Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

* Freeze Oisplay & Review information On line with no loss of data. 

* Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 
« And much, much more. 

Supports: Word-Pak I, !l, ft.S. and Double Density 60 Column Cards 
Disto Controller w/80 column card &■ parallel printer 
P8J Parallel Printer Card and Dual Serial Port (2SP-Pak) 
R. S. Modem-Pakfc Deluxe RS-232Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 52K & Di3k, Only $59.95 



Hl-RES II Screen Commander 

Tired of looking at the 16 line by 32 character display on your 
CoCo? Wish you could see more lines and characters? Then HI-RES II 
is the answer, it can give you the big screen display you've always 
wanted. It will display 24 lines of 32, 42, 51, 64 and even 85 true 
upper and lower case characters per line without extra hardware. 

HI-RES li is the most powerful screen enhancement package available 
f or the Color Computer, yet it is the least expensive. It is completely 
compatible and transparent to Basic. Once the program is loaded, 
everything works the same as before, only you have a much better 
display to work with, it even allows you to have mixed text and 
Hi-resolution graphics on the same screen or have separate text and 
graphics screens. It also has an adjustable automatic key repeat 
feature and allows you to protect up to 23 lines on the screen. 

HI-RES II features over 30 special control code functions that allow 
you to change characters per line, protect display lines, change 
background color, position cursor, switch normal/reverse video, 
underline, double size characters, erase line/screen/to end of 
screen, home cursor, character highlight and much more. It works on 
all models of the CoCo with 16, 32 or 64K and provides automatic 
reset control so HI-RES II won't disappear when you press reset. 

24.95 on Tepe or $29.95 on Disk 



"The Source" 

Now you can easily Disassemble Color Computer machine language 
programs directly from disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
Source Code. And "The Source" has all the features and functions you 
are looking for in a Disassembler. 

* Automatic Label generation and allows specifying FCB, FCC and FOB areas. 

* Disassembles programs directly from Disk or ROM. 

* Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen orboih. 

* Generates Assembler source files directly to disk . or a printed listing, 

* Generated source files are in standard ASCI! formal. 

* Built in Hex/ASCII dump/display to locate FCB, FCC and FOB areas. 

* Built in Disk Directory and Kill file commands. 

* Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

* Written tn fast machine language, one of the easiest to use Disassemblers 

Requires 32K Disk $34,95 



TEXTPRO III 
"The Advanced Word Processing System" 

* 0 Hi-Res Displays from 28 to 255 columns by 24 lines & Upper/Lower Case 

* Three Programmable Header lines that can be re-defined at anytime. 

* Programmable Footer line &. Automatic Footnote System. 

* I 0 Programmable Tab stops & 7 Powerfull Tab Function Commands. 

* Completely Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left and right. 

* On screen display of underline and Double size characters. 

* Change indents, margins, line length, etc. parameters anytime in the text. 

* Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to the size of a full disk. 

* Easily Imbed any number of format and control codes. 

* Automatic Memory sense 1 6-64K with up to of memory workspace. 

* Fully supports the use of 80 column hardware cards. 

TEXTPRO HI is an advanced word processing system designed for 
speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is not like 
most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking f or a simple word processor to write 
letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be better off 
with one of the other simpler word processors. But, if you want a 
powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex 
formating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO 111 is what your 
looking f or. TEXTPRO works in a totally diff ©rent way than most 
word processing programs. It uses simple 2 character abbreviations 
of words or phrases f or commands and formatting information that 
you imbed directly in your text. There are over 50 different 
formating commands you can use without ever leaving the text your 
working on. There are no time comsuming, and often furstrating 
menu chases, you are in total control at all times. The formatted 
output can be displayed directly on the screen, showing you exactly 
what your printed document will look like before a single word is ever 
printed. This includes margins, headers, footers, page numbers, page 
breaks, underlining, column formating and full justification. 

DISK $59.95 TAPE $49.95 



The CB AS I C Editor/Compiler Vl.1.2 
Do you want to write fast machine language programs butyou 
don't want to spend the next few years trying to learn how ??? 
Well with CBASIC, you could be writing them right now! 

CBASIC is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and program 
editing system available f or the Color Computer. It will allow you to 
take full advantage of all the capabilities available in your color 
computer without having to spend years trying to learn assembly 
language programming. CBASIC allows you to create, edit and 
convert programs from a language you are already familiar with 
Extended Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine language 
programs easily and quickly. We added advanced features like a full 
blown program editor, Hi-Res text Displays and 80 column hardware 
support for editing, compiling and your compiled programs. Plus we 
made it exceptionally easy to use, CBASIC is the friendliest and 
easiest compiler available for the Color Computer. 

The most complete E dit or/Compiler I have seen for t he CoCo.. . ' 

- - The RAINBOW, March I 036 

CBASIC is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced 
Basic or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs 
without having to worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory 
allocation and so on, because CBASIC will do it f or you automatically. 
Or, CBASIC will )et you control every aspect of your program, even 
generating machine code directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC features well over 100 compiled Basic Commands and 
Functions that f ully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, 
Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. CBASIC supports ALL the High and Low 
Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play and String Operations available in 
Extended Color Basic, including Graphics GET. PUT, PLAY and DRAW, 
all with 99.952 syntax compatibility. CBASIC also supports the built 
in Serial I/O port with separate printer & serial 1/0 baud rates. You 
can send and receive data with PRINT, INPUT and INKEY commands. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor 

which allows you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. 

It is a full featured editor designed specifically for writing and editing 

Basic programs. It has block move &. copy, program renumbering, 

automatic line numbers, screen editing, printer control and more. 
"The Editor is a very good one and could be the subject for re view- 
all by itself... " - - The RAINBOW, March I 086 
"Comparing EC B's edit mode to CBASIC s text editor is like comparing a 
World War 1 1 jeep to a modern sedan Both get you to your destination^ 
but what a difference in the ride. --Mot CoL o, F eburary I 080 

The documentation f or CBASIC is an 8 1/2 * 11 Spiral Bound book 

which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. 

"C8A SICs manual is easy to read and written with a minimum of 
technicalese. " --Hot CoCo Febrvsry , 1 036 

The price of CBASIC is $ 1 49.00. It is the most expensive Color 
Basic Compiler on the market, and well worth the investment. 
Compare the performance of CBASIC against any Color Basic 
compiler. Dollar for dollar, CBASIC gives you more than any other 
compiler available. Requires 64K & Disk, not JDOS compatible. 

The price tag it carries seemed a bit steep for an integer compiler on first 
glance \ but when you add 64 k', hi-res drivers, and full-screen editing, CBASIC 
begins t o look more like a bargain. " -- Hot CoCo febrvary, f086 
"A Complete Editor/Compiler Welt Worth its Price" - -RAIN8QW March 1 036 



EDT/ASM 64D 
64K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM 64D Is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler. 
It has a Hi-Resolution 51. 64 or 85 column by 24 line display, so you 
see your program listings easily and it supports Column cards. The 
disk also contains a f ree standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug 
your assembled programs. 

This is the most powerfull, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/ Assembler package for the Color Computer. It even has 
automatic line number generation for easy entry of program material, 

* Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

* Full screen line editing with immediate line update. 
" Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

* Load&Save standard ASCII formatted Tape/Disk files. 
" Move or Copy single k multiple text lines. 

* Create and Edit disk files larger than memory. 

* Hi-Res Text Display 26 to 85 columns by 24 lines. 

* Supports Word-Pak ) ,11. & R.S. and Disto 80 column display cards. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM 64D features include: 

* Supports the full 680Q instruction set. 

* Supports conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

* Supports Disk Library files (include) 

* Supports standard motorola assembler directives 

* Allows multiple values for FOB & FCB directives. 

* Generates listings to Hi-Res text screen or printer. 

* Assembles directly to disk or tape in LOADM format. 

* Supports up to 0 open disk files during assembly. 

* Allows assembly from editor buffer, Disk or both. 

The freestanding DEBUG program provided includes: 

■ Examine and change the contents of memory. 

* Set, Remove and display up to ! 0 breakpoints in memory. 

* Display/Change processor register contents. 

* Move a Block of memory or Fill Memory range with specified data. 

* Search memory range for data pattern. 

* Oisa ssemhle memory range into op-code format. 

Requires 32SC Disk $59.95 



To order products by mai I, send check or money order for the amount of 

?urchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below, 
o order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call usa t (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST). 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
702-452-0632 



112 DRAW M C1BM179, 9)3M+2)3 , 5F2D8L6U 
3L16" 

113 DRAW"BM13)3,58H3E3H3E3H3E3H3" 

114 DRAW M BM1)35 , 66U2H4U4H4" : DRAW" 
BM155, 66U2E4U4E4" 

115 DRAWBM127, 95BLD1)3F3R5E3U1)3 M 

116 DRAW M C1BM112 , 118F3M+15 , 7R5M+ 
15,-7E3U2" 

117 DRAW M BM114 , 89C1BL2E2R5F2G2L5 
H2BR3)3E2R5F2G2L5H2 11 

118 DRAW M BM124, 138D1)3M-15 , -5D15M 
+15 , -5NU5ND5R12NU5ND5M+15 , 5U15M- 
15,5NL12NU1)3 M 

119 F$ = M M-3,5F2RE2M-3,-5 M 

12) 3 A$= M C1BL2E5R7F5G5L7H5 M 

121 B$= M C1BL2E2R5F2G2L5H2 M 

122 C$ = M Cj3BL2E2R5F2G2L5H2 M 

12 5 DRAW 11 BM11)3 , 9)3 M +A$ : DRAW 11 BM14 fS 
,9)3 M +A$:GOT02)3)3 

13) 3 G0SUB1)37 : DRAW M BM114 , 9)3 "4- B$ : D 
RAWBM144, 9)3 M +B$ 

131 G0SUB1)37 : DRAW M BM114 , 9)3 M +C$ : D 
RAW 11 BM144,9)3 M +C$: RETURN 
2)3)3 X=RND(5): ON X GOTO 2)31,2)32, 
2)33 , 2)34 , 2)35 

2)31 GOSUB13)3:GOSUB7)3)3:GOSUBll)3)3: 
GOT0125 

2)32 GOSUB13j3:GOSUB6j3j3:GOSUB13j3j3: 
GOT0125 

2)33 GOSUBl)3)3)3:GOSUB5)3)3:GOT0117 
2)34 GOSUB13)3:GOSUB5)3)3:GOSUB12)3)3: 
GOT0125 

2) 35 GOSUB9)3)3:GOSUB3)3)3:GOT012 5 

3) 3)3 DRAW M C1BM198 , 1)33 M + F$ : GOSUBl)3 

5 : DRAW M C)3BM198 , 1)3 3 M + F$ : DRAW" C IBM 
198, 113 M +F$ :GOSUB8)39: DRAW" C)3BM19 
8, 113 ,I +F$:DRAW II C1BM198, 12 3"+F$:G 
OSUB8)39 : DRAW M C)3BM198 , 123 M + F$ : DRA 
W M C1BM198 , 133 M +F$ : GOSUB8)39 : DRAW" 
C)3BM198,133 M + F$ 

3)31 DRAW M C1BM198, 144 M + F$ : GOSUB8)3 
9 : DRAW M C)3BM198 , 144 M +F$ : FOR X=5TO 
15: CIRCLE (2)3)3 ,16)3) ,X,1, .3:NEXT:G 
OSUB8 1)3 : FORX=15T05STEP-l : CIRCLE ( 

2) 3)3,16)3) ,X,)3, .3:NEXT:GOSUB811:RE 
TURN 

5) 3)3 DRAW M C)3BM112 , 118FEM+15 , 7R5M+ 
15 , -7E3 » : GOSUB8)3)3 : G0SUB1)35 : DRAW" 
C1BM112 , 118FEM+15 , 7R5M+15 , -7E3 " : 
RETURN 

6) 3)3 F0RY=1T03 : DRAW M C)3BM13)3 , 58H3E 
3H3E3H3E3H3 » : GOSUBl)3 6 : DRAW M C1BM1 

3) 3, 58E3H3E3H3E3H3E3 11 : DRAW M C)3BM13 
)3, 58E3H3E3H3E3H3E3 11 :DRAW M C1BM13)3 
, 58H3E3H3E3H3E3H3 11 : NEXT : RETURN 
7pp R=RND(4):FOR Y=1T0R: DRAW M C)3B 
M1^9, 8)3E2R9F2BR18E2R9F2 M :GOSUBl)3 

6 : DRAW M C1BM1)39 , 78E2R9F2BR18E2R9F 



2" :G0SUB1)36: DRAW M C)3BM1)39, 78E2R9F 
2BR18E2R9F2 11 : G0SUB1)36 : DRAW 11 C1BM1 
)39 , 8 )3E2R9F2BR18E2R9F2 11 : NEXT : RETU 
RN 

8)3)3 X=RND(8) : ON X GOTO 8)31,8)32, 
8)33, 8)34, 8)35, 8)36,8)37, 8)38 
8)31 PLAY M 02V25L16ACEF M : RETURN 
8)32 PLAY II 03V3)3L16CEFA 11 : RETURN 
8)33 PLAY II 04V2)3L3 2EFAC 11 : RETURN 
8)34 PLAY II 05V3)3L3 2CAFE 11 : RETURN 
8)35 PLAY"05V2)3L32FCEA 11 : RETURN 
8)36 PLAY"02V3)3L16FCAE 11 : RETURN 
8)37 PLAY II 03V2)3L32EACF 11 : RETURN 
8)38 PLAY II 05V3)3L3 2FACE 11 : RETURN 

8) 39 PLAY M 05V25L128B-GP4 M :RETURN 
81)3 PLAY II 04V3)3L16G 11 : RETURN 

811 PLAY II 02V3)3L16G 11 :RETURN 

9) 3)3 CIRCLE(8)3, 96) , 1)3,)3, .9 , . 25, .7 
5: CIRCLE (8)3, 96) , 1)3, 1,1.1, .25, .75 
: G0SUB1)35 : CIRCLE (8)3, 96) ,1)3,)3,1.1 
, .25, .75:GOSUBl)35:CIRCLE(8^,96) , 
1)3, 1, .9, . 2 5, . 75:PLAY M 03L16CEGL80 
4CL1603GL404C" : RETURN 

1)3)3)3 DRAW M C)3BM127 , 95BLD1)3F3R5E3U 

I) 3" :DRAW M C1BM127,95BLBD2D1)3F3 BR 
3BD6NM-16,3NM+16,2BU6BL3 R5E3U1)3 
11 : GOSUB8)3)3 : G0SUB1)37 : DRAW M C)3BM127 
,95BLBD2D1)3F3 BR3BD6NM-16 , 3NM+16 
, 2BU6BL3 R5E3U1)3 M : DRAW M C1BM127 , 9 
5BLD1)3F3R5E3U1)3 11 : RETURN 

II) 3)3 F0RX=1T03:DRAW M C)3BM1)35, 66U2 
H4U4H4" : DRAW M C)3BM155, 66U2E4U4E4 11 
: DRAW M C1BM1)35 , 6 6U2E4U4E4" : DRAW 11 C 
1BM155 , 66U2H4U4H4 11 : G0SUB1)36 : DRAW 
M C)3BM1)35 , 6 6U2E4U4E4" : DRAW M C)3BM15 
5, 66U2H4U4H4" : DRAW M C1BM1)35 , 66U2H 
4U4H4" : DRAW M C1BM155 , 66U2E4U4E4" : 
NEXT : RETURN 

12)3)3 DRAW M C)3BM1)35, 66U2H4U4H4" : DR 
AW M C)3BM155, 66U2E4U4E4" : DRAW 11 C IBM 
1)35, 66U2H4U4E4" : DRAW M C1BM155 , 66U 
2E4U4H4" :G0SUB1)36 

12) 31 DRAW M C)3BM1)35, 66U2H4U4E4" : DR 
AW M C)3BM155, 66U2E4U4H4" : DRAW" C1BM 
1)35, 6 6U2H4U4H4" : DRAW M C1BM155 , 66U 
2E4U4E4" : RETURN 

13) 3)3 DRAW M C)3BM12 4 , 138D1)3M-15 , -5D 
15M+15 , -5NU5ND5R12NU5ND5M+15 , 5U1 
5M-15,5NL12NU1)3 M : LINE ( 116 , 148) - 
(146,188) , PRESET, BF 

13)31 DRAW M C1BM124 , 142NU4D14M-15 , 
-5D15M+15 , -5NU9ND8R12NU9ND8M+15 , 
5U15M-15, 5NL12NU18" : PLAY M 01V3)3L6 
4CDEFGABC" : G0SUB1)37 
13)32 DRAW M C)3BM12 4, 142NU4D14M-15 , 
-5D15M+15 , -5NU9ND8R12NU9ND8M+15 , 
5U15M-15 , 5NL12NU18 11 : DRAW M C1BM124 
, 138D1)3M-15 , -5D15M+15 , -5NU5ND5R1 



102 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



i w no 



TEXT PRO I 1 1-3 
"The Advanced Word Processing System* 

* 8 Displays from 32/40/64^0 coiLrrreby 24 lines 1 92 (r 225 Resolution. 

* Three [^oc/arrmable l-teader lives that can be rt-defined at anytime. 

* Rxgiirf r^e Footer lire & Automatic Footnote System. 

* 10 R^znrTiabte Tab stops & 7 Powerful! Tab Function Commands. 

* arrpjrjjiiy ALtoatk Justification, Cenlfinng. Flush \qH and n$i . 

* On screen display ofurdarlro and Double size characters. 

* Charge indents, margins, line length, etc. parameters anytime in the text. 

* Create and Edit Hies largar !hn memory, up to the size of a full disk ( 1 56K). 

* Easily imbed any ruiter of format and control cooes. 

* &ithUlraFart2drive RATUEiK fr5l2Kauppai. 

TEXTPRO II! is an advanced word processing system designed for 
speed, taxability and extensive document processing. It is not like 
mostof the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer, ff you are looking for a simple word processor to write 
letters or other short documents, then most likely you'll be better 
off with one of the other simpler word processors. But, if you want 
a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex 
formating problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO III is what 
your looking for. TEXTPRO works in a totally different way than 
most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 character 
abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and f ormatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 
50 different formating commands you can use without ever leaving 
the text your working on. There are no time comsuming, and often 
furstroting menu chases, you are in total control at all times. The 
formatted output can be displayed directly on the screen, showing 
you exactly what your printed document will look like before a 
single word is ever printed. This includes margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, underlining, column formating 
and f ull justification. 

Requires 128/512K & DISK $59.95 

EDT/ASM I I I 
128/512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor 8c Assembler. 
It is similar to our EDT/ASM 64D for the COCO I & 2 but designed 
to take advantage of the new features of the COCO 3. It has 8 
Display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 lines in 192 or 
225 Resolution, so you can use the best display mode whether you 
are using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your 
display. Plus you can select any f oreground and backbround colors 
or even color or monochrome display modes, It even supports 5 1 2K 
by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fast RAMDISK for lightning 
fast assembly of program source code larger than memory. The 
disk also contains a f rea standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you 
debug your assembled programs. See our other Advertisement for 
information on some of the advanced features supported in the 
Editor, Assembler and Debugger. 

Requires 12B/512K & Disk $59,95 

512K RAM UPGRADE 
Assembled & Tested w/120 nsec RAM 

Give your COCO 3 all the power i t deserves with this easy to install 
(no soldering/plug in) 100% Tandy compatible 512K memory 
upgrade. Completely assembled and tested (in a COCO-3), not like 
some upgrades that give you a bare board and a set of ram chips to 
assemble & test yourself, (upgrade without RAM $49.95) 

Now only $99.95 Assembled & Tested 

Ultra Hi-Speed 5 1 2K RAMDISK 
and MEMORY Tester 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 
ULTRA High Speed Ram Disks in your 51 2K COCO III. It does not 
need or require [he GS-9 operating system, it work's with R.5. DOS 
VI .0 or V 1.1 and it is completely compatible with Enhanced Color 
Disk Basic!!! Plus it allows your 512K C0C0-3 to run at double 
speed all the time even for floppy disk access!!! The MEMORY 
tester is a fast Machine Language program to test the 5 1 2K 
COCO-3. II performs several bit tests as we}) as an address test so 
you know that your 512K of memory is working perfectly. 

Requires 512K & DISK $19.95 
COMING SOON 

Maybe even by the time you read this!!! 

TEXTPRO IV- Word Processor with ONScreenUnderlining, Italics, 
Bold and Double Width display. What you see is what you get. 
THE SOURCE-3- Disassembler Source Generator better than ever. 
CBASIC3 - With Enhanced Graphics & 512K RAM support plus more! 



Data Pack Mi Plus V 1 . 1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
AUTOP ILOTand AUTO-LOG Command Processors 
X-MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT- I 00 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 



• rbl()std3taevaiat24X)Baudonl]ie CC0>3Seriai l/Optrt 

• 8 Selectable Display Formats. 32/40/64/80 columns at 1 92 cr 225 Resolution. 

• 50K. Text&jffer when using lie i-c~Res Text Display and Disk . 

* ASCII & BINARY disk file tnreTer s^jcrt via XMCOEM. 

* DirecUy record racers data to a risk file white online (Data togging). 

* VT- 1 00 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

• VT-S 00/52 arsor keys & posiucn. insert/delete. PF & Alt. Kbd. keys. 

* nrograrmiableVML 

♦ Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled dote. 

* Send full !28chractjrsetfromKeytx3ar^wi^ oonfrol codes. 

# Complete Edbr, Insert Delete, Change or Add to Buffer. 

* g Vanite length, Pm^tmv^M Macro Key buffers. 

# Rrogrammable Printer raLas fnm 1 10 to 9600 Bar!. 

♦ Send Files oVectty from the Buffer, rtxro Key Buffers or Disk. 

• Display onScron or PrvL the contents of the Buffer. 

* Freeze Display & Review infornaUcn Ch line with no loss of data. 

• Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

♦ 8uiltin2DrT^RAT1)!SKr^ 

Supports: R. S. Modem-Pak 2* Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128/5 I 2K & Disk. Only $59.95 



HI RES III Screen Commander 

Now you can have up to 54 different character sizes on 
your COCO-3 screen at the same time!!! 

* 54 Different Character Sizes available Hto212cpl. 

♦ Sold, /{j//cor Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad Width characters. 

* full 96 Upper/Lower case characters. 

♦ Continious or Individual Character Highlighting. 

♦ Scroll Protect from 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

• Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN3 mode. 

♦ PRINT © available in all character sizes. 

* Programmable Automatic Key repeat. 

* Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

# Full Cursor Control command support. 

« Selectable Character & Background color. 

• Color or Monochrome Display modes. 

• Uses only AK of Extended or Basic ram. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES III was designed to improve the standard display capabilities 
of the Color Computer 3, even the AO and 80 column displays have 
several f eatures missing. For example you can't use PRINT O or 
have different character sizes on the same screen, even mixing 
text and graphics with the HPRINT command leaves a lot to be 
desired. HI-RES III can give you the kind of display capabilities you 
always dreamed about having on your color computer but didn't get 
with your COCO-3. Well now it's here and with a wide varieLy of 
display options that you cm easily use with your Basic or ML 
programs. HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color 
Basic and its operation is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the 
normal screen display with an extremely versatile display package. 
It also overcomes some of the disadvantages found when using the 
Width AO L 80 screens. You can use the Print ® function on any 
line length with HI-RES 111. It also gives you a programmable 
automatic key repeat that can be very handy for editing your Basic 
programs. Automatic key repeat can be adjusted from ultra fast to 
super slow and can be disabled entirely if desired. You also get a 
f ull control code keyboard using the 'CTRL' key. So many of HI-RES 
Ill's extended functions can be controlled directly from the keyboard 
easily. With just a couple of simple keystrokes you can change 
character- sizes and styles at any time. You can even switch back 

and forth bolwoon iho standard COCO-3 display and HI-RES Ml with a 

simple keyboard entry or under program control. But, after you 
use HI-RES III, you most likely won't want to do without it again. 

HI-RES III can be used for a wide variety of applications, with its 
many different character sizes and styles. You can make your 
program really look professional, wILh protected menus. Ooid or 
Italic emphasis, Double or Quad characters for easy to read displays 
& menus. It can be idealy suited for Video Titles or Store Displays, 
Printing Signs or Fliers in conjunction with a Hi-res Screen dump 
program. The visually impared will espically appreciate the extra 
large character sizes available. 

Requires I 2 8/5 1 2K Tops or Disk $34,95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of purchase, 
plus 13.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at {702) 452-06 32 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8om to 5pm PST). 

CER-COMP 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 891 10 

702-452-0632 



2NU5ND5M+15, 5U15M-15, 5NL12NU10" 
1303 DRAW I! C1BM118 , 170U6R3FD4GNL2 
BR5U6R3FD2GL3BRF2 BR5NU6BR5U6R3FD 
2GL3 11 : RETURN 



Listing 3: 

0 ! <ADESIGN> 

5 FOR P=0 TO 4 

10 PMODEP, 1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 

15 FOR X=l TO 40STEP2 

20 DRAW ,f A3S=X$ ; BM128 , 96U2R4D2L4 11 

2 5 NEXT 

35 FOR X=l TO 40 STEP2 

40 DRAW M A1S=X$ ; BM128 , 96U2R4D2L4 11 

45 NEXT 

55 FOR X=l TO 40 STEP2 

60 DRAW"A2S=X$ ; BM128 , 96U2R4D2L4 11 

65 NEXT 

75 FOR X=l TO 40 STEP2 

80 DRAW" A0S=OC$ ; BM12 8 , 9 6U2R4D2L4 11 

85 NEXT 

90 NEXTP 

100 GOT05 

Listing 4: 

0 ' <TWOKINDS> 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 

15 1 FOR X=20 TO 40 STEP RND ( 6 ) 'M 
ULTI 

16 FOR X=20 TO 2 4 STEP4 1 BLINKING 
NEON 

20 DRAW !I A3S=X;BM128, 96U2R4FGL4 11 
40 DRAW !I A1BM12 8, 9 6U2R4FGL4" 
60 DRAW fi A2BM128 , 96U2R4FGL4" 
80 DRAW !I A0BM128 , 96U2R4FGL4 11 
90 FOR Z=l TO 200: NEXTZ , X 
100 GOTO10 

Listing 5: 

0 ! <CROSS> 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 
15 FOR X=20 TO 4 STEP-3 
20 DRAW"A3S=X;BM130, 94U2R4FGL4" 
40 DRAW I! A1BM120 , 98U2R4FGL4" 
60 DRAW"A2BM116,90U2R4FGL4" 
80 DRAW lf A0BM13 4, 100U2R4FGL4 11 
90 FOR Z = l TO 200: NEXTZ , X 
100 GOTO10 

Listing 6: 
0 1 <A1> 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 
15 FOR X=20 TO 4 STEP-3 



20 DRAW !I A3S=X;BM12 8 , 96U4R4F2G2L4 
n 

40 DRAWA1BM12 8, 96U4R4F2G2L4 11 

60 DRAW 11 A 2 BM 12 8 , 96U4R4F2G2L4 11 

80 DRAW !I A0BM12 8, 96U4R4F2G2L4 11 

90 FOR Z=l TO 200: NEXTZ , X 
100 GOT01J3 

Listing 7: 
0 f <A2> 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREE Nl , 1 
15 FOR X=20 TO 4 STEP-3 

20 DRAW !I A3S=X; BM128 , 96U4E2F4G2L4 

n 

40 DRAW !? A1BM128 , 9 6U4E2 F4G2L4 11 

60 DRAW !I A2BM128,96U4E2F4G2L4 !I 

80 DRAW n A0BM12 8 , 9 6U4E2F4G2L4 11 

90 FOR Z=l TO 200: NEXTZ , X 
100 GOTO10 

Listing 8: 
0 ! <A3> 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 

15 FOR X=20 TO 4 STEP-4 

20 DRAW"A3S=X;BM128 , 96U4E2BF4BG2 

L4 fl 

40 DRAW"A1BM128 , 96U4E2BF4BG2L4" 
60 DRAW 11 A2BM12 8 , 9 6U4E2BF4BG2L4 11 
80 DRAW ,I A0BM128,96U4E2BF4BG2L4 !I 
90 FOR Z = l TO 200: NEXTZ , X 
100 GOTO10 

Listing 9: 

0 ! <A4> 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 

11 A$= !I BM128 , 96U4R4BF4BG2L4 11 
15 FOR X=20 TO 4 STEP-4 

20 DRAW'»A3S=X;»+A$ 

40 DRAW I! A1 !I +A$ 

60 DRAW 11 A 2 11 +A$ 

80 DRAW"A0"+A$ 

90 FOR Z=l TO 200: NEXTZ, X 

100 GOTO10 

Listing li: 
0 ! <A5> 

10 PMODE4,l:PCLS:SCREENl, 1 

15 FOR X=20 TO 4 STEP-4 

16 A$="BM128,96U4R4F4G2L4 !I 
20 DRAW lf A3S=X; !l +A$ 

40 DRAW I! A1 !I +A$ 

60 DRAW I! A2 !I +A$ 

80 DRAW f, A0 !l +A$ 

90 FOR Z=l TO 200: NEXTZ, X 

100 GOTO10 



104 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Uncompromisin g performance at an incredible price. 

The Tandy 
Color Computer 3 

More colors, superb graphics, 
greater power for only $ 219 95 





— 



■ 1 ■ * 



t fit i i.i i i i i iT'i 

■ .» ,1 .1 » J J .J I 1 I 
I f I t t f 1 






Our most powerful 
Color Computer 

Finally, the ideal computer for 
your family: our most advanced 
Color Computer ever. The Color 
Computer 3 is great for small 
business and home applications. 
You get the advantages of a high- 
priced computer — without the 
high price! 

A rainbow at your 
fingertips 

The Color Computer 3 fea- 
tures 128K memory (expandable 
to 512K), giving you greater 
programming power. With the 
CM-8 High-Resolution Monitor 
(26-3215), you can create razor- 
sharp graphics using 64 colors. 



The Color Computer 3's Ex- 
tended BASIC features 21 new 
commands that allow you to al- 
ternate screens, colors, and 
backgrounds — all at a higher 
resolution and with a greater va- 
riety of colors than any previous 
Color Computer. 

Compatible and 
expandable 

Best of all, the new Color 
Computer 3 is compatible with 
software and accessories de- 
signed for the Color Computer 
2, including a wide selection of 
educational, personal-manage- 
ment and game programs. Ex- 
pand with a modem or printer, 
or add a disk drive to create a 



sophisticated disk system and 
open the door to a library of ad- 
vanced disk software. 

The Color Computer 3 
(26-3334) is your affordable alter- 
native. See it today at Radio Shack. 




Send me an RSC-17B Computer Catalog 



Mail To: Radio Shack, Dept. 87-A-720 
300 One Tandy Cenler, Fori Worth. TX 76102 




_ 

Address 



City 



Stats 

Zip_ 




Radio /hack 



Price applies at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating stores and dealers. TU« I*** ^S^mma™ 

Monitor and accessories sold separately. 



The Technology Store 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



t 



More Graphics 

Speech 
and Education 



By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Editor's Note: If you have an idea for 
the " Wishing Well, " submit it to Fred 
c/o THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, and don 7 forget that 
this is BASIC. All programs resulting 
from your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 

Last month we introduced a new 
series of educational programs 
called Knowing Your Body. That 
first program, titled How Your Blood 
Works, combined some classy graphics 
that you might expect to find in an 
expensive software package with the 
added optional bonus of synthetic 
speech (using Tandy's Speech/ Sound 
Pak). All of these aspects were the result 
of reader requests for more practical 
uses of the Speech Pak, for more excit- 
ing educational programs, and the 
strong desire many of you still have to 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 




experiment with some creative graph- 
ics. Therefore, this month's "Wishing 
Well" offers Knowing Your Body II: 
How Your Heart Works. 

I mentioned I was working on a 



beating heart simulation that would 
knock your socks off. Well, it only made 
sense to incorporate that simulation 
into this series, since our first part dealt 
with the blood (see last month's issue for 



106 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Radio Shack has the*** 





♦♦♦best of everything! 



Unleash the true potential of your 
Color Computer with accessories 
from Radio Shack. 

Add a pair of joysticks (A, 26-3008, 
Pair/$19.95) for fast 360° movement 
or our Deluxe Joystick (B, 26-3012, 
$29.95) that adjusts to your touch, al- 
lowing "fine tuning". For maximum 
control of games and graphics, simply 
'Voll" the Color Mouse (C, 26-3025, 
$49.95) across a tabletop to accu- 
rately position the cursor. 

Maximize your Color Computer's 
power with the Multi-Pak Interface 
(D, 26-3124, $99.95). You can change 
programs instantly using the selector 
switch, or under program control. 



And you can connect disk drives or 
other accessories, too. 

Here are two more great-sounding 
accessories! The Sound/Speech Car- 
tridge (E, 26-3144, $79.95) adds 
three-voice sound and text to speech. 
The Orchestra-90 CC (F, 26-3143, 
$79.95), lets you create electronic 
music and sound effects. 

The 300-baud DC Modem Pro- 
gram Pak (G, 26-2228, $89.95) makes 
it possible to join the telecommuni- 
cations wave. Since the modem and 
software are built in, you can access 
information services by phone. Need 
more memory? Hard disk storage is 
yours with the Hard Disk Interface 
(H, 26-3145, $129.95)*. 



Come in to your local Radio Shack 
today for the accessories that make 
your Color Computer even more of a 
high performer! 



r 



Send me an RSC-17B 
Computer Catalog 

Mail To Radio Shack. Dept. 87-A-721 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102 



■I 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



Phone 





Radio /hack 



' Requires 64K, Multi-Pak Interlace, floppy disk with controller and OS-9 (2.0 or later). Prices apply at participat- 
ing Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating Radio Shack stores and dealers. Orchestra-90/TM Soft- 
ware Affair. 0S-9rfM Microware Corp. 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



an in-depth explanation of how these 
programs work). 

I have found that large print is usually 
very effective in presenting material to 
a student on a computer screen when 
only a small amount of text is displayed . 
In fact, several years ago I devised a 
large text word processor for one of my 
visually handicapped students that 
came in quite handy since he had great 
difficulty using a program like Color 
Scripsit. If enough readers are inter- 
ested, I may write up a new version of 
that program, since it is also very useful 
for small children. Let me know if it is 
something you would like to see. 

When Knowing Your Body was writ- 
ten, I took that large-text concept one 
step further by creating large-text 
graphics characters in a combined 
PMDDE2/ PMDDE1 graphics mode. This 
allowed me to draw chunkier letters 
while using just a fraction of the mem- 
ory PMDDE4 would take. Also, the lower 
resolution executes much more quickly. 

Making Movies 

I am sure that at some point in your 
life, you have tried the trick of drawing 
a set of pictures on the pages of a book 
that you would later flip through to 
show movement. This is the same tech- 
nique used to show the beating of our 
illustrated heart. First, the program will 
PCLEflR eight pages of graphics. When 
the time comes to draw the beats of our 
heart, we will use three full screens 
starting with pages 3 and 4, to pages 5 
and 6, and finally pages 7 and 8. These 
three screens we then alternately PCDPY 
to pages I and 2, which are the two 
pages (one screen) always displayed to 
the viewer. 



As these screens are copied to our 
viewing screen, the viewer is given the 
illusion of motion, much like a motion 
picture. This differs from the technique 
weused in last month's program. In that 
program (Blood), we showed a white 
blood cell attacking a foreign invader. 
That was done by drawing the f rame out 
of the user's view and then copying it to 
pages 1 and 2. This is an effective means 
of animation, but would not work well 
with a pumping heart. 

Instead, for our heart we have three 
separate drawings that are not redrawn 
each time we see them. They are saved 
on their own screens and simply copied 
to view. This allows us to get machine 
language speed from BASIC, since the 
PCDPY command in Extended Color 
BASIC is in fact a machine language 
subroutine in the CoCo's ROM. The 
authors of Microsoft BASIC were wise 
enough to include these hooks into 
machine language speed from BASIC. I 
haven't yet tried the graphics magic of 
the CoCo 3, but I understand even 
greater speed can be milked from BASIC 
with the new commands. 

Using the Program 

The operation of this program is just 
like last month's offering. Upon run- 
ning the program, some older CoCos 
may give a Syntax Error the first time 
through. This is caused by the PCLEflRB 
problem that later CoCo ROMs cor- 
rected. Running the program again will 
put everything as it should be. 

You will next be shown the standard 
title card, only this time the color 
settings will be slightly different. You 
will be asked to choose between talking 
or not by pressing T or N. This program 



does not need the Speech Pak by Tandy 
in order to be viewed. It will not talk, 
but you can still use it for other pur- 
poses, such as reading and viewing the 
material. 

Next, either a red or blue screen will 
appear. If the screen is blue, press reset 
and run the program again. If it is red, 
simply press ENTER to continue. If the 
Speech Pak is not used, the program 
will slowly pass through each screen. 
You may advance to the next screen and 
thus speed up the program by pressing 
ENTER after you finish reading a sec- 
tion. The talking mode will advance 
after each line has been spoken. 

At various points in the program, a 
cross section of the heart will be shown. 
In each case, an arrow will be inside the 
chamber being described and will point 
in the direction of blood flow. 

Once the screen is ready for the 
pumping illustration, you will be asked 
to press ENTjR to start. After the illus- 
tration is running, you may exit the 
illustration by pressing the space bar. 
You may again restart the program by 
pressing ENTER. 

Where Do We Go From Here? 

I hope some of you can come up with 
some other topics to cover in this series 
(the brain, teeth, lungs, etc.). I'll need 
some ideas on what will be useful topics 
to cover. It will be easy to adapt this 
format to educational material on any 
subject. (Maybe a session on U.S. 
history, including maps, would be one 
area to explore.) 

Until then, keep your ideas and re- 
quests coming. Maybe your suggestion 
will help open up a whole new world for 
other CoCo users. □ 



r 



Wf 12! 



50 . 
120 
225 
300 
345 
375 
420 



210 450 152 

.31 495 225 

122 520 155 

.32 570 85 

159 600 138 

.76 670 228 

166 END 244 



The listing: HEART 
J8 GOT0715 



T 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 



************************ 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



KNOWING YOUR BODY 
HOW YOUR HEART WORKS 
A GRAPHIC SIMULATION 
BY FRED B.SCERBO 
6)3 HARDING AVE. 
NORTH ADAMS, MA )31247 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 



* 
* 



************************ 



1) 3 CLEAR1)3)3)3:CLS)3:PRINTSTRING$(3 
2,156) ; 

15 FORI=lT02 8 8 : READA : IFA=)3THENA= 
16 

2) 3 PRINTCHR$ (A+112) ; :NEXT 
25 PRINTSTRING$ (32,147); 

3) 3 DATA, 93, 81, 94, ,93,91,84,94,85 
, 92, 92, 9)3, 93, 8)3, 85, ,85,88,92,94, 
88,84,95,82,93,88,94,92,92 , 93, , 
35 DATA85, 93, 82, ,85,84,91,9)3,85, 
, , 9)3 , , 9)3 , 9)3 , 9)3 , 9)3 , , , 9)3 , , , 9)3 , 93 , 8 
7 , ,9)3, ,83 ,83 ,, 

4) 3 DATA87, ,93,82,87, ,87,91,85,83 
,83,9)3, ,85, , 85, , ,83,91,82,81,9)3, 
81, 95, 82, 91, 83, 83, 86, 8)3, 8p 

45 DATA18, ,18,19,19,18,18, ,17,17 
,19,19,19, ,115,115,115,115, ,113, 
115,115, 115,113, 115,115, 114, 113, 



108 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



,113, , 

50 DATA2 6 , ,26,26, ,26,26, ,21,21, , 
,21, ,117, , ,117, ,117, , ,117,117, , , 

117,117,., 117, , 

55 DATA26, ,26,26, ,26,26, ,21,21,1 

6, ,21, ,,117, , ,117, ,117, , ,117,117, 
, ,117,117,112,117, , 

60 DATA20, 22, 16, 26, ,26,26, ,21,21 
,28,29,28, ,117,12 4,12 4, 124,125, 1 
17, ,,117,117, ,,117, ,121,120, , 
65 DATA, 26, ,26, ,26,26, ,21,21, ,20 
,26, ,117, , , ,117,117, , ,117,117, , , 
117,, 117,,, 

70 DATA, 26, ,27,19,26,27,19,23,21 
, , ,2 9,32,119,115, 115, 115,119, 117 
,115,115,119, 117,115,115,118, ,11 

7, , 

75 PRINT® 3 89 , " HOW YOUR HEART WO 
RKS "; :PRINT@421," (T)ALKING OR 
(N)OT ? "; 

80 PRINT§453," BY FRED B.SCERB 
0 "; 

85 PRINT@485," COPYRIGHT (C) 19 
87 "; 

90 X$=INKEY$: IFX$="T"THEN110 
95 IFX$="N"THEN105 
100 GOTO90 
105 NT=1 
110 CLS0 

115 XX=&HFF00 : YY=&HFF7E 
120 POKEXX+1,52 :POKEXX+3 , 63 
125 POKEXX+35,60 

130 PMODE4,l:PCLSl:PMODE4,5:PCLS 
1 

135 DIMR(23) ,L$(26) ,Y(40) :C$(1)= 

"CI" : C$ ( 2 ) =" C2 " : C$ ( 3 ) =" C3 " : C$ ( 4 ) 

="C4" 

140 F0RI=1T02 6:READL$ (I) :NEXT 
145 GOTO280 
150 AA$=JK$ 

155 A$=STR$(A) :B$=STR$(B) 

160 DRAW"BM"+A$+" , "+B$+C$ (CL) 

165 IF LEN(JK$) <=21THEN185 

170 FOR T=21TO0STEP-1:IF MID$ ( JK 

$,T,1)=" "THEN180 

175 NEXT T:GOT0185 

180 L$=LEFT$ ( JK$ , T) : W$=L$ : GOSUB1 
90:JK$=" "+RIGHT$(JK$, (LEN ( JK$) ) 
-T) :GOT0155 

185 W$=JK$:B=B+14:GOSUB190:RETUR 
N 

190 SL=LEN(W$) :FORI=lTOSL:BB$=MI 

D$(W$,I,1) :C=ASC(BB$) -64:IF C=-3 

2 THEN DRAW"BR12" : GOTO 2 10 

195 IF C=-18THENDRAW"BR2RBR9" :GO 

TO210 

200 IFC=-20THENDRAW"BR2R2D2G2E4B 
R7":GOTO210 



205 DRAWL$(C) 

2 10 NEXTI : B=B+ 1 4 : RETURN 

215 PCOPY8T06:PCOPY8T07:PMODE2,6 

:PMODEl, 6: RETURN 

220 IFNT=1THEN260 

225 FORII=lTOLEN(AA$) 

230 IF PEEK (YY) AND 128=0 THEN 2 30 

235 POKEYY,ASC(MID$(AA$,II,l) ) 

240 NEXTII 

245 IFPEEK(YY) AND128=0THEN245 
250 POKEYY,13 

255 F0RHH=1T01 600 :NEXTHH: RETURN 
260 FORHH=1TO3000 

265 X$=INKEY$: IFX$=CHR$ (13)THEN2 
75 

270 NEXTHH 
275 RETURN 

280 PMODE2 , 1 : PCLS1 : SCREEN 1 , 1: PMO 
DE 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : PCLS0 : POKE 65314,24 
8 

285 GOTO330 

290 PM0DE2,3:PCLS1:PM0DE1,3:PCLS 

295 CIRCLE(120, 98) ,66,1,1.3, .9, . 
3: CIRCLE (110, 110) ,76,1,. 9,. 27,. 5 
9 : DRAW"BM44 , 80C1NR8L10U2L8U2L6U2 
L4H4U2H2U4G12U22": CIRCLE (0, 20) , 2 
2,1,1.4, .75, .25 

300 DRAW"BU70R3 6M+4 , +12D8G2 " : CIR 
CLE(40,50) ,30,1,1, .75, . 1 : DRAW'BM 
62 , 66ND4M+12 , -20U6R2U8R2U14L2U4N 
E12G6D6NF6BL20BU4U4R2U4R2E14NR20 
L24M+16,+6BR2 6R4D2R8U2M+14 ,-6R30 
M-3 6 , +2 0M-6 , +8M-8 , +30M+2 0 , +7 0E4R 
2F2M+2 , +2 0D2 2 " : CIRCLE ( 120 , 9 8 ) , 5 6 
,1,1.3, .9, .24 

305 DRAW"BL12BU2M-16,-34U4E2R4F2 
M-16 , -60U6R2U6R4U2NL2U2 " : CIRCLE ( 
110, 110) , 66,1, .9, .25, .6:DRAW"BR6 
BU10F20U2H10U6L2U14R2U6R2U6BR16B 
U8D4F2R6E2U10E6R8M-4 , +16F2R2E18R 
14G22F4R2E2 6R14G36D6L2D4M-3 4,+16 
M+30,-4" 

310 PAINT(120, 176) , 1, 1 

315 DRAW'BM 5 2 , 80C1BE10E16F18E10R 

10" 

320 DRAW'BM 5 2 , 80C1E10BU8BR56R14" 
: PAINT (40, 60) ,2,1: PAINT (150, 52) , 
3,1: PAINT ( 1 50 , 90 ) , 3 , 1 : PAINT ( 100 , 
52) ,3,1: PAINT (86, 52) ,2,1: PAINT (8 
6,90) ,2,1:PAINT(62,26) ,3,1:PAINT 
(56,2) ,2,1 
325 RETURN 

330 PCLS3:A=0:B=56:CL=4: JK$=" PR 
ESS RESET AND RUN IF SCREEN IS B 
LUE . " : GOSUB150 : B=B+20 : JK$=" PRES 
S ENTER WHEN THE SCREEN IS RED." 
:GOSUB150 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 109 



335 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$(13)THEN 
335 

3 40 PCLS0:R=3 :BL=2 

345 PM0DE2 , 6 : PM0DE1 , 6 : C0L0R2 , 3 : L 
INE (0,0) -(256,48) , PRESET, BF:A=0 : 
B=14:CL=4: JK$=" THE HUMAN HEART 
IS ONE OF YOUR MOST IMPORTANT OR 
GANS . " : GOSUB150 : PCOPY6T01 : GOSUB2 
20 

350 COLOR2, 3: LINE (0,54) -(256,92) 

,PSET,B:B=70:A=0:CL=1: JK$=" IT I 

S A VERY POWERFUL BLOOD PUMP.":G 

OSUB150 : PCOPY6T01 : GOSUB22 0 

355 COLOR2, 3: LINE (0,98) -(256,180 

) , PSET,BF:B=114:A=0:CL=1:JK$=" I 

T IS ABOUT THE SIZE OF YOUR CLOS 
ED FIST AND IS JUST TO YOUR LEFT 
OF CENTER INSIDE YOUR RIBS.": GO 
SUB150 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB2 20 
3 60 GOSUB215 

365 COLOR3,2:LINE(0,0)-(256,48) , 
PRESET , BF : A=0 : B=14 : CL=4 : JK$=" TH 
E HEART IS MADE UP OF VERY POWER 
FUL MUSCLE TISSUE .": GOSUB150 : PCO 
PY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB2 2 0 
370 LINE(0, 54)-(256, 92) , PRESET, B 
:B=70:A=0:CL=3: JK$=" THIS MUSCLE 
FORMS FOUR CHAMBERS .": GOSUB 150 : 
PCOPY6T01 : GOSUB220 
375 COLOR3, 2: LINE (0,98) -(256,192 
) ,PSET,BF:B=114:A=0:CL=1: JK$=" W 
HEN THESE CHAMBERS CONTRACT, THE 
Y SQUEEZE THE BLOOD INTO THE NEX 
T CHAMBER OF YOUR HEART . " : GOSUB1 
50:PCOPY7TO2 :GOSUB220 
380 GOSUB215 

385 COLOR3,2:LINE(0,0)-(256,48) , 
PRESET , B : A=0 : B=14 : CL=1 : JK$=" THE 
BLOOD IS THEN SQUEEZED OUT INTO 
ARTERIES AND VEINS .": GOSUB150 : P 
COPY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 
390 LINE(0, 54)-(256, 192) , PRESET, 
BF:B=70:A=0:CL=4: JK$=" THE ARTER 
IES CARRY BLOOD WHICH IS RICH IN 
OXYGEN TO THE CELLS ALL OVER YO 
UR BODY. THE VEINS CARRY BLOOD W 
HICH HAS CARBON DIOXIDE IN IT BA 
CK TO THE LUNGS. " : GOSUB150 : PCOPY 
6T01:PCOPY7T02 

395 JK$=LEFT$(JK$,121)+" DI OX I 
DE IN IT . " : GOSUB2 20 : FORI=1TO1200 
:NEXT 

400 GOSUB215 

405 COLOR2,3:LINE(0,0) -(256,48) , 
PRESET , BF : A=0 : B=14 : CL=1 : JK$=" TH 
E HEART HAS TWO UPPER CHAMBERS A 
ND TWO LOWER CHAMBERS . " : GOSUB150 
: PCOPY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 



410 LINE(0, 54)-(256, 136) , PRESET, 
B:B=70:A=0:CL=2: JK$=" THE UPPER 
CHAMBERS ARE CALLED AURICLES AND 
THE LOWER CHAMBERS ARE CALLED V 
ENTRICLES . " : GOSUB150 : PCOPY6T01 : P 
COPY7T02 : GOSUB220 

415 GOSUB290:PCOPY3TO6:PCOPY4TO7 
:JK$=" HERE IS THE HEART . 11 : PMOD 
E2 , 6 : PMODE1 , 6 : COLOR2 , 3 : LINE (0 , 17 
8) -(256,192) , PRESET, BF:A=0:B=188 
: CL=4 : GOSUB150 : PCOPY6T01 : PCOPY7T 
02 :GOSUB220 
420 GOSUB215 

425 COLOR2,3:LINE(0,0) -(256,48) , 
PRESET , BF : A=0 : B=14 : CL=1 : JK$=" TH 
E UPPER LEFT CHAMBER IS CALLED T 
HE LEFT AURICLE. " :GOSUB150: PCOPY 
6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : G0SUB2 20 
430 LINE(0, 54)-(256, 134) , PRESET, 
BF:B=70:A=0:CL=4: JK$=" IT PULLS 
IN OXYGEN RICH BLOOD FROM THE LU 
NGS THEN SQUEEZES IT INTO THE CH 
AMBER BELOW . " : GOSUB150 : PC0PY6T01 
: PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 : FORI=1TO1200 
:NEXT 

435 LINE(0, 140)-(256, 182) , PRESET 
,B:B=B+4:A=0:CL=3:JK$=" HERE IS 
A DIAGRAM OF WHERE IT IS . " : GOSUB 
150 : PC0PY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 
440 PCOPY3T06:PCOPY4T07 
445 JK$=" THE LEFT AURICLE. " : PM 
0DE2 , 6 : PM0DE1 , 6 : C0L0R2 , 3 : LINE ( 0 , 
178)-(256,192), PRESET , BF : A=0 : B=l 
88 : CL=4 : GOSUB150 : GOSUB450 : PC0PY6 
T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 : F0RI=1T01 
200: NEXT :GOT0455 

450 DRAW"BM130, 30C4D10L4F8E8L4U1 
0L8": PAINT (132, 32) , 4 , 4 : RETURN 
455 GOSUB215 

460 COLOR2,3:LINE(0,0) -(256,48) , 
PRESET, B:A=0:B=14:CL=l:JK$=" THE 

LOWER LEFT CHAMBER IS CALLED TH 
E LEFT VENTRICLE. ": GOSUB 150: PCOP 
Y6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : G0SUB2 20 
465 LINE(0, 54)-(256, 134) , PRESET, 
BF:B=70:A=0:CL=1: JK$=" IT PUSHES 

THIS OXYGEN RICH BLOOD UP INTO 
THE AORTA, WHICH IS THE LARGEST 
ARTERY . " : GOSUB150 : PC0PY6T01 : PCOP 
Y7TO2:GOSUB220 

470 LINE (0, 140) -(256, 182) , PRESET 
,B:B=B+4:A=0:CL=3: JK$=" HERE IS 
A DIAGRAM OF WHERE IT IS.": GOSUB 
150 : PC0PY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 
475 PCOPY3T06:PCOPY4T07 
480 JK$=" THE LEFT VENTRICLE .": P 
M0DE2 , 6 : PM0DE1 , 6 : C0L0R2 , 3 : LINE (0 
,178) -(256, 192) , PRESET , BF : A=0 : B= 



110 THE RAINBOW June 1987 




ECTOR 
S-69B 
VIDEO 
DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 




USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS™ 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR™ 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you canget any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



COCO 3 SCREEN 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 



188 : CL=4 : GOSUB150 : GOSUB485 : PCOPY 
6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 : GOTO490 : 
FORI=1TO1200 : NEXT 

485 DRAWBM132 , 76C4D14H16E4L12D1 
2E4F2 8U3 0L6" : PAINT (134,78) ,4,4:R 
ETURN 

490 PCOPY6T05 : PCOPY7T08 : PMODE2 , 6 
:PM0DE1,6:PCLS4 

495 COLOR2, 3: LINE (0,0) -(256,106) 
, PRESET , B : A=0 : B=14 : CL=2 : JK$=" IN 
THAT LAST DIAGRAM, THE ARROW WA 
S INSIDE THE LEFT VENTRICLE AND 
WAS POINTING TO THE AORTA WHICH 
IS THE RED ARTERY ABOVE . " : GOSUB1 
50 : PCOPY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 : 
FORI=1TO1200 : NEXT 

500 COLOR3,2:LINE(0,112)-(256,19 
2) , PRESET, B:A=0:B=B+12: :CL=3: JK$ 
=" HERE IS THAT DIAGRAM ONCE MOR 
E FOR YOU TO LOOK AT. 11 : GOSUB150 : 
PCOPY 6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB2 20 
505 PCOPY5T01:PCOPY8T02: JK$=" TH 
E ARROW IS POINTING TO THE A ORT 
A. ":GOSUB220 

510 PM0DE2,6:PM0DE1,6:PCLS4:PC0P 
Y7T08 

515 COLOR3, 2: LINE (0,0) -(256,106) 
, PRESET, B:A=0:B=14:CL=3:JK$=" TH 
E BLOOD TRAVELS FROM THE AORTA T 
0 ALL PARTS OF THE BODY, BRINGIN 
G OXYGEN TO THE CELLS AND PICKIN 
G UP CARBON DIOXIDE. " :GOSUB150:P 
COPY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB2 20 : FORI 
=1TO1200:NEXT 

520 LINE(0, 112) -(256, 192) , PRESET 
,BF:A=0:B=B+12 : :CL=4: JK$=" THE B 



Him . . 



Bug-Tracking Lowdown 



OK, you typed the long listing in and saved it, but, 
when you entered RUN, it bombed out. So you go to 
the line the error message specifies and check it out. 
It looks all right, but you retype the line anyway. Upon 
typing RUN, the program dies again in the same place. 
What is going on? Your CoCo can certainly see a 
problem that you cannot. 

While this is very frustrating, keep in mind most 
"out of data" (?OD) and function call (?FC) Errors 
do not occur in the line the computer reports to you. 
Though the errors are actually located elsewhere, the 
computer only realized your mistake when it reached 
the reported line. At this point, you need to check the 
data lines and string assignments involved in the line 
in question. For the complete lowdown on these 
errors, ref er to "Escape From the Bug Zone" (January 
1987, Page 58). 



LOOD THEN GOES BACK TO THE HEART 
THROUGH THE VEINS .": GOSUB150 : PC 
OPY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB2 20 
525 GOSUB215 

530 COLOR1,2:LINE(0,0)-(256,106) 
, PSET , BF : A=0 : B=14 : CL=3 : JK$=" THI 
S DARKER BLUE COLORED BLOOD EMPT 
IES INTO THE RIGHT AURICLE OF TH 
E HEART BY WAY OF VEINS CALLED T 
HE VENA CAVA . " : GOSUB150 : PCOPY6TO 
l:PCOPY7T02 

535 JK$=LEFT$(JK$, 102)+"VEE NA C 
AVA":GOSUB220 

540 LINE(0, 112)-(256, 192) , PRESET 
,B:A=0:B=B+12: :CL=2: JK$=" THE AR 
ROW IS INSIDE THE RIGHT AURICLE 
IN THIS DIAGRAM. ":GOSUB150: PCOPY 
6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 : FORI=lTO 
1200: NEXT 

545 GOSUB215:PCOPY3T06:PCOPY4T07 
550 JK$=" THE RIGHT AURICLE." :P 
MODE 2 , 6 : PMODE1 , 6 : COLOR2 , 3 : LINE (0 
, 178) - (256 , 192 ) , PRESET, BF : A=0 : B= 
188 : CL=4 : GOSUB150 : GOSUB555 : PCOPY 
6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB2 20 : GOTO560 
555 DRAW " BM2 2 , 44C4F10G4R18U18G4H 
10G8":PAINT(28,44) ,4,4:RETURN 
560 GOSUB215 

565 COLOR1,2:LINE(0,0) -(256, 106) 
,PSET,B:A=0:B=14:CL=2:JK$=" THE 
BLOOD IS THEN PUSHED DOWN INTO T 
HE RIGHT VENTRICLE BELOW WHERE I 
T IS THEN PUSHED UP INTO A LARGE 
VEIN LOCATED ABOVE .": GOSUB150 : P 
COPY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 : FORI 
=1TO1200:NEXT 

570 LINE(0, 112)-(256, 192) , PRESET 
,B:A=0:B=B+12: :CL=3:JK$=" THE AR 
ROW IS INSIDE THE RIGHT VENTRICL 
E IN THIS DIAGRAM. ": GOSUB 150: PCO 
PY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 : FORI=l 
TO1200:NEXT 

575 GOSUB215:PCOPY3T06:PCOPY4T07 
580 JK$=" THE RIGHT VENTRICLE.": 
PMODE2 , 6 : PMODE1 , 6 : COLOR2 , 3 : LINE ( 
0,178) -(256,192) , PRESET , BF : A=0 : B 
=188 : CL=4 : GOSUB150 : GOSUB58 5 : PCOP 
Y6T01 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB220 : GOTO590 
585 DRAW " BM7 6 , 74C4G8R4D16H6G4F12 
R6U2 6R4H8 " : PAINT (76, 78), 4, 4: RETU 
RN 

590 GOSUB215:COLOR2,3:LINE(0,0)- 
(256,48) , PRESET, B:A=0:B=14:CL=1: 
JK$=" WE WILL NOW WATCH THE HEAR 
T AS IT PUMPS THE BLOOD .": GOSUB1 
50 : PCOPY 6 TO 1 : PCOPY7T02 : GOSUB22 0 
595 LINE(0, 54)-(256, 134) , PRESET, 
BF:B=70:A=0:CL=l: JK$=" PRESS THE 



112 THERAINBOW June 1987 



ENTER KEY TO START THE PUMPING 
AND PRESS THE SPACEBAR TO STOP I 
T. " :GOSUB150:PCOPY6TO1:PCOPY7TO2 
:GOSUB220 

6pj5 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$(13)THEN 

605 PMODE2,5:PCLSl:PMODEl,5:PCLS 
fix POKE65314 , 248 : PCOPY3T05 : PCOPY4 
TO 6 

610 CIRCLE(12j3, 98) ,58,4,1.3, .9, . 

3: CIRCLE (110, 110) ,70, 4,. 9,. 27,. 5 

9:DRAW"BM44,82C4NR8L10BM+130,-30 

E10": PAINT (122, 178) ,4,4 

615 CIRCLE(120, 94) ,48,1,1.3, .9, . 

3: CIRCLE (110, 106) ,58,1, .9, .27, .5 

9 : DRAWBM60 , 82C1U10" : PAINT ( 104 , 1 

60) ,1,1:PAINT(126,160) ,1,1 

620 PCOPY5T07:PCOPY6T08 

625 GOSUB585:GOSUB485 

630 PMODE2,7:PMODEl,7:POKE65314, 

248 : DRAWBM84 , 48C4M+8 , -26NG8M+3 , 

+10BL26H10U2E10ND6NL6" 

635 PMODE2,3:PMODEl,3:POKE65314, 

248 : GOSUB555 : GOSUB450 

640 PMODE2,l:SCREENl,l:PMODEl,l: 

SCREEN1 , 1 : POKE 65314,248 

645 PCOPY3T01:PCOPY4T02 

650 FORI=1TO100:NEXTI 



655 PCOPY5T01:PCOPY6T02 

660 FORI=1TO100:NEXTI 

665 PCOPY7T01:PCOPY8T02 

670 FORI=1TO100:NEXTI 

675 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=" "THEN685 

680 GOT0645 

685 PM0DE2,6:PM0DE1,6:PCLS4 
690 B=170:CL=1: JK$=" PRESS ENTER 
TO RETURN TO START .": GOSUB150 : P 
COPY6T01 : PCOPY7T02 

695 DATA U6E2R2F2D2NL4D4BR6 , U8R4 

F2G2NL4F2G2NL4BR8 , U8R4BD8NL4BR6 , 

U8R4F2D4G2NL4BR8 , U8NR4D4NR4D4R4B 

R6 ,U8NR4D4NR4D4BR10 ,U8R6BD4NL2D4 

NL4BR6,U4NU4R6U4D8BR6 

700 DATA R2U8L2R4L2D8R2BR6,NU4R4 

U8L4R6BD8BR6 , U8D4R2NE4F4BR6 , NU8R 

4BR6,U8F4E4D8BR6,U8F6NU6D2BR6,U8 

R6D8NL6BR6,U8R6D4L6D4BR12 ,U8R6D8 

NL6NH4NF2BR6 

705 DATA U8R6D4L4F4BR6,R6U4L6U4R 

6BD8BR6 , BR4U8 L4R8 BD8 BR6 , NU8R6NU8 

BR6 , BU8D4F4E4U4BD8BR6 , NU8R4NU6R4 

NU8BR6 , E8G4H4F8BR6 , BU8 D2F4ND2E4U 

2BD8BR6 , NR8E8NL8BD8BR6 

710 IFINKEY$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN RUN EL 

SE710 

715 PCLEAR8:RUN1 /R\ 



SPECIAL DEAL ON 
500 PROGRAMS! 



GET 50 DISKS OR 50 CASSETTE TAPES FULL O F OVER 
500 PROGRAMS. HERE IS WHAT YOU'LL RECEIVE: 

*Over 250 Utility/Home Application Programs including a 
Word Processor, DataBase, Spreadsheet, Account Man- 
ager, 2 Basic Compilers, Terminal Programs, ROM Copies, 
Mail List, Machine Language Tutorials, Plus Much More! 

★ Over 200 exciting games including Warlords, Star Trek, 
Super Vaders, Solar Conquest, Horse Races, Football, 
Baseball, Frog Jump, Invader, Plus Much More! (Many 
machine language games) 

* Over 30 adventures including The College Adventure, Dun- 
geon Master, Space Lab, Ice World, Ship Wreck, Zigma 
Experiment. Plus 32K Graphic Adventures. 

EACH INDIVIDUAL ISSUE SOLD FOR s 9. 00 
EACH OR *450 FOR ALL 50 ISSUES. WE 
SLASHED THE PRICE TO ONLY 150.°°. 



REG. $450 



$ 150 



00 



★ ★THIS MONTH ONLY** 



vrsA 



Buy this package of 500 programs and 
receive a free 6 month subscription. 
(A *35 value) 



RAINBOW 

CtRTITKATtON 



THE GREATEST SOFTWARE DEAL 
ON EARTH JUST GOT BETTER! 



THAT'S RIGHT! THIS MONTH WE'VE DROPPED OUR YEARLY 
SUBSCRIPTION RATE AN UNBELIEVABLE *10.°°TO ENTICE YOU 
INTO SUBSCRIBING WITH US. GET 1 2 DISKS OR TAPES A YEAR 
CONTAINING OVER 120 QUALITY PROGRAMS. A SUBSCRIP- 
TION TO T & D SOFTWARE CONSISTS OF 10 READY-TO-LOAD 
PROGRAMS DELIVERED BY FIRST CLASS MAIL EVERY MONTH. 

NO WE ARE NOT THE SAME AS THE RAINBOW ON TAPE. IN 
FACT, MANY SUBSCRIBERS HAVE WR ITTEN IN AND SAID THAT 
WE ARE MUCH BETTER THAN RAINBOW ON TAPE! 




1 YEAR (12 Iwues) 
6MO.(6ls»uw) 

1 1SSUE 



PRICES- 
tape 

OR DISK 
JfcOCf 



THIS 
MONTH ONLY 
60.00 
35.00 
0.00 



Michigan Residents Add 4% 
Overseas Add $10 to Subscnption Pnce 
Personal Checks Welcome 1 



* 16K-64K Color Computer 

* Over 4000 Satisfied Cuslomers 

* Back Issues Available From 

* July '82 (Over 500 Programs) 




OUR LATEST ISSUE CONTAINED 

1. Accounls Receivable 6. Fool Race 

2. Work Mate 7. FlippytheSeal 

3. Calendar 8. Screen Calculator 

4. Invasion 9. Able Builders 

5. TripAdventure 10. Super Error 2 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
UAL 



Available on COCO 1. 2 and 3! 
All Programs Include Documentation 1 



I MasterCard I 



T & D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, 2490 MILES STANDISH DR., HOLLAND, Ml 49424 (616) 399-9648 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 113 



MUSIC 



32K 
ECB 



The CoCo 

Composer 



By Harold Nickel 



Having little musical background (one summer bang- 
ing on an old upright), I wanted Piano to be simple 
and fun. The programs I had seen were not only 
beyond my present capabilities, but beyond capabilities I 
cared to develop. They all seemed bent on teaching me to 
write musical scores. 

Piano is played using the computer keyboard as you 
would a two-level organ keyboard. It can store a song to 
be replayed one to nine times. It allows you to edit a song 
(for those of us who need a little help in getting it right). 
And, it lets you save your work on tape for posterity. 

On running the program, you first see the title screen 
followed by a demonstration of the piano as it is initialized. 
The next screen is the main menu. It displays the highest 



Harold Nickel lives in southern Massachusetts with his wife 
and three children. He has worked with micros and 
mainframes for more than nine years developing 
educational and business applications. 




114 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



level commands: Play, Replay, Edit, 
Save, Get and Quit. I call these modes. 

To select a mode, press the first letter 
of the mode name. As with most of the 
commands in this program, you need 
not use ENTER. The only time you must 
use ENTER is when a message prompts 
you for information (such as the song 
name in the Save mode). Using ENTER 
at other times will simply be interpreted 
as an incorrect selection. 

There are two ways to move between 
modes. You can use the ? to return to 
the main menu and make a new selec- 
tion. Or you can use the = followed by 
the letter of the mode you want. The 
second method bypasses the menu 
display. 

Besides modes, you will notice ?, *, 
SHIFT / CLERR, and SPfiCE listed on the 
main menu. These are the most com- 
monly used second level commands, or 
options. They are included as a quick 
referenceaid but are not active whilethe 
menu is displayed. 

Screens 

Each mode can be identified by its 
particular screen. There are two kinds 
of screens: text and graphics. Text 
screens are used to prompt for messages 
and vary between modes. The graphics 
screen is the one you see demonstrated 
on first running Piano. It displays a 
baby grand piano as its main feature 
(Figure 1). 







P R 
\ K 


\ 














iilip 


ill II 


III 

I I ■■ il 11 >■ ■ 








II 







Figure 1: Main Graphic Screen 



The text screens are used in the Save, 
Get, Quit and Edit modes. Save and Get 
messages prompt you to enter song 
names. Quit displays a sign-off message 
and then ends the program. While Edit 
mode does not use the text screen for 
its main screen, it does use it for an 
option. 

The basic graphics screen is used in 
the Play, Replay and Edit modes. Be- 
sides ,the piano, it displays four letters 



(P, R, E and K) clustered in the upper- 
middle and has two lines at the bottom. 
The four letters are circled to indicate 
active options. The first three are for the 
Play, Replay, or Edit modes, respec- 
tively. The K is for the Keep option. 
When active, Piano stores the notes you 
play in memory. Keep is toggled on and 
off using the * in either the Play or Edit 
modes. 

Thetwo lines belowthe pianoarealso 
indicators. The short line directly below 
the fifth white key from the left marks 
middle C. The long line below it is a 
storage indicator. It shows the amount 
of space still available to keep notes. 
(Piano has room for over 2,500 notes.) 
As you play notes with the Keep option 
on, this line will change color from left 
to right. It is also used in the Replay and 
Edit modes to mark the currently active 
note. 

Modes and Options 

In the Play mode, you use the com- 
puter's keyboard as piano keys. The top 
and third rows control the black notes. 
The second and bottom rows control 
the white notes. The space bar is used 
to insert a pause, or rest, for the length 
of one note so you can add meter to 
your songs. You will notice that not all 
the keys in the top and third rows 
correspond to a black note. This reflects 
the notes missing from a piano key- 
board, such as B#. 

There are two options available in the 
Play mode: Keep and Clear. With Keep 
on (set with the *) any valid note you 
play, including rests, will be added to 
the end of thesong currently stored. The 
Clear option erases any song currently 
stored. To use Clear, hold down the 
SHIFT key and push CLEAR. 

In Replay mode, the song currently 
stored will be played back to you. 
Pressing a number from 1 to 9 will play 
the song that number of times. Other 
keys, except ? and =, will play it once. 
Using the space bar will pause playing 
until you once again press a key. 

The Save mode lets you record your 
song on tape. Using a text screen, you 
can enter the name of the song. The 
name can be any combination of eight 
characters, except ? or =. You can also 
specify a song already on tape for the 
new song to be positioned after. If you 
do not enter an "after" name, the song 
will be saved at the current tape posi- 
tion. In either case, you will be prompt- 
ed when to set the recorder to play and 
record. 

Get uses a text screen to request the 
name of a song to retrieve from tape. It 



will also prompt you to set your re- 
corder to play. The song gotten from 
tape will replace any song currently 
stored. 

Quit displays an exit message and 
ends the program. Once you quit Piano, 
you must run it from the beginning to 
play again. Any song not on tape is lost. 

The Edit Mode 

The Edit mode uses a variation on the 
basic graphics screen (Figure 2). Be- 




Figure 2: Edit Graphic Screen 

cause you must point to the position of 
one particular note while editing, a 
second storage scale has been added on 
the right of the screen. This scale mag- 
nifies portions of the storage indicator 
in groups of one hundred notes (about 
one key's width on the bottom scale). As 
you move through the song in Edit, the 
bottom scale shows the general location 
and the side scale the exact note in the 
group. When you go beyond the last 
note in the current group, it will be 
replaced by the next group of one 
hundred. 

There are two ways to move to a note 
in Edit. You can move one note at a 
time, or you can move directly to the 
note. To move one note at a time, hold 
down the left or right arrow key. Each 
note will play in the order indicated by 
the arrow used until the key is released. 
This method also provides wrap- 
around; that is, with the right arrow, the 
first note follows the last and with the 
left arrow, the last follows the first. 

To go d irectly to a note, use the # sign. 
A textscreen will let you enter the note's 
number. If that note exists, you will be 
moved directly there. If not, an error 
message is displayed. Entering no 
number returns you to the graphics 
screen with no change in position. 

Once you are positioned at a note, 
you can change it, erase it, or add a new 
note after it. You change a note by 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 115 



turning the Keep option on (using the 
*) and playing the new note. The current 
note is repJaced and you are moved to 
the next note. Without Keep on, playing 
notes will not affect stored notes. This 
way you can practice bef ore changing or 
adding notes. 

Erasing notes is done with the down 
arrow. Using the down arrow alone 
erases one note. Holding down the 
SHIFT and pushing the down arrow 



erases all notes from the current posi- 
tion to the end of the song. 

To add a note, use the up arrow and 
follow it with a valid note key. The note 
will be added after the current position. 
As with the down arrow, you can use 
the up arrow with the SHIFT key. In this 
case, all valid notes will be added until 
the up arrow is pressed again (similar to 
how CAPS LOCK works on a typewriter). 

I had fun writing Piano, and I enjoy 



playing with it, even though others 
sometimes have difficulty guessing what 
songs I'm playing. To assist in using this 
program, I have included a Quick 
Reference Guide to the commands 
(Figure 3), For those who want to 
analyze the code, I have also included 
an outline of the program routines in 
Figure 4. I hope Piano provides you 
with as much enjoyment as it has 
me. □ 



Lines 



Description 



Quick Reference Sheet 

MODE 

OPTION DESCRIPTION 

All Modes 

(?) Returnsto Menu 

(=) (mode key) Goes to indicated Mode 

PLAY 

(*) On/Off switch for Keep 
(SHIFT) (CLEAR) Erase currently kept song 

(SPACE) Play a rest (1 note pause) 

other keys Plays corresponding notes 

REPLAY 

(0) to (9) Replays song the selected times 

(SPACE) Pauses Replaying (any key restarts) 

other keys Starts 1 Replay 

EDIT 

(#) Select current note number 

right arrow Move note pointer forward 

left arrow Move note pointer backward 

up arrow Insert 1 note after current 

(SHIFT) up Insert until up arrow pushed 

down arrow Erase current note 

(SHIFT) down Erase from current to end of song 

(*) On/Off switch for Keep 

valid note key If Keep On, replace current note and move 

or (SPACE) pointer to next note 

SAVE 

name (ENTER) 1-8 character name for song 

'AFTER' name Name of song it will follow 

GET 

name (ENTER) 1-8 character name of song 

QUIT Exits PIANO 



001 

002-009 
010-017 



020-054 



060-088 



090-091 
100-136 
150-199 
200-242 
300-341 
400-497 
500-545 
600-625 
900-960 
1000-1123 



Program Name 
Display Title Screen 
Reserve Memory 

010 Reserve Graphics Area 

011-017 Initialize Variables 

Store Table Values 

020-022 Piano String Lengths 

030-032 Color of Piano Keys 

040-042 Piano Key Note Values 

050-054 Piano Key to Keyboard Key Relationships 

Draw Piano Graphics Screen 

060-064 Outline the Piano 

070-074 Draw and Play White Keys 

075-079 Draw Mode Letters 

080-084 Draw and Play Black Keys 

085-088 Draw Middle 'C and Note Storage Lines 

Reset Note Duration from Demo to Normal Length 

Display Main Menu 

Get and Process Mode Selection 

PLAY Mode Routines 

REPLAY Mode Routines 

EDIT Mode Routines 

SAVE Mode Routines 

GET Mode Routines 

QUIT (Exit) Routines 

Common Subroutines 

1000-1099 Play One Note 
1100-1123 Messages 



Figure 3: PIANO Commands 



Figure 4: PIANO Code Outline 



CORRECTIONS 



"Tracking the Tempest" (April 1987, 
Page 26): H.G. Williamson wrote to 
warn us of an error in the review section ' 
of Hurricane Tracker. Line 485 contains 
an incorrect reference to the cell (N,2) 
of the DS array. The corrected line 
appears below. 

485 PRINTD$ (N,0)TAB(6) D$(N / 1) ;TA 
B(ll)D$(N / 2) ;TAB(17)D$ (N,3) ;TAB( 
22)D$(N,4) ;TAB(27)D$(N,5) 



a 



The Tournament Master" (April 



1987, Page 120): Richard Steinbrueck 
tells us of an error in his program, 
RNDRDBIN. To correct the problem, first 
retype Line 50, but number it as Line 
507. Then delete the original Line 50. 
This will correct a problem with the TfiB 
function, which occurred if the sum- 
mary sheet was printed before the 
competition assignment sheets. 



"Fast Relief for Tape-Loading Head- 
aches" (February 1987, Page 182): Due 
to a production error, part of Line 82 



in the listing of TAPE DDC is missing. The 
entire line appears below. 

82 DATA 9F,76,9E,F3,86,9F,A7,80, 
9F, F3 , 9E,7 6,3 9:FORX=0 TO 12: READ 
R$:POKE&H9F00+X, ( VAL ( » &H'*+R$ ) ) : 
NEXT : 1 routine to put white squar 
e 

For quicker reference, Corrections 
will be posted on Delphi as soon as they 
are available in the Info on Rainbow 
topic area of the database. Just type 
DATA at the CoCo SIG> prompt and 
INFO at the TOPIC> prompt. 



116 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1987 



Pro-Coloh 
Series: 

If You're 

Serious 
About 
Getting 
Oiganized. 

Our Pro-Color-Series consists of three programs. 

Pro-Color -File 'Enhanced* V2.0 Design a record structure 
up to 60 fields with 10?0 spaces per record, four 
custom-desionertdata entry screens and math functions on 
single records. Report totals, averages and summaries. Gen- 
erate mailing labels. Output reports to the printer, disk or 
screen, Send information directly into a DynacalcP compati- 
ble file for use in spread sheets. Streamline repetitive tasks 
in*o one keystroke with the command processor. Sort 750 
records in less than five minutes and create special indexes 
of your file for reporting and accessing. Store as many 
records as your disk wi I hold! $59.95 

Pro-Color-Forms V2.0 This mail-merge feature will allow 
you to write a letter and have names from your database 
inserted automatically. Design invoices, inventory cards and 
other forms. Or, if you use preprinted forms, you can set up a 
template to print information in the appropriate place. If you 
have our Telegraphies® program, you can have hi-res 
pictures included as part of the form! $29.95 

Pro-Color-Dir Read the directory of all your diskettes and 
create a data file that can be accessed by Pro-Color-File 
Store up to 1,000 entries on one diskette and generate a 
master report that shows where each program is in your 
library. Included FREE with Pro-Color-Forms. 

Our Pro-Color-Series gives you database capabilities 
found on larger computers, at a fraction of the cost! So if 
you're serious about getting organized, try our Pro-Color- 
Series It lets you organize important information together in 
one place, right at your fingertips, and at a savings -just 
$79.95 for all three! 

Derringer Software, Inc. 

PO Box 5300 Florence, SC 29502-5300 
Shipping: $3/$12 air mail (overseas). 
St Residents add 5% sales tax. 
Send check or money order. VISA/MC* customers call 

(803) 665-5676 

*(Credit card orders subject to 5% service charge.) 
Canadian Distributor: Kelly Software 



41 . 
73 . 
100 
162 
310 
410 
425 



147 


443 


169 


Zoo 


4y i . . . 


. . . Zoo 


158 


523 


85 


12 


620 


225 


149 


1000 


92 


10 


END 


131 


68 



1 



The listing: PIANO 

1 1 PIANO 

2 CLS:PRINT@203 , "P IAN 0":PRIN 

T@235, " " :PRINT@3 3 5 , "BY" 

: PRINT@363 , "H. NICKEL" 

10 PCLEAR 4 

11 DIM L(4l) ,C(41) ,N(41) ,K(122) , 
NS(2520) 

12 DIM I$(0) ,F$(0) ,S$(0) 

13 DIM KF(0) ,LP(0) ,CP(0) ,XP(0) 

14 DIM 1(0) ,S(0) ,T(0) ,X(0) ,Y(0) 

15 NS (0)=0 

16 KF=1:LP=0:CP=0:XP=0 

17 S=0 :T=1 

20 1 SET STRING LENGTHS 

21 DATA 3,3,4,5,6,7,8,1)3,12,15,1 
8,22,27,33,4)3,48,56,63,69,74,78, 
81,84,86,88,9)3,91,92,92,93,94,95 
,97,99,101,104,1)38,112,117,12 3,1 
30 

22 FOR 1=1 TO 4 1 : READ S:L(I)=S:N 
EXT 

30 1 SET KEY COLORS 

31 DATA2,4,2,4,2,4,2,0,2,4,2,4,2 
,0,2,4,2,4,2,4,2,0,2,4,2,4,2,0,2 
,4,2,4,2,4,2,0,2,4,2,4,2 

32 FOR 1=1 TO 4 1 : READ S:C(I)=S:N 
EXT 

40 'SET KEY NOTES 

41 DATA5, 19, 32, 45, 58, 69, 78, 0,89, 
99,108,117,12 5,0,13 3,140,147,153 
,159,165,170,0, 17 6,180,185,189,1 
93,0, 197,200,204,20-7,210,213,216 
,0,218,221,223,225,227 

42 FOR 1=1 TO 4 1 : READ S:N(I)=S:N 
EXT 

50 'SET KEYBOARD/KEY RELATIONSHI 
PS 

51 DATA 37,100,39,41,18,100,2,4, 
6 , 100 , 10 , 12 , 100 , 16 , 20 , 40 , 100 , 100 
,100,100,21,100,31,27,26,5,100,3 
0,32,15,34,100,38,35,33,17,19,1, 
7,24,9,13,29,3,25,11,23 

5 2 FOR 1=1 TO 122:K(I)=100:NEXT 

53 FOR 1=44 TO 90: READ S:K(I)=S: 
NEXT 

54 K(32)=0 

60 'OUTLINE PIANO 

61 PMODE 3,1:PCLS:SCREEN 1,0 



118 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



62 LINE(2,188) -(2,1) ,PSET:LINE - 
(4,1) ,PSET 

63 FOR 1=1 TO 41: LINE -((1*6) +2, 
L(I) -2) ,PSET:NEXT 

64 LINE -(254,148) , PSET : LINE -(2 
54, 188) ,PSET 

70 1 DRAW WHITE KEYS 

71 COLOR 2,3 

72 FOR 1=1 TO 41 STEP 2 

73 LINE((I*6)-2,161)-( (I*6)+6,18 
7) ,PSET,BF:GOSUB 1001 

74 NEXT 

75 ' DRAW MODE LETTERS 

76 LINE (112 , lp) - (112 , 16) ,PSET:LI 
NE(114,ip)-(116,12) ,PSET:LINE(11 
6,12)-(114,14) ,PSET 

77 LINE(132,1P) -(132,16) ,PSET:LI 
NE(134,1J3)-(136,12) , PSET : LINE (13 
6,12) - (134, 14) , PSET: LINE (132, 13) 

(136, 16) ,PSET 

8 LINE ( 152, 10) -( 152,1 6) , PSET: LI 



82 FOR 1=2 TO 4J3 STEP 2 

83 IF C(I)=j3 THEN GOTO 84 ELSE L 
INE( (1*6) -2, 161) -( (1*6) +6, 17 9) ,P 
SET,BF:GOSUB Iflpl 

84 NEXT 

ENE MIDDLE C 
,188) -(60 f 188) , PSET: LI 
NE(52,189)-(6j3,189) , PSET 

87 'DRAW STORAGE LINE INDICATOR 

88 LINE(4, 191)-(255, 191) , PRESET 

90 'SET NOTE LENGTH 

91 T=3 

100 'PRINT MENU 

101 CLS: SCREEN 0,1 

110 PRINT" 

111 PRINT" 



112 PRINT 

120 PRINT" 

121 PRINT" 
ONG" 



MENU" 



P - PLAY PIANO" 
R - REPLAY THE 



WIN \J 

122 PRINT" E - EDIT THE 



123 PRINT" 
ON TAPE" 

124 PRINT" 
ROM TAPE" 

130 PRINT 

131 PRINT" 

II 



SON 

- SAVE A SONG 

- GET A SONG F 



Q - 



QUIT PLAYING 



Now Create Your Own Signs, 
Banners, and Greeting Cards. 



Introducing The 
Coco Graphics Designer 

Lait Chriitmai we introduced our 
COCO Greeting Card Designer program 
(ice review April 86 Rainbow). It hu 
been so popular that we've now 
expanded it into a new program called 
the COCO Graphic! Designer. The 
Coco Graphics Designer produces 
greeting cards plus banners and signs. 
This program will further increase the 
usefullness and enjoyment of your dot 
matrix printer. 

The Coco Graphics 

Designer allows you to mix text and 
pictures in alt your creations. The 
program features picture, border, and 
character font editors, so that you can 
modify or expand the already built in 
libraries. Plus a special "grabber" utility 
is included to capture areas of high 
resolution screens for your picture 
library. 



Requirements: a Coco or Coco IT 
with a minimum of J2K, One Disk Drive 
(Disk Ext. BASIC 1.0/l.l.ADOS, or 
JDOS). Printer* supported include- 
Epson RX/FX, GEMINI 10X, SG-10, 
NX-10, C-Itoh 8610, DMP-100/ 130/ 
400/ 430, Seikosha GP- 100/250, Legend 
808 and Gorilla Bannana. Send n SASB 
for complete list of compatible printers. 
#C3S2 Coco Graphics Designer $79.95 



Over 100 More Pictures 

An optional supplementary library 

diskette containing over one hundred 
additional pictures is available. 

#CSS3 Picture Disk #1 114.95. 

Colored Paper Packs 

Now available are packs containing 120 
sheets of tractor-feed paper and 42 
matching envelopes in assorted bright 
RED, GREEN, and BLUE. Perfect for 
making your productions unforgettable. 
#C274 Paper Pack $19 95 




With Zebra's Coco Graphics Designer it's easy and enjoyable 
making your own greeting cards, signs, and banners. 




WICO 
TRACKBALL 
Now $19.95 

Order Cat#TBRS01 
(Was $69.95) 

You can benefit from our purchase of 
brand new WICO Trackball Controllers 
at closeout prices. This model was 
designed specifically for the Radio Shack 
Color Computer and plugs right into the 
joystick port. 

WICO is the largest designer and 
manufacturer of control devices for 
commercial arcade video games. If 
you've ever played an arcade video 
game, chances are you've used a WICO 
joystick or trackball and experienced its 

We have bargain priced trackballs for ATARI, Commodore, TI, 
and other computers. Call or write for our price list. 



superior control, pinpoint firing 
accuracy, and exceptional durability. 

Includes one-year limited warranty. 
Phoenolic ball offers 360-degree 
movement. Two optical encoders 
provide split-second response 

Quick-action fire button for smooth, two 
handed arcade response and feel Long 
5' computer connection. Heavy duty 
plastic case for long hard use. 
Compatible with all color computer 
models. 



Ordering Instructions: All orders 

add $3.00 Shipping U Handling. UPS 
COD add $5.00. VISA/MC Accepted. 
NY residents add sales tax. 



Zebra Sytems, Inc 
78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 119 



132 PRINT" ? - MENU" 

133 PRINT 

134 PRINT" (SHIFT) (*) - KEEP 
SWITCH" 

135 PRINT" (SHIFT) (CLEAR) - ERAS 
E NOTES" 

136 PRINT" ( SPACE ) - PAUS 
E / REST" 



15 0 


I$= 


=INKEY$ 


:IF 1$ 


= iim THEN 


150 














160 


IF 


1$=' 


ipn 


THEN 


GOTO 


201 


161 


IF 


1$=' 


i R n 


THEN 


GOTO 


301 


162 


IF 


1$=' 


•E" 


THEN 


GOTO 


401 


163 


IF 


1$=' 


•S" 


THEN 


GOTO 


501 


164 


IF 


1$=' 


•G" 


THEN 


GOTO 


601 


165 


IF 


1$=' 


IQII 


THEN 


GOTO 


901 


166 


IF 


1$=' 


• 


THEN 


GOTO 


101 


167 


IF 


1$=' 


'M" 


THEN 


GOTO 


101 


199 


GOTO 150 









200 'PLAY PIANO 

201 SCREEN 1,0: CIRCLE (114,13) ,9 
,0 

210 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN GOTO 
210 

220 I=K(ASC(I$) ) 

221 IF K100 THEN GOSUB 1001 ELS 
E GOTO 240 

230 IF KF=0 THEN IF LP=2520 THEN 
GOSUB 1121 ELSE PSET ( INT ( LP/10) 

+4,191,2) :LP=LP+1:NS(LP)=I 

231 GOTO 210 

240 IF 1$="*" THEN KF= (KF+1) - (2* 
KF) : CIRCLE ( 134 , 65) ,9,KF:GOTO 210 

241 IF ASC(I$)=92 THEN LP=0 : CP=0 
: LINE (4, 191) -(255, 191) , PRESET: GO 
TO 210 

242 IF I$<>"?" AND I$<>"=" THEN 
GOTO 210 ELSE CIRCLE ( 114 , 13 ) , 9 , 1 
:IF 1$="?" THEN GOTO 101 ELSE GO 
TO 150 

300 'REPLAY SONG 

301 SCREEN 1,0:CIRCLE(134,13) ,9, 
0 

310 CP=0:XP=1:S=1 

320 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN GOTO 
320 

321 IF I$>"/" THEN IF I$<" : " THE 
N S=VAL(I$) 

322 IF 1$="?" OR 1$="=" THEN CIR 
CLE (134, 13) ,9,1: IF 1$="?" THEN G 
OTO 101 ELSE GOTO 150 

330 IF XP>S THEN GOTO 310 

331 IF CP<LP THEN PSET ( INT (CP/ 10 
) +4, 191, 4) ELSE XP=XP+1:CP=0:GOT 
0 340 

332 CP=CP+1:I=NS (CP) : GOSUB 1001: 
PSET (INT ( (CP-1J/10) +4,191,2) 



340 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN GOTO 
330 

341 IF I$=" " THEN GOTO 320 ELSE 
GOTO 3 21 

400 'EDIT SONG 

401 SCREEN 1,0: CIRCLE (154 , 13) ,9, 
0 

402 LINE(254,1) -(254,120) , PRESET 
:FOR S=l TO 101 STEP 20: LINE (250 
,S) -(252,S) , PRESET: PSET (2 52, S+5, 
3) :PSET(252,S+10,3) : PSET (252 , S+l 
5,3) : NEXT 

403 XP=1:IF CP>0 THEN GOSUB 490 
ELSE IF LP>0 THEN CP=1: GOSUB 490 

410 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN GOTO 
410 

411 IF I$="#" THEN IF LP=0 THEN 
GOTO 495 ELSE GOTO 420 

412 IF ASC(I$)=8 OR ASC(I$)=9 TH 
EN IF LP=0 THEN GOTO 495 ELSE S= 
335+ASC(I$) :GOTO 430 

413 IF 1$="*" THEN KF= (KF+ 1) - (2 * 
KF) : CIRCLE (134, 65) ,9, KF: GOTO 410 

414 IF ASC(I$)=10 THEN IF LP>0 T 
HEN GOTO 440 ELSE GOTO 495 

415 IF ASC(I$)=91 THEN IF LP>0 T 
HEN GOTO 450 ELSE GOTO 495 

416 IF ASC(I$)=94 THEN GOSUB 470 
:GOTO 410 

417 IF ASC(I$)=95 THEN GOSUB 460 
:GOTO 410 

418 I=K(ASC(I$) ) :IF K100 THEN I 
F KF=0 THEN GOTO 480 ELSE GOSUB 
1001 

419 IF I$<>"?" AND I$<>"=" THEN 
GOTO 410 ELSE COLOR 1,3: LINE (250 
,1)- (254, 120) , PSET, BF: CIRCLE (154 
,13),9,1:IF 1$="?" THEN GOTO 101 

ELSE GOTO 150 

420 CLS 

421 PRINT@160, "" : INPUT"ENTER THE 
NOTE NUMBER" ; 1$ 

422 IF I$<>"" THEN X=0 ELSE SCRE 
EN 1,0: GOTO 410 

423 FOR S=0 TO LEN(I$)-1 

424 IF ASC(RIGHT$ (I$,LEN(I$) -S) ) 
<48 OR ASC(RIGHT$ (I$,LEN(I$) -S) ) 
>57 THEN X=l 

425 NEXT 

426 IF X=l THEN GOTO 4 28 ELSE IF 
VAL(I$)>LP THEN GOTO 42 8 ELSE C 

P=VAL ( I $): SCREEN 1,0: IF CP=0 THE 
N PSET (2 54, XP, 3) : GOTO 410 

427 GOSUB 490: GOTO 410 

428 CLS : PRINT@256 ,"************* 
A*****************": PRINT "*NUMBE 
RS MUST BE FROM 0 TO" ; LP: PRINT© 3 



120 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



18 , : PRINT 11 ******************* 
************** 



SOUND 5, 5: GOTO 421 
IF CP=j3 THEN CP=1 
GOSUB 490 

IF PEEK(S)<>247 THEN GOTO 41 



IF CP< 



IF CP> 



ELSE I 



429 
430 
431 
432 

433 IF S=343 THEN CP=CP-1 
1 THEN CP=LP 

434 IF S=3 44 THEN CP=CP+1 
LP THEN CP=1 

435 GOTO 431 

440 IF CP=P THEN GOTO 410 
F CP=LP THEN GOTO 450 

441 FOR S=CP+1 TO LP : NS ( S-l) =NS ( 
S) :NEXT:LP=LP-1 

442 IF INT ( (LP-1)/10) <INT (LP/10) 
THEN PSET (INT (LP/10) +4 ,191, 3) 

443 GOSUB 490 

444 GOTO 410 

450 IF CP=0 THEN LP=CP ELSE CP=C 
P-1:LP=CP 

451 IF LP<1 THEN LINE ( 4 , 19 1 ) - ( 2 5 
5, 191) , PRESET ELSE IF LP<2501 TH 
EN LINE (INT ( (LP-1) /10 ) +4 , 191) - ( 2 
55, 191) , PRESET 

452 IF LP>0 THEN GOSUB 490 ELSE 
PSET(254, 120,3) 



453 GOTO 410 
4 60 GOSUB 470 

461 IF ASC(I$)=94 THEN RETURN EL 
SE GOTO 4 60 

470 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN GOTO 
470 ELSE IF K (ASC (1$) ) >99 THEN 

RETURN 

471 CP=CP+1 : LP=LP+1 

472 IF CP<LP THEN FOR S=LP TO CP 
+1 STEP -1 : NS (S ) =NS (S-l) :NEXT 

473 NS (CP) =K ( ASC (1$ ) ) : PSET (INT ( ( 
LP-l)/10)+4 , 191, 2) :GOSUB 490 

474 RETURN 

480 IF CP>0 THEN NS (CP) =K (ASC (1$ 
) ) : GOSUB 490 

481 CP=CP+1:IF CP>LP THEN CP=1 

482 PSET(254,XP,3) : XP=121- (CP- (I 
NT ( (CP-1)/120) *120) ) :PSET(2 54,XP 
,2) 

483 GOTO 410 

490 PSET(254,XP,3) : XP=121- (CP- (I 
NT( (CP-1)/120) *120) ) :IF CP>0 THE 
N PSET(2 54,XP,2) 

491 PSET(INT( (CP-1)/10)+4,191,3) 
: I=NS (CP) : GOSUB 1001:PSET(INT( (C 
P-l)/10)+4, 191,2) 

492 RETURN 

495 CLS : PRINT@192 , "************* 




PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO I, II & III 

HALL OF THE KING TRILOGY 

HALL OF THE KING III is finally here to complete the most extensive trio of two 
disk adventures ever available for the color computer. Amazing hi-res graphics 
fill your screen as you follow your quest for the Earthstone. HALL 0 F THE KING 
I, II, & III may be played separately for a great challenge and wonderful entertain- 
ment. The Rainbow review of 9/86 called Hall of the King II a "Winner" while 6/86 
Rainbow review called Hall of the King I "one of the best adventure programs I 
have experienced to date". Try one or all of the Hall of the King series. Each 
adventure is priced at $39.95 if purchased separately. You may order all three for 
a package price of $99.95. If you are one of the lucky adventurers who has 
already purchased Hall I & II, send proof of purchase (invoice, cancelled check, 
etc.) and receive a $10.00 discount on the new HALL OF THE KING III. The Hall 
of the King series is compatible with all versions of the Color Computer in- 
cluding the COCO III. Requires 64K and 1 disk drive. 




WARP FACTOR X (Rainbow Review 2/86) $34.95 
DARKMOOR HOLD (Rainbow Review 8/86) $29.95 
DOLLAR WISE Requires 32K Tape $24.95 — Disk $27.95 



FONTFILE — (New for the COCO III) $24.95. 

DRAGON BLADE (Rainbow Review 11/86) 
Animated Graphics Adventure $29.95 



POLICY ON PROTECTION 

We believe our customers are honest — all of our software can bebacked up us- 
ing standard backup procedures 

Your Personal check is welcome no delay. Include Si 50 shipping for each 
order. TX residents add 6 1/4% sales tax O/ders shipped within two days 

Dealer and author inquiries are always welcome Canadian dealers should con 
tad Kelly Software Distributors, Ltd 608. STNT. Calgary, Alberta T5H 2H2. (403) 
236 2161 



For a complete listing of all our programs call or 
write for our free catalog. 
PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE ( ^ HS 

] M ft 213 La Mirada • El Paso, Texas 79932 

(91 5) 584-7784 



i' 



121 



June 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



ft*******************: PRINT " * NO N 
OTES ARE CURRENTLY KEPT *": PRINT 

ii 

496 SOUND 200, 10: FOR S=l TO 1000 
:NEXT 

497 SCREEN 1,0: GOTO 410 

500 'SAVE SONG 

501 CLS 

510 PRINT @1 60, "" : INPUT "SAVE AS W 
HAT NAME " ; F $ 

511 IF F$="=" THEN GOTO 150 ELSE 
IF F$="?" THEN GOTO 101 ELSE IF 
F$="" THEN GOTO 101 

512 IF LEN(F$)>8 THEN CLS : GOSUB 
1111: GOTO 510 

520 CLS 

521 PRINT §1 60, "": INPUT "SAVE afte 
r WHAT SONG" ? S $ 

522 IF S$="=" THEN GOTO 150 ELSE 
IF S$="?" THEN GOTO 101 ELSE IF 
S$="" THEN GOTO 540 

523 IF LEN(S$)>8 THEN CLS: GOSUB 
llll:GOTO 521 

530 CLS:I$=" play ": GOSUB 1101 

531 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN GOTO 
531 ELSE IF 1$="?" THEN GOTO 10 

1 ELSE IF 1$="=" THEN GOTO 150 E 




THE 




RAINBOW'S 

One-Liner Contest 
has now been expanded 
to include programs of 
either one or two lines. This 
means a new dimension and new 
opportunity for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply just won't fit in 
one line. 

Here are the guidelines: The program must 
work in Extended basic, have only one or two 
line numbers and be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, no calling ROM 
routines, no poked-in machine language code. 
The program has to run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our readers will use it). Make 
sureyour line, or lines, aren't packed sotightly 
that the program won't list completely. Finally, 
any instructions needed should 
be very short. 

Send your entry 
(preferably on cassette) to: 




LSE IF ASC(I$)<>13 THEN GOTO 531 
532 PRINT@296, "skipping ff ;S$:SKI 
PF S$ 

54j3 CLS :I$= ff record ff : GOSUB 11J81 

541 I$=INKEY$:IF I$= ffff THEN GOTO 
541 ELSE IF 1$="=" THEN GOTO 15 

f} ELSE IF 1$ = "?" THEN GOTO 1J31 E 
LSE IF ASC(I$)<>13 THEN GOTO 541 

542 PRINT@2 97 , "SAVING ";F$:OPEN" 
0" , -1 , F$ : PRINT@297 , "saving " ; F$ : 
IF LP<1 THEN GOTO 544 

543 FOR S=l TO LP: PRINT#-1 , NS (S) 
:NEXT S 

544 CLOSE-l:CLS:PRINT@137,F$; ff s 
aved. " : PRINT : PRINT" ********* 
**************»»: PRINT" * PUSH 

? FOR THE MENU *": PRINT" *** 
********************" 

545 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="=" THEN GOT 

0 150 ELSE IF 1$="?" THEN GOTO 1 

01 ELSE GOTO 545 

600 'GET SONG 

601 CLS:S$="NEXT SONG" 

610 PRINT@160,"":INPUT"GET WHAT 
SONG" ; F$ 

611 IF F$="=" THEN GOTO 150 ELSE 
IF F$="?" THEN GOTO 101 ELSE IF 
F$="" THEN GOTO 620 ELSE S$=F$ 

612 IF LEN(F$)>8 THEN CLS : GOSUB 
1111: GOTO 610 



About Your Subscription 



Your copy of THE rainbow is sent second class 
mail. You must notify us of a new address when 
you move. Notification should reach us no later 
than the 15th of the month prior to the month in 
which you change your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending another copy when you 
fail to notify us. 

Your mailing label also shows an account 
number and the subscription expiration date. 
Please indicate this account number when renew- 
ing or corresponding with us. It will help us help 
you better and faster. 

For Canadian and other non-U. S. subscribers, 
there may be a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial office address. Do not 
send any correspondence to that mailing address. 
Send it to our editorial offices at Falsoft, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
This applies to everyone except those whose 
subscriptions are through our distributor in 
Australia. 



122 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



62J3 CLS:I$=" play " :GOSUB 1101 

621 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="" THEN GOTO 
621 ELSE IF 1$="?" THEN GOTO 10 

1 ELSE IF I $="=•' THEN GOTO 150 E 
LSE IF ASC(I$)<>13 THEN GOTO 621 

622 PRINT@2 93 , "searching for ";S 
$ : OPEN"I" , -1 , F$ : PRINT@293 , " ge 
tting 11 ;S$:CP=^):LP=j3: COLOR 2,3:L 

INE(4, 191) -(255,191) , PRESET 

623 LP=LP+ 1 : INPUT #-l,NS( LP) :IF E 
OF(-l) THEN GOTO 624 ELSE GOTO 6 
23 

624 CLOSE-l:CLS:PRINT@137,S$;" g 

otten. ": PRINT: PRINT" ******** 

***************" :PRINT" * PUS 

H ? FOR THE MENU * 11 : PRINT 11 * * 
********************** ;IF LP>0 T 

HEN LINE (4, 191)- (INT ( (LP-l)/lj3) + 
4, 191) ,PSET 

625 I$=INKEY$:IF 1$="?" THEN GOT 
0 101 ELSE IF 1$="=" THEN GOTO 1 
50 ELSE GOTO 625 

900 'QUIT SCREEN 

901 CLS: SCREEN 0,1 

910 PRINT@2j3j3, "GOOBYE, FOR NOW." 
920 PRINT@257,"I HOPE YOU ENJOYE 
D PLAYING THE" 
930 PRINT@331,"P I A N 0." 

940 PRINT@363," " 

950 PRINT@448,"" 
960 END 

1000 'PLAY ONE NOTE 

1001 IF 1=0 THEN FOR X=l TO 160: 



NEXT X: RETURN 

1010 LET X=I*6:IF C(I)=2 THEN LE 

T Y=187 ELSE LET Y=179 

1020 LINE(X-2 , Y-6) - (X+6,Y) , PRESE 

T , BF : C0L0R2 , 3 : LINE ( X+2 , 1 60 ) - ( X+2 

,L(I) ) ,PSET 

1030 SOUND N(I) ,T 

1040 LINE(X+2,160)-(X+2,L(I) ) , PR 
ESET:COLOR C (I) , 3 : LINE (X-2 , Y-6) - 
(X+6,Y) ,PSET,BF 

1099 RETURN 

1100 'MESSAGES 

1101 CLS : PRINT@128 , "************ 
*******************»; PRINT"* SET 
RECORDER TO ";I$;" & PUSH*" 

1102 PRINT"* enter TO BEGIN (? F 
OR MENU ) * " : PRINT "************** 
******************* 

11J33 RETURN 

1111 PRINT@2 57 ,"**************** 
*************»: PRINT 11 * NAMES MU 

ST BE 1-8 SYMBOLS *": PRINT" **** 
*************************** 

1112 SOUND 5, 5: RETURN 

1121 CLS : PRINT@192 ,"************ 
a******************": PRINT"* SPA 

CE FOR KEPT NOTES IS full*":PRIN 
I" 1 ****************************** 

*" 

1122 SOUND 200, 10: FOR S=l TO 100 
0 : NEXT 

1123 SCREEN 1,0: RETURN 



LOWEST CONTROLLER PRICE EVER!! The New JFD-EC, Only $75 

NOW COCO 3 Compatible * 




t//A 



JFD-EC DISK CONTROLLER 

The JFD-EConomical controller combines the best features of the 

original JFD-COCO with 
the two switchable ROM 
sockets, fully buffered data 
lines and Memory Minder 
in ROM. The JFD-EC re- 
places the JFD-COCO in 
our product line at an even 
lower price. The controller 
includes JDOS, the JDOS 
manual and Memory Mind- 
er in ROM. (Precision Alignment Disk not included.) 

JFD-EC DiskControllerwithJDOS $75 
OPTIONS 

Precision Alignment Disk &Memory Minder Manual D/S $ 40.00 

Precision Alignment Disk & Memory Minder ManualS/S $ 26.00 

JFD-EC Disk Controller with RS DOS 1.1 S 75.00 

JFD-ECDiskControllerwithJDOSandRSDOSl.l $ 95.00 

JFD-ECDriveOSystemwith one double sided drive $250.00 

JFD-EC Drive 0. 1 System with twodoubie sided drives 5365.00 

'JFD-EC and JFD-CP with JDOS or RS DOS are COCO 3 compatible. 



NEW TERMS 

Oneyear warranty on parts & labor. Freeshipping 
via UPS in continental United States for payment by 
Visa, MasterCard or Cashiers check. Blue Label & 
foreign shipping extra. 

DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Drive systems include our JFD-CP or JFD-EC 
disk controller, JDOS with Memory Minder 
in ROM and one or two half-height floppy 
drive(s) with case and power supply. 



<//A 

JAM SYSTEMS, LTD. 

15100-A CENTRAL SE 
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO 87123 
505/292-4182 




JFD-CP DISK CONTROLLER 

Our new JFD-CP, compatible with the original COCO, COCO 2 and 

the new COCO 3, features 
a parallel port to support a 
Centronics compatible 
printer or our hard drive, 
and an external ROM 
switch, which allows you to 
select JDOS or an optional 
RS DOS-type ROM. It 
comes in a case and in- 
cludes JDOS 1.2 and man- 
ual. JDOS implements all RS DOS commands, plus many more, in- 
cluding auto line numbering, error trapping, baud rate selection, 
OS/9 boot from floppy or hard drive, and Memory Minder, our disk 
drive analysis program. (Precision Alignment Disk not included.) 

JPD-CP Disk Controller with JDOS $ 99.00 

OPTIONS 

Precision Alignment Disk & Memory Minder Manual D/S $ 40.00 

Precision Alignment Disk & Memory MinderManualS/S $ 26.00 

JPD-CP Disk Controller with RS DOS 1.1 $ 99.00 

JPD-CP Disk Controllerwith JDOS and RS DOS 1.1 $ 11 9.00 

JFD-CP Drive O System with one double sided drive $265.00 

JFD-CP Drive 0, 1 System with two double sided drives 5379.00 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 123 



IT'S HERE! Radio Shack announced 
'March 9, 1987, the availability of OS- 
9™ Level II, the user-friendly operating 
system for the Color Computer 3. The 
OS-9 Level II package includes 
BASIC09™ and several utilities. The 
operating system features windowing 
|and graphics in addition to the multi- 
user, multitasking environment. It also 
features a powerful memory manage- 
ment system with memory protection 
■inherent in its operation and affords a 
high-level of system 1/ Os, including file 
•and record locking. Available at all 
Radio Shack stores, Radio Shack Com- 
puter Centers and participating dealers 
nationwide, suggested retail price of 
OS-9 Level II (Catalog No. 26-3031) is 
$79.95. 

UP, UP AND AWAY Tandy Corpora- 
tion announced that consolidated sales 
'and operating revenues for the month 
of February were $244,449,000 — an 
increase of 12 percent over the February 
1986 sales and operating revenues of 
$218,103,000. Tandy's U.S. retail oper- 
ations recorded a 15 percent jump in 
sales and operating revenues to 
$210,737,000 in February 1987 from 
$183,567,000 in February 1986. Sales 
and operating revenues of U.S. retail 
stores in existence more than one year 
increased 13 percent in February 1987. 

TEACH AN OLD DOG NEW 
TRICKS To meet the needs of new 
niche markets, C. Itoh Digital Products, 
Inc., has added more speed, memory 
and faster throughput to its popular 
ProWriter jr. dot matrix printer. 

The enhanced printer is called the 
ProWriter jr. Plus, and C. Itoh has 
increased its speed by 33 percent to 160 
cps in draft mode. In addition, through- 
put speed on the jr. Plus has increased 
jfrom 48 to 61 lines per minute, and the 
buffer memory has been enlarged three- 
fold to 8K. One button selection sets the 
printer for 30 cps in NLQ mode. 

The lightweight ProWriter jr. Plus 
features a unique, space-saving, built-in 
printer stand that allows for paper to be 



placed underneath the printer. Also, 
paper handling is designed to offer 
versatility to the user. Paper input is 
facing the user so that single sheets, 
variable-size forms, envelopes and 
continuous paper can be loaded 




The acclaimed UNIX System Library avail- 
able from Howard W. Sams & Company 



through the front of the printer without 
leaving your chair. Cut sheet forms can 
be inserted without removing the con- 
tinuous paper off the tractor feed 
sprockets. 



Emulating the Epson FX-80+ (plus 
built-in IBM character sets), the Pro- 
Writer jr. Plus retails for $369. Contact 
C. Itoh Digital Products, Inc., 19750 
South Vermont Avenue, Suite 220, 
Torrance, CA 90502, (213)327-2110. 
GET AN EDUCATION The Hay den 
Books UNIX System Library is a series 
of books on various topics related to the 
UNIX system. This acclaimed series 
covers everything from introductory 
texts, such as Programming in C and 
Exploring the UNIX System, to more 
advanced titles such as UNIX Text 
Processing and UNIX Shell Program- 
ming. The books were edited by Ste- 
phen G. Kochan and Patrick H. Wood, 
who specialize in training UNIX and C 
users. They worked for several years at 
Bell Laboratories teaching introductory 
and advanced courses. 

Hayden Books UNIX Library was 
recently aquired by Howard W. Sams & 
Company, a division of Macmillan, Inc. 
The UNIX Library and other titles from 
Hayden Books are available through 
bookstores, electronics distributors or 
by calling Howard W. Sams at (800) 
428-SAMS. 




The new C. Itoh ProWriter jr. Plus 



124 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



"4 



(i 



i 



/I 



1 



ft 



j 



Computer Island Educational Software 



ARROW GAMES 

32K Ext. - $21.95 tape/$26.95 disk 
Six menu driven games for young 
children (ages 3-6) to teach direc- 
tions. All games involve using the 
arrow keys ONLY. Games include: 
LADYBUG, BUTTERFLY, ARROW 
MATCH, KALEIDOSCOPE, RABBIT, 
and DOODLE. Colorful graphics. 

FIRST GAMES 

32K Ext. - $24.95 tape/$29.95 disk 
First Games contains 6 menu driven 
programs to delight and teach your 
early learners (ages 3-6). These 
games enrich the learning of colors, 
numbers, lower case letters, shapes, 
memory, visual discrimination and 
counting. 




CLOZE STORIES 

32K Ext. - $19.95 Tape/$24.95 Disk 
These programs give students prac- 
tice using the popular CLOZE read- 
ing technique. Each program contains 
grade appropriate short stories with 
key missing words to be deduced by 
the student. Available for grades 3, 4, 
5, 6, OR 7. Please specify. 

DRAWING CONCLUSIONS 

32K Ext. - tape $19.95/disk $24.95 
These programs contain short stories. 
Each story has two accompanying 
questions that ask the student to draw 
conclusions from the text. Available 
for grades 3-4 OR 5-6. Please specify. 



LOCATING STORY DETAILS 

32K Ext. - disk only - $24.95 
These programs contain short stories. 
Each has an accompanying picture. 
Questions about story details refer to 
either the text a pictures. The disk 
generated graphics are an integral 
part of these attractive programs. 
Available for grades 2-3 OR 4-5. 
Please specify. 




FOREIGN LANGUAGE GAMES 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 

(500 words) 
French or Spanish Baseball 
Score base hits or home runs for 
correct answers. You're out if wrong. 
Correct answers supplied. Fun way 
to learn and practice vocabulary. 
PLEASE SPECIFY LANGUAGE. 




PUNCTUATION PRACTICE 

32K Ext. - tape $19.95/disk $24.95 
On screen practice in proper usage 
of the familiar punctuation marks. 
Grades 3-7. 




MATH TUTOR SERIES 

16K Ext. 

These tutorials take the child through 
each step of the example. All pro- 
grams include HELP tables, cursor 
and graphic aids. All allow user to 
create the example, or let the com- 
puter choose. Multi-level. Great 
teaching programs. 

LONG DIVISION TUTOR 
$14.95 tape/$19.95 disk 
MULTIPLICATION TUTOR 
$14.95 tape/$19.95 disk 

FACTORS TUTOR 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (addition) 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (subtraction) 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 
FRACTIONS TUTOR (mult.) 
$19.95 tape/$24.95 disk 

COMPUTER LITERACY 

32K Ext. - $19.95 tape/$29.95 disk 
A computer literacy quiz exclusively 
for the Color Computer. Tests and 
scores from over 60 questions on a 
Hi-res upper and lower case screen. 
Reviews computer literacy and 
beginning programming knowledge. 
Ages 10 and up. 



\ 



I 



/, 



n 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 



Computer/rlsland 



SEAL 



VISA 



(718) 948-2748 
Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 



Please add $1 .00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE, including full directions, with 
orders of 2 or more items. 



Dealer Inquiries Invited. 



TRS-80 Color Computer 



All Payments in U.S. Funds. 



DELPHI BUREAU 



Help One, Help All 

By Cray Augsburg 
Rainbow Technical Editor 



Last month in "Delphi Bureau," 
we discussed several ways in 
which users of the CoCo SIG 
could find help on SIG operation. This 
month, we will turn to a related topic 
of how CoCo SIG members can help 
themselves, as well as the rest of the 
CoCo Community. 

Three sections of the CoCo SIG exist 
for the purpose of allowing users to 
boost growth in the CoCo Community. 
These sections, as they appear on the 
CoCo SIG menu, are: I) Poll, 2) Ques- 
tions & Feedback, and 3) Rainbow 
Magazine Services. While these titles 
for the three sections are somewhat self- 
explanatory, we will now cover each in 
a little more detail. 

Questions & Feedback 

The Questions & Feedback area of 
the CoCo SIG is an area designed for 
matters directly related to SIG business 
and the operation of the CoCo SIG. To 
enter this area, just enter QUE at the 
CoCo Sig > prompt. 

Four options are available in the Q & 
F area. The first is Feedback to SIG 
Staff. Use this selection if you wish to 
send a complaint about any aspect of 
SIG operation. You will be prompted 
for all necessary information and then 
given several lines on which to compile 
your message. We only know how good 
a job we are doing if you let us know. 

The second option in the area is 



Cray Augsburg is RMNBOWs technical 
editor and has an associate's degree in 
electrical engineering. He and his wife, 
Ruth Ann, have two children and live 
in Louisville, Kentucky. His username 
on Delphi is RAINBOW MAG. 



Request for Free Upload Time. Yes, we 
believe that if you have something you 
are willing to share with us, you should 
not be charged for making it available 
to others. SIG Manager Jim Reed 
(JIMREED) has been quite generous in 
allocating free connect time to anyone 
who wants to upload material to our 
CoCo and OS-9 Online SIGs. So, get 



your "upload list" ready and send a 
request with this selection. 

Suggestion Box is another important 
option. If you have an idea you think 
would be good for the SIG, by all means 
send it to us via this selection. Your 
suggestion will be mailed to all con- 
cerned SIG staff for evaluation. Keep in 
mind, while it is true we might have 



DATABASE REPORT 



During March OS-9 Online showed 
an increasing number of uploads, as 
more and more of our members acquired 
OS-9 Level II and began to learn about 

it. ■ i^y* 1 ^^^^^^^^^^^ 
OS-9 Online Databases: 

In the General Information section, Ed 

Orbea (basque) sent us a list of changes 

in the 0S9Defs file. Ray McCoppin 

(raymccoppin) gave us a BASIC09 utility 

to read the Hi-Res mouse or joystick 

ports. Dennis Weldy (OS9ER) gave us a 

utility to allow RS-DOS source code files 

to be assembled under OS-9. Chuck 

Hoffman (CHOFFMAN) provided us with 

an OS-9 Level II boot fix utility that can 

be used when creating double-sided boot 

disks. 

In the Applications area, Steve Clark 
(STEVECLARK) gave us a program for 
adding up rows of numbers and another 
for creating overlays on a screen. Gene 
Loefer (gloefer) uploaded a BAS1C09 
program that creates windows on an 80- 
column screen. 

In the Utilities section, Toni Ryan 
(tntrhodan) sent us a new ccobbler 
and 0S9Gen file, which provided a dump 
with more features, provisions for creat- 
ing double-sided boot disks under Level 
I and for breaking up a boot file into its 
component modules. Steve Clark pro- 



vided code to issue 66 carriage returns to 
simulate a form feed. George Janssen 
(GBJANSSEN) sent us XREF, which produ- 
ces a cross-reference for assembly source 
files. Steven Goncalo (goncalo) gave us 
WILD, a program to support wild-card 
functions. Gene Loefer gave us more 
BASIC09 window setup utilities. Greg Law 
(gregl) donated a simple utility for 
unlinking modules from memory in 
Level II OS-9. Mark Sunderlin (meg- 
abyte) provided a utility for stripping 
padding characters from Xmodem files. 
Donald R. Grafton (GRAFTON) gave us a 
file sorter routine. 

In the Device Drivers topic area, Toni 
Ryan gave us Level II drivers for a RAM 
disk, an 80-column driver and double- 
sided device descriptors. Dennis Weldy 
sent us a tutorial and example of how to 
write device drivers in the C language. 
Kevin Darling (kdarling) provided us 
with an excellent Level II RAM disk 
driver. 

In the Patches topic area, Toni Ryan 
sent us a patch to the assembler to allow 
filenames with the underline character in 
them. Chuck Hoffman provided a patch 
to shorten the motor off delay and to 
allow accessing the back sides of DO and 
Dl as D2 and D3. 

In the Telcom database, Bill Brady 



126 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



already heard a similar request, very few 
requests are "minor" enough not to be 
made. It is the silent wish that makes a 
good suggestion. 

The last option in the Questions & 
Feedback area is the Trouble Report. If 
you encounter any problems with the 
system in Mail, during a download or 
anywhere else, please take the time to 
fill out a trouble report. We have been 
able to help several members as well as 
head off further trouble through this 
avenue of communication. Similarly, 
timely reports have enabled us to head 
off minor problems that could have 
quickly become major problems. 

What Is "Poll"? 

The Poll section of the SIG is just 
what its name implies. It is an area 
where members can create polls and 
surveys and vote on other polls. Pres- 
ently, active polls include such topics as 
"Interest in Level II OS-9" and "Who 
Likes the MC-10." At any one time, 20 
polls can be active. When it appears a 
given poll is no longer active, it is 
archived and placed in the Topics area 
of the SIG for perusal by all members. 
Jim Reed is in charge of this area. Since 
it seems full almost all the time, if you 



want to create a new poll, you should 
send him a message via Mail. 

When in thepoll area, several options 
are available to you. They are: 

BROWSE through poll results 
CREATE a neu poll 
EDIT your poll comment 
LIST pol 1 names 
RESULTS with comments 
VOTE on a poll 

As always, in addition to the above 
options, you can ask for HELP or EXIT 
the area and go back to the CoCo SIG 
menu. A handy option in the Poll area 
is BROWSE. After entering this com- 
mand, you will begin to review the 
present results of all active polls one by 
one. You will be given an opportunity 
to VOTE or READ pertinent comments on 
each poll before moving to the next. 
This speeds things up in the poll area 
and allows you to vote on all the polls 
that might interest you without having 
to go through a lot of trouble. The other 
commands, such as RESULTS, require 
that you enter the name of a specific poll 
before continuing. 

Visit the Mini-SIG 

For the CoCo user, one of the most 



important "self-help" areas on Delphi is 
the Rainbow Magazine Services "mini- 
Si G." You can get to this area by typing 
RRIN at the CaCo 5ig> prompt. 
Another way is to enter the Magazines 
& Books area off the main Delphi menu 
and then select Rainbow Magazine 
Services. However, this would require 
more work, as most CoCo SIG 
members have their default menu set up 
to take them directly to the CoCo SIG 
upon logon (if you don't, use the Set 
Preferences item in the CoCo SIG). 

Rainbow Magazine Services is an 
area of Delphi set up foi correspon- 
dence with RAINBOW magazine. It offers 
several features that many users will 
want to take advantage of. Many users 
already use the area to its fullest extent. 
The options offered in this area are: 

Announcements 

Ask The Experts 

Address Change 

Letters to Rainbow 

MAIL 

Order RAINBOW est Tickets 
Subscriptions On-line 
Vo t i ng Booth 
Help 
Exi t 

Portal to COCO SIG 



(wbrady) gave us several new uploads. 
He generously provided packed proce- 
dures for his BigT Terminal program 
that supports Xmodem and a newly 
proposed variation of Xmodem to facil- 
itate transfer of OS-9 files. He provided 
C0C0BIN.TXT, a discussion of his 
proposal of how to modify Xmodem to 
deal with problems it causes with OS-9 
files. He also gave us full source code for 
his BigT program. 

Color Computer SIG Databases: 

In the CoCo SIG, uploads continued 
at a good pace. In the General Informa- 
tion topic area, I posted an essay detail- 
ing my reservations about the war on 
drugs. Mike Fischer (M1KE88) gave us a 
humorous item called Funny Text. 

In the Utilities section, Jason Ruddock 
(jayr) sent us a code to change the 
prompt under Disk BASIC on the CoCo 
3. Steve Bjork (6809ER) sent us a unique 
disk quality checker. Jim Sparks (ESCO- 
man) gave us a monitor program called 
Color Bug. Kurt Stecco (highrailer) 
sent a calendar printer for the DMP-I05. 
Steve Macri (dracman) sent us 
RS232.P/X. Roger A. Krupski (hard- 
warehack) sent us a Morse Code utility. 
Richard Ferreira (SKEEVE) sent us a 
program entitled J 987 Tax Liability. 

In the Music topic area, Mike Knudsen 
(ragtimer) gave us two new tunes. 

The Graphics section received quite a 



few new files. The CoCo Galleries for 
November and December of 1986 and 
January 1987 have arrived. Tony Rapson 
(TRAPSON) gave us a Serif font set. Earl 
Knutson (bj#rnknutson) donated Mc 
Paint printer drivers for the Star Mi- 
cronix SG10. Bob Wharton (bobwhar- 
ton) gave us National League baseball 
images and a picture entitled Top Gun. 
Billy M. Hambric (SNOOPYDOG) sent us 
pictures of Alf, Peanuts and other digi- 
tized images. Loren J. Howell (XENOS) 
gave us the CoCo 3 program HCOMP. 
Fred Ahlberg (fredahlberg) sent us 
several pictures f rom Doctor Who. Rich- 
ard Trasborg (tras) sent us some con- 
verted Atari pictures. 

In the Product Reviews section, I 
uploaded an announcement about a 
solderless CoCo keyboard extender cable 
that I will test market at the Chicago 
RAINBOWfest. Roy Crosby (UNCLE) 
sent us a review of Microwork's latest 
revision of their superb digitizer, the 
DS69B for the CoCo 2 and 3. Andrew 
Ellinor (CROPPER) sent us a review of the 
PBJ 5I2K upgrade he purchased from 
Computerware. Michael Schneider 
(MSCHNEIDER) sent us a review of Koro- 
nis Rift, a new OS-9 Level II game f rom 
EPYX sold by Tandy. 

In the Source Code for 6809 as- 
semblers topic area, Roger A. Krupski 
sent us a source code for his Morse Code 
program. Alan DeKok (alandekok) 



gave us source code for his New Attri- 
butes program. 

In the Games topic area, Kurt Stecco 
sent us a submarine war game. Keith 
Morabeto (kmorabeto) uploaded a 
Yahtzee game. Craig Green (spudly) 
sent us his Win Ten lottery number 
selection game. Pat Abramovitch 
(hubbs) gave us a Lunar Lander game. 
Loren J. Howell sent us a simple BASIC 
shoot-'em-up game. Mike Ward (MIKE- 
ward) shared his researches into the 
game Rogue. Game hackers will love this 
file. 

Next month's uploads will likely in- 
clude some reports of what I and others 
saw at the Chicago RAINBOWfest. Also, 
expect to soon see a revision of Ricky- 
Term that will, among other things, 
support the bit banger port on the CoCo 
3. There is even a chance that in the next 
month or two we shall see a version of 
WEFAX enhanced by support for buffers 
and different frequencies. I also expect 
we will be seeing more rainbow Galleries 
in the Graphics section. In the OS-9 SIG, 
members will probably begin to see what 
will eventually be an additional five 
megabytes of OS-9 User Group material. 
Well, I must go now to catch my plane 
to Chicago. I'll see you all later in the 
CoCo SIG and OS-9 Online SIG. 

— Marty Goodman 
Rainbow's Delphi Database Manager 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 127 



The Announcements area, while usu- 
ally used by the SIG staff as a way of 
posting announcements, can be rather 
interesting. You might find some items 
in here that you have not seen before. 

Ask The Experts is an area designed 
to allow you to send questions to rain- 
bow's question and answer columnists, 
Dan Downard, Marty Goodman and 
Richard Esposito. The questions you 
pose will be received by these colum- 
nists and may be published along with 
an answer in future issues of the RAIN- 
BOW. 

Letters to Rainbow is similar to Ask 
The Experts, except these letters are 
intended for the "Letters to the Editor" 
section of rainbow magazine. Using 



Ask the Experts and Letters to Rain- 
bow is very easy and sure beats waiting 
on U.S. Mail. 

As its name implies, Address Change 
gives you a quick and reliable way of 
notifying RAINBOW magazine of your 
new location. Along with Order RAIN- 
BOWfest Tickets and Subscriptions 
On-line, all Address Change entries are 
received and sent to the subscription 
department at the Falsoft Building in 
Prospect, Kentucky. These three op- 
tions are for the express purpose of 
expediting transactions with RAINBOW 
magazine. 

The Voting Booth area is identical to 
the Poll area in the CoCo SJG, except 
that the polls are different. This means 




PREMIUM PRINTER SYSTEMS 

PLUG-N-GO FOR THE COCO 



STAR NX-10 



Easy-to-use and ready for heavy 
workloads. System includes the 
NX-10 printer with BLUE STREAK II 
serial to parallel interface and our Soft- 
ware Trio (see below). 1 Year limited 
warranty serviceable nationwide. 



CITIZEN 120D 



System includes Citizen 120D printer 
with serial interface, cable, and our 
Software Trio (see below). 12 month 
limited warranty. 



SPECS 120 cps Draft. 
30 cps NLO. Italics. 
Sub A Superscnpis. 
Emphasized. Doublesinka 
Proportional. Iniernaiional. Down 
Loadable Char., Graphics 480- 1920 
dots/line. Forward or Reverse rv2l6" 
Line Feeds. Friction & Push Tractor, 
5K Daia Bufler 






J" v 

These 
are complete 
systems. Nothing 
more to buy! ^\ 

$279 95 

■♦$11) Shipping .mil tiiMunnu- 



Reviewed in 
'87 March 



SPECS: 120 cps Draft. 25 cps 
NLQ, Italics, Sub & Superscripts. 
Emphasized. Doubiesinke, Proponional. 
International. User Defined Characters. 
Reverse print. Graphics <1G0- 1920 dois;lin9 
Friction and Tractor, <JK Bufler. 



-1 



$229 95 

+SH) Shipping ;irul Insurance 



BLUE STREAK II I SOFTWARE TRIO 



A serial to parallel interface thai can increase 
your data transmission 4 fold over conventional- 
compatible interfacing. An additional serial I/O 
port permits port sharing with another serial 
device withoui recabiing. 



SPECS: 300io9600Swiichable 
Baud Rates, \ Year Warranty, Input 
4 Pin Seriai.Oulput 36PinParailel 
and 4 Pin Serial. 



$4995 
$5495 



+S2 Shipping 

w/power supply 
+$2 Shipping 



Type Selcclion Tutorial Program 

Specify Siar/Scikosha/or Citizens Printer. 

Super Gcmprint Screen Dump 
8"x I I "dump with grey level shading for color. 

Drayon's Word Processor 2.2 
Create, save &. print customized documents. 

All Three Programs $19 9 5 +S2 



Shipping 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES Wk, INC. 

7201 CLAIRCREST BLDG. C 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX • CO.D. ADD $2,00 



PERSONAL SERVICEl 

(513) 236-1454 

Visa & MasterCard 
within the continental U.S. 



we can offer up to 40 active polls and 
surveys directly to the CoCo Communi- 
ty at one time. 

The Portal to COCO SIG gives you 
a way to jump into the SIG. Keep in 
mind, if you came into the Rainbow 
Magazine Services area from the CoCo 
SIG, all that is required to return to the 
CoCo SIG is a press of CONTROL-Z. On 
the other hand, if you entered the area 
from the main Delphi menu, you might 
want to use the Portal option as a 
shortcut to the CoCo SIG. This is 
because a CONTROL-Z (if you entered 
from MflIN>) would take you back 
toward the main menu. This is an 
important point to remember on Del- 
phi. CONTROL-Z returns you to the menu 
from which you entered an area. 





Some "Editorial" Comments 

Many people have asked the ques- 
tion, "How can I easily edit a mes- 
sage I am sending in Mail or Forum?" 
Well, in Forum, when you use ADD or 
REPLY to create a message, you start 
out in a "mini-editor." Many folks 
don't realize this. To see for yourself, 
during a message, type /HELP at the 
beginning of a line and you'll see: 



/LIST - lists all lines typed 
/DELETE - erases the last line 
/EDIT - invokes your editor 
/EXIT - same as Control-Z 
/QUIT - same as Control-C 



But, for more sophisticated edit- 
ing, use the /ED (all commands must 
be at the beginning of a line) to call 
up either the EDT or OLDIE editors, 
whichever you have selected as your 
default editor by using the Set Pref- 
erences selection f rom the CoCo SIG 
menu. 

You can begin your message in the 
edit mode in Forum with ADD/EDIT 
and REPLY/EDIT. 

In Mail, you can use SEND/EDIT 
and REPLY/EDIT at the MflIL> 
prompt. This will invoke your editor 
initially. But, once you have begun a 
Mail message, you cannot invoke the 
editor in mid-message. 

As a hint, these editor options give 
you the ability to save parts of your 
message to Workspace, as well as 
merge other files from your Works- 
pace into your messages. It can be a 
very handy feature. 



128 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



RAINB 





ADOS 1.02 

Better Than Ever /SpectroSy stems 146 

The Amazin' Maze Game 

Labyrinth of a Maze/Mikaron Software 137 

Bumble Games 

Educational Challenges/The Learning Company 142 

Cave Walker 

Magic Spells and Treasures/Tandy Corporation 135 

Color Scribe III 

Word Power for the CoCo/Computerware 136 

Dragon's Castle 

A Bargain Basement Adventure/ Mitchell Software 143 

JramR 

512K Upgrade for the CoCo 3/J&R Electronics 134 

Lockout 

Secures Your Disk Contents/Custom Software 140 

MYDOS 

DOS Enhancer/Haw/cso/f 144 

PAL Switcher 

Solves Multi-Pak Dilemma/ Spectrum Projects, Inc 138 

SECA Coupon Filer 

Database File Program/SEC/4 139 

SoundScope 

See What Sound Looks Like/7of/7/an Software 133 

StopBurn 

The CRT Saver/Lucas Industries 2000 140 

Super Collection of Super Games 

Old Favorites for the CoCo/Mikaron Software 145 

The Word Factory — Synonyms and Antonyms 

Educational Game of Words/SEC/A 132 




RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



The following products have recently been received by THE RAINBOW, 
examined by our magazine staff and approved for the Rainbow Seal of 
Certification, your assurance that we have seen the product and have 
ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 

This month the SeaJ of Certification has been issued to: 



mesoft, 4 Hallfield Court, Balti- 
more, MD' 21236; (301) 256-7558, 
$19.95. 



* * * 



ADOS-3, an enhanced, EPROM- 
able Disk BASIC. For the CoCo 3, 
but will function on the CoCo 1 or 
2 acting as a mildly enhanced ver- 
sion of RSDOS. SpectroSystems, 
Hill N. Kenhall Drive, Suite 
A108, Miami, FL 33176; (305)274- 
3899, $34.95 plus $2 S/H. 



The Best BBS, a bulletin board 
system that operates on a 32K CoCo 
with one drive and a DCM-5, using 
a standard serial port. The Saint 
John Gallery, P.O. Box 613, Mt. 
Sinai, NY 11766, $12. 



The Disk Scripture Index, a set of 

programs designed to make an 
index of Bible topics and Scripture 
references. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 
Sovereign Grace Software, 221 
Highview Drive, Ballwin, MO 
63011; (314) 227-3238, $10.95 plus 
$2.50 S/H. 

* * * 



BSS 512K RamDisk, a utility pro- 
gram that offers flexibility, requires 
no BASIC user storage, and is com- 
patible with RS-DOS BASIC 1 .0 and 
1.1. For the CoCo 3. Bangert Soft- 
ware Systems, P.O. Box 21056, 
Indianapolis, IN 46221; (317) 262- 
8865, $14.95 plus $2 S/H. 

* * * 

BBS Print Spooler, BSS Screen 
Print, BSS Date and Time, and 
TYP-O-MATIC Keys, a series of 
utility programs that can be run 
together as an integrated package. 
For the CoCo 3. Bangert Software 
Systems, P.O. Box 21056, Indiana- 
polis, IN 46221; (317) 262-8865, 
$9.95 each plus $2 S/H. 

* * * 

BTU Analysis, a program that an- 
alyzes heat loss and gain, and calcu- 
lates proper heating and cooling 
unit size. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 
A to Z Unlimited, 901 Ferndale 
Boulevard, High Point, NC 27260; 
(919)882-6255, $39.95 plus, $3 S/H. 

* * * 

Basic Freedom, a full screen editor 
that features lowercase interpreter 
and auto-key repeat. For the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3. Dr. Preble's Programs, 
6540 Outer Loop, Louisville, KY 
40228; (502)966-8281; Disk, $29.95; 
Tape for CoCo 1 or 2, $27.95. 



CoCo HI Unravelled, a commented 
disassembly of the new code in the 
CoCo 3's ROM. Spectrum Projects, 
Inc., P. O. Box 264, Howard Beach, 
NY 11414; (718) 835-1344, $29.95 
plus $3 SI H. 

* * * 

Color SCRIPSIT II, a 16K word 
processing program that offers a 
wide range of format options, which 
enable you to use a variety of type 
styles; to center, boldface and un- 
derline text; and to set tabs and 
margins. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 
Tandy Corp. Available in Radio 
Shack stores nationwide. $29.95. 

* * * 

CSG IMS, a database manager that 
includes all the necessary tools to 
create business software. It has both 
relational and network capabilities. 
For the CoCo 2 and 3. Kelly Soft- 
ware Distributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 
608, Station "T," Calgary, Alberta, 
Canada T2H 2H2; (403) 236-2161, 
Single user, $149.95 U.S.; Multi- 
user, $199.95 U.S. 

* * * 

Custom Palette Designer, a pro- 
gram that lets you alter any palette 
slot without having to remember 
names or numbers of colors. For the 
CoCo 3 with one disk drive. Gim- 



Disk Tutorial, this two-disk pack- 
age for BASIC/ ML programmers 
gives almost everything you need to 
know about the disk system. Micro- 
corn Software, P.O. Box 214, Fair- 
port, NY 14450; (716) 223-1477, 
$36.95 plus $3 S/H. 

* * * 

Dollar Wise, a personal business 
utility that takes some of the guess- 
work out of making major pur- 
chases or investments. For the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3. Prickly-Pear Software, 
213 Mirada, El Paso, TX 79932; 
(915) 584-7784, Disk $27.95; Tape 
$24.95. 

* * * 

Donald Duck's Playground, a 64K 

action-packed game to help children 
ages 7 to 11 develop money- 
handling skills. Four separate games 
teach spatial relationships, as well as 
matching and logic skills, while 
encouraging creative expressions. 
For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. Sierra On- 
Line, Coarsegold, CA 93614; 
$34.95. Available in Radio Shack 
stores nationwide. 

* * * 

EXAMS III, a multiple choice, true- 
false, and/or answer test sheet 
generator. For the CoCo 3 with one 
disk drive. SECA, P.O. Box 3134, 



130 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Gulf port, MS 39505; (601) 832- 
8236, $24.98 plus $3 S/H, includes 
10 free disks. 



FONTFILE, a font library that 
makes full use of the CoCo 3 graph- 
ics capabilities. Prickly-Pear Soft- 
ware, 213 La Mirada, El Paso, TX 
79932; (915)584-7784, $24.95, 



IRA Analysis, a financial planning 
program that lets you compare 
IRAs and get more on your invest- 
ment. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. A 
to Z Unlimited, 901 Ferndale Boule- 
vard, High Point, NC 27260; (919) 
882-6255, $39.95 plus $3 S/H. 

* * * 

Leonard's Pencil, a 32K graphics 
programming utility that creates 
BASIC programs for generating 
drawings. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3 
with one joystick. E. Z. Friendly 
Software, 1308 Belmont Avenue, 
Front Royal, VA 22630; (703) 635- 
1354, Disk, $12.95; Tape, $10.95 
plus $1.50 S/H. 

* * * 

Life, a 32 K non-competitive, non- 
violent Simulation of a colony of 
cells that live and reproduce accord- 
ing to three rules (survival, death 
and birth) relating each cell to its 
neighbor. For the CoCo 1, 2 or 3 
with one disk drive. Prometheus, 
14684 Joshua Tree Avenue, Moreno 
Valley, CA 92388; $20. 

* * * 

iMental Freedom, a 64K Preble 
Thoughtware program that com- 
bines the technology of the CoCo 
with Radio Shack's Biofeedback 
Monitor and features digital speech 
without a speech synthesizer. For 
the CoCo I, 2 and 3. Dr. Preble } s 
Programs, 6540 Outer Loop, Louis- 
ville, KY 40228; (502) 966-8281, 
Disk, $29.95; Tape, $27.95. 

£ # % 

My Artist, a picture drawing pro- 
gram that uses the high resolution 



graphics of the Color Computer 3. 
Pictures may be drawn using four 
different combinations of color and 
resolution. SEESOF, P.O. Box 574, 
Beaufort, SC 29901; (803) 524-0 11 6, 
$14.95. 



OS-9 Text Formatter, a word pro- 
cessor that runs under OS-9 Level I 
or II. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 
Computerware, Box 668, 4403 
Manchester Avenue, Suite 102, 
Encinitas, CA 92024; (619) 436- 
3512, $34,95, 



QIKPOINT-SC, a set of floating 
decimal point arithmetic and matrix 
routines designed for use with the 
CoCo expanded by the SC68000 
expansion board made by Cir-Pac, 
Ltd., using Kamelion as the inter- 
face operating system. DJ. Leftler, 
955 Trinidad Road, Cocoa Beach, 
FL 32931; (305) 783-2713, $47.75; 
$99.50 supplied with Kamelion. 
Users manual, $9. 



Screen Star, a program editor that 
runs under Level I or II of OS-9. Use 
with OS-9 Text Formatter or Radio 
Shack's TS Word for word process- 
ing. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3, Com- 
puterware, Box 668, 4403 Manches- 
ter A venue, Suite 102, Encinitas, 
CA 92024; (619) 436-3512, $49.95. 

* * * 

Super Extended BASIC Unra- 
velled, a book of information on the 
high resolutions graphics com- 
mands and BASIC enhancements 
available from the Color Computer 
3. Microcom Software, P.O. Box 



214, Fairport, NY 14450; (7 16) 223- 
1477, $24.95. 



Superthello, a 32K computer ver- 
sion of the popular board game. 
Develop game strategy for a 100- 
square grid and testyour skills while 
racing against the clock. For the 
CoCo 1 , 2 and 3 with two joysticks. 
SEC A, P.O. Box 3134, Gulfporf, 
MS 39505; (601) 832-8236, $2198 
plus $3 S/H. 

* * * 

Supplement to 500 Pokes, Peeks 'n 
Execs, a book that contains 200 
additional POKEs, PEEKs and 
tw^^tiK^s to th e popular book. Mic- 
rocom Software, P.O. Box 214, 
Fairport, NY 14450; (716) 223-1477, 
$9.95 plus $3 S/H 



VCR File, a 32K file program for 
video cassette tapes. Individual 
entries may be sorted, edited, 
printed, labeled, deleted or added 
to. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3 with one 
disk drive. Sunrise Software, 8901 
NW 26th Street, Sunrise, FL 33322; 
(800) 628-2828, $19.95 plus $2 S/H. 

* * * 

Winnie the Pooh in the Hundred 
Acre Wood, a 64K Adventure game 
for ages 7 and up. The blustery wind 
has mixed up everything in the 
forest and Christopher Robin and 
his friends are waiting for someone 
to return their missing belongings. 
Be a hero and they're sure to throw 
a big party for you! Sierra On- Line, 
Coarsegold, CA 93614; $34.95. 
Available in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide. 



The Seal of Certification program is open to all manufacturers of products 
for the Tandy Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in 

THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a SeaL the magazine certifies the product does exist — that 
we have examined it and have a sample copy — b ut this does not constitute 
any guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or 
software items will be f orwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for 
evaluation. 

— Judi Hutchinson 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 131 



Software Review, 



7Z\ 



The Word Factory — 
Synonyms and Antonyms 

The Word Factory — Synonyms and Antonyms is a game 
of word meaning for children and adults. The game is 
written for a Color Computer with 64K Extended BASIC and 
at least one disk drive. A printer is required only if you 
intend to print word tests. The game is written in BASIC and 
uses ASCII data files to supply the lists of words. The actual 
program uses a binary version of the ASCII file you create 
and places it in an unused 8K portion of RAM to enhance 
its speed. 

The program disk is unprotected, and the manual 
requests you make a backup copy before using for the first 
time. The manual also requests you honor the program 
copyright. 

The main menu consists of three options: A) Play The 
Game; B) Use List Maker; and C) Use Printer. Selecting A 
begins the game by asking which of the six word lists you 
want, how many players, difficulty level, and antonyms or 
synonyms. The @ key allows you to return to the previous 
option and correct your choice. 

The main game screen is a high resolution graphics screen 
containing four circles in the top section and a polygon in 
the bottom-center. Next to the polygon, on both sides, there 
are two triangles. The left side is for Player 1 and the right 
side is for Player 2. The upper triangle contains the number 
of right answers, while the bottom one contains the number 
of wrong answers. Choosing the one-player option allows 




I 



A unique approach 
to disc reliability 

Memory Minder f rom J&M Systems is 

one of the most comprehensive disk 
drive diagnostic programs available for 
microcomputers. It quickly and easily 
runs comprehensive testing of all vital 
operating parameters to assure data 
integrity. 

Data Integrity 

Means Data Confidence 

Memory Minder is so easy to run you 
will be inclined to test vourdisk driveson 
a regular basis and correct problems be- 
fore they ever endanger your data. This 
program provides long term confidence 
in your data integrity. 



Memory Minder is currently available 
for the following: 

Version 1.03 
TRS-80 Model UI/4 

48 tpi Single Side 

48 tpi Double Side 

96 tpi and 48 tpi Double Side 

TRS-80 ModeM 

48 tpi Single Side Single Density 

TRS-80 C»I»r Computer and 
TOP- 100 

48 tpi Single Side 
48 tpi Double Side 



Technical Knowledge 
Not Required 

Simply slip in the Mem»ry Minder disk 

and select one or more of eight sophisti- 
cated tests. Easy to understand graphics 
on your screen display findings in a few 
moments. Now you can discover poten- 
tial misalignments and problems before 
they endanger your valuable data. 

Call or write for details and 
more information 

J&M SYSTEMS, LTD. 

15100-A CENTRAL SOUTHEAST 
ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87123 
505/292-4182 

We accept MasterCard and Visa 



you to save the score to disk so a student can compete with 
the entire class. The two-player option is for one-on-one 
situations only and does not allow you to save the scores. 

To play the game, a word appears in the polygon and four 
more words in the circles. The player must choose the 
correct synonym or antonym depending on which option 
was previously chosen. A hand points to one of the four 
circles and may be moved with the arrow keys. You must 
select the correct answer with the hand and, according to 
the manual, press the ENTER key. However, I found the 
ENTER key did not work, and I had to use the space bar 
instead. At the end of each game, a score card containing 
the number of right and wrong answers and the percent 
correct is presented to each player. The scores may be saved 
as stated above, and the top 10 will be displayed. 



"Choosing the one-player 
option allows you to save the 
score to disk so a student can 
compete with the entire class. " 



Option B selects the word list menu. You are allowed to 
create new lists, add to existing lists, or correct a list. Each 
list may be protected by a password to keep the younger 
players from destroying the list. The lists are originally 
created as an ASCII file containing three words per record. 
The first word is the master entry, while the second and third 
are the synonym and antonym respectively. There are six 
word lists provided with the game. When you finish creating 
a list, you are asked if you want to format it for program 
use. This formatting converts the list into a binary form, 
as stated earlier, and enhances the speed of the program. 
You may create separate data disks containing only word 
lists; however, the binary version must be on the program 
disk itself when you want to use that particular list. 

Adding to a list is essentially the same as creating a new 
one. You are allowed to select the list you want to add to 
and, from that point on, it functions identically to the create 
list option. The correct list option works only on the binary 
form of the list. It is used to correct misspelled words by 
choosing a list and entering the word as it was incorrectly 
spelled. Once the word is located, you may correct the 
spelling and re-save the list. You must keep in mind, this 
does not correct the ASCII source list. If you later add to 
this list and format a new binary copy, the corrections will 
be lost. 

Option C lets you select a word list and print a test to 
paper. You may use up to 200 words per test. There will be 
25 words printed per page. The lists are password-protected 
for this option also. 

The Word Factory — Synonyms and Antonyms is a very 
nice package for young and old alike. 1 must admit there 
are words in the sample lists provided that I do not 
recognize, and I could learn from this program. 

(SECA, P.O. Box 3134, Gulf port, MS 59505; 601-832-8236, 
$19.98 plus $3 S/H) 

— Larry Birkenfeld 



132 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



I()MM4HHH|HilHHUIHMirillllHMMI4tt1l1IM»fMIMUMtlMMMUIMHfiilHlf1MMHHllllliillllMH|HliM 



<L > LO-RES 

<H> HI -RES 

<U> ULTRA RCS 

<K> KALEIDOSCOPE 

<BRE AK > QUIT 



Software Review i 



if /"% 1 



Picture It With Soundscope 

Tve been teaching science for nearly 16 years, and one 
of the topics of study has always been sound. When THE 
rain B#w sent me Soundscope for review, I was more 
interested than usual, because it looked like a program I 
could use in my physics classes to show what sound "looks 
like/* The program is easy to use and loads from either tape 
or disk. The single-page instructions include all the 
information necessary to run the program and its four 
options without problems. They also include a short 
explanation of sound waves that, although simplistic, is 
clear and correct. Included with the instructions are three 
screen dumps of the program display. Operation is simple. 
You load and run the BASIC program, Scope. Scope loads 
a machine language program and a high resolution graphics 
screen that forms the background for the program display. 
After all parts of the program are loaded, you are instructed 
to put an audio tape in the cassette recorder and press Play, 
Immediately, the screen begins to show a Lo-Res display 
of the sound from the recorder While the program is 
running, you have the option to switch to any of the other 
three displays or to quit the program. If you quit you can 
r e s u in e d i splay easily. In addition to Lo-Res, Soundscope 
has three other display modes: Hi-Res, Ultra-Res and 
Kaleidoscope. 

The Kaleidoscope option displays a rapidly changing 
color display of the sound. This display is very interesting. 
It would make a great background display for a music 
demonstration or something of that sort. Hi-Res and Ultra- 
Res modes, as their names imply, are higher resolution 
versions of the Lo-Res display mode. The advantage of 
higher resolution displays is greater detail. The disadvan- 
tage is less speed, There is a noticeable delay in the Ultra- 
Res mode; it isn't displaying in real time. This isn't a 
problem, just a different method of display that trades detail 
for speed. All of the displays are entertaining, Soundscope 
is worth the price for the entertainment value alone. In fact, 
for entertainment, I recommend Soundscope heartily. 

It wouldn't be fair to end the review here, however. After 
a couple of weeks of watching and experimenting with 
Soundscope, I'm still not sure exactly what is being 
displayed. I fed it a musical scale played very slowly on a 
piano, and I couldn't see anything that resembled the 
standard oscilloscope display I expected. The distance 



THE FLOPPY SOURCE 



PRICE 
BREAK- 
THRU 

LIFETIME 
WARRANTY 



,594: EACH 
1 O B"OR $ 4, _ 9 5 
5 O FOR $22. 9 5 

SLEEVES , LABELS, W.P. TABS INCLUDED FREE! 



SEMD CHECK / HONEY ORDER PAYABLE TOs 

THE FLOPPY SOURCE 
P.O. BOX 57431 OKC. , OK. 73157 



OKLAHOMA RESIDENTS ADD 5.25% SALES TAX 
ADD $2.00 S/H IN U.S.A. - CANADA ADD $3.50 + $1.00 /LB 



between peaks normally representing frequency or wave- 
length didn't vary correctly with changing pitch over the 
entire octave range. Soundscope is fun, interesting and 
entertaining, but it isn't an oscilloscope and doesn't display 
sound in a conventional way. Buy Soundscope for enjoy- 
ment, but do not expect a program that can be used to 
analyze sound waves in a measurable way. 

(Tothi*n Software, Inc., Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 16248; 
$19.95) 

— Donald McGarry 



TIMESAVERS 



Parallel Printer Buffer 



* !n line Stand alone 

* 64K Expandable to 128K 

* Self powered 

* Centronics cable incL 

* 5 Year Limited Warrantee 
Reg $ 1 49 




only $84.95 (3) 




80 Track 3V2 Drive 

* 3Vt" in 5V4 Frame (fits all) 

* Double Sided Double Density 

* 720 K Formatted Capacity 

* Mnfg by Teac 

* Ready for OS-9 !!/MSDOS 3.3 
Reg. $249 

Horizontal case w/power S49 
with drive purchase. 



Polygon Computers Tel (24 3) 463-4406 
P.O. Box 65905 Visa/Mastercard 
Los Angeles, CA 90065 M.O. 



only $139 (6) 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 133 



Hardware Review 



JramR: 512K Upgrade 
for the CoCo 3 



J & R Electronics has released a 512K upgrade for the 
Color Computer 3. The upgrade, called JramR, is available 
either as a complete, ready to plug in and run circuit board, 
or just the bare circuit board with special header pins. If 
you choose to build your own and order the kit, you will 
have to purchase these components also: 

16 16-pin IC sockets 

16 41256 120 to 150nsDRAMs 

16 0.1 Mf or 0.01 Mf ceramic capacitors 

1 10 to 47 Mf electrolytic capacitor 

The kit comes with an illustrated, easy to follow, step- 
by-step assembly and installation booklet. The double-sided 
glass epoxy circuit board is well-made and measures 4% 
inches by 2 l5 /i6 inches. The circuit etchings are very close 
together and, unless you are experienced in soldering small 
electronic connections, I recommend you buy the completed 
board. Although I did not assemble the kit for this review, 
I consider myself to be an experienced technician and 
estimate it could be assembled in about an hour. In the case 






If you're still plugging printed 
circuit cards into your 

CoCo 1 
CoCo2 

CoCo 3 

ziHtfiout a card guide . . . 

CUT IT OUT 

Write or call for a free brochure describing 
printed circuit cards and guides designed 
for the CoCo expanstion port Bare cards 
or with connector for disk controller. 

206 782-6809 



ROBOT]^>j<^|CROSYSTEMS 









BOX 30807 SEATTLE, WA 98103 




of either the kit or the fully assembled product, the 
installation procedure is the same. Several suggestions are 
given to ensure stray static electricity is not present before 
handling the board. The four 128K RAM chips (IC16, IC17, 
IC 1 8 and I C 1 9) are removed. I stored mine in conductive 
foam and wrapped them in aluminum foil for safekeeping. 
Capacitator C65 must also be removed and can be clipped 
with wire cutters. The JramR upgrade mounts the compo- 
nents on top of the board. This is a good idea since it allows 
better air circulation around the chips. J & R was wise to 
use special header pins that contain an integral spacer. This 
prevents the board from being pushed down too far into 
the sockets on the CoCo 3 board. The spacers serve to 
prevent electrical contact between the bottom of the JramR 
board and components on the CoCo 3 board. Although no 
ground plane shield is used, I did not detect any RFI (Radio 
Frequency Interference) on nearby radio equipment or a TV 
set. 

One of the best things about this upgrade is that it comes 
with some very useful utility software. With either the kit 
or assembled board, you get a disk and an 18-page user's 
manual full of helpful ideas on using your expanded 
memory. The disk contains the following programs: 



JRAMRDSK 



J RAM RSPL 



JRAMRTST 
RAMDSKUT 



a customizable RAMDisk program 

that patches into DOS and emulates 

one or two FAST disk drives. 

a customizable machine language 

printer spooler program that allows 

you to compute while your printer 

prints. 

a RAM test program that lets you see 

if all 512K is functioning. 

a BASIC subroutine that allows the 

user to do things such as change a 

RAMDisk drive assignment or back 

up from the RAMDisk to your real 

drive. 



I tried all of the programs and they worked fine. Most 
impressive was RAM DISK. The ability to do a directory 
without a drive coming on aid nearly instant loading of 
programs is quite impressive. 

I think J & R Electronics is on the right track with their 
upgrade. The do-it-yourselfer or the non-hacker can both 
be satisfied, and the inclusion of some pretty nice software 
rounds out the package. 



(J & R Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MD 21045; 
301-788-0861, $139.95 Assembled; $109.95 Kit plus $4 
S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



134 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Software Review ^^^^^^S^^^^^^^^tT^ 

Magical Spells and Treasures 
Abound in Cave Walker 

"Grab your hat and enter the legendary Cave of the 
Mystics. Within this underground palace, magical spells and 
treasures abound. Do you have what it takes to find the 
secret vault and the fabulous Treasure of the Ancients? 
Watch out f or the steam jets and the Great White Bat, whose 
sole purpose is to stop you." 

And so we begin a review of one of Tandy's latest entries 
into the game arena, Cave Walker. This game requires a 64K 
CoCo with disk drive and joystick. It operates under the 
OS-9 Level I shell that comes on the disk, but has some 
provisions for Level II OS-9. 

Cave Walker brings together the concepts of the Adven- 
ture game and the arcade game. Your objective is to find 
the treasure chest that controls the entrance to the secret 
vault. But first, you must find the three spell books that give 
you the magic key needed to open the treasure chest. The 
method of moving through the caverns is determined by 
careful manipulation of the joystick, as in a classic arcade 
game. While this blending of the two game forms is not 
particularly new, Cave Walker is set up in a way that makes 
it interesting and definitely challenging. 

To effectively play the game, you will have to master 
jumping and good joystick positioning. This can be 
achieved by using the practice game mode and the jump 
meter at the top-center of the screen. This meter reflects the 
position of the joystick. When the joystick is positioned at 
the edges, long distance jumps are achieved. With the 
joystick positioned near the center, you can jump virtually 
straight up. However, you have to be steady with the 
joystick in order to keep from falling off cavern ledges. As 
you can see, learning how to jump with the joystick is crucial 
to this game. 

To aid you in moving from cavern to cavern, you must 
collect door keys that allow you to open a door to the next 
cavern. If you have collected some of the bags of gold that 
are found in the caverns, you not only score points but a 
bag can be used to open a door. Also, scattered throughout 
the caverns are locks that open new passages and make 
hidden doors or passages appear. Of course, you need to 
find a lock key to open them. 

When you move around a cavern, you need to use certain 
objects. Floating islands move you either vertically or 
horizontally. Some of these islands require considerable 
skill to get on them; hence, the need to develop good 
jumping skills. Pillars rise and fall out of the cave floor and 
can be used to move to different levels of the cavern. Some 
caverns also have springs to increase jumping distance. 

In all of the caverns, there are objects that you should 
avoid. One of these is the firepit. Care must be taken when 
jumping over the firepit, as fireballs are often emitted. On 
the ceilings of most caverns are steam jets, which shoot 
down like lasers. On the sides of caverns, there are cannons 
that fire missiles. Contact with any of the these results in 
death. Even if you are successful in avoiding these dangers, 
you still must watch out for the great white bat. If you are 
bitten by the white bat, you lose strength equal to half of 
the maximum. 



Throughout the caverns there are objects, such as flasks, 
umbrellas and rings, which protect you from the dangers 
of the caverns. Be careful of your jumping, for even non- 
fatal falls reduce your strength. So, watch the strength meter 
at the top-left corner of the screen and pick up loaves of 
bread to increase your strength whenever possible. 




Keep in mind it is always possible to save a game, so you 
don't have to start with the first cavern when you lose a 
game. However, don't save a game too many times! No, 
your computer won't blow up, but your final score is 
affected by the number of game saves during a game. When 
you complete the game, you receive a bonus of 30,000 points 
if you have not saved and/ or loaded the game more than 

10 times. If you do more than 10 saves or loads, you lose 
500 points for each save or load. 

Cave Walker was designed to run on all models of the 
Color Computer with at least 64K of memory. With a CoCo 
1 or 2, the game operates in the standard PMOOE 4 graphics 
with artifacted colors. With a CoCo 3 and an RGB monitor, 
there is a provision to produce color. 

At the beginning of this review, I noted that Cave Walker 
also runs on a Level II OS-9 system. Unfortunately, Level 

11 was not available at the time of this writing, so we were 
unable to test this option. However, according to the 
manual, the Hi-Res graphics of the CoCo 3 are used. Also, 
there is a provision for two-button control from the joystick 
when using Level II. On Level I systems, the space bar is 
used instead of the second button. 

Overall, I enjoyed the game very much. Although the 
theme of Cave Walker is similar to a number of games, I 
found it to be a real challenge. So much so, that I haven't 
gotten through a game during the month I've been working 
on this review. 

It is important to emphasize the care that went into this 
game. It appears every effort was made to make the game 
compatible with all CoCo models and still take advantage 
of some of the CoCo 3's features. Of course, this will not 
always be possible, but it's nice to see that the effort was 
made. 

(Tandy Corporation. Available in Radio Shack stores 
nationwide, $29.95) 

— Donald Dollberg 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 135 



Software Review. 



Color Scribe III 

Word Power for the CoCo 3 

Color Scribe ///is Computerware's new word processor 
for the CoCo 3, requiring 128K and one disk drive. Color 
Scribe III is a line editor and, at first, 1 was very skeptical 
of its usefulness. After using it for some time, I believe it 
may be the best line editor I have seen. While it is not a 
screen editor, it has a multitude of very powerful features. 

Color Scribe ///uses "dot" commands for text format- 
ting. It has a maximum line length of 250 characters and 
has three modes to manipulate your file. First, there is the 
Command mode. You work with the entire file here. In this 
mode, you are able to move selected blocks of text, find, 
delete or change specific words. The Input mode lets you 
work with one line of text at a time. It is used to input new 
lines. Again, each line has a maximum length of 250 
characters. If you enter the 251st character, the computer 
beeps at you, and you must backspace a character and press 
ENTER to start a new line before you can continue. 

The Line Edit mode gives you control over one line at 
a time. Working in this mode allows you to do just about 
everything to a line of text: insert or delete characters, break 
a line into two lines or combine two lines together. When 
combining two lines, you must be careful not to combine 
lines that would make a line longer than 250 characters. It 




J, ! 



;] I. ' 

MAGAZINE FOR COLOn COMPUTER USERS. 

Spectrogram Magazine provides useful and interesting support material 
for the Color Computer with a wide range of programs and articles by 
some of the best writers and programmers available. 

BASIC HeJp -by Bill Bernico: A monthly question-and-answer 
column tor the BASIC programer. Using program examples, Bill 
gi ves detailed answers to questions ierfc By our readers. 

Pascal Pro gr amming by Delmar Searls: With useful program 
examples, Dcfmar gives, an irr-depth study of Pascal and how to 
use it effectively. 

Downtime by Rush Caley: Thought-provoking, emotional, and at 
times very humorous, Downtime is informative and entertaining, 
providing little-known facts and new and different ideas. 

CoCo Club Cor ner by Ted Paul: News and information about your 
organization^; RHS r newsletter, and club activities in this cofumn- 

Strict ly J? u s jncii : A special section for use of the Color Computer In 
a bus in ess- like setting- Problem-solving techniques' j>rogr am 5> such 
as Trend Analysis ana Ad Effect, interviews ana profiles. 

The permanent columns and series compliment an array of articles 
covering Assembly, C, OS-9, graphics animation with an emphasis on 
understanding, utilities, games, and home management — and all 
programs are available on "Finger Savers" disk or tape. 



pnl A t£ S t^£ *rr E ,L 2 ISSUES 0F SPECTROGRAM MAGAZINE 
l"OR >7\ \40% off the cover price). 

Name: 



Address: 



City, State £ Zip: 

( JCheck ( )Vlsa ( )M/C # 



Exp. 



Signature 



Mail to: 



SPECTROGRAM MAGAZINE 
P. O. Box 138 (81 5)968-9600 
Rockford, IL 61 105 



forclon subscrip tions: (U.S. currency only) 

r jnada and HpxIco 178 All others $36 
Single Issue price: $2.95 
Finger Savers $70 per year ()Dfsk (}Tape 




will then display 251 characters, signal with a beep, and the 
remainder of the line will be lost. You will then have to 
backspace one character (to 250) and press ENTER. 

Turning to the display, the Default Screen mode displays 
40 by 24. The options for the display include 40 by 24 
(default), 64 by 24 or 80 by 24. You can select a blue, green, 
amber or monochrome (black and white) screen. You also 
have the option for inverse video. Now, once you settle on 
your favorite setup for the screen, save it and load that 
program with the default mode you want. 

One more turn reveals commands that allow you to 
manipulate parts of your file in the three modes. The 
available commands include a type of Search and Replace 
with a confirm option. To view your file, you can either Print 
the file to a printer or List the file to the screen. If you want 
the screen listing to appear as what will be printed, use the 
Format function. This implements all the special features, 
but more on Format later. 

Color Scribe III has many features not always found in 
other line editors. A Bell command lets you set a bell to 
sound when entering a character in a specific column. This 
corresponds to the margin bell on a typewriter. If you are 
a quick typist, sometimes the character being typed as the 
bell goes off is not always received by the computer. When 
you want to save your work, Color Scribe III has the 
capability to write the whole file, or only a specific block, 
to disk. This can come in handy if you want to save a portion 
of your file so it can be used in another file. The Free 
command provides you with the amount of free buffer 
space. The buffer starts out with just under 64K bytes free. 
If you find that this is not enough to cover your entire file, 
a More command allows you to have and edit a file larger 
than 64K bytes. The Clone command saves your customized 
version of Color Scribe III to disk under the name 
CLONE .BIN. 

Once you are ready to see how your file is going to look 
on paper, the Format command comes in. This starts the 
text formatter and implements all the "dot" commands 
embedded in the file. You have the option of . FI (default: 
Fill) or . NF (No-Fill) f or line formatting. The Fill command 
does a right-hand justify and implements word-wrap. Then 
if you turn Fill off by .NF, this is close to a ragged-right 
mode. I say close because if you have a line longer than the 
specified line length, the line will be cut off at the line length 
exactly, even if it puts part of a word on one line and the 
rest on the next line. This would be a good place to use the 
Bell command. 

I stated earlier that each line can be as long as 250 
characters. Well, each line is appended successively when 
the Format command is given so, when you want to start 
a new paragraph, you enter a BREAK (.BR) or SPACE (.SP) 
to separate paragraphs. This sounds a little confusing, but 
in practice it is fairly simple. The point is that you will not 
want to have all your lines at 250 characters. I suggest close 
to the line length you want printed out. Color Scribe III 
supports many special features, such as centering, under- 
lining, headings, footnotes, and relative indenting, and has 
the capabilities of sending user-defined control codes to the 
printer for other special effects. 

(Computerware, 4403 Manchester Ave., Suite 102, Enci- 
nitas, CA 92024; 619-436-3512, $49.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Dale E. Shell 



136 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Software Review, 



Pick Up the Path with 
The Amazin^ Maze Game 

Many of you probably have sat down with the daily 
newspaper or a favorite puzzle book and traced your pencil 
up, down and sidewise in the complex labyrinth of a maze. 
Some professionals never get over the fun of the maze and 
love to watch mice or rats find their way through mazes for 
a reward of cheese. Well, The Amazin' Maze Game provides 
that same fun. Instead of cheese, the reward is the high 
score. Mikaron Software has developed a maze game that 
includes 60 mazes to keep the maze fanatic happy for quite 
a while. The game requires a 64 K CoCo with one disk drive. 





THE COLOR COMPUTER MONJHY MAGAZINE 





tlen = 2 Ener gy Dqt s = 



The Amazin' Maze Game should not be written off as 
another variant of Pac Man. There are no "beasties" chasing 
you around the maze; you can take all the time you need. 
You start at one end and try to find the best way through 
the maze to the other side. Very simple, or is it? The mazes 
provided with the game are fairly complex and should give 
everyone a good challenge. Starting with three men, you 
proceed through the maze trying to find the best way out, 
while accumulating points. Points are accumulated by 
collecting the white objects scattered throughout the maze. 
These are worth 1000 points each. The blue objects are the 
destroyers; don't pick them up unless you have picked up 
three red objects, the energizers, f or every one destroyer that 
you cross. If you haven't picked up at least three energizers, 
then you lose your man. If you have three energizers, then 
you get 500 points when you pick up the destroyer. You now 
have to find three more energizers in order to cross over 
the next destroyer. That's the challenge — to find the path 
through the maze, all the while accumulating energizers to 
get through the passages that the destroyers have blocked. 
While doing this you must accumulate as many white 
objects as possible. 

The Amazin' Maze Gameis written in machine language 
with the maze displayed in the artif acted PMDDE 4 colors. 
While the game runs on a CoCo 3 with a TV, it cannot be 
run on a CM-8 RGB monitor, as it appears in black and 
white. Movement through the maze is controlled by the 
arrow keys. A joystick would have been nicer, but it is not 
a major loss. Overall, The Amazin' Maze Game is a neat 
game and certainly well worth the modest price. 

(Mikaron Software Company, P.O. Box 1064, Chester, CA 
96020; $9.95 plus $.50 S/H) " 



— Donald Dollberg 



Back copies of many issues of THE 
rainbow are still available. 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents 
for each additional issue for postage and 
handling if sent by United Parcel Service. 
There is a $5 charge for the first issue, 
plusa$1 chargeforeach additional issue 
on orders sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not 
deliver to a post office box or to another 
country. 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 
are available on white paper in a reprint 
form. All others are in regular magazine 
form. VISA, MasterCard and American 
Express accepted. Kentucky residents 
please add 5 percent state sales tax. In 
order to hold down costs, we do not bill 
and no C.O.D. orders are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To order, just fill out the form on the 
next page and mail it with your payment 
to: 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




June 1987 THE RAINBOW 137 



Hardware Review* 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 
(Payment must accompany back issue orders. Wedonot bill.) 

□ Please send me the following back issues: 



NO, 


MONTH 


YEAR 


VOLUME 1 


PRICE I 


1 


JULY 


! 81 


PREMIER ISSUE 


$2.00 




2 


AUGUST 


'81 




$2.00 


3 


SEPTEMBER 


'81 


EDUCATION 


$2.00 


□ I 


4 


OCTOBER 


'81 


PRINTER 


$2.00 


□ J 


5 


NOVEMBER 


'81 




$2.00 


□ j 


6 


DECEMBER 


'81 


HOLIDAY 


$2.00 


O 


7 


JANUARY 


f 82 




$2.00 


D I 


8 


FEBRUARY 


'82 




$2.00 


□ i 


9 


MARCH 


; 82 




$2.50 


□ I 


10 


APRIL- 


*82 




$2.50 


□ i 


12 


JUNE 


'82 


VOLUME 2 


$2.50 


□ ' 


11 


JUNE 


'83 


PRINTERS 


$2.95 


□ 


12 


JULY 


'83 


ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 3 




□ j 


1 


AUGUST 


'83 


GAMES 


9S 


□ I 


2 


SEPTEMBER 


'83 


EDUCATION 


$2.95 


□ I 


3 


OCTOBER 


'83 


GRAPHICS 


$3.95 


□ 1 


5 


DECEMBER 


'83 


HOLIDAY 


$3.95 


□ 


8 


MARCH 


"84 


BUSINESS 




□ 1 


9 


APRIL 


'84 


GAMING 


$3.95 


□ 1 


10 


MAY 


'84 


PRINTER 


$3.95 


□ 1 


11 


JUNE 


'84 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


□ j 


12 


JULY 


'84 


ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 4 


$3.95 


□ 


1 


AUGUST 


'84 


GAMES 


$3.95 


□ 1 




SEPTEMBER 


'84 


EDUCATION 


$3.95 


□ i 


3 


OCTOBER 


'84 


GRAPHICS 


$3,95 


□ 1 


4 


NOVEMBER 


84 


DATA COMM. 


$3.95 


□ 


5 


DECEMBER 


'84 


HOLIDAY 


$3.95 


□ 1 


8 


JANUARY 


'85 


BEGINNERS 


$3.95 


□ 1 


7 


FEBRUARY 


'85 


UTILITIES 


$3.95 


□ 1 


8 


MARCH 


'85 


BUSINESS 


$3.95 


□ 


9 


APRIL 


'85 


SIMULATIONS 


$3.95 


□ 


10 


MAY 


'85 


PRINTER 


$3.95 


D 1 


11 


JUNE 


'85 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


□ 1 


12 


JULY 


'85 


ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 5 


$3.95 


□ 1 


1 


AUGUST 


'85 


GAMES 


$3.95 


□ 1 


2 


SEPTEMBER 


'85 


EDUCATION 


$3.95 


□ 1 


3 


OCTOBER 


'85 


GRAPHICS 


$3.95 


□ 1 


4 


NOVEMBER 


'85 


DATA COMM. 


$3.95 


□ 


6 


JANUARY 


'86 


BEGINNERS 


$3.95 


□ 1 


7 


FEBRUARY 


'86 


UTILITIES 


$3.95 


□ 1 


8 


MARCH 


'88 


BUSINESS 


$3.95 


□ 1 


9 


APRIL 


'86 


HOME HELP 


$3h9S 


□ 1 


10 


MAY 


'86 


PRINTER 


$3.95 


□ 


11 


JUNE 


'86 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


□ 1 


12 


JULY 


'86 


ANNIVERSARY 
VOLUME 6 


$3.95 


□ 1 


1 


AUGUST 


'86 


GAMES 


$3.95 


□ 


2 


SEPTEMBER 


'86 


EDUCATION 


$3.95 


□ 1 


3 


OCTOBER 


'86 


GRAPHICS 




□ 


4 


NOVEMBER 


'86 


DATA COMM. 


$3.95 


□ 


5 


DECEMBER 


'86 


HOLIDAY 


$3.95 




6 


JANUARY 


'87 


BEGINNERS 


$3.95 


□ 


7 


FEBRUARY 


'87 


UTILITIES 


$3.95 




8 


MARCH 


'87 


BUSINESS 


$3.95 


□ 


9 


APRIL 


'87 


HOME HELP 


$3.95 


□ 


10 


MAY 


87 


PRINTER 


$3.95 




11 


JUNE 


'87 


MUSIC 


$3.95 


a 



RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to our first three years. July 1981 
through June 1984. is printed in its entirety in our July 1984 issue. 
Separately bound copies are also available$2 50 □ 

Note: Our Fourth and Fifth Year Indexes, including RAINBOW ON TAPE 
indexes, are included in the July 1985 and 1986 issues, respectively. 

TOTAI 



KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 

U.S. MAIL CHARGE 
SHIPPING & HANDLING 
U.P.S. CHARGE 
TOTAL AMOUNT 
ENCLOSED 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



U Payment Enclosed, or charge to my: 

□ visa □ mc Dae 

CARD U 



EXPIRATION DATE 
SIGNATURE 



PHONE # 



To order by phone {credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0319. 8 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



PAL Switcher Solves 
ulti-Pak Dilemma 



One of the first things we learned when the new CoCo 
3 came out was that the Multi-Pak Interface (MPI) would 
not work unless its internal PAL chip was replaced. We also 
learned that this was a lot easier to do on the old Multi- 
Pak (R.S. Catalog No. 26-3024) than it was on the newer 
version (R.S. Catalog No. 26-3 1 24). If you have the newer 
26-3 124, this review will not be of interest to you, so I 
recommend you read Marty Goodman's upgrade article in 
the January 1987 RAINBOW on this subject. 

Before I bought my CoCo 3, I called National Parts and 
ordered Part No. AXX-7123. The first thing I did when I 
got my new CoCo was to change PAL chips in my MPL 
While I was making this change, I wondered how often I 
would regret changing the PAL as the MPI would now only 
work on the CoCo 3 but not on my older CoCo 1 (or CoCo 
2). How would I be able to use CoCo Max now that the 
new PAL chip was no longer compatible with my older 
CoCo? I did nol like the idea of having to change PAL chips 
every time I wanted to use the MPI on different Color 
Computers! Well, obviously Marty Goodman recognized 
this problem early because he has designed a PAL Switcher 
Kit for the older MPIs that solves this dilemma. The kit 
consists of a small 2J/2-inch square, single-sided, glass epoxy 
printed circuit board that contains sockets for both PAL 
chips. A third "header" socket plugs into the original PAL 
socket in the MPI, and an attached double pole, single 
throw switch is mounted on the MPI so either PAL chip 
can be selected. Since you have to remove the old PAL chip 
anyway to insert the new chip, it makes sense to install this 
board while you are at it so you can maintain full compat- 
ibility on all CoCos. 

The kit is very easy to install but does require you to open 
the MPI case (keep this in mind if yours is still under 
warranty). The documentation consists of VA pages of 
typewritten, easy-to-follow steps and illustrations to 
complete the installation. You will also have to drill a 54- 
inch hole in the case of the MPI to mount the switch. I put 
mine just to the left of the slot selector switch and it works 
just fine there, but you can put it anywhere you like since 
about lYi inches of wire is attached to the switch. No 
soldering is required and total installation time is about 20 
minutes. 

■ 

The PAL Switcher is offered in two versions. You can buy 
just the kit for $29.95 or the kit with the new PAL chip 
installed for $39.95. 

This is a product that will be very well received in the 
CoCo market. It provides the opportunity to not only 
upgrade your MPI f or use on the CoCo 3 but to continue 
to use it on your older CoCo as well. It's a good idea at 
a fair price. 

(Spectrum Projects Inc., P.O. Box 264, Howard Beach, NY 
11414; 718-835-1344, $29.95 w/o PAL; $39.95 w/PAL plus 
$3 S/H) 

— Jerry Semones 



138 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1987 



Software Review* 



SECA Coupon Filer 
Takes Charge 

Ah, database programs — such handy things. Southeast- 
ern Computer Arts markets a coupon filer program that is, 
in essence, a dedicated database program. Nearly any 
database program could be set up to do this job, since by 
their nature database programs are flexible creatures. A 
good database program can be used for a wide variety of 
tasks, but may not be ideally suited for each — there may 
need to be some compromises made. On the other hand, 
you gain the convenience of a single set of commands to 
learn and the ability to tailor data input and output to your 
needs. A dedicated program such as the SECA Coupon 
Filer is not flexible. It is meant to do one job only, but to 
do it well, and with all functions optimized for the task at 
hand. Coupon Filer is successful in all those respects. 



"It is meant to do one job only, 
but to do it well, and with all 
functions optimized for the 
task at hand. " 



Coupon Filer has seven main options: enter data, correct 
data, search for expired coupons, select coupons, calculate 
coupon worth, print a list of coupons, and change entry 
date. The first two and the last are self-explanatory. The 
third allows the user to find and delete any outdated 
coupons from the file. The fourth option allows the user 
to scan through the coupons on file and select one to use 
on a shopping trip. The program then allows you to print 
a list of the selected coupons and delete these coupons from 
the file. The fifth option figures the worth of the coupons 
on file and shows it on the screen, and the sixth option prints 
a complete list of all the coupons on file including the total 
worth. A maximum of 200 coupons can be stored. 



All the program options work as stated in the manual. 
The overall program worked smoothly. The user is pro- 
tected from input errors in nearly all instances. The 
information screens and menus are attractive, and the 
manual is complete, neatly printed and well-organized. The 
program is provided on an unprotected disk and carries a 
90-day- warranty. A printer is recommended but not 
required. 




As with any database program, initial data entry is time- 
consuming. The payoff should come with the resultant rapid 
manipulation of data, and the ability to select and print that 
data in a variety of forms. The purpose of a database 
program should be to make the user's life easier. But 
Coupon Filer seems to add more work, not relieve it. 
Coupons still have to be cut, put in some sort of file, and 
manually retrieved for use when this program is used; but 
in addition, they must now be entered and selected 
electronically as well. 

In short, SECA Coupon Filer works well, is user-friendly, 
and is well-documented, but may not actually save the user 
any time. 

(Southeastern Computer Arts, P.O.Box 3134, Gulf port, MS 
39505; 601-832-8236, $19.98 plus $3 S/H) 

— Mark Williams 



ORDER PHONE (416) 456-0032 

Get your free Catalogue! May we market your programs? 

Duck Productions, 18 Rowe Court, Brampton. Ontario, Canada L6X 2S2 
Please add $2.00 lor handling. Ontario residents add 7% provincial lax 



Micro • Fi re the ultimate secret weapon. 

Have you beat your thumbs more than the aliens? mis is a great 
rapid fire circuit thafs easily installed on any joystick. Has no computer 
side effects. Comes with complete instructions and calibration program 
lor adjustment to taste. $19.95 ($24.95 CDN.) Reviewed October 86 

Class Monitor Dual monitor driver 

The best monitor driver lor any Coco. I drives any composite, colour 

or monochrome monitors. Complete with dual audio outputs tor 

immediate access of either or both monitors. Simple insiallahon 

instructions. $31 .50(539.50 CDN.) 

Laser Mazer master puzzle of reflections 

The supreme game of suspense. Engage in a strategic battle of lime 

and space. A realtime contest of wits. $14.95 ($19.95 CDN) 

Battle to D-Day the multiple player adventure 

The master game of strategy. Battle against time, battle against the 
Third Reich. Up to lour joystick players. Adventure in thoughtware. 

$29.95 ($38.95 CDN.* 




] \COMPUT€R PRODUCTS 





RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Machine Genisis assembly tutor ...plus 

is a clean and simple approach to learning binary programming The 
package includes lull beginners instruction in plain language, an editor 
assembler, a debugger, a disassembler and utilities lor advanced study 
and application. Fantastic value at only $34.95 ($49.95 CDN.) 

Buy Quality and Value! 



Keeping Track more than a disk manager. 

If you own more than two disks you'll love Keeping Track. A manager 
menu ol nine utilities that do il all! The real highlight is "D". the 
directory/auiostart. It's a continuous access l.D. direciory lhai loads 
and executes any program with a single keystroke. All programs 
fully documented. SPECIAL SALE 1 only $14.95 ($19.95 CDN) 

Map 'n Zap semi automatic disk repair 

The layman's step by step kit for direciory and grain table repair. 
Locates errors, maps out disk contents to screen or printer, backs 
up any flawed disk and prompts built in disk zap lor repair. Complete 
with lull tutorial on Coco's disk input / output access operation. 
S19.95 (S24.95 CDN.) Reviewed January 87 

Code Buster machine language disassembler 

Three terrific programs to explore machine language. Screen or printer 
accurate disassembly ol binary code. Simple prompied procedure 
with some instruction to dissect and understand your ROMs Fully 
documented lor only $19.95 ($24.95 CDN.) 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 39 



Software Review, 



Software Review 



"Wife rjp^ "■ Af™^% "W"Wt 

StopBurn: IheLMl haver 



Stop Bum is a utility that provides needed relief from a 
little-known malady that afflicts computer users. If a 
constant image is displayed on your computer's screen for 
long periods of time, it can "burn" or "etch" its way into 
the coating on the inside of your monitor. This will, in time, 
make the monitor's display hard to read and will ultimately 
force its replacement. StopBurn provides relief from this 
potential damage, 

StopBurn is a machine language utility program that may 
be loaded into a convenient location in your computer's 
memory. Once executed, it links itself into the interrupt 
servicing structure in your CoCo and starts to protect your 
CRT. 

StopBurn monitors your computer for signs of I/O 
activity such as keyboard entries, disk I/O, printer output, 
cr joystick movement. When such activity ceases for three 
minutes, StopBurn blanks your screen in order to avoid 
screen "burn-in." When any of the above I/O activities 
resumes, StopBurn rapidly restores the text screen for you. 

StopBurn is supplied in two forms: the program itself and 
a testing program called StopTest. The difference is that 
StopTest is intended to be used for testing purposes only, 
and blanks the screen after 10 seconds, not the three minutes 
required for StopBurn. Other than that, the two programs 
are identical. 

The documentation supplied with StopBurn is in the form 
of a BASIC program, The Book, which can be run from Disk 
BASIC. The program provides the minimum knowledge 
necessary to use StopBurn. Personally, I would prefer to 
see printed documentation, for it eliminates the need to run 
a BASIC program to review the operation of the program. 

The instructions concerning how to load StopBurn from 
within a BASIC program were incorrect. Space should be 
cleared before LORDMing the program, not after, as the 
direction program, The Book, stated. I view this as a simple 
oversight and, hopefully, it will be corrected shortly. 

I had some difficulties using StopBurn in the high-RAM 
locations. Most of the problems were related to nonperfor- 
mance of the program. This was especially true when using 
my CoCo 3. The program would simply not run properly. 
If loaded at other locations (such as &HE00), the program 
worked fine. However, when using StopTest, the screen 
would blank every 10 seconds, then return to normal color 
almost immediately. I was expecting the screen to stay 
darkened, waiting for a key press, and I was unable to 
determine why this instance occurred. This problem did not 
exhibit itself when using StopBurn, 

I have used similar programs on my IBM computer. I feel 
that StopBurn offers some refinements over these pro- 
grams, Despite its few idiosyncracies, StopBurn is a 
valuable utility for the medium-experienced CoCo user. 

(Lucas Industries 2000, 14720 Cedar Street NE, Alliance, 
OH 44601 ; 216-823-4221, $15) 

— Don Hutchison 



Lockout Secures Your 
Disk Contents 

When I received Lockout to review, I immediately started 
thinking of how this program could benefit someone, As 
a teacher, I could lock my grade and test files, As a 
programmer, I could prevent unauthorized snooping at any 
programs I was developing. A small business could use it 
to protect financial or inventory reports. A parent could 
lock up the games until homework is done. Just about 
everyone has something he would like to secure. With those 
thoughts in mind, I read the documentation and was ready 
to go. 

There are two pages of documentation that fully outline 
the procedures for locking your disk. The software is user- 
friendly with one menu that does all the work. As with all 
software, step one should be to back up the master disk. 
The standard backup command works. The directory 
contains two programs: L0CK.BR5 for the CoCo 1 and 2 
and L0CK3-BR5 for the CoCo 3, Both programs may be 
customized as to default drive number, and LOCO may be 
changed to re-enable the BREAK key and to alter the palette 
to your liking. 

You are directed to load the program for your model 
computer and follow the directions for customizing and 
inserting your password. The password may be up to 255 
characters in length. When you run the customized 
program, you are instructed to save it under LOCKOUT . BR5 
or L0CK0UT3.BR5. This program can then be placed on any 
disk you want to protect, or left on a system disk. It need 
not be on the disk you are locking. 

Lockout has four menu options: 1) Lock a Disk, 2) 
Unlock a Disk, 3) Select Drive and 4) End. If you choose 
Option 1, you are given the option of using a double 
password system. The second password may be up to eight 
characters. When completed, your disk is locked. If you exit 
the program and type DIR you see only one program, 
UNLOCK . BR5, or the word LOCKED if the program isn't 
resident on that disk. Your disk will seem full. If you run 
UNLOCK, you get the same menu as before. Option 2 allows 
you to enter the password(s) and, presto, your disk is 
unlocked. DIR will show the original directory. 

I was curious as to how secure the disk was. 1 am an 
experienced BASIC programmer, but looking at Lockout 
didn't give me any clue as to how it worked, or what the 
password(s) were. In that sense the disk is secure. I pulled 
out a disk, zapper, dusted it off, and in five minutes I had 
an unlocked disk. So, the security of the disk depends on 
the skill of the person trying to crack it. It does lock out 
the casual intruder, but it might be nice if , when the original 
directory is relocated, it is encrypted in some fashion. 

If you need a program that will lock the disk in the 
manner described above, then Lockout is one to consider. 
It is easy to use and not very expensive. 

(Custom Software, Box 42, Long Lane, MO 65590; 417-345- 
8163, $15 plus $1.25 S/H) 

— Aram Langhans 



140 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



The Best Money Can Buy . . . 
HDS Floppy Drive Controller Board 




Reduce your I/O errors with the Hard Drive Specialist 
Floppy Drive Controller for the Golor Computer. Gold edge 
card connectors, advanced design, and the absence of 
potentiometers make it the best available. Our newest ver- 
sion controller allows the use of either- (two 24 pin ROMS), 
or (one 24 pin and one 28 pin ROM). Using this board 
with the standard Radio Shack ROM gives you 100% com- 
patibility with all Radio Shack software. 
Completed and Tested Board 

with Radio Shack ROM $99. 

(Includes Case, and DOS Instructions) 

Completed and Tested Board without ROM . . . $79. 

(Includes Case) 

Bare Board with Instruction manual $30. 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without ROM $30. 

Radio Shack ROM (current version) $20. 

Radio Shack ROM 1.0 $40. 



Ordering Information : 

Use our>WATS line to place your *>rdef via Visa, MasterQarct, or Wire Transfor Or 
mail your payment directly to us. Any non- certified funds will ba held until proper 
clearance is made. COO orders are accepted as well as purchase orders from 
government agencies. Most items are shipped off the shelf with the exception of hard 
drive products that are custom built. U&S jground is our standard means of shipping 
unless otherwise specified. Shipping costs are available upon request. 



Drive 0 SS/DD $150 

WHILE SUPPLY LASTS! 

Drive 0 Complete V $199. 

Drive 1 Complete $129. 

Drive 0 & 1 Dual Drive $319. 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 



1-713-480-6000 
Order Line 1-800-231-6671 
16208 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, Texas 77059 



Software Review ^^^^^^^^S^^^^^^/^\ 

More Challenges From 
The Learning Company 

Education blooms again on the Color Computer with 
software from The Learning Company. Moptown Parade, 
Moptown Hotel and Magic Spells all require a Tandy Color 
Computer, Extended BASIC and a disk drive. Bumble 
Games may be purchased on cassette. 

Magic Spells is a game designed for children ages 6 to 
10. It provides spelling exercises in the form of scrambled 
words or a flashcard technique where words are displayed 
briefly on the screen and the student spells them from 
memory. Sample word lists are provided, or you may make 
up your own and save them to disk. The lists may contain 
up to 20 words, and each word may be up to 15 characters 
in length. Utilities are provided to copy lists, add new lists, 
and delete lists, as well as display a list. 

Each time a correct answer is given on the first try, the 
student receives a reward represented by a picture of a full 
treasure chest. If it takes more than one try, you must split 
the treasure with a demon. If you receive assistance from 
the computer, the demon receives all of the treasure. Magic 
Spells is very interesting and can provide a great classroom 
experience. The only problem I found was that my copy 
came with a manual for a Commodore 64. Since I used to 
own one of these, I had no problem translating the program 
loading instructions. All other instructions are built into the 
game, so you will have no problem once you load it. Maybe 
Tandy can correct this oversight soon. 

Bumble Games is an educational math program for ages 
5 to 10. It is designed to teach the basic concepts of arrays 
and grids. The program consists of six different games using 
a grid and x,y coordinate techniques. It comes on either 
cassette or disk. 




WOULD YOU LIKE INSTRUCTIONS? 

<V OF. N> 



The first game, Find Your Number, provides a straight 
line numbered from 0 to 5 either horizontally or vertically. 
The object is to guess the number the computer has chosen. 
After each guess, an arrow is provided to indicate if the 
correct number is higher or lower than the number you 
chose. Games two and three, Find the Bumble and Butterfly 



Hunt, provide a 4-by-4 or 5-by-5 matrix of boxes lettered 
*A' to 'D' or 4 E' horizontally and 0 to 3 or 4 vertically. Hidden 
in a box is the bumble or a butterfly. You provide the x,y 
coordinates to locate the hidden object. The difference in 
the two games is the way clues are given. Find the Bumble 
uses arrows to point up, down, left or right, while Butterfly 
Hunt uses word clues. 

Visit From Space uses a 5-by-5 grid of numbers to assist 
you in locating Bumble's cousin from space. This time the 
character is hidden where two lines intersect and, again, you 
must choose the correct coordinates for the intersections 
and are provided with word clues when your guess is 
incorrect. Tic Tac Toe is also a game of coordinates; 
however, this one is for two players. The object, of course, 
is to place four dots in a row before your opponent does. 

Bumble Dots is the last game. Here you play a dot-to- 
dot game by either selecting one of Bumble's pictures or by 
creating one of your own for someone else to play. Selecting 
one of Bumble's pictures displays one dot at a time, and 
you must provide the correct x,y coordinates for each dot. 
Clues are provided with each incorrect guess. As each dot 
is named, it is connected to the other dots until a complete 
picture is drawn. If you choose to create your own picture, 
you are asked how many dots and the location of each. You 
may name your picture and save it so that it may be used 
in a later game. 

If you have Extended BASIC 1.0, you may receive an SN 
error when running Bumble Games after power on. Typing 
RUN again will cure the problem. This is not stated in the 
manual, but I found it in both Moptown manuals. Bumble 
Games provides excellent practice in learning how to plot 
coordinates. 

Moptown Parade and Moptown Hotel form a series of 
1 1 different games using creatures called Moppets. Parade 
is for ages 6 to 10, and Hotel is for ages 8 to 13. The games 
are progressively more difficult. They are used to teach 
patterns, similarities and differences. 

Moppets have four different traits: tall or short, thin or 
fat, red or blue, and bibbit or gribbit. A bibbit has a long 
nose; a gribbit has no nose but instead has a curly tail. The 
simplest game is Make My Twin where you describe a 
moppet with the same traits as one displayed. The hardest 
is Moptown Hotel. Here you have 16 squares in a 4-by-4 
matrix. Two players alternately place moppets into adjacent 
squares. The catch is — each moppet placed must be 
different from all those adjacent, by two traits. This 
becomes more and more difficult as more moppets are 
placed. Even adults may find this one a real challenge. 

The Moptown series is a delight to use. My 9-year-old 
really enjoyed them. These games are a great way of 
teaching the concepts of "same" and "different." 

The Learning Company series is a fun way to teach young 
children, providing a challenge and yet still remaining fun. 
They would make a nice addition to anyone's library of 
educational software. 



(The Learning Company, 545 Middlefield Rd., Suite 170, 
Menlo Park, CA 94025; 415-328-5410; Magic Spells $34.95; 
Moptown Parade and Hotel, $39.95 each. Available in 
Radio Shack stores nationwide.) 

— Larry Birkenfeld 



142 



THE RA/NBOW June 1987 



Software Review* 



Dragon's Castle — A Bargain 
Basement Adventure 

The Dragon's Castle by Mitchell Software is a graphics 
Adventure, using four-color, medium resolution graphics, 
for all Color Computers. It is written in BASIC, runs slowly 
(unless you have a CoCo 3 and use POKE 65497,0 to run 
double speed), is fairly easy to solve, has a limited 
vocabulary, and does not allow the player to save a game. 
Most importantly, both the graphics and the plot could 
stand a major improvement. 

Yet, in spite of these drawbacks, The Dragon's Castle is 
worth consideration. This game is by no means "state of 
the art," nor is it baffling. But it is fun to play. Thus, for 
those of you wanting the thrill of Adventure, but with 
budgetary restrictions, The Dragon's Castle might be 
something to consider. 

The game is available on an unprotected disk or cassette, 
and it loads easily. You use two-word commands, such as 
LOOK ALTAR, USE SWORD, or TAKE BOOK to tell the computer 
what you want to do. The top half of the screen presents 
a graphic view of where you are (in PMDDE 3, or four-color, 
medium resolution graphics), while the bottom half of the 
screen presents short, nondescriptive statements telling you 
where you are and asking for your command. Your quest 
is to rid the princess' castle from the big, bad dragon. You'll 
also have to fight a few other meanies, as well as avoiding 
the Elvish Imp, a dastardly kleptomaniac. 

The Dragon's Castle is fairly easy to solve. It will 
probably take the average Adventure player only five hours 
to finish. Most of the puzzles are unremarkable, and the 



Two-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This little wonder lets you enter sound values, play 
them and even print them out. Just enter the pitch value 
and length for each note. Make sure not to use a value 
greater than 255. 

The listing; 



1 CLS8 : PRINT@32 , "INPUT SOUND &LEN 
GTH. EX: 1)8/1)8. WHEN DONE, INPU 
T 999,999. " : DIM A(25)3) , B(25)8) :FO 
RT=1T025)3:PRINT@128, "#" ;T; : INPUT 
A(T),B(T):IF A(T)=999 THEN GOTO 

2 ELSE NEXT 

2 PRINT@12 8, fI PLAYBACK 
11 : FOR N=l TO T-l : SOUND A(N),B(N) 
:NEXT:PRINT@128, "PRINT (Y/N) : " ; : 
INPUTP$:IF P$="N" THEN RUN ELSE 
FOR N=l TO T-1:PRINT#-2,"#";N;" 
";A(N) ;",";B(N) : NEXT: RUN 

Matthew Coenen 
Norwalk, I A 

(For I his winning two-liner conlesl enlry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 




YOU ARE IN THE FOREST ON 
A PATHWAY 

YOU SEE NOTHINO. 
OBVIOUS EXITS NORTH, 
EAST. NEST. 

MHBT now? 



limited vocabulary doesn't give one a great deal of freedom. 

Still, the game isn't all that bad, and I did enjoy playing 
it. I'm not going to recommend it to most. I personally 
would rather save up my money and spend $35 on a really 
good Adventure than $15 on a couple of minor ones. Yet, 
if you've been yearning for some adventure and don't have 
tons of money, you might find The Dragon's Castle to be 
what you're looking for. 

(Mitchell Software, P.O. Box 194, Tomahawk, WI 54487; 
715-453-4204, $14.95 plus $1.50 S/H) 

— Eric W. Tilenius 



Canadians! 



We arc Canada's largest 
national distributor of 
Software for the Colour 
Computer 



Send for your FREE copy of our 

Catalog 



Kellynews is now available and contains news, 
hints, programs and articles from the crew at Kelly 

Software. We are Canada's largest national 
distributor of Colour Computer products and we 
stock all the latest games, utilities, simulations and 
business programs. We encourage all Canadian 
Colour Computer owners and Dealers to send for 

our FREE catalog. 







Kelly Software Distributors Ltd, 

P.O. Box 608, Station T Calgary, Alta. T2H 2H2 

Tel: (403) 236-2161 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 143 



Software R e vie ji^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Sf?^ 

Should MYDOS Be 
Your DOS? 

If you bought your CoCo 3 in Princeton in October, or 
shortly thereafter, have memorized your Radio Shack 
dealer's home phone number, and rip your mailbox off its 
mounts when RAINBOW arrives, MYDOS from Hawksoft 
could be your DOS. 

DOS — three mighty letters which stand for Disk 
Operating System. In the CoCo 3 that is DOS 2. 1, the most 
powerful and versatile DOS from Radio Shack for the 
CoCo. MYDOS is not a stand-alone or separate DOS. It is 
a DOS enhancer, which gives the user certain features and 
capabilities that the CoCo does not have without it. MYDOS 
is a very useful extra for the CoCo and, in spite of a few 
drawbacks, is well worth the price. 

MYDOS adds the following features to the CoCo 3: 

1. Supports J&M disk controller printer port. 

2. Resets drive heads to Track 0 to prevent "head 
banging" on power-up. 

3. Provides clear-reset function for a software cold 
restart. 

4. Utilizes Radio Shack Speech/ Sound cartridge. 

5. Utilizes mouse control. 

MYDOS also adds these six commands to disk BASIC: 

1. Lease on/ off switches in and out of lowercase 

2. Mdir gives a mouse controlled execution directory 

3. Mouse on/off provides a very powerful input option 

4. Voice on/ off echoes all input to speech cartridge 

5. Say "Your input" or Say AB$ voice output 

6. Xrun "program, bin: 1" &HI000 uses same syntax as 
LDADM and EXEC, with the allowance of a drive specifier 
and a memory offset location. 

On the whole, MYDOS works very well. However, there 
are a few drawbacks that I did want to mention. First, Lease 
shows you lowercase letters, but converts them to uppercase 
for the CoCo, so for real lowercase letters you must use the 
SHIFT-O combination. 

The Mouse command gives the user a double row of 
punctuation, numbers and letters (the keyboard) plus a 
BREAK., ENTER and CLEAR icon across the top of the screen. 
Input is handled by moving a mouse or joystick to the 
desired letter, and clicking. The letter becomes lowercase 
if the cursor is on it, which takes a little getting used to. 
Numbers and punctuation are in inverse video. This is a very 
powerful input device, particularly for editing. I can see the 
non-typists and handicapped users finding this feature very 
helpful. The drawbacks: Only the right mouse/joystick port 
is active, and there is no keyboard input possible while in 
Mouse mode. Therefore, you must find and click Mouse Off 
to exit this feature! Even reset will not dump you out of 
it. 

Also, with Voice On, the computer says every word that 
is input. Most of these features work all the time, and all 
work with BASIC (Xrun works with machine language), but 
MYDOS does have a few quirks: The Mouse command will 
not work with all programs, and Xrun will not run and load 



all programs. The arena seems to be applications programs; 
for instance, VIP Desktop cannot be Xrun, and Mouse and 
Voice do not work. However, another product for the CoCo 
3, a graphics Adventure, worked under Xrun. I suspect the 
culprits here are certain memory locations used by machine 
language programs. If the user has a particular application 
in mind to use with MYDOS, he would probably want to 
check on that particular software package for compatibility. 



"MYDOS is a DOS enhancer, 
which gives the user certain 
features and capabilities that 
the CoCo does not have 
without it. " 



One really nice feature of MYDOS is the customization 
routine. This gives you the choice of which disk controller 
you are using, screen display, prompt display, power up and 
reset messages, and speech synthesizer on or off. 

All in all, this is a very handy and useful product for the 
price. I would recommend the EPROM option only after 
using the disk version to see if the EPROM would suit your 
needs. If it would, perhaps multiple DOS users would find 
this an exceptional product indeed, particularly with its low 
price. 

The documentation is very straightforward, easy to read 
and easy to follow. One final note about MYDOS: It arrived 
from the U.S. Postal Service with the disk folded, spindled 
and mutilated, and the EPROM pins mangled worse after 
they had been poked through the disk. Chris Hawks, owner, 
author and programmer of Hawksoft and MYDOS respec- 
tively, had new materials to me in 24 hours with a very 
courteous note. He even followed up with a newer revision 
of the documentation a few days later. Therefore, I must 
add excellent product support to MYDOS's qualifications. 

(Hawksoft, 307 Sexauer Ave., Elgin, IL 60123; 312-742- 
3084, $15 disk only, $35 disk and EPROM.) 

— Jeffrey S. Parker 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This one is for all of us who can't afford the cost of 
a trip to Egypt. 

The listing: 

lj3 CLS : PRINT 11 WELCOME TO EGYPT... 
" : PMODE2 : PCLS : DRAWBM128 , 6j3 ;NG12 
j3F12j3" :FORI=6jdT019j3STEPlj3:LINE(3 
, I) -(251,1) , PSET : NEXT : PAINT ( 0 , $ ) 
, , 5 : SCREEN1 , 1 : E$="T5L4DEL2FEDL4P 
29DEFAEFD" : F $= 11 P7 FGAAAAAGEFGGGGG 
F" : SONG$="XE$ ; XF$ ;XE$ ; PI" : FORI=j3 
TO1STEP0 : PLAYS ONG$ : NEXT 

Calvin Barnett 
Ft. Meade, FL 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbosv Book o/^mw/ar/omanditscompanion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



144 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



Software Review ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^/^\ 

Old Favorites in a Super 
Collection of Super Games 

Mikaron's Super Collection of Super Games may be a 
welcome change from the common joystick shoot-'em-ups 
or the recent fad of graphics Adventure games. Nothing in 
this group is really new, but the price is low (averaging a 
little over $4 per game) and there were no real "bugs" found . 
There are some problems: On a CoCo 3, use of reset to 
change artifact colors crashes the program, and attempts 
to Quit a game to go to another often require having to do 
a cold start. However, the overall programming and 
debugging quality is good, and most users will have few 
complaints. 

The six games on the disk include: 

4-in-a-Row, a 3-D version of Tic Tac Toe. It is well-don« 
and challenging, and can be played by two players or youl 
versus-computer. Red and blue were not easily discernable 
on a monochrome monitor, but if you have a color TV or 
a color monitor you should enjoy this one. 

CoCo Cube is a form of Rubik's cube for computers. 
Again, the use of a monochrome monitor is not recom- 
mended. I must, however, compliment the author for a 
superb Rubik's tutorial. His help screens are probably 
worth the price of the entire disk. 

63 Puzzle is a larger version of the old number scramble 
puzzles that were a craze in the fifties. One attempts to 
rearrange numbers from a random to a non-random order 
using specified sliding moves. 

Super Color Match is a similar concept using colored 
blocks. 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Here's a little something for you '60s music lovers. 
■ 

The listing: 

1 A$= ff 02L8B03C02BL203DP255L4 . DP2 
55DP3 L8 CDCDL4 . FP4L8DCDCL402BP8L8 
B03C02BL203DP255L4 . DP2 55DP3L8CDC 
DL4 . FP8L8DCDCL402BP803L8EF7G7FL4 
EL8F+G9A9GL4F+L802B03C02B03D02L4 
.GL8B-L403CL4 .02BP4P8" :D$="03L8G 
C02A03CFC02A03CGC02A03CFC02A03C ff 
:'A HARD DAY'S NIGHT 

2 B$= ff 03L8DL4GL8F+LlF+L8G7EP255L 
4EL8F+GL4F+P2 55L8F+L2 . F+P2L8DL4F 
+L8GL1GP255L8G7EP2 55L4EL8F+L4GL1 
AP255L4.AP255L8AP8 11 : C$ = ff 02L8B03C 
02B03DL4 . 02GL8B-L403CL802L4 . BP5L 
8B03C02BL203DP255L4 . DP255D" : X$=" 
XA$ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; XA$ ; XA$ ; XB$ ; XA$ ; XC$ ; 
XD$ ; XD$ ; 11 : PLAYX$ 1 GOICURIA 

Eddie Goicuria 
Maiden, MA 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



One Peg is a game in which you remove pegs that have 
been jumped over, while trying for an order that leaves only 
one peg on the board — hopefully in the selected spot. You 
may have seen this type game in plywood on the table at 
diners or bars where service is unusually slow. 




Progressive Puzzle is also one in which the order of moves 
is critical. In this version, Red can only move certain ways 
and Black can only move in the opposite direction. The 
object is to exchange the location of all Red pieces for all 
Black pieces in a minimum number of moves. 

In summary, these games are all old stand bys, but they 
are well-done and the package price is low. 

(Mikaron Software Company, P.O. Box 1064, Chester, CA 
96020; $24.95 plus $.50 S/H) 

— H. Larry Elman 



Two- Liner Contest Winner . . . 

Just type this one in and run it for a small sample 
of your CoCo's sound capability. 

The listing: 

J8 CLS:F0RN=1T042:READA,B:S0UNDA, 
B : NEXTN : END : DATA1 76,6 
1)3 DATA176,6,17J3, 3,176,3, 185, 6,1 
76, 3 , 159 , 3 , 17 6, 6 , 17 6, 6 ,17)3 , 3 , 17 6 
,3,185,3,17 6,3,147,3,159,3,159,3 ' 
,13 3, 3,147,3 ,159,3,14 7,6,13 3 ,3,1 
25,6, 12 5, 6, 14 7, 3, 147, 3, 1)38 , 3 , 125 
,3,13 3 ,3 ,14 7,3,159,6,17)3,3 , 17 6,6 
, 176 , 6 , 17)3 , 3 , 159 , 3 , 14 7 , 3 , 12 5 , 3 , 8 
9,3,58,6,58,6,78,3,89,9 

■ 

Matthew McGinnis 
Terre Haute, IN 

(For this winning iwo-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies of 
both The Second Rainbow Book oj Simulations and its companion The Second 
Rainbow Simulations Tape.) 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 145 



Software Review ^^^^^S^^^^^^^^l7Z\ 

ADOS Is 

Better Than Ever 

SpectroSystems has released A DOS Version 1.02. While 
this new version was released mainly for CoCo 2s containing 
the new lowercase 6847T1 video chip, it is still the best 
alternative to Radio Shack's BASIC for either the CoCo I 
or 2. Some of you may even have the CoCo 2 with this new 
chip and not realize it. These CoCo 2s were sold since late 
1985 and can be distinguished by model numbers ending 
in a B; the nameplate says "Tandy" instead of the familiar 
"Radio. Shack," and, finally, the zero is slashed. These 
machines have the capability of displaying true lowercase 
characters, but the mode is fairly hard to access. Simply 
typing 5HIFT-0 does not do it. You will still get the inverse- 
video uppercase characters. 

The new ADOS allows you to access this mode and 1.02 
has the option to allow the default mode to be real lowercase 
characters. Also with the new CoCo 2, A DOS can provide 
an all-green background with no black border, or an all- 
black background, along with the standard display with the 
black border. With the standard screens, ADOS 1.02 still 
has all the enhancements the earlier version included. A few 
small changes have occurred, but first, let's cover the 
enhancements in case some of you are not familiar with 
ADOS. 

In general, ADOS is a version of Color Disk Extended 
BASIC 1.0 but with many added enhancements that were 
seemingly overlooked by Tandy. After you use ADOS for 
a while, you will think they had to be overlooked, because 
they sure are handy. First, ADOS may be used as a disk 
utility, to be loaded in whenever it is needed or it may be 
burned into an EPROM. The EPROM replaces the ROM 
inside the disk controller. In either case, you can modify 
ADOS to your individual needs. The EPROM option is the 
most recommended since A DOS will always be there when 
you turn on your CoCo. ADOS was well-designed in that 
there are few incompatibilities. SpectroSystems does not 
offer ADOS on an EPROM, but they do furnish you with 
information to have an EPROM burned if you do not have 
access to that capability. You really need to play with A DOS 
for a few weeks before you have it burned into an EPROM. 
You will probably change your own version several times 
before you get it just the way you want it. 

The features of ADOS include repeat and edit of the last 
direct-mode command, control key entries, automatic line 
number prompts, and the ability to enter commands in 
either lower- or uppercase. There is a DOS command for 
booting up OS-9, error-trapping, a one- or two-column 
directory with free grans to the screen or printer, an 
enhanced copy command, an AE error override option for 
Copy and Rename, and a RUNM command to load and 
execute an ML program. 

Also included: RAM command to convert to all-64K 
RAM mode and a ROM command to convert back; a Scan 
command to list ASCII files or give start, end and EXEC 
addresses for binary files; a PRT on/ off for routing text to 



printer or screen; a mini-monitor for hexadecimal memory 
examination and changing; and a command for viewing 
memory. 

Also included is the customizing utility to define control 
key abbreviations, printer baud rates, disk step rates and 
disk access time, and 35- or 40-track drive support. 

You have the option to support single-sided, double-sided 
or the combination of both types of drives. A high 
resolution text screen driver that gives a 24 line by either 
42, 51 or 64 columns is included on the disk. 



"Once you have ADOS 
at your fingertips, you 
will wonder how you got 
along without it. " 



Other programs on the disk include NUTRAX.BIN, 
WPG4fl.BIN and BOOT . BflS. The BDDT.BfiS utility allows 
you to run any program on a disk by using the up- and 
down-arrow keys to select the program. I renamed this 
program X.BflS, put it on all of my disks and defined one 
of my control keys for RUN"X". 

WPG4A is a modified version of PBJ's Word-Pak boot. It 
corrects some conflicts with the use of the down arrow key 
by both A DOS and Word-Pak. A DOS uses the down arrow 
as a control key. 

The NUTRflX utility allows you to convert your 35-track 
disks into 40 tracks by formatting the upper five tracks and 
adjusting the GAT while leaving the contents of the original 
35 tracks intact. 

Another feature is the ability to modify the start-up logo. 
I suggest you modify it with your name; this will help serve 
as a form of theft protection when ADOS is burned into 
an EPROM. You can even give a short message stating the 
modified version of ADOS in case you have different 
EPROMs. 

Overall, anyone with a disk drive should not hesitate to 
get this one. You will not fully appreciate it until it is burned 
into"an EPROM, but, even as a disk utility, I would 
recommend it. Once you have A DOS at your fingertips, you 
will wonder how you got along without it. The documen- 
tation is very clear but, should you have a problem or any 
questions, you can call Art Flexser. You will find him very 
helpful and friendly. I give ADOS five stars and recommend 
you get it soon. 



(SpectroSystems, 1111 1 N. Kendall Dr., Suite A108, Miami, 
FL 33176; 305-274-3899, $27.95 plus $2 S/H) 

— Dale Shell 



146 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 



A GUIDE TO COCO 3 BASIC AND GRAPHICS 

Do you want to learn more about your Color 
Computer 3? If so, you need A Guide to 
Coco 3_ Basic and Graphics i 

More than 50 pages of explanations of and 
programs for using Super Extended Basic. A 
aisR. full of programs and pictures includ- 
ing two high resolution graphic editors. 
Translate low res graphics onto the high 
resolution screen. Learn how to display 
256 artifacted colors on a television. An 
accurate list of all 64 RGB and composite 
colors. Lots of good information that s 
not found in the Coco 3 manual. 

Unlock the power in your Coco Three! 
Order your GUIDE todayl $21.95 



r 



f fifttr a still 1 i ft fcg 
V -Paul C 





BETTER GRAPHICS ON YOUR COCO 3 

Use more of the graphic power of your Coco 
3! Discover new graphic modes ana how to 
edit them using Basic. Display all your 
original high resolution Coco pictures in 
the colors you intended. Find the RAM 
resident character sets. Create better 
static illustrations. Learn to move video 
memory and use Basic to create animation. 
Use horizontal scrolling to display a 360 
degree panoramic view, and much more. 

Better Graphics on Your Coco 3^ plus two 
aisKs of programs and pictures , Useful 
information $24.95 



GET THE CLEAR, CRISP DISPLAY THAT YOU DESERVE! 
MONITOR INTERFACES FOR THE COCO 1 AND 2 

DOUBLE DRIVER I 

The VERY BEST video driver available for the original Color Computer 
1 (the D, E, and F boards). Color composite, true monochrome, ana audio 
output. Fast, solderless installation $24.95 

MONO II 

An EXCELLENT monochrome video driver for the Color Computer 2. True 
monochrome and audio output. Simple, solderless installation $24.95 

DOUBLE DRIVER II 

The VERY BEST color composite video driver for the Color Computer 2. 
Excellent color composite r true monochrome and audio output. Fits all 
models of the Coco 2. Easy installation. No Soldering $29.95 



NEW!!! Color Computer Three Gallery Disk I $9.95 




THE COCO-SWITCHER 

A QUALITY PIECE OF HARDWARE 

The CoCo Switcher allows you to hook up 
three peripherals to your RS-232 jack. Con- 
nect your modem, printer and any other 
RS-232 compatible peripheral to the CoCo 
Switcher. An LED on the CoCo Switcher 
shows if your computer is on or off at a glance, 
The LED flickers when transmitting or receiv- 
ing data. 

$39.95 plus $2.00 shipping and handling 



MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 

A Division of Morelon Bay laboratory 
316 CASTILLO STREET 
SANTA BARBARA 
CALIFORNIA 93101 
(805) 962-3127 



MasterCard 



Ordering information 

Send $2.00 shipping and handling per order, We ship 
within 1 working day on receipt of order. Blue Label 
Service available. California residents add 6% sales tax. 






he modular quality of BAS1C09 
lends itself to the kinds of things 
teachers like to do with computer 
programs. The idea of merely amending 
a data procedure to get a new set of 
questions is right in line with teaching 
practice. The word study program 
Sound Puzzles allows just that. 

Four sets of words are called f rom the 
menu (procedure mmenu), but more are 
available by adding to the menu op- 
tions, or by even introducing a second 
or third page of menus. Only one of the 
data sets has been fully developed as a 
procedure (procedure one), but data for 
three other sets of words are provided. 
All you need to do is change the data 
in one and then rename it to two, three 
or four. 

If you are not familiar with BASIC09, 
a few development hints are in order. 
The steps go something like this: 

Del Turner is an elementary school 
principal who programs for the CoCo 
and MS-DOS machines. He is also a 
proprietor of Thompson House Educa- 
tional Programs. 



148 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 



1) Fire up OS-9 and then call 

BASIC09. 

2) Enter the editor by typing e 
soundpz. 

3) Enter each line of the procedure by 
moving one space from the margin 
and by typing in the characters 
required by the listing. 

4) Quit the editor by typing Q (if you 
have errors, they will be shown to 
you at this time if not already 
noted). 

5) Correct any errors you have made. 

6) Save the procedure to /dO (for 
example) by typing save 
soundpz. 

7) Return to Step 1 to type in another 
of the procedures. 

You can test your progress once you 
have the first five procedures (soundpz, 
printat:, notes, title and mmenu) 
saved to disk. Clear your workspace by 
typing kill*, which kills all procedures 
in memory. Now, load the five proce- 
dures back into the workspace and type 
run soundpz. 

But let's go back a bit. A couple of 
items in the first five procedures might 
have gotten by you if you are used to 
Extended Color BASIC. The printat 
procedure is a handy one you will use 
in many programs. Without the PRINT0 
of Extended BASIC, you need a way of 
placing the cursor where you want it. 

Another item quite different from 
Extended BASIC is the use of graphics 
characters right from the keyboard, 
similar to a Commodore 64. The blue 
square, or CHR$(175), is produced 
under BASIC09 by pressing the @ key 
plus O, which prints out in the listing 
as a black square. This technique is used 
in the title procedure and in the screen 
procedure. Then there is the command 
for clearing the screen, which is PRINT 
CHR$(12), and CHR$(7), which gets a 
beep. Did you notice the neat way of 



handling the menu selections using the 
REPEAT-UNTIL loop? 

The next three procedures (screen, 
nowgo and one) will have to be typed 
in, debugged, and saved to disk before 
you can finally see the whole thing at 
work. Once you have them safely saved, 
you can reload them into the workspace 
and give them a run by selecting Choice 
One from the menu when it prompts 
you. An important thing to remember 
is that you must have lowercase 
enabled. All answers are expected to be 
in lowercase! Now, it may be that the 
workspace will be so full that things 
won't run unless you call for more 
memory. Type mem 7000 and that 
should do the trick for you. If not, go 
for more memory. 

You can finish the job by typing in 
procedures two, three and four using 
the same listing as procedure one only 
with the different sets of data state- 
ments. 

When all is done, you can "pack" the 
procedures and have them called from 
the CMDS file where you will find them 
after the packing process. With your 
unpacked versions loaded into the 
workspace, pack the first four proce- 
dures under the soundpz title by typing 
pack soundpz, notes, title, 
mmenu. Pack the pr inta t procedure by 
itself. Then pack two more under the 
screen title by typing pacl< screen, 
nowgo. Finally, pack each data proce- 
dure separately. Type pack one, then 
pack two, and so forth. 

Your disk will now have two full sets 
of the procedures: one in the /dO direc- 
tory and one in the CMDS directory. The 
packed version will take less memory to 
run and can be called while in BASIC09 
by typing run soundpz, or when in OS- 
9 by typing soundpz alone. The un- 
packed version in the /dO directory can 
be listed to the screen or, even better, 
to the printer, to be arrayed in a pretty 



style like the one shown below. To get 
such a listing to the printer, load the 
procedure desired into the workspace 
from the /dO directory and then type 
list soundpz>^p, for example. Note 
that you may save all procedures in the 
workspace under one title. For instance, 
with all procedures in place, type save* 
soundpz to have them all saved under 
the title soundpz. 

The educational value of the program 
is unique because it deals with a persist- 
ent problem we have with English 
language spelling. Although there are 
some rules that work to tell us when to 
choose a certain phoneme (e.g., i before 
e except after c), more often there are 
no rules to guide us. Yet, 36 percent of 
all spelling errors occur not when a 
phoneme is misspelled, but when the 
wrong phoneme is chosen. The first step 
in learning how to tackle such words is 
to recognize that it is not a rule we need, 
but practice in replacing incorrect 
phonemes with correct ones. In other 
words, dealing with the errors we make 
is the best way to learn. 

As to how to expand the program, 
you could look at improving the proce- 
dures themselves, maybe adding a 
border to the title, or other print graph- 
ics additions. The content of the lessons 
leaves lots to be done, as only four of 
a possible 47 phonemes of the English 
language have been tackled. If you want 
to deal with a tough phoneme set, try 
getting involved with the sound of "o" 
as in boat and you will find 23 possibil- 
ities (a, o, i, y, ei, oi, ai, eo, he, iu, au, 
ah, u, e, ea, ou, ie, io, ia, eau, oa, iou 
and ough). No wonder people have 
trouble learning to spell in English! □ 



(You may direct questions about this 
program to Mr. Turner at 2305 Green- 
field Ave., Kamloops, British Colum- 
bia, Canada V2B4P5. Please enclose an 
SASE when expecting a reply.) □ 



Editor's Note: On RAINBOW ON DISK, The following procedures will be combined into one source 
file. All you will need to do is enter load soundpuz at the BASIC09 prompt after entering BR5IC09 87K. 

The listing: soundpz 

PROCEDURE printat 
PARAM col, row: INTEGER 

PRINT CHR$(2); CHR$ (col+32) ; CHR$ (row+32) ; 
END 

PROCEDURE notes 
PRINT CHR$(12) 

RUN printat (0,0) \ PRINT "SOME NOTES:" \ PRINT 

PRINT "PHONIC SUBSTITUTIONS WHEREBY A SOUND IS SPELLED CORRECTLY YET IT IS THE WRONG FORM FOR 

THE WORD, ACCOUNT FOR 36% OF ALL ERRORS MADE. NO OTHER ERROR IS AS FREQUENT ! " 

PRINT \ PRINT "FEW RULES WORK IN SUCH CASES, SO THE PROCRAM MERELY ATTEMPTS TO HAVE THE STUD 

ENT SEE THAT IT IS A MATTER OF RESPONDING TO THE NATURE OF THE ERROR." 

PRINT \ INPUT "PRESS <ENTEH> TO CONTINUE a$ 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 149 



PROCEDURE mmenu 


PRINT "correction:" 


DIM choice : INTEGER 


RUN printat(J2f,9) 


REPEAT 


PRINT " " ; 


PRINT CHR$(12) \RUN printat(ll , 2 ) \ PRINT "M E N U" 


PROCEDURE title 


RUN printat(8,4) 


DIM phoneme : STRING [4 j 


PRINT "1. e sound as in bed" 


»^ mm v m m mm* % m mmm mm* ^m mmi m^ 

DIM count ,h,v; INTEGER 


RUN printat (8, 6) 


count=»p 


PRINT M 2. a sound as in cat" 


h=0 


n TTYT - - f , ^ , /ft ft \ 

RUN printat(8,8) 


v=0 


PRINT "3 . e sound as in we" 


mm) m mmm. ^mx m v «h >^ y ^% V 

PRINT CHR$(12) 


RUN printat (8 , 10) 


DATA "a" , "au" , "ai" , "e" , "ee" , "ea" , "ei" , "ie" 


PRINT "4. a sound as in name 11 


DATA "i" , "eo" , "oe" , "ay" , "ey" , "y" , "ae" , "is" 


PRINT 


DATA "a" , "ay" , "ey" , "eigh" , "ei" , "ea" , "ai" 


5 INPUT " ENTER YOUR CHOICE , choice 


DATA "aigh" , "ei" , "eue" , "ai" , "ewe" , "yew" , "iew" 


UNTIL choice>- 1 AND choice<-4 


REPEAT 


IF choice-1 THEN 100 


h=RND(24)+2 


IF choice-2 THEN 200 


v-RND(12)+l 


IF choice-3 THEN 300 


READ phoneme 


if / #nvvwxx / t*t t*t 

IF choice«4 THEN 400 


count :=count+l 


100 RUN one 


RUN printat(h.v) 


200 RUN two 


PRINT " " ; 


300 RUN three 


PRINT phoneme ; 


400 RUN four 


PRINT CHR$ (7) ; 




UNTIL count>29 




RUN printat(8,5) 




PRINT " "; 


PP /"IPTTMTP IT Ann 

rKuut-iJUKt- one 


RUN printat(8,6) 


DIM count , i : INTEGER 


PRINT " SOUND PUZZLES Hj 


fs TV/ ma ..1 ma o e 0 • OTP TMf r ^ (1 1 


RUN printat(8,7) 


HTM cartl-on r o • QTR TNf2 f ^ Of! 


PRINT " if " 


u±n errorw . oikiinli [l j j 


PRINT CHR$(7) 


DIM correctw: STRING [ 15 J 


RUN printat(5,12) 


count=0 


INPUT " PRESS <ENTER>. . . ",a$ 


DATA "The e sound as in bed" 


END 


DATA "e ie ea ai u a ay eo ei ae" 




DATA "He sed he would return. 11 , "sed" , "said" 




DATA "Tom will gat it. ", "gat" , "get" 




DATA "There are too meny 1" , "meny" , "many" 


T"*ft A/^PTNTTn — J 

PROCEDURE soundpz 


DATA "Run it agen .", "agen" , "again" 


Kfc.n sound puzzle 


DATA "The box is hevy . " , "hevy" , "heavy" 


P TTM Vt rial t-nrnor 

Ktn oy uci turner 


DATA "Is that ther house? ", "ther" , "their" 


RFM (c*\ octohpr 1 <386 


DATA "Are there eny lef t? " , "eny" , "any" 


ts.fc.ri os? v.z / oasicyjy v.± 


DATA "I ment to clean my room. ", "ment" , "meant" 


DIM COUnt . IN 1 fc.bfc.K 


DATA "I've red that book. " , "red" , "read" 


count . =)d 


DATA "The colour is yallow .", "yallow" , "yellow" 


count^count+i 


count=count+l \ IF count>l THEN 5 


wHiJ_.fc. count<z L)U 


RUN screen 


O T TV1 m — 4. — a 

kun notes 


READ messl 


Run title 


READ mess2 


count=count+l 


score-0 


ENDWHILE 


5 FOR i=l TO 10 


RUN mmenu 

*■ V ~ ill 111 w * m ^mm 


READ sentence 




KCiAu errorw 




klad correctw 






PROCEDURE nowgo 


NrJvl 1 


DIM studentw: STRING [15] 


RUN printat(>J ,4) 


PARAM messl ,mess2 , sentence : STRING [30] 




P ARAM errorw, correctw: STRING [15 ] 


PRINT ; 


PARAM score: INTEGER 


TMPTTT HO VOTT L7AMT TO PT AV APATM9" aC 
INrU 1 UU XUU WANl 1U rLAI AuAINf , ap 


RUN printat(0,ll) 


TT? o C _ '< ti >* TUTTM 1 (1(1 

If a^™ n lrl£.N Vpy 


PRINT messl 


RUN sounapz 


PRINT 


i act RYF 


PRINT "MAY BE WRITTEN THESE WAYS : " 




PRINT mess2 




RUN printat (7 ,2) 




PRINT sentence 


PROCEDURE screen 


RUN printat(13 ,4) 


PRINT CHR$(12) 


PRINT errorw; 


T\ YTXT J j_ . ✓ ftt ftt V 

RUN printat(0,0) 


PRINT " " ; 


PRINT "*SOUND PUZZLES* SCORE: "; 


10 RUN printat (13 ,6) 


RUN printat(7,4) 


PRINT " " ; 


PRINT "error:" 


RUN printat (13 , 6) 


FOR count=0 TO 31 


INPUT "", studentw 


PRINT CHR$(58); 


PRINT ""; 


NEXT count 


IF studentw-correctw THEN 100 


RUN printat(2,6) 


score~score-5 



150 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



GOSUB 200 
GOTO 10 

100 RUN printat(7,2) 
PRINT " 

score«score+10 
GOSUB 200 
PRINT CHR$(7) 
RUN printat(13,6) 
PRINT " 
END 

200 RUN printat(23,0) 
PRINT V, 

RUN printat(23,0) 
PRINT score; 
RETURN 



PROCEDURE two 

DIM count , i : INTEGER 

DIM messl ,mess2 : STRING [30] 

DIM sentence : STRING [30] 

DIM errorw: STRING [15] 

DIM correctw: STRING [15] 

count-0 

DATA "The a sound as in cat" 
DATA "a au ai" 

DATA "Shall we all go?" ," shall" ," shall" 

DATA "I caun do that . " , "caun" , ''can" 

DATA "Thainks for the help .", "thainks "," thanks " 

DATA "I was bom in Jainuary .", "Jainuary" , "January" 

DATA "The game is on Sauturday .", "Sauturday" , "Saturday" 

DATA "All begain to cheer .", "begain" , "began " 

DATA "I aim on the team. ", "aim" , "am" 

DATA "My ant lives in Toronto . M , "ant" , "aunt " 

DATA "The skirt was a plad one .", "plad" , "plaid" 

DATA "It was blaik as night . " , "blaik" , "black" 

count=count+l \ IF count>l THEN 5 

RUN screen 

READ messl 

READ mess 2 

score=0 

5 FOR i=l TO 10 
READ sentence 
READ errorw 
READ correctw 

RUN nowgo(messl ,mess2 , sentence, errorw , correctw, score) 
NEXT i 

RUN printat(0,4) 

PRINT " k\ 
PRINT " st ; 
INPUT " DO YOU WANT TO PLAY AGAIN?",a$ 
IF a$-"n" THEN 100 
RUN soundpz 
100 BYE 



PROCEDURE three 

DIM count , i : INTEGER 

DIM messl ,mess2 :STRING[30] 

DIM sentence:STRING[30] 

DIM errorw: STRING [15] 

DIM correctw: STRING [15] 

count-0 

DATA "The e sound as in we" 

DATA "e ee ea ei ie i eo oe ay ey y ae is" 

DATA "The grass turned grean .", "grean" , "green" 

DATA "Thees are the ones !", "thees ", "these" 

DATA "eich child got a candy .", "eich" , "each" 

DATA "It is underneth the bed .", "underneth", "underneath" 

DATA "I like it verie much .", "verie ", "very" 

DATA "She is fiftean years old. ", "f if tean" , "fifteen" 

DATA "Reed that sign for me .", "reed" , "read" 

DATA "That is hard to beleive !", "beleive" , "believe" 

DATA "Yhe answer is obveous "obveous " , "obvious" 



DATA "Did you receave a gift? ", "receave" , "receive " 

count«count+l \ IF count>l THEN 5 

RUN screen 

READ messl 

READ mess 2 

score=0 

5 FOR i-1 TO 10 
READ sentence 
READ errorw 
READ correctw 

RUN nowgo(messl,mess2 , sentence , errorw, correctw, score) 
NEXT i 

RUN printat(0,A) 

PRINT " " ; 

PRINT " "; 
INPUT " DO YOU WANT TO PLAY AGAIN?", a$ 
IF a$- J, n" THEN 100 
RUN soundpz 
100 BYE 



PROCEDURE four 

DIM count,!: INTEGER 

DIM messl ,mess2 : STRING[ 30] 

DIM sentence: STRING [30] 

DIM errorw: STRING [15] 

DIM correctw: STRING [15] 

count=»0 

DATA "The a sound, as in name" 

DATA "a ay ey eigh aigh ei ea ai et au" 

DATA "Mey i go to the show? ", "mey" , "may" 

DATA "I alweighs use salt .", "alweighs ", "always " 

DATA "How much do you way ?", "way" , "weigh" 

DATA "He is ayght years old . " , "ayght " , "e ight" 

DATA "Give the apples awe igh .", "aweigh" , "away" 

DATA "It is all the saym to me . " , "saym" , " same " 

DATA "He took aym, and f ired . " , "aym" , "aim" 

DATA "Snow meant s laighing .", "slaighing" , "sleighing" 

DATA "Miss Muffet ate her whay . " , "whay" , "whey" 

DATA "He has a laim leg . " , "la im" , "lame" 

count=count+l \ IF count>l THEN 5 

RUN screen 

READ messl 

READ mess 2 

score=»0 

5 FOR i-1 TO 10 
READ sentence 
READ errorw 
READ correctw 

RUN nowgo(messl,mess2 , sentence , errorw, correctw, score) 
NEXT i 

RUN printat(0,4) 

PRINT " " ; 

PRINT " " ; 

INPUT " DO YOU WANT TO PLAY AGAIN?", a$ 

IF a$-"n" THEN 100 

RUN soundpz 

100 PRINT CHR$(12) 

BYE 



GET IT ALL!!! 

Excellent 27 Disk CoCo Software Librar y $95.00 
includes Word Processor, Modems, Utilities, 124 Games, 
Graphics/Pics, Business, Languages, Music and More. 
Public Domain and Shareware. Over 350 Programs. 

15% Discountto User Groups and Students. Major Credit 
Cards Welcomed. Call Al at 1-800-221-7372; in New York 
call 212-732-2565. 

Public Domain Software Copying Company 

33 Gold Street-Suite L3 
New York, N.Y. 10038 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 151 



DOWNLOADS 

1 he Breathing Video Display 



By Dan Downard 

K. 1 rip. | • 1 171 i». 

a hi how lechnical Lditor 



I am using a Zenith 1 31 OPT television 
display. It "breathes" vertically as 
though the TV is in and out of sync with 
the Co Co vertical timing. This does not 
happen with other TVs, such as my 
Panasonic, which has a vert sync adjust- 
ment. What do you suggest? 

Joseph P. Chide st er 
Owing s Mills, MD 

Joe, it sounds as if you are getting RF 
interference into your TV set. As you 
know, the CoCo uses a clock frequency 
of .985 MHz, which is in the RF range. 
Harmonics interfere with your TV 
picture. The only sure way 1 know of 
curing the problem is installing a mon- 
itor adapter and using a monitor instead 
of a TV set, 

There are a few more things you can 
try, though. First, try replacing the 
cable from the CoCo to the TV with 
coaxial cable, such as RG58/U. Make 
the cable long enough to coil about 10 
turns of coaxial into a4-inch circle. This 
will provide a little bit of attenuation of 
the harmonic signal. 

Some people have even gone to the 
extreme of spraying the inside of the 
plastic cabinet with conductive paint. 
Be careful about flaking, since you may 
accidentally short out something on 
your circuit board. As with any type of 
electronic equipment, care should be 
taken to protect against possible dam- 
age to the components and the circuit 
board. Good luck. 



Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
27 years through Ham radio (K4KWT), 
His interest in computers began about 
eight years ago, and he has built several 
68XX systems. 



8-Inch Drive Modifications 

/ need information concerning hook- 
ing up an 8-inch disk drive ( Model 801 
Shugart ) to my old 4 D 3 board CoCo 
with RS disk controller. Is it possible? 
If so, what changes need to be done to 
CoCo, controller (ROM Version 1.0) 
and drive? Is the 8-inch drive card edge 
similar to the card edge of my 5 l / 4-inch 
drives? 

Roger W. Donahue 
Bristol TN 

It is indeed possible to connect an 8- 
inch drive to your disk controller, 
Roger. An article appeared in BYTE 
magazine a few years back showing 
both the hardware and software re- 
quired for this project, Unfortunately, 
the software was written for a 6502 
microprocessor, but should provide a 
guideline for your effort. 

I wouldn't recommend using the 8- 
inch drive, though. First of all, the 
standard IBM format for 8-inch drives 
is single density. You can actually store 
more information on a 514-inch, 
double-density floppy. Even if you are 
successful, severe compatibility prob- 
lems will exist, That*s the main reason 
3 s /2-ineh drives have not become popu- 
lar. They were just not like the rest of 
the CoCo world. 



Delphi Novice 

/ am new to communications on the 
CoCo. I've been trying to use the Delphi 
network, but it tends to get a little 
confusing for a beginner. Could you tell 



me if there is any publication I could 
buy to help me out? 

Stephen J. Benson 
Everett, WA 

It sounds like you are on the right 
path already, Stephen, due to the fact 
that you wrote to "Downloads" using 
the electronic mail service provided by 
Delphi, 

I am not aware of any publications 
that specialize in bulletin board com- 
munications, but be sure to read Cray 
Augsburg's monthly "Delphi Bureau*' 
column, Cray is rainbow's Technical 
Editor and he offers easy-to-follow 
tutorials on using Delphi in his column. 

The next time you are on CoCo SIG 
on Del phi, try typing CO. This will get 
you into the conference mode. There, 
you can carry on an electronic conver- 
sation with many of the editors and 
RAINBOW contributing authors. If they 
can, they will be glad to help you with 
any problems you are having. You can 
also type HELP at any prompt and 
receive an explanation of your options. 
See you on Delphi! 



Twice the Normal Speed 

/ have a Color Computer 3, a Metric 
parallel interface and a Radio Shack 
DMP-200 printer. When the computer 
is operating at 1.78 MHz, what do I do 
to make the printer print legible infor- 
mation? It prints properly at the slower 
clock speed. Also, how reliable is disk 
I/O at the faster clock speed? lam using 



152 THE RAINBOW June 1967 





Time passes quickly as you use your nimble fingers to escape 
the very passion that consumes you. Thoughts are fleeting at 
a time in which you need them most. The spidery web of 
mystery and intrigue you have spun is now entangling you. Every 
breath you take . . . Every move you make ... Is it correct? Will it even 
accomplish the task at hand? Is there any time left? 

No, we don't mean to imply time is nearly up for our Fourth 
Adventure Contest. Plenty of time remains. However, the final 
deadline fa your entry in this contest is August 15, 1987 - a date 
that is rapidly approaching. So, you'd better get started soon, if you 
haven't already begun. 

What? No ideas, you say? Just take a look around you! Your 
everyday life presents you with hundreds. Just sit down and start now! 
We await the very best you have to offer. If you want some pointers, 
check out "The Adventure Writer's Toolkit" (April 1985, Page 105) by 
Eric W. Tilenius. Or, fa another helping hand, see "The Adventure 
Processor" (August 1986, Page 26) by Bill Cook. These articles, and 
many more, are just what you need to get started on the right track. 

Your Adventure can be written for a 4K early model CoCo, or it 
can be written to take advantage of all the features in a 512K CoCo 
3. It can be written under Disk basic, or it might be a creation in 

BASIC09. 



Judging: The judges of the fourth Rainbow Adventure Contest will be looking for several 
things in each entry, in addition to ensuring each submission is complete, they will consider 
the following: 

• Originality • Vocabulary and Grammar 

• Creativity • Responsiveness 

• Programming Efficiency • Level of Challenge 

• Clarily of instructions • Enjoyment 

• Ease of Use 

The judges will also be concerned with the "punishability" of each Adventure. A shorter 
program is easier to fit into print (both in THE RAINBOW and any subsequent Adventure 
book) as well as being easier for the reader to type in. While the use of graphics tends 
to enhance any program, graphics are not necessary for an Adventure to win. The winning 
entry will be chosen fa its unique appearance. Make your Adventure stand above the 
rest! 

RULES: Your submission should include all programs and information needed to set up and 
run the Adventure. All programs must be sent on tape or disk with several saves of each 
program including at least one ASCII save. If an Adventure cannot be loaded. It cannot 
be judged. We will not lype in even the shortest of programs! Hard copy of all program 
listings and instructions must also be included. If your Adventure uses machine language 
routines, all source code, as well as assembled object code, should be included on the 
tape or disk. Indicate the minimum CoCo system required to run your Adventure and 
include a complete solution! 

Please, don't use packed lines that can't be USTed orLUSTedfor the benefit of our readers. 
Your program should run on standard Radio Shack equipment without requiring any 
special modifications and should not rely on commercial software for its execution. The 
only exception is the use of the OS-9 operating system (Level I and Level I!) and BASIC09. 
If your Adventure uses graphics, make sure the graphics are self-contained. In other words, 
don't submit a program that loads several different graphics screens unless those graphics 
are created by a publishable program included in the submission. 

In summary, send a complete package. Put the accompanying article, documentation, 
iistings. complete instructions and solution, and cover letter on paper. Include your name, 
address and telephone number on each page of all materials. Be sure to write-protect 
your disk or punch out the tabs on your cassette to avoid accidental erasure, and label 
each with the name of the program(s) and your name and address. As in any contest, 
packaging does make a difference. 

Your entry must be postmarked no later than August 15, 1987, in error-free condition. Each 



j ii 



entrant will receive a free pass to the RAJNBOWfest of his or her choice You may also win 
one of the many prizes donated by our generous advertisers as well as have your program 
published in THE RAINBOW. So. get a move onl Write it up, put If together and send it 

to: 

Adventure Contest Editor, Rainbow Mogazine, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, 
P.O. Box 365, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Additional Rules: All entries must be original, unpublished and unmarketed works (no 
"conversions"). No programs that have been placed in the public domain are eligible. 
AllenrriesbecomethepropertyofFd^^ 

of the judges will be final. Duplicate prizes will be awarded In the event of a tie, Winning 
entries will be featured In a future issue of THE RAINBOW. 

Prizes: Following is partial list of the prizes the winners of our 
Fourth Rainbow Adventure Contest will be receiving. And, 
many more prizes are being donated each day! 



Tandy/Radio Shack 

Tandy Home 
Education Systems 



Computer Island 



Frank Hogg 
Laboratory, Inc. 

Howard Medical 

HJL Products 

Computize 

RAINBOW'S Delphi 
SIGs 



Diecom Products 



Computer Plus 
Derringer Software 

Speech Systems 



Tom Mix Software 
Spectrum Projects 



CompuServe 

Microcom Software 
Sugar Software 



DMP-106 Printer 
VIDTEX 

Creative Exploration Series 
Spectaculator 
Hands On 

Problem Solving Series 
Cooperative Strategy Series 

Chemistry Tutor 
Area & Perimeter 
Division of Fractions 
Quadratic Equations Tutor 
Distance Problems 
Cloze Exercises 
First Games 

The CoCo Wheel of Fortune 

Inside OS-9 Level II (5 books) 

Zenith 12" Amber Video Monitor 

Softswitch Auto/Manual Printer 
Switch with cables 

Color Max 3 (2 programs) 

Three five-hour free evenings in 
your choice of the CoCo or OS-9 
Online SIGs. 

Bouncing Boulders 
Caludril 

Lansford Mansion 

Color Computer 2 

Pro-Color-Series Enhanced Ver- 
sion 2.1 

Super Voice Speech Synthesizer 
includes Text-to-Speech Transla- 
tor Program 

Worlds of Flight (2 programs) 

Three Book Set: 
CoCo III Secrets Revealed 
The History of the CoCo 
basic Programming Tricks 
IntroPak - An Introductory Sub- 
scription (3 IntroPaks) includes 
$15 usage credit 

Utility Routines Volume II 
Trig Attack 



$200 
$30 

$99 



$30 
$20 
$20 
$20 
$20 
$20 
$25 
$20 

$40 ea. 
$150 

$140 
$60 ea. 



$36 ea. 

$29 
$39 
$39 

$100 
$80 



$80 

$35 ea. 



$50 



$15 ea. 

$30 

$20 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 153 



Teac 55 VB DS DD drives. I can 7 tell 
you people how much I look forward to 
RAINBOW Magazine and using RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG. Thanks for any infor- 
mation and keep up the excellent work! 

Andrew E. Stangel 
Milwaukee, IV I 

Since you are operating at a clock 
speed of twice the normal rate, Andy, 
you have to divide your delay constant 
by a factor of two. This is not the exact 
method of obtaining the constant, but 
it will work. For example, if you want 
600 baud at a 1 .78 MHz clock speed, use 
the constant for 1200 baud, or 41. 

As far as high speed disk I/O, please 
read the following letter I received after 
my April column. 



Goodman's Response 

In the April "Downloads," you told 
Steve Zweitel that the CoCo 3 s BASIC 
disk I/O should function at double 
speed. This is incorrect. In the DSKCON 
code (sector I/O) and in the DSKINI 
(format code) there are a number of 
places where delays allow data to "set- 
tie " in the Western Digital Chip after a 
command is sent to it. These delays end 
up being too short when the CoCo 3 is 
run at double speed. Unreliable disk 1/ 
O and unsuccessful formatting result. 
Art Flexser in ADOS3 and Steve Bjork 
in a program called Disk Fix, which he 
has posted on Delphi, have fixed these 
problems in the DSKCON and in DSKINI 
routines in Disk BASIC. 

In another question, Mike Roush 
complained about a CoCo I with G and 
Okey problems that got worse when he 
changed his old chicklet keyboard for a 
high-profile, CoCo 2 type keyboard. 
You advised him that the 6809 or the 
6821 was likely to be at fault. Instead, 
this problem is due to a design flaw in 
the CoCo I circuit. The flaw consists of 
too big an RF limiting capacitor on the 
joystick Jlrebutton lines (C57 and C58) 
on the old ' D' and 'E' boards. On some 
CoCo Is, the value of .01 used causes 
the G and O keys to fail to work, 
because the pulses of the keyboard scan 
for those keys are getting shorted to 
ground by that improperly sized RF 
limiter capacitor. This problem always 
gets worse if the computer is run at a 
higher speed. 

On Page I of Tandy Tech Tip for the 



Color Computer, Sheet CC:22 (a series 
of tech tips Tandy sends to their repair 
centers), Tandy advises that, in the 
course of installing any CoCo 2 key- 
boards, the C57 and C58 be replaced 
with .001 mF capicators (instead of the 
.01s that were originally there). This fix 
always cures the missing G and O bug. 

The report that dropping in a CoCo 
2 type keyboard exacerbated the prob- 
lem is probably explained by some 
physical effect (increased resistance? 
added capacitance 9 ) caused by the 
membrane connector used by those 
keyboards. 

As you are well aware, I advise 
against anyone running their CoCo 1 or 
2 at any of the high speed pokes. 

It is remotely possible that swapping 
keyboard 6821 (as you recommended) 
might fix the problem, for the problem 
may appear only with some 6821 chips 
and not others. But such a fix is a poor 
one, for even when working, the system 
will be marginal and vulnerable to 
tl relapses." The cap replacement is 
really the right approach. 

Marty Goodman 



Marty, as always it is good to hear 
from you. I agree that high speed disk 
I/O is undesirable, but it does work on 
occasion. As far as the timing problem 
associated with keyboard malfunctions, 
I agree that this, is probably the prob- 
lem. Thanks f or your input. 



Multi-Pak Does the Job 

Can you use a modem, disk drive, a 
printer and Mi key Term all at the same 
time? I have a CoCo 2 and a Multi-Pak 
interface. I also have an RS-232 pro- 
gram card. Can I disable the internal 
terminal program in the card to use it 
that way? 

Willis Calvert 
Avenel, NJ 



You just have to plug the RS-232 card 
into your Multi-Pak, Willis. The rest of 
the details are accomplished by the 
software. If you don't have a Multi-Pak, 
you may have to disable the ROM, due 
to address conflicts. 



C on Level II 

I plan to buy OS -9 Level II when it 
becomes available, but I was wondering 
if it will be possible to use Level I C 
under OS-9 Level II? If not, will it be 
possible to get an upgrade to OS-9 Level 
IIC without having to just fiat out buy 
it at full price? 

J. Michael O f Connor 
Austin, TX 

Fear not, Mike, your Level I C pack- 
age will run just fine under Level II. I 
tried it and it works. 



Needs More Space 

A few months ago, I asked about 
extending the space between the CoCo 
and the Multi-Pak. I am again toying 
with an idea to "clean up " the look of 
my computer room. My hope is to 
remove the CoCo motherboard and the 
Multi-Pak board and enclose them in a 
PC-style case. In order to do this, I 
would have to mount one board over 
the other, so enough room is left for 
drives. Since my letter to you, I have 
now seen cables being advertised in the 
RA IN BO W to exend the distance between 
the Co Co and the MPL Do you feel that 
a mere 2 to 3 inches would be allowable? 

Eric A. Canha 
Fair haven, MA 

I don't see anything wrong with a 
short extension, Eric, but I wouldn't 
recommend it unless it was absolutely 
necessary. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

Your technical questions may also be sent 
to us through our Delphi CoCo SIG. From 
the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type RSK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "Down- 
loads" online form which has complete 
instructions. 



154 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



OS-9 LEVEL II 



Exploring Level IPs New 
Features From BASIC09 

By Rick Adams 



Several articles in THE RAINBOW 
have given examples of how to 
access the new windowing fea- 
tures of Level II via display com- 
mands and the ucreate (window 
create) command. But BAS1C09 users 
under Level II have an even more 
powerful interface with OS-9's new 
windowing and graphics capabilities — 
the GFX2 module. 

The GFX2 module is the BASIC09 
programmer's friend. It provides an 
easily-remembered method for acces- 
sing special display functions. To clear 
the screen, for example, everybody 
knows (or do they?) the command 
PRINT CHR$[12] will do the trick and 
that PRINT CHRS(7) causes the termi- 
nal to beep. But this is a rather obscure, 
"system-freaky" way of performing 
what really should be a straightforward 
operation. 

Enter our friend GFX2. From a 
BAS1C09 program, if you want to clear 
the screen, use the command RUN 
GFX2[ "clear"). If you want to beep 
the terminal, use RUN GFX2 ( "bel 1 " ] . 
The GFX2 module takes your descrip- 
tion of what you want done and gener- 
ates the proper display codes. 

Experienced BASIC09 users will recog- 
nize that GFX2 works the same as the 
GFX module that came with OS-9 
Level I. A Level II system also comes 
with the GFX module, but GFX2 pro- 
vides an additional bag of tricks, via 
which your BASIC09 programs can now 
activate literally dozens of new and 
amazing functions available under 
Level II. 

Rick Adams (Delphi username RICK- 
ADAMS) is a UNIX systems pro- 
grammer who enjoys using and writing 
software for his CoCo 3. He, his wife, 
Alice, and their two children live in 
Rohnert Park, California. 



Take a look at the BAS1C09 program 
shown in Listing 1. This program clears 
the screen (sound familiar?) and then 
turns on a new feature in Level II OS- 
9 called the "graphics cursor." 

The graphics cursor is a little arrow 
that moves around with your joystick 
and points to anywhere on the screen. 
In this sample program, pressing the 
firebutton on the joystick causes a circle 
to be drawn on the screen, with the 
center of the circle at the place the 
graphics cursor was pointing to when 
the firebutton was pressed. 

Let's do a few setup operations so we 
can be ready to type in and run the 
example program given in Listing 1 . We 
need to set up a high resolution graphics 
screen for the program to run in, make 
sure the GFX and GFX2 modules will 
be available for BASlC09's use, and use 
the stdptrs file to pre-define our 
graphics cursor. 

Either type these commands directly 
into OS-9 or create a "command file" 
(using build or your favorite editor) 
containing them: 



ucreate 'wl -s=5 0 0 B0 24 1 0 0 
merge /d0/sys'stdf onts >'wl 
merge /d0/sys's tdp trs >'wl 
display lb 3a cB 01 >'wl 
echo Window 'wl >'wl 
shell i='uil& 

Run these commands to set up win- 
dow wl for our BAS1C09 program. Then 
press the CLEAR key to go to the next 
window. You should see an 80-column 
screen containing white letters on a blue 
background. If you are using an RGB 
monitor, you will need to enter mon- 
type r at the OS-9 prompt. 

The uicreate command created the 
window and the window color set (white 
on blue, with blue border). The merge 
of the stdfonts and stdptrs files to 
the window defined the text font and 
the graphics icons to use when drawing 
a graphics cursor. The she 1 1 command 
created a new OS-9 shell to run your 
OS-9 commands in the new window. 

Now that you have taken up resi- 
dence in your new window, wl, it is time 
to make sure that BASIC09 will be able 



Diagram of pointer icons in stdptrs file: 

Group 202 buffer 1 — 
pointer arrow: 

• •»•••« 
* 

*** 



• • • • 

*** 
**** ** 
* ***** 
**** 
***** 

^^^v 



Group 202 buffer 2 — pencil: 

**** 

* * * 

* * 

* ••••• •••••••• 

. *. . * . 

* * 
* * * 

* * 
* * 
* 



June 1987 



THE RAINBOW 



155 



to find the GFX and the GFX2 modules 
when it needs them. 

Many people customize several ver- 
sions of their working OS-9 disks, 
trimming all files that are useless for a 
particular application to conserve disk 
space. If you have customized your 
working Level II disks to the point that 
GFX and GFX2 will fit in the CMDS 
directory, it would be a good idea to 
copy these files into /d0/CMD5. BASIC09 
looks for these files in the current 
execution directory if it can't find them 
in memory. Obviously, it would also be 
a good idea to put BASIC09 itself into the 
/d0/CMDS directory, too! 

Otherwise, you may use the load 
command to load the GFX and GFX2 
modules (as well as BASIC09) into mem- 
ory from disk. These modules will most 
probably reside on your second Level II 
disk as /d0'CMDS/g f x, 'd0/CMDS/ 
gfx2, and /d0/CMD5/basic09, respec- 
tively. If you have two disk drives, you 
can pop that other disk in Drive 1 and 
type: 

load /dl'CMDS/gfx 
load /dl/CMDS/gfx2 
load /dl/CMD5/basic09 

If you only have one drive, swap that 
disk in place of your Level II commands 
disk (and, substitute d0 for dl above). 
The load module is already in memory, 
so you can load those modules, then 
swap back the original disk, with no ill 
effects. 

Finally, it's time to fire up BASIC09. 
When &ASlC09's title page appears, type 
e circles to begin entering the pro- 
gram in Listing I. Enter each line from 
the listing carefully, beginning each line 
with a space so that BASIC09 under- 
stands that each of the lines is to be 
entered as a line of your program, 
instead of being interpreted as a BASTC09 
editor command. 

When the final end command has 
been entered into the program, type a 
q at the left margin to exit the BASIC09 
program editor. At this point it would 
be a good idea to save your work: 

save* circles 

If all has gone well up to this point, 
type run c i rc les to start the program. 
The screen should clear, and a little 
arrow should appear on the screen. 
Move the arrow around with your 
joystick, and then press the firebutton 
to put a circle on the screen. Move 
somewhere else and put another circle 
on the screen. Hold the firebutton down 
and move the joystick as the drawing of 
circles auto-repeats. 



The graphics cursor is visible as a 
little arrow. The data that defined the 
shape of this arrow was loaded into 
memory when you used the merge 
command to merge the contents of the 
stdptrs file (the "standard pointers" 
file) with the window. More on that 
later. 

Notice you didn't have to do anything 
to prevent the moving cursor arrow 
from wiping out what it moves over. 
OS-9 automatically takes care of that 
detail for you. 

The GFX2 calls to "curoff," "clear" 
and "bell" are used to turn off the 
cursor, clear the screen and make a little 
beep sound, respectively. The GFX call 
to "joystk" will be familiar to those who 
have used the GFX module under Level 
I BASIC09. So far, things look fairly 
straightforward. But there are a few 
GFX2 calls in there that bear explain- 
ing. Let's take a look. 

The "gcset" call turns on the graphics 
cursor. The "putgc" call tells OS-9 to 
move the graphics cursor to the speci- 
fied X and Y coordinates. You are not 
telling BASIC09 to do it; the OS-9 oper- 
ating system itself is doing all the work. 
If you interrupt the program, the graph- 
ics cursor will still be there on the 
screen. As a matter of fact, the graphics 
cursor will stubbornly stay on the screen 
even if you exit BASIC09! 

The "setdptr" call sets the display 
pointer (the screen position used as a 
reference point by many of the graphics 
commands) to the specified X and Y 
coordinates. The "circle" call to GFX2 
uses this point as the center point of the 
circle it draws. The number 80 in the 
"circle"call establishes a circle radius of 
80. 

Now, what is this about the "standard 
pointers" file? Are there several pointer 
icons in this file? Yes, there are, but to 
access them, we're going to have to 
explore the inner workings of Level II 
OS-9 in a little more detail. 

The definition of pointer icons for the 
"graphics cursor" is a specialized appli- 
cation of a facility called "get/put 
buffers." Get/put buffers, when loaded 
into memory, are referenced by two 
numbers that describe which buffer 
"group" to use, and which "buffer" 
within that group. 

All of the pointer icons in the 
stdptrs file are referenced as get /put 
Buffer Group 202. Within that group, 
there are seven buffers, numbered 1 
through 7, each containing a pointer 
icon. 

Thus, in the "gcset" call in Listing 1, 
notice that the pointer icon we are 



Group 202 buffer 3 — 
cross- hairs: 

** 
** 
** 
** 
** 

•• •••••« 

• •••••*»* 

**************** 

**************** 

** 



** 


• • • • • 

• • • * * 


** 





** 


• • • * • 


** 


• • • • • 


** 


■ 1 ■ ■• * 


** 

• •••• ••• 


• • • a » 



Group 202 buffer 4 — 
"system busy" Icon (hourglass): 

**************** 
* * 



* • 



+ 4 



********** 
******** 
****** 

**** 

* « 

** 



* * 
* 



** 

• * » * 

* ** * 

• v 



** 
■ • • • 

**** 

* • 

****** 



* 

**************** 



Group 202 buffer 5 — 
"illegal function" icon: 



***** 



** 



* 
* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



• » * * 

** 

* r * 

* 

* * * * 

*** 

■ ■ 

** * 
** 



** 
** 
** 



* 
* 



** 
** 
** 
** 

• • • 
** 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



** 



4 • 



***** 



w m 



156 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



telling OS-9 to use is in Buffer Group 
202, Buffer Number 1. This is the 
picture of the little arrow we have seen. 
(To turn off the graphics cursor, use 
another "gcset" call to set the graphics 
cursor to Buffer Group 0, Buffer 
Number 0.) 

Just for fun, change that call to use 
Group 202, Buffer 2, instead of Buffer 
1. The next time you run the program, 
the little arrow pointer will be replaced 
with a little picture of a pencil. More 



fiddling will reveal each of the other 
pointer icons. Note that one of the 
pointer icons is an hourglass, with sand 
running through it. This will no doubt 
be used by Multi-Vue as a "system busy 
— please wait" icon, just like on the 
Macintosh. 

Speaking of which, it seems fairly 
obvious that a MacPaint-Wke program 
would be remarkably easy to program 
in BAS1C09 using these tools. Perhaps 
such a program may someday be writ- 



Group 202 buffer 6 — 
"insert" function cursor: 

kk "kick "kick 
kk 

* ■ • ¥ ■ V 

kk 

* • • • * • 

** 

m m m * * • 

** 
■ * ■ * * * 

** 

* ■ • * * * 

** 

* • • » » p 

•kkkkkkkk 

Group 202 buffer 7 — 
"plus sign" cursor: 

** 

* » * * + « 

** 

* • * » i * 

** 

* • * • * * 

******** 

** 

* * * * - • 

kk 



ten and placed into the public domain. 
Perhaps you, brave RAINBOW reader, 
might be the one. But, at the very least, 
here is a demonstration program to play 
and experiment with. Happy explor- 
ing! /K\ 



The listing: Demonstration 
PROCEDURE circles 



)3j3j3j3 DIM f irebutton, xval , yval : INTEGER 

j3j3j3F RUN gfx2 ("curof f " ) 

RUN gfx2 ("gcset" ,202,1) 
0j33j3 RUN gfx2 ("clear") 

j3j33D LOOP 

003F RUN gfx ( "joystk" ,j3 , f irebutton, xval , yval) 

005F xval=xval*lj3 

)3j36A yval=(63-yval) *3 

p^78 RUN gfx2 ( n putgc",xval,yval) 

RUN gf x2 ( "setdptr" , xval ,yval) 
)3j3A8 IF firebutton<>J3 THEN 

j3j3B4 RUN gfx2 ("circle" , 8j3) 

RUN gfx2 ("bell") 
P^Dl ENDIF 
j3j3D3 ENDLOOP 
j3j3D7 END 






PROGRAMS • PERIPHERALS • SUPPLIES • SERVICE 

For Coco . . . 

in the Midwest 

Now in our 5th year! 



Awxtex 1200 Ttfato* 





•300/1200 
Baud 

•Auto 

dial 

Auto answer 
•Hayes command set 



Avatex 1200 $ 99. 00 
with Coco Cable 109. 00 



COMPLETE SYSTEM 



Avatex 1200, Cable 
AUTOTERM Software 



$139. 



00 



CHOOSE FROM OUR LARGE SELECTION OF COCO PRODUCTS 

B5 ... Colorware .. Derringer ... Diecom ... Dynacalc ... Elite ... HJL 
J & M ... Mark Data ... Metric Industries ... Michtron Microcom ... 
Microworks ... Tom Mix ... PBJ ...PXE ... Spectrum Projects ... 
Speech Systems ... Sugar ... TCE ... VIP ... Zebra ... and more! 



WE'VE CHOSEN THE BEST OF OVER 600 PROGRAMS (OVER 5 YEARS 
OF ACCUMULATING FINE SOFTWARE), AND PACKAGED THEM FOR 
YOU. 10 TO 12 PROGRAMS EACH PACKAGE. COLOR COMPUTER I, II 
or III. SPECIFY TAPE OR DISK. ONLY *29 flS EACH PACKAGE! 



#1 HomeMgmtl 

Budget 

Checkbook Balancer 
Costof Living 
Tmycalc Spreadsheet 
ElectronicDatebook 
Account Manager 
Stock Market 
Word Processor 
Lottery Analyst 
Coco Database 
CocoTermmal 
Bartender 

#4 Adventures 

Treasures ol Barsoom 
Kilter Mansion 
CollegoAdventure 
Coco Terrestrial 
Escape 

Zector Adventure 
Skid Row 
Quest 
Naughide 
Haunied House 



#7 Utilities I 

Cassetio Merge 
Coco Monitor 
Tape Analysis 
MLtoData 
High Text Mod. 
High Text 
Program Packer 
Easy Basic 
Key Repeat 
FullScieen Editor 
ROM Copy 
BasicRAM 




#2 Home Mgmtll 

Video Cassettes 
HomeProductEval. 
Elec. Gas & Water 
Baseball Manager 
Car Manager 
Ham RadioLog 
Home Inventory 
Personal Directory 
Recipe Machine 
Disk Labeier 
Password Scrambler 
Disk Dir Print 



#3 Education 

FiashCard 
Spanish Lessons 
TypmgTutor 
CreativityTesi 
Arith. Football 
Costof Living 
MathTutors 1,2 
TrigonomeiryTulor 
TypingGame 
WordTests 
TalkmgAfphabet 
Clown Dunk Math 



#5 Business Helper .. #6 Games 



Workmate 
Word Processor 
Spread Sheet 
Calendar 

Accounts Receivable 
Accounts Payable 
incomo Property 
MailLiSl 

Small Business Helper 
Stock Charting 
Job Log 
AsseiManager 

#8 Utilities II 

Disk Or Protector 
Dir. Pack & Son 
Disk Zapper 
RollOut 
Doss Boss 
Disk Backup 
51 "24 Editor 
51 '2a Screen 
Autocopy 
Faslsort 
I/O Enor Ignorer 
Text Screen Print 



Trek 

GalacticConquesi 

Warlords 

The Power Sword 

Steps 

Robol Bomber 
ForceField 
Rat Attack 
CaferpillarCave 
Meteor 



#9 M achine Lang .Tut. 

BasicCompiler 

ML Tutorial Pt. 1 

MLTutonalPl.2 

ML Tutorial Pt. 3A.3B 

ML Tutorial Pt. 4 

ML Tutorial Pt. 5 

ML Tutorial Pi. 6 

ML Tutorial Pi 7 

ML Tutorial Pt 8 

MLTDictionary 

Coco Technical Look 

Coco Technical Look Pts. 1-3 



29 95 EACH SET 

* Special This Month * 
Buy 2 Packages and get 1 
FREE 



RAINBOW 




T & D Subscription Software • 2490 Miles Standish Dr. ■ Holland, Ml 49424 • (616) 399-9648 



• Call • • Shop by Modem • 

51 3-396SOFT 51 3-396 SHOP 



VISA 



mm 




• Write • 

2235 Losantiville. Cincinnati, OH 45237 

SHIPPING will bo charged at our ACTUAL COST 
Ohio residents add 5.5% Sales Tax COO add 2.00 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 157 




BITS AND BYTES OF BASIC 



Getting Started With BASIC09 



By Richard A. White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



About a year ago, I did a column 
on BASIC09, but then got dis- 
tracted by other topics includ- 
ing the CoCo 3. Obviously, there has 
been much interest in the CoCo 3, and 
many older CoCos have been retired in 
favor of the new machine. However, the 
earlier machines will be around for 
years* and RAINBOW needs to meet the 
needs of these owners as well as the 
CoCo. 3 Community. 

BAS1C09 works on all machines run- 
ning jOS-9. Programs written on one 
machine are easily portable to others. 
The main changes needed may be screen 
formatting, although many BASIC09 
utilities make minimum use of the 
screen and run unchanged on a CoCo 
1 or 2 even if written on a machine 
featuring 64- or 80-character displays. 
Obviously, an application written on a 
CoCo 1 or 2 will run unchanged on a 
CoCo 3, provided any system calls are 
supported in both environments. Since 
I do not propose to use system calls, the 
programs in this column will work in 
any CoCo under OS-9 Level I or II. 

At this writing, OS-9 Level II is 
imminent. Perhaps this is good so I can 
focus on BASTC09 and not be distracted. 
We understand that BASTC09 is included 
with Level II OS-9 at $79.95. This puts 
CoCo 1 and 2 owners who are consid- 
ering moving to OS-9 Level I and 
BASIC09 in a quandary. BAS1C09 f or Level 
I sells separately for $99.95. With Level 

Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in BASIC pro- 
gramming. With Don Doll berg, he is 
the co-author of the TIMS database 
management program. 



I OS-9 priced at $69.95, There is a $90 
difference that could be applied toward 
a CoCo 3. For a serious CoCo 1 or 2 
owner, this must make an upgrade 
tempting. 

Level I BASIC09 comes with four files 
on the disk. Let's start with BASIC09. 
This is the software development pro- 
gram and includes a syntax-checking 
line editor, a workspace for storing 
source code procedures, an Execution 
mode to run procedures, and a de- 
bugger. To load and run BASIC09, it 
should be copied to your current CMDS 
directory. This way you can boot and 
then type ex BASIC09 and be up and 
running in BASIC09. I have a short start- 
up file, called b09, in the data directory 
of my system disk that runs BASIC09: 

EX BASIC0S B14K < /TERM 

This executes BASTC09, sets work- 
space memory at 14K bytes and routes 
input from the keyboard. At this point, 
the user is in the System mode, which 
accepts various file-handling com- 
mands for dealing with files within the 
workspace. These commands load them 
from disk and save them to disk. All of 
these files are ASCII source code, which 
means they can be listed from OS-9 or 
loaded into another editor. From Sys- 
tem mode, any procedure in the work- 
space can be run. 

Since I have made it a point to de- 
scribe these files as source code, you 
might infer there is some other type of 
BASIC09 procedure file. You are right. 
Source code files will generally be kept 
in a data directory. But from the work- 
space, source procedures can be packed 
and saved to disk, generally to a CMDS 
directory. When a procedure is packed, 



all keywords and variable names are 
removed and numeric tokens and ad- 
dresses are substituted in their place. 
REMs are totally discarded when a proce- 
dure is packed. How much memory is 
saved depends on how wordy the source 
code was. If you use one- or two-letter 
variable names and dispense with re- 
marks, the savings may be less than 20 
percent. If your code uses long and 
meaningful variable names and is well- 
remarked, savings could approach 50 
percent. I have verified the space sav- 
ings many times. I have not seen that 
packed code is noticeably faster, but I 
may not have used the right applica- 
tions. 

A packed procedure may be run 
either from BASIC09 or from OS-9. It 
cannot be loaded into the workspace 
any longer, but can load into available 
memory outside BASIC09. If the proce- 
dure is being run from OS-9, it first 
causes the interpreter procedure runb, 
which must be in the CMDS directory, to 
load and execute. To run a packed 
procedure in your CMDS directory, type 
its name just as you would type di r or 
1 is t. 

There are two other procedures on 
the BASIC09 distribution disk. Inkey is 
a machine language procedure that gets 
a character from a given path, generally 
the keyboard, and returns it in a vari- 
able that has been supplied as a parame- 
ter when Inkey is run. Inkey must be 
in the CMDS directory or have been 
loaded into memory. The Graphics 
Interface Module, GFX, is a CoCo- 
specific machine language module that 
provides color graphics commands. 
Like Inkey, it should be in your CMDS 
directory from which it is easily loaded 
into memory from OS-9, or it will be 



158 THE RAINBOW June 1987 




0S9 LEVEL 

SOFTWARE and HARDWARE 

"Frank Hogg Laboratory has supported OS9 longer than ANY other company!!!' 



INSIDE OS9 
LEVEL II 

The definitive Inside' story behind OS9 for the CoCo III. 
Kevin Darling and Frank Hogg team up to provide the 'nuts 
and bolts' information needed to really use OS9 Level II. 
This book takes you chapter by chapter thru the inner 
workings of OS9 including the window drivers, fonts and 
patterns, bugs and how to fix them, GIME reference and it 
even shows you how to use Tandys Rogue game disk to 
make a workable OS9 Level II system, plus much more. 
Approximately 100+ pages. Source listings are provided for 
some things plus flow charts and tables. A Must buy for 
anyone interested in OS9 Level II. 

Just $39.95 

Coming next "Inside Multi-View" 



THE QT CoCo 

Question: The QT CoCo is the second most expensive 
hard drive/floppy drive subsystem for the CoCo? True or 
False? The QT CoCo is 
the only system that 
can be upgraded to a full 
68000 based computer? 
(The QT Plus) True or 
False?The answer to 
both questions is True. 
If you want to have the 
best drive subsystem 
for your CoCo then The 
QT CoCo is for you. 
20MegHD + 360 or 
720K floppy $1350. 

Fast 40 Meg HD with 360K or 720K floppy is $1 998. 
Requires a host adaptor. (Disto etc) 

Call or send for more information today! 




SCULPTOR 

Sculptor is a fourth generation language, an applications 
generator and a database all rolled into one. The 4th GL part 
of Sculptor means that programming time is cut by a factor 
of 5 or 10. The applications generator part of Sculptor writes 
programs for you and the database part is a very fast B+ 
tree. Sculptor is FAST! New users are up to speed in a few 
days, up to speed users can write sophisticated programs 
in half an hour! In our database of over 20,000 names we 
can retrieve any name in less than 1 second!! The program 
that does that only took 2 minutes to write! That's right 2 
(two) minutes! Maximum # of records is 22,000,000! No limit 
to # of fields etc. Includes a menu program, a query program 
and a variety of utilities to maintain the files. The typeset 
manual is the best available with both a table of contents 
and an index. A handy pocket guide is also included. Re- 
quires CoCo III and OS9 Level II. Call for more information. 

List $595 - Special Only $495! 



r 



The WIZ 



By Bill Brady 

The Wiz is the First and Only program designed for 
the CoCo III that uses WINDOWS! The Wiz is a smart ter- 
minal and communications program for the CoCo III and 
OS9 Level II. Making use of multiple windows and overlay 
windows with pop up dialog boxes The Wiz really shines. 
Features include: Autolog- lets you configure The Wiz's col- 
ors, characters boldface etc., Xmodem and text send and 
receive, sleep mode, conference mode uses a separate 
window for your text, usage log and much more. Does not 
work with the CoCo's internal bit banger serial port. The 
complete package includes a special ACIA driver that al- 
lows baud rates from 300 to 19,200 baud. Requires the 
RS232 pak or the Disto RS232 or similar port plus a CoCo II 
withOS9 Level II. 



Only $79.95 



Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. Est. 1976 - 770 James Street - Syracuse New York - 13203 
315/474-7856 Visa, M/C, Amex, Diners club accepted. Prices do not include shipping. 



automatically loaded the first time it is 
referenced from a procedure. I expect 
the Graphics Interface Module to 
change dramatically for Level II to use 
the CoCo 3*s new graphics modes. 

To review, the four files supplied with 
BASIC09 should be copied into your 
CMOS directory. This may be on your 
normal system disk or one you make 
specially for use when working with 
BASIC09. BASIC09 is started by typing ex 
BASIC0S WXYK, which loads the proce- 
dure, gives it an XYK workspace and 
executes it. The source procedures that 
you write using the editor are ASCII 
files and should be saved to a data 
directory. Source code can be loaded 
back into BASIC09 for further editing. 
Packing strips the words from the 
procedure, which is then saved to disk, 
preferably to the CMOS directory. Packed 
code cannot be reloaded into the work- 
space so be sure to save your source 
code before packing the procedure(s). 

Now that we are set up to use BASIC09, 
what should we use it for? In July 1 98 1 , 
when RAINBOW'S first issue came out, 
about the only way to make a CoCo do 
anything was to write a BASIC program. 
The history of other machines is similar. 
Now it's 1987 and software abounds to 
do most things we need, What will we 
use BASIC09 for? The answer lies in those 
speciality tasks that cannot be done well 
in a word processor, spreadsheet, file 
program or other existing software* We 
need to remember that setting up an 
application in a spreadsheet or file 
manager is programming as well. 

An example is a rank and awards 
program I wrote for a local Scout troop. 
I could not program a file or spread- 
sheet program to print the kind of 
reports I wanted. That may be an 
overstatement. I did not see how I could 
make the software I owned do this. I 
knew generally how to go about the task 
in BASIC09, and it turned out to be rather 



easy to do. There will always be special 
tasks that require special software. 

Another use of BASIC09 is simple to 
learn to program. Understanding how 
a program works helps one understand 
computers in general. The career impli- 
cations of such understanding cannot 
be understated. And many concepts 
learned on a CoCo are easily transfer- 
able to other machines. A friend sold his 
employer on purchasing a Tandy 6000 
with a Xenix operating system to run a 
multi-user lab management system 
based in large measure on his under- 
standing of OS-9 running on his CoCo. 
The 600i is in place and running well 
because so much of his OS-9 knowledge 
was was transferable to Xenix. 

OK, but why learn BASIC09? Isn't 
BASIC good enough? BASIC is good 
enough for many quick programs 
geared to do some specific task. I have 
written some rather large BASIC pro- 
grams, so I am well aware of its short- 
comings, But, rather than fault BASIC, 
let's look at some BASIC09 strengths. 

Line numbers place some severe 
limits on BASIC. Preferably, BASIC09 is 
written without line numbers. One 
immediate benefit is that almost any 
amount of code can come after a THEN 
in an I F-THEN-(ELS£)-END I F structure. 
This eliminates the need to branch 
somewhere else in the program to get 
space for a substantial routine. This 
greatly facilitates structured, top-down 
programming where you can read the 
program listing from top to bottom 
without jumping around. 

BASIC09 supports a variety of control 
structures including IF-THEN-(ELSE)- 
ENDIF; F0R-T0-(STEP)-NEXT; WHILE- 
DO-END WHILE; REPEAT- UNTIL; and 
LDDP-ENDLDDP with EXI T I F-THEN- 
ENDEXI T. Each of these work somewhat 
differently, giving the programmer a 
selection of tools, one of which is likely 
to do their specific job. 



While you can use GDTD and GDSUB 
to numbered linesin BASIC09, the ability 
to run named BASIC09 and machine 
language procedures is much more 
straightforward and powerful, When 
you run a procedure, you give it only 
those variables it needs. If you inadvert- 
ently re-use a variable name in the called 
procedure that you used in the main 
program, no harm is done since variable 
names are local, not global, as in BASIC. 

BASlC09's handling of variables is like 
a compiled language rather than like an 
interpreted language. There is no string 
space management, as in BASIC. The 
programmer must decide how long a 
string will be and then tell BASIC09 using 
a dimensioning statement. Once a var- 
iable is dimensioned, its storage space 
is allocated and fixed, whether it con- 
tains data or not. Thus, variable length 
strings pose a problem. 

Otherwise, BASIC09 has an extremely 
powerful variable typing system that is 
a major contributor to its speed. In the 
numeric domain, B as ICO 9 supports 
BYTE, INTEGER (two byte) and REAL 
variables. BVTE and INTEGER variables 
save memory and compute very quickly. 
REAL variables are floating-point vari- 
ables that use more memory and com- 
pute much more slowly. For most pro- 
gram control purposes, BVTE and 
I NTEGER variables are preferred. If you 
need to run a FDR-TD-NEXT loop 10 
times, an INTEGER does the job and 
does it faster than a REAL would. There 
is also a BOOLEAN type that carries either 
a true or a false, But this is only a starter. 
BASIC09 supports arrays and complex 
data structures: 

DIM name(30,3) :STRING{20] 

This is a dimension statement. It tells 
BASIC09 to allocate storage to an array 
called name that will have 3t sets of 
three variables, each of which will be 20 
bytes long. This can be viewed as defin- 



BUDGET FORECASTER 

PROJECT HOW MUCH YOU WILL HAVE AND WHEN 
YOU WILL HAVE IT BASED ON YOUR 'WHAT IF BUDGET 
STRATEGIES. INPUTYOUR CONSTANT AND VARIABLE BI- 
WEEKLY, FIRST OF THE MONTH, END OF THE MONTH, 
SEMI-MONTHLY AND BI-WEEKLY EXPENSES, INCOMES, 
AND INVESTMENTS (INCLUDING RATE OF RETURN), 
ENTER YOUR STARTING CASH BALANCE AND INVEST- 
MENT BALANCES. SEE YOUR RESULTS IN INCREMENTS 
OF TWO WEEKS UP TO THE CALENDAR LIMIT OF 
12/31/99991 

64K TAPE VERSION $34.95 



GAME SIMULATORS 

COMPUTE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING BASED ON 
PLAYING AND BETTING STRATEGIES. SIMULATE UP TO 
10,000 GAMES! 64K TAPE VERSIONS. 

"CRAPS" $22.95 



"BLACKJACK" 



■ • * a 9 



$10 OS 



"5 CARD DRAW" $19.95 



SEND CHECK OR M.O + $1.50 EACH S/H TO: 

PROBITAT, 2213 VENETION DRIVE 
STOCKTON, CA 95207 

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 



160 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



ing 30 records of three, 20-byte fields 
each. These might be first, middle and 
last name. Many of the programs I have 
written deal with records with multiple 
fields. 

Actually, using a simple array to 
define fields in a record is very limiting. 
Further, the fields are identified by a 
number that is not very enlightening to 
someone else reading the program, or 
even to the original programmer when 
he wants to modify the program. 
BAS1C09 lets you build extremely com- 
plex record structures using the TYPE 
statement. Since TYPE is very powerful, 
it is also a bit difficult to understand at 
the beginning. We will take it slowly. 

Here is a restatement of the name 
array using TYPE: 

TYPE ful L_name - f i rstJiame , 
middle_name, las t_name : 
5TRING[20] 

DIM name ( 30 } : ful l_name 

TYPE creates a new data type called 
ful l__name that has three fields called 
first-name, middle_name and last- 
_name. Each field is a STRING 20 char- 
acters long. TYPE does not allocate any 
variable storage space. This is done in 
the next line where an array of 30 
members having the type full^name is 
dimensioned. 

What if you did not want to store the 
full middle name, but only the middle 
initial? Let's change the TYPE statement: 

TYPE ful^^^^l = firsL_name, 
last_name:STRING [20]; 
middle__init:5TRING[l] 
DIM name ( 30 ) : f ul l_name 

The manual says new data types are 
defined as "a one-dimensional array of 
previously defined types." At this point, 
ful Ljname is a previously defined data 
type and can be used in another TYPE 
statement: 



TYPE member - name : ful 1— name 
; add ress : STRING [ 24 ] ; telephone 
:STRING[8] 

DIM entry (200):member 

You might want to set up such a 
structure to handle entries in a member- 
ship list. However, you would also want 
a few more fields in the record. City, 
state and ZIP code would be needed at 
minimum. What about an expiration 
date? How about a few fields for notes 
or other data? Perhaps a business phone 
would be useful; the telephone fields 
may need to be 12 characters long to 
include an area code. Try your hand at 
writing a TYPE statement that includes 
these added fields. 

A word about the ZIP code field. A 
ZIP code is a number, and you may be 
tempted to make it an INTEGER type to 
save memory. But, ZIP codes range up 
to 99,000 plus, which is well outside the 
32,767 range of INTEGER variables. 
Your choices are to make the ZIP code 
a RERL or leave it a STRING. I would do 
the latter. You can still sort on ZIP code, 
which you would probably want to do, 
and get the list in proper ZIP code 
order. 

When you use TYPE variables, you 
need to access fields by their names: 

entry (22 ). address : - "44 Dow 

Ct . " 

This puts the address "44 Dow Ct." 
into the address field of en try (22) 
record . Since "name" is really two-deep, 
assigning a last name looks like this: 

en t ry ( 22 ) . name . las t__name : 
= "White" 

One of the neatest things about these 
complex data structures is you can send 
the whole record or array to disk and 
get it back with single statements. 



Further, the whole structure is saved as 
a direct memory dump making the 
whole operation fast. PUT ttpath, 
entry saves the whole array to disk, 
while GET ttpath, entry loads it into 
memory. 

Memory is what puts a limit on how 
bigthe data structure can get. In my Boy 
Scout awards program, the structure 
includes name, patrol, datejoined, a 12- 
member array for skill award dates, a 
1 20-member array for merit badge dates 
and a 10-member array for rank dates. 
The size of the structure is over 1,000 
bytes, but this is no trouble since only 
one member is in memory at a time. 

Last, but not least, when you dimen- 
sion a variable, that variable is not 
automatically initialized. When the 
program is run, BASIC09 assigns mem- 
ory space to the variable and whatever 
is in that area at the time is in the 
variable. So, let's initialize the entry 
array: 

FOR count=l TO 200 



en t ry ( count 

M 

entry ( coun t 

l n 1 1 : - 

ent ry ( count 

m 

en try ( count 
en try ( count 
NEXT count 



. name „ f i rst„name 

. name .middle. 

.name. 1 as t— name 

. address : - 

. telephone : - "" 



This puts a null into each field and 
provides another example of how to 
access individual fields. 

Next month, we will start developing 
a name, address, telephone and other 
data program that can be used for 
rosters, printing mailing labels and a 
variety of other related needs. Because 
of the modularity of BASIC09, a basic file 
structure and data entry/ edit program 
can be written with various application 
modules added later to do jobs not 
anticipated. ■ 



LOT Z ALUK 
IS HERE ! 

LOTZALUK , a machine language program for COCO 1, 2 , & 3, lets a 
user study history of a LOTTO game just as a handicapper studies the 
horses* Valuable data on California LOTTO 6/49 game is included, 

California program is complete. Other state's games will follow. 



William G • Brigance , Sr , 
1001 Fairweather Drive 
Sacramento, CA 95833 
(916) 927-6062 



%J *J lF""iiPiiiiftJ 

On Disk! 
$29.95 
Introductory Price 



California residents add 6% sales tax 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 161 






KISSable OS-9 



Shooting for a Standard 

By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



We've been helping Bill Brady 
beta test Wiz, his OS-9 Level 
II terminal program, for sev- 
eral months now, and it just keeps 
getting better. In the latest edition, he 
has implemented VT-52 emulation. You 
might ask what advantage this has for 
a Color Computer user. I did! 

"You and I may not use it too much, 
but the people who like to play online 
games like Delphi's Flight Simulator 
will love it," Brady said. "It will also be 
a great feature for people who need or 
want to talk to VAX or several of the 
other minicomputers or mainframes." 

I checked out the VT-52 by exercising 
it with Red Ryder running on the Mac- 
intosh. It worked great. 

After we discussed the pros and cons 
of a VT-52 emulation mode in a CoCo 
terminal program and Brady threw out 
a few plugs f or his "alt g" function that 
lets you create and use a graphics screen 
while online, the conversation turned to 
CoCoBin, an excellent addition to the 
Xmodem file transfer standard. I sug- 
gested the name to Brady after we 
compared it to MacBinary, a similar 
standard used by both the MAUG on 
CIS and the Delphi's Macintosh ICON- 
tact. Mac Binary and CoCoBin, if we 
can pull together and make it a stand- 
ard, give us a way to transfer binary files 
to another computer with all the file's 



Dale L. Puckett, who is author of The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide and co- 
author, with Peter Dibble, of The 
Official Rainbow Guide to OS-9, is a 
free-lance writer and programmer. He 
serves as director-at-large of the OS-9 
Users Group and is a member of the 
Computer Press Association. Dale is a 
U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and lives 
in Rockville, Maryland. 



attributes intact. 

For example, when you download a 
program from MAUG or ICONtact 
with a Macintosh, the terminal program 
gives your new file the name of the 
original file. At the same time, it 
transfers all the data in what Apple 
programmers call the resource fork of 
the file. This fork often contains icons 
that visually identify the program and 
other resources that make a program 
look like a Macintosh program. 

CoCoBin works by appending an 
extra block to the beginning of a file. 
That block contains the OS-9 unique 
information that we find in the file 
descriptor including the size of the file 
and the security attributes such as d, s, 
e, pe, u, pu, r and pr. 

Brady hasn't finalized the convention 
for putting the filename in, but he is 
working on it. The major question 
CoCoBin must answer is what it should 
do with a file when it reads in a name 
from another computer that already 
exists in its own current data directory. 

In Mac Binary, the authors give the 
new file the same name with a . 1 
appended to it. Brady does it the same 
way in his initial implementation, and 
it seems to solve the problem nicely. 
Keep in mind the module name inside 
will come from the module name within 
the file being received so it will not be 
affected. 

CoCoBin does not presently have the 
automatic filename feature, but Brady 
hopes to include it in the near future. 
That feature alone makes MacBinary a 
dream to use. 

"The ultimate objective is to send any 
file and have it end up at the other end 
with exactly the same name and all the 
attributes of the original file," Brady 
said. "With straight Xmodem you must 
fill the data at the end and all the other 



attributes are left to the beck and call 
of the programmer." 

CoCoBin will be needed to handle the 
new data types that we will be seeing 
with OS-9 Level II, namely fonts. Who 
knows, when Multi- Vue arrives we may 
even be able to transfer a program's 
Icon. Let's take a closer look at the 
CoCoBin standard. 

With the advent of OS-9 Level II for 
the Color Computer 3, new data types, 
fonts, are possible in the OS-9 file 
system. Additionally, when any file 
traverses the Xmodem send /receive 
cycle, and that file is not exactly divis- 
ible by 128, the Xmodem block size, fill 
data is appended by the sender. Tradi- 
tionally the fill has been removed by 
either passing the file through the OS- 
9 verify utility or by loading it into 
memory and re-saving it in another file. 
Unfortunately these steps only work 
with files that contain loadable mod- 
ules, i.e., those prefaced with 87CD. 
Text files can be repaired with any text 
editor. None of these methods will work 
for fonts, since they are neither 87CD 
prefaced modules nor straight text files. 
It would aid inexperienced operators if 
the file could be traversed with as little 
modification as possible, for all type of 
files. Therefore, it is proposed that a 
new subset of the Xmodem protocol be 
created that shall be called CoCoBin 
and be defined as follows: 

A single Xmodem block shall be sent 
in preface to Xmodem transfers. This 
block shall contain information needed 
to remove the fill at the end of transmis- 
sion. On upload, the operator will be 
given a choice of straight Xmodem 
upload or CoCoBin upload. If Co- 
Co Bin is selected, the sending Xmodem 
will preface the actual file data with a 
block that contains the following infor- 
mation: 



1 62 THE RAINBOW June 1 987 



XMODEM 132 Byte Block #1 CoCoBin 



Byte 1 SOH (01) 

Byte 2 Block » (01) 

Byte 3 Block MOD(256) 

Byte 4 ATTR byte (usually (07)) 

Byte 5 OWNERmsb (usually (00)) 

Byte 6 OWNER Isb (usually (00)) 

Byte 7 YEAR (87)($57) (Date) 

Byte 8 MONTH (03) (Last Modified) 

Byte 9 DAY (02) (Sent) 

Byte 10 FILE SIZE mmsb 

Byte 11 FILE SIZE msb 

Byte 12 FILE SIZE 1sb 

Byte 13 FILE SIZE 11sb 

Byte 14 YEAR 

Byte 15 MONTH 

Byte 16 DAY 

Byte 17-131 NOT YET DEFINED 
Byte 132 Checksum 



After this block is sent, data transfer 
will continue in the customary fashion, 
with the n^xt block labeled as Block 2. 
This method, while requiring pre- 
knowledge on the operator's part, both 
for upload and download, is transpar- 
ent to the host computer. On download, 
the receiver must know in advance that 
the file is in the CoCoBin format. The 
receiving Xmodem will then decode the 
file size — the most useful piece of 
information — and use it in the follow- 
ing ways: 

• Display to the operator the number 
of blocks forthcoming in the trans- 
mission. 

• May also use the the total blocks/ 
received blocks to drive a percent 
complete indicator. 

• Will discontinue writing data to the 
incoming file when bytes received 
equals the file size (fd.siz) effec- 
tively "stripping the fill." 

After this use, the receiving Xmodem 
will discard the CoCoBin block (Block 
1) and save all subsequent blocks to the 
file. 

The opportunity still exists for other 
information to be included in the not yet 
defined bytes (more than 100) of this 
block. Responses are encouraged and 
should be sent to "KISSable OS-9" at 
RAINBOW. We will forward them to Bill 
Brady. If you would like to discuss it 
with him online, you can reach him at 
any of the following addresses: CIS, 
70126,267; Delphi, wbrady; Genie, 
W.BRADY. Or you may write him at 
4776-B Carmody Court, Harwood, MD 
29776. 

CoCoBin is already a feature of Wiz. 
It is up to us to make it a standard. If 
we do develop this standard and en- 
courage both the CIS and Delphi OS- 
9 SIG SysOps to adopt it, we will find 



OS-9 FD Definition 



FD.ATT 
FD.OWN 

FD.DAT 
FD.SIZ 



FD.DCR 



life much easier when it comes to binary 
data file transfers. 

Paul Searby Continues to 
Support OS-9 

During Color Expo '87 we jumped at 
the chance to interview Computer- 
ware's Paul Searby. Computerware was 
one of the first companies to support 
OS-9 users, and they have stuck with us 
through thick and thin. When Searby 
addressed the OS-9 Users Group Break- 
fast at R AINBOWfest, Palo Alto, 
nearly a year and a half ago, he made 
a strong plea f or sof tware developers to 
write intuitive programs that are easy to 
use. We thought this would be a good 
time to get a progress report. 

Dale. What's changed since Palo 
Alto? 

Paul: For a long time the real concern 
and the nagging question was, "Is there 
going to be a Color Computer market?" 
Then in late July and early August we 
picked up a fairly strong sense that there 
was really going to be a Color Comput- 
er 3. Later in the fall we were able to 
get a copy of OS-9 Level II through a 
non-disclosure agreement, and we 
started to verify that everything we had 
published worked on the new machine 
and started to develop a WordSlar-Yikz 
word processor, Screen Star. 

Dale: I hear you have a new terminal 
package. 

Paul: Yes, we also ported our com- 
plete Color Connection terminal pack- 
age, and it now works on both OS-9 
Level I and Level II. It gives the Xmo- 
dem protocol, the CompuServe B Pro- 
tocol, as well as standard Xon/Xoff 
data transfers. It works at 1200 baud 
using the bit banger port on the CoCo 
1, 2 or 3. We tried to supply the features 
people have requested. It is menu- 
driven, supports auto-dialing, has built- 
in macros and can capture ASCII files 
larger than your buffer. It works con- 



sistently on RS-DOS, Level I and Level 
II. 

We wrote our own driver to let it work 
at 1200 baud. In fact, we have actually 
merged it into the program. It links with 
the Color Connection when you load it 
and unlinks when you exit. We have 
merged our device driver and descriptor 
with the program code. When you load 
one, you load them all. We also added 
a rather large buffer in the driver so that 
when Color Connection says stop, we 
won't lose any data f rom the host Q even 
if the host doesn't stop quickly. With 
both the Color Connection and Screen 
Star, we have provided our own screen 
driver for OS-9 Level I, Version 2.00.00. 
It gives a 5 l-by-24 display and reverse 
scrolling, a feature that isn't available in 
the Radio Shack drivers. We use the 
stock OS-9 windows on the Level II 
versions. 

Dale: How close is Screen Star to 
WordStar! 

Paul: First, you must remember that 
the Color Computer keyboard is differ- 
ent in a number of ways. The cursor and 
SHIFT keys are a problem area. On the 
Color Computer they actually generate 
a control sequence, and you can stum- 
ble into a conflict if you aren't careful. 
And sometimes, you can't make the 
keyboard do exactly what you want it 
to. There is a system call that lets you 
check to see if the SHIFT or CONTROL 
key has been pressed at the same time 
as a cursor key. We are using it and it 
has helped a lot. 

Dale: Is Screen Star WYSIWYG? 

Paul: We are not supporting the full ■ 
left and right justification feature of 
WordStar within the editor. Rather, we 
are putting it in a package with our text 
processor. You can load the text proces- 
sor from your disk or have it in memory 
on an OS-9 Level II system. We have 
added a help menu and a spelling 
checker. The help menu gives you a 
preview of the text formatter com- 
mands. You can run Screen Star in one 
OS-9 Level II window and keep the text 
processor running in another. If you 
don't want to open another window, 
you can exit Screen Star and then run 
the text formatter. Later on, we hope to 
release an enhanced version that more 
closely merges Screen Star with the 
formatter. Registered users can upgrade 
at nominal prices. 

Dale: Have you added anything to 
WordStar? 

Paul: There's an interesting set of 
menus called the parameter menu, 10 
function keys, one through nine. You 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 163 



can run any other OS-9 program from 
within Screen Star and when you re- 
turn, your cursor will be positioned just 
where it was when you left. You can 
toggle the help messages on and off by 
pressing a single control character. We 
are supporting the lock functions, find/ 
replace functions and we let you use the 
"?" wild card with the find and replace 
commands. 

Dale: How much does it cost? 

Paul: It sells for $49.95; a bargain 
considering it was all written in assem- 
bly language. My philosophy, all along, 
has been to keep our software afforda- 
ble. For $79.95 you get Screen Star, the 
speller and the formatter. We also 
believe in very reasonable upgrades and 
have carried many customers through 
three or four upgrades for $10 or $15 
each on a $100 package. For example, 
a Level II update f or Databank will only 
cost $15. It has been modified so the 
same version works on both Level I and 
Level II. It can even determine the size 
of your window. 

Dale: Why a WordStar clone? 

Paul: A lot of people have already 
been exposed to WordStar at work. 
This means they are already familiar 
with it and will enjoy working with the 
same command set at home. Other 
people can learn it on the Color Com- 
puter and then apply their skills at 
work. It gives them the opportunity to 
pick up the feel of a very expensive MS- 
DOS package at a very reasonable 
price. Besides, when you get down to it, 
WordStar commands are logical. 

Dale: Is Screen Star hard to learn? 

Paul: The manual is well-organized. 
In the first few pages, you learn all you 
really need to know. I try to learn a 
command a day. Or during one week, 
I concentrate on a single command. 
When you work this way, you slowly 
but surely wind up knowing most of the 



command set. 

Dale: How much memory does 
Screen Star take? 

Paul: The program is only 7K long. 
In fact, we will probably be able to 
provide all of our enhancement in a 
single OS-9 Level II 8K block. If we do 
go over the 8K boundary, once we 
receive the real Level II documentation, 
we will really be able to knock your 
socks off. 

Dale: What's next for Computer- 
ware? 

Paul: I would like to get the company 
back in the database area. But, any new 
product must be different from Profile 
because we have licensed that program 
to Tandy. 

Dale: Having any trouble moving up 
to Level II? 

Paul: We have been using it for years 
on other machines so it is an elementary 
move for us — a matter of building the 
system disks. 

Dale: How do you like Level II? 

Paul: Well, quite candidly, we need an 
interrupt-driven disk driver. You can 
have all the power in the world, but if 
you can't get at the keyboard when you 
need it, it doesn't work. Yet, I have been 
doing a iot of consulting and it's the best 
that's out there. 

Dale: Does OS-9 Level II have any 
shortcomings? 

Paul: It's not quite as user-friendly as 
it could be. For example, the BASIC 
copy command should have wildcards. 
Also, Microware should offer a backup 
command that supports downloading 
from a hard disk to a floppy. There are 
some pieces of the system that are still 
needed to put a pretty face on OS-9. 
Some of the commands are the same as 
they were several years ago. That's why 
we hope to follow up with a KShell II 
for Level II. We'll also upgrade our 
advanced utilities. 



Dale: Do you see any problems in the 
future? 

Paul: We are market-d riven. The type 
of pxogram we are developing requires 
at least six months to develop. If the 
market stays with us, we will continue 
to support it. But if the market dies 
down, we will have to make it a smaller 
percentage of what we are doing. I like 
this market; it is fun and serious, enter- 
taining and productive! 

What Is a Pathlist? 

M. L. Braun of Bellevue, Ohio, wrote 
us this month to ask for some additional 
help with OS-9. He needs to know how 
to read a directory and print it out and 
how to load the OS-9 programs from 

RAINBOW ON DISK. 

The first thing to remember is that if 
you want to give OS-9 a complete 
pathlist, you must start that pathlist 
with a slash (/). For example, if you 
want to give OS-9 a complete pathlist 
to the dir utility command on your 
standard OS-9 system disk, you would 
type: 

^d0/cmds/di r 

This command line tells OS-9 you 
want to run a program stored in a file 
named dir. That file is stored in a 
directory named CMOS, which is a file 
containing a directory that is stored in 
a directory named 'd0. The slash tells 
OS-9 you want it to start its search for 
the file named di r on a device, i.e., disk 
drive /d0. 

If you have just booted a copy of the 
standard system disk you received when 
you bought OS-9, you will be using a 
current data directory named 'D0 and 
a current execution directory named 
/D0/CMDS. Because OS-9 tries to load 
files from its current execution direc- 
tory, you could have have simply typed: 
dir. 



OC-Check Writer it you use Dynacalc to keep track of your 
household bills, then here is the best way to pay them. $ 19.95 

CC-Fhghi Log Prepares a flight log to use in flight, airport 
directory built-in, customize il to your airplane. $24,95 

COMING SOON' 1 . CC-QFFSCE WORLD accounting package!! 
Requires QS-9 and printer. Works with PBJ Wordpak 

DISKS, 100% CERTIFIED, MADE IN USA! ! 

Double Sided , Double Densily $4.90/10 disks $43.00/100 Disks 

TO ORDER CALL F M - Technology 



(713) 550-3565 

Checks, MaslerCard 
and VISA Accepied 
Add $3.00 S&H 



14 115 Spencer Road 

Suite 2 
Houston, TX 7704 1 



Answering 
machine on 
duty, 8;00AM 
lo 8:00PM 



Tx Residents add 
6. 2 5 % sales lax 



OS-9 trademark of Microware & Motorola Inc, 



Hint . . 



Precautionary Poke 



If you are looking for a way to trap the entire CoCo 
keyboard, look no further. If you want to "turn off" 
the keyboard, just use PQKE65281 ,0. To turn it back 
on, use POKE 65281,4, This is great during demo 
programs or during critical computations where an 
inadvertent press of the BREAK key might cause a good 
deal of lost data. Just make sure this poke is not in 
effect when your program asks for keyboard input. 
This would obviously result in a locked-up system. 

Ryan Devlin 
Louisville, KY 



164 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



After you have typed either of the 
commands, you will see a listing of the 
files stored in your current data direc- 
tory, /d0. It most likely looks some- 
thing like this: 

Directory of m 19:23:59 
CMDS SYS DEFS startup 

The three names printed in uppercase 
letters are directories. The other file, 
startup, is a straight text file that 
contains an OS-9 procedure file that is 
executed f or you automatically at start- 
up. If you wanted to see the names of 
the files in the DEFS directory, you 
would type: 

di r def s 

One of the files in that directory is 
named 059Defs. If you wanted to look 
at that file you would type: 

list defs/0S9Defs 

When you typed that command, your 
current data directory was /d0. This 
means you did not need to type the 
complete pathlist: 

list /d0/defs/DS9Defs 

If you find you understand what you 
are doing by typing complete pathlists, 
by all means type them. After you 
become more familiar with the system, 
you will get lazy and want to learn the 
shortcuts built into OS-9. 

Braun wanted to learn to load and 
run the programs from "KISSable OS- 
9" distributed on RAINBOW ON DISK, To 
do this, he will need to remember that 
the binary (executable) code is stored in 
directories named CMDS on those disks. 
The source code on the disks is usually 
stored in directories named SOURCE. If 



he has two disk drives, Braun can place 
his RAINBOW ON DISK in Drive 'dl and 
type: 

dir /dl 

This command line assumes that he 
still has his OS-9 system disk with its 
CMDS directory loaded in Drive /d0. If 
he sees a directory named CMDS on 
Drive 'dl when he types the command 
line above, he can look at the names of 
the files by typing: 

dir /dl/CMDS 

Let's assume he sees a file named 
demo and wants to run it. Let's also 
assume it contains one or more execu- 
table OS-9 modules. How can he load 
this file? First, he has to stop and 
remember that his current execution 
directory is set to 'd0/CMDS. This 
means that if he types, for example, 
demo, OS-9 will look in 'd0/CMDS and 
won't be able to find a file named demo. 
It will then report the infamous "file not 
found" Error 216. What happened? 
What can he do to run demo? 

There are two answers to that ques- 
tion. Braun can either type a complete 
pathlist to the file or he can change his 
current execution directory to 'dl' 
CMDS where the file named demo is 
stored. To take the first course, he 
would type: 

■ 

/dl/CMDS/demo 

If he would rather use the second ap- 
proach, he could type: 

chx 'dl/CMDS 
demo 

Or, he could have loaded the modules 
in the file named demo while his execu- 



tion directory was still set at /d0'CMDS 
by typing: 

load /dl/CMDS/demo 

He could then run it by typing: 

demo 

Time out for one more "gotcha" and 
we'll move on. What would have hap- 
pened if Braun had changed his current 
execution directory to /dl'CMDS and 
then tried to load demo? He would have 
typed: 

load demo 

After typing this command line, he 
would again receive the "file not found" 
error message. Why? Because his cur- 
rent execution directory was set to 'dl/ 
CMDS, and load was stored in /d0/ 
CMDS. When OS-9 went to its current 
execution directory to find load, the 
cupboard was bare. 

Braun also mentioned that he would 
like to be able to print out a directory. 
To do that he. merely needs to redirect 
his output to the printer. Assuming he 
has a serial printer plugged into his RS- 
232 port, he can type: 

dir /dl/CHD5 >/p 

This will print a listing of the contents 
of the directory 'dl/CMDS on his print- 
er. Hopefully, if you are brand new to 
OS-9, this short tutorial will help get 
you off to a fast start. 

Not a Good Idea, But . . . 

Here's a tip from Ian Hodgson of 
Dorval, Quebec. Hodgson needed to 
run some OS-9 Version 1.0 1 programs 
on his CoCo 3. He discovered he could 
do this by booting in Version 2.00.00 



OS-9™ SOFTWAREIHARDWARE 



SDISK— Standard disk driver module allows the full use of 35, 40 
or 80 track double sided disk drives with COCO OS-9 plus you 
can read/write/format the OS-9 formats used by other OS-9 
systems. (Note: you can read 35 or 40 track disks on an 80 track 
drive). Now updated for OS-9 ver. 02.00.00 $29.95 

SDISK + BOOTFIX— As above plus boot directly from a double 
sided diskette $35.95 

L1 UTILITY PAK— Contains all programs from Filter Kits Nos. 1 
& 2 plus Hacker's Kit #, plus several additional programs, Over 
35 utilities including "wild card" file cmds, MacGen command 
language, disassembler, disk sectoredit and others. Very useful, 
many of these you will find yourself using every time you run your 
system. These sold separately for over $85. $49.95 

SKIO — Hi res screen driver for 24 x 51 display; does key click, 
boldface, italics; supports upgraded keyboards and mouse. With 
graphics screen dump and other useful programs. Now UPDATED 
FOR OS-9 Ver 2.0 $29.95 



PC-XFER UTILITIES— Utilities to read/write and format ss MS- 
DOStm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. $45.00 (requires SDISK) 

CCRD 512K Byte RAM DISK CARTRIDGE— Requires RS Multipak 
interface, two units may be used together for 1MB RAM disk. 
Addressing is switch selectable. OS-9 level 1 and 2 driverand test 
software included. $169.00 

All disk prices are for CoCo OS-9 format; for other formats, specify 
and add $2.00 each. Order prepaid or COD, VISA/MC accepted, add 
$1.50 S&H for software, $5.00 for CCRD; actual charges added for 
COD. 

D.P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St. 
Portland, OR 97223(503) 244-8152 

(For best service call between 9-11 AM Pacific Time) 

OS-9 Is a trademark of Mlcroware and Motorola Inc 
MS-DOS Is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 65 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 



Fill out your CoCo library 
with these selections 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to take 
advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser features. An easy- 
to-read, step-by-step guide packed with hints, tips, tutorials and free 
software in the form of program listings. 
Book $19.95 

Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 



The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid introduction 
to the realm of statistical processes and thinking for both the 
beginner and the professional. 
Book $6.95, Tape or Disk $5.95, Package $11 .95 



The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adventure contest. 
Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors, Horror House, One Room, Dr. 
Avaloe and more. Plus hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 



The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
compiled- Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue Meanies, find a 
hidden fortune, or win the heart of a mysterious princess. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 



The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. Discover 
backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, attempt a daring space 
rescue, or defeat evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. Evil 
Crypt, Spymaster, Time Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the 
beginning! 

Book $11.95, Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 




The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first Simulations 
contest. You are a Civil War Commander, an air traffic controller, 
a civil defense coordinator, or a scientist on Mars . . . your wits are 
on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 

The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winners from our second Simulations contest. Fly through 
dense African jungle, bull your way down Wall Street, lead a bomb 
squad, or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and 
talents. Book $9,95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 

Coming soon: A complete Rainbow guide to 
using OS-9 Level II on the Color Computer 3 



r 



/ want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Name 

Address 

Cil 



ZIP 



ity 

State 

□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 (book only) 

□ Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Disk Package (2 disks) 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (lirst) 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

□ The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

□ Guide to Statistics Package (indicate choice of tape or 
Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4 per book 

Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 
(Allow 6 to 8 weeks lor delivery) 



$ 9.95 . 

$ 9.95 . 
- $ 9.95 . 

$ 9.95 . 

$10.95. 

$19.95. 

$31.00. 
$ 3.50 iJ^r. 
$ 3.50 1J£9\ 

$13.95. 

$13.95. 

$11.95. 

$ 9.95 . 

$14.95. 

$ 6.95 . 

$ 5.95 . 
disk) $11.95. 



Total 



Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059 

To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847- 
0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. 
That is, they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape 
or disk, you will still need the appropriate book. OS-9* is a registered trademark of the Microware 
Systems Corporation. 

i j 



from a program disk that uses it, Desk- 
Mate, for example. After the initial 
boot, he did a warm reset by pressing 
the reset button and everything worked 
fine. Of course, you'll soon discover that 
OS-9 Level II is the only way to tap the 
real power under the Color Computer 
3's hood. 

PrintF orm Update 

In the May 1986 edition of "KISSable 
OS-9" we featured the source code for 
a shareware program named Print Form 
from Frank Malaney of Pataskala, 
Ohio. Again, if you need an excellent 
print formatter and don't want to type 
in the source, Malaney will send it to 
you on disk if you send him a shareware 
donation of $15. His address is 8708 
Mink Street SW, Pataskala, OH 43062. 

PrintForm is versatile. It lets you 
change a printer personality file when 
you move up to a newer model. Mala- 
ney has received many questions about 
this process during the past year and 
decided to share some of the techniques 
needed to generate a new printer per- 
sonality file with "KISSable OS-9" 
readers. 

Control sequence codes are stored in 
a file in your execution directory named 
prtr.contrl. This file contains infor- 
mation about your printer and the 
control letter sequences you need to 
send to it. When PrintForm is first 
called, it loads prt.contrl, your 
printer personality file. 

The first step is to understand what 
PrintForm expects in this printer per- 
sonality file and how it is used. Print- 
Form was developed with the idea that 



printer technology is constantly chang- 
ing and that your printer may not be one 
of the currently popular models. 

Malaney decided you should be able 
to configure the program to your print- 
er and your needs on a semi-permanent 
basis. He realized that there had to be 
a simple and reasonable method for you 
to generate the printer personality file 
without resorting to programming. He 
also recognized that the method used 
should have some self-documenting 
procedures so that, at a later time, it 
could be easily revised or updated. 

The concept that evolved was to 
create a printer module using an editor 
and include provisionsf ordocumenting 
each control sequence. The printer 
module is then processed by a program 
called printer .mod to compile the 
printer personality file prtr.contrl. 

The printer, mod program does not 
perform any error checking on your 
data. The format must be followed 
exactly, or your printer personality file 
will not be correct. 

The letter associated with the control 
code sequence that follows must be a 
capital letter in the first column. A space 
must follow the letter. The first number 
of the printer code follows. It must be 
a decimal number. A space follows. This 
sequence of a decimal number and 
space continues through all the 
numbers required to implement the 
desired printer function with that con- 
trol letter. You may use up to eight 
numbers for any one letter. An asterisk 
terminates the sequence. After the 
asterisk, the remainder of the line is 
available for comments. A typical data 



line with back slashes substituted f or the 
required spaces is listed below: 

§y.l4\21\45\6*This is a typical 
line with back slashes for 
spaces 

This is how the line would actually be 
entered: 

5 114 21 45 6 * This is a typical 
line with proper spaces 

You will find that sometimes you may 
need to use more than one printer 
control sequence to get the desired 
result. For example, if your printer 
requires a 27 45 to cancel double wide 
and a 27 34 65 to set up 10 cpi to be 
assigned to control letter C, you would 
type: 

C 27 45 27 34 65 * Cancel double 
Joide and set for 10 cpi 

Note that we have documented ex- 
actly what the control letter is intended 
to do. Decoding those strings of 
numbers at a later date is not easy! 

You may need to spend a lot of time 
with your printer manual to find out 
exactly what your printer will do and 
the code number sequences needed to 
do it. You may also find that certain 
modes of operation preclude other 
modes. For example, certain Gemini 
models will not print superscripts or 
subscripts in the emphasized mode. If 
something does not seem to be working 
properly, review your manual very 
carefully. Remember, PrintForm was 



PRINTERS! 

N EW! Okidata 1 92+ (Par. or Ser.) s 370 

NE W! Okidata 193 (Parallel) s 540 

N EW* Okidata 193+ (Serial) $ 6 1 0 

Okimate 20 Color Printer 5 1 35 

Fujitsu 2100 (80 col.) s 4 1 0 

Fujitsu 2200 (1 32 col.) s 520 

Toshiba 321 (Par. or Ser.) s 5 1 0 

Qume Letterpro 20 (Letter Qual.) s 445 

Silver Reed 420 (Daisy Wheel) $ 240 

Silver Reed 600 (Daisy Wheel) $ 575 

(Add 5 10 Shipping for Printers) 



ACCESSORIES! 

Taxan 12" Green Monitor $ 1 25 

Taxan 1 2" Amber Monitor 5 1 35 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot(80 col.) $ 30 

Table Top Printer Stand 

w/Slot(l32 col.) s 45 

Stand w/Diskette Storage (80 col.) s 47 

Stand w/Diskette Storage (1 32 col.) s 57 

Other Printers. Monitors, and Accessories for CoCo 
and IBM upon request. 

5 15 off interface with purchase of printer. 

Find your cheapest published price and we'll beat it!!! 



DISK DRIVE SYSTEMS! 

ALL 'A HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED 

Drive 0 (addressed as 2 drives!) s 235 

Drive 0.1 (addressed as 4 drives!) s 350 

All above complete with HDS controller, 
cable, & drive in case with power supply 

Bare Double Sided Drives 5 109 

Dual l /i Height Case w/ Power Supply 5 49 

Double Sided Adapter *25 

HDS Controller, RS ROM & Instructions s 99 

25 CDC DS/DD Diskettes s 32 & s 3 s/h 

We use the HDS controller exclusively. Can use 2 different DOS ROM's. 
Shipping Costs: s 5/ drive or power supply, 5 10 max. 
Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft — MO. Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft.- 5 20. 
Other cables on request. (Add s 3°° shipping) 



SP-2 INTERFACE for 
EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Optional external switch (*5 00 extra) frees parallel 
port for use with other computers 

■ M9 9S (plus s 3°° shipping) 



SP-3 INTERFACE for 
MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem/printer switch — no need for Y-cablesor 
plugging/ unplugging cables 

■ s 64 95 (plus *3°° shipping) 



Both also available for IBM, RS-232 and Apple IIC computers. 



c 




R 



P.O. Box 293 
Raritan, NJ 08869 
(201) 722-1055 

ENGINEERING 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 167 



designed not to limit what your printer 
is capable of doing. But, your printer 
has definite limitations and it may not 
be able to do everything listed here. 

The control character can also be 
defined in the printer module for inclu- 
sion in the printer personality file. This 
is done by putting an equal sign (=) in 
the first column where the control letter 
normally appears followed by a space, 
the ASCII value of the control charac- 
ter expressed as a decimal number, 
another space and the required asterisk. 
A typical line for this is shown here: 

= 32 * sets back slash as control 
code 

The letters need not be in alphabetical 
order. The control character may be at 
any fixed position in the list. The most 
important requirement is for the spaces 
between the letter, the numbers and the 
asterisk. Remember, you cannot use 
more than eight decimal numbers per 
control letter. 

Here's how you compile a printer 
personality file. Assuming that your 
printer module is named module, the 
following sequence does the job: 

1) Check and verify that print- 
er, mod is in your execution direc- 
tory. 

2) Enter pr in t . mod <module 

3) You will see a status report that tells 
you the printer module file has been 
read. 

4) The disk drive will come on and 
write the file to your current execu- 
tion directory. 

More Shell Prompts 

Dave Satterfield of Carson City, 
Nevada, wrote to suggest they put the 
following patch in their start-up files. 

debug 

1 shell 

. {space) .+37 

=4B 

=20 

=07 

q 

If you do this, you'll be greeted with 
the f amiliar OK f ollowed by a bell tone. 
The address above is for the standard 
OS-9-Level I, Version 2.00.00 shell. I 
looked at the shell that comes with OS- 
9 Level II and found the 05-9 prompt 
at an offset of 36 Hex bytes. If you want 
your OS-9-based Color Computer to 
look like it's running UNIX, you could 
change the prompt code above to: 



=24 
=20 
=07 

OS-9 Level II Patches Already 

Hackers sure love to find out what 
makes a system tick. Would you believe 
that before OS-9 Level II was in the 
stores, a patch file was available in the 
RAINBOW Delphi OS-9 Online SIG? 



Courtesy of Chuck Hoffman: If you 
would like to make your floppy disk 
drive motors shut off sooner, make the 
following patches to CC3Disk: 



Offset 

$329 
$3F0 
$42A 



Old Value 

$F0 
$F0 
$F0 



New Value 

$80 
$80 
$80 



Listing 1: fit 



(c) 1986 by STEPHEN B. GOLDBERG 



* AT 

* Use: at <time> <cmdfile> 

* Executes 'cmdfile 1 at future f time T 

* 'Cmdfile 1 is the filename or pathlist of an OS-9 

* procedure file. 
■>v 

* If f cmdfile f doesn't exist you will be prompted for file 

* entries from the keyboard just like the 'Build 1 utility. 

* All output to the screen (standard output path and 

* standard error path) is redirected to /nil. If you 

* want to save any of it, you must redirect these paths 

* in the procedure file's commands or in the lines that 

* are entered from the keyboard to other files. 

* Time is set using 24 hour clock (0 to 23 hours and 

* 00 to 59 minutes) . A one or two digit time entry 

* is considered hours. A three or four digit time 

* entry is considered hours and minutes . 

* EXAMPLES: 

* 0S9: at 930 /dl/workfile <ENTER> 

* Executes the commands in 'workfile 1 at 9:30am 
* 

0S9: at 15 /d0/newfile <ENTER> 
? format /dl r"NEW DISK" <ENTER> 
? backup #30k <ENTER> 
? yy <ENTER> 
? <ENTER> 

* Builds 'newfile 1 from keyboard and executes it at 3pm 

* NOTE: The f Atrun f module must be in current execution 
■>'<■ directory and the Nil and NilDrv modules must be in 

* RAM for 'At 1 to function. 



* 
•>v 



hour 

min 

count 



ifpl 

use 

endc 

mod 

rmb 
rmb 
rmb 



/d0/def s/os9def s 



len ,name , prgrm+obj ct , reent+2 , entry, dsiz 

1 set hour 
1 set minute 
1 digit count 



168 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



If you have some old OS-9 Level I 
disks laying around that you have 
formatted with the back of the disk 
/d0as/d2 and /dl as /d3,youcan read 
that data off onto an OS-9 Level II 
double-sided disk with these patches: 

Offset Old Value New Value 

$2AE $04 $41 

$2AF $40 $42 

Here's a quick way to get that data 
off of the old disks on to the true, 
double-sided disks you will always want 
to use with OS-9 Level II: Temporarily 
patch the device descriptor /dd to make 
it look like /d2 or /d3. Here are the 
offsets and values, first for /d2: 



Offset 


Old Value 


New Value 


$13 


$00 


$02 


$19 


$02 


$01 


$22 


$C4 


$B2 


Offset 


Old Value 


New Value 


13 


$00 


$03 


19 


$02 


$01 


22 


$C4 


$B3 



Hopefully, you'll only need these 
patches one time. You can save them to 
a disk file. When you load them, make 
sure you run the iniz utility before you 
try to use them: 

load BackSide.dd 
iniz d2 d3 

The command lines above assume 
that you have saved the /dd device 
descriptor patched above and then 
merged them into a file named Back- 
Side. You must also remember to verify 
the new files with verify's update option 
and set the execute attribute in the new 
file. Here's one possible sequence. 

save /d0/pa tchedD2 {space) D2 
save /d0/pa tchedD3 (space) D3 
verify </ DO/ pa tchedD2 
>/D0/D2.dd U 

ueri f y < / DO/ pa t c h e d D 3 
>/D0/D3.dd U 

merge /d0/D2.dd /D0/D3„dd 

>Back5ide . dd 

attr /D0/Bacl<Side - dd a pe 

Additionally, before you use /d0 and 
/dl while /d2 and /d3 are installed, 
you must make sure to modify the /d0 
and /dl device descriptors to tell 
CCS Disk that they are now single-sided 
drives. The easy way to do this is to use 
the dmode utility command from Com- 
puterware. 



path 


rmb 


1 


output path number 


pointer 


rmb 


2 


filename pointer 


buffer 


rmb 


128 


line buffer 




rmb 


/"* /™W /™W 


stack 




rmb 


m 


parameters 


dsiz 


equ 


* 




* 








name 


f cs 


/at/ 




fcb 


1 


edition number 




fee 


/(c) 


S.Goldberg/ 



* DECIMAL TIME TO BINARY TIME 
* 



f ixtime 


ldd 


, - -x get digits 




stb 


,u save units 




dec 


count done? 




beq 


back yes, return 




ldb 


#10 




mul 


multiply by 10 




addb 


,u add units 




stb 


,u save total 




dec 


count count digit 


back 


rts 


return 



* i<i<i<i€ ■jW<ftff "staV * >V>V ************ * * 
* 

* CHECK AND SET TIME PARAMETER 

* 

count zero digit counter 



entry 



clr 
clr 
Ida 

testloop suba 
bmi 
cmpa 
bhi 
sta 
inc 
Ida 
cmpa 
bne 
pshs 
bsr 
beq 
cmpb 
bhi 
stb 
bsr 
bne 
cmpb 
bhi 
puis 
ldd 
cmpb 
beq 
bio 
stx 



min zero minutes byte 

,x get first digit 

#'0 make binary 

bad not valid, prompt & quit 

#9 valid digit? 

bad no, prompt & quit 

, x-h yes, save it 
count count it 



,x next character 
#$20 end of time param? 
testloop no, check for digit 
x save parameter pointer 
f ixtime set minutes 
hourchk hours only 
#59 >59 minutes? 
badtime yes , prompt & quit 
l,u save in minutes byte 
fixtime set hour 
badtime more than 4 digits 
#23 >23 hours? 
badtime yes , prompt & quit 
x retrieve parameter pointer 
, X+ get next characters 
#$20 space? 
chkloop yes, look again 
bad no filename, prompt & quit 
pointer save filename pointer 

* CREATE PROCEDURE FILE 



hourchk 



chkloop 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 169 



* 


ldd 


#$020b mode and attr 




os9 


i$create create file 




bcc 


savepath save path number 




cmpb 


#218 file already exists? 




beq 


fork yes, fork to 'atrun 1 




bra 


out exit with other error 


************* ^ftfr>V*Wf*****tftf*##** 

•JL. 


* ERROR 
* 


PROMPTS AND EXIT 


bad 


leax 


<syntax,pcr syntax error message 


screen 


ldy 


#100 maximum length 




Ida 


#2 standard error path 




bsr 


write message to screen 


noerr 


clrb 


clear error 


out 


os9 


f$exit quit 


badtime 


leax 


<timerr,pcr time error message 


* 


bra 


screen message to screen 


timerr 


fcb 


7 bell 




fee 


/WHAT TIME/ 


atpmpt 


fee 


/? / keyboard input prompt 




fcb 


$0d 


syntax 


fcb 


7 bell 




fee 


/Use: at <time> <path>/ 




fcb 


$0d 


write 


os9 


i$writln output line 




bes 


out exit with error 




rts 


return 


****************************** 


* BUILD 


FILE FROM KEYBOARD 


savepath sta 


path save output path number 


getloop 


leax 


<atpmpt,pcr command prompt 




ldy 


#2 two characters 




Ida 


#1 standard output path 




bsr 


write to screen 




leax 


buffer,u line buffer 




clra 


standard input path 




ldy 


#128 maximum line length 




os9 


i$readln get line 




bes 


out exit with error 




Ida 


path output path 




cmpy 


#1 carriage return? 




beq 


close yes, close file 




bsr 


write line to file 




bra 


getloop get next line 


close 


os9 


i$close close file 




bes 


out exit with error 


***************)V*************V{* 

JL. 


* FORK 
* 


1 ATRUN 1 


INTO BACKGROUND 


fork 


ldu 


pointer filename pointer 




ldd 


hour get time set 




std 


,--u put with filename 




ldy 


#200 maximum parameter length 



Another way would be to patch 
it. sid, which is the location in the 
device descriptor that tells the driver 
how many sides are available on the 
media, i t .sid can be found at an offset 
of 19 Hex bytes from the start of the 
device descriptor module. You will want 
to change this byte from 02 to 01 if you 
have been running with double-sided 
drives. 

Name Warning 

While Bill Brady was working on his 
Wiz terminal program, he tried to build 
a device descriptor named WT2 — it 
probably stood for Wiz Terminal 2. 
Unfortunately, it wouldn't work after it 
had been installed in his 0S9Boot file. 
It did work when he merely loaded and 
inized it. Fortunately, after he re- 
named it M2W, it did work properly after 
installation in the DS9Boot file. Inter- 
esting quirk. 

About Attr 

Sam Johnson asked for some help 
with the attr utility on the Delphi OS- 
9 SIG recently. Here goes. To determine 
the attributes of a file, you can type: 

attr ✓d0/'CMD5/'dir 

If things are set up normally on your 
system, you should see the following 
line on your screen: 

--e-rewr 

That line is trying to tell you that the 
file you have just checked can be exe- 
cuted by both its owner and the public. 
It can also be read by the owner and the 
public. However, it can only be written 
to by the owner. If you look at an 
extended directory listing of the CMDS 
directory, you will see that its owner is 
the superuser, user number zero. On a 
single-user system, that will generally be 
you. Therefore, you have permission to 
do anything you want. 

Now, let's assume you want to pre- 
vent the file f rom being deleted . In other 
words, you don't even want to be able 
to write to the file yourself. Since you 
own the file, you can set its attributes. 
The following command will work fine. 

attr /d0/CMD5/dir -u 

After you run this command, you'll see: 

- - e - re - r 

This means that anyone can read this 
file. Likewise, anyone can execute the 



170 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



code in it. However, no one can write 
to it. Therefore, no one can delete it. 
Not even you. To delete it, you would 
need to go in and change the write 
attribute to w like this: 

attr /d0/CMD5/dir w 

One more thing. There are certain 
things that certain utilities can't do. For 
example, the dir command can't list 
the files in a normal text file — there 
aren't any! Or, list can't list a direc- 
tory like a normal text file. If you try 
to do either of these things, list CMDS 
or di r startup, you will get the infam- 
ous "no permission" Error 214 message. 
The secret comes with confidence. 
Don't be afraid of the OS-9 error mes- 
sages. Just sit back, take a deep breath 
and try to figure out what happened. 
Attack the problem in a logical manner 
and the problem will be obvious to you. 
One good way to develop your skills 
with this is to make mistakes on purpose 
just to see what happens. Remember 
those test results and the next time you 
see that error message, you'll be ahead 
of the curve. 

June Listings 

This month we feature another at- 
tempt to simulate a UNIX command in 

the Color Computer OS-9 environ- 

■ 

ment. fit lets you execute an existing 
OS-9 procedure file or a file entered 
from the keyboard at a future time. 

The Color Computer version of Rt is 
different from the UNIX version be- 
cause RtRun receives its parameters 
directly from fit rather than by scan- 
ning a disk file. This keeps disk use to 
a minimum. This version of RtRun 
checks the time every four seconds 
instead of every 20 minutes or so like the 
UNIX version, fit author Stephen 
Goldberg of Bethpage, New York, 
didn't write a date parameter into his 
code because he felt that most Color 
Computer users do not leave their 
computers running continuously. 

You'll find fit useful when you have 
a long, disk-intensive procedure to 
perform, and you don't want to take up 
your own work time waiting for it. For 
example, when your files become frag- 
mented into small bits and pieces spread 
all over the disk after you have edited 
them many times, you could have your 
Color Computer run a procedure file. 
Start by typing the following sequence 
of commands into a named fix file: 

chd /d0 

format /dl r "New Disk" 

dsave -b -s20 'd0 >'d0/copy f i 1 e 



•k 

atrun 
len 



ldd 

leax 

os9 

bcs 

bra 

fee 
emod 
equ 
end 



#$0001 type, lang. and data size 
<atrun,pcr name of program 
f$fork fork to 'Atrun 1 
out exit with error 
noerr quit 'At 1 

/atrun / 



Listing 2: RtRun 

* ATRUN - (c) 1986 by STEPHEN B. GOLDBERG 

* Checks time every four seconds and executes the 

* command(s) passed from ! At f at the correct time. 



ifpl 

use 

endc 



/d0/defs/os9defs 



mod len , name , prgrm+ob j c t , r eent+2 , entry , ds iz 



settime 


rmb 


2 set hour and min 


realtime 


rmb 


3 yr,mo,day 


chktime 


rmb 


3 hr, min, sec 


pointer 


rmb 


2 parameter pointer 




rmb 


200 stack 




rmb 


200 param 


dsiz 


equ 


■ 








name 


f cs 


/atrun/ 




feb 


1 edition number 




fee 


/(c) S.Goldberg/ 


direct 


fee 


">/nil »/nil" 




feb 


$0d 


shell 


fee 


/shell / 



•k 

* SET UP REDIRECTION TO /NIL 

•k 



entry 



mvloop 



ldd ,x++ get time parameter 

std settime save set time 

leay -13, x room for redirection 

tf r y , s move stack out of way 

sty pointer save command address 

ldd ,x+ command character 

sta ,y+ move it 

cmpb #$0d done? 

bne mvloop no , do again 

leax <direct,pcr redirection 

Ida ,x+ get character 

sta ,y+ add to command 

cmpa #$0d done? 

bne dirloop no, do again 

i<i<ici<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<i<icV(i<i<'k'k'k'k 



dirloop 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 171 





Those Great RAINBOW Programs 

Without All the Fuss! 
Subscribe to rainbow ON tape! 



Every month, rainbow on tape brings as many as two dozen ready-to-run 
programs right to you. Using the current issue of the rainbow as documen- 
tation, all you have to do is load and run them. Just a one-year subscription 
gives you more than 230 new programs! The typing time saved is time that 
can be spent with the CoCo. (rainbow on tape does not include OS-9 
programs or those less than 20 lines.) 




Need a back issue of rainbow on tape? 
Issues available beginning with April 1982 



Subscribe to rainbow on tape Today! 

LOOK FOR OUR ORDER CARD 
BETWEEN PAGES 34 AND 35 

The cost for a single copy of rainbow on 
tape is $10 within the United States; U.S. $12 
in all other countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow ontape is $80 within the U.S.; 
U.S. $90 in Canada; and U.S. $105for all other 
countries. U.S. currency only, please. In order 
to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not 
bill. 




DISK USERS: RAINBOW ON DISK 

IS NOW AVAILABLE! 

All the programs from the rainbow — includ- 
ing OS-9 — are now available on disk. For 
more information, see Page 116 of this issue. 



NOW AVAILABLE ON DELPHI! 

For your convenience, RAINBOW ON TAPE can also be 
ordered via the Delphi Information Network, in our Shopping 
Service area of the rainbow's Color Computer SIG (Special 
\nlerest Group). 

The individual programs from our past June issues are also 
available for immediate download in the RAINBOW on tape 
Database area in the rainbow's Color-Computer SIG on 
Delphi. There is a $3.50 per program surcharge. 



rainbow ON tape is not a stand-alone product, but is 
intended as an adjunct and complement to the magazine. 
Even if you purchase RAINBOW ON TAPE, you will still need 
the magazine for loading and operating instructions. 

To order by phone, {credit card orders only) call 
(800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. EST. All other 
inquiries call (502) 228-4492 



Programs From Our Past Sound/Music 
Issues: 

June 1986 — OnHold, an animation program with telephones 
dancing to music; Music Paper, a program that prints blank 
sheet music on the DMP-105 printer; Castle, a challenging 
game that tests skill; Shadow of the Rings, a graphics video 
to an original music recording; Music+, a music synthesis 
program that allows editing and playing of four-part music; 
Sound Processor, a utility to create PLAY strings easily; Name 
That Song, a music game that simulates the popular game 
show "Name That Tune"; Track40, a disk utility that adds an 
extra 22K of memory to Disk BASIC 1.1; Soundbase, a utility 
toadd sound effects to programs; Piano, turns the CoCo into 
a composer/synthesizer; Pool Maintenance, helps in main- 
taining proper pool conditions; and Transformation, copies 
MS-DOS files to CoCo disk format. Plus five additional 
programs. 

June 1985 — Piano Note Tutor, a tutorial on the notes of the 
piano keyboard; Minute Waltz, a music program that brings 
classical composer, Frederick Chopin up to date; Name That 
Song, a game to test music and memory skills; Multo of Mars, 
a graphics game to learn multiplication; Chopper Assault, an 
arcade game of action; Anaiog-T o-Digitai , a sound synthesis 
program that puts your voice into memory; Simplifying the 
SOUND Command, a tutorial on saving keystrokes and 
memory; Animatic, a demonstration program to ease the 
writing of animated graphics; CoCo Chronograph, a hard- 
ware/software project that adds a real-time clock to the CoCo; 
Hi-Q, a challenging puzzle peg game of skill; and Super Disk 
Charger, a utility to put the "turbo" in your drives. Plus seven 
additional programs. 

June 1984 — Includes 20 programs from our Music issue. 
June 1983 — Includes 20 programs from our Printers issue. 



chd /dl 
/d0/copyfile 

del copyf ile /d0/copyf ile 

Then on the day you decide it's time 
to clean up your disk, type: 

at 1205 /d0/f ixf ile 

Just before you leave for lunch, stuff 
a blank disk in /dl. While youVe gone, 
your Color Computer will go to work 
by itself, and you'll have a completely 
unfragmented disk in /dl when you 
return. 

If the file you give fit doesn't exist, 
it will be created and you will be 
prompted for entries from the keyboard 
exactly as with the bui Id utility. Type 
in each line at the ? prompt. Make no 
entry and press ENTER when done. 

fltRun always redirects the standard 
output and standard error path to the 
bit bucket, i.e., the /nil device descrip- 
tor. If you want a record of this output, 
you can redirect these paths to disk files 
in the command lines in your procedure 
file. 

Until next month. Enjoy Level II! 
May all of your windows be clean and 
error free. □ 



* TIME COMPARISON LOOP 

timechk leax realtime, u time buffer 

os9 f$time get current time 

bcs out exit with error 

ldd settime get set time 

cmpd chktime same? 

beq execute yes, execute command(s) 

ldx #240 no, 240 ticks 

os9 f$sleep sleep for 4 seconds 

bcs out exit with error 

bra timechk check time again 

* EXECUTE THE COMMAND (S) 

* 



execute 


leax 


<shell,pcr Shell name 




ldd 


#$0001 type, lang. and data 




ldy 


#200 maximum param length 




ldu 


pointer parameter address 




os9 


f$fork fork to Shell 




bcs 


out exit with error 




clrb 


clear error 


out 


os9 


f$exit quit 




emod 




len 


equ 


* 




end 





VISA 



A new generation of CoCo 111 software 




fT^yT^n a\^^T*t §T3G» i" V" J~B 

CD GO E) Q 




BMW 



Znslom 



A user friendly, user programable function key utility 
that creates up to 20 function keys. Other features 
include DOS mods, DISABLE, and is EPROMable. 
Compatible with CoCo \/\\ and includes enhanced 
CoCo III version! [See review in April '87) 
^S=s. Disk Version 1.3 $19.95 




Easily alter the contents of any palette without 
having to remember numbers or colors! Once con- 
figured, all sixteen palettes can be saved to disk as a 
single subroutine which may then be used in a basic 
program. 

Disk £19.95 




ttULTX-L^BEL III 

UERSION 1.01 

An easy to use, versatile label creating program in- 
cluding many new CoCo III features. Even if you al- 
ready own a label program, this one's a must for 
the III!! 

Disk £16.95 




^MrwWm 



This disk utility allows the use of three double sided 
drives without any special hardware modifications. 
CoCo i/ll/lll compatible, and it's EPROMable. 

Disk £16.95 

With purchase of FKEYS III £12.95 



GIMMESOFT Add £2.50 for shipping 

4 Hallfield Ct. MD residents add sales tax 

Baltimore, MD 21 236 Phone 301 -256-7558 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 173 



THESE FINE STORES 
CARRY THE RAINBOW 



The retail stores listed below carry the rainbow on a regular basis and may have 
other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We suggest you 
patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Modlson 

Montgomery 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Phoenix 
Sietra Vista 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayetlevllle 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Citrus Heights 
Gross Valley 
Half Moon Bay 
Hollywood 

Sacramento 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Sunnyvale 

COLORADO 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 

Electronic World 

TRI-TEK Computers 
Livingston's Books 
Books Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronlcs/Radlo Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Software Plus 
Advance Radio, Inc. 
Strawflower Electronics 
Levity Distributors 
Polygon Co. 
Tower Magazine 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Computer Literacy 



Westminster 


Software Clly 


DELAWARE 




Mlddletown 


Delmar Co. 


Milford 


Milford Newsstand 


Wilmington 


Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 


FLORIDA 




Boca Raton 


Software. Software, Inc. 


Cocoa 


The Open Door 


Davie 


Software Plus More 


Delfona 


Wilson Assoc, dba Radio Shack 


Ft. Lauderdale 


Electronics Engineers 




Mike's Electronics Distributor 


Jacksonville 


The Book Nook 




Book Town 




White's of Downtown Bookstore 


North Miami 




Beach 


Almar Bookstore 


Orlando 


Book Mania 


Panama Cily 


Boyd-Ebert Corp, 


Pensacola 


Anderson News Co. 


Pinellas Park 


Wolf's Newsstand 


Sarasota 


Family Computers 


Starke 


Record Junction. Inc. 




Radio Shack Dealer 


Tallohassee 


Anderson News Co. 


Tampa 


Fine Print Bookstore 


Tltusvllle 


Computrac 


GEORGIA 




Athens 


The Academic Resource Center, inc 


Bremen 


Bremen Electronlcs/Radlo Shack 


Jesup 


Radio Shack 


Marietta 


Act One Video 


Toccoo 


Martin Music Rodlo Shack 


IDAHO 




Lewlston 


Books, Etc. 


Moscow 


Johnson News Agency 


ILLINOIS 




Aurora 


Kroch's & Brentono's 


Belleville 


Software or Systems 


Champolgn 


Book Market 


Chicago 


B. Dalton Booksellers 


N. Wabosh St. 




West Jackson St. 




Bob's In Newtown 




Bob's News Emporium 



Chllllcothe 

Danville 

Decatur 



East Mollne 

Evanston 

Geneseo 

Kewanee 

Lisle 

Newton 
Oak Brook 
Oak Park 
Paris 
Peoria 



Schaumberg 

Skokle 

Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Columbus 

Garrett 

Greenwood 

Indlonapolls 



Jasper 
Madison 
Martinsville 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Ottumwa 

KANSAS 

Topeko 

Wichita 



KENTUCKY 

Georgetown 

Hazard 

Hopklnsvllle 

Louisville 

Paducah 

Plkevllle 

LOUISIANA 

Crowley 
Monroe 



Bob's Rogers Park 
Book Market 

East Cedar 

North Cicero 

West Diversey 
E.B. Garcia & Associates 
Kroch's & Brentano's 

South Wabosh 

West Jackson 

516 N, Michigan 

835 N. Michigan 
Parkway Drugs 
Parkwest Books 
Sandmeyer's Bookstore 
Univ. of Chicago Bookstore 
Univ. of Illinois Bookstore 
Vldeomat, Inc. 
Book Emporium 
Book Market 
Book Emporium 

K-Marl Plaza 

Northgote Mall 
Book Emporium 
Chicago-Main News 
B & J Supply 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Bill's TV Radio Shack 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 

Sheridan Village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Book Market 
Illinois News Service 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Kroch's & Brentano's 
Book Emporium 

Sangamon Center North 

Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Place 
North Shore Distributors 

D & D Electronics 
Radio Shack 

White Cottage Electronics 
Micro Computer Systems. Inc. 
Finn News Agency. Inc, 
The Computer Experience 
Bookland, Inc. 
Delmar News 
Indiana News 
Elex Mart 

Arco Office Supplies 
Radio Shack 
Mlttlng's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 
Southslde Drug 

Palmer News, Inc. 
Town Crier of Topeka, Inc. 
Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 
Lloyd's Radio 



Goodwin Electronics 
Donlel Boone Gulf Mart 
Hobby Shop 
The Computer Store 
Radio Shack 

Ray's Fumlture/Radlo Shack Dealer 

Acadlana Newsstand 
The Book Rack 



MAINE 




Bangor 


Magazines, Inc, 


Brockton 


Voyager Bookstore 


Caribou 


Radio Shack 


Sanford 


Radio Shack 


Watetboro 


Radio Shack 


MASSACHUSETTS 




Brockton 


Voyager Bookstore 


Cambridge 


Out Of Town News 


Fltchburg 


Corners Book Shop 


Ipswich 


Ipswich News 


Littleton 


Computer Plus 


Lynn 


North Shore News Co. 


Swansea 


Newsbreak, Inc, 



MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Dearborn 

Durand 

Harrison 

Howell 

Lowell 

Mt, Clemens 
Muskegon 
Owosso 
Perry 

Royal Oak 
Sterling 

Heights 
Trenton 
Wyoming 

MINNESOTA 

Duluth 

Minneapolis 

Wlllmar 

MISSISSIPPI 

Jackson 

MISSOURI 

Farmlngton 
Jefferson City 
Klrksvflle 
Moberly 
St. Louis 



St. Robert 

MONTANA 

Butte 
Whlteflsh 

NEBRASKA 

Omaha 

NEVADA 

Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Cedar Knotls 

Clinton 

Marmora 

Pennsvllle 

River Edge 

Rockoway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 



NEW YORK 

Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonla 
Hudson Falls 
Johnson City 



Book Nook, Inc. 
DSL Computer Products 
Rabbins Electronics 
Harrison Radio Shack 
Howell Auto Parts 

Curl's Sound & Home Arcade Center 

Michigan Radio 

The Eight Bit Corner 

C/C Computer Systems 

Peny Computers 

Software Clly 

Sterling Book Center 
Trenton Book Store 
Gen/s Book Co. 

Carlson Books 
Read-More News 
The Photo Shop 

North Side News 

Ray's TV & Rodlo Shack 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Audio Hut 
Book Emporium 
Computer Xchange 
Front Page News 
Bailey's TV & Radio 

Plaza Book Store 

Consumer Electronics of Whlteflsh 

Nelson News 

Hurley Electronics 

Verhom News Corp. 

Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 
Outpost Radio Shack 
Dave's Elect, Radio Shack 
Software Clly 
Soflware Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Desert Moon Distributors 
Front Page Newsstand 
Page One Newsstand 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Cromland. Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

G.A West & Co, 

Unicorn Electronics 



174 THE RAINBOW June 1987 



New Yoik 



N. White Plains 
Pawling 
Rochester 

Woodhoven 
NORTH CAROLINA 



Barnes & Noble— Soles Annex 


TENNESSEE 




BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Coliseum Books 


Chattanooga 


Anderson News Co. 


Burnaby 


Compulit 


Eastern Newsstand 




Guild Books & Periodicals 


Burns Lake 


VT. Video Works 


Grand Central Station, Track 37 


Dickson 


Highland Electronics 


CamDbell 




200 Park Ave., (Pon Am # 1 ) 


Knoxvllle 

1*1 1 V—/ A\ VIII 


Anderson News Co. 


River 


TRS Eleclronlcs 


55 Water Street 




First Byfe Computer Co. 


Chllllwack 


Charles Parker 


World Trade Center #2 


Memphis 


Computer Center 


Cooitenay 


Rick's Music & Stereo 


First Stap News 




Software, Inc. 


Dawson Creek 


Bell Radla & TV 


Idle Hours Bookstore 


Nashville 


Mosko's Book Store 


Golden 


Taks Home Furnishings 


International Smoke Shop 


Smyrna 


Delker Electronics 


Kelowna 


Telesoft Marketing 


Jonll Smoke 


Union Cfly 


Cox Electronics Rodlo Shack 


Lanalev 

k— *— 41 ImIw J 


Lang ley Radio Shack 


Penn Book 


TEXAS 

Brenhom 




N. Vancouver 


Mlcrowest Distributors 


Software City 

OIUIG l\JtJW5 


Moore's Electronics 


i\eison 
Parksvllle 


WHv©f 5 DOOK5 

Parksvllle TV 


Usercom Systems. Inc. 
Walden Books 


Elgin 
Orange 


The Homing Pigeon 
Norlhway Books & News 


Pentfcton 


D.J.'s 

Four Corner Grocery 


World Wide Media Services 


VIRGINIA 




Salmon Arm 


Matrix Computing 


Software City 


Gafton 


Electronics Marketing 


Sidney 


Sidney Electronics 


Universal Computer Service 


Norfolk 


l-O Computers 


Smlthers 


Wall's Home Furniture 


Village Green 


Richmond 


Software Clly 


Squamish 


Kotyk Electronics 


World Wide News 


WASHINGTON 

Seattle 


100 Mile 




Spectrum Projects 


Adams News Co., Inc. 


House 


Tip Top Radio & TV 



Aberdeen 

Caiy 
Charlotte 

Havlock 
Hickory 
Marion 
Wilmington 

OHIO 

Blanchester 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Columbiana 

Coshocton 

Dayfon 

Falrborn 

Kent 

Kenton 

Lakewood 

Lima 

Mlamlsburg 
Mount Orab 
Rocky River 
Toledo 
Xenla 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 



King Electronics 
Radio Shack 

News Center In Caiy Village 
Newsstand Infl 
Papers & Paperback 
Computer Plus 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Boomers Rhyfhm Center 
JB's Newsstand 

JR Computer Control 
Lltlie Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Clnsoft 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

Utopia Software 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

Wllke News 

News-Readers 

The News Shop 

T.W. Hogan & Associates 

Lakewood International News 

Brunner News Agency 

Edu-Caterers 

Wllke News 

Mount Orab Radio Shack 
Programs Unlimited 
Leo's Book & Wine Shop 
Fine Print Books 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, Inc. dba Radio Shock 

Steve's Book Store 



Portland 


Fifth Ave. News 


PENNSYLVANIA 




Allison Park 


Software City 


Altoona 


Newborn Enterprises 


Brookvllle 


Larry's Stereo Shop 


Malvern 


Personal Software 


Philadelphia 


City Software Center 




Newsy 


Phoenlxvllle 


Stevens Radio Shack 


Pittsburgh 


All-Pro Souvenlers 


Pleasant Hills 


Pitt Computer & Software 


Temple 


Software Corner 


Wind Gap 


Micro World 


York 


The Computer Center of York 


RHODE ISLAND 




Warwick 


Software Connection 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Charleston Hts. 


Software Haus, Inc. 


Gaffney 


Gaffney Book Store 


Greenville 


Palmetto News Co. 


Spartanburg 


Software Clly 


Union 


Fleming's Electronics 



Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Ladysmlth 
Milwaukee 



Mlnocqua 

WYOMING 

Casper 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Klngsford 

CANADA 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Blalrmore 

Bonnyvllle 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 
Drayfon Valley 
Edmonton 
Edson 
Falrvlew 
Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hlnton 
Innlsfall 
Leduc 
Lethbrldge 
Lloydmlnster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 

Stettler 

Stralhmore 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetasklwln 



B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Badger Periodicals 

Cudahy News & Hobby 

Electronics, Etc. 

Book Tree 

Booked Solid 

Booked Solid II 

Harvey Schwartz Bookshop 

Univ. of Wisconsin Bookshop 

Island Technologies 

The Computer Store 



Informatica Y Telecomunicaclones 



Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
L & K Sports & Music 
Paul Tercler 

Double "D" AS.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Kelly Softwore Distributors 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio' Shack 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
AS.C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack, ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 
Jim Cooper 
L & S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Datatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's Electronics 
Stettler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



MANITOBA 

Altona 

Lundar 

Morden 

The Pas 

Selkirk 

Virden 

Winnipeg 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood 
Carbonear 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsvllle 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Llstowel 

South River 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Asslnlboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nlplwan 
Reglna 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tlsdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whltehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

San Juan 



L.A WiebrLtd. 
Goranson Elec. 
Central Sound 
Jodl's Sight & Sound 
G.L. Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Ltd. 



Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewltt Elec. 



Seaport Elec. 
Slade Realties 



Atlantic News 

Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modern AppllanceCentre 

Huntsvllle Elec 

Danny "B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Messagerles de Presse Benjamin Enr. 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Reglna CoCoClub 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H & O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 
Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and selected Coles Bookstores, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, Barnes & Noble, Little 
Professors, Tower Book & Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



June 1987 THE RAINBOW 1 75 



A D VER TISER INDEX 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the 
Tandy Color Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when 
you contact these firms. 



Alpha Products 21 

Ark Royal Games 28 

Cer-Comp 101, 103 

Cinsoft 157 

Clearbrook Software 

Group 72 

CNR Engineering 167 

Cognitec 63 

Colorware 22, 23 

Computer Center 35 

Computer Island 1 25 

Computer Plus 3 

Computerware 85 

Computize 25 

D.P. Johnson 165 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc 128 

Derringer 

Software 118 

Diecom IFC 

Disto 51 

Dorsett 65 

Duck Productions 139 

F.M. Technology 164 

Fazer Electronics 95 

Federal Hill Software 29 

Floppy Source 133 

Foto-Wear 55 



Frank Hogg Laboratories ...159 



Gimmesoft 1 73 

Hard Drive Specialists 141 

Hawkes Research 

Services 54 

Hemphill Electronics 15 

HJL div. of Touchstone 

Technology, Inc BC 

Howard Medical 34, 178 

J & M Systems 123, 132 

J & R Electronics 45 

Jason Guilbeau 75 

Kelly Software 

Distributors 143 

Logicware 93 

Metric Industries 91 

Micro Works, The 111 

Microcom Software 9, 11, 13 

Microtech Consultants 

Inc 61 

MicroWorld 33 

Moreton Bay 1 47 

Novasoft 57 

Other Guys Software, The 14 

Owl-Ware 81, 82, 83 

Perry Computers 16 

Polygon 133 

Preble's Programs, Dr IBC 



Prickly-Pear Software 121 

Probitat 160 

Public Domain 151 

PXE Computing 7 

Radio Shack 105, 107 

Rainbow Bookshelf 166 

Rainbow Introductory 

to Statistics 86 

Rainbow on Disk 117 

Rainbow o n Tape 172 

Robotic Microsystems 134 

Seca 93 

Software House, The 39 

Spectogram 1 36 

Spectrosystems 54 

Spectrum Projects 

Inc 17, 67, 69 

Speech Systems 

40, 41, 42, 43, 

Sugar Software 1 77 

Sunrise Software 31 

T & D Software 113, 157 

Tepco 73 

Tom Mix Software 56 

True Data Products 98, 99 

William Brigance 161 

Woodstown Electronics 30 

Zebra Systems 119 




Call: 

Shackleford, Nolan, Davis, Gregg and Associates 

Cindy Shackleford, president 

Marian Nolan Carpenter 

Advertising Representative 

P.O. Box 725 

516-1 89th St Court East 

Spanaway, WA 98387 

(206) 847-9901 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 
The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

(502) 228-4492 



Call: 

Jack Garland 
Garland Associates, Inc. 
10 Industrial Park Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

(617) 749-5852 



176 



THE RAINBOW June 1987 




NEW TRIG ATTACK - (100% ml) In this educational game, enemy trigs with names 
like sine, cosine and tangent, travel along math curves. Players learn important mathematical 
concepts as they destroy the trigs with their rotating slope. Trig Attack is filled with sound eft'ects 
and colorful graphics. The game features 11 challenging levels and 7 different trig enemies. First class 
mathematical entertainment for ages 9 and up. Excellent manual includes an introduction to 
Lriflonomctrv. T:»>e 1GK CB/Dfck 33K ECB C0C0 1 2. 3; ft 10,0 a. 



CALLIGRAPHER 

C0C0 Calligrapher - (ttybrid BAStC/ML) 
Turn your C0C0 and dot-matrix printer 
into a calligrapher's quill. Make beautiful 
invitations, flyers, certificates, labels and 
more. Includes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters are '/a 
inch high and variably spaced. Works with 
many printers including Epson, Gemini, 
Radio Shack, Okidata 92A, Banana and 
Prowriter. Additional fonts are available 
(see below). Tape/Disk; $24.95. 

OSO Calligrapher - (C) Although a 
different program from the C0C0 Calligra- 
pher, the OS9 Calligrapher prints all the 
same fonts. It reads a standard text lile 
which contains text and formatting direc- 
tives. You may specify the font to use, 
change fonts at any time, centering left, 
right or full justification, line fill, margin, 
line width, page size, page break and in- 
dentation. Similar to troff on UNIX (tin) 
systems. Includes Gay Nineties, Old En- 
glish and Cartoon fonts. Additional fonts 
are available (see below). Disk only; OS9; 
$24.95. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires Calligra- 
pher above. Each set on tape or disk; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; $14.95 
each. Set #1 - (9 fonts) Reduced, re- 
versed and reduced-reversed versions of 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon; 
Set #2 - (8 fonts) Old Style and Broad- 
way; Set #3 - (8 fonts) Antique and Busi- 
ness; Set #4 - (8 fonts) Wild West and 
Checkers; Set #5 - (10 fonts) Stars, He- 
brew and Victorian; Set #0 - (8 fonts) 
Block and Computer; 

Economy Font Packages on disk; speci- 
fy RSDOS or OS9; 29.95: Font Pack- 
age #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 
fonts) on one disk. Font Package #2 - 
Above font sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts) on 
one disk. 

UTILITIES 

Auto Run (H - (Hybrid basic/ml) Utility to 
allow your own tape- based BASIC or ML 
programs to display a graphics title screen 
and then self-start after loading. Includes a 
graphics editor to create professional look- 
ing title screens. Tape only; 16K ECB; 
$19.95. 

Piratector - (100% ML) Utility to allow 
your own disk-based BASIC or ML pro- 
grams to display a graphics title screen 
and then self-start after loading. Adds 
copy protection to your programs but still 
allows users to create non-executable back- 
ups! Includes Semigraf. Disk only; C0C0 
1, 2, 3 (except Semigraf); $39.95. 

A complete catalog of* other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Semigraf Graphics Editor - (ico% ML) 
Use 8 colors and standard text characters 
to draw graphics pictures and screens in 
high resolution semi graphics mode. In- 
cludes sample pictures. Tape/Disk; 1GK 
CB; $19.95. 

Super Screen Machine - (100% ML) Put 
your C0C0 into high resolution mode for 
your own BASIC or ML programs. Smooth 
scroll, key click, lower case with colored 
characters, many other features. 
Tape/Disk; 32K CB; C0C0 1, 2, 3 (except 
64K mode); $19.95. 



Disk 



Manager 



(100% ml) Disk 



Color 

utility with these features: Disk repair, 
selective track initialization, verify sectors, 
backups, tape to disk transfer, ROM Pak 
execution from disk, much more! 
Tape/Disk; C0C0 1, 2, 3 (except for 64K 
mode); $24.95. 

Color Tape Manager - (100% ml) Tape 
utility with these features: display start, 
end and exec address of ML programs, 
convert ML programs into BASIC DATA 
statements, append ML to BASIC, loa.d, 
display /modify and save tape file, handles 
missing EOF and filename blocks, much 
more! Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; C0C0 1, 2, 3 
(except for 6IK mode); $19.95. 

INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information Management 
System) - (i-lybrkt Tape or disk, 

fast and simple general data base program. 
Create files of records that can be quickly 
sorted, searched, deleted and updated. 
Powerful printer formatting. Up to 8 user 
fields, sort on up to 3 fields. Tape/Disk; 
$10.95 (sec combo pkg below). 

TIMS Mail - (Hybrid basic/ML) Tape or 
Disk based mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files arc compatible with TIMS. 
Fast and simple to use. Supports labels 1, 
2 or 3 across, 2Vz to 4 inches wide. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95 (see combo pkg below). 

TIMS Utility - (Hybrid BASIC/M,) Utility 
companion for TIMS and TIMS Mail to al- 
low multi-term search (AND and OR log- 
ic), global change and delete, split large 
files and more! Tape/Disk; $1-1.95 (see 
combo pkg below). 

TIMS Combo Package - All three of the 
above programs: TIMS, TIMS Mail and 
TIMS Utility on one disk - $34.95. 

SPORTS STATISTICS 

Statistics programs for the coa.ch, team 
manager or avid fan who wants to keep 
accurate team and opponent records. 
Printer output supported. The following 
are available: Baseball, Basketball, Foot- 
ba.ll and Soccer. Disk only; $10.05 each. 



EDUCATIONAL 

Silly Syntax - (Hybrid basic/ml) Ages 5 and 
up. Story creation game; output to screen 
or printer; includes 2 stories or create your 
own. Tape/Disk; $19.95 or disk with 62 
stories for $29.95. Sets of 10 stories on 
tape/disk for $4.95: Fairy Tales, Current 
Events, X-Rated, Sing-Along, Adventure, 
Potpourri. 

Bible Stories Adventure - (Hybrid 
BASlC/lvL) Ages 4 & up. A graphics adven- 
ture game for young children & their fami- 
lies. Old testament. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

The Presidents of the USA - (100% ML) 
Ages 10 and up. Two trivia games, user 
modifiable, printer output supported. 
Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

The Great USA - Ages 9 and up. Trivia 
game of the 50 states. Capitals, nick- 
names, abbreviations, flowers, trees and 
birds. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $19.95. 

Galactic Hangman - Ages 7 and up. Ex- 
citing new twist to the popular word 
game. Outstanding graphics; 700 word vo- 
cabulary. Tape/Disk; 16K ECB; $10.05. 

Pre Reader - (Hybrid BASIC/ML) Ages 3-5 
(level I); Ages 5-7 (level 2); Great graphics 
and music. Level 1: match colors, shapes, 
letters and numbers; Level 2: match letters 
and consonant blends with their sounds. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $19.95. 

Statgraf - High school and college level; 
Linear regression analysis program com- 
bined with a plotting and line graphing 
system. Up to 250 x/y pairs; data 
transformation; residuals; regression line; 
print graph with screen print program 
(not supplied); Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Expense 
Management Package - Maintain your 
rental property income and expense 
records. Print output supported. 28 ex- 
pense categories. This program may be tax 
deductible. Disk only; $29.95. 

Radio Systems Design Calculations - 
Performs 14 different calculations common- 
ly used in design or evaluation of land 
mobile radio systems, satellite TV, etc. 
Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

C0C0 Knitter - Easy to use program to 
display or print instructions to knit a 
sweater: Cardigan or Pullover; Round or 
V-neck; Raglan or Set-in Sleeve; 3 weights 
or yarn; 8 sizes from baby to man. 
Tape/Disk; $10.05. 

Plying Tigers - (100% ML] Fast Defenders 
style arcade game. 5 levels of difficulty; 
Great graphics and sound ettects. 
Tape/Disk; Joystick; $19.95. 



i 1 



RAINBOW 

CERTiFICATKM 

iiM 




VtS/T 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoC'o 1, S and 3, S2K 
Extended Basic, ii7iles6 otherwise noted. Add 
Si. 50 per tape or disk for postage and handling. 
Florida residents add h% sales tax. COD orders 
add $4. Dealer inquiries invited. 



Save $200 on Magnavox Monitors 
Magnavox 8CM643 RGB Analog only $385!! 



MONITORS 




$125 



122A Zenith 1 2" Amber Screen offers 
the same 640 dots x 200 lines reso- 
lution at 15MHz and a 90-day war- 
ranty valid at 1200 locations. 



$88 



(«7 shipping) 

MAGNAVOX 
8 CM 515 has 

analog RGBf or CoCo 3, TTL RGB 
for Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and 
composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. 
Built-in speaker. 14" screen with 
640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 
2 years parts and labor warranty. 

reg. list S499 



SAVE 
$200 



1230A12" 

This 12" green screen high resolution 
monitor offers 80 column capability, 
Zenith quality and a 30-day warranty 
valid at any of Zenith's 1200 locations. 

Retail $199 
Our price 
($7 shipping) BRAND NEW 

All monitors require an amplifier cir- 
cuit to drive the monitor and are 
mounted inside the color computer. 
They attach with spring connectors 
with two wires extending out of the 
computer, one for audio and one for 
video. CoCo 3 does not require an 
amplifier circuit. 

VA-1 for monochrome monitors only, 
fits all color computers 



$24.45 



($2 shipping) 

VC-4 for monochrome or color, fits all 
coior computers 

($2 shipping) 



$39« 





+ Si 4 Shipping 
CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable 

only $19.95 with 

Magnavox Monitor order. 
$29.95 w/o monitor. 



MAGNAVOX 

8CM643 has anaioq 

RGB and TTL RGB and compo- 
site color input. Built in speaker. 
13" screen with 690 dots x 240 
resolution in RGB mode. Pius 2 
years parts & iabor warranty. 

reg. list $585 

SAVE 

$200 



$385 

+ $14 Shipping 




DRIVE 0 +. Howards Drive 0 gives you a 

DD-3 MP I drive, a CA-1 cable and a J&M DC-4 Disk Controller 
for onlv 



$17845 

($5 shipping) 
Add $34 for a Disto DC-3. 



DOUBLE SIDED 
DOUBLE DENSITY 
360K 



GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to eliminate the uncertainty- 
of dealing with a company through the mall. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compatibility. If you're not happy with it for any 
reason, return it in 30 days and we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) 

Shipping charges are for 48 states. 

APO, Canada and Puerto Rico orders slightly higher. 



DISK CONTROLLER 




includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. 



DC-3 

$2 shipping on all DISTO products 



ADD-ON BOARDS 



DC-38 Includes 80 column capacity, 
parallel printer, real time clock, and ali 
software $138 

DC-256 256K RAM Board includes 
software to access all RAM $QQ 



DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer In- 
cludes all software to program 2764 
or 27128 chips 



DC512 512K RAM Board with 
software $125 

DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port $40 



2764 8K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 

27128 16K Eprom 28 pin 

$8 50 each 

C-DOS 3 28 pin Eprom makes Disto 
controller compatible with CoCo 3 

$20 



SOFTWARE SPECIALS 



Payrol/BAS™ 



(*2 shipping) 

• Nonprotected basic modifiable 

• Tax tables built in for automatic 
state and federal calculation 

• Custom code for every state 

• 4 pay periods 

• 7 deductions 

• Prints checks 

• 100 employees 

• 30 ledger numbers for checks 
other than payroll 

• Check register includes monthly 
or weekly federal deposit amount 

• Enter, update, delete employees, 
company and check information 

• Print payroll and nonpayroll 
checks 



Payrol/BAS 
30 Day 



$79.95 




VIP LIBRARY 

Softlaw's integrated package In- 
cludes VIP writer terminal, data 
base, call and disk zap which can 
fix a diskette that Is giving I/O 



errors 




$125 



(«2 shipping) 



MEMORY 



Memory for CoCo 3 PC memory 
board plugs into thespareslots In- 
side the computer and can be 
populated with 256K ram chips. 
Completely solderless with com- 
plete easy to install instructions. 

$49.50 

PC Memory board with 512K *99 

Software spooler and RAM disk 
for lightning quick response or no 
disk swapping drive backup for 1 
drive system and printer spooler to 
free computer during long listings. 

$19.45 

($2 shipping on Memory 
products) 



64-2 for CoCo 2. Kit requires one 
solder point, no trace cuts. 

(>2 shipping) $24.45 

64-E1 for E Boards with complete 
instructions. Remove old chips 
and replace with preassembled 
package— no soldering or trace 
cuts. 

(>2 shipping) 28.45 

64-F1 for F Boards. No soldering 
needed. Capacitor leads must be 
cut. 

(92 shipping) $ 2 4.45 

64-22 TWo chip set for 26-3134A 
and B, 26-3136 A and B. Koren Col- 
or Computers require 1 solder 
point. 

(«2 shipping) 28.45 



Howard Medical Computers 1690 N. Elston Chicago, IL 60622 

ORDERS INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS 

=(800) 443-1444 = (312) 278-1440 



Showroom Hours: 
8:00- 5:00 Mon. - hi 
10:00 - 1:0<I 5*t. 



WE ACCEPT: VISA • MASTERCARD • AMERICAN EXPRESS 

CO.D. OR CHECKS • SCHOOL PO.'S 



Dr. Preble's Programs 
Striking A Blow For 




. . Freedom is nothing else but a chance to be better . « , 

— Albert Camus 



*** Mental Freedom *** 

for CoCo 1, 2 and 3! 

A Thought-Controlled Video Challenge 

We call it The Preble Thoughtware. 

DOES GREEN BLOOD flow in your veins like Mr. Spock? Is your mind well 
ordered 7 Or is your mind a mass of conflicting emotions like most 
humans? 

THOUGHTWARE may answer these questions and more. 

IMAGINE! Some day, a computer so advanced that it responds to your very 
thoughts and emotions. Imagine, some day, thought-controlled 
graphics: levitation and materialization! 

PLUG IN YOUR MIND and UNHOOK YOUR JOYSTICKS — 
now! The Radio Shack Color Computer has many ad- 
vanced capabilities, just waiting to be tapped. Dr. Preble's 
Programs combines the advanced technology of the CoCo 
with the amazing Radio Shack BIOFEEDBACK MONITOR 
to bring you "Preble Thoughtware." 

THOUGHT-CONTROLLED VIDEO CHALLENGE? Unlike any 
video game you have ever played, Thoughtware tests your 
ability to handle stress, to remain calm under adverse 
circumstances. 

LIGHTNING FAST reflexes will do you no good here, unless you 

first tame the fickle dragon of your mind. 
DO YOU HAVE SELF-CONTROL? Many people can keep a 

"Poker Face',j even when they are worried so that others 

may not notice; but can you really stop the worry itself? Thoughtware 

will find out! 

AND IT TALKS! Did you know that the CoCo can produce incredibly realistic 
digital speech without a special speech synthesizer? And I mean really 
high quality speech! Forget the mechanical robot voice. This voice 
quality is so good, it sounds human! Honest. Best of all, no extra 
hardware is needed for speech. None. The CoCo produces this amazing 
digital speech all by itself (with a wee bit of programming by Dr. Preble). 

THOUGHTWARE — Next time your friends ask what your computer can do, 
show them the Preble Thoughtware? 

Requires Radio Shack's Biofeedback Monitor Catalogue #63-675 

The Preble Thoughtware — TAPE $27.95 + s/h, on DISK $29.95 + s/h 





*** Basic Freedom *** 

for The Color Computer 3 
(with versions for CoCo 1 & 2) 

A Full Screen Editor for BASIC Programming 

We call it EDITOR 3. Chris Babcock wrote a pure, efficient Machine Language 
program to open a new dimension of ease and power for anyone typing in 
a BASIC program. 

Here are your BASIC Freedoms! 

FULL CURSOR MOVEMENT — Use the arrow keys to move anywhere on a 
screen. If you are using a Color Computer 3, then even the 40 or 80 
column screen is supported! 

INSERT, CHANGE or DELETE CHARACTERS anywhere on the 
screen. Simply move to what you wish to change, change 
it and continue working! 
LOWERCASE COMMANDS are OKI EDITOR 3 lets you type in 
lowercase any time or all the time. Lowercase command 
words are automatically translated to uppercasefor BASIC. 
Of course, lowercase text within quotes stays lowercase. 
This is great when typing wiht the CoCo 3's 40 or 80 column 
mode with true lowercase! 
MERGE LINES within a program with just a few keystrokes! 
AUTO KEY REPEAT — Hold down any key and it will repeat. 
INVISIBLE — Once EDITOR 3 has been loaded in, it is activated 
^With a single keystroke! It hides itself out of the way of other programs 
and can be turned off any any time. Pressing RESET will not hurt 
EDITOR 3! 

EASY TO USE — Installation takes seconds! Well-written goof-proof manual 
included. 

COCO 1 & 2 — Yes, even though this program was conceived for the powers 
of the new CoCo 3, we still support the previous Color Computers. They 
too, need their BASIC Freedom! 

EDITOR 3 — So easy and handy, you'll never want to run your CoCo without 
it! 

Available on DISK only for CoCo 3 @ $29.95 + s/h 

CoCo 1/2 version can not support 40 or 80 column screens. CoCo 1/2 version 
is available on TAPE for $27.95 + s/h or DISK for $29.95 + s/h. 



Also Available for CoCo 1 & 2 only: 

VDOS, the UnDISK: Save multiple programs in memory! Works with or without a disk 
drive. TAPE $27.95 + s/h, DISK $29.95 + s/h 

VDUMP, for the UnDISK: Save multiple programs in a single file! $14.95 + s/h on tape. 
VPRINT, for the UnDISK: Printout UnDISK Directory! $9.95 + s/h on tape. 



Order From 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
(502) 966-8281 



Check, Money Order, MasterCard, VISA or COD accepted. For Shipping to USA and 
Canada add $1 .50, to other countries add $5.00. 



Technical questions answered 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 




The Ultimate 
Color Computer 

Enhancements 

for Productivity 
from HJL Products 





To achieve maximum productivity with 
your Color Computer, you have to make 
it as easy as possible to get Information 
into and out of the system. 

This is why we developed the HJL 
family of high-performance 
enhancements for ALL MODELS of the 
Color Computer. £ S/au/ 

The Keyboard - $79. 

The overwhelming favorite of seriou 
Color Computer users worldwide, the 
HJL-57 keyboard has the smooth, 
consistent feel and reliability you need 
for maximum speed with minimum 
input errors. Includes 4 Function Keys 
and sample function key program. 
Installs in just a few minutes with no 
soldering. ^ /fa 

The Numeric Keypad - W§M$j£tt££ 

The Number Jack is a self-contained/*^* 
cable-connected keypad for heavy-duty 
number-crunchers. Besides the number 
keys, it has all the cursors, symbols 
and math keys, including autoshlfted 
(one-touch) ADD and MULTIPLY. 
Comes complete with 3-foot cable and 
all necessary connectors for quick and 
easy installation without soldering. 



The Monitor Adapter - $25.95 

This universal driver works with all 
monochrome monitors, and is easily 
installed without clips, jumpers or 
soldering (except in some later CoCo 2s 
with soldered-in video chips). Here's 
crisp, clear, flicker-free monitor output 
with all the reliability you've come to 
expect from HJL Products. 



The Monitor - $89.95 

The GoldStar high-resolution amber 
monitor brings you the monochrome 
display that's preferred by most 
computer professionals today. Once 
you've used it you'll never connect your 
computer to a TV set again. The 12- 
inch diagonal CRT has an etched non- 
glare faceplate. (Requires adapter sold 
above) fleto 



The BASIC Utility - 

Quick Basic Plus, a high-performance 
programming utility, can be used with 
any color computer that has four func- 
tion keys. 26 pre-defined BASIC 
statements, 10 user-defined macros at 
a time (you can save as many sets of 
macros as you like), automatic line- 
numbering, word wrap, global search, 



and instant screen dump to printer, 
make this software the BASIC pro- 
grammer's dream come true. Comes 
with re-legendable 3-way reference 
chart. Specify disk or cassette. 

The HJL Warranty 

Every HJL product comes with a full, 
one-year warranty and the exclusive 
HJL 15-day unconditional guarantee 
(except software). 

Pick a Pair & Save 15% 

Now, for a limited time, we'll give you 
15% off the price of any two or more 
products shown here. Just mention 
this ad when you order. 

Call Now, Toll Free 

1 -800-828-6968 

In New York 1-800-462-4891 
International calls: 716-235-8358 




Ordering Information: Specify model {Original, F-verslon, or CoCo 2 Model Number). Payment by C.O.D., check, 
MasterCard, or Visa. Credit card customers include complete card number and expiration date. Add $2,00 for 
shipping, 3.50 to Canada; except monitors (call for shipping charges before ordering monitors). New York state 
residents add 7% sales tax. Dealer Inquiries Invited 



PRODUCTS 

Div. of Touchstone Technology Inc. 

955 Buffalo Road • P.O. Box 24954 
Rochester, New York 14624